The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02610

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
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"""""
FLITES
1 i
10MEWARD anil
to RIO
THE MARVELOUS
CARIOCA CAPITAL
AN INDEPENDENT tHEX, PAHY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let tfce people know the truth and the country is $aff Abraham Lincoln,
via BRANIFF
Tel. Panama 2-0975 Colon 119 7W
83rd YEAH
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1958
FIVE CENTS

.
( SeagramsO. MS
CANADIAN WHISKY

U.S. MARIN

ES

LAND

IN

Talent-Laden Fish-Talk Trip
Marks Milton s Last Day Here
Dr. Milton Eisenhower and President Ernesto de la Guardia Jr. led a tajjnMadn fishing expedition into action
off the Pearl islands today in the last day of Eisenhower's Panama stay.
Aboard the Dredging Division's craneboat Atlas they will resume disoutWW which the US president's brother
last night described as helpful and thorough. $F
Meanwhile, student leader Carlos Arellano Lennox said student organizations here had not been in touch with
similar organization in which Eisenhower will be visiting on the rest of his tour considering the failure of plans for
Panamanian students to meet Eisenhower. However Arellano did not rule out the possibility that individual students
may have made such contacts.
The brass-bound fishing expedition flew down to the Punta Coco strip in the Pearl Islands this morning in an
Albrook C-47 and two light planes. The fishing boats were waiting for them there.
They are expected back at Balboa early tomorrow morning, leaving little time for the Eisenhower party to
igrab their bags and head for Tocumen to board the MATS Constellation scheduled tf take off for Honduras at 8 a.m.

t In officialese, the fishing exped expedition
ition expedition was planned "to give an op.

LEBANON
o

Leathernecks Answer

President's Call For He

ip

poi'iunny ur imuiei'

of questions ot mutual interest in
a maxeu aim unonuai amios.
phere."
An addition to the mother ship
Atlas, loo-i t long anu aoie to
sleep It iii uuw ua uuu...uii tj
tne quarters ior i;r d.uiini crew,
tne iauncnes riunuer, curuma, auu
;iercn irom tne iranama v.. anal Co.
are on nand tor tne top-iovel fistt fistt-ing
ing fistt-ing activities.
1 ihe Kunner is a bo lt, dredging
Division uiesel-engineu lamicn car
frying a crew oi two.
'Hie Cormua is a 62-ft. launch
from the ixavigauou Luvisioi., va varying
rying varying a crew ot uiree anu a Die
lo sieep lour or live.
Ine z2.n. fetch, which belongs
to tne Ureugiug uivisiou ana Was
carried aown tu tne islands a Doard
tne Atlas, will be usea as a terry
between the Atlas and the other
two launcnes.
i The SpmHr do la Guard Guard-dia
dia Guard-dia party It lief pai ncipaung in
the" Panama Kod and Keel
Club's sum International Kod
and Keel tournament .which
opens today. It is understood
tnat no members of the party
I have paid the due which will
j enable them to enter .in the
'tournament any monster they
may boat touay.
On the expeuition, in addition
to Eisenhower and President de ,r

Guardia, are Panamas foreign

Minister Miguel J. Moreno Jr

US Ambassador to Manama, Ju.
lian F. Harrington; Pianance Min Minister
ister Minister Fernando Eleta; assistant

Secretary of State for Latin Am
erican affairs. Roy B. Rubottom

Panama's Ambassador to the US,

Ricardo M. ( Dicky ) Arias as assistant
sistant assistant Treasury Secretary Tom B.

f'niKThram. Presidential assistant

innpnrin Galindo: Canal Zone

Onv. William E. Potter; Pa

nama's Comptroller-General Ro Roberto
berto Roberto Heurtematte; Lt. Gen. Ridg Ridg-ely
ely Ridg-ely Gaither, commander in chief,
Caribbean Command Export.
Import Bank president Samuel C.
iWaugh; Development Loan Fund
manager Dempster Mcintosh;

Dr. Palmer Futcner, a jonns nop.
kins doctor who is travelling with

BBBBIl Mr ..j3IBI i

HflB. KillaBBsaaB:"al bse"! m ff Las

O

BEIRUT, Lebanon, July 15 (UPI) -United Slates Marines landed in Lebanon today.
At least seven warships of the U.S. 6th Fleet sailed into Beirut harbor with advance units
of more than 5000 Leathernecks asisgned to the fleet.
The ships, including an aircraft carrier, anchored two miles offshore and sent the Marines
ashore in small boats on orders from President Eisenhower to help protect Lebanon's "sovef

eignty and integrity" as well as American lives. 1

President Eisenhower said that the action was in response to an urgent appeal from President Chamoun of

Lebanon.

"These forces have not been sent as any act of war," the President said in a special statement.
He pledged that the U.S. will support the United Nations in taking measures adequate to meet the Middll

Eastern situation and "which will enable the U.S. forces promptly to be withdrawn."

The landing of Marines in Lebanon followed the seizure yesterday of the Iraq government by a group of rebels
The President earlier asked the U.N. Security Council to act in the Middle East crisis.

The Navy announced in Washington that the first

landing of Marines were accomplished without opposition
under air cover provided by the 27,000-ton aircraft carrier

Essex.
The President said an urgent plea for U. S. troops to
be stationed in Lebanon had been received yesterday

morning, cnamoun saia me u. o. forces were neeaea to

hlp mainnttfj$y -and independence.';

CMamoun made clear, tisennower smav'Tmn ne con considered
sidered considered an immediate U. S. response imperative if Leb Lebanon's
anon's Lebanon's independence, already menaced from without, were
to be preserved in the face of the grave developments

which occurred yesterday in Baghdad whereby the lawful
government was violently overthrown and many of its
members martyred."

UN Security Council Gets
Ftkmal Notice From Lodge

RUTH EISENHOWER and Panama's treasury minister Fernando Eleta on the Panama Canal
tug Culebra yesterday.

A. Walter, official interpreter
Eisenhower.
While the men were down

Eisenhower and Lt. Col. Vermon the Pearl Islands there was

for
at

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DR. MILTON S. EISENHOWER emerges from the dunt;eon at
ancient Fort San Loremo during his tour of U.S. Army lnstal lnstal-lations
lations lnstal-lations yesterday afternoon. At right is his guide, 1st Lt. Ken Kenneth
neth Kenneth Bukowskv of Fort Gullck. Now approximately 400 years
old, the fort Was twice destroyed by Henry Morgan s men In
1670 and again by British Adm. Edward Vernon in 1140; and
twice rebuilt. Eisenhower's party clambered about the fortifi fortifications
cations fortifications and in And out of ilujdungeon and underground .store
rooms. s iV.B. Army rnoto)

distaff fishing and swimming par.
ty unuerway.
heaaeu uy Ruth Eisehower,
who is acting as ner iatner's oi.
ticial nostess on his current tour,

anu lnciucung Mrs. Uarnnyion,
Mrs. Kuooiiorn, Mrs. Jaime u-j ia
Guarcua, jo min anu auan hot hotter,
ter, hotter, Li ia vice.consui Eune J.
Bashe, Li. j. a. Heiungtr anu
James Golden, of tne biate JJe JJe-parimem.
parimem. JJe-parimem. 'xms expedition is due back at
Bamoa tins aiternoon alter a day
of iismng auu swimming ai la la-boga.
boga. la-boga. Eisenhower was asked last night
aooin uiai portion u aunuay's uis uis-cussions
cussions uis-cussions wiui rresioent ut la
anu ms a-uviser wnicn- concern

ed the flying or tne Panamanian
liag over tne Canal Zone.
cisennower said tnore wag
notning in that section of tha
taiKs "which implied any cnanga
in tha traditional treaty reia reia-tionsmps
tionsmps reia-tionsmps between the two coun.
tnaa."
homo time a.ter the hour they
are bet ior meeting aim at tne
university lasi.mgnt an appoint,
ment Kisennower had intimated
earner he would not agree lo
students maoe public the loliowing
list ot minimum atpiratiocs",
tu Eisenhower.

1. Express reaffirmation oy the

Umteu states oi tne sovereignty

oi the Republic of Panama over

the Canal Zone territory.
2. Liquidation of the Panama
Canal Co. because It si a viol
ation of the terms of exitting
treaties between the two coun.
tries.
3. Substitution of the term "in
perpetuity" in the 1903 Canal

Treaty by a period which will be

in keeping with the principles oi
international law.
4. Sharing on an equality basis
of economic benefits resulting
from the Canal enterprise.

t. Express recognition of Pa

nama's civil, penal, fiscal and

labor jurisdiction over non-military
affairs in the Canl Zone.

6. Elimination of discriminatory
policies in the Canal Zone.
7. The free use by Panama of
the terminal ports of Balboa and
Cristobal.
8. Enforcement in the Canal
Zone of the principle of equal pay
for equal work.
9. Preferential use of the Canal

Zone market for Panamanian in

j iiiomvi ayi a Biiuiiiaiiiun
(Continued on Page 10)

Eisenhower said it was appar apparent,
ent, apparent, 'that in the face of the tra
gic and shocking events that are
occurring nearby," the United Na Nations
tions Nations must take stronger HCtion
than the learn of observers that it
no"' hs rn Lebanon.
The President said, that in view
of th" 2500 Americans in I.rhann.
the U.S. could not stand idly hv
"when Lebanon may not be able
to preserve internal order and to
defend itself against indirect ag aggression."
gression." aggression." The Sixiih Fleet, whose ships put
the Marines ashore in Lebanon, is
a force of 74 ships and about 45,000
men.
It gets itf ttrikinq powar chiof.
ly from three nuclear-armed ilr ilr-eraft
eraft ilr-eraft carriers the 40,000 ton
Saratoga and the 27,000-ton Es-

ui and Wasp.

The Navv no Innser makes anv
secret of the fact that its aircrif
carriers carry nuclear weapons,
and Gen. Randolph Pate, Marino
commandant, has stated that Mar Marine
ine Marine equipment ia the Mediterra
nean includes atomic artillery.
However, there was no sug suggestion
gestion suggestion that nuclear arms would
play a part in the present crisis.
The Pentagon said the Marines
landing in Lebanon were "nor "normally
mally "normally eauipped," but refused to
elaborate.
The fleet also includes two crui cruisers,
sers, cruisers, the Boston and the Des

Moines; 23 large and seven small
destroyers, three submarines and
18 amphibious ships.

The total strength of 74 ships
and about 45,000 men, built up in
a series of Middle Eas. crises, is
about 50 percent above the fleet's
normal complement.

The initial 1700-man Marine out outfit
fit outfit landed under the command of
Lt. Col. Harry A. Hadd of S.. Paul,
Minn.
Rear Adm. Charles Fitzpatrick
chief of Navy information, said in
Wachinolnn' I unulH imaoinp n

I don t know when asked it: lo suDsutuie me uireu
more Marines have been "alerted! for law.
for movement from the U.S. to: "If this is left unchecked, he
the Mediterranean. I said, "the people of the Middle
(Continued en Page 10) East will have denied the solemn

'5

UNITED NATlOlS,,NX W

15, (UPI) -wTh ValMn jpnrtes m-u

formed the tm
formally today that U.S. forces
ohave landed in Lebanon to pro protect
tect protect American citizens, it said
they will be with drawn soon as
the United Nations can take o o-ver."
ver." o-ver." The U.S. forces, ambassador
Henry Cabot Lodge told the coun.
cil, have instructions to establish
immediate liaison with the U.N.
observer group sent, to Lebanon
as a watchdog team afainst in.
filtration of men and material
from the United Arab Republic
"It is too early," Lodge told
the council, "to tell what the
outcome of the revolt may be.
But itis a grave threat to the

integrity if free and indptn indptn-dent
dent indptn-dent countries. Lebanon cannot
combat it without support from
fliedly countries."
Hodge said there are "powers at
work in the Middle East" seeking

House Approves Single Wage Bill;
Senate Okay Expected By Tomorrow

WASHINGTON, July 15 (UPI) The House unanimously
a Breed today to the conference report on a bill establishing
a single wage scale for U.S. and local employes In the Canal
Zone.
The report is expected to be approved also by the Senate
late torday or tomorrow, and will then go to the White House
to be signed into law.
It is designed to implement a memorandum of under understanding
standing understanding accompanying a 1955 treaty between the United
States and Panama.

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mBESm fli Las aaflaaBaass1k flLsF LaaaHB NRfj&jjjjSKr mflk
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THE EISENHOWER PARTY looks down a hundred feet into the bay from the ancient wall of Fort San Lorenso during a tour
of U.S. Army installations. Listening to the official guide, 1st Lt. Kenneth Bukowsky of Fort Gullck at extreme right are (1 to r):
Miss Ruth Elsenhower; Panama's finance minister Fernando Eleta; an unidentified man; Col. Glnes Peres, commandant of the
U.S. Army Caribbean School at Gullck; and Dr. Milton E. Eisenhower. Now almost 400 years old, the Fort has Men restored by
men of the Army and Is a popular tourist feature. (U.S. Army Photo)

guarantees ef the U.N. charter.
and will hBOlia jsh nv red irrfo
anarcby."8
Soviet Ambassador Arkady A.
Soboiev challenged the right of
the representative appointed bjt
King Feisal's government to sifc
for Iraq. But Secretary General
Dag Hammarskjold said he could
not accept a demand from the re.
volutionary regime that deposed
Feisal yesterday for a delay of th
council meeting until a new ap.
pointee could arrive here.
Council President Alfonso Arau
jo of Colombia upheld Hammarsk.
jold's view and Soboiev declined
to force the issue to vote.
Lodge startled the council
with a disclosure that Fadhil
Al.Jamali, a diplomat familiar
in the U.N. for tha part decade.

had been murdered in yester yesterday's
day's yesterday's insurrection and his body
dragged through tha streets of
Baghdad. Ha said he had re received
ceived received the news just before an.
tering the council.
"The council meets today to
confront difficulties as serious a
any in its history" Lodge said.
"Lebanon's territorial integrity
is being incrensingly threatened by
forces from outside.. The plol
gainst the kingdom of Jordan il
another sgn of serioius nStabrty
in relations between the nations of
the Middle East. And now conies
the overtrhow, in an exceptionally
brutal manner, of the established
government or Iraq."
Lodge reported formally, that
Lebanese President Cimilte
Cahmoun, With the unanimous
authority of his government, had
asked for "help from friendly oi'.
ernments to preserve Lebanon i
integrity and independence."

Applications Being
Accepted For CZ
Teaching Positions
Men or women living on the
Isthmus who are qualified for
teaching positions in the Canal
Zone schools may now apply
for substitute or full-time posi positions
tions positions which will be availabio
during the coming school year,
it was announced Monday at
Balboa Heights.
A minimum of 20 teaching
positions will be avallablp for
the coming year. These will be
In various subjects. Most of the
teaching positions will be for
the elementary schools avlthougli
there may possibly be a few
vacancies on the Junior and
Senior High School teaching
staffs.
Elementary and Junior High
School teachers must hold a
bachelor's degree, and hign
school and junior college teach teachers
ers teachers must have a master's de degree.
gree. degree. Preference will toe given
to applicants with previous
teaching experience.
All applications should be
submitted to the Employment
and Utilization Division of th
Personnel Bureau. This office is
located in the new Personnel
Building, at Frangipanl Street
and San Bias Place In Ancon.
Those desiring further Informa Information
tion Information should telephone 2-36M off
2-3448.

is i tank
i



PAGE TWO

HE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1951

THE PANAMA

WWBS AN

I VM.MNtB mr TH1 PANAMA AMKBICAN WIM. INC
tmmm mlmn ouHtvia ieee
HAKMOOIO ARIAS. IC'TOK
M MMIt O BOX 34 Panama R or P.
7LPMONl 2-0740 B UWII
CBU AOOMSP. PAN AMERICAN. PANAMA
It T CBNTRAL AVCNUI MTWIIP t fH R 1STH RTRICTR

ON ftlPRENNTATIVCa,
946 MADISON AVL
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IN ADVANCE
NI VtA IB ARVANCR

t?;

TMIt tt rOUt FQKUM THt KtAPtHS OWN COLUMN
The Mail t k n opn to rum tor readrn o The Panama American
Letter) srs received gratefully and art handled in a wholly confidential
H HM contribute a letter eWt ba Impatient it it doen t appeal the
' Mat day. Letten are nubliihed in the order received.
Pleait try to keep the lattert limited to one page length.
Identity ot letter writer, it held in itricteat confidence
Tkii newt pa per etsumet no retpontibility tor etatementt or opinion!
txarettcd is letterl from reader.
THE MAIL BOX
o
WATERED GIN
6ir: Riddle ior the week. Who put water in the gin bottle at the
fivoii bar last Friday evening?

POLICEMAN'S LOT

Sir:
x t t

JJUe 10 laziness i. am e"" pnlirp
Lhe honorable and dishonorable merits of the Canal Zone Police
that have appeared in this column during the past few wee.es
But I do want to say I, unfortunately, had the opportunity
to meet several policemen and also Judge Deming during busi busi-hours
hours busi-hours Although the experience leading up to this encounter
wasad 1 eft the court-room with a deep affection in my hea t
Vbe police force, and a first hand knowledge of their polit polit-ness,
ness, polit-ness, consideration and efficiency.
A policemen's life is not an easy one. I too would get slight slightly
ly slightly irritated if I was people disregarding the rules set up or the
safety of the community. And if two cars were taking up the
space of three in the commy parking lot I would boil
P Speaking of boiling there are very few men who would spend
the whole day in the sun away from a nice cool office to piu piu-t?ct
t?ct piu-t?ct his fellow man and his family. My hat off to the men in
b!ue- Thankful
LIP SERVICE COOPERATIVE
81r:The Consumers' Co-op, organized by a group of enterprising
and conscientluos Panamanians, is now on the brink of bank bankruptcy
ruptcy bankruptcy The cash flow indicates a progressive deficit as dis dis-Ements
Ements dis-Ements exceed receipts. Capital outlays are too high in pio-
rtEverw?ndling sales and non-payment of pledges made by
bona fide members are the economic cancers that are destroy destroying
ing destroying the Co-op's anemic body. A concerted drive must be under undertaken
taken undertaken either to collect these pledges or to write them o f. At
present, these pledges represent a spacious asset and thus poi poi-tray
tray poi-tray a false picture of the net worth of the business A dead deadline
line deadline must be set for collection of these pledges, and those that
remam outstanding, unpaid or uncollectible after the time-limit
has elapsed should be written off.
Although 1 express this opinion reluctantly, it seems that
the Co-od was spawned on lip-service. Prominent individuals of
tested capability and integrity were elected by popular vote to
run it But these same officers have become negligent and In Indifferent
different Indifferent to the needs of the Co-op. They lack a sense of ur urgency
gency urgency and business verve. And "worse they are too easily dis-
C6Ur(Come on men. Man your battle stations aid lift the Co-op
by Its bootstrap!) ,
The lame-duck members of the supervisory and business
committees need a shot in the arma to perk them up. Thf bookkeeper-treasurer
and accountant are prone to put off then du duties
ties duties "hasta manana." . ,. ,
Tit is the consensus that if these same prominent individuals,
who were elected to serve unstintingly, guide and develop the
Sft-oo to success, were holding comparable positions in the Lions
Suhv Rotary Club, or other well-known civic organizations their
4taflttto would be wholehearted, productive and profitable
WKf 'IS organization n i..
H iThat do these officers desire? Publicity to gratify their
egos .to spur them on to accomplish greater deeds. I will con-
-v8de that they have earned the collective gratitude and respect
Of the rank and fil of the Co-op. But they ar capable of doing
much more and are morally bound to live up to this obligation
ahd thus vindicate the faith of those who still rely on them.
fli The Co-op is in dire need of aggressive leadership ami their
managerial experience is invaluable in this hour of crisis. But
BK must develop a sense of urgency or the Co-op will fail.

These are tne lmmecuaie neeus ui me vu-up.
1. Collection of pledges to pay off debts.

Re-location of the grocery store in an area access Die 10
the bulk of members.
Installation of home-delivery service to boost sales.
Aggressive stimulation of sales. Disregard patronage di dividends
vidends dividends give across-the-counter rebates on large pur purchases
chases purchases once a week.
Simplification of book-keeping procedures. Request IFE
to modernize its co-operative concepts and doctrines.
The filling station needs stricter supervision. Its per

sonnel are not, piompt.
Wiir r.n-nn rnrPtpnU a cross

maxt and the dull, the generous and the selfish, the tjood and
jSe bfcd. Grouped together, our individual weaknesses are com com-aensated
aensated com-aensated by our individual strengths. However, it is hoped that
Vie Officers elected in 1956 possess the finer or finest qualities
H our composite membership. Should time prove the wisdom of
Ijjfja choice, I will offer a prayer of thanks to God for showing
9 tho way to success through unity.
Spectator

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SKYSCRAPER FLAG DAY-Raising of an American flag,
Clamped to a steel girder 28 stories above New York's Fifth
Avenue, marks the completion of the framework for the new
Corning Glass Works building. The flag-draped girder was the
.test of more than 10 million pounds of steel used in the build build-.
. build-. The entire steel skeleton will be covered with 200.000
quart feet of green-tinted, heat-absorbing glass. The building
Is expected to be ready for occupants by the end of this year.

