The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01824

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
s.D^JLY WSWSPA
anima American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $aje" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTI-EIGHTH YEAR.
111111 n
PANAMA, H. P., FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 1953

_

five com
If 7 GIs
(NEA, Radlo-Telephoto)
1HE LONG WAIT IS OVER Smiling United Nations soldiers wave from the rear of an ambu-
ance after their release by the Communists in first prisoner-of-war exchange at Panmunjom,
rea Only member of the group identified ia Warrant Officer Dwight E. Coxe (second from
it with beard) of Fresno, Calif. Ambulance took the men to Freedom Village, near Munsan.
* *' *
'The Kids
Coming Home
Tears
Dulles To Initial
US-South Korean

BY FRED SPARKS
PANMUNJOM (NEA) To
those witnessing the return of
our captosed Ofs, the event is a
sober, personal, throat-tighten-
ing affair.
Politics and hate are far re-
moved aa we greet with all the
facilities of an army in the field
those who have suffered so
much.
To the Communists at Pan-
munjom, the return of captured
North Koreans and Chinese is an
hysterical state event, strictly
pcTstlcfi. The Communist* re-
turn not to ah atmosphere of
peace and hope, but to one of
hate and revenge.
For days the Communist pris-
on chiefs prepared demonstra-
tions for the time of release.
These demonstrations r a c h
their conclusions as trucks 1th
Chinese, driven, by Yanks, reach
the Red base here. Each track
has a cheer leader who clenches
his: fist and leads the POWs in
anti-American cheers and Com-
munist songs.
' (NEA Radlo-Telephoto)
RETURN FROM HELL Army Cpl. Richard M. Davis of Battle Mountain, Nev., is borne on a
litter to a waiting ambulance after his repatriation. Davis, one of first UN prisoners freed I
Reds, told of a death march that claimed 1250 American lives In February, 1981. or io men
who began the march," he said, "only 150 aurviv ed."_________________________
Memorial Shaft to Goethals
Nears Completion in Balboa
Plans for the erection of a
memorial to Mai. Gen. George W.
Goethals, Chairman and Chief
Engineer of the Isthmian Canal
Commission from 1807 to 1914
and first Governor of The Pan-
ama Canal, which have been in
a project stage for more than 18
years are now nearlng fulfill-
ment.
Placing of the marble on the
58-foot memorial shaft at the,
foot of the Administration Build-
ing steps In Balboa has been
tJOmpleted and the only work re-
maining Is the landscaping in
the area which Is now being
done.
Final plans for the dedication
of the memorial are expected to
be announced at an early dale by
members of the Goethals Memo-
rial Commission, which is head-
ed by Ralph Budd, Railway "exec-
utive of Chicago and himself an
employe in the Canal Zope dur-
ing the Canal construction era.
It- is presently expected that
the dedication will be held some-
time early next year.
Prices Of Sugar,
Butter To Co Up
Soon In Britain
LONDON, Aug. 7 (UP)
British housewives were sched-
uled to start reaching deeper
inte the family pune next
month as the Ministry of Food
announced price lacreases for
sugar, butter, and fate.
Bagar prices will rise half a
penny a pound, butter goes up
four pence a pound and marga-
rine, cooking fat and lard two
pence. A temporary price re-
duction for bacon at four and sight
f-half pence si pound, and in
sed ham of a shilling a
id was also announced.
The Goethals Memorial was
approved by Congress in 1935
when an appropriation of $75,-
000 was made available. A design
for a memorial was first made by
Dr. Paul Cret, architect of Phila-
delphia, at an estimated cost of
$160,000. Congress subsequently
made1 available $158,500 for the
memorial.
The work was suspended In
1939 because of the impending
World War. The Commission
was reconstituted in April of
last year and is now composed
of Budd. Brig. Gen. R. E
Chan Gurney, R. H. Whit
Gov. Seybold and former Canal
governors Julian L. Schley and
F. K. Newcomer.
The monument was designed
by Shaw. Metz and Dolle. Chlca-
?o architectural and engineering
Irm. with the firm of Mndez
and Sander, of Panama, serving
as associate architects of the
project.
TJttr tear their seed Ameri-
ca* issued clothing to shreds, rip
etf their shoe* and even ~
crutches. iBut these caju..
handouts lossed In a pile are no
doubt salvaged later.
It's almost frightening the way
the Chines* march tato their
camp without a personal smile,
only a political shriek. I saw one
Commie make a long, carefully-
prepared speech to an American
medic protesting against assort-
ed United States actions.
Through an interpreter, the
medic said his Job was caring for
the sick of warnot starting a
new one.
On the other hand, United
Nations men pouring into
Panmunjom's Freedom Gate
are greeted with non-political
calls like: "Bet yoa rays don't
know who wen the World Se-
ries last year."
There's not a shred of hatred
visible at interviews of returning
Americans and British which I
attended. They all quietly discuss
the difficult first days after
capture and the later Improved
conditions. You hear no grudge
against the guards, who they felt
were merely puppets under or-
ders.
Status of a 1949 automobile ,_.: .,-. h
which changed.hands so often A."f".w.ft7^fS*..?K- Tolh
that It has become the bone of:*"w>-* OI^. tl Day
contention in a damage suit was | Worte'Asked whathe thought
.ought u^^oA^^^t^am^papsr.herald.
due, perhaps broken. lot. After a
cup of coffee and a cigarette,
most of them seem to resume the
life of the past as if they were
returning from a patrolnot two
years later, but two hours.
A casele remark that I'll al-
ways remember was made by a
GI as visiting John Fester
Dulles walked into the process-
ing center. "Meeting the Sec-
retary of State was the biggest
moment of my life," the soldier
said.
The fact that one hour before
he had been released from a Red
prison cell, also ft highly impor-
tant event of his 22 years, was
not mentioned.
In little partitioned rooms, the
Oils tell their stories to newsmen
and officers with the calm delib-
eration of a pilot being "de-
briefed" after a bombing raid. No
matter how sick the soldier may
be, aense of humor always wins
oveft grimmer memories. One lad
laughed as he recalled how the
Commies held a big conference
and decided to
Used Car WHh Long
Pedigree Starred
In Damage Suit
reports of frlend-
oen caged United Na-
troopers come from muy
A Scottish soldier, hi*
hair flying In all diree-
like a mop. recalls how
Commie haie-seuads tried to
stir friction between the Brit-
ish s^d the Yanks.
"If anything, it made us closer
friends," he said.
Although those of us who
(Continued on Page S, Col. I)
yesterday
Bpeevack filed claim for $800 a-
Klnst Harry Stevenson for al-
jdly taking the vehicle with-
out permission.
In filing the suit, Speevak
stated that the defendant had
driven away with his car which
was parked in front of tb
saslllan Affairs Building on
^ailla^d Highway June SO.
peevak said that Stevenson
took the car without his per-
mission and drove it into Pan-
ama City.
.* It is understood that Steven-
son was the former owner of
the car which changed hands
Several times. He apparently
news."
Many of us expected GIs re-
turning to freedom to be a nerv-
Navy Version
Of AF's Sabre
In Production
WASHINGTON, August 7 -
'UP)-The Navy announced to-
day that a new and faster
model of its Fury Jet fighter,
carrterrbased version of the Air
Force Sabre, has been put
through successful flight tests
and is going into production.
The Fury, a swept wine
fighter with improved gunsight
and armament, is powered by
the British-designed and Amer-
ican-built Sapphire Jet engine,
the Navy said.
Sapphires are rated at 7.200
Dounds of thrust, more power-
ful than the engines in any
but the latest model Sabres.
Defense Treaty
SEOUL, Aug. 7. (UP). The
United States and South Korea
agreed today on a defense al-
liance pledging America to come
to the aid of the Korean re-
public to repel- future aggres-
sion.
The draft treaty will be Inl-
Ualed Saturday by U.S. Secre-
tary of SUte John Foster Dulles
In a ceremony at President
Syngman Rhee's mansion, a
State Department spokesman
announced.
Korean officials said it speci-
fically provides for UB. "mili-
tary action" if South Korea a-
galn Is attacked by the Com-
munists and elves the United
States the right to base mili-
tary forces here.
American officials refused to
divulge terms of the agree-
ment. They emphasized it would
be Initialed rather than formal-
ly signed by Dulles tomorrow
because assurance of Senate
ratification .has not been re--
celved.
Korean officials said the de-
fense pact pledges the United
States to take "military action"
la support of the 8outh Ko-
rean repuMIAaiafee any furth-
er Communist aggression. It al-
to *ives the Unrtofc States the
List Men
Deserters
orts True
WASHINGTON, Aug. 7 (UP) Tht Army refusad
rodoy to occapt without exhaustive checking report! that
stye Americans have swallowed Communism and refut-
ed to be repatriated.
Legally, any American prisoner of war who refuses
to be repatriated because of conversion to Communism
would be classified as a deserter.
But before listing a man as a deserter, officials said
the Army would hoye to be "thoroughly satisfied" by its
own investigation that the soldier refused to be returned.
Under the ormistice agreement, all soldiers refusing
to be repatriated are turned over to the. custody of the
neutral nations commission, and each side has a chanca
to interrgate the soldiers and explain their right
return.
to
If after' such interrogation thing. Some of it's coming back
the Army is convinced the man to me new/
Only xAct Of Congress'
Can Make Haymes Citizen
A contract for the erection of
the memorial was awarded last
August to the Panama firm of
Constructora Martins, S.A. Ap-
proximately 200 tons of Ver-
mont marble was used for the
monument.
The memorial is located in the
circular plot at the north end of
The Prado. It consists of a 56-
foot shaft rising from a reflect-
ing pool Into which water will
flow from a series of bastas.
The memorial Is symbolic In
its concept with the shaft repre-
sentine the Continental Divide.
The shallow pool, 5 feet In di-
ameter and the- bastas,from
which the water flows represents
the flow of Gatun Lake water
through the locks and Into the
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.
The memorial is an Imposing
ght from various vantage
points in the area and particu-
larly from the Administration
Building and from The Prado.
HOLLYWOOD, Aug. 7 (UP)
An immigration official said
today that only "an Act of Con-
gress" could make an American
- citizen of singer Dick Haymes.
believedlone of thei Intermediate!who faces possible deportation
buyers had failed to pay for the because he chased Rita Hay-
automobile. worth to HawaU.
Speevak is suing Stevenson ] Herman L. Landon. district
fpr the aoproxlmate value of, director of the Immigration and
the car, $800, plus his costs for
court action. Speevak Is being
represented by Atorney Donald
J. McNevln
- Speevsk is an American em-
ployed In Panama. The de-
fendant Is also an American. He
worts for the Navy in Rodman.
Benefit Casino
Opens Tonight
Another benefit Casino will
open tonight at El Rancho
hear rarden.
Tils week-end benefit has
fceeri arranged to raise funds
fee the Matas Hernandez
Bespital Ser the Insane which
at present Is badly tat need of
repairs aad new equipment.
The usual gasees roulette,
dice, chuck-a-rark, black-
Jaek. etc.will be in seer-
attec.
Naturalisation Service, also said
he considered the crooner's
chances of being deported
"good."
The J4-year-old singer, a citi-
zen of Argentina, was arrested
by Immigration authorities yes-
terday while driving his con-
vertible along Hollywood's famed
Sunset Strip.
A few hours later he was re-
leased on $500 bond, pending his
appearance before as immigra-
tion examiner. How much free-
dom to travel Haymes has un-
til the hearing was not disclos-
ed.
Haymes was charged with vio-
lating the McCarraa-Walter Act
by going to Hawaii In June for
a singing engagement and a visit
with Miss Hayworth, divorced
wife of Aly Khan.
Under the McCarran-Walter
Act. an alien such as Haymes,
can remain tn the United States
but cannot renter without
permission If he leaves,
es. now 34, was born in
Aires, the son of an A-
concert singer and an
Importer. The Justice
it said he entered the
States on May 28, 1937.
for permanent residence, but
never Scame a citizen.
Mis Hayworth refused to
comment on his arrest. But his
estranged third wife. Nora Ed-
dlngfcm Haymes. who recently
said he was "a fool" for carry-
tag oa a cross-country romance
with Miss Hayworth, leaped
loyally to his defense. "This is
awful," abe cried. "I feel so
sorry for hlra."
Mrs. Haymes denied that her
husband tried to get out of the
draft earing World War n. .
"He tried several times to en-
list tn the American Army and
he was turned down because he
has high blood pressure," she
said. ^That's why he went all
over sha United sutes on these
Army eemp tours." *
Haymes' first wife was dancer
Joan Marshall, whom he mar-
ried OS Sept. 21. 1041. They
divorced Jan. 13. 1S4S. he
ried the current Mrs. Haymes,
the divorced wife of actor Errol
Fr/nn,
right to base armed forces in Is of sane mind and sincerely Captured 21 months ago, Kutya
- told a strange story of how vita-
min deficiencies plus constant
interrogation linked to .leave
maAyprlaoners with a blank
rhe Chinese questioned me
about American military infor-
mation. I steeled my mind a-
galnat military things. I tried not
to think about them.
"When the Interrogation was
(Continued en Page S, Col. 1)
Released US POW
Hungers For Look
At Marilyn Monroe
FREEDOM VILLAGE. Korea,
Aag. 7 (UP) A shy Ameri-
can soldier just released from
three years in a Chinese pris-
oner cams strolled inte the
Red Cress recreation room to-
day aad began searching nerv-
ously through a stack of ssagW
"Could I hela yee-f asked
Red Cross worker Winfrid Eiey
ef Lansing, Mich.
He looked about- and asked ia
a low voice, "AraM I see a
picture of Marilyn Monroe,
.nick?"
South Korea, they said.
Colombia Pre sklent
Seeks Qokk End
To 'Haya' Affair
by DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON, Aug. 7.
President Rojas Plnllla of Co-
lombia has made up his mind
to use whatever means may be
required to settle the four-year
controversy with Peru over Raul
Haya de la Torre, Peru's opposi-
tion political leader who has
been a refugee inside the Co-
lombian embassy at Lima since
November 1049.
Diplomats says that If neces-
sary, this may include making
common cause with Ecuador In
Ecuador's perennial border dls-
Eute with Peru, which recently
as brought on a new series of
armed clashes between Peru-
vian -Ecuadorian frontier gar-
risons.
Diplomats report that Pres-
ident Rojas Pinilla, former com-
mander-ln-chlef of Columbia's
armed forces, who seized power
from Dictator Laureano Gomez
last June IS has now named a
special three-man military mis-
sion to carry out a thorough re-
connaissance of Ecuador's roads,
airfields, and Army Installa-
tions. The Bcuadorean govern-
ment has willingly consented to
this undertaking.
The case of Raya de la Torre
has twice been taken before the
world court at The Hague, but
that tribunal's findings provid-
ed no adequate solution of the
oroblem.. Its last decisions,
handed down a year ago, held
that the asylum granted Haya
was unjustified and should end
but that Colombia was not
obligated to tura Haya over to
the Peruvians.
Both eovernment* claimed
this verdict as a victory, and
the stalemate continued as be-
fore.
Peru argues that Haya should
be surrendered for trial as a
common criminal. Colombia In-
sists that he Is a political re-
fugee, entitled to the right of
asylum traditionally recognised
by Latin-American governments.
When General Rojas took
over Colombia's government, he
announced at once that he was
hopeful of reaching an agree-
ment on this issue with Gen.
Manuel Odria, Peruvian chief
executive, "as one military man
to another." However, prelimi-
nary overtures from the Colom-
bian Foreign Ministry were
promptly rejected by Peru, and
Odria stated publicly that his
country's position was unalter-
able.
Since than, the controlled
presa ef Lima has launched a
series ef vigorous attacks an
Colombia.
The letter's next move will be
to ask the Organization of A-
mertcan States to seek a solu-
tion. But President Rojas Pinilla
has toM intimates that, if this
gaseare is unsuccessful, be is
determined to settle the matter
by "whatever method may be
necessary. .
does not want to return, officials
said, the Army has no alterna-
tive but to list him as a deserter.
legal ene than that ei a
threatened penalty or retribu-
tion far a change In poM.ical
views.
"Actually,"- one official said,
"we'll look upon such persons
as psychiatric sufferers from
Communist Indoctrination tech-
niques."
Before a prisoner could he
convicted for desertion, he would
have to be tried in person by a
military court martial. The max-
imum penalty for desertion In
time of war Is death but an of-
ficial said such a sentence has
rarely, if ever, been imposed.
Meanwhile at Inchon, In
Korea, a repatriated captain
said today that many prisoners
loet their memories in Com-
munist POW camps when they
tried te resist Red interroga-
tien.
Vie called It *POW memory,""
said Capt. Joseph J- Kutys of
Drexel Hill. pa. "It was a sort of
mental blackout.
"Two months ago I couldnt
tell you a thing about accounting
although that was my civilian
business. I had forgotten every-

Most Everybody's
Daily Sex Life
Is Illegal Kinsey
CHICAGO. Aug. 7 (UP) Dr. searchers learned of the prev-
Alfred C. Kinsey said today that alence of Illegal sexual activity
SS per cent of all American! in their interviews with men
wamenand 95 per cent of thel and women,
mensooner or later engage In He said that he and his
sex acts that would land them scientists do not "determine
In jail If Une laws could be en- what the sex laws should or
forced. should not be," but can only
On the other hand, the famed provide "data" on which leg-
sex scientist and zoologist, said i islative policy could be based,
only about one per cent of the "We suggest that the social
population ever goes to jail for interest would be best served If
sex offenses. i there were more objective die-
"Our sex laws ar so comple- cussion of what sex activities
telv at variance with actual are of most concern to society,"
behavior that full enforcement! Kinsey said.
The Hoosier researcher, for
Instance, classifies exhibitionists
and peeping toms as' "nufatan-
oas."
"They dont threaten people
or institutions," nt said, "but
unfortunately many people
think they are potential rap-
ists."
He said 3 study of 1 300 male
and female sex offenders show-
ed that the exhibitionist or
peeping torn should be separat-
ed from the phychotlc offender.
such as a rapist.
Kinsey was asked what sen'
is Impossible," he told a news
conference yesterday.
'A great deal of everyday sex
behavior Is illegal"
The Indiana University pro-
fessor, 1 author of "Sexual Be-
havior in the Human Male" and
the new. uareleased "Sexual
Behavior In the Human Female"
addressed a refresher course for
prosecuting attorneys at North-
western University.
Reporters and the public were
barred from the speech.
At the news conference, Kin-
sey said that police and prose-
cutors commonly refuse to en-
force sex laws to the letter sation he thought his new book
since such action, coupled with,on women would create when Jt
good detection, would overflow Is published Sept. 14.
the nation's jails. "No doubt it will sell better "
Bs said his group of sex re-1 than the book on males, he sasi.


