The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02334

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
12nd TEA

To Check O'Hara Story

HOLLYWOOD Sept. 2 (UP)-V.Th prosecutor in,tha
Confidential criminal MM trial indicated today that red
haired Maureen-. O'Hara .may be on; of two "sufprisa",
rebuttal witnesses slated to -attack defense testimony that
the actress cuddled, with, a "Latin lover"-in the rear of a

movie
ri theater. -s
rw.ni.t. Attv. William

ned 'to call tw-witneeses when .the trial resumes to-
morrow.-"-'- V ,,,..
"I can't tell you whether the two- winesses will bsr
movies stars," Ritzl said', "l ean only ay. that you will, be
able to recognlzt thair.flama., Sr ',

:'.f X. . -A tt
indicat ons xn
CjuTse
; U PO-iWe for
mui rvwara to engage mi w
Miss uar-j amali
TOW ,.u
women in the Jury will visit the
heater tomorrow to Inspect the
ieats wheiT a Confidential mar-
j rrw. d mn 1111 niA i
azine awry o""u ..r7 ; ,-ir
- iP.?!. "Sf. Sftt lt would
.taavepeenjQ
Dsminlcch Republic
Granls Asylum
To Rojas
4;-.
BOGOTA, Colombia, 1 Sept. 1
ttTPi --Ousted Dictator U. Gen.
overthrew him announced today
The five-man junta which took
ove? when Eoas PimUa.w.. Re Reposed
posed Reposed ss president last vMty, "2
F h v let hlfTefuR evle the
last srived. Tfsterdajr
Ji tiuJadirrBiilloj esuital

ThrjUneyerM.ia
it would permit-Rojas PilUIBorothy f Dandrldge lir amon

to Teturn .but umtea w -wouimj
, dangerous for him to, do
He was ousted two day a aft
he had himself-, reflected pr
" myTandRomC
. V. nifi. ontuneetsd' With
his downfall caused laa estimated
; 100 deaths. Rojas Tuulla. and .Ms
family flew to exile ia Spain and
later went to the Canary Islands.
One of thr Junta members,
. Brig. .Gen, Rafael, NavSa, -aaid
today that fformer Presidest
Rojas should inake no1 mistake
' about the armed forces' deter determination
mination determination to keep order in
Colombia; J A.t.
," It was Relieved here thkt Rojas
, Pinilla was'the r guest of Do Dominican
minican Dominican strongman GenT Rafael
TrujUlo. 4 ; .' ..'
AdsnEasr Confident;
01 Vici3ry;iSlai1$ 5
Planning Hew Gov!.
BONN, fcermany,1 ept. t (UP)
rd Adenaur u U confident ; of
T
t
victory i&tne general
vst two- weeKt irom wuaj
.2. ,TtA lannin his third
coalitioa government ..political
' jj
- ine iourc?
Chsncelior, leader of the Christian
Democrat Psrty (CDU), wants to
Jng all major parties except we
..iiaH Cmaia liarf Sir r..:
"vlv . i
- a u ...nfid.nt 'thev said,
thu h."wou!d not only be the tojt
?.?Kffl,h!'u
19th century 1d.re.0!?;
ments. but also that his CDU
W I repest its '-Pj
and wia.aa absolute majority of

24S seats ;M,Zi teI on them Vhe thef enter
tag (lower bouofParhament).7an

- The crucial four-yer elections,
which snsy decide West Germanys
"fn'ur membership in the North
Atlantic Tteaty Organisation, are
expected to draw 2S million voters
a-Sepfc--.,.- v,v-i ;.
, .".-
Tha eampalga issues are mil military
itary military and economic, .Adenauer,
campaigning by train with the en energy
ergy energy of a man half bis age, has
emphasized West.. Garmaay's
booming economy, : i"
' His "arch-ODOonent.V't Socialist
leader Erich Ollenhauer, concen concentrated
trated concentrated tHe military issoes. He
charged that the Soviet announce announcement,
ment, announcement, that it has perfected a
intercontinental ballistics missile
shows the bankruptcy- of Alen Alen-atier't
atier't Alen-atier't policy of strength through
membership Jn NATO -" ';.,-" 4
Adenauer'a reply was that
Ve f?nl threat aim olv rroves

that V.et Germany nr.urt re'aiotcentiy and !ey were believel
c.f e military ties with the West hsva been towed to Saseno.

' "$ ;
Ritzl revealed that he plan-

mtVa Inv anrawled arrOsS
f r;-;:- ;
tied, ;it Was The Hotted show
Ju...vu w
rft rrinjM m Row ss'Vwas true.
h.uuu..tM .Wtmnt fn nrnv
imiv i.iix nil mix an. uuliiiuu r w w w
that Confidential reported the
truth about.the actress.
r;Meanwhile, defense -attorney
i'. J
witnesses;? who will" testify-that
;.n ,aid tt. ;ued off-
camera escapade loojt piace in
ronruarv i ma ana not- No
vember. 1953 M a defense wit
ness nreviousl? testified it did.
: Mists O'Hara had produced a
passport and other proof. that
she was in Spain in November,
i on rrnwlev insisted that the
defense witness James Craig,
former employe or tne wiener,
"never set a definite date lor
th cuddlintf incident,: but my
new witness will.' 0
oitvi Mriintit that the' case
feiu vntn th lurv for a verdict
in, two1 weeks. He said because
of the Labor Day holiday and
another teoess on Thursday he
-11 ni. Viv' th ( lava this
week toau reouiwu wjuh
VTbjSS'T'Osewtihws lndlr "t-
Ai i.nui fn attack lurid sto
ried tha the defense sought to
Drove as ;irue., ..r rwitn
possible rebuttal witnesses,, :
Five-Shrp Soviet"
Squadron Doing
Trailed Bf llATO
C6pENHA6EN,' Denmark, Sept.
2 (UP) A squadron of five Soviet
warships steamed out of the Baltic
i...t. tv. Msriitrirranean ves-
terdav under close water by NATO
forces.vv' "V H
thai latAst In-a aeries of
Soviet ship movemenu which has
caused Hie west w "VPI
i.n naval buildub in i the vital
Mediterranan,": r, 1 "i
NATO vessels were taiung tte
five Soviet vessels, which lncwa-
ed the heavy xruiser xnoanov ana
four destroyers. r ;i it
Both- Radio Moscow and the of official
ficial official Yugoslav Newi Agency said
the ships were en "route t Yugo
slavia for a courtesy eaiu
. o;PrisWp vlsllr :
f A squadron ti five waVshlps t
including the Cruiser Zhdanov and
tne aiiir.j.i r
mmoeo .Tiwnuiuu.i
, mfttA-Saturday on a friendship
visit to Yugoslavia Radio Mos-
"BUT I'lWi imir ui-tuw-
ers were wim ue jnunv ma
pMe(j trrough the Baltic towards
North Sea ea route to the
Hediterraacatv --
-aw I .aa l T AiuImI
a iav at
tonfirmed that Danish patrol ves-
'r"
BritUh or Norwegi..,vesMlt of
the NATO North Sea com ma td
, k. am.t
r&.rSn sili-Oth
"' iu
c..; Cihrltr tt rnute tO
tha Adriatic and .Yugoslav ports.
. Plva Jr In Raato v T
.-.J.' t . ; : ;
in Mediterranean waters, headed
In recent months, Soviet naval
activity has increased to the Mint
warnea. 01 an apparent, iwna
minder in the Mediterrasean.
. : . i C
Vice-Ad m. .Crarles R. Brown,
warnel of aa apparent S o v i a t
! buildup.1 .'
The soviet cruisers Aamirai
Ushakov and the Mikhail Kutuzov
hive been in Mediterranean wat
ters. Both were reported ea route
to Albania. . t
The Soviets are believed to have
a major naval base at Alm a's
Saseno Island. Two heavy fr et
DoatiTig dryrtocks were sent from
the Black Sea throush jhe os-
poroui in.o the Meditersneaa re-
to

tOW-LEVEL BAILOUT These photos show R.A J. Plying Officer Sidney Hughes In a test of a new Grumman low altitude
election seat at Patuxent, Md. Hughes blasts himself out of .the jet plane (l)he is just five feet off the ground at this
time as it leaves the runway-at 130 mph. He is -catapulted 80 feet into the air. At this point his parachute opens (2) and
he. leaves the ejection seat. Hughes rolls over on the ground (J) as the test is completed successfully. Secretary of the Navy
Gates described the device as 'The greatest thing In aviation safety since the paarchute.". The Navy ordered the seat in in-staUed
staUed in-staUed in 50 jet trainers.' r.y,,,;.;. t.:: .

50 Killed, 400
Hurt In'Jamaica
Train Vreck
KINGSTON, Jamaica; Sept. 2
(UP) '. Fifty: persons were killed
and 400 injured last night in one
of the worst train wrecks in West
Indian history.
The accident occurred when an
excursion tram of 12 coaches and
two diesel engines left the rails
just outside Kendal 'Station.
Cause of the derailment was not
yet known.
Doctors and nurse! from nearby
towns were rushed to the disatter
area, and a group of four doctors
and 10 nurses were sent i X e m
Klnsfston,
. 1 island-wiae appwil was w 'e
forblood donors to hel a Us e
Can:I transits Dfcp
After Big Business
Week Sels New Ilih
; Transit ftrecssts for'.th Pana Panama
ma Panama Canal today had dropped back
to an unexciting 12 in each direc
tion after last week's "big busi
ness" that helped set another all all-time
time all-time high, for commercial ships.
On Saturday, there were 1& lock lockages
ages lockages northbound, and 10 r ships
m MUlthl -J f
The final (August total wiH show
one less ship than it might have
excent for a minor accident
Late Saturday afternoon the 204-
ft. Dutch ship uordiss a t a r 1 a a
from her berth at Pier t Crlsto Crlsto-hal
hal Crlsto-hal for a southbound transit. But
her engines reversed, causing the
ship to back into Pier t. The ves vessel
sel vessel had some dented stern plates;
and a few of the pier blocks were
damaged.
-But tha delay was long enough
to throw the Gordias' transit over
into September.. i
Judy. Holiday,
1 '.
in
To Wed This Year
CORSIER, Switzerlsnd,-Sept. 2
(UP Blonde Judy Holliday and
handsome Sydney Chaplin, co co-stars
stars co-stars of the Broadway musical
"Bells Are Ringing," will be mar married
ried married before the end of the year,
a friend of the Chaplin family said
today. .'' 1
' Chaplin, younger son .of come comedian
dian comedian Charlie Chaplin, brought his
bride-to-be to his fatner s jaaesiae
home at nearby Vevey yesterday.
Thuir trio to Europe sparked
reports that they planned to msr-
ry,. and servanu at ui uap" uap"-home
home uap"-home in Vevey reterred to the
38-year-old actress as Sydney's
"fiancee." But not until today
were the reports confirmed. -"
-The friend declined to -permit
the use of his name and- refused
to give any further details of the
wedding plans.
it will be tha first msmage for
the 21 yesr old Sydney, who
scored success opposite Miss Hol
liday ia the Broaaway mc 11 wiu
be her second. She was divorced
from clarinetist David Oppen Oppen-heimer
heimer Oppen-heimer after their separatloa- last
year.- k 1
Today, the elder Cbaplia, BOW
SB, rented a movie theater at
Vevey for a special famuy show showing
ing showing of his new movie, "A King in
NrYork.M ..
Miss Holliday. iwbo soared to.
success as the dizzy blonde show-
r ri in the stage and movie kit
" Born xesiemay, dm rot anena
the privato screening. But she
ioined the Chaplin family later at
ithe swimming pool on Let 90-acre
Chapiia esuia.

v PANAMA, "R. P., MONDAY SErTEMBEK S, 9S7

7 V n v. f 9 v n.:svjS-'
j 1 ' ', J ..-7

Missiles Will Not Be tired
At Worlds Greatest Air Show

'pARNBOROUGH, tngland, Sept
2 (UPW The world's greatest air
showr opens hert t o d a y w 1 1 h
grounded rockets and missiles as
the key exhibits.
.: v h -firt tim a 'tfulaea
weapon enclosure will be located
at this normally secret Royal Air
Force establishment alongside
scores' of Britain's latest epmer epmer-cial
cial epmer-cial and jnilitarr aircraft., $
Missiles ana rockets, most" strip stripped
ped stripped of : their 1 top-secret guidance
.n,ifnmut will bt ahown either
in. tna enclosure or u;iici w
the oddlv-shsped wihgs irf Jan
aiiTwrnni(- r f i rhters;.. and
bombers'. Button d L.i vc.poaf
lwiU he flreoV ,i V"
Kit will be the lth exhibition of
the1 Society of British Aireraa.
Constructors Since ; W32 and tne
biggest with a new high of more
than 850 exhibitors from Britisr
and commonwealth aircraft and
equipment firms. ; v jVi -. f'
From 120 CeinMeai
J, r .;. I. tr f
s More than 8,500 representatives
of airlines, air forces and manu manufacturers
facturers manufacturers from- 120 counties r are
registered to attend the tost fou
'.'nrivate days' befora the -week
long exhibition is thrqwn open to
the pubuc. f
Ttho air show is designed te ad
vertisa and sell British, aviation
products abroad. Orgsnsers. said
that with the exception. of Yugo Yugoslavia,
slavia, Yugoslavia, no Communist state repre representatives
sentatives representatives have been : invited be because
cause because Russia and the Iron Curtain
countries offer "no market" ;
Tha show will include flying dis
plays of everything from jet bomb
ers to neiicopters, wnicn wiu go
Red Jet Airliners
Should Reach NY
In About 13 Hours
MOSCOW. Aug. 21 (UP The
first Soviet jet airliners to land in
the United States are expected to
make the liloscow tc New York
flight id 12 hours, one of, their pi
101s saia toaay, -,..
The 1 V. S. State Department
granted the Russians permission
to land -the two jet plane loads
of united Nations delegates at the
McGuire Air Force Base in New
Jersey. Bans on jet aircraft pro prohibit
hibit prohibit them from landing at either
of New York's commercial air'
ports.
Aa Interview with the- unidenti
fied pilot appeared in "Iiteratum
va Gareta." He said that a "gen
eral rehearsal" of th flight would
soon take place. The sleek silver
TU104 Jets, the pride of Soviet
aviation, will make three refueling
stops on the transatlantic flight
via London,' Iceland and Gander,
Newfoundland, he said. In Gander
a U. S. navigator will come oa
board to guide th plan to New
Jersey.
Victim Of Paraiso
Crash I m proving
He's Improving.' was the
word from Oorgaa Hopital to today
day today when asked about the con-
muon or Marganto Araus Ret Ret-na,
na, Ret-na, 40, Panamanian. ;
"Araus Reina waa the most se
rlously hurt of 11 tnen Injured J
last Tuesday when a truck con converted
verted converted Into labor carrier over overturned
turned overturned en OaUIard dgowsx
near ran-a1

'I t

4
t
L
iiiy'tiVn'imwifirrrf'i
through an airborne; 'calypso bal ballet"
let" ballet" and a "square dance' This
vear. as a concession to sensitive
neighbors, deliberate sonie-break-
ing "oooms nave Deen ruiea out.
ut the imoersonal nilotless mis
sile has shoved its electronic nose
into what once was the field of
the dare-devil pilot and his .flying
macaine
s
V
Rockets 0b Display?
The missiles and rockets on dis
play include; '
Th iau-ey virenasn,j an
sir-to-air weapon powered ,by-two
ttwo olid-uei.-o-.k e t motiriA
aU pad- is la 4ervice, with vthe

h if f t' Leeisiatlve Commlttea v of .the animals wereSusetf in- eonjunc eonjunc-iMalinl
iMalinl eonjunc-iMalinl .'rlr-: National Assembly plan to meet tlon with a "missile studies"
JlXSLai, everyday until they have com- project.

.Th Tie
streak.'" another airo-air weapon
which homes in on, 'its target by
means of infra-red rays and is
eiaimad to ba immune to anti-
radar jamming,' The Firestreak is
t be fitted at sianaara armament
t tna j a veu? ana sea vixen jvi
fighters anq to in -rjr jei, saia
to have a speed ot mor .man
1,500 miles ,per rour.
Thr n be no display of
Britain's planned long-range 4 mis
ilea. Stilt in nroduction. all mod
eia er these missues are unuer
top-secret wraps,,, t
Japs Eventually
May Kecoqnize
Communist China
MIYANOSHITA HOTSPRING
SPA, Japan, Sept. a (UP) Prime
Minister. Nobusuke Kisrl hinted
todsy that Japan eventually may
recognize Communist China.
Kisn told ewsmen at tnis
mountain resort that the problem
of Red China 'was twofold the
future outlook and the immediate
issues involved...
"Under cresent conditions, he
said, "it would be premature to
recogniz Communist China or
support Its 'admission 10 ue
United Nations." '.
The Prenuei"? added, however.
that be wss not ruling out eventu
al recognition. But be stressed
trit it was vitallv important to
keep Asian countries from ( be
coming tommumsi satellites
MAMrr LIATIS KOPITAL
a bright ami) from tre back
Hospital in Waahinpt-a. Mrs.
Shs n4enreci surgery Aug.-

llliiii
t
;:;::;-;i:i::::-:W:S::;:::
iii
yf
THE PULSE
OF PANAMA
MOST "OF the-retail pork ven vendors
dors vendors at the Public Market went
on strike yesterday, but some
pork was still available as a few
vendors refused to Join tne
.strike.
At press time today It was not
whether the Government
had decided on any action in
the conflict between, me iwi iwi-ers
ers iwi-ers and the k wholesale. ,. pork
butchers.
1
T'mhIr r Permaaeiiti
rtinn on an administra
tlon bill to change present im import
port import duttes. j
G2.
The oldest police booth in
Panama City ia about to become
a. victim of progress; The police
checkpoint located on Via Espa Espa-fla
fla Espa-fla Is scheduled to e moved to
a new location a a result of
k.nn. rinnewi the exten
sion of Pederico! Boyd Ave. to
link-Via Espafta with the Trans Trans-Isthmian
Isthmian Trans-Isthmian Highway- k
Both the Ministry of Educa Education
tion Education and the Posts and Tele,
graph Department are interested
iM fr.nifsrrinr their headauar-
. A. .1. llnnama R fl 1 1 TOfld
sUtion In Panama City when it
vers m iuc ..
ia turned over to Panama by me,
Canal Zone government.
Ciyil Wal Vet, 109
Dies In Florida
' ItREStVIEW, Florida, Sept. 2
(UP) William jAllen Lundy, one
of the three surviving veterans of
the Civil War, lied last night at
Okaloosa Memorial Hospital He
was 109 yesrs old,-.

As the President looU on. ifrs. MamI Enhowerflashe
sat of ths Prtiidential limousine after leaving Walter Feea
EUeiihowtr had, been la the hospital atonosfc luurvee
tV-'-. .: .". ; ;- -. i V v,:iW"-'-

Fire Third

In Four
.

At Nevada

ATOMIC TEST SITE, Nev., Sept, 2 (UP) Scientist,
made up lost time for numerous weather-caused delay
early today by triggering the 16th nuclear blast of the
1957 Atomic Energy Commission test series at the Nevada,
proving grounds. 'iv'w' 1.'
The shot, dubbed "Galileo' was fired at 5:40 err?,
from atop a 500-foot steel tower; It was the third atomic

resr wirnin lour aays. ...
A gigantic fireball, changing in color from bright
red to orange, zoomed skyward as the' blast vaporized the
steel tower. ...
The force of the nuclear explosion was equal to .10;

000 tons of TNT, about one
bombs which were dropped on
Animals ranelna. from guinea
pigs to. goats were huddled In
shelters within three miles of
ground fcero.
Scientists used the animals
instead of "human guinea pigs'.'
to test what .the AEC termed as
"biological environment
' 'The animals were nlaced In
aheltera designed to protect
joeoolex lj-.atomic.,jrrare ;,,
Helen ti'sts also disclosed the
The AEO said It wouldnt know
until the test area was cleared
for entry whether the dozens of
animals survived the terrific
blast.
.'
A research group participat participated
ed participated In a human experiment
following th detonation. Ar Army
my Army troops with full combat
equipment ran through an ob obstacle
stacle obstacle course about 4800 yards
from where the tower stood
seconds before.
The test was aimed at test-
ing the reaction of human be

Miami Paper Claims US Successful
Fired ICBM About Two Months Ago?

MIAMI, Sept. 2 (UP) thVlSOO miles from the Uttnchlnss!'.il

i ... .i.i I l
Miami uauey news ciaimeu tom
ht the Unite(i states' successful-
lv firj intercontinental ballis-
tics missile ICBM two months a-
go.
Th coovrighted article, written
by reporter Milt Sosin. said the
ICBM was a Convair Atlas. It said
the missile was fired some 2,400
miles into the South Atlantic as a
"two or three-stage'', rocket.
Th'm Atlaa aubseouentlv will coW-
tain five stages that will project
it 1.000 miles upward into space
to fall on a designated target 5,

- A -

, .. ...if i J i -, .,ii'...';I-.(B.:

Shot; f
ft. f f i J I

vSite'"'"'
essw as bpv

half the size of the atomie
Japan during World War tl.
ings under, "atomic combat
conditions. ' 1
The vivid flash from the shot
was seen some 300 miles away in
Los Angeles. The near-blinding
flash appeared as a ghostly
white In Hollywood, , 'j
, Early rising residents' at Las
Vegas, Nev., Reno,vNev., and a'
lonr the California, border alsa
snocK waves snook- News No
where about 100 siewsmerL.'jvit
nessed the shock.' News Nob- Is
about eight miles from ground
sero, l i
The shocks also were ifelf Ia
Las Vegas and were heard as
"rumbles" within a 100 mile i
dius of the proving ground r
Twenty Air Force, planes
streaked over the p 1 0 v In
grounds as the huge firebafl
blossomed into a mushroom
shaped cloud. :
The planes carried equipment
to check radiation anl also par participated
ticipated participated in giving support-tT a
mythical advancing ground
....... 1 ,-. -t
1 1
N l ....
uie report aaia. .19 &
osln appare&uy based Hi r
port on interviews with civilian
scientists working at th guided
missle test center' at Cap Cana
veral, Fla. None was quoted by byname
name byname and the reporter admitted
that all, officials of th test center
and nearby Patrick Air Force-Baj
refused to duscusa th ICBM pro
gram.-. :, ' 's c
Th articl ajut4 'n lry '.
civilian en major ICBM proj.
cf" as saying: "I'm not cUim. ;
in wa hava firad n irBaafH ?
I'm Bot danyfas It jthr. But t
sura wish Washington would Kur Kur-ry
ry Kur-ry up ind fflikt an annaunc.
mtnt that would allay th fairs'
tf th papl of th.JUnl
. .Statas.'? '-"
' :,iv,
.It wss reported Unofficially ia
earjy. June .that an Atlas has bees
launched from Cape Canaveral'
But the reports said th test "was
unsuccessful. -'. : ;
:'
"Whether Washington 'preferred
to let the report -of the missile missile-failure
failure missile-failure stand without denial and
an Atlas- wa really fired,, or
whether the successful f i r i a g
came later in th same month ha
not been determined," th Daily
News said, "But th two-star or
three-stage ICBM was fired. Ja Ja-June,
June, Ja-June, according to ail indications.'-
The article said th missile
"reached a point far; the South,
Atlantic about midway betwee
the tracking station oa the BriUia
island of SL Lucia and th equa equatorabout
torabout equatorabout 2,400 miles from t&a,
Florida coast.
: ."s ; ::', : U?
The missile Is believed' to biva
attained aa altitude of coo Tm)e
at the top i its trajectory and a
velocity f about 13,000 miles a
bour," th newspaper added
f-
The Soviet TJnio announced
tier thia week that it had berr-
the first nation to suce;.'
launch an intercontinental bi.. -tics
missil capsbJ el hiTuBg a 7
spot a earth



If AGE 'TWO iM'---il,"&''

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY,' SEPTEMBER S, 1957

X

" TH E PANAMA AMERI CAN
MKUME eiLMH Of TMt MMM AMMKtN aeaa, IMS.
. minora NtLaoN MOUNacvULL in
' HAMMOOIO NIA. fPITOn
, 7. rH araarr O eox s panaha. tr ..
.-ii'..:i!eLl AOOHMfc MNAMBWICAN, PANAMA '.J. Jfc
eaten Omea, Omitkal Avcnu aatwatw rw ano ISth eratna
fSSmm HWMNTTivUh JOSHUA B iraWIRS. INC
. S4B MAOiaON Avft New VOMt. I17 N V.
MM MONTH.' IN ABVAIWB ,2'Ert
ON SIX MONTH. IN AOVAHCI ,I'S2 21 M
. Fan ONt TR. IN AOVANCe Jg
, y -t i . i i i .