AMERICAN

JOSHUA B POWIRi ll&
New YORK. (17 1 N V.
LOCAL "Alt
' To a bo
OO
IS BO
Mir., tn rpfpr to the letters about
- section of socletv the bril-

Peter Edson

Washington
WASHINGTON (NEA) The big
question raised by .he new Cun Cun-lerence
lerence Cun-lerence on Transportation Unity,"
just announced here by Presiuent
James R. ("Jimmy") Hoffa of the
teamsters' union, is whether it will
create a labor force strong enough
to tie up the country in a transport
workers' strike.
The official answer given is that
it would not.
"Even if all the transport work workers
ers workers of the country got this power."
says one Hoffa aide, '.hey would
never it. It would be too much like
using the atomic bomb. A gener
al transportation tie-up would mili
tate against us. .It would put us in
public disfavor."
What the organizers of the trans transportation
portation transportation unions' conference, call
ed for August, are counting on is
that employers will welcome U as
a stabilizing influence in their in in-dustrv.
dustrv. in-dustrv. Employers in the past have been
whipsawed by rival unions and
victimized by jurisdictional dis disputes.
putes. disputes. If unions could settle these
things anion? themselves befoie befoie-hand,
hand, befoie-hand, it is believed this would lead
"to more orderly collective bargain bargaining.
ing. bargaining. This might mean industry
wide contracts with uniform ter termination
mination termination da.es.
There is considerable doubt that
al! U.S. unions in transportation
industries will affiliate with the
Hoffa-inspired conference. But if
all 50 of them come in they vvoiftd
represent about three million work workers.
ers. workers. Hoffa estimates the number at
3.5 million U. S. Department of
Labor outs it at 2.7 million.
Hoffa's own teamslers' union
claims 1.8 million membership in
893 local unions, biggest in the
country.
Joining with Hoffa in the call
for the new Transportation Unity
Conference are Joe Curran of Na National
tional National Maritime Union and Oapt.
William V. Bradley of Internation International
al International Longshoremen's Assn. N.M.TT.
claims 40.000 workers in 30 per s
and I. L A. 52.000 members in 186
locals.
In addi ion to these three. Sea Seafarers
farers Seafarers International Union with 75. 75.-000
000 75.-000 members is expected ,0 i-n
the other three in the conference
organization. S.I. If. is a holding
federation of autonomous unions.
It includes fishermen, sailors, !.re
men, oilers, wipers and inlam
boatmen.
Paul Hall, head of S.I.U., was
unable to at end the Washington
meeting at whicji the conference
agreement was signed. But Hoffa
talked with Hall bv phone and was
authorized by Hall to say he look looked
ed looked on the conference wih favor.
He will call officers of his unions
together to consider i..
Over a million of the transport
tion workers are in railway broth
erhoods. They usually pursue in independent
dependent independent courses. What Hoffi is
believed to be counting on to bring
them together is i he depressed
state of railroading today. To
maintain their present benefits,
railroad workers may need all the
support they can get from oiher
transport unions.
Air transpport workers unions,
which will also be invited to join
the conference, have about 145 000
members. This includes 11,000 in
the Airline Pilots' Assn.. 11,000
other flight personnel, 65,000 clerks
and 58,000 maintenance workers in
machinists and other unions.
One of the stumbling block1! in
the road to transport union unity
the question of what to do a a-bout
bout a-bout Harry Bridges and his west
coast International Longshormen's
and Warehousemen's union. It
claims 70,000 members in 83 ports.
IBridges is bejng invited to the
August conference. But Hoffa.
Curran and Bradley make clear
the conference itself will make its
own rules and decide who conies
in.
This leaves the way open to in invite
vite invite Bridges out. But in this con connection
nection connection it is pointed out that the
West Coast Conference of Team
sters in Hoffa's own union si si-ready
ready si-ready has an operating pact with
Bridges' longsh"men.
Hoffa has b-en working for
months to build up a series of
pacts with Other union teamsters
work beside. He now has such a a-greements
greements a-greements with machinists, retail
clerks, upholsterers, office work workers,
ers, workers, laundry workers, bakery,
workers, meat cuttes, carpenters
and operating engineers.
L4ifl EtjiLsCsbASJ
Football was "born" by sc sc-cldent
cldent sc-cldent in 1823. A Rugby stu student,
dent, student, William Webb Ellis,
while playing a game similar
to today' soccer, .suddenly
caught the ball and ran up the
field with it instead of kicking
the ball in the prescribed man manner.
ner. manner. Ellis was criticized and
his captain apologized to the
opposing captain, but that il illegal
legal illegal maneuver marked the
birth of modern football.
e Brltannlca Jr. Xneyelepsdi

WalterWinchelllnNcwYork

MAN READING THE PAPERS
Cong. Charles S. Gubser popped,
off: "i should not say this, but
there is no greater group of iree.
loaders in. the world than the
press. They will take anything
they can get". .Several days
later Cong. Gubser apologized:
"Under siress 1 ma(k what could
be interpreted as a blanket con condemnation
demnation condemnation of our press corps. This
was not intended. I know many
press representatives. They have
a job to do and they do it con.
scientiously and well."
The free press was not made ;n
Heaven ... It is a fundamental
fact of human behavior that
where there is power you will
find some who abuse it. ..The Bill
of Rights not only entrusts journ journalists
alists journalists with the privilege to record
tire truth it also endows them
with the responsibility of preserv.
ing the moral basis of free journ journalism.
alism. journalism. .Newspapermen who be.
trayed that trust are in small"
minority.
Boston's Mr. Goldfine is candid
frank and blunt. .One of the best
stories about him and Sherman
Adams of the White Houm (which
convulsed Washington insiders

' SUPER CONVA1R 340
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and others) has the earmark of a
classic. . It ueais with the time
Santa Claus Gold.ine had an ap.
pointment with President Eisen Eisen-hower
hower Eisen-hower and didn't show up.
"What," demanded Mr. Adams,
"happened?"
"1 met some very important
people," shruggec Goldfii.e.
"Who can be more important,
said Adams almost choking with
fury, "than the President?"
"Customers," replied Mr. G.

Dictator Zsa Zsa and Gen. Ra.
fael Trujillo Jr., have been mak.
ing hot weather news. .Tne head headlines
lines headlines are inspired by the hardly
asiounuing fact tnat a rich voun
man likes girls and Zsa Zsa ad.
oiv;s rich men. . Everything a a-bout
bout a-bout Junior has been grist tor the
papers. .Who he likes, how ne
steeps, what he eats, and there
is always Zsa Zsa (the One and
Only) to provide reporters with
the proper quotes.
The fact that Junior operates in
rajah fashion is hardly news to
those who know his background...
His father trea:ed him like a goH.
en boy almost from the day he
was born ...When he was five
his floting father made him a col.
onel in the army at $450 a month.

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Pvt. Elvis, who is currently
making aie Army sale tor Pres.
lej, is acting anu twang-iwdutji..
in nis latest movie, 'King Creoh'.
ins uramatic career was launch,
ed in this unique manner: A film
prouueer queried: "How inn.

it-ung expnence nave you ever
tiau; i-resiey was canuio: "ev.
er read a line in my life." he
responueo. . Elvis was signej lu
a seven.year contract. . In his
initial llicekr he was a star.
ou mink about movie stars-
ana Deaiutiiul visions appears. The
reality is much difienant. Lana
Turner's confession last week re
present a good case in point. .
The star stutea: "A great part of
...c wuuiu line very much not to
continue, i wish I could say that
I had enough put away so that
I Wouldn't have In ,,,r,,.l. I J i.
I must coiitini,w working. The iact
IP (ll'i, tl' 1. . 1
a ui,, ai s uie unty worK 1 Know
and that I have been the sole sup
port of my daughter and my motnl
er.
Mardom is frequently a tough
heartbreaking job with more
promises than rewards. And the
vision turns out to be a mirage.
The strange world of Oscar Lev Levant
ant Levant is lit by lightning. The flash,
es are frightening as well as
fascinating. The current to-doooie
about Oscar's neurotic complies complies-tions
tions complies-tions isn't a novel event. He has
been making with the ireudina
mpups lor many years. . Some
tune ago, Levant's old friend
(composer Aaron Copland) was
spenuing an evening listening
to Uscai s squawks aDout his com compulsions.
pulsions. compulsions. .Alter uiree hours o.
levant s latufciHiiifc. Uiplanu de
ciueu to exu ... Aaiouo Osc.r
snouieu, "you re ejaeveioping into
an eiouiamac. vvny, you u.ea tu
be auie to sit Here ana usten to
me an nignt!"
uace w.,m a uvad observed
that ievaiu "haa meuowea," an.
iiiciiuweu an Old ptsioi.
One ol the more amusing indoor
oyuiis LUiiaiois, o. l'u.Hiig uju mags
Vviicu sue v,ds pid)uig mtj,.
eiW Uiii. rtll fAallL.P Iv ....
towing
ulli-j
in a iiug waxen quoieu
i itdU d uUiCl Hip. i in a
suiB.e fc.n dim i o.dy UlU. uikuu
moiu ui.en tiidii youu think.
V.Oives are no problem. I mum
lua,e mta. uiu,.id.;
In Italy, where va Gaiuiier is
tuiu-inaiwiug siie has been giving
lnLtrvicws vvuitii iohow a ljpic,
pa.icin: one is ocauuiui, iious
anu envied by minions, sue is
also nuserauie and contused,
widckcu ,ear a.m uVuJ,
Miss Garuiier personuies an ironic
ac: fconioiimea, success is the
lust step io laiure.
A Senate Committee's investiga
tion oi the ramo-iv ratings sys"
terns has maue cjdr m lu"
adequate ana ineLitiency ji the
systems, j&ven more Uevasling
was tms report, which appeared in
lime mag several monui, ago ago-.
. ago-. Ahe mosi eloquent, hard-hitting
critics ol the ratings are the ter
vices themselves when speaking
of their competitors Nielsen, for
example, argues that human er error,
ror, error, oias and iorgetiulness work
against the accuracy of Uie otuers
methods. He says also that their
samples are usually unreliable. .
iN5lsen's rivals seize on the fact
that Nielsen's national system
measures the tuning of sets, not
the number of viewers, and does
not account for the chance that
the set might be playing to un unheeding
heeding unheeding householders or even to
an empty living room. American
Rsearch Bureau insists that this
is a big facotr, Nielsen insists that
itfis negligble!"
Goodman Ace once quipped:
"Polls are fascinating. They are
read by. everyone, from the farm farmer
er farmer in the field all the way up to
Tom Dewey, President of the U-

miiyWasHINGTON
Merry-Go -Round

WASHINGTON Calvin Grif Griffith
fith Griffith got a rough time from Warn Warning
ing Warning ton ball -fans about moving his
Washington Senators to Minnea-
nolis. But he tot a rougher time
lrom other big league club own owners
ers owners when they met in their inner
sanctum in Baltimore.
Del Webb and Tom Yawkey,
respective owners o, the iMew
York Yankees and the Boston'
Horl Snv 03 vp drift it h enrh s I
hard time that he agreed to hold
up the transfer.
They were furious at Grif 1th
for springing his iranchise shift
just as they were seeking Congres.
einnal annrnvfll nf a hill In.-'vcmnt
baseball from the anti trust laws.
The bill, already passed by the
House, is now pending before the
Senate and the baebail moguls
did not want any discordant is issues,
sues, issues, such as taking baseball away
from the nation's Capital foulinc
up their lobbying.
Seldom has there been any
more private lobbying to vass leg.
islation than there's been to nass
S. 4070, the bill to grant tne base-
I II !- t I
oan owners tatso protessionai
football, basketball and hockey
teams) unlimited nowerc tn ex
tend their monopolistic practices
in such things as player confrac s
player drafts, farm club opera operations,
tions, operations, territorial r'ghts, ind TV
broadcasts.
Under this law, if passed, own.
ers could mak," their own rulp on
everything. They could even bar
a newspaperman rom any big
league park if, for instance, he
exposed baseball graft.
S. 4070 is orohablv Hip hip
gest concession any business has
sougni irom congress in this ses session
sion session comDlete rxemntion from
the antitrust laws.
Only such operations as the
sale or lease of ball parks and the
operation of peanut and other
concessions would be subject to
monopoly policing.
In all other things, club owners
would be the sole arbiters of their
own actions. Ordinary recourse
to the courts would be destroyed;
so would the bargaining position
of players and player represent representatives.
atives. representatives. The Congressmen chiefly re responsible
sponsible responsible for steering this mon monstrosity
strosity monstrosity through the House were
Rep. Francis Walter of Penn Pennsylvania,
sylvania, Pennsylvania, Democrat, and Rep. Ken
neth Keatinc of New Vnrir pI
publican.
Theyt had potent lobbying help
from the baseball owners. Vir
tually all of them UTrp nn tha
job, pressuring Congress with
pnone calls and personal visits.
Democratic Congressman Thom Thomas
as Thomas O'Neill of Massachusetts ad ad-mitted
mitted ad-mitted during House debate that
he had been "contacted" by no
less than four baseball bigwigs
Tom Yawkey, owner of the Red
Sox; Lou Perini, owner of the
Milwaukee Braves Jow Cronin.
business manager of the Red Sox;
and Carl Sheridan, a "oersonal
representative" of the Milwaukee
Braves.
Most outspoken for of the "To "Total
tal "Total exemption" bill has been New
York'(s Democratic Mannie Celler,
who favored a analifipH Ymr.
tion of professional sports from
anuirust enforcement, when
"reasonably necessary" and in
the public interest. OIW niri
ed with his colleagues:
is Daseoall a business? Well,
we have but to look at the profits
that have been made out of base,
ball. The conclusion is that it is
a business and hence must come
within the mirview of the anti.
The Celler forces, however
were outlobbied.
DIADPAN NASSER
When dictator Nasser o' Egypt
arrived for his state visit with
Marshal Tito of Yugoslavia, the
American Embassy in Belgrade
... ,LU aiiu io give iNas
an a inenuiy dui strong warning
regarding Lebanon.
As a result, Tito warned Nas Nasser
ser Nasser against any rash action
wnicn would force the United
States to intervene. The Ameri
cans are not bluffing, Tito told
Nasser, and are determined to
keep Lebanon independet.
Nasser, it can be reported, was
not too impressed. He had pre previous
vious previous evidence that the United
States was bluffing.

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The U.S. Ambassador Ray.
mouu hare, hau turn to.aec mm
several weeks before and spent
4o miuUlea Walinug Brf WS Uriil
ed States wjulu land troops to
protect American nai,o...-. r'oJU
uwuig taw, a curiui.jtM ot U.S.
Marines .L.t am oallie was
put aboaru me oui i'ieei anu kept
cruising in the eastern Meaner Meaner-rauan.
rauan. Meaner-rauan. But Nasser knew that they
had finally oeen ofuered back to
rvaples. ne also knew uidt Joan
rosier Duliei, alter problaun problaun-mg
mg problaun-mg me i.temiu v.cr uoume Oi
aiu to irienuly ..jar East nations,
nau oeen iiuuiiuauy anu secret,
ly pleauing witn resident Cha.
niuun oi Lebanon not to invoke
uie. Atseiuiower Doctrine.
xasser swoie to iviarsnal Tito,
deaupan, tuai he was not sup.
polony uie reDei ioic-s in Lcua.
non. he oiameu nis unpreaictau.e
yAau comrauea ior amugg
arms ana men across toe boiaer
auu toiu' iiio uiai ue nas u'uw
repiaceu the cmprits. He is de de-lermineu,
lermineu, de-lermineu, lie tolu Tito, to estau estau-Usu
Usu estau-Usu pace.
Noie Meanwhile, fighting in
in leuanou was going iioin oati
to worse.
CRUSADE FOR PEACE
While the USA has been worry,
ing dooui uie luccesion, uoloime a
gius, and nigu taxes, the Deser.
ei rtews oi oaii iae city has
been worrying aoout the problem
nearest the heart of mankind-peace.

The Deserest News nwnHhvMi
Church of The Latter Day Saints
(Mormons), which pioneereu tne
ttocxy jvioutain piateao, aa wvu wvu-len
len wvu-len euitorial after editorial whwh
would do the Russian people a lot
oi gooa u readable ui -.aUsloiv.
"We must take and neep tne
initiative in the search ior peace,"
says the Deseret Aews. "we must
be imaginative, we must abandon
oid, lauure-worn patns, we must
creaie new unuersianuing at home
an abroad of our honest desires
.or peace."
The News proposes a presiden presidential
tial presidential peace coniunioii, iuciumg
the unest minas ana most Ciiec.
tive citizens in the nations to keep
our eves umimi ,, on urc,
of peace and keep the world"s
iiiet to tne tire to achieve tnat
goal.
"Normal diplomatic channels
are not effective when Russia
wants to ciog them," says we
iews. "We cannot await Russia s
pleasure in pushing for world
peace. We must move loruia
imaginatively on many fronts."
Suggestion: Broadcast the De.
seret News editorials over the
Voice ot America and reprint
them in the magazine Amerka,
which is permittea a limited die-
iriouuon in Moscow.
VOTE TEST
A test of how much American
housewives react politically a tne
high cost o. livinc will tak nUxa
in Virginia this week when Jo-
sepn freeiui, the last man who
tried to keep prices aowu, 1J;1s
in the Democratic primary tot
Congress.
Freehill was national adrr.ints
trator for the Office ofpriceSta ofpriceSta-bilization
bilization ofpriceSta-bilization when tlie Eisenhower ad administration
ministration administration took over. Hp
the new President, that, it umnM
be dangerous to remove price con
trols in a nurry at the end of the
Korean war. His advice was ig ignored,
nored, ignored, and Drices have heen no.
ing up ever since to the highest
point in nistory.
Freehill, who has had a long
record o public servide, ranging
from counsel to the Puerto Rican
trust laws."
Reconstruction Commission to
counsel for the Railroad Retire Retire-ment
ment Retire-ment Board, is now running for
Congress in Virginia's bulging
10th District, just across the Po Po-tomac
tomac Po-tomac from Washington.
Recently in Ohio, Democratic
voters nominated for governor,
Mike Di Salle, the man who preced preceded
ed preceded Freehill in keeping prices down.
Di Salle has a good chance of
winning in November. It will be
interesting to see how housewives
in northern Virginia react to one
of their price protectors.
Model 9088WE

- (Calidohia)

nited States."



tUESDAT, JUW 15, 195
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PACK

THE

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jfcSSjlti
ppj MjssasssiiifrK jiIBBI eiv!m& 5

UAMr.K nu TAPITOL HILL An extensive face-lifting

now going on at Capitol Hill in Washington will result in a
vastly expanded, modernized and more efficient plant for the
' nation's lawmakers. Costing a quarter of a billion dollars, the
job will take about six more years for completion. Superim Superimposed
posed Superimposed on aerial photo above are some of the new buildings
which are under construction or are being planned: (1) a third
! House Office building for the 435 representatives and their
staffs, to be built at a cost of 64 million dollars; (2) remodeling
of the Capitol, which will include an extension of the center

portion by 32 Vi

i nri a rnmnlete overhaul of the dome. A

four-level, 1,900-car garage will be built under the present east

front plaza; (3) the Robert A. ran Memorial,
pink marble carillon tower, underway; (4) a new Senate Office
building, which will cost 23.4 million dollars and will provide
40 senators with five-room office suites. The new Senate build building
ing building should be occupied before the end of this year, and if Con Congress
gress Congress gives the final go-ahead, the Capitol extension .could be
completed in time for the 1961 inauguration cewmonies. Pho Photograph
tograph Photograph courtesy of Steelway magazine.

Atlanta Provides Homes For Negro Population
In Attempt To Improve Conditions, Relations

t)loVIES-TELEVISION iHwH
NlA Stall Correspondent gM

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) "It
Could Be you."
It could be. But whether you
would like the idea is another
question. Even if I had a mad
idesire to eat watermelon in bed,
which 1 don't, the idea of eating
'watermelon in bed in front of a
ITV camera, with th6 whole coun country
try country looking on, is rather nauseous
to me as public entertainment
'and deplorabe as a frightful
'waste of time,
i
! But it wasn't for one surprise

;guest of "It 'Could Be You:

She loved every

'every seed of it.
; So did the estimated five and
la ha'f million NBO-TV fans of
!"H Could Be Yau'V.vha tune in

r
I
I

minute and

everyday, Monday through Fn

day, to see people tail vicuna

to

Tanv innnEuejn-cireeR. biuuvs, w

have mad "reunions," to meet
movie and TV stars and old
friends and relatives they haven't
'seen for years and to receive
"surprise" gifts.

i THE SHOW, starring Bill Ley.
Men as "master of surprises'' with
IWendell Niles' help, again proves
Ithere's a litt'e hara in everyone
and that ordinary people, even
as unsuspecting victims, will do
almost anything, with good hu humor,
mor, humor, in front of a TV camera.
' In its second year and among
'the top five daytime shows. "It
Could Be You" has receive!
1,560,000 fan letters and total
'of 207,500 people have crowded
into an NBC studio here io see
'the show. Of these, 4,500 hav
I been on. camera guests who says
jNBC, have been "amazed, do.
'lighted and surprised." So it won't
be me sayin people are nuts to
watch the show.

EXPOSING FAMILY skelstons
if they are crazy enough is the
biggest appeal of the show, which
is owned by Ra'ph Edwards, that
old master of casting Mr. and
Mrs. John Q. Public as "gimmick
stars."
Like that girl eating watermcl.
on in bed. It happened this way:
She was due to visit relatives
in Los Angeles. So they wrote to
"It Could Be You," saying that
her suppressed desire was to eat
watermelon in bed and could "It
Could Be You" do something a a-bout
bout a-bout it, please.

The show could and did.
She became a surprise guest.
When Leyden handed her a big
slice o. watermelon and the cur curtains
tains curtains parted on her own bed,
flown to the NBC studio from her
home town in Ohio, well there
wasnU much of a choice. She ate
watermelon in her own bed right
there on the stage.
"It Could Be You," as you may
have guessed, wasn't designed for
introverts or for viewers who be believe
lieve believe TV s a great medium for
improving the nation's intellec intellectual
tual intellectual standard. But the behind-the-scenes
work of people like

Stunt Dreamer Jim Critchlield
and others associated with the
show has become legendary, in
its particular. ,vwXr at the .NBC
network.
Some other "It Could Be zyou"
surprises include these:
Grace Kurth had an old rock rocking
ing rocking chair which she hated flown
to the show from her home in
Pottsville, Pa., at a cost to NBC
of $160. ..Ethel Barnes of Sioux
Falls, S.D., was flown to Hollywood
to return a cup of sugar she bor borrowed
rowed borrowed 30 years ago from a for.
mer neighbor, Carrie Stover of
Santa Monica, Ca'i".
Gitta Wilson of Elwood, Ind., a
coffee lover, was iven a coffee
tree and 250 pounds of the stay stay-awake
awake stay-awake beans. C.R. Beezley of O.
klahoma City, Okla., was present,
ed a pair of pants with cast iron
lining. The gag: His wife hurt
him too often, kicking him under
the table.
Then there was Mrs. Ruth Wew.
ell of Evanston, 111., as the wo woman
man woman who has everything. They
gave her a mink-covered garbage
can.
John Kosis of Atlanta, Ga., was
given a bowling ball on roller
skates in order to improve his
game. There was talk at the time
of a bowling ball with a thumb in
it for John, but the idea was dis discarded
carded discarded as "too gory."
Well, if you haven't seen "It
Could Be You," I'm sure you get
the idea. People enjoy surprises
and practical jokes and gag gifts,
either as participants or as on onlookers,
lookers, onlookers, a.id Iguess it might as
well be a TV show.
But if you're saying, "It won't
be me," I'm with you.
It won't be me, either.
Besides, I don't even like wa
termelon.

World-Wide Cooperatives Pay
Homage To Founders Of Idea

By CLARENCE BEECHER
Chairman, Education Committee,
Panama (Consumers Coopera Cooperatives).
tives). Cooperatives). The first Saturday in the month
of July, has been set aside by the
International Cooperative League,
as a day in which all cooperafcors
through out the world pay hom homage
age homage to those unforgettable pover
ty-stricken weavers in Rochdale,
England, who in 1844 pooled their
modest resources to open a small

shop to serve themselves. They

established operating rules and
methods of conducting business
wherein the individual enterprise
was subordinated to group enterprise.

Out of the efforts of the Roch

dale Pioneers grew a movement
addressed to no special class,
industry or occupation, but to the
interests of all people. This move movement
ment movement soon gdt the recognition of
.many governments and nations
who realized that apart from sti.
mulating initiative and bettering
their economc standard of living,
it eliminated the people asking
the government to do things fcr
them, therefore leassening govern governmental
mental governmental expenses.
In order to arrive at their sev
en Principles, known today as
Rochdale Principles, which con constituted
stituted constituted the base of their business,
it was necessary to study a sc scries
ries scries of retarding factors common
to all businesses, such as: unfa unfavorable
vorable unfavorable political conditions, t h e
low standard of business morals,
lack of knowledge of economic
principles, unscientific accounting,
and a scarcity of men of the pro.
per caliber to undertake the task
of organization and management.
From this scientific study it was
concluded that the progress of a a-ny
ny a-ny cooperative movement hinges
principally on the education its
members receive in cooperative
philosophy.
This movemrl it, considered as
the outgrowth of experience, -founded
upon mutual confidence and
reciprocal good faith. It does not
adhere to a predetermined philo philosophy,
sophy, philosophy, its philosophy is created
out of practices. Its social moral morality
ity morality is wide and permanent and its
business is non.profit because the
profits are returned back to who
made them. Service in the wide

sense of the word, constitutes
major objective.

The Cooperativa de Consumo
Panama, embraces this opportuni opportunity
ty opportunity to salute all cooperators both

worldwide and locally, who are

engaged in the arduous and noble

tjsk of bringing mankind together
as one, irrespective of all human
interests and classes, and also
urges all other persons locally to

join in this titanic struggle, de

ATLANTA (UPD A Negro can
stand at a certain spot in Atlanta
and as far as his eye can see
there is space for him to live.
That's perhaps the most signifi significant
cant significant victory yet for the Negro in
this Deep South Metropolis. It was
won with very little disturbance
and with not a little cooperaion
from the white citizenry.
Gone are the days when the
only place a Negro of average
means could find to live here was
a tumble-down shack, a cracked,
plaster walkup apartment or in
the kind of squalid settlement that
has been labeled since Recon Reconstruction
struction Reconstruction times as "nigger town"
There are several modern all all-Negro
Negro all-Negro housing developments in
Atlanta, city where one out of

three residents is colored. By far

the most impressive ues in a
long corridor bounded on one sir!,?
by a railroad and on the other
by a trunk highway. It begins
near the heart of the city and
sweeps west for many miles to
the Chattahoochee River.
At least 1,000 undeveloped acre?
lie in the rolling and beautifully,
wooded suburban countryside
where there's room for almost
unlimited real estate expansion.
Homes for Negroes, many in
the $20,000.$50,000 class, already
are showing up on the winding,

iree-iineo streets.