r*
v -.
lift TWO
TUB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT OAIIT NEWSPAPER
PRIDAT, AUGUST 7,
i i \
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
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>atua ia latitn haM raaaan
Labor News
And
Comment
Alternate Big Four
e
A DOG STORY
Sir
There has been much hubbub about dogs in your mail mag
lately. And in other p-rtl oi your paper I've seen where were
people were "getting rid" o their pets. I even heard one min
sav he would rather kill his dog than pay a two-dollailicense tag.
Sol lust thought maybe it would be a good Idea If you would
run this piece. It's the story of a trial brought by the owner ot
a dog which was shot on another man's property. The property
owner claimed he had a right to shoot the dog because it was
trespassing" and was a "sheep killer." but the dog owner slawyei
made no reference to the incident at all. He simply addressee
the jury as follows: .
"Gentlemen." he said in a voice free from emotion and In
manner free from gestures, "the best uiend a man has in the
world may turn against him and become hia enemy. His son or
daughter that he has reared with loving care may prove ungrate-
ful. Those who are nearest and de.rest to us. tnose v,nom we
! trust with our happiness and our ood name, may become traitors
>to their faith. The money a man has he may lose It flies away
>from him when he .needs it most. A man's reputation may be
sacrificed in a moment o ill-considered action. The people who
are prone to fall on their knees to do us honor when success is
Tvlth us mav be the first to throw stones ef malice when failure
: settles its clouds upon our heads. But, gentlemen, the one ab-
solutely unselfish friend that, a man can have in this seliteh
: world, the one that never deserts him. the one that never proves
ungrateful or treacherous, is his dos. A man's dog stands by him
" in prosperity and in poverty, in health and in sickness. He will
I sleep on the cold ground where the wintry winds blow and the
snpw drives fiercely. If only he may be near his masters side.I
Ha will kiss the hand that has no food to ofier, he will lick the
sores and wounds that come from encounters with the roughness
'pf the world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he
were a prince. When all other friends desert, he remains. If
riches take wings and reputation falls to pieces, he is as constant
in his love as the sun in its journey through the heavens.
"If misfortune drives the master forth an outcast in the
.world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher
i privilege than that of accompanying him to guard against danger,
'to fight against his enemies. And when the last score of all
3 come* and death takes the mar sr in its embrace and his body
is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends j
. pursue their way. there by the graveside will the noble do* be I
found, his head between his paws, his eyes sad but open in alert
: watchfulness, faithful and true, even in death."
By Victor Riesel
MUNICH, Germany. There
are men in this propafca...aa
warfare capital who have such
massive data on what It "hap-
pening behind the Iron Curtain
that they have 'been trbte to
predict accurately Soviet ma-
neuvers lrom three tp six
months beiore they o-curred.
These men now believe there 1
a shooting civil war inside
Kussla between divisions of the
secret police (MVD) and the
Red Army.
There is no doubt here that
the rebellious secret police will
be wiped out by the Army.
But not until tne ,VD'i
private an force and special
armte J dA.aions ta..e a oioooy
toll of Red soldiers in many
towns.
This heavily curtained war'
fare, is eatd here! is being
/S/..4 oetioeen followers of
the deposed Lavrenti Baria,
who ar not waiting around
to be slaughtered, and the
Soviet Army's brutal po.likal
police, a branch virtually un-
known to the American public.
The psychological warfare
scientists, gathered here In the;
ill give you three guesses who won the case.
Mter
TOMORROW NIGHT
ANOTHER
* '
GAY GET TOGETHER PARTY
AT THE
ATLAS GARDEN
Your choice of a special dinner and ail the draught beer,
dry Martinis or Manhattans you can drink,
from 7 to 1:30 p.m.
$1.00------PAYS FOR YOUR DINNER-------$1.00
and the cocktails nnd beer
CAROL GREAVES ORCHESTRA
FOR YOUR DANCING PLEASURE
VISIT OUR AIR-CONDITIONED COCKTAIL LOUNGE
THE TOWN'S POPULAR RENDEZVOUS
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERY DAY
The home of the world famous
Vew Orleans poor-boy sandwich
60c.
HECTOR DOVVNE
To Greet You
nerve center of Radio tee Eu-
rope, beiieve that this Red civil
war developed in this la.Mili.n:
As far back as Feb.' IS, a Ma],
Gen. Klsilev was killed in the
Kremlin. Of that there is no
doubt. Though unknown to the
world, Kisiiev was a meat vital
part of Stalin's iron machine.
r or Kisiiev was commander o
cialln's personal Kremlin guard
of about LOGO tough ir.cn. The
major generis oeaui leit the
guard without any veteran
icadeishlp.
A few days later another
Moscow m>ieiy ma.i, u.im.ov
aiinough ne vat o.u of the
most poweriui ouicia.s In the
Soviet world, dlsappcs.u. Jit
was Coniiade fcs^ic^yshev.
There is no uoubt of his Disap-
pearance, its been double
checid.
Tow.uschl Po.sk re by she v wat
head oi sou men wh i were the
actual peer under Stalin,
'ihey were, in fact, a hard core
of super-secret policeStalin's
personal secretariat. Under Pos-
krebyshev these 800 men ruled
even the MVD. They were the
palace administrative body, an-
swerable only to Stalin, appoint-
3 on.v by Stalin, coordinating
eery single agency aud ministry
.u all the Soviets.
qtie W4SHIH0T0H
MERRY-GO- ROUND
ly DRKW PIARSON
**r" -
~~**1KfV*XXXM**XCKrt
ALVIN Sterling
$18
UU 6 pc. place setting, C. Z. Deliver)
rii^hi lovely pattern to choose from
mercuri
Convenient
Credit Terms
May be Arranged
HeatIt Catted TU**
*
ENTRAL in person
OF THE WORLD FAMOUS .
"NICHOLAS BROS
HOLLYWOOD and TELEVISION STARS!
Plus: A VARIETY SHOW. .!
ONEIOA and EMILIO"
Acrobats of Fame.
M
"CHELO RICO"
Piste Spanish Singer
ON THB SCREEN:
"ON OUR MERRY WAY"
with Paalette GODDARD Jane STEWART
B'JCNK TIVOLI $100.00 F It E E >
Also:
"JUNGLE CHANG'
Kirk Douglas, in
"IIG SKY"
With Klsilev dead and Pos-
krebyshev iquidat'd and Sta-.
tin's pSiMnut pUy.s.iuii:: jailed,
the 74-year-old Red ruler was
at the mercy o/ the old guard,
which now wanted to see the
dictator dead. And dead he
was on March Sth.
With Stalin out of the way
i he tug-of-war lor power tensed
ihe entire Kremlin. Bart. had
an MVD loree of 2,000,000 secret
police, according to the vast
archives here.
In addition to their tanks,
warp)a nes and armored divi-
sions, these secret police con
trolled, all arsenals and ammo
dumps. The Army had the euns,
but only 24 hours of firing
rounds. The MVO had the keys
to the munition depots. That
was Stalin's technique for keep-
ing power from the generals.
It is important to know that
Stalin had created another
force to keep the balance of
power. This was a managerial
group which .actually shared in
the profits of all Soviet enter-
prises.
Here's how it worked: every
factory had its production
quota. The workers were pushed
in the manner which is now
so familiar to the world since
the Berlin June Day riots. If
the plant exceeded Its quota by,
say, three per cent, the wages
o all workers there would go
up three per cent as a bonus.
But the pap of the manage-
rial group, which was, and.is,
a powerhouse inside Russia
beause of its technical know-
ledge and indispensability as
a mass bloc, was hiked any-
where from SO per cent to ISO
per cent each time the factory
passed its guota.
They really shared the profits!
There was only one threat to
the stability of this group, which
lives in expensive and scarce
villas, drives big state cars and
buys Its food and luxuries In
special stores. That threat came
from Bertas secret police and
the MVD stool pigeon system,
which had something on most
of these managers.
So the managerial group tied
In with the Army and other
forces against Beria. Thes
factory executives were deter-
mined that they would no long-
er be at the mercy of early
morning MVD squads, whlcn
could pick them off one by one.
So Beria Went. The MVD split.
Part was loyal to Its chief. The
other Joined with the Red
Army, .now the political power
nrtde Russia for the llrst time.
But none of the specialists
here believe that Berla's fol-
lowers gave up without a run-
nio* bloody battle. The special-
ists do believe that some day
the world will learn from some
refugee that there was deadly
civil war inside Russia in the
months after Stalin.

PARIS. I suppose there must be one or two
Americans left ta America.. One or two British
left in England, and a few Germans scattered
around ine Vaverland But It. seems to me that
something must be done to make lebensraum for
the displaced French who have been displaced
in Paris by the world, with Americans leading
the way. .
You caaujot walk the streets of Paris, or go in-
to a shop ia Paris, or walk through a hotel in
Paris, without running into old Joe. from Ko.-
kemo, who never had the time or money to even
contmplale the continent before the provident
air lines stuck in that fine tourist fare, which
would give Joe a breezy trip aboard for about as
much as he would spend getting himself mos-
quito-bit at the beach.
The same thing applies to Rome, and to Ma-
Faces And Places
By BOB MARK
I kind of resent all this wholesale traveling, no
matter how broadening it may be. It has stolen
distinction from the fellow who used to make
one trip abroad and dine off it the rest of his
life
There was a time when the man who crossed
the waters was a celebrity. You would smirk and
sey: "Now, when I was In Paris last year I saw"
and everybody would be properly appreciative of
what a gay dog you were, and so brave, too, to
go all what way without fearing the language or
the customs.
I made a couple of trips on a freighter, as a
kid. and was the local celebrity In Wilmington.
N. C for mopths. For behold. I had seen the
far places.
For the rest of my life I have, held .that awe
of being a stranger in strange places, and so
drtd, and to .London, where the tourist.has re-, find. It odd In an pui-of-way town in fcata to
placed the local .' ie flck of Texas wildcat oilmen planted down
The wSuld today seems to have become, a. sort to the talddJ#of ndwhere. and^ctlninfa ****-
of large^roota Shor's where yoil carl erpect to province of Navarre was a section of Deal
meet anybody at arty time. There Is rio'Place to
hid*. A man can be holding the quiet hand ef a
strange blonde In a Montmartre night club and
run Into his wife's mother.
There Is more Texas-talk In urope than there
is In Texts- Hamburger Joints have sprouted in
most of the major dtles. You can get a kipper-
ed herring ta Rome, a decent gazpacho In Leeds.
There Is no such thing as a separate language
any more. Everybody speaks a blend of Ingllsb-
French-Sptnish-Itahan. -
There is ho need to go to Hollywood to see the
movie stars. They are all In either the George V
or the Ritzs bar in Paris, after having Just come
from Madrid, Rome or London. I have been In
half a dozen cities lately, and have seen at least
three of the same people in all she cities. You
cannot wait out a olane in an airport without
colliding with five old enemies.
The well-worn wallet Is indeed a mess at the
moment. Mine contains lire, escudos, francs, both
French and Swiss marks, pesetas arid fragments
of pounds sterling. This does not include some
old ones, such as Egyptian piastres. Greek drach-
mae, and Elthloolan dollars. The average tourist
could retire-on what he has left over ta unusable
currencies.
County.
I still find it peculiar to walk into a Joint In
Germanv and run acros* the same bunch I saw
last in Tim costello's on Third Avenue.
The other day I was in Madrid, accidentally,
and came across the festive openlne of Mr. Con-
rad Hilton's new hotel, the Castellana, a seg-
ment of a serles of hotels which he is building
to cater to the tastes of Americans abroad.
Apart from Gary Coooer. Mary Martin. Tex and
Jinx. Leo Carillo. Ethel Smith, and four or five
hundred newspapermen from New York, there
was onlv Ed GaTdner, of Duffy's Tavern, to lend
a Spanish flavor fa the scene. They all went out
and fought cows.
I suppose this Is what is truly known as one
world, but I feel a little uneesy about It. If the
M"*ssrs. TWA and Pan Am keep functioning, we
will eventually wind up with an Interesting sit-
uation: Everyone who should be here will be
Eventually, thev will all get bored and swap
locales, and th* tired two worlds old and new
will be righ' back wherethey started. At home,
where thev belong. 1
(Copyright, It53, by United Featare Syndicate'
lire.). .Metf
NEW YCM CONFIDENTIAL
By LEE MORTIMER
given a package. He opened It with keen tn-
tlcipaUon. having so often received expensive
gjfts from loveldrn heiresses.
Out Jumped a Uve skunk!
A card In the box read. "With love and admlra-
THE BIG TOWN: Niefcy fluattiwcleeehl, silent
creen leve, ex-man-abent-toWn, philanthropist,
and Knight of Malta, celebrates If. years as own-
er of the fabalos El Borracho Restaurant.
THE LOWDOWN: Nicky "wat "vampire'; Fola tloji fromyour dearest frlend. Macoco.
Negri'a leading man until the talkies put him out
of work. .Hit high accent which thrilled divers pigeons when be held their
little hands in dark corners, was, a bit too thick.
for general romantic consumption. Thus tn-
world was saved from another Charles Boyer.
Which is a break any way you look at H.
BOW ABOUT THE
HOUSES?
FOXBORO, Mass. TUP) The
combined ages af four harness
horse racing drivers at Bay
State Raceway total 270 years.
The drivers are James Sullivan
at-' Den Steele. both of Boston
EdVlie Rowe. PioMm-e. R.
NICKY'S TORN CAME f few aanl***;
coco, yoa see, has a fear of height He weald not
live la an u*snet above the first floor. He
also insisted on oir-oondltlonUig. The*MtaMtta-
Uke unit of bis conditioner was withini area*
reach from the sidewalk. So Nicky reached up
and inserted a whole pounu of ripe and fragrant
Drew Pearson says: Senator Tobey's biggest battles were
against big corporations; He exposed bribery of U.S.
district court by RCA; Ike wants powtr to vete sepa-
rate items in appropriations, bills.
WASHINGTON: They buried old Charley Tobey up In the I
green hills of New Hampshire the other day. He was a great Sen*
ator and the nation will miss him. I shall miss him too.
Three years ago almost to the month, I wrote a story abmlt
Senator Tobey captioned "Tobty's last battle." It read In part
"Charles Tobey, now 70 years old, has been campaigning
with the vigor of a man aged SO. But he has been fighting al-
most slnglehanded. while his opponent appears to be well heel*
el with campaign funds.
"Money and Influence being what they are In politics, Tobey
will probable lose.-:
"But though powerful New Hampshire publishers are against
Tobey, this columnist does not propose to let him finish his fight
without paying tribute to e? grand old man who hae courage of his convictions; and to express the opinion that If
Senators who hare hud the courage to step on Important people's
toes continue to be defeated, we may have a Congress of men
who spend their time bowing from U>e waist ta the presence of
big campaign contributors."
Fortunately, I wea wrong. It was not Tobty's last battle. He
won that election.
The Manchester Union-Leader, biggest paper in the state,
canceled my column for what I wrote, and Tobey, at the age
of 70. went on to fight many more battles for the little people
who elected him.
TOBEY'S BIGGEST BATTLES
But though the public will chiefly remember Tobey for hit
battles against crime, they were by no means his most important.
More courageous by far were his Ditties against certain big eorS
porations. -*
It was Charley Tobey who exposed the operations of SB*
giant Radio Corporation of America when It endeavored to wanpf
out of an antitrust case.
RCA, with its control of the' National Broadcasting Company'.
Is one of the nation's most important moulders of public opinion.
Its power to bar .people from the air. id report the newt as 11
tees tit can mean political life or death to a senator.
Despite this Senator Tobey showed, in hearing before his
Interstate commerce Committee, that RCA had hired ex-Sen.
George Moses Of New Hampshire to try to squelch the antitrust
case against it. When he failed, RCA hired Ben. Dan Hastings of
Delaware, a top member of the Republican national committee.
Hastings, according to the Senate testimony, was paid *7-
500 by RCA, of which he paid $2500 to the clerk of the US. dis-
trict court in Wilmington. Del.
The clerk then induced Judge John P. Nlelds, appointed to
the bench through Senator Hastings, to postpone the antitrust
suit Finally RCA got off with a consent decree.
FOUGHT TO END ,
Senator Tobey dared spell out this shocking story, showing
In detail how one of the great corporations of America had ra
sorted to bribery. Few others had Ms courage. ,,,
Tobey also dared brave the giant Textron company wk'
operaste 20 textile mills in New England, showed how Roys
tie, head if Textron, had mad heavy personal profita
should have gone to stockholders.
Refunds totaling $00,000 were give,baek to stockholder
as a result if. Tobey's eoWige. *>.. -
oil interests wlSrPne-blOied the confirmation of^SffiSian Ed
Pauley to be undersecretary of the Ntyij., a Mrjaa/t
The 1*** tin T talked to Senator Tobfey -- WMTa month
ago *-I urged him to take it e^H ha softwe^ one sfrok.
M^tw
Jersey
Was working day arid night on a
-front. He Was 73 and raldnt1 last f,
"That's what my wltoyt," theoWtoftiejiBFK^M I carft
seem to stop. ThereTt Jdtt too much to d.9
And so. working for the poop of the nation right up to th*
very end, Charley Tobey passed on to other work iri other vine-
yards.
ITEM VETO
II
virav r.sisvtTATFD to New York where he llmburger In the unit. Within 15 minte
S^Sb.WK|S =338 MtfiffMS 2
getting by. He was made welcome ta.eomedf the air It out. # #
u..i #>* aiM. hniriH vhr# hiue-blooded and ______ __. __JM1.... _^,i
best East Bide homes where blue-blooded
blue-booked hostesses found hbn amusing and a
swell dancer. And his romantic accept!
Thus the cutlet went for him, too. but Nicky
always managed to retain his amateur tondtag.
\%7f1tsV!S^Xj^/^^ '
where he
boy. and
Ritchie
cuesedThe ISSEtlSSZbuTnSE
-"Tirr.! _w_ Z.Ia .h.t ONE OF NICKY'S most profitable practical
Jokes was played on his friends at large. He
formed an honorary committee to promote a
"Bundles for NldrT party, conceived with the
aim of furnishing his bare 12-room apartment.
The committee'* printed stationeryMacoco
only one who talked about them In smgllsh.
, .^.w '*%! J.*, ...nuca which ANOTHER PROFITABLE GAG was El Borracho
IN ADDITION to ** j^l "**" fwhich meant "drunkard"). Nicky talked a cou-
made hna the Mle of the party Me* wat a <*"C.B .^"iJJ-S^ciudiagi Oracle Fields, into
practieal Joker of ta*eiwtteal **~**?* J^^St^vt^^^^ P"* u
WM. t~L a?-aT7 ?,E52'1u. ^dough'^ttU down and contributed the
7,n&",J'92J!Ztt.^ttami?&*M ideas To save the expense of wallpaper he
family's large hHH*)gt ta the Arger ,?-ri the wills with the lipstick imprints of
him with the wherewithal to tad.lge hie bobby ^^fVrii^ And" cotex the cellta
:&Saw?egca s$g^WJars
issjfsaa'SsrSisvst HHwS.taSS
as meanest to teesoty. # Ssdre and tablet.
in THBBE TWO WHIR
?! ta".?*^.TlSpreeS. W!
The pMlc doesn't, realist it. but for yetrs American prelP
dents have been plagued by -the fact that they ctuj-t vtto a
specific item ta. an apptojrl*tioiU measure. They mdefvete the
entire bill or nothing. _
^ The cure for this, accprltag to two conscientious .Oeanea-
men, Florida's Charlie Bennett and Ntw York't Kenneth Keat-
ing, It a constitutional amendment. Havina drafted tbJt amend-
ment, the two congressmen took It to the White House where Jke
gave it hit warm endorsement;
'1 can't tell you hoiTmuch I wish your proposal were al-
ready a part of the Constitution," said the President, rather
sadly
"Only this morning I had to algn an epproprlatkma bill that
was Just loaded down with odd little items that I wanted to cut-
out.
"But I had no choice. It was a cue of all or nothing. I either
had to accept the whole measure or reject lt.'*_
As Ike continued the discussion with the Florida Democrtt
and the New York Republican, he became increasingly enthu-
siastic.
"Yluiow, I've talked to a lot of experts on the Constitution
about this said the President. "And every one Jtft se real
understanding of the subject has agreed that we've got todhango
the rules so the President can knock, out those expensive and
Often useless little riders that are tacked onto huge appropria-
tions btm. It'lUava million of dollar gad actually ghiui bet-.
**T NOTE-AdJai Stevenson agreet with Ike &eMM to Bfch
mond. Va.i last September M. Stovemon noted that mW'
confederate conatitutlon provided for an Item veto. He termed
the provision a "Classic exemple of the political genius of the
South."
WHAT'S IN A NAMB?
*
Democratic Congressman Don Magnusen, ex-ne^paperje-
porter and first man to serve as wP>**tlT-.*i*1,*{R .2?
Washington tate, Is constantly asked if bt't related to. M MP-
ator of the same name and tete.^ .,.m./i,
The questions almost caused the congressman to name Tils
latest son Warren, after the Senator. *
"Then," he aid. "when people ask me ,If I'm related to War-
ren O. Magmison. I can say. sure he's my ton." < -
At the last minute, however, the representative backed dejrn
and named the boy Eric O.
When be flrtt announced for Congress.'even *,>*<****
In Magnusoa* bam tate felt he wet wasting his tinke. Because
of thl, the party bosse* backed Magnuaon to tbetaM of *000
_ mtre chlcWfild compared to-the <^}-1^.*!lgg
which Republicana put behind Al Conjee, hit gmrnL Ibta
represented more money.than was spent by any other candidate
for the House of Representatives. i
Magnuson admits that part of hjs victory was dut to thtj
popularity of Sen. Warren Magnuson- ..
But he also attributes part of his success to the family dog.
who traveled through the state with hU master bearing a sign
"Vote for Don Magnuson. pemocrat, for representative-at-large.
UNDER THE DOME
California's quiet-spoken Coapteamtin Clyde Doyle the man'
who forced the House Committee on Un-AmerlcAetlvlties to
give Bishop Oxnam a fair hearing, has been deluged with mail
running 100 to 1 ta favor of him and the bishop.
Homey Congressman Don .Wuson, WMbtagton ?MJ<*rat
hat warned the Interior TJei*rttnent thatjhe *^ ****
will be Indefinitely retarded by lack of igw ~ tf the bowii-
ment turn down the high T?/P~ii S&l&PiL leu*
Northwest is bigger than the Idaho Power Company, he told.
officials.
Ur)^dVfed.C!a5i|W#
I
tnd Joe Boldutf of New Bedford!'called to the fro
ah.



