The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02461

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
111 "V" 1 1 1111
BRANIFF
, INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYI
-

Seagram's
AN INDEPENDENT Hfem DAILY NEWSPAPER
Janatna Ammcan
CANADIAN
WHISKY
"Let the people know the truth and the country i$ safe" Abraham Lincoln,
33rd FEAR
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1958
FIV E CENT

4

958 CZ Govt. Budget Up $1,831,400

Capital Items Top
PC Budget Projects

Capital outlay items for pushing short-term improve improvements
ments improvements to the Canal channel and facilities topped the
detailed items listed in the Canal Company's 1959 Budget
presented to the US Congress today by the President.
There 'were "also large outlay items for replacing
facilities transferred' to Panama under the 1955 "preaty.
Big items included $2,500,000 for continuation of
conversion of the locks' electric system.

There was another $1,900,000 for

continuation of the general plan of

electric cycle conversion.
Replacing a portion of the
trans-continental telephone cable
at a cost of $300,000 was includ included.
ed. included. There 'was also an item of $1, $1,-400,000
400,000 $1,-400,000 for towing locomotives and
frames.,
Channel improvements at Pa Pa-raiso
raiso Pa-raiso are budgeted at $900,000, and
there is another $1,000,000 for
starting other short-range channel
and bank improvements.
Replacing the gasoline serv service
ice service station on the Pacific side
is budgeted at $150,000.

THE PULSE
OF PANAMA

A SPOKESMAN for the Pana Pana-menista
menista Pana-menista Party was quoted today
as saying the party cannot have
any confidence in the new electo electoral
ral electoral code (now up in the National
Assembly for discussion) while the
theory exists that "whoever counts
the votes elects the candidates."
, Jorge P. Adames, described as
one of Panamenista leader Dr. Ar Ar-nulfo
nulfo Ar-nulfo Arias' confidential lieuten lieutenants,
ants, lieutenants, said it is useless to talk about
the minimum number of members
each party should have w'hile the
people have no faith in the authorities.

8PP vwsrnMWpwi nmilon do

mnieires- nave coiieciea

to-a

piojreaj o
Puerto. ,.

naions J0tog i&17W9
wards the construction of

school for their children.
The government has offered to
appropriate an equal turn for the
construction of the school, but
the Indians have refused to turn
over the money to the authorities
until construction work begins on
the school.
They have threatened to return
the money to the contributors.

The investigation of the whole wholesale
sale wholesale mail theft discovered recent recently
ly recently by the Panama Secret Police
has been turned over to District
Attorney Dario Sandoval.
Five postal employes are under
arrest, including Delfin Pariome Pariome-que,
que, Pariome-que, 32, who has revealed the mo modus
dus modus operandi of the group.
Detectives say the men not
only stole money from the let letters
ters letters that they opened and medi medicinal
cinal medicinal samples, but also sold the
mail bags in which the letters
came at SO cents each.

A columnist of the tabloid daily
La Hora today took a dig at the
fact that a placard appearing in
the show window of an establish establishment
ment establishment owned by Gustavo Trius.

the chairman of the Carnival Jun

ta, announces the advent of "Car "Car-naval
naval "Car-naval In Panama."
The columnist points out that if
the placard is meant to be in
English it should read "carnival"
instead of "carnaval," and if it is
in Spanish the preposition should
be "en". instead of "in."

New Swiss Luxury
Liner Arose Sky
Due Here Tomorrow
Due in Cristobal for the first
time tomorrow morning with some
700 tourists is the new Swiss-owned
luxury liner Arosa Sky.
Booked to have boarded the ship
at Wilmington, North Carolina, was
the governor of that state, Luther
Hodges.
The 20,000-ton Arosa Sky sailed
from New York, but stopped in
Wilmington to pick up a special
group" of Carolinians.
, Havana was her last port of
call hefore Cristobal.
The Arosa Sky will sail at 6 p.m.
for Curacao. Later she will touch
at La Guayra, Trinidad, Martini Martini-ai'e
ai'e Martini-ai'e end St. Thomas in the (Virgin
Islands. j
The Arosa Sky was builtfor the
trans-Atlantic service, but 'is mak making
ing making several West Indies trips this
winter. She is due to return to the
Isthmus later this year.
yd Brothers are agents for the
ship.
veral other vessels of the A A-rcj,'
rcj,' A-rcj,' feet are due shortly. Some
o t'len? will stop longer in Panara
of eni wil. stop longei in Panama.

There were also a sizeable bud budgetary
getary budgetary items .for Atlantic side
quarters. This may not be utiliz

ed due to the impending acquisi

tion of Navy quarters at Coco

Solo.

In the capital outlay listed for

Canal Zone Government, there

so an item of seearal ma

nors for jpnstructmg new

s.i.n tafttrnuc-side to re

place tnose being transferred to

Manama. 'J Bp
Here, too, expenditures, even if
authorized, may be radically
changed by the conversion of for former
mer former barracks and BOQs at Coco
Solo for a high school end an ele elementary
mentary elementary school respectively.
PC Board Members
Arrive For Annual
Canal Zone Parley
Members of the Panama Canal
Company's Board of Directors have
arrived on the Isthmus for their
annual meeting in the Canal Zone.
Several of the directors, includ including
ing including Assistant Secretary of the Ar Army
my Army George H. Roderick who is
board chair mafi, arrived shortly
after noon aboard the Panama lin liner
er liner Cristobal. Other members had
already arrived by plane and
Ralph A. Tudor is slated to arrive

tonight by plane from- the west

coast.

, Those arriving by ship included
Mai. Gen. Julian L. Sehlevxfiharies

S. Reed, Howard C. Petersen and,

jonn w. mariyn. Also arriving a
board the Cristobal, was W. M
Whitman, secretary of the Compa
ny.

Board members who .alreadyihad
arrived by plane were Maj. Gen.
Glen E. Edgerton, Baioh H. Cake.

Robert P. Burroughs and Ogden

n. ijeia.

The group arriving by ship was
met shipside by Gov. W. E. Pot Potter,
ter, Potter, other board members and
members of the Governor's staff.
The group returned by Panama
Railroad motor car to the. Pacific

side soon after the ship docked.
The directors will be entertain
ed tonight by Canal bureau direc
tors and members of the Govern

or's staff. They will visit Coco So

lo tomorrow morning and hold a

formal session tomorrow afternoon

and night.
1

Board members will go to the
Atlantic sid. Wednesday morning

and after an inspection of the new

LeTourneau t o w i n g locomotives
they will attend a luncheon plan

ned at Fort San Lorenzo, most of

the members will leave Wednesday
afternoon or night.

1

? I v.
r i m
I lis sisieEl'
E9 I

BALBOA BRIDGE

Ike Requests
$19,250,000

ACKNOWLEDGES CHEERS President Eteenh ower acknowledges the tremendous ovation
tie received as he stepped up to the rostrum in the House Chamber to deliver his State of
the Union message to a joint session of Congress. v
Missiles, Space Ship Res earch, Defense
Get Fat Share of $ 73,900,000,000 Budget
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UP) President Eisenhower asked Congress today for a record
peacetime budget of $33,900,000,001, including b illions for missiles, space vehicle research and
other nrotective itaures "in a growing time of danger."
Vhli ; mind obviously were ,tt frojsts f jaower to hurl rockets on any spot on earth
WAiSS!i tTiht fUcalTelJ I SSwitln neiftuTy I It was M.iOO.OOO.OOO
Mrser thaV estimated ejgpendltures in the prfcsejittSjr. .
Including aid-to allies and other freaojld friehds, th amount the President pfqr
nosed to spend on defensive measures totaled $45,800,000,W0, orv84 percent of the total.
Elsenhower put the blawe for the time of danger sfiarely on Soviet policy.

day in the many strengths that programs, such as the United Na

"Soviet' ambition," he said;

poses a threat to the free coun-

tr that takes several, lor ran;

nnen armed auacK, miarnai sou-

version and economic domittation.

'Mutual security helps to meet

all forms of this threat."

He budgeted $3,888,000,000 tor

this form of foreign aid, compared
to $3,749,000;000 the current fiscal

year.

The President estimated mat ms

would spend $5,300,000,000 on mnV

sue research, development ana
procurement, compared with $4,-

300,000.000 in the current year and

only $3,000,000 last year.

Twenty four per cent ot an pro

curement funds will be spent on

missiles, he said.

Anv hone the public had of a

tax cut for this year was destroy destroyed
ed destroyed by the President's message to

Congress on tne budget, tw n
said present tax rates must be
maintained to support the larger
aaea.

However, he forecast a balanced

hnrfffpt with a surplus ot aoout

.tsoo 000.000. based largely on the

expectation that economic condi

tions will improve after the pres

ent recession.

'There are strong grounds to

support my confidence that the
expansion of our economy will
snnn he resumed, bringing higher

levels of receipts with present tax

rates, ne saiu.
F.isenhower repeated his assur

ance to the nation that n is strong

militarily now.
"Today we possess military su superiority
periority superiority over any potential ag aggressor
gressor aggressor or aggressors," ho said.
" our defenses are strong to today,
day, today, both as a deterrent to war
and for use as a crushing re response
sponse response to any attack. Now our
,.nr.m is for the future."

TWardine this nutlook, he said

in P9rt :

"Hie progress or me
in long-range missiles and oth other
er other offensive weapons, together
with their continuing rejection
of a workable disarmament,
compels us to increase certain
of our defense activities which
we have only recently expanded
minv fold.

"We know that we are sturdy to-

keep the peace. This budget re reflects
flects reflects our determination to remain

so in the future."
In addition to nearly $4,000,000,-

000 in the general foreign, aid, the

President proposed several other
measures to help other countries

economically including:

1. Expansion of the lending pow

ers of the Export-Import Bank by
$2,000,000,000;

2. Addition of $625,080,000 to the

development loan fund for nations
that need money to expand their
production to raise the living

standards 01 tneir people;
3. Spending $200,000,000 on refu refugee
gee refugee and other international aid

tions International Children's

Fund;
4. Speeding $164,000,000 on fur
ther technical assistance to under
developed nations;

5. Extension for another five

years of the Reciprocal Trade Act
by which the United States already
has cut import duties on more
than 2000 categories of products in
order to stimulate international
trade and permit other nations to
ear more dollars by increased
sales in the United States;
6. Welcoming the proposed Eu European
ropean European Common Market and free
trade area as steps toward the
broad goals of reduction of unjus unjustifiable
tifiable unjustifiable trade barriers. 1

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UP) -President
Eisenhower asked the
Congress today to appropriate $19, $19,-250,000
250,000 $19,-250,000 for the construction of the
high-level bridge over the Plna Plna-ma
ma Plna-ma Canal at Balboa.
The President requested the) ap appropriation
propriation appropriation under authority of'the

bill which Congress passed on July

23, 1956, authorizing construction
of the bridge.
Eisenhower signed that bill in into
to into law at a special ceremony in
the United States Embassy in
Panama City while he was there
to attend the assembly of this
, American Presidents In July,
1956.

flicardo Arias, who then was

President of Panama and host to

the Presidential assembly and

now is ambassador to the United

States, attended the signing cere
mony.

The request for the appropria

tion' was made in the annual Unit

ed States budget for the Fiscal

year 1959 which begins next July 1.

Eisenhower asked that the Con Con-rgess.
rgess. Con-rgess. appropriate the funds and
allow them to remain available
until expended, thereby avoid avoiding
ing avoiding subsequent appropriations as
the work progresses.

Last year Congress appropriated

$750,000 for work preliminary to

construction of the bridge.
Construction of the bridga was
one of the provisions of the latest

revised treaty between the Repub

lie of Panama and the

States which was signe

governments in isss.

Canal Operation
Due To Cost Less

In Fiscal 1959

New York Jobless
Niinibers Soaring,
Harriman Reveals
NEW YORK, Jan. 13 (UP)-Gov.
Averell Harriman reported there
are 100,000 more unemployed New
York state residents now than
there were a year ago.
The governor said during a te television
levision television appearance yesterday that
New York jobless total 400,000 or
six percent of those workers who
are covered by unemployment in in-sursncc.
sursncc. in-sursncc. 't
"The figure is higher than a
good many years," he said. "It is
due to the federal government's
policies. I don't think the men
dealing with finances in Washing Washington
ton Washington know what they are doing."

l9

W-v; if. v

CflraoratiuB Ifieoiw laws
27$

The BUDGET

DOLLAR

The budget request submitted to
the Congress provided for these

expenditures by the Canal Zone

Government (the figures i paren parentheses
theses parentheses are'le expenses estimated
tot lin Rem. during the current
fiscal year)
' CIVIL FUNCTIONS: Customs
and immigration, $420,600 (same);
postal service, $1,117,200 ($1,106, ($1,106,-700);
700); ($1,106,-700); police protection, $1,615,600
$1,593,200); fire protection, $1,048, $1,048,-500
500 $1,048,-500 ($1,024,800); judicial system,
66,300 ($70,500): education, $3, $3,-838.500
838.500 $3,-838.500 ($3,314,200); public areas
and facilities, $1,572,400 ($1,338, ($1,338,-300);
300); ($1,338,-300); library. $104,400 (same); in internal
ternal internal security, -$158,800 ($107,700);
other civil affairs, $164,000 ($107, ($107,-600).
600). ($107,-600). HEALTH AND SANITATION:

Hospitals and clinics, $6,240,000

($5,521,100): other public health
services. $853,000 ($632,560).
GENERAL GOVERNMENT EX EXPENSES:
PENSES: EXPENSES: Office of the Governor,
$59,500 ($56,400); other general
government expenses, $1,465,700

ft $1,395,900).

That made a total for operation
costs of $18,674,500 for the forth forthcoming
coming forthcoming fiscal year.

iiisfitt

M

1

THE BUDGET DOLLAR This chart was released by the Budget Bweau to accompany
President Eisenhower's Budget message to Confess It shows the budget dollar (estl-

go.

WASHINGTON, aJn. 13 (UP) President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower requested today an appropriation of $17,597,000
for the operation of the Panama Canal Zone Government
during the fiscal year which begins next July 1.

The request was made to the Congress in the Pr

idents annua! budget message, and compared with

765,600 that the Congress appropriated for the ci

fiscal year.
In addition, the President asked Congress to appro
priate $1,930,000 with which to make the annual pay payment
ment payment to the Panamanian government.
He pointed out to the Congress that that payment
was provided for in the 1955 revised treaty between the
two countries and that the Panama Canal Company would
reimburse to the United States Treasury $430,000 of it,
Another appropriation requested was $19,250,000
construction of the high-level bridge over the Canal af
Balboa. The bridge also was provided for in the 1955

treaty.

That sum was raduced.

over, by $1,077,500, which was
charged to depreciation on fa facilities
cilities facilities and equipment capitaliz capitalized
ed capitalized under the capital outlay ap appropriation
propriation appropriation not requiring financ financing,
ing, financing, to the impropriation request
of $17,597,000.
"This appropriation provides for
those functions in the Canal Zone
which, in the United States, would
be performed by state and local
governments and civilian depart departments'
ments' departments' of the Federal government,
and for the operation of hospitals
and clinics.
"All operating expenses, includ including
ing including depreciation, are recovered
and paid into the Treasury as mis miscellaneous
cellaneous miscellaneous receipts. These are de derived
rived derived from revenues from individ individuals
uals individuals and agencies served and the
balance from the Panama Canal
Company as follows": (The, fig figures
ures figures in parentheses are the esti estimated
mated estimated revenues during the cur current
rent current fiscal year from the sources
named);
REVENUE: Hospitals and clin clinics,
ics, clinics, $3,159,600 ($2,900,000); educa education,
tion, education, $1,963,000 ($1,752,000); postal
service, $935,000 ($870,000); fire
protection, $673,500 ($681,200); all
others, $507,800 ($508,900). Total
revenue, 7,238,900 ($6,172,100).
Net costs reimbursable by Pan Panama
ama Panama Canal Company, $11,435,600
($10,303,300).
The total of the revenue plus

compas-

015,40ft

se&

Diablo Crossing
To Be Closed
For Repairs
Diablo Crossing will be closed
to vehicular traffic from 7:30 a.
m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, it has
been announced by the Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering and Construction Bureau.
The crossing is being closed in
orcer to p;rmlt Railroad Division
forcts to make necessary main maintenance
tenance maintenance work on the roaobed and
ties of the main line track.

Detailed Report Bares Red Plot To. Overthrow Guatemalan Government
... ,h rnort claims.We try-itemalan exile)," says the report! QuotlBg an exile who had talked, ''According to information I

Bv DREW PEARSON

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 Count Counter,
er, Counter, agents, who have been shadow shadowing
ing shadowing Guatemalan exiles in Mexico
City, have turned in a detailed re re-nort
nort re-nort to the Central Intelligehee A-

gency giving names and details of
a Bed plot to overthrow the Guate-

ma an government

The report warns that the Mos

cow-minded rulers, who wert dm
eft out of Guatemala in 1955 by Col

"CfttiHo Armas and a CIA-supported
revolution, are conspiring

to return to power.
"The Guatemalan political exrl

es. tne repori ciaunn, n. aic

ing to unite the three sectors which
rfiviried. namelv. the follow

ers of Juan Jose Arevalo and Ja-

cobo Arbenz (the former pro-uom-munist
President), those which
in Guatemala are partisans of Ma Ma-VIA
VIA Ma-VIA MpnHez Montenegro.'

enmo rf the Blotters were ob-

ren entering the Csechoslova

kian Embassy in Mexico City on

Nov. 7.
"fln Wednesdav. 19BV. T,

watchfulness was set up in Villa-

mar Contreras (a Bedauited ua

to the CIA.

"At noon across from- the Capi Capitol
tol Capitol Hotel, this individual met two

persons apparently Europeans as
well as a Guatemalan named Pe-

tiche. After this, all bf them got

into a taxi and went towara tne

r.TPrhnslavakian Embassy. The

firs to leave the legation was Pe
tixtu the Guatemalan, who stay

et is minute's m that house. Half

an hour later Villamar Contreras

went out. The Europeans remain
ed inside."

with Arevalo, tht report said Are

valo "let him know that by the end

of the current month a revolt will
break ou in Guatemala, supported
by Col. Paz Tejada, Col. Diss,
Col. Monzon, and Col. Pedro Mey Meyer
er Meyer who will assume the command
of the Fifth Mittary Area of Quet Quet-zaltenango.
zaltenango. Quet-zaltenango. "Capt. Alfonso Martinez Este Este-ves...
ves... Este-ves... would break in Guatemala
through Ayutla heading more than

e thousand rmatantii rr Kevoio

Keyes wun a similar rorce wo

help the movement.

have, they are preparing actively
in a place near Tapachuhv (on the
Guatemalan frontier). The liaisons
with the Guatemalan peasants
are: Bevolorio Beyes, Celada Cro Cro-zo
zo Cro-zo and Max Salazar.
These persons rective watch watchwords
words watchwords from Mexico City through an
individual named Erntsto Benero
The meeting places in Tapachola
are: la pension Bonanpak the house
of Btvolorio Beyes, the house of

Celaha Crozo and the newspaper
El Sol del Soconusco."

the net costs reimbursab

Fiscal 1959 is $18,674,500,

ed with an estimated $17,

for the enrrent fiscal year.
For the Panama Canal Com Company,
pany, Company, the budget estimated the
tola I cost of its operating pro program
gram program during the 1959 fiscal year"
at $72,797,400 compared with an
estimated $75,054,36 during the
current fiscal year.
It arrived at those totals n

the following breakdown of the op

erating program by activities

current year's estimates for I

items being in parentheses): t,

Canal ope rations, $18,553,70

($19,580,000);

Allied maritime operations,
694,200 ($5,507,900);

Employe services, $17,1

($16,886,000);
Transportation and utility
ces, $8,620,900 ($8,489,400);

Other supporting services,

122,200 ($2,094,400);
General corporate expense: Nat

cost of Canal Zone government.

$11,435,600 ($10,303,300);

payable to Treasury, $8,9

($8,857,900); other, $6,989,400

097,200).

Those figures gave a total

1959 of $79,529,900 from which ;

deducted depreciation and ca

adjustments of $5,478,700,

in reserve for locks overh

$1,010,800, and costs finance

obligations of other years
000 to give the amount of

cations for the total op

program of $72,797,400.
The budget said that as

1, 1951, the net interest-bear

vestment in the Panama
Company was $373,341,086,
added:

"As a result of dividends

to the Treasury and net

ty transfers subsequent to Jv

1951, the net interest beam
vestment at June 30, 1957,
at $356,885,966.

"The resultant total interest
expense payable to the Treasury
for the years 1952 through Ufr7
was $50,280,491.

"For 1958 and 1959, at inter

rates of 2.482 per cent and 2.5

cent interest costs will be $8,5

900 apd-18,'S2,l00, respectively.'

Cosmic Becoming
Conors Biggest Biggest-Regular
Regular Biggest-Regular Transit
With her third transit in a
month, the broad-beamed ore-car.
rier Cosmic is having no compj.
tition for the title of tht "H
al's biggest regular customer.'o
Today, as on her first trsfJB
Dec. 17, the 744-ft Cosmic is south southbound
bound southbound in ballast. When the 4S,
deadweight too ore-carrier return
ed Dec. 30 she was carrying
load of iron ore from Chile fcf
Baltimore.
Today, as on her previous trip,
four pilots are required to put tajt.
Cosmic through.

t ui ...;n Kn Klr 1

in a fortnight.

ft. beam barely enawes.

ease through the Mm

ers.

ft
h
q
s ft
H
r



fAGE TWO

L
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1958

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

7

PANAMA AMKHICAN MtMS. INC

N ItOUNSEVEU. IN MM

K ARIA. INTO

O Box '34 Panama or P.
2-0740 (S LINES) V

ACOMN. PANAMBMICAN. Panama

179 Central Avenui oetween t?m anb iitm in h

rOAUOW tURAEAmH I ATIV1, JOSHUA POWtNS. INC
345 Madiaon Ave. new York. M7 n T.

MONTN. M ADVANCE

ERE MONTHS. IN ADVANCE ADVANCE-PO
PO ADVANCE-PO X TEAR m ADVANCE

1 TO
BO
IS SO

AT RAH
t SO
IS 00
14 OO

THE MIL BOX

LETOURNEAU MULES

The lock man who signs himself "Dimes', sounds like

anything bu & etVLstymVaiDitA codger, no

matter when he was born.
To me, he suggests the mental type who would have gunned
,r.Jr.JwnA imnrorMral. hooted at Henry Ford's tinker

ing, and said that Tlf Goa tad meant man to fly he would have

allowed him to grow wings.
Every piece of complicated machinery ever made had de defects
fects defects that required correction. ,. m
What if the new mules do have trouble rounding H corner?
That problem is easy to solve.
The big question is whether this or some other device can-
VTJZLZSJi tn Mf chins throuch the locks faster -than

lSvmTSi more cheaply if possible,
mr.. .li t irnnw these LeTourneau mules may turn out to

be a flop It's too soon to tell. Certainly the Governor gave-

them no great endorsement, wneu nc cw '
sriment." Ypu can bet LeTourneau didn't consider that an
Onfthing I do know is that these new units, or some others
designed for the same purpose, are going to demand more per performance
formance performance of the operators' than the old mules ..do, (And the
pS mules demand lots of skill and iudgmeUMule-skin-txm
are going to be learning a new technique, if they can
""mogenes's" ill-natured lunge at the Governor sounds to
tne:',as.if he's afraid he might not be up to operating the Le Le-tPourneau
tPourneau Le-tPourneau mules, if and when the time comes.

VIA ESPANA ROTTLENECK

rWR
The Roads Commission (CA) of the Panama Public Works
Mfaitatry, which I understand has some U.S. engineers in execu execu-ioos
ioos execu-ioos ttons certainly pulled a boner with the construction
-$S Tor the Pasadena intersection at Via Espafia near Our
U3? Joining the Trans-Isthm -Highway
with Via Espafia it only took one policeman to handle the rush rush-53
53 rush-53 traffic but now it takes as many as four and sometimes
poUcemen. Even with this number they are "'We
to solve the bottleneck which occurs especially at the noon
hourwhen suburban residents are heading home for lunch after
TheZubms'to be mainly the manner Whlhe
intention was designed with four widely-separated entrances
andfexite. Engineers "and traffic experts are said I to be jres jres-entty
entty jres-entty studying the problem and there have been suggestions
that traffic lights would be the solution

K?Srjr' i to ttaSUeetlnter-

va -"6"- -.rr- Thpv wmilri be able to see how

section on umaiu L

Labor iNews
And
Comment

CAM engineers would pay a visit to the "corozo Street inter inter-P6".,!!
P6".,!! inter-P6".,!! Hi?hL Thev would be able to see. how

w "r"'"ir"r;r: wonrRiiv handle itseii.

uXgXTush Bnhour: wSt the pnce of a single

V T il admrt tha the Via Espafia intersection might be a
m.T.J S He?! fanVe than the Corozc Street intersection

tat I don't think it's too late, or that it would cost to mucn
to remodel the intersection in keeping with the dictates of
.practical highway design. Motorkt.

By VICTOR RIESEL

aomeDoay weak it gently to

asti marx, wherever he is. The

proletariat isTttsappearing. Ame

ncan labor ii going Ivy League

at so rapid a rite that the workers

oi our world 30vyears hence will
jiaye to lose but the chains which
hold their Phi'. Beta Kappa kevs.

Factory jobs, are disappearing
fast. I talk not of unemployment
as Such, but of the number of

separate tasks which once had .to

De penormed. At least 650,000

am-ii jod siou nave oeen wiped
out as new factories replace the
old.

vTht General Eltctric Co., for

xampie, has ditRisnmd much
of its New England production
divisions in its shift to a fabul fabulous
ous fabulous polished plant in Louisville,
Ky. That Louisville plant can
whip out mora gadgtts with thou

sands lower workers.

It's a sign of the times that
this trend though unnoticed and

iiui ei wiaeiy aiscussea is
considered so sensational that

labor's skilled technician are say

mg that "the entire aoDrnach tn

labor negotiation must be re

vamped drastically since outmod

ed concept of the country' eco

iiomic picture are are outmodtag

many previous union contract de

mand."

These labor ..technicians will

meet in Washington on Jan. 16 to

analyze what has happened and

that'll mAA( WL: J 1 J

with the press excluded. These
AFL-CIO researchers believe that
1958 must not slip by without de detailed
tailed detailed planning to meet the swift

ness ,with which the white-collar

worker, the engineer and the push pushbutton
button pushbutton and dial operators of the

. r.i 7 :

tuture replace the factory worker.

This development already has

occurred in several major indus

tries, indicating to the experts

mat in two decades tne new la

bor leader will have to be a train

ed college graduate to head a mo

ment in which the production and

maintenance workers, the over

awed men of today, will have all
but disappeared.
At this moment fifty percent
of tie workers in the oil refining
industry are white collar, lion-pro.
duction workers. At least 40 per

cent in the chemical and aircraft
industries are white collar work work-ess.
ess. work-ess. Of those in the electrical in industry,
dustry, industry, one-third are clericbl, tech

nics or professional.