City planners, officials and or.
ganizations are getting mucti of
the credit for this condition,
peacefully arrived it for the most
part. But it could not have been
accomplished without the unfold.

Soviets May Install
Rocket Bases
In East Germany
BERLIN (UPD The visit of So
viet Defense Minister Marshal Ro

dion Malinovskv to East Ger

many might foreshadow establish establishment
ment establishment of Russian rocket bases
there, diplomatic sources said
today.
The sources said Soviet Premi Premier
er Premier Nikita Khrushchev hinted at

signed to better the place of man this when he told the East Ger

ing of a neighborhood drama in
a little subdivision of white homes
then known as Collier Heights.
Collier Heights was developed
in the days of scarce housing
following World War II in a raw
area near the western rim of the
city. Buying the modest homes in
the $6,000.$10,000 class were re returning
turning returning GIs, city employes and
and young businessmen a cross cross-section
section cross-section of just about any Ameri.
can middle class suburb.
The thing about Collier Heights
that no one in the neighborhood
realized at the time was that it
lay astride the corridor through
which the city's expanding Negro
population was moving. Separated
from the Negro section by main
traffic arteries, no one had given
the racial problem a thought.
Then one spring day in 1954
a neighbor came home to Collier
Heights and put out the call for
an urgent community meeting. The
news he gave his friends was a
shocker. He had stumbled on evi evidence
dence evidence that Negroes had bought
1,000 acres of undeveloped land
and had them surrounded.
What happens when that kind

of news hits a southern commun community?
ity? community? At first there was anger and
bitterness a bit of panic among

widows and elderly families. Aft After
er After heated discussion, it was sug.
gested that the entire neighbor,
hood agree to sell their homes to
Negroes. The argument was two twofoldsuch
foldsuch twofoldsuch a move would protect
property values and it would re.
duce racial tension by opening up
to Negroes an unlimited area for
home building.
On the first vote a bare major,
ity approved the drastic step.
Community leaders felt that was
not sufficient. Real trouble was
feared with opinion so sharp sharply
ly sharply divided. But gradually the
enthusiasm for selling grew
stronger.
The big Job during that period
was to keep someone from jump,
ing the gun and selling too soon.
It was realized that such "block "blockbusting"
busting" "blockbusting" tactics could lead to vio.
lence and also to a rapid break,
down of property values.

loan money ofr Negroes. Three
big and well-heeled Negro lending
institutions started providing real
estate loans and broke open the
market. Now they are in competi competition
tion competition for borrowers with all the
city's banks.
Another factor has been edu education.
cation. education. Such agencies as the At

lanta Urban League have persu
aded Negroes to get out of their
dilapidate! environment and to
buy new homes on new land in
the suburbs at monthly payments
that amount to no more han
rent back in the old haunts.
Many 40-year loans are being
negotiated at monthly rates of
$50 to$ 72 for $10,000 to 15,000
homes. To pay for this proud new
property, Negroes, whose average
earnings here still are only $1,200
to $1,400 a year, pool the wages
of husband, wife and other kin.
"If you go out in one it these
new sections in the daytime a
Negro banker told me, "you prob.
ably will find very few peop'.e at
home. Everybody in the family is
out working."

WOLVES QUIETED
PALERMO. Sicily (UPI) An Antonio
tonio Antonio Lota doesn't appreciate any
one expressing admiration for hit
girl friend with wolf-ealli. Tens!
street gang youths learned that
last night. Lota a former
professional middleweight boxer,
knocked out two of them and left
the third so groggy he couldn't
run away. Police detained Lota on
a charge of violence and the.
youths for disturbing the peace.

in society.
This task requires a great
deal of planning, education, di directors,
rectors, directors, who should, be fully a.
ware of the pledges they rave
made to their organization, and
should readily accept the fact that
all businesses thrive on its numer

ical strength and the fulfilment of
the obligations thereto. So there therefore
fore therefore we should strive to cast off
any negative factor and solely
think in terms of the progress
and success of this movement in
Panama, and the great benefit it
world be for our people if we
manage to organize ourselves for
the first time; and this can only
be accomplished by subordinating
personal interest to principles and
group interests.

LEGION DELAYS DECISION
EVANSVILLE, Ind. (UPI) A
proposed resolution to limit dis display
play display of the Confederate flag to
'commemorative" events ha-
been sidetracked by the Indiana
American Legion. The resolution
was introduced at the annual con conversion
version conversion here yesterday by Her Herman
man Herman Wenige, 77, chairman of the
Americanism Department. But the
rules of the convention were that
a resolution must be approved by
a post and a district before it
could go before the convntion.
The Americanism committee said
it was "in sympathy" with Wen Wen-ige's
ige's Wen-ige's resolution, but had to go by
the book.

man Communist rany uongre

last Friday that West Germany

would be hit by "short range

rockets if war broke out.
Malinovsky was believed to be
discussing setting up rocket bases
in talks with Soviet and East Ger German
man German army leaders here. He came
here with Khrpshchev and thrn
remained berind when the Soviet
Premier returned to Moscow Fri Fri-dav.
dav. Fri-dav. The Communist explanation that
Malinovsky had come to E-st
Germany for a vacation was dis dismissed
missed dismissed as "nonsense" by sources
here.
In his attack on West German
Chancellor K o n r a d Adenauer
Khrushchev emnhasied West
Germany would be hit by shnrt shnrt-ranse"
ranse" shnrt-ranse" rockets in contrast with
medium-range or intercontinental
m'siles.
He said it was nonsense for Ad Adenauer
enauer Adenauer to justify nlans to establish
rocket bases in West Germany by
talking of the threat posed by So Soviet
viet Soviet intercontinental missiles.
East German Communists al already
ready already have warned that rocket
bases would be established in
East Germany, Poland and Czech Czechoslovakia
oslovakia Czechoslovakia if the West Germans
get atomic weapons.

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
( INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1846)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE
TO COLOMBIA,, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
s.s. "potosi" Jiy
M.V. "SARMIENTO" August 8
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
KINGSTON. HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. SPAIN
AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR" (20,225 tons)
(Alr-Conditloncd) Sept. 26
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "SANTANDER" July 16
S.S. "CUZCO" Jniy 25
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.HOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "LOCH RYAN" July 20
S.S. 'LOCH GO WAN" July 26
TO UKCONTINENT
S.S. "DINTELDYK" July 17
S.S. "LOCH AVON" ......August 1
ALL SAILINGS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
TELEPHONES:
Cristobal 3-16545 Panama 3-12578 Balboa 2-1905

U. S. PLEDGE SAID
SAIGON (UPI) The United
States has greed to contribute
six million dollars for the con construction
struction construction of a modern telecommu telecommunications
nications telecommunications system in South Viet Vietnam.
nam. Vietnam. Plans provide for new radio radio-tele
tele radio-tele phone communications be between
tween between Saigon and Manila, Bang Bangkok,
kok, Bangkok, Singapore and Hong Kong.

COMMISSION TO MEET
SEOUL (UPI) The Commu Communists
nists Communists have called a meeting of the
Korean Armistice Commission at
Panmunjom today to dicuss' an
alleged violation of the armistice
agreement, the United Nations
Command said yesterday. The UN
announcement did not say what
violation the Communists had in
mind.
(A Soviet Tass Agency disnatch
from Pvonevane. North Korea.

coiH thp Nnrth Knrpan pnvprnmpnt

has made public a "protest
against the establishment of Am American
erican American missile bases in south Korea.")

JOB'S FOR THE BIRDS Photographer Mike Srrlick can't
watch the people for the birds in Miami, Fla. Mike focused
the- trm101! on himself when he snapped open, a bag of corn.
A pigeon riotJrtyjtJfiped. It's enough tqjpake any lensman

Mai

Although there were severs
pressures from all sides in those
tense days, there never was an

incident inside Collier Heights.
One big factor was a carefully carefully-planned
planned carefully-planned program of keeping
everyone honestly informed and
nformed and everyone abso abso-utely
utely abso-utely calm. Group captains were
assigned eight homes each among
the 135 houses in the section.
They made house.to.house con.
tacts on progress and problems.
Filially the vote to sell was up
fo 87 per cent and at that point
the Collier Heights neighbors
agreed to put their homes on the
market to Negroes. Again old
fashioned community spirit came
into play.
Some owners objected to show,
ing their houses to Negro appli.
cants. Neighbors did the job for
them. A number of families
moved out, leaving homes vacant
and lawns unkept. Such eyesores
were removed by others.

tension grew anew as Negores

swepi mo me community t
make purchases. In nearby fringe
areas occupied by whites, several
tried to sell individuall to Negroes.
Bombings resulted that could be
clearly heard in still peaceful
Collier Heights.
Within three months, It was all
over and Negroes were the new
owners of Collier Heights. This
was the signal for immediate ex expansion
pansion expansion of the undeveloped area
to the west. Today the sound of
hammer and saw is everywhere
as the section mushrooms.
Money Available
All interests agree there are
several factors, not present in
most southern cities, which en.
courage Negroes to make such
progress in home ownership here.
For one thing, there is plenty of

'

9

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service Arrives
Cristobal,.
"YAQUE" Mtii II

"ulua" :....
"hibueras"

"YAOUE" Aug.

"ULUA" Aug. 16
"HIBUERAS" Aug. IS
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
New York Service Cristobal
"ESPARTA" July 21
"LEMON" July 2
"COMAVAGUA" .Aug. i
"PARISMINA" Aug. 10
"SAN JOSE" Aug. IS
CRISTOBALW.C.C.A. FEDDER SERVICE
TEXITA" Every (10) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco

and Seattle. M

SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSENGER FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return $240.00
To Los Angeles and San Francisco and
Returning from Los Angeles $270.00
To Seattle and Return $365.00

TELEPHONES:

CRISTOBAL 2121

PANAMA 2-2904

Miles Laboratories Pan American Inc.
takes pleasure in announcing the appointment
as exclusive representatives of their products
amongst which is ALKA-SELTZER for the
Republic of Panama and the Canal Zone
UNIVERSAL EXPORT CORP.

with main offices in Panama

branch offices In:
DAVID
COLON
CHITRE

Avenlda Jose Feo. de la Osaa No. 3S
Telephone: 2-0834

Avenlda Quint a Este No. 5058
Telephone: 2505
Calle 8a. 2.004
Telephone: 362
Paseo Enrique Geensier 3425
Telephone: 217

smitten r



TUESDAY, JUL II, 1951
PAGE FOUR

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILE MEWSPAPm

Social and Otherwise
By Slafftri

Jt Jt U ly lLfk

j . .- t a ;
i i n l.ilaMaaii.iaaaaiiaiaBaaaSiaa, ilvaMii'Haaafl i i i- n i ii ij i DM

MISS HARR1ETTE BEAUPRIE PRESTON

ISS PRESTON WILL MAKE HER DEBUT
(ixT WEEK AT THE UNION CLUB
Mi uarriette Beauprie Preston, daughter of Col. nnd
M,H i Preston 1r of Fort Amador will be among
thirty y.unf lS who will make their debut at the
.n,,a debutants ball sponsored by the Damas Guada upa upa-S
S upa-S The bll will held Saturday, July 26, at the Ln.on
Miss Preston is a graduate of Balboa High School and
will attend the Canal Zone Junior College next year.

ir. and Mrs. R. Austin Acly
fill be host at dinner
"The Counsellor of the U.S. tin.
JLisy R. Austin Acly and Mrs. Ac.
Wirnl five a buffet dinner tonight
f their home in honor of Mis
tuth Eisenhower. The guests will
to Mrs. Julian Kiske Harrington,
Irs. Roy Rubottom, Mr and Mrs.
iariane Eteiza, Mr. and Mrs. Jai.
he de la Guardia Jr.. Mr. Eugene
Bashc, U.S. Vice Consul and
Ir. James Golden.
nformal Party To Be Given By
Irttr American Women's Club
The first psrK of the now club
ar Of the Inter-Amencan Worn.

nppp.
jljjt PURER
111 FINER Q
il RICHER

WKS?:-- mm mwM I

mm"'1-

'
WW WW BBEHeWy m mmwBM

NOW! 2 Weekly Flights
ONLY NON-STOP
Constellation ( Scr
- MEXICO
ONLY 6 HOURS LOWEST FARES
Connections In Mexico for all of North America

GMST

ABROVIAS MEXIC0.SA

TILS. 3-1087 A 3-1 69ft

2-0740 2 0741 Ltu

en s iiud win ue ncm i w.d w.d-day
day w.d-day July 17, at the Community
Hali of the 15 Naval District. Un Un-der
der Un-der the direction of the Hospitali Hospitality
ty Hospitality Committee, this party will be
an informal get together and wel welcome
come welcome for all members, their guests
and prospective members. Cock,
tails will be served at noon and
lunch at 1 o'clock. The cost of the
luncheon is $1.50 per person.
Casual or sport attire is request,
ed by the committee, since infor informality
mality informality of Ihe occasion will be em emphasized.
phasized. emphasized. Reservations may be
made by calling the Club's office
Balboa 2.3464 by noon on Wedne; Wedne;-day.
day. Wedne;-day. ... i :ii u u.l j rt TVinrc

'i

CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT

Box 134,
Panama

8,00 J 10 Jt
Mrs. Carroll L. Taylor
Visiting her psrentt
Mrs. Carroll L. Taylor (Betty
Louise Flatau) of Lfayette, La.,
and her son, Kevin Andrew, ar.
rived recently and are staying with
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John
F. Flatau of Panama.
Toattmasten Ciub
To Matt Tonight
The Isthmian Toastmaster's Club
will hold its regular monthly meet meeting
ing meeting tonight at 6:30 in the Fern
Room of the Tivoli Hotel. Mr, Ike
Harrouche will be the topic mas
ter and supervisor of the tabic
discussions. Frank Mendes will be
toastmaster of the evening and will
have as his speakers, Gregg Ar
mitage, Gibb Stuckey, Bud Hoi
lingsworth, Miles Gehn and Keitn
York. Carl Mott will be the gen
eral evaluator.
Anyone interested in attending
ihould in;orm the Sergeant at
Arms, Ralph McClain, Panama 3
7001.
'CONTINUID ON PAGE FIVE)
By ED FITZGERALD
The recent visit to this counlrv
by Walter H. Pierstorff of WeSt
Germany, representing t h e
world's oldest and largest manu.
facturer of optical glass, result resulted
ed resulted in a most interesting question
and answer period regarding the
use of "rare earth'' glasses in the
manufacture of lenses for photo,
graphy.
A condensation of gome of the
queries given and Pierstorff an.
swers goes like this:
Q: What is the meaning of rare
earth sands?
A: Rare earth sands contain
rare earth elements. You have to
process the gands in order to gain
these elements.
Q: A recent Kodak release on
the aubject states: "No sand is
used in the making of these
lenses." Is that correct?
A: That is riaht. Nn anH it ...
ed. It means that out of rare
earth sand you can, through pro processing,
cessing, processing, gain these elements of
thorium. Ianth in 11 in tflntnlum inrl
niobium. Rare earth sand is the
medium for these elements. Only
the elements themselves are us
ed.
Q: Where are thse sands
found?
On Japanese Lenseg
A: Only in a very few places.
Europe, gome are found in the
Far East and gome in the United
States.
Q: Have you ever gupplied glass
to the Japnaese,
A. Yes, we have in the past.
We gupplied rare earth glass to
the Japanese up to two years ago.
Q: Do the rare earth elements
referred to in advertising of
the Japanese industry mean they
are of the same quality as rare
earth glass used elsewhere?
A: I can't say that it does. I
don't know.
Q: A number of the recent
Japanese lenses have advertised
that it is not necessary to use a
filter with them; that the lens has
a built in-sky light filter. Is this
true?
A: They may add certain chem chemicals,
icals, chemicals, to get a tint and thereby get
a filler effect. But its the first
I've heard of it.
Q; Are you convinced the Japa
nese have better lens glass than
you have?
A: I don't think they do. I have
tr;.?d to get samples of their glass
but they are impossible to get.
Help Yourself to
Daily Vigor
v-s
Is m trademark
of tha
makari of
Ompball'a Sou pa.
The juicea of 8 different garden garden-freeh
freeh garden-freeh vegetables are blended into
this famous drink. You'll love its
lively flavor, and thrive on its
vitamin-packed goodness. At
mealtime or between meals V-8
S gives you the refreshment
you want, and the nourish nourishment
ment nourishment you need.

a vaw i

km

By DOROTHY KILGALLEN
(Dorothy Kilgallen is en vaca.
tlen. Her guest columnist today
is Lenora S. Slaughter, execu executive
tive executive director of the "Mist A.
merica" beauty pageant.)
LENORA SALUGHTER WRITES
Of all great American inventions,
from the steamship to the ice
cream cone, none has found such
universal recognition as one born j
on the Atlantic City boardwalk on
the Tuesday following the Labor:
Day of 1921. It was the bathing!
beauty contest.
Today the Miss American pa pageant,
geant, pageant, direct descendant of the
idea conceived so long ago, is
proven by TV ratings to be the I
most popular single show of the
year. More than 50,000,000 viewers
sat in on the 90 minutes of the fi finals
nals finals at which Denver's lovely Ma Marilyn
rilyn Marilyn Van Derber was chosen
Miss America of 1958.
All over the world, there are
imitations and variations too nu.
merous to list. I receive letters
indicating that similar competi competitions
tions competitions are held in tht jungles of A.
frica and among the pulchritudi.
nous lidies of the Arctic. They
are accepted Summer procedure:
in Russia.
But it was not alwavs thus. Let!
me go back to the beginning, that
birthday 37 years ago. Atlantic
City is a 12. month resort now, but
at that time it was strictly a Sum Summer
mer Summer place. The shutters went up
after Labor Day.
For a long time the communi
ty leaders dreamed of extending
me season just ore more week,
and they tried a lot of stunds that
didn't help. The visitors ignored;
mem an ana went home at the
usual time.
But in the Summer of 1921 a
boardwalk restaurateur named
Tom Endicott, who must forever
be credited as the man who began
it all, came up with an inspira inspiration.
tion. inspiration. Why not invite some pretty
girls from nearby states to come
to Atlantic City right after Labor
Day and display their charms un until
til until Saturday night, when the judg
es would select one and name her
Miss America?
Some of the more conservative
hotel men thought the suggestion
rather daring. But they finally a-
greeo 10 give it a try and what
Endicott dubbed the Atlantic City
Bathing Beauty Revue got under
way.
Then as now, the newspapers
were avid for pictures of attrac
live girls, and the winner, a tiny
five.foot-one inch blonde from
Washington, D.C. named Marga Margaret
ret Margaret Gorman, was front. paged from
coast to coast as 'Miss Ameri America."
ca." America." From then on, Atlantic Ci.
ty's short season problem was
well on its way to solution.
The spectacle was not what
you'd call daring. The contestants
wore voluminous "bathing suits"
reaching to their knees, plus long
stockings and high laced "swim,
ming shoes" that resembled sneak sneakers.
ers. sneakers. A fashion designer looking at
pictures of Miss Gorman in my
office the other day told me qui.le
seriously that her bathing suit
could past for a chic 1958 sack
dr.ss without a atich of altera
tion.
Since I was put in charge of the
pageant in 1942, it as been r
non-profit organization, supported
by all the business leaders of At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic City. But it's anything but
non-profit for the girls. This
year's Miss America will be as assured
sured assured of at least $50,000 in book,
ings the minute she is picked. If
she's willing to work hard, she
can make much more.
Also, she'll receive a SIO.OOO
scholarship to any college in the
world. She will acquire gifts a
car, clothes from French couturi couturiers
ers couturiers and two trips abroad worth
another $25,000.
The success of former Mis A A-mericas
mericas A-mericas such as Bess Myerson
and Lee Ann Meriwether, both of

' Mjh
I mm m
mm mm mm $mm mm
H Xm M' m W
mm

A beautiful and sophisticated gown for a formal wedding Is
thin one in peou de sole with bodice and tiny aleeves In
Beigian lace. Hem is slanted to just a suggestion of a train.
Her flowers, whleh came fresh Dy lre-"wWte lllaes cen centered
tered centered with pale Mllow tulips. By OA ILK DUGAS, NEA

. MWW-
Jliimen's Editor

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

whom made the grade in televl.
sion, fills all of us in the pageant
organization with great pride. But
it's fun to follow the careers of
the also-rans, too.
Shirley Jones, Cathlee Crowley
and Clods Leachman of "Lassie
are three recent runners.up who
made good. Two of the best Known
aspirants were eliminated in
their local contests Dorothy La La-mour
mour La-mour in New Orleans and Joan
Blonr'ell in Dallas.
I'll never forget Miss Kansas
of 1949. She was lovely and bright
and went right to the finals. At
the crucial judging for first
place, she made a solemn little
speech confessing that she was
totally devoid of talent (which
counts one-third in the scoring)
and that her only ambition in life
was to make some man a good
wife and raise nine crildren.
She has sin.ee proven somewhat
in error about her talent, for to today
day today she is movie star Vera Miles,
whose next part will be the lead
opposite James Stewart in "The
FBI Story."
The pageant is an accurate mir mir-ror
ror mir-ror or the changing concepts of
the Ideal American Gilr. The
first winner, Margaret Gorman,
was so small and cuddly she'd
probably not even be considered
by this year's judges. But in her
day the chances of the 1958 dream
girl tall, athletic, windblown and
well.scrubbed would have been
equally slim.
Mere beauty, however dazzling,
isn't enough now, anyway. When
the winner goes abroad as Miss
America she must be a girl so
poised and charming and intelli intelligent
gent intelligent that all Americans will be
proud to send her anywhere as
our representative.
Mm FRIENDS
It's a bit disconcerting to arrive
at your hostess' house at the ap.
pointed time to find the hostess
not ready to receive you.
When you are the hostess, try
to be ready and wailing for
guests so that you can greet
them at the door.
Campion of liberty
HPT.,
Snited states postage
HONOR LIBERATOR This
eight-cent, U.S. stamp honors,
Simon Bolivar, the liberator of
South America. In red, blue
and golden ochre, it bears a
medallion likeness of him. An-'
other in the "Champions of
Libertv" series, it will go on
first-day sale In Washington,
DC, on July 24. A similar
four-cent issue, in one color,,
will be issued at the same time.

km

m 1

W:t(.t Sa...
It was a group of husbands and
wives, but the women were doing
most of the talking. The subject :
their plans for their children's
summer vacation.
One wife said they were send sending
ing sending all three children to summer
camps and she' was exhausted
from buying camp clothes and e e-quipment
quipment e-quipment and sewing in name
tapes and taking them for medi.
cal and dental check-ups. Her
husband asked wryly if anyone
knew how much it cost to keep
three kids kids in camp.
Another wife had all her chil children
dren children enrolled in aummer courses.
Swimming classes for two, gym.
nasties for one, art for another
She figured that chauffeuring
them back and forth would keep
her hopping.
A third wife said she was tak.

