The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02342

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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1 I,
SEp. 11" 1957
No.
(
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TOIOIST FLIT ES
Id i:evv Yoriit
AND TO SAO PAULO
&riVVtrrtvoi V (II)
AN INDEPENDENT V jgVl HE OAILY
NEWSPAPER
RIO BUENOS AIRES
Let the people know the truth and the eeuntry U !' --j lAbrmhem tineoln.
- TeL -anam -0975
PANAMA. R.P... TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1957
fflVf CCT3
J2nd TEAR

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" HER FIRST "DAY The new
Miss America for 1958, Marilyn
Elaine Van Derbup of Denver,"
Colo., began her first day with
; the title In "Atlantic City, N. J.
Marilyn had an early morning
run along the beach as she
wore her new crown and car carried
ried carried a sceptre. :
Miss America Says
Girls Should Play
Field In'Teens
T r it" Jr i v
NEW-YORK i UP Marilyn
Van DerBur, riewly-crowned Miss
America of 195- udviged Ameri American
can American teen-age girls today Vtevdaie
as manvvbovs :as Possible sot you
can be sure of
Pfne' 20-yelr
can be sure of marrying the right
The 20-vear-old- Denver ipost-
''debutante., whose1 poise j.

'"" Kellr mold, said-she was opposedf

to the system of f'steadjrV dating

f that has swept trie nation- mgn
ichoolst - '
"I've always dated several boys
" at a time myself and I .think it is
'the only way to find the right
husband,", she said. MThe teens
are an especially important time
to meet as many persons as. pos possible,"
sible," possible,"
Gowned in a white bouffant cor coronation
onation coronation gown that had served as
her debut dress last December,
Miss Van DerBur told reporters
at her first Manhattan press conference-
that she did not have;
"any special boy friend."
She said she enjoyed "very
touch" her date with Chuck Lar Larson,
son, Larson, a U.S.. Naval Academy stu stu-,
, stu-, dent' from Omaha Neb., t the
" Miss America coronation ball and
' "hoped to see him again."
' Miss America's main interest Is
music and : she is majorinx, in
music, p e e e h and political
science at the University of Col-
orado. She plays the organ--a
- talent that- helped her -win ner
. tit'.eand is a dramatic soprano
with ( aspirations ,t toward musical
comedv roles.,
: "I like the classics best but I
do' special jam arrangements on
the organ."-she ;. said. "I don't
like rock. 'n roll particularly but
,1 find Jfty foot-tapping when I

hear it. 1 wouian i' Duy an .t.'y
Presley record but I admire him
for doine what he likes and stick-1
lng to it!" u r 1
Air Force Sergeant

Kcrt Wnest Crespin; 28. anjan when both "cars were alleg-

American airman, was fined $25 ediy bumped oy crespin in mi mi-American
American mi-American ameldenta. :

in KRinna jiaaiciawi
today on a cnarne 01
drivin on Bruja Road at about
8:20 a.m. last Baturday. ' ;
- Another charge against Cres-
pin that of failing to control
the speed of his vehicle while
' driving on Miraflores Bridge a
ahort time earlier, was taken
under advi?ement by Judge
John E. Derrdng.-.
' Both charges afalnst Crtspin
were filed by police officers.
'After beint charred, Cres- ;
pin himself filed reckless driv driv-inr
inr driv-inr charres against a mother,
Mrs. Caroline HUbert Gan, 46.
, American, and her 21-year-old
eon, Richard Kenneth Gau,
- Ji, also an American.
winfher and son had been
drlvine separate cars and were;
bound for their home In Arra.

' SEEK DIE-HARD JAPS
" TOKYO (UP) Japan soon will
sk the Philippines for permis-
ion to send a search party into
the jupeIps of Lubing Island to
rescue two die-hard former Jioa Jioa-rese
rese Jioa-rese oldier believed still hiding
thTC, the TnVyo newspaper Ma Ma-richi
richi Ma-richi reported yesterday.

Mdj. Griffith's
Stirs Guesses

"On, Sept. 30, popular Maj, R,W. Griffith will work'
his last day as a fCanar employe and chief of the Police
Division, ''. i".- "4 1 ' t,f
' With Mrs. Griffith, he will s&il Oct. 2 for the States
en route to his new home in' Phoenix Ariz.

v His departure is due to
police executives.
With retirement parties for the
Chief and Mrs. Griffith, breakmg
out all over, speculation has been
circulating as to who will succeed
him, first perhaps as acting chief,
hm isttr it in annointee. -
Officially noting is forthcoming
as to who may soon ce octupyuis
the Phpf' nffice and Chair.
- But the rank and, file have not
failed to observe that the Senibr
Captain of the four men of that
rank on the foie has on three
separate occasions served as Act-
ing-umei wnne winim w : v
leave.' (Griffith returned i f r p m
leave Jate last month).
The man then serving In act-N
Ins capacity was capt. b.
Dardan, 'Commander of the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Police District. Darden also
trved en -sevorat 'occasions as
Acting Assistant Chief, before
that iob was abolished.,
Griffith has four months annual
i. nnminff so it may. or may
not be, next February before any
one is permaneuuy nicv
The major isgoing" out with $
nrf frvf. months of govern
ment service including 30 ; years
with the canai s rwuce
He's retiring late, as he could
have stopped keeping order on the
Zone a year ago last May.
' Griffith hasa unique "implov "implov-1
1 "implov-1 m.nt record In that he hasilU
Potter Urges.
GU:.nct.in
ITIZenSnip 0, I
n i f m IT 7
ObseryanccJruntu-
7 . " v
Potter aaf cauea
President Eisenhower desigaatmg
Sept. 17 as Citiienshig Day a h d
the oeiod -beginnmg. Sept. 17 and
ending, ftepu
- . ., . hk u. f 'ntietiTurinn
w5..-. i.iaiTts. toeether
with all Othe United ftates citH
tens, fte ruggea 10 1"sc"1""
period vM approprlaU ceremo ceremo-ii
ii ceremo-ii .ni rtitstt commemora
tion of the i signing of the Consti
tution of the united iaies.i .. w
....ffaaafsrf that On SeDU IT
the flag of the United State .te
displayed on pudiic duuui.
Squirrel Held
After Disturbing
Peace At Clayton
- A red-tailed squirrel lias join join-ed
ed join-ed a cow held in legal duress as
th responslbiUty of Canal Zone
police. .
The squirrel la belnsr held be because
cause because It inspired a door to bark
so much that the peace of Ft.
Clayton waa disturbed.-
Since the squirrel has metal
chain collar, it will b held at
rnrnxnl animal oound until, Sod.
18. Then it will be auctioned. If
not SOia, K Will De aeswoyca.
i The cow. found on ;;. Amador
causeway last week, js
ing boarded on the post.
causeway last week, is still be-
iW to Pay $25
nor accidents.
First. CresDin's car bumped
that driven by Mre. Gau while
it was standing in a line on the
east bridge approach, waiting
for the structure to open. She
testified that though she 'had
three feet clearance she was al almost
most almost pushed into. truck Just
ahead. :
Later she stopped near Rod-'
man to report the matter to a
police officer when she saw
Crespln turning into Rodman,
and identified him to police as
having acted peculiarlv.
When she reached home, her
son. whose car had been several
hundred yards ahead of hers on
the brldee, told her of having
been deliberately bumped on the
road by a ear th.r fitted the de de-scriDtion.
scriDtion. de-scriDtion. of Crespin's. Young
uian had also taken the license
nnmher
crespln argued that Mrs. Gan
had nearly forced him off the
road on the bridee approach.
He also charged that young Gau
had driven in a teasing manner,
cutting in and out and stopping
suddenly.
Judee Deming remarked that
the evidence given in the cases
was so much at variance that he
needed further time to analyze
It
All parti ps were told to return
at 2 p m. today.

Retirement
On Successor

cause several shifts among
; 1
d every collet slot en the Zone,
including some that no longer
exist. A
i Darden. at 47. though by no
means' the oldest man on the force
has actually the longest service
record of any policeman now on
duty. He's been7 cop for 23 years,
- Whoever is named to the top po police
lice police job on the C.Z. vacancies
will be created all along the line
that will mean several promotions
among the Zone s olhcets in blue.
;-vz." ; ' 11 '-"n. : 1 -:- ': ;w "r
Calypso Singer
Says He Doesn't
-
Recall Stabbing!
v Calvoso singer Silvestre (Smok
ey Joe) Stoute today claimed that
he didn't remember anything that
happened Sunday when he stabbed
to death a, man who reportedly
had just gone into a bar to get a
drink of water.
The 35-vear-old alypso singer,
who -returned to Panama a.-r few
weeks age after Ifullfilling a con contract
tract contract in Honolulu, told Dist. Atty.
Dario. Sandoval that he had, no
intention- of killing anybody and
does-not remember stabbing Eric
Stewart to deah in the' Graham
bar last Sunday afternoon. .
Sloute "sykotF had ,bee-drftftmg.
)vsaidto ave bad -ght,with
Jaime Williams earlier in the day.
Witnesses say ha went away and
armedv- himself 'with, a 'Darners
scissors. He reportedly returned to
the bar just as the otaa man, wno
was dressed almost exactly -"like
Williams, was leaving tter drink drinking
ing drinking a glass of r water ; while some
friends waited, for Kim outside. 1
According td the ; eyewitnesses,
Sbute attacked Stewart without a
word stabbing him the throat and
killing him almost instantly.
Th district attorney plans to
hear all the witnesses before is
suing an indictment.
00 'Tommies 'Tommies-Here
Here 'Tommies-Here Tomorrow,
En Route To UK
Some 500 British Tommies will
bay reaming the Streets of Bal Balboa
boa Balboa and Panama tomorrow eve
ning after the. ship Captain
Cook ties np.-
. The troops are on their way
home to the United Kingdom
after having taken part in the
nnclear tests at Christmas Is Island.
land. Island.
The Captain Cook, usuallyin
service as "migrant carriar," la
due te dock in Balboa in the aft aft-tar
tar aft-tar having taken part In the
nuclear testa at Christmas Is Island.,
land., Island., VV-' ''''V.- :.-,':
The captain Cook, usually 1rt
arvlat "migrant carries," Is
due to dock i Balboa -in the
afternoon. It is expected the
troops, will have overnight leave
n the Pacific side.
Payna and Wardlaw are a a-gents
gents a-gents for the British ship. .-

TAKING BIBT HOME For the first time, Mike Todd and
actress Elizabeth Tayior proudly dlfplay their baby, Liza, to
photographers as thev Uke the child from Harkness Pavilion
In New York. IUza waa born oo Aug, -

THE PULSE;:
OF PANAMA
A eeneral strike to force the
government to either abolish or
reorganizethe Price Regulating
Office is being discussed by
wholesalers and retailers,, ac according
cording according to a report issued today
by La Hora.
The Price Keguiaung uince ia
accused of arbitrarily setting
Drince ceilings on v consumer
goods, the tabloid said,
: TTnrmer Finance Minister Al
fredo Aleman, manager of the
National Brewery, ; was quoted
today as saying he has no idea
why the brewery has been fined
$25 and ordered jto replace its
bottles hi six months by the
oresent Finance Minister Ruben
D, Carles Pr.
Aleman said the bottles the
brewery Is now using are the
same size as the ones. they
have been, using for more
than 40 -years,. v adding that
they are the same ones the
brewery was using when the
Fiscal Code was promulgated
in January 1956 by. his office
when he was Finance Minis
ter and President Ernesto de
la Goardla Jr. was the man
ager of the brewery.,
;;Th artJBi strike of the doc
tors at the- Obaldla Hospital in
r.hirinnt-was I solved i yesterday
with,, the, lifting. of the suspen
sion oU DT." 1AWS Aguuar, w"
had "been suspended by the medd meddles!
les! meddles! director for refusinsf to ex examine
amine examine patient M the middle
of the night.
Th iwlv-formed Asoclacion
Nacionaf de Locutores INation INation-n.1
n.1 INation-n.1 Radio Announcers Associa Association)
tion) Association) will install its first offi official
cial official board of officers at the Ca-sa-
del s Periodistas tomorrow
nlprirt(irit A la Guardiiv. mem
bers of his cabinet and Other
Kovemment of nciais are exDecv
ed to attend the Installation.
TVi At.tnmev General Of the
wpnnhHft hns reDortedlv agreed
to consider a charge that there
were 1 certain discrepancies u
the arrest of Lester L.- Greaves,
who is serving; a 60-year sen sentence
tence sentence in Gamboa penitentiary
for rape almost ten years ago In
the Canal Zone.
The charge saia Greaves was
rrtjd in Panama bv -Pana-
nianlan detectives employed by
the Canal Zone police, depart
ment t ) i
U.S. CAR FOR "DRIVER
TnKVft UP Local newspapers
praised .Prime Minister Nobusuke
Kishi last week for his "buy Jap
anese SPiriv 1" purcnasuia
small Toyopet auto. They attacked
Kishi today for using an Americas
automobile for a Sunday golfing
trip. .;
COLDILOCKS IN REVERS1
DULUTH. Minft. (UP) It was
the Goldilocks story in reverse at
the MaxrChilds'; nome i&unaay.
The family found a 1-year-old bear
cub sitting dszed on the basement
floor after dropping in wougn a
window. .'v .,.

Faubus Defiance of Integration

Spurs

LITTLE ROCK:, Ark., Sept. 10 (UP)-The Federal Government's patience ran' out on Gov;
Orval E. Faubus today and the Justice Department filed an injunction petition against him for
his continued defiance vof school integration i orders. ft,

i -
ORDERS INVESTIGATION

Washlnson. President Elsenhower 'savs 'that he Sias diredted ;

' Attorney General Herbert Browne! to Investigate the. use Of;
National Guard troops in preventing school Integration at' Litw j
tie Rock, Ark.' The President said Brownell will decide what to' ;
do after hat confers with the Federal judge jwho ordered
, ; Integration vf
Midnight Dynamite Blast Demolishes
Newly-integrated Nashville School
NASHVILLE, Tenn- Sept 1 (CP) A thunderous dynamite

blast demolished a newlr-interrated school here early today,

climaxing a day and night of

testing racial mixing at the nrst-graae level.
Police later arrested three white men sittinr In a car1 near

another of the seven Nashville

ed yesterday. Officers said m detonator was found in the car,
which was parked in frenf of a, school about an hour before

school opening time, j j
The million dollar Hattle Cot-'
ton School, where one Negro at
tended first-grade classea yester
day, waa shattered at 12:45 a.m.
by a dynamite explosion that left
onlv the exterior walls standing,.
No one was injured hut nearby
residents were knocked from their
beds and windows were blown out
over an area of several blocks.
Police bloclmd of streets
raund fnest ef the frasly-into
grated NahviMe schoels e be bewildered
wildered bewildered youngsters atariod arv.
other, day,f claaaes.. .'"j
The" three whit men arrested for
questioning n connection' with the
exolosion at Hattie Cotton were
nicked uo near the Fehr school.
scene of most of yesterday's inte
gration turmoiL '.
Segregationist 'John K a a p e r,
who has twice been convicted for
interfering with integration at Clin
ton, Tenn.. last year, waa active
at Fehr school yesterday and be
spoke to a segregation rally here
last night. .---
Police today raped eff Inte Integrand
grand Integrand lemenfary acheela and
ia seme instances Wt nabedy
tnrewgn the lines but the yevng yevng-trara
trara yevng-trara thentMhren. Evan the par par-nrs
nrs par-nrs aeeampanrinf thtm wro :
twmad back.

Four eersons some carrymgiby any doctor who wanted me to

signs and others riding by in car j star in the hopita! yesterday. -were
arrested at the Glean! The integration leader was at at-Khool,
Khool, at-Khool, aite of jeering and rock; tacked by a group of white men
Oirowinr vesterdav. . yesterday when be stepped from

Some of the score of Negroes
whe besan attending class with i
white pupils vesterdav showed up

ror uif aevvMi amy c,Br. wijujc wmw hi,,i uh vuw..
attendance of both whites and Ne- Shut tie iworth was strvck with
rmea fell off aharolv. I chains and brata knuckles bit

Many wnne parems wne yesier-i
...
day pulled their children out of
classes in a boycott movement
kept them borne arira today.
At Jones school, principal Katb Katb-ryn
ryn Katb-ryn alUIjpaorh said U looks as tf
'bardly aay" duldrea were at-

1 v
f I m
i 1 i t

Justice Department

'At. his
news .conference":
demonstrations and violence pro
grade schools that were integrat
tending classea in the u p p e r
grsaes. ', ;
In one first grade class where
23 students are reeistered. five
had appeared by class opening
rb Minister
Incapacitated
Mincer Beating
' BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Sept 10-
iur-. me Rev. F. L. Shuttles Shuttles-worth,
worth, Shuttles-worth, Negro minister beaten up
yesterday when he tried to enter
Negro children' in white schools,
said he will aaake no such attempt
today at, the police .. patrolled
schools,-' "- '',;
j t "-."" : --.
He would not 'say definitety,
however, whether he plana to make
further efforts at integration m the
future, as be had threatened ear earlier.
lier. earlier. . i-
"I am incapacitated." be said.
"I have been ordered to my bed
a ear containing several Negro
children, including two of bis own.
The incident octurrea in front of
1 1 . .1.
niunn uj yn oars mo im c.
and.was taken to a hospUaL He
was released after treatment
Police were ordered to patrol aC
h ..KmI. a mini avamxt
violeace ahoiOd any further into
gratioa attempts be snaa.

The petition, which could eventually bring Faubus

into open court, was requested yesterday by U.S. District
Judge Ronald A. Davies. - ""

The action, which must

processes, came too late to give Negroes a chance ta en-
roll in a controversial high school here this semester, ; 1

The Justice Department asked for both temporary ;-(
and permanent injunctions against Faubus, Ma.' Gen.
Sherman T. Ginger, state adjutant general Who is con(

IIIBIIVVI "VI .11. I1MWMI MMUI

Johnson, unit commander of guard troops Faubua hat
used to prevent Integration of Central High School. ;
. Faubus, who claims his action was taken to preserve
the peace and prevent violence; has not disclosed whether;
he wilf willingly accept a subpena from the government
,; A hearing.on the petition was set for Sept. 20 at .10

a.m. and 0, S. marshal were
the aovernor. aooarently dismissed
any chance for fan early court
snowaown oeiween me guvei nnicui.
and the Arkansas state officials.
Preiftint Eisenhower, gravely
Worried over the trouble in Ark.
angi,. cheaa an avenue of pa.
tient waiting lit hopes the situa situation
tion situation would clear, up m Little
Reck without h necessity for
drastic federal measurvs. t
Davies was exnected to set a
hearing date for sometime next
week on the government s peu
tinn. ... .- J
fauhua a (freed vesterdav to let
a bi-partisan commission of fellow
governors settle nis integration
deadlock with the Federal govern govern-ment.
ment. govern-ment. ,
While aereemg to the govern-
Ar'a eommusron susgestion of Gov.
TTn.t.r Knrroin of Massacnuseiii.
fauhua atood his eround against
ths 0nvrnmnt. He Siid. "my
conscience wiu oeciear even u
Federal forces intervene ana Diooa
shed results, :;;.-i
r.uhu.' National Guardsmen
around Little Rock's Central
High School tent the delay on in integration
tegration integration there Into its Mcond
And a force of civilians,' led by
an angry parent, prevented six
Negroes from entering a school at
nearby Nortn Luue -hock. -FttmnlA
iiipffested to Faubus
h.t Cm William G. Stratton Of
Illinois, chairman of the National
Governors Conierence, appoint
committee of -governors .from all
lections to aeek solution of the
Little Rock problem.- t j
H said every American was
nrnfoundlr concerned with the si
tuatloa which has "assumed inter
national proportions." 1
.A annbexinan for Faubus said
the New England governor called
rauhua and the Arkansas govern
or immediately accepted hia pro
posal.'- ",. v
Nineteen little NeCToes. n 0 B 0
over six or seven years old, sat
down with whHes m Nashvuie btk
erada.rooma at seven scnoois yes
terday. Far too young to com
prehend wnat we tension ow.kjc
was aooui, ine cnuurm bmw
sily, their teachers said.' ; J
Outside the Caldwell r.. achool,
where three Negroea enroUed, a
notice Insnector and a Negro moth
er were atruck by rocks.
At another, the Fehr school, two
white women were arrested for
thro win rocks and a Negro moth
er was charged, with carrying a
RmriM ceffreffationinst John KSS-,
per was whetting up bis Whites inj
Elsewhere on the South Inte
gration "front" r,
. Integration reeded ejnieKy W
the throe largest of Naeth
Caralinj with- ee Negro, girt,
Darathy Cewnra, who- bed ben
REDS HOST GSRMANS
Tnrvo ftTP WThe Chinese Com
munUt capital of Pelping played
host yesterday to oeiegauow
from both West tast oer-
aaaay. A West German trade dele-
Ration arrived there from Canton
Sunday. At the same lime, Pei-
anilitir VlifTl WOTC nOtt-

The Justice Department, in seek-1 fcilted lasr vaak, returning' to

3.m HinM .A.4ur ntMciinait.1" tela in rtvMM. x v.:.-

ering an East German jnillUry'but his klenuty ; had been e s

Idelegatioa.

( i '' tr"
'' 1 1 ' J1 f
- '' -' .-i j, Tifrt-. -'.','.
;'- , J .:'

Action!

travel through legal court
M, .11. k.WVIf.: I.IMIIVII f
ordered to immddiately erv
Ten' other Negroes were enroilT
ed iirfotmer all-white schools' there ;
and In Greensboro- and Winston-
Salem. :,,-.
At Alexandria, Vs.), just outside
Washington,; an attorney for .'the,
National Association for thesAd thesAd-vancement
vancement thesAd-vancement of Colored People ask ask-ed
ed ask-ed a Federal judge to hold the
Arlington County school board in
contempt for, refusing to integrate -white
schools. U, S. District Judge
Albert V. Bryan set tomorrow as
a day to hear the complaint i
Deputies Seek 6th'
Of Whites Vho
Emasculated Negr i
.-.':-"' ": ? r '.f'!if4
' ntn MTKriW A M Ala. fTJP)
Deputiea today sought the last f
six men' accusea -to ku? ;
mutilating a mentally defici. ;
Negro in what was described t
a Ku Ipux Klaa plot-
Three men were arrested durinj,
the weekend following, detailed
confessions signed by two--men
picked up. Friday, officers said..
The five have been charged. WUhj
mayhem.. ' :
: Deputies 'Said the confession a
inaicatea mat juage Aroi, -vear-old
Neera who haa the men
tality .of .a 4-year-old,, was picked
at random ana attaexea as an..
,examnle to those.' seeking i's
gTation on the buses and ia ..a
schools ; of Birmingham. Aaron,
beaten and emasculated a week
ago; remained "seriously HIT. from
the ordeal., V- -,
Chareed in the case 10 far are
William J. Miller, 28. and i. N.
Griffin, 38, grocery atore clerks ;
Joe PrichelU 31. a construction
worker: B. Floyd. Snd Jesse VV
Ma Dry, 34. uepuues saia rncnp;i
heads the "splinter Juan group
that laid tile plot.
Officers said Miller and Griff, i
told of S meeting last Monday at
a Klan member's home, durin
which it was decided that a Negro
was to be chosen and emasculate I.
The confession indicated the ait
men involved put on robes ari
hoods and rode around in two e
looking for a victim. They apott I
Aaron tilkiae to a Negro worn
friend, took him to the Klaa 1:
and carried out the pus, aeco:
ing to the statement
Deputies" quoted MiHer a
Griffin and aaying 'Aaron
eivea-lhe- choice of emasculit:
or -death, and that after refus 4
either, Aaron oecidea to take t: a
first altmative. Aaron also was
beaten severely and anfiered a
minor stab wound.
; The Negro waa dumped ea t'
side of a road outside a Birrr---ham
suburb,: where be waa la:
located by police.
Investigators said they vi.
the scene of the attack l"r
and found a quantity off
paraphenau'a. White Citizens C
cil bterature and the raior
allegedly used in the muti'r
A aurth maa waa taken i
custody late Sunday, deputies

1



r

A
n
c
1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAHY NEWSPAPER'
lTJESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1957
f AGE TWO

f THE PANAMA AMERICAN
mito mo rviumn ev TM ran AMmiexN mw. IMS. .,
Jf rouNoro av niuon nouNecvcu. in mm
- HAHMODIO AMIA. KDITOa
' J H mtrr P. O. Bo W4, ana. O l.
' .. TELEPHONE -740 tmni
' CA.LI ADOAM PANAHmiCAN. PANAMA H
CfelOM Omet 18.170 CENTRAL AVENUE IITWIIN 1rH A NO TM TNtfT
rSwiQN RtMtUINTATIVU. JOSHUA fOWIM. INC.

