The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02313

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
SZnd TKAB

PANAMA, R, P.; MONDAY, AUGUST 12, 1957

'They've. Been Working

National Economic Cbi

Recommends New Uses
For Colon, Panama Stations
' The National Economic Council has recommended the
ionvertlonvof the Panama City railroad ,tationJ expected;
: soon to- be turned over to Panama by the United States.
; Into central administration offiees for posts and telecom-;
tnunications ' '.' '
' According to art official Panama -bulletin- issued to today.'
day.' today.' the council also recommended .that, the present Pan-
ama Railroad .freight house be used for customs offices,
" parcel' post' delivery and bonded warehouses. ;
'I A portico of the railroad yard directly behind the sta station
tion station andthe freight house could be used for street I to
provide parking places for the business places m the area.

the council said.
-. Another portion could be used
tor the construction of a public
market, If. studies indicate that
It is convenient -,
remainder of the railroad

' Yard not 'occupied by buildings

and streets snouiu vo "r"

. Into a park lor nearoy re&iueuw
. the bulletin said.
! PaltMa Point, which is also
f ' included anion the lands to he
turned over to Panama as a
. result f the 1955 Panama-U.S
Treaty of Mutual Understand Understand-.
. Understand-. f nr and Cooperation, could be
v for huildinr a Port and

h f m Inatalltnr shipyards. the
Hoover, it- added that it
would be convenient to reserve
a portion, of the area for future
," w th huildina of streets is
v nnt.mniat(l.' care should 'i be
taKen not to scu any wwum i
the land until such imnroye-
;.. imartta nave Deen iitmue, v
tdA wrif rirmmndd. i

.VTSe council also recommended

vV-athe wasningion tiowi oe
..,.Jinriwd io r.ontlnus renderire

: the service it now offers, but it

, Seit that the Colon Hospital could

le used by the social security
Board OS some other government
! agency engaged in social welfare
t or as a part of the Amador, Oue-
rrero Hospital. ,.

" other suggestions made by tne
National. Economic Council to

"Ti.ii t nn.am.nr

: xne vouuuuuauini xivvu.
nJSrnesto de la Guardia lnciuoe:
Rochet's Yard; The govern govern-'
' govern-' .tntnt should first check on the

1 : duration of contracts, between

the U.S. government ana private
, Individuals.
Aspinwall Lot, Taboga Island:

Dostlivalion llils

2 Local Vessels;
USSOvlUSS Rail
r Two ships 'presently assigned
to the 15th Naval District are to
i be deactivated before the end of
: 'the calendar 'year, according to
' word received today by Capt. A.
- R. St. Angelo; acting command commandant
ant commandant from the Secretary of the
Navy.' They are theTJSS Owl and
" the USS RaJ.L ;
'The Owl has operated out of
the UA. Naval Station at Rod Rod-.
. Rod-. man since it first reported to
the Canal Zone in February,
1954 It is presently under the
; command of Lt-James S. Bon Bon-v
v Bon-v ner. Local citizens will remem-

. ber the Owl for its part in aidlngi

the fire-threatened British
" freighter, Hope Range, In the
Balboa Harbor earUer this year;
The Owl will be decommissioned
. In Charleston, S.C.
The Rail has been stationed at
-'the Coca- Solo Naval Station
' since June, 1954. Her present
" commanding officer is Lt. (l g.)
: John H. McKay. The Rail will be
decommissioned in Norfolk, Vas
i : In past years the Owl and the
.Rail transported Navy guests to
' the Black Christ festival In Por Por-i
i Por-i tobelo.
. The lnactlvatlon of the two

, -vessels Is part of the Navy's
present plan to decommission 81

k. anips wis year.

Pan-American union Reports Increasing
-In Development Q

WASHINGTON, D. C. Aug 12

(PAU) Increasing interest isjcis del Toro near the Coasts Ri-

beiag shown in the r' nelopmentican border,

cl mineral resources in tradttio tradttio-ally
ally tradttio-ally sencultural Panama, tbe Pan-
Amencaa L'oion reported today.
r the "petroleum Eeld, a Calif Calif-.Aa
.Aa Calif-.Aa company will soon begin
exploration ef the Petrolera de
s3urcba concession la Cbinqui.
' A new eil conpeision tits Ixn
f!H is the Provinee of Poeai del
T. tumuBg eperatieni have
btfua f tie eesst ei Alal-ixU

On The Railroad.

Should be held in reserve for fu future
ture future use. 5 -' '
Military Reservations on Ta Ta-tora,
tora, Ta-tora, Santa Catallna, Las Isle Isle-tas
tas Isle-tas Ancon Cove and El Vigla:
Should be held in reserve, but
the possibility of the installation
of a shipyard is ind'cated.
New Cristobal High School
Building: Should be used for ed-i
ucational .purposes.
n. rrUtnhal Emerrency vx
vrm Station: Should be dedicat
ed to the kind ot public service
to which it is most suitea.
New Cristobal C.Z. Police sub substations:
stations: substations: For public service. Con Consultation
sultation Consultation with National - Guard
commanders suggested.
Folks River Dock: Should be
as is at present to continue-serv-icing
coastal vessels which sail
hptween Colon and Atlantic
nnrt 'V
Pier 3. Colon; Should continue
t.n rnder its oresent service as
lonor as necessary.
Colon Railroad Station: For
public services. A detailed atudy
riven taking Into account the
nri fif Colon.
Residential Buildings In New
Cristobal: The g o v e rnment
should, retain ownership or tnese
buildings, giving tne income to
autonomous institutions fot pre
determined uses.
Buildlncs at Fort BeLesseps
should be used for the Dover
nor's office,, the port captain or,
customs, after conbulting'publlc
opinion in the city of Colon.
Rental to private firms may al
so e considered,
First A-Povercd ;
Passenger Ship
To Be Ready In '59
1 BOSTON, Au. It (UP) Tho Thomas
mas Thomas E. Stakem, Jr.a member of
tbe official Federal Maritime
Board, said h a speech here yes
terday that the, United States ex expects
pects expects to launch its first nuclear
powered passenger cargo ship
late in 1959. ...
He said this would be cart of a
general replacement of almost the
entire dry carlo ships in the Unit
ed States, merchant marine with within
in within the next 15 years. ;
, He spoke to the graduating class
e( the Massachusetts State .Mari .Maritime
time .Maritime Academy. (, .. (
:. "Almost without exception all of
the dr cargo ships and a large
number of tankers are ready for
replacement he said. ."Some
must be retired under the con contracts
tracts contracts their owners hold with the
government, or due to the plain
logic of competition, in order to
make room for the better equip equipped,
ped, equipped, faster and more competitive,
new chips in our American fleet. 1
v r v
"We In the Federal Maritime
Board and in the maritime ad administration
ministration administration are working in close
harmony with the shipping indus industry
try industry to phase out (spread) this build
ing program ever the next 15
yeart so that we can look forward
to an orderly replacement of units
of our fleet year after year on a
continuing qisji,
jsnd a well has been drilled in Bo-
Anthr cm ony srparlnt
to exploit mtnsimit tfepesits
in the Hie kquern are of Ce-.
ton Prevince. An eccest read to
rhe mining properties will open
ue the virtually Uoiated reiel
for the first time.
To subsidiaries of American a.
lurainum companies have filed
four-year nrhts for mining bsuxite
in the Province of Colna. Vera-
ruts, and CfcinouL.w&Is explore-1

:THF PULSE
OP PANAMA

A BID to have representatives
of two-times former President
Arnulio Arias' Panameftista Par
ty sit in on the discussion of a
new electoral code, being studied
bv the National Electoral Tribu
nal, seems doomed to j failure,
according to a prediction made
today,,
: The Panamefiistas have ; de declared
clared declared that they will not acwpt
the invitation unless the Electa,
ral Tribunal gives official recog
nltlon to the party
, sources close to the tribunal
said it is believed that. the Pan Pan-amenista
amenista Pan-amenista hid will be rejected
and the tribunal ,1 will recom recommend
mend recommend Instead that the party of officially
ficially officially enroll the number of
members required by law.
: The new electoral code aimed
at streamlining elections has
been submitted to the tribunal
by the administration of Presi President
dent President Ernesto de la Guardia Jr.
oOo
i The Panama Canal is not the
only area on the :: Isthmus ... af affected
fected affected by the unusually dry rainy
season, i- -
Thousands of families in the
Santa Rita region on the bor border
der border of Cocle and Veraruas yes yesterday
terday yesterday gathered in a field to
offer their Joint prayers'', for
rain to ease the drought which
is threatening their crops. v
'. It is understood that the cen central
tral central provinces of the Republic of
Panama have had even less rain
In recent weeks- than the Pan
ama, colon and canai zone
areas, A j.
-. i oOo r
One more home-made bomb Is
said to have exploded on upper
Central. Avenue Saturday night,
but police have not been able to
find any trace of the culprits,
" Saturday .night's petard re reportedly
portedly reportedly exploded opposite the
Tivoli Theater in Calidonla. No
one was hurt. p
Two bombs wenk off Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, in. which' some, sources re
gard as a reign of terror
One morning paper '- reported
with alarm today that over 5000
firearm permits have1 been is issued,
sued, issued, to residents in the San
Bias region, i r
The paper also reported that
the sale of munitions in San
Bias is "voluminous" and specu
lated that the ammunition is be.
mg bought by persons for nefa
rious purposes. ,-'
79 Reported Dead
In Worst Canadian
Airplane Disaster
i i i t ;
NEW YORK, August 12 (UP)
The crash of a Canadian Maritime
Central Airlines DC-4 near Quebec
City. Que.: yesterday, which ppa
rently killed 79 persons would be
Ihe worst in Canadian history and
one of the worst on record. Other
major air disasters include:
129 killed crash of C-124 Globe,
master Air Force plane near To.
kyo while carrying U.S.,. service
men back to Korea from leave
June 18, 1S53. :
128 killed collision of a United
Air Lines DC-7 and a Trans World
Airlines Super Constellation over
the Grand Canyon June 30, 1956.
87 killed crash of an Air Force
C-124 Globemaster carrying Amer
ican servicemen at Moses Lake,
Wash.. Dec. 20. 1952. i
v 80 killed crash of an Avro Tud
or airuner near Cardiff, Wales,
March, 1950. v t .
"74 killed crash of a Venezue
lan Airlines Super Constellation in into
to into the Atlantic off the New Jersey
coast June 20, 1958.
68 killed crash of U.S. Navy
DC-6 st Honolulu, March 21, 1955.
86 killed crash of United Air Airlines
lines Airlines DC-4 at Laramie, Wyo., Oct
f 7, 1955. .
66 killed collision and crash
of two UiS. Air Force Flying Box Boxcars
cars Boxcars in Germany, Aug. 11, 1955.
62 killed crash of Trans-Canada
Airlines North Star into the
wilds of British Colombis, Dec. 9,
1956,. m the worst previous Cana Canadian
dian Canadian crash.
tion rights for iron ore have been
filed ia the Province of Herrera.
Owners of the mining concession
oa copper deposits near Tola re report
port report that a U S. company will
seat Ks geologists to study tbe ex extent
tent extent to tbe lode end tbe feasibili feasibility
ty feasibility of commercial exploitation.
A new Panama company fcai
been organized to deal in all
classes of metals and plant macm
nery has been ordered from th
United States. Tbe company will
encourage tbe gaUierici of local!

(DJiJlioJ

11

1 (NEA Telephoto)
ACCUSED. SPY ARRAIGNED Flanked by FBI agents, Ru Rudolf
dolf Rudolf Abel, accused Soviet spy, arrives for his arraignment at
Edinburg, Tex. Abel ivas indicted by a federal grand Jury in
.Brooklyn, N.Y on charges of transmitting American military
.' t and atomic secrets to Russia.

Altrincham's Criticism of Queen

Gets Many British Papers Support

WNDONJ Ant 12r,-tr5pTi iaeresMi;m.4 V.-V.

British newspapers today r took up
where Lord Altrincham left off
with criticism of Queefl Elizabeth,
hea Court, and the whole of Brit
ain's hereditary aristocracy.
The empire-minded Sunday Ex
press printed- an attack on the
828 dukes, marquises, earls, vis viscounts,
counts, viscounts, and barons who. form the
hereditary nobility.-
The Socialist Reynolds News
complained that the Queen's1 court
was doing- a bad job of supporting
tne peso tnat is tiritisn.
The arguments were an expan
sion of the commerit by Lord
Altrincham, an obscure young
peer criticizing the Queen for her
"schooleirl attitude" and de
nouncing her courtiers. ,z
Altrincham received consider
able abuse ss well- a a slap in
the face from an irate retired
army sergeant. r But his remarks
sparked a public examination of
the. British conscience by tne
press' "w
The Reynolds News complained
that "if- the job of the royal
family is to support and sponsor
that which v is best in British
achievement, then. ..the Job is ill-
done.,.
"What has the court done to
encourage Britain's art, music
(other than jazz), theater (other
than the Danny, Ks ye type vari variety),
ety), variety), literature, architecture?" .it
asked. , ,.'-, ; :'
"The lisf is Impressively, de de-pressingly
pressingly de-pressingly .long. .
. "The s Queen's patronage has
been devoted largely to bloodstock
breeding The Duke of Edinburgh's
active interests in polo, yacht rac
ing, aerial) gliding and occasion-1
al bread-outline excursions into
science extended the pattern but
not too far," the paper, said.
. It ssid thst "no amount of per
sonal abuse of Lord' Allrincnara
can now mask the fact that if the
monarchy is to be more useful
than a traditional frippery. It must
catch up with and reflect this
modern World and all its lo
Interest,
scrap iron, a ready market for
which has been found ia Japan.
Meanwhile, business in the Colon
Free Zone cotinues. to be brisk.;
The seventh and largest public
building, with a floor space of O O-ver
ver O-ver 2,5ou square yards, was open opened
ed opened recently. Some 4 firms are
now operating ia tbe Free Zone,
with sales reported up substantial substantially.
ly. substantially. Tbe Government is considering
the establishment of an air ex express
press express office with warehouse facili facili-h
h facili-h at Torumen airnnrt in view
of the increasing am sunt si air-
freixhi. -' -

:

tions.'
The Sunday Express charged
that the hereditary nobility, far
from buttressing the throne, has
Become its yihakiest pillar.1;
Italian Defender
Sends Queen Liz
Single Rfed Rdsev?
LONDON A$g.- 12 (UP) Xn
Italian ex-artilltry officer who, has
challenged Lord Altrincham .to a
ouei tor his atuack on iBritish roy royalty
alty royalty yesterday-sent a singlered
rose to Queen Elizabeth as token
of jiis. "unshakeable devotionr."
'; British alrlinerofficials said they
did not quite lenow what to do
with the rose, Sent by Ren a to Ma Ma-miroli
miroli Ma-miroli in a small p a c k a g e ad addressed
dressed addressed to the Queen. ;
Marmiroli his challenged Lord
Altrincham to a duel for his criti
cisms of the Queen and her cour
tiers.
. - t
- The rose is in the freight office
at London airport. ;
- Queen Elizabeth is -at Balmoral
Castle in Scotland for the opening
of the grouse-hunting season.

Dry Year Affects Generation

Of Electrical Power In Zone

The amount of water flowing
i
into Gatun Lake during the first i
six months 'of this year was the t
lowest January-July period on I
record since the lake was Oiled!
In 1914. according to the month
ly report of Meteorological ana
Hydrographic Branch. --
The accumulated runoff of the
Gatun Lake basis amounted to

CW9 ajere-feet this year up perature recorded was 93 degrees
through the end of July. Theiat Balboa' Heights on July 25.
continued lack of heavy rains, The lowest thermometer reading
during July brought the level of : was 71 degrees in Cristobal on
th lake to 81.78 feet on July 13 I July-21.
the lowest elevation ott record There were 12 earthquakes re re-for
for re-for the month of July.' j corded on the Balboa Heights
Madden Lake also fell to. Its seismographs during July. Two
lowest elevation on record for of these were within 300 miles
the month of July when it and one of sufficient Intensity

reached sow or 201 .94. leer, on;
July 20.
The extremely "dry year has
vitally affected the generation
of electrical, power and cuesei
plants generated over 28,000,000
KWH during the first seven
months of the year, the highest
amount ever required for Canal
operations. To generate this a-
mount or power at the uatun
Hydroelectric Plant would re-,
quire an equivalent of 4.71 feet
of water on Gatun Lake. -The
'report of T. C. Renter,
Acting CtiUt Hydrographer,
showed that rainfall has ranged
from less thsn an inch below;
normal on the Padlflc side 1 to
'more than 20 inches under or-

U IT iff f r- 4 h
-

Capal Sets Up
12-Year Fund
For Claimants
The establishment of a trust
fund paying $50 monthly to the
beneficiaries in the settlement of
a. death claim against the Pana Panama
ma Panama Canal Company has been ar arranged
ranged arranged by attorneys of the claim claimant
ant claimant and th& Company. '.
This is the first time that a set settlement
tlement settlement of this type has ever been
made by the Canal organization in
a death or injury claim, In. the
past cash settlements have been
made nr such claims.
' Ths beneficiaries of ,th trust
fund r Clotilda Alonw, and and-her
her and-her four ..miner children, whose
father Donaciano, Boniche, dud
at l result of traffic accident
on June 1 of this year when
. struck by a truck owned by the
Panama Canal Company and e e-perated
perated e-perated by one o its employes.
The accident occurred In Ps
nam, ;ity. end ,the victim: died
In Gorge Hospital of injurns
sustained. ;
Arrangements for the trust fund
and agreement for settlement of
the claim were made by the Of Office
fice Office of the General Counsel of
the Canal Company and Woodrow
De Castro, Attorney for the claim claimants
ants claimants v Arrangements for the Banco
General, S.A., Of Panama, which
will act as trustee of the fund
were handled by Roberto Jimenez,
the bank's attorney...
fund "agreement, a "settlement of
$7,500 was made. After payment
of attorney's fees, hospital and ftw
neral expenses, and $100 cash to
the claimants, a cash payment, of
$6,606.77 -will be made, to the Ban Banco
co Banco General by the Canal Compa Company
ny Company and this amount will be held
in trust for the mother and four
children. The fund will draw two
per cent interest and the princi
pal interest will De paid in sau.uu
monthly installments oy me Dante
Payments will extend over a pe
nod of more than 12 years.
'Shasta A-Test
Again Postponed
LAS VEGAS, Nev.. Aug. 12
(UP) Adverse wind conditions
have forced the Atomic Energy
Commision to call the 14th post postponement
ponement postponement in its "Shasta" test at
the Nevada proving grounds.
Firing of the below nominal
yield device from a 500 foot tower'
was rescheduled for 5 s.m. tomor
row. Scientists yesterday announc
ed that the present wind patter
would have carried fallout over
nearby populated areas.
The postponement 'set a record
for delays in the AEC's 1957 test
schedule. "Shasta" originally was
really to be fired July 29..
mal en the Atlantic
side this
year.
Pacific side stations had more
than the normal amount of rain
last month but all stations north
of Pedro Miguel reported below
normal rainfall for July.
Temperatures were slightly a-
bove normal over the Isthmus
last month. The highest tem
to be noticeable.

2200 CZersMaGetJIfo'Vage Hike
i ., t
.' Abeat 2! Canal Zone employes' stand" U gain If the
11 peiteat Federal pay raise kill pastes the Senate It was
approved bv tbe House over the weekend.
bains Lovelady, president ef Lodce 14 of the Amtricsj
' Federation of Government Empleve. aald today that about
ZOOS ilasslfieeT employes will be affecteJ and ivet lae swatal.
, employes will et tbe raise thoald the bill be rotate law- -lit-
ssid today that be did not aaUrtpat aay trtxikle In
the Senste. Lovelady cabled Sen. OUm D. Jehnson (D-S. C.)
who is chairman of the Senate Poet Office and Civil Service
Ommlttec nrtiag htm U pash throern the rUItin.
"I know that Johnson favors approving the bill," love
lady said today, 1 am very hepefnj f a fsvorahlo vote."
The Boose apprevet tbe pay kill fey a voU ef lli to U.

u

Retirement Bill

Making

8 In Line Mow

Only slight Panama Canal pilots out of a total of a-
bout 100 would become eligible immediately for optional
retirement, should a Senate-approved bill become law, if
was. learned today.
The Senate approved legislation Saturday authorize:
ing the retirement ot Panama Canal pilots at the agifc of
55 after 20 years1 of service, (instead of the 30 years now"
required) provided that at least 15 years has been spent
as a pilot,
Capt. Harold Longmore, president of the Canal Zone
Pilots' Association today said that the pilots, were ex
tremely gratified and pleased with the Senate action.

"Pilots feel that this legisla
tion would not place them in
any special category at all, but
would simply give the pilots the
same opportunity, for optional
retirement that all other civil
service employes now have," he
stated... 1 rf.
It is the pilots' contention.
Longmore explained, that the
averaee,aa:e of pilots when they
-are usually 'huanftecT w wHer the
job is between 36 ana 4u years.
Under the old arrangements,
they must put In 30 -years : of
service before they could become
eligible; to retire. This means
that they could, hardly ever take
optional retirement until they
are 65 or 66. r
- The Canal's 'mandatory re retirement
tirement retirement age is 62, he said, "so
the pilots can never make It."
At the time that hearings
were held by the Senate Post
Office and Civil Service Com Committee.
mittee. Committee. Governor Potter whoi
flew to Washington, testified in
favor of the lowered retirement
requirement.
Despite anticipated opposi opposition
tion opposition to the measure in the
House, pilots said today they
have "every confidence that
the facts in .the case will over overcome
come overcome the ODDosition."
On the House floor, two bills
have been proposed. HR 4000
rwas introduced by Rep John
Shelley (D-Calif.) and HR Ji851
was introduced by Kep. jonn
Allen, Jr. (R-Callf.) The bills
are Identical, and both are now
nendlnsr before the House com
mittee on Post Office and Civil
Service.
"This legislation has been
sorely needed for years," Long
more said today In taking an
optimistic view of Its passage in
the House.
Rebel Arms In Oman
Mav Be U.S.-Made;
Ho British Comment
TBawpirrM Persian Gulf. Aurr,
12 (UP) British Headquarters
rushed samples of rebel gre grenades
nades grenades jmd land mines to London
today for Identification but re refused
fused refused comment on frontline re reports
ports reports the arms captured in Niz-
wa were American-made.
A pooiea uispnicii iium mi
Tork Times correspondent Sam
Pope Brewer, covering the Nls Nls-wa
wa Nls-wa frontline for the combined
American press, said that tne
grenade he saw appeared to be
American style and that ths
strengthened belief Saudi Ara Arabia
bia Arabia was arming the rebels.
Saudi Arabia, which itself dis
putes some of the Oman tern
tory, receives American aid..-.-
L 1 1 '" I.

i i t I I i

mmw.

K
Progress;
He also added that as for the
effect on othwc-fcanal employes
of. this legislation which will be.
oenenciai to 100 men out of ap approximately
proximately approximately 3500, "can do no
harm,"
"In fact' Longmore added,
"we have been supported in
our plea to Congress by other v
Canal employe groups. We ap-'
r preeiattr their" backing .'yer .'yer-i.
i. .'yer-i. much; he statedT- 'f
-The senate's actioif on the ft
lots" retirement bill earn on a
unanimous voice vote, it was re reported
ported reported from Washington.
' :. The Civil Service Commission
has voiced some objections to the"
bill saying it puts the pilots In a
special classification and that if
approved, it would lead to simi similar
lar similar requests from other groups.;
Commenting- -on this todav.
Longmore said that pilots knew
several such groups had submit
ted their reauests for more lib
eral retirement, and these- were
given ciose study, by the Senate
uommiuee a year ago.
They Included prison guards,
workers In TB hospital wards,
and others. He added that he
knew nothing of their particular
situations however. v.
Second Stranded
Alpinisl Found
Hanging Heed Down
GRINDELWALD,' Switzerland,
Aug. 12 (UP) Alpiee restfuerg
today spotted the econd ef four
stranded mountain cumbers en entangled
tangled entangled in his rooes and haneine:
head down on tbe sheericy north
wau ot i3,03S-iooi Mount Eiger.-
. "It aooesrs that he died dnrlnf
the light," the rescue teams from
from five countries reported. "The
storm must have been too much
for his exhausted body."
The cumber was Satafano Lou
chi, a 44-year-old Italian. Ha had
been clinging precariously to a
tiny ledge. 12.000 feet below the
summit of the mountain, dangling
from two rcpes. He was reported
injured.
The 60-man rescue team pulled
one man to safety yesterday ia
'a dramatic hours-long pickaback
haul before a raging snowstorm
halted attempts to reach. Longhi
and two missing Germans.
The two Germans were feared
to have plunged to their deaths U
one of the many blizzards -that
has stung the -frozen mountain face
since the party of four set out a
week ago for one of tbe most dif difficult
ficult difficult climbs ia tbe Swiss Alps.
- German alpinist Alfred Hellpart
made a daring descent from the
top of the mountain yesterday and
rescued Claudio Corti, 29, of Lee Lee-co,
co, Lee-co, Italy. Corti was so wesk HeU-;
part had to lash ira'to his back. -
;$ic3
Two cases- of drunken driving
were aired today la the Balboa
Magistrate's Court. Both de defendants
fendants defendants are Panamanians,
Oscar A. Brewster, 33. fit
fined 2100 for driving wre in intoxicated
toxicated intoxicated on Oalllard Ilijtiway
Saturday at 8:15 pm,
. The second case, which to
volved 34-year-old Psblo Avila.
was continued until Wednesday
afternoon following a request
by the government The viola violation
tion violation with which Avila Is charr charred
ed charred allegedly occurred last nlchl
on Balboa Road. JU pieces.
guilty. ... r

; r -



ACE TWO

V-

i

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

AMD roUBM RY TM

MUHMO BY hhjvii mwnniiui in mm i-v-'Wvi
MARMOOIO ARIAS. CPrre
'ST. H P. 'O Boa t4. Panama,. ..

1

eM.I ABDMtaa. panamkrwan. Panama
amim Owmm it. it cintmai. avinui miwmn irn anb tm aretcr
M RIMinKNTATIVU. JOSHUA 0. POWBRR, INC,
,', Ul MAOIMM AvR. MIW YWM. N V.
5 1: I I.M ', 1.B0

'. -PPH pWJWWe W( ewVeWfc
PM All RWMTMR, IM ADVAMCl,
WOm TSAR.' IN ABYANC

r fWS IS TOUR rORUM THt RIADEH OWN COtUMH
t thm Matt tabu fww hi raaden at Th' 'aitante America
,UMr are reseto" gratefully and are handled Ir a wMlv confident.!

. AABtrfButa'a Urtar dWt

t ram day. Letten ar pvWhM in tha der receWad.
' Meat try ta kaap tha lattara limited to ant page length.
I death? f hrHar writers b) held In trlctetf confidenc
V Thla aewspaper aarames no reipenilblliry far statements or pmIom
axaraiae' in lattara frm raiders.

THE MAIL BOX

EMPIRES AND
-Sir:

' It has been quite amusing reading the (wnstructtvejsrlticlBm
IJtL iHint.iv weii-mformed, men-are-writing about the

Army Engineers. But In the Aug, 7 Mall Box there was a-letter
tj on poot apul who signed himself "Not Bitter."
, tjh-.- .r.aif nr ih neressarv reorganization the Army

.d.Am time aao. This may

does the Army Judge men to be qualified? I have been doing a
w of raaearch on this, and from what I have seen watching

foremen and supervisors on both sides of, the Isthmus, there are
some' who run their Jobs Just pathetically., l seems one must f
into the Charlie picture, whoever be may be. Most likely some
Indian matfe Chief. "'.'. ,
Jn my research I have checked the mileage from each side,
stnd I find there to be little difference' in actual Jobs.- But on
checking the organizations I find the JPaqlfir side overflowing
with help, and the Atlantic side operating on a shoestring. There
m thra tima thA number of Dlumbera on the Pacific side, and

nit tin h number of

tjuipment operators oh the Atlantic eide and 11 on the Pacific

sifle.. mo woriaer me roaus art mi wu buuc vu uw uuwi uo.
Evidently someone has built himself an empire at Las Cruces,
loaded up with high-salaried personnel, and no one notices or
earej what a lop-sided organisation the Chiefs have created.
X be'ievt the US Army has some good officers' on the Isthmus
who ean also do a little investigation of this situation, and who

en do little straigncenmg-oui
CLEANER

I'd like to know if something can't be done about the un

sanitary food we people here are forced to buy, or do without.
During my two years stay down here I have bought nothing
fct Commtssary bread, thinking it's from the Zone and there there-lore
lore there-lore clean. Ha! I have- come across cockroach legs, wings, hu human
man human hairs, and on one occasion a mass of tangled hair embedded
la three slices. In almost every loaf is the hard, rubbery lump
Jtnown as "rope" and caused (as any baker, will know) by un unsanitary
sanitary unsanitary conditions.
My neighbors and I have at various times bought rancid,
nelly bacon, luncheon meat and sausages from the Commies,
making they were fresh.
Even an lnnocent-tooklnr bottle of soft drink at times will
have cigarettes butts, insect legs, and trash in general.
It would be possible to state more, but this gives the gen gen-mi
mi gen-mi idea. Let's have cleaner food and threby less disease.
A. J. W.