MAIDS IN MASSACHUSETTS

"Odd I Wcs Thinking of Your
Constituents, Too"

:.Z-.U vTAKkEEWsSy

'"l'rWTreEEEEEEEEEEEt EEEE

NtA Service, Inc

Memo To Bernie B.
By BOB RUARK

As automatic machinery which

m turn runs otner macmnery is
installed and almost literally
learns, "to think" by itself, the
production and maintenance work workers
ers workers in,1 the auto and steel indus industries
tries industries are being replaced hv the

white collar people including pose, like everything else, yo
increasing numbers of women. I can't find a good bird ,dog an

u went almost unnoticed last

se-or-

' .. -J,
"A Housewlie" (Mail Box, Jan. 12) seems hell ben t ojv ojv-IW
IW ojv-IW hert&tA complete dope. The Lord knows whe
inm Stateside. Must be the Ozarks or hill-billy country if it s
aTacenere maids get paid 35 cents an hour, start at 6 a.m.

rSnaW' I ttta-a AAAAAAWOV UUAJUUVCU
I'm Canal Zone housewife, too, and my home state 4s in Tuesday, hut this trend explains

Near England. The "dally" who comes to my moirwsr s nouseWhy Dave cDonaW told lfi0Q

onoe a week arrives at 8 a.m. and is usuauy ry ; united steelworkers of.. America
t 4-30 t ,u! officials in Washington that meir
ntJ t. Um Aav hv rfnlnir A week's Wash, but this COn-, union HTJST launch a vio-oriffls

slats onlv of a few house dresses, dish wipers, pillow cases, drive to organize white collar peo
nm wur w ,i. i,i. mrt ahpot men's i

handkerchiefs ana general iiems n ov""- r i
lrte and the like go to the laundry. Nylons are done by hand i McDonald said the giant union,
by various members of the family. Blen "s"aUy symbolraed by a husky
J itn,u v,o immrir,. is aninninc and drying in the electric ifellow sweatine it but at a hla.

washer she starts the upstairs cleaning aim wwm i --j ii oiasi lurnace, wouia De
down individual members of the household make their own riously weakened" if it didn't

beds. When 12 o'clock rolls around she sits down to ner iuncn iuncn-eon,
eon, iuncn-eon, and hear this-prepared by the lady of the house.
Her noon meal is just what the rest of the folks eat-
i.n. 1 zLfw HoRRprt. nrt ft hot drink when it's cool.

.if iiifM .aiui nUte. dessert and a cold drink during the.

hot months nrnng drive for USW. The 1,000
She does the dishes and resumes the last of her down- officials were instructed to go
stairs cleaning Her final chore is to iron the clothes she jlionie and "set up organizing com com-tackled
tackled com-tackled in the morning. Imiitees in each one of your plants
Far her eight hours of work she collects $8, plus 40 cents for the express purpose of orga orga-for
for orga-for bub fare On particularly inclement days an additional nizing the office and technical
50 cents Is provided, and a taxi phoned for. workers."
So much for the dally. ..7... V' t i There wiU be even more whje
Mv familv has no full-time maid; can't afford it. But our collar, professional and "unskill-
t in. firt,Krc An Their Trlsh heto eets $40 (not a month, ed" technicians when the Penta-

but a week) She has a pleasant roomwith a small bath of gon begins spending billions on new
her own and a radio. She works five and a half days a week, type ihissiles and atom-powered

The other day and a half is hers to ao as sne win. ine rcm rcm-gerator
gerator rcm-gerator Is hers also and she eats what, and as much, as she

likes.

I have written this piece be

fore. As long as they mas type

writer ribbons I will write it

from time to time as long as a

gentleman named Bernie Baruch

graces the earth.

Chief, I wish I could make it

this year, but I can't. I'm stuck

on .the other side of the pond,
and you'll have to scathe the
brave quail on your own. But,

man, l c smell those p i n e y

woods around Little Hobcaw and

the features of Mister Henry Nel

son and Mister Ely Wilson, not
to mention Mister iave McGul,
come through powerful loud and
clearn. ; t

And-how are the dogs I

ganizc the white collar and tech

nical workers in the steel industry.
There are 100,000 of these, accord according
ing according to John Pastm, chief of the

office and technical workers orga

fir:

subs, aircraft and power stations

Disappearance of the produc

tion and maintenance workers who

tm. e nr.mniA.tPlv true nicture of working conditions for ; earn their living with hands and

.I'MJ J- J M .14

urawu, means a sieauy aim sen-

Realist, ous loss in union membership.

Furthermoni, the college and high
school generations are flocking to

the retail, wholesale and dittri

maids to the sovereign state of Massachusetts

BIGOTRY, BLOCKADES AND 50-50

tnA. wMUm nf tb avernarp TTS-rate emnlove towards the butive trades, service industries,

common Local Raters In the Canal Zone is undemocratic and govarnmsnt sorvicn and banking
bigoted. The US-Raters are prone to abuse and bait the Local- and insurance, since that offer
Rater, especially if they think he holds too responsible a job. ht greatest job openings. For tha
In fact, Job advancement in the Canal Zone depends greatly on most part these are non-unoniid
the pigmentation of a man's skin and the texture of his hair, and lower-paying lobs.
True, the United States gave moral and material support To survive, the labor leaders and

to Panama's blood'ess independence revolution. ineir movement must unionize tne
Put hv the Hnmc token BYjince pftme tn the aid of Georcelmen in the button-down shirts. If

Waahino-ton at, vorVtnwn in 171. when French warshins effect- these drives succeed, American

Iwrjr blockaded Cornwallls. Had it not been tor lovers of liberty,
such as Lafayette, Rbchambeau and Thomas Paine, who came
to the aid of the fledgling US, the British could have whipped

the New world rebels with one hand. In fact, the US was as assisted
sisted assisted morally and materially by several countries in its fight
tor Independence. These European countries have not demanded
perpetual squatters' rights in return.
Now for the color problem. Because of the pressure now
being exerted by the colored peoples of the 'world an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming majority of the world's population, by the way the
US's internal color problem is assuming the character of an
alarming external problem as well. It lis to be hoped that the
combined efforts of Billy Graham, Eleanor Roosevelt, Drew
Pearson, waiter Winched the NAACP and a h03t of other
crusaders for good will prevail over the evil forces of segrega segregation
tion segregation supported by such as Robert Patterson and Tom P. Brady.
There is negligible difference In the IQs of Negroes and
wWUi, but there is great difference in their levels of achleve achleve-ment.
ment. achleve-ment. The average white out-achieves, if that is the expression,
the average Negro, socio-economic causes rather than heredit hereditary
ary hereditary lectors are responsible for this. The majority of whites do
not experience the economic and social hardships most Negroes
undergo. People who are oppressed and stigmatized find it
difficult to make the advance achieved by more fortunate
groups.
However, no,country or ethnic group has any monopoly on
brains. Nations get ahead because of their geographic advan advantages,
tages, advantages, and their cultural, industrial and economic dynamics.
Panama's chief resource is her geographic position. Saudi

Arabia's chief natural resource is its oil King saud receives

annually in royalties from an industrv his

did nothing to develop Panamanians are grateful to Uncle Sam
for many thtags. but gratitude should not deny them the right
to seek nationalization of the canal, or a 50-50 split of the
gross profits.
Just one final exhortation to white US citizens here: Don't
try to impose Dixie's racial patterns on the Republic of Pana Panamait's
mait's Panamait's bad enough in the Canal zone.
One of God's Children.

labor Will be a white collar force,

headed by university -trained
men. Labor's rough. and tumble
era. will he locked in the history
books.

Fasroifnui

The North Star, Polaris, is
so far away that its light takes ;
nearly 500 years to come to
the earth. If a person could be j

on Polaris with a inestepc
powerful enough to observe the
earth, he would only now be
seeing Christopher Columbus'
ships landing on the shores of
the New World.
Britannic Jr. Encyclopedia

sup

you

y

nore. special y one like Joe.

You do remember Joe, Ely's
mongrel? He was the star of the
show that day when I came in
out of the rain with the 15 bird
imit and a hawk in something
under an hour. Nobody could
smell that day but Joe, and Joe
smelled so good that Ely got off
the mule and put Joe in the sad saddle,
dle, saddle, between conveys.
"Dog this good too good to

walk when he ain't workin'," E-

ly said.
We had some shooting' this
year, boss. A couple of good lea lea-pards
pards lea-pards and a reasonable elephant,
and I wasted some money and
ammunition on grouse in Scot Scotland,
land, Scotland, and the Spanish partridges

were just dandy.

That's something you ought to
try some me, the Spsnish per per-diz.
diz. per-diz. He's as big as a Scotch
grouse -and flies faster. Driving,

flying with he wind, he hands tilist that Imtr, I can walk mem

you a ballistic where you start
with the idea that he's logging

a hundred mi.es an hour.
In Tanganyika we collected a
real good greater kudu and a
line sable, but they do not com compare
pare compare for thrills with bobwhite
euail on the reservation of Mr.
B. M. Baruch, the eminent au author
thor author who dominates the best-seller
lists these days. (As a matter
of fact, I got a boo out myself,
and you're costing me money in
the Christmas traue. Back to the
stock market, sir, and leave us
starving scrjveners alone.)
You know how it is, bob, when

you want to think o: something

wonderfully pleasant when the pa

pers are full of sputniks aha tra

gedies and cqnfusion? Sort of
drugging yourself against the
pressures of the present?
I use you and Hobcaw instead
of tranquilizers, Mister iB. No
matter how bad it is, between
death and taxes, I can run my
mind back to 11 years of the
quail season at Hobcaw, Big or
Little, and all of a sudden I feel
better. It wasn't so much the ex excitement
citement excitement of birds exploding under
your feet, or that solid slap of
bourbon when the day was fin

ished, or the quality of the food

tally from room to room in both

your houses in South Carolina, e e-ven
ven e-ven at a very long distance.

I hope that nobody's bothering

tne ducks on -.uiss Navarro a

pond, and that all your friends

are shooting as badly as one edi

lor we snow, l hope tne rains

didn't drown the spring clutches

of quail chicks, and that Eiy ano
Henry are shooting the tame

cats gone wild.

I hope there is always a covey

next to the sawdust piles, and

that hoodoo covey of E y's is still
putting the hex on the hunters.

i nope mat au tne tureys are
safe and sound on Belle's place,
and that tht deer are eating the

garaemas, as usual.
I hope that all the little fat

rumped ponies are enjoying, the

best ol health, although they must

be nearly as old as me now. I
hope that crazy horse who
doesn't like me comes to a bad

end.

I hope that the woods look like

J think they look, and the spar

leoerry Dusnes r.re giving you

good cover, and that the first

Dournon oia-iasmoned tastes as

good ;.s you always seemed to

think. I hope the ire leaps high.

and Churchill's pictures stands out

Or even the quality of the com-1 in bright relief, and that Nava-.

pany.

It was a mixture of the com components,
ponents, components, which somehow blended

into a kind of Graustarian ad adventure
venture adventure a harking back to the

days when they hung the halls

with holly, dragged m the Yule

rro will slap your hand when it

reaches too often to the candy

plate.

Ano i wisn you a yery, very

Happy New Year, chief, with one
ii junction: Save some auail tor

me for next year. I have perfect

log, shoved an apple in the pig's ,ed a talent for missing which is

iace, piixea up me mead a n d uncanny and wish to try it out

generally made merry. Sehtimen- a your preemcts.

Walter Winchell I New York

THI WALTER WINCHELL FILE
Celebs Coast-to-Coast: Beautiful

Margaret O'Brien complaining to
Steve Allen about how dateless
she is in Manhattan. "All the fel fellas
las fellas I know are in the Army. ..Lois

OBnen (ingenue lead in the
"Rumple" flop) embellishing the
Beverly Hill:, Hotel poolside steal stealing
ing stealing the ogies from Mrs. Ron Ran Randall
dall Randall in a bikini... W. R. Hearst
spellbinding Californtans with his
easy-to-sawy speech on Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev and Co... Van Johnson cup cupping
ping cupping his. ears against the brrrisk
wind near Rockefeller Plaza.Ab Plaza.Ab-be
be Plaza.Ab-be Lane (The O, Babyl in "Oh.
Captain!") showing Eden Rockers
what a tiny waistline does for

curves... Gwen Verdon (star of

"New Girl in Town") getting oat

ty -cakes from the Rockefeller rink rink-siders
siders rink-siders with her perfect entrecnats
and arabesques... Suzy Parker, the
Lovely One, who lisits her phone

number under such names as Ca Ca-melna
melna Ca-melna Grey or Marguerite de
FUbert.
Sallies In Our Alley, After
watching the vultures circle the
credits (at the start Of "River

Kwal"), Tennessee Williams turn

ed to his femme companion and
drawled: "So far I lak it!"...Joe

E. Lewis was asked where qhe

went new Year s isve... i stayed
home," he hiccupped, "I never
go out on amateur night!"
Midtown Vignette: Harold Gary
visited an absent minded pro

fessor, who' decided to cook the

dinner... After leaving a chicken

in the oven four hours the forget forgetful
ful forgetful prof went to see how it was
doing... The sherie shirt pave
him a glare and sarcasm 'd: "Eith "Either
er "Either turn on the gas or gimme
back my feathers I'm freezing

to death!

fumos of a Mldnighter: The

still wondering why leading man

&. Chaplin didn't go on the other

perf... He was made-up in bis

undressing room and suddenly did

appeared. Understudy Hall Linden

took over... They say D. J. Hunt
(a mechanical engineer) prolly

will be Diana Barrymore's next

groom... Don't invite Robert (Con

fidential publisher) Harrison and

his former west Coast No. 1 Sneak
to the same party ...El Morocco's
John Perona is in agony with
sciatica. (Never heard of her)....
Jim Bishop's blast at Louis' Satch Satch-mo
mo Satch-mo Armstrong (for insulting the
President weeks ago over the Lit Little
tle Little Rock Story) needed syndica syndication.
tion. syndication. Bishop revealed that the
"Uncle Tom',' crack kept specta spectators
tors spectators from Louie's Copacahana date
etc... White House staffers are
still unhappy about Satchmo's out outburst,
burst, outburst, but adore Marion Ander Anderson's
son's Anderson's "Vonderful goodwill ambas ambas-sadoring
sadoring ambas-sadoring all over the world.

Nighclub Phine Booth at 4 a.m.:
"I know it's four in the morning
ma, but you just don't understand
show business!"... "You and your
suspicious mind. I'll bet you even
think I'm in sbme njght club"...
"I have the most wonderful news,
Jenny He, said I'm perfect for
the part and is taking -me to bis
place to ead the script"... "Pa "Papa,
pa, "Papa, do you think it's all right if
I watch the sunrise from his ter terrace?"...
race?"... terrace?"... "Maude, I had a swell
time like you said, but now how
do I get. rid of him?"... "Mabel
don't give me any arguments. I'm
sure it was Harry"... "Oh, come
on get up and let's have our hair
done. Have I got a scoop. He's
a swish!"
Broadway Confetti: Elvis Pres Presley's
ley's Presley's managers are concerned a a-bout
bout a-bout the loot they'll lose while he's
in the Army. They iear the fickle
Dublic will cool off by the time

ne's discharged... The high cost

er mus' take in eight million at

the box offices to make any sort

of profit... Nat (King) Cole's pre

miere at iiie topa tomorrow even evening
ing evening is a must-go... Latest chorus
girl fad: Bracelers made of tint

ed walnuts... Kate Smith relaxes

by studymg-the clarinet... Actress

Dorothea Lockhard and fien Ham.
mer are an all-of-a-sudden merger
threat.

"iBells Are Ringing" troupers are of high cost: A million dollar flick- the Mariners.

Caat of Charattrs: Mickey Spil Spil-lane,
lane, Spil-lane, the landlord of seven cars,
is shopping for his 8th... Ian Wof-

fe, rehearsing in "Winesburg, O-

mo, is no Kio. At w ne scaled
(alone) Mt. Whitney, highest U.S.
peak. Then stood on his head
at the summit... Eddie FisherJs
agent M. Blaekstone has a new

gimmick geisha patties. Has

40, of them booked up fill March.
Usually for society people... Five
years ago Morton Da Coasta got
$75 per as the understudy (plus
walk-ons) in "The -Devil's Disci Discipline."
pline." Discipline." His income todav is over

300,000 per year... Do hit shows

wreak up marriages? Co-authors
Lerner and Loewe ("My Fair
Lady") were divorced during the
click's run and the Frank Loessers
went phffft after "Most Happy Fel Fel-la"
la" Fel-la" won rave notices... The lewdy-of-the-evenmg,
who fights the E E-vangelists
vangelists E-vangelists at 48th and Rwav

preaching against the theories of
the halo set... The crowd usuall

ooos ner off or cops take over.
Tha Big Time: Patti Page's
latest recording: '"Belonging to
Sonieone"... Frankie Lyman's "Lit "Little
tle "Little Girl"... Felicia Sanders' "Sons

of Geryaise'" at th Blue Angel ..

"Monday Ir: Manhattan' (especi
ally the arrangement) via Richard
Himber's platter... Wes Brown's
waffle of "Lonesome Love"... Lar Larry
ry Larry Meeks' latest, "I Heard Ya
the First Time" as rendered by

dailyWASHINGTON

Merry-Go-Round

ty Dei W rlAISON

WASHINGTON Not every everything
thing everything that happened at the NATO
conlerence saw the light of day.
It was published, for instance,
that Eisenhower had canceled a
state dinner' with Spaak of Bel

gium just 40 minutes ahead of

time.
What actual y happened was
that the NATO session had begun
to run long that day and Eisen Eisenhower,
hower, Eisenhower, well in advance of the
dinner, told Jim Hagerty: "look,
I'm not going to be able to make
that dinner?
However, it took seme time to
notiy all the heads ol states; so
it was not until 40' minutes be be-lore
lore be-lore the dinner that the announce announcement
ment announcement was issued.
Actually Eisenhower put on a
dinner jacket and dined with
sdnfe old buddie in Paris, not
with the heads of states.
IKI-'S PICTITIOUS MARTINI
Again it was published, and the
French press made quite a stew
over the fact that Eisenhower
had referred to some delicious
French wine as a Martini.
What actually happened was
the waiter had passed a tray of
drinks which Eisenhower had re refused.
fused. refused. But as v a toast was pro proposed,
posed, proposed, he took a glass of wine,
barely touched it to his lips.
Then, wanting to be agreeab e
and. wantingv to say something,
he patted his tummy and said:
"I haven't had a Martini for
years."
This was true- fnr tha

dent drinks only Scotch and wa

ter in tne privacy of tht White
House.
American npwsnnrwt-mon ha

decided not to write about the

incident until a British brigadier
rushed out to the French and
British press with the, story that
the President drank wine and
cailed it a Martini.
JIM HACERTY'S ULCERS
A lot was published about the
dressing-down Jim Hagerty dish dished
ed dished out to Art Buchwald, the New
York Herald Tribune funnyman.
Events which preceded the dressing-down
were, not published.
Hagerty, friends say, was hav having
ing having trouble with his ulcers. He
couldn't keep newsmen in line
in Paris as he irequently can
around the White House.
But what really griped him
Was the nnenincr lino n n.i.h.

hvald's take-olf on a Hagerty

iness conierence. it quoted a fic fictitious
titious fictitious "Jim" as saying: "I'm
sorry I'm late, gentlemen, but I
thought the shew at the Lido
would end at ejeven-thinty."
It happens Hajerty is?t,ite a
night-owler. But like some other
prominent night-owlers, he does doesn't
n't doesn't want the public .to know he's
a night-owler. Newspaper friends
hushed up, for instance, the fact
that, during Ike's stroke in No November,
vember, November, the White House couldn't
locate Haeertv until 4am in a

- --- ... a
Paris nitery.

bo when Buchwald, who knows
Paris better than the Paris pol police,
ice, police, tossed in the little dig about
Hagerty and the Lido, Jim hit
the ceiling.
News pals of Hagerty's urged
him to ignore the gibe, told him
the Buchwald coumn was aimed
more at them than at him, ad advised
vised advised that any public retaliation
would only give Buchwald pub publicity.
licity. publicity.
They thought they had him con convinced.
vinced. convinced. But after a long press
conference devoted to legitimate
matters, good old Jim let loose.
"There's just one more thing,"
he Said, then proceeded to belt
the correspondent of the paper
which has heen tne eta imp hoc

v.R-y UOBUIIWIIVOV
supporter of the Eisenhower ad-

minion auujl.
Jim's ulcers must have been
hurting bad.
CRACKING DOWN ON PRESS
Manv White House nress snnre-

taries have cracked down on
newsmen in the past, but none

more so man our Jim.

Haeertv once called in F.fhel

Payne, reporter for the Negro
newspaper Chicago Defender, aft

er she had asked a series of ques

tions at white House press confer conferences
ences conferences regarding failure to abolish
segregation in the Nation's Cam.

tal, and threatened her with loss

ot credentials.
Hagerty had done a thorough in investigation
vestigation investigation nf Miss Pavne wmVh

must have included her ineome-

tax returns. This unearthed thai
fact that she had been paid by
the CIO PAC for some editorial
work at the same time she was
an accredited correspondent. Hag Hagerty
erty Hagerty threatened to report this to
the Press Credentials Committee.
Again when Milton Friedman of
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
asked a series of embarrassing
questions at press conferences re regarding
garding regarding Ike's refusal to push the
immigration bill, he was called in
by Max Rabb, secretary of the
Cabinet. Rabb suggested that
Friedman lav off the emharrassin

questions.

. i
' When Friedman declined, Fried Friedman's
man's Friedman's boss in New York got a call
from Bernard Katzen, head of the

Jewish Division of the Republican
National Committee; protesting
that Friedman was askine embar

rassing questions and that he be

oraereo to lay off.
The Jewish Teleernnhir Apencv

did not, however, discipline Fried

man, it increased his salary.
In the Hoover aHminietrnlinn

there were various attempts to
crack down' on the press: also

some in the Roosevelt administra

tion.

In the Truman administration
ndly Charley Ross and .Tne shnrt

never made any effort to retaliate
against critical newsmen.
Good Old Jim's nneratinns him

been tougher than any other press

secretary since mat job was established.

SAHARA METALS FOUND
ALGIERS, Algeria (Uf) Im Important
portant Important traces of precious metals,
including platinum, and diamonds,
have been found by French geolo geologists
gists geologists exploring the mountains
south of the Sahara more than
1.000 miles from Aloierc li v, r

reported today. French press re reports
ports reports said further tests will be
necessary before geologists can
telriuihAthai. lb. .....

commercially evnlnitahtn Tf an

they would add immeasurably to
,K. .....l.L i e i i

me wtaiiu in me oanara wnicn
has heen uncovered in recent
years, including immense oil de deposits
posits deposits already being worked.

I u I J
mt Ew m JM

CORN KING Charles N.
Fischer, 50, of Shelbyville, Ind.,
disAlays samples of hybrid seed
corn 8446 which won him this
Veer's "Corn Kthg honors at
the International Livestock Ex Exposition
position Exposition in Chicago. A four four-time
time four-time winner, Fischer previously
held the title in 1440, 1949 and
1950. He spent some 200 hours
this fall in selecting his prize prize-winning,
winning, prize-winning, 10-ear entry.

Eat Drink, Be Merry

Answer to Previous Puzzle

T5T

ACROSS
1 Poached'
on toast
4 Cole
8 Malt drinks
12 Split soup
13 Stir
14 Finest
15 Table scrap
16 Happen at last
18 Nose (slang)
20 Property item
; 21 of butter
22 Filet of
I 24 Biblical name
26 Vend
27 Cut down,
as grass
, 30 Underling
32 Wish
34Chant
35 Wiped opt
36 Moines,
Iowa
37 Cook the
surface
39 Minus
.40 Charts
41 Pronoun
42 and
sour sauce
45 Predict
49 Subsequent
81 Snake
52 Gaelic
83 Dry
54 Household god
55. Source of

3 Fence parts
4 Food fish
5 Be very fond
6 Opposed
7 Small cyst
8 Mistreat
9 Meadows

10 Italian dty
ULet It stand

17 Higher In

St

19 Cowboy

equipment
23 More aged
24 Eager
25 Horse's

neck hairs

a.nIuII UIaItIuIHI

26 Night custom device

27 Wretched 41 Droves

28 Mineral rocks 42 Hastened
29 Marries 43 Had on
31 Having a 44 Essential
handle being
33 'Auctions 46 Disturb
38 Reach toward 47 Supplier of

. 40 Measuring special milk

48 of corn
50 Tatter

66Sets
57 Diminutive
suffixes
i: DOWN
1 Heroic poetry
2 M!obe

r-T-- l
s i r
T-r"ir"it
prf -L-L-1
rr--if -mrww
W T B
g ,g
9
1 1 1 r I I r I, ,1 ,i



MONDAY, JANE ACT 13, 1958

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE THKIP

-
it

si bV k!

Easi German Rfeds iVew Concepf C Ciurcj Finance Inspires

mAj REN THOMAS L. HARROLD, commanding general, U Army Caribbean, second from left, pauses during recent visit
to labth Infantry NCO Academy and listens attentively as Sic. Leo Griffin, at the extreme right, gives a deta led explana explanation
tion explanation of aaS SrclsYon a sand table. Others shown are, left to right, Capt. William T Pitts tactical officer; Lt Col.
T.irw.i a Brmim. chool commandant: Col. Ralph A. Jones, Jr.; USARCARIB G-3 and Col. Robert W. Garrett, commanding

officer, 20th Infantry.

(U.S. Army Photo)

Political Strategy Proves Demo Bigwigs
Consider Nixon The Big Threat For 1960

WASHINGTON (UPV-The Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic high command is honoring
Vice President Richard M. Nixon
as the Republican they are most
anxious to cut down.
Democratic political strategy is
in obvious acknowledgment of a
belief that Nixon is the man most
likely to be nooinated by the Re Republican
publican Republican Party for president in
1960. As the Democrats see him,
Nixon is the man to beat.
If they can beat him before
1960, so much the better for the
Democrats. He probably would be
the strongest man the Republi Republicans
cans Republicans could put up to succeed
President Eisenhower.
The Democratic estimate of
Nixbn's political potential is indi indicated
cated indicated by the sustained attack on
his public record underway in the
pages of the Democratic Digest.
The-Digest is a monthly publica publication
tion publication of the Democratic National

Committee.

Republican who may, .also, covet
his party's presidential nod.
Can't Ust Advantage
The next 18 months promise to
be rough ones for the vice presi president.
dent. president. The nominating conventions
will take place after that period.
Meantime, the going will be espe especially
cially especially rough for Nixon because he
probably cannot cash in on the
greatest advantage which normal normally
ly normally can be claimed by a Republi Republican
can Republican politician who has a good
early lead toward his party's pres pres-nnnnnal
nnnnnal pres-nnnnnal nomination.
That advantage is the windfall
support of the Republican organi organizations
zations organizations in the Southern states.

These largely are ghost organiza-
1! r 1 . A 1 i a .t

lions oi nine suusiance dui iney
send substantial and often control controlling
ling controlling delegations to nominating
conventions. More than anything
else, the Southern Republicans

want to line up with the probable
winner.
Nixon will not get much or any
of that windfall support at the
1960 Republican National Conven Convention,
tion, Convention, His bold stand for Negro
civil rights and his association
with NAACP forbid it

Music Scholarship
Fund Committee
Schedules Concert

AIRLINE PACT SIGNED
I
MOSCOW (UP ) The West Ger German
man German Lufthansa Airline and the So Soviet
viet Soviet civil airline Aeroflot have
signed an agreement under which
each will honor tickets issued by
the other line. The pact signed
today is similar to ones signed
by Aeroflot with other Western
airlines which do not provide
flights to Moscow. A West Ger

man source said the agreement

was a first step towards direct
flights between West Germany and
Russia.