------
,nUDAY, AUGUST 1, IMS
TUB PANAMA ABfEKICAN AH ENDEPENDBNT DAILY mWSPAPB
I1SLI2S
Democrats Lambaste GOP Claim
To Good 83rd Congress Record
WASHINGTON, Aug. 7 (UP) The^mocratic na-
tional committee issued a box score today lambasting
Republican claims that they rolled up a great record dur-
ing the first session of the 83rd Congress.
The eight-page "fact sheet" was mad* public only
matter of hours after President Eisenhower told the
nation he was proud of the accomplishments on the GOP-
controlled legisjatur.
The committee said tha achievements actually fell
for short of Republican promises. And most of these, it
declarad, stemmed from Democratic rotes and Democra-
tic programs.
Democratic Congressmen generally complained that
Mr. Eisenhower failed to give them due credit in his na-
tionwide radio broadcast, tbat what he said seemed to
be mostly praise for the Republicans.
The following Is a topical sum-
mary of Mr Eisenhower1 radio
report to the nation:
REPUBLICAN RECOKD
It would be "foolish" to claim
that the Republicans hare "con-
quered all the problem! of our
nation" durlne their first seven
months In office. There have
been many solid accomplish-
ments In both domestic and for-
eign affairs but these represent
*ory a Httle more than a be-
ginnlnp;." The future "remains
full of trial and hazard."
KOREAN TRUCE
"We do not greet It with wild
rejoicing." Orare problems re-
main before real peace is estab-
lUhed. But a "precious victory"
has been won because "we have
shown, In the winning of this
trose, that the collective resolve
of Che free world can and will
meet aggression In Asiaor any-
where In the world."
KOREAN RECONSTRUCTION
r
The next step In Korea Is to
show that free people "can build
M peace as boldly ma they fight
In war.". Congress, at his request.
Ra voted *800,000,OQO for Korean
satruetlon. He has also "in-
Tan the skilled specialists of
i -united States forces In Ko-
reaenrtneers, signal corps,
technicians of all kindsto offer
their ImrtMedge -to help rebuild
v mmp worr
rattohel
faith In freedom'.
Germany, wh*re^ottafe have shouted a "message of defi-
ance- to Soviet occupation au-
thorities and have.braved Com-
munist reprisals to come to West
Berlin for U.S. food parcels.
TEAMWORK WITH CONGRESS
, On the home front, a major
accomplishment of the new ad-
ministration has been the re-
storation of teamwork and "good
will* between^ Congress and the
executive branch.
House Democratic leader 8am
Rayburn accused the Republican
administration yesterday of fall-
ing to. keep every campaign
promise except Its pledge of hard
money.
"They have made it harder
to get," the Texan declared.
"They have raised Interest
rates on the little feUow, the
home-barer and the farmer.
But the big banks and finan-
ciers are doing well."
Rayburn ridiculed the "so-
called accomplishments" of the
OOP-led congressional session a
few hours before President Els-
enhower defended Its record in
the nationwide broadcast.
Rayburn noted a majority of
voters demanded a change in
last November's election and said
they "are getting Itwith a ven-
geance."
He said taxes have been in-
creased Instead of cut under the
new regime, prices hare gone up
Instead of down. U.8. defenses
have been reduced "to a danger-
ous low" and "the budget Is
more unbalanced than they
found It."
The former House speaker In-
serted his statement In the Con-
gressional Record as one of the
nost-morten analyses of the ses-
sion which ended early Tuesday.
He said Mr. Elsenhower "must
be unhappy" with the showing
the Republicans made during
their first half year In office.
"They failed to keep their 1052
campaign pledges." he said. "The
Republicans promised to balance
the budget. The budget Is more
unbalanced than they found It.
"Thar premised to reduce
tMe.:#iuS%eif* been re-
d*d Aolw.Ur.ihey hare
been Increased by an extension
of taxes.
"They promised to stabilise the
nation's economy. Prices of
many commodities are rising.
The cost of .living Index fa at an,
all-time high. Farm inoome is
down 14 per cent.
They promised to reduce the
national debt. Instead they have
asked Congress to Increase it.'
President and Mrs. Elsenhower
will leave by plane tomorrow for
several weeks vacation at the
Denver home of Mrs. Elsenhow-
er's mother, Mrs. John 8. Doud,
the White House announced.
Press secretary James C. Hag-
erty said he would assume only
serious national or International
developments would prompt the
President to return In leas than
three weeks. He indicated the
Eisenhowers might spend an
even longer period away from
(Continued on Page C, Col. S)
IKE AT GOVERNORS' MEETING Texas Oov. Allan Shivers
(right) shakes hands with President Elsenhower at the Gov-
ernors' Conference dinner in Seattle, Wash., where Elsenhower
spoke Informally. Host at the dinner was Oov. Arthur B. Langlle
(center) of Washington. The assembled governors discussed
federal and state relationships.
RUTH MILLETT Says....
A 36-year-old married woman
wants to know If she should try
to persuade her recently widowed
mother to come and live with
her, her husband, and their two
children.
Her mother has her own home,
but she lives a thousand miles
away and the daughter feels that
perhaps It is her duty to per-
suade the widow to sell her home
and come to live with her.
First, she ought to ask herself
these questions:
"Why do I feel that I should
try to persuade my mother to
give up her own home and come
to live with me? Is It because I
think she will really be happier
with me?
"Or is it because I think that
if I do urge her to come and live
with me I will feel that I am
doing my duty, and will have a
clear conscience?"
. If thei latter Is the reason, It
Isn't a very sound one. Approach
your problem with common
sense You may come up with a
different answer.
Ask yourself what Will be best
for your mother and your own
family.
If you think you cant answer
the first question, think of the
widows with whom you are ac-
quainted. You may be surprised
to discover that the happiest
ones are those who are main-
taining their own homes and re-
taining their place In the com-
munity.
They are free to come and go
as they wish and to live as they
like. They haye their own friends
SECOND PLOOR
We are unpacking
Double bathroom
curtains ........6x6 2.95
Bathroom curtain* 3x6 1.76
Bathroom rug* ..... 3.95
Bathroom scales .... 8JO
Mela Crest' towels
22x44................ 1.3f
Colored sheets 72x108... 4.5C
Colored sheets 81x108 .. 4.75
k Foam rubber pillows .... 9.25
W
Sachet with humidity protection .......... 0.35
Sill baga with humidity protection........0.50
Flowered glass bags ......J.....1.10 and 1.60
Colored plastic table mata............... 1.40
Rocking metal chairs. .14.50
Upright metal chair*. .14.50
Sofa* with three seats.49.50
e Round center table*... 8.95
BUY NOW
SECOND FLOOR 5* AVENIDA
and they.dontpe*d*to constant-
ly try to lit intoanflther-family's
way of life
-

LA MODA AMERICANA
Be no "smart look" from
our wide collection of Dresses...
SUITS
2 and 3 pieces,
handsomely tailored.
MATERNITY DRESSES
Charming styles,
easy to wear.
COTTON DRESSES
plok your cool-w*ath*r cotton
from our variad group.
See Our Special Sale On
NYLON LINGERIE
G"a fa/tlich
16I CENTRAL AVENUE


n

SALE ENDS AUG. 8th.
,


..*
up to 25 % and more reductions on items from
each department except flatware;
} !
* DIAMONDS
* GOLD and SILVER
JEWELRY
* WATCHES and
CLOCKS
* WEDDING BANDS
* WATCH BANDS
V
a
.....
* STERLING SILVER
NOVELTIES
* PLATE*'
HALLOWARE
* MINTON CHINA
* CIGARETTE LIGHTERS

a
* CRYSTAL
* LEATHER
* CARPETS
* CAMERAS
* BABY ITEMS ^
* GIFTS
* MEN'S JEWELRY [

Look ahead... buy the gift you will need now... tuck away gifts for CHRISTMAS
GIVING.. .Remember, you still find wonderful savings throughout Hie en firf
store.. .and we have not let down our high standards of quality one bit..;. TT*
aya fa/tlich

r
Jewelry Headquarter*
.....



IT IS A PLEASURE TO PARK IN FRONT OF CASA FASTLJCrJ NOW.
WE WILL GLADLY PAY YOUR PARKING EXPENSES.
LA MODA AMERICANA
102 Central Avenue
it Mf**a '

frryHr



All eyes on
i

^ "Mom and Pop Had //
..

-
Our new Bendix Washers that keep my Diapers
and clothes bright while and like new!
REMEMBER:
WE DON'T A GREE.
.TV
Bendix
the washer
you must see!
BENDIX WASHING MACHINE AGENCY
KELVIX,S.A.
Avenida Cuba A East 26th St.
Phon* 2-4538Panama.
TAGAROPULOS, S. A.
Call* 13
Phon* 1000Coln.

.ay
put
ney
t to
ted
he
s-
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id*
one
com
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end
the
the
Men.
ed
.tided
1 si s
I mes-
hing.-
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?he

Cht-
pitsl.
more.' wtfe of the
Bureau In the Soviet C*
Why Do Women
Buy? tfere's Why
OTTAWA. Camas. June II
(yfV-Why do women uy?
At the eaavention of the Ca-
nadian Dietetic Ataoeiatlon here
today, Mr*. W. B. TWItea. Jr.,
National FraMaent of the Ca-
. nadtan Aeseefktlon Of-Consum-
en. caedceVy V* retailer whe
"Sea*** aeoedy tos eae tike
Beeeao^-Wwer^ej*.
Beosaoo It stakes them reek
at.
rece
anno

-

OUCBt
fr,r tt M
tr-r U
Tht
soles
orison
la*ei
they w
week.'
Just!
nnunet
sidere^
po*in
He
In redi
noon."
Burto,
a tone t>
There '
full CO)
the' *t
by CV
im
STfV
thei
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.

'

WHEN FT COMES TO

dlxey (Buy (Because c/ney Jinow
It's Tops
----------i-------------M _
c/br Q,ooa JLtving
41S0JI C0lQ*.f*0t STMtir IK .AtIMA Of CttOH BUIllM M."
PARK FREE ON OUR LOT ON 4th at JULY AVENUE