THANKS,
Sir;

I rive thanks for bein aliva today, and to ha.v had the

privilege of being admitted to finer Oorgas Hospital. I suffered
tor about three months with an ailment that could be consid considered,
ered, considered, apendioltl or an Intestinal obstruction. vl was admitted to

oorgas three tunes Between May 20 (my birthday) and July 29
this year. The surgical section staff have been very cooperative
trying to diagnose my ease which was complicated to start with.
' They referred me to the urology section which is governed

y a very competent na consiaerate specialist who I am hon hon-ered
ered hon-ered to mention: Col. Hewitt. Dr. Hewitt Is u man nf few words

I am completely cetraln that his work with me has been exact
fJd perfect, and would say to every person who has trouble in

vn neios in wnicn ne specializes, and who has Qorgas privileges,
Come up and see this good doctor."
To cut a long story short, I was operated on July 31 and am
ow Improving considerably, even though I feel like a mechan mechanical
ical mechanical mail under these- heaw antibiotics. I am In good spirits,
"4 d my Bible daily. To close friends, It Is good to be alive

w"Jn ana mmum ngia to tne
REAL COOL
Sir:

I have Just returned from a States vacation, and find my my-;
; my-; W co-npletely disillusioned about the school system here. My

w-uu oil ro ir oenina tneir otatesiae cousins, who-are in com comparable
parable comparable grades.
I have always been proud of the fact that my children were
tang to school in the zone because I had been told that the
schools here are ahead of those In the States, but you can't tell
It by my findings.
. i5om of toe teachers I talked to in the States suggested
tha It nay not be the teaching at fault but the slowed -down
!?. tropics. But why do we have to put up with tro-
I pleal heat in our schoolrooms?
L lr wmdiaontaf is her to stay, but are our children going
J. dult before ven a portable aircondiUonlng unit Is put
lto their stuffy overcrowded rooms.
. 1 I ook are overcrowded In the States too.. but
: 572, wrc"',doLh,P tr7- And Stateside children do
I ?f.'tciw1 work during the cooler months. In the summer
J mJStTvSUI1 lLrf0T T?7 cnt Can1 ffl to
, spend s little money on the children of it employes?
! Meas

SALTATION ARMY GOODBYE

r:

S?K?H,!if .vf MrL Mooruawmv and myself, I wish to thank
e Public for the part each member of It has played In making

i ulve W,U1 oiob central corps or
w Salvation Army a magnificent success, and to bid you all a
reodbye. May Ood bless you all. V
Clement A. Meonaawmy

. .5
- i. v

' :

eCSUXa Cr FftOCCSS-T&J rrn f SWam trea e
Irrtrr TanrMt, Aslaota, O, fooaat tte perfect war t kaa)
ael eMrRBc Q arc rail atlaR'a tfarae boor parade a Mta
aeiBli, TWtr -or te rerrU wV4 wtiicR tola theea tet

vveaJfe ef vRtrr.wna every
lrtlripad ta th parsdA

PANAMA ambrican ri

INS.
ao i3 oo
1R.BO
14 00
be Impatient if doean't appear rhi
(
ENGINEERS
be true, but how in the hepk

elr-r.triclans: There ate two heavy

ai me same wnie.
B3.
FOOD
DR. HEWITT
Stan oi uorgss.
M. A. Anderson
SCHOOL
.
an. Brru 1
, i ;

Labor News

And
Comment
By VICTOR RSISEL
BERLIN This is no fool's para paradise.
dise. paradise. Operatives of 91 espionage
and counter-espionage units slither
in and out of this city's shattered
streets. Both sides know what's
happening almost every minute W
the other's sector; From the cor
roborated files of units m the west western
ern western sector stalks a grim spectre
itotailrri renorts of intensified anti-
Semitism in the soviet areas since
the recent purge.
"Over these." Soviet occupation
officials always have been anti-
Semitic, as has Nikita. Khrusnc Khrusnc-chev.
chev. Khrusnc-chev. There is an "incident"
never before reported which re reveals
veals reveals the kind of state the Rus
sians are building in their tones.
Some time aso there were' antl
Semitic riots and brutal pogroms
in Poland. Some 3,000 Polish Jews
fled to Berlin, Over 2,000 were
made welcome in the democratic
Western secfor- artd flown out to
the German Federal Republic.
More han, 1,000 tried to stay with
friends fcnd. relatives in the Rus Russian
sian Russian sector of the City. The Soviet
Command summoned the leader of
the' Jewsih' community In the Red
sector. There is' a record of this
conversation The Red official told
the Jewish' leader to tell the 1,000
refugees --'from Poland to get out
of East Berlin, They had to flee
agaut
Contraatad with th rnwd
antl-SamltUm in al Soviet tar tar-ritoria
ritoria tar-ritoria it Germany's new Dam-
Mracy. I heard ef it from tnan.
cellor Adanauer. I heard f it
frem 0rmany' new genera la.
But I else heard f it frem Karl
Marx net th baroi fllw
wh started all the trouble, but
my god frhmd, Karl Marx of
DutMldorf, leader ef th Jewish
community In that induttrial ca capital
pital capital of th Ruhr, and editor ef
the "Allgemeine Wechenseitunf V
dor Judan in Dautachland." This
I th general weekfy of the
Jews in Germany,
Mr. Marx and I talked priv
ately in bis home. The Jews are
ha f 37 m. .SntUtinrwhat I
wiJ
had been told in Bonn by Werner
Middlemann, head of the Ministry
For Expellees. Refugees and War
Victims. More than 5,000 Jewish
folk returned to the German Fed Federal
eral Federal Republic last year. Two years
ago- the -retttTning wanderers av averaged
eraged averaged U years of age. Now the
younger people are returning and
Herr Marx put their typical age at
45.
In all of Germany today there
ire 45.000 living peacefully, going
into th professions, and even be beginning
ginning beginning to take their place in the
Army. Here in Berlin there are
4,500; In Munich, 2,000; in Frank Frankfurt
furt Frankfurt about 2,000; Hamburg, almost
1,500; Cologne, Just over 1,000; Dus Dus-seldorf,
seldorf, Dus-seldorf, about TOO, and StutUart ov over
er over 500. The rest are spread through throughout
out throughout the land.
There is more than the freedom
of the Jews and the aid given them
by the Republic which attests to
deen strivinr to create a 'demo 'democratic
cratic 'democratic state. From General Ulrica.
de Ma'Tip'e, head of the new arm army's
y's army's G-3, the Joist Command, I
learned that no man need
yield his conscientious objections
and be forcibly drafted into the
new army, new 100,000 strong.
There Is Ceunt WoM Baudl.
ln, wh has chart f .Inner
euidaftee" Indectrlnatien ef
th Bwnowhr. the army. A
cultured man, given ta molding
madam pottery ai e hobby, the
Count exejainad effort I ta make
certain that the future German
Mie wulef be a Reed flohtlnf
man, but e man fighting for po po-iltlve
iltlve po-iltlve demeeracy.
I asked how thev could assure
the world of this. The Count told
(ne ot the Army School for Demo
cracy la Koblens. There, every!
three months. 100 officers are
trained in democracy. Every bat
talion commander must ko
through it. Mostly caotains, 1 ma
jors and It. colonels, they are lec
tured to by university srofessors.
labor leaders, parliamentarians
and authorities on Jewish culture
who pull no punches on the bruta
lity of the old WeHrmacht and Hs
anti-Semitism, university profes
sors not only, lecture to the army
officers, but trsia regular army
men te teach fellow officers ta the
future.
This Army college new has 17
university instructors and is Just
starting, asvtng teea iaoehed
last year 1a hotel suites. And it
may tickle many a GI back home
te know that there also is a course
for Sergeants-Major. It's a two-
week stint. All this operates the
theorv that the serceant is like
the shop feremaa. He eemes Ute
direct contact wttk U troops
snd should learn hew te treat the
enlisted mas '.
The caste system Is banlsneeL
WorkiBrmea'B sons caa be officers,
and officers sa bark eemmands
only e the military and ot the
social kreL ;
vAnd tfi the peeRle's rHvIImr
fe bee) the Rew new Army. Se
wawks a a Military fruiting
Hens, a aw a I at a wnw ng en)
ele, was bad rtght ef
Jatfarm by th audd
wee srthr Bit (flat.
ucnne which
If Germany doesat grow irte a
rtnmg democrstic aation. it went
be beeanse Ms kaders a real try

isg w male democracy wart,

II 1 r Don't'

i i. 'K .r c. i' :. -rw as a w:: a i

NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL
. By LEE MORTIMER ;

This Is Not H'rhbro'w: One of
the greet names in fiction is Tay
lor Caldwell (square monicker Ja
net Reback). with some 17 or .18
best-seliers to her credit, when
she. began to fight the Reds, the
highbrow literary supplements that
once compared ner to gauac, ig
nored her completely, which is
how they'll probably treat her new,
starUing and exciUng novel, "The
Sound of Thunder," due U Octo
ber. It takes Communism and the
Income Tax apart. An Uncle
Tom's Cabin" for the taxpayers,)
Mrs. Reback (and- her husband
Marcus) are now working on a
new one an historical novel about
St.' Luke. Tliey went to the Holy
Land ind Some for the. back
ground.
Second Chapter: Taylor Caldwell
writes' me and I quote: It was hor horrifying
rifying horrifying to find in our researches
there the Close parallel had crush
ing taxation, the exploitation and
crushing of the middleclass. mill
tarism, self -called "leadership of
the worid.?Sf the "rax Romans"
which waa ominously like the U-
otted Nations and had the same
aims, gangsterism, corrupt law-
makersi bribery, public housing
and other "welfare" measures,-ca
tenae to venal mobs and minori minorities,'
ties,' minorities,' nd manufacturers growing
rich on war orders due to everlast
ing "crises" thought Up against
the "Enemy" by Roman politi politicians.
cians. politicians. It took Rome 400 years to
decay. I give America ten more
years) (End Quote and The End.
The Bit There's No Biz Like:
Barbara Stanwyck's being paged
for a return, to Bway, in "wines "wines-burg,
burg, "wines-burg, Ohio." Long time no see, Bar
bara, come hornet ...Pat QBrien
ia coming back. Will make bis
first appearance on the IfY stage
"Mountain State"
ACROSS
! "Mountain
Suu."
! Virginia
; t capital.
' is Charleston
ixl Much is
I mined her
Always
I 1 Ctn.
- DOWN
1 Departed
2 Wights before
2 Withered
4 Hone's gelt
8 Bury
I Golf mound
7 Stutters
I Male swans
uimI mwV
1 W Toward the
Roman
II Not as much
emperor
llBeveraie
It Tree fluid
,21 Organ of
j IT Honey maker
. hearing
l ia Airican iiy
is Disorders
21 Musical
dramu
!24Uadenlett "UBt
i Kctcn
i febrieV "Arabian gulf
fMMUiury
( BR-iSUUt :
iMThroufh
!tt Asseverate
M Arrow poicon
ST Bitter vetch..
SI Bellow
iSSCberal
i- tempMitloa
i41 Darns
Ai Stratagems
- 44 Letter of
, eJulumg
UMoUm
', irRwari .
!&S Genua of
shrub t
I4WUR
MouBtta ;
eeovb. torn)
JTIUp j
4Bor
SI rennet
- Ruaaiaa
MCoDtrodes
Dsde
EL

I'llS eThatH

since 1930 in "Miss Lonely Hearts."
My heart's been lonely lor you,
Pat Patricia v Morrison going o-
Seratic with, a '.'Carmen" uebut in
lexico City. If her voice is like
her "bilt," you san have Callas
and Tcbaldi. -v;.;;
Hot Nothings From Nowhere:
Eddie Bragno, best known as the
on-agaln-off again Finnegan hus husband
band husband of MolEe Netcher, Chicago
department .store heiress, is get
ting tired of reconciliation discus
sions which don't reconcile, and is
planning visit to the law courts
... Anne Woudward, who accident accidentally
ally accidentally killed her millionaire husband.
'is coming out of her' Paris mour
mg jor return wmri at new
York's social whirl.. Hollywood
studios flooded with scripts about
faked and fixed i beauty contests
and contest winners... Excursus on
ex-Latin Quarter s cutiesl S a n d 1
Preston discovered Bob Ritchie,
dean emeritus' -of El Morocco's
Wolves' Table Round. (But he took
her to. the ilarwyn. Figured she's
too young for Morocco s aging lu
pos) ... Muriel Kjng, ex L.Q. chan
teuse, snd eight-year-old Terry, i
new act in the Catskills.
Dateline Mexico City: I suppose
the Chinese, have a, word for this,
but I call it a twist of fate. It's a a-bout
bout a-bout Marilav Shih Hsieh, the at
tractive Chinese heiress who us
ed to -trip the light fantastic at
El Morocco with Hindu importer
Harry Jaag. She's a sister of the
fabulous Chneie who lavished mil millions
lions millions on Marion Saunders, the pla
tinum blonde model, to whom he
was briefly wed. Maruan and her
long time companion secretary
were in Mexico City. It was Mart Martian's
ian's Martian's habit to walk her poodles
after lunch;' but this day a long
distance call interrupted and the
cpmpamon took them out instead.
Answer to Previous Puzzle :
5ixC
w T i7 B
mm w : i . -J
29 Solicited 44 Quot
river 44 Penis
1 Conduct
47 Sailors
S3 Strays .' 49 Dove's horn
34 Peevish t : 80 Gaelic
40Tber 2S Si Masculine
institutions of appellation
hifher . 82 Rocky .
'education her pinnacles
-41 Manuscripts ISScottlsb
(ab.)
sheepfold

I 7 t ifrlS v f Wft
e m g ? ToTnjnS via lT
T I r 5 111 Si 5 5E F
K s TS n mlwi cj" A Njc n

ft tt U I B p I I f P l
r-" "" r r T"T""i
r r r t
i P-rr
ji u9i.p -ri p flijai
3" j .., 3k
" '. SI- T
r -jr --
'A 'IS U U "7" U. 4 U H H I
:rr--r t
t r"" r---"
r--" rT r r
L-ju

- CfsThem''

When the. earthquake struck. Ma Ma-rilan
rilan Ma-rilan was umiarmea but the com companion
panion companion who walked in- her stead
was wuedi -y-'- A
' Forgive Ke I'm New At This;
Betsy Blair, Gene Kelly's 'ex, do doing
ing doing Monmarte with Henri Claude,
the writer. But I remember ber
when she hoofed in the Diamond
Horseshoe chorus ... Jimmy Dona
hue inughing it up with Evelyn
ana, the lady buimgbter, at Cher
ry- Grove. Plenty yocks there, at
that .... Dorothr Malone's latest
is dress manufacturer Arthur We
ber; an Ava Gardner last season's
numbei. There' a-phony around
town claiming to be- Johnny Mey Meyer,
er, Meyer, the erstwhile Howard Hughes
tab-picker-upper. Stripper Lois De De-Fee,
Fee, De-Fee, Who knew the genuine item,
spotted the counterfeit at the Me Me-tronomo
tronomo Me-tronomo and threatened to toss
him Into the street if he didn't
pay up.: Lois could do it, too; She
used to be a female bouncer; I
once saw het knock the heads of
two fresh guys together and let
them lay. ....
' Success Story: My guide to the
Philippines was a young Ameri American
can American newspaper "vet named Marvin
Gray," who qpee did a Bway col column
umn column Despite hit youth,' he was
fniblisber of the important Mani Mani-a
a Mani-a Evening News and with Gen General
eral General Romulo is the biographer of
the FMUppines' late and beloved
Pres. Magsaysay. About a year
ago the Philippines got too hot to
hold this young crusader, so he
returned -to the States and bought
three smaliweekly papers in South
era .California, with a total cir circulation
culation circulation of 6,500. They are the
Rialto Record, (Bloomington News
and Fontana City Bulletin. which
published six pages an issue then.
Less than a year later, their corn corn-to
to corn-to more than 20,000 and the ca
pers are running 24 pages stand
ard site. Couldn't happen to a nic nicer,
er, nicer, smarter guy. (And such a beau beautiful,
tiful, beautiful, wife).. r. ;
I Don't Krow. I'm Merely a Ask
ing: Has anyone mentioned Anna
Maria Alberghetti and Don Robin
son f who he?) ... Is Ben Scanner.
veteran of 50,000 legal defenses
for the Legal Aid Society, going
over .to the other side of the -fence
with a prosecuting Job in the Brook -l
nil. tt; ..4 u.... tv. ...
ord companies finally found Flor Florence
ence Florence Michaels, the lovely song-
fvAaa Tf' Km. lint. T
there anything good about 'being;
poor 7 yes. it s inexpensive,., is
there better roa st-beef In New
York than at London's' Simpson's-in-the-Strand?
(Yes, at Joe s'Pero s'Pero-na"
na" s'Pero-na" Berger'a McCarthy Steak
House at Mirror Square.)... Do
you have to make a lot of money
to amount to something?- (No; You
can always inherit a.)
Major of the Same: Second-base-
mil Billy Martin (whose lather
was born in Hawaii) practiced his
Japanese (which he learned in Ja Japes)
pes) Japes) and his Hawaiian at th
Harwyn with the Lexington Ho Ho-ENELDA
ENELDA Ho-ENELDA ADD NEW YORK.
tel's Hawaiian Rbem -beauts, the
Viennese Lantern's 'Yasuko and
the.LQ.'s MiUuko Morigai "while
Bob Fukuda, Hawaii's handsome
Deputy Attorney General, umpired
Tenants ia swank sew 45 Sut Sutton
ton Sutton Place So. wifl be able to fish
in the East River from their liv living
ing living room windows (it says there.)
.:. Msyb I printed this before, but
George Sanders, the smoothie, is
acting smooth with Sharmaa Dou Douglas
glas Douglas ia Hwd.
Wisdom Of A Wis White Wry
Wench: When he comes te call for
you' meet him in the lobby. Don't
Invite him to your apartment If
you do, beH decide to stay, smoke
your cigarets, drink your liquor,
raid your ice-box, then when you
get difficult before dinner he
wont buy you dinner!

WW I Oa Vacation

:.:pa!iyujas!h;:gto;j
f-lEBRV-GO-RoO

'WASHINGTON Just a few
days before 'the vote on the jury
trial amendment,? Sen, Lyndon
Johnson knew that he didn't have
the votes to win.: He stalled for
time." The fact that he finally won
was considered nothing short of a
political miracle.
The tall Texan had first per persuaded
suaded persuaded Southern Senators to ac accept
cept accept the jury trial: amendment
with Negroes en jurie by Wil Wiling
ing Wiling them It would merely result
in hung (urle. One white mart
en the jury culd always Vet,
against conviction; could alwiys
torotct whit dfn6nts.
-'With the South behind him. there.
fore, what Lyndon needed was to
cut into the huge bloc ot m m
nublican Senators which GOP lead
er JCnowland had lined up against
the jury trial amendment.
s At this point. Lyndon and the
Church-C'Mshoney-Kevauer group
conceived the idea of extending
trial by jury to all criminal con.
tempt cases, including iaDor.-
This, In turn, ewung three po
tent labor ereuDs behind trial by
jury Their shift was what real-J
ly dtMtfd the administration's
civil rights bill. 1 r
The three labor groups,,'' were:
the United Mine Workers, the
postal workers 'ind the railroad
brotherhoods. ..,..'
How Lyndon won them, despite
an emphatic, repeated resolution
by. the. AFL-CIO executive council
to the, contrary, is the real story
LYNDON'S PAST VoOTWOR ;
! Here is how he did it: .r:
The postal workers' have 'been
desperately anxious to pass a pay
raise diu. it must' oe un.a oy
Sen. Olin Johnston of South Caro Carolina
lina Carolina and his Post Office Commit Committee.
tee. Committee. So Johnston agreed to make
postal pay increases the first order-
of business before his commit
tee and keep .it there. until passed
if 1 the portal- workers lu turn
would woo Republican Senators
over tn the iurV trial amendment.
Lyndon Johnson; and. Johnston al also
so also agreed to push the postal pay
increase over Elsenhower's veto,
by as, expected, he-vetoes t.
.Jereme Keating, able legislative
reDiesoutativeoi the letter car-
briers, kept bis end of the bargain,
bunonhoied many senators. j
-He is credited with swinging
Sen.iKuchel of California away
from his colleague, nowiana, m
favor of the lury trial amendment
United Mini Workers: The Mine
Workers Journal had gone M rec
ord vigorously against tne jury
trial amendment. Its' June issue
had described it as "phony as a
three-dollar bill."-
1 Despite this, John L. Lewis aud aud-denly
denly aud-denly reversed his union and, sent
telegrams to every .Senator urg urging
ing urging the amendment which his ova
magazine labeled phony.
This switch was accomplished
through Welly Hopkins, one-tune
member of the Texas Senate, a
great friend of Lyndon Johnson,
now counsel to the United Mine
Workers. v .,;:" .V, -Z
.The fact that John La Lewis was
once socked the biggest fine in
labor history by U. s.. Judge Alan
injunction, did not handicap' Lyn
don and Hoyxins in swinging jonn
L.r around .W the rewritten jury
trial ameument.,
V Lewis, In turn," swung at least
One Republican vote away from
Knowiuud tnat or cnapman itev
ercomb of West Vinrinia. r
. Railway Brotharheodi:-This was
the most influential labor group
of 4lL The brotherhoods have a
Railway Retirement 'Act which
they want pasied 'arid which ik
stalled in the House. However, the
chief factor which swung them in into
to into line was' the, personal persua persuasion
sion persuasion of Lyndon, j, -. sv. i
i PARTING-THI'RID SIA
Lyndon got hold of Cy Anderson,
warmhearted representative of
the Railway. Labor Executive As Association,
sociation, Association, put his nose almost ai
gainst Cy's and told him that to
save a split in the Democratic par party
ty party be had to swing the brother brotherhoods
hoods brotherhoods -behind the jury trial a a-mendment.
mendment. a-mendment. .When Lyndon starts
tslking he can almost persuade
the waters of the Red Sea to part
Cy Anderson got busy. He even
persuaded ex Congressman Bob
Mollohan of West Virginia to come
to Washington te use his influence.
' f f '. ..
HfCH ON THE HOGThat's the
Baleish. HC Ih pup'i arabbing
fBlu Boy.".a heriy porker U
vhiic puppy "bams it up."

ty PIIW riARSON
I i .ill I M -T TT'J

Harry See, lobbyist for the train-
men, also talked to key Senators.
, It. was this big push by labor
which really rescued Lyndon John
son on the jury trial amendment
' There wete two ironic facts v -bout
labor's position;
1. it lined up with part of exact-
ly the saint; Dixie-GOP- coalition
which put across the Taft-Hartley -,
Act. It was Taft and Northern R
publicans who worked out the long.'
standing coalition whereby w t h
South voted against, labor and
Northern Republicans ,v ate d a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst civil rights. '
i 2 Labor also lined up against
imnnriant laws .which it ; helned ',

jLo pass, the Minimum Wage Act,
the JJavis-Hacon aci, ana tne
Walsh-Healy Act all enforced
by court orders. Enforcement of
these laws by jury trials is almost
unworkable.'- i

' NOTE At the last minute, John Johnson
son Johnson almost lost one Republican
Senator, .Barry 'Goldwater of Ari Arizona,
zona, Arizona, because jury trials were ex extended
tended extended to labor injunctions
Goldwater, a Phoenix department
store owner who hates labor. went -up
to Knowland and told him he -didn't
intend to rewrite the Taft
Hartley Act in the civil rights bill.
He promised to vote -against the
jury trial. "' ,.;
Later Goldwater began to feel
uncomfortable, siding with Walter
Reuther anr Jim Care; : former
mainstavs nf the CIO.iWho fought
against the jury trial compromise.
- Lyndon shrewdly detailed Sen.,
Strom Thurmond of South Carol!-.,
na to work on Goldwater.' Thur Thurmond,'
mond,' Thurmond,' former Dixiecrat candidate
fnn. ProsiHent. in Goldwatef'a best

friend in the Senate and -finally
swung him away from' Knowland
over to the jury trial amendment.
Senator Introducing
Bill To Expand U.J.
College Facililies
WASHINGTON, Aug, 12 (UP)
Sen. Clifford P, Case (R-iMJr an announced
nounced announced today-he will,) introduce
a biU to authorize a $2,500,000 fed federal
eral federal program; to help, the, states
develon nlans for expanding, their
lutllaff tarilitiel. I i ((
Case said the need for such ac action
tion action sas pointed up bytte report
yesterday by President Eisenhow Eisenhower's
er's Eisenhower's committee on education be- (
ydnd the hig;h school. .

The commmee saia ..ma wmaw
of Americans seeking admission r
to coUcge will double by 1970.- To y

mfeet their
u i ..... - i ... nof xnr
federal-state cooperative pro- y
.m in itnanca education' at a
low intertst rate, They wouia pro provide'
vide' provide' for- federal ; granU,-; among w
other(things, xgffiffc.
J On Matching BasU f 1
- Case said Us ,proposed,'!$2,500, ,proposed,'!$2,500,-000
000 ,proposed,'!$2,500,-000 would be distributed among
the states on a mktchitrg 'basis.
Each state would receive at least
$10,000, with the rest-to oe appor apportioned
tioned apportioned on the Basis of school-age
population..- l' rt" v'i
The program would be admims admims-teired
teired admims-teired by the U.S.' Cbinmisslener
of Education. -.ivfirj.-
Case said he planned .to intro introduce
duce introduce a second bill lster te ; pro provide
vide provide assistance to the states fof
establishment and expansion of
two-year public community col college.
lege. college. ; .
CHaas n f raubla
'The fen a tor noted that the
President's committee- said pres present
ent present xlleges will be- uasble to
meet the fgreat expansien of ea ea-pable
pable ea-pable young people seeking edu edu-cation
cation edu-cation Beyond high school." The
committee said eollege. tesotirces
already are strained and their
"quslity stsndards". In jeopardy.
"Obviously, we will have to takt
tremendous steps ttf overcome
this deficit," Case said. College
educatioi. is not a luxury, but ;
rather a necessity in today s
-wid of nuclear tensions and con-
tant ideological competitlon.,,
tie said his legislation was in intended
tended intended "to stimulate the states,
and the public at large, to recog recognize
nize recognize the extent of the problem
which we face and to bedn mak making
ing making plans for its solution.",
way thla puppy-a livinj i
free ride doesn't bother
jt keep reel ma mm atmwi

o

I1



- j

1 I
N 1
','
X
J j v
THK PANAMA AMERICAN AN INBEPENDKNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PACK tmft
.MONDAY, AUGUST 12, 1957 ,

T

uu$&

injnniim iiniiniflin.ir--iiiiii -rr 'li nimT i rT-nn r - i in n fl

' FOOTING THE"B!Lll These girls found it cooler washing a
"-ear in bare leet m one of their jobs to earn money for a Euro-'
jean vacation. Sixteen such girls o( Mt. Lebanon, Pa., have
worked through, summer vacations and on jobs during the rest
ef the year to raise the amount. -AH Girl Scouts, they need
about 595Q each Jorjhs frajid. tour, next year,

HOLLY1

I 1 Wj

Moms ry radio

Erskino JohijsoJi

HOLLYW06D NEA) --.Belied
the Screen: Remember the Most
Outstanding TV tjUE
48" .i6-year-bld ventriloquist Shir-

lev Dinsdale wiin a iive-y-v
quipster named Judy Splinters on
hel$L lm onn't. It was'the

vear of the first Emmy Awards
and TV -was in the stone age .of

min.k timing. n v a lew 5

ri.i, on scattered! U.S. rooftops

were casting their shadows o:

tint f vmi ari ft pioneer TV

fan, you may have said, I won won-aL,
aL, won-aL, Worn of Shirley?"

, wu Rhirlev's now 25. She s

iiin 'in Colorado Springs, Colo

4k. ;; f Frank Lavburn. a

yd engineer or the Sperf y Gy-

ennn CO. XneV were in

3? in 1953. Their children are a three three-tyea&ddv4(irl,vPattx,
tyea&ddv4(irl,vPattx, three-tyea&ddv4(irl,vPattx, nd:.k hree-jnonth-ekLasiejyfieorge.
fv ,L
After winning their .Emm Sm

ley ana juay app.eareu
and" ABC-TV from .Chicago in 1949 1949-50
50 1949-50 and on a New York panel show,
"Where Was I?" in 1953. Before
moving, to Colorado,; Shirley and
Judy laughed it up on a Saturday
morning local show for WCAU-TV
in Philadelphia. -'.-.. , ,
"But: Judy is, not dead," Shirley
writes me. "I don't think she'd
know how to die. My daughter
claims he as her very own now,
but when she will be more active
is hard to say.-She's part of our
family but-she doesn't come first
any more.'1 r ; '-ii-
HOLLYWOODITES Are Talking
, Aboutr Marlon Brando donning a
I bldnd wig. for his role of a Nazi in
' "The Young i Lions." He'll also
have makeup nose bob to makei

him look ''Aryan."?... fat uanens
('aughter, Mavourneen- -becomes
Mrs, pavid' Garten June 29 .
":iia Kazan quotes about why
he prefers to hire neW faces for
hrs mbyies:'
' .' .' ' x ".

their way up. It's ,a life or death
struggle for them and they give

their utmost to the1 role."

Anng Maria Alberghetti s sis

ter, Carla, deciding to go it alone

as a solo singer after completing

three night-club dates with Anna

Maria ., Jimv "Amess explana

tion of why adults like his TV $e

nes. "ilunsmoke".: ; v.

'.'We don't fire 10 bullets out of

a six-shooter. : :,

"I get aT lick out of working
with people who are hungry.
They're like young fighters on
:

JANIS PAIGE hurling drink

in a glass at Producer James

EUsworth -Slrflt' Holivwbod cafe

In "an- argument over.'? occupancy
of a "bar stool.! Art Carney jplay-

ing .the role of Dublin's Lord May

or xtoDert jsriscoe in "The' Fabul

ous Irishman" on CBS-TV's Play

nouse 80 June 27.

Grace Kelly' reported "very un

set" over Gant Gaither's biogra-

pny of her ,due in the bookstalls

soon. He s thes Broadway' nroduc

er who gave Her Grace her first

big break. .-.

Someone meetinc Gordon Scott.

the. screen's Tarzan wha wears

shoulder-length hair, .in V; Holly Hollywood
wood Hollywood bar and asking him: "How

many guys have you had to slus

for. making cracks about your

tresses?"

"Seven," i replied Gordon, "bo

ing on eight." ?

HOLLYWOOD'S keeDina no with

the times. A movie titled, ''Down
Payment,"; has been changed to

"No iiown Fayment." Judy Gar
land reading the script of "Honey

moon in Madrid," a nonmusical
slated for film in Spain this fall if

she likes the role.. David Niven's

crack at the TV-Radio Writer A'

wards banquet: "I haven't Seen so

many writers in one room since I

guested on Bob Hope s show.

Rosemary ciooneys 10 year-

oid sister, Gail, signing on the
dotted line for the role of Eve
Arden's daughter, in i new, TV
series.

r

1090 Jics,, Colon V
Telephones: 2-3066 Panama
1063 Colon 1
PRESENTS'. r:

Today, Monday, Aug. 12
P.M.
4 !nn -Feature Review

'4:30 What'a Your Favorite (re (re--
- (re-- quests taken by phone

i till 3:00)
5:30 News ' 7
5:35 What's Your P a ? o r i t
, (cont'd) ,

6 : 15 BLUE RIBBON SPORTS

REVIEW (Pabst Beer)
6:30 WRUL Rebroadcast
7:00 Over To You
7:30 VOA Report From U.S.
8:00 Music By Roth 1
6:30 Proudly We Hall .'

9:00 You Asked, For It ( (-'
' (-' quests taken by, phone

till 7:30)

10:30-ifCavalcade Of America ,;.
11:00 Concert under The Stars
13.00-Slgn Off

Smorrow,. Tuesday Aug. 13

6:00 Slem On Alarm Clpci

Club (requests taken

' by phone uu 7:uu)
7 : 30 Morning Salon 1 Concert

8:15 Church" In The Wlldwood

8:30 Musical Reveille
9:00 News ?
9:15 Sacred Heart
9:30 As I See It

10:00 JENNIFER'S JOU RN AL

(Cutex and Odorono)
10:05 Spins and Needles (re

quests taken by phone

till 8:30) 4
11:00 sNews :
11:05 Spins and N d 1 e
(cont'd)
11:30 Meet The Entertainer i
12:00 News
P.M.
12:05-Lunchtlme Melodies
12:30 Musical Travelog
1:00 News
1:15 Music Of Manhattan
1:30 Sons Of The pioneers
1.45 Forward March
2:00 Tex Beneke Show
2:15 Freddy Martin Show
2:30 Songs From The Shows
3:00 Hank Snow And His Raln-
. bow Ranch- Boys
3:15 Sammy Kake Show
3:30 Music For Monday
4:00 Feature-Review
4:30 What's Your Favorite
"(r e q u ests taken v by
phone till 3:00) ..
5:30 News
5:35 What's Your Favorite
vM "(eonfd) '
:0O InteHlde,liw,':!
6:15 BLUE RIBBON SPORTS

REVIEW (Pabst Beer)

6:30 On Stage America

(WRUL) . .-.
7:00 interiude For Music"
7.-154-HOW CHRISTIAN 6CI
ENCE HEALS
7:30 VOA Report From U.S.
8:00 World Of Jaza
8:30 Life With The Lyons

9;0OtYou Asked For It (re (requests
quests (requests taken by phone

till 7:30) i

10:30 Music From Hotel El pan

ama

10:45 Temple Of Dreams

11:00 Concert Under The stars

12:00 sign OK.

Billy Graham Plans
Times Square Rally

' NEW YORK (UP) Billy Gra

ham will definitely close his New

York crusade Sept. 1 wiih '"a

tremendous climactic rally right

In the heart of Times Square," the

evangelist announced last night.

- He said city officials had agreed

to rope oft the famous "cross

roads of the world" for the final

meeting of his 3Vi month revival

His audience that Sunday night

may be the largest ol his 10-year

career as an evanglist, be pre-

aictea. '
. Police estimate that on several

occasions, such as New Year's
celebrations, as many as. 850,000

persons have jammed into: the
teeming Times Square area.
Graham, who has packed the

18,500-seat Madison Square Gar

den nearly every night since his
crusade began May 15, drew a
record. 100,000 persons to a Yankee

Stadium rally July -20. Another

20,000 were turned away.
' Testimeny.Te .World
"I believe this meeting in Times
Square will be a testimony to the

whole world that God has moved

mightily in New York," Graham

told his Garden audience of 17,200

last night. ;
JHe later told the United Press:
"It should be a truly glorious

service. Can you- imagine It? The
word of God going out to thous thousands
ands thousands of people gathered under the
neon signboards!

"Just picture it:. Our 2.000-voice

choir singing "the i Gospel, hymns

echoing, off those tall buildings,
even being heard down in the
Latin Quarter and other night
clubs and bars I It's wonderful$"
He said tnat "Times Square is
noted for its loud revelry and good
'times and it'll be a good thing for
thousands to hear the Gospel
preached there for a change."
Graham has drawn more than
1,538,500 persons to his Garden
sermons, plus an added 142,000 in
Yankee Stadium, Wall Street,
Brooklyn, Harlem and Central
Park meetings.
"'.-iV'Goed. Fer Jowl
Graham preached a lesson
last 'night on 'how to get the
most out of the Bible, that book
that is food for the soul."-
"The w o r.l d's bestseller, con continues
tinues continues to be the Bible,", he said.
'-'For centuries it has been ridi

culed,' burned and destroyed but

it is an, anvil that has worn out
the hammer.. The directives, of the
Bible are not. out of date. The Ten
Commandments and the Sermon

on the Mount still apply."

The 38-year-old North Carolinian
said, "The devil will fight you on
your Bble-reading more than any anything
thing anything else, for he knows that if
you become a regular reader of

the book, he s lost a customer for

Hell." .:
The 390 persons who recorded

"decisions, for Christ" following

the sermon brought Graham's

New York total to 43.830.

