The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02453

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
MORE TOURIST FLITES

ScttflramYQ AJffj 1
CANADIAN Jm
WHISKY hljj-
it KMC (U0 fl$jf 1

HOMEWARD VIA
Lef tft people know the truth and the country U safe Abraham Lincoln,
PANAMA. R. P., SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 195S

FEAB

TKNCBRli

LEGAL TURNABOUT Judge Guthrie P. Crowe swears in Judge Edward t P- Tatelman as
special judge for the case involving a burglary at the former's home, President Eisennowef

designated Tatelman ior xne joo.

Panama Railroad
May Run Spur Into
Colon Free Zone
THe possibility of extending rail
lines info the Colon Free Zone is
reportedly being contemplated by
Panama Canal and Panama Gov Government
ernment Government officials.
Informed, sources said the plan
Is being pushed by Free Zone
manager Everardo Duque, and that
Canal rail engineers visited the
area to- look over the terrain last
Friday-
The plan if put into effect would
tuA nraoant pnet nf handling
. jAllpllt
by truck is
k tan
k. airf that hv rati me
cost would be around $110.
Tho nmt nf thr nroiect IS es
J. IIC WW- -t. -jil
AUG vwut v j
i: .t ohnnt tis nnn the source
said. The new rail spur would be begin
gin begin at Domingo Diaz and 16th
Streets, Colon, running- for a half
mile to the rree Aone.
It Is believed that the rail spur
would attract heavy equipment
firms into the Free Zone.
tn the sources. Ditoue
AVVW i
has been holding conversations
with U. S. Ambassador Julian F.
Harrington and Canal Zone Gov.
William E. Potter, who have ex expressed
pressed expressed agreement with the plan.
Army Will Bounce
Radio Signals
Off Moon, Jon. 14
FT. MONMOUTH, N. J.,. Jan. 4
(UP) The Army disclosed today
that it would begin bouncing ra radio
dio radio signals off the moon Jan. 14 to
shape up its instruments for track tracking
ing tracking future American earth satel satellites.
lites. satellites. The experiment will be con conducted
ducted conducted with the help of amateur
radio operators around the nation
who will monitor rr oon signals and
report by mail to Army signal
laboratories here.
The-project is part of the Navy's
Vanguard program to fire an
earth satellite into space.
Ah Army spokesman said the
experiments were designed to help
minitrack stations adjust and cali calibrate
brate calibrate their equipment to measure
accurately the movements o." earth
satellites.
The first radio signals tentative tentatively
ly tentatively were to have been bounced off
the moon between 8, p.m. yester yesterday
day yesterday and 2 a. m. tday. However,
it later was decided to wait until
Jan 14 so mnrp rnriin amstpiire
cou'd be notified about monitoring
Via cinn nld
TVers In Britoin
Slated To Hear
Real Bronx Cheer
LONDON, Jan. 4 (UP) TV an announcers,
nouncers, announcers, and performers in Brit Britain
ain Britain soon ire to be subjected to
the horrors of pushbutton war
through a device enabling a
chosen few viewers to give them
an electronic Bronx cheer.
A London TV firm announced
that it planned, to give a "cross "cross-section
section "cross-section group" of about 200 Brit Britons
ons Britons pushbutton equipment en enabling
abling enabling them to express disap disapproval
proval disapproval by flashing a red light in
the studio and sounding a loud
warning "burp."
Not onlv that the button Will
turn off he set.
'The idea is to let the viewer
answer back," said a spokesman
for the Associated-Rediffusion
Co.
"We welcome any criticism we
can get. In some cases, we may
be able to make improvements
during a. nroaram.". L ;

Judge Crowe Loans Tatelman Robes,
Acts As Witness In Robbery Case

Judge Guthrie F. Crowe loaned
hjs robes to Judge Edward I. P.
Tatelman after the latter had rid
den across the Isthmus yesterday
morning to serve as a special
judge for the United States Dis District
trict District Court in the Canal Zone, by
appointment of President Eisen
hower.
The case, which caused this
turnabout, is the robbery of Judge
Crowe's home in Ancon.
Judge Crowe also swore in his
enhstitiitp hpfnrp lakinc his unac
customed place in the body of the
courtroom as a witness.
Shark-Fighter Dies
Battling Crocodile
In African River
BANGUI, French' Equatorial Af Africa,
rica, Africa, Jan. 4 (UP) The tough
French colonial infantry today
mourned one of its bravest mem members
bers members whose hobby was fighting
sharks until he met up with a
crocodile.
Lt. Col. Jean Edmond -Itfarie
Kerhoas, 47, died battling a giant
crocodile in the "green hell" of the
M'poko Elver, the army reported.
He and his young native servant
had left early this week from
Bangui in a canoe. The servant,
wno surviveu, sain a i,uuu-pouno
crocodile overturned the boat.
Kerhoas who eninvori fiohfino
sharks with a knife, went over overboard
board overboard and the crnrnHilo nhirooH
him. While Kerhoas fought his los
ing battle, the servant made it
safely to shore and traveled 80
miles thrnueh the innple tn ronnrt
his master's death.
Home Deliveries
Favored By Doctor
SMRTHWTflTf V.nolond Ton A
fUP-U-Tlr. RfrhnrH .T FlnHHc Staf
fordshire distfkt health officer, ad-
visea prospective motners today to
have their babies at home to avoid
"nam-nanded" nospital treatment.
DoriHs said in his annual ronnrt
that thp new anti-hintine haH H1U.1
off most relatively harmless bac bacteria
teria bacteria and replaced them with "var "various
ious "various spartan breeds of organisms
and rungi' mat caused a- good
deal of troflb e whikh should n'ot
have occurred."
He said children were safer bora
at home.
Understandable
PARIS. Jan. 4 (VP Penal nf.
ficials reDorted toriav that the most
popular books in the prison librar libraries
ies libraries were travel folders.

Nixon's Use Of Jet Tanker As Taxi' Rapped
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4 (UP) refuel SAC's hydrogen-bomb carry- A spokesman for Nixon, who was
Sen. A. S. Mike Monroney (D.-ing B-52's and B-47's the na-in New York today, said Thursday
Okla.) angrily blasted as "extrava-tion's chief defensive weapons a-'the multi-million dollar plane had
gant and dangerous" today con- gainst Russia. been offered for the vice presi-
version of a Strategic Air Com- In a statement, Monroney said dent's use "when it is practical
mand (SAC) KC-135 jet tanker in-he doubted SAC had a "sufficient to do so."
to a "criss-country taxi" for Vice supply" of the jet tankers at pre-
President Richard M. Nixon. sent to affofd giving one away. The plane the same one used
He also hit at President Eisen-The senator said he had demanded in a record-breaking flight from

hnwer personal planes and heli
copters.
Monroney, chairman of the Sen
ate Aviation subcommittee, de
clared the 550-mile an hour plane
for Nixon was urgently needed to

The defendant Feverice Zapa Zapata,
ta, Zapata, a Panamanian with an Elvis
Presley haircut, said that he
had been in hospital at the time
of the crime, Aug. 13, '57. Hos Hospital
pital Hospital records were produced to
show that his hospitalization
dates were from Oct. 1 to Oct,
18.
Thereupon the defendant enter

ed a plea of "Not Guilty," and a
date for the trial was set for
Tuesday, April 29.
Matty legal personalities were
Dresent at the hearine. Wondrow
de Castro acted as interpreter for
the court. U. S. Marshal Joseph I.
Kincaid, 'Deputy Marshal William
P. Fuller, Acting District Attorney
J. Morton Thompson Jr., Clerk of
the Court c. T. Mccormick. Pub
lie Defender William J. Sheridan
and Court Reporter Mrs. Quiggle
were all present m their official
capacities.
Among the spectators were
Judge John E. Deming, Acting
Magistrate Garcia, who will be
Judge Tatelman's replacement dur
ing his vacation, and John H.
Michaelis, clerk of the Balboa Ma
gistrate's Court.
Judge Tatelman left the court
to cross the Isthmus again and
board a ship bound for the United
States, yesterday afternoon.
NEW JOB? Adm. Arthur W.
Radford, former chairman ot.
the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff,
may soon be named to a high
diplomatic post Sucb is specu speculation
lation speculation In T"ky0 which further
has that Radford might be
named as ambassador to the
Philippines if the present en envoy,
voy, envoy, Charles E. Bohlen, de decides
cides decides to retire.

in a telegram to Defense Secretary Argentina by Air Force Vice Chief
Neil H. McElroy to know "by whatGen. Curtis E. Lemay was not

authority the Air Force could fur-assigned exclusively to Nixon, the
nish the vice president with thespokesman said. It is based at

latest, most expensive and most
urgently -needed jet transport,"

.
Postmen Don't Ring Once

THE PULSE
OF PANAMA
THE ROUTE for this year's
Carnival Tuesday parade was ap approved
proved approved Friday at a meeting of the
Carnival Junta, which was attend'
ed by members of the press.
The parade will start on via
fspafta below Hotel El Panama
Hilton and break up at the Na National
tional National Stadium after returning
from Chorrillo along a rpute
which will put the parade along
Fourth of July and Tivoli Ave Ave-nues
nues Ave-nues for the first time in history.
Rita Burrell. who waa selected
recently as the "Sweetheart" of
Panama newsmen, is among the
first candidates for Carnival
Queen. v
A inrnr named Saeel was on the
jury of the last murder trial of
1957 and the first of 195B at me
Superior Tribunal;
Imp Ma Sacrel was one ot me IU
rors on the panel of the President
Remon murder trial wnicn enoea
last Dec. 6 and Roberto Sagel,
said tn he Imelda's brother, was
on the panel Friday at the trial of
Pfc. Harold F. nose ana ms wue
Blanca.
Beds In Guatemala
Gain New Foothold
Despite US Dollars
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4 (UP)
State Department experts said to
day Guatemala once again ap appears
pears appears in danger of falling under
the heel of communism.
Both department officials and
congressmen made clear-they are
closely watching developments in
the little Latin American republic.
Members indicated the House
Foreign Affairs Committee might
order an investigation of the situa
tion.
"We have been very concerned,"
one State Department official said.
Guatemala in 1954 became the
only nation ever to overthrow a
Communist regime. But last July
after a Red sympathizer assassi
nated Guatemalan President Car Carlos
los Carlos Castillo Armas, exiled Com
munists and fellow travelers began
pouring back into the country.
Pen Alhert P. Mor8no (R-
Pnnnl whn visited Guatemala I&st
year with a five-man foreign jff jff-faira
faira jff-faira subcommittee, told the Unit Unit-ad
ad Unit-ad Press the Communists already
have "a new foothold" there. He
called Castillo Armas' assassina assassination
tion assassination a "tragic setback for free freedom."
dom." freedom." The new Guatemalan swing to
tha left rnulri reach a climax in
the forthcoming national elections
Jan. 19.
Three narties have offered can
didates for the presidency. Two of
the parties are strongly anti anti-Communist.
Communist. anti-Communist. The third was report reported
ed reported to be a target for Communist
infiltration.
Some officials feared the elec
tion could result in a new wave
violence.
Th emintrv held national elec
tions only last Oct. 20. But the
new government leu almost im immediately
mediately immediately in the face of wide widespread
spread widespread demonstrations against it.
A caretaker government headed
by Col. Guillermo Flores Aven-
dano took control pending new
elections.
Momhers nf 0nffreKS are oartic-
ularly concerned about Guatemala
because Congress has twice sin singled
gled singled out the tiny country for spe
cial treatment in the U. b. foreign
aid program.
In 1955 Congress earmarked 15
million dollars for Guatemala.
Last year Congress specified that
Guatemala receive at least 10 mil million
lion million dollars of the funds going to
Latin American countries for eco economic
nomic economic development.
Andrews Ajr Force Base in nearby
Maryland.

ALICE AND

Christmas Eve Shipwreck

Brings

Latest castaways to arrive in
Panama are Alice and Peter Pin-
nev. whose schooner Rex was
wrecked off the Colombian coast
on Christmas Eve.
Down for the moment but far
from out, they are currently con
sidering where to go, now, and
what to do if and when they get
there.
Pirmey, who last left his na na-five
five na-five Australia 11 years ago,
passed the better portion of ten
years wandering haphazardly
through some eighty nations, col colonies
onies colonies and protectorates in Eu Europe,
rope, Europe, Asia and Africa.
In 1955, following a solo trip in
a 15-foot canoe tor aw mus
down the Peace and Mackenzie
rivers in-Northern Canada for a
month's sojourn with the Inuuk-
piaat Eskimos, hunting wnite
whales, Pinney moved south to
New York and his fiancee, Alice
Brown.
Alice was (hen the youngest
media director of New York's
advertising business, and living
in Greenwich Village; but Pin-,
"rtey's talk of faraway places
lured her off with him the on only
ly only "condition being that he first
remove his beard.
Beardless, Pinney travelled with
her across the States to the West
Coast, down the west coast ot
Mexico, and they wound up hiking
through hot dry scrubland for a
week, four days of this with no
food, and limped into the back
door of British Honduras.
During this southern journey
mey nan oeen luuKing iur a uuu
some kind of small freight vessel
At 1 1 1 1 I I
with Which they could earn their
livelihood. They found her in the
Roatan Islands, off the coast of
Honduras. Twenty-one tons, 45
feet, she was a dainty little yawl
built well and beautifully in tne
best traditions of the buccaneer buccaneer-descendants
descendants buccaneer-descendants who inhabit these is islands.
lands. islands. With her they moved South
to Panama. That was July in 1956.
For any little vessel bearing a
foreign flag, opportunities in
Panama are somewhat restrict restricted,
ed, restricted, so after half a year they
went to Costa Rica. In Puntare Puntare-nas,
nas, Puntare-nas, en the calm Pacific coast,
they began a small enterprise
carrying tourists and sport-fish,
ermen among the nearby islands.
They loved the life, and loved
the Costa Ricans too, but were
always willing to come south te
Panama with freight. . and
freight was their undoing.
Dec. 21 they accepted cargo In
Cristobal, bound for Aruba off the
coast of Venezuela. In the small
hours at the morning they thrust
northeast from Cristobal into the
teeth of the northerly season.
Saturday and Sunday were
rough, but not abnormally so, and
the schooner rode that sea as if
she owned it. Early on Monday
there was motor trouble, which
persisted through the day until
finally the motor quit. The cooling
system had completely broken
down, and the motor threw a rod.

PETER PINNEY

That night they took to sail.
Tuesday, Christmas Eve, vio-
lent weather bore down on them;
the mainsail blew out and they
were powerless to prevent them themselves
selves themselves from drifting onto the coast.
They rigged a sea-anchor out
of a 55-gallon drum, but seas
were crashing aboard green and
stripping planks from along the
gunnels, bursting against the
drums of fuel on deck, smashing
woodwork aft and threatening to
take the compate box. No pass passing
ing passing vessel came in sight to aid
them.
Land was not far off at dusk,
The wind was pushing them
straight inshore, somewhere near

the border of Panama and Co- subjected to high speed a key one
lombia. for the builders of ocean-spanning
They let the anchor down to ballistic missiles and space ships
catch where and when it might, of the future,
and in the seething darkness of, p also deals in the nose cone
the night they waited, drenched, 'problem of missile re-entry into
bailing with buckets and sauce-the earth's atmosphere,
pans, soothing a terrified kitten) The granting of asylum to No No-and
and No-and preparing emergency stores to winski after his wife and daughter

take in one of their two skiffs
At 11:20 they hit a bar' amidst
a chaos of bursting rollers whip whipped
ped whipped to frenzy by the howling
north wind.
Stricken, helpless, the disabled
schooner was flung this way and
that by the violence of heavy
seas; drums of fuel quickly dis disappeared,
appeared, disappeared, the aft deck was strip stripped,
ped, stripped, gunnels smashed, vents and
smokestak matched away. One
skiff was reduced to matchwood:
the kitten was flung to its death
from Its refuge in Alice's life life-jacket.
jacket. life-jacket. By cutting free the second skiff
lashed to the roofing aft, the Pin Pin-neys
neys Pin-neys were able to ,ride inshore,
swamped but clinging on, and
made the beach.
What beach? They didn't know.
They salvaged a few things drift
ing inshore and passed two lonely
days. .Christmas. .waiting to see
if they might get back aboard to
save spme precious items.
When the schooner began to
break up in unabating seas they
left, ,' walking slowly eest elong
the beach, arid In the course of
time came to a plantation owned
by e German. He flew them in
his small plane to Playen Chi Chi-co,
co, Chi-co, San Bias, where they found
a canoe te take them half a day
to Nargana, and here they were
succoured by Father Kelb.
And now the Guardia Nacional
was interested; even suspicious.
l)nder suspicion they were es escorted
corted escorted by plane to Panama, to
spend 11 hours locked up in the
gaol, then to be taken on to the
Secret Police.
Police there, began with Pinney's
life story as from 1939, a formida formidable
ble formidable undertaking involving many
hours and a formidable dossier.
When friends intervened the case
was declared cleared, suspicions
dissolved in smiles, and in a mat matter
ter matter of minutes Immigration gave
them a 30-day permit to stay. And
now?

Mail Carriers'
House Yields
5000 Letters

Five thousand letters from all parts of the world were
found under a stairway today followina the arrest of three

'Panama City letter-carriers

Detectives gnve the names of the letter corners as
Delfin JPalomeqiie, Secundino Rujano Jr. and Feliciano
Pinzon, all residents of Colon Street, where the letters
were found in a building where the three men live with
their families.
Others are reportedly involved in the theft of letters,
which has been going, on for some time. The Secret Police
said they had the names and addresses of the others and

expected to make further arrests.

Detectives said the letter-carriers had opened the
letters in search of money and usually took them to Glo Glome
me Glome or San Carlos beach where they were burned.

One of "the three men arrest arrested
ed arrested is a stamp collector In whose
home a valuable stamp collec
tion was found. Detectives be
lieve he remove the stamps he
wanted from the stolen letters
before burning them.
The Secret Police had been
I' investigating the reported loss of
correspondence for some time
land only recently began to sus sus-ipect
ipect sus-ipect the letter-carriers who
,ww phKjec under surveillance.
US GfdlllS A$ylUfT!
"
T- DaSIcU f iAnftIrf
10 rOllSll JUCIIIIjI
Dr. Jerzy Novinski
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4-(UP)-Polish
mathematical wizard Dr.
Jerzy Leon Novinski, who defect defected
ed defected from Communist laboratories,
pledged his high-power brain to,
America today in the great mis missile
sile missile race with Russia.
Nowinski, well acquainted with
Russian advances in research, is
an exnert theoretical researcher
on thermoe-elasticitv. This is a
science in the stress and strains of
metals and other materials when
had succeeded in fleeing from be
hind the Iron Curtain to England
was disclosed yesterday by Attor
ney General William P. Rogers.
When his family escaped. No Nowinski
winski Nowinski was in Baltimore lecturing
at Johns Honkins University. He
had been a research professor at
the University of Warsaw for
seven years.
The Disinterested
nntSTOT,. Eneland. Jan. 4 (UP)
Four British army officers, in including
cluding including a major general and a
brigadier, failed in their mission
to promote the army as a career
at a Bristol scncui.
One boy turned out to listen and
decided he wanted to be a pharmacist.

Army Identifies 3 Missing GIs

The three soldiers, missing; since Monday In a 12-foot
sailboat bowad tor Taboga, have been Identified by VA.
Army Caribbean. They are: .
Sp3 Terry A. BulMs, 21, Headquarters and Headquarter
Company, 1st Battle Group. 20th Infantry, Fort Kobbe, son
of M7Srt. William C. BuUls, 6th Armored Division, Fort
""pfc. Terry I. Cote, 1, VS. Army Aviation Detachment,
Fort Kobbe, son of Clyde L. Cole, 413 7th Street, Michigan
Center, Mich.
Pvt. Walter W. Beck, 23, U.S. Army Signal Service, Fort
Clayton, son of Mrs. Lucille Beck, 2525 N. Terrace Avenue,
Milwaukee, Wis.
All three men were assigned duties tn the U.S. Arraf
Aviation Detachment at Howard Air Force Base, Fort Kobbe,
The three men left Fort Kobbe in a 12-foot open sail

boat about 2:30 p.m. Monday bound for Taboga isiana

about fifteen miles off the

to the Panama. Canal. They were due Jck Wl
night when their passes expired.
When they failed to return, a full-scale air
search was instituted with Army and Air Force via

Army and Navy boats. The
yesterday when all reasonable
exhausted bv search officials.
The men will continue
status by the United States

O

by the Panama Secret Police.
Jammed Cell Block
In Horrible Ness;
Drunk Has To Wait
GASTONIA (UPV-To onlookers.
the situation at the Gaston County
jajl yesterday was hilarious. But
to harried jail, Snd eosrt officials
it was a horrible mess.
Before a jammed eell block lock
could be fixed, city court had to
be cancelled because the defend-
ants couldn't set out
of jail, t
drunk couldn't get in and
soner threatened to "take
7
business elsewhere."
It all began at midnight We
day when an assistant jailor i
to the cell block to release
trusties for duty. He found
lock on the main door leading to
tne diock jammed.
Jailor Earl Clemmer called
company which manufactured
lock, and a repairman was sent
from the office m Koanoto, Va.
He arrived about noon and had to
take the entire compucafc
chamsm apart before rep
Meanwhile:
City court was called off because
all six defendants on the docket
were in the locked cell block.
LeRoy Carson, who has a loni
list of drunkenness convictions- ana
who had been released only
Friday, wandered "home,' hut
had to wait to be committed.
A crowd gathered to offer ad advice,
vice, advice, none of it appreciated by
Clemmer.
One jailor finally managed to
quiet a prisoner in the woman's
section who kept singing "Birm "Birmingham
ingham "Birmingham jail" in a loud voice.
Two prisoners slept through all
the commotion.
Another muttered, "If I ever
get out of fiiis jail I'm going to
take by business elsewhere."
After several hours, the
locksmith got the door pen- The
trusties got out, Carson got in and
court was rescheduled.
And Clemmer went home early
to restore his shattered nerves.
v
coast from the Pacific ent
search was abandoned
possibilities were
to be carried In a
Army.

ed me-

airin it.



SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 1M
Peter Edson
In
Washington
High on the Hog and the Agenda
mis Muwn wr the panama
T NKwSON ROUNKVILl IN M
HARMODIO IDITOM
U. M ImiT P O BOH '34 PANAM OP P
J TKCPHONt 2-O740 9 LINM
Cabli acduu pan ambk tc am. panada
OPPtCtl 1J.179 CBNTRAL AVINIK BCTWIEH !fM AW 1ST tPMT
PMBM IMPmaCNTATIvW. JOSHUA a POWIR. inc.
SAB MAMMN AVC NEW VOftlt. OT N V.
LOCAL
ASVAWCB
1 70 t SO
BO i3 00
. 80 tltC-P.
: m HBWWIA HI ADVANCE.
MB YEAH m ADVANCE

.'A

aBBeWeaWaHaBeBaBBVaVH

m row FORUM THI waders own column

The Mail

loi if an open feram fw readera ot The anawa 7,e;
Wivad" gratefully and ara handled in a wholly confidential

t..-M.trihutc letter dent be Impatient IT It dDetnt apptw the

cay. Letttn are published in the order received.
Maw tra to kaeo the ratters limited to one page length.

Identity ot letter writers Is held in strictest sonfidenee
This newspaper assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions

tj tressed in letter from reader.
I THE MAIL BOX

TRAINING PROGRAM

4

!! gimme another one of them PersonaJ-ewij
1 J P c,or timo vn rinpo" that n

mocairtrras w mi ouu. ier mm. u. ------
accmuMTs it with the kind of languase I cant repeat here on
aeeount of this is a family newspaper and everr the men in tn
tMned forces might object. The only time he gets madder is
Sen he gets a bulletin from the Decimal Point Pushers Brtw-

ety as tin mm aooui ms uuurcl iu mo lo-w --, -
Sirs What difference does it make Red says. I never gu
at'l asts.fer anyhow and I cant understand why they even
bathers to ast except maybe its on account of they, gotta have
simethln they can say no to. !.Mjt ,mi(!
1 But this last one was fer the heads of independent units
and Mr. Doolans boys want to know about the tralnin program.
fiell, I sSess Reds bosVfiggers Mindi 'Dairy to an independent
unit so ie sent a copy Red to fill out and like. I said. Red
alve it to me on account of I handles the' caows- and do most
9 there trainin. And them caows is well trained, iffen I must
sty so myself. As much as you can train a caow, that Is.
First Mr. Doolan says they are goin to tell us about there
tftlnin program after we tell them what we done. Looks like
aemethin got ahead of somebody or the program sortal boomer boomer-anged
anged boomer-anged down hill. Then they tell us what they ,dont want to
Sow, an include "pep talks." an "tailgate conferences." Now I
Sow what a pep talk Is. Thats all I git from Red mostly. But
a' tailgate conference beats me. That must be one of them new
Sprds only fellers what study Personal Administration knows.
Sorta makes me feel Inferior when a feller talks English and I
cant understand him. Wish they would send out another Ut Ut-3s
3s Ut-3s bulletin and explain what a tailgate conference is. because
iffen they alnt gonna give us any credit fer glvin or attendm
ttjem then I dont want to have anythin to do with them, even
unconscious.
A Then they say, "w.:. to skve your time, please forward to
Training Officer, Personnel Bureau, the raw material, in
the form you receive it from your subordinate units." Now
ldoka here. The wav I Bit my raw material is two ways; from
ttie milkih machines, an hy scrapin it offen the stable floors
an iffen the Personal Brewery wants it in the raw material
shape they will either have to git it from the refrigerator car
oj from the compost pit. I dont know which raw material they
riremost interested in, but it must be the milk. They dont
nto any of, the other stuff, havln a plentiful source of supply
GawjJ" ... .. ;
An I would appreciate it Iffen the Trainin boys would add
a cotrpIF of courses to there trainin program. The first is a
course in how to house break caows. You know, ive bin In
this business ever since I could walk, way down in South Ar Arkansas
kansas Arkansas where I was born an I aint never bin able to teaoh a
caow much. Horses and mules and even jackasses is different.
Thei can be taught. Trouble is unteachin them. Show them
bruifs anythin an vou have to beat them' to death to maka em
forget it. But iffen the Personnel boys could come up with a
traiijln method on how to -house break caows it would sure
save, me a passel of back breakui man hours of work.
the second thing iaa course on givln stupid answers. This
would come in mighty handy fer the fellers in the maintenance
ere who have to repair plumbin an elftctrje stoves an such.
Seems like nobody gets ast so many stupid questions as them
fellers an Iffen they was given a trainin course on how to give
a stdpid answer it would be a. pleasant thing all around.
Me, Im fer progress two.
T i
Sadeye Sam

WASHINGTON (NEA) Every

segment of the U.S. transporta

tion industry is now crying its

eyes out. There is a strong suspi

eion in Washington that much of

the grief is crocodile tears, ihey
are being shed in profusion now
to make demands for rate in increases
creases increases look good.

A Senate commerce subcommit

tee on transportation under Sen.

George A. Smathers (U-DJa.) win

open an investigation in mid-January.
But it seems interested on only
ly only in the plight oi the railroad's.

And that takes m only one part
of Amercia's vast transport sys

tem today.

That s needed, according to in

dependent transportation experts

in Washington, is a Hoover com

mission type of independent tnvts tnvts-tigation
tigation tnvts-tigation into all kinds of com com-merical
merical com-merical carriers air, water, rail

land highway.

This commission should Be giv

en plenty of time-i-three years or

so and plenty of money to do a

thorough job which has never

been done, and which, Congress
can't do.

Its goal could be to design a

regulatory system that would gear
the country's transport services to
future needs instead of to past

penormances.

ONE OF THE MANY commis

sions set up by the Eisenhower
administration when it came to
town in 1953 was a transDortation

study group under Secretary of
Commerce Sinclair Weeks.

The Weeks commission got bp.

ged down in land surface trans transportation
portation transportation problems. It was princi principally
pally principally concerned, with competition
between railroads and truckers.
Its 1954 report became a dead

letter and its recommendations

were never acted upon.

The result is that today even'

part of the transportation mdus
try is clamoring for relief, along

these lines:

Airline executives, their trade

association, their bankers and
their backers are now claiming
that unless the commercial air
carriers are granted a rate in
crease, they will go oankrupt.
Thev will orobablv cet their

rate increase, all right. But a

strong suspicion has been built op

here that better financial manage

ment would solve many of their

problems.

International airlines recently

put over a smart movu. They in introduced
troduced introduced a new third-class service
with lower fares. It is. expected
to reduce gradually the number
of first class services to a tew
luxury flights a week.

NEW ZEALAND BEEF
Sir:
As a housewife I am not much concerned with tho ethics
of or buying New Zealand "or Panamanian beef. That is some.,
bodil else's department. But as a customer wMb buys and cooks
for ieven people, I am certainly interested in getting meat that
is not only edible but enjoyable as well, and this game of
chance we are forced to play with our family food is about to
drive me to Equanil.
To be specific, a couple of weeks ago I brought home a
cut Ot New Zealand sirloin that was pretty good, and we re rejoiced
joiced rejoiced and presumed Jthat happy meals were here at last. Bit
our pleasure was short-lived; our next three purchases of IWw.
Zealand beef sent us right back to the native stuff. As luck
would have it, for several days we had very good Panamanian
beef, and we innocently supposed that the competitive angle
had improved the home product; then bang, we hit that old
wild; game supply again.
Now slnee we are from Texas, where "Good" beei is ex excellent
cellent excellent and "Commercial" grade is dependably good, we have
never learned to look farther than the label for identification;
so if anyone knows how to tell by looking at a hunk of meat
whether it is going to taste like beef or wildcat or some un unidentified
identified unidentified weed, won't you please tell me?
Confused Carnivore

CANAL ZONE GIRLS

Blr:
t think the Canal Zone girls are the best I've ever known.
Furthermore, in personality, looks and so forth they can put
Southern girls to shame. I'll wager whoever wrote the letter
signed by "The Slobs Club" (Mall Box, Dec. 11) is from the
Soutjh. I say this because of his reference to the girls drink drinking
ing drinking alcohol. It Is so dry in the South you are lucky to get a
drttik of water.
t have been ou with Canal Zone giris when i never had

any money. I have a car, yes, but hardly ever put gas in it

when I'm short of money. Certain people chlp.in artd we ride
aroimd together. They also take me to their 'JaOuses and feed
me.
i i
How does the writer of the "Slobs Club" letter figure the

girls complain about their parents? In the States I once took

out a girl I had met in the zone. She was going to school
Stateside. I had a better time with her than I would have had
with one of those countey girls up there.

JVhy' didn't the writer of the letter sign his name, instead

of saying "we here at Albrook"?. Who is "we"? Man, that
writer is out to lunch.
-Wi: Later

50-50
sir: f ..

One of the reasas for the upsurge of interest in the Idea-

of splitting tne uanai zone tons revenue 50-50 between the US
and Panama is the facility with which non-resident, non-US
citizens can make purchases in the Post Exchanges, Panama
Canal Service Centers and Commissaries, and even at the hos hos-oital
oital hos-oital candv stands.

Contrabanding is at its peak. Though Paparria could estab-

nsn customs poais moiig me poraer, it is consiaered to De tne

CI

at
the

efil

authorities' responsibility to control contraband material

source.

the Canal is unable to cope with the nresent situation.

it is suggested that Panama put its contraband laws into

itncltifllng the confiscation of vehicles caught transport-

BUT. THIS MOVE is now being

resisted by the passenger carry

ing merchant marine lines. They
want the airlines- to taise rates
so that the passenger' ships can
raise rjtes. They're now getting
seven to eight cents a mi!e. Any
increase will probably drive still

more business to the airhnes.

This Will make the plight of rbe

shipping companies worse than it

Common carrier truck line oper

ators are screaming against the
increasing trend of private indus industries
tries industries that do their own trucking.
Some transportation experts think
the remedy here is for the com common
mon common carriers to get busy and of offer
fer offer a. competing private farriage
of freight under contract.

But lines are in the curious po

sition of steady income but a fall-

off in passenger business. They

would like to raise rates, but if
they do they will lose more passengers,

Pipelines were never in a more

prosperous positioln. But they
have a gripe against proposals

to regulate the cost of natural gas
and oil imports. So they're complaining.

TWO UNSOLVED MURDERS

What is known locally as "the

crime of January 2, 1955" when

President Jose Antonio Remon was
killed at the Juan Franco Race
Track has not been solved. The

disappearance March 12, 1956 in

New York City of Jose Maria Ga Ga-lindez,
lindez, Ga-lindez, a distinguished Spanish-

Basque scholar at coiumoia uni university,
versity, university, also remains unsolved.

Both crimes reflect on the coun

tries involved, Panama and Santo
Domingo, and their shadows will
hang over these countries until
the crimes are solved and their
perpetrators brought to justice.

Unfortunately the efforts so far

towards solution do little credit to
either country, although there has
been one conviction in the Galin Galin-dei
dei Galin-dei case wfcieh,, this column will

U1SCU55.

FINALLY. YOU COME to the

railroads, which are always coin

piaimng, signs ox tne umes are

the drop m railroad security pric
es and profits. The proposed Penp
sylvania-New York Central mer

ger and B. and O.'s dropping of
Baltimore-New York passenger

sci vice are saiu 10 DC MCucauve

of more of the same to come.

Some railroad economist now
feet that part of the trouble stems

rrom trying to regulate railroads
as though they were all a 1 i k e.

They aren't. Long Island hauld 90
per cent commuters. New Haven's
business is 60 per cent passenger

traffic, Pocahontas carries 90 per

cent coai.

In the light of many facts like

these, it is considered no longer

possioie to talk about the prob

lem of "the" railroads, or the
eastern, southern or western roads.

To get at their economic diffi

culties, they should be reclassifed

by function.
(But this proposal meets oddo

sition from most railroad execu

tives particularly those who

oppose any new idea in transper

tation.

fe droits V
1 1 f 1 ... .i i Ill 1 I Ijyjt-.

Half a Column More or Less Now and Then
by CREDE CALHOUN

A former FBI aen&;one John

Joseph FMnkrhae lee convicted

in a u.S,iederarvurt ot acting
as ah agent of Generalissimo Ra

fael L. Trujillo, without register registering
ing registering in accordance with law.

Generalissimo Trujillo has and

has had many unregistered agents
ih the Unfted. States, just as he has
in very country in Latin America.

He and his agents have been

suspected in the vanishing of Dr.

Gaiindez, because the latter was
about to publish a book, "The Era
of Trujillo," which exposed instead
of praising "El Gran Benefactor."

Other deaths were involved here,

just as in the Remon case. Ger Gerald
ald Gerald Murphy, an Americas airplane
pilot, also disappeared. When it

got too hot for Trujillo a Santo Do-

mingan pilot was charged with the
killing of Murphy, and under in in-ojadible
ojadible in-ojadible circumstances was said
to have hanged himself in jail aad

left a confession that Was not in

his handwriting.

The evidence in the Frank trial,

Which stood- the test of a Federal
Court showed that on the date of
the disappearance of Galindez,
Murphy had ilown a hired air

plane to West Pa'm Beach, and

that before leaving Long isiana,
New York, he plotted a flight to
Santo Domingo, This,, was sworn
to by an US Air Force sergeant,
named Harold L. French, a close
friend of Murphy.

French accompanied Murphy
when he hired the Plane .and help

ed him install additional gas tanks
to increase its il'ght range. This
was six days before Galindez van

ished.
The man who raid the bill for

the plane was introduced by Mur Murphy
phy Murphy as "Mr. John Kane," but in
reality he was John Joseph Frank,
agent of dictator Trujillo.

At the time Frank was accom accompanied
panied accompanied by Maj. General Arturo
Rafael Espaillat, former Domini Dominican
can Dominican Consul General in New York,
who has refused to come to the U U-nited
nited U-nited States to give testimony and
by Felix Bernardino, who was
Consul General when Andres Re Re-quena,
quena, Re-quena, an opponent of Trujillo was
killed in Manhattan by hired gun gunmen.
men. gunmen. French declined Murphy's invi invitation
tation invitation to fly as co-pilot and the job
was taken by Octsvio de la Maza,
later charged with the murder of
Murphy as already noted here.
Murphy took the plane to an air airport
port airport at Amity, Long Island Mar.
12, the day that Gallndes was last
seen alive.