ing the children to the family's
lakeside cab' and her husband
would get N vn on weekends
"when he could." He would he
batching it while Mama and the
children got away from the heat.
Then a husband, whose wife
hadn't been heard from, spoke
up and said: "I've taken care of
the summer plans of our three. I
told Joe, who is 13, that his allow
ance stopped one week after
school ended. That gives him a
week In which to find a job. So
ne u De ousy earning his own
spending money.
"And I told the girls I want
Jane to be able to take it a bit
easier this summer. They are go going
ing going to be responsible for part of
the housework. Both have their
Jobs, and while they are helping
make Jane's summer a little less
hectic, they wil! also be learning
how to run a house, something
they'll both probably be doing in
not too many years."
So there's one man's answer to
what to do with the kids in sum.
mer let them become contribut contributing
ing contributing members of the family circle.
And it is mv guess that his rhiL
dren will finish the summer just
as neattny and happv and far
more self-reliant than the children
whose parents are paying hard hard-earned
earned hard-earned money to have someone
else keep them busy for three
months.
By OSWALD JACORV
Written for NIA Service
NORTH It
K J93
V A J 6 4
84
AQ2
WKT (D) EAST
A 4 8 7 8 5 2
72 V83
KJ6I2 OAQ107
SOUTH
4Q104
VKQ1095
95
983
No one vulnerable
West North Beat Sooth
1 Double 3 sty
1 Pass Pass
Pass
Opening lead 4 A
EAST'S jump to three diamonds
was intended to crowd the bid
ding and it did exactly that. South
did not want to bid as much as
three hearts hut he was not go going
ing going to be shut out when he had
such a good suit
West's tour cluo bid wa. also a
push and no one can criticize
North's bid of game. Actually the
contract was a most reasonable
one and the only thing that beat
it was the spade singleton.
West opened his ace of spades.
He knew that ruffs were the only
way to beat the contract. West
continued with the three of dia
monds and East made the sort of
play that separates the men from
the hoys.
He played the queen of dia
monds. When it held the trick he
gave his partner a spade ruff and
got in to with the ace of diamonds
to give a second ruff and set the
hand two tricks instead of one.
East's play involved a slight
risk. There was some chance that
West would not hold the king of
diamonds. However, East was
not risking the game. If West did
not hold the diamond king the
hand would not be set. East, was
only risking an overtrick or s.)
against an almost certain extiM
50 point penalty.
v-v""r","aui has been:
1 We
pZs D,Ub,e
Yftll Ca..4U a .
!4wLtKJ50i..
to prodise inanv Mck.
TOD"'' hVe
West bids two Hmh.
Partner and fZt ? t yr
you do now? W" Wh'
A"",wr Tesneeieis
cuticura Talcum
Acts Like Magic
Fine, soft deliahtfu!
ly (rafrant Cuticura
Talcum contains de deodorant
odorant deodorant tntieeptir
C-8 (Hexschloro (Hexschloro-phene).
phene). (Hexschloro-phene). Keeps the
akin freh and swwt
Soothe sunburn.
Preventn, relieves
heat nd ditpet rash,
loot irritatione. Buy!
i.

m
i Wo

Food and Drink

ACROSS
1 on eeb
IGael
Pronoun
12 Century plant
IS Seaweed
14 Mountain pass
15 Grocers, for
instance
17 and
downt
II Portals
If Division of
Ancient
2 Breed apread
2 Turning
(prefix)
4 Approaches
Slt
Cut
7 Monitor
I Sample food
I Kitchen
servants
10 Indian
11 Feminine
appellation
16 Water
surrounded
land
20 Senior
22 Donkeys
Greece
21 South
European
22 Cloth measure 24 Plant juices
24 Droop 28 Wlngi
27 Bewildered
29 Telephone
part
32 Straightens
34 Shrimps
38 Procession
37 Stinging insect

mm MM rrr
r--r-lP
t:p:"L:
it fir f -LJ
nr r pir-nnr
!i "IT t
l 17 H
ij as a :
I it l i i i riii?

: 38 Line of
Junction
39 Snow vehicle
41 the table
42 Seine
44 Fruit drinks
46 Angriest
49 Japanese city
53 Stir
54 Joys
86 Boy's
nickname
57 Eternities
38 Choler
39 Tollower
60 Girl't name
61 Speaks
DOWN
1 Ace of spades,
I for instance

7ie Plafote Patent

CHILD SHOULD BE REASSURED
WHIN HI TRIPS OVER WORDS
BY MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE
James has a bank into which
he puts the nickels, dimes and
quarters which adults, caotivated,
by his 4-year-old charms, give
him.
One Sunday his Uncle slipped!
him a quarter saying, "Here, seej
how many ice cream cones yoi'i
can buy with this."
The idea that money could be
exchanged for ice cream cones j
was brand new to James. At once
it started germinating fascinating j
connections in his irwnd. He jre, jre,-membered
membered jre,-membered the children he'd teen
at the corner store exchanging
coins for gum drops and peanut
bars and the notion that he too
could engage in this kind of de
lectable trade hH iim with a
bang.
He rushed out to the porch
where his mother was sitting with
his grandparents, and aunt and a
neighbor. Pulling at her arms, he
said with urgency, 'Mommy, do
me a flavor and don't make me
put this money, in my bank."
Everyone burst into Uughter.
James' Aunt Lila said, "What do
you want your Mommy to do?
Say it again, Jimmy."

Toy Town Tavern Tentalizes
Tastes With Hot Muffins

BY GAYNOR MADDOX, NEA Food and Markets Editor

t BnBHBBJ MmLtFmWmmwm

THIS GIANT reckinr horse leads the rallop to the Bay State's
Toy Town Tavern where bountiful eatinr awaits travelers.

In Winchendon, Mass., on a roll rolling
ing rolling golf course stands a mam mammoth,
moth, mammoth, brightly-painted rocking
horse. It leads you galloping to
some of the best hot breads in
New England.
Every June we greet the wood,
en horse again and refresh our our-seves
seves our-seves at the relaxed and gracious
Toy Town Tavern, where Brew,
ster Towne, innkeeper and enjoy enjoy-er
er enjoy-er of like, encourages us to put
on extra pounds with his bounti bountiful
ful bountiful meals. He says there's a swim,
ming' pool, woods to walk in and
golf to overcome these extra ca calories.
lories. calories. Even so we always leave
a little heavier and very much
refreshed.
Like ginger muffins? Hot anl
spicy, and blueberry muf ins with
hunks of country butter? Well,
let's look in at the tavern. Here
is a recipe from the new "Tread "Tread-way
way "Tread-way Inns Cook Book" by Ann
Roe Robbins, a collection from
Toy Town Tavern and all the oth oth-er
er oth-er hospitable Treadway Inns.
Sweet Blueberry Muffins
(Makes 12 3. inch muffins)
One third cup shortening, 'i cup
sugar. V teaspoon salt, 1 egg,
well -beaten; 1 cups sifted cake
flour, li teaspoons baking pow

Answer to Previous
21 Candleholder 43 Wigwam
28 Hurt 45 Short pencils
30 Toward the 46 Wite men
sheltered tide 47 Mine entranct
31 Native ot
Latvia
33 Gambled
33 Western
shows
40 Hidden
48 Narrow
opening
50 Operatic solo
51 Depend
52 Employs
53 Man's name
"A flavor," James said bew.
deredly and was greeted with an another
other another burst of laughter.
He felt so awful he ran away
and hid under the grape arbor for
the rest of the afternoon.
He was entitled to feel aswful.
He had risked the word "favor"
to speak in grown-up language.
But his attempt to talk in his
mother's terms had produced ridi ridicule
cule ridicule instead of respect.
This kind of thing is very tough
on children.
It takes courage for small boyi
and girls to risk words they are)
uncertain about. When we laug.i
at their mispronunciation, we give
them the impression that we findj
their effort to speak in our
terms amusing. Their experience
of ridicule for such an important
effort can make them afraid of
other kinds of yenturesomeness in
human relatiorujilp.
So when, we find theli1 word
mangling funny, let us oxolain
that our amusement is for the
mispronunciation, not for the ef effort
fort effort behind it. Let's say to James,
We are laughing, not at you, but
at the funny way you said the
word 'favor.' It's not 'flavor,'
dear, but 'favor.' It's f-a-v o-r."
James will find it a great relief
to know we are not laughing at
his attempt to speak our language
to us.
der, 'i cup milk, 1 cup fresh or
frozen blueberries.
Cream the shortening (butte.- or
vegetable shortening), V4 cuo su
gar and V teaspoon salt. Add i
well-beaten egg and blend thor
oughly. Sift together 14 cups of
cake flour and 1 1 a teaspoons bak baking
ing baking powder. Add alternately with
Vi cup milk, beating for just a
few seconds after each addition
(bejter not use a machine for
this step). Lastly, stir in the ber berries,
ries, berries, which have been dusted with
a little flour. If you ar.? using
frozen berries, be sure they are
well drained. Fill a greased muf muf-fin
fin muf-fin tin 2-3 full. Bake lor 20.25 min minutes
utes minutes in a moderatelv hot oven at
400 degrees F. until the tops are
a nice light brown.-
Note: This recipe makes a fine fine-textured,
textured, fine-textured, sv.vet muffin more like
a tea or dessert muflin than a
plain one.
BODY GOES HOME
LONDON (UPD-Soviet Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador Jacob Malik left for Mos Moscow
cow Moscow abonrd a Russian IIyushinl4
airliner yesterday with the bodv of
j his l-year-old son Eugen, who
(lieu ot a kidney disease in a Lon Lon-I
I Lon-I don clinic Friday. He was accom
panied by hia other sonYunj, 25.1

.. ....... ,,jM-AMLi.

Hn,"



TUESDAY, JTJLt II, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER
PAGE FTO
Social and Otlierwi&e
Cm tinuiJ
oCialttweialit Jdandbacjd Jkey re foomy 4nd Jdanddome
Ana Mr4i Piiarre
Btptiiad en Sunday
Ana Mercedes Piiarro, infant
dauchter of air. and Mrs. Jesus
Tribaldoi. Following the ceremony
a reception was held at the Pizar Pizar-ro
ro Pizar-ro residence in Patilla.
Antonin Piiarro was bantiied on Announc Birth f Son
Sundiv it the Church of San Fran. Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Celerier an.
Cisco de la Caleta. Godparents I nounce the birth of their first son
wre Mr. and Mrs. Ruben Dario! Glenn, on Monday, July 14.

Vacation Time Chit-Chat
By Mary Skinner

Isn't it just wonderful that Chris Chris-tin
tin Chris-tin Huff of Balboa, and Martha
Miller, also of Balboa, are the two
senior scouta to represent the Can Canal
al Canal Zone Girl Scouts at the eighth
year of All States Camp at Osito-

Rancho, in San uernaraino,
The camp is in the San Bernardino

mountains and nas acres ami -cres
of pine forests and mount in
meadow. ,
Martha will be in the survival
skills Camp and will specialize in
learning to assume responsibilities
in emergencies. This will include
such things as evacuation plans,
mass feeding, group, entertaining,
temporary housing, storm signals,
etc. It sounds like it would really
be interesting to learn!
Christine will be in the drama dramatics
tics dramatics unit and specialize m writing
and selecting ballads, stories, le legends
gends legends and plays for out door pro
duction and setting, techniques of
casting, directing, costuming and
scene setting. Camp starts July 30
ad ends on Aug. 12. Good luck
girls, and have lots of fun.
James W. Albin, better known
as Jimmy, returned to the Canal
Zone on July 9 to spend a short fur furlough
lough furlough from the Navy at home with
his family in Balboa. Jimmy only
has 8V4 more months to go in the
Navy to complete his four years
'of military service. He is a Sonar Sonar-Iman
Iman Sonar-Iman 3-C aboard the minesweeper
'U.S.S. Adroit. Jimmy expects to
spend his last six months in the
(service over in the Mediterranean.
It will be a wonderful onoortunity
and a nicely-remembered experi experience,
ence, experience, we are sure.

Teen Club, the Army and Navy
Club, and over CFN television net network.
work. network. Saturday afternoon they were
playing at the Army and Navy
Club and some of the guests of

Sis Brady's wedding party who
were dancing to their music were:
I Kathleen McConaghy, Jimmy Mc Mc-1
1 Mc-1 Keown, Suzzi Potter, John Magee.
j Angela and Frankie Azcarraga,
iDottie Metzcar, Suzzi Magee, Chi Chi-jpi
jpi Chi-jpi Azcarraga, Charlie Morris, Ju Julia
lia Julia May and Owen Sutherland.
Also at the Army and Navy Club

that Saturday afternoon, a show shower
er shower was given for Pat Leach of Mar Margarita
garita Margarita who Is going to marry

I Jack Newport on the 26th of this
. mi l

monm. ine snower was given uy
Mrs. Devore and her daughter
Sharon. Pat received many, ma many
ny many pretty things.

"

Soft and bright leathers are used in Paris for beautiful
summer handbags. New here is sweet calf, textured sup supple
ple supple calf that's washable. Sunny lemon is the color used for
this handbag with soft draping. This over-the-arm style
springs open with gentle pressure of the thumb. The soft

and unframed envelope bag (center) is navy trimmed and
buttoned neatly with white calf. Half moon ba (right) is In
coral colored calf. All three bags shown here are the roomy
kind dear to the heart of the American woman. And all three,
while holding lots, will maintain their chic outlines.

RE-ENLISTS Sfc. Alfred S. Jacobsen, right, of the supply
section, U.S. Army Caribbean School, re-enlists for another tsi!1
years in the Army. He receives the oath from Maj. Elaclio A.'
Buigos, secretary of the school. Jacobsen entered the Army in;
October 1939 and his home of record is Davenport, Iowa
(U.S. Army Photo)'

Girls! I have a wonderful an announcement
nouncement announcement to make! The Gor Gor-ham
ham Gor-ham company, through its agent,
Casa Fastlich of Panama, has of offered
fered offered to give every girl graduate
of Balboa High School of the class
of 1958 one piece of silver. Here's
what you do. Call Sheila Sneider
of Curundu Heights and she will
exnlain further.
The different companies that
patterns may be chosen from are:
Gorham, Wallace, Heirloom. Towle
Reed and Barton. Kirk, Interna International
tional International and Lunt. Call today don't
delay!

V. Have you been seeing blue spots
ibefore your eyes lately. These
(particular blue spots that we are
(speaking about, can also be heard.
iTt i rnrk V roll combo The

Blue Spots composed of Jackie
n.vnra Qnrf BiiHHv Morean. guitar.

iRonnie Pearl, drums and Jimmy
Wilson, bass.
Thasa fellows will all b fresh
man in high school this coming
September and thty art doing a
fin job of playing and tinging.
Jcki and luMv turn up to
do th singing. This combo is a
wonderful lda bcus they will
hav it all throughout high
school and gt bottor and bettor
a tim goes on.
The Blue Soots have been heard
at the Coco Solo opening, at the
Balboa Theater, at the Balboa

Friday night's sneak was prac practically
tically practically jammed with kids. Some
there were: Nancy Hughes, John
Smith, Donna Jones, Charlotte
Herr, Joan Dimpfl. Mickey La
Valle, Sua Taylor Lavne Taylor,
Mimi Conover. Gladys Millar,
Jim Watson, Dee Selby, Jack
Hammond, Kay Flowers, Chris Christine
tine Christine Huff, Ed Scott, Tim Heti,
and Doug Pajack.
Also Ray Caldwell, Billy Righy.
Mike Kelly. Dorothy Strum pf, Pe Peter
ter Peter Thibo'ieau. Ronald Johanson,
Joe Wood and Jim Albin.

Governor Vetoes
'Seatmale' Bill
For Louisiana
BATON ROUGE, La. (UPI) -Gov.
Earl Loug today vetoes a
"seatmate" bill that would have
permitted the first person in a
double seat of a bus to decide if
a person of another race could
use the other seat.
Long said he believes the nwas.
ure would "do more harm than
good." He noted on the legislation
that some segregation leaders are
opposed to it.
He attached a letter from Dr.
Emmett Irwin, chairman of the
New Orleans Citizens Council re.
(ttesting the veto on grounds such
ft law would "increase existing
tensions between the races."
Irwin said about 0 or 5 per
cent of bus passengers since a
bus integration order are Negroes
and that they usually sit in win.
dow seats.
That would mean white persons
wanting to sit down might have to
ask a Negro's permission, Irwin
pointed out. The system wouiJ
cause "embarrassment and humil humiliation"
iation" humiliation" for both races, he said.

This past weekend was quite
nice for a dip at the beach and
these were some of the kids seen
there this past weekend. Nancy
Hughs, Barbara Bartlett. Joaline
Clare, Kay Davis, Kevin Sheridan,
Doug Pajak, Denice Hansen. Fred
Sill, Carmen Smith, Margie Smith,
Fred Dube, John Smith, Dave Yer Yer-kes,
kes, Yer-kes, Joan Dimpfl. Carol Dimpfl,
Jim Selby, Dan Eggleston. Paul
Glassburn, Cynthia Orr and Karen
Magnuson.

Argent)" fn,rh
Granted Holidays
Alter Rioting
BUENOS AIRES. July 15 (UPI)
President Arturo Frondizi an announced
nounced announced todav he will try to find
a quick solution to the problems
created by the reorganization of
the federal courts in collaboration
with the bar association.
All federal courts in the capi capital
tal capital have been granted legal holi holidays
days holidays since the resignation of the
president of the Supreme .Court,
Dr. Alfredo Orgaz and the subse subsequent
quent subsequent further rioting in the law
courts palace last Tuesday.
One judge is on duty in each
court" for cases involving freedom
or arrest.
The President said he had re received
ceived received all the data on the subject
from the Ministry of Justice and
Education and would study it in
the light of the constitution and
each personal case.
Some judges have been replac replaced
ed replaced and others have resigned in
protest. The government claims
eighty per cent of the magistrates
have been retained in their posts
and only six per cent replaced.

New York Firm Chosen By RP
To Underwrite Bond Issue

NEW YORK, July 14 (UPI) -Panama's
Finance Minister, Fer.
nando Eleta, with the approval of
President Ernesto de la Guardia
and the cabinet, has appointed
Let. man Brothers to from and
head an underwriting group for a
public offering of approximately
S2,000,000 Republic of Panama
external bonds.
Security for the bond issiw will
be based on the treaty of 1903 be
tween the United Slates of Amer.
ira and Panama for the construe
tion of th Panama Canal. Under
treaty, as amended, the United
State agrees to pay Panama in
perpetuity $1,930,000 annually
compensation for the right grant,
ed to th United States in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone.
$1,500,000 of the annual treaty
payment is to be irrevocably as assigned
signed assigned for 30 years to the First
National City Bank of New York
fiscal agent for th bond issue, so

that the bank will receive the an-

mum i in "" tt hi m vvvi w laats nn aywvivw a .......... v
nual payment directly from thelnited States at a 3 per ent in

United State treasury and apply terest rat and with th tecurit:
it to the full payment of jn-iiuinjl of $430,000 of th annual treat;
and interest when due. payment.

Proceeds of the bonds are to br
applied, partly, to the redemption
of certain outsanding debts of the
republic and, partly, to the costs
of Panama's feeder road pro
gram. The Inter-American High
way from the Panama-Cost Hi.
ca border to Panama City and
Colon has been previously financ financed
ed financed and a larg.? part of it has been
constructed. The feeder roads to
be constructed will afford access
to the highway from many areas
of the nation, thereby greatly im.
proving the economy of the coun
try.
Spokesman at Lehman Broth
ri said that the offering date and
terms of th bond can not br
determined until a securities and
Exchange Commission registra.
tion statement has been filed and
has become effective and that
every effort is being made to file
the statement at an early date
Panama In 1950, through Lehm Lehman
an Lehman Brothers, piaiced privately $10

5000,000 similar nonas in ine u

NEW YORK (NEA) From
France comes a sur mer story of
lightweight leather handbags in!
bright colors. They take their
place among other light accesso accessories
ries accessories for hot weather wear: a,ry
hats, stripping sandals and cool
lit. le fabric gloves.
Actually, these leathers are1

handled in much the same way
that fabric is draped. They're
pleated, folded, draped or worked
smoothly for a suave effect. The
idea is to create an accessory with
very li : tie weight for hot days.
After all, a woman doesn't really
want to lug around a great weight
when the temperatures soar.

The leathers include: capeskin.
lambskin and sweet calf. Sweet
calf is much liket he popular ;cx ;cx-tured
tured ;cx-tured calf. Paris handbag design designers
ers designers like it because, it is said, it
won't crock or bleed against light
summer dresses.
As Paris does them, the ,iew
bags are both roomy and hand

some. They are meant to hold
everything a woman needs to tote
around with her and to weigh in
at practically nothing.
Colors range from sand and

beige into sandlewood and lem-l

on, then reach out into azalea,
brilliant turquoise and the much much-loved
loved much-loved hyacinth.

mil ii ill i 1 1 Hi 1 1 1 1 : ngggta & m

kwi mm mm-, s"m m m

L", k "It I i WWW

wry, :ii-' i

BRIEFING Maj. Gen. Charles L. Dasher, nswly arrived commanding general of U.S. Army
Caribbean, gets a first hand look at the Inside workings of the Caribbean Forces Network
(CFN), Armed Forces Radio and Television Service outlet in the Panama area. The general
and his party were briefed by Lt. Co!. T. M. B. Hicks, USARCARIB Information officer; Capt,
Bruce W. Parrlsh, officer in charge at the station, and Sp2 Joe T. Daly, program director.
Here, the general, third from left, looks over the shoulder of television director Sp3 Ja'c
Hawkinson as he monitors the TV cameras. From left to right, members of the group are:
Hawklnson; Col. Walter J. Preston, Jr., G-l. USARCARIB; Parrish; Dasher; and Sfc. Frank
Harrison. TV technician and engineer. (U.S. Army Photo)

IsLWff MtjiCipiili ilwBH mh3Lvb
EaSaH ar flLV a4al li- aw VNvTa-alLais!

Macmillan Defeats
Bill To Take Military
Authority From Him
LONDON (UPI) Prime Minis,
ter Harold Macmillan has defeat,
ed a controversial plan to take su supreme
preme supreme authority over the nation's
defenses out of his hands and vest
it in a powerful new defense
board, in'ormed political sources
said today.
The dispute was similar to the
defense reorganization fight going
on in the United States where
President Eisenhower has asked
for more uncontested powers for

i his secretary of defense.

A lengthy battle over the

scheme within the British govern,
ment and the armed forces has

j produced agreement on a sweep sweeping
ing sweeping reorganization of the British

defense set-up and Macmillan
was expected to announced it to
morrow afternoon.
Under the plan, sources said,
Macmillan will remain Britain's
defense boss. An attempt by De Defense
fense Defense Minister Duncan Sandys and
the Navy's commander. in chief,
Admiral of the Fleet Earl Mount Mount-batten,
batten, Mount-batten, to be named supreme
joint defense chiefs was reported
to have been de.'eated.
Details were expected to be
made public in a government
white paper at the same time that
Macmillan makes his announce,
ment in the House of Commons.
For months, according to relia reliable
ble reliable political sources, Sandys has
been campaigning to become Brit Britain's
ain's Britain's supreme defense boss.
As defense minister he holds a
coordinating position over all
three armed forces. But the three
services ministers and the chair,
man of the Chiefs of Staff Com Committee
mittee Committee equivalent to the U.S.
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff enjoy the right to go over
his head directly to the prime
minister in case of disagreements.

bandys plan, sources said, was
to create a new defense board I
with mil authority for military I
planning. He himself would have
presided over the board and;
Mounlbatten would have been his
services deputy in it.
The three services ministers. I
the commanders in. chief of the
armed services, and the chairman
of the Chiefs of Staff Commiltee

could have communicated with
Macmillan and the cabinet only
through the Sandys-- Mountbr. u
board.

