The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02335

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
A A TCLCIST FlITES
cunMiw?AV.(ll)
i P-T'.,. :-
la i:fj yc?;;i
AND TO SAO PAULO
RIO DUENOS AIRES
7
III
rV
, -r
) i ,( M
1 J
the people know the truth end the ceuMry it tttfe
.
."
Tef. Panama M)975
. ' i
, i
82nd TEAR
. f PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER S, 1957,
1 fITB CERT

I

1

1 r. (We

Deportee Vlforks Three Years

As" Pin-boy, at Balboa Alley
: 'i i-ir tnJr. niifhrt F. rrnwc askH from

" ) t ji"io you mean w v, j V
his fcencK today, "that this man who had been fPt has been
workiny rijht here in a l overnment buildtoif Jn Balboa lor the
PaSrwaVexined to the Court that defendant, leary Earl
Chantrell, 27, Panamanian, has been employed on a da-to-day
-basis as a, pin-boy at Balb.oa bowling alley.
. Sm-h rmnlore are not processed by the Central Labor Office,

since they are paid out of a petit csh fund and are not eon eon-sidered
sidered eon-sidered federal employes.- .. t v
' Chantrell was caujht when he went to the Central Labor
bfffce, apparently In hopes of a better job. , ,.

The d'efenadant admitted that he
Un u ''Luis Antonio as nis
first names, and that he has an another
other another alias, "Agustin Sumgan.
1 ri,r,(roii haH n Ions record ot
petty thefts on the Canal Z o n e
and ot otner oitesca --------
ac. .Am.iv.o d term in tiamD0
ZS 1951 to" 1953. Chantrell was
m vpar. while work.
ing in -a Panama laundry he -re,-
At that time, Judge Crowe sen
tenced him to two yeai
hut siisnended the
f vp vears on conm-
tion that he break tio law oi Pa
Iha TanAl 7flne.
- Today Chantrell faced both J
of rpturnins! and a charge
Of having broken his .Probation. t
In pb.ding for himstlf, Chan-
work and that he Was "flolng a a-To;
To; a-To; all right." (He
reported a being
ky's more wii.ble P
also argued that he did not hang
a ound on th. Zo. but got right
on a bus and went homewhen
the a"Y closed,.
Dr. L. S, Carrmgton pj d
that' Chantrell was. trying .to lead
a decent life. i,
fjpcrscrkr
U:.d:r Quoslbnlng i
1 h '" ,,;,; I
A m v' pnt b?C t ,f a
hrma (jucsLHined at Uie
Police desk has been sent to t-or
br
gaTHospH.Uor.ment.t observa
Manuel Zapata, 31-Pana-
i. ,..t.', rnnrt-with assault
weapon. His ease
was continued until tomorrow, for
nu;nfriet' rnort--v.
1 "LSST wM being questioned by
the Balboa aesn
. he suddenly pulled a 7H mch i kitch kitchen
en kitchen knife and lunged at a Panama
detective, Cristobal Despalgne,
who was standing nearby.
Provision Govt
In Haiti To Hold,
General ElectionsV
; PORT3 AU PRINCE, Sept. 3 -(UP
The,mtl:tary government
i7MterdaV set' Bern,
Antrn frtr e-eneral elections.
, Haiti has been without an
elected chief executive since the
ouster of Gen. Paul E.; Maglolre
last December .The present
. finree-man, military Junta, head
ed bv Gen. Antonio j&eoieau,.
the th provisional regime. -'
in addition to a ; president
voter also will elect 21 senators
and 37 members of the lower
house.': Voting will be secret.
Arms 'Shipments
To Arabia," i
Jlyjt'ffi IIUCI 'f
JERUSALEM -J l Israel, Sept. 3
CUP) Foreign Minister Golda
Welf aa'd yesterday Israel views
wlth'ii 'extreme,?- anxiety" the
lante shipments, of arms to
neighborinft Arab' nations whose
avowed 'ntentlon is to destroy
thti country.
Mrs. Meir particularly cited
arms supplied to Syria bT "one
of the world s great' power" as
a threat to Israel's' well being
Sw Al .:
and existence. The reference was
to e Soviet Uhion..,-
,
GiPaysjT6';$25-'-Fines
In Balboa
Tjxnard Rivmond Gale. 42. a
V. S. soldier, was given two $25
fines in Balboa Magistrate's coun
today." TZ't''
... fM kkl ue trivinV
e other for failure to remain at
the scene of a accident accident--
- accident-- Gale reportedly attempted to
eonceal bis identity is connection
with a minor accident.
Intoxication Kets
$251Fines For Two
ia me wise m uj "T7
weekend, tw toen were fined i
Balbo Mseistrste'a Court today
for iBtfnioion.
Richard Norel Rhodes. 14. an
American soldier, paid $23 for be being
ing being drunk oa 4ta of July Avenue
ia Ancon.
Domenir Ortert. 22, Panama-;

man, was g.veo a $10 tine.

.Judge Crowe said he appreciated
this, but that the defendant had
given him small choice in the mat matter,
ter, matter, having broken the law and
his probation, not occasionaly, but
daily for three years. ,
- Chantrell was given a suspend suspended
ed suspended sentence on the new defense
of returning.' But his probation was
revoked on the old charge1 and he

was sent to serve m& two ;year
Knife Brandishing f
Bandit Sent To Pen
For 18-Month Term
'A 27-year-old Panamanian who
milled a knife on the cashier at
La Boca Service Canter and grab
bed -4.50 in nickels ana quarters
before he was overpowered will
spend the next 18 months in Gam
boa penitentiary.- ; i "-
- When asked this morning in
U.S.i District Court if he had any
thing to say-for hlmsef, George
Ulysses Allen repueo to juage
Guthrie' F. Crowe. i
"Ahuolutelv nothing;, sir."
The "court was told that Alien
i iinpmnlovpd and has no home
lie sleeps around on balconies of
buildings, wnere people ieea nn
now and then.
jiirftfa Onw observed thai the
man wa apparently affected1, by
considorsble povrrty, but that his
crl!1ie that ,f Tol!jli'y. wa xs
ry serious oife"se.
ist 8ccepted D1gtrict .At-
nrnpv Knowland K.- Hazard's Tej
commendation fbr the 18 month
term.
Panama Line Sails
Wednesday Loaded
With College Kids
. The Panama Liner Ancon is
scheduled to sail from Cristobal
Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock
for New York with a large num-
oer .oi locai resiaenis aooaru.
S.?J&JmXI$.
are several, .college students who
are en route to school in the U U-nited
nited U-nited States after spending th,e
summer vacation on the Isthmus.
, Also sailing on the Ancon: are
Lee R Beil, Station chief at the
Madden Dam Hrydro Electric
plant and Lt. Clarence D. Howell,
of the Balboa Fire District, both
of whom are retiring from Canal
service. They will be accompanied
by their wives. ,
$100
tv
iIlUlfcCJl OliVMlK WaS U15
.(.m- !:' T .-
V';r"

aaAa, ha j waa -viu imuci iitxu" s. riUtif no vtiw, fc
,- He was fined $100 after belniriers It necessary." Martlnea ex:

picked up at 3 a.m. Aug. 21 on
Diablo Road. , y ;
r
1.
iiiiiisai
TRAPPED Motorman William
n crude bandaged -.-

he was pinned. In the cab of his subway train when It smash smashed
ed smashed Into the resr of another standing empty at an elevated
station in the Bronx, : N.Y. Hochsteln was trapped for more
than two Vimir. and k-a rpmnwH nlv after doctors amtJU-.

i Uted his left foot- At least 13

Draniff Pilots
Threaten To Go
Out On Strike
1 DALLAS,' Texl, Sept.' S (UP)-A
member- of the National Media Mediation
tion Mediation Board was in Dallas today in
connection with a threatened strike
of 485 pilots Of Braniff Airways,
Inc.,: at midnight Friday.
He was Leverett Edwards. The
airlines asked the board Satur
day to request President Eisen
hower to-appoint a special board
to examine the facts in the case.
The airiine operates in bothtthe
United States and South America
and a strike, should it become ef
fective! would affect service on
all its lines, a Braniff spokesman
said. Ti
The nresident has not vet ap
pointed a special fact finding
hoarder . x
Should he appoint such a hoard
the strike would be postponed un
til 30 days after the board report'
ed its findines to the President.
The airline pilots association set
li:au p.mv'i r naay. as n ucauitwj
,A spokesman for the association
said the dispute concerns a retire'
ment program," rates of compen compensation
sation compensation and rules and working con conditions.;
ditions.; conditions.; I ;
'Creeping Jerror' v
ReVunied Dy Rebels
It. i v. t.! VUJ
The rebel campaiRn cf "creep
ing terror,? resuming ; after
nearly K montn of uneasy peace
in- the "principal cities of Cuba,
injured six men and two wom women
en women over the wekeend,
.vThe casualties were caused ny
n time bomh set off In the bar
of the Hotel comodoro, 'In the
suburbs of Havana. Three other
bombs exploded In TebeMnfest TebeMnfest-ed
ed TebeMnfest-ed Santiago, buV caused, no re repotted
potted repotted casualties or serious dam'
are -
Damage caused to pipes In an
earlier bomblnft deprived the
Santiago suburb of Mariano De
t a"mrr nf -walvr '-'"'--' :
Meanwhile, two leading oppo-
sitlon nollticians were in the
hands nf t.h nolice today. In
formed sources said their arrest
war a symptom of a growing
split- in anti-government ranks
in cuba's siow-mouon revoitx
Guillermo Martinea Marquej,
President orthe Diter-American
Press1 Association, and Jules Du
bois, chairman of its Freedom or
The press Committee visitea
President Fulgencio Batista last
n'eht to trv to oersuaae rum
to end censorship of the Cuban
Dress. v k 1

r ni.i.t. i.ij ti.. I., m.n fhit'nume atv wnr vmvs in uiusu

vCUSU W1U UJ lU m-y
iMhln "mill i ..nnt.lniio
ir" I. it- ZZ.ZZmMi-i
pressed -r hope that rt will soon
come to an end.
ii
Hocbstein, 51,' his face bloody
tnr rescuers to free htm after
other persons were injure tL

ENJOYED HER RIDE IN JET Sister Mary Aquinas of Mani Manitowoc,
towoc, Manitowoc, Wis., a 62-year-old Catholic nun, tells Ma, Chester
Biedul. who flew her In a let from Madison. Wis., to McGuire

. KM Force Base, N.J., how much

Aquinas said tnai sne "was excited out never airaia" during
th one hour and 45 minute flight.-
1 (JJEA Telephoto)"

Chiva Chiva Resident Gets 90 Days
Fbr StatutoryAflape of 15-year-old

The experience of mankind
through thousands of years has
shown that young women should
not b iTnilpted by older men,
Juciae CiuuuiP I Crowe said to
day lru passing aentence lor
statutory .r ape.
Defeiidant Franklin Benja
min Harewood,, 22,' Panama Panama-'nian,
'nian, Panama-'nian, pleaded guilty; He lives
on a land-lease at Chiva Chi
v ham ,1S-vear-oM Pan-a
' amanian girl who willingly en
tered into set relations wltn
him last December, the court
was told.
Relations were resumed In
February and again In July. But
on the last occasion the pair
were caught by the girl's father.
The girl will- be 16 years old,
the age of consent In the Canal
Zone, before the end of this
month.
District Attorney Rowland.. K.
Thief Gels Term ;
For Burglarizing
Land-Lease Home
On his plea Of guilty to hav-l
ing burglarized a land-leass
..-.li .v-i... i i
,iv.., A
oay uaii.-;.- un :,-yviiwm, ;
Panamanian, received
an 18
month oenitentiary term today.
It was suspended, however nn4
he was put on probation lor
three years?' -j.-: .v
In U S. District Court It was
brought out' that Gonzalez stole
a pair of blue jeans, a bottle of
cooking oil a ehirhneV.Jojr t
kerosene lamp and & white sack.
The defendant claimed that
lock broken ott the loor of the
house had been smashed by an
accomplice who could not be
found.- y -' "V yr
District Attorney Rowland" K.
Hazard told the court Gonzalez
had also taken a pair of shoes
and a live thicken from another
land-lease home. He threw a
-0
S
way the shoes arter they
wet: but sold the chicken
tor
Aged Mail Found
Undernourish
- ... ,

NEW YORK. ept. J UP1 An tha hospital mates a. Tne youne-0-vear-old
-recluse -wsu-found man. now about Jl. Is ono jf

wt mrA a v Anffarins frAm mftlnii
trition and shock. In hU posses-l
aion, police found 54 bank
hoarm hnwln deDants of imiw
tban 1100,000. V r
.William canty. retired
ter carrier, lived alone ln a1
three-room apartment in Brook
lyn. The Brooklyn superinten superintendent
dent superintendent said Canty always paid his
montdy rental of $85.23 prompt
ly. HlUaidrthe aged man spent
only i I a week on food.
Km r.bon said cantv had toidi
J had Inherited -lot nf
moivy' a lew years ago said m-'
ve.ted It in stocks.
He was reported In' critical
condltioa at a hospital.

she enjoyed the flight. Sister
'V
Hazard asked a six-month Jail
term -for Harewood, who fin finished
ished finished the flth trrnde at the nlrl
Rpd Tank ?rhool. and -who work
ed iov a. t.it fur a,.Canl Zone!
contractor
! Acting -Public Defender Dr.,L.j
8. uarrington askea jor a sus
pended, sentence. He said
"You have to take into con consideration
sideration consideration the living conditions
oi tnese people living out mere
in the jungle., These things will
happen under those conditions."
Judge Crowe said lie knew it
was difficult sometimes for peo people
ple people to realize the gravity of such
offenses..
Ho atdded that he was uncer
. tain' of the standards of mor morality
ality morality which the Congress of
the t United States intends to
Impose on people raised in
different environment from
those-under which the laws
are usually applied. (
At. this point the Judge un
derlined that molestation of
young, girls is universally con
demned, 'adding that lt often
led tq heartbreak, illegitimate
children; and other undesirable
situations.
Carrington pointed out that
the girl'' was very close to the
age of consent. -.
Judir Prow xnid that nevr.
theless the defendant's act was
etlll illegal,, and morally wrong,
ana mat ne deserved some pun
lsnment:
: Noting that Harewood had
already been In jail 45 days, the
juage gave turn anotner 90 days
CZ P(obalioner
PeplledTo Report
By Phone In Future
- A nrobationer who found It
difficult- to come in by cayuco
and bm to the Ancon Court Courthouse
house Courthouse will be permitted In the
future to make his montniy re
port to the probation officer by
telephone, but under the eye of
mIImimii at th ftamboa. ata-
JWMVn"
tion.; -,
- Arturo Mendieta told the court
tt took him 43 minutes by cayuco-to
come Into the Canal
Zone town of Darien. Then he
had to spend 10 cents for bus
fare to Damboa, plus another 10
centrto Ancon.
During recent weeks, he said.
his, mother naa come in ta re re-nh4.
nh4. re-nh4. fnr him hut had rone to
vt w I -
iilpht Children.
District Attorney RowlahdK.
Hasard did not recommena
MenflleU S nrooauon oe revoa-
;eLs,lnstad he askea tn me

Jet-iderenaans M KuaonuQca, ihi

this was done.
Illegal Peddling
Nets:$10 Fme
Peddling four wrist watches in
namboa when he had no
cense to oo so newea a i nm
to Balboa Magistrate's Court for
Lu' jrl SUW. a Jl-vtar-oia itai
Jian. r:,"

THE PULSE
OF PANAMA

ONLY ONE professor "has ap
plied for the vacancy created by
the resignation -of the sector of
the National institute. "v ;
Prof." Jose' de la Cruz Melo is
the, only aspirant for the post
leit vacant by canos M. oane
gos, who quit for a number of
reasons, Including health.-1
Melo, meantime,, has received
the spontantaneous support ; of
a number of parents of students
attending the National Insti Institute,
tute, Institute,
' Efforts are belnar made bv Pres
)dent Ernesto de la 0uardia to
soive tne eoniuct between pork
rtaiiers and wholesalers.
' Yesterday the President re
calved a delegation of pork
butchers to hear their side of
the conflict, This morning he
heard from the retailers, some
of whom are on strike.
- The President has been forc forced
ed forced to resort to receiving visits
from the public1 daily Instead
Of the usual oiice a weak.
In addition to the pork re retailers,
tailers, retailers, today the President re received
ceived received delegations Including
bartenders, radio announcers
and farmers, most of. whom
were in shirtsleeves. ,
One morning paptr reported
today- that -ibe' VjMrt.f
rinanot 1 Tr' e y .n r
dement of public fundjin the
eltv of David. r
According to the-paperappar-
emiy for some time- now em employes
ployes employes of the Public Works Min Ministry
istry Ministry have been selling govern
ment construction material to
private individuals below cost
and pocketing the money, thus
enabling several persons to
build .homes at the government's
expense. .. .:,v .
Antique Stirrups
From Colombia
At CZ Library
An extensive group of antlaue
stirrups from Colombia of the
Spanish conquest and colonial
eras in this hemisphere are on
display in the Canal Zone Mu Museum
seum Museum through the courtesy of
Mrs. Allen M. Stuhl.
These strrups, classed as col collector's
lector's collector's items, are particularly
fine examples of the brass and
copper stirrups used by conquls conquls-tadores.
tadores. conquls-tadores. The collection includes
a very rare pair of Moorish de design,
sign, design, as well as others of lesser
value but rare also. Also includ included
ed included Is' a curious child's stirrup.
.The display is located In the
rear half of the second lighted
case in the Museum, Civil Af
fairs Building and will be on
view through tne month of Sep September.
tember. September. it
i
i
m
9
f
4-t
A
i
t
f
i

HANGING TS SPAfJl Window washer Henry Scott. 54, hangs
from the fourth floor of a building In Boston after a sup supporting
porting supporting peg in one of his straps broke. BcOU dangled for. 20
minute beZort being rescued,

Survivor

Of Fiery Wheel
Slipping Off ;

KENDAL Jamaica, Sept.
of the worst railroad wrecks
defective wheel slipped off

ir crashed.
The accident occurred one-half mile from! Kendal
Sunday night as an excursion train sped back to Kingston-
from Mbntego Bay with 1500 Roman Catholic weeker.i;
yacationists aboard. -' 4 -rf
The death toll neared 200. '
The 12-car train hit an S-curye about half a m'jlft
west of this town, jumping the track, demolishing nint

coacnes and spreading panic.
More than 700 were injured.

There were tales today of dra dramatic
matic dramatic escape.
One of those who survived was
Pauline Donald, a teenager whose
aunt died in the crash.
It was she who indicated the
possible cause of the disaster.
.."They had trouble "with a wheel
on tne way out ana some men
tightened
said.
on the
c" It
b.
rv
.wheul ha slipped oM-' "Th
crash amash -everything came
Pauline wJs riding in the fourth
roach from the end. It ran off the
tracks and mounted an embank
ment, but she escaped.
The stories of others who sur survived
vived survived were almost miraculous.
A little girl, the only one alive
among the dozens in the car in
which she was riding -.a. a woman
who lived because she crouched
under a train seat... a man who
survived because he merely stood
and prayed as his coach was de demolished
molished demolished about him.
The derailed coaches tumbled in into
to into a ravine where two cars were
smashed to splinters and others
were heavily damaged.
Scores of persons trying to
jump to safety (fell on th tracks,
to be decapitafitd or otherwise
mutilated bv the .wheels.
The only worse such tragedy oc occurred
curred occurred in Italy in 1944 when 520
rail travelers trapped by an air
attack suffocated in a tunnel,
The worst previous peacetime
wreck happened five years ago in
Argentina, where 119 persons were
killed.
A spokesman for Acting Gover Governor
nor Governor John Stow said as far as bad
been determined there were no
American tourists on the tram
The excursion was led by two
American born Roman Catholic
priests but all others on the train
were, oeuevea to oe wamucaiu,
the spokesman said.
Maj. David Smith, aide: to me
J
MM
i-V
i
if
'
. t
I
t
t
1.
1

,h. at Moniego buj, snv-igries Joseph Eherle. 58. of J

"But if gave .trouble againcY"., v's vCollese. Kington -..n

way iaek. itlf J, .Mulct S8. Pavifir rf'

It icl !4 fira nd "-' "') 'C'jrfh it hu z 'n t.
slippn)V wrre 9"-i : v"v et f Hntei-iy-ii ed in Boston,
fstt and someont idf '1 n r ..tul'it j Edfiv of Stirinafi!;f.

Tells
'-M -V M
3 (UP) A survivor at aha
WW?
in history said todav thof-W
the speeding train just before
governor of this British 3st
Indian island in. th Caribbean,'
accompanied Stow to 4he wreck,
''It's certainly .a major disaster,'1
Smith said.' ,.
He said several 'more of the in injured
jured injured were not expected to live.
.The train was carrying, a tour
group org anir ed by Father
w leniA
Father Eberle escaned unhurt.
Malette was injured. Ho was was-taken
taken was-taken to a nearby hospital..,', ,
Smith said the excursion traia
had gone from Kingston to Mon Mon-tego
tego Mon-tego Bay and was en route back
to Kingston when the" wreck 'oc 'occurred
curred 'occurred at 11:15 o'clock Sunday
night.
He said the coupling" between between-the
the between-the third and fourth cars of the.
train 'broke. Three or four cars cars-plunged
plunged cars-plunged into a ravine. The others
smashed into one another; t
scoping and trapping most : Of fi s
victims in the wreckage. V t 4 :
coacn cumDea up an emnanxnj 4
on one side of the ravine: H
Some of the cars-were smash, 3;
But Smith said many of the pas passengers
sengers passengers in the telescoped i ears
were trapped with broken asms!
and legs until every available
doctor, nurse, policeman and vqN;
unteer rescue worker eouldC j" 1 1-them
them 1-them free. ',,, -J,
All of the dead and injured
removed yesterday, Smith sal .
Some of the injured were breu .Q
to Kingston, but most were 'takwn
to hospitals in towns nearest her
wreck scene. '";..
An island wide appeal t w
made for blood donors to help. 1.
the emergency.
Now Proceed-TficyV
Have Found Steno:
The' prettiest, and by far .
youngest, of the suceesioh 01
stenographers who have-been try
ing to take testimony in U.SrDis U.SrDis-trict
trict U.SrDis-trict Court was on the job tods
tnr th nllinff of the criminal doc
ket. ".!--
Tall slender Kay Quiggle sewn
ed to be keeping ,up with ls
,..a th. tmwmrw a.n in. nnn. ..
Mrs. Quiggle, who was bora it
Hawaii of Japanese, parentsep,
has had some experience in taic- -ing
evidence given at Army court -martial
at Camp Atterbury, Ind.
She is the wife of Sic. Howara
e. Quiggle of Ft K 0 b b e,: Th -Quiggles
came to th Isthmus. lata)
ia gmay. ,.. .-j -.--
, 1. 1 1 M 1
Friday Thirteenth
Has Significance
For JudgeTCrowe
AssemoJT : uepuvy Aqun-xiq
Sanchez Garcia said he wasn't -superstitious
today when
appeal of a coavlduon oi a stop
sign violation .was set for Fri
day, sept 13 in vs. Diatrwi
Court, Ancon. is
in fixing the date for hearing
the appeal. Judge Guthrie T.
Crow said it reminded -htm ot
a skeleton In his own closet. H
recalled that the date on h!c
he was admitted to the prfttct
of law was a Friday, tha lS'.i.
Deputy Sanchej was rr -sented
In his appeal of the rr'
nor traffic matter by stttsrr ?
Woodxow d Castro.

t.4 WUiWaftflC- is'-sa



THS PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIIT NEWSPAPER Vr

Ati0lAX Dr AK-ltA-w X0t
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
iin rtilt n.WM THB PANAMA AMmiCAN MM. INO.
rOUKWO Y NDJON OUNVU-. IN 1MB .
: HAMMOOIO ARIA. BDITOa
. i B7. H SntdT P. O. BO '4. PANAMA,. ..,
I 11 TlwHHl -0740 B LINM1 J
' II f CABIB ADDMaa. PANAMWMCAN. PANAMA '
C04.O OrMca. 1B.I70 CINTRAL AVINPI MTWUM 1m Ama1tTN.fTNim
, Ttmbm R(miSintativu. Joshua 0 ; POWIRS. INC.
I . 4B MADIAON Ave. NW VOK. 4I7 W. V.
i-slhe Teamster Lind
ft rMiH?',?aX.:
y BMW flAMOBl

1 ' I

!

Labor. News
; And;
Comment"

f T . 1.7 I BO

' .. ... --

u .... ....

THIS" IS YOUK FORUM f Ht READERS OWN COIUMH
tha Mail Bob to aa mmm lenim fee naJtn TImj imhu America.
LattU m$2i I Jr'Xl, and ar. haadlad I- A wholly c.nf id.nti.l
"leu eentribule a lettereoe't be Impatient If doesn't appeal Mm
Mxfcday. letter, are published la the order received. ,
Please try to keep the lattart limltad le Ma page length.
'Identhy f letter writers b hald la MM ""J"" .
1 Tail aewtpaper luumn no responsibility or statements ar eplnlom
. expressed m lattan from readers.

