The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02615

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
-S
MORE TOURIST FLITES
I v-
HOMEWARD VIA
i
Let the people know the truth and the country is safe' Abraham Lincoln,
PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY, JULY 20, 1958
TEN CTNTf
33rd YEAR

American

Khrushchev Calls

For Summit Meet
Wants Geneva Tuesday,

Would Go To Washington

MOSCOW. Tulv 19 niPI). Soviet nremier Nikita S. Khrushchev todav proposed a summit

conference in Geneva Tuesday to discuss the Middle East situation.
He said he wants to avoid "The World's Greatest Catastrophe," and assured the US that Russia
was more advanced than any other nation in the field of intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Khrushchev made his propesal in letters to President Uasennower and tne rnme iuinisiers

of Great Britain, France and India.

He also suggested United Nations secretary-general Dag Hammarskjold be present at the meeting.
i i .i .. -l i.-. i i ,l..ij -.t. l. iin,.,j n kimma nn nhttnrle tn the meetina. Russia

ne saia rne question or rime nu piutc nuuiu ni us unumu j
would accept any site for the meeting if, for any reason, Geneva or the capital of any other neutral country
was inconvenient for the Western powers. ... ,

In Moscow this was interpreted as meaning Mirusncnev wouia oe wiumg ru go iu YYuanmyiui. .. .nut w
. . I II f .1 A a

the only capital the united stares wouia agree ro ror me proposea mecimy

N4TIVP PANAMANIAN CEAFTS and eager creative youngsters obviously make a happy combination here. In arts and -craft
classes one ofthe tnanj programs sponsored by the Foft Kob be Youth Activities Council some 300 children have learned by
gnSrXhatea painting and other crafts native to -Panama. Teenage instructress is Miss Gail Brannon. (U.S. Army Kioto)

Number Of Jobless Receiving
Benefits Expected To Climb

WASHlWlxJ.tFW, July IV vun; "xiiij nuuac AppiujiiiaiiiHv v i n n j
1 a labor Department prediction that the number of persons receiving jobless benefits will climb
to a record high of 3,500,000 next winter.
The committee also accused the administration of viewing the economy through rose rose-colored
colored rose-colored glasses, asserting that the forecast did not jibe with administration statements that
the recession has hit bottom and things will get better soon.
Meanwhile, the Labor Department reported that the number of persons drawing jobless
benefits rose by 37,200 to a total of 2,588,900 in the week ending July 5, the first such increase
since early April. ... .
But the department said new benefit claims in the week ending July 12 dropped sharply
. mt nr. 4nlal f '2Q 1 fin oftpi an innate, in th. nrpff-l'rl i n i Week.

ny i i,iuu iu "' ...... .... ...woou ... t

, The Democratic controlled
i group levelled the charge in ap.
proving a $94,900,000 appropna appropna-'tion
'tion appropna-'tion to make sure a temporary
i extension of jobless benefits re recently
cently recently approved by Congress does

not bog aown tor lacn oi iunu.

This was almost w million aouars
more than the labor Department
sought.
i "The committee is at a com complete
plete complete loss to reconcile the recent

Submarine That Ran

Aground Reports

No Injuries To Crew

PPROVINCETOWN, Mass., July
(19 (UPI) A Submarine with a

crew Ot 82 ran agruunu ou
fvinceiown yesterday but the Navy
(said there were no injuries to the
i crew.
i The Coast Guard at Boston said
Frederick Lee W3S

tstanding by alongside the sub m a.-

nne. mis appeareu iu uw"-
ub was surfaced, but the Navy
nnt maifo eipsr whether it had

.11,1 I.". ........
been cruising on the surface or

submerged.
The U.S. Navy submarine base
let New London, Conn., said the

submarine Piper, a tieei snornei

Igub, ran aground on wood Ena
ftar. Extent of damage to the sub,

which was based at New Lonaon,
was believed to be minor.

Thp Naw at Boston immediate.

ly ordered all crewmen of the U.
.S. Skylark, a submarine rescue
ship, to return to duty immediate immediately.
ly. immediately. In addition, the rescue ship
Sunbird based at New London
was sent to the vicinity of Wood
End Bar to assist in refloating
the Piper.
The Piper left its home b a s e
late Thursday and was conducting
"calibration exercises" (a navy

spokesman said the axercises
"could take anywhere from two
minutes to two days," depending
on the method of performing the
exercise.
Caot. William H. Hazard, com commander
mander commander of submarine souadron
two at New London, said the S"i.
birrl wis pxrpctd to reach the
gc"" nt shout 3 p.m.
JViht officers and 74 unlisted
mm were in the crew of the PI.
per, commanded by Lt, Cmdr.
Charles S. Bowcock Jr.

nnt.imistic Denouncements of, hit

some in high places in the ad.

ministration with the official esti.
mates of employment for the lis.
cal year 1959," the report said.
"The official estimates ...are

that unemployment will be con.

siderably greater in tnan aur aur-ing
ing aur-ing 1958," it said. "The commit committee
tee committee fails to see the optimism in
the official forecast." 8
The committee disclosed testi.
mnnv if Robert C. Goodwin, di.

rector of the Bureau of Unem.
ployment Security, who forecast
that the number of persons re receiving
ceiving receiving unemployment checks
would hit 3,500,000 next winter,
compared with this year's peak of
3,334,200.
The committee also noted that
official estimates show the aver average
age average number of persons drawing
jobless benefits in fiscal 1959,

which began July 1, will run

900,000. That's a 30 per cent in.

crease over the 1958 average of
2,225,000.
Thp pnmmittpp attack on admin.

istration optimism regarding the
recession was the latest of sev.
eral. But it was the first since
administration officials pro pronounced
nounced pronounced the economic decline had

the bottom and would soon

move up.
finndwin told an aDDroDristions

subcommitee that "there is no ev evidence
idence evidence as yet to indicate when a
pick up in economic activity will
begin to gather momentum."
Even after conditions in general
show improvement, he said,
"there is likely to be a lag be

fore the unemployment rolls

reduced substantially."

Army's Share Of

Sewage System

Here: $1,060,000

WASHINGTON, July 19 (OTP
The Army asked Congress
today for $1,000,000 to finance
its share of a joint sewage dis disposal
posal disposal system in the Panama
Canal Zone.

Thp nroiMt Is Included In

the military construction ap appropriations
propriations appropriations bill now being
considered by the House Ap Appropriations
propriations Appropriations committee.
Army witnesses told the com committee
mittee committee the entire project, de designed
signed designed to eliminate excessive
pollution of the Canal, will
cost $9,239,000 and will be fin financed
anced financed jointly by the Army, the
Canal Zone government, ur urban
ban urban Panama, City and subur

ban Panama City.

Highly authorativ West Car Carman
man Carman intelligence reports said to today
day today that troops and armor .on
tha Turkish and Iranina bord borders
ers borders that far exceeds allied forces
in tha Middle East.
Thpsp rennrts sais there were

91 arm Hivisinns lnrated on the

-strategic borders, including many

armored and mecnanizea oivisions
equipped with new T-54 medium

tanks.

Russia has announced rt is hold

ing maneuvers in the area but

these are the first authoratative

wnnrtt nn hnw hupp thev are.

Th rpnitrts also loiiowea on tne

heels of a Soviet demand to cod

U.S. and British "agression" m

the Middle East. It warned that

if the demand goes unheeded Rus

sia "will not remain passive.
If the United States and Britain
nnt withdraw from Jordan and

Lebanon, it added, the Soviet Un

ion "wftl have to take the neces necessary
sary necessary steps, dictated by the interest
n tho Krwipt Union's spcuritv and

the preservation of world peace."

It did not state wnai me neces necessary
sary necessary steps" would be.
The main Russian force is
the Transcaucausus Amy on
tha Iranina and Turkish bord borders
ers borders commanded by Marshal An Andrei
drei Andrei Crechko, the report said.
It totals 19 divisions, two thirds
of which ara armored and merh
anixed divisions equipped with
T-54 tanks.

Ciriaf iaf rtlanpc flpw nminOUS-

tlWVUI Jl. IIIBtlVB
ly close to the Iranian border.
Intelligence reports reaching
here said "maneauvering" Rus Russian
sian Russian armored columns also were

ooerating near the Iranian front.

ler.
In Berlin, a West Berlin prio.
ate intelligence agency said Soviet
ncmnatinn troons in East Ger

many alio werp on maneuvers. It

said the military exercices began
June 28, as scheduled.
Tn Athens Creek officetS re

ported from the Bulgarian border

that Bulgaria was carrying oui
maneuvers on the Turkish fron frontier.
tier. frontier. No such activity was report

ed along Communist Bulgaria's

border with Greece or Yugoslavia

; ...

Cat Girl May Dance

For Judge To Show
She's No Stripper

NEW ORLEANS (UPI) "Cat
girl" Lilly Christine says she may
perform her exotic routine for a
iudge in an effort to scuttle the

district attorney's crackdown on

racy Bourbon street s trip-lase
clubs.
Lilly had just completed a rou.
tine she calls "torn cat fever"
Wednesday night when chief in.
vestigator John Grosch arrested
hpr under the citv ordinance for

bidding "lewd and indecent con.

duct."

"I'm going to fight this through

tn tha ond thp ( nt (iir said.

Her act shouldn't be affected by

Grosch's ban, she said, Because
she is an exotic dancer, not a

stripper.
BALBOA TIDES
MONDAY, JULY 21
High Low
6:85 a.m. 13:41 a.m.
7:11 p.m. 1:0 p.m.

Houdini Gangster

Proves Once More
He Can't Be Held

MONTGOMERY (UPI) Bars
and walls just won't hold Ralph
Cozzolino. He is running loose
again.
The underworld Houdini. who at

the age of 34 already faces wcl!

over a litetime ot accumulated
ii

prison sentences, went over me

wall of Alabama s Kilny Prison

here last night, along with rwo

other inmates.
Guards pumped a volley of bul.
lets at the trio, but apparently
Cozzolino's life is still charmed.
He and his companions made a
clean getaway in a pelting thund thunderstorm.
erstorm. thunderstorm. Deputy prison commissioner
Frank lee said the prisoners were
wnrkine at the orison cotton mill

when one of them pulled a knife
and held it against a guard's back

while the other two leaned a iaa.
der against the wall and went
over. The knife wielder then fol

lowed.

, The other fugitives were identi identified
fied identified as Robert Phillips, 34, and
Glenn Magee.
Cozzolino owes the state of Ala.
bama bout 70 years for various
offenses, the latest committed last
November just one week after he
had escaped the Tennessee state

prison at Nashville.

The November escapaae was m
Rirmintrhnm Cozzolino eot him.

self up as a halioween witch and

robbed a supermarket, lie was
caotured after a wild chase by
the (officers in city police car No.
19

Bafk in Terinessee, the slippery
bandit is under a sentence of 99
years for armed robbery. His
breakouts in both states havejw havejw-come
come havejw-come a lawmen's legend.

uavi r..L:..

nuiu uuiuer
Arrested For Theft 1
Of Goldfine Papers1
WASHINGTON (UPI) A veter

an hotel cashier, described as "an
honest sort," was arrested today
in tho 10 dav old mvsterv Of

Bernard Goldfine's pilfered "Pa "Pa-perman
perman "Pa-perman papers."

. y- ( ''''JiSBBBBBBBS
I BsBisisHBaB 11
- I
EL-"

r .- M ML r I
ii -ji" i -. - jMSaeiaMtwaMam

William .Tarksnn Walters. 33. a

rashier at the Sheraton Carlton

Hotel or seven years, was picked

up on his day Oft ana cnargeo
with house breaking. He was re released
leased released on $1,000 bond.

Meanwhile a dispute developed
over whether the Goldfines, who
left Washington yesterday visited
the rented home of their old
friend. Presidential Assistant
Sherman Adams, Thursday night.
Mrs. Goldfine said they did, but
White House Press Secretary
James Hagerty said they didn't.
Hagerty admitted however that
Adams visited Goldfine at his
hotel suite, this morning.
Thn r-asp of the stolen DaDcrs

nearly grabbed the spotlight from
thn ill, ii... inflnonep invpsticatinn

of Goldfine's gift.giving friendship

with Aaams.

TWildrpd Panerman. Goldfine's

blonde secretary, reported on July

7 that ner room at me sneraiun.

furltnn had horn ransaektd dlir

ing the preceding weakened. She
said some papers of the Boston
industrialist were missing.
The Goldfine case was rocked
by a new sensation when, on the
same day Baron L. Shacklette,
then chief investigator for the
committee which questioned the
industrialist, and Jack Anderson,

an aide to columnist urew rear rear-son,
son, rear-son, were discovered with a mi mi-,
, mi-, r,mhnhe and t arm recorder in a

room next to that of Jack Lotto,

UU1UUIM

martotc' HIT THE BEACH IN LEBANON Woman in foreground watches as U.S. Marines
MARINES H1I IBfc nenvn vya,A- n.,.1, ..,, neirnt T phannn ae thp first.

unload equipment irom lanunig wn "Vll"
Sroup oi troops arrived to aid the pro-Western Lebanese movement.

The Iranian army, acting under
orders from Shah Mohamed Re
za Pahlevi, was on full alert in
the Soviet border region and all
leaves wero cancelled.

Turkish cavalry, infantry anl

armnrpd units also wore on thp

alert-both on the Russian bor

and' in southeast TurKy n

"aq. ,..

Militant strafpnUts tn tha Iran

Ian capital said that ft the Sov

iet Union decides to crass
swords with American and Brit,
ish units tn the Middle East it
probably would send the Red ar army
my army through northern Iran.
Thev anirt northern Iran would

be the first Russian objective in
1 a A ifl T- TV -.1

any anempi 10 uuuiaiiK uie iiun.
This would be particularly true
if Iraq became the center of coi"
flict, they said.

Meanwhile Japan's forthcomin

compromise proposal on the Mid.
die East deadlock in the United

Nations Security Council has only
faint chance of success, observers

said todav. Anv effective U. N.

action appeared to hinge on a

meeting oi tne fuu uenerai As Assembly.
sembly. Assembly. The Soviet veto of an Amerl.
can proposal to replace U. S.
forces in Leabnon with ah Ifl.
tarnational police force and the
failure of a Soviet bid to force
im mediate withdrawal of the
American Marines ami soldiers
blocked any quick U. N. action.
The Japanese proposal, still lie.
ing drawn up, could not be takes
up before Monday.
The General Assembly, now is
recess, could not meet until
Wednesday at the earliest.
U. S. ambassador Henry Cabot
Lodge called on the deadlocked
Security Council last night to sum
mon the veto.less assembly, but
he agreed that a decision shouU
be postponed until the Japanesi
resolution is taken up.

iii
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--

QUIET BEACHHEAD
machlnegun,

U.8. MMlneret after landirnc on Khaide Beach near Beirut, Lebanon. Men in lotegraund

y, .-.i j ....

i



. . --s-W
SUNDAY, JULY SO, 1958
PAGE TWO
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN

w
WET
ft'1-'"

:
1'

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

or

no PV.L..H.D myjmPnAjumwmcMn

HltMODIO ARIA. IDITOO

a, m mmtt p o Box '34 Panama

TELWHON1 2-O740 9 UWU
CA.Lt ACD1f. PANAMEWICAN. PANAMA
OPTtC 1B.17 CINTPAI AWNUI .7"V"'M.r,.J7" T""T"
FOREIGN IWPRMINTATIVM. JOSHUA 8 POWBM. 1MB.
S4B madiaon Ave. new Yorm. i7i n V.
LOCAL MAIL

1 70 2 90

9 .00 IS OO

ACVANCt

hOP. am MONTH IN ADVANCE

P-OP Ni VEA IPJ ADVANCE

18 BO

24 OO

THIS IS YOUSt FORUM THE RiAPERS OWN COLUMN
Tkl Mill to k op rorur. tot reader, of Th. 'MM Art"r.
"""?' coRtribut. letter don't b. Imp.ti.nt "" .ppM th.
BMt 4,,. Lett. .r. publahed in th. ord.i received.
Plant trv to keep th. kn.r. limited to on. page lenfth.
Identity ot PjttPi writer, is held in ttrictett confident.
o r.p.".ibilit, to, rt.t..nt. o,rl.n.
expressed in letter, from reader.
THE MAIL BOX

T1V0LI GUEST HOUSE

Sir:

The Tivoli Guest House M

months ago with the avowea oojuvc
trom its operation. rooms have been raised,
To meet this challenge rates on roorru nave tiall
cost to clientele lor food uSfortui.ately. the
increased and overhead tow been reaucea
S8K 2r3 SrTar r
ffid
TneTivoli Guest House is designated, as a Iftvernment guest
deCU' are" ffiSMteTgoMa r a company or
improvement of The business enterprise in a long-run venture
during the previous 1t
Ite SiS PuWic room the lobby, halls and guest rooms were
iApnnraLf And for the first time in many memories, the ex extorter
torter extorter wasiainted Theae improvements benefitted the commun commun-,
, commun-, ferXle by making the Tivoli more attractive as a social
""since the advent of the new regime, improvements have
been ? restricted to rooms expected to be occupied by board mm mm-Eets
Eets mm-Eets or other important guests and maintenance has consisted
orimarily of painting over the chipped places on the woodwork
O 'Tubllc brooms reserved for important parties or receptions
Ftor every skilled employe who has been transferred or whose
worX hows have been cut to the subsistence minimum .two
or thrfe unskilled workers, at low wages, have been hired as
WPSnf'flo evidence to support the supposition that little
capital and a large amount of unskilled labor constitutes an
onomlc gain. On the contrary, the controlling factor is not
Wgh or low wages, but high or low operating costs. Thus it Is
Silt Sugh relative wages, when accompanied by still higher
relative output, give low labor costs. v2sL
The recent change in bureau policy- which permits the p-
. oearance of "Lucho" at the Tivoli could be a step in the direc direction
tion direction of establishing good public relations. But regular customers
; should not be given the impression that they are paying for
"Lucho" through high prices, for poor food and services, during
; the balance of the week.
Although the Tivoli deserves the interest and support of the
administration, previous exnerlence has indicated that admin admin-'
' admin-' istrative support is insufficient, in itself, to sustain continuous
lnafficiency in a business enterprize.
An Habitue.
GOD AND WATERED GIN
Sir:

Perfection rests only in God's hands. Events are not always

what we intend doing, but sometimes jusi wnai iiapijcua. ou
why should "Very Sober Friend" (Mail Box, July 15) complain
over a little watered gin? Why dishonor the name of so great
a place as the Tivoli guest house?
Where else could "Very Sober Friend" take his family and
be at home? Where else could he leave his purse with more
than $100 in it, and return to find it secure at the office?
Regardless of what you do, people always comnlain.
Perfection

WHO WEARS SHORT SHORTS?
Sir:
fin manv hppfs nhnnt thp short shorts, so many who ap

i prove and so many who do not approve, so many who say we
miss the point about the new regulation, so many who ,feel the
. , ,, ... . : I . . na

Navy has Its gall mulcting ims new ruie upon m wuiucn
sonnel.
On the whole I feel the following lines represent the genu
lne feeling of the adult majority:
We do not miss the point at all,
Don't feel the Navy has Its gall
In asking women to be chaste
By wearing clothes that are good taste.

On military bases where the men
Outnumber the women time and again
Is it not proper to subdue
The anatomy from viewers' view?
Why flaunt the sex of female graces
In front of lonely, manly faces?
All's fair, they say, In love and war,

So use discretion, ana weep no more.

5

-

X

It

Undercover

CANAL ZONE LABOR LAWS

Ruarkous
Comments

4jBlr:
I would like the governor of the Canal Zone to check on
' whether the few private individuals and firms which are per permitted
mitted permitted to practice or operate In the Zone are all observing the
Zone labor laws. I heard a story recently to the effect that
I one locai-rate employe had worked for one of these private
1 operations for about 20 years without receiving p. penny for
'vacation pay or sick leave. When he went to Balboa Heights to
complain, according 1o the version I heard, he was told that
the Canal had no control ever his employer in such matters.
Is there no Canal Zone labor code which applies to every everyone
one everyone working on the Zone, no matter who for?
Anil-Exploitation

AMERICANISM ABROAD
Sir:
I have to agree with "Real American" (Mall Box, July 16,
Mid I believe any other fair-thinking American would too. I
have been here eight years, which is long enough to get the
score, and I have come to the same conclusions as "Real Amer American."
ican." American." The recent manifestations against our government, both
here and abroad, do not stem from our government's failure to

meet any demands, or show "goodwill. They stem rather from
the actions of the people chosen to represent the government.
These people do not seem to realize that their country Is Judged
S their own behaviour, both individually and as a group. That
bltude of "If-vou-are-not-an-American-you-are-not-as-good-

as-I-am" brings criticism upon us all. Such an attitude is not
truly a American. It is not what we are taught in school nor

toy our government.
W 3 If we all try to live in a brotherly manner with our fellow
countrymen, and with the citizens of any other countiy where
we may be assigned for duty, whether civilian or military, the
US would, as the leading country of the Americas, regain the

love ana respect It once had among tne smauer memDers.
1 Real American No. 2

By ROBERT C. RUARK
In the pigeon chest of every

man there beats a staunch heart,
the urge to Te llOff The Boss, and

To Get Even With Them As
Wronged Him.

This is parcel to the axioms

that Truth WiU Tell, Murder Will

Out, and that You Can't Cheat An

iionesi man. seian.

My (heart sings as I offer the

tale today of Mr. Pat Pateman,
building, contractor of Loughbor Loughborough,
ough, Loughborough, Leicestershire, England, who
has just bought himself a golf

club because the committee at
Longliffe Country Club were "so
toffee-nosed." Translation: sniff i-

ly snooty.

It seems that Mr. Pateman had

some business confusion, and had
to resign from the club for ecoio ecoio-my's
my's ecoio-my's sake, after being a member

for 15 years.

But the business straightened

out, and he reapplied for member

ship for himself and his wile

Treasure. The committee didn't

treasure Treasure, and stood ve

ry pat indeed on Pat, and render rendered
ed rendered a large no.

On another occasion, Mr. fate-

man was taking his mother for a
stroll round the club to observe

the daffodils in bloom, and iney

were warned off by a snooty from
the chairman, saying that stran

gers were not welcome on the

course.

'No explanation was offered for

their refusal to readmit me," Mr.

Pateman explained. "They thought

that just because I lived in an

humble semi-detached house, I

wasn't good enough. Now I have

not got an inferiority complex, but

I felt hurt for my wife's sake and

swore I d get even.

Remember the gorgeous scne in

the movie, "If I Had A Million,"

some 20 years past, when Charlse

Laughton, the humble clerk come

into money, walked into the Doss s

office and gave him the razzber

ry? Readon.

The other day Mr. Pateman

strode into the club and called

for drinks. Nobody answered. Mr.
Pateman pounded on a table. A
servant emerged from the wood woodwork.
work. woodwork. "The bar's closed," he said.

"I say it's open. Open it." said

Mr. Pateman. We re within li

censing hours. .and. .1 just
happen to own the club. What I
say goes. Open the bar."

The bar opened.
"Mind you," Mr. Pateman said,
'I am not going to pull a Lady

Docker act with this club just be because
cause because I own it. I shall not tear up
the club flag. I just want to play

with many of my friends whe are
members here. My only grievance
is against certain members of the

committee.' If thev don't like me

, M.X t. ,1

ana ireasure, iney can iujnp u,
and clear out.

"Golf at Longliffe is ns-t going

to be for the rich and snooty any
longer, but for the less wealthy

and more sincere people.
"I want," Mr. Pateman said,
"to be known as the Robin Hood

of Charnwood Forest. But everybo

dy will have to acknowleJgo that

I am the boss, and if worse comes

to worst, I shall turn the course

into nine holes.

"And I shall have the clubhouse

converted into a private resi
dence for myself."

The club, I believe, is one of

the sportiest courses in the Mid

lands of Xngland, and has been in

existence since 1908.
When its lease came up for re

newal the other day, Mr. 1 ate. nan

called the executors and said that

no matter what the committee of offered,
fered, offered, he was prepared to top it
by a thousand pounds. They ac accepted.
cepted. accepted. I love this story all the way.
Threasure, Mrs. PUeman, now
plans to take lessons to learn to
play golf.
And when a reporter asked
Treasure, Mrs. Pateman, now
at the moment, she said: "He's
off playing bowls somewhere.'
I say a loud hurrah for Pat and
Treasure, and my boss better
watch his step.
I'll save my money and buy the
joint, and when I tell tehm to o o-pen
pen o-pen the bar, by golly, they better
open that bar or people wi.l be
looking for work.
TAX LAW CLARIFIED
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Internal Revenue Service ha
ruled that a taxpayer may not
deduct as medical expenses the
wages paid a maid hired to as assure
sure assure the taxpayer's wife medical medically
ly medically needed rest. The IRS said the
expense off hiring a maid does nci

aualify as an expenditure for

prevention of disease as set
forth in the tax code.

mm

"Glad to See You fOw!) Looking So Good, Harry"

iff?

Half a Column More or Less Now and Then
by CREDE CALHOUN

m i" i iw.

ii mi mm

1

THE MISSION Of DR.
MILlON EISENHOWER
There are people who ask the
reason tor Dr. Milton Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's trip to Panama and t en
tral America, just as the same
question was asked about the trip
of Vice President Nixon.
They ask what facts he can
find ihat the regularly accredited
diplomatic mission could not find.
Tney ask that he can do that the
diplomatic missions in the field
cannot do as Well or better.
The answers, to the foregoing
would be in favor of the regular
diplomatic missions, if it were not

lor the present organization and

u, ministration ot tne state de

partment under Johri poster Dul
les, In present circumstances the

missions are messengers witii
tew messages to deliver.
Their authority has almost dl dl-appeared,
appeared, dl-appeared, and when they uo ven venture
ture venture to do something constructive
they may have it spoiled by high higher
er higher authority. And in the State De Department
partment Department the higher authority is
John Foster Dulles.
They have no definite policy to
follow and if they did, they
would follow it with fear and
trembling. The policy must bo
guessed from the speeches rnd
press conferences of the Secretary
of State, and often they are con contradictory.
tradictory. contradictory. Milton Eisenhower is not work

ing under the same kind of hand

icap. That is the best reason for
his mission. It is hoped that he

can get results and that some at attention
tention attention will be paid to his recom recommendations.
mendations. recommendations. I'm incuned to believe that he
is one man who cannot be over overruled
ruled overruled by Dulles.
Furthermore I feel that Dr. Li
senhower comes with an open
mind and no personal axe to
grind.
His mission is in striking con contrast
trast contrast to the Nixon junket and
there should be the same con contrast
trast contrast to his reception.
Eisenhower has not come to
the 'Isthmian Republics as a can candidate
didate candidate for any elective office nor
for nomination to such office.
Hence he is not conducting a po political
litical political citepaign
He is hot looking for any per

sonal publicity. He is not covered
by press, radio and television in
the same manner that Nixon was

covered on his trip.

Eisenhower seems to me to

have set the pattern of his mis mission
sion mission here in Panama and that pat

tern has dignity, simplicity and
sincerity as the chief elements.
Eisenhower, unless I am baiily
mistaken, and I often am, is not
going to stop an official cavalcade
to have his picture taken buying
bananas from a market women.
I doubt that Eisehower will ge
a haircut in a cheap barber shop
and. call in. the photographers for
the international event. That
doubt is based on the fact that,
like his brother, the President of
the United States, he does not
need frequent haricuts.

I also venture that Eisenhower
will not stop the procession of
caoinet ministers and other high
brass to so into a cheap posa.la

for a cup of coffee and a nucha,

and call in the photographers, ax
Nixon did.
1 feel sure that, as president of

a ereat university, he will Lot

engage in street debates with un
dergraduate students.
It he does I'm sure that he will

not lose his dignity and inuut

tell them "You are afraid of the
truth." I suspect that. Eisenho

wer is willing to grant that even

the students may be right about

something and that he is not tne

sole repository of the trutn

Former President Jose iigueres

The first permanent motion
picture theater in the U.S.
opened in November, 1906, In
Pittsburgh, about 12 years
after Thomas A. Edison per perfected
fected perfected his kinetoscope, the first
American movie projector. In
1903, "The Great Train Rob Robbery,"
bery," Robbery," the first film which
told a story, was produced in

the Edison Laboratory.
J JO UrlUnnipA. Jr. JCftCZfilmei.

x. i 1 at
v New Ma W jkW mm m I m LJjJiB

"I

of Costa Rica over-stated the se
ol growing anti-Antericanism
Latin American when he appear

ed before the House Subcommit Subcommittee
tee Subcommittee studvine Vice President Nix

on's tour. However, his critical at attitude
titude attitude is reflected amongst tl.e
11.000.000 inhabitants of Central

America. A Costa Rican said of

Figueres' tirade: "It is a wonder

he did not blame the United a.ates

for the catcalls he received at the

inauguration of Mario Kchandi."

One of Eisnhower's greatest
handicaps comes from the (lis

patch of troops to Guantanimo

and. San Juan "to rescue Vic

President Nixon from mob viol

ence in Venezuela. President JSW

nuiuuwcr lamer naively uajjiciiiio.

that it was to help the Venezuel

an government, if it asked tor
help.
There probably is not one In
formed person in Latin America
who believes that Venezuela would
ever have asked for intervention
That President Eisehower did not

realize this net only surprised

Latin Americans, but also indie

ated a woeful lack of knowledge

of their countries and the national

pride of their people.
Dr. Rafael Caklera, leader of
the Christian Socialist Party, pro probably
bably probably expressed the feeling of the

Venezuelan people when he, said
that, if the United States had land

ed armed forces, they would have

ben resisted by every Venezuel Venezuelan
an Venezuelan in the country.
The action of President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower weakened Nixon's state statement,
ment, statement, regarding the alleged friend
ly attitude towards dictators, that

it was prompted to avoid even th

appearance of intervention.
The Somoza dynasty in Nicara

sua is a legacy of intervention in

the days oi "Tne Big stick" policy
The same thing is felt of the
dictatorship of Trujillo in tha

Dominican Republic.

Both the late General Anastacio

Somoza and Generalisimo Rafael

Leonidas Trujillo. as sergeants,

were trained by the United States

Marines.

Dr. Eisenhower will find prom
ises made by Nixon on his first
goodwill tour of Central America
in 1954, that have not been redeem
ed.
Nixon told us here m Panama
that when the Remon-Eisenhower
Treaty was approved, Panama
would enter on the greatest era- of
prosperity in the history i of the
country. The treaty has been ap approved
proved approved fqr almost three years
now.
Two things that will work in
Eisenhower's favor are the at attendance
tendance attendance of United States repre representatives
sentatives representatives at the conference to dis discuss
cuss discuss means of stabilising the
price of coffee, and the invitation
to President Lemus of El Sal Salvador
vador Salvador to visit Washington.
Coffee is the chief export and
source of dollar exchange in Gua

temala, El Salvaor and Costa Ri-
I j i .jr.. l

ca ana n ranns mgn m Micaragua
and Honduras.
Central Americans have grown
skeptical of promises and sweet
talk. Dr. Eisenhower is not indulg indulging
ing indulging in either one. In the word
of Adlai Stevenson he is "talk "talking
ing "talking sense."
Nevertheless, In the language; of
present day Washington, Dr. Ei Eisenhower,
senhower, Eisenhower, on his goodwill mission
has been given what is known as
a "hard ieU,"

LACKWITS, INC., any of you boobs teen anything
lately of Milton Eisenhower? Brother of th president
fella. You must have heard of him. All sorts of second-!
hand reports last week that he was round here tome tome-where,
where, tome-where, but there doesn't seem to be anyone who actually j
saw him. Like the Abominable Snowman in the Himalayas.
Mind you, you can hear a lot of people grizzling that
they haven't seen much sign lately of Milton's brother;
either. Brother Dwight, that would be. Guess the invisibil invisibility
ity invisibility bit must be a family failing. Or accomplishment. j
So happens I. met a fellow late last week who had
not gone at all for that story about Milton and Ernestito
and a whole clutch of other fop-line talent setting out on
a fishing expedition aboard the Panama Craneboat Atlas,
and a couple of other launches. The 'observer of whom I
speak was prepared to believe the fishing expedition '-story
on one condition only that the raconteur substitute the
name "Mario Celeste" fox the Atlas.
You waterfront buffs will remember the Mario Ce Celeste.
leste. Celeste. She was the vessel found drifting mysteriously
abandoned in Mirafbres Lake, a warm meal on the neatly neatly-arranged
arranged neatly-arranged table, alt sails set. and a note on the helm to
the effect that because of the inconvenience of the sailing
vessels' narrow bunks all hands had repaired to the K-9
road. 1
There is some slight evidence that Milton arrived at
Tocumen I have seen photos that did not look too
amateurishly touched up but there is no evidence at all
of his having left.
Everyone knows how impossible it is to leave Tocu Tocumen
men Tocumen without a paz y salvo I asked the man Jn charge of
checking those documents at Tocumen whether any one
name of Milton Eisenhower had presented Hie any time
last week. Answer: No. Roy R. Rubottom? Neither.
Export Import Bank president Samuel C. Waugh?
Tampoco.
Sure does go to show you that you cannot believe
everything you read in the papers.
I don't agree with everything the Panama University
students are doing and saying these days, but I respect
for the accuracy of their replies to my question. "Did you
see Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower?" I asked them. "No," they
replied, unequivocally. There was a timbre in their voice
that compelled me to believe them.
Personally I consider this invisibility gimmick Is
something the Republicans should boast of at this time,
rather than hedge about. With unemployment Stateside
climbing steadily as it is, and the country's budget about
to go in the red to the extent of some fat fistful of bil billions,
lions, billions, any top-level gesture of economy is highly effective
and much to be commended. What could be more econ-J
omical than an invisible goodwill ambassador? The project
may seem on the "Alice in Wonderland" side, but what
of it? "Alice in Wonderland" has made a profit.
,r
Let's start this thing from the beginning. Some sort
of a show has to be put on at the airport arrival
ageeohes, handclapptofcahd so forth; ;liapple angle
can iasily be attendfTpolby producing atiocal boy for the
onlookers to hail to pick a possible example quite; at
random, Panama's ambassador to Washington Dicky Arias.
The onlookers can recognize Dicky, whereas the first guy
down the airplane stops may be the fellow who has
to put the checks under the wheels, or hold on to the
propellers in case they start going around, or something.

The reply to the speeches of welcome? No sweat.
Dulles makes the same one every stop, and what's good
enough for Dulles is good enough for any American abroad.
Look back oyer the accounts of what Milton Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower was reported to have said in Tocumen on arrival,
and tell me whether it is any different from the carefully
chosen remarks of John Foster Dulles upon arrival in
Hong Kong recently,: 1

It is a great pleasure for me to return to France,
where I have so many dear, sincere friends, and so many
wonderful memories." V
Eh? What's that? Where? Oh, we are, are we?
Dammit, fire that navigator.
The run into town is really nothing. A smart, motor motorcycle
cycle motorcycle escort, a suitable sum of Cadillacs, and a Steady
pace such as recommended for bottleggers fast enough
to inconvenience marksmen, but not so brisk as to dam damage
age damage the merchandise.
After that, the rest is simple. Send decoy expeditions
dashing hither and yon from the reputed dwelling place
of the invisible goodwill embassy and issue brisk com communiques.
muniques. communiques.
"He has just called on the president." '&r?i
"What did the president say?"
"The president said 'Hullo.' But that's off the record.
All policy statement must come, direct from the President
Protocol."
"What next?" j
He inspected the Third Locks system.'
"But the Third Locks project was abandoned long

ago."
"Security. Remember Nixon."
"No thank you."
"What did he say about the Third Locks?"
"He'aakU 'Does that cat Potter dig this?' that's
off the record." t&
See what I mean. Nothing you can really pin down.
Spread around a bunch of halfway competent press
agents, and you've got yourself a goodwill tour, a study
mission, or you've gone fishing. And you have saved all
the money it would have saved transporting Exhibit A -no,
you unseemly rabble, not Ruthie f rom place to place,
feeding and watering him en route, and indeed providing
similar logistic support for his food taster, Dr. Palmer
Fuchter.
It was a good gimmick and one of Which such staunchly
economical Republicans as Rep. John Taber D-N.Y.) may
be justifiably be proud.
I would like it remembered however, that the idea of
the invisible emissary did not originate with the current
administration in Washington. First credit belongs to an
English versifier name of Tom Gray, who onoe propped
himself against a tombstone in Stoke Pogss graveyard,
on the northern Outskirts of London, and drafted the first
handout with which to fob off any reporters who wanted
to know Whsther the President's brother was bedded
down at the Embassy residence on La Crssta.
Wrote cagy flack Cray, non-oomittally: "Some mute,
inglorious Milton here may rest."
PERCY'S PEERLESS PORTENT is dedicated to the
proposition that we all have luck with
8800
the total of US Marines and paratroopers who
along with 2000 British paratroopers, are presently in
the Middle East playing the world's briskest sandlot game,



AGE THUS
SUNDAY, JULY ira
THE RJiniAT AMERICAN
Government Mortage Plan
For Recession In Success
LAST 3 DAYS!