- 4S MADMON AVI. NIW Ton. iii

Vta MONT. IN AOVANO

JL

Oe SIX MONTH. IN ADVANCE.
Worn ONI rt. IN ADVANCE

1.70
' O.BO
10. BO

V MAH
S.BO
13 OO
14.00

THIS IS YOU rORUM THI KIADtRl OWN COLUMN
X'Tke Mali' Boa it an opea tormn for rtaaart of Tha Panama A?"1",";
, UHM ara reeaivao gratefully ana are handlad ia a wholly canfidantlal
"T"" ran contribute a lattar doa'f ba Impitltnf if doeia'r appaar tha
east day. Lattaia ara published in tha ordar yecelved. ;
i Plaata try ta keep Hie lattart limited to ana page lenatn.
Identity a letter writers ia hald in strictest canfldanea
" TMi aewipaper anumat ae retponiibllity for atatemeat or epkilem
exprenad in laHan t rom readers.

THE MAIL BOX

I
Sir:

FAVORITE DISLIKES

Labor News
And v
Comment

"No Wiile-rJust an Old'Fashloned Torpedo"

By VICTOR RIESEL
' Meanwhile, back ou the labor
beat... t i f
Ffrom out of the i southland
comes the birth of new blues for

the nation's harassed labor chiefs.

Call it the rank and file blues.

Millions of unionists are restless,

disturbed, wondering if they iave

been led hy men devoted to the
inner circle instead of to them.

With the honest union leaders

trying to handle the hottest crisis
since John Lewis first took a walk,

many a local labor official has

developed delusions of grandeur

and a "meet me on ine

barricades" 1 bluster. This means

strikes and toueh. damaging walk

outs wmcn 'can spread use Asian

flu.

The wildcat epidemic has begun

-i L Peoilewiio 'whist.; In PubUc places,, such asoffices res

tauranU, and the nice. & common i drsch whisM has hit at the pulsing-hea? ot
pnertn Rican soldiers, and Balboa High School was Sucnwnisi -lptrie nowor in-

line is a sign of either mental deficiency or a progressing scnizo scnizo-ih?enic
ih?enic scnizo-ih?enic state wherein the todlvidual is lapsing periodically Into
aTeam world. It is not a sign of happiness, rf you think you
ain't mertaUy deficient, better see your psycUateiit.
2 PeoDle who must be surrounded by electric Jans going at
too sueea or they can t do any work. This is probably either a
' balv run down physical condition or some mental feeling that
such fan? imply a degree of importance of position or sWnding.
AUttw sweating will do you good, at least it wlU give otfc peo peo-3...
3... peo-3... JLM..i&t it. von are workinir. ' i

rirrSmta who come to work dressed in theitW

, dress clothes, change oa the jobinto their VWk
clothes, then change again at the end of work into their dress
ctothes it Klves all your neighbors the impression that going
to and returning from, work in such clothes implies that you
Lh.M o hL shot such as a bank president. Try being

yourself, you willTe happier, and anyhow you. are not kidding
anyone. Laboring and the trades is not a disgrace, and to most

Uis ateS common amongst the "little" Americans who, al al-moTT
moTT al-moTT nniv hh as's think that they must always P'

pear in white shirts wirh tie and long sleeves, Us short sleeve

woxjcers nave omy cuuwiuhi vu:l, ,1 j i. w
1. a rnnniM whn brinor their sriolled brats into the

-restaurants, aUow these brats to scream and raise hell all over
the place, then slyly glance at other people to see if they are
aim admirlnB your product. Remember when you are admiring

' your brat that Army statistics show 50 of them are defective
to such a degree that they can't pass a common Army examina-
11.. MmnmW that, for everv brat you can turn out, any

resident of Calidonia can turn out three to your one, at less cost,

bother, and pain; Sour Pus.

, f LAND RUSH
Esteemed publico:
' i t -rv,. tn ho that ton mnrh nreoccuDation are being had

by our people about what we are going' to do with those lands
ihint. rvrintma ar divine back to us. There is nothing to

worrv ahout. Already Mr. Chain Gang, the well-known Hindu

second hand merchant is giving reduced rates on third class
lumber and is selling it by the trucks load. The trespassers and
vagos have already picked out the sea view lots in PaitlUa and
some even on the railroad tracks in Panama where they are go go-in
in go-in toibUld their mansion. You think it is bad now with scum

settlements .all over the city where every .tourist can. see tnem?
wait if mv friend and dear amieos. ; just wait. 'iv-

x tit. nmnon tinv new RAttlementa with fancy names such

, aa Freightard Vista, PaiOlla Hills, New, New Cristobal, New'
A New Cristpballto, Sandoval Dump, and Room 308 Cristobal High

That's right, my amigos, the authorities will have to Jump
last if they want to get the High School building before the va-gos-wbo
move quite fast. What's that you say? The authorities
, wiiLorevent any such grab? My dear friends and amigos. Let
me give you the basic rule in Panama governing authorities. ....
1 Biile A If it's going to cost us a vote don't do it
and the vagos have votes.
1 Z This will be very interesting to see, practically a photo fin finish
ish finish between the vagos and the authorities as to who gets the
Qringos ex land (or should I say the Ex-gringos land)? A purely
' academic Question.

eaiuaos,
Pepe Picaion

r

SCOUTS AND SCOUTMASTERS

t wax deliehted to see the picture in the recent Sunday

. newspaper of our Boy Scouts who represented Council 801 at

yaucy Forge mis summer, x oniy wisn a urge picture oi uie
Scoutmaster and the two assistant Scoutmasters could have
. appeared.
Each of the parent involved have taken opportunity to
thank Bill Taylor, Rudy Gangle and Sgt. McBride for giving up
lb much time this summer to take the boys to Valley Forge, but
I would also like the Canal Zone and Panama City public to
know what these men did.
Not only were they iesponslble for a group of boys from the
Canal Zone but also for several boys from Panama and several
American boys who live in Colombia, all of whom, made up pa pa-'
' pa-' trol 18 at the Jamboree. It is good to know that we have men
' like these who believe in what the scouting program has to
offer boys.
j And while giving thanks I would also like to thank Mr.
Townsend and his committee who worked so hard this summer
encouraging the children in competitive swimming.
; I saw a letter about the Council's financial need. I hope all
parents will contribute something. I have already given mine.
- One Who Appreciates

NU SPELL

sir:

Thanks for the recap on the Sopa Borracha. I can guess
that a "wax-line pan" means one lined with -wax paper.
, Your columns are a goldmine of news not available else elsewhere.
where. elsewhere. It was interesting, to glean from the same page as the
teclpt:
That Prime Minister Macmlllan "is to quit London for a
Commonwealth tout in January." Hope he can make a atopoff
in Panama.
That 8fe Riley E. Withers of D Battery, 784th AAA, has been
presented with a "bronze clash." Huh?
. That psychologists are "wondering what a female eonqust
of tht moon'' will do to masculine pride. Eh?
Signing off now, to try that recipe.
Wanld-B Ceok

JUST RECEIVED
NEW SHIP5IXNTS
OF
18 KARAT GOLD
CHARMS

i

1

morcuno
Jewellers

the land the electric nower in

dustry. It threatens to darken

many a itv a hundred cities,

to be specific, between now .and
the end of the year. It hit first
in the south while most of us were

covering the rackets or flying a
cross continents.

It hit the Florida Power and

Lisht Co. on July 3. Members of

th International Brotherhood of

Electrical Workers wanted a plant

supervisor fired. He had a 30-year
record with the company." There

was a wildcat strike, the first in
the public utility field in decades.
. Some of the men Sat in the plant.
Some simply refused to work. Oth Others
ers Others picketed the Fort Lauderdale,

Fla., plant, me state s two u. a
Senatoni stood bv. alone with Pen

tagon officials, ready to "introduce

emergency legislation in tne. con congress
gress congress up North. S

For some 10 days the Pentagon
fretted. This company supplies
power all the way from Miami to
Coco site 'of the (Big Missile.
Our military knew that the Rus

sians had been firing red rocKets.
We have a timetable which could
have been disrupted if power lines
failed somewhere along the road.
But the Governor, Leroy Collins,
intervened. The national union
leaders. Gordon Freeman and Joe

Keenan, roared. The wildcat end

ed. But it was a warning. xne re regional
gional regional leaders would bet hack.
They wanted a seven percent in increase
crease increase 18 cents in a field where

the average Is a .nickel increase.

No pa jam a gameV this. There's
high voltage here. The contract is
now being discussed. Industry, and

labor people I've just tauced witn

say that some parts of southern

Florida mav eo oars suaoeniy.

So may scores of cities in Ala

bama. There, the Alabama : row

er and Light Co. was .struck by

another IBEW local aounseiea
by the same legal mind now brain brain-trustinff
trustinff brain-trustinff the Florida utility union-

Joe Jacobs oi Atlanta.

The Alabama Power and Light

Co. strike ended the other week

onlv after the national union presi

dent telegraphed a tough warning
to his people not to paralyze the
state. Such a day would be known
ai the dav Alabama stood still, but

it would also be known as the day

an angry nation would scream mat

it had enough.
'Now contract neeotiatlons be

tween the local unions and the u-

tilit, have broken off. Once again
observers say that some of the na

tion's biggest steel and experimen

tal defense installations may sud

denly stop pulsating, a strata may
break at any minute, despite its
discouragement by tthe national
leaders. J

Alabama Power and Iagnt cov
ers the state's biggest citifes, from

Mobile to Birmingham and many

points feeding into Huntsvllle,

where some oi tne worm s weigni-

lest brains are working on the

world' weightiest weapons mis-

sues.

From Kansas City. Mo., home of

Kansas Power and Light, to the

high voltage Niagara-Mohawk Co.,
which rushes power into the heavy
concentration of steel, aircraft,
tool, auto and some secret weapon
plants, there's tough bargaining at

the tables. Everywhere 'there is

talk ef strike. -.

Between this day ana New Year s

day, some 100 public utility con

tracts expire, as nave uwse in ine

south where FBI men were aieneo.

to head wff a neurosis known as

cable-slashing, which afflicts some

people when a plant is tnui aown

and there u jitue xo wnue away

the time.

Since there are about 400 elee-

trie utility contracts across this

land, 100 expirations means xnai
...It I am M.tina1. M.

XUUJ 3 pavcni Ql .uuu yvrw-
er may be disrupted for a day or

a week, sometime tnis year.
, What disturbs observers is the

militant barricade mentality of
many local leaders. Surely there

are grievances. Surely the regional
chiefs have a right to ask for more
money. But this union has tradi

tionally been a responsible force in

the public utility field. The power
in the national leaders' hands has

mr eon to their heads.-

Obviously the local leaders be

lieve this is the time for defiance.
Everybody's looking elsewhere.
Not only ia the electric industry.
There' are power pUys coming in

all fields. :-f

Shootin, In The Minors :
By BOB RUARK V ;

These minor fracases, such as captive by his own court, since he old bomb tomorrow for some bad
t i iL .. I J L' 1 it. i. l a

ikuiyVJasiiikgto:
ifwlERRY-G0-R0U;.'D

ly DttW MAUOW .,.jt.,

X

v

WASHINGTON Senator Mar

garet Chase Smith of Maine,: only
ady Senator, has now won her

battle with the Air Force, i.

She has blocked the promotion of

Air Force glamor boy Jimmy
Stewart, who played the part of
Lindbergh in "The' Spirit of, St.
Louis" to be a brigadier general.
She also blocked the promotion, of
John Montgomery, vice president

of General .Electric.

How she did it is a little-known

story oijne lady, plus a determin determined
ed determined assistant, against the' brass

hats. -f -'

The backstage" battle sot tough j

u a :u i .ni'

m nines, nu jurte yiuyaganuisis
accused Mrs. Smith's assistant,
Bill Lewis, of holding up other
promotions because he was not

promoted himself, .

They also put out stories that

Mrs. Smith was irked because she
wanted to be commander of the
WAFS in time of ; war and the Air
Force turned heT'down; :

It was also intimated that Mrs.

Smith..-wanted to extend her own

reserve commlssionvas a Colonel
in the WAFS, which expires auto automatically
matically automatically -December 14 when she
reaches the age of 60 first, be because
cause because she didn't want her aee

known and second, because she

wanted continuing reservist pay.

This was obviously erroneous be because
cause because Mrs.- Smith has made i no
secret about her age, spells it out
in Who's Who for everyone to
read. ',"'.'

Real fact is, that Senator Smith

is the author of the Reserve Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Act. contends oast ; wars

have been won ninety per cent by

the reserves, that their training in

peacetime must be thorough.

MRS. SMITH DIGS -'-

the current nonsense between the
Imams and Sultans, the petty re

volution In Cuba, the business m

Syria, the contained but horrible
all the finor league shootin' and

all th minor league shootin' and

hollerin just make Bernie Ba-

ruch's forecast a decade ago stana
up stronger.

In effect, the old gentleman said

that the real danger of atomic

warfare was not so much vested in

the major powers, but would come

in the days when the second, third,

and right on- down-to-no-raters

found atomic construction so cheap
that you could start the end of the
typrld "with a zip gun-type bomb.

urn ui we uesk aKieuusu bivuuu.

a man who also writes, is JNevu

GhntA anri ha ha -fuck tartiirran ,et

horrifying novel along the same

lins in which something like Al Albania
bania Albania chucks a do-it-yourself bomb

at somebody else and the fat s lit

erally in the fire. Everybody thinks

everybody else donet he dirty need

and commences to burl dissolution

at everybody else, until the fallouts

eat up the world.

I am certain that if. in the av

erage Cuban revolution, the rebels

could cook up a homemade bomb
from the mountains of Oriente,

thy would steal a Piper Cub and

drop one on Havana on the off-

chance of discommoding Fulgenclo
Batista.

Batista is being held more or less

IE I r 1 L

What you don't know moy no

hurt you. but H aura anoMs you

signed himself on for the extra use by some bad, little boy.

term, because they don't want the
stealing to stop.: Nearly all Latin
American governments steal their
countries blind. The main trouble
with Batista's self administered

tips was that he assigned the loot

to the good lady he divorced and
she went. off with the toys. So he

had to stay on and recoup his

losses. He'd like to quit now, but

his bully-boys won't let him. f
But if a revolutionary in a chro

nically anarchy ridden, country

can raise ail tne tuss mat is going
on in Cuba, with a handful of peo

ple," figure' what Yugoslavia could
do with a rusty A-bomb against E E-gypt,
gypt, E-gypt, say. Egypt would- think we

did it, and we would think uussia
did it when the Gippos hit us, and
we would, bang Russia, which
would let one fly at Germany, and
Germany would have a bit of a

bash at; Britain, It. would get toi

be real noisy, and besides,, I don't

thinK my sinuses could stana it tor

very long..
The problem Is there unless some
sort of really rigid control on this
death dealing dandruff is im implemented.
plemented. implemented. Because as our John
Foster Dulles, the lady killer (ac (according
cording (according to Carol Burnett, the sing singer)
er) singer) points out, the Stockpiles are

building throughout the world for
peaceful purposes. What could be

a stockpile for electric powers yes yesterday
terday yesterday could get turned into a nasty

In the old. early Nazi days.

when Hitler was building .. his

Brown-shirts into a force, every everybody
body everybody said: Oh, no, this is no army;
this is a youth movement, a con

clave of agtriculturists and birdr

watchers, as the Hitlerjugend

marched through the streets.

One of the funniest pieces West West-brook
brook West-brook Pegler ever wrote had to do
with a stenographer r hitting, the
spacebar of her- typewriter and
shooting the boss. It is not entirely

unappucaoie to tne present.

mi

.xne smart ioiks nave got to tne
point now where they say -that

anyDooy wno can, aflord, to bu a

hunk of Uranium, 233 and hirers

couple of myopic- scientists can
build a homemade atom bomb.
Crude, yes. But boomr yes, as well,
The stuff which started the eter

nal seven year itch is getting
cheaper and more easily available,
and I imagine that there are sev

eral oil rich sheikhs, as well as
minor nations, who could dip into
the cracked cup behind the clock
and come up with enough moo to
at Jeast make a down payment on
enough stuff to start the process
which might blow up-the world.

Sometimes, especially with a

hangover, I wish Einstein had
been' aa interior decorator.

C-A-l-L-WI-G
ALL ATLANTIC SIDERS

Caiiina all -Atlantic Sidt

9 .......

Now you TOO can. enjoy
HI-FI in its maximum

expression

And it must be

GRURDIG
1 (German made)
HI-FI of course!

We have Special ; Duty-Free
Prices' ior you : of course I

MUEBLEItIA

. V:-

)
w ) I

?:,

' : i;r

FAR-TON--. I :

: ; 1 'AV

No. 26-109 Central Ave. Calidonia

So when the Air Force recom

mended eleven officers for: promo promotion
tion promotion for brigadier or malor een-

erals, Mrs. Smith discovered they

included big-shot executives who
hadn't handled an airplane.: for

years. f

She and her' assistant did What

the Senate Foreign Relations Com
mittee has rot dono with ambas

sadors, such as Maxwell Gluck

She dug into the background of

eveijr ouicer,
In doing totha caught tha
haad of Air Forca personnel," Lt.
Can. Emmatt "Resla" O'Don.
nail In many mis statements of
fact and cracked down en him
for wanting te -ehanga forty
three of the forty-nina pages of
testimony In answer to Mrs.
Smith; five ef six pages, tn an answer
swer answer to Sentor Stennjs of Mil Mil-sissippi;
sissippi; Mil-sissippi; three out ef three
pages in answer to Senator Bar-
(rtft of Wyoming; and two out of
four, pagat In answer to Chair Chairman
man Chairman Russell of Georgia. f-

Mt. Smith sent i the testimony

back telling O'Donnell to confine
himself to editing for grammar,

not cnangems answers. -.--

During the course of the testi

mony, O'Donnell brassed that he

had kicked 68,000 men out' of the

reserves because their, traimne

wasni gooa enough. - vt
"In view of this aeveritv.". mier-

ijd Senator Smithy Vwhy are you
promoting Brig. Gen. Robert L.
Smith, whose record isnt good en enough
ough enough either?? t

LYNDON'S FRIKND
She referred to the eood friend

of Senator Lyndon Johnson of Tex

as who is president of Pioneer Air
Lines of Dallas. ,- v

He had only one 15-day tour of

duty in eight yearsi Mrs. Smith

pointed out, in direct violation of

Air orce Reserve requirements.

O'Donnell, however, tried .to show
that Mrs. Smith was wrong. --

"Senator Smith," he flajed up,"

general amiui was on duty Dec.

10 to Dee. Z1J1956."
"I don't see that on the records
supplied byihe Air Force," com commented
mented commented Margaret. ,.
"Dee. 10 to Dec. 31, emphasiz emphasized
ed emphasized O'Donnell with great vicor.

implying that the lady Senator did

not know what she was talking a-
bout.

She did. He didn't." When the
transcript of O'Donnell's testimo testimony
ny testimony came back, he had deleted bis
answers, Mrs: Smith refused to al-1
low the deletion. -,
Mrs. Smith prastad O'Donnell ';
, to explain -the double startdrad
for reserves. .which fiwd 48,000
reservists but promoted an air-
line ; axtcutjva despite his lary I
training record. 4 "',
He replied:- 1
"Well, even though he hasn't so
many points; he is in the airline

business." -s -1 ' 1 ,.

Note As a courtesy to Lyndon

Johnson, Smith's -promotion was

linally okayed by the Armed serv

ices Committee.

HELPED HIS TAXES '..-
Senator Smith ;also pointed out :
trat John Alison of Nortbruo Air.

craft had not done a single 15-day
tour of duty in nine years. How v

ever, ne was imauy oaayed tor

promotion, 1 K

Wot so another business execu

tive, J. B.-Montgomery, who re-r

tired from the Air Force as a

temporary major general to take

a lush salary with American Air

lines, but who now wants to come
back into the Air Force as a re-"
serve officer, thereby drawing -double
pay.
Mrs. Smith did some digging,
found this would be a bonanza to
Montgomery income taxwise; that :

this was why he haun t taken his

regular retirement pay when he -left
the Air Force. '

Montgomery, now with General

Electric, is one of a growing7

group of officers who get out of
the regular service to take jobs In
big business, then draw double
pay retirement or reserve bene benefits,
fits, benefits, from the government plus'

salaries from private business.
Mrs. Smith won. Montgomery

was denied his promotion.

Whenv actor Jimmv Stewart's

name came before the committee,'
Senator Smith showed that in 11 -years
as a reservist he had taken
only one 15-day tour of duty this
only last year just before he was
to come up for promotion. v. v
Despite this zero training record,
he had been given a mobilization
assignment as deputy director of
operations for the Strategic Air
Command which reauires expert

knowledge.

"Is it true that Colonel Stewart
has had eighteen hours as -first

pilot of a B-52?" asked Senator

Smith, referring ot an inspired Aif
Force story.
"No," replied O'Donnell.
"Just what aircraft in the Air

Force is Colonel Stewart now cur--rent
and authorized to fly as a
first pilot?" pressed Senator
Smith. ,f ,

"None.'reDlied O'Donnell. '

Jimmy Stewart rwat not prdmot-M
ed. i'

Moral: It doesn't nay to irsue

with a lady,

Lt: Co!.: James? Moore
::' '';-:Yy y,;:y :iyyA:.:,

Now Deputy fPost ;;:
Commander Of Amador

Lt. Col, James A. "Moore; until

recently professor of military"
science and tactics at the Uni-

versity of Idaho, has taken pverv

the duties of deputy cost com-

mander at Fort Amador. ( ii

; Moore s previous overseas serv--
ice : Includes duty with the X

Corps in Korea as chief of civil
affairs irom sept, 1951) to Dec.