THE MAIL BOX r

V

LA BOCAVPAEK jtffc

- kavine- read In the papers that La BocawUl be ftwUly
gut S"thlilctur7bX? long -we've been wonderta? whether
wy!wtual lans have been made for the area, if not, I.nK
in are little more than vacant lots with a iew swings nu
"aVIS to'em are pleasant places where a lankily can spend
few mtautefor an afternoon, where the parent may relax
?n a bench under a tree while the kids run and yell .a n d
tmnble to thrir hearts' content without disturbing the neigh neigh-'
' neigh-' hori 6r eetttne tangled in passing traffic. Yes, sir, Id like, to
E5L SrtTta tee canal zone. And where could you find a

rtnf Yhr it than at the La
.away for most families nor too
- LIGHT
Slri.
' .....

since wnen nave we
t thafltte legal to steal? We

i Tnttr anrt now we seem w oe ai- i& ga. m
Snt aftemooS ci can supply the date) I was parked injny
car at i nte Net S at Fort Davis when I saw one of the guards
.tc wht looked to me like a San Bias. This San Bias had
a Sizable package of fluorescent light bulbs.
.' as I am in charge of some personnel too

was an everyday occurrence. They told me the San Bia,s" 07
1 U to of those Spanish American guys, who owns his home
', dow here, and is supposed to be some ort of godfather to
heNSdSue American is going t0 cpver up for an employe
. iA.i h i raueht with a packet of fluorescent light bulbs. I'm
! SdVls nofth?ing
wlthAIt ia government property hlch I Imagine the employe
' totended for the market in Panama City. But the MPa 1 have
not vi.n caUed. on him again, and J understand that nothing

" hu been said or done in his

duct wVot "be tolerated In
ONE" PITTED CUP
Sir:
Hease reprlnfvthe recipe

tt EESSrp&tt lelrnfUlln the
4. -.r..V. 2,niiT iai Vftonstantlv left oVt.of your

at fpitter cup,pot even onC Tve never offered1 them a
gUck, plain; and as for'line": Juice, thafa for you. t- av
, itCt your vef sionfof Mrs. Smith's "Sopa Borracha
1 1 i x Isthmm Wedding Cake
' 1 .sponge cake baked In a 12x8x2-Inch wax-lined pan
', PyrUa "cups sugar, 3-4 cup light rum, 4 cup water, 3-4 cup
' 1 Spanish, or Italian, 5 whole cloves, 2 cinnamon, muscatel, stick,
; j wine, Pinch of salt, 1 cup pitted, 1 cooked prunes, 1 teaspoon

rU .aiinanon inmh1rt Kntrar

jjia m acv.vaAA vv"v a 1
iiitMA intftA nHnv vU a hnll Simmer 5 minutes. Cool to

mmjt jaMww. B
' a...a a J J

Add-prunes; coper, Allow to stand for a couple of days. BaKe

a..4ii run Hrv piac nn A
. m dU. .rnn

. .i obbK a Tin him run nver uic bti uls

t dragees ane$ baked meringue rsettes. Yield: 24 2-inch squares.
i rre found about eight mysteries In this. Maybe more.
Would-Be Cook.
V- Ed. note: Just as soon as the stomach pump engineers
art through with the proof reader, we'll try a revised edi edition
tion edition of Readers' Digestion.
AIR CONDITIONED BRATS
, Sir:
Td like to add my two cents worth to these petty gripes
presented to the Mail Box. This air-conditioned school talk is
roor asinine than Ike expecting to get a suitable disarma disarmament
ment disarmament plan from the Russians. After air-conditioned schools
they'll be wanting air-conditioned, airport-type limousines to
take them to school in place of the free bus transportation
' they now have.
f Why, I had to walk miles through ice and- now with no
hoes to a school that was well air conditioned, it didn't have
any windows.
If these are the whlny, bawling type of future adults that
r we have to rely on for progress then I'm agin it!
J think the sgt. had a good point in last Thursday's is issue
sue issue In not alr-condltioning that hot air place up on the hill.
It would empty the treasury to cool off all the hot air that
comes out of that place.
! Too bad these Canal Zone boats that have so many low
cost.CZers going on free vacations don't look like the Queen
, Mary. Have you ever ridden free, ration included on the fifth
: hammock of the bottom compartment on a crowded troopship?
Boy,, that's living 1 Her gripes were leaky faucets and frazzled
curtains and last but by no means least the big clock wasn't
running! Imagine thatl Cuckoo? I guess so.
i Instead of air-conditioning these Elvis Presley worshipping
bratl. buy muzzles to put on some of these whlny parents who
i think that Junior and themselves should have it so good

Cpraya
Ditt nwoyl

rasa Biiaiiart, cabiaen, oanj la kaH
f aa attt TO-TEP cmMCX Ma b mm
In tuapaaaar totllt . sany ea ; anee
1...aaaMac aaasosl
CRIME-GO nam

: ATAHABLK AT ALL COMMISSAKIXS
1 WbMna, S &

rst!e KODAK fa. N

80 13 OO

1.BO
14.00
Boca area? Tnere is aiways i
close Jj.,.
FINGERED
'
Kopn telHncr Panamanians
" ,, -. -tt. ,.,
gave way all we had in the 1855
office to. let him know ucn con
future.;
Hash Hush.
WITH; LINE JUICE
for Jsthmus Wedding-Cake and
wotftr. clnvex. fiinliamon. 8<
. .
arJ ntlvn o Tl H t011i lTirft 1 B TV
lflrtr lervintr trav. Remove snlc-
naniifata wttH 1M1iriBlfl sllvAl
i&ua
Tt M7K

by VICTOR RIESEL
Jimmie Hoffa lectured at Har

vard. But it was a one night
stand. Had he staved over for Lat
in, he might have come away with
a bit of ancient Roman not un unknown
known unknown to another Caesar. Ex ni
hilo nihil fit "All that exists has
always existed, nothing is created
from nothing."
Hoffa's opponents, acting more
out of instinct thanclassicial Latin
introspection, have nonetheless
dug deep into ms record tor tne
charees they've just hurled against
the Teamster chief. To what Sen.
McClellan and Robert Kennedy
tenaciously wrote into the most
popular of recent television
scripts, the AFL-CIO Ethical Prac Prac-tices
tices Prac-tices Committee has added the
discoveries of an. earlier Congres
sional committee, circa 1953. ;
That earlier committee Deiievea
that Hoffa .handed the insurance
agency, run: by friends of his,
Diuion aouars worm u uuiuu in insurance
surance insurance policies when he could
have done far better with other
firms.
In fact, this Congressional
committee beliavud that Hoffa
could have placed his union's
insurance for half of wht it
cost the Michigan and Central
States' Teamsters. H-':ri:
Since the Latins did say that
nothing comes from nothing, it is
better to start at ine oegmniog.
For it is from that beginning that
Jim Hoffa enabled his friend,
Paul Dorfman of Chicago, to set
up an insurance agency which
made millions in a few years.
It was some 10 years ago that
Hoffa's bright young mind first
saw the possibilities of pension
and welfare funds for the welfare
friends. Soon Hoffa had negotiat negotiated
ed negotiated a contract with the1 4000 Cen
tral States employes which had
them paying two dollars a man a
week for 96.000 Teamsters' mem
bers. By 1953 this fund had ac
cumulated some 118,000,000 most
of which helped pay ofr the bil
lion dollars wortn of insurance
policies'' r"
Hoffa" was never less the boss
than he is now. So he placed the
insurance witn uoriman s union
Insurance Agency of 1 1 1 1 n o 1 s."
This company took its commission.
But that didn't end the pie cut
ting. This agency then turned its
business over to united ruDiic
Service Corp.. of Mount Vernon,
N.Y. This outfit also took a slice
Of the commission. Then the poli policies
cies policies were finally placed with the
Union Casualty and Life' insurance
Co. 'ii-'
Now," man could earn i living
on these commissions. The central
States Teamsters i Were throwing
W7 ,000,000 a year worth1 i of insur insur-Aancebusuless
Aancebusuless insur-Aancebusuless tol.Dor f in ahif
ine insurance cuuits -were tax taxing
ing taxing XI per cent pt the money tor
commision and expenses, ia hand handling
ling handling the business. That's a lot of
voucher money, considering the
startling fact that other insurance
companies were willing to charge
anywhere from six to eight per
cent. Or coonsiderably less than
half which would have saved
the funds millions of dollars.
Now it so happens 'tat the law
says that since the employers pro provide
vide provide these millions, they rave the
right to appoint trustees to work
with the labor leaders in nursing
this kitty. There were trustees.
Just what they nursed is not cer certain.
tain. certain. The 1953 Congressional com committee,
mittee, committee, directed by Rep. Wint
Smith of Kansas, asked the em
ployers' men just why they were
so carefree with their responsibi responsibilities.
lities. responsibilities. One of the trustees said unhao-
pily that he and his colleagues
went along with Hoffa In an ef
fort to gain peaceful labor rela
tions. The employer trustees said
tney Had been uneasy and had
suggested an investigation of their
own into the multi-million dollar
insurance operation.
The committee counsel. Bill
McKenna, asked tha manage management
ment management trutteas whether H a f f a
had retorted that they could do'
"any damnthing you please but
tha union will have nothing to
de with H." They said those
ware his general words.
Wearily the mangement trustees
trestified that there were to oth other
er other union trustees besides Hoffa.
But, these labor men iust sat
there and refused to make anv
decisions at regular trustees ses
sions when Hofia was absent. All
ne had to do to tie- the committee
up wa to stay away.
To which one of the Con ere ss-
meu snapped uat Holla was "ob "obviously
viously "obviously in complete control of the
und."
There are other charees aciinxt
Jim Hoffa, who considers all oth
er men pygmies, for he'recosniz-
es none as his peers. But in the
next week he will come to Wash
ington to answer the indictment
by men of labor, and he will
learn that history, and even the
men who make it,"do not run
from supermen.
!,
5
L .... i
POETS -tOVE-Debra Paget
sUps back into history to be
come- toe Jora of. poet Omar
Khayyam Cornel Wilde la
the Paramount picture.. "Omar
MQtayyem" based oa the life of
Persia' legendary banL j

' fli

Haif a Column
by
LIVING IN A FOOLS PARADISE
That is perhaps what we are all
doing today, nut we are going out
with a lot of big bangs from atom
and hvdroeen bombs. ;
Present day adults may not get
it unless the soviet uovernment
decides to start a war. Don't kid
vourself that President EisenhoW'
er and Dulles are keeping us out
of war. It is Khrushchev and his
cohorts. They are hot ready to
start, but they are getting readier
every day. ., ;
iwlen'Adrat Stevensonf ftlrcan
iftrilta fnr President, taronosed I
truce an the exolosion ft of atom
bombs his distinguished opponent
Tha head of the Atomic Energy
Commission, an armchair admiral
from Wall Street, backed up the
President. Admiral Straus 8 is
mainly concerned with industrial
use of atomic energy, just as he 1
interested in nrivate power com
panies getting the Tennessee Val
ley Authority, lor instance.
Now T am interested in my
grandchildren and their children
and their children's children, if
they have not all been wiped off
the face of the earth before that
generation comes to life.
I may have grandchildren right
now who have been impregnated
with strontium 90 to the point
where thev will become invalids.
You may be in the same posi position
tion position if you are lucky enough to
have grandchildren, but maybe it
isn't lucky after all.
"Four prominent geneticists told
Congress today mat raaiaiion rrom
atomic weapon tests would harm
tens of thousands and pernaps mu mu-lions
lions mu-lions of children in future genera
tlons.
"They agreed vthat hereditary
damsee would be smalt in rela
tion with the world population or
the total figures on death and sick sickness.
ness. sickness. However 1 they emphasized
that the hazard could not be lg
nored in deciding whether or not
to continue (atomic) weapons
testing." .5,, f
The foregoing if from the New
York Times.
But what about the tremendous
explosions of bombs by the United
States, Great Britain and Russia?
The lame geneticists quoted a a-bove
bove a-bove said that the genetic damage
caused by radiation might have
been underestimated, and added
that the damage to reproductive
cells would be passed on to future
fenerations in the form of harm
ful mutations, which would per
sist for hundreds of years.
Ia a recent issue of the New
Yorker, C. B. White, complains
about a warning from the Atomic
Energy Commission that a drum
of radioactive sodium waste, it
authorized to he dumped in the
sea, is a menace to navigation. v
1 sometimes wonder," writes
White," about these cool assump assumptions
tions assumptions of authority ia the areas of
tea and sky. The wa doesat be belong
long belong to the Atomie Energy Com Commission,
mission, Commission, tt belongs to me. I am not
ready to authorize dumping radio radioactive
active radioactive waste into it, and I suspect
that a lot of other people to whom
the sea belongs are not ready to
authorize it. either. The only rea
son the Com mission authorizes it
is that the Commission is desper desperate;
ate; desperate; it doesat really know how to

More or Less Now and Then
CREDE CALHOUN

get' rid of atomic waste,
neither does anybody else.
and
"A neighbor of mine in Maine,
Dr. Clarence Little, who experi experiments
ments experiments with mice, told members of
the Bangor Rotary Club the other
day that because of fallout their
children's children will be abnor abnormal:
mal: abnormal: they will have water on the
brain, clubfeet, defective kidneys,
defective eyes. 1 recall that when
the A.E.C. was waiting, last May,
for ''suitable' weather for touching
off the experimental blasts in Ne-
3ada, it left the decision about the
ate to an electric brain. Whether
this brain had water bn Mr I don't
know f;. v-i
i'Another mechanical ?bralil that
I read about recently suddenly re refused
fused refused to thfnk at all. Men stood by
and fed it questions, but it seemed
staggered by them and failed to
come up with an answer, which
did not surprise me.
"I am unable to understand how
any man in a responsible position
in any country of the world, when
told that there is a wide differ difference
ence difference of opinion as to the effects
of radiation on people yet unborn,
can choose the optimistic view and
discard the pessimistic view, on
the mere chance that the opti optimists
mists optimists are correct in their prophe prophecies.
cies. prophecies. Suppose they are wrong. Sup Suppose
pose Suppose the pessimists, or alarmists,
are correct. What then will we
have done in our arrogance?
"These test explosions are for
'security,' but it would appear
from some of the evidence at hand
that we are now in the business of
buying security for ourselves with
the lives and bodies of unborn
children, and if that should prove
Mathematical Maze
ACROSS
j I Combine
i numbers
4 Function of
J trifonometry
, i t Distinct part
1 12 Prosecute
11 One-spots
i 14 Carbonated
beverage
15 Favorite
j 16 Agreement
; of tenure
I II Civil War
general
j JO Heredity units
21 Free
J2 Pitcher
' 24 Girl's
SSJournalist,
Ernie
J7 Golf mound
DOWN
1 Vipers
2 Song for two
3 Decide
4 Dinner course
5 Refrigerator
6 Tidier
7 Worm t
Escort
t Midday
10 Unemployed
11 Small
children
17 Gives out
IS Exercise ;
22 German river
! nickname
i 31 Metric
measures
27 Seaport (ab.)
30 Spryer
i 12 Fixed part
24 Fuel
35 Get away
: SI Garden tool
; 37 Bellow
39 Shoshonean
Indians
'40 New Zealand
bird
;41SinU(b.)
. 42 Political
writer,
' Thomas
4S Flower ?.
'.- clusters, '-r
41 EmphaslM
"91 Age
;S2Accumulatioa
ef water
, S) Man's name
: 14 Nothing -'
S3 Seasoning

AM,

to be the case, then t think this Is

the ugliest bargain I ever heard oi
uglier and more bestial tnan any
Other bargain ever made on earth,
and I am ashamed to be a part of
this race of shrewd traders nd
selfish security hunters. ;-
"That our intentions are good is
poor excuse. We seem able to
whin ourselves into a frenzy of so
licitude for the life of a boy trap
ped in a well, at the same time
gambling away the lives of thou thousands
sands thousands and perhaps' millions of
hovs yet to be born, most of whom
will never fall into" a-well, except
tha well we are digging for them
in oup ignorance,- a well so deep)
and terrible that u staggers even
a mechanical imagination..
"Havmif sDlit the atonK we1 a
sume that we must keep splitting
it, contamination or no contami contamination,
nation, contamination, as though, having broken
a horse, we assume we must ride.
- "Atoms for' war have the pretext
of heat and power for future ages.
The. security is fast fading in a
general uneasiness about the con
sequences. As for the neat and tne
Sower, what are we proposing to
eat, and. whom are we planning to
endow with power? If some of the
predictions come true, then we are
in fact engaged in providing foot
warmers for the elubfooted and
power for those with water on the
brain and defective vision.
"I do not know, and neither does
anyone else, what sort of murder
I am being made party to by these
'authorizations.' I just hope that
my generation Is not destined to
become known as the 'clever'
generation full of ingenuity dis displayed
played displayed in small matters. I hope
that in the giddliness of our tri triumph
umph triumph we haven't already placed
the atomic submarine ahead of the
sea itself, the plane ahead of the
Answer to Previous Puzzle!
TATel
24 Number
study (ab.)
25 Exchange
premium
28 Missile
27 Declaration
J8 Pontiff
2S Very (Ft.)
31 Weirder
23 Kind of angle
38 Lightly-,
40 Genuflectad
41 View
42 Young dogs
43 Forest ox ,'
44 Sacred imatw
44 Indigo
47 Great Lake
4 Auction
SOCutoff

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WASHINGTON Since I am a-

bout to leave on one of Ike's so so-called
called so-called "work-and-play" vacations
to Greece and the Near East, I
would like to settle some scores
before I go with people who de deserve
serve deserve to have them settled. Here
are 'the scores:;
Commissioner Joseph Minetti-r-
When Minetti was up for appoint appoint-ment
ment appoint-ment to ,.the Civil i Aeronatucis
iBoard I wrote some critical things
about him and raised questions a a-bout
bout a-bout his qualifications lor his job.
Since then he has done an ex
cellent ob, and the things I said
about him have proved unjustified.
I want to congratulate him,,
The other day he ana o t n e r
members of the CAB i with the
exception Of ex-Sen. Chan Gurney
of South Dakota took i a cour-
aeeous stand aeainst the "big air
lines and for the public by refus
ing a passenger fare increase;
Unlike the bandwagon rush of
U.S. Steel,1 and others to. h i k e
prices, tney bucked tne stampeae
toward inflation. Chairman James
K: Durfee is another who is do
ing a good job on the CAB.
The Mellon Family r or a gooa
many years I have been critical
of the Mellon family's financial
empire and its; pnetime monopoly
in aluminum. . .-
- But the other day I was In
Pittsburgh, where the Mellons have
patriotically contibuted m o n e y
and foresight and community spir
it in remaking that city in cooper cooperation
ation cooperation with a mayor who is just
as, strongly Democratic as they
are Republican.
Mayor Dave Lawrence ana ine
Mellons are a politically diverse
team. Nevertheless, the Mellons
are now supporting Lawrence for
a fourth term. They may disagree
with his politics, but they xigure
he's been a fine mayor.
Paul Tellon. son of the old gen-
man who was Secretary of the
Treasury under Harding, Coolidge,
H1IU jTlUUVCAa Slaa .JiM. iw"vu v
long list of charities which he
doesn't advertise and ? few people
m J Tjaai laaiaf AAtt1rHirA TA
know about, while Dick Mellon,
nephew of the old man, is the
hinlfier-un of Pittsbureh.
Miss Frances Rnignr, tniar at
State Dpartment passports
Some time ago,, I wrote some
mean things about Miss Knight
and sueeested she was not tne
person to handle the State Depart
ments passport envision.
- What I said was undeserved. On
the contrary, Miss Knight has put
amazing new vim into the pass passport
port passport division, has moved it out of
rundown' quarters, got the cock
roaches out of the files, and has
increased efficiency to the point
that it can turn out 4000 passoprts
In teifyears, )he number of pas pas-iorts
iorts pas-iorts Issued annually had increas-
ed from 200,000- in 1947 to S50,000
this year. .-":.-;
To handle this increase. Miss
Knight has junked the old glue glue-pots
pots glue-pots with which clerks slowly and
laboriously pasted your picture on
the passport. Instead, an up-to-
date machine, plus not irons, ooes
the work.

Thing About Tipping
By BOB RUARK

trnnff-minded chao I know
has got a new thing about tipping
which might well come into com com-mnn
mnn com-mnn n and reform the whole
itching-palm policy. It's a 1 device
I've been using to a miraer ae ae-gree.
gree. ae-gree. but this kid has bit on the
big stick.
Tt'i understand first that there
ar manv neoole who. due to the
cheapness of their employers, de
pend on tips to mane up
malor income. But this is not real
ly our fault, is it, now? And it
doesn't entitle the tip-recipient to
backsheesh not entered on tne
th a tin is suooosedly awarded
for services above and. beyond
certainly not tor being suriy, ne negligent,
gligent, negligent, or Just plain stupid.
L in effect, hire a waiter or a
hrhr nr a cab driver when i
mntfT their domain. reopie wno
work for tips are essentially sales salesmen
men salesmen who are working on commis
sion against a smau drawing ac
count. If they sen weu, wey reap
well. If they sell poorly, they
arent entitled to so much as that
forgotten coin, the nickel. .
This Wend ef mine says he
has finally developed en.ooh
courage to pay the eact amount
of the check and walk eat of the
joint If the waiter is surly. Un Unobliging,
obliging, Unobliging, er hostile. He says ho
can look the waiter in tha eye
and ge heme to sleep mere sound
ly thn his babies.
I know my boy, and with him
it ain't economy. The very next
waiter or cabbie who treats him
good gets double the expectation.
In short, he is building up a fund
off the bums to reward the de
serving,' Y
He has a one-ma a plan to re-
volutionUe the tipping business.
Whea he's had a lousy deal, he
looks the dealer la the eye and
announces that he's ordinarily a
good tipper, but he doesat tip for(
scrambled orders, baek talk, in inattention,
attention, inattention, or sin-lines. Whea be
doubles the expected tip for good
performance, be explains the why why-for
for why-for ef the extra largesse.
If enough people do it, fee says
he figures that the word u
spread, and the rude menial will
have to come into liae er starve.
. He Hat tee tar wrong. I anww
nether tuh4eod lad what
SM-actWalry reorganised New York ;
cab drivers' ivcltnatien t avU
up en crosswalks, driving tne
rwcWatriana into the craet see of i
traffic. He weun merery
rh door af fhm cb, w!V ffwvtih M
the back seat, hew peiiteia to tKi

She is also a great promoter ef ;
"people-to-people friendship and
a believer that every American

traveler can be an unofficial iiu,.
bassador of goodwill if be wants
to.,;.: :v:(,:,,,,
Miss Knight tucks a discreet re
minder in "every envelope when she
mails you your pasporis, suggest
ing that you tog can be an ambas
sador, i j. c&'ii-:-l'- ,'"':-r.-
Sacretarv ef Defense Wilton A
long with quite a tew other news
papermen, I have sometimes been
mean to old, Charley Wilson.
' One of my editors, Dale Stafford
of The Greenville, Mich;; News, i
told me a long time, ago that l
shouldn't be top tough on Charley,
He was right.
Charley came to Washington
pretty green and stumbled around
quite M bit. But he has now learn learned
ed learned the ropes in the most intricate
department in Washington, and it's
too bad that he's leaving just as
he's getting good. i
One thing youhave to remem remember
ber remember about Charley is that he's the
only Cabinet member, aside from
John Foster Dulles, who holds reg regular
ular regular press conferences.
In fact, he's gone much further
than Dulles in speaking out frank
ly It's because Charley tries to
be frank that he gets his foot in
his mouth. It's paradoxical, but a
fact, that the press has crucified
him for speaking out in the man manner
ner manner they-demand that Cabinet
members speak ouf. When Char Charley
ley Charley Wilson obliges, they, murder
him. i , x,
I strongly suspect that Charley
would stay on in Washington if ha
were not such a dutiful husband.
Mrs. Wilson doesn't like it here
and wants to go back to Michigan.
In Detroit she was the queen of
the motor industry. Everyone bow
ed to her. In Washington she was
just another Cabinet wife ; in a
town jampacked with ambassa--dors,
Senators, new Cabinet wives
and old Cabinet wives. Truth is,
Mrs. Wilson has been lonesome,
a bit isolated, and very much
wants to go back to Michigan.
When Charley comes home in
the evening, he puts on his slip-
nera and bat ms evening mpncau.
When he finishes it, he reacei
for a second. But Mrs. Wilson in intervenes:
tervenes: intervenes: --t-p ,';',;V;:
"No. Charley,; she says firmly.
"that's enough."'-'- w-we;
Charley obeys. He's obeying now
by going back to Michigan. But
it's too bad, Washington, will mis
him,-- i-.- ? f.A.
Having got these things off my
chest, I am leaving the whirl of
Washington Merry-Go-Rotind in the
hands of my able associate, Jack
Anderson .;-frw!
.1 shall Jtakena trip to Greece.
now sitting .between- the Iron .Cur-
tain and Syria as ene of the most
important, bastions aeainst com-
munism in all of europe.
Maybe I'll also take a look at
the Sixth Fweet and its important
job of keeping the peace; also take
a look at Syria and its neighbors.
Ill be writing from there as
the news develops.
the occupants, .; and. lesve both
floors open. i
I also invented a gimmick of
" amvma ,m fa-MW Ulll tf 1RU
ed to thank me for a tip and I
am an overgenerous gent with the
pour-boire I used to merely get ',
out and leave the door open. On
most old-fashioned cabs, it meant'
the driver had to get out and walk
clean around the cab to shut the
mr own. wnpn mr frir a 1 1
dbck aoor. oecause ne : eouion i
make it over the meter.- u
Tipping, to me, Is next to the'
atom as a sickness of the times.
People attempt to buy politeness
and service due to their own fears
just as -America tries to- buy
friendship abroad by wasting mon money.
ey. money. You wind up hated for your
dough, and hated double when
you don't parcel out another good
hunk to follow the had, money.
- ,- ., V ..
We have tipped the English In Into
to Into hating us. We have tinned near
ly any nation jtou can name lata
natlng us. The French loathe us.
The Indians spend the .money and
the fawn on the Russians. We
throw it around like a drunken
oilman up from the boondocks to
sample the night life in New York
or Miami or Las Vegas.
But Inteniationalhr, the poopla
we tip still give as the surly r
leek and the inefficient aerferrn
nee and demand, like a cea
cierge ar a head waiter, for ex ex-tre
tre ex-tre money for doing what they're
elready paid far.
' '" '"-This
This '"-This cot a little more sm-inua
than I first intended, but there's
a pretty fair moral here.- Over Overspending,
spending, Overspending, from fright or insecuri
ty, whether it be with a waiter or
a -nation, never bought anything
but contempt and an outstretched
hand for more. With a sneer bo-
hind your back and treachery a a-round
round a-round the corner.
HASPEL
SUITS
to.
Are coming; back to
thg Isthmus
tha first shipment ef
this brand ef Suits tk
reach here since 1953.