!! TbM.il tea h an open tonint fat mdma of Tht Panama A;'1!?.";
letters are taciiroi fratefully and an handle. a wholly confidential
7""rf'.oo contribute a Utter doa't be Impatient II It doesn't appear Jhe
a'c'xt day. Letrara ara publlihed la the ardar received.
i Plaaia fry ta keep tha lettara llmltad ta ana page langth.
h Identity ef tetter writers is held In strictest confidence
vj? TTiii newspaper nuimn no poniblllty for atatamanti or opinions
expressed in lattaia from readers.

THE

BO X

MAIL

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

' With tXX SSSSA

, .. nAtniAnf Inn u I ffim TTI I LLrca ill iiiic wv"i"v-f

pqor shog, local leaders should take note, ;
..4.'.. thai, mofnhwnrri 1

Labor News

And

Comment

. And Well-Deserved

By VICTOR RIESEL

EDITOR'S NOTE: While Victor

Riesel was in Europe, he asked

President Eisenhower's Secretary

of Labor. James P. MitchelL to

write a special guest column to

appear on Labor pay. ;,
By JAMES P. MITCHELL

my ine r, wwu. includinir in the Big

Bpvs'SsVdip; till, but I do mean that they
SSl&vS2t with their crusade for better pay and condi-
TVSnVon
preclable change in the costs of ft that

he.meani ini v.,. inir.nt. or much

TSSmS;to any

;-Mnea us waees in the Canal are pegged and US-rater can
ndt "a raile in pay no matter how hog-wild prices go It
not get a r,miM for a. raise for on

Panama ana me uiuuiido"j. --i----- - thi
segment of employes (local-rate) can hardly be mad. on this

aslB, y nnv for all utilities in the

hereby the toii-taice apparmuy uuc "uuv"-""
ZSaM rSo well to beat their tom-toms in another direction,

'I'imyon'unions appeal to the Panama Government
. !ir -.rnMai fnnrt. in Panama. Then the D3o-

Die of Panama could eat more cheaply, and the Zonlans would
shop lor foodstuff s in Panama and Wing more revenue into
the country. Who would pay for the police, firemen etc. I don t
know? but if the well runs dry in the Zone. I suspect some of
the 'thinkers' in Washington would decide to pay for these
things out of the only legitimately profit-making part of the
Zone the Canal. t ..,
. Here's a Labor Day thought for what its worth.

xuib nuu'c au.

t'

Bit,;

REENLISTMENT REVERIE

" it-- -4 ...... ...mfrii Ho vnii PenHst. fOr the

advantages. etc. etc. These signs and similar ones can be
found throughout numerous military installations and Post Of Offices
fices Offices As you read them you will notice that they are all true
antf tend to fool the poor unknowing lob, thinking of Joining
'Theyoung innocent Jerk will not listen to his older bro brothers
thers brothers or buddies, who have been forced into slavery for two
,- nr mnr vimim him of all of the Derlls that await him

at basic training camps, and all other camps that he will visit
throughout his enlistment, such as:
a mtuom uneducated thine with a couple of stripes of a

eruddy looking uniform, shouting at the tip of his lungs and
fivAhg orders like he is God Almighty. A Thing that is too
umb to carry out an order that he himself gives. He can
make you stay in a confined area for the longest length of
time, or have you cut grass until it is too dark to see the
ground you are standing on. This my friends is Just a small
AvamnlA

VThe Army also has officers whom are considered, or plac

ed, above the lowly ennstea man, wmcn you win no mum oe
If you don't heed my warning in time. These of ficerA preside
aver lares numben of metv apd, according to the Army ttlble ate

suDoosed to bulla moralt," and in leadership, and watch over

the' men. (Myself with 2,4 years of service behind-me, have
yet 'to see or even hear of a man In the service that comes
close to fitting the above description). These officers take great
pleasure in shouting at you, degrading you and putting you in
thd stockade (Jail). Just sneeze in any formation and see how
long you get restricted. These small matters thus far mention mentioned
ed mentioned jlbove are considered trivial matters with the average man
Inane service.
. During your 18 weeks of basic training you are given a per per-,
, per-, iodTvof the day which is called "off duty hour. Believe ms these
are the roughest hours of your, training. Very rarely you will
be given a pass. This pass states that you will be back at a
certain time, which usually is when everything starts to Jump,
you are told that while on this pass, you will carry yourself at
all limes in a military manner, such as:
i You are in a bar or cocktail lounge and a drunk tries to
take your girl friend or wife away by physical means. If you
catpot stop him with words becoming to a soldier, you will
eau the manager or a policeman to stop him. Above all, don't
hit 'him for you will be locked up by the civilian police and'
when released you have had the course. The Army then tries
voir at a trial by court martial, which brings us back to the
officers. They pretend to help you in your moment of need,
although they know in advance Just what your fate will be.
M4te than likely, six and two thirds (six months in the stock stockade
ade stockade and 23 of your base pay for a like period) will be your
sentence aftet a long drawn out hearing at which you have
no! defense.
Some of the terms that you will hear consistently in the
Artny are as follows:
"Hey soldier, you will do this, your uniform will be, say sir
toyne, etc., etc." The above mentioned arc just a few, I could
fo-on and on. Latrine and extra guard duty come to those that
dotft ingratiate themselves with the orderly room staff.
. Reenlist for the advantages, go RA all the way. Stay in if
yon want and like this type of dictatorship. I've had my share.
HA.

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TELEPHONES:

CtrSTOBAL 2121 o

PANAMA 2-2904

WASHINGTON wnen I was

in Geneva earlier this summer

spoke for our government at one

of the world's1 most unusual for

ums. There East does meet West

in a constant battle of ideas.

These clashes occur at sessions

of the International Labor Orga

nization (ILO).

The importance of the ILO as a

great forum of the UN was clear

ly exemplified at that 40th ILO

Conference.

The attention of the world was
focused on such crucial matters as

forced labor, individual freedom

and the improvement of working

conditions wrougnout me worm.
In the important conflict of i
deas anl. ideals the ILO is a uni

quely significant forum. While it
is similar to other UN specialized

agencies, nuch as the World Healtr
Organization and the Food and

Agricultural Organization, it has

one special characteristic which

Sets it apart from all other inter

national forums. That is its tri

partite composition.
In the ILO workers, emnlovers

and governments from tre ( 78
member nations gather each, ac according
cording according to the constitution, inde

pendent of the other; each bound
to seek as he thinks best the bet betterment
terment betterment workers throughout tre
worll.

Naturally some serious and deen

disagreements arise in the ILO.

The final result is good for the
free nations, however, because i-

aeais of freedom and individual

dignity are made to stand the test

of competition. Those beliefs which

we cherisr thrive best when they

are cnanengea. it is through sec sec-cessfully
cessfully sec-cessfully resisting the challenge to

our economic, social and political
institutions that the strength of

freedom and democracy is dem

onstrated.

At that session the ILO com

pleted an agreement which nrovid-

es mat eacn nation prohibit the

uoc ux iuiccu iHtnir wnoiu us ju jurisdiction.
risdiction. jurisdiction. The United States Gov

ernment and workers pressed for

the agseement with diligence and

have consistently thwarted Com

munist efforts to hide from world
opinion the facts of agonizing tor torture
ture torture and enslavement behind the
Iron Curtain.
This pact declares to all the
world that forced labor should be

abolished. It also labels forced lab

or i that particular form of com-pulsions-whteh
the TaniHbe 1X0
have, shown to be widely practic practiced
ed practiced m Communist countries.
Tha ILO this year alho conild conild-arad
arad conild-arad tha matter of discrimina discrimination
tion discrimination in employment. This tfave
tha United States aa excellent
opportunity to ly before tha
world tha extraordinary accent accent-plithmentt
plithmentt accent-plithmentt which have bean
made in recant years with re respect
spect respect to eliminating racial dis discrimination
crimination discrimination in our country. Our
recitl of those accomplishments
in the opening days of the con.
ference won respect for the li linked
nked linked States around the world,
which have boon made in recant
years with respect ta eliminat eliminating
ing eliminating r'clal discrimination in our
country. Our recital of thoto ac accomplishments
complishments accomplishments In tha opening
days of tha cenferencs won re respect
spect respect for tho United States a a-ronnd
ronnd a-ronnd tha world.
While relatively few of the goals
and standards set bv the IT.nli.vo

direct application in the United
States, because of our own exist existing
ing existing high standards, they are of
real value to our nation. They as assist
sist assist other countries to improve the
conditions of wort and living
stsndards, thus contributing to

world wide trade and economic

stability.

For example, several standard

adopted some years ago nrovidine

for improved working conditions

in me maritime industry have
been of real help to the U.S. mari

time industry. For as pay and
working conditions improve in the
maritime industres of other na nations,
tions, nations, so our maritime industry
will benefit by the -improvement
of its competitive position.
While a good deal of publicity
attends the annual conference of

the ILO where resoluton end re recommendations
commendations recommendations are argued out, all
I through the year the ILO ouietlyJ

ana euecaveiy carries on what is
'rapidly becoming its most impor impor-l
l impor-l tant function technical assistance
to newly developing areas of the
world.
In 1956, for example, the ILO
sent 289 experts to 58 countries
and territories, helping to improve
training, develop better conditions
of employment, better labor-management
relations and to make
other practical achievements of
lasting benefit to their people.
The deep seated drive on the
part of all people for the fulfill fulfillment
ment fulfillment of their aspirations for a bet better
ter better life will not weaken or fail. It
will grow stronger, and this is as
it should be.

Through the ILO and the UN
we can with wisdom and ingeuity
help the peoples of the world to
attain this fulfillment so that thep
can enjoy the material achieve achievements
ments achievements of our time and also retain
the freedom and dignity so neces necessary
sary necessary to all mankind.

v.::"' at'

B&z ife ;
, y$
L 4Zfi$

pKudloty

A Big Family Day
By James G. Crossley

Along with the lace curtain in

the front window, Labor Day

has been remodeled with the

passage of time.
. The lace curtain is now a
pinch-pleated, tailored drapery.

The front window itself has
evolved into a wall of glass call

ed a "picture window,

There is little in this land of

ours which hasn't felt the hand

of change and this holiday is

no exception.

Labor Day was first advocated

by the now almost-forgotten
Knights of Labor, a -once-great

labor orgarUEation4.g

The mass demonstrations were

proposed ini the 4teamDKr to

"cnecx we unjust accumulation

of great wealth, which is inevl

tably leading to the pauperiza

tion and hopeless degradation of

tne toning masses."

The holiday grew out of a

stormy period of labor strife be

tween 1883 and 1888.

Several worker parades were

neid on tne date and tnen it was

recommended that the first

Monday in September be observ observed
ed observed as a great labor holiday annually.

Colorado was the first state to

make it a legal holiday. Other
states quickly followed.

At the beginning it was a

mailed fist upraised by labor in

its first self-consciousness. There

is little reflection of this now nowadays.
adays. nowadays. Just what does Labor Day
mean to us moderns?
First and foremost it is a day
off which i neatly brackets the
summer, with Memorial Day at
the start and Labor Day as tha
conclusion.
It's a nicely placed day, al

ways coming on Monday.

it's a' good opportunity not

too long or too short to make

an intercity trip to visit rela

tives. It can give aad a long

weekend to go up to the cottage

pack up. the family and bring

tnem npme. ..

f Ana by counting the number

or nersons wno hock to oeacn-

es, parks and playgrounds or
hold picnics in their back yards

it is one of tne great seasonal

waves of sun worshiping.

Second. Labor Day is the door

step to school. Either the follow'

lng day or within a week or so,

our national maenme is siippea

int oa different gear.

All our lives change as the

public schools are thronged by
our Junior, citizens exercising
their right to receive an educa education.
tion. education. Alarm clocks ring earlier
and even the pattern of traffic

on our streets changes.

As an echo from the pasty La

bor Day brings a spate of state

ments from professional labor

peopie aoout tne rights and
honor Of the humble... workinu
man, Some cities have parades.

out omy long memories can
summon up the processions and

tne oratorical din which herald heralded
ed heralded yesterday's Labor Days.
In truth, Labor Day .like so

much in America has become

a symbol of moving ahead to-

waxa tne -pleasant uie. .
No longer is it a' day for em emphasizing
phasizing emphasizing the battle between
two. classes in, ournatlon,OddL
that thUi day born t of -.force,
should become af great family

flay.. odd, but meaningful.'

"It la only through labor and
painful effort, by grim energy
and resolute courage, that we
move on to better things," Theo

dore Roosevelt once said.

And gradually. Labor Day has
come to symbolize the type of

laoor ne was talking about.

Labor Day honors all of us. in

this day and age. By the very

frivolous approach we take to

this day of respite at summer's

end we demonstrate that it is a

day dedicated as little as we

realize it to all of us who are

building our nation, into some-

miiyWachi

a WrkTI

Gran

Merry-Go-Rou;.'d

ly 111W riAIION

, WASHINGTON There would

be oq Hoffa headlines, no TV sets
turned on to the Senate Rackets

Committee, no sure fc.3t that Jim

my Hoffi will be next president

of the Teamsters, if it hadn't been

tor a quirx ot late m Michigan

lour years ago. '

four, years ago Hoifa was be

fore another congressional commit

tee. Much of the same informs

tion was being exposed about his
person?) loans, his race track, bis

pouce record, bis deals wi t n
triends who benefited from union

welfare funds, his attempts to

muscle in ou the juke box busi

ness.-parking lots, and other en-

leiynses ,,iar removed irom me

Teamsters, '

Then gudcMnly, tho hearing was
called Of. It was called off ay
vary high-up Republicans, and
many signs pointed to Arthur
Summcrfiold, now Postmaster
General ahd a power in Michi Michigan
gan Michigan politics. Ho now denies this.
But, in rtiwn, Hoffa supoartad

San. Homer Parguson, Rapublic-H

an, for governor against Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Governor "Soapy" Wil-
liam.s; vti. i'j.y:-v, vvijf A,t.?v:,
The mysterious question mark

is: who worked out the deal to

save 'Hoffa? Who called off the

congressional dogs?

If that probe had proceeded.

Hoffa might not be the power he
is today '

The question, has met with de denials
nials denials all over the place. But here

is wnat KepuDUcan congressmen
said at the time thev were stonoed

dead in their tracks from inves-

ugauns joaa: ;

WHO KILLED THE PROBE?

encouraged racketeering and ex extortion.
tortion. extortion.
' In Detroit, as hearings suddenW
folded, Congressman Wint smith
of Kansas looked at the ceiling
and said: "The pressure comes
from so high that I can't even
discuss it." ')'-''
Said committee counsel William
F. McKeruia: "We were silenced
before we could make public cert certain
ain certain important financial-legal' as aspects
pects aspects of Jhe Teamsters open-',
lions."
Just who did the silencing is
somethfiis the McClellan Commit Committee
tee Committee sftould investigate. But it won't
Too many senators on his cbmmit
tee or their friends might be in-
volved. '" 1 v
, .," i V t M
' UGLY HIGHWAYS ' v

TROPICAL RADIO
TELEGRAPH COMPANY

DUE TO OUR RECENT RELOCATION THE TELEPHONE NUMBERS APPEAR APPEARING
ING APPEARING IN THE CURRENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY ARE IN ERROR. PLEASE
REMOVE THIS NOTICE FOR -YOUR REFERENCE AND CONVENIENCE.

ATTLI TO THI DIATH
KrrWE, Northern Rhodesia (UF)
African spear fishennaa ffumo
Phiri and a eroeodila fought sa
underwater -battle to the death
hero yesterday In the Longs
River. Horrified spectators
watched as the mas- and the
crocodile rose aad sank three
times, before Phiri managed to
kill the beast with ria spear aad
struggle ashore.

U)tfddwicbi Radicqham $aJwk&
FOR MESSENGER CALL
MAIN OFFICE Samuel Lewis Ave.
3-7474 3-7475
BRANCH OFFICE Plaza 5 da Mayo
2-0688 2-0689

Rep. Clare Hoffman of Michigan

made a dozen speeches pointing
the finger at Unnamed high s- up

On Jan. If, 1M4 he said: "It

takes courage sometimes to try

to proco tne racketeers in vour

own home city ... Hoffa testified

under oath that his local had a
million dollars in the treasurv and

that Ihey had given him -Hoffa
authority to SDend such nart nf

that million in elections as he de

sires.

In my own committee I was

stripped of any authority to con

tmue these investigations, except

for a period of 60 days in two lo

calities, why?" .. ,f

On jaB. 21, 1954 Hotfman con-

tinued- "I have been warned that

retaliatory action would be taken
if I investigated Teamster racke

teers." 1 .... .-, ,,, .

On Feb. 3. Hoffman again com

plained that his committee had
been "liquidated." "They gave me

no reason, for ; such action.", -r:

un i-en. zj, Honman protested:
"Tha faot 'nf tha nitl... 4. 4k...

Ftried to; tut my, throat ,lVe".were

in along UII rieht.no.sinc.

(the racketeers' ? antf : thei extortion

ists, but we got too close to some
politically high influential gentle gentlemen.
men. gentlemen. We were stepping on their
toes. They said, 'cut that old man
Hoffman off.' i :
On March J4, Hoffman, still
anxious to investigate Hoffa,

cnargen mat ms committee had
been "killed" and that this had

Sen. Chapman Revercomb of
West Virginia cast the tie-break""
lng vote In the Senate Public
Works Committee in '.favor of Ma-
dison Avenue's desire to clutter up ;.
the djv Vederal highway system'
with billboards.
Voting with Revercomb were his
fellow Republicans, Senators Mar Martin
tin Martin of Pennsylvania, Kuchcl of
California, and Hruska of Nebras Nebras-ka;
ka; Nebras-ka; also Democratic Senators Kerr
of Oklahoma, McNamara of Mi- f.
chigan, and Scott of North Caroli- f
ua., , -'
Before Revercomb casthis tie-

breaking ballot; be pleaded with :
committee members to lay the.

bill on the table so he wouldn't
have to vote' This made Senators -Richard
Ncuberger (D-Ore ) and
Albert Core (D-Tenn.) furious,
"You want to have your cake
and eat it, too," protested Neuber-
ger at Revercomb. "You want to,;
kill the anti-billboard bill, hut you
also want to be able to go home
and tell the ladies in the garden k

club and the sportsmen in the out outdoor
door outdoor club that we cain revive the
bill "hext year. ,
"I agree with Senator Gore that
now is the time to act," insisted
Neuberger. He explained that once
the roads are built and the bill billboards
boards billboards erected, it will be too late
to beautify the Federal highways.
Neuberger reminded his -fe!low
senators that' American school kids
sing 'America the Beautiful' in
their classrooms. ;;h.
"There's a line that goes, Oh,
beautiful for spacious skies. It's
iust too bad if statesmen i can't
live up to what their children sing
in school."
NOTE The anti4)illboard bill,
introduced by Neuberger in the
Senate, hasn't even received, a
hearing in tne House. Perhaps this
is because the chairman of tha

House subcommittee on Roads is

Ken. George FaUon(D-Md.) of
Baltimore, who used to be in the
business of nrintina-. sians for d.

. irj ,.trtfK-

IT V

thing- so great that t crJuldn'l
have been imagined in 1883.
' This day is not only for the
carpenter, the bricklayer, the

ones who physically build or la

bor with their hands. It is for

office workers, for errand boys,
for foremen, for. clerks, for but

ton pushers and switch snap

pers.
: It is for the mothers who strive

to develop strong sons. It is for

oaas wno deprive tnemselves so
that their children may have
better educations.

ft is a special day fr the chil

dren themselves and dont they

enjoy their last crack at sum summer?
mer? summer? since they are the build

ers of tne future.

Labor Day has gradually be

come, without our noticing it, a
day for all of us, the true build builders.
ers. builders. And we hope you're enjoy enjoying
ing enjoying it. j

C Brltannlca Junior Encyclopedlaj
Oliver Hazard Perry, whose!
resounding "We have met thai
enemy and they are our" an-l
nounced victory in the Battle of) -V
Lake Erie ta the War of 1812, v
was only 27 when he was made
commander of the "squadron of) r
Lake Erie,?' which did not exists
His men built the ships in which! 1-
they won the ;battle. Perry'a
brother, Matthew, led the mis-'
slon 40 years later which opened

.up trade with Japan. y

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' "' 'V . vr'1 "'' '''"! f pi'1, .''i'ff';' :' '.i-'i'..'V' '' Au AA'AIA '.-;AA?V' A;, Alii
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
M3I.TAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 195TA. :
H 1
A,
PAGB THREE (
. .j.-ff. .!':.,, a t.. .. fit'-'"1.
Tithes
square
V"

Ends

Graham Crusaae

T a A aW i 1 V"

NEW YORK. Sent.2 (UP) -Bil

' v firahain pnHed the ereatest cru

t ae of modern times last night
wjtii a Times Squared rally in
u-uch he turned "the gay white

way" into 'a "great cathedral"

ciumg with hymns' and sermon
based on a text taken t X o m

, Hrnariwav theater marauees

- The 38-year-old evangelist said

he came down to "the crossroads

nf thf world." a. Dlace frequented

'hv rinno addicts, alcoholics and

h. riots, as well as "the, finest
' citizens of the, world., to ; make

Times Square a symbol of the re

ugous revival in America,

i i lt was .'Graham's 100th. sermon

in: 15V4 peeks of evangelizing in
the, nation's bieeesti citvi: In this

city of 8,000,000 he drew" a total
attendance of more than ,2,000,000

id .meetings In- Madison Square

Harden. Wall Street. Yankee Sta

: dium, .Central Park.' Harlem and

a crass ..tennis court at Forest

Hills., x '"'

Well over 50,000 persons have
made '"decisions for Christ" at
crusade meetings that cost
$2,500,000 to hold. Graham re re-ceivel
ceivel re-ceivel an average of 56,000 letters

every week and as many as 75.O0W

in peatc weexs. He esumaieu
hs too television audience at

s 000.000.

Winding up hi crusade in what

he calls, the most unchurched
city' in America, Graham 'told
his. followers, many of whom have
attended nearly every one of- his

meetings:
"On the theater marquees here
at .Times Square, we can see

many inscriptons that descrbe

the condition psychologically, ma

'terially and spiritually of millions

today. s

The movies he cited were
"The Ten -Commandments," fThe

; Lonely Man," "The W a 1 k i n g

Dead," and -"Love m the After
noon." 1

JAC03T CM

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NBA Service

'J
V'

NORTH 22
AI2
V 5 J
74-
4QJS7S4

, WEST t EAST i
q jioii A9
VKJ7 Q106J1
eiocr r4X'J5 2
lr .f? ? AK87' ;
. Jl" f A4 ,,'
'""-'Alii '
rfrrAK82 -""-r
; Both vulnerable
South West North East
tlN.T. Pass 2a Pass
3N.T.' Pass Pass. ... Pass
i bpening lead 4k Q

; in this last article on the.JTB
for awhile I will bring up a few
final features. The first feature
is that the bid is 6nly used' In

response to the opening bid of
one no-trump.-We may extend
It-to other no-Jtrump situations
some' day, but so far it is only
on the opening ; .t j

Tne second feature is that u

second hand Overcalls, the trans
fer bid Is not made at the, two
level. You either abandon the
transfer bid ensirely or you

move It up tc the four level. 1

Assuming that your partner's

opening notrump has been over over-called,
called, over-called, by a bid of two hearts

you may bid four hearts as a
transfer to spades. Obviously,
business will be better if your
partner played .the hand and
you do want to be In game.
In today's hand my son, Jim,
Opened an absolute maximum
one no-trump. His partner's two
Spade response was the club
transfer but Jhn decided to tau-'
tiny and bid three no-trump. He
was sure that, his partner would
bold six -clubs and .that meant
six club tricks at no-tramp. He
hoped for three tricks In the
pther suits.,4) j ; '"
' He was lucky, west had a nat-
vral spade lead "and Jim ,romjK
ed home ith his expected six
club- tricks and one in each of

the other suits.