1951. .durine which he nartic

Dated in -the Inchon ; Invasion.

He also has been stationed in
Japan as director of recreation,

for the Far East Command. ,
The couonel, who holds th
Legion of Merit and the Bronzo
Star Medal with cluster, is a
1937 graduate of the University
of Idaho. He and his w!fe Dor -othy,
are living at Tort Amador.

Wiiirwit n

THE WORLS'S

W0JT 'Z?jt IEAOTIFUL

' From $20.75 10-piece place selling

CHINA"

THG ((
OUTVV

SBBBF BJW
T""
Z1Q7H

m:nton headquarters

161 CENTRAL AVENUE, PANAMA

c



if

!
Tuesday, September u,' ms?
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT VAXLJ NEWSPAPER
PAGE TBSEB
T
19

i I 1 y 1 i
.. -"iiis:. ...
' 1
i:iss:ii:;5:5ii?;i:?il '.
i .1 4-if-- '-Jti. f -, ;

A PRESENT FOR MAMIE Rhode Lsland Gov. Dennis Roberts (left) presents a silver bowl
to Mrs, Eisenhower as the President looks on following their arrival at the U.S. Naval Air;
Station, Quonset Point, R.I.? The -Eisenhower s were en route to Newport, RX,; where they,
are 'spending their vacation. 1

Movie-Maker Launches Search
For Wistful, Precocious Girl

HOLLYWOOD (UP) Mastee
movie maker' George Stevens
launched a worldwide search to

day for a girl to play the title
role in "The Diary of Anne

Frank."

He is looking for the "living
counterpart'' of the martyred
teen-aged heroine who wrote the

touching story or ner me oi niaing

from the mzis.

"I'm not trying io build a star,"

says Stevens, -rm not loowng tor
an acfressj either.' We hope to
find a ; girl between the ages f

13 and 18 with the basic qualities
of Anne Frank. -

"She must be wistful, thoughtful

and precocious. Her personality
hould? be at one appealing",
lympathetie, gay and optimistic."
Temple Types Out
Stevens; who made "Giant" and
"Shanej" is not looking for a
miniature glamour girl. Shirley
Temple types are out
The director., asks everyone who
knoes a youngster who fits the
qualifications to write him in care
of 29th Century Fox Studios,
Hollywood. Studio" representatives
will attempt to check out every
lead.
"Our; search is especially inten inten-i
i inten-i fiV sive in -Amsterdam (where Anne

I 7 wrote her diary). New York and
v- Tel Aviv," he,: added-, ,Bufc we

ai not limiting the Search;
f-t speech accent is all, right,

but the girl must speak fluent

English." .",,..!(.;.

Stevens went on to say that he

will distribute photographs of Anne

to give people an idea of the type
nt mrl Via wants '. Ua r? tvi ife Viii

ever, that physical resemblance
to the original Anne Frank is sec

ondary.

Decided Against Stars

"We considered stars for the

role in the beginning, lie said,

"but decided against it. Susan

Strasberg (who played the role
on Broadway) and Natalie Wood
were among them. Now we def definitely
initely definitely want a girl who has s had
no acting experience at all. -,

"Every intelligent human beinB

is capable of playing one role to
perfection. Just as it is said that
everyone has one great story to
write.

"It is auite likely the girl who

plays ,the role, will never appear
in another movie."

Stevens traveled to Amsterdam

earlier, this summer to talk to
Anne's father, Otto Frank Both
men agreed that casting the lead

role is the single most important
element .of, the film., ;.: ,

"We won't turn ai camera, until

We' find- !the right girl," Stevens

concluded. "And wnen I say 'right,'
I mean the one girl in the world

wno is perfect for the role."
Zenith Radio dorp.
Is Big Winner
In Anti-Trust Suit

! By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service

NORTH (t 1
K5S
If 10 T S 4
AK432
7
WEST EAST
44 AQJ103
88 33 i
08 J109S
J9654 AKQ2
SOUTH
AA98T
1 478
"' 108S
East and West vulnerable
North East Sooth West
Pass 1 Double 2 .,
3 Pass 8 Pas
4 V Past Pas Pass
Opening lead 5 1

; (NEA Telephoto)
SURRENDERS Harry
fitromberg,. indicted with 43
others on charges of conspir conspiring
ing conspiring to violate., the narcotics
law, Is shown in New York
after surrendering to U.S. At-
tomey Paul Williams. Strom Strom-berg
berg Strom-berg )s accused of mastermind masterminding
ing masterminding a 20-million dollar a year
narcoltlcs smuggling ring.
Stromberg pleaded innocent
and, was released in $20,000
bail. ,v

BriUnnlca Junior Encyclopedia
Daylight savings time, an irri irritation
tation irritation for the farmer and the
blessing of city people, isjnot a
new idea. When Benjamin
Franklin was living in France in
the 18th century, he suggested
"fast time. It, was not adopted,
however,'; until World" War I,
when It was tried as sr measure
to .counteract electrical power
shortages. v"

CHICAGO (UP) i- Zenith Radio

corp. today announced the settle
ment of its l-million-dollar mon
opoly suit against Radio Corpora'
tion of America.

. Attorney Thomas C. McCnnnell

did not reveal the amount of the

settlement. He said the figure was
"very substantial.'' and that Zen-

ltn recovered "more than any

private organizatzion has in the

history of the courts, in an anti

trust suit."
According to unofficial reports,
the amount was between 10 and
11 million dollars.
The settlement, he said, also
opened foreign markets for Zenith
products.
Zenith had charged that RCA
conspired with Westinghouse
Electric Manufacturing Co. and
14 foreign electric companies to
bar Zenith from the world mar

ket.' Westinghouse and the foreign
firms were named as coconspir

ators, but not defendants..

Stassen Insists
London Talks Have
Not Collapsed

Afrayoftop ; stars heads bigcast

hi, spectacular j urn umhu

7f. V H

a;

. ... ... V 1

The career ef a fabled land's most extraordinary fi figure,
gure, figure, the exotic splendor of eowt nd harem and the vast
operations of medieval warfare -are the ? background Ior
what promises to' be the movie year's most colorful and
writing spectacle, "OMAR KHAYYAM- OPENING TOMOR TOMORROW
ROW TOMORROW AT THE CENTRAL, the Vista Vision Technicolor ad adventure
venture adventure romance will dram a tire the fantastic career of
Eleventh Century Persia's celebrated soldier-poet-scientist.
A brilliant array of stars, a, massive list of anpportinr play-

era and hundred. of extras enact the storr of intrirue,
romance and mAilary adventure.-Cornel Wild portrays

Omar, and starring with him are Michael Rennie, Pebra
Paget, John Derek, Raymond Masse j, Yma Sumac

WASHINGTON, Sept. 10 UP)
Presidential adviser Harold E.
Stassen insisted, yesterday that
the breakup of the London disar disarmament
mament disarmament conference was "not a col collapse'1
lapse'1 collapse'1 and did not rule out even

tual agreement.
He returned from the meeting
of the 'five-power United Nations
Disarmament subcommittee still
displaying some of the optimism
with which he entered the sessions

five months ago.
Stassen said Soviet refection of
the 11-pointl-Western plan meant
the subcommittee would buck the
problem back to the full 12-nation

disarmament commission. He said
"The next major move should

come from Moscow."

"I want to emphasize, he told

reporters, ."that this is; a matter

of a recess, not a collapse: it is a

matter of an interval, not a break

off.

I believe the, day will come

when we will reach agreement on

first-step disarmament plan

The nations of the world know

nuclear war would be a great loss
for everyone."
He said he believed it would be
possible to move on to a first-step
agreement "if the Russians would
express willingness to stop pro

duction of fissionable materials
for weapons uses."
The United States has main maintained
tained maintained that the production ban
should be tied in with the Soviet
proposal for 'a ban en nuclear
weapons tests. But Russia would
not accept this' formula.
Stassen said he would report to

Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles on the wind-up Of the Lon London
don London parley hut did' not indicate!
whether he also would check in

with President Eisenhower at
Newport,' R.I.'

The came was duplicate And

South tieclded to put in a, light
take-out double against his vul vulnerable
nerable vulnerable opponents..
North, with a maximum pass
and support for any unbid suit;
forced South to chpose a trump
by cue bidding In his. opponents'
suit and South promptly found
himself in a game contract, a

West opened his fourth best

ciuo. 'East woo with-the oueen

and continued the suit and West

snowed that he had started with
five clubs by following with his

lowest, mat incic was jrunea in
dummy and a low heart led.

East played the king and South

won. .-

South had a mighty good

count on the East hand by this
time and reasoned that he had
started with 4-4-4-1 distribution.

This left West with only two

cards each in diamonds and
spades and South promptly

worKea out a nice squeeze a-

gamst East to produce live odd

ana a top score.
, All he did was to trumn his

last club and lead a low dia

mond from dummy.

West won with' the aueen and

returned the suit; as good a

piay as any. goutn won m dum dummy
my dummy and drew trumps. He dis discarded
carded discarded a diamond and a snade

from dumrny-and sure enough
the squeeze had operated. East
had no way to guard both
spades- and diamonds. He chose
to unguard the spade. Declarer
might -miscount that suit but he
couldn't miscount diamonds.
South did not miscount. He
made the last five tricks with
the ace-king of diamonds and

the king-ace and a small spade,

Color Clues

Answer to Previous Puxilo

I ACROSS
' lDrab color ;
I 4 Sky color
v 8 Light browns
- J 12 Goddess of
1 infatuation

18 Operates
14 Region
15 Legal matters
16 Christian
denomination
18 Landed;;,)

1 properties :
: 20 Bare v
31 Falsehood
' 22 Worthless

table bits
24 Sacred bull
2 Sloth

27 Greek letter
20 Is unable
32 Slanted type
34 Take In
35 Testify

3 Moines,

lows
37 Decades
39frees
40 In this plae
41 Pronoun f
42 Of a rellgio
, doctrine
45 Unnatural

49 Made
' operative
81 Australian
ostrich
92 Always
83 Center of
an apple
54 Tear ..
88 Soap-makln
tram :
, 58 Sea eagles"
57 Temale
asint(ab)

TSTTgrg fgryna IjuUm
ImcK t i r iE $ et
5 n X 5 STII1 ETI
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s fifty r?
Ur" Xi.tr '"58?
5 1 A LJ Tint ? F 5'
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I 5 r Z 'A lg
! y i ; i ioi E r o
6nt 5 Wffl f io J

DOWN
1 Venture
3 Shoshonean
. Indians
3 Young birds
' 4 Animal
- 5 Moon T
8 Concord
7 Superlative
suffix ..

8 Pastries : 28 Complete ' 41 Conceals
9 Operatic i olo 27 Monasteries 42 Prayers
10 Close : 28 Female deer 43 Rant i'. '.
.11 Went lower 29 Chills . 44 French
nperceptivt 81 Belgian' ," .-. ; islands
19 French river seaport : 48 Sea bird
23 Incursions 33 Spring month 47 Give forth
24 Sour 38 Wise old man 48 Deceive
25 Window glass 40 Filaments 50 Pitying etfd

i rTTJ l U. li h j Is H 16 III
iT""" IT"" R
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I I I I I II 11 II lit

Federal Grand Jury Indicts
Stern, Wife In Absentia

Americas Church
Leaders Gain New
Unity At Oberlin

OBERLIN. Ohio (UP) Church

leadera aereed- today that impor

tant progress toward Christian

unity nas oeen acnievea at me

Oberun conference ot 47 rrotes

tant and Orthodox denominations

The conference will end Tues

day with adoption of "a message

to the churches summing up me

results ofe lent days of unity talks

by nearly 500 leading theologians,
ministers and laymen.

The message is expected to call

on local churches throughout

North America to continue discus

sion of issues raised here at thou thousands
sands thousands of interdenominational 'con

ferences on the community level.
Dr. Samuel McCray Cavert, ex executive
ecutive executive secretary of the U.S. con conference
ference conference for the World Council of
Churches, ssid it is necessary for
"rank, and file C h r i s t i a n to
learn, as delegates to Oberlin
have learned, the "the unity
which they have by reason of

faith in one Lord is of vastly

greater moment than any of the

things that divide them."

Episcopal Bishop Angus Dunn of

Wewport,' K.i.

AND NOW...
THERMAL TOUCH
l fltt Rsrsl rHWlnjv tha autrttlsu,
anutb-vsttrtng lassart ttist m?'
: lotfi torn. Eacs atckags has wmt
t fcolftkwthn'a half Dtsr af Bilk.
:.- lakes fcar al aortioM,
1mI tarn R toaijiit, T.

Washington, D.C.. chairman, said

the Oberun talks nave been con

ducted in the most amicable con

structive spirit he has witnessed

in 35 years of participation of the

worldwide church unity move

ment.

Instead of squaring off to fight

in defense -of their own denami

national positions, he said, the

delegates have displayed a sin

cere willingness to "lcam from

one another in Christian humil

ity.

To many participants, the most

impressive aspect of the confer

ence has been the strongly orthor

dox tenor of doctrinal discussions.

It has been strikingly evident in
all conference working sessions
that America's leading tiieologians

nave returned en masse to bibli

cal Christianity."
Many years ago, a conference
of this type would almost Tt4--ly
have resulted re pitched battle
between theologians adhering to
the classic Christian creed and

"modernists" who doubted or de

nied the divinity of Jesus Christ

NEW YORK," Sept. 10' (UP)

manna uoaa stern, one-time

debutante daughter of a U. S

ambassador to Nazi Germany.

and her husband were charged by

a eaerai urana jury yesterday
with financing a music company
that published "Chattanooga Choo
Phnn uhil aspirins ".nir.."

vuww .. v aw.., a, m buici
for Soviet spies.

Mrs. Stern, 49, daughter of the
late William E. Dodd and a for

mer party girl ofthe leftist move
ment. and her 60-year-old hus

band, Alfred K. Stern, a former

muiti-miuionaire investment bro broker,
ker, broker, have fled behind the- Iron

Curtain, taking their riches with
them.

Government officials said thev

doubted the couple would ever be
brought to trial.

The Sterns were indicted on

testimony by counter agent Boris

Morros, who interrupted his Hol Hollywood
lywood Hollywood movie directing career for
12 years to spy on Russian spies.

Morros, composer of -"Parade of

jne wooden soldiers," said the
Sterns bought their wsy into the
musical spy ring for $130,000.
MastermiiMM By Berla
The ring allegedly was1 master masterminded
minded masterminded by Kremlin secret police
chief Lavrenti P. Beria, who since

has been liquidated.

The Sterns last were seen in

Prague, Czechoslovakia, in Au

gust, with their 12-year-old son.

They renounced their U. S. clti

zeznship and claimed Paraguayan

nassnorts. They said they were

giving up their life of capitalistic
luxury on the Connecticut estate

where they allegedly footed the

bill for formation of "The Boris

Morros Music Company.

Government officials said the

music firm earned so much moiM

ev from the songs it published

that Morros was congratulated by
the Russians. He fell out with
Stern, however, over one of the
company's biggest hits, officials

said.

New Into A Rage
Morros told the grand jury

Stern flew into such a rage over

the title of "Chattanooga ; Chool
Choo" that he and his wife with-1

drew from the company and then
tried to convince the Russians
Morros was .a phony spy. The
company was doing so well, how
ever, Morros said, that they just
told him to keep up the good
work. '
The U.Sborn couple are the

third husband-and-wife spy tesm
indicted on testimony by Morros.

The new indictment brings to sev

en the number of persons charged
with espionage as a result of his

testimony.
Charged as co-conspiratOrs with
the Sterns were Jack and Myra
Soble and Jacob Alhan, who have
pleaded guilty and are in prison,
and George and Jane Zlatovski,
who fled to France before they
were indicted July 8. Mrs. Stern
allegedly recommended Mrs. Zla

tovski for espionage service as a
person dedicated to the Red
cause.

The grand jury said the con con-spirscy
spirscy con-spirscy started in .January, 1940,
but the Sterns did not join it ac

tively until 1943.

Morros, acting at Bena s ne ne-hest,
hest, ne-hest, said he organized the music
company with the aid of Vassili
M Zubilin. then first secretary of

the Soviet Embassy in Washing

ton, and with funds supplied hy

the Sterns.

U. S. Attorney Paul W. Willi

ams said the company carried on

espionage. Then came a "person

ality clash' between Stern and
Morros, he said, and the firm was

broken up. The sterns got back
$100,000 of the rinvestment, he

said.

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, MSI
f AGE FOUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

octal ana vsuterwise
By Staffers '

jPanama

Cnaaammls, Warriors, BirlL, ParlUl an J "DtavA iloufJ L ma,U prtmpti y LututmLn iLum.
Jt miff I. c.aJ lj UpLon.. .v., Panama 2-0740 2-074 Umm 9.00 OnJ 10 a.m. .J?

t i

a J JJ&tis. v 2i-

7fe Mtfo'te fkt&tf

(Mr. Muriel Lawrence i on
vacation.' In her absence, noted
psychiatrist Eric Fromm discusses-
' six frequently askad ques ques-tions
tions ques-tions on child . parent relation relationships.
ships. relationships. His answers are condens condensed
ed condensed from his book, "Man for
rfflnself," published by R I n e e-hart
hart e-hart and Co.)

Q. How do pamnts unconscious'

hr undermine their child's will?

A. The most effective method

for weakening the child's will is
to arouse his sense of guilt,
This is done early by making
the child feel that his sexual striv

ings and their early manifestations

are bad." Smce the child Cannot

help having sexual strivings, this
method of arousing guilt, can
hardly fail.

Once parents (and socletv re

presented by them ) have succeed-

ea in malting the association ,of

MR AKD MRS RICHARD LINDSAY WARWICK are shown leaving the Reformed Church of
Bronx' ille N,y', after their marriage. The bride Is the former Miss Arlene Vadergrift, daugh daughter
ter daughter of Mr,.' and 'Mrs. Joseph M. Vandergfit of Gatun.

GOV AND MRS. WILLIAM I POTTER ENTERTAIN
FOR VISITOR FROM WASHINGTON, D.C.
Gov. and Mrs. William E, Potter gave a supper party for a
mall group of friends on Sunday night in honor of Mr. Le Roy
K. Gerhardt, who is down here representing the General Ac Accounting
counting Accounting Office in Washington, D.C.

Warwick-Vadergrift
Wedding In Nw York
Miss Arlene Vandergrift, daugh daughter
ter daughter of. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M.
Vandergrift of Gatun, and Mr.
Richard Lindsay Warwick, son of
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Warwick of
Bronx ville, N. Y., were united in
marriage at The Reformed
Church of Bronxville, N. Y. on
Aug. 24.
The Rev. Lee Lewellyn Kester,
Jr., officiated at a candlelight
ceremony before an altar decor decorated
ated decorated with white gladioli and chry chrysanthemums.'
santhemums.' chrysanthemums.' The wedding processional and
recessional was played by the
church organist.
The bride, given in marriage by
her father, wore a waltz length
princess style gown of silk organ organza
za organza with lace yolk and small
sleeves. A short veil was attached
to her head piece and she car carried
ried carried white orchids resting on a
prayer book.
Miss Judy Malcolm, maid of

h,onor, wore a pink, princess style
dress with matching hat and white
accessories. Her bouquet was
white and pink carnations.
The groom was attended by
his brother, Mr. Bruce Lindsay
Warwick and the ushers were, Mr.
Douglas Healy a"d Mr. Don Ad Adams.
ams. Adams. The bride's mother wore a
street length dress of blue lace
and linen, blue flowered hat and
matching accessories. Her corsage-was
white sweetheart roses.
The mother of the groom wore a
dress of orchid silk shantung with
white accessories. She wore an
orchid corsage.
Following the ceremony, a re reception
ception reception was held at the home of
the groom which was decorated
with gladioli, asters and roses.
White asters and greens decorat decorated
ed decorated the cake table
Among the out-of town guests
were Mrs. Ralph Malcolm, Capt.
ami Mrs Vinrpnt Fnrrl and daugh

ter Marilyn, Mr. Keith Moumblow,

Miss Joan Brennan, Mr. and Mrs.
Mark Kuehn, formerly of Gatun,
and the bride's great-Aunt and
uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dodd
of Pittsburgh, Pa. and their son

and daughter-in-law, also of Pitts

burgh.
Following the reception Mr. and

Mrs. Warwick left for a honey

moon in the Pocono Mts. in Eas

ter Pennsylvania. Upon their re

turn they will reside at, 16 Bolton

Gardens, Bronxville. New York.
For her going away-outfit, the
bride chose a green linen dress
with white accessories.

Mij. And Mrs. Roger Griffith
Fefd By 200 At Deipedida
Over 200 Atlantic Side friends
attended the retirement party
given for Maj. and Mrs. Rodger
W. Griffith on Saturdey evening
on the Roof Garden of the Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal Masinic Temple Building.
Seated with the honored guests
were Gov. and Mrs. William E.
Potter, Lt. Gov. and Mrs. N. M.
Arnold, Miss Nazezl Griffith, Mr.
L. O. Calloway Jr., Mr; and Mrs.
Donald (Bruce, Capt. and'Mrs. E.
S. Shipley and Mr. and Mrs.
James Marshall.
Suspended over the center of the
garden was a triangle of large

i&xg!t!irisaiii

ENTRY BLANK FOR QUEEN -OF
THE TEENO BALL
Name Age
Box No. Phone No
Height Weight
Measurements
Hobbies
Pacific side teenagers are eligible only from 13 to
19years of age. Dead line for entry blanks is Sat-,
urday, September 14th. Final selection for the can candidate
didate candidate will be held at the Balboa Theatre, Monday,
September 16th at 4:00 p.m. Please bring bathing
suits. Mail entries to Miss Harnett, Box 106, Balboa.

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Tels 1-HS7 S 1CIS

replicas of gold police badges
with pictures of the Griffiths in
the middle.
The Canal Zone Police decorat decorated
ed decorated the hall effectively with vari varicolored
colored varicolored hibiscus,1 bird of pira-

aise ana nanging terns.
Captain Shipley introduced the
speakers for the evening, calling

iirst on governor Fotter 'who men

tioned a few amusing incidents in
Major Griffiths' earlier years on
the Force and said that" although
he only knew the Griffiths for a
year, he could readily understand

why so many people turned out

to wish them the best in their re

tirement. He was followed by Lt.
Gov. Arnold and Mr. James Mar Marshall.
shall. Marshall. Police Officer D.. A.. Waddell
then presented each of the Grif Griffiths
fiths Griffiths with a gift from the Person Personnel
nel Personnel a! Canal Zone Police Force
and Captain Shipley called for an
intermission so thoy could open
them for everyone to see. Mrs.
Griffith's present was a Hakata
Doll, "The Persimmon Man." Ma Major
jor Major Griffith received a gold police
badge with dates engraved on the
back beginning with his applica application
tion application to the Police Force and each
advancement to .Sergeant, Lieuten Lieutenant.
ant. Lieutenant. Captain, Inspector, Assistnat
CA and finally his retirement,
date. Then Sgt. ft. E. Hughes,
Police Officers Waddell and Tully
gavje the Griffiths a complete mov moving'
ing' moving' picture outfit, including cam camera,
era, camera, case, screen, projector and
lights, a gift from all those pres present.
ent. present. Throughout the evening, Po Police
lice Police Officers Griffon and Richmond

took movies of the gathering
which were also given to the
guests of honor.
The Griffiths will sail on the
Panama Railroad ship leaving
Cristobal Octber. They plan to re reside
side reside In Phoeix, Arizozna. Their
daughter Miss Hazezf Griffith, Will
rem aid on the Isthmus. She is
employed by the Army at Fort
Amador, Rodger, Jr., is present presently
ly presently visiting in Newport News,. Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia with his grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. David Potts, retired
from the Panama Canal. He will
enter Virginia Military Institute
this week.