(

TUESDAY,' SEPTEMBER S, 195T K-r-l
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
Stan Freberg Adds
Science To Comedy
,'By DICK KLEINER I
NEW YORK (NEA) When it
comes to being funny on records.!
Stan i Freberg leads all the rest. I
His satires on hit sones like his
1
if
OH
last one, "The Banana Boat Song"
are 45 rpm gems.

s
I
i s 1
llillllllSI: 1l.sIHillMpSllill:

...

1 ATOMS OVER BRUSSELS The 360-foot-high Atomium, sketched above, will be the doml.
uaiit theme-Structure at the 1958 Brussels World's Fair. Equivalent to a 30-story skyscraper, it
". "' H Win renresenf the atomic structure of an elemental irort crystal- enlarged 160 billion times.

" J The Atomium consists of nine gigantic steel spheres, each 59 feet in diameter, interconnected
i fcya series of 95-foot tubular passageways, i The structure, with bo overall weight of 1,400
.' tons,' will rest on base sphere with additional support from a trio of rigid steel pylons-but-r
stressing the three lower spheres.

Infuriated Husband Beats Wife
With Crowbar, Kills Two Others

V

'. i i ,"

DECATUR, Neh, Sept.. 3 (UP)
Police' today threw a -dragnet
over two states in search of n

4n'Fnritd husband whoi went her

serk because his ; estranged, -wife

would toot return to him. He Jfciuea
two people and beat his wife with
a crowbar until she feigned death.
Burt Countjr Sheriff Walter
Dean said Arthur McCluskey, 37,

Decaturwent. to- the farm home
nt th narents of his estranged

wife, Betty, and emptied a 21
"calibeV automatic rifle,, fatally
wocnding his mother-in-law, Mrs.
Ada Stoddard, 59, d a family
friend, Orvllle Brewer, 60, while
they were "playing' cards, i
, Ho then used the -rifle as r club
and beat the bodies of the victims i

before turning to his wife and hi

father -in, law, t Glean tbtodaaxa
llJeaK Mild McCluskey was 3SO sav

We in his beating he broke "the

stock from the barrel of the rifle:
ntinaa Attack
v 'McCluskey took his wife' from
flho Stoddard home after the
jsbooting' and dragged her to their
farmer home, where he continued
the saTsg&'attack Dean-said. -V
A hospital spokesman said Mrs.

McCttluskey probably would not be
. alive had she not' feigned, dead

after continued beating with

crowbar in. a second storr room

in me nome. ;
Stoddard was treated early to

oay, ana Mrs. McCluskey was

Hospitalized in lair, Neb.

Aumontief : saw Mccitiskev "es

caped in a 1949 hght green auto-

mouue pevongmg to urewer ana

war believed 40 b' heading for
nearby Omaha; s where he was

empioyea as i -car dealer.

asked for his wife. Stoddard said
he told. McCluskey his wife would

not talk with him and asked him

to stop bothering her.
According to -Dean, the 1 Stod Stod-dards,
dards, Stod-dards, Mrs.-McCluskey and Brew

er were playing cards when Mc

Cluskey fired three shots through
the -screen door, hitting Brewer,
and entered and continued to

spray tne room with i gunfire.

- Altnough Stoddard had been hit

on the head, he attempted ,to

teiepnone tor help, out the phone
was out of order. He had to
drive one-quarter mile to-. the

Gordon Mussock farm to notify
authorities.

n

JACQgY CM BXreCl
By OSWALD JACOBT
- Written for NEA Service

LiLj
I Stan Freberr

Sal Mineo

Maxin found out that Mineo did

4 VI

bulldog
,. m-vr.it- i.iti dr

4

1 1

; i-'Cttslder Escape Routes'

They also were workihg on the
possibihty that he may have

neaaea north'to Sioifxi City, Iowa,
or that he may '-have' hidden jn
nearby swampy; marshland on the

aaisouri itiver.
Dean told the United Press Mc
Cluske had te enhnnoH th cnl.

dard home earlier yesterday and

LtTTLlj Llgl

- Where there's smoke there's
probably bride-cooking..

By MARY SMITH
Well kids it's hack" to the salt
mines once more.
The portals of ole BHS' are a a-gam
gam a-gam open for another year of good
times and a chance to further nnr

xnowiege.

West
AK4
VQ6$
A 10
KQJ764

NORTH V 24

A A J 6 3
V A K 10 8 4
Q63
10

EAST D
AQ1075,
VNone

k A a m A

; SOUTH,
A982

4 KSS2.

. Both vulnerable v 1

fCast south

PassMPass'

21- 2V '31- 3

Pass.4V; Passim

fSS

1 West North7
flAA Double

jl- J?f 3VM
.4 V PassTlPassl

r)Opninlead-K'

They should be, judging by the

work that goes into, them. Like

many funny men, comedy to Fre Freberg
berg Freberg is a science. He just doesn't
go into a recording studio, turn on

the switch and, presto, out comes
something like St. George and

the Drapon"!" nrf "Cent Si IHhn

Ha first stnriip all mneix oor.l not Sing, but asked him to mm in

fully, watching the hits come and ?"d try The ory turned out to be
nn U lllna .(I.:-I StSlT MoVIn

that, first: is in thp fan fivo nnH

second, that lends itself tn his For her efforts, Mary Fitzgerald

peculiar treatment. Ho feels the now eets an autographed, copy of

top five is essential otherwise evy "neg recora as it appears.

there wouldn t be enough people
who'd know what he was satirizing. i

When he's singled out his orev. birirc oirv

" rr rallu navp a oig one in "t;aaKo-
days in analyzing the song. What sie On the Phone" (Columbia).

w u ucr uy is h popuiary others: "Raintree Coimty" (Nat
What can he do to camtahza on "irino" riiiir r.nh. vi

if. .,iio.u.. i i in -.""WirTiZyf-!"

this is worked over carefully, then Verve); -"Par Favor" (Ames

ub icwiiicBi icaaaciiiuics. Lears Krnrnorei h 'iv irioi- x i.

1 WWWW, MVISJ. 1UJ A" II at, JJIIJH.-

aown, rips away, eroaes and oth- en Heart" (Joy Layne, Mercury):

tbuw auwio iuv VI Mil J lA. XUC XCI. I Mill B tH rkllT ir I iVnnA m

suit is generally, hilarious Clooney, Columbia); "Seven Days
1 Usually, the songs that he xji. Tn oi.-irt- t-, a.,.jh r

tiriVA tttA AHAf ThDr Vlttir "mikk.J ... 1 .' t . .. ...i. ? v

v iuuucu rai;; : wisning well" (Jana Lund,
me the wrong way He looks on Liberty); "How Very Wonderful"

mo, uFU UlORBt OO tuuutci 11111 A Inn IJfllO A H('.P9Kmmi

Nowadays, Freberg is achieving "That Old Feeling"

success in another field radio. ie" -Poij.
His f!RS-BflHiA nrnirram hi. ho.

come a Sunday night hit. Between A new BelafOnte album leads off

...j. u : -. j 1 1 .... snma fnn.nr.H. iiaa.i 1 1 . ;

VMIIU 1119-TVCUIU3 IIB' Keeps DUSy. v r 61 o iikhi .uuci:uu!is

riict stoo. n-obablv. will b t1 eiafonte Sings of the Canh-

lavision. "Eventually," he savs. Dean (RCA) is great stuff, some

I'll be driven to it." rousing, some tender, but all pure

: JBeiaionte; the fine voice of tenor

But meanwhile, e's content "eppe Dr. Stefano turns to the

with radio and records. He thinks jemi-ciassical with "Songs of

style is best expressed in Zaplr" AnZl ,tn" na O Sole

tu "u such, me cApcn ixurman

L,uootf Choir, in "Songs of the
Sea" (Columbia) has all the salty

cnanues ana a gorgeous cover;

Carmen McRee's 'After Glow"

(uecca) is one of the finest

to come from a fine artist

m

Hi

WdWrSTGP TO

10

o)

mameno

MOM-STOP

Paramount):

(The King sis-1

his

sound,' not sight. Or, as he puts it,

"une new sound is worth a thou

sand old pictures."

SHORT PLAYING Betty White,

star, of the TV show, "'Date With

the Angels," will record an album

of songs that have something to

no witn angeis, wee "Uot a Date

With An Angel" and such. Accom

Two new operas for vour

Shelf KUA has a new

The chiefs have been slaving to
come out with our programs all

set up and ready to follow. It's
no easy task to try to figure the
schedules out and it is a big help
if all the students would consider
their programs with a great deal
of thought cause it takes a lot off
the' shoulders of those who marip

them not to have kids swarming

iniq me oitice me urst week want
ing to change their present sched

uie. '.'

Gosh! It's hard, to believe that

summer is over 'and everyone is

returning from vacation to join in

wim inose wno stayed here' and
cram in a few more days of fun
before settling into the familiar

routine of books, nen rallvs anrf

just everything that goes to make

up our scnooi year. J

ihe cheerleaders will nrm hi.

choosing a uniform and thinking

1. . .. .. o

up cneers ior ineiootoau season.

u ne returning seniors and the un
derclassmen will be out there ept

ting into shape to beat the tigers,

nu ueviia.

The 57 seniors are all' gettinc

reauy 10 no to couege and saying
farewell to BHS for the last time

Dot wui be hack at Christmas
walking through the halls looting

ior a laminar face to say "hi" to

Then of course the class of "58,"
now the mighty seniors, are rar raring
ing raring to make this "the" year, the
greatest of all. Well, folks, this i

all for now but will be seeing you
all around Sept. 4. So be good and
have a ball while you caw.

Roger Wells of Bayside won

the opening club lead with his

singleton ace and surveyed the
dummy with a tinge of disap disappointment.
pointment. disappointment. His partner certain certainly
ly certainly lhad a good enough band but
the singleton was annoying ar.d

he could see plenty of trouble
ahead.
His first play was to lead -the
deuce of diamonds. West Played

the ten and dummy's queen
held the trick. The ace of hearts
was played next and East show showed
ed showed out.

anied. no rlonht. hv n ll.hrn to, and a good one done

band....Andre Kostelanetz predicts beautiful package; Peters, Bjoerl-

that, within three years,- classical ,n nu jerri head the tine cast

music programs will be big TV ,na 00 morougniy aeugntiuijob;
hits. "I'll be very disappointed if a,s0 .ood "L Boheme"

it doesn't happen." he says..Pol- AnBei. wnn vanas maKing a

ly Bergen is now a partner in a
music publishing firm. Her co copartner
partner copartner is her brother-in-law; Ed Edward.
ward. Edward. Fields, rug manufacturer.
...Carmel Ouinn. of the Godfrey

group, ,is about set. to .launch a

tug pitcn at record stardom. Via

jbum rcora.v
Sal Mineo'e 'Start Movln Is a
big hit, anl he owes it all to e
baby sitter. Seems that Arnold
Maxin, the boss at Epic Records,
stepped out one evening last wint winter
er winter and left his children in the hands
of a baby sitter named Marv vtr.

gerald.

when the Maxins came home,

Mary was watching Sal on a TV
drama, "Trees."
"Mr. Maxin," shit said with stars
In her eyes, "that bey could ell
millions of records for you'

perfect Mimi; other are: Di Stefa

no, Panerai and Moffo, making

mis one oi me Desi itsoenemes av
ailable. 1 t t

filling "Hill 1 1

yet I Ui:::i::: I

m ::!!:iii :: I

I J: :::: :U 1

opera I Hl::iilll!:5lllli

Rigolet- I feU:::K5H:::!:l
up in a II ::::::!:& I

fe:ilSsSlil
8!.i::.HV:Uii::UlU:
iK"U:::a!!:ii:"-

h::t:

r i
Inca,

LMIO!l-S?OP YO

rv1

X "fa i ill jf

i:i lf

:3 Ito.

HASPEL
SUITS
Are coming back to
the Isthmus-
the first shipment of
this brand of Suits to
reach here since 1950.

, si A

1 4t.Bh4v4

'lm'

at

Things really looked bad now
but the game was match point
duplicate and Roger knew that

all other declarers would get the I

same break. He also saw there i

was still some chance for his i

contract. He slaved the six of

diamonds from dummy andi

ducked In his own hand. West I

had to may his ace and was

stuck m the lead.

West made his best nlar. the

king of spades. Roger let It hold

the trick but when a spade was
continued he jounced on ft and

played King ana anuother heart-

Tnis put west back in the lead

again and this time he had

nothing In his hand but clubs.
He led a club and Roger trump trumped
ed trumped in the dummy and discarded
the losing, spade from his own

hand.

A diamond lead to the king

and a ruff of his last low dia

mond left him with nothtae- but

trumps and all the match points

ior making his four heart con'

tract.

FOR YOUR HIGH-BALL INSIST
always on CANADA DRY

"LM-L nu i r J-

nign-Ddii wnnuui lanaoa ury

is Foul-Ball"

i

SHIRTS
; i; -1 .-" '.'.:'.'
l.JtWt
i r Clt -.
M. : v I -t
. .y -t
;SPORT.SHlRTS

St'

CONTINUES

r shifts v

sr

DRESS. SHIRTS (pure silk)

CASH ONLY

-NO

RETURNS
-

MOTTA'S

PANAMA

i

IHttUKXumimmmt.wm wi.mm 'nrM'ii .ihmwhuj)) yww.'mw iin.i, "i '"o

with
Jfci&zr Wz'fflhz ''

" jomporent e glaul

K. BEST lf PLUS (
;V'-ySNNSSv YEARS EXPERIENCE
, V'Tv Over the rough
fr? ' NX ANDEAN y

PANAMA1

QUITO

r ReprcscnlafiTcs: CIA. ATLAS, S. A.
"Scotch" brand colored tapes la 71 yard reus arc
printed fa Panama with seer's name and apeeifica apeeifica-tions
tions apeeifica-tions by Cla. Atlas. & A. ' v
. Cuba Avene ;
Phone 3-1167 P. O. Box 4496

O

DOUGLAS C3 I NGINE

THE SHORTEST ROUTE TO SOUTH AMERICA
k VIA rniOMBlA"

DE LUXE SERVICE OR LOW TOURIST FARES : fh

mm -mikm Bogoti-Medellinfananfaj

Pit eolf I Of ao and take up to

20 aaornh 10 par tb balanre

. riiaM every Monday and

"; Thursday

OLDEST AIRLINE IN. THE AMERICAS
PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS SYSTEM
CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT

" 1

1

bus

ISO

hie!

"tod

Aft
n
ff'V
4
vt2
1

COLON



V:r.i;rf"

' ; ;
''''X:
.' v
''far
lUE rANAMA"AMERICANTrANTINDEPENDENT DAlLTtfEWSPAPEIt "h
.' .TUESDAY CErTCMBE.R-SrlSSTr'.
I and Otk
jpx J 34,
erwi$e
oua
Here's Pis To Serve At
'Dack-To-SchoF Party
anama.
1 i
1

"" f ... T i

'ggj $&A

: u" I-1 -v."

t' . : -J- mm p

-1 Urn: W ' "f.f iJ
'. mm '':f'?t"!" jt i IslI jitMUfe -liiiinaii hi i niii mm i:

MB. AND MRS. GARY DE LAINE TURNER leave the Albrook Base Chapel following their
wedding on Friday. The bride is the former Miss Jean Molyneaux of Balboa.

FIRST LADY OS PANAMA CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
QUIETLY AT PRESIDENTIAL PALACE
Mrs. Mercedes de de la Guardia, wife of the President
of the Republic of Panama, Ernesto de la Guardia Jr., cele celebrated
brated celebrated her birthday quietly at home today.
Many friends called to wish her a happy birthday.

Anglo-Anwrican
Society Plans
Dinner At Union Club
The AnKlo-American Society
will hold a dinner on Thursday
evening at 6:30 lor members and
friends
Election of officers will take
place .before the dinner.
French Ambassador
Gives Cocktail Party
For Distinguished Visitor
The French Ambassador and
Mrs. Lionel Vasse will give a
cocktail partv this evening at I
Embassy residence' in honor
Jean Luis Tmaud, Senator of the

AMII J

CD "MSB rKtS)

rs-s.

Department of the Lower Pyre Pyrenees,
nees, Pyrenees, who is here for a brie i
visit.

French American
CommiCo Givn
Luncheon For Senator
The French American
tee of Panama will give
Commit Commit-a
a Commit-a lunch-
eon at the Golf Club today in hon
or of visiting French Senator Jean
Luis Ijnaud.
.
TurneMolyniux
Wedding At Albrook
hi' Miss Jean Molvneaux. daughter
of ; of Mrs. Amada V. Molyneaux of
lialboa ad the late John G. Lo-
ill

I Tit ill

iVaiisi-'a "ia i a

n av

v. w r i vi.

: mm v pr- m aw

Men's SHIRTS
on Our Special Sale Continues
SPORT SHIRTS
"T-SHIRTS
DRESS SHIRTS (pure tilk)
CASH ONLY NO RETURNS ?

lyneaux,; became the br,ide of Mr
Gary De Laine Turner at Al

brook Air Base Chapel, Friday
Aug. 30 at 6:00 p.m.
Father Donovan Officiated.
The groom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ned H. Turner of Mai
vern, Iowa.
The bride, who was given away
by Mr. Modesto Avila, wore a
gown made of chantilly lace and
pleated tulle, embroidered with
seed pearls and sequins. Her veil
fell from a lace coronet, and she
carried an orchid bouquet.
The maid of honor was Miss
Catherine Molyneaux. sister of
the bride. Bridesmaids were Miss
es Judy Sig Eileen Damereaux,
Edna Olvae and tiorence uaucn
man. Lupita Avila was junior
br desmaid. The Drme s youngest
sister Mary Lynn Molyneaux was
flower gnl and Jorge l,uis Arango
was ring bearer.
Mr, Kobert Summers was best
man. and the ushers were Mr
Ralph Sheppard, Mr. Robert
Bradford, Mr. Larry Walker.
A reception was held following
the wedding at the bride's home.
The bride, who graduated this
June from Balboa High School,
chose a beige colored dress with
matching accessories for the hon-
vvmoon tria to El Valle.
The groom is an airborne radio
operator with the United States
Air force at AJDrooa A,r rorce
Base. He graduated in 1954 from
Malvern High School, Malvern, lo lo-wa
wa lo-wa
The couple win make their home
in Panama.
(CONTINUED On PAGE I)

.-V

INVITED .TO CONFERENCE Miss Loula Tate, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse De Witt Tate of Gamboa has been Invited
to attend a Campus Leader's Conference at Stephens College,
Mo' from sept. 7 to Sept. -9. Louis ; ts president' of Kappa
Alpha Phi social sorority and Is a Senior Pal who aids new
students. throughout the school year. She is a member of the
International Club.

'

MEMO to middle-age men:
JiiHoinc from mv mail, an in-
nrsacinff nnmhpr nf wives are wor
rying about the health of their
husbands, to put it cmnuy, inese
wives don't Wa,nt to be widows.
Rut anvinin as thev are to look
ft vnnr hpaith there are some
things they can't keep you from
doing.
-Vj Iich aotle 'or inciiii' in tkHi
. column should ba submitted m
lypt-written form and mailed o
the box number listed daily in 'So 'Social
cial 'Social and Otherwise," or delivered
by hsnd to the office. Notices of
meetings cannot be accepted by
telephone.
CZ College Club
Thursday Morning
Study Croup Meets
The Thursday Morning Study
Group will meet at 9:30 Sept. 5 at
the home of Mrs. Edward Brow Brow-der
der Brow-der Jr. in Diablo.
Mrs. John C. Adams will be co-
hostess.
The group program for the year
will be presented.
MOW
Powdered
milk
that
mixes
instantly!

Wife Needs Husband's Help
To Prevent Being Widow

Your wife can see that ydur
meals are well balanced and ea easy
sy easy on calories. But she can't keep
you from raiding the icebox at
night.
Your wife can cut down on-her
demands so that the budget isn't
a constant worry to you. But she
can't keep you from being extra extravagant
vagant extravagant in such matters as hav having
ing having to drive the latest model car.
Your wife can limit the number
of nights the two of you go out
each week so that you Can get
plenty of rest. But she can't keep
you from bringing your business
worries home with you. ?
, COOPERATE. id
" i. '; ' -A
YOUR, wife can eneourage-you
to get away from it all whenever
you get the chance. But she can t
keep you from turning a hunting
or fishing trip into an endurance
contest that brings you home ex exhausted.
hausted. exhausted. Your wife can urge you to drive
carefully, but there's not much
she can do if you are the kind
who lies to brag about how fast
your car will go.
Your wife may be able to talk
you into getting regular -physi-caleck-ups.
But she can't make
you take your doctor's advice a a-bout
bout a-bout slowing down, losing 15
pounds or easing up on smoking.
Your wife doesn't want to be a
widow. iBut she can only avoid it
with your help.
Safety-Sealed In
aluminum foil. Look
for the "Package
with the Star."
5 Quarto
From Erry
1 lb. Package

New you can put an end to thai
tiresome stirring. New Starlac
mixes instantly . just restort
the water, stir for a second .
and "presto" . vfresh-tastin;
milk for the family. Nourishing
Starlac costs less. Start giviag giviag-your
your giviag-your family the important milk
nourishment they need every day
Start on Starlac today 1
ITS NEW ITS lOW-COSr
IT MIXES INSTANTLY
ITS NOURISHING I

It is never good manners for
two or three of a small group
to talk at length about a party
others In the group were not in invited
vited invited to. Those who were not
there are bound to feel left out
at least, out 6f the conversar
tion. - a

; Choosing a topic of eonversa
tion that shuts out some mem members
bers members of a group is just plain
rune. .
C Britannlca Junior Encyclopedia
The albatross, whose death
brought ill fortune in Coleridge's
"Ancient Manner," is one of the
most magnificent of flying crea creatures,
tures, creatures, having a wingspread of as
much as 12 feet. It may soar for
hours without apparent effort,
and in; southern seas the alba albatross
tross albatross is, -often the only living ;
creature seen for days. Ill court-j
ing, the birds cross bills and seem
to fence like swordsmen, while
uttering;, strange dries. y.
When a womon gives her hus;
bond a look that speaks volumes
she usually reads, them to him
later on.
11
t1-M tm.M
Mnnna'i ( tnUt dk
tion, tburbrat corattarck
bait aeothn, cilng clea
la ikia, armati haal ma,
cbala, (ill.
MEXSANA
MIOICAtlt tOWBII
Needlotsofpep?:
lJrink
The juices of I different, tardea"
1 fresh rrfttablci are blended into
; this famous drink. Youll love it
lively flavor, and thrive oa Ha Vita-
: Bun-packed goad goad-Mesa.
Mesa. goad-Mesa. At mealtime
or between meal
. V-4 givee yo the
f-efrethmcBt you
want, and the nour nourishment
ishment nourishment you accd.
3 U

I fj- .--V f:f
T

N

I iLJJ

ssuY

CHOCOLATE SWIRL chiffon pie

that "back to achool" party you
. By GAYNOR
,- 'v.- ; NIA Ifood and
'ViVlVl school starting, how about
throwing a party for the young youngsters
sters youngsters to make the return to "the
pursuit of knowledge?" A ; little
tun, something special, gives: the
return to school a, more pleasant
meaning. ,.
Chocolafii Swirl Chiffon Pio
One envelope (I tablespoon') gel gelatin.
atin. gelatin. 1-3 cup sugar.- y ..teaspoon
salt, cup evaporated milk, V
cup water, 2 squares unsweetened
chocolate, 3- egg yolks," slightly
beaten, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 3 egg
whites, 1-3 cup sugar, Vt cup whip
ping cream, 2 teaspoons sugar, 1
baked xS-mcn pie shell, vt square
unsweetened chocolate, melted and
cooled.
Mix gelatin. 1-3 cup sugar, the
salt, evaporated milk and.: water
in top of double boiler, : Add -j?
squares chocolate. Cook over hot
water until chocolate is melted and
gelatin is thoroughly dissolved.
Beat with egg heater until smoom.