(2

Anthony Frevele. night watch

man at the airport, told his relief

and later his daughter that a
man who could not move a muscle'
was taken from an ambulance and
placed aboard the plane.
The plane landed at a West Palm
Beach airport to refuel.
The mechanic who did the job

LARGE
AMERICAN
FIRM
. Needs Representative for
the Republic of Panama
Basic Salary, Commission
and Bonus Plan
Those Interested Contact
Mr. M. COVARRUBIAS
At El Panama Hilton Hotel
lay, January 7
8 to 10 a.m.

had to take his hose inside the
plane tv til the tanks that had
beert installed in the passenger

part o. the fuselage.

lie saia ne noteo a peculiar
stench" possibly of a strong drug
and also saw on a stretcher an un unconscious
conscious unconscious or lifeless body.
The mechanic, Donald Jackson,
did not testify at the Frank trial.
Jackson, like a number of other
important witnesses, was dead.
He was subpoenaed to testify
Nov. 12, but his ?ppearahce was
postponed until Nov. 18.
On Nov. 12 Jackson left with his
father in a private plane for Tex Texas.
as. Texas. The, plane crashed and both
were killed. There were no wit witnesses
nesses witnesses and the crash has never
been explained.

Another 'witness who could not
testify at the Frank trial was An Anthony
thony Anthony Frevelle, the watchman who
saw the apparently 'inanimate bo body
dy body placed aboard the plane at the
Long Island airport.
Frevelle died pi a heart attack
in September 1956.. His testimony
was most important and would be
more so, if any. further progress is
made in clearing up the mystery
of the disappearance of Dr. Ga
lindez.
The pirates who once infested
the Spanish Main around Santo

Domingo are credited with say

ing: Dead men tell no tales," or
was it Robert Louis Stevenson,
who wrote it? It is true never nevertheless.
theless. nevertheless. Another death that may or may
not have been conpected with the
Galindez case was that of Salvador
Cobjan, chief of po'ice, of the capital-city
of Santo, Domingo. Ccbian
was Murphy's closest friefid in
Ciudad Trujillo.
One day in November 1956 a
man, who has never been identi identified,
fied, identified, walked into Cobian's office
ami started shooting and killed Co Co-bian
bian Co-bian and then left to vanish as com
pletely as Galindez.
When 'Murphy heard the news
he said: "My Good they's killed
my protector. Less than a month
later Murphy was to disappear as
mysteriously as Galindez,too.

Another disappearance was that
of Felix Hernandez Marquez, an
agent' of Trujillo known as "El
Cojo," because he was lame.
If El Cojo were still alive he
would be easy to identify, because
in addition to limping he had a
glass eye. He was one of the finger
men and had visited Galindez in
New York.
Later he told a Cuban friend

that he had money to "do away
with a professor in New York."'

El Cojo was either drunk or indis indiscreet
creet indiscreet as soon afterward he Was
ordered to return to Santo Domin Domingo
go Domingo and has never been heard from
since. The Cuban told this story
on a C.B.S. broadcast.
El Cojo had a girl friend, Ana
Gloria Viera, in Ciudad Trujillo,
who probably was suspected of

knowing too much about the Ga

lindez case. At any rate her mane-

led body was. found one day in

August 1956, in a wrecked automo automobile.
bile. automobile. Presumably she had been driv driving
ing driving alone. Curiously her close
friends said that she did not know
how to drive a car. and she had

no driver's license. "Possibly she
just had bad hick the ..first time

sne iriea.
There is the record, or part of
it to date. The Generalissimo some
months ago hired a prominent New

York lawyer, Morris Ernst, and a
former Justice of the New York

State Supreme Court, and a form former
er former Tammany press agent to clear
up the mystery, because it was
hurting his popularity in the Unit United
ed United States.
Let them taka the case from
here.

YOU HORRIBLE OMENS fOR 1958. let u have n
more knocking ot the luxuries Available here on ihe Isth Isthmus.
mus. Isthmus. Particularly let me hear no knocking of theTxmagni theTxmagni-fieenoa
fieenoa theTxmagni-fieenoa of the Panama Railroad, which for glorious, w
screen technicolor can out-do the swankiest railroads Mi Mi-where
where Mi-where in the Vjiorld, I learned laet Friday night.
Alt right, so I admit the Panama Railroad does nyt
have tho seven-course cuisine of the dining cars of the
famous streamliners stateside. But there's always plenty
of water in the cooler at tha end of each passenger car.
Neither are there any of the little duplex arrange arrangements
ments arrangements the long-haut streamliners make so much boast
about. But if you want the comforts of: home, no One rid riding
ing riding the Panama ftailro&d would object to your taking your
shoesand socks off and rlxing in drowsy delight
Thore is one feature in which the Panama railroad
surpasses the best available anywhere in the world.
wuitk lU 'M S? a(vertsfnnt for these streamliners
with the something extra. The Western Pacific Railroad
nl Chica o Zephyr hihba"in, betwwi Oakland
The Northern Pacific Railroad-has its North Coast
Limited bowling along wherever it was the men who built
the North Pacific put the rails in the first place.
The Canadian Pacific has & much-touted streamliner
running from Montreal and Toronto to Vancouver.
There are all sorts of others, all making the same
claim.
What is this claim, this super-feature possessed by
none but the best in- railroads? It is the Vistadome, a
blister on top of the passenger car.
Last Friday night I rode in the Vistadome of the
Panama Railroad, on the Panama Railroad's celebrated 8
P.m. (give or take half an hour) non-streamliner from Mt.
Hope to Diablo. Never have I had a more pleasant trans transcontinental
continental transcontinental crossing.
Too sharp to use the terms hackneyed by so many
advertising writers, Panama Railroaders unobtrusively
refer to their Vistadome as a caboose. This car Is sin-

" TiT 1 w 'B inB "inmus y moonlight, fis
tZll 6 W xf I"y cr0Mig- There is ntf light in it
except a couole .of lanterns which create the romantic
faiUs" & traPptr'$ hut omewhere up in he moun-
Such seats as there are on the lower deck of its
double-bubble fuselage are hewn from the living stone,
to such effect that even the Venus de Mik would likely
find them a little hard for comfort.
But in the conning tower andor Vistadome, nothing
but" dreamy scenery and Lucullan luxwy.
At the urging of conductor Floyd M. Johnston, and
with the aid of three runga which looked as though they
were filched from some ancient Spanish well at Old Pan Panama,
ama, Panama, I climbed to cruising altitude before Engineer Harold
Chambers had pushed enough buttons and pulled enough
ever to get the train more, than a couple of miles out of
Mt. Hope,
By this time I could no longer hear the importunate
tooting of an unnamed Pacific-side pilot who had man managed
aged managed to communicate his travel urge to Johnston &t the
back of the train, but whp had not come up with any
ideas for passing the message forward to where Cham Chambers
bers Chambers was making merry withthe machinery. Wonder how
!IaI 'L0t,V get. hprrterhat, night. And what Was
that word I heard him us as the' caboose light faded
into the night?
So there we were Vistadoming along like ydu com commonplace
monplace commonplace travellers never dream of. For us, nsne of this
chiva-l.ke stopping stilting at Pedro Miguel, Paraiso, G& G&-tun
tun G&-tun and wherever. Just one passing stop at Gamboa, and
2! Toi th.d AVay nhi8: that the Canadian Pacific's
proud streamlmers could ever hope to cope with.
nJ! firma "can Valerie and trakeman Willie
Douglas up front helping Chambers decide which tap to
urn next, and flshian Cecil Thompson back in the
caboose hanging enison, to whatever it was the struc-
ur. was designed for in the firs place, we sped through
the balmy Isthrnian night.
advrtf. Cnadi Pacific. and the others boast, brag and
uk:orA;herny.wa,,t-There ar a few qwMtion8
: Who wants to sit in a VistadOme getting snowblind
gazing at the wintry prairies of Manitoba when he can
instead contemplate, likewise 1 from a Vistadome, the
slivery glitter of moonlight on Catun Lake.
Who wants to sit in his Vistadome, as the train
makes a waystop, being tempted to" get off and suffer
the high-priced pleasures of Banff? How much better, at
a stop, to sit untempted in one's Vistadome contemplating
Gamboa, a settlement which offers negligibly few tempta temptations
tions temptations of any kind whatsoever.
Who wants to watch the mist dripping round the
over-rated Rockies, when instead to gladden the heart
one can see clearly, from the Panama Railroad Vistadome,
r u ozen taw-powered colored lights of the Summer
Golf Club glowing in friendly if fble fashion as the train
Hashes by?
Who wants to be tumbled out of his passenger car.
Into the garish hustle and bustle of Vancouver Station,
when you can descent cautiously (those Spanish well
rungs again) from your Panama Railroad Vistadome and
make your dignified, unhurried way across the Balboa
marshalling yards in serene darkness, if you don't break
your ankle.
Don't save yourtravel brochures for me, you clowns.
I have travelled Vistadome On the Panatrta Railroad. I have
in my heart an assurance that ,triere is no experience
quite like it in all sallroading.
If anything is to come of the attempt to keep the
last breath in Pacific Side amateur baseball by entering
a team in the Atlantic Side Twilight League, sell the fans
on commuting to games by Panama Railroad Vistadome,
O'Malley's relied a lot in VistadOme traffic when he shifted
the Dodgers to the Pacific Side, Why shouldn't the same same-work
work same-work in reverse. Great for" biseball and great for the
Panama Railroad.
PERCY'S PEERLESS PORTENT this week pay. its
respects equally to the Panama postal system which had
a surplus of $200,000 for the, year just ended, end the
three Panamanian postmen who. ended up with a surplus
of 5000 letters for: the Christmas season just ended.
Makes..
loo'; good to me.'Order your tickets by mail

ing

itraband articles.
Adolphus Quinlan



JANUARY 8. 1958

TIX SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAG1 TfRi

ami

I

5hs 0 ...

THE SCALE MODEL OF MlftAFLORES LOCKS,
Maintenance Division shops in Balboa and wil
States this year. The model was built by Alb
employed by the Canal for this job. It was bu
buildine a working model of the loclts for per
Maps, pictures and various source materi
by the Cia. Puerza y Luz to be shown at the
the Miraflores Locks model will be one of the
opened to the public Jan. 26 and will remain
series being arranged by the International Tr

material oemg rurnisnea oy uuiu
the Republic of Panama which is the central

shown above, has just been completed in the
1 be included in a display to be sent to the
ert J. Deutsch, retired machinist, who was re rent
nt rent primarily to determine the feasibility of

manent display purposes.

al will be used in the display being gatnerea
International Trade Mart in New Orleans and
pieces. The display "As! Es Panama" will be
open until the end of March. It is one of a
ade Mart of Latin America. In addition to the
the Cia. Fuerza y Luz has a big display from

theme.

By CHARLES W. CORDDRY
WASHINGTON. Jan. 4 (ITP)-

The Air Force announced vesterdsv

that it had set up the first two

squadrons for operational use of
th Thnr nrt tiinifer 1 WA mile

intermediate ranee ballistic mis

siles.

The two units -presumably will

be sent overseas after their train training
ing training to operate rom missile bases
which this country plans to set up
in Great Britain. Allied defense
planners also were said to be
studying the French A'"' for pos possible
sible possible missile sites.

The 672nd Strateeic Missi'c

Sauadmn was assipnerl t h Air

Force Thor missile. It was acti

vated Jan. 1 and will be com commanded
manded commanded by Col. Harry J. Zink.

&SBl AROUND TOWN I 71

AROUND TOWN

BY TOM

Mucho entertainment friends
There is no doubt that many of
us are trying to wipe that lost
weekend look off our mugs... the
look that had its beginning with
the coming of the yuletjde sea season.
son. season. However, now that the reso resolutions
lutions resolutions have been made, and While
the battle of sputniks and missiles
continue it's necessary that we
put up the back to work, look sing
and go about our task diligently
and consistently.
Speaking of entertainment, Mr.
and Mrs. (Blackett Forde, gave
a real gone get-together last
week for a few friends' at their
now home.
Amonjr those enjoying the Bla-

ekett Forde's hospitality were:

zia Kinch, Octavia Jone Apple Applewhite,
white, Applewhite, Isblyn Reid SSolomqn, Iris
Henriquez, Albertha White and
Irene Yearwood Mayers and Miss Misses
es Misses Edns Clement and Jilma Lowe
and Ricardo and Delano Wilson.

Relatives and friends gathered

last week to take part in a seno seno-off
off seno-off party given for Mrs. Maud
Dell Green,, who returned to the
big city several days ago.
Leaving for New York was
Miss "elmonena Newman of Co Colon
lon Colon and Samuel Mason a former
employe of the P. A. who is
going to reside stateside perma permanently.
nently. permanently.

Yesterday's birthday celebra-

Mr. and, Mrs. Albert Patterson, 'tions included: Misses Aurelia La
. Milt in 'ii. tr .-a J VJa CvnifU nH an

Mesdames: muii Braunwstue, e- many luih gnum,

Finland Paid Heavy Price
For Present Neutral Status

HELSINKI, Jan. 4 (UP)
Whatever the merits or draw drawbacks
backs drawbacks of the Soviet plan for
1 troop Withdrawals of East and
West lrom Central Europe, the
fact remains that a militarily
neutralized area already exists
In Europe. It is Finland.
Finland does not belong to
NATO. She turned down an invi invitation
tation invitation to join the Warsaw Pact.
There are no foreign troops on
Finnish soil. And Finland has
managed to retain friendship
with East and West through an
uneasy postwar period-
Soviet diplomats have private privately
ly privately admitted that they would
have had more friends if they
had treated Central Europe as
they treated Finland.
The price for, peace with Rus Russia
sia Russia in 1944 was a heavy one a
reparations bill equal to a full
year's Finnish government budg budget,
et, budget, loss of 10 per cent of her ter territory,
ritory, territory, almost half a million per persons
sons persons to resettle, drastic cuts in
armed strength, and the uncer uncertainty
tainty uncertainty of what lay ahead.
The Leningrad military dis district
trict district continues to send amateur
spies across the border, and the,
Finns just as regularly arrest

them and apply one or two-year
Jail terms.
Finland is shunned by Iron
Curtain refugees who know Fin Finnish
nish Finnish authorities would have to
send them back if picked up.
Finnish-Soviet trade t regu regulated
lated regulated by five-year pacts.
Finland's armed forces total
less than 42,000 with no tanks,
bombers, guided missiles, subma submarines
rines submarines or large naval craft.
All these aTe the pattern of
gostwar Finnish-Soviet policy,
ut there are other aspects, too.
Finland kept her independent
republican form of government.
There are no occupation forces.
Britain is still Finland's big biggest
gest biggest trading partner, although
the Russians run a close second.
Finland is a member of the
United Nations and also a mem member
ber member of the Nordic Council, which
links five northern European
states.
Despite the irritations., Soviet
policy toward Finland appears to
be one of genuine desire to make
friends.
There is no indication that the
Russians would like to make Fin Finland
land Finland a satellite even if the op opportunity
portunity opportunity presented itself.

Coolidge Was Unsual Politician:
He Never Had Very Much To Say

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4 (UP)

Twenty-five years ago tomorrow,
Calvin Coolidge Silent Cal from

the silent bills of Vermont died.

Most American presidents are
remembered for what they said.
Coolidge is remembered because
he never said very much. There
are hundreds of stories about his

New England taciturnity.
Once his tram stopped in a small

town. A local official tried to

shush the noisy crowd. "Now ev
ervbodv kppn oniot T want uhsn

lute silence. The President is gu

lag w address us."
Coolidge said, "Good bye."
That's aU.
Another time a newsreel earner
aman ordered Coolidge to "say
something."
The President quipped back,
"That man gets more conversa conversation
tion conversation out of me than all Congress."
In the early meming hours of
Aug. 3, 1H3, Coolidge, then vie
president, was awakened at his
Plymouth, Vt. heme by a tele-.
graph messenger. Pro tidtnt
Harding had died. Coolidge was
America's 30th President.
His only comment was, "I be believe
lieve believe I can swing it."
At 2:45 that moridhg; by the
light of an oil lamp, Coolidge took
bis oath of office from his father,
a notary public.
His rise in politics was rapid.
In qti'ck s"ssfon he wns elected
mayor of Northampton, Mass.,
state senator, lieutenant governor,

and, in 1919, governor of Massa Massachusetts.
chusetts. Massachusetts. A year after he became govern governor,
or, governor, he made national headlines,
and became a hot presidential can candidate,
didate, candidate, by quelling the Boston po police
lice police strike.
The Republican picked him
that year as Harding's running
mate. He ran for President in
1924 and defeated Democrat
John W. Davis end Progressive
Robert M. LaFollette.
Coolidge's administration Was
marked by revelation of scandals
in the Harding government, ef efforts
forts efforts to preserve peace, and great
prosperity.
Before the 1928 election, he is issued
sued issued a typically terse, and now now-famous,
famous, now-famous, statement, "I do not
choose to run for President in

1928."

After he left the White House,
Coolidge returned to Northampton

where he wrote his autobiography
and a syndicated newspaper col

umn.
On Jan.. 5, 1933, he spent about
an hour at the office he maintain maintained,
ed, maintained, then went home, complaining
that he didn't feel well. Later in

the day his wife found him on the
floor at home, dead at 60 of a
heart attack.

Coolidge's biographer, William

Alien White, commented, "He

who lived aloof, died alone."
Coolidge bad been president dur

ing one r America s greatest
boonls. He died in the midst of one
of the biggest busts.

Keach ana r rank Austin. At a

time like this they must be hav

ing a real good time. But, Miss

hmene Monuque took the cake

for being born on the right day,

ner s was flew Year s day.
After being away for some

time Miss Eneida Crouch return

ed to the fatherland from Detroit,

Mich, last week looking the pic
ture of health and beauty,.

A forum embodying several
subjects including the development
of the family and its connection
with the church was expected to

be lormed soon; it was disclosed

Di. waiter Akierton, Ph. D.,
in. an address delivered a few
days ago at the Panama Metho

dist Church.

An increase in the 1958 budget
of the National Government in the
amount of $250,000 and the hiring
of 170 more postal employes was
expected to bring about some
form of solution with the very
acute mail caongestion and de deficiencies
ficiencies deficiencies now being experienced.
Water... Water... Water...rhat is

the cry in the suburban areas

of the capital. New that the dry
season is really here, the folks
residing out there are letting
less and, a, the same, time, see seeing
ing seeing then- bills take en a hike.
Things are net denn ecernlght
but, it it high time that the ad administration
ministration administration do something t help
ce-iirve this miserable cenditon,
which could very well turn in into
to into a full-fledged crisis.
Automobile salesman Heriherto
Soley, was about his winning ways
again, when he was given a bo bonus
nus bonus for his high sales percentage

during 1957.

It will be recalled that friend
WoriWtn in 19R5 entered the win

ner! circle when he was award

ed a "leadership trophy lapel em

blem and leadersmp scrou.

n alumina far a short vacation

with her parents is Miss Gloria
Barrett, a student at a nursing

school in Nicaragua.
Have a pleasant stay this side
of the Carib, Gloria.
Morris and Whitney Martin,
former Cojonites, returned from
Jamaica after an absence of ten
years. Whitney is expected to
leave for New York on Sturday,
while Morris will continue to va vacation
cation vacation with his parents.
Canal Zone Guards Association
prexy Alfred B. Warner was dis discharged
charged discharged from the Gorges Hospi Hospital
tal Hospital and is now recuperating at
fourth street Radio City house No-.
228.
Grin and Bear It: A fellow who
was known to be a very ardent
worshipper at the shrine of Bac Bacchus,
chus, Bacchus, wondered from a bar in the
vicinity of the cemetery. Una Unaware
ware Unaware of where he was headed
be entered and m his drunken
stupor fell ssleep on one of the
tombs.
At about four a.m. he awoke
and looking around him and not
being able to recall just now he
got there, he became cold sober
and shouted man, I am the first
guy to rise on resurrection morn morning.
ing. morning. Thought for Today:: Liberty
is the only thing you cannot have
unless you are willing to give
it to others."
William Alton WWte

Air Force Sets Up First Two Squadrons
To Man Thor And Jupiter Bases Overseas

The 8645h Strategic Missile

Squadron, which was assigned the

Army's Jupiter, will be activated

Jan. 15 and will be under the com

mand Of Col. William C. Erlen-

busch.

Pick Air Perce
Although the Jupiter was de

veloped by the Army, the Air
Force has been assigned the use

of all land-based missiles with a

range of more than 200 miles.

The two sauadrons were the

first setup for operation of Inter

mediate range ballistic missiles.

But they will not be on an opera operational
tional operational basis for months not until

this country has the missiles to

equip tnem.

The Air Force said the two units
would be "in a training status and
will not be eouiooed for some

time."

When the squadrons actually are
assigned to operational bases, it
expected that they will have about
15 IRBM's each.
Today's anoun cement did not
assign the squadrons to any train training
ing training base. A spokesman said that
airmen at various bases around
the country would be assigned to
the squadrons, and then sent to
schools or to contractors' plants
for training in such specialities as
electronics.
United Training Later
Then the men will be assembled
for unit training. This presumably
will be conducted at Camp Cooke,
Calf., which has been set up to
train Air Force missile men.
The Air Force- said that both
Zink and Erlenbusch have had

"extensive experience" within the
Strategic Air roif
will operate the IRBM's. They
have been connects: with tfce
Force ballistic missile division for
more thsn a year.
The announcements did not say
where the squadrons eventual'y
would be assigned. But it noted
that "it has previously been an announced
nounced announced that the first operational
IRBM units will be deployed over overseas
seas overseas by December, 1958." Britain
is scheduled to get the tirst units.
Members of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization agreed "in
principle" at the recent NATO
council meeting to beef un allied

defenses in Europe with American

ballistic missiles. However, some
countries have demurred.
Since the weapons have a range
of 1,500 miles they must be sta stationed
tioned stationed within European countries
if they are o be of value as a
retaliatory weapon in the event of
a Russian attack.

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As for os teert-opers ore con

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Tfflt SUNDAY AMEBIC AN

SUNDAY. J AN UAH If 5, 1951

IS

aaai ana Ksinerwiov

Bf Staff.

Jt JtL J lj t.t.fl
MISS BARBARA

BBBBa.. BH BBk
Hpf-i" ffflHB IBflL SB
f iBBEMkA. Br
vnj B Is IT

MISS BARBARA EGOLF BECOMES ENGAGED
TO MR LOUIS DEDEAUX OF MARGARITA
Announcement of the engagement of their aushter'
Barbara Ann, to Mr. Louis F. Dedeaux is made by Mr. and
Mrs Leo J. Egolf of Gatun, Canal Zone. Mr. Dedeaux is
1 the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon B. Dedeaux, of Gulfport, Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi and formerly of Balboa, Canal Zone.
Miss Erolf is a graduate of Cristobal High School, and
is employed by the t. 8. Army at Fort Gulick, Canal Zone.
Mr Dedeaux is a graduate of Balboa High Scnool, and
received his BS degree in Physical Education and Recrea Recreation
tion Recreation from Oklahoma State University and is now employed
by the (Canal Zone Government Schools Division at Marga Margarita,
rita, Margarita, Cahal Zone.
An early Spring wedding is planned.

Mr. and Mrs. Hollowel
Give Christmas Tree
Burnlna Party
Mr, and Mrs. W. I. Hollowell
and Mrs;. Phyllis Crook entertain entertained
ed entertained with a Christmas tree turning
party at their Diablo home last
night.
Hot "dogs and picnic fare was
served for the children and there
was an. attractive buffet for a a-dults.
dults. a-dults. A larfee number of guests of
all ages! enjoyed the evening.
DORESE WAITES
School of Dancing
'Enroll in one of the begin beginners
ners beginners classes starting soon.
Registration January 8th
:ojtt am. to 11:00 a.m.
Kdights of Columbus
i Hall Balboa
i
Residence phone 2-2363

PaBalaaaBS ai
j Am. Justo Arosemena 30-30 Tel. 3 6740 B
ai' Apply cream to nipple (g-j-si '".'
H and surrounding area. I IAasfl
Special for baby also I B 5???5?!?35!!TB
Irritation camed by r j) LttIJ li 1
chafing of diaper. H fj IVI 838 I

If XI

P 3-OUO
9-074 1
ANN EGOIT
Mr. and Mrs. Kelly
Entertain
Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. Kelly of
Aneon were "At Home" to a
group of friends last evening.
Martita Chanis
Feted At Barbecue
Miss Martita Chanis,. daughter
of Dr. nad Mrs. Rolando Chanis
was feted at a barbecue recently
at the hpme of her grandmother
Mrs. Rosa Vda. de Chanis. Mar Martita
tita Martita will return to school in the
United States this week,
Bella Vista
Bctrd Will
Meet Wednesday
i The regular monthly meeting of
the Board of Administrators of the
! Bella Vista Children's Home will
be held on Wednesday, Jan. -8 at
4:15 p.m. at Bishop Morris Hall
!in Ancon. All members are urged
to oe present.
Gem and Mineral Society
Hears Talk
On Agatized Coral
At the December meeting, The
Canal Zone Gem aid Mineral So
ciety voted to have two meetings

Box

134,
cmama
9:00
10
mlf
a month. The regular business
meeting for members only, will
be he d on the second Friday of
each month, and on the fourth
h'irriuv a social and nrngram even-
ins? will b held to which visitors
are invited. This change was made
in order to be .ible to devote more
time to the program with the
accompanying discusssion period,
and to gel better axquainted with
visitors.
Kouert Stewart nave a talk on
agatized coral, which is exception exceptionally
ally exceptionally hard material and considered
to be one of the more prized
iimi" m loeal rork hnunm. on

exhibit were 60 slabs and thin ? Psychological AssqcUtion and
slices o; some of the many varie- ?s ,ne f'?st officiating Rabbi to del del-lies
lies del-lies of coral, from tiny plohead,lvr scientific paper before this
size desings to large feathery pat- ?i'ety since u was founded in
terns. Mr. Stewart told of the,182-
manner in which corl is formed I. He 1S a member of the explora explora-and
and explora-and how it grpwns through the'.01"7 committee on Religion and
ages. He estimated that the speci-Pusycl)otheJ8Py recently created by
mens on display were approxi-ltne. American Psychological As As-matey
matey As-matey lifty million years old. '?c'atl0n- DJ new book.

Bert Davis, recently returned
lor a Mates vacation, gave a
run-down on his trip by car to
the West Coast. Finding tnat many
of the rock stores were closed
for the winter season, he was
unable to make many purcha purchases.
ses. purchases. Visiting Virginia City,, New.
was a bit of a disappointment
as it was Sunday and veryting
was closed. Calico Town, in the
Calico Mountains near Barstown,
California, proved to be very in interesting
teresting interesting as it is in the process
of being restored by Mr. Knott o.
Knotts Berry Fram in Los Ange
ies county, uaiu. Anyone wtio has
visited Knotts Berry Fram with
its General Stores, postoffice, jail
ana saioons ot tne ISOO's wllh have
an idea of what to expect at Ca Calico
lico Calico Town.
Plans have been formulated for
a fishfry which will be held at
the "Gem and Mineral Clubhouse
on Jan. 18, from 4:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. Tickets can be obtain obtained
ed obtained from Mrs. George Hamilton
in Quarry Hts. at phone 27-2-2265,
Mr. A. I. Bauman 2-4452 and Mrs.
O. K. Waorley 2-4203.
Betty Bentz
Will Resume
Art Classes
Mrs. BettV Bentz will resume
her Art Classes at the Bablboa
X.M.C.A.-U.S.O. on Mondav. Jan.
6 at 7:00 p.m.
Mrs. Bentz has taught oil paint painting
ing painting at the "Y" for the past eight
years and has exhibited her own
work widely. Her work in oils is
especially well known.
The paintings of many of her
students have also been on exhi exhibition
bition exhibition in recent years.
These classes meet every Mon Monday
day Monday night and each stodent is gi given
ven given individual attention.
Those interested in registering
niay call thai "Y" at Balboa 2830
or come in Monday evening before
the class to meet Mrs. Bentz.
Tryouts Tomorrow
For Theatre Guild's
Next Production
Final tryouts for th Theatre
Guild's next play, "Will Success
Spoil Rock HunterP" will be held
Monday and Tuesday evenings,
Jan. 6 and 7, beginning at 7:30
p.m. in the Guild Palyhouse in
Ancon. All interested persons are
invited to attend.
"Will Success Spoil Rock Hunt Hunt-efc?"
efc?" Hunt-efc?" a recent Broadway hit by
George Axwlrod, will be staged
under the direction of Mrs. Adela
Bettis during the week of Feb.
10. There are two girls and six
men in the cast. Rehearsals are
schedules to begin immediately
after tryouts.
Edmund R. Macvittie, president
of the Theatre Guild, requests l-

HAS THIS CREAM FOR "SOFT "SOFTENING
ENING "SOFTENING DRV STRETCHES SKIN.
PARTICULARLY FOR SOFTEN SOFTENING
ING SOFTENING THE ABDOMEN DURING
PREGNANCY.

Rabbi-Psychologist
As Honor Guest Of

Tomorrow at 8 p.m. the Irving
Zapp Chapter of the ffnai B'rith
is holding a special meeting in
honor o' Dr. snd Mrs. Henry
Enoch Kagan, who are herefrom
New York.
Dr. Henry Enoch Kagan is a u-f
nique figure in the American Rab Rabbinate,
binate, Rabbinate, for he is both Rabbi and a
qualified psycho'ogist.
Descended from a successive line
of Rabbis that goes back 400 years,
Dr. Kagan was ordained ai the
Hebrew Union College and holds
a Ph.D. degree in psychology from
(Columbia University. He is -one of
! th country's leading advocates
0! me union oetween religion and
psychiatry, and has nude unique
contributions in the field of religi religious
ous religious counselling.
He originated and is the Nation National
al National Chairman of the Committee of
Pastoral Psychology a? the Cen Central
tral Central Conference of American Rab-
bis. He is a member of the.Ameri-
.."a"" uu w inris-
tian Toward Jew: A Psychological
Approacn mrougn k e 1 1 g i o n,"
which was recently published by
Columbia University Press, s the
subject of wide interest through throughout
out throughout the country.
it is tne first attempt to test
whether the methods used to red
uce anti-Jewish prejudice actually
worK ana it proposes new dynamic
methods o' group therapy. He is
alio co-author of the pew book
"Judaism and Psychiatry'
Dr. Kagan is the first Rabbi ev-

West Germans Try To Combat
Red Subversion By Education

BONN "Germany, Jan. 4 (UP)
Three special schools have been
established in West Germany to
combat Communist subversion.
But they aro not concerned
with the strange, half-world of
spies, underground couriers, and
state secrets.
Their Duruose is to counter the
Communist attack in the world
of ideas, and to prepare west western
ern western minds for service on the
ideological battleground.
Opening the "Eastern College"
in Cologne, West German Inter-,
ior Minister Gerhard Schroeder
warned that Communism's main
aim remained world revolution.
so that all persons, interested in
doing backstage work be' present
at the Playhouse on Monday or
Tuesday.
Ft. Gulick
Christian Fellowship
Holds Soci I
Last Friday, the Fort Gulick
Christian Fellowship held its month
ly social with a swimming party
and picnic at Shimmy Beach, Fort
Sherman. This was also a "going
away" party for the Fellowship's
S resident Bill Garrett, who left
an. 3 to join the 79th Army Band
at Fort Clayton. After swimming,
eating, and several games of soft
ball, and volley ball, Bill was pre pre-sented
sented pre-sented with a gift from the whole
group. Those present were: James
Hansen, Jeri Brewer, Bill Gar Garrett,
rett, Garrett, Bob Todd, Beth Drydale,
Nancy Chaphe, Ralph Hartman,
George Dube, Bobby Chaphe, Ro Ronald
nald Ronald Brooks, Frances Siegfried,
Lim Rogers, Freddy Vinas, Capt.
and Mrs. Dube, Gene Romano,
Carol Chaphe, Dede Dube, Gary
McWilUams, Judy Monroe, Ronny
Gannon, and Chaplain (Major)
and Mrs. Chaphe.

