The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02092

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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THE MARVELOUS
CAWOCA CAPITAL!

AN
DAILY NEWSPAPER

it. MANIFF

HITS AVION AUkAIATI

Jattatua American
"Let the people know the truth and the country U Abraham Lincoln.

Commies Christmas

$200,000 Down on

Christmas salts in Canal Zona commissaries fall soma

$200,000 below thoss of tha sama nonoay parraa isi
vear, officials revealed today. The period covered includes
. ALt L. J

the last-minute-ruan ax xne unnnmas

The news of the drop in overall volume came at a
. i i wil UtJ ikin knar npa.

surprise to outsiae 0D3rvr f--

Christmas crowds in trie commissaries, espeemnj mhw

due to close soon.

PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY. DECEMBER 28, 1958 FIT! CENTO
I

soes nA aaa u:U

Last Year J I V V V V V fO 1 1 1 JVC

f I aa

Tnfm-mallv the dfOD W8S attri'

by commissary peopie w

iveral factors.

(1) During the year nnere ns

en some reduction in ioree put

tto effect througnom u.o.

ijencies on the Zone.
si rhtrc hojt been a limi

tation on the volume of items
per ctwtomer on some mer mer-eaandiie,
eaandiie, mer-eaandiie, such as salad oU. Al Alio
io Alio each commissary has been
mLht mith onlv normal o-

wrants, to prevent overbuying

(3) Prices on ceriam uiw.
jftilch are being closed out have

reduced m anwcipauuu v

His ..

H) Some, men ths ago me cam-

arles oegan to cui wvcuw wvcuw-so
so wvcuw-so that they would not find

selves overstocked wnen

lose over n.oou .customer
afternoon.

(6) The 900 or so people who

be Off tne payrou next i ues ues-have
have ues-have been economizing.

if Savs farewell

Gen. Gruenther

His Retirement

Washington, Dec. 28 (up-

Army today said iormai

to Gen. Aiirea m. wiu-

10, during 3b years i

ce, gainea a repu-

braln of the Ar-

Vnofficial observers noted
also that while those who will
lose their commissary rights
have undoubtedly been laying
in supplies of foodstuffs and
other basic necessities, they
foresaw a drop in their buy buying
ing buying power, hence they bought
lightly of trinkets, toys and
Christmas present luxuries.
Yesterday there was an atmos

phere of controlled hysteria at

Tivoli commissary, one of three
that will close their doors for
good at the end qf business to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow afternoon.
The other two are Ancon and

Chsgres. near Gatun.

The Camp Blerd commissary

will shut up shop at the end of
business Monday afternoon.

Whep Tivoli Commissary open

ed for the day at 1 p.m. yester-

dav. thousands surged in.

within a half hour, the salad

oil was "finished": shortly there thereafter
after thereafter there was "no more margarine."

Many cleaning nems were
soon sold out.
Every customer wanted
Klim; but there was none.
Some settled gladly for a pow powdered
dered powdered milk manufactured in
Denmark. This, too was ration rationed.
ed. rationed. There was no fresh milk
after the first onslaught, un unless
less unless replacements came in lat

er.
The only six stoves were sold
in the first ten minutes.
In no time at all, 50 customers
were standing behind each cash

observer remark-

thre vpars 1

end of this month from the
and win become president

the American ea oruss.

Tn honor Gruenther on his

kim.nt thp Armv arranged

rtraditlonad military review at

rt Lesley J. Mcwair nerc,
re the 57-year-old general

ice served as deputy comman comman-int
int comman-int of the National War Col-

Ann President Eisennowcr

- 1 1. 1 i

ind to award mm a iniru

Taf Cluster for his Dlstin

lushed Service Medal at a White

louse ceremony.

iw t the Ft. McNair review

re Defense secretary na"

Wilson. Army Secretary wh-

M. Brucker and uen. wu-

31 D. Taylor, Army cniei 01

ft.

In an interservice tribute to

M four-star general, tne ur

rce ordered nine troop earner

les, eight fighter Domoers

I four day fighters to ny over
parade grounds.

icr Albacora

lay be Released

rout Libel Suit

nl arraneements were a-

1 rristnhni todav that may

0 the release of the coastal

Albacora. Tne eignt crew-

en of tne panamann-ug

ssel may be repatriated.
Tho vpxsel was libeled early

Is wise for the sum of $1,100

tvanead by Panama Agencies

r various n.
larles E. RarnTfez filed the
mnlftfnt

E Attorneys DeCastro and RObles

eared in u b. uistnci
OPAK Poods, the owner of

vessel

OThe Albacora has been In the

stt of Cristobal since last sep-

Ptober.

rilson Not Making

Ions To Resign

WASHINGTON, TVc. t6 fUPW

fense Secretary Charles E. wil-

said today he does not intend
LI. n.Ll i 1 ..4

Sign ms i.apinei post ai iest

he sees the new defense

tat thnugh Congress.

'3hjt I might chsnge my mind,
Bourse." he added.

Asked if the plans to resign aft-

l that, Wilson said: "I don't us.
Wy try to make my plans so far

HMO."

rtdter. i Oaa

! A lie uwnu

was orderly: Press

ed close together, nobody jos jostled.
tled. jostled. Nobody was actually crying;
but few faces wore smiles.
The general spirit was that
of a community battening
down and collecting what it
could to withstand a hurricane.

Normal operating schedules

are planned by the commissary
Division for New Year's Eve next

Monday, which means that two
commissary stores on each side
of the Isthmus will be open for
business. These are Diablo
Heights and La' Boca on the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific side, and Margarita and

Camp Blerd on the Atlantic side.

The Service center Division

will operate on a normal work workday
day workday schedule Monday and the
two units being closed as a result

of the Treaty commitment on

sales privileges in the Canal

Zone will not ooen for business
after Monday. These are the Pa

cific and Camp Bierd Service

Centers.
14,000 To Switch"
Civvies To Khaki

WASHINGTON, Dec. 28 (UP)

The Defense Department announc announced
ed announced today that 14,000 men will be

drafted in February for the Army.

That represents a cut of 3,000

men from draft calls for tne
preceding four months.
The Defense Department said
the lower draft call for February
rtflects higher enlistments in the
active and reserve forces that tra traditionally
ditionally traditionally take place in January
and February.
Tht February call will bring to
2,166,430 the number of men draft drafted
ed drafted since the outbreak ef the Kote Kote-an
an Kote-an War.
The ltst 14,000-man draft call
was in September. Since then

draft calls have been running at

a rate of 17,000 men monthly.

Reorganized

ArmyCombat

Units m 57?
WASHINGTON, Dec. 28
(UP) The Army formally an announced
nounced announced last night that it will
reorganise its combat divisions
next year to give them more
speed and mobility for atomic atomic-age
age atomic-age warfare.
The announcement confirmed
press reports of several weeks a a-go
go a-go that such a step would be
taken.
The reorganization th most.

drastic since the Army revamp-

ca us envision structure at the
outbreak of World War II, will
result in a reduction of about 25

per cent m the size of combat
divisions.

The Army emphas zed, how however,
ever, however, that the move will net
mean any cutback in overall
Army manpower, now estimat estimated
ed estimated at about 1,025,000 men. It
said some 60,000 men freed
from combat units under the
new plan will be reassigned to
supporting units.
Under the Army reorganiza

tion, the Army's 12 Infantry di divisions
visions divisions will be reduced from 17, 17,-500
500 17,-500 men to about 13,800 men. Its
two airborne divisions will be
trimmed from 17,100 men to 11, 11,-500
500 11,-500 men.

One airborne division, the

101st, already has been cut to

atomic-age size. The Army said
only minor reductions will be

made in the size of the four

armored divisions, which now
have 14,500 men.
Instead of. the present three
regiments to a division, the
command structure will b

changed to give each division
bat groups. Each will be
capable ef fighting independent independently
ly independently aid will be responsible direct directly
ly directly to the division commander.

15 RUSSIAN SHIPS SCHEDULED
TO TRANSIT P C. WITHIN MONTH

Three Soviet vessels are approaching Canal Zone portals for
transtt. Another 12 are expected during the next 31 days.
The blockage of the Sues Canal is the reason for the re-rout-"
of the Russin sb'Ps via Panama, shipping sources say.
The influx of hammer-and -sickle vessels marks the first ap appearance
pearance appearance of that flag here sine last February. One ship transit transited
ed transited then, and another came throurh in Mi. io Th... t,.

first in many years.

Nobody Wen! to Jail
But 6 Found Guilty;
Drunk Drivers Ungay
The last two of the rash of

intoxicated drivers picked up
over the holiday week-end have

oeen round guilty and sentenc
ed.

Edward N. Perrvman of Las

Cruces, a Panamanian employe

oi tne Dredging Division, was

found guilty and fined S50. He

was speeding oh McFarlane

Highway and failed to nass a

sobriety test.

Judge John E. Deming had
previously taken his case under

advisement in Balboa Magis
trate'a Court.

In Cristobal Magistrate's Court

Armando Vega M., 29, an Ameri American
can American soldier, was fined $100 and

given a 15-day suspended sen

tence for driving on Bolivar

Highway while intoxicated. The
offense occurred at 7:10 p.m.
Dec. 22. A minor accident re resulted.
sulted. resulted. Of the seven persons charg charged
ed charged with driving while intoxi

cated during the Christmas
holidays, one was found guil guilty;
ty; guilty; one, ferryman, was fined
?50. The other five were fined
$100 and several were given
suspended sentences of from
10 to IS days. Nobody went to
On Location
8T0RMVILLE, N.Y., Dec. 28 -(UP)
"Public Pigeon No. t, a
comedy movie which features a
prison break, had its world pre premiere
miere premiere todav before some 2.000

inmates at Oreenhaven prison.

The Soviet ships are approach

ing from both oceans.

Shipping agents Payne St

Wardlaw received a cable today

irom Acapuico, Mexico, inform

lng them that the freighter Ni

kolai Ostrovskl is due in Balboa
in the afternoon of New Year's

Day.

Her skipper a Is asked
Payne ft Wardlaw to secure
an American flag for flying
while transiting the Canal
and a catalogue of charts.
Bond from Vladivostok, the

2121-ton, 240-foot Nikolai Os Ostrovskl
trovskl Ostrovskl has a load of 2570 tons
of canned fish consigned to

London.
Originally she had expected
to show up at Balboa today. It
is not known whether she will
stop for engine repairs.
The next two Soviet ships
are the Kurgan, which will be
towing a floating workshop,
and the Tuloma, a fish car carrier.
rier. carrier. Both are new ships,
launched recently in Yugo Yugoslavia.
slavia. Yugoslavia. They were originally due in

Cristobal tomorrow, but have
radioed no word that they were
approaching the Canal.

Three soviet tankers are aiso

expected from the Pacific. They

PC Gas Stations

To Close All Day

New Year's Day

All Panama Canal gasoline
service stations will be closed
all dav next Tuesday, New
Year'? Day, it was announced
today. This is one of two days
In the year whlh all stations
are closed.
The stations will operate on

a regular schedule next Mon Monday,
day, Monday, New Year's Eve. This will
be the last opportunity for a
majority of Canal employes to
purchase gasoline in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone as the privilege will
be withdrawn beginning Jan.
1.
Procurement Chief
Visiting on Zone
Leslie A. Ferguson, Chief of
the Procurement Department in
the Canal's New Yortt Office,
arrived in the Canal Zone this

morning for a brief official .visit.

Ferguson has visited tne one
cn many previous occasions and

has many friends on tne lsin-

mus.

are the tankers Samarkand,
Sverdlovsk and the Kaunus.
Six of the additional vessels
expected by Payne ft Wardlaw
are refrigerated ships.
A Canal spokesman said the
transit of the Soviet ships will
be a normal operation.
But special attention will be
given both to the capacities and
handling capacities of the ves vessels.
sels. vessels. Admeasurers will go through
the ships on arrival, since all
are seeking transit for the first
time.

Two Days Left
To Buy Wales
For Zone Cars

Canal Zone automobile own owners
ers owners have two more full days in
which to get their 1956 license

plates.

As a convenience to the gen

eral public, the License Section
offices will be onen Saturday

from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The offices
will be open Monday, New Year's
Eve, on regular schedule.

No extension Is rranted tar

the use of 1958 license plates
after midnight next Monday
jtET

While the luinnr, nt fW. .,.,

license plates has been brisk

uuqpg tne past few days, there
are several thousand cars still

,o ucensea ror operation in
1957. according um...4i..

' w wwyMllurO

fit
Sect,0n nJ to
S2 7409 'toenw plates for the
nW yeai up to Friday for privately-owned
ran A fatal A 1-

370 license plates for private
WJ towed during the pre-

Ike Wants US Arms,
In Case of HldEasf
Soviet Penetration

NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UP)
President Eisenhower is think thinking
ing thinking about asking Congress for
authority to use U.S. armed
forces whenever he believes they
are needed to keep peace In the
Middle East, the New York

Times said today in its lead

story.
Times Washington Corres
pondent James V. Reston re

ported that the President and
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles plan to talk about the

country's future middle east pol

icy with leaders of Congress in

a meeting at the White House

next Tuesday.

Reston said that President
Elsenhower and Dulles discuss

ed future Middle East policy

yesterday ai a wniie House con conference.
ference. conference. He noted that President Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower privately has said
he agreed with President Tru Truman's
man's Truman's move in sendinr troops
Into Korea to halt commu communist
nist communist aggression there but
thought Mr. Truman first
should have sought Congres Congressional
sional Congressional approval.

The
Judge's Bench

xwo men were charged with
grand imnv m, i..

mJ. i 1100 worth of biding

The charge In Balboa Magls-

irws uourt is that Cornelio

renmcow, Panamanian, and

r" wmeju, Panamanian,
took the material from a n,.ir

?ng,!g to Marcelino Augusto

"'"T- "e irucx was parked at

ranuaen nam.
The case was continued until

Monaay arternoon.

James Rupert Harris 32 Pan.

amanian, was fined $5' for fail-

, .. i we ml secure the load on his

uuruiK nis presem i"" irucx

will consult with various Canal

officials, and particularly those
of ths Supply and Employe

Service Bureau, on procurement
and transportation problems

which will arise as a result of

curatiled commissary and serv

ice center operations next year.

Elton Jay Dixon, 59, Ameri American,
can, American, was charged with battery.
The complains witness was
Marta Escalante Dixon.

Bail was set at $25 and the
case was continued until Jan. 3.

Han Freed in Trial
Of Foodstuff Theft
From Zone Drive-In

Edward Norman Bernard, 35,

Panamanian, one Of two men
accused of stealing foodstuff

from the Canal Zone "drive-In"
last Dec. 18 was found not guil guilty
ty guilty Of petit larceny when his
case was heard yesterday In

Baiooa Magistrate's Court.

He was represented by Attor

ney Charles E. Ramirez.

Carlos Oil Perich, 27. Pan

amanian, charged with Bernard
in the offense, had earlier been

found guilty, fined $25 and given

a lo-aay suspended sentence.

The pair were accused of steal

ing a can of chocolate syrup, a
can of chocolate fudge, a can
of fruit salad and three pack packages
ages packages of coffee worth $8.58.

Armed Services'
Non-US Workers
On CZ Get Raise

A wage adjustment up to five cents aer hour, nrrsw.

mg approximately 40 per cent of Armed Services non non-US
US non-US citizen employes in the Canal Zone has been approved
by the Department of Defense in Washington, Headquar Headquarters
ters Headquarters Caribbean Command announced today.
D.r Vife?tiVfuDM" 30 ?hi Amy and Alr For-
utc. 31 for the Navy, the increase in pay is selective in
order to bring military rates more closely in line with Pan Panama
ama Panama Canal Company-Canal Zone government rate for
comparable work.
Officials here emphasized that the military employes
pay increases will not be across the board as was the re-

...!..

i ii i iv nnnniinroi jAmbMlMMl..

, uiiiuuny-qovernmenr wnnm

because some employes are now receiving the same or
higher rates of pay for similar work than will ha ia 1

his selective pay adjustment will facilitate future
implementation of the single waae nlon f, T.

ment agencies in the Canal Zone. n"
The waae adjustment will rmmuit '.-

$160,000 incase in the riZSZ!!X

i : r-y -" lliiiiiifr

Two More 'Mad Bomber Gifts

Left in New York ?mcuc

Algerian Mayor
Shot in Street
In Mid-Morning

ALGIERS, Algeria, Dec. 28
(UP) A rebel extremist today

snot ana killed the president of

tne Federation of Algerian Ma Mayors
yors Mayors in. broad daylight In the

center of Algiers.
The official, Amedee Froger,
fell under a hail of pistol bul bullets.
lets. bullets. His assailant escaped.

Froger, a former delegate to

tne Algerian AisemDiy, was
mayor of the town of Boufarik,
located 18 miles southwest of

Algiers. few rows from the spo

The assassination took placet pipe bomb exploded last year.

at 9:o a.m. in Rue Micneiet, in
the center of Algiers.

NEW YORK. Dec. 28 (1TP

TWO home-made nin hnmha

bv nollce tn he th

of the "Mad Bomber" who has
terrorized New York for 15 years,
were found today.
One was in a seat at tha
Paramount Theater, the sec second
ond second at Grand Central Station.
The latest of the maniac's
"calling cards" was found by a
Grand Central redcap at 8:35
a.m. atop the pneumatic hinge
of a door at a taxi entrance to
the station.
Vehicular traffic was immedi immediately
ately immediately barred from the area pend pending
ing pending inspection by a police bomb
squad.
The suspected bomb was a six six-inch
inch six-inch tjrass cylinder, capped at
both ends.
It was similar in sije to the
known products of the "Mai
Bomber," whose e x p losives
have injured 15 persons her

since 1940, bat it was not
wrapped In a sock as most of
the bomber's have been.
A crude bomb wrapped In a

red sock was removed from a
seat of the Paramount Theater
in Times Sauare early today, as

a result of a telephone tip from
a caller believed to be the "Mad
Bember."
It had been planted only a

few rows from the spot where a

Discovery of the bomb was

made seven hours after police

n r 1 :
Hes Been In More Countries J ban You've Been In Grocery Stores

A 76-yearvyoung Danish ex

plorer, author, lecturer, sailor.

mapper and collector of science

Rationing

iARIS, Dec. 28 (UP)-French

tee station operators threat threat-today
today threat-today to close unless the gov-

BBent compensates them for

keeping work caused by gas-

rauonins.

BJwfcBMsBBBleHBkfcfcAi t. !w.- .flSafeSsf

NEW JET BOMBER TAKES OPT This is one of the first official photos 0 the U.8. Air
Force B-58 bomber. The 18 tires on the main landing gear of the B-58 Hustler create a
cloud of dust as the supersonic bomber takes off on a test flight at the Forth Worth, Tex..
plant of Convair Division of General Dynamics Corp. The dejta-wing bomber is Dowered by
four General Electric J-79 jet engines with afterburners. The new plana carries a crew of
three, is 95 feet long, and. has a wtngsnan of 55 feet,

data Is in Panama todav wait,

lng for the freighter taking him

w Argentina for another scien-

nnc look-see.

Capt. Khar- Mikkelsen and his

wife, who've been in more coun

tries than most neonle erocerv

stores, are spending their first
second and. thus far. onlv

days in Panama and the Canal
Zone; but they find the coun country
try country "a delightful" place and the
Canal- "an engineering wonder."

The captain, who started as a
Danish naval officer at the aae

of 19 and since 1900 has been a
self-described parlor-sailor, is

officially retired.
However, he still is active in
the field of writing, traveling

and speaking.
He 18 currently writing two
books, planning a series of lec lectures
tures lectures while in Argentina, and

preparing for another trip to
Greenland in three months.

But Greenland, its history and

future, is Mlkkelsen's first scien

tific lore.

Fifty-six tears axo. he relates.

he first visited Greenland and
the Eskimos there first saw a
white man.

Since that time, most of his

work has been m the Arctic re
glons of Greenland. Alaska. Slbe

ria, and once unsuccessfully-

near the South Pole.
Most of his 15 books, translat translated
ed translated into five languages, deal with
the discoveries and data of
Greenland.
"When I first arrived In the

country," Mikkelsen recalls. "Es "Eskimos
kimos "Eskimos believed themselves to be
the only living people on earth,
had never seen Iron and were
living in a stone-age period.

I have followed them from

that stone-age to the atomic

age."

his maps and data are still

used by scientists working in
Greenland, most of whom come

from Denmark.

(Greenland is not a territo

rial possession of Denmark, the

captain is quick to point out, but
a "full-blooded member of the
Danish family.")

He is convinced Greenland has

an immenselv imnortant future.

But, weather is the enemy that

orevents faster development.
Weather and the mountains.

During World War II. a UJS.-

Denmark agreement permitted
Americans to build airstrips on
Greenland. Later, most of the
strips were turned over to Den Denmark.
mark. Denmark. And today the airplane,
along with the boat. Is the ma major
jor major forntvpf transportation.
How much ice is in Green Greenland?
land? Greenland? Mikkelsen states that If the
39,000 Inches of ice covering the
island were to melt, every ocean
in the world would rise 273 inch inches.
es. inches. "And It's melting," he adds.
Capt. Mikkelsen has no home.

he says, but calls home "wher "wherever
ever "wherever my wife is."

However, he was born in Ves-

ter Bronderslev. Denmark.

In Greenland s earlier days, he

was the chief of inspection on

the then -almost-unknown East
Coast.

Now he is on his way to the

Denmark Scientific Station lo located
cated located near Buenos Aires. Tomor

row he and Mrs. Mikkelsen will
continue their trip aboard the
"Maran Dan," a Danish freight

er bound for Argentina.

He'll oome back through the

Isthmus in mid-spring.

received a telephone call frm
off m the paramount at 7:55
te?naht?ont.dUtJ!rbln
theater, but found no trace of
But duriiif a more thorough
"arch early this morning" po police
lice police found the latest weaJon
seat. Tha seat had been
and afr,wlfc
and the bomb placed inside.
An unidentified Woman

covered an aluminum ..... ...

afternoon in the lower level of

ui urana central terminal, it
was unlike th it.hai

planted by the "Mad Bomber
who uses a timing device.
Address Change

For Telephone

; Holders In Ancon

All Canal Zone telephone sub subscribers
scribers subscribers who previously receiv received
ed received their mall at the Ancon post
office are requested to notify
the "Electrical Engineer, Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Heights, CZ." of their new
postal address.
The 1957 Panama Canal Co.
telephone directory will be dis distributed
tributed distributed the latter part of Jan January,
uary, January, and to facilitate the de delivery
livery delivery of the telephone direc directories
tories directories without delay, it will b
necessary that the new addres addresses
ses addresses of the telephone subscribers
be available Immediately.
Service at the Ancon post of office
fice office will be discontinued effec effective
tive effective December 31.

Guerrilla Band
Kills 3 Malayans
!n Ambush Attack
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya. Dee.

28 (UP) A band of Communist

guerrillas killed eight Malavan

soldiers and wounded three others

m an ambush attack on two mili

tary vehicles yesterday, it was

announced here today.
The announcement said 20 to 30

guerrillas attacked the two army

vehicles.

Authorities said that after Com

munist bullets had killed eight of
their comrades and wounded an

other, two Malayan privates

other, two Malayan private?
fought off the guerrillas until
troops came to their relief.

V

. ,rtu



FRIDAY BECEMBE!
FA6I TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN All INDEPENDENT DAILY IfEWSPAFER

M
it
i i
n

I I
1 1
if
h
m

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

AM avALIAHED rr THt PANAMA AMKHICAN PRIM. INC.

rOUMDtB AT NELSON HCUNIHIU. In lew
MAAMODIO ARIA. I0ITO
7. M mitT P. 0. Box 1S4. Panama. A. or P.
TtLfFHONt a-O740 '9 Lints)
Cable aedsh. panamwmgah, Panama
obloi offici 12.17 central avsnui between 1:h and 13tn ttts
P-Mliaw KiartNYTivtt. JOAHUA B BOWtM. INC
14B Madison Avi. New Vornt. 17 N Y.
LOtAt tT KAIL
MA MSWTN. IN APVANC1 90

M IV HMMM III IRVkNri O V w.w

W Nt YIAR. IN ADVANCE

24 00

JWI TOW 'OKUM THI MAPW3 OWN COtUMM
THE MAIL BOX

Tkt Msil Isi is as opto f-rvm tor rA-tor a r"aL-t,i
tatter, are hbMvm r-MWH, M or. handled lb ell- WftarUI

It a bbbMbbN b Mb aWI e imp-Kent doBM I
BMt BAT UHB Bft BB.Irtfcee' m ths ordei received.
PHmm try t KNi the Wters limited to one page length.
ieWntit At Utter writer it held m strictest confide nes.
Ibm stMMBBf swurnee no responsibility Itare meets

rem reeaen.

OLD TIMERS' PLIGHT

t- riat nrmnid's" letter. I wish to state that

All CkJLieTWCi XAJ m- V v. ij"-.
a- in 1 Ti TTroH Riiv or rant. J. Davis, they

M iV WeUi KVU 111 WUtll TV VA A iv,u A- T
could give you the names of sqme of the retired people oft
both sides, and maybe could have a meeting and select a fe
folks to call on the President in regards to our privileges. Ill
that way we might get somewhere.
Our own government is certainly letting us down. The jot jot-ernorsays
ernorsays jot-ernorsays his hands are tied, but I feel sure if he communicat communicated
ed communicated our predicament to President Eisenhower he could get to to-J
J to-J ether with President de la Guardia and possibly work thte out
The sanitation here is way below par, flies and roaches
we flying on and around the meat that is hung upon hooks
and thiy expect people to eat it. That's something else again
to "we have enjoyed a good situation here with the working
Wnamtnians and Americans both
so why change it when it worsens conditions Instead of better-
to TrfTpoverty and conditions in Colon are almost unbeliev unbelievable
able unbelievable Peojte are starving here and ho help from their govern government
ment government is coming. It's the Americans, priests and Salvation
Army who are doing what they can for them.
So if vou will get in touch with some of us, "Get Organ Organ-tad"
tad" Organ-tad" w sure would appreciate it but what we need is a
fl No one wants U go ahead on their own. but what have
toey got to lose? It looks the cause is alrWdyJntere.ted

Labor News
And
Comment

That Missing Missile

Animal Fair

Answer to Previous Puzzle

ACROSS
1 Young horse

4 Forbidden
5 Three (prefix)
6 Save
7 Notion
8 Sheriff's men
9 One present
10 Bodies of
water
11 Dispatched
16 Marsh birds
20 Angry
22 Buddhist
Scripture
24 Pigeon variety

25 Ostrich

5 Journey

Balaam's
Animal
12 Operatic solo
13 Make over
14 Golf mound
19 Fat hips
17 Light brown
It Wading bird
19 Simplest

21 French river
33 SM eagle

S4fflteptaee5ryneM
in MA.ml.in linn ""'Ua'

iiisV"'ffi

32 Charm mu ai.b

34Vretable v

38 Withstand

7 Views

IWftatgoate dote

explosive

42 One of the
Gershwins
440h Watar

8 Sectional
Animal trail

3 Employ
Food

aaaimiiation
m Female

relative (coll.) pgr
mm m

o( war

ii

By VICTOR RIESIL

Workers of the Communist

world unite. You have nothing
to lose but your chain reaction
Nchain reaction of strikes
which are criDDllne the Russian

war machine by snutting down

factories deep in the heart of

Russia itseif.
It may, however, be quite pa patronizing
tronizing patronizing for anyone to shout
out to the anti-Communist un underground
derground underground behind the Iron Cur Curtain
tain Curtain to unite. Something strange
is developing. Mass strikes are
reported by international labor
networks to be paralysing huge
metal, steel and armament
works in and around Moscow.
Leningrad and other big Soviet
working-class cities.
Whether those shut-downs
are spontaneous or organized
by a single anti-Communist
underground reaching from
Warsaw and Budapest right
into Russia, no one can yet
say for sure. But it la certain
that the Russians are gasping
for steel, coal and transport
and electrical equipment.