Missile Expert Says ICBM Can

Be Intercepted And Destroyed

't WASHINGTON. SeDt. 8 (UP)
The chief -of the nation's air de-.
fenses and" ; top missile expert
aelieves it is possible to estabush
du defense .itllsit the ocean-
spanning intercontinental baliisticj
missile.
s Gen. Earle E. Partridge, com
mander of the North American
Air Defense Command, said in an
interview with, the weekly news
TT Wu, 1 WnrlH .SaL
nort that the intercontinental mis-
I sile ICBM could be intercepted
'..nth mtr onti.mittiU missile."-
He said it would-require long'
range radar to detect the enemy
ICBM and a system of radar lp
dispatch the anti-missile missile,
"This stretches my imagina imagination,"
tion," imagination," he, said, "but that's what
thev (scientists say can be done,
and we have to get along with
building such a system ana ao u
as quickly as possible."
A scientist agreed. Dr. Walter
Dornbereer. Germany's World
1 War II missile chief and now a
design consultant on misiles for
Bell Aircraft, said netense
should not be too difficult," He
was interviewed by the Army-Navy-Air
Force Register, unoffici unoffici-cial
cial unoffici-cial service publication.
Both Partridge and Dornberger
made the-statements before Rus Russia
sia Russia announced last week that it
had developed' and successfully
tested Sn ICBM.
Dornberger said speed alone
would not guarantee that an

diouosi you thi&d

COINTREAU FRARPE
v -. :-' ..'.' ,v-:; r : I
. : -
-
, T-y it toniglit afJer Dinner
you will like it;
-' -; :-. v. it is a V;;fr5i;
FINE DELICIOUS REFRESHING
ond very DIGESTIVE DRINK

Ml

ft

-fe.'psi
!
- V.
0$m
is bound it make a sneeew
may be plaiminr these days..
MADDOX, x
Markwts Editor
Pour slowly over egg yolks, stir'
ring constantly! Return moisture to
double boiler and tpok 3 "minutes
longer, stirring, constantly- Add
vanilla. Chill -until slightly thick-;
ened. Beat egg white until foam foam-y.
y. foam-y. Beat in 1-3 cap sugar gradually
and continue beating until mixture
will stand in stiff peaks Then
fold in cold chocolate mixture
gradually; v blending-" weH.Whip r
cream with 2 teaspoons sugar. un.
il stiff. ji t.
Spoon half the chocolate mixture
into baked pie shell. Spoon., half
the whipped cream in '5 small
mounds on top of chocolate Pour
half of the melted Vi square-chocolate
over the whipped cream
mounds. 'Cut through the-? filling
with a spatula to forni a swirl
pattern. Add the remaining choco chocolate
late chocolate mixture, whipped cream, and
melted chocolate, in the. same way;
repeat the swirl pattern. Chill pie.--
Note:-If desired, VA cups fresh
milk, may e substituted iortbe
evaporated milk and water,.""
ICBM would' rCach its target, He
then went on to outline a .defense
against ballistic rockets after
noting that they ll aye a "ivory r
shotrt. burning timai'vduring which
they are guided. f t i'r u
1 i,Aftervbundnj?"' cut-off1, they fir
unguided on a flight path that Can
be exactly calculated. If you have
an instrumentatibft'oi the 'ground
which will pick up:the flight path i
of this ballistic rocket .thousands ;
of miles away, you cap -calculate
in a computer wnnin pars or a
second exactly where.it win hit
and that gives "you the means to j
put up defensive weapons againsf
them.. "' -'i ,j 1 : a
i : i : i '
"When you know wher: they v.
come from, 'on what flight pth,
and where they w! h",
send something against It to.-collide
with it on its way dowu... iUA
let the ICBM run Into it? ;
Dornberber said aa ICBM "hss
only to be stopped at. a safe dis dis-tance
tance dis-tance from the target," rather
than "some miles away J' ; Just faf
euuugu, UC BMW, w Wi,
ploding warhead has; ne- destrey
ing effect on the ground." ;
t- r r ( '.1.
"You have to : send am. ntl.
missile np in time with Jew speed,
not even with supersonic t speed.
Let the ICBM. diving -with tre-
mendous speed,,-hit the anti-
missile, or if you wish you may
explode the anti-missile at. the
moment that the ICBM, passed itv
You don't have to chase the
ICBM." 4

r

i

4

Distributors: CIA. CYRNOS, S..A,
1A5AMA COLO V
k -Panama. M.OTTA'S
COLON



f r i.
TTJJSDAT, SEPTEMBER I, 1957.
1951 :V-
' THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN, INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
f age nvi

at and

Otk

.. OUBl Wl
Xut'tk
v deace la

Angela' Marks it
Marries? Prank" Aicarraaa

Mr. an4 Mr. Fred n. Lee of
Balboa announce the mamafce u,

ineir qaugnier, Angela wane, 10
Wr. Frank Azcarraga, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Luis Ascarraga of Pa Panama.
nama. Panama. The Wedding toot place at
U.to.a.mTtoday. ' -Tht
bride graduated from Balboa
Jligh School with the cUia of 1956
and attended Canai Zone Junior
Colle g The groom also graduat graduated
ed graduated from Balboa High School and

M1 presently employed wltn FWan
. que'l. Travel Service.

: : Mrs.' iJlanquita Davidson w a a
Mies' Lee' matron-of -honor while

m. JJruce quinn served as. : pest

maw tor tte- groom.'
, following the ceremony a lunch

eoa was held at the Tivoll Guest
House iar the wedding party and

in jmmeoiaie lamuy.

"Jdttt a week In 1 .Valle .the

couple will be at home temporal

ue lmii Azcarraga resi

Panama City. v :

Takeg PealHen,'
' M Souther Peru '"

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wilcox,
. have recently returned from the

States, where they were guests of

senator w. Kerr Scott of jn. car
elina.

Mrs. "Wileo has returned' to

their home in Balboa, but Mr Wil-

; esfc.Js In Southern Peru; where he
' has taken a position with the To

que Pole Copper Project.
' Mrs. Wilcox hopes to join hint
theft next June.
IpaatsV Classes
ReauwNd At YMCA
-. Miss Maria del Pilar Vega, who
lias- taught Spanish at the Balboa
YMCA-USO for several years will
raeiim her-classes on Monday,
ufkare will be elasses for begin-
ners, intermediates and advanced.
.Registration and tests will be con conducted
ducted conducted on Thursday evening from
' 4-1 p.m. to determine which class
'student should attend. '
In the new series, i beginners
will meet at S:00 p.m., Interme Intermediates
diates Intermediates at 6:00 and advanced at
TOO fi.Bi. m- v.:

Those interested may inquire at

the Balboa YMCA-USO or call

Bawboa 2839 or 2759.
' Classes will meet on ; Mondays
and Thursdays each week.

r

I 4
i! to-: A

BORED "COED-Jw0-,month-oJd
Wan Hyang Jin
.seems to find college life a bit
boring as she accompanies her
-mother to class at Kent State
University in Kent, Ohio. Mrs.
Jin, whose husband is a pol pol-W
W pol-W seleacf major at the linl linl-'
' linl-' varsity, was caught without a
baby sitter so she took the
youngster along when she hd
to do some catchup york op.
her architectural x d r a w in g
course. The parents, both from
Seoul, Korea, expect to return
' home when Mf. Jin completes
tes studies.: -j

Xf. MU MUR1IL LAWRINCI

: On. Saturday mor.nings ..J e d' s

father gives him his, weekly allow

cbi o cfuu. i v i wnen we compel mem to ao'ify
He- gives it In nickpls and dmeq we t are 4he, money-savers, Wkthej

Be gives la ihesa coins o that
Td ean at once put aside, i cents
for the next day'a Sunday school

collection and drop another

nickel and dime In his oiccybank.

tWhea they're safely dropped, Td's
lather, says, A' Aren't, you proud of

yourseu you u soon nave ano another
ther another 18. dollars to deposit in the

real bank aaaml"

? But Ted doesn't feel a bit proud

- ef ffcimaeu. instead, his leeiingi
raiemble those of people in stories

frm whom f ajry godmothers di-

jijif ano otner unpreoictaoie pow pow-,
, pow-, era .. suddenly snatch away the

Imafical aifts they have granted,

He feels helpless, not proud. He
feels it's very confusing to be told

clalSchfice
Keeps Troops Busy
Inlilsure Hours

XT M Arm rrlhhon 1 wflrlr.

in eonstantiy t sucDiy mmta

ry personnel with recreation and

earcertaunnenc.
Under that supervision of XA

-CiV Leslie, C. Wood, Special

Berrlces in UJJ. Army canDoean

haa. increased Ita activities in

reeent Tears;

1 1 With: Hollywood and Broad-

iww actors ana actresses per

rornuBff in atagv snows, icreen

atara ttencunc service ciud

functions, sportihg programs ln ln-ereaalng,
ereaalng, ln-ereaalng, and library and craft

nop jacuities neconung mora
popular with the troops, Special
Serriots' goal of raising morale
has become much easier. -

' Tha VS. Army Caribbean
porta program, tinder the su su-berrlsion
berrlsion su-berrlsion of Major Alfred ?.
Massond, la growing. According
ie tha major, The sports pro-

rram in vs. Amy c&ruiean is

ia lt infancy and as it growa we
,hopa to have every serviceman
14 the command participating
la at least ona snort'.

.-1 Theaters, gymnaslama,' golf

eeoraea and all the above men-

tinned Special Services facilities
ere- snore popular with military
personnel now than at any oth

er period r time. Ana as tna

soldier beglna participating In
these Tarioas fonctlona, be be

gins to realiza that utilizing his

time. In a cquatmatlTa manner

not only puts his mind at ease
but aviso gives him that moment
of recreation and entertainment,
tit foal epaeixl Services strives

have a 45-cent allowance then you

actually have 15.
No, 1 do not believe in forcing
Children to save money.

When we. compel them to do U,

chudrenitiy .dropping cents in

his piggy-bank Ted exercises bis
father's sense of thrift, not his
own. Thus, his action haa no moral
meaning to him. So if we want to

congratulate ourselves over his e
conomy. let's rejoice over the a.

cumulated coins in his piggybank
but not kid ourselves that we

have so much as touched his ap

preciation of thrift.
Ted will be ready to ssve mo mo-ney
ney mo-ney when he has wanted some

thing badly enough te forego less
important, momentary satisfaction

to save lor it.

This development in self-control
we have to wait for.
It's seldom achieved by chil children
dren children of nreadolescent abe. They

simply can't trust the promise of

future gratification enougn to oe
able to forego one they can enjoy
right now. This doesn't mean
that they are badly "adjusted" or

otherwise psychologically doomed.
It just means that they haven'i

lived long enough to discover that
postponed pleasure can be more

aatisfying than a present one.

Until this discovery has been
made, they are not ready to save
money. When we insist they do,
we are demanding a maturity that
has yet to be unfolded.
As a result we may defeat our

Own purpose by making thrift ap

pear oppressive ana cruet to l ea

instead 01 neipnu to mm.
Actor, Cab Driver
Settle For $4,000
Each On TV Show

NEW YORK, Sept. 3 (TJP)

Actor Hans Conrled and x-

cabbie Tom Kane both missed a

question on the English Ian'

guage tonight ana settled for a

prise of $4,000 each on TV

quia program. v
Conrled. 40. a Hollywood mov

ie, TV and radio performer, was

asked a four-part question on

the CBS TV program, "The $64.-

000 Challenger As part ox bis
answer ha said that the word

striglne was associated with a1

goat Instead of Correctly saying

it was associated with an owL

Kane, 49, of Rockport, N.Y,

waa orierea c nance to chal challenge
lenge challenge Conrled 'a answer, but ac

cepted it as correct.

conned answered tna rest of

the question correctly. Although
they were at the $32,000 level
when asked the question, they
dropped to the $$,000 level when
it was missed and split the prize

,,snoney. -

EgypI Craplafas -':
To US Concerning
Henderson's Probe

CAffiOv- Egypt, Sept 3 (UP)

Egypt has complained officially to
the United States that U. S.
Middle East envoy Loy Henderson
failed to go to Syria itself to
determine the extent, of Soviet

activity in that country, an au
thoritative source said today.

f Mohammed Heikal, editor' of

the Cairo newsnaner "Al Ahram"

and a confidant of president
Gamal Abdel Nasser, said the
official view Is that Henderson

should have visited Damascus in

stead of Turkey and Lebanon on
his fact-finding missiov. '
"Egypt disagreed with the way
Henderson carried out his mission
and said so frankly and officially

Heikal said.

i This was understood to mean

that President Nasser expressed

this feeling to U. S. Ambassador
Raymond Hare when they met in

Cairo Saturday.)
Henderson, veteran U. 8. Mid

die East troubleshooter, returned
to Istanbul Sunday from Leb Lebanon
anon Lebanon where he had conferred with

officials on the Syrian situation.
He also met in Turkey last week

with King Feisal of Iraq and King
Hussein of .Jordan. rs
The key to the (Syrian) situ

ation lies in Damascus ana ua
mascus' itself.' Heikal said.

He said a visit by Henderson

to Damascus itself would have

shown him that there is in fact

a Syrian "rapprochement, or a
closer s state of relations, -with
Russia "but not as -Americans

understand rapprochement."
Heikal said that unlike Lebanon
and Syria, "whose rapprochement
with the United States means they
are receiving orders from Wash Washington,"
ington," Washington," the Syrian government
has gone to Russia to get only
what the Western powers refused

to give ner. ; .-..
Anything Syria asked for from

Russia his received, prompt .at .attention
tention .attention from the Russians,"
Hikal added.

"Arms which Syria asked for

butcould not get from the West

ine nas receivea xrom nussia.
"Should Syria then have refused

these arms lust because of the

hidden ulterior motives which are
ascribed to Russiae" he asked.

Negro Farm Worker

Charged With Rape
Surrenders To Cops

PITTSBORO, Miss., (UP) A

Negro farm worker, ooject a
manhunt Since Wednesdsy for al

legedly raping a white ,om"'

surrenoereo iq

er his brother nirnea mm va.r

' i Meanwhile, snerin auw
m.v aiiT the fio-vear-old woman

who made the auegeo assauu

days after the alleged assau t

changed ner srory ana vua om om-cers
cers om-cers Vernon Armstrong only at attempted"
tempted" attempted" to rape her.

Shoemaice s a i a Armstrong,
about : SO, still was technically
charged with rape but there would

be no cnarge lor resisting arrest.
"He was arrested on an affidavit

charging rape," Shoemake said,

"but l don t tnmx mere' wm dc
much to it. He is well liked by

the woman's family. They raised

him."

Highway patrolmen and Diooa-

hounds were brought into the
search Wednesday after Arm

strong bolted when officers at attempted
tempted attempted to arrest him in a pes
patch. The woman told officers
Armstrong attacked 1 her Sunday
Afternoon but she did not report
it until Wednesday because she
"didn't want to cause any
trouble." .... .;.

Armstrong walked out of his

brother's house in the Schooner

community with his arms up at

4:30 a.m. today after the brother,
Clainton, turned him in. The fugi fugitive
tive fugitive had been ahot below the el elbow
bow elbow with a .22 rifle by an officer
as he ran into the woods but Shoe Shoe-make
make Shoe-make said the wound was -minor.

Armstrong told Shoemake he

did not know what happened at
the woman's house Sunday be

cause he war drunk, but ha did

not think h would, try to -hurt

her because she "was just like a
mother." ,'
Armstrong said be had been
hiding ia the woods since Wednes Wednes-and
and Wednes-and had. only two small
watermelons to eat

"He was mighty humble," Shoe Shoe-make
make Shoe-make aaid. "He said be had been

Ltrying to find a way to turn him

self in w me."

r

....::;y::.:i:y':
I y ft '
J

Vlu lfi';klf. i m-Txwwmiii.iii.iii m iiiiiinuirwraiff-

EXECUTIVE PLANNING Executives of Hamilton i Management Corp. discuss-the ; opera:
tion of Hamilton Sunds Inc. In Panama, Cen tral and South American during a recent vis visit
it visit from C. Ky Tyrone, (left) the company's Vice president in charge of sales. Shown with
Tyrone are Hilliam B. Lyon, (center) the investment firm's local representative, and G.
H. Flaherty,, assistant sales manager for Latin America, Lyon, recently opened a regional
office .here to handle queries from investors in 'Central and South i America. ;

FOR YOUR HIGH-BALL IIISiST
always on CANADA DRY
"High-Ball without Canada Dry

is Foul-Ball"

UK Protests Red Rejection
Of West s Disarmament Plan

LONDON, Sept. 8 (UP) Prime

Minister Harold Aiacmuian pro

tested Russia's brusque rejection

ef Western disarmament, propos proposals
als proposals in a letter to Soviet Premier
Nikolai Bulganin released today.
"You have but to say the word
and progress can be made toward
arms cuts, the prime minister
told Bulganin.
MacmUlan, in the latest of a
continuing series of summit ex

changes, appealed for "favorable

consideration" of the west's
"practical and imaginative" arms

cut proposals.

His letter to Bulganin was made

public on the eve of the London
disarmament conference's first
session since Soviet delegate Val Valerian
erian Valerian Zorin "rejected" the West Western
ern Western package plan. v

Macmiuan also attacked Soviet

policy on German reunification,
Intervention in the Middle East

and jamming of Western broad broadcasts,
casts, broadcasts, -f

But he onened his sharo 600-

word letter to the Soviet Premier
on the subject of 'disarmament.

"Of the many questions with

Quote Unquote

MANCHESTER. Kv.! "Aunt

Jcse" Sizemore, mountain mid midwife,
wife, midwife, celebrating her 111th birth birthday
day birthday Sunday:

The Lord willing, I'm coming
back next year."

CHARLOTTE, N.C.: Segrega Segregationist
tionist Segregationist John Kasper on B i 1 1 v
Graham's spreading of the Chris

tian religion among. Negroes:

amy (iraham went to New
York a white man but he's coming
back as a Negro-lover."
NEW YORK: Billy Graham. Aft After
er After winding up his New York cru crusade,
sade, crusade, on Kasper 's criticism:
"It's so. ridiculous it isn't worth
a comment."

SPA, Japan: Prime Minister No-

dusuki Kishl, on the possibility
that Japan eventually may recog recognize
nize recognize Red China:
"Under present conditions, ft
would be premature to recognize
Communist China or support its
admission to the United Nations."
DAMASCUS: Syrian President

Shukri El Kuwatly, reasserting

mi country a atutuae on dealing

wuu mm j. asi ana wesi;

"Jtyaia's sovereignty shall not
be violated in the least bv anv farm

m.m r J .7

ui jhjuucu or economic aeaung.

wo have no other ideoloev hut

tnai or true and pure Arab
tionalism."

which our correspondence; has
dealt, the most urgent is how lo
avoid the continuation of an arms
race both in conventional and un unconventional
conventional unconventional weapons and forces
said Mafcmillan. :
"The Western proposals ssem
to be an important contribution,
both practical and imaginative, to towards
wards towards agreement between us.
"I earnestly trust that they will

have your favorable consideration.

You have but to sav the word.

and real progress is assured.

"Hut we wre not encouraged
by the tone and substance of Mr.
Valerian Zorin's intervention in

the disarmament subcommittee on
Atgust 27," Macmillan said.

Maemillan's attack on Deputy

Foreign Minister Zorin was

prompted by the latter's asauit
last week on the West's disarma

ment plan and its virtual refection

two days before it was formally
put to- the five power disarma

ment conference here,-

"In regard to the Middle East."

Mttemillan went on, "I note your
statement that the sole considera consideration
tion consideration which,,goides the Soviet Union

conventional, weapons and forces,"

in its. approach to the problems
of the region is the desire to con

tribute towards ensuring a lasting
peace there.

I welcome this declaration but

I must frankly say that the

actions especially the recent
actions of the Soviet, government
have- appeared in a somewhat dif different
ferent different lightl" -..;
On European security and
German reunification Macmillan
reiterated Britain's support of the
four-power Berlin declaration of
last July 29 demanding free elec elections
tions elections as the first step toward re reuniting
uniting reuniting Germany.

FABRICS $il
Distinctive Original Designs

Cotton
Nylon
Silk -Fiberglass

THE .'
FURNITURE

1NI TOME
J n ni nm

4th of July Ave. & H
Tel. 2-0725

St.

BY POPULAR DEMAND .
WE ARE EXTENDING OUR
SPECIAL

SALE

for 2 more days,
with
flew
fflerchandise
added

This is your last'
chance to take
advantage of our
low...low.. prices I
Don't miss this
Fantastic Sale!

CAMPO ALEGRE BUILDING
Across EI Panama Hotel Ample parking
Open from 9:00 to 7:00 and during noon

space,
hour, -r

DOROTHY CHASE'S
Fall Classes Begin October 1st.
at the Balboa YMCA
INCLUDE:
Ballet (the foundation for every field of dance)
Tap Toa Limbering A Body Placement
Women'a classes and Tumbling for "Little Guys."
Registration dates: Sept. 5th, 6th and 7th
from 2 to 4:30 p.m.
At residence: 744 A Las Cruces St, Balboa
(Near Balboa Post Office)
For further Information Phone Balboa 1751

na

- &

PAIIAMUSICA FIIIAL UQUIDATIOII

BRAPiD NOT 78 RPM RECORDS
M:-M DOLLAR A t)OZEN ? t
:ft.-.-0a APIECE i-P.S
: PANAMUSICv
;.' V- : ALL OTIOTt RECORDS GREATLY REDUCED.
' CALLS MOXTESERIN No., 4 PHONE SOgJ
- ' -, Beside LellU Market.

2 Men Succeed
In Breaking
Into Prison

It was a good try. and it finally

worked.
Uoson County Sheriff E.T. Bray

reported today that Johnnie Dun Duncan
can Duncan and L.F. Daniels, both some

what intoxicated, tried to break
inte a county prison eamp to visit
a friend. The guards objected and
fired two warning shots.
Duncan and Daniels persisted.
A third shot hit Duncan U the

Both Negroes vent admitted to

the prise ror somewhat longer
visit than they origiaany planned.

HASPEL
SUITS
Are coming back to
the Isthmus
the first ahlpmtnt of
this brand of Suite to
reach here since 1950.

Funeral Services

For Mrs. Lashley
Will Be Al Corozal
Mrs. Cecilia Henry Lashley,
who died at oorgas Hospital on

Sunday, will be burled at coro

zal Cemetery tomorrow.
The remains will be taken
from the Lashley residence,
building 37, Mariano Arosemena
Street at 12:00 noon. Services
will start at the cemetery at 1:00
pjn.
Mrs. Lashley was a former
employe of Hotel El Panama.
Her widower Carl Dalton

Lashley Is an employe of trie
Naval Supply Department at
Rodman

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II
Cosmopolitan Mixed Bowling
EJraves
Loop Opens Season Tomorrow
Editor; CONRADO SARGEANT
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. Jl NEW YORK, Sept. 3 (UP) It will take more
tnan a "miracle finish" like the New York Giants
produced in 1951 to catch the Milwaukee Braves now
the National League pennant race.