Back la November, the Digest
observed that Nixon apparently
had decided to break away from
the Eisenhower organization,
whose popularity with the voters
had been shrinking since last
spring.
"Nixon has been acting," the
Digest reported, "Like a man who
has decided to abandon a slow slowly
ly slowly sinking ship but in such a way
as to suggest ithat he merely is
going- for a swim."
Until last spring, according to
the Digest, Nixon had identified
himself with the "Eisenhower per personality"
sonality" personality" to build up his own
chances for the 1960 nomination.
The January issue of the Digest
recuses Nixon of joining the late
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy and
others in destroying the morale of
the United States scientific com community.
munity. community. Debates Blamed
Hence, the Communist triumphs
with sputniks? That's the way it
looks to the Democrats who con contend
tend contend the nation is paying today,
in terms of a lag in defense sci
ence, for Nixon's actions during
the national debate relating to
Communists and internal security.
If such charges against Nixon
can be made to stick, his availa availability
bility availability for the Republican presiden presidential
tial presidential nomination will decrease and.

perhaps, disappear. That seems to

be what the Democrats have in
mind.
Nixon unquestionably is front front-runner
runner front-runner as of today in the race for
the 1960 nomination. The disad disadvantage
vantage disadvantage of that position is that it
invites, even demands, attack not
only by the Democrats bnt by any

Cliff Robertson who is at present in Panama;
filming "The Naked and the Dead" will
appearance in person at the LUX Theater
Tomorrow on the occasion of the Pre-Release
of his picture "THE GIRL MOST LIKELY"

A 1
in Hfehw
Y ji H J
miS JMB4HMB4HHb4B B. "i

I 1 1 1 ii lull i ill T .ZBbBBL

A nroeram has been arranged

by the Music Scholarship Fund
Committee for presentation at
the Rex Theater in Colon on Jan.
28, at 8 p.m.

A benefit performance to boost
the fund for the musical educa education
tion education of Desmond Daniels. Pana

manian tenor now studying in

the United States, the concert

will feature artists who have an

peared on programs abroad and

Will be appearing here for the
first time, as well as those who
have been local favorites for

many years.

To be heard by many for the

first time will be Mrs. Constance
Nelson and Samuel Anchor, two

accomplished English pianists
Solos on the flute will be ren

dered by Charles W. Sacquety.

holder of a masters degree in
music from the University of
Michigan, while vocal selections

will be contributed by Miss Con Con-stancia
stancia Con-stancia Bell, Isthmian mezso-

soprano. and the Rev. Allan R

Wentt, baritone, whose musical
ability is of great assistance in

his ministry.
The Music Scholarship Fund
Committee was organized in Co Colon
lon Colon a few years ago while the
Very Rev. Mainert J. Peterson, a
former music teacher, was rector
of Christ Church By-the-Sea.
Through his efforts a partial
scholarship was granted to Dan Daniels
iels Daniels when the local committee
assumed responsibility for the
additional expenses. Daniels Is a
graduate of the Abel Bravo Col College
lege College and was honor soloist of

Christ Church Choir when he

left the Isthmus two years ago
to further his education at the

Huston-Tillotson College, Austin,

i Texas.

Victor Henrlquez, Colon bus!

nessman and vice-chairman of

the committee, is in charge of
the distribution of tickets for

the coming concert.

Clear Uo Jysfery
Of U .$. Physician
BERLIN, Jan. 13 (UP) The
East German Communists today
cleared up the mysterious disap disappearance
pearance disappearance of an American doctor
last summer by announcing his
arrest and demanding a 10-month
prison term for him on charges

Ngf buying camera equipment in
East Berlin.

Details of the case of Dr. Walter
Steinberg, 35, of El Hambra, Cal Calif.,
if., Calif., were revealed in the o ficial
Communist party newspaper,
Neues Deutschlsnd.
Until today, all the U. S. con consulate
sulate consulate in West Berlin had were
"third hand" reports that Stein Steinberg
berg Steinberg vanished in an East Berlin
police station Sept. 5 when he went
there to pay a fine for a minor
traffic offense. Soviet authorities
informed the consulate several
times that ,they never had heard
of Steinberg.
The Communists said Steinberg
and a "Swiss journalist" named
Josef Gutmann of Zurich were ar arrested
rested arrested together.
Steinberg was accused of break breaking
ing breaking Communist law by purchasing
a camera and equipment worth
1800 through Gutmann.
Gutmann, in turn, was accused
of smuggling $5,000 worth of pho photography
tography photography equipment from East
Berlin to West Berlin in Stein Steinberg's
berg's Steinberg's automobile
Neues Deutschland said the
American physician asserted that
he did not know he had broken
the law. It ousted him

ho thought Gutmann was author author-wed
wed author-wed to make purchases in East

loerun.

Commercial traffic between East
and West Berlin is forbidden by
the Communists.
The newspaper said the East
Berlin prosecutor has demanded

a 10-month sentence for Steinberg

no i nve-year prison term for
Gutmann.
Swiss consulate officials in West
Berlin said neither has yet been
sentenced.

Greater Generosity Among US Presbyterians

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA S.rvic.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UP)
The Presbyterian Church in

the United States has asked its
three million member to dou

ble their total giving to. church

work by 1962.

Many denominations would

consider this five-year plan

hopelessly idealistic. But the

Presbyterians have the best pos possible
sible possible reason for believing this

can be done; they've done it be

fore.

In 1950, the so-called northern

Presbyterians were giving about

100 million dollars a year for lo

cal, national and foreign enter-

prices of their church. Last vear.

they gave more than 220 million

dollars.

Although the denomination

has grown in size during that

period, most of the lump in it
budget reflects more generous
giving.

The present per capita giving
figure of $72.03 a year is one of
the highest to be fount", in major

Protestant oodles. It compares,
for example, with 452.79 for Epis

copalians, $43.82 for Methodists,

and $48.17 for southern Baptists.
Behind the remarkable Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian record is a new concept of
church finance pioneered by the
Rev. Dr. John Thompson Peters,
secretary of stewardship and
promotion.
Before Peters took charge eight
years ago, the denomination fol followed
lowed followed the custom which still
prevails in most Protestant bod bodies.
ies. bodies. Each year it would adopt a
budget for the coming year,
hopefully making the total a lit little
tle little larger than the previous one.
This national total was then
parcelled out among the 8600 lo local'
cal' local' Presbyterian churches. When
the goal was reached, the drive
was described as a success and
everyone rested until the next
year.

Under-Peters' leadership, the

Presbyterians switched to an

open end" hudget. Each year

the national church proposes a
"basic program" which simply

maintains the status quo. At the

same time "advance programs

are laid before the denomination
on the basis of "Here are some
things which we ought to do,
and which we will do if we get

the money."

denomination's budget repre represents
sents represents all that really should be

done this year.

The onen end hudept tc a mn.

stant reminder that the respon responsibilities
sibilities responsibilities and needs of Christian

service are unlimited. The indi individual
vidual individual member is able to see a
direct relationship between the

size oi njs own comriouuon and
the extents which the church

can obey Christ's command to
proclaim the gospel to every llv-.
lng creature.
This, according to Dr. Peter,
Is the only basis for "true Chris Christian
tian Christian stewardship."
"The church is not a club 16
which we pay fixed dues," he
said. "Giving is part of our Hs Hs-cipieshlp.
cipieshlp. Hs-cipieshlp. a ifact of worship, an
expression of gratitude to God."

handsome
dependable

Panama will be the first Latin America country to
present, in a pre-release exhibition next Tuesday 14th at
the Lux Theatre, the extraordinary Technicolor picture
"THE GIRL MOST LIKELY," starring JANE POWELL and
CLIFF ROBERTSON.
CLIFF ROBERTSON, who is at present in Panama for
the filming of "THE NAKED AND THE DEAD," has grace gracefully
fully gracefully agreed to appear at the Lux on the night of the pre prerelease
release prerelease of this picture and on this occasion will present all
persons attending this function with autographed pictures
of himself. Cliff Robertson renders a splendid performance
in the picture "THE GIRL MOST LIKELY."

"

, , 1 ...
;1 IfiHjjfl I m lira
m mWm HHl
H HI BBkS Ih
iwfo-ftiS?A'. WWUfflpSjHBHf wBmi tBBBBBBHWHI MssnsssBsOsW na

NORTH (D) 2
652
V K 9 5 2
AQ "$
AKQS
WEST EAST
AQJ10J S43
VNone V J 10 7 4 3
J 10 7 3 2 95
4J0I2 41064
SOUTH
AK7
V AQ8
K 8 6 4
7$
North and South vulnerable
North East South West
l Pass IV Pan
3 V Pass 4 N.T. Pais
5 V Pass 5 N.T. Pass
6 V Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead A Q

jpenjng i

The advance programs
spelled out in detail.

Thus Presbyterians know that
in 1958. if thev give more than

the bare minimum requirements

represented by the basic pro
gram, they will be helping to ex

pand mission programs In West
Africa, Japan. Iran, Chile and 30
other countries; to build new

churches in mushrooming U.S

suburbs and support missions In

teeming lpnercity slums; to ex
nand the facilities and strength

en the faculties of 41 church-related
colleges; to train thous thousands
ands thousands of church school taechers

and other lay leaden.

Beyond the "advance program
for 1958" is a list of long-range
projects in Christian education.

home and foreign missions

which win be undertaken when

the money is available.
The effect of this approach is

to disabuse anv church member

of the comfortable idea that the

are

am.

VfH

LIGHTERS

SSSBBB

Styles for Ladies and Men
Pocket Table Desk Models

LUCKY WINNERS IN OUR
FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE

Ann Williams
Enid de Lewis
Juan de Mena
Eva Aguilera
Esilda Montoya
Alberto A. Guardia
M. Capps

Mrs. Schwartz
C. McNall
Harold E. Reid
Rafael Amar
Mrs. R. D. Owan
M&rcela de Janon
Margaret Albertson

DOUBLE CHECK YOUR SALES SLIP
IF IT ENDS IN 3 YOU WON!

TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
18-47 Central Ave. (137)

Where You Double Your Money Free

SAVED" FROM FLAMES Trapped In her burning apartment in Boston, Mrs. Alice Collins,
39, waits to be rescued (left). A firemean lifts ner out of the third floor window (center),
and she is brought down to safety (right). She was then rushed to a hospital for treat treatment
ment treatment of burns.

Negro Maid Terms
Teenage Slabbing
Segregation Issue

HOUSTON, Tex., Jan. 13 (UP)

A 28-year-old Negro maid to
day told police she stabbed 16

year-old David Wilson Taylor

with a letter opener because he

wouldn't let Negroes sit beside

him on a Houston bus.

Taylor, a white boy from

Cleveland, Tex., was in good

condition in Houston Hospital.

The woman, Mrs. Ruthle Lee

Jenkins, was charged with as
sault to murder.

She said the trouble began

Wednesday' when an elderly Ne

gro woman tried to sit beside

the boy near the front of the

bus. She said the boy "kept slid

lng back and forth on the seat"
to prevent this until the woman
gave up and sat down across

the aisle.

About six blocks later she said
about "17 Negroes" got on the
bus and one of them, a 23-year-old
girl, sat down next to Tay Taylor.
lor. Taylor. She said Taylor told the girl
to move, and when she didn't
he slapped her twice.
Other witnesses, including
the girl, said she was not slap slapped
ped slapped but that Taylor pushed her
out of the seat.
Mrs. Jenkins said she was sit sitting
ting sitting to the rear of the bus.
cleaning her fingernails with a
six-inch-long letter opener. She
said she rushed to the front to
see if the girl was hurt.
"When I got there this boy
swung his closed fist at me. I
ducked back and then he kick kicked
ed kicked me In the shins. I swung at
him blindly with the letter
opener," she said.
She said after the bus start started
ed started again, the boy opened his
jacket, saw he had been stab stabbed
bed stabbed and fainted. Then she said.

I a girl started screaming and
I "everybody ran off."
che said she currenderer to

police "because I knew I couldn't

live with myself if I didn't."

Since becoming president of the

American Contract Bridge League,

J. G. Ripstra of Wichita has be

come quite conservative in his bid bidding
ding bidding on the theory taht it is undig undignified
nified undignified for the president to be set.

His failure to bid seven with to today's
day's today's hand must be ascribed to
this conservatism but with trumps
breaking five-zero it took very
good play to bring even the small
slam home.
Rip won the opening spade lead
with the king and played the ace
of trumps. West showed out and
Rip was mighty glad he had not
bid seven. He studied the hand and
noted that he could make the small
slam if East could not trump in
too soon on his high cards in the
side suits.
Rip cashed his ace of spades
and continued with three rounds of
clubs. On the third club he got rid
of his last spade.
The ace and queen of diamonds
were taken next and dummy's last
spade led and trumped.
East was now down to trumps
but it did him no good. Rip led a
diamond and ruffed with dummy's
king. The last club was now played
and East could ruff high or low
but the best he could get would be
one trump trick.
To forestall a lot of letters, I
must point out that this hand will
make seven no-trump provided the
first heart trick is taken with
dummy's kinc but that particular

result does not detract anything
from Rip's fine plky of the hand
at six hearts. 1

Q The bidding has been:
South West North East
ie Double 3 Double
Pass Pas Pass
You, West, hold:
KJ32 VAK104 f ftQJIM
What do you lead?
AThe seven of trans. Tear
side suit cards will keep and it Is

MP to yon to start setting rid of
the enemy's trumps right away.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Th bidding has beon:
South West North last
IV 2 2 3
4 Pass 4 N.T. Pass
9 V Pass 6 Double
Pass Pass Pass
You, Wast, bold:
9743 4KJlMtS A 3
What do you lead?

FREE "Chico" de 0R0 G0LD) STAMPS
1

o

You'll take in bigger profits
Is your office working at full capacity? You can take on untold

amounts of work with Burroughs Ten Key and Director
Adding Machines. Chances are there's a place for both

of them in your business. Why not get the details r
call your turrpughs man

BOYD BROTHERS, INC,
Ne. 30 J. F. da la Ossa Avenue (Automobile Row) Tel. S-I01t

r

"farter

noIT'
mm
9m
rife
HA
a-a
'JM
i
'Y.it
f
w4
m



Mil rorat

Tint PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1951
Social and Qtlieruhe
MEETINGS
134,

n c,

Ou Jtafftn

Ji mH L If uUfUm

DIPLOMATIC CORPS TO OFFER FAREWELL RECEPTION
FOll AMBASSADOR AND MRS. RAUL H. BARRIOS
Tk. imhaceaiw of Pniombia in Panama and Mrs. Raul H.

Barries, who are soon to leave the Isthmus, will be feted by
members of the Diplomatic Corps in Panama at a reception ai
the Union Club on January tS, from 6 to I p.m.

A farewell luncheon honoring
Mrs. Barrios will he held on Fri
day at noon, at the Union Club
by the ladies of the Dams Gua
dalupanas of Panama. Friends c
Mrs. Barrios who wish to attend
the luncheon are asked to call
Mrs. Cuca de Arias at 3-4858 or
Mrs. Marta de Chanis at 3-3377.
On January 21 Mrs. Lionel Vasse,
wife of the Ambassador of France
in Panama, will honor Mrs. Ba
rrios with a Champagne party.
Legion Auxiliary President
Honortd At Recaption
The National President of the
American Legion Auxiliary, Mrs.
Pt. J. Kelly, who rs visit visit-ing
ing visit-ing briefly in the Canal Zone, was
honored at a reception yesterday
evening at the American Legion
club in Fprt Amador
Clayton Officers' Wives
Ilect New Officars
The election of new officers was
the highlight of the monthly cof coffee
fee coffee and business meeting of the
Fort Claytor Officer's Wives Club,
held last Wednesday morning at
the Fort Clayton Officer's Club.
Those elected to ser e for the
next year were Mrs. R. W. Heckin Heckin-gr,
gr, Heckin-gr, president; Mrs. M. F. Mou Mou-cha,
cha, Mou-cha, vicepresident; Mrs. John l.
Ettershank, secretary; Mrs. R. S.
Nbrris, vicesecretary; Mrs. B. E.
Adams, trasurer; and Mrs. G.
W Carter, vicetreasure.
Outgoing president Mrs. Spur Spur-geon
geon Spur-geon -Messner conducted a short
business meeting, during wuin
the committee chairmen gave
their reports. Mrs. A. F. Wier
read the history of the Club's ac activities
tivities activities for the past six- months.
Following the report of the com committee
mittee committee chairmen, Mrs. Walter Ki Ki-lillae,
lillae, Ki-lillae, honorary president, spoke
at leangth of the exemplary lead
ership of Mrs. Messner during
her term of office. Congratulations
were also extended to the other
retiring officers, which included
Mrs. Arthur Munson, vicepresid vicepresident;
ent; vicepresident; Mrs. A. F. Weir, secretary;
Mrs. D. L. Knoll, vicesecretary:
Mrs. Walter Moeller, treasurer;
and Mrs. S. Jt. Johnson, vicetrca-
aurer. Mrs. Messner then tutnert
over the gavel of office to her
auccesaor. Mrs. Louise Hechinger.
Mrs. Kilillae completed her con
gratulations by presenting Mrs.
Messner with a beautiful silver
tray. Each outgoing officer pre
sented her successor with a Car
nation corsage.
New members introduced at the
meeting included Mesdames Mc
Clud, Proctor, Gallveath, Singer,
and Pierce. Guests indludes Mrs
W. H. Moody, mother of Mrs. Da
vid Ramsey.
Hostesses tor the atfair were
the wives of the Medical Corps
with Mrjs. Leonard F. Wilson as
chairman. Presiding at the re
; freshment table were Mrs. Wilson
Mrs. R. t. Singer, and Mrs. G
D. Batcheldor. Attractively dis
played on thr table were three new
PURER
FINER
RICHER
Sorry, no exchange
No gift wrapping
Cash Kales Only

I aVT "V.taTaeaw'

mvB

til

Pm 20J40 0W
linen tablecloths purcnasea
for
the use of the club
Balboa Rainbow Girls
Hiva Swimming Party
The Balboa Assemoiy
Girls held a swimming pany ii
Fort Clayton saiuruay cc.6,
and enjoyed box lunches prepar
ed by the giris ior
and tneir guests.
Afterwards eleven of the gins
and chaperones Mrs. Mxweu
Smith, Mrs. J. v.
i i .. i'hriatian Gunderson went to
ClubM at Albrook for a slumber
party. (
Union Church Women
To Moot Tomorrow
unmin s Auxiliary of tne
Balboa Union Church wdl meet
tomorrow in me social i
r-hhrrh at 9 a.m. Cotiee wm oe
served preceding me Dnsiuess
ing. Mrs. John Mallhan will be
inharee of the devotions, and
the sneaker will be the pastor
of the church, the Rev. Oscar
W llkpn
All women of the congregation
are
invitpH tn come me wnn
the group, and to dhii
friends who are interested m at-
ending
College Club Croup
t. u;,;i Summit iiaraeni
tk- Nature Study Group of the
Canal Zone College Club will our
Summit Gardens on weancsuay i
3:30 p.m.
Momhera wno Dian 10 auenu ic
. ..n oithor Mrs. Walter
Dryja, Balboa 2437, or Mrs. John
R. Hammond, Jr., for reserva reservations.
tions. reservations. Clayton NCO Wives
Hold R-aular Meeting
The Ft. Claytor. NCO Wives'
Cluh held their regular monthly
business meeting last Tuesday
evenine. in the Ft. Clayton NCO
Open Mess. A new guest who be be-came
came be-came a memher the Club was
Mrs. Marie Mellenax.
New officers were installed or
the coming term, as follows: pre pre-sldent,
sldent, pre-sldent, Mrs. Esther Moore, vice vice-Mra
Mra vice-Mra Julia Browning,
secretary, Mrs. Virginia Mosely,
and treasurer, Mrs. Jean Collins.
Mrs. Esther Moore presided at
the meeting. Wood rose corsages
were presented, and pictures wer
taken of tne retiring uu mv
ing officers. .,
Th new r.hanmen of Commit
tees were also elected at this
metinsL as follows: Program
chairman. Mrs. Pat Swanson, hos
pitalitv chairman, Mrs. Rosary
Bullock, ways and means chair
man, Mrs. Florence Ryan, mingo
r.hirman. Mrs Margaret Hicks,
and Publicity chairman, Mrs. Vir
sinia Dorset!.
Lime sherbet and cookies were
served.
Hostesses for the evening were:
'Mrs. Margaret Ross, Mrs. Marga
Jte&h

aA all autdwM

&
mm wtt.iti l
OUR

ENDS TOMORROW!

MORRISON'S

4th JULY AVE. and "J" STREET

P

anama
Umm 9:00 sj 19 mlj.
ret Hicks, Mrs. 'Ruth Hall, and
Mrs. Rosary Bullock.
The next social event on the
NCO Wives' Calender will be the
Morning Coffee on Wednesday
morning from 8: 30 to 11:00 in the
Ft. Clayton NCO Open Mess. Ail
members and their guests and
newcomers to the Post are in
vited to atend.
Cristobal Woman's Club
Hears Governor Potter
The Cristobal Woman' Club
held its regular monthly meeting
last Wednesday, in the Red Cross
rooms in Cristobal. Mrs. William
Brooks, president, presided at the
brief business meeting1 during
which several interesting commit committee
tee committee reports were given. Mrs.' Per Perry
ry Perry Francey and Mrs. Robert Al Allan,
lan, Allan, co-chairman of the Philan Philanthropy
thropy Philanthropy Committee, announced that
the Christmas program had been
more successful then efen, and
that food, clothing and toys had
been given to many of the needy
of Colon. They thanked the club
members, friends, schools and
other organizations who assited
in many ways.
Mrs. William Grady gave a re report
port report on the Woman's Club Engage Engagement
ment Engagement Calendares. She announced
that they are for sale at the
JWB-USO on the Pacific side and
at the Hotel Washingon, Surany's
and Motta's on the Atlantic aide
In the very near future the ca calendars
lendars calendars will also be available in
the Commissaries and Service Cen Centers.
ters. Centers. A musical program was present presented
ed presented by the taleniea Miss carol
bruland, a stuaent at Cristobal
Junior High School. Miss aruiand
played several selections on the
piano Polish Dance" by Schar Schar-Wenka,
Wenka, Schar-Wenka, "Blue Danuoe Waltx" by
Johanu Strauss and Prelude" Uy
vitfno I iinrl-Kk-ahn
Following the musical program
the guest speaker, Governor Wm.
E. Potter, was introduced by Mrs.
George Roth. Governor rotter
spoke of the new townsite of Coco
solo and reminded the women that
the various clubs can do much lo
add to the community spirit. He
told them that, just as in the early
days of the canal, the more cul
tural and social activities, a com
munity offer, the happier the peo people
ple people there will be.
Following the meeting the mem'
bers and guests enjoyed a lovely
tea prepared by Mrs. H. u. Clay
ton and Mrs. A. J. McLean and
their committee. Mesdames Stan Stanley
ley Stanley Kidd, G. Morland, E. C. Orr
and J. W. B. HaU presided at
the tea table.
USO JWI TO Prosent
Travol Movies Tonight
The USO JWB Armed Forces
Service Center in Balboa will pre
sent tonight at 7:30 n.m., two
color travel film; titled "Wing
to Finland" and "Wings to Viking Viking-land.
land. Viking-land. V For a beautiful preview of
your trip to the Scandinavian
countries, schedule this program
in your evening's activities.
Three travel bags, through the
courtesy of Pan American World
Airways, will be given away a a-mong
mong a-mong the audience tonight.
All military personnel and their
dependents as well as the civilians
of the Canal Zone and Panama
are invited to attend.
Balboa High Students
Preterit Style Show 9
The annual fashion shwo, "Chez
Eloise", will be presented Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday night at 8 on the front
campus of Balboa High School.
There wlfi be ample seting for
spectators and musical entertain entertainment
ment entertainment will be provided through
the talents of Don Randel, Leon
Odenz. Joaline Clare and Vena
Bennett.
Edgar Ameglio will act as mast master
er master of ceremonies' for the style
display.
This marks the eighteenth time
for this production under the di direction
rection direction of Miss Eloise Monroe, in instructor
structor instructor in Household arts at the
high school.
Quarry Heights Wives
Have Bingo Party
For Gorgas Patients
The Quarry Heights Officers'
Wives Club conducted a bineo nar
ty on Ward 14 6f Gorgas Hospital
on Monday evening of last week.
Hostesses Tor the evening were
Mrs. Porothy Ashton, chairman
Mrs. Betle Merriani, Mrs. Dorcas
Manly, Ms. Kitty Anderson,
Open During
Noon Hours

tacit aatko for inclusion in rfcta
column ihould b tubmirtco in
typewritten torni ana mailed
h boa number listed daily in 'So 'Social
cial 'Social and Otherwise," or delivered
Dv hand to the office. Notices of
Meetings cannot be accepted by
telephone.
Ivening Guild
Moots Tomorrow

The Evening Guild of St. Luke
Cathedral will hold a meeting to
morrow evening at 7:30 at the
home Oi Mrs. Elvira Byrne, House
356, Apt. 14, Mamei Place, Ancon,
C. Z.
Dean Peterson will be guest
speaker, and all women of the
parish are invited.
Inter American Women
Meet At Tivoli
The Interamerican Women's
Club will meet on Wednesday at
9:30 a.m. at the Tivoli Guest
House.
Charm Class
Te Be Resumed
The Charm Class of the Inter
american Women's Cluh will be
resumed by Mrs. Marjorie Bur-
goon on Thursday morning at
9:30 at the Tivoli Guest House.
Cristobal K. of C.
Mooting Tomorrow
Cristobal Council No.
Knights of Columbus, will
tomorrow evening at 7:30.
1689,
meet
Numismatic Society
Meets In Margorita
The Isthmian Numismatic Socie Society
ty Society will hold its regular monthly
meeting this evening at the Mar Margarita
garita Margarita Service Center. Visitors are
welcome.
Catholic Daughters
Meet Tonight
Court No. 874, Catholic Daughters
Of America, will meet tonight at
7:30 m the social hall of tne
raculous Medal Church.
This .neeting was regularly
scheduled for January 6, but was.
postponed. All members are ask
ed to attend.
Atlantic Bridge Club
Plays At Margarita
Tha Atlantic Bridge Club will
begin playing promptly at 7:15 to-
mgnt at tne Margarita service
Center.
All Bridge players, and especi especially
ally especially members of the Armed Forces
are invited to join the group, wich
meets regularly on Mondays.
Mrs. Mary Clark, Mrs. Betty Em Em-mett
mett Em-mett and Mrs. Dorsey Franks.
Prizes of playing cards, toilet
articles and staplers were given.
Punch and cookies were serv
ed.
Social Lionesses
Tangle In Dispute
Over Scrap Of Fur
LONDON, Jan. 13 (UP)- Two
of London's social lionesses went
at it tooth and claw today over a
scrap of f.x fur.
The controversy started at a
charity raffle last month when a
tpx fur stole was won by ticket
number 68. Boh Lady Victor Pa Paget
get Paget and Mrs. Alan Selborne, both
leading Mayfair hostesses and cha
rity workers, claimed they held
the winning ticket.
Lady Victor claimed Mrs. Sel Selborne,
borne, Selborne, who was actually present presented
ed presented with the stole by actress Vivien
Leigh and Sir John Gielgud at
the hall, was looking at her ticket
upside down.
Her ticket was number 89, Lady
Victor said, and "a genuine mi
stake was made by reading it
as 68. The real number 68 ticket
was in her own possession.
(By today, tempers had flared
so high in the dispute that Mrs.
Selborne's husband turned the
matter over o his lawyers.
Said Mrs. Selborne: "I will give
the fur to a charity at the earliest
opportunity, that should answer he
gossips.
"Anyway, I doub if I would
want to wear it. It is a very tatty
piece of fur, and definitely not
worth all his fuss."
Funeral Services
For Mrs. Dixon
Tomorrow AI Noon
""Funeral services will be held to
morrow at noon in the Bethel Mis Mission
sion Mission Church, Paraiso, for Mrs. An An-geline
geline An-geline B. Dixon, who died at Gor Gorgas
gas Gorgas Hospital yesterday morning.
tBurial of the 71-year-old Barba Barbadian
dian Barbadian resident of Paraiso is sched scheduled
uled scheduled for 1:15 p.m. In Corozal Ce Cemetery.
metery. Cemetery. Mis. Dixon is survived by her
son; Rexford Innis, a Canal Zone
PolU guard, and her daughter,
Mrs. Millicent Brathwaite.
e.