(Continued from rage 3)

sex' and guilt perm anent, : guilt

feelings are produced to tne

same degree, and with tne same

constancy, as sexual impulses oc

cur. t
In addition,, other physical func functions
tions functions are blighted by "moral"
considerations. If the child does

not go to the toilet in the pre prescribed
scribed prescribed fashion, if he is not as

clean as expected, if he does not

eat what he is supposed to he

is bad.

At the age of five or six the

child has acquired an all-persua

sive sense of guilt because the

conflict between his natural im

pulses and their moral evaluation
by his parents constitute a con constantly
stantly constantly generating source of guilt

temngs. v

Liberal and 'progressive sys

terns of education have not chana

ed'this situation as much -as one

would like to think. Overt author

lty has been replaced by anony

mous authority; overt commands

by 'scientifically"' established for

mulas;-v don't do this bjr "you

will not like -to do this."

IN fact, ia many ways this a a-nonymous
nonymous a-nonymous authority may be even
more oppressive than the overt

one. The child is no longer aware

of being bossed (nor are the par

ents oi giving oraersi, ana ne

cannot fight back" and thus devel
od a sense of indeDendence.

He is coaxed and persuaded in

the name of science, common
sense and cooperation and who

can fight against such objective

principles?

Once the will of the child has
been broken, his sense of guilt is

reintorced in still another wav

He is dimly aware of his submis

sion and defeat, and he m u s t

make sense of it. The fact of his

loss of freedom is rationalized as
proof, of guilt, and this conviction

increases the guilt feeling indue

ed by the cultural, and parental

systems of value.
Liberian Tanker
Aground In Mouth
Of Suez Canal

SUEZ, Egypt, Sept. 10 '(UP)

The 21,262-ton Liberian tanker

Petrokure, loaded with oil from

Kuwait, went aground at the

southern' entrance to- the Suez Ca

nal during nigh tide last m i d-

night.
Officials said the shin would

have to lighten its load before

tugs could free it. Other Suez Ca

nal traffic was not affected. The

Petrokure was en route to the U-

nited States. , i.

Prevent Diaper Rash,

ut Hixiin after
Trj chant. Gantljp
medicated; hat pura
cornstarch baa.
Clinfa cloa to akin,
tuarda aiiinat chafe,

SS-iMi MEXSANA

Ml DIC AT IB fOWOll

eta.

Iij

if vm2 a v, i i
" .,., "inriwi ,i-,i;: I,, I
-;L iiL I

APPRECIATION UPON RETIREMENT Raymond A. Harvle (left center) is presented a
letter or appreciation by, Maj. J.-C. McMillan, quartermaster storage officer, from Maj. Gen.
Thomas L. Harrold, commanding general, U.S. Army Caribbean, as a culmination to nearly
30 years Federal service both as a serviceman and civil service worker. Harvie haa been with
the since 1931. He first entered Federal service when he did a stint with the Army from
June 1818 to February. 1919,-another hitch during the period from November 1928JanuaryJ
1931 at which time. he smarted work with the qm and' has had covMuous servlee with that;,
branch until his recent retirement last month. Flanking Harvie-and Maj. McMillan are fel fellow
low fellow employes, from' left to right they are: Alfred E. Genther, Daniel Fabrega, Frank New-
man, Harviel McMillan, Anthony Shatrosky, Carmen Bright and Anthony Amato. Harvie's
indications are .to settle In Corpus Christl, Texas, when he leaves the canal Zone for the"
States. ' (U. S. Army Photo)

JEETIfiS

tach notice for inclusion In thra
column ihould be Mibmltted
type-written form 'and mailed
the box number lilted daily in 'So 'Social
cial 'Social and Otherwise," er delivered
by hand to the office. Notices of
meetings cannot be accepted by
telephone. '
' -' ')"
San Antonio Credit Union
To Meet Wednesday
The San Antonio de Padua

Credit Union Study Group, will
meet tomorrow night at the
French Society hall on "O"- St.

A continuation of lessons on
Credit Union functioning will
be the main topic of the eve

ning. Members are reminded to

attend.

Cristobal Knights

Of Columbus

Meet Tonight

The Cristobal Knights of Colum

hus will hold their regular meet

ing at their K of C home tonight

at 7:30.

At 9 o'clock Mr. William Kosan

will narrate and lecture on a film

taken in the interior of Panama,

cauea "Doctor s Holiday."

i

1111

MuMMtmtWs

Here Are Some

Better Left Unsaid

LI 31

t l;

hi

i

r'VJ

lpy;gmake . show .

Enjoy the most

thrilling pictures in all photography!

1 Kj"

POIIY 135 GWS&ItOUTFIT
Gift outfit for making-and-showing color slides
Copoble Pony Comera to moire your slides ... superbly tryled
Kodok 300 Projector with Reodymotic Changer to show them.
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aient attt-aient ... a revolutionary advance in tlide projection.
CAMERA (With c$) $44.45 PROJECTOR 56 UO
' KODAK PANAMA, Ltd.

PANAMA

COLON

D.A.R. Will Hold
Constitution Week
Moating ben Saturday

The Panama Canal Chapter,

Daughter of the American Revolu

tion, will hold their annual Consti

ttoir Week meeting at 41:00 a.m.
on. Saturday, Sept. 14 J aV the Al-

brook Officers' Club, rae meeting

will be followed -by a luncheon.

Please call Mrs. Ronan, Balboa

3391 for reservations before Thurs

day evening.

All eligible ladies in the Panama

area are invited to attend.

m

Gen. George W. Goethalt

Poet No. 3835 VFW

Meets Friday

The next regular business mett
inB of the General George W. Goe

thals Post No. 3835 Veterans of

Foreign Wars of the U. S. will be
held at the Post Home in Cocoli

at 7:30 p.m., Fride Sept. 13.
Post Commander David H

Searle Jr. requests all members
to attend this important meeting
in which nominations and elections

will be held for the vacant post

tions of Junior Vice Commander,

Two Year Trustee and Chairman

of the House Committee.

There are some things no smart

wife eVer reminds her husband of

when others are present. Such

as:
How she kept him from mak

ing a mistake, or tried to, only
he wouldn't listen to her.

That is was her money that

paid for this or that.

That her family was set against

their marryinjg. V

That the man she almost mar

ried is how Mr. Big, the inference
being that if she had married the
other man she would be on Easy
Stree.t..,
That the couple .couldn't get
by without her pay check.
That if she hadn't married she
would have had a fabulous care career.
er. career. That the only reason the fam family
ily family gets by on her husband's pay
check is- because she is such an
excellent manager.
'That she hasn't had a new
dress in ages or that the dress

she Is wearing came from a bar
gain: basement,': ;
HE'S HELPLESS
That her husband-always con consults
sults consults her Wore making any
kind of decision., -y
That she is Mrs. Fixft' for the
family because her husband can't
hammer a nail without hinting
his thumb. ; -. ; .'
That her husband's boss doesn't
aprpeciate him enough to j pay
him what he is worth; J
That her husband is the 'big 'biggest
gest 'biggest baby in the world'1 when he
is sick and thinks he is dying

if he gets a head cold.

That her husband's family are
a trial nd tribulation to her.
That her husband big laugh

is a sucker for any kind of
hair tonic that promises to help
him hold onto what hair he al
left.

That she doesn't know what

her husband, poor -dear, would

ever do without her.

Ike Has Fans Too-Is Kissed

Twice By

Lady

NCO Wives' Club
WiHI Hear Talk
On Cade Cultuni

The NCO Wives' Club of Arbrook
Air Force Base will hold its
monthly Aloha Coife at 10 a.m.
Saturday morning at the Albrook
NCO Cluh. Guest speaker will be
Mr. Mokray, who .will give an In Interesting
teresting Interesting talk on the Code "Cul "Culture.
ture. "Culture. All members are asked to

bring a guest.
Balboa Woman's Club

Card Crauo to Meet

The Card Group of the Balboa
'Woman's Club will hold their bi bimonthly
monthly bimonthly meeting at the Ft. Ama Amador
dor Amador Officers' Club on Thursday,
at 12:30 p.m. For those wishing
to attend, please call one of the
hostesses: Mrs. Mary Worley, Bal

boa 2-4203, or-Mrs. Mario wag wag-ner,
ner, wag-ner, Balboa 2-4358, today.
Local W
Armed Forces

Employ- Union
A meeting of Local 907, Armed
Forces Employes Unioa will hold
a meeting tomorrow evening at
7:30 at union headquarters Cnsto-
E very worker of the Armed
Forces is extended an urgent and
cordial invitation to attend this
meeting. Plans are in the making
in connection with the present
publications on the "single wage
scale" and it h important th at
everyone he informed. Castillo and
other officers of the Local will be
in attendance to aaswer questions
and report on the general pro progress
gress progress of the program.
Pacific Clvk Council J 1
Moots Tomorrow .
The next regular of the
Pacific Civic Council will be held
in the Board Room ,Admimitx ,Admimitx-Hoa
Hoa ,Admimitx-Hoa Building. Balboa HeighU. C.
Z., at 7:30 p.m., tomorrow This
meeting is opea to the public. :
AROUND THE WORLD IM i
DOVER, England (UP) Three
men and a dog left Lere yesterday

; 174QH v a w l im m fwjiiir

they hope will take the around

tne worui ia me wrxi ar jmh.
Rrnrd YendalL 27. said be and

his two cremembrs aboard the
29-year-old -Marjinn" liave oly
enough supplies to last a few
wk TtY nlaa to take lobe at

By FRED T. FERGUSON

NEWPORT, R.I. UP) Presi President
dent President Eisenhower had to do some
explaining today.
While the first lady was cruis cruising
ing cruising Narragansett Bay aboard the
presidential yacht Barbara Anne
Sunday, her husband wal kissed
by two enthusiastic female admir admirers
ers admirers after playing a Sunday golf
round in the "high e'ghties."

The "President, who described
his golf as a game of "eights and
pars," greeted many persons

among a large crowd of specta specta-ors
ors specta-ors as he walked from the golf

course to the Newport Country
Club clubhouse. He changed shoes

in an anteroom and, on his way

to his car, entered the main

lounge.
Kissed On Cheek

Mrs. Edna Flint, 40, of Cran

ston, R.I., rushed up the Presi President,
dent, President, threw her arms around him

and hussed the surprised Chief

Executive on the cheek.
He managed to respond with a,
"Thank you very much."
Before secret servicemen could

establish who the woman was, Ei
senhower was kissed again.

The blushing President said not

a word when Mrs. George Guthro,

of Providence,- R.I., seizezd the
opportunity to throw her arms

around him and kiss him near the
mouth. He broke away and made

a beeline for his car.

Admirers

Mrs. Guthro and Mrs. Flint had
Just come out. of the club bar.
They said later they were in
Newport in connection with a
meeting of the Builders' Iron
Foundation. Mr a

rshickered when asked her age.

- oome memDers oi the fashion fashionable
able fashionable country club were alarmed
and apologetic" because of the
bussing in their handsome draw
ing room. One old-time member,
his white flannel slacks and prop proper
er proper tattersal shirt flapping in the
breezez, raced up to reporters and
asked they not inform the Ameri American
can American public about the kissing
ladies.

Pe-

fea-

Myrtle Green
To Sing Sunday
Kt Paraiso
The Choir Guild of the St.

ter's Church, La Boca, will

lure soprano and guild member'
Miss Myrtle Green Sunday at J
p.m. in a musical recital at the
Paraiso Theater in honor of the

parish priest and his fie, the

Kev. and Mrs. John Spear.
Pianist-composer Hugh Adams,
director of the St. Christopher's
Church choir at Rio Abajo, will
be her accompanist.
' The price of admission is mod

erate, and tickets may be obtain

ed from, any member of the choir

guild.

!rnr'rJ

3eix
received:..:

Thi 1st shipment of
CockUil &nd Evening'

resses

elected to New York,
by Mrs. Edith Deutscb

MAIN STORK
22-0 Central Are.
Phone J-17TJ.

' BRANCH STORK
No. 114 Tirol, Are.
Phone J-U24

ports of call te make their way.



f
1 J
IT
V

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1957
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY : NEWSPAPER
PAGE ITF1
1:
Social anil, Qtli
erwide
. f :
onunuta

I
l

&

Ltwe-Perter

lngfmnt t

Announced

Mr. nd Mn. Frank F. Lowe of

Coloa announce the engagement of

their daughter,. Norma. Felicia to

jar. samuei u. sorter, son of Mr.
and Mrs.. Uriah F, Porter of East

AUUsboro, Penn. No date bat

been set for the wedding.
BVnal I'rlth Lodge A- '
Honors A.D MeMiado,

The Irving Zapp Chapter of the
B'nai B'rith is featuring at their

Iirst. meeting which will fie neid
e Thursday', at 8:00 p.m.: at the
Community Hall of the Kol Shear Shear-ith,
ith, Shear-ith, ..a special program honoring
one of the oldest members of the

Jtwish Community and a p a s t-

president oif-the B'nai B'rith

LjMlge, Bro. Abraham D. Melha

.The members of the Lodge, as
well: as the Jewish Community

ape Invited to this meeting. An in interesting
teresting interesting program preapred by Dr.
Kuznziecky will be featured tbat
evening. !.-,: i

Colon SoroptlmUt '.
Hold Tea At Washington
The newly formed Soroptimist

Club of Colon held a meeting fol

lowed by tea on Sunday afternoon
at the Hotel Washington.-Members
present were v Mesdames Betty
Slaughter, Nieves Hauke, Zenia C.
Julio, Rosemary Reardon, Audrey
Watson, Josefina P de Reduga,
Mercedes A. Maurer, Eunice del

vane ana xne misses carmen ca
longe .and Grace Williams; Mem

bers of the Soroptimist Club

Panama present were Mesdames

Rosita Palacio, veme Hull, uar

ta Wrightt Hettie Shaw, Otilia ,Te

jeira and Miss Mane MCNen.
The following officers were

lected: president Mrs. del Valle

vide-presideht, Mrs. Saughter and

secretary, Mrs. Kearaon.

Raymond Engla .
Back From Hawaii

Raymond Engle, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond Enisle of. El Can Can-ereio:
ereio: Can-ereio: has returned from Honolu

lu, Hawaii,- where he spent the
summer.-The Engles. formerly liv

ed-in Honolulu and Raymond re

turned: to study during the sum'

mer with his former teacher of

piano. He is a student at. Balboa

Hrgh School

1 1 iiwmi iimii'Mi i i mtmsmmmmmmi ) a
W t v

IN HER HONOR Dr. Milton Elsenhower, his daughter Ruth,
and-President Eisenhower posed on the porch of Dr.. Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's home in Baltimore, Md., after the President dropped
In on a reception in honor of his niece. She will make her de-
- but in iociety in December. N

Defeatist Attitude In Ranks
Of GOP Seem Well Founded

5

! WASHINGTON JUP) Politi Politi-fllans
fllans Politi-fllans who. unhappily.Tasrt the
i utter demoiaUaaUoV of yie Re, Re,-publican
publican Re,-publican party Organization are
i citing new evidence of what they
i believe to be wrong.
. All of this, of course, is cited
more in sorrow than in anger.
This latest complaint sii ar
to but nt identical with those
which have preceaej u ihija,,u
much of the Eisenhower adminis adminis-top
top adminis-top men1 in the" administration can cannot
not cannot or, will not play politics for
keens. 'i

For example:' The- Republican
Part was repudiated a fortnight

ago by "Wisconsin voters who elect elected
ed elected William Proxmire, a Demo Democrat,'
crat,' Democrat,' to the late Republican Jo-

epn Jfc jftccartny i aenate seat,
Wuconsin is normally and tradi

tionally a Republican state. Prox

mire defeated waiter J. &onier,
a popular and heretofore success successful
ful successful Republican candidate in Wis Wisconsin.
consin. Wisconsin. The election was a severe
blow to Republican prestige and

prospects, .
HurUd to Washington
The new Democratic senator

elect hurried to Washington, took,

nil leai jusi Deiore aajourumeui
and stayed on to adjust to his new

environment, uooa thing' be did,
too. The department of Health,

caucauon ana weuare telephoned
Democrat Proxmire a couple Of

days ago to report that it had al
Jotted a substantial sum to a hos-

aital in Port Waslunaton. Wis.

This good hews, elsewhere un

known, was transmitted by Prox Proxmire
mire Proxmire to his Wisconsin constituents,
and if they decided that their new
senator waa getting results mighty
fast,, what better evidence could
they desire than the government's
eheek for more than $1,700,000

1

Allenlion
Teenage Girls
V' :- f. -v-:
Help to make fund raising
fcr. youc;Tnae;g Club a
big success. Fill out your
tntry blank today for can can-dIdatag,for
dIdatag,for can-dIdatag,for tht
Teeno Ball Queen
Mall your tntriaa to
..Miss Harnett, Box 106,
Bilboa.

shortly to be received?
f Port Washington is in "WisdoTt "WisdoTt-sin's
sin's "WisdoTt-sin's 6tb Congressional District
represented by a Republican, Wil William
liam William K. Van Pelt, now in his
fourth term. The department did
not advise Van Pelt of its alloca allocation
tion allocation to his district of funds to
build a hospital addition. Neither
did the department call Wiscon Wisconsin's
sin's Wisconsin's Republican Sen. Alexander
Wiley. It was a good deal Ml
around for freshman Senator
Proxmire.
Bad for Republicans

It was bad for the Republic ap
Party in Wisconsin, however. This
incident is not precisely typical
nor is it suggested that Secretary
Marion B folsom of the Healtn,
Education and Welfare Depart Department
ment Department is sabotaging his party. Fol Folsom
som Folsom probably knows nothing of
the incident unless Van Pelt or
Wiley protested.
(At best, however, someone in
Folsom 's ofice goofed. At. worst,
someone in Folsom's department
is out of step with the adminis administration
tration administration sufficiently out of step
to offer aid and comfort to the
political enemy. This latter is en entirely
tirely entirely possible and, perhaps, prob probable.
able. probable. j The Incident is an example of

what th nolitieal oroa mean when

they complain that the top people1
in the Eisenhower administration
do not or 'will not play politics.
They mean the legitimate, petty

kind Of politics which pays oif

at the polls.

It is not often that a government

department would tip off a Demo

cratic memoer ot umgress mat
a chunk of federal money was

about to fall into the lap of de

serving' constituents. More of a
problem is the fact that the Re Republican
publican Republican department heads fail to

make sure tnat KepuDucan con con-gressmen
gressmen con-gressmen will be tipped off in
time to let the voters back home
hear any available ood news
from their good Republican friend
in Washington. ;
There is a defeatist attitude in

the upper. Republican' ranks. It

seems to be well founded.

r r t iniiiiiii-.il
aa;. ; -ss2
ITU m" r''x ; 1 J fjf 11

VISITOR HONORED AT LUNCHEON Roy W. Keeley, vlcepresldent of the Interhatlonal Di

vision of Minnesota 1 Mining and Manufacturing Co., was guest or honor at a luncneon given
at El Panama Hotel on Sunday. The Minnesota Minine and Manufacturing Co.. which is po-

nularv known as the "3M" Comnany. is the inventor of the Scotch-Brand Droducts. Attending

the luncheon were local "3M" distributors and factory representatives for the Caribbean and
Central America. From left to- Tleht are Milton C. Henriauez of Cla. Atlas, Robert J. Boyd of

Boyd Bros., Keeley, John. B. Wright of Empresas Pa,namenas, Frank D. King Jr., and Roy W.

Betus or Tropeico.

JTlfflrfrr-ffi .&Ar: acS
f: l A- :t 4 VI
li iA '
r. LjH A'v ,, km:i m ?rtimJ

m snip oi mm
Ri THE Slf TIK1E?

. BmiN U tbttnl tMdtolly-iBwl (Umlruff duocr Uub my dinuy ihampo. Imam
tmtamt u4 ilch-nidiiiif ihuapos 11 your htsx ft, riunini ud My t nu.
OM,vUibll without prMcriptidB. N Mp- DiKovtr for yourMlf why million, of nua.
raU lotiotul Enoin ii tht pltuunt wy worowi nd childnn njoy mn u tMr
. ihimpM.wiy to nd ltdiinf. flldn nd N rrulir ihimpoer-tnd k"p ddruf
etlinf for food. It malm your scalp (al tar probtanf away

Dandruff Treatment Shampoo 1

. fWOIVittta

4UARANTCED OV M8LKNS CURTIO TO END 'DANDRUFF PROBLIMS AND RRiVBNT THIIR RETURN

I t :r

w ) P. A. CLASSIFIEDS

COL. V'ALTER L. KILLILAE, third from left, new post commander at Fort Clayton, greets
Capt. J. H. Boyd, shown shaking hands, post' adjutant of Fort Clayton, and other Fort Clay

ton staff officers, upon tne coionei'S arrival yesieraay w assume nis new amies, ljoumng on
are (left to right) Col. Joseph R. Walton, USARCARIB provost marshal and present post
rnmmander of Port clavton: and Lt. Col. J. C. Wilkerson. commandinc officer of the 65th

AAA Group. Klllilae was accompanied to the command by his wife, lone, and their four
children: Kathryn, 10; Patricia, 8; janicet 7,. and Nancy, 4. His mother, Mrs. Virginia W. Kll

lilae, also accompanied them.

Discontent, Dissension Cuts

Into US Red Party Membership

NEW YORK, Sept. 10 (UP)

Discontent and dissension have
sharply reduced membership and
caused a crisis in the American
Communist Party, the editor of
the Daily Worker said yesterday.
' John Gates, editor-in-chief of the

Daily Worker, the Communist or

gan in the united states, saia me

the lowest figure since 1931 when
there were 8,300 members. The
highpoint in U.S. membership was
reached in 1945, at the end of
World War II, when American
Communists claimed 80,000 mem members.
bers. members.

Gates, in an article iri today's

t' Worker, said it was difficult

Party's U.S. membership declined to analyie the "fundamental caus-

by 45 per cent in tne last year.
National party officials confirmed
the sharp drop, saying the party
lost 7,000 members .during the
past year.
The present membership, a

spokesman said, stands at 10,000,

ods were largely responsible for

the drop.
Gates' statement was, in ef

feet, a reply to one published ill

the Daily Worker yesterday by

Joseph Clark, announcing his re
sienation as the newspaper's for

eign editor and from party mem membership.
bership. membership. Clark, a Communist for
28 years, openly admitted his dis-

luusionmeui wiui iue mucui-au
Communist Party. He said the U.