:

PRE-INVENT0RY

NEW OFFICERS of Knights of Columbus, Council 1371, Balboa, pose after their recent in installation.
stallation. installation. They are: back row, left to right, Charles P. Williams, trustees; William S. Bow Bowman;
man; Bowman; trustee; Charles A. Deger, treasurer; James Bodell, recording secretary; and John
Toothman, outside guard. In the front row from left to right are: Erhest Veno, warden;
Rudy Burda, deputy grand knight; Frederick A. Mohl, grand knight; Donald J. Benson,
chancellor and William Mumaw, financial secretary. Other officers are James Belcourt, ad advocate;
vocate; advocate; Lewis Girard, inside guard; Peter Monaco, trustee and George Parks, lecturer.

QrACumrTAII TTTT Tho ProsiHent T CranlAu ipQiiDhnnn

.... .i l.i: xi i -i

government s ami-recession mon- oeneves me program nas surou-

gage purchase program is tnuinp-j laiea aaamonai cons. ruction, out

t-l I I D D V I UAMr Tkic KflKv nrairto Art ic in i Knrrv ) KM. a. It.

. . "r r w viic oaxcKy "A IllUUier,

m ureiuwvi v- jpuivuvu uic iiatiuii a icw i tiiiaiiiing prairie OOg tOW
located in Mackenzie State Park at Lubbock, Texas. At one time the little rodents thrived

in nmituus in me ouuinwesu'

ing along at an average weekly

commitment rate at 35 mu
lion dollars and is considered a
resounding success.
Officials of the Federal National
Mortgage Assn., which adminis.

ters the program, say it has:

Helped home buyers get mort mortgage
gage mortgage loans, sometimes at a small
cut in interest rates.
Encouraged some .builders to
shift production to lower prtce
models a boon to low-income and
elderly buyers.
Occasionally been responsible

for price cuts with no change in

the house itself.
Stimulated construction of hous houses
es houses that would otherwise hsve
not been built.

Since it was started in April to

spur construction of new nourses

and create jobs, the program has

rung up mortgage purchase com commitments
mitments commitments in 42 states totaling
$457,837,000 on 38,895 mortgages.

Congress voted a billion dollars

for the program with the restric restriction
tion restriction that it be spent only for a

mortgage insured by the Federal

Housing Administration or guar,
anteed by the Veterans Adminis Administration.
tration. Administration. In addition, the mortgage

may not exceed $13,00 and must

be purchased at par. 5 less sepci sepci-fied
fied sepci-fied fees.

FNMA offioials believe that
builders and lenders have made
some concessions to meet these

eligibility requirements. Enticed

by the prospect of a government

purchase guarantee, some lenders

have been willing to make small
cuts in interest rates to meet the
FflA maximum of 5u per cent.
On a $13,00 mortgage the difSfer. difSfer.-ence
ence difSfer.-ence between Vi and u5 per
cent over 25 years is a saving to
the home owner of $2 on eac.i
month's payment and more lean
$600 oyer the life of the mortgage
Officials also claim that build

ers have shifted the cheaper mod models
els models to get under the 13,00 coil 5
ing. Still a third reported result
has been a paring of discounts.
When discounts run large, build builders
ers builders sometimes try to make up the
difference by boosting the house
price.
Freedom of Action
The program has been partial
larly attractive because a com commitment
mitment commitment binds the agency to buy
but does not Oblige the lender to
sell. Hence, lenders have freedom
to sell to th govrnmnt on in the
private market or to keep the
mortgage.
The most interesting question
asked about the program is
whether it has induced extra
building or whether it has only1
caused a shift from conventional
to government financing. FNMA

he declined to estimate hew

much.
How many of the commitments
lenders will decide to ask the gov

ernment to make good on re

mains to be seen. But with lead

ers paying a commitment fee of

three fourths of one per cent and

an equal purchase fee when the
deal is closed, FNMA stands to

make on the venture, counting

even the cost of borrowing fiom
the treasury.

CLEARANCE

HURRY! PRICES DRASTICALLY REDUCED

More Hungarians
May Be Executed

WASHINGTON (UPI) The

State Department says more par
ticipants in the Hungarian re revolt
volt revolt "may shortly share" the fate
of executed Premier Imre N'agy
and Gen. Pal Maleter.
The statement yesterday came
after a report was issued by the
special United Nations committee
on Hungary which accused the
Budapest government of violating
the U. N. Charter and the Del
claration of Human Rights by the
trials and executions of those who
took part in the 1956 UDrising.
The State Department said the
United States had pledged its jH
to keep the "plight of the Hun
garian people before the con conscience
science conscience of the world."

KENMORE SEMI AUTOMATIC WASHER
Floor demonstrator model
Before 259.95 gg QQ
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Translsthmian Store

Jazz Artist Feels
Better, But Still III
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) -Famed
Dixieland trombonist E-

'ward (Kid) Ory, 71, was "feeling
better, but still not out of
danger," doctors at St. Luke's

Hospital said today.
Fans of the jazz pioneer re re-spondee)
spondee) re-spondee) to a plea by Mrs. Orv

and gave a dozen pints of blood
yesterday to help him out. Ory

required several transfusions alter
a tumor operation last Friday.

PILOTS FACE DECISION

TERNHILL, England (UPI

tour Iraqi pilots who just grad graduated
uated graduated from the Royal Air Force
flying school wondered today
"where do we go from herce"
The fliers, who came to England
under a program to train pilot
officers for King Feiial's je je-equipped
equipped je-equipped Iraqi air force, had to
decide where to return home to
serve under the nw rbel govrn govrn-ment
ment govrn-ment or stay out of their native
country.

KENMORE GAS RANGE
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129.00

Before 159.95
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Translsthmian Store

ELGIN OUTBOARD EXPRESS CRUISER
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Completely new, Sleeps two

888.00

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8.88

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188.

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HEYWOOD WAKEFIELD FURNITURE
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58.01

Many other articles reduced but not ad'
vertised. Limited Quantities. Come in Nov :
Only 3 days left!
SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE

SATISFACTION GUARANTIED
OR YOUR MONEY BACK
OPEN FROM 8:00 to 12:00
and from 2:00 to 6:00

SEARS

Panama, Tivoli Ave. .. 2-091 1
Los Angeles Transthmian
Highway 3-1955
Colon, Bolivar Ave 1U7

IT'S WORTH YOUR WHILE
to visit Tropicana

see our complete HOUSEWARES DEPARTMENT

Pyrex ware
Cookie cutters
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utensil sets

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Collapsable Shopping

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COLORFUL DECORATOR COLORS
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1

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1



THE StTIDAI AJOEKTCA
SUNDAY, JULY JO, 1951

PAG FOUR

i j i

t

joaa
an

By Staffed

Ji JI L
MISS MARY ANN

.Sen f M n-VkZ, a..U SMIHHBL: :yv.-?H

- m Wk TWrm ffi

HHIk if

" HH 'in '! I itIM
h VflBr ifc.
: H ius v

MISS MARY ANN BATCHELDOR TO MAKE
HER DEBUT AT L'NION CLUB SATURDAY
a
Miss Mary Ann Batcheldor, daughter of Lt. Col. and
Mrs. George D. Batcheldor of Fort Clayton will be among
the thirty debutantes to be introduced to society at the an annual
nual annual Debutantes Ball next Saturday at the Union Club.
MisS Batcheldor attended the Canal Zone Junior College

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Smith
Will spend week in Costa Rica
ijr. and Mrs. Morgan Smith of
Curundu lett yesterday by plune
for San Jose Costa Rica where
they will attend the Americanist
Congress of Anthropologists. Mr.
Smith is the survival oliicer tor
the Caribbean Air Command and
an ethno-botanist by profession.
Mrs. Smith, who shares her husb husbands
ands husbands interests, is a connossieur
on local looCs. The Smiths will
return next Sunday.
National Orchestra Concert
Tomorrow Night
. "the National Symphony Or Orchestra
chestra Orchestra of Panama, under the di direction
rection direction of Prof Herbert de Cas Castro,
tro, Castro, will presents its second of the
1958 season tomorrow night at
1:15 p.m. in the National Theatre
The soloist will he cellist Henry
Eosen, who will play the Kirst
Concerto for Violoncello and Or-
Stra, by Camille Saint-Sancs,
aer numcers on the program
be the Symphonic Movement
Roque Cordero. the Panama-
. Mian composer, and Anion uvor.

rut

ak's New World Symphony.
Reservations may be made at
tip Department of Fine Arts,
Ministry of Education. Panama 2.
0258 and the ticket office will be
open at the National Theatre at
10:00 a.m. on Monday. The' phone
ijWmber if Panama 2.2302.
Tta and Canasta Party
Jhe wives of the doctors of St
I'lwBmas Maternity Hospital extend
';.pi invitation to 'those interested
HI attending their tea and can.v;
ta party on Ausust 13 at the Union
. Club. The proceeds from the af
"Sjrs which will begin at 2:00 will
!& towards th Maternity War I
"C-harity Fund. Prizes for the win-
TBSgrs of the card games and door
prizes, which have hern donated
Bjr various firms in Panama., mill
beX awarded. Among them will be
'. B. "sewing machine, several ladies
Jtches and a painted coffee set.
or reservations call Mrs. Bone-

MW1 bJOTH I afllir W 1 1 1

herwi5e

l 1 I l

and reutl stututn main

2-074 0 or 2-0741 Llwun HiOO w 10

ah H

BATCHELDOR
detti, Panarna 3-3366 or Mrs. Al
uro, Panama 3-0468.
Balboa Women's Club
Charity Card Party
The Balboa Women's Club Char Charity
ity Charity Lard Group win meet al fort
Amador Officers' Onen Mpss n:i
Tnursuay, juiy 24 ai U.m p.m. i
for rlpQ:prl anrl r3i-rlc
llnDtiu. ,.,,11 i, H! n
A1L,JLVOO.O Will UU j I
Hearon, Balboa 1833; Mrs. M. 1
Klipper, iBalboa 3U; ana Mrs.
A. aaanneu, Balboa 3345. Keerv-1
at inns must hp maiip wilh on.- nf
the hostesses by mext Wednesaay.
Mr. and Mrs. Donaldson
Entertain House Gutits
Mr. and Mrs. R. u. Donaldson
of Gamboa have as their guests
from Minnesota Miss Sally Hen Hen-ning,
ning, Hen-ning, Mrs. Donaldson's niece and
Miss Karol Kleinshmidt. Miss Hen
ning is a graduate of Mankato
State College and Miss Klein Kleinshmidt
shmidt Kleinshmidt is attending the Universi University
ty University of Minnesota.
Change in Meeting Data of
American Society Women
The next meeting of the new
Women's Auxiliary of the Amer American
ican American Society of Panama has been
changed to September 9th. at 4 00
p.m at the Panama Golf Chb.
The purpose of the Society is
"to keep alive wilhin our mem members
bers members the patriotic spirit of our
country, the United States of
America, to loiter present friend friendly
ly friendly relations between Panamani.ins
and Americans, to assist in develop
ing the commercial and cultuial
relations between the two peopic-i
and to promote acquaintanceship
among our members."
At the organizational meeting
held in July, it
was agreed mat,
the wives of the officers of the

American Society would hold the! bring a ininimum of 5 slides,
same positions in the Auxilijry : Scries HI of the European tra tra-as
as tra-as their husbands do in the Si'- vclogue will be presented by Mr.
ciety. Therefore, during the con, Jerry Schear. The countries to be
inn year. Mrs. Richard L. Dehl-j shown will be Germany, Austrin
inger will serve as president of tiic 1 and Yugoslavia. Guests are wel wel-Auxiliary.
Auxiliary. wel-Auxiliary. Mrs. William C. come.

I

Be

134,
anama
i J
L u Lit i
enfu.
Schmilt, vice- president; Mrs.
Louis a. Gomez, treasurer, uuj
Mrs. Myron W. Fisher as secreta
ry.
Anv U. S. citizen residing .n l'a-
nama or in urivale eiuci prise in 1
the Lanal Zone is eligible for mem
bersnp in ihc American ionic.'
If interested, please contact Mr
James J. Plata at 2-0620. I or
more inlormatidii about the Worn
en's Auxitiariiy, call Mrs. Cnar Cnar-les
les Cnar-les E Smith, 3 0377, Mrs. irv.ns
Bennett, 3-1344, Mrs. Elton 1).
Todd, 3-0976, or Mrs. Vernon E
Williams. 3 7168.

Any women who are interested
are urged to attend the next mcil-lwas
ing of the Women's Auxiliary. n
TnnsHav SeDtember 9th. at 4 00

p.m. at the
Panama doll uuo.
"The King and I"
To Be Presented
Thp Vpnpr Circle of
Gamboa;
Union Church is sponsoring a be benefit
nefit benefit showing of ihc movie, "The
King and I," starring Deborah
Kerr and Yul Brynner. at the
Gamboa Service Center on Thurs
day Julv 24 at 7:00 p.m. Tickets
will be 45 cents for adults and ?0
cents for children.
Western Talent Night
At Fort Clayton
The Fort Clavton Service .ur)
will have a Western talent contest
on Wednesday, July at 7:00 pn.
All enlisted men and their de.
pendents are invited to attend.
The audience will select the three
best entertainers.
Each notice for inclusion In this
column should be lubmitted in
net-written torm end mailed ee
the box number listed daily in So Social
cial Social and Otherwise," or delivered
bv h.nd to the oHice.
Notice) et
meetings cannot
tairphone.
be
accepted by
The C.Z. Spanish
rnnvrsatioil Club
'Hio Canal Zollp Spanish C'ill-
I'll. 1 11
versalion Club will hold its regoi
ar bi-weekly meeting at 7 :30 p.. u.,
Wednesday, 23 July, at the yuarru
Heiuhts Olliccrs' Uub. This IS 1101
classroom instruction, oui u is
an opportunity for members and
their guests to improve their abil ability
ity ability to converse in Spanish. All le levels
vels levels of fluency are welcome.
There are no rules, regulations,
dues nor formality. Dress is spurt
shirts or comfortable attire. Span
ish-speaking guests of mcmoers
are particularly welcome, ana
members will be happy to assist
them in practicing English.
Peraiso Civil Defense
Volunteers Corps
The Paraiso Civil Defense Vol Volunteer
unteer Volunteer Corps will meet Monday.
July 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the school.
Final plans and preparations dor
the home nursing course with
Miss Janet Almeda Marshall as
instructor will be discussed at this
meeting.
All members of the Volunteer
Corps are urged to attend this
meeting. The general public is
also invited.
Atlantic Side Camera Club
The next meeting of the Atlantic
Camera Club will be held on July
21, at 7:45 p.m. in the Club rooms
at Mt. Hope. The subject for the
Color Competition will be Gen-
. eral" and members are asked to

30-Year-Old Gal Takes Her Place
As One of Leading Rocket Experts

VAN NUYS, CUf (UPI) Mrs.
Florine Cain, a chic, green-eyed
young woman from, the midwest,
looks more like an actress than an
aeronautical engineer.
But at the age of 30, she has
successfully invaded the man'F
world of space age research and
established herself as one of the
nation's top missile development
experts.
A native of Joliet, 111., she sot
the aviation bug as a high school
student
'Your remember during
Wort
War II," she said, "when they Uied
to roll out airplane engines on
flat cars for War Bond rallies?
Well, 1 used to go and listen U
hear what made them tick until
I was almost deaf, i
"My parents thought I was!
mildly insane, but they didn't di
courage me
From this early start, Mrs. Cain,
progressed to where she recently
the only woman engineer ou
! a staff of 50 persons which devel
1 oped Lockheed Aircraft Corp.'s
sleek new missile, the X-7. Mrs.
Cain, who is slender and has wua
she calls "dark sterling silv
hair said shp fnllnumd iho Jnl'M
High School and even took iiy-
ing lessons.
From high school, Mrs. Cain
went to Joliet Junior College, wherc
she majored in engineering fjr
two years. Then she went to Pur Purdue
due Purdue University and specialized
in the study of aircraft engines.
At Pudue, she met the man who
was to become her husband, A.
Chaney Bender.
Rut traeerlv overlook th pnn
pie in 1954 when Bender and his;
father were killed in the crash of
their private plarie.
When Mrs. Cain graduated frojn
Purdue, she worked first for the
Pullman Standard Car Manufact Manufacturing
uring Manufacturing Co. in Hammond, Ind., and
then for the Armour Research
Foundation at the Illinois Insti Institute
tute Institute of Techonology in Chicago,
where she helped develop "larSJ
caliber, liquid propellant guns."
She came to California on husi
nes and met Richard Alton Cain,
a Navy contract administrator at
Lockheed.
PICNIC. CHICKEN
PHOENIX Ariz. (UPI) -Ruth
Kruger, Arizona Public Serv Serv-ice
ice Serv-ice Company's home economics
specialist, suggests this mounth -waterer
nxt time your picnic
plans include campfire cooking.
Chicken Bundles
1 chicken thigh
1 slice of pineapple
1 medium sized peeled sweet
potato
Slice of green pepper
2 stalks of celery
Place all ingrediei.ts in heavy
aluminum ion. Brusn witn melt melt-ed
ed melt-ed butter or margarine. Fo!d foil
carefully to expel air and to kpep
moisture in. Bake for 45 minutes
over campfire. Serve in 'oil.

Married Chinese
Couples Plan New
Benefit Dance

Preparations are being made
by the Group of Married Couples
of the Chinese Colony for an another
other another benefit ball at the Pan Panama
ama Panama Golf Club on behalf of
the Asilo de Malambo.
The group, In a great spirit
of solidarity, has taken upon
itself the task of helping to
provide for the needy children
being cared for in this orphan orphanage.
age. orphanage. Those who attended the suc suc-cesful
cesful suc-cesful ball last year will surely
recall the very entoyable eve evening;
ning; evening; spent, especially the many
pleasant surprises. You will also
recall the feeling of warm

ft
JK' jrEiJeBeM siMfilsaMrfii eBBBKfe
yleB -.jHeHPiH Wmit 1
eKiijeeBvH Hf.BHmH gsW ilH

Nowl We blend colors. We accent them. And we create the one
color that fits your desire, your needl For with this sensational new
Roux product we can produce literally hundreds of individual
haircolors-the most lustrous, most natural looking ever! Phone
today, for your appointment for your "parsdne)!" hoireotert We
use Roux Creme Color according to directions.
in CMMI-KIND TO YOUft HAIR
ASK FOR IT AT YOUR BEAUTY SALON
Distributors In Panama

JULIO VOS, S. A.
Second Diagonal (Old "A" Street! No.
Box No. 297 Tel. 1-3S71

Cain had known her and her

late husoand as fellow students'
at ruraue. He tea in love win
her, they were married and set settled
tled settled in Beverly Hills.
She got an engineering job at
Lockheed, starting out on de design
sign design work.".
When the X 7 came along, Mrs.
Cain worked on its fuel system,
structure and electrical develop.
ment.
"Recently," she said, I was
assigned to do liaison work win
the machine shop, and at meetings
with manufacturing groups a
bout the X.7 contract, I repre
sent the engineers about changes
in design and structure."
Mrs. Cain doesn't want to quit.
be a housewife and have children
yet
"I enjoy going to the office," she
said. "It's a good type of work
for women, it neips tnem duiuj a
mental discipline that they
wouldn't be forced to develop
otherwise."
auA...
lt doesn't take much to give a
woman a lift when she is feeling
low.
Just a compliment from a man.
For instance, a husband glancing
up from the morning paper to
really look at his wife and say,
"My, but you look pretty this
morning." Something like tht
nan turn what started out to be
blue Monday into a pleasant day.
Or something new for
the
house- It may be no more than a
kitchen gadget if the housekeep
ing budget is small, but some something
thing something new will often give a wo woman
man woman a little lift.
Or an invitation to a party.
That starts her off on a new train
of thought what to wear, who
will be there, should she call right
away for a hair spDointmeni .
Or a telephone call or letter
from an old friend she hasn't
heard from in some time.
Or going out to inspect her
flower garden and finding that a
cherished plant has put out it it-first
first it-first blooms during the night.
Or an advertisement in the pa
per saying something she has
been wanting for a Ion? time is
on sale at a price she can afford.
Or an unexpectea bit of Nought Nought-fulness
fulness Nought-fulness on the part of a child an
expression of appreciation from
youngster who usually takes all
that his mother does for him for
granted.
It might be a chance to help
someone else, or to comfort somo
one who needs reassurance or
sympathy.
It could even be just a new hat,
t new hairdo, a new recipe or a
new lipstick.
We women are fond of saving
that men are Just little
boys
grown up. But considering tne
variety and smallness of many of
the things that give' us a lift,
isn't there a lot of the little girl
in us, too?
satisfaction you enjoyed for
having cooperated to better the
living conditions of thrw? un unfortunate
fortunate unfortunate children in the Asilo
de Malambo.
Once again your attendance
and assistance In carrying out
this task are being solicited.
You are assured of another en enjoyable
joyable enjoyable evening, pleasant sur surprises,
prises, surprises, and dancing to the mag magnificent
nificent magnificent musical arrangements
of the well-known Victor M.
Pa 7. and his Orchestra.
Be on the alert for the date
and further details on this
grand benefit ball. (Advt.)

PERSONALIZED HAIRCOLOR

CUSTOM-BLENDED . WITH
ROIIXc'COlOR

7-27

Some Sewing Tips

For Newer Fabrics
CHICAGO (UPI) With sheer
fabrics in th fashion spoUignt,
milady probably could use some
hints on how to sew with the new
light and airy garments.
Here are some helpful sugges
lions from the National Cotton
Council:
Use a new machine needle. Ad
just the machine stitch and try
it out on a sample before doing
the iinal sewing on your dress.
Stitch through tissue paper stripe
ana tear mem away later.
A narrow, nand rolled hem is
best for sheers or chiffons. Stitch
near the edge of the fabric as a
stay, then roll edge between fin fingers
gers fingers and hand stitfh. If you use
a wide hem, turn under the raw
dg about on fourth inch and
dge stitch. Then hem edge to
the dress.
Soft, sheer cottons gather pret.
tily and here's an easy way to
gather a full skirt: divide the top
Of me sun in quarters for gath gathering.
ering. gathering. '. .at the side seams, cen center
ter center front, and center back. Baste
and stich in sections. This moth
od will help you space the gith.
ers evenly, and your threads
won't break.
Moudekoid J4inti
A spoonful of olive oil added to
an opened jar of dill pickles or
olives will eiminate the white
film that often forms.
Splinters can be removed with
less pain if an ice cube is pressed
to the spot lor 20 to 30 seconds,
before "operating."
To get an omelete fluffy, add
pinch of powdered sugar and
pinch of cornstarch.
Collar shiny?' Sponge first with
vinegar, then press on the wrong
side.
To remove stains froma porce porcelain
lain porcelain bathtub or sink, apply a
pate of cream of tartar -ind hy hydrogen
drogen hydrogen peroxide.
A cotton swab makes, it easy to
clean decorative open work in
vases, lamp bases and figurines.
Save all those washing instruc.
tion tags that corn,? with the gar.
ments you buy and post them on
a bulletin board near your wash washing
ing washing machine. Or staple the string
to an index card and file them in
a recipe box.
The soiled unholstery of a car,
if it's the currently popular plas plastic,
tic, plastic, can be cleaned by sponging
with a solution of three tables,
spoons o," sal soda concentrate per
quart of water. Rinse and dry,
To clean white wall tires easily,
apply sal soda concentrate dry
with a damp, stiff bristled brush.
Avoid-buying lettuce with rusty
red streaks or spots. Although not
harmful, they spread throughout
me neaa ana spoil us appearance
For dessert snrinkle fresh nine
apple with powdered sugar ard
top with a sprig of mint or a ma
rachino cherry.
Leave caps on fresh strawberries
and keep them dry and refriger.
ated until you are ready to pre
pare them, if the caps are miss
in?, the berries do not keep as
well.
The cooler the salad, the better
it tas'es, lo insure coldness, mix
the salad over a large bowl of ice
A thin glaze of brown paint will
soften the elare of white or o"ier
bright shades. Add the glaze iVer
the color.
LAMB SHOULDER
NEW YORK fUPI) Keep
economy on your dinner menu
with a skillet dinner o' shoulder
lamb choos with vegetables.
Cook 4 shoulder lamb shops,
A inch thick, over low heat until
browned on both sides. Add 2 cups
water and 2 beef bouillon cubes
Cook covered, over low heat for
30 minutes. Add one l.pound can
white onions undrained, a 10 ounce
oackage fror.en french.style green
beans, 1 1-2 teaspoons salt and
Vi teaspoon rosemary. Cook, cov covered.
ered. covered. 8.10 minutes or until beans
ate tender.
ARRID.
Whirl-in
11 B0TTU Wi.
Steps pre,lrtlen
tain and odor
no othr
deodorant can I

L.kannel-qu

lauilted Co

Coot s4-nd eatltef'fialil

Cbannel-qullted coverlet is feather-light because of the all all-synthetic
synthetic all-synthetic combination of padding- and fabric. Strips of aqua
and white are defined by narrow gold threads. Matching dust
ruffle and curtains pick up deeper aqua tone.

74e Mafote Pamt

o
At 13, Anne can always find
some excuse for any behavior you
object to. j
11 she leaves her bed unmade,
it's not because she doesn't like
making it but because she hauVt
time. If she's late getting home!
from a friend s house, it s not be because
cause because she lost her sweater. If she!
fails to get cream on her way
home from school, it's not be
cause she didn't want to be bo.
thered by getting it but becausse
the store had sold its last car '.on.
Understandably, her mother
finds these excuses irritating. For
by making clocks, lost sweaters
and other external things respon-
sible for what she does, Ann?
herself avoids any responsibility
for what she does and with it th-;
obligation to do any better, jlcr
excuses really say, "I want to do
what I want."
The answer is to help Anne put

ON THE BRINK Although they're on the brink are these
ducks wqrrled? Not by a dam site on Turtle Creek in Dallas,
Texas, where they challenge the strength of the current flowing
over the falls.

LOOK WHO LANDED Pretty Sharon Dick, ef Phoenix'

nucsn i appear 10 rensn me men or Decomfrrg a tasty morsel
for, this one-eyed, one-horned, flying purple people-eater. How- 1
ever before it could devour the 16-year-old lass, a photog photographer's
rapher's photographer's flash bulb scared it away to its hideaway in a remote
Arizona mountain range. .-'

9

this desire into honest words in instead
stead instead of into dishonest excuses.
We have to start saying, "I
bought this dress because I 'ikei
it," "I didn't hem your skirt be.
cause I didn't feel like it, "I want
to go to the mountains because
I enjoy a holiday."
When we can amiably accept
ouself as a mother who didn't
want to put in a hem, Anne will
find the courage to reveal herself
as a child, who didn't want to get
the cream. Until then, she nny
continue to present us with virtuous-sounding
reasons for doir.g
as she pleases.
When she's given the freedom
to be honest about what she want?,
she'll start at once to be interested
in what we want. For we human
beings love on one so much as
those who allow us to be honest.
It's those who won't permit it
that we do not want to please.

efl I
. IT A 1 bsm I



ItTNDAT, JULY 20, 1958

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
r age rot
ii -mi f ii
Wife Agreed To Bear Child
To Give To Her Neighbour

v. iyjlWMHCoyMwSMBapgriFFjSfc wjf v9 1

KOBBE REENLISTMENT Three Fort Kobbe reenllstees, Sgt. Rudolph Russell, D Company,
34th Armor- Pfc Hector E. Tello-Torres, C Co npany and Sgt. Albert A. Clarke, A Company,
this week were sworn into -the Regular Army for four, six and three years respectively by
Mai L R Chase, second from left, command reenlistment officer. Sgt. Leo P. Champagne,
extreme left, command reenlistment NCO, watched the ceremony held at Fort Kobbe.
(U.S. Army Photo)

British Air Freight Business
Has Key Role In Export Drive

LONDON July 19 (BlS)-Be-cause
speed is almost the only
advantage that the airlines are
ible to offer their passengers,
businessmen used to regard air;
freighting as a rather uneconomic-!
al method of delivery, for emer emergency
gency emergency use only. .J
Now all that has changed, and!
the mounting success of Britain's!
export drive is due in no small;
part to a growing realization that
the use of air freighting as a nor I
mal everyday substitute for sur surface
face surface transport cart save money as
well as time.
Tie old pttitudc was understand understandable.
able. understandable. A shin disabled in a foreien
port costs its owners such vast
su"is in lost earnings capacity
and wages for the idle crew 'hat
the expense of flyine out spare
p-rts to mke it seaworthy is,
ckarly justified.
It is less easy to aomeciate why
motor dealers in Africa, for ex example,
ample, example, should re"ard air freight freighting
ing freighting as the logical way o oVin-1
ing recular shii'iien's of spares j
from manufacturers in the United
Kingdom.
UNREALISTIC COMPAP'N
On a strp''1' forward wei"ht.for-j
weicht basic, it is much more ex expensive
pensive expensive to fly anything over any
distance than to send H by sur surface
face surface routes. But such compari comparison
son comparison is unrealistic, and can be
proved bv the experience of a
local agent for a we'l-known type
of commercial vehicle. j
Until recently.- ll-aftfc$Hj
stock more thani61 Wferent i-;
terns to ensure an efficient rensur,
service for his customers. nd he,
had to order all replenishments
eight months in advance of when i
he estimated he might need them. I
This not only tied up a great:
deal of caoital. but led to cori-;
dersble annual losses through p-'rtsi
becoming obsolete or deteriorating!
ir. the hot climate.
Now he his weeklv consianments
flown out by the "Spares-by-Air"i
scheme th?t is operated as nrtj
of the Hunting-Clan Transport 'A 'A-fficargo"
fficargo" 'A-fficargo" service, knowing that he,
can obtain and fit any component
that may be needed in a matter
of days. I
This not only helps the dealer; I
"luj enables the vehicle manufac-:
hirers; to match the traditionally traditionally-good
good traditionally-good after-sales service of their
cnntinent?l competitors.
Another British air operationpat operationpat-roirized
roirized operationpat-roirized on a large scale by the
motor Industry is the cross-Channel
ferry service that was nio nio-neered
neered nio-neered ten years ago by Silver
Ctty Airways.
In these days of fashionable dual
color schemes, no retailer over overseas
seas overseas can stock every combination
of body style and decor of a par particular
ticular particular model. He can. however,
meet his customer' individual re requirements
quirements requirements by having a car flown
over on the air ferry within, per perhaps,
haps, perhaps, 24 hours.
KEIPS COSTS DOWN
In many respects, the English
Channel offers unrivalled condi conditions
tions conditions for air freighting, because
it is narrow enough to keep to a
minimum the costly flying phm
of any combined surface-air oper
ation lute suver uiy s nigniy-auc-cessful
Roadalr service for gener general
al general cargoes.
dally

NOW

SAN

:

One company (hat uses Roadairj
extensively is Massey-Harris-Ker-guson.
whose agricultural equip-;
nient is used all over the world.
Until this year, all spares des destined
tined destined for this company's Paris as-'
sociate went by road from Man Manchester
chester Manchester to Hull ana then by sea to
France. The jouirev took eight
days, rnd' it was often ten days!
before the goods were ready toj
be unpacked.
Now,-the Roadaid door-to door
service conveys the snares from1
Manchester lo Lvdd Airport in i
Rent by road, flies them across
the Channel to Le Touquct in 20
minutes and has them delivered
to Paris by road, the total time
for the 450-mile journey being 72
hours.
Nor is speed the only attrac-;
tion, for Massey Harris Ferguson'
I'laims that Roadair saves $10 per
ton in transport costs.
This is because air cargoes u u-suallv
suallv u-suallv spend less time in ware warehouses,
houses, warehouses, are handled and tran transhipped
shipped transhipped less, and are far less 1'ke 1'ke-ly
ly 1'ke-ly to be damaged in transit than
surface cargoes, which may be
crammed into riilroad waeons or
the; ho's of shins and suhjee'ed
o shocks during shunting or hoist hoisting.
ing. hoisting.
Often no protection other than
a few strips of felt is needed In I
the aircraft, and this reduces
packing costs, especially for fra-j
gile goods such as furniture, ra-j

UIM riini beir V iiuii acij. nuwawi; i
apprigiu an ty pwritegfe
wjptrtnemiore.. w, npuranee
rates for "air freighting aw often
only one-enth of those for sur surface
face surface teansoort becswse of the low lower
er lower risk of damage or loss.
This annlles particularly to high high-value
value high-value shipments such as gold hul hul-lion,
lion, hul-lion, bank notes ordiamonds. which
are safe from .any possibility o".
theft whilst in the air and can
be well guarded during short pe periods
riods periods spent on the ground.
One recent "Africarso" load in
eluded such varies items as a
shaft wheel weighing about 340
pounds; machinery, about 695
pounds; syringes, about 41 pounds:
electrical switchgear, about 2000

MAJ. GEN. CHARLES L. DASHER, right, pins the Commenda Commendation
tion Commendation Ribbon with Metal pendant, on Col. Olnes Perez, depart departing
ing departing commandant of the U.S. Army Caribbean School, Fort Gu Gu-lick,
lick, Gu-lick, during a ceremony at Command Headquarters, yesterday.
Colonel and Mrs. Perez, left, are scheduled to leave Panama
for the U.S. Monday morning aboard the U8N8 Goethals.
I (U.S. Army Photo)

fll0hlS tO...