MOTEL ROOMS LOOTEP
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. (UPI)
Seven rooms in one of Atlantic
City's resort motels were looted
of 3,835 by sneak thieves yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. Police said jewelry valued at
$1,845 was taken from the Strand
Motel room of Mrs. Saily Grabo.
sky, Philadelphia. A Montreal
couple said $800 in travelers
checks and $75 in Canadian cur currency
rency currency was taken from them.

datti rrin n rc rnMnoDnw The

drawing above pictures a battle scene of the
future if the weapons currently under develop development
ment development are employed. A pllotless, plastic plane
(1) swoop down for a look at a line of
enemy tnks pproaching a bridge which has
Just been blown up (2) by a nuclear blast. The
charge was set by soldiers, racing away from
the scene (3) in a 140-mile-an-hour personnel
carrier. New 18-ton tank (4) aeroe-in on
enemy tanks with its atomic cannon. The
plastic construction of the plane will enable it

to evade enemy radar. It will carry high speed
cameras, radar end television plus an atomic
warhead and fly at speeds up to 400 m.p.h.
Two models, one propeller and one jet, have
been developed. The small nuclear demolition
kit is being prepared for Army Engineers to
blast out bridges and other obstructions. The
speedy personnel carrier, expected to replace
the truck and jeep, will be shielded to protect
infantrymen from radiation. The new stream streamlined
lined streamlined tank is expected to travel at mor
than 35 m.p.h.

Is Mow i mh r

P. A. CLASSIFIEDS

NO DIAPCR RASH

LnfrJs9
afltaSwKuK3waB

Mom Uses Moxona On Mol

Mexana prevented diaper rash in ovit
95; of hospital caej lasted I No ordi ordinary
nary ordinary powder, it' medicated, antiseptic,
bat absorbent cornstarch base. Clings
close, prevents heal rash, chafe, toot
list after ivtry chaiift.
MEXANA
MEDICAJED POWDER
MidfcMM' Mnaaa Skin Cream help bad
eViergcnt hands. In gentle lanolin softene

GETS RESERVE COMMISSION Col. Walter J. Preston, Jr,
G-l, swears in Sp4 Howard Forman as a commissioned officeJ
in the reserves. Forman will remain on active duty as an ad'
mlnistratlve specialist with the G-l Section, Hq. USARCARIB,
(U.S. Army Photo)

$ $ HEY KIDS ! $ $
COLLECT EMPTY BOTTLES EARN EASY
extra MONEY
we want
MENT1C0L BOCAS BORYMOL ASTRA RUB
ALCOHOL RUB BAY RUM ASTR1NE

LYVfcl.Lt WATER bottles.

Just like finding money.
The ASTRA truck will be at:
PARAISO PLAYGROUND Sat. July 26, 10 to II a.m.
BALBOA COMSY PARKING LOT
(near the stadium) pr juy 75, 3 to 4:30 p.m.
COLON During business hours at our
office Ave. Bolivar at 6th St.
WE PAY CASH

ENGLAND'S FINEST
"OR UK"
Pipes
all sizes and shapes

Also fine Tobacco Pouches
MORRISON'S
4th of July and "J" Street

HEAVIER C TRAFFIC

MORE STOP

Be Sure About Your BRAKES
INSIST ON 1T 9
GENUINE YYCI&II&T

LOCKHEED HYDRAULIC
BRAKE PARTS and FLUID
Constantly increasing cat traffic demand'
that you have good brakes . brake
that stop quickly, smoothly, and safely.
Regular brake check-ups are your assur assurance
ance assurance that your car is properly prepared.!
Don't take chances.' --

PANAMA AUTO, S.

TEL.' J-4550

Am

lata mi
OVA
H .11



THE P ATT AM A AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
UE5DAT, JTTLY Iff,
Yankees Aiming To Win Flag By 20-Game Margin
LEADING
HITTERS
(Bated en. 200 official at bats)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Casey Stengel Would Like
To Be Manager Of Record
Editor: CONRADO 8ARCEANT

1 WOK STX

I

SPOPT8

By MILTON RICHMAN
NEW YORK, July 15 (UPI) The New York
Yankees aren't looking to coast into the World
Series, they're aiming to fly in by a record 20-game
margin.
Thev didn't decide on that figure tack, the bulk of which was borne
S T either. If taey can, by loser Red Worthington. Coving,
make it they will shatter their: ton drove m three runs with a
Venrd of M-Vi games by homer and three singles while Lo-

which they won the 1936 American
Willi II i
League pennant.
This bit of side-play is perfect perfect-y
y perfect-y all right with Casey Stengel,
who wouldn't mind being remem remembered
bered remembered as the Yankee manager who
captured a pennant by the. biggest
margin in their history. Right now.
the distinction belongs to Joe Mc McCarthy,
Carthy, McCarthy, who led the 1936 Yankee
The runaway Yankees increas increased
ed increased their lead to 13 garnet larg largest
est largest margin of the season with a
5-0 victory over the Chicago
White Sox iat night.
Southpaw Whitey Ford breezed
to his Huh victory while giving up
onlv three hit and walking none.
He got the only mn he really need needed
ed needed when Hank Bauer led off the
first inning with his ninth homer
off loser Early Wynn. Mickey
Mantle slammed his 33rd homer
in the seventh to help ford run
in me sevenm i ncip
v,; iifo;m rornril to 24-8 over the
1U1 UJllllllv Ifcvyir
White Sox. I
Ex Yankee Jack Urban naiTen
Kansas City's six game losing
streak when he shut out Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, 4-0, on four hits for his sev sev-er'h
er'h sev-er'h triumph of the year.
The Athletics rapped Pedro Ra Ramos
mos Ramos for three runs tot the first in inning,
ning, inning, Prestoi Ward doubling home
two of the runs and then scoring
himself on Harry Simpson's smgle.
BOD IBOyUS eiCniO IIIIIIMK UUII1-
er broke up a pitching duel be-j
tween Skinny Brown and Herb Mo-
ford and led the Baltimore OrroW j
to a 2-1 win over the Detroit Tig-,
ors
ers. jlj .... i
Bob iBoyd's eientn inning num
i Boyd also scored. Baltimore s
first run m tne opening mnin.-,
when he doubled and came home
on Gene Woodling's single. IBitiwn
yoilded seven hits and struck out
eight in posting his third straight
victory.
The Boston Red Sox snapped a
tn--p-game losing streak by de defer
fer defer the Cleveland Indians. 4-3.
in ") Minings. Southpaw Don Mos Mos-si
si Mos-si walked in the winning run by
eivineiup a base on balls to pinch
... . .11L It 1
Bitter jrea ijepcio wun un ussr-
Ml. Jon (Mudcat) Grant, howev

er, was the loser. j
Murrav Wall hurled two-hit ball
after replacing Dave Sisler in the los ANGELES (UPI) The
seventh inning to gain his founn contract between the city and the
Victory. Dick Brown homered for los Angeles Dodgers baseball
the Tribe. j club for 315 acres in Chavez
Milwaukee, which relinquishea Ravine was ruled invalid today by
the National Lracue lead yester-1 Superior Judge Arnold Praeger.
day, recaptured it from San Frm-
pco by dnibhine the Giants, 12-3, praeger found in favor of plain plain-hind
hind plain-hind Lew Burdette's five hit j tjffs jn two taxpayer sui s which
pitching. challenged the legality of a con-
TWes Covington and Johnny l.o- tract that was approved by voters
jgan paced the Brave's lfi hii at-Jjn a june 3 referendum.

K0DAY-ENCANT0-.25-.15
WAHOO! $115.00
Gregory Peck in
"MAN IN THE GREY
FLANNEL SCIT"
Robert Wagner in I
"Between Heaven and Hell" I
it!

Showing At Your Service
Center Theatres Ton'iqht
K BALBOA 6:15 & 7:5(1
PtOdolio Acosta. James Darren
'THE TIAJI ANA MUM
hi Recommended Adults Only'
COCO SOLO 7:00
John Beal Colleen Gray
"THE VAMPIRK"
nTABLO HTS. 7:00
leit Chandler, Orson Welles
"MAN IN THE SHADOW
In CinemaScope & Color!
OAMBOA 7:00
Richard Egan, Jan Sterling
-'SLAUGHTER ON 10th
AVENUE"
1
GATHN 7 :00
Basil Rathbone
Bela Lugosl
I THE BLACK SLEEP"
MARGARITA 6:15 & 7:45
Rory Calhoun
Susan Cummlngs
m TIT AH BLAINE"
Bliv (Repeat. Rum
PAR A I SO 7:00
"THE DISEMBODIED" and
"PORT OK HELL"
pINTA CRUZ 7:00
Anthonv Qulnn
I "THE RIOE BACK"
CAMP BIERD 7:00
"From Hell It Came'' and
1 "STAGE STRUCK"

TO

l)AV lt

CAPITOLIO
SSe. i!c
BANK! $125.00
OUNriGHT AT
O.K. CORRAL
With Burt. Lancaster
I m Also:
BUN FOB COVER
With JWWW Casmey

gan also Knocked in uiree runs
, .L, hnmar urirl a nail flf SinP PS

with a homer and a pair of singles
Leon Wagner homered for the
Giants. The victory was Burdette's
eighlh of the year.
Little Don Zimmer cracked out
two home runs as the Los Ange
les Dodgers made it four in a row
over the Cincinnati Redlegs with
an 8 5 decision. Zimmer drove in
four runs with his two homers
while Charlie Neal contributed a
three-run homer and Steve Bilks
connected wt.h the bases empty.
Southpaw Johnny Podres scored
his ninth victory although he gave
way to Johnny Klippstein rn the
sixth inning. Bob Purkey suffered
his sixth loss against ten vicio
ries.
Walt Moryn's two-run double
n tka I 1 th inninn an,hlrl tha
... .... ..... ..
Chicago Cubs to come from j-
..... -, n
nlntl ncl rn ,n v,tory ov-
er the rnnacieipnia rnmies
Moryn struck the winning blow
off loser Ray Semproch after the
Phils had gone ahead with an un unearned
earned unearned run in the top of the 11th.
Lee Walls was the key man in
Chicago's 15-hit offensive, driving
in four, runs with his 20th homer
and a double. Moryn and Jorn-j
I1J 1J1 l I1VI1IC11.U 1MI ..-
Cubs Reliever Glenn llobbie was
credited with his seventh victory,
.
Pittsburgh and St. Louis were,
id,e-
i
Judge Rules LA
Contract With
Dodgers Invalid
Attorneys for the plaintiffs had
contended that the city had no
legal right to transfer land in the
ravine to the Dodgers because of
"public purpose" deed restric restrictions.
tions. restrictions. The land originally had
been acquired as a public hous housing
ing housing site.
The jurist returned the decision
after more than two weeks of
studying arguments advanced at
the hearing and taken under sub
mission June 25.
Litigation over the question has
held up work by the Dodgers in
their plan to build a multi-million
dollar. 50,000 seat stadium in 1 he
ravine.
TROPICAL
0.60 TODAY! 0.40
GREAT FORTUNE NIGHT!
$150.00
Be One of The Lucky Winners
of These Cash Pri7es!
1st Prize $100.00
2nd
3rd
4th
25.00
15.00
10.00
THE FORTUNE NIGHT
PLAYS AT 9:00 P. M.
ON T1IE SCREEN:
Double In Technicolor!
Clark Gable Yvonne
de Carlo In
"BAND OF ANGELS"
William Holdcn Virginia
Leigh in
"THE TOWER CNKNOWN"

T I V O LI
15c. 10c.
JET PILOT
with John Wayne
- Also:
THE RESTLESS
. BREED
' Hh ft rady

VICTORIA
15c.

TOBOR THE GREAT
HOUSE BY THE
RIVER
and
RIO GRANDE

G AB R
4 264 39
81 323 69
67 273 33
79 316 47
76 285 51
84 335 60
75 281 42
80 323 52
84 337 67
71 229 31
H Pet.
96 .364
110 .341
91 .333
102 .323
92 .323
108 .322
87 .310
99 .307
103 .306
69 .301
AMERICA
N LEAGU
E
Power, Cleve.
Fox, Chicago
Runnels, Boston
Kuenn, Detroit
Cerv. K. C.
Williams. Boston
Ward, K. C
Jensen, Boston
Malzone, Boston
Vernon, Cleve.
76 304 53
100 .329
106 .324
93 .321
87 .321
89 .319
77 .316
76 .314
89 .308
102 .304
62 .302
83 327 46
76 290 49
70 271 35
75 279 57
76 244 48
72 242 32
81 289 51
82 335 46
69 205 29
HOME RUNS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thomas. Pirates 25
Banks, Cubs 23
Walls, Cubs 20
Cepeda. Giants 19
Mathews. Braves 17
Boyer. Cardinals 17
Neal, Dodgers 17
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Jensen. Red Sox 26
Cerv, Athletics 23
Mantle, Yankees 23
Sievers, Senators 20
Triandos. Orioles 16
Lemon, Senators 16
RUNS BATTED IN
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thomas. Pirates 72
Banks, Cubs 67
Cepeda. Giants 57
Anderson, Phils 56
Snencer. Giants 52
Walls, Cubs 52
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Jensen, Rerl Sox 76
Cerv, Athletics 63
Lemon, Senators 52
Sievers. Senators 52
Lollar. White Sox 49
Panama Rod & Reel
Tournament Notes
The VI In.ernational Marlin and
Sailash Tournament stans today.
July 15 and lasts tnrougn Aug. 20.
iam Moody, lournament cnair cnair-man
man cnair-man asks thai tne angler and boat
captain be very careful to see thai
their cai.cb.es are weighed and re registered.
gistered. registered. Fish catches should be
written fully on the entry blank
supplied for that purpose. Remem Remember
ber Remember thai, even it your lish doesn't
sem to large to .you, it may be
a prize winner, as a larger fish
may be disqualified for some rea reason.
son. reason. All boats out lishing may use
the Balboa Yacht Club frequency
at 8 a.m. each morning. Marvin
Chadwick, Marine Representative
of the Texas Petroleum Company
will relay the calls on a Phone
patch to Mrs. Audrey E. Klme,
so that we can keep up to dale on
lishing catches, and any interest interesting
ing interesting news on the tournament.
Frank Violette took off on the
".Seri" on Sunday af.ernoon with
J. Frank Baxter, John Mahoney,
Dr. Rob Dickover, and Tracy Hav Hav-erfield,
erfield, Hav-erfield, all of Miami, Florida. They
went to "tie up the marlin and
sailfish" for the tournament a a-head
head a-head of time.
Violete reports by radio that
the word has been passed and
Uhye're just waiting for the "starl "starling
ing "starling gun" around Pihas. The Mia Miami
mi Miami fishermen fish with light tackle
and J. Frank Baxter holds a
world's record for the 12 lb. class
saKish, caught here last year.
They will be out fishing for a a-bouv
bouv a-bouv two weeks, so should come
up with something good.
Coca Cola is giving as prize a
six month's supply of Coca Cola,
every week a case of Coca Cola
to be delivered to the winner's
home. Motta's is giving $25 of
I : 1 .. K 1
any mercnanuise (mikcu ui uy
winner of their prize.
Colpan is added to the list or
those giving trophies, as is John Johnson
son Johnson Motors.
The list prize donors is grow growing
ing growing daily.
fDRIVE-IN
I Z. TODAY 5;5 I
David Nlven In
I "MY MAN GODFREY'
In Technicolor!
Tomorrow
POPULAR NIGHT!
$1.10 per CAR!
Jack Hawkins In
LAND OF PHARAOHS"
In Technicolor!
- TOI)AY
RIO
25c.
15c.
THE MONALITH
MONSTER
with G. Wllllama
- Also:
KISS OF FIRE
with Jack Palance

Player and Club
Musial, St Louis
Mays, S. F.
Dark, Chicago
Ashburn, Phila
Skinner, Pitt.
Walls, Chicago
Anderson, Phila
Cepeda, S. F.
Banks, Chicago
Green, St. Louis

OFF FOR FISHING TOURNAMENT Dr. Tracy Haverfield, Jack Mahoney, Frank Violette,
Dr. Rob Dickover and J. Frank Baxter photographed just before setting out for Pirias Bay
where they expect to fish in the Panama Rod & Reel Club's VI International Marlin & Sail Sail-fish
fish Sail-fish Tournament. All but Violette are international fishermen from Miami. Both Baxter and
Mahoney have held several world's records.

Nelson Homer Gives Toronto,
Pat Scantlebury 5-4 Victory

OUT OF DOORS
NO NECESSITY FOR
DISHONESTY
By JOE STETSON
Dog Editor
1 HAPPENED to mention the se-
Playground
Sports
The Interplayground Basketball
League fo r the Pacific Side of
the Isthmus got underway last
week, with games being played
on Tueseas ad on f naay
the llth. The league this summer
is only composed of the C, D, and
E Leagues of Gamboa, Ancon
Diablo and Balboa.
Tuesday, July, 8, the Balboa
'C overwhelmingly defeated the
Ancon 'C, by the score of 46 to
15, The Balboa lads displayed
line teamwork on both the of offense
fense offense and defense. For Balboa,
both, Warren Ashton and Fred
Chase tallied withnine points a
piece. For Aneon, Robert Aseron
was the only one able to pene.
trate the Balboa defense and tal.
lied for 7 points.
In the 'D' League games, Bal Balboa
boa Balboa again proved to be too much
for the younger Ancon boys, by
handing them a devastating blow
to the tune of 62 to 5. One boy a.
lone was the main factor in this
enormous production of points for
boys their age. Chuck Moses play played
ed played a very good game both on the
offense and defense, ripped
through the Ancon defense and
tallied up a grand total of 40
points, a fabulous figure for any
man, and much more so for a
young boy of 12. Not to be over overlooked
looked overlooked were Billy Coy and Gary
Mann, who themselves tallied 12
and 10 points respectively.
The other games around the
league, found the Gamboa 'D' de defeating
feating defeating the Diablo 'D' by a 38 to
10 margin, in what was a very
well contested affair.
Friday, July 11, the reams once
again took to th courts to round
out their weekly schedules. Begin Beginning
ning Beginning with the younger ones, the
Diablo 'E' displayed a better
brand of ball than their Balboa
rivals, by handing them a 34 to 10
defeat, in the 'D' game, Balboa
once again showed their shoooting
and scoring ability by routing the
Diablo TV to the tune of 45 to 9.
As in the first 'D' game, Chuck
Moses was the key figure, this
time dumping 29 points for the
Balboa five; R. Watson scored
the most for his Diablo team
mates, 5 points. Though this was
a very lop-sided affair, tha Diablo
lads proved to be very high spir spirited
ited spirited and quite game, even in a
losing cause.
In the other games around th'
circuit, the Gamboa 'D' defeated
the Ancon 'D
league standings (as of July
11 ):

C League
Balboa
An con
D' League
Halboa
Camhoa
Ancon
Diablo
'E' League
Diablo
Balboa

W L
1 0
0 1
W L
2 ('
2 'I
0 2
0 2
W L
1 0

0 1

with

riousness with which hound dog
people take their breeding pro programs.
grams. programs. The reaction of the elderly gen.
tleman who has been an aciivc
all.breed show judge for a half
century was so extraordinary as
to bring me to my feet in a star startled
tled startled endeavor to set him straight.
"Hound dogs aren't even regis registered,"
tered," registered," he said. "Breeders cross
in anything without regard to pe pe-digree
digree pe-digree or concern for type."
I could only think that, is an
intelligent dog man with such a
wealth of experience with show
dogs could be so mistaken about
the hound breeding situation,
there could be many others who
could bene.it by the facts.
The second largest dog "-egistiy
in the United States is the Lnnec!
Kennel Club. This is the stud reg registry
istry registry for the Plott hound, Blue
tick, Treeing Walker, Black and
Tan coonhound, Redbone and Sev
eral otlier breeds.
Far lrom beine indiftWpm in
the breeding of his hounds, the
nounci breeder is most serious a
bout the qualities and characteris
es wun which he is dealing in
ns breeding program. His is a
unctional breed.
The things he is considering are
SO clOSelv asxnriatnH ..,,!,, k;.
nights of tramping through the
' usiening to the chop or
bawl of his hounds on lino nl
hastening pell mell through' the
nwdinp.-, ana over the windfalls
through the night to the tree bark
too closely to be indifferent a
uuui perpetuating the good qua qualities
lities qualities ol his hounns anri mnHir,,;
or eliminating their shortcomings
. .iuiicsi mmnu is too much a
part of the very liber of the man
to allow his hrppH
.. B "6i a in ;u
be taken lightly.
If a hound happens to have qua
l'ty bllt is not a nnrohraH ;t
be registered as a "grade'" hound
nu i mi in competition. In order
to compete, therefore, there is no
necessity for a dishnnoct ( t-i.
ing of pedigree or dishonest ree'
A good hound ran tfni
tion without need for conniving or
i rriiiii 1 1 -i ;i .. :i
sMi.a.njr ,,, lls registration,
something of which, I am sorrv in
say, the registrations of m,,
breeds are not entirely free.
LEADING
PITCHERS
National League
McMahon, Braves
McCormick, Giants
Farrell, Phillies
Phillips, Cubs
Koufax, Dodgers

W L Pet.
6 1 .857
6 1 .857
6 2 .750
6 2 .750
7 3 .700
8 0 1.000
13 3 .813
7 2 .788
6 2 .750
11 4 .733

American League
Delock, Red Sox
Turlcy, Yankees
Sullivan, Red Sox
Pappas, Orioles
Ford, Yankees
McMURTY NORKUS
TACOMA, Wash. (NEA) Pat
McMurtry and Charley Norkus,
heavyweights, are scheduled to
box 10 rounds in Tcoma on Sat-
urday night, July 26.
MONMOUTH HANDICAP
OCEANPORT. N. J. (NEA)
Bold Ruler heads 31 horses nomi-
nated for the $100,000 Monmouth

Handicap at a mile and a quar
ter, July 19,

NEW YORK, July 15 (UPI)
An Inn rl i Dnnliii Malunn 1 n ,- L. 1

ns lung ivui.a iicmuu ft i i .i
belting home runs, the Toronto
Maple Leafs figure to stay in the
International League race.
'Ine 32 year.ola first baseman
smacked his 27th of the season
last night as the Leafs scored an
uphill 5.4 victory over the Buffa.
lo Bisons. The win kept second second-place
place second-place Toronto within six games
of the pace.setting Montreal Roy Royals,
als, Royals, who defeated the Rochester
Red Wings, 4.0.
Significantly 20 of Nelson's hom homers
ers homers this season have been hit in
winning causes. Luke Eautmr Mol
son's nearest oononrnl fnr
home run crown socked Itis 20th
oi me season for the Bisofis. Eas Eas-ter
ter Eas-ter hit 40 bust year tp lead the
league while Nelson had 28.
In other action, the Richmond
Virginians deleated the Miami
Marlins, 4-1. and tho Havana Rn
gar Kings cored early and la.e
ui a (-i win over the Columbus
J.3ts, who dropped their tilth
straight game.
Steve koranda hit his llth and
12th homers of the season to
lead the Royals to their win. Bill
Harris, who was the beneficiary
of Koranda's hitting, picked up his
seventh win against six losses
lor Montreal.
Yesterday's linescores:
Havana 7, Columbus 1
Montreal 000 101 2004 5 1
Rochester 000 000 0000 7 1
Harris and Teed; Ricketts, Lov Lov-enguth
enguth Lov-enguth (9) and Katt. LP Rick
etts. HRS Koranda 2.
Bufaflo 022 000 0004 9 0
ioronto 000 101 0215 11 o
COX. Rodrifl!P7 IQ rA NInhl
Scantlebury and Thompson. LP
vsvx.. nna cox, faster, Nelson.
Richmond 000 021 1004 7 0
Miami 010 000 0001 6 (J
Dick, Chakales (9) and Oldiv
Bunker, Green (7), Anderson (8)
and Coker. WP-Dick. LP-Bunk-er.
ALL CLASS Moe Drabowsky,
the Chicago Cubs' righthander
with a name reminding of a Big
Ten fullback, was a workhorse
over the first half of the season
and came out with a 7.7 mark,
but included was a one-bit ef effort
fort effort against Pittsburgh. He's one
of pitching's names with a tu.
-turev-

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W
43
44
43
39
38
39
37
38
L Pet. GB
34 .544
Milwaukee .
San Francisco
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
38 .537
41 .512
38 .506
39 .494
43 .476
42 .468
44 .463
V
2'2
3
4
SVl
6'2
6V2
Today's Games
Milwaukee at St. Louis (N)
Philadelphia at San Francisco
(N).
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles (N).
Only games scheduled.
Yosterday's Results
Milwaukee 210 02 320 12 1 1
San Fco. 010 001 1003 5 2
Burdette (8-7) and Crandall
Worthington (8-5), Crone, Ship Shipley,
ley, Shipley, Monzant and Schmidt.
Phila. 400 140 000 01-10 10 0
Chicago 200 100 104 02-11 15 3
Card well, Semproch (11-6) and
Sawatski.
Phillips, Fodge, Drot, Henry, EI.
ston, Hobbie (7-6) and S. Tay Taylor.
lor. Taylor. Cincinnati 100 022 0005 9 1
Los Angeles 030 401 OOx 8 8 5
Purkey (10.6), Kellner and Bai
ley.
Podres (9-8), Klippstein and
Roseboro.
Only games scheduled.