And as certain as a vodka

elass in Khrushchevs hand is

the existence of a tough disci
nlined. well-directed anti-Corn

munist underground stretching

across the satellites. Its repre

sentatives move, like the Bear

let Pimpernel of old, in and out
of Red occupied lands. To some
labor leaders of the western
world, these Communist hating
agents are more than wrathful
wraiths.
Leaders of the underground
have, for example, met with

Victor Reuther in Vienna dur

ing the past few weeks. Reutner
was in the Austrian capltol on

behalf Of the AFL-CIO.

31 Greatest
33 Measure
35 Groups Of
eight
40 Insignia
43 Lena River
tributary
45 Russian labor
group

46 Shove
47 Continent
48 "The Emerald
Isle"
50 Well
ventilated
51 Coconut fiber
52 Leg joint
55 Worm

HL' tJaY
HHfli-- eW

HhA- ; 'I
HH jff I

Wi xx

MERRY-vO-KOUl

NEA Santee, Isc

11

Plastic Christmas
By 008 RUARK

OHW f I At ton

WASHINGTON. -Dramatic last

minutes of test-pilot M e lb u r n
Ant's life were filmed by so au

tomatic camera trained on Mm a

the cockpit, ai I powered the
needle-nosed X-2 rocket plane to s
record-ahAttAuns 2100 mnh
wwefcesssjABj eAssePF 1 T

The amazing films, now devel

oped for Air Force eyes only,
Am that Apt died 1 hero trying

to bring his lightning craft back

to base.

The Air Farce eastern hit too

speed in the thin, black air 10.090

feet above the earth Whefl his fuel

burned out. He was streaking a a-way
way a-way from Edwards Air Force Ba Base
se Base Calif., the onlv nlace he could

land, at the rate of to miles per

minute.

To save the precious plane he

had to reverse course and glide

all the way back to the base. The

terse, last words that crackled oy

er his radio transmitter Were:
"Burn out Turning

He started swinging toe a-z a
round, still hurtling at 2100 msh.

But the strain af turning at this
tremendous speed was too much.

the plane lurched from side to

side, then up and down. Finally it

corkscrewed.

The camera grihding inside the

cockpit showed what was happen

see took his wife along f

pany, also at the taxpay
pease.)

mxON NOTE: Truth
Vict President Nixon's

trap is that he invited hi

be seat overseas to

Hungarian refuges
i J W l

iucdu aisennower w

metis to the

sympathy for the Hung;

gees.

uiuceaea Benin m 1348-4.
Nixon suggested that he, as A

w. e, man, might m

yenwu Villi 16 XVt

c?f This would demoastfatei

jltTU,

re,ixruu iEUD: The AM

ii j mau nit porce are squanofl
off for the bitterest feud since tJM
three services were supposed to

WJUfU,
. Arrty brass intend to fightj
il ftm U.i Jll.k ; si

J. a ,. ktU 10 congress a-

g.msi uie nmicatwns that havel;

imposea on army wmM
and planes.
.lry Secretary Wilber Bruckej

ina to Ant. He was taking a terrl- to ... tuL:.. ??

fie buffeting. He reached for the ConaVe.smir, to b ih !. :

v.. M llAldHII llll IRH flim ni Mkl.ll. J

cockpit free of the tumbling, twist

fiig plane: But h was jolted back,
his head smacking against Hie
Side of the cockpit.
Three times he tried to grab
the release but was knocked back.
On, the fourth try he succeeded. At
this, point the film ran out.

It is known that the cockpit wal
ejected at 43,000 feet. Ah oM-fakh-

ioned parachute blossomed but at with

battle.

kT?"" Force climg. kowtve

mi.i rmr i wyiBg W muscle
on air defense.

,.!y!H0WDER KEG Stanisl

""AwejciyK, exueo FOlijj
nimc m.(a .4 i w

jiuwr, nas jut return

vu Europe wun undrj

wvra inai roiand

may

rnunti

nic eiiu iu uauuiic in. nun i suc- ufle State DeOartmont .rl,.t.

ennsH Hit ihm sfmnenhara fU. il. .

vit is a aisiinct nnc h v

inn mm nm

i i i i i i i in i 1 1

5 5hm L i 11 LI 1 M I 14-4-1;

r-" ISf- i

iiii 1. 1 i i .... j, i i iii

.i 87Wargod P WX' VM'

JocTpT prwr TfM rprpn;
SffiSL 5 n r
n down s 5- a
; 1 Money L
I 2 Heraldic band T M
8 Prevaricator llll I I III 1 ftl
i i r
,
-V BAW 1 it
m
I
t It1-
mmmmwm.lK. TJHAUA-itotl. VA9wew'9tm-r

Just back from the border of
brutality, Reuther has this to

report:

Polish Industry is really at

the mercy of antl-Corhmunlst
Workers Counrils in direct con contact
tact contact with the west. These coun councils
cils councils have systematically purged

themselves not only of Stalin

ists but of active Communists

as well. The councils, operating
inside most factories and mines,
are feared by. the Russians but
will not move against the So Soviets
viets Soviets recklessly. Nor will they
futilely hurl their leaders a-

gainst Russian guns. They are

watching carefully what the IJ.

S. and the rest Of the free, world
will do for the embattled, Hun Hungarian
garian Hungarian strikers and their decapi decapitated
tated decapitated workers' councils there.
The Polish workers anti-Com-

aji cyme uuvvu wiui a a ,m uiuic tuuuui muia ui a aiuv auyoouy upa lumei. wtu
tack of the fuddy-duddies i of well-rubbed velveteen, With also apply to home shortened pie pie-the
the pie-the Yule season a common what the trade calls "self" crust, and hard country ham
mmk c ... uuu., ...Ll.t...i mu. U-1 I u 1 . 1 1 4.1

I always come down with a se- a bit more comfortable in a suit anybody's open market. This wilt

vere anacK

around

complaint of us ex-bobby soxers

who complain that things ain't
like they used to be, and are pro probably
bably probably right, at that. The main
theme would be that there are
some things that don't need im improving,
proving, improving, and certain substitutes
won't do.

We do not have to hold out for
a sleigh ride through the snow to

Grandma's farm, with the bells

iinelinn and Grandpa's nose mat

ching the sunset. But there is still
no system of steam heat with
ersatz electric logs that can match
un to a six-foot birch log with a

fat pine kindling base as a dispen dispenser
ser dispenser of cheer. And the scent of hol

ly and mistletoe in an open-fired
house has not been produced by

the Du Ponts.
There was a perfume hV the old older
er older ChfiStntas houses compunded
of kitchen odors as the clove clove-specked
specked clove-specked hams fought valiantly

h th sage-stuffed turkeys and

whiskers. The shine on his cheeks which does not come in a plasti-

and the glow from his nose was cine coverall.

natural, not a Kevion product.

If you are a pipe or cigar smok smoker,
er, smoker, a lighter is a handy thing. Bui

munist leaders don't want our the fruit-and-Sally White Cakes

military help nor do they be-....ca Witn the sharpness of unac

Iieve that such fighting forces

PW ask once more! Don't you think I'm beautiful?"

PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT AD$

CAS FlU VOI R NEEDS!

should go to the aid of the Hun Hungarians,
garians, Hungarians, wonderful as that
would be for those walking in
the shadow of the gallows.
Nor do the Polish workers
need advice on tactics giten
them by the outside world
ivy radio, leaflets or balloon
barrages, I presume. The Pol Polish
ish Polish workers' councils know
well, indeed, what they have
to do and how to move. What
they want is for ts to mote.'
They are not impressed by the
world's warmth to Hungarian

refugees. That is humane and

should be taken for granted.
That is the least that can be
done. And the least is being
done, they believe. They would
like to see some of our bisr lux luxury
ury luxury liners, such as the U. S.
Constitution and the United
States, chartered by the western
world, steam into Trieste and
shuttle hack and forth with

thousands of refugees each trip

to the outside woria.

The anti-Communist under underground
ground underground asks why UN truce u u-nits
nits u-nits cannot be put into Hungary
as they are being rushed into
Egypt. The underground wants
to see just what the world does
eettlne teams of Un observers
into Budapest. The underground
fighters and strike committees
want to know if the western
world is going to continue re recognizing
cognizing recognizing the bone crushing
Kadar regime or set up the
Hungarian workers,' leader, An Anna
na Anna Kethly, as head of a Hun Hungarian
garian Hungarian government-inrexlle.
'Vk er&thlb rirror' In the U.

MIPS ntiiii,, w
Sand IS the highest ranking

survivor OI ine wph;,
n..j .nirnnMimtnt. Huntfa-

liveu oimi-v.......
rian government Jhlch was
"voted" out Of existence when
the Russians rolled up a huge
,m a.ba hmh Muni

plurality OI lane. u u.i.

All these are actions really
short of war and 'the briny,
if the west will not make these

peaceiui muw,
tTT-TTi. 4rrrniinH will know

imillBt uiivvb-"- "..i n
that they can get no support. Jf
the west stands up for its simple

rigntS me unannuuuu
stand up against Russian tanka

I believe I've passed on Vic
...n,rv ronrtrt rorrectlV

That is what he heard from the
anti-Communist underground a a-eents
eents a-eents who now mfty well be beck
inside Hungary, Poland and the

other sateuns.

If we want that anti-Communist
chain reaction to speed on,

we had better speed some ac
tion ourselves.

customed oranges, clumps of
1 .1 IL J I 1 I..

piump raisins oouseo in ornuy
and set afire, crushed eversreCh

and the genial odor of Pa's bour

bon toddv. You cant ptasticize

that one, Messrs. Union Carbide

and Carbon, whoever ye be be-I
I be-I know full well that Santa Claus

wears clothes made out of glass
and old newspapers and his beard
is pure nylon, but he used to look

While I never touch anything

stronger than grain alcohol, neat,
you can't tell me that these

modern refrigerators. Which breed

ice cubes at the appalling rate of
maddened guinea pigs turning out
progeny, can hold a highball to the

old-fashioned cracked lake ice
that came but in chunks to rest
in an insulated Icehouse until

thirst demanded a sub-division.

Natural ice even sounds better
than the ersatz version, and it
sure keeps a drink colder than
those fancy hotel pellets With the
holes in them.

Ice cream. You can buy all the

fancy mixes, pop them into the

monster macmnes, ana nave ice
cream in all the colors and flavors.

But the ice, and the salt and the

dasher, with a small boy to turn

it... I love you. General Electric,

but drop in some time for a plate
of peach-cun Jersey cream, and

you may even get to lick the dash
er.

We own a toaster thai has three
speeds rare, medium-well, and
burned, according to the button.
But you take a piece of butter butter-coated
coated butter-coated bread and fry it in a skil skillet,
let, skillet, and them maybe bust ah egg
over it, aad it will compete in

if you are a dedicated type, the
old long-shanked, red headed kit kit-Chen
Chen kit-Chen match is ail by itself as an
incendiary agent. Nor' has there
ever Been a miracle fiber that
embraced the feet with the same
tender loving care of a pair of
hand-knit Scots-wool socks.
They make synthetic rubies,
Dearls. diamonds and saOPhires

that could fooj a pawnbroker, but
thev never fooled the iflttde of a

Woman's emotions, xney are now
making ersatz mihk out synthetic
fibers, which might baffle a maa
at 24 yards but would never deli

neate tne mrect rpuje w

A dame does not have to wear a
mink to feel rich, cherished, and
important. If she's got the real

article in the deep freezer, she's
rich just by knowing she owns it
Mink-type, fur-like fabric is not
going to arouse that love light W

ner oeaay, mm eyes.

You can make anything out of

synthetics these days, including
silence. But the new plastic si silence
lence silence isn't nearly as good as the;
eld-fashioned silence, which was
golden.

sonic

with too

chute was as1 useless

rag.
The cockpit capsule with Apt in
side twisted and tumbled. Pfcsum

ably he blacked out. He was dead

C.I.A. MAN SUED

WINnFAT.T. TWT12T iwvvk

Whan faaAfla WArUa. fm,nl him- ir.,. m' TT WV

;r;; ? B,m swn central

2000 mph.

mc liisi mail lo no raster man r.plliepn ..:- ..

i j cum procuri

DULLIS EQUIVOCATfS

Went Officer, Martin MeHHo

recover $23,919 in hum a

profits. This was MeHUfh'l ttZl

Secretarv nt Stat. nll. .i ",e nlriy OTWi

less than frank wBeh he announc rStoapj' inntn.rSf

fistor e.? ? tockholdW!

poasibly for some 'airtamliadlir jaUy Zt We

z uiuni wuvn u uuiik ATOMIC FLIGHT" The At
my has been ordered to trim Force will flirtn Trait fw
NATO force at least she divi; tomic nlanJ K Wk
lh the text two vears. The on.v L! lL?.n? pr.?,ba.bly ya

streamlmifig" involved is

iy budgetary.

This is part of an over-all, 18 per

cent slash in Arm' strength. Even

'"J However it ,.wn i.-

, . mil 1 1," n cniMaw

i;a. ef uwvc"

Existing atomic riant

more drastic, the Budget Bureau ST "r.' B

has .rriprarf fapilihi. trainma T, "'-v".u "PerBW ABBBBJ

rtservisM cut to he bSe. IFSfr

The Air Force, too, is getting e'. ZltZT U
its. wiogs clipped. The 137 wtflg J m S1

But, for XDri mental

UteAirWwiU tfyornt

Ttm ?me 10 lurB lBe fjrJps in
old standard model oSbe!
probably a B-36.

I Fly LACSA Super Convair 340 I
r r-E to feitivie. . hospitable
Personalised Service
3 round Trips weekly tp
mm e Excellent hot meals x
In Ultra modern spacious Super Cenvair 340
... 2 seats to aisle H
Day light flights . convenient arrival and I
I Wm departure hours
LACSA panoramic routes include: M
WHPI I MIAMI, HAVANA, GRAND CAYMAN,
T CGSTA RICA. PANAMA, MEXICO.
mm Jt"M m Puerto rico. el Salvador
IK M I PASSENGER and CARGO SERVICE 1

BBl BBJilll I IFSSL. -m. BBBBBJ W

LACSA serves the heart
of ib kr- J

goal- deflnitely will be scaled down

w wv-xot, wings.
However, Dulles assured Air
force Gen. Lsuris Norstad, new
NATO commander, in Paris that
only ground strength would be re reduced
duced reduced in Europe. NATO air
strength will be both increased
and modernized. In fact, the NA NATO
TO NATO nations will denend iinon air-

atomic power to defend Europe in

case oi ao viet attack.

Note: Britain, too. wants to sa v.?

money by withdrawinc trnnns

from the European continent. Prob
ablv two British divisions will be

puuea none.

NIWS CAPSULES

LAST FLING: Lame-duck Con

gressman Leroy Johnson :R., Chi. )

has jUst returned from his last

fling at the taxpayers' expense.

He hurried off on a Far Eastern

junirei netore nis free privileges

as a onaressman exnired

rte not only flew oh ait Air

Force plane but demanded the

red-carpet treatment wherever he

wem. ne claimed to be making a
legislative study, though Sit all

tnrough legislating. (P.S.-John

LINEAS AEREA COSTARRICENSE3. 8.A.
PAA AJflliaie
Far further Information consult year Travel Afeflt
or call our Office Tel. 3-7011
Junto Aronemeria between 31st 2nd Sts. IB

Now it

the time

to forget
About
business

and wish you all
the blessings
of CHRISTMAS
and
may the NEW YEAR
be as rich and full
as you have made
1956 for us.

GEO. F. NOVEY, INC

279 Central Ave Tel. 3-e)ttl

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrlvtt
New Orieao. Service Cri,teba,
"LEMPA" D
"MORAZAN" 1. MS
"SANTO CEHEO' MfJ
"TELDE" W
"SIXAOLA" .fa
A STEAMER Jiff. If
Alo tUndlint Refrlgertel nd Chilled Cerge
Arrivee
New York Seryjce Crietebal
"PARISMINA" J
A STEAMER JM- 7, iff
"MARNA" i lf
'JpNIOR' J. U
HEREDIA Jt H
"ESPARTA"
"ERA RERLANGA" Feb-
. 1 3:
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger shies to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle.
'
SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSKNG1R FARES PRQM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
Te New fork an Return S240.ee
Te Lo Angeles end San e'rancisce and
Returning from Los Angeles SZlMt
To Seattle and letoro fM.Q
m m ....-ill iiwi Hi mm. .. i ., . I i Hi i i-P i
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2904



AT, DECEMBER 21,

PANAMA AMERICAN A INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPM

PAGE

JACOtT ON ttPt

4

ByOSWALD JACOBY
Wriitaa for NEA S.rvic.

AWARD Albert Parker, left, marine maintenance foreman
at pier 20, Balboa, accepted a Suggestion Award Certificate
and a check for $275 from Col. Dick A. King, USARCARIB
Transportation Officer, In ceremonies at the latter's office re recently.
cently. recently. Parker received the certificate and cash award for his
suggestion that all propeller shafts for U.S. Army harbor craft
be cut from stock shafting in lieu of requisitioning pre-cut
shafts savings the Government about $13,000 annually.
. (U.S. Army Photo)
Dry Season Trip To Islands
Of Panama Set For January 6

WEST

AQ7
KQJ873
J94

NORTH
414
T41
105
AS7SJ1
BAST

4

J 10 9 5 2
V 1095
4
Q 10

SOUTH (D)
4K63
V AKQJ62
A 6 2
K
North-South vul.
Wt North East
2 Past Pan
Pus Pass Pass

Opening lead K

The first of the dry season
trips offered by the Panama Na National
tional National Tourist Bureau in cooper
ation with the USO-JWB Armed
forces Service Center will take
place on Sunday, Jan. 6.
The one-day combined plane
and launch trip to Panama's
most colorful sights leaves To-
' cumen airport at 7 a.m. and re re-turns
turns re-turns at 5:30 p.m. after visiting
' four or five of the Islands. Time
wil lallow for the purchase of
souvenirs and a swim in the
cleat-as-crystal waters surround surrounding
ing surrounding the .100-odd islands.
The trin is nriced at $20. How-

5 ever, should 32 passengers be
obtained, a rebate of 25 per
: cent, $5, will be made. This
same offer will be made to any
organization or groups that wish
to make the trip at any time.
A canal trip is planned for
I Sunday, Jan. 13. Priced at $5,
.which includes railroad fare, the
launch will traverse the Canal
A ttorn Gatun to Pedro Miguel
with stop-offs at Gamboa and
Hairline Decision:
Editor Curls Issue

In Hairy Fashioning
i MEMBHIS, Teun.f Dec. 2$ (UP)
Editor Rcssell VL,J) rule of
tht Dyenburg (Tenn.) Gazette Is
the author of a new book Weep
' No More For Me," a title he chose
r because he got himself a "hair
nierp

" For three decades Bruce sak
: i u 4kn frtof fnr "nninti

ne nau ueeu uie wj" m i r-
friendly jibes and sparse morsels
of sympathy," all because of hi.i

' Data spot.
iun. ..,Uh hi. "Hnlliumnri tvne

(g .i.un FT LI 1 inn ""-.J r
liairpiece," Bruce says in his book
"When T en around with my head

In the nude it's purely a matter

of choice."
"I can wear it (the hairpiece)
when I want to. I can go without
i it. I can take it or leave it, as
my naural-born hair has done."
And don't call it a toupee or
wig, Bruce says.
"They're old fashioned words."
Rnire tells in his honk what has

to be done to be outfitted with a

hairpiece and its subsequent care,
Ml 1 i : i

, -penoaic ary cleaning, eic.
ft hie hnirnippp Rrnee tsvi

i "Save your sympathy for the bald

ana Daiaing wno are wunoui a

choice. I can make mine. I've sot

840,000 extra hairs at my beck

and call, to use or not to use."
Bruce, at his first nartv wearing

his new hairpijece was told by a
Woman guest: "I hear you wear

a toupee.
Bruce came back: "I hear you
i wear falsies."
Bruce is a native of Gallatin,
Tenn., and is listed in Who's Who
In the South and Southwest. He
fjfces been correspondent for bo'
United Press and Associated
Press.

an on-1 he-scene explanation of
the locks procedure at the Mlra Mlra-flores.
flores. Mlra-flores. For information or reserva reservations,
tions, reservations, servicemen are requested
to dial the USO-JWB, Balboa,
1072. Civilians may obtain the
information by dialing the Na National
tional National Tourist Bureau, Panama
3-3094.
Congress Anti-Talk

Measure Supported

By N. J. Republican

WASHINGTON. Dec. 28 (UP

Senator H. Alexander Smith

(R-NJ) today joined a bi-partisan
drive tn tighten the Senate' snti-

filibuster ride when the new Con Congress
gress Congress convenes next Thursday.

.smith said, however, that he
will suDDOrt a rule Dermitting the

Senate to cut off debate by a vote
of two-thirds of the Senators pres present
ent present and voting. Chief sponsors of
the Drorjosed rule change want tn

choke off filibusters by a simple

majority vote.

Neither proposal stands much of

I a chance of approval. Senate
Demnrrafin TmiIm t d

. A.nul 1JJUWUU JO.
Johnson of Texas already has

come out against the proposal.
The aim of snonsors ic tn Heal

th e wav for nataaee nf eivil rtoht.

legislation.

Smith said in a statement that

he thinks the Senate's present

ann-niiDusier rule, acquiring
sixty-four votes to shut off debate,
"is too rigid to be of any practical
value."

Most of the country's experts

will be in New Orleans for the

national tournament during the
first week in December. Many of
them will remember today's

hand, since some of them stubbed

their toes on it in last year's
tournament.

West ooened the king of dia

monds at practically every table,
and declarer won with the ace.
Each declarer cashed the king of

cubs to get it out of the way and

men returned a low diamond

West's best defense was to take
the iack of diamonds and lead the

queen ot diamonds, tempting de

clarer tq rulf m dummy, when
declarer yielded to this tempta temptation,
tion, temptation, East overruled and
returned a spade. The defense,
thus took a diamond a triimn

and two spades to defeat the con

tract.
The more cautious experts
made their contract by refusing
to ruff the third diamond in dum dummy.
my. dummy. Instead, they discarded one
of the losing spades.
Now it was Dossible tn give n n

one spade and ruff the next spade
in dummy. Declarer could then

aiscard his last spade on the ace

w ciuos, alter which It was safe
to draw trumna and claim th.

rest, ot tne tricks.

LLOYD E. EDWARDS, civilian employe of the photo lab at the
USARCARIB School, Fort Gulick, receives certificate ana a $10
award for suggesting an improved method of making Vu graph
transparency negatives required for instructing purposes at the
USARCARIB School. Col. Gines Perez, USARCARIB School
' Commandant, presents award to Edwards.

Squirrels Nibble,

Face Open Season

CHESTER. HI Dee tt (VP.'

i 0 ficc declared nnen ceaenn nti

squirrels within the city limits

waay atter four residents were

attacked an bitten by squirrel.

Three women and a hnv

,1

live near a cemeterv u H the

squirrels jumped on them and bit
them.

Doctors gave the fnnr anti.

rabies shots and sent the heads

of two squirrels to a state public

neaitn laboratory to determine if
they were rabid.
Police Chief Ren Athmor

-- ..v. ...... bhiu
preliminary tests indicated the
squirrels were not rabid, but he
declared open season on the ani animals
mals animals and in.stniet.ed hlintar. tn

turn over to police any that they

SI1UUI.

"As a practical matter this rule
virtually prevents anv considera

tion Or Vote on President Vie

bower's civil rights recommenda

tions aurmg tne 85th Congress,"
he said. "The present rule also
might prevent anv action n ntho

matters including national emer

gencies.
Smith said he flnae Tint FA.n

- "wo uuu Aft rur
shutting off debate by a simple
majority, however, because there
must be sufficient discussion "for
the people of the countrv tn hv.

an opportunity to know all' the
pros and cons of any pendin,
issue."

He also said the Kenatn ehn.,1.4

vunvb ."I It 1 11
adopt new rules at the start of
each new Congress just as the
House does.

Didn't Do It?
DUBLIN. Dec M .nro m..

outlawed Irish Republican Army
denied todav it WAS rdannneikA

for the bombing nf nkiin uLu

75 menional to Irishmen who

uieo anting m the British army.
The Christmas Dav ernn.jn

blew a two-foot gash in the base

ui ine w-ioot cenotaph in' the

unusn region Memorial Park.

4
4

ML

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Sit YOU TRAVEL AGENT
KIM orol DwMfi Alrllnat
21A-H Tivoli Av,n.. fonomo
tl. 2-1(22, 2-3372, 2-23

Wind Hurt Farmers

During '56, But...
Relief b a Coming

WASHTNfiTnv rt. tti,

"mgea nearly 2 million
acres in the Midweet "t...i k.m

as of Dec. 1 and another 29 million
acres was in danger of wind ero-

aion, ine Agriculture Department

am wuay.

About one-third nf th. A...

occurred m Kansas, the nation's
top wheat nroducinsr tat. ik.,,i

oennnn . r """Ul

u,wu acres w wneat have been

nun, witn about 80 per cent of

ine aamace renor ert n e.n...

j . , "fliinas

ami l oioraoo.
In annthfir rm-m

aecretarv of AgHeuitnr 17... t

nenson extenaeo through Jan. 31

permission ior farmers to craze

iiybsiock on son oank reserve land
in 678 COlintie in 11 atata. Tk.

- 1 lie

aUtnOrilV har: heen enheAUA (

- .vnvuuinj

expire uec. 31.