S. Partv persisted in following bo

viet foreign policy and no longer
was serving the cause of Social Socialism
ism Socialism effectively in the United

States.

t Oi uie mtraucriiup uecuue.
But he hinted that dissension

within the party along with mem membership
bership membership discontent with party meth-

AMIRICANS LIKE TRAVEL
The government reported that A A-m
m A-m erica ni took 48 million travel
tripi away from home during the
first IS weeks of this year. The re

port, part of a preliminary study cr"

American iravei nauiia ui ur
nprl thia week, showed 21 million

trips were to visit friends or rela

tives, 14 muuon IUT ousmeas iw
13 million for' pleajura jaunts.

- FOR YOUR HIGH-BALI II1S1ST
h;ayi on CANADA DRY
' "HIsh-BsII vilhoul Canada Dry..',

b Foul-Ball"

Tickets For Zimbler
Sinfdnietta On Sale
At Morrisons Only

Tickets for the Zimbler Sinfo-

nietta, which will perform at the
National Theater on. Sept 20, are
on sale at Morrisons store on 4th
of July and 'J' Street. This is the

only place they will be sold. Pnc
es are $3.00. $2.50 and $1.50.
The Zimbler Sinfonietta was or

ganizezd to present the best in

chamber music literature, em
bracing the whole field from pe
bahoaue to contemporary manu

scriots. The seventeen musicians

play without a conductor perform

ing old and new music tn a Beau Beautiful
tiful Beautiful and transparent vasirion. The
ensemble consists f picked vir

tuoso olayers from tLe ranks of

the Boston Symphony Orcheitra

and display top technical perfec

tion in their perform anees. us
members use fine old Kalian in

strument! enhancing the tonal

quality of the group. Among the
instruments are four violins made
by Guadagrni, others made by
Gaglian. Testori and a famous

viola, a .Caspar de Sak. Also a
viola made hr Ceruti and One by

MagginL Celli used a re a Goffri-

lo, a Joseph Gagliano and a Cal Cal-canus.
canus. Cal-canus. The combined value of the
instruments used is approximately
seventy-five thousand dollars
. FIREMIN'S. HOMIWORIC
UNION. S.C (UP) Firemen

Bud Keitler and Robert Blalock
should have stayed home.' The
two alarms received during the
day cam from tbera.

Need lots of pep?
. A A
Driiik..e ':

Mm
""' i a Mrart

The Juice of I different, farden farden-Wah
Wah farden-Wah Ttfctabia are blended mta
thii famous drink. Younfiten icr
' ta trrely iiror, and tbiiva o tta

itaBLa-packed
goodncM. At mcal-timc-or
betweca
Bealt V-S tire
then th refrcah refrcah-vieat
vieat refrcah-vieat ay want,
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THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER y
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER II), 1957.
s Biiv
riAajor League
Leaders
IM-flW lllllli III IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIII I ill TOIIM 1 in u iw mim iiiiinn m i iiiimiIm llllfl
iAL League Leaders Taking
No Chances Despite Margin
'. '":'"'
m
Editor: CONRAQO SARCEANT

r AGE SIX

Yankee

Del

Greco As

0utf

.

1 1 ,-r

By MILTON RICHM AN
NEW YORK, Sept. 10 (UP) The Yankees
never take any chances, so even with a fat 5Y2 game
lead and Mickey Mantle back in uniform, they
bought a bit of added pennant insurance today by
'acquiring outfielder Bobby Del Greco from the Chi-

' cago Cubs.
Mantlp fpfiline "much better" af
ter a four-day stay in the hospital
because of shin splints, was given
the green light to play against
Cleveland tonight if he wants to.
Although Hank Bauer, recovering
from a broken bone in his right
' thumb, also may be ready to face
'the Indians, the Yankees leu iney
could use another experienced out out-filrtr
filrtr out-filrtr fnr th stretch run. Hence,
tiii nnrrhase of the 24-year' old
Del Greco from the Cubs.
i Del Greco has seen previous
mainr fescue service with the fi
rates and Cardinals as well as the
Cubs.
The chunky, right-handed hit hitting
ting hitting outfieldwr spent most of tho
curent Mason with Montreal of
tho International League, from
where the Cubs recalled him ys
terday. He had .278 batting av average
erage average that included s v e n
home runt in 118 gamus with
hM Bavlk.
Del Greco may be remembered
. one of the central figures in
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ir

what general manager Frank Lane
calls "the worst deal" he ever

madei Lane and Cardinal man
ager Fred Hutchinson personally
scouted Del Greco one day while
he still was with Pittsburgh and
saw him connect for two homers,
The Cardinal pair were so fav favorably
orably favorably impressed that they dealt
off Bill Virdon to the Pirates in
exchange for Del Greco, May 16,
1Q1K Riit Dol flrom failed tn hit
for the Cards and they traded himl
to the Cubs tor outfielder Jim
. .
King last April. Shortly afterward,
the Cubs sent pirn down.
"He's young, though, and he
couldhelp us the next few weeks,"
explained -a Yankee spokesman
In any case, the Yankees, with
16 games remaining, take on the
western invaders for the last time
this season. Right- hander Bob
Turley, the world champs' most
consistent pitcher recently, will
face southpaw Don Mossi of the
Tribe tonight.
After tonight s game and one
tomorrow with Cleveland, the
Yanks will have a 'first-hand op
portunity to widen their lead a
gainst the second place Chicago
White Sox, whom they meet Fn
day and Saturday.
Casey Stengel said lefty Bobby
Shantz will pitch against Cleveland
tomorrow and that it will be Whi
tey Ford and Tom Sturdlvant. a-
gainst the White Sox. Billy Pierce
and Dick Donovan are Al Lopez'z
nominees to go against the Yan
kees,
Over in' the National League,
where Ynt Milwaukee Braves al also
so also have a 5Vi game lead, they
face the happy prospect of play playing
ing playing 15 of thtir 18 remaining
games at home.
Pittsburgh supplies Milwaukee's
opposition tonight, with rookie
Whammy Douglas of the Pirates
slated to face Lew Burdette.
The second place Cardinals, at
home against the Phillies, will
send Sam Jones against Harvey
Haddix, while the third-place Dod Dodgers,
gers, Dodgers, seven games back but still
hoping for a miracle, have nomi
nated left handed fast-baller San
dy Koufax to oppose Don Elston
of the Cubs at Chicago.
The Giants are at Cincinnati In
other scheduled N.L. game.
No major league games were
played yesterday.
Braves Will Do
Well
Against
Yanks-Spahn
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Sept. 10
(UP) Warren Spahn, the big
pitching "stopper" in Milwaukee's
pennant drive, shrugged off the
club's recent nosedive today and
predicted the Braves will "do all
right" against the New York Yan Yankees
kees Yankees in the World Series.
"Sure we'll win the pannant'
said the 3i-year-old lefthander.
"And we'll do all right against
the Yanks in the Series, too.
"Every player on our team feels
the same way. We've had a few
bad games lately but we've still
made a great overall showing in
the last month and we'll get going
again."
Spahn said the idea that the
Braves are slipping in the home
stretch because they lost four of
their last five games "is causing
more concern among newsmen
than it is among the players. Of
course, it's a little demoralizizng
to lose any ball game but there's
no feeling on the team that los losing
ing losing is going to become contagi contagious."
ous." contagious." Spahn, who has won nine in a
row and seeks his 20th victory in
his next appearance, has been the
only consistent winner on the
Braves' pitching staff in the past
few weeks. But he pointed out that
Bob 'Buhl, the club s ace righthand righthander,
er, righthander, should be ready to pitch regul regularly
arly regularly again now after being out for
two weeks with a sore shoulder.
Spahn said the Brave are a a-nvthina
nvthina a-nvthina hut awar Awad mi ttv
prospect of meeting the Yankees
in the World Series.
"We don't think they're over-
powering," he said. "We've play-
ed some pretty good ball clubs im
the National League all year and;
we can 00 as weu against t n e
Yanks. We have good hitting pow-
er ana our pitcning is adequate to,
do the job.
RIO
25c.

TERROR AT
MIDNIGHT
with Scott Brady
- Also:
Woman They
Almost Lyavcbed

READING BATTERS
(Bated on 350 official at bats)
' American League

Player and C,
G AB R H Pet.
Williams, Bis.
121 402 87 151 .376
135 447 115 165 ,369
Mantle, N.Y.
Woodling, Cle
119 378 66 123 .325
Fox, Chi.
Boyd. Bait.
136 337 98 171 .320
130 448 66 139 .310
Skowron, N.Y.
121 454 55 138 .304
Mmoso, Chi.
134 494 86 150 .304
134 500. 91 151 .302
129 496 84 148 .298
113 407 57 120 .295
131 505 72 149 .295
Sievers, Wash,
McDougald.N.
Doby, Chi.
Kaline, Det.
National League
Musial, St. L. 122' 469 75 160 .341
Mays. N. Y.
138 533 1UD IIO .33
134 550 89 180 .327
111 446 55 144 .323
Robinson, Cin
Groat, Pitts.
Aaron, Mil.
133 549 108 176 .321
100 365 45 117 .321
Fondy, Pitts.
Sch'ndienst.M.
133 576
109 358
86 181 .314
52 109 .304
rumiu,
tt.Jo.. T3L- 'r
Hodges, Bk'n 134 519
Bouchee.Phila. 139 516
85 156 .301
73 154 .298
HOME RUNS
American League
Sievers, Senators
Mantle, Yankees
Williams, Bed Sox
National Hague
Aaron Braves
Snider, Dodgers
Banks, Cubs
Mays, Giants
Mathews Braves.
Crowe, Red Legs
RUNS BATTED IN
American League
Sievers Senators
Jensen, Red Sox
Mantle, Yankees
Minoso, White Sox
Sbowron Yankees
National Leauge
Aaron, Braves
Musial, Cardinals
Mays, Giants
Hodges Dodgers
Ennis, Cardinals
36
34
33
39
37
34
32
30
30.
101
94
91
89
88
119
97.
92
51
90
PITCHING
(Based on 12 decisions)
Schmidt, Cardinals 10 2
.833
.750
.739
.727
.714
Donovan, White :ox is a
Sanford, Phillies 17 6
Buhl. Braves lb b
Shantz, Yankees 10 4
Phil Hill Wins
Road America 500
ELKHART LAKE, Wis. UP)
Phil Hill, Santa Monica, Califs
outdistanced two other "iron men"
Sunday to win the "Road America
500" the first 500-mile sports car
race in the nation's history.
Hill, 30, an eight year racing
veteran, drove a 3.8 litre f erran
an average of 81.4 miles per nour
tj whip second-place tinisner car-
roll Shelby, Dallas, rex., Dy near
ly one lap and by two minutes
and 40 seconds.
Third place went to &o craw-
ford, Northfield, 111. Hill, bneiDy
and Crawford earned their "iron
men" labels by driving the entire
125 laps alone.
Giants-Dodgers Play
Final Polo Grounds
Inter-City Contest
NEW YORK (UPW No one cried
in his beer and no one sang Auld
Lang Syne, but the Giants and
Dodgers revived a flock of golden
memories after facing eacn other
for the last time at the Polo
Grounds.
A crowd of 22,376. made up
mostly of sentimentalists who per
haps wanted to tell tneir grand grandchildren
children grandchildren that they had seen the
final game between the two clubs
at the Polo Grounds, watched the
Giants fashion a 3-2 victory in the
interborough wind-up.
Players on both sides couldn't
help but recall some of their clas classic
sic classic battles of the past as they
peeled off their uniforms. Most, of
course, cited Bobby Thomson's
Dennaqt winning homer for the
GianU in the 1951 playoff.
NBA Convention
Racial Question
Before Delegates
DENVER (UP) The National
Boxing Assn. opened its convee-
tion today faced with a racial
seeregation question.
Executive Secretary Abe Kotxen
denied a move is afoot to boycott

wrne segregated southern states Rocnester 0f the Interna Interna-but
but Interna-but said the question, at it relates :... 1 1 . .. .n .,truum

to ugnters ana spectators, wouia1Gene GreeB Rochester and Jim

a ia tj id
VICTORIA
15c
lie.
BROKEN LAND
- Also:
CARMEN JONES

I v v:

' fn 1 1 i n.m i i

'...,:

"''"Mi"! ' V mm,xJlA

International League Playoffs
Scheduled To Begin Tonight

America's Davis Cup Hopes

Dwindle After
Dominate US
by STEVI SNIDER
FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (UP)
America's Davis Cup hopes dwin-
Sports Briefs
HOAD FINDS TOUCH
SCHEVENINGEM, Holland
UP) Lew Hoad, the Australian
tennis star who tcrned pro after
his Wimbledon victory in July,
hoped today he finally had re regained
gained regained his touch. Hoad, who had
been taking beatings from every
other member of the Jack Kra Kramer
mer Kramer professional troupe, beat
Pancho Segura on Saturday and
Ken Rosewall in a three and one-
half-hour marathon Sunday.
MERLO WINS TITLE
BADEN BADEN, G r m a U s
(UP) A brief moment of glory
was over today for Rupert Huber,
a 26-vear-old German tennis play
er. GiuseDDe Merlo of Italy beat
Humber, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4 Surf-
Ldav in the final of the uaaen
Baaen international locruamem
after Huber had upset former
Wimbledon champion Jaroslav
Drobny of Egypt in the semi
finals.
PARSONS PLACES FIRST
DETROIT (UP) Johnny Par
sons of Van Nuys. Calif., winner
of the 1950 Indianapolis 500 -mile
auto classic. v seemed today to
have found a home away from
home'. Parsons won a 150 mile
new stock car race at the Michi Michigan
gan Michigan State Fair Grounds Sunday
after winning a 100 mile midget
race on the sametrack last week.
TIGERS RECALL PRESKO
DETROIT (UP Joe Presko a
29-year-old relief pitcher, looked
forward today to a return to the
bigtime. The Detroit Tigeri re-
led Presko from 'their Charles-:
to, W.Va., .farm club of the
American Association, where the
former St. Louis Cardinals pitch pitcher
er pitcher has spent the last two seasons.
CARDS CALL UP FOUR
ST. LOUIS (UP) Four farm
hands will join the St. Louis Car
dinals tonight im time for
their game against the Philadel
phia Phillies. The Cardinals re-
TVTSAt I. vim f .tven truth
King and Don Lassetter Of Omaha
of the American Association.
Today Encanto 25 .15
WAHOO! SllS.Of
Grace Kelly In
"HIGH SOCIETY"
Gig' Toifng In
-ARENA
Today -IDEAL-20 -JO
' Double la Cinemascope I
Lna Turner tn
-RAINS or RANCHirat"
Tom rwell In
lieaUaaat Wert SkkrU"

Australians

Men's Singles
died to ground zero today with
Australia plainly in the driver's
seat again after 10 davs of sunerh
tennis in the U.S. Singles chara-
pionsnips.
Two ancient traditions fell Sun
day after 77 years when Althea
Gibson of New York became the
nrst Negro ever to win a U.S
grass courts crown by out-steadying
veteran Louise Brotigh of Bev Beverly
erly Beverly Hills, Calif., 6-3, 6-2, and cow-
ooy Maicoim Anderson of Aus Australia
tralia Australia became the first unseeded
player ever to wm the men's
uue.
11 was Anderson's straight set
triumph over Australian champion
Ashley Cooper, 10-8, 7-5, 6-4, that
cast gloom over U.S. cup hopes
uei-ause Anuerson strictly was a
bolt from the blue.
He pulverized America's leading
player, Dick Savitt of South Or Orange,
ange, Orange, N.J., en route to the final
ana was equally potent against
uuper, wno previously had licked
him five straight times.
With Savitt already withdrawn
from the U.S. team and top-
ranicea Ham Richardson a doubt-
iui traveler Decause his wife like likely
ly likely would not be pernitted to go
with the team, the Unitd States
on,'y Herb Flm of Beverly
HlllS. Calif.. Whn VH trnnnA K
Cooper, and Vic Seixas of Phila Philadelphia,
delphia, Philadelphia, who lost to Flam.
miss oiDson completed her se series
ries series of world tennis conquests in
precedent-setting fashion by trim trimming
ming trimming Miss Brough with the loss of
only five games to round out her
grand slam of Wimhirtn .n,t
U.S. chamoionshiDs. a feat irmm:
pUshed by only five other players
in history.
1 ne 30-year-old Miss Gibitn
scoring on her -eighth try, was al
most as nervous as th 3i.v.r.
old Miss Brough as thev fnucht
(l.. u .v- .1.- Z
uiiuugu me cany games oeiore a
gallery of 10,000. But when Althea
ran out a 4-1 lead in the second
set, miss Brough, winner in 1947
and four time champion at Wim Wimbledon,
bledon, Wimbledon, beean unxuerfiin
fight back her tears and then it
was only a matter of tim hfn
Miss Gibson walked over, to pick
up her championship trophy from
Vice President Richard Nixoa.
Later, Althea rounded out her
big day by winning the mixed
doubles with D e m a r k's Kurt
Nieisen ver Darlene Hard of
Montebello, Calif., and Bob Howe
of Australia, 6-3, 1-7.
DRIVE-IN
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tSt TODAY
1:M
t.N
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I
LEX BARKER
"THE GIRL IN THt
Tomorrow!
FOPtXAR KIGHT!
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- Also:
RrrrRJi or wnn mwr

CLOSE ONES (Top) Dun
(7) hits the finish line a long
nose In front of Teloreo in
Saturday's first race. Francis Francisco
co Francisco Gatlca rode the winner
while Braullo Baeza had the
leg up on the runnerup. Mu?
tuels favorite Le Matelot,
which wound up third, barely
got his head in the picture. Te Teloreo,
loreo, Teloreo, owned toy Pres. Ernesto
de la Guardia Jr.'s Cococha

Stable, was one of three of the
which finished In the money
over the weekend Double
Four also winding up second
and Crew's Hill thfrd. The oth other
er other finish shows Bluno (B) nos
ing out odds-on favorite Tiny
Brook (2) in Sunday's second
race. Cervecero was third. Hec Hector
tor Hector Ruiz guided Bluno to vic victory.
tory. victory. Jorge Phillips was a a-board
board a-board Tiny Brook,
NEW YORK, Sept. 10 '(UP)
The pennant-winning Toronto
Maple Leafs, with manager
Dixie Walker considering the
offer of a two-year contract,
play host to Miami and second second-place
place second-place Buffalo hosts Richmond
tonight in the opening games of
the international League play playoffs.
offs. playoffs. Winners in the bestof-seven
semi-final series will clash In
the finals for the right to play
the American Association play playoff
off playoff champions in the Little
World Series.
Toronto, pennant-winner by
just half-a-game, was expected
to start righthander Jim Pearce
against Miami's 12-game win winner,
ner, winner, Ray semproch. At Buffalo,
righthander Glenn Cox was
slated to hurl for the second second-place
place second-place Bisons against righthand righthander
er righthander Jim Coates of Richmond.
Walker, former Brooklyn
Dodger star, and Leafs coach
Lou Kahn both were offered new
two-year contracts by owner
Jack Kent Cooke as rewards for
winning the pennant. Cooke al also
so also refunded all fines paid by
players during the season, in including
cluding including a $300 fine paid by for
mer Yankee and White Sox
pitcher Don Johnson.
Walker said his team was
"100 per cent ready lb go, with
no injuries" and said Johnson
probably would start the sec second
ond second game In Toronto tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. Dick Bunker Is scheduled
to hurl the second game for
Miami. Ancient Satchel Paige,
if not used in relief In the first
two games, will start the third
game for Miami -when the
scene shifts to the Florida city.
Buffalo did not disclose ad
vance pitching dans, but Rich
mond plans to fouow with Bin
Bethel as starter In the second
game. The Virginians were mi
nus regular catcher Harry CM CM-tl.
tl. CM-tl. former Cub who is injured,
Chitl was replaced. by Les Pe-
den.
NEW CALLERS
Nw York (NEA) The Na
tional League went with five roo
kie umpires this season Tony
Venxon, Vinnie Smith. Ed Sudol,
Ken Burkhart and Bill Baker.
Showing at Your Servc
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CAMP BTERD :1S 7:J5
fTHE 7TH CAVALRY" and
EMISSION OVER KOREA"

Teams
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Brooklyn
Cincinnati
Philadelphia
New York
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (N)
Philadelphia at St. Louis (N)
New York at Clncinati (N)
Brooklyn at Chicago
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled

No Records Established
In Jr. Olympics Meet

The Junior Olympic swimming
meet neia at the uamboa nool last
aaiuraay went pretty much ac
cording to form. The boys and
girls who should have won the
races did just that. It is rather
unusual m tne canal zone when
swimming meet- doesn't produce
some kind of a record, but Satur
oay mere were none established,
Sixty-two boys and eirls splash
ed their way through the 60 event
program in about one hour and 40
- mL.' ,11
inuiuies. xius was maue possioie
when the officials doubled ud sev
eral events that had only one or
two entries. .-' ':
This is the. meet in which all
the efforts are against time. Re
suits of the swimming Saturday
will be sent to the national a.a.u
office in New York where they
will be compared with others from
all over the United States, Those
close to the swimmine tiicture in
the Canal Zone feel that the girls
200 yard-freestyle relay in the Ju
nior Division (11 and 12 years) has
about the best chance of placing
Helen George. -Margaret Mahoney
Charlene Graves, and Verna Hilde-
brand stroked over the course with
a fine 2:07,9 docking, which was
only about .3 of a second oft the
times, that placed last year.
Several of the races were very
close. In the boys 25 yard freestyle
in the midget division Mathew
Manning, John Townshend, and
Dick Ebdon all finished with .1 of
second of each other with Man
nine getting the first place and
Townshend the second. If Town
shend had gotten a good start he
might have upset Manning in this
one. As it was Townshend was the
big winner in the midget section
with a 'first in the breaststroke and
another' in the butterfly to go
long with his second in the free
stvle.
Results of the Junior Olympic
Swimming Meet:
Midget Division
10 years and under)
Boys 100 FS Relay: 1. BohMiku-
Uch, stew urown, uary vaucner,
Andy Jacobson. (1:C2.4)
Girls 100 FS Relay: 1 Susan
Shirk,' Nancy Chadwick, Linda
Benton, Betsy Twombly. 1:12.9)
Boys 25 FS: 1.-Manning (14.8),
2. Townshend 14.8). 3. Ebdon
(1.49).
Girls 25 FS: 1. Chadwick (16.5),
2. (Benton (16.9), 3. Shirk (17.0)
Bova 25 Brst: 1. -Townshend (19.
7). 2. Mikulich 19.9). 3. Brdwn
(20.6).
Girls 2S Brst: 1. Holgerson 23.5),
2.- Henderson 23.6). 3. Chadwick
(24.2).
Boys 25 Butterfly: 1. Townshend
(17.7), 2. Vaucher (lTJ). a. iJrpwn
(19 4). f
Girls 25 (Butterfly: i. Henderson
(21.4). 2. Shirk 22.1),' S.; Benton
(22.2).
HOME-GROWN LADS
Ti-: :- i.,v Vk fNVk
Out of 54 Dlavers invited to report
the pre-season football drills at
Penn State, 44 are nauve rennsyi-
vamans.
TROPICAL
0.60 TODAY! 040
Great Fortune Night!
: $iso.cp
Be ne of the lucky winners
- f thee Cash Prises!
1st Prize 5100.00
tni m
3rd
4th
. KM
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THE FORTUNE KIGHT :
PLATS at 9 JN P. M.
On Use Screen:
Double Feature In
ClnemaScopt and Color!
Sophist Loren Alas Ladd
- w
"BOY ON A DOLPHIN"
Vtrka Leigh bs
"DEEP BLUE SEA" ;