ANGELES

FRANCISCO

Fly now

pounds; car spares, about 1230
pounds; tractor spares, about 640
pounds; a poodle dog, four jer jersey
sey jersey calves, a young chimpanzee
and 35 boxes of chicks.
ANIMAL SPECIALS
The last item is a reminder that
baby chicks were one of the first
big-scale air cargoes back in the
1920's. They trave' well in spe-j
cially-designed cardboard boxes
and, needing no food until they
are 72' hours old, offer fewer prob-!
lems than human passengers.
Other unimals require rather
more attention, but are still car-j
ried in enormous numbers, to the
extent that Skyways, Ltd decided'
last year to open the world's first
regular "animal special' services!
between Britain and the Continent.
Their most frequent passengers
are racehorses, sometimes destin destined
ed destined for new owners, but often mak making
ing making the journey just to take part
in a race.
Experience has shown that these
sensitive animals take to flying
so well that they can be raced
within 24 hours of landing, where whereas
as whereas a sea journey might make
them sick of nervy for days.
Last year, a total of more than
153,000 short tons Of air frieght
animal, vegetable and mineral
was handled at airportsxin the U U-nited
nited U-nited Kingdom.
It Included almost everything
from nightly loads of newspapers
tg flowers, .fur coats, umbrellas,
chocolates, elephants, sewing ma-
climes, cemDs, warnings oi
and kippers. -
Much of it travelled in the fright
holds of airliners; but more and
more is going by special all-freight
services in aircraft specially de designed
signed designed to carry heavy, bulky
loads.
Nor should it be forgotten that
some of the most profitable and
deservedly.famous exports flew o o-.verseas
.verseas o-.verseas on their own wings. Dur During
ing During 1957 Britain's aviation indus
try sold a record $325,000 000
worth of aircraft, engines and e e-quipment
quipment e-quipment to air forces, airlines
and private pilots in every conti continent.
nent. continent. Cixeirr tumdav)
Pay later

MIAMI (UPI) A Brooklyn
woman asserted Friday that
neighbor with six children agreed
lo .lave a seventh and give it to

her, then tried to get the baby
ban; because of a triangle (com (complication
plication (complication in the two families.
Calling the case "weird" and
"fantastic," Juvenile Court Judge
W. R. Culbreath oHered the sub subject
ject subject of the 'custody action, Charles
Patrick Moody, 3, sent to a county
detention home.
His foster parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Eugene Moody, former, operators
of a dance studio, were ordcied
to jail for extradition to New York
on kidnapping charges filed by the
natural mother.
The mother, Mrs. Constantino
Mogielnicki went back to her
other six children in Brooklyn
While the case was being hei'-'
the chubby boy played with his
toys outside the courtroom.
The Moodys and the Mogiel Mogiel-nickis
nickis Mogiel-nickis were close friends in Brook-
Quote Unquote
BEIRUT, Lebanon Lebanese
Premier Sami Solh, commenting
in an interview on the landing oi
American Marines in his country
"Once Lebanon and Iraq nave
been liberated, Nasser's influence
will be destroyed throughout the
Arab world. The Arabs will see
the light and will realize that the
champion of the free world the
United States is ready to de defend
fend defend small nations and protect
their independence."
NEW YORK U.S. Ambassa Ambassador
dor Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, speaking
in the United Nations on the Mid Mid-east
east Mid-east situation:
"There is in the Middle East a
common purpose to take over
everywhere all at once. It is mas masterminded
terminded masterminded from one source. .You
can read all about it in Cairo. .
We face the brutal fact of assas
sination by men in plain clo'hes
rather than by men in uniforms.
History will hold us responsible.
Will we condone subversion in
plain clothes? If w deo, the U.N.
will break up."
NEW YORK British Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador Sir Pierson Dixon, discuss discussing
ing discussing a charge by Russian Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador Arkady A. Sobolev that
British Prime Minister Harold
MacmiHan decided to send troops
to Jordan after Parliament haa
adjourned:
"He suggested that the British
prime minister managed to de
ceive the British Parliamcn.
What an extraordinary sugges
tion!"
WASHINGTON Sen. Mike
Mansfield D Mont), comment
ing on a copvright dispatch by
Frawk H. Bartholomew, presraent
of United Press Tnternational,
which reported that the Iraqi coup
and manv other Red-inspired plots
wear a "Born in Bern" label.
"Bern is a natural haven for In Intelligence
telligence Intelligence agents because of con contacts
tacts contacts which radiate in alf direc directions
tions directions from perennially neutral
Switzerland."
WASHINGTON Bernard GoM GoM-fine,
fine, GoM-fine, in a statement following his
final appear Wore House rn rn-:sJ0)eSnc3AU)
:sJ0)eSnc3AU) rn-:sJ0)eSnc3AU) aauanrj
"I have nothing to hide. The
hearings proved I did no wrong.
Of course I did not answer ques questions
tions questions which pried into my person personal
al personal and business life. Who would?
LONG BEACH, Calif. Osar
Meinhardt. director of the 1958
Miss Universe pageant, praising
Miss Costa Rica Eugenia Maria
Valverde who revealed to offi officials
cials officials shp was unr the contest
aae limit of 18. She first hoa-tl
of the a"" r"' following her ?r
rival in the U.S.:
"She's one of the most hor.rsl
eirls I ever met, and a credit to
her country."
Fnnr IK Soldiers
Killed In France
ORLEANS, France (UPI)-Four
American soldiers and a French
civilian were killed and 21 other
American injured yesterday
when a bus collided head-on with
a truck near the village of Olivet,
the Army announced today.
Names of the four Americans
a captain, a sergeant and two en enlisted
listed enlisted men were withheld.
Army officials said the truck
suddely swerved into the path of
the bus, which was carrying 36
servicemen.
AND

lyn where the Moodys operated a

aance studio, the evidence showec.
'i ue Alogielnickis' 19-year old son
worked in the dance studio. Bu
trouble started when the Moodys
slipped off to Miami early this
year and brought Charles Patrick
with them.
The Moodys said they had raised
the boy from infancy and that
Mrs. Mogielnicki promised them
the baby even before she became
pregnant.
"Did Air. Mogielnicki agree to
this weird arranemente" Judge
Culbreath asked Moody.
"He offered no disagreement,"
Moody said.
About that time Mrs. Moody
jumped to her feet and shou'ed
at Mrs. Mogielnicki, a dark -haired
40yearold housewife: "How can
you do this, Betty"
Then Mrs. Moody turned U tne
judge and a iswered her own
Question: "because she was in
love with him (Moody)."
The judge called Mrs. Moody to
the witness stand.
"She (Mrs. Mogielnicki) couldn't
stand not having Gene (Mooiy)
anymore," she testified, "after we
came to Miami. It was frustration
for her."
Mrs. Moody, speaking in a clear
clipped voice, said Mrs. Mogiel Mogielnicki
nicki Mogielnicki had been in love with Moody
for a long time and that she called
him "any hour of the day oi oi-night."
night." oi-night." But she added, "I don't thmk
there was anything immoral .
I Ho not think there was anything
evil."
She said they paid several fooJ
and utility bills for Mrs. Mogiel Mogielnicki
nicki Mogielnicki whose husband, Constantino,
a pipefitter, "often left his family
for long periods of time with no
word of his whereabouts."
Mrs. Moody said she was "flab
bergasted" when Mrs. Mogielnickr
offered to have a child for them.
"This whole fantastic story tax taxes
es taxes my imagination," Judge Oil
breath said.
Jhe Retires After
10,000 Car Sales
HARRISBURG, Pa. (UPD (UPD-Mrs.
Mrs. (UPD-Mrs. Ora C. Shaffer. 63, made tyr
first automobile sale in 1914, a
used Hupmobile she had bought
for $65 and sold for $200, and de decided
cided decided right then that selling cars
"wasn't a bad occupation."
After 44 years and over 10,000
sales, Mrs. Shaffer is retiring
at least, officially. Unofficially,
she said she would still sell cars
"to anyone who wants to buy one
from me."
Her secret of success?
The usual "hard work gooij
judgment and an honest effort to
make and keep friends by giving
them satisfactory service."
But she has an added tip for
the modern salesman: "Pay more
I attention to the woman in the
I family. She's the one who makes
most of the decisions.
Mrs. Shaf'er learned to drive at
the age of 19, when not more than
25 people in Harrisburg owned
automobiles? Wheeling around in
her Abbott Detroit, she had then
the distinction of being one of the
first two women in the area to
drive a car.
By the time she was 20, Mrs.
Shaffer had her own agency with
a Huf'man Six franchise, which
the maintained until the Huffman
was discontinued.
She remembers that in her first
truck sale, the customer traded in
a horse for $32.50 toward the pur.
chase of his vehicle. She sold the
horse the same day for the trade,
in price she had paid.
"The outcome was not quit
what we expected, the horse died
the next day," she said. "But then
we nver did give out used horse
guarantees."
DUTCH CAPTURE 43
HOLLANDIA, West New Guinea
(UPI) Dutch navy patrol ships
yesterday captured 43 Indonesian
rebels off the coast of West New
Guinea. Officials took the rebels
to Manokwari where they were
placed Under guard. A tight se security
curity security blackout was imposed on
the incident- and ""further details
withheld.
INDONESIA TAKES FIRMS
TOKYO (UPI) Indonesia has
taken over control of 14 Dutch in.
surance companies, the independ.
ent Indonesian news agency An An-fara
fara An-fara said yesterday. It said Fi Finance
nance Finance Minister Sutkno Slamet
took the action May 24, but that
it was announced yesterday. The
order Was retroactive to April 17,
it said.

PAN AMERICAN brings you the ultimate in servi servi-tfeand
tfeand servi-tfeand comfort aboard the giantSUPER6C!ippers.
with RADAR.
Choose either the "President" first class aervice
with luxurious two-by-two seats; free cocktails,

WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE
Panamai 22 Stravt No. 12-83 (Facing Palacio legittotlvo) Tel, 2-0670 C0I60. Edif. Solas

FAIRLY AFLOAT in a sea of bateas Is Mrs. Nancy MoKray, of the well-known husbanoTnd
wife batea painting and decorating team. Albrook personnel and their dependents will again
have the opportunity to attend a ten-week course of Instructions on how to paint and de decorate
corate decorate the beautiful Bateas of Panama. The designs are from the ancient artifacts recofrereJl
from the Code Indian Culture near Pencnome in the Republic. Arthur MoKray will begiit the
new series cf classes In the "Caribe Lounge'' directly above the Albrcok Post Exchange ''at 7
p.m. next Tuesday. (Photo: G. Welch)

Greatest Array Of Weapons

US Artillery's 183rd Anniversary

The artillery of the United
States Army celebrates its 183rd
aniversary on July 21 with the
greatest array of weapons in its
arsenal ever known by mankind.
All types of missiles are now a a-vailable,
vailable, a-vailable, yet the mission of Artil Artillery
lery Artillery has never changed. In the
Revolutionary War period and
until 1901, field guns, siege can cannon,
non, cannon, and fixed coastal defenses
were all lumped together under
the single term "Artillery."
It was not until Feb. 2, 1901,
however, that the office of chief
of Artillery was created with two
branches the Coast Artillery
and the Field Artillery. The first
Antiaircraft Artillery units were
created on Oct. 10, 1917.
Field Artillery is a supporting
arm. It contributes to the action
of the entire force by giving
close and continuous fire support
to forward elements and by giv giving
ing giving depth to a combat by coun coun-terbattery
terbattery coun-terbattery fire, fire on hostile
rtwrvH fire to restrict move
ments in rear areas, and fire to
rllsrnnt command agencies
The mission of the Coast Ar-4
tillery Is to protect, in conjunc conjunction
tion conjunction with the Air Force and the
Navy, 'elements of the fleet while
at, entering or debarking from
their bases, and to defeat naval
and air attacks against harbor
defenses, cities, or ether impor important
tant important installations; and to sup support
port support the combined arms In beach
defense, along with support to
the combined arms In field op operations
erations operations while acting as army or
theater reserve Artillery.
The Antiaircraft Artillery pro provides
vides provides local protection for field
forces and important ground es establishments
tablishments establishments and against all
forms of enemy air attacks and
activities by day and by night.
Even with the new missiles de developed
veloped developed by science during the
past few years, all can be utiliz utilized
ed utilized within the three groups with without
out without changing the original mis missions.
sions. missions. In Department of the Army
Pamphlet 355-21, 1955, "The Ar Army
my Army in the Atomic Age," Gen.
Maxwell, D. Taylor, Army Chief
of Staff and himself a former
Artillery commander, states: it
Is ev dent that tne Army is m an
era of evolutionary changes in
weapons, organization ana con concepts
cepts concepts of employment. It must, be
prepared to fight under varying
circumstances. Its soldiers must
have the best possible training,
the most competent leaaersnip,
and the most effective weapons
and equipment which American
technology and inventive genius
can provide, in short, while re retaining
taining retaining Its strength in being, the
Armv i neektnir the best combin
ations to fight tomorrow's war
wrth tomorrow s weapons wiu
techniques. Only in this way can
the Army be prepared to accom accomplish
plish accomplish the vital task of defeating
an enemy's land forces and de

stroying at a minimum cost the
vital resources of his power roof roofed
ed roofed in the land."
In the light of the Chief of
Staff's stated views, the Artillery
is adopting the weapons of the

Artillery arsenal to support thej
ground -gaining arms that will
win the war of the future.
Locally, the 764th Antiair Antiaircraft
craft Antiaircraft Battalion, commanded by
lit. Col. Miroslav F. Moucha,
and with gun positions at Fla Flamenco
menco Flamenco Island, Chiva Chiva
Trail, Gatun Locks and Fort
Davis, will join with all Artil Artillery
lery Artillery members In celebrating
the day. Members of Mortar
Battery, 1st Battle Group, 20th
Infantry, will also join in the
celebrations.
In any future war conducted
over extended frontages and
with much greater depth to the
battlefield, the atomic capabili capability
ty capability of the enemy would require
dispersion of our forces In order
to deny the enemy lucrative tar targets.
gets. targets. Gaps between forces can
and must be covered by fire to
deny the area to the enemy. In
order to do this, the Artillery
must be prepared to operate a-

jfr: !bImSmEEEmEEEEbEbEEBe1

PROMOTED AT JWTC Col Ralph A. Jones, Jr., center,
commanding officer of the 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry,
officiated at a surprise ceremony at the Jungle Warfare Train Training
ing Training Center, Fort Sherman, when two staff officers there were
promoted. Wearing the insignia of their new ranks for the
first time are, left, Capt. Alstalr Munro, S-4 at JWTC, and 1st
Lt. Paul E. Cook, instructor. (U.S. Army Photo)

superb meals served in the continental manner
with selected wines, OR
Thrifty "Kambow" tourist service with delicious
complimentary meals and snacks; bar servica at
moderate prices.

Mark

lone If necessary, providing its
own protection against infiltra infiltration,
tion, infiltration, airborne assault, and guer guerrilla
rilla guerrilla warfare.
Dispersed-battalion tvnp nf
employment, in defense or of offense,
fense, offense, may not require drastic
changes in proven Artillery doc doctrine
trine doctrine and concepts, but it ill
reouire modernization nf wenn.
ons, communications, transport,
tactics ana techniques.
The spirit with which the ar artillery
tillery artillery stands ready to accom accomplish
plish accomplish its task was epitomized by
Maj. Gen. A. M. Harper, former
commanding general, Artillery
and Guided Missile Center, when
he said:
"The Field Artillery accepts
with pride Its mission as the
primary supporting arm to the
Infantry and Armor, it operates
zealously to maintain its estab-
I llshed reputation as the greatest
Kiner on tne battlefield, wheth whether
er whether by conventional projectile,
tomic projectile, free rocked, or
guided' missile. It executes its
mission with an esprit that is
widely recognized as the spirit
of the Field Artillery."
Tol 1097

XM5 fit ;



SUNDAY, JULY 29, IS
Republic Of Colombia

tub sunoai amncaitx

W ""SB 0
Handicap

Tops

Race

Card
BBSM)BS-.

pouglas Changes From Football
Po Tennis And Finds It As Tough

Bv JOE OUINN i
NEW YORK "(NEA) At lirst
clance. vou'd be more apt to con
alder Jon Douclas a tennis play. I
T than a college football quarter-1
"nek. 1

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SERVICE CENTER
DIABLO HTS. 2:30, 7:00
Jane Powell
Cliff Robertson
"THE GIRL MOST
LIKELY"
Margarita 2:30, fi:15. 8:30
Ann Blyth
Paul Newman
f'THE HELEN MORGAN
STORY"
m Cinemascope & Color
BA fi A
A L 3 vJ A

I V VvVBBBrtoX Veav BtfttV'MBH KkA.4<uf BSa

BETSY PALMER-MICHEL RAY NEVILLE BRAND JOHN McINTIRS
BBS WWmi FMtwi nt Gori SmMo Directed b Anthony Mua ScreenpUy by Dudley NichoU

ALSO SHOWING

EFARAfSO 7:00
Richard Wldmark
Richard Todd
"SAINT JOAN"
(Alo Showing Monday)

CAMP BIERD 6:15 & 8:15
Jerry Lewis In "THE DELICATE DEL1NCUENT"
In Vlstalsion! (Also Showing Monday)

GAY CROONERS
PRODUCTION
mAPITOLIO

TODAY

T IV O LI
35c. 20c.
Spanish Program'
LAS MIL Y UNA
NOCHES
with Tin Tan
- Al.so:
IIORAS de AGONIA
with Lilln Prado

mm. 20r.
1 DAMN
CITIZEN
Also:
mm i s s
CROSS

But you wouldn t be wrong on

either count. Although Douglas
weighs only 155 pounds and star.ds
5 10 (he says) he was Stanford s
regular quarterback last season
and one of the best in the college
ranks.
i
THEATRES TODAY!
GAMBOA 7:00
Cameron Mitchell
Glynls Johns
ALL MINE TO GIVE"
COCO SOLO 2:30 & 8:30
"THAT NIGHT"
GATUN
2:30 & 7:00
Andy Griffith
Patriclal Meal
"A FACE IN THE
CROWD"
AIR CONpiTIONED
2:45 4:40 6:35 8:30
i
MONDAY!
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
Robert Mltchum
rTHE ENEMY BELOW"
Bn Cinemascope & Color
(Also Showing Sunday)

'ROCKING ON THE ISLANDS"

August 6-7-8

VICTORIA
25c. 15c.
Spanish Program!
EL VAMPIRO
with Abel Salazar
- Al.so:
VIVA FX AMOR
with Silvia Pinal

Now that Douglas has been

graduated from the school in Palo
Alto, Calif., he hasn't any imme imme-dia.e
dia.e imme-dia.e plans to play more football.
Instead, Douglas is planning to
give tennis a good whirl, some something
thing something that football has prevented
him from doing the past three
years.
As a Santa Monica, Calif., high
school boy, Douglas played foot football,
ball, football, basketball and tennis. He
was capable enough to hold the
number three national ranking as
a tennis junior. After that lie
didn't have time to play the sum summer
mer summer circuit because he had to re
port early for football' practice.
And in the spring he had to di divide
vide divide his time between tennis and
lootball.
Jon also must have put in a fair
amount of time on his books as
he made Phi Beta Kappa this
year as a pre-law major.
Douglas is going to law school,
but probably not until January.
Between now and then he is con concentrating
centrating concentrating on tennis. He'd like to
be a member of the Davis Cup
squad which goes to Australia in
December. The realization of that
goal depends en.irely on how
much his game develops.
Douglas is going to play the
entire tour to help himself as
much as possible. If he doesn't
make ii, he figures he'll have giv given
en given it a real try and that will be
that.
Talking about the difference he
twecn football and tennis
Jon
says, "A good many people stil
regard tennis as something raiher
easy. But both football and tennis
are tough. In football you may
get more bruises and bumps but
I'd say that playing a five set
match in tennis often can be as.
physically exhausting as playing
an entire football game."
Evidence of Douglas' improve improvement
ment improvement in tennis was providend in
the National Intercollegiates when
he went to the final to lose a four
set match to Alex Olmedo, Ihe
Peruvian star from the University
of Southern California. On the
way, the compact little Califor Califor-nian
nian Califor-nian defeated Ron Holmberg, who
was with the United States Davis
Cup squad last year, and Don
Dell, Yale captain, each in
straight sets.
Douglas played in the Tri-State
Tournament in Cincinnati, was
named to the preliminary Davis
Cup squad.
So Jon Douglas may make the
transition from football to tennis
much faster than might ordinarily
be expected.
Left-Hander
Is OK In Golf
CHICAGO (NEA) -Natural left
handers who switch to right-hand
ed in golf are wrong, according to
Harry Pezzullo.
The veteran PGA official and
Chicago area pro points out that
all the bugaboos such as courses
"being built for right-handers
are untrue.
Pezzullo contends that south
paws swing no dmerentiy than
others.
A right hander who plays al
most as well from the other side,
he predicts that some day a nat
ural left-hander will make head
lines by winning a major tourna
ment.
Racetrack Tips
By CONRADO
1 Dona Flora
Eros
2 Don Brigido
Don Luis
Jipi Japa ()
Bosllongo
Vespucio
Abolengo
Coral
Guacamaya
Distingo
Gavilan
3 Don Pastor
4 Demltlla
5 hermelina
Evening Star
7 Philipipon
8 Victoria
Germanio
10 Double Four
LIONS ROAR AGAIN
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich
(NEA) The professional football
Detroit Lions report at Cranbroqk
School at Bloomfield Hills, July
22.
NATIONAL GOLF DAY
DUNEDIN, Fla. (NEA) Early
returns indicate that money de
rived from the 1958 National Golf
Day, June 7, may top $100,000.
TODAY -ENCANTO 35 -201
John Wayne Sophia Loren
- in
"LEGEND OF THE LOST"
George Montgomery in
"Gun Duel In Durango"
RIO
35c.
20c.
Witness For The
Prosecution
with Tyrone Power
- Also:
MONKEY ON MY
BACK
with C. Mitchell

Williams'
Homerun
Beats Tigers

BOSTON, July 19 (UPI) Ted
Williams smashed a tremendous
two-run homer, his 15th of the
season, in the lZtn inning today to
give the Red Sox a 7-6 victory
over the Detroit Tigers and extend
Boston's winning streak to six
games.
The 39-year-old Williams tagged
Tiger reliefer Hank Aguirre's
first pitch to him after Jimmy
Piersall led off the frame by sin
gling and advancing to second on
a sacrifice. The ball carried a
good 450 feet into the right field
grandstand.
The Tigers, who lost their fourth
in a row, had gone ahead in the
top of the 12th on Billy Martin's
double off the left field wall to
score Harvey Kuenn. Boston sent
the game into extra innings by
rallying for two runs in the last
of the ninth on Sammy White's
homer, a hit batsman and singles
by Gene Stephens and Pete Run Runnels,
nels, Runnels, i
In Cincinnati Ken Boyer's 10th 10th-inning
inning 10th-inning homer broke up a score scoreless
less scoreless pitching duel between Larry
Jackson and Alex Kellner today
and ended a seven-game St. Louis
Cardinals losing streak with a 1-0
victory over the Cincinnati Red-
Boyer, who hit Kellner's first
pitch of the inning for his 19th
homer, was only the second Car
dinal runner allowed past first
base by the 33-year-old refugee
from the American League.
It was Kellner's first start for
the Redlegs and his first National
League loss against one relief win
since coning from the Athletics
a month ago.
Turk Lown came in and struck
out Ed Fitzgerald with the poten potential
tial potential winning run on base today to
help the Chicago White Sox score
a 7-6 victory over the Senators in
Washington.
The Senators were trailing 7-5
when Jim Lemon hit his 17th
homer of the year off Gerry Sta Sta-ley.
ley. Sta-ley. Staley retired the next two
batters and then gave up a pinch
single to Clint Courtney and walk
to Roy Sievers.
Lown took over and had a 3-1
count on Fitzgerald who fouled
off the next pitch and then fan fanned.
ned. fanned. Al Smith hit his seventh homer
for Chicago and Eddie Yost his
fourth for Washington.
Veteran Andy Pafko made a
spectacular catch of Bobby
Thompson's ninth inning drive a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the left field wall today
and gave right-hander Joey Jay
and the Milwaukee Braves a 3-2
victory over the Chicago Cubs in
the Windy City.
The 37-year-old Pafko, who came
in as ninth-inning substitute for
Joe Adcock, saved the game for
Jay and evened the three-game
series with the Cubs at one game
each.
In New York, Bill Tuttle's 3 3-run
run 3-run homer in the 12th inning gave
the Kansas City Athletics a 6 4
victory over the New York Yan Yankees
kees Yankees today and dealt ace reliever
Ryne Duren his first defeat since
June 14.
Southpaw Bud Daley, Kansas
City's third pitcher, started the
winning rally when he doubled
with one out in the 12th. Mike
Baxes followed with a walk and
Tuttle then unloaded his fifth
homer of the season into the lower
right field seats.
Daley, who entered the game
in the ninth, was credited with his
second victory although he need needed
ed needed relief help from Ralph Terry
in the bottom of the 12th when
the Yanks put together three
sjngles for their final run.
Ray Jablonski put the Giants
back in business, with a three run
: i- l i 1
pincn-nii nomei, men mey went.
on to defeat the Pirates, 5-4, and
retain their half-game lead over
Milwaukee in San Francisco.
Jablonski's fourbagger, his 10th
of the season, came in the
fourth inning and hoisted
San Francisco back into a 4-4 tie
with Pittsburgh. Daryl Spencer
then hit a sacrifice fly off losing
pitcher Bob Porter -field in the
fifth inning for the clincher.
Field & Stream
American Water Spaniel
Still Active
By JOE STETSON
Dog Editor
ONE of every 10 letters reaching
my disk refers to the type or oreed
of dog a man should have to satisfy
a particular need.
One in 10 indicate a smallish dog
that will fit easily into house and
ear, can be used on upland gime in
season, can double on waterfowl,
will perhaps start a rabbit if a fel fellow
low fellow needs one for the pot and will
be a good pet for the kids.
This is quite a bill of goods for
any breed, but there are individu
als of a few breeds that can fill
the bill and one spot, where the
chances Of finding the righ indi
vidual is better than average, is the
American water spaniel.
Call these little liver colored,
curly-coated dogs with the water-
repellant hair, rat-tailed spaniels
if you will, they are versatile.
When I was a kid, there was more
game about, but the rmarkable
thing about the dogs that earned a

Lowly Fifth Series Racers
To Hold Limelight Today

Eight well matched and cleverly handicapped fifth
series thoroughbreds get their chance to bask in the lime limelight
light limelight this afternoon in the featured $1000 Republic of
Colombia Handicap.
The one mile race, which will be run at the President
Remon racetrack, commemorates the independence day

of the Colombian Republic.
The probable mutuels favor favor-it"
it" favor-it" is Alhajar but he is sure to
get plenty of competition in the
betting from Philipipon, Pasa.
tiempo and the native CoraL
Surumeno, which returns from
a layoff following treatmenttor
a leg ailment, could be a surpirse
winner here. Suremeno is way
below his natural class and
doesn't have to be in A.l condi
tion to beat this field. Jose Tala Tala-vera
vera Tala-vera will guide the hefty Argen
tine 1 horse.
La Generala, Fifito and Carti.
llero will be the rank outsiders.
Andres Gonzalez will guide Phi Philipipon,
lipipon, Philipipon, Fortunato Hidalgo Jr. has
the leg up on Alhajar, Virgilio
Castillo will do the booting on
Pasatiempo and Guillermo Milord
will handle Coral's reins.
Outsiders Fifito, Castillero and
La Generala will be ridden by Jor.
ge Phillips, Arquimedes Alfaro and
Braulio Baeza, respectively.
The secondary, attraction, which
ordinarily would have been the
main event, pits sprint champ
Double Four against his old ri.
vals Gavilan, Melendez and Gra
milla.
Eight other races are included
on the card.
THE DIVIDENDS
First Race
1 Now Then $4.80, $2.60
2 Pepin $2.20
Second Race
1 Tiny Brook $8.40, $4.60
2 Lark $3.80
First Double: $28.80
Third Race
1 Don Dani $2.80. $2.20
The Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Teams
W L Pet. GB
San Francisco
Milwaukee
Chicago
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Cincinnati
X.Philadelphia
49 3 .563
47 37 .560 Vi
46 43 .517 3'a
41 45 .477
40 43 .482
40 45 .471
38 42 .475
7
6V4
7'2
6V4
x-Los Angeles
39 46 ,459
x-Result not available
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Los Angeles
Pittsburgh at San Francisco
St. Louts at Cincinnati
Milwaukee at Chicago
YEATERDAY'S RESULTS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mil. 300 000 0003 8 0
Chicago 010 000 1002 5 0
Jay (5-3) and Crandall; Dra Dra-bowsky,
bowsky, Dra-bowsky, Hobbie (1), Elston (8),
and S. Taylor, LP.Drabowsky (8.
9), Hrs.Aaron (20), Banks (26)
Long (10)
(10 innings)
St. L. 000 000 000 11 8 0
Cinci. 000 000 000 6 )
Jackson (6.7) and Smith; Kell Kellner
ner Kellner (1.1) and Bailey. Hr- Boyer
(19).
Pitts. 010 300 0004 6 0
San Fco. 010 310 OOx 5 9 0
Raydon, Cross (2), Porterfield
(4), Fkce (7) and Hall; Worth,
ington, Johnson (4), Monzant (5)
Antonelli (9) and Thomas. WP.
Monaznt (6-7), LP.Porterfiedl (1
4). Hrs.Kirkland (8TH), Jablonski

(10).
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Teams W L Oct. GB
New York 56 30 .651
Boston 46 40 .535 10
Detroit 41 44 .482 14V4
x.Baltimore 41 44 .482 14
Kansas City 41 44 .482 14V4
Chicago 42 46 477 15
x Cleveland 41 47 .466 16
x.Night game not Included

TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Washintgon
Kansas City at New York (2)
Detroit at Boston
Cleveland at Baltimore
Chicago 311 010 1007 13 n
Wash. 020 003 0016 13 n
Wilson, Shaw (2), Stanley (6),
Lown (9) and Battey; Ramos,
Clevenger (3) Hyde (7), Pascual
(8) and Fitzgerald, WP-Stanley
(3.5) LPRamos Hyde (78), HRS
Smith (8), Yost (4), Lemon (17)
(12 innings)
Detroit 010 100 111 006 14 0
Boston 110 100 0Q2 0027 12 0
Lary, Aguirre (9) and Hegan;
Sisler, Byerly (9), Kiely (10) y
White WP-Kiely (4.1), LP-Aguirre
(3.2) HrsVirgil (3), Kuenn (5) Heg
an (1), White (3) Williams (15).
3 (12 innings)
K. C. 000 001 110 003 10 2
N. Y. 001 000 020 0014 15 2
Grim, Herbert (8), Daley (9),
Terry (12) and House, Chiti (9);
Maas, Turley (8), Shantz, Duren
(9) and Howard, WP-Daley (2 1).
LP-Duren (4.3), Hr.Cerv (24)
Maris (14), Tuttle (6).
Cleveland at Baltimore
game).
(night
rpsnerteH nlare hv the fireside wa
their ability to hanndle a vaiety of
jjame

2 Lucky Test $3.20
One-Two: $20.60
Fourth Race
1 Nirvana (excluded from
betting)
2 Naranjazo $45.60, $9.40
3 Black Bee $7.40
Quiniela: $82.00
Fifth Race
1 Alarico (excludedfrom
betting)
2 Sputnik $3.80, $2.20
3 Red Label $2.20
Sixth Race
1 Pastoreo $8.00, $3.80
2 Pocas Pilchas $4.60
Seventh Race
1 Nagir $7.60, $5.60
2 As You Like Her $4.80
Second Double: $58.00
Eight Race
L-Lady Edna $2.20, $2.20
2Tanara $3.40
Quiniela: $11.40
Ninth Race
1 Charicleia $4.00, $2.40
2 Zumar $9.60
One-Two: $48.20
Tenth Race
1 Parasol $2.40, $2.20
2 Silver Heel $2.?0
Eleventh Race
1 Sicabu $9.00, $2.60

K bmH B
K TlJph
BsSalP KB
BssenSflFR- T' BBkSS Hb
pJS iJbk IbbbBBh
I;
mmm B.

TAKES BEST SHOT -In ad addition
dition addition to being the best hustler
among the second basennn,
Nellie Fox of the Chicago White
Sox is taking dead aim at the
batting championship.

LOVE IN

In Guest Weekend Release Next
Wednesday at the CENTRAL Theatre'

bnKflel Mai Iff SBBMftM Ei
&-&v'" ANmm wmWl w ibJbB wi bbbbbVv am r'' "' J"ffllfl

With "Love In The Afternoon," Billy Wild Wilder
er Wilder again forcibly demonstrates he has no
peer among the screen's, producers and di directors.
rectors. directors. And the three stars of the film, Gary
Cooper, Audrey Hepburn and Maurice Che Chevalier
valier Chevalier will have a long search before they
again find a screenplay better suited to their
unduplicated talents.
Proof of these statements may be found
at the "Central" Theatre in great regular
weekend release next Wednesday.
The spirited screenplay is at once heavy

Race Track

P.P. Horse
Jockey
1st Race
Non Winners" Imp. 7 P
1st RACE OP
1 Bathina
2 Dona Flora
3 Platano
4 Licenciado
5 Eros
H. Ruiz 110
F. Hidalgo 113
A. Reyes. K. 104
A. Alfaro I09x
B. Baeza LU5
2nd Race "C and D" Natives 7
2nd RACE OP
1 Mimi
2 Engaiioso
3 Don Luis
4 Don Brigido
5 Chito
6 Blanquita
G. Milord lOOx
F. Sanchez 1)7
B. 'Baeza 110
G. Sanchez J15
F. Justiniani lOOx
J. Talavera 107x
3rd Race "F G" Natives 6 Fas
ONE
1 Solito
2 Uamel
3 Ocean Star
4 Julie
5 Don Pastor
6 Folleto
7 (Mr. Jack
8 (Jipi Japa
9 Titita
S. Carvajal 105
A. Aliaro 103x
M. Correa 115
G. Milord UUx.
F. Hidalgo lua
E. Ortega 100
ja. gonzaiez 108
J. Talavera 107x
B. Baeza 115
4th Race "G H"

Natives 6 Fgs. Purse $375.00
QUINIELA

1 El Pequeflo
2 ban nsiobal
3 luObllUUgO
4 Doimtua
5 Kauicai
6 Viima P
A. LourlessluOx
G. muoru HO.t
A. vasquez ii3
K. Vasquez 113
Jt. Aguine H5
B. Baeza 115
5th Race 7th Series Imp. 5 Fgs.
1 Sober View
C. Iglesias li;
2 Desiello
3 Hermelina
4 Vespucio
5 (Cooksmaid
6 (JacK itiit
7 Postin
G. rfUloru iu7x
B. Baeza Hi)
A. Alfaro I07x
C. Ruiz 115
J. Taiavera u;ix
F. Alvarez 115
6th Race 6th Series Imp. 7
1st kaCE
Fgs.
OF
1 Evening Star
2 Loberia
3 Lniviiingo
4 Abolengo
5 Sapristi
A. Vasquez U3
G. Sanchez 110
J. iaiavera iU5x
F. Alvarez 115
B. Baeza HO
7th Race 5th Series Imp. 8 Fgs,
Purse $1000. Pool Closes 4:10
1 Fifito J. Phillips 1x0
2 Cartillero A. Alfaro 104
3 L,d Uenerala B. ibaeza 108
4 Surumeno J. Talavera U2.t
5 Coral F. Alvarez 108
6 Pasatiempo V. Castillo 112
7 Phillipipon A. Gonzales 103
8 Alhajar F. Hidalgo 115
8th Race "H" Natives

6 Fgs. purse $375.00
QUINIELA

1 Bagdad E. Ortega 105
2 Okiland B. Baeza 108
3 Hock'n joll F. Justiniani I01.x
4 Victoria
H. Reyes 110
5 Don Manuel
6 Guacamaya
7 (Tanganica
8 ( Guarare
J. Talavera 115x
A. Alfaro 112x
C. Iglesias 110
J. Cadogan 108
9th Race 4th Series Imp.
9 Fgs.
ONE
1 El Agheila
2 Paquiro
3 Mouche
4 Germanio
5 Grand Finish
6 Distingo
7 Fieltro
8 Narcotico
9 Cervecero
J. Phillips 108
G. Sanchez 115
H. Ruiz 113
F. Alvarez 115
J. Talavera 106x
R. Vasquez 113
F. Sanchez lOlx
A. Vasquez 110
A. Alfaro 107x
10th Race 1st Series Imp. 7 Fgs.
1 Gavilan
2 Double Four
3 Melendez
4 Gramilla
A. Alfaro 105x
R. Vasquez 122
G. Sanchez 110
F. Alvarez 106

THE AFTERNOON

with sophisticated humor, and Its entire east
superbly reflects Wilders keen knowledge of
how best to people a motion picture.
An AUied Artists film, ?Love In The After Afternoon"
noon" Afternoon" is the story of a millionaire American
long known and deservedly as an in international
ternational international Casanova who never wants to
become entangled in a serious love affair,
and what happens to him when in Paris he
meets a young cello student, who first be became
came became aware of him when surreptiously read reading
ing reading dossiers in the files of her father, a de detective
tective detective specializing in obtaining evidence of
martial dalliance.