1 mx years ago, the Giants elec elec-trifled
trifled elec-trifled the baseball world when,
after trailing the Brooklyn
Dodgers by six games at the La Labor
bor Labor Day milestone, they won 17
;of their last 21 games to .finish
'in a first place tie with the
Dodgers and then walked off
with the flasr on Bobby Thorn-:
., itrnmntta ninth Inning
home run in the third game of
' Now consider the almost hope hopeless
less hopeless task confronting Milwau Milwaukee's
kee's Milwaukee's nearest rivals at this same
staere of the campaign this sea season:
son: season: sWhlle the Braves were sweet) sweet)-lr
lr sweet)-lr their holldav doublphecder
against the Chicaeo rubs yes yesterday,
terday, yesterday, the second-place St.
Louis Cardinals dropned two
Karnes to the Cincinnati Redlegs
nd the tblrd-nlace Dodders ot
uhllnriMnriia. That, Iff
the Cardinal1 8'2 ame behind
and the Dodgers nine games
out. V
Even it the Braves win on-
tf 18 pt helr remaining 2
tsnmem, the Cardinals must
win 21 of M to rn them of the
championship while the Dodg--era
must win 21 of 22 to retain
the flag.
So If the good bursters of
Milwaukee are already order-
Inr up special tankards of beer
5 today to salute their heroes.
' an filnmtfk them?
-The Braves got in some good
hattlnsr nraotlce for the World
Serlea gafcistthe Cubs y ester
riav. collecting 26 hits In tun
ning off with tha opener, 23-1C
Wes Covington and Hank Aaron
each drove In sixvmnst'iand
F$ank Torre tied a maior Wane
record by -scoring six times. Bohj
Trowbridge blanked the Cuba
with three hits In winning the
hfrhtcao. 4-0.
The Redlegs nipped the -Car
dllaals, 8-1, on Frank Robinson's
two-run nomer in tne ium in inning
ning inning of the nightcap after home
rim. Hit Rnh Thurman. George
rrnw and Ed Bailey carried
rwivinniiti to a 10-5 opening
gslme victory. Robinson's blast
enabled Don Gross to post his
fiMt trlumDh since May 13. Hal
Jeffeoat picked up his 10th vic victory
tory victory in the opener.
The Philadelphia Phillies used
two castoff pitchers in sweeping
the Dodgers, 10-4, and 7-4. War War-ren
ren War-ren Hacker pitched his first
I HASPEL
SUITS
Are coming back to
tha Isthmus
the first ahipment of
this brand of Suita to
reach hera tinea 1950.
"Showing at Your Service
Center Theaters Tonight
RAT.ROA i:15 8:0
"WICKED AS THEY COME"
DIABLO BTS. 7:M
"Bad DAY At Black Rock"
nAMBOA 7:M
JiMAN IS TEN FEET TALL"
CATUN 7:0
THE RIVER CHANGES
MARGARITA C:1I
- 7:50
-TEXAS LADY
CRISTOBAL 7:
CTive Step Te Danger
FAR AISO :15 7:35
"THE 7th CAVALKi
LA BOCA 7:H
"BACK FROM ETERNITY
WANTA CRCZ
8:15 8:18
"THE BOSS"
ICAMP BIERD 6:15 7:41
"Dance With Me, Henry

77 VP I
-35c : 20c
- Spanish Pictures!
TARDE DK TOROS
, Alto
I PANCHO LOPEZ
with Luis Aguilar

Me. iu.
BANK! SLU.M
" ATTACK IN THE
CHINA SEA
- A'o: -"
DrFTY IN 8.
-i.r QL'ENTCf

Milwaukee

MORIARTY
complete game of the season in
the opener while Jim Hearn won
the nightcap in reiier or jac
Meyer.
Hank Sauer hit two homers
and drove in six runs as the Ne
York Giants walloped the
Pittsburgh Pirates, 11-5. The
Giants also won the nightcap,
4-3. on southDaw Johnny Anto-
nelli's two run homer in the
sixth inning.
The Baltimore Orioles dealt
the New York Yankees their
first double-header defeat of the
season, but the Chicago White
Sox had to settle for a split a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Detroit Tigers.
Connie Johnson pitched the
Orioles to a 6-1 victory after
Billy Gardner's 11th inning
single earned them a come comeback
back comeback 8-7 triumph in the open,
er. Mickey Mantle lost the
American League batting lead
to Ted Williams (.375 to .373)
by collecting only one hit in
seven at-bats.
The White Sox, who now trail
the Yankees by 4A games, whip
ped the Tigers, 8-2, as Billy
Pierce became the major's lead
ing winner by porting his 18th
victory in: the opener. However,
Detroit won the nightcap, 5-4,
on homers by Al Kaline, Harvey
Kuenn and Rene Bertoia.
wun wiinams sidelined bv a
heavy chest cold. Sammy White
and Jim Piersall shared the
heroes' role with eighth inning
homers, that carried the Red
Sox to ,ian 8-7 second game vic victoryover
toryover victoryover the Washington Sena Sena-tors.
tors. Sena-tors. The sox also -won :the
opeaefc, 7-l behind big". Frank
t iWfc Cleveland;' Indians iiouhc iiouhc-d
d iiouhc-d tajasjithjetlcs
twice-,- a-tt anr ssMJKewoarcia
allowed only live- bit in pitch pitching
ing pitching his first shutout or the sea season
son season in the opener. Relief 'pitch 'pitcher
er 'pitcher Cal ,McLish won the second
game with a three-run homer.
Ailing Ted Williams
Repains Bal Lead
By Slaying In Bed
BALTIMORE, Md.. Sept. 3
(UP) Mickey Mantle needs a
rood day at bat arainst the
Baltimore Orioles today to re recapture
capture recapture the American League
batting, lead from Ted Wil Williams:
liams: Williams: Williams, unable to play for
the Red Sox in yesterday's
doublcheader because of a
chest cold, took over the lfd
while idle. He stayed at .375U
while Mantle bagged only one
hit in seven at-bats for th
Yankees in their twin bill a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Orioles.
Mantle had "1 for fi" in the
opening game and struck out
as a pinch-hitter in the sec second
ond second to drop from .377 to .373.
Hare's how the two stars
stand:
G AB R H Pet.
William 121 402 7 151 .3756
Mantle 132 442 115 165 .3733
Water Ski Distance
Record Set Sunday
In. 255-Mile Jaunt
FORT WALTON BEACH, Fla.,
Sept. 3 (UP) An official of the
American Water Ski Assn. said
today Allen Warriner, 27, set a
new long distance water ski rec record
ord record on his 255-mile jaunt here
from New Orleans.
-Warriner, helping boost the an-
nual Billy Bowlegs Festival here,
f arrived Sunday at 510 p.m. es t..
after skiing 11 hours and 20 min-
! 1J- 1M T .t. T 1.1 1 .1
KW fMlini with Rnk V Vatk
suing dc tuna anomer Doai. Dut
Nathy quit after 40 miles because
of atomacb cramps.
, Paul King of PennooJl, in offi offi-eial
eial offi-eial of the association, said War War-riner's
riner's War-riner's feat was a new world lone
distance record. 1
RIO
15c

IT AH BLAINE
- with Rory Calhoun
- Also:
rR.NIUM BOOM
with Dennis Morgan

MERMAID Holding one of!
her first place trophies is,
Charlene Graves, who will be
one of the leading contenders
in the canal Zone ( Junior",
Olympic swim meet to be held
Sept. 7, at the Gamboa pool.
Charlene was first In the SO
yd. butterfly, first in the SO yd.
freestyle, second in the 50 yd.
backstroke and was a member
of the winning 12-year-old
relay team In the Fourth of
July swim meet. In the Junior
Olympics she will compete in
the 50 yd. freestyle, the 50 yd.
butterfly and will swim the
freestyle leg of the Medley
Relay.

Major League
Leaders
LIA0IN6 BATTERS
(Bated en 350 ofl'ielil st bats)
National League
Player and C.
Musial, St. L
Mays, N. Y.
Groat, Pitts.
Robinson, Cin.
Aaron, Mil.
Fondy, Pitts.
Sch'ndienst.M.
Cimoli, Bk'n
Hodges, Bk'n
Bouchee, Phil.
G Aft R M Pet.
121 468 75 159 .340
133 508 102 170 .335
104 418 52 135 .323
127 521 82 168 .322
127 524 103 168 .321
98 363 45 116 .320
127 550 81 174 .316
120 446 74 135 .303
128 497 79 149 .300
132 489 70 146 .299
American
Laagu
WmiamBoi: J21;4lM!'i87 151 .3756
Mantle, ,0fV 3?r'441 lis m .3733
wooaiingir ue.ii 367, bs izi .33U
FOX, (Jni. 13Z SZU 96 167 .321
Boyd, Bait 127 429: 65 134 .312
Skowron, N.Y, 117 437 54 135 .309
McDougald.N. 123 473 81 145 .307
Doby, Chi. 109 390 56 117 .300
Sievers, Wash. 129 482 89 144 .299
Minoso, Chi. 130 479 85 143 .299
HOMI RUNS
National Laagtw
Aaron, Braves
Snider, Dodgers
Banks, Cubs
Mays, Giants
Crowe, Redlegs
Mathews, (Braves
Musial, Cards
38
36
32
30
29
29
29
American League
Sievers, Senators
Mantle, Yanks
Williams, Red- Sox
Colavito, Indians
Wertz, Indians
Maxwell, Tigers
34
34
33
23
23
23
RUNS BATTED IN
National League
Aaron, Braves
Musial, Cards
Mays, Giants
Hodges, Dodgers
Banks, Cubs
' American League
Sievers, Senators
Mantle, Yanks
Jensen, Red Sox
Minoso, White Sox
Skowron, Yanks
Wertz, Indians
113
97
89
87
84
96
91
88
87
85
85
Pet.
Pitching
Bated en 11
W L
ctecUioni)
Schmidt, Cards
Sanford, Phils
Donovan, White Sox
Buhl, Braves
10 1 .909
17 5 .773
15 5 .750
16
10
.727
.714
Shanti, Yanks
Today Encanto 25 .75
WAHOO! S115.80
Ingrld Bergman In
"Anastaaia" in Cinemascope!
Alice Faye in
"WEEKEND IN HAVANA
Today IDEAL 20
Edmond O'Brien In
"711 OCEAN DRIVE"
Randolph 8cott in
"CORONEL CREEK"
.70
ViC TORI A
15c
. THE BEAST OP
THE AMAZONS
- Also:
GIRL IN THE
MCHT
15c

Latin American School
Teams Won Lost
Poxa Relojes 6 2
Marlboro Cigarrillos 5 3
Volkswagen Carros 5 3
La Mascota '5 3
National Radios 4 4
Wovey Materiales 3 5
Army and Navy Almac. 2 6
American Supply 2 6
Bedecked in their new regalia
the Latin American School league
put on a Colorful show at the Fort
Clayton Bowling Center. This up
and coming league will maugur
ate the "Sponsors Night" tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. Every week the spotlight will
be focused on one of the "angels."
This week the honors will be
heaped on Sam Friedman's La
Mascota team from Tivoli Avenue.
The keglers who proudly
wear the 'La Mascota on their
backs, are Stevens, Dinger, Vigil,
Morehouse and Dominguez. The
last results of the competition was
as follows.
Doxa 4 Novey 0
By winning all of their games.
the Timepieces of Doxa took over
the first place m the loop, ihe
Doxas had a close call in the sec
ond game which they took by the
narrowest ot margins, one pin.
The muchachos of Novey certain
ly were consistent, they register
ed an 828 in tne nrst game; came
back with the same total in the
second, and in the finale they hit
830.
For the .Doxas the highest series
mark went to Chuck Nunez, and
next to him was Fred Reisb was
531 and Tito Barrabas 550. For
tha losing Novey Materiales Mike
Nunez came through with 522 and
Garcia 52Vi"'y:v' .f;,.
La Mascota I MarWe4
The fim game of this Watch
proved tothe the close one, when
the Marlboro Cigarrillos won; by
two pins, but after that it was all
La Mascota. As a result these

I
Marlboro Edges Fort Clayton
In Basketball Battle of Champs

By HERBERT MOISI
In a game billed as the "battle
of champions" Carlos E 1 e t a's
champion Marlboro five eked out
a close 75 to 73 aecision over me
Panama Canal Zone area cham
Dions from Fort Clayton.
The Marlboro win evened the se series
ries series between these teams. Erlier
this year the Cavaliers easily heat
the Colonites at Fort Clayton.
Rnth fpamx iilaved without the
sprvieps of kev players but still
put on a fine exhibition of basket basket-hall
hall basket-hall tn delicht a fair-sized crowd.
ThP Fort Clavton Cavaliers played
without their star center !am Wil
liams who left for the U.b. last
Friday. Also missing from the ca
valiers line-up, with a spramea
and swollen ankle, was Big am
Reynolds. Marlboro played without
their spectacular veteran Fernan Fernando
do Fernando Tom and their two-handed long
distance shooter uemetriooosue;
Tagaropulos.
Bin Vern Clemmons of Fort Clay
ton was awarded a trophy for scor scoring
ing scoring the most points in the contest,
nosing out Carlos Pomares of
Marlboro who scored zi pomu j
demons' 22. Vem scored five fieia
goals and tallied 12 times in 22
free-throw tries. Pomares scored
S FG's and five of eight throws.
The game was played in inree
periods. There were two ten-minute
periods in the first half then
straight-ZO penoa m uie iccunu
h.if At the end of the first ten-
minute period, Clayton led 18 to 15
TROPICAL
0.60 TODAY! 0.40
Great Fortune Night!
$150.00
Be ene of the lucky wtnneri
f these Cash Prises! ;
1st Prize $100.00
Xnd
Srd
4th
XS.N
1S.N
1S.M
THE FORTUNE NIGHT
PLAT at l:H P.M.
On the Screen:
DOUBUS FEATURE I
Tab Hanter Natalie Weed
"THE BURnTnG HILLS"
In Technicolorl
CarreD Baker Xarl Maiden
"BABY DOLL" :

two Yearns ,ar now. tied With
Volkswagen for the runner-up spot
on the league, .! '- -(,.
Bob Morehouse is In hot win

ning streak and he has trained
that sixteen pounds of hard rubber
10 go aown tne lanes for good
scores.' In this match he was tons
for La Mascota with 550, none of
his team mates went over, the five
hundred marlc For the cigaret
te smokers
Huertas 510,
Collins hit 500, and
'. National Radios 2
American Supply 2
Close games were the style lor
the evening. This match was no
exception, when the National Ra Radios
dios Radios tuned in an 823 game which
was one better than American Sup
ply could supply. The Radios
ran, into some static in the second
game so the Americanos took it
easy,, but the National R e d i o s
ound the correct wage length and
walked away with the third game.
However, they had to settle for a
split, because of the large differ difference
ence difference in favor of American Supply
in the mid game. L
Ernie Campise was the leading
scorer for American Supply with
536, Olsen had 529 and Pailo 500.
However, this trio had to take a
back seat to National's Martinez
who came up with the best scratch
mark of 477 and a nandicap set of
555. His teammate posted a 539,
Volkswagen i
Army and Navy Stores 0
The Army and Navy Stores just
could not get going, whereas the
Vokswagen was in high gear, ine
results were apparent. Carros
vs Stores 0, Four out the five bow bowler
ler bowler for the Volkswagen passed the
500 mark Villa lobos 509, segura
539, Vasquez 507 and Grar 538.
For the Army and Navy stores
onlv one went over the 5C with a
whopping 555- The, results fhere
shoved the Army and Navy' Stores
into a tie for last place while the
Volkswaeen moved into a tie lor
second place.
but in the second quarter, Marl
boro scored 20 points to Clayton's
16 to lead to half time 35 to 34.
In the second half the soldiers
started fast and moved out ahead,
stretching that lead to seven points
at one stage. Inside the final three
minutes repeated interceptions by
Carlos Pomares and Rogelio (Pap (Pap-sy)
sy) (Pap-sy) Aikman cut the seven-point
lead to a one-point difference and
sparked a small lead which went to
five points at the one-minute time
mark.
Fighting back hard, the Armed
Services champions cut the lead
Gown to the hnal two-point mar
gin. Marlboro's speed and fine
Dall handling told the story in fin
al two-point margin.
Visibly tired from playing
the fast-moving Smokers, the Clay Clayton
ton Clayton Cavaliers were at a standstill
as the now-crowned Isthmian Marl
boro champions froze the ball to
the delight of the hometown crowd,
FG FT FTM F POINTS
Marlboro 28 31 19 21 75
Clayton 26 42 21 17 73
Joseph, Everseler,
Blades, Kirton (op
Table Tennis Titles
Senior, junior and girls titles
were won by Arthur Joseph, Ral Ralston
ston Ralston Kirton, Cardinald Blades and
Zurita Everseley in the recently
conducted Unisport Table Tennis
Tournament, which came to a
close Friday evening in Paraiso.i
Joseph, Luis Moreno, Stanley
HalL Frank Durham, Hiram John
son and William HiO gave samples
of the more technical angles of
J the game.
I Joseph, who last year annexed
the JWB Isthmian title and this
year the Unisport championship.
I won wita little difficulty over Luis
Moreno, who was a heavy fav
! orue to take top Honors la the se
nior, division.
Kirton, who was the underdog
in his match with the sturdy E-
duarde Blades, the boy wonder of
Paraiso. found himself ia a atraa
gle as his younger opponent press-
ea mm te nve fames, wit a
deoce ia the final, which ended
28-26.
Oliver WekB, trying ksrd, t-
periewced the ferocity of Cardi-
aald Blades, who smashed lum to
take the title for junior high school
boys.
' Grace Yearwood and Zurita Fv Fv-erseley,
erseley, Fv-erseley, two of Psraiso's promis promising
ing promising gui athletes, fought e almost
even terms tmul the Is tier gamed

Tomorrow evening at the Diablo

Bowung Alleys eigut of the best
mixed bowling teams on the Isth
mus -will be ready to do battle
am Colley has his Jast year's win
ners practicing nightly in prepa
ration of defending their: title
gainst all '.comers. 4!. J
This .year there will be several
strong teams in the race, out to
dethrone the defending y champs.
Bud Balcer has pulled Ted Me
lanson out of retirement and will
probably be the biggest threat
iBill Jamison, Ted Albritton, (and
George Riley have their s a m
teams back while the other three
teams have new faces caused by
the departure of some of last
year's bowlers. ;
Sponsors are still being lined up
and all teams hope to be decked
out in new shirts for the opening
night; Bowling will start at 7:30
p.m. but it is hoped that alt man
agers will be out a little early to
help the Secretary and Treasurer
straighten out the. few loose ends.
Mem hers of the eight teams are
Team No. 1, Bill Coffey, Bill Rog
ers, led bchmidt, Reggie Schmidt
LU uunn.
Team No. 2 Bill Jamison, Chuck
MacGarvey, Virgil Camby, Thilma
Camby, Marge Hicks.
Team No." 3 George Riley, Bob
Boyer, Betty Boyer; Wilma Riley
Team No. 4 Bob Toland, Jack
Voss, Harry Klumpp, Betty Cole
man, Betty Brown.
i Team No. 5 Al Minor. Art Rob
erts, Don Rudy, VI Rudy, Bernice
Roberts.
Team No. 8 Ted Albritton, Mac
Lane, Walt Coiciasure, Addie Col
clasure. Myrtle Albritton.
Team No. 7 Bud Balcer, Ted
Melanson, Ed Lowande, Thelma
Lowande, Marge Rogers.
Team No; 8 Bob Bowen, Dick
Soyster, Roger Willi ims, Dotty
Williams, Marian Bowen.
's Return
To Forni Brightens
Things'' are looking brighter lor
the San Francisco Forty-Niners
now that Hugh (The King) McKl-
henny is running through rival de
fenses in his old-time form.
Hampered hy injuries the vast
three years,-the former University
of Washington halfback believes
this may be my best year" in
the National Football League "if
can stay all in one piece.".
Hurryin' Hugh 'never looked bet
ter Sunday as he scored two
touchdowns one on a 54-yeard
scamper in the final minute to
carry the Fort-Niners to a 21-17
victory over the Cleveland
Browns. It was San Francisco's
third straight exhibition game vie
tory and the Browns second defeat
in three pre-season warmups.
in two exhibition games Satur
day night, the Los Angeles Rams
walloped the Chicago Cardinals,
63-21, at Portland, Ore., and the
Detroit Lions downed the Wash
ington Redskins, 31-14, at Birming Birmingham,
ham, Birmingham, Ala.
Sports Briefs
i
LOGAN REJOINS BRAVES
CHICAGO ( UP Shortstop Johnny
Logan, who injured his right shin
in a game against St. Louis Aug.
16; was expected to rejoin the
jauwauK.ee uraves here today.
. BECKER WINS XITLl
.BEIRUT, Lebanon (UP) Roger
Becker of England won the Beirut
International tennis championship
Sunday by defeating Mervyn Rose
or Australia, 3-6, 3-6, 6-4. 6-1. 6-Z.
SHARE SIGNS CONTRACT
ST. LOUIS, (UP)-Charlie Share,
a six-year veteran in the National
.Basketball Association, has signed
his 1957-58 contract with the St
Louis Hawks. He wss the team's
fifth leading scorer last season.
ON ACTIVE LIST
PHILADELPHIA (UP) The
Philadelphia Phillies have Disced
Coach Andy Seminick back en
their active player list. He will fill
in for first-string cstcher Staa Lo
pata. who has been Dlaaued br an
ailing anee most ol the season
PRINCETON OPENS DRILLS
BLAIRSTOWN, N.J. (UP)
Fifty-six members of the Prince
ton University football team today
opened their pre-season training at
thia northers New Jersey retreat.
The Tigers will aot return to
Princeton until Sept. 21 a week
before their opening game against
Rutgers.
j PHILLII CREW WINS
? PHILADELPHIA (UP) Olym Olympic
pic Olympic oarsman Jack Kelly, a brother
ef Princess Grace, of Monaco,
stroked the Vesper Boat dub
eight-oared crew to a four-length
victory ever the West Side Club of
Buffalo, N.Y, Sunday in tha Mid Mid-die
die Mid-die States Rowing Regatta n the
Schuylkill River.
the verd'x-t for the title In Junior
firls diviiioa. I
Priies were awarded following
the evening's activities, and the
presentation was made by Web Webster
ster Webster Marshal. I

National League -J'

Team
W L Pet. CB
81 49 .623 :
Milwaukee
St; Louis
Brooklyn
Philadelphia
73 58 .557 8V4
73
68
67
65
49.
.49
59
64
64
70
79
82
'.553 9
.515 14
Cincinnati ;
New York
Chicago i
Pittsburgh,
..511 14V4
.481 18V4
U383 31
.374 32H
Today's Games
Philadelphia vs Brooklyn ( At
C.N),.- V
Pittsburgh at New York (N)
Milwaukee 'at Chicago.
St. Louis at Cincinnati (N).
Yesterday's Results' t
(First Game)
Milwaukee 625 203 122-23 26
Chicago 124 010 020-10 14 -3
Burdette. Johnson (7-2) and
Crandall.' v
Rush U-U). Anderson. Poholskv.
ijuwu, oingieion ana neeman.
(Second Game) '
Milwaukee 002 000 0204 8 (
Chicago 000 000 000 0 3 i
Trowbridge (5-4) and Rice,?
Hillman (5-10). Rush. Drobows
ky and Neeman.v : '
(First Game) -" '.
Pittsburgh 000 W J 1(KM5 9 ; 1
Ne w York 023 000 33x-ll 14 1
Kline, Swansoni 'Purkey Face
(4-6),JArtoyo-ahd Foiles, Rand.
Barclay, Monzant (3-1) and Tho
mas. ; '. :
(Second. Game)
Pittsburgh 000 021 000-3 10 r
New York 002 002 OOx 4 11 1
O'Brien (0-2), Purkey, Face and
Peterson.
Antonelli (12-14), Constable, Gris-
som and Katt, Thomas.
(First Game)
St. Louis 300 000 1105 13 0
Cincinnati 050 013 10x-10 14 8
V. McDaniel (7-5). Schmidt, Wil-
helm, Merntt and Cooper Land-
nth.
Jeffeoat (10-12) and Bailey.
(Second Game)
St.- Louis vv 01O 000 000 0 I yvl
Cincinnati 010 000 000 23 7
j season xi2- ano,. omim
.Gross (5-9), And; Burgess..
(Firxt.Gama)
Philadelohia 102 214 B00-. 10 17 1
Brooklvm 200 200 0004 8 2
Hacker (7-5) and Lopata.
McDevitt (6-2). Labine, Bessent
and Campanella, Roseboro.
(Second Game)
Philadelohia 202 020 1007 14 1
Brooklyn 012 010 0004 8 0
Meyer, Hearn, (5-1) and Semi-
nisck.
Craig (5-8), Roebuck and Rose
boro.

Ability To 'Bourtce Back'

Keeps Toronto In IL Racfe

NEW YORK. Sept. 3 (UP)-:
Because of their ability to bounce
back from the floor, the Toronto
Maple Leafs remained in the
chase for the International League
pennant after the holiday activity.
The league leading Buffalo Bi
sons edged the Maple Leafs, 3-1,
in the opener of a crucial double double-header
header double-header yesterday hut Toronto won
the second game, 9-2, with the
help of a two-run homer by Mike
iroiiat and a three-run blast by
Bin Wilson.
A double defeat would b a v e
dropped Toronto 4V4 games back
of the leaders with only seven
remaining. But the split left the
second place Leafs only 2V4 back
ol Buffalo.
The Richmond Virgininas swept
their twinbill with the Columbus
Jets, winning the opener, W, on
a five-hitter by Jack James and
rolling to a 4-2 triumph in the sec second
ond second game.
Miami nipped Havana, 2-1, In
18 innings after copping the open opener,
er, opener, 3-0. on a three-hit shutout by
Satchel Paige. A single game be
tween Rochester and Montreal
was rained out
The linescores:
( first Gams)
Buffalo- 000-001-002
87-2
Toronto 000-001-000
Cox and Noble: Robinson. Tie-
fenauer (9) and SL Claire. LP
Robinson. HRs Cox Morton.
(First Game)
Havana 000400-000
Miami 000 030-OOx
Pena, Cuellar (8) and Izquierdo:
Paige and MeCuUough. LP Pena.
2

, FOR YOUR HIGH-BALL IIUIST

iity on CANADA DRY
.Hijh-Ball vIIhsul fcn:d3 Dry
iiFd-Bdl"

American League

Tsamt
W
83
L
Pet. ftn
JVew York
Chicago
Boston -Detroit
r' f
Baltimore '
Cleveland
Washington ,
Kansas CUyi
48
53
1
66
M
68
.629 J
.595 4V
'534f 12Vt
.500 17
78
70
,66
64
85-
.492.
.489
.382
-879.
18'4
32
38
50
81'
50 t?2
today's Games -?
Chicago at Detroit, "i ,,,
, Jew York at Baltimore, ;
Only games scheduled t
' Yesterday'! Results 1 , i
(First Game)',
New York p 033 000 001 00-1-7 12 1
Baltimore 004 100 002 01-8 15 1
Larsen, Shahtz, Ditmar, F o r d.
Wight, .Zuverink, Lehman
(5-3)
(Seeond Gamer-
New York 000 000 001 -X, 8 1
Baltimore 420 000 OOx 6 10 t
Kucks (8-9), Cicotte and D. John
son, Howard.
V
kC. Johnson (13-8) and Triando.
(First Game)
Chicago
Detroit
401 002 1008 11
010 001 000 12
Tierce
(18-10), Staley and Lol-
lar.-
"Mttm fl.T9ir Sfiima I
Shaw, Byrd and Porter.
(Second Game) t
Chicago 000 010 201-4 10 IS
Detroit 310 100 OOx 5 t
Donovan (15-5);i Derrington, Sta Staley
ley Staley and Lollar: (i i
Lary (9-15) and House. h' i
(First Game) ii
Kansas City 000 000 0000' 5 ,V
Cleveland 331 100 00x--8 7 U'
Garver (5-12), Burnette, Portock
rrero and Thompson
Garcia (9-8) and Nixon. V J
(Second, Game). J' V
Kansas City 030 000 0003 11 -V
Cleveland 011 300 01x-4 10 2
Ter
Vat
erry.i-lOLvTrucka and imith.
alentinettiMcLUh (8-5) ajhd
Narago
(First Game) ',:
Washington 001 000 0001 8 I
Boston 200 011 21x 7 14 J
Ramos (11-13), Black and Court
SulUvaa (12-9) and Daley. s-
( Second Game)
Washington 000 005 020 7 8
Boston ,100 300 22x 8 11
Kem merer. Hyde, Byerly? (5-6)
and Berberet. 1
Sisler, Delock, Wall (1-0), Por Por-terffeld,
terffeld, Por-terffeld, Susce and White. i-
(Second Game)
Miami 2, Havana 1.
(Second Game) 7 innings)
Buffalo
Toronto
200-000-0 271
030-123-X 9 lO-o.
Hahn. Nagy (2) and Astroth. No
ble (57; Grimsley and RosellL LP
Hahn. HRs Easter, Goliat, Wil-
son,.. : :-r -y.r,
Rochester at Montreal, postpon
ed, rain, ., ,'
'. Xlrst Game)'
(8 innings) .'. '
Columbus 000-000-00- 651
Richmond 00(M)60-01. 150
" Kildoo and Kravitz; James and,
Watlington. .: ) s
(Secend Gams)
Richmond 4, Columbus 8.; ,4,J ii
. ;f?".'"5 -:
P'. a 'ae'3
UKIVb-INi
5 TODAY. .1 I
A GREAT PICTUFJClf
George Nader Tim Hevey Bj
I "MAN OF RARI"
Tomorrow!
I
POPULAR NIGHT!
L19 per CAR J ?
lUbert MKchmn la
"MAN WITH A- GUN'



If ,.J ;r.-,;fJ-, J)

: HITS THS SPOT.