I" PURER
f FINER
W RICHER

Here From N. Y.
B'hai B rith

WL H Bl 'la

DR. HENRY ENOCH KAGAN
er to lecture at a Catholic Monas Monastery,
tery, Monastery, when in the summer of 1956
(he was a member of the faculty
on psychiatry, teaching priests the
technique of pastoral psychology
at St. Johns Abby in Minnesota.
In June 1956 the Hebrew Union
College conferred an honorary de degree
gree degree of Doctor of Divinity upon
Rabbi Kagan for his outstanding
contributions in- the field of relt-,
gion and emotional health.
Since 1937 Dr. Kagan has been
the Rabbi of Sinai Temple, Mt.
Vernon, New York, and visiting in instructor
structor instructor in psychological guidance
at Teachers College, Columbia U U-niversity.
niversity. U-niversity. Dr. Henry E. Kacan has recently
been appointed as consultant to
the Joint Commission and Mental
Health which functions under an
appropriation from Consress and
is conducting a study on Mental
Health in the United States.
. It was not, enoueh he arldfd
to fight Communism by "laws,
court decisions and, administra administrative
tive administrative measures." The struggle
must also be waged on the poli political
tical political and intellectual, level) where
the ideology and half-truths of
Communist doctrine: could be
weighed In the balance and com
pared to the ideals of Western
democracy.
The Coloene College nattern-
ed on Britain's Wilton Park
where Germans studied demo
cratic' processes after World War
II, has 10 resident professors who
arrange the week-lone courses.
while some 60 experts on Sovtet
anairs, both German and for
eign are available as guest lec
turers.
Subjects dealt with include
dialectical materialism, Soviet
economic develODment. the
church under Communist rule,
natural science in .the Soviet un
ion. and a general outline of
Russian history.
The colleee Is desitrned to at
tract persons who, by virtue of
tneir positions in Dublic life, can
best counter the Communist ide ideological
ological ideological attack.
Thestf Include trade unionists.
judges, teachers, journalists and
enurenmen of all denominations.
A second school the "institute
for eastern law" has been es established
tablished established in Munich, efpeclally
to study the legal basis of Com Communist
munist Communist states.
Addressing the institute re recently,
cently, recently, Bundestag Parliament
Vice President Richard Jaeger
said that in the Soviet Union and
Its satellite states ,law was, an in instrument
strument instrument of the ruling class, je
.signed to uphold the power of
the Communist Party, and link linked
ed linked neither legally or morally to
any Independent standards.
He warned that the real dan danger
ger danger to the West would come
when the Soviet Union had in
some measure matched Western
material progress and was ready
for an all-out offensive on the
ideological front.
The third school, the "Insti "Institute
tute "Institute for Eastern Churches,"
which Is attached to the theol theological
ogical theological faculty of Muenster's Wll Wll-helm
helm Wll-helm University, has a more lim limited
ited limited aim of studying the history
of the Protectant church in Ger Germany's
many's Germany's eastern territories, and
making its findings available to
church communities.
W. Germany Cons
Atom-free Zone
In Central Europe
BONN, Germany, Jan. A (UP)
West Germany said today it was
studying "with care" Communist
Poland's proposal for a "de-mis-silized"
and atom-free zone in Cen Central
tral Central Europe that would include all
German territory.
It was the first time the govern government
ment government of Chancellor Konrad Aden Adenauer
auer Adenauer had admitted that the plan
INTERMEDIATE
SPANISH
For those who
know some, and wish to
learn more Spanish
Emphasis on Conversation
Mondays and Thursdays
5 6 p.m.
Beginning Thursday
JANUARY 9th
,BALBOA
Y.M.C.A.-U.S.O.
Register Now
Phone Balboa 2839 or 275

IjJEETIMS

tach nofica for Intluiion In this
tolumn thould tuemittad
tyet-writtan rm and mailad a
tht baa ftvntbw lilted daily in Sa Sa-ial
ial Sa-ial and Otherwia." er delivarad
v hqd to rha atfica, Netkta ft
RMtfinta cannot ba cad ty
talephene.
Quarry Heights
Woman's Club
Heidi Eleotlons
The Quarry Heights Women's
Club will hold an election-luncheon
meeting on Jan, 8 at 12:30 at
Quarry Heights' Officers Club.
Hnateaxe are Mrs Frank D.
Miler Chairman, Mri. Harry L.
Chippeaux and Mrs. L. C. Wooten.
Clayton NCO Wives
Mot On Tuesday
Ft. Clayton NCO Wives' Club
will hold their next meeting on
Tuesday evening at 7:30 in the
Ft. Clayton NCO Open Mesa.
Group Investigates
Southern Governor's
Anti-Teacher Ruling
WASHINGTON (UP) The
American Assn. of University Pro Professors
fessors Professors has charged that South
Carolina Gov. Gtorge Bell Tim Tim-merman
merman Tim-merman Jr. used state authority
to interfere in the operation of a
private Negro teachers college.
Dr. Rdfcert Carr, AAUP general
secretary, said the S6uth Carolina
board of education, of which Tin-
merman is chairman, ippeared to
be trying to force the resignations
of thiree professors at Allen Uni University.
versity. University. On Sent 9 the hoard rovnlrori
approval of the school's teacher
training program. The action
barred graduates of the Negro
school from state paid teaching
jobs; in South Carolina.,,
Carr also said Timmerman had
Used a "Dfiremtorv tnrtA" in re.
fusing to discuss .the case with
the AAUP, which investigates dis dismissals
missals dismissals of college professors
wnere tneir academic freedom and
tenure rights appear to have been
violated.
Timmerman in effect told the
AAUP to mind its own hnsiness
when the organization asked on
wnat grounds tne state board had
withheld its approval of Allen Uni University's
versity's University's training program.
"Our state is concerned with
protecting all its peoples and your
authority to Question its nffirial
action is without recognition."
Timmerman wired the nrn!.
- s
tion.
M 'termed Timajieran's re-
vy wnoiiy ;unaccjeptame. He
said the-AAUP "takes the posi position
tion position that the welfare nf the nee.
demic profession is of national
concern, not state concern alone."
TTo said thn A ATTP ,,.!tl
tinue to do its utnjost to protect"
the jobs of the three professors
urs. jonn u. Kiaeout and Ed
Hoffman, both white, and Forrest
O. Wiggins, a Nefcro,
PRINCESS SINTINCED
CAIRO (UP)-The Court of Ap-
Deals has fined former Prinre
Faiza $59,566 and sentenced her
to a month in orison for evading
customs regulations seven yenrs
ago. raiza, a sister of ex-King
Farouk. now lives in Tatanhnl and
WffS not in ennrt fhr the rnlina
Thursday. The indictment charged
sne used ner royal prerogative to
bring unspecified personal goods
into Eavnt in 19S0 without navintr
customs duties. The prosesution
cnargedsne later sold the goods,
put forward by Polish Foreign Min Minister
ister Minister Adam Rapacki was under
consideration! East nibnfh, a Bonn
government spokesman had criti criticized
cized criticized it as Vunrealistk."
West German press chief Felix
von Eckhardt told newsmen the
Rapacki plan was being studied in
connection with Adenauer's forth forthcoming
coming forthcoming reply to a letter from So Soviet
viet Soviet Premier Nikolai A. Bulganin.

urn

Toptlightflerina
To Dance At Balboa Theatre

Lea Ballets Janine Charrat de
France brines to the Canal Zone
the leading ballerina of France in
me person ox .a nine L-narrai.
Still a young woman, she is-com
pleting the second decade of an
amazingly successful career, u
began in 1938, when she was fea featured
tured featured u the child star in "Balle
rina," a film that brought her in
ternational acclaim.
A future in motion pictures lay
before her, but instead she con continued
tinued continued her ballet studies with fa famous
mous famous teachers, including Alexan Alexandre
dre Alexandre Volinine, the celebrated part partner
ner partner of Pavlova.
She made her first professional
appearances under the sponsorship
of Serge Lifar. Word of her abili
ty spread quickly and soon she
met her first dance partner, Ro Roland
land Roland Petit, then with the Paris
Opera.
Charrat and Petit became the
toast of Paris during the three
years in which they gave their w
citals. When Petit founded his
Ballets dea Champs Elysees, Char
rat was featured as his star.
Her rapidly maturing art now
revealed a new facet of her gen-
10tetl
MAKE FRIENDS
When a friend or acquaintance
is showing you something of which
he is obviously proud, you can't
be too enthusiastic in your reac
tion.
Under such circumstances, faint
praise is scarcely better than no
praise at all.
1 ).
POSITION STAB I LI TED
TEHRAN, Iran (UP)- Premier
Manouchehr Eghbal's position was
further stabilized today following
his decisive victory in a par'ia par'ia-mentary
mentary par'ia-mentary vote on a financial issue.
Eghbal called for the vote Thurs Thursday
day Thursday after opposition deputy Hos Hos-sein
sein Hos-sein Pirnia charred the govern government
ment government was mismanaging the na nation's
tion's nation's finances by allowing oil pri
ces to Skyrocket. The vote was 77
to three in Eghbal's favor, with 17
deputies abstaining.

CIRO

Aiifsts off Solid Prestige
3 SHOWS 3
9:30 p.m. -1:30 p.m. -1:30 a.m.
SOON! Artiiti direct from Cubaf
COLON

i

BttHeSMaVMfleSaSHeVMi

iaV

I

JANINI CHARRAT
ius, that of choreographer. She)
created three major works for tht
Champs Elysees company, earn earning
ing earning the accolade of the critics.
Soon she was comnosing ballets
for ijther leading bUefc, companies
throughout Europe.
'In 1952 she reaUjed her 4tHm
of creating her own cdmpanv, a
virtuoso group in whicii each danc dancer
er dancer is a highly accomplished artist.
Acclaimed in Europe for its zest,
brilliance and unusual repertoire,
the company is now king its
first American tour.
The Canal Zone performance of
Les Ballets Janine Charrat de
France will be given on Friday,
Jan. 24 at Balboa Theater. R.
served seat tickets are now on
sale at the Box-Office from 5:30 to
9 p.m. daily. Reservations may be
made by telephone to 2-2700 dur during
ing during working hours.
Beauty Tips
I One of the best eye exercises exercises-is
is exercises-is simple, but few persons take
time to do it. While at works of.
while reading, simply look up from
the material. Gar at some dis distant
tant distant object.
Some women like to add a
sweet scent to their fiair while
sh ...lpooiirg it. Toilet water or
cologne may be used for- this. A
teaspdonful or two in the rinse
water it sufficient But avoid an
overpowering scent for the aV
Of DeODle VOU will meet Hiirino
your daily routine.
'S



LIT 5, 1958

TIE 81TNDAT AMERICA
PAG1
Fundamentalist Theology M akes Comeback;
Billy Graham Leads Responsible Preachers
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES

Church oi Christ

fcvajigcUst
1'AlMtlMDI avaaflSattt"
V3gMa aj
16:80
No
laUj Si
Unitarian
aociaia
! iu a.
8MB. SM
MiM alive,
Niamey e lam
Ancoo
1UUI
to liberal
rafifi"
UKLUJ RAW"
"faaaw
.to a J
Ml W-ui
i JO DJn
!uuvuy benuoi
, lu-iuui ui"iip
jLUUl'J UU1UU
7:U0 u-m.
lu:uv) am
...IIWIQV ......
riK SI BAfllSl CHUKCB
Balboa rlttSMa. C Z
HI) Aocoti Boulf
Orws B BalBoo Heitfita
Phone Balboa IW
Willi) H. 8Mb. Pastor
School
UnrshlD
9:30 a.m.
10:4b awn
8:30 o m.
I4S. ...........
7:30 p.m.
JStlC Barvwe ........
laatllni Wednesday.
7:00 p.m.
MS Bible Study lours-
lays
i.n- Brotherhood tLast
: a J.
130 pjd
alondav in month i
rUHT HAPtWI CHUC
MaraariU Avenue t 5 to Street
Mr.nt. Canal Zone
Wend.U C. Prt.
... 5. :D am
.uw.i Benuui
IH ..a
liiav
:30 pjn
7:45 p.m.
7:00 o.m.
Union......
efljood. Tuesday ......
yr Servlc, wecnaaoayi
4.TJ. 1st 3rd Friday
... R.A.. Sunbeam.
lday .r
, 7:00 pm
1:30 p.m
Salvation Army
iNou-OruwiBUudtou EaaaUtl
FBruilft Btreei, rnona. to-w
11:00 isolloasf Mtaiin.
3:00 5i.noy nooi nooi-7
7 nooi-7 :30 Sal Vtioo Uaetln
Wo-as,.
0.1 auiinta Mt)n
w f-utidr"Scnoo)
eWvatlen MaaiaBB
jSU, C.Z.
i Mrs. C U MoHlay
a Sueet.
..00 BU.day School.
1:0 Hoiinaa Mtln.
3:00 Sunday School.
7:30 Salvation lieetlsia
IJLON CENTHAL
ar 1 iidl and Mm 1 : Maanawmi
SUet. Phone: 38-743.
il'RMT
730 Saivtioo
Union Churches
ALSOA
Th Rev. Otcar W. Olsen, Pastor
Balboa Road at San Pablo Street'
Phone 3-1486 Church Office 2-3238
330 .m. Church School Free bus
rvice. Class far all ages
1039 a.m. rsortrujl servic Tna
Ud Session for Nursery. Kinder
and Primary Depta. Church
luracry lor children under 3 yrs.
7:00 njn. Senior HIBh Fellowship.
730 pJn. Evening Service.
The Rev. Ray M. Blakely Minister
Tehyprton. 5-3B
Chutch School, with Adult Bible
Service of worship, 11:00.
Youth Frilowship. 5:45.
ARGARITA
Margarita Av. and Bolivar Hwy.
Rev. Theodore E. PrsaXiin Patter
'hones; Office. 3-3042. Res 3-H98
'JTa m. Nh jMhool. Bus service.
Uasses: NurMry" (hrough adult.
1.00 a.m Wernlnf Wftrahlp.
'nr:r for lflfnt and small chil chil-reS.
reS. chil-reS. 00 p.m. Junior Fnihtp.
13 p.m Youth Fellowship.
i-amnlMa schedule of auxiliary ac
les end offrcl! meeting gs an an-iced
iced an-iced from Mk to week.
1B
f. Walker M. Alderton. Pastor
t : 6-470 R W38
W a m, Sunday 3ahol
M a m. Mornine WfershlD.
.ificlal meetines nd week-day
t a omoottced

ut ftainlni

un worsniD

" '1 N

Churches Mm maav firths in th
of Finiw tni Colon. Rapwalie of

tin to Mil ana wtMH tf Hm armed aswvtt. ana to civili
Wl, friends and strgi.

As hUk rvic, Th Panama

rfons, otice t hours ef worship aad othtr regular activities.
I a- A AaaBaaaak B iaaai la aialaka ftafc I aitlalaaal aUaMa-ama aMMI
Lrvrmyi rv rpirav ifwwf iwi fv yva o m rnjr rvrra owtii) t
OB or two taiH''ws era list" WMNt "Othr Chavtfca at $fric."
A special listim is iaiMaJ for strriccs at Army posts. Ait Pare
and Naval stations.
Ministers, choreh crtris and chaplains ar ashed ta Inform th
news dsh m writing -fey Wednesday Ma) at the latest f My ckMs
for til coming Satarday'i tharth pt.

Catholic
ST MARY'S CHUBCH Balboa
SuOdaj alas: 140. 0:00. 1040 and
U auiv
Holy Day Ma: S-ii IS ua -m
add, 3:00 p.m
Confession
Saturday. 3:30
:00
and 7:00 to 8.00 p
p.m. Thi
ursday before
rirst rru J so io oo pja
i:uu pjn
oa MnrvSivm. J
Catechism elan' lter COO oaaas
o Sunday .......
aortas day ulw 0,1
SACaUlD BLAST Aacoa
Sunday Masses. 345. 7:30 m O am
Holy Day ma- 1:55 II and 5:00
Friday 1:00 p.m.
Sacra Heart DevoUoa; 7:30 pa an
'"SBchi
Ttiumday
M Class: 3:1 to 4:48 PJB. on
OUR LADY Of FATIMA-Cnrnnda
Sunday Mass at 140 a.m.
Holy Day Mm at 8:30 p.m.
Confessions: OHIO to 6:45 Dm on Sat
iirrtav
Catacnlsm cuss: saturaay u w iu
SI. JOSKTH-Faralaa
Sunday Masses at 7dM and 8:15 a.m.
Holy Day Mass t :00 p m
weekday mass: .. wo a.m.
Cooiauioos Saturday 340 to 4:30 and
8:30 to 730.
Catechism Class: sunaay saw u :w
Ana,
Miraculous Medal Novnai 7:00 p.m.
an Mdav
Convert uutruciiona: inursoay i:w
pm
8T. VINCENTS ranam City
Sunday Masses: 6:00 and 8 30 .m
Holv Dav Masses: 8:30 and 5:00 o.m.
lit It falls on Saturday th Mass sr
8:00 and 8:30 a m i
Conteasion: Saturday 3:08 ta 1:08 an
7:00 to 8:00 p.m mursaaya oerore rirsi
Friday
730 p m
Mlraculour
Medal Novwa and su
Uona of th Cross: Friday 7.10
Catechism Class: Altos :ao
itechlma Cuss: Aft
out on
Sunday
Thursday
Convert Class. 6:30 o.m. Tuesday and
ST. THKRESA'S-twU
fllinrtav Maaft: S VI a.m.
Holv Dav Man: 630 am. (It H falls
sn aaiuroay b:jv a.m.;
catecmstn ciasss j:au io iw p mi
Monday.
Confessions: 8:oo to :so a.m. sunoay.
ST. JOHN BAPTIST OR LA SA1XR
Parana Lfvr
rrl. and I
Hiy i
p.m.
Confaeslons: 8:30 to 43 and 7:08 ta
8:00 p.m. on Saturday
Miraculous Medal Novena: Friday 130
"'CattehlMB CTaMitfSR ml m Stmmry
Convert' Class: Monday 730 MS
Matt: 730 am
arHa: f
' o.
JO to 73 pm.
1 aunoaj-
vert Claiai I3 pm urda
ATLANTIC SIDr
ST JOSEPH S-Colmt
Sunday MM: 6:a. 638nda8ajn.
Hl7 Dy Miuiees; i:U and 830 n
'"colSns1: Saturday 433 to (30 and
730 to8:00 p.m. m j
Miraculous Medal Nov ana: Wednesday
6:15 and 7:00 pm
8crd Mr woven : r nosy i u p m
Sunday Evening Services 730 p.m.
Convert Class: 7:15 om on Mondays
and Thursdays
Cal
atechlsm Clasai Sunday 10:13 .m. to
11:45 .m. 3:oo p.m. to : jjb.
riret rridavcnmntlnn of Moat Bless
ed Sacrament all day ReooslUon at 830
a.m. Saturday morning,
i First Saturday Devotions Io our Lady
of Fetima-The Holy Rossry-5:00 .m.
rirt CAmmunlnn Ihatructlons lor chil
dren Monday and Thursday 030 to
itsj p.m.
WRACIILODS. MED AL-Jfjtdbal
ourraav asasaas: iM..mraiu.ija
Ho v Day Masses: 0:0. : a.m. and
5:15 p.m.
Confessions: Saturday 4:06 to 030 and
7:60 to 8:00 p m. Attar Rosary aaen ove-
nmv.
Mjraculou Mdt Nevni 3:J8 and
7:00 n m. on Monday.
, Catechism CUss: Aft 330 Haas on
Exposition all day during
tne scnooi rear.
First Saturday; Maas at 8:00 era.
HOLT FAMILY CHURCH In Margarita
Sunday Masses: 730, 330, U3S an.
First Saturday Ma: 6:00 .m.
Weekday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
Saturday .. 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m
Miraculous Medal Noven 7:00 p.m
Holy Day Masses; 7 30 a.m 5:15 p.m
Confession .. 3:45 pm to 43 Dm
. every Mytiflay - .
Parish Family Rosary and
Benediction .. 7:00 p. m
everv Wedneadav
DlKusilon fewulry Group 7: 30 p m.
very iTtagy.
1st. Ssrur'dsy Dvttiohi 730 pS
ST. VINCRNTS Ranlbow Citt
Sunday Mam: 030 am. and 8:00
a.m. i
Holy Day Masses: 030 a J, and 030
pm.
. Confession; 4:00 to 030 and 730 to
8.00 p.m, Saturday.
Cnteehlsm Class: 10:43 a.m. on Sunday
Convtrt asvry Monday at 730
p.m.
Miraculous Medal Nbvena: 730 pa
Sarred Heart Novenai 73 pm. on
irsaay,
IMMACULATE LONCEPTION-GalOn
Sundav Mass' : ajn
Holv Dav Mass: 5 00 am
'Confession : 030 to 733 on. Sat-
LTQatj
Ctrhlsrn Clasn- no am ar Mmdai
. OUR LADY OF OOOD COUNSEL
Oaatbea
ar730 nd 330 a.m.
Sunday 11
Rob- bay M
aro .m and 8:oo
Confasalon Satui
7 30 p.a and
all evi
aculou
7:00 pjn
on iicaaay i
ancren Hi
Fridas.
Irt Novena; 7.00 pm an
Sunday School: 3:30 pm on Sunday
anWau Instruction Clau-fnr rwi
dren: 430 p.m on Thursday
Religious Instruction for adults icon.
ducted in SntnEahl: 7:00 pm en Mon Monday
day Monday Convert Instruction bp appointment.

Confeaalona: naiuroaj

Thursday before rirrt Ft

Ctchlsw Class: p.. i

Sacred Hrt Novni 7:00 p.

Pal) as

rday .1

CmuI Zmm, aaa the eeeaial titit
Mini, eaten" wImm ft ail

American lists Maw. by
Episcopal
Ik It In I. Hebas Ciidsa, LI D.
Ta Very Rev. Maaaon d Pllttsin.
S.TR. Don
Jsttils Cat
THE CATHEDRAL OF ST. LUX
SUNDAYS
SUNDAYS
7:36 J. Holy Communion.
IJ5 am. Church School (Holy Com.
amnion 3rd Sunday).
9:30 jn. Santa CdttiMJnien. aro Sun
day
8:3 .m. Kacueu uominicai.
11:00 a.m Morning Prayer and Ser
mon. Holy Communion 1st Sunday.
7:80 bjb. Cvasuai service.
wRUMJCSDATS
Holy Cemmunleav
Evtnin Prsyer
iSl alk
tm on
kOL DAYS
:00 am Holy Communion
83 ant Holy Crjmmuruon
DAILY
8:18 a.m. Mornlni
Prays
17:00 Mi -da
COCOU
Ckarch at
Andrew
W. RM
The Rev Willlsm W.
win,
Priest ns
SUNDAYS
Holv Communion .....
7 JO JB
Family Prayer and
Church School 830 ta
(Also Holy Communion and.
Sunday each month.
Mornina Pray A Sermon 1130 J
WpISSUAT
Holy communion
COROZAL
Chapel of Th Uood Shepherd
The Rev CUienc W. Hay.
Priest In Charge
FRIDAYS
g:00 a.m. Morning Prayer.
(H.C. first Friday each Month)
OAMJtOA
at ataaaaa CJuaaab
That Rev. John Speai. Priest IB Charge
SUNDAYS
Choral Eucharist nd Ut-
man 7:oo am
Church School ........... 3:00 m
Episcopal Young Churchmen 5:08 p.m.
Evensong and Sarmofi 130 pjn
MONDAYS. TlIaTOAYS.
and FRIDAYS .x
Morning rrsyar ana noiy
CutlAltJBlOB
Worn!? AuSiary.' 2nd and
338 a m
7:00 p.m
WEDNESDAYS ft THURSDAYS
Morng'Tpntyar J JJ
Evening Prayer "38 gun.
SATURDAYS
Family Eticnsnn
Off ic of Complin 830
LA BOCA
Oatar'a r.hnrah
Th Rv. Job Spent. Priari Cftaige
Morning rrayer ana vnuru
School j "'
Confirmation CI 3:30 m
Choral Eucharist and W-
mon "30 OJa
Holy RapUsm iff anJ
Evenaong and Addrees .... 730 P.M
3rd MOTBATS
Woman- Auxiliary sn i
THURSDAYS FfttT AS
Holy Communion
130 BJB
Chape! of ft MWCaijftrlor
Ven. L. a Shirley, Prit la Cbai
THURSDAYS
8:30 at. Holy communion.
MARGARITA
Church of St. Margaret
Espave and Braze Blvd.
Th Rev. Jesse K Renew, Beet)
SUNDAYS
7:80 .m. Holy Communion.
0:45 ajn. Morning .Prayer and
Church School.
11:00 a.m. Choral Eucharist.
THURSDAYS nc HOLT DAYS
I -JO a.m. noiy coram union.
FARAISO
The
WifltaV
lv. David A. Oil
vicar tasartfa
SUNDAVfc
3.00 u Church School
i iiA m Eiwint and Addraes.
3nd and 4th WEDMtSpAYS
1.30 pin woman a ausiuaiy
tar Ouild MMting
PANAMA CITY
St PBrChotch
rhe Ven Lemuel B. Shirley, Heete
The 5 R AtweB. beacon
SUNDAVL.
0:00 a.m. Holy consmimien
8 00 ajn Sung Eucharist A Sermon
10:45 a M Morning FtaT BBd Churen
School
13:80 nocr Holy Baptism
7 00 r,.m Solemn
rM0DrnHoJy Communion
7:30 p m. Evening rrayar ad
f3??fliiy
TWO v.in.
fhURSUAYB AND FRIDAYS
6 00 a.m. Holy Con
CHRIST CHUBCH BY-THE-SEA
CoileriFF."'
(Opposite Hotel Waihlngton
Th Rev. James Peter Farmer, Rector
Th Rev. Henry A. Biaka, Asaistanl
SUNDAY
6:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
8:30 a.m. Morning Prayer.
6:00 a.m Chnral Ellrharlat and Baillion.
1030 a.m. Church School.
730 pjn. SoiajM Bvenseng and Sat-
MONDAY,
Y A THURSDAY
:tw JW
730 Jh.
8:00 pjn.
7:00 ajn. Morning Prayer.
730 pjn. Evenjnf Prayer and
3:00 a.m. Children's Eucharist.
5:00 p.m. Evening Prayer.
SATURDAY
630 a.m. Holy Communion.
7.00 a.m: Morning Prayer
3:00 p.m. Evening Prayer
7 30 pjn. Compline and Meditation.

, ivaovs

noiy conunun en.

Morning Pray sr.
EVMtiif Pryr.
WEDNESDAY

6 :00 a m. aostv flaaaasunien.

RIO AJPAJO
St Christoaher's Chare
10th Street. Pirque Ufovre
The Rev Clarence W Hayes.
Priest ta Charge
The Rev. Clarence A. Cragvrcfl.

SUNDAYS
Ml J Holy Communion.
738 Am Sung Eucharist and SVrmon.
1033 Am Momint Pray and Church
School
U.HO noon Holy Baptism
OnDAYS ftomon.
7:30 p.m in and 3rd. aYaaaan Auxi Auxi-Kan.
Kan. Auxi-Kan. TUESDAYS
830 pm Junior Daughter at th
Rin.
7:30 djb Yout
NE6DAYS
:w .m aery communion.
00 eon LVeriing Prayer and Religious
THURSDAYS
0:00 p m Giria- Friendly Society.
030 u. IU and 3rd. Singletons.
SA
TUSUMTB
8:30 bjb. Junior Confirmation Class.
Other Churches
CHURCH OF THE NAZAHENE
448 rranglpanl St. Ancon C.Z.
Rev. turner O. Nelson, Pastor
Box 307 Balboa. C.Z. Tl 2 2803
Sunday School 0:45 jn.
Wortfito Service 10:43 s m
Youth Sarvic 6:45 pm.
Evangelistic Service 730 p.m.
Prayer Service. Wed. ... 738 p.m
CHURCH OF TUB NAZARENB
Margarita School Gymnasium
Paster Ralph L. Hysong
Write: Box 3013 Margarita. C.Z.
Phone: 3-1383
Sunday School 3:41 am.
Morning Worship 1130 am
Evening Service 730 p m
NATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH
Panama R.P.. 33rd Street East
Bat B. N Brewa. Minister
DivtB Worship :J0a.m
Sunday School 3:00 p.m
Sunday Massas T. 735 11:45
Rio Abaio. RJP.
Sunday School 3:00 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
MMtina Thursday at 730 p.m. and
Sundays st 4:00 pm. Wars Memorial
SOS Balbue Road. Balboa.
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF
LATTER DAT SAINTS (Mormon)
Chapel on Balboa Road
Priesthood Meeting: Sunday 830 am
Sunday School; Sunday 10:00 a.m.
Sacrament Meeting; Sunday 8:00 p.m
Relief Society; Tuesday 0:00 a.m.
MIA: Wdnetdy 730 pjn.
Primary: Thursday 4:00 pjn.
Telephone Balboa 4327.
Atlantic Branch
Building 300. Schoolhous Rotd. Oatun
sunaay ocnoor, aunaay :au a.m.
Sacrament Meeting: Sunday 1133 a m
CURUNDU PROTESTANT CHURCH
"A Warm Hearted Church"
Milton K LeWlg. Mliustet
Phone Res. 83-7110 Of. 83-5105
Sunday School 3:36 a. n
(A class for vry age)
Umlni Wnrihln 11:00 S B
eneUowahlp 52!
Rvnln Worship ........ 730 PJB.
Prayer and Praia (Wed. 730 pan.
A church nursey m provided.
OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH
aa fclnj ho Anaaaaai
Holy Eucharist: Sunday at 130 a.m.
Tuaadaya, Wednesday and Thursday!
030 ajn.
Baeramant ot
leak First Sunday
730 PJB.
Mornlni devotion
030 Ban.
Fellowship Worship
Sunday School
1130 .m
330 ajn.
DiVln Brvie
7:30 pjn.
BAHAI'S
a fltraet
UrbanlaeldB El Carman. Panarpd City
informal Taut ana uucuwona
luradaya....,.............30 pm
Oteai'stb Front 'strU
.."-sarrio
Study
p.m
BETHEL MISSION CirURCR
Espslaba t 'J C,t
$jyilBL VorW sirvie.
330 p.m. Sunday SchooL
7:13 p.m. Gospel Service.
Monday: 730 Young People's Society
Wednesday: 730
Mid-week Christian
FaUaarahln.
Thurdday: 8:08 Oioh Reharl.
Friday: 730 Women'a Missionary So-
clety.
THE CHURCH OF GOD
-- B ..mile am
Hear Fgatvtflanca
Mrs. Maada Hint. Paatar
Sunday School 10:00 a m
Moming Worship 11:00 .m.
Night tevias 130 pjn
FIRST CHURCH OF GOD
Cat. Jamaica aad Trinidad SO.
Rainbow City, Canal Zone
Rev. Wm. Llvingatan, Pitta
THE CHURCH OF GOD
biGGrFor
Sunday. School 830 ajn.
Mornlni Worship 10:30 a m
Night Service 730 pjn
Morning Worship 0:00 ajn.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Nlgnt service sans p-m.
THE CHUBCH OF GOD Bt Abaja
Monte Osetrro Rd-18tb St
a I Baa..
Sundy Schoo OtJO a m
Morning worsnip m m a m
Night Service 730 p.m
CHURCH OF GOD (PenteeosteD
Phone U. B0?gSSob
Church at Para Is o, C.Z. (Rev. and
Mrs. Barman O. Whvtel. Colon. HP
Iv. Fernando Lorenee), Rio Abaio
(Ray.. saTlK. Otolaa BKfnas), and
Catlv (Rev. and Mrs. Clifford Greave
aunaay ana. weexaays services ar
Churchos.
COMMUNITY CHAPEL
Diablo HiBhs, C.Z.
(near Diablo sehooli
Rev. Ctrl V. Thompson, Minister
Box 33. Diablo Heights.- C.Z.
Phones: Home, Gambaa 317
Church Balboa 6371
Sunday School 1030 .m.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Youth Service 7:00 p.m.
Bvangellstic Service ...... 730 pjn.
Wedneeday: Bible Study
and Prayer Service 1:30 p.m.
Lutheran
BEEDEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
Balboa Road t Wight Street
Rev. Bobert F. Gotalek, PaaU
P.O. BOX 000. Bloo
School. Bible claas 030 tJkt.
Servloa 10:15 am.
holy Communion, first Sunday of the
month.
Atlantic Side
Format chapel of Our Saviour' Rpia-
oopsl chapel 3rd St. end MeMndei Ave..
New Crisfdbal.
MT. Eugene H. Deaner, Vicar
Sunday Scnooi. Bible Class 3:00 a.m.
Divine Servlee 10:18 a.m.
Holy Communion, last Sunday of the
month.

Jewish

jewrn woifiw Beam Mai ngwX La
iBuca Roan Balboa. C.Z Rabbi Nathan
WiUtln Director.
Serine" Friday. 7 JO ouaa. Saturaav
53T O-r
(See o ustuura ot Jewish servlaar
under Pent Bases end Sutimu
Conreeuon KM Shearttb Israel Ave.
aide C"b and 36th Street Bella Vtata.
Pi name City Service tM Pjd
Christian Scientist
CUIJ1 lJ aCtANCA cJlLKUi
jtx ChureL at Chran. lrnntssi Ane
80S Ancoo BouMvWd.
1MB. Waineedav S3 Van
atom 630 a-ae
Oaten at Canst, a inaanu Usm
13th Street A BoUvai Hiajwav
aund Vtteav i jpi
ll :o i Wednesday 838 p
Posts and Bases
PACIFIC SID
Protestant
FORT AMADOR
Sunday School ;
Morning Worship
Church-time Nursery School..
83C
10.00
1030
(FORT CLAYTON
"sr.
School (Building No.
330
Morning Worship
Thursday Evening Mid -Week
Service
Youth Fellowship Sunday ....
1030
730
0:00
FORT KOBBI
Sunday School 3:00
Morning Worship 10:30
Evaning Worship 7:00
Worship Service. Madden Wye 730
worsnip oervice. kio tiato .... s:ia
Christian Youth Fellowship .... 6:00
Soldier' Fellowship Thura. ., 7:00
Officer' Christian Union Thurs. 830
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Sunday School ,, 830
Adult Bible Class (NCO Club).. 3:30
Morning Worship 0:30 10:45
Youth Fellowship 030
U.S. NAVAL STATION, Rodman
Sunday School 8:30
Morning Worship ., 11:00
Holy Communion First Sunday
of Month)
15th ND HEADQUARTERS CHAPEL
Morning Worsnip :oo
(Holy communion Finn Sunday
of Month).
Naval Radio SUtion, Summit... 6:00
CatbeU
FORT AMADOR
Daily Mas
Sunday Masses 7:00 dj
Confessions. Saturday .. 6:30
Sunday 830 A
0:30
3:30
7:30
8:25
FORT CLAYTON
Daily Maas
Sunday Massas
Confessions Saturday
0:48
.7:45 A
0:30 A
3:00
8:00
FORT KOBBE
Daily Maas 0:15
Saturday Masses 8:00
Sundiy Masses 8:00 11:45
Monday Noven Devotions .... I
Corrfasatoaa Saturday.. 030 730
CfjROZAL
1036
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Dally Man 030
Saturday Mass 7:00
Sunday Massas 731 A 1338
Bpanlsat 7:00
Novena Services-Tuesdsy 7:08
Conialona Saturday 730
UJNAVAL STATION.
830
FORT KOBBE
Saturday .......
130
usu-JWB, Balboa
T33
4:08
030
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASB
US-j(B7bo)
ATLANTIC SIDE
Protaalant
FORT DAVIS
Sunday School Bldg. 253 ....
Moming Worship
Prayar Fellowabip-Bldg. 353-
3:00
1030
ifflHay.
7:00
030
KYBB Wednesday Post Chapel
cnotr Practice Wednesday
Post Chapel 733
FORT GULICK
Sunday School
038
" ""p
10.41
avuus a
ellowshlo. Sunday .... 6 JO
Bible Study. Wednesday 7:30
Ladle Chapel Guild. 1st Thura. 130
U.S. NAVAL STATION. Coco Solo
Sunday School 030
Morning Wand
lionST
worsnip i u:o
uian s irsi aunaay
Cathnlle
FORT DAVIS
Dally Mis
Sunday Mas
Confessions: Saturday
7:00
8:30
833
FORT GUtJCX
navllaw aVRaaataa
Saturday MuX'.'.'.'.','.
7:00
7:00
aunaay asaaia
Cofifaaalona, Saturday
7:43 A 10:15
030 A 7:03
U.S. NAVAL STATION, Coca Sol
vaiiy Mats 4:00
Saturday Mass 830
Sunday Masa : 830
COCO SOL1TO
Sunday Maaa
730
Jewish
FORT GULICK
Tuesday ..
too
Ml
Grk Orthoda
Greek Orthftdoz services sre conduct
ed at thd Choreh of the Anunclatlon,
VI Btlttarlo Porrs, San Francisco da
la Cslst. Panama City, H P., and at
th Church of fit. Anthony. Avenlda
Melendez. Colon. R.P on alternate Sun
day at 3:30. For further Information,
call th Offic of th Army Chaplain,
31-8113.
Seventh Day
Adventist
Weekly Services In all church
follow:
SATUKDAY:
SabbSth School 8:30 a.m.
Divin Service 11:00 a.m.
Youth' Matting 430 p.m.
WEDNESDAY :
Bible Study and Prayer Service
t:30 pjn.
Pacific Side Panama
Pastor W. H. Waller Tel. 23-3-159
Cabo Vard. Av. J. F. d 1 Oiss
e. 17 ChorrUlo 36th No. 37 Pu Pu-le
le Pu-le Nueve 2 A St between 3rd and 4th
nd rrtjh
Pastor G. D. Willlm-Tl. 6 580
Pastor A. A. Grizzle Tel. AtM
Spanish Chorche PacHU Sid Paaami
rasior jxoreerto wuiroi
Panama, Calle Darlen No. 3
Pedregal A Nuevo Guarar.
Atlantic Side
Pastor G. A. Jeffries-Tel. 38 826L
Colon
Cristobal Engllsh-l6tn A Bolivar Av.
Crtstdbal Spanlh-llh da Bolivar Ave.
0844 Gviin Road-Tel. 2-1358 A 13531

WASHINGTON. Jan. 4 (UP)