His tid of

"The Ten Commandments."

said, are God's moral law given

through- Moses. He' warned there

can be no- peace in the world until

the law is kept.

Of the Movie," "The Lonely

Man. he said there are thou

sands vof lonely persons in New

York and the rest of the country,

Loneliness can come, he said, as

a result of Being "separated from

tzod." 1 -J

"The Walking Dead," Graham
said, are spiritually dead "apart

from Christ." Millions of nersons

nave mis sense ot "lostness." he

said. 1 and are 'bewildered hv

life despite ; temporary ,, fun and
pleasures. ' f
-As for "Love in the Afternoon."

vriauaui saiu uib yicuiesi Jove
story of all time reached its

"climax" in the afternoon with

tne- crucifixion of Jesus Christ:

who "died for our sins."

"That was love in the afternnnn

in capital letters Graham said.

He ignored a double bill of sex

movies stiowine onlv about ion I

yards from his pulpit, on a plat- i

torm in the middle of Rrnadwav

just south of 42nd street. He did

not mention "Man on Tire" on the I

-flail ItaKea feenshnw" irntmH

me corner on 4Znd Street.

Graham, standing with hte ,..i

to Times Square so his 4,000-voice
choir and audience rnuld innir

over vthe famous mtprsptinn coin

that this is the spot thousands of

wuumj uiiux oi as XNew Yor.

ManV fore en

America by Times Sauare h

said. "Scores of nationalities inttu

w.u uuier speamng many ian-

some stare in urnnrfai-mnnt .f

me Diaze of liehts .nther h.r.

along the streets to-the th.t..

sua places or amiissmant u..

in nines' aauare t. ths

.... -- uwc au-

aict, th alcoholic, the harlot

niuiit witn tne' tmpt i7.n.

l- -r. -M9 VI

i wona. it is primarily a place

ui amusement, mnnen mt.n

.( . . jusaiue.

urwKing,, eating and mairino

ItlftPPV. "6

As Graham nnk tn th.

uuicce oeiore mm, the movies
and nnnkv ; tnnlrc h

cades and souvenir shops, the pin-

u na record stores re-

iiiaiiiea open ior, Dusiness as us

ual. une of them had, a slot m.

wafs in wiucii ror ii rtmtm ma

-uuiu DUV a CODY -AfV th I nrA'e

T. .. - uw. u a

i-rayer printed nn a mf.i

ficatinn t J"-

Behind Graham, advertisements

iur wniSKev. rnxnrotn i

beamed down from the huge elec electric
tric electric Signs for Which Tim.. ,....

i. f"'c

Hilt. .M.t..-l

was; turned into a athdi-.I

AOniBFlT -.TAl I fAUi .AMA.. la.

m o a.vr uiuiii trill si it

is being turned" into a prmt

I.. i ,J t7,!'PT,l'

Let US fell the whnU nni-1 j

nignt tnai we Americans believe

God. Let ii tell th h.u

"i1 .ht our trust is not in our

Vue. atomic and hydroeen

Domos, but in almighty God. .it

us xraun.iv aamn nur mmni J

, uivi a auu
social sins and .humbly bow in re-

Fciauce Deiore uod." -,The
crowd in Times Kmir i.

gan gathering many hours before
uranam aooearsii to n.k k.

ii lis- .

aermon. a rhnip

. a .. -. Biii.iTi

reported : at ;7: 00 a m TK-

'cjiiucr to we outdoor Cnnirrea.

uon arrived at ji-m m cv,. .....

iw i...u r,r rr-Ti w

xuia. XIULU AUIEnr.. Mnnt.l... XT T

who brought her lunch and' stood

unm 7 p.m. just waiting for the

f The American Broadcasting Co,

1 1 ..... u vii

i"c crowa jiuinff Rroadwav nnj

we watchful eyes of 338 noli.

mAM 1, a.L I

...c... wiaiiam a sermon was car carried
ried carried to a nationwide TV audi ATI A A

The crowd was considerably
mi"ion-Person

UJ" jama, nmes square on
some New Year's eves? It also
was considerably quieter. The
greatest sound came with the
singing of "All Hail the Power of
Jesus Name" by the choir, accom-

paiucu oy piano ana organ.

FOIT T1IRJ5E DAYS ONLY
TO CLEAR SOME OdDS; AND ENDS TO MAKE ROOM
FOR NEW GOODS NOW ARRIVING

I MM"'1 v

n "if? MftRK-n.i

ill i I ii,

a AkaT aar s av

1

x

lilliSllilllsiiiill

,'l

SATURDAY MONDAY TUESDAY

Positively These Three Days Only
REDUCTIONS from 33 fo 50 :'

IV'q $60,00
; 28.50

1 In

N0RTM00L

SUITS

ONLY TO MAKE ROOM FOR NEW STOCKS ARRIVING
;--: ...... I
Nothing Imported Specially for Sales But

All Our Regular Stock Items7 to Clear.

SUITS
SUITS
SUITS
SUITS

NOW'
NOW
NOW
NOW

-

SPORTXOATS All up to $21.00 NOW
SPORT COATS All up to S5.00 NOW
Leisure jacketS-up to is.oo no

DINNER JACKETS

Double Breasted
Huk-a-Buk $35.00 NOW

$36.00
27.00
21.00
17.10
12.95
16.95
6.95
17.50

1500
Pairs

MEN

'S

SLAX

REGULAR SLAX Up to 7.50 Now to Clear. . .
REGUI-AR SLAX Up to 13.50 Now to Clear ......
WAITERS' .& BARTENDERS' BLACK PANTS 10.75..
BOYS' DRESS SLAX (Size 8 only) Reg. to $4.95

Rayona 0,
Daoron
Dacron !tc Wool
Wool v
$3.95

MEN'S ALL WOOL FLANNEL SLAX
(For States Side) Reg. 18.00 .

MEN'S ALL WOOL TROPICAL DARK SHADES
12.00 NOW
SIZES 28 to 42 Regulars and Shorts
A CLEAN-UP IN THE TRUE SENSE OF THE WORD

5.95,
6.95
2.95
9.75
6.95

f..

LONG SLEEVES
SHOftT' SLEEVES'

LINO CLOTHES COTTON RAYON

FIRST GROUP

SPORT SHIRTS
that we sold regula-r
up tb $8.75

- Si

$2 95

NYLON DACRON

Small
Medium
Med. Large
Large
tralarge

NOT ALL SIZES IN ALL STYLES THESE ARE TO CLEAR

WHITE

T.'7'i W .BJBB1 ssw ..mwiwivaai

FIGURED PATTERNS

2000 TO CLEAR WE NEED THE SHELF SPCE

SECOND GROUP

Premium Qaulity
SPORT SHIRTS
Our Regular
$5.75 to $7.50

$1 95

We have 750 dozens 7
new Shirts coming In to
replace these 65 dozens wt
MUST CLEAR FOR SPACE.

4(11

u

Austria: Raob
LINZ Austria, Sept.' 2 (UP) -l
Austrian Chancellor Julius Raab
spent "a ouiet night", after suffet suffet-ing
ing suffet-ing a minor stroke, -doctors at a
local hospital' said today, .
';'' ; .-
!, TRAILED BY TRICKLsTH'
; CHICAGO (UP) Leon Kucewici
was tn hot. water today on crarges
of crashing into a parked car and
leaving the scene ef he accident.
Kucewici'a car radiator was dam damaged
aged damaged in the collision and left
f rirklA nf watr whifh rwliA fnl.

IV,n. j. .tnii.fi IntBAI slnntf Attv tfrMf.

had been a calculated risk that Kucewici at the end of the watery

paid oiu-i irrau. ..

f FOR YOUR HIGH-BALL INSIST
duays on CANADA: DRY
N "High-Ball wilhoul CanTada Dry

is Foul-Ball"

B J 't

7FIAN 7IDDFD NFfKTIFS TERRY CLOTH SHORTS knitted T shirts BOYS' Knifed
ZELAH ZIPPER tllt5 Long Sleeve "t"
JACKETS mcuding pur, .i.k t.e, to JACKETS BERMUDA SHORTS 0negroup $15 ;J i
One xolor only $4.75 each White, green maize White and colors. kKfiTmo- 1 A $2.50 Value
a A .Perfect for Golf Tennla 9 aa ANOTHER t I AE i,.et r.., u ... ?
Regular 9.50 J u a v ( an Sizes-28-44 I aJ Just 8 Few to Clear
. Keguiar Bring Thrown At You at All sizes Values up to $10.75 Group I
': M, Reg.:$5.7S ;,. nr i"
TO CLEAR $4.95 95C. NOW $ 2.95 Clear $2.95 Val- to $4.00 SQ.C...."
S 0 C K S I S 0 C K'S 1 MANHATTAN MANHATTAN too nylon dress I MAIIHATTAII i
M TUXEDO DRESS Finest Rtyon f U I Q T f DACRON & COTTON
for Men tmpn PAJAMAS .:,, wash-nwear
,. r Six colors J II I K I J Ongmally $10.75 r
Sol,d Fance. Slightly. Soiled Reg. $8.50 to $25.00 size. 14, 14, 15. oniy f
Values to $1.25' ISizes 9-13 'Broken Sizes NOW Reg. $9.50
. Reg; $6.75 to 8.50 u to Clea, Pink on ry Vi
3 x $1.35 3 x $1:00 uu,u$ln : 3 off Now $2.95 i. $2.

NOTE: For '25 years, we have run one Sale Annually A pre-lnventory Sale. Th'is is the first time we are running a mid-year CLEARANCE

SALE and only because our. Purchases for the coming Holidays were so heavy we need the space for new goods.

A :.

- -' r

3 DAYS ONLY ;
SAT.iMON.TUE;
HOURS: 8-12
t V ; j
1:30-6 p.m. ;

SAMUEL FRIEDMAN, Inc.
LA MAS C OTA

this sale will
not be prolonged;
after tuesday

AVE. TIVOLI

WE" CORDIALLY. LNVITE YOU TO SEE.THE: :'js'-

mw.w

at:

A PRODUCT 0fhE BRITISH DIVISION OF GENERAL MOTORS-PRESENTS AN ENTIRELY NEW VERSION THE FAMILY 4 DOOR SEDAN-NEW STVLLNQ--THE ONLY EUROPEAN CAR WITH WRAP AROUND WINDSHIELD

1

J
3
l
7u l
y i
fAi
it
Wi j
3
si,
'
n
4
i
5
It
r
3
3
1 r

TROPICAL MUTURb, b. A. r



1.

PAGE FOUR
. THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
..JMONDAT, SEPTEMBER X, 1957

fiand Otii

TV

OClUi
'

By Staffers

J-f tf Cnfajmtxh, Wamapi,
Jt Jl L c.hJ h
'T
i
-4

A S.!lc?" -, o -"s i( V

'DINNER AT CHINESE EMBASSY The Ambassador q? China Mao Lan Tuan and his' wife
Jjiw shown with their guests at a dinner party given at the Chinese Embassy laat week.

"COLON INTER-AMERICAN WOMEN'S CLUB ;
. tVILL FETE FIRST LADY AT TEA PARTY
The Colon Unit of the Inter-American Women's Club will
Jfete Mm. Mercedes de la Guardia, wife of the President of
' Panama at a Membership Tea, which will be held on Tics Tics-day,
day, Tics-day, Sept. 17 at 3:30 p.m.
The party will take place at the Club Headquarters.
' Members and friends are invited to attend.

Mrs. Olga Arias
Returns To Washington
. Mrs. Olga Arias de Arias, wife
of the Panamanian Ambassador to
the United States left over the
; -weekend with her children to re rejoin
join rejoin her husband in Washington.
Mrs. Arias has been hre for a
brief visit with her' family and
" friends.
Mr. And Mrs. Burnham
Return From Stafcu
, Mr. and Mrs. Brodie Burnham
of Los Rios, returned on Friday
lirom two month's leave spent in
the States.
While there, Mr. Burnham at attended
tended attended Cornell University, where
he completed work for a master's
'degree in education.
Mrs'. Burnnam, who Is librariati librariati-'
' librariati-' curator of the Canal Zone Libra Libra-;iry,
;iry, Libra-;iry, spent her vacation with' rela relatives
tives relatives in Louisiana.
: 'Oa ream Beyd
fleeted Prviident
: .Of Union Chib
Clarence Boyd was elected pres president
ident president of the Union Club on Satur-
day night.
'
J Other hew officers are vice-president
Alberto Arango N Treasur Treasurer
er Treasurer Jose Rogelio Arias Jr., secre secretary
tary secretary Miguel Capriles and vocal
.Abraham Acrich.
jCol. Wilson's
JChildren Return
JTo Colls
Miss Jackie Wilson, daughter of
CoL and Mrs. L. F. Wilson of Ft.
JJClayton left on Thursday for Wil-
ilian and Mary College in Wil Williamsburg,
liamsburg, Williamsburg, Va., where she will en en-.iter
.iter en-.iter her senior year.
; Her brother Fritiz left on Satur Saturday
day Saturday to enter his second year at
MSaylor College of Medicine in
JJIouston, Texas.
PANAMA

.

erwi5e
Bi'iU, ParfiH mJ Vfvtk 1 JuHtU I,
- Pnm' MM '4W
Wilis:
'f.
"
Buach Party
For Kobbe Wives
Busines hut not "as usual"
will be the order of the day on
Thursday, at 9 o'clock when the
Fort Kohbe Officers' Wives' Club
will move to Kobbe Beach for
their regular Coffee and business
meeting. Dress will be beachwear;
business will include voting on the
proposed revision of the club's
Constitution; entertainment will
be swimming, with the tide "just
right."
An urgent call is made for all
members to attend if at all pos possible
sible possible in order that a quorum pay
be obtained for the proposed vot voting.
ing. voting. For reservations, calif Mr a.
Earl at 5231 prior to noon Wednesday-
jv :
Pacific Navy Wivits
Will Play Bingo
The Pacific Navy Wives' Club
will play Bingo at their monthly
social tonight at 7:30 in the club club-room
room club-room of the Cocoli Clubhouse.
All members and prospective
members are welcome to 'join, the
fun and refreshments.
Mr. and Mrs. Bilonlck
Move Back To Paitilla
.Mr. and Mrs. Mike Bilonlck
and their children Mlkek and
Rlckie have moved back into
their home at No. 119 12th
Street, Paitilla.
NEEDS ELEVATOR SHOES
HOLLYWOOD (UP)- Irish
("Sheena") McCalla, blonde ama-zon-type
actress who stands six
feet tall in low shoes, says the
long and short of her latest film is
that she quit. "The leading man
they had for me was five inches
shorter than I am, she said. "I
don t mind playing comedy, but
this was supposed to be a serious
picture."

f
x

Men's SlllllTS
on Our Special Sale Continues
SPORT SHIRTS
T" SHIRTS
DRESS SIimTS (pure ilk
- CASH ONLY NO RETURNS '

MOTTA'S

' J7 4 OA J

fU0X ja v
anama
mm,, J fnmpAif U Lnnumbri iLwn.
Umm 9.00 mni 10 Jf
m
Each notice for inclusio la thh
column ahould ho suomitttd ui
typo-writton form and mailsd so
tho box number liitod daily iir'So iir'So-cial
cial iir'So-cial and Otharwiu," or doliversd
by hend to tho office. Notices of.
mooting cannot ho accosted by
telephone.
Mary-Martha
Circle To Moot
The Mary-Martha Circle of the
Balboa Union Church will meet at
the home of Mrs. Helen Went
worth, S73 San Juan Place, Ancon,
tomorrow at 9:00' a.m. Mrs.
Maude Clinchard will be the host
ess. The devotional will be given
by Mrs. Vance Howard. Miss
Thelma Tschabold will apeak on
the topic." The Lesser Known
Women of the Bible."
Members are asked to return
completed "Yo-Yo" dolls.
Archtlshee Bec&man st
Will Attend j ? t
IC. of C. Meetinf
' "His Excellency Archbishop Fran Francis
cis Francis F. Beckman of Panama will
attend tbe meeting of the Knights
of Columbus, which 'Will be held
'-Mtinrrnw at 7:30 p.m. on he first
Iloor ol the K. of C. nome in Bal Balboa.
boa. Balboa. Canal Zone
Retired Workers
Moot Wednesday
The Canal Zone Retired Workers
Association will meet Wednesday
in the rear of the Ancon Laundry
Building.
Members are asked to attend.
Albreok NCO Wives
Will Maot Thursday
The NCO Wives Club, of Albrook
Air Force Base will hold their
monthly business meeting -on
Thursday, at 7:30 p.m. in the
basement of the Albrook Chapel.
Ail members please come, as this
will be the first meeting with the
new board. Each- member bring
a guest or new member. All wives
Waik-Efti Athlit'tS: it This
Prevent
HEM
HASH
Chafe
fWaro. offer mnim
Clinical tciti with
loaeiag athiotic
aroupo provo that
. Mexsaaa Pewdor prvoti many minor
skia irritations. Modicatcd, abtorboot
Ctios clOMto iluo for looser protet protet-lipal
lipal protet-lipal Fod comfort Wo cvoo in oottetl
woothor. ot Manaoa today!
MEXSAMA
MtDICAT ID ? OWl) ft
s

COLON

Minted
Is Tasty

By GAYNOR MADDOX,
NEA Food and Markets Editor V

" Summertime calls for delicate
and interesting desserts. But easy-
to-prepars desserts. Here s one that
ut$ pleasantly into that category.
Min1id Lemon Tea Pie
, (Makes ene nine-inch pie)
Two cuns strong tea (7 tea tats).
I Clip light cream or milk, 2 pack
ages' instant lemon pudding, Vi
teaspoon mint. flavoring or few
drops peppermint flavor, 10-12 lady
fingers (separated).
To prcpaie tea, pour two cups
boiling water over seven tea bags.
Brew five minutes. Add cream or
milk. Cool at room temerature.
Pour liquid into mixing bowl. Add
instant lemon pudding and mint
flavoring, Beat slowly with egg
beate?, until blended, about one
minute. Mixture will be thin. Place
in refrigerator to set.
In the meantime, lightly but
ter ammc-mch pie plate and ar arrange
range arrange lady finger halves in bot bottom
tom bottom and around sides. Pour in
Thief Caught Asleep
Mop Safe He Was
Trying To Crack
ST. Paul. Minn.. Spet. 2 (UP)
Joseph Borgerding probably nev never
er never will live down his latest bur burglary
glary burglary attempt. He was caught
sleeping on the job.
Borgerding was found by police
yesterday perched atop a safe in
a nrioate earage. Hea pparently
had worked very hard at acrack-
ing the safe, and was resting from
his lbors.
In fact, Borgerding was so tuc tuckered
kered tuckered out, he didn't even wake
up when police slapped the hand handcuffs
cuffs handcuffs on him.
Police discovered the sleeping
burglar, while touring an alley in
a routine squad car check. They
noticed, a ray of light from a pri private
vate private garage and heard Borgerding
snoring away.
Authorities hauled Borgerding
off t jail and a more comfortable
bunk,,
If you are Invited to a dance
and cannot go, be sure to let
your hostess know ahead of
time.
Even when the Invitation does
1 TJ 1

always be made If the inTitationjtPassenS,s" aboard.

is not accepted.
whose husbands are Airmen First
Class or above are eligible, even
though their husband does not be belong
long belong to the NCO Club.

PnOCESSING

KODAK PANAMA, LTD. I'SSSf

"LUCHO" is his (nick) Name

'( if inyooe here doesn't know Lucho)
If you kn t, "yen. should loee no time In dropping into our
delightful 8undsy Brunch Dance. Also Lucho and his
Conjunto sow play one night weekly in the Bella Vista
Room,' where you can enjoy an evening of dancing to
'Lucho'a toe-tapping tunes.
If yon know bis music, youH be glad we reminded 70a
about that Lscho sight.
This week It la Umorrew a!ght-TUCSDAT.

Enjoy yersf
It's cheaper than yea think lU

Lemon Tea Pie

Summer Delicacy
.L
lemon-mint-tea filling. Place pie in
refrigerator for about 15 minutes.
Top with whipped cream if desired.
Big lawn party at your house?
Then you'll want a good punch
recipe. ,
P Cosmopolitan Fruit Punch
1 (Makes about' 50 four-ounce
servings) ,
ft r
One quart boiling water, 1-3 cup
loose tea cor 15 tea bags), 1V4
quarts cold water, 3 cups 'orange
juice, lMt cups lemon juice 1V4
quarts ginger ale, 2 cups simple
syrup. v
Re nove boiling water from heat.
Immediately add tea. Brew un uncovered
covered uncovered five minutes. Stir and
strain intc a bowl containing the
remaining ingredents except the
ample syrup. Gradually' add en enough
ough enough simply syrup until the sweet
ness of the punch suits your taste
Add ice cubes. Garnish with thin
slices o lemon and ; maraschino
cher-iea
Esjquire Talent
Contest Set For 4
Next Sunday
Finals of the weekly Cafe. Es
quire talent contest will" be- held
on Sept. 8 at 8:15 p.m. Original
plans had called for the finals to
be held on Saturday in the Atlan-
tico Theatre, but que to .. lack ot
certain technical arrangements, it
was decided to postpone it until
the Sunday and stage the contest
at the cafe. As added attraction,
the promoters have plznned to raf
fle several prizes.
Already classified to participate
on this final contest are 14 soloists
and four groups. The contestants
are being asked to attend a meet meeting
ing meeting at the Cafe Esquire tomorrow
at 5 p.m. to receive briefing on the
regulations that will govern the
contest.
Music for the contest will be
furnished by Reginald "Big Boy"
Nicely. and his Rockers.
A list of the contestants will be
issued later this week a long with
further details on the items to be
raffled among the customers in at attendance
tendance attendance at the finals.
lndian5DC3 Hit
By
British Plane
During Landing
CALCUTTA. India', Sept. 2 (UP)
The undercarriage of a Britisn
airliner landing with 61 persons
aboard ripped open an Indian
DC3 tansoort waiting to take off
at Dumdum airport here today,
killing three crewmen aboard tne
Indian plane. The British airliner
landed safely.
A fourth crewman aboard the
All Indian Airlines Corp. DC3 was
seriously injured. There were no
.., vA fn,oni?in
Handley Page Hermes transport
owned by Airworks Ltd. of Lon London,
don, London, was being detained pending
a government inquiry. One pas passenger
senger passenger was treated for shock.