1 .vS-rl '-s--V II I

' "'R sJ JrilrSPl!'?,, 1 """"" fv-, l

IU9 OUT 01 I
visit A 1:11,1X1
; A A P 'iw I

J, B08fJX6' GRAM -Z?- i f

,HDUtQU-OBFYIHir f X,

I Dan Daniel

' Pity th poir" fan of Brooklyrf,
f whom It utd to b MM that
or thoir ardont apiilH vltaaoball
w ot t a port bur a rnfu
. no 'MditfjsW'So
chance to get wveng" W th
Vinkwi for th Debacle lof last
f October, in fact, in anovner iori-
. jught, Brooklyn' no ; longer may
tin it. hioved Dodeers. s
i it the Corporation Counielf the
City of JNew xorK isui io mm jki
nthAriiv for condemnation pro-
' ceedingi ip fufrfiSh" a' faVbredVaitel
for Walter Mauey a new siaaium
i downtown Brooklyn, tho Dodg:
ri will announce their departure
for Los Angelea, as of 1958. ;
Pity the poor adherents ol the
TnHeir brnhani of 'the storms
temmini from, the.. whirlwipd
risa of the Braves, and the expan expansion
sion expansion movement in the National
Leagu which already has located
tho Giants in San Francisco.
.' in past years,: the approach of
September usually found Brooklyn
enthusiasts worrying abbUt World
Series tickets nd bewailing the
limited capacity of .their obiolete
park in Flatbush.
li, USASONS rOR
V COLLAPSE MANY
But now the harbingers of the
autumn equinox- cry through the
rafters of Ebbets Field, and Brook Brooklyn
lyn Brooklyn is stepped in baseball' grief
and despair. After having figured
in six of 10 World Series since 1947,
" the historic and hitherto dramatic
Superb s appear to be most em emphatically
phatically emphatically eliminated. Brooklyn
could .cry. :
' What hit tho Brooklyn club?
What factors massed to confound
thoso who, last. April, were so cer cer-'
' cer-' tain that the depth of formidable
.pitching, and multiplicity of old
pros, would produce just one more
championship? 4
v Tb roa sen -for tho Dodger col
, ItpM ir many. Ont, of conrso,
to. MilwankM which,, with tho a a-!
! a-! ejuisftion Rod Schoondionst from
tho Giants on June IS, bocamo tho
I OUT rF nnnrtQ
- DOGS OOR BACKSEAT r
A 1 v DRIVERS v
. By JOE STETSON
f f Dof Editor. : ; C ;'
' j f 'i"5 - -. -f ;
' 'DRINK and drivers don't mix.
And some people haven't been
convinced yet that doss and driv
ers can bta dangerous combina combination,
tion, combination, too,-
.' Once, after being foolish enough
to think that I could m ana re a
tho of three-month -old puppies in
a car without a container to re
strain them. I was tempted to
write a piece entitled "Puppies
Under the Pedals." Anybody can
i fill in the details of my journey.
It didn't come to jnsig the
choice of crushing. a pupp? to
I stop the ear, but my gear ahifting
j was phenomenal. If they were
' dachshunds, the whole contraption
could have been decontrolled by
nr of them. -.
When we consider how flight a
deviation can ciuse a car to move
into trouble, w should h! con convinced
vinced convinced that our attention, balance,
and control should be in posse posse-lioo
lioo posse-lioo at all times. Not only are

most formidable club In t tho
leagui.
: But 1 cannot rule out the uncer uncertainty
tainty uncertainty regarding tho Dodgers' ul ultimate
timate ultimate destination geographically
as a -strong factor in -their failure,
t The old spirit has not been .evi .evidenced
denced .evidenced on the field,! in the stands.
There, has been a public apathy
which arose from-, anger over O' O'-Malley's
Malley's O'-Malley's alleged scare tactics.''
Evidence given at the Washing Washington
ton Washington hearings that the club had not
been so pitifully, devoid of profits

as had been bruited about also tend
ed to injure the Flatbush situation.
VICTIMS OP SECOND -FLIGHT
REVOLT
Behind these reasons for Brook'
lyn's downfall has been the failure
of its attack, imposing on the pitch
ing far too back-breaking a task.
ome of the Dodgers are eith
er washed up, or stand on the
fringe of reduction to second. dm
The front office should have seen
that the club needed a third base
man, that it lacked adequate catch
in, th.r 1 mrm ajtf tlM Afliim.
ped in the outfield. V S
But talk of Lit Anaeies,, of Hit
bush and Atlantic Avos., of Plush-
ing Meadows, apparently blin4d
Dodflor .authorities to tho Imme-
diato mods on the field. Little was
done. ''.,-.' '-.
If chance hadn't produced on
of tho groat shortstops of tho ma
jors 'in Charley Neal, the Brook Brooklyn
lyn Brooklyn dobaclc would bo mach more
drastic. ,,
Says Walter Alston. 'We are the
victims of what you might call the
big revolt of the second division.
It hit all the first flight clubs ex-
cept Milwaukee which,' through
luck of the schedule,, was not forc forced
ed forced to play many games with the
second, four during this .August
uprising."
True, that revolt, too, had much
to' do with" the Tlatbush. tragedy.
But, whatever the reasons, pity
the poor fans of Brooklyn, They,
could cry.,.,-.,, ..u,,
puppies a baxard, if loose, but ma mature,
ture, mature, even well trained dogs, can
be instrumental in causing a tra tragedy.
gedy. tragedy. The terrier that jumps from
seat to seat," in particular. Or the
cuddly dog that wraps himself a a-round
round a-round your neck on tLe back of
the seat, the do that leaps with without
out without regard for consequences at aa
insect happening to enter the ear.
the pet that must crawl into your
lap and somehow seta his head
or' foot- tangled ta the steering
wheel. -.
IBig dogs can- throw the catch
of a door handle by leaning en it.
They can even cause an accident
by unexpectedly wrapping a big
wet toncue ground the back of
your neck.
. If a strange dog is to be trans transported,
ported, transported, even the problem of its
jumping out of the car must be
admitted. This necessitates win window
dow window adjusting regardless of.wea
ther, and may wind up wica vis visibility
ibility visibility impaired by a nervous,
panting dog in a poorly vcntlat vcntlat-ed
ed vcntlat-ed situation.

, By HARRY GRAYSON
SAN FRANCISCO (NEA)
Contractor Charles L. Harney Is
.ucking tha t, grandstand of the
Slants'- new baseball park back
into a 190-foot hill which will act as

a break against the cold wind and
San Francisco's famous fog.
Exterts on the subject contend
thatv the" new plant at Candlestick
Point in the city's Bay View dis
trict will be much better protected
against the elements than the pre present
sent present Seals Stadium.
A Jot of outsiders contend that
summer nights In the Golden City
are too windy and cold ior base
ball. Bill. Yeeck. making a survey
for major league ball in Califor
nfa, suggested that a new San
Francisco layout be heated.. So
many customers were frozen out in
1955 that the new owners, the Bos Boston
ton Boston lied Sox, had the Seals play
only in the aiternoon in '58 but
that didn t work either, f y
WATER MAILS, who is in a Po
sition to know best, says that visi visitors,
tors, visitors, and Johnny Come Latelys ob object
ject object to the San Francisco baseball
weather, which has been unusually
favorable this season, by the way.
Mails, the celebrated ouster who
helped the Cleveland Indians to
the world championship in 1920,
points to the minor league record
of 670, 546 paid admissions at Seals
Stadium in 1946. He says, and we
agree, the weather business is over-Worked.
-
'"It was the large segments of
people brought to San Francisco
by World War II who put the rap
on our baseball weather," contends
Mails, who pitched for. the Seals
for 10- years and has been their
public relations director for 20.
"Like any story, it got bigger with
each retellinc until thev had clubs
playing here in snow up to their
a,uees.
vThe people embellishing this
yarn don't know what fog is. Listen
to them, you'd think we need a fog
horn at the put ana a lantern
at each base."
Unlike most San Franciscans,
Mails, doesn't wear a topcoat on
July and August evenings.
'THE PEOPLE HERE enjoy the
good weatner. isan rancisco is a
top summer resort," he stresses.
"ine weather won't keep them a-
way from the Giants' games. Give
them a show and they 'll come out.
i uon t contend tnat an Francis Francisco
co Francisco will be another Milwaukee, but
I'm certain the. Giants will, play to
i,Z50,ooo in eacn of the first three
years. After, that,' when the new newness
ness newness wears off, the Giants will be
on their own.- But, attendance will
never drop as low as it has at
ine roia urpuops, j..v'':i'--4 $
. Outside of baseball.-San Fran-
cisco long has been a hig league
towntused to the best. M-- ,f ., ul
It ViU go 'along with' 'jecondl
division club,- but not one that's
down in the dumps too long, it's
iue any otner city in that respect.
The Giants are going to be sore sorely
ly sorely handicapped by lack of seating
accomodations well into next sea season,
son, season, for Contractor Harney says
he cannot hope to complete the
new park before July 1. This
meant a capacity of no more than
18,075 at the present Seals Stadium
until then.
The Dodgers have to play at Los
Angeles Wrigley Field, where
there are only a little more than
23,000 seats, all next season. That
is, if they come and out here
it's taken for granted.-
These historic franchise switch switches
es switches remain inconceivable., No one
can understand why the American
League, after having, a foothold in
San Francisco, is turning Califor California
nia California over to the National
EVEN MORE INCREDULOUS
is the National League abandoning
the New York metropolitan area
and its 14 million people to the
American.,'.
Perhaps the most implausible of
all is the Giants and Dodgers rush rushing
ing rushing to the- Golden west before
suitable parka have been built.
At any rate, the San Francisco
Giants are a reality. Now on to
Los Angeles and Dodger doings.
By BEANS REARDON
QUESTION: la there any differ-:
ence in tne way American and Na National
tional National League umpires call balls
and strikes? George Horwood.
Answer: .Yes, National 'League
umpe oy peering over the catch
er's shoulder, nearest the batter.
In the American, umpires look ev ev-e
e ev-e the catena's head to see the
plate.
' Q. Battor bunts along the third
base line. It twists foul, and then
as it reachea third base turns fair.
Isn't it a foul ball once it lands i"
foul territory? George Schneider.
A. Ne, it's fair' as long as it set set-tied
tied set-tied in fan; ground before-passing
third. . i f
! Q. How far up the line Is a run runner
ner runner allowed to go after sprinting
across first safely? Lou Valvano.
A. He is allowed the normal di distance
stance distance needed to pull np, tura and
come back directly to first Any
movement toward second by the
runner place him in Jeopardy of,
oemg xaggea out at nrst.
HASPEL
suits;
Art eominj back to
tho lithmut '-the,
the, '-the, first shipment of ',.
this brand of Suits to
reach hero since 1950.

v - I :'' -- V --.r-sji

i m
-WAITING IT OUT- For a

: Jit v
mmmmmmtmmmmimtmmmmmKmmmmtmmtmMmmmMimtmmmm Duma tmm wBMwSwi "Vmmm'i I

Arcj.,;. Aiexanana eay. oi.i., training camp ne set up ior nis proposed noui' witft nay Korjtnson. But
. Carmen, back in full training, now fishes for relaxation as he gets ready for the, Sept. 23 bout.
Robinson: A Puzzle That Punches

i -m i T -!- '

Word's getting around that Von
MeDaniel doesn't have the swift
to be. the pitching phenom he look looked
ed looked tho first time he toured the
league ... even Frank, Lanead Lanead-mits,
mits, Lanead-mits, "I'm darned if Ilcnow how
he geis them out." ... no reserva reservations
tions reservations about brother Lindy's stuff,
thMickey" Mantle's getting the full
treatment from the boys who gath gather
er gather round tre batting cage ... about
the scandal mag hub-hub on we
coast he wis a target). .
A. dozen seasons of pitching
have made Warren Spahn one ,of
the most affluent men in the maj majors
ors majors with enough guile to com compensate
pensate compensate for his loss of speed to
tep jhim a high-salaried employe
a few jnore years ... but as a kid
VHobks(dubbed 5for ;his4 profile,
as welha ,crye) wanted to be a
first ibaseman, and actually play played
ed played in tne same infield with his dad
on Butiilo tandlot ... he became
a pitcher only when he turned out
for Jiia high school team and took
a look at the competition on first...
RilHKknwron bats and throws
rieht. eats right, thinks right
hut when he was a Eriaaer i
Purdue he punted with his left
footW ; v ::'L.:..
The" Cincinnati Reds think a Kid
who lies vet to throw a ball for
them is their best-looking pitcher
since Ewell Blackweii . ne s
Jsy Hook a bonus hid plucked
out of, Northwestern, ana siooa
the Rcdlcgs sluggers on their ears
in a simulated game drill the oth other
er other day ... said big Ted Kluszewski,
"Hia. ball "moves better right now
than Newcnmbe's." ...
Part of Klu's continuing physic physical
al physical troubles: the big guy won't work
consistently enough to stay in
good shape and ease the load on
his weak -back:..
What sours us on boxing: ran in
to a big-time Las Vegas gambler
in a Chicago hotel lobby the eve
of a televised fight ... "Just called
Cleveland," he whispered. "Bet
the dog." ... The favorite looked
like an out choice, the "dog" didn't
seem to nave a chance-... but the
man winked knowingly ... staring
at us over morning coff : t h
at us over morning coffee: the
"dog" won by a kayo

Haney Solid Candidate For NL
'Manager-of-the-Year' Award

By STEVE SNIDER
NEW YORK, Sept. S (UP)
Fred Haney of : the Milwaukee
Braves, often criticized for his
strategy in the past, is the one
solid candidate for the National
League s "manager of the year"
awardV . ... ,. .. .
He's winning with a club that
figured to win and the normal
reaction to that is "so what?"
But the peppery little man who
has naa so many more downs
than ups in his stormy managerial
career has been giving it the
"Casey Stengel treatment" all
year long and. rates major
share of the bows for the tremen
dous showing of the Braves.
1. They said he had no bench
but be went for long periods at
a stretcn witnout sucn aces .as
Billy Brut on and Joe Adcock. -2.
He started the season with
a championship club, rebuilt it by
mid-season end still if operating
cnampumsnip ciun.
The 'club that cracked the race
wide open early in Augusta was
a far different Outfit from the one
voted fcy the nation's experts as
shoo-in for the pencanL
How many would have picked
the Craves if they'd known is
advance -that such characters as
Andy Pafko, .Frank Torre, Wes'
Covington, Bob llaile. Felix Man Mantilla
tilla Mantilla and Del Rice would be called
upon to carry a big load?
It s true tbe front oiiice. Gen-1
eral Manager John Quinn in par-1

u oust, naa peea a tremenaous

time. Carmen Basilio thought all

Warren Spahn
, ,j i-.'.rr

George Kell's not too worried a a-bout
bout a-bout his playing days in the maj majors
ors majors t-iiling off ... he's rated a top
managerial prospect and he's got
a little piece of an oil well going
for him in El Dorado, Ark. ...
The reformed dept.: one of the
stretch, run had to lick a bad boy
tag ... he'd been canned by the
majors in a previous hitch when
he showed up loaded in the club clubhouse
house clubhouse one aiternoon and went out
on the field to indulge in a pepper
game- with the bat hoy ... still tog togged
ged togged in his street clothes...
About the time George King
found out he'd been peddled by Sy Syracuse
racuse Syracuse Nats of the NBA to the
Cincinnati Royals, he took off for
Africa ... but only to conduct are
clinics in Mozambique...
Out at Lake Hopatcong, N.J.,
there's a 59 year-old Wall Streeter,
Leland Sutherland, who commutes
50 miles to work every day, the
first five of them directly across
the lake by toat ... except that
Leland's not in it ... he's hanging
on to a tow rope, gliding on water
skis...
(Between you'n'me, the athlete
nowadays who doesn t smoke is
the xarity ...
help. The deal bringing second
baseman Red Schoendienst from
the Giants to Milwaukee generally
is credited with being the boost
tbe Braves needed
But it was Haney who decided
Hazle was the man he needed off
the Wichita Club's minor league
roster and it's Hazle who slugged
his way to lame with an incred incredible
ible incredible batting start of better than
.500. i
And the bench that figured to
provided adequate fill in jobs
be Milwaukee's orime weakness
from Pafko, Covington. Mantilla,
Torre and nice. ;
Torre took over In magnificent
style when Joe Adcock, one of the
club's top sluggers, went on the
shelf. Pafko and Covington' moved
into one outfield slot as alternates
when the original left fielder,
Bobby Thomson, waa dealt to the
Giants. Hazle came out of Wichita
to earn his nickname "Hurricane'
when Bruton was hurt and Man
till a has been filling short in the
anseoce oi jonnnr utgan.
, Del Crandall still does most of
the catching but Rice is in there
occasionally always when Bob
Buni h piienmr. wnen nice ana
Crandall are slumping, Carl Saw-
alsU comes la to perk things up
with his bat.
It's still a chib that looks like
a champion. But it's not tbe same

club that started the- season andJiilio and few others have a food

the maaarer, Haney, rates the

bows ior tnau -'..

he'd be doing was fishingat the

By JIMMY BRISLIN
NEW YORK (NEA)VAi invas
supposed to be, Ray Robinson,, the
middleweight champion' .? of v' the
world, would come out: under! the
bright lights of the Yankee Stad
ium ring, sept. 23, ana light uar uar-men
men uar-men Basilio, .- the welterweight
champ, beiore the first million dol dollar
lar dollar gate in the television age.
But Robinson decided to call the
fight off unless some impossible
business demands were met and
while he was arguing in that high-
pitched voice ot his, the interna international
tional international Boxing Club found its ticket
sale had stopped cold and. they
doubted whether they could get it
going again the original scale.
Boxing people counted, up some some-thins;
thins; some-thins; like 42 fights from which
Robinson had pulled out. But, in
the Basilio case, he was in line
tor a half million dollar payday.
Why, everybody asked, would the
guy put a payday such as this in
jeopardy?,;, -. .
Anybody who knows Ray Rob Robinson,
inson, Robinson, fighter and self-styled busi-
nssman realizes it i impossible
to come no- with a
leniible- n-
swer. He' u puzzle
that 'can
punch. -,.-.-!.,.. -t
i "You Wake something but of
the guy ,'1 Ernie Braca, who man managed
aged managed him for a time, snjorted one
afternoon. "If you come up with
an answer tell my lawyer. He's
handling my business with Robin Robinson
son Robinson now."
Braca has ulcers and spends his
evenings refusing drinks and eat
ing tarina.' He was fine before he
took over Robinson. Jim Norris
doubled over in his office and
wound up placed on a stretcher j
wiiu augai nay bi 1115 siuc ana
was carted to a hospital.
As a fighter, he is a question
mark, too. Once, he could do ev everything.
erything. everything. Da it so well even "the
hardest old-timers had to go for
him all the way. But now, at a
claimed age of 37, he is a mystery.
He flattened Bobo Olson, but Ol Olson
son Olson then went down against any anybody.
body. anybody. He looked pathetic against
Gene Fullmer in a losing 15-round
fight, but hailed wide-open Gene
with a left; h0k m May at Chi
cago.
If he hadn't nailed Fullmer.
would he have been able to win
over 15? Was it a lucky punch?
Or is he Still such a workman that
he has everything needed to take
Basilio, who is lighter but comes
more heavily armed than Full Fullmer?
mer? Fullmer? There is a debate over this.
' Many suspected his motions this
time come from his private ideas
on what he has left. "He doesn't
want to fight Basilio," Braca said.
"He knows he's shot and he does
not want a licking," others said.
Against Fullmer, he msde most
forget he ever looked bsd. It
seemed to be a confident, planned
move. Suck. in Fullmer, pound
rights to the body, then hook.
Robinson had tried to set up a
couple of times before Fullmer
went for it. But it was only the
sixth round and it could have been
his one, way to win.
ji.
Outside the ring, Robinson Is
even more complicated. He is
good-looking, dapper and he talks
quickly and convincingly. He loves
people around" him, but does not
seem to have a close friend. When
Braca wanted him-to hang up his
glover after a poor fight with
Johnny Lombardo in Cincinnati, he
was a tearful guy, pleading for an another
other another chance. He'd never forget
Braca. he said. Now they don't
even talk.
With other fighters, he'll be warm
and talk humbly. Or, he'll be the
haughty guy who passed Basilio
on the street with a wbo-are-you
nod. Or an aniered fighter who
told George (Susari. Castner. be-
- lfore a'fieht: "Bnv. 1 hear too
talkin. big about me. I'm going to
take eero of you." Ho stiffened
Costrrer in a rounds ; ., i
He aavs .he still needs mooer
but he's made a fortune and peo-
pie in Harlem still quote, wnat ne
said to a cur, one day.
A fin?" Man, get your ewa tin.
I got to work toe hard for mine."
Nobody knows j what Kooinsoa
will do tomorow. "But Carmea Be
idea. of what they'd like to do to

mm. '.t" : .1

Sporlsvrilers Pick
Tennessee to Repeal
As SEC Grid Champs

JACKSONVILLE.' Fla Sent. 3
(UP) A poll of Southeastern
Sportswriters by the .Jackson .Jacksonville
ville .Jacksonville journal today predicted
that Tennessee would ; a;rain
capture the Southeastern con conference
ference conference football crowjhls
Seven of the rjix'-e experts
named th Vols of Bowden .wy .wy-att
att .wy-att as repeaters, with four of
the remaining five writers poll polled
ed polled naming the defending con conference
ference conference champs for ai sceond
place finish. The last remaining
ballot picked the vols for third.
The only close challenge? lr
the pre-season pick was Auburn,
which landed, .a, solid second
place, berth by' virtue of five
first place" .ballots, four tor
ond. one for. third and two ,-for
fourth. 1
Georgia Tech, perennially- a
top contender for the pixie doz dozen's
en's dozen's No. l spot, didn't even land
a single first place ballot in the
.lournal poll, but the Engineers
were p!cked for third, hiace.
The rest of the conference was
picked to end the seasohvin the
following order: ; Mississippi,
Florida, Kentucky,-1 Mississippi
State, Louisiana state, Vander Vander-bllt,
bllt, Vander-bllt, Tulane,-Georgia and Ala Alabama.
bama. Alabama. The pre-seasoh concensus for
all-conference team berths look look-ed
ed look-ed like this: 'ends Jirrimy Phil Phillips
lips Phillips of Auburn and. Jerry Nabors
of Georgia Tech: tackles Char Charlie
lie Charlie Mitchell of Florida, and Lou
Michaels of Kentucky; guards
Bill Johnson of Tennessee and
Jackie Simpson of Mississippi;
center Don Stephenson of Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech; quarterback Bill Sta Stacy
cy Stacy ofMlsslsslppl State; half,
backs JPhil King of Vanderbilt
and Tommy Lorlnd of Auburn
and fullback Tommy Bronson of
Tennessee. AH Juniors, will be
playing their final year 'fOr their
respective schools. :

WHY CRY OVER SPILLED PAINT!
GEM Lustre Enamel Looks
Good Anywhere

. a

BE PARTICULAR
PAINT WITH GENERAL
.
fl li-L.' 1 'Dili
Opposite SociaJ-

uenerai

rami

yircotono
'V,DRI-aiARGED'
Batteries

I "if

Only
1 MINUTE
Old
When You Buy It!
DRI-CHARGED
, Batteries
ACTIVATED .
AFTER YOU BUY 1TL
Cannot ago on your -'
tervico -on shelf
GUARANTEED GOOD A,
HERE.nnd IN THE U.S.A
'-fo-j IvailablaOffupr
f SERVICE STATION .
7ilpo$for)c:
' Translsthmlan Highway
Tel. 3-1501
BUY NOW PAY LATER
11"
san
We recommend It for r
kitchens, bathrooms,'
doors and woodwork. r
Washable! Wipes
whistle-clean with a
a damp cloth!
'V't.
i!.
Securitj Bldg.

s x raiiiiL i ll

Wv

PANAMA -V : .:



THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
, .THIS SPACE' IS FOR SALE" r ;
' K FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740 1 1 t

w
it 1
Ml,

i
IS
1 f
if

Houses

FOR RiNT New ehaler.
fceoVoemi, Uvinf-diniin roem,
maid teem, perch end iaraie.
Center Pasee Cincuenrenarie
and 7rh Are. Ceee del Mar (See
Francisco; Tel. 3-3005.
Resorts
PHILLIPS Oceanside Cottage
Santa Clara. Box WO Pana Pana-ma,
ma, Pana-ma, R. da P. Phone Panama
3-1877, Cristobal 3-U73.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES and large
leach Houses Phone Balboa
2S30, nine to twelve non, Mon Monday
day Monday through Friday.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Space for office.
CompaRia de Saguro building in
Cempo Alegre. Air conditioned,
elevator, claanerman, big space
' for parking 26 M2. Tel 3-0136.
FOR RENT: Clean furnished
room in bast residential section..
Cooking facilities. 43rd Street
No. 13.
, FOR RENT: Urge furnished
room, good condition, amarican
bachelor. Corned Juste Aroieme Aroieme-na
na Aroieme-na 31 Street No. 9.
Kidney-Transplant
Twin Doing- Well;
Surgeons Hopeful
Boston, sept. S (UP) Sur Surgeons
geons Surgeons were hopeful today for the
success of an emergency kidney
transplant operation performed on
14Tyear-old twin girls.
, Doris Huskey of De Soto, Mo.
yesterday, donated one of her
healthy kidneys to her sister, De De-lores,
lores, De-lores, afflicted with uiuallyJatal
nephritis '!
It wa e filtlrsucr
, performed at Teter Bent Brigham
Hospital here and tUe-second in involving
volving involving girls.
Hospital spokesmen said it
might be days before the probable
outcome would be known. A "pro "progress
gress "progress and full condition report will
be issued following a 72-hour post postoperative
operative postoperative period, the hospital
said.
However, the hospital said to today
day today that doctors were "very hap happy
py happy about the condition of the
husky twins and described both
as "satisfactory.?
Delores had lost the function of
both kidneys and the transplant
operation was scheduled upon the
twins' arrival in Boston last week.
Tests indicated the twins were
identical, a requisite to success of
the operation.
Last Friday, the healthy twjn,
Doris, won legal permission from
Court for the operation. Permis Permission
sion Permission was necessary because the
twins are minors.
San Quentin
Administrator
Found Dead
SAN QUENTIN, Calif., Sept. 8
(UP) Warden Harley 0 Teets Oi
San Quentin Trison wis found
dead in his residence inside the
prison walls this morning. He was
the victim of a heart attack.
The 50-year-old penologist, ad administrative
ministrative administrative head of California's
largest prison since 1951, was
found dead at 7:30 a.m. by prison
business manager Irving Ritter.
Hitter said that Teets apparent apparently
ly apparently died while reading in his
favorite chair. A reading lamp
was still burning when he was
found.
His death was attributed to
coronary thrombosis.
Teets started his career in 1939
in the office of the. Federal Bu Bureau
reau Bureau of Prisons at ChiUicothe,
Ohio, and came to California as
guard captain at Folsom Prison
in 1944. He became associate
warden at San Quentin in 1948.