Graded Entries

mil

Comment
urse 150.00
THE DOUBLE
Peel Close. UK j
Returns from layoff 10
Seems best here EVE.
Could surprise 5-
No. 1 contender
Much improved
Purse $425.00
THE DOUBLE
Pool Closet
Early speed only 25
Not good enoygh 30.;
Will fight it out 2.1
Form indicates 2.2
Dangerous contender 5-'
Dropped shoe in last t
urse $375.00 Pool Closes ?:U
TWO
Would pay off here 15-1
Ran well in last 3 l
Bad legs hamper 50 l
Could be ussetter 10 :
In fight to finish 2.1
Always close up 5.1
Last doesn't count EVE
Has strongest finish EVEN
Excluded from betting XXXX
Pool Closes 2:31
Enjoying best form 10-1
Woulu pay o.f 15. j
in aghi 10 anish 3 i
Gets auotner cflance 3.,
Oooa eany speea 5 i
Hard to beat here 2-1
Purse $400.00 Pool Closes 3:0i
linei early speed 30..
bacK in iop lorm 5 i.
In tight to finish 3 I
f orm lnuicaies '. j
Nothing recently 5-ij
Coula oe runnerup 5.J
Excluded from betting XXX..
Purse 400.00
THE DOUBLE
Pool Closes 3:49
ivlucn the best 3-5
Vasuy improved 7-j
Nothmg in months 25..
Returns from layoff 4l
Could go all the way 3-t
'Republic elf Colombia Handicap
2nd RACE OF THE DOUBLE
Distance 'should help
Likes long route too
Must improve plenty
Reportealy ready
Enjoying top form
Last was excellent
Could make it too
Distance to liking
10-1
5-1
10.1
2-1
4- 1
5.2
3.1
5- 2
Pool Closes 4:
Improved in last 8-1'
Early speed only 10-1:
Could score here 5.1
Should score again EVEN
Last was terrible 8-1
Always dangerous 2-1
-Returns from layoff 'SU 5
Ran well last Week 5.2
Purse $600.00
TWO
Pool Closes 5:15
Distance handicaps 15-1
Will fight it out 3-1
Should be close up 5 1
Form indicates 3.2
Longshot possibility 10-1
No. 1 contender 2-1
Must go lower 30.1
Good recent races 5.1
Enjoying good form 5-1
Purse $1000. Pool Closes 5:40
Handicap in favor 2-1
Form indicates EVEN
Lacks early speed j 3-1
Serious effort here 5-2
n
A,



i
;- -J.
PAGE 8EVEH
AY, JULY 21, 1958
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
IX
Patterson-Harris Fight Excites Only Downtown

SUM)

Cut and Shoot

Results Of Third Weekly
i
Balboa Swimming Meet

3rd Pamela

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA) With C
laborate safaris to Cut and Shoot,
Tex., and whatnot, Bill Kosenihn,
new to ihe beak busting business
is making a frenzied attempt to
quickly sell the Floyd Pattersoh Pattersoh-Rov
Rov Pattersoh-Rov Harris fight to the public

There isn't much time, for this
manufactured ma ch is down for
Wrigley Field, Los Angeles, Aug'
18, with only the immediate ter territory
ritory territory blacked out of closed cir
cui, television, the one hope to get
the production off the hook.
The Teleprompter people, pro
moting the show with Cus D'Ama
to, Patterson's manager, at first

n an 19 vear nri hovs I t talked Diitneiy oi rne large: cios-

Jerry Mann -50 points; 2nd Ro ed circuit TV audience in history,
ark Summerforrf 30 polntR; SrdiWhat they overlooked was that
Stewart Brown 24 points; there is no demand for the fight,
li anri i5t vear old eirls 1st; The blunt truth is that interest

HSri -.rrt,lMawle Mahonev 60 uolnts; 2nd! largely is confined to downjovn

:uc eimwie i "T -,"iC;u on rtnt- serf Cut an

Public Links Champ Plans
College First, Then Golf

An PvcPiior. ripmnnstration of Darden 6 points;

life saving was given during the Grosz l point; -.
third weekly swim rrieet sponsor- j 9 and 10 year old boys 1st An

ed by the Summer Recreation ay jacooson pi points; ma uu
Board in cooperation with the can Summerford 38 points; 3rd
Schools Division. The victim, ; Kevin Yocum M potato:
who gave a very realistic per-1 9 and 10 year old girls 1st Pat Pat-formance.
formance. Pat-formance. was successfully re-;sy Albritton 45 points; 2nd I Viv Viv-vived
vived Viv-vived by the E and J resusolta- ranna Kosan 45 points; rd Zcm

tor. Only the victim had been; Ann Biermau n puu is,

apDrlsed of this demon'traiion
Anv bov or girl who wishes to
swim' in the next two meets, to
I be held on Jilv 25 and AuTUSt 1

hvill be welcome but in order to

thT,,.t ha vp romneted In one Call Albritton 20 points;

other meet, making a total of; Christina Vogt 10 points;

three meets'.

3rd! Cut and Shoot (pop. 192).

The results of the meet and
number of oolit esfiip" are:
6 year, old girls, lot Fr-en
Thomogon 5 nolnts; 2nd Kf-ra
Gordon 3 points:
7 and 8 year o'd bov. 1st To Tort"
rt" Tort" Summerford 5 Dol"t.s; ?M

Charles snencer 3 points;

Richard Waiiarian 1 nninv

13 and 14 vear oM boys

Harry Van Loon 40 points; 2nd
Jim Wilson 28 points: 3rd Cor Cordon
don Cordon Bovwell 2p points;
13 and 14 year old girls 1st
Frances Yost 41 points: 2nd Jean
Walker 24 points; 3rd Betty Vnn
Dyke 18 points;"
15 and 16 year old boys 1st Ray

?-1 Caldwell 28 points; 2nd Albert
i White ?0 noints; 3rd Rachel Van

jsJ The promoters firs, realized that

7 and 8 year o'ff vr 1st.. Ann Dyke 10 points.

Powelson 5. r.o'nts; ?nr w"a
Darden 3 "oints; 3rd Pamela
Grosz 1 point;'
9 and 10 yenr o'd boys lt. An An-dv
dv An-dv Jacobson ifi nolnts: Dn Dn-cen
cen Dn-cen Summerford, 10 points; 3rd
Kvin Youm 9 nonts;
9 and 10 vear o'd "iris 1st wiv wiv-lanna
lanna wiv-lanna Koan IP. no'nt,; ?nd Pt-

... j i

sy Albnnon 12 points; jru mr-j
lanle Whe1n 4 points; INGLEWOOD. Calif

11 and 12 vear o'd boys m late-develooing group
Torrv Mann 90 nolnts- r'i-t P'i -' pu olds Headed by

ark Summerford 1.0 joints; 3rd
St "wart Brown 5 p'n'nt-
11 and 12 year o'H "iris t
Maeele Mahonev 20 Rnoints- tod
rhristina Voet fi points; M?1"'

DWnan 4 points;
13 and 14 vear old hovs 1r;t
TJarn' van Loon 20 noints; 2nd1

Jim Wilson and William Arey 8
points; ,
13 and 14 vear old "iris 1st
Jean Wlkr 13 nolnts- nd
Prances Yost 10 noints; 3rd Fe
ty Van ryk 8 boints:
15 and 16 year o'd bovs 1st
Ray Caldwell 10 no'nts- "nd
Kenneth MacKenzie 5 points;
3rd Peter Mack 3 noints:
15 &M 16 year old girls 1st Pat
Rogers 20 points: 2nd Peveriv
Bowman 9 points; 3rd, Rachel
Van Tlvkp t noints-

Thp total nolnts for the fT"ft JUsI

S swim meets In the first three
positions in. each age group are

as follows:

The Shoe, Full
Brother To Swans,
To Prove MeIHe

(UPT)-A

of three.
Swaps' full

brother. The Shoe, decide meir
relative merits today in Hollv
wood Park's version of a Derby,
the $100 000 Westerner.
A field of 10 'was named for
the mile and a quarter race that
originally drew the entries or such
nationally known sophomores as
Silky Sullivan. Old Pueblo and
Gone Fishin'.
But none or those stars was
around when the Western zoomed
up on the' program, having either
failed to train for the race or suf suffering
fering suffering injuries that prevented
them from running.
Instead a new group of stars
emerged. Thev included The Shoe.
Hillsdale. Strong Bay antt El

Cajon

the selling job was going Vo be

considerably toucher than exneet exneet-ed
ed exneet-ed when they invited a Pirn Pirn-burgh
burgh Pirn-burgh sports editor on a junket to
Harris' home in the Ihicket, 4.1
miles north of Houston.
"Can't afford to waste the
time." replied the sports editor,
"because Pittsburghers never
heard of Harris and rare little a-
bou. Patterson."

By JAMES C. WARTERS
JACKSONVILLE UPI) Dan
Slices Jr surprised the golf world
last week by winning the Nation -al
Public Links Tournament at
Chicago.
He also sumrised and delight

ed his home town by sweeping
through his opponents with such

apparent ease.
Tn fact about the only person

not bowled over by his outstand outstanding
ing outstanding achievement was Sikes him himself.
self. himself. Not that the 27-year-old
golfer is a braggart or even cocky
he just has that rare quality
nt nniPt confidence which car

ries him over the toughest hur hurdles
dles hurdles when the pressure Is greatest.

"Dan was just a little over 100
on that first round," the chapp's
father recalls.
From that moment on, Sikes
played and studied the game
with the intensity of a matadr
in a ball fighter's arena. His fa father
ther father bought him a bag of clubs a
few days later and the new pub pub-linx
linx pub-linx tltleholder was on his wav.
Roland Hurley, pro at the
Brentwood Municipal Go f
Course, remembers Sikes' first
daye at the links as a shy. retir retiring
ing retiring high school boy.

None of the on-the-srene ex-

nr thought much of sine'

-i.,n... u'hrn his 76-79-

qualifvi.u score was only eood
enough for a 16-way playoff.
"I was playing all right, even
with the 155. It was Just a mat matter
ter matter of putting." Sikes said just
tiefore returning to his studies at
the University of Florida.
"But my putting Improved
after the matches started."
What the modest Floridian
rxxrieptert tn mention was that

. l- a

IIC
true

"If he sa'.i hello' when he
came into the clubhouse, he was
making a speech." Hurlev said.
"He had the biggest practice
bag of golf balls I've seen." said
the professional "He wouldn't
talk to anybody, but he'd go out
and hit practice balls for hours.

155; play a few holes, and then ';o

courses.

REMINDED THAT THE fisht
was for the World heavyweight
championship, the sports editor
said the title no longer was worth
a dcso unless worthwhile active

combatants were lighting for andjonce fhe tournament, bean
defending i He expressed doubt niaved sub-par golf the

that a moving picture house in his mark of a champion,
area would make any sort of a j slices, who carries only 160
guarantee tor the fight lelecast. pounds' on his six foot frame,
While Harris is undefeated, the started olavfne olf when he
backwoods schoolteacher with the wiS 17 when his father took him
back muscles is still considerably out one of the municipal

ghor of being Texas answer 10
Alaska's admittance to the Union
Sure, the very name of the little
pine cabin community from which
Roy hails lends itself to descrip descriptive
tive descriptive writing.
The challenger is quick enough
to take advan age of a highly un unusual
usual unusual set-ub. When his footwork

was faulted, by example, the
newly tagged Lion of the Alamo
quipped: "Fancy footwork is like
the curl in a pig's tail. Little
more.style but no more pig."
Wri ei s will sbon run out of
back country talk and words de de-sciibihg
sciibihg de-sciibihg Roy's quaint kinfolk, how however,
ever, however, and the question remains,
"How good can the guy fight?"

to has nursed Patterson along,
told the editor of Ring magazine
that he would keep his tiger in
u. i,;.,,iw,ru uniil he eot a cracK

t the crown. That's precisely

...w. h.c rinnp and he s f.et'ing

Willi II, no..
- inn nnn tmarantee along Wl'.n

a fivu,ww
thp rhance.

No banter ever took an easier mind

back

balls

and hit more practice

Two years later. Sikes was
playing tournament golf and by
1952 he was beating the best in
the city. That was the year he
won thie city championship, the
Florida Winter Golf Champion Championship
ship Championship at St. Augustine and the
camp invitational at Ocala.

Sikes entered the Army in

1953 and In 1955 won the medal
play all-Armv tournament a
ralnst such players as Gay Brew

er, now a touring nrofesslona,
and Boh Moncreif, Texas State

champion.

Sikes' win at Chicago gained
him an invitation to the Na

tional Amateur at San Francisco
In September, but he still doesn't

know if he can accept. "The

tournament comes riiht about,

when the school vear starts and

I don't know yet if I'll be able to

take the time off from my law

studies."
Gettina that law degree in Au
eust. 1959 Is foremost on Sike

risht, now

.ri tn thi championsmp man nut as iar as turning pioies-

tt rCn who with the exception sj0na. that's definitely out. The

Two weeks

another

ago
roll

The
who

EXCEPT AS AN AMATEUR,

attracted

some attention because he was a
full brother of Swaps that appar.
ently did not live up to his breed.

vear or dfflrls 1st Florence mg. men me .v"nin
u ji vl i 1 , tfoc ry,

Mlldsilillg late 111 111c ii.vuu

Shoe was jiarrjs has never boxed out of Tex

Thompson 13 noints; 2nd Karen
Gordon 8 points;
Trilnd 8 year old. boys 1st Jodv
Summerford:, .5 point.fr 2nd
Charles Spencer and William
Robinson, 3 points each; 3rd
Richard Mallahan 4 noints:
7 and 8 vear old girls 1st Ann
powellson 10 points; 2nd Twila

ema. winning by a head in a

stretch duel with Strong Bay and
El Cijon a'fhe favored' Hillsdale
faHed to fourth.
The Shoe was named for jockey
Willie Shoemaker who rode Swaps
to his big wins and also handles
his younger brother.

as. lie marches front and center
against Patterson after a stretch
in the Army and having been i i-die
die i-die 10 months, and on the strength
of winning decisions from Willie
Pasttaho, Bob Baker and Wi.lie
IBesmanoff, hone of whom could

dent Ford Frick's poor imitajhi

of JiSfite USndis' old felf Kit wit!

an ax.4
When 'Nat Fleischer saw Harris
as a very raw hand in 1956, Lo'j
Viscusi, who has handled the
challenger as carefully as D'Ama-

JERRY WALD S

The LONG HOT SUMMER'
OPENS ON WEDNESDAY AT THE BELLA VISTA

Jerry Walil's production of William Faulk Faulk-nfT'a
nfT'a Faulk-nfT'a '"THE LONG, HOT SUMMER," a 80th
Century Fox CinemaSoope, De Luxe color
f resentatlori which opens on Wednesday at
he Bella Vista Theatre, examines human
problems and passion with a probing eye
and that special sort of insight which has
become a Wald trademark. The producer of
the much acclaimed "Peyton Place", Wald
chose a brilliant and unparalleled cast for
his story of love, hate and violence in the
Deap South. Paul Newman, Joanne Wood Woodward,
ward, Woodward, Atttjhony Francoise, Orson Welles and
Anrela lnsbury.
Filmed airalnst the lux backdrop that
cnarncterSfc tltf South. 'THE LONG, HOT

SUMMER," under the supervision of Wald
and Hitt, brings this much heralded cast
successfully Into the story Which has won.
for writer Faulkner the title Of "America's
finest living author."
The picture eomes through m many parts:
It is a story full of lusty action, yet, there
Is both spiritual and earthy love in it too.
All of the many parts of this picture have
been handled 4n the rapidly becoming fa
mous Wald-Kitt manner-frank and forth forthright,
right, forthright, yet with controlled good taste.
Don't miss this groat dramatic impact
whirh opens on Wednesday at your Bella
Vista Theatre.

of ancient Archie Moore iu
t?clled one of the currently rank ranked
ed ranked first 10. And Patterson has
tread an even softer path since
scaling the heights. He has made
just one s art since Moore declin
cd to make any sort of a stand
against him, Nov. 30, 1956, and that
a year ago against a rank ama amateur,
teur, amateur, Pete Rademacher.
Under the circumstances, the Pat
terson-Harris ma.ch is a tough
bill of goods to peddle.

tie
Sports Bill Gels

Healing's Support

WASHINGTON (UPI) Rep.
Kenneth B. Keating today urged
approval of pending sports legis.
lation as a "measure intended to
be equally good, not equally bad,
for all professional team sports.
The New York Republican, sen.
lor GOP member of the House
Judiciary Committee, said a pend pending
ing pending Senate bill to exempt major
professional team sports from the
anti-trust laws is "essential if we
are to eliminate the discrimina
tory treatment of our national
team sports under present court
decisions without at t he same
time subjecting all 0' them to
potentially ruinous antitrust liti litigation.
gation. litigation. Keating made the statements in
tastimony prepared for the Senate
antitrust and monopoly subcom.
mittee. Also scheduled to testify
with Keating were Bob Feller and
Jackie Robinson.
"There is no grave threat to
our economic system from the
alleged baseball or football or
hockey or basketball conspiracy
which demands that sports be
treated so verely," Keating said
He said all should be treated
alike as opposed to the presenl
confused status in which baseball
holds broader exemption from
antitrust statutes than footbtll or
other team sports.

GRACE

LINE

future attorney, who is now try

Ine to teach his wife of one vear

the rudiments of golf, said "this

tournament took too much out

nf ma T nan't haor tVlfi tVinnffHr

Ul 111-. A K Willi nit viiw....

of playinsr in one every week
Of all the trophies and prizes
Sikes has won the oast 10 years,
he is proudest, of the miniature

cup his wue nanaea mm wnen

he ot off the plane rrom cni cni-cag;o.
cag;o. cni-cag;o. On It was I n s cribed
"World's Greatest Golfer."
"I bought It Saturday to (jive
to him, win or lose," said Mrs.
Sikes.

WEEKLY EXPRESS CARGO SERVICE FROM U.S.
ATLANTIC, PORTS.

Sails Sails Sails Arrives
Baltimore Philadelphia New York Cristobal
SANTA RITA lulv 19 July 18 July 23
SANTA MARGARITA July 27 July 26 July 25 Aug. I
SANTA INES Aug. 2 Optional Aug. 1 Aug. 7
SANTA ELISA Aug. 8 Aug. 14
PASSENGER SERVICE
Panama to Ecuador, Peru & Chile Panama to New York
SANTA ISABEl July 24 SANTA MARIA July 29:
SANTA MARGARITA Aug. I SANTA BARBARA Aug. 5
FORTNIGHTLY PASSENGER AND CARGO SERVICE FROM UNITED STATES
PACIFIC COAST PORTS
Sails Sails Sails Arrives
Vancouver S. Francisco I.05 Angeles Balboa
SANTA A DEL A Julv 1 July 24 July 26 Aug. T
SANTA JUAN A lulv 29 Aug. 6 Aug. 8 Aug. 16
SANT FLAVIA Aug. 13 Aug. 20 Au?. 23 Au?;. 31
SANTA MALTA Aug. 28 Sept. 4 Sept. 7 Sept. IS
Each equipped with 27,000 cubic feet refrigerated cargo space.
OR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY:

PANAMA 3-0784 3-7999 CRISTOBAL 2131 2135 BALBOA 2150 2159

A CLASSIFIEDS

THIRST-QUENCHING

SWITCH TO QJe7m

Souvenirs Go
With Tickets
CHAMPAIGN, 111. (NEA)-U
niversity of Illinois 195S football
tlrkels feature a full-color cf.a
of the band and block I taken
fal.
Ilinois vas first in the 'Bi g Ten
to print full-color photographs on
football tckels, thus orovding an
other colorful souvenir. Last year's
tickets featured a view of Chid
Illfnlwek and Memorial Stadium
Illinois football nrnerarn rover
will continue the series of fa mod
cammis scenes H fow color renr"
duction This autumn's issues w'H
show the Men's Residence Halls,
the Men's Old Ovmnssium ."nd
fhe Class of 1909 fnimtain, 'h'
brick "itewv to thc erne's nntl
the sidewalk south of T.inmln
Hal, thf Nntnr-I Hislorv Hp'tHir
end the new Chemistry Building
entrance.

m IhhhB
9BB fel fell fellll

ON HIS OWN
OAKLAND, Calif. (NEA) Alex
Viteff. Argentine heavyweight,
wil lign his own contracts in the
future. Fredde Fierro will be in
hl corner.

THIRfTflL'ft BI OR NOT TO BIJMAT IS
TNI QWrTfON 7
if sweel soft drinks leave you thirsty. . Switch to SQUIRT. I
THIRST-QUENCHING SQUIRT it the most pleasing drink becauter
THIRST QUENCHING SQUIRT it mode exclusively with pure fresh
fruit juice. THIRST-QUENCHING SQUIRT mixes well with anything,
it is the ideal mixer for your favorite drink look for the green
bottle of fresh THIRST-QUENCHING SQUIRT now available in
Panama at populor prices.
drink THIRST-QUENCHING

MORE JON tO REDS

1
CINCINNATI (NEA) The Cin
dnnati Reds purchased Dan More
Jon from SeslHe. The oulfielder
was playing with Havana on np
tion.

Distributors in Panama and The Canal Zone, Cia. Pan Amerkuna de Orange Crush.
In Colon and Bocas del Toro, Industrias Tagaropulos, S. A

im
2: !'
1 1". I
1
I,..

A,

i



n

1'
Jr-
Sunday, roir w, kg
Pr Til HT
THE SCIfDAT AAfEKICAR
CLASSIFIEDS
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
3
Mr
Ifcf

A'

1
'7.t.
9M
JTCr"
rn'
i

Automobiles

Leaving Panama accept besl
oHer, 1957 Lincoln Premier 4
deer sedan, only 6300 miles,
duty paid, extras, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Tel. 3-1709 Panama.
1855 Ford Victoria hardtop, pink
and white, radio, power steering;
2-1891, 2-1895 weekdays. 3 3-5954
5954 3-5954 nights and Sundays.
FOR SALE: 51 Kaiser standard
;". thif, $150.00. T sgt. Dan La
Grange Qrts. 335-A Albrook
, after 4 p.m
FOR SALE:- 1956 FoH Victoria
hardtop, four door sedan radio,
w s w, Thunderbird engine. $1, $1,-500.00.
500.00. $1,-500.00. Call 2-3364, or house
532 Ancon
FOR SALE: Buick 1954 Riviera
Century, duty paid, with Mdio,
dual speakers, white side wall
tires, tinted windshield, one own owner,
er, owner, beautiful condition. Panama
inspection passed, very reason reasonable
able reasonable price. Phone 2-2021; after
5.30, p.m. phone 3-1637.
FOR SALE: 193 1 Model A
Ford Roadster, good running con condition,
dition, condition, new tires and battery,
$1 85.00. Phone Balboa 4134 or
if at 6249 Los Rios Saturday
or Monday.

. FOR SALE: 1957 Chevrolet
110 4 door sedan, $1700. 5360
Magoon Place, Diablo. Balboa
'ir-,4453.

FOR SALE: 1952 Cadillac four
doors, all extras $1000. Phone
36-202.
FOR SALE: 1953 Ford Station Station-vagon
vagon Station-vagon (9-pass. Country Sedan I.
Five 6-ply tires, new battery.
Excellent condition. $1200.00.
16-B Prido, Balboa 2-3480.

FOR SALE: 1956 Chevrolet
Bel-Air convertible. Many extras.
""'' Call Navy 3689.
. -f SJ 1
cy

AROUND
BY

U.S. Senate and House versioa
""of he Equal Pay for Equal work,
i in onformity with the 1955 irea irea-.
. irea-. -Tty between Panama and the U S.
I "-apparently was understood tuu
week to have received the green
tlignt with the usual double taut a a-aout
aout a-aout its administrative application
- Sere.

M Pfpsident Eisenhower's person-
jfHfl rrrmr"' nis Drother mil
ptpftr.came into town last Saturday
HfjftO'A trigid welcome, and ailer e e-(ikhaiiginfe
(ikhaiiginfe e-(ikhaiiginfe several leUers enotJ up
jiot seeing the students, who re re-,ltfusea
,ltfusea re-,ltfusea to go to me Emoassy real-
. jjjence on La Cresia.

i Some ftew Yoik fashion design

ffjetr aid the chemise was dead, bul
,-. the gal.s tins side oi heaven are
unjust getting organised to wear the

ftnjtuif, and don i talk about th ej
HPaja i- u.t

hcs. .aiiem.

Things in yonder land. .Leba
'aon took on a rather sinister look
,,,Sie latter part of the week. We
faZSjUt not seers, but a lot of conuol
Swioing to be necessary to avert
SP ;
Mff A lot has been written abn.it
jbublic relations and human rola rola-iJJJonl.
iJJJonl. rola-iJJJonl. Let's hope that some n
j$Jjpi is put into practice.
'iWi irh. Castillot Bovs seem a-

.ftktH readv tor their bio daiiCe

tyhrto weeks hence, at the Casi-
no Vina del Mar

MPTrlt joint is expected to start
if i) rack from 9 p.m. on tho night
jtt of Saturday, Aug. 9, and will do

so continuously until 3 a.m.
Sunday. How aDout that? That's
really entertainment.
Wall, if you have not yet
ceived your invitation, get
now.
rc rc-it
it rc-it I. Club Altammi is again planning
ma lead the parade of happinen
fghis year when the popular so. .a I
Winit.will journey to the Athn'ic
kitb' for its sixth anniversary
I And as if the
afliiir at
not enougli
Ihr
a
i'CITn, f ill,, IC
OOlc will be putilisnen oy inc chi

n .entitled "Altamtran. and edi'n
Why George G. Thomas.
IK The anniversary dance, for which
fflffillie Morrison and his super or
'JJorchestr.i, v.-i'l pl-iv is slated lor
V Saturday, S ;l ?0.
ggHT
Bi Invitation..- were received this
Hpeek from the printer, according
Wma an Official of the group, and

Jtre 10 be (ii.stribiiied mi meoia'e
Hr. With Altamira it's ,ilway '.he
Soit. Moreover, remember, when

taiw asMi MLnniirt. ..mi rtiiiwinn
Hneally help a desrrving sto'leil

h get alonn with his enuration
Hfto preparr him to mert the sin: 2

es that It anead in this agr m
lM FEARED DROWNED
f CALCUTTA, India it'l'l) A
ggpiMBI launch carrying 2UU passen
fWr overturned in the Itupn.i.
Inyan River 40 miles Irom here
Thursday and Kill persons were
missing and feared drowned !'
fuCe laid 100 persons wen- its
,ftieJ and the rest unaccounted

Jj Aportments

FOR RENT: In El Cangrejo.
Newly furnished one bed room
apartment with large dining, liv living
ing living room, kitchen, laundry, ga garage,
rage, garage, all screened Call 3-7453.
FOR RENT: Room apartment,
Caisa Navarro. Cuba Ave. and 29
Street. Tel. 3-6298 noon te
2:00 p.m.
FOR RENT: Furnished 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, master bed bedroom
room bedroom air condition. Call 3-0611
or 3-4398 Ave. Chile No. 24.
FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, Darien Street No. 14 14-21,
21, 14-21, next to 4th. of July Ave.
FOR RENT: Apartments, cool,
quiet and attractive; one bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, living, dinette, etc., with
or without furniture, on street
adjoining entrance to Hotel El
Panama-Hilton. Inquire Foto Hal Hal-con
con Hal-con in same vicinity. Tel. 3-1 1 79
or 3-6082.
FOR RENT: Comfortably fur fur-nished
nished fur-nished 2 bedroom apartment,
hoi water, maid': room and ga garage,
rage, garage, Campo Alegre. Phone 3-
5024.
SENTENCED TO DEATH
SINGAPORE (UPI The iiipih
court here yesterday handed down
its lirst death sentence for a
woman since the end of World
War II. The court imposed the
punishment on Salha Binte Nasp.
22. after finding her guiliy of
stahbing her sister in law tr,
death.
AMERICANS FLEE
ROME (UPI) A group of 25
American women and children
evacuated from Lebanon flew
here Friday aboard a Middle
East airlines plane. The U.S. Em.
bassy was caring for them and
housing them in various hotels.
TOWN
TOM
nuclear weapons, missies and spul
niks. .
Birthday celebrants whig week
included Mrs. Nena Soley, wife of
our good friend, Heriberto Soicy.
To a jolly lady. .kinda late, but
many happy returns.
Mamr Carmichael also came in
for her share of congratulations
as she climbed another runftj of
the "age step of life."
Veteran linotype operator Moes
St. Louis Darling was birthdayn.g
on Monday last, and a jolly time,
indeed, the hale well met fellow
had.
The (lay Crooners ire all set
(for a stage show at one of the
local rate service centers wnon
the Calypso Iron Band, Lady Trix-
i i i i : j
ib aim several oilier real sutiu
penormers will participate, I h e
date is set for Aug. 7.
Miss Anita Burke, popular em employe
ploye employe of the Ancon Laundry, this
week observed another anniversa anniversary
ry anniversary of her birth, according to in.
formation it was spent like all the
other days. Nothing special.
Looks like time's up folks but
any way. .for the third conse consecutive
cutive consecutive week the talent night
held on Tuesday at the Salon V
proved to be another huge suc success.
cess. success. This time, Johnny accom accompanied
panied accompanied by his hot rods, took the
prize, but a mighty good fea feature
ture feature was that all contestants re received
ceived received a priie for having par
ticipated.
In short, it was a swell show
and there is nothing to indicate
that this Tuesday evening will not
be a repeat of a nice time for all
those who attend Then on Mon Monday,
day, Monday, as usual a preview will be
broadcast with 1 1 n ; Wood ;ird
Ceorse C, Thomas doing the babbling.

persons, including iwo Americans.
Grin and Rer it: "Fnough i; American novelist Frances Park-
iridecl enough." said a bov wholinson Keyes, who recently fin.
was likinc Latin. Not hcinc i :ic ished a book on St. Teresa written
best studen! and. mnrese, not K j in the Spanish town of Avila, re.
in- l.at'n at all. he wi; observed reived a ribbon of the Order of
one dav writing something on tie1 1 Isabel the Catholic. Mrs. Jessie

front ef his hooV dnpi0 a I
rlaw Of course. Ihr professor
verv nroud and thought t'-'at
h.irl reallv imnressed the lad
:"rr nuking him for the book
ilicovi'red. said 'he nrofessor.
Ml.- citrnfifp -'nd eh;r"';i th" hov
had written 'In ease of fire, throw
111', book in.'
Thouoht for Today: C!n nut your
creed into your deeda And do not
peak with double tongue.
FRENCH DIVE
YOKOHAMA, .lanan (UPI)ThP
III went down to a ecth of 9, WO
frrl off the rn" nf rVhn Prpf'(
tnrr near here Fridav in an un undersea
dersea undersea rnloeati'i "'-rr'r.im iftn-l
neeted with the 1958 lnternation:;l
Oieihv.-ie-'l "e-r. "rof llir"''.lii
X'iino of the Tokyo fisheries Uni
ver.'ly made C'e dive with I.I.
Cnidr. Ceoi Ilonol. canliir; i'
l)o cr-ft, to sliidv I'm nninre of
the i i I et he '-;i bottom. Th Th-tsiiI'h
tsiiI'h Th-tsiiI'h of the descent were not
revealed.

LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 13 37 "H" STREET, PANAMA MBRIRIA PRECIADO 7 Street No. 1J AGENCIAS
INTERNAL. DE PLBLICACIONKS No. 3 Lottery Plaza CASA ZALDO Onlral Ave. 45 t) LOUSDES PHARMACY 182 La Carrasquilla FARMACIA LOM LOM-BARDO
BARDO LOM-BARDO No. 26 "B" Street MORRISON-4IH of July Ave. a J St. t LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tlvoll No. 4 FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS 14 Central Ave.
FARMACIA LUX-164 Central Avenue HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. Fro. rle la Osu Ave. No. 41 FOTO DOMY Justs Aroseaneaa Ave. and 33 St. FAR FARMACIA
MACIA FARMACIA VAN DER J1S 50 Street No. 33 FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parque LIevre 7 Street FARMACIA "S AS" Via Poms 111 NOVEDADES ATHIS
Beside the Bella Vista Theatre.

Resorts
PHILLIPS Oceansidt Cottages
Santa Clara R de P. Phone Pa Panama
nama Panama 3 1877 Cristobal 3-1673.
FOSTER'S Cottages and Largs
Beach House One mile past the
Casino Phone Balboa 1866.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Commercial locale
in Justo Arosemena Ave. No.
37-11. Opposite Cristo Rey
Church. Tel. 2-2341.
Houses
FOR RENT: Three months,
beautiful 3-bedroom residence
in El Cangrejo completely fur furnished.
nished. furnished. For information call 3-
1167.
FOR RENT: Chalet three bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, 2 baths, living-dining-room,
kitchen, garage, fenced
yard. Telephone 4-1241 good
neighborhood.
'(iKl STREAMLINED"
Excereisius Machines. Turkish
,hr MrLevy way Body Massage,
twin Trained operators lor ladles
nd gentlemen. G.-t results.
MASSAGr. SALON
Services "SCROLL'S"
Products
J. Arosemena Ave. 33-48
Tel 3-2217
8 DAY
LIMA TOUR
Inc. atr fare, transfers, tours,
and deluxe hotel
$180
leave every Tues. and Frl.
FIDANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. Panama 3-16G1
idea
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rates and information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
NEW!
SPEEDLITE 40
ONLY $24.00
BANTAMWEIGHT
ONLY 2.3 Lbs.
Panama
Colon
SPANISH AWARDS
MADRID (UPD Generalissimo
Francisco Franco Friday con.
lerred decorations on about 250
1 'I'ih.L-ji.' n mum .nr
i l H r i I A i i n ii
Western Reserve University in
Chicago, received the Grand
Cross o, the Order of Civil Merit.
SHORES WEAR WELL
FLORENCE, S. C. (UP1) An
Arkansas shoe salesman who
walked more than one thousand
miles in 52 days to prove his
shoes could lake it, rested here
yesterday. Adrian Robertson, 15,
ended his hike from Little Rock,
Ark., to Florence yesterday push,
ing a Iwo. wheeled garden cart
with 60 pounds of travel gear.
AUDIENCES GIVEN
VATICAN CITY (UPI) Pope
Pius XII yesterday received in
private audience Msgr. Joseph
McShea. auxiliary to Msgr. John
F. O'Hara, archbishop of Phila Philadelphia.
delphia. Philadelphia. The Pope also received
in private audience Msgr. Thorn,
as Aloysius Poland, archbishop of
Newark, N.

Miscellaneous

YMCA SKIN DIVERS. We have
your choice of equipment.
CRAWFORD AGENCIES CORP.
"J" St. I3A-3C Tel. 2-1905.
B E G I NNERS SPEARFISHING
OUTFIT Quality Italian JunyLux
Gun, Fins and Mask... $18.50
CRAWFORD AGENCIES. CORP.
"J" St. 13A-30 Tel. 2-1905.
FOR SALE: Iron safe 24x24x
32, metal 4 drawer file, dining
table. Call 599-L., Colon.
FFOR SALE: Large plate-glais
mirror with mahogany frame,
sixe 33 in. x 54 in., excellent
condition. Picnic charcoal grill
on wheels, very good condition.
Phone 2-2409 (Balboa).
FOR SALE: Conn trombone.
Call 86-2166 A 2c Hager.
FOR SALE: Spare parti for
cars, trucks, heavy equipment,
radios, motors, electric and
plumbing fixtures, refrigerators,
safe vaults, bolts, steam electric
tables. CONTINENTAL SUPPLY
at 12 and 13 St. Central Ave.
Phone 1088-B, Colon.
FOR SALE: Gulbransen small
Upright piano, in good condition,
$300.00. U street No. 7-21,
apartment 15, Calidonia.
FOR SALE: Hotpoint
Excellent condition, 60
dryer.
cycles.
$125, quarters 79. 86-5221.
FOR SALE Shoe skates, ladiet,
white, like new, sise 6Vi. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone Balboa 3318.