The extension wilt alfntv tnr

- ""v. T A V.. J
re-examination of the neeH w m

ergency grazing of soil bank lands

ay me governors of the affected
states and of the department.

I"'
The department said that ahnut

85 per cent of the 29 million acres
of land in condition tn suffer uu

- .. "1IIU
damage is in the southern Great

riams states or Colorado, Kansas,
New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Tex

as.

It said the acreage facing nnl.

ble dsmaee is larger than at anv

time in the past two years.
Drought and moisture conditions
were said to be thr wont on
record.

Swedish Cops Nab

Russian-Born For

Spying For Soviet
GOTHENBURG, Sweden, Dec'. 28
(UP) Swedish police have ar arrested
rested arrested a 60-vear-olri SnuUt k

: uvi 11

engineer and charged him with
spying for Russia, it was announc-

cu louay.
The man what, nam a

released, has heen in Su,.

Z? 7 lg ln WKnenDurg
nlpyard as an engineer. Police
said he was suspected of relaying
information on raHan inat.u.H.-.

to the Soviet government.
He was arrested after detectives
kept a close watch on his apart apartment
ment apartment for several days.

Scientists Claim
To Have Found
Hissing Link
WASHINGTON Dec M VP

Scientists claimed today to have

found the missing unx Between
modern man and his apelike ancestors.

The creature was identified in

the Smithsonian lnsttuton s an
nual renort as AuscraloDthecus

He lived in South Africa abeut a

million years ago.

Dr. Raymond A. Dart of t h e

university 01 wuwatersrana in
Johannesburg wrote the reoort.

He said AustraloDithecus aiong

with the previously known Java

ana ieanaertnai men completes

the chain of man s development.
Skeletal remains of Australo

pithecus were found in South A

frica about 10 years ago. Since

men. more tnan 100 snecimens

have been unearthed

"The apparent gap between liv

ing apes and living sapient men

has been comrjle.tetv hririgeri

by overlapping Australopithecine,

riinecantnropine (Java man) and
Neanderthaline phases of human

development, he said.
Dart, a principal worker in the
studv of Australooitchecines sairi

Australopithecus had an "almost

ni'.man Dony ana Dram.
He said the South African crea creature
ture creature walked erectlv and imnro.

vised tools and weapons that he
used with his hands.

However. Dart said Auatrsln.

pithecus probably didn't talk in
the human sense.

EE

MT7U evrcM Mi

WOliO-S Sr AIRLINE

Of the 29 million acres in con

dition to blow, nearly 25 million

are in tne southern Great Plains.
About 84 per cent of the total is
crop land, r ore than 21 million in
the southern Great Plains and 3.2

million in the northern Great

Plains.
Red China Lashes
Out At Josip Tito
On Salin's Views
TOKYO. Dec. 28 itJPi Hen

China lashed out today at Mar-

snai josip 1 Ho and other Yugos
lav communist leaders for their

views on Joseph Stalin and his mistakes.

The attitude of Titn anil hie

sociates towards "Stalin's mis

takes and other related questions.
. . cannot be regarded by us as
well balanced or objective the nf.

ficiaf PeioHiar Peonle's Hailv atM

in a lengthy article broadcast in

summary lorm ny the New China
News Agency.
The PeoDle's Datlv alan rttli.

ed Yugoslav vice President Ed Ed-yard
yard Ed-yard Kardelj for his statement on
the Hungarian uprising that "a
thorough change is necessary in
the (Hungarian) political system."
"The Hungarian comrades," it
said, "are entirely right in reject rejecting
ing rejecting Kardeli's nronnaals" heeanaai

"otherwise Hungary's frrttire would
belong not to Socialism hut. tn

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MAIN STORE
No. 22-08 Central Ave.

BRANCH STORE
No. 18-60 Tivoli Ave.

Phone 2-2126

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ill

counter-revolution." 1
T



FHIDAT, D BO EMBER
Social and Otherwise f34'
SSh. M A ev-m
anama
.ww a ssb
or
By Staff
Box 5031,
neon

TPE PANAMA AMEBICA5 AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

Iren's obedience without
.or it.

if (( L J Lf uLfimm Pm 2-0740 (r 2-0741 Llmm 9:00 J 10 m. mf

Hr jAltoSm Mm flHH
HlB Ht I m
'-'UBI I c,HMpr

DR. AND MRS. KENNE S. JOHNSON shown cutting the cake
at the reception, which followed their wedding last Saturday.
Mrs. Johnson is the former Miss Ligia Isabel Martinez, daugh daughter
ter daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jose B. Martinez of Panama City. Dr.
j Johnson is a captain in the U.S. Air Force at Albrook.

REAR ADMIRAL AND MRS. ATKESON
ENTERTAIN DISTINGUISHED GROUP
Rear Admiral and Mrs. C. L. C. Atkeson entertained a
distinguished group at a dinner party held at their quarters
at Ft. Amador last night.
The guests included Lt General and Mrs. William K.
Harrison, U.S. Ambassador and Mrs. Julian Fiske Harrington
and the Rt. Rev. Reginald Heber Gooden S. T. D. and Mrs.
Gooden.

Henriquex-Francey
Engagement Announced
Mr. and Mrs. Herman J. Henri Henri-quez
quez Henri-quez of Colon announce the engage engagement
ment engagement of their daughter Judith to
Mr. Donald N. Francey, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Perry Francey of Brazos
Heights. Miss Henriquez, who is
presently visiting on the Isthmus
for the holidays, will return Jan.
to complete her second year at
Finch College in New York City.
Mr. Francey attended Southern
Methodist University and is pres

ently employed with C. B. Fenton
and Company in Cristobal.

Johnson-Martinez
Wedding
Miss Ligia Isabel M,a r, t i n e z,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jose B.

Martinez of Panama City became

the bride of Capt. Kenne S. John

son Jr. medical officer, of the

5T0Oth USAF Dispensary, Afbrook

Air Force Base, at the Cristo Rey

Church, last Saturday morning.

The young couple left for Miami

Fla. where they will spend about

30 days. Upon their return, they

will reside in quarters at Albrook.

Femenias-McTaeeart

Engagement Announced
U on1 Mrc TlttfaoJ Fampniac

1,11 U1IU lUl.-i v.... u
of Panama City, announce the en

gagement of their daughter rucia,
to Sp2 John M. McTaggart, who Is
presently stationed at Fort Clay Clayton,
ton, Clayton, CZ.

Since graduating from Balboa

High School in 1955 Miss Feme Feme-nias
nias Feme-nias has been employed at Point
Four. Mr. McTaggart who works
at the hospital at Fort Clayton, is
known locally as an active mem

ber of the Theatre liuua.

Pittsburgh Man
Returns For Visit
With Hirt Family
Mr. G. Roy Keitzer of Pitts

burgh, who spent some time on
the Isthmus last year, has arriv arrived
ed arrived for a holiday visit with his cou cousins.
sins. cousins. Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Hirt

of Diablo.

Mr. Keitzer expects to get in
some fishing and waterskiing over

the holidays.

On Jan. 4 he will leave for Ma

drid and Lisbon, via Caracas.

Wagners' Open House
Slated For Sunday
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wagner
will hold Open House Sunday eve

ning, not Monday as reported In
this column yesterday. The party

will he given In honor of their
daughter Miss Louise Wagner and
their houseguest Edwin Prien.

jfp!!! Eh
BhLiv. ei m I mm mmf i fl S&ifcJi

LOOKING UNDER THE TREE Robert Roth, Nancy Mitchell and Richard Pennington look
at gifts beneath a tree of modern design made by members of Room No. 5 at Oatun School
at their Christmas party last week. j,

Lt. Gov. And Mrs. Schull
Entertain For Sen
Lt. Gov. and Mrs. H. W. Schull
gave a buffet supper last night for
a group of young people in honor
of their son Walter's birthday.

Walter, who Is here for the holi

days, will return to Columbia Uni University,
versity, University, where he is engaged in
graduate work in geology and geo geophysics,
physics, geophysics, Jan. 6.
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 5)

US Officials Join
French In Wilson
Plaque Dedication
PARIS. Dec. 28-(UP) High

American and French officials
dedicated a plaque here today
commemorating the hundredth
anniversary of Woodrow Wilson's
birth.

The nlaoue dedication took

place In' front of the Hotel Cril Cril-lon
lon Cril-lon on the Place de la Concorde.

In 1919 President Wilson drew up
the League of Nations conven conven-anfc
anfc conven-anfc with fellow delegates to the
Versailles peace conference in
the Hotel crlllon.
Speaking today were U.S. Am Ambassador
bassador Ambassador to France Douglas Dil Dillon,
lon, Dillon, French Secretary of State
for foreign affairs Maurice
Faure; and former French Pre Premier
mier Premier Joseph Paul-Boncour.
Dillon read the following mes message
sage message from President Eisenhow Eisenhower:
er: Eisenhower: "The 100th anniversary of the
birth of Wdodrow Wilson Is one
of many occasions on which the
citizens of America Join the citi citizens
zens citizens of France on a mutual alle allegiance
giance allegiance to the ideals of great
alert."

SPARERIBS AMD PORK HOCKS
ARE ECONOMY FAVORITES

By GAYNOR MADOOX,
NEA Food and Markets Editor
Snart-rihs and sauerkraut anil

flavorful pork hocks are everyday

y favorites. Both of these
are thrifty meat buys.

' mmmmmmmmmmmmmKKUMKBKt&Bmnma. .
flRfflrafleMKVe&W 1 1 I
mm HflflflflflflflflflflflfllflflflflflflflK
' IflJ HHHHHH!hHHH9HhP
HW ytsHHi
Bjj (T 1 1 flP "iff IBM II 1
mm mm PrHfBNIr I 1l
flfl & ' lifcxi m W
wmGr 4"4ir "Vwl IHI id mMJ tflflflflflflfj Wliflis
JflJflflflJvVHfljsa HH sssssssMsssssstHteisassoM

A

mencans

m

enu

'amilv

cuts

Spareribs (the breast and- rib

bones) have very tender, juicy
lean meat between them. Pork
hocks are cut from the lower part

of the foreleg, containing nuggets

of lean meat. When buying these

bony cuts, allow 2-3 to pound

for oach person.

Spareribs and Sauerkraut
Yield: 4 servings)
Three pounds spareribs, 1 tea

spoon salt, 1 uart sauerkraut, Vi
teaspoon caraway seed.

Cut spareribs into serving-size

pieces and place in large sauce saucepan.
pan. saucepan. Add hot water to cover and

simmer, covered, until meat is

nea.ly tender, about 1 hour. Pour

on most oi the water, ado sauer

kraut and caraway seed, and cook

snowier naif nomv
Pork in a Nest
(Yield: 4 servings)

Four pork hocks, 1 tablespoon
salt, 1 bay leaf, 1 cup celery
leaves coarsely cut, 1 medium

head cabbage.

Wash pork hocks; cover with

water. Add salt, bay leaf and

iclery tops; heat to boiling. Sim
r.er IVi to 2 hours or until tender.

Cut cabbage in 8 wedges; add to
pork. Cook 10 to 15 minutes, or

emu caDDage is tender. To serve;

piace pork hocks in center

platter and circle with cabbaj1
wedges.

Former Congressman
F. Davenport Dies
WASHINGTON, Dec. 28 (UP) -Former
Rep: Frederick M. Daven Davenport
port Davenport (R-N.Y.) died last night at
his home. He was 90.
Davenport, a former professor

Y MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE
IN child-caring places like board boarding
ing boarding school, summer camps, or orphanages
phanages orphanages and reformatories, aihn.
take rules very seriously.
When they want to make one,
they hold meetings to talk about
it until everyone has compared us
advantages with its disadvantage.1;.
If they finally pass it, they ex explain
plain explain it to the children and then
begin the real job of checking obe obedience
dience obedience to it.
But in homes, wt parents take
rules much less seriously. So what
happens is this
Nine-year old Ruth, who's sup supposed
posed supposed io make her bed every

Lmorning, departs for school leav

ing it in a very untidy state. When
she gets home, we say, "Just wait
before you mix that ehocplate milk
uni.il you've gone upstairs and

made your bed properly.

u we arc nui icnuy 10

.iuth s bedmaking every

nah.K nei uvu uui aci v ca uc

.0 her, You seem too rdilH

make your bed properly on schoo
mornings, so I'll make it Jar Mj
But on Saturday and Sundays, I'J
expect you to do a terrific job."

SOME THINGS PARENTS CAM
LEARN FROM TEEN-AGERS

These are some of the thine

you learn from having a housa

tnat is a neighborhood hangout for
teen-agers:
That it is the shv boy who iifea

the most talkative, vivacious firls.

BUT two dK are too'?

busy ironing to note that Buth has m wno we6
repeated her carelessness. As we
don't tell her to correct it, she' That any mother Who wants hef
trkes oyr silence as, consjitani daughter to be popular with boyj
the following morning, leaves her canT make a eeter inveatnieitt
bed exactly as she got Out of it. than a ping-pong table. Boys have
The spectacle fills us with bicter- a way of congregating where they
ness. We think of how much we have something more to do with
do for Rdth compared with how their feet and hands than sit uj a
little she does for hs. By tjie time hviqg room,
she gets home, we're so resenifU That teen-agers are easily han han-Uiat
Uiat han-Uiat we not onlje doek her allow- died if a mother has a few house
ance but revoke permission to rules and makes them Stick. Fur Fur-have
have Fur-have her friend Grace to dinner, hermore, she is respected for no!
Infuriated by what she regards being "too easy."
as our "unfairness, Ruth becomes That what every teen-ager
a behavior problem for the next seems to want most, next to a car,
three days. iis a telephone in his own 'room,
'Teen age telephone conversations
Unless we are prepared to su I are very private affairs
pervise a child's obedience to a
rule, we shouldn'l make it. An Inside Look At "Going Steady"
THIS knowledge is what trainei
chijd-caring people have got thj! That girls in high school like t
we haven't got. Through hard ex "gp steady." It's not because thef
perience they have learned thevhink any certain boy is really tha
simply can't afford the hostility one and only but merely social
and chaos that result from mak- security,
ing inconsistent demands on chi1-! That "going steady'' isa't any
dren and just don't make rules Ut,- thing for parents to get alarmist
less they are prepared to make about beeause a girl "Will usually
them stick. i"go steady" with anywhere front
But we in our innocence think four to six boys in the course Of
that wanting Ruth's bed made is one school year,
having it made. Like the small boy, That the slang that is driviaf
who says he's killed a lion because you erazy today won't be gettin
he wishes he had, we want chil-on your nerves next montS,
i There'll be new words for every
at Hamilton College, represented tnin6 y en en-New
New en-New York state's 33rd coneression-1 That if you think today's Uen
al district from 1925 to 1933. 'oprs rion't have strnna chSrar.

He was a former president of the'ters iust notice how the bov tat

National Institute of Public Af- girl who is havinc skin trouble

fairs and former chairman of the turns down soft drinks, sweets a$
Federal Personnel Council. chocolate and how frank the u
He unsuccessfully ran for Gov- dividual is about the reasoa Jar
enroi of New York on the Progres- the self-restraint,
sive ticket In 1&I4. 1 Beit there is one thing you'll

Davenport was a native of Sa- never know what a group of teen

lem. Mass. He was graduated

frort Wesleyan University in 1889
He received i doctorate from Co Columbia
lumbia Columbia University.

11

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agers were talking about before

an adult walked into U room.
That's a world in adult can never
enter.

You know it's tbe

Ik km Hmh
II 9 mn X E!ki9 mwmrW
Hi H BjTi'TM Hi! I H
u fH e1 Ef e1 lim
Hl I I H fl II 1

when you give-or get-

-jTERLINClJt
'ih
ami. twiicttr ft itx kMt. I r;'S!4 poAwrnj
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mm i HP mmt I via-. -. j
f STOIH 161 CENTRAi AVfNUi, PANAMA



IT. DECEMBER lMf

Soclai and Otktrwlse (Iron Curtain Ambassadors will Attend

President Eisenhower's Inaugural Ball

It Pmimi'i Sunday

Wttt rts

m.Um.t
TM 1

El Panama's Sunday night Buf

fet Wfl known to Isthmians will
be inaugurated this weekend. In

to popular demand, ana

war ft win be resumed in the

downstairs North Patio, where pa

trons may dance under the atari
n the mmic of Clarence Martin's

Orchestra. Lucbo Axcarraga wBl
nbr the organ in his inimitable

fashion during the dance interims-

ions.

The beautiful disolav of fine

foods, and decorations of El Pane..

ma s jBuaet are now lnwnwuunw
ly known, since the Buffet has
been ft dry season feature of the

betel for six years.
New Year' Ive

Party M Amador

Officers' Open Mess
A limited number of tickets at
15 per person will be available at

I the door of the Ft. Amador on

eers' Open Mess on new xear
EDinner starts at 1 p.m. end tie
musk will continue from t o'clock
until well into 1957.

Mr. And Mrs. Davis

I Birth Of San

Mr. and Mrs. jamea l. uv

Ivwmit Mirhiean. announce tne

I birth of their second child, James

IWilloughby Davis, Dec. 23. Mrs.
Davis is the former Ardia WIT WIT-loughby
loughby WIT-loughby of Gatun, Canal Zone.

I Miss Judith Phelps
Marries In States V

Mr. and Mss. ueorge u. run

l.fmsr resiripnts of liamDOa, lB-

nal Zone, announce the marriage,

8, of tneir aaugnwr, iuui,

Mt. nnhtrt Brown, son oi mi.

land Mrs. George Brown of Pride,

siana.

The young newlyweds are now

iding m Baton itouge, iiu-

New Year's ve

see At Hotel

II Panama

Hotel El Panama s gayest w-

of the year wm do rae n

rear s JSve uance muuuy ms"

the patio when uarence( mar-

ft'S ana Uicno Azcarr y--
hestras will alternate for dancing

wn 9 p.m.

The management has receivea

especially beautiful favor, a
eoliemakers from the United

es to give to iw merryniKia.

New Year's Eve under the stars

pleasant innovation w mow

are accustomed to aiaiesmc
IT

or ceieoraiions.

Tickets for the New Year's Eve

are on sue ai u

.v. h hntp.i A soecial dinner

available for those who desire

Regular dinner P.-"

em wm one in c ----
Zr. George Gbdoy's Club

t:30 Trio will play for dancing.

exhibit of

K. Morris exhibit
. W .

rm avp v reramics

t! V--V ----- .

1 E. K. Morns, wmcn na u..
display at the USO-JWB Am Am-'
' Am-' Forces Service Center, and tea tea-mr.A
mr.A tea-mr.A Aina mnst. of the month ot

Jecember, will terminate on Satur-

v,hich is on display

.

i the Art Gallery, presenw

dash of fall ana wmier ctu
which lie the beauty and suc

cess oi u .

A cordial invitation is

to view me bjuuu",

be seen daily from a
p.m.

everyone

lich can

to 10

Irs. Maynard

lies Suddenly

In Vista Alegre

Mrs. Desmond Louise Maynard,

Barbadian resident or vista
Mare, died suddenly at home at

:this morning. She was 62 years

id.
Cause of death was hot re

pealed.

A member of St. Paul's Church
ad St. Peter's Society, Mrs.
iaynard is survived by her hus-

Edward w. Maynard.

New Year Dance

The Night-Before-the-Night Be Before
fore Before New Year's orchestra Dance
will be held on Sunday, beginning
at 8 p.m. at the USO-JWB Armed

Forces Service Center.

as with athletes who need aj

warm-up penoa so as io umoer
up their tense muscles, so the
Night-Before-the-Night Before
New Year's Dance is planned to

help New Year's Eve enthusiasts

prepare and pace themselves for

the following evening when "Out

with the Old, in with the New" oc
curs.
Sponsors for the speecial month'
ly Orchestra Dance will be Mr,

and Mrs. William Horn a of Gam-

boa, C. Z., Cant, and Mrs. Louis

Zislis of Fort Kobbe, C. Z., Dr.
and Mrs. Daniel Hirshl of Ancon,
C. Z. and Mr. and Mrs. Saul Wyn Wyn-shaw
shaw Wyn-shaw of Cocoli, C. Z.

Servicemen and their dependents

are warmly and cordially weicom

ed to participate in the festivities

which preceed by one day only
that Annual Big Blow Out.
Balboa Woman's Club
Card Group

The Card Group of the Balboa

Woman's Club enjoyed a delight

ful and relaxing afternoon of cards

and refreshments on Tnurday aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon in the Art Room of the Ti

voli Guest House. Co-hostesses for

this enjoyable affair were Mrs.

Phil Euper and Mrs. Janda Pen

nington. The following guests and

members attended:

The Mesdames Maria Days, Dor

othy Allen, Maude Cllnchard, Ruth
Jenkins. Ruth' Kongable, Mollie

Johnson. Carrie Brown, Kay Dan

iels, Maja Nordeng, Florence Klip-

per, Ruth gourgeios, Mary nup nup-nel.
nel. nup-nel. Blanche Schilling, Louise

Merchant. Peggy Parker, Jacoba

Joustra. Helen Adler, Emily Bol

ton. Juanda Pennington, and Phil

Euner.

The next meeting is scheduled

for Jan. 10. This will be a no

host luncheon at El Panama Ho

tel.
Sport Shirt Dance
Planned For New
Year's Eve
Lt. Garvyn H. Moumblow Mem
orial Post 3876 Veterans of For

eign Wars will have a sports shirt
dance New Year's Eve at the Post

home in Cristobal.

Dancing will be from 9:30 p.m.

untif morning. Admission will be

$.00 per person. Reservations may

be made by caning unsioDai

1590.

Ontario Train Jumps
Track, Claiming Two

MONTREAL. Dec. W (UP) 1

Seven cars of a nine-car train car carrying
rying carrying Air Force personnel to new
bases in Ontario jumped the tracks
near here in a snowstorm last

night, killing two persons and in

juring IS.
A witness said "it was a mi miracle
racle miracle no others were killed"
when the train "literally leaped
off the rails" and tore up seme
400 feet of tree at Brosseau
station, 10 mile south of here.

Canadian national railways offi officials
cials officials identified the dead as train

engineer Sam Ruttenberg of Cote

St. Luc and fireman Paul Lafon

taine of Verdun, both in the Mon

treal area.

The more seriously injured were

taken to the Air Force hospital at

St. Johns, Que., the base from

which some 170 airmen and air

women were being transferred,

and to the Montreal General Hso
pital.

Railway porter B. G. Green, 35,

of MacKayville, Que., was slight
ly injured.

Porter T. R. Marshall said he
believed the all-pullman train went
through an open switch. He said
the derailment "came pretty quick,

with no warning at all."
Airman William Gilchrist of Par

is, Ont., was with 20 others in one

of the battered coaches which

stayed upright after they went off
the tracks. He said "lots of us

are lucky to be alive."

(ML" Will Broadcast New Year's

Day Message Of Henry B. Sargent

(PA-C) International Radio

tion WRUL has invitee

ry B. Sargent, president ol

wan it Foreign power

apany Inc., to deliver a New

renr's Day greeting on its

arican Business Bulletin

m. Mr. Sargent will briefly

ress his views as to what

He year 1957 holds regarding

economic growth in Latin
America.
This program will be broad broadcast
cast broadcast at 6:15 p.m. (EST) on
January 1st on the following
short-wave channels.
19 METER BAND 15230 Kc
end 15390 Kc.
16 METER BAND 17710 KC.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 1st j
"THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH" I

Specialized

TO BIST FIT YOUR

CHILD'S NEEDS SUflSfPfl

Bach tablet contains 1 M grains of pure
aspirin the preferred standard of accu accurate
rate accurate dosage measure. Children like its

r flavor. Accept no substitute
get St. Jo h Aspirin For Children.

WASHINGTON, Dec. O-(UP)
Ambassadors and ministers
from Iron Curtain countries
including those from Russia and
Hungary have been Invited to
be "honored guests" at President
Eisenhower's inaugural Ball next
month.
The Communist diplomats last
week received invitations to the

Jan. 21 fancy dress affair de despite
spite despite two facts which will make
their attendance somewhat iro

nic:
-fSome of the money received
from inaugural Ball ticket, sales
will be donated to Hungarian
relief.
The name of the Presiden Presidential
tial Presidential reviewing stand for the
Inaugural Parade preceding
the Ball has been changed
from "Court of Honor" to
"Court of the Spirit of Free Free-dom"
dom" Free-dom" as a tribute to the Polish
and Hungarian uprisings a a-gatnst
gatnst a-gatnst Moscow.
Inaugural Ball committee and

State Department spokesmen

emphasize that tradition and
protocol are responsible for the
"honored guest" status for Rus Russian
sian Russian Ambassador Georgl Za Za-roubln
roubln Za-roubln and satellite diplomats.
Ever since the first inaugural
Ball in 1809, when Britain and
France were the only countries
with representatives here, for foreign
eign foreign dignitaries have been in invited
vited invited as special guests to honor
the new Chief Executive.
The tradition still holds even
when it means inviting today's
75 ambassadors and seven min ministers.
isters. ministers. And in the words of
State Department Protocol
Chief John F. Simmons, who
advised Inaugural Ball chair-
man Carl L. Shipley on the
diplomatic invitations, the In Inclusion
clusion Inclusion of the Iron Curtain
countries must be "automatic"
that is, you don't invite
some and not others.
Shipley had no problem on
the rest of his "honored guest"
list. They are, besides the Presi President
dent President and Vice President, the en entire
tire entire Supreme Court; ex-President
Hoover; the entire cabinet;
District of Columbia commis commissioners;
sioners; commissioners; the joint congressional
committee on the Inagural; OOP
Chairman Leonard W. Hall; As Assistant
sistant Assistant OOP Chairman Miss Ber Bertha
tha Bertha Adkins and OOP Finance
Chairman J. Clifford Folger.
A Soviet Embassy spokesman
saM that "as far as I know"
Zaroubin plans to attend the
Ball just as he did in 1953.
Other Iron Curtain social sec secretaries
retaries secretaries who could be reached
indicated the same about their
bosses.
It was on President Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's request that the Inau Inaugural
gural Inaugural committee "enthusiasti "enthusiastically"
cally" "enthusiastically" agreed to contribute to
Hungarian Relief $100 from the
sale of each $500 Inaugural. Ball
box If the three-day inaugural
program operates in the black as
expected, in 1953, there was
some $121,000 left over after ex expenses,
penses, expenses, most of it donated to
charity and the rest saved for a
start on this year's program.
The iron Curtain diplomats
won't be contributing financial
aid to the Hungarian freedom
fighters since "honored guests"
will be the only ones at the four
ball sites attending free of
charge. All others will have to
pay from $15 per person up to
$500 for a box if they want and
can get one.
Drunken Deputy
Fired In Latvia

MOSCOW (UP)-Latvian voters
have fired one of their deputies in

the Latvian Supreme Soviet bt bt-cause
cause bt-cause he drank too much, the
Communist party organ Pravda

disclosed todty.
The newspaper said the deprj
for the Dundovsky mountain dis district,
trict, district, G. K. Podkaln, had been dis

missed because -"he was drunken

and did not carry out the instruc

tions of his electors."