Fundamentalist theorory is mkk
inst a strong comeback from the
Doundine It took from 'modern
ists" in the Deriod between world
Wars I and II.
Originally known as "Evangeli
calism." the conservative pro-
testant creed is making the re recovery
covery recovery under a new name "Fun "Fundamentalism."
damentalism." "Fundamentalism." The name is pre
ferred by most of the leaders of
the resurgent conservative move
ment, including its best-known
preacher, Billy Graham.
one strong indication of tne
strong recovery of Evangelical Evangelicalism
ism Evangelicalism is the rapid growth of such
unaDR&neoiy fundamentalist de denominations
nominations denominations as the Southern
Baptists and Seventh Day Ad-
ventists.
Still another is the soaring cir circulation
culation circulation of the new "Evangelic "Evangelic-alist"
alist" "Evangelic-alist" magazine "Christianity
Today," which In one year of
publication has outstripped the
liberal, 50-year-old "Christian
Century."
Fundamentalism got its name
from five "fundamental" doc doctrines
trines doctrines which its adherents hold
to be essential to the Christian
faith. They are: the infallibility
of the Bible; the Virgin birth of
Jesus Christ; the belief that
Christ, in his death on Calvary,
achieved a "substitutionary a a-tonement"
tonement" a-tonement" for the sins of man
kind; the bodily resurrection of
Christ from the tomb; and the
expectation that Christ will come
again in person to establish his
kingdom on earth.
During the 1920 s, fundamen
talist, fought a bitter and deci decisive
sive decisive battle with "modernists"
theologians who were prepared
to water down or sacrifice these
doctrines in an effort to "ac-
First Nighlers Argue
Merits Of Ballet
h Francoise Sagan
MONTE CARLO. Monaco. Jan
4-(UP)-An elegant first night
audience and a host of interna international
tional international critics today disputed the
merits of French novelist Fran Francoise
coise Francoise Sagan's first ballet, the jazzy,
suggestive and tragic "The Bro Broken
ken Broken Date."
Her storr of a young man's love
for a married woman and his
eventual suicide was as melancho melancholy
ly melancholy as the three best gelling novels
ticked off by the 32-year-old writ writer.
er. writer. Some persons were shocked,
but the reaction was generally ta
vorsWe.
There was thunderous applause
and five curtain calk. Miss Be Began,
gan, Began, smiling and wearing a long
dresa of reel satin, took a bow. Her
worried looks of earlier evening
had vanished.
' Jean Cbctean, aging "spoiled
child" of French letters, called the
ballet "a very good portrait of an
unpleasant epoch." Anton Dolus,
artistic director of the London Fes
tival Ballet, said he liked the
third act but he found the music
and choreography could be re
proved.
Miss Sagan's three best-selling
novels were "Bonjour Trktesse,"
"A Certain Smile" and "In A
Month, In A Year."
The audience was star studded
but Prince Rainier and Princess
Grace did not attend.
m.
Rabbits, whose mother'
mflk contain about 10 ner
cent albumin, a simple protein
substance, double their weight
in six days after birth, while
a human infant, feeding upon
milk containing less than one
per cent albumin, requires ISO
days to double its weight. 1
Cow's milk contains about
616 of one per ecM, goat's
mflk a little mere, while s
reindeer' milk eantain a
much as 10 per cent albumin.
3fitasl HH lyvslaaai-'
, p-
Indian-born Solon
Finds Affection
On Goodwill Visit
LONDON. Jan. 4 (UPV Rep.
Dalip Singh Saund (D-Calif) said
today he found "affection and
understanding" toward the United
States during his goodwill tour of
Indis.
The Indian born congressman
told newsmen on his arrival here
that there was some "displeasure
at our handling of the Kashmir
issue."
"tut I received a tremendous
reception everywhere and I feel I
Was able to remove some of what whatever
ever whatever misunderstanding there might
have been between our peoples,"
he said.
"After you get through their sw
face hesitation, you find the peo people
ple people of India obviously feel aftec
tion and understanding toward the
United States."

r

commodate" Chris t i s n 1 1 y to

what then appeared to be an lr
resistible march of scientific ma materialism.
terialism. materialism. By the esriy 1930 s, the mod modernists
ernists modernists seemed to have won tne
fight. Fundamentalism was rele relegated
gated relegated to the fringes of protest protest-ant
ant protest-ant life. Major denominations
and theological schools came un under
der under virtually complete sway of
liberals who de-emphasized the
Bible as sn authoritative source
of revelations and who spoke
softly, if at all, about the super supernatural
natural supernatural aspects of Christian doe doe-trine.
trine. doe-trine. Although fundamentalism is
again becoming a powerful force
In protestant thought; there Is
little prospect of a renewal of
tne old battle with modernism.
The reason is that there are few
modernist theologians left to up uphold
hold uphold the "winning" side of the
30-year-old debate.
The dominant school of theo
logy in protestantism today is
what is called "Neo-orthodoxy."
by comDarison with funda
mentalism, neo-orthodoxy may
be termed a liberal theology. But
is essentially a conservative re
action against the excesses of
modernism.
For example, neo-orthodoxv
leaves room for several view viewpoints
points viewpoints on the precise nature of
atonement, but it takes very se seriously
riously seriously the historic christian af affirmation
firmation affirmation that "God was in
Christ, reconciling the world un unto
to unto himself." If it does not insist
upon, neither does it deny such
doctrines as the virgin birth.
ine DHnclDal dlfferenc. be
tween today's "neo-orthodox"
and "evangelical" theologians
stem from differing views of the
Bible.
Unlike extreme fundamental
ists, modern evangelicals do not,
as a rule, uphold the belief that
God 1 i t e r a 1 1 v "dictated" the
words of the Bible. They admit
the possibility that slight errors
have occurred in translation or
in copying manuscripts.
But with these nuallfleat on.
they regard the Bible as the
verbally Inspired, lnerrant word
of God." For example, they read
as genuine history the Old Tes
SATINA CARRIES YOU
THRU THE IRONING
Satina...
fit 110 Ironing
ofd In he little
AFOVtS PANAMA
PANAMA-MIAMI
MIAMI-NEW YORK
PANAMA
NEW YORK
Todiy's
3:00 Chapel of th Air
3:30 Look Up and Llv
3:00 Faith for Today
3:30 Professional Football: Orcn
Bay Packers vs. Detroit Lions
6:00 Air Fore Story No. 18
0:15 CFN NEWS
6:30 You Are There
7:00 Jack Benny

Courtesy of Aerovias Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1698 3-1699

J
unxprajjed
desire io possess

? Daiire

a

'J8 "elegant, so small, that its possession
becomes inherwtly an expression of
your personality . There is such an
exquisite watch . the new Mido Power Power-wind,
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I oF
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siiswihoin eJioc-. war raa's tTBB
O ANTI UASKITIC UN1K I MSI!
C. CASULL0 y CIA. LTDA.
45, FRONT STREET COLON

tament accounts of the creation
of the world in six days, the
floor, and other episodes which
many modern Christians regard
as symbolic.
A rediscovery of the scriptures
as a primary source and testing testing-ground
ground testing-ground for all Christian doctrine
has been one of the major fea features
tures features of neo-orthodoxy theology.
But while neo-orthodoxv ac

cepts the Bible as a unique and
divinely-inspired reecr of God's
revelation, it also recognized as
human role-and therefore the
possibility of error in writing
and transmitting the sacred
books.

It also believes that the ulti
mate revelation of the "Word of
God" was in his incarnate son,
Jesus Christ, and that all of the
Bioie must be read and inter interpreted
preted interpreted in the light of this reve revelation.
lation. revelation. M
Mexican Highway
Official Given
RP Decoration
MEXICO CITY, Jan. 4 (TTW
Romulo O'Farrill Sr., president af
the Mexican Highway Associa Association
tion Association and to the permanent com committee
mittee committee of the Panamerican High Highway
way Highway Commission, has been a-
warded the Order of Vasco Nu
nez ae Bamoa by the Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian government.
Presentation was marl Ym wn
berto Lopez Fabrega;, Panama's
minister or public works, in cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies at the Panamanian em embassy
bassy embassy here last night. He praised
O Farrill's work on the Panamer Panamerican
ican Panamerican Highway Commission and
said the construction of the
highway would create "a conti continental
nental continental conscience."
O'Farrill, who Is publisher of
the Mexico Cltv rlnllv "nrtvaria-
des" and the English langugt
"The News," said in his accept.,
ance speech, "Without highways,
culture would stagnate, economy
would suffocate, and supply and
demand would be limited to lo local
cal local products."
1
SMOOTHLY
HOUR I
box
AfMWAYS
.............a-. S8.00
44.06
99.
$
oo
Y Program
7:30
8:00
3:00
0:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:08
Cavalcade of America
Ed Sullivan Show
Loretta Young
Phil Silvers
Conrad Nigel
Vole of Firston
CFN NEWS
Goodyear TV Theatr
. . You secratly

LatfaV

1 9

watch of such pace,

ever made!
toowerwind

i if

-

z



LMEBICAH
STSDAT,
Irasgo Choice lo Win INew Year s Uassic loday

THB

ission To

AUIM

Rescheduled $4000

nor

f Furlong Route Race

The resrheriuleri New

SWO increase in the original $3,000 added perse,

be rim this atternoon

Thu samp eleven horses that firot off to a DOOr

id straggling start last Wednesday that caused the

to be canceled are

ljiclin in il lanonrlonpipt nf thp rarptrark

nuiiiiivii w mi uiiviiviivivo m. -

WfH again be free.
tTfasgo, the newcome- which w s
a'9-5 favorite at starting time on
New Year's Day. is expected to
be an even shorter price'' mutuels
fivorite this time on the bans
of his exce'lent performance after
beng hopelessly left at the start
Second choice in the betting
should be King's Park which won
fife race after setting the best of
the had start. Posiblemnte is an another
other another that is sure to be heavily
backed in the mutuels. The latter
ehfseH King's Park over the fi finish
nish finish line by three-quarters of a
lenth.
t Gavilan and Batallen, which ran
'surprising well after getting off a a-imong
imong a-imong the leaders,, must also be
reckoned with.S Batallon will be
ridden this timt by Guillermj Ri Ri-Ivera
Ivera Ri-Ivera instead ofVCarlos Bovrl.
Another jockerchange was mHe
;when Alfredo Vasquez accepted the
mount of Melendez a'ter Cristian
!Rebolledo decided to sit the race
'out. Rivera rode Playboy and Vas--ouez
had the leg up on Horacio.
"Their chanee in mounts leave Ho
racio and Playboy without riders.
fieir owners will probably an an-unce
unce an-unce their choice of jockeys at
(3 time.
' ThA other scheduled starters win
all have the riders that were;
; aboard on New Year's Day. King s
'Park (Ruben Vasquez), Trasgo
(Braulio Baeza), Sculptor (Bias
Aguirre), Gavilan (Virgilio Casti Castillo),
llo), Castillo), Posiblemente (Fernando Al
varez), Double Four (Alejandro
Ycaza) and Contralor (Amado Cre-
: didio).
Nine other prospective thrillers
are included on an attractive rpo rpo-!
! rpo-! gram.
' Yesterday's featured Manuel
Aranda Handicap was won in a
major upset by Louvre. The lat latter
ter latter showed none of, his recent
quitting tendencies as he held
Jon tenaciously to score by more
than a length in the $1000 sev-
en furlong sprint for second and
.third series imported thorough-
breds.
Braulio Baeza, the day's rid rid-ln&
ln& rid-ln& star with four victories, had
I th tti up on Louvre and was a
vast improvement over suspend suspended
ed suspended Chilean jockey Julio Rodri Rodriguez
guez Rodriguez who had been aboard Lou Lou-.
. Lou-. vri in his last, two losinsr efforts.
Baeza got Louvre off to a
j good start, ratde him just off
i-fine sizzling pace set Dy uone
.Inn nnri flramtlla' nnt.11 near
ing the far end of the bftck bftck-?
? bftck-? stretch where he gave.the?fenfv
i lean-bred four -year-old bay colt
"his head. SBHH
Louvre shot to the front,
TODAY &
TOMORROW!

THE BOODLE... AND W THE BLONDE!

They were 1
each worth I
-depending I 1 I I
on how you HHB ) flHHHHH
'iLni OHPTA i- nnrnnm lllrEll I

iviaiy uuoih james mm wiiinEn

w ROBERT H. HARRIS COREY ALLEN
Screenplay by MARTIN BESKELEY Produced by WILLIAM
& THOWAS, HOWARD PINE MOCtOSjOV ROBERT STEVENS
Pine-Thomas Production Released thru United Artists

Be Free

Year's Classic, with a
at the rresiaent uemon
expected to go postwara
opened a safe lead and held on
in the gruelling drive up the
homestretch to withstand the
closinp efforts of Slneful, Ka Ka-dir.
dir. Ka-dir. Hostigador, Michlripa and
Town's Wall which were close closely
ly closely bunched at the wire.
Singful was second by a long
nose over Kadir while the lat latter
ter latter held a clear head over Hos Hostigador.
tigador. Hostigador. MichiriDa was fifth a
half length back and Town's
Wall sixth another half length
behind Gonetino and GramilR
were fat back at the finish..
Louvre turned the distance in
the fast time of 1:25 3-5 and re returned
turned returned 22.40 to win. He com combined
bined combined with mutuels choice Sing Singful
ful Singful for a one-two payoff of $101 $101-60
60 $101-60 tops for the day. Baea's
other winners were Josellto, Ro Ro-mancero
mancero Ro-mancero and Solito.
Elko's $27.40 straight odds
we'e the day's best.
THE DIVIDENDS:
First Race
lViolin Viejo $14.00, 20
2 Melrose $2.60
Second Race
1 Camberwell $6.40, $3.80
2 Venganza $3.20
First Double: $77.20
Third Race
1 San Cristobal $4.00, $2.20
2 Okiland $2.40
One-Two:" $10.80 J
Fourth Race
1- SolltO $3.60, $2.40
2 Tanganlca $3.40
Ouinlela' $10.20
Fifth Race
1 Romance (excluded from
betting)
2 Apache $8.00
No place betting
Sixth Race
1 Josellto $3.60, $2.60
2 Miss Patience $4.40
Seventh .Race
1 ElkO $27.20, $10.00
2 Introduction $10.80
Second Double: $69.20
Eighth Race
1 Vergniaux $3.00, $2.40
2 Calif ato $4.80
quiniela: $7.20
Ninth Race
1- Louvre $22.40, $7.60
2- Singful $3.60
One-Two: $101.60
DRIVE-IN

'mm 1
The grand-slam hold-up.. that would
live forever in the annals of crime...!

HE'LL STAY AWHILE After
breaking his ankle carrying
Christinas packages, former No Notre
tre Notre Dame football coach Frank
Leahy was hdspitahzed in Chi Chicago.
cago. Chicago. He's shown telephoning his
wife the news that his physician,
Dr. Clifford Barborka, has ad advised
vised advised him not to take the Texas
A and M coaching post he's been
offered as it could endanger his
health.
Whatever
Happened to ..
Lao (Gabby) Hartnttt
The competitive fire in Gabby
Hartnett burned as brightly as his
tomato red face in the years when
he was operating for the Chicago
Cubs a one ot tne greatest earn earners
ers earners in the game. In 1938, nearjthe
end of bis playing career, he
blasted a "homer in the gloam gloam-in'
in' gloam-in' just as darkness fell to lead
the Cubs he managed to a nen
nant against the collapsing Sep September
tember September leaders, the Pirates. Once
he sMd. "if I could run, I could
hit .500" but even so he set nu numerous
merous numerous record.' for catchers both
for battmg and durability until tne
string ran out with the Giants in
1941.
Whatever happened to Gabby
Hartnett? Today, at 57, he's co co-owner
owner co-owner of a busy howling alley in
Morton Grove.. 13., recently to totalled
talled totalled 745 in a league match, plays
nlf iAPocinnatlv in thp 70's and
is four-times a grandfather.
Racetrack Tips
By CONRADO
t-Slderal
2- Quiekit
3- Soberano
4- Brae Val
5- Dtlta
4 Empire Cross
7 Germanio
g-Rabiblanco
9 Trasgo
10-Eric U)
Golden Moon
Blue Sky
YooJktto
Enganoio
Crows Hill
Mar Bravo
Aguador
Poncho Lopoz
Sculptor
El Aghoila (e)
BROWNS SIGN THREE
CLEVELAND (UP) Quarter Quarterback
back Quarterback George Walker of the Uni University
versity University of Arkansas and tackles
Charles Mitchell of the University
of Florida and Gene Hickerson of
the University of Mississippi have
been signed by the Cleveland
Browns for the 1958 National Foot Football
ball Football League season.
60c.
30c.
WEEKEND RELEASE!

Powes Play CHS In Atlantic
Twilght Loop Opener Tuesday

Hol
wdEU'JtR mm I
mw SAm i
PBHk mM
yStEM m I mm mm. 1
m m mWsmmw'

1VW. REBOUND Seven-foot Wilt the Stilt Chamberlain of
Kansas outleaps two opponents to take a rebound at North Northwestern.
western. Northwestern. The Jumping Wildcats are Phil Warren, foreground, i
and Billy Jones. Chamberlain guarantees ball possession, j

Race Track Graded Entries

P.P. Ham
1st Race, "Hla.
Jockey St.
' Nativts Fgs.
FIRST RACE OF
1 Filon
2 Sideral
3 Golden Moon
4 Bagdad
5 Fabionet
6 Don Manuel
7 Nacho
A. Credidio 109
J. Talavera 115x
B. Baeza 106
A. Gonzales 106 -J.
Cadogan 105
. Ortega 104 -A.
Vergara 115
2nd Race, 4th Series Imp. 7 Ppt.
SECOND RACE
1 Embassy R. Vasquei 116
2 Crews Hill B. Baeza 112
3 Embrujada B. Aguirre 108
4 Delta F. Alvarez 108
3rd Rica, "C" Natives
7 Pis.
ON
NE
1 Soberano V. Castillo U
2 Chito F. Alvarez 106
3 Yosikito B. Aguirre 115
4 Takeaway R. Gomez 106
5 Sandokan R. Vasquez 118
4th Raee, "P" Natives

6 Fgs. Purse $375
QUINIELA

1 EngaSoso H. Ruiz 113
2 Brae Val B. Aguirre 113
3 Pichoto R. Cristian 110
4 Golden Wonder Credidio 112
5 Black Bee R. Vasquez 118
6 Radical B. Baeza 112
5th Rice, 4th Series Imp. 7 Fgs.
-Blue Sky B. Aguirre 110
1 Quickie B. Baeza 110
-Distingo F. Alvarez 104
4th Race, 5th Series Imp. 4 Fgs.
FIRST RACE OP
1 My Friend B. Aguirre 110
2- ureco A. vasquez izo
3 Mar Bravo J. Talavera 107x
4 Empire cross A. crecudio 115
5 Jal All 106

7th Race, ith Series Imp. 7 Fgs. Purse $500
SECOND RACE OF THE DOUBLE

1 Fieltro
2 Germanio
3 Aguador
4 King John
5 Red Label
6 King
7 Chivilingo
A. Ycaza 113
R. vasquez lis
G. Rivera 115
B. Aguirre 115
E. Dsrio 310
A. Credidio 108
E. Ortega 104
Ith Race, "DE" Natives 4 Fgs.

QUINIELA
1 Pancho Lopez R. Vasquez 118 Mutuels favorite
2 Naranjaso A. Credidio 100 Dangerous contender
3 Rabiblanco B. Baeza 115 -Not fractious these days
4 Damadura R. Cristian 112 Best early speed
5 Tinela F. Alvarez 307 Should be close up
6 Don Grau A. Vasquez 110 Always dangerous
7 Daniel C. Quiros lOlx Rider handicaps

9th Race, 1 14 Mile
NBW YEAR'S CLASSIC
ONB TWO W

1 Horacio
King's Park
8 Trasgo
4 Sculptor
5 Gavilan
6 Posiblemente
7 Melendez
8 Double Four
9 (Contralor
10 (Batallon
11 (Play Boy
112
R. Vasquez 110
B. Baeza 115
B. Aguirre 106
V. Castillo 113
F. Alvare 112
A. Vasquez 113
A. Ycaza 118
A. Credidio 104
G. Rivera 108
115
10th Rac, 5th Series Imp. 7 Fgs.
1 Oliver
2 Blakemere
3 Diocese
4 (Eric
5 CE1 Afleija
105
B. Aguirre 113
B. Baeza 108
R. Vasquei! 115
A. Credidio 108

Odds
Pool Closes 1:00
Purs 375
THE DOUBLE
-Usually close up
-Form indicates
-Poor start in last
-Ran well in last
-Would pay off
-Nothing recently
-Should be close up
41
3-2
3-1
5-2
30-1
20-1
52
Purse S400 Peel Closes 1:30
OP THE DOUBLE
Form indicates
Has strongest finish
Better this time
Rest may hdp
32
2-1
5-1
2-1
Purse 142
Peel Closes 2:00
TWO
- Should be runnerup i
Poor recent races 31
Distance handicaps 84
Rider handicaps 10-1
Excluded from betting XXX
Pool Closes 2:30
Hard to beat here
Depends on start
Better than ever
Barely won last
-Sack )n good form
2- 1
3- 1
8-1
5-1
3-1
Purse $M0 Pool Closes 3:00
Form indicates EVEN
Will fight it out 6-5
Good chance this time 5-1
Purse $500 Pool Closes 3:40
THE DOUBLE
Would surprise 5.1
Weights handicap 3-1
Better chance now 2-1
Back in best form EVEN
Fair effort in return 5-2
Peel Closes 4:10
Early speed only 3-1
Long overdue 3-2
May go all the way 2-1
Won ridden out 5
Hasn't shown much 8
Rates good chance 10-1
Doesn't seem likely 30-1
two
Purse
Peel Closet 4:45
3-2
3-1
2-1
41
5-1
3-1
30-1
Distance to liking
8-1
Has proven class
Seems best here
Could surprise
Can run; unpredictahle
Dangerous contender
Not a classic horse
Best early speed
Outclassed here
Early speed only
Not in winning form
3-2
EVEN
5-1
81
3-1
10
104
20-1
20-1
20-1
Purs $500
Pel Closes 5:45
Rates good chance 3-1
Will fight it out 2-1
Apparently overrated 4-1
Much the best here EVEN
Could be runnerup EVEN

Comment

By TREVOR SIMONS
The defending champions of 19-

57, Powells, will oppose Cristobal
High School Tuesday nigni ai aw,
Hooe Stii'pr in th jrr.'no eame
of the 1358 Atlantic Twilight Leag
seasuu. iie uo-tiAwi ie
their debut in the second schedul scheduled
ed scheduled contest on Thursday night. All
night eames will begin at 7 p.m.
Neither Palumbo or Gibson, re
spective managers of the two 0-
penmg night teams, nave announc announced
ed announced their starting assignments for
the Tuesday night opener, bat it is
believed that the first game of '58
season will feature a brother's bat
tle with two Gibson toeing the
mound. Noel Gibson, veteran ace
of the Twi-looD. and winningest
pitcher of 1957, will undobtedly
be trying to get hi team off a
fast start while the youngest of the
Gibson clan, Bill, will be working
to start Cristobal High off fast.
The complete schedule for 1958
was read and approved by all
managers at a meeting last Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night. The schedule of games
and times follow below:
Last named team shall be home
team. All night games will be play-
eu ai 1 p.m. auuuay uvgiiiuuu
single games wiU start at 1:30 p.m.
and doubleheaders at 1 n.r.
1st Half
Tuesday, Jan. 7 Powells vs C.H.S.
Thurs., Jan. 9, CHS-Alumni vs
Mercury.
Sun., Jan. 12, Powells vs Mer Mercury;
cury; Mercury; Mercury vs Powells
Tuesday, Jan. 14, CHS-Alumni
vs C.H.S.
Thursday Jan. 16, Powells vs
CHS-Alumni.
Sunday Jan. 19, C.H.S. vs Mer Mercury.
cury. Mercury. Tuesday Jan. 21, OPEN.
Thursday Jan. 23, Mercury vs
CHS-Alumni.
Sunday Jan. 26, CHS vs Pow Powells.
ells. Powells.
TiuiilGir Ton 98 ft P V. TV
lusuaj MM... MV, V
Thursday Jan. 30, CHS-Alumni
vs Powells.
Sunday Feb. 2, Mercury vs CHS.
Tuesday Feb. 4 O P E N.
Thursday Feb. 6, Powells vs
C.H.S.
Sunday Feb. 8, Mercury vs Pow
ells.
Tuesday Feb. 11. Powells vs
CHS-Alumni.
Thursd y, rw. is, ujas-Aiumni
vs C.H.S.
Sunday Feb, 16 O P E N.
Tuesday Feb. 18, C.H.S. vsMef-
ClTnursday Feb. 20. CHS-Alumni
vs Mercury.
Sunday Feb. 23, C.H.S. vs CH5-
Alumni.
2nd Half
Tuesday Feb. 25, C.H.S. vs Pow
ells.
Thursday Feb. 27, Mercury vs
CHS-Alumni.
Sunday March 2, OPEN.
Tuesday March 4, C.H.S. vs
CHS-Alumni.
Thursday March 6, CHS Alum Alumni
ni Alumni vs Powells.
Sunday Mardh 9. Mercury vs
Powells; Powells vs Mercury.
Tuesday March 11, Mercury vs
C.H.S.
Thursday Feb. 13, Powells vs
C.H.S.
Sunday March 16, OPEN.
Tuesday March 18, CHS-Aluini
vs Mercury.
Thursday March m, c.h.s. vs
Mercury.
Sunday March 23, Poweljs vs
CHS-Alumni.
Tuesday March 26, UrJS-Aiumm
vs. C.H.S.
Powells.
Sunday March 30 O f e JN.
Tuesday April 1 Mercury vs CHS-
Alumni.
Thursday April 8 C.H.5. vs una-
Alumni.
Supday April 6, Powells vs Mer
cury.
Tuesday April mercury ts
Thursday AprU 10, CHS-Alumni
vs Powells.
Sports Briefs
BXPECT 30 ROOKIES
ptwptimiM att ("TIP, The Cin
cinnati Redlegs will open their
rookie training camp ai nam
City, Fla., Feb. 15, with Manager
Birdie Tebbetts and Coaches Jim Jim-mv
mv Jim-mv rtviraa Tnm Fprrick and John
ny Riddle instructing an expected
group of 30 youngsters.
DOW WINS AWARD
rnrrACn niP, Dow Finster-
wald, who played the most con consistent
sistent consistent golf on the pro circuit dur
ing 1957, has been named winner
nf iha riaU nirpst mapa7.inp's ner-
formance award. Finsterwald fin
ished with a .643 average in the
magazine's ratings, while Doug
FnrH wnnnrl un second with B31
mark. Bill Casper was third at
.434. Arnold maimer tourtn at .491
and Art Wall fifth at .407.
CAPITOLIO
35c. fi 1. 20c.
THE CURSE OF
FRANKENSTEIN
- Also:
THE COUNTERFEIT
" FLAN
with Zachary Scott

Editor: CONRADO SARGEANT

XsoLjhew-

PANAMA PROFESSIONAL LEAGUE
TMm CV CB C VV L Pet
Carta Vieja ........ x 4 5 9 6 .600
Cerveia B&iboa 3 x 4 7 8 .467
Chestei field 3 4 x 7 9 .438

Lost
6 8

TODAY'S GAME

At Colon Stadium : Cerveza Balboa (Benedict 3-2 ) vi.

Game time 10 a.m.
Beer
by brewmaster
Hector I.onez' rtiim t tho
.u
Cerveza Balboa lineup for their
tussle this mnrninc at tho rnlnn
--O v.v nt vv.w.x
Municipal Stadium ha made the
Beermen favorites. Southpaw
Dave Benedict (3-2) will attempt
to post his fourth victory at the
expense of the league leaders. He
will be opposed by Jim Umbricht,
towering righthander who sports
a mark of 1 and 1.
Bocas born ball players were
very muck in the limelight in
Friday nights afterpiece.
Pitcher Winston Brown, whose
brilliant two-hit relief stint
earned him his third win; out outfielder
fielder outfielder Reg. Grenald, whose
two-run homer in the seventh
inning off Chiricano Jose U U-sondro
sondro U-sondro tied up the match and
starting Smoker hurler ten
Ferguson, who held the Beer Beer-men
men Beer-men in check for. the first six
innings were the outstanding
stars. Other "tortugueros" tak taking
ing taking part in the contest were
Walter Barnes, CB catcher and
Carlos Heron, Smoker third
baseman.
Friday nleht's twin hill mvmI.
AH .MHA A u .. 1 1 .'m fn 1 1 1 m i-
"V""C very Bnuent iacis,
and from an impartial point of
view, we are inclined to agree
with the fans when they claim
that the caliber of play' at the
oejgam anair was below par.
Tn fVia firm u n 1..
were handed the match on a sil silver
ver silver Tlner mh.n n-
lackadaisical demonstration of
uuw wi piay me outneia m the
first. Innlncr navoA th. ,o.. tn
the first Chesterfield tally. Pe Pe-pe
pe Pe-pe s lack of hustle failed to dou double
ble double up a Stooker runner at first
ZTvl I:6?! cajcrung a ny pan in
rig-ht field. The runner had al already
ready already reached second, but the
rtonr and HafTaa.
which Pepe threw to first base-
fMAH TTnl Si 1 n
uoraon aiiowed tne
runner to scamper back safely.
ai.uriiy mat wouio nave
been the iflinn4 nut A fn.. i
lowed and then came two rlng-
ik singles 10 get omoicer starter
Humberto R.nhinsnn nft t. an
. w.i inj nti
early lead.
Alonso Brathwaite's failure
to retire Pablo Bernard, after
having him trapped between,
second and third also resulted
in another Chesterfield tally.
" O 1 WU1VB.VI
supporters their chance to
squirm. Pitcher Humberto Robin
son, proDabty elated over his
third vietorv hn.st.ilw ihnmatA
and was seen shortly after the
n-AU4. M 11 1
8ln 01 tne secona game m civ.
vies, receiving the plaudits of his
admirers in the field boxes.
Starter Len Ferguson was
coasting along with a 3 to 1 ad advantage
vantage advantage and developed a blister
in the sixth inning. He kept it a
secret and it continued to bother
him in the seventh. According to
the horse and buggy syatem used
by local clubs, there was nobody
warming up m ine cnesterlield
bull pen.
Ferensnn unnhlo tn mmiMkim
had to be relieved. In the opinion
of many, it would have been no
prooiem ior Koomson, wno toyed
With the Rpprmpn In nrfnnlnor t.ho
first contest 4 to 2 On a four-hit-
ier, to go in and hold things
down. Jose Lispndro had to take
over and Reg. Qpehald greeted
him with a two-run homer to tie
up the match, the Beermen scor scoring
ing scoring another run in the same in inning
ning inning to go ahead.
The straw that broke the cam camel's
el's camel's back canw in the ninth. The
Smokers were guilty of violati
another baseball law. when :

Si

their turn at bat and trailing (by
the scant margin of one run', the
first two Smoker batters went for
tne first Brown pitch, to be re retired
tired retired on easy pop-ups.

7 I VOX I
35c 20c.
Spanish Program!
CAMTNO DE
: GUANAJUATO
Also:
LA MUJER DE
DOS CARA8

ft 10
S5c.

FIRE DOWN BELOW
wth Rita Hayworth
- Also:
NIGHTFALLS
with Aldo Ray

ci

9 23 23
Suds
These and other iniquities
bear out the fact that the local
players care little or nothing
aJ?lLthJan who make the
smn) ice to come out and see
them perform; and it also pro.
vides good reason why thB
Carta Jifia team, which to
fassification i5 inferior to Z
3L Chetterfield or Cerveta
Balboa is leading the league.
Tt. io a1vHf 4-4 vw.. x a i I
lads 1 "'i1" f. local
" wie ici mat it
Wif fans uwh? re weponsible!
for the navrhppV. th n....
u ejio or A
it T u:.-t',-0"uwulJs mre ffi
. "c' wuuiu mean
slonnl hoii n.-.J'loit
- unit in t-summa.
WO Or. nt tt.- Mt
1 if V1 WiC li opinlor
ilii i IC"lcuy"is inane ilia bvl
laying down the law, by flniMl
these offenders or have fee rna&J
aaers nnnlv m.
-,7 ,T'-'-"J ...v oucuier C1UB
remilatinns tj.i 1 u-,,
need fu!,rmwmu
TODAY.fNaNTO.J5..20
utugnun in
HE DELINQUENTS"
Tim Holt in
"THE MONRTI
CHALLENGED the WORLD" I
TODAY-IMU.. JO-JO
if 11 ara in
THE STRANGE ONE"
Randolph Scott in
"7th CAVALRY"
In Technicolor!
Today
2:30 4:30 6:30-9:30
A Happy tkw Yat
from The
Balboa Theatre Staff

B bbbwambvZbbbk.
BfT n9S
9krM

BBBBBBI

COLOK kr DI LUX!

tins MICHAELS (
I TUUOPKOMC HUM

VICTORIA
- 20c. I 25c. ..win ISc.

CALTMO m
with Lord Ilea
- Also: -HOTS
SHOTS
with LayPandllla



SUNDAY AMfSICAH
PAGE SEvkJ
YDead Sports Town? Roller Derby To Rescue

J ART S, 1958

WWWm. vfl
tIhkv H a J sHL i

PRIZE PACKAGE Young members of the Windsor, Ontario, Oymnastic Club ihowed their
medals to Ernestine Russel as she loosened up for competition m an Indianapolis invitational

meet, Miss Russel, twice Sanada's woman athlete pf the year and member of its Olympic team

in Meioourne. nnisnea first m the senior group. The youngsters are, left to right, Lee Ann New Newman,
man, Newman, 13; Leisa Krol, 11; Janie Newman, 10: and Rochelle Falkins. 16, the all-round junior champ.

Boxno Is

A Thing Of

To Arcel And Others,

Past
Too

Fight Pilot
With Heart

SCHENECTADY. N. Y. (NEA)

When stories about fighters who
made big money but wound uu

apparently broke croo ud. neo-

pie always make the manager the
culprit.

Sometimes, it isn't this wav at

all. As Bob Pastor's case shows.

Until six years ago When he
caught on with an operating en

gineers" union and went on six

and seven day o ertime weeks weeks-Pastor,
Pastor, weeks-Pastor, who grossed $70,000 in two
depression lay bouts with Joe

Louis, had been having tough

sieaaing.
"I was running a sporting goods
store. I sold beer. I sold maga-

nes. Nothing panned out. It

looked as if I'd be in a rut in in-depression
depression in-depression day bouts with Joe
came up and pulled me out," re recalls
calls recalls Pastor.
What about the future and
all that money- he earned in the
ring That's where his manager,
the late Jimmy Johnston, cornea
in.
"Jimmy Johnston, Pastor
says, "was the greatest manager
m the world. He looked out for
his boys. You see, in the spring
of 1960 I begin collecting $400 a
month annuity Jimmy made me
take."

Wilfonq Is Only Recruit

It As Cage Pro

Making

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA) Any com combatant
batant combatant win tell vou that the jump

from college to the professionals
i toucher in basketball than eith

I' er football or baseball.

To give you a rougn raea, muy
am nii0 meruit has had any

I meaaure of success in the eight-

club National BasKetDau associb-
this year, and the season is
ttle more than one-third gone.

And Win Wilfong ot Mempnis oiaie
tit only a semlregular with the
rapidly moving St. Louis Hawks.
wiv Sauldsherrv. 6-8. IS a

freshman attracting attention with
fh- PhiladlDhia Warriors, but he

put in severel years witht
Harlem Gtohetrotters. Amateur

Athletic Union experience
necessarily qualify an athlete for
the NBA. After being an AU Ame-

rioa at Stanford, Jim- waisn iw.
out for three winters as a Phillips
nnr but has gotten nowhere in

tirith-the Wamos. Lett-

ienViinth shooting ace of

.2UeSNi Carolina last

... Vvi . ,,w.

trip, is naving w u
A peagreen has to be a Bill
Russell to crash the runaway Bos Bos-i
i Bos-i n.ui. whnm Sam Jones

olNoTlh Carolina Cdlege had d
little onnortunity. The New York

trwkAckers found 6-8 Charley

! Tyro of Louisville run-o'-mme.

HIGH-SCORING

rfL.x found the grade too

W r rwmnati. .where Di

DucU of st. 3W&rtr:
'tastes to hang on. BilMIflben of
fTT-w.Ttv nf Detroit has been

ZrXSSKi the Detroit Pta-

tons,' attendance.
. ?IrnL wmrilpv was consider-

Lb ofTcard W,VlrJniji.
Km doesn't hav, much chance to

get iWl act wveji' with tne
KJjSLnlft Lakers. Neither

Methodist. i'V
r.Tf i lot different in this

league" saya Hundley, who was

highly puoiicizea ana uie cucuin
numhei Atie draft choice.

-HiindleS broke almost every col-

lege scbrihg record while putting

IBUBiJ'il'.

OA

By HARRY GRAYSON

Field & Stream

on a West Virginia sideshow with
his clowning, but sits in the dres

sing room a bit dejected after

so-so performances with the Lak

ers.