Middle East Troubles Turn World Attention
To Plan For Solving Problems Of Cyprus

LONDON (IBIS) The atten attention
tion attention of the world has been rudely
turned to the problems of the de defense
fense defense of the West in the Near
East One of these problems i of
course the situation in Cyprus.
Dor that reason the recent plan
of the British Government is
worth examining as an attempt
to bring peace to the Island in an
atmosphere of harmony between
Greece, Turkey and Great Brit Britain,
ain, Britain, all of them allies and vitally
interested in the maintenance of
peace in the island.
The recent intervention of Paul Paul-Henry
Henry Paul-Henry Spaak secretary secretary-NATO,
NATO, secretary-NATO, was much to be commend commended.
ed. commended. Great Britain, Greece an.l
Turkey are all represented on the
council of NATO and the other 12
members favor discussion on the
basis of the (British plan.
British Prime Minister Harold
Macmillan, recently told the House
of Commons that British poLcy
in Cyprus has four main purpos purposes:
es: purposes: (a) To serve the best interests
of all the people of the is.
lad;
(b) To achieve a permanent set settlement
tlement settlement acceptable to the two
communities in the island a
and to the Greek and Tunc
ish governments:
fc) To safeguard the British
bases and installations in
the island, which are neces necessary
sary necessary to enable the United
Kingdom to carry out her
international obligations;
(d) To strengthen peace and se security,
curity, security, and cooperation be between
tween between the United Kingdom
and her allies, in a vital a a-rea.
rea. a-rea. He went on to say that in vitw
of the disagreement between the
Greek and Trkish Governments
and between the two communi
ties in Cyprus and of the disas
trous consequences for all con concerned
cerned concerned If violence continues, the
British government is obliged at
the sovereign power esponsiblt,
to give a firm and clear load
out of th present deadlock.
He then spoke -of th new
British plan which he described
as "an adventure in partne. -ship."
Salient points in the plan are as
follows:
1. Cyprus should enjoy the ad advantages
vantages advantages of association not
only with the United King,
dom, and therefore with the
iBritish Commonwealth, but
also with Greece and Tur Turkey.
key. Turkey. 2. The Greek and Turkish Gov
ernments will each be in it
ed to appoint a representa representative
tive representative to cooperate with Ihe
governor.
have a system!
3. The island wi

of representative goveriinicn! Because of his role in the dis dis-with
with dis-with each community exer- pute, White was subjected lo in incising
cising incising autonomy in its own! tensive questioning by Southern

private affairs.
typriots, if they wish, sho.ild
receive Greek and 'furnish
nationality while retaining
British nationality.
5. To allow time the new nivn
ciple of partnership to be
fully worked out and brought
into the necessary a t m o o-sphere
sphere o-sphere of stability, the inter
national status of the is
land Will remain unchanged
for seven years.
6. S system of representative
government and communal an
tonomy will be worked out,
by consultation with repre representatives
sentatives representatives of the two com.
nunitie and with the rcyre-

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Largs mahogany
diningroom set. 1 China closet,
buffet with mirror table with sis
chairs Sec at house 23 14-A or
call Balboa Tel. 2413.
FOR SALE: 4 wicker chairs,
1 floor lam, 2 fiber rugs, 1
Westinghouse electric roaster,
1 CBS 21 inch -television set, 4
folding chairs. Telephone Balboa
1245 4246.
FOR SALE: 2 single bed spring,
2 Moncayo paintings, 1 beautiful
Ecuadorian wool rug 9x12
6333-A Los Rios 2-1275.
FOR SALE: Complete house household
hold household goods. Coco Solo. Phone No.
652 Qrts. 317-C.
FOR SALE: Rotisserie, new
$25.00. Double Sunbeam toatst toatst-master
master toatst-master $9.00. Pressure cooker,
Presto $9.00. Phone 83-2139
Mrs. Zorn.
FOR SALE: Bamboo set. 2
chairs, table, settee $40.00.
Electric Singer Sewing Machine,
$25.00. Carved silver cabinet,
525.00. Child's tall metal dining
ifiair, $5.00. 5184-B Diablo
freights, 2-3514.
FOR SALE: Westinghouse ref.
60 cycle, 1 Bendix automatic
washer, 1 Deepfreexe, 60 cycle.
Phone Gamboa 368.
aentatives of the Greek and
Turkish governments.
7. There will be a separate
House of Representatives for
each of the two communi
ties.
If th Greek and Turkish Gov Governments
ernments Governments are witling to Cooper,
at, th British Government will
be prepared at th appropriate
time to go further and, subject
to th reservation to th Unit Unit-ad
ad Unit-ad Kingdom of such bases and
facilities as might be necessary
for th discharge of hr inter inter-national
national inter-national obligations, to share the
sovereignty of th island with
her Greek and Turkish Allies.
The plan does not fulfill GreeK
hopes of Enosis through self-deter
mination or the Turkish demand
for partition, but it does not re require
quire require either party to renounca
these claims. If the plan succeeds,
ideas of self-determination or
partition may well be seen to
be out of date.
Troops Will Only
Go Into Little Rock
As "Last Resort"
WASHINGTON (UPI) Asst.
Atly. Gen. W. Wilson White as assured
sured assured angry Southern senators
yesterday the Justice Department
will do its "level best" to aoid
any further use of federal troops
in the Little Rock, Ark., school
integration dispute.
White, who has been serving
without Senate confirmation as
head of the department s new
Civil Rights Division, said he did
not believe the "same circum circumstances"
stances" circumstances" that prompted the use of
troops last fall will arise again
in Little Rock.
He insisted that he did not think
President Eisenhower made a
"mistake" last September Alien
he ordered federal troops to en enforce
force enforce school integration court or orders
ders orders at Central High School.
He made the statements in testi testimony
mony testimony before the Senate Judiciary
Committee which held its third
hearing on his nomination since
it was announced by President
Eisenhower last December. Ha
was ordered to return for further
questioning Monday afternoon.
Before assuming his present
post. White was in charge of th
Justice Department's Office of
Legal Counsel. In that post, he
helped dralt the legal opinions
that led to the President s decision
in the Little Rock crisis.
committee members. including
I Chairman James O. Easlland (D
Miss.) and Sens. Sam J. Erin
Jr. (DN.C), John L. McClelJan
(D-Ark.) and Olin D. Johnsion
(D-SC).
McClellan asked him if he wouH
recommend the use of troops
again in Little Rock if the Court
of Appeals sets aside a lower fed federal
eral federal court order delaying furlher
school integration in the public
schools
He replied that the use of troops
is a "last resort ... a last ex extremity"
tremity" extremity" that "no one in the coun country
try country wants." He said he 'earnestly
hopes there would he no srrioiu
troirolr again in Little Hock."

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Lots on the most
exiitusivd, safe and atractiv
beach in the country on the
banks of the Corona river. A
private beach for property own owners.
ers. owners. Only 60 miles from the city.
Easy payment plan. For informa information
tion information enquire at Alfa Store, No.
29-110 Central Avenue. Phone
3-6153.
FOR SALE: Unfurnished house
at 53 St. El Cangrejo. $28,000.
Furnished, a bit more. R. Ma Ma-duro
duro Ma-duro T. sign outside.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: 1958 AS 600 ce.
Good condition. Call Balboa
1649.
FOR SALE: Motorcycle, like
new, 1955 Tiger Cub, 200 cc.
must be seen to be appreciated.
2 bicycles, (one English), model
Airplanes, ready to fly. Quarry
Heights 82-2265.
TWO SHOT
MANILA (UPD U.S. security
guards shot and killed a Filipino
and wounded his companion
Thursday night during a robbery
at the Clark Air Force Base, the
Philippine news service said Fri.
day. It was reported four accom accomplices
plices accomplices escaped. The news agency
said guards spotted the men try.
ing to cart away U.S. government
property from the base and
opened fire when the Filipinos
fled and ignored orders to halt.
The debate in the House of Com
mons showed a general wish lo
see a peaceful solution of the Cy
prus question rather than to use
it as an element of party strife.
The Opposition did not divide the
House. v
Both Conservative and Labor
parties recognize that Cyrpus is
both an internal and an interna international
tional international problem and look to the
Greeks and Turks to enter into
constructive discussion on the ba basis
sis basis of the plan.
In view of the disturbed situa situation
tion situation in the Near East, the British
government hopes that all men of
goodwill will press forward on the
basis of the plan to secure a
chance for Cyprus to escape irom
violence and into a future of
peace and prosperity.
The British hold that the inter
ests of all parties to the dispute,
including those of NATO, should
be taken into account and consi
der that any solution which satis
fies only one party will not be
lasting.
Lost Man Wanders
Through Newark
With $10,900
NEWARK, N.J. (UPI) A be.
wildered old man found wander wandering
ing wandering aimlessly in the streets with
$10,900 in his pockets has been
reunited with his daughter who
said he got off the train in the
wrong city.
Mrs. Sarah Togoff of the Bronx,
N.Y., told police today her fath
er, 83-year-old Jacob Rivkin of
Columbia, S.C., had been expect expected
ed expected in the Bronx on Monday for
the funeral of Mrs. Togoff's hus husband.
band. husband. Her fathered, discovered Thurs.
day morning wandering through a
Wilson avenue truck terminal,
had the large sum or money
stuffed in a soiled handkerchief in
his rumpled gray suit.
He wouldn t have worried
about carrying the money around
with him," said Mrs. Togoff. "He
is a man of God, and believed
that God would protect him
wherever he went."
Detectives found Mrs. Togoff
through an address in Rivkin's
pocket and summoned her to
Newark.
Rivkin had been able to tell po.
lice only his name and age. He
couldn't remember where he
lived,-or where he had been go going.
ing. going. Mrs. Togoff told police her hus husband
band husband William had died in Union
City, and that her father might
have thought the funeral was
there and left the tain at New Newark.
ark. Newark. New York police had sent nul a
messing persons alarm for Rivkin
when he didn't show up at the fu.
neral, she said.
Mrs. Togoff said he apparent
had withdrawn the money from
I the bank because he nlanned to
stay with her in New York.
Detectives learned from Colum.
bia police that 'Rivkin had large
real estate holdings in the South
Carolina capital, and had drawn
5,000 and cashed bonds, at the
bank there.
Some of the money was bound
in wrappers which bore the stamp
of the First National JJank of Co
lumbia'""

Miscellaneous

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A." DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
The Cumndu Post Restaurant of offers
fers offers for bid the following articles
listed below. Bide will be opened
at 1400 on 15 August 1958.
These articles can b seen at the
Post Restaurant in Curundu. Tel.
83-6205. 8 Bowling Alley Lanes.
WANTED: 3 or 4
chalet. Call 3-1407.
bedrooms
WANTED TO BUY: Used piano
in good condition. Pleas call
Panama 2-2517.
Domestic Employment
WANTED : Good cook with
references for small family. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone at 2-0345 during office
hours.
Former Isthmian
Visits Panama
After 40 Years
A former resident of Emmre
Canal Zone, during the early days
of the Panama, Canal, is visiting
the Isthmus after an absence of
almost 40 years.
Victor L. Ruben, of Vedado, Cu
ba, who left the .Isthmus in 1918,
returned here Tuesday for a vis visit
it visit with his sister, Mrs Leonie
George, and his niece, Mrs Iris
arkeorge Lovell.
During his stay on the Isth nus
he will be the house guest of the
Lovells at San Francisco de la
Caleta.
GIVES AUDIENCE
VATICAN CITY (UPI)-P o p e
Pius XII Friday received in pri.
vate audience Msgr. Leonard
Cowley, auxiliary to the arch archbishop
bishop archbishop of St. Paul, Minn.

$ $ HEY KIDS 1 $ $
Collect Empty Bottles Earn Easy extra Money
we want
MENTIC0L ASTRA RUB ALCOHOL RUB
BAY RUM LAVELLE WATER COLD RELIEF
CREME SHAMPOO AQUA GLACIAL bottles
Just like finding money.
The truck will be at:
PARAISO PLAYGROUND Sat. July 26, 10 to 11 a.m.
BALBOA C0MSY PARKING LOT
(near the stadium) fri. July 25, 3 to 4:30 p.m.
COLON During; business hours at our
office Ave. Bolivar at 6th St.
WE PAY CASH

r-DRi VE-INh i

30c i I

TODAY

WEEKEND
ATTRACTION!

Once he killed

HIMLED V
I "The LAST of the
J FAST GUNS" j

WANTED : Bilingual secretary
with shorthand and experience,
also accountants. Servicio y Co Co-locacionts.
locacionts. Co-locacionts. Tel. 3 -7028 Eddie io
Camera d Comercio.

Shirt operator!, pant operators
with experience on ait presses
Panama Steam Laundry, Nacional
Ave.
SERVICES
3 -minute car wash $1, eteera
cleaning ef motor $5. waxing of
cat $t$. Auto-Banc Trani-lsth
mian Highway
TELEVISION SERVICE
WE REPAIR IN
YOUR HOME. $3.50
You. get service th tarn day
WE GUARANTEE OUR WORK
LOS ANGELES trained techni technicians.
cians. technicians. Crawford Agendas. Phone
2-1905 Tivoli Avenue 18-20.
TELEVISION SERVICE
6 MONTHS CUARANTEE
ASK FOR MR. TV
PANAMA 2-3142.
TELEVISION SERVICE
No service charge
No minor charge
Boston-Miami Technicians
30 years in electronic
6 MONTHS GUARANTEE ON
PARTS INSTALLED. Ask for MR.
TV. Panama 2-3142.
Lesson
Accordion profesor Nelly Hof Hof-mann
mann Hof-mann graduated in Germany will
give private classes to pupils at
their homes, in English, Ger German
man German and Spanish. Call 2-3193 in
office hours.
Learn Spanish with Mrs. Ro Romero's
mero's Romero's practical conversational
Spanish lessons. Lessons morning,
afternoons, evenings. 4th of July
Ave. TI-352 No. 10. In front of
Quarry Heights.
Rapid, practical and economical
Spanish course for foreigners.
Tel. 3-3997, from 2 to 7 p.m.
9:00
TOMORROW
for vengeance

just to stay

mm m m w

Omcm.ScOPE COLOR EmitSU,
Protifonirada per
JOCK GILBERT LINDA
MAH0NEY ROLAND SRISTAL
con EDUARD FRANZ LORNE GREENE TJVsSv
CARL IENTON REI0 EDWARD C. PLATT 4 JJt

r.

v
Mi,;.;.



' 8TTNDAY, JULY 20, 1958
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPxteb
.
: u

!

Outdoor Accessories Add
un s4nd tSeautu Jo

L jCSSr BSSSSttia4 SSSSSSv Sal

I uvuKauwvr iraus mj-scrvcr in MKDen ann nnnjs 11 10 ler ler-t
t ler-t nee Where it rests on ball bearings in a three-legged stand.

Npw arressnrips beamed to
catch the homemaker's eye em emphasize
phasize emphasize that outdoor entertaining
is an extension of, indoor gaifty.
In furtnermore of outdoor tun,
a dedicated handy man and cook.
j4onestu Are

Understanding your own kind
of beauty take a real intelli intelligence.
gence. intelligence. It also takes the kind of
resilient spirit which reoUs
against the idea of copying the
looks of the current reigning
movie queen.
Probably the best way to gam
a notion of one's true looks is to
remove all make up and survey
, one's face in good, strong light.
Note your bone structure, hair,
line, skin (good or bad?) natural
eyebrow arch and Upline.
This will tell you most of what
"you need to know if you are
honest and impartial. It will also
ten -you'That something must fee
do about concealing a poo
hariline (with a new hair), us using
ing using a touch of rouge high up on
the cheekbones and near the
tmeples for a lovely glow or re resolving
solving resolving to revamp your diet in
order to improve a poor com complexion.
plexion. complexion. The truth is that something
can -be done about almost any
beauty problem if we are wining
to face the fact that the problem
is ours.
The un, sea and surf provide
the very best means to free
health and beauty available.
Years ago, when Victorian doc.
tors sent their patients to take
sea air, it was because they knew
how beneficiail it was. It's relax relaxing,
ing, relaxing, soothing, good for the eyes
and the inner spirit, too. And
while you're doing yourself gen general
eral general good, you're also acquiring a
healthy tan.
A word about this, though:
don't overdo. Move, into the
shadevand don, a beach jacket or
sweater when the sun starts to
( bake. Use one of the new and
. excellent tanning creams which
J permit you to get a tan but seal
1 out all burning rays."
Follow the instructions exacdy
! and renew the' cream whenever
you sliould. And watch those sap.
er sensitive spots: the nose, the
I backs of the legs.
How long have you used the
same lipstick shade? Worn your
hair the same way? Bought the
i lam type of drss.
If the answer is more than a
I year, then it's time for a change.
I Habits take hold of us and re refuse
fuse refuse to let us go. But they ddn't
make for a new and dazzling look
: that makes people take; notice
a yuttV a favorite hairdo, line;.
S- Just have it restyled enough to
A Kitnfnrm In the now haircuts. Pi, V

a brand new lipstick shade,, buy
some dresses of a type, you've
never worn. Then sit back and
listen to the compliments.
m

You'll be glad you use dial
(and so will your friends)
(fcMtww- in A beautiful color-tones
to harmonize with your color scheme
In addition to it's eyp-appeal, DIAL
gives you that always; fresh, always
clean-all-over feeling. . all day long.
DIAL smells so good, yet is so mild!

ii
1

out king may build a great stone
monument to the barbecue in a
remote corner of the yard.'
Some of us maintain that friend
ship, fresh air and good food can
be enjoyed just as much in an
attractive place convenient to
the kitchen where trays of viltle.i
need to be carried only a few let.
S mailer, more compact char charcoal
coal charcoal broilers make oudoor cook cooking
ing cooking in limited spaces easier. Act
ual cooking surfaces are, how.
ever, ample.
The modern patio with an elec
tric outdoor outlet permits the
hostess to set up such aids as
mosaic-patterned electric trajs
which, when plugged in, keep
casseroles or coffer hot for sec second
ond second helpings.
Candle warmers for bases of
casseroles and carates are go-ju
for keeping foods warm for urn.
ited periods of time.
Ingenious, inexpensive new ta tables
bles tables are good examples of outdoor outdoor-indoor
indoor outdoor-indoor accessories.
These have a round, removable
tray top and a folding chornie
stand with ball bearing tips on
the tops of the legs.
This ballbearing arrangement
permits the tray top to be rotat.
ed for Lazy Susan service.
The tray tops, in white, blue er
sold, come in different designs.
There are solid tops, tops Willi
indented relish trays or chmse
blocks, tops with cut-out holes
for inserting matching ice buck
ets er puch bowls. They re made
in 24. and 19-inch diameters.
Designed especially for outdoor
patio suppers but with a future
inside at morning coffeee-hour
Hble or a teen age party is the
latest addition to what American
glass manufacturers call "snack
sets."
This one couples an oval, milky
white glass platter with a 1,
two.cup mug. The design of the
mug is said to keep coffee hot
longer.
Other snack sets with conventional-size
cups include some
very pretty clear glass ones With
the plate.
The plates of all I've seen are
large enough to use for a meat
and-salad supper.
ion
Tote bags are big fashion for
summer; They're good looking in
the canvas versions with leather
trim. Ideal for summer travel, too,
since they hold lots and lots.
The nylon fichu with surplice
front and back waist tie can be a
girl's best friend. It comes in a
rainbow of pastel colers.
Wallets are becoming oblong
and flat instead of square and
fat. They're roomy and hold every everything
thing everything that the standard type does.
Some have gold embossed corners.
The crushable velvet hat with
open crown and double drwstring
is for summer trave. Comes in
Mack, white and colors, too.
Those big bows on clip bands
are ready of r summer parties in
chiffon. Some like black and some
like the pastels.
A

R

former

By ANN HARVEY
"No, no, I refuse to be
interviewed," were the words
that greeted me as I entered
Arte y Decoracion, S. A.
Horrified, I wondered how
did Craziella Arango Harman
know the purpose of my vis visit.
it. visit. I had not warned her and
I doubted if she knew I had
anything to do with the
newspaper.
To add to my bewilder bewilderment
ment bewilderment I realized she was
addressing a man behind me.
Who was this man she re refused
fused refused to tell her life story to
and why did he have to ruin
my delightful assignment?
I soon relaxed because
they were obviously enjoying
their joke. The man was
Paul Kennedy, the New York
Times correspondent who
was here to cover Dr. Milton
Eisenhow.er's visit to Panama.
It was just a matter of old
friends greeting each other.
With Mr. Kennedy was Miss
Ann Boyle of the American
Embassy and Lt. Col. Ver Vernon
non Vernon A. Walters, Dr. Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's official interpreter.
The meeting was reveaf reveaf-ing.
ing. reveaf-ing. It showed once again
the winning and snarkling
personality of Graziella Aran Arango
go Arango Harman. In no time these
three visitors who Had just
spent a very hectic 24 hours
were sitting peacefully in Mrs.
Harman's shoo among the
creative achievements of
known and unknown artists
in Panama.
As they left, I stated my mis.
sion and. told about my earlier
bewilderment and with that gty
laugh that poets would love to des.
cribe, Graziella collasped on a
snarkling gold couch she had de designed.
signed. designed. "The material is lovely and tru truly
ly truly a creation. It comes from Me.
xico," was the enthusiastic reply
to my compliment.
Mrs. Harman's warmth and en.
thusiasim always overflows when
she discusses her favorite subject
beauty created by man.
"There is far too much ugliness
in this world and in my own coun.
try. People must learn to respect
beauty, to know its value not only
for themselves but be able to
share it with others. It is hard to
construct something beautiful for
everyone to enjoy because it is
soon distroyed by someone who
thinks it is theirs. Even a tree.
You can plant a tree to add beau beauty
ty beauty to the street for all to enjoy.
Sooner or later some one man will
come along and pull it up."
This is the foundation of Gra
ziella Harman's thoughts and of
her all out enthusiasm when she
nesien a cnair or a room. It is
the foundation of her values and
her everyday life
Yet she cannot say whether or
not she had this driving desire to
create beauty that could be shar shared
ed shared by others in her youth or when
she was in school.
"I did study art when attend,
ed Holy Cross Academy in
Washington, D.C. and I contin
ueH my art plus interior docor.
ating when I was at the Univ-

MATCH YOUR TILE WITH dial
Look for the now color foil wrappers
Complexion site avilale in...
Bin. Pink. Green and Gold
Economy bath slo in Gold
TRY LONG LASTING fUdl TODAY!

-
WoniBii,sli

t
men
(JSeverli

EACH MONTH MRS. GRAZIELLA ARANGO HARMAN sponsors an exhibit by a known or un unknown
known unknown artist from Panama in her shop, Arte y Decoracion. Here she displays a striking
black and white drawing from the current exhibit by Ciro Oduber.

orsity of Southern California,
but it was to satify my own
curiosity. I never dreamed I
would put it to use. Perhaps
then my sub-conscious mind
was giving me a helpful push."
To go back a bit, as is suggest suggested
ed suggested by her name, Graziella Aran,
go Harman was born in Panama
and lived most of her childhood
here. Her family is a prominent
and old one. Her grandfather Jo.
se A. Arango was one of the ar.
chitects of the indpendence of the
Republic of Panama.
After attending school in the
States she decided to continue to
live in Beverly. Hills,ial.
"This was. indeed a very good
choice on my part. Although I mar married
ried married shortly after I finished col college
lege college and became a busy house
wife and mother I, did have the
opportunity to decorate my own
home and to help many of my
friends do the same. Then when
my son went to prep-schooi I
found I had time to accomplish
one of my dreams. I opened iny
first interior decorating business.
"My experience as a customer
helped me greatly to understand
my own clients and furthermore
Beverly Hills is the interior dec.
orator's dream come true. You
can find everything, from the ri ridiculous
diculous ridiculous to the sublime, in the
many different shops that sell
only to decorators. Everything
was custom-made and never sold
in the department stores and the
wealth of beauty at the decorat decorator's
or's decorator's disposal was overwhelming."
People who know Beverly Hills
and the surrounding area can ap appreciate
preciate appreciate Mrs. Harman's feelings
about leaving this perfect and
well.groomed city to accompany
her husband to Mexico shortly
after they were married.
Phillip Harman had developed
the three.minute car wash es establishments
tablishments establishments in Southern Califor California
nia California and was now going to try his
luck in Mexico. So Mrs. Harman
closed her business and they drove
down to their new adventure
'The contrast was terrific and

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Sunday Women's page.... Photo B SOtillo ..
Arte y Decoration is a refreshing and exotic wonderland of
many beautiful objects .of art and material. Silling on a
lovely gold couch that she designed, is (iraaiella Arango
Herman.

OIK

ti
horrifying the minute we crossed
the border. I felt my creative
days were over and I would never
see beauty again. You can see how
foolish I was. There are many
things in my shop now with the
"made in Mexico" label.
"My husband did not know
Spanish and so I became his full
time interpreter. This gave me an
even greater opportunity to know
the people of Mexico, and I soon
learned that the art and beauty
they could offer was deep and free.
There were no set stanuards and
each man was an artist in his
own right. By the time we left,
four and a half years lalers, 1
had learned to appreciate and
love the imperfections that hor hor-ritiedme
ritiedme hor-ritiedme when I arrived."
Alter their successful business
venture in Mexico, Mr. Harman
decided to try establishing car
wash firms in Puerto Rico. Al.
though they could not acquire the
necessary land, the Harman's did
spend a delightful two months en.
joying the sun and the beaches
before they decided to come to
Panama.
Within a few months after their
arrival, Mr. Harman established
the "Auto Bano" and Graziella
opened Arte y Decoration.
Unlike Beverly Hills, Partem
does not have tht wealth of
shops where Mrs. Harman can
obtain the objects she needs to
decorate the many private
homes, clubs and companies she
has done since the shop opened
18 months ago. Instead she
finds the country has a more in inspiring
spiring inspiring wealth of raw material
and manpower. Hero she has to
use her imagination far more.
Every piece of furniture she do.
signs sho must bo able to ex explain
plain explain to the cabinet maker and
the upholsterer just what she
wants down to the last detail.
"An interior decorator, must
have a good team and I do," says
Mrs. Harman, "I have been very
lucky because the people who
work for me understand and can

111

oualtt
it
ecoraior
interpret my ideas. They are art.
in their work.
rtiiuiiier very important secret
iu uiuieua Arango s success ii
her greai aesire to lind new ar.
lists and to give them the chanc
show what they can do.
"A boy .rorn me interior or from
the city can come to me and I
will try to encourage him to create
his ideas. As a result I have
acquired many original objects
including lamps, paintings, chairs
and sculptures. Each month I trv
to exnibit in mv shoo ihi wnrv nr
if amsl llvln8 m Panama
of drawings by Ciro Oduber. He
and his wife, Roser Muntaola
just completed the mural Mrs'
Harman designed for the bar at
urt Amadr Officers' Club
the beauti ul and refreshing at
mosphere in the shop is aiSo ap apparent
parent apparent in the Harman's lovely
5!2r ln Bella 7ista- Each room
holds a new adventure and the
whole house invites a visitor to re
tax and to enjoy its unique beauty.
Graziella Arango Harman does
indeed appreciate beauty created
1 and she knows how to
hZ USe advant"8eouSly and
how to encourage man to create
beauty and to respect it
JJomentahi
una
Home movie fans li-ir. i w.
professional as possible. And keen
as
ing linger smudges off film he'ps
impress the home audience. Do
this by wearing clean, lint free
cotton gloves when handling film
Also, protect it from dust by keep keeping
ing keeping it in the container betwefn
shows.
Most housewives frown on chil chil-dren
dren chil-dren or Hubby sitting with feet
propped on furniture Actually
doctors recommend this as being
healthful and restful. So to keen
everyone happy, cover stools and'

featuring
the newest "HOUSE & GARDEN" color,
in modern paint.
PINTURAS ISTMEMS, S. A.
Tels. 2-3444 2-0857 In front of Coca Cola Co.

azinq

oCord
or
"We need trail blazers, need
them today perhaps more than
ever before. Success has a way of
making people think only in
terms of what has already been
successful. Trail blazing, on the
other hand, requieres imaginative
thinking and does not bow to cur.
rent popular cliches."
When Dorothy Shaver president
of Lord and Taylor oldest and
one of the leading New York City
department stores issued this
call for more trail blazing, she
was only asking others to follow
in her footsteps. The only wom woman
an woman ever to be elected president
of so large a retail corporation,
Miss Shaver in more than three
decades with the organization
has been startling the world of
merchandising, fashion and creat.
ive design with the results of her
Imaginative thinking. The "Shaver
Touch" has made her name a leg.
end in the retail trade.
It was in 1924 that Dorothy
Shaver, then an ambitious young
woman of 26. started her career
at Lord and Taylor as head of the
Comparison Shopping Bureau,
whose function it was to check
other stores' prices, values and
styles. To one with her creative
mind, this appeared to be a great
waste of time.
"It seemed to me that we should
spend less time in finding out
uhat nthar ihnni iiiai. jjiintf ..nH
pay more attention to developing i
our own business.' Miss Shaver!
...
recalls. Sshe organized a staff of
women with taste and flair to help
the buyers develop their own ex exclusive
clusive exclusive merchandise, and thus
was born retailing's first bureau
of stylists, dedicated to improving
fashion design.
From there on. Miss Shaver vir.
tually "made her own job." In
1927 she was named to the store's
board of directors. Her wide-rang.
ing interests included the rlecorat.
ive arts no Ipss than fashion, and
her next tradition-braking venture
was to stage the first comorehen.
s:ve American exhibition of mo modern
dern modern decor. Featurin" material
she had brought from France, the
show disolaved furniture, glasi.
screens, rugs and paintings. It
nrovd an enormous success, ra radically
dically radically chaneing existin? modes
of dermrtmpnt store decoration
and advertisine. and resulted in
surge of modern decoration all
over the country.
By 1931 Doro'hv Shaver ws
vice oreident of the store and six
vears Uter was nut in rhors of
its entire advertising, fashion pro promotion,
motion, promotion, oublic relations and dis
may Droerams. Her eleeiion to
the presidency, bv a board o' men
directors, came in late 1945.
Meantime, the "Shaver touch"
had become evident in many
wavs. In 1M2. artine unon one if
her most cherished beliefs, she
took the 'irst major heln step in
develonine native American de.
sinin talent. While other were
unnnestinninffly accenting the
'shion dictates of Pris. Mis
Shaver began to publicize and
promote young American design designer'.
er'. designer'. Such presentld?" fashion not notables
ables notables a Adrian. Clare Potter,
Merry Hull. Thomas Brigance,
Claire Mcr-rrtll. Nettie Rosens.
tein. and Lilly Dache were among
hassocks with washable materials,
like plastic, to discourage perma permanent
nent permanent soiling.
Wood furniture, like other home
items, needs a good washing oc occasionally.
casionally. occasionally. The key is not to soak
the wood when cleaning it. A cloth
wrung out in clear water. Polish
dry before waxing.
Storing clo'hes after laundry
can be more logical, especially
where Babv is concernced. V.'hv
put each item with its mates? For
convenience and speed, sort
freshly laundered baby clothes
into one dressing. Put clean dia
oer. shirtand gown together ready
to put on iBaby

3oh poLnl-AtyJing

come to our

UP-TO-THE-MINUTE color combinations

direct frrjm
Noted Cobr Designer and Interior Decorator,
of New York City.

P

uti
OJTe?Ci
a
? Baylor
the many hitherto unknowns
received initial recognition
and
encouragement from Dorothy
Shaver.
"One need not be rich to be well
dressed," says the woman who is
credited with being the "godmoth "godmother"
er" "godmother" of what has come to be
known as "the American look."
This personable and gracious
woman says she has always been
"tremendously interested i?
ideas both my own and ether
people's." She has been described
as a woman "sizzling with ideas,
not only about design but about
politics and the world in general."
One of the most firmly held ol
these ideas is that a department
store should not be just a merely
andise mart, but should serve Us
local, national and world com community.
munity. community. In 1937 she established
the Lord and Taylor Awards are
presented annually in the convic conviction
tion conviction that great achievement;,
when recognized, serve as sym.
bols of hope, and renewed faith to
others. Distinguished citizens or
organizations have been honored
for their contributions ia. such such-fields
fields such-fields as design, medicine; the
arts, education, human relations.
United Nations activities and
buildings for peace.
For her own leadership and v s s-ion,
ion, s-ion, Miss Shaver has been award.
ed honorary degrees by ric U.S.
"J1'8"- Sh1wirs th ,Cr' 2
Chevalier of the French Leion of
M rTl or nrnrnnlnr ap 1 'Aiif Bianelinet
Honor, presented for "outstanding
services rendered to the cause or
French art and French fashion is
the United States."
The Italian Republic has gives
her the highest award possible for;
a foreigner, The star of souaarw
ity", for her "outstanding contri contribution
bution contribution to the promotion. of Italian
fashion in the United States and
therefore, the development of ee
onomic ties between the twoeoun
tries." '
The New York Dress Designers,
the American Women's Associa Association
tion Association and the American Schools and
Colleges Association are among
groups that have cited her for her
professional contributions.
Miss Shaver is a member of the
governing boards of such profes professional
sional professional organizations as the Par.
sons School of Design and the
Fashion Group, o which she was
a founder. But business connec connections
tions connections are not enough for this wom woman
an woman who believes in "getting in.
volved with life rather 'than just
living." Her interests and serv.
ices range far afield, and she
holds directorships in the Metro Metropolitan
politan Metropolitan Museum of Art whose
Costume Institute she helped ts
establish, the New York Public
Library, the American Association
for the United National the Girts
Clubs of America, and the Feder.
ation of Protestaht Welfare Agen Agencies,
cies, Agencies, to name but a few.
In 1854 she was honored by the
National Conference of Chnan--and
Jews for 'castmguisneo serv service
ice service in the field of human re.
lations." In 1957 she became the
first woman to receive the annual
award for "distinguished philan.
thropic service," presented by the
nonsectarian National Jewish Hos.
pital in Denver Colorado,
"I believe that whatever spir.
itual growth, whatever success I
have achieved is because I have
become involved in extra work,
extra-curricular activities, in the
ideas, the problems, the boys ol
other people," Miss Shaver said
in expressing her personal credo
on the radio program, "This t Be Believe."
lieve." Believe." "Had I not done so, my
life would have been empty and
poor."
Born in the southwestern stats
of Arkansas, she was educated at
the State University there and al
the Univeristy of Chicago. A long,
time devote of the theater, her
other chief hobbies are ideas and
people. It has been said that on
of her constant qualities n.. her
, deiignt in tne new ana unineo
She once took up mountain ciimb-
ing and skiing just to prove her.
self that she could do those
things.
idwA,
Store and see the

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PANAMA CANAL BRIDE
4 Sory 0 Construction Days
By Elizabeth Kittredge Parker

XVI
AS I LOOKED BACK ON THE
FIVE YEARS SINCE I had arriv arrived
ed arrived on the Isthmus, a bride, I mar marveled
veled marveled at the changes. At Culebra.
dredges would soon replace the
.Steam shovels. At Gatun. the
sleepy little village across the riv river
er river was no more. Instead was the
long dam extending from hill to
hill, broken only by a circular
epillwav with its fourteen open openings
ings openings through whjch the tamed
Chagres would find its way to
.the Atlantic. The lock walls, tow towering
ering towering gaunt and high, were ready
for the heavv gates and strong
protecting chains. The electrical
machinery, which was to bring
these wonders to life, was being
installed in the spacious tunnels
below. The unique towing engines
were no longer merely figments
of the imagination. The control
tower, where buttons were to be
pushed to set in motion all these
wonders, was patiently waiting.
Hd hvHrnplprtrir nlant that was
to furnish power was nearly com-!
pleted at the spillway.
And all this time, we wives
were becoming accustomed to tro--pical
living and loving it. Con Conscious
scious Conscious of the thrilling part our
men were playing in this gigan gigantic
tic gigantic project, we turned out thoughts
'to our homes and routine lie.
The population of the Canal Zone
took a sudden rise The materni maternity
ty maternity wards of Ancon and Colon
hospitals were full. We discussed
baby formulas and careless nurse nursemaids.
maids. nursemaids. Here, on the palm fringed
Shores of Limon Bay, while pile
drivers worked noisily in front of
our home, beginning the long
mole from which the huge docks
were to extend, arrived our first
little blue-eyed girl, Anita. Her
first ocean voyage was a trip 10
Toro Point, where we went to seei
the progress of the breakwater.!
From the front porcn ot our
homes, she watched, with baby
wonder, the big barges bringing
sand from Nombre de Dios and
rock from Porto Bello for the
locks at Gatun. We took her in a
launch up the old French canal
to the dock where everything for
the Mt. Hope storehouse was un-
' loaded.
Like all proud young fathers, j
Charlie wanted the best for his
'little daughter. Without consulting
me, he ordered a beautiful En?-1
lish perambulator. He was hpmej
the day it arrived. It was a noble
1 1 .1 1....)
Carnage Diue icauier uiieu, iu
jnafch the badgy's eyes wide
.nr''0s of the finest steel an ac accordion
cordion accordion shaped hood 10 protect
from the tropic sun. It was, in indeed,
deed, indeed, a glorious spectabte. He
walked around it admuiing it
from everv side.
'Put the baby in," he said,
"and see if she likes it."
So I put her prettiest embroi embroi-.
. embroi-. ifcred pillow in and a thin muslin
Shawl an heirloom from way
back. Then. I lay Anita on the

soft bed. She kicked and cooed
1 M approved fashorf Charlie smil smil-,;
,; smil-,; 4 proudly. I gazed dubiously at
the high contraption
'Let's take her out for an air air-1
1 air-1 IBP.' he said
,'AH right," I said, with crim
I;terrnin?tion in my eye. "You
HE wheel it."
' ""Me?" he exclaimed in amaze amaze-iient.
iient. amaze-iient. 'Me wheel a baby car carriage?"
riage?" carriage?" "AH right," I answered, then
, -fie baby stays home. If you think
Jftja going bo wheel the great big
.filing, you're crazy! Why, I can't
even see over the top'"
i I stood behind the carriage to
iB8ve my point. The handle bars
came up to my eyesl Charlie
hJ(rst out burning and gave me
a big bear hug.
'I guess you win. little sweet
fljjprt. I'll exchange the buggy for
pSe nearer your size."
f,o peace was restored once
more.
When Anita was about eighteen
:finths old. one morning, much
alSfher joy. she found a little ba baby
by baby sister. Nan. asleep in her car
riage, and a year or so later
Iffinne Bettikins to make a happy
threesome
As the work at Gatun. Pedro,
nd Mirafloies n'Miod coinple
tion, slides in Culehra Cut befall
'to- give more trouble I.arue
: cracks in the earth beneath the
commission clubhouse heuan to
develop and reconstruction was
necessary to make the building
ratafe. Father Collins reluctantly had
,to abandon his cherished work on
Mm little church. Old Cucaracha
woke up a fain Steam shovels
Htft covered with out from the
gliding nl,ls l lw' "'nrU wore
rendered useless. A mass of
HKfth was pushed up from the
fleor of the Cut.
After a series of setbacks, when
ft WOT" lide than ever occurred,
Ode of the engineers in charge,
HBwOuraginglv callinr Colonel Goe Goe-bHEI's
bHEI's Goe-bHEI's attention to the havoc, be bewailed.
wailed. bewailed. 'What shall we do now.
Colonel""
"Hell, dig it out again'" was
the Colonel's historic reply.
And dig it out afain they did.
again and again
On May 20. 191L' two steam
, ghovels met at the bottom of the
Canal at Culehra, thus competing
the first through nil On Sept em
brr 6, work was started withdraw
Hg all steam shovels and con construction
struction construction tracks from the Cut.