P AGP POD
TAN AM A AMERICAN j. .AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWHP
_ FRIDAY. AUGUST 7,
how
MOV7K TV *ADIO
by irsfcmt Johnson
HOW-VWOOD (NEAl Close-
ups and LongshoU: There may
have boon howls of protest when
Producer Stanley Kramer cast
Van Johnson as Lieutenant Ma-
rj* In "The Calne Mutiny" but
Kramer Is Insisting that "the
role will make Van a bigger star
than ever."
Watching Van rehearse a
scene for the film with the fore-
head scar he received In that
motorcycle accident showing
prominentlyMGM always cov-
ered it*'with make-upKramer
told me:
"Everyone thought of Kirk
Douglas as a wistay-wasby char-
acter hut I thought of him as a
fighter and put him in 'Cham-
"While Van was getting all
that publicity as a song and
dance man in Las Vegas, I kept
remembering his acting in '30
Seconds Over Tokyo.' That's why
he's playing Maryk."
The combination of the new
l-D and wide-screen movies, it's
now believed, will sound the
death knell for the double fea-
ture menace.
Now tf somethine would only
corsfc along to eliminate pop-
cof-ni _____
he Broadway musical version
, seventh Heaven." with Edith
Piaff and Gregory Ratoff, will be
minus the movie's hit song. "Di-
ana." .'ictor Young, who's writ-
ing the score, couldn't clear the
movie tune for the show. Victor
and Petty Lee. by the way. are,
collaborating on a Hollywood
fcfcwl concert in September and
he's teiling it:
VPeggy i two of the greatest
nen- I've ever met. She's a
_at performer. But at home
e's a woman."
RATHBONE IN MOVIES
Basil Rathbone answered an
SOS from Hollywood and leaped
from the stage to movie stardom
when the "talkies" were born.
New it's wide-acueen films a-
galn requiring experienced emot-
1ns. and again Rathbone has
made the stage-W^movies leap.
Working for a .'movie camera
for the first time,in seven years
In Bob Hopes "Mr. Casanova.
Rathbone grlnnW '..about the
roles he and other New York
atase .actor* played when they
Af brought to Hollywood; and
tt~ new sound movies. .
"We were hired to hold up lit-
tle babies who onldn't act. All
tbe prettv little face are gem
new, bat the real talent is still
around."
Remembers Mitzi:-
"The picture was TWy Blue
Heaven.' The script called for
the camera to ahoot Betty over
my shoulder, but she didn't think
it was fair. She asked our direc-
tor to let us play the acene 50-50
with ihe earner*on both of as.
"What other studio would do
that with .some young chick?
Anybody else would have had
me xipaide down so that just my
feet showed."
PHIL SILVERS BACK .
Phil Silvers Is back on movie
Stardust alley after two years
with the Broadway hit, "Top Ba-
nana." He Just started in the
movie version and now he goes
to Warner Brothers as Doris
Day's co-staT in "Lucky Me."
Phil spent a year at MGM and
got exactly nowhere but: "I'm
not bitter about Hollywood. I've
just proved to myself that there
is a place for the evomedy Hol-
lywood didn't want."
It's no secret that Phil's role
of a TV comedy star in "Top Ba-
nana" was inspired by Milton
Berle. Berle's comment after;
Phil described the character to I
him, before the show opened, is
still a classic.
Explaining the play's charac-
ter, Phil told Berle: "He's a
comedian who has been on stage
all his life. He's the type of guy
who would give the President of
the United States a push and a
dirty look if the President's tim-
ing loused up on one of his
jokes."
Replied Berle: "You know.
Phil, I know guys Just like that."
East and West
HORIZONTAL
1 Eastern city,
------York
4 Sea eagle
6 Western city,
__ Lake
12 High priest
(Bib.)
13 Require
14 Century plant
15 Three-toed
sloths
18 Unfasten
18 Nocturnal
carnivore
20 Comforted
21 Pronoun
22 Shoshonean
Indians
24 Seek
28 Employed
27 Owns
30 Invisible
32 Region in
Northeast
France
34 Scottish
children
35 Complain
38 It rises in the
East
37 Golf mounds
39 Malt
- beverages
40 The sun
- in the West
41 Wrong
(prefix)
42 Toil
45-----Desert In
the West
49 Science of
sound
51 Metal-bearing ?
rock
52 Leg bone
33 Existed
54 Girl's
nickname
55 Retained
58 West Polish
river
57 Worm
VERTICAL
1 The-----East
2 Pen name of
Charles Lamb
3 Middle West
state
4 Witch of -
(Bib.)
5 Check'
6 Legendary
centaur
7 Dutch city
Answe r to Previou Puzzto
[r u u M
1" T O A.L
1* M A T T 1 SJ* | 1
*> | A. 1 Jj PJi. T-l
ararju cm cicium
unua -ul'i mrjrim
?naUtHSftrjklbfeLK-jTJLJ
UQ1U *kJHEJlJU C3UC3
nuauL3cisjor3Uk*Hiu
MHUIMJ
25 Two-toed
sloth
28 Not mounted
8 Norse legends 27 Ice pellet
9 Sad cry 28 Skin disorder
10 Theater box 29 Observes
11 Started a golf 31 Comes In
ball 33 Country in
17 Sewing tool West Europe
\mmm
Anybody who haa the first
dollar fie ever earned, and it
was 20 years ago or more, has
Just beat himself out of 50
cents by aav.ng it, says Lew
Cash, of the bank, .
There's an Ironic note to Betty
arable's departure from Fox,
which means that Mitzi Gaynor
may now draw roles originally
S-marked for Mr*. James,
tad's first film at the studio
wjas a Grable starrer and Betty
voent out of her way to help her.
G A R R A R D
Becord chanters
?.-.*. cycles S4.SS
We accept C.O.D. orders
CASA SPARTON
Central Ase. 2M (next la
Encinte Theatre)
Pains iK Back!
NERVOUS!
Rheumatic?
Wrong foods and drink*, worry, over-
work, and frequent colds often put a
atraln on IttKBaMyi. and Kidney and
Jtlsdder timitto* inav rnu.ee Kxessa
Acidity, StrrohT.' COSurir t'rlne, Getting
I p Nights. Burma*: Passages. Lag
Pains, Xervousnesav7I>lzzlne*a, Swollen
Ankle*. Rheumatlam, Puffy Eyelid and
feeling old before your time. Help your .
kidney* purify your blood T7ith Cystex. j
Cyetex goea right to work helping your
kidney* 3 way*: I. Cleans out polsonou* '
acid*. 2. Combats germs In the urinary
yatem. S. Hoothee and calms Irritated
tisane*. And thus you quickly get on the
rod to enjoying fife again. Get Oyatex
fros your druggist today.
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrives
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE____________________Cristobal
S.S. "PLTANO" .................'................Aug. 7
S.S "CIBAO" ....................................Aug.. 14
S.S. "BYFJORD".................................Aug. 15
S.S. SANTO CERRO" .....................,.......Aug. 21
S.S. "CHIRIQUa"................................Aug. 23
Hannllm RefrlferaleV Chilled agat Ge-or.l Cargo

NEW YORK SERVICE



Arrives
Cristobal
S.S. "QMSQIJEYA" ..............................Aug. I
S.S "CAPE COD" ...............................Aug. IK
8.8. "ESPARTA" .................................Aug. 17
S.S. MAJORKA.................................Aug. 2.1
S.S. "COMAYAGUA" .........;.,..:!.:...........Sai. 24
Passenger Sailings to New Orleans
via Santa Marta, Colombia.
Saillag at
S:M a.sa.
.
S.S. "CHIRIQUI" .................................Am. 25
S.S. "CHIRIQCr.................................Sept.
Weekly sailing* of twelve passenger ships to New York. New
Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle.
Frequent freight sailings from Cristobal to
West Coaat Central American parts.


TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2104 COLON 20
tMJUTS AND tUJa BUUDUa
WfSCTVV i ItA \Vf \MST O? TKfc 7
Wft^VSlTVCiOWCv
PWWO VflrVO C00\.O
POS>\n_V VNOV* PfcOCK
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who Yv\ ^YWKMtttG e*.lfcv WSNOlV VOW**3 tV\f. [ <3fcRfcW ,1 ^
^OWU K?^PQ^V5tSTl-
,. -i ..,. i,\cvoty\;. ;
CAPTAIN BA
See You Later
BX LESLIE
HPis WELKIN Plaaetear
Good Question, Amaixa
BX ROSS WINTERBOIMAM

/VVPLIIPPI T HEAVEN HELP AW.
9H0H&KTJ WBLlO*l!lCLlAl0EP
XXI BE 0FF7D6ETSOMETrllN&
ABOAIZP AriPlTgLASTEPOFF
THAT V f^-ACClPENT...ANP7BO
*HlP? A. PBOCLE ASLE ABOAIO...
VIC FLINT
Piti>. UXA'si POT
-Y. Seeing Is Believing
-
T AL VERMEIR
gjaiaSfa s*>||1lir "* c,i
i*i
at UN HIINNT
"Over Uie Waves?"
sVhen
VlC
PlN-9H*r$
HI*
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OFSTHfB*'
NOTH*MfSKS: sAeWM
THE LAMPLAPy HSri
HEAKP THE M*ME. ME
MOHT'-micB PHCNE MB-
iSAOB* fKTHE WXKX,.
0U MiCUAKL O'sUAUdal
Utt.
BOAKVINU UOUBB
T>6 16 A5 EASr M, rtcKlN' until
W v*?RD'60YCJ'RB 6oTfa PAiCAKft/ DA ParrJC* WA
PULUrT OUT DA POST* O K&A
If4 HAPE KC THIS, 6iB ?
I'LL JSCk DAT IhlDlAM ,
OUTA HI 5 M0CCASIK6 AN"
ateWOB UOOfLAOCT OUR WAX
BX J. k. WILLIAMk
*


FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 1051
THE PANAMA A ME* 1 CAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
racific *2)ocie
t
ff/iU Sally ^Jiikirman, -/clinf
Box 526. -dncon fkon^ Halloa 2803
BOOK REVIEW GROUP ENTERTAINED
Mi*. George V. Daniels entertained the Book Review Groop
of the Canal Zone Colleje Club at a coffee party Thursday
morninjt in honor of Mrs. J. E. Schrlftgiesser, who is leaving
the Isthmus soon. Mrs. Schriftgiesser has been the chairman
of the Group for the past fire years.
About forty (nests tended.
Jo L^ontriputors
Dr. Refina Zhnmermann
Visits Isthmus
Or. Refina Zimmermann,
head of the organization and
culture department of the
Women's International Zionist
Organization Federation In Is-
rael, is a guest at Hotel El
Panama.
Dr. Zimmermann Is a mem-
ber of the World WIZO Execu-
tive Committee and a recipient
of a United Nations scholar-
ship to study the organisation
of community centers.
community
r. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs. Rex E. Beck
And Sons Leave Isthmus
Mr. and Mrs. Rex E. Beck,
accompanied by their sons,
Thomas W. Qrimlson and Gene
Beck, sailed aboard the 8.8.
Panama today for a vacation
to be spent in New Jersey,
the New England states and
Pennsylvania.
Angeles, returned today to
spend two weeks with Mr. and
Mrs. Roger Williams of Balboa.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Brady
Honored .
Mr. and Mrs. Wendell- L.
Lindsey entertained a group of
friends with a dinner party
and cocktails at the Army-
Navy Club at Port Amador
on Tuesday evening, in honor
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward J
Brady, who were to leave the
Isthmus today, via the Panama,
to reside In the United States.
Mr. Brady, who worked for the
Terminals Division, resigned on
Jt.ly 31st.
Those attending were Mrs.
Helen Jones of Sarasota, Flo-
rida, houseguest of the Lind-
says; Mr. and Mrs. Christian
8. Skeie; Mr. and'Mrs. Philip
Goodman; Miss Elizabeth Ken-
nedy; Mr. Jonn Hannermaa
and Mr. Robert King.
Colored SIMe Showing at JWB
There will be a colored slide
showing of the Galapagos, the
Marlanna Islands and Tahiti by
Mr. F. F. Hargy at the USO
JWB Armed Forces Service Cen-
ter at La Boca Road, Balboa,
next Wednesday, at 8 p.m.
Military personnel and their
families and the public of the
Canal Zone and Panama are
welcome.
Currently shewing at the
JWB is a ceramic exhibit by
tomobile collided on a bridge ap-1R. K. Morris. This exhibition
->roach today and olunged into a is sponsored by the Canal Zone
anyon 40 feet below, killing six Art League In cooperation with
uersons and injuring 33. the U80 JWB Armed Forces
The Oklahoma Highway Pa- Service Center. This exhibit will
trol described the crash as the; remain Until August 15 and is
worst accident In the state's hla- open to the public,
tory. I
The accident happened on U.S. Dancing At The
er
Please send society Kerns for
the Pacific bide Society col-
umns to Miss Sally Ackern.au
of Ancon, whe Is acting Socie-
ty Editor while the regular ed-
itor is on vacation.
Miss Ackerman's telephone
number and post office box
number appear at the top of
this column.
Items for the Friday and
Saturday columns should reach
Miss Ackerman not later than
Thursday afternoon. Items for
the Sunday column should
reach her by Friday afternoon.
Hotueguest Arrives Today
Miss June Dreghorn, who left
here in 1844 to Uve in Los
(fas-Country Bus,
Automobile Collide
On Bridge; 6 Killed
HYDRO. Qkla., Aug. 7 (UP)
A cross- country bus and an au-
hal', held a variety of dn'.nty
delicacies. Soft chairs and sr.ia'l
table: were arranged on the
side around the hall for mail
groups. Colored lights and ap-
propriate music kept the eve-
ning lively.
Mr. E. Joseph welcomed the
parents and guests. The hostes-
ses. Yolande Roseley, Florence
Griffith. Beverley Baxter, and
I inHa Griffith, were seated at
the head of each table to serve
tea, coffee, or punch.
Chairmen of the committee
wore James Olton, Florence
Griffith, and Yolande Rowley.
Mr. Herman Jone was respon-
sible for preparing the tasty
delicacies and drinks.
Following the brief talk by
Mr. Joseph, thanks were ex-
pressed on behalf of the grr up,
and the evening's activity was
brought tr> a close with the
plaving of Gounod's "Ave Ma-
ria."
Anybody Seen Zip
WASHINGTON, Aug. 7 (UP)
Rep. Charles B. Bennett, a
Florida Democrat, was stuck in
Washington today by the dis-
appearance of Zip, a low-slung
Florida hound dog with droop-
ing ears.
Bennett would like to" go
home like other congressmen,
but his 8-year-old son won't let
him. Bruce steadfastly refuses
to leave without Zip. And Zip
is lost.
Every time Bennett mentions
leaving for Jacksonville. Bruce
begins to filibuster. So his dad-
dy has agreed to postpone their
trip until next Wednesday in
hope they can locate the mon-
giel pet.
'If we dont find her by then
we will Just have to try to get
another red bone hound for
Bruce," Bennett told a reporter.
"A what kind of hound?" asked
the reporter,
"Red bone* said Bennett.
"Everybody in Florida knows
what that is."
The congressman inserted an
advertisement in the classified
columns of the local papers:
"Substantial reward offered
for our 8-month-old female
mongrel hound answering to
Zip*
"So far we've had lots of-calls,"
Bennett said. "We've been offer-
ed red dogs and brown dogs and
dogs that Jumped into cars with
people and refused to get out.
But the right dog hasn't mate-
rialized."
Bruce has been pounding the
streets of his neighborhood since
Tuesday asking strangers if tbev
had seen a handsome, friendly.
intelligent dog that never hurt
anybody.
Just in caw, Bruce carries
around a rope with nothing tied
to either end. if he finds her, be
plans to fill the vacancy with
Zip, taking no chances that she
will get away again.
The dog waddles a bit now, but
she got her name because of the
way she "zipped" around when
she was a puppy. Bennett ex-
plained.
Last week a small bat fell from
a neighbor's chimney and Bruce
tried to nurse it back to health
with milk In an eyedropper. He
also keeps a turtle, a duck, a sa-
lamander, some grasshoppers,
some bumble bees and some but-
terflies. '
Bruce figures there's a chance
Zip might have taken off for his
randmother's place in High-
lands, N.c. where there are some
cool woods.
"It's real hot here," the boy
said. "Zip couldn't stand it."
cooed'cSfdh"'k
NU
UMW Official
Shot To Death
In Kentucky
BYDEN. Ky., Aug. 7 (UP) A
United Mine Workers Union or-
ganizer was found shot to death
today, and a UMW international
reprewntathe Immediately de-
manded that state police con-
duct the investigation of the
shooting.
Charles' Vermilllon, 44, Haz-
ard, was found dead in his auto
on a state highway in Leslie
County near here, shot through
the head.
UMW International reoresen-
tatlve Tom Raney said, "I think
he was killed by the same people
who tried it before." and de-
manded that Gov. Lawrence
Wetherby send state police to in-
vestigate.
"I have reported more than 30
instances to state police where
union organizers were beaten.
stores dynamited and houses
fired into, but not one arrest has
been made," Raney said.
VermllUon's car was found
near the spot where he and
three other UMW members and
organizers were wounded in an
ambush last January.
Vermilllon still was on crutch-
es from the earlier shooting and j
had one leg in a plaster cast.
Violence has been reported
from both union and non-union
men and mine onerators in Clayj
and Leslie counties since the)
UMW began an organlzlne drive
in these last two unorganized I
eastern coal fields counties more
than two years ago.
f
'
Hra It the ring to moke "him" trios'
envy of all who behold its beauty/
TAHITI
HI 4 I W I t t T 0 I I
66, one mile west of here. The
express Greyhound, carrying 38
person, was one of four travel-
ing in a group from Los Angeles
to/pklahoma City.
Or the three oersons In the
car. onlv the driver, Manuel Wil-
kev. Springfield ill., survived.
Theiwo vehicles landed on
their aides, nose to nose. One end
American Legion Club
There will be an evening of
dancing tonight at the Ameri-
can Legion Club at 7:30 for
members and their guests.
Van Evera-Ludwick
The marriage of Miss Jean
Van Evera of Diablo.and Staff
Sgt. Charles E. Ludwlck will
of the bus solit open, throwing be solemnised this evening at
pa=senvers into the roekv creek;? at the Balboa Union Church,
bed. Othersrwerr.tiapped inMderAM friends ?ot the Couple are
and had to' be^frWcf with axes I cordially United.
RTAfl ^i fl f* s^fflffpaf "^ a*
Gasoline from Uie bus's brok#f Orchid 8c|c|etv Heidi Meeting
i-'ii'-s saturated the area, but me'. SVe QHH Zone Orchid So-
wr-pkaee did not-.eatch fire. ^MJEMk hel^tts regular monthly
A house trailer, being pulled by. meeting mr Tuesday at the
the automobile, was smart, on J VB In *iali'oa.
Mr. and Mrs. Fried Hos>
Dinner Party
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Frieda
are giving a dinner party this
evening at their home in Bella
Vista in honor of Mr. and Mrs.
David Swanson who are cele-
brating their second wedding
anniversary today.
Following the dinner, the
guests will go to the El Panama
Hotel.
Others attending the evening's
celebration are: Mr. and Mrs.
James McClaln, Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Emge, arid Mr. and Mrs.
William Howard-
Mr. Swanson. who is station-
ed with the 7461st Signal Corps
in Fort Clayton, pliris to return
to Shetek. Wisconsin in Novem-
ber with his wife find son Fred-
die.
p briteTairand (U dn
th creel?. -
-me Oklahoma Hinhway Pa-
trol identified the dead as Mrs.
Suzle.' Webster, Joolln. Mo., Mn.
Manuel Wilkev. Sorlngfield. 111.,
the wife of the automobile driv-
er, and the Wilkevs' three-year-
old daughter. Two other women
an** man were not identified.
Charles Ensrleman publisher o
BMssgi i se mi
Ellch, and the
was won by young Mike Dare,
a Junior member of the Go'.d
Coast Orchid Society.
The p-ograrn featured co.ored
films with sound by a promi-
nent Hawaiian grower.
SUmp Clnb to Meet
The Caribbean Stamp Club
the Clinton rpaily News, deacrih-1will hold Its, regular scheduled
ed the scene a. one of "terrlhl- | meeting on Monday August
screams; moans and horrible
co"fnsk>ri."
It toSc more than an hour for
ambulariftes to. carry the dead
?nd in hired to Clinton and
We-tberford wet of here.
o'-lahoma hMiway natrolmnn
Art cordrv snid bus driver Wil-
llm Pra)t told hbn he ste^e^ to
P"ss the car driven *>? Wllkev
whn It suddenly pulled to the
lef*.
"We locked together and went! of Good Counsel" Catiro i Te
on througbjhe rail," Pratt sard. Church in GAmboa, to foster
better relations among parents
10th at 7:30 pm. in the library
of the JWB on La Boca Road
In Balboa. An auction of phi-
latelic material will be the
feature of the evening. All in-
terested persons are invited.
Tea Party. Given
At Gamboa Church
A dellghtul "Tea Partv" was
given last Sunday by the In-
termediate Groups Of Our Lady
ixxcnBc axMbocitAToas
IS CtcIm h; avilUM*
Na tan pajmmm, mr anMthlr
IniUllaenli.
CASA STAKTON
Central Ava 1X3 (aext te
acute Tkuiit)
h rough Jhe 1
.'. Paaifly
Affair
tomobiles collided on a narrow
rood near here. No one was hurt.
CYO leaders. The party
tion for the children.
The parish hall was beaut)
Htv Prpvencher. 24. Vergen- fully decorated with flower
ne. wa* at the wheel of one car,
Arthur Provencher. 19. was driv-
ing the other. Brothers.
pots, vases, and wall and cell-
ing decorations. The tables, all
in the middle of the pansa

WANTED
Yottaft.pMiaiiuuitaii witM' ambit'on for good position
In the future. Not over 3o years of age. At {east graduated
from High 8ehool and with knowledge of Accounting and
Correspondence. Essential to speak and write English and
Spanish correctly. Also It is necessary to have seme ex-
perience in general office work and sales. Write to Apartado
1635, Ciudad de Panama giving all possible Information and
attach a photograph. -
--------------taii
KLIii
t
NOURISHMENT
to cooked dishes
.