V'
J-

14-Year:0Id Twin
Gives One Kidney

To Save Sisler i
BOSTON. Sept 2 JUP) Doc
tors today v performed a delicate
kdney tra nsplari t operation in an
effort to save the lite of a 14-year-
old twin girt suffering from a suu
allvkfatal disease.
Jt was believed to be the fifth
such operation in history.
c Peter Bent Brieham .surgeons
decided to operate today when the
cnucauy ui gin ueiores itusxey,
Of Desoto. Mo., rallied briefly.
Earlier, she had been too ill to
withstand surgery.
Delores. who had lost the func
tion pf both kidneys, was surfer
ing from nephritis. Two teams of
surgeons, working in adjoining op operating
erating operating rnnmx. transnlanieH Virf.
ney from Delores' henlthv ideati-
t iwiu, ijons. ine iive-nour op operation
eration operation was performed by Dr. Jo Joseph
seph Joseph E,. Murray. Dr. J. -Hartwell
Harrison and Dr. Warren Guild,
the same sugeons whp performed
four previous kidney transplants
at tne Hospital.
- .v. V.-" ..... S
"Everything so far has proceed
ed according to schedule and in
nne witn tne four previous trans
plants,", a hospital spokesman
said in an' official bulletin. How-
ever, doctors would make no com
ment on the success of the opera operation.
tion. operation.
Officials said a "progress and
full condition report will be issued
following a-72-hour: post operative
period."
Doctors ;,e a rl J e r predicted it
would be next week Before Delores
would be strong enough to under undergo
go undergo the operation.
Doris successfully pleaded Fri Friday
day Friday in the Massachusetts Sum-eme
Court for legal permission to do
nate one of her, kidneys.
"I would not be able- to live
with myself- if I couldn't givd her
this kidney," she said. "I knew
my sister will die if the operation
is not performed."
The rare kidney transplant has
been performed successfully 'at
the hospital on four other sets of
identical twins. The hospital re reported
ported reported today all four pairs of oth other
er other "kidney transplant twins" are
alive and healthy.
Red Paper Reports
Rape In One Of Rare
Stories About Crime
MOSCOW, Sept. 2 (UP) A
Communist newspaper, in one of
its rare articles on crime, report reported,
ed, reported, that i7-year-old girl-jumped
from a three-story window "to de defend
fend defend her chastity when three Stu
dents trledt o rape her.
Svetlana Antonova, an employe
at; tne noisBeviK?c,aKing plant, was
reported to be in critical condition
and her assailants, two of whom
said they were "foreigners atend atend-ing
ing atend-ing the Moscow Youth Festibal,"
were awaiting, trial.
The newspaper "Moskovski
Komsomolets" reported that Svet
lana and a friend were invited by
the two boys to their dormitory
at the aademy of sciences. The
young men masqueraded as for foreigners
eigners foreigners but turned out to be So
viet citizens.
The article said one of the es escorts
corts escorts tried to attack Svetlana who
S leaded with two other students to
ide her in their room. They did,
and then tried to attack her along
With the other young man,,
ASIAN FLU THIORY
Detroit (UPi Hazel Park
Councilman Oscar S. Beamer said
he had heard Somewhere that
Asian flu was caused by mos
quitoes and suggested yesterday
that the council have the city
sprayed with DDT, City Manager
Calvin C. Henry said the mosquito
theory was a new one on him, and
anyway, it would cost $1,500 per
square mile to spray DDT from
the air. That would cost Hazel
Park J6.000 and the idea was
dropped.'
RH0DAS
ANNUAL SALE
iMain Store, Only
Brassiers-Exquislte Tonn,
Cheers, UUy of France.;
God dew Brassiers from
l.M.
World famous American
- Shoes from l.M. -- i
Beautiful Drssses for" ill
occasions, prices as low
as 6&5. v
- Sport wear, Including
Pedal Pushers. Slacks etc.
At DRASTICALLY
I V REDUCED. PRICES
Real Bargains -at our
- Baby Department, donV
miss them.
Lovely Handbags, choice
of styles and colors.
Sllpperi troraUS. :
Rome Coats, Lingerie,
.Tablecloths, sheets
, at PRICES NEVER
- OFFERED BEFORE
J. Areeeneaa Ave eeniee
; 4tfc Street --
TeL. 1-1477

'

Plan Ahead For The Day
When Last Child Leaves!

college this fall. I know I'll be
simply lost with the last one gone,"
I recenty heard a woman remark.
It's not an unusual observation.
But a woman, should make up her
mind ahead of time that, she lis
boud to feel lost, when her chil children,
dren, children, leave home,
Sure, the house is going to seem
empty. And there won't be ; as
much work to do.
But .why should that make a
woman feel lost?
She doesn't have to sit in the
house all day listening to the; emp emptiness.
tiness. emptiness. 'v
And certainly a few free hours
of her Own each dav oueht not to
be a weight around any woman's
necK, 1
Why should we women take such
a defeatist attitude toward the
peace and -.'leisure offered when
the long job of"Tearine afmilv
is done?
Why arewe frightened by the

Arab Leaders Ask Economic Aid
' T i ' p a N a i
To v Check Red Forces I n 'Syria

BEIRUT.' I'SeDt. 2 (UP) Pro
Western Arab leaders have asked
U. S. State Department, trouble
shooter Loy Henderson for more
U. S. economic aid to help check
communist torces in syriai in
formed sources said Saturdavi ;
Increased financial support of
the Baghdad Pact and the Eisen
hower Doctrinewere reported to
have been requested ia a warning
to Henderson of the seriousness of
the leftist military coup in Syria.
Henderson, a deputy under sec
retary of state' was rushed to the
Middle East last week for top
level conferences with Arab lead
ers in Turkey and Lebanon when
Communist infiltration into Syria
Ike To Start
Delayed Vacation
WASHINGTON, Sept 2 (UP)
President Eisenhower will -follow
Congress ut of .town Wednesday
for nis aeiayea vacation at "New
port,' -RtI.,r the "Whitr-tHousf :an
nouneed over'' the weekend, r' ir)
1 .President and-Of rs. JEisen.
howerrare scheduled fo. board the
Columbine ill' here at 9 a.m.
Wednesday for a 1V4 hour flight
to the Ouonset, K.I. Naval Base.
They will take the presidential
yacht "Barbara Anne' for the
short voyage to their vacation re
treat. :.
On the advice of her doctors,
Mrs. Eisenhower "reluctantly" will
skip a' civic reception to welcome
the chief executive to historic
Newport, White House news sec
retary James C. Hagerty said.
Instead, the "Barbara Annei.'
will drop the first lady off at
Coaster's Harbor Island Naval
Base, where the Eisenhowers will
spend their vacation, and the
President will proceed alone to
Newport for a drive through the
town and the reception at Colony
House.
The President will hold a news
conference tomorrow morning.
Hagerty said. Eisenhower will be
prepared then, he said, to assess
the legislative record of the first
session of the 85th Congress.
"We've been looking over the
so-called accomplishments" of the
Congress and "will have something
to say- about it," Hagerty said.
Hagerty said none, of the major
bills awaiting his signature for foreign
eign foreign aid, civil rights, FBI fles and
sppropratons wll be sgned be before
fore before they are studed by staff offi officials..
cials.. officials.. ;. v-.-ii ; ..

FOR YOUR HIGH-BALL INSIST

always onCMADAsDRX

"High-Ball vilhoiil Canada Dry

; ljFou
ODO

nnn cJ.

II 11 4 1 X W"

prospect of haying enough time to

do things we always cisimea we
wanted to do? , 1 i
HAN60VIRT -
Is it just a' hangover from yeara
when there actually wasn't much
for a woman to do once, her fami
ly was reared? ,l -'
Does the prospect ': of ,:; doing
things we always wanted to do
scare' us silly because' we don't
rejilly want to do anything any;
mtr-? .-.".,
That is something f of a woman
to start thinking about long before
her last child leaves nome. r
Just a little thought ought to
convince any woman that a bit
more freedom than she ? has been
used to isn't anything to be frigh frightened
tened frightened oft ,a-
There's nothing so terrible about
a home from which -children have
gone forth to make their own way.
became criticaL Henderson h a
conferred with the heads, of state)
of Turkey, Jordan, Iraq. an4 Leb
anon as well as U. S. ambassadors
to those countries. He said he
might prolong his stay, 'although
he was due to fly home today.
V Mtanwhile, In Cairo, U.S. Am
bassader Raymend Hre was
' : meet with Piusidanf : Carnal Ab
del Nasser. It was reperted ttty
. weuld discUss tb Syrian crisis.
Soma seurces said that : Nasser
wis trying te ease political tan tan-siens
siens tan-siens and that the U.S. "shewed
interest" In his kihlnd-the-sen-s
maneuvers. 1 V ivlJ,
Turkish and pro-Western u Af ab
officials -were reported to have
urged Henderson to adopt a tough
line with Syria as well as to push
for additional aid to the pro-Western
states in the Middle East
He was told that 'Syri Is under
the Communist grip for all prae
ticai purposes" despite denials i
Damascus, and that he should not
be fooled by Syria's ; attempts to
soft pedal anti American senti sentiment
ment sentiment while actually she iraf "con "consolidating,"
solidating," "consolidating," leftist gainsi Ti i.,
f While .Henderson" talked;to V A.
merican and Arab experts Lebsn Lebsn-oun
oun Lebsn-oun called lor a summit coner coner-ence
ence coner-ence onvSyria with Kings Hussein
and Feisel of Jordan and Iraq
and King Saud of Sudi Arabia f a
Cairo! newspaper feportefl, f how however,
ever, however, that King Saud turned down
Chamou's. invitation. HMy; 4 I-
In Turkey. concern over the
Syrian situation was evidenced m
a meeting between. Turkish prem-
yer Adnan Menderes .and exiled
yan, an anti-Communist wis forc forced
ed forced to leave his country.' ' ?
Turkey, with neighboring Iraq,
Iran, Pakistan and Great Britain
belongs to the pro-Western Bagn Bagn-dad
dad Bagn-dad Pact and is strongly anti-
Communist. v
Asiatic Flu HitsSS
Britishliin Shiplft
ROSYTH. v Scotland.' Seot.l 2
(UP) The royal Napy'a "Jinx?
ship, the aircraft earner : Eagle,
has been quarantined beeause of
an outbreak of suspected Asiaue
flu, it was announced today; f
Officials said 150 crew members
were suffering from influents be believed
lieved believed to be of the Asiatic type,,
quarantined. ; rsrr?tL
The Eagle has been piaguea
with mlsfnrtun aine it : was
launched in 4951. The carter was
involved in a collision, a plane
crashed 1 aaainst its funneL .fuel
tanks have exploded, and mali
cious damage was done to tne
engines. .
i!:r.;'i.'.
Balf

, eoeau your caarsu ,

prcbleras oway!;'

": i .'"'.'' .;.
Ne worriaa about perspiratte prob
km when ye ae Odo-Ro-Ne Sprayl -Instantly.
tUa da&chtfuSy fragrant
daooraot baniabaa Biderana dor... -chacka
moisturt ...for a full 24 bounl
Safe for akia aad dotKea, toe!

- RO 110



r

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER it. 1957
THB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY JJEWSPAPER-
PAGE FIT
ftqbbl&roijsihgl Racist JCcispe r Jee r e cf
Bffihietiiarea i'Crdwd- in Winston-Solent

SaBMBMBBeBBBaBBBBe mmmU MBMBkejBBMBBBBBBBaBBBB
'"' M

? WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., Sept. Charlotte, then return to Nasn Nasn-J
J Nasn-J (UP) Segrefeationlst .John ville, Tenn., where schools are
Kasper. surprised by leers of a, being? Integrated, "to see, this

r hnstu. rmtii t hi "antl-inte-

' hostile crowd at his "anti-inte

gratlon rally"! on a court house
lawn yesterday, was forced to

retreat across town -to. organize

fa wmte Ciuzens councu. -b
, f Kastr. 27" later- formed v his

cpuncU in the shadow of a small

i garage some ai5tance. truia iuc
: courthouse with about 30 initial
members, mostly' teenagers.

'Tliey'wlU actively' ppp,pst? In,

thins through."

Kasper's arrival in this Pied

mont city was greeted with any anything
thing anything btt enthusiasm. "'
,-, Hardly had he stepped into
the neatly-mowed lawn, at
Forsyth County courthouse be before
fore before he became the target of
Jeers from the milling crowd
; of about 200, half of them Ne Negroes.
groes. Negroes. Kasper started in to blast the

U.S. Supreme Court, Gov. Lu-

teeration-of a. Nesro tatl into ther H. Hodees. the Winston

.Winston-Salem's previously all-! Salem school board, the Forsyth

. white Reynolds High

'this yelf e, h said.

i,Then Kasper set out for

Greensboro tq organize a simi
lar KrouD there.

; Kasper said he would visit

school 'County United Fund, the Na

Itional Association for the Ad

I vancement of Colored People

'Economy Of Nation
JJpr.Soys Mexican
PresjfjentCortines

MEXICO CITY, Sept. 2 (UP)

f resident Adolf Ruiz. Conines
a saiq yesterday Mexico's economic
growth in the last year surpassed
"the most optimistic predictions."
v In a state of the nation message
thai took more than three hours
" to read, Cortlnes told Congress all
sections of the national economy
. progressed during the year. Na National
tional National production In different fields
increased from seven to 45 per
cent of the foods it consumes.
? However, Cortlnes said Mexico's
foreign .trade balance had a defi deficit
cit deficit of f97-million pesos; ($33,615, ($33,615,-OW)
OW) ($33,615,-OW) because of an increase in im imports
ports imports of raw materials and invest investment
ment investment feeds, lie hinted that his oo-i

lie during the last year of his
term wilj continue' to be one of
'.austerity.- :.-'

US Envoy To UK :

Back In Britain.
After Vacation
' LONDON, Sept. 2 (UP) U. S.
Ambassador to Britain. John Hay
Whitney and bis wife arrived back
in London today after a three
week (UcatiM. ia the United

and many other organizations
he claimed to be "Communist

fronts."

- But hardly at any pointy could
the segregationist get in two
consecutive sentences before the

Jibes and barbs of the crowd in interrupted.
terrupted. interrupted. "Let the dojr speak,"

yelled some. "He doesn't have

anything o say to us," said

others. 1

One Negro yelled "We have
good race relations In' Win-ston-Salem,
and we don't need
no one least of aU a Yankee

to come down here and tell
' us what to do."
v Another demanded that he go
back to Nashville, and others
started passing a hat "to pay

his way Dack."
i ' Fevered Pitch

' But the crowd reached Its
most fevered pitch and seemed
ready for stronger action when

Kasper commented that "lnte

gration will let Negroes borne In
and assault our. white girls 'in
the schools," and will "bring

venereal disease into the

schools."
v One woman, referring to
Kasper's alleged association
with Negroes in New York Ci

ty, asked "have you had, a
blood test lately?"

Then the mob pressed In on
Kasper, yelling "Kasper go

home!"
Finally he attempted to lead a

group of whites to another sec

tion oi tne lawn, and wnen tnat

failed he set up another meet meeting
ing meeting place, at the garage about
one-half mile inside the city
limits.

There, in a weederown field

Kasper set up what he said ha

hopes will become the nucleus
of an anti-integration . move movement
ment movement in this staie.
Later, he said the outlook was
"very good," and said "it ap appears
pears appears likely the school here will

be boycotted and picKetea."

.' He said the" group here will,
among other things, investigate
the Winston-Salem school board.
He said he was "somewhat
surprised" at the greeting of the
courthouse lawn, but that '".t
Just shows the Negroes are typi typically
cally typically primitive and uncivilized,

and should De Kept in weir

place."
Storm Off Borneo
Capsizes Vessels;

97 Feared Drowned

DJAKARTA, Sept. t (UP)- A

fleet of native sailing vessels were
capsized in a' tropical storm off

the Borneo coast and 97 persons
were feared drowned, according to

a news report received here today

Four survivors nicked un oy a

fishing boat after drifting in the I

sea lor two days toia oi tne aisas

ter.

SHfRTS
'fa
mm
at

0$

CONTINUES

'
SPORT SHIRTS "T" SHIRTS
DRESS SHIRTS (pure lUk)
CASH ONLY ; NO' RETURNS
MOTTA'S
PANAMA COLON

.bS:HH9'A Sii .-i-rwf.i 'S.. Stir,. .''!.

OfHCIAl LIST OF-tri NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE

7-", ' 'w t" 1 i
PANAMA, EEPUBLIC OF PANAMA
ft
Ih .-Coaipki Priie-winnlnr Numbers in the Ordinary Drawinj No. 2008, Snndgy, September 1, 1957

fhn'

', 4'.';.
1

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Tha whole ticket has 82 pieces divided In two series "A" Jk "B" of 28 places each.
First Prize 8302 $,52,000.00
Second Prize 9090 $ 15,600.00
Third Prize 0655 5 7,8 00.00

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IMS IHM MH IHM MM IHM 1 eSH IHM HH IHM I MSS IHM TUi IHM MH IHM MIS IHM
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Wit-irtolf Nainberf ;t yerterday'a lottery Drawlnt; were sold at: The 1st In Colon, 2nd and 3rd In Panama

. Te Mm Hunired wkele tiekeU endinf in 2 and Bet indaded la the abere Us win Tlfty two Dollr (UtM)' eeolL

j'tnfw niece vUch ewmpriM the twe aeries ani "B

flOKKD Byt AXBEKTO ALEMAN, Geverner f the rrorinea ef Panaaan-. Ced. 47-LT15J

... .Tha.KepresentaUva i Tha Treasury, JOZX MEDINA

WTTNIfXIS: Penando Bodrirnei, Ced. Ne. 47-i23S
, i '- t lUdrlr Kspinos. Ced. Ne. 47-XmS .

ALBERTO X iBAKSALLO
Notary Pnblie, rananw

PABLO A. PINEI, M.
Secretary.

' t nciy mly to Um riral Prlsa.

.

IJQTT 1u.if Orltt the bfl elplMr eat vttk ttM SMt

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' Soflday, September I, 1957
,-' ' k -.
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. f ". ;"' Ie ".Ticket--

nrft; Prize ......02 f 11.00 1220,00

Second Prize .90 t 3.00 60.00
Third Prix' I ..,55 i 2.00 40.00

rHa CM Official UM af Pmi m
Lattary altaatad aa Cnttnl wm

Plan f Ordinary Drawtar Ne. tm which wUl take
- Uee Septemker S, 1157
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frict cf a fifry-stcond part $..30

pkizes ah rAED wiiHorr crscvrxTs o TAXIS

fi v ifii.i 'If -I ht&. v v? jf r-!

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VwSir TODAY ;
U M i-r AT 6:00 P.M.

f -'(fillip "A 11 -'nn

mauricio s ?

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WfA USMM MM. ..IMM h; MM' JMM MM ..IHM MSI t IMM MM IMM MM. IMM MM IMM MM ; IMM

NEW HEADQUARTERS

for your

mm

and

Ymmo to fS
dV mmm-St

8 r J

Looking forward for the
Convenience of Our Customers
and Fishermen, we're Opening this
New. Headquarters for you!
We will keep the same policy that
we have been carrying in Our
Store of: 'Better and Reasonable
y -,
V ...
Prices,, to let more people enjoy

Fishing and Sports ... ;

' V-wy'''MMJ edoetM

Beside 1 Hal con Foto Studio Studio-Across
Across Studio-Across 1 Panama Hotel
i Phone 3-7788
L :

-.' a

'

1



4

1 L V .1.
5: f AGE SIX
1HE PANAMA, AMERICAN AN INDEPENpENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
,..t MONDAY, SEPTEMBER. I, 195

...

f.'
1
n

: Ifebin Roberts
IS..!"."

. : -i

: Great Righthander Welcomes
' !! r'-fi ::
Cftance By Mayo Smith With
Impressive Win Over Pirates

j: By EARL WRIGHT
1! NEW YORK, Sept. 2 (UP) Robiij Roberts is
thfeikind of a guy who inspires even the Philadelphia
- Phillies to collect a barrel of basehits.

JWnager Mayo Smith "senlenc "senlenc-t'lRoberts,
t'lRoberts, "senlenc-t'lRoberts, one of baseball s all all-timti
timti all-timti pitching greats, to bullpen
dutjf after he suffered his 18th
lo6s,,of the season Aug. 25. But
Smith gave Roberts another chance
to rtaxt Sunday because the Phil Phil-lieaj)ave
lieaj)ave Phil-lieaj)ave two weekend double
headers.
i Roberts responded by showing
Vome of his old-time magic while
'holdjng the Pittsburgh Pirates to
seven hits. Robin's normally weak-
hittinc mates made it easy tor
himjj
Swinging as though inspired by
ufinn the former Illinois farm
hov back in the starting lineup,
they tattered four Pirate pitchers
for 18 hits and an 11-3 victory.
Batters often hit homers off
Roberts because they can "dig in,"
knowine he isn't the kind of pitch
er who will throw close to keep
thertt "loose." But he rounded out
a peJlieci uay auuuay vy ui sci v
In a single home run ball.
THe Phillie batters collected t
total of 16 hits and scored five runs
in tB first two innings to sew up
tjb gme. They got nine hits as
teharies (Whammy) Douglas, Pitts-
'Bcrghs one-eyed rookie, beat them
' The Chicago White Sox remain remained
ed remained SYt games behind the .New
j"Vork; Yankees ind the St. Louis
-Cardinals cut the Milwaukee
gravis' lead to 6" in pennant
races' already considered "dead"
by thjs oddsniakers.
Chicago gained a game Satur:
W W I f I 'ft 11
I U KIVt-IN
i l TODAY
.1 m LAST DAY!
.7
t.ev
31 if VSSj
I
cuYsuosoal
fiUOAMfiR
KATRRYN 6filNT
I
I
K,,
IB aval wm aV wm t

ESEMM

CAP IT OLIO
35e. 30c.
THE MIO
f BOODLE
' j Also:

T IVOLI
tic SOc.
Spanish Pictures!
TARDE DE TOROS
- Also
TANCHO LOPEZ
y "with. Luis Agullar

4b
IpTT AND RUN
milm

PRE-RELEASE LUX
TOMARPnll'

IT N
THET TAR3rS
GRAFT
'KTOS :
ds : r-
NE U
RONG1
GONE

) 'A-. A-

L
t

MHUillfi' rtUniMtMealMtikaaiiataMi

day" night when the Yankees lost
to Washington and shut out the
Kansas City Athletics Sunday, 5-0,
while the New York edged ne
Senators 3-2. Bill Fischer allow allowed
ed allowed Kansas City siXvhits and drove
in two runs. Andy arey's ninth ninth-inning
inning ninth-inning single scored Jerry Cole

man ana enaiwea imbw yors io
beat the seventh-place Senators
lor the first time in their latt five
meetings at Yankee Stadium
The Cincinnati Kecuegs made
some progress against a far big
ger jinx by shutting out tne Braves
b 0. behind the xive-hit pitching ot
Brooks Lawrence and Bob Thur-
man's hitting. It was only Cincin
nati's third triumph over Milwau
kee in 19 games this season.
The Cardinals scored a 10-inning,
3-2 victory over the Chicago Cubs
and advanced from third to sec
ond in the National League when
the New York Giants rallied to
deleat the Dodgers, 7-5. Brooklyn
now trails Milwaukee by seven
games.
Jim Buning's three-hit pitching,
backed by Al Kaiine and Dave
Philley homers, eased the Detroit
Tieers to a 6-1 victory over the
Cleveland Indians and the Balti
more Orioles edged the Boston
Red Sox, 2-1, in the other Ameri
can league, games, u e o r g e
Kell's two-out single scored Tito
Francona from second with Balti
more's decisive run in the bottom
of the ninth.
Bob Turley struck out 10 and
overcame a bit of poor defensive
support to snap Washington s mod
est victory string at Yankee Stadi Stadium.
um. Stadium. A single by Roy Sievers drove
in Washington's runs after Bob
Usher's high fly fell between
shortstop Gil McDougald and left
fielder Elston Howard for a doubU.
While Turley scored his 11th vic
tory. Chuck Stobbi relieved Tru
man LMvenger in- uifl sevantn ana
suffered hff l?th defest. $
The Redlegs"eat h Graves
for the first time In their last 10
meetings. Thurman backed Lawr
ence s good pitching by driving in
three of Cincinnati s first four runs
with a homer and double off Gene
Conley. Thurman has hit three
homers in four games since he
was recalled from Seattle of the
Pacific Coast League.
St. Louis edged the Cubs when
Wally Moon's 10th inning single
scored Don Biasingame. L.1 n d y!
McDafflel, fifth Cardinal pitcher,
was the winner.
Marking their last came in Eb-
bets Field as New York Giant.
manager Bill Rigney's men beat
the Dodgers with a five-run rally
....u 1 1 . 1 1 : l : i :
in me eveum, nuue mays nil on
29th homer of 'the year.
R I O
J5e.