Thurmond Raises Possibility

Sou

. JACOTT czTttntrtj

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service

.,v.;-;;;:-:;:::;: ;; -:y-::- m: ; -s wm 'i
- ; -, t
' ' 'I
' 7 ty ... I
I i K'
i. "... :

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.. -A

' S! N KA B LC One ferry that wont sink to, the Burgh bland
S : Terry in Devon, England. Passenger ride on a covered pUt-
form built oo U1U attached to trctor-sty) "caterpillar"
; 7 .wheels, which ride along the e floor. The ngine is set oa
; tbe platform with .the passengers and eperates the track by
i .means of chain. The ferry run from the resort spot of
Bigbury-On-Sea out u nearby Burgh Island tout alwaya keep
; m p-t" n the gTMftl ', ',''"

WEST CD)
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North and South vulnerable
Weat Narik Eaat &ik
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Double Redouble Pass Paes 1
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Opening lead K v'

WASHINGTON, Aug. 12 (UP)

Sen. Strom Thurmond (D-S.u.)

raised the nossibility today that

Southerners might form their own

party if Democrats and Repubii-

cans put strong civil rignis canal canal-dates
dates canal-dates at the head of their tickets
in 1960, .( i'-

Thurmond, who headed the

States Rights Party in 1948, said

he oelieved the South wouM go a-

lone with Senate Democratic lead

er Lyndon B. Johnson as a presi presidential
dential presidential candidate despite his vote
for the curtailed civil rights bill.

Johnson led the successful fight to

modify the measure.
- '
Also on the1 political front, Sen.
Barry M. Goldwater (R-Ariz.) said
Senate GOP leader William F.
tttwwland dfinitely "stregthen "stregthen-d"
d" "stregthen-d" his chances for a possible

presidential bid by his strong lead

ership in support or President Ei Eisenhower's
senhower's Eisenhower's broader civil rights bill,
i s

Meanwhile," the first sesson Of
the 85th Congress, wearied by its

long, still-unsettled civil rights

fight, staggered into its final
stages today with hopes of adjourn

ing by Labor Day. i

Few key lawmakers thought theJ

House ana senate wouia- realize
their original hope of quitting by
Aug. 24. But they had their

fingers crossed that- they could

head for home and political fence

mending a tleast by the end of

tbe month.

The big stumbling block was

President Eisenhower's, civil

rights bill, endorsed by the House

but restricted; considerably by the
Senate.
If House Democrats succeed In
their efforts to persuade the

House to accept the Senate ver

sion with modifications, the rush

hearts at the next play and East

discarded tne nine of clubs.

West was not slttdng-around

gazing at tne scenery, his part

ner was asking for a club lead.
Why?

Obviously hi partner held six
clubs and wanted the dummy

killed, west led his six of clubs

and did Just that.

South was a dead duck. He

had to lose two more tricks no
matter how he played while it
West had played otherwise.

South would have made a small

slam. ...

toward early adjournment would
be on.
But if House Republicans suc succeed
ceed succeed in their plans to send the
bill to a joint Senate-House con conference
ference conference committee for revisions,
the outlook for adjournment would
become extremely cloudy. .The
issue probably will be settled
sometime his week,
Other fe Items
Besides the civil rights fight,
other items on the congression

al pre-adjburnment "must" list

include:.

A compromise $3,366,000,000 for

eign aia authorization. .Both the
House and Senate were expected
to pass th.hiH this week They
then njut Jake up. a separate
money .bill to provide the actual
cash for the program. The final
total may be nearer three billion

aonars.-.
There' was also considerable
sentiment in both the House and
Senate for action before adjourn adjournment
ment adjournment on an administration bill to
protect the sanctity of FBI files.
Under a recent Supreme Court
decision, defendants in criminal
cases must be shown pertinent
FBI reports of goverment wit witnesses
nesses witnesses against them. The Justice
Department has contended that
the decision, unless restricted,
would scuttle the FBI's law law-enforcement
enforcement law-enforcement program.
. The Senate also was expected
to pass House-approved bill to

provide pay boosts of $564 a year

w suu.ovu postal workers and of
11 per cent to some 937,000 other
federal employes. Both measures

race an almost certain veto by

ine rresioenr.

The House this week nlanned

to take up the administration's

bill to raise postal rates, including
a one-cent boost in first class and
airmail postage. But Senate ac

tion o the measure this year was

considered highly unlikely.

Ah effective remedy For

Skin Diseases
Thia excellent nHtcstie. k n s w n

throughout th Americas M MOONf

EMERALD OIL, ix as effective in the

treatment of akin diaeaaaa that the

itching ef eczema atopa with the firet

tew application.
MOONB EMERALD OIL ie haimlaai

and plaaaant to uae and la audi a pow powerful
erful powerful and penetrating antiaeptic that
even the moot atubbom caaaa reanond

to ita effecta. It a on aale at au drug

store.

You Are Cordially Invited To Attend The

Monday Bible Clasi
Every; Mon. 7:45 P.M. Tivbli Guest HoustK
Lecture Discussion Informal Dress
. Teacher: Rev. Lester J. Soerheide
Bring Your Bible A Friend And 25c. For Refreshments
"FOR. PEOPLE WHO LIKE TO THINK"

ViCxat.iii 1 m

t

i
t

tmating HOLKf BATIfuar.

Wearproof mi Hlj-windin,
thorn th im tuufmaticallj
through a aneU window la iht

Is this a watch or a miracle?

r

u
i

Illustrated above U the amtzing Rolex
Qatejiutcrowning achlvmntr.pf th.
SwiM watch industry. No other watch made
today, it any price, combine all its
modern, highly desirable feature!.
It ihewt th iatt automatically and clearly
through an opening in th. dial, thui avold avold-'
' avold-' ing the complication of an extra hand.
It k waterproof it patented Oyater
oaae efficiently protect and maintain the
accuracy of the movement by tealing off
dirt, duat, penpiration and. water.
It ii ulf-wlnding; it will keep going auto automatically
matically automatically for 36 hour after being worn for
only 6 1 The Rolex Perpetual (ilent self selfwinding
winding selfwinding mechaniam it the finest of it kind.
It has been tested and proved in every
continent sine. 153 1. And remember that
a aelf-winding watch keeps better time than
a watch with conventional, old-fashioned
hand-winding I
It is a chronometer, the most accurate
type of watch mad today. In fact, it' so

accurate that, tity Datefuit effertof for,,
. aal.kaa.fine th. rigid standards set by;
the Swisn Government Testing' Station f
and hts obtained an Offletal Thninjf
Certificate.
Th Rolex Detejutt is mxh a line
timepiece that It production s necessarily
limited. It is a watch made by craftsmen, in-'
tended for the connoisseur. Intended, fact,
for those who will accept no compromise;

for whom only th. best is good enough.

A
ii

WMM4MHMMHt

FOR VISITORS TO EUROPE. If you're
, visiting Europe this year, what 'finer
memento of yeur visit than a Rolex
watch t There's a Rolex agent in most of
the principal cities of Europe. Why not
sec what he has to offer?
And if you are going to Italy, writ to
us in Geneva for your free copy of The
Guide to Good Eating in Italy, published 1
by Relax.

f

ROLEX
DATEJUST
Chronometer Swiss officially certified
MONTRES ROLEX S.A. (H. WILSDOKf, CevaraJag Dtncm) IS Rue in Marcfec, Geneve, SwitaerlanS

TMO

DUTY

P3QO
CT0.7G

WATCH CENTER
161 CENTRAL AVIHUI. PAHA&ii

4 l

' '$
IV

r V

East really operated v?lth his
two ten spots. Hi bid of four
spades was a. premature sacri sacrifice,
fice, sacrifice, in spite of his partner's
opening; bid he felt that' the
hand had to belong ."to North
and South, y v 1
West would not have made
four spades, nor would he have
been hurt badly at that contract.
No one can blame South for
bidding five hearts. He held nine
sure tricks and needed very lit little
tle little for 1L -( ; .'.. ..
West doubled. Be did not know
that his. partner was ten spot

high and be held as' many

hearts as spades. North's redou redouble
ble redouble was ouite sporty.' He did

know that South would not be

hurt badly and he hoped to scare
East Into a five spade bid.
East was scared all right, but
he decided to trust his partner's
double rather than take a sure
loss at five spadea.
South won the opening spade
lead. East played the deuce. The
king of hearts held the second
trick. East dropped the diamond
deuce. West took his ace xcf

PANAMA RAILROAD TIMETABLE-Effcctlve Sunday, August 18, 1957-SubJect to change

' rt.ii. XUr ,ulr Daily
Except Dt!y Dally Except Daily Except Deltjr
fM SaaHoL Ttt. tsw.-HoL rat tu-HoL AM
'' AM rM f M AM
il M .11 9 7 l 1
' 10 00 5.10 J.00 W OO MS 7.00
. 7J0 '5M aS.U s3 05 sll.06 S930 S7.06
- .,- S5.15 S10.14 a55 S3 15 slJ.15 slfl.00 s7.1
; j
;' 15.44 rtu
' 1 1 s i us 1 ---- ' i
i . .'
,
" : isj.09. 10.4 ,JD0 SS50 S12 4S slTi3 f7.4
'.r t nn z zzr
. sllXH. a.17 S47 slJ SlO.41 UM
i i
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rAGE FOUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
'Ant .istr .'(,( rft Pi -.'. IfrV.- "A1-
MONDAY, AUGUST 12, 1957
Box 134,
Panama
octal ana KSinenviae
Staffers
snJ Jravtt JuutJ it mrnLJ fttmplkf U lu-ntunltrt littu
' Jt mil L Mcil If l.yl
2-0740 tr 2-0741 Llumm 9:00 J M m.m. mff.

i

BRITISH AMBASSADOR AND MRS. HENDERSON
! GIVE DINNER PARTY FOR VISITING KNIGHT
' The British Ambassador and Mrs. Leslie Ian Henderson
rave a dinner party on Saturday night in honor of Sir
Francis Evans G.B.E., K.C.M.G. and Lady Evans who were
Visiting the Isthmus. "... eo
Guests included Commodore A. G. Litherland of the S
" Reina. Del Mar, Miss. Carmen Gabaldon, Mr. and Mrs. P.
Francey, Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Biggs and Mr. and Mrs. C. W.
Wallace.

, Champanacla Honors
i Special Mission
I To Dominican Republic
I ; The Ambassador of the Domini Domini-1
1 Domini-1 (an Republic in Panama Lie. Hec Hec-'tor
'tor Hec-'tor B. de Castro Novoa aud Mrs.
'de Castro Novoa entertained at a
fhampanada at the Embassy res-

'twnce yesieraay iuuiuiub iu uun uun-tor
tor uun-tor of the Special Mission which is

to represent Panama at me uain

of Otiice Ceremony of the Presi

'dent of the Dominican Kepubiic,

His Excellency General Hector a
Trtiiillo Molina.

Comprising the group are the
Ambassador of Panama in puba
Don Alberto Boyd and Mrs. Boyd,
IX. Col. Francisco Auet and Mrs.
Auet, Ambassador of Panama i"

i Santo Dommeo. the Governor oi

i the Province ot Panama Don Al

Iberto Aleman and Mrs. Aleman,

I Municipal Councilman of Panama

i Don Jose Rogelio Arias ano Mrs
I Arias, Don Alberto Vallarino Jr.
land Mrs. Vallarino and Mai. An

Uonio Huff of the Presidential

Guard and Mrs. Huff.

'Miss Vilma Reina
j Becomes Brido
Of John Livingston

, On Saturday Aug. 3 Miss Vilma
Reina, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
I Ernesto A. Reina of Panama Ci Ci-ty,
ty, Ci-ty, became the bride of John R.
J Livingston, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Mark W. Livinston who came to
.Panama from their home in Au-
rora, Illinois for the nuptial festi-
vUies. The ceremony was perform perform-led
led perform-led at 8:0O a.m. by Chaplain Ber Ber-'nsrd
'nsrd Ber-'nsrd Schumacher m the Aibrook
' Air Force Base Chape, Cana
Zone.
I fhe bride was lovely in an ori ori-'ginal
'ginal ori-'ginal gown of white tulle and
iChantilly lace, and carying a
'spray of white orchids. Her at

tendants were Misses Hiima ue
jBello, Magdalena Miro, and Yo-
laada Maggiori, all dressed in i-
' identical dresses of white enbroi-
dered lace over pastel shades of
pinr, yellow and green. Mitses
jTpresita Tapia and Marisol de
'Leon acted as junior bridesmaids,
and Analida Diez, Alicia Tapia,
j and Lourdes Jimenez scattered
r$se petals along the aisle as the
I bride approached the altar.
( "Gary Gilleon acted as ring bear

er, and Ramon Ricardo Diez car

ried the "aras" (the traditions

thirteen eoW coins) to the altar,

Ronald L. Ridenour was best
man for the groom. The ushers
were Italo Roias de Leon and

Jack M. Jones. -The
wedding march and reces

sional were played by Mrs. Abbie
de Linares at the organ. She also

accompanied the tenor sj.oisi

Wayne W. Woodward who sang

''Ave Maria."

Immediately following the cere

mony the brides' parents rcceiv

ed approximately three hundred

guests at the Atlas Club lo;
dsliL'htful wedd.re breakfast.

Sponsors "for tne newly married
coiiDle are Dr. and Mrs. Pedro

Brin. Mr. and Mrs. Carlos U. Ta

pia, Mr. and Mrs. Miguel Capri-

les. Lt. Col. fl.ui Mrs. Mcar.or m.
Villslaz. Mr. and Mrs. E'tuardo

Tiyycs, Mr. and Mrs. John C

Cevil. Mr. and Mrs. Demelrio Du

tar". Dr. and Mrs. Osi.nr Lt.t.,

Mr. and Mrs. Guillermo Marine!

li, Mr. and Mrs. Alejo Jimenez,

Mr, John F. Young, M-Sgt. and
Mrs. Raphael J. Amato, Cr.pt.

nd Mrs. Julns B. Batista, and

Mr. and Mrs. George V. Daniels,

Loon Holloway

Givon Bachoior Party

r. Leon Alvin Hollow, y whose

v.cdding to Mis Aurora P. I.im
w;.'l take place on Saiiirdry aug.
1, was honored with a bachelor

party.

The Party was held at the home

of Mr. and Mrs. Iuis E Wong

and was given by the best man,

Mr. Harry Boyland and the ush

ers: Mr. Dave Pelock, Charlie Fal-

ber Julio Kum. Gilmorc Jones,
Victor Mizrachi and Andrew P.
Li in.

About thirty five guests from

both sides of the Isthmus attend

ed.
Mr. Hollowav is the son of Mr.

ami Mrs. Walter E. Hollowjy of
Jewl,4Kansus, and at the present

time Is stationed at toco Sjoij,

Canal Zone.

Mis Arurora P. Lim is the

daughter of Mr. Alexander P. Lim

and the late Mrs. JLim oi Aimiran

te. Miss Lim is l the present

time employed al the Coco Solo

Hospital.

iSotboa Woman's Club
Card Croup Most
The Card Group of 'he Balboa
Wovoan's Clilb enjoyed their b

nioi'thly meeting ft i he For Am a

dor Officers' Open Mess Hostess Hostesses
es Hostesses were Mrs..- Molly Johnson, Mrs.

Teresa Luce and Mrs. Alms
Di js. The members and t i-.ir

uests playe'i bridge and samba.

Tiuse attendui; were: Mrs. Annie

:.u:nsnn, Mrs Manila uasnani,
'.''s. Blanche Schilling. Mrs Elsa

IVmm, Mrs. Tercs B. Luce. Misj
Cjrrie Brow j.' Mm. Moi'y John,
sti', Mrs. Marian Waaner. Mrs.

Maiy Worley Mrs. Elsio Stand-

is'), Mrs. M.m Dtys, I"rs. Maude

Llis chard, Mrs. Marie Wetzel, Mrs

Kay Daniels, Mrs. Louise Mer-

ctKiit, Mrs. Edith pplcy, Mrs

Betty Skelton, An. Am Williams,

Mrs. Uertrudj smouse Mrs. Ma Mary
ry Mary Ruppel and Mrs. Lois Van
horn.

The next meetina will' be on

Aug. 22 at the Fort Amador Ofi-

cers Open Mess.

Birthday Party

At Rollordromo

Tiny Kilbey, daughter of Mr.

and Mrs. E. W. Kiioey of Balboa,
celebrated her 10th Dirthday on

Saturday with a skating pany at

the Balboa Rollerdrome. Tina s

guests were: Carol Satinen, Dia

na Haky, Gae Secrest, Janet

Fields, jacky Lovelady, Carol Ka Ka-tinos,
tinos, Ka-tinos, Susie Soyster, Amelia Gar

cia, Sandy Hauday, Craig Stoud-

ner, Bruce Lovelaay, Philip Stew Stewart,
art, Stewart, Bobby Eugelke, John and
Lewis Stapler and Douglas and
Garth Feeney,

After an afternoon of skating the

youngsters returned to the Kilbey
home for relreshments and danc

ing.

i
t

WEDDING PARTY Mr. and. Mrs. Johrf R. L ivingston ere "shown with their parents at the

recepuoii wnicn ionowea tneir weaamg: &i AiorooK Atr Force Base cnapel Saturday, Aug. 8
The bride 13 the former Miss Vilma Reina, dau ghter of Mr. and Mrs; Ernesto A. Reina of Pan Pan-ama
ama Pan-ama City. The groom is the son of Mr, and Mrs. Mark W; Livingston of Aurora, Illinois.

Vermont; Maple
Recipes Delicious

By 6AYN0R MADDOX
NEA Food and Mirktts Editor

Last Shows Tonight & Tomorrow!

THE SILVAS
from Chile. .f
Bella Vista Room.
No Cover No minimum.

TWO DIFFERENT SHOWS NIGHTLY
9 & 11:30 p.m.

ODO-RO-NO . Ueauu no mirror tan Ml
fm all you thould know about your charm!

inn

A

I
I
. A-

You're sweet
and lovely...
For 24 hours!

Instantly, Odo-Ro-No banishes
nnplras.nl odor, checks perspiration! It's so
COMPLETELY EFFECTIVE, protection
lasts right around the clock . safe-guards
your charm all day, all evening long! So
gentle! And to safe' for akin and clothes,
because Odo-Ro-Ko was originated by a
doctor! Available Lb Cream or Spray.

Hackott Family
Back From Vacation

Koger C. Hackeit. Dean of the

Canat Zone Junior College, Mrs.

Hackett and their daughter, Mar

tha, returned last Tnursday a a-board
board a-board the SS Cristobal alter a va

cation spent touring Canal where
they visaed Montreal, Uttowa and

Toronto and in Worth (Jar on a

Miss Hackett, who accompanied
her parenis back to the XsiAmus

will return at the end of the sum

mer vacation to enter her second
year at Vassar College in Pougn-

keepsie, JN.Y. i . v
. - i ' $
Jorry Dorfoo -Loavks
For
Marino Academy

Jerry Durtee, popular member
of this year's graduating class of

Balboa High Scnool, leu on Sat

urday night for King's Point, New

York, wnere he win enter the U U-uited
uited U-uited States Merchant Marine A A-cademy.
cademy. A-cademy. Signal Officers' Wives
Hold (.unshson
At Washmflton
Th USAKCAR1B Signal Offi Officers'
cers' Officers' Wives' Club held tueir montn-

ly luncheon at the Hotel Washing Washington
ton Washington on Thursday Aug. 8 with Mrs.

Jane Wilson serving as hostess.
Mrs. Irene Herera was present

ed with a sterling spoon and wood-

rose corsage, since she is leaving
the Canal Zone this month.

The door prize was won by Mrs.
Louise Thurmand. Other members

and guest attending were Mes Mes-dames
dames Mes-dames Bea Clark, Shelly Morgan,
Claudine Grady, Beaulah, Glenn,
Marge Jackson, Pauline Bynum.

Jane Brookshire, Alice Dube and
Major Clifford Jackson.

VERMONT'S women have per perfected
fected perfected delicious maple recipes.

These certainly prove a.
Maple-Baked Ham
One ham for baking, 1 cup ma maple
ple maple syrup for each S pounds ham
(dark syrup preferred).
.Bake ham according to your u u-sual
sual u-sual method. When half done, re remove
move remove half the drippings from pan.

Add maple syrup to pan and con

tinue baking, covered, until done.
Remove cover a few minutes to
brown if desired. You may Use an
uncovered pan and baste the ham
with maple syrup.
Sauce: One cup maple drip

pings, l cup water, 4 tablespoons
flour.
Blend flour into maple drippings,
add water and bring to a boil,
stirring constantly. Serve hot in
bowl or pitcher for delicious ham
sauce. iThis recipe was from Eve Evelyn
lyn Evelyn Wi" Stanley,' Franklin, Vt.
Maple But)er (IV cups)
One cup maple syrup, one cup
butter, melted. Cook syrup until
a small amount forms a soft ball
in cold water (238 degrees F.).

Add butter and beat with rotary
beater. until thick and ereamy.
Serve warm on gingerbread, waf
fles or hot biscuits, cold on slices
of bread. This recipe was from
Mrs. Henry Bezio; Williamstown,
Vt,
V Sour Cream-Maplo Pi. .
One cup maple sugar, 1 table table-(or
(or table-(or less), 1 teaspoon all spice (or
(or less), 1 teaspoon alspice (or
less), l egg, beaten; 1 cup sour
cream 1 unbaked pie shell.

Combine sugar; flour and spices.
Add cream to beaten egg. Then
stir in sugar mixture. Pour into

unbaked pie shell. Bake at mod

erate (325 degrees F.) until just
firm. This recipe, used fof over

100 years, is from Miss Nancy H

uaicer, jonnson, vt.

SUNDAY'S DINNER: Vermont

maple baked ham, baked sweet

potatoes,, green beans and small

white oihions, rye bread, water

cress and cucumber salad, sour

cream maple pie, iced coffee, ic

ed tea, milk.

MutkMttett
Housewife Should
Vacation By Herself

Montana Cops Hold
Fourth Man Wanted

In $100,000 Crime
f
MISSOULA, Mont. Aug. 12
(UP) Police yesterday held a 38 38-year
year 38-year old nian, who is charged
with being a member of the gang
which r.taged a $100,000 robbery
of opera- star r Lauritz Melchor
two monthi ago.
Authorities said Richard McFali
was the last of a four man gang
indicted by the Los Angeles coun county
ty county grand jury for robbery and kid kidnaping
naping kidnaping still at. large.; H did not
put up a struggle when arrested
last night, but denied any knowl knowledge
edge knowledge of the crime. ('
: Los Angeles authorities f had
alerted Montana police to ba on
the look out for McFali qn a tip
he might be heading for that part
of the country. v

Last week San Francisco police

picked up another member of the
gang, Louis G. Spivak. Two others
were arrested three days after the

roooery. ; a

The gang broke into Melchior's

home on June 18 and held the
portly operatic tenor and his wife
at gun point while they looted the
luxurious Beverly Hills horns of

$100,000 worth of jewels and furs
All but $11,000 of the loot vas re
covered.. mt

SENIOR GIRL SCOUT Jean Seaman senior Girl Scout from
Cristobal has just returned from spending the summer In the
States. She joined the scouts at Camp Maldian in the Judith

Mountains in tne Rockies for part or her stay; t

Jb."

MEETINGS

QdQ'RQW
tt IftflMt sAy NsvbA t-

lack .etlce for iocluiioo ia Ikk
colwmo ku4 o (ukmiHirf
tyM-writto. form and mti4 so
lb kK ottmoor listed dairy i. 'So 'Social
cial 'Social and Otkorwiso," or dolivorsi

.V hand lo tka olfico. Notioos of
Moriafl immI ko aocoptod k
taiopkeoe.
Quarry Holflhfs
Woman's Clus
Mots Wodnosday
The Quarry HelehU Women's

Club will hold its regular coffee
and husines meeting oa Wednes-1
day at 2:30 at the Quarry Heights'1,
Officers' Club.
Hosteses will be Mrs. James!
W. Lane, Mrs. Robert C. McDan McDan-iel
iel McDan-iel and Mrs. Arnold E. Rica.
Members unable to attend are
asked t. call one of the hostesses.
Numismatic Society j
Moats In Margarita

A meeting of the Isthmian Nu Numismatic
mismatic Numismatic Society will be held ea
Monday at the Mariarita Service

Center at 7:30 p.m. Anyone inter interested
ested interested in the coUectioa or study of
old coins or currency should con

tact one of the office who are
always available or information

oa numismatic subjects. All mem members
bers members are wged to attead or dis dis-eussion
eussion dis-eussion as te the possibility of na national
tional national affiliation with the Ameri

can jNumumsue Association, for

information please telephone CapC

Kerley 43-1U1) a Mrs.- Haukc

(Colon S8S).

ONCE a year, Marge, who Is a

hard-working homemaker 50 out
of every 52 weeks, kisses her fam

ily goodby and' takes off for

"Mom's annual iwo-weeK vaca

tion".

An older woman who lives near

bv ninch-hits for her in the day

time and her husband taxes over

at night and on weekends. Marge

has been taking her homemaker's

holiday every year for live years
and she highly recommends it to
other housewives.
"It's not only good for me. It's
good for 4he family," she says.
"I get a complete rest and come
home eager to get on with the
job of bomamaking, ready to face
and maybe even solve problems
that were getting me down.
"The children have drawn clos-"
er to their father while I wasn't
around. He has had a chance to
do things his way for a while. I

And he has also had a chance to

find out that my job is no snap."
ALL BY HERSELF

SOME women can't possibly
manage a homemaker's holiday
once a year. But many who could,
don't probably beacause, they se secretly
cretly secretly feel they aren't entitled to
it.
But why should they feel that
way? The job of full-time home home-maker
maker home-maker is not only one of hard
work but heavy responsibility.

Why doesn't the homemaker need
and deserve a vacation just like

any other worker?

Even if she gets a vacation with

tne family, she is still on the job.
What she needs is a vacation a
way from her family. x

Any homemaker who finds her

self frequently wishing. "If I

could just get away by myself for
a few days" ought to start look looking
ing looking around to see if she can't fig figure
ure figure out some way to set a vear

ly holiday.

.

Nationalist planes
Drop Propaganda
Oyer Red China

TAIPEI, Formosa, Aug. 12
(UP) Waves of Nationalist
Chinese planes dropped more
than- thiee million propaganda
leaflets today in a series of raids
over Chinese Communist coastal
provinces.
An Air Force announcement
said the pre-dawn raids covered
the Red port of Swatow and a
dozen other key cities in Kwan Kwan-tung
tung Kwan-tung and Fukien provinces.
The Nationalist nlanes encoun

tered no opposition from the Com Communists
munists Communists and returned ; safely to

tneir t ormosa bases, the Air
Force said.

Judith Seaman :
Visit camp
In Rockies

Jean Seaman senior Girl
Snout. Jrom, Cristobal. was the
house truest of the Rev. Milton

Cookson of Xewlston, Montana

formerly --or Cristobal, 'canai
Zone

Mntsd fijemanumh
BOQUETE
Announces the annual closing for the
rainy season September 1st. Reopening
for the dry season around February 1st
will be further announced.
Management!

SEE THIS
TO DAY 1
a hearing aid that defies
detection completely
concealed inyouf
"eyeglasses!

While a guest of the Cook-

son s, jean received' an invita invitation
tion invitation from the ; Lewis ton Girl

Scout Council to join the scouts

at camp Aiaidian m the juaitn

Mountains; a part of the Rock Rockies.
ies. Rockies. This invitation was accepted
and thoroughly enjoyed as Jean

displayed her native crafts from

Panama and gave a very Inter

esting talk on- the Republic. She

aemonswaiea aance,, wore a open spaces

IAJ11CIH, 1 BI1U SsnliE euuie rvu'

manian songs. -: l

Before continuing on to the

All States Encampment, to be
held In Cody, Wyoming, a de

lightful tea was given Jean py

the Lewiston Girl Scout coun

cil at the home of Mrs. Cookson

where she and four more; Girl

Scouts from Montana were host

esses to four scouts frqm Idaho.

These eight girls, were en, rout
to a camp In Canada. Mrs. Cook

son takes very active part In
scouting and is a member of thaw

Lewiston Council.-
Jean reports that the weather
has been chilly but not-too cold
to earn her- Senior ILlfesavlng
badge. She saw her first snow
on the' peaks, first, dust storm
and heard the wild screams of
a mountain lion. ; i K K
Amont her 'other "firsts." she

described a Western sunset as

"a whole sky of red, pink, pale

gold' and even green .mixed in
the variety; of vivid colors." She
attended a Fair: with huge Wes Western
tern Western cattle, had her first view of

the great plains with Its "miles

ana miies oi grain" ana wiar

' .4-.. ,-" '
Hung Hangs Self

Woman Holds Up
Plane's Flight,
With Bomb Scare1

DEN;ER. AugV 12 (UPKPolice
today held a Colorado woman
after, she told passengers board boarding
ing boarding a United Airlines plane at
Stapletrn Airport that a bomb had
been planted on the craft.
The FBI identified the woman

TAIPEI, Fromosa, Aug. 12 as Doris Hall Flutcher of Pueblo,

(UP) An 18-year old Formosan Colo. They said no federal

student hanged himself when he charges 'were, contemplated but

learned. bis pet doves bad starved she was lield by Denver police
to death, while he wis away on for questioning..- ?
vacation, authorities reported Airlines officials said the wo-
today. man told passengers about to

Hune Sun-Yan had entrusted board FUCht 624 for Omaha.

his doves to his father before he I Neb., last pigbt that a bomb had
went to a summer camp. When I been planted. The plane, origin-
he returned he found that all his ally scheduled' for takeoff at
doves had died because his father, 8:50 p.m., left: at 10:30 p.m.,
forgot to feed them. 'after a thorough search had been
Hung hanged himself yesterday. made. No bomb was found.

TJzzrRtaJtZurr

Mm

kKkl Htk ml

Ml

mem Mi

MEXSANA

m w an at aw bbt i

mi

Women' Classes in Exercises and Dance- -Coordination
for Slimming and Posture.
.Children 3 to 12 years, classes in 'Tap, Acrobatic and
Ballet. Ballroom dancing for adults and teen-agers,
classes and -private Instruction. ;
' PLEASE TELEPHONE PANAMA S4327
. ., FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

Hiar BttUr! Work Better!
; Fel Better! Uv Better!
Because through QuaHtone Lis Listening
tening Listening Glasses you'd hear mors
normally! with new confidence.

, No button in your ear to ;

aavenise your oeafness.
No tell-tale cords or wires to
-give away your secret ? ?
No binding headbands.
No Irritating clothing noise
IP YOU HAVE HESITATED TO
' WEAR A HEAR1N8 AID
BY ALL WEANS SEE -THE V-
- EXCITINe DISCOVERY
THAT DEFIES DETECTION
IN YOUR HOME OR IN
-' OUR OFFICES -.,
OTHER MODELS IN STOCK
SOSA'S OPTIC
"J" Street

Dr. MARCIAL DIAZ'S
, clinic ; '
Kechet St. and Tlrali Ate.
- Phene 2-2541

DEAN and JERRY hit new hilarious high in
Tuneful comedy
"HOLLYWOOD OR BUST"

A -
.. V ,. I

On eress-onntry trip paved with hilarity and sonr.
Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis and Pat Crowley head for the
movie capital in scene from Hal Wallis' "Hollywood er
Bust," apening Wednesday at the Central Theatre. The Vfc Vfc-taVUion.
taVUion. Vfc-taVUion. Technicolor laughrett has five new sonrs by the
CKcar-winninr composers ef "Leve Is A Many gplendored
Thing." Frank Tashlin directed the Paramount picture,
whkh spotlights famed Hollywood landmarks.



MC&3IxTATjfclJS? li, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER'

o

1?