'

ere's Never a Dull Moment..."

So says MISS GERTRUDE SAUSSE.
our Executive Housekeeper
Platter Fans. You'll Welcome Our
l-
Club
'le as J f .00 or 2 W Wtddy
Firt In ttmr. 1M Hoed Co. Internal! Copf. BtMtvee
GONE
I
.SICK VUADACHE
A(
ON
She ought to know, for she's been in the business some 23 years now, although
this is the first time outside of the .8. for her.
Housekeepers aren't much In the public eye. so it must be a carry-over of their
self-effacing attitude which makes Miss Sausse refuse to give us her picture
for this item. She's a- alender, blonde, very neat lady who appears much too
gentle to run her large group of supervisors, maids and housemen.
Her day begins at 8 a.m. sharp when she puts the force on the floor, and from
then on she s the all-seeing eye of the good housewife who must have every-
thingbut every thin*in order for the guests.
Are the beds properly made?. Is' there a spot on the terrace tiles? Are the linens
immaculate? Do the picture frames hang straight in every room? Are the maids
courteous to guests?... You take it from there. Only a well-organlied. Indefati-
gable worker like MiSs Sausse r]ould keep up With It all. ^ ."T"
-
11La ?tx,,Pt designer for Vogue Magasine, Miss Sausse was In Arizona for
her health whan she was asked to decorate the Ariaona Blltmore Hotel which
she did "as a lark." From there she went un. unknowingly, to a long' career
which included many years as travelling decorator and executive housekeeper
for the Albert Pick chain of hotels from Texas to New York.
She says It was by accident that she came to Panama, but we call It a haDDV
accident for us. A topflight housekeeper is Just as important to the happiness
of our guests as the beautiful buUdlng which is in her care..
,,, .


Make your reservations today
for "CARNIVALITO"
Saturday. Aug. 22.
CaU Maltre d'hotel, 8-1660
m
A Klrktky H.trt
I '
-
IRignt you are with t
helix's J%t

ccessortes;
r
-

(Mmi

---------
tSM


utoops ana more (sloops
Still Xalest Sfaski
Surprise!...

rf T1** '* vrmt tootm o/ tht lautt "htttr..,.
{ or nlfttim tip* of mu*c you # moitt
Cfa.Cymos Cyrnos Gifl Shop
!*. I jMAPea eat.
. (Tivoll Creasing)
Me. M TtvsU Ava.
(Aereas from Aneen Playsfcd)
*&

BiBfifMFH/Xiqht)
me WHO
Why fe.1 ubiM, tlrd, hciilachy
bcciutc of lata hours, icid iadifMUoa
or temporary IttgeUhaassfTaka
paridina Ear at Uirm, and you'll'
promptly help aaottalita lit
ttocoach add. Wbtm ym uwir, take
Eao ai a tpdj, gentle laxative.
Caution: use oaf as directed. Boy at,
dfuggistt wttap iss bow gaW it ii! '
ton
~'
Yes, hoops are still the earring fashion... and
wo'v. th. moot fabulous aoaortmont .v.r. You'll
so. hoops in all sizes, colors and shapes at Felix's
Including the ones just prefect for you!
.,.i i

.cookies made of
Vnole, fresh oranges!
Sweet treat, from heaven!these crisp delicate
cookies made of fresh, tree-ripened oranges.
They smell of oranges, have the sasae fresh test,
in the mouth. (And trv their fragrant sister-
cookies, FFV Lemon Thins and FTV Vanilla
Thins.) They're all nine times fresher than
ordinary cookies, because of their aluminum
FOIL-wrap.
ORANGE THINS
e.............................e..
(.Urcle your Waist with
11 logic (olden (Hoops !

*
New hoop belts accent your waist... matches youf.
.ft/Hi : i. *^taH^slogK
earrings. Yours In contour or slim stylos in
sleek black, velvet, all sizes $3.50 and $3.95.
FELIX B. MADURO, S. A
N. 21 Central Avenue
No. g TlvaU Avenas
!
Cookies ana Crackers
that surprise your taste!
a**
wfooiyfa6C2S$(6



pm;e six
THl PANAMA aMOMCaVN AH UiDBnUOfHt DAILY NEWSP
You Sell'em... When You Tell'em thru PA. Classifieds!
_ fp m.! mm li.wh% o... ..: a
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1,
Leave your Ad with une o our Agenta or our office in No. 57
.' No. 12,179 Central Ave. Colon
LEWIS SERVICE
No. 4 Tivoli Ave.Phone 1-22*1, and
r'IVEDADES ATHIS"
Via Espaf> No 34 Parama. R. P.
* (Bella VUla Thoatn BUg.)
MORRISON'S
Fourth of Juiv Ave.Phone 2-0441
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones
No. 3 Lottery Plaza Phone 2-3198
4H" Street Panama
CARI TON DRUG STORE
10,059 Melndeg AvePhon 255, Coln
PROPAGANDA, S. A.
"H" Street corner Estudiante St.
Phones 2-2214 and 2-2799
50*
Minimum for 12 words.
3c. each additional word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:Mahogany diningroom
set, made by Cows, Spanish style
with leither covered chaira. $3/5.
00.. Tomis Arlos, Cubi Avenue
! and 32nd., Street (Exposicin).
FOR SALE:Double bed, table ond
chair, sewing machine, vaccufli
" cleaner, 25 & 60 cycle, livingroom
' suite end tables. washing mochn*.
25 cycle. Novy 3250.___________
.FOR SALE:Westinohoues Refriger-
ator, 9 cu. it., excellent condition,
moderate price. 2717-A, Cocoli,
I' c. -z. _____
'; FOR .SALEDouble beds (complete)
$48.00, Smgle $33.00; Dressers
S S8.0C, Woidrobes $35.00. China
Close*.*, $35.00, Tables $16.00,
5 Straight chairs, $2.50, gas stoves
I (GuaranteedI $59.00 and $69.-
O0; Wiekir choirs $5.50. Sofo
* Beds $78.00. Folding beds (brand
new) $39.50. Coil Springs $25.-
! ;j00, New mattresses $16.50, small
m tables, $6.00. Desks $25.00, Buf-
* fets $18.00. ond many other
. borgoins in complete sets and in-
* dividual pieces.
CASH OR CREDIT
We deliver
J HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE (HX)
2 4-J Auto Row Tel. 3-4911
National Ave)
!j VV,*jlso reupholster and' slip cover
J Call for tre* estimate
FOR SALE: Matching livingroom
sofa, oversfuffed choir, and occa-
3 sionol choir, plus slip-covers, $60.
Panama 3-0267.
- FOR SALE:Modern sofo, 4 seats
2, in good condition. $95.00. Tel-
>< ephone 3-4227.
FOR SALE: 25 cycle, 9 cu. ft.
Westinghouse refrigerator. Excel-
lent condition. Phone Albrook 86-
Irffi__
|;ljpR SALE:9 cu.
all porceloin, perfect running ,,-
dition $90.00. All household items,
mu;t go.- House 269-9, Gatun 5-
519.
i. ft. Westinghouse,
rfect running con-
< FOR SALE:Borgoin Upholtsered
livingroom set, Simmons couch.
,, two choirs, two side tables ond
coffee .table, mahogany wardrobe.
J'. Cowes. Via Espona>.54 Apt.f4.
"IOR SALE:25 Cycle Refrigergror
- Westinghouse, $75. Fan 25 Cycin.
$20. 2 work tables. Weave rug
$5.00. 212-C, Pedro Miguel. 4-
513. '
FOR SALE:Chinese rug, 8 x 10
very good condition. Mahogany
bar with mirrors ond gloss top,
beautifully finished. Phone Pea
ama 3-1254.
LOST & FOUND
[LOST: Red leother wallet in or
near Cocoli Post Office. Reward if
returned to Shirley Simmon. Box
336. Cocoli or Genell Bliss' Beau-
ty Shop.
LESSONS
FOR SALE
Automobile*
FOR SALE:1950 Studebakcr. Ex-
celled condition. 16,000 miles.
Low down payment. Liberal terms.
Coll Curundu 5245._____________
FOR SALE Victoria Ford 1951
with radio, Hawthorne green.
Looks like new. Leaving, t-hone
days 83-2134.
MISCELLANEOUS
re* have aV-kiae p.**l.mf
Wrproj AK#MHsa*i nMSjSfVOTWpaj. p*M
2091 Aaeee Cl
FOR SALI:1944 Buick 4 Door in
Me ceaeUtiea). ReatOMkla buy,
our $450. Smoet Haaaieutt S.
A. 16th Street. Cutral Avenue.
Fkeae 900 Celen.
FOR SALE: Nice 1952 Mercury
Monterrey hard top convertible,
yellow ond block, excellent condi-
tion, oil over. Pedro Miguel Dis-
pensary from 8 to I 2 noon, 4-674.
Can be financed or trade In.
DR. WENDEHAKE. Medical Clinic.
Central Avenue "K" Street cor-
ner. Telephone 2-3479. Penoma.
VoMAMI & f'EW YORK vio AREA
Boeing 4 engine planes. One-way
to Miami: $70.00 Round-Trip
$126.00. One-woy to New York:
$114.00 Round-trip $214.00. See
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
telephone 2-1655.
Diplomat desires to rent furnished
chalet. Phone 3-0388.
RESORTS
Phillip*. Oceanside cotroges, Santo
Claro, Box .435, Bolboa. Phone
Panama 3-1877. Cristobol 3-1673.
FOR SALE:1951 Packard Series
400' Patrician. Excellent condition.
Apply owner, No. 5, 48th Street,
Ponoma. from 9 O. m. to 6 p. m.
Duty Free.
SPECIAL FLIGHT to Kingston, leav-
ing every two weeks $60 one way.
$108 round trip. Panama Dispatch
Service 36 Avenida Nacional (Au-
tomobile row) Tel. 2-1655, Pon-
oma.
FOR SALE: 1952 Packard 200
green, like new. Apply owner, No.
5, 48th Street, Panamo. From 9
a. m. to 6 p. m. Duty Free.
FOR SALE-1941 DeSoto ccupe
new tires, 2 good used tires, 710
x 15. Hou 2-1758.
SPECIAL EXCURSIONS vio LACSA
PANAMA-MEXICO one woy $85
round trip $135 (15 doy limit)
$165, good one year; to LOS
ANGELES on* way, $159.25 round
trip $268.64 (90 day limit). Pon-
oma Dispatch Service. 36* Avenido
Nacional (Automobile Row). Tel.
Ponoma 2-1655.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Houses on beach, Santa Clara. Also
In COOL Campana mountains.
Phone SHRAPNEL. Balboa 1389
or see corf laker there.
oremlich Santa Claru ueech-cot-
toges. E'ectric iceboxes, gas stoves
moderate rotes. Telephone d-441
Gamboa; 4-567. Pedro Miguel,
/Villiams' Santa Clara Beech cottages,
2 bedrooms, refrigerator, RocVjas
ranges. Balboo 2-3050. except
week-ends : t .
Foster's Coltoges. One mile post
Santa Clora. Phone Balboo 2-1866.
Spend your week end ot Cosine San-
ta Claro, cobins $4.00 a couple
Dance music by Casino Aces.
HOsFfoTrnt SepT* to MsV. ,15th
or will lease for 1 year. 210, 2nd
St., Los Cumbres.
FOR RENT
House
FOR SALE :-r 946 Ford Sedan (4
door). Radio, excellent motor.
Phont Novy 1303, osk for R. D.
Filppi.
FOR SALE: 1946 Ford (4 door)
sedan, radio, excellent motor. New
battery. Phone Navy 3303 between
9 o. m. and 3 p. m. Ask for
Richard Filppi.
FOR SALE:Complete line of Smith
Woy Welding Electrodes: Mild
steel, cost iron (Machinable),
and hord facing. F. ICAZA Y CIA.
FOR SALE: Metal "4 bed and
mattress. Girl's bicycle (Amer-
ican) balloon tire, almost new, 5
wooden venetion blinds 34'A"
wide; Bookcose. Phone 2-4425.
FOR SALE:1947 and 1949 Willys
Jeep. 1950 Chevrolet, 4-door, '48
Nash, 4 deer. 1942 Buick Coupe.
No. 51 Vio-Esparto. Tel. Jf-3022.
FOR SALE;.1952 DeSoto Custom 4-,
door, fully equipped, many extros
like new condition. Will trade or
self'chebp for cash. Call 82-3168
doys or 82-2272 nights,
FOR SALE:.195f Ford" Victerio. 2
tone, W-S-W, radio, undercool-
ing. Guaranteed mechanically per-
fect. Call Kobbe 6276.
FOR SALE:Piano Spinet Winter,
Chipendole Style $385.00. Call
Ponoma 3-2840. Prof. Cordona,
9 p. m.
FOR SALE:Large woll micro/, on-
tique frome. Phone Panamo' j-
0427.^_______
FOR SALE:50 empty steel barrels
$.50 each ^.O.B. Bolboa. .Vhe
Texos Company Tel. 2-0670. *"
FOR SALE: 1953 Single; 1,300
mile*; oH accessories; Single car-
buretor. Accept trade in $1,450.
Fort Kobbe 3236.
FOR SALE:1948 Buick convertible,
excellent condition, new tires, duty
paid. Panama 3-0427.
FOR SALE:Plymouth 1934. Full
Price, $79.50 (sevnty nine dol-
lars ond fifty cents. This car has
served me faithfully but now I'm
leaving and the car is looking for
o new owner. Call Curundu 7294,
anytime.
FOR SALE.Chevrolet 1-2 ton pa-
n*l 1953, almost new. Chevrolet
Sedan 1952 new tires, radio. Per-
fect conditicn. Phone 2-2298,
Panama.
MRS. ROMIROPRACTICAL CON-
VIRSATIONAL SPANISH LES-
SONS. Learning Spanish this woy
is fun. Start now. Apt. No. 2 Bldg.
77-A Estudiante St.
\rmy Checking
(Continued from Pace 1)
finished, my mind was a blank.
' "I was worried about it, and
there were other prisoners with
the same trouble. I think the vi-
tamin deficiencies In our prison
diet had something to do with
the lost memories."
Mere than 2,099 American
prisoners froze or starred to
death In the notorious "Death
Valley" ef North Korea during
the harsh winter of 1950. an-
other returning officer report-
ed today.
; ''We buried five to 17 men ev-
ery day In Death Valley," said
Warrant Officer Dwight E. Coxe
eaT Fresno, Calif.
The veteran of S3 years in the 0r thefr oini lW.w ririHe
Army and 32 months In Red cap- "we-riddm
flrrity gave the most detailed ac-
count Vet of the mass nvrder nf
TJJS. soldiers In Communist camp
by wholesale atrocity and neg-
lect
Others coming back in "Oper-
ation Big Switch" supplemented
Coxes account with grim recit-
als adding up to the war's most
sweeping indictment of Commu-
nist camp bosses.
The men who survived Death
Valley estimated that "thou^
Unds" of Americans
FOR SAL:1950 Pontiac 4, doors,
excellent condition, new tires,
radio, hy'dramatic, tailored seat
cover. $1,350.00. Panama 2-3037,
9 o. m. 6 p. m.
guards left them In Korean vil-
lages. Some of them I never aw
again. On Christmas Eve we ar-
rived at a Korean mining
cuaD-'
It was the Infamous Death
Valley.
"We lived in Japanese-type
houses, 20 men in a 10-foot
square room. We had to sleep
sitting up. By going on wood
runs we got a little kindling to
heat the floors.
"Medical at-.entlon was a
farce. We became extremely
lousy, and they brought In a
aenail bowl ef DDT for 1.999
men. The diarrhea rate was
terrible."
The m# existed on cracked
corn. They te from rustv tin
Position Offered
WANTED:Soles, gents, for club.
Apply with your identification cordj ,
(Cornet). .Qood opportunity M
Interested persons. Parisin Furni-
ture No. 168, Centra* Avenue.
Wanted Position
Experienced bilingual Panamanian
offers his services as accountant
or clerk. Box 1154, Ancon. C. Z.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED:Vocation quarters. Sept.
First through Nov. 15th. Diablo
5083-A. Call 2-3429.
WANTED:Refrigerator, large boby
bed. Fan. Coll 2-6394.
FOR SALE
Motorcycles
FOR SALE:Motorcycle 1949 Ariel
500 c.c. Good condition. New bat-
tery ond aenerotor. $300.00. CoH
3-5663.
FOR SALE:1946 Cushmon motor
scooter, gear shift, excellent con-
dition, Albrook 3285.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
"We deloused ourselves by
squirrel hunting," said Coxe, fa-
ther of six children and grand-
father of two.
"Every man was honor bound
to do all he could," Coxe said.
But that work by sick and ema-
ciated men "added considerably
to the death' rate." coxe himself
drooped from 180 pounds to 110.
The horror was not ended pt
FOR SALE:BOAT. "GINGER." in-
board 90 HP Dodge converted
motor; 21' length, 6' beam. Solid
mahogany hull, plywood cabin,
aluminum roof, stain less steel gas
tank. Carries all required equip-
ment plus extras such as fog horn,
spot lights. In excellent condition
for immediate us*. Con be seen ot
Gatun Tarpon Club, docks. Call
4-194 during business hours, (af-
ter 4:30 p. m.) 4-613.
FOR SALE:Outboord motor Scott
Atwattr 7 WH.n excellent con-
dition, SPD0.O0. Fort, Gulick 88-
_ 252. __________
FOR SALE:,16 ft. V-Bottom Boot.
Brand new. .Contact-frank Mendex,
172 Central AVenue. Telephone
2-0383.
Death Valley. On Jan. 20. 1951.
,t w, tne survivors were forced to
Kh.!Lth'r,eH ^lep*LtoJ5: ""eh north until thev reached
FOR SALE":25 H..P. Evenrude. 12
HP.. 5 H.P. ond 3 H.P. Elto out-
board motors. Trade in your old
motor. Fishing rods, reels ond Out-
board motors repaired. Abirnothy
No. 99 Pru Avenue. Panama.
below-zero cold during thai win-
ter when Red China's eptry
termed the tide of the war a-
galnst the Allies
the Pyoktong camp on the Yalu
River.
Coxe said 800 men perished on
Opl. Miguel Oalvan of Harlln- ff^lrton, tatorTturl^f ?hta
m. Tex., said he saw about 700 ,7olrtonR fore June of this
US. soldiers left behind to die on
' S tour-day march of 1,500 from
th* Death Valley camp to the
permanent camp at Pyoktong on
tiie Yalu.
Coxe's account also included a
forced march which ended la
Death Valley on Christmas Eve,
' 1960 He was captured Dec. 1 to
the Chinese smash through the
Kunu sector.
"We traveled at night." Coxe
related. "Sometimes it was 20 de-
grees below aero.
"T hid lo't my gloves. I wrap-
ped my muffler around my face.
We stayed In Korean houses d r-
Ing daylight Some of our wound-
ed marched with us.
"U they couldn't keep up, the ]
.rOR SALE:Salsbury motor scooter,
completely rebuilt. This is a mod-
dified scooter, plenty of power. A
real buy. Price $175 or best of-
fer. Ceil Albrook 86-7222 Qtrt.
236.
year.
It was that same er a .fmils'"
march to which Oeh/sn referred.
"There were about i.50f> of us
started out from the rrln'"*
camp he renorted. "About ROO
were left when we got to the
orison camp. Moat of the ones
left behind died."
Garrant Pecorrl Chancera
15 anr* RO evele* Pav
onr* 49 so complete with
nrtrldee at
Mueblera CASA 8PARTON
Central 223
(Encanto Theatre)
Club Meeting
The Debonair Social Club will
hold an extraordinary meeting
tonight to discuss olana for toe
second semester of the year.
The meeting will be held at the
regular meeting place.
Refrigerators SB eyclee.
S15.00 down and flSOO
monthly. To residents of
the Canal Zone only. Only
a few left. Act now!
Mueblera CASA SPARTOM
Central 221
^^Encantc^Theatre^^^
FOR RENT:Modern chalet, fur-
nished, 2 bedrooms, $140.00. Vio
Belsono Porros No. 143. Miguel
Hive, phone 3-4844.
FOTT~RNT^-For about 3 months,
nice furnished cholet, Bella Vista
Household linen, kitchen utensils.
Good price. Telephone 3-44|.
FOR RENT:2 bedroom cho'it,'jiv-
fngroom, porch, diningroom, kitch-
en, garage, No. 4, Samuel Lewis
street, facing Tile Factory Pan-
ama. Enquire some house.
FOR RENT:Two bedroom chalet,
livingroom, porch, garage, com-
pletely furnished, lorge yard. Phone
3-4337, after 3 p. m. English
spoken. g
FOR RENT:September 1st. Luxur
ou residence, -completely furnish _
ed, now occupied by the Chilean
Ambassador. Tel Panoma 2-2037.
FOR RENT:Large completely fur-
nished home including .utilities;
middle aged woman, will share, it
with decent couple. 9th St., Rio
Abajo No. 2612.
FOR RENT: Modern chalet, two
bedrooms, maid's room. $140.00.
Via Espao No. 2024. Miguel Hive
' phanr'9-4844. f
FOR RENT: After 5 October to
reliable person, modern resider^i.
3 bedrooms with services, dining-
room, Hvlngroom, gorog, maid's
quarters and lawn. Ninth Street
San Francisco No. 39, Intersection
50 Street. For particulars inquire
Via Espaa No. 2034, phone 3-
5177.
FOR RENT
Apartments