I decided, since I hadn't seen
Kay for a long time, that I would
go to Gorgona for a visit. Leav Leaving
ing Leaving the babies with their nurse,

I took the early morning train
from Colon. At Gatun, I was all
Gerig had described it all to usj
and had remarked that he could;
see the finished dam and spill-1
way in his mind's eye. Now, I
was the slowly rising water of
the lake, on which we could see
native cayucos piled high with
bananas, as if the lake had al always
ways always been there.
As the train pulled out of the!
station, it curved to the left. We
were on the relocated railroad
tracks, which were now in use
between Gatun and Gorgona. The
old tracks had been removed be
fore the lake began to rise. As
the train began to wind through
the jungle, I noticed the water
around trees on whose branches
colorful orchids were growing. We
crossed trestles and bridges, arriv arriving
ing arriving at Gorgona in due time.
I thought of my arrival in that
little towm five vears ago, when
the American part was new and!
when new employes were arriv arriving
ing arriving weekly. Now the town would
soon be at the bottom of the lake.
Tlans were being made to close
down the machine shops, transfer
the men, take down the houses,
and rebuild in other places.
Kay and I talked over our ear early
ly early experiences and our plans for
the future. They were going back
to the States; we were staying" on.
It was with a tinge of sadness
that Gorgona was to be abandon abandoned,
ed, abandoned, sadness tinged with pride that
so much had been accomplished,
so many problems met and suc successfully
cessfully successfully solved.
XVII
THE STEAM SHOVED IN CU
LEBRA CUT HAD finished their
work. The required depth of the
channel had been reached. The
tracks on which the shonels had
operated and on which the long
dirt trains had whizzed in and
out at regular intervals were no
longer needed. The locks at Mira Mira-flores.
flores. Mira-flores. Pedro Miguel, and Gatun
and were comple'ed.
Charlie and I wandered over
the locks at Gatun, standing on
the edges of those awesome
chambers and looking down at
the men below, who, from that
distance, looked no bigger than
ants. We investigated the gigantic
tunnels in which the intricate e e-leclriral
leclriral e-leclriral machinery had been in installed.
stalled. installed. We saw the controls that
would so quietly open and close
the ponderous gates, would raise
and lower the heavy chains that
wou'd serve as safeguards to the
gates in case a ship should get
out of control. I had no idea how
many miles we walked through
the vast tunnels, but I was glad
to climb the steps and see the
bright sunlight again. We looked
curiously at the little towing en engines,
gines, engines, called mules, with a cab
at either end. Then we went up
to the control tower where, by
the pushing of tiny buttons, the
whole massive lock machinery was
put in motion, while, on a model
table, miniature gates and tiny
chains moved with the same pre precision
cision precision and at the same rate as
the heavy gates and chains be below.
low. below. Charlie pointed out to me
the tall gauges that would show
the deoth of the water in each
lock as it rose or fe'l to the lev.
el of that in the adjoining lock.
We came down and walked to the
end of the third lock and gazed
at the lake soon.to.be. We noted
the skeletonlike emergency da,ms,
further safeguards against unfore unforeseen
seen unforeseen rontingecies.
"Surely," Charlie said, "the Ca.
nal rightly deserves to be called
the eighth wonder of the world."
All these things were finished,
but the caplive waters of the
Chagres could not yet be unions,
ed. All the little towns along the
line had, like the steam shovels,
served their purpose. Soon ihev
would be at the bottom of the
lake. Many of the houses were
salvaged
The problem of Hie natives in
their palm thatched huts scattered
here and there through the jun jungle
gle jungle had to be solved. New towns
for them were built or new jungle
homes above the lake level. Ail
these stolid unimaginative people
had to be convinced ol the nec necessity
essity necessity for moving. I thought of
Bernicia del Rio and wondered i'
she would bo sari to leave her
vine cov ered home, her shady ba
nana plants, her fragrant lime
trees 1 wondered if she would
have the courage to start all over
again.
Then came the historic day
when the water was to be tumor!
into the Canal channel The dyke
at Gamboa. built across the chan channel
nel channel where Die Chagres River en entered
tered entered the Canal, had kept the ris.
ing water of the lake from the
Cot. Now, its job was finished,
like that of the steam shovels
and the little line towns. It must
be destroyed It was a bright sun.
ny day on October, 1913 On spe
cial trains a'l who could rushed
to the banks of the river near
the dvke We held our breath as
the clocks licked the minutes a
way. At the anpointed time, Pres President
ident President Wilson in Washington touch
ed the key, giving the signal,
then, like 11 uleeninp tnant rndr
ly awakened, the dyke became

alive, the dirt was blown to the
sky, and the unfettered waters
surged into the Canal channel in into
to into Culebra Cut.

Gradually, little trickles of wa water
ter water from the Atlantic met little
trinkles of water from the Paci Pacific,
fic, Pacific, mereine and risinp unlit tho
water in the Cut was of sufficient
depth for dredges, which took o o-ver
ver o-ver from the shovels the work of
excavation.
As the lake rose higher and
higher, a constant patrol was
necessary to drive the natives
back to the hills. And back to the
hills fled all tropic life. The mon.
keys, the tapirs, the snakes, the
weird insects, even the lazy
cloths, all fled to the hills, which
were made islands by the oncom oncoming
ing oncoming waters. Only the mighty
hardwood trees remained their
bare branches stretching over the
blue water ghost'y reminders of
a once. teeming jungle.
The lake gradually reached the
required height and the spillway
gates were adjusted to maintain
it. It was time to test the locks
Charlie and I were anvig the
first to reach the lock wills on
that memorable day. Chanie had
his camera focused on the little
tug that, with flags flying, came
chugging up the Canal from Cris
tobal. On the prow proudly stood
Colonel Sibert; on the lock wall
stood Colonel Goethal, chain sriok
ing, his steel.blue eyes fixed on
the tiny craft.
We all watched closely as the
sturdy boat entered the lowest
lock chamber. The gate behind it
silently closed. Tow lines were
thrown to it from the electric
mu'es on either side of the lock.
The lines secured, we watched
tensely as the water came gush gushing
ing gushing from the bottom and sides.
The little tug remained steady
perfectly controlled by the taut
lines Gradually she rose with
the water until it was at the same
level as that in the second cham chamber.
ber. chamber. Then the chain in front of
me gale s ow v dronnprl fho
sive gates, as if in obedience to
an unseen master, quietly open
ed. and the electric mules went
into action amid our excited
cheers.
Like ants crawling up (he
trunk of a tree, the mules smooth smoothly
ly smoothly climbed to the height of the
second lock, towing, carefully 'the
brave tug. Then they came to a
poised stop. The tug obediently
stopped, too, while the gates 'be
hind began to close. The boat
was again raised to the level of
the water in the next chamber,
the gates opened and the elec
trie mules started on again and
safely brought the tug into the
final lock chamber. Here the pro process
cess process was repeated. As the final
were repeated. As the last gates
opened, the towing lines were
cast off and, under her own pow power,
er, power, the intrepid tiny craft enter
ed the lake the first to go
through the locks at Gatun
Afterward, olf Cucaracha pro protested
tested protested with one of her biggest
slides. However, it was attacked
by dredges from both the Allan
ic and Pacific sides, as well as
by hydraulic excavating from the
op o' Gold Hill, which sluiced
material from the top of the slide
until a channel was finally clear
ed.
The first steam vessel fhroufh
the Canal was, fittingly, the old
trench crane boat "La Valley"
which for so many years had
been giving faithful service It
was passed from the Cut through
he Pedro Miguel and Miraflores
locks. And another page of histo
ry was written.
XVIII
THE PACIFIC SIDE OF THE
ISTHMUS WAS BRISTLING with
activity. Here would be needed
lacilities for servicing ships after
long ocean voyages a huge dry
dock, mechanical shops, coalir."
station, storage for fuel for oil'
burning ships.
Dredges were pumping day and
night. The town nf Rolhn,
, t Aiwa diitilj-
ed from a muddy swamp. High
on the hills overlooking the Canal
where it entered the Bay of Pa Panama,
nama, Panama, spacious residences for Co
lonel Goe.hals and other officials
were built. Houses salvaged from
Gorgona and Empire were recon recon-striKted
striKted recon-striKted for other employes. A
beautiful cement building was be being
ing being constructed to house not only
the administrative brances of the
Canal organization but also a li
brary and post office.
About this time, we were trans transferred
ferred transferred to Balboa Heights. With
three babies and a nurse mnv
i ng was not a simple matter
We arrived in Panama in a
drenching downpour and drove di
redly to the home of friends in
Ancon in the Canal Zone. After
lunch, leaving' the children snd
Mimi, the nurse, with our help
ful friends, Charlie and I started
for our new home. The house was
halfway down a muddy hill. We
drove as far as we could, then left
the coche and proceeded down
Ihe slippery incline of foot.
We spent Ihe afternoon unpacks
ing the boxes of household belong belongings,
ings, belongings, trying to get some order out
of chaos. Then Charlie went for
Ihe children and Mimi. He decid decided
ed decided to try coming by the road
that ran below the house rnsiead
of by (he one above, which we
l,.l Tk. ....... f,.
IIBU uncw. j lie i Mill nan in
ly stopped by this time but the.

' innimrft gBaalaaaa I jjBB fP"
HUm Wt m w fr B mt. HhbHI

HOSPITAL SHOW Providing entertainment for hospital patients here is one phase of Special Services diverse activities. Here members of the traveling
show, "The Duke Ambassadors," perform at Coco Solo, one stop on a busy scheduled 23 appearances at post and base theaters, antiaircraft sites service clubs
and over CFN-TV. The Ambasadors were the third show sponsored here this year by USARCAtllB Special Services for all -U.S. armed forces.
(U.S. Army Photo)
Special Services Division Combats GIs Loneliness

Loneliness on the part of the in individual
dividual individual soldier is something the
Army can do little about with without
out without the help of its Special Services
division.
You can train a soldier, have
him work many hour; a day, but
there comes a time when he has
to relax and enjoy some recrea recreation.
tion. recreation. With the rapid expansion of the
Army in 1940, it was perhaps for
this very reason that a Morale
Division was established in The
Adjutant General's Office. It was
placed under the Chief of Staff in
March 1941, redesignated the Mor Morale
ale Morale Branch, and was charged with
the "operation in the War Depart Department
ment Department of those matters pertaining
to recreation and welfare."
These were the origins the the
office of Hie Chief of Special Ser-j
vices, which will mark its 18th an anniversary
niversary anniversary Tuesday.
In January 1942, the Morale
Branch became the Special Ser
vices Branch with the added func function
tion function of administering such special
Army services as the Army Ex Exchange
change Exchange Service, the Army Motion
Picture Service and the Library
Service.
In March 1942 the reorganization
of the War Department placed the
hill was a mass of mud. He got
the family out of the coche and
started up the hill, but alas,
climbing up proved as difticuit
as slipping down. Poor Mimi!
Hampered by her ponderous avoir avoirdupois
dupois avoirdupois and her long skirls, she
found the going rather rough. Be Besides,
sides, Besides, she was carrying the ba baby.
by. baby. She took three steps and slip slipped
ped slipped back two. She tried again.
Finally, she sat down in the
mud, disgus.ed. "No, suh,' she
moaned, 'I doan' go." And fehe
refused to budge.
Charlie took the baby from her
and tried to persuade her to start
again, but Mimi was stubborn.
No, suh, Use goin' back ter Ja Jamaica,
maica, Jamaica, suh."
At last, however, after Charlie
had promised her a hit of brandy
when she reached the top, she re relented
lented relented and finally made the
grade.
Living in Balboa had its ad advantages.
vantages. advantages. There was an air of
permanency now. Cement living
quarters were being tried out.
Roads were built, trees planted,
grounds landscaped. Gone were
the ugly black stoves, the lone e e-leclric
leclric e-leclric bulb dangling from the
ceiling on a cord. Electric stoves
were being installed in some qur qur-ters.
ters. qur-ters. We even had telephones!
It was exciting, too, to be neir
a city. We joined Ihe University
Cluh, where we met friendly Pa Panamanians
namanians Panamanians at the weeklv dances.
There were official receptions and
lawns parties. There were teas at
the American Embassy, private
coclc'ail parlies, and afternoon
bridge.
We often went to the Plaza Cen Central
tral Central in the city to watch the week
ly lottery drawings. We always
bought at least one piece or a
ticket and, since there were a
number of approximations we oft often
en often won at least our money back.
Anvhow, it was fun.
My firs' carnival was also in intriguing.
triguing. intriguing. Such confusion and mer.
riment! Groups of singers and
dancers cavorted in Ihe crowded
streets of the city. Every
conceivable fancy costume wa3 in
evidence. But by far Ihe most
beautiful was the pollera the na national
tional national dress of the Panamanian
women a type of dress that got
its inspiration from Colonial times.
Donning a pollera wag almost
a ceremony. No variation was to tolerated.
lerated. tolerated. Two very full embroider embroidered
ed embroidered petticoats were the foundation,
'tie blouse was cut low, a little
olf the shoulders. A wide lac--trimmed
ruffle reached to the
waist. An insertion around the top
was threaded with bright wool.
matching the colored figures on
the white material of which the
dress was made. A big wool pom pompom
pom pompom graced the center of ooth
ihefront and the hack of the
neck. The skirt was very full,
made with a placket on either

Special Services Branch under the
commanding general, Services of
Supply, functioning through the
Chief of Administrative Services,
and the branch was renamed the
Office of the Chief of Special Ser Services.
vices. Services. July 20, 1942, the Office of the
Chief of Special Services became
a staff division of Services Of Sup Supply,
ply, Supply, functioning under the assist assistant
ant assistant chief of staff for personnel,
and was redesignated the Special
Services Division.
Separation of functions in the
fall of 1943 placed educational and
related services under a new
Morale Services Division (later
renamed Information and Educa Education
tion Education Division) and the recreational
and entertainment aspects and
library services contained under

the renamed Special Services Di Division,
vision, Division, with the Army Exchange
Service again included.
Jan. fi, 1947, the chief of staff
approved continuation of the divi division
sion division as the Office of the Chief of
Special Services, an administra administrative
tive administrative service of the War Depart Department
ment Department in the postwar military es establishment.
tablishment. establishment. Some of the opera opera-lions
lions opera-lions of Special Services have been
with it for many years.
Army hostesses, known today as
side, the waistband secured by
tapes. A wide ruffle on the bot
torn of the ground-length skirt
was edged with wide lace, match
ing, in pattern, the lace on the
blouse. Chancletas (heel-less slip
pers ) were worn with no stock
ings. Ihese were of the same co
lor as the other accessories. The
pollera of the elite was more ela elaboratemany
boratemany elaboratemany with beautiful hand
embroidery.
Around the neck, the girls wore
the chaia. Other chains might be
worn, but the chata was customa customary.
ry. customary. The hair was twisted low be behind
hind behind the ears in two Utile guns
and stuck into the hair, almost
covering it, were scores or pairs
of tembleques, made of bright
beads strung on thin wires in the
form of insects or flowers. These
quivered tantalizingly as the light light-hearted
hearted light-hearted maid coquettishly tossed
her head.
At the toldas erected on threet
corners, girls in their gay polle polle-ras
ras polle-ras and their escorts danced the
tamborita, the native dance, to
the tune of "Mi pollera es colora colora-da,"
da," colora-da," in the traditional manner,
swishing their voluminous skirts
while the boys rhythmically bent
and swayed to the music of
drums and the clapping of an en enthusiastic
thusiastic enthusiastic crowd.
The last day of the carnival
was Pollera Day, when the girls
and older women, in gowns hand-
ea aown irom generation to gen generation,
eration, generation, bedecked in family jewels,
rode up and down Avenida Cen Central
tral Central in endless procession.
At night, the queen of the car
nival, who had been chosen from
one of the oldest and mos, prom prominent
inent prominent families, was Honored with
a erand hall while (hp lcc evult.
ed danced in the toldas. At dawn
all gaidy ceased and everybody
went lo Mass to receive the cross
of ashes on the forphpad anH hn
gin to piously observe the sacred
aays oi urni.
Amid all this merriment and
fun. the Canal was fast noji-ins
completion.
(TO BE CONTINUED
NiXT WEEK)
PRACTICE BOMS
TOKYO (UPD-Soviet artillery
in the Kurile Island north of Ja.
pan thundered for more than 12
hours Thursday in a practice
bombardment. Dispatches from
Hokkaido, the northernmost .lap
nese main island, said the firing
started at 10:52 a.m. and contin continued
ued continued with rising intensity until
midnight. The artillery fire, aimed
towards the sea, created flashes
that could be seen in Nemurn City
in Southern Hokkaide

LIBRARY SCENE Special Services Libraries in U.S. Army Caribbean are well stocked and
are erttremely popular with servicemen and their families. Collections range from children's
books through special collections on Latin America, with, of course, ample supplies of the
latest fiction and fion-fiction. Here Mrs. Juanita Blakely, Fort Gulick librarian, helps two
Army researchers. Reference service is available at Army libraries for the military commu'
nity and in addition some of the post libraries boast excellent record collections and music
rooms (U.S. Army Photo) 1

service club recreational direc directors,
tors, directors, were first assigned in 1919 to
service clubs, then known as "host "hostess
ess "hostess houses," on Army posts in the
United States, the Philippines, Ha Hawaii
waii Hawaii and the Panama Canal Zone.
They were authorized by an Act
of Congress in 1923 and today
operate service clubs for enlisted
men in (he U. S. and overseas.
Lt. Col. Blaine W. Butters is
chief of Special Services, USAR USAR-CARIB,
CARIB, USAR-CARIB, and service clubs are lo located
cated located at Fort Clayton, Fort Kobbe
and Fort Gulick, with libraries at
each of the locations mentioned
and also at Fort Amador and Fprt
Sherman.
Service club directors work
steadily planning programs of en entertainment
tertainment entertainment for all the posts in
this area. The libraries in USAR USAR-CARIB
CARIB USAR-CARIB are generally regarded as
some of the best throughout the
Army.
The Army Recreational Service

I TODAY I

LUX
WEEKEND
1:09, 3:05, 5:01, 6:57, 8:53 .75

turn wuoh jtl

I
. v i ,,' ... KM ;::

as such is new within recent years,
although its brartches and sec sections
tions sections have varied histories.
A general order in 1918 official officially
ly officially made athletics a recognized
Army activity largely utilized for
physical conditioning.
The Library Service, operated
by the War Service Committee of

. i . ii i i'n
... 'i.U YVMC-II IIC
con miss his train ond not worry
obout being fired. unea
CENTRAL
RELEASES!
- .401:10, 2:57, 4:58, 6:59, 9:00
mLm
"ANOTHER TIME,
ANOTHER PLACE"
VistaVision!
The story of a woman
too deep in love .
'to risk the cruelty
ot the truth!

the American Library Associatioi
during World War I, became ai i

Army operation in July 1921.
At 5:45 p.m. Tuesdav official!
of the Special Services Offices,
USAHUAHIB, will appear on CFN
TV's Panorama program for )
rundown on SDecial Services ac,
tivities in this command. Thil
wul mark Special Services' spe
cial observance of the day.
TODAY! 75c.
1:30, 3:05, 4:50, 6:55, 9:05 p.m.
Francoise: Sagan's best-seller
...five unconventional people
competing for "Kicks," plea pleasures
sures pleasures and love!
DEBORAH KERR
DAVID NIVEN
JEAN SEBERG
Mylene Demongeot
in
BONJOUR
TRISTKSSE
CinemaScope
Technicolor!
Prohibited for Minors
Under 18 Years Old!
Keieaseo Dy
COLUMBIA PICTURES!



FORiVERYW

SCIENCE FUN

Puzzles & Pastimes

NO MA TCH FOR GRA VTTY

Inviting You to Draw a Conclusion

THREE volunteers of difterent
' weights, above, are conduct conducting
ing conducting an experiment. All havt1
jumped at precisely the same
moment. Who will reach the
water first?
A similar experiment may be
conducted with a heavy ball arid
a marble. Drop both from the
same height simultaneously
What do you discover? Both ball
and marble strike the ground a:
the same time.
This demonstrates an impoi
tant law of physics: All frech
falling bodies drop at a uniform
rate of speed. Previous to the
time of Galileo, it was believed

that a falling body's weight in influenced
fluenced influenced the rate of fall. Galileo
dropped objects from the Tower
of Pisa and observed that except
for very light ones, all fell at the
same rate.
Disregarding air resistance,
speed increases by 32 feet per
second for every second of fall.
breadbare Stunt
SUSPEND a button on a thread
from a cork. Place it in a
Dottle. Challenge .someone to tell
you how the button can be re removed
moved removed from the thread without
shaking or breaking the bottle.
VlSun iqajuq ui sse3 Su.jiu.8buj
b (HI pRaiqj am u.mg :jmiiv

SOMETHING obvious obvious-ly
ly obvious-ly has the lady at
right in distress. But
what?
It's eaay enough to
ffnd out. All you need
is a pencil preferably
one with a sharp point.
Note that the hori horizontal
zontal horizontal and vertical
rows of dots in the dia diagram
gram diagram are designated
by letters and numbers.
To complete the pic picture,
ture, picture, simply start at
the first point listed be below
low below and then draw
lines from point to
point as indicated
thereafter.
Begin at intersection
D-l, draw to D-ll.
Draw D-3 to F-4 to
H-3, J-3, K-4, M-4, P-2.
Draw D-7 to F-8,
H-7, J-7, K-8, M-8,
Q-5.
Draw U-9, W-8. W W-11,
11, W-11, X-12, Z-12, Z-14,
X-14, X-16, Z-16, Z-18,
T-18, T-17, V-17, V-13,
U-12, T-12, 5-11, T-ll,
U-10, U-9.
Draw X-13 to Z-13.
Draw X-17 to Z-17.
If a second person
is available, ask him or
her to read off the
lines which are to be

while you 641 them in.
See if you can guess what the
picture's all about before you be begin.
gin. begin. Cover the diagram with tissue
paper so others can participate.

3 4 S 1 t S 0 II 12 13 tMS tfc f? IS

t i i i i i i i i I i i r

I l I I i I I I I i l I I I I l i i
. A
g. -
n 5 fl Sfife. c
: : : :
j ; ; ; J $ 0
V vV 9
H V T
C ' J
-... X fnii v
j . w
!(... x
(. Y
N z
- i t i i j i i i t i

inserted

COLORS BRING OUT GOING CONCERN

Geographic Word Play

a;

1 t I m I hi
m
mm 9'
-
"""""

B U j 0 f
jHH tmHm p """"
-
:M& &M mm i

Fit and Fuss

Cut-Out Gadget
"ADGETS are always sure-fire
entertainment. Here is one
you can make for your next
party.
Cut a circle about three inches
in diameter from a piece of heavy
cardboard. Prom the center of
this circle cut out a cross-like
keyhole. Make the short arm
about an inch long; the long arm
about 2 inches long.
Similarly from another piece
of cardboard cut four keys, each
about 4 inches long. The narrow
parts should be thin enough to
slide to and fro in the short arm
of the cross; the two ends about
L;I4 inches long.
When the parts are completed,
insert the keys through the cross
and mix them up as shown at
bottom left. The trick" is to re remove
move remove them.
A way to arrange them so thai
they c''.m be easily removed i';
shown in the column at riTjht --

AN EXTREMELY fast-moving
object is attached to a rather
slow one in the scrambled scene
above. Wherever a part of the
drawing contains an X, 'cover
that segment with any color you
choose. Wherever O appears, ap apply
ply apply the color red.
How quickly can you bring
forth the scene?
Those who do not have colors
handy can observe the scene by
shading O areas with a pencil.
Cents mid Nonsense
V7HAT amount of money can
be divided 50-50 between
two persons and yet one will have
one hundred times more than the
other?
"SlUSO

RIDDLE
What shape

Aijy pu s.iunp

. L
1

a kiss?

-ssn-dil-r)

(81

po

8KELETON-

Z E D key

word appears
across the top of
the block at left
and another
across the top of
the block below.
Both have a geo geographic
graphic geographic connota connotation.
tion. connotation. You are
asked to Identify

these words as follows: To begin, place all of the
letters now showing in the blank spaces directly
below them. That is to say, place a T in the single

blank below it
(top diagram);
an N In the three
blanks below It,
etc. Then, using
these letters in
the lower blanks
as clues, guess at
missing letters to
form short hori horizontal
zontal horizontal words.
Insert trial let

ters In all respective vertical blanks till solved.
iujSp AVedia.i jo tinsui
-ojnbJ m JJOjnegg pint ojjubuv pjom aqx iuv
RHYME AND REASONING

A QUAKER once, we under understand,
stand, understand, For three song laid out hie land,
And made three

equal squares
to meet
So as to bound
an aore neat.
In centers of the
squares around,
A dwelling for

each son was found;
And in the center of the acre
see rightj
Was found the dwelling of the

Quaker.
Now can you tell by skill or art, how far from sons
he lived apart f No fair peeking below.
jtu tin "tpoJ 8LT Jo R8'8 ,nId '8 t """
jo .ia)n3 0 eiJnsiJ JO oiojj aivnwa epoJ ZT. 9
H'tl l PI" H W isnbt jo jod uiojj 9ou)B!a
poa 9K8 Jo f VZ jo ft epi o Suvd jo jaju.

iuojj 9ouBit(p joja.raiu, ipoj 515 p4iti mi mu !"''

HtJ I '1W 1ar" 1 PI "IJ. 'J3
-uoa ) 3Ui 'ipoj urabs 091 lSaBiJi

PLA Y CHECKERS WITH SHEARS

THERE in
cut-ups who
are Smart Alecs
and there are
cut-ups who are
really smart. To
prove you're the
latter, get out a
pair of scissors,
and solve this
cut-out problem.
It requires a
Knowledge of
checkers. When
you have dissect dissected
ed dissected the checker checkerboard
board checkerboard design, by
cutting along the
heavy lines, you
are to reassemble
the eight seg segments
ments segments into an an-other
other an-other checker checkerboard
board checkerboard in such a
way that the
black king can
"jump" or take
all the nine white
men. (Solution
elsewhere.)

oo o
oog
o
M1 1 1 M

TAKE A WALK
A GROUP of hikers set out for
a destination seventy-two
miles distant. Stops were de decided
cided decided on at certain distances
along the way for refreshments
and rest. Just to make things
Interesting, the leader stated the
distance of six of the stops from
the starting point as follows:
1. The middle third of the first
third of the last half of the hike.
2. The last third of the Hrst
half of the last half of the trip.
8. The first third of the second
third of the first half of the total
distance.
4. The last third of the first
half of the first half of the trip.
5. The middle third of the first
half of the last quarter of the
hike.
6. The first quarter of the sec second
ond second half of the last third of the
trip.
What was the distance of each
of these six stops from the start starting
ing starting point?
XlAJ3rfdS9.l 9IU g9 piIW 9II1I 0J
'MHUi gl sanui 9 ssnoi vs '69iu
a.m juioci alliums t(i ujojj adojf mo
mj.jo sotniiip 9iu, :onag

A Wits Tester

(D.

2)G

CD

To
st

SCORE a

strike in the

diagram at left,
that is, to suc succeed
ceed succeed In crossing
out all of the
numbers, you
must find the

3orrect numerical
I Ct J w) answers to the
definitions hplow.

If the answer to
No. 1, for in instance,
stance, instance, is 0, cross
out 0 In the dia

gram; if the an answer
swer answer to No. 2 is 4315, cross out 4, 3, 1 and 5. Etc.
Answers may have as many as five digits. See if
you can bowl a perfect score.
1. A bed, curiously, has legs but only foot.
2. Inches In the largest measure hand, foot,
yard
S. Number reminder of leap year: 60, 29, 58.
4. One-fourth of this number is two less than half.
5. If the earth's atmosphere Is mostly oxygen,
cross out 858; if not, cross out 507. (aaso.nin
X1oui) aA9 0J9I Aj g 'JHia '(X.iiuqaj ti 9Xp)
ttjn oaij, '(p.isX) jq 99jqx Z -9UO Jno.g '1 :u9Minv

FILL-IN PROBLEM FOR JUNIORS

NJANCY is run-
ning home
with a bouquet
of wild flowers
for her mother.
But something Is
missing from the
scene. To restore
the missing por portion,
tion, portion, draw a line
from dot 1 to dot
2 to dot 3, etc.,
until you have
touched at all of
the numbers.
Where two num numbers
bers numbers are beside
one dot, use the
dot for both.
Afterwards, color
the scene appro appro-p
p appro-p r 1 a t e 1 y with
crayons.
Jlrrawcd Checker Checkerboard
board Checkerboard Answer

i

JO 93JV i9M9Ul

15
I
i 5 2. '22
3 4"3 2, ,7
t9ie, cMKfKM

Some Introductions Are i:i Order

CHALLENGING (jriZ-fgnOSSWOBP WWE fXEWISt

It's Your Move

ACCOMPANY Beanie Bear,
above, on a stroll and he
will introduce you to three ot his
friends.
Begin journey at bottom left
l vertical arrow 1 ; stay within
path lines Meet Beanie's friends
in 1, 2, 3 order, and return to
starting point (bottom arrow).
Can You Read It?
ONCE vuu get started readln
this iitniblid proverb yoi
should read fast Can vou do it"
fllM IAI S N S N

VN AG RAMBLES

'j r p.
V : I) M-u t-.i

IN this word game, you are
given a word and an additional
letter and are required to make
a new word composed of the
combined letters. For example,
YKAST with F is safety. Now
try these:
I. ESTEEMS with R is ?
2 BLURTED with O Is ?
3. CREEPS with 1 is 7
1 COLLAR with H is ?
5. SMEARED with U is ?
i' ROUSE with B is V
Usui aiioiu mi" ioj is9ua u ui.u
ntlA't )UB ..?! u Bij.i s X.i0g IBJ
a 1 Jii auiei. a. S aK.mog 'aajuog '9
iiaJiiSBa 9 'lJmO r faojau g
painmuj, z aaisouiag I njasuv

By Eugene Shefier
HORIZONTAL
1 The fourth book of the New
Testament
5 Father of Anak (Josh. 21:11)
9 In what city did Peter see s
vision while praying? (Acts
11:5)
14 Curved molding.
15 Prison compartment
16 Sign of the zodiac.
17 Slight elevation.
18 Case for small articles.
Ifl Irritates (colloq.)
20 Maria"
21 Marsh grass.
23 Lamprey.
24 Deliberate.
28 At what time of day did a
great light shine upon Paul
while on his way to Damas Damascus?
cus? Damascus? I Acts 22:6)
30 Articulate.'
32 Religious tenths.
36 Legendary bird.
39 Go in.
41 Feminine name.
42 Woe is me!
44 Type of automobile.
46 For fear that
47 Biblical companion-country of
Persia (Dan. 8:20)
49 Women of title.
51 Bishopric.
52 There are 32 on a compass.
54 The tree of life was on either
side of what waterway? (Rev
22:2)
56 Breaches.
58 These are among the things
that will occur before the de destruction
struction destruction of the temple (Luke
21:11)
62 South African antelope.
64 Absent.
66 Artificial language.

67 Papal veu.

69 Operatic solo.
71 Money exchange premium.
72 Paul was one (Acts 23:27)
73 Peal.
74 Dissolve.
75 Pitchers.
76 Brink.
77 Land-measures.
VERTICAL

against

53 Mineral spring. of wood or coal
55New England state (abbr.) 82 Expand.
57 Old Biblical form of swear 63 Cognomen.
(Gen. 21:31) 65 Dry.
59 Simeon was called this (Acts 67 Metalliferous rock.
13:1) 68 Abstract being.
60 Roman magistrate. 70 Stage of life.
61 Substances from combustion 71 Eucnaristic wine vessel

him

1 Jehu conspired

(2 Ki. :14)
2 Pointed arch.
3 To his son pertained Sochoh
(1 Ki. 4:10)
4 Born.
5 Heroic aviator.
6 Fell back.
7 Mordecai wore royal apparel
in this color and white (Esth
8:15)
8 Stranger.
9 Be discordant.
10 Eastern.
11 Heap.
12 Take off rind.
13 Balaam's steed (Num. 22:25)
22 Speck.
25 Exists.
26 Monkey.
27 Decimal Units.
29 The wise virgins took this
with them for their lamps
(Mat. 25:4)
31 Son of Ishmsel (Gen. 25:13)
33 Tints.
34 Scottish -Gaelic.
35 Cloy.
36 Inclined roadway.
37 Oil: comb. form.
38 Arabian chief judge.
40 Dividing into branches.
43 Exceptional.
45 River in Russia
48 Luzon Negrito.
50 New Testament spelling of
Shem (Luke 3:36)

mm

VA

rr

JO

AT

71

7S

7A

I
ill
25 2 17

43

K

4T

II
53

21

us-

5T

8

1

29

IIP

10

7T

3

7
33 34 35

V?

59

12

6o

By Millard Hopper
THE TEST: White checkers to
1 move and win in four moves.
It's White's turn; moving up the
board. Clue: White sacrifices a
man on his first move.
:i '91-81 sWUs
'91-CT 13IH '8I-IT-0I 9AOlU 9JlJfc
'81-11 Jl JaAo si sural 9iij 'ai-et
98A0UJ Haia Jt ou ot-tZ SWUM
IT S sasia "i-01 WM 'Bl8
o?-i

Distributed by King Features Syndicate

T-IO CBO88WOBD ri'ZZLB SOLUTION

K A,.