"EvervthinB is a lot tougher and

faster," he reports to his personal

representative, Rene Henry, who
beat the drums for him at West
Virginia. 'The defense is so much

more advanced, you naraiy nave
time to get a shot off even if

you're behind a screen. Someone
is harassing you all the time.

"You really have to wonc on

defense, too. Give a guy a chance
to take a breath and he's got two
points. They keep the middle clos

ed, so it's rougn to orrve.

HUNDLEY, COMPARATIVELY
short as a pro at 6-4 finds

almost Impossible to get to the
boards because of the size of the
men underneath. Here he bumps

into towerine athletes like 7-foot

dharlev Share of St. Louis and

Detroit's Walter Dukes, New
York's 6-il Ray Felix and Boston's

6-10 Russell.
"In college you could make se several
veral several mistakes and still come back
to win," Hundley goes on. "Just
one boa-boo can cost you a game
here."
With all his difficulties on the
flood Hot Rod says the 2 hardest
things for him to overcome have
been sitting on the bench and be being
ing being a loser.
"This ijuthe first time l) ever
played with a losing team," he
stresses, "and it isn't exactly fun.
This is the first timei I've sat on
the bench so much."
Hundley rates Bill Shaman of
the Celtics as the toughest man
he hasxhad to guard. 'JHe does
everything and 1 believe he's the
greatest shot id basketball," he
says. "It seems be never misses."
Richie Guerin of the Knicks gets
the nod as the best defensive op opponent
ponent opponent Hundley has faced.
Hot Rod Hundley, who came up
reeling very sure of himself, closes
with a warning to the college star.
He'd better be prepared to be
just another guy.

NEW YORK (NEA) They gave
it to Ray Arcel with a lead pipe

in Boston, but that didn t get mm
out of boxing.
Neither did the depression years
when he had to go to Chicago
every couple of weeks to work in
somebody's corner and get $45 so
the milkman in New York would
stop yelling.
But these mornings, Ray Arcel

walks into New York s Pennsyl

vania Station at 6:25 and boards

the Congressional Limited for the
half-hour ride to New Brunswick,
N. J., where he spends the day
buying sand and pig iron and

whatever else is required of a
purchsing agent for a steel firm.

He has been doing it for two

years and doesn't come near even

the fringes of the boxing beat

because i m too busy working

tor a living."

OPEN SEASON ON
INTERNAL PARASITES
By JOE STETSON
Dog Editor

For 40 years, the mannerly soft

spoken Arcel was a part of box boxing.
ing. boxing. A big part, because he was
the kind of guy who did things
right. But what a lead pipe and
years of being broke couldn't do,
the television era of James D. Nor Nor-ris
ris Nor-ris and the International Boxing
Club' handled easily.
"I found Arcel was saying over
a bottle of beer, "that 1 couldn't
make expenses' out of bosing. If
it weren't for Harry Kessier. the

reteree, wno owns this steel plant.

I don't know what would have

happened. Who would have hired
me? 1 waa 56 and had never

done anything but boxing in my

lite."

ALL TOGETHER NOW Bill Case, foreground, of Western
Kentucky State and Setori Hall's Barry Epstein leap for the
'bill et Madis6n Square Garden. Looking on are the Hill Hill-toppers'
toppers' Hill-toppers' Eric Back, left, and Owen Lawson, right foreground.

This was the original boxing
guy. He came out of the East Har

lem section of New York Little

Italy, they called it and grew

up tough.

"The only Jewish kid on the

block," he says. "You had to take

care of yourself.
"That's why that slugging busi business
ness business didn't mean anything to me.
Joey Rao, Three Finger Brown,

guys like that I grew up with

them. When I was in the hos

pital, fellows I hadn't seen since

I was a kid came and asked me

who did it. I said if I knew I

wouldn t tell them. It was only

some poor kid doing what he got

paid nor.
"But when the TV contract De Dewey
wey Dewey Fragetta, Sol Gold and I
had ran out I was licked. I thought
we had run fights the right way way-blacking
blacking way-blacking out the home town. And

we brought along new fighters

Camen Basilio and Tony DeMar-

co among them.

Some internal parasites are al
most impossible to eliminate.

Hookworm, for example, when

it. is naiseu bv one dog. lies in

wait for the next or to reinfest

the aame dog.
Some kennels with many dogs

are faced with the problem of

eliminating hookworm completely
from all dogs at the. same time
and treating every run so that not

a single worm can find its way
into a dog and spread the infesta infestation
tion infestation all over again.
A single infested dog entering
the grounds can reeestablish the
problem. ,
Many large kennels try to keep
the worms at a minimum by a
regular schedule of worming. The
dogs in such kennels usually de develop
velop develop a tolerance and manage to
mt alnnir desoite the hookworms.

.. -.- i 4

Though were is always ai ieasi
some drain on their blood supply
because of the -worms they are

supporting, they ge,t ny.
Puppies, however, may not be
so lucky and may have their con

dition so impaired by parasiws

before they can develop a tolerat

ing strengtn or ne wcaieu

they tall victims oi some ucKueaa
which they could ward off it they

had more resistance,
if tvi.ro is nv time when a ken

nel can completely rid itself of

hookworm, it is now- mat is.

if the kennel is located aDove irosi

line. Hookworms cannot survive

in froen ground, xney aepenu u-

pon animais as nos w
them over the winter season.

Extensive use ot cnemicais sh
or some preparation recommend-

m v vnnr veterinarian is

neeessarv when the grouna is noi

frozen, but now, when a sustained

cold spell comes aiong, is me racm

time to plan ana launcn n v v-tack
tack v-tack on hookworm and other in

ternal parasites.

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA) -Now that
such a novelty as National League
baseball has been tested on the
New York market and found want wanting,
ing, wanting, a sport is .oovipg in.
When the Roller Derby finally
was driven out of New York in
1954, it. was rated as something in
a class with watching people jump
off high building.- But witiv no
boxing to speak ot and a televi television
sion television program needed, the Roller
Derby is back.
"Our trouble in the early '50s
was that we ran 52 weeks a year,"

says Ken Nyden. "We are coming
back as a sport, so will run only
28 weeks and be on national TV
each Sunday afternoon. Just like
any other sport."

Nydel will telecast the Derby.
And to give you a rough idea of
how bad the beak busting business
is, the show is being put on at the
9th Regiment Armory by James A.
Farley, Jr a New 'York boxing
commissioner, who seemed to in inherit
herit inherit a rich sports background
from his father, Big Jim-
A Roller Derby publicity release
tells you that young Jan "signed
Buddy Atkinson as manager of the
New York Chiefs teaajt Farley,
long a Roller Derby fan, has al

ways admired tne ability of Atkin

son on the banked track as a play

er and leader."

The last time we saw the Roller

Derby a gal was stirring up most

of the excitement. Manorie uiaire

iBrasuhn, better known as Toughie

Brasunn, is coming back as a
Blonde Bombshell, by the way.

She made the Roller Derby the

biggest thing since wife beating.
She was a gal who preferred fist
fights to dancing, and describing

her you spoke aemirmgiy ni ner
left hook.

There was the time, Mr ex

ample, that helmets wen added

to normal equipment usea ny noi:
ler Derby combatants. Toughie
went into a rage.
"There is a gal with a hair-do,"
she rasped, "that I want to rip o o-ocn
ocn o-ocn from ear to ear. What's this

game coming to when they're

wearing helmets?"
Toughie is about 34 now, but ad ad-vance
vance ad-vance estimates of her condition
insist she is meaner than a hang

over. If this is so, we are going iu

start a fan club for her.
A natural rivalrv between the

Roller Derby teams should keep

Toughie m this frame of mind, W
startling logic, Farley is calling
one team the New York Chiefs.
The other will be the Brooklyn Red
Devils.
The affair opens on Jan. 7. It
will run three nights a week for
benefit of in-the-flesh fans and on
Sunday afternoons the entire vis

ta of Roller Derby will open for the
national TV audience.
Roller Derby rules call for two
teams of men, with such as Billy
Bogash and Ken Monte and Far Farley
ley Farley a favorite, Atkinson, to get on
a banked circular track and roller
skate around until they become
dizzy. The object is to pass each
other and knock people down while
doing it. It always was suspected
that the better Derby skaters be.

lieved they could catch up with

tnemseives.
Then two teams of girls take the
track. It is something like a wrest wrestling
ling wrestling tag team match in this re respect
spect respect but plese don't mention rass rass-lin'
lin' rass-lin' around the Roller Derbv be

cause, we have their word for it,
the thing now is a sport.
Later in the season the Bay
Bombers are coming to the big
town. And then the Clippers and
Westerners. There are several Rol
ler Derby road shows, you see.
Who needs the Dodgers and
Giants? And who says New York
is a dead sports town?
Toughie Brasuhn is back.

1
WWW WWW 1

il WWW JIH WWm" nwHBKr
I te

1 JSC I.

Toughie Brasuha

"So that ends and I try to keep

going and it isn't long before

look at my bank balance and I

go and get a job.
"Manage fighters? Who can you

one of the few professionals the

kids in to meet a TV schedule.
That" isn't my way of doing it.
"Go back to training? I work

ed with 16- world champions, but

there isn't enough work to go

around now.'

This is the most eloquent testi

mony yet given on the state df

boxing. For Arcel always was

One of the few professionals the

business had. He's out of it. It
isn't good for boxing and you

wonder how eood it is zor Arcel.

"I'd go to camp with a fellow

like Tonv Zale." he mused. "And

two people like Sam Pian and

Art Winch, who managed him

I'd spend six" weeks with Tony

and get so close to the situation

I died with the fighter.

"Then you work the corner for
those three Rocky Graziano fights.

You have no idea what mat was

like.

"Then was the day I picked up

Tony Paycheck at the weigh -in

tefore he fought Joe Louis and

i iook one look at him and I was

sicker than he was. You couldn't

talk to him. He wouldn't listen.

A nice smart boy and not a bad

boxer. But he was chilled. I felt

terrih'.e.

"Sure I think about them when

I have time. It seems strange to

say it, but boxing is a thing of

the past with me.'

It's getting to be that way with

Putting Is
In Thinking

LATROSE, Pa. (NEA1- What
An father and Son Coif OTflfeSSion-

l talk about at the end of the

mil

"Putting," says Deke Palmer,
'Arnold and I araued about this

Brin and that, one stance and an

other. The boy tried putter after

miHr. T finallv told him, 'Ininit

n ran mitt and Vou can. Use

k. oma nutter all the time.' He

did and he is putting tetter. I
hn. t have convinced mm that

success m putting is 75 per cent

thought waving tne dbii in u
hole

If Pop Palmer is right about
nuttinif watch Arnold when he

resumes play in the Los Angeles

Open after tne nonaays.

PAYS HIS WAY

mTNF.niN. Fla. (NEA) Dow

Finsterwald has teen in the, mo

ney in 65 consecutive proiessiuuu

golf tournaments.

T&mL JaHsm I
i flfl pSBjH j B
il
I flafeY m Ot
1MB ' SBai n

STOUT DEFENDER Ned Duncan, 22, upper left, of South-'
era Methodist starts a drive for the basket in Dallas. Closely
guarded by Kentucky's Phil Johnson, upper right, Duncan
cradles the ball ready to shoot. .As Duncan lays' the ball up,
lower left, Johnson blocks the shot and taps the ball away.

No doubt about it!

. .it's what your money buys that counts!

i

CflMCL

always
gives
you
smoking
pleasure

M

.Despite another inpreaee in importacifin taxes on cigarettes, CAMEL

emokere continue to enjoy the emoking pleasure of the real tobacco
flavoi found in every CAMEL cigarette. Even now, with the increase
to 30c. a package, CAMEL continues to be the finest cigarette you can
buy in Panama. Remember, Jt's what you receive for your money that
really counts... And 30c. is" but a small price to pay for the freshest,
smoothestrich fiill-flavared real tobacco taste in cigarettes that you

can buy in Panama... at any price! Smoke the finest... Smoke

LAMtLb, it s a sign ot gocd taste:

Continue to smoke

CflMCL

ahhius. fiiuh, jwshy 15 daifA

a lot of other people, too.



SUNDAX

FAGS SIGHT
TBI BUND AT AMEXICAA
CLASSIFIEDS
TH'S SPACE IS FOR SALE
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2
IMsBsl hr-m-i-.
i mm .. ism mm j

Resorts i

' j"
WILLI

PS 0 wrtda CtfaM
Clara, tax lira Pana-
R. da P. Phono Panama
. Cristobal MoT.
IL1 runUekesl bouses, m
Phono Thoomson, ialbaa
Ht'S Cottao.es and Uroe
Hsuh. One mila part rhe
L Pfcaaa Balboa 1866.
Houses
HINT OR FOR SAL!:
residence completry
furnished, in Mia ExaaiMaa
Grounds, 4 b.droomi, 2 batb-
Imng-room, dimna-
, garage, iarta kitchan, bat
water, maid I roam with eorv eorv-ka,
ka, eorv-ka, wash tuba, ahathaa lines, ar ar-dan,
dan, ar-dan, lot 20 by 30 meters, aaay
nsymenfs. Far further informa information,
tion, information, aaa Fabrtga personalty,
laat Straat behind Vaico markat,
trem 10 to 12 noon and 3 to 6
FOR RINT: 2 badroom thalat
complete with workshop $85.
Telephone Balboa 2-1542 attar
5 p.m.

Santa

ma,

sun

J2.

FOR

i t
Luxunvui

' apjEt jiO "-" j
'dBEa liBaEEKrw'
PSbsb
I WKHk wBi 111
EEEEEEEEEEEEaEEEEfif
'-lsgBaga p-: :
' Br--
pIiiiipi;;: : Mj.:: :iiiifpiiiifiii

OF HAM Tony Galerrto may never make a
ire oc a shaving rreara.ssd. but the former world

Uhmaj weight

championship contender most certainly looks

zoosm. cnaracter
Football Sings
r Dying '57
w.
By HARRY WISMl
N1W YORK (UP) FootbaE
has aune its swan long for the
19ST season. A couple of bjalated
post-season ventures still remain,
but to all intents and purposes
everything goes into the moth mothballs.
balls. mothballs. The windup was a pleasant one
for Jour reporter. Our selections
stood up in the professional cham championship
pionship championship clash when the Lions de defeated
feated defeated the Browns. And, on New
Year's Day all four picks came
home in front, Oklahoma, Navy,
Misissippi and Ohio State. Five
for five.
Oklahoma, in defeating the Blue
Devils had the advantage of the
breaks. Coach Bud Wilkinson's
eleven ay ed what was probably
its best game of the year and
didn't slip up en any of its op
portunities.
At Dallas, in the Cotton Bowl.
the great Navy line stiffened when

itm raw in

Wilt Chamberlain Regains
College Cfige Scoring Lead

NEW YORK (UP)-Wilt Cham Chamberlain's
berlain's Chamberlain's 106 point barrage in three
Big Eight tournament games last
week enabled him to regain the
major college basketball scoring
lead,
Tha Kansai junior, who was
sidelined by an infection for
Thursday night's game with Okla
homa lUte, has tallied 322 points
in 10 g'inies for a 323 average,
according to official NCAA statu
tics released
Don HennoflxOf Pittsburgh, last
week's leader, fall to fourth place
as he was held to 67 points in
New York's HolidakJestival. The
power-charged guard,' who is more
than a foot shorter than Chamber
lain, has a 27.9 average with 223
points in eight sanies.
Oscar Robertson of Cincinnati
and Leo Byrd of Marshall each
moved up a notch to second and
third, respectively. Robertson
canned 52 points in two contests
last week for 237 points and a 29.6
averse whHe Byrd scored 33 in
a "le rme for- ?15 total point0
lis top 10 aiOivrs

Apartments

ATTENTION, t. U JwaL
2 )0Jroontv ImjY tttf witW.
Pbaaa Panama 1-4941.

FOR RENT: Beautifully fur furnished
nished furnished two badroom madam
apartment with maid's quartan,
plandid ratidantial district. Ca Ca-U
U Ca-U Miraflores Gtrardo Ortega
Straat. Pbaaa from 7:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Panama 3-3094.
FOR RENT: Two badroom fur furnished
nished furnished apartment, two bathroom,
living-dining room 48 straat No.
27. Phaaa 2-2504 ar 3-6097.
FOR RENT: Beautifully fur furnished
nished furnished ona bedroom apartment,
garage, hot water, near the El
Panama Hotel, across tha Con Continental
tinental Continental Shipping $100.00 Call.
3-3421.
FOR RENT: Vacation quarters
Harries: Hts, caal, beautiful
view. Jan. 15-July. $125.00
Balboa 3646.
Miscellaneous
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A." DIABLO
OX 1211. CRISTOBAL CX
ne is playing in a motion

. in tfte Jkmaa Everglades. Keai tough.

Swan Song
Grid Season
it had to. With Forrestal doins the
piicning, wary used tne aerial at-j
tacK to move out in front and then
coasted i, Tony Stremic and Bob
Reifsnyder en the Navy line were
great.
At New Orleans, m the Sugar
Bowl, another football player!
named Bro v ., was the outstanding
star. Ray Bfown of Mississippi
aominatea tne action as his big
v . .. X. k f i . Tt
lme pummelled Texas to a stand
still. The teams from the Lone
Star State had a rough time
against the opposition in the post postseason
season postseason tussles. Texas Aggies, Rice
and Texas all met defeat.
At Pasadena, the Webfeet of
Oregon put up a stubborn defense
against Ohio State ind as a re result,
sult, result, the game that was supposed
to be the most one-sided wound
up being the closest. That field
goal, kicked in the fourth quar quarter,
ter, quarter, was the difference ana it
marked the second time in three
years that tbfee points brought a
Big Ten team the victory.
are Bailey Howell of Mississippi
State (26.9). Kelly Coleman of
Kentucky Wesleyan (26.3), Elgin
Baylor of Seattle 25.9). Dom
Flora of Washington & Lee (25.7).
Wayne Eiribry of Miami, (Ohio)
(25.4) and Red Murrell of Drake
(25.3).
The deadliest field goal shooter
is Ralph Crosthwaite of Western
Kentucky with a .622 shootins oer-
centaee. Arlen Clark of Oklahoma
State holds the free throw accu
racy lead with .897.
Niagara's Alex (Boo) Ellis and
Al Inniss of St. Francis (N.Y.)
share the rebound leadership,
each with a .258 mark.
Western Kentucky leads in team
offense for the third straight week
with an 86.5 average in eight
games. However, the Hilltoooers'
ranking is in Jeopardy for Mar
snail nas cumoea to w. tnrougn
seven games.
On the other side of the ledger.
perennial leader Oklahoma State
State is showing the way in de
tenfp. having a'lcprl nn avwajp
" i".' ;.'tnls pr came i seven
uresis.

LRATB YOUR AD WITH ONk Of

rUBUCACIONES No t Lettrn ftua
"B" Straat a MORRISON iih -t j.i. V

BABDO-Ne M
raanaua lu- im ventral Avenue e)
JSr
Vleta Thcatra. a COLON
...
FOR SALE: 1955 gray-white
Pontiae Carolina, white wall tires,
heater, radio with back and
front seat speakers, accessories,
beautiful condition, good mile mileage.
age. mileage. See or call 0434-1 Frangi Frangi-paai,
paai, Frangi-paai, Anton. Phaaa 2-2989.
FOR SALE: 1953 Ford Sadan,
black "wsw" tiras excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Phone Balboa 2304, caa
ba seen 5775-A. Diablo Hgts.
FOR SALE: Oldsmobile 1948,
Hydr., radio. Motor excellent,
body very good. Call MacKenaie
87-6272, S7-3214.
FOR SALE: Oldsmobile 1957
four daor sadan, hydromatic, ra radio,
dio, radio, "Solas" glass, two-tone.
Phona Balboa 3767 after 3:30.
FOR SALE: Ford 2 door 1948
$100. BSA 125 cc w extras
$200. V Pram $15. PH. 83 83-4137.
4137. 83-4137. FOR SALE: 1950 Ford 4 door,
6 cylinder, good condition $350.
Tel. Balboa 2342.
FOR SALE: '49 Dodge coupe,
new paint, complete angina
overhaul, new battery, new
brakes. Seat covers, $450.00.
Balboa 3646.
"GOT STREAMLINED"
che McLevj way Bad; Massage.
F.xrtrrlsine Machine. Turkish
I bath. Trained operators tar ladles
n gentlemen resorts.
MA88AGF SALON
Services "SCHOUL'S
Products
, J. Armenians Ave. 88-41.
' Tel. S-221T
NIKON
Cameras
at
(Across Banco Nacional)
PANAMA COLON
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rates and Information
Tel, Panama 2-0552
leading
CAMERAS
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave.
SAN BLAS
EXCURSION
January 12, 1958
Fidanque Travel Service
Tel. 2-1661
TRY OUR SPECIAL
$7.50
Permanent Wave
Monday thru Thursday
Balboa Service Center
Beauty Shop Upstairs
Call 2-2959.
Sports Briefs
CARDS SION PITCHER
WILMINGTON, Calif. (UP)-
Howard Hughie, 18-year-old pitch
er rom Harbor Junior College
has signed with the St. Louis
Cardinals organization and will re report
port report to the Stockton club in the
Calitornia League. Hughie com
piled a 10-2 won-lost record in 1957
with Washington High School of
Los Angeles.
TD CLUB PICKS UNITAS
WASHINGTON (UP) Balti
more Colts quarterback John Uni
tas has been named the outstand
ing professional football player of
tne year by the Washington Touch
aown uuo. umtas. who was
a .
unanimous pick, received the
award in a special ceremony
Thursday.
BRITAIN RATIFIES PACT
GENEVA. Switzerland (UP)
Britain has become the first coun
try to ratify the new forced
labor convention, the Internation
al Labor Office announced today
The convention, which will go into
effect one year after the second
lrstifieatsati
is deposited, wa
adopted at the June, 1957, mter
natonal Ipbor rs'rer? :xz alt
er two years o pieparaUon.

Automobiles

. nm

OWKB AT tt-M "IT BTMSsTT, PARAIM- tM !7 1' ri?-3 "SJ!

WrWiaWJt

HOUSEHOIJ) EXCHANGE J
.... ,i'u, L&IN 1H. JZ
Home Articles
FOR QUICK SALE: Phtlipains
Rattan diringroom sal $175.00,
9x12 rug and pad $7t.00, 9ft.
G. E. refrigerator, $100.00.
Simmons folding .bod with mat mattress
tress mattress $25.00, Full 24" cut pow power
er power mower $95.00, Rattan mag mag-asina
asina mag-asina rack $60.00, bicycle
$8.00. Call Balboa 3712 any
time.
FOR SALI: pieces maho mahogany
gany mahogany bedroom sot. Diablo 5341 5341-A.
A. 5341-A. Phone, 1 733.
FOR SALE: Shi months old
Maytag Wringer washer new,
60 cycle motor. Navy 2238.
FOR SALE: "Swedish lirch"
dining room set; "Mallory"
piano; gelded horse. 2301-
B. Balboa 3715.
'Lance buckles on her skis and
would be delightful company
j running down a slops at Sun
i Valley, Ida. No lack of show.
(STRONG-ARM STUFF
IWhitey Ford of the Yankee
punches the bag in New Yorkr
to strengthen the arm which'
troubled him most of last year.
Although he never liked lan languages
guages languages or any other school
work which had to be memo memorized,
rized, memorized, Albert Einstein taught
himself analytical geometry
and integral and differential
calculus at the age of 14. He
was born in Germany in 1879,
moved to Switzerland and be became
came became a Swiss citizen in 1901,
and Anally to the United States
in 1932, where he became a
citizen in 1940.
Brltannica Jr. Encyclopedia

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Bs Ess I

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aEsas

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r. a. J a Ocmi Ave No 41 rOTODOMY -jmlo rosemw, 5

rMriA "Pa,--Tta
LOST: Siamese Female cat in
Diablo. If found, call 2-3121 or
Balboa Police Station.

by
JOE WILLIAMS

If it hadn't been for old Judge
Landis and his insensate .preju .prejudice
dice .prejudice oi horse racing, Big Jim Far
ley would be running the xan
kes today, a millionaire several
times over.
Not until the other day, when
we sat with the former Postmast Postmaster
er Postmaster General at a meeting, which
had as its purpose the re-establishment
of a National League iran-
chise here, did we learn why his
bid was denied by the then com commissioner
missioner commissioner of baseball.
One of Farley's principal finan financial
cial financial supporters was in racing; had
been for years, and still is. This
is an enthusiasm he inherited from
bis dad, along with a fine family
background, immense wealth and
a gracious, generous spirit. Today
he is a man of international pres prestige,
tige, prestige, with racing, as it's always
been, simply a hobby.
Far.ey thought it would serve no
good end to make the man's identi-
known at this late date... I
could readily have got. the money
elsewhere, but 1 still would have
had to wxplain to my friend that
Landis didn't want him in base
ball. As much as I wanted the
Yankees, I didn't want them that
bad."
The price was to be 13 million,
susbstantial part of which, inci
dentally, had been pledged by Jes
se Jones, a Texas tycoon and fel fellow
low fellow worker in the Democratic na
tional party. The late Ed Barrow,
general manager of the Yankees,
was calling the signals for Farley
Barrow was to continue to run
the club. In fact, this was one of
the conditions on which I agreed
to put our syndicate together, 1
bad known Barrow for years and
regarded him as the most knowing
man in DaseDau.
Product of Panic
It was typical ot Farley that he
would not subject a friend to em embarrassment,
barrassment, embarrassment, however slight, for
personal gain. When he says be
could have got the money else
where, do not doubt it, for at the
time Farley was a national figure
of considerable influence.
How much the Landis veto cost
him can be no more than a guess.
A sizeable fortune by any calcula
tion, that's for certain. Later the
Yankees were sold for less, than
Farley's group was to pay, and
still later, Larry MacPhail minori minority
ty minority stockholder, got out with a mil
lion profit.

Anthony Chin May Determine
Future Of Light-Heavyweight,
Heavyweight Boxing Divisions

0
By OSCAR FltALIY
PLEAS ANTVI LLE N.J. (UP)-
Tony Tnthony did neck exercises
until everybouy watching Degan to
get dizzy ana men ne am more.
"That's right," said Ernie Bra Bra-ca,
ca, Bra-ca, his manager. "Keep at it."
For, as Braca sees it, that neck
could well determine the future of
boxing's light heavyweight! and
heavyweight divisions.
There is a theory in this wind windswept
swept windswept boxing camp not far from
Atlantic City that these exercises
wul assist young Tony in building
up a resistance to a knockout
nunCh. And it is an ability, they
admit, which he needs desper
ately.
"He has all the talents that any
fighter has ever had, Braca as asserted
serted asserted ondly. "He can hit with
anybody and box with anybody,
anu that memoes rioya rauer rauer-son."
son." rauer-son." Tony Glass-Jawed
But Tony, a slender, hard-mus-c
ed picture tighter who carries
horse shoes in either hand, is as
suspect as a three-time loser when
it comes to absorbing a wallop to
the whiskers.
Right how he is training to take
on Yvon Durelle at Madison
Square Garden on Jan. 10. It is
a oout wnicn coma ieaa rony oaca
to the threshold of great oppor opportunity.
tunity. opportunity. He stubbed his toe the last time,
a pappy guy named Archie Moore
clouting Tony into limbo when the
young upstart attempted to wrest
the light heavyweight crown from
Archie's graying locks. Anthony,
however, hasn't given up. If he
had such a tendency, he might
have stepped out of the ring for
gooi ions .ago.
t!i ''iw, you m y r
member, who was op the 1952

Pane 111 a NOvawneiHi "Tin

Miscellaneous
BABY ORCHIDS corsages, bou bouquets,
quets, bouquets, hospital all occasions
delivered anywhere United
States, Panama. Canal Zona.
Telephones Pan. 3-0771 Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal 1033.
Landis was a product of panic,
and in the circumstances... gam gamblers
blers gamblers had recently fixed a World
Series.. .hysterical c ub owners li literally
terally literally surrendered all their rights
io him. From then on it was his
privilege to determine who should,
and should not, be in baseball.
Farley's friend was not th" only
one who was barier from baseball
because of racing activities. Few
entertainers have enjoyed higher
public esteem and respect than
King Crosby, but when he tried to
buy the Bos. Braves, Landis turn-,
ed him down. At the time, Crosby,
had a small stable and was finan-
dally interested in a Ca ifornia
In Landis' zeal to prevent anoth-
er scandal and protect the players
against evil associates, he had po
pular commendation. Racing was
a medium tor betting, hence was
undesireable. By his dictum, ev every
ery every man in racing was potencially
an Arnold Ro'thstein.
Actually Rothstein had nothing
to do with the fix. He merely back backed
ed backed a sure thing. A big league bail
player originated the sell out. We
doubt that Landis ever knew who
rea'ly supplied the bribe money
It was a night club operator.. .and
he had no more to do with racing
than Tiny Tim
Picked His Poos
Our regard for Landis never quite
bordered on the idolatrous. As a
practicing lawyer and judge in
Northern Illinois he had no parti
cular distinction. He is remember
ed as the man who fined Standard
Oil $29 million. What isn't always
remembered is that the judgement
was promptly set aside.. .and the
government nicked for the costs.
And in baseball, even with un
limited power, he moved with cau
tion against a formidable foe Frank
Navin, owner of the Detroit Tigers
nan been in racing tor years, wnen
Landis took ovei and requested
that the dispose of his property,
Navin threatened to take him to
court., and that ended that.
Today, of course, baseball wel welcomes
comes welcomes reputable n cing mem Pitts Pittsburgh's
burgh's Pittsburgh's John Galbreath, owner of
the illustrious Swaps, is promin prominent
ent prominent in the game's hierarchy. Cr Cr-by
by Cr-by is a stockholder in the same
club. Even Farley has a tenuous
connection with the game. He's in
Coca Cola.
Olympic team with his pal, Patter Patterson.
son. Patterson. Turning pro, he won eight in
a row by knockouts and then
was flattened himse'f.
10-Win bounce Back
Tony bounced back to win 10 in
a row, six by knockouts.
Then Tony was flattened again.
"That happened at Johnstown,
Pa.," Tony recalls with a wry
grin. "A disastrous place. They
had a flood there, too."
Anthony won another pair and
then, monotonously, was kayoed
himself.
Since then it s been up again,
down again. He flattened Chuck
Spieser to win a shot at Moore
and was put in cold storage him
He can punch, as attested oy his
record of 23 knockouts in 31 fights.
But whenever somebody lands one
from the outfield, Anthony does
the most complete blackout since
the Battle of Britain. All five of
his losses have resu ted when his
chin came in contact with a leath
ery object
R 6 VOLT LEADER EXECUTED
VIENNA (UP)-Lasz'o Ivan Ko Ko-vacs,
vacs, Ko-vacs, a leader in the Hungarian
revolt, was executed Thursday
shortly after the Communist Hun
garian Supremo Court confirmed
his death sentence, Budapest Ra Radio
dio Radio reported today. Kovacs was
accused of having led an armed
eroup during the 1956 uprising. He
al.o manned to establish an ex-
itrcrae r!c:nt-wing pary z tcr the
revolt, Budapest Radio said.

Army couple wishes to rent va vacation
cation vacation quarters, beginning lanu lanu-arv
arv lanu-arv 1st, 1958. Dial lalboa 2-3419.

WANTED: Completely up upholstered
holstered upholstered 3 place sofa and 2 easy
chairs suitable tor slip covering.
Call 3-4911 between 9 a.m.
and 6 p.m.
WANTED TO RENT: Unfur Unfurnished
nished Unfurnished beginning January 15-31
three house or chalet or four
bedroom apartment. Telephone
Mrs. Hansen 2-0698 during of office
fice office hours.

Cagers Continue To Grow

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (NEA)
Don't think basketball players are
getting taller?
At one time when Indiana and
Kansas State met earlier this
month, six of the 10 playera on
the floor were 6 feet 8 inches or
""re. The Boosters rod Arc me
...rr' '," r ,., j V. :;..
- a-p
Bob Boozer and Wally Frank,
B" D'
Branch McCracken's new look

SHOOTING FOR RECORD SSgV Shelman Angain, of
Fayetteville, Ark., demonstrates an M-3 submachine gun
equipped with a gupsight movla camera with a three-inch lens, i
The camera, which accurately records effectiveness of ground
fire against low-flying aircraft, is being tested as part Of
Operation Textbook, at Fort Ord, Calif. The Army's Combat,!
Development and Experimentation Center, at Fort Ord, is
running extensive tests to attempt to determine what tactics
and weapons it will take to fight a future war,

BOOKKEEPING EASE
WASHINGTON (UP) Labor
Secretary James P. Mitchell has
proposed easing the bookkeeping
chores of firms holding govern government
ment government contracts in excess of
$10,000. These firms now are re re-auired
auired re-auired to retain wage and hour
records of employes ior at least
four years. Mitchell Thursday pro proposed
posed proposed cutting this tifne to three
years. Interested persons will have
until Jan. 17 to submit their views
to him.
Port Port-lose
lose Port-lose your shin
on wrong
campaigns
in the
Mama-American
ami keep it on!

WANTED: Male bookkeeper,
experienced, bi-linguaf, age 25
lo 35. Parmanenl position. Write
stating details of axperience,
references, etc. and salary ex expected
pected expected to M. H. S. A., Bos
3224, Panama.

SERVICES
3 -minute car wash $1, steam
cleaning of motor $5. waxing of
cars $6. Auro-Bano, Trans-lstb
mian Highwav near Soars, if-i
j ffS :
For the boat TV service call
Dick, phone 1479 Colon until
7.00 p.m. Work guaranteed 90
days.
Tha best dinner, and drinks
ate served in our modern air air-conditioned
conditioned air-conditioned cafeteria grill and
bar Hotel Internacjonal "Pla "Plata
ta "Plata 5 do Mayo."
at Indiana involved moving AH
America candidate Dees Hack
to
his pivot post, switching positions
with Radovich; inserting 64 Jim
Hinds, who failed to win a letter
last year because o scholastic dif difficulties,
ficulties, difficulties, at the other forward;
and bringing sophomores Allen
Schlegelmilch and Bob Wilkinson
into the starting unit as guards.
Aione wim inai. uiacn mo
Cracken dropped the 1-8-1 offen offensive
sive offensive pattern in favor of a two-
smicc
CCNTCRS
TODAY
BALBOA
1:M, t:M, f:M, l:
V
CINbmaScOPE
COLOR ty Ot LWXI
CRISTOBAL
2:30 & 7iM
(Umbo a ;-.oo
"A HATFUL OF
BAIN"
DIABLO 2:S0 7:09
"THE LIVING
IDOL"
MARGARITA
2:30 8:15 8:15
"THE WAYWARD
BUS"
GATUK 2:S A T:
"BUSTER RXATON
STORY"
PARAISO
8:15 1-XS
"WAR
ARROW"
SANTA CRUZ
8:15 9:21
"BATTLE
HYMN-
CAMP BIERD 8:15 8:15
.Tiff Chan-ITpr In
'"DRANGO



I, 1958
MB SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAft
Horseradish Pears Add
omen 5
New Taste To Ham Course

abate p
HHaim H

5 iH

A UNIQUE idea to tejmpt the palate ire pear halves iploed with
a horseradish mlxtiire. They r "'fectly with a ham dish.
y OAYNOR MCDDOX
NEA Pawl and Mrket Editor
-

WITH your baket ham, or if
ou broil or fry it, serve hot and
.11, I . f 1 1

ilk i nw UXIP Uffil.

It comes from the Pacific coast.

nus as vn l icnnw. in lessens

i wrvM ii rir iiiiiii iiir i-mii

Horseradish pears

One No. m can Bartlett pear

I lllll-f lltlll I II- K tUllll .-

Drain pear halves. C o m b. n e

Em in rpir geraior. uiarn ana

VP H' HCtllllllUailllHBIII. WJ 11 a III

Reserve remaining sauce for gela
tin salad.
Horse radish-Cottage
Cheese Saled (serves o)

Cne tablespoon unflavored gela

tin, v cup cold water, sauce from

horseradish pears (about IVi

cu.is), cuos c'tage r 1

pint), 3-4 cup chopped celery; 2

tablespoons chopped pimento, few

grains salt.