Rooms
- i i

GLIDDEN PANAMA, S. A.

Phone
3-7711
3 V VHyJwn U).

BIANACER

Apartments

ATTENTION. O. I.I Just built
modem furnished apartment, I,
2 bedrooms, hot. cold water.
Phone Panama 3-494 1.
FOR RENT: Furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartment. 13th street
(new number 90th street) No.
16. Via Porras. Phone 3-2457.
FOR RENT: Cool furnished
apartment to couple without
without children, $65.00. Via
Porras No. 120, beside Roosevelt
Theatre, Overlooking SAS Com Commissary.
missary. Commissary. Phone 3-5024.
FOR RENT: Apartment, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, screened. Via Porras 56,
$60.00. Key apartment 7, call
Tel. 2-2316. 3-0234.
FOR RENT: At El Cangrcjo.
Modern apartment, 2 bedrooms,
hot water installation, garage.
Phone 3-1043.
FOR RENT : Furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Screened military inspect inspected,
ed, inspected, one end two bedroom. Auto Automobile
mobile Automobile Row No. 36.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apart apart-men
men apart-men in new house, maid's room,
hot water. Via Argentina' 75
2nd house corner 55th street
Cangrejo.
Baldwin's furnished apartments
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Trim, Balboa 1622.
FOR RENT: Army inspected
furnished one-bedroom, kitchin kitchin-ette,
ette, kitchin-ette, refrigerator, all conveniences.-
4th of July Ave. Phone
2-2081.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, two bedroom, living-dining
room, independent service.
86th Street East No. 6. San
Francisco, near Roosevelt Theatre.
Tel. 3-2628.
FOR RENT: Cool, recently
pointed one bedroom apartment,
living dining room combination,
porch, etc. in Calle Parian. Call
telephone 2-1455 during office
hours.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, military inspected. Via Po Po-rra
rra Po-rra No. 99. Telephone 3-2068.
$55.
FOR RENT Apartment. 8th
'block from Baturro Commissary.
FOR RENT: Very cool comfor comfortable
table comfortable three bedroom apartment
with' porch, two principal bath bathrooms,
rooms, bathrooms, maid's room and bath,
hot water, garage, etc. Second
fleer apartment. Bella Vista.
Rent $120.00. Tel. 2-00273-0763.
Thomas A. Johnson
Funeral Services
Set For Tomorrow
Thomas Alexander Johnson,
72, died suddenly at his home In
Parque Lefevre Sunday morning
at 0:80.
Johnson, a native of Turks Is Island,
land, Island, was a retired employe of
the Dredging Division of the
Panama Canal. He was a mem member
ber member of the Sojourners' society
and the Star of Aaron Lodge, j
U1UCI UI ivicuuuuius.
Funeral arrangements have
been made for tomorrow at the
Corozal Cemetery, with services
at the Chapel beginning at 1:30
and interment at 2:00 pm.
Survivors are his widow. Mrs.
Rebecca Johnson, better known
as "Ma Beck," a brother, Joseph
Johnson, foster children: Clif Clifton
ton Clifton Lopez, Mrs. Nina Whyte,
Mrs. Mavis Smith, Thomas D.
Taylor and other relatives.
. Yu con convince o mon, per per-'
' per-' auode a womon, but you hove to
Ignore a teen-oger.
Nos.
3-7712
JL&Jwt

i .un vnitn An wrrw nv. nf mm.

ItlTI'DMI. IIV. PIIRI.ir ATIONKS Nn.

BARDO No 26 "B'' Street MORK1SON 4th of July Ave. A J SL e LEWIS
t'ARMACIA LUX 164 Central Avenue HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. Fo. de
VAN-DKR-JIS 50 Street No FARMACIA GL BATURRO Parqoe Lefevre

Ine Velia viaie loeave. ej .wmxai. jtvvoue .x,i09',va eu'" :L-

Automobiles
FOR SALE: Hudson Wasp,
1952 4-door, Cream 2 lone,
wiw, excellent. 552B Curundu
83-5196.'
For better used cars see Smoot
& Paredes.
For better used cars see Smoot
& Paredes.
For better used cars see Smoot
fir Paredes.
For better used cars see Smoot
& Paredes.
FOR SALE: Buick, 4-door
sedan, 1 949, Dynaf low, 37,000
actual mileage. Clean appear
ance, new battery, good tires,
one owner. $375.00 cash. Call
Balboa 2-3064. House 0530-A,
Ancon.
FOR SALE: 1949 Olds, coupe,
hydra, good tires, good transpor transportation,
tation, transportation, highest offer over $275.
Panama 3-5627.
FOR SALE: 1957 Chevrolet
2-tone or 1953 Buick hard top,
radio, heater, wsw, 2-tone.
Cheap. Terms can be arranged.
Balboa 2-3096.
"GET STREAMLINED"
the McLevy way. Body Massaie,
Excerrislnfr Machine, Turkish
batb. Trained operators tor ladies'
ind gentlemen. Get results.
MASSAGE SALON
Services "SCHOLL'S
Products
J. Arosemena Ave. 33-48
TeL 3-2217
HA5SELBLAD
PAXETTE
... i
leading,
CAM ERA S
Internation'dhjetcelryi
155 Central Ave.
TRANSPORTES BAXTER, S. A,
Packers Shippers Movers
Phones 2- 245 1 22562
Learn Riding at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding flr Jumping Classes dairy
3 to 5 p.m. Phone 2-2451
or by appointment.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Ascent
Gibraltar Mfe Ins. Co.
(or rates and Information
TeL Panama 1-0551
DOROTHY CHASE'S
Fall classes begin Oct. 1st
Include Ballet, Tap. Toe.
Women's classes and tum tumbling
bling tumbling for "Little Guys."
For all information
CaU 2-1751.
NIKON
Cameras
at
I.I.IUIII
(Across Banco Nacional)
PANAMA COLON
LEGAL NOTICE
UNITED STATES or AMEBIC A
Canal Zone
TJaltre State District Ceart For The
Olstrirt The Chl Zeo
Dhrisian of Balboa
Jane Turpin Fuqua, Plaintiff, vs. Steve
M. Fuqua Defendant. Summons Case No.
iSU CrvU Docket 21 Action for Divorce.
Te tfae above-named defendant;
You are hereby required to appear
ane anewer toe complaint iiiea in tnc
above entitled action within ninety dari
after the flnt Bubliration.
, In case erf your failure te ae appear
ana answer, raacmem vtu ee alien
Mint vou by default for the relief de.
-a m tnc
complaint.
WITNESS the Honorable Guthrie T.
Crowe, Judre. United SUtes Diirtrict
Court for the DtetHct of the Canal Zone,
true Aucua It. 10ST.
C. T. aicCeraaarh, Jr.
' Clerk
(Seel)
Br fsloed) ten ee le Mi
Deputy Clerk
Te Steve M. raeua:
The loreegtntT iaannane le
VQ by publicatian purattnt to th er er-der
der er-der ef the Honorable Guthrie T. Crave.
Judfe. United Statce Dtitrtrt Court for
the District ef the Cane! Zone. aVIrd
Auaw 14. 1tS7. arat entered end UnmII
ki th ecam tn tbe effice of the Clerk

ft ai Unite S'1 DiatrVt Court fw
rh Dtvtaiaa ( Balbee. oa Aufuat IS
las:.
. C. T. McCaeeaieh. Jr.
Clerk
. Kv ri(Be ten e h Ma
, Decwty Clerk

arkkto. nn rtim nrrirr it

S littrrv Plain A CXStA Ill.nrkJ'ntni
SERVICES
3-minute car wash $1, steam
cleaning of motor $5, waxing of
cars $5. Auto-Bano, Trans-Isthmian
Highway near Sears.
In order to better aerve our many
friends in Panama and ,tha Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone, we have moved our
shop. FOR BETTER THAN EVER
SERVICE, CALL U. S. TELEVI TELEVISION,
SION, TELEVISION, Panama 3-7607. TV, Ra-
dio, Hi-Fi, Antennas, Transmit-
tors, InterTComm. and all elec ;
tronic equipment. Write our new
telephone number down set you
will not forget it.
Lloyd Wright Says
US Drifting Toward
Fatal Conformity
NEW YORK, Sept. S UP)
Frank Lloyd Wright said Sunday
night the common man was re responsible
sponsible responsible for a drift toward con
formity in the United States and
"will ruin our Democracy.
The 88-year-old architect said
the common man belives "in
what he can see and can't see
anything he can't put his hands
on. He s a block to progress.'
Wright, who appeared on the
ABC television program, "The
Mike Wallaoj Intarvtew," said
"I never cared much which way
the public .was going or what
was the matter with it."
Admitting that his boastfulness
may be "arrogance," Wright said
that if he had 15 more working
years, he could change the nation.
He said that for 500 years "what
we thought was architecture was
'phony.'
He said the mob, education, and
very few architects of the world
know anything ahout architecture.
U.S. architecture, he said, is not
innate or organic and does not
have character. ;ll .
; Wright talc? ho had a mite.
nigh skyscraper, ami 'drawing 'drawing-board.
board. 'drawing-board. It would make thio "sil "silly
ly "silly boxes' lit Now York City
look foolish;, ho said. Put two off
then in-Contral Park, ha said,
' and "you could obstroy the rest
f tho city and plant grass."
" Asked what he thought of the
American Legion, Wright said "I
never think of it if I can help
it." He said "they are profession
al warriors and I'm against war."
Asked what he thought about
President Eisenhower, Wright re replied:
plied: replied: "He's a helluva nice fel fellow."
low." fellow." He said his wife voted for
Eisenhower but that he voted for
Stevenson "against my conscience
because I thought he was too
good for the job." He said he was
glad Stevenson wasn't elected.
Tenderfoot Investiture) Cere Ceremonies
monies Ceremonies of Boy Scout Troop 15
will be held tomorrow evening
at 7:00 In the Scout meeting hall
building 618, at Albrook Air
Force Base. Troop 15, sponsored
by the Base Chapel, extends an
Invitation to present and former
Boy Scouts and Seouters.
friends and persons Interested
in scouting and scout activities,
to attend.
I Highlight of the evening pro pro-I
I pro-I gram will be the Candlelight Candlelight-I
I Candlelight-I ing Cerdmony conducted en entirely
tirely entirely by boys of Troop 15, fol followed
lowed followed by the Inveatiture Cere Cere-jmony.
jmony. Cere-jmony. Chaplain Frederick E.
iZlgan will present the Invoca Invocation
tion Invocation and Chaplain Bernard F.
tSchumacker will perform the
I Benediction.
Roy Barrett, a member of the
District Council, will preside as
Master of Ceremonies, with more
than 40 boys of Troop 15 parti participating
cipating participating In the program assist assisted
ed assisted by Scoxft Master Orvllle C.
Morehouse and Assistant Scout
Master Henry Hunter.
Dallas L. Nash, president of
the Troop Committee, will open
the program and welcome those
in attendance. Invited guests
Include representatives of the
ExectrUve and District Councils
and the Local Boy Scout com-'
mlttee, and officials of Albrook!
Air Force Base. i
TELE-RAD

TV SERVICE
SPEEDY-DEPENDABLE
- TEL 2-2374
Comer H" Paries ft.

w enmnr' iui nnniii

i Inniini'l tulDMlf-V

SERVICE Ave. Tlvoll No. 4 FARMACIA ESI ADOS UN1DOS 14 Central Ave.
le OsuAve.No.4I FOTO DOMY JUite Arosemena Ave. end 33 St. FARMACIA
I Street FARMACIA "SAS Vie ronai 111 NOVEDADE1 ATH1S. Beaide

. '-v x
Real Estate
FOr SALE; Excellent level lot
in desirable neigborhoodK
1 000 M2, Lefevre Avenue. Par Par-quo
quo Par-quo Lefevre. Autobus passes. No
reasonable offer will be refused.
-Telephone Pedro Miguel 333,
House 26248, Cocoli.
FOR SALE: New well planned
modern t homo best residential,
Coco del Mar area, concrete and
stone, well kept, largo grounds
fenced in (10x150 feet), 3 bed bedrooms,.
rooms,. bedrooms,. 3 baths, studio, 2 ter terraces,
races, terraces, cool. $26,250. Mortage
$13,000 been offered $200
rent. Call 3-6082 or k 3-6090
FOR SALE: Female dachshund
black and tan four months eld
A.K.C. registered. Called 8 8-1994.
1994. 8-1994. Aunt Josie Has
llllh Birthday
Celebration
MANCHESTER, Ky. Sept 3
(UP) "Aunt Josie" Sizeroore,
Kentucky mountain midwife who
has "fetched" 5,000 babies into
the world, observed ? hef' 111th
birthday Sunday along with 8,000
ceieDrators ana kin ana announc announced;
ed; announced; acidly, "the Lord willing, I'm
coming back next year." "Cf-- v
Aunt Josie, who credits'? her
longevity with goinn to bed early,
rising early, getting plenty of ex exercise
ercise exercise and relaxing "smoKjg your
old cob pipe," got congratulatory
messages from President Eisen Eisenhower,"
hower," Eisenhower," Vice President Richard
Nixon and was made an honorary
citizen of Tennessee by Gov. Frank
Clement of Tennessee, i
Aunt Josie, perhaps the oldest
living resident of Kentucky, said
she can recall Civil War days and
remembers that her husband, Gil Gil-lis
lis Gil-lis Sizemore, was one of three
persons in this mountainous area
who voted for Abraham Lincoln
for president...- "-jiv
Knowlan
I 1"' ret ? FT
Certificates For
WASHINGTON, Sept.. J (UP)
Senate Republican leader William
F. Knowland (Calif.) said Sunday
ne bad "no psrticular objection"
to admitting Red Chinese news newsmen
men newsmen to the United States as long
as they were not issued Visas.
Knowland suggested that a
"temporary news certificate" be
worked out to permit .Chinese
newsmen to enter this country.
This would avoid issuing them A A-merican
merican A-merican visas which could not
be done, he said, without some
form of U, S. recognition of Com Communist
munist Communist China.
Knowland, m a television Inter Interview
view Interview with Rep. Kenneth B. Keat Keating
ing Keating (R-N.Y.), also said he did not
"fully agree" with President Ei Eisenhower's
senhower's Eisenhower's appraisal of the past
session of the 85th Congress.
Eisenhower told a recent news
conference he was "tremendously
disappointed" with the records of
congress.
But Knowland said the only
"real test" of the record of any
Congress is not the "volume" of
legislation j it passes, but -the
"pi'slitv."
He said he thought the ."batting
average" for the first session was
"fair." :
Knowland cited the passage of
Eisenhower's Middle East doc doctrine,
trine, doctrine, the civil rights bill and the
fight for economy in government
were the "most significant" -''ac'-complishments
of the past session.
He said recent developments In
Syria "might have been eveo far
more serious" had it not been for
the doctrine to help middle East
natinna rataiala Mmmttniif a ,nr.i.
sion. I
Asked for his reaction to the I
Modem

aounac

This month the construction of the Mercedes Building1 will start, and will have a frbntage of. 60 meters on
the Avenida Balboa, and also a frontage on. the 30th and 31st streets. ,Thrs building will be tne of the ".,
most modern and luxurious' in Panama, wilf have granite floors, entrance and corridors walls covered with
marble, floor outlets' for electricity, telephone and Intercommunication systems. Private parking for '25 cars :
and unlimited parking space in 30th street YV have still available In the ground floor 280 square meters
-space with private entrance; we have also available ah office with 45 square meters space. WOcin stifl v

make aftwations to suit
I".

ntriinni atnt Ha. 11

AGENCIAS
1U? I. farraannllla A PARMAClJt. LOM-
Home Articles
FOR SALE: Kanmore Auto.
Washer, 9 lb., 60 eye. $100.
Electric Range, Frigidaire, auto,
oven, good. $75. 5521 Curundu
3-5196.
Radiation-Caused
Leukemia May Kill
100,000 Persons
v
LOS ANGELES, Sept. 3 (UP) (UP)-Dr.
Dr. (UP)-Dr. w Hermann J, Muller, Nobel
Pilze winning biologist says that
atomiff warfare probably would
kill as u.any survivors of the bat battle
tle battle as were killed in the war it itself.
self. itself. The Indiana University profes
sor, who won the Nv.wel T.-ize fori
his work on the genetic effects I
of radiation, called on the United i
States Saturday to stop testing I
H-bombs for a year whether Rus-i
sia does or does not. j
. "Our .most precious trust is1
hereditary -material," Muller said. i
"Even though nuclear war i
wouldn't ruin (the hereditary ma
terial; of survivors as to cause a
noticeable more abnormal human
race," still' the damage would he
there and would be serious."
TVias' nlAs4 oantiiz4- e Q if Tslrm Infi
4! ATi f LI ksvmH faatfl urillf Hni
lltu -Jl XL lAiuu ve00 nuui v v
set the United States back a great
deal and would offer some advan advantages.
tages. advantages. "It would have an important
moral effect and would ..;be-- a
challenge to Russia," Muller said.
"We can stop testing because
each country already has the
power to destroy the other."
Leukemia caused by radiation
released in nuclear tests 'so far
may take 100,000 lives within the
next 30 years," he- estimated, r
'
.
ISIS
Red Newsmen
State Department's' recent an announcement
nouncement announcement that 24 American
newsmen be permitted to go to
Red China on an experimental
basis, Knowland said he was a
"newspaper man" and was-a lit little
tle little 'prejudiced."
He, said he personally "would
like to see the channels of infor information
mation information kept open." I
He said he thought it "far bet better"
ter" better" for the nation's wire Serv Services,
ices, Services, television and radio networks
and leading publications to send
correspondents to Red China than
tn "nick un" information, from ra
dio Peiping or get it "second I
hand" from allied, sources.
SOME ON t PINCHES PILOT
CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (UP)
The Wathan Flying Service said
someone took a $1,060 automatic
pilot Saturday while employes of
the service were "gassing." The
workers were outside the building,
putting gas in an airplane.
lC. FOR
AUTOMOBILE INS. CALL
LOU DUCRUET
Your choice of Co. with
Premiums Financing
Maryland Casualty
-National Union i; -U.SJ.
& G Coloniai
Continental Casualty
Telt. 1261 1604 Colon
' 6007 Front St

jemp

And Luxurious Office

vou. Will be ready for occupancy on February, 1st 1958.

rRicardo A.

Miscell
aneous
. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
, DRAWER "A." DIABLO 1 -OX
1211. CRISTOBAL. CX
j Dr. Wondehaka medical clinic.
Day night service. Opposite
Chase Bank. Telephone 2-3.479f
Lesson
DOSESI WAITES School of Danc Dancing
ing Dancing reopening September 5th.
Knights of Columbus Hall. Resi Residence
dence Residence phono 2-2363.
!7 :;oe8i.
i
i
i
!
1950
OLDSMOBILE "88"
Hydromatic, Radio
1952
OLDSMOBILE "98",
Hydromatic, Radio,
....... ,. )
1953

Bga oa ''iBa m sbbb" 11 '

CHEVROLET, 4,ddof, 'SedarT Power y V
z Glide, Z tone, Seart Covert ii .i 950.00
BUICK Super 2-door '
Dynaflown. Radio, Seat "Covet s." 695.00

i
M952
I
I
I
1956

FORD Ranch Wagon, Radio.

W.S.W. Tire ......

1953 FORD Club Coupe,
1953
PLYMOUTH, 4-door
Venyl Upholstery
I
I
1955

MERCURY Montclair, 2-dopV Sedan,
Merc-O-Matic, Radioi; 'vi"v'--'t,

i
1953

PONTIAC Convertible, HydrdmatlcrV ';
Radio, W.S.W. Tires 850.00
- --...;. "- .' : t4. .
MERCURY, 4-door Sedan oo
,1 f .jf ,r'. 7t t :

I
1950
l
l

FAST FRIENDLY FINANCING
Visit our
Ultramodern Showlot ;

I
I
Tels.

I PANAMA 3-7010 AUTO ROW COLON .46iV I

WANTED Stenographer oxpa.
vienccat competent. Shorthand
English Spanish. ; Good apeller.
Columbia Pictures, Eusebie Me
ralo,o. ,

Boats & Motors
FOR SALE 14' boat with trail trail-.
. trail-. or, excellent condition. Must aelL
$65.00. Call Albrook 6-7 161.
FOR SALE Cabin crusier UVa
- it., just off the ways. 60 h.p.
engine. Excellent mechanical
end seaworthy condition. CaU
.Albrook 2207.
:efli3S
I
2-door Sedan
$ 450.00
4:door Sedan; V v. i
Seat Coytrtv 750.00
1,895.00
. m n vie
2 tone Radio 895.00
i
Sedan,
895.00
i
i
i
i
1,850.00
.'-'i ?iM
i
i
i
Reasonable, rent'
' I -4
S: A.
2-3331 ud 2-3436

r -' i.. i

V 1

Buildinf



tTSDAT, SEPTEMBER S, 1957

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TERR? AND THE PIRATE
BY GEORGE WUNDEB
THE 8T0RI OF MARTHA WAYNE
' A Good Guess
By WILSON SCRUGGS
'it:
X OOOOHC&RMrARN
TRAVH.IWSI.BHX )0H 1 MEAN I LOST MY
f Si) I INTRODUCE US. 1"
HOW CAN X BE ALLURINGLY FEMININE IN A
IF VOU SUSPECT I PLANNED TO HAVE TERRY
AKtNT ICUf SUITCASE. BUT TUB
i T 1 PAN6JU!
l WfM l IHAV6A
' J? L t SHAKING
FANejuyr when fyf's
WAT UP OLP OUTFIT f ANP LOOK AT MY 1
MEEJLYOU THI5 WAY, FCU JOU'KE 50 RkSHT
I At KIT UTIDOnui iv
WAS NOTHINS VALUABLE
RJCKECMEUC TO THINK
HAIR,.. fiOT TO PO SOMETHING BEFORE
13i
THE COURIER. AND VOiEE
CHANCE Cm rl
. BESIDES, MY AUNT
TERRY ?ET5' HERE 3
HOLLY LEE, WINNER OF V t
VERY RICH
OURRAPEtfS ESSAY CONTEST I
and MISS RJNAWW O5 i I
FROM 9HA6REEN, WJ
rk7 HAS TO HAPPEN. J

"jhop m.' how far
I V0U6QIM6?
' yUHTO CHICAGO" i if

I

. iTVIi ;: 1

mm

FRECKLES AND HIS FRIEND

Haunted Man '

By MERILL BLOSSEB

ALLEY OOP

f
Oscar on the Job

By T. T. HAMLIN

,17"" ' yrm rnwv nrnrrtrir T
V I TRY SENDING HER
pSsiSgSSr OANGED IF t KNOW ON, ALLTH' WAV BACK I
H ?-Sa OOOLA NEVER J TO MOO, TP BETTER
H f GOT ANY FARTHER SEE HOW THINGS Am

-" ) M3U THINK VOU J VOL) BfcT X NKtfeJt
AHHf THAT 2? CAN SNAP OOP CAN... BUT f
' ,T 1 1 Ji OUT OF THAT GOOD.TOOI ylfUyL
THINK... NEEDS Iff HYPNOTIC WCH

PRISCILLA'S POP r

Proof Positive

AW. YES.

children;

THIS IS
HISTORIC
COUNTRY.'

ft

H PERHAPS H

THfc PIONEERSI

MADE CAMP
. IN TMIS VERY

Y r CDrtT'

JEEPERS, POP!