' V

-
-Mrs-' t 1
SUNDAY. JULY 20. 1958
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, JULY 20, 1958
fgllY AND THE PIRATES
By GEORGE WUNDER .THE STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE
While Gloria Plays
By WILSON SCRUGGf
' SHE'S TH3QRC,
'NONSENSE, POC.
MA! I JUST SAW WHAT WAS LEFT
I'VE HAP WORSE
OF yOVK. F1ANE WHEN THE ;
m HUH,HCWEf
TAioNfi nu (tff Piny SUMPS ON THE
TENANCE PEOPLE TRUCKED (T
K9
T7. Ine- a miPLF OF CAYS, r7 HEAf PlAYiNt
PAST HERE'
IB
DOYOUTHIUKI
1 ""L" ": yTH -rue A-AIWHAV
COULD SLEEP KUCWIU6
ur i.ir.1. ww
l TF KEST IS INPICATtK
THAT I'VE BEEN MAEt
THE LAU6HIM6 STOCK
OPTUCTOWW BVMV
wmtAW
VEKVOWW SISTER

MEANWHILE... TTJ

WAIN- J

j)' ri iTTrn

nm I i i lam aibbbbbbbbbbi

1 I mm IHW

on

SJI51

ALLEY OOP

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

CAPTAIN EASY

MORTY MEEKLE

mm

'PRISCILLA'S POP

Knows Her Limit

By AL VEBMkis

FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS

Modest Start

By MERRILL BLOSSER

' 7

I IB
o

The proa is som.

BE SUCH AN EXPENSE,
IT LOOKS LIKE I'LL

HAVE TO SELL

PARBELL EQUIPMENT

II.... T

Win I T ypc

AT THAT NEED A

RETTPC

-I k AV. 1

TIIU

V L M TKW &l

Yes.' I'll

0 IT.'
I'LL
STAPT-

YVEI3HT
LIFTIM&

BEAT 1
MV

MOUSE
AT FIVE
--with

i

A CASH: J

4

FOR A Ty

.- -v TIME T WPERE-HER
,TS 'WAV f PLEASE! I LL'TJ,LEB HER TOl
PAST BED) JUST ONE) FftiRL JBW TO I
Sj1 STOY)

ai it ;up KEPT STALLING

AND S ALUu iilj

:K

TWA"

SOT SO rTO" ,V

NOT TO WAITjPnj'
,FOR THE m a
. T.M. fat. u.i. Pt 0t.

Bad News fur Darwin?

By V. T. HAMLIN

1 11

BIGS BUNNY

Real Pal

You Don't Say I

By EDGAR MARTIN

-.-..'-U -'-' v3
J) Rt66, I -J

1' N)OT SV)WSEP,THE

PLfSV. OW.I'r'OUW
TUE.W TO VWX tiCH

BUT

TWPLE

STUFFV'.

UMPTTft
oTOW?

OH, SO OLD-

6-2

.""1BBBB1 BSSSSI X

Tf T "7 BUGS IF
VOU SAW A
jflA LITTLE OLP LADV
I I jyi I TIPE.VJOULD VOU
'

HEBE'S SOMEBODY TO

FIX YOUI? TIRE LAPV

OH, THANK

YOU, SONNY!

MENTION

THAT'S N

WDON

Li 'SV m

T.M. Nag. U.I. Pat Off.

a)Atrrsife True Life Adventures

Wrecking Blast

By LESLIE TURNER

1511 I fopsO TowTAY tTkEX
'Jky CAREFUL AIM AT EASY. K
HHn A TERRIFIC EXPL05I0W fm

PANCV
POOTWORK

MUWWWBBl IU'.'l V 1ST"' w SB IBSSUTAT

Mow CAN A
SIX-TON MONSTER
LIKE AN ELEPHANT
TRAVERSE 60PT,
MARSHA (SROUNP
WITHOUT STICKING
IN THE MUP ?

"lTHE SEC1?ET IS THE
CONSTRUCTION OF HIS
FEET. WHEN HE PUTS
THEM DOWN WITH HIS

FULL WEKSHT, THEV
SPREAD. BUT WHEN

tHE PICKS THEM UP
THEW CONTRACT...

(BECAUSE AN ELEPHANT
ACTUAL-LW WALKS ON
HIS TOES.)

Otdnbuted by King Frrturn Siiiute

317

There Was One, That Is

By DICK CAVALLI

YIPE7 I SLEPT
RK3HT THROUGH

THE ALARM.'

IW LATE FOR

5-7 O THE ALARM,'
v IX LATE FOR

I WONT HAVE TIME FOR

BREAKFAST, MRS. 0UOLEY

MOLU me POOR OPEN

1 v.

r TOR ME jS

0

5HE ALWAYS
FORGETS THEREfe vTx
a screen ymm
DOOR, TOO &

MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAY

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

KS. HOOPLE.

H HAS HYPNOTI2ET

Mi MAN NTOTHIMK-

he'$ Rich and

Mil TON WlOM'T nlnoi 1

I L THRKATEMED

HIM WITH JAIL AND

HE SAID THAT

would es

ST1 p ni iM

HFj

PHONEt) THAT HE'S ENTERTAiN-

INCs A bUYtK AT SOME PLACE

IhAI WUNDED LIKE GLUPP-

bANocK- PALLS .'-.5AYX

HEARD OU BARKIN6 AT

yjlLTON VMITH ALL
THE STOPiOPEN

AT 1:30 A.M.

PLEASE

THAT

SIREN

0

1 1 rviLi- viim ALL rvj
THE STOPf.DPesJ C-rr--w7B PI

W A.-S HI

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calbraith

THERE AREKJ'T MAMY V WELL THPffP'i V ucdc'c ,-.,

JOBS OPEW, BUT HERE'S X JUST THREE made ,P-. .,1

. u ItT Tu AT trtl ikin 1 . . I I CL,..

...... n a. . I wnriWCK

nNi..BUjrUKlHJM- THAT AD 1 ruciit vtn .irrn

n ,-Jr....Lcnrvr.ui:N- 1 1 MA I KUIN LEAPU iuVTunifi.

rr FERME- I GOOD OPPORTUKIITIES

7t ooof off:' READ

LEAKU, ANT ME OWE LIKF THAT

AlVAMCE VA AW TM ALL BRS.'

ERAL OFFICE ROUTINE.

eoop CXAMCETO

ArAklC

vv

I Ml i

TH6 PLAYBOYS

Iff

"Of course you always got your homework done--you

grew up betore tne oay or moaern nnamwi..

Faltering Philip!
PhUlp'r Ute is filled with Dmlsec
BMr ovld leave hi home Uke new.
f. A dastifleda. font the rtrht rle

DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
To leant your 'Tortuiw" for today from tho tUrl. writ in the Ittttr
of the alphabtt corrnpondinf to the numerate on the line of the attro attro-logicel
logicel attro-logicel period in which you watt born. You will and it fun.
11J4J.7HH1I 14 15 1o 17 It If 3021 1221 241$ 2
AlCDtfOMI JK IMWOfQtSTUVW X Y t

IAN.
fn.20

f II. 21-MAI.M

MAS. 21 21-AM.
AM. 21-AM. 20

APl.21 APl.21-MAY
MAY APl.21-MAY 20

MAY2I.
JUNE 21

JUNI22-JUIY23

JULY J4 J4-AUG.
AUG. J4-AUG. 22

AUG. 22 22-SOT.
SOT. 22-SOT. 23

SEPT. 24-OCT.2J

OCT. 24 24-NOV.
NOV. 24-NOV. 22

JAN. 21

25 15 21 18 12 15 22 5 0 19 19 15 21 7 8 20

1 22 0 3 20 15 18 25 5 24 1ft 5 3 20 5 4

119 1 3 18 9 693 9 112 12 15 22 6

1 3 1 18 5 5 18 18 5 IS 12 1 14 14 5 4

2 1 4 19 20 1 18 20 15 22 5 18 8 15 18 6

23 9 14 4 1 12 12 15 6 13 15 14 5 25

4 15 13 1 9 14 9 19 6 24 16 1 14 4 5 4

1 14 19 23 5 18 19 20 15 16 18 1 25 5 18 19

3 12 15 21 4 19 3 12 8 1 18 9 14 7 21 16

1 12 5 20 20 5 18 9 19 4 21 5 8 15 13 5

1 6 12 5 5 20 9 14 7 23 5 5 11 5 14 4

25 15 21 18 16 18 1 25 5 18 19 8 5 1 18 4

n $u 06.7. gj&

1 1

T.M. B.r u s, Pl,
1M y NtA S.,,1,.. Im,

"It's a pretty small piece of seaweed better
throw it back in!"

AF0OWAS PANAMA AfiWA YS
PANAMA-MIAMI
MIAMI-NEW YORK

PANAMA
NEW YORK

Today' XV Program

55.00
46.80

80

1:00 Lamp Unto My Feet
2:30 Country Music Jubilee
3:00 Game of The Week
5:30 THIi I; The Life
6:00 Jonathan Winters
:lf CFN NEWS
:30 You Are There
7:00 Jack Benny

7.30 Schlltz Playhouse of Stars
8:00 F,d Sullivan
9:00 Telephone Time
9:30 Phil Silvers
10:00 Wrestling
11:00 CFN NEWS
11:15 Encore; Caesar's Hour.

Courtesy of Aerortas PanamA Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1087 3-1698 3-1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.



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SP3 FEDDE STELLEMA adjus.s the sound controls for the
Auricon movie camera while covering last week's Panama
visit of Dr. Milton Eisenhowe.
( See Pages 2 and 3 for story and pix)

.American
Supplement

PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY, JULY M, 1951



Gl Newsmen

Photos by ..
SP3 VERNON K. RICHEY ..
Quick changes of costume out
side the Presidentica, broadcast

ing from the back of a van, and

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JEWS PHOTOGRAPHERS and reporters In action as Dr. Milt m Eisenhower (far right, back to camera) replies to speeches
f welcome at Tocumen airport.

SGT. BOB JENNINGS and Sp3 Joe Daly pose in the outiits
they wore to the Presidencia while covering Eisenhower's visit
there, they had to make a quick change from sports clothe
to borrowed finery before they could enter the palace.

PFC RICHARD E. LENHARDT "blows up"" a shot of Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower in the darkroom of the Signal photo lab.

editing tape while riding back to

Clij from r ort ban Lorenzo are
among the memories a team of

Public Information and Mgnai

Service men of USARCARIB have

of Dr. Milton Eisenhower's recent

goodwill visit to Panama.

In a successful effort to bring
up-to the minute news and pic

tures to CFN radio and television
audiences this group worked day

and night and found themselves

in some bizarre situations.

Public Information Officer Lt.

Col. T. b. M. Hicks and M-Sgt. Rob.

ert L.. Groover covered the report

ing end of the detail.

. Capt. William B. Radtke, chief
of the Pictorial Division Signal
Section, Sfc Guy V. Hall, Sgt. Rob Robert
ert Robert S. Jennings, Sp3 Vernon K.
Richey, Sp3 Fleetwood H. Scroggs,
Pfc Richard E. Lenhardt and Sd3
Paul W. Johnson manned the
still and motion picture cameras.
Sp3 Joe Daly announced for tel television
evision television and radio and T-Sgt. R.
D. Ryan operated the tape recor recorder.
der. recorder. Eisenhower's plane landed at To To-cnnien
cnnien To-cnnien Airport at 6 o'clock cn fie
afternoon of Saturday, Ju.y 12.
As soon as hi1? motorcade left
the airport at 6:30 p.m. the Army
news party was on its wiy to pro process
cess process pictures and tape for special
shows over t : t aribbenn Forces
Radio and Television NHwork.

iu uuur later a n minute apt
recording frun the sceve at ta
airport was being aired over( CFN
radio This was followed by a
four minute special of films of tha tha-arrival
arrival tha-arrival which were shwi over over-television.
television. over-television. At 11 p.m. a wrap-up story "with
pictures was simulcast over CFN
radio and television.
Sunday morning the Army news
group was on hand at the Presi Presidencia.
dencia. Presidencia. Since they were covering
this assignment in civilian clothing
the group turned up in sport
shirts, only to find that coat and
ties was necessary.
Vernon Richey. who had coma

directly from church, was the on only
ly only enlisted man correctly attired.
Hicks offered his coat and tie,
and Jennings quickly put these on
and hurried inside.
Joe Day, after a quick discus discussion
sion discussion with a Panama nian house housewife,
wife, housewife, disappeared into a nearby
apartment house for a few min minutes.
utes. minutes. He came back wearing a'
yellow coat far too small for him.
On being reminded that he still
lacked tie, he dashed back into
the house, and returned wearing
a purple cravat.
Doubling up with his tape re recorder
corder recorder and still camera hs had
grabbed from one of his coatlesi
colleagues, Daly created some in interest
terest interest by talking (apparently to
himself) and clicking away with
the camera once inside. The tape
he recorded faithfully reproduced
not only the camera clicks but
Joe's heartbeat.
After this the group followed
the motorcade as it went f
Presidencia to the home of Canal
Zone Gov. William E. Potter and
the quarters of the commander

II

- SP3 FLEETWOOD H. SCKUtiUS, who was one oi me
- .. . n m t. i ii.iiii iij i. ... M.ft in kAi nrhioK wive ip, i Kkrnhinpi'i visit, looks over sonM

flVVAl I IH, ine arrival 01 l- tiseimuwcr a viov. n imira zr -. .-i
tight) Sgt. Guy Hall, Hindi Diamond, Sgt. Rob ;rt Jennings and Lt. CoL Thomas Hicks. negatives before decWmg bt to print.

m two

Suntlav American SuDDlement

SUNDAY. JULY20.1958;



r

11 If i

FiconhnApr
LlbcllMOVYci

I

in-chief Caribbean, Lt. Gen. Ridge
tf G?ither.
They were waiting at the presi
denlia! suite in El Panama Hil Hilton
ton Hilton at 2 p.m. to pet pictures of
the conference that afternoon, and
followed Eis'nhr.wcr o the Em
bassy residence at 6 p.m. for nis
meeting witii la'.r leaders of
Locals 900 and 907,- AFSCME,
Al'LCIO.
Their last ch rc for the evening
was shooting pictures of the re reception
ception reception given by President Ernes Ernesto
to Ernesto de !a Guart'Ja Jr. in honor of
Dr. Etsenhobr.
On-the-scene broadcast were an
ed over CFN radio at regular in intervals
tervals intervals during the day with tele telecasts
casts telecasts in the evening. A wrap up fi fiver
ver fiver both radio and television each
evening summarized the day's ac activities
tivities activities of the visitors.
On Monday and Tuesday morn mornings
ings mornings the Information Office; US
ARCARIB, published a special
"Dr. Eisenhower" issue of its dai daily
ly daily news summary, the Chronicle,
At 8:30 a.m. the news team met
for distribution among servicemen
Eisenhower at Miraflores Locks
and a taped version of his inspec inspection
tion inspection there was on CFN radio by
midday. Pictures of the event fol followed
lowed followed over television.

Odd sound effects were created
by Daly's making a ape recoiing
as he bounced along in the back
of truck on the way to For
This tape was included in the
eveningshow of motion pictures
end taped material simulcast over
radio and TV that evening, cober cober-Ing
Ing cober-Ing Eisenhower's inspection of the
Miraflores and Pedro Miguel locks,
his tour of the United States Ar Army
my Army Caribbean School at Fort Gu Gu-lick
lick Gu-lick and his viewing of Fort San San-Lorenzo.
Lorenzo. San-Lorenzo. The third day, when Eisenhow Eisenhower
er Eisenhower and his party went on a fish fishing
ing fishing trip unaccompnied by corre correspondents,
spondents, correspondents, the information office
looked forward to a routine day.
But this was July IS. Just as
the daily news sheet, the Chro Chronicle,
nicle, Chronicle, was being published for the
day, President Eisenhower's an announcement
nouncement announcement of the landing of
5000 Marines in T,ebanon was re received.
ceived. received. A full page bulletin was
prepared and distributed with the
rest of the Chronicle.
Meanwhile bulletins were beiti2
broadcast over CFN as fast as
they were coming over the wire
These were followed by news
roundups.
At 9 o'clock that night, the tn tn-fomation
fomation tn-fomation office was tipped that
-President Eisenhower's address
on Lebanon might be broadcast
shortly by the Voice of Ameica.
(Continued on Page 7)

SOUND FILM must be carefully edited. MSgt. Robert L.
Groover brings all his concentration to bear as he erlits sound
i film for a Panorama newareel roundup of Eisenhower's visit.

SUNDAY, JULX20, 1958

SGT. BOB JENNINGS mans
Tocumen airport. From left

SGT. GUI HALL draws a bead on a member of the Milton
Eisenhower group as he operates a 16 mm Bell and Howell
silent motion picture camera.

HaBF Hf!H llvf II sVP'4lBsi
jy" jf K Sjl
J THlBH Hbhw. jHsBiBiHVil skPSshst BHs'1' JH

the Auricon sound movie camera
to right are Sgt. Guy Hall, MSgt.

RECORDING THE ARRIVAL of Dr. Eisenhower at Tocumen airport are Pfc. Richard E. Len Len-hardt
hardt Len-hardt at the silent motion picf re camera and Sgt. Bob Jennings (right) at the Auricon
sound camera. Films from both sources were used on CFN television.

svtlMtate AsMfKiA tSitlfVllif Hm

as he gets set to cover Dr. Milton Eisenhower's departure from
Pobert L. Groover, Werner Wolfe and Jennings.

SP3 PAUL W. JOHNSON and Sp3 Vernon Richey look over a
negative which Johnson has made from Richey's shot. Boih
these men worked day and night covering the Eisenhower
goodwill mission to Panama,

V ' '



TH PANAMA AMERICAN

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POETy CORNER
CROSSING THE 'BAR
By Alfred Lord Tennyson
Sunset and evening star,
And one clear call for me!
And may there be no moaning of the bar,
When J put out to sea,
Bvl such a tide as moving seems asleep,
Too full for sound and foam.
When that which drew from out the boundless deep
Turns again home.
Twilight and evening bell,
And after that the dark!
Ami may there be no sadness of farewell.
When I embark;
Tor tho' from out our bourne of Tim and Place
The flood may bear me far,
I hope to see my Pilot face to face
When I have crost the bar.

NEVER SAW A MOOR
By Emily Dickinson
1 never saw a moor,
1 never saw the sea;
Yet know 1 how th" heather looks,
And what a wave must be.
1 never spoke with God,
Nor visited in Heaven;
Yet certain am I of the spot
As if the chart were given.

WHEN WAS ONE AND-TWENTY
By A. E. Housman
When I was one-and-' wenty
1 heaid a wise nan say,
"Give crowns and pounds aid guineas
But net your hrart away;
Give pearls away and rubies
But keep your fancy free
But I wa-; one and-twenty,
No ue to talk to me.

When I was one-and-twenty
I heard him say again,
"The heart out of the bosom
Was never given in vain;
'Tis paid wi'h sighs a plenty
And sold for endless rue."
And I a'n wo-and-twenty,
And oh, 'tis true, 'tis true.

Herewith find solution to Sunday Crossword Puz Puzzle
zle Puzzle No. 749, published today.

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CHEMISES CAME IN FASHION, WHENCE
WANDEPED WOMAN'S FORM?

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The Washington

ly MiW PEARSON

Mitchell's statement issued while
.. id j i. ..;.. f

Mitchell's somersault wa engi j workers' aemuerauc rtgnu.
neered by none other than the as J Yet the same Mitchell, speaking

sistaat president, Sherman Ad. I seam ewsea aoors in mew ioi,
ams. confessed frankly: "I would also
nil I idi.i 1 c- I 111.'.. .nnamAni ft tha infcrAr.'A

lac w wmmcui m mi.i'v
that democracy in unions Will be

beneficial to the interests of the

While Mitchell was in Switzer

land, Adams put out an angry

statement in Mitchell s name blast blasting
ing blasting the labor reform bill drafted
by Massachusetts' Sen. Jack Ken.
nedy, even though the bill had
been endorsed by a bipartisan ma majority,
jority, majority, including all but one mem member
ber member of the Senate Labor Commit,
tee.
FEWER LEGAL RULES

WASHINGTON U'i fashiona. campaign for Governor ol Cafifor

ble in Washington these days to

jump on Sherman Adams, ana ne
doesn't deserve quite all that he
is getting.
However, Defense Department
officials may be correct in Diam Diamine
ine Diamine him tor an amazing boondog-

gie in west Virginia 1 uupiic.il.
ing laboratories to receive signals
from outer space.
Bight alongside in the next
county, at Green Bank, W. Va.,
the National Science Foundation is
constructing, a radio astronomy

station at an estimated cost of
$55 million. It also will receive

signals from American and Rus.

sian sputniks.

The purpose, of the two labora

tories is exactly identical.

Nevertheless, they are being no it

almost side by side, one by the

Navy, the other by the National

Acaoemy o Science.

Reason Defense Department of

ficials blame Adams for these

two duplicating laboratories is the
administration's desire to re-elect

a couple of Republican Senators "My job," he said then, 'is to
from West Virginia. quiet the hysteria so we donget
Republican strategists figure that i the kind o legislation that wonW
with plenty of defense buildirtg in be dangerous to the American la.
West Virginia they may be able bor movement. Maybe the right
to re-elect Senators Reverco.r.b. way to put it is: feed a little inno.
and Htblilzell, both of whom comecuous legislation to the lions, and
up for election next November, t this may give us the time to put
the thing in the right perspective.
BLACK POT AND KETTLE "I don't think," he added, "that
anybody is going, to be able to

When the Democratic Policy! write and pass legislaslation that

employer. Basically, a union rs
an oligarchy. You could have' a.
r.arciiy if you instituted complete

ideal democracy in unions. . .1

think that many employers would

be afraid o' completely democra democratic
tic democratic control."

Mitchell's words in April imli.
cafe that his statement in June
was strictly a political document.
'I think the fewer the legal
rules," he said in April, "the bet.
ter off you are."

UNDER THE DOME

Committee met behind closed doors
recently, Sen. Tom Hennings of
Missouri tried to persuade fellow
Senators to okay his Federal Dis.
closure Act. This is a bill which

would p r e v e n t the executive

gress and the public.

Mitchell's alleged statement
from Switzerland described pres

ent labor laws as "pitifully inef.
fective" and demanded more po

er "to compel testimony, hold
hearings. .and issue subpeonas.

This was aexactlv opposite of

what he had said privately two Democratic members of the Har.

months earlier. ris investigating commmee are

still suspicious uf their chairman,
the Arkansas Congressman. They
learned recently that he was keep keeping
ing keeping secret a confidential diary
kept by ex FCC Commissioner

Richard Mac. Mack s cuary was
seised by the FBI' and turned o.
ver to the House committee, but
Harris would let no other mem members
bers members of his committee look at it
. .Congressman Jack Shelley of
San Francisco, a member of the
Teamsters Union, is one of the a a-West
West a-West members of Congress but
one of the scarcest for his constr.
tuents to locate. .Several million
American GIs will learn about
democracy and Communism from
a book, "Democracy" vs. Commu.
nism," by Professor Kenneth Cole-

grove, formerly of Northwest cri

will correct- the evils that the Mc

Clellan committee has uncovered
and may uncover in the future.
The job must be done by the la labor
bor labor movement itsel'."

As for the authority he is now

branch of the government from 1 demanding to disclose secret rec

withholding information from Con. ords of union funds, Mitchell said

in April: "This would require aj University. The armed service!

' based on the botk.

However, big, bluff, Bible pound, i change in the law, and I would are distributing 1,000,000 pamphlets

mg 5en. Bob Kerr of Oklahoma pre er to defer this.
was opposed.
"This has hpen a law sinrf

178!) even before we had a (.in (.institution,
stitution, (.institution, he growled. "Why
change it now?

"The newspapers want it chaiig
ed, but I can get along without
the newspapers. Why should we
act just to please the papers?"
Kerr was referring to the fact
that the American Society of
Newspa :er Editors led by Herbert
Brucker, editor of the Hartford
Cojrant, has been urging hat

Congress clari y the old law
whica was established merely as
a housekeeping provision lor the

storing o records, but whteh

now cited by various department

MUSIC, MUSIC MUSIC-

By DELOS SMITH

I Music in Philadelphia; each artist
lis an individual who may or may

NEW YORK (UPI) The iiig not send a particular listener, de de-(and
(and de-(and sometimes hot) argument appending upon whether an emotion emotion-mnnf?
mnnf? emotion-mnnf? musicians right now is 1 hook-up gets established be-

whether the business of award

ing prizes advances either the

cuse of music or of the profes-

tween the two. Of course, eaid

E'man. Cliburn is "enormously

gifted."

sionals who play it for the aeslhe-, On the other hand, I can give
tic elevation of the public and you the private thoughts of a

si their own livelihoods. world-renowned conductor, who

The argument stems, ot course,

t) prevent even routine 'Oi Vma- ;from Van Clibdrn, the piano ploy

tion from going to Congress and er from Texas of whom no one,
the public. aside from some fans ot piano-
Fortright Attorney General Wit playing, had heard until he wn
liam Rogers has said that tbt old a prize in Moscow. Then over over-law
law over-law passed in 1789 is mer'Jy a night he became the No. 1 lon lon-"keeping
"keeping lon-"keeping of custody" stat'ise !o hrir oer.'orii er nf the worl
provide a clerk in each epart wjin a stock-pile of concert bids
ment to keep records. Rogers Lu that'tl take him years to set
claims the law does not mean through.
that the rocorJs -' ould wi.h. : You'll understand why thu sr
held from the public. i.Pt js mnink ioi"? on behind
However. Keir ana the ma jonty dospd stuHjf) rlonrs No Tffo,,
of the Democratic Policy Commit -jwants to be accused of display
lea were opposed. Senator Russell J j sour es gettine out a
of Georgia wanted more time to 'hammer for use on a collef-gue -consider
the matter , Jin this case. Cliburn. Yiu'll ?ko
Thus Democrats who howl about ,undprgind that no musician sir

secrecy in a nepuDiican aorai .is. ... r,ihllrn isn-t a terrific

tration are now putting themselves

in the nosilion of the, pot calling
the ke'.tle black.

SOMERSAULT FOR IKE
Secretary of Labor Jim Mitchell

is a truly loyal member of the

Cabinet. He will really turn som.
ersauks for Ike. i j
How complete was his recent
somersault regarding the Kennedy Kennedy-!ves
!ves Kennedy-!ves labor reftrm bill has iustj
been revealed by the secret min
utes of a meeting which Mitchell ;
attended in New York April 24.
The minutes were stamped "Con.
fidcntial" but hfrve now reached
this column. They show that be.
fore the Secretary o' Labor went
to Switzerland he was against a a-ny
ny a-ny tough labor law as now de demanded
manded demanded by Senator Knowland of
Cali'ornia and the White -House.
"I know there are pressures to
pass right-to.work laws," Mitchell
told a Columbia University semi seminar,
nar, seminar, "but this won't solve the cor.
motion problem."
Yet two months later Mitchell
completely reversed himself after
Knowland demanded that the la
lor issue be kept alive to help his

piano player.

Elman's View

The argument is that th?)" atr

scores of other young musician

who'll never get a brew, and

who'll Drobably olay their ,nanns

or violins or clarinets on the po-

tnto-rhins-anrl rl'ken-sa'ad'Ct'cuit

for years until they retire from;

exhaustion to make a ooor living

as teachers. When a Cliburn gets
sky-rocketed, don't, until numbers
of also deserving young men get
disheartened? And isn't this a

loss for music?
So far only one top musical fig

ure has lifted a public voice to

support this widely held view.
Mischa Elman, the venerable vio violinist
linist violinist who has been an interna internationally
tionally internationally celebrated artist since
childhood, came right out and

said it was a bad thing for mu music,
sic, music, this business of prizes which
m.'ikn it. annear that, music has

"chamnions" as do bbxinc and

basebalL

Music has no champions, he

said in addressing he graduating

class ofthe Combs College of

would break his baton over my
head if I connected his name with
his private views, since they are
quite unaesthetical. The Cliburn
w'inss has b?-n a "circus," he
told me.
"Let's have more musical circus circuses,'
es,' circuses,' he. said. "Let's get into the
concert halls all the people we

possibly can, by whatever means.
Let's expose those people to ope-

ra,, symphony orchestras, chorales

and even piano players even if it
takes a circus to do it. We can
convert them to serious music
(meaning non-pop) if we can ev ever
er ever get them to lis'e:, to it serious seriously.
ly. seriously. And that would be a wonder wonderful
ful wonderful thing both for music and mu musicians.'
sicians.' musicians.' Elman cited the most famous
of musical prizes, the Grand Prix
de Rome, which has been award awarded
ed awarded annually to a graduating stu student
dent student of the Paris Conservatoire
for well over a century Look at
Camille Saint Saens, said Elman.
He tried twice for it and was
turned down twice Yet he went
on to become an esteemed com

poser.

Now. I don't want to play the

wise guy with Elman, whose sur

passing merits as a violinist are
beyond praise. But look at Claude
Debussy; he won the Grand

Prix. Also Hector aertiz wno,

with Debussy, ranks at the very

top. Georges Bizet, Who made
himself immortal with the opera,
"Carmea," won it Even Charles

Gounod won St, and his opera
'Faust' certainly has lasted bet

ter than the one healthy surviv

ing work of Saint Saens, Sam Samson
son Samson and Delilah."
That's no contribution to the
pro or circus side of the argu argument.
ment. argument. It's only to show that big
music prize winners of the past
frequently have gone on to long long-enduring,
enduring, long-enduring, achievements.

i
MmV JTTTjY 20. 1358
LliLJllUHUii
' ill M
HI lli

m

. 4 i



Walter Winchell

ws Notebook
-
In New York
Alaskan Addenda Well Done49ers
Flagging Sales Rug Bug Wet Wait

Jut tmk

MAN ABOUT TOWN
TWA pilot H. Hughes and his
wile (former movie star Jean Pe.
ters) are now 3 according to
neighbors along Mulholland Drive,
Beverly Hills... Mickey Rooney's
new interest is Metro starlet Pat
Cawley ... Charles Chaplin, Jr.,
has proposed to actress Susan
Magness, 22 ... Eleanor Searle,
who just got a 3 million $ettlemint
from Cornelius Whitney, is an ex.
Arthur Murray dance .tutor ...Prin ...Princess
cess ...Princess Grace Rainier's sister Peg
and her husband (Philly society)
are making news ... Look out Tor
counterfeit $20 bills around Broad Broadway.
way. Broadway. The serial tipo f is M-43 ...A
group of Warner Bros, stockhold stockholders
ers stockholders are plotting a suit against that
management to find out why War,
ner's pre-1948 movies got only 21
million bux from teevee while Par Paramount
amount Paramount (with an "inferior" back

log) got 50 "mill" ... What's the
fuzz about Suzy Parker's where whereabouts?
abouts? whereabouts? Just ask us. Suzy's a
The Hosp. tor Special Surj here
under the name of Cecilia Ford.
The Internationals: Alleged love
letters from Princess Margaret
Rose to Group Capt. Peter Town Town-send
send Town-send are being of ered (in N.Y )
to national mags. Said to have
been thefted from Petah's car a.
bout three months ago... Insiders
say the real reason the Royal Fam
ily won't permit her to marry him
is that she'd become step-mater to
Bis sons: Hugo (12) and Giles (16)
... If yon plan Summering -along
the French Riviera don't invite
author Francoise Sagan and Ro.
ger Vadim (Bardot's ex) lo the
same party. Their mutual hatred
society is the highlight of the sea season.
son. season. Or Ava Gardner and Wal Wal-ter
ter Wal-ter Chiari ..." Former Broadway
pet (from the South) "Pat" Wild Wilder
er Wilder (Princess Alexander Hohenlone)
has written a 70page story about
her African sa'ari that cannot be
printed.
Gwen Pinza (cousin of the late
Ezio Pinza) becomes the bride of
John Adamo (a cha-cha teacher)
soon ... Noath Dietrich (for 35
years Howard Hughes' righthand
en oougnt hammv uavis, jr. s
$14,000 specially built Caddy ...
Christine Jorgensen was almost
electrocuted during one of the
rainstorms (mit lightning) last
week. Says her hair stood up like
a Ubangi's ... Marilyn Monroe's
new white platinum bleach is
breaking off her tresses ... Olivia
Ladd (dghtr of the late Russel
Davenport) merges wiih Keith
Highet vson of the scholarly Gil Gilbert
bert Gilbert Highet) in Great Barrington
Aug. 23 ... A recent study report report-ec
ec report-ec that about 28 million so call,
ed whites (in the U.S.) have Ne Negro
gro Negro ancestors. Source: Ohio Jour,
nal o" Science.
Time, Inc. may be interested in
Jerome Beatty's skewp in the Ju.
ly 26 Saturday Review ... Up o
lately, Life mag insisted that the
author of "Parkinson's Law" did
.not exist. That the name is ficti ficti-ous
ous ficti-ous ... He is Professor C. JIorlh
cote 'Parkinson. His book sold ov over
er over 100,000 copies. He just emerged
from Singapore, his home. He will
spend the Summer lecturing io
Harvard students on the history of
the British Empire. The editors o
Life (and St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
may interview him there ard, says
Mr. Beatty, "perhaps retract that
earlier statements that there is no
such person."
The Greg Juarez story (Bob Se.
grist, the heiress) will get rough,
er. The British bride tells pals she
will make bigger headlines with
the reason she tried lo return to
Bermuda without him when he
snatched their image off that plane
... Dottie Harmony of the Tropi Tropi-cana
cana Tropi-cana Hotel (Vegas) has given up
recording stars Presley and Sands
for Jonathan Keller, rick kin of
richer Woolworth Donahue and
Babs Hutton ... Diane Ladd wings
in from H'wood to start rehear,
sals for "The Verdict Is Yours,"
which now owns the spot lost by
"Climax". ..Warning to sloppy New
Yorkers: Gendarmes are handing

out tickets for "wrinkled" or "dir
ty" drivers licenses ... It doesn't
pay to work what with employ
ment agencies (here) taking near,
ly a month's salary and unemploy.
ment insurance at only $45. ..More
pro it in being a moocher.