Tten gelatin in cold water.

Heat sauce to boiling point and

dissolve gelatin in it. Cool slightly

ana stir in cottage cheese, chop
ped celery, pirn j, and salt.
Chill until firm, stirring occasion occasionally
ally occasionally to keen ingredients well dis

tributed. Serve as a salad with

the meal featuring horseradish
pears, or as a next day" salad.

.

7letfa6iie?htmt

y MRS: MURIEL LAW ENCH
MRS. JET writes, "If one of -our

uuk iii j iiuouauu may a u b hi v

. i i a, i r'tm lr Lt'A i4

an HiiKiD in. lihiiti. rit- is inn nn

. t j : r i: j i av

enann inn i nan i gra in our

s na lhp rni nrRn navp nnpr

my Miner s weanness, out ne

I have a mesrtKft for fe. K

' frnm r Konrttn S UaWnncnn

en nMvrn si aim a

ation for Mental Health. It's this;

While t Vte is a suspicion a

predisposition to alcoholism, the

ik oi eviaence suggests mai ii

not inherited."

Mr. K. May not stop accusing
s wife of poisoning their chil-

vii a uiiwu uccayac tnc accuaa-

Sometimes a person's need to
ake us feel helpless is stronger
ah his reason. If we disprove
e charge that we have transmit transmit-d
d transmit-d a bad inheritance to our chil

li, he'll just locate another way

make us feel helplessly victi victi-ized
ized victi-ized by forces beyond our con-

we we can ajtow our

resnoftse t

So Mrs. K.'s answer may hot be
to correct her accuser but to cor correct
rect correct her response to his accusa

tion.
To do this' she may need the
kind of help her local Family Serv
Ice Association, can make avail available
able available to her.
IF we have had an alcoholic par

ent, we :an be easily infectal hy
his, sense of helplessness. Without

long,

mi-

oui

ff Rnhhv felli a lip nr Mv

lpcls ehnres fn'r mnvip maora-rinpc

lwb ii nrmg to their irresponsibility

au in aisr -agement aroused
by -their grandfather's. We'll ima
fine we're as powerless to help
lobby learn to trust the truth as
We Were to stor f ath-" 'it
ing. In Mary's carelessness we'll
see his fatal submission to im

pulses.
Psvphiatricts wmild

"Droientini?" the helnlessnpc

felt toward our father on to our
children.
Thus, Mrs. K.'s real problem
may not ha, her husband's unreo
sonable prophesy of more suffer
ing ahead; it may be her own ex expectation
pectation expectation of jt.

Cjolden glaired (rina dincL fi

anama

areer

By JEAN BAILEY

"Panama has been very good to me, and I am
very grateful to her," says gringa Muriel Mykland,
who Has been conducting her own advertising agency
here for the past ten years.
Muriel's interest in Panama began as long ago
as 1939, when' she came here as a bride. She had
married a Canal Zone boy, Bert Betz, three days after
her graduation from the University of Kansas, where
she majored in journalism.
She lived here until 1943, and her daughter Ber Ber-nice
nice Ber-nice was born in Colon. Before long, her marriage had
gone the way of many youthful alliances, and she
realizes that she would have to "go it alone" with
her yjoung daughter.
Back in the States, Muriel worked for the Army
Effects Bureau in Kansas. This bureau handled the
property of soldiers who were dead, missing or pri-soners-of-war.
One of her jobs was to write to the
wives or parents of these men, and make arrange arrangements
ments arrangements for the disposal of their effects.

The greatest difficulty in living
in the States was the problem of
finding someone to take care of

Bernice, and the difficulty of mak

ing a home for the two of them. It

was this problem that prompted
her return to Panama 15 months

after leaving.
She came back to work for Pos Postal
tal Postal Censorship in the Canal Zone
in June '44. From there she went
to work for the Motion Picture

Service in Quarry Heights.
Then she moved to Panam Ci

ty, and worked in the advertising

department of the Star and Her Herald,
ald, Herald, selling and writing advertise advertisements.
ments. advertisements. She was then from August

'45 to May '46, when she left to

work at the Panama .American.
Here she used her journalism
training in its full sense for the

first time. She worked asa staff

reporter. She was covering the

news when Eisenhower came

through and when the CIO was

started here. "Headlines of the

day were plane crashes and re reductions
ductions reductions in force in the C a n a 1
Zone," she remembers.
After her stint at the Panama
American, she went to work in
the first advertising agency here,
Propaganda S.A. as their English
ad-writer. She worked mornings
for this company, and in the af afternoons
ternoons afternoons she worked for a private
company formed by Lowell Yer Yer-ex,
ex, Yer-ex, a colorful New Zealander, who
founded TACA airlines.
"Every time I changed jobs, I
earned a little bit more, "explain "explained
ed "explained Muriel. "But I was ready to

take the plunge and start on my

own."

In July, '47, she did start on her

own. Shu started first with direct

mail, and production jobs. Since

telephones were at a premium

then, her first office was is her

apartment in the Britannia Build Building
ing Building on 43rd St. Esso Standard Oil

was her first big client.
A year later, she found an of

fice on 29th, and she started her

own agency, Servicios Mykland,
She prepared Esso's complete
campaign for Panama and Cen Central
tral Central America; the Panama Trust
Co., Sam Friedman and others
became her clients, and she began
to see the "green light."
An unusual aspect of Muriel's a a-gency
gency a-gency is that it operates in other
countries. She has helped to en en-couraffe
couraffe en-couraffe and dpvelnn small aopn-

cies all over Central America. This

worK takes her on many trips,
and she often ha tn an nut nt fho

country for superyisbry work for

sucn clients as uoigara-numoiive;
and Esso.
She also makes trips to the
States to keep in touch with large
U.S. Agencies.
Many executives of Stateside a a-gencies
gencies a-gencies have expressed surprise
that' her office' does not handle
strictly "women's accounts." On
the contrary, most of her accounts
such as Braniff and Gillette are of
general interest.
"I loye agency work," says Mu Muriel.
riel. Muriel. "It is never dull, and I. learn
a great deal about a number of
businesses. I also get to travel a

m Wstm if IrSr ll JLh H
aBSil ill I tfar ifi f B
-HiaeHBleBV

BERNHARD FAMILY poie in front of tiie small Cessna plane
In which thev flew from Wisconsin tn Panama for- t.h nhrl.1

mas holidays. They will set out on their return trip tomorrow,

3

ami

Do P.

anama

MURIEL MYKLAND flashes the smile that has probably con contributed
tributed contributed as much to her success in advertising and public
relations as her efficiency. An American girl, she has a deep
affection for Panama, where she has made a home and
established a successful business.

great deal, which I have always
wanted to do."
She has found the people of Pa Panama
nama Panama most helpful and coopera
tive. Her employe jre all Pana Panamanian;.
manian;. Panamanian;. They are "Elb Collazos,
her chief assistant Evelia Ho,
secretary and Clifton Henry, of office
fice office assistant. Artists and other
talent are employed locally on &
part-time basis.
Her reporting background tjvhs
given Muriel an edge on many ad
vertising people, since she is able
to take on publicity and public
relations assignments as well as
advertising. She has, on occasions,
done public relations work for for foreign
eign foreign countries.
Muriel now speaks Spanish flu fluently,
ently, fluently, but she says U has not al always
ways always been so, and that her great greatest
est greatest difficulty in learning Spanish
in Panama, was the fact that the
country is so bilingual that she
could never practice; Courteous
Panamanians would always spe-ik
English to her. She actually be

came fluent in Spanish by using it
on her trips to other countries.
Since Muriel is. a blue ,- eyed
blonde with a feminine love of
pretty clothes, business people arc
often surprised to find that she is
"Servicios Mykland." However
they soon find that she is as effi efficient
cient efficient as she is attractive.
With her accounts, she plans
for definite sales, budgets the a

mount to be spent, and establishes

controls to check that the "work is
being done.
Bernice is now a senior in Bal

boa High School, and since she

will probably be going to the
States to college in the fall, Muriel
can feel that part of her battle
is won. She has made a pleasant
and charming home for her daugh daughter.
ter. daughter. In doing so, she has built up a

fascinating business, which brings

its own rewards m many ways.

She is looking forward to 1958

as a year of progress for her a gen

cy and for- Panama the country

which has made her success pos
sible.

omemamn

-.4.l. ..iiA& ....

not noid flpsnes sucn as she-

rViL... ...Ml .lh i

.hegvy4 traffic iitf the smooth

vim auj Linvsii

Dusting ceilings and walls of a

tachment will keep them look-

nice longer. This also avoids

sn in inp nnrrnm n npn

unwashed sections. Water,

can m mis vancijr aie nam
remove.

may leave curtains and windows
sparkling bright, (put what about
window sills and frames? Clean
curtains will highlight the dingy
frames, inside and outside the
house. So they have to be washed,
too.

housewife can have a spot spot-home
home spot-home without working like a

rb iftinci man leiviux nit

a 'lull day's job is one way.

example, as part of the disn

n nv rn nr cnnniio nvt hn

na items will ennnnrauc

use, especially bV voune

... .....

mops, cleaning waxes or vac-

eieaner attachments Try

up aa orianizra storaee

ior r pan ne maipr a k

young housewtfe trymg to
within a, budget will find she

AIIIV nnpp a WPPlf Rllnmna

store every day leads to
unnecessary items.

drawers can be planed

sanded until they move

with shellac' to keep dirl
working into It.

rash of hoiiseeleaaiag

Beauty lips

Facial muscle: need exercise so

tney win resist letting down as
the years move on. One exercise
calls simply for opening the mouth,
a normal state for women, ac according
cording according to mpst men. But to exer
cise these museles, open the mouth,
drop your jaw and then close your
mouth. Repeat this from 10 to 20
t.mes sevc. .1 times during a week.

Brewer's yeast tablets 'id vi vitamin
tamin vitamin A can help clear up skin
difficulties that are traced to
weak diets. Your doctor will rec recommend
ommend recommend a balanced diet, exercise
and a full night's sleep along with
these supplementary items.

A short stint of deep breathing
makes a relaxing break in a busy
schedule. Step what you re do
in and t about 20 dei breaths.
This is easy to do, even in an
office, without creating a scene.
Finriintf vmir Nbin inn a k.l.r

in buying lipstick and rouge that

naiiers you me most, f or a pink
skin tone, blue-red is best. Or
ange-red is tb$ color for yellow
skin tone and true red for th:
in-between and sallow skins. And
always match your lipstick ant'
rouge.

A scalp massage does double
duty. It stimulates circulate n of
Wood &nd thus makes far a
healthier scalp. It also proves, re relaxing
laxing relaxing after a day of tensions in

thtt nffiitt At a i hAma
wir vince Or HI nCflnr.

Cleanup Routine ,3s iSeil Antidote
Jor Jller-partu eefina Of lAJc

When the door closes on the last
holiday party guest, don't kid

yourself that the ball is over. A

view of the room that was so spic
and span a few hours age testifies
that it must soon continue in the
kitchen.
Whethr to leave the mess un until
til until morning or pick it up at once
is the wearying nuestion. I've tried
it both ways.
The disadvantage of waiting un until
til until morning is that the mess looks
just as bad and takes longer to
clean up, working around the ordi ordinary
nary ordinary household routine and with
the questionable help of the chil children.
dren. children. A few minutes spent in organ organized
ized organized effort at nights slicks up the
room presentably and your clear cleared
ed cleared conscience may enable you to
sleep that much later in the morning.

To prevent time wasting trips
back- and forth to the kitchen, take
a large tray or kitchen cart to the
living room.
Empty ash trays into a silent
butler or closed metal can. Stack
trays and collect glasses, plates,
coasters, napkins, and leftover
snacks.
Don't forget to look at the floor
beside chairs and tables for glas glasses
ses glasses and ashtrays, and down be between
tween between cushions for paper nap

kins. Open the door briefly to air

the ream.
Cart the debris te the kitchen
and put glasses te soak in a sink sink-ful
ful sink-ful of warm water. If you've
served egg nog or mixed fruit
drinks, the soaking will lessen
the amount of scrubbing you'll
need to do.
While the dishes soak for a

minute or two, return to the liv

ing room to check for spills and
rings from glasses that might

have slipped their coasters on

your coffee table or occasional
tables.

Class, marble or tile .top

ped tables can be wiped clean with
a damp sponge or cloth.
Wipe up dampness promptly
from wood table tops and you may
prevent kite ring from forming.

A wttte watemark may re-

1 wSnKKIfw flSSj esi

Baklaf soda acts as a deodorizer when cleanin ash trays.
, Sprinkle star with seda, scrub lhtly and rtose.

spond to this old-fashioned eras erasing
ing erasing trick: rub the ring with a little
salad oil or mineral oil and salt..
Let the treated spot stand over overnight,
night, overnight, and wipe off excess oil and
salt in the morning.
, The dishes by now will be rea
dy to be rinsed and dried or lined
up in the drainer.
Next, empty ash trays into a
metal can and place it outdoors
overnight, or dump contents im immediately
mediately immediately into Incinerator. Take
no chances on fire from smoulder smouldering
ing smouldering butts.
An easy and effective way to
clean ash trays and rid them of
stale toeaseo asetsia-as- asu bee

Jdoiida

A great number of visitors have
escaped the snow and ice in the
States to spend the holidays in
Panama, but the Jack Bernhard
family dropping in on relatives
here, did so bi a novel fashion.
They flew their own Cessna single-

engine plane down from Wiscon
sin.
As well as planning a wardrobe
for herself, husband and two
daughters to carry them through
from ice to trade winds, Mrs. Bern
hard found time to take t we if e
hours of flying lessons, "just in
case" she needed them. So far
she hasn't.
In packing, she ajso had to con consider
sider consider the boredoni basadfls of
Linda, Wl arid Brenda, 7, an l
pack enough literature, Sod games
to keep them Occupied during the
hours in the air.
Although the actual flying time
from Wisconsin to Panama ran
only 21 hours, the, Bernhard

made,lriBjent-! stops, spuming, out

their, trip dver four and' a half

days. They plan to take longer on
their return journey.

From Wisconsin they flew to
Easterwood, Texas, where they

spent the first night. They clear

ed customs at Brownsville, Texas
and flew to Tamplco, M'exjco

where tnerspeM The second flight

From Tampico, they went to Ve

racruz, r rom vnrapurz thev i

h i ah a hn vp th pIamIc tn T.n.(

viex rn men tn n s irin. or

. -r wOT.TwuvA a i

ban Jose, Costa Rica. From Sa

Jose tnev flew her

Mrs. fRernhard's sister and hrnlh.

er-m-law, the William Swensons

live on via Porras, right by Pa-

tuia Airport where the little

landed the week before cf

mas. Linda and Rrenda were 3

.. . ...

lighted to be reunited with th

cousins Nancy and Joyce Swe

son,- and the adults have had 1
tnuethpr Aver the hnli-dnv oenc

They even managed to dp a littS

nyiHg, maKing trips to cmtr

the San Bias Islands,

The visitine ehildren we

piled, flhnnt HAlnrt fiuiimmittff

.,vu Huu. bww, wmiuiiimg, ..Juy,

memories of ice skating at home
still fresh in their minds.
They will all start out for hotBl

lumunuw, aiiu iius ume.mey 1"

to take ten or eleven days,

ing some time Guat
1tr!.'l.iAA Pil.r

.Tapir Bernhnrd Ravs that

hit- wiTn Have the nerfept tro

ll'.l T. 'I- . V. ..... pw., "HI
ling partnership. "I do the flyin

anu sue aucs me wuuyiiig,
laughed. But they all agree tti
theirs is the best method of ta

ing a vaiation anq seeing
countries.

r.

9

r

ing soda during the cleaning opera
tion.

"Shatal the sods over the trav

and in the grooves where cigar cigarettes
ettes cigarettes have lodged. Scrub lightly
over the sodaed surface with an
old vegetable brush.
Baking soda acts as a mild de detergent
tergent detergent and deodorizer. I've founi'
it particularly helpful when used
on certain types of metal and cera ceramic
mic ceramic trays which hold sooty stains
and tars very tenaciously.
When the food is put away and
paper is stowed in the waste-basket,
.yoii're ready to retire. The
carpet probably still shows &gns
of the party, but itean be vacuum
ed ta the meeaiaeU

Most of us, in spite of good
resolutions, tend to eat a bit too
much during the holiday season.
We go visiting and the food is
tempting. Or, we entertain during
the evening and serve juicy snacks
to our guests. It's only natural
to taste what we serve. And bit
by bit, the poundage creeps on.
Food for the holidays is usu usually
ally usually rich and somehow, crackers
and lettuce lose their diet ap-

paeal. But nevertheless, it pays

to waien tne caiors. The truth
is, you can't eat all of the tempt tempting
ing tempting foods offered you anyway so
you might just as welb exercise
and don't spoil it by talk of diet dieting.
ing. dieting. But do, also, take small por
tions. and skip the really very rich
fruitcake, cookies and pies. Those
small cookies can be deceptive.
They're light and crisp but they
pack loads of calories. If you put
on a pound or two during the
holidays, it's no tragedy. More
than that and you'll have a serious
problem to deal with on Jan. 1.
One of the pitfalls of holiday
parties lies in those bowls of tid tidbits.
bits. tidbits. A handful of peanuts, a
couple of pretzels, some olives and
a few bacon curls and you've eaten
enough calories to equal a small
meal.

Since it takes inhuman selfcon-

trol to eat just one peanut, about

the best thing you can do is pass
up the tidbits. They seem harm harmless,
less, harmless, true, and when you're hungry
and dinner isn't in prospect for
a couple of hours, they can be
almost overpoweringly attractive.

If you need a visual idea to
keep yourself ffom reaching, just
picture yourself trying to wedge
into your favorite dress which has
become foar too tight. This notion

should stay your hand. For, in

nocent though they look, those

crystals and Silver bowls yield up

roils ana Dump ef unsightly let.

111 ' 1 1 n

i ejj PliBT

Sight -seers in New York feel that a trip to the Statue of
Liberty in New York harbor is a must. This visitor wears a
Softly tailored acrilan jersey dress for the trip. Pleats are are-there
there are-there to stay and the dress washes and dries without need
for ironing. By GAILE DUG AS, NEA Women's Editor.

::.m American

WANT AD

ess Jap u.

7vm-.

roots

ti4J tllL HK iVfciJSJ



free Admission To Racetrack To

dm

.Read sfory
4
Are Canal Zone Teenagers Better, Worse, Or About The Same As Staj
:anvas DAeeti
by HELEN REILLY
- ill! JJI y (
pmym r nia Sunn.

9

m

h THE STORY: Inspector McKee, who is inYestigating
;the murder of artist Grant MeNille, receives a call in New
ork from Melville's widow who wants to know i her late
?Husband had any living relative. The reason: Melville left
Jthe "little sum" of $43,000. McKee sets out to find where
the dead artist had accumulated the amount in less than

ar.
XXIII
LISA HALL was sweetly sorry.
Her husband was not in New
Yorkhe had left town that morn-
. hucinocc triD. uy ci
7s,Te did"ar; for flying, of of-fe5'
fe5' of-fe5' c.r,.j onieiv hv car.
te":?ur killed
.. m.iv7h. or' Joseph
eiiner v ; was a sick
man and he hadn't gone off i
Sess trip, he was being de-
i-i.. i,ont nut. of the way
SfCEK hYln the .partment, he
migfc be anywhere. Even if ne
mlr....w;V certainly would-
vas avauauiv
''ti? Scotsman tossed Channing
Hall's absence aside with casual
regret "Ah, well... Thank you,
Mrs HaU' He bowed over the
Ser hand extended to him
and went, leaving a man hehin
him to keep an eye on the Han
Tatthe office he talked to
the fingerprint department Tne
collection of prints from the Cape
had only just arrived and it wouia
ill" .while. McKee said, "Let
me know as
SOOI1 Ju"
Right after that. Lt. umej
" S .JL-.thmntfh from Cornwall
Lt. C a r n e y s
Someone had Entered the stone
houseV night, before at around
3 a.m.
"What?"
iiti.i'. riuht Tnsoector
body knew Officer Silva was there.
You can't see the house from
A a .f. all what with all
those fences and hedges If must
haye been kind oi a w-v" -whoever
went in..."
. n niH KcKee about a
VtU lit .Y w ...
light that had shown on the : offi officers
cers officers eyes around 3 o'clock. When
Silva came awake there was no
light anywhere and the room was
dirk He thought he had imagin imagined
ed imagined the light, that he was dream dreaming,
ing, dreaming, and went back to sleep. That
Hi
0.75-0.40
WEEKEND!
1:15 3:45 6:15 : p.m.
Join
rhym'ts with "play(irls")
and see a world of
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M-G-Mprej.nl. II ft IS
stiffing
iQFNF KPIIY. MIT7I HAYNtlP
Iulih. IU.LLI urn 1.1 uninuii
KAY KENDALL TAINA ELG
hm, JACQUES BERGERAC

1 TODAY BELLA VISTA 1
jtfjpk You have never seen its like
K -and may never see
its equal!
CaryGrt 1flk
v FRANK SflvttRA
v mmtmWii in STANLEY KRAMER'S
WrW MONUMENTAL FILMING OF
The PASSrosr
2E$mS TRCIINICOLOU" VISTAVISION"
llhTHOD0WIKCl.W C
lOSC NlfTO CAM.OS UMlWMf 1 NOVfllO
MCO EL UIERINTO ScfKnTkfH1"-!' VN ZANDI
tONA and EDWARD ANHALT BaHf! Screenplay by PRICES:
Cun" by c. S. foreiter Music cHL? "0,(' "TIw Jf'lJtV ei nn a ka
Anlhui pracf need atirj Directed bWAMI fV SA QW
HeleeserJ thru UNITED AITISIS WM SjL fc ShOWS!

morning when he got up tiie kit kitchen
chen kitchen door was open and swinging
free on its hinges. The door had
been bolted whan he went to bed
on the living room sofa. The bolt

had been pushed back during the
nieht The officer's visitor had
entered by way of the living-room
winrinw which was oDen from
the bottom and within easy reach
of the ground.
TWO hours and 40 minutes later
the lieutenant picked him up at
th Prnvinretown airport.
"Grant Melville a blackmailer,
McKee?" Carney couldn't believe
his ears. A man like mat it
wasn't in the picture. He gave
the wheel a spin and the car
swung south into the wide, empty
j ...1 ,l,.i- "Vim..
roaa roiling over me uuira.
are sure. Inspector? v!
"I'm Dositive. There isn't enough
proof yet to put on the point of
a Din. but it 11 come
Carney hadn't know Melville per
sonally but he nad Known ot mm,
he was;. wealthy and successful
man.
McKee said Grant Melville was
neither. He hadn t a penny to his
name When he married the sec
ond Mrs. Melville, and thought he
was at last in clover. He naa
found ont that he was mistaken,
and had proceeded to' take steps
to augment his income. He had
done very weM, had made a nice
thing of it. There was no danger,
no "Meet me at the old mill, and
bring the papers." He simply
painted a portrait of his elected
victim orobablv from photographs.
and sold it for a whopping price
in return for immunity
Whoever had killed Melville had
to have been in a position to
make the murderous attack on
Zita Warren in lower New York
and later dispose of Joseph Den
nert ud there in Cornwall.
As far as these requirements
were concerned, at present eight
DeoDle and eight people only ful
ed the bill. Eight men and women
had been .isolated who had been
in New York when Melville died
in C6rnwall when Dennert was eli
minated the Task? the Browns
the Satterlees, Crystable Dolvin
and Tom Gillespie
Tho ramev nhtetrl "Ac
cording to Miss Casement it was
a man. and not a woman, who1
was with Melville up there on
the top floor of the Tenth Street
house just before Melville was
shoved through the window."
McKee shrugged. "Miss Case Casement
ment Casement didn't see a person, she saw
a shadow." His eyes roamed the
road-ahead. "There you are, Over
on that corner in front of the
erocerv store." He waved at a
group of three. They were all
Hrpseprf nrettv
mucn alike, due

jeans, loose coats, short hair; one and have concrete ramps support supported
ed supported them was a man and two were'ed by stone pillars which connect

oirU tn outline there wasn't a,
pin to choose between them, ex except
cept except for their different girths.
THE ZITA Warren angle and
the whereabouts of those eight
people when she was pushed into
the path of the oncoming truck
hadn't yet been established. Leav Leaving
ing Leaving that aside for the moment.
there was another and more for formidable
midable formidable difficulty in regard to
thp eight.
If one of Melville's blackmail
victims had killed him, it didn't
look as though any of these neo neo-nle
nle neo-nle could be guilty. Non of them
had money to speak of.
The house had been well cov
ered bv the experts and anvthinn
significant was now a matter of
record. As to the mine ne ws
after, it could scarcely be the

I
l .jilSliPL. -1 i ''ST' f
m lImmm iliiii

JAN AND GARY sit on the

Alumnus' Compares CZ, California Schoolkids

STATESIDE HIGH SCHOOL

Through the co-operation of Har
ry Fnshman, public relations di director
rector director of the Long Beach Unified
School District in Long Beach, Ca California
lifornia California this reporter visited the
campus of Lakewood Senior High
School recently and .interviewed
students and faculty in an effort
to learn as much as possible about
the school and its activities.
Lakewood High has an enroll enrollment
ment enrollment of about 200 students, and
therefore is comparable in size
to our own Balboa High School.
A photographer from Hollywood,
a local newspaper reporter and
myself spent the day touring the
campus and sitting in various
classes with two students picked
at random from the student body.
They were a young lass of 16
Jan Breshears, who is president
of the Junior class and Gary
Franklin, 17, a senior, and one of
the school's best swimmers.
Lakewood High School was
built only two years ago. When
you walk on to the campus it re reminds
minds reminds you of a modern college
built in miniature. All the build
ings are one or two stories high,
tne modern structures.
The first event of the school day
was the raising of the flag by
dead man's missing brief case, a
brief case was a fairly bulky ob
ject and it would have been
found before this it it was there.
"Then what, Inspector? What
was he after?"
McKee eyes were narrow on
the streets of the town golden in
late sunlight. "That's the ques
tion... I haven't the slightest idea.
I'm sure of just one thing. When
we find out if we find out
we'll be on the home stretch, and
it will be all over but the shout
ing."
(TO BE CONTINUED
NEXT WEEK)

DRIVER TRAINING Is an important part of Lakewood High's

ttUU VVCiyUAlC Ir-IOWl .."i.iunaii.

campus of Lake wood High School,

ROTC cadets, milch the same as is
done at Balboa H.S. Then we went
to the first period of class at the
chemistry lab.
After mixing up a concoction
that appeared to be a small A A-bomb,
bomb, A-bomb, but proved harmless, we
headed for drivereducation class
but, paused at the student body
store for a mid-morning snack.
The store, which Is managed
entirely by the students, teaches
through actual operation how a
small business should be run
and th problems encountered in
opening your own business.
Th student store supplies th
student body with school sup supplies
plies supplies and confections.
They also sell the senior rings
and take orders for the yearbook.
When we arrived at Driver
Training IB, Gary slid behind the
wheel of a new driver training car
with dual steering. He noted that
the driver training class is a great
help 'in cutting down the number
of accidents involving teen age
drivers.
On the way to the next class we
passed the student parking lot and
I agreed that driver training vas
indeed a necessary part of the
school's curriculum as evidenced
by over 300 cars parked there.
As we entered Gary's next class
auto mechanics a- group of
boys and the instructor were gath
ered around what most parents
term a "hot rod." As the instruc
tor put it, "It only makes Sense
to show the kids how to keep
car in a safe operating condition
rather than let them drive a hop
ped up death trap that they at
tempt to build up themselves."
While on our way to lunch I no
ticed an absence of the once very
popular fraternity, sorority and
car-club jackets. It seems that
school officials deemed it neces
sary to ban the wearing of the
jackets, or sweaters on campus.
Th school board ruled that toe
much emphasis was being placed
60 th clubs and not enough on

DRIVER TRAINING
PROGRAM

in s,. mi

Long Beach, California,

For the next few Sundays we will publish a series
by "Alumnus" comparing High School and Teenage
ways Stateside (in Southern California) and here
on the Isthmus. Most Of the photos of teenage life
on the Isthmus will be taken by BUI Kirkland, a Bal Balboa
boa Balboa High School junior who has turned in some fine
work for the Panama American in the past.

school spirit and extra-curricular
activities.
When several students were ask asked
ed asked what they thought about Lake Lake-wood
wood Lake-wood high and school life in
Southern California they made the
following comments:
"I like being a student here very
much, especially because they
teach so many courses."
"All the guys and gals here
have a -lot of school spirit. We all

LONG BEACH UNIFIED
SCHOOL DISTRICT

training for Jan and Gary,

CADET LT. COL. PAUL BENNETT, of Balboa High School's
BHS junior Sandra Morency.

pull together to make us the best
school in the city."
"Schools here are almost like
college. We have our own student
government and settle our own
problems."
The student government class
makes the rules of the school, un
der the guidance of a faculty
member. A commissioner is in
charge of each of several school
committees including Athletics
Campus, Scholastic, Welfare and
activities.
Another unusual feature of th
school is th student body court.
If a student violates any of th
campus regulations, he or she is
brought before the count where
th case is heard by fellow stu
dents and action is taken.
Lakewood high has its own ca
feteria and lunch area for those
who bring their lunch.
Since the school is gelf-suffi
cient, students are permitted to
leave the grounds only to go home
for lunch. A Juvenile Police offi
cer is assigned to the school to en
force this, regulation.
Lakewooa senior tiign acnooi is
indeed one of the, finest senior high
schools in the west, and any stu student
dent student there has an opportunity to
obtain a fine education. The rest
is up to Teenagers of today and
leaders of tomorrow.
LITTLE LJXl
Ediicotion should teoch chll chll-dren
dren chll-dren to moke great decisions
such as when not to run tor presi president.

Hi

BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL

After returning from California
we went to Balboa High School to
gather information for the Pana Panama
ma Panama American.
B.H.S. was -built in the 1920's
and therefore is not as modern as
the newer Stateside schools.
ever it has been remodeled iiP
therefore is adequate for the
school's approximately 1000 stu students.
dents. students. Plans ar now being mad for
a new cafeteria, auditorium, and
a new structure to house th Re Re-serve
serve Re-serve Officer's Training Corps.
As in California the flag is rais
ed every morning by an ROTC
color guard. Due to the fact that
students are not required to at
tend high school here, they seem
to take more interest m their stud
ies. There is no need for a truant
officer at Balboa.
The "hot rod" is non-existant at
B.H.S. Only a few cars and about
twenty motorbikes are driven to
school by the students. This fact
plus the excellent driver-trainini
class has reduced the number of
accidents involving Teenagers to
practically nothing.
Dunn my short visit in Cali California
fornia California last month four high
school youths from one city were
killed in three separate acci.
dents. Zone youths have a safe safety
ty safety record of which they can be
proud.
Balboa high students are re
quested to remain on camous dur
ing school hours, except for the
lunch period, just as the Lake-
wood, Calif, students, are. There is
no juvenile officer present at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa to enforce this rule, however,
as few students here tend, to
"Skip" class.
Classes at B.H.S. are much the
same as Lakewood High and stu students
dents students are offered a very wide
choice of subjects they maj take.
Unlike Lakewood high, B.H.S.
does not have a student law lawmaking
making lawmaking body. Their Student As-

s

PAUL AND SANDRA check over one ot BHS's driver-tral;

V, cars.
(Photo: BUI Kirk

crack. ROTC tail, chats with
(Phete: Bill Kirkland)
sociation has much less voice
school matters than In Califor-I
ma.
There are no sororities, fratei
bjfies or ear-clujo at Balboa Higl
and there
is more tlnti
ir sen
im tmmmgmues that usua:
ly belong to many of the car club
are absent here. Instead, tho
youths, with a few exceptions
well behaved at school.
The low-flying planes that re
any make b.h.s. students an
faculty alike gasp are a disturq
mg sight. This reporter has see
one fly so low as to blow th
leaves off the trees outside thj
school, and shake windows.
The comments of several B.HJ
students about their school are
follows:
"The extra-ctimcular program
offers many opportunities for st
dents to take part in the activi
of his choice."
"I see no reason why the cheel
leaders should be forbidden ro col
gratulate the players after the vl
nous games."
"I think that B.H.S. has just
bout everything you could a
for."
"Balboa, in itself, is a fli
schdol, but there are too ms
'cliques' among the student body
"Some of the teachers shoftf
learn not to hold grudges."
(And we must add; some of tit
students should show the facuH
more respect)
Balboa High School studen
think their school is tops and the
faculty the best, and the 1958 arm
uates who -go forth to become dj
tizens of the community should
grateful to the principal, T.
Hotz, and the, faculty of B.H.S. fd
their well rounded education.
Next week's topic will b
school spirit of Balboa Higl
School vs, school spirit of Lake!
wood, Calif. High School.

iiol activities

-t.



mm

mm

Dividing Lines

;;vm 1 1 1 rjj
XvTi vr
IFx i rl
I ix Jill
roni iiiijl
C v i

En Garde: Vou
cu almost hear
the clank of
chain- mall a
Junior duel to
ava his lady fair.

Knightly Garb
IS NIGHTS, men-at-arms, proud bishops, Jolly
friars all are gone! But 'the days of old are
still fun to remember and Junior can hark back to
them with a few pieces of homemade equipment.
A headdress la one piece. This may be fashioned
from a paper bag, as shown at right Aluminum
foil may be added (or adornment A medallion is
provided for the visor.
A sword ia easily fashioned from cardboard and
covered with aluminum foil. Similarly, cut and
cover a piece of cardboard for a ahield.
To make this regalia more colorful, bnght-hued
metallic wrapping paper is suggested as a covering
for both the headpiece and shield. You may find
some of this paper among leftover Christmas
wrappings.