ATTENTION G. I furnished modern
one, two-three bedroom opart-
ment. Hot, cold woter. Coll 3-
4941.
FOR SALEOn* bedroom apartment.
with services, 15th Street, Rio
Abalo, house 3011-A.
FOR RENT:Apartment in best res-
idential neighborhood. Modern
construction. Well planned venti-
lation, porch, diningroom, living-
room, two bedrooms with cedar
lined closets, bathroom, kitchen,
laundry room, garage, storage
room. Water heater furnished. En-
tire apartment screened. City gas
line connections. On bus route to
and from town. For further In-
formation call Ponama 3-0439.
FOR RENT;3 room apartment, new
house, concrete. La Carrasquilla
Enquire Estudiante 98, Panama.
FOR RENT:2 bedrocm apartment,
porch, parlor, diningroom, kitchen,
modern services, $50.00 unfurnish-
ed, $80.00 furnished. Inquire St.
No. 7, bis. House No. 5 Porque
Lefevre.
FOR SALE: Furnished apartment
with kitchen, Frigidaire. gas in-
cluded. Inspected. 4th of July Ave,
No. 5. Tel. 2-5133.
FOR RENT:Furnished apartment,
2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, best sec-
tion Bella Visto. Prom S*ptmber
1st. for 4 months. Tel. 3-0580.
FOR RENTrFurnished 2-bedroom
apartment, nejar Bella Vista Theo-
ter'for Gl'a. Coll 3-1596.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:Nicely furnished cool
. room, meals available. Call 3-
1789 or 2-1693 office hours.
FOR RENT:Furnished room with
kitchen privilege. 43 St. No. 43,
apartment A.
FOR RENT: Beautifully furnished
room for couple, kitchen privileges.
Bella yista. Mexico Avenue, 69,
neor 43rd. St. Phone 3-0553.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
FOR RENT:Office apace i.
building focing Hotel El P*nomo.
$100.00. Apply Foto Hekon. Tal.
| 3-1179. or 3-i^OT...____________
FOR SALE
Roa] Estate
FOR SALE:Chole* land at Santa
Claro beach. 3,000 *q meters.
Cost $1.700.00. beat offer takes
it. William R. Corlln, Sox 1501,
Bolboa, C Z.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Another Novey New!
Champ insect Bulb
An elpctric light bulb that
kills Injects for a few
pennies a month.
Por Use In Homes. Offices,
Stores. Factories, Hotels,
Warehouses and
Restaurants
9EO. F. NOVEY, INC
(Wtier* aarlriat li ae problem).
*T9 Cenrtal Ave. Tel. 3-9149

'Learn Ballroom Dancing"
Rumba Samba. Manbo,
Tanro. Foxtrot. WaJta,
Jitterbur
"STUDIO BALBOA 'Y'
Tel 2-1894-2-2839
HARNETT aV DUNN
Household Exchange
DEALERS IN NEW AND
USED FURNITURE
41 Automobile Raw
Tel. S*4ll
WK BUY AND 8RLJU
CHIROPRACTORS
On1 A an* r. OMLLAC-
omCF. HOURS:
J 12 and 2 S o m.
Saturday: I 12 noon.
H reru Avrnue Tel. 3-1.1*1
fl black from Lux Th*atr*i
TRANSPORTES
(.BaAXTER, S.A.
'"raeier." &*/ m.
Tela. I-IM2-S-9U1
H >
M
5S id
H M
X >
V T CXl
O
2
^
t
pi

SM00T
&
PAREDES
OUR GUARANTEE
IS
OUR REFUTATION
j.
Abo
TALLER Transportes Baxter-
Repairs installation of aaa
iST^ Lw,Ur he*ter' <
AU work nuaranteed. Sidney
Morrell. General Supervisor.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Tel. 3-1713
No. n
East 29th St
Ls Exposicin
DEFIANT TO THE END Two truokload of North Korean
POWs move down a road at Panmunjom during the height of the
"BlR Switch" prisoner exchange. Defiantly, the prisoners wave
oversized Red flag to celebrate their repatriation.
* *
Ike Vetoes Repeal
Of Federal Tax
On Movie Tickets
Tibe 'Kids Are
(Continue*! fresa EWfe 1)
watch these arrivals' can hardly
swallow and our eyes are misty,
the kids are coming home aa if
they got rid of any tears before!
WASHINGTON. 'Augnst 7 they U to Panmunlom
,mJ-Z. Preaident paenhoweri Jiwt as ITe seen them go intA
used his "pocket veto'' powera battle with a gag on their lips,
',r, ^wSt* m' ,ye^e,t5y ^their rome from prison with a
sill a bill to repaal the 20 per, twinkle in their eves.
cent federal tax on movie one exc-ntned'his Hue POW
tickets.
The Preaident announced lw
will hot sign the measure,
which dies midnight tonight 1
without his signature, because;
the government cannot afford
to lose the $100,000,000 to
9120,000,000 In annual revenue
the tax produces.
Congress had approved the
repeal to give theater-owners
a better break la their efforts
to compete with television.
*mock nd bh'e sneakers, then
touched the fabric of a well-
dressed Marine guard's uniform
and said:
"Brother, what a zoot rulM"
There ere eerleos moments
ef refection for ir>nv retnrn-
** whe gather with the cha n-
lr>in* in raver. Formal reli-
gious errice* ware denied te
tn*st |n the POW earn**. One
I aaeed a ehan'Mn; "Please,
fr?*. r*^ ran a4w me % paje-
ar** I lost mine 29 months
age."
In a message of "dlsapprov
assart,****'*
Commute*
000 ima
hare
i* Kft baa
te Mraareeti twl*a la thai
Ef lhKLr?^*? ^-CRlaaee Mfe eavonet. as
,* ?1S?t.2wn..!?'2Ffti?! I*' 'oirmwHI the
end ot the ye*r unless they
get some -assistance. He said
about 9,000 already have been
forced to close since the ad-
vent of- television.
Mr. Eisenhower promised to
enter th* newtrai tone if
the* lflght pi.il a nrisoa
break at such a late late.
The sadrleit r>r.te Is our sick
and wounded soldiers who erf
onHtlv moved to rear-xone hos-

-overall program ior.xevisl
! excise taxation.
fjfndl" fare
* healing
plasma.
Had the repeal become law,
most theater owner were ex-
pected to poclfet the difference
to compensate for sagging box-
office receipts rather than cut
adrrjleslon prices.
Snyder Explains
Actions In Tax
Case 01 Monsanto
TOLEDO, Aug; 7 (UP) For-
mer Treasury Secretary John W.
Snyder said today that all he did
in the Monsanto Chemical Co.
tax case was to tell representa-
tives of the company where to
go.
A House Subcommittee inves-
tigating tax scandals In the Tru-
man administration renorted In
Washington that the company
obtained a favorable ruling in
1949, shortly after Snyder In-
quired about the case.
It was a case of people who
came in to see me and asked
where they should take the mat-
ter up." Snyder said.
"They asked me where they
should take then- inquiry." Sny-
aer said.
"I had
years
said. "It
going In
calling u
for ihfor:
"It was nothing more
that," he said.
than
"All that I had to do -with the
case was to refer them," snyder
added. A \
In early summer, children
5aJ count the days untfi school is
over, and in late summer
mothers count the It begins again.
m
RECONSTRCTRA NACIONAL, 5. A.
Sells Tires. Guaranteed Retread Tires.
Buya Old Tires Too!
No. 7 Per Avenue
Tel. 2-0499

Democrats ...
(Continued freaa Page S)
the capital's oppressive late sum-
mer heat.
Mr. Eisenhower will take part
of hi* staff with him and main-
tain offices in the administra-
tion building at Lowry Air Bate.
Denver, Hagerty said.
The Preaident will conduct the
necessary business ot his office
at the base, Including signing of
legislation. .
Abeat 197 billa approved In
the final dan ef the. reeently-
adaWned Cmgreas iseaaleed
yesterday far preeideataal ae-
M*)B.
While definite plans have not
been made for any fishing trips.
sea near fresar Colo.
presidential Assistant Sherman
Adams and other staff members
will remain here. But Hagerty
:
bers probably will go te D*0*"
fi
sooalljr.
Why So Many People Soy;
"BUT INSURANCE FROM
BYD BROTHERS, INC.
Our cliente appreci-
ate frigndly iervioe
. and unbiased
advice on insurance
problems. They
K*e to-deal witn aa
eetabihhed agency T^i j*ea*^-easjja. ijjj
which has complete facilitiee and fulMcnowledg^
of conditions in this jnimiity. Aicordingly;
we are proud that inanjr of our cliente, say," J
wHhu^jreBotvation, "Buy iojiurance frum .. J :
V
pMYi MOTHtslf. wc
Ne. I US St.. Lesaeps Park
Tett.: 2-2999 99M
General Ateats.Called tales FideUty CuarpaUy Ce. .


FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, .IMS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAM NEWSPAPER
PAOESEVB
^Mtlantic J^ocieti

i

MORNING COPFEE PARTY
HONORS MRS. HOWARD MILLER
7f]ri. cLton Efoff, ~Slcti*f
34, tjatun JiUphont, Ljalun 463
Klrwtf.i
A bon royare morning coffee earty wa tendered Mrs.
Howard MiUer of Coco Solo. Wednesday, bv Mn. Frank Roten
and Mrs. James F. Pate at the home of the former at Nob Hill,
France Field.
An arrangement of red car-'Jersey, where they will meet
nation with white ribbon their chile*ren, Helen and Dan-
streamers inscribed "bon voy- lei, they Will motor to Jack-
age" centered the coffee ta-ile. sonville, Fla. where they win
The guests Included with reside*.
Mrs. Miller were Mr* E. D.i _>
Woolrldge, Mrs. Walter J.' Those preset were Mes-
Wright, Mr. J. W. Nelson and dame*. Agnes Simon, Angela
Leslie
1 o Enter C Of
Leslie RtoehjSrt, r.fJromlnent
athletic star- of> Cristobal High
School until his graduation
last June, sailed this morning
on the S. 8. 'Panama for 'New
York, where he will visit for a
few weeks before entering the
University of Colorado, Boul-
der, Colorado.
The W. H. Keenans Hosts
For Dinner At Santa Clara
Mr. and Mrs. William H.
Keenan of Santa Clara, were
ri chief and Mrs. Mlle>dringjM*rgeret fioplclha, Cecilia Bush
the^eek^nd aboard the W Clain, Gejjtgau, Lucia Blades,
General OoethaTa, en'G. 1. Trimble, Anne Schulta,
to tlieir new duty in I and Ursula Hylton. Also the
pert
ro,ue
Jacksonville, Florida.
Isses- Aminta Melendez, Ma-
li Lyew, Canden Calonge and
Hotel Ifashlfttea Reident J^pnlne Chen.
^W"ul&8 i uubb ^^ hosti8as for the eve-
Mr. and Uts. <^_^h*_*_* 'ning were MrtTMarion Tarr,
res dente at the Washingion m* Mrj
Hotel, Colon, will >~'e '-Lyew and Miss Mabel Lyew.
day morning By plane ior, _____
Houston, Texas, en route to _^t T Vti
ttexlco City to Joto their clul-, m"^*;0
dren for a vacation oi two
months. Mr. Hubb Is with the
Point Four Program.
Breakfast Party
H-mcrs Vaeatloners i
Mrs. Arthur McLean of New
Mrs. Samuel Plerpont who
has been visiting her sister-in-
law, Mrs, Marion. Taylor, of
Cclon emplaned today to re-
turn to her home in Rio de
Janeiro, Brasil.
"Buy Me Blue Ribbons'*
" Opening Tonight ..
Mil
June Simps, n, who has bsen
visiting her from Virginia. T.iey
sailed this mo. ning aboard the
S s. Panama en route to Nor-
folk, Vt. :'__ .,
The guests Included Irri
Harry Clayton, Mrs.
Cristobal, was hostess for
breakfast at her home Wei..es- -ql^ tbniilht at the
day moroing Tbe party ho.c.i-)st a Colon |u
f?. M-. *-? t.-y SL? T, the Cristobal Little Thea-
Cristobal and her niece s ^ flrst Uy ,n the roun(l
"Buy Me Blue Ribbons." The
performance will start at 8:00
o'clock, tickets are one dollar.
Members of the cast include
Carl Pinto, a former movie
.,Z12istar, "Ann McCormack, his mo-
i. m Ow who spoils him, Tom
Wilder, Mrs. Roger Swain, Mrs. j Brennan tre {athej. who m|g_
C. W. Lewis, Mrs Roy ^".,understands his son, Anne
Mrs. Hector Orant MM. reter, Henrlquez will take the part if
Duncan, Mra. R. A AJien ana thf jfiected leading lady, Dick
Mrs. Norman Hutchison. Garcia, the .distinguished direc-
L. ZT7T~ m-,i .--,- tor, Roy Burr, the disappoint-
C. D. A. Court No. 174 MMtUf ._, ____ g^ WiUlams ._,
The monthly meeting of hou8ekeeper> judlth Henrlquez,
Court of Our Lady of the Mi- ___e iecreUry an_ ike ______
raculous Medal No. 874, Cath- the nurf^
ollc Daughters of America, met
in the Parish Hall of the
Church Monday qfght. Follow-
ing the meeting a farewell
eirty was held for Mrs. MUo tn 9tn
lasam who will make her' _____
home in the States. An orchid Return From Gorgona
filigree pin was presented *!Beaeh Vacation
Mrs. Kissam as a token of re-'. Mr> ^ ^n Herbert
membrance from the members _elke
The play will, be repeated
at the same time, same place,
Saturday the 8th and Sunday
lolgue of Cqlon, and her bro-
ther-in-law, Fred Lewis of
New York, who i a visitor
here. Other guests were Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Alberga, Mr.
and Mrs. Jose Parr, Mr. and
Mrs. Carl Serger, Miss Genell
Bliss and her house guest, Mn.
Shirley Simmons of California,
and Mr. Westmeler.
Ferns, coral vine and ailier
cindelabra were used for dec-
orations on the dinner table.
The guests enjoyed themselves
during the evening with group
singing.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Serger. of
Cristobal, have been the guests
of her parents, Mr. and Mra.
Keenan, for the past weer.
Next week Mr. and Mrs. Keen-
an will entertain their son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs!
Marvin Keenan of Balboa, and
their younp son, Charles Mar-
vin, Jr., who Was born June
28th.
Coco Slito Recreation Has
closing- Program Tonight
Tonight at 7:30 there will be
the final exhibit of handicraft,
square dancing and Spanish
dancing sponsored by the Sum-
mer Recreation Pnwrram of Co-
co Slito. It will be held in
Bldg. 08 in that town. Every-
body is Invited.
Jimmy Roosevelt
Refuses Comment
On Seoaration
Democrats Elated
Over Reception
Of New Magazine
WASHINGTON, Aug. 7 (UP!
Democrats sala today they
a.-e elated over public reception
ot their plunge into the mag-
azine field and disclosed they
have ordered a slightly bigger
press run lor the second issue
of the pocket-size Democratic
digest.
The magazine sells for a
quarter and Managing Editor
8am Brlghtman said "salea of
the first issue exceeded our ex-
pectations, we won't have final
ilgures for a month or so, but
we are increasing the press run
for the second issue to meet the
demand."
The press run for the second
Issue will be Increased from
140 000 to 160.000. The Issue wnl
hit the newsstands t week from
today.
Although the. publication de-
voted to domestic politics, its
circulation Is being extended to
the international field. The sec-
ond Issue will be offered on
newsstand* to' six Canadian
cities Winnipeg, Vancouver,
Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and
Hamilton, Ont.
Brightmaj, who also la pub- j
licity director of the Democratic
Nwtional Committee, said 250
copies of the first issue sent to
Paris were told out swiftly.
Circulation Manager John
Hovlng said. New York and
Atlanta boto reported sales of
88 per cent Of their allotments
in the first:*, days. He said al- j
lotments were made under a;
formula that Included total
population arid the number of
Oamocratlcc votes usually cast
Ufa community.
The Democrats launched the
magazine last month as their
"answer to the one-party press."
,1$'-r
S SHOWTIMB TONIGHT!