The Washington Wire: J. Edgar
Hoover dieted off 25 lbsi Had to
have all his clothes taken in.
No cocktails, no bread, butter, po potatoes,
tatoes, potatoes, ice cream or sugar. (And
no fun) ... The top G Man and
Justice Irving Kaufman make
speeches soon before the Bar Ass'n
on the Coast ... The Sherman Ad
ams probe may irvolve people re responsible
sponsible responsible for getting a visa for
Venezuela's recent dictator (Jime
nez) to enter the U.S.. .$50100 al.
legedly was the oayoff to a Wash Washington
ington Washington fixer ... From Pae 6 of
"Your Income Tax" (by I. K. Las
ser): Although you can claim
people who are not related to you. j
they have to be members of your
nousenoia. a mistress cannot he i
taken as a dependent ... The ex exemption
emption exemption is disallowed as against
public policy'' ... Now that Alaska
is to be a State it'll be entitled
to Congressmen, Senators and a
road-building scandal.
They say NBC dropped a stag,
gering ten million dollars in three
years trying to make "Matinee
Theatre" click ... Top tunesmith
Robert Allen ("Chances Are") an
his ex.wife clash in court. She was
dancer Lucille Allen, who alleged
his hit songs make scads of mon money
ey money but she and the tots have to
sing the Blues ... When you hear
Jonah Jones' (at the Embers)
trumpet wail "The Saints Go
Marching In," It's hard to believe
this happy jump chune was a fun
eral march ... Cafe de Paris res
cuer Sy Pollack reports he has
over 20,000 reservations booked
when August ends. Lou Walteres
returns as producer next month,
plus 15 percent ownership o' the
stock. Rudy Vallee stars there Ju July
ly July 31. Chicki James and "Marilyn.
Jr." are only two of the lovely
Eves.
Abbe Lane reminds all concern
ed at "Oh, Captain that she
was misquoted. That she gave her
notice when the closing notice
(since taken down) went up .
Roberta Sherwood again confirm,
ed (he colyuni's raves in Chicago
where critics unanimously made
love to her after the Black Orchid
premiere ... Flamenco dancer Vi
torio Korjhan (recent soloist with
the Met Opera Ballet) is a hit at
hi Chico in the village. His fadda
s a popular delective lieut ... The
big event tonight is the reopening
of the smott set's Colony. ..In Lon.
don they are hilarious over 'al
sie derrieres. They are called
"Bardots" and give the gals that
Brigitte curve ... The Mirror's
Charles Kenny Nick's brudda
and Anna Suzanna Mahometa
(she's Turkish-Viennese) wed any
edition... A new dime boak is tit.
led: "I Was a Teenage Pansy."
Liz Whitney and actor Dale Rob
ertson did the whoopee-bit at Ben
Blue's ... Carol Lynley (lead in
"Blue Denim") and Tom Dewey,
Jr., turned necks at Dan Stamp
ler's spot ... Merle Debuskey (of
the 'Look Homeward, Angel' press
corps) and dancer Chris Karner
unite at Baltimore. A Mexican
honeymoon ...Lana Turner's stead steadiest
iest steadiest date appears to be actor Ken
Dibbs, once part of the El Moroc Morocco
co Morocco scene ... "Wagon Train," they
say, loses $70,000 weekly. The hour,
long hoss.opera costs $100,000 a
week. The station sells it for 30.
"to keep the sponsor" ..The Me
Guire Girls broke Lena Home's
July 4 attendance record at the
Hotel Ambassador's Coconut Grove
the West Coast's happiest spot ...
The "Winchell File" (Desilu) se series
ries series resumes in the Fall in N.Y.
over Channel 5 ... A Detroit news,
man's merciless truth: "Constant
use wears out everything includ including
ing including friend." v

W ASH1NGON ( NE A ) MTafia
racketeers, the Kremlin and Sber-;
man Adams may be making the
most dramatic headlines these
days, but Washington party.goers
rank Alaskan statehood and the
recent visit of the Sbah of iran
highest on the capital chuckle
barometer. For instance:
Enest Gruening, the ex-terri-torial
governor of Alaska and key
figure in lobbying for stjte.iood,
found out that there was me k k-laskan
laskan k-laskan statistic he didn't ,now.
He and Mrs. Gruening invited ev.
ery person in town who had ever
lived in Alaska to a big statehood
celebration at his house ihe day
after the Senate vote.

"I never dreamed there were so 49tn sta,e- 11 has been ruled ruled-many
many ruled-many people in Washington who Thus- 0"'y replacement flags
had once lived in Alaska," he ad. Purchased by the government
....1 Af . TL .III

mit'.d.
ri the trrv hom h knu.i
Alaskan
(natch)
salmon held
out, and
ous time.
everyone
had a hilari-
Associate Supreme Cout Jus
tice Felix Frank "urter was there

and somebody asked him if heiyear bought 55.970 small flags for

had ever been to Alaska. "Ni t
recently," he replied. "But I love
the salmon Ernest always serves.'
THE FLAG'S future 49th star
is anything but lucky for six
Washington secretaries. Annex
ing Alaska to the United States
means that the gals who worked
or the Alaskan delegate and
three special statehood promoters
will soon be looking for new jobs.
I heir bosses are closing rp shop;
iui suoci ana neaaing Hack to A A-laska
laska A-laska to campaign. But the gals
arm just as enthusiastic as ever
about statehood. And they
ITlieht PPl fheir inh kk it n..:.
bosses are elected to Cnnerosc
Isabel Lynne. who has been with
the special three.man delegation
since it first came to
flashing.
(Bos, cSWt
en
Fiction
ANATOMY OF MURDER Ruber)
Traver
THE W1NTHROP WOMAN
-Anya i
seton
-ICE PALACE Edna Ferber
A SUMMER PLACE-Sloan WH
son
J'ORTH FROM ROME Helen Mac
nines
THE SERGEANT
-Dennis Mur
Phy
THE GREENGAGE SUMMER
Rumer Godden
Non-Fiction
1INSIDE RUSSIA TODAY
Gimther,
MASTERS OF DECEIT
gar Hoover
John
Ed
PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAI DAISIES
SIES DAISIES -Jean Kerr
KIDS SAY THE DARNDEST
THINGS! Art Linklelter
DEAR ABBY Abetail Van Buren
MADISON AVENUE, U.S. Mar
tin Mayer
THE ORDEAL OF WOODROW
WILSON-Herbert Hoover
TO LIVE AGAIN-tatherine Mar Marshall
shall Marshall BEN Z VI ENDS VISIT
AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands
(UPI) Israeli President Ishak
Ben Zvi and his wie ended a
three.day unofficial visit to the
Netherlands yesterday and "lew to
Brussels. The presidential couple
visited various cultural and histor
in sues auring ineir slay here.
They also met Queen Juliana aniJ
Prince Bernhard and representa-
tives of Jewish and Zionist organ.
izations.

By DOUGLAS LARS EN and JERRY BENNETT

( ton, declares: "I wouldn't take
anything for the work I've done
'in spite of the fact I campaigned
myself out of a paycheck."
Alaska delegate to Congress,
Bob Bartletl, got the following
wire from Nome after the Sena.e
voted for statehood:
"Nothing could be finer than
to be a torty-niner in fifth -eight."
A Federal executive order issued
in 1916 by President Woodrow
Wilson forbids any government
agency to replace for dispose of an
American flag unless iit is worn
out tvyond use.
This order is still in effect and
will hold in spite of the addition
witi nave ij Mdi.v inai ami
means sizable flag purchases.
Last year. Government Services
Administration bought 30,000 A A-merican
merican A-merican flags for the civilian gov government
ernment government agencies as replace,
ments.
The Army, which does all the
flag buying for the services, last
graves and 28,843 flags 'if
var
ious sizes for other purposes.
Anyone wanting to buy a Per.
sian rug "to loan" to some friend
in government had better get his
order in early.
The cost is going up, Mo.
What Do
There were 400,000 men in the
! Grand Army that opened Napole
' on s Russian campaign in June
1812. About 1000 000 ol them went
to Moscow, and lef. it on the night
of Oct. 18. About 1,000 corribai
troops, with some thousands of
s ragglers, arrived in East Prus Prussia
sia Prussia two months later.
For Napoleon it was the begin,
ning of the end. With Napoleon
on that ill-omened expedititri was
the young Count Philippe-Paul de
Segur, a general on his personal
sta f. De Segur wrote a report of
the retreat. For years it was a
source book for the Russian ex.
pedition. Tolstoy borrowed liberal,
ly from it for his novel "War and
Peace
It was out of print for 50
years.
Now de Segur's classic has been
republished in an admirable new
translation by Wil iam L. Langei
under the title Napoleon's Russian
Campaign 'Houghton Mifflin).
Day by day. week by week, in
burning heat, in teeming rain, in
blinding snow, de Segur marched
with the Grand Army. Few more
rranhir stories of war ever have
been written than his account.
! Half starved half naked fre.-z-
line soldiers and the disorderly
horde of stragglers -troops who
had thrown away their muskets,
women and children dropped in
the snow to die as they marched,
or died huddled in rings around the
weak, f ickering camp fires, or
drowned in the rivers. Now, the
Russians were hacking away at the
motley column. Heroic French rear
guards held them oft, and tne nus nus-sians,
sians, nus-sians, never won a battle. It was
Russian space and the Russian
climate that won.
And now ctmes some of the sum summer's
mer's summer's choicest reading Oliver
Warner's Victory, The Li e of Lord
Nelson (Little, Brown).
For those fiction lovers who
have been thrilled by the exploits
of Horatio Hornblower, Victory
wi'l appear, rather familiar, as it
should be, since Hornbkwer'i cre creator
ator creator dipped deeply into the real-
life exploits of Britain's greatest
cp.t rani a in for his basic material.
For the Napoleonic historian,
Victory comes as one of the better
biographies, one superbly and

Beaadt

hammed Riza t'ahlevi S.,
Iran revealed during his
ington visit.
a of
V. sn-
It isn l tne demand that s rais.
ing prices. It's Iran's new social
security laws which prevent child
labor and provide for higher min minimum
imum minimum wages.
His Imperial Majesty held out
this promise or lobbyists, in in-Ihiemv
Ihiemv in-Ihiemv peddlers and other poten
tial buyers:
"We'll try to keep the industry
alive."
At The National Press Club
luncheon for the Shah, he volun volunteered
teered volunteered the information that there
was complete Ireedom of speech
in his country. He put it this way:
"Tonsils are removed by tht
mouth. You can open your
mouth."
Most Talkative reception Una
of the year was the one at a big
blowout which the Iranian Em.
bassy threw for the Shah al the
Mayflower Hotel.
In fact, some guests insisted on
chatting with the ever patient
monarch for almost five ir.iiiutes
Reason for all the chatter was
that a special squad of uniform""!
waiters kepf walking up and
down the long line serving cham champagne.
pagne. champagne. By the time many o" the guests
finally reached the Shah, they
had downed at .east three drinks.
You Read?
with a fresh, approach that ably
intertwines the three pluses of
Nelson's lite into an understand understandable
able understandable pattern.
Warner was not content to touch
on y on the sea, or on the land,
or on the romantic aspects it Nel Nelson's
son's Nelson's life. Each phase receives Ihe
proper emphasis as it relates io
tne other until a well-rounded, lull
portrait comes forth. The aut icr
is neither sympathe.ic wr antago.
nistic toward the lady Hamilton
romance, and consequently pre.
sents it in all its distasteiulness,
but with a discerning understand,
ing oi the prime roe u played.
The Admiral's pettiness, his in
pulsiveness, and selfishness all arc
j on display but at an integral
part ol his courage, his immense
tactical abilities and his physical
stamina.
It is a wholly fascinating por portrait
trait portrait and a signi icant eontrioution
tt Eng ish history.
For months Americans have had
hurled at them a steady barrage
of self-criticism about U.S. educa education.
tion. education. Now William Benton, former
U. S. senator from Connecticut,
offers a meaty, provocative sum.
mation of what all the fuss is a a-bout
bout a-bout in This Is The Challenga
(N. Y University Press). A fore foreword
word foreword by John Gunther and a pre.
face by Adlai E. Stevenson intro introduce
duce introduce this collection of lectures
and essays based on Benton's 1955
trip to Russia. This is probably tho
most deailed analysia of Soviet Soviet-American
American Soviet-American educational systems and
the challenge of Russian science
that has been made available in
one volume.
Benton has carried on a cam campaign
paign campaign for two years to arouse
America from its "intellectual nap.
ping." His warnings of 56 and
1957 are even owe pertinent today
ia pointing up ihe threat of a gi gigantic
gantic gigantic Russian educational pro program
gram program that casts a long shadow
over the years ahead when the
battle of "competitive coexistance"
will move into critical stages. Ben.
ton emphasizes the Soviet chal.
Ienge to American businessmen,1
the Soviet bid to capture under,
developed countries and the erod eroding
ing eroding effect of Soviet tactics on
Western unity. ;

if
SUNDAY. JULY 20. 1958
M it
i i
PAG8 IIVl
a

ill t .lJfi



M
wmmm 1

WILLIAM H. SINCLAIR, AFSCME international representative
tells Lt. Col. T. M. B. Hicks what the unions are presenting to
Dr. Milton "Eisenhower for his consideration.
GI Newsmen and Eisenhower

I Premier Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle
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k Continued from Pae THRKr.
The office contacted the Signal
Corps receiver station at Chiva
tJhiva. The station nmde a side
band caH to Washington and ob obtained
tained obtained four different Voice of A A-merjea
merjea A-merjea fiequencies. By monitoring
the four they were able to br'mg
In the President's speech and

IN THE President's speech and

broadcast it over CFN.
At the same time thev rerord

ed the speech so that it could be
rebroadcast the following day.
Earlier on Tuesday CFN staffers
located a travel film on Lebanon,
whirh thev nrpsented before their

Middle East round-up of news on

TV Panorama.

mHF

HORIZONTAL VERTICAL
1 Green 45 Re- 91 Quintet t A kind 4T Forbid 81 Troop
.. herbage animate sence Of 48 Disjoin 83 Oive
Small 48 Jargon 92 Convex cheese 49 Path medicine)
marine 60 Full curvature J Imperial 51 River 85 Many
duck 84 Sharp given to 3 Subside of legged
ift Caat off mountain a column 4 Aggro (Germany bisect
14 Cover With spur 84 Unite gate 82 Anglo- 88 Caprico
melted fat 85 Future firmly 5 Wound Indian 88 Met-
18 Retort 58 Thieve 86 Humbly 6 Arachnid weight lower
38 Chinese 88 Wood 97 Luke- T Worth 58 Pitcher 00 Portable
wax durable warm 8 Omit 85 Small lodge
SI Plant of In water 88 Dwarf 8 Lived African 93 Like
cabbage 88 Meddle 100 Mend 10 Blemish fox 95 Mull
faihily 81 Ruthless 101 Plum 11 Esteem 57 Wager 98 Maacu
fl Pickled 63 nius- 104 Outpour 12 Evoke 60 Terror line
bamboo trious 106 Stipule 15 Mislead er 61 Long 98 Separate
shoote 84 Fifth sign 108 Saltwort 14 Un- for 100 Leave
23 Old World of zodiac 112 Wing worthy 62 Fatal 101 Alluvial
lizard 65 Hurled 113 Individual 15 Behave 66 A frag- matter
24 Flower of 66 Worrier 115 News- 16 Allot- ment 102 Modify
Bayous 68 Display print ment 67 Cry 103 Scowl
25 Indigo- 69 College 117 Recep- 17 Claw of 105 Cap Cap-plant
plant Cap-plant dignitary tacle 18 Uplifted ostrich tured
26 Tasteless 70 Tall wad- 118 Russian 29 City of 69 Having 107 Chaff-
27 Indian ing bird stockade Pennsyl- toothed like
acrobat 71 Pitch 120 Enjoy vania margin bract
28 Becloud 73 Mineral 121 Tissue 30 Nuisance 70 Contain- 109 Aloft
80 Acquire vein 122 Do 31 Renovate ing 110 Cloth
82 Fabulous 76 Accept penance 34 Pick Cerium 11 Sluggish
bird 78 Split 124 Finch 36 Plexus 72 Tele- 113 Cooped
S3 On shield 79 Exclama- 125 Arm of 38 Instru- graphic 114 Serve
ed aide tion Arabian ment device 116 Float
85 Leave 82 Correct Sea for 73 Weak of
37 Be con- 84 Position 126 River of blowing 74 Fore- logs
veyed in fencing Germany fires token 119 Poly-
88 Stiff wiry 85 Nature 127 Great ex- 40 Loath 75 Hollow nesian
grass 87 Wise cltement 42 Earthy 77 Head plant
89 Bed of counsellor 128 Negotiate 44 Prolong covering 121 Measure
wild beast 89 Crater 129 Burst 45 Thin 78 Converse of
41 Snug 90 Fresh- 130 Orderly bird 79 Solar capacity
abode water 131 English 46 Sea disk 123 Thrice
43 Rigid duck river bird 80 Repair (music)

Average How et Miotics: S3 minute.
CBYPTOQUIP
UXFKJ KQJRXUJU KCRJ XF LCUQXZF. OQJFKJ
OCFGJBJQ OZRCF'U LZBR?
tO 1968, King Features Syndicate, Inc.)

HE BOUGHT IT-Morris Snyder of Canton, Ohio, is out $200
after a friendly joke backfired on him. He and his son Phillip,
8. are shown giving a group of neighborhood children a ride
after a burro and cart had been delivered to his home from
Indianapolis. A formet neighbor called Snyder and told him
he had a burro and cart for sale. Snyder said he would buy
If his friend could deliver. He did much to Snyder's surprise.
No doubt his passengers are convinced lt was a good buy.

J

For The Best In Fotos & Features
..It's The Sunday American

SUNDAY, JULY 20, 1958

tAGJb. SIX
Sunday American



v,'. -,-,. ': 8 fjL--, a. r"

Review Of The
9
WORLD-WIDE ISTHMIAN
SPORTS

Week

THE MIDDLE EASTERN situation erupted last
week in one of the gravest- International crises
tince the end of World War II.
It started with a revolt in pro-Western Iraq by sub subversive
versive subversive army elements friendly to President Gama-1
Abdel Nasser of the United Arab Republic; who aspires
to the mastery of the Arab world.
In a dramatic series of consequent events, the Unit United
ed United States landed Marines in Lebanon at the request of
the Lebanese government. . Soviet Russia demanded
the United States withdraw at once and threatened,
if it did not, to "take the necessary measures" .
United States paratroopers landed in Turkey, ad adjacent
jacent adjacent to Lebanon. .British paratroops landed in Jor Jordan
dan Jordan on the appeal of King Hussein, who had united
his country with Irak as the Arab Federation . Rus Russia
sia Russia announced military maneuvers, land, sea and air,
adjacent to Iran and Turkey.
The Iraqi revolt broke with startling suddenness
Monday It shocked Allied governments, which realiz realized
ed realized at once that it might mean disaster to their en entire
tire entire Middle East situation.
It was known the revolt was brief, bloody and suc suc-eessiful.
eessiful. suc-eessiful. Later, day by day, the details leaked out, in including
cluding including the murder of 23-year-old King Feisal, his
uncle, Crown Price Abdul Illah, and Premier Sami Es Es-Solh,
Solh, Es-Solh, one of the foremost statesmen of the Middle
East.
President Camille Chamoun of Lebanon, fearing hi3
government might face the fate of Iraq's, appealed to
the United States, Great Britain and France for im immediate
mediate immediate military help.
President Eisenhower, after day-long conferences
with administration and congressional leaders, called
for an emergency meeting of the United Nations Se Security
curity Security Council.
Tuesday United States Marines landed in a perfectly-executed
amphibious operation from units of the
Sixth Fleet, on the beaches of Beirut, the Lebanese
capital. They occupied the airport and other key posi positions
tions positions under the eyes of the friendly public and made
friends with admiring children.
The U.N. Security Council met. United States Chief
Delegate Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. asked the U.N. send
police force to Lebanon to preserve its independence,
replacing the American troops, Russian Delegate Ar Arkady
kady Arkady A. Sobolev demanded the U.N. order the United
States forces to get out forthwith.
Wednesday, the Soviet government reacted. It de delivered
livered delivered to United States Ambassador Llewellyn E.
Thompson Jr. a blisteringly angry statement. It called
n the United States to withdraw from Lebanon at
once. Otherwise, the Statement said, Russia "reserves
the right to take the necessary measures dictated by
the interest of peace and security."
King Hussein of Jordan appealed to the Big Three
Allies for help.
o
Thursday the news came that United States para paratroopers
troopers paratroopers flown from European bases had landed at the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization air base at Ada Ada-na.
na. Ada-na. in southern Turkey, during the night.
A few hours later, British paratroops landed in
force in Jordan.
Russia announced its military maneuvers, and So Soviet
viet Soviet troops were observed moving close to the forntier
of Iran.
o
Meanwhile the investigation of Benard Goldfine
took a breather and a second set of investigators went
to work on a military contract case involving Gold Gold-fines
fines Gold-fines White House friend, Presidential Assistant Sher Sherman
man Sherman Adams.
Goldfine, whose gifts to Adams and other officials
have received nearly as much publicity as the Yule Yule-tide
tide Yule-tide works of Santa Claus. moved out the spotlight
at least temporarily when the House Subcommit Subcommittee
tee Subcommittee on Legislative Oversight dismissed him Thursday
after eight days of testimony.
The subcommittee Is expected to issue a contempt
citation against Goldfine for his refusal to answer
questions about his business activities, although It
mav not come immediately.
The Boston millionaire departed with a new charge
pf "smear" against the subcommittee and a complaint
that its inquiry has hurt his textile and onther in interests.
terests. interests. Even as Goldfine left the center of the stage, how however,
ever, however, a House Armed Service subcommittee moved in
for a searching inquiry into the controversial refund
of an Army textile contract in which Adams' name
was reported to have figured. Goldfine was not in involved.
volved. involved. Chairman F. Edward Herbert ID-La.) of the military
group said no lormal decision had been made on
whether to hold public hearings but signs pointed to
public hearings in a week or two.
The new case, turned up by the subcommittee that
euestioned Goldfine, involves the 1957 refund of $41, $41,-284
284 $41,-284 of a penalty that had been assessed during World
War II against Raylaine Worsted, Inc., a New Hamp Hampshire
shire Hampshire firm, for falling to deliver cloth to the Army on
time. 3
Sources on Capitol Hill said Adams and other of officials,
ficials, officials, including at least three congressmen, express expressed
ed expressed an Interest in the case in 1957 when it was revived
after lying dormant 15 years.
The White House said Adamg referred inouirles a a-bout
bout a-bout the refund to the Pentagon "as a matter of
routine."

0 THE VISIT OF Milton Eeisenhower to Panama at.
the start of his tour of Central America as personal
representative of his brother President Dwight, went
smoothly and without incident. Security precautions
were rigid, especially in view of the rough ride ac accorded
corded accorded Vice President Nixon in South America re recently.
cently. recently. But Milton received a mild welcome.
Student demonstrators with "sovereignty" arid
"Share canal profit" banners picketed the U.S. Em Embassy
bassy Embassy but Milton was taking a trip on the Canal at
the time. Students never got around to talking with
Milton because they refused to see him at the Embas Embassy
sy Embassy residence and he declined their invitation to go to
the University.
Eisenhower said he intended to gain a "quick per perspective"
spective" perspective" of Central America which would form the
basis for a "new Look" policy by the United States.
In bis party were three prominent financiers.
President Ernesto de la Guardia heading a team
of Panamanian Government ministers met Eisenhower
for forma! talks on Sunday, the day after his arrival.
Topics which de la Guardia presented to Eisenhower
Included flying the Panama Flag in the Canal Zone
and using Spanish as the official language, guaran guaranteeing
teeing guaranteeing Canal Zone markets to Panamanian industry
and commerce, and economic development of Pana Panama
ma Panama stating that "The United States should have pri primary
mary primary interest in Panama's development of its full
economic possibilities."
Among other groups who met with Eisenhower were
representatives of Local 900 and 907 of the AFL-CIO.
One of the major topics they brought up was the
desperate need for more housing in Panama.
The last two days of the visit were passed informal informally.
ly. informally. Monday was spent on the Canal tug Culebra and
on a sightseeing tour during which time Eisenhower
had opportunity for informal talks With Ricardo Arias,
Panamanian Ambassador in the U.S. and Fernando
Elet'a, Finance Minister.
Tuesday saw Eisenhower, together with boatloads
of bigwigs from the Pan Canal and the Panamanian
Government, fishing in Panama Bay. Milton apparent apparently
ly apparently did not have too much luck at the fishing but a a-gain
gain a-gain he had plenty of opportunity for informal talks.
On the day Eisenhower left the Isthmus, a cry was
heard from Rep. Daniel J. Flood (D-Pa.) who told
Congress that Panama is becoming a storm center
of hostile propaganda against the United States.
He said a campaign to create anti-U.S. feeling had
increased, especially in the Spanish language press.
He likened it to a "smoldering period presaging vio violent
lent violent volcanic eruption." The propaganda, he said was
aimed at bringing about the surrender of the United
States' long established position as exclusive sovereign
over the Canal enterprise and to obtain a "grossly un unmerited
merited unmerited share of receipts.
The Single Wage Bill which establishes equal wage
rates for local and U.S. employes in the Canal Zone
passed by the House-Senate conferees last week was
unanimously approved by the House in Washington
this week and now awaits approval by the Senate be before
fore before going to the White House to be signed into law.
Meanwhile the United States Citizens Association
of the Canal Zone announced that thev are contem contemplating
plating contemplating challenging the constitutionality of the bill
In the courts.
The courts would be asked to determine whether
the bill conforms to the 1955 Remon-Eisonhower treaty
pnd its accompany Memorandum of Understandings .s
thev were approved by the Senate or whether the bill
is "an executive and legislative hodgepodge passed in
pn fttemot to establish the complete autocracy of the
local administration over all matters pertaining to
wawes nd employment in he Can-1' Zone, and at the
c t(mo f0 rnt, inWn-ional obligations at a cru crucial
cial crucial time in world affairs."
The Association said it was pleased that retirement
benefits would be extended to local-raters, and added
that the decision whether or not to test the bill in
the court depended on how it was administered.
A new pay scale was announced this week for Ca Canal
nal Canal Dilots nroviding increases ranging between 2.5 and
10 ner cent. The new scale is retroactive to April 29
and creates a new rating that of senior pilot.
"This special ratine will not be determined bv longe longevity
vity longevity but will be granted to a maximum of 20 pilots
who have demonstrated special capability in handling
unusually dfficult assinments.
The Canal Company's Board of directors in Wash Washington
ington Washington approved Plans to modernise the Tivoli Guest
House dining facilities and to air condition the Fern
Room at the Tivoli.
A renort to Washington from the U.S. Embassv In
Panama this week said that construction of the new
2n.P00.00n brldsre across the Canal at Balboa will
bHntr a "tremendous boost" to Panama's economy.
The report added that economic stimulus to Panama
is eyneCted to result from the employment of con constriction
striction constriction workers, purchase of vast amounts of ma materia
teria materia and development of new skills among particip participants
ants participants in the bridge construction.
The sandfly problem in the 7one. which has both bothered
ered bothered residents since construction davs came under
studv this week bv Dr. G. Breeland an experienced
entomo'owist who started work recently with the Sani Sanitation
tation Sanitation DivHon. He is setting up an operating base
a.id i-Horatiry pt rio Po'o Unsoital where he wi'l
study breeding and flight habits of the tiny insect.
The dispute of the trunk operators nlving between
the )r,tror and Panama Citv over enforcement of
Panal 7o" reflations aloP": th "corridor" which
thev ue through the Zone Is still haneing fire. The
Pariama government presented the truckers' case to

SUNDAY, JULY 20. 1958

SEVENTH-RANKED HEAVYWEIGHT Alex Miterr
says "Bring them on I'll fight anybody." Mi Mi-teff
teff Mi-teff was confident after beating Ruben Vargas in a
rough and tumble brawl Tuesday night at Oakland,
California. The bout got so rugged at one point that
the referee stopped it in order to let Vargas recupe recuperate.
rate. recuperate. Miteff said "When Vargas butted me in the
seventh round, I started to fight dirty too. I can fight
as dirty as anybody, and I started using my thumbs."
The former president of the International Boxing
Club has been served with a subpena ordering him to
testify on September 16 before a grand jury investigat investigating
ing investigating corruption in boxing.
Jim Norris arranged through his lawyer to ac accept
cept accept the subpena at his apartment in New York
City. The former promoter, who is ailing from two
previous heart attacks, came to New York from
his farm in Kentucky to accept the subpena. New
York district attorney Frank Hogan and the spe special
cial special grand jury had been attempting to serve the
subpena for more than two months. However, Nor Norris
ris Norris did not come to the city until Monday.
Miss Patty Berg made it look easy as she won the
$7500 American Women's Open Golf Tournament at
Minneapolis.
Appearing in her first hometown tourney Miss
Berg notched her fourth under par round Sunday to
finish with 288 eight strokes better than runner runner-up
up runner-up Louise Suggs of Atlanta, Georgia
Miss Berg's four under par 72 gave her top money
of $1250. Miss Suggs fired Sundav best round a five five-under
under five-under part 71 but a bad round Saturday gave her
second place with 296.
Tied for third with 297's were Betsv Rawls, of Spar Spartanburg,
tanburg, Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Joyce Zisi'te of Milwau Milwaukee
kee Milwaukee Fourth with 298's were Marlene Bauer Hagge and
Bonnie Randolph. Beverlv Hanson was fifth with 299
while Mickey Wright and Wiffl Smith took sixth with
even 300's.
The United States made it a five-nothing clean
sweep over Canada in Davis Cup semi-final play a.t
Toronto.
John Douelas of Stanford University beat Don Fon Fontanel
tanel Fontanel of Toronto 4-6. 6-3. 6-2, 6-1. Douglas' win made
t five strai-rht for the Americans in the North Amer American
ican American zone series.
E1rrUS Davis c"n )e"er Bnrrv Markay beat
Paul Willey 6-8, 6-2. 12-10, 7-5. Willev's win of the
first set, in (he match was the first win marked up
by any Canadian player.
o
Jackie Rurke of Kiamesha Lake. New York shot re record
cord record golf to win the Insurance City Open at Wethers Wethers-fipM
fipM Wethers-fipM Connecticut.
The former National PGA and Masters champ clos closed
ed closed Sunday's round with a twn-nnder nar 69 That gave
him a totqj of 268. or 16 tro'-s under nar for fonr
rounds. Tho nrevious record 269 was held by Bob
Tn'M and Rnnl Knead.
Tn second o'ac ws Art Wall of Pocono Manor New
vorv: whn hot,tied Ri.rk ri"bt down to the finish.
Wa'l not, Ht.hn nn strn'-o 0r PprVe earlv In the final
rii"d h"t fo'foro ond ennon lin wttb Tn three
s'r, behind tim With Wall was Dow Finsterwald
of Tefueta, Florida.
Sweden' unbeaten European, beav'weight ehamn
Ingemar Johansson added another win Sunday. He
knocked out weinz Neuhaus or Germany fn the fourth
round of o vheduled 10-round non-title 1i"M at Gote Gote-burg
burg Gote-burg Sweden.
American tennis nlaver Kami Faeerns of Miami
lost he women's singles title at -actad. Sweden to
Heathr TJrPWpr fj0(jo of ,cjnth Africa. Ip men's sin sin-ples
ples sin-ples Wimbledon winner AshW nooor defeated fel-low-e-traHqn
Mery'p Ros" in the final of the Ba Ba-astad
astad Ba-astad International Tournament.
A German rowinsr ctph handed Harvard's light lightweight
weight lightweight crew an unexpected defeat at an internation international
al international rnwfno- rppatta in Wambl'riy, Gernianv.
The P-er-nnn c'ub finished about three leneths in
front of Warvard in the two-fhoncpnd meter race.
Harvard was also beaten h" another German chib in
an ear)!r race of th rer"tto. Tho Harvard ere had
been unbeaten until the first race.
Anv hones the Dodeers had of leaving t,h Coliseum,
for tetr own nark- next vear were dashed Tudpv as
ho rinh nrcnared to anneal a hide's ru'ln" that the
Chayeo; Rnvjnp confront w)tv, fh0 rfv Wp, invalid.
Dodder president, Walter F. O'Mnfiev indicated he
evnei-t" ti pIot, the entire 1QtQ i;fic.on )n the huse
bowl V''h its OKn-foot 'eft f'eld foul ne. But he said
rlrht fiid mio-ht ho revarrmed no that, left-handed
tutors iiiro nVo RniVor won't lose all chances of get get-tine'
tine' get-tine' an p"focinna home run.
Sner'or .Tndre ArnoM Praerer's ruling that the.
Ondirerc' o-ot w'h the c'tv was not valM was
he'"" vtifHerf bv at tor-cvs for the baseball club
ariA1 ,. Hfv. AssMant rv At'orneT Bnurke Jones
mM i "ght be six months before an appeal could
be heard.
the u t. Wmha.ssv but no renlv has vet been announc announced
ed announced artd the truckers sHU threaten to strike if a set settlement
tlement settlement is not reached.
A chain letter scheme dealing with U.S. savings
bonds, which has been frowned on bv Canal Zone
Postal authorities but stated to be not illegal, has
gained momentum since it arrived on the Isthmus a
cohpIp of weeVs wko. Banks in Balboa announced that
thev had sold out of their entire stock of $25 bonds
owina to tho scheme and several Zonians who were
first to get their names on the lists which are cir circulating,
culating, circulating, have already received over a dozen bonds.

Sunday American Supplement

ft

VAIJM REVIEW



SCT. BOB RYAN edits radio tape, taking ou t extraneous sounds and unrelated scraps of
conversation, as part of last week's coverage of Dr. Milton Eisenhower's visit here.
J See Pages 2 and 3 f oratory anil jm )

1

T



American

Comic supplement

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-V J 1 I ...... 7

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looks Better

FXCEPT-FOR

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jeli?e That's his
favorite j
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I WARNED
ABOUT THIS

NEIGHBORHOOD.

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i'll get

CAR BEFORE

SHE CHANGES

HER MIND

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LEAVE ME
HERE ALL.

ALONE I

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i ii ifiSA l. i n rsc sym "?

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OF COURSE NOT.

kGlRL YOU'LL NEED

ME HERETO
NURSE HIM BACK

"TO SHAPE

THEN YOU

WON'T LEAVE L

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UStNG OALY MENTAL POWER NO TR ACTON

RA YS OR EQUPMEHT- RA SEP A FOREST--

Iks. l ""1 BsW flBfl bv .mSI IhKm.
P1" COLLUSION-- TWO BILLION I SAFE NOW! WHCP f IT MAS LUCKYfN
THE RACE OF MAN' ARE WIZARPS! WE MUST RELIEVE ALL THIS? V BUT SOME PAY--1 ?-
W MASTER WlZARPS-OUR J FIN P ANOTHER PLAMEtI HOW LUCKY THEY HgL WE'LL VISIT
WEAPONS ARE NO L-THAT'S EASIER! CHOSE. YOU AS A Ji TNHM!
MATCH FOR THIS TYPICAL SPEOMEHT Vr f

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ORIENTAL

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HIS MAGIC TfSIOcA fejj T WAVES A ICNIFE AND FORk: OVEC
THE ONE HE PULLS J ft I THE REFRESHMENTS AND MAKES Sj
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I IT 15 POISON IS THAT- I f : 1 MAS RUM OUT IT'S
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PI

!

AAV GOODNESS ME EVER

SlkiCE MR. PETER TR1BBLE

WROTE THAT STORY IN THE

PAPER 'BOUT THE OLD
SEA FOAM WE'VE

HAP TOURISTERS ALL

OVER THE POCK

WE CERTAINLY HAVE YOU WOULD

THINK WE WAP ALREAPY OPENED IT UP

AS A SEA-FOOP RESTAURANT. IF CAPTAIN

BLOW HADNT R1SGEP THIS CHAIN ACROSS

THE GANGWAY WE P BE OVERRUN

OH, LOOK IT
' HERE COMES MR. I
PETER NOW- P
LIKE HIM

tfOSH-I WPULPNTi

DO ANYTHING TO,

HURT YOU, LEE k

I ONLY WROTE'

THE FACT5

THEY WERE

TOLD TO ME'

PC-TP P TCIBRLP- VOUP NEWSPAPER STORY ABOUT

THE SEA FOAM HAS BROUGHT CROWDS OF SIGHT

SEERS THEIR BIGGEST QUESTION IS, WHEN ARE

We QOiNo IO l UKN 1 1 INiv

RESTAURANT

BUT I HAVE NO MONEY TO FINANCE

SUCH AN ENTERPRISE YOU

SHOULDN'T HAVE

WRITTEN THAT.'

.!

M

THATS MY

FAULT.' X WAS

THE ONE

WHO SAID

IT

I'M TO BLAME- tTWASl

MY WG MOUTH THAT

kSAIP IT- I'M

TERRIBLE

PONT BE SORRY KID

IT WAS A GREAT
IDEA AMD RliSHT

DOWN MY.ALLEY'

JUNIOR, YOU ARE NOW PRIVILEGED TO

SEE THE vJ.K. FLING TOUCH OF

GENIUS AT WORK I'VE TALKEP

TO ALL OF LEES CREDITORS

LAIP IT ON THE LINE

SO'

mm

vec; 'fey-)"-. I VP S)L D 'FM THE IDEA OF FINANCING

THE SEA FOAM AS A NOVELTY SEA-FOOD RESTAURANT'

"SPEND MONEY TO MAKE MONEY; I ALWAYS

?A A MAN WHO GETS THINGS lANfc:

MR. FLING IS RIGHT.
HE REALLY POES
KNOW HOW TO START
THINGS BUT X
GOT A HUNCH IT'LL
TAKE ALL OF US

TO KEEP IT

ROLLING

-

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