NEW OFFICERS INSTALLED The new slate of officers of the Quarry Heights Officers' Wives' Club were installed thU
week at the regmlar monthly luncheon meeting last Wednesda y. Scheduled to serve until July are, left to right seated, Mrs.
R. H. Hubbard, treasurer; Mrs. W. H. Clark, vice president; Mrs. R.. M. Montague, wife of Lt. General Robert M. Montague, Montague,-Commander
Commander Montague,-Commander In Chief Caribbean, honorary president; Mrs. T. M. Ashton, president; and Mrs. W. A. Franks, secretary. Th
outgoing officers of the women's club are, standing left to right, Mrs. E. W. Emerson, treasurer; Mrs. E. J. sass, vice presi-
dent; Mrs. R. E. Classen, president; and Mrs. J. H. Merriam, secretary. (U.S. Army Photo)

HMHIkB 111111 J LaHH&lHIB bbH
iHltlll n in nuKffffij flfH oanBk ffljjapJV MggaojjjMM HKnttcaH MlflBSrfBnll
B KBr cBefl LB JnonHBHScUnnniaflr BHsaaB kafli 9aK BbBb. eaaHat- eaaB' 1
JL salK

WBB&BSKi 9BS&KK&L HaBRs ;: 'HanaBBB wSuBBSUtS&$ LlHgaittaar iJaaBwSaiaBBBBaef fw SaT i Son

MRS. MARY MESSNER PRESENTS the president's gavel to Mrs. Loiise Heckkiger at Installation of officers of the Fort
Clayton Officers Wives Club. Left to right, Mrs. Johnson, Mrs. MOeller, Mrs. Nelr, .Mrs. Messner, Mrs. Heckinger, Mrs.
Moucca, Mrs. Ettershank, Mrs. Norris, Mrs. Adams, and Mrs. Carter

Children Grown Up, Widow
Takes Pride In New Work

A iob is taking the place of a
family for many middle-aged and
older women today. And it is nean
warming to hear now many oi
them are happy in the substitution
and proud jA having achieved fi financial
nancial financial and emotional independ independence
ence independence from their grown children.
A typical letter from one of
these women tells a story that,
with a few variations, keeps com
ing to me from women readers.
Widowed when the oldest ot net net-six
six net-six children was 16 apd her young
est only 20 months, this mother
held the family together until the
children were grown and gone
from home. Th,en she set about
looking for a job that would give
her the feeling she was doing
something "worthwhile."
She foond the job at a hospital.
As an admitting clerk she says
she has a chance every day tt "be
kind and helpful to people at a
time when a warm smile, a sym
AS we traveled through the great
vegetable and fruit growing areas
of the United States, we dined at
the hospitable homes of growers
frequently. Lots of good food, al always
ways always lots of vjtamin-packed fresh
vegetables. Sometimes the meat
was cooked with the vegetables, a
time and labor-saving method you
may want to try.
For pot roast, select two or three
fresh vegetables such as white or
sweet potatoes, carrots, onions,
parsnips, celery (cut in 2 or three
inch pieces) and whole snap
teans, Cabbage wedges, turnips
and rutabagas may be added to
his list also, if desired.
Leave the vegetables whole or
out them into, large .pieces. Add.
them to the roasting pot 30-45 min minutes
utes minutes before cooking time is up.

However, with celery and snap'nish with fresh parsley o water-

pathetic attitude i
mean so much."

and kindness
TOO BUSY TO BE LONELY
THOUGH she says the work was
hard for htr at first, going from
years of homemaking into job
for which she had no particular
training, she looks forward to ev every
ery every day, has no time to feel lonely
or useless.
And she's proud to think that
not one of her children has to wor worry
ry worry about "poor mother, just sit
ting around waiting for a letter or
for some of her children to come
home for a Visit."
If this were just one letter, .. it
might not be important.

But so many letters come to! mother will press him to duplic duplic-this
this duplic-this column from women who have 'ate, his brother's enthusiasm.

found the right job a happy substi
tution for heing needed by a fami family,
ly, family, that I believe it is a possibility
more women should explore.

Cook Meat And Vegetables
Together To Save Time

beans, add them only 15-20 mm
utes before the meat is done. This
applies to pot roast cooked on top
of the stovt as. well as mat cook-
ed in the oven in a covered roast
ing pan.
For tender cuts of meat roast
ed in an open pan, use a slightly
different method. The best veget vegetables
ables vegetables in this case are white and
sweet potatoes, carrots onions and
parsnips.
They should be peeled and par parboiled
boiled parboiled 10-15 minutes, then drained.
Add to die roasting pan 45-60 min minutes
utes minutes before the meat will be done.
At intervals, turn the vegetables
over in the pan to coat with
meat drippings or haste them with
drippings..
Serve either tvpe on a platter
surrounded by the vegetables, uar

"''

An old king once took it into his
head to ask his children how much
they loved him.
His two older daughters express expressed
ed expressed themselves enthusiastically; the
youngest showed reserve. The king
was pained and outraged by the
third child's refusal to duplicate
her sisters' response to him. Mad Maddened
dened Maddened by disappointment, he set
loose forces which destroyed him,
his kingdom, his children and his
frien.s.
He was King Lear and Wil William
liam William Shakespeare's Idea of tops in
parental foolishness.
But we do not learn from poets.
Today Mrs. Jones will bring
nome new sweaters to ner two
boys. Tom, 8, will say enthusias enthusiastically,
tically, enthusiastically, "Gee, Mom it's cool! It's
just what I wanted!"
But Harry, 11, will show re-
I serve, exactly like King Lear, his
wnen, uxe Loraena, ne insists
on h'ing himself, she will com complain
plain complain aflgrily to his father, "Why
isn't Harry an outgoing child
like Tom? There is never any sa satisfaction
tisfaction satisfaction in doing anything for
him."
However, we are sometimes will
ing to learn from psychiatrists.
Dr. Alexander Wolf i one. A spe specialist
cialist specialist in group psychotherapy, he
said to me the other night:
"Group treatment is especially
cress
Serve eithei4 type on a platter
surrounded by the vegetables. Gar
nish with fresh parsley or water
cress.
Here are two other interesting
things we learned on our inspec
tion trip:
1. More potatoes than ever be
fore are coming to market under
controls on size, grade and matu
rity impose 1 under marketing a a-greements.
greements. a-greements. This means that con consumers
sumers consumers get better quality potatoes,
while lower grades are diverted
automatically to starch and live livestock
stock livestock feed.
2. To get better spinach, scient scientists
ists scientists are experimenting with deter determining
mining determining and changing the sex of
spinach plants. They also have
developed spinach of sufficient
height so it can be harvested by
machine. It is now common pract-
ce to wash spihach in a shower of
ice water immediately after harv-
est to
cool to shipping tempera-
ture,

iiiiJiieaaanaenaeaeaii mi i, nmmwmmmmmmmmmm

useful ytd people who expect every everyone
one everyone to respond to them in the
same way. They learn to alter this
expectation. They learn to ques question
tion question the childishness in themselves
that is made uncomfortable by a a-nything
nything a-nything different or unexpected in
other's reactions to them."
King Lear's demand for same sameness
ness sameness in his children produced his
tragedy. Shakespeare makes a
daughter say of him, "He hath
ever but slenderly known himself."
' If We feel hurt when one child
fails to respond to us like his
brother, we may find other rela relationships
tionships relationships constantly disappointing,
too.
We may cling to a friend who
sends us birthday cards and with
draw from one who doesn't. If our
new butcher fails to crack jokes
with us, we may go out of our way
to take our business to the old
butcher who does.
Like Lear's, our actions are bas
ed not 'on the worth of the friend
qr the meat we purchase but on our
unconscious fear of anything new
in human rcsDOnse. V
law'
JytAKE fRIENOS
When you move to a new town
and are accepted by people who
entertain each other frequently, it
isn't necessary to try to out-enter-tain
the others. In. fact, it isn't
even wise to try.
If you go overboard, tht ethers
may think you ar. trying to Show
off.

V 1



MONDAY, JANUARY Ju, 15

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE rm
Unlawful Acts By Reuther Goons
Need Investigation, Solon Says

SECOND SESSION OF 85TH CONGRESS OPJEJjs The Rev. Bernard Braskamp, chaplain of
the House of Representatives, leads members of the House in a prayer for God's guidance as
the second session of the 85th Congress opens in Washington. Speaker of the House Sam
ftaybum la on rostrum behind Rev. Bra&
Song Writer Takes Leap From Tin Pam Alley To Vatican

of Catholicism and of the history
of the times in which the noly
days originated.
He wrote, songs explaining and
describing 10 Catholic holy day's.

Then, going through the same
study process, he did 10 Protestant
days. Ray Middleton was secured

to sing and do the narration on
the three albums, which were is issued
sued issued recently under a new label
set up specifically for them, Can Can-die
die Can-die Records.

By DOC QUIGG
NEW YORK (UP)-"This," said
Gerald Harks, "is the love of my
life and let me tell you it's a
long ways from Tin Pan Alley to
the Vatican."
The author of such resounding
popular song hits as "All of Me"
and "Is It True What They Say
About Dixie?" held in his hand
three record albums containing 30
songs about the Protestant, Catho Catholic,
lic, Catholic, and Jewish faiths.
Five years ago Marks, who has
contributed music for such di diverse
verse diverse outlets as the Ziegleld Fol Follies,
lies, Follies, the, poetry, of. Carl Sandburg,
and safety ditties for children,
discovered that he didn't know too

much about the holy days of his
own Jewish faith.
He began studying their history
and writing songs explaining,, de describing,
scribing, describing, and celebrating them.
When he had finished 10, he began
thinking about reports he had
heard that the Vatican and vari

ous churches in Italy had shel

tered refugees from Hitlerian per persecution
secution persecution during World War II. He
decided to do something in grati gratitude.
tude. gratitude. Gets Enthusiastic Response
Marks journeyed to tile Vati Vatican,
can, Vatican, explained his plan to write

original songs about Catholic holy
days, andvgot an enthusiastic re

sponse. He returned to New York
and with the aid of a priest put

in seven months of intensive study

Reversal Of British Policy
On Cyprus May Bring Split
LONDON, Jan. 13 (UP J The went on, Cyprus' Governor, Sir
(British government hat approved Hugh Foot, will talk with Maka-

a complete reversal of its policy
on Cyprus in a move that may
cause a split in Conservative Par Party
ty Party ranks, the Sunday Express re reported
ported reported yesterday.
The report said Prime Minister
Harold Macmillan and his cabi cabinet
net cabinet had agreed to permit Arch Archbishop
bishop Archbishop Makarios to return to the
troubled island without any form formal
al formal reunciatlon. of violence.
A formal disavowal ei violence
has been a precondition of his re return
turn return iuntil now, a policy which
has been reitereated by Colonial
Secretary Alan Lennon-Boyd.
The nwsnsper said the, govern government
ment government will defend its reversal of
polio en the jren-tiMi, With
terrorktMtiviUes apparently end end-ed,
ed, end-ed, a pledfL from Makarios would
be irrelevant.
It added that the cabinet's plan
also includes another attempt to
get Turkish participation in talks
with Makarios.
If the Turks refuse, the paper

rios alone in London. If the talks
are satisfactory, Makarios will be

permitted to return to Cyprus
to resume leadership of the
Greek Cypriot community.
The report said the basis of
talks would be sovereignty for the
Cypriots in return for a period of
self-government under British so sovereignty.
vereignty. sovereignty. Eriosis union with
Greece would be barred by
treaty for a further periooV pro probably
bably probably 10 years.
If the Greek Cypriots chose
union with Greece at the end of
that time, the Turkish community
would get a similar option for
union with Turkey. But Britain,
fte report said,' vkvlif keep par t
f the island as a military base.
It said the government was con confident
fident confident it could get these proposals
through parliament without risk
of defeat ajid a consequent gener general
al general election. But if added that there
might be a "substantial splinter
group" of Tory MP's.

Marks describes the tunes there therein
in therein as "semi sarrpri standard mu

sic." He's enthusiastic about this
latest Droiect but savs it rlrwun't

mean he's going to quit Tin Pan

Airey.
"I keep writing songs all the
time." he said "And tot mo tall

you what Tin Pan Alley is it's a

siaie oi mina. Wherever, at this
moment. snmhnriv i lahnrinmlv

trying to compose a popular tune
and set some words to it that's
Tin Pin Alley."

Hits Involve Luck
As for the secret of turnine out

a hit tune, Marks believes much
depends on luck, including the

iuck or tinamg tne right person
and circumstances to present it.

"Back in 1931, nobody wanted'

my song -ah ot Me,' no publ sh-

er. Around the Middle West I'm

a native of Saginaw, Mich. I eot

8 or 10 pretty good singers to sine

it on radio, and I didn't get a call
for a single copy.

"But one day I ran into a singer
named Belle Baker and this song
hit her. Her husband had died a
month before, and she was

touched with such lines as 'Vour
goodbye left me with eyes that

P5yp!w can i go. on dear fjtho

She sang it one Saturday mid midnight
night midnight on a New York local sta station,
tion, station, and on Monday morning it
was a hit. Matter of fact, a pub publisher
lisher publisher wired me right after he

heard it that night, and I'll never
forget the words: 'You will have

a world-wide hit in 20 minutes.'

WASHINGTON, Jan! IS (UP) (UP)-Sen.
Sen. (UP)-Sen. John Marshall Butler (R (R-Md)
Md) (R-Md) called on the Senate Rackets
Committee today to investigate
what he described as "more than
one hundred unlawful acts" com committed
mitted committed by "Walter Reuther's
goons" in an Indiana strike.
In a letter to committee Chair-
Tl T ci I. n

man junn u. jncieiian tu-ATK),

Butler urged the committee to
look into the dispute between the

United Auto Workers, headed by
Reuther, and the Perfect Circle
Corp.

Sen. Pat McNamara (D-Mich),
a committee member who has
charged that some GOP senators
were out to 'get" Reuther,
promptly declared that "the vio

lence was not all on labor's side."

He also said the committee al

ready was scheduled to look into

the Perfect Circle case.
Incidenti in the Perfect Circle
dispute are scheduled to be aired

when the committee looks into the

long battle between the auto
workers and the Kohler Co. These
hearings are tentatively due to get
underway next month.
Feud Among Members
The committee's inquiry into
Reuther's union brought into the
open a feud between some Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic and Republican members.
McClellan attempted to quiet it

last week by assuming personal

command of the investigation.

Butler said tne Kohler case was
only one instance of alleged "vio

lence" involving Reuther's union.

"Perhaps an equally flagrant
case is that of the Perfect Circle
Corporation of Hagerstown, Indi Indiana,"
ana," Indiana," he said. In the latter part
of 1955, the plants of this corpor corporation
ation corporation were struck and terrorism
reigned i n Hagerstown, New
Castle and Richmond, Indiana."
"According to my information

more than one hundred unlawful

acts on the part of Walter
Reuther's goons occurred," Butler
declared.
Intimidation Of Workers
In the "union lawlessness on
the rampage" he said, there were
shootings, bombings and' intimida intimidation
tion intimidation of workers.
As a result, Sutler said, three
of the four UAW locals with juris jurisdiction
diction jurisdiction over the Perfect Circle
Corp. were decertified by the
National Labor Relations Board.
Butler declared that Reuther
had tried to "surround his head
with a halo and to pose as a
responsible labor leader."
He charged that the "terror "terrorism"
ism" "terrorism" at Perfect Citcle occurred
"under the leadership if not the
specific direction" of Reuther. He
said it "completely refutes" the
union president's "sanctimonious
and phony posture."
"I think that his effort to de deceive
ceive deceive the American people and
the American workers should be
exposed for what it is "A fraud,"
Butler said.

bbbw mW

1 J

Bb BBl wf
WWw. -axWW bbbbm

Li

PRESIDENT ATTENDS SPECIAL PRAYER SERVICE Following a custom he began when he
first took office, President Eisenhower leaves the National Presbyterian Church in Washing Washington
ton Washington after attending a special prayef service marfcfng the reconvening of Congress. With the
Chief Executive, are Vice President Nixon (right) and Rev. Harold Martin, Moderator of the
General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church.

Ike Urges Congress To Okay
Important' Farm Law Changes

SIMPLE SBX CON7USED
LONDON (UP) The authori

tative medical journal, the Lancet,
said today that science has con

fused the simple issue of deciding
whether a human is a man or a

woman. When trying to determine
the sex of a person, the Lancet
sard, scientists now look for six
things: genetic sex, gonadal sex.

anatomical sex. hormonal sex. so

cial sex and psychological sex. In
most people ail these "sexes"

agree, the journal said, but there
are some who have a mixture of

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UP (UP-President
President (UP-President Eisenhower urged Con Congress
gress Congress today to approve "import "important"
ant" "important" farm law changes aimed at
saving taxpayers 346 million dol dollars
lars dollars next fiscal year and even more
later.
The President's $4,981,000,000
farm budget for the 12 months
starting July l was 6-2 per cent
below the record breaking 15,327, 15,327,-000,000
000,000 15,327,-000,000 total for the current fiscal
year.
He said his economy proposals
would be spelled out in details in
a special message to congress.
The proposed savings would come
principally on programs for sup supporting
porting supporting farm prices, stabilising
farm income and controlling ex excess
cess excess production.
As the President put it, they
would "permit the Secretary of
Agriculture to esablish price sup sup-pors
pors sup-pors for basic crops consistent with
the increased productive capacity
of our agriculture."
He said present programs have
"tended to price key farm com com-modities
modities com-modities as if they were scarce,

-

i

wmm bbbbbbbbb mm

mm wmKimWi:Wm B
I

stimulating continued production In
txress of the quantities that exis exis-ing'
ing' exis-ing' markets can take a these
prices." This, he said,, "placed a
heavy burden on taxpayers."
In addition to proposed current

farm savingc, the President asked

Congress to trim 100 million dol dollars
lars dollars from ah annual 225 million dol dollar
lar dollar subsidy program toi encourage
farmers to carry out conservation
practices. This savings would be
eflected in the fiscal 1960 budget.
He asked Congress to vote 450
million dollars for the soil bank
program, some 375 million dollars
less than the lawmakers autho authorised
rised authorised for the current 12 months.
When it originally was set up in
1956, it was contemplated the plan
might cost up to $1,200,000,000 a
year.
But the president, as disclosed
previously, recommended junking
the acreage reserve section of the
program at the end of the 1958 crop
year. This is the section under
which farmers are paid not to
plant such basic crops as wheat,
corn, cotton, rite and tobacco.

mw H 9
njHH WMSBA BsPPH Hi
. WiWW iffim BBBBKmi BBY a

CLOSE BRUSH WITH DEATH Forty-one Wysox, Township,
Pa., school children narrowly escaped death when this school
bus and truck crashed through a bridge and fell 25 feet into
the Susquehanna River ait Wysox. But serious injury to the
children Was prevented when the bus fell on the truck, cutn cutn-icning
icning cutn-icning the blow. Eight to 10 children were reported cut, and
one was hospitalized. The bus tried to pass the truck which
was parked on the bridge, and the structure collapsed under
their combined weight.

THE PAJAMA GAME

I auvawiua nit M Tur m n nrwi tl... in it.. i tu. TmMui1 flm I

unLLtlvinu jf Jn inc. ulu bui uc,it uiunuis jcu m uiv wwimomvm www-

physics year it extends until Dec. 31, 1958. But already considerable has been learned about
the earth and its surroundings, which is the aim. Numbers above indicate discoveries. 1.
Northern and Southern lights flash simultaneously, caused by radiations from the sun. 2. The
magnetic equator has been charted. It runs sometimes north and sometimes south of the go

oceans aren't chan; : i;ss rs rapidly as they used to. 4. World's record low temperature:
103,1 degrees below r Scuth Pole. 5. Weather of past ages can be checked by ice borings. ;
They are read like U 3. 6. Antarctic ice 10,000 feet thick recorded. 7. Flowing in the
opposite direction, tha r.n czem current 9,000 feet below the Gulf Stream. 8. A quarter-inch-long
worm was ft fmn 1600 feet below sea level without iU exploding from the
pressure change. 9. Much can be learned of the earth's surface from tha satellites but Sputnik
secrecy and confusion have so far concealed the value of this phase of the effort. 10. A mountain
rtdge 8,000 feet high has been located on the floor of the Arctic Ooean.

Recently arrival in Panama" is Mr. Clav V. Hake. 8nl1 Ren.

resentative of Paramount Pictures, in chartre of the world-wide

distribution of Cecil B. DeMUIe's production THE TEN COM

MANDMENTS. Mr. Hake in in Panama, for discussions concern concerning
ing concerning the release of this important production here and in the

countries of Central America.

Shown in the photo, from left to right are Mr. Richard Na Nathan.
than. Nathan. Mr. Clay V. Hake, and Mr. Mario Ghlo.

jmt' iMjjmmSit i mm i "wsp m mm
it" jmmW-' 4sKLl, 'sAiil
wt3pSB: WXWww ,Bji(asSKM
fm k1bHHHHB fBmm iKwbms
H 1
Ml ssjr SHnHpH H
mwmwmwwM
' w.

(NEA Telephoto)
FLOODS SWEEP TEXAS This aerial view shows the extent
of flooding in Robstown, Tex., In the wake of a severe storm
which swept through the area. More than 1,000 persons were
left homeless after heavy rains, measuring up to eight inches,
inundated the area. In Robstown 600 people were driven to
higher ground and taken to nearby Corpus Chruti, where
m.,.g. ;. f .they watt, given ihelter.,

ADVISOR Frank Mendez, a
registered professional engineer
in Ohio and the Canal Zone, has
joined the USARCARIB Ord Ordnance
nance Ordnance Section as chief technical
advisor. Mendez is married to
the former Leticia Carles Guar Guar-dia
dia Guar-dia of Penonome.

Man Slays Wife
In Church Study
After Baptism
LAREDO, Tex., Jan. 13 (UP)
Authorities today held an Iowa
man charged with killing his
estranged wife in a church study
shortly after their infant son was
baptised.
The fugitive, Jack Hoskins, 30,
was picked up last night by two
border patrol inspectors about 10
miles south of here, He was not
armed and offered no resistance
when officers stopped him on a
routine check.
Police said Hoskins admitted
stealing the car in Rock Rapids,
Iowa, where he also admitted
killing his wife.
Border patrol agents said Hos Hoskins
kins Hoskins was headed up the Rio
Grande toward Laredo. He had
crossed over to the Mexican side,
but had returned to the United
States where he was arrested.
Authorities said he admitted
fatally shooting hiKestranged wife
in the study of theCongregational
Church at Rock Rapids last Sun Sunday
day Sunday after their, only child, two-month-old
Paul, Was baptised.
Red China, Yemen
Sign Friendship,
Trade Treaties
TAIPEI, Formosa Jan. 13 (UP)
Authoritative military sources
said today that a deputy division
commander in the Chinese Com Communist
munist Communist army has deserted and
surrendered to the Nationalists.
The sources said the general
fled to the Nationalist nf.Wa

island of Quemoy in a small boat

wun several otner army officers.
The sources did not iv hi

name or other details of the de defection.
fection. defection. Thev Said an nffixlal

Nationalist communique was ex expected
pected expected next week.

:iWmmWmmmmmwWfimM
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaafl BBS SrBBBBBBBB
M bbbHt JmWlmm 'll
Wmm wLr ;jkWm bbbHLp JjHH9&iLK,H
H LLWmSLLummmmWSS VbbbbIbbbbbbbbbI

II

Soon they'll be playing "THE PAJAMA GAME" at Ra Radio
dio Radio City Music Hall! Broadway's bit bov-loves-iiaiama-airi

sensation is on the screen, starring Doris Day and the won- 4

wiim cast ei me nw piay jonn nam, cajroi Haney. See
"TUn DA I A IMA IIIHVII I. 1. nlmmun n

DAY 15 4T THE LUX.

CLUB CIRO S

ANNOUNCES THE DEBUT
of the
"CORTIJEROS"
Spanish Singers and Dancers and Impersonators
3 SHOWS 3
WO p.m. 1 1:3a'p.m. 1:30 a.m.

TODAY

COLON

TODAY

L

)



MONDAY, JANUARY IS, 1931
T
Roberto DeVicenzo Enters $10,000 Panama Open

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

sn

Local Amateurs Must Enter
By Jan. 20; PAA Trophies
On Display At La Mastota

0

Roberto DeVicenzo, golf champion of Argenti Argentina,
na, Argentina, 1952 and '53 Panama Open Champion and titlist
. of Mexico, Colombia, France and Holland, has enter enter-!
! enter-! ed the $10,000 Panama Open Golf Invitational under
the sponsorship of Viceroy Cigarettes.

This announcement was made
tnAav hv Tabacalera Istmena,

vtiwnv renresentatives in Pana-

De Vincenzo, one of the most
popular golfers to show his wares
in the Panama Open, has won the
Argentine championship so often
that it is rumored he may sell
shares in it the next time. He also
has a fetish for picking up titles all
over the world.
In his first invasion of the U.S.,
De Vincenzo picked up two crowns.
In 1951, the loquacious Latin dust dusted
ed dusted off his slide rule as well as his
driver and went to work on the
Prim Beach Round Robin title.
Knowing that one 'robin' doesn't
m alee a summer, Roberto captured
the Inverness Round Robin a few
weeks later at Toledo, Ohio, part partnered
nered partnered with Henry Ransom.
Money talks, in every language,
including broken English, so after
collecting some $6,000 in 13 weeks
of tournament play, he returned to
Argentina where he won the South
American PGA title and the Ar
gentine Open.
1 Just as Babe Ruth became pop popular
ular popular via the home run, De Vincen Vincenzo
zo Vincenzo has gained a following because

he belts a long ball.