Find the Path to the Squirrel's Storehouse

YOU have sixty minutes with
which to play around In this
test but only one minute to
answer. The question is this:
The clock face at the top of
this diagram shows Ave dividing
lines. Notice that the numbers
present in teach segment total 13.
You are asked to divide the sec second
ond second clockf ace similarly, but using
only two dividing lines, so that
the numbers in each of the three
segments thus attained total 26.
Remember, there's a ae-minute
time limit
?au pin jnoj
MR ta)aq o )qS)a pu auiu aq)
ilta)q tuojj sboj.is aaj puojss aip
ttvjp :aaj4) aq) pun oj aqi uaa)
-ea oj uaS pne uai aq) naa)aq
uiojj saoi.m au auo abjj :aopaog

Will This Pan Out as Expected? A SHIFTY THREESOME

'2 ,'7

NERfS THFl

i!

jam

By H. C. Kaufman
LETS suppose one picture is
worth 10,000 words. Add SO
words, given below, and you have
a 10,0S0-Word description of the
"fMnfl!" above:.
A Frenoh scientist called the
Father of Modern Chemistry,
used this apparatus In the 1700a
to learn more about a curious
property of air. Mercury was put
into the large flask ami heated
over the charcoal stow (left).
Water rose slowly in the bell jar
(right), proving that a part of
the air therein eras consumed In
the reaction. The Frenchman
gave thla part of the air the
name oxygen.
Here's the thing: What1 was the
scientist's name?
iujnq 9uiouv sbav bh iflitiiv
0iitial Question
YOU have to put on your think thinking
ing thinking cap to solve this one.
The following letters when
placed in their customary order
indicate a sequence of names you
know as well aa your own.
SO NMMJJJFDAA
Each is an initial letter.
How quickly can you deter determine
mine determine the names these letters
represent?
uaaX eto jo iq)notu n jo ats)
tmu aq) aas ieitj, uaMiiv

IF EVERYTHING pans out as
' expected in the drawing above,
a pencil line will restore the
missing figure.
Begin at dot 1, of course, and
draw to dot 2, dot 3, etc.. to dot
16.
Where two numbers are beside
one dot, use the dot for both.
Can you guess what's : missing
before you begin? If you said a
dog, you're wrong.
Good Sound Logic?
IT HAS been suggested more
than once that one of the
greatest of all puzzles is the Eng English
lish English language. As one verse of
anonymous authorship puts It
When the English' tongue you
speUk
Why i$ break not rhymed With
freakt
Can you tell me why it's 'true
That you say sew, but not like likewise
wise likewise fewt
Why can't the maker of a verse
Rhyme the word horse with
worse f'
Beard does not rhyme vAth heard
And cord is different' from word.
Cow is dew and- low is low
But shoe is never rhymed with
hoe.
Now there's hose and dese and
lose.
Think of goose and again of
choose.
What about comb and tomb and
bomb,
Doll and roll and home and
some f
Bo, in short, it seems to ste
Sounds and tetters disagree.
What Number Is It?
"THERE is a certain three-digit
1 number. When the three
digits are added, they total 16,
but if the number is reversed and
subtracted from the original num number,
ber, number, the result is 396. What is
the number?
ajqi
xui nsAaa s jaqtwm am immiov

Call the Doctor

JUST before the nurse died oi
J the effects of a beating, she
said, referring to one of the three
doctors in the room, "He did it,
the villain!" She didn't glance ot
point In his direction. The doc doctors
tors doctors were named Green, Brown
and White. Why was Dr. Brown
immediately suspected ?
uaiuo
aaa HM pa u3jq sjovwrj
usui s. aq asnvoaa uaAtiuy

THERE is

so m e t h i n g
about this game
that is reminis reminiscent
cent reminiscent of the old
Army game in involving
volving involving the pea
and a walnut
shell. Perhaps it
is because it
seems so easy to
do, yet can prove
so confusing
when attempted.
Note that the

total of each vertical and horizontal column at right
above is six. Also one diagonal column totals six.
The other diagonal column, however, totals only
three.
By moving three figures In this arrangement,
both diagonal columns as well as all vertical and
horizontal columns can be made to total six. See
if you can make the adjustment
If you'd like to try this test on someone else, cut
out the numerals above and paste them to coins.
Arrange coins in the positions shown and then pop
the question.
auo 'aajqi 'OA
japjo aiuBs aq) uj do) o) avoj wo))oq aq) aAOjv :jmuv

(D
(D

Just Fill in Missing Letters of Key Words

I I Oj S ll
t
1
SP "r"" r"""' T

Rj B TT"
-V :
,: : ...
l MM ,l 1 i. ' '

BUSBY SQUIR SQUIRREL
REL SQUIRREL has been
preparing for a
hard winter. He
has discovered an
unusually large
store of nuts and
an equally largt
and secure place
for storing them.
Trouble is they
are not near each
other and the
paths to each are
twisting and mis misleading:
leading: misleading: And now
Busby has tem temporarily
porarily temporarily lost his
way. Can you
help him relocate
his cache and
treasure house ?
Begin at the low lower
er lower right corner,
going first to the
point marked 1;
then on to the
storage place in
the tree at upper
right. Lines must
not be crossed or
retraced.
See if you can
complete the jour journey
ney journey first try.

' Triogram Test
EACH of the following words
has certain letters missing as
Indicated by the dots. Definitions
at the right are clues to enable
you to fill in the missing letters.
For example: the definition
"country" has as its answer IRE IRELAND.
LAND. IRELAND. Now, continue from there
and fill In all the missing letters.
IRE .... Country
. RE . Andiron
. IRE . Ancient galley
. . IRE .Departed
. . IRE Ask
.... IRE Kind of fire
. . IRE Hoped
. IRE . Most honest
. IKE . Somber
IRE .... Without anger
taaiwi "injaaja
paildsv 'ajyuoa 'ajmbui 'pajoaa
'auiajJX 'Sopauijl 'puajaji :aoBog
Water, You Know
VHAT goes under the water,
" over the water, yet never
touches the water?
'paaq jaq ao sfq uodn smvn
jo ld Su)i(JJ3 uinaj)S aAO
3pjq SatOJ3 UOKiad V :Jttv

PERSON OF STRENGTH?

AT your next
party or fam family
ily family get together,
ask someone if he
is aware of how
much strength
you have at your
finger tips. To
prove your point
this is what you
do: Stand with
your elbows bent
and your fingers
touching as
shown in the il illustration.
lustration. illustration. Have
another person,
with strength
about equal to

yours, grab your left wrist with one hand and your
right wrist with the other. Tell him to make Sure'
he has a good grip. When he reaffirms this, tell
him you defy him to pull your fingertips apart That
is to say, he must separate your fingertips by pull pulling
ing pulling your wrists outward horizontally.
Unless he possesses unusual strength, no matter
how hard he tries he will not succeed. Your finger'
tips may separate If1 he pulls one hand up and the
other down, but they will not pull apart by pressure
exerted outwards.

This Is the Doggonedest Jig-San: Problem

KEEN Wits and good powers of concentration are
Important to the solution of the tests posed by
the diagrams above, but luck is also involved, espe especially
cially especially for those who wish to solve them quickly. An
exciting pastime is to put one's skill and good for fortune
tune fortune against an opponent in a race against time.
The test is this;
Certain key words appear in skeleton form across
the tops of the blocks. Solvers are asked to com complete
plete complete them:
To begin, copy all of the letters now showing In
the empty spaces directly blow them. Then, using
a system of trial and" error, fill the remaining blanks
with letters to form short words. Of course, letters
Inserted must also be placed in all blanks of respec respective
tive respective vertical rows. If the correct letters of the key
words are discovered, all horizontal rows will con contain
tain contain short words.
'pazao)33)(s uaaq aAq
ipiq ipjoa Xaa aq) est aiuqojd pua umsaoci :j3avuv

Drawing Account
AT a small party where there
were five guests, door prizes
were to be given out during the
festivities. Ten counters, having
the numbers one to ten, inclusive,
were ,put into a bag, and Henry,
Eileen, Bill, Mabel and Lily drew
out two counters each. The sum
of the two numbers drawn in
each case was: Henry, 16; Eileen,
11; Bill, 4; Mabel, 17; Lily, 7.
What counters were drawn by
each?
Remeniber, each person present
draws two counters.
2 P" 8 'tin
6 P"B g 'laqBli :g pm T "Ilia 'L P"
t 'uaana :0t pua 9 'iiu9H :iiotnog

ALL the pieces
necessary to
recreate an amus amusing
ing amusing scene are in in-felufred
felufred in-felufred in the
drawing at right.
How quickly can
you fit them to together?
gether? together? The pieces will
be easier to han handle
dle handle if you first
cut them out and
glue them to
heavier paper or
cardboard.
Later you may
wish to color the
scene.

Riddle
WHICH is the

w

largest room

in the world?

')uaui
-aAojduq jo) uiooj
aqj, uaAtaav

W "X It sT KIsbbW M- Jss' i'ml

m m ST M M BBBBBBb M C w W m.

1" JL I M I L

i aaaaar -m. m. r J

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Counting Out the Girls and Boys

O
o ra o
; m (if ft o
O ((r-jGlRLS
o iN o
O RBOYSO O
K?V O
U

CHALLENGING (E)uil-(gBOSWOKD 9I8U EXERCISE

It's Your Move

By Eugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL

wedding

feast

A LL the girls in the circle
a above can be counted out of
the rang without removing a sin single
gle single boy, if you can lad the magic
formula.
First select ft number between
1 and 15. Then, beginning at the
arrow and counting clockwise,
cross off the marker Indicated by
the number you've chosen.

How quickly can you find the
right number?
m ) jaquina auj, itfMiary
Answer, Quickly
HOW quickly can you re rearrange
arrange rearrange the letters in the
wosd "stare" to form three other
words?
aajifl
art ami tarai 'jaisr iwauot

1 City of the
(John 2:1)

5 Son of Sadoc (Mat 1:14)
10 Biblical mount to be cursed
(Deut 11:29)
14 Thin.
15 Elevate.
16 Knob.
17 Place of final battle between
good and evil (Rev. 16:16)
19 Intense look.
20 Pertaining to poetry.
21 Bewilders.
23 Declaim.
26 Pony.
27 We are told not to love it (1
John 2:15)
30 Chop.
32 Knock gently again.
36-Toward the sheltered side.
37 More sacred.
39- Prior, in time.
40- Tilt
41- Son of Noah (Gen.'9:18)
42- Arid.
43- City'in Brazil.
44- Twilight
( 45 Marbles.
47 Son of Jerahmeel (1 Chr. 2:Z5)
48 Leased again.
50 Distress signal.
51 Iridescent gems.
52 Meadow,
54 Public warehouse.
56 Butterflies.
59 Stanzas.
63 He named every living crea creature
ture creature (Gen. 2:19)
64 Subsistence.
68 Festive.
69 Willow.
70 Makes fece edging
71 Land measures.
72 Dlsnatches.

73 Series of heroic events.

VERTICAL
1 Applaud.
2 Air: comb. form.
3 The unclean spirit said Legion
was his what? (Mark 5:9)
4 Novehst France.
5 Betef-nut palm.
6 Despicable fellow.
7 Secreted.
8 Equal: comb. form.
9 Son of Mattatha (Luke 3:31)
10 Hire.
11 Ruth's second husband (Ruth
4.13)
12 Hand-cutting tool
13 Dregs.
18 Encompass.
22 Paul told the. Corinthians that
if they do this they do not
sin ( 1 Cor. 7128)
24 The doubting disciple.
25 Conger.
27 John the Baptist baptized with
-this (Acts 1:5)
28 Evergreen tree.
29 Repulse.
31 Broadest
33 firma.
34 Spirit of the air.
35 Mexican peasants.
37 Crone.
38 Bitter vetch. f
41 Detester.
48 Pedal digit
47 Run.
Word Cbangeovers
ONE word leads to another in
this test How quickly can
you find the answers?
1. Change the first letter of
GOLF and get an animal.
2. Change the first letter of
ESTER and get a flower.

ue)VZ TIom 1 lenaee

49 His name by interpretation
was "sorcerer" (Acts 13:8)
51 Overt
53 Place where Paul stopped on
his Macedonian journey (Acts
20:14)
55 Avows.
56 Icelandic literature.
57 Hebrew month.

4

58 Narrative.
60 Vigor.
61 External: comb.1 form.
62 Soap-frame bar.
65 Function.
66 Wilderness where the chil children
dren children of Israel received manna
from the Lord (Ex. 16:1)
67 Spread for drying.

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By Millard Hopper
yyHITE'S blueprint for victory
" In this game involves five
moves. It's White's turn; he'll
traveling up the board. Can you
sit In for White?
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tS-C amui -Tt aaaia 'SC-SISTt
-t Hi i-tt-tz 3ia 'ii-tz uue
aaaig. 'g-n )HUa

CBoaawoao ruzzxa solctiom

O UN, Klag reatarea Syndicate, laa.



i

1 V Nj A HEADY
W Jf0 1 the toasts of the nation's wine growers m
llffill ftlfcff HHI I mam W vl gk gdin,
i 3wBBHy-:wPBBBB Wk IB hHBBBBBKE& IB SPWwRWH

g JMMMi A NEw PATTERN Foreman Joe Patalon (top) gauges

..... ....lum a Wm HnUtc kine-sized Dane of glass toward

the eighth floor of the almost-completed C.I.T. Financial corporate building on
a blockfront on New York's Msn avenue. This operat.on bypassed ms.de-the-iSn
elevators. Panes wirfftrtn a floor-to-ceiling glass wall under the roof.

" t7

A NEW PATTERN Foreman Joe Patalon (top) gauges
thickness of new embossed steel strip at U. S. Steel
plant in Cleveland while Marie Evert (bottom) "re "reflects"'
flects"' "reflects"' on beauty of steel tray. The patterned steel

will be used in office equipment, nome appiwntes.

LIVING GHOST TOWN-Virginia City, Mont., once a gst town, is now a living
museum. The' preserved town shows a glimpse into the West C. the UoVs.

- r . i

i i iiihir anmiin i m im

RELEASED by the U. S. I
Coast Guard, these pho- I
I 1W BtMDtt wBtmmk tos were made during the I
IBM y. S. Navy's Military Sea
mk mm tic operation in which Coast I I
I Guar;d vessels conducted hy-
fljj drographic surveys for MSTS.
I jjjjjjHjj' mUitary in- JwJRffiB KHhShIHKhHKKI
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I Htt ''BE son Comdr. jwV MflBMH HHBpPlEjH
L I Wttfi"'"'' Harold L. Weed, commanding Ik jk
'mmsd& BbP81' officer of the Sforis' Young" H amI
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I'rssjtevtSiT" mi,sion iBlTS Y""9'" """"" i HHBBnfl

fcfckf ..giMjgMMBBBMjSM HEjtBBB)BBBBfBJHJj

MOUNTING A BARRIER Pat Smythe takes her
mount, Flanagan, over -one of the hurdles in the
leading show jumper competition at the Horse of
the Year pageant in London. FJtinagan seems a lit little
tle little more conf ideat of wjiming than his rider does.



UP... UP... UP... ha goes. Because the Panama sun can be tricky, a workman
from the jungle set of "The Naked and the Dead" being filmed mostly in the little
fishing village of Camaron beyond Fort Kobbe, climbs up a palm tree to put up a
diffusion net which would help disperse the glaring sunlight from the faces of the
lotors. As roon as he reached the spot where the net would have been slung, the sun
Went down. His accent was being watched closely while all shooting stopped.
(Story and Pictures on Pages 2 and 3)

t& surt PAY
American
Supplement

'I 'i "4

PANAMA, p., SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 195$



Jungle

- x jH Il. I

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PANAMANIAN WORKMEN who are beta emp loped on the set of "The Naked and the Dead"
pause a moment in their labors to itndy the group of actors taking part in the movie.

TENSE MOMENT during
shooting for Aide Bay,
of the leading men in
movie.

the
one
the

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WHO'S WATCHING WHOM? ... Soldiers who are extras in the
movie ogle two female spectators who were observing the
shooting from the sidelines. Many people took the jaunt out
to Camaron during the filming.

ON CAMERA are two local boys from Ft. Amador who were
loaned to the movie company as assistant cameramen. Watch Watching
ing Watching the shooting log book (lower left) is Clark Kane, while
George Hollowell (at right) holds up the marking slate of the
scene being taken.

Provides
- pit I Wp
The natives of the little fish

rag village of Camaron near Ft
Kobbe will never be the same

again.
They may seem oblivious now
to the rolling truckloads of cam

era equipment, hundreds of sol

diers tramping over their beach
es and genera,! uproar caused by
the RKO movie company now

filming "The Naked and the

Dead on its shores.

But when the labyrinth of barb

ed wire has been removed and
the last gun emplacement pulled
out vttlagers will be able to sit

quietly and ponder the goings-on
of the last few weeks when their
village became a movie set for
a war picture.

Spectators however who spent
hours watching takes and -rotates
found movie-making a te tedious
dious tedious back-breaking job far re

moved from their ideas of the

glamorous profession.
As one be-helmeted acta

drenched in the noon-day sun re

marked:

"It's a lot of sweat over a lit

tle mspiration." :
Luckily for move goes pro pro-ducer
ducer pro-ducer Paul Gregory and director

Raoul Walsh don't feel the same.
They are bringing Norman Mail

er's 605-page -novel to iueopin
an assist from the army pe ad-

quarters here.

Young UWgory wno is oesi oesi-known
known oesi-known for "The Caine Mutiny
v r I It! Tl 1 ....

uourt Maruai w Miuy
also produced -"The Rivalry"

RAYMOND MASSEY plays the
part of a general.

f m ii hi rw mm n i r n r irii n m&mm

Hgyftj HPi ft Hi wWL m I

WORKING RAPIDLY, construction men ire laving two wooden rails in the jungle So that
the dollies can be readily moved hack and forth.

TALKING OVER the book on which the movie Is based, with
one of the "Japs" is Marion Hargrove who came down for a
week to work on the movie script. The Jap is really Thomas
Moy, a civilian employe M the Army who Work at Ft. Amador.
SUND JANUiART -5, 195

sssMBSMssmmafsssMssaissaBMBs

i)H
Sunday



Riming of Naked And Dead'
Excitement For RP Villagers

a series from the Lincoln-Douglas
debates in which -Raymond Mas Mas-sey
sey Mas-sey stars.
Steel -haired Massey took a week
eft from the touring company
which has travelled all over the
States to appear briefly in the
movie as Brig. Gen. Cummings.
Jungle conditions here, accord according
ing according to chief cameraman Joe La
Shelle have hardly bogged down
the shooting' time, and if aU- goes
veil, the company should close
up shop by Jan. 20.
The weatherman, he says, has
cooperated fully so that with sun
ny unblemished skies, the crews

can take maximum advantage of

the rainless days.
Perhaps on of the hardest
scenes they had ta r I in involved
volved involved the pseude -invasion an

Vonado Beach. With 250 men
of the 1st Battalion group rea ready
dy ready to spurt out landing craft
that was inching onto the
beachead, ana small LCM hit
a small obstruction and sang sang-Bed
Bed sang-Bed the operation.
But actually, director Walsh is

so pleased with Panama's jungles

that he is trying to shoot as
much of the movie here as possi possible.
ble. possible. The rich foliage, color and
deSse overgrown sections of land
make it an ideal substitute for a
South Sea island, locale of the
story.
When lunchtime rolls around,
the Army sends out their mess
trucks and feeds over 400 people
hot lunches.
"It isn't Romanoff's," one ac
tor remarked, "but the Army

chow'a pretty good." RKO picks
up the tab.

One of taw "extras,'' an Army
boy, Sp3cl Eitoku Oshiro, who
plays a captured Jap, may end

up with a case of indigestion; but

this wont' be the Army's fault.
In one of the scenes, Oshiro
who is supposedly starving, is
given a chocolate candy bar to
eat by Aldo Ray. His instructions
are to gobble it down. After five
takes of the same scene, and aft after
er after five bars of candy were con consumed,
sumed, consumed, Walsh roared:

"Somebody take Oshiro
pump his, stomach out."

and

But outside of killing a few
snakes, and battling with the
bugs, the movie troupe generally
has suffered no ill effects from

working in the jungle. Perhaps
their worst moment came when

they all lined up for yellow fevet

shots before the turning startea.

Outside off their work, the doz

en Wnllvwnod extras and techni

cians who are hcie for the first

time, say they are h a v 1 n a
"marvelous" time.

"We never knew we'd meet so

many wonderful people," one of

me ien remaricea. -this aeu aeu-njtely
njtely aeu-njtely calls for a return trip."

ANOTHER LOCAL BOY, one of four who were Riven small
roles in the movie is John McTaggart (left) who plays Toglio.
McTaggart was. recently discharged from USARCARIB, and
plans to jo to Florida to continue his studies next month.
With him is his buddy in the movie, Greg Roman.

HaHftW &. aHBHBBaV 9avaHK bt
Ess.. JJE m St. 'HaljjBda'
i WKr- iNR

DIRECTOR RAOCL WALSH (with hand raised) gives a lasi lasi-minute
minute lasi-minute instruction to one of the actors while producer Paul
Gregory (at right) keeps a sharp eye on the filming.

I'iyipit t$vmnl It i tSaT ; w9iT II 1 t iflj
aroMaiWaBi ? IL m mk W&SmlMB WB&lJ

SOLDIERS from the 1st Battle Group of the 20th Infantry were used as extras In the film

ing of the war movie. Here a group prepares to take part in a scene.

mm gahSaLiiaaB. v 9ESf9BawHRasaKaT J9lBaiaraK Baai lfewBaaaaal SmB. JlIBwBaMJaaaaa3i iBMttliiHIililt .traaaaaaaiillr
ltMaliaii Klklii!BLaS

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CHARLES WALSH (Chuck)
plays the chaplain. He U em em-played
played em-played at the Balboa Post
Office, and eventually plans
to make actinr his career.

JUNGLE TURNS INTO SET ..The fisbina; fUlage of Canuron prpvides a picturesque Wrop for the Nrm.an Mailer WorW
War n drama. It is being filmed In CInemaScope, and will be distributed iointlv by RKO and Warner Brothers.

SUNDAY, JANUARYt 5, 1957

Sunday



THE PANAMA AMERICAN

ate Ofxh

S UtC ruBLWMID BT TWI PANAMA AMERICAN fHMt M
WHIM MUNHVftx M MB
HARMODIO ARMS. ioitc
7 N rnun P o Bos OA. Panama. MK,.
TlLIMMM 2-O740 LtNml

CaOli AnMMk WWAUBmCAH. PANAMA
ia.i7 ccntral AvtNut erw tttw tJW

FOMION mtPflfMNTATlvtA. JOSHUA WWW INC

P MONTH

94 S Madison Ays. NIW YORK. t!7 N V

ywA
IN DVANC 70

FOR AIX MONTHS IN ADVAMCA.
PO ONt TtAR AOVANCA

AO
! no

T MAR
eao
13 CO
4O0

The Washington Mcrry-Go-Round
ly DREW PEARSON

1

POETyCORNER
POEMS BY WILLIAMS BLAKE

Editor's Note: Wilttala JMake's gift of vision must have
Mated strange in the London Hosiery shop which was his
childhood home. His father was of Irish descent and the
family were Swedenborgians. Blake was never sent to school.
Apprenticed as a child to an engraver, he found his own way
into art and literature. Between his twelfth and twentieth
year he wrote n seriles of poems as amazing as anything in
English literature. The following are from these early works,
lake lived from 1757 until 1827.
TO THE EVENING STAR
Thou fair-haired angel of the evening,
Now, whilst the sun rests on the mountains, light
Thy bright torch of love; thy radiant crown
Put on, and smile upon our evening bed!
Smile on our loves, and, while thou drawest the
Blue curtains of the sky, scatter they silver dew
On every flower that shuts its sweet eyes

in timely sleep. Let the west wind sleep on
The lake; speak silence with thy glimmering eyes,
And wash the dusk with silver. Soon, full soon,
Dost thou withdraw; then the wolf rages wide,
And the lion glares through the dun forest;
The fleeces of our flocks are covered with
Thy sacred dew; protect them with thine influence.

SSP

5- :

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fbj. Be
neath the giant sky rockets that
soar above Cape Canaveral, the
ground crews are plagued with a
festering morale problem that
caused a drastic 45 per cent turn turnover
over turnover last year and shows only
small signs of improving.
. This critical loss of manpower
not only imperils our missile ef effort
fort effort but costs the taxpayers an es estimated
timated estimated $4 million a year.
Maj. Gen. Donald Yates, who
commands the missile test center,
complained at a recent staff meet

ing that it costs $5000 to replace
an engineer. This much is spent
U hire, train, and investigate him
before he can even start work.
It will take more than the suc successful
cessful successful flight of an intercontinen intercontinental
tal intercontinental Atlas to lift sagging spirits per permanently
manently permanently out of the Florida sand.
Here is a disturbing firsthand, re report:
port: report: WORKING CONDITIONS The
converted barracks that serve as
office buildings at Patrick Air
Force Base, headquarters for the
missile range, are the worst
sweatshops this side of New York's
garment jungle.
Summer temperatures hit 105
degrees in some offices. The sup:
ply building became so stifling last

summer that the health inspector

shut it down temporarily because
of insufficient oxygen.

Yates frankly described these

working conditions as "the worst

1 have ever seen.

After badgering the Pentagon

for three years, he is just now get-

SONG: HOW SWEET I ROAMED
How Sweet I roamed from field to field
And tasted all the summer's pride,
Till I the prince of love beheld
Who in the sunny beams did glide!
He showed meJllles for my hair,
And blushing roses for my brow;
He led me through his gardens fair
Where all his golden pleasures grow.
With sweet May dews my wongs were wet,
And Phoebus fired mu vocal rage;
He caught me in his silken net,
And shut me in his golden cage.
He loves to sit and hear me sing,
Then, laughing, sports and plays with me;
Then stetches out my golden wing,
And mocks my loss of liberty.

Art In Review

Cut On Popular Records

I By WILLIAM D. LAFFLBft
' NEW YORK (UP)- Some of
the finest music ever written has
evolved from the simple folk songs
Classical symphonies and nation national
al national anthems have been written a a-round
round a-round them. Folk songs are songs
of the people.
The so-called hillbilly tunes thai
are so popular today are pattern patterned
ed patterned from the folk songs brought
to America by the early English
settlers. Most sea chanties are
really folk songs.
Thus the group that wishes to

specialize in this type of music
has a limitless store to use. And
one of the groups that has fared
so well in this field is a quartet
known as "The Weavers."
The Weavers are Pete Seeger,
Ronnie Gilhert, Lee Hays and
Fred Hellerman. They may, be

neara on an outstanding w is

sued by Vanguard called "The
Weavers at Carnegie -Hall."
This is an on-the-spot-reproduction
of a concert that krttf a

packed house cheering from be-

sinning to end.

But Vanguard Judiciously has

kept applause at a minimum to

get. the music on the record.

There are 20 folk songs on this

LP, representing many countries.

The singing is almost inspired,

tne nanjo and guitar work is ex exceptionally
ceptionally exceptionally good. And Seeger' s re recorder
corder recorder solo, especially on "green "green-sleeves,"
sleeves," "green-sleeves," shows what can be done
on a simple, whistle-like instru instrument
ment instrument that almost anyone can learn
'.o play.

NEW YORK (UP)-Some art

lists paint the, things they love,

others the things they hate.

A fine artist of the first cate

gory is Giorgio Morandi whose re

trospective has been on view at

World House Galleries.

Because he painsts mortly -small
bottles, Morandi has been called

in 'his native Italy "the painter

of small bottles." This tag reveals

the root of one of the profound

misunderstandings between art

ist and public. Old bottles are not

objects of use in a painting. They

are subjects of inspiration. Theirl

presence congeals the painter's

artistic fantasy into a poetic vi
sion.

The intimate charm ctf Moran

di' s soft colors infun s a contem

plative sort of enjoyment into

his simple shapes delineated by

an ascetic, hesitating line.

The scope of Morandi is nar

row, but within this limitalon he

is all himself. "My glass is not
big, but I am drinking from my
glass," wrote the great French
poet, Musset.

ting air conditioning installed ia
the worst buildings.
HOUSING The missile work workers
ers workers are packed into teeming trail trailer
er trailer courts and shoebox housing.
Some have even been found sleep sleeping
ing sleeping in car seats and in concrete
pipes. Yet this slumlike living
costs them Gold Coast prices.

fhe test center publishes a so-

called housing bulletin" which

contains wrong addresses, obsolete

information, and excessiye rentals.
SALARIES Pan American Air

ways, the contract caretaker of

Uncle Sam's missile range, pays
shockingly low wages for the cali calibre
bre calibre of men needed to run a com complex
plex complex missile base.

The top administrators who di direct
rect direct this vital tes center are paid
between $9,250 and $12,500 a year
little more than carpenters and

bricklayers make in some North Northern
ern Northern cities.
Technicians, who spend $75 a

month on gasoline running back

and forth between the lab at cape

Canaveral and Patrick Air Base,

can't collect gas money.
Thp nav scale lis toDsvturw too.

It came to light the other day that
janiors are paid better than nurs

es on the emergency crews.

LEADERSHIP Two many Pan

American administrators are form

er pilots and ticket agents who

nave no business running a mis

sile rantft.

Kev iobs have also been nana-

ei out indiscriminately to retired

military officers who have cronies

in the Pentagon, unur two monms

aeo. Fan Am natt oneren no

management course for its admi

nistrators. The engineers and tech

nicrans have little confidence in

the men over them.

Surrounding the test center are

all the ingredients for a tropical

oaradise gently sloping s u r i

washed beaches, fish ehoked nv nv-pr
pr nv-pr golden oranfie groves, grace

ful palms. The. climate is warmeo

by the Fiorina sun m tne wimcr;

air-condittoned by tne ojcean Dreez
es in the summer.

Other recommended folk -styled

LP's:

"Livin' in Western Style" (R-

CA-camden). A selection of range
songs by Tex Williams, John Johnny
ny Johnny Lee Wills and Billy Williams.

"One Man's Songs" by the Sons

of the Pioneers (RCA Victor).

his is the Sons' tribute to the

ate songwriter, Fred Rose. Com

positions include "Be Honest With

Me," "Pins and Neddies," "Roly

foty" (sung by Pat Brady of the
Roy Itogers TV show) and nine

others.

"Swinging Guitar" by Jorgen

Ingmann (Mercury). Ingmann

gives a folk-styled instrumental!

twist to a dozen pop numbers.

including suchritems as "Rose
Room" and 'jrwilight T i m e"'
which some day may be regard
ed as 20th century folk songs.

named Dan Sullivan, lasted only
one week.

This is the untold story behind

the spectacular missile firings at

Cape Canaveral.

MISSILE MATTERS
The Army Enginers have pro

posed an educational plan to en

courage amateur missile

to build home-made rocs

their hisements. In order to

build these home-made rockets

and also to prevent accidents, the

Army Engineers propose provid

ing engineers to offer home build

ers advice and supervision ... Dr.
James Killian has called in Dr.
Wernher Von Braun, the German
rocket scientist, for high level
talks' on manned space flights
in other words, putting men inside

missiles and shooting them into
outer space ... U.S. naval scient scientists
ists scientists have now succeeded in tap tap-nine
nine tap-nine some of the secrets of outer

space gathered by Russia's first
two Sputniks. The beep-beep sig

nals have been decoded suiticient-

ly to satisfy our scientists that
Sputnik I recorded only the tem

peratures ana pressures msrae me

satellite ... But Sputnik II collect

ed considerable scientific informa

tion in addition to recording the

reactons of the space dog.

It was learned that the solar

itortns caused bv Uk sun, have

a definite influence on our weath

er- also that it is far colder in me

upper atmosphere than we had sup supposed;
posed; supposed; also the atmosphere is less
dense than we had calculated ...

Fmallv radio signals irom me

Sputniks have taught our experts
. . j.i a in KaAr

important less.ns ia win
radio and T7 broadcasting.

OVERCROWDING RAMPANT

These travel folder attractions
lure1 many workers to the missile
center, but hold few after they are

exposed to the miserable living
conditions. Neither the Federal nor

local government has lif ed a fin
ger to help the newcomers.
The schools are hopelessly ov

ererowded and substandard. The

two lane highways are congest
ed durins rush hours with bumper

to-bumper traffic that backs up

as 20 miles.

Elaine de Kooning belongs to

those abstract painters who do not

paint their subject matter, jusi
their reaction o it. The reactions.

of Miss de Kooning are violen.

She apparently enjoys the un unpleasantness
pleasantness unpleasantness of situation in whicii

clashing colors are forced into an
uneasy co-existence with each

other. As a result her canvases

are shaking from commotions, be because
cause because the subjugated colors and
lines try to break out almost ev everywhere.
erywhere. everywhere. It has been said that
an artist's way of painting is his
commentary upon his subject. This
is true in the case of Miss de
Kooning, too.
The only difference is that she
makes her commentary about
subjects which she is not willing

to disclose.

its

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m ??;; Hii m mjlul.

is iih mi ms-t Mf mr tm i

!i -JBL.tfJi ..flit... In... it. Hit

A handsome group show com composed
posed composed of works by Jean Foliett,
Lilly Brody, Jan Muller, George

Segal and others is on view at the

Hansa Gallery. Miss Brody exhib

its a large water color which is a

cityscape of New York with
Parisian sensibility.

The beauty sht finds here is
French. It is all atmosphere, nu nuances,
ances, nuances, hints, charm.
The aspect of New York is as
geniune and convincing as it
is new.
We realize that the artist does
not mirror the world but revelas
it to our unsuuspectng eyes.
Pal Mectanyi

Undrained swam PS breed

swarm- of mosquitoes that force
. i i i.: a I t

OTie 10 live a iviu-caKe caioi
-1 -e

All these cause contribute to
the terrific turnover that leaves

many vital missile functions in

the hands of perpetually green

workers.

As a typical example, take

rush construction job behind Cape

Canaveral's guarded gates.

A work crew was ordered to re

construct the concrete blockhouse

that had been used m the Navaho

missile test. A lackhammer crew

showed up with only one jaennam

mer, though later two more were
scraped up. But it turned out that
only one of the four men in the

lackhammer crew anew nis iraue

Meanwnue tne macmnisi crew

sat in the shade rrom 7 a.m. to

p.m. waiting for the carpenters to
huild thetr forms. Then the labor-

ers left th-ir shovels in the trucks

and it took them half day to

get the shovels back.
Yet the work in this yital mis missile
sile missile center is supposed to be the

most urgent going on in the free

world.
Dick Mitchell, the Pan Am vice
president in charge of the missile
range, pointed out to this coUumi
that the turnover figures include

transient laborers.

Yet four key men resigned
one was fired from administrative
jobs during a two-month period
iast summer.
In nine months, four civilian
chiefs rotated through the missile
station on Eleuthera Island. In less
than a year. 14 ton changes were

made in the personnel division it-

sea,

(Bool BrUh

Elliot Paul, irrepressible author

of such entertaining works as
The Last Time I Saw Paris, is

also an irrepressible musician ana
commentator on things- and

personalities musical. To estab establish
lish establish himself as an authority in

this somewhat unsuspected field.

Paul has written a highly perso personal
nal personal history of American music
from its very, beginnings in pre pre-colonial
colonial pre-colonial days to its rock-n-roll pe

riod. His book is That Crazy A.

merican Music (Bobbs Merril1).

Paul doesn't confine himself to

the development of jsrzz in its mul-

ti forms but ranges over the whole
field of music including the clas classics
sics classics and opera and their influence
on and reception by Americans.

Beethoven. Brahms and Liszt

rub shoulders in this book with
Stephen Foster, Gershwin and

Duke Ellington, to say nothing
of Liberace.

Paul knows and has known

many of the greats of past and
present music. His stories about
them, interspersed with his highly

original opinions and comments

makes this an informative and

entertaining pot pourri, and should
confirm Paul as ? leading music

critic.

Room at the Top, by John Brai Brai-ne
ne Brai-ne (Houghton Miff in): A first
novel by one of Britain's most
promising young writers, is the
story of a young man on the
make and of the price he hid
to pay for success.

Joe Lampton, the hero, is a man

love with two women and a

wn. when the time came for

him to choose among them, his
decison precipitated a tragedy that
left a permanant scar on his life.
Joe's three loves are Susan, a
beautiful brunette cn the threshold
of life who stood at the top of
his private rating scale, which clas classed
sed classed women in grades 1 through
12; Alice, a married blonde, fad fading
ing fading but" still passionate; and War War-ley,
ley, War-ley, the Yorkshire town that em em-played
played em-played him.
Braine, the author, is a deft
storyteller whose bril'iahce shows
most clearly in passages describ describing
ing describing the soul of a man in torment.
The publication in Britain of
Room at the Top won him inst

ant acclaim which appears naeiy

One trained suDerintendent, to be repeated in mis country.

fj ISfi

ill

it!



Walter Winched
In New York

HERE'S TO YOU!
The affairs of the world are ma managed
naged managed absurdly and tragically.
The inauguration of a new year,
however, is a time for festivity.
The traditional celebration is al almost
most almost a testament of faith. A chil
lenge to hope and a rebuke to
despair. Paper hats certainly un

dermine dignity. Alcohol tends to

overpower wisdom, confetti-tossing
is hardy an exercise in intel
lectual endeavor. The annual
spree, nevertheless, also conveys
something poignant and glorious.
Here are people who can tempo

rarily forget the fury and terror

of the world crisis. And they dy
the ominous thunder of the future
by tooting a horn or drink drinking
ing drinking a toast.
As Wfil Rogers once toasted:
"Here's to the old -year and the
new. Today meets tomorrow. The
end is. the beginning."
There is truth and a tough o.'
poetry in Alben Berkley's oft-quoted
toast to children: "Here's to
children! They enter your home
and make such a racket for eigh eighteen
teen eighteen or twenty years that you
scarcely ean stand it, then they
depart, leaving the house so dis dismally
mally dismally silent you think you'll go
lad;"" : "r"

Mark Twain's toa-st: "We have
' not all had the good fortune to be
ladies; we have not all been ge generals,
nerals, generals, or poets or statesmen; but
when the toasts work down to the
babies, we stand on common
ground for we have all been
babies."
Another Twain nifty: "Here's to
ladies of our land. May the first
be ever well rigged and the
latter ever well manned."