Cinemascope!
MISTER CORY
with Tony Curtis
- Also: -THE
INCREDIBLE
SHRINKING MAN

TV

LnJ
DISGRACEFUL PENAL

AND-CRAB LOOPHOLE THAT ENGULFS

TAMIEVAH DOREtlfLOni fiELSOU

rVlaior Leaaue

Leaders
LEADING BATTERS
(Based on 350 official at bats)
Player and C G AB R H Pet.
MusiaL St. L. 121 468 75 159 .340
Mays, N.Yi 131 499 lQfr J.6T ,335
RobinsonjCin 125 511 81 .64 .321
Aaron. Mil. 125 514 98 .64 .319
Sch'ndienst,M. ,125 541 77 172 .318
Groat, Pitts 102 409 51 130 .318
Fondy, Pitts. 87 361 44 144 .316
Hodgesi Bk'-n 126 489 78 148 .303
Thomas, Pitts 127.500 63 151 -302
Cimoli; Dk'n '. 18 439 72 132 J01
- '''American' LBur':''
Mantle,'N.Y, 130 435 115 1B4 i.3770
WUliams, Bos. 121 402 87 151 .3756
Woodling,; Cle. 104 360 64 120 ,333
FOX. Chi, 130 512 85 JS.jm
BoyaV Bait 125,423 63 133 ,314
Skowroiu N.Y. ;15 427 54 138 ;.3il
McDougald.NY 121 46T 80 142 .304
Dobv. Chi. 107 383 S6J.16 .303
Sievers, Wash. 127 475 88 143 .301
Minoso, Chi. 128 473 84 141 .300
HOME RUNS
National Lugue
Aaron, Braves
Snider, Dodgers,
Banks, Cubs
Mays, Giants
Musial, Cards
38
34
30
29
29
American League
Mantle, Yankees
Sievers, Senators
Williams, Red Sox
Colavito, Indians
Maxwell, Tigers
34
34
33
23
23
RUNS BATTED IN
National League
Aaron, Braves
Musial, Cards
, Hodges, Dodgers
Mays, Giants
Crowe, Redlegs
American Ltagu
Sievers, Senators
Mantle, Yanks
Jensen, Red Sox
Minoso, White Sox
Skowron, Yanks
Wertz, Indians
108
97
87
87
.82
94
91
85
84
84
84
Pitching W L Pet.
(Basud on 11 decisions)
Schmidt, Cards 10. 1 .909
Donovan, White Sox 15 4 .789
Sanford, Phils 17 5 .773
Buhl, Braves 16 .727
Shantz, Yanks 10 4 .714
. ; M RUNS, TOO
5 Nsw'Tork (NEA-) In his first
18 attempts this season. Mickey
Mantle was thrown out stealing
second only three times.
Today Encanto .35, J20
Judy Hoiuaay in
"FULL OF
LIFE
Cornel WiWe In
"BEYOND MOMBASA"
in Technicolor!
Today IDEAL .20 .70
Double In Cinemascope I
Stewart Granger In
"BHOWANI JfUNCTION"
Edward G.1 Robinson In
"BIG LEAGUER"
VICTORIA
35e. 15e.
O D O N G O
In ClntmaScope I
- Also:
MIAMI
EXPOSED
20c
ABUSE! A uy

WtKmmKtKmwmw'mW'''ll' bIHbV

"'4JN

ShbMs Old-Time Maffic :'In; :iieteip$

Scintillation Cops

mass

3f;,':'5.::
Daniel : Cinlgllo's
ana hard-running
Sclritillafclon yesterday justified
the fans' faith in sending him
out the mutuels favorite by
haneinK on to score a half-
length victory in the $2,000 add
ed one tnlle and an eighth La-
dot uay classic ior mree-year-
olds ;t the President Rernon
racetrack.
Ruben Vasquez got Scintilla
tion off to a fast start and bid
ed his time in third place until
some three furlongs out where
he called on the colt. Scintilla
tion took command with two
furlongs left then had to go all
out to the finish line to horn on
the persistent challenges of
strong finishing Grand Finish:
Tiequest, a trailer for half the
distance, similarly wound up
with a rush, much too late, to
land third a length and one half
behind Grand Finish.
Canoe, which alternated with
Sera Buena and Ragazza In set setting
ting setting & fast pace, held on to save
fourth place and the shortest
end of the purse after Ragazza
and Sera Bueno quit. 1

Mag lie Regrets
To Pitch In

Buffalo Opens Vital 4-Game
Series With Toronto Today

NEW YORK, Sept. 2 (UP)
The Buffalo Bisons, boasting a
two-and-a-half game lead in the
International League, will meet
runner-up Toronto in a vital holi
day doubleheader today.
With only one week remaining
to the regular season race, the
four-game fries opening in roron
to could decide
this years
pen-
nant winner.
In Sunday's games, Buffalo
whipped ; Montreal, 8-0, while the
Leafs suffered a double defeat at
Rochester, 8-7 and 3-1. Miami de defeated
feated defeated Richmond, 8-1, In the sec second
ond second aama after droDnina the o-
pener, 5-2, and Havana edged
Columbus. 2-0. in other action.
Rocester, fighting for V fourth
place and the last playoff s p o t,
scored once in the 12th inning to
upset the Maple Leafs In the o
Mickey Retains
Lead Over Ted
In Bat Race
NEW YORE, Sept. t (UP)
Mickey Mantle and Ted Wil Williams
liams Williams both flopped In pinch pinch-hitting
hitting pinch-hitting roles Sunday, leaving
Mantle an eyelash ahead in
the battle for the American
League batting title.
Mantle, bothered by leg troa troa-ble,
ble, troa-ble, filed out In his only at at-bat
bat at-bat as a pinch-swinger for the
Yankees against the Senator
and dropped to .3770. Wil Williams,
liams, Williams, kept out of the Red Sox
starting lineup by a chest
cold, struck oat in his lone
appearance against Baltimore.
Here's how the red-hot race
stands i
G AB R H Pet.
Mantle lit 435 115 164 .3771
Williams r ltl m t7 1S1 4756
v

"FUNNY FACE":
I 1 1 11 I I II .III

Tb meet lav1(i and reportedly the meet nifety desipied and pbetecraphed
eat t eeme eat Tunny Fare" marks the firrt idtaginr and dancing raiie far MiM Hepberi
as she portrays a eookish Greenwich Yllager wtte ia tranafermed int e world-famed md md-:
: md-: eL See this wonderfnl pictere end marreleos new kind H entertainaunt In "FUNNY
PACE" which OPENS ON WEDNESDAY 4th AA THE CENTRAL.

ic In Thrilling Windup

consistent! Scintillation tunrned the nine
Irish coltlfurlongs ia the good time of

1:54 1-5 over a slowed un track.
The big bay son of Lurnlnary, Lurnlnary,-Villalny
Villalny Lurnlnary,-Villalny paid $3.60 win and $2.60
place.. Money Maker's $10.20 and
Lanero's 410 were the day'jj best
win odds as favorites again, dpm
inated the card. .
Unbeaten: Santurron 'Chalked
up his. fourth "victory while, the
native sensation Janina won
ner tentn r. consecutive race.
Braulio Baeza rode both San
turron and janina and also
scored aboard Best to share top
riding honors with Vasquez who
aiso won: inijee, f
The dividends:
v ';
FIRST RACE
1 Dun $3.80, $2.80.
2 Persiflage $3.60.
- SECOND RACE
1 Hostigador $2.60, $2.20.
2 Bonifacio $3.40.
: First Double $5.20
THIRD RACE
1 Tanganica $9, $3.40.
2 Currita $2.80.
One-Two: $22
pener. Ed Stevens hits a two-run
homer in the nightcap to provide
the winning margin for Gary
Blaylock.
Jim Coates won his 13th game
of the season forRichmond in the
opener but .Miami came back with
six quick runs in the first inning
to clinch the nghtcap for Howe
J udson The -i Marlins are now 1 in
a fourth place wie with Bocneater

while Richmond is setUed in thirdleaNati0naIlaKue pres

nlace.
Havana kept alive its playoff
hopes as Pat Scantlebury set back
the last-place Jets on eight hits.
The Sugar Kings are a game-and
a-ahlf out of fnurlh place.
The standings:
Team
w
83
81
L
61
64
70
75
76
77
79
80
Pet..
.576
.559
.521
.483
.483
.473
.455
.452
GB
Buffalo
Toronto
Richmond
Miami
Rochester
Havana
Montreal
Columbus
2V4
76
70
71
69
66
66
8
13tt
13
15
17W
18
Red China Alhleles'
Admission To U. S.
Not Yel Decided
WASHINGTON, Sept. 2 (UP)
The question whether Red Chinese
athletes will be permitted to en enter
ter enter this country in order to com compete
pete compete in the Winter Olympic- Game
at Squaw Valley, Calif., has not
yet been decided, State Depart
ment officials said today
The department is understood to
be preparing a letter saying that
the United '.States will not discri discriminate
minate discriminate against athletes of other
nations, subiect to U.S. laws.
But officials pointed out this
does not mean the bars are being
lowered lor the Red Chinese Ath
letes. They said that the law as it
now stands ban the admission of
communists to this country except
under waiver provisions.
The sources said that seven A A-merican
merican A-merican Olympic officials and one

Labor pay

FOURTH RACE
1 Black Bee $3, $2.20.
2 La Gazia Ladra,$2.40.
Q&iniela: $4.60
FIFTH RACE
1-lSanturron $2.40. $2.20.
2 Batallon $2.20.
f
I SIXTH RACE
1 Lanero $10, $4.60.
2 Genizarito $6.
SEVENTH RACE
1 Best $4, $3.40.
2-Oliver $26.20.
Second Double; $21.40
Wpt1 v -.
EIGHTH RACE
1 Money Maker $10.20, $3.40.
2 Le Matelot $2.60.
Quiniela; $8.60 :
NINTH RACE
1 Scintillation $3.60, $2.60,
2 Grand Finish 45-60. 1
One-Two: $22.60.
TENTH RACE
1 Melendei $3.60, $2.40.
2 Bacanclto $3,20. V v t
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Janina (excluded from bet
ine).
2 Marcelita $3. $2.20.
3 Rioui $2.20, ;
NEW YORK. Sept. 2 (UP
Sal Maglie: newest member, of
the pennantbOund ,: New 1 York
Yankees, regrets very much that
he is ineligible to. pitch,. hi. the
world; series.;, -,:
But the reason for that situa situation
tion situation is, ft tribute to the -respect
the National League haa' for this
40-year-oia curve bail artist, i
MagHe, acquired by the Yan Yankee
kee Yankee Sunday for. an i estimated
$30,000 and two minor' league ;
players to be delivered next
spring, cannot pitch m the se seriesif
riesif seriesif the Yankees make it-M
because the deal was complet-'
ed after the midnight Aug 31
- deadline. t, J J ..
.The Dodgers5 would'' n'cf"f lei
tige.' it Magile ever, beat tne na
tional League entry m the se
rles, other club owners and gen
eral managers would never for
give Vice-President Buzzy. Baya-
si of the Dodgers. -The act tf
giving the, domineering Yankees
a pitcher of Magne's craft, com
petttiveness and e x p e rlence
would be regarded as the worst
kind of double-cross to the rest
of the National League.
So the Yankees have to be
content with having Maglie
for the last month of the reg
ular season where he can lend
his talents to manager Casey
Stengel's' somewhat spotty
pitching staff. And in the
meantime, the erafty "Bar "Barber"
ber" "Barber" can provide Stengel with
the most authoritative "book"
available on how to pitch to
the Milwaukkee Braves or
any other club that wins the
National League pennant.'
"Sure. I'm sorry I'm Jiot eliid-
ble for the series," Maglie said
as he put on his Yankee unl
fornl for the first' time yester
day. Td have loved to pitch in
anqther series. But what can you
do? "You certainly can't com
plain about being traded to the
xanxees.
Squaw Valley games.
American reporter are being an
proved for travel to Communist
Bulgaria for the forthcoming
meeting of the International Olym-j
pie Committee. The seven officials
are l.o.c. President Avery urun urun-dage;
dage; urun-dage; J. Lyman Bingham, execu executive
tive executive secretary of 'the U.S.: Olym Olympic
pic Olympic Committee; one other I.O.C.
official; and four officials of the

Ineligibility
World Series

.::.(.!. .. . : .n.'.y...

Editors CONRAOO SARCEANT

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tea mi
W L Pet.
79 49 ',617
73 ,56.-568
73 57 ,562
GB
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Brooklyn
Philadelphia
Cincinnati
'7
14
.4V4
18V4
29
30Vi
66
64 '.508
65
63
64
70
77
.504
.474
.389
.380
New York
Chicago
Pittsburgh
49
49'
Philadelphia at Brooklyn (2)
Pittsburgh at New York-12)
St. Louis at Cincinati,2)' i
Milwaukee atChicago 2)
" Yisterdv's- Results
Milwaukee 000 000 000 0 ". 5 0
Cincinnati 202 002' 00x-6 12 0
Conley (8-8). PhiUins. Jolly and
Rice. '- '..
Lawerehce ; (13-il-and Burgess.
St. Louis! 1,- 000 200 000 1-3 6 i0
Chicago '-000 000 020 A 2 9 0
Jones,; Mufiett, Li McDaniel (12-,
o), mueui'. mejTuv ana Xianarnn.
Smith. ., "'. :,-vr;
Prott, Lown (5-6), Littlefield and
weeman. :. ; .... ..
New York 1 000 101 5007 14
Brooklyn 020 000 0035 7
Crone (7-7), Grissom and Thom
as. j 'iv.. -"-J
Podres (10-7) Bessent, Koufax
and Campanella.
-' ;-'
" (First OameJiw V
Pittsburgh 000 030 000 8 f S3
Philadelphia 230 213 00x 11 15
Purkey (10-13), King. Arroyo,
awanson and rones."
Roberts (9-13) and Lopata, Lon-
neu. i '
(Second Came)
Pittsburgh 010 004 001 6 .0 2
Philadelphia 100 100 0103 9 3
Douglas (2-2), Face and Peter
son.
Simmons (11-11); FarrelL Miller.
Hearn and Lonnett, Seminickv Lo
pata. i
Maglie To Be Last
.A
Player To Perlcrm
t f
For All 3 NY Clubs
. NEW : YORK, Sept. 1 (UP)
sat Mague, purchased yesteraay
by the New York Yankees, is the
17th and probably the last play
er to wear the uniforms of all
three New York major league
teams during his career.
With the Giants already, headed
toward San Francisco next sea season
son season and the Dodgers possibly head headed
ed headed for Los Angeles,' future players
won't be able to follow Sal's trail.
Others who "touched all t h e
bases" here were: 1
Casey Stengel, Leo Durocher,
Charley Dressen, Waite H o y t,
Rosey Ryan, Burleigh Grimes, Bo Bo-bo
bo Bo-bo Newsom, Johnny Allen, Zach
Taylor, Ernie Krueger, Jack Doyle
Pete Kilduff. Fred Merkle. Tony
Lazzen, Lonnie Frey, and Lefty
Ufoui, j
Baltimore Orfoles
Buy Dizzy Trout
BALTIMORE, Md., Sept. 3 -(UP)
The Baltimore Orieles
today announced the purchase ef
veteran right handed pitcher
Paul (Dizzy) Trout from their
Vancouver farm club ef the Pa Pa-Clle
Clle Pa-Clle Coast League. .' .'
Treut, who Is 42 veers, eld
signed with Vancouver a week
ego after being out of baseball
for five years. He retired at the
end ef the 151 tnason t tak
Showing at Ybur Senricv
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
Scott Brady ' ; ,.
Joan Vohe
TERROR AT mDmOBTZ
Tuesday "Bad Day At Black
Keck" '- '"

CRISTOBAL Roc Hudson Dana Wynter
A-dondiUoned "SOMETHING OF VALUE"
7:00 p.n. Tneeday "FIVE STEPS TO PAWGCT'

B A P. -v A Air-Conditioned
Al O J-rV2.30 4:30 6.30

ftA sMftaP)fof 0ftttt
V- i Z 4 r

Uiill Success Spall Uccrtimntsr?
' Tuesday -WICKED AS THET COMT ?

PARAISO 6:19 I:1J
AniU Ekberg
"BACK FROM ETTTRNTTT
CAMP BIERD
6:1S 7:55

. . f '. ,. i" i. M v ,:c

.,,- i 1 j ml I

AMERICAN LEAGUI ;
Teams
W
L Pet.
New. York,
Chicago
Boston v-'
Detroit
Baltimore -Cleveland
Washington
Kansas City
83
77
68
65
62
63
50
47;,638
52 .597
61 .527
66 .484
68
79
t481 2014
50 80
.385
33
Todiv'i Ginuii
Chicago at Detroit (2)
Kansas City at Cleveland. 2)
New York at Baltimore .(2) t
Washington at Boston (-2)"C
m v., V,,,rt,y'',Ru .:
Washington 000 O00 200--2 ".'. 1
New York 100 001' 001-3 9 0
C.!evenger, Stobbj j(7-18) a n d
Berberet. v
Turley (11-5) and Berrs'.r''
Chicago 000 310 010 S
Kansas .City ooo 000 OOOfl.
6 ,1
6 2
riscner .t-i) and Lollari, ,
, Urban (4-3), Trucks and.Thomp-
Boston
Baltimore -Fornieles
Whiter
000 100 OOOJ-1 -6 1
000 001 0012 8 1
(8-13) and Daley,
Moore (10-11) and" Ginsberg.
Detroit 010 000 2306 3 j:
Cleveland 000 001 000 1 3 l
I Running (,6-7) aiidorter..
NarlesKi. (8-3), .Tomanek and He
g9n,.Naragan. a
Carib Basketball
Federation Said
To Be In Making

Mly HIRBERT MOIft k l
Through the efforts of the Na- ',
tional Basketball Federation mt P. :

rnamavand several sportminded in- 1

uiviauais in MexKot ruerto Rico,
and Oiba, a 'CaribbeanJ Basketball" i
Federation is in the making. T
Panama's delegate, 'Capt. Luis1-"
A.. Seelira. left vesterdav lav Puer

to Rico where the first meeting is -being
held, prior to the formation'
of this international federation.
Should the federation become a'-
reality.' it will mean that local Jma

will get to see once' every four,
years, teams from Mexico. Puer -.
to1 Rico and Cuba playing here in
Panama. This will be a federitinm

similar to the one for professional -baseball.
The only difference here
is that Venezuela is included m
baseball but not in basketball, ,-which
which ,-which will include Mexico.

t -1 i -
This move is one of the man
discussed by the-raembers of the
National Federation at its last
meeting. Among the other 'item r
discussed were the presentation of
the Harlem Globetrotters and f a'
iroposea lour-team series here in,
anama. The Trotters are schedul

ed to. be here in October and all'

affairs will be bandied by the Fed-,
erationv v ','. -' ' -The
proposed series;will kiVe,
four teams meeting here in- Pa Panama
nama Panama City. The teams ate.. Fort
Clapton Cavalier!, a team from
Call, Colombia, the runner-up team '
in the Panama Provincial League
and the champion Marlboro team.
Details for this series have not yet v
been worked on. At the next feden-f
ation meeting team representatyes: 'u
will be invited to plan the proposed
series.... .... v-.-V'H'..-?fr- ti ;

e ob as a beeba breedcaster I
after spending H 'soatoni with i
Detroit and the Bftton Red Sex.
Center Theatre Today
MARGARITA :1S f:SS ';,
Phil SUvera' : -if
"TOP A1AKA, " : '"'
Color I "-,
Tneeday "Texas Lady
Air-Conditioned
0ata4JaTccVif
lUftliWlljALL,,
SANTA CRUZ 6:11 7:M
"Dewoeradoe Are In Town"
"GIRL CA.VT HELP IT"

'-v

Joen rontaine Dana Andrewr
ETONT A REASONABLE DO CRT

14V4..
IS
20-

! ''



it
fit V

i 1
, v i v ' 1 (
HK PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT 1AILT NEWSPAPER
HONDAT, SEPTEMBER t, 1957
PAGE SEVEN

NM Race F

COMPLETING TH2 PICTUnO

- r : n kv.rv- r

In lO Days-

: jtiMtW-"5 aW ? ft SSli JaJ

i Dari Daniel;

ffim Norrii' icvert and a u i t e

senous ;tttct oi food poisoning

Mondy -evening very likely saved

til ,mid4lew4ignMHnampifiDanip
fieht beiweeik Bay Rcbinson .and

Carmen Banlio, ae( iac Sept 23

in. unite ,iaQiunv, i ,t'.

Early ilnthe afternoon, Robin

Mn,r .who With Norm bad gone
through an exciting bearing on
cloied-eircuit televiMon issuei be

fore the .Boxing Commission, an-

nouncea mat 11 were were any

telecasunn lie would not go on

Later; Kar .caued worns and

asked lor. a conference. B e f ore

this talk could, get started, "Norris
became severely ill, apparently

from having eaten, a sandwich of

contaminated corned beef.

As Norris was being removed

to St. Clare's Hospital Robinson

shook bis band, and said Don't

worry v Jim. We will mske every

thini all right.; Wr win work It

it w It Is presumed that
there will b imw serf ef cem
premiss n4 .Mm battle will a

Just 'what sort of deal Ray had
in mind when-he asked for that
conference late Monday, he. would
not reveal; "He said he would re

sume light training,; and remain

in5 New! York. vV. 4 ...i

!w6UL0 DIPIND SANS TV.
' "i M X vi." Sj'i '''''.
Tim was when professional box boxing
ing boxing concerned itself ; exclusively

wilhthe-fieht The matched pair

wanted to know, where, and howl

much. Nowadays the contest it
quite secondary. There are what
are called "ancillary rigrts," hav

ing to do with splitting the swag.
There, are television and radio
revenues, motion picture splits and
other details- of high finance
which stress .legalistic maneuver maneuvering
ing maneuvering over the left book. That's why
boxing is in the dumps.
' Asaisting. in the obsequies of the
game are tactics Such as Robin Robinson
son Robinson adopted in his dupute with;
Norris. .- ;
, i, v J -r: ".'
' Afters sming Iff on the hearing

conducted by Julius Heuand, chair
man of the Boxing Commission,

tad Jamea A. .Farley Jr. mad
Frank Souhan.' his associates, on

Robinson's closed circuit televi

sion hassle with the IBC I came

away with the impression that Ray

didn't Wish to- fight on Sept. 23.
Korris' seizure may have changed
bis attitude.
. i :
Having let Ms apical U the
iMimiiia .tt frc Mwrit
. abanaan hh catract4 4al with
' TMittr TV H (hift Ttt
friiipHr Hr ctxd circuit
, t". -.- . v

presentation ef the fight In m
. vie hewses, Kebinten staMd that
he would defend hit title with

,out awyte4avisiM naet tlk V

Helf and .-had. announced fair
and just decision -which gave con consideration
sideration consideration to the" public and to
Challenger Basilio, who was toTgct
only 20 per cent of the. gravy, as

gauiivu lor ay a,
1 '.

."The commission is not empow
ered to settle contractual disoutei

between fighter, and promoter

Helf and said. "Robinson, you are

oroereu 10 aeiena your utie

gainst uasmo. as you have con

traded to do. biit this commission

does not preclude the possibility

vi vour uisuiuung a iuii, alter me

tignu against the IBC in the mat

ter. 01 the closed circuit con

tracts.'! But Sugar Ray Would not

nave u mat way. He had been

fighting for a $250,000 personal

guarantee irom Xeieprompter.

' By JIMMY BRESLIN
NEW YORK (NEA)1 On Aug.
4, the National League race was
a simple' scramble. Cincinnati was
in first place, v with Milwaukee,
Brooklyn- and St. Louis close e e-nough
nough e-nough to be partners. Only Phila Philadelphia,
delphia, Philadelphia, six and a half games out
in fifth place,, showed any ; signs
that it would not be around lor
what was shaping up at a wild

finish.