Onpn another time, and his entry

intn the tournament augers hot

competition for the 1957 winner,
Doue Ford.

It was announced by the tourna

ment committee of the Panama
Golf Club that all local amateurs

must submit their entries not later

than 5 p.m., Monday, Jan. 20th.
Pairings for the play will be made
Monday evening and any entries
not submitted by that time will not
be considered. Entry fee for ama ama-teurs
teurs ama-teurs is $10, and $25 for professionals.

The silver awards, again to be
donated bv Pan American World

Airways, are now on display in the j

show windows of La Mascota on
Tivoli Avenue. The Pan American
trophies, some of the most attrac attractive
tive attractive ever to be given in the Pan Panama
ama Panama Open championship for ama amateur
teur amateur winners, will be on display
until opening day when they will
be transferred to the club foyer.
Entries for local amateurs wiD
be restricted to those amateurs
having handicaps of 12 and below
only. All scoring in the tournament
will be done by members of the
Panama Women's Golf Associa Association,
tion, Association, as in previous years.

The usual "tnpleta" wUl be run

i.huu a lung I ,
Few who saw the 1956 Panama! by the Panama Golf Club during

Open will forget his memorable
eagle on No. 12. Over the green
and up the slope above the green
in two. at least 40 feet from the

cud. and with 'Slammin' Sam!

the tournament and the tickets for

the pool are on sale at the club.
Calcutta pool tickets are also on
sale.

Tickets for the four days of play

Snead only three feet from the cup are on sale at all mditaryc ubs
for an easy birdie, De Vincenzo and Isthmian golf ekibs. Tickets
pitched the ball a foot to the right for all events are priced at $5
of the cup about ten feet out where 'each for civilians, and $3 for mili mili-it
it mili-it rolled into the cup for an eagle tary personnel.
3 on one of the longest holes of A silver trophy donated by Sca Scathe
the Scathe Panama course. .gram's, represented locally by

cyrnos, inc., win oe oh uispiay

this week. This trophy will be a
permanent award for the winning

professional of the Panama upen

Crisp, firm iron shots combined

with his long game make mm a
fnrmirishlo nnnnnpnt ffftm tfife to

green. He's bold with the putter invuauonai, ana eacn winner win
sometimes almost too much so, be-1 receive a replica for his perma perma-cause
cause perma-cause he always "goes for the nent possession.
kiffi Por.miu nf thi hp miehti The1 $10,000 Open will start

some day be known as the 'Gam- Thursday, Jan. 23. The Golf Clinic
Mino riourkn The nnlv annarpnt will be held on Jan. 22 at 4:30 p.m.,

flaw in his game is his jittery ap-, tickets for which will be on sale
preach to short putts, a weakness at the entrance gate to the club
which every Sunday golfer has ex-:for $1. A cocktail party, donated
perienced. (by Seagram's, will be held after
"Uneasy lies the head that wears the clinic. Tickets for the all all-the
the all-the crown" so true when this events (four days of play) are not

golfing bandit steps in with his good tor entry to tne gou cunic.
clubs smoking. Besides, Don Ro- Tickets for this event must be pur pur-berto
berto pur-berto wants to win the Panama chased separately.

Bill Casper
Cops $50,000
Crosby Open
y HAL WOOD
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif., Jan.
12 (UP) Burly HI Casper
wrapped up the pro division of
the $50,000 ing Crosby National
Pro Amateur Golf Tournament
today as he looked third round
co-leader Bobby Rosburg in the
eye in a head-and-head duel and
whipped him by 10 strokes.
With many of, the golfers still
on the course, Casper posted a 72 72-hole
hole 72-hole total of 277 strokes and there
wasn't a man who had a chance
to catch him.
First prize was worth $4,000 and
brought his official PGA earnings
for the young 1958 season to $6,200
for two weeks sof golf play.
While the star packed field
trailer along, all the dramatics
were packed into one foursome

today, featuring Rosburg and Cas Casper
per Casper and their amateur partners.
The two had finished the first
54 holes with equal 206 totals. This
was supposed to be a fight to the
finish. But it didn't last long.
The chunky, 26-year-old heler

from Apple Valley, Calif., took a
one-stroke lead on the first hole
and by the end of nine h ewas
in front by five strokes with a

two-under-par 34 agamst an nor
rendous 39 by Rosburg.

Then Rosburg made things
worse by taking a three-over-par
seven on the 10th a Casper went

eight up.
The coud de grace was applied

on the. lUth. This is a 380-yard

dog-leg hole, par four. With the

wind behind him, tasper nit a
tremendous 250 yard tee shot.

Then he toor: out a nine iron, nn

it high in the air. It came to rest

nne foot from tne cup. took jne

bounce and plopped into ttte cup

for an eagle-two.

That closed out the show. Ros Rosburg
burg Rosburg fcad a par-four there and
was now 10 strokes behind. From

there in, Casper coasted.
CasDer had nines of 34-37 for a

71; Rosburg went 39-4281.

Gabe Paul's Inability To Get
Pitching Help For Cincinnati
Rao Against Him as Top Dealer

King Races To Easy Victory
In $1,000 Jim Towey 'Cap

RES

IK

CLASSIC LEAGUE
Teams
El Panama Hilton
Syemour Agency

Carta Vieja

Cardoze Lindo

Agewood

Austin

30
30

30

32
37
38
49

team of Austin, who won with low

707.

By STEVE SNiDER
IEW YORK, Jan. 13 (UP) -The
rap against Gabe Paul as a
demon baseball dealer is he
couldn't help Cincinnati's pitching
no matter where he looked.
But for '58, the popular front of-

ing pitchers Bob Rush and Don
Kaiser from the Cubs in a deal
that raised a howl within the Na National
tional National League.
Paul, however, grabbed we
most tor his weakest spot his
pitching staff. His only important
"giveaway" was outfielder Wally
Post.
May Be Wron9
It could develop that Gabe
guessed wrong on first baseman
Ted Kluszewski, the ailing slugger
he sent to Pittsburgh for Dee Fon Fon-dy.
dy. Fon-dy. If Big Klu recovers, he'd be
an important loss but at least
Fondy is a known quantity phy phy-sically.
sically. phy-sically. Four of Cincy's new pitchers
have been through the mill and
three are considered the kind of
young material we.l worth waiting
lot.
Paul landed Harvey Haddix
frnm ths Phillies for Post. Bob

Purkey from the Pirates for young
Don Gross, sifined veteran Bid

wieht o Baltimore as a free

aeent. grabbed Willard Schmidt

fice boss of the Redlegs has come I from the Cardinals along with two
up with seven new flingers for youngsters. One other, Jerry
his firing Une in the neatest coup Cade, he pulled in the minor

n leaeue draft.

High Averages Balctr 197,
Coffev 194. Cascio 192 Toland 190,

Richardson. Lane, Danuan 187.

Keep Saturday and Sunday mint

Open for the Mld Doublet.
El Panama Hilton 2 Evinrude 2
These two teams put on a dis dismay
may dismay of bowling worthy of any

league. In the first Cardoze Lindo
Evinrude Motors averaged 208 and
compiled 832 pinfall and took

measure of the league leaders

With their first place in danger,

the Hotel Keglers cam back

strong in the middle game and

won by 26 pins. Again in the third

game the Hotel Had to powi Better

than 200 wo win by nine pms.

They never did catch up with

Evinrude in the total pin fall, so

they settled for an even split. Bill

Coffey after that 417 series Thurs

day night came back Friday night

with 638. How 'bout that. McNair

McLane assisted Bill with 619. Ev

inrudes power was divided, only
44 difference between the four

men, with Ed Kunkel having the

highest 614.
Evinrudo

Soyster 200 184 186 570

Lowande 223 168 194 585
Kunkel 185 203 226 614

Toland 832 736 793 2361

El Panama Hilton

Lane 216 171 232 619

Schmidt 159 192 167 518

Allen 208 162 185 555

Coffey 183 237 218 638

Contact Don Rudy, Tournament
Manager, Per This
Week End Deublos
Seymour Agency 1 Agnwood 2

For Seymour this was a must

series that is win or drop out of

first place. For Agewood, Friday
night that boys did not get the
breaks. They reported that they

were hitting bu no geting them

Seymour Agency did have, first

place all by themselves for about

45 mmutes, when they won the

first game while the Hotel drop

ped theirs. But Seymour slipped

so badly in the second game, that

they lost total pin fall. They made
a recovery in the last game by

nozing out Agewood by 12 pins.

Thet wo lead off men Bob Rich
ardson for Seymour and Bud Bal

cer for Agewood put on their own

private bout. Bob landed 630 and

lost to itsua wno rouea m.
The Mixed Doubkt Should bo a
Must for Every ABC
And WIBC Member

Carta Vieja

Gleichman
Rudy

Brown
Almeda
Austin
Best

Pahl

Blind

Samanrego

of a busy trading session in whic

11 ol the 16 major league clubs
already have helped themselves.
Even the world champ Milwau Milwaukee
kee Milwaukee Braves were active, acquir-

Walker, Swenson Win
King's Ransom Tourney

Robert Walker of Balboa won
the first flight championship of the
195T-1958 A. G. Reynolds "House of
Lords-King's Ransom" Golf Tour Tournament
nament Tournament yesterday when he defeat defeated
ed defeated Carlos Arosemena over the 36 36-hoh?
hoh? 36-hoh? route by a" score of 5 and 4.

In, the first 18 holes played Sat-
. ... it a : i 1

Uruay, wawer wounu uu si, uujcs
ahead of Arosemena. In the con continuation
tinuation continuation of the play yesterday,

ArOiemena managed to salvage

one: hole but the match ended on
the '14th which they halved, leav leaving
ing leaving Walker the winner 5 and 4.

Walker at no time during the 36
holes was in trouble, shooting
steady, consistent golf all the way

around. Arosemena conversely was
unable to maintain his accuracy

of the previous weeks, especially
around the greens. Bob Walker
thus becomes the champion of the
tournament, won last year by Jim

Ridge, also last year s Panama
Golf Club president.

Wants Good Pitching

Chuck Comiskey of the White
Sox made the most spectacular
trades of the hot stove season, un unloading
loading unloading Larry Doby, Jack Harsh Harsh-man
man Harsh-man and Minnie Minoso in pur pursuit
suit pursuit of more good pitching.
From Cleveland, Chuck landed
Early Wynn and outfielder Al
Smith for Minoso and infielder
Fred Hatfield. From Baltimore,
he obtained pitcher Ray Moore,
utility infielder Billy Goodman
and outfielder Tito Francona for
Doby and Harshman.
Chuck is happy. So are Frank
Lane of the Indians and Paul
Richards of the Orioles. Lane
wanted Minoso to "light a fire un

der the Indiana." Richards got

202 213 173
198-180 199
162 142
193 212 173

588
577
450
578

755 751 687 2193

142
185

216
167

182 540

163 515

450

199 .212 595

732 707 2100

You do Have a Chance Regardless

of Average tho Mixed Doubles is

A Handicap Affair.
DIABLO WOMEN'S LEAGUE

Maxims

iBalboa Beer

Glidden

Ancon Bar

Pfaff

Mountain Dew
Copa

29
29
27
27
22
22
13

18

18

202

21

25

26
32

Editor: CONRAOO SARGEANT

Maxims 0 Pfaff 3

Seymour
Richardson 252 169 209 630
Bowers 190181 143 514
Nunes 166 161 160. 487
Cascio 179 181 221 581
787 692 733 2212
Agewood
Balcer 186 224 224 634
Boyer 171 209169 549
Knoll 159 169 158 505
Damian 201 179 170 550
736 781 721 2238

in tne men's flight, a surprise

winner was Bill Swenson who took
over Domilar Enriaue de la Ossa

by a score of 5 and 3. In the first needed power in Doby and pitch

18 holes played. Saturday, Enrique ing in Harsnman.

and Rill n aved oven fnr the Neeaea anortsrop

match, but vesterdav's rainfall i Detroit needed a shortstop and

sppmpri tn hamrwr d la naV a reliever, so the Tigers snared

play. Swenson played with a bull-1 BUy M""1 nd Tom Morgan as
dog tenacity and eventually took' key men in a H-player swap with
the match. Coming around the, th hcs. .A 8 hev
.ct v.i. c..,.. ,u aided their outfield and catching.

CmanpAn 1a1 O im Aim. .1a In A... I TIM BraVeS, HI tlte CyCS Of

nr. o. .. t, some, executed a steal in get

hrT m."T-fliMrU ting Rush, Kaiser and outfielder
2-!2f? Jfi lJPi K4fiUa- 1-faaa from the Cubs for

u.eii irujwy awarus ne aunnay: pitcher Taylor phmips and catch.
evening at the presentation-party t.vW tv... pk.

presented the King's Ransom-, ured Rush couidn-'t win for em

nouae 01 uons locai represenia-j and sa,d they had no other offer

uvea, 0-1:1. otuur aim nuc oaiigei.'-- him

Roberto Torres, who won a 3

way playoff over Bill LeBrun and
Dr. Massot for the medalist award
in the first flight, and Roberto Ale Ale-man,
man, Ale-man, the medalist in the second
flight, will receive their medal a a-wards
wards a-wards at the same time.

The rnillies, who needed power.

are happy with Post who likes to

hit in the Philadelphia ball yard.
They also added outfielder Dave
Philey.' Pittsburgh, desperate for
power, was willing to gamble on

Kluszewski.

imVthoalrA't

-MM

C A P I T O L 10
35c 20c.
THE LIVING IDOL
; ; in Cinemascope
!!' Also: -HOT
SUMMER
Nrc-wT
with Lesiie Nielsen

v Of I

35c.

20c.

THE BIG LAND
with Aan Ladd
- Also:
TFE D. I.
witjj Jack Webb

RIO

35c.

20c.

Spanish Pictures!

La mujer de 2 Caras
with Elsa Aguirre
ftritenme Piedraa del
Campo Special Short
Hombres de Acero

VICTORIA
Uc 15c.
Spanish Program!
TARDE de TOROS
Teatro Del Crimen
with Silvia Pinal
ADIOS A PEDRO
(Special Short)

Carta Vi.ja 3 Austin 1
The Carta Vieja Rum Runners

had it easy in the opener, they

were presed a little m the sec second
ond second but still came out ahead by 19
pins. But they slipped in the third
to lose, by 20 pins to the cellar

SERVICE
CENTERS
TODAY

BALBOA 6:15 8:45
Tyrone Power
Ave Gardner
"THE SUN ALSO
RISES"

BALLET TICKETS
ON SALE
Daily 5:3ft to 9 p.m.

CRISTOBAL 7:0ft
Pat Boone
"APRIL LOVE"

DIABLO 7:00
Fred MacMumy
Dorouiy' Malone
"QUANTEZ"

MARGARITA 6:15, 7:55
"THE VANISHING
AMERICAN"

PARAISO
: 8:95
"WICKED AS
THEY COME"

SANTA CRUZ
6:15 9:05
"Hit and Run"
"Beachcomber"
7:40 only

Maxim's Maidens are trying to

figure out what happened.

Was it because their mascot,

Jack Voss, was in the States, the

absence of their two regulars

Cocktail Cuties, the holiday lay
off, or just the fact that their op
ponents were justt oo good? What

ever the reason they lost all three

points by substantial margins.

Three of the winning Pfaff Sewing

Circle were hot; Dot Hay man 519,
Marge Rodgers rocked a 525, and
Ruth Nunes knocked 511. For the

Maxim's nary a damsel did any

thing outstanding.
Gat your man for tho tourna

ment, fjlrlt.

Balboa Boer 2 Glidden Paints 1
Although the Balboa Beer Beau Beauties
ties Beauties were beaten in one game, they
stilled gained a tie for first place.
This was a scratch match in a

handicap league, because neither

team gave tne other any puis

With both teams taking one each

m the first two games, the last
ussle went right down he line
wih Balboa Beer breaking through
by one pin. For Glidden Paints,
three ladies glistened with thier

500' series. Grace Moskoovitz, 528,
Anita Serna 505 and Kitty Van
Ernst 542. Balboa toasted two
gals, iBernice Roberts for her 564
and B. J. Nielson with 576.
You guys and dolls got to Dia Diablo
blo Diablo Saturday and Sunday night we
rued you In tho mixod doubles.
Ancon Bar Grille 2 Copa 1
Here was a whiz bang match,
.with seven of the ten damsels go going
ing going over the 500 mark. The An Ancon
con Ancon Barmaids broke the ice with
a neat helping of 901 m the fist,
and came in for second helping
with 868 and 11 pin advantage,
but then Copa flew in with a 67
pin victory. The 4 Barmaids that
who broke through 500, were Mar

ty Wrzesniewski 510, Polly Blaney
531, Betty Coleman 523 and Vi Ru Rudy
dy Rudy 532. Liz Buston was 18 pins shy
of the mark. Copa's coppers were

Betty Brown 564, Lee Bashman

543 and etty Hennon 530.
Baxter's 2 Mountain Dow 1

Baxter's made their New Year's

resolutions come true by staying

on the winning road, knocking off

Mountain Dew 2 to 1. Mountain

Dew did it in the first game by

over a hundred pins. This irritat

ed the Transportes Baxters, and

they made their move by taking

the next two games. Tex Wray 544

and Helen Mingins 531 were the
top transporters of pins and the
Dews that dood it were Joanne
Doyle 529 and V. Nessler 503.

Isaac Gustines' inconsistent King

found conditions to liking -yester

day and raced to a relatively easy
five-length victory in the $1,000

Jim Towey Handicap at the Pres President
ident President Remon racetrack. The event
honored the memory of one of the

pioneers of local horseracing.

lung, wmch raced in the Gus

tines' trained entrv alone with sta

blemate Mar Bravo, went off the
even money mutuels favorite to

win in the fifth series seven fur

long sprint. He returned $4.20 and

$3.00 and combined with second

choice Ornamental Star for a $12

one-iwo payon. tang turned tne

distance in 1:27 2-5.

Jockey Ruben Vasauez cot Kine

off to a good start then rated him

in hand close to the suicidal pace

oeing cut out by Picudo, Mikel,

Empire Cross and Ornamental

Star. King easily took command
when given his head and then

breezed to the wire while Orna

mental Star was doing his best
at die' finish to save the place by

a nau-iengtn irom Empire Cross'
closing effort. Mikel wound up
fourth, Mar Bravo fifth and Picu Picudo
do Picudo a distant last.

Formful racing dominated the

card except in the sixth race when
newcomer English Wonder made
her first start a victorious one and
heralded trainer Alberto Pereira's

return to the races oh a success successful
ful successful note. English Wonder paid
$18.60 to win and $11.20 place the
day's best dividends. She also con contributed
tributed contributed the major portion of a
$107 winning double combination
with seventh race winner Cervece-

ro.

Vasquez also scored with Mel-

rose in the first race to share sad saddle
dle saddle honors with Braulio Braeza,
Alejandro Ycaza and Amado Cre-

aidio, au of whom won twice.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1- Molroio $3.60, $2.40
2 Grimilda $3.M
SECOND RACE
1 Introduction $3.40
(No place betting).
Double: $6.20 (MelroseLittle
Fool) $4.80.
THIRD RACE
1- Mr. Jack $3.40, $2.80
2 Folletifo $4.0
One-Two: $23.60
FOURTH RACE

1 Golden Moon $6.00, $3.20
2 Don Manuel $11.80

Quiniola: $73.60

PANAMA PROFESSIONAL LEAGUE

Teams cv cr ct w i d

- WW W WW Bv S WM
Carta Vieja x 4 7 11 8 .879
Cerveza Balboa S x 5 10 9 .526
Chesterfield ......... 3 5 x 8 12 .400

CB

Lost

8 9 12 29 29

TOMORROW'S GAMES (2)
Cerveza Balboa vs. Carta Vieja
Game time 6 o'clock.
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Chesterfield vs. Cerveza Balboa
at Colon: Postponed, wet grounds.

Chesterfield, Cavaliers

Play At Clayton Tonight

0

The Chesterfield Smokers, currently in last place
in the three-team Panama Pro League, will meet the
Fort Clayton Cavalier tonight at 7 In an exhibition
gam at Jarman Field, Ft. Claten.
The public is invited. Thete will be no admission
charge for the game.

The Smokers were to have nlay-

ed the Cerveza Balboa Beermen
at Colon Stadium yesterday morn

ing but the game was postponed

because of wet grounds. League
president Raul Arango today was
expected to reschedule the contest
for Saturday, Jan. 25 at 3 p.m. at
the Colon park.

Today is open date in the Pro

Loop. The Beermen tangle with

the Carta Vieia Yankees in a dou-

bleheader tomorrow night and the
next scheduled game for the
Smokers is Wednesday night when
they meet the Yankees.

Heavy rams which fell in Colon

from 3 a.m. yesterday had the

field in poor, playing condition.

tfeerman manager Leon Kell-

man and Smoker pilot Stanford
Graham inspected the field at

CAMP BIERD 6:15 7:55
Maureen OUara Jeff Chandler
"WAR ARROW-

FIFTH RACE
1 Louvre $3.80. $2.40

2 Hostlgador $2.60

SIXTH RACE
1 English Wonder $T8.60, $11.20
2- Califato $7.40
SEVENTH RACE
1- Cerveeero $8.60, $5.20
2 Camberwell $9.60
Double: $107
EIGHTH RACE
1- rrliolito $8.20, $3.60
2 Naranjazo $5.40
Quiniela: $14.20
NINTH RACE
1 King $4.20, $3
2 Ornamental Star $2.60
One-Two: $12

TODAY.ENaNTO-.35-,20

Jeff Chandler
Kim Novak in
"JEANNE EAGLES"
Glenn Ford in
"3:10 TO YUMA"

TODAY IDEAL .25 .15
Robert Mltchum in
"ANGEL PACE"
Rosalind Russell in
"Never Wave At A WAC"

"A REAL COMEDY GEM"
NOW PLAYING
PRESIDENTE
THEATRE

You'll Laugh Your Heads Off!

j 4MCANIW1tOM M VI
I WltlNTI

(MflANrlAtWM

I WltlNTI

UEC 6UINNESS

KIIIMIUI
rcuem m 1
Kill MUM

MINIMI

tv

DRIVE-IN
TfinAV !? H

ovc. yarn h:uo
e LAST DAY! e

DIRTY AND DEADLY!

...that's the way they play
ft in Europe's sin-and-

murder market!

9:15 and agreed that the contest
should be called off.
The postponement was a big dis disappointment
appointment disappointment to Colon fans who
were to see the teams play each
other on the Atlantic Side for the
first time this season.
The Yankees defeated the
Smokers 5-4 in 11 innings, and the
Beermen stopped the Yankees, al also
so also 5-4, in ten frames in the two
games played in Colon since the
current campaign got underway
last Dec. 1. 7
Gold Coasters will get a game
they didn't bargain for next Sun Sun-day.
day. Sun-day. The contest which was ori originally
ginally originally set for David will be played
in Colon instead.
Tffesterday's postponement was
the first for this season.

CARIBBEAN COMMAND LITTLE

LEAGUE OPENER
i
Caribbean Command one ned

their home game schedule with a
4-3 win over West Bank at Russell

Field Thursday.

The pre-game ceremonies were

high-lighted by the presence of
Brig. Gen. L. V. Hightower, Chief
of Staff, Caribbean Command;
Capt. A. R. St. Angelo, Chief of
Staff, 15th Naval District; Col. J,

K. Kuss, Chief of Staff. U.S. Armv

Caribbean.

The dignitaries were introduced

by the CC manager, H. W. "Wood "Wood-ie"
ie" "Wood-ie" Post, after which each spoke a
feww ords of encouragement to the
boys. Both teams lined ud at

home plate and recited the Little
League Pledge after which Capt.

LEADING
HITTERS

(50 or more times at bat)
Player-Team ab h hr rbi Pet.

H. Lopez, CB 57

Schmidt, CV 70
Bartlrome, CV 63
Brathwaite, CB 68
DeGroote, CB 69
F. Robinson, CB 62
Kellman, CB 54

67
70

St. Angelo threw the first ball and
the ga,me was underway.
Ronny Humway, the CC south southpaw,
paw, southpaw, pitched a fine game and kept
West Bank off balance, for 5 2-3 in innings,
nings, innings, with a smooth tantalizing
delivery. An error and a walk in
the sixth put two men on but Billy
Russ came on to put out the fire.
Humway allowed only two hits,
walked five and struck out three.
The CC defense weakened sever several
al several times but on the whole played
heads-up ball highlighted by three
running catches by Richardson at
second; Russ at SS; and Ted Sex Sexton
ton Sexton on third. Rusty Sexton led CC
at the bat with a perfect day, one
at bat, one hit, one run.
Bibbo led the West Bank of offense
fense offense gathering one of the two WB
hits in two times at bat and scored
one run. Linfors of West Bank, one
of the smallest players in the
league, sparkled defensively at
second and aided the offense by
scoring a run.
The 15th Naval District has giv

en Russell Field a face lifting this
year complete with outfield and

foul-line- fences.

Boak. CV

Shields, CB
Mitchell, C

Wiihelm, CV

22
21
21
20
18
15
17
17
16
16

10
11
5
6
11
7
7
9
r
5

.343
.333
.309
.290
.290
.278
.254
.243
.235
.235

LEADING
PITCHERS
(30 or more innings 'pitched)

Pitcher-Team
Davie, CV

Brown, CB

Aylmere, CV
Benedict, CB
Robinson, C
DePalo, C
O'Reilly, C
Umbricht, CV

ip
63
41
31
48
50
30
31
39

to Pet.
23 .750

31
4
31
38
17
12
25

.667

.6671

.600
.429

.W

.333
.333

The box score:
Caribbean Command

Richardson 2b ... ..

Russ ss .

Emerson If

Moore, T. rf . .

Sexton, R. lb .. ..

Schoomaker, P. c ..
Emmett cf

Sexton, T. 3b .