"He did not justify the high con confidence
fidence confidence placed in him," the news

paper added.
The decision was approved by

the Latvian Supreme Soviet. A

new deputy was appointed after a
re-election, Pravda said.

& sbBIH

RETIRED HERO With the
U.S. Army disbanding its famed
carrier pigeon corps, some 1,000
of the birds, all stationed at Ft.
Monmouth, N.J., will be. sold to
the public. Eighteen war he heroes
roes heroes among the feathered mes messengers
sengers messengers will be placed in public
soos. Typical of these is Char Charlie,
lie, Charlie, shown above wearing the
Purple Heart he was awarded
for injuries receiu i in October,
1944, Khile flying a mission
over the-Metz area of France
during World War 11.

THE LOLLIPOP TREE Mrs. John L Sugar hands yim..
to Harriett Hewitt and Mike Klovky ,t SRSSftSSS
party for Grades 5 and 8, Gatun School. Mrs SugwtoW h"
story "The Lollipop Tree" to the chlldVeTT

Ex-Luftwaffe Sgt.
Returns To US
Where He was POW
NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UP)
A former sergeant in Hitler's
Luftwaffe returned to the United

i au iiiiuuginiK, iu me
country be learned to love as a
prisdher of war during three
years in the Southwest.

Leo Wodarz, 40, was a member
of the Nazi air force unit attrhH

to Gen. Erwin Rommel's armv In

North Africa. He was captured by
Free French forces in the sum summer
mer summer of 1943. He sneni th. iwvf

three years in prison camns in

this country.
"Everywhere I, went, I saw
what wonderful people you Amer Americans
icans Americans were," Wodarx said, "they
were kind and generous even to
us prisoners. I made up my mind
that if I ever got a chance to re re-urn
urn re-urn here, I would do so and be become
come become an American citizen."
It took Wodarz 10 years to real realize
ize realize his goal. Returned to East
Germany in 1948, he was unable
to reach the western zone until
two years ago. Immediately, he
applied for entry to the United
States as a displaced person.
Wodarz, his wife and two chil children
dren children were among 1,137 displaced

persons arriving aboard the trans transport
port transport General Taylor today.
The family will go to Indianapo Indianapolis,
lis, Indianapolis, Ind., where Wodarz will work

on a farm operated hv th mn

wno sponsored his admission to

wus country, ram E. Hoffman.

'mama iin
Sailings

The Panama is scheduled to

sail today from New York on her
last run under the Panama Line
flM- ...

Tne snip, one oi we inree m

the Panama Line service, has
been offered for sale or charter.

Bids were opened last week in

the office of the Maritime Com

mission in Washington ana are
presently under consideration.
The highest bid was made by
the American president Line
which plans to use the vessel in
its trans-Pacific service.
On her last southbound trip
the Panama Line will omit the
stop in Haiti. She will sail from
Cristobal for New York Jan. 5.
Aboard the Panama on her
last trip are 89 passengers, a a-mong
mong a-mong them Lt. Gen. Robert M.
Montague who will succeed Lt.
Gen. William H. Harrison as the
new commander of the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean command. He is accompa accompanied
nied accompanied by Mrs. Montague.

The complete

for the Panama's
trip follows:

sneer list

southbound

Miss Frances Altman; Mr. and

Mrs. William N. Black; Mr. and

Mrs. Robert N. Bowen and two
children; Mr. and Mrs. Ernest
Caswell; Mr. and Mrs. Frank D.
Harris; Mr. and Mrs. Hubert
Hart: Mrs. Paul Harvey and
daughter; the Rev. Thomas V.
Hill; Miss Jane Hobin; and Miss
Barbara Hobin.
Rev. Joseph F. Keefe; Rev.
Francis X. Keyes; Mr. and Mrs.
8. Theodore Lande; Miss Ana
Levine; Miss Gertrude Levlne;
Mr. and Mrs. David Marder; Mr.
an dMrs. cyril H. Meyers; Lt.
Oen. and Mrs. Robert M. Mon Montague;
tague; Montague; Harry E. Moon; Mr. and
Mrs. Hans Nathan;
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Peterson and
2 children; Granville Quaken Quaken-bush;
bush; Quaken-bush; E. Rex; P. Rex; Miss Lor Lorraine
raine Lorraine Roach; Mr. and Mrs.
Charles F. Robblns; Rev. Vin Vincent
cent Vincent J. Ryan; Mr. and Mrs. Wal Walter
ter Walter H. Schwelkhardt; Mr. and
Mrs. Frank A. Sullivan; Mr. and
Mrs. A. B. Walbrldge; Miss Ethel
Watson; and Mr. and Mrs. c. H.
Wilhelm.

QUALITY

, SERVICE

II

SELLS
,n-s iX'i v ; 'V,'
PENETROL
to prevent oxide

Once again! our
SUNDAY EVENING BUFFET

beginning THIS SUNDAY

NEW YEAR S from 7 :30 p.m. PATIO

m on bbsssj m w w wmm sw

EVE PARTY!

X

an

JUSTLY FAMOUS
for
FOOD MUSIC
ATMOSPHERE
at the

low price of
$3.50 person

1

,er- ST

enjoy yourself
it's cheaper
than yon I'-
at

P" at ffn t-

' r fill WUtMIMJtJT CM

Kirkeby huiti

GENTLEMEN:

YOUR j

m

Dress up to
the Season
in a Suit
that DOES
Things for
You.

EL

w

Step into the social whirl with the ease and con
fidence that comes from knowing you look your
best. Choose here the suit that will serve-you hand
somely during the holiday season and long
after. Wide choice of fabrics and patterns.
Remember our BUDGET PLAN
Immediate Delivery
No Co-Signer
No Interest
No Down Payment
20 Small Weekly Payments from 1.50

Just say: "CHARGE IT"

No. 25 Central Ave. Plain 5 de Mayo
El Panama Hotel Panama
Across Railroad Station Colon



PAGE sn

mt PANAMA AMERICAN AJf INDOTfWRT DAUT NEWSPAFfB
FRIDAY. DECEMBER
Jeanne (rain Denies
Plans To Harry
Millionaire Rhoads
Tucker Torpedo Inventor,
Broke Now Dies of Cancer
lout

Bffli S
Hfl mtsowtY fH

FOR A WORTHY CAUSE Rin Tin Tin, famous dog actor,
does his bit- for the campaign of the Muscular Dystrophy
Associations of America by posing, with Bobby Wilkinson, 12,
of Chicago. Bobby is this year's Muscular Dystrophy Child.
The drive collects funds to aid more than 200,000 victims of the
dread disease.

JIX MOVIES TV RAOO M
fl by Erskine Johnson JJ

f

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) The Year
i in Review: Grace Kelly, the girl
' who- SAVED i;he bank at Moiiie
-Carlo ; . Elvis the Peivis ... major-studio
old movies on television
.long, long movies in theaters.
Legion of Decency bans on "The
Man With the Golden Arm" and
"Baby Doll" ... the strange post posthumous
humous posthumous fame of Jimmy Dean ...
that was Hollywood, i95B, Mrs.
Jones

A onetime Memphis truck driv driver,
er, driver, Elvis Presley, zoomec! to fame
s the teen-egers deiight. He sold
eight million records n 11 months,
s'jrred in e movie, started a side
burn-raising erase and lifted adult
yebrows, end voices, over the de decency
cency decency of his rock 'n' roll antics.
Despite her plea that marriage
is a private affair, Grace Kelly's
marriage in Monaco was about
as private as a "Hello" on "Per "Per-j
j "Per-j son to Person." . Every studio
except Paramount and Universal Universal-International
International Universal-International sold or leased its old
pre-1948 movies to TV. MGM's
profit soared to 2 million dollars.
Theater owners screamed but con continued
tinued continued to do good business with
Hollywood's super-spectaculars.
THI LONG, long movies of
from three to almost four hours
inspired this conversation:
Husband: "Let's go to the mo movies."
vies." movies." Wife: "Fine, I'll pack."
Ingrid Bergman returned to the

screen in "Anastasia," her first

U.S. movie since she starred in a

personal affair titled, "It Happen

ed on stromboli." ... Esther WU
lianas decided "I'll DRY Tomor
row," and played a straight dra
vatic role minus bathing suit ..

JNoet uowara confessed, 'l sine

but I have the world's greatest as

set for a singer I have no voice.
Marilyn Monroe went on a dra

mafic binge which included a trip
to England io costar with Sir Laur Laurence
ence Laurence Olivier in "The Sleeping
Prince." ... And England's Mari Marilyn
lyn Marilyn Monroe Diana Dors came

to Hollywood for the year's big biggest
gest biggest spiash in a swimming pooi

BOB HOP I denied a feud with
Bing Crosby: "There never was
a feud. I love Bing. I love every

bone in his .rset." But it didn't

turn out to be love and marriage
for Bing and Cathy Grant. Bing
ca'led off the romance.
C. B. DeMllle celebrated 42 years

of movie making with his biggest,

The Ton Commandments.

Western heroes of Hollywood

telefilms argued about who had

the fastest draw but no one chal

lenged anyone except ex-baseball

star Chuck Connors, now a cow

boy. Said Connors:

"I can t draw fast but I can hit

a ball farther than any other west
em hero."

Jimmy Stewart, Grace Kelly and

John Wayne were tops at the box
office ... The Oscar winners were

Ernest Borgnine for "Marty," and
Anna Magnani for "The Rose Tat.

too."
ROSALIND RUSSELL'S movie

"The Girl Rush," was a flop but
she came back to win screen hon honors
ors honors in "Picnic" and on the Broad Broadway
way Broadway stage" in "Auntie Mame." ...
Jack Lemmon as John Wilkes
Booth was the best evidence yet
that live Hollywood TV isn't buy buy-ing
ing buy-ing the type-casting system of Hol Hollywood
lywood Hollywood movies.
Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis
called it a day as a team. Both ap appeared
peared appeared in separate movies and Jer Jerry
ry Jerry made one of his biggest hits as
a solo night cluben tertainer at the
Sands Hotel in Las Vegas.
The "big change" in Hollywood

men included a new voice for
Francis the Mule. Chill Wills bow bowed
ed bowed out and TV and radio actor

Pul Frees moved In for the vocal
trek.

A Hollywood steak house post

er this sign:

"In case of atomic attack, keep
.iln. Po kill ft... lib-, mA

i im, i a,T Milt, unci i nil itnc iiinu
(Part 2 Tomorrow)

840 kcs., Panama City
1090 Kcs Colon
Telephones: 8-3066 Panama
1063 Colon
"RESENTS

Today, Friday, Dec. 21
P.M.
4:00 Featurt Review'
4:30 What's Your Favorite (re (requests
quests (requests taken by phone
till 3:00)
5:30News
5:35 What's Yonr F a v o r 1 1 a
(cont'd)
6:00 Allen Jackson Commen Commentary.
tary. Commentary. 6:15 BLUE RlBBON SPORTS
REVIEW (Pabst Beer
6:30 Top Tunes of the Week
(WRUL)
7:00 Thirty Minute Theater
7:30 VOA Report from US
8:00 Music By Roth
8:30 Short Story Theater
9:00 You Asked For It (re (requests
quests (requests taken by phone
till 7:30)
10:30 Cavalcade Of America
11:00 Jazz Till Midnight
12:00 Sign Off.
Tomorrow, Saturday, Dec. 2
A.M.
6:00 Sign On Alarm Clock
Club (requests taken
by phrne till 7:00)

7:30 Jazz Salon
8:15 The Christophers
8:30 Musical Reveille
8:00 News
9:15 Bonj our Mesdames
9:30 Paris star Time
10:00 News
io:05-,SDlns And Needles (re

quests taken by phoat

till 8:30)

HOLLYWOOD (UP) Jeaaae

Crain denied Wedresday. night
that she has any plans to many

millionaire Hcmer Rhoads, wno
claimed be was assaulted by the

actress' former husband, Paul

Brtnkman.
Rhoads, 45, told police he was
socked by Brtnkman. 37, Christ

mas night because he planned to
marry Miss Crah. as soon as nil
wife divorces him. Hcwever, Miss
Cr,n after emiininf silent on the

subject for some time released a

statement which reao:
"Mr. Rhoads is a genleman I

met through my husband during
our masrie.e. I have no romantic
interests in Mr. Rhoads or in any

one else." ....

Rhoads said he wouldn't press
any charges against Brtnkman for
the alleged attack behind Rhoads'
aoartment but led Ryan, a friend
of Rhoads, charged that Brtnkman
attacked him before turning on the
millionaire aircraft executive.

Ryan obtained a msaemeanor
ccanit and batterv complaint

against Brtnkman and a warrant
was issued in Beverly Hills Muni Municipal
cipal Municipal Court for the radio manu manufacturer's
facturer's manufacturer's arrest.
B:inkman charged in a sensa

tional divorce case last summer
that Rhoads had carried on an
extra marital affair with Miss

Crain. The Brtnamans war w
vorced las Aug. 6 after a long
court battle.

Two Scalpers Held,

airline Detectives
Trim flerlr Friend

. DJAKARTA, Dtc. 2 (DPI
n..i.,ili ,. .... i-

mtamt mpi-National Airline IKBe"ou wi. Mtaiuam eimoo eimoo-MIAMI
MIAMI eimoo-MIAMI CSSJMSilon with his officers and troops
cav unmasked a reservations .j .j .T

sumably to carry on his revolt

YPSILANTI. Mich.. Dec. 28 (UP)

Preston Thomas Tucker, a

young man with visions of an. auto
empire in 1046 but a financial ruin
by 1050, died Wednesday of cancer
at the age of 53.
Existing auto-firms hadn't dust

ed off peacetime machinery is
1345-46 when the handsome Tuck

er, a "mystery man." unveiled

.-ketches of the revolutionary (ear

drop "Tucker Torpedo."

The public investors, would-be

dealers and buyers was to invest
23 miHion dollars in these sketches

and some 00 handbuilt and partly.

finished models before Tucker's
final exit in 1050.

Tucker announced enfineerins

features which auto firms had

only on drawing 'boards or ex.
perimental ears. He got an im-

iressive list of auto executives

and technicians to join him. He
leased 200 million dollar war
plant to build the cars. He tried

vo buy a government-owned steel

mm.

The government indicted Tuck

er and seven other executives of
his firm for stock fraud, mail

fraud and consoiracv. But fe

deral court jury acquitted the de-

rcnaants and Tucker chareed un-

1 his death, opposition by power powerful
ful powerful figures of the auto industry,
political and financial worlds pre prevented
vented prevented his success.

Fortune bloomed briefly after
Tucker described his oar in Feb Feb-laary,
laary, Feb-laary, 1046. And many of the fea features
tures features which grasped the public's
imagination and have since ap appeared
peared appeared or may stilt apeear-on
production ears, such things as
torque converter automatic trans

missions; a rear-drive engine; in individual
dividual individual four wheel suspension

with torsion bar springing; rein reinforced
forced reinforced interior with padded dash;
pushout windshield; cut proof

glass; air-cooled disc bri

steel and plastic body; int

air-conditiodnt: headlights ttir

ing with the wheels plus a third
center headlight, and doors slid sliding
ing sliding into the roof.
Many of Tucker's biographical
claims were questioned but his
sketches shorn he was bom in Ca Ca-pac,
pac, Ca-pac, Mich., son of a railroad en engineer
gineer engineer who died when Tucker was
.; The family moved to Detroit
and Tucker said he became a
Cadillac Motor Co. office boy at
13.
In the 1920s, he went into sell sell-ing,
ing, sell-ing, auto raoin? and car Inven Inventions
tions Inventions in the 1930s and war plant
work in the early 1940s. He got
some technical and business train training
ing training in high school and later col college
lege college extension courses.
Funeral services will be held
here tomorrow afternoon, with bur-

ill at Flat Rock, Mich.

N. Sumatra Revolt Leader Escapes
As Indonesia Govt. Regains Control

11:00 News

11:05 Spins And Needles

(cont'd)
11:30 Journey Into Space
12:00 News
P.M.

12:05 Luncheon Music
12:30 New Tune Time
1:00 News
l:lV-Serenade In Blue
1:30 Wayne King Serenade
2:00 Old New Orleans
2:15 Rhythm And Reason
2:30 Paris Star Time
3: 00 Concert On, The Mall
3:30 Music For Saturday 1
4:00 Feature Review
4:30 What's Your Favorite (re (requests
quests (requests taken by phone

till 3:00)
5:30 News
5:35 What's Your Favorite
(cont'd)
6:00 Guest Star
6:15 BLUR RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW (Pabst Beer)
6:30 Manhattan Melodies
6:45 Dolt Yourself
7:00 Much-Binding
7:30 VOA Report from U.S.

8:00 Saturday Night Dancing

Party
8:30 Educating Archie
8:00 Your Hit Parade
9:30 Ray's A Laugh
10:00 Music From Hotel El Pan Panama
ama Panama 10:30 Owl's Nest (requests
taken by phone through'
out program)
1:00 a.m. Sunday Sign Off.
Off.

scalper"-a woman clerk who had

turned over 75 tickets under lieu
tious names to a bartender for re:
sale to hard-pressed travelers at
premium rates,
"he woman clerk. Marlys And

erson, will not be tried, police

said, because she turned states

evidence, ino uni vyvunvj v.
ci tor's office ordered the arrest of

Harry Weiss, 40-year-old bartend bartender.
er. bartender. Angus Stephens Jr., chief crim criminal
inal criminal nrnsecutjr. said Miss Ander

son, who had been a National
clerk for three years, was fired

Wflrtnusdav.

He said Weiss will be tnea n

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The Management of the Drive-In Theatre

I'. :
notifies the public iflpeneral that as of today, Friday, December 28th,
on "Popular Nights" when the admission price for each automobile is
$1.10 per vehicle, only the number of persons for which the cor is made
w?!l be admitted as spectators in each auto which enters the Drive In
Theatre. In other words, if an automobile is a six-passenger model, only
six persons will be allowed to enter for the price, if the car is a five five-passenger
passenger five-passenger model, only five persons will be allowed to enter for the price
of $1.10. Any extra passenger in the vehicle will have to pay the regular
admission prices, 60 cents for adults and 30 cents for children.
Y Panama, December 1956.

against the government from

the jungles of North Sumatra,
The government's Information
Ministry in Djakarta- confirmed
r.n earlier press report that Sim Sim-bolon,
bolon, Sim-bolon, who led an uprising: a
week atio, had fled into the jun jungles
gles jungles after Lt. Col. DJamin Gin Gin-tings
tings Gin-tings seized control of Medan,
capita lot North Sumatra, in the
name of- the central govern government.
ment. government. The press report said Simbo Simbo-lon
lon Simbo-lon was now in the jungles of
Tapapul,, his home.
Sources here said that obvi

ously Glntlngs" troops that yes-

courl, of crimes on a misdemeanor, '..ja rmioimi wnrth snma

of conspiracy to violate the stat-returned to Djakarta .rule

uie governing me sue u uiaww controjiftd only Medan

on common carriers.
Steohens said the racket was de

signed to sell the reservations to

In Central Sumatra, largest is

land of the Indonesian Repoblic

Tfc f'nl Ahmad Hossein and his

a. m ... A. A. At. I" V"r"' T T 41

"desperate iraveiers- n me buffalo division veterans' councu
"peak of the Orange Bowl crowd's continued to defy the government.

exodus" from Miami. They refused to negotiate with a

Airline travel north frem Miawii gpeciai commission sent by the
is usually jammed around the first cabinet to Hussein's Capital of

of the year. He said the selle

might be able to get an extra $25

to $40 per ticket.
National Airline said a block of
75 reservations had been set aside
by the clerk during the period of
Oct. 1-21 for use on "choice"
flights leaving Miami Jan. 1-7.

Filing of the charges followed
nearly four weeks of "day and
sight" investigations, Lou Weid Weid-man,
man, Weid-man, security director for the air-

line, said.
Amodis Club
Holds Anniversary
New Year's Eve

The Amadls Club of Colon will

hold its anniversary dance on New

Year's eve at the Colon Arena
from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m.
The dance will feature the Sone

ra Panamefia orchestra, with Ba

by (Cascartta) Yarns as vocalist.
Admission prices for male guests

is si. 25, lames tree.

Viet Nam Reform
SAIGON, Dec. 28 (UP) The
North Viet Nam government is
pouring hundreds of land reform

officials to appease farmers who

revolted agaln-t the Communist

regime last month, a South Viet

Nam newspaper said today.

drive-in;

4s dhJb TV ft m I M 1A

f:w iuuat y.-w

POPULAR NIGHT!

$1.10 per Car!
JAMES STEWART
Jean Drew 1b
'THUNDER BAY"
In TECHNICOLOR 1
lyfomo7rowT''pW
WEEKEND RELEASE!
VIRGINIA MAYO
George Nader in

"CONGO CROSSING"

Usia.

CAPI TOLIO
24c 15c.
THE HARDER
THEY FALL
- Also:
DUEL ON THE
MISSISSIPPI

Tl V Oil
25c. 15c.
BANK NIGHT!
$125.00
THE DESPERATE
HOURS
Also: -SHANE

CECILIA
A Sensational Double Feature
Rhonda Fleming In
WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS
- Also:
Glanna Maria Canale in
T E O D O B A
Something really different!

SSe.

RIO

BANK NIGHT!

Gold Prise S5M.M
Show: King Salomon
Quartet
The Rawhide Yean
RIDE CLEAR
OF DIABLO

VICTORIA
15c.
MEET THE
MONSTER
Also:
WINGS OF HAWK

Padane.

The counci said it would nego

tiate enlv with a commission bear

ing a mandate from president

Sukarno.

In South Sumatra. Java born

Governor Winarno blocked deliv delivery
ery delivery to Jakarta of all government

monev collected since Dec. Z4. it

was reported that Winarno tookPatrolmen.

oyer more than 100,000 rupiahs to

baud police md army barracks,

schools and bridges.

The newspaper ?edoman report

ed unrest and "unusual nd con-

enlAHAiio' maAI.iU.. i. Ab

c nebes and Borneo.

Originators of the Sumatra
army revolts complained of cor

ruption in tht central government

and the regime's inability to en ensure
sure ensure the progress of the nation

ana to entt party squabbling.
The rebels demanded the dis
missal of Premier All Sastroamid

jojo's Cabinet and its replacement

wiih a "business" administration

neraed by former Vice President

Mohammad Hatta.
Hatta said today that "The crea

tiea of a strong government is

necessary to cone with he siua.

ion." He called for a residential

uaoinet led by tin head of state

and, assisted by ministers from

Parliament.

NURSERY APES Two Biblically, named, seven-month-old
gorillas erijoy being comforted by their nursemaid, Mrs. Marian
Voorhees, at Cheyenne .Mountain Zoo in Colorado Springs,
Colo. Rebecca, left, and her pal, Abraham, recently arrived,
from Africa. The zoo has the largest ape colony in the country.

Chiefs, Indians
Thina Unbalanced
CARTERET, N.J. (UP)-Demo-cratic
Mayor elect Edward J.
Dolan accused the ouitoinc fte.

publican Borough Council of leav leav-m
m leav-m him a police department witt
"more chiefs than Indians."
, As one of its final acts, We out outgoing
going outgoing council voted wholesale pro promotions
motions promotions and tht police fore nnw

has 21 superior officers and 20

r

EXTRA! CENTRAL

"YO YO" Contest
SATURDAY 29th AT 4:00 P.M.
PRIZE TO THE WINNER ONE BICYCLE!

1

9

in aw see bjt i li v n p si m

WtlHtNU RtLtAiti! A

2:51 4:57 6:5 9:00 12:50, 2:29, 4:27, 6:27, g:45 fif

i.75 0.40

0.75 0.40

A ROMANTIC

COMEDY HIT?

St mi

fPmnt "WWBlgMP

ft
9

ft

Mjfltf

GoflEL QAVMOR

Mir

catY TECHNICOLOR

RE6PJA10 GARDlHER
WSOCIAAK
., PAUL JONES

....., NORMAN TAUROQ
.... M, SIONEV SMEUOON

PRESTON STURM
ill, K .,) M tr. nw

jpfk Mmm nwkmpi sjaafea am asm

MM I Me Bee WXM
mi Me m eev rm

JmWmm

m

6

ft

Dun far Hie fun

e RICHARD WIDMARK
e TREVOR HOWARD
JANE GREER

I W i TSiOHNIOOlvOR

ka 1

I

I

EXTRA! LUX
"YO-YO" Contest
, SUNDAY 30th AT 4:00 P.M.
PRIZE TO THE WINNER ONE BICYCLE!

"THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH" 1

lgHHHalgiHgHH

Portraying an American couple involved in a politieal U
assassination p4ot in London and French Morocco, James (
Stewart and Doris Day give exceptional performances in Al- II
feed Hitchcock's tale of suspense and danger, "THE MAN
WHO RNEW TOO MUCH." The VfstaVlsfen, Techelcelor
thriller arrives at the CENTRAt ON TUESDAY, JANUARY

I tr .iai. v uakfl .1J ..... Ilul m D

I HAUEjfcX (MODeri nenn; wntren juu imn. jmtci, iuj mm

HAOLfci (hobert

daughter?"
BIFF (Grant Williams) "I slew met her before. Not
'till she picked me np tonight."
HADLET "She picked you up?"
BIFF "Sure, that's how she operates. I don't like to

sheet mr mouth off. I also don't like being on the carpet.

I didn't take her to the motelshe took me. You daughter's
a tramp, mister!"
Dialogue and scene front Universal-International's
Technicolor production 'WRITTEN ON THE WIND," star star-ring
ring star-ring Rock Hudson, Lauren Baeall, Robert Stack and Doro Dorothy
thy Dorothy Malone, which OPENS AT PRE-RELEASE, ON JAN JAN-UARY
UARY JAN-UARY 1st AT THE LUX.