Ten days later, people in Mil

waukee were wondering just hpw
much that empty guestroom up upstairs
stairs upstairs might, bring fromaa World

Series customer.

,Th Bravas beat the Dodgers on
Aug; 4 Thea they heat Cincinnati
three "tims and St. Louis three

times.-Then Chicago tossed Moe
Drahowsky.- Dick Droit and Bob

Rush at the Cardinals7 and took
three irt a row.' In New York,: the

Giants decided -4ft. but together

winning streak and they- beat the
Dodgers -five out of seven.

So as ired Hanev brought ms

athletes east, i he found himself

with the kind; of lead which, he

read in." the papers daily, only
miracle could overcome. ;

Evewbody e'.se 1 interested in

baseball took it for granted that

the, race, was, over.

But' Hanay 1a$ thr ideas. "It

happened' he says.; "in a little

over a week. It was the strangest
thing you'd ever want to see and
nobody has given me a gurantee

it can't happen again. Although

I'm highly in favor ox things re

maimng as they are."

mmmmmmmmm?!mmTZmm!7?,
-Ariel 1 It Could Happen Agam

' " '- 1 "". 1 1 .". H I 11.. '.' 11 I 'I ..( 1.1 1 1 I )li i'i I. r i, -i.ii'n-'t i' In, '. t,(,i,i..i .)
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I WELL-BALANCED m Podoley does a handstand sifter being tripped by San Fra.netaeo'8 KjT SY 'A3 Vnil'fi MlfF? IKl

4 Jim Rldlon (No. 42). Dicky Moegle (No. 47). : I NAAVjTr! JsJ uj

The obvious is, of course, to

bring up the Bobby. Thomson
home tun' which turned back
(Brooklyn in 1951. But Haney goes
beyond that tale. Instead, he talks
of how this year's race, seeming

ly settled in one short stretch,

could be flipped around again, ur.

with a shudder, what it took for

the Philhes to win in 1950.

Pros Don H Rate On Scrapbooks,

So Podo ley Gets Heavy Credit

Miiiii

1

CHAMPIONSHIP,' j

inwwiiv HAT

After ordering Robinson to live

up to his contract. Helf and men mentioned
tioned mentioned probable reprisals if Ray

taiiea to meet Basiuo, who, up

to that time, bad not figured at

all in the proceedings except as

a. name deep in, the background.

The commission 'chief said that

Ray defaulted, there would be
move to shift the title to fiasl-

"... .... 7 4...
: i i- , .1
Whereupon Rebinsori Who had
mad a-pctacular thawing as
an artuftar aad had taken tha

play awiy fram hit lawyer; last
hit haad, hit tamper and hie

fartntic advantage. Jf threat
nad t two the cammiuloM. the
IIC, at al, wt el, their attlf Heat,
thalr htlrs, ta have and to hold,
ta wh- .. V

"You can't take away my mid

dleweight championship," shouted

EoDinion. - .; ,-.,

. V -' .... "" -. r-

uuite true, uuet nave to be won

and lot --iD the ring. Robinson

could tie uo the 160-cound Cham

pionship Indefinitely. For the com

mission to attempt to read him
out of the title would be futile.
In the. meantime. Robinson Is

dead wrong in his assumption that

any boxing championship if the
exclusive property of the bolder.
All titles beWg to the public:
They are givea- to recognized
championi to hold for the public
good and the furtherance ot. the
welfare of boxing. i

: fOR Y0U2 HIGH-BAll i:i3IST ..'

ctwayjcn CANADA DRY
:"il!-h-D:i"wiuian:d3b
ijFcd-D:!!''-

The Whit Kids of that year
were a shoo-in a 'they, entered
September With a big lead. As the
month ended, they were a nervous
pack of large young mn watch

ing a -: night professional football
game at the Polo Grounds to help
kill the hours before they had to
put their; one game lead on the
Une, against Brooklyn the .next

day the last of the season at

Ebbets Field. They finally won it

on a nome run oy vick sisier jn
the 10th. But the Phillies were

still shaking after losing tix games

to the Giants and nearly all of

their, once-awesome lead.

Yw Im tiniti so' auickly

sometimes." Haney says, "that
one minute people are Asking you
for World Series tickets and the
next they are patting your back
and "saying, too bad, looked like
you had it. I wish he race was

over rght now, like everybody
tells me it is. But we1 tot this

lead so. fast It makes you think."
Hhis was no steady, expected

rise on Milwaukee's part, as the
records show. Take Cincinnati, for

-example. Their weak pitching had

gotten Uiem through three and a

half months. So birdie Tebbetts

was chioper and assumed it would

carry through to the end, v

By HARRY GRAYSON

SAN FRANCISCO (NEA ) Jim
Podoley gives early Judications oi
liping up to the fine old tradition
of small college players making
good in the professional ranks.
Starting his first game for the
Washington Redskins, an exhibi exhibition
tion exhibition against the? '49erS in Saa Fran Francisco,
cisco, Francisco, Podoley took a pass from
Eddie LeBaron good for 52 yards,
putting the bajl oh, the four-yard
line and t setting up. Washington's
first touchdown. A pitch from Fred
die Wyant to Podoley was good
for 24, placed the ball on the three
and paved thY. way ,for another
score. When Wyant was trapped
on the Redskins' three, late in the

going, Podoley came back to meet
the play. Wyant hit him 'with a
nass and he zig-zagged to mid mid-field;
field; mid-field; ;
Until now, the only time most
have heard of Podoley if ever
was as a decathlon man.

That's because outside of the
school's immediate area no one
pays much attention to Central
Michigan College football. As re remarkable
markable remarkable as the six-foot-two. 200 200-pound
pound 200-pound Podoley was, he could not
grab headlines. A halfback, he had
extr aordin ary, perform ancesagains
such as Eastern Illinois State, Il Illinois
linois Illinois State Norml, Northern Il

linois Stte Southern Illinois
Western Illinois State and Michi

gan State Normal. But you don't

In one slide, he wound up a dis

turbed, .almost sullen man who

railed'at his. athletes and slapped

curfews on them it they retched

deficit of over 14 It met. It wis

the time -for Fred Hutchinson of
St; Louis; One dty thin at were

fineHfr had hitting and hit pitch

ing was spectacular-at timet.
ThenfocTtui dayt against seventh

place Chicago his ieamdidnt hit

a -Ml! squarely. He seeme out of

it SM.OC wuian c supply- a Tea
oo..'Vi i-J---fc- ? C -. I

Clem I-at-Jne 4tadnT been doinel

the Job for Walter AUton rigblj

from the start, but the Brooklyn

manager otuck with him. H stay

ed w(lr aging Carl Fuytjlo io
right He used Pe Wee Reese and
Roy Campanell and the rest of
his Ccreaking vterBt. ; And he
still wat no more than a game,
threat at the mint, .out of first

placed He, too, felt his club would
hold- an. Tbfi even-body ttoDoed

at once and Brooklyn teemed out

of it. . .

Hawey. who" 'received iH "the

benef, remembers this too clear

ly. ; 'Too suick" asyi,- "Too
o,uick to get excited over."

CHICAGO (NEA1 One of foot-

btll's 1956 glamour boys has got gotten
ten gotten the big head ... snoots co-work-

ers.ind is endangering nis imure

with the pros by flaunting training

rules.

Riiaranteed to too the Fatter-

son-Rademacher joust the locker

room prawi featuring au omr
tackles Earl Uggett and ,Carl
Vercjn... Leggett won by a TKO.

Pontific Pete Rademacher did

hit best telling job in the south

. attracted so mucn interest tnai
bew of iouthern Writers made

the lont trek to Seattle for

the Auc: 22 fight. . and now

that one amateur's gotten into thel

act, umaa. imeresia are unei
the Patterson interests $300,000 for
a Havana meeting another kid
who's never had a pro fight. .
This will probably be Frank
Gifford's last year in football...
the Hollywood setup's getting too
enticing for him- financially to
transplant hit family again ...
For the TV millions who thought
they 'heard Bob Pellegrini paying
tribute to his 'dog"-when he ac accepted
cepted accepted the MVP award at the All All-Star
Star All-Star game, the Maryland alumnus
was reslly thanking hia dad...who
is currently in Genoa. Italy .

aeema when bod was a college
soph, .his father was. laid off in

the mines of western Pennsylva

nia, and the kid wanted to quit
school to help out ... pop said no,
and Bob made a vow that from

his first pro grid contract would

ome a trip to his native oenoa
for the elder Pellegrini
All for nothing: those twin foot

ball-player who got Auburn in
hot recruiting water couple of sea

sons back re now at .Tulsa... .and
nothing to write home about-.

'CIA IaJ

Pete Ridemacher

hear of these schools, so Podoley
will have to be introduced througn
play in National Football League
All-Americas habitually cannot

mane.
Pro coaches and scouts watch

ed young Podoley since his fresh

man year and not because of his

versatility in track or basketball

sharpshooting.

He is not as polished as Olllc

Matson of the, Chicago Cardinals,
but possesses nearly as much
speed and has the. same gangling
stride, "He's our guy-on punt and
kick-off returns' says Washington

coacn joe junancn.

Podoley. one-man track team.

has done the 100 in 9.6, the 220 in
20.9, the high hurdles in 14.5. the

lows in 23.4 and broad jumped 23

teet ji v incnes.
His football record was more in

teresting to George Preston Mar

shall. He scored 54 times from mid

field or longer and 10 from 75
yards or more hiking hit average

touchdown rnn to; a phenomenal

42 yards. He averaged 7.9 yards
per carry in ,352 tries. HV scored
four touchdowns against a' Great
Lakes Na vat Training Station team
loaded with pros. u ;
A long line of remarkable play players
ers players have crashed the money ranks
from institutions who do not play
high pressure football. End Bar Bar-Ion
Ion Bar-Ion Hill of the Chicago (Bears came
out of Florence, Ala., State teach teachers
ers teachers to be 'elected hy. National
League players as the -player-of
the-year and winner of the first
Jim Thorpe trophy presented by
NEA Service. Perry Jeter, who

Deai tne rittsourgn steelers for
the Bears with a 73-yard dash the
the other evening, performed for
California Poly. Garry Click,

standout defensive back, was the

Steelers' surprise bonus pick out

of Colorado A. and M. Ted Wegert,
who lugs leather for the Philadel

phia Eagles, did not attend col college.
lege. college.

Podoley, as far as sports fans

are. concerned, never went to- col

lege, either. But the professionals
feel he is well accredited. For
some reason, they like muscles

over clippings nasted in scran-

books.

Lou Viscusi, the mastermind be behind
hind behind the Rcy Harris push for the
title, is sitting on another heavy-

THE UMPIRE

; MAKING IT BI6
Milwaukee (NEA V- The Braves
draw 1.009,952 fias in their first
four tram i Mrwauke almost
double that of ttv next highest Na Na-t'or.l
t'or.l Na-t'or.l Leseue club for that period,

the ixxsgers. j

' ,Bv BEANS REARDON

QUESTION: The batter swings

at a third strike; misses, and the

ball then hits him: la he-ntitledJ

to first base or must the catcher
tag him out or what? Bob

Porenrin. . . .V.-

Answer He is automatically out
' Q. With, a fast .runner on first

the-batter, -a slow footed man.

lines' to the third baseman. The

fielder; deliberately drops the ball.

then throws to second. He clearly

did t lu oraer to have the slow

man on base. Do umpires allldw

uus 7 Jerry wiuiams.

A. No. The batter is automati

cally out ana the runner remains
on first t 1 ; :.
Q. The runner from third heads
home with the pitcher's motion.
The bitter foul tips the ball. The
catcher oolds it, but it too lite
putting hi tag on the runner
Isn't tUs the same case as a foul
ball ard th runner returns to
third?-Paul Deiti.
A. No.' a foot tip is not p!ayed
is a loid ball, so the runner is,
safe beta.

weight in his entourage he doesn't

dare turn loose on the Cut and

Shoot scrapper ... for fear the un

known would pierce the Harris
ballyhoo bubble with 'a short, right

to tne cnin.
Bear players are less than hap

py tiiat Dr. Bill McCoU can delay
reporting in their training camp
to devut-e time to his medical work

... while they're broiling and foil foiling
ing foiling for free..

Harry Grayson escorted the Pat

terson camp hallway to beatue

prompting Floyd to recall another

ride with the lapel-grabbing sports

ed... after beirtg jabbed on the

shoulder and ribs for 30 minutes,

while Grayson drove home his

point, Floyd finally turned and
whispered. "This guy's hit me

more in half an hour than my last

40 ooDcnents. ...

It wouldn't take much to wheedle

Jim Tatum away from North Ca

rdlina .. where he operates in the

shadow of basketball...

. The 95lb birthday of Amos Alon-

zo S'aei recalls that one of his

last innovations as a head foot

ball crach was the P -dinner forma formation
tion formation it Cof.ige of the Pacific ...
the. forerunner of today's flank

ers, split ends and slot menand
he tailback oar his bowing-out '46
team ws a 16-year-old kid who's
still pitching them Eddie LeBaron
of the Red?kihs.-
Suspended Phil Dickens of In In-duna
duna In-duna won't even be allowed to

watchi praence,' view, game mOA.
rlat as h sir rf 1 m aavi4 k ika mi K mm M

w IV v wu vaa vovui .i
while collecting. full year's tala
rv .: :

Mir. ToDin Koie louna out t-

bout the trade which tent her hus

band from Green (Bay to tha- Lions,

via a ohone call from Detroit.. but

wouldn t believe it "Until she asked
a friend, "Who's this fellow, Par Parker?"
ker?" Parker?" tEuJdv. tobin'l new coa"h

until hit recent resignation, who
made the call) ...

Bet'-cea you n ie. midwest

sources expect the Big Ten to lead
a movement away from the NCAA
in the interest d go-it-alone TV..

BUT WHY WAIT?

When at

TAHITI

you will

find just the ring to please, you.
You will find not larger selection in town.
EASY CREDIT TERMS
ARRANGED TO SUIT-YOU.
LUCKY WINNERS IN OUR FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE

Telms. d Cracia
Patrick Stanton
Carmtla d Boyd
Erasmo. Arias
Aurora Pabido
Anita B. dt Ford
Chela da Boyd

Aura da Medina
John George Weiss.
Griselda Valdes
Charles Hini r
Mary Louise Zeyen
Dr. N, Cvriio ;
Margery Icke

: v FREE M

WE CIVE'V" 1
a v-.J r 4. .11 t t 'lm

Chico" AeXfRO. STAMPS T001

DOUBLE tHECK YOUR SALES SLIP
IF YOU HELD Na 2 YOU WON

TAHITI

THE JEWELRY STORE
18-47 Central Ayehui (f37) '

The Store Where You Double YourrMooeyvlee

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AGEKCIAS COSMOS, S. A.
. a.

TEL 1-4721 :

.

Al
.

3

.' J



v

"
1
J
.V
"THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER "" V
PAGE EIGHT
""".-"MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1957
CLASS IF I D S
' THIS SPACE JS FOR SALE
FOR ifflrbRMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
V. this space is for sale
' ?FOR INFORMATION -TELEPHONE 2-6740' ..

I

V
1
1

FOR RENT: New chalet. I
bad room t. Irving-dining room
maid room, porch and garage.
Corner Paseo Cineuentenario
and 7th Ave. Coco dal Mar (San
Francisco) Tol. 3005.
Resorts
PHILLIPS Oeoanaido Cottages
Santa Clara. Son 1890 Pane Pane-ma,
ma, Pane-ma, R. da P. Phono Panama
3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673.
J, FOSTER'S COTTAGES and larga
: loach Homo. Phono Balboa
J 2830, nina to twelve won, Mon Mon-day
day Mon-day through Friday.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT-Spaao fo :icr.
Compania do Soguro building in
Campa Alegra. Air conditioned,
elevator, claanarman, big apace
far parking 26 M2. Tel 1-0136.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Clean furnished
room in bait residential lection.
Cooking fiellltiei. 43rd Street
No. 13.
Democratic Digest
Calls Eisenhower
Indecisive Leader
WASHINGTON, Sept. 2 (UP) (UP)-The
The (UP)-The Democratic Digest pictured
President Eisenhower yesterday as
shifting between the roles of "con
stitutional monarcn ana a com
promising" indecisive leader.
The Digest gummed up the
President's first six months of his
second term as "months of waver wavering
ing wavering leadership in the Whte
House." i
The Dlgett, official publication
of the Democratic National Com
Sittee, accused Eisenhower of a
"dual (approafhta hia job.
"At dmee Jnreimi, ttTprafer
the role cat the constitutional mon monarch,
arch, monarch, a .aortof benevolent king
dressed In a ouble-breaited busi business
ness business ault, ,
At other Him, At Digest said,
he is the "moderate, compromis compromising
ing compromising leader who -caries his ability
to see both sides of the question
to the point where vacillation and
indecision become the distinguish distinguishing
ing distinguishing feature of his leadership."
Federal Area 4
l
ACBOM
51 Solar disk
t rmtMt Jit Social insects
w nirt-t-t 3 Abo
oCDcttrietot
Columbia ts
the American
Beauty
Sit motto ts
N-Juetloa to
iMIasbe
. of the
ti Small children
DOWN
! Log Boat
J Derived
from oi)
River
4 Eternity
8 Device for Jk
signaling 1
Crippled If
1 Victim of
ttSipgiBC
18 Now
- leprosy
8 The sun
Click-beetle
10 Military
assistants
11 Driven
obliquely
port
1 14 Hodgepodge
j IS Polypody
I II Ampere (ab.)
j IT To charge
j It Cravat
IS Apostles'
I SI Scatter
i 12 Billiard stroke
4Getaip
: 3 Males
1 17 Weight of
1 India
ttPerWef
i tup;
0 Depot fab )
. 31 Colt Mac her
jUSeaoAgie
i II OoUaaMind
1 84 Froxas water
i 3f Analyae a
' sentence
t St Sharp and
! harsh
! 40 Male aheep
1 41 Befinninf
i 41 Knock
i 45 Ledf or entry
47 Bustle
! 41 Solicitude
; 44 Trial
M Knave a
' elube

GLIDDEN PANAMA, S. A.

. Phone
3-7711

MANAGER

Apartments

ATTENTION. 0. I.I Jest built
modern furnished apartments, 1,
2 bedrooms, hot. cold watar.
Phono Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Furnithad or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartmonf.' 13th atraot
(new number 90th atroat) No.
1 6., Via Porrai. Phone 3-2457.
FOR RENT: Cool furnithad
apartment to couple without
vithout children, $65.00. Via
Portal No. 120, beiide Roeievolt
Theatre. Overlooking SAS Com Commissary.
missary. Commissary. Phona 3-5024, I V
FOR RENT: Apartment, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, screened, Via Porraa 56,
$60.00. Kay apartment 7, call
Tel. 2-2316, 3-0234.
FOR RENT: At El Cangrcjo.
Modern apartment, 2 bedrooms,
hot water installation, garage.
Phono 3-1043.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Screened military inspect inspected,
ed, inspected, one and two bedroom, Auto Automobile
mobile Automobile Row No. 36.
FOR RENT: Beautifully, dec-,
orated studio apartment f com com-pletly
pletly com-pletly furnished, including util utilities.
ities. utilities. Hot water, elevator, parking
apaca. Will acomodato a couple
perfectly. Call 3-3884.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished apartment. Sea view,
suitable child play area. Tel 3 3-5024.
5024. 3-5024. FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apart apart-man
man apart-man in new house, maid's room,
hot water. Via Argentina 75
2nd house corner 55th atreet
Cangrejo.
Indian Paper Says
Russia Raising Limit
On Huge Ruble Loan
NEW DELHI, Sept. 2 (UP)
Russia has offered to credit India
with another 100 million rubles in
addition to a 500 million ruble loan.
already announced, the. Hindustan
Timea reported today. s
The' Bewspaper'said' detafls of
ine latest nussian iinanciai oner
to India were not available, but
added that discussion began to today
day today between officials of the Indian
Government and Russian financial
experts on the disbursement of
the 500 million ruDies credit.
The Russian credit will be used
mainly to finance dam building
projects during the next five
years plan, tne newspaper aaia.
Answer to Previous Puxxle

i4iAim IvIailiii rstr n
lsTv.l5?t;xC3e
r wsfffOeTuiS'
S cJ t 5 W W X t T H m
I O IE B 15 j T a C T e
TtgTE l: y at g S X CTF
eTOTTlellEylyepg
i FJ3f 5TT5R-aTi:x
TEn"anT TF
m "5 aJJ pSny 7If

18 meet
hare
JO ltd a
federal
IJ Harvester
25 Spiritualistic
sitting
28 Daybreak
(comb, form)
90 Compass point
IS Most
domesticated
85 Mistakes
38 Communion ;
plate
37 Storehouse
38 Delicate smell
39 Disrobed
40 Cosmic order
42 Jewise month
44 Sties
46 Mountains
tb.)
48 Feline animal

i u n H I s n I Is (4 bo III
:;:p::-:p!:::
III8
s
5 in"
r igi-n
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r -rr- P
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m

Nos.
3-7712

LEAVE rODK AD WITH ONE or OUK

LNTF.RNAL. DK PUBLICACIONE&--NO. 3 Lottery Plaza CASA ZAUDO Central Ave. 45 LOUBDES PHARlVJACY-182 l. Carraia.uilla PARMACW LOM.
BARDO No 26 "B" Street HORBHON 4th of Jul; Ave. J St LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tlvoll No. 4 FAKMACIA EST ADOS UN1DOS US Central Ave.
FARMAC1A LUX 1S4 Central Avenue HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. To. de la Omi Ave. No. 41 rOTO DOMV Joilo Anwm!na Ave. and M St FARMACIA

VAN-DEB-JIS 50 street No. in FARMACIA EI. BATIJRRO rarque Lefevre

the Bella Vlita Theatre. COLON:
Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1957 Buick Special
Riviera, 4-door, Dynaf low, ra radio,
dio, radio, 2 tone paint and custom,
interior. This car is a real buy,
356 Apt. 1 1 Ancon, behind,
Ancon Masonic Templet
FOR SALE: Hudson Wasp,;.
1952 4-door, Crearti ,2 tone,
wsw, excellent. 552B Curundru
83-5196. (l
FOR SALE : 1954 2-door Ply Ply-month.
month. Ply-month. In good condition. Tele-

. , , 'V.
For better used cars see Smoot
& Paredes.
For better used cars see Smoot
& Paredes.
i 1 '' TT
For bettet used cars sea Smoot
& Paredes.