anama
Canal dhealen
BALBOA Charlton HESTON Rhonda FLEMING
\ZZS "PONY EXPRESS" Technicolor!
i:H CIS I:M ____________Aba Showing Saturd.y!
DIABLO HTS.
CIS IK
*EDRO MIGUEL
CIS CIS
-
GAMBOA
Tom EWELL Harvey LIMBECK
"BACK AT THE FRONT"
_____ s.iurd "scabed mrr" _^
Dean MARTIN a Jerry LEWIS
SCARcD STIFF"'
_ Saludar __THE BON MISTRESS" __
Rosalind RUSSELL a) Maria WILSON
'NEVER WAVE AT A WAC
___i_al4ay "RUBY GENTRY" "~ ^
asir lift
lm
MARGARITA
CIS l:M
* -
CRISTOBAL
Ah-Condllloned
CI5 8:2*
Betty GRABLE Dala HOBERTSDN
'The Farmer Takes A Wife"
Technicolor! Saturday "Aaaaaatn Par Hire"
Maureen O'HARA a Errol IXYNN
"AGAINST ALL FUGS"
rechnlc__lw!_Saliirday "Nevar Wava At A Wae"
Burt LANCASTER Nldr CRAVAT
'THE CRIMSON PIRATE"
Technicolor! Saturday "TAXI
IX ANQELE8, Aun. 7 (UP)'
Jimmy Roosevelt,.eldest.son of
the former president, refused
comment today on rumors that
_ he and his wife, Bomelle, would
be seoarated.
^guer^^a^Mar/X^bfl"'^0^^*6"* < ^
arid their
of theconrt. :reurlte ihd Mary aCe ;; sonal relaUon8 R t
tVev wilt laa*~ miaaCat >th erid'f "h Mr1
ot thr.week tor the -United!Balboa, and Mr.
States and. after a- Wlt with charles Bath and
tan days
Gorgona
their house
stay. Mr.
Baltoser of
and Mrs.
family
'anda.

'
Of
Sky Bar \Beat the Heat
HIGH-FLYING _The Nicholas Brothers (above) leaped and
sang their way Into the hearts of a small audience at the Central
Theater last night; but the crowd made it up to the artists by
calling then! back to take several curtain calls. The brothers
will appear again tonight at the Central Theater and the Happy-
land Cabaret, where they gave three shows last night to an
\ enthusiastic audience.
CENTRAL Theatre
The Movie Schedule of the Central
Circuit Will Appear on Page Two
(2) of this Newspaper.
HI, has three child, ....
lM*-.Ii Steep ,
MlLPORD. Oofin.'fUPi Po-
lice and Coast Guard boats
searched long Island Sound;
when it was reported that Carl
L. Hartshorn was missing in his <
boat. After some1 time, Hartshorn
was foundsleeping in his craft.'
vfn the^lWWls serving at
table and aska a guest If he
prefers white or dark meat or
raw or medium roasthe's ask-
ing for Information. It doesn't
help him any to qay sweetly, "It
rY>doe*ift matter."
So speak Up when spoken to
If you Want to be helpful
8MB O A
SUNDAY MONDAY
TODAY TOMORROW
4:00 6:05 8:10
PONY EXPRESS,
TECHNICOLOR
FLAMING ADVENTURE
in i tmd where
JwtitBW ratal
*5?
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now Cor cha fomily.
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* 1 u
AGE EIGHT
)THE PAMAMA AMHtlCAM AW WPKF1NPPT DA1LT HEWSfAFK
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7. INS
^LUS-----------------------------__--------------------------------------------------------------1------------------------^-------1-----------1---------------------i----------------1----------------- .
Class 'D' Horses Vie For $600 Purse In Feature
; ...... .....
- ------------------------_---------!-----------i-------------------------------------------------.-------------------,----------,---------------------i------------~--------------,-f*-;---------------------u-------------------aw--------------------_-------.
Newcomer Follow Me II
Choice In 7 Furlong Race
The Stud La Giralda's Peruvian-bred Follow
Me II will be an overwhelming mutuels choice to-
morrow when he goes postwards in search of his
first local victory in the featured seven-furlong $600
CV>- 'D' ninth race.
Follow Me II was an lmpres- ner of seven of her eight local
*ive second to Mv Dear In the starts, makes her first start a-
Republlc of Peru "Classic In his gainst the track's better naUves
debut. Most turfites attributed
Follow Me's nose defeat to poor
riding on the part of jockey Al-
fredo VfSoue7. The same Vas-
quea will be in the saddle to-
morrow but he hopes to imorove
on his dismal classic perform-
ance
and is the choice of most se-
lectors.
Slated to opoose La Enea are
Redondita. Dalida P., Panchlta
Valaria and La Loba.
Still another ooint of Inter-
est is the scheduled debut of
Black Gold, a full brother of
Valley River, with ace Bles A- native champion Black Sambo
fulrre ud. and <(8*e. under Po-, Black Gold has not been as im-
ndo Lonez Oil's hiist'ino- ri^.; oressive In his workouts as sta-
are expected to offer Fo"ow Me blemates Plmp'e Wing and Cher-
II b* stlffest romoetftion rv Time but he has shown e-
boft In the mutuels and in the noi>*h to beat his competitors
arjal race. of tomorrow._____________
%\ ?0"i 'Fortunato Hi^alvo..
i-- ....-*... .'Aah'ianaw'al *'*wm
FUTURE CHAMPION Black Gold, a two-year-old black on'
of Goldwyn-Just Rolling, is scheduled to make his debut to-
morrow In the four and one-half furlong third race for non-
winners. This youngster Is still a bit backward, failing to
display the form being shown by his s'tablemates Simple winy
and Cherry Time. However, owner Louis Martinz expects the
chunky colt to develop into a stout racer in the near future.
Turf LofW (Bolivar More
and RaWn tloht (Osr-n
kuer> round out the sir-
fee field. Of this ?roun. Sir
_ 'la given th best chance of
gporinnr an upset.
"irf Lode has been worVln?
we)' however, and Ppthl'n Lih
1* down class and eirV,er of
the"! could roir-e ni> ttvi one
of those freiuent Juan Franco
for Anot>*f l"teresHn rac will
be t>-. fjftv. f0' Mves o' Cl-
es "\" and "B" over six ?r\t\
one-half furlonss. La Enea. in-
* *
Juan Franco lips
By CI.OCKER
1-Reria
2It i(i mar
5Black Gold
4Souvenir
5la Fnea
6Coraleca
7Oelhia
1Rrarmour
ftArate
10 ....'!'I'mparo II
* *
Mueco
Tosikito
I.xdv Moon
Avivato
Redondita
Sun's Moon
Salnstlo
Veranda
..Fallow Me II
K. Gambler
by
Dan Daniel

.
Juan Franco Graded Entries
P.P. Horse Jockey Wgt. COMMENT ODDS
1st Btate "G" Native 6'i Fgs. Purse: S273.60 Pool closes: 12:45
First Race of the Double,
l--Cn'paenUda Mena R. A6x Nothing to tpC-mmend 15-1
2Regia R. L. Gil 107 Was never better 3-2
3Pecodo R. Gue. 99x Doesn't belong here 30-1
4Mueco B. Aguirre 1'4 The horse to beat 2-1
5"ipg"?! G. fan. H4 Good outside rhanee 5-1
8Romntico B. Pulido l? "''?lief h-^dlcapa, 5-1
7opex A. Va?. 1H Outl'de- with chance 15-1
Volador F. Hidal. 107x Should be close up 5-1
tnil
Eace
"F"
Native
Second Race 4/
1Rmar
2 Ma'aya
3ViUarreal
4Coran
5Resorte
6Yosikito
Frs. Pnre\ XV*M Fool closes: 1:15
" tl O. Castl.' 110 -Chance if not fractious 3-1
F. Hida'. Wt -Lhrht weight will help 5-1
A. Vas. "0 Retes slim chance 10-1
Mena R. I00x Not in this bunch 30-1
F. Orre-a. mx nnmedlctable 15-1
B. Aguirrc 116 Seems sure thing 1-5-
Irfl Race 'Non-Winners' i' Prs. 'es
1 ONE TWO
GROSSINGER'S, N. Y."What you did m a first
fight with an opponent must not be taken at a pattern
for a second meeting with him," said Rocky Marciano
yesterday, as he discussed his Sept. 24 defense of the
heavyweight championship against Roland LaStarza.
"I have been asked time and again, how I plan to Improve'on
my split decision over LaStarza in the Garden in 1950. Well, In'
my first fight with Jersey Joe Walcott, I was floored In the first,
and had to wait until the 13th round before I could tag him.
When we met again, joe lasted only 2 minutes 25 seconds."
Marciano gazed for a full minute across the mountain land-
scape to an adjoining ridge turning purple In the dying sun.
"You ask me If I believe the bell saved LaStarza after I had
dropped him in the fourth with only eight seconds to go," Rocky
resumed. "Frankly. I don't know. However, I was told after the
fight that LaStarza's handlers had dragged him back to his
corner. He must have been hurt.
"This I do know. I failed absolutely, to follow up my advan-
tage, in the fifth round. I should have gone after him with
everything I had. That I failed to do this. I must lay to my in-
experience. Were I to floor him in our coming fight, I certainly
would not pull that rock a second time.
"The eighth round'was my best, but I lost it for a low punch.
This sort of thing had not happened to me before. I didn't know
what to make of it. I guess I was scared.
"LaStarza never hurt me In the 10 rounds. The next day when
we met in the Garden for the payoff, his eyes were black and
blue, and he was pretty much cut up. I was unmarked.
"However, it was a close fight, too close for comfort. 1 must
not let it get that close again."

'LaStarza Could Avoid Good Punches'
Worsham Shoots 65
for Opening Lead In
World Championship
CHICAGO, Aug. 7 (UP) Lew
Worsham has grabbed the lead
among early finishers in the
pro division of Tarn O'Shanters
so-called "World Championship"
golf tourney at Chicago.
Worsham who often threat-
ens but rarely wins a major
tourney blasted a seven-un-
der-par 65 in the first round...
giving him a three-stroke mar-
fin over five other pros among
be early finishers.
Tied at 68 are Julius Boros,
the defending champion from
Mid Pines, North Caroline...
Gardner Dickinson of Panama
City, Florida... Jack Burke,
Junior, of Klamesha Lake, New
York... Ed Olivar of Palm
Springs. California... and Fred-
die Haas of New Orleans.
Ih the women's pro division,
Patty Berg has taken the early
lead with a slx-under-par 70,
equalling the course record for
women. Babe Didrlkson Zaha-
rias, who set the course record
in 1950, and Betty Jameson trail
Miss Berg with scores of 74.
Joe Conrad of San Antonio
leads the field in the men's
amateur division. He fired a two-
under-par 70 to grab a one-
stroke lead on Frank Stranahan
of Toledd, who has won the
tourney three tunes in the last
four years, and Ray Chamberlin
of Waukegan. Illinois.
Barbara Little of Wauwatosa,
Wisconsin, is pacing the women
amateurs with an 81.-
Along The Fairways
Matches in the XVI Esso An-
nual Golf tournament at the
Panama Golf Club over this
week end closely contested and
while surprises are not expect-
ed many of the matches should
be won on the last hole.
Lockman, An Artisan With Bat, Is Giants5
Best Outfielder Starring At First Base
By MURRAY OLDERMAN
NEA Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK, Aug. 7 (NEA)
You can wrap up Carroll Lock-
man in Leo Durocher's terse ex-
pression, "My kind of ball play-
er I"
It means a man who Is alert,
quick on the trigger and wants
to win so badly It hurts. That's
Whitey Lockman.
It means natural ability
ed, power finesse. That's also
tey Lockman.
spee
Whl
In the first flight divisibn
Dicky- Arias meets Johnny Mac-
Murray and both have been
playing excellent golf having
defeated all their opponents so
so far in a very easy manner,
In the other bracket Luis C
deck meets Herb Milten. Lo
game has improved a lot lft
and it Mitten plays In the man-
ner he did against Gallndohe
is going to have a rough time.
The towhead from North Car-
olina, an eight-year veteran of
the National League at 27. was
a magnificent outfielder, the Gi-
ants' best. Now he's a fine first
baseman, the literal salvation of
the Giants in their 1961 pennant
drive.
The New Yorkers made their
move when Durocher switched
Lockman from left field to take
over a position he'd never play-
ed. Yet Leo claims. "Becoming a
first baseman made him great."
Deft Whltev has no peer at
scooping a ball out of the dirt to
ave an errant throw. Onlv the
fact that big, brawny Gil Hodg-
es Is operating around first base
in Brooklyn keeps Lockman from
being the class of the National
H-Black G.
a ?ru Fru
SiSpear
4-<---ayabita
5f-Otl
6Lady Moon
Julio Rodri. 112 -Should score easily
B. Mo!eno 110 Has good workouts
H. Reves 107x Ferns outclassed
B. Pulido 110 Not readv. vet
R. L. Gil 110 Not miK-h class
O. Casti. 108 Black Gold's contender
1-$
5-1
30-1
30-1
10-1
3-1
j
4th ace "H" Native
1
JTao Lady
3Dunne
-Mara
"on venir
Avivato
Sirena
6'a Fes. re:
QUINIELA
O. Castl. 115 Poor recent races
Jul'o Rodri. 1?0 Always wins here
A. Ycaza 97x *oparent)v ctclassed
A Verwpn 113x Peeging for lockey
Hidal. I05x Uao*Irv close up
M. Arose. 104 Performing evenly
"What did LaStarza show you in the 1950 fight, and what,
$250.00 Pool closes: 1:45 primarily, will you have to watch out for this time?" I asked.
"LaStarza surprised me with his" ability to avoid good punch-
es." Marciano replied. "He did take some hard ones.
"He tied/me up" so.that I could not wear him down, let alone
stop him with one weH-dir*cted blow. Whenever I get into a ring,
I figure that I will have an Important edge In condition. I did not
have that advantage over LaStarza and possibly with him at 26,
I mav not have it in September.
"I have a two-fisted equipment. I proved that In my first-
round knockout of Walcott. LaStarza. on the other hand, showed
me nothing but a jab with his left. He could not hook it, and I
am told he still lacks that ability.
"Roland Jabs, grabs and apologizes, and then he jabs, grabs
and apologizes all over again.
"Getting back to my left hook. I hit Walcott with one of
those things early in the first round at Chicaeo. He was standing
away. I missed a couple of overhand rights. Now he was moving
away. I hooked the left. His head turned, and.fell into a right
uppercut to the point of the chin, a great punch with full power.
$275.90 Pool closes: 2:26
5-1
1-2
15-1
5-1
5-1
5-1
Ith Race "A&B" Native 6<< Frs. Purse: $375.60 Pool closes: 2:55
-"alarla
2anchita
Sj-La Lona
4"ednndHa
Sj-Dallda P
1La. Enea
F. Ro 114 Vothin" recently
F. Fidal. lMx Tn enod fern
E. Ort P. L. on 118 nngeroi'< contender
V. Casti. 114 Has excfUnt chance
B. Aguirre 110 Seeks eighth triumph
10-1
5-1
30-1
3-1
4-1
1-2
Race "H"
Imported 7 Fgs. >e- *4*.ai Fool closes:
First Race of the Double
Sun's Moon B. Aguirre ll* Bi American M. A. Phil. 115 Nee^s fllentv md
Cradle Sone H. Reves lOflx Much touvher field
*ontmrtre A. Mena 110 oour^in? hito shane
'.& Prar-ero
IIn Time
fCocaleca
Toperin
Pia
Race "H"
E. Ortca in?x _niB distment
O. M'Tuern ms _\'eeds Jose "rnvo
p. t. nn 11- _Tn too eordltkm
F. Hidal. in->x *ms outrjessed
Julio Rodri. 110 -Tfctasjocfc knows her
Imported 7 rra. F*- taa*# Fool closes:
Second Race of the Double
B. Auirre 118 Improving stendiry
P. I.. Oil 10S -Cn-ld unset dOft
Rider will beta
L. w. Jara 112 ee"s irmo*lbl
O. Maztiera no Rates fair chance
H. Reves W5x Tn-and-nuter
B. Polldo 114 Ran well In last
A. Vas. 114 hold beat these
R. Guerra 109x Tn A-l condition
-Petal C.
-Ismo
Royal Claim J. Bravo 118
"an lies
tT. Dauber
Alabarda
ISalustio
Mon Etolle
Delhla
3:35
S-2
10-1
10-1
5-1
in-i
5-1
4-1
25-1
4-1
4:65
3rl
10-1
3-1
30-1
10^1
25-1
-r
3-2
3-1
Ifh Race "I" Imported
7 F. -
QUINIELA
S375.66 Fool closes: 4:46
"Was I surprised that he did not get op? Yes. I believe I hit
him harder at Philadelphia without stopping him."
"Rocky, you won your second fight with Walcott In the first
one," Charley Goldman, Marclano's trainer, broke in. "Those
punches to the stomach and chin which Joe threw off at Phila-
delphia left their mark. Joe was-an old man* and take it from
me, the ring Is no place, for old men. You proved that.for Joe
Louis and LeeSavold, as well. jy ^f