W L Pet. CB Teams W L Pet. CI
83 53 .610- -fc New York 87 51 .630
78 59 .569 5V4 Chicago 80 55 .593 51
77 61 .558 7 Boston 74 62 544 12v
70 68 .507 14 Detroit, 69 67 ,507 IT
70 69 .504 14W Cleveland s 66 70 .485 20
67 74 .475 1814 Baltimore 65 71 .478 21
54 84 .391 30 Washington 52 84 .382 34
52 83 .385 30V4 Kansas City 51 84 .371 34V

Today's Games
Detroit at Washington (N) -Kansas
City at Baltimor N)
Cleveland at New York (N)
Chicago at Boston' '-
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled
Boys. 25 Back: 1. Akers (20.0),
2. Ebdon (20.7), 3. Manning 21.1).
Girls 25 Back: L Dignam (21.5),
Redmond. 21,5), 2. Redmond (21..
9), 3. Manning (22.5).
Boys' 100 Medley Relay: 1. Ak
ers, Mikulich, Vaucher, Jacobson
(1:14.3). .
. Girls 100 Medley Relay. 1. Red Red-fan,
fan, Red-fan, Dlgnam, Twombly, .ManninS
1:27.2).
Junior Division (11 and 12 years)
Boy s 220 FS Relay : 1. Holmes,
Mann, Feeney, Whitkin (2:05.5),
2. Martin, McCoy, Gangle, Shirk
Girls 200 FS Relay l orge,
Mahoney, Graves, Hildegrand (2: (2:-07.9),
07.9), (2:-07.9), 2. Figueroa,, Hern, Graves,
Albritton (2:27.4). 4
Boys 50 FS; 1. Holmes 29.5), 2.
Whitkin (30.2), 3. Gangle (30.5).
' Girls 50 FS: 1. Graves (32.0), 2.
Mahoney (34.2), 3. Figueroa (35.2).
Boys 50 Brest? 1. Linfors (42.7),
2. Mann (49 0). j f
Girls 50 Brst: l. Bailev (45.2)
2 Morency 47.9), 3Varela (55.2).
, .Boys 50 uutteriiyt Mann 41.0)
Z Gangle 3 JlcCoy (50.5V
Kins 50 Butterfly: Iv;,Gorgfc
(40.2), 2. Bailey (43.3).
Boys 50 Back: 1. Shirk (394), 2
Feeney (40.0), ?'
(Boys 200 Medley Relay: i. Fee-
ney, Linfors, Holmes, Whitkin 2:-
3"0 '
Girls 200 -Medley Relay i l..: Hil-
debrand, Dailey, Graves, Mahoney
(2:40,2). 2. Morency, Hern, George
Gravfes 2:53.7).
Intermediate Division
Girls 200 FS Relay li pallet.:
Herring, Dunn, Spector (2:12.1)
Boys. 50, rs; l. Manning 29.0),
2. Suarei 1(29.3), 3. Smith (29.5).
Girls 50 f'Sf 1. Harned (29.8), 2.
Spector 32,3); 3. Durih (33.0),.
Boys 100 Brest: 1 Dugan u:zo. u:zo.-1),
1), u:zo.-1), 2. Rudge 1:2.2), ,3. Egdon
(no time). -'x;t
Girls 100 brst: l,v Hallett fl
32.3).; '-.,.;
Boys 100 Butterny: uugan
1:17.1), 2. Rudge (1:25,;). 1
Girls 100 Butterfly:-1 named
(1:37.3).
Boys 100 (Back: 1 Guly (1:25.3),
Manning (1:29.5).
Girls 100 Back: 1. Harned (1:33.-
3)- ' ;
Boys 100 FS: 1. Mohl 1:10.8),
2. Suarez (1:13.9), 3. Smith (1:20.2).
Bovs 200 Medley Relay: 1. Man
ning, Dugan, Rudge, Mohl 2:24.;)
Girls 200 Medley Relay: 1. Her
ring, Hallett, Dunn, Spector 2:-
39.8). U j
Girl's 200 FS Relay:. 1. Gunder-
son, Rogers, Howe, Argo (2:13.8).
Boys 50 FS: 1. MscLean :si.4).
Girls 50 FS: L Argo 81 J), 2.
Gunderson (33.8), 3. Howe (34 6).
Boys 100 Butterfly: L. MacLeaa
1:31.1). .
GirlsJOO Butterfly: I. Howe ti:
l-3).
Boys 100 Back: scott y.
GirU 100 Back: Argo u:soo.
Boys 100 FS: L. Scott (1:1. V
Girls 100. FS: 1. Rogers 1:19.3)
Gunderson (1:19.4).
All distances arc yards.
- I
By BEANS REARDON
Written for HEA Service
- i 'l i
t QUESTION: A runner standing
on third base is struck by a bat batted
ted batted balL Does the fart that he U
standing on the bag protect him?
Jimmy Olsoav. ;
Aaswer: Ne. Tne rvu is 4ain.
Any ktatriwr hit hf a hetted
haR Is evt.
Q. L read where the foul lines
at Comiskey Field ara sloped s
Nellie Fox of the White Sox can
get a better break with his bunt
ing. I've read where other parks
nave similar mat 10 here u '
bom tea Is this legal? Boh
UVCTM.
A. Within hewndfc, Many pvk 4
rn shnd tacn t if
llhtry slcd ful Rn r h.
vily wf4 IwfteMt ere n
v id the hm aMe. THr
"nr has h tnmck m.itt
frewbte ervr at.



!

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1 s
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- 1 'i
o
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1957
."' '' THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
"wtchair Fan Games
lulu Pprp7 FArhc I
NOW LET'S BRING ON THE PROS
Big League; Tills Telecast ;
Oh(v In Minof Territory v
W mm 1 ai mm mmmm mmmw
Shot At Berrios
Or Isidro Next

Majors.

Make Baseball As
- : s : Li lj

By MARRY GRAYSON

NORMAN, OJcla., (NEA) Bud

Wilkinson s living room was com comfortable
fortable comfortable and his two big kids, Pat

and Jay, i were- lounging- on vuw

couch watching television.
"It's the Dodgers and Giants,"
said Pat, who- linebacked Norman
High to 10 straight victories last
fall. 1

r" This was im 'Norman, but it

could have been any one of hun
dreds o( minor league towns a
round the country.

This is what prompted President
Leslie M. O'Connor of the Pacific
Coast League to point out that the
majors are making baseball an
arm-chair game, and to further

lash out against the big league of

ficials and owners who are .respon

sible. ;--v
With minor, league baseball ve

ry sick, they continue to permit
major league games to be pump pumped
ed pumped into its far-flung territory.
"I canrt get their thinking," said
O'Connor, who policed baseball for

24 years under Kenesaw Mountain;

ijauuia, aiiiu -was. luc'uiemu vy"-
missioner between the judge and
Happy Chandler. "How money
hungry and selfish and unwise can
the major league owners get?
They not only wreck ; the attend attendance
ance attendance of farm clubs, which they
either own outright or have a fi financial
nancial financial interest, but put indepen independents
dents independents out of business'. They choke
off the source of talent .supply."

mot, to 'sIcd ori one another's toes,

J.UCV JUOb' IHIVIP UIC ftUUiUV'OJ

What stops O'Connor and all
minor league owners is the total
disregard the, majors have for
them.
"You will note -that the games
of the week are not televised and
the game of the day' not broadcast
into major league territory,"
stressed O'Connor. "Not within 50
of it. The magnanimous big league
owners took good care of that and

telecasting monejr and let the lit
tie fellows do the best they can a-

gainst 1 severe "outside competition
which the costomer gets free,
gratis and for nothing in his living

room or favorite pud.

This is the eighth year or me

radio tame" of the day. On Satur

days, it s joined Dy two games 01

the week, The Columbia Broad Broadcasting
casting Broadcasting System televises from 12

major league parks, the National,
from the other four. ''" ";

So on Saturdays, the minor

league town is fed big league base

ball for four hours or more. The
fans hear a broadcast While Dizzy
Dean and partner give them a pic picture
ture picture of an eastern game, after
which "Leo Durocher and Lindsey
Nelson take over from Milwaukee.

Wrigley f ield in Chicago or Pitts Pittsburgh.
burgh. Pittsburgh. ; ,'

It wasn't lack of interest that

gave the Dodgers and Giants the

urge to-quit 'New. York: They have

tried to give the game away andJ

sen it, too. And the Brooks have

done a pretty good job of that.

once more playing to more than

a million at home.

Horace Stoneham says he will

get as much for the Giants' tele

casting rights in San Francisco as

he did in New York$750.O00. Once

the newness- wears off, unrestrict unrestricted
ed unrestricted telecasting wiU have the same

eflect in the Golden Citv as it had

at the Polo Grounds, and nav TV

is. extremely expensive and. some
awav V

The 3750.000 telecasting swas is

uie equivalent ot auu.uuu paid ad
missions. '

If Horace Stnnphsm wnntri licfon

td Louis Peririi, he'd throw put TV

ana Diay to a lull and nthu:ia.t

park.

Lou Fermi found that much heal-

tmer in Milwaukee.

i J. J

NEW YORK Sent.- 10 UP)
Lightweight Lulu Perez' zexplained

today that reducing made mm so
fast -and accurate ne won handily
over -Bobby Bell 1 their return

TV fightat&t, Wichoias Arena.

Perez zof Brooklyn scaled 131 1-4

pounds last night' as he won" an

upset, unanimous aO-round dcci

sioii over. Bell of Yoiingstown, ,0.,;

wqo Jiad held mm tt a draw, in

the same ring three weeks ago.

- Tliat was 4 pounds lighter

for. Lulu. Belfr .favpred; at 8-5,.ren

gistered: the same :z8va as he nao

Scaled oh Aug.' 19. , ; j ,

Despite his victory. Perez, was

automatically placed on the N.Y

State Athletic Commif sion's ill-and

unavailable list for 30 days because

of a seven-stitch gash on his -left

brow, suffered in the fourth round

: When Lulu returns to action he

will be offered another TV fight at

St. Nick's with either Miguel Ber
rios of Puerto Rico or Isidro Mar

tinez zof Panama, promoter Teddy

Brenner said, i 1 -( v

After Bell was penalized t h e

eighth round for a low-blow foul,
the three ring officials 'favored
Perez zon a rounds basis: 8-2, 6-4
5-4-1. ' -;
The crowd was 1,105 and the

gross gate $2,041.

' Pacific Women's Lvague
The miss and "missus" league
started their "Mis' gathering on
the Clayton lanes. When most of
us are pounding or pondering at
our jobs, these ladies pound the
hardwood 'floors knocking down

those three-and-a-half pound maple

Dins. Just about our morning coi

fee break, 8.30 in the morning af

ter the youngsters nave been sent

off to school, tnis league swings

into action every Friday a.m.

The league had an auspicious

start the first morning, when four

teams tied for first place and four

teams landed in the cellar, now

ever 27 more weeks will change

this.

- nek
C iJXjty'U 1 f' "-vV y i -n- .15:110
1. m .,rSMB

Iff Newl It'i fast! It'i fun! It's n
- fA, original path-button ihrrl
Givai INSTANT, BRU8HLES8 LATHER
for unoothMt ihavei in Vt th
Am: Putt more moiitur into whiik whiik-ra
ra whiik-ra docs mot of raaor'i work in ad

vance, leather rintea instantly no
clogged raxor. Exclusive built-in
after-ihave comfort toothei face ia
kinder to tkin. Now America'
have. Ovef 20 million cant sold
Today get Rissl

Mittakna 3 Michitft 1

!2

'; (NEA Telephoto)
READY FOR SOME GOLFING A beaming President Elsen Elsenhower
hower Elsenhower wears a golf cap of the Newport Country Club as he
arrives at the golf course from his--vacation retreat at the
Newport, R.I., Naval ase. y

FOR YOUR HIGH-BALL INSIST
alwiyi on CANADA DRY
"High-Ball without Canada Dry
is Foul-Ball"

The only mistake the Mistakes

made were losing the last game to

the Mischiefs. otherwise they

werfe perfect.. Four, bowlerettes m

this match Went.ovi!r tne iour nun-

dred scratch sets. Mischief's Inez
Davis' hit for a 197 single gkfe.

anH 490. set. This is Dremium

bowling. Marion Howard, 'Inez'z

hammate had a 447. For the

winning Mistakes, it was PAULINE
Bunun with a 420 and Mifi Metz
ger 406.

Misfires 3 Misbfhavads 1
Bea Lombroia of the Misfires

fired a scratch 462 series to help

her .team wm three points, iromc,
however, was the fact that in the
game she tallied 171. her team lost.
For the losers, Wally Morgan had

a 406 and Croseanne Mornsey a
425.
Misifts 3 Missy s 1
The Misfits were far from what
their name implies, because after
the opening game jitters t h e y
went on to a 3 to 1 win. No lady
want nvor tho inn mark. Mvrt

Mangels had high game and high
series for the Misfits with a 148
and 392. Missys' Kitty Van Ernst's

342 was her teams tops.

B 1 II

I

f laA

Big iu rooioaii v.nampion

Must Win Title Hard Way

By LEW BYRER

COLUMBUS. O. (NEA)-Which-

ever school wins the Western Con Conference
ference Conference championship this fall will

nave eameu u.

The schedule liss moreamss
between ,Big". 10 opponents than

ever before. Ohio Mate and live

others meet esven Big 10 squads,

Minnesota eight, the other three

six.

It's a slow progression toward

the dreamed of-day when edch
Big 10 team meets nine Big 10 op opponents.
ponents. opponents. That day may never

come, but some conference fol

lowers are still hoping for it.

Time was when a Western Con Conference
ference Conference team could win the title

by beating no more than four
league opponents.

Schedules are much

now.
Ohio State, with seven confer conference
ence conference games, opens against Texas
Christian, Sept. 28, and plays at
Washington; Oct. 5. Minnesota,

withf,,eight conference

pens with Washington... Wisconsin
starts 'with Marquette and West

Virginia, Northwestern tackles
Sanford and Oregon State before

swinging into conference opposi

tion.

Purdue opens against Notre

Dame and sandwiches in Miami
of Ohio between conference en engagements.
gagements. engagements. Michigan kicks off' a-

gainst Southern California and

tougher 1 Washington State and closes a-

gainst Notre Dame.
Michigan State breaks up its
league card opposing California
and Notre Dame and ends the
campaign interrupts its league

ames, ; oj'fichedule to combat Notre .. Dame

vuianova ana iK'cinnau,
Some argue that Minnesota, with
an eight conference game sched schedule,
ule, schedule, has an advantage percentage

wise. Others contend that the
teams with six conference games
have a better chance of going un

defeated against Big 10 opponents.
There's something to be said on

both sides, but I d hate to be the
coach of a Big 10 team called upon

to meet Washington, Perdue, Mi-

Georgia, Illinois against UCLA and hois. Northwestern, Michigan, In-

Colgate. Iowa, defending champion, diana, Iowa, Michigan State and
opens against Utah State a n dl Wisconsin on successiv Saturdays.

Miscasts 3 Mitltds 1

The Misleds led in the

first

but after that

ni hv ceven oins,

it was all Miscasts. Ilelerf Winkler,
Misleds' leadoff keglerette, had
407 let which included a 165 lime.
The Miscasts did not nee any 400

set, Margie Seweil came up wim
the tops for her group with 376.
While Lottie Johnson copped ae
tingle game with 150.

f

The Pacific Sf earn navigation Company
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1141)
' -'FAST FREIGHT. AND FASSENUER SERVICES

TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR PERU AJ0 CHILE
M.V. "SALAVERRY" ...Sept. II
M.V.. "SALAMANCA" Sept. It
" TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA LA CCAIRA,
. KINGSTON, HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA, SPAIN
AND FRANCE
&S. "RE1NA DEL MAR" (825 Tims) .. .Ner. X
-(AtreondKtefied)-.
JlV.REIN A DEL FACIFICO" (1331 Tens) . . .Pec 9

- TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT

M.V. -SALINAS"

S.8. "POTOSI"

...Sept. 21
...Oct. 7

- ROYAL MAIL LINES LTDVHOLLAND
. .AMERICA LINE
-. TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
8.S. -DAtEDYK-
&A. DIEMERDYK"

.Sept 1
.Sept. 17

TO UKCONTINENT

R.S. -Lorn cowAi
S3. "DnVENDYK"

.Sejit. II
.Sept. II

ALL SAILINGS SUBJECT TO CH ANCE WITHOUT NOTICE
TELEPHONES : CRISTOBAL S-U545
' PANAMA : 3-12571 BALBOA: MMS

A ro

i

v,
7

p

:

i

iijj'.'jjyy)yniwwWH

I)

NO MISSES. ALLOWED Joe Cunningham, Cardinal outfielder, comes up with what ordi ordinarily
narily ordinarily would be a big catch as he slides across the turf holding this liner. But with the Cardt,
desperately trying to catch Milwaukee, plays such as these must become almost commonplace.

EASY ON EYES The efes
of Texas are upoa among aum
erous ether stiekout playrrs. Bob
by Bryant, the Lor g boms' pivs pivs-snatching
snatching pivs-snatching right end.

1

1311

0GDI1

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service

Arrives
Cristobal

"HIBUERAS" Sept. 1
"MOR.AZAN" Snt. V
"YAQUE" Sept. 28
"HIBUERAS" Oct. 5
'
Also Handling Refrigerated apd Chilled Cargo

New York Service

Arrives
Cristobal

"ESPARTA" ....Sept. 16
"JUNIOR" .Sept. 23
"METAPAN" Sept. 30
"SAN JOSE" Oct. 1

Weekly sailings of twelve passenger sKps to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San 1 rancisco
and Seattle.
SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSENGER FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return $240.00
To Los Angeles and San Francisco and
Retnrnlnr from Los Angeles 1270.00
To Seattle and Return 1369.80

TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2904

From
Scotland
every
precious

drop. .

Vte Scctdii in tu Blcndttty
BD. ACEC& WIHl ITS'
SCOTCH WHISKY
"BUCHANAN'S

u

Mm iucmawan a ee. itp.; taseow. tcoTtn :

DISTRIBUTORS

AGENCIAS V. H. DOEL, S. A.
V JS-U AaUsMkO Row TeL 1,7173



vi V". v 0 .v. '.'vV .'i "'v, r

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s
ft';
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if
( I , t
r
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN pAItY NEWSPAPEB V " v
- 'vJ TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, MSt ?
PAGE EIGHT
t;
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,:';
s r
; THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
i f
1
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v1,

Ml

f

if
t!
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V
6,1
5;
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Resorts 1 1

PHILLIPS Ocansidt Cottg
Santa Clara. w r"
ma, R. d. P. Phona ?"
3-1877. Criitobal 3-1673
FOSTERS COTTAGES and Utoa
beach houia, one mile past Ca Casino.
sino. Casino. Phone Balboa 1866.
Baldwin's furnished apartments
t Santa Clare Beath. Telephone
Smith. Balboa 3681.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Space for office.
CompaAia de S9" building in
Campo Alegre. Air conditioned,
elevator, eleanerman, big space
for parkin 26 M2. Tel 3-0136.
Houses
Vacation quarters available 3Vi
mot. Handy location in Balboa.
Call 8-4. Mr. Oken 2-1625.
FOR RENT: Newly built cha chalet,
let, chalet, 2 bedroom, 2 wall to wall
closet, living-dining room, maids
quarters, garage. Via Porras No.
90th Street East, Call 2-157
Panama after 6.30 p.m.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Clean furnished
room in best residential section.
' Cooking facilities. 43rd Street
No. 13.
AEC Reschedules
Year's 18th Shot
For Tomorrow
LAS VEGAS, Vev., sept. 10 -(UP)
The Aotmic Energy Com Commission
mission Commission last night rescheduled its
"Whitnev" nuclear test, the 19th
ol the 1957 series, for 5:30 a.m.
tomorow at the Nevada proving
grounds.
Scientists originally set the test
for today but were forced to call
a delay because technical prepar preparations
ations preparations were not completed. Anoth Another
er Another shot, dubbed "Fizeau," also
is on the schedule for tmorow.
However, the AEC said it would
nnlv firp one shot tomorrow. Sci
entists were to meet today to
decide which shot to grigger at
Yucca Flat. "Whitney" is exepct exepct-ed
ed exepct-ed to equal 15 kilotons or 15,000
tons of TNT, while "Fizeau" will
equal about 10 kilotons. Both shots
will be triggered from 500 foot
steel towers.
Revival Services
Begin Tonight
At Paraiso Church
Beginning tonight the Bethel
Mission Church of Paraiso will
Conduct foun nights of revival serv services,
ices, services, beginning each night at 7:30.
Russell Cloer of the U. S. Air
Force will be the preacher for
the series of meetings.
The meetings will be marked by
the singing of lively gospel songs
and choruses, individual testimo testimonies,
nies, testimonies, and special vocal numbers.
The four nights of revival serv-'
ices, which will be directed by
the Rev. W H. Stewart, will cli cli-jnax
jnax cli-jnax a week of missionary activi activities
ties activities ponsored by the Bethel Mis Mission
sion Mission Church. The general public is
invited.
FOR
AUTOMOBILt INS. CALL
LOU UUCKUtT
Your choice of Co. with
Premiums Financing
Maryland Casualty
National Union
U.S.F. & Q Colonial
Continental Casualty
Tels. 1261 t604 Colon
6007 Front St

Famous GLIDDEN Paints

GLIDDEN PANAMA, S. A.