Frod Alien was once introduced
at a dinner with a windy and
laudatory toast. After being sJsCw
red with the superlatives, the
comic arose and quipped: "An in introduction
troduction introduction is like a perfume. It
smells beautifully, but shouldn't
be swallownd."

The dells, bless 'em, have in inspired
spired inspired numerous toasts. One of
the most quotable is editor L
Howe's: "To the Ladies we ad admire
mire admire them for their beauty, res respect
pect respect them for their intelligence,
adore them for their virtue and
love them because we can't help
it."
Then there's George M. Cohan's:

"Here's to the lasses we've loved

my lad... Here's to the lips we've
pressed... For kisseg and lasses,

like liquor in glasses... The last
is always the best."
During World War II, we ran
an errand for Uncle in South A A-merica.
merica. A-merica. While there, we offered
a toast to our Good Neighbors
which was "widely quoted in South
American as well as U. S. dailies,
To wit: "Never above you. Never
below you. Always beside you."
Another favorite: "Here's to the
land I love and the love I land!"

of the free press were eloquently
exemplified by his fervid' toast:
"Publicity! Publicity! That is the
best offense against the forces u
evil. So here's to the honest jour journalist
nalist journalist the officer in the Depart-
ment of Intelligence of the Armies
of the Good!"

Of course, the most quoted toast
to reporters if Newman Levy's
rollicky verse:
So hero's to the gallant reporters.

The boys with the pencils and
pads.
Those cool, imperturbable, calm,
indisturbable,
Nervy, inquisitive lads.
Each time that vu pick up a
paper,

Their marvelous deeds we should

bles.
Those bold, reprehensible, brave,
indispensable
Stnsib u leds of the press I

A classic among toast tales hrj

supposed to have taken place at

a dinner of the foreign ministers,!

following the Revolutionary War.

The British ambassador offered

the following toast: "England
the sun, whose bright beams en
lighten and brighten the remotest
corners of the world."
The French Ambassador follow followed
ed followed with : "France the moon,
whose mild, steady and cheering
rays are the delight of all na nations,
tions, nations, controlling them in the dark darkness
ness darkness and making their dreariness
teautiful."
Ben Franklin then arose and
toasted: "Here's to George Wash Washing
ing Washing the Joshua, who command

ed the sun and moon to stand

still, and they obeyed him.
Shortly before World War I, Sir
Winston Crurchill attended a din dinner
ner dinner that included several German
diplomats. There was much to eat
and too much to drink. The inevi

table happened one of the Ger

man diplomats became sold coWr
and forgot his diplomatic manners.
He rose shakily and gurgled
"Here's to the Kaiser drunk or
sober!" Another German diplomat
promptly bristled: "Sir, that's an
insult."
"No sir," Churchill responded
coolly, "it is only a reply to one."

BSSR 4rfBSSBll BSSSBSSkPIs jjtjjL
1 i. Ji vsCbsC9bbI bs? -2
LaeaniJ eaaek. mKSc I W

SKATE JOINS THE FLEET The crew of the world's first hunt-and-klll type atomic sub submarine,
marine, submarine, the USS Skate, selute the colors as t he vessel is commissioned at Groton, Conn. The
Skate, smaller but deadlier than her predecessors, is the third atomic submarine to become
part of the UJS. Navy,

Washington News Notebook

Lares

Baldy Roadblock Time Differences

French WhinesShrapnel-Whiffler
S By DOUGLAS LAB8EN and JERRI BENNETT

E3

Bennett

WASHINGTON (NBA) An old sions, when the scores were add-

friend, who hadn't seen the Vice
President for a year, approached
hint at a luncheon the other day
and said, "Dick, now I know where
all this talk comes from about how
you have matured recently,"
Knowing his old pal was a
jokester, the V.P. said cautiously,
"Okay, I'll biter What's the rea reason?"
son?" reason?" "You're getting bald," the friend

explained. V.P. Nixon promptly
went to a mirror and admitted

that sure enough, his once thick,
black curly hair Was getting very
thin in front.

Mayor Jimmy Walker once at attended
tended attended e New Year's Eve banquet
wrore the toast master gave him
wow buildup. WmVgreat fervor,
the toestmaster stressed his years
of public service, his intelligent
tact, charm and wit. Fol 'owing
the gushy eulogy, the "everwhem "everwhem-d
d "everwhem-d Mayer Walker arose, faced the
audience and grinned: "After Sud Sudan
an Sudan introduction, I cen hardly wait
to hear what I'm going to say."
When a staffer on HoracS Gree
ley's paper became a father, he
was gifted with a $50 bonus plus
a drink. A reporter named Carr
who was the proud father of
eight youngsters appeared be before
fore before Greeley one morning and
cheerfully announced: "Well, sir,
my wife has just presented me
with another little Carr."
The publisher wrote out the
traditional chclck, filled' two glases
and toasted: "Here's to the new newest
est newest Carr. May it be the caboose!"

Joseph Pulitier's passion for
Journalism, his respect for reporter-
and devotion to the concepts

Toast to scientists sheeting for
the moon: Uppy New Year.
With toasts and hoopla, we ex express
press express our aspirations and joy an:l
in these fearful times, when cou
rage is essential and survival de demands
mands demands allies, it is well to recall
the rather bitter toast propose:'
several years ago on a D Day an anniversary:
niversary: anniversary: "Here's to the optimist
who landed in Normandy."

Only the foolish and desparing,
however, would be so cynical, and
embittered. While peace has made
it difficult for Allies to be friends,
history demonstrates that in time
of crisis the Allies have fought
and died together. The foregoing
is probably test exemplified by a
toast credted to Gen. Esenhower
shortly after World War 2. At a
meeting of British, French and
American leaders, he toasted:
"Here's to all of us. It couldn't
have been done without each of
us."
And here's a toast N those won wonderful,
derful, wonderful, wonderful people: The
Runyon Fond doners. The tribute
v; pay them cannot match the
deBL all of as ewe them.

Toast for 195t: Here's wishing
you 365 of the Good Old Days.
NO CONVOY BLOCKADE
AMMAN, Jordan (UP)-Jordan
will not resume its blockade of
Israeli supply convoys to the Is Israeli
raeli Israeli enclave of Mount Scopus in
Jordanian Jerusalem. Foreign
Minister Samir Ri'al promised
yesterday. He told Francisco U'r U'r-rutia,
rutia, U'r-rutia, of Colombia, personal rep representative
resentative representative of U.N. Secretary Gen General
eral General Dag Hammatskjold, that Jor Jordan
dan Jordan intends to hrnor the agree agreement
ment agreement between Israel and Jordan
worked out by Hammarskjold.

Hortensia Miranda, vivacious
wife of the Spanish military at attache,
tache, attache, was complaining at a cock cocktail
tail cocktail party that she couldn't get any
of the British diplomats into a con conversation.
versation. conversation. "They're just too reserved,"
she told a friend. "In fact, some
of them act like they don't know
how to talk."
Embarrassed, the friend whisp whispered
ered whispered that Sir Edgar White-head,
British embassy official, was stand
ing right beside them.
Sefiora Miranda quickly apolo apologized
gized apologized to Sir Edgar but added:
"I wish you had said something
instead of just standing there
eavesdropping."

."My dear lady," Sir Edgar an answered,
swered, answered, "I was not eavesdrop eavesdropping.
ping. eavesdropping. You've teen standing in
front of the hors d'oeuvres for the
last ten minutes. I've just been
waiting for you to move so I could
get something to eat."

ed up, the red-faced experts were
confronted with the irrefutable ev evidence
idence evidence that they could not tell
French from the California wines.

What dismayed them more was

the revelation that the average
price of the California wine they

had tasted was 12.26 per bottle.

compared to $4.71 for the French.

First thing friends asked Assist

ant White House Press Secretary

Ann Wheaton when she returned

from the NATO conference was

how many new hats she bought in

Paris.

"Didn't buy a single one," Ann

replied. "I'm saving my money

for a steel helmet to wear the next

time I have to hold an emergency
press conference by myself."

Visitor to Washington, Petite Pa'

rado, charming sister-in-law of the
Philippine military attache Capt.

Ralph Pargas, is a world traveler

Alejandro Frers, the new finan

cial attache to the Argentine em
bsssy is having a terrible time ad

justing to this town's time sched

ule. He explains:
"Back home we never went out
for cocktails until seven or eight
and never ate dinner until nine
or ten. Here vou are asked for

cocktails at five-thirty and eat at

seven. That s wny we find our ourselves
selves ourselves arriving at parties just as
they're breaking up."

His pretty wife explains that

the one time they left real early

to try to get there on time they

got lost m the town s tranic cir
cles and never made it at all.

President Eisenhower may have

to make another quick trip to Pa Paris
ris Paris to patch up American relations

With the French if a ((roup of snea sneaky
ky sneaky California grape growers don't

stop picking on the French wine
makers.

Other night these Californians

repeated their favorite stunt of

serving unlabeled French and Cal California
ifornia California wines to a group of exoert

tasters, asking them to tell which
were the domestic and which the
imriorted wines.
As always happens in these ses-

who has carved her Initials on mo monuments
numents monuments ranging from the Sphinx
to the Eiffel Tower.
Other evening friends asked her
where she had left her initials in
Washington.
'On the White House, of course,'
she answered. "I thought they
would show up better there than
anywhere else."

Washington's most eligible young
bachelors have nicknamed them themselves
selves themselves the Dubs as a take-off on
the Debs.
Each year they throw a big holi holiday
day holiday ball which attracts such names
as Vice President Nixon, Joint
Chiefs of Staff Head Gen. Nathan
Twining, Marine Commandant
Gen. Randolph Pate, U.S. Trea Treasurer
surer Treasurer Ivy Baker Priest and Form Former
er Former French' Premier Camille Chau Chau-temps.
temps. Chau-temps. Credit for the whole idea goes
to Mary Stuart Price, Washington
debutante social advisor.

Herewith find solution te Sunday Crossword Pus.
zle No. 722. published today.

C E R A T ETOWC R E P TMRlE M O T E R

Answer for'Rwiday. Nov. t4. CryptoquiP!
FRECKLED NEWSBOY PATIENTLY PROMOTED
SELF FINALLY BECOMING BIG-SHOT NEWSHAWK.

'W&''fm mm af sM if. if? m

7F
Sunday MM
Iff



1 9
Bf ""i bbbPeJ Br wibbI

CLIFF ROBERTSON Mk Joey Bishop about his dog-tags In
a scene from the movie. Robertson has Wnd in three
other movies, "Picnic," "Autumn leaves" and "Girl Most Like Like-ly"
ly" Like-ly" with Jane Powell, which has not yet ten tehwjl. Bishop
a well-known TV comic has just finished making "Omonhead'
and "Deep Six" with Alan Ldd in Hollywood.

V &dMMMBUFBBBMBH&B &3IBBB
rjjML I' b Il-sA I H

A LITTLE HORSEPLAY ta ease the tension. Here press agent
Harry Friedman (from Hollywood) watches Ted Haworth, art
director who- wields a mean machete. Later they both tasted
' the delicious coconut.

in & JkralraBF
jHBJBJBjKrVBoB B9Bjf

BEHIND THE SCENES.. .Boots take a beating in rough iungle
areas, so here Cliff Robertson has his repaired by a veteran
choetnan at the Ft. Kobbe Shoe Shop.

Premier Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle
, 1
72?
r r zzzzzzz
sr; 15
"!f i i
sr v?
4l 45 TTsT TV
piiiiif piiillpiiilPI I
tt tfw-w j
W& l S9o 9, 9 93
; WLZZZWJZZWZZZ
3T fir 77Zb 77m "5
A 1 11 1 1 1-1 1 1 1 i-l l I 1 XT

1 Covered
with
waxy
ointment
8 Crawled
13 More
distant
20 Green
. mineral
21 Hawk's
nest
22 Arsenate
of
copper
23 True to
the fact
24 Punitive
1 25 Sweet
potato
! 26 Part of
a play
27 Incident
29 Occur
t 31 Seniority
32 Male of
any
bovine
species
i 34 Hard
I mineral
I 35 Substance
' from

ammonia
36 Over
again
37 Of a
region
39 One of
King
David's
rulers
40 Endured
41 Slender
blade
of
grass

HORIZONTAL
42 Second
copy
44 Rutace Rutace-ous
ous Rutace-ous tree
46 Com Comforted
forted Comforted 48 Pass Password
word Password 49 Fellow
50 Conflict
51 Provided
a supply
of food
55 More
capable
57Wine
produced
in one
season
61 Field
62 Noisy
celebra
tlon
64 Happen Happening
ing Happening 66 Colorless
67 Depend
68 Cheek Cheekbone
bone Cheekbone 69 Resound
70 Hold
71 Language
of the
72 Tapestry
73 Ancient
Roman
goddess
74 Seragli
75 Raised
level
space
77 Over Overdue
due Overdue 79 Freely

81 Entire
amount
82 Realize
83 Clever
84 School
book
88 Map
90 Walker-
94 Prompt
95 Clear
sky
97 Auditory
organ
99 Barrel
part
100 Three,
at
cards
101 European
country
102 Terse
104 Outpou"
105 Cap
106 Hits
107 Coops
up
109 Fuss
110 Bone
of
internal
ear
112 Wear
away
114 Woodland
bird
116 Go back
over
117 Freighted
118 Cele Celebrated
brated Celebrated 119 Guided
120 Native
of a
European
country
121 Meals

lTown m
Nigeria
2 Gdtirmet
3 Clattered
4 Goddess of
5 Automo Automobile
bile Automobile part
6 Public
7 Fix the
bounds of

8 Kind of
tobacco

9 Abound Abounding
ing Abounding in
marsh
grasses
10 Sea eagle
11 East In Indian
dian Indian herb
12 Male
Jngure as
""pilaster
13 Ties once
more
rWipe out
Small sum
of money
16 Indian
17 Of enor enormous
mous enormous force
18 What-not
19 Stitched
once more
28 Indian
weight
30 River
(Spanish)
33 Theft
35 Make
amends for
36 Separately

VERTICAL

38 Female
name
40 Limited
in degree

70 Spear-
shaped
72 Conform
73 Gloomy

74 Desires

11 Win twj-
43-Charge ll 76-Political

for

services
45 Lighted
coal
47 Due
51 Twenty Twenty-fourth
fourth Twenty-fourth part
(of gold)
52 Mountain
crest
53 Of a
tissue
54 Arrange
folds
55 Stop
(Naut.)
56 Kind of
foot race
57 Capable
of being
bribed
with
money
58 Cognizant
59 Chair
man's

mallet

meeting

78 Of a tough
wood
80 Row
84 Dogs for
hunting
85 Embank Embankment
ment Embankment 86 ermit
87Walked in
contrary
direction
88 Carpen Carpenter's
ter's Carpenter's tools
89 Earthy
90 One who
regales
91 Harms
92 Plain
93 Replies
96 Draw off,
as liquid
98 Matter
the
earth
101 Cut

102 Portended

60 Snake-in- 103 Fire

the-grass 106 Heavenly
63 Samuel's body
teacher 107 System
65 Truck for of rules

furniture 108 Clip eua-

68 A twin

crystal
69 Beverage
made
from
apples

denly

111 Mineral Mineralized
ized Mineralized rock
113 Untrained
115 Miscellany

CRVPTOQUIP

BLFAVHFS

UFNWMJX OTIZFUIHX OLJCJIFS WFHB

BZUTHHX MFAJCZUQ. M Z W P J I U F N W P T N V.

For The Best In Fotos & Features
. It's The Sunday American

UANtJf ART ftM Mt

Sunday



eeA
SPORTS
ISTHMIAN
WORLD-WIDE

Review Of The

The week's biggest sports news was the cancel- f PANAMA WOUND UP 1957 with a surplus of 8383,- THE WEEK'S GOOD and bad news on the inter-,
lation of the New Year's Classic at the President m wi4fc the biggest portion of ft coining from the national balance sheet:
Remori racetrack due to a bad start caused by an pt office Department, which has been under fire o -i.
lmnroderlv functioning starting gate. for some time for faulty handling of the mall. The leaders of fee United States and Soviet Rus-
Theanceled race was won by King Park with starting off the year, however, with a number of" da Interrupted their prosecution of the cold war to
Posiblemento second, three-quarters Ma length appointments m accordance with the new budget, exchange friendly New Year greetings and express
back Gavllan was third and Batallon fourth, a neck 170 Mw employes were named to the Posts and Tele- the bone that 1958 might bring better relations be-
aheadTof mutuels favorite Trasgo, The latter was graph Department throughout the republic with a tween Wem.
one of five horses whose chances were dashed toy view toward improving the mail service. For Soviet Russia, .President KUment Y. Voroshl-
the uneven start o lov, Premier Nikolai A. Bulganln and Communist lead-

The tracks SteWMUS mnaww; ...v....... ric. naroiu t. nusc, ui biucuui touto wu o er ;iuum o. aiieusucucv muu.
. A irkanai annannml that U 4IM. rrAa Knit 00 IDflZ mi onnilitfpH Wa Ho hnu thof tKa fnrfhortmlnor Wr

Friday by an all-male jury of murdering his 20 will be a year of strengthening of friendship and co-month-old
stepson. However, the Jury brought in a operation between the peoples of the Soviet Union
verdict of guilty on a lesser charge in connection with and the United States of America."
the death of fee little boy: serious bodily injury and For the, United States, President Elsenhower repli-

race nd manager PmWo A. Thayer announced that
ST event would be rescheduled for tWay with

an increased nurse. The race is w worm
addff instead the erllfnal 8S.888. Admission
will again be free.

maltreatment. ed

Rose's wife, Blanca, who was married to him
While they were awaiting trial, tared better than
her husband and was given a blanket acquittal
on a complicity charge.
Whether sentence will be imposed by the Su Superior
perior Superior Tribunal which brought Rose to trial or
by a lower court was still to be decided some time
next week.

Amid much activity, but little violence. 1957 merg-

Heavywelght contender Zora Folley started the
new year right by -registering his 17th straight vic vic-ffiyWedneay
ffiyWedneay vic-ffiyWedneay night and by challenging Floyd
Patterson to a spring title fight today.
Folley of ChandlerTAriz., outpointed Garvin Saw Sawyer
yer Sawyer in their nationally' televised 10-rounder Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night by the perfect score: 100-77, 100-78, 100 100-82
82 100-82 sawyer of Cincinnati was on the floor twice,
and he was lucky to. last the distance.
Taii his viotorv he fore 400 at the New Capi

tol Arena, had stretched his winning string into into 1858. HappUv lacking were multiple traffic problems would be solved.'

nouneid, "I'm challenging Patterson to defend a a-galnsfe
galnsfe a-galnsfe me in the sprlngi We could draw a terrific
gate at .Los Angeles." :

Meanwnue, pusy sora expects w muse an

'I earnestly trust that fee new vear will bring a

firmer and better understanding between the citiz citizens
ens citizens of the Soviet Union, the American people and
those of other nations,"
In addition, Khrushchev Iff warmly toasting the
United States at a new year reception In the Krem Kremlin
lin Kremlin said:
"If fee Soviet Union and fee United States can

get together and reach agreement, most of the world's

deaths or other mainr rrimps stemming from too

much holiday roirit. The mothers of three Americans Imprisoned by fee
.On the Canal Zone, several people were arrested Chinese Communists as spies flew across the Pacific
Jbr drunken driving a berserk soldier led cops on to see their sons.
o .) Anm tha Ponoi ohannai ffr Mno The three men are among the last six Americans

ctari on Jan. 27 at Chlcaeo or Feb. 2 at Los An- from rh fm nn nw vpot-c mnminr rfriwor known to be under detention bv the Reds.

geles against some good opponent. was fined for stopping on the Panama Railroad track, ton ago, til Chinese Communist government ln-
Twnty-two-year-old Sawyer was completely out- bringing a locomotive to an emergency halt... A- vlted t Relatives of all six prisoners to make the visit,
classed although he tried hard to make at fight of Rainbow City man, Calvin Antonio Ashby 22, Pan- But the State Department had refused permission
It. He was out-speeded, out-boxed and out-bombed, amanian, was Jailed for 30 days for faying to Intimi- the United States Is still technically at war wife Red
t date a witness who had testified against his brother, China because of its intervention In fee Korean War.
The form chart stood up pretty well In the bowl cteorge L. Ashby in a burglary charge There was no'Wnt that fee Chinese Intended to free
game drama on New Year's Day but the name of The bleeest crime of fee week no apparent con- the prisoners. If they did, It would be a most import
Don Sutherln went into the books today as fee man nectlon with fee holidays A fight over a woman, In gesture. It might prove to be the first move to-
who erevented what could have been the biggest which Donald S. Wright of Camp Blerd stabbed Ed- wafd eventual American recognition.
upset in the history of the Rose Bowl. Lin niv hrourht Wrhzht no for murder after o
Sutherin, Just back from a month's idleness ctar&Ued ta'cow Secretary of SMte John Foster Dulles announced
with a back injur,, booted a "not so tough" field der case came rafOT Prelta that he would Ankara- rnTk' 10 attend a
give Ohio State a 18-7 victory ever Oregon. Morton Thomson moved fnr dismissal because of panwation the so-called Bagdad Pact on Jan.

m-1 irunupn aver luce iu wic uuuwiu duwi, nuau;

sinnl's surprising 39-7 rout of Texas In the Sugar

Bowl, and Oklahoma's 48-21 trouncing of Duke In
the Orange Bowl.
Oregon went into the Rose Bowl clash before 100, 100,-000
000 100,-000 as a 21-ooint underdog, the biggest odds ever
ouoted on the classic at Pasadena, Calif. But the
Webfoots won every thing-first downs, yards gained,
most valuable awards to quarterback Jack Crabtree
everything, that Is,, except the game.
Navy, a one-point Cotton Bowl favorite, beat Ric

on tne rock 'em, sock 'em line play of Tony Strem Strem-lc
lc Strem-lc a suonosed rrlnole with an ankle Ininrv Roh

Vindication seemed closer for Army Col. John
C. Niekeraon, Jr.. missile expert now "banished"
in Ft. CIvton. when he was nmd 'Kentucky
Man of The Year" bv station WHAS-TV. Barry
Binzham who heads the LouisviP- Courr-JoKr-nal.
lauded Nickeiin, a nativ of Paris, Ky., for
havln- "tonoHed ff aoniHd controversv and
brovM Mrht the Wrts of interservice rivalry
on missile development."

The United States sponsored fee alliance, formed

to combat Communist aggression and subversion, but
refused to joint it.
The historic new Civil Rights Commission began its
task of insuring the voting rights of American Ne Negroes
groes Negroes and other minorities.
The six-man commission, headed by President John
A. Hannah of Michigan State University, was sworn
in Friday In a White House ceremony presided over
bv President Eisenhower. Then thev adinurned to a

. . Tr .?,7. nearby conference room to sit down together for the

lc a suoposed cripple with an ankle injury, Bob -7 Zl r?ZUlnar first time.
Reifsnyder, and Pete Jokanovlch. The Middle mulers ?teL?li!J. Administration officials said Eisenhower would take
Jolted Rice ball-toters loose from the pigskin five ,'JSrtal2L.iSJ22 SatSf SSh hands-off attitude toward fee commission and Its
times and two of these recovered fumbles led to rial WvWor!. tmnlqje worker moldiv 'to Rether on Work &nd membrs wouW on tneir own from
Navy scores. Joe Tranchlnl. Harry Hurts, and Ned her ve he trl2nabl'L car,?rod start-
Oldham scored the Navy TD's although passer Tom ro (,!,rH''r Cosmic tueeed through northbound
Forrestal won the "outstanding back" award to go I"10 H" ore for Baltimor ?fJ?-' The President selected three northern and three
with Stremlc's "outstanding lineman." TJL81"8 'JfiEK ?JJr southern commission members to Implement a sec-Hard-hitting
Mississippi made Texas sophomores der 0 "ttaf,r A'femt' boUt w- Juflg on of fee avil Righto Act passed by Congress last
pay heavily for mistakes before 79,000 In the Sugar mert wa over $45,000. year. w
Bowl, setting up four of Its TD's by two fumbles, ,r7if .i. .t.irhoid.r The aiel's Job Is to Investigate alleged violations
and interception, and an incident In which a Texas The Coal's nual rort to ito s ngle stocUwWer o( yott ftnd of otner CivU rights and to propose
man got In the way of a Texas punt. Ray Brown reveaM fee exlstenee of a "master nlan .tarcr legislation It believes Is needed to safeguard
was fee ball-ringer for the Rebels as he passeTfor '"Ir.i-ncy for the waterww. Though waMjrtfl thodShfa.
one touchdown and ran for two others, including a r1"' ea"1' durln e next 10 year. It is 2ffJ It Wdport to fee President and Congress by Sept.
92-yard romp wife a. minute to play. "t navnii rnsts w mn di to aterne,flen 9, 1959, two years after fee 1957 civil rights bill be-
nd nrodn-vtf The root's rtayroll bill last year came law. Then it wUl pass out of existence.
Oklahoma didn't blow open the Orange Bowl tilt 07er 3 mUlloh. or whidi oyer 824 million went Hannah was appointed Dec. 23 to succeed former
before 76,31ft at Miami, Fla., until It scored four to non-Trs eitln emnlove' T.t year, also the ra- Supreme Court Justice Stanley F. Reed as chairman,

Mjucnuowns in me iinai period. Dave Baker, forced "! roaie nrct nurr.nases wnaiiiig wno quit to avoid possible involvement as a still ac-

to carry most of the load at quarterback with reg- RetmbUc of Pan".
lilor Pari TVH UmltAj . a a a 1. r xu.

mmwu w MtiL-uiue action, starreo
by passing for one TD and scoring two others, one
on a 94-yard pass Interception return that set an
Orange Bowl distance record.
l!ltwmalIer day-time games, Louisville drubbed
ST4"20' before 12-(fe0 to Sun Bowl at FJ

tive jurist.

Besides Hannah, the group includes former Flo Florida
rida Florida Gov. Doyle E. Carlton; former Virginia Gov. John
S. Battle; the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, president
of Noire Dame University; Assistant Secretary of La-

Dor J. Ernest wuwns, a Negro; and Robert o. atorey,

a, a miH nf th Rn M'Km-e. about $3,848,888

mre hi tolls were collected h h Pnan4 Ca Canal
nal Canal d the Company hopes to hold this divert diverted
ed diverted business.

Ponal TonianQ vrill ho navine more for llOUOr SOOn Aoon 'nt h Tout SKh'nnl nt Cn'uthorn nTnfVinHlof TTvii

Paso, Tex., and Prairie View A M and Texas South- the result of a rise In Panama's toriff. The tariff ver8ify, Dallas, Tex.

shukrjcu 10 a o-o ue oeiore 5,000 m the Prairie was niso raiJl on exnensiveaurom"uc, uwuco
a L. Houston Tex. In a night game before sl radios. It went, down on fertilizer farm ma- The three northerners are on record as opposing
10,500 at Orlando, Fla., the holiday's only upset saw rhinerv. ome foodstuffs and ofe"- mass consumo- j. dberiminationj the three southerners as de-
Fk Tsxas,State n.iD Mississippi southern, 10-9, in frtWes. It win be ome months before the net fenders of segregation. But all have the reputation
the Tangerine Bowl. effect of the tariff is visible. of being moderates within their respective areas.
Abandoned by a i coach who called them "dead'' J"dge E. t P. Tatelmn, outeotoe Cristobal Maais- he State partme7hppedto hire a new science
wiS-jif an? h h84f montbs ago, the Detroit, lions trate who nlani to retire this vear. was named bv adviser soon to help cope wife problems of space-age
bested bad fortune's every obstacle to finish with President Eisenhower as Actlffe Tt.S. District Judge to diplomacy.
fi.r .,rout, of toe Cleveland Browns Sunday for 't In buwrlarv charge nendtoe aeainst Federieo shortly thereafter the department plans to recruit
!iinal, S411 Leairue chamnlonship. 7arwt Redar Judge Guferi" F. Crowe had disdual- scientists for assignment to five foreign capitals to
vTt Rote'" addi&lriustr9 to fee Ifled hlmwlf because Zapata Is accused of burglariz- work on scientific matters. It has 8200,000 earmark-
W i r J?P JtDaiI trade the swap tfeat brought in Crowe's home. ed to finance fee program during the current fiscal
feefrtnmtnG.reen.Bayu.ln Jy-faulttessly led fee 1 year.
Lions to their astonish nir vMnn . ...

cnT teUr wn-'passes and scored Tsoasot KTer cbach

t ...... T3nrtHir oarirpr nopi lov tne i .ions aeaa aim UI1-

$Tm2S?EZ. TOmR0teen enable" just 48 hoursbefore their first exhibi-

D..kt. j e l . .UUUUUUWll.,.

The department's science attache program came to
a halt about two years ago when the last of a dozen
such men came home and were not replaced. Tho
Mi.-. - l i i i..:

i-.VL, ud SSlZJl""' wn want to Wil-d 34-14 in the opening regular season game laW lrTl953 when Dr. Joseph B. Koepfli of California
? !"? y Detroit because he didn't think he'd JtlTZZJl tuT SSSLn ZnSvM the Colts institute of Technology left tho post

wtaed 188 tw. aerlil,s and and San Francisco Fortv-Ntaers In, the tightest tte State Apartment gave money as one of fee
wnliK. Ty? ,.on five Psses. Western Conference race In history basic reasons for death of the program. It also said
nuoacR John Henry Johnson, former San Fran- ,ir thpr wna "must." iame hnildlnff un most of the attaches in fee past were college profes-

.yJN'ner.an5.a ev. mn in fee title drive to the nlavoff in San Francisco where Detroit fought son who took fee Jobs 'for only one year,, a period

ed nnt ii,p Kigw 01 D10CKinK wrme Rote ptefc" back from a 24-7 half time deficit foi

for a heartstop- too short to be

red worth while.

ed out fee receivers, T Z. Part of the problem has been finding a scientist

,',n defense, headed by captain Joe Schmidt, Meanwhile, the Browns had it comparatively easy, willing to give up his present work for the pay and
continually spotted the Browns plays and pierced cHnchtn the Eastern title Dec. 7. desk work of a science adviser to Dulles, The depart-
tne defense, causing fire .pass Interceptions and Detroit's title hopes certainly took a downward ment probably will not be ableto pay much more
renSyerlnlJt(i Browns fumbles. nlunge Dec 8 when nnarterback Bobble Layne suf- than 815,080. The work may -pat appear taterestlng
-ISg.&gSH'fe mJLtfmi jm'X.mMML t:f:mim& :mvkJT;-;.. Z.. : to Klevm wiw Wkes to wcjk lp. laboratory.

SUNDAY, JANUARY' 5 J

PAGE, SPYP



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IMACISkl CPk.ir ... -

rf?lfrJ? wn,c" required the use of ZMJ soldiers and the full cast of "The Naked and the Dead" is being
viewed by Maj. Gen. Thomas L. Harrold, Commending General of the U.S. Army Caribbean. Shown from right to left
in the foreground are Col. Robert W. Garrett, Maj. Gen. Harrold and Col. J. R. Russ.

If
I

15



t: SUNDAY

American

Comic supplement

I J IIJlll I AFTER BBMS 0660 1 H SOME OSE Fl fL CM SKW M 1" 11 1 J
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JUST LOOKING LIKE
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THfi i
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mm.

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WHEN I SET THROUGH

WITH MY HAIR YOU'LL

Jdon't be funny
NEVER. RECOGNIZE
WELL, THE
LEAST I CAN DO
MP.
IS TRY A NEW
HAIRDO
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: THERE,
ENAMEL YOU JUST
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WHY? IT MAKES
VOU EASY TO

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THAT'S ALWAYS

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x
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AFTER 15 YlARS,

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you ip you had

TWO HEADS

V

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READY

FIRST I WANT

YDU TO GO OVER TO

MABEL'S AND BORROW
SOME HAIR SPRAY FOR ME

BOY, THIS IS JUST TM6
THING FOR OUR POKCH
FURNITURE -IT'S NICE

OF ED TO LEND IT TO ME.

1

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MB

fc DID YOU SET HOLY SMOKE I
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llMAgU "ID 8ETTeR

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1 Y K r MH V THAT HA,e ANYWHERE

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I A GREEN WORLP-- 2 my
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TO THE
GAME:
DPESSED
LIKE THAT
OKAY
CATCH PNEUMONIA
BLAME US
vr
i ip
SETTEE PUT MY COW ON .'
ax

BUT ETTA, YOU, CANT

r ifljrj y dt A f- u ULy-Luty-t

wT3

ARE YOU SUBE VOU

DIONT CATCH COLO,

GOING TO TME

GAME fN

THAT
THIN

ri mnm

GOX OH, MOM DOMt""!

j

I &E-Pi-A KkBHr we told ya. j
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VVAMT MV

SLIP THESE

CAP MUFFS

RiR-LIMSO.
Boors on
m mm
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SNEEZED ALL THE WAY
HOME GUESS THEY GOT
OVERHEATED FROM
ALL THOSE HEAW
COATS THEY1
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I TO THEM THAT J 6Vg THifil
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f ssi have a surprise A I N. JJr I
iHiHHrAU. "THAT WuClOUS HfllCBBri AISlD 'K 7 1 ) 7 VOU FORGOT CARf UU VRE SPtU J
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I

Slhlce I STARTED SCHOOL X HAVE A LQTTA FUM

WALKIM' TO AW FROM HOME WITH THE COOL WIMP

Alt' LEAVES BLCWIN'ROUNPMEMISS RELRA

IT fOEVER- ETS TERRIBLE

I SOTTA SNEAK SOMEjQF MY MONEV OUTA ITS

HIDEAWAY PLACE AM SUV SOME BOOTS AM' A

RAINCOAT BEFORE MISS PINE MOTTOES I AlMT SOT

AMY I'M TROUBLE ENOUGH TO HERBY "JUST BEIW

HERE -3. X POM'T WANT HER TO

UAPTA UY MV 7j

CLOTHES, TOO

i in mni in i i

SAYSAH

k HERE BUT THEY 3ET JBBWK I

pi BURIh i
j 1 mHHHi wmmmmwm -q
I'LL PUT MY BOOKS V OH- 1 THOUGHT THAT WAS MISS 1 i f OH.' HOW RARE YOU f SMEAK UP
AWAY AM' THEM I'LL I PlME SITTIN' AT HER PESK, SUT I I SMEAK--UP OM ME LIKE V'JlM
COMB OUT, ZERO-J BjjjpJH rf8HK SB
IflfLPB IS i m I

B"' WAS ONLY

STAMP PO

unperstanp:

JBHhmiss RELPA.71 TO EXCUSE Me BUT THIS

YOUl E T ffl KO" HASNT BEEN PUSTED I

2 1 III OR CLEANED N AN Auc I

' IPI 5 I 1 I'll ACT AT IT 1

HHHfoHPEARi COUSM JULIA IS SoJB
CARELESS WITH HER HOUSED
Xll 3LPCHOXHH

YDU LITTLE SPVJN& SNEAK- POM'T,

Vt?U PARE TELL AMYOME WHAT

you THOUGHT I WAS POIMS ATj

AUNTIES PESK, BECAUSE ITSJ

A LIE

HONEST,

vJEWEL-I

POMT KhJOW

WHAT YOU'RE

TALKlM'BOJn

I CAN
WHAT

UVIN

lT. BMCl FEATUBE8 8YMMCATIS, W0R1J) KIGHT3 BgSggVUD

- 1,1 'JVUHH9 'p mKk

T FIS6ER OUT OM GOLLY!!
JEWEL WAS WOMPER IF SHE

E- privim' at rr '-r'liiirTn meant x thought,

1.. K 6E VAS STEAUN'M
WL MONEY!'. M
WL OH.GCLLV!