AB R H I

Humway p .. l

Totals

15 4 2 5

West Bank

Linfors 2b ........ 3 1 0 0
Bridges lb-c 3 0 1 1
Lima lb .. .. .. .. .. 3 0 0 0
Calleja c .......... 1 0 0 1
McGriff ss . . . ,, 2 0 0 0
Bittle If 2 10 0
Bibbo 3b-p 2 111

tirow n .....1000
Malene cf .- .. 1 0 0 0
Beckermeyer p ...... 0 0 0 0
Bunguss p 0 0 0 0

Totals

18 3 2 3

IT MAY BE YOUR LIVER

If life's not worth living

it may be your liver!

go out of life. That's when yon
need mild gentle Carter's Little

Liver Piua. Those famous vom

it's a fact It takes ufi to two Dints table pills help stimulate tho flow

of liver bile a day to keep your of liver bile. Seen your

Hirefivafraf;ntnnihiralTfvniir fltarts fUnCtlOnHlE DrODerlV aiM

liver bileianot flowing&ly your you foal that teppy day. are hero
food may not digest . gas Moata again Don't ewer Stay sunt:,
up your stomach . you feel con- Mwayt keep Carter' a Little Liver
atipatedandaUthefunandaparkle Pills on hand. Ask your druggist

I 'JJJJJJSj'liSl 1 ajf



TUB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE 8 EVE
Interscholastic Baseball Loop Opener Reset For Tomorrow

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1958

by
JOE WILLIAMS

the day s mail included a tra travel
vel travel loMer. The West Indus
beckoned. A sun kissed Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean holiday far from the wintry
htts. fiav. exotic, romantic, a
fciioir.tor'c mtrh set to a calypsOi

jjggj mbarrassment on an innocent
Naturally out thiughis prompt-, player. Through the years the US US-ly
ly US-ly turned to Jackie Pung, the 240- jGA consistently has run the best
nound 5 feet 3 htfhes. Hawaiianl shop in sports. Integrity, sports sports-house
house sports-house 'wif mother of three. whomanship and lair play have al al-won
won al-won the V. S. Women's Open i ways been its. guiding stars,
golf championship at Winged Foot I But this is plainly a bad rule,
last June .. and moments later had! a dangerous one even, and so,
it taken away because of a scor-igay, exotic .and romantie, our
m ttchnicalfty. i thoughts still on Jackie Punf, we
You may recall the circumst-l called on the USGA executive dt dt-ances
ances dt-ances Her total score was correct, j rector yesterday to see what, if
but on one hole there was a dis-iany, remedial steps were con con-crecancy,
crecancy, con-crecancy, a 5 instead of a six. templated.
Despite the fret that in the final "Personally, I Wee to rule
comDUtatiou she charged herself; is much too severe, nodded Dey.
with the 6. she was disqualified. "And I believe our executive jora-

..,rHlo tn th ru es, tne 01-
ntvutwuts
tin, hA nn alternative. ine
uni cvniiritlv states that the pe
n.itv for attesting' an incorrect
score is the automatic heave-ho.
Extenuating circumstances arent
recognized.
v mtv recall, too. the sponta
neous outburst of indignation the
action set off. This was carrying
rule-book tyranny too xar. m.
Two Ton had counted all her
atrojes and that was -the import important
ant important thing... to only thing. To de deprive
prive deprive her of a championship, fair fairly
ly fairly and honestly won, because of
a mental lapse which had no
bearing whatsoever on the actual
play was rank injustice.
"But it says here in the book,
rule 38, section 3"... protested
Joseph C. Dey Jr., executive di director
rector director of the USGA, who was in
charge. "It says..."
Nobody was in a mood to pay
any attention to the beleaguered
gentleman or his infallible1 book.
An outrage had been perpetrated.
A pleasant, wholesome woman vi visitor
sitor visitor had been humiliated. And
besides it had cast her $1800 first first-prize
prize first-prize money.
Need Britain's OK.
Generally these angry flare-ups
ejuidty dissolve into innocuous
mutterinjs and that's the end of
them. But in this instance they
Were to take a realistic turn. iraie
v.. (nV nn a ml pp-
o1i (ever;p6rts writers covering
the event contributed) and it yield-
S the distressed victim 13,500. A
-prestige loser, she nertheless was I

Bern Says He Shouldn't Be
Paid For What He Didn't Do

f By OSCAR FRALIY
Kir.w YORK (UP) Yogi Berra
always has been a man who want wanted
ed wanted to get paid for what he did,
so today he admitted he shouldn't
to naid for something he
didn't do.
That was to olay ball in to
Berra manner to which the New
York Yankees have become accus
tnmeH
"So I took a alight cut," Yogi
grinned, "and signed my con con-tract."
tract." con-tract." But Lawrence Peter Berra fig figures
ures figures on getting it back come this
time next year. Which means that
Yogi is looking forward to a good
year and that in 1959 he will be
holding out as usual "for what I'm
worth"'
Yogi, often held up to public
view as a dim wit, is far and
away front any 6uch designation
actually. He is an astute business
man with 'a piece of a soft drink
concern and, with Phil Eizzuto.
the owner of a soon to be opened
40-lane bowling alley in Clif Clifton,
ton, Clifton, N.J.
It's Anyone's Guest
There is a great deal of specu speculation
lation speculation as to what Yogi receives
from the Yankees in the way of
backstop remuneration. Guesses,
and they are strictly that, range
from $55,000 to $60,000 a year. The
cut is speculated to be anywhere
from $3,000 to $5,000. So you can
choose your own figure.
"Just let it be said," says the
grinning Yogi, "that I ain't .starv .starving."
ing." .starving." But the grin fades when he looks
.back on 1957, his poorest season
in 11 as a Yankee and the cause
for the first salary cut he ever
has sustained in baseball. There
were reasons. He had a sprained
thumb and his eyes troubled him
or a while. Then, in June at
Cleveland, a foul tip off the bat of
Larry Raines smashed his mask
and broke his nose.
Throws Goggles Away
"I had a checkup at the Mayo
Ciinic and they said there wasn't
anything wrong with my eyes,"
he explained. "As for the nose,
they advised against an operation.
They said t6 wait and see how I
breathe in spring training, but
that it should be okay. As for that
glasses, I threw them away. I
dont need 'em."
Yogi, who "sometimes gets
down to 85 playing golf," will
leave for spring training Feb. 5
so he can play in the Ballplayers'
Gpjf Tournament. But he's look
ing pa's! that to th regular sea-!
son.
"We got a good chance of win-
inn ; lie said slyly, with that gar
eoylf grin. "But everybody should
be tougher '-t including us. What

a substantial winner on the dol dollar
lar dollar side.
No rule, no matter what its
purpose... and the purpose of this
one is to prevent cheating... if

desireable if it can impose public
nimee ieeis imewise. i wouiu maw
the penalty one or two strokes
where carelessness is the only of
fense. Where deliberate falsifica falsification
tion falsification is established there must, of
course, be disqualification.
It develops, however, that the
executive committee, which will
meet later this month in Chicago,
is powerless to act on his own
No rule changes can bs made with
out the concurrence of Great Brit
ain'a goH leaders, and the next
ioint session won't be held until
'59
Tough One to Call
In '51 the United States and
Great Britain established what
is known as the "world code of
golf." It was agreed that in the
interest of uniformity the 2 coun
tries henceforth would work to
gether in all matters concerning
rules.
"Meantime," said Dey, "we'll
try to minimize the emotional con conditions
ditions conditions which tend to confuse and
distract the players after they've
holed ou. If we can get tnem to
reoort directly to the scorer's tent,
that may help."
Dey admls tne msquaimcauon
of Mrs. Pung was the unhap-
niest decision he ever had to
make... "It was so obviously an
honest mistake, the kind anyone
might easily make in a moment
of happy confusion, l stui teei usi
tprrrh c about it.
We handed Dey the travel fold
er. A sun kissed Caribbean holi
day might hrmg peace to his trou
bled soul.
I want, like all the rest of the
Yankees, is to get those Milwau Milwau-kees
kees Milwau-kees back into the World Series.
Yogi leaves no doubt in any anybody's
body's anybody's mind that the Yankees will
take a lot of beating. And that
he's going to help them stay on
top.
After all he wants tot cut back
with interest.
C7 Trackmen
Loosening Up
Sore Muscles
With to coming of the trade
winds and bright sunny days, the
spiked-shoe brigade of the Canal
Zone comes out of hiding and
starts to loosen up the old mus muscles
cles muscles and to get the feel of the
track and the runways for anoth another
er another season.
Although the Canal Zone Inter Interscholastic
scholastic Interscholastic League members won't
officially start practice until next
week, it is possible to see the'
boys getting m some early licks
most any afternoon.
Albrook Air Force Base has al already
ready already started and from all indi indications
cations indications coach Al Guidet will be
out to build another team capable
of defending the Balboa Relays
title they have won for to nasi
kWo years.
Some members of the Atletic
Club team have been around get getting
ting getting the feel of things while veter veteran
an veteran weight man Charlie Morris
Of the J.C. is condluding his
weight trajnint program in ami ami-cipation
cipation ami-cipation of the forthcoming track
season.
Climaxing the season for all
locol track and field athletes will
be the highly regarded Balboa
Relays. Each year the Relays' ma ma-nagenu
nagenu ma-nagenu .t has made an effort to
improve to meet and to present
the athletes and the public a real really
ly really first class evening of sports.
In line with this policy the direc directors
tors directors of the meet have announced
that this year there will be sever several
al several events added to the program
and the Realys will be donducted
over a two-day period. There will
oe a total of 24 events. Thriteen of
these will be in the Open diyison.
eight of them in the Junior Hitrh
Division, and three of them in the
keimeittary School division.
The Relays will bs hela on March
21 and 22 at Balboa Stadium and
if, every thir.g works out this year
mieht nee the finest meet in th
nine year history of the event.

Bulldogs Meet

junior College
At Balboa Field
After being rained out in the
first effort to kick off to 1958
Interscholastic baseball season.
tie Balboa Bulldogs wilt take
another stab at it tomorrow nicht.
this time at Balboa Stadium and j
witn tne J. t. ureen Devils as
opponents.
This will be the opning game
for both teams and so little is
known about either of the ball!
clubs that establishing a favorite
is somewhat risky.
The Bulldogsn wil field a team
might have only two members
from last year's championship nine
on the field. Charlie French seems
to have nailed down the center
field position, and Don Rfter has
moved in from the outfield to take
After these two lads comes all
new faces.
Gary Ness of football fame, will
open at the initial sack in snite
of a bad foot that has hobbled
him all season. Johnny Morris will
take over at second in place of
to graduated Owen Sutherland,
while Lane Thompson and Ralph
Parker are fighting it out right
down to the wire, for the call at
the hot cornor.
Aside from French in to out outfield
field outfield coach Larry Horine has been
hard put to come up wich a
set group. He has tried several
boys and when asked who would
start he said he probably would wouldn't
n't wouldn't know until game time Tuesday.
George Barbier, Lem Kirkland.
Carlos Kiamco, Ralph Blevins,
Dick Scott and Charlie Chase are
all possibilities.
If Chase isn't in the outfield, ft
will be either he or Bruce Bate-
man behind the plate. Both boys
have come along fast in the last
week .with Chase having to edge
witn tne willow.
At the all important pitching
position Horine can call on any
one of three boys and expect to
get a good performance. tern
Kirkland, who played in the out outfield
field outfield and caught last year, has
looked good on the hill, but he
will have to be sharp to take to
starting assignment away from
Morgan Schock or Fred Harley
Schock, who throws mostly fast
stuff, has looked better with each
practice session but Harley earn
ed his letter last year toiling for
the Bulldogs on the mound. He
has been slow coming around this
year, but now appears to be about
ready.
Stu Brown, J. C. mentor, does-
n t claim to have to bench to
high school does, but he admits to
having a good ball club with e
nough experience to give ti eon
siderable poise and stability.
In Joe Cicero he has the most
experienced player in the league,
for this will be "Little Joe's" sixth
season, having played four with
BHS. Cicero can play most any
position, meludng both pitching
and catching, but he is at his
best in center field.
Jack Hammond is another i boy
who knows his way around the
.baseball diamond. He will un
doutedly do some of the pitching
for J.C and when he sm't hurling
he will be in to infield some someplace.
place. someplace. Ronnie Mead has looked
good on the rubber for the Devils
and it is quite possible he will
get the startmg call Tuesday night
Game time is 7 p.m. at the
Balboa Stadium, and barring the
same conditions that rained out
the scheduled opener at Mt. Hope
last Friday, it will be "play ball"
for the 1958 Interscholastic pan pan-nant
nant pan-nant chase.
Jesus Santamaria
In Lopsided Win
Over Gonzales
Panama's interim featherweight
champion Jesus Santamaria, 126,
last night scored a lopsided, unan unanimous
imous unanimous ten-round decision over Cu Cuba's
ba's Cuba's Huesito Gonzales, 125, be before
fore before a good crowd at the Olympic
Stadium.
Santamaria, who is now unbeat unbeaten
en unbeaten in 12 pro fights, showed mark marked
ed marked superiority over the visitor but
was unable to set him up for a
kayo because of Gonzales' holding
tactics.
In the eight-round semifinal, Lo Lorenzo
renzo Lorenzo Samuels, lll'a, chalked up
his second consecutive victory as
a pro when he easily defeated fly flyweight
weight flyweight champion Baby Quiros,
109y2, by a unanimous verdict.
Quiros, who had not fought
for

seven years, demonstrated game- theory is what should be remem-ness-
in refusing to go down de-.bered. If you make it harder for
spite the battering he took through- teams to shoot, they'll hold the
out the onesided affair. j ball longer.
Escobito Rivas, 124, TKO'eH Jo
se Felix Gondola, 126, in 1:58 of

the third heat of a scheduled four-.
rounder in one preliminary, and
in ihe Aitvrain rqtear Tnca Ta h I
ill v,vi mui a ntaci woe t CUA

1191 ""'! !: i"00: ?HWork nfi tliif l)a v

Cisco iuu, xib, in anomer iout-
rounder.
Sports Car Club
Meets Tomorrow
The Isthmian Sport Car Club
will hold a general meeting and
lection ef officers tomorrow
night at 7:30 at Hotal El Panama
Hilton. All members are re requested
quested requested to attend.

i'W?Q9KK SSw ..BtVwlSsBwSSSBStHSsBSBSBsl BsmZmSEtESinBBBBttHEIB&wUtl
11 M m im all --jf jT IP e

STANDING TALL Players remove their caps-at the opening PAAF baseball game at Port Kobbe's Rencher Field as the
National Anthem is played. Members of the teams were introduced individually. Men from Fort Kobbe are on the left and
those from Fort Clayton are assembled on the right. Down the base-line is a series of flags representing several Latin Amer American
ican American countries. The Kobbe Regulars lost this ppenlng thriller (Sunday 5 January) to the Clayton cavaliers in a 10 inning
struggle, 7-2.

Why Not Keep Scoring In

f, DUTCH DEHNF.VT
As Told to Jimmy Brtslin
NEW YORK (NEA) If you
enjoy basketball, you've got to
get a kick i'Jt of watching the Bos Boston
ton Boston Celtics move the ball. They
come down quickly, nobody hold holding
ing holding onto to ball.
Then somebody will screen ior
Bill Sharman. Or Boh Cousy will
drive and twist through for a lay lay-up.
up. lay-up. Or Tommy Heinsohn will let
one go from the side. And Bill
Russell is around to stuff m a re
bound. 1
But tore is a basic flaw. You
don't see enough of it. If one team
gets, say 50 baskets and the other
scores 47, that means action stops
and the ball is put in play from
out-of-bounds 97 times.
The way they shoot in the pro professional
fessional professional league today the Cel Celtics
tics Celtics particularly 50 baskets is
nothing extraordinary.
BOB COMSY
The rules hould be engaged to
do something about it. The old
cry is, of course, do something
about the big man. But actually
a player like Boh Pettit of St.
Louis can't be considered a big
man. Sure he's 6-9. But he can
shoot from outside, either' hand.
and move as if he Were a six-
footer. No special rules against
a big man. will stop him.
The small man can be brought
into to game more by making it
harder for everybody, not just
big men. Maybe raising the basket
a foot and at the same time bring
ing it a foot more out from the
backboard would do the trick.
That's iust an idea. Prohahlv
there are better ones. IRnt the
I ffif f rilra TOatTI
LUtlVf Jlillw Iwdlll
...
" w wwi i
The Lucky Strike entry in the
Pacific Twilight Baseball Leaoua
will work out tvtry afternoon
this week from tomorrow until 11
Friday in preparation for the tl
loop opener at Balboa Stadium
The turn today was scheduled
to matt Kent Cigarettes in a
practic game at 4:30.
Manager Jack Love requests
his players to attend en time.

sssKrsssB

The way they shoot today, even
bad shots go in. But if to bad
shot became too difficult to make,
ball control would become impor important
tant important again. With it the old-fashioned
floorman would be a much
more important part of the game.
A team 'would have to work for
its points.. Sure, Cousy and Shar Sharman
man Sharman are small men. But they are

tne exceptions.
New rules have to be thought
out carefully. Because the situa situation
tion situation you're trying to correct has
had a trememdous head start. Like

the pivot play I started with the1 Finally, they put in the three three-Original
Original three-Original Celtics. It first was used second rule. It was supposed to
that night in Chattanooga, but ac- do away with pivot play But by

tually I had been fiddling with it
for a couple of years. One night
in Concordia, Ind., for example,
I rememher trying a couple cl
quick variations of it.
When we came back to New
York and sprung it against cluhs

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY CF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winoinj Numbers in the Ordinaary Drawing No. 2027, Sunday, January 12, 1 958
The whole ticket has 52 pieces divided in two series "A" & "B",of 26 pieces each

No.
0033
0133
0233
0333
0433
(S33
0(33
07.13
0833
0133
Prim
I
1SS.00
1S6 00
150.09
i5fl.no
156.00
1500
1SS0S
2.H0O.O0
150.00
158.00
Ne.
1033
1133
1233
1333
1433
1533
1633
1733
1333
1133
N6.
2013
2133
2233
2333
24S3
233
2733
2633
2S33
1M.M
156.00
156.110
156.00
156.00
156.0
156.00
2,600 00
156.00
156.00
S
529.99
529 00
1724
2725
2726
272T
520 90
(20.09

mot 1115 m 31" MW am (us mm tn 289.9 m um ,. ooo
ss as w ss as ss ss as ss las as as jjT sTlrs liTiss
' Approximations Derived From Third Prize
M" 'mM 'm an i5(.( mu 9( mi mt m.99 su mm
1 ss t ss ss sts g ss as as ss as siTiES saTIss iTgs

- ... m. -. U1U 111 1 O.IK
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending- in 3 and not included in the above list win Pifty-two Dollars (S52.W) each.
The whole ticket has 52 pieces divided in two series "A" & "B" of 26 pieces each

Signed by:

WITNESSES: Jaime Henriquez Ced. 47-50217
Edmundo R. Recuero Ced. 47-1908

WATC. Hit timiiMji McKrtt with the last cipher and with tht two last
PI V Iff. cipher mil only to (he First Prize.
rne rtrrt Prize am) tin 2nd and 3rd Prize are drawn separately Th an.
proxlmatlons are calcinated on the First. Second and Third Prize In ease'
a ticket should catrv the number of each prize, the holder I entitled to
claim navment for each

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, January 12, 1958

Drawing
First Prize .... 33
Second Prize ... 15
Third Prize .... 11

like the Broklyr Visitations,! found I would be the system fans in old
a couple of the boys Rody Cocm.Prospect Hall in Brooklyn used

ey and Joe Brennan, in particular
had their own way to handle
it
They would either put their hands
ever my eyes so I couldn't see or
tliey would take target practice
on the small of my back. In 1928
and 29, when I played with the
lOvelanad Roscnblums every
time I'd wheel I'd wind up witn witn-out
out witn-out a shirt. The guy behind mc
would hang onto my uniform that
tightly.
this time I'd iound that b you
couldn't work i a play within two
seconds it wash' any good, so the
rule didn't uglier mo.
It's something which should be
remembered any new rule has
a lot of catching up to do.
On thing I can't recommend

Pirst Prize 2733
Second Prize 2115

Third Prize 8811 $ 7,800 00

Prltef
S
156.00
156.00
156.00
15S.00
156.00
156.0P
156.00
52,000.00
156.00
156 00
Ne.
3033
3133
3233
3333
3433
3533
3633
3733
3833
3S33
Prizes
S
136.00
156.00
156.00
156 JO
156.00
156.00
156.00
2,600.00
156.00
156.00
Me.
4033
(13.1
4233
4333
443.1
4S33
4633
473.1
4833
433
Prist
S
156.00
156.00
156 00
156.0
156.0
156.00
156.0
2,90.0
156.00
159.09

Approximations Derived From First Prize

I
529.99
510.9
I
520.09
520.90
2728
2739
2731
2732
2734

Approximations Derived From Second Prize

ALBERTO ALEMAN, Governor of the Prorince of PanamaV Ced.:
The Representative of the Treasury JAIME DE LA OUARDIA Jr.

Number 728
Fraction
Ticket
$11.00 $220.00
3.00
2.00
60.00
40.00

PR1WSS ARB PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

Bounds?

to hamper scoring, particularly by
tne visiting team. It was a cramp-
tne visiting team, it was a cramp-
od place and if you sal in the
first row you had to tuck your legs
unaer tne cnair or they'd be on to
court
Trouh'es was, when the Celtics
played there some people would
forget this and always .accident .accidentally,
ally, .accidentally, they kept saying stick a
brogan out as you wefe passing
by. You could spend half a game
on the floor.
One night I wa taking the ball
Out-of-bounds, my. back to thesi
seats, when somebody politely put
his cigarette out on the back of
my leg.
It was a good way to stop the
Original Celtics. But if you want
to stop the Boston Celtics of to today
day today the best team I've ever seen
I'd suggest a shotgun.
They move too quick to get
burned by cigarettes.

$ 52,000.00
$ 15,600 00

No.
5933
5133
5233
5333
5433
553.1
5633
5733
5833
5933
Prist
s
159.90
156.90
156.90
159.99
156.99
159 99
156.99
2,609 00
156 9
1690
I
52(99
(29.9
520.00
520.99
2735
2736
29.99
29.90
2737
2738
JULIO R. VALDES D.
Notary Public. Panama
The prizes will be
the fftce.
of the ..nna Heneflcenl

Ne. Prist No. Prist
. $
6033 156.09 7033 156.99
6133 15S.N 7133 156.90
9233 159.99 7251 156.00
9S33 156.0 7333 159.
S433 1SS.09 7433 156.9
9533 156.09 7533 156.00
6633 159.99 763.1 156.00
673.1 2,699.00 7733 2,609.9
9833 15900 7S33 156 00
9933 1SS.99 17133 156 09

PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. tm which will

i.ifAfj rlACE JANUARY 18, 19M
Divided If two erle of 29 fraction each denominated "A" and

PIRST
1 Ftrat Prize. Series A .nri a .f
1 Second Prlzel Series A and B. of
1 Third Prize. Series A and B. c'
IS Approximations Series A and B.
Prizes Series A and B of
n Prizes, Series A and B. of
WO Prise. Series A and B. of

SECOND PRIZE
IS Approximations. SeriVA and B. of S 5.00 each series

m r a taction a aim r. O'
THIRD
IS Approximations, Series A and B.
Prizes. Series A and B, of
174 Prize
Price of a whole ticket
Price of a fifty-second

Kobbe Teenage
Baseball Opener

The 1958 Teenage baseball sea season
son season opened at Fort Kobbe Fri Friday,
day, Friday, with a five and a half in inning
ning inning thriller between men from
Port Kobbe "Garrett's Regu Regulars"
lars" Regulars" and Albrook' "TMiun
Flyers."
Opening the name was Kobbe
pitcher Mike Gaean who o.itnfc.
ed only four men to get on base
oeiore Koooe came to bat; AJ AJ-brook
brook AJ-brook pitcher. Livingston, the
first to the late m the game
was tagged out at third bat
showed a better record at the.
mound as he kept the game
scoreless at the close of the
first inning.
Score for the game remained
at zero until the last of the third
inning when Kobbe scored fofrr
runs. The next inning also saw
"Garrett's Regulars" gain anoth another
er another point making the score 9-0 at
the end of the inning. Kobbe's
teenagers Mack Cunningham
John Fortune. Ric stubbs. John Johnnie
nie Johnnie Walton and Billy Lemmer.
made the scoring runs.
Darkness cut the game to five
and a half innings as the Al
brook "Teenage Flyers" bowed to
a 5-1 loss.
"This win," says Kobbe coach
r 44ft... -.., W-..I l 1 H
team ffi too spirits theTsSouid
do verv well thU seaVon '
.
1 1 i a j i.i.
Mfl AnnPKflll VVlfK
' ,UI "l,uc' Wl 1113
U- l A it'
Tennis Championship
PERTH, Australia, Jan. 1?
(UP) Davis Cup star Mai Ander Anderson
son Anderson today won the n.en's singles
title of the West Australian tennis
championships by defeating Neale
Fraser 6-2, 4-8, 6-2, 6-4.
Anderson broke Fmer's service
six times to win the final sets be before
fore before nearly 2,000 spectators.
In doubles competition, Angela
Mortimer of England and Helen
Waters of Australia beat Austra Australians
lians Australians Jill Langley and Margaret
Robinson for the women's crown
6-1, 6-0.

I
Ne. trttf Ne. Priiet
S I
8033 156.99 9933 158.99
8133 159.9 9133 159 99
S233 136 00 1233 156 99
833.1 156.N 9333 IS 9
S433 159.99 9433 159.90
4533 156.99 9533 159.9
8833 156.99 063.1 156.99
S733 2,999.99 9713 2,69.99
S833 156 99 9833 159 9
8933 156.09 9933 136.00

S
.VW.09 I
320.09 I
2739
2749
529,00
520.00
2741,
2742
47-12155
PABLO A, PINEL M.
Secretary.
l-oller situated on Central enne
PRIZR
S28.OT0 00 each series
$52,000 m
t5.m(
7.8000
.30I
23.400 At
14 MAD
4M0O0a
S 2,340.00
2.340.0
S I.S72.0O
1.404.0O
of
7, son on each series
3.900 00 eaeh series
2SO.0O each series
1.300,00 each series
7R 00 eaeh series
JS.00 each series
130.00 each aerie
FMZr
of S
U(M each series
e.w eacn sane
Total
si7c.ese.ee
. $2600
part .$. ..50



PACE EIGHT

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPB1
MONDAY. JANUARY 13, 1951
CLASSIFIEDS
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740

Resorts

POmrS Cottogoe and Largo
Beach Hou.t. Out mil past the
Casino. Phone Balboa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oceantlde Cottage
Santa Clara. Bon 1M Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, R. da P. Phona Panama
3-1177. Cristobal S-WTS.
SHAPNEL'S furnished homes, an
baach. Phona Thepmion, Balboa
T772.
Houses
f FOR RENT OR POP. SALE:
Luxurious raiidene completly
I furnished, in tha Expositien
Graunda, 4 bodroomi, 2 bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, living-room, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, garage, largt kitchen, hat
water, ma id 'a room with terr terr-k.
k. terr-k. waah tuba, chothes Knot, gar gar-dan,
dan, gar-dan, la 20 by 30 matara, easy
payments. Far further Informa Information,
tion, Information, eat) Fabrega personally.
East 29th street, behind Vaaeo
market, from 10 to 12 noon ana
J to 6 p.m.
FOR RENT: Newly built chalet
living-dining room 2 bedrooms
with modern closets. Maid's room
with service, garage. 90 St. East.
San Francisco da la Caleta. Pana Panama
ma Panama R. P. Call 2-1757 Panama.
After 6:30 p.m.