0
7
v;
til

UCrCQLlHAlPH E. ROSE, (right foreground), executive icer '20th Infantry Regime
Mess Plaque to -etc Walter G. Kitchens, (left foreground), mesa steward Of Headquarters and e3"sprcKA in the
fantry in ceremonies held recently at Fort Kobbe as Capt. Charles C. Early, center), company ;cwnrnander .on-"t""
sifn nnW sni n.nri n T.mlenan. fiirt. Howard A brisrht. M-Set. Joseph P, Chamoefk M-Sgt. Carson l. assiay,

Sic. Edward Badger. Sp3 George C- Lusignan, egt. Howard AiDngns, lu-ogu. uactju v r 'airTj,"
Ho. wXm EAderm, Pvlldrige H Sooner, Sfc. Howard Galllpear,, fife. Ray S. Bonebrake siq. Olaf Dove r an d 1 Sp3 Idle Idle-foriid
foriid Idle-foriid Rivera,- -. . J V tu-a. Army www

. X. ,.,., S. 1.
BlfaDINtADDrnONAI. stands
--i' nritv. mfln lllr&
bftt'Bniriheers. .With men like

' t-mmjft ,' 4v -?f J i .1 r 11 111111 A
: -i x, f,. yv v

r I i ,Y t 7" Till
.: ' :

vejTal-WsVOn .the go, the project which started on Jjal IS is expected to be finished within
the-k-4wo weeks.. Thirty -five men, under the eupervlsidn of 1st U. Kenneth R. Kramer,
fwtjtottlttucting an extra 40 feet of stands at each, end of the present structure. The pro-

ecv4ete one of the many assignea to me oi;n, as iney support me suui lnianiry ana car-

iiy other additional duties.

Family Wages
112ryea. Battle.
Oyer' Paying Tax
CAGLIARI, ItalyV Aug. 12 (UP)
Elephants' rand the ,-tax collector
sever 4orgeU
TAIJlaxcoIlector in this town
Set-out today to get his hands
q ,a4az, payment now 122 years
'
TBeriginal Judgment was ren ren-.
. ren-. deptdcMnsr a local resident,
Coymff Eufu?, in lg35, He refused

to-yy tip- nd panaea tne Dill
tiiOiCwhen he died. ':
. Tnrewgh the succeeding en en-turythArbDl
turythArbDl en-turythArbDl has passed from son
te somritlK each generation of
the" family fighting it in his turn.
Today, it was pp to the latest
' in-the fine Of Cuguis. "if
The amount-involved is 100 lire
12 cents In today's currency,.
:. . 1 1 v :
RoyaliNayx YachtJ
-SmCrew 'Safe?'

V RRIXHAMi "England, 1 Aug. v-12
(UEWU ocean-going yacht, the
."Hswk- unk yesterdsy after a
'Cetci'- gale, dismasted her Satur Satur-syr
syr Satur-syr ---- z f ."
- Aff tlx" crewmea' were rescued
by -ttteiorwegian freighter Atta
. in She middle .of the English
. chac!Ci:'- V- .."
. l Tl- Kk, .Owned by the Royal

- ravsrrcZe st Dartmouth, wasi
f buCt-W wtSds, that reached

70- Grj-EZThd Atn tried to take
the efet-4n tow but the wallow-!
ing 5'30af to .be abandoned. 1

for ttw port Kobbe para'de field are men of the 518th Com-
Dut Turn ITsllv R'r Tlmav rirlffln and Sf 'Tnunh Hir.

(1-r) Pvt. Tom, Kelly, Sc.Elmer
.-: 1
f
I
1 i
- t
. I
J

, iloMana Rory, a stunnlnr blonde end Gfe Seals,. a cultry brunette ce-star with Errol
' flynn.-e.nd Pedre Armendaris la THS BIG BOODLE" which will epea next Wednesday at
the Lux Theatre. Havana is the background ef The Big Boodle," an explosive story ef In-,
'trifiie, revenge and sisxling romance.

T.

A. .J
1
Griffin and Sfc. Joseph Har-
(U.B. Army pnotoj
i y
'

F-Soviet Foreign
Minister Shepilov
Said tn Trouble

LONDON, Aug. 12 (UP) -Former
Soviet Foreign Minister
Dmitri T. Shepilov was reported
todav to be in. serious trouble in
the wake of his ouster last month
from the Soviet Presidium.
Diplomatic sources said Shepi
lov is in greater danger tnan was
originally thought at the time he
was fired in the Moscow shake-up
along with V. M. Molotov. Lazar
Kaganovich and Georgi Malenkov.
: Shepilov, a one-time friend and
protege of Communist Party Chief
Mkita Khrusncnev, is Known to m
in a Moscow hospital, where he
was spotted by Western corre
spondents.
The new danger signs emerged
from a belated attack on Shepilov
in "Kommunist." the Soviet Com
raunigt party's chief theoretical
publication.
The latest edition ef the power
ful publication compared Shepilov
with "Tretikyitii and Bukharin
itei" one of the gravest charges
in toe Communist vocabulary.
It also accused him of failing
te araw tne necessary "eon.
elusions" from the Hungarian
revolution.
Sources said it was significant
that Shepilov, about whom little
was said at the time of the
senssuonal Moscow ouster, now
appears to be under more violent
attack from Soviet officialdom
than Molotov, Malengor er
Kaganovicn.
Shepilov was Khrushchev's oro-
tege for years. It wss Khrushchev
who transferred him from the
post of "Pravda" chief editor last
year to that of foreign minister.
Sinee Shepilov's downfall
Khrushchev has made only one
known official reference to the
ex foreign minister. That wss
when the party boss termed him
one of "the most shameful In
dividuals" without giving dar
tailed reasons for the attack.
Shepilov wss understood to have
tided with the Molotov group
against Khrushchev in the crucial
Presidium meeting last month
nearly toppled the party, chief
from power.

Tehran Police Ban

As Moslem Girls Let Down Veils :

M TEHRAN Aug: 1Z &JP) -Rock
'n' roll has been; banned in Iran
as a threat to civilization. 1
. "This new : canker can very
easily destroy tiie roots of our
6,000 years' civilisation,"., police
said before launching a r'Hate
Elvis", campaign.
The decision was -founded' on
Moslem Custom which forbids tin tin-dignified
dignified tin-dignified behavior of. women in
public. It also was based on doc doctors'
tors' doctors' 7- reports that young people
had been sustaining serious injury
in the hip-jerking motions of rock
'nV roll. Some youngsters had
been hospitalized with broken
limbs.. : r ,A. .
' AKI Sheek Up
,Two boys were knowff to hsve
bitten off their tongues. And one
broke a knee, his neck and spine
during one spin, authorities said.
The rock V, roll craze began
this spring when the American
film "'Rock Around The Clock"
was shown. Teenagers, who had
read of Elvis Presley, in movie
magazines, demanded records
from dealers and the rock 'n' roll
show was on the road.
The dancers who gsthered in
front of the music shops were
mostly boys, but as time went
on girls began to let down their
veils.
Tehran's plush Park Hotel im imported
ported imported a band called "The Rock
V Rollers" from Italy which
drew bumper' crowds.
Radio Tehran, the official gov government
ernment government broadcasting agency,
which plays light music between
programs, stocked up on the new
music.
Dance instructors who claimed
to be close friends of "Elvis" and
held "certificates of .competency"
from mm began classes.
The Iranian girls, who never
London Paper Tells
English Mother's
Tale Of Texas Woe
LONDON, Aug. 12 (UP)- The
"Sunday Pictorial" yesterday re-
Eorted the "shameful" story of
ow the English wife of a Texas
airman was reufsed admittance to
two hospitals one, of them a U.S.
Air Force clinic after her baby
had been born in a taxi.
In a front pagu story the tab tabloid
loid tabloid told how Mrs. Helen Graham,
wife of Airman 1C Richard Gra Graham
ham Graham of Dallas, Tex., was rushed
from one hospital to another for
two hours sfter her baby was
born last week.
Graham was on duty at Laken Laken-heath
heath Laken-heath Air Base early Tuesday
when Liverpool-bora Mrs. Gra Graham
ham Graham felt her baby coming, the
newspaper said. She staggered to
a friend's home and the two wo
men roused a taxi driver for the
race to a' hosDital. 1
But the baby was bora in the
taxi before they could reach
hospital.
A half-hour later a U.S. Air
Force doctor at Lakenheath ex
amined the mother and child and
told the taxi driver to rush them
to a British civilian hospital at
XNewmarxew to minutes away.
An Air Force doctor ssid later
he did not take the woman in be
cause his clinic wss not equipped
to aeai witn maternity cases.
According to the Pictorial, one
nurse at Newmarket scolded, Ahe
taxi driver for arriving at the
wrong entrance and another de
clared: "what a' disgusting condi
tion in whicn to bring a woman
to the hospital"
The hospital tnen said it could
not take the mother and child and
sent the taxi on tu Wimpole Park
Hospital where Mrs. Graham was
finally admitted, more than two
hours after birth.
The Newmarket hospital said
later "American mothers always
go to Wimpole Park. This woman
was msde comfortable and then
sent on."
(But the Pictorial called the
whole incident an "almost
unbelievable story."
Mo

Rock 'n' Roll

show emotion in 'public, began
wearing "I Like Elvis" buttons.
Dancers- Photographed
X "-,'-!' $'.;' '.- .' ', .,'(
But the beginning of the nd
came when a photographer
thought he would get a scoop by
showing pictures of Iranians, who
hate to be '-photographed, doing
rock n' roll dances. ;
He sneaked a camera into a
nightclub' and six pictures ap appeared
peared appeared promptly in' Tehran's most
prominent ; magazine "Teheran-I-Mossaver"
with a story describ describing
ing describing the "decadent, degrading, im im-mpral,
mpral, im-mpral, dangerous and lascivious"
new dance.
Radio Tehran reacted by ceas ceasing
ing ceasing to play rock 'n' roll.
The chief of police, after con conferences'
ferences' conferences' with the minister of
education, put out a communique
banning the dance throughout
Iran.-;; ..
All proprietors of public places
of entertainment were warned
that if any of their customers was
seen engaged in this "abomina "abomination,"
tion," "abomination," they would be heavily fined
and their establishment would be
immediately closed.
Puny Bank Robber
Spreads Prison
Bars And Escapes
: BALTIMORE, Aug. 12 (UP)
Police rushed a statewide search
yesterday, for a- bank robber
who spread the bars of his cell
window with s' homemade device
to slip out of the Maryland State
Penitentiary.
The escapee, Charles Wilson,
24, was serving 20-year term for
the $30,000 robbery of the Canton
branch of the Provident Savings
Bank. Three, other men convicted
of the 1954 robbery are in the
same prison.
Warden Vernon Peperssck ssid
Wilson spread the bars on the cell
window to a width of six and
one-quarter inches yesterday,
squeezed through and dropped 25
feet to the ground from the second
floor tier. Wilson then vaulted a
seven foot fence to freedom.
gt
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Republicans Playing Politics
With Civil Rights, Says Solon

WASHINGTON, Aug, 12 (UP)
A 1 e a d i n g House civil rights
spokesman accused Republicans
yesterday of trying U scuttle the
Senate's modified bill In an effort
to gain political advantage in
next year's congressional elections.
The charge was levelled by
Rep. Emanuel Celler (D-NY),
chairman of the House Judiciary
Committee and author of the
administration-backed civil rights
bill passed by the House In June.
Celler said in a statement that
Republicans were trying to make
rhe House and Senate versions "so
irreconcilable that no bill can
come forward." He said "It is no
secret that they want to keep the
issue alive in the 1958 elections."
The New York Democrat con conceded
ceded conceded that the Senate bill was
"disappointing" to pro-civil rights
Democrats. But he said they were
willing to accept it to get a bill
through Congress. He ssid the
National Association for the Ad Advancement
vancement Advancement of Colored People felt
the same way.
Urging GOP leaders to face up
to "the realization that the art of
politics is the art of the possible,"
Celler said the Senate bill was not
a victory "for. any one regional
factor. It is significant that each
faction yielded in measure.
Celler plainly was irked by Re Republican
publican Republican insistence that the Sen Senate
ate Senate bill be sent to a joint con conference
ference conference committee in an effort to
hammer out a compromise on the
jury trial provision adopted by the

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Senate over administration' pro
tests.
Democratic leaders are pressing
House members to accept th
Senate version after changing it so
tnat the jury trial guarantee
would apply only -to tfght-to-vot;
cases. It now would apply to all-

federal criminal contempt esses
but not to civil contempt.
Noting that time is running out
in me uuneui icssum, veucr aia
it is "yet posible" to pass a civil
rights bill this year "were it not
for the desire of the Republican
party to'play politics with this im important
portant important measure."
Some Democrats have com complained
plained complained that Republicans want to
delay a final test until next year.
They contend the Republicans rea reason
son reason that this would expose the
North-South Democratic split on
civil rights and might swing
Northern Negro votes to the GOP
1,1 1
Hussein Celebrates
5th Year As King
AMMAN, Jordan, Aug. 12 (UP)
Kinjr Hussein yesterday celebrat celebrated
ed celebrated the fifth anniversary of his
ascension to the throne.
Jordan Radio broadcast mes messages
sages messages of congratulations and
greetings to the 22 -year -old
monarch.

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THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEW8PAPEH
MONDAY, AUGUST II, 157
-.1'
09 Pace Shapes Up Ms
QincMii
If I

PAGE SIX

Flag

:.:Aim TV T : : V.

g mum

l-V fi?-! ,',V' .V i;v iVlVV,
"f ) .,'?; ;,.','V f j-N ': -ftf..--.'' ri-'V f i )V'

Both Braves, Yankees

Could Be Home

With 22 Wins In 44

By FRED DOWN
NEW YORK, Aug. 12 (UP) A mere 22 victor victories
ies victories in 44 games a .500-pace shapes up today as
the magic pennant-clinching number for both the
.Milwaukee Braves and the New York Yankees.

, The once-close National League
scramble cracked wide, open yes yes-:
: yes-: terday when the Braves whipped
. the St. Louis Cardinals, 5-1, for
. their seventh straight victory, their
T 12th in 13 games and their 21st
' in 26 games since July 15. The
Yankees", meanwhile, downed the
- Baltimore Orioles, 7-2, and picked
up a half game when the Chicago
White Sox split with the Detroit
.Tigers.
" Those successes enaDiea dom
. J Jfront runners to open up 5Vi game
,, 1 .1 : 1 l J ll rtn Mi. a
'Iremainine. A .500 pace would en-
lable the Bravei to finish with 90
, victories end the Yankees with 94
!To overtake the Braves the Cardi-
nals would have' to play .644-ball,
' ithe Brooklyn Dodgers .674, the

' Cincinnati Iledlegs .682 and the
Philadelphia Phillies .727. The
White Sox would have to clore at
' a .644 pace to wip out a .500-Yan-kee
closing pace.
Gene Conlty, 4-1, tine that
key July 15 date, pitched a raven-hitter
for his eighth win as
, the Braves gained tha biggest
. N.L. lead of the Mason and the
4 (longest sine they enjoyed the
' im margin en July 26, 1956.
'The eurmnt 5Vj game lead plac placet
et placet the Braves In a much strong stronger
er stronger position because trotr rivals
have some 20 fewer games left

in which to close the gap."
Almost every statistic imagin imaginable
able imaginable now supports the theory that
the iBraves will go on to their first
Hag since the shift to Milwaukee.
Since July 15, they've played at
an .ti08-cliD compared to the wed
legs' .577, the Dodgers' .567, the
Cardinals' .556 and the collapsing
Phillies' .407. In addition, they now
hold a season's edge over each of
' their rivals 7-5 over the Cardi
nals, 9-7 over the Dodgers, 11-2 ov
cr the Redlegs and 10-8 over the
Phillies.
The Yankees, pulling out of a
momentary slump, slammed out 14
hits behind the six-hit pitching of
. ohnny Kucks and Bob Grim and
- row show a steady 7-4 pace for
.ugust. The White Sox, who suf-
-rwed an 8-5 loss before beating
" t)ie Tigers, 11-2 show no signs of
. mounting a late drive on tneir s-e
- Pace for this month.
l"r Ed Mathews knocked in two
ri as with a single and his 22nd
' hemer and Johnny Logan smash smashed
ed smashed a two-run single in a. four-run
,,"iv.rd inning rally as the Braves
i t! it Cardinal ace Sam Jones. Con Con-,
, Con-, who didn't win his third game
' 1 J'lly 19, yielded seven hits
four walks but was helped
,$w double plays and pitched
out of numerous jams. Ken Boy-er's-
homer produced St. Louis'
jrun in the ninth.
The Pirates dealt the Dodgers
k staggering blow with a 4-3 ten ten-nins;
nins; ten-nins; and 6-2 sweep, Bill Mazeros Mazeros-'.i
'.i Mazeros-'.i singling home the winning run
;.Jtt '.he opener and Charlie (Wham-
fji'y ) Douglas scoring his first big
' sue win in the nightcap. Paul
;5mith sent the first game into ex ex-.
. ex-. a innings when he homered off
rciief ac Clem Labine with two
out in the ninth.
CECILIA

TODAY LAST TIME!
Tony Curtis In "MISTER CORY"
In Cinemascope-Technicolor 1
Plus: The most amazing story
"The Incredible Shrinking Man"

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CAPITOLIO
Me. Me.
Robert Ryan In
MEN IN WAR
- Also:
PANCE WITH ME,
HENET

Free

Rookie Jack Sanford pitched a
three-hitter for his 15th win and
eavp the Phillies a 2-0 decision ov
er Johnnv Antonelli after Curt
Barclay's three-hitter won the o o-pener
pener o-pener over the Giants, 5-0. Wil Willie
lie Willie Mays had two triples in the
opener and two singles in the
nightcap to stretcM his h i t i n g
streak to 18 games. Cincinnati's
scheduled doubleheader with Chi Chicago
cago Chicago was rained out.
Oarrsll Johnson, subbing for
slump ridden Yogi Berra, had
three singles and Bill Skowron
homered as the Yankee tagged
Kim Lehman with hit third de defeat.
feat. defeat. Grim replaced Kucks after
the Orioles rallied for two runt
in the seventh and shut out
Baltimore in the last two innings.
Walt Dropo drove in four runs
with a homer and a single to help
the White Sox gain their split af
ter Jim Bunmng won his 14th game
for the Tigers. Jim Wilson scat scattered
tered scattered nine hits for the White Sox
in the second game to win nis
fourth straight and 13th decision
of the season.
Gene Steohens drove in the de
cisive run with an 11th inning
trinln tn ffive the Boston Red Sox
a 4-3 victory over Washington af
ter the Sox pounded out an a-a
decision in the opener. Ted Wil Williams
liams Williams had one hit in four trips and
drew two intentional walks as his
average dipped to .387.
The Kansas City Athletics got
two-hit pitching from Ned Carver
in their first game and walloped
four homers in the nightcap to
beat the Cleveland Indians, 7-0 and
9-8. Gus Zernial smashed two hom homers
ers homers in the second game as the In
dians dipped into sixth place.
DOMING PIGEON It must
ie appie turnover or a piece
of upside-down cake which
lured this New York City
pigeon to the top of this friend friendly
ly friendly fellow's head. The pigeon
turns his head over to take the
snack from the Angers of the
unidentified man.
THEATRE

i "T v""'v V'
ft (

T IVOLI
lie Uc
Spcnlah Double j
Ajrustln Lara In
LOS 1 BOHEMIOS
- Also:
DOS ChVrROS T
UNA GHANA

RIO
15c.

Sophia Lortn In
BOY ON A DOLPHIN
- Also:
THE STOBT OF
JESSE JAMES
In Cinemascope!

hlajor League

Leaders
LEADING BATTERS
(Based en 275 at bats)
National League
P and C G AB R H Pet.
Aaron, Mil. 107 435 87 147 .338
Musial, St. L. 109 425 67 141 .332
Groat, Pitt. 84 336 39 111 .330
Robinson, Cinci. 106 431 77 142 ,329
Mays, N.Y. Ill 422 81 139 .329
Fondy. Pitt. 93 356 43 113 .317
Schoendienst, M 107 458 63 144,. 314
Moryn, Chi. 104 389 54 121 .311
Cimoli, Bkn. 99 368 60 114 1310
Hodges, Bkn. 107 411 62 124 .302
American League
Williams, Bos. 104 346 77 134 .387
Mantle, N.Y 110 367 99 139 .379
Fox, Chicago 110 432 76 140 .324
iBoyd, Bait. 105 353 57 113 .320
Woodling, Cle. 95 297 51 95 .320
Minoso, Chi. 108 404,67 125 .309
McDougaM, NY 101 386 71 118 .306
Malzone, Bos. 109 452 54 138 .305
Skowron, N.Y. 98 362 50 109 .301
Doby, Chicago 87 304 42 91 .299
HOME RUNS
National League
Aaron. Braves
32
29
26
26
25
Snider, Dodgers
Mays, Giants
Crowe, Bedlegs
Musial. Cards
American League
Mantle, Yanks
Sieveri, Senators
Williams, Red Sox
Wertz, Indu.ns
Colavito, Indians
Zernial, Athletics
31
30
30
20
20
20
RUNS BATTED !N
National Ltac7
Musial, Cards
Aaron, Braves
Crowe, Redlegs
Mays, Giants
Ennis, Cards
.87
87
74
72
69
American League
Sievers. Senators
Mantle, Yanks
Wertz, Indians
Skowron, Yanks
Jensen, Red Sox
81
80
78
I4
7i
PITCHING
(Based en 11 deciont)
W
Pet.
Schmidt, Cards
Donovan, White Sox
Sanford, Phils
Bunmng, Tiger
Grim, Yanks
10
12
15
ii
.909
.800
.789
.778
.769
By BEANS REARDON
QUESTION: With a runner on
first base, the umpire hands the
catcher a new ball. The Ditcher
isn't looking when the catcher
throws the new ball to him and it
goes on into center field. The run-
ner moved to second base. Is this
legal? Walter Reid.
Answer: No. Play does not re
sume until the pitcher steps en
th rubber with the baM.
Q. A foul ball on the third srike
is missed by the catcher and lodges
iu me umpire s masK. wnat a a-bout
bout a-bout it? Caswell Stark.
A. The ball is dead. The count
n the batter continues.
Q. In softball, the batter steps out
of the batter's box In an attempt
to hit a pitched ball. He misses it.
Is there a penalty? Leslie
McCarter.
A. No. The ball must be batted
in order to impose the penalty.
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PICTURE PUZZLE Pete Rademacher studies pictures taken ;
as Floyd Patterson stepped Hurricane; Tommy Jackson in the ;
10th round. Giving -Rademacher pointers is Trainer George ;
Chemeres. The Olympic titleholder realizes that he has quite a

I jah on 'hand bidding for Patterson's crown in Seattle, Aug. 22. j

Teeners Win

In Exhibition Contests

The Panama VTW, Teener base baseball
ball baseball team concluded its pre-tour-nament
tour by adding three more
victories to its record, all against
Pennsylvania opposition. On thurs thurs-dav
dav thurs-dav the local boys handed Mifflin-
town a 9-2 defeat, with lefty Jeff
rKline the winning pitcher (or Pa
Amateur Net Brass
Fast Losing Interest
In 'Open' Tourneys
By STIVE SNIDER
NEW YORK, Aug. 12 (UP)
Amateur tennis brass hats are
losing interest in "open" touma
ments since the pros began to
lower the boom on Wimbledon
champ Lew Hoad of Australia.
So far, Hoad is a $125,000 bust
as a pro with a 2-9 record. That
caused amateur officials to blink
and take a second look at their
tentative endorsement of open
championships patterned after
golf with amateurs and pros com competing
peting competing in the same tournament.
"I was all for legalizing open
play," said one highly placed
amateur official, "but now I don't
know. It looks like even the best
amateur doesnt have a chance
with a fourth-string pro."
ThTe pros insist open tourna tournaments
ments tournaments would be the greatest force
in the world for developing ama amateur
teur amateur talent. The amateurs fear
extinction or, at best, second rate
status.
But there is considerable evi evidence
dence evidence on the side of the pros,
according to Ted Schroeder of Los
Angeles, s i d ekick of promoter
Jack Kramer.
Rotewall's Improvement
"In less than 60 days of pro
competition, Ken Rosewall im improved
proved improved 30 points a game," says
Schroeder. "If that sounds too
tricky, put it this way: When he
first turned pro, he blew two shots
a game that he now makes
easily."
If, the world around, leading
amateurs mix freely with the pros
in open tournaments, the best of
the more-or less simon pures
would improve similarly and the
amateur game would be raised to
its highest peak in history, Schroe Schroeder
der Schroeder bl
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9, Tie One

nama. In the national tournament
last year the Canal Zone team was
the only team which defeated Mif Mif-flintowa,
flintowa, Mif-flintowa, which won the champion championship
ship championship of the consolation bracket.
Moving on the next day to Me Me-ehanicsburgh
ehanicsburgh Me-ehanicsburgh the Canal Zone boys
added toother victory to their al already
ready already imposing number by defeat defeating
ing defeating Mechanicsburg 4-3, with Kline
again chalking up the win. Mgr.
De la Pena states that Klin did
a good job in that game but the
boys were not feeling up to snuff.
Aside from the 1-1 tie in Union,
N.J, the 3-3 score in ttfe Mechi Mechi-nicsburg
nicsburg Mechi-nicsburg game has-been the clos closest
est closest margin of victory.
On Saturday morning the boys
journeyed to Carlisle, Pa. for the
final stop before Checking in to
Hershey for the tournament play.
rnis is the third year the Carlisle
lotks have played host for the Pa
nama team ana the tnird year
tne Carlisle folks have played host
for the Panama team and the
third year Charles Nixon, of Car Carlisle;
lisle; Carlisle; has beaded the arrangement
committee. It was Charlie Nixon
who set up the Mechanicsburgh
game this year for us, and it was
also he who made the arrange arrangements
ments arrangements for chartering the bus to
stay with the local team for the
final five days of hectic traveling
this year. Because of his wonder wonderful
ful wonderful assistance and cooperation for
the past three years the V.F.W.
Teener League of the Canal Zone,
with Moy De la Pena' as sookes sookes-man,
man, sookes-man, formally extended its thanks
and appreciation to Nixon.
When it was learned that the
son of the umpire in the Carlisle
game was in the hosnltaL the V.
F.W. Representative accomoanyinf
Doys, Kaipn Zachry, gave the hos hospitalized
pitalized hospitalized boy a baseball autograph autographed
ed autographed by the Panama Canal Zone
team members. In the Carlisle
game played Saturday evening the
Sonians were on the long end of
a 8-4 score. AD four Panama
pitchers were used in the game
Chieo Martin. Jeff Kline, Brian
Lutz, and Keith Kulig, with Ku'ig
getting credit for the win. Keith
whose regular position is shortstop,
waa also the big gun at the bat
getting a triple and a home run.
After attending church and hiv hiving
ing hiving dinner in Carlisle the bovs
checked into Hershey where tour
nament play was to start today.!
In the drawing for playing sched schedule,
ule, schedule, the Panama team did not
draw a bye this year and was
scheduled to play in the first
round.
The boys played 10 exhibition
games in 11 days, winning Bine
and tying one. This grueling sched schedule,
ule, schedule, together with the illness which
plagued the boys, has tired them
somewhat, but both are seeming seemingly
ly seemingly conquered. The team will re remain
main remain at Hershey this entire week,
and yesterday by ham radio the
boys were reported to bo in good
shape. j
Today Encanto 35, J20
T Rode Hudson and
" Sidney Pottier In
fSOMXTHINQ Of TALUK-
Van Johnson tn
"-- 'ILANDIl
Today'- WEAL JO .70
1Z Martin Lewis Jx
7 RING CIRCUS"
"William Holden In
BRIDGES OF TOKO-RI

lk,.

; Bacancito sprinted to the jfront
in; the first furlong and' was; nev never
er never headed as he raced to a one
length ppst-to-post victory in the
$750 one mile gallop yesterday aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon at the President Remon
.racetrack.'-' "...-m.s.-::;
The dark brown horse, owned
by the Stud Durrieu and trained
by "Juiian Marshall,' was sent out
the favorite" in the main event for
second rand third series imported
horses and justified the fans' faith
in him.Hii';r-K:,v: .vyo-;-., ;
' Heliodoro Gustines got the Ar Argentine
gentine Argentine bred son of Esquimazo Esquimazo-Deterita
Deterita Esquimazo-Deterita off last but by the time
the i field reached the first turn,
Bancancito had squeezed through
an opening and was on top. He
Set his pace in hand under judi judicious
cious judicious rating until two furlongs out
where he was his head and open
ed a three length margin at the
head of the homestretch but lost
ground steadily in the run through
the stretch and had to hard driv driven
en driven to maintain a one length lead
over Embrujada at the wire. Pa.
quiro wound up third, only a half
jengtn turyier back. -Bacancito's
time was a credita
Die i : 4i -i i over a slowed up
iracK. Jtir returned $5.40 win and
S3.40 place. The one two combi
nation with Opulento returned $14,
40. The day's best win odds, how
cvcii were dubsn i uii in tn
third i ace. Bugaba also combined
wnn golden Moon, for a one-two
payoff ojt $172.60 tops for the day.
. Rhben Vasauez was the winninff-
0st rider with three victories a a-beard
beard a-beard The Gipsy, Horacio and Ce Celestial
lestial Celestial Fire. Fernando Alvarez was
the runperup with wins on Daniel
ana lineia.
The dividends:
, A v
FIRST RACE
1 Daniel $11.4d,. $6.
rortai S7.20
Seoend Race
1 The Gipsy $3.20. $2.20
2 I Forget 2.20
UOUDie: S23.80
Third Rata
1 Bugaba i$30; $8.60 s
2 Golden Moon 15.
One-Two:, $72.00
Fourth Race
1 Tlnela $8.80, $3.20
I Vilma P. $2.10
Qulniela $7.40
Fifth Race.
1 Nautical Tou?h S. 2 so
1 Ocalai Miss1' $2.4o
Slxrh Raee
1 Tiequest $14.20, $3.80
2 Michungo $2.80
Seventh Race
1 Horacio $6.80, $3:40
3 fiatallon $4.
Double: $96.20
. Eighth Race
1 Celestial Fire $3.40,2.20
2 Lanero $2.80
Qulniela: $12.20
Ninth Race
1 Bacancitd $5.40, $3.40
2 Embrujada $3.60
One Two: $14.40 ;
Field & Stream
Righr-Handers Really Sheet Uft
By WAR IN PACE
Sheeting Editer
Tuss a horseshoe with your
rignt nana? Grip a steak-carving
knife in your right lunch hook?
Sign checks with your right hand?
Then you shoot a scattergun right right-handed,
handed, right-handed, right? Or .do you?
You don't. As a right-sided in individual
dividual individual you undoubtedly pull a
trigger with yoin right forefinger
ana set a gun's buttstocjc against
yur right shoulder. You use your
rioht sVsl Itl tTiinviT1 timet eitka
because it is so completely dom
inant that it overpowers the left
in alignment, or because you shut
or blink your left eye. But it's
your left hand that does the real
business of pointing that gun.
The right handed golfer's dex dexter
ter dexter side is important in manipu manipulating
lating manipulating the clubhead, but ido not
most professionals agree that the
bulk of his hitting power comes
from the left arm?
The seattergunner must put sim similarly
ilarly similarly important responsibilities on
his left arm and hand.
For a comfortably smooth swing
which is the et sense of successful
shotgunnery the left band grip
must not be too far out under
the barrel, or too clou in to the
action.
It will crsmp ad Emit the
Swing, though giving good gun
control. It offers maximum swing
radius but impossibly poor con control.
trol. control. If the left elbow is high, as
in the left elbow is high, as ia the
rifle shooter's stance, it cramps
the gun move. Too low, it achiev achieves
es achieves the same inhibition of fluid
movement. Positions of head and
elbow must be a eomforUMo com compromise.
promise. compromise. i
The left hand points the gun.!
It supplies the motive force to
swing our scattergun muxzlo up
into positioa ahead of the eye,
along the target's Bm of flight
and out ahead for the forward al allowance
lowance allowance necessary for a fciL
If the right baad s Jobs of hold holding
ing holding the run butt in positioa) a a-gsinst
gsinst a-gsinst shoulder and of polling the
trigger could be do by some
other means, we d still find
it a
rough go to h a pheasant with-
out taut fuidUi left hand,

mi

Editori CONRADO 8ARCEANT

mmmmmimmmm)mmmm.-. ... x

( llllMlrlU fa? A a m f -t. '

Teams
New York a
Chicago
Boston."'
Baltimore
Detroit
Cleveland
Washington
a.ansas City
Today's Games'
open date, u s
Yesterday's Result!
new xonc 041 oil 000 7 14 0
Baltimore 000 000 2002 6 a
JiUCKS (7-7). tirlm and Johnson:
Lehman (3-3), Walker, O'Dell
and Triandos, Zupo.
(First Catmi) 'X
Washington 102 000 2005 10 2
Bostou 202 000 04X 8 10 1
Stobbs, Clevenger (5-4), and Ber-,
beret.
Porterfield Fornieles, Delock
(6-7), WaU and, White.'
Second Came)
Washington 000 200 010 003 9 0
Boston 000 003' 000 01 4 11 0
Hyde, Byerly, Ramos (9-10 and
Courtney.
Susce, Fornieles (7-il) and Da Daley.
ley. Daley. ;
(First Game)
Kansas City 003 400 0007 11 2
Cleveland : 000 000 0000 2 1
Garver (5-10) and H. Smith.
Daley (1-8, Gray, Tomanek and
Nixon, Naragon. (
(Second Game)
Kansas City 301 050 0009 11 2
Cleveland 300 230 0008 11 0
Kellner, ; Urban, Morgan (7-S)
and d. Smith.
Mossi, Lemon (6-11), Garciai,
Wynn and Megan, Naragon, ;
(First Came) 1
Detroit 411 000 020-8 15 2
Chicago 011 000 0035 13 2
Bunning (14-4), Maas and House.
Keegan (7-6), Howell, Fischer
Hughes, LaPelme aad Lellar.
(Seeend Came)
Detroit ; 001 000 100 1 f i
Chicago 203 212 01x-ll 14
Hoeit (4-T), Shaw, Byrd, Abor,
Heater and Wilson.
Wilson (13-7) and Moss. ;-
2-Hitter For
NEW YORK, Aug. 12 (UP)
Humberto Robinson, who paced
the Toronto pitching staff during
the first half of the season, is re regaining
gaining regaining his winning form as To Toronto
ronto Toronto is picking up its drive to toward
ward toward the International League pen pennant.
nant. pennant.
The slim righthander pitched a
two-hit shutout in the second game
as Toronto swept a twin-bill from
Richmond yesterday. 'Robinson's1
6-0 victory came after the Leafs
had rallied for an 8-6 triumph u
the opener..
In other games. Buffalo defeat
ed Havana, 4-2, after dropping the
opener. 1-0, in 15 innings, Roches-,
ter swept two from Miami, 6-2
and 4-2 and Montreal beat Colum
bus. li-8. in the first game with
the Jets winning the second, 3-2.
Robinson, who had gamea his
llth win by June 21, won omy nis
second same in nearly two months
with his masterful seven inning
E itching efforti In the opener, the
eafs' offset and early Richmond
six-run lead to help reliefer Niles
Jordan earn his third victory while
Jim Post waseharged .with his
eighth loss for he vees.
Paraiso Mid-Season
Tennis Toiuiramenl
Finals Hexl Sunday
The mid-season siaeles tourna tournament
ment tournament by the Paralso Tennis Club
Is fast eominf to an end and ef efforts
forts efforts will be made to have the fi finals
nals finals played on Sunday if the
weather permits. i
Arthur J. Crifths has donated
two trophies for the players In the
finals. .-
A doubles' tournament will ret
nndrwav lmmstelv after, the
sineles and double's carta ers are
urged to submit their names to
the secret! soon is possible.
Only one gsme wis eonroleted
durint: the past week. Smythe de-
rested Elie Jr.. 6-0, M On SaturH
oay evening after the court was
dry, Johnson Hubert hammered
Howell down to win five games
rtrairM Howell mneed to wia
the tixtb gsme sad five games
thereafter. Hubert woo-that ee
8-4. The second set was caTJed
on account of darkness by umpire
Douglas, with Hubert on top at
3-2. This match will continue o
Tuesday eveniag at S p.nu-
Sondav monuag. Simpeoa dis displayed
played displayed top form aad defeated Ji Jimenez
menez Jimenez tn the first set 6-4. Even
though Jimeoet did not displav
the tennis form that waa expected
ec mm. se wore down Simnso
for an 14, 74 win. Jlmeaes
Cosittaied f are t,

sutiir hiiin i.r bums ..tr ivi at va a. .