Modern Golf Clubs, Balls
Don't Mean A Thing Unless
You Have Got That Swing

By OSCAR FRALEY
WHITE PLAINS NY (IIP11
'Progress is tine, electric lights
are better than kerosene lamps
and modern baseball is a tiling
of machined beauty but when
it comes to golf, it don't mean
a thing if you ain't got that swing.
Al Heifer, the jumbo-sired tele television
vision television announcer, and old Fear Fearless
less Fearless proved this to the complete
satisfaction of a breathless world
today. We did it by absorbing a
10 and 8 shellacking from a pair
of golf pros named Jay Hcjert
and Mike Turresa at Knollwood
Country Club.
Such a rout might be expected
under ordinary conditions but we
figured we had these two guys on
the hip.
Hebert and Turnesa played with
the old-fashioned hickory-shafted
clubs, most of them 75 years old,
and the old-time dead ball. Heifer
and old Fearless used those
gleamine. DOlished Soaldins wnmSt
and irons which look as if they
came from Tiffany's.
But, as the old saying goes, you
can't make a silk evening bag out
of a porker's ear.
Scores Are Secret
In the interest of self respect
iana Decause tne 250-pound Hei Heifer
fer Heifer held a ham-sired fist under
my schnozzle) our scores will for
ever remain a deeper and darker
secret uian sign language at the
bottom of a well. As one fistic
manager remarked after a disas
trous bout, "We shoiilda sito'od in
bed."
But our hopes were higher than
our now depleted funds when we
saw the equipment which our two
''pigeons" had to play. Those
clubs looked as if they had been
made about the time Mary Queen
of Scots invented the first pair of
lady's golf slippers.
The shafts were cracked. The

I I
'kiiKZsK $sejK I
iflHBPIBg 'IssHfBjsssk, sisl 8 isfl
dgwiHgKAiisiMfl H $ Iff!

NO FOOLIN' Frank Crosttti kids Joe Gordon about his

"-'"n wwiu, juuaui in. j in ibiircv coacn and tne
Incfians' m manager, formed a matchless double nUyi

AMERICAN LEAGUE

W L Pet. GB
54 27 .667 Zi, i
41 40 .506 13
40 40 .500 1314
3 41 .488 14Wr.
39 43 .476 15Va
38 42 .475 15V
39 45 .464 I6V2
35 47 .427 ltti
New York
Boston
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
Baltimore
Cleveland
Washington
Detroit at New York. ,.'.
Cricago at Baltimore (N).
Cleveland at Washington (lfi J
Kansas City at Boston (H'n
Yterdy's Result '- Yfj
Night Game) .93
Chicago 000 000 000-0 3 2
New York 100 110 llx5 9 0
Wynn (8-8), Quakers and Lollar.'
Ford (11.4) and Howard
Cleveland 010 100 010 03 7 2
Boston 002 000 100 14 6 1
Wilhelm, Narleski, Grant (6-8L
Mossi and Brown, Nixon
Sisler, Wall (4.7) and Berberef.
(Night Game)
Kansas City 300 100 0004 1
Washington 000 000 0000 4 1
Urban (7-7) and Smith.
Ramos (7-7), Constable and
Courtney.
Detroit 10 000 0001 7 1
Baltimore lR 000 Olx 2 6 0
Moford (0.2) and Wilson.
Brown (3.0) and Trinados,
grips were of a leather as slick,
ii...ij wljua. ille nouns
were rustea uke a nine-year o;u s
ears in poiaio uiggm' ume and
tne Wnole collection Innkcrl 9 3 if
H hao. been rescued, lrom a hoc
shop in the Gay 90's.
"It Savs 'ri I nn thin n;i..
- .wa vu ."ifl pUlll,
moaned Hebert, on of gok's top
luumig pruiessionais. "it wasn j
necessary to stamp it because tms
thing coulan t have been made
A.D.'
Then, as thpv wapolrl thoir .nil.
lowy, creacking weapons on tne
J.U01 ice, we suppea ov'er wnat we
thought was the clincher.
we made 'em use sand leoi,
too.
So what happened? Personally
I don't believe it yet.
Ancient vs Modern
Hebert assumed the. honors and
cracked tha "dead ball" 22i)
yards right smack down the mid middle.
dle. middle. I can attest to that 220 yartfj
because, after two shots with my
modern, high compression pe.iei,
I still was exactly 20 yards be
hind him and I am known in.er
nationally as a 100-yard man.
Things got no better fast. Jay
and Mike played those ancient
sticks with such precision tlsat! ;
Spalding must be thinking today
of going back to the hickory shaft,"
lurnesa added insult to injury on
the 362-yard seventh hole when he
hit his second shot into tho noiWl
auu uieu useu a eiuD laeniiiiea .as v
"something" to hole out for a par
anyhow. It didn't matter. Hebert
knocked in an wight-footer with a
potato masher putter for a birdie.
Hebert wound un with nnr.
over-par 37-35-r-72. Turnesa shot
himself a 38-3674 and observed
that "with good sticks, the way
we played today we both wojld
have broken my course record
of 64."
As I said, it don't mean a thin
if you ain't got that swing.
i

i1



-

-
ESDAY. JILT 15, 138
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
P.A.G. Is Now Just Another Golf Tournament

B j- atiafcal I

tL,

imt won

Kent Cigarettes 30V!
ttvoli Travel 25
Bunlop-Hillman 25
ialboa Beer 24
tenith Radio
Scott Atwater 18
Pepii Cola-Martini 16
Duran Blue Star 15

Leading Averages: Daraian 182,
Kunkel 173, Lane 167, Soto ana
Dube 166.

By HARRY GRAYSON
HAVERTOWN, Pa. (NEA) Thej
touring golf professional ia a guy
whose mind usually is on the prac-

tice tee. I
j Ask him about something in he
locker room and he'll say, sure.

I then go out and start hitting balls, j

Fifteen minutes later the subject;
is totally forgotten. Ask him some something
thing something in a hotel iobby and the re response
sponse response is the same. Then he goes
upstairs and practices his swing
in front, of mirror, forgetting
every word that was said.
The money players worry only;
about their games and nothing
illustrates it better than the 40th;
PGA Championship over the rela-j
tively easy Llanerch Country!
Club course in Havertown, which

is hardly a fashionable suburb on
Philadelphia's west side, July 17-20.

From 1916 through '57, the
PGA was contested at match

play. It was a grueling, seven

day test with the survivors going
36 holes on each of the last two

days.
For years this tournament rated

a very good second to the United
States Open in importance. It

perhaps had most to do wh mak

ing. Walter Hagen famous. The
Haig won it five times. He

bounced down in front in 1921,

then after losing to Gene Sara-

zen at the 38th hole in '23, he
copped the plums four years in a
row.
But the structure fell apart in
the one spot a pro can be hurt
most prize money and now in
an effort to save the affair four
days of 18 holes of medal play
has been installed.
This makes the PGA the same
as any other of the weekly tour-

0 Inaments the pros engage in.
j Through lack of planning, the tour tour-Lost'
Lost' tour-Lost' their way in the first two games' namet on its old basis ran into

ON TARGET Contestants in the Midwest Archery Cham Championship
pionship Championship m St. Louis made a pretty picture. Among them
ware Mrs. Ann Clark, left, defending and former national
A enampion. and Mn. Senda Roff.

IT MAY BE YOUR LIVER

If life's not worth living
it may b your liver I
It'i a fact It takes up to two pints
f liver bile a day to keep your
digestive tract in top aha pe 1 f y our
liver bile if not flowing freely your
food may not digest . gas Moats
p your stomach . you feel con constipated
stipated constipated tnd all the fun and spar Ida

go out of life. That's when you
need mild gentle Carter's Little
Liver Pills. These famous vegs
table pills help stimulate the flow
of liver bile. Soon your digestion
starts functioning properly and
you feel that happy daya are here
again! Don't ever stay sunk.
Alway keep Carter's Little Live
Pills on hand. Ask your druggist

AROUND THE BUOY Columbia, left, goes around the first marker buoy after taking an
early lead against Vim off Newport Nipping Vim by 45 seconds in the Adams Cup race
places Columbia in the favorite's position "in the battle to represent the United States in
the America's Cup races in September. The English have not yet decided on their candidate.

i
i

Milt Appears to be Real Plum
As Quarterback For Browns

I3li! piling upa lead two games, pi)

18V ing up a lead of 192 pices of plas

tic lumber. In the last round the
Beer gizzlers continued heir stea steady
dy steady rolling pace of 800 and over,
but the Kent Cigarettes staged a
rally, rolling a neat 882 game to
give them one point.

18Vi

20
22Y
2f.
23
29

bad times the past few years.
With the familiar complaints a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst match play hurting more
than ever drama of the 18tn
green lacking, big names knocked
out early, etc. the last two shows
fared poorly.

Jorge Soto paced the Balboa
Beer with 541 which included a 200
gUme. Next in line was Lou

Dunlep-Hiliman 3 Tivoli Travel I Glud with 536 in which he had a
I 209 ou.put in the initial game. Kay
Here Was a golden opportunity j Dube formed a trio of 500 bowi-.rs
for the Tivoli Travel Agents to for the Balboas with 508. For tne
elose the gap between the first and league leaders, the old reliable
slots In the standing. But i youngster Curly Bates put togeth-

the Tivoli agents got detouredi er anifty 522 set. A newcomer af

tome where along the lane, when
the Hillman-Dunlop rolled into the
win column by eight pins in the o o-pener
pener o-pener and 84 sticks in the second
and thw margin insured them the
TP marker.
The Tivoli Travels,' foipd their
way to the road of victory in the
laat atania by 14 maple tenpins,
Jack Voit with his 200 even game
and $30 aeries wai thtsandout
tor the- Tivoli Travels. A rookie in

the Dunlop-Hlllman roster stnie
the show tor his quintet with a 552
set in which a 223 effort helped a

great deal. But it was for the vei

teran oi tne lanes, an ivunnei u
get recognition from AiBC for his
performance. Ed will be awarded
th three-of-a-kind patch to com
meliorate his 173 games for a 519
aeAes. This three game win !:as
pvi the jolly English products in a
tie 'for aecond place.
i Balbea Beer 1 Rent 1
the Kent Cigarettes still lead

en the summer league By 5'a
times took it on the chin for three
wit of four points afcthe hands of

t five Balboa Beer n.eg xegiors.
Mama favorite brewmasters had

Ethel Perantie
Wins 1958 PWGA
landicap Tourney
Ethel Perantie, one of the fin fin-t
t fin-t golfers in the Istrmus, won
e championship flight 4 to 3 o.
,t Mae Askew in the 1958 Handi.
p Tourney jusf completed at
Panama Golf Club.
rtrt flieht winner was Helen

mple who came in 1 up on the
ch over Madelon Garret. Second
!'. winner was Louise Jones
this was tought one one up o-ver-JC.
Purdy. Third flight, winner
was Maxine Hood; 4 and three
over Bea Cllnely.
Prizes are on display in the
Pro-Shop at the Panama Golf
Cub. Winners and Runners.up in
each flight will be awarded priz prizes
es prizes next Saturday at the regular
Monthly PWGA tournament at Ft.

Amador Golf Club.

PWGA wishes to express appre appreciation
ciation appreciation for the use of the -facilities
' the Panama Golf Club and to
the staff for their time and effort
in helping make this tournament
a success.
Seigeants

In Command

t'CHAMPAIGN 111 (NEA) -Tfon't
be surprised if the Illinois
fftotball team of this fall breaks
from the huddle and does milita milita-rl
rl milita-rl drill. The Illini most certainly
should walk their posts in a mili.
try maimer.
Included among outstanding so.
p lomore prospects are three vor vor-n
n vor-n er Marine sergeants. They are
tickles Cliff Roberta and Darrell
Tie-Decker, the former of Philadel.
phjia. and end Gerald- Wood. Gas.
fell Giene Cherney, a aernior 'rom
Bella, Minn., wat an Army three.
stri(vr.
TVey kow hpjv to eiva nd fol follow
low follow -orderi.

ter getting over the li ters of

leagueitis in the first two games

rolled a 206 game. This helped Al
Taylor in assisting the Kents win winning
ning winning the last point.
Zenith Radios 3 Scott A water 1
Scott Awater outboard motors
got offto a great start and before
the condensers and resistors of the
Zenith Radios got warmed up
the Scott-Atwater putt-putt boys
had the game wrapped up neatly
by 106 pins and it looked mighty
sad for the Zenith lads. But the

Motors ran out of gas while the

Zenith resistors resisted by mak

ing up the deficit when they won

by 110 pins.
With all things practically even

the last game mean: three points

lor the winner and the game went
right down to the last frame and
the Zeniths eked out a 6 pin win.

The one two puch of Zenith was

Joe Burgoon and Humberto De
Luca wr h 523 and 535. Joe had a
207 and Humberto 210. For the
Short end Scot: Atwaters, Navy
man Ed ThibauR thumped t h e
sticks with 505
Cafe Dm an Blue Star 4
Pepsi Cola-Martini 0

The two tatlenders of the league

1 I

' mm wmmumm

Lionel Hebert

Last year, Lionel Hebert, the
stouter of the handsome brothers
from the Louisiana bayous, de

feated Dow Finsterwald in Day-

attracted the attention of the spec-, i011' u ,or lne lue' lne year
tators mainly of the super duper fore' Ja'e Burke won at Can Can-bowling
bowling Can-bowling of Ted Melanson Last! ton- Mass and somebody was
week, genial Ted suffered agonv atuck with a lot of bills,
on the sticky approaches, but this The principal need of the PGA
week fortified with slip stick on,in more recent years has been
greatly improved al'lhough still not better courses,
perfect approaches, Melanso n start Then they need something dif dif-ed
ed dif-ed with 222, followed it up with ferent.

237 and taoered off to 208 for a iney snouia nave put in mea-

By BILL SCHOLL
'
. HIRAM, 0. (NEA) Paul Brown
called his quarterback seminar to together
gether together at Hiram and this time
there was no doubt who would sit
at the head of the class.
The place with the professional
Browns belongs to Milt Plum on
the basis of his performance as
a recruit last year.
In fact, Plum looked so good
after taking over as a starter in
the late stages of 1957 that Coach

Brown indicated tne renn state
alumnus would be number one
this fall even if Tommy O'Con O'Con-nell
nell O'Con-nell had returned. As the Course
opened here, the Browns were
resting their near future in Plum'j
ruggedness as well at his ability.
One of Otto Graham's many
virtues was the fact that he al always
ways always reported ready to work. In
10 illustrious seasons with the
Browns, the Northwestern prod product
uct product never failed to start because
of an injury
Thingi have been different
since Graham left. In 19 5 G.
George Ratterman and Babe Pa Pa-rilli
rilli Pa-rilli were on the shelf before the
leason was half finished. O'Con.
nell had to be summoned out of
retirement as a .hurried replace replacement.
ment. replacement. Last season 0'Connel was in.

jured in the ninth game. Plum
took over only to pull a leg mus.
cle before the championship with without
out without a healthy passer for the most
important game of the season.
Plum's record last season indi.
cates that he might not provide
the required stability. Not only
did he suffer the pulled muscle,
but he was stretched out prior to
one starting assignment with an
attack of influenza. He played
fairly well, but could not go the
distance.
Plum's physical make .up does
not indicate delicacy, however,
for he stands six-two, weighs 200
pounds and is powerfully con constructed.
structed. constructed. Plum is still shaking his head
regarding the pulled muscle
which occurred In nothing more
strenuous than a game of catch.

"It was the first pulled muscle
1 I'd ever had," he says. "It was

the first time in high school and

at Penn State that I'd ever miss,
ed starting a game because of an
injury. I'd never been hurt, an
at Penn State I played a lot o'
defense, too."
Sothe Browns have reason to
believe that turn is i lie rugger j
operator they are looking for.
Others enrolled in the quarter quarterback
back quarterback class are Bobby Freeman.
John Borton, Jim Haluska and
rookies Jim Ninowski of Michi Michigan
gan Michigan State, Maryland's Frank Tarn
burello and Ohio State's Andy O-

Isthmian Sports
Car Club Ladies
Rally This Sunday

kulovich, the latter merely an ob.
server.
"We are .rying to talk Andy
into completing nis education at
Ohio Slate," s:resses Paul Brown.

So You Want
To Be A Pro?

AI.TANTA, Ga. (NEA) Those
thinking of a professional golf ca

reer would do well to consult, Ha

i old Sarsent. president of the

Professional Golfers' Association
Sarpenl of East Lake in Allan
ta det.-iils the varied and runner
ous duties of a club pro.

He points out that golfers who

want to loin the monev ranks

This Sunday, July 20, is ladies 'because they love to play" would

oay lor me ismmian sporis Car he hetter off remaining amateurs

uut. tars will meet at the Diablo Club pros have so many othor
Club House at 8:30 a.m. The ral- duties that Ithey do not have the

ly win lasi approximately lour opportunity I to plav much.

nours- It takes five years of hard work

Unlike last time, the ladies are as an assistant before a player

noi providing luncn so nnng your can become an approved P(iA

own. tiuesis are invited, ror in- member, usually many more be be-formation
formation be-formation call Jean Elia, Balboa fore he becomes truly well-versed

teas. I m his profession.

For extra dependability

insist on

finstom

dri charged
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f USE OUR BUDGET PLAN

total of 667.

t

Encouraged by this performance,
Raul Alvarado came up with 535
and Manny Fernandez hooked In Into
to Into the pinsfo r 527. With this trio"
being red Hot, The Duran Coffee
with Blue Star Milk, put together
four winning points and brought
down their opposition closer to the
ce'lar. The Pensi Tola Martini
mntf'ures had a rough night but
as iftoal their big man Pee Da Da-mian
mian Da-mian turned in a dpendable rer rer-formpnfe
formpnfe rer-formpnfe with 554. which includ included
ed included a 213 game.
Prexy Lou G'ud of th's Summer
Leaeue gave George Mcfullnusn
of the ervif a nat on the back
for petting the apnwhes In

al-match play," says Fred Corco

ran, who did so much to make the
present tour, what it is. 'Have two
players go out against each other.
But instead of the winning of the
most holes deciding the match,
and having it end, say on the 11th
green, let them play medal play,
the low score prevailing. If both
come home with 71, then send
them right out for a sudden death
hole."

. Anyway, the pros find them themselves
selves themselves in a spot where their own
tournament has lost much of its
meaning and prestige. The impor important
tant important names will be at Llanerch
Tommy Bolt, Sam Snead, Dr'. Ca Ca-ry
ry Ca-ry Middlecoff, Julius Boros, Doug

Ford. .everybody but Ben Ho

Playground Sports

Cambea 34, Ancon 5
Gamboa.'i spunky little Tigers
added a second victory in as ma.
ny games Frida'y morning on
their home court with a resound,
ing 34 to 5 win against Ancon's
small, but valiant, "D" team.
Gamboa's height and depth a p.
peared to be the deciding factor

: which led to Ancon's defeat.
Scotty Tyree .was one man

show for the Gamboa cause in
scoring 22 points. He was aided
by Bill Catron. Tommy and Dic Dicky
ky Dicky Zornes, Ray Hignett, and Bar.
ry Olsen.
For Ancon, Yocum was high
scorer with 3 points. However, all
oi the Ancon youngsters played a
fine game.

sati-'--tory shape for the bowler; gan, who practically placed a lily The box score:

to slide

!

, I

in the hand of the PGA when he
refused to appear as a repeating

Open champion.
But the more important names
are present practically every
Thursday when the pros tee off
for the Phoenix, Insurance City
or the Rubber City Open.
throughout the years the pros
have not heeded growing public
disinterest. No move was made

to bring back the PGA until this

year and then the obvious was
to play it like any other tourna tournament.
ment. tournament. This should be a tremendous
tournament. It's the proa' own
and should mean a lot.
But I'm afra)d it has got to be
just another outing.

STILL A PRO
ORLANDO, Fla. (NEA) Re Remember
member Remember Eddie Miller? The for former
mer former shortstop of the Braves and
Reds is now in gold as assistant
pro al the Tcquesta Country. Club
in Florida.

Ancoi.
Adams
Colburn
locum
Austin
Isaac
Total

Tyree
T. Zornes
D. Zornes
Hignett
Olsen
Catron
Dunn
Totals

fg ft pf tp

0 1

0 0
1 -0
0 0
0 0
1 1

Gamboa

il 0 0 22
10 12
0 0 0 0
10 0 2
00 00

2 2 0 0
1 00 2
16 2 1 34

Only

Viceroy

has the filter

to give you all the pleas pleasure
ure pleasure of the choicest im imported
ported imported tobaccos.
Try them like millions of peo people
ple people all over the world you'll also
ay, "1 prefer Viceroy.

DANCER'S SON
NEW YORK (NEA) East In.
dian, first son of Native Dancer,
won his first race aix years to the

day after his champion aire won I
hit first race..

9

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filters, guarantees you all the fla fla-var,
var, fla-var, all the pleasure of Viceroy 'a
rich tobaccos.