Auto Steel Industries
Pessimistic About 1958

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UP) (UP)-The
The (UP)-The nation's 30 major industries
look forward "as a whole" to 1958
with "moderate optimism," the
Commerce Department reported
today. But two key groups autos
and steel don't expect it to
tie as good as 1957.
The department said the aircraft
industry also was "somewhat on
the di'ro side." But like some
others it "naturally" will be
helped by big defense spending.
However, the department satd
most industries lookt o "natural
growth to improve their position.
" t vrf hosri n, the de-
Uirtment's Business and Defense
Services Administration, issued a
report on a survey of 30 major
industrial field. The report was
a consensus of experts in each
particular field.
Industries expecting conditions
. ,.. j-j MatniKtinn
to improve inciuueu wu-
truck and trailer manufacturers,
agricultural machinery, power
Sputnik Tumbling
Head Over Heels,
Scientist Reports
inunrtH Janl 13 (UP) The
i c-,.t snutnik rotates as
JSfJLUIIU dviiuv
if it were tumbling head over
heels," a Soviet scienusi nas
the official Soviet neWs agency
Tass, Moscow Radio reported to today.
day. today. The broadcast quoted a Prof.
Tsesevich as saying the conclu conclusion
sion conclusion was drawn from observaUons
of changes in the Sputnik's bright brightness
ness brightness carjried out by the Odessa
Astronomical Observatory.
He said the satellite was alter alternatively
natively alternatively as bright as the bright brightest
est brightest star and completely invisible
to the maked eye.
The broadcast continued, "This
hac lart to thp rorwlusinn that the
satellite rotates round its tranvers tranvers-al
al tranvers-al axis, as if tumbling head over
neeis, ana us urinimir ucueuus
on whether it allows to the ov-
server ana tne sun us siae or
its end."
Tsesevich added that it had
been ascertained that half a cir circuit
cuit circuit by the Sputnik takes about
80 seconds.
. :
Former Boxer Held
On Procuring Rap
NEW YORK, Jan. 13 (UP) (UP)-Lee
Lee (UP)-Lee Oma, one-time heavyweight
boxing challenger, was accused
of produring and was freed yes yesterday
terday yesterday in $500 bail for a hearing
Jan, 20.
Ponce said Oma, now working
as a bartender in New York, ar arranged
ranged arranged detaes for prostitues,
PlainclQthesmen Edward Port Porter
er Porter tod Paul Rodrigues said Oma
introduced them to girls who took
the 'officers to their rooms, par partially
tially partially undressed and then demand demanded
ed demanded money. The officers arrested
the girls and Oma, who is 41 years
old.
GUARANTEED
TV SERVICE
TEL. 2-2374
Corner "H" & Uarien St.

TElf AD "1

Apartments

ATTENTION, 0. I.I Jam) built
2 leaJtaema. hat. told water
Phono Panama 3-4941
FOR RENT: Apartment unfur unfurnished
nished unfurnished pleassant surroundings,
two bedroom, two bathroom, ga garage,
rage, garage, maid's room, laundry. Be Bella
lla Bella Viata 44th. Street Na. 32.
Phona 3-0815.
f X
FOR RENT: Beautiful apart apartment,
ment, apartment, just built, 3 bedrooms,
hat water. Phone 3-6589.
FOR RENT: Now apartment 1
bedroom, living-dining room and
parch. Via Porras Na. 64. Phone
3-1863.
Cottillion Club
To Sponsor Picnic
On February 22
The Altamira Cotillion Club will
sponsor a picnic at the parish hall
of St. Alban's Church in Paraiso
on Feb. 22.
AO square dancing clubs are
invited to share in the picnic;
wmcn win learure ooin square
dance and rock n roll music.
equipment, industrial chemicals,
synthetic rubber and household ap
pliances.
Those expecting a 1958 downturn
included machine tools, copper,
mining machinery, industrial fur furnaces
naces furnaces and ovens, and railroad
equipment.
The report said the iron and
steel industry looks for a "moder
ate, decline" from 195T levels of
production and shipments. Tne in industry
dustry industry anticipates ingot output of
108 to 110 million tons, compared
to 11S million tons in 1957.
However, the report said that
by the end of the year steel ca
pacity should reach 146,500,000'
tons, exceeding the 15 million ton
expansion program announced at
the end of 1955.
The auto industry looks for
some downturn" from the 6,117,-
000 passenger cars produced in
1957. The report said a 'reason 'reasonable"
able" 'reasonable" estimate would be between
5,750,000 and six million units. It
sain the outlook for truck and
trailer production generally was
"good."
The construction industry looks
for a five per cent increase, in
spending for building of all types,
with most of the expansion in res residential
idential residential construction, both private
and public, and for highway work.
This upturn should spill over into
the plumbing fixtures, lumber and
Portland cement industries.
"Ike" Rejection
Of Summit Meeting
Supported By NATO
i nNnOV Tan 13 f!IP Prn-
siuem cioeuuowei s icjwtuun m
an immediate East West "Sum "Summit"
mit" "Summit" meeting was supported to today
day today be West European diplomats.
But Western newspapers were
lukewarm to critical.
A United Press dispatch from
Moscow said Russian leaders may
accept Eisenhower's call lor Fo Foreign
reign Foreign Minister talks first but
only if they are assured there will
be a summit meeting later.
Moscow .Radio, commenting on
earlier proposals for pre-summit
talks, accused the West of trying
to stall off such a high-level con conference
ference conference "to gain the time needed
for organizing the production of
rocket weapons."
Diplomatic sources in London
said the NATO countries were
advistd in advance on the con contents
tents contents of the Eisenhower note to
Bluganin and that there was ge general
neral general approval through no form formal
al formal comment. Similar notes will
now come from the othef NATO
countries they said.
Russians Claim
Another 4 First1
i'
LONDON, Jan. 13 (UP) The
Soviets claimed another "first"
today. Moscow Radio said Soviet
engineers have devised tne tirst
machine for picking leaves off tea
plants.
The broadcast said the machine
was equipped with "mechanical
cutterfi which carried out the
selective picking of leaves" which
are then sucked into a bin.
It did 'not say how the machine
selected the right leaves or how
many men were required to oper operate
ate operate it. It said, however, that the
mechanical tea leaf picker could
pick 1,100 pounds of tea and
replace 110 human pickers.

I.KATK TO

V AD WrTH ONK OP OVU AGENTS OR OCB OFFICES AT 13-S7 -IP STREET. PANAMA- LtTOHtlA PEK1ADO-? Street Re IS Ap"1"
Ot PtiBIJCACIOVES-No S Letter PJai. a CASA MtDO-Centrel Ave. 45 LOUBDES PHARMACY-.IM.Jft" 'M2M;
' Street a MORRISON 4lh at Jnli a A J Hi a I tvn SKRVICK-Ave. Ttvoli No i FARMAOI tSIAOOS UNIOOS MS Central Av

INTERNAL.
BARDO- No

M5"lA.S.05rJ9 C"2aiJk"?Jt. HOUSEHOLD EXCHA NGE J Fo do
V AN-DFR-J19 50 SUrri No. B FARM ATI A EL BATURRO Piignf Lefeyre
the Bella VMa Theatre. O COLON: Central Avenue 12.165 Tet 432

Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1956 Morris Minor
station wagon. Like new, $1150
or best reasonable offer. Quarters
305-B Ft, Kobbe. Phone 84 84-3213.
3213. 84-3213. FOR SALE: 49 Oldsmobile
deluxe, $240 phona 83-5295;
545-A Curundu Heights.
FOR SALE: 1950 Packard vary
good condition. 1958 inspection
$235.00. Call 4-261.
FOR SALE: 1955 Pontiac Ca Ca-talina
talina Ca-talina w'w tirts, accessories,
condition good, goodf mileage.
Call Balboa 2-2989 2-2735.
new canon
CAMne
Model V
With F 1.2 Lens
t
i.i. sum n.
Panama N. fork Col6n
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
ARRIVED
TRANSISTOR
ELECTRONIC FLASHGUN
temperature of the eun
only $32.50
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave;.
Mail order Phones 2-2318
SAN BLAS
EXCURSION
January 19, 1958
Fidanque Travel Service
Tel. 2-1661
Wave Of Arrests
In Commy China
Highlight Purge
HONG KONG, Jan. 13 (UP)
A province to province commu communist
nist communist nartv nuree is underway in
Red China, an assessment of
Peiping dispatches disclosed
today.
Chekiang and Hunan provinces
hwn hit. Nine ton of
ficials inrlndine one provincial
governor, have been charged with
Being "ngntists. ai leasi ve
officials have been dismissed,
rutaiu nt the Red "rectifica
tion" program followed admission
hv ihe Peinine regime that anti-
f'nmmiinists in Sinkiane. China's
biggest province situated near the
borders of Kussia ana xmei, iriea
to break away a nd form an
inrlpnpnHpnt state
Although Peiping gave few de
tails, it was oeuevea inai ine
Communists had launched a wave
nt arrests in Sinkiane.
In Chekiang province, : pro
vincial party congress neia uec
Q.11 a.prnspfl Governor Sha Wen
han and three colleagues of being
"rightists." They were accused of
being "very particular aoout meir
personal fame, position and
remuneration.
Swiss Auto Racer
Gets Four Months
For Car Accident
CHARLEROI, Belgium, Jan. 13
(UP) Swiss auto racer maurice
Caillet was sentenced to four
mnnthe imnrisnnmpnt on oharses
1UVUVU0 ... f J I,
of causing the accidental death
of five spectators and injuring a.
others in the Grand Prix Desl
Frontieres disaster at Chimay,
Belgium, on May 20, 1956.
The sentence Dronounced by a
court here yesterday was sos-!j
penaea ior live yea.
Caillet also was ordered to pay
British racer Christopher Threfall
$6,000 compensation for wrecking
the Briton's car.
Threfall and Caillet collided at
a sharp corner and ploughed into,
the spectators. The court found il
responsible for tne accident.
Atlantic Softball
League Meeting
Scheduled Tonight
The Atlantic-side Soft ball
I ........ will in alia Maraari.
ta Clubhouse tonight at 7 o'clock. Il

Real Estate

FOR SAL I: Lot. 14,175
square meters en tha Trans Trans-isthmian
isthmian Trans-isthmian highway. 14 miles from
the city. Frontage 62.50 on
highway, watar at all times, 30c.
square meter. Phona 3-4923.
Mire,
Pay Raise Comes
By Changing Sex
, LONDON, Jan. 13 (UP) A
40-year-old government scientist
got a raise in pay today for
changing sex.
Jonathan Ferguson, who used to
be Irene Joy Ferguson will re receive
ceive receive more money since men get
paid better than women as em employees
ployees employees of the British Ministry of
Supply.
Irene Joy Ferguson was for a
while a wartime woman ferry
pilot for the Royal Air Force. She
joined the Ministry of Supply as
an experimental officer in 1941.
Yesterday a personal announce announcement
ment announcement in the Times of London
formally stated ) t h a t spinster
Irene Joy was naw bachelor Jon
athan and was legally registered
as a "male" instead of a "fe "female"
male" "female" in city records.
Ferguson will maintain his iob.
There was no fuss about the sex
change at the Ministryrtsf Supply.
The pay raise was automatic.

STANDING STILLMaking a last stand against progress,
this picturesque building in Manhattan finds itself alone, but
not for long. The houses that formerly surrounded it have
been cleared away as workers continue excavations for a new
apartment building. The owner of the old house has refused
to sell and the new building will be erected around his prop property.
erty. property. In the, background is Washington Square Arch with the
Empire State Building looming in the distance.

.

III HI

linn

TICKETS ALSO
CARMEN
IN
BALBOA THEATRE

Br-

la Ossa Aw. Mo 41 a FOTO HOMJWnMo J"""' Jrii TaadK
I Street a FARMAC1A "SA8"-Vla Porras til MOVED ADES ATDR ""'

Miscellaneous
CARNIVAL! polleras, blouses,
montunos, costumes, dresses and
embroidered. You will find them
at Almacen "La Flor da Calide Calide-nia."
nia." Calide-nia." Central Ave. No. 26-36.
FOR SALE: Seal-point female
Siamese cat. Telephone Quarry
Heights 2165.
FOR SALE: Save money! Buy
Clayco burMiMj blocks. 4"xl2"
xl2". They are economical, light
and do not crack, $123.20 per
thousand. Clayco 0 Alfareria. S.
A.. Via Espana No. 37-40.
Phone 3-0160.
CONTRACTORS, BUILDERS
For septic tanks and water out outlets
lets outlets in general insist on Clayco
terra cotta pipes, especially made
for such; purposes, and resistant
to compression and acid action.
4"xl2" pipes at 12 cants each'.
FOR SALE : O n e stenograph
mochine, one camera 2 14x
3 14 speed Graf lex, w focal -plane
shutter, flash. One China
closet, mahogany. 8420 Marga Margarita,
rita, Margarita, Tel. Cristobal 2598,
FOR SALE: Selling used double
sixe flat spring and innerspring
mattress, $ 1 0.00. Balboa 2 2-2448.
2448. 2-2448. FOR SALE: Three tablet, seven
chairs, one single bed. Call Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2-29892-2735.
BOOK
SEATS
TODAY
ike
(BaLisd 4
1 Performance Only
FRIDAYJANUARY 24
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY
5:30 to 9:00 P. M.
BALBOA Theater
AVAILABLE FOR

' Bjaanaae'' bpimsm 'vSP"?
i i : v 1,&
Vi

CAVALiARO
PERSON

Wednesday, Feb. 12
II

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Household, living
room, dining room drapes, etc.
Reasonably priced. Apply corner
Paitjlla Airport Road (Via Bra Bra-sil)
sil) Bra-sil) and Calls 91 Este.
FOR SALE: Piano, occasional
chairs, excellent condition. 8048
Apt. 3, Melendei 10th. St. Co Colon.
lon. Colon. FOR SALE: Nine piece Dinette
set, cocktail table, two end
tables and step table. All solid
blonde mahogany. Reasonable.
Phono Albrook 86-7222 after 4
o'clock.
FOR SALE: Rattan sectional
davenport innerspring, thirty thirty-five
five thirty-five dollars. Call 2-3372 or
house 5083-B, Diablo.
FOR SALE: Almost now ona
mahogany dining room set and
one mahogany bedroom set. Call
Tel. 3-0222.
Inter-American
Center May Be
Set Up In RP
WASHINGTON. Jan. 13 (UP)
The Council of the Organization
of American States approved a re
solution today that calls (or a stu
dy of the possibility of setting up
an inter-American center to co coordinate
ordinate coordinate transportation activities
in the western hemisphere.
When established, the center
will probably be Panama.
Oldest West Point
Living Graduate
Sroffs 'Nonsense
STAMFORD, Conn., January 13
(UP) Retired Maj. Gen. Henry
Clay Hodges Jr. today became
the oldest living graduate of the
U.S. Military Academy.
He did it by reaching the age,
of 97 years, 8 months and 23 days.
The previous record was held by
'Ijr5l wWlBed'in 1899.
Asked to comment, Hodges
said: "It's a lot of nonsense!"
WANTED Santos Traficanti,
43, (above), is one of two gam gamblers
blers gamblers for which a nationwide a a-larm
larm a-larm was broadcast by New
York District Attorney Frank
Hogan. Traficanti, also known as
Louis Santos, and Joseph Silesi,
61, alias Joe Rivers, are wanted
for questioning in the slaying of
Albert Anastasia. Traficanti, who
operates a gambling casino in
Havana, Cuba, said, "The next
time I am in New York, I'll be
glad to call on Hogan."
Unique Defense
JERUSALEM, Israel, Jan. 13
(UP) Lawyer Moshe Cohen em employed
ployed employed a unique defense in appeal appealing
ing appealing against a six-month sentence
imposed on a client for auto theft.
He contended Israel is too small
a country for any automobile to
be stolen permanently.
The court agreed. It changed
the charge to using the car with without
out without the owner's permission and
reduced the sentence to four
months.
Rink Razed
DETROIT, Mich., Jan. 13 (UP)
Fire today destroyed a half half-block
block half-block long roller skating rink in
the downtown area. Three fire firemen
men firemen were injured When a wall
collapsed.
Fire Chief Edward Blohm esti estimated
mated estimated damage to the rink at
$100,000.
Five fire companies fought the
(blaze which broke out at 5 a.m.
I and was brought under control an
nour later.

Br fl m

WANTED: Experienced tales talesmen.
men. talesmen. Attractive commission,
immediate payment. "Mueblcria
Rattan Lux."

Miscellaneous
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A," DIABLO
OJC 1211 CRISTOBAL. C.2.
Customers of the Pott Radio
Shop Fort Kobbe C. Z. who have
left sets there for over 30 days
should claim them now or they
will be sold.
WANTED:-Amarican executive
leaving Isthmus wishes to place
excellent cook-maid. Call 3 3-7040
7040 3-7040 during office hours.
Domestic Employment
WANTED : Young white maid,
clean, with references, to take
care three yean old girl tleep
in. Rochet street No. 12 apart apartment
ment apartment 24.
Red China General
Reported Deserter
LONDON, Jan. 13 (UP)-Commu-nist
China and Yemen have sign signed
ed signed treaties of friendship, trade and
cooperation in Peiping, according
to Peiping radio.
The broadcast said Yemenite
deputy Premier Crown Prince
Mohammed al Badr and Chinese
Premier Chou En-lai signed the
treaties.
Reds Jailed
JERUSALEM, Jordan, Jan. 13
(UP) A Jordanian military court
yesterday sentenced four men to
'ong prison terms after convicting
ar8es of affiliation
tne.Communist party and
holding illegal meetings, it Was
renorted today. ;
Two of the, men drew 19 year
forms Tk in '"'
. r .."U,C1 lW0 were sen
vcuccM tQ in yeis ,1a prison

tfgHM
iSjHPBggggggggggggggggggl HeflGi
JtPfc ' ' JStft I. Joaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
W fcgv-' I

SeNraTS 1 T "ECOVERY-Comedlan Red Skeltori, recu recu-perating
perating recu-perating from a cardio-asthmatlc attack, is joined 'bv hif
wife at St. John's Hospital, Santa Monica. Calif, as Red look
at the many get well cards he has received.

FOR RENT
Office space available in new building,
corner Cuba Avenue and 32nd Street,
near Banco Nacional. 1700 square feet,
prepared for air-conditioning. Independ Independent
ent Independent entrance. Call 3-104$.

FOR SALE
The building formerly occupied by
the Eden Theatre on Via Belisario

Porras. 1766.90
small Industry.
Tel. 2-4627

SERVICES

3 -minute car wash $1. steam
cleaning of motor $5. waxing of
cart $6. Auto-Bane, Trans-Isthmian
Highway near Soars.
For the best TV service call
Dick, phone 1479 Colon' until
7.00 p.m. Work guaranteed 90
days.
LOST: Diamond bracelet watch.
Liberal reward if returned. Phone
2-1 661V 3-6901.
Civil Pifthif Fund
' ijasaai i nun
Qf Over A Million
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UP) (UP)-President
President (UP)-President Eisenhower asked Con Congress
gress Congress for more than a million
dollars today to carry out provi provisions
sions provisions of the Civil Rights law.
He requested $750,000 for the
new Civil Rights Commission and
an extra $342,000 to step up the
Justice Department's work in pro protecting
tecting protecting civil rights in the new fis fiscal
cal fiscal year starting next July 1.
The law created the six-member
Commission to investigate any
complaints that Negrpes are de
nied the right to vote; to study
legal development that deny e e-qual
qual e-qual protection of the laws and
appraise federal laws on the sub subject.
ject. subject. Eisenhower's budget calls for
70 Commission employes. The
Commission is just getting orga organized
nized organized and is seeking a director
to head its staff.
The president has alloted it $200, $200,-000
000 $200,-000 from his emergency fund or
its expenses in the current fiscal
year.
The new law gave the Justice
Department authority to seek court
injunctions to protect voting rights
and provided a? new assistant at attorney
torney attorney general for civil rights mat matters.
ters. matters. Eisenhower asked A Congress to
increase Department funds for
L"i"gni? ?rR ttWMf $148,000 this
3WU
m2 lot. Ideal for I
- 2-1077

Requests

r war 'io MSO.WOO.

ei k i l j V C-. JaaB



PAGE NOW
MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1951
Difl
By WILSON SCRUGGS
AMD
BT GEORGE WUNDEB
I THE STOBI OP MARTHA WATNB
..CAW VOU BE AN A5SET AS THE VHFE OF A SHARP
WPNOEVlPEfIOFA LINK peTWeeN
NOUN AK 3WMANPEK AS L0N6 AS THERE IS
(THAT'S DCYSCALE BARMCTMf EWTOR!
MOCMkKSNTHC
YOU AMP YOUR PATHET5 CumiN&
EN ASHAPOW
WITH THE CHINESE KEF5.
atfTBMLLE
sow j
COURIER...
AA
FRISCILLA'8 POT
"A" fer Sffrrt

THB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAM NEWSPAPER

r
a CoR I 4tT THOCY MAnTY TUB MATTER Ur l
IT V Me'COONet. CO" Ay

I -I I I (tOUKETOAVSC i L -l

thATVWLBE TWM DOUARJ )""""
(Al9XTVOBn5PLWt r-
BP5e 1

erg

l'BHCRTA WELL, H'

L4 jKh

fRECRXES AND HIS IRIENB1

In Advsne

Icoxpsure
use TMe buck

LARD BORROWED

FROM ME

BUCKS
ShteRC He

.

STILL

OWES A

RAY RAY-MEN
MEN RAY-MEN T

ON THE

TRUMPET

HE BOUGHT
FROM ME

i

HEYjHISOHOMl

lb I He RAY WE D
HE6ET5 MIS, BETTER.

ALLOWANCE UURRy'

MONEY BURNS

POCKErf MOT GET

VViTH ANY

JIM6LE

We're Here To collect our
rillnr nr I ADfllC A 1 I OVA A Ut

A I

ALLEY OOP

No, That Isn't Itl

By ? t.

TIME-MAHINE...ONiy T WISH K JIMMIED
-4 DOC HADN'T JIMMIED TH' VIEW- ( VEH ...MAYBE ALL J
ffgr 1 SCREEN SOS NOBODY COULD) HE DtD WAS J

HA! THIS IS FT,
I BETCHA! THIS
TUBE LAtvtN'

BUT, PRISCILLA!

OATMEAL

I

aoog

FOR,

(Iwie)

JENNY LU HATES IT.1

O DOES WOLLYHpCKL

KID MAUREEN AND

CYNTHIA AND VIRGINIA.

I'

I ''-.THERE WAS THAT
I HELEN YATES WMC

WENT TO SCHOOL WITH

MB.-. I
LIKED

e jr y

BUGS tflTNNE

Brsve "Wtl'

a mi ij Ml fcrvm, T.M. t-. U.I. Hi, w.

ROOTS AND

BUDDI

This Is Serioufl

Bp EDGAR MARTIN

' X

VEAH,
A WHAT?
( GREETIN'S, BUTCH U--
T

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calbraith

m

PC I GUESS m SHOWED :
rHlM ,HEY, PCKCWjr?,
1

Butltr Spills If

CAPTAIN EASE

BHIJ-V Jnjfv6S,5lg...VEMggrAV; I THAf6 HIM1 K? X HP HAPJ'T LEPT
WTZnur m. -iT4ui 7IJl WA THE MM WITH VOU RECALL HOW WHEW I WENT Of P
1 SrV?7'i'5 JxtIV LKHT LIMP, WHO L0N4 STAVBP ) DUTY LAST NIOHr,
U VET? WRE flRRTriBR N1 1 y- --BIR! AWP X W

Br LESLIE TURNER

PERHAPS WR. WILWNd 1MVITED

HIM TO 5TAV Cye. AWP JOIN
Hl OW A SHORT CRUISE! I

NOTICED Hl CRUISK AT THE,

TOPAV!

w

dm

1 n i

THAWKSi

WH.L,ir
LATE'. TWE
I WAS CM

MV WAY.

cat I LA

MORTY MEERLE

Yap, That's Itl

By DICR CAVALU

IffrsuRE von wiu,
I ( WINTHBOP. MDU BEEN
IlL USING IT ALL DAY AND
I v( VOU'RE TIRED OF IT r
if NO, I V V

AND PRETTY SOON VOU HAVE TO

GO IN FOR SUPPER, AND BESIDES,

r If VUU PONT UW Wt

(I'LL BREAK YOUR )
SCRAWNY NECK V

I WONDER IF THAT9
I WHAT THEY MEAN BY J
i THE IRON FIST IN

n

I

I

I

1-lfc

T.M. U.S. P. Off.
e 1M7 T Si S,v,. Im.

gnr (w gy Mt (Si
DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
To loom your "FtrtHMt" lor today from Ik lUM, wriM in th WWH
of th olphobot corrMpondinf to tht nurrwroUfcn th lint (4 itM attt
locical ponod in which you wr born. You will Md it lun
I J 1 4 S A 7 I I 10 II II 11 14 )5 II 17 II 1 21 22 24 2S M
ASCOfFCHI J K j M W Q P Oil T U V W X T 2

IAN. 22-
rn.2o

ni.2i-
MAI.20

MAS. tt tt-APS
APS tt-APS 30

AM. II
MAY 20
MAY 21 21-AINI2I
AINI2I 21-AINI2I JULY 73

JULY 34 34-AUG.
AUG. 34-AUG. 22

"I'll bring tht antvwt to these problems tomorrow.
Miss Binks Dad took them to the office bookkeeper!"

AUG. 23-SffT.22

$T.24.
CKT.23

OCT. 34 34-NOV.22
NOV.22 34-NOV.22 NOV. 23 23-MC.22
MC.22 23-MC.22 MC. 21 21-JAN.
JAN. 21-JAN. 71

16 12, 1 24 1 14 4 It 1 18 20 28 20 J3 0

14 5 23 19 IS 3 9 1 12 1 6 6 1 I M

3 12 5 22 5 18 4 S 22 5 18 19 9 15 14 19

2ft IS 21 It 7 21 S 19 19

9 U 20 I

9 14 1 4 22

9 19 18 9

4 5 3 15 18 1 20 9 15 14 19 3 I S 13 5

9 14 19 21 18 1 14 3 5 16 18 21 4 5 M 20

1 14 5 23 10 15 25 9 14 19 8 IK 9 14 7

4 1 25 6 15 18 $ 24 3 9 20 5 13 5 14 20

3 8 18 9 19 20 13 1 19 20 18 5 S 31 14

1 8 18 9 5 14 4 14 5 S 4 19 8 5 12 )

1J 1 20 5 18 21 18 3 8 1 19 5 19 14 7ft

n

OUR BOARDlNii HOUSE

MAJOB HOUfLI

GET YOUR SCORE-BOOK
Akin rocniT rrciK

lObHUSHrn'M, mnninni pZ z H DAISY Vv TH A SUO

UN BEO 1. AUtoi OtlN f J iTH OME SvOlNS J

DO YOU KNOW WhATIhAT old

PERSIMMON BAXTER OUST

pJEISHBOR-

YULETIDE- 6ET-

T06ETWEK

a SU66E&TED
I -7 KAK.'-A

iTTrfnn Vhooo

I I I V

I v ,-aaHN.

G0 6ET YOUR SCORE BOOK 1

SHE HAS BROUGHT THt I
PlClT OF BROTHERLY A

LX LOVE AND PSACE
M 0Nl EARTH TO OUR

ri Asi

l I IB

OUT OUR WAS

By I. R WILLIAMS

SURE. JUST KEEP PttJKJCiW&--THF

STOVE WILL STRETCH TO OBLIGE VOU.' 1

VOUK WOOP COTTIWG IS LIKE VOUR

ASH CARRVINO--VOU LEAVE THE

WOOP SO LONG IT WON'T SO IW,

EAVE THE ASHES. SO

THEV WON'1

THOSE OLl THIMQS THAT CAUSEt? US SP MUCH MISERvr

RyjLs. n't if slr

CARDINAL

VIRTUES

AMAW CARDINAL CARDINAL-HE
HE CARDINAL-HE TAKES THE
VOUN06TEK6 OUT
PORAOIN0, VCEEPe
A, WAKV EWE OPEN
9U7E THEM TO

The shoicet

TlPI

aiTTlN5 ON A BATdH Or

S(9eBiHE eiNe i'-'
KEEP HER OOMPAN1-

ls

i
sw.