- 72 38 655 IT" i Pet-
- 6 a i 7L Milwaukee 68 42 .618
Jf ? 18V4. CincmnatI 61 49 t
' .53 h IS S S 1 1
43 70 1?i 2? New York ,50 62 '.446
41 60 1?3 SCV i 39 69 J61 21 J
V Pittsburgh 39 71 .355 at

,.' : 1 .uv.'. ''.1

Humberto Robinson Hurls

Todsv'itGamM V..'
Open date. 1
v Yetfcsrday's Results
Milwaukee 004 010 000-41 I I
St. Louis 000 000 0011 T
Conley (8-5) and Crandall.
; Jones (9-6) Schmidt, MizeH,
Jackson and Lsndrith.
' (First Game) "'
Brooklyn 101 010 000 03 1ft 1
Pittsburgh 000 002 001 14 11 0
Podres, Labine (5-6) and Cam Cam-panella,
panella, Cam-panella, Walker. ; . :
Kline, King, Arroyo, Face Law
(8-7) and Foiles, Rand, Peterson,-
(Second Game)
Brooklyn 000 010 010 2
Pittsburgh', .joo 013 Olx 6 11 2
Newcombe, Craig (5-7), Roebuck,
Koufax and Walker.
Douglas (1-1), Face and Peter'
son. .-',
v (First Game)
Philadelphia 000 000 000 0 3 6
New York 010 001 30x-5 j 2
Haddix ($-) Miller. Hearn and
Lopata. ": ,.
Barclay (6-7) and Thomas.
4 (Second Came)
Philadelphia-. 011 000 0002 7 9
New York 000 000 0000 ,1 2
Sanford (15-4) atod Lonnett
Antonelli (11-11) and Westrum.
Chicago at Cincinnati I games,
postponed.
j
T 1 FLYING START

Oeeanpert, WjP (NJA) Xi)iv
Howard Grant, an apprentlcs, ls ( I CJ
the leading rider at Monmouth. Vv

13th Win
(Buffalo, by virtue of its sot.
ond-game win, increased its league
lead to a game and a half over
Richmond and Toronto. Karl
Drew, with late Inning help from
Mike Kume, brought his,, season
record to 4-7 lor buffalo. In the
opener, Hanana scored the only
run of the game in the bottom of
the 15th inning to' break a pitch
log duel between ay Gerbert
and Orlando Pena. Lou Kretlow
and Miguel Cuellar, tha two start start-ers,:
ers,: start-ers,: weren't around at tha finish.
Kochester moves to within live
games of first placa when Gary -Jtslaylock
and Lynn Lovenguth heid
the Miami Marlins to a total of
five runs in the doubleheader.
, George O'Donneli outlasted Mon
tresi s r'red Kipp to win the night
cap for Columbus in 11 innings.
In the opener, Montreal won out
m a slugfest that saw the two
teams stam 39 hits.
The line scores: '
(First Game)
Montreal 001-263-00012 47 a"
Columbus 320-010-011 1-13 4
'"I w maa uison;
EtO, Kiidoo (4), O'Brien (5) and

u-aviu. wr-tierris. LP Kiidoo.
HRs Powers, Harris, Gentile, Mo
vak, Tooth man.
.'.'J First Game)
Toronto 000-620-000 87 1 1
Richmond 150-000-000 6 3
Pearce, Crimian (2), Jordan (4)
and St, Claire, Coatss, Post, (4),
Jsmes (7) and ChitL WP Jordan.
LP Post HRs Jethroe, Jek.
(First Game) )
Rochester, -. 112-000-110 4) -Miami
000-200-000 4 72 '
G. Blaylock and D. Ricketts;
Church, Bunker (3), Quaitars (9)
and McCullough. P Church. HE
Smith.
(Firs Game)
toffelo 4 Havana 1
(Seeend Cam)

BUUHO 000-000-
Uavana 100-000-001 ,1
Drews, Kume (7 ad Noble:

Scsntlebury; Cueche (7) tad la
ejuierdo.. WO Dres. LP &cantle- v
bury. ; s

Geme)-
eil-031-6-
Toronto
6-3-d
Richmond oon-ooo-n o a o
RoMBaoa and .RoeeUi; Wiesler,
Dixon (5), Parsons (7) and Ovtti..
urn lean
I
tSeeewd taste)
r - 001 -COO-OS-
4-3
Miami 001400-CO 1
Loveeguth, wntht and Sm-
nroch Paire (HMnd Burha1
Levnguth.- LP Semproca. EX
Bucca.

(SeetMt) Geane)
Montreal S Columbus

VI-

oo

J.

i



5

' .in
4 ) ,
MONDAY, AUGUST 12,' 1957
't TTIE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAItT NEWSPAPER
4- f-r
PAGE SEVEN"
To
1 iy-i!"f

Mex.kBm
if j a i J'
J O

'Base ba lh B&m b

Rock

ClemMml

V,

Haiilc Greenberg Js Target As

Attendance' Drops 2

By HARRY GRAYSON
CLEVELAND' (NEA)-The next
oi'gnaseDalibomb is quite .likely
to' rock Cleveland.
The situation on the lakefront Is
of grave concern to the America"
-ague,' already saddled 'with a
fttpelea itcp yui : Washington
dwindling interest in Kansas
City...
A bold stroke must be!: made
i when attendance drops nearly two

million in nine years, wmcn is tne
i'nil storv iu Cleveland, a frachise

made the best in the business by
the master showman, William v.

VppfIc Jr.

The out-and-out panic in Cleve

land is much too serious to De as-

uasftrf in the customary easiest

way-out way--by firing the. man-1

ageF; in this case ft.erc-y D arren,
whp hardly has been around long

It easily could result inWhe sale
nf the. club bv the practically ab-

spntpe f Drincioal owners and fi

nanciers. William R. Daley and

' Q. Wfth runners o first and
third bases', the man from first
is hit by batted ball. Does the
batter get hit and can the man
.n third score? Leslie McDevitt.
A. The batter get a hit and the

wnnir n third bam cannot ad-

. Aff ihfield fins called by an

IJT umpirebeforer ;theball iJiitjLjhe
::,."-gr0Und."rThe windolows the ball

into foul territory, where it re-
mains. Should the umpire stick to
his original ruling? Joe Kane.
A. No. U is foul ball. Um Umpires
pires Umpires shout: "Infield fly, if fairl"
INFLATION HANDICAP -l
- r y. K
Camden, U.S. (NEA With
190 two-year-olds kept in The Gar Garden
den Garden State, through final eligibility
.payments, the total value of the

' richest race- this fall .now is $210, $210,-65(J,
65(J, $210,-65(J, with more to come from, en-

' tranre fees, ; V;xjk?

By BEANS REARDON
'Written for NEA Service

' QUESTION: The batter's line
drive bits an umpire before it passes-
or is touched by an infielder
other than, the pitcher. What hap-

' pens? Joe Ouglielml.
Answers The batter gets a base
hit and the ball Is dead.
O. The batter tops a ball down

the third base line. The ball rolls

foul, then fair and hits third base,
Fair or foul? Jack Delaney,';;
A. Fair.

Ignatius y Aloysius O'Sbaugncssy,
the latter of St. Paul. . ,
... The number of Davintf suests

has fallen off so alarmingly that
there has been substantial, talk of
switching the Indians to the new

stadium ins Minneapolis.

A much more likely development

would be the dismissal ot-Hank

Greenberg as. general manager.
There are numerous reasons giv
en for the gradual decline of Cleve

land attendance from the all-time

major league record of 2,620,000
in 1948. The record shows that the

fans did nbt quit on the Indians
easily or suddenly. There were
2,233,000 paid in 1949, 1,727,000 in
'50 1,704,000 iii '51, l,i,000 in '52,
1,069,000 in '53, 1,335,00 in the pen pennant
nant pennant winning year of '54 and 1, 1,-221,00
221,00 1,-221,00 in '55. '

Last year the attendance drop

ped below the. million- mark for
the first time since the last of the
Alva Bradley days in 1945, It was
865,467.
This year the Injuns will be hard
pressed to draw 700,000. They at attracted
tracted attracted no more' than 532,258 In
their first 51 games,' went above
the haJf-million mark only with the
aid of the last week-end series" a
gainst the Yankees, which drew drew-109,000.'
109,000.' drew-109,000.' 1
The remaining home schedule is
totally unattractive and the latest
disaster in New. York isn't going
to help things any. ;
There is organized reseatment
against the front .office, parti particularly
cularly particularly "Greenbergv who pulls well
with everybody except the addicts
who have to support his policy in
Cleveland. Foi some reason, old
Hankus Paiikus is murdered by
followers of the Tribe, treated as
though he had just dropped an ea easy
sy easy fly to lose another game;-
The fans giew tired of running

second five out of six years, ine
Giants sweeping the 1954 World

Series in four straight from an out

fit wmcn won a record in games

hurt badly. 4 '.,

Games11 were te'ecast a .bit- too

freely for a spell and tho. trade

didn't like it' when the free ride

was abbreviated. ;( -v.

Thetlndians1 are a dull.- uninU-

restine lot with no spectacular In'

hlivrduaFattracilonr"

Despite new turnpikes, the. cus

tomers no longer come in aroves

from out of town.;
Bill Veeck was caUed back this

year, but fireworKS roving musi musicians
cians musicians and give-aways no longer
worked.-

Meanwhiler the Indians dropped

far off the pace,' and- the clamor

for a new, deal all around became
louder. "?

It will take all that and then

some to-bring back what until

recently was a matchles piece of

basebau property. ;

NOW HEAR THIS

u t7P"tt causae all-stab U vV
, ( fut up wtm ( 'AxV r: ,r ?
. i ;
' ; "v! I xMatr. a thb &
- J? If. i-i Tv1 I THB CHAfttON V eS rUU

j erv.

V-1 i -V.l li r 4

ii.NCW. a. rue

SSt BOOA CP

THB CHAMPION

WANTS, HE'LL
raovoB "rue
fOR. ANOTTHBR
BATCH Of STARS

Alumni Seek To Clinch 1957

Atlantic Cage Crown Tonight

STANDINGS 1
Atlantic Basketball League
W L Pet.

Aldmnl 10 5 .667

Cristobal 7 "8 .461
Working Boys 7 8 .461

Powells 6 9 .400

Temght't Games
?' Alumni vj Cristobal' -Powells
v Working Bwi
By TREVOR SIMONS. J'

The Alumni quintet can end it

all tonight and not only win the
1957 Atlantic Basketball' League
championship, but also the honor
of never having relinquished first
place since the opening of the sea season.
son. season. For the Alumni five,, now pro-j
hibitive favorities, have been on
top since June 17 when they open-1

ed the Season with a 49 to 42 win
over Powells.
Tonight, the league-leaders face
Cristobal, the team that has glvei)
them the most- trouble all year.
The season totals for the Cristobal-Alumni
games shows that A A-lumni
lumni A-lumni have finished on top three
times and lost twice.

The Working, Boys, deadlocked

for second place with Cristobal,
takes ob Powells In the nightcap;
Powells with their sights set on

climbining out of the cellar and

the Workinz Boys trying to move

into the runner-up spot, should A-

lumnl beat Cristobal in tne urst
game,
The scoring race is practically
over. Alumni's John Hatgi has a
comfortable 229 points and his
nearest contender now is Louis

Si

7T3

1

-m BfaBVBfc.

l.l II II In

TEE NEW SERIES MGA

M! Uermat! rt tad Itumrknal Bvt"tKl-i

. tarfrt kc ttMipartaMotaritt kkutem eland
mtai of ttw unoiful M.O. Brtw UOA. BmI
ImUmt spbalsUry. ntrlu aU-mmC Anlltl
wit rlckt or la ni trio In u xolUii( obalo of
. toeMMV ooloan. Omnudml r

For the right land of motoring-

t

itmustJbB

IWUTi HOKTKT WAUUIfTT

1

eurtematte & Arias, S. A.

Panama

Colton

Martin Alexis
Chitre

David

Hooper with 153. But all eyes
will be focussed on Working (Boys'
Isaac Peltyuovitch whose 30-point

average pep game and 151 total

for five .games could bring him
up into contention.
.

Loeffler Set
Things Up For
Texas Aggies

COLLEGE STATION, Tex, (NEA'
Texas A. and M. may have been
dissatisfied with Ken Loeffler as
basketball cpach, but his succes successor,
sor, successor, Bob Rogers, can't find any anything
thing anything wrong with the material Lo Loeffler
effler Loeffler gathered In the last year.
Rogers' first move as coach was
to contact 6-8 Wayne Lawrence of
Pawtucket, R.I., a freshman last
year who said be wouldn't return
if Loeffler was gone. ;.f
' "Lawrence guaranteed me he'd
be back," Rogers beamed after
contacting the boy Loeffler called
the country's best player outside
of Wilt Chamberlain.
Other prospects certainly are of
top-flight sue'. Dave Corson is 6-6,
Sammy Meyers 6-4, Jack McNi McNi-chol
chol McNi-chol 6-6, Jack Schwa ke 6-5 and
Irvin Turner 6-4.

All Depends
On Steaks

NEW YORK (NEA) -Alex Mit Mit-eff,
eff, Mit-eff, the battering Argentine heavy heavyweight
weight heavyweight who has yet to lose in 14
bouts, has had no trouble becom becoming
ing becoming adjusted to living in New York
City.1
"ir Argentina," Miteff says, "I
eat nteak. I eat steak here. Hymie's
a nice fellow."
He meant Manager Hymie Wall Wall-man
man Wall-man who, as the word steak
would seem to indicate, is con considerably
siderably considerably out of pocket so far in
bis venture with the fighter.

NO FOWER GUY
New York (NEA) When Ger Gerry
ry Gerry Coleman hit his first homer of
the season against the Tigers-Jit
also was the first 'four-badger
the Yankee infielder had hit since
1954.

ALL HANDS PULLING AS ONE

HCv. i
' IXfeisga, - yoaiTi,,, j u ,y

Bobbv Braaan Is eut at Pitts

burgh. Chuck Dressen left Wash

ington a while age. Leu Boudreau

got his at Kansas City Ur weoK.
Can BMI Rignoy stick with the Gi Giants?
ants? Giants? How tabout Bob Schoffing
with the Cubs?. Is '- enly Casey
Stongol safe? r
With the unemployment problem
among major league managers ap approaching
proaching approaching its annual peak I check checked
ed checked with my expert on this matter,
Frank Frisch. :
At his home in New Rochelle,
Frisch bas been working1 on a. job job-security
security job-security program for managers
based on hu experiences -while
directing the Cardinals, Pirates
and Cubs.
He had deveoped a' two point
platform for prospective mansgers
who wished to avoid iasomnia.
These are, first, buy the ball club;
second, if this is impractical make
sure you have a guranteed game game-winning,
winning, game-winning, meal-ticket type of play player.
er. player. -v.

Frlsck edds a third after not

ing gtamly that Bragan. represent represent-d
d represent-d the 35th menagorial switch In
the majors since July 22, ,l51,
when Frank withdrew from the
field at Chicago to take up his
studios. r-
- "After seeing so much ie the
Yankees in the' past. fewyears,"
he revealed. "I aave to admit to
Stengel has the best system. He
not oaly has lot of meal tickets,
but be is able, in that congenial
way of his, to put over the idea
that he has only one thought to
win and tost his fellows h (bet (better
ter (better have that thought, too."
, DIZ THB MEAL TICKET.
Frisch began working out his
platform one day in Bubeen,.A Bubeen,.A-hi.
hi. Bubeen,.A-hi. As a yirang manager be was
trying to leare the secret of be becoming
coming becoming an old one while he bad
lunch with the late Connie Mack
before the exhibition -game.
. "It was a fine chat' Frank re reminisced,
minisced, reminisced, "until Connie said: 'Tm
the ctly manager that can't be
fired I own the c'.b. Se looked
right at me, and I worried the rest
of the day. Did Connie know some some-thin
thin some-thin e was I the next to eo?"

As player-manager for the Car

dinals in ls&4. r mcn naa one oi

basebalfs preferred meal tickets

in Diz DeaB, woe won 30, lost sev

en that season.
"Who t woriW," the Flash
recalled, "Dii would toll mo take
it or. Frank, and I'H make a
groat managar out of yew. He
4idn1 know i waa worrying about
him h wit tSo maal tickat.

" "In the fourth game of thatf,34
World Series,"- Frisch continued,
"I needed a runner and Diz ask asked
ed asked to go in." 'Go away, you'll get
hurt,' I snapped at him. 'I got to
get in the game, Frank,' he insist
ed. He went in and on the next
play- the shortstop tried for a dou double
ble double play and conked Diz. I found
out later hr. was trying out- a
new way to break up a double
play by jumping into the ball."
'NOT EVEN A LUMP THERE.
Dean ran into a throw by Billy
Rogell, Detroit shortstop, and was
knocked out and carried off on a
stretcher. ;
"I was frantic," Frisch related.
"He was groggy when h came
to the least he could have was a
concussion.' Hjs brother, Paul
felt Diz's head and said in dis disgust:
gust: disgust: "Why there's, not even a
lumptbere you ain't hurt."
- Coan wasn't hurt much he
won the World Series. After Dis
roelly was injured in the All.Star
game erf TT, Frishch dropped eut
of the first division the following
year and was asked to leave St. j
Louis. Ne 'manager is greater
than his meal ticket Frank phi philosophized.
losophized. philosophized. -philosophized.
That's why Stengel has the only
system, he concluded. "He has all
those fine young fellows going on
on tbe field, like men going to
work in the morning, with only
one thought to do that job right,
or somebody else will do it right.'1
Frisch- will study the Yankees
a while longer before adopting a
method to activate bis Universal
Stengel Job Security Plan. He
doubts whether be will have it set
up in time to -help Rigney and
SchefSng next. i

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
' PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
: Complete Prize-winninn Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 2005, Sunday, August 11, 1957
' The whole ticket his 82 pieces divided in two aeries "A"-& "B" of 26 pieces each. rrr

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

9391
8009
5974

$ 52,000.00
$ 1 5,600.00
5 7,800.00

No, Priaaa Ka. Priaw No. Frlxw Na. Prtaae Ha. Frtaaa Mo. trttm No. Prhaa No. Mm No. frlt
esse im.m ism is.m vm im.ss loss lus.te ms iss.m ih iss.ss ssm is.bs tbse iss.ee stse iss.n
SIN 1SS.SS 11SS ISS.M 21M IM.M llM 1M.M 41M 1M.M SIM IM.M SIM 1M.M I1M IM.M SIM IM.M
SZM 1SS.M 12M 1M.M 22M 1SS.M SZM IM.M 4ZM IM.M SZM 154M 82M IM.M 7JM IM.M 82M IM.M
SSM Z.SM.M IMS Z.6M.M H 2.SM.M MM Z,M.M 43SS 2.SM40 S3M S.SM.M S3M Z,SM.M 73M I,H M S3M Z.SM.M
S4M 1M.M 14M 1M.H 24M IM.M 14M 15S.M 44M 1.M.M S4M IM.M S4M IM.M t4M 1M.M S4M 1M.SO
SSM 1M.M 15M 1M.M 2SM IM.M SSM IM.M 4ISM IM.M SSM IM.M SSM 1M.M 15M IM.M SSM 1M.M
MM IM.M 16M 1M.M MM IM.M SSM IM.M MM 1SS.M MM IM.M MM IM.M TM IM.M MM 1M.M
7M 1M.M 17M 1M.M 27M 1M.M 37 M IM.M 47M IM.M S7M IM.M S7M IM.M I7M JM.M J7M IM.M
SSM IM.M ISM 1M.M MM IM.M SUM IM.M 41M 1M.M MM 1MM SSM 1MJO 7SM 1MM MM IM.M
MM 1M.M ISM IM.M 2SM IM.M ISM IM.M. 4SM IM.M SSM IM.M SSM IM.M ISM 1M.M SSM IM.M

SIM
S2M
93M
S4M
SSM
7M
SSM

a
1M.M
JM.M
IM.M
oj2a a
IM.M
. IM.M
IM.M
IM.M
1M.M
1M.M

Approximations Derived From First Prize

SSSt S2S.M I S3S2 ; SJS.M I SMS S2SM I SM7 SJS.M BM S2S.M J S32 SMM S3M S20.M I S3M S20JJ MM S2SM I
S3S2 S2S-M I SSM S2S.M I S3SS. S24M I S3M S2S.M SMI S2S.M I S3S2 52S.M S3SS S20-M MI SZS Hv
Approximations Derived From Second Prize A
MM 2SS M J IMS 2M M 2MS 2t.M MM 2M.M SMS 2M.M SMS 2M.M MM 2M.M 7MS 2M.M .1 MM 2M N
SMS IM.M i SMS 13S.M SM4 ,t IM.M SMS IM.M SMS 13S.M SII 13S.M i MIS ; IM.M MIS. IM.M SS1T IM.M
SMI 134M I MM 1M.M SMS 13S.M MT IM.M MIS MM M12 IM.M M14 IMS MIS' ,M.M Mia IM.M

'Approximations Derived From Third -Prize

. em 'mm tm' imjs I 7 u.H j tnt issss
SMS1sIm im .- 1M.M j MM
SMS 1S4.M SMS ; 1S4.M I M7S ... 1S4.M i. M72 1M.M

S7a lMJSl S0I4 1M.M
St7S IM.M -S7S I04.M
M7I 1S4.M' M77 184.M

TS74

S
1MM

7S
M7S

JM.M'
1M.M

SS74,
SfM
(Ml

1M.M
1M.M-1M.M

M74

SM2
SMI

1S4.M
"lMM
1M.M

": -

m4

'The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in and net Included In the above list win Fifty Two Dollars .9) eacn.

Prize-winning Numbers of yesterday'a Lottery Drawinr were aold at: The 1st, 2nd and 3rd In Panama.

6

. tiY :

Signed by ALBERTO ALEMAN. Governor of the Province of Panama C6d. 47-12155 J;
; The RepreSenUtJye of the Treasury. JOSE GUILLERMO A1ZPU ;l

PABLO A PINEL M.
Secretary. ?

WITNESSES: Oscar B. Lowe Cedula No. 47-2056
- Lnpo Peres Cedula No. 47-1115$ t

JOSE DOMINGO SOTO,
Notary Public, Panama.

JrtTC. Tha irtnutri Hckda with tha last dpbar an4 with Um two laat
' IW I C. cipbara tnrAy only to tba flrat Priaa.
yTUrn rtrat Ptii ana tia 2n4 and Srd PrUca ara drawn aaparately. Tba an an-'
' an-' proxtmaUon ara cairuiatad an ttia rimt Bacand and Third Priaaa. in t
a Urkat hould cairv il sum ban of oadv priia. tpt boldar la oatiUad to
daia aaraMot to aaek. .; :. .t if ; "5 .. j ; ?
DRAVlaG OF THE 3 STRIKES
; Sunday"; Aujust 11 1957 ; t :rvy..
" V'..:,'..., Drawing Nnmber 7M -u:':

-: r Fraction

First Prirc. .... 90 V
StMJond.Prltr. .. 09 ;
Third Prize. T. . '74

Ticket

$11.00 $220.00

60.00:
40.00.

1 3.00
2.00

Tha orhaa win a kaM 4a attardanta with tha Official Uat af Iaaaaa fea L
tha rtri W h NMt Oo.lt. aat Lattan aata Caatral Aaa

PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. tW WHICH WILL 17
. ' AKE PLACE, AUGUST 18, 1157

? Olvtdod to two aariaa af M fraction aaek daooaainataal "A and T .1

'v ... r :'.! ? mrr fatarn w
- -I rirM Frtaa. Sarteo A and B. t $2 M-M aaeh tria
: 1 Second Priia. Sia A and B. ef ; 7 we M aach aaria. IS J
' 1 Third Prtw. Si A and B. of I.SOO.M kach aarMa
IS Appraxlmatiaiia. Barlaa A ud B. of 2M.M aach aariaa Sa .or
- S Priua. Sartaa A and of UOMaaeH a.4Jr
a arisM. bim A and B. af - 7S M oach aw.a 14.a4S.or

too Priua. aartaa A and B. af 2ee oach oarlca
- becoxd nm
It ApprexImaMon. rie A and B. of t M aach aartaa
a ftizat. Bariaa A and B. of -j ua Maachaexwa

'''.'.: ;."."- THIKD PUZB
It Aparoximattons. SHa A and M. af $
, a Fniaa, Sariae A aad B. at j
M74 Ttttm "

S2M aach acrita
S-M aach aartaa

$ 2340M
SJ40 SO-
0

t 1 T -f

l.aoaao

Tatal

. ..aiTtjM.se

Price of a whole ticket ,s..
Price' of a fifty-second part

PRIZES ASK PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

$26.00
......$...50



1 V

V
MONDAY, AUGUST It, 157
PAGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
509 Pace Shapes Up Ms Fla
0
JM

r r

g-CilDC

J
i

Both Braves, Yankees

Could Be Home Free
h 22 Wins In 44

1$

By FRED DOWN

NEW YORK, Aug.

ies in 44 games a .500-pace shapes up today as
the magic pennant-clinching number for both the
.Milwaukee Braves and the New York Yankees.

The once-close National League
mhlp cracked wide open yes
tprrfav when the Braves whipped
the St. Louis Cardinals, 5-1, for
, their seventh straight victory, their
12th in 13 cames and their 21st
. in 26 games since July, 15. The
Yankees', meanwhile, downed the
Baltimore Orioles, 7-2, and picked
up a half game when the Chicago
Whits Sox split wun me ueiruu
Tleers.
Those successes enabled both
'. Tfront -runners to open up 5Vi game
. Jeads with each having 44 games
"remaining. A .500 pace would en-
' Cul 4U. 13,..,., a. finioh with QO
- Victories end the Yankees with 94.
.To overtake the Braves the Cardi-
; nals would have to play .644-bau,
, Jthe Brooklyn Dodgers .674, the.
' Cincinnati Itedlegs .682 and the
.Philadelphia Phillies .727. The
Vhite Sox would have to clore at
' a' .644 pace to wip out a .500-Yan-kee
closing pace.
Gene Corvlty, -L since th,t
key July 15 date, pitched a. itv-en-hitter
for his eighth win as
the Braves gained the biggest
N.L. Ied of the mason and the
, longest sine they enjoyed the
ame margin en July 26, 1956.
' The cunnnt IVi game lead plac placet
et placet the Braves In a much strong stronger
er stronger position because ttuir rivals
have some 20 fewer games left
in which to close the gap.
Almost every statistic imagin imaginable
able imaginable now supports the theory that
the tBraves will go on to their first
Hag since the shift to Milwaukee.
Since July 15, they've played at
an .(08-clip compared to the Red Red-legs'
legs' Red-legs' .577, the Dodgers' .567, the
Cardinals' .556 and the collapsing
Phillies' .407. In addition, they now
hold a season's edge over each of
their rivals 7-5 over the Cardi Cardinals,
nals, Cardinals, 9-7 over the Dodgers, 11-2 ov over
er over the Redlegs and 10-8 over the
Phillies.
The Yankees, pulling out of a
momentary slump, slammed out 14
hits behind the six-hit pitching of
. ohnny Kucks and Bob Grim and
row show a steady 7-4 pace for
ugust. The White Sox, who suf--'rtred
an 8 5 loss before beating
'ie Tigers, 11-2 show no signs of
. ihounting a late drive off their 5-6
- JJace for this month.
; rEd Mathews knocked in two
n us with a single and his 22nd
' hrmer and Johnny Logan smash smash-ex!
ex! smash-ex! a two-run single in a. four-run
:'l:'rd inning rally as the Braves
t' it Cardinal ace Sam Jones. Con Con-"
" Con-" who didn't win his third game
1 July 19, yielded seven hits
. four walks but was helped
vV w double plays and pitched
' out' of numerous jams. Ken Boy Boy-er'S
er'S Boy-er'S homer produced St. Louis'
run in the ninth.
The Pirates dealt the Dodgers
a staggering blow with a 4-3 ten ten-'
' ten-' ning and 6-2 sweep, Bill Mazeros-
':i singling home the winning run
, !rn '.he opener and Charlie (Wham-
ny) Douglas scoring his first big
, ':. ""gue win in the nightcap. Paul
mith sent the first game into ex ex-."a
."a ex-."a innings when he homered off
relief ac Clem Labine with two
out in the ninth.
CECILIA

TODAY LAST TIME!
Tony Curtis In "MISTER CORY"
In Cinemascope-Technicolor I -Plus:
The most amazing story
"The Incredible Sbrlnkinr Man"

TOMORROW TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY!
(NOT RECOMMENDED FOR CHILDREN)

ALSO "tTOto'DARK WATERS'
COMING THURSDAY!
"THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH"
Mas: "GODZILLA KING OF THE MONSTERS"

CAPITOLIO
lie See.
Robert Ryan In
MEN IN WAR
' Also:
PANCE WITH ME,
HENRY

12 (UP) A mere 22 victor-

RnnVi Jack Sanford pitched
three-hitter for his 15th win and
cave the Phillies a 2-0 decision ov
er Johnnv Antonelli after Curt
Barclay's three-hitter won the o
nener nvr the Giants. 5-0. Wil
Be Mays had two triples in the
opener and two singles in the
nightcap to stretcli his h i t i n g
streak to 18 games. Cincinnati's
scheduled doubleheader with Chi
cago was rained out.
Oarrell Johnson, subbing for
slump ridden Yogi Berra, had
three singles and Bill Skowron
homered as the Yankee tagged
Kin Lehman with his third de defeat.
feat. defeat. Grim replaced Kucks after
the Orioles rallied for two runs
in the seventh and shut out
Baltimore in the last two innings.
Walt Dropo drove in four runs
with a homer and a single to help
the White Sox gain their split af after
ter after Jim Bunning won his 14th game
for the Tigers. Jim Wilson scat scattered
tered scattered nine hits for the White Sox
in the second game to win his
fourth straight and 13th decision
of the season.
Gene Stephens drove in the de decisive
cisive decisive run with an 11th inning
triple to give the Boston Red Sox
a 4-3 victory over Washington af after
ter after the Sox pounded out an 8-5
decision in the opener. Ted Wil Williams
liams Williams had one hit in four trips and
drew two" intentional walks as his
average dipped to .mi.
The Kansas City Athletics got
two-hit pitching from Ned Garver
in their first game ana wauopea
four homers in the nightcap to
beat the Cleveland Indians, 7-0 and
9-8. Gus Zernial smashed two hom
ers in the second game as the In
dians dipped into sixth place.
DOMING PIGEON -It must
dc appie turnover or a piece
lot upside-down cake which
jlured this New York City
pigeon to the top of this friend friend-Jly
Jly friend-Jly fellow's head. The pigeon
i turns his head over to take the
snack from the Angers of the
; unidentified man.
THEATRE

! 7 1 111 "" V 'JW".