Showing At Your Service Center Theatres Tonight

BALBOA 4:30, 1:10, 2:50 diaiiw hts. 7:oo
Alr-Conditioned ?JU!&lL

Late show 10:30 p.m.
"Fll Never Forget Yon"
Sat. "Searchers"

-JOHNNY JOHNSTON

Sat. 'That Certain Feeling"

GAMBOA 7:00
Wayne Morris
Sat. "Showdown at Abilene"
"GREEN BUDDHA"

GATUN 7:00
Dan Dailey
"MEET ME IN LAS VEGAS"
Sat. "Seven Men From Now"

MARGARITA 6:15 0:10
o Randolph Scott
'Seven Men from New"
Late show 10:30 p.m.
"Beast from $0,000 Fathoms"
Saturday
"D-Day The Sixth of June"

CRISTOBAL 7:00
Alr-Condltloned
Robert Ryan
Virginia Mayo
"The Frond Ones"
Saturday
"Rook Around The Clock"

PARAISO 1:15 -"THE
KILLING"

8:00

LA BOCA 7:00
"THE GIRL RUSH"

SANTA CRUZ 6:15
"CAROUSEL"

' m -Havask fswasnn a m mm

"World tn my corner"

O.aO I Vrtv v.m ,yg

PRIZE TO THE WINNER ONE BICYCLE! I I "carousel" "worlo m mi tua"



rBJDAT, DECEMBER 28, 1956

Tm PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAOI SEVER
Four Convicted in Oilmap Game,
Racketeers Hoped to Find Fields

KSIH9flQQHIBHIH9lflKiBBS9RnMK RBB"1flElBERBBRRK8BlElBRRB I!

II 1 ProlSWK I

H aEREsV Kinl&a.-

ZsebebbsreWeebb' jTVT XTI. Hp f

AT REST IN NEST The pilot .of. this, light plane, Dr. David L Paice (inset) of Hagerstown,
Md., descended unhurt after making this impromptu tree landing in Berkeley Springs, W.Va.
The plane ran out of fuel and he attempted to set it down in what he thought was an open field,
but getting himself hung up 35 feet above ground. The plane, hardly damaged, was brought (
down by crane. . -

wMr.
m HBpIMf W"'
BJHem Hi;

AWARDER. G. Glbbs, left, electric motor repairman. Engi Engineer
neer Engineer Section, Corozal, received a Suggestion Award Certifi Certificate
cate Certificate and cash award .from Ernest F. George, acting electrical
loreirian, Engineer Section, for his approved suggestion that
a hole be drilled in the rear fan cover to oil the bearings
without removing the cover. TJ.S. Army photo)

Italians Says Reluctant
Farewell To Clare Luce
ROME, Dec. 28 (UP) Clare goodbye to her reluctantly.
nXiuce ended a tour of Any She left an Italy that now has a

her wist over to a man

Pump Station Work
Goes to RP Jobber

W. A. Rogers of Panama City
was apparent low bidder this
morning when bids were opened
for furnishing! and installing
new pumps and switchgear in
the Mount Hope pump station.
The project is a capital im improvement
provement improvement project as well as
part ol the Power Conversion
program.
The Hogers bid was $347,250.
The four bids submitted ranged
from this figure to a high of
$284.!285. Other bidders were the

Electric Service Company, Sachse
International Corporation and
L. R. Sommer.

The Mount Hope pump station
supplies water for the entire At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic side of the Canal Zone
and the city of Colon.
The project includes replace replacement
ment replacement of all pumps, instalaltion
of new switchgear, rewiring the
buildings and. converting all
other frequency-sensitive equip equipment.
ment. equipment. Also opened Friday were bid
for conversion of the Paraiso
pump station. Only one bid, for
$24,105, was submitted. The sole
bidder was C. A. High.
Rainier, Grace
Play Santa Claus
To 550 Children

The slieht. blonde piaywrigm.

turned diplomat boarded a putie
with her husband, Henry R. Luce1
Time Inc. publisher, for the trip
home.

Mnm than 500 Americans am

Bcores of diplomats and

officials sanfi "For Jane's a

Almost no on

this rebuilding

MONTE CARLO, Monaco, Dec,

28 (UP) Prince Rainier' and
Princess Grace of, Monaco played

Santa flans vpstprrlav in 550 can

Setfdren of this tiny principality. r

Rainier and Grace, who are
expecting the birth of a child in

February, played host to the chll

Communist party.

denied a share of
was hers.

She and her husband held their, dren in their palace overlooking
last reception at the airport the bay.

lounge. The mink-coated ambassa- The children, ranging in aga

dor was smiling but tearful as sne from one. to 13, first were treatet

Italian hugged friends goodbye. to a show beside a huge Christ-

M'.'l ,u. iJL-. i...J'mas tree in the palace dinm

PITTSBURGH, Dec. 28 (UP) (UP)-A
A (UP)-A federal grand jury indicted four
men today after hearing a mild mild-mannered
mannered mild-mannered geologist tall now be

stole millions of dollars worth of

oil-survey maps from Gulf Oil
Corp. and peddled them to rack racketeers.
eteers. racketeers. The scientist, Thomas W. B.
Smith, 47, Pittsburgh, a Gulf em employe
ploye employe for 25 years, was reported
to have detailed his part in the
almost incredible swindle. The
maps he stole pin-pointed areas
with possible oil reserves worth
milions of dollars, but he escaped
indictment today because of his
cooperation in the investigation
and his aid in recovering large
quantities of the maps.
Racket Figures Named
Names in the indictment were
two reputed New York racket fig figures,
ures, figures, an oil speculator from Hous Houston,
ton, Houston, Tex., and a "shady character
With a geological background
Who now is believed a fugitive In
Canada.
Smith, who was dismissed un under
der under suspicion by Gulf last Jan. 5,
and John Marvin Leivia, 34,
nattily-dressed geologist from
Orange, Tex., who admitted being
a member of the ring, both re related
lated related the ring's five years of traf trafficking
ficking trafficking in the oil maps.
U. S. Atty. D. Malcolm Ander Anderson
son Anderson said the full extent of the con

spiracy still has not been ascer

tamed and that the investigation
is being "pushed hot and heavy."
Name These Charged
Indicted today were:
Odie Seaeraves. 70. Houston.

Tex., oil speculator; Irving
Milner ahnnt in a New Vnrker

being sought in Canada, and two
New York brothers, Edward Lieb Lieb-erman,
erman, Lieb-erman, 30, president of U.S. Tack Tack-less
less Tack-less Corp., and Emanuel Ueber Ueber-man,
man, Ueber-man, alias Lester.

Stagraves, the Lieberman
brothers, and Leivia were ar arrested
rested arrested Dec. 18. Andersnn said the

charges against Leivia will be

uisnussea'annougn tne indictment
listed him and Smith as co coconspirators
conspirators coconspirators on charges of illegal
transDortation nf st.nien

wwwwa (,wvu.li
Emanuel Lieberman already is in

prison wr irywg to extort money
from finanrier.riraft c..

Ruben8tein before he was slain

wo years ago.

Anderson said investigators had

received reports that the maps
Were stolen hv a lMKsnn ...

heavily in debt to New York

gamblers am. was forced to take
the documents in

- - -w k; i iuw
ever, the prosecutor said, these

reports have not yet been "re "related',
lated', "related', to Smith,,
Smith, who is married- and has
two sten children U7!)o inul nA4-n J

Mr lK
not to talk about the ease because

'vas regarded as a "brilliant"
man.
.ith joined Gulf as a drafts-

n an. several years ago he was

named a regional geologist in
charge of several southwestern
states at an annual salary of
$8,500.

"A private investigation within

ine company disclosed many ir irregularities
regularities irregularities and suspicious cir circumstances
cumstances circumstances connected with vari

ous geophysical maps and reports

iounc in nis possession which he
refused to explain or discuss with
company officials," the spokes spokesman
man spokesman said.
Gulf said the stnlon man.

showed potential oil reserves in
the United States nimdi tiu.

- "..in kuu U4C
Near East. Their full value could
be disclosed only by drilling, but

uiuersun aescriDea tneir worth as
"fabulous."

Sewage Plants Aide

Dies In Cornell U.,
Was Professor There
News of the sudden rient.h nf

Professor Howard M oifft. f

Cornell University who spent

two summers in the Canal Zone
assisting in the rlssip-n nf sew.

age disposal plants was received
this week by friends here.
He died of a heart attack De December
cember December 20 at his home In Itha Ithaca,
ca, Ithaca, N.Y. Prof. Glfft was 38 years

old.
He was to have assumed the
post of dean of the Cornell uni university,
versity, university, faculty on February l.
At the time of his death he was
head of the Sanitary Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering in the School of Civil Engi Engineering.
neering. Engineering. He is survived by his wife, a
lecturer in the C.ornell Rehnnl nf

Hotel Administration, and by

one daughter and one son.

LINE FORMS AT THE RIGHT There appears to be erica response to a heln-wanted aim
nn this Miami. Fla shnn unnrtmi T- J.-JKT. TV.!z W ?mpTWfal B

iZ thT "" uliVMW wwimg u d

NO Ml DIG A
Cocktail Loung, wishes you a very Happy New Year, and invitM you to
join in the celebrations beginning from New Years Eve.
Dance to the rhythm of the
BRISETT QUARTET

and listen to famous Panftmarian pianist
DOLORES

$5.00 minimum Per person

LIMITED RESERVATIONS
Call now at Tel. 3-6225
Reservations will be held
till 10:30 p.m.
Noise makers, horns and hats
will be distributed to all.

specialists
AT CUTTING COSTS

Good Fellow" as Mrs. Luce stood', "touched" by thtl T- T 7 2!
the donrwav of her idand S..-!i.-DL i". drawmg room where Princess

in the

waving

Her departure closed a career

that started three years, eigne
months and five days ago when

she landed at Maples aboard, tne
liner Andrea Doria.

Italy had a crisis -ridden govern

CZ Baha'is Hold

Weekly Discussion

lK??--TO.efce handed out candy.

Jiuauaii ycufuc. one oatu ius,u uui-

ir her years here she naa learn

ed the "secret of Italy's great
ness. .t he integrity of the fam
ily."

Politically. Mrs. Luce's ereatesc

Cllppcc viae hpr nart in iha ccltloj T ..Ll 1. D 1 1

ment, a shaky economy and the.ment of the Trleste Droblem be' 1 nignr in DQIOOQ

tween Italy and Yugoslavia ui ...
1954. The Canal Zone group of the

But the average Italian will w- 1 wn ""h win present

member better that she was one iTi"J,. .T5. m. iaI

in the Wire Memorial Hall, Bal-

Doa.

Subjects of timely interest are

aiscussea at tnese meetings
which are topen to aH people of

an races, creeds and national!
ties.

Sublects conperninir rarlnT

-

amity, the spiritual and social

evolution of man, and world

peace, through world faith, are
among those that have been

presented by the group to date.

rue general puDiic is mvitea.

bifigest and strongest Communist

party outside the Iron Curtain"!

Italians did not take kindly to the
idea of a woman represening the

Uniced States J of the first persons on the scene
But she pitched into her job of the Sorrento Peninsula floods in
with such fervor, intelligence an 1 October 1954, one of Italy's worst

v wiuos uiiuiBucy mat mey saiai postwar disasters.
Tlircrviv tisittinir t I

I 1 ULJUA I JAnUAK I 1st
"THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH"
LsaHHsejsassai.as

seseM fOUl IRS

SHIPSHAPE-Reminiscent of
the court of Marie Antoinette
is this towering hairdo, topped
with a frigate under full sail.
It was shown at a Berlin, Ger Germany,
many, Germany, hairdressers' contest for
"modernized historical styles.

Richard Waterman

Dies; Funeral

Set For Sunday

Richard DaCosta waterman, a

retired emnlove of the Panama

Canal Marine Division, died this
morning Tn Santo Tomas Hospi Hospital
tal Hospital after a long illness.
A Barbadian, he was 70 years

old and a former resident of La
Boca. He resided at Radio City
at the time of his death.
Funeral services have been
scheduled for Sunday afternoon
at 4 in St. Paul's Church.
Mr. Waterman is survived by
his wife, Olive, and his children,

Jackie, Violet, Sammy, Myrtle,
Mrs. Ethlyn Rose and Mrs. Doris
Weeks, in addition to several
grandchildren.

Flesh Money

ROME, Dec. 28 (UP) Film

star Gina Lollobrigida told Rome

tax officials today that Italian and

foreign film makers rated her
curves $22,400 more valuable than
those of her arch rival, Sofia
Loren, in 1955-56.

For tax purposes Gina declared

her earnings during the year at

$48,000. Sofia said she earned

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, Tal. 2-22042-22052-22

$25,600.



PANAMA AMERICA AH INDEPENDENT DA11T NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, DECEMBER It, 1884
Mathieson-Stirewalt Capture Mido Multifort Tournament

PAGE SIGHT

Beat Galindo-Cross Team
3-And-l At Brazos Brook

Scottie Mathieson, the veteran from the banks
f the Clyde, in partnership with Fred Stirewalt,
Navy chief from Coco Solo, won the Mido Multifort
watch tournament at the Brazos Brook Country
Club by defeating Anibal Galindo, reigning club
champion, and Harold Cross, also a Navy chief from

Coco Solo, by a score or 3 ana i.

Scottie has forgotten many
of the customs of his native
land although he still enjoys
an occasional highland fling
at which time he drsdains the
drink of his forefathers and
uses ram and coke for fas.
However, he stll possesses a
grooved Scottish swing which
proved to be a strong factor in
the victory, backed up by
sound short fame on behalf of
Stirewalt.
Cross, who was the higher
handicap man of the losing

team, played fine golf throng throng-out
out throng-out the tournament and Galin Galindo
do Galindo gallantly assumed the re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility for their defeat in
the ftaaf, maintaining that he
was not-too sharp and conse consequently
quently consequently did not give his Navy
partner the support he deserv deserved.
ed. deserved. Mathieson and Stirewalt
each received a handsome Mi Mido
do Mido MuKifort watch for their
fine effort while Galindo and
Cross were each awarded a
neaut'ful sterling silver dish.

Bob Feller Said Ready
To Announce Retirement

By STEVE HOWICK
CLEVELAND, Dec. 38 (UP)
Bob Feller, the Iowa ptow ov
who succeeded Walter Johnson
as the greatest strikeout king of
the modem era, is expeected to
annunce today that he is retir retiring
ing retiring lrom baseball.
'. The 36-year-old ex-flreballer,
an almost "automatic" selection
for the game's Hall of Fame,
planned to call a press confer conference
ence conference today to concede he's all
through." Close associates say
he will reject several major
league offers to devote all his
time to an insurance business
and helping to guide the play players'
ers' players' pension fund.
; Although recognized as the
most overpowering pitcher of
his time, Feller's decision
means he will go into retire retirement
ment retirement without having achieved
his No. 1 goal: a World Series
victory. He had two tr'es for it
Jto the 1948 series with the
Boston Braves, losing once by
1 .a in Johnny Sain.

Bfct a World Series victory is
justmbout all the "boy wonder','
or th 1930s failed to accom-

pjlsh in an 18-year career during
wMch he equalled or smashed
some of the game's most prized
oitchinsr records.

' A sensation from the time he
broke In with the Indians in
1936, Feller shares the all-time
record of three no-hitters with
the late Cy Young and Larry
Corcoran, established a major
league mark by hurling 12 one one-hitters
hitters one-hitters and set marks of 18
strikeouts in one game and 348
in 'a season.

Weekend
r V TAKE
AjM CAMERA
.yjjn PLENTY
&Slr FILM!

KODAK
PANAMA, LTD.
PANAMA COLON

m addition h won 20 or

more games for the Indians in
six seasons, topped the Ameri

can League in stmeouw seven
times and niled ud 266 victories

comnared with 162 losses. The

1956 campaign was oy iar ma

poorest Bob finishing witn an
0-4 mark.

Discovered by Cy Slapnicka
in Van Meter, Iowa; the 11-year-old
Feller was permitted
to remain with the Indians
over the protest of several
other major league teams. The
controversial decision was
made by the late Kenesaw M.
Landls, commissioner of base baseball,
ball, baseball, in order to prevent one
of the wildest h'dding sprees in
history.
Feller was an immediate

strikeout sensation, equalling
the then major league mark of
17 strikeouts in a game against
the Philadelphia Athletics on
Sept. 13 of his rookie season. By
the end of 1938 he had written

a new mark of 18 strikeouts in
one game into the record books
and had acquired enough poise
and skills to go with his fast ball
to launch his string of 20-vic-tory
seasons.

He rose t "real" stardom with

a 24-9 record and 246- strikeouts

in 1939, then started the 1940

season against the Chicago

White Sox with the only opening-day
no-hitter In .baseball
history. Bob finished that sea season
son season with a 27-11 mark and was
25- 13 in 1941.
A three-year break for service
in the Navy followed after which
Feller, in a planned campaign,
set out to break Rube Waddell's
ancient mark of 343 strikeouts
In one season. Feller accom accomplished
plished accomplished that in 1946, fanning
348 batters while compiling a
26- 15 record.

McDonald Leads

North To 17-7
Win Over South

MIAMI, Dee. 28 (UP) Jump

ing Tommy McDonald showed 39, 39,-181
181 39,-181 fans in the Orange Bowl

Wednesday night why he is an All All-America
America All-America as he led the North to a
17-7 victory over the South in the
annual Shrine college all-star foot

ball classic.

McDonald set up one touchdown
with a pass and led the Yankees
on an 88-yard drive in the closing
minutes of the game which was
turned into a 13-yard field goal
by Michigan quarterback Jim
Maddock.
Sports writers chose McDonald
as the North team's most valua valuable
ble valuable player. A similar award for
Dixie honors went to Wake Forest
fullback Bill Barnes.
Michigan's Mike Rotunno
grabbed a fumble on the South 25
to set up the first score in the
second period. Michigan State

halfback Dennis (The Menace)

Mendyk ran to the 19 from where
urdue quarterback Len Dawson
it Michigan State end Jim Hines-

ly in the end zone. Dawson made

the first of his two conversions.
The North scored again mo moments
ments moments later when Wisconsin end
Dave Howard covered a bobbl eby

names.

Trapped on a reverse at mid-

field, McDonald leaned and threw

to Mendyk on a play that covered

n yards, f rom there, Oklahoma's

Jimmy Hams tossed to Indiana

end Bob Fee for the touchdown.

The South averted i shutout in

the third period, going 22 yards

m seven plays after Florida half

back Jackie Simpson intercepted

a pass Dy Dawson. Duke's Sonnv

Jurgensen flipped a fourth down.

iour-yard pass to Mississippi half

nac-K n,a rawiora lor tne score.

Mississippi fullback Paige Cothren

converted.

Osorio, Robinson To Oppose
Grba, Romberger In Twinbill

Editor: CONRADO 3ARGEANT

tuHHHHHHHHPsnHHn! Hm. "Hfek, sslsEV SsssS Luna!
I r
ii i
fl Wr : s

STAR STUDENT Frank Gilford, New York's Jim The

Trophy winning halfback, concentrates on the Dec. 30 title

football game with the Chicago Bears during i skull session.

Kansas Retains Unbeaten
College Basketball Status

NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UP)

First. ranked Kansas retained us

unbeaten college basketball status

today because it has a good little

man to go with its greai Dig one.

Hoad, Rosewall Complete
Clean Sweep Of Davis Cup

Sports Shorts

BALTIMORE, Md., (UP) A
solemn high Requiem Mass was
scheduled today for Brother Her

man, the man who gave Babe
Ruth his first baseball coaching

anu nis middle name.

Brother Herman, 75, a member
of hte Catholic Xaverian Order for

60 years, died Christmas Eve aft

er alengthy illness. He first be

came acquainted with Ruth when
the future bastball star, then 13,
entered St. Mary's Industrial

School in Baltimore.

ADELAIDE. Dec. 28 (UP1 --Ken

Rosewall and Lew Hoad made it

a clean sweep for Australia in the

Davis Cup challenge round aeainst

the United States when they de defeated
feated defeated Sam Giammalva and Vic

Seixas in the concluding two sin singles
gles singles matches today.

Having clinched possession of the

silver cup yesterday when Rose

wall and Hoad won the doubles

match against Giammalva and

Seixas, the Aussies poured it on

today to make it 5-0.

Rosewall, playing what Is ex expected
pected expected to be his last tenuis match
as an amateur, turned back
Giammalva 44, 4-1. 14, 7-5 (-2,
7-5, 4-3.
On the opening day of the match

es, Hoad had beaten Herb Flam

and Rosewall walloped Seixas so

today's two tingles matches meant

Homing.

But Australia was out for

sweep and made it. It marked the
seventh triumph for the Aussies

over the Americans in the last

thirteen straight challenge rounds

they have met in.

The outcome was expected. The

join the fun at the
most popular night spot
in town
Fridays & Saturdays
midnite to 4:30 a.m.
(Nightcap on-the-house at
4:30 a.m.)

GEORGE GODOY TRIO
playing your favorite tunas in the
air-conditioned BALBOA BAR

George also plays the piano
18 p.m. to 2 a.m. Sun.,
Tues., Wed. & Thurs.

Sports Briefs

ft-- J'

U. S., with Seixas. 33. ind the ace

of the team, did not figure to have
a chance but Giammalva proved
to be a surorise as he nlaved well

in the doubles with Seixas yester

day and in his losing match
gainst Rosewall today.

Actually, feammy was the vic victim
tim victim of bad breaks. He was trailing

one set to two but was leading

give games to one in tne fourth

set when tennis fortune went a

gainst him. He got bad breaks, but

did not complain.
After the.. matches, the Davis
Cup was formally presented te
Harry Hopman, the non-paying
captain of the Australian team.
He called Hoad and Rosewall
the "greatest two man combina combination
tion combination the tennis world ever has
seen."

He paid tribute to the Ameri

cans for the "fight they put up"

and especially pointed out Giam Giammalva
malva Giammalva as "a player who entertain

ed you not only with his tennis but

his general behavior.

"Next year he might be too

much for us," Hopman added.
At the ceremonies, all the play

era were introduced. Rosewall

and Hoad spoke only briefly.

The "little fellow." by modern

court standards, is 6-3 Gene Els Els-un,
un, Els-un, who sank a 12-foot jump shot
wilh six seconds left to give Kan Kansas
sas Kansas a 58-57 victory" over Iowa State
Wednesday night and answer the
question which has haunted Coach
Dick Harp all season: Can Kan Kansas
sas Kansas win on a night when seven seven-foot
foot seven-foot Wilt Chamberlain is stopped.
Elstun's "clutch goal" made the
answer a ringing "yes" because
big Chamberlain was stopped but

good. Triple-teamed by 6-8 center

Don Medsker and forwards John
Crawford and Chuck Vogt, Cham

berlain was limited to three field

ueriaiu was iiiuiwu wi unce nciu . .
goals and made only six of 13 M.?.?,1!

MILAN, Italy (UP)-Duilio Loi

of Italy, the European lightweight
champion, successfully defended

his title against Spanish challen challenger
ger challenger Jose Hernandez In a dull 15-

round bout Wednesday night. Loi

scaled 135 pounds, while Hernan
dez weighed 134 1-2.

U.P. All-Pro
Football Team

MIAMI, Fla., (UP) Bold Ruler,
Barbizon, King Hairan and nearly

every other candidate for three-

year-old honors, have been nom

inated for Hialeah Park's $100,0000

added Flamingo Stakes, March 2

Eighty seven candidates In all

were named fo the mile and an

eighth event, and included on the

list are the winners of 43 stakes

events.

DETROIT (UP) Three years
ago today the Detroit Lions shad

ed the Cleveland Browns, 17-16, to
win the National Football League
championship. The New York
.Giants meet the Chicago Bears in

New York's Yankee Stadium this

Sunday for this year's crown.

By J. J. HARBISON JR.
The front- running- chester

field Smokers and the second
place Carta Vleja Yankees play
a doubleheader at the Olympic
Stadium tonight, the first con

test set for seven innings, to De De-gin
gin De-gin at 8 o'clock.
Humberto Robinson (2-1) and
Alberto Osorio (3-0), the win win-ningest
ningest win-ningest pitcher in the loop, will
oppose the Yankees' Eli Grba
(1-2) and Dutch Romberger ti till
ll till on the mound.

A double win for Carta Vieja
would place them in a first place

tie witn tne smokers.
Last night at the Stadium,
great pitching by Jerry Davie,
who allowed seven hits as he
went the distance, and a 10th 10th-inning
inning 10th-inning bases-loaded single by

Frank Austin, an artnr old pro

who is still giving the young'
'uns lessons In classy playing,
gave the Smokers a 3 to 2 win
over the Beermen.
Manager Billy Shantz of the

Yanks fields his team tonight

"worried" over the injury of Ev Evans
ans Evans Kllleen, a key man in his
pitching staff.
Shantz said last night that
Killeen, who sprained his left
ankle while trying to field a
bunt by Cerveza Balboa's Leon
Kellman in Wednesday night's
game which the Yanks lost 5 to
3, would be out for "around two
weeks."
There was no fracture, said
Billy, but the hurt spot was still
swollen and very painful up to
yesterday.
The Yankee pilot, who himself
has been out of action for over

ten days after suffering a split
finger which took several stitch

es after being hit by a foul tip,

said the digit had healed well

but still remained "pretty

numb."

Billy honed to catch one of

the games tonight if he could

"grip tne ball nrmly enough.

kast nignt s game was a

thriller that had an enthusiastic

crowd spellbound all the way.

The Beermen scored the
first run of the contest in the
third frame when Clarence
Moore's sacrifice fly brought
home Reinaldo Grenald from
third.

The Smokers took a 2 to 1 lead

Teams Teams-Chesterfield
Chesterfield Teams-Chesterfield Carta Vieja.

Cerveza Balboa.

e

Won Lost Pet. 6B
.... 7 4 .636
4 5 .444 2
.... 4 6 .400 2J4

TONIGHT'S GAMES-(2)-At Panama
Chesterfield (Robinson 2-1 and Osorio 3-0) vs.
Carta Vieja (Grba 1-2 and Romberger M)
Game Time : 6 o'clock.
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT-At Panama
Chesterfield 3, Cerveza Balboa 2 (10 innings).

NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UP)

The 1956 United Press All-Nation

al Football League team (with

first team votes in parentheses):

r II ai I will
Offensive
Hill, Bears (20)
Howton, Packers (13)
Creekmur, Lions (11)
Brown, Giants (11)
Jones, Bears (10)
Stanfel, Redskins (10)
Ane, Lions (7)

QB Layne, Lions (14)
HB Gifford, Giant- (19)
HB Matson, Cards (20)
FB Casares, Bears (23)
Defensive
E RobusteM, Giants (15)
E Brito, Redskins (12)
T Grier, Giants (8)
T Stautner, Steelers (8)
MG George, Bears (7)
LB Schmidt, Lions (13)
LB Bednarik, Eagles (8)
HB TunneH, Giants (12)
HG Lane. Cards (8)
S Christiansen, Lions (18)
S Dillon, Packers (7)

throws for 12 points 23 below
his average per game for Kansas'
first six games.

Kansas, favored to win the Big

Seven Tournament at Kansas City,
Mo., led 28-27 at halftime and the

lead changed hands eight times

during the second half. Iowa State

led, 55-54, with 3:30 to go and went

ahead, 57-56, with 13 seconds remaining.