Phone
3-7711

Apartments

ATTENTION, 0. I.I Just built
modem furnished apartment, I,
2 bedroom, hot. cold water.
Phone Panama 34941.
FOR RENT: Cool furnished
apartment to couple without
without children, $65.00. Via
Porras No. 120. beside Roosevelt
Theatre. Overlooking SAS Com Commissary.
missary. Commissary. Phona 3-5024.
FOR RENT: Modern 2 bedroom
apartment in El Cangrejo. Ter Terrace,
race, Terrace, living room, kitchen,
maid's room and laundry, gerage.
For further particulars call ele
phone 3-4968 from 8:00 a.m.
thru 5r00 p.m. telephone 3 3-6737
6737 3-6737 after hours.
FOR RENT: From October 1st
1957: Two 2 bedroom apt.
two (2) baths (one including
shower and tub) extra targe sit sitting,
ting, sitting, dining room, maidroom and
bath, and laundry space. In select
modern apt. House No. 374, "F"
Street. El Cangrejo, attractive
garden and putting green. Stem Stem-pel.
pel. Stem-pel. Telephone 3-0319, during
business hours.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, one bedroom, hot water.
Perejil, Second street No. 1 1.
Phone 3-26943-0533.
FOR RENTi Completely fur furnished
nished furnished apartment at El Cangrejo,
Alberto Navarro street No. 48.
Two bedrooms, living room, din dinning
ning dinning room, bathroom, kitchen,
balcony all around, maid's room
with bathroom and garage. Phone
2-2883.
Hurricane Carrie
Pommels Atlantic;
8 Days From US
MIAMI, Sept. 10 (UP) Hurri Hurricane
cane Hurricane Carrie pommelled the open
Atlantic 1,950 miles from the U.S.
mainland today with a wallop e e-qual
qual e-qual to "three atomic bombs ev every
ery every 30 seconds."
In its advisory at midnight the
San Juan, Puerto Rico, weather
bureau located the bruiser of a
storm near Latitude 19 S north and
Longitude 50.7 west, "or about 1,000
miles east northeast of San Juan.
The advisory said Carrie carried
160 mile-an-hour winds at its cen center
ter center and was moving' toward the
west-northwest at 11 miles per
hour.
The storm, still eight days from
the U.S. mainland at its present
pace, was expected to move in
the same direction at the same
speed with "no chinge in sizez or
intensity" during the next 12
hours. Carrie, the weather bureau
said, was "no immediate threat
to any land area."
A super Conste'lalion from the
Navy's famefl "Hurricane Hunter"
squadron took off last night from
Puerto Rico and was due to reach
the yicinity of the tempest around
3 a.m. The plane was piloted by
Lt. Cmdr. Robert R. Kidwell of
Daytona Beach and Ens. Gerald
Pai-ham of Jacksonville.
Median Income
Of US Families
Is $4800 A Year
WASHINGTON (UP) The gov
ernment reported today that half
the nation's families had incomes
of more than $4,800 in 1956, but 7
million families received less than
$2,000 each.
The Census Bureau report said
the median income figure o
$4,800 was about 8 per cent higher
than in 1955. (A "median" divides
a. distribution excatly in hall.)
Hiaher incomes were reported
by both farm and non-farm fam
ilies.
Part of the greater farm earn earnings
ings earnings resulted from non-farm
work, the report said.
On the basis of 43 million fam families
ilies families in 1956. the census showed
this distribution of' earnings:
3.500.000 families, or 8 per cent,
received more than $10,OCK).
17 million families, an addi addi-,;onal
,;onal addi-,;onal 40 per cent, ha incomes
I etween $5,000 and $10,000.
16 million families fell in the
$2,0O0 $5,000 bracket.
M the bottom of the ladder. 7
million families nearly one-fifth
o" the nation had incomes less
than $2,000.
Nos.
3-7712

LEAVE you AD WITH ONB OF OUB

LtVituJtvPi ajl. ut ruuLit-ACiUNts wo.
ts a du Aa-i a i tiv iff r..iHi

VAN-DEB-JIS SO Street No W FABMACU L BATURBO Parqa Wsml

th Beti vut Tbtr4fc col.un:
Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1950 Packard
2-door sedan, radio. Can sea ar
Balboa YMCA between S;30 and
6:30. Ask for Farr. Or' phona
Curundu 2178 office hours.
FOR SALE: 1957 Fairlane 500,
radio, safety-pack wsw 4-door,
town Victoria, low mileage. Good
price. 249-A Gatun. Tel. 5-362.
FOR SALE: 50 Studebakar
Champion, 2-door, overdrive.
Runs good and looks goods.
Leaving Isthmus. A bargain at
$250.00. Albrook 86-5213.
Quartes 137-A.
FOR SALE: 1953 Pontile
coup Custom Catalina, clean
inside and out. Excellent buy
$850. Qtrs. 120 Albrook 86 86-4245.
4245. 86-4245. FOR SALE: 1952 Buick Rivie Riviera,
ra, Riviera, power windows, radio.' Dy
naflow. Excellent Hres, paint.
Call 6-206.
FOR SALE: Semi Custom 1950
Chevrolet 4-door, new wstires.
Call Jack Lewis, Kobbe 3166
during th day 2-5347.
Boats b Motors
FOR SALE: Stuart Diesel ma marine
rine marine engine with reserve and re reduction
duction reduction gear, electrical equip equipment,
ment, equipment, standard stern gear and
installation equipment. Maximum
1 1 B.H.P., propeller 1 7 in. x 17
in. See us for particulars. Cii
Enqleton, S. A. Calla 28 No. 12 12-129,
129, 12-129, Tel. 2-4970.
leading
CAMERA S:
International' Jewelry
155 Central Ave.,
transports; baxter. $ a.
Packers Shipper Mover
Phones 2-2451 -2 2562
learn Riding at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
, Riding b Jumping Classes daily
3 to 5 p.m. Phon 2-2451
or by appointment.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Aeent
Gibraltar life ins. Co.
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama t-0551
DOROTHY CHASE'S
Fall classes begin Oct. 1st
Include Ballet, Tap. Toe.
Women's classes and tum tumbling
bling tumbling for "Little Guys."
For all information
Call 2-1751.
n"w canon.
Model V
Yfith F 1.2 Lens
t
.-.ft M.
Panama N. fork
Col6n
Chaplin's New pic
Best Ever, Says
Charlie In London
LONDON. Sept. 8 (UP)-Chrlie
Chaplin arrived her today for the
premiere Thursday of his litest
picture, "A King in New York."
He described the movie, wnicn ne
wrote, directed and in which be
stars as the most exceiting he
stars as the most exciting be
Chaplin left the United States
five years ago. At that time he
was under criticism for alleged
Communist sympahties. Persons
who saw advance showings of "A
King ia New York" said it was
the actor's answer to the criti criticism.
cism. criticism. However, Chaplia denied.lt
was anti-Americaa.
TAKI ON NEW AIRS
ST. PAUL, Minn. ft'P) The
Cf T3,,1 lapmifi.l Af Ik, lisp.
chants Freight Co. will take oa f
new air. The firm is icidln
Whiff and Poof to the terminal to
pep up sale.. Whiff, and Poof are
a ja of noa-deodorued skunks.

aw-

w

AGKNT OR Ol OrriCKS AT 13-3T

9 ioitcry r vaA ZAitVU central
a UAlccurtt n cvrn a mb 1 an- j
Lmtrai Avenae lz.ibs tu. 3t

MISCELANEOUSN Home Articles

FOR SALE. Half price for new
demostrator Sundscrlbcr dictat- -ing
machines. Models for xcu xcu-tives,
tives, xcu-tives, secretaries, also ( pound
portables, and combinarions. On
Used Portable cembination
$ 1 25.00, at No. 90 Call Eitu Eitu-diante,
diante, Eitu-diante, Telephon Panama 2 2-4916
4916 2-4916 or 2-3142:,
W must mov all eurTED WIL WILLIAMS
LIAMS WILLIAMS FISHING TACKLES to
make room for the 1958 line.
Prices reduced 3 S.;1 op ell T;
W. items spin rods, boat rods
and spin reels, (set- yours whil
they last. An unusuaf bargaip at
Wm. Violett Surtplr Serviu,
No. 19 44th street. Bills yist.
Phone Panama-3-6318.
Cub Reck 17
Holds Fttld Day
More than a score of enthusias
tic Cub Scouts, and their dads
and mothers, participated in the
annual field day for Pack 17 at
Fort Clayton last Saturday mom-
ing.
Winners of the morning long
competition, which established
claim to the coveted honor den
pendant, were the boys from Den
2 with a score of 21. The other
dens finished as follows: Den 5,
16 points r Den 4, 13 points; and
Dens 6, 1 and 3 in that order
with 9, 8 and 5 points respective respectively.
ly. respectively. The winners of the Individual e e-vents
vents e-vents were:
Baseball throw: Allan Bennett,
Den 5, Tim Stokes, Den 2 and
Cris Wells, Den 5.
Sack Race: Cris Wells, Dick Taf Taf-fe,
fe, Taf-fe, Den 6'and Gary Crowden, Den
5. i -' ;,
Three-tieggd Racr.rSkipMoore,
Den 2, Eddie Kinnett, J)en 5. and
Rutherford Brice, Den' S. ?
Volleyball Relays Den 21 (John
Scott, Tim Stokes, Skip Moore
and Clifford Farmer; Den 4 (Ga (Gary
ry (Gary Crowden, David Ramsey, Greg
Barger and Ronnie Crowden);
Den 6 (Dick Taffe.; Hasty Horn,
Steve Gerecke and Dennis Stokes).
Wheelbarrow Race: John Stokes,
Den 2; Rutherford price and Ga Gary
ry Gary Crowden.
Tug of War: Den' 4 (John Ress Ressner,
ner, Ressner, Gary Crowden, Greg Barger
and David Ramsey); Den 1 (Har (Harvey
vey (Harvey Hanlen, Scott Norris, J i m
Sullivan and John SullivaTi; Den
5 (Steve Gerecke, David Gerecke,
Eddie Kinnett and Allan Bennett).
Barracks Bag Relay: Den 6
Dick Taffe, Hasty Horn, Allan
Bennett and Clifford Farmer) Den
2 (Tim Stokes, Dennis Stokes,
Skip Moore and John Scott):
Den 3 (Gaines Howell. Rutherford
Brice, Ralph Hill and Paul Brown Browning).
ing). Browning). Balloon-burstlnff Relav: Den 1
Scott Norris. Jim Sullivan, John
Sullivan and Glenn White); Den
4 (Gary Crowden, Greg Barger,
Russell Clover and David Ram
sey); Den 5 (Cris Wells, Allan
Bennett, Steve Gerecke and Eddie
Kinnett). .;"
Nikita Cracks
Down
LONDON, Sept. 10 (UP1 So Soviet
viet Soviet Communist Chief Nikita
Khrushchev has ordered tighten tightening
ing tightening party control of the Russian
armed forces in a move apparent apparently
ly apparently foreshadowing a conflict With
Defense Minister Georgi Zhukov,
diplomatic reports revealed today.
3

NEWS MW

ANCRT JACK Artor ack Palanc charge a news photog photographer,
rapher, photographer, throwing a '.enter of document at him and later h ov ovine;
ine; ovine; him against the wall in SanU Monica, Calif. -.Palance pa
pea ied in court for a temporary alimony bearing and went in into
to into the rampage when the photographer tried U take hi picture.

RTBEET; MANAMA-'.-fJBREBU;

Ave. 45 LOUHDfcS rHAfAv-jc 1
a a ... ma tPAVA nnuv Inaiaa,

ttrcat a FASMACIA 'SAS" Via PottM 1: NOVEDOM A THIS Bastt

,
"' FOR SALEf Dining room table,
mahogany; 4 chairs, $10..- Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2-1683. '
FOR $ALE Tw Rattan chairs
excellent condition $25.00 each.
1 Rattan chair needs retinshing
$10.00; 1. footstool $5.00. Qtrs.
,532 Curundu, Phone Curundu
;2U4V,t;V''?:'-i'i.V;;:':rr.'
FOR SALE: Bedroom end din dining
ing dining room sat, household articles.
Ujs Cruca street No 746, Bal-
: ba. :
FOR SALE: Refrigerators, half
' price. Folding bdr. Chines, end
table. Medium .. sis wardreba.
Stte.45th trt No. 9,, Ap"
' 5J4-'e "'';,'..' "Is '.. '.' ' r."X"'-
Services Tomorrow
For James Hammeil
James Hammett, a retired em employe
ploye employe of the Panama Canal Co.,
died, at ma nome in Panama, ci
ty Sunday. .: v,
-A Jamaican, he was itfyeari
oia,
Funeral setvlcea wlll be, held
tomorrow afternoon at the
Morning Star Lodge Hall, f ollow ollowed
ed ollowed by the funeral at 4 p.m. to
the Pueblo Nuevo cemetery.
Mr. Hammett was a member
of HeliopoHa Temple No.. 1,. of
the Mystic Masons, ana 01 tne
Sojourners Society. He Is sur
vived by his daughter, Lena;
stepsons Charles and Clifford
WauKh: stepaauenter Mrs. jsa-
na clunis; Miss Louise CarglU
and other relatives.
Cuban Army Alert
Far Possibility
Of New Uprisings
HAVANA. .Cuba (UP-Eenof
of possible new rebel outbreaks
held Cuba's armed forces. on the
alert today.
Havana was outwardly calm, but
the army, navv.and police forces
were at full staff and an air of
tension surounded Cuban govern
ment offices. The rumors, uncon
firmed, hinted at new rebel action
following their defeat at Cien-
fuegos last week.
American newsmen who cracked
a government Blockade ot tne im
portant south coast sugar port es
timated that some 250 persons died
in the Thursday revolts
Al Waldron of United "Press
Movietone and George Seeding of I
Time Life magaziznes quoted a
funeral director as saying 206 per persons
sons persons had been buried in the Azea
Cemetery alone up through Satur Saturday
day Saturday morning, y -'
Annual Festival
Thursday Njaht
Af Rainbow City
The annual music festival of the
Rainbow City High School will be
held Thursday night at 8 o'clock
in the Rainbow City Gymnasium.
The program will" be presented
by the High School Chorus and
Bank under the direction of R. T.
Prescott. v
A similar program is being pan
ned by the Paraiso High School
te be presented1, Thursday night,
Sept. 19.

rHECJADjW -ffneft U AmCIAft

vriqWMi iw VT'V: a"Tr
Atmmwitamm 'Aval, flfl 31.1 HI am rAJUnACtn
. .'
SERVICES
3-minur. car wash $1, ateam
cleaning f motor $5, waxing f
cars $5. Auto-Bario, T tans-Isthmian
Highway nr Saaru
For the best In T.V. and letro letro-nie
nie letro-nie repairs, telephona: Panama
3-7607 U. $. Television.
FOR SALE: Entire household
furnitur. Call 3-6286 after
5:00 p.m. .' ;": y. -'V
Soviet AF Chief
Warns US, Allies
Against New War
MOSCOW ( UP ) Marshal Con.
stantin Vershinen, chief of Rus Russia's
sia's Russia's air forces, warned yesterday
that the United States and its Al
lies would be wiped out in world
War III. ;
Vershinen. in an article in the
Communist 1 Party newspaper
Pravda. said the Soviet Union was
prepared te go into action 'at a
moment s nouce wun -n u c,i e r
weapons, "intercontinental missiles
and ; -submarines ; equipped with
rocket, missiles with atomic and
hydrogen bomb warheads.
It was the kecond Soviet warn
ing within, two months cf. Rnsia's
war potential, .wst jy ,uepuiy
War .Minister Alexander yasnev
sky said the .United States faced
a erim fate, ft.it. attacked Russia
Vershinen said cities like New
York. Chicago and Detroit were
virtually defenseless against the
latest Soviet weapons. He admit admitted
ted admitted the Soviet Union might suffer
from attack from the West, but he
said, "we shall suffer' losses, but
these losses will, be smaller than
those of a country With a 'dense
population 'and its industry .concea-t
tratea in restricted areas
"This particularly refers to the
Western European countries and
the United; states,?, "he said.
Vershinen1 warning apparently
was set jff by the reported dec declarations
larations declarations of Western leaders that
the Soviet Union would b de destroyed
stroyed destroyed in any new war but the
United States would be saved by
its remoteness from Russia! air airfields.
fields. airfields. Hungary Becoming
'National Prison
Special Report
NEW YORKaUP) A pecia'
report charged today that terror
in Hungary has increased since
the Russians put down last fall's
rebellion, turning that country
into. a "national prison."
The report was issued by a pii
t
vate group to bring the world up
to date on the situation in Hun Hungary
gary Hungary under Soviet domination. It
was released on the eve of a spe
cial session of the United Nations
General Assembly which meets
tomorow to debate the plight of
Red-ruled Hungary.
The document charged there is
one guard fore very 100 citizezns
in that country, with a network ot
Soviet military prisons established
and an army ot guards seal sealing
ing sealing the borders against escape.
It charged that conservative es estimates
timates estimates snow that between Jan. 1
and Aug. 1, at least 2,000 persons
have been executed or sentenced
to death since the revolt was
crushed with the help of Soviet
tanks and men.
At least 25,000 persons have
been imprisoned or sent into
forced labor and 12,000, mainly
I
young, persons, have been deport deported
ed deported to Russia:
The special report -was pre
pared by the American Friends
I
I
of the Captive Nations and the
Assembly of Captive European
Nations in association with the
Hungarian Freedom Fighters
Assn., the Hungarian National
Council and the National Repre Representation
sentation Representation of Free Hungary.
It was -edited by former diplo diplomat
mat diplomat A.. A: Beiie Jr., industrial
consultant Leo Cherne, theologian
Reinhold Niebuhr and Mrs. Clare
Booth Luce, former U.S. ambas
I
I
I
I
sador to Italy. -
The report was prepared to
cover the five-month gap between
the close of the Uji. special com committee
mittee committee hearings on Hungary and
the special U.N. session.
It was based oa -carefully-screened
information given by re-'
cent refugees, confidential infor
mation smuggled out of Hungary,'
and detailed analyses of Hunger-!
laa newspapers and radio broad broadcasts,
casts, broadcasts, iU compiler said.
I
BUSY 1IITHDAY.
DE BEIRA. Portugal (UP)
Saturday was a busy birthday in
the household of stone mason
Evaristo Mendes. Twenty seven
births occur ed withia hah" an
J
hour on boy, seven, pigs, sere a
raooas ana u

Miscellaneous
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A," DIABLO
BOX 121 1, CRISTOBAL CX
Lesson
Ders Walt 'school of anc
Ing knights of Columbus Hall
(upstairs). Balboa 2-2363.
Nw Spanish course for English English-speaking
speaking English-speaking people at University of
Panama from September 16 to'
' Octebar 31. Classes in morning
hour on Monday, Wednesday
and Thursday. Beginners: ;30;
. Intermediate: 9:30; advencedr
10:30 a.m. amphasi on conver conversation.
sation. conversation. ; Registration 4 aires d y
opened at Secretary's off ice
WANTED. Undastanding adult
to share home. Call Ft. Kobe
6167. Ask for Siamese kitten.
Registration For
3 FSU Courses
Still Possible
Registration for three' Florida
State. University courses to be of
fered at the Fort Clayton educa education
tion education center has been extended un until
til until noon tomorrow. c
The three courses" are p Ian e
and analytic geometry, on Mon Mondays
days Mondays and Wednesdays; western 4sU
vilizaztion on Tuesdays and Thurs Thursdays
days Thursdays and trigonometry on Tues
days and Thursday.
Those interested in registering
for any. of these courses should
call Fort Clayton 7137, 3220 or
2171 .before noon Wednesday. r
I

BIGGEST SELECTION
USED CARS

I
I
I
I
I
1952
1951
1953.
1952
1952
1955
1955
1956
1951
1952

C&LPAN

OLDSMOBItiE "98" Sedan
Hydromatic, Radio, Seat Covers ....p50.00
. PACKARD SEDAN -.
Patrician, Ultramatic,
Radio, 2 Tone, tc. 450.00
; PLYMOUTH SEDAN j 2 Tone r 895.00
FORD-SEDAN
rordrp-Matic, Radio 2 Tone 750.00
BUICK TUDOR SEDAN
Dynaflow, Radio, Seat Covers ,750.00
CHEVROLET CONVERTIBLE
Radio, White Tires 1,850.00.
FORD FAIRLANE TUDOR"
6 CyL, 2. Tone, Seat Covers 1,650.00
FORD RANCH WAGON
W.S.W;. JTires,, Radio ... 2,195.00
OLDSMOBILE ','88" SEDAN
Hydromatic," Radio, Seat Covers . .'695.00
OLDSMOBILE i "96" SEDAN ".
Hydromatic, Radio, Seat 1
Covers, etc . ... : . 800.00-

I
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I

FAST FRIENDLY FIAyCLG
'' : i-A'V uv Visir our ;:. ? T"t T"t-.
. T"t-. Ultramodern Showlot C-
PANAMA 3-7010 AUTO" R0W -e : COLON 44

. WANTED: Stnographr xp.
ri.nced competent. ;t Shorthand
: English Spanish. : God spoiler.
Columbia Pictures, Eusabio Mo-
rals. v i

Russia Will Not
Beat US In Missile
Race Says Qua rles
NEW YORK (UP)-Deputy De Defense
fense Defense Secretary Donald A.
Quarles. said confidently today
that Russia will not beat America
in the intercontinental ballistic
missile race. ; : .
He told the U.S. Conference or
Mayors that thifc? country credits
the Soviets withy substantial prog progress
ress progress in long-range ballistic ..mis.
silerwork. ;.),,-,
But he belittled the Russian
claim of Aug, 26 that an inter intercontinental
continental intercontinental ballistic & rocket had
been tested successfully. He said
the Russian announcement creat created
ed created "an impression that suhstan.
tiallyN exceeded the truth."
After examining all the evl evl-dence,"
dence," evl-dence," Quarles said s in a ore.
pared speech, "I am confident
that we will not be outdistanced
in this so-ealled ballistic missile
race.".
Using "straight talk" which he
said was stripped of political en entanglements,
tanglements, entanglements, Quartes said the
U.S. missile program is not be
ing spared from, the- administra
tion's search for defense econ
omy.
Some Democratic senators have
contended the- missile' program is
being curtailed and have called
for a speedup in -view of the Rus
sian announcement.. ;
"So long as we.have well prov
en manned nomner. systems, mat
have the ability to penetrate and
recohnoiter the target area,
Quarles said, "ballistic missiles'
will not even be ,the preferred
methods of accomplishing the
mission."
H a
I
I
I
. v. -"
J
J
'J

t



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 5T y

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER (
PAGE NWlVi
TERRY AND THE PIRATE
BY GEORGE WUNDER
THE STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE
Nature Columnist
" By WILSON SCRUGGS
f 60T TO EE CASUAL. TERRY
woulonY be misssure would.
MU5T THINK I COME HERE
HOLLY LEE; WOULD (SHE'S WOW THE
ITf COURIER'S
BRUNETTE. BUT
NATURE
QUIT WORRYING
SHE'S ONLY ELEVEN.'
;d

i

'they can't EE rZ7r"v";

WHAT'S MY C
r UKETBLOl

1

t- 1 C MRB
f HI, HONEY. HAVE V-
Iagocoday?

THENEYf I
TUATS U

OPTEN FOR A SWIM
" -:

V'OR REDHEADJ

l J

:R

or!

1 ses

It.

lace

FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS

On the Prowl

By MERILL BLOSSER

SAYS TO PUT

YOUR. FOOD UP

Vy yur op reach op

' Jmc AMlVUuS AT

7MATOU6Hr

TO DISCOUR.-

Aee ANy
FURRY
RllBALAM

1

) mi,

I I I ME AND MV BIO MOUTH Jlgel

PRISCJLLA'S POP

Cry and Hue

' By AL VERMEER

1 JUST CAN'T

GET OVER-IT'

. BOTTS... IN HER

OWN HOME.

MRS

KNOW

DEAR... I
ALMOS

JEALOUS

IT'S WRONG, )

BUT 'Mr

HEAVENS!! KTHATYI

I'M ACTUALLY)- ISN'T H

-PROM ENVY

WITM ENVYiXr61-'

.THAT'S FBOM CBVINkS

ON TWS CHEAP

MECKTie ? i

v.

re 't mi

Alton:

ALLEY OOP

Greetings!

NOT BAD MX RIGHT.

NOURSELF. J MJL RIGHT.

YEH.JAO...: OOP.' CMON.VOU

I OU MAKE A ajV3. 1 WMT

PRETTY GOOD f J! TO CATCH UP

.lOOMIM' IISJJUN! WITH THAT C

' WAGON,'

.4-' ."I

MAYBE WE CAN
BUM A SLUG
OF SOWBELLY

AN BEAMS
OFF EM4

C YEH...ONE OF 'EM J
1 THINK A JUST TURNED
THEYVE I ABOUND... AN' JVlfS!
V SEEN US' IS FOlNnN 0t

BUGS BUNNY

v Landlnf Strip

Ufee iter

, , C UI?K! THEFE
flgS lijju jr,

L 2

I'm in luck X

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Yes, Luther?