T IVOLI
IU. Joe.
Spanish Double!
Afrustln Lara In
LOS S BOHEMIOS
- Also:
DOS ChVrROS T
UNA GIT AN A

RIO
15c,

Sophist Loren In
BOY ON A DOLPHIN
- Also:
THE STORT OF
JESSE JAMES -In
Cinemascope!

lAajor League

Leaders
LEADING BATTERS
(Based en 275 at bats)
National League
P and C G AB R H Pet.
Aaron, Mil. '107 435 87 147 .338
Musial, St. L. 109 425 67 141 .332
Groat, Pitt. 84 336 39 111 .330
Robinson, Cinci. 106 431 77 142 .329
Mays, N.Y. Ill 422 81 139 .329
Fondy. Pitt. 93 356 43 113 .317
Schoendienst, M 107 458 63 144 .314
Moryn, Chi. 104 389 54 121
Cimoli, Bkn. 99 368 60 114
Hodges, Bkn. 107 411 62 124
.311
.310
.302
American League
Williams, Bos. 104 346 77 134 .387
Mantle, N.Y 110 367 99 139 .379
Fox, Chicago 110 432 76 140 .324
iBoyd, Bait. 105 353 57 113 .320
Woodling, Cle. 95 297 SI 95 .320
Minoso, Chi. 108 404, 67 125 .309
McDougald, NY 101 386 71 118 .306
Malzone, Bos. 109 452 54 138 .305
Skowron, N.Y. .98 362 50 109 .301
Doby. Chicago 87 304 42 91 .299
HOME
National
Aaron, Braves
Snider, Dodgers
Mays, Giants
Crowe, Redlegs
Musial. Cards
RUNS
League
32
29
26
26
25
American League
Mantle, Yanks
Sieveri, Senators
Williams, Red1 Sox
31
30
30
Wertz, Indn.ns
Colavito, Indians
20
20
20
Zernial, Athletics
RUNS BATED !N
National Learvt
Musial, Cards
.87
87
74
72
69
Aaron, Braves
Crowe, Redlegs
Mays, Giants
Ennis, Cards
American to "one
Sievers. Senators
81
80
78
7i
Mantle, Yanks
Wertz, Indians
Skowron, Yanks
Jensen, Red Sox
PITCHING
(Based en 11 deci.'on$)
W
L Pet.
Schmidt, Cards
Donovan, White Sox
Sanford, Phils
Bunning, Tiger
Grim, Yanks
10
12
15
lo
.909
.800
.789
.778
.769
By BEANS REARDON
vuu&iiuw: Witn a runner on
first base, the umpire hands the
catcher a new ball. The pitcher
isn't looking when the catcher
throws the new ball to him and it
goes on into center field. The run runner
ner runner moved to second base. Is this
legal? Walter Reid.
Answer: No. Play does not re
sume until the pitcher steps on
thii rubber with the baM.
Q. A foul ball on the third srike
is missed by the catcher and lodges
in the umpire's mask. What a a-bout
bout a-bout it? Caswell Stark.
A. The ball is dead. Tho count
en the batter continues.
Q. In Softball, the batter steps out
of the batter's box in an attempt
to hit a pitched ball. He misses it.
Is there a penalty? Leslie
McCarter.
A. No. The bell must be batted
in order to impose tho penalty.
TODAY &
TOMORROW!
60c.
30c.
! DRIVE-IN I
I
SPECIAL RELEASE! v
I Fma Against Awriwitic
test Amcoa Jeegle lodtgr M
- A . I
lockereeee I
VICTORIA
Xfte.
THE WINGS Or
THE HAWK
- Also: -TARZAN
THE
APE MAN

I test Ihkm Jewels I

j luigiUITII BSS3ET
i M'c't

Mm is &

Bacancito Cops Pbst-To-Post
Victory In $ 750 Mile Race

v-' w c ; i ?
pT- 1-..
'' J
'4. j- i
' v, r

PICTURE PUZZLE Pete Redemacher studies pictures Uken ;
as Floyd Patterson stepped Hurricane Tommy Jackson in the ;
10th round. Giving -Rademacher pointers is Trainer George :
Chemeres. The Olympic titleholder realizes that he has quite a
joJb on hand bidding for Patterson's crown in Seattle, Aug. 22j

Teeners Win 9, Tie One
In Exhibition Contests

The Panama VFW, Teener base
ball team concluded its pr-tour-
nament tour oy adding three more
victories to its record, all against
Pennsylvania opposition, on thurs-
day the local boys handed Mifflin Mifflin-town
town Mifflin-town a 9-2 defeat, with lefty Jeff
rKline the winning pitcher lor Pa-
Amaleur del Brass
Fast Losing Interest
In 'Open' Tourneys
By STEVE SNIDER
NEW YORK, Aug. 12 (UP)
Amateur tennis brass hats are
losing interest in "open" tourna
ments since the pros began to
lower the boom on Wimbledon
champ Lew Hoad of Australia.
So far, Hoad is a $125,000 bust
as a pro with a 2-9 record. That
caused amateur officials to blink
and take a second look at their
tentative endorsement of open
championships patterned after
golf with amateurs and pros com
peting in the same tournament.
"I was an for legalizing open
play," said one highly placed
amateur official, "but now I don't
know. It looks like even the best
amateur doesn't have a chance
with a fourth-string pro."
ThTe pros insist open tourna tournaments
ments tournaments would be the greatest force
in the world for developing ama
teur talent. The amateurs fear
extinction or, at best, second rate
status.
But there Is considerable evi
dence on the side of the pros,
according to Ted Schroeder of Los
Angeles, sidekick of promoter
Jack Kramer.
Rosewall's Improvement
"In less than 60 days of pro
competition, Ken Rosewall im improved
proved improved 30 points a game,',' says
Schroeder. "If that sounds too
tricky, put it this way: When he
first turned pro, he blew two shots
a' game that he now makes
easily."
If, the world around, leading
amateurs mix freely with the pros
in open tournaments, the best of
the more-or less simon pures
would improve similarly and the
amateur game would be raised to
its highest peak in history, Schroe Schroeder
der Schroeder bel
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3ANTA CRUZ :15 '- 7:4i
"HORIZONS WEST" ansl
-GIRLS IN THE NIGHT-
CAMP BIERD :1S :
-TEA AND SYMPATHY

nama. In the national tournament
last year the Canal Zone team was
the only team which defeated Mif Mif-flintown,
flintown, Mif-flintown, which won the champion championship
ship championship of the consolation bracket.
Moving on the next dav to Me-

ehanicsburgh the Canal Zone boys
added mother victory to their al
ready imposing number by defeat defeating
ing defeating Mechanicsburg 4-3, with Kline
again chalking up the win. Mgr.
De la Pena states that Kline did
a good job In that game but the
boys were not feeling up to snuff.
Aside from the 1-1 tie In Union.
N.J, the S-3 score in tne Mecha-
nicsburg game has-been the dos
est margin of victory.
On Saturday morning the boys
Journeyed to Carlisle, Pa. for the
final stop before checking in to
Hershey for the tournament nlav
This is the third year the Carlisle
louts nave played host for the Fa
nama team and tne third year
the Carlisle folks have played host
for the Panama team and the
third year Charles Nixon, of Car
lisle; has beaded the arrangement
committee, it was Charlie Nixon
who set up the Mechanicsburgh
game this year for us, and it was
also he who made the arrange
ments tor cnartenng the bus to
stay with the local team for the
final five days of hectic traveling
this year. Because of his wonder wonderful
ful wonderful assistance and cooperation for
tne past three years the V.F.W.
Teener League of the Canal Zone,
witn toy De la Pena' as sookes
man, formally extended its thanks
and appreciation to Nixon.
When it was learned that the
son of the umpire in the Carlisle
game was in the hospital, the V.
F.W. Representative accomoanvim
boys, Ralph Zachry, gave the hos
pitalized boy a baseball autograph
ed by the Panama Canal Zone
team members. In the Carlisle
tame played Saturday evening the
Sonians were on the long end of
a 8-4 score. All four Panama
pitchers were used in the game
umco Martin. Jeff Kline, Brian
Lutz, and Keith Kulig, with Ku'i?
getting credit for the win. Keith
whose regular position is shortstop,
was also the big gun at the bat
getting a triple and a home run.
After attending church and hiv hiving
ing hiving dinner in Carlisle the boys
checked into Hershey where tour tournament
nament tournament play was to start today.
Id the drawing for playing sched schedule,
ule, schedule, the Pmima team did not
drew a bye this year and was
scheduled to play .,, in the first
round.
The boys played 10 exhibition
fames in 11 days, winning nine
and tying one. This grueling sched
ule, together with the Illness which
plagued the boys, has tired them
somewhat, but both are seeming
ly conquered. Tne team will re
main at Hershey this entire week,
and yesterday by ham radio the
boys were reported to be in good
shape.
Today Encanto 35, 20
Rock Hudson and
' Sldner PoiUer in f
."SOMETHING Of VALur'
Van Johnson tn
- "BLANDER
Today -WEAL 30 .10
3 Martin Lewis .in
1 Vj ring caters"
"William Holden tn
"BRIDGES OF TOKO-RI

; v Bacancito sprinted to the front
' ftvr tKa -fietet -fii Inner mrA iwif nau.

iw dlic iuok luug t Je
er headed as he raced to a one
length post-to-post victory in the
$750 one-mile gallop yesterday aft
ernoon at the President Kemon
racetrack.'
The dark brown horse, owned
by the Stud Durrieu and trained
by Juiian Marshall, was sent out
tne favorite in the main, event for
second and third series imported
horses and justified the fans' faith
in him.
, Heliodoro; Gustines got the Ar
gentine bred son of Esquimazo-
ueterita oa last nut by the time
the field reached the first turn,
Bancancito had squeezed through
an opening and was on ton. He
set his pace in hand under judi
cious rating until two furlongs out
where he was his head and open opened
ed opened a three length margin at the
head oi the homestretch but lost
ground steadily in the run through
the stretch and had to hard driv driven
en driven to maintain a one length lead
over .Kmbruiada at the wire. Pa.
quiro wound up third, only a half
lengtn iuryier DacK, a.
Bapanpitn'n timp wn a rrdit
-oie i. z-5 over a slowed un
track. He- returned 35.40 win and
sj.40 place. The one two cambin
nation with Opulento returned $14.
40. The day's best win odds, how-
even were Bugaba'a $30 in the
third i ace. Bugaba also combined
with Golden Moon, for a one-two
payoii o S172.60 tops for the day.
. nuueu vasauez was tn winmntr.
fst'irider with three victories a
Deard ihe (;in Hnpai r
lestial Fire. Ferhandn Alvsrtt ...
therunjierup with wins on Daniel
ana iineia. ; ,
The dividends: 1
FIRST RACI
1 Daniel $11.46. $6.
2 Portal $7.20
Seoond Race
1 The Gipsy $3.20. J2.20
2 I Forget 2.20
Doubie: $23.80
Third Race
f Yl.. V -on a
2 Golden Moon $5.
One-Two: $72.00
Fourth Race
1 Tlnela $8.80, $3.20
I Vilma P. $2.10
Quiniela $7.40
Fifth Race
1 Nautical Touh $3. r $2.20
1 Ocalai Misf $2.40 t, ,
SIxtH Race
1 Tiequeat $14.20, $3.80
Michungo $2.80
Seventh Race
1 Horacio $8.80, $3:40
X fiatallori $4,
Double: $96.20
. Eighth Race
1 Celestial Fire $3.40, $2.20
2 Lanero $2.80
Quiniela: $12.20
Ninth Race
1 Bacancitd $5.40, $3.40
2 Embrujada $3.60
One Two: $14.40
Field & Stream
Right-Handort Really Sheet Uft
By WAR IN PACE
Sheeting Editor
TOSS a horseshoe with your
right hand? Grip a steak-carving
knife in your right lunch hook?
Sign checks with your right hand?
Then you shoot a scattergun right right-handed,
handed, right-handed, right? Or do you?
You don't. As a right-sided In Individual
dividual Individual you undoubtedly pull a
trigger with youl right forefinger
and set a gun's buttstocjt against
your right shoulder. You use your
right eye in gun-pointing, either
because it is so completely dom dominant
inant dominant that it overpowers the' left
in alignment, or because you shut
or Duns your len eye. But u s
your left hand that does the real
business of pointing that gun.
The right handed idlfer'a dex
ter side is important in maninu-
lating the clubbead, but lo not
most professionals agree that the
bulk of his hittini newer eomai
from the left arm?
j
The scattergunner must put sim similarly
ilarly similarly important responsibilities on
bis left arm and hand.
For a comfortably smooth swing
which is the essense of successful
shotgunnery the left hand grip
must not be too far out under
the barrel, or too close ia to the
action.
It will cramp aad limit the
swing, thoujrh trivia food sua
control. It offers maximum swing
raoius out impossibly poor con
trol. If the left elbow Is high, as
in the left elbow is hlih. as in the
rifle shooter's stance, it cramps
the gun move. Toe low, it achiev achieves
es achieves the same inhibition- of fluid
movement. Positions of hand aad
elbow must be a comforts ale com compromise.
promise. compromise.
The left hand points the can.
R supplies the motive force to
swing our scattergun muxxio up
into position ahead of the eye,
along" the target's Hae of flight
and oat ahead for the forward al allowance
lowance allowance necessary for a ha half
lf half the right nad'a jobs of hold-
iag e gun Dun in position
gainst shoulder and of puUieg the
j trigger could be done by some
1 ether means, we'd still find it a
rough go to hit a pheasant vita
out t4t fuidUf left feand, : .,

Editor: CONRADO 8ARCEANT

MfllKlkAn LCAUUH : ff 'j -V U1T AU1 I e 4 f last 1

Teams
New York
Chicago
Boston
Baltimore
Detroit
Cleveland
Washington
Mna City
Today's Games'
Open date.
Yesterday's Reiulta
New York 041 011 0007 14' 0
Baltimore 000 000 2002 6 3
Kucks (7-7), Grim and Johnson.
Lehman (3-3). Walker. O'DeU
and Triandos, Zupo.
1 (First Gamn)
Washington 102 000 2005 10
Boston 202 000 04x 8 10
Stobbs, Clevenger (5-4), and Ber-,
oerei. ...
Porterf ield Fofnieles, 'i -, Delock
(6-7), WaU and White.
Second Game)
Washington 000 200 010 003 9 0
Boston 000 003- 000 014 11 0
Hyde, Byerly, Ramos (9-10 and
Courtney.
Susce, Fornieles (7-11) and Da Daley.
ley. Daley. (First Game)
Kansas City 003 400 0007 11 2
Cleveland 000 000 0000 2 1
' Garver (5-10) and H. Smith.
Daley (1-8, Gray, Tomanek and
Nixon, Naragon. r
(Second Geme)
Kansas City 301 050 000-9 11 2
Cleveland 300 230 0008 11 0
Kellner, Urban, Morgan (7-6)
and -I. Smith. v ,
Mossi, Lemon (6-11), Garcia!,
Wynn and Ilegan, Naragon.
' (First Game) y
Detroit 411 000 0208 15 1
Chicago ' 011 000 0035 13 2
Bunning (14-4), Mass and House.
Keegan (7-6), Howell, Fischer
Hughes, LaPelme aad Lollar.
(See end Game)
Detroit 001 000 100 t tI
Chicago 203 212 Olx 11 14 t
Hoeft (4-T), Shaw, Byrd, Aber,
Heater and Wilson. i
Wilson (13-7) and Moss.
2-
NEW YORK, Aug. 12 (UP)
Humberto Robinson, who paced
the Toronto pitching staff during
the first half of the season, is re regaining
gaining regaining his winning form as To Toronto
ronto Toronto is picking up its drive to toward
ward toward the International League pen pennant,
nant, pennant, i
The slim righthander pitched a
two-hit shutout in the second game
a a Toronto swept a twin-bill, from
Richmond yesterday. "Robinson's
6-0 victory came after the Leafs
had rallied for an 8-6 triumph in
tho opener.
In other games. Buffalo defeat
ed Havana, 4-2, after dropping the
opener, 1-0. in 15 innings, Kocnes
ter swept two from Miami, 6-2
and 4-) and Montreal beat Colum
bus, li-8, in the first game with
the Jets winning the second. 3-2.
Robinson,, who had gained his
llth win by June 21, won oniy nis
second iame in nearly two months
with his masterful seven inning
itching effort In the opener, the
eafs-offset, and early Richmond
six -run lead to hem reliefer wues
Jordan earn his third victory wnue
Jim Post '-wasv charged with his
eighth loss for us vees
or ye ve
mi
Paralso Mid-Season
Tennis Tournanienl
Finals Ilexl 5und:7v
The' mid-season sin vies tonrna tonrna-ment
ment tonrna-ment by the Psrsiso Tennis Club
is fast eomlng to an end and ef efforts
forts efforts will be made to have the fi finals
nals finals played en Sunday if the
weather permits. t
Arthur J. Griffiths lias donated
two trophies for the players in the
finals, v : .-.
' A doubles' tournament wfll vet
underway immediately after, the
einsles and double's nartners are
urged to submit their names to
the aecretttx as soon as possible.
Only one game was completed
during the past week. Smythe de
feated FJie Jr.. 6-0, -0 On SaturH
day evefiiag after the court- was
try, Johnson Hubert hammered
Howell down to win five games
traifht. Howell itineed to win
the sixth fume aad five tames
theretler. Hubert won-that set
8-C. The second set was called
en account of darkness by Umpire
Dourlas, with Hubert on top at
3-2. This natch will continue on
Tuesday evening at 5 .ra.
Sunday morning, Simpson dis displayed
played displayed top form aad defeated Ji Jimenez
menez Jimenez in the first set 6-4. Even
though Jimeees did not. display
the tennis form that was expected
of him, he worn down Simpson
for a 8-6, 7-9 win. Juneaex is
I Con tinned ea ran f.

. "Z, : 77, Mnwauxee es 42 .618 . l
' "5S Brooklyn 2 49 .550 CVi 1 1
S '.lil'M.iaiicinnatl-, 61 49 .555 1 T U
' 53 If'H? taddllt 59 51 '.536.;,
A 52 'ill J?14 New York 50 62 .4461 It
43 70 .375 31 rhir.on o a mm j fc

Humberto Robinson Hurls

Hitter

For

... V

w Pittsburgli 39 71 .3SSV 20

, Today' Games i
Open date.
' Ysrday's Results
Milwaukee 004 010 000-8 I 1
St. Louis 000 000 OoLi-l T i
. Conley (8-5) and Crandall.
, Jones (), Schmidt, JUzelL
Jackson and Landrith.
(First Game)
Brooklyn 101 010 000 0-iSlO 1
Pittsburgh 000 002 001 14 11 0
Podres, Labin (5-6) and Cam Cam-panella,
panella, Cam-panella, Walker.
lOine, King; Arroyo, Face Law
(8-7) and Foiles, Rand, Peterson.
(Second Game)
Brooklyn "000 010 0102 I 6
Pittsburgh. 100 013 01x-6 11 2
Newcombe, Craig (5-7), Roebuck,
Koufax and Walker.
Douglas (1-1), Face and Peter Peter-son.
son. Peter-son. (First Game)
Philadelphia 000 000 000-0 2
New York 010 001 30X-5 $ 2
Haddix (8-8) Miller. Heam and
Lopata. 1
Barclay (6-7) and Thomas.
' (Second Geme)
Philadelphia, oil ooo 000 2 T 0
New York 000 000 0000 8 2
Sanford (15-4) nd Lonnett
Antonelli (11-11) and Westrum.
Chicago at Clneinnatl 2 .games,
postponed.
,1 1 FLYING ItART
Oeewport, (NIA)
Howard Grant,- an apprentice,
the leading rider at Monmouth.
Buffalo, by virtue of Its second-game
win, increased its league
lead to a game and a half over
Richmond and Toronto; Karl
Drew, with late Inning help1 from
Mike Kume, brought nis season
record to 4-7 for Buffalo. In the
opener, Hanana scored the only
run of the game in the bottom of
the 15th inning to' break a pitch
ing duel between ay Gcrbert
and Orlando, Pena. Lou Kretlow
and.iliauel Cueliar. the two (tin.
ers,: weren't around at tne finish.
JKochester mevep to within five
games of first place when Gary
ulaylock and Lynn Lovenguth heij
the Miami Marlins to a total oX
five runs in the doubleheader.
. George O'DonneU outlasted Mon.
treat's tred Kipp to win the night
cap for Columbus in 11 innings.
In ths opener, Montreal won out
in a slugfest that saw the two
teams slam 39 hits.
The linescores: '
. (First Game)
Montreal s. 001-263-000 U 47
Columbus (320)10-011 1-12 4
-rII,Vl!, (6 Olson:
Hall, KOdoo (4), O'Brien (5) and
KraviU. WP -Harris. LP Kildoo.
HRs Powers, Harris, Genfile, No No-vak,
vak, No-vak, Toothman.
. J First Game)
Toronto 000-620-000 8 Tl
Richmond 150-000-000 68 2
Pearce, Crimian (2), Jordan (4)
and St. Claire, Coates, Pest; (4L
James (7) and ChitL WP Jordan.
LP Post HRs JethVoe, Jek.
' '(First Game)
Rochester. 113-000-110 8-11
Miami 000-200-000 2 T-4
G. filaylock and D. Ricketts;
Church, Bunker (8), Qualters (8)
and McCullough. P Church. HR
Smith.
(Flret Geme)
Buffalo 4 Haven t
. (Second G a mo)
iBusaio 000-000-;
Havana 100-000)01,'
Drews. Kume (T aad Noble:

13th

Wn

Scantlebury,' Cueche (T) and Is
eniierdo. WO Dres. LP gc antic
bury, v' . ,'r; i,
'i- Second Geme)-
Toronto 011-0310 I I I
Richmond v 000-000 0 0 8 -,
Robinson and .Roeelli; Wiotler,
Dixon (S) Parsons (7) and Chili.,

Ljfn lesier.

. ... .'4 :

(Seeend Gomel
Rocbeeter - OCT -POO 0 4 6
Miami 001-000-02 iTt
Lovengutb, Wrisht and Sem-
proch.-. Psige (8.and Buch. PT)rv
Levenguthi LP Sem proch, EX I I
Bucca. - V

(Seeend Game)
Montreal 2 Columbus 8

s

,:

i



'

I'
!
4 1
't
WDAY, AUGUST 12,' 1957
"THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
page seven;
1 T
i
1l
Next-. Bm Basebalk Sam b,
:' -' ; i -, j u I i : : . i
To

Rock

CieveMml

A

If-'
1
1i,

0

Hank Grieenberg Is Target As

Attendance Drops 2

! r
i
U
.-

Bf HARRY GRAYSON

'CLEVELAND' (NEAj-The next
jigbaseuall 'bomf) is quite likely
to5 rock Cleveland.
; The situation on the lakefront Is
of grave concern to the American

' ein.' airpaav caacuea wiia a

Bdrelea titD Mil

w dwindling -interest in Kansas
City. ..'

. 1 j
: A bold stroke must be"" made
1 . when attendance drops nearly two

million in nine years, wlucn is the
"' i -"sad story iu Cleveland, a frachise

. made tne oesi in me Dusiness uy

'J'- the master showman William
" Veeck, Jr. t-
! The out-and-out panic in Cleve

f land is much too serious to be as-

' auaged in the customary easiest
- wav-out way-i-by firine the man

ageri in this case Kerby ijfarrcll,
H t whp hardly has been around long

It easily could result in' the sale

, of the, club py the practically aD'
e :' sentee nrlncioal owners and fi

I ', nanciers, William R. Daley and

Ignatius Aloysius O'Sbaugnessy,

the latter of St. Paul. ,

i.The number of caving guests

has (alien off so alarmingly that
there has been substantial, talk of
switching the Indians to the new

stadium in Minneapolis.

A much more likely development

I .1 t. .' 11. .1!. T. I.;. r t I-

WasmngtLt'ir wouiu ue me uismissai ot naim

ureenDerg as general manager.

By BEANS REARDON
WriHtn for NEA Service

QUESTION: The batter's line

drive hits an umpire before it pass

ee'or is touched by an infielder

other than, the pitcher. What, hap
pens? Joe Guelielmi.

Answer: The batter gets base

' hit and the ball is dead.

Q. The batter tops a ball down
the third base line. The ball rolls

foul, then fair and hits third base.
Fair or foul?-Jack Delaney.'. :

, A. Pair.

tv .0. With runners on firrt and

third bases', the man from first
is hit by a batted ball. Does the
batter get a hit and can the man
. en third score ?--Leslie McDevitt.
i A. The baHer gate a hit end the
v ynnir en third bam cannot ad ad-rSjmc.
rSjmc. ad-rSjmc. ?1"'.r'K"-"-:s-') :', ; v-.y
; (J "Q. An flifielcT Hy'ls caUed by an
roundTTne windDlows the ball
into foul territory where' it re-
mains. Should the umpire stick to
-bis original ruling? Joe Kane.
A. No. It Is foul ball. Um.
" pirts shout: "Infield fly, if fair!"

i $ INFLATION HANDICAP J ..
W Camden, N.JV t (NEA With
1 190 two-year-olds kept in The Gar Garden
den Garden State, through final eligibility
v payments, the total value of the
richest race this fall ,now is $210,-
?,, 650, with more to come from en-

i tranre fees. -:-. ...',

: There are numerous reasons giv

en for the gradual decline of Cleve Cleveland
land Cleveland attendance from the all-time
major league record of 2,620,000
in 1948. The record shows, that the

fans did not quit on the Indians
easily or suddenly. There kwere

2,233,000 paid in 1949, 1,727,000, in
'50 1,704,000 in '51, 1,444000 in '52,
1.069,000 in 53; 1.335,00 in the pen

nant winning year of '5t and 1,

221,00 in '55. x t.
, Last year the attendance drop dropped
ped dropped below, the million, mark for
the first time since the last of the
Alva Bradley days in 1945. It was
865,467.
This year the Injuns will be hard
pressed to draw 700,000. They at attracted
tracted attracted no more' than 532,258 in
their first 51 games; went : above
the hall-million mark only with the
aid of the last week-end series' a
gainst the Yankees, x which drew drew-109,000.
109,000. drew-109,000. The remaining home schedule is
totally unattractive -and the latest
disaster in New York isn't ttoing
to help things any.
There Is orgahized resentment
against the front office, parti particularly
cularly particularly Greeribere.t who pulls well

with everybody except the addicts

who nave to support his policy in

Cleveland. Foi some reason,' old
Hankus Pankus is murdered by

followers of the, Tribe, treated as

though he had just dropped an ea easy
sy easy fly to. lose another game; v

Tne tans giew tirea oi running

second five out of six years, xne
Giants sweeping the 1954 World

Series i tour straight from an out

fit which won a record 1U games"

hurt badly. -'..

Games' were te'ecast a WL-tiV)

freely ior a spell and the trade
didn't like it when the free ride

was abbreviated. : '-

The'Indians7 are a dull.! uninte

resting lot withjno spectacular in in-aTviduaFattfacilbnr'
aTviduaFattfacilbnr' in-aTviduaFattfacilbnr'

Despite new turnpikes, the, cus

tomers no longer come in .droves

from, out of town

Bill Veeck was called back this

year, but fireworks, roving musi

cians and give-aways no longer

worked.-? ,,yy ; :

Meanwhile.' the Indians dropped

far off the pace,' and-the clamor

for a new, deal all around became
louder. '-, y-' vv:'

It will take all that and then

some to brine back what until

recently was a rnatchles piece of

baseball property. ; y

NOW HEAR THIS

I, s -
s -U-Tnr wt smuctz frank IAi;C
5-IFFOJZ ( 1 y
- X I 60TTA H yVV ) fr'
'- FuTuyiiTM I r -r L 7
" v '"" :.mk a Te W
J i v y. .Jr. :i && boom. a V 1
V ") Ijn' twc champion 'jl 4HI
. I X y ; lf A WANTS, HE'LL s-'
, lC.c '" cr Li t smscrs JSums
, ,eAn '& r-TTBB. AW I UW

Alumni Seelt To Clinch 1957

Atlantic Cage

Crown Tonight

STANDINGS' 1
'"Atlantic. Basketball League
V y W I. Pet.

Aliimnl 10 5 .667

Cristobal 7 S .461
Working Boys 7 8 .461

Powells 6 9 .400

, Tonlght't Games y
f Alumni va Cristobal -k
Powells vs Working BoVs

By TREVOR SIMONS.

31.

The Alumni quintet can end It
all tonight and not only win the

1957 Atlantic Basketball' ( League

cnampiousnip, dui aiso me niwur
of never having relinquished first
place since the Opening of the sea season.
son. season. For the Alumni five, now pro prohibitive
hibitive prohibitive favorities, have been on
top since June 17 when they open

ed the season with 49 to 42 win
over Powells.
Tonight, the league-leaden face
Cristobal, the team that bas given
them the most trouble all year.
The season totals for the Cristobal-Alumni
games shows that A-

lumnl have fimsnea on top tnree
times and lost twice. .

Tbe' Working, Soys', deadlocked

for 'second place with .Cristobal,
takes on Powells in the nightcap;
Powells with their sights set on

ciimbining out of the cellar and

the Working Boys trying to move

into the runner-up spot, snoum a.
lumni beat Cristobal in the first
game.': y' 1 ; '' y
The scoring race is practically

over. Alumni's John Hatgi has

comfortable 229 points and his
nearest contender now is t Louis

Hooper with 153. But all eyes
will be focussed on Working (Boys'
Isaac. Peltynovitch whose 3o-polnt
average pep game and 151 total
for five games could bring him
up into coptention.

Loeffler Set
Things Up For
Texas Aggies

COLLEGE STATION, Tex,(NEA'

xexas a. ana m. may nave been

dlssaitsnea with Ken Loeffler as
basketball cpach, but his succes successor,
sor, successor, Bob Rogers, can't find' any anything
thing anything wrong with the material Lo Loeffler
effler Loeffler gathered in the last year.
Rogers' first move as coach was

to contact 6-8 Wayne Lawrence of

rawtucket, R.l., a rresnman last
year who said he wouldn't return
if Loeffler. was gone.
' "Lawrence guaranteed me he'd
be back," Rogers beamed after
contacting the boy Loeffler called
the country's best player outside
of Wilt Chamberlain.
Other prospects certainly are of
top-flight size. Dave Corson is 6-6,
Sammv Meyers 6-4, Jack McNi McNi-chol
chol McNi-chol 6 6, Jack Schwake 6-5 and
Irvin Turner 64.

All Depends

On Steaks

NEW, YORK (NEA) Alex Mit Mit-eff,
eff, Mit-eff, the battering Argentine heavy heavyweight
weight heavyweight who has yet to lose in 14
bouts, has had no trouble becom becoming
ing becoming adjusted to living in New York
City;
"In-Argentina," Miteff says, "I
eat Aleak. I eat steak here. Hymie's
a nice fellow."
He meant Manager Hymie Wall Wall-man
man Wall-man who, as the word steak
would seem to indicate, is con con-siderably
siderably con-siderably out of pocket so far in
his venture with the fighter.