Chamberlain Frustrated
Elstun had 12 points for Kansas

while Gary Thompson tallied 17

nd Vogt connected for 16 for

Iowa State. Chamberlain was thor

oughly frustrated on offense but
grabbed 21 rebounds. It was the

first loss for Iowa State, ranked

ninth with Oklahoma A a M. by

the u.f. Board of Coaches

Oklahoma, connecting on 29 of

40 free throws, defeated 11th.

ranked Kansas State, 67-64, in the

opener of the Big Seven tournev

center Joe King tamed 19 points

for Oklahoma while Bob Boozer

made a league-record 15 free
throws and scored 27 points for

Kansas State. The tournament

continues tonight with Missouri
meeting Colorado and Nebraska

playing Michigan State.

Notre Dame gave its "subway

alumni" of New York Citv a thrill

wnen bod Uevine s layup with two

seconds left provided the Irish

with a 72-71 win over New York

University in the Holiday Festival

lournament. The victory sent

Notre Dame into the semi-finals

along with Manhattan, Ohio State

and Brigham Young.
Manhattan Sinks Niagara

Guard Tom Deluca sank two

free throws to put NYU ahead,

hv-ro, with 52 seconds left but he

then was called for travelling and

the Irish passed down-court to De-

vme for the winning basket. It

was Notre Dame's 18th victory in

me zz-year-oia rivalry.

Manhattan went on a 60-per cent

first-half shooting snree that

rocked Niagara, 95-79; Ohio State

lought off a late Temple rally for
a 64-63 win, and Tom Steinke
scored 30 points to lead Brigham
Young to an 89-75t riumph over
St. John's of New York.
In other games Wednesday night
UCLA toppled St. Louis, 72-66, In
ciiana State whipped Georgetown
of Kentucky, 89-80, Muskingum

beat Lawrence Tech, 100-85, and

Aavier (la.) Gowned southern,

ro-B7.

Speculation High
On Winner Of Open

cos Cobo and Ed Napoleon and

a throwing error by Hector Lo
pez.

A base on balls, two singles

and a sacrifice fly by the Beer

men tied up the game in the

sixth and so it remained until

the bottom of the tenth

Napoleon led off the frame

with his third hit of the night

to boost his BA to .371, tops for

tne team.

Manito Bernard bunted foul

twice and then laced a single to
left, moving Napoleon to second.
Clyde parrls who attempted to
nrtvanpn the runners fnrnvrf Ma-

poleon on the first pitch, pitcher

to third baseman.

With left hand hlttine Ellas

Osorio coming to the plate port port-slder
slder port-slder George Brunet came to the
mound and Ronnie Sheetz re replaced
placed replaced Harold Gordon at first
base.

When Ellas drew a base on

balls to load the sacks, sheets;
returned to the hill to face Aus Austin,
tin, Austin, who -with the count two-and-two,
hit a pitch far over Gre-

nald's head in left for a hit, that
ordinarily would have been two
bases, to score Napoleon from
third and end the ball game.

Austin, wno had two more
hits last night and now sports
a .363 batting average, was al also
so also brilliant afield taking part
in two doubleplays.
Sheetz. who permitted ten

safeties, looked real good out on

tne mouna, out as it turned out,.
Davie was better.
The Smoker rteht hander pick picked
ed picked up his second victory against
no defeats and Sheets' record is
now 1-2.

Kubski To Manage
Grand Forks Again
AI Kubski, former player player-manager
manager player-manager of the Canal Zone and
Panama Pre League's, has re received
ceived received word from the Pittsburgh
organization of hie reappoint reappointment
ment reappointment at manager ef the Grand
Forks club in the Northern
League.
Kubski hat managed mere
pennant winners than any ether
profeitionel ever to come to the
I tfhmut winning five out of five
in the Canal Zone League and
three out of four in the Panama

Professional League, last year

being the first time that a club
managed by Mm here did net
finish in first place.

Speculation is starting to run

hign on who will be the winner of

the 1957 Panama Open Pro-Ama

teur tournament schedcled to be

played over the beautiful cnam-

pionship Panama Course came

January 10, 11, 12 and 13.

In 1952 it were the Gaucho from

the Argentine Roberto De Vicenzo
who repeated in 1953. The 1954 e e-vent
vent e-vent found "Slammin" Sammy

Snead in ahead of the field, while
1955 saw the smooth play of little
Tony Cerda, countryman of De
Vicenzo off with the $2,000 first
prize money.

Last year the 1956 tournament
provided thrills galore at the
young but formidable Arnold
Palmer met with the great Snead
In a play-off which went to the
4th hole when Palmers' great
birdie putt gave him the cha m m-pionship.
pionship. m-pionship. Dick Dehlinger, the general
chairman of the Open Committee,

for this year has returned from

Florida with this year's profession

al line-up. Will the winner be Ait

Doering representing Cemento Pa

nama, or will it be Jim Feree

sponsored by Novey a Company

together witn Electric Service. Or
could it be past double winner Ro

berto JJe vicenzo ask viceroy.
There will also be Dow Finster

wald backed by Panama Insurance

Company, George Bayer represent representing
ing representing the Panama Shrimp Compa Company,
ny, Company, Joe Conrad who. is sure not to

run out of gas with Esso. The Chi
riqui Land Company's Mike Get

chik, Doug Ford by courtesy of
Cerveceria Nacional, Art Wall,

Jr., backed up by Hacienda Fidan

que, past winner Tony Cerda

brougnt down by GIBCO, and Doug
Sanders with as pretty a game as

is the Hotel El Panama.

The Open Committee also says to

keep your eye on Henry Castillo,
the Florida Open champ. But to

contest ail of the above the local
Chesterfield cigarettee distributors

say never undersell the champion

who is of course the 1956 Open

Champ, the likeable and keen com competitor
petitor competitor Arnold Palmer.

Art Doering who has inked for

Cemento Panama doesn't hit the

tournament trail too frequently but

when he does the other better be

on their games. Art recently com competed
peted competed In the New York Giants

sponsored Mayfair Open at band-

ford, Florida and although he was

finding the going a bit tough, tne
Cincinnati pro grave a very good

account of himseu and is ngureu

to be amongst the leaders in the

forthcoming Panama open, this

will be Doerisg's first tun in tn

Panama Open but after watching
his play in the Mayfair, Dick Deh Dehlinger
linger Dehlinger thinks the Panama course
made to his game and states not
to sell him short.

The committee chairman also
announced that the Triplets tick
ets are now on sale at the Pana

ma Golf Club or may be secured

from committee members. These

1-2-4 ducats marked for 82 each

and the lucky buyer will cash in

for a neat 82,000 prize. The draw drawing
ing drawing to match up th ticket num numbers
bers numbers with the players will be held
at the Panama Golf Club immedi immedi-attly
attly immedi-attly following the golf clinic on

Wednesday, Jan. 9. The Calcutta

ticket chairman Bruce Carpen Carpenter
ter Carpenter it the Balboa branch of the
National City lank and are al also
so also available at all Post Ixchang Ixchang-et
et Ixchang-et and Service Clubt besides the
various golf clubs.
Tickets for the Golf Clinic art
priced at $1 each and include ad

mission to the party in the Club Clubhouse
house Clubhouse following the exhibition. Ad Admission
mission Admission price for the matches, on
Thursday, Jan. 10 and Friday, Jan.
1 is $1.50 each day. Saturday and
Sunday events, Jan. 12 and 13, are

tagged at sz.50 for each day. Wow-

ever, a special bargain is offered
wherein a season ticket may be
purchased for only $5. The season
ticket admits the bearer to all

four days of play exclusive of the

Golf Clinic. An extra, bargain is
offered to all military personnel in
that a season ticket may be pro procured
cured procured for only $4.

01' Reliable Frankie

Cerveza Balboa Ab R H PoA

Moore, ss 3 10 0 5
Charles. 3b 4 0 1 A 0

Glenn, cf .. 3 0. l.ji 1
Lopez, 2b 4 0 12 3
Pinkstorf, rf 2 .0 1 3 0

P. Osorio, lb 4 0 1 8

Gordon, lb O 0 0 2
Brunet, p 0,0 0 0
Brathwaite, lb ... 0 0 0 0
Kellman, c 2 0 0 3
Grenald, if 4 1 1 4
Sheetz, p-lb 4 0 10

o
o
0
o
0
0
0
1

Totals

30 2 7 28 10

Chesterfield
Napoleon, rf 5 1 3 1
Bernard, ss 5 1 2 3
Parris,3b S 8 1 1
E. Osorio, lb 4 0 0 10
Austin, 2b 5 0 3 3
Grote, cf 3 0 0 2
Nufiez, If 4 0 0 1
Cobos, c 2 1 1 7
Davie, p 4 0.02

1
7
2
3
3
0
0
1
4

Totals

37 3 10 30 21

Score By Innings
C. Balboa 001 001 000 02 7 2
Chester. 000 020 000 1-3 10 0
SUMMARY Errors: Pink Pink-ston
ston Pink-ston Lopez. RBI's; Moore, Ber Bernard,
nard, Bernard, Austin. Earned runs: Ches Chesterfield
terfield Chesterfield 3, Cerveza Balboa 2.
Two-base hits: Orenald, Pink Pink-ston,
ston, Pink-ston, Bernard. Doubleplays: Co Cobos,
bos, Cobos, Bernard; Bernard, Austin,
E. Osorio; Austin, Bernard, E.
Osorio. Sacrifice hits: Moore,.
Glenn, struckout by Sheets 2,
Davie 3. Base on balls off Sheets
3, Brunet 1, Davie 5. Lett on
base: Cerveza Balboa 5. Chester Chester-9.
9. Chester-9. pitchers' record: Brunet
(pitched to one batter in 10th).
Winning pitcher: Davie (2-0).
Losing pitcher: Sheetz (1-2).
Umpires: Thornton, Ritzko,
Hinds. Time of game: 2:29.

NEW YORK (UP) -Sharpshooter
. Paul Pettit of the St. Louis
er Paul Pettit of the St. Louis
Hawks seized a 26-point lead over
Paul Arizin today in their race for
the National Basketball Associa Association's
tion's Association's scoring title.
Pettit, who beat Arizin in
close, season-long race last year

has scored 672 pouts in 26 games

raffle for players will also be held;fer a 25.8 averace Ariiin u t.f

the same evening. (of the Philadelphia Warriors, is

Intry tickett for the ttar-ttud- eCond with 646 points in 26 games
ded show are now on tale by a 24.8 average.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 1st

"THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH"

I
I

....... .J

Jodasfi CoddaU

BACARDI RUN PUNCH: One teaspoon sugar In a highball glass.
Dissolve it in a small amount of water. Add a tablespoon of native
lemon juice and fill glass with crushed ice. Float ice with BACARDI
COLD or WHITE LABEL. Stir gently and serve.

rrepare your every day drink with BACARDI Ane jo er Carta de Oro in High Ball (Ginger Ale or Soda).



PAGE NXNT
Special Races Top Tomorrow's Track Program

PANAMA AMMHCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT N1WBP4FOI

0

Non-Winners to Dispute
$650 Purse Over 1 Mile

Two $650 one mile "Special" races for recently
imported non-winners in Panama will headline to tomorrow's
morrow's tomorrow's President Remon race track program.

Tomorrow $ '5 g One Of Oddest Baseball Seasons

(Racing Card

Seven horse are entered for the
first co-feature. The schedued
starters are Reauelto, C r t e r o,
Fieltro, Gramilla, Hineapie, Picudo
and Hablando.
The race figure to be a three three-tided
tided three-tided battle among Resuelto, Cer Certero
tero Certero and Picudo off their last per performances.
formances. performances. Fieltro, Gramilla and
Hineapie are apparently not rea ready
dy ready for a winning effort yet.
The second "special" also lists
even entries. Surumeno, Bonifa Bonifacio,
cio, Bonifacio, Starwick, Weima Jimmey, Ba Ba-cancito,
cancito, Ba-cancito, Remozada ami Jai Alai 11

-e entered for this event.
Surumeno and Jaj Alai II, Argentine-bred
newcomrs with roiy
advanofe notices, will be making

thir lnral debut However, on pa

per the event shapes up as a bavl
tie between Starwick and Bonifa-j
cio with Weima Jimmey holding
a good chance of upsetting the fa-j
voriUs.
Bacancitcs a reportedly expen expensive
sive expensive newcomer, is another which
cook", find the pickings juicy e e-nough
nough e-nough for his first loeal victory.
Three $600 Fourth Series seven
furlong sprints are also listed 01
the card. The roost attractive is
the nightcap which could be a real
humdinger. Seven of the eight
scheduled starters have been re recent
cent recent winners.
Soveral nther interesting race?

complete a much better than aver

age Saturday afternoon program

1st Race 6th
Purse $400

FIRST RACE
1 Reflector

2 Oro Purlto
3 Incaica
4 Fenix
5 3- Slipper
8 Greco

Series Imp. If,
Pool Closes 12:45
OF THE DOUBLE
V. Ortega 113
F. Hidalgo 111
F. Qatica 106
A. VfiJQUez 124
G. Vasquez 103x
B. Baera 104

2nd Race
Purse $650

2ND RACE
1 Resuelto
2 Certero
3 Fieltro
4 Grlmilda
5 Hineapie
6 (Picudo
7 (Hablado

Special" Imp. 1 M.
Pool Closes 1:15

OF THE DOUBLE
J. Jimenez lOSx
J. M. Bravo ill
A. Ycaza Hit
R. Vasquez 110

A. Vergara
F. Alvarez
C. Ruiz

3rd Race Non-Winners Nat. 4 f.
Pun $250 Pool Closes 1:45

ONE TWO

Y aft 1 lia -ji aflaHK&Mki.
a kv 1 m flkssssBsssl HbgI
Lm h 1 APS
H km am ial H fl Hi

PLAYERS' CHOICE 'Before a nation-wide television
audience, Harry GraySori, right. NEA sports edited presennfT
I the Jim Thorpe Memorial Trophy to Frank Gilford. The New
York Giants' halfback was elected by the players as the out-,
standing operative in the National Football League.

by
JOE WILLIAMS

ENELDA DIC. 26 JOE WILLIAMS SPORTS

Our idea that the Yankees' Don Larsen should be tappped for

the baseball Half of Fame went over with a bang. Rather a messy

one. we are pained to report. It failed to survive.

Although a perfect game, i.e., one in which nobody gets to

first base, comes along about as often as a ueorge m. conan

(there have been only seven, one of dubious, validity, since base

ball was Invented), we are apparently one of the few jaspers in the
whole of North America who bo bUfi-eyed over such a feat.

James Boyle, Manhattan, patiently explains: "In a perfect

game the skill of the pitcher is subordinate to at least three vital
elements: (1) errorless, if not sensational, support; (2) a knowing,

stimulating catcher: (3) luck, meaning the pitcher's.'

On the same subject, Roy Wieboldt, also of Manhattan: "You
attach too much credit to a single game. How about Johnny Bur Burnett's
nett's Burnett's nine hits in one game in 1832? Nobody did that before or
since. (Ed note: It went 18 innings.) Joe Oeschger and Leon Ca-

dore pitched a 26-inning stalemate in 1920, another unprecedented

performance.
"Consider Larsen's career record as of today: 30 wins, 40 lot

ses in four years with last season's 11 his best. Yet if Laren

doesn't pitch another game ... and your reasoning is that he
I .1 j tl 1 1. . TT-ll 1 L 111.

woman i nave to ... ne nas earnea a nicne in me nau aiuag wun

uch authentic greats as Walter Johnson, Christy Matthewson, La Lair
ir Lair Grove and Cy (Perfect Gamer) Young.
"Methinks you mistake glamour for genius."
And from out on the Island. Jee Jess offers a compromise:

"Certainly unusual deeds should be commemorated. Let a special
lection the Hall be set aside for this purpose. Strike off bronze

miniatures and exhibit them as soon as time permits. In this way
even if the performer eventually fails of selection, his one big mo moment
ment moment will be preserved for posterity."
Weil buy that. Actually, recognition of the rare and dramatic

achievement, on its own, is all we've been interested in from the

tart. Whether a Don Larsen could have carried Cy Young a hang
over (and old Cy was an excellent judge of bourbon) was, and is, be

side the point. Our premise is simple; what's a Hall of Fame for

if not to testify to history's highlights?
HARD TO BALANCE

Particularly puzzling in this debate is the official tendency to
low-rate such achievements as freaks of fate which must be re remorselessly
morselessly remorselessly ignored lest in some cockeyed way they give the

Cooperstown as tique shoppe a bad name.
Except for certain regulations concerning length of service,
tnd related time factors, no standard criterion of selection exists,

nor is it possible to establish one. Consequently, we fisd a Cy Young

With 511 victories and a Dizzy Dean with only 150 being acclaimed

equally and if this makes for consistency we fail to see where or

BOW.
Charley Robertson's perfect game (the White Sox beating the
Tigers) has been unhonored and unnoted for 35 years. His over-all
record was not dazzling but, according to the rules, he's ineligible
anyway, not having pitched 10 years.
Addie Joss, shy by one year, is rendered ineligible by the
same minimum. The Cleveland left-hander was outstanding; he
led the league, had four 20-game seasons, a perfect game, a no hit hitter
ter hitter and three one hitters in one season.
About all Dean could do better than Joss was sing the Wabash
Cannon Ball.
WHY KNOCK THEM?
Baseball is the only sport that refuses to accept pre-eminent
performance at face value, and so when a Robertson or a Larsen
implausibly create a masterpiece, bis reward is disparagement;
ka is a lucky stiff.
A Broker's Tin who had never won a race before and was nev never
er never to win one again, can win the Kentucky Derby and no one ques ques-tioss
tioss ques-tioss his entitlement to a place on the roster with such turf Im Immortals
mortals Immortals as Count Fleet, Citation and Gallant Fox.
A Sam Parks Jr., not even distinguished among amateurs, can

the National Open, and for as long as golf is played the records

inspired occasion, ne wanted wun the

will snow that o nthis one

Havens, the Joneses and the Hogans

Let's have that special section, anyway. We always did say

AaJf a plaque Is better than none.

1 Angelita
2 La Fula
3 D. Perica
4 Cochisa

5 El Profesor

6 (Full Moon

I. Baeza 100
S. Carvajal 110
A. GonzAlez 110
J. Bravo 111
R. L. GU 103

C. Ruiz 110

7 (Transaction G. Vasquez 103fx

4th Race "G" Natives 6 Fgs.

Parse 1275 Pool Closes 2:20

QIIINIELA
1 La Pampanini G. Monte. HQx

2 Certamen B. Aguirre 113

3 Fil6n

4 Bagdad
5 Guarare
8 Chepanita
7 Chlto
8 Avlspa

C. Ruiz 113

C. Iglesias 110
J. Phillips 109
R. Vasquez 118
A. Vasquez llf
G. Sanchez 115

5th Race "Hla." Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse $275 Pool Closes 2:55

New Year's Classic 1 Mile

Parse
1 Bull Flea

2 Que Lindo

-No Gallito

4 Engreida

6 Tap Lady

$2,000

A. Vasquez 118
F. Hidalgo 110
B. Aguirre 113
E. Ortega 103
A. Gonzalez 108

6th Race 6th Series Imp. 6 F.

Purse $400 Pool Closes 3:35

1ST RACE OF THE DOUBLE
1 L. Girdle J. Rodriguez 119

2 D. Duchess G. Montero 107x

3 Proud Pearl A. Ycaza 113
4 Amat B. Aguirre 115
5 Remiron J. M. Bravo 109
6 Tiny Brook F. Gatica 105
7 Bright Blade R. L. Gil 108

8 Soft Note F. Sanchez
9 Cascador A. Vasquez
10 (Matruh F. Hidalgo

7th Race 4th Series Imo. 7 Fr.

Purse $600 Pool Closes 4:05

2ND RACE OF THE DOUBLE

1 Volcanlco R. Vasquez 113

2 Cachgfaz
3 Patan
4 Cartillero
5 Mezereum

V. Castillo 119
F. Alvarez 119

A. vasquez 11

S. Carvajal 10;

8th Race "Special" Imp. 8 Fg,
Purse $850 Pool closes 4:40

QUINIELA

1 Surumeno

2 Bonifacio
3 Starwick
4 W. Jimmey
5 Bacancito
6 Remozada
7 Jai Alai II

J. Avila 119

V. Castillo 118
B. Aguirre 112
F. Alvarez 107
J. M. Bravo 118
B. Baeza 113
R. Vasquez 119

9th Race 4th Series Imn. 7 FA

Purse $600 Pool Closes 5:15

ONE TWO

1 Abrami
2 Panlcus
3 M. Stuardo
4 Orn. Star
5 Febrero II
6 fluntonner
7 Andes
8 M. Beam

J. M. Bravo 118
A. Ycaza 110
V. Castillo 122
F. Alvarez 115
A. Vasquez 110
R. Vasquez 110
B. Baeza 115

G. Vasquez 99x

16th Race 4th
Purse $600
1 Plateado
2 Dawn Sone
3 Albatross
4 Persiflage
5 Garramufto
8 P. Countess
7 (Pavlnelto
8 (Kiroga

Series Imp. 7 Fg.

Pool Closes 5:40
F. Alvarez 113
B. Baeza 108
F. Gatica 110
S. Carvajal 110

G. Vasquez UOx

J. M. Bravo 113
G. Sanchez 116
A. Vasquez 113

Racetrack Tips

By CONRADO

1 Feniz
2 Picudo (e)
3 Dona Perica
4 Chepanita
5 Tap Lady
6 Tiny Brook
7 Volcanico
8 Weima Jimmey
9 Ornamental Star
10 Pavinetto (e)

Reflector
Certero
EI Profesor
Certamen
No Gall'to
Remiron
Cartillero
Starwick
Suntonner
Plateado

HOLLYWOOD. Calif. (UP) w.

The university of Iowa Football

team was to visit actress Kim
Novak Wednesday but the players

never showed up. It seems all so social
cial social life for the team had been
suspended until after its New

Year s Day game with Oregon

State in the Rose Bowl because

the players had broken too many
rules during the Christmas weekend.

Today Encanto .25
At 9:00 p.m.
"LOS MONARCAS del AIRE"
presents the "Reek 'n Roll Roll-Contest!
Contest! Roll-Contest! On the Screen: 2 Pictures!
Today IDEAL .20 .70
Dennis OTCeefe In
INSIDE DETROIT"
Rita Hayworth in
"SALOME"

By MILTON tICHMAN
NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UP)
Baseball experienced one of its
oddest seasons in 1956. It was a
campaign in which one player drew
a $5,000 fine for spitting, another
chased a foe clear across the field
anH till annthar nitohuH tka fine!

perfect game in World Series his-

Ted Williams, the celebrated
Red Sox slugger, was the one who
was fised the $5,000 for spitting
toward the press box on Aug. 7
and although some doubt exists as
to whether he ever actually paid
the money, the event hit the base baseball
ball baseball world like a bombshell.
Big Joe Adcock of the Braves

swathe fellow who took up the

cnase, legging after Ruben Gomez
when the Glarjts' right-hander hit
him with a ball as he was charg charging
ing charging out to the mound after him.

Adcock never caught up with

Gomez but the incident caused a
stir for weeks afterward. i
Don Larsen, the Yaskees un

predictable right-hander, was the
Hurler who pitched the perfect

game in the World Series against

the Dodgers on Oct. 8. That per

formance undoubtedly was base

ball's most talked-about event of

the year and it gave the Yankees

a tnree-game to two cage in tne

world series which they went an

to wm in seven games.

Larsen's perfect same plus the

fact that Casey Stengel wrapped

up his sixth world championship
took some of the edge off Brook Brooklyn's
lyn's Brooklyn's gallant uphill battle to win
the National League pennant, but

even so, raw oiseoau ians win ior ior-aet
aet ior-aet how Milwaukee had the flag

practically in its mitts only to

blow it in the last three flays.

From the Dodgers' point of view

no one figured more prominently

in their climb than 39-year-old Sal
Maglie, who was considered all
"washed up" when they got him
from Cleveland "for a song" on

May 16. Maglie proceeded to

astound everyone by winning u

games for the Dodgers, including
a no hit, no run effort against the

Phillies, Sept. 25.
Other Ne Hitters

In addition to the no hitters
turned in by Larsen and Maglie,

there were two others in 1956. Carl

Erskine of Brooklyn pitched the

second one of hi scarcer on May

12 against the Giants aqd South

paw Mel Parnell, who also was
supposed to be all through, hurled

one for the Red Sox against the

White Sox en July 14.
Ttroughout the entire campaign

there was a constant undertone of

oddity.

Larsen, for example, pitched bis
perfect game without using a

windtiD. But that Wis nothing.

Take the case of Brooklyn's big
Don Newcombe. Here was a man

who won 27 games during the reg regular
ular regular season but still had charges

hurled against him that he couldn't

win the big ones. He was unocKeo
out in his two World Series ap ap-oearances
oearances ap-oearances against the Yankees

end couldn't even go the route dur dur-ingt
ingt dur-ingt he Dodgers' post-season tour

of Hawaii and Japan.
But he had the last laught at his
critics bv winding uo with the Na

tional League's Most Valuable

Player award, the Cy Young

award as the best pitcher in tne
maiors. and a personal "hang in-

there" Letter from Presi-J

dent Eisenhower.

The 1956 campaign was also one

in which Mickey Mantle's support

ers turned ip their tape measures
for time-tables. Instead of mea measuring
suring measuring each o fthe Yankees out outfielder's
fielder's outfielder's homers, the fans con

sulted Babe Ruth's home run rec

ord time-table daily to conjecture
on whether Mantle would or
wouldn't eclipse the Bambino's all all-time
time all-time mark or 60.

Well, Mickey fell eight hort and

wound up with only 52, but it
was more than enougn to dve him
the heme run title. In passing, he
also won the batting Hue with a
.353 figure and the runs-batted-in
crown with 130. As an added fillip.

b also won the slugging title with
a .705 percentage Mantle wa sa
unimimous choice as the AX.'s

MVP.
The All-stsr Oame
On July 10. hte National League

all-stars, loaded with five Cincin Cincinnati
nati Cincinnati players in the starting lineup,
defeated the American Leaguers,
7 7 Wnn Ofl OiQ f.na of Griffith

V, WV4Vl H.,VW m ........
Stadium In Washington.

Outfielder Frank Robinson of

the Redlegs was voted the Nation National
al National League Rookie of the year,

while shortstop Luis Aparicio was
designated the American League
Rookie of the Year.

Charley Grimm was let out by

the Braves on June 16 and suc

ceeded by Fred Haney. Al Lopez

resigned at Cleveland was named
manager of the White Sox when

Mary Mariont urned over the Chi Chicago
cago Chicago reins. Kerby FarreQ was
named Cleveland manager.

in the confusion, Frank umont,

an American League arbiter, be became
came became the first major league um

pire to put on eye glasses during

game at Kansas city on April

24 but hardly anyone noticed.