IE RKSHT.

7

(YOU'F

7

5

, By AL 1TERMEER

m

8

4t &em49,

fTMT Ht t..it. I. T.M. .. U.l. .t Ml.

BUGS BUNNY

i 'vevvy
: 1 v well..v
( HERE'S YER OUTFIT, ) 7nOP5n

Just Gallop!
DWATIT! I TORE Y I rTHA'S A
TWOUSERS ON NOUI? CMCH. )

V 0' YER COSTUME WHEN 1
"1 SSrSES fv)
T.M. tig. UA Ft tM.
5 !2J

Okra&ife True Life Adventures

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Rod's Stuck

By EDGAR MARTIN

WW1

V V I j ULVfK'S

1 I i

ROCK

RUIN

A.

CAPTAIN EAST

Listening '-

By LESLIE TURNER

COUMTHY PlAC
NBWt 0AU5AUTO

' M THAT RBCBMT INTtRVIBV
Xi TRIED TO PRY INTO MY
fM-T, POK6E. TME5 PAPER

UJrAK. THAT UP! J!

TED... THEM MINIM PAPER AMD r U.M

HE- VYAift IN AU5TRAUA 0URIN4 I MARIE-! HE 15:

WITH MOTHER IN ALADAMAS WANT DATE

AND WAME

TO CHECKS

Bur THAT may Y m uiit APPCAR

TAKE DAV5S t CONVWCEDJ TAKE HI

MUT GET SACK I MONET AN? OA WHILE

TO MuTHEIs CHECKINO ON THCSt

CHANCE ARB- IT

RIShtFUILt HER

7

f m'4
Id

QdOOMlNd LIKE A SKIM

MEDIEVAL PWtrrCKS. TWlS

OI ANOTHER AOS -A FKQWCT OP EROSION.

DAILY FORTUNE FINDEi.
To ham your "Frtun" for tediy frm th itart, writ in the taurs
ot tht alphabtt corrttpMiding ta tht nunwrali M the lint ( ih iitra iitra-lofictl
lofictl iitra-lofictl period in which you wort born. You will And It fun.

I I 1 4 5 7 f 10 It 12 13 14 U U 17 II It M 21 11 IS U IS 1
AEC0IFOHI JKtMNOPQtTUVWTl

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calbraith

MORTT MEEKLE

v

I How's ThatT

By DICK CaVaLU

mi

HAV5 VTTIHFABO

ABOUT ML iOGMUB

IATC5T CTUKTfi

IHPS WtARINO

wo.h

IMS

kXTd

(6NEAKERg?J

HC SAYS WC jL( THATb ILLY' L
TAUCABOUrf X IT1L NEVER
HIM Br rT J.A WORK
HIND HIS JT"Tr-r-
BACK, AND H A X-A fl I
HE WANTS J, Pi nW B I
TO HEAR ll nj f
- - '- ; '- --

COARDDtQ HOUSE' v V

'. MAJOR HOOPUt

C k'CX. i :r a V.l oon 1 FEAK THAT t ALfetU ivvfe

-JiCPClfiHO YOU MOCIN5 CM

(I FAoerre perch i
fOLT UlkA VOL) VOFCt A FkS

HOTTER VJrTM A

TO MEET J K

YOU.'

'5.

OUT OUR WAT.

By J. R. WILLIAMS

I IS'JT J I -TIT- iTA

X II I A

11 -"JJgS

LWASIrtTMBTWeofS

OP A NIKTMAE.t,
Pit0ciiklA A rUcrrAU

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CHATEAU TA(?TLcr 1

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CDTXY

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6XP10iJ SOU' VI

' MY CIMCM

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, cne Muixswe or )
. I TM HOLE CAVCO
j on mc-ut I
L t.V think sou kj pull, I
fl L I our or rr ir 7
V I VOU MAKE MORS S
TtA: no ruLi. eM 1

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: $mf .. ffpr's.-

I "HtYtn't

JAN.JJ, 1 10 1 21 14 20 10 13 1 4 5 14 5 1 18 2 25
' rn v
PC. 21. 12 1 10 8 14 7 14 a 33 10 5 21 6 13
MA.t '; y '
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(AM.JI. 1 7 IS 6 1 20 6 16, A 15 ji 'l 12 16 33 i
,may3i. 7 .i5 iso'.J VoT'jii T.HA 4' li ,r
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JUNI22. 20 1 20 10. 2 5 14 6 8 8 0 1 13
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strr.w
SfPT.ao. 7 21 04540 14 4 5 8 0 10 0 15 14
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11 8 10 10 23 8 20 8 1 13 5 1 14 0 14 7
NOV. It mmm mmmmm wmmmmmmmLmm
NOV. 23- 18 8 4 4 12 6 10 14 15 23 19 15 12 22 6 4
QIC. 21 1
mEo?" 25 19 16 11 25 30 21 11 11 19 20 15 7 8 8

x m
O utr, kim rwtiuw irMWt. ijm.

you got aploaiant porfumo for a woman who
doesn't feel quit 80 romantic?''. ,-

The Pacific Steam Havigalion Company
(INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840)
FAST t'REIGHl AND PASStMGER SEKVltLS
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PERU ANii CI1H
M.V. "SALAVERRY" Sept. 18
M.V. "SALAMANCA" Sept. 18
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA.
KINGSTON, HAVANA, NASSAU, BERMUDA, SPAIN
AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR" (20,225 Tons) Not. 2
(Alrconditioned)
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO" (18,008 Tons) Dee. 9
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT"
S.S. "KENUTA" Sept. 16
M.V. "SALINAS" Sept. 28
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.HOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
M.V. "DALERDYK". Sept. 12
S.S. "DIEMERDYK". . j Sept. 17
ro UKCONTINENT
S.S. "LOCH COWAN Sept II
S.S. "DUIVENDYK" .Sept 28
ALL SAILINGS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
v TELEPHONES: CRISTOBAL 3-16545
- PANAMA t J-12571 BALBOA: M905

Faltering Philip

uttr Bfu 0j BUM wtt OCTtae.
trpatn vitM km Us ktm Eka otev.
A. OasattWa fvt Che rtrtt eiW y

. f s ,--, -
PANAMA-MIAMI ..... .... .$55.00
MIAMI-BOSTON 51.40

PAN44MA $
BOSTON

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PANORAMA
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TJ 8C4MS )OttM
I M Cmfty Hour
t Red tkchna
M TrMsurt Hunt
MM Krft TT
11 M CM KIWS
110 Bncora: Jockio CteuoM

Cowrtsry AeroTlaa Paaama AlmaT
"PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1 0573 H98 3 1659

W5C eg MACS -MOT BOttKl ."TT"?"r



1
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(NEA-Telephoto)
AT MEETING Retiring
Teamsters r President Dave
Beck Is shown in Los Angeles
where the executive board of
the Teamsters Union Is meet meet-ling
ling meet-ling in closed session- this
week. Beck refused to endorse
either James Hoffa or Thom Thomas
as Thomas L. Hickey, both of whom are
seeking his post.
Reds Send Planes,
Boats To Aid Flood
Victims In China
TOKYO, Sept. 3 (UP) Chi Chinese
nese Chinese Communist a u t horities
have dispatched planes and
boats to the assistance of flood
victims alonpr the Sungari River

AN INDEPENDENT

'AllY NEWSPAPER

"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe Abraham Lincoln

32nd YEAR

PANAMA, R,P TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1957

FITS CENTS

Top Union Leaders Hear Danger
Of Corruption At Labor Day Mass

WASHINGTON (UP) The na

tion's top union leaders attended

the fifth annual Labor Day mass
today and heard a warning that
"corruption" in a few unions
"could assume grave proportions
unless courageously met and de

feated."

The mass at the Shrine of the

Sacred Heart keyed a holiday sa salute
lute salute to American working men and
women across the nation.
Intermixed with the tributes
were pleas for rank-and-file union
members to snap from their
"apathy" and root out "crooks
and hoodlums" who have infil

trated the labor movement.

Rev. Mark Fitzgerald, director

of Notre Dame's industrial rela-

near the Mancnunan citv 0ii"u"' "'ou "".

Harbin Peiping Radio reported

today.

Dykes along the river Were

, breached by the swollen river a

bout 62 miles north of Harbin

.last Friday, according to a dis dispatch
patch dispatch by the Communist New

cnina news Agency,

t.
4',
r

TMoy of wortwhood Is whqt
a Wnon expert wet wheftoll the

.,uw.. au.

ers in a sermon to dedicate trem trem-selves
selves trem-selves to maintaining the integrity
of huge union welfare funds.
The Catholic educator said the
"American union movement is
facing a critical internal challenge
to its prestige, which must be over overcome.
come. overcome. The forces of coruption,
though minor now, could assume
grave proportions unless coura courageously
geously courageously met and defeated."
Corruption is being stopped by
labor leaders who, in codes of
ethical standards, have "rejected
the evils of individualism and av avarice,"
arice," avarice," he said.
Among the 1,200 officials and
guests attending the observance

were AFL CIO President George

Meanv and Secretary of Labor

James P. Mitchell. The Most Rev.
Patrick A, O'Boyle, archbishop of

Washington, celebrated the mass.
President Eisenhower issued a

statement from the White House

paying tribute to labor's contribu contribution'
tion' contribution' toward a ''climate of general

"We live in a favored fand

where the Iruits of production are
widely shared. More Americans
are holding jobs and enjoying se security
curity security than ever before," the Pres President
ident President said.
Sen. Irving M. Ives (R-N.Y.)
vice crairman of the rackets com committee,
mittee, committee, said in a statement that a
"handiul of crooks and hoodlums"
were threatening to give the labor,

movement a "bad name'. He

blamed "rank and file -apathy"
for prmitting racketeers to ''gain

the upper hand in some unions.
He predicted legislation will be
passed next year to protect pen pension
sion pension and welfare funds from
abuses by union officials. ;

Sen. Frederick G. Payne (R-

Malne) noted that "a few individ individuals
uals individuals in the labor movement stand

AFL-CIO Will Expel Corrupt Unions
Says Meany In Labor Day Address

,;;

T ci, yell-being" in the country.

WASHINGTON, Sept. 3 (UP)

The nation took us annual i.aDor

Day break yesterday in the sha shadow
dow shadow of a new crisis in the trade
union movement.
AFL-CIO leaders and other La

bor Day orators charged that the
enemies of organized labor were

trying to use corruption charges

against some union officials as an

excuse to "destroy 'unionism. -Thev
declared that labor itself

while at the same time resisting

must deal with these officials

efforts to put across anti-labor

legislation.
AHtnded Annual Mats

AFL CIO President George
Meany and other members of

labor's high .command were re

minded of Ahis two-homed prob
lem as they attended the fifth afr

nual Labor Day Mass at the
Shrine of the Sacred Heart here.

The Rev. Mark Fitzgerald. in

dustrial relations expert of Notre

p. r7t w j j

ILOT DIES AS PLANE HITS

plane sheared off the fronts of

HOMES This aerial view shows where a Naw trainer

two Clinton. Pa., homes and set them afire. Twn wnmon

and three children in the houses were jarred but fled safelv out rear doors. Th nilot. was

killed when the craft disintegrated into flaming wreckage.

Dame University, told them "the
American union movement is fac facing
ing facing a critical internal challenge
to its prestige ... the forces of
corruption, though minor now,
could assume grave proportions
unless courageously met and de defeated."
feated." defeated." Labor Secretary" James P.
Mitchell also was among the 1,200
officials ang guests attending the

mass, which was celebrated' by
the most Rev. Patrick A. O'Boyle,
archbishop of Washington.
Later, in a Labor Day address
over CBS radio, Meany declared
that the AFL-CIO "can and...
will expel" organizations found to
be substantially influenced by cor corrupt
rupt corrupt elements. r
Labor Will Flghr
But he said the giant labor or organization
ganization organization will "fight to the last
ditch", any attempt by k ''enemies

of labor in Congress to capitalize

on we lavesuKauuu lor me nur-

pose hi fastening further -restric-

live lemsiauon udou 1 o i nun

trade union movement,"

On another radio, program,
AFL-CIO Vice President Al Hayes

charged that some employers and
politicians were trying to "brain

wash the working people" and

turn them against their unions. .

He said they were using "exa

geration and distortion" to create

the impression that the labor

movement was "honeycombed

rrom top to bottom with graft.

racketeering, coruption and dis

honesty."

Hayes Is chairman of the AFL-

CIO Ethical Practices Committee,
which is spearheading labor's own

nousecieamng" campaign.
Similar sentiments were voiced

by Democratic National Chairman

Paul M. Butler in a Labor Dav

outing at Cincinnati, Ohio. He said
that "those Who would have us
believe that all labor Is bad .

are intent upon the destruction of

tne organized labor movement in
this country by whatever means

it may take to accomplish it."

BEAUTIES BEGIN ARRIVING
ATLANTIC CITY. NJ.. fUPU-

Registration begins today in th

annual Miss America beauty pag

eant. The vanguard of 51 of the
I tnation's prettiest snd most talent talented
ed talented girls arived Sunday.

If

PRE-RELEASE

, 4:10, 5:49, I I
t. 9 07 nm 1 J

0.75 0.40

r" JvT x f
r : i v 'a
1 i II

1

THE 'FArS' DISGRACEFUL PENAL ABUSE! A
GRAFi' Ar.P 21AB LOOPHOLE THAT ENGULFS p

GONE
WRONG!

ttafriJif the iwl kuUt Kks s I'.itmam wernM

MAMIE VAN DOtlEN LORI NELSON

"31

lUUAYiftspi;

X MW

0.75 6.41
BY SPECIAL REQUEST!
12:50, 2:04, 1:17. 0:38, 8:45

noia
your
breath!
HENRY
FONDA

AIIGRYi

MEff

with Lee i. Cob Ed ue ue-Mrf
Mrf ue-Mrf siii E. G. Marshall -Jack
H'ardea Martin Bal Balsa
sa Balsa nt Joksi Ffcdter Jack
Klnrnasi Edward Blnns
Joseph SweBey Georre
VesUvec Robert Wefcber.

t

condemned before the bar of pub

lic opinion." But he said "the la-

Ipor movement' as whole has

gaiueu luuieaseu respect ana siai
ure from the alacrity with which
it has moved to expel the ques questionable
tionable questionable few from its midst."
Labor' Secretary Mitchell called
for renewed efforts to make sure

that equal job opportunity "be "becomes
comes "becomes a reality and not just a
slogan."

Meany. meanwhile, called atten

tion in a statement to inflation and

automation as threats to national

prosperity

"We of the AFL-CIO believe
very strongly that there should be

a full-scale, impartial congression

al investigation of the whole price-profit-wage
relationship so that

some effective and intelligent pro'

gram can be launched to combat

inflation," Meany said. -;

"me business in recent years

has taken more than its share of

profits and has insisted on charg

ing the consuming public all the
traffic would bear," he sSid. The

AFL-cio cmet added v tnat "we
have demonstrated the sincerity of

our pledge to keep the labor move'

ment clean of Communism and

corruption." it
Western Electric
Unions Negotiate
On Labor Day N
NEW YORK, Sept. 2 (UP

There was no rest for? labor
negotiators on this Labor Day.

Officials of tne western Electric

Company and the Communica

tions Workers of America plugged

away i negoiiaiions in nave
been UBderwar dajly sine their
contract expired at midnight
Aug. 25. v
The union has threatened to
call 23,000 telephone equipment
installers out on strike unles a
new one-year contract is signed.
The union wants a 60-cent hour hourly
ly hourly wage package, including 22
cents in wage increases. Western
Electric has offered 5 to 10 cents
an hour across the board, without
any package.
The present hourly wages range

from S1.39 to 12.38

"
- i
. -1
-
4 X

p:1 '
."if

W Sfi if M VJ f ai,;v:f iy,V:.:;;;;ii
1 ) L r
i ii 13" t r- i 1

Read.story-onpato

1

PRINCE weds FORMER model Prince .sa druddiix Khan (second from- Tight),- younge

sun -ui me w s xvii, ,uw''wihu..'nM-riae;'.:iormer':Mnaon':moaei'''-'Jiiiia Dyer, an(

otner memoers 01 tne weaumg paxiy, aiter ineir marriage at Collonges-Bellervlve, Switzen
land. Left to rleht: Princess Andree. the tcroom's mother: Prince Alv Khun the (.rnnm

half brother; Prince Karim, now'the Aga Khan IV;, the bride and groom; and an unidenti
tied flower girl. :

Benson Blames Scars From Primarid

For Republicans' Defeat In Wisconsi

US Marine Ac

In Case Similar :

To Girard Shooting

TOKYO (UP) -A XI.S.; Marine

was courtmartialed for shooting

and wounding a Japanese woman

metal picket last September in

case that closely paralled the case
of Army Specialist 3-C William S.

Girard, it was learned today. The
Marine was acquitted by the mili

tary court.

In the Girard incident. Mrs.

Naka Sakai died almost instantly

when hit in the back by a shell

casing Girard fired toward her

from the grenade launcher on his

rifle. ..

la the Marine incident, the wom

an, Mrs. Unue Negimi, was badly

wounded when a shell casing, sim

ilarly fired, penetrated her right

side snd lodged near her spinal
column. -. j
Both incidents happened on U.S.
military firing ranges where Jap Japanese
anese Japanese metal scsvengers defied au authorities
thorities authorities to pick up spent shell cas casings
ings casings to sell as scrap-metal. a
A U.S. military spokesman said

I that the Manae was acquitted and
that he was returned to the U.S.
I There appeared, however, to be
a reluctance on the part of U.S.
'military men in Japan to disclose
'details of the court martial. Rec Record
ord Record j of the case no longer are in
i Japan, they said. -.i ;,) -v
I "It's all old finished lusiness,",
;said a Navy spokesman. "We an
do no good in tying it in with any anything
thing anything else," in an apparent refer reference
ence reference to the Girard case.
The name of the Marine" who
j shot the woman could not oe as ascertained.
certained. ascertained. Military sources gave
four different names, the only sim similarity
ilarity similarity being that they all started
;with a "T".
! The incident took place last
Sept. 7 on the Higasbi-Fu firing
range located at the foot of Mt.
,Fuji. i-
1 Mrs. Nets mi. 32. the wife of. a

firmer, said the Marine fired
j without warning. She said she Was
sure the Marina "wanted to hit!
and kill me because he had the;
gum to his shoulder and was aim-,
ing right at me." ,
I Mrs. Negimi said she was not
called to testify at the court mar-1
! tial and that she did not. know the!
name of the Marine.- l:
! Told the Marine had been sc-i
quitted sad returned to the United
States. Mrs. Negami said "I feel
that this nan should have been
,tried by the Japanese because he
was not evea punished by the mil-;
nary."- -- i

WASHINGTON, Sept. 3 (UP)-

Agriculture secretary Ezra T.
Benson suggested today that scars

left from Wisconsin's heated .Re

publican primary battle and not
his farm policies led to the

GOP's defeat in the recent sena
torial election,

He said he did not think Wis Wisconsin
consin Wisconsin farmers supported Demo

cratic Sen. William Proxmire(D

Wis) in his surprise victory last
week over former Gov. Walter

Kohler. He said Wisconsin farm farmers
ers farmers went Republican in 1958 and

there has been an increase in

farm income in the state since

then. ;

Benson,: who 'said criticism of

his policies "doesn't wory me too
much." also declared on the MBS

radio program, "Reporters Round

up," that the Eisenhower admin

istration's farm program is based
on "sound economic pinciple.'V

! Resentment Against Bnten ;4.
But Kohler; in ah interview with

the weekly magazine-U,'S. News

world Report, said that "gen

erally speaking" there is resent

ment against Benson among Wis Wisconsin
consin Wisconsin farmers. He also said there

was "general dismay" in the state

over the. size of the Eisenhower
budget - 0

The Republican National Com"

mittee had prepared an analysis

of the Wisconsin election, com comparing
paring comparing it with the 1954 race' be

tween .Proxmire and Kohler "5 for

the governorship. -f'
A spokesman said it showed
that Kohler's percentage of t h e
total vote cast fell off about 7 per
cent in MilwaukeeT 1 the -state's

largest city, and about 14 per cent

in a number

rural counties.

of predominantly

No Clear Evidence

This official said there was no

clear evidence that the drop in the

wr tarm vote was an "eco

nomic" vote shift. He said he felt
a lot of Wisconsin farmers "stayed

home" election day, probably be

cause they favored former GOF

Rep. Glenn Davis over Kohler.
. .Davis," a conservative Republi

can, r was defeated by Kohler in

tre primary.

Neither Proxmire nor Demo

cratic National Chairman Paul M.

M. .JButler agreed with the Ben Benson
son Benson and GOP committee views of

the 1 election. Proxmire said yes yesterday
terday yesterday that Wisconsin farmers
voted for him "because I was an
anti-Benson candidate."
,. iit in oop ;
Butler,' addressing a Democrat Democratic
ic Democratic Labor Day outina at Cincinnati.

Ohio said Proxmire won because

he opposed and criticized Vthe

Weather Or Not
This weather report for the
24 hours ending g a.m. today,
is prepared by the Meteorolo Meteorological
gical Meteorological and Hydrogrsphle
Branch of the Panama Canal
Company: v
Balboa' Cristobal

TEMPERATURE:
High ........
Lew. .,
BUMIDITTl
High.........
Low ,

87
74

94
07'

WINDj';
(max. mph) NW'14

RAIN jinches) T
t t

WATER TEMP:

(Inner harbors), tt

85
74

E-l
741

Indian Socialist
Urges Recognition
Of State Of Israel

- NEW DELHI, India, Sept. 3
(UP) a socialist member of
the Indian Parliament yester yesterday
day yesterday urged, the government to

seek. "cordial relations" be

tween Israel and its Arab neigh

bors.

HerA Chandra Barua said In

dia should grant recognition to

Israel. as the first step toward

woriung tor relaxation .01 ten tensions
sions tensions between the Israelis and

Arabs. ,
Turkish Embassy
Bombed In Jordan

AMMAN, Jordan, Sept. 3 (UP)
Anti-Western rioters bombed the

Turkish Embassy here today. The

explosion, officially described as
"mild," caused neither casulties
nor serious dsmage.
A similar nuisiance bomb was
set off yesterday outside the U. S.

Information Service office here.
Turkey,' although a Moslem na nation.1
tion.1 nation.1 is allied with the West

through the Atlantic and Baghdad
pacts. ; ,- v

V

tight money policy Republics!

nauon ana nign prices, smaU

iness failures and the farq

economic plight." -
Kohler said in his interview

Republicans who were disgj

uea wnn Jiisennowerand
me, perhaps, too just st

nome. ho said the split m
Wiscinson Republican oartv

contributed to, the "stay-at-hd

vote.1

Benson insisted that the far J

01 Wisconsin probably did not
against the Republicans He

larm income, notably ip Wia

sins dairy and livestock hi

tries, has been increasing -J
overall farm picture I feel is
encouraging". t '. y

dressed to explain- the Hi

crauc victory he said, he hari

yet studied the election in dd

uui ne added; .-.
"I do not know that' fKPv h

very heated; primary campaig

which seven candidates as

call, Were Vied against each
on the Republican side. That
have left some scars. That

have ..been, an. important fac

12

WEDNESDAY; SEPT. 4

1:53 a.m,
t :Z9 p.m.

t:0i a.m.

U:2( p.m.

SEEK BUBBLE SPEEDOMETER
'
. CHICAGO (UP)-Eneineers' at
the Illinois Institute of Technology
rope to perfect an apparatus to
measure the speed of fluid inside
a bubble. s

BIG RELEASE

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Last Day! -. .75 &

2:30 4:30 6:35 9:00 p
James Mason. Joan Fontai

Dorothy Dandridge, Joan C

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- .;. ) Belafonte

I OMRYLf. ZANUCIC3
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OPENS ; I ''
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'IKTERNATIONA
POLICE

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