NO POWER GUY
New York (NEA) When Ger Gerry
ry Gerry Coleman hit his first homer of
the season against the Tigera-.
it also wat the first four-bagger
the Yankee infielder bad hit since
1954. ;y,
y;f yyJ- i-tt-r ". :-4f

ALL HANDS PULLING AS ONE

In -w8- v-
In ;
: if my0w ,;;
v'-

t

& i-': ''V..'.-'. f- i ' :
TEE NEW SERIES MCI jUUIJu

KmI Staatt rwtuShumrloMt BM'in-MtlMV

of tb aooMrfid M O. SartM MOX. Iul

Iwtfcw BgholfT. Mfatrtl a-T- AnlkHt
vlUrtcktor laft-tau trtn In M nalUa ohoio (
kftemtanoakran. Oohob4m(! :

.

Irdr the right land of motoring

itzausthe

0 a

Ma

t

rwan mowtw waxuxtt

eurtematte & Arias, S. A.

noma

Colon

Martin Alexit
Chitre

David

iMylJOE ICING

. lobby Breean Is evt at Pitts.

burgh. Chuck Dressen left Wash

ington a while ago. Leu Beudreau

get hie et Kansas City last week.

Can Bmi Rlgney stick with the Sl

ants? How labeut Bob Schoffing

with the Cubs? Is only Casey
Stencil safe? :i ';
. With tlie unemployment problem

among major league managers ap approaching
proaching approaching its annual peak I check

ed with my expert on this matter,
Frank Frisch.
At his home in New- Rochelle,
Frisch bas been working' on a. Job Job-security
security Job-security program -for managers

based on hu experiences .while

directing the Cardinals, Pirates

and Cubs. j ' ..
He had deveoped a' two point
platform for prospective managers
who wished to avoid insomnia.
These are, first, buy the ball club;
second, if this is impractical make
sure you have a guranteed game game-winning,
winning, game-winning, meal-ticket type of play player.
er. player. -.-y
FriscKaddt a third after not noting
ing noting glumly that Bragan. represent'
d the 35th menegoriel switch in
the majors since July 22, .151,
when Frank withdrew from the
field at Chicago to take va his
Studio. ..
"After seeing so much to the
Yankees in the past. few years,"
he revealed. "I nave to admit to
Stengel has the best system. He
not only has lot of meal tickets,
but be is able, in that congenial
way of bis, to put over the idea
that be bis only one thought to1
win and tost his fellows h bet better
ter better have that thought, too."
DIZ THI MEAL TICKIT ;
Frisch began working out his
platform one day in Bisbeen,.A Bisbeen,.A-riz.
riz. Bisbeen,.A-riz. As a yuung manager be was
trying to lesre the secret of be becoming
coming becoming an old one while he hsd
lunch with the late Connie Mack
before the exhibition fime.
- "It was a fine chat' Frank re reminisced,
minisced, reminisced, "until Connie said: Tib
the only manager that cnl be
fired I own the cl-b. St looked
right at me, and I worried the rest
of the day. Did Connie know some somethingwas
thingwas somethingwas I the next to go?"
As player-manager for the Car Cardinals
dinals Cardinals ia 1&4, Frisch bad one of
basebairs preferred mesl tickets
in Diz Des. who won 30, lost sev seven
en seven that season.
"When t worried," the Ftash
recalled, "Dii would toll sne take
it eatv, Frank, snd I'M make e
grott manager out of you. He
Sdnl know I was worry about
him ho was tho ml tttkot.

"In the fourth game of that" '34
World Series." Frisch continued.

"I needed a runner and Diz ask asked
ed asked to go in." 'Go away, you'll get

nun. i snappea at mm. i got 10
get til the game, Frank,' he insist insisted.
ed. insisted. He went in and on the next

play-the shortstop tried for a dou

ble play and conked ihz. 1 lound
out later hr. was trying out a
new way to break up a' double
play by jumping into the ball.":.
'NOT IVEN A LUMP THKRI
y. y. y ,-.."
Dean ran into a throw by Billy
RogeH, Detroit shortstop, and was
knocked out and carried off on a
stretcher, y
"I was frantic," Frisch related.
"He was groggy when h came
to the least he could have was a
concussion.' His brother, Paul
felt Diz's head and said m dis disgust:
gust: disgust: "Whv there's not even a
lumptbere you ain't hurt."
. D;an wasn't hurt much ho
won the World Series. After Diz
really was Injured in the AI!Star
game of 37, Frishch dropped eat
of the first division the following
year end wee asked to leave St.
Louis. No manager is greater

than his meal ticket, Frank phi-

losopnizod. -philosophized.
That's why Stengel has the only
system, be concluded. "He has all

those line young fellows going on

on the field, like men going to

work in the morning, with only i

one thought to do that job right,
or somebody else will do it right.
Frisch- will study the Yankees
a while longer before adopting a
method to activate bis Universal
Stengel Job Security Plan. He
doubts whether be will have it set
op in time to help Rigney and
Schefling next, y

- iimi a

-1.'

7 rr

1 1

a

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
y "''":'y'; PANAMA, RIPUBLId )F PANAJVIA ,;;
Complete Prizewlnnirj2 Numbers Jo the Ordirjary Drawing No. 2005, Sunday, August 11, 1957

' y The whole ticket ha 62 pieces dlvlded Jn twb aeries "A"-& "B" of 28 pieces each.

i

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

9390
8009
5974

$ 52,000.00
$15,6 00.00
S 7,800.00

N. Prim No. Prim No. Prim No. Prim No. Prim No. Prim No. Prim No. Prim No. Prim No. Prim K
esse ih.m ltse iss.se lose issh ssse ss.te m imm ssse iss.ee stse iss.h tsse im.m sese iss h se mn ',
sise iss.se use iss.es ziss im.m sise iss.es 4itt iss.es sise iss.n sise iss.se Tise iss.se sise iss.h sim iss.se
m i5s.se ize iss.ss kso iss.es szs iss.ss 42se im.m szn. jssjs szse iss.es 7tse iss.es S2M- iss.se szse lssoe
S3M J,M.M 13M 2.SM.M tlSO 2.SM.M S3SS Z.SM.M (3SS t.SOSJO S39S Z.SM.M S3M 2.SM.M 73M tM.N S3SO Z.SM.M S3M K,M M
S4M 15S.M 14M ISS.SS Z4SO IM.M 34M 1SS.M 44SO ISS.M S4SO IM.M S4M IM.M t49S IM.M S4M 1M.OS S4M 1SS.OS
esse im.m i5se im.m zsm im.m ssm Im.m sxm im.m ssse im.m ssm im.m ism im.m ssm im.m sm im.m
MM IM.M ISM IM.M MM IM.M SSM IM.M 46M IM.M SSM IM.M MM IM.M tSM 15S.M MM IM.M MM IM.M
7M IM.M 17M IM.M 27 M IM.M S7M 1M.M 47M IM.M S7M IM.M S7M IM.M T7M IM.M ; S7M IM.M 7M IM.M
SSM IM.M ISM ISS.M 2RM IM.M 3XM IM.M 4M IM.M MM 1M.M SUM JMJS 7 KM 1M.M SSM IM.M SSM 1M.M t
MM 1SS.M ISM IM.M ZSM IM.M ISM IM.M. 4SM IM.M SSM 1M.M SSM 1M.M ISM IM.M SMS IMM SSM 1M.M

Approximations Derived From First Prize

SSSI S2S.M I KIM S2S.M S38S S2S.M I S3S7 SZS.M I SSSS SZS.M Mtl S2S M S3S4 SZS.M I SMS SMjM SMS SM.M
S3SZ S2S.M I MM S2S.M I S3S SZSJO I SMS S2S.M I SMI SZS.M S3S3 SZS.M SJSS S2S.M I S3S7 S2S.M S3M SZS.M v

Approximations Derived From Second Prize

t
HIM

SMI

1ZS.M
IM.M

IMS

ZM.M

MM

s
Z4I.M

SMZ
seas

l.W.M
1M.M

1M.M
- i3e.es

-
24 .M

see?

IM.M
13S.M

MIS

2M.M
' ise.M ?
. 1M40

. SM.M I

I

I
ZM.M I

ISM

zss.se 1 1

SH 1SS M I MM 13S.M
MIS 1J4.M I Ml IMM

"MIS
Mir

llt.H

13S

I.M I

SS1T
MIS

S
zsei

ISS.t
lM.a

'Approximations Derived From Third -Prize

- a "' ".'' i
, SS7S WW 1ST4 1MJ0 ZS74 1M.M 4 1MSS
sms isTee sm . i4.m J sms im m Hit im m
SMS 1S4JO SMS 1S4.M I MIS lOfcOS h SOtl 1S4JS

sm 1MJS 1 eri imm
rs7i -f- im.m 1 s7S leTee
SS7I 1 104.M' SS7T 1S4.M

. -,.f ;'. $
TS74 IM M aS74, IMM. j M74 154 M
t7s is.' : sMi4,oa 1 saw imm
M7S 14 -M SMI IM.M 1 SS3 104.M

Prize-winning Numbers of yesterday'i LetUry Drawinr wero told at: The 1st, 2nd and 3xd'ln Panama.
'The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in t and Hot included in the above list win Fifty Two Dollars' ($52.4 ) each.

Signed by ALBERTO ALEMAN, Governor of the Province of Panama Ced. 47-12155
' .The Repteseutathre of the Treasury. JOSE GUDLLERMO A1ZPU

-

WITNESSES: Oscar B. Lowe CWula No. 47-2056
Lupo Peres-4dula No. 47-11154 -x y

JOSE DOMINGO SOTO,
: Notary Public, Panama

PABLO A PINEL M..
Secretary.

i'jrATC. Tbo irUuitrit u'ckola with the tart clpbor end witk Um two lut
I1W I t. eir,h ncfv anl to th Pint friz.

Tn rtrt Prix ma Um Zn4 and Srd Prim aro dnwn (Oparately. Tho ao

BroximaUonii aro catrHittad. an tna rim, aacona ana iiuia mm. id emmm
a Urkat ahsuld cainr il sum bars of oaca pris ttie kmloar la oatitlad Ve
daia oaraMnt toe -co. .'. r . .-.--

DRAWING OF THE'3 STRIKES
' ....
'Sunday, Aujust II, 19S7
" V Drawing Number 105 .-.

- rractloB

a. 90
...09
..74

First Prize. .
Second Prizt?!
Thin! Prixe.

Ticket '. '.

$11.00 $220.00 ;
, 3.00 60,00 : ,.
2.00 40.00..

Too prim wilt wa SwM a tcwduw wRk Um OffVctal IM of haui ta
ta Hflraa ml th. wwat ttmrn tMaol Vlrt mH 0trl aa ..
PLAN OP ORDINARY DRAWING No. MOO. WHICH W1XL 17
t ; TAKE PLACE, AUGUST 11, 1157 ;

' DlvWad te two ocrlot at 3S fraeUons auh dtooaainatad "A1" and T T

(jl.ana aa -,
IS o"
SJa
ma wr

. . prasT pBme- -
-1 Pint Prln. Bcrica A and B. at S2S Sne oaeh ocrtaa
' 1 Scnd Prin. Sria A and BV ft ': T.WW M aach (criaa
' 1 THlrd Mm, Strtm A and ft. of S.Sn M kack aniai
IS Appraxbnatiaoa. Sariaa A and B. of ' SM.M aaeh ao-Ma
- 0 PriMa. Bariai A -and B. L30SM ch trritm
SO Priaaa, Ti A and B. of -ISMaawwo
M Prliaa, (ariaa A and B. of aacn onttoa
stcavD pxrn
1 Apprarhnationa. Sarte A and B. of ( SS M aac aartaa
Piixas. Sariaa A and B. of ISSad aacb aariaa
"":.'...'!. TsrntB puzb
IS Apprazfanattent. Scriaa A and B. of $ SZM aach aarwi
' 0 Pmav Aarias A and B. at -.aM eaca aarna

uTlprb- v :..

9 j 540 a
uaw
e

f l srtae. -4

l.OM-Pl

Price of o whole ticket .V..,......J26.00
Price of a fifty-second part ....... $...50

PRIZES AM PAID WLTHOTJT DISCOtNTS OB TAXES '.



THIi SPACE
; FOR INFORMATION

IS FOR SALt V
TELEPHONE 2-0740 Jr
.T; FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE ,'TP
i f

jz )? (o) .? winner i:

'A I

It

i JaVr"'
Houses
.... iiyr. Tut hadroom
' run awn
erialat, living ream, H ream,
! swimming electria 'hl
A.roooo i-,r?.
th street Ne. f-10. None 2 2-1711.
1711. 2-1711. FQR RINTt CMphtahT
.Mi' eoncreta .tojH li,
2 edreems. Road facing
II, AlrfiiM N. 109. Call 3-
0551.
fOR RINTt 3 bedroom chalet,
all eenyenlencee. 51 afreet Ne.
14, iella v. rnn
FOR RINTs Brand new ahalat.
"Lama Alegre." 2 bedrooms, living-dining
room, porch, -tor
installation. Call 2 2648.
2-271
FOR RINT: New chalet at "La
radera." 1 edreems, livlng livlng-dinlng
dinlng livlng-dinlng room, garage, $IJ. Sailor
Umela. Weet 16th Ne.
13-7. Phona 2-0064.
FOR RINTs Beautiful ehalet.
1 bedrooms, littn room. ample
arch, "aid ejuartera. laundry,
araae and fane all around. let.
SZ'Fary Hill No 19 Call
Tel. 2-1206 during. aHica haura.
FOR RINTs Now chalat. 3
fcedreeme, Irving-dining, room,
maid room, porch and garage.
Cantor Faaoo Clneuentenarie and
7rii Ave. Caea dol Mar (San
Fraacieee) Tal. 3-3005.
Resorts
r PHILLIPS OeeansMe Cottagaa
Santa Clara. Bex 1M0 Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, R. c) P. Phone Panama
9-1177, Crictebal 3-1673.
FOSTIR'S COTTACIS and largo
. teach Haute. Phono Ralboa
2830, ulna to twelve neon, Mon-
jay inw,"Bi
"Commercial Sites
FOR RINTj Large alto for of office
fice office en firat floor, latt 22nd
atraot No. 24-72, $100.00. In.
ejtiiro 8th street No. 5-30. Phono
2-2718.
FOR RINTi Office apace with
area of 26 seuare tnetart. Pana Pana-,m
,m Pana-,m Inaurance Company building
fn Campa Alegre. Air cenditiea cenditiea-od,
od, cenditiea-od, elevator, janitor aorvico,
parking lot. Phono 3-0136.
FOR RINT) Rnkii, $20.00,
$22.50. $5.00 and ,$7.00
1 weekly,' Phone 1-0850 or 2-
'1508.
FOR RINTt Fumtahee' room,
eeal. elean, independent en entrance.
trance. entrance. Via Porraa No. 46.
Par a iso Mid
1 Continued From Pace 6)
neof the young players of Parai-
ao tbat la under tne coacning oi
Lewellvn Simmons, and it is an-
, tieipated that stiff competition will
be given to the winner of the
Howell-Johnson match, whom he
will meet some time this week.
Brown and Smythe got together
next. Brown was off to a alow
fane not realizing that he wis
playing the type of game that
i Smythe knows how to defend him
self against. Smythe took the first
I set 6-3. Brown tried to change to
i a little faster pace hut Smythe
(was prepared for the change and
he defeated Brown 6-4.
UEGAV NOTICE
i UNITED STATES OF AMEBICA
' Canal Zone
tJaJaod Statea District Court Per The
Divialon of Balboa
William H. Hyde. Jr.. plaintiff, vs
Nailto Hyde, defendant. Summons Case
No. oMl CivU Docket 21 Action for Di Divorce.
vorce. Divorce. I To tko obevojumed defendant;
I You oro hereby required to appear
land answer the complaint tiled In the
latjevowentitled action within ninetf days
after -the first publication.
I In oaao ml your failure to eo appear
and answer. Judgment "HI be taken a a-ainet
ainet a-ainet you by default for the relief dt dt-ananded
ananded dt-ananded tn the complaint.
J WITNESS the Honorable Guthrie T
.1 ervwe. Judn. United" Statea District
rfCoert for th Diatrirt at the Canal
Zone, this Aug. f. 15T.
C. T. McCermlrk. Jr.
Clerk.
(near)
By Bora de la Pene
Chief Deputy Clerk
Te WeDle Hvde
Ttto forego ins summons la aerved upon
ywa by pubiKauon purauam to tne or.
der of the Honorable Guthrie T Crowe.
Judar. Vntted SUtes District Court for
the Dbrtrict at the Canal Zone, dated
Auauat L 1S9T. and entered end Med
thki arrlnn in tne afflre of Hit Cierk

i
Rooms

' aaid United Statea Diatrict Court .for

tne DrraMoa of Belboe, en Auguet Z.
lsau
j j ri!1 55.,. a, ia Veuo
. I Chief Deputy -Clerk
TELE-RAD
GUARANTEED
TV SERVICE
- : TEL 2-2374
4"H Dartea it.

Apartments

ATTINTION. O. I.I Jest built
madam furniihod apartments, I,
2 bod noma, hot, cold water.
Phono Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT Spacious two-bad-room
unfurnished apartment in
fine residential dictrict, Riviera
Building. Call Panama 2-1661
.during office hours.
FOR RENT: Nicely furnished
apartment, porch, parlor dining
room, bedroom, kitchen', screen screened,
ed, screened, tiled, $55. Inquire No. 112
Via Belisario Porraa, near Roose Roosevelt
velt Roosevelt Theater.
FOR RENT: Furniihod Ef Efficiency
ficiency Efficiency apartment fully aquip aquip-ad
ad aquip-ad kitchen, hot water, daily maid
aarvico. Call: Arte y Decoracien
3-7425, 3-6699. Edificio Cam Cam-pa
pa Cam-pa Alegre acrbat Hotel Panami.
FOR RINTs Three bedroom
apartment, living ream, dining
room, maid's room and bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, garage, hot water, air air-conditioned
conditioned air-conditioned bedrooms, 2 bath bathrooms,
rooms, bathrooms, completely furnished.
Joae Marti street, Lupita Build Building,
ing, Building, II Cangreio, $175,00. Un Unfurnished,
furnished, Unfurnished, $125.00, Inquire 8th
street No. 5-30. Phono 2-2718.
Ready for occupancy Auguit
25th.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment, living room, dining
room, maid's room with bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, garage, hot water. "D"
street El Cangrajo, Rosita Build Build-ding,
ding, Build-ding, $105.00. Inquire 8th
etreet No. 5-30. Phone 2-2718,
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, one bedroom with bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, light, gaa and telephone.
Sabanaa No. 172. $70.00. In Inquire
quire Inquire 8th street No. 5-30. Phono
2-2718.
FOR RENT: Recently built
apartmetjt to responsible couple.
East 90th. street No. 61, San
Francisco.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment No. 27. Francisco Fi Fi-los
los Fi-los street. Viata Hormoaa. $40.
Tel. 3-4259.
FOR HINT: Beautiful modern
and spacious two boodroem
furnished apartment. Ave. Peru
37-48.
FOR RENT: Army inspected,
furnished 1 -bedroom apartment,
4th of July Ave. Phono 2-2081
or 2-1140.
FOR RENT: Furnished attrac attractive
tive attractive apartment in 'Gloriole"
Building (third houss on side
street serosa from Hotel El Pa Panama).
nama). Panama). $90.00. Apply next door
at Foto El Halcon. Tel. 3-1179
or 3-6082.
Dulles. Has Hunch
Influencing Soviet
WASHINGTON, Aug. 12 (UP)
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles has a hunch that runaway
British diplomats Guy Burgess
and Donald MacLean may be
playing important roles in carry carrying
ing carrying out Soviet foreign policy ma
neuvers.
Dulles has wondered aloud
whether Burgess and MacLean,
who fled to Russia from Britain
six years ago, are working in the
Soviet foreign office. The idea oc occurred
curred occurred to Dulles after he detected
a more effective understanding of
Western psychology in Soviet dip diplomatic
lomatic diplomatic notes.
US Sfeel Chairman
Blames Increased
Cosfs On Wage Hikes
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1J (UP)
Roger M. Blough, chairman of
U.S. Steel, estimated today that
80 per cent of the company's
total Increased costs In recent
wage Increases went to the
United Steel Workers (AFL (AFL-CIO).
CIO). (AFL-CIO). Blough and Robert C. Tyson,
chairman of the company's fi finance
nance finance committee, gave the ten
tatlve estimate after almost an
hour of wrangling with chair chairman
man chairman Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.)
of the Senate anti-trust and
monopoly subcommittee. The
group has been Investigating U.
S. Steel's July 1 88 a ton price
Increase, which Blough and Ty Tyson
son Tyson blamed on increased labor
costs.
. The company officers said It
was Impossible to tU exactly
how much of the increase was
attributable to the new con contract,
tract, contract, also effective July 1, with
the steel workers union became
the comnany doesn't keep books
that way.
However, they emphasized that
any wage increase to the Steel Steel-workers
workers Steel-workers Union automatically
Leads to similar raises for the
company's workers under other
contracts and salaried non-union
employes.
Kefauver insisted on an esti estimate
mate estimate of the total cost increase
doging directly to the. steel steel-workers.
workers. steel-workers. He said earlier state state-menu
menu state-menu ty Blough "gave the im impression"
pression" impression" that the steelworkera
contract was the sola causa of
tea f a ton price hike.

LFAVB TOUR-AD WITH ONR OF OVS

uiavtMaMt si s tuuvnwswiioij iw.
TWraiBTDIkl At sTlsV DflDI A P Iok aJI7l 1tIM

BARDO No. ZS "B" Street a MORRISON 4th of Jul Ave. A J St. a LI

VAN-DER-J1S 90 BUOOI WO. N t) rJUUUA Mb TUqUC lICVN I
tko Bella Vista Tbeatra. -.

Automobiles
FOR SALE: 194! Buick in
good Condition. Now motor, and
brakes. Duty Paid. : $100. Call
Navy 2326.
FOR SALE: 1949 Ford 4
door V8. Radio, OD, good
paint, good tires. USES NO OIL
$275.00 Phone Balboa 2-2913.
FOR SALE: Model "A" Ford
coupe, good condition, $300.
Phone 3-1384 for 5 to 7 p.m.
FOR SALE: Willy's Jeep.
House 8054-D Margarita 3rd.
St.
"GET STREAMLINED"
the McLevy way. Body Massage,
Excereising Machines, Turkish
bath. Trained operators for ladies
and gentlemen. Get results.
MASSAGE SALON
Services "SCHOLL'S"
Products
J. Arosemena Ave. 33-41
Tel. 3-2217
TRANSPORTES BAXTER, S. A.
Packers Shippers Movers
Phonos 2- 2451 2 -2562
Learn Riding at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding (V Jumping Classes daily
3 to 5 p.m. Phono 2-2451
or by appointment.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
' General A?ent
Gibraltar Ufa Ins. Co.
for rates and Information
TeL Panama J-0532
NEW G&TI0T1
Model V
With F 1.2 Lens.
at
I.I.IIIIH ...
Panami N. York Colin
Burgess, MacLean
Foreign Policy
The secretary has asked U. S.
intelligence agencies to try to find
out more about who is conducting
Russian foreign policy operations.
American officials do not feel
that Burges and MacLean actual
ly are making Soviet foreign poli-
j : is ... i i
ty uei'isiuus. dul uieir auvice may
be taken into account by Soviet
foreign policy officials at the
policy-making level..
Dulles and his staff want to
know more about their opposite
numbers in the Kremlin. Such in information
formation information would be of consider
able value in trying to judge the
future course of Soviet foreign
policy.
Dulles and his advisors have
been impressed by some Soviet
maneuvers in the Middle East
where the Communists constantly
iry 10 sur up trouble.
Significantly. MacLean was as
signed to the British Embassv in
Cairo beginning in 1948. He was
recalled to London in Msv. 1950.
after wrecking the Cairo apart
ment oi an American girl in a
drunken brawl.
Informants said an American
recently saw Burgess in a Mos
cow Hotel. Both Burgess and Mac
Lean were produced by the Rus
sians in Moscow at a propaganda
news conference on Feb. 13, 1956.
MacLean anrj Burgess are ad admirably
mirably admirably suited to assist in Soviet
diplomatic jousting with the West
Asioe from being Britishers and
employes of the British Foreign
Office, both men once were as
signed to the British embassy in
Washington.
MacLean is regarded aa the
more competent and experienced
diplomat. He was assigned to the
embassy in Washington from 1944
to 1948. He worked primarily on
atomic energy matters, including
declassification of secret informa information.
tion. information. New Zealand Chief
Sidney C. Holland
Resigns Ministry
WELLINGTON, New J Zealand.
Aug. 12 (UP) Prime Minister
Sidney G. Holland resigned today
because of ill health. He will be
succeeded by Kirth J. Holyoake.
deputy Prima Minister and Minis Minister
ter Minister of Agriculture.
Holland, 64, made the announce announcement
ment announcement at the armiidl conference f
bis Free Enterprise National Par Parry,
ry, Parry, which has ruled New Zealand
since 141. The party is preparing
for tough general election cam cam-paig
paig cam-paig afainst the Labor Party.

AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 1S-S7

9 I Dl... ran l A W T4 a"l
tr awi.ascB'jr trntim SJi VnOA tinwV"-Vin as
d.
SERVICES
The FATIMA PHARMACY lo located
cated located at Marcada El Kay, 1 offers
efficient filling of prescriptions-':
and homo delivery service. Phono
3-3416.
3-minute ..car. wash $1,' steam
cleaning of motor $5, waxing of
cars $5. AutOTDano, Trans-Isthmian
Highway, near Sears.
Small Boy Finds
Engagement Ring
Lost In Haystack
YORK, Pa., Aug. 12 (UP)-An
8-year old farm boy said today
he found what the .National
Guard, armed with mine detec
tors, was unable to locate an en engagement
gagement engagement ring jn a haystack.
Stanley Wakeling said he was
playing around a pile of chaff
wnen ne "just came. up with it."
Barbara Summers,. 20. lost the
ring a w?ek ago in a bay" stack
while visiting relatives, Stanley's
parents. The ring had been given
to her by Airman David Fleming,
who is stationed in Kansas.
Miss Summers became frantic
and called out the National Guard
for help.
A local unit of the Guard joined
the search Friday with mine de detectors
tectors detectors but to no availa.
The Guard was on Its' way to
the Wakeling farm to resume the
search yesterday when Stanley
made, the discovery while playing.
tr

I ,',ta.

MAKING A CLEAN SWEEP The world's largest vacuum
cleaner, designed to protect Jet aircraft by leaving runways
; cleaner than a kitchen floor, is prepared for a test run at
, Mitchell ir Force Base, N.Y. The JARC (Jet Aircraft Run Run-!
! Run-! way Cleaner) cleans an eight-foot swath of runway with each i
! pass, removing sand, pieces of machinery, nuts, bolts, assorted I
: hardware, and chunks of rock and-gravel. The vacuum de- I
j veloped by the JARC is more than 1,500 times more powerful i
'than the most efficient home vacuum cleaner. The volume of ;
air handled each minute would sustain the breathing of 40,000 j
!. men. The reason for allthis power is that the Air Force, la :
. many tests, has proved that even a quarter-inch steel bolt,
sucked into the intake of a jet, can cause an explosion and the :
! disintegration of the engine, r ,

COME WIZ ME. MONSIEUR French film actress Etchika
Cbotireau take a Ann grist on Clark Gable cardboard version
for a 6,000-mile trip to Paris. The actress, seen lea vine'

I Hollywood, is taking the six-foot two-inch photographic figure -i
to her sister, who is head of the Paris Clark Gable fan chin,
' Gable's figure is dressed as a Southern plantation owner, which
'.be plays in, his newest film, "Band of Angels.", r.-.' :

"IP OTKFET,' PANAMA- UBRERIA WBCIAD Btreet 4P2wS

"CvvoTno
la O.Av..N0.41 rOTODpMyM.Arfmen

a n
tl im Att ak f tTI IRTili A PU A ft M AC Y
IHxeOI lAUUAtU
or" ; ; f (
Miscellaneous
- Bids are being- accepted for air
, conditioning Fort Kobbe N. C, O-
Club.' Ballroom or dining room.
Prior to 15th August 1957. Call v
4264 or 6100 Kobbe.
FOR SALE: Horses: ana mare,
aha stallion, one gelding. Pana Panama
ma Panama Riding Scool. All day Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, phona Ft. Clayton 2262.
FOR, SALE: Three greater In Indian
dian Indian hill mynah. birds. World's
best talkers. 885 Morgan. Phone
Balboa 3169. After 4:30.
FOR SALI: Exceptional Bar-,!
gains In newest Models SOUND SOUND-SCRIBER
SCRIBER SOUND-SCRIBER DICTATING MA MACHINES,
CHINES, MACHINES, used only slightly as
DEMONSTRATORS, now con condition,
dition, condition, offered for quick sale far
below USA prices:
Executive's RECORDER, value
$445 for Sale at only $225;
Secretary's TRANSCRIBER Value
$397 for $200; COMBINATION )
MACHINE which is both Rec Recorder
order Recorder and Transcriber $497 value
for $250; Portable Combination
Recorder and Transcriber book
' ise, weighs 6 pounds, Value
' $360 for $22Q. T el op ho n a
SOUNDSCRI6ER Panama ,, 2-
916. -
F0R.SALE: RCA 21" television
set; table model, 60 cycle, good
condition. Call Rodman 3661.
FOR SALE:--FX, Xelee auto automatic
matic automatic F2 lens with F4 Zaias tele-
photo 135 m.m. Brand now,,
$275.. list value $385.00, Call
Panama 3-6608.
FOR SALE: r"Elna sewing ma ma-china,
china, ma-china, portable, in perfect con condition.
dition. condition. 40th street No. 2-66.
'w-a. -,." V i r-r a

1 'ffl'

IH2 LA farTalllOUllaal fj rlltinrivm

... w
, 1 , r
Home Articles
FOR SALE: Living room sat
$39; complete dining room sat
f including china closet and side-
.' board $150; complete double
beds- from $39; kitchen, cabinats
i $39; porch sofas .$19; basket
chairs $12; mattresses $15;
rocking chairs $16.50; alumin-),
urn porch chairs $9-50; metal
, bade ; 30' $7.50; natal chairs
$3.50; linoleums $695.' House House-hold
hold House-hold Exchange, National Avenue
No. 41. Phone 3-491 1, 3-7348.
FOR SALE: Frigidaira refrigera
tor, 8 cu. ft.' In excellent condi-
tion. Reasonably priced. Call at
No; 26 Calle 32 Eata, Apt. $
(second flight). From 7:00 p.m.
Ilallonal Theater
To Feature Young
Panama Flutist
Outstanding Panamanian flutist
Eduardo Charnentier Jr. will be
featured at the National Theater
tomorrow night along with group
of noted woodwind musiclnas.
Charpentier Jr.' has just arrived
from Europe and the United States
after intensive courses at Paris
Conservatory and Eastman School
of Musie at Rochester. XM.Y. 1
i With him, will be his father, E-
duardo Charpentier, also a flutist:
Alberto Charpentier,' clarjnet; Vic Victor
tor Victor Guiilen,' oboe; i Luis .Garcia,
English horn; Jose Olivares, bas bassoon;
soon; bassoon; Henry Rosen, cello; and
Hans Janowitz. piano. This group
is regarded as one of the best en
sembles, of chamber music per performers
formers performers in Panama. ,'
The concert willl begin at 8:15
n.m.. and reservations for orches
tra seats, av $1.50, may be made
by calling MacKay musio store,
telephone 2-2731, or the Depart Department
ment Department of Fine Arts Ministry of Edu Education,
cation, Education, telephone 2-0258.
, ..
Delegate Due Here
Following Bible
Talks In Brazil
Tk. 11... V 13 Vnkavt.on afniln
secretary of the United Bible So Societies,
cieties, Societies, will arrive in Panama next
Saturday as guest oi the Rev. J.
W. Umkemann, Bible bociety sec
-retary here. ) .-
, Robertson is returning from the
U.B.S. Conference. in Rio de Janei Janeiro
ro Janeiro and Sao Paulo by way Of the
west cbast Of South America. He
will leave for Costa' Rica the fol
lowing Tuesday. He is making
further brief visits in Guatemala,
Mexico and New York before re
turning to his office 4n Geneva,
Switzerland.
While on the Isthmus the Rev,
Robertson will consult with groups
of lay people in several local
churches. Monday morning he will
meet with clergymen of the Atlan.
tic side in- the Bible House, Cris
tobal, and that afternoon with
clergymen on the Pacific side in
the Balboa' Y.M.C.A.
Over a five-year period he. Is
conducting a study on "The Place
and Use of the Bible in the Church Church-and
and Church-and Use of the Bible in the
Churches." Preliminary findings
have already been made available
to the nublic throueh series of ra
dio talks on BJB.C. London, and
these in turn have been distribut
ed in written form for general ov ov-erseaa
erseaa ov-erseaa use by radio stations and
for vubucation.
After sever: years of work as as
sistant head of Religious Broad Broadcasting
casting Broadcasting of the B.B.C. the Rev. Rob
ertson terminated tnat service oy
appearing on the B.B.C. TV pro pro-cram
cram pro-cram or Sunday. April 29, last
year to explain to viewers the na nature
ture nature of his new work. In May 1956
be left London to establish his of
fice for United Bible Societies m
Geneva, Switzerland. . ..
Services Tomorrow
For C. E. Richards
-. ... i ...
Funeral aenricea -will he held
for Charles E. Richards at the
Corozal Chapel tomorrow after
noon. He was 68 years old.
Burial will follow In the ceme
tery at 1:30 pm. following' the
services, which will be conduct
ed by the Rev. 8. N. Brown. Bus Buses
es Buses will leave from 20th Street.
OuachapalL at noon tomorrow.
- Mr. Richards ,1s survived by
his wife, Doris, and his. ton,
Hugh (Roy). -'.
r- r w-e ti