On July 23, Greenberg and Joe

Cronin, general manager of the

Hed box, were inducted into base

ball' Hall of Fame at Coopers Coopers-town,
town, Coopers-town, N.Y.

Major league attendance was

virtually the same in 1956 as It
was in 1955. A total of 16,547,372

watched big league gimes this

year as compared with 16,617,383

tne year before.

Baseball s best-known patriarch.

Connie .Mack, died during the

year.

mm

I- i-fNE' Cr FIRE

fUiYD PATTM&SON

JtmB-Bl ...ano already rv05 M HHHlL
jSUKJM- X StGtHTBb IN BY... fflEHB KBEHMKhMiSlti
faaV aamHaaK aVaaaavmrj '"aaaVl aaaaaaaM. aa $8ft j6iaaV

Fearless Fraley Predicts New Sports Craze' Here To Stay

By OSCAR FRALEY
NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UP) -A
new sports .raze is sweeping the
country today with a I least one devotee.

Take back the samba, the got?

clubs, the skin diving equipment
and your favorite pool cue. Eveni
go so far as to take back you;
neighbor's lawn mower.
Besause Fearless Fraley is pio pioneering
neering pioneering this new dodge and I Ml

free to predict that my new org a
nlzation soon will have equal
standing with the U.S. Golf Asso Association,
ciation, Association, the U.S. Lawn Tennis
Association and the U.S. Amateur
Polo Federation.
Charter member now are be being
ing being accepted for tha U.S. Amateur
Boomerang Throwers Associate i
and you'd better get in on the
ground floor.
Began In Australia
This new craze began in the

Australian boondocks when, in a
weak moment. I sought out an
aboi gipal cMeftain named Johi
Ti m berry, boss man of the Illa Illa-wara
wara Illa-wara Tribe. In no time at ail,
Chief John had become the first
boomerang professional in the his history
tory history of the sport.
The conversation went some something
thing something like this:
"Chief, I'll give you two pounds
to teach me how to throw a
boomerang."
After all, I figured, a lot of ex
caddies in the United Stages are
making big dough teaching idiots

like me the impossibility of strik-j
ing a golf ball. Chief John was1
pretty quick to catch on. too, like
a golf pro in a greenhouse.
"No can do," he said. "Not fori

two pounds. But for three pounds
six do. That pay for boomerang
breakage.'
Lightning calculation, whicu
took no more than. 15 minutes,

permitted nit to ascertain that
this came to roughly seven dollars
and 29 cents. A bargain consider considering
ing considering the dough I've paid and still
can'!, hit a drive as far as I can
throw a three wood.
lager To Start
"Jolly good," I told him in the
native idiom. "Not only that, but

okey doke and let's go wi;h the
flying woodwork."
We went.
Chief John was pretty good at
it, I'll hand him that. He gripped
the ground with the handiest toes
I've evei seen snd forgot to yell
"Duck I didn't see any ducks,
anyhow, but I saw stars. They
really do come all tha wav back,
Anyhow, after a half-hour les lesson.
son. lesson. I was prouder than when
Jackie Burke congratulated me on
my eight iron shots as Chief John

patted me on one already aching

snoumcr and commented:
"You practice lots. You br
much good."
Then he sat down, just like any
golf pro, and watched me prac practice.
tice. practice. And, like some other golf
pros, he sold me forty bucks.,,
worth of new equipment when 1
left.
Tbe Frafoy living room now it
a shambles from impromptu de i
onstrations. Insurance men call ,'at
all hours of the day and nighf and
I can'i hardly hear them becaus
of the bandages. But the boomafr ...
ang boom is really here to stay. ..

NIT HALL OF FAME
Newport, R.I. (NEA) Mow
than 10.000 pcope visited the Na National
tional National Tennis Hall of Fame and
Museum at the Newport Casino
this year.

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Camera Shop, Hotel El Panama, Joyerfa International, Joyerfa Porraj,
Joyeria Darria, Newstand-Tocumon, Politecnica, 3. A., Panama Marine
Supplies Co.; PANAMA: Almacin Colombia; COLON: Comisionas Jlon;
PENONOME: Foto Baru; DAVID: Casa Horna; BOQUETE: Antonio Chen;
FILMS DEVELOPED IN A DAY
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PREPARE POR HOLIDAYS
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Bop, Cha Che Cha, Mernbe,
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Good until Jan. 15-W
iitv i y j
ARNETT tDUNN
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Far VS. pereoiuiel and their
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t
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With F 1.2 Lens
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CANAL ZONE LADIES
The Y.M.C.A. Beauty Salon
wishes to thank you once a a-galn
galn a-galn for your patronage dur during
ing during the past year.
"HAPPIEST HOLIDAY"
Velma, Fran, Ida & Maria
CZ Plumbers Union
Re-Elect Garriel
As President
Th ranal Zone Plumbers Lo
rai TTntnn no. 806. of the United
Association of Journeymen and
Apprentices ot the Plumbing
and Pipe Fitting industry of the
U.S. and Canada, has re-elected
Samuel J. Garriel as president.
.Other officers chosen for the
1957-58 term include:
James P. Youne. Jr.. vice-ores
ldent: Edwin J. Roddy, recording
aecretaw: Walter EMarek, fi
nancial secretary; John A. Tay Taylor,
lor, Taylor, inside sentry; and James F
Ahearn, Theodore P. McGann
Kenneth Brazzel and Ernest P,
Muzzio, all members of the exec
utlve board.
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FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE: MaytH wetblng
machine, 25-cycle, good condi condition
tion condition Cad Navy 3662.
FOR SALI: All household ef ef-recti,
recti, ef-recti, including mahogany bad bad-room
room bad-room suite, reed perch furniture,
maple dinette tat and 25-cycle
refrigerator Call Balboa 2896.
Bird Believed
To Be Extinct
Found In Colombia
WASHINGON, Dec. 28 (UP)
a Diro neutved to be extinct has
made a sudden reappearance.
. Tht flighty creature is known as
Arment's cowbird a black robin-
like bird with a sliehtlv dissinatprl
look. No one had seen one since
1866.
The National Zoo sot a bird
shipment from the Colombian iun-
gles yesterday and there sat lit
tle old Arment's cowbird.
Herbert Friedman, curator of
birds at the Smithsonian Institu
tion, said the last known Arment
was spotted along the Caribbean
Coast 90 years ago. After that.
nothing.
"It's a little like be ne lesallv
dead, vnil know In hp a hird that
hasnt been seen since 1866,"
Frieda an said. You're not exact
ly extinct, but your chances of
amounting to anything ornitholo
glcally are seriously diminished.'

Thars Sumthin Wron Tuuday;

Stewdients Dont Lern Spelin

NEW YORK (UP)-A new ex
planation of why science courses
are not popular wim coiiege sw
dents was offered today. It is be-
cause
so. manv students leave ele
mentary and high schools unable
nv
to
spell even tne most sunpie
words.
Dr. Kenneth B.M. Crooks, a pro
fessor of zoology, told the annual
meetine of the American Associa
tion for the Advancement of Sci
ence that for some years a de
pressing proportion of his college
students use the following spell spellings
ings spellings (among others no less shock
ing):
Norse. Bind, Gmny pig, anamai,
brane. human bean, colur, divilop,
Wf, and writting. So it follows,
docter, curcle, ekeeter, punkm,
he said, that when kids who spell
hat way, come to couege they re
afraid of science courses because
of new and "big;' words they 11
have to spell.
A Serious Matter
The relative lack of interest
of
college students in science is
an
extremely serious matter, and the
meeting devoted much time to it.
With the developing of atomic
power, automation, electronic
mechanical brains, and super
sonic travel, it is an always in
creasing scientific and technical
world. Colleges simply aren't turn turning
ing turning out enough scientists and en
gineers to meet America's future
need for technical know-how.
Various explanations were of offered
fered offered at the sessions, having to
do with lack of effort to interest
children in science, improper
teaching or unqualified teachers
of elementary science in high
schools, and absence of sufficient
"motivation" to give youngsters a
scientific bent.
Prof. Crooks, of the faculty of
the State College, Fort Valley,
Ga., blamed the whole teaching
set-up in elementary and high
schools. He's been studying tht
misspellings of college science stu stu-ing:
ing: stu-ing: "If is well known that col college
lege college students do misspellings of c
dents for 26 years, he said, add adding:
ing: adding: "It is well known that col college
lege college students do not read, write
or comprehend as well as they
should. This study proves that
they cannot spell, either."
Don't Know Phonic
He said many vounnster rnme
to college without knowing the al alphabet
phabet alphabet "nor that letters have
sounds. Elementary teaching
now places emphasis on reading,
"npupr An onfillinn TU ,'.A
. w vu ffmiuig, Jiue get
away with cheating that is an
other reason. Still another is that
lower school teachinc methods
"tend to encourafie haste shallow
thinking, and superficiality."
GARRARD
We have 25 cycle motors
for Garrard RC-80 record record-changers,
changers, record-changers, now at the greatly
reduced price of
only... $10.00.
MLEBLERIA
CASA SPARTON
Central 26-79
(next to Encanto Theatre).

FOR SALE

Automobiles
FOR SALE: Salvaged 1951
Kaiier parti including hydrama hydrama-tic
tic hydrama-tic transmission, radio; 25-cycle
refrigerator. 876225, McCarthy.
FOR SALE: 1951 Oldimobile
Oaluxa Coupe, dirty free. Reei Reei-denca
denca Reei-denca Panama 3-6871, office
Albrook 5148.
FOR SALE: Brit iih Ford "An "An-glla"
glla" "An-glla" 1955 modal, $750. Phono
Panama 3-2166.
FOR SALE: 1956 Pontiac Star
Chief. Only 3000 mlloi, power
steerinf, power brakes, Hi-Fi ra radio,
dio, radio, automatic drive and beauti beautiful
ful beautiful upholstery. Bargain, leaving
tha country. Call Panama 3 3-0563.
0563. 3-0563. FOR SALE: 1948 Ford 2-door
adan, 6-cylinder, good condi condition,
tion, condition, $250. Phone 2-4494 Bal-
FOR SALE: 1950 Tudor Pon Pontiac,
tiac, Pontiac, Hydramatic, radio, 3 new
tires, 2 fair. Phone Balboa 2506.
Detour
SAN DIEGO, Calif., Dec. 28
(UP) Mrs. Ida May Lefevers
was surprised indeed when an
automobile crashed into her liv living
ing living room while she was watch watching
ing watching television. She was even
more surprised when the driver
got out, looked around, then got
back in the car and drove out.
Not only are lower schools to
blame. The "national affliction.
sloganitis," has to share it be because
cause because many slogans "entrave
ng spellings in the young
ds." Adult "inventiveaesg"
S telescoped snellintrs Hp
he ''horror" of "iaxnville" 'fan
Jacksonville.
Fairchild Exhibit
Opens Tomorrow
Al JWB Gallery
On display In the art. onll
of the USO-JWB Armed Force's
Service Center beginning tomor tomorrow,
row, tomorrow, will be the art exhibit of
Mrs. Elva Bell Fairrhilri Th.
exhibit has been arranged in
cooperation with the Canal
one Art League.
The artist's bar.karrnunri is
varied and impressive. Sculptur
ine experience was imineri in
Boston, Mass.; while her paint-
hik was disciplined at Phillips
Gallery in Washington, in Mia Miami,
mi, Miami, and at the University of
Minnesota.
rne wire of Dr. Graham H
Fairchild of Gorgas Memorial
Laboratory, Mrs. Fairchild is fa
mous in her own right. In addi
tion to painting, the artist Is
profound literary scholar,
The exhibit on disDlav. done
in on, conte crayon, and pastel
uuuzes me categories or por portraits
traits portraits and still life and flowers.
The exhibition is, In part, a re retrospective
trospective retrospective show. Included are
the portraits of her two chil children,
dren, children, Ignacio Molino, James
Zetek, Llona Joan Sears and Dr.
John Boshell some of these
prize w!nners in the 15th Com
munity Art Show held in No
vember in the Tlvolt Guest
House.
3000 War Orphans
Going To College
At VA s Expense
WASHINGTON, (AFPS).-More
than 3000 sons and daughters of
deceased servicemen and vet veterans
erans veterans are going to college under
the new War Ohphans Educa Education
tion Education program, according to the
Veterans Administration.
Established by law to assist
children whose fathers died of
service connected causes, be between
tween between 10,000 and 15,000 students
are expected to be tatending
school under the program by
next fall.
War orphans schooling is
primarily for those between 18
and 23 years old. They may re receive
ceive receive a maximum of 36 months
education on VA allowances up
to $110 a month.
Tae VA said the peak in the
program should come In the
1960s when many children of
deceased WWII veterans, now in
tf.er early teens, will reach ell
Bible' age.

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A," DIABLO
BOX 1211, CRISTOBAL, CZ.
rOK SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Duty paid '49 Ca Cadillac
dillac Cadillac Convertible, '53 Harlay
Davidson motorcycle, Hi-Fi rec record
ord record player. Phono Balboa 2706
from 4 to 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: 60-cyclo ft -hp.
Wostinghouse motor, novor used
$45; 60-cyclo washing machine,
now motor $30; 3 fishing poles.
Phono 2-4424.
PROBES REDS Sen. James
0. Eastland, of Mississippi, is in
Honolulu, heading a congres congressional
sional congressional subcommittee to investi investigate
gate investigate Communist activity in
Hawaii
Homegrown,
Unpicked
HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 28 (UP)
Atalent scout for Warner Bros,
travelled nearly 5,000- miles to
find a girl who wag virtually just
around the corner. Seeking an
actress to play the lead opposite
Marlon Brando in "Sayonara,"
the scout conducted intensive
auditions in Japan before find finding
ing finding Mliko Taka at a Japan
ese-American carnival m Los
Angeles.
WHITNEY NEW
FROM US.
WASHINGTON. Dec; 28 (UP)
President Eisenhower yesterday a
cepted the resignation of Winthrop
W, AMrich as U.S. Ambassador
to Great Britain and appointed
John Hay (Jock) Whitney, New
York financier and sportsman, to
succeed Aidncn at the Court of
St. James's.
Mr. Eisenhower told Aldrich he
accepted his resignation with the
most regret. He asked Aldrich,
however, to stay at his ambassa
dor's post for a few weeks beyond
Jan. 20, the date Aldrich had
asked that his resignation become
effective.
"ites 'Personal Reasons'
Aldrich, who has held his post
for the past four years, said he
wanted to step down "for person personal
al personal reasons." He told Mr. Eisen
hower that he always intended to
return to private life at the end
or the President s first term.
Aldrich was nominated as am
bassador in January 1953. He was
president of the Chase National
Dank at the time.
Whitney, 52, is senior partner
or me jonn Hay-Whitney Co., a
JNew York investment firm.
Whitney now serves as a mem
ber of the President's committee
on education beyond the high
school level. He served on the
President's foreign economic poli policy
cy policy commission in 1954.
He was vice chairman of the
secretary of state's public com committee
mittee committee on personnel and is
a member of the business advis-
Madrid Train Jumps
Track; Five Killed
PONFERRADA, Spain, Dec. 28
'UP). At least five persons
were killed and an undetermin
ed number Injured today when
the Madrid-to-La Coruna ex
press train struck a broken rail
and lumped the track.
The accident happened be between
tween between Quereno and Soradelo in
Leon province.
The engine, tender, mall
coach, dining car and two pas passenger
senger passenger cars overturned, trapping
several persons in the wreckage.
A trainload of first aid equip equipment,
ment, equipment, rushed to the scene from
Leon. All hospitals In tne vici vicinity
nity vicinity were alerted to prepare
beds for the Injured.
Railway officials at the crash
scene said at mid-day that five
bodies were recovered ana tney
feared several other victims
were buried in the wreckage.
"We do not know how high
the casualty figure will go,"
they said,

FOR RENT

Apartments
ATTENTION. G. I.'l Just bark
modern furnished apartments, I,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold
Phono Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 5 1st Street No. 42. For
further details call 3-3337 or
3-1802.
FOR RENT: Furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished 2-bedroom apartment
at "El Cangrejo" near Hotel El
Panama. Living dining room,
bathroom, kitchen, hpt water,
maid'a room and bathroom, love lovely
ly lovely lawn. For Information call
3-6796, Panama City.
FOR RENT: Cool, comfortable
apartments: living room, dining
room, bedroom, kitchen, bath''
room. 4th of July Ave. No. Tl-3-52,
facing entrance to Quarry
Haighta. Inquire same building
11 to 12 and 5 to 6 p.m. or
3-3318 anytime.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, garage, in recently built
building, "J" Street, El Cangre Cangre-jo,
jo, Cangre-jo, near Cologio La Salle. Phone
2-2718. Sth Street No. 5-30.
FOR RENT: Modern one (!)
bedroom apartment. Combination
living and dining room, balcony,
built-in kitchenette complete
with stove, refrigerator, hot wa water,
ter, water, aliding door entrance. Campo
Alagre area. Phone after 6 p.m.
3-7192.
FOR RENT: Large apartment.
Living and dining room; porch,
2 bedrooms, large kitchen,
maid's room, 2 bathroom, ga garage,
rage, garage, $115. Call Panama I I-3338.
3338. I-3338. FOR RENT: January lit, com completely
pletely completely furnished apartment, two
bedrooms, living room, dining
room, large pore h, Venetian
blindi, garage, hat water, linen,
china. Exclusive residential sec section.
tion. section. Bell, Vista $175. Phone
alboa 1448.
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, living room, porch, kitch
en, maid's room, laundry and
playground, all ten
3742.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Refrigerator, stove. One
bedroom, tcreonod. 43rd Street
No. 27
AMBASSADOR
TO BRI7IAN
ory council of the Department of
Commerce.
Whitney's nomination is subject to
Senate confirmation when Con Congress
gress Congress convenes next month.
Tht, Aldrich resignation came
amid reports that the administra-
Hon plans
diplomatic
a reshuffle of U. S.
assignments in the
next year.
It was said that
Mr. Eisenhower may nominate
between 25 and 35 American dip
lomats to new posts in 1957.
There also was some specula speculation
tion speculation that the President would an
point new envoys to Moscow and
Paris. Some of the very early
nun ma nuns are expected to in include
clude include appointments to West Germ Germany,
any, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, the
rnuippines, and Norway
manes E. Bohlen, ambassador
to Moscow since March 1953, is
expected to be replaced during the
year, mis speculation is based on
the length of time Bohlen, prob probably
ably probably the top Soviet expert in the
U. S. foreign service, has served
m one soviet capital.
if Bohlen resigns, he may be
sucrauen ay Llewellyn E
mompson ambassador to Aus Austria.
tria. Austria.
There also has heen
ui wougias uwon, ambassa
dor to France, al.on win k.
placed. His resignation is not ex-
pecieo io oe accepted, however
until American relation. ..,irk
vy iiu
France improve.
TO HEAD TWA Carter L.
Burgess has resigned as as assistant
sistant assistant secretary of defense to
become president of Trans
World Airlines. At 3. he i
the youngest president of a
major airline. He succeeds the
late Ralph Damon.

BPPIrHRI iWW
MSW 'mOBOBM
V -sTol BToV
V Isroa

missfc i

RESORTS

FOSTER'S COTTAGES and largo
beach house. One mile pact Ca Casino.
sino. Casino. Phono Balboa 1866.
Spend your week ends at Rio
Mar, the boat bathing beach in
the Republic, with all conveni conveniences
ences conveniences Moderate prices. Th
now management it anxious to
servo you.
PHILLIPS Ocoaniido Cottage,
Santo Clara. Box 435, Balboa.
Phono Panama 3-1877, Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-IC73.
Reserve NOW. Inexpensive sat satisfying
isfying satisfying vacationi Santa Clara
Beach. Shrapnel's furnished
houses. Phono Thompson, Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 1772.
uact k-iccAQi r Mrs. Jean
Linck, formerly of Loveland,
Tex., was named '"Miss russa russa-ble
ble russa-ble of 1958" in nationwide
contest of several thousand
girls. Entrants' sent imprints
of their lips, made by "kissing"
a piece of paper, into a Wash:
inirion nr.. radio station. Mrs.
Linck now lives with her hus-
Iband at Falls Church, Va.
LOSES NO TIME Alice Sle
zak, 23, in the U.S. only a short
time as a refugee from the Red
terror in Hungary, has won the
first of ten scholarships the
University of Chicago has es established
tablished established for her fellow es escapees.
capees. escapees. A pre-medical student,
Miss Slezak said she was dis dismissed
missed dismissed from the University of
Budapest in 1954 after disagree disagreeing
ing disagreeing with a Russiav psysiologisL
Cut Classes?,
Yeah, But Wait
He Don't Say It
HAMILTON, N. Y. -(UP)- A
New York state English Council
committee has recommended that
high school English classes be re
duced to 25 students.
The committee on class size and
teacher load also recommended
that total teacher load be confined
to loo students.
The group said they found in a
two-year study that Engish
teachers cannot do an adequate
job for the average student when
the teacher load and class totals
exceed those figures.

' JB
bbsosTsW" dr0r9ejjjf -JsaWJ
BBS BBBBBS IsM
ljik :

"i sVHroSBsfiffisfflBgRSp

The committee said in a report1

published by Colgate University,

that special provisions must be
made for the least talented stu
dents. It suggested teachers be
given adequate time for evaua
tlon of papers and confetencp
with students, and for teacher re

sponsibilities in school other than

teaching.

FOR RENT

Houses
FOR RENT: Chalet, residential
sector, 4 bedrooms, hot water,
fenced. 7th Street Golf Heights.
Phone 2-240,7 or 3-3641.
WANTED
Apartments
WANTED: Apartment suitable
couple, semi-furnished, refriger refrigerator
ator refrigerator and range required. San
Francisco preferred. Nothing over
$60 monthly. Immediate occu occupancy,
pancy, occupancy, Call 86-4191 er corre correspond
spond correspond Box 64 Albrook AFB, Ca Canal
nal Canal Zona.

' : '
is jgJ

1

lS sososososoS

COL. GINK PEREZ, commandant of the USARCARIB School,
congratulates Cade Lt. Col. Norman Dials, battalion com commander,
mander, commander, after a review held at Cristobal High School.

r
TITFnAV
I
I "THE MAN WHO

&BIBlMBBBBI-lo"iR"S

WHO SAYS
A TWO
Make that

aCOLPANM
USED CAR
Our stock of lot model used cars
consists mainly of cars that have been
traded for new '57 FORDS
MERCURYS
Visit our ULTRAMODERN SH0WL0T
Panama 2-0625 Auto Row Colon 446

Position Offered

WANTED: Radio Technician
with experience in broadcast,
f M. Phono 2-0660, technical
department.
Help Wanted
WANTED: Maid general
housework, live in. Mutt be ex experienced.
perienced. experienced. Tivofi Avenue No. 18 18-64,
64, 18-64, Apt II.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT: Largo room with
light and phono, opposite Chat
Bank. Phono 2-3479,
i
IAMI TARY 1t
I
KNEW TOO MUCH"
YOU CANT BE
CAR FAMILY
second car .



THE PANAMA A HEP If AH AH INDPPENDEN1 DAJIT NEWSPAPER
PAOE ELEYER
TB 41 OF MAKTHA WAT HE
Qaek to Act
wilson smi
I TERRY AND TBI PIRATM
rf ouyotcTTieii
WW ItffttyL is the tbp icrESttffv 7
rTHEVE ON Wflfg TUNEf? InI PcHAZZ, OiP 80V ALL I LACK (5 ONE OF
OK WBR INTERCOM FREQUENCY wfU HEAR..J I COLONH. PIPIT'S LMMEMDOHABtSi AROUND
T MX FOR HUP"
CU7F7ENDAM0SHE
MEswrWneeDCPHOoe
El
m
m
553
iPWUstt'j
PBJSCILLA'S POP
Aims to Please
67 AL VERMES!
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
It's a Code
B7 MERRILL B LOSSES

AT. DECEMBER 21. MM

TC PLOT TRCkBtf, TMEUM j
TB BPT O0BvfT AfliBTM.9!,

j

TO.' 7T

mt.WlMlw.M.TJI.te..UP1,OW.

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olSA ( QJEETIN'5, FUDDSY! FER AtMLE V
Art nNV V WA5 AFRAID I'D HAVE T'MISS V
IMrSfl KCALLIKI' ON VA T PAY "r-

IT WAS YOU WHO

BROKE up out RO

MANCE, TbBy.-.vtxj

aAlD VDU NEVER.
WANTED TO SEE ME

AGAIN

SNiPFir

Sniff- mm

Sniff-- Tmis happens

SNIFF- J WITH EVEBV

PIGEON WHO
TRIES TO

Break up wnw

ME-TmEYJUST
DHANrTAKElT-

una.. 1

RAIWER.TMAN BREAK

YOUR ACHING HEART.

lit- COME BACK TbVOU

POLL

CODf 10 THE HEAD WITHOUT BEING

ALLEY OOP

Here We Go!

BY V. T. HAMLIN

DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
"To iMm your "Fortont" for today from the tur, write in the latter
f the alphabet eamtaeading to tit numeral en the line of the aetre
tesjett period iowhieh you wweborn. You will find it fun.
11)4371? 10 11 11 tS )4 II 1 17 II If N 11 It M J4 IS M
A I C M 1 t H I JK IMNOfQIJTUVWXYZ

"MAk.ii-

mm

MfW

30 18

1 22 5 12 2 25 1 9 18 II 12 1 H 0

1 30 18 1 14 7 5 18 2 5 14 S 20 19

S I 5 S 18 I 14 7 8 15 21 18 1

T

1 2 12 9 20 8 5 5 14 I II 21 14 20 8 II

9 14

n 11

30 8 18 3 5
S 15 12 IS

15 18 16 1 12 19

18 1 18 5 2 1 18 7 1 9 14 6 15 21 14 4

1 line

21 18 32 13 9 3 6 1 18 18 8 1 12 19

2 31 34 35 15 21 18 24 18 1 19 3 1 18 4 19

21 19 9 28 11 31 18 1 2 9 13 9 30 9 9 19

10 15 2 J 8 1 14 7 8 14 5 1 18 9

3 15 14 7 5 14 9 1 12 12 15 4 7 6 18 19

0i

0114

. tat

Crying Light' Alerts
Baby's Deaf Parents

DALLAS, Tex-. (UP) -Mr.
end Mrs. Robert J. Wood Wh
tetsUy daf, ue t "ttyiag light
ttteU them when their baby needs
Attention. ... v
The "crying Ught" was built by
Wood's co-workers at Texas m m-h.i.fi
h.i.fi m-h.i.fi iai Whenever the

baby cries, it sets a table lamp

to bunking.
k. w.m hnnn t.i. Mr. and

Mr. Woods, but confuses their
' mhd. whinh

cocKer spamei, "'v"
learned that a banking light, be be-fOre
fOre be-fOre the baby came, meant some some-liody
liody some-liody was at the floof.
the gadget isn't completely or original,
iginal, original, lettre Robert Joseph Wood
Jr. was born Oct. the parents
were intrigued by a magazine ad advertised
vertised advertised of a crying lamp but
were bothered by the large price
'tig
So, Ceil Magers and Jesse
Moeely at the insiniment plant put
together a box, containing among
other things a transistor, which is
placed near the baby's crib. Con Connected
nected Connected id the tabl. lamp which can
be moved to any part of the
howe.
Whenever the baby m ues the
slightest cry, the lamp start
flaahing and continues until a
switch on the box is cut off and
the device reset.
Naturally, the lamp flashes quite
often. And Topsv immediately runs
to the front door to welcome vis visitors
itors visitors because she learned months
ago that ringing the doorbell
caused lights to blink In every
room hi the house.
Lights, too, start off the day for
the Woods. They have alarm
clocks that wake them by blinking
at a pre-set time. Their son's hear
idg is fine.
Both the Woods attended special
schools in St. Louis, Mo., to learn
how to read lips and how to speak.
He won letters in football, baseball
and basketball at Jesuit High

School and also played football it
St. Benedict's College in Acheson,

Kan. She was graduated from Cra

zier Technical High School in Dal

las and from Christian College in

Columbia, Mo.