For better used cars see Smoot
& Paredes. ft,.
FOR SALE: Buick, 4-door
sedan, 1949, Dynaf low, 37,000
actual mileage. Clean appear appearance,
ance, appearance, new battery, good tires,
one owner. $375.00 cash. Call
Balboa 2-3064. House 0530-A,
Ancon.
FOR SALE: 1957 Chevrolet
4-door, sedan, standard, radio,'
2-tone or 1953 Buick, hard hardtop,
top, hardtop, cheap, terms can be ar arranged,
ranged, arranged, Balboa 2-3096.
FOR SALE: 1949 Olds, coupe,
hydra, good tires, good transpor transportation,
tation, transportation, highest offer over $275.
Panama 3-5627.
FOR SALE:-M956 Ford Victo Victoria,
ria, Victoria, Fordomatic, radio, heater,
many extras. Priced to, sell.
Phone 87-6134.
cam irk a
International Jewelry
155 Central
Ave.
TRANSPORTES BAXTER. S. A.
1 Packers Shippers Movora
Phones2-2451 jysJL62
j Laarn Riding at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding t Jumping Classes daily
3 to 5 P.m. Phono 2-2451
ot by appointment.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Aeent
Gibraltar life Ins. Co.
for rates and Information
TeL Panama 8-0552
DOROTHY CHASE'S
Fall classes begin Oct. 1st
Include Ballet, Tap, Toe.
Women's classes and tum tumbling
bling tumbling for "Little Guys."
For all information
Call 2-1751.
YASHICA
"AIRES"
Cameras
PANAMA. COLON
ASKS COMPARISON
' WASHINGTON (UP) National
ist Chinese Ambassador Holling
ton K. Tong has invited news or-i
ganizations seeking to sena report reporters
ers reporters to Red China to also send the
time newsmen to Formosa to
compare life in the two Chinese
aaaons. He said it was his "ear "earnest
nest "earnest hope" that if and when Amer American
ican American newsmen are admitted to Red
China they "will have an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity of throughly investigating
the deplorable situation that now;
prevails."
TELE-RAD

GUARANTEED
TV SERVICE
TEL 2-2374
Corner "H" V D&rie gt,
t

ARIrKTS OR OUR nFriCKS -AT 1S-ST

Central Avenue 12,f65 Tel. 432
SERVICES
The FATIMA PHARMACY lo located
cated located at Mercado El Roy, offers
'' efficient filling of prescriptions
, and home delivery service. Phono
3-3416.
3 -minute car wash $1, steam
: cleaning of motor $5, waaiiig of
cars $5. Auto-Bano, Trans-Isthmian
Highway near Sears.
In order to better serve pur many
friend's in Panama and the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone, we1 have moved our
ahop. FOR BETTER THAN EVER
SERVICE, CALL U. S. TELEVI TELEVISION,
SION, TELEVISION, Panama 3-7607. TV, Ra Radio,
dio, Radio, Hi-Fi, Antennas, Transmit Transmitters,
ters, Transmitters, Inter-Comm. and all elec electronic
tronic electronic equipment. Write our new
telephone number down so you
will not forget it.

California Contest Shapes Up
As Knight Knowland Give Sign

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Sept. 2
(UP) Gov. Goodwin J. Knight
in a face-to-face encounter Satur
v all but challenged, U.S. Sen,
William F. Knowland to run for
governor against him next year.
Knowland hinted broadly he will
accept.
The first meeting in eight
months between two of the most
important Republicans in Califor
nia took place at the 31 st annual
host breakfast of tne state unam
ber of Commerce.
Knight took public notice of the
widespread rumors that Knowland
will run against him next year by
ending his prepared speech with
these off-the-cuff remarks:
'I have no inside information as
to his plans, but if he (Knowland)
should decide to run, I take this
occasion to assure him and all of
you that I intend to wage a very
vigorous campaign, but fair,
clean-cut campaign, conducted on
principles, not on personalities,
"It there is a connrw, it is
bound to be a hard contest, be
i cause Bill ana r'.re Dorn ewror-v
;mirjdmen but I hopet and be
lieve if. can do rougnr in gooo
spirit." '' :-'
Senator Says US

Russia In Guided Missile Race

WASHINGTON, SEpt. 2 (UP)
Sen Henry M. Jackson (D-Wash)
said today the United Statesuand
Russia are locked in a "neck and
neck" race for the intercontinen
tal ballistic missile and "we may
well be behind.
Jackson, a frequent critic of the
administration's defense policies,
called for restoration of cuts i
the ballistic missiles program and
production of B52 jet bombers.
. He said the Defense Depart Department
ment Department was "completely inconsist inconsistent"
ent" inconsistent" in giving top priority to
missiles, and then placing a 38
billion dollar ceiling on military
spending. j
Has Interview
Jackson, a member of the Sen Senate
ate Senate Armed Services Committee,
made the statements, in an inter interview
view interview over the CBS-TV "Face the
Nation firnffrnm
Asked If he believed Russia and
fired a nitenrcontmental ballistic
missile (ICBM), he said "It would
be dangerous, indeed, not to as assume
sume assume that they might have fired
such a missile."
Jackson declined for 'security
reasons to say whether the United
States has fired a long range
missile. But he said this country
does not how have an "operation
al" ballistic missile of either
FOR SALE
TOLKSWAGEN 1
-VI178D.00
Ton
195S PONTIAC
Convertible, white Tire
$1800.08
1955 OPEL
$1188.88
1955 taunVs
White Tires and Radio
$120f.0
1953 CONSUL 4-door
$790.08
1953 VOLKSWAGEN.
1 Ton Van
$109.99
1953 FORD Mit(
S8H.9
1954 DODGE, Coupe
Radio, White Tires
$149.99 :
1955 PLYMOUTH, Coupo
$160.N
1949 DODGE
$399.90
1951 DODGE, Coupe
$12994
195C FORD, Vedett
4-dor $17M.M
1953
HIXLMAN,
, Waron
$799.N
SUUom

PB MHEETV PANAMA LlBREBIA

J Street a) r ARMARIA "VAS '-rVia rem
Real Estate
FOR SALE: 3 Vi list at Las Cum Cum-brct,
brct, Cum-brct, near to highway. All or any
portion. Call Balboa 2-2304.
FOR SALE: Excellent level lot.
in desirable neigborhood,
1000 M2, Lefevre Avenue. Par Par-quo
quo Par-quo Lefevre. Autobus passes. No
reasonable offer will be refused.
Telephone f Pedro Miguel ; 333,
House 2624B, Cocoli.
FOR SAtE) New Well planned
modern home best tesidential.
Coco del Mar area, concrete and
stone, wall kept, large grounds
fenced in 10x1 50 feet), 3 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, 3 baths, studio, 2 ter terraces,
races, terraces, cool. $26,250. Mortage
$13,000 been offered $200
rent. Call 3-6082 or 3-6090
After noting that the Wisconsin
senatorial election sounded a
"stern and ominous warning of the
dangers of intra party strife."
Knight went on to say:,
"Welcome home, Bill1. 1 wish you
success in all your endeavors with
the one exceDtion. which I am sure
you will understand your possible
candidacy for the office'-. -a now
hold.'
At a' news conference a few
minutes later, Knowland said he
wasn't ready to discuss his deci
sion until he tours the state. But
he took on Knight for the gover
nor's stand on right-to-work legis legislation,
lation, legislation, told reporters that he, didn't
think a contested primary election
would wreck the GOP, and then
"I've never been intimidated
about running against incum
bents."
Knowland questioned the pro propriety
priety propriety of Knight's bringing poli
tics into a non partisan non-po-
Uticil meeting such asthe Clram
ber hreakfast. ft:
"Ths is the first time it's ever
happened In the 15 to zo years
i vc oecn going to sucn meeuiiss.-i
he said. "' '" ''.,
May Be
intermediate or long range.
Jackson said that hy "oper "operational
ational "operational use" he meant "actual
military use that can be ready
or retaliate against a would-be
aggressor of the United States.;
'Sees Close Race
"I think that at the present time
we may well be behind the Soviets
. .'.I think that we are neck and
neck in the intercontinental race,
but it is conceivable that they
could be ahead of us," he saia.
"The real d a n g e r," Jackson
said, "based on their past record
of performance, is that they may
be able to turn out these missiles
so fast, as compared with what
we may be able to do. .that they
will have more operational 1,500
and 5,500 nautical mile missiles
than we will, have at the future
date." v 4
Jackson said retiring Defense
secretary Charles E. Wilson
"consistently underestimated" the
Russians during his first years in
office. But he said in recent
months, he felt that Wilson
changed his position somewhat"
FOR RENT: for 2 months,
from September 5th on,
completely furnished 3 bed"
room residence with maids
service in Las Cumbres.
Reasonable rental to re responsible
sponsible responsible party. Call Wolff
and Company Ltd., Pana-.
ma, Tel. 3-6969.
Modem

thi month th cohstruction of tht Mercedea Building will "itart, knd will hav ft f rontag' of 60 metert;on Vt
. 1 . -"' -1 v--.--.. .v.----t'.
the Avenida Balboa, and also a frontae on th 30th and 31tt streets. Thi building .will b on of th
-. .,.'v--' .,,,...', r-V''':; ., 1 c
most modern and luxuriout "in Panama, will hav granite floor,' entrance and corridor Walla covrd with ; i
marble, floor outlet for iectrjeity," tUphon and intrcommunication,ytem. f riya parking for ,25 cars :
and unlimitd parking spac in 30th strt. W-hav atiJI availabl .in th ground floor 280 aquar mtrs

8pac with privat 'ntrancrw haw also avaitabl'ariN

mak alterations to suit

fRKCIADO4 Street Ne.-U AGENCIAS

m t dviuiwu inv .u.
Hpme Articles
, FOR SAT.E: Kanmore Auto.
Washer,4 9 lb., 60 eye. $100.
Electric Range,' Frigidairev auto,
.oven, good. $75. 552B Curundu
83-5)96.' 7 ;
FOR SALE: Bedroom set $90.
; Livingrooni set $85.00. Dining Dining-tabla
tabla Dining-tabla four, chair $35.00. Baby
wardroBV" $30.00.i Twe metal
tables $1 5.00 each, ( Two tires
, 60016,.- two i 650x16 sii ply
new $85.00 Flouresent lamp
two 40 watt $ 1 0.00. Household
articte:. Telephone 2-2217..

Ike Must Still Decide On Two Major
Appointments Senate Didn't Confirm
WASHINGTON, Sept. 2, (UP)isions on possible conflicts of

President Eisenhower must
decide soon whether to make two
major appointments which the
Senate failed to confirm before it
adjourned. , .
The nominations- of Dr. Paul D.
Foote to be an assistant secretary
of defense, and Arnold B,i Jones to
be a Tennessee Valley Authority
director were on a list Which the
Senate threw back: in the Presi President's
dent's President's lap,.
The chamber also failed to act
on nominations for 10 U.S.Y mar
shal posts, a number of post postmasters,
masters, postmasters, and other minor posts.
.May Ask Again
It is customary in such cases
for the President to authorize
temporary recess appointments.
He then may seek Senate approv-
1 n. ; I n . .
ai again wneo congress recon
venes itt; January.- 'lv-;-
Eisenhower .nominated Foote,
69-year-old retired -Gulf Ou Cp.
scientist, to become1 assistant de defense
fense defense secretary in chaVenes in
January .
Eisenhower nominated Foote.
69-year-old retired Giitt Oil vCp.
scientist, to become assistant de
fense secretary in 'charge-o re-
:srcH mno; engmaering.r vv
"But the Senate Armed Service's
Committee declined! to approve
him on Aug. 22. after .he said 'be
could not give up stock holdings
in the Quit and Standard VOU
companies which represented a
substantial part of bis life
savings. ,3
' Chairman Richard ,B..' Russell
(D-Ga.) said "thegroup had de
cided against acting on Foote's
nomipation 1 pending policy deci-

r ,mryt rv--' n -"-w m n mm ui n iWiQ Hilling IJ- 1. liepf wtmnmrn

&Z&fW&'1Sil "MstfBJggkM,

'Mr. Jack Weir and Mr. Eloy Alfaro, Sales Manager and Assistant sales Manager : or
v Smoot y Paredea, SJl respectively,, present Mr. Alfredo T.- Scott with the award be earned
m, ontatandinr salesman for 1956-1 957. Mr. Scott bar Just completed ten yean

wfth the firm and today manages No. 2 usei car lot.

Anil

you. Will b raady for occupancy on February 1st 1958.

1'

, 'ii-ivl-fiW t" ( t

.y.;DbgS:;:.
"-- -jii y -

' FOR. SALE: A.K.C' reoiatared
, toy Boston terrier puppies.
seasonable. See at quartaia 123A
, Albrook or telephone Albrook
5235. J :
i it --' -i 1 ;l fc .--"i,'; ''
FOR SALE: Quality golden
fawn BOXER PUPPIES register registered
ed registered A.K.C, 3 months. Phono '2'
1 344 of f ice 2t 1 704 residence.
Astdd. 915. : i
Miscellaneous
' ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
i DRAWER "A." DIASiO
BOX ?H- CRISTOBAL. C.2.
t" "'V""1 1
iintrests.
Charge By GOP
Jones; was i the victim of what
Republicans -termed a "stall"! in
the Senate Public Works Commit Committee
tee Committee by TVA area Democrats.
Jones, who has been the. deputy
budget director,", was- -sharply
qcestioned in a week' of hearings
which :continued ,to adjournment
dj,y-; u 2 i.
TV A Supporters expressed con concern
cern concern that the 53-year-old former
Kansas educator would be influ influenced,,
enced,, influenced,, by the Budget ? Bureau,
which they charged has tried to
curtail TVA operations or destroy
, ... ...... ; ... m-
Jones is' scheduled to meet with 1
the President tomorrow, when it
is expected the matter of a recess
appointment until January will be
settled. i y
Meanwhile, the three man TVA
board Of directors continues with
two .vacancies and is not legal
ly empowered to make P"cy
decision,;: :y ; -iM
.mJ$ki,gl ,..'." 4iy-
Prime Minister 4
Buying Pfqnes
.
. LONDON.' Sent., 2. (UP) Prime
Minister Sayed .Abdullar Khalil of
Sudan arrived here today honing
to place orders in Britain for air
craft to add to his four-plane air
fprce.,, .. .. .
But I don't
like these fast
things," he said;
"I want propel-
ler planes, not these jets."

offTcrwth '45 squai miters "spac

Ricardd I A." Mir6r

Tels.

.;. WANTED t Stenographer pxpa- '''
riencedfcompotent. -Shorthand
, English Spanish. Good speller.
Columbia Pictures, Euiebio Mo-
ales,

Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: 14 boat with trail trailer,
er, trailer, excellent condition. 'Must salt
$65.00. Call Albrook 86-7161.
FOR SALE.-C,bi crusier 18V4
ft., lust off iho way. 60 h.p.
engines Excellent mechanical
i and seaworthy condition. Call
Albrook' 2207. ,
Lesson
t :. ...
ATTENTION COCOLI:" Ann Let Let-'
' Let-' tin's School of DancO reopens
. September 3rd (Tuesday). Re Register
gister Register August 20th and 27th, 2
to 5 p.m. Cocoli Clubhouse Stu Studio,
dio, Studio, second : floor. Residence
X phono Balboa 2-4415.
DOSESE WAITES School of Dane,
ing reopening September 5th.
Knights of Columbus Hall. Resi Residence
dence Residence phona 2-2363.
ill
Y
MOVING' UP7 -3 Dlspatchei
from Moscow Inditt to that-Rus-sia's
famed tourin,Uam of 'B
; and i KM- .may be revised to
"K end JH, wtth Deputy Pre-K
mier. Anaatat JMikoyaa, above.1
replacing Premier Nikolai Bui-;
ganin as Communist party boag i
Nikita Khrushchev's traveling
companion. Mikoyan accom-' 'f
panied Khrushchev to Romania
for talks with Marshal Tito and r.
will go with the party chief to-f
.
Building
VY: can r still'
ReasonJ
Reasonable ent
2-3331 and 2-3436

AGLSCUS COSMOS, SA.

TeL 8-47! 1



11 )
':'41;.f,S':,5-i'.:'

o

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1957

jfHE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE NEW

f, ITOIAA'DIHiPBAnP ,'-- ' ', BX GEORGE WUNDEJt A I THE STORY OF MARTHA WAXNE Two DUapoolntmenta B? WILSON SCRUGGS C l

i 1 1 I "T i M "7r".:L;..:::Lr-.;:-'-y.-".'.'- "' "Vr i-"' ''' : ZicibWvciA I lfHOoVEAMuawsJ'BECAul maybe sq but i sure) MEAwwiii7'''t'r !--m
U 5tS5SS lAfTERfooNATfcrozENTHEi; suessdgatomtmewt. riE vout f rrst Pmzs. ,- ,1
8 THE NEXT NEiV BEAU, ME UP HERE, PA7. CHr ANVONC Z yj OUT5IPE OP SOME OLP I I HIM, AT AW RATE.' JfeJSftS;' tucictshop T HI rouoiEirPKAV AWOTUAT -JfiS. BE5T -1
.! C ll PRISCIXJujpj ' tjwn J
' WlLES AND HIS rRIEND. ,,Wron,Cheef : By MERILL BLOSSER' k J LlONSll f CARLYLEI 1 fpON'T TOU WORRY, ILNOT EVEN V I I
fnnwt r7 "lUnTT MOORAY FOR; wwo twrcwms V aw, m neaw upJSSJ TSILlcome '' ffcsusAizrfi :
' : S : g '
T '' t BDGS BUNNY " '""" MMT " y
' ALLEY OOP Rljht, OooU! By Y. T. HAMLIN r'J'XQ 'A TlJjF1 ; ";
: zoh ojoiAv ' j r

. JgiMMMi I ;Ag5fel I Qtoas-True Life Adventures I

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Afttrmath

By EDGAR MARTIN

,1,1ft.

V,":

fKVlf PAVi'T e3R& ViWiR.-

CAPTAIN EASY

Key Man

By LESLIE TURNER

1 THfeV WOM'T ArigV II WlUkr XT tAfcgKimiJ. TK.V TO POV I I TH' Tflgtf M HgBAK TWAT W
.,, LeS THAT REPORTER. NtOC! MOUTTH J HER OW fkWP 5BMP HSR 50PBCTBO 01 MAKKHAMi OTHERS
AjOCXiWfcr ABOUT V HB 0T SB W5Bl J(RL? HOME- TOPAV. THAT, 1 WHO KNPW MW U TH' PAST WILL C0A I
TH05BI PAPER tAAKK-X 0 EBF0RB TR1C5 v-1ri FAlLi HE'LL 4ILBWC y I fORWARPJ IT'LL EUIM MARKl AN MAV 7
, ..;. f HAP fOUStO L0H6 kOO TO VBRIPV'BAA'. V HI PAUdHTtR.1001 j V UNCOVER OU WHa WeAUlZATIONl,
l V-" T!
I MORTY MEEKXE Overplaylnf It By DICS.CAVALU
' V' ; - 1 IX OCX NO TO REHEARSE MY JJ I II I l I I I II nqwwhvM
" ACT0.L NIGHT, UNTILfftJ iff i ; f7i wSJo
' .1 1 -iL zM lJ -:'-;-

OCR BOARDINQ HOUSE

MAJOR HOOPLB

OUT OUR WAY

By S. R. WILLIAMS

HE'S ir4 WALL He Needed was

iliT OllKlV AT1DCJ -M I AOu:

1! it!p2rM0fiTAOREf UfcETMS RUMMER

I MY BOSS CAMS Occd ii rlsnl AlVMDir AAAAF-

iMOAve wootMLv 1 -o rr sixcb we I we mosta $kt a ,1!
li?. n CANC SALLOP-lHEW CROSS-COOCTeVlf

I i& pcize eels !rST

-HOCW POPPER lVpalvL

CHAMPA6tfEH4

41 T ii - -T I 1 W rxKLaJwi,!,,!. 1 rJ

11 'frAllH fe.2:,flaiiMMVUa

MAWS AND EPFECT.
TfUE filiSWT OF THE WIPE-OPEM
BEAKS OF BABV BlRPS HAS A
STIMULATING EFFECT
UFON THE ADULTS.
THEV RESPONP

V BKIK1SIN3
FOOD.

OUST N FASSlNd,
A BlRt? WILL VIZOr?

POOP FATHERED FOR
HER OWN BROOP INTO
THE CAWNINS MAWS
OF A STRANOER'S
NESTLINGS.

its

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calbraith

imp

M

DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
To torn your "Fertunt' for todty from tho tUn, writ, in tho ktlm
of tho alphoUt corroipondinc to tho numorah tho lino of tho Mtro
loieol poriod in which you woro born. You will ftn4 it fun,
t 1 4 S o 7 1 9 10UinjU1iHI7lllM JIMM41iJ

AlCPirONI JK IMNOPQISTUVWXVI

HIM 13 1 14 7 5 15 JS 1 0 20 20 J
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'
TH KJ. 0. I j.
tHIIIKlkll. J K

,

"Th only thinj h caught was a cold!

"W could livt right hart. Mom, with you and Dad! ;
Charlas aays K two can livt at chaaply aa on, four
1 Can liva aa chaapty aa thrto!"

Faltering Philip:

I

?. A. CUMtfteda.

Ida Inm Bka ac.
torrMrW

PANAMA-MIAMI

55.00

MIAMI-SAN FRANCISCO 124.70

a cuicuiia-
San Francisco

Tcrlay'a'JY Protiann

Jpoo

1 SO olo Aro tanqr,
. ( 0 Jackx GImo v
t Tatwrt Scmro
IM Tn W A (ml
10-00 Atm Hw j
110 cn Krvrs
U:U torn: X4 BunhnM.

too cn nnr
. i it AJutro roitcts irocs
; 4 00 Fmo Tw N'auaa
4 0 Tuvd Timo
lo Vatani tUnhot
i m lu i t a Trip
00 PANORAMA

Comrlorir of AtrwlM Numi airwo
PHONES: PANAMA! 3-1057 3 U5& 3 16SJ

it
t'..



labor Day Philosophy, Futility and Fatalities

' -J

AFSCME,

At a union meeting held in the
city Of Colon in 1950, a union
spokesman told a gathering of non-US-
workers of the Canal Zone
that one of the Pa"ons f7
union was to get the Onal Zone
administration to establish an ad administrative
ministrative administrative minimum wage of 40
cents and hour, recalls William
H Sinclair, international represen represen-tatve
tatve represen-tatve for the American federa federation
tion federation of State, County and Munici Municipal
pal Municipal employes, in Labor Day
statement.
The statement said:
"In those days the accepted
minimum was set at around 26
ni an hour. A number of mem
bers attending that meeting mum
bled, to themselves tnat union m m-Irl
Irl m-Irl well dedicate their
time to other activities, trying to
achieve other gams, inasmucn
at that time HAwas considered ri ridiculous"
diculous" ridiculous" by the average worker
that a 40 cent an hour minimum
would ever be set
"Today lass than seven years
lalur the administrative mini minimum
mum minimum hoerly wane i" the Zon
is up to 50 cants and Congrtss
has just approvtd legislation re re-taining
taining re-taining the Canal Zona under tha
covoraga of tha Fan; Labor
Standards Act, with minimum
wages sat at $1 car hour.
"If the Canal Zone non-citizens
worker who was around in those
days, is still around today,, and
would like to make comparisons
in this one field he will find that
achievement is greater than his
wildest expectations. Unon oficials
who have been on the fighting
front all these years can measure
achievements on all fronts just as
important as what has been chalk chalked
ed chalked up on the long long list of over overall
all overall improvements, only through
the persistent and effective effort
put forth by their locals under the
banner of the powerful American
Federation of Labor Congress of
Industrial Organizations which re represents
presents represents nearly 17,000,000 work workers,"
ers," workers," Sinclair's statement said.
"Labor leaders are well a a-ware
ware a-ware that enough has not been
done and there is, today, more to
be done than what has been done
to far, and through the coopera cooperation
tion cooperation of the workers, a democratic democratic-minded
minded democratic-minded administration and the
help of God, more and more will
Tm. Ann to make this world a bet
ter living place for the average
working man.
"Aa we eelebrato Labor Day
157, eur members find them themselves
selves themselves without the coverage of
Civil Service retirement provi provisions,
sions, provisions, although the unions haw
been fighting for it alnee I'M,
and commitments aet forth in
the Remon Eisenhower treaty
have ben promising It to them
ie
"With the adjournment of the
Congress it means that we shall
have to prepare ourselves for an another
other another stiff round of battle to get
the House of Representatives to
vote favorably on the so-called
Canal Zone single wage scale and
Civil Service retirement. The suc successes
cesses successes or failure of this new round
will depend on now mucn me
rage Canal Zone non-citizen work
er is willing to do about it by tak
i-- .t;. nart in his organza
inn. to strengthen the voice of
hi leadership
Anhr imnortant phase we
cannot forget is that U.S. Con Congressmen
gressmen Congressmen in are no different from
Congressmen in any other part of
the world, iney ioo ue
the voting power making repre representation
sentation representation before, their commit committees,
tees, committees, and if the non-citizen work workers
ers workers believe that just because they
want Civil Service retirement and
a new wage scale the "Congress
will jump to act on it, experience
should have taught then! different-
-C Zse. Zm Caber Lex Barker
J "THE GIRL IN

$8flQ.O (TODAY) mWiTil!
ri 1
LAST DAY!
J J:l :St a I ., !:. 4,17. Cil. : ;
iFrf" WATCH ,nj
i r-:; Sl THEM... t
it ) to hold i
! M, H m vour t

t -- MEN

AFL-CIO

ly during the last congressional
years." Sinclair added.
"It goes without saying that the
principal reasons why our unions
must always maintain internation international
al international affiliations are not only to pro provide
vide provide per capita payments for an
international union or to boast of
international connections; but main
ly to make sure that whenever a
local union spokesman speaks for
a worker, management in t h e
Canal Zone, government officials
; Panama and congressmen in
the United States will always real realize
ize realize that these relatively small lo local
cal local unions in this all-important out
post of American democracy are
represented by an international u u-nion
nion u-nion with over 180.000 members
in every congressional district in
the United States and Canada with
the all important voting power
which everyone must respect if
he plans to seek reelection, and
by the AFL-CIO which has spokes spokesmen
men spokesmen in every corner of the United
States, Canada, Alaska, the Canal
Z.ne, before international bodies
and with representatives working
in an international department with
connections all over the globe."
Sinclair stated.
"This type of affiliation is cost costly,
ly, costly, but we do not know of an in investment
vestment investment as small as a $2 a month
membership fee which has always
derived so large a dividend to
contributors, as that affiliation.
"When the history etf Canal
Zone non citizen labor is writ writ-tan
tan writ-tan if it is avar written statis statistics
tics statistics will prove that for ovary
dollar a local rater has paid to
a union srewaru o
turned to him multiplied by 1, 1,-000.
000. 1,-000. "If that seems fantastic, we re
commend to the worker to earn earnestly
estly earnestly sit down with a pencil and
ninor. not one sneei Decause uiai
rnnlrt not be enoueh. but with ma
ny sheets and compare nis wages,
wnrkinc conditions, a seniority, pr
tection fringe benefits today to
what they were iu years agu
nri we are sure that worker who
has accepted this challenge may
unravsl anmethine mucn more
greater than a 1,000 per cent di
vidend.
"Ever since the first Labor Day
was rplehrated in 1882. the work-
hivp known no better and more
loyal a friend thah his union," Sin Sinclair
clair Sinclair declared.