-r'vv

Mr



?i rAOE eiuht
TBE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NET-r.-.
TUESDAY. JULY 15, 1951 f
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
THIS SPACE IS ROR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
IK is?
am
paSllrTffmtJ.CT
Isasasl W i. j

i

I
I

I Automobiles
av

Hillmin Husky 1956 top con condition,
dition, condition, radio, best offer. Call 2 2-1891,
1891, 2-1891, 2-1895 weekdays, 3 3-5954
5954 3-5954 nights and Sundays.
1955 Ford Victoria hardtop, pink
and whitt, radio, power steering,
2-1891, 2-1895 weekdays, 3 3-5954
5954 3-5954 nights and Sundays.
FOR SALE: 1955 Ford Thun Thun-derbird
derbird Thun-derbird sportcar Excellent tor tor-drtion.
drtion. tor-drtion. Call 2-2887 before 3 p.
an. Balboa.
,fOR SALI Two-tone 1955 Ford
V-S, 4-door. 9 passenger, atation
wagon, 4 new fires, new battery,
underceated, clean car, call Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2789 or house 0817.
FOR SALE: 1947 Ford jalopy
$75. Taylor 2172-C Curundu.
Tel. 5162.
FOR SALE: 1954 Ford Custom Custom-line
line Custom-line tudor V-8 w 'overdrive, ra radio,
dio, radio, tutene blue and white ex excellent
cellent excellent condition. Rhone Ft. Clay Clayton
ton Clayton 4297.
FOR SALE: 1950 Buiek, 4 4-doer
doer 4-doer sedan, Super Dynaflow, ra radio,
dio, radio, whit side walls, excellent
mechanical condition, duty paid.
Panama inspected, original own owner.
er. owner. Tel. Balboa 2376 oltice hours.
FOR SALE: 1956 English Ford,
excellent condition, $450. Navy
3122 toe at 2614-B Cocoli.
FOR SALE: 51 Kaiser standard
ehif, $150.00. Tgt. Dan La
Granga Qrts. 335-A Albrook
after 4 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1955 Pontiac 2 2-door
door 2-door Catalina. By public auction,
Saturday, uly 19, 1958 at 10
a.m. in parking lot in the roar of
tha Canal Zona Credit Union
building, Balboa, Canal Zona.
FOR SALE: 1956 Ford Victoria
hardtop, four door sedan, radio,
w sw. Thunderbird engine. $1, $1,-500.00.
500.00. $1,-500.00. Call 2-3364, or house
532 Ancon,
IFOR SALE: Morris Minor 1951
'price reasonable. Call 2-3147
after 5:00 p.m. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. FOR SALE: 1951 Morris Minor
convertible, duty paid $250.00.
Tel. 82-5282.
itevenson Tells $i
tussians That He j
Von't Run Again
LENINGRAD, Russia (UPI)
i Russian asked Adlai Stevenson
1st night whether he would run
gain for the Democratic presi.
ential nomination.
Stevenson replied: "Never a a-Bin."
Bin." a-Bin." For the past two nights, St.
taacs Square facing the Hotel
istona here has been turned into
fair replica of a Hyde Park
tee speech forum.
Last night, close to 200 Rus.
lans were gathered in the square
then the Stevenson party turned
p after dinner.
At once a public debate was
0, and Stevenson dished it out
well as he took it.
"Don't Americans enjoy a very
Igh living standard?" asked one
Altaian.
"Americans don't think so,"
lid Stevenson. "They are always
omplaining. The living standard
l one of Hie highest in the world
lit taxes also are high."
There was a more belligerent
Uestion: "Why do some Or your
enerals and statesmen make
.ggressive and provocative speech.
8 against us?"
Belore Stewnson could answer,
i loud rumble oi protest came
rom the crowd.
"This is not a political meet,
ng," said one man. "Just a
nendly discussion, lt't not a,sk
luch questions."
OUND WELCOMED
MERANO, Italy (UPI) Amrr.
can poet Ezra Pound received a
musical welcome last night from
lie villaEPrs Ol Pastel Kunlans a
Umlet of the Merano out skirls
here he arrived during teh
reekend for an indefinite stay.
IOAT SETS PIER ABLAZE
LEGAL NOTICE
UNITH) STATUS or AMI Kit A
Canal .one
United s District Court For
The DUlrttl ol The (anal Zon
Division n Hulhou
C. T. Anderson. I'lanliff. vs. Evrlvn
Anderson. Defendant
10. S71U. Civil Docket 21 Action for
Mvrjt-ce
' To the above-named defendant;
You re hereby required to appear
Ind answer the complaint filed in the
tbove entil led action within ninety days
tfter the first date of publication.
In case of your failure to so appear
MM answer judgment will be taken a
telnst you by default for the relief de de-Banded
Banded de-Banded In the complaint.
WITNESS the Honorable Guthrie Y
Crowe, Judffe. United States District
Court for the District of the Canal
Hie, this July 14. 1958.
Sara rie la Pena
Clerk
JNJ)
!B.y a I.oia F. Harrison
Chief Deputy Clerk
(a Evelyn J Anderson:
Jftie foregoing summons is served upon
U by publication pursuant to the order
if the Honorable Guthrie F Crowe,
fudge. United Slnles District Court ten
M District of the Canal Zone, date,!
WOf 11, 195S. and entered and filed in
tie office of the Clerk of said United
tt tee District Court oi Ihe Division
( Balboa, on July II. it.k
Kara de la Pena
Clerk
Bya Lois T Harrison
Chief Deputy Clerk

Aportments

FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 2 bedrooms, living-dining-room,
large porch, Venetian
blinds, garage, linen, China glaa glaa-ware.
ware. glaa-ware. Exclusive residential sec section.
tion. section. Bella Vista, telephone Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 1448.
FOR RENT: Furnished one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment across from El
Panama Hilton, apply Foto El
Halcon or call phones 3-1179
or 3-6082.
FOR RENT: Well appointed
unfurnished two bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, maid's room, large terrace,
spacious kitchen, elevator and
24 hours watchman service, also
suitable for office. Located at
Edificio Campo Alegre on Via
Espana across from Hotel El Pa Panama
nama Panama Hilton. Telephone 3-1409.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment
ment apartment one large bedroom, living living-room,
room, living-room, diningroom, large front
porch, dinette and kitchen, etc.
has stove, bed, refrigerator, etc.,
near Canal Zone, rent $75.00.
Phone 3-0763 or 2-0027.
FOB RENT: Furnished, one
bedroom modern apartment, ga garage.
rage. garage. 168 Via Belisario Porras.
FOR RENT: 2 rooms and 2
apartment. Convenient for mili military
tary military personnel. Close Ancon bus
stop. Phone 2-5174.
FOR RENT: Two Duplex apart apartments,
ments, apartments, one with furniture, Campo
Alegre. Tel. 2-2341.
Local 'Witnesses'
To Attend Parley
In New York City
About 80 of Jehovah's Witnesses
from Panama and the Canal Zone
will attend an international con convention
vention convention in New Vork city July 27
through Aug. 3, it was announced
today.
A. V. Raper, minister in charge
of the congregations in the coun country,
try, country, said special arrangements
have been made with Panama Air
ways and that two groups will be
leaving for New York, on on
July 23.
Raper laid the convention will
further the understanding and
gopd will among the various races
and nationalities of Jehovah's Wit.
nesses, and will also demonstrate
to the world how the Bible mes.
sage and Christian living can un.
ite people from all walks of life,
regardless of race or other back,
grounds that tend to divide the
world. Only common interest in
the pure worship of the Creator,
Jehovah God, can do this, he said.
Watchtower officials in New
York point to the record attend,
ance of 165,000 at the 1953 interna international
tional international convention in New York
city's Yankee Stadium. At that
time several overflow areas prov provided
ided provided space for the Witnesses and
interested persons. Yankee stad.
ium has again been secured, but
because of the cramped quarters
of the previous assembly the Polo
Grounds will be used in addition.
The program will be presented by
the same participants following
the first presentation in Yankee
Stadium.
Most of those from Panama
and the Canal Zone will be stay,
ing in private homes in New York
city and nearby areas. All hotel
accommodations will be filled,
according to the Watchtower room
ing committee, and the majority
of delegates will lv placed in
homes following a gigantic house
to-house effort to find available
accommodations for more than
125,000 of the delegates in attend,
ance from other places.
Civil Defense
Graduates To Cet
Certificates
Mrmoradum To
Chief. Press and Publications
Press Release
Cards and civil defense certif.
icales and identification cards
will Ire given lo first aK graduat graduates
es graduates of Pedro Miguel Civil Defense
olunteer Corps on July 25, at
7:30 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
Curie M. Turner at her residence
House No. 326 J Pedro Migivl
I his class was conducted
iirjii ,, .
hv
vviinam m. Gordon ol I'araiso
Civil Defense first ait! instructor.
The following trainees will receive
recognition: Amy R Ramsay, E
melia K. Flemmings, Miriam A
Farrell. Pearl E. Karrrll, C.lenda
E. Farrell. Wilms F Daniels
Barbara A. Raphael. Ula E. Wil.
liams, Barbara A. Rurton, Patri
cia M. Callender, Carrie M Tur Turner.
ner. Turner. Sadie M. Sinclair, Gloria J.
Davis, Iris T Pilgrim. Gloria M.
Foster, Amalia F Johnson. Mar.
celina A. Wilson, Richard F. Wil.
liams, Enrique W. Manderson Sil Silvia
via Silvia L. Powell, Aminla H. Vllevnr,
C.lene F. Pilgrim, Carole M. Hey Hey-wood,
wood, Hey-wood, Virginia I). Hralhwai'e.
TYPHOON HITS PHILIPPINES
MANILA (UPI) -Typhoon Win
nie sideswiped the northern Phil
qppineS yesterday, killing at least
two persons and causing damage
estimated at millions of dollars.
Howling 140. miles. per hour winds
were reported at the siorm ccn.
ter as the typhoon moved in a
northwesterly direction toward
Formosa.

LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OP OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 13 37 "H" STREET, PANAMA UBRERIA PREC1ADO 7 Street No. 13 a) AGENCIAS
INTtR.NAl.. DE PUBLICACIONE'S No. 3 Lottery Plaza e CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 45 a) LOURDES PHARMACY 18 La tarrasquilla a) r'ARMACIA LOM LOM-BARDO
BARDO LOM-BARDO No. 26 "B" Street MORRISON 4th of July Ave. Jr. J St. a) LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tivoli No. 4 a FARMACIA EST ADOS UNIDOS 149 Central Ave
FARMACIA LUX 164 Central Avenue a HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. Fco. de la Ossa Ave. No 41 FOTO DOMY Justo Arosemena Ave. and 33 St. FAR FARMACIA
MACIA FARMACIA VAN DER JIS 50 Street No. 53 FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parque Lefevre 7 Street FARMACIA "SAS" Via Porraa 111 aj MOVED ADES A THIS
Beside the Bella Vista Theatre,

Resorts
SHRAPNEL'S furnished hornet,
on beach. Phone Thompson,
Balboa 1772.
Baldwin's furnished apartments
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Smith, Balboa 3681.
PHILLIPS Oceanside Cottages
Santa Clara R da P. Phone Pa Panama
nama Panama 3-1877 Cristobal 3-1673.
FOSTER'S Cottages and La raja
Beach House, One mile past tha
Casino. Phone Balboa 1866.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Commercial locale
in Justo Arosemena Ave. No.
37-11. Opposite Cristo Rey
Church. Tel. 2-2341.
Houses
FOR RENT: Three months,
beautiful 3-bedroom residence
in El Cangrcjo completely fur furnished.
nished. furnished. For information call 3-
1 167.
FOR RENT:4 bedroom chalet,
two baths, two services, all fenc fenced,
ed, fenced, 7th street, Golf Heights Call
3-3641 2-2407 House 36.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet,
two bedroom living-diningroom,
kitchen, U.S. Army inspected.
Enquire 45th Street 2-241.
Phone 3-5351. From 8:00 to
9:00 a.m. or 7:30 on.
FOR RENT: Chalet three bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, 2 baths, living-dining-room,
kitchen, garage, fenced
yard. Telephone 4-1241 good
neighborhood.
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom chalet,
maid's room, hot water, garden,
fenced yard, 7th street Gtoif
Heights No. 14. Tel. 2-1601 of office
fice office hours. af
Rooms
FOR RENT: Room for couple
without children, inquire old
entrance at Golf. Store Julio.
8 DAY
LIMA TOUR
Inc. sir fare, transfers, tours
and deluxe hotel
$180
leave every Tues. and Fri.
FIDANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. Panama 2-1661
the first and only
transistor t
SPEED LIGHT
no more burned out tubes
guaranteed for life
work on flashlight batteries
angle of 7o
only $27.50
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co..
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
The New
SP
NIKON
With built-in Universal
Viewflnder System
Panama Colbn
Ladies' Sodality
Sponsors Trip
Through Canal
The ladies Sodality of SI Vin
cent de Paul's Church will sponsor
a trip through the Panama Canal
next Sunday.
Tickets must be secured not
later than tomorrow from any
members of Ihe Sodality or at
the Balboa dressmaking shop.

Miscellaneous

YMCA SKIN DIVERS. W have
your choice of equipment.
CRAWFORD AGENCIES CORP.
"J" St. JM3A-3C Tel. 2-1905.
BEGINNERS SPEARFISHING
OUTFIT Quality Italian JunyLux
Gun, Fins and Mask... $18.50
CRAWFORD AGENCIES. CORP.
"J" St. 13A-30 Tel. 2-1905.
FOR SALE: Grand piano or will
trade for small Upright. 821 Cro Cro-ton
ton Cro-ton Street Balboa 2321.
FOR SALE: All household fur furniture,
niture, furniture, also '39 Ford, '51 Buick,
typewriter, adding machine,
inter-cam set, automatic rifle
and Ammo, movie camera, record
player, washing machine, vibrator
aander. After 6:00 p.m. 762-A.
Barnebey St,

r a

DECORATED MaJ. Fred Vigil (center), senior Infantry in instructor
structor instructor in the United States Army Caribbean School's tactics
departament, receives the Orden Militar de Ayacucho in the
grade of "Caballero" from Brig. Gen. Alejandro Cuadra Ravi Ravines,
nes, Ravines, Peru's Minister of War, who made the presentation at cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies held recently at Casa Caribe, Fort Amador. At the ex extreme
treme extreme right is Col. Gines Perez, commandant of the US ARC A -RIB
School, who also received tho Peruvian decoration.
(U.S. Army Photo)

Venezuela Studies
Ways Of Easing
Unemploymenl
CARACAS, Venezuela, July 15
UPI)( Top government offi officials
cials officials met today to consider possi
ble ways and means of alliviat'mg
the nation's serious unemployment
problem.
Representatives of the Labor,
Public Works, Economic Develop
ment and Treasury Ministries con
vened with construction union del delegates
egates delegates to study the unemployment
situation.
Meanwhile the Municipal Coun
cil of the Federal District order
ed a speed-up in the granting of
building permiUs in an eitort to
stimulate more jobs in tha con
struction industry.
Dentists Join Strike
To Protest Removal
Of Argentine Doctor
BUENOS AIRES, July 15 (UPI)
Dentists joined 8,500 doctors em employed
ployed employed by municipal and state a a-gencies
gencies a-gencies in a protest strike todr.y.
The doctors are protesting the
romnval nf a doctor from the So
cial Services Department of the
Buenos Aires Transport Board. The
exact number of dentists partici
pating in tne siriKe ws noi imme immediately
diately immediately known.
Only emergency surgery cases
will receive attention until the
strike is settled, the doctors said.
Meanwhile, a strike by postal
workers paralyzed mail delivery
and the only thing Argenlinr-s
could get from the post offices
were stamps being sold by skele skeleton
ton skeleton postal crews.
A slow-down by lug boat crews
in Buenos Aires harbor forced at
least two freighters to depart
under their own power.-
Altamira Club
Plans Anniversary
Dance In Colon
The Club Aflamira is now mak
ing plans for the celebration of
its sixth year of operation on
Sept. 20.
This year's anniversary observ observance
ance observance will be held on the Atlan.
tic side the Strangers Club is he
site of the rendezvous. .Music will
be furnished by one of the bes
known local bands Willie Mor Morrison
rison Morrison and his "Super" orchestra.
Invitations are to be distributed
during (he course of this week
The club will meet in Colon
Sunday for the discussion of mat matters
ters matters of importance pertaining to
h coming anniversary rcelebra
tie.

Home Articles

FOR SALE: 5-piece Rattan set
livingroom. No American, Rea Reasonable.
sonable. Reasonable. Tel. 3-7387.
FOR SALE: One bamboo living
room set, and one bedroom set,
very cheap. Call at 3-1690.
KARACHI DRIES OFF
KARACHI. Pakistan (UPI)
This capital cky was drying off
today ollowing five inch mon
soon rains which caused one
death by lightning, flooded the
streets, ripped up pavements,
stalled buses and cars, and knock
ed out telephone and telegraph
lines. But the rains delighted
thousands of children who swam
in waist deep pools throughout
Karachi.
COMPLETES TRAINING- U.S.
Naval Academy midshipman Car
los de la tiuardia Jr.. son of Car
los de la Guardia, director of the
Panama Urban Housing Institute,
recently completed two weeks ol
amphibious training at the Little
Creek Naval Amphibious Base at
Norfolk, Va. His training was cli climaxed
maxed climaxed at a mammoth assault on
the beaches of Camp Pendleton,
Va., joining with 2000 members
of the 6th Marine Regiment from
Camp Lejeune,, N.C., for the full full-scale
scale full-scale amphibious landing.
Brazialians Won't
Renew Relations
With Soviet Union
RIO DE JANEIRO, July 15
(UPI) The recent top l?vel
changes in the foreign ministry
will not mean any change in Bra Brazil's
zil's Brazil's consistent refusal to renew
diplomatic relations with the So Soviet
viet Soviet Union, reliable sources said
here today.
New Foregn Minister Francisco
Negrao de Lima and Joao Augus Augus-to
to Augus-to Araujo Castro, head of the Min Ministry's
istry's Ministry's Political and Cultural De Department,
partment, Department, agree that there should
be no change in Brazil's position,
informants said.
Miss Odete Carvalho, Araujo
Castro's predecessor, wrote a re recent
cent recent Foreign Ministry report oppos opposing
ing opposing the renewal of relations
wnich both he and Negrao de Li Lima
ma Lima "completely concur with"
sources said.
They do not believe there it i i-ny
ny i-ny 'immediate threat 6f commu communism
nism communism taking over any Latin A
merican country," informants add added,
ed, added, but they believe the ability of
military Communists lo agitate
and poison the thinking of mpo mpo-verished
verished mpo-verished Latn Amercans should
net-be underestimated.
"The real danger in their pi
nion is Communist manipulation of
honest grievances and sowing hate
for the United States by beating
the drum of nationalism' one
aourcea said,

iOil,li'iir irWk. , jgjJg

Boots & Motors

FOR SALt: "35" h.p. Evinrude
lonj leg. Call 83-2227 "Trail "Trail-car"
car" "Trail-car" S00 lb. boat trailer.
FOR SALE: New outboard mo motor
tor motor boat. Call 2-2887 Balboa
tor details, before 3 p.m.
FOR SALE:-,I4' Runabout, trail trailer,
er, trailer, 10 h.p. motor $250.00. Und Under
er Under House 234-B. Coco Solo.
Real Estate
FOR SALE: Lots on the most
exWuslvi, safe and atnsctive
beach in the country on the
banks of the Corona river. A
private beach for property own owners.
ers. owners. Only 60 miles from the city.
Easy payment plan. For informa information
tion information enquire at Alfa Store, No.
29-110 Central Avenue. Phone
3-6153.
Lesson
Accordion profesor Nelly Hof Hof-mann
mann Hof-mann graduated in Germany will
give private classes to pupils at
their homes, in English, Ger German
man German and Spanish. Call 2-3193 in
office hours.

Goldfine's Tax Records Shipped
To Washington; None For 1956

WASHINGTON (UPI) Million,
aire Bernard Goldfine clamped
tight silence today around wheth whether
er whether he filed a federal income 'a
return ffjr 1956.
The eift-eivinff fripn1 nf trooi
dential Assistant Sherman Adams
renispn rn nicpncc I., iccna with
newsmpn linon hie return ham
l ... . uwk
irom a very nice rest at his
uunie in Boston.
uoiatine'a plane arrived here
several hours after Harrv f.ni
naught, district internal revenue
II A 1 . T, . ... .
collector in oosioit, said ne nad
found no record of any 1956 tax
return from Goldfine.
The 67.year old textile mag magnate
nate magnate emDhasized lv was eninc fn
testify tomorrow before the House
suDcommiuee mat has been inves.
tigating his open-handed gift giv giving
ing giving to Adams and others and his
troubles with federal regulatory
agencies.
But he would not tell reporters
whether he would testify about
his 1956 tax return. He also re
fused to say whether he would"
back down on his refusal to an.
swer 23 questions about his busi.
ness operations. His defiance
drew him a threat of contempt
prosecution last week.
Asked directly whether he had
filed a return for 1956, Goldfine
said:
"I have read a lot of stories,
and I am going to testify tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. I am going to testify, and
I II rely on the advice of my at attorney."
torney." attorney." The newsDaner th Rncfon km
I erican, reported earlier fhat eon
Prpssinnal i i t ...... : 1
" irc.ui5iuia nan or ordered
dered ordered all of Goldfine's federal tax
records seized and shipped here.
The newspaper said the order
also applied lo records of his two
sons and Miss Mildred Paperman
his blonde secretary bookkeeDer
who probably knows more than
anyone else about Goldfine's tan
gled money affairs.
According to the law, congres.
sional committees have to obtain
an order from the President be before
fore before they can get Internal Reven
ue service records on anyone. No

TO OUR ADVERTISERS:

With a view toward improving service and correcting
irregularities that occur, involuntarily, from time to time,
THE PANAMA AMERICAN has established a special

CLAIMS SECTION

2
Please dial Tel.

We will appreciate your call which
to serve you better

Miscellaneous

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A," DIABLO
BOX 1211 CRISTOBAL. C I.
Mrs. Nona White: Your visit ac accounting
counting accounting department CASA AD ADMIRABLE
MIRABLE ADMIRABLE will be appreciated.
Will pay $10.00 for sharing un un-crowded
crowded un-crowded private car on trip to Da David,
vid, David, Chirlqui. Phone Hellmunet
2-25J2, Ana Elizabeth Marti.
WANTED: 3 or 4 bedroom
chalet from August or Septem September.
ber. September. Tel. 3-4707.
WANTED: Good cook with
reference, most know how to
balance meals. Ave. Peru 37-20.
WANTED: To buy three Wolks Wolks-wagen,
wagen, Wolks-wagen, CASH. Only Canal Zone.
Will see after' 5:00 p.m. Mr.
Fonseca, Hotel Colon, Panama.
Phone 2-0770.
WANTED: Cook with good re reference
ference reference for small family. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone 2-0354. Avenida Peru No.
20.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE:-1958 A)S 600 ce.
Good condition. Call Balboa
1649.
such request for an order has
been reported by the subcommit subcommittee
tee subcommittee or its chairman, Rep. Oren
Harris (D.Ark.)
Goldfise paused thoughtfully for
a moment when a reporter asked
whether lederal tax agents had
been in touch with him during the
last few days.
"Not" with me," he then com commented.
mented. commented. But asked whether this
applied also to members of his
staff, Goldfine said "I don't know
about, them you'll have to ask
them."
Harris told reporters that tax
agents had been attending his sub subcommittee's
committee's subcommittee's hearings on Goldfine.
He also had said earlier that the
House Ways and Means Commit
tee, which has jurisdiction over tax
matters, was "standing by" pos possibly
sibly possibly to look into "certain phas.
es" of Goldfine's affairs.
U. S. District Attorney Oliver
E. Gasch reported that a federal
grand jury may be summoned
this week to investigate an al alleged
leged alleged theft of papers from Gold
fine. Gasch said he wanted evi
dence that would give him a
"reasonable prospect" of convic.
tion before taking the matter be before
fore before a grand jury.
'Cadillac Jack'
Arrested In Mexico
For Counterfeiting
MEXICO CITY, July 15 (UPI)-
Police today jailed Charles Ches Chester
ter Chester Asworth, 31, of New York, on
charges of counterfeiting.
Authorities said Asworth is also
known as Jack Raymond Ward
and 'Cadillac Jack." He was ac accused
cused accused of making counterfeit Amer American
ican American $20 bills which have been cir circulating
culating circulating in the federal district re recently.
cently. recently. 3330