MEETING OF THE MINDS Sen. William J. Fulbright (left)
(D-Ark.) and Sen. Theodore F. Green (D-R. I.) appear to be

seeing eye-to-eye during the senate Democratic caucus in
Washlngtdn.The caucus was held prior to the opening of the
second session of the 85th Congress.

Faltering Philip!
fhiMr'f M Is tWed tb BftUm-

9hMn vraM torn BR km Ske
A CIsMrtflfSs tart ttw Hst ehje'

Af0OVIAS BAHAMA AfiWA YS
PANAMA-MIAWI .'. 55.00
MIAMI-ST. LOUIS 44.80

PANiVlA
ST. LOUIS

Tods JY PrograTi

99

80

cm njws
Nit King Colt
Today
KIDDIES KORNER
Mr. Wlard
PANORAMA
Blondle

7:30 Twenty On
8 00 Kraft TV Thoatra

Treasure Hunt
I've Got A Seerat

9:00

9:30
10:00
11:00
11:15

Colgate Oomedy Hour

crw NEWS
Encore' Ed Sullivan.

Courtesy of Aenwrtsw Psnsnis Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1698 3-1699
i Office Hours: from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.



Chesterfi
Tonight
Read story on page 6

Plays

Clayton

Defense Dept. Chief Discloses Pla is To Build!
. . m ii-i ii I

Third Base

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UP) Defense Secretary Neil H. McEIroy today disclosed plans to build a third
base for launching 5,000-milt intercontinental missiles.
He said funds for the project are in President Eisenhower's new budget and work on it will start iir the; 1959
fiscal year.
McEIroy told Congress that the new budget also includes funds to begin production of the Polaris, the Navy's
ubm&rine-launched 1,500-mile solid fuel missile.
The defense chief discussed Increased mlitary spending proposals in closed door testimony before the House
Armed Services Committee, which opened today a full-dress investigation of where this country stands in the

arms race
with Russia.
.
TEST A SUCCESS The Atlas
ICBM missile blasts skyward
from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on
its fourth test flight.. The Air
Force said the test was success successful
ful successful although it was not full full-Snge
Snge full-Snge This photo was taken with
J ew mm. lens from about six
miles.
UAW SeeksShare
Of All Profits
Over 10 Per Cent
DETROIT, Jan. 13 (UP) The
United Auto Workers International
Executive Board announced today
u i ..sir a share of all proms
above 10 per cent on investment
from the automomie companies
In this year's bargaining.
The UAW board said its profit profit-sharing
sharing profit-sharing formula is "based on the
formula used, hy the corporations
themselves for computing execu executives
tives executives bonuses."
The contract demands recom recom-Monifod
Monifod recom-Monifod hv the board omitted che
earlier UAW announced fight for
i four-day worK weeK.
I Weather Or Not
This weather report for the
24 hours ending S a.m. today,
If prepared by the Meteorolo Meteorological
gical Meteorological and Hydrographie
Branch of the Panama Canal
Comnanv:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
High 2 SO
Low IS 75
HUMIDITY:
High '5 W
Low 80
WIND:
(max. mph) NH-14 N-22
RAIN (inches) .35 2.12
WATER TEMP:
(Inner harbors) 79 80
TUESDAY, JAN. 14
Rich Low
10:43 ajn. 4:34 a.m.
11:17 p.m. 4:58 p.m.
TODAY
LAST DAY!
3:11. 5:04. 6:57. 8:53 p.m.
GEORGE NADER
KmNtU. PORCHERS MICHEL RAY

IBfHK flit 9
ill

n
175 I
no 1

i

ror Launching D,uuu-Miie Missiles

"

. I- V- V "... 8
McEIroy a aid the Defense
Department already had started
building two intercontinental bal
listic missue (1LBM) Bases ana
Communist-Backed
Candidate Wins
Naha Mayoralty
NAHA, Okinawa, Jan. 13 (UP)
Communist backed Saiiem Aa Aa-neshi,
neshi, Aa-neshi, 49, beat U.S.-suppbrted Tat Tat-suo
suo Tat-suo Taira, 65, for mayor of this is island
land island capital, official returns from
yesterday's election showed today.
Official returns showed Kaneshi
defeated Taira by nearly 1JM vo votes
tes votes of the 70,446' ballots cast. Ka Kaneshi
neshi Kaneshi had 34,968 votes and Taira 33,
986. There were 1.492 questionable
ballots.
His victory was a severe poli political
tical political defeat for the United States
and. in effect another vote of
"Yankee go home" from this stra
tegic outpost trom which even in intermediate
termediate intermediate range missiles car
reach virtually every potential
i i a. t -
irouDie spot n. me raunt.
Both Kaneshi, who claims to be
an anti-Communis Socialist de
spite his Red backing, and Taira,
also a socialist, favor return ot tne
Ryukyuan islands including Oki
nawa to Japan, ts o t n concede
that the United States should not
be expected to hand over the is
lands immediately, because of the
international situation.
Travel Club Sacks
60 Members For
'Savage' Behavior
LIVERPOOL. England, Jan. 13
(UP) A travel club here reported
it has kicked out 60 members who
cavorted "like savages" on con continental
tinental continental holidays.
The youth travel club has orga
nized holidays abroad for 3,000
Britons in the last six years and
has a present membership of 10,
000.
The club charged the 60 sacked
members brought disrepute on
their country.
It accused women of getting
drunk, men of bullying villagers
and hoteliers, girls of being im immoral"
moral" immoral" and all of being discourte discourteous,
ous, discourteous, violating local customs, and
flouting religious conventions.
One of the clubs patrons, Lord
MacDonald, said "these people
should have been showing the
world that the British way of life is
worthy. Instead they behaved like
savages."
Persons travelling to the conli
nent on club-arranged holidays in
future will have to sign a declare
tion guaranteeing they will behave
themselves, he added.
British Turncoat
Termed Homesick,
Moscow Alcoholic
LONDON. Jan. 13 fUP)-London
newspaper reports said yesterday
that turncoat diplomats Donald
MacLean arid Guy Surges had be
come alcoholics in Moscow and
that Burgess, at least, wants des desperately
perately desperately to come home.
The reports in the Sunday
Graphic and Sunday Pictorial
were conflicting. Government of officials
ficials officials said they had no new knowl knowledge
edge knowledge of the two men who fled
to Russia in 1951, one skip ahead
of Scotland Yard agents assigned
to arrest them on charges of spy spying
ing spying while working for the Foreign
Oflice.
The Graphic Said Burgess, who
once was a secretary in the Brit British
ish British embassy at Washington, was
drinking heavily, had lost his So Soviet
viet Soviet friends, and wanted to leave
Russia and return to Britain.
It claimed MacLean was happy
and living with his American-born
wi e and three children with the
"upper crust" of Soviet society
in a suburbanhome supplied with
a housekeeper and maid.
But the Pictorial said MacLean
also had been drinking heavily and
had lost his job. It said his wife,
Melinda, was fighting to get the
children, Fergus, 12, Donald, 10,
and Melinda, 6 out of the Soviet
Union.
Both Burgess and MacLean were
believed to have been holding
translators' jobs in the Soviet For Foreign
eign Foreign Office.
MacLean, once a "fair haired
boy" of the British Foreign Office,
was joined in Russia by his wife
and children. They Slipped behind
the Iron Curtain after a chase
through Western Europe in 1953.
Burgess end MacLean rarely are
sesn in the Western dip omatic col
on
I at
ony in Moscow. They turned up
one reception last year but
were coldly ignored by British din-

lorn als present.

? -S .... -V.

has funds for
budget.
a third in the hew
The first two bases he ap ap-parenly
parenly ap-parenly refered to are Warren Air
Force Base in Wyoming to be a
wartime launching site and
Campa Cooke, Calif. primarily
a training base for ICBM crews,
week in wich the United States
noisy Army Redstone missile
Chairman Calls
GOP Leaders
To Strategy Talks
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 -(UP)
Republican National Chairman
Meade Alcorn today summoned
Dartv leaders from all over the
country to on-the-record confer
ences here with President Eisen
hower and Vice President Richard
M. Nixon to plan strategy for next
fall's congressional elections.
Alcorn announced in a state
ment that national committeemen
would attend a two-day meeting
here Jan. 30 and 31. While here
they will meet with the President
and vice president.
Alcorn said the meeting had
been called to drum up enthusi
asm for the party tn us upnni
fight to regain control of Con Congress.
gress. Congress. Republican senators and
representatives have oeen report
ed downcast at their party s
chances in the November election.
Appearing on an AffiC-TV pro pro-eram.
eram. pro-eram. College News Conference,
Alcorn, said the GOP would have
"considerable difficulty" electing
a majority in the Senate. He gave
the Republicans "a real chance
to take the House of Represent
atives.
He said the Republicans sum
adhere to their 1956 election slo
gan "peace, prosperity ana prog
ress," and would nave a greater
chance of fulfilling it with a Re Republican
publican Republican Congress. Despite recent
reverses in tjie missile and satel
lite fields,. Alcorn saw, tne nation
was at peace ana economically
strong.
"I think the voters will remem remember
ber remember that when they go to the
polls," he said.
The GOP national committee
had been scheduled to meet here
Dec. 6. But the meeting was
cancelled after the Presidnt suf suf-fred
fred suf-fred a mild stroke a few days
beforet he planned session
In announcing the January
meeting, Alcorn said the Pre
dent had "enthusiastically" ac
cepted the invitation to meet the
committeemen at a breakfast
Jan 31.
Alcorn said that Nixon would
the committeemen a secret
briefing on party matters at lunch
the same day. i
Solon Deplores
Refusal To Air
Gaither Report
WASHINGTON. Jan; 13 (UP)-
Stn. Thomas C. Henmngs .Jr.
mi. mm laid todav the adminis
tration's refusal to release the
i-nntrnversial Gaither report was
"lust another exercise" of govern
ment secrecy that has become
prevalent in recent years.
UAMiinitf chairman ftf Ihp Spfl
IlCllUIllfeO, V.1, ."
ate Constitutional Rights subcom subcommittee,
mittee, subcommittee, said it was "depldrable"
for the administration to withhold
the rennrt which was said to have
raised alarms about the state of
the nation s defenses.
But he emphasized that he was
not surprised by the aominisira
iton's attitude.
Hennings said his subcommittee
staff has come across "uterauy
dozens" of cases in which infor
mation has been withheld from
Congress and the public by
ecutive departments and agencies
under oroaa power ciaimea oy
the attorney general.
He said he invited the attorney
general last year to appear before
the subcommittee to "explain
these powers in detail but so
far he has not accepted the.
Invitation."
Hennings said he is still hopeful
that the attorney general eventu
ally "will see fit to appear,"
Ton ftn the oirl who thinks
she shows distinction in her
clothes only shows distinctly.

' : K V. I .1 fc : .!

may blast off today to open the
eek in which the United States
hopes to hurl a satelite into
space on the second attempt.
The trim white Redstone missile
has been in its gantry tower for
more than a week and is believed
ready for launching, today or to
morrow. The Redstone is short-
range missile which is already
operational. It is the rocket from
which the Army's big Jupiter C
missue grew.
n Air Force Thor intermediate
angc missile also is in its tower
and may be fired this week.
But the big show is expected
later in the week when the Navy
tries a second time to put up a
grapefruit-size test satelite with
it s slender Vanguard rocket. The
Vanguard is believed ready for
launching, but just wheh it will go
has not been disclosed.
Spacemen's Arrival
In Lady's Lounge
Scares Off Guests
BIRMINGHAM, England. Jan.
13 (UP) Mrs. Cynthis Appleton
said today that her .riends and
neighbors walked out on hr when
two spacemen walked into her
life.
The 27-year-old mother of two
girls claimed that the spacemen
walked right into her home, sat
down, and had a talk to her about
their plans for earth.
Mrs. Appleton said she saw the
spacemen twice in six weeks. The
first visitor from outer space ar arrived
rived arrived solo but on bis next visit he
Tigm me along she said.
"Tall and blond-like Greek
athletes they were," she added.
One afternoon last November
I was in the lounge of my home
when a spaceman suddenly ap appeared.
peared. appeared. v
"1 was terrified but he spoke
so kmdly that I wasn't frightened
J mux c
' He laid his nennlo wAtA
to rwrv vi j fTiillUK
,n.cm. earth but with only
.ne objective in mind. . to aise
tne standard of our civilization."
ma ..?ppiei,on sa,d tfle 'Pace 'Pace-man
man 'Pace-man returned and brought his
friend along last Tuesday
iney had domes o n their
Aisrusi sitt
friends and relative., hZ CJJS
cropping in. She
avoiding her.
said they are
I am"1." e are "8 ""at
h r r oiners that I
have been working too hard,"" he
But two Church of Engl,nd
e'ergymen who have called on
Mrs. Appleton said they believed
her story.
Her husband, Ronald, said he
believed it, too.
Arrest Of 2 Or 3
Of Fidel Castro's
Lieutenants Claimed
HAVANA. Cuba. Jan W MTU 1
Reports from Santiago todav
said two, and possibly three, of
reuei leader FMet Castro's top
lieutenants have fallen into gov
ernment nanus.
Reported captured last night
while returnine to Santiaov. frm
rendezvous with Castro hi the
rebel chiefs mountain hifew
were Armando Hart and Antonio
oucn.
Unconfirmed reports said that
Javier Pazos, son of Felipe Pazos,
a former president of the Cuban
National Bank, also was arrested
earlier by. government forces.
Pazos attended Sidwell-Friends
rrep school in Wash nstnn Hie
father now is an official of the
International Monetary Fund in
Washington.
vThere were no details on the
reported Capture of young Pazos.
It was believed he was being held
in Santiago.
Hart and Bdch are key
H" e Castrb rebel movement
men
against President Fukenrrn
Batista.
Hart, an attorney,, made a sen sensational
sational sensational escape from a Havana
courtroom several months ago
while being tried for terrorist
activities, His father was a mag
istrate of the Cuban Supreme
court.
Buch was Castro's right-hand
man in Santiago where the rebel
chief obtain nfMt of his material
and financial sources.
Santiago is capital of Oriente
Province m southeastern Cuba.
Castro led a rebel "invasion"
force ashore in Oriente more than
a year ago and had maintained
a steady campaign of hit-and-run
raids from hideouts in die Sierra
Maestra Mountains.

The
Judge's Bench

Failure to halt at a stop-sign
cost Bias Efebo Hernandez, 32,
Panamanian, $5 in Balboa Magis Magistrate's
trate's Magistrate's Court today, Hernandez
was fined an additional $5 for hav having
ing having no license to drive.
Backing without safety brought
two. be. ore the Balboa Magis Magistrate.
trate. Magistrate. Carlos Manue Raven, 47,
Panamanian, and Gerommo Al Al-viz,
viz, Al-viz, 61, Colombian, each paid $10
fines.
Jose Jungencio Sanchez, 21, Pa Panamanian,
namanian, Panamanian, was fined $10 for having
no operator's license. v
Little League
Boys 10, Girls 7
Seventeen babies were born at
Coco Solo Hospital during the week
ending at midnight Wednesday,
according to the regular hospital
report. During the same period
88 patients were admitted and 58
were discharged,
Babies were born to the follow
ing American citizens: Sfc. and
Mrs. Kichard Culver, of Coco So-
hto, daughter; Pic. and Mrs. Jo Joseph
seph Joseph Wil.iams, of Colon, daughter;
Sp-3 and Mrs. Fredric Bowen, o-
Colon, son; Sgt. and Mrs. George
Combs, of Coco Solito, daughter;
IC-1 and Mrs. Richard Worlds, 01
Coco Soio, daughter; Mr. and Mrs
Darwin Grier, of Margarita
daughter; and Sp-3 and Mrs. Al
bert Smith, of Colon, daughter.
Babies were born to the fol-
lowin parents of Panmanian citi
zenship: Mr.and Mrs. Alberto
Wilmet, ol Colon, son; Sp-3 and
Mrs. Clement Authur. of Rainbow
City, son; Mr. and Mrs. Benito
Cuervo, of colon, daughter; Mr.
and Mrs. rov Reid. of Colon, son:
Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick Peters, of
colon, son; Mr. and Mrs. .muio
Dixon, of Colon, son; Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Anderson, of Rain
bow City, son; Mr. and Mrs. Jo
seph James, o. Rainbow City,
son; MR. and Mrs. Reginald
Arcnpoid, of colon, son; and Mr.
and Mrs. Conway Waldron, of Co Colon,
lon, Colon, son.
Iran Says Death
Of Point 4 Trio
Avenged By Police
TEHERAN, Jan. 13 (UP)- The
Iranian Foreign Ministry officially
told the United States embassy
today that Iranian gendarmes had
avenged the killing of three Am
eriian Point Four employes.
The gendarmerie described to
day how m a running battle a
gendarmerie patrol killed brigand
leader Dad Shah and his brother.
Dad and his brigands murdered
Kevin and Anita Carroll and Brew
ster Wilson, all Point Four em
ployes in Iran last spring.
The spokesman said a gendar
meih patrol of some 20 policemen
caught up with two Baluch tribes tribesmen
men tribesmen in the scraggy shelter of the
Hashtkouh hills, some 180 miles
pro the town of Iranshahr, antf
ordered them to give themselves
up lor interrogation.
The tribesmen replied with
hail of lead which immediately
killed three gendarmes.
Two and a half hours later five
more gendarmes lay dead. So did
the two tribesmen.
Ford Foundation
Gave $83 Million
In Grant In 57
NEW YORK, Jan. 13-(UP)-
The Ford Foundation made grants
and appropriations totaling 83 mil million
lion million dollars last year, according to
the foundation's 1957 annual re report.
port. report. The foundation, founded in 1936
by Henry and Edsel Ford, has
now expended more than one bil billion
lion billion dollars to advance human
welfare, the report said.
The largest grant last year was
24.5 million dollars to the Wood
row Wilson National Fellowship
Foundation, sponsor of a campaign
to attract college students to
reaching careers. It will award
1,000 graduate fellowships a year
for the next five years.
The second major grant was an,
appropriation of 4.5 million dollars
to the educational facilities la
boratories, an independent re research
search research organization to improve the
construction and facilities of
schools and colleges.
The foundation also gave 2.6
million dollars to the American
council of learned societies for
"numanistio scholarship" and 2.5
millfen dollars to New York's proj-
MmA T:inrnfn nmntmr far thm tier.
hv-vv" re
forming arts.
Panamanian Dies
Under Treatment
At Corgas Hospital
.Pedro Figueroa, 51, a Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian brought to Gorgas Hospital
as an emergency case early this
morning, died there while being
treated by a physician in the
receiving room.
He lived at 23 Alcalde Diaz St.
hi Panama City. He had trouble
in breathing at his home and
was brought into Gorgas because
of his acute condition.

IT IS 25 YEARS since an airplane first landed in Trinidad on a flight to survey the pos possibilities
sibilities possibilities of a service between thai British West Indian Island and the continent of
South America. The Introduction of air travel brought a new epoch to the British West
Indies, and marked the beginning of a change in political structures which today Has led
to the establishment of the sturdy British West Indies Federation. The photo showj a
Viking of British West Indian Airways on the attractive little airport at Grenada,
Air Travel Is Key To West Indies Federation

By J. M. SPIY
Formerly News Editor of
"Trinidad Guardian"
LONDON, Jan. 13 (BISV A
quarter ol a century ago I saw
the first seed sown from which
has grown the vigorous plant of
the West Indies Federation and
did not recognize the full signific significance
ance significance of the event.
In that I was not a lorn. Indeed,
it would be true to say that pro
bably tut a single witness of the
vent realized that on that day
we saw the t'irst indication of a
process which has developed with
surprising rapidity since World
War Hi
At the time, whe arrival of an
aircraft from Caracas to investig
ate the possibilitits of a regular
airmail service between Trinidad
and the mainland of South Ameri America,
ca, America, in addition to the flying boat
services which already linked the
island with the United Staes and
the east coast capitals of South
America, was exciting enough.
tven when the Government of
Trinidad embarked on the draining
and levelling of Piarco Savannah,
in the center of the island, to pro provide
vide provide a-landing-ground for land-bas
ed aircraft, though many realiz
ed that a new era in communi communi-catinons
catinons communi-catinons was being ushered in, few
suspected that it would also be
the beginning of a new political
structure.
ISOLATED
Twenty- five years ago, aoart
from a common nride, sometimes
very fervent oride, in being Bnt
ih, the scattered is'snds of the
Wet Indies shaded little else.
Each island was conscious of
New B. Hondurait
Deletion Arrives
For London Talks
LONDON. Jan. 12 rUP)-Three
remaining members of the recon
structed Britrh Hindu dele dele-Hon
Hon dele-Hon arrived here bv nlane todav
for talks with the British govern-
rnATlt
The three are Der.!ffh Jeffery,
member for nublic utilities, w T
Bowman, associated number for
natural resources, ana 10m vaies,
financial secretary.
Ah earlier delegation left Lon-
rinn aftar tallrc tt' SHSDnded fOl-
inivino chames that delegation
member George Price had held
talks with former Guattmila-n
Minister to London Jorge fcama
SlaM4rlAS!
Commenting on the Price inci
dent, Jefferv saw. "everyinina m
(,AMA ; nuiAt daw anart from a
uuiiic ia liuv. t r
fan pattrH miseuided people
throwing slurs on us. it was de
finitely a plot, Dut we nropea n m
the hiiH it wast he best thing that
in,,IH kava hannened to US. We
didn't know anything about this
1 i ...,: 1 4.1 T nnrlnn inMont
piUt Willi UIC liuuw" ""viw""
Local Student At
Vermont Named
Most Outstanding

r

J. Rodney Ely, a senior stud student
ent student of engineering at the Univer University
sity University of Vermount, has been nam named
ed named as one of the most outstand outstanding
ing outstanding engineering students in the
United States.
This information was received
in a letter from the mechanical
engineering department of Ohio
State University in which Ely was
offered graduate fellowshis which
are granted only to the best qua qualified:
lified: qualified: students.
Ely was graduated from Ba'boa
High School in 1952. During his
high school days he was active in
baseball, track, football, basket basketball,
ball, basketball, and served as a sergeant
in the ROTC.
He is the son o' Mr. and Mrs.
R. B. Ely of Diablo Heights.

Va4a:aHnlH9HH iHeK?" T wt YjHlfi.v Bw

The West Indies
EDITOR'S NOTE; The Islands
of the British West Indies, with
which many Isthmians have close
ties, this month joined in a fed federation.
eration. federation. To mark this important
step towards self-government,
this week we will run a series of
articles on tho past, present and
future of the islands and the
federation.
the existtnee to little more than
a spirit of rivalry between the
larger members of the group, and
of jealously of the larger members
among the smaller.
In the "Trinidad Guardian" in
those days we gave little space
to the doings of Jamaica, Barba
dos or the rest of the islands.
Communications were so poor
that for the mosF,,part reports
of events in other parts of the
West Indies were too old to be
regarded as news by the time
they came into, our hands.
In any case, except when teams
of cricketers exchanged visits,
there was very little public inte
rest. Distances were too great.
In terms of time, rather than
of miles, each of the islands was
as far from the others as most
were from the United Kingdon,
or Canada, or the Americas.
Inter-island trade was small, and
much of what did exist as trans
shipment, trade.
It would have required a pro
phet of exceptional foresight to
realise that the exploratory flight
from Caracas foreshadowed a com
plete transformation of outlook
throughout the islands.
COMMON INTERESTS
It is interesting, but nrofitless.
to try to guess to what extent
woria war u speeaea up or slow slowed
ed slowed down the development of air
transport between the islands of
the West Indies.
But one thing is certain. The
air a a it directly iDSDOnsible for
the growth of that attitude of mind
which has resulted inevitably in
the West Indies Federation.
Communities formerly isolated
frnm each other have Decome cuie
ly aware that their common in
terests are much greater tnan any
differences between them.
Fuchs' Expedition
Slowed By Snow
treks Toward Coalj
WELLINGTON, New Zealand,,
Jan. IS '(UP) A 12-man British
Antarctic expedition pushed to
within nearly 200 miles of its goal
at the South Pole today in a heavy
snowfall that made the trek doub doubly,
ly, doubly, dangerous ever uncharted ice icefields.
fields. icefields. Dr. Vivian Fuchs, the expedition
leader, radioed that falling snow
had slowed the a'ready snail-paced
expedition in its attempt to travel
from the Weddell Sea coast to the
pole and then press on to the op opposite
posite opposite Ross Sea Coast.
But Fuchs, 50, showed no signs
of giving up the attempt to be-,
ccme the first man ever to trek
across the entire 2,000-mile-wide
wasteland. Despite appeals from
Sir Edmund Hillary of New Zea Zealand
land Zealand and other explorers in the
Antarctic, he has vowed to press
on.
Hillary, who beat Fuchs in a
raco to the pole, said that once
the British expedition passes the
pole it will find the going easier.
Fuchs and his men aboard sno sno-cat
cat sno-cat tractors have been plagued
byhidden crevasses in their trek,
part of 'it through the uncharted
South Ice never before touched
by human foot.
Hi hvry, who reached toe pole
Jan, 3, has established a major
supply depot on the final leg o
the trans-continental crossing for
Fuchs.

Each island has its num nurtl.

cullr problem or problems, but
each has Others whifk it eh.,.,.
with its neighbours.
Perhaps ont factor above all is
responsible for the drawing togeth together
er together of tht islands, and that is the
desire for independence.
BARRIERS BROKEN
Automatirallv tho
. "J.I ww ayi tUU Jl C"
CfUCatlOn Iinripr British
che introduction of electoral sys
tems, started the people? of all
the West Iidian islands, like the
peoples of other parts of the Com Commonwealth,
monwealth, Commonwealth, on the nath nf ca!.
government.
Equally automatically, education
brOU&ht to loral Iparlorc tho
isation that in a troubled world,
the individual islands were, not
strong enough to stand as fully-
indtnendent mnmhor nf (h.
. hi w ,uv
Commonwelath.
Until the coming of ..the air age,
the difficulties of distant present,
ed an insuperable barrier to the
formation of an organization ara
enough to stand on its own feet
as tne older commonwealth coun
tries have done for manj years.
With its advent, the hanHiean
shrank and the dream of a feder
al structure crystallised into rea
lity.
TODAY!
.75 .40
3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 p.m.
1
5ivniL f$ilCCB$S'
TM MOTION HO MM
mar wni nivi m roawvm
...Off PORQOTYIN1
muut n mint mm
WEDNESDAY
WEEKEND
RELEASE!
Filmed on the spdt... In the
dens and back alleys of the
city' of the thousand pas passions!...
sions!... passions!... Ma P.
stoyotp
COLOR by DELUXE
Cinemascope
In the wonder of STEREOPHONIC SOUND
ROBERT JOAN EDMOND
n

faffifao"j f real