Motorists

NEW YORK, Sept. 2 (UP)
The long Labor Day weekend
threatened to become me wuisu
killer holiday of the year today
with the traffic death toll climb climbing
ing climbing at a n"alarming" pace and
the worst yet to come.
Safety officials blamed hot,
humid weather, which prompt prompted
ed prompted an apparently record num number
ber number of motorists to seek heat
relief, and carelessness on the
hlghwava for the disappoint disappointing
ing disappointing traffic tolL
A United Press count this
morning, showed at least 279
killed in traffic.
' In addition, 36 persons drown drowned,
ed, drowned, and 27 died in miscellaneous
accidents for a total of 342.
California had the worst rec record
ord record with 37 killed, or an aver average
age average of about one highway death
an hour.
Ohio was next with 20 deaths,
followed by Texas with 18 and
New York with 17.
The National Safety Coun Council
cil Council had estimated that 426 per-

tirme. it. Parana

la I ..

h

CLU

One individual who repre represents
sents represents a group of federal em
ployes can aennueiy mnuc
the thinking of the U.S. 'Con 'Con-in
in 'Con-in the oriinlon of Canal
Zone labor leader L. S. Bamianl
who returned late last, ween irum
Washington.
miani has been in the United
States capital for some weeks as
a representative of the Canal
Zone Central Labor Union and
Metal Trades Council.
Damlanl also stated that Con Congressional
gressional Congressional committees look more
and more to the expressions of
organized labor bodies for data
on proposed legislation.,
In a Labor Day message to
"fellow Zonlans D a m i ani
stressed that "It is to organized
labor that Congress turns for
the employe position."
He struck at those employ employes
es employes who fail to give unions sup support
port support because of failure to se secure
cure secure one particular better betterment,
ment, betterment, or another.
Damlanl issued this year
message in the absence of CLU CLU-MTC
MTC CLU-MTC president E. W. Hatchett,
who is still in the States but will
return next week.
The Labor Day message fol follows:
lows: follows:
"It is fitting and proper that
on this day as 170 million peo people
ple people of ouf great nation are ack acknowledging
nowledging acknowledging and paying homage
to the American laboring mass masses,
es, masses, I bring to you a personal
message in behalf of the canal
Zone Central Labor Union and
Metal Trades council, AFL-CIO
"It is with great pride and
humility that I served as your
legislative representative before
the elected members of the 89th
Congress. I assure you, ur fears,
needs, and hopes were simply,
but earnestly brought to their
attention.
"I assure you further by say saying;
ing; saying; no one individual from our
Governor on down to myself can
assume the credit for anv of the
benefits incurred. The beneficial
results were solely the outgrowth
of concerted efforts by all con concerned.
cerned. concerned. "My message will limit it itself
self itself to two points, namely:
'Understanding and Solidari Solidarity.'
ty.' Solidarity.' "Year after year, for almost
sons would be killed In traffic
during the three-day holiday,
but hoped 4he count could be
held to about S75 the aver average
age average number, of fatalities for a
non-holiday period at this
time of vear;
But Ned Dearborn, president
of the National safety council,
said It now appeared the coun council's
cil's council's original estimate may have
been "too low."
Dearbornsald it was "general
ly feared'' by traffic officials
that the life saving records
chalked up by motorists over
the Memorial Day and Fourth
of July holidays, when traffic
deaths were neid to a non-nou-
day average, would be shatter shattered.
ed. shattered. The Labor Day weekend pe period,
riod, period, traditionally the last big
flinsr of summer, began at 6
p.m. Friday and ends at mid
night tonight.

Stateside

WASHINGTON. Sept. 2 (UP)
Government and union officials
saluted the working men and
women 'of America today and
lashed out at the "crooks and
hoodlums" who have wormed
their way into the ranks of labor.
Recent exposures by the Senate
n.iiro. committee fisured prom-
in.ntiti in the statements and
speeches prepared for the observ observance
ance observance of Labor Day 1957.
in rrn President George
u..nv and other labor leaders
pledged new eiforts to drive out
corrupt influences. At the same
time, however, they vowed a last last-ditch
ditch last-ditch fight against any legislative
attempt to penaliie labor as a
..k,U
Th rank and Ilie acrois me
. .1
nation generally put such matters
.crU at thev took advantage of
line weather predicted for the tra
ditional last nouaay oi aumiuei.
Praises Labor
In Washiagten. where a
"school's out" mood was brought
on by the adjournment of Con Congress
gress Congress last Friday, President Ei-
sennower i a s a
praising labor's contribution to
what he called "a climate of gen general
eral general well-being" Uthe nation.
"We Live in a favored land
where the fruits of production are
widely hared." the President
said. "More Americans are bold bold-ing
ing bold-ing jobs and enjoying security
the ever before."
Eisenhower cancelled plana to
spend Labor Day at his Gettys Gettysburg.
burg. Gettysburg. Pa, farm, but will bead for
Newport, R.I., Wednesday for his
delayed vacation.
Blames Rackeoora
Sea. Irving M Ives (R-NY),
vice chairmaa of the rackets com
mittee, said in a statement mai
"handful of croou ana nooa-

MTC

three-quarter, of a. century,

there has been a constant nas- -v-sle
and bickering between labor, the opln on of labo rleader Ru-

and management, wncrew Vri. ..mutual vear in
demanded of the other the act 'tyvj. 1 said.

ceptance Of Its full terms
ana
proerams.
."Today, however, throughthe
medium of cooDCration and un
derstanding the merits ', oi a
give and take compromise poli policy,
cy, policy, necessary to a commop. mu mutual
tual mutual acceptable program has all
but erased the once standard
negative reaction of the repre representatives
sentatives representatives of the employe and
emnloyer.
"Tn a recent address C, M,
White, chairman of the Repub
lic Rteel corporation, saw:
There is no aaic,eoniic o
interest between organised la labor
bor labor and management business
and public, or business, and
government. There Is only the
conflict rrowlnr out of ignor ignorance
ance ignorance and misunderstanding
p tht credo. Whit not only
rfiairnosed the cause for the di
vision between laoor ann man management,
agement, management, bufably prescribes the
remedial measures as well.
t have been askea counties
times, 'can a single Miaiviauai
representing a groun of Federal
employes influence the thinking
of our coneress?' My answer is
definitely yes. ;
"Tim and time aealn. mem
bers of Congress have said gov government
ernment government employes should be or organized
ganized organized to a f af greater extent
than they are. t
"Congressional trommittiees are
lookinpr more and more to or organizational
ganizational organizational expression of sen sentiment
timent sentiment on proposed legislation.
Employes owe the Congress con
sideration, pemanas upon ouf
time Is great.
"One voice for many -persons
acting In unity conserves the
time of our lawmakers. It Is to
organized labor that Congress
turns ior tne empiqye posiwwi
on legislation pertaining to the
Canal Zone.
"During the course of my
stay in, Washington, I have be be-indoiftrinated
indoiftrinated be-indoiftrinated to the fact
that, pressure groups and poli
tical tactics can often, sway mc
outcome of the tote for short
periods of time. But In the end
the onlnlon of the majority pre
vails, and will prevail so long as
our system oi government en endures.
dures. endures. V "
"In the United States today,
management has accepted labor
unions as a permanent part of
our economic structure, and la labor
bor labor has come to respect man management's
agement's management's sincerity towards, the
welfare of Its employes;
"A union lh government as In
industry,' is a stabilising influ influence
ence influence whett It has the confidence
and support of management.
Th r.nel 7.one CLU and MTC
is today well on the roaa. it nas
the confidence and support of
the Canal Administration, ana
will continue to have it only as
long as it remains the true rep representative
resentative representative of the feanal em employes.
ployes. employes. "Many of our co-workers on
the Zone have committed a car cardinal
dinal cardinal blunder in divorcing him
or herself from organized labor
for reasons of personal animosi animosity
ty animosity andor the inability of the
unions to successfully win all of
his or her grievances.
"Only unity of purpose, and
solidarity in numbers will pre preserve
serve preserve our future existence in the
Canal zone."
lums
' were threatening to give
the labor movement a bad
name." He blamed "ranK and rue
apathy" for permitting racketeers
to gain the upper hand in some
unions.
Ive nredicted lesislation will
be passed next year to protect
pension and weuare iunoa irum
abuses by union officials. -srrtarv
of Labor James P.
Mitchell observed that "both Jobs
and income are at record levels
ai we celebrate this holiday." He
called for renewed efforst to
knake sure that eaual job oppor
tunity "becomes a reality ana not
luat a ilocin."
"Only when the talents and
resources of all America's people
are brought into c-lav can the full
potential of this country be real-
Meanv called attention to infla
tion and automation as threats to
national prosperity.
We of the AFL CIO believe
very strongly that there should
be a full-scale, impartial congres congressional
sional congressional investigation of the whole
price profit wagt relationship,
Meany aaid. "to that some effec effective
tive effective and intelligent program can
be launched to combat mnauon.
"Big business in recent years
has taken more than its share ol
profits and has insisted e cnarg cnarg-traffic
traffic cnarg-traffic would bear," ht said.
The AFL-CIO chief also said
that "we have demonstrated the
sincerity f our pledge to keep
the labor movement eleaj of
communism and corruption,
AFL CIO Secretary-treasum
William; F. Schnitiler observed
that "one-fifth of our nation n
hmKmL ill4Mied. ill-fed." He
rll4 it "intolerable' that 30
million Americans "live in ffa-
ilU arhnaa annual income is KS
thaa S2.000 a year, leas thaa 40
a week. .. ".

AFGE

United El ates citizen labor on
thecal zone iJ f ff
. "k-"-' r- v..
xneaKins narucuiany v
imwirm Federation or uov
ernment Employes, or wmcn no
la a national officer.
"We didn't lose anything,"
LdVelady recalled. "We dldn t
have anything taken away from
us-, but we didn't gain either.
Like other observers, juoyeiau
counts the mere passage .of the
classified nav-ralse legislation
and the postal pay raise as no
oflin since the President has in
dicated he will veto both measures.:-,,
;
Cuban Police Arrest
Til Rebel Leaders
In Havana Hideout
HAVANA, Sept. 2 (UP) M"
captured opposition political lead leader
er leader Raul Chibas and Boberte Agra Agra-monte
monte Agra-monte Jr., son of a lormer presi presidential
dential presidential candidate and jailed them
i.nmimiiiHii a rebel leaders.
ftnth men had loined the rebel
a. of Findpl Castro in the Sie
rra Maestra Mountains of Oriente
Province several weeKS ago. iney
were seized in a pre-dawn raid on
the suburbsn Havana nomeoi a
man identified only at Frank Mus-
teliai '' ?'.' 'f-U.'
Sources said Chibas head of the
Cuban Peoples Orthodoavaparty,
a arramonte had come from the
Sierra Maestra Mountlns or 10
days ago on an "official mission'
for Castro. The sources did ,not
elaborate.. It was reported here
yesterday that the Rebels were
planning an early announcement
of "revolutionary government in
arms" in opposition to the, regime
i i..!ir ir.iiffonpiit Batista.
Agents of the K overraent s3u s3u-reau
reau s3u-reau of Investigation raided Mus Mus-telier'a
telier'a Mus-telier'a palatial home in suburban
Palatino and 'seized me inrw
apparently as the result of a tip.
father. Prof. Rober-
to Agramonte of the. University! of
onetime political
leader, went into exurin Mexico
hortly rafter hit son Wf Jte
Castro rebels. The elder AgramOn AgramOn-te
te AgramOn-te said he wm forced to 1 e aye
Cuba becauseoi pouce nra.iu"-
Government kgents had "ought
t.-u r;K. andT Asramome for
week. .inci was'learned that
thev had fled the capitar?aad
joined the rebels in the mountain
fastnesses of eastern Cuba where
Castro has been holding out since
last December,
Mussolini's Widow
Seals Duce's Tomb
In Ordered Privacy,
oovniPPtfti Italy. Sept.' I
(UPKPolicV
...rirtf San Cassiano tonight to
let BenitO Mussoiinrs 7a?Z "Z
up the cuctator. wm- T rv
vacy aemea ner ?j ,-
"'""!r",r" 'nested on the
roXle.'dinrto the far cemetery
Ind crowdf 50 POme wffe
..fcrSl wilow.
Donna R.ehee Mu.c4ini, the po police
lice police ordered. out the 100 Fascists
VTahe'rrivrd:
.iAaiaf isrnBn mm ui uiiu
7u- m.terv. punching
ma rl7Uul Haas f w
policemen and photograpfiers ad
...,..; .it slogans in the
midst of a requiem i n.
- kair
m... Tint until me wiuow w-
self demanded that they atop was
order restored.
Todav at aiinset, with the Fas Fas-c
c Fas-c l3u goni1 the blacked widow
sealed the stone tomb whose hd
has been left aside to allow other
members of the family a last look
at the three-foot-by-three-foot box
containing all that remains of the
man who wanteo w w
u ..rn1ri widow super-
..:.a k. inine of the tomb on
which was embossed the ancient
fasces symbol-tne ouna m
iVj ..... Ki.ii that Mussobm
had adopted just as Hitier used
the swastika.
a. ..tim.t.a 7.000 veteran Fas
cists and neo-FascisU crowded the
little town of Predappio to render
last homage to the man they still
revere. But they made no attempt
further demonstrations.
In the end, Donna Rachele Mus
solini had what sne wanieu. jner
were no Fascists presem,. ui
woman at the grave of her hui
band, i
Hungarian Athlete
Asks Asylum, Says
Cairo Newspaper
PATHO. SeoL 1 fUP Newspa
nr Al Ahram aaid today that Hun.
garian kmg distance swimmer
Miss Magda Milinar has asked for
mliriMl aavlum in FfVPt.
The paper said Misa Mihnar
esne to Egypt te Uke parTi"
the Soet Canal marathon swim,
which has been postponed till aext
year.. .

V;

t

"STASSEN REPORTS .TO IKE AND DULLtS Harold; E, Stassen
negotiator, reports to President Eisenhower and Secretary .of
whit 'Hnnaa nrt the tendon arms conference. '.m m

Stassen, Returning To London Talks,

Still Hopes
WASHINGTON. Sept. 2 (UP)
Presidential disarmament adviser
Harold E. Stassen headed back to
the London disarmament talks to today
day today expressing last ditch' hopes
of some agreement with Russia.
But reports from London said
for all practical purposes serious
East-West disarmament; Negotia Negotiations
tions Negotiations there have ended. ; -r
Stassen planned to meet win
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles tnia morning for ftnal
conference before leaving. He was
scheduled to leave tms anernoon
fof New York' en route to London.
Says She'll
Big Game
PARIS. Sept. a (UP) Frehch
...ti, Vranmiae Staxa. 22, re
turned to her original plot line -to
day and coniirmea sne wt nMj
a ear, aeaicawu w
twice ner age. i
rv.. nnniincement COlBClaeQ
with the publication of Mis Sa-
Sin'i.new boOK, "in
a Yar," dedicated to herfUnce,
fiuv Schbellef. at publishm execu-
uve ana pig-su
ui. fi.san had first said yei-
. i ntnmina ahe nlanned to
H!l U J ;--- If JJ...au1
marry Scnoeuer, wn is uvo
nial' was issued calling the Mar Marriage
riage Marriage reports; "without foun-
h 'ihest-selllng writer,
. nrf n hi. Airs. LiBSL UIKUl,
reached by : the CBlted -.
her Riviera vuia, .aaia m
Schoeller definitely would be mar
ried this winter,. : ..i
Schoeuer,; i a aircctor t
frnih publishing firm of
Hachette, is now in Kenya on an
African safari. Mist Sagan is re recuperating
cuperating recuperating on" the Riviera- from
injuries suffered to i sports car
accident last April 14.
i'm m m to eet mamea
winter,". Miss 5agan confirmed to-
told' her father about her plans
because "It always forget to warn
ax, cha tnai sne oio uui
him. ...
Her father, weaitny uiausinauai
tir. Oi.nir! had aaid vester-
dmv h was surprised and
pleased" .by the news, even though
& came to him second handfrom
"SSuf'sagan's new book : is Uie
third she, has written in the past
four -years and promises to
become as great as best seller as
the sensational "Bonjour 'Tris 'Tris-tese"
tese" 'Tris-tese" and "A Certain Smile.!'
In "A Certain smile, miss Be Began
gan Began advocated that a girl, of 18
should marry a man in his. 40s.
. .-: i : :'y.
Senate To.Look Inlo
Ways-To Boost Jide
In Lalln America
WASHINGTON. Sept. 1 (UPVr-
The Senate Commerce Committee
has voted to mak a sweeping
study of ways to intenaify trade
relations with Latin, America,, it
wa a disclosed todav '. '';."
The studv wiu be part ox a aur-
vey with Uie objecUve of recom
mending specuic proposals u new
ahnliih trade restrictions.
Chairmaa Warren mi gnu son
n.wa h inld tha .. United Pres
the .committee has agreed unasi-
mously to look into free worm
economic development ;, and cus-
toma problems- before Congress
reconvenes in January. :
-We hope i to help our iaun
friends and ether areas
tn mm toward the fulfillment of
economic aspirations under th e
antf demecrauc conoiuona, aaag-
nusoa said.- Wa know oi no oeiwr
way of promoting theae ; thaa
throusli the advance af free trade
ia the worlLMT. :.
The chairman said tnai om.
George A. Smathers (D-Fla-and
possibly a Republican member ot
k. MnmittM would-conduct the
t im i.irinii atudv. He said
Smathers would leave late in
November o a three-week tour
of Mexico, Central, and
America. ' V'. : '"'

For Soviet Cooperation r

The disarmament talks resume to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. 4.- C-, ' -"."
U.S. offielalt said Stasmn be-
Hews there is a chance the Ru.
sians may have second thoughts
eboct their rejection of the Unit.
ed States' latest disarmunt pro pro-i
i pro-i pesala and may accept some ef ;
' They said .Stassen realizes the
orostct for. continued disarma
ment negotiations in London is un
promising. But he contends that
no-one ceauy Knows wnai uie ua ua-siana
siana ua-siana have in mind until they give
Stassen was reported to be piac-i
ine emphasis on tne tact boviet
disarmament negotiator Valerian
A. Zorin appears to have had his
relection ready even before the
Western paper was read.
Stassen was' said te bulieve
that the Soviet ruters may r. de decide
cide decide that fn outright;, rejection
ef carefully pi'apared Westere.
proposals would put them In an.
embarrassing position before
world public opinion particu particularly
larly particularly amonottiw "uncommitted"
British Girl Sqy
Mwiir-Firsm
Words In 15 Years
CHmCfCiRD,- England,' Sept.' 2
(UP) .. .For weeks, zu-year-c-ia
June Tapp practiced saying ,' her
first, two spoxeo woraa : in ia
years.
,miss Tann was aeaieneo vy a
aerious illness during, the early
war years and lost; her ability to
speak-because she-could not hear
her ; own- voice!.': ' ."
But yesterday in a church here,
a vicar asxea ner, .win inou taae
this man to be thy lawful wedded
husband?" Xl
Her bridesroom. Bill Northman
of ; Waltramstow, .and 70 wedding
guests waited tensely.
, TK.n th T will aairi- T will
"We can only hope that one flay
her speech will come back .com .completely."
pletely." .completely." ,.the bride's mother aaid
after the ceremony.
. wvw K YK1 .
the events of
the (ntematiooal
beet-seHer are
on me screen I
DAKKYLf. ZANUCtCS
. ROBERT ROSSOf

J m jaw-

7 V

wwyri 'wwfi rvniAint ;
, DOROTHY DANORIDGE v 1 'k
JOAN COUINS MICHAEL RENNlt
. uiBtM ton irAtrTt

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OARRYlf.ZANUCX-ALFRED HAYES l

Also: Tenice, f earl of. The Adriatic:; short,

Opens WEDNESDAY!

V
1
...
v

T
(right), U.C. disarmament
State Dulles (left) at the
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nations where they have been
posing as champions of dUarma-j
ment. t t J
If so. thr Soviets" might be ex 1
petted to accept enough of the
West's plan to mae iurther negof
tiations profitable, officials said.
, Thpv said Stassen argues, that ;
Russian negotiators have a habit
of reacting harslfiy- to Western
proposals,' but sometimes have
secona mougnis arnsr tuiuw&.ius
question more fully.
110 mph Typhoon I
Rcges Over
Iwo's Battlefield
TOKYQ, Sept. 2-"(UP) A
typhoon which, lashed the battle battlefield
field battlefield of Iwo Jima yesterday with
110 miles an hour winds, moved
up the Pacific today, in the gen gen-eral
eral gen-eral direction of Japan
- The -U. S. Air Force said the
typhoon, dubbed Bess, 'caused no
damage

e on Iwo J.ima. r i t Yj-.

Vcatlter;Or;Not
This weather report

is weather repork for the'

is prepared by the; Meteore?
gleal, and Hy drogr aphi
Branch of the Panama Canal
: Company: "
' ,i Balboa Cristdbal
High
87
73
8v
92
79
Low( ......
HUMIDITTi,
. High r...i.
Low
91
,67
WIND: .''t:--Z-
(mai. mph) NW-14
RAIN (inches). 0 .
N-14
: T
WATER TEiMPj ? '
j- (Inner harbors) 82 85
' TUESPA1:'JSEPT. S
U:07 a.m, 7vY,i' :44 a.nt.t
- i -V ;':'. :21 p.u
' 'I j"- '"::-:Ji.'-': t
' PRICES: .75 .40
-TODAY-
. 4.:M y 6:35 V 9:00 p.m.
INTRIGUE! MYENTCT
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'INTERNATIONAL POUCE'.

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