Miscellaneous

, ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
' DRAWER "A," DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C t.
Real Estate
FOR SALE: H 000 meter lot La La-f
f La-f evre Avenue, Parqua Lef evre,
$3.25 meter. Also, 10-hectaro
farm on Trans-Isthmian High High-way,
way, High-way, near Buana Vista. Wood
house, electric light plant, atcr
will go for any reasonable offer.
Leaving Country. '" Phona Pedro :.
Miguel 333 or call at 2624 Co- i
coli.
; FOR SALt: Two bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished house, 4 lots, Santa Cla Clara.
ra. Clara. Phone 2-3753.J-. ;
Domestic Employment
WANTED: Good cook. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent Salary. Young with refer references.
ences. references. Sterling Garage, 14th. and
Bolivar Ave. Phone 352, Colon.
WANTED: Good housekeeper
for 2. Cook and live In. Refer-
en'ces. Call -Clayton 4268.
Dogs
FOR SALE-A.K.fc registered
Toy Boston Terrier puppies.
Sea at quarters 123-A, Albrook
or call Albrook 5235.

t-"'"'-
!" J i V V'T' a ; ;t
i r- a

LIFE COES DN This robin, circle, pays na attention to the

tact that she's hatching life among
Wary Cemnteryt Her nest rests
H r snmuol V. Ttood. who died in

Yugoslav Red Party Organ Flays
Anti-Red Boon By Former Leader

.00

- BELGRADE, Yugoslavia, Aug.
12 (UP) The Yugoslav Commu Communist,
nist, Communist, :, party newspaper 'Borbx"
charged today that a new anti anti-Communist
Communist anti-Communist book by jailed former
Red leader Milovan Djilas shows
the author "is -in the servUieof
the foes of our country." ;
. The party organ launched
bitter attack against Djilas' book,
"The New Class" and said it was
"written in -the spirit of Goebbels
propaganda." s -r-
It. was' the first official Yugo Yugoslav
slav Yugoslav reaction to the book which
will be released in the United
States tomorrow.
- The book was written in Sre ru rusks
sks rusks Mitroviea prison, where the
former Yugoslav vice-president is
serving a three-year term for
earlier anti-Communist articles in
the Western press. o
"Djilas is in the service of the
foes of our country," Borba
charged. "He has become an' in instrument
strument instrument of interference .' from
abroad jn our internal, affairs."
.-.. .'
Calls" Reds Despots 1!
In the book' Djilas denounces
communism as a form of despot
ism far worse than that of the
absolute monarchist 1 regimes .it
replaced in many countries. He
attacks the new privileged classes
that have grown up under Com
munist rule. :
Borba called the book a new
anti-Communist 'pamphlet" not
different from thousands of
Others. k v
"However, this pamphlet was
given broad publicity in the West
even before it was published." the
nffirial suraytnaner added..-
The reason is simple: it wss
written by aluovan Diuas. accept
ed by the international reaction
as a name to use against social socialism.
ism. socialism. It-is being used as, an at attempt
tempt attempt at interference in 'the in internal
ternal internal affairs of our and other
Socialist countries and as .a
weapon against international co
existence."
Borba ch-rg eI pre-publication
reviews oi vjuu; book were pan

Boats fir Motors

FOR SALIj Small eutbeard,
spaadboat, new 10-hp. Evlnruda
. motor, remote controls, $425
Phona 3-2831.
FOR SALE: 16-ft. boat 2rje.
Karmath inboard. Sea. Dock Dock-master
master Dock-master Diablo Boat Club.
FOR SALE: 18 Vi-ft. cabin
crusier, 60-hp. angina, v Excel-;
eiont mechanical and seaworthy
condition. Call Albrook 2207.
FOR SALE: One Kohler gata gata-lina
lina gata-lina electric light and pewar
plant, 220 V, 60 cycle, 3 phase
: with transformer and extra an an-1
1 an-1 gine .$500.00. One 1 1 0 V, 60
cycle electric, light plant, $250.
Navarra fir MacMurray.
Lesson
DORESI WAITES Schaal of
Dancing reopening September
5th. Registration August 20th-21st-22nd,
10 a.m. ta 5 p.m.
Knights of Columbus Hall. Resi Residence
dence Residence phona 2-2363.
- Practical Conversational Spanish
Mrs, Romano, 4th af July Ave,
Bid. Tl-352 Apt, 10.
ie
the dead in Chicago's Cal-ti;
on a cross, majkini the greve
1896. :"
of 'a "tremendous" propaganda
campaign that "deserves to be
taken into serious consideration."
Warns Against Mrddllno;
; "Yugoslavia wants to wara
against the consequences of these
anti-democratic actions in inter
national relations,' the newspaper
saia. -me aims oi this cam
paign are completely, opposite fe
me interests or lnternaUonal co
existence." :
The jnanuscrint of the boolr
was smuggled from the Yugoslav
prison and given to the publisher
with instructions from Djilas to
bring it out no matter what the
consequences.
Djilas a wartime partisan fight
er, was expelled from the Com-
mamst parry central committee in
1954 for criticism of President.
Tito and the Communist system.
Shortly thereafter he resigned big
party membership and his vica-
presidency. r.
He was' tried oft charges of
"propaganda against the state
and Uic social order" and Eiven
an 18-month .suspended sentence.
jNoveraber. 1956. he was arrest
ed followine "Dublitation n hi a
critical articles, in the Western
press. He was Sentenced to two
years in prison and is serving aa
additional year of the earlier sua
penuea term. V -.

r r I ii r1 rniw 'i r mm

- ; ; :y.
Rnrftc Klouemnn

evw I IWUaJIIIWII
Back In Hospital
Veteran Bocas' trd Tore' news,
naner eorrnnonrfnt Jnntla--B',
Rantdne reported today that he is
retnrning-tins evening to Ward
of the Santo Tomas Hospital, aft after
er after leaving the hospital for a few
days tn attend to some business.
The seed Rankdae, who has
been in Sto. Tomas for about four
months, aaid be left the hosnilal
a a pass last Friday.



PAGE NIN1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEE
J
MONDAY, AUGUST 12. 1957
TERRY AND TEX FEtATK
7gO POUT AT ALLTttlVwrACe Uff JASUN REAAEAERHElf uysIVE
COUU? OHLY MEAN. THAT I THAT WE, TOO, BEAR THE
F V A THE 'WWRACUWT HAS
I -1
MARK. OP THE 'PAIWACUPA? JL 6IVES WITH THIS
" mmjA "ACTEACUPA'f
k i rr it
v mm w

i

BY GEORGE WUNDER I THE STORY OP MARTHA WAYNE Help Needed , .By WILSON SCRUGGS

'THE VERY CUE5TI0N IA5KEP-WHEN J Enl CBMOST : ThTfK. MAV I CAaWjIMsJ r S W6KT5 MS 6CW6TO fS,J -

fco

a is j -N ir a -ji voiKrN? r 1 ii ncr

pt-. v E

rv a

rawing i ir

-" ITUECKXES AND HIS FRIENDS,

Special

. I lil6HTO TWE OLD I I M'eW

ALLEY OOP

WHO ARE MDU?

r am. maj iMmw cvou

mv toA.rAfte T THOuawr .iknovV about

HMINS AN AwRJU M l HEARL A i 6HL7T r

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' BOOTS AND HER BUDDttS V Snip, Rub, Snip, Rubt

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' ' ELMER! Lt S HEAP I MTtn, : V WITHOUT UE. J fir
w" vv V'' ,r;Byv.T.HAMLiN ryjy 1 -
1 I PLENTY,1 I'M p,'-- I TOOK OVER Af TR "T 1 -L? KtDifefei. 1 ) K h x VLj V I
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'I b m ffl unr?S:E2 ranfSiM True Life Adventures

:7r.r J 1 i7T-n)i nrnnthiii 1. 1 1. 1 1 tw-n : 1 : 1 t v.i.

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mORTTMEEXiC A-Ji ; I"'." .Dtobument By PICK CAYA1U
. : ; rat-a- -7 .- :;Kfe)7
" I

' MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAT By wuxiam
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OUR BOARD Eta HOUSE

V,X J?; AND HIS f IMUTE5

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( IWM. T-W.I mrm HHU HMN IMC BT o. r- t-v a 1

IJARjeiHS TJI6ODRO OF THS

JARRIHft OP THft f rajTnME NEI? I KILL WAFT

CtTy A HAS CALLED A J HIM BACK
4 -??V lrsMrr

put dam- v eetezE

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SHUT Off THE WTE8.- AN
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WHY MOTME CT fttA1

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THS ELEPHANT SEAL.

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haven't the slightest idea of what 1 want to do witM.,;
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Af MOVAS PANAMA At AWAfS

PANAMA-MIAMI ....... .V. . . 55.00 i '1

MIAMI-WASHINCTON 39.80

V

WASHINGTON 0

' PANAMA

Today's Prcgiam

in cr nwt
t If ARkUEO rORCXS-BOtm
4 M Far T)w N.lMa
4 TrvA Hm '. ."
' I N T)nt (VroMU -
I N Lt l Tlr A Trip
PANORAMA
I 1 Leva Lucy

1 0 Jack Clum ? f
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( M I t Ooi A Sr
- Kit Ahimtnum Hour
11 N CFN NeWS
U U Xncor: ColU ComKly Hour 1

1 Cevrtery ef aerU Pmnema Alr Ij
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573-1633 3-1C39 ;
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TAKES ST RUT HERS, OHIO, 5-3
ON BR YA N LUTZ' SIX-HITTER

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: I I I v' . 1 ; H T 1 I 111
' I .!iifimt mitv ThP thrpp henrhmen of 'racketeers Johnnv Dio balked when the Senate I 111

PITS PHOTOGRAPHER Photographer Stanley Tretick snap snap-iiped
iiped snap-iiped this picture of racketeer Johnny Dio moments before JDiO
!ciipped him on the ear in the Senate Office Building in Wash Wash-f
f Wash-f ington. Dio,. being pursued by photographers, tried to brush
i past Tretick and into a swinging door. His -upraised arm hit

Treubk on tne ear. "i ""
the Senate Labor
Guilford Farmer
Fetes Homecoming
7Pf His Twin Sons
? OTJLFORD, Vt. Aug 12 (UP)
Faiiiia' Warren Franklin tooay
served up a fatted steer to the
whole town to celebrate the home
coming of his twin sons.
-Jf&nkiin planned the giant all-
dayibarbccue to honor Wilfred and
; Affrtd, 21-year-old identical twins
wha? returned recently from the
'Antty.
? B started the 2,600-pound Hol Hol-itei'
itei' Hol-itei' to roasting last Thursday
with a carpenter, Russel Deane
Of .Bernardston, Mass., supervis supervis-1.
1. supervis-1. The menu included 3,000 buns.i
1000 ears of corn, '500 pounds of
potato salad, 2,000 bottles of btr
Jtfff soda and "lots of ice cram
f thJ Children."
Most of tne i.buo popuiauuu ui
the town turned out tor the feast.
''i rranklin said he couldn't foot
the Wil alone so he sold tickets
at: $3 each.' ..
f feather Or Not
; 'fblM weather report for the
24 hours ending S today.
Is prepared by the Meteorolo Meteorolo-fritml
fritml Meteorolo-fritml and Hydrographlc
i Branch of the Panama Canal
Company:
. Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
- High ........ 90
" Low 76
HUMIDITY:
v High 94
.Low 63
WIND:
- (max. mph) NW-18
RAIN (inches) .03
WATER TEMP:
dinner harbors) 83
86
79
90
79
NE-15
.07
83
TUESDAY, AUG. 13
5:31 a.m.
'5,1'? p.m.
11:34 a.m.
11:49 p.m.
ZTODAY!
t-.OO -5:00
75 -).40
- 9:05 p.m.
7:00
iJT HAPPENED ON
Mis world
it guys
widdolli!
Her world
jfiown$-
4 r
i M-G-M
' GREGORY PECK
LAUREN BACALLr
1
!OOIORIOIUT
v r v

1 OPENS
vTONESDAT f

(NEA Telephoto)

in wBsrynsion io apoear oeiuic
Rackets Committee.
HiT BY DIO Photographer
Stanley Tretick rubs his ear
after being hit by racketeer
Johnny Dio in Washington.
Dio, pursued by photographers,
forced his way past Tretick
and into a swinging' door.
Raising his arm, he hit Tretick
on the ear.
Discount Rate Upped
By Bank Of France
!o Halt Inflation
PARIS, Aug. 12 (UP) The
Bank of France raised the dis discount
count discount rate from four to five per
cent today in this nation's lat latest
est latest move to halt inflation.
Following immediately on the
heels of the devaluation of the
franc which went into effect
yesterday, the discount rate was
raised to make credit and mon money
ey money more costly.
The action was designed to
reduce Inflationary pressure by!
decreasing the amount of money
available for Investments.
The tax on advances for bonds
was raised to seven per cent.
Meanwhile, the Paris Bourse
reacted well to the sudden week weekend
end weekend financial changes. The mon money
ey money market was Steady, and gold
prices dropped slightly in early,
trading.
Government sources said ear ear-'lier
'lier ear-'lier that officials feared the wes western
tern western allies might cut French
imports as retaliation against
devaluation of the franc.

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p f m

E. German Reds. Draft Berlin Workers
To Attend Khrushchev's Farewell. Rally

BERLIN. Aug. 12 (UP) The, Tomorrows farewell rally will
East German Communist govern- be- held in East Berlin's Marx Marx-ment
ment Marx-ment resorted to a draft yester-iEogels Platz. Special trains will
day to get workers to attend a be run to the citv from towns on
farewell rally for visiting Soviet! the outskirts of Berlin, the party

Communist Party Chief Nikita S.
Khrushchev,
The Communist party news newspaper
paper newspaper "Neucs Deutschland" dis disclosed
closed disclosed that all factories in the
Berlin area are holding meetings
at which workers "obligate"
themselves to attend the East
Berlin rally scheduled for tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. To make sure the East German
workers attend they will be
i marched to the rally or will travel
there in special trains, it was an an-I
I an-I nounced. - ?
I Communist authorities hoped
I the draft would end an anti-Communist
boycott of Khrushchev's
appearances. Failure of East Ger Germans
mans Germans to turn out to greet Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev has been the most marked
feature of his tour sine be ar arrived
rived arrived ra fast Berlin last Wednes Wednesday.
day. Wednesday. ...
j The Soviet leader got another
poor crowd yesterday when he ad addressed
dressed addressed a rally la Magdeburg.
The Communist press said 100,000
packed the Cathedral Square but
reports frem the city placed the
crowd at only about -25,000.
Khrmhcheie en Thursday spoke to
a -half -empty stadium ia Leipzig.

vSILENT MEN These three henchmen of racketeers Johnny Dio balked when the Senate
Labor Rackets Qommittee in asninjton tried to trace their careers in "paper locals' of the.
Teamsters Union. All three give only their-names and addresses,; f Left to right; Sidney,,.
Hodes, Abraham, ferler And Nathan Gordon. r -. '

Senator Disgusted See
'Rat' Dio Pleading Fifth

WASHINGTON, Aug. 12 (UP) (UP)-Sen.
Sen. (UP)-Sen. Barry M. Goldwater (R-Ariz)
said today it disgusted him to see
"rats" like New York hoodlum
Johnny Dio claim the protection
of the Fifth Amendment against
self-incrimination.
But Goldwater, a member of
the Senate Rackets Committee
which heard Dio invoked the priv
ilege some 140 times last weeK,
said he was firmly opposed to any
"tamnerine" with the constitution
al guarantee. He called it "one of
our basic human rights."
i
Goldwater made .the statement
on a television program when he
was asked whether the rackets
prniin and other committees in
tended to permit Dio nd .similar
witnesses to defy them.
A Disgusting, Sight
The senator replied, that "(he
Fifth Amendment is one of the
most important parts of our con
stitution and when you see a man
like Johnny Dio take it, it disgusts
vou. .but I don't think you snouia
tamper with the Fifth Amend
ment."
Goldwater went on to say that
it "would upset the whole legal
svstem" if- the protection of the
Fifth Amendment was discarded.
Then he. added:
' "Much, as we dislike having
these rats' and Communists use it,
they're Americans and entitled to
the use of it." j
The senator also was asked if it
was not "more or less an admis admission
sion admission of guilt" when Dio refused to
answer repeated committee ques questions
tions questions about his alleged links with
Teamster Vice President James
R. Hoffa.
Dio Asking Per It
Goldwater replied that the Su
preme Court had cautioned
against any such interpretation.
He added, however, that 'Johnny
Dio was more or less asking for
it" when he pleaded the Fifth
Amendment.
It's olmost impossibft to oet
on oilmwnt treotcd in JH eorly
stooes, considering how long you
' hove to woit In the dock's office.
newspaper- said.
Khrushchev's traveling partner,
Deputy Premier Anastas. Mikoyan
took the spotlight in East Berlin
today while the Communist party
Chief visited a state-run corn tarm
npir Magdeburg.
XMikoyan warned that Ameri
cans who he said "enriched them
selves" during. 'World War U
would suffer bombing and shell
ing if a new -war breaks out.
AN
Let ths people

S2n TEAR
-r

It Was learned yesterday that
federal' agents; are digging into the
tax returns of Did and Hoffa, who
allegedly used underworld muscle
in an effort to. seize- control, of
New York's Joint. C 0 u n c i 1 of

Teamsters.
The committee intends to press
that phase of its inquiry tomor
row when it is scheduled to hear
testimony from Anthony J. Doria,
former secretary of the AFL Auto
Workers union. According to pre
vious testimony, he 'secured Dio's
first New York charter in the
union.
Ft. Sherman Group
Toiling liew Type
Individual
New Individual combat meal'
type rations are currently being
tested at tne jungle wanare Tram
ing Center .at Fort Sherman by
men of Companies A. B, and K
of the 20th Infantry along with
personal assigned to the J.WTCv'it
was announced by Headquarters,
U.S. Army tariDDean;
The new type rations, contain
ing 3600 calories per day, are be
ing tested under the supervision
1st. Lt. Keith Colson. assistant S
3 at the JWTC. Testing' started on
July 29 and is expected to end to
day.
During the past' week four
man teamcomposed of one offi
cer and three enlisted men from
the Quartermaster Research Cen
ter. Nitick: Mass. arrived in the
Canal Zone. The purpose of their
trip was to nave the, men under undergoing
going undergoing the tests fill out question questionnaires
naires questionnaires on the new type of rations,
On July 29-'Accompany began
eating the new ratio three meals
a day for live aays; -j- company
two meals a day for seven days;
and personnel of 'K' Company and
the JWTC one meal a day for 14
days.
Included in the new field ra
tions are: frankfurters and beans,
turkey loaf, beef steak, boned
chicken, fried bam, ham ana chop
ped eggs, pork steak, ham and po
tatoes, bread, pecan rolls, pound
cake, cheese spread, jany peanut
ouuer, cracxeri, iuuge, cookici,
coffee, cream, sugar, cigarettes
and chewing gum.
The new rations are being test
ed for portability.. Dalatabilify
east of preparation and compari-
on oi miuiarj xnaracieruuts.
"MikoVan told a croup at the
East Berlin television studio that
Russia and Germany had cities
and Howns wiped out in "World
War II while the United States
escaped unscathed.
. v.. 'V -. V-'. .-! i
"The! Americans enriched them
selves in the war but not one
bomb fell on their territory,, he
said. "If a new war comes, this
situation will not be continued,
- The A m e r t c a n s under understand
stand understand that, too," he added. "That
is why they are not ia such a
hurry t have a war." ;
INDEPENDENT! H
know the truth end the

PANAMA, WL r- MONDAY, AUGUST IV 1957

Ruling May Cut List
Of Stars Subpenaed
For Hollywood Trial

'HOLLYWOOD, Aug. 12 (UP)
More than. 100 jittery Hollywood
after yesterday a waiteua ruling
which could free many of them
from testifying in the trial of
Confidential magazine about spicy
tales of filmland.
Earlier court efforts of two
stars,-Tab Hunter and Rory Cal Calhoun,
houn, Calhoun, to escape the stand as de defense
fense defense witneses failed and the de defense
fense defense continued subpenaing more
personalities over the weekend
with 10-tfmes married orchestra
leader Charlie Barnet and singer
Herb Jeffries announced as the
latest. r ;
Defense attorney Arthur 3
Crowley,, representing ; the two
operators of Hollywood Research
inc., aUeged Hollywood gossip
gatherer for Confidential, said he
expected a ruling by Superior
vuuge neroen v. Walker when
me iioei trial resumed tomorrow
which could cut his all-star list
oi witnesses considerably. r
-ut crowley said he h6ped for
runng wiich would allow him
to aeep on tap all of his witnesses,
ii need oe, to testify to. "the
truth" ?boul the scandal stories
"The attorney, representing FrH
and Marjorie Meade, operators of
nouywooa .Research, asked for
ruung Friday on whether state-'
merits about, stories1 other than
uiose mentioned by. the prosecu
uon would fte admissible as evi-
oeoce. He said If the ruling was
against inclusion of tetim
wriex noi oirectiy involved in the
suit, he would not be able to call
many oi inose.' suDpenaed.
ine states has Said it wonM
Concentrate its nrosemitlnn nn
articles i n v o 1 v 1 n g Maureen
JPik Votary Dandridge, Rob-
s jHiicnum .Dirir Pnu.n r-.
nie caivet, Mae West, John Car-
run ana Marie Stevens. But the
prosecution, has subpenaed, many
o -j testily concerning
vviuiueun. none s, includ ns
ary Cooper, Sonny Tuft, Buddy
Baer, Lana Turner, Walter
iuKeon ana scow, Brady.
u ; is Significant that nf crn
stories appearing- over, a five-year
fciiuu, uie district attorney's of-
nee round only eight which they
considered libelous enough for
action," Crowlev Said "n,.
juries are oased on truth. Let's
look at all of them."
At the same time, Crowley said
he intended to "really ; concen concentrate
trate concentrate tomorrow Oil rrnci.avnmL
nation of Howard Rushmore, for-
v. suiiur oi omiqentiai and a
cj witness m the case. He said
was sigwticant that Rushmore
was' "an editor of TTn. a
Cuban Pickets'
Denounce Batista
At White House
WASHINfiTnTtf i Ttii
F.y-cica me wmte- House for 90
minutes todsy jn protest against
the antl-rebel tactics of the gov
erament of President PulnrU
BaHsta, V-
There Wist fUi Jtieffifittii..
. ----- waviuuaute, ..rir
if-c tJBlrt", nowver, that the
pickets keep moving, w
t ne pckets, mostly, from New
cameo placards demanding
that the United State refuse to
send any more munitions to the
Batista regime which, they ssid.
uses U.S. arms 4,to kill the inde inde-fensive
fensive inde-fensive and peaceful citizens of
vuo. . .,.1 i '.
The nlacarda aW
. T. Smith. U.S.: mho.Hnr t
Cuba, who recently criticized anti anti-rebel
rebel anti-rebel tactis of the Batista eovem-
raent with the comment that "all
excessive police action is abhor abhorrent
rent abhorrent to me." ..... i

XZ2Z DAILY KEWSPAP

country u re 'Abraham Lincoln

K.f HERSHEY, Pa., Aug. 12 (UP)--The Panama Canal Zone rapped Strnthera, O-i 5-3 in' tha
opening game of the Veterans of Foreign Wars National Teener baseball tournament here to today.
day. today. i .i S f i'. ?,,"ft
The Canal Zone, at-large entry In the nln e-team field, took an early lead on the string tb.
of some ragged fielding by the Ohio nine and was never headed, ,4 ; 6
Bryan Luti pitched a steady, six-hitter for the winner. V
1 Three more games were scheduled for this afternoon.
- The ninth team in the playoffs, Chicago; Heights, Ul. drew a bye and does not play
until tomorrow when it will meet either Aztec N.M, or Tyrone, Pa., who clash today.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 12

partial victory in the battl of the military budget at th expense of tht Army. '.
A Pentagon spokesman disclosed that' defense' secretary Charles E. Wilson has,
decided to restore to the junior service 25 per cent of his $1,2SO,QOO,000 cut iri its
fund; ,('' '-''; 1
The spokesman indicated that : most of the 300 million dollarsAvill go for Weap Weapons,
ons, Weapons, particularly guided missiles. 1 5 i' ' '-f 1 -'

The greater part of the
count.
Wflson made the original slash
to help keep military spending
below 38 billion dollars in the
current fiscal year which began
July 1.
He ordered a umuar; ceiling
for next year.
wniie ail tbe services grum grumbled
bled grumbled about the cut, the Air.
Force particularly, had set in
motion a campaign to recover
part of the reduction.'
Wilson aoDarently acted in re
sponse to a protest lodged by Air
Force Secretary; J ames H. tioug tioug-las
las tioug-las last, spring. v Douglas com
plained to Wilson about the cut
before, it even was ordered.
The action means that the Air
Force now will be able to go
ahead and place orders for about
a billion dollars worth of missiles
and other weapons. The additional
funds to fulfill these contracts will
come. from future appropriations.
Wilson launched an all-out drive
to cut defense spending rates oy
S2.2OO.OOO.OO0. After spending rose
to an : annual rate of $40,200,-
000,000. ,, -s -,i
Services, Tomorrovi
For Mrs. Thompson
Mrs." Alni Frances Thompson,
wife of Robert J. Thompson, Sr.,
an employe of the Industrial Di Division,
vision, Division, died suddenly Saturday
mgni aner suiicnng wni ap appeared
peared appeared to be a stroke, She was
48 vears old. v,-, ":
Accompanied by her husband,
Mrs. Thompson was leaving the
Cristobal Service Centef about
9:45 cm. after attending the
movies when she suffered the
fatal attack.
Dr. Samuel D. AycocK, wno
arrived in an ambulance from
Coco Solo Hospital shortly after
wards, pronounced Mrs. Thomp Thompson,
son, Thompson, dead. : :
A native of Lead wood, Missou
ri. Mrs. Thompson came to the
Canal Zone with her husband in
1947. when he was employed as
a machinist In the Locks Divi
sion. They returned to the Unit United
ed United States In 1949 and came back
to the Isthmus' in 1955. Mr.
Thompson was re-employed.-by
the Canal organization as a ma machinist
chinist machinist in the Industrial Division
in Cristobal.
In addition to her husband,
she is survived by a son, Robert
J. Thpmpson, Jr., of Balboa and
a grandson. Surviving her in the
United States are her father
William F. Garrett, of St Louis,
HI, four sisters and one brother.
Funeral services will be held
at 10 o'clock Wednesday morn morning
ing morning at the Corozal Chapel. In Interment
terment Interment will take place at the
Corozal cemetery. The services
will be conducted by the Rev.
William H. Beeby, Pastor of the
First Baptist church in Balboa
Heights.. , :
French Conditions
For Economic Talks
Offered To Egypt
PARIS. Aug. IX (UP) France
has laid dowa a number, of condi
tions for the resumption of econo economic
mic economic talks with Egypt, authorita
tive sources said today. They did
not weal those conditions. -'
The French government hopes
to receive an official answer from
Cairo "shortly." Inmmediately op
en its receipt both sides would a a-gree
gree a-gree on where and when, to start
the negotiations'. Informants ssid.
-. t
--

NEWSPAPER

QJ
nn csfTt

FORCE EDGES

BATTLE CF

(UP) -Th Air.Forct was rportd today to hava -won a

restored mon ey was "transferred out of the Army's ac-

While: Wilson blamed most of
the increase on rising prices of
military goods, another factor is
the current shift from' convention conventional
al conventional to atomic-age pushbutton' weap weapons
ons weapons The. service must buy both,
conventional-: and ; new weapons
until the latter are available in
sufficient; numbers. (
Ships -.Mothballed
. Wilson last week s ordered a
worldwide half to civilian hiring
by the armed services and cut cutback!,
back!, cutback!, military vpetroleum pur purchases.
chases. purchases. On ;: Monday the Navy
decided to mothball 60 ships,
including the battleship Iowa.

Hollywood Magnates Warner, Zanuck
fjelp Break ;Blc AfiRiviera Casino

-. CANNES; Aug.; 12 (UP) The
man 'who broke the : bank- at
Monte Carlo had a counterpart
today.. Someone, broke the bank
at Cannes.',, x -1 "i : -t
The bank that was broken here
was at the plush palm Beach Ca Casino.'
sino.' Casino.' The. catastrophe sent 'the
Casino Mq the traditional three
aays ,oi "official mourning
which' follow such an nvenfc It
was expected to reopen tonight
Tne-bank or the Palm Beach
gambling hquse, one' of two in
Cannes and one of martv on the
Riviera, was broken last week by
movie magnates Jack .Warner
and Darryl zanuck and several
Other mternstional tourists,
Gambling circles on the bac
carat-lined Riviera said : today
the. Casino had been losing all
last week,; from Mondayvto -Frlr
Sums won .Individually by
Warner, Zanuck -and, three oth
ers ; administered S .the -final
knockout.- They .were not. gam gambling
bling gambling together.- j ? f ; a v ; ; : v
au toia, tne casino went broke
when it lost $1,000,000. j; ;
Tne live- tourists won half a
million dollars. Several other
tourists are believed to have ta
ken away the other half million
dollars during the week,
But the biggest sums were
t a rnr
i
l
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4:53, 6:56, T62
2:50,
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: 1 CsafSctsT

ARMY-;

BUDGET
Earlier s the i secretary called for
a 100,000-man cut in military man manpower
power manpower .by Jan. 1.
Wilson also has directed the
secretaries of Army Navy and
Air Force to work out plans. for
trimming the total numbers of
workers on their payrolls. These
plans must be submitted by the
plans must be submitted by the
end of this month..
The Army now1 has 429,218
civilian- workers, the Navy 389,717,
the- Air ., Force 340,326 and the
ttffice ol the defense secretary
1,655. In the first 'six months of
this year an average of 17,488
civilians were employed An aver average
age average of 20,137 left each mont,h.-

taken by Jack Warner, who won
$114,285;' anuck, $57,142; London -jeweler;
Bobbie-BarneV $83,714;
New York clothing manufacture
er Arthur Cole,:-$57,142; ; and sk
Brazilian coffee gjower; namedr
Marvin, the j biggest winner with r )
$142,857."'''-' -";. :.- -'?
r-Trie winners ''eit'';stUl'.on.'--'ttit
Riviera.:, ,,. Warner himself who
arrived i- on -. the TRlvlera three
weeks ago to stay at his '. villa,
would not discuss reports he lost
the sum he.won shortly '-after-
wards at the Monte Carlo Caai-,
no.' ''v' c-R y-Si-;v .rfri
"It's quite privateatter,"
he :sald. today.-: : -.i

Co. Directors
DecIaO-Ceiii P
i. NEW YORK, AuglM57
(PA-C)v The Board of Direc
tors of W. R. Grace tt Co. has
declared a regular,' Quarterly
dividend of $.60 per share on
Its Common Stock. It Is payable
on September 10 1957 to Stock
holders of record at the close
of business on August 19,. 1957.
r a x r

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' cnAuri

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:15, 1:43, 4:45, 6; 47,
.75 $.49
1:50
MYSTERY... C
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