By EDGAR MARTIN

Ik'f WOULD YA MIND WALKIN' V

(to&ite True Life Adventures

P1CKIN ON "THE
WRONG. CHICKEN.

-4'

CAPTAIN EASY.

TOO LATBfTHB HAWK
BBa3MBS ANVARE THAT
; MB HAS ATTAs3KBt? ';
NO PEF:BKJ6eUES6
, UUNSLB FOWU.

J (g 1WT fcy NEA 8"-'C. Inc. TJX. .. (rt. Off.

Marie SUIli

VI

HIE

CHAUPFELMC

XA1T5 HJ THB
CAR.. MAKIE-
cHAuee auo

IL

L

THSY'Rt TOO EktbEZ 10 aT

M OUT OP TOWN flkn I'D

KATHCR. MIA ONt PLIdHT

ANI7 66 SUkS TCP 5AFfr

il3

U PODS AROUNO THB COEklbe

THBY SAIP TEP

WILL 6E6e3USHr

TO TOWN IK) THB"

WHT. HEIm

500N(ril REPORT

' SUSPICION TO

W5

1 1 1 i

By LESLIE TURNER

YOU'LL 0 AftHORS IK) THft Tl THOUGHT YOU'D

LAUNCH THAT 8RIN45 A PROM-fKV TO W MB
INENT JUPdi ABOARR WREC! FROM CHECMO

wr ON WUR IA4T

6TOR.1t GUESS X

4 i;f

W II AV WI'UV i,.L

DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
T Um your Tortun" for ttxlty from lh tttn, writ in the Itttm
( the tphabat corrMpendinc to the numcrali en the line et the ettre
i i .i u u.k:k umii ur. hitM. Ym Will Aim! St fun. t .: f

jraiwH wn... V j

113 4 171 T Q H 14 I 14 IJ le 17 II IT 21 2Z 7? 24 23 M

T."MS HAS TAKUSLSO
. WITH A rSSATHBKE17
i '! URV .THE MALAVAN

COCK O' THE WOqDS,
' YHB" VIU7 e5TO3K lKOM VsWkl
TV9HTlNa BANTAM COCKS AIDES BKBP.

S4

illGil

H. U.L ru. Oifc L

MOBTY MEEXXK

SIDE GLANCES

By Calbraith

n (9 e 8-2 W

And Where Ii He Now?

By DICK CAY ALU

" rSTHATMXL
' ( FRED? WINTHROP

I THINK HEPLANtllNO

A SURPRISt FOR MX).

FIRST HE PESTERED ME

FOR A PAPER BAG...

A

-Tf

I THEN HE

i:

RUSHED

UPSTAIRS

THE MINUTE

HE SAW MX)

COMING UP

THE STREET J

4

V t. : A

I .1"

1 HAI 'I I I I I

, I. w

OCX BOARDING HOUSE

MAJOR HOOPLR

OUT OUR WAY

. j.L'''A IFEO CDM& IM HEgSTOMAjA"
i 5EVEN-I JAkTE WHEN IMEV b Sf PkTL
TUeNsV WAS IN 3AIL.X J, m.c ARE AW
TMft I MOPEO AGAINST' rH-f ic
I' key; mope (TviAswT i
: 1'' pt

By j. r. Williams!

TH6 Lrr ty
TMK AMCAM

H V 'rx X ; v. A'

. I V 1 S I v-

- TJL HW".

lCrtainly "they're Lima beane, Louise! That's how they
" look before they're froxen and put in packager

ViCAii OF 'MAD SLASHER' Doctors work over Lillian Man- j
tyla, 37, a victim of the "mad slasher", who knifed four per-
sons Sept 6 In Chicago's busy Loop area, raising his total
Victims tO Six for the cast Week. PoUrC her stnnorl nr V,lr

manhunt for the assailant, believed to be mentally IU.

Faltering Philip :

Vbx'tp Ufa Is titlee' mb bruise
r-plrs wee 14 lest bis hw Cke arw.
A. CUMineda. fart tbe Hrbt tW

PANAMA-MIAMI . . -,4 ;i; ;v.$55.00
PANAMA-PHILADILPHIA ........ 43.25

- -i

Phaadelphia $
- Panama

-I

0(Q)oo
70,

. II ARVXTD FORCXa HOmV. M HHM
4 ot hri. C t M Th L4
- Jaltua LtiaM r Star PlarhmiM
4 a J S'nttare 14 M p f Stw7
4 B T-o : cm MrS
ije m mumm
Cfurterr et Aerertse Paaama lrw
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573 U33 3 M7J

--- -



M
$P. 11. 1957
7
. "ft
.Read story on page 7
i r S
Alt INDEPENDENT
incur
"AILV ; NEWSPAPER

I

a

me

if:

fe
l'
S
A'
I it

ll

U 4

ft XT

J

v

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attama-

ilm

"Let tht people know the truth and the country U $afe Abraham Lincoln.

2nd YEAR

PANAMA, R.P, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1957,

rm cents

rm

US Arms
As

Planes Stream Into Middle East
Dulles Foresees Peaceful Settlement

WASHINGTON, Sept. 10 (UP) Secretary of State Jolirt Foster Dulles : said today h believes the crisis In 4;
Syria will be settled peacefully. ) ' S s
Dulles emphasized that the United States does not favoy peace at any price, and is ready to act, if neces.
Eary, to meet Russia's efforts to undermine the independence of Middle Eastern states.
He spoke as major- elements of the powerful U. S. Sixth Fleet patrolled the "east-central. Mediterranean" ancf
jet fighters and other arms were being sent to severaL Middle East countries; 1 .. '!': .,
Administration officials said the U. S. plane deliveries are in various 'stages. A dozen speedy -F-86 Sabres

already have been flown into Saudi Arabia., 1 '

X

STABS OF 'JANUS' The Theater Guild's latest production
opened last night. Here Jessica (Dorothy, Walsh) and Denny
(John Mayles), the writing team known as Janus, show their
clippings to Gil (Richard Eisenmann).
Audience Enjoys First Night
Of Carolyn Greens 'Janus

"Janus." Carolyn Green's

phistlcated comedy, opened last

night to an entnusiaswc auai auai-ence
ence auai-ence at the Theater Guild In
Ancon with the humor effec effectively
tively effectively expressed and sustained
throughout the play, except for
a brief lapse at the opening of
the third act.
Bo much has alreadjr been
written about this neat play
since its completion of 250 per performances
formances performances In New York and a
full season's tour that a summa

ry of Its content seems hardlyi

necessary. The fact that It is
currently playing to capacity au audiences
diences audiences in London and Oslo
brought Isthmian theater-goers
' to the first night's performance
anticipating an unusual and en entertaining
tertaining entertaining comedy. Due, in a
large measure, to the able dl-
rectlon of Len Worcester, they

were not disappointea.

Dorothy Walsh displayed a
piquant charm that made the
role of Jessica become alive
from the moment the curtain
went up. AJways delivering
her lines in a polished and
professional manner, she
showed poise and a distinct
flare for comedv as well as a
certain original Ky in her por portrayal
trayal portrayal of the respectable wife
and mother who slips away
from home each summer to
spend two months in New York
collaborating with an English
professor in the writing of
historical novels.
Her collaborator, Dennis Rus Russell,
sell, Russell, the other half of "Janus,"
the pen name under which they
write, is well played by John

Mayes, who wall be remembered
for his comedy performance in
the Guild's "Remains to be

Seen." He succeeds In maintain

ing the accent and manner of

the English professor while be

lne convincing as the summer
author and lover of Jessica.

As the cuckold, Gil, Richard
Eisenman turns in a consistent consistently
ly consistently fine performance, being most

eiiecuve in tne scenes where

without uttering a word, he

evoKes some or the best laughs
of the evening with a raised eye-

Drow or a snrug or the shoul shoulders.
ders. shoulders. Richard Eisenman is an old old-timer
timer old-timer in Canal Zone theater
activities, having played in
"White Cargo" at the Balboa
Theater in 1931 and having
acting experience going back
to 1928 when he was with the
Community Players in New
York. His last appearance on
the stage of the Theater Guild
was in "Remains to be Seen",
when he played the part of
Dr. Chester Delapp.

FLY
EAC&A
TO COLORFUL
Costa Bica
Juit 8) minim dying
- tune fma Pinun.
No rP rtqtund
br VS. citucns or
, Kttivr PiaamuiittM.
Ptcraiaque "m
Ktaerj fttita
Qunue
IACSA PANORAMIC ROUTES

Wellcast as the literary agent,
Miss Addy, Beth Wolcctt. reiv reiving
ing reiving on her professional back background,
ground, background, makes the most of all

the humorous possibilities of her
role while appearing to enioy
herself Immensely. Along with
Ray Gordon, whose appearance

as Mr. Harper, the revenue

gent, was a high point of the

evening, she prevented the nlav

irom oecommg tedious and repetitious.

Costumes of the men were
well chosen and contributed to

the successful characterisa characterisations
tions characterisations but sagging hemlines and
exaggeratedly billowing skirts
at times detracted from the
overall picture of Jessica.
The set, which was designed
and constructed by Morton
Gornlck, Bob Johnson and E. R.
MacVittie, created the appro appropriate
priate appropriate atmosphere showing care careful
ful careful attention to detail. It caused
an immediate favorable reaction
when the first curtain went up
and put the audience in a recep receptive
tive receptive mood. F. N. Neuntan

Dulles at a news conference,
virtually ruled out the use of arm

ed lorce by this country under
the Eienhower doctrine unless

the situation becomes much worse
He said he does not btliev
there will be outright aggression
by Syria. Should it occur, he
added, it could be dealth with
bv nation in the are.

Dulles' said this is the .way he

sees the situation today: that e

vents could happen which would

change the picture completely.
Dulles said many oeoDle ap

parently including the secretary

him sell would agree with

Sept. 2 statement by Indian prime

minister jawanariai xsenru mat

the Middle East sitution is dan

gerous and explosive. Dulles said

he did not believe there is any

reason to take issue with Nehru s

assessement.

Dulles said in his opinon the -sit

uation will be worked out peace
fully.
One 'basis for this judgment,
he, said, is that the United
States is taking" the situation
seriously, is doing something a a-bout
bout a-bout it, and therefore a peace peaceful
ful peaceful solution is likely to be found.

If the United States did nothing

in the face of present problems,

he said, there would be great like likelihood
lihood likelihood that a war could develop.

An air- caravan of giant U. S
transport planes flew into Jordan

yesterday with an emergency ship

ment 01 arms delivered on orders

of President Eisenhower to bol

ster the tiny Middle East king

dom against Communist threats.
The airlift of six Air Force

Globem asters and two flying box

cars touched down at Amman s

sun-baked military airport shortly
after noon with 40 jeep-mounted

106-mm recoiliess anti-tank rifles,

ammunition and small arms.
(In Damascus a Syrian govern

ment statement reacting to the

U. S. arms.shipments, bitterly ac
cused the United States of begin

nine "provocative acts" aeainst

Syria. Syria accused the United
States of sending warships and

possibly planes close to its tern
torv in an "open challenge." Mos

Cow Radio charged the United
States was seeking "pretexts" to

land troops in Syria.

(Ia, Cairo-. Egyptian

President

Gamil Abdel Nasser announced
his unqualified support for Syria
in the present-crisis. The British
government expressed "deep

anxiety over the Syrian situation
and formally endorsed President

Eisenhower s decision to re-amrra

the Middle East Doctrine).

, Pay $75 Landing Fe

who had flown over thousands of

miles of ocean and desert to .de

liver the rush cargo, had to wear
civilian clothes as part of clear clearance
ance clearance requirements to land in Jord Jordan.
an. Jordan. The United States also bsd to

pay $75 landing fee for each

plane.

The Jordanians showed by an
impressive turnout that they were

glad to get the arms, part oi a
U. S. ten-million-dollar military

aid grant -accorded by tie U. S

government last spring at the

time of the crisis that threatened
King Hussein's throne.
With the exception of the King King-vacationing
vacationing King-vacationing in Spain virtually

every top government nd army
official was on hand to watch the
U. S. planes roll up the runways,
open their massive maws and dis

gorge the green jeeps. Stencilled

on the jeeps in yellow paint were
the words: "Special Project.' i
' The arms were formally turned

over to Jordan by u, !, Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador Lester Mallory, who was in
the place of honor on a wooden
airport dais, flanked by the, three-

man regency council representing

Hussein'; '5.;?A

f Mallory turned to Deputy .Pre

mier and foreign Minister aami
Rifai as he walked down the line
of gun-bearing jeeps and said :
1'Give this to his majesty from
iis." J- :,:'-:
"Operation Good Hop"
The arms airlift was called
"Operation Good Hope." To Jor Jor-Hsnian
Hsnian Jor-Hsnian it symbolized their hopes

of holding on-1 their uiaepena

ence in the tense Middle East

where the outlines of cold war
were sharply crystallizizng as the

Araos lined up either on, the side

of Kussia or the West.

; But to the U. S. airmen from

Military Transport Service It was

just another lob.

"This is just another run for iis

said Maj. Matthew J. Freda, of

VIIU1VUU11, A! 4 VTIIU VUllllilHIlUVU

one flight of five Globemasters

from Dover Air Force Base, Del

aware.

Russell L. Gallaher

Dies At Gorgas
After Brief Illness

UMaJUiaj

Nowadays office workers don't
consider themselves Jote unless
fhey miss the first coffee break.

1

Xo 0 0 (TODAY) !tf;i t
1 I

I STARTS 1:00 p;m RELEASE X

Russell L. Gallaher. retired

Maintenance Division employe,

died at Gorgas Hospital at 4:45

this morning after a brief illness
He wan 55 yearn old

A native of Beardsely, Minn
Mr. Gallaher served with the U

S. Army during the First Word
War and was with the U.S. Navy
from 1921 to 1927.. He was em employed
ployed employed in Panama and Colon for
several years before joining the

Canal organization in lHja.

He was employed as a general

clerk with the Municipal Engineer

ing Division, now the Maintenance
Division, and later held the posi

tion of senior clerk and account-

in a clerk. From 1954 until his re-

tirement in February of this year,
he was Supervisory Supply Clerk
in the Cristobal office of the

Maintenance Division.

Since his retirement the has

been making his home, in Gorgo Gorgo-na,
na, Gorgo-na, Panama.
Surviving him is a brother,
Claude, of.Bamer, Minn.'
Funeral arrangements wil be
announced later.

'Never Been Sick
A Day In My Life
Then- Drop Dead
NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE Eng.

Sept 9 (UP) Albert Cook, a re

tired. 76-year-old eiera, spent 10
minutes here yesterday telling an

evangelist meeting how good it
was to be alive.
Cook said he never had seen a
doctor, never had suffered a days
illness and enjoyed every minute

of lui uie

Drunk Seaman Who

Fell Into Locks

Out Of Gorgas

k drunk n man who fell' from

the Virginia Trader whilft the ship

was transiting rearo jiiguei iqcks

last week has nee uiscnargeu
from Gorgas Hospital and sent to

the (juaranune aiauun ai vuiuii.
He seemed none the worse for

Local 595 Has

20th Anniversary

This Thursday

his experience

center

I MuU operators on the

mall had "ahooed" Joseph T. Ku-

linski back onto his ship-earlier

as the man tried, to Jump irom

the 'deck to the center wau.

1 i
a tew minutes later a man-o

verboard cry was hear. Kulinski
had gone over the stern of the

Canal seamen fished him out
and a Goraas doctor summoned

to the scene recommended hospi-
ralixatinn i v

The Virginia Trader proceeaea

without him.

Comet To Make Its

Non-stop Atlantic

Crossing Tomorrow

LONDON (UP) A Cornel II

airUner(!r vanguard of a jet-propelled
task force, leaves for North Northern
ern Northern Ireland' today en route to a

bombing competition in Florida

with the best oi tne u. ait

Force. ., '

The fbur-iet Royal Air force

transport is making it first east east-west
west east-west nonstop crossing of .the
North Atlantic with 28 persons
aboard Wednesday.

It will be followed later in tne

month by two more Comet li s,
four delta-wine Valiant Jet bomb

ers, two Vulcan Jet Do m Deri ana
four piston-engine Hastings trans

ports. -.-I-,?-; ;

The Valiants and Vulcans will

take part in the U.S. An- Force
Strategic Air Command bombing.

navigation and reconnaissance
competition;, at Pinecastle Air
Force Base, Fla., from Oct 30 to

Nov. S. : ,,.

Spare parts,- equipment and air

Local 595 will observe the 40th

anniversary of the NI FE and its

u own zutn anniversary ;Wtth a din

ner ana open-meeting at the Chiva

univa .Clubhouse Thursday at
n m - '

Local 595, had its origin in 1937.

its purpose was to drrect the un

sausiaciorv conaitions mat were

tne lot of Army and Navy employ

es at uiai ume,

"Improvement of tliose conditions
would have been doubtful without
the whole-hearted support of the

ivtJt. in Washington. .The years
since the inception of Local 595
have witnessed steady gains. More

adequate travel facilities for State

side leave. Establishment of the

Credit union, bus service for Cu
rundu are but a few of the ac

compusnments." There are many
more benefits tangible and intan-

giDie," an IMF is communique
said, J-r";;f .; -A ," ; ...
The communique added "in its
future endeavors, as in the past.
Local 595 will not inject itself into

controversial disputes, whether in
politics, economics, international

relations or otherwise. It will not
attempt to interfere in any way in

tne determination of administrative

policies. .. ".. v : y ;
. "It will stick, strictly to its own

particular; field betterment of.

the Federal service in genera! and

promotion of the common welfare
0?' Federal employes here on the
Zone. Here it will be Unhesitatinn-

ly aggressive and judging from
the records, will be effective and
successful."

'I'ikaiMtt.'

' AMERICANS IN RED CHINA

(NEA Radio-TeleDhofo

Members of the party of 4l

Americans whn arrived in nommiinict rh)nn:.: -LJri,i

the World Youth Festival in Moscow display an AnYertcan fl2
aa, members of a Chinese youth group -greet them at the ran?
1 -way station in Pelping. in center of the- group hoTding the "a
are Guy Carawan (left) i of Los Angeles, and Louis Athonotf
(right) o Brooklyn, N.Yl

k

US Student Expelled
From Red China
ro Depart Moscow

MOSCOW f UP1A 22-VPar

American student, who was ex expelled
pelled expelled from Communist China for

reiusmg to surrender his U. S

passport t to customs officials.

coped, to leave Moscow today on

ma way pacK to iionpon.

Shelby Tucker., of Pass Chris.

tian, Miss., sarrived in Moscow

Sunday from Peiping. He said he
intended to leave Moscow. as soon
as possible, and return to bis law
studies at Oxford University 4n

Tucker called on U.S. Amhassa-

dor Llewellyn Thompson today to
report on his brief visit to China.

since tne emDassy oas not re

ceived any instructions from Wash

ington on measures to be taken
against Americans who violated

the ban on travel to China.

Thompson suggested Tucker re

port to the embassy in London,

Tucker was' one of 42 Americans

who accepted an invitation to vis

it Communist China in defiance of

tne u.s. Mate Department ban

after. the? 'Communist ,i sponsored

youtn lesuyai in Moscow.,

Tucker said. "I wanted to eet

out tot China) as quickly as pos
sible.f V-v :r,.!.y

16-Year-Old Gets
15 Pays On Charge
Of' Vagrancy
, A man known as Roberto Nu
nez,z j who gives his age as 16 and
his nationality as Colombia, found
the, steps of the Union Church in
Balboa an inhnsnirnhlu nl.

loiter in the early hours of yes-

v :Tri'jV ''ft ;J'i-'
Nuiiez told .the ; Balboa Magis
trate he had come-off a banana 1
boat at Colon, but his method of
having entered either Panama or
the Canal Zone was not supported
by documents; ., a
Judge John E. Deming.senteDO!
ed Nuiiezz to a days in jail on a
vagrancy charge,
Meanwhile, authorities are try. h
ing to learn how the. youth got in into
to into the country, . y

Before hi and other Americans

left Moscow for; China', Tucker
said, they were told they would

not need passports and that Chi

nese visas .issued on separate pa-

paper would he enough for entry.

However, Chinese authorities de

manded the passports when the

Americans reached the border, be
arlrlprl Turlri aaiH thai at ipast

35 of the Americans handed over I 5:13 p.m.'

the passports but '.'I refused." .,

Weather Or Not
. This weather report for tha

24 hours ending S a.m. today,
Is prepared by the Meteorolo--gical
arid Hydrographie
Branch of the Panama Canal
-Company: -:
:yy ";'! Balboa" Cristiba 1

TEMPERATURE:
tHigh ..; tl

Low -..... 74

arMTDiTYi f
High 95
Low i ....4.;,, 60
WIND : ", : f
(max. mph) v W-2

RAIN (inches)

84
75

92
79

WATER TEMP: -.

(inner harbors) 84

NW-14
.03

83

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11

4:55 a.m.

11:07 a.m.
11:20 p.m.

(yaiea lioi

m im mm mwt mar --
m ffiea TL t-HU

IM A tM Ma.

IACSA

-

GREAT
FESTIVAL
14
Wonderful

SHORTS

1:15, 3:10, 8:05, 7:00, 8:55 4

1

""en he sat down, collapsed and 'crew are- going on the Comets
iA V I'aua and naatinv

PIT

umm

died.

1 V

-f- 4.

JOE DAKOTA

4A
-r"r
m

' Btarrtng
8 JACK MAHONTT
. LIANA PATTEN
CHARLES MrGRAW
BARBARA LAWRENCE
with Paal Birch Aatbvny

Carat

A

r

't,

4

TODAY-BELLA VISTABY ''ffig

PRICES:
.75 .40

Shows

2:30 '-'4:30 Ii

0:30 -0:05
p.m.

COkOWkyMlUXI .-""'r'fi 7

REQUEST!,

' Starring:
. James Mason '
Joan Fontaine : ;
Dorothy Dandridge
Joan Collins
' Michael Rennie
' Harry Belafonte

TOMORROW

WEEK E ND:
k'iiiis'Yi

JWJL. sliiiswroolcecl oti a desert island rwlthi yWO !M2H2T I

theLTTTLEHUT

.J

FOR THE CARDINAL New York'i Mayor Robert T. Wagner. J

leu. uovernor Avereu Mrr-man or New yotk ana rranua
CarclnaJ Spellman, right, are chatUng during the religious
rally held In Yankee Stadium. The high point of the rally, at attended
tended attended by an estimated 50.0OC Roman Catholics, was a Solemn
Ponlific Mass In thaato-giV.ng for the 25th anniversary of
Cardinal peUmana installation aa a Bishop.

mix

i i t

TherejWas a'young lady named Ava,;;
Who, when wrecked on ah isle asked a fY-a,;

She confessed to a yen .','V: -For
TWO handsome men, .I -v ;

; And preferably no one to sava.-

.;;;

oomedy

In feluartiln COlrORl