Defense Post Eyed
For Jap Ex-Ambass.
TOKYO. Dec. 28 iTIPl KiMiLo.

buro Nomura, Japan's ambassa

dor to Washington at the time of
the Pearl Harbor attack, was pro proposed
posed proposed today for the post of defense
agency chief.
The Cabinet nnst pnrrontlv ie

held by Prime Minister Tanzan

isniDasni.

ntisheri hv an influential drnun in

the ruling Liberal-Democratic par party,
ty, party, including Foreign Minister No-

bosuke Kistu.

Nomura was neeotiatine with

U.S. leaders in Washington when

Japan attacked Pearl Harbor On

Dec. 7, 1941. He now is a leading
member of the House of Council

lors, the upper house of Parlia

ment.

8n

IN THE MAZE OF NNETlNS TUNNELS WWIOA ARE Hh$
HOME,TME BUCKET dOPHEH OAh6 FA2E T0 TAE WITH
A VILLAINOUS HOUSEBREAKER. HE RETREATS. SWIFTLV,

RUNN1N6 BAcKWARv A FA&l At, His kunk kkww.

mSiSk wM -91 Bk?wQCa

mm mwv"

i m mm uwr

VWt lSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSH SSSSSSSSSSSESSn

I

WS TWILkSHT THAT THE

etoRHER'6 TAIL Vto&660&&0 A

TURNS WITHOUT LOSSOF SPBEtt

SIDE GLANCES

By Colbroith

If toxes aren't cut pretty soon,
people may start marrying for
'ov'flOOftt fU

n .' lil

HIM AM' HIS TWO. OHHO )
IPSO) BURIED THUGS.. THEY WCNT ( AWFUL.! i o)
OEL8ERT BOTHER M3U ANY U A tt
Wm, tUVE? I MORE ...I GOT "EM ( MONSTER y

OH, THANK. HEAVEN
I GOT HERE IN J
TIME...PW1ENCE, f
DB-BERT, IU. J

rTY.'r vis

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Yeab?

By EDGAR MARTIN

I e

1

IBsl

KiOO, C)OT OlOiE TpjVJME I T'COOW5.)7

BEKlEOTH TWS, WX)T
TVm PEBLt

THMsi6 OT

EEftUT9,

CAPTAIN EASY

Trouble

n

.

1 I I XfllMkX h I 1

ol

By LESLIE TURNER

nj HiRfi HELPING,

V THE 6H0W ILiS i

THEIR PARENTS 7
A THRU THE CLUB. Mittl

I WMJf TO AUE5TI0N HIM

ABOUf THAT WATCH STOLEN

PKUM HAflN SAFE- TWO

MONTHS AS0l BB

it iwur-fi 110 iVHPW A Y ,-im.NOI tucn

"FENCE IN TH1 5ttiURBB HE WAS THE

WAS KAIPEP TOPAyl AnP 0NB rVHO-HWW

we ounp our cLwcy solp

r. IV BW MfNW!

v ; 1

AfilLE ENOUSH TO THIfr 16 A 814 NI6HT
ESCAPE THRU THAT IN THE KID'S UPEl
TRANSW.IMfc JlWl WAIT TILL HESTHRU
BEFORE yOU FOUND WITH HIS PART 0'

1 TAKE HIM IN:

MORTY MEEKLE

Echo

By DICB CAVALU

r.. u.s. pm. on.

WAIT FOR JU-LCU15IPE?

THAT POCKET RW710

MAKKMff rCRVCuS

1 v

1 "W

Bw Ai V

MAN CANY HAVE A

LITTLE QUIET IN HI6

CWN HOME-

HOW

S3K

If TRY (71?. kONN5
Ib teeny live? m
TAglJrTT5...ypp

OUR BOARDING HOUSE

MAJOR HOOPLEOUT OUR WAX

By J. R. WILLIAM

'They're going to start kissing; games; wo can go hide
in the eioeet and come out in time for the eats!"

Faltering Philip!
Philip's life Is filled with braises,
Repairs would leave his home like new.
' A Classified, tnet the rrM rh

WHY THE

8ACkMOT)S

6ERET ? ARE

YOU PLAN"

tflN3 fO MOVE

IN WITH A

POSSUM

COLOMY FOR,

THE WINTER

OAA YOU

MISUT f?P.TTEE

FOLLOW MV EKAfAPLE

THAN FLADNiT YOUR

I6NORANCE.'- THIS COZY

HEADGEAR N1LL RE- 4
9TORE THE 5TREM0TH

t 1 OftT TUAT

i DRATTED 6AR5ER GAME

i ME A CRE.VM CUT-
THE HEAT PROMOTES

HAIR GROWTH AKiD

REBUILDS EhlECGy

-HAk-AFF.'

1 SET THAT'S
WHY DAMTEL

600NB WA5 SO
ACTIVE TRY

ING TO RUN

UNDER THAT d

FURNACE OH

MIS CONK.'

IL HIS CONK 'A

(?ER5Pll?ATlONl

15 HEALTHY TOO

IWf I DON'T KNOW WHETHER) W f OH, TAKE I
I I I L TO 2IVE YOU A G.OOP ( ME HOME 1
1 1 HOI3-T IN TH' PANTS rff K 7 TO AAV
I ffffi OR Take -iou home y ( fiTHER J
, h V, to ua P 1 V-y
JRwaiiw
QgN THIHTV VEAR5. 100 SOON t'iiSE '-iS

I
m



Carta Vieja-Chesterfield Doubleheader Tonight

Read story on page 8

Segregation Law 'Dead as DoornaH'
Federal Judge Orders Hands Off'
Tallahassee's Integrated Buses
ATLANTA, Dec. 28 (UP) Negroes waged their second of three' big integration
campaigns with indirect Federal court sanction today in Tallahassee, Fla., with whites
mapping counter moves in the other two test spots.
Buses remained integrated in Montgomery, Ala., but integration was called off
pending legal action in Birmingham, Ala.
Tallahassee integration leaders said the Negroes will take advantage of a Fed Federal
eral Federal injunction forbidding the city to interfere with the bus line even though it per permits
mits permits integrated seating.
Federal Judge Dczier Devane In issuing the injunction from his home in an ex extraordinary
traordinary extraordinary hearing last night saiefh believes segregation "law is as "dead as a doornail;"

Hnt n Montgomery, where

buses were integrated under
--A.r xMb nern and

nitinh.iin ahnt n inter CIS

iL .w4ir4 whitp citizens

Council leaders planned new le-

gal and popular opuuoiwu".

jRt council lescier

lerles of rallies 01 wm w
3m. hnn tn nnnnse the drive

cviuc i.u w r w
integrate Birmingham buses.
jnnthar nr emoted that White

mimtemen" ride the buses
arid enforce segregation.
White segregationists in Mont Montgomery
gomery Montgomery also threatened to pro pro-Srate
Srate pro-Srate the Rev. Martin Luther
King for his part in instigating
the Birmingham integration at at-tlfiipts
tlfiipts at-tlfiipts which resulted in 21 ar arrets
rets arrets Wednesday and another
yesterday.
The Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth,
BjjTblngham Negro leader, called
off defiance of bus segregation
IbSws until they can be tested In
Federal Court in defense of the
afefendants.
Birmingham police commis commissioner
sioner commissioner Robert I. Lindbergh or ordered
dered ordered officers to continue to
make "spot checks" to insure
that buses remain segregated
aM warned white "mlnutemen"
would also be arrested.
tfc. t r K Steele. Tal-

ahassee Negro leader, urged
Sm,-a. in continue to Sit

...he thou nlenxe. on buses AC-

Sue heal segregation laws
but to avoid conspicuptw aem aem-onstrations.
onstrations. aem-onstrations. A throng of jeering teen-agers
lata yesterday caused Steele and
ofier Negro leaders in Talla Talla-hassee
hassee Talla-hassee to abandon a publicised
plan to board a bus in a laige
group and mingle with whites.
fievane took Jurisdiction in the
ciSi-company dispute at Talla Talla-hassee
hassee Talla-hassee although the City Com Com-mlssion
mlssion Com-mlssion had ffled a counter-suit
a few hours earlier in the Leon
County circuit court.
Devane ordered the city to
atop arresting bus drivers on the
ground that the company had
violated its franchise by permit permitting
ting permitting integrated seating.
The Federal injunction was is issued
sued issued pending action by the state
court.
Passenger Gain Seen
Bf Airline Director,
100-Million in 1958!

TAMnnM TW M (Wi The

r t.h International Air

TriSDort Assn. Report tonight

umrM'e fhfHiilfd airlines car

WWW ..-
ried an estimated 78 million pas-

''Jtf'wilnam P. Hildred, director director-f
f director-f tho TATA, said "It is

not unreasonable to anticipate
that the scheduled airlines will

pais the 90 million passenger
mark in 1957 and will be carrying

100 million by 1858.

"Looking ahead a few years,"
he said, "the radical increase in

the meed and capacity of air

transport resulting from the intro intro-AmeAim
AmeAim intro-AmeAim f it. and t.nrhonrODS and

the. continued determination of the
airlines to price their prodection
riai tit the largest possible public

should make today's figures look

pretty picayune.
Hhdred said the world's passen

e'er air traffic Has literally

doubled in the five years since

rhe rate of incerase during

1856 has been 15 per cent for

passengers, slightly less for cargo

and 10 per cent for man. ne

reported.
f
I Weather Or Not
This weather reeert far the 24

fcawi ending I a.m. today, it re

fer the Meteorological and
graphic Branch of the Pan-

Canal Company:

BALBOA CRISTOBAL

l Washington's Integrated Schools

Draw Congressional Criticism

schools in the District of Colum

bia.

They said that two years of
"forced" ratfal integration had
lowered educational standards,,
resulted in "appalling" disci disciplinary
plinary disciplinary problems, and created
sex problems of "vital con concern"
cern" concern" to parents.
The subcommittee made the

finriines of lowered educational

standards and sexual and dis disciplinary
ciplinary disciplinary problems in its formal

report.
Then In a senarate document

labeled "additional views" the
four southerners called for a re-

Hwlro

am.

TIMPIRATRE:
His 16 I!
UST 71 71
HUMIDITY:
Mie. 5 7
Uf,. S5 7
WlSiO:
(max. mph) NWI4 N12I
RAIN (inches) 04 .05
WATiR TIMP.:
(iMMr harbor, i 10 10
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29
HIGH LOW
1:31 7:52 a.m.
2:10 6.v Ml ,.m.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 28 (UP)

fiUMlAMOV All IT.
The Southern members of the tion.

X 4V JW
six-man House subcommittee

SlX-niaii Jiuuac oum.yiiuiuvv --a- -
called today for re-establishment maxed a study of ractally-inte

of racially aegregaiea puduc grated scuuuio

look' Reporter,

Photographer Said
To Be In Red China

WASHTNfiTON. Dec. 28 (UP)

The United States is investigating

reports that two more American
newsmen have defied a State
Department ban and entered
Communist China, it was dis

closed today.

Dispatches from Hong Kong

said that Edmund Stevens, a

reporter, and Phillip Hollington,

a photographer, both employed oy
Look magazine, had arrived in

Peiping yesterday from Moscow.

Press officer Lincoln White said
the State Department did not
have enough information on the
reports to comment.
U. S. Ambassador to Moscow
Charles F, Rohlen told the depart

ment that he learned of the trip
from another newsman after Ste

vens and Hollington left Moscow.
Il sairi ho bad nnt heart in.

formed of the trip in advance and

consequently had not approved it.
Annfhpr Amprifan newsman.

William Worthy of the Baltimore
Afro-American, crossed the Red
China border at Hong Kong the
dav before Christmas

a spoxesman said ai mai ume --rr- -.-.-r-. l,
that "The department deplores Df the Dlstrlct of Colum

L:- -.! i n r- ---! DM.'

ins acuon uecause ii is hkhhisi

the expressed policy of the United

states government.
The State Department,

president' Eisenhower s

turn to public school segrega

The subcommittee's report cll-

The sturlv had heen under

attack from the start by pro proponents
ponents proponents of racial integration.
The National Association for
the Advancement of Colored
People charged that the sub subcommittee
committee subcommittee was under control
of "n'getts."
The four Southerners were a

monsr the 100 Southern members

of Congress wno earner mis year
signed a "Southern manifesto"
which denounces the Supreme
Court's ruling against public

school segregation.

Signers of that report pledg

ed themselves to use an iegtu
means tn nnnose the decision.

The subcommittee reDort con

tained .these findings:
1. The racial integration of
schools here was "too hastily or

dered witnout suiiicieni con consideration
sideration consideration of the enormous prob

lem.

9 "iPnrped" lni.eirrH.Mon "oreat-

ly accelerated an exodus of the

white residents to tne suouroan
areas nf Vircinia and Marvland.

This "seriously threatens the ed

ucational, economic, cultural,
religious and social foundation
of fiie District of Columbia."
If the exodus of whites contin continues
ues continues at the present rate, the re report
port report said, the nation's capital
"will become a predominantly
Negro community in the not too
distant future."

3. There is "a wide disparity
In mental ability to learn and
educational achievement be between
tween between the white and Negro
students."
4. In trying to cope with inte integration
gration integration problems, the morale of
some teachers "has been shat shattered,
tered, shattered, their health has been im impaired,
paired, impaired, and some have separated
themselves from the school sys
tern by resignation and early re retirement."
tirement." retirement." fl. The Negro has "demonstrat-
erl a spy attitude from the nri.

mary to high school grades that
. J.1 .1. J VII-

lias greavuy aimmcu wuiirc par parents
ents parents and is a contributing cause

of the exodus of the white resi

aen
bia.'

Reds Withdraw
12-14 Divisions
From Hungary

BUDAPEST, Dec. 38 (UP).
The Russians have withdrawn
three of the 12 to 14 divisions

rhev VtaA In Hrtrwarv at the

height ol last month's rebellion,
independent non-Com munlst

sources reiwted today.

one minor eas ana tweuvy ac-

,mr trjiro nova fsaxr BO tne

tanks, troops and supplies across

tne soviet Hungarian iiurw
recently and the movement

westward is continuing, the re

ports said.

The iniormation aoout so soviet
viet soviet withdrawal has been receiv

ed bv several inaepenaeni, xw xw-able
able xw-able sources here. It Is beilevia
designed to mesh with a master
plan to build a Hungarian gov-

ernmenu simiwr w mc

iook" Conununist regime in ro ro-land.
land. ro-land. No 'Bottleneck',
Nixon Declares,

In Refugee-Ins
CAMP KILMER, N.J., Dec. 28
(UP). Vice President Richard
M. Nixon denied reports yester yesterday
day yesterday that there is a "bottleneck"
in the government's relief pro program
gram program for Hungarian refugees.
Nixon, who returned Sunday
from a first-hand look at the
refugee problem in Austria, in inspected
spected inspected the refugee relocation
center nere and said procedures
for handling the Influx of Hun Hungarians
garians Hungarians are "improving every
uay."
The Vice President expressed
confidence the stepped-up Dn Dn-gram
gram Dn-gram here will soon be able to
resettle 500 refugees a day.
The fact that "less than two
per cent" of' refugees arriving in
Camp Kilmer remain more than
weeks nroves the falsity of

reports a "bottleneck" exists, he

saia., ...

Nixon, after luncn in a re refugee
fugee refugee messhall and making a
tour of the camp, which
houses more than 6,000 re refugees
fugees refugees awaittof relocation,
told a- news conference that
resettled, refugees will not be
sent "Into areas where unem unemployment
ployment unemployment exists."
Ho. .sin he did not anticipate

any special taxes to be imposed
to meet the expense of resettle.

ment, but "we can voiumijr
iav ourselves to support volun

teer agencies." .

Nixon saw ne anew m u se security
curity security risks infiltrating the U.S.
under cover of the refugee pro-
8r"None has been reported to
me," he said. "I'm sure I would
have heard of It." i
Right, By Gum!
CHICAGO, Dec. 28 (UP)
Charles Scott walked into a po police
lice police station, complaining "some
old rrav-halred sruv" had arrest

ed him for a traffic violation.

Scott's story was contlrmea Dy
the "old guy", Police Commis Commissioner
sioner Commissioner Timothy J. O'Connor.

.AUH.

vxv

... a.-x.w m w m m vsv -v s s s

AN INDEPENDENT -SS T HK V DAILY NEWSPAPER

Mama American

Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

32nd TEAR

PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, DECEMBER U, 1956

FIVE CENTS

R The Interrated schnnl svs.

... tem hero "eannot ho ennied" hv

int with I t, j
' other communities which seek

I TZj "an orderly ana successful scnool
Has refused to permit any Amen- operation
can to travel to Red China. The

governmenttoo the action h The formal report contained
view of Red China s refusal ta!nm. m ....in. i-.t.ioH

relesse 10 Americans now held mendn.r.lnnit ineiudlnrr theraitB..

there. It fears the Communists tion of student transfers to
may jail still more Americans schools which are' outside their
if given the opportunity. 'neighborhood

rwa7Sd-itJi

.Mi inn mnrw used

mere ore
JsTn spite of tr-ropidturrer

JM BaiiiiH
P gSJ BsSHF
ffSaav eaEPPBaa WrlSt s ': 'Uaaa
m iBf 19 SflnNsaaBflT iUmrLmtX

If No Snags,

WorkonSuez

Starts Today

LONDON, Dec. 28 (UP). The
United Nations salvage team
hoped to begin clearance of the
blocked Suez Canal today if njb
further hitches developed.
Negotiations were reported
started on the future operation
of the canal.

Israel disclosed that Egypt's
blockin of the canal had en enabled
abled enabled Israel to seise naval
control of the Gulf of Aqaba
by seuding some vessels a a-round
round a-round the Cape of Good Hope
and by transporting others a a-cross
cross a-cross the Negev desert.
Israel also disclosed it hart nf.

fered to exchange 5,600 captur captured
ed captured Egyptian soldiers for four
Israelis held by the Egyptians,
said it was preparing to claim
huge reparations from Egypt,
and raised new protests against
Egyptian commando activities.

Almost every step In plans
to reopen the canal have been
delayed by a series of negotia negotiations
tions negotiations between Egypt and the
United Nations, but Lt. Gen.
Raymond A. Wheeler, the U.N.
salvage chief, twice told the
United Press work would begin
today.
Two UN. officials arrived

from New York to try to prevent

iurther snags from developing.
They were Andrew W. Cordler,
executive assistant to Secretary

General Dag Hammarskjold, and
Alfred G. Katzln, deputy under

secretary of the U.N. Secretariat.

India s rovlne ambassador. V.

K. Krishna Menon, conferred in

Cairo yesterday and today with

President Gamal Abdel Nasser

and Was believed outlinina- the

latest ideas of the United States

and other nations for the future
of the canal.

State-Run Medicine

Faces Medical Fact,
Doctors Want Raise

LONDON, Dec. 28 (UP) Some

40,000 British doctors threatened

today to quit the state-run nation

al health service unless they get

a 24 per cent pay increase from
the government.
Some 22,000 general practition practitioners
ers practitioners and 18,000 consultants and
hospital staff are involved in the
dispute, which will roach show
week from today whtn doctors
loaders meet with government
officials te discuss the pay
claims.

The British Medical Association
announced last night that the
"strike" against the national

health service would not affect pa
tients, but that doctors would re
fuse to draw their government sa
larles, which have remained un
chanced since 1051.

The 1948' national health scheme

cave free medical treatment to ev

ery inhabitant of Britain against

oavment of a compulsory msur

ante premium of up to one pouna

(2.80 cents) a month.

Since then, small charges have

been imposed on medicines and

prescriptions, but doctors' pay

claims have been turned down.

The government now pays the

nhvsicians as civil servants, rny

siclans now earn so.iou ana are

demanding an increase to ss,mw.

HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Everyone was home for Christmas in the Galloway family.
but not without some assistance. Mrs. Ruby Galloway Is a patient in Gorgas Hospital. She
had to be taken home to the family Katharine on Christmas day in an ambulance. The oldest
son, William A. is an Army recruit taking basic training at Fort Dix, N. J. SFC Joe R. Gal Galloway,
loway, Galloway, head of the family, who works for the QM Section, Corozal Commissary, wired a
plane ticket to William for the trip home after phone conversations with the company com commander
mander commander of the training company. The two seafaring Galloways are aboard the USS Owl
berthed at Rodman Naval Naval Station. From left to right are Seaman Apprentice Jonas E.;
Pvt. William A.: Sgt. Galloway with son Jimmy Ray; Mrs. Galloway with daughter Julie:
Patricia Ann; and Engineman Second Joe R. Jr. The sergeant reported that having the
family together was the best possible Christmas present for he and his wife. (U. S. Army

Photo.). ..., .., ,.,-, n

ffkjjljjjwaLHp&ijH aiiBV A. euaaal MBggBP'P' '''' LV
WWW PK AaHliwaHHBaigl x9bbbbbibS: 'H
i iimiiii Tri m

fuFu1?8 7. -FVflh nd ohotographer at the huge Mallbu, Calif., brush fire run for
their Hvts with names just a few feet behind them after a sudden shift of the wind caused
the blaze to blow their way. . ummw
Los Angeles' Swank Bel -Air
Latest to Face Fire Threat

MALIBU, Calif., Dec. 28 (UP)
The third major brush fire in

three days of West Coast infer inferno
no inferno broke out early today in the
fashionable Bel-Air district of
Los Angeles.

The new fire was less than
20 miles away from where 1200
firefighters are battling flames
that have blackened nearly
27,000 acres and turned this
movie colony into a "disaster"
area.
The harried Los Angeles city

fire department sent 12 engine

companies manned by 110 men
to the residential area In Bel-

Air where flames were reported

licking over dried up foothills.

A fire department spokesman

said no homes have been de destroyed
stroyed destroyed yet. He said "there is a

good chance of containing this
fire before lt does any damage."

No injuries have been reported.

The cause of the latest fire

was not known. But fire officials
said an arson squad is investi investigating
gating investigating both the fires here and
the blaze at Bel-Air.
Flames have eaten up the
parched Malibu soil and de destroyed
stroyed destroyed at least 60 homes. The
fire exploded through the
streets here early today and
came within a few yards of
the swank $350,000 Malibu
Sands hotel
More than 1000 persons fled
their homes earlv tndnv tn es

cape the flames.

Gov. Goodwin J. Knight de declared
clared declared last night that a state of
disaster existed shortly after a
second fire broke out while more
than 1200 firefighters were bat battling
tling battling a two-day blaze seven
miles away.
Residents fled in terror as the
fire exploded In tinder-dry canyons.

"There is so much smoke w

can t get crews in there," said
fire chief Keith Klinger Who is
heading the army of firefight firefighters.
ers. firefighters. "We just hope that every--
one got out."

The second brush fire starter!

in a heavily-populated area near
what is called Hume Trqt. It
was whipped by strong northeast
winds and headed inland after
destroying 15 homes.

Klinger saio) it was tmpossi
ble at this time to estimate
when the fires might be
brought under control. He said
it might be "three or four
days" before the flames can be
quelled.
It was estimated by the sher sheriff's
iff's sheriff's office that damage across
more than 35 square miles from
property destruction and erosion
already, had reached $80 million.
The fires still are edging to toward
ward toward more built-up areas.

- V
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iitriiiiiiiigiii '"tfllfttt iwih
IuhBBbI aaBsEawaaPwawHb rgWWasWSIaSaSl aaroawMpBSiBSBliao

(NBA Telephoto)
FOREST FIRE RAGES OUT OF CONTROL IN CALIFORNIA This ft an aerial view of the
forest fire that is raging out of. control through the famous Malibu, Calif., movie colony area
outside Los Angeles. Hundreds of families have been driven from their homes and at least
one person Is dead. The blaze has destroyed more than 50 buildings.

Protestant Chaplains Here Hail
Gen. Harrison As Soldier Of God'

Lt. Gen. William K. Harrison,
jr., commander in chief of the
Caribbean Command, was salut saluted
ed saluted recently by the Protestant
chaplains of the armed forces
for his work as a "soldier of God
and a christian statesman."
These words, inscribed on a

scroll presented by chaplain

(Lt. Col.) Roy A. Morden, assis

tant chaplain of USARCARIB,
expressed the appreciation of
all the Protestant chaplains of
the Caribbean command for the

spiritual guidance, inspiration

and assistance given tnem oy

Gen. Harrison during his more

than two years here as com commander
mander commander in chief.

The presentation of the scroll,

which was signed by all the
chaplains, was made at a lunch luncheon
eon luncheon at the Army-Navy Club at

Fort Amador in honor of the
general who is departing for the
United States on Jan. 4 for re

tirement from the Army after 40
years of distinguished military
service.
The idea, originated by Chap Chaplain
lain Chaplain Morden, was for the Prot Protestant
estant Protestant cvhaplalns of the Army,
Navy, Marine Corps and Air
Force stationed here to salute
Harrison personally as a "Chris "Christian
tian "Christian gentleman whose spiritual
influence was felt by all who
came int ocontact with him."
Harrison responded to the
presentation with an expression
of his appreciation to the chap chaplains
lains chaplains and gave a brief talk on
the basic Christian principles
and their applieatio nto the
problems facing the world today.
The handpainted scroll was
prepared by Jim carter, a civil civilian
ian civilian employe of Headquarters
USARCARIB, and In addition to
the words of appreciation, con contained
tained contained an original drawing of
the General.

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