SERVICES

3-miiMita car wash $1. ttmm
cleaninp of motor $5, waxinq of
ears S6. Auro-tafto. Trsns-Isthmian
Hiqhwav mar Saara.
TELEVISION SERVICE
WE REPAIR IN
YOUR HOME, $3.50
You get service the same day
WE GUARANTEE OUR WORK
LOS ANGELES trained techni technicians.
cians. technicians. Crawford Agencies. Phone
2-1905 Tivoli Avenue 18-20.
Protect reur home and p opcr opcr-ty
ty opcr-ty against insect d a m a e.
Prompt scientific treatment on
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777.
TELEVISION SERVICE
6 MONTHS CUARANTEE
ASK FOR MR. TV
PANAMA 2-3142.
Dodgers to Appeal
Judges Invalid
Contract Ruling
LOS ANGELES, July 15 (
Anv hoDes the Dodeers har
leavine the Cnlispnm for thoir
baseball park next year
ed to appeal a iudee's ruline I
the Chavez Ravine 'contract v,
the city was invalid.
Dodger President Walter F. 6r
n it i i : i a. j
ind irv l iiuii a en ric ri i itfti i.fi i l
nlmr tU. 1 ncn A il.
tU. 1 J 1 I I- i L. 1A.A TV.-1
.-if iii it i n r invii a u nannnoc n
getting an occasional home run.
f I 1 1 1 1 1 1 t' 111,1 lllk I II M IfliflOfM
' uuiinvi wuii i ii r i n v w a 11
a ornevs for ip hasp ha r 11
JVC ) 1111" A si 1 II II. II 1 1 L' III lit" X
months before an appeal could
heard.
1 1 ,-: sieV
The Jugf),und the contract
ik. 1 Ui : e r.
MIC VUIUB UI1 JIUW UUUIIC TUsl
iiliuuiu isct aar-111. s. 1 Mil II 11 1 r 1 1 11
v 11 v hi uuv d 1 lui a m VH P ru
f : ...u : ..1. n..u it. a.
PlL I At T-Y 1
a. l r it
U.. 1 I 1 1 111 .! X I.
Dodppr had CAMcrhf in waivtt h-.
right when trw of two taxpt w
suits vame before the court.
O'Malley refused to lose
optimistic view of the Dot
future in Los Angeles, hov f
declaring he had expected a
peal would be taken to h, 1
vvu&fcs n,ftniiirin JL Wllllll
won the court test.
h Mm at .aaas.
rmnp 1 akes Jv I
Ceremonial Duri
vw ri 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 o r k nr
riling VUVLII lc:u
beth's attack of catarrhal sinu'l
kept her in bed again "yettei!
anrl liar Iiiil-KhwI r,-;,, Tit..
.,w iiuiiuhiiu, 1 1 iiilc I lli
I'l i n. 11 i n in k nvpr enmo n
ceremonial duties. (
Buckingham Palace announce r
that Philip. Duke of Edinhnrph
will represent the Queen at palace
ceremonies mesday at which a
number of her subjects are to be
Knigntea.
Special letters and warrants
were being prepared by the Brit British
ish British Home Office so the duke
would be empowered to confer the
nonor ot knighthood.
in bed for a week, with her tern tern-perature
perature tern-perature hovering around 100 for
several aays.
for prompt attention
will enable us



$ 1 E
THE
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINI
Jtafcttf V AND THE PIRATES
By GEURGE WUNDEH THE STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE
Mallo Calls
By WILSON SCRUGGS
WHUFFF.'fobsot
W0THW6TO0OMTH
THEW5 THE ENPOf THE RUNWAY. COME AEWNt?
VDU, MAUO... IlL
SEC TO THAT.' MOW
fM TEUJW6MDU A6AW
A POUT THAT RASTEI7
MM ear to une up with that concrete..
R5HIN& VILLAGE
TO 6ET0UT

tTESD AT, JULY 15, 1958

1 fl z' CUCV; TARTOJG, TOUtiWT. I PLAN TO BE S !BJI IH

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Pi fLAYSAlOTOFPlAMOANOI f RE- WCfc iu hhc thai ft
WHAT ARE ICti T WACPEKI TO HAVE A F1AU0 WITH A 1 U, ( REAL WKTE TO MEy -- 1

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FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS

That Was Easy

By MERRILL BLOSSER

V I'LL rvTll S CAM DAISV Vl I I X CAM ITS TRUE- I T

OH, BUT I CANY BACK TO SCAMPER. DOWM I HARDLY I Hf I I ; TTTMi

LEAVE UNLESS I MIS DEM AND To TME CRUMPET UEUcvt NODDcD kM Z i
6ET PADPYS PER- ASIC FOR. I HUT WITH ME? J I JTL( M 1EAD WIT vifc2
JfS

Into the Dim Past

By V. T. HAMLIN

6 THERE ANY- NO MXJR PART IS
THING IN THIS JUST BEING THERE

PROJECT YOU WE'LL MAKE THE
VWW ME TO NECESSARY
WATCH FOR OBSERVATIONS

ESPEOAU.Y? BY WAY OF THE

VIEW'- SCREEN

RIGHT.' WE'RE I I ...WHO THfcy vVbkt, "'''P'','-'IP'TIiiiiBBSI
... THEN TRACKING WHERE THEY CAME OKAY, I'M GOOD TrjSJJBS: "H

WE RE MORS AN ETHNIC FROM OR WHERE READY... LUCK AMD V VW&oJSl
INTERESTED IN GROUP OF Tl THEY WENT -J, LETS GO' J HAPPY Eg BR PVBJ
THE PEOPLE I WHICH WE 7-7-n -faW ,MBWWI ilH 1

WDl..C.-nctu n,m;nwr, un,.,,.,. -L III 1 Mil UUUIIIUUMIH awmB

5" riVvi ,SH

5 16

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Dory's Idea

By EDGAR MARTIN

y ftTal WOP. 1VE

PfcWENivs or. r-ou. v?.p6hsowe

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TO WW jNpeWTfH&Wi

M,Wo. OPVVE

VERSCXNiAV., i
F66R.THrT
MS.OV?-E

Covered!

By LESLIE TURNER

Immortal Maybe

By DICK CAVALLI

7 I I fall down-- k SOME PEOPLE JUSf m

OUR BOARDING HOUSE

with

MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAY

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

1 auEm&P 1 SURPRISE- VIE vlERE: "DAvJNed
' ?uiP WiiTrtMl CONDUCTING AM ( ME l'ft A RICH
I lNikeoo 'M EXPERIMENT IN HYP-) MAN- HOM
VaotoIe IN S MOTISN AH-ER ) MUCH HAVE X
Rpn2MlRCH)VATON&TIElWA6 (30T IN TME (

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PRISCILLA'S POP

Quick Clinklnc

By AL VEBMEKB

CLANK! I
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I SUPPOSE EVEN A

ROBOT LIKES COOKIES)

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BUGS BUNNY

Big Help

(i)Limtefe True Life Adventures

BEAUT1
QUEENS

.SSI ESWTWW

H9R

CSt3

BTjj

UL-TlVATBt?

1 CARNATIONS

HAvVH EVOLVBP WOM

WIL.C CARNATIONS
WHICH TljOURieHEP

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SIDE GLANCES

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DAILY FORTUNE FINDER!
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NOV. 11

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AfOVA$ PANAMA AffWAYS
PANAMA-MIAMI $55.00
MIAMI-DALLAS 71.00

PANAMA
DALLAS

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126.

Today's JV Program

oo Odyooy
9 00 Pooplt Are funny
9 30 TeruMoaec Emit Ford
Rpt 10 Jun ST
10 00 Men of Annapolis

10:30 Court of Last Resort

NEWS

3:00 CTN NKWS
3:15 Dinah Short
3:30 Report from Rutfen
4:00 The Latt Word
4:30 Big Top Rpt 12 Nov 57
5:30 PANORAMA

7:00 Dec. Brld Rpt I Aug 57 11:00 CFN

7:30 Beat The Clock 11:15 Encore: Kraft TV Theatre

Courtesy of Aeroms Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1698 3-1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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MONKEY BUSINESS diverts members of the Eisenhower party yesterday afternoon as they relax at the Jungle Warfare Training-
Center, Fort Sherman, during an orientation on jungle living. Amused by the monkey's antics are (I-r): Mrs. Roy R. Ru bot bottom,
tom, bottom, assistant secretary of state for Inter American Affairs; Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower; Mrs. Milton L. Ogden; Ruth Eisenhower;
US Ambassador Julian Fiske Harrington and Samuel C. Waugh, president of the Export-Import Bank of Washington.
(U.S. Army Photo)
Eisenhower Finds De la Guardia Projects
To Be Exceedingly Well Thought Through'

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(St
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(Continued from Page 1)
dustry and commerce. Elimina

tion of private commercial com.
panies in the Canl Zone.
10. Raising of the Panamanian
flag in the Canal Zone and re.
cognition of Spanish as official
language.
11. Elimination of United States
postage stamps and exclusive use
of Panamainian postal service in
the Canal Zone.
12. Refund of the rentals collect
ed by the United States on laud
formerly owned by the Panama
Railroad Co.
Under the heading "Specific
Items To Be Discussed with Dr.
Milton Eisenhower" the students
listed the following:
1. Release of Lester Greaves,
who is serving a 50year peniten.
tiary term in the Canal Zone on
a charge of rape.
2. Elimination of military train.
ning for the National Guard,
which should be limited only to
police functions.
3. Non-recognition by the United
States of dictatorship.
4. Greater cooperation between
the United States and Latin Amer American
ican American countries to enable the latter
to create their own economy.
5. Hemispheric solidarity on a
basis of equality and mutual coo-
i peration.
6. Cessation of provocative
and offensive acts on the part
of Canal Zone residents and
members of, Congress of the
United States against national
dignity."
7. Ratification of the stand of
the National Congress of Students
for the nationalization of the Ca.
nal.
As a group of .six student
leaders, with a few supporters
also present, waited for Elsen Elsenhower
hower Elsenhower in an air-conditioned
room in the university's mod modern,
ern, modern, baby-skyscraper adminis administration
tration administration buildiiiR, Eisenhower In
a white tuxedo was awaiting
the students at the same time
out a different place the
Embassy residence on La Cres Cres-ta.
ta. Cres-ta. Only university representative
who showed up there at the ap appointed
pointed appointed hour was Rector Dr.

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!?RV MILTON S. EISENHOWER (centert examines a bristling segment' of black palm at the Jungle Warfare Training renter
Fort Sherman Explaining the characteristics of the palm at right Is Col. R. A. Jones, Jr. commanding office? of the 1st
Battle Group. 2(1 th infantry. Following -his explanation are il tor) U.S. Ambassador Julian Fiskl TaXn. DlfiwS
an unidentified lady, Mrs. Milton L. Ogden and Brig. Gen. Ogden, deputy commander of U.S. Army Caribbeap ,8enower'
(U.S. Army Photo) ,-

Jaime de la Guardia. According

to Eisenhower, the two Univer
slty administrators had a hap happy
py happy talk.
Told that the students, asked
what they thought about his
visiting Elsenhower, had said
he had the right to go where
he liked, de la Guardia replied
that that was precisely his own
point of view, too.
As they awaited Eisenhower
at the university, student spok spokesmen
esmen spokesmen complained about what
they claimed was the State De Department
partment Department attitude that such
emissaries "should shut them themselves
selves themselves up in the embasssy. or
at banquets." They said they
had thought Eisenhower would
follow Vice President Richard
N. Nixon's recommendations,
and move around publicly "to
know the people In the streets,
the parks and the universities."
Eisenhower gave his own
views on this contention as
follows: "If you want to dis discuss
cuss discuss an issue seriously you do
do not i;o out to do it in the
city square, where you can be
shouted down. You sit down
and discuss it calmly and
quietly."
He said this had been his
practice In twelve Latin Amer American
ican American countries so far, and he
did not propose to change it
now.
As for the students statement
that they did not go to the cm
baasy because It was technical
ly United States rather than
Panamanian territory, Eisen
hower said that if he had felt
that way he would never have
come to Panama -at all.
He said he had met several
other representative gTOups In
the embassy residence, and the
students would have been wel welcome
come welcome there. In other Latin
American countries groups rep
resenting industry, agriculture
government, labor, and educa education
tion education had met him in the em embassy
bassy embassy or embassy residence,
"and I hope they will continue
to do so."
He had very much enjoyed
his Sunday meeting at La Cres Cres-ta
ta Cres-ta with representatives if Lo Locals
cals Locals 900 and 807.
Elsenhower said his mission

was met merely to make head-

lines, but to learn, the problems
and poliples of the countries he
visitea.
As for the high school stu students
dents students who picketed the US
Embassy briefly yesterday af afternoon
ternoon afternoon while Eisenhower was
on a trip through the Canal,
Eisenhower said that had he
been at the embassy he would
have Invited them to send a
group of representatives in to
discuss "anything they want wanted
ed wanted to talk about."
"I don't want to close the
door on anyone," Eisenhower
said.
He went on to give his views
on Sunday"s formal session be between
tween between Panamanian and US ne negotiators.
gotiators. negotiators. This sesison ran al almost
most almost double its scheduled 80
minutes, and is being continu
ed less formally today aboard
the fishing boats.
"I consider the presentation
(of Panama's problems) by
President de la Guardia and his
associates to have been thorough
and exceedingly well thought
through," Elsenhower said.
Eisenhower emphasized that
any money sought In connec connection
tion connection with any of the projects
would be repayable, and there
was no discussion of any non nonrepayable
repayable nonrepayable grants.
A large part of Sunday's ses
sion was devoted to the eco economic
nomic economic situation in Panama
Eisenhower said. "Most of the
discussion was devoted to the
aspirations of the leaders of
Panama to Improve the eco economic
nomic economic status of their people. I
think they have gone about
things in a very businesslike
way."
He said the Panamanian gov government's
ernment's government's plans were divided
broadly into three sections
immediate, middle term, and
long term developments.
Projects included develop
ment of agriculture, highways,
schools, telecommunlca lions
power, pier facilities and other
matters.
"Some of the projects mav be
quite eligible for private credit,"
Eisenhower said.
As for the others. "I have nn
doubt that project documents
will be developed looking into

(Continued from Page 1)

Four-star Adm. James L. Hoi
loway has left London to become
senior commander oi U.S. forces
in tne Mediterranean. He will
have a joint Marine-Army-Navy
Air Force staff.
Holloway, former chief of Nav
ai personnel in Washington, is
commander in chief of all U.S.
naval forces in the eastern Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic and Mediterranean, with head headquarters
quarters headquarters in London.
the first Leatherneck outfit to
land was the 2nd Battalion, 2nd
regiment, otf the 2nd Marine Di Division,
vision, Division, normally based at Camp
Leieune, N.C.
The 1700 men of this battalion
were carried to the scene in four
amphibious ships, the Monrovia,
the Capricornus, the Walworth
County and the Travers County;
and two destroyers, the Wadleigh
and the Sullivan.
Adm. Arleigh A. Burke, chief
of naval operations, sent Hadd the
following message:
"As you land you will be writ writing
ing writing another chapter in our coun country's
try's country's history. I am confident you
will uphold traditions of the Na Navy
vy Navy and the Marine Corps. Good
luck. God bless you."

TEXT OF THE IKE'S ANNOUNCEMENT

WASHINGTON, July 15 (UPI) (UPI)-Text
Text (UPI)-Text of President Eisenhower's
announcement of the landing of
U.S. Marines in Lebanon:
Yesterday morning, I received
f'tm President Chamoun of Leba Lebanon
non Lebanon an urgent plea that some U U-nited
nited U-nited States forces be stationed in
Lebanon to help maintain securi security
ty security and to evidence the concern of
the United States for the integrity
and independence of Lebanon.
President Chamoun's appeal wa.i
made with the concurrence of all
of the members of the Lebanese
cabinet.
President Chamoun made clear
that he considered an immediate
United States response imperative
if Lebanon's independence, alrea
dy menaced from without, were o
be preserved in the face of the
grave developments which occur
red yesterday in Baghdad where
by the lawful government was viol
ently overthrown and many of its
members martyred.
In response to this appeal from
the government of Lebanon, the
United States has dispatched a
contingent of United States forces
to Lebanon to protect American
lives and by their presence there
to encourage the Lebanese gov government
ernment government in defense of Lebanese
sovereignty and integrity.
These forces have not been sent
as any act of war. They will
demonstrate the concern of the
United States for the independ independence
ence independence and integrity of Lebanon,
which we deem vital to the na.
tional interest and world peace.
Our concern will also be shown
by economic assistance. We
shall act in accordance with
these legitimate concerns.
The United States, this morning,
will report its action to an emer emergency
gency emergency meeting of the United Na Nations
tions Nations Security Council. As the U U-nited
nited U-nited Nations charter recognizes,
there is an inherent right of col collective
lective collective self-defense, in comformi.
ty with the spirit of the charter,
the United States is reporting the
the possibility of public credit."
sources of such public credit
could include the World Bank,
waugh's Export-import Bank
and Mcintosh's Development
jjoan f-una.

Fitz pa trick's statement that he

- "would imagine'' more Marines
will be sent to the Middle East
came after newsmen pointed out
that the U.S. Sixth Fleet's entire
present complement of leather
necks has been assigned to Lcba
non.
Murray Snyder, assistant sec secretary
retary secretary of defense, said there is
"nothing we em announce"
when asked If eny Army units
heve been alerted for service in
the Middle last.
A Navy spokesman in Naples
saia units or we sixth Fleet leu
hurriedly from Naples, Genoa,
Cannes and Villefranche and "per "perhaps
haps "perhaps other Mediterranean ports."
Their destination, he said, was
secret.
The carrier Saratoga, the de destroyers
stroyers destroyers Rick and H. E. Enneson
and the repair ship Shukanan sail sailed
ed sailed early this morning from Cannes
France.
At the same time the Des Moines
steamed out of nearby Ville Villefranche
franche Villefranche for a sea rendezvous with
the other four vessels.
Meanwhile in London, foreign
secretary Selwyn Lloyd announc announced
ed announced today the British government
has given "full support" to U.S.
measures taken by it to the Securi
ty Council of the United Nations,
making clear that these measures
will be terminated as soon as the
Security Council has itself taken
the measures necessary to maint
ain international peace and secur
ity.
The United States believes that
the United Nations can and shomd
take measures which are adenuate
to preserve the independence and
integrity of Lebanon. It is appar.
ent, however, that in the face of
the tragic and shocking events
that are occurring nearby, more
will be required than the team of
United Matrons observers no it m
Lebanon. Therefore, the United
States will support in the United
British Anti-Sub
Frigate At Rodman
The British anti-submarine frig,
ate H.M.S. Scarborough is visitng
the Isthmus today on her way to
the British nuclear testing ground
at Christmas Island in the Pacific.
The frgate, with a crew of 180
men and nine officers, is taking
part in the international Geophysi Geophysical
cal Geophysical Year.
She is berthed at the Rodman
Naval Base where the personnel
is being entertained by the U.S.
Navy. Adm. George H. Wales en.
tertained the captain to lunch to.
day.
British Ambassador Sir Ian
Henderson is giving a cocktail
party tonight at the Embassy re residence
sidence residence i'or the officers. The frig frigate,
ate, frigate, a new showpiece vessel equip
ped with all the latest anti-sub.
marine weapons, will leave to
morrow morning.
Survivor Of Fire
Not Responding
Jo Treatment
Gorgas Hospital doctors report reported
ed reported today that the survivor of the
Rodman Naval Station fire last
week Alfredo Rosales who receiv received
ed received 75 peT cent burns did not have
such a good night and his condi.
tion has deteriorated.
The doctors said he was not re responding
sponding responding well to treatment.
The
Judge's Bench
Taxi driver Woodrow Washing.
ton Bovke. 39. Panamanian was
fined $5 by Judge John E. Dem.
ing at Balboa Magistrates Court
today for leaving his taxi parked
a i lerminai riace witnout an act actual
ual actual emergency.
The iudee announced a findino
of not guilty in the case of a Sal.
vadorean, Domingo Cea, 57, who
was charged with loiterinp arnnnn
Quarters 359, Paraiso, without
permission.
Weather Or Not
i nis weather report for the 24
hours endinr 8 n.m tiuiav i
prepared by the Meteorological
ana nyarograpnic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE :
High 93
Low 76
87
75
HUMIDITY:
High
Low
inn
nn
80
NW-I5
.97
85
WIND:
(max. mph) NW-18
RAIN (inches) .23
WATER TEMP:
(Inner harbors) S3

BALBOA TIDES
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16
High Low
S:19 a.m. 9:32 a.m.
3:21 p.m. fl;55 p.m.

landings in Lebanon but Is i
taking part In the operation.

Lloyd told the House of Com
mons that British forces "Save
oeen alerted but not sent into ac
tion.
"Her Majesty's Government has
oeen in close consultation with the
U.S. government throughout the
present crisis," he said.
"It was informed in advance of
the U.S. government s action and
believes this action was necessa
ry to preserve security and inte
grity in the very uncertain situa
tion
"This action ha Her Majesty's
government s lull support.
An ominous silence blanketed
Iraq early today as Western
leaders grimly conferred on pos possible
sible possible actions to stave off one of
the harshest blows to the West
in recent years.
The coup d'etat that swept
through Iraq early yesterday took
the West by surprise. Iraq was
the seat of pro. Western fee'ing in
the Middle East and a staunch
member of the Baghdad pact.
The only source of what had hap.
pened inside the oil-rich Middle
Eastern nation was Baghdad ra-
Nations measures which seem to
be adequate to meet the new si situation
tuation situation and which will enable the
United States forces promptly to
be withdrawn.
Lebanon is a small peace-loving
state with which the United States
has traditionally had the most
friendly relations. There are in
Lebanon about 250O Americans and
we cannot, consistently with our
historic relations and with the prin
ciples of the United Natons, stand
idly by when Lebanon appeals it itself
self itself for evidence of our concern
and when Lebanon may not be
able to preserve internal order
and to defend itself against indi indirect
rect indirect aggression. i

LUX TODAY CENTRAL

LAST I Antti I!
3:13 5:49 8:25 Bg 4:& M, 7:36, 8:08

CARNIVAL OF SHORTS
JOM and JERRY
ALSO
Elvis
if I 1 iTLfsf 4 I an s7t3j hs
Li
faeenraSWseee::::eeeffi
IN
HIS
FIRST
BIG DRAMATIC
SINGING ROLE!
in
'JAILHOUSE ROCK'
CINEMASCOPE!

The story of a woman whose emotions
were driven completely out of control
by a tragic love!
Another time, another place is LAN A TURNER'S
latest picture A Paramount release in Vista vision!
OPENS TOMORROW AT THE
CENTRAL

, uin UUI1KK nut

over bv the military ernnn

. iii v.. w" cm svt. x

Kasaem. It said that Crown Prince
Abdul Hlah has been assassinated
by an angry mob.
Birf there was still no word on i
Hie fate of 23-year-old King Pol. (
sal and Premier Nurl es Said,
the elder statesman and staunch I
friend of the West.
Early reports said he too had
been killed but there was no con
firmation. 1
Two brigades of British soldiersi
about 6000 men, were called into
a state of readiness late yesterday
by the British Ministry of Defensej
Defense Ministry officials were
reported to have conferred until
early morning on the details of an
airlift info the Middle East. i
In Paris, Gen. Charles de Gaullel
called an emergency meeting td
discuss the events. 1
In the Middle V.att W J
both joy and consternation. I
in W Wted Arab Republic, I
wleh, obviously hopes to absorb 1
Iran Mum II i mm
were ceieoratforau
This morning less than 24 hours i
arrer ine COUD, it extend fnm
recogmrion to the rebel gov.
And in Ankara, worried IumJ
of state from Turkey, Iran and Pa
kistan who had flown to Turkey
for a meeting of the Moslem niemj
oers oi tne Baghdad Pact-tteld
meetings in the guarded palacje ol
Turkish President Cella Bayar
Iraq was the fourth Moslem mem.
ber of the pact. ? i
It appeared that the Baghdad!
Pact was shattered. Iraq fras
a driving force and the orffnlJ
zation's headquarters were in 1
Baghdad. J
Britain is the fifth full member
of the organization. The United!
States is not a full member, but
plays a leading roll,
In Jerusalem, Premier Batfid
Ben Gurion also held conferences!
with his government leaders and
with Western ambassadors. TheJ
little Jewish country felt the clos
ing noose of Arab unity around RJ
CRASHING THE "X
BARRIER!

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