'You Learn Little in Fight/ Goldman Insists
"I faced WalcQtt for less than three minutes at Chicago, and
yet I learned more in that short fight than I had in any firevious
scrap," Marciano continued.
"You Just Imagine that Goldman broke in. "Fighters learn
little in the course of their battles. They use up what they know,
and are too absorbed in their jobs to soak up any education.
"Believe me, you learn more while shadow boxing in training,
when you have time to think and plan.
"This time. Rocky, you will meet a younger man, a clever
boxer. The scientific fighter figures to improve automatically in
a second shot against the same man.*
"I don't hold with those experts who regard this contest as
another Harrv Matthews match. I am training you for the tough-
est fight of your career."
-Tilama J Roma. H6 *
Wendigo A. vidWa 110 Fit to null coach
Beach Sum R. L. Gil 10* Farlv soeed only
Bracmour F Silver* 118 Tn *Mck of It
Fspartano F. Hidal. **x Nothlne to recommend
6Veranda O. Castl. 114 No good; has chance
9 h Race "D" Imported
I asked Marciano If he believed the fact that LaStarza never
had gone more than 10 rounds would prove a handicap to the
challenger.,
t dont think so." Rocky replied. well-conditioned flght-
r h .*r, unless subjected to severe punishment, shoull find 15 rounds
chear. fied vs ho tougher than 10. Th'ad gone 0 only five times when I stopped
I
7 f-. "n : SC00.66 PNl eloaes:
ONE TWO
25-1
15-1
5-2
1S-1
5-2
6:15
Wr Boas
*_Va11ev R
iwte R. L. Gil 110
T. Lochre B. Moreno l'l
Rothlin L. O. Maniera 118
Follow Me II A. Vas. 118
F. Hidal. 10*x Good outside chance
B. Aiulrre 112 nanaerom contender
"=*acln well
Most earrv soeed
Tn-and-otiter
Horse to beat
5-1
3-1
S-l
5-1
10-1
3-5
Race "G- Imported 7 Fga. Perse: S456.66 Pool clases: 5:46
Prestido O. Castl. 115 _Tn new hands now 80-1
g_qtate Barge V. Castl. 112 More competition here 3-1
-Scythla J. Sama. 118 Still a bit green 15-1
-Bedlam A. Mena 118 Mud would help S-l
-R. Gambler B. Aguirre 11* Slight!v fractious 3-1
-Pebetero G San. 108 T.on?shot possibility 25-1
7Oolflwr Tap F Hidal. In7x Racing to top form 8-1
-Rose Hip F. Rose 120 Down another class 4-1
-Relmpago II R L. Gil 112 Should win now 3-6
Walcott In the 13th."
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In the second flight Rsfaet de
Mena meets Mike Moteno'hT
what may prove the best match
of the day. They had a practice
round last Sunday with de Me-
na edging Mike on the last two
holes. However, It was not the
tournament match on that oc-
casion and that means olenty.
In the second bracket Roberto
Torres is betting his shirt that
he defeats Pico Dlas and the
latter is accepting, all kinds of
bets, despite of the fact that he
Is allowing eight strokes to Rob-
erto.
In the ladles' fllcht Alice
French meet Jane Wilson and
M. Snelder plavs Virginia de la
Guardia. All these are already
In the semi finals and'whoever
wins is entitled to a prize be-
cause of their marching up to
the finals.
Juniors are also playing tntt
weekend with Lalo-a rango try-
ing Moo Arosemena in the
principal affair. Alberto Paz Ro-
driguez meets TMck Duran and
Maxito Henrtematte p'ays Oa-
brielito Galindo. In the other
match Joree Paz Rodriguez is to
play Agustn Arango.
A ringer tournament is next
In the batting order at the Pan-
ama club and much action is
expected from the tournament
committee, since this tourna-
ment should be already under
way.
The next lnter-club matches
between clubs in Central Amer-
ica will take place this year in
San Salvador. Captain of the
team Is not worrying whether
he can make a team as In pre-
vious years. Everv one seems to
enjoy the idea of going to that
country. Late November Is the
date.
Teams on the Isthmus not to
worry any longer either with
their 20-player team for the
yearly inter club matches. Each
club now has enough juniors to
complete the rosters. And you
can count on them.
Sports Shorties
WENT WITH LEASE
East Lansing. Mich (NEA1
Buck McCurry. 1946-47-48. li
the only player ever to captain
more than one Michigan State
football team.
WHAT'S IN A NAME?
Louisville (NEA) In tha 76
years of the Kentucky Derby,
two horses named American
Eagle and two named St. Ber-
nard have raced in the classic.
BIG BUSINESS
New York(NBA) More
than billion dollars were spent
by sportsmen in the UnRed
States tn 1682 for such items
as equipment, transporoatlon
and lodging.
DNBBOKEN STRING
Maderia. O. (NEA)
Women's Western Golf
tion is tile only f>
tournament to be
consecutive yearn
The argument, Hodges or
Lockman, receives impetus every
time big Gil goes into one of his
drastic slumDS. Whitey doesn't
rjretend to hit the same lon<
ball as Hod?es (although he hit
18 homer* in 19481. but consis-
tently bats for a higher aver-
age.
A left-hand batter, he's an
artisan at the nlat'e. poklne' hits
to left, nulling the Inside or high
Ditch .to right and legging out
bunts. He never rtve* up run-
ning out an infield hit.
i*
-.
Watching film-hastie down to
first bese with that deceptively
fast lope/ one would scarcely
picture him on crutches six
years agohis baseball career
marred. A slide on a skinned
diamond at Sheffield. Ala., 'a
week before the 1947 season be-
gan, left him with a dangling,
broken, twisted ankle. It was the
same type of injury Monte Irvln,
another key Giant, was to suf-
fer five years later.
Limping and stiff legged.
Whitey was in uniform again by
the season's end. The limp and
tha stiffness now are gone.
Whitey Lockman's here to
stay.
drive -to
" right/,'
Backache, Getli
RheuiMfism ud
" ron ar
Nlhli, or
cloudy url
matism,
KarvouMeH, Dim
b*r>rt y
Ankle*.
_ and feol old
btfor. jour Unw. kidxr iroubl. my
th rtuu.
ron* foe* ad rlDka,
* .OYtrJ!or't .'c Boarr train on
row kHniri *o that th.r function
paarlr and ortan may aaad n*lp to
propofly pjirlfy yow blood and main tain
baauu and enera-}'.
vMtrilaa Taw U|aM
A faat nctln lnttraal medicina
Cy.tex, drolo"-d by The Knox Copq-ol
line Has

Trouble
'\
foral,
.Vitalia*
-n ovt DOlaonoua
irlty the blood, i. Combat*
Urinary yafem. S. Soothe*
rltafed tlanea.
nSLn",*,r!*a *T leadln
there Is no need of any2
Iron
drusa-lita, ao t
on* auflerlnc I
UP Wiht* and
mentioned anon. _
of thl* araat medicine.
Get Cyetex from your draraiat today
and m how quickly It help* ut yo*
on. the road t* better health.
Irofti Backache, atttn
d tac #thr ymploma
r* wlthSeTth* benefit*
i 1
To s man with a seeming palssc.wbisky <*><
merely 'Scoee'. He looks for the finer pomt4ap4
ami bis preference ... White Horse. Every
drop is so ladtfringly smooth, perfected and
matured ml h is as fine a whisky u ever came
out of Scotland. AS good things.haTs a name;
j ted si Scotch the aame to remember is
' White Hone.
M- llore
' such items M
ansporteUlon ^ ^^^ &VJ
ITsUNG
KZA) WM Z^M
5olf Assocls I ^S"StaWS?S--SJ-i---
WHITE HORSE
r. +*
ASK FOR IT BY NAME
Ar C**m e> -tmm



FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, lfftl
-*
THE PANAMA AMERICAN .- AN INDEPENDENT DAII.T NBWUPAPE
PAGE NDfB
White Sox Open fDo-Or-Die9 Series Against
;---------------_-------------!----------1-------------- ____L-------------.--------1---------------!------------U-------------~*-----;------------A--------
American League
TEAM* W L Pet.
New Tor* 70 M .673
Chicago < Cleveland > M 40 .623 1 44 .SSI 4 62 .410 18 7 .362
tostn Eruhlnctoa Philadelphia
Detroit
It. Louli U 71 Mt
W L Pet.
66 17 .646
61 46 .566
57 48 .559
56 47 .544
63 40 .520
46 56 .466
39 63 .362
36 75 .324
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago *t New York
Cleveland at Beatn Detroit at Philadelphia
St. Louie at Washington (N)
, YE8TEW>Ari RESULTS
Cleveland 000 000 010-1 6*
Wash. 101 010 10x-4 0
Feller (4-6), Wight and Olrw-
berg, Tlpton, Vegan. Shea (9-3)
and Fits Gerald.
National I eafiue
NATIONAL LEAGUE
TEAMS
Brooklyn
Milwaukee
PHltadelBhl
St. Louis
New York
Cincinnati
ChiOagO
Pittaburth
TODAYS'GAMES
Brooklyn at Cincinnati (N)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (N)
New York at St, Louis (N)
Philadelphia at Chicago
YESTERDAY* RESULTS
First Game (Eleven Innings)
Brooklyn 002 000 010 01-4 10
Mil. 110 600,4)10 00-3 14
Loes, Wad*. Brakine- (12-Si
and CaihpanaUa. Spahn (14-5)
and Crandall.
Chicagoans
Hope To Keep
Streak Going
ees

-
Chyba, Weiland Pitching Duel Basketball Doubleheader
Tonight At Balboa Stadium,At B#oa Qym TonidlM
Ten Innings
St. Louis 300 010 003 1-8 IS ft
Boston 020 020 003 6-7 12 1
Kretlow, Llttlefleld, Stuart
(8-21 and Courtney. Brown. Nixt
on (4-5), Kinder and White,
WUb*r.
Detroit 000 000 020-1 5 0
MW York 630 300 Olz-119 0
After (l-S), Herbert. R. Mil-
ler and Bucha. W. Miller (J-0),
Reynolds and Berra.
Second Game V.-.
Brooklyn ooft OOl Wi-2 4 o
Milwaukee 000 009 003-3 6 0
Lablne. Meyer; (11-51 and
Walker. Buhl, Liddl* (5-4) and
Cooper.
Night Game
Phlla. 000 000 000-0 2 0
St. Louis, 101 000 OOx-2 7 0
Simmons (9-9) and Lopata.
Haddrk (14-4) and Rice.
Chicago
Phlla.
010 000 060-4
100 012 000-4
Vlisir Raster**,
hads Made You*
MUM lM|ir Howir; to JJJr-
>Hk namorr ii5idy, Brt'VwunMj.'
tanpur Mood, tohly akin, a*r*MUM.
Pittsburgh 300 000 011-4 8 2
3 Clncinntl 000 100 101-3 S 1
I 0 Linda. (5-12). LaPalme and
andlock. Raffensberger, King
2-5) and Se/ajjeack.
S) and Lollar. Coleman, Bjrnl 31/ ,
(10-13), Fanovich and Murray. New York 000 202 080-12 11 1
Chicago 000 042 000- 6 13 3
Orissom. ConMn. Beam, WlN
helm (7-15) and Noble,
helm (7-15) and Noble. Hacker
(7-15). Church. Simpson. Wlllta]
and McCultougtl, Sawatski.
1 ,31
%flfisJw"5S!i
DKMBP
Joe'Parks says there's nothing
m disappointing as to hv a.
neighbor any If you* Hkt- a
glass of lemonade and you And
there's nothing but lemon Juice
hirC.-
r
Transportes B.\xftrS. A.
SHIPPERS MOVERS
We accept general cargo to all
paints in the Interior
DAVID VOLCAN
And orders for Lumber on return trip.
Guaranteed insured service!
NEW YORK, Aug. 7 (UP)
It was now or never today (or
the White Sax, who still have
a chaes to win the American
League pennant If they can
maintain their magic teach
over the Yankees in Yankee
Stadium.
Five games behind with time
i running out on them, the whia-
| zing White Sox hoped to lm -
firove on a streak which began
Mt season and which- has
found them winning nine games
in a row in the Bronx nalace
where the Yankees usually are
invincible.
Yesterday. In the 5-2 triumph
over the Tigers, the Yankees
01 stranded 11 men on the paths.
1 Lefty Bill MUler, making his
first start since comlne back
from Kansas City, pitched a
flve-hltter and had. a shutout
until the Tigers put together
three hits in the eighth.
The White Sox swept their
series with Philadelphia, win-
ning 6-4 with a five run rally
in the eighth as Sam Mele,
plnch-hltter Connie Johnson,
and Sherm Lollar drove In runs
with key hits. Lollar sent in two
with his-second double of the
day.
The Brawns edged Boston.
1-7. in 16 innlngs when Bobby
Yenng homered after Tad
Williams, making his first ap-
pearance since returning from
Korea, fouled out a a plnch-
hltter to end a throe-run Rod.'
Sax rally in the ninth. Don
Lenhardt and Vera Stephens
also homefed for St. Louie. <
Spec Shea pitched a six-hit-
ter as Washlngtn beat Cleveland
4-1 and Jack Jensen drove in
two runs with three hits. Rookie
Pompeyo Davallllo eot two hits
and stole home for the Nats.
In the National Leazue, the
Dodgers split a twin bill with
Milwaukee., winning the first,
4-3, In 10 innings and losing the
second. 3-2. Pittsburgh edged
Cincinnati 6-5 and the Giants
clubbed Chicago, 12-6.
Lefty Harvey Haddlx of the
Cards pitched no-hit ball for
eight Innings hut had to settle
for a two-hit, 2r0 victory over
the Phillies, his 14th. Richie
Ashburn, who also wracked a
no-hit bid by Warren Spahn of
the Braves last week, wrecked
Haddlx' try with a nlnth-lnnlng
le and Del Ennls also sin
Red Behoendlenst scored
Card runs.
Pee-Wee Reese singled home
the Dodgers" winning run in
their opener-, giving Cart Ersklne
his 13th win tn relief. The
Braves rallied to win the second
when Harry Hanebrlnk tripled
with the bases loaded In the
ninth inning off Rusa Meyer.
Catcher Mike Sahdloek, bat-
ting ninth as good hitting pitch-
er John Lind batted seventh,
responded by doubling in the
eighth and scoring on a fly,
than driving in the winning run
for Pittsburgh in the ninth.
The Giants scored eight runs
in the eighth aa Monte Irvin
and Al Dark each hit three-
run homers. Irvin had two sin-
?itt, too, driving in four runs
or the day. ,
By HERBERT MOISE
The two outstanding pitchers
on the Isthmus of Panama will
face each other tonight at the
Balboa stadium In the first
game of the proposed series be-
tween the Harlem Sporters,
champions of the Rainbow City
Major Softball League, and
Norge. winners of the La Boca
Senior League title.
Ricardo "The Remarkable"
Chyba will oppose Bob Weiland
of Norge. These pitchers have
faced each other twice in the
Rainbow City Major League
Bob played for Cerevecerla Na-
cional and In each contest no
decision was reached.
ani*aertT-sa and- W.
tolled-'
morning* sun and dueled for
nine Innings to a thrilling aefo-
xero scot*, fti this game, Wei-
land..
er,
sera
oppose*
pltcbSr'nd-l
nine innings.
Thy sjomid meeting wae less
spectacular' with botJi pitchers
being scored upon because of
poor defense due to a soggy
playing field. This game, how-
has taken on. the
an Isthmian title
series. BoUt.Uams are' loaded
with talent that would be U-
"Mr. Pitch- stat potential in anv loop bn
the MHaMfe^Og' the
roster. PlpDo Malcolm is
big'Rwo. RsrWwa, the cham.
T^guOandWayefraateUar out-
field to support Wefiand.
Weiland is so fast that most
hitter* hit him to the opposite
field.
The other two componen
Sell
the Norge outfield
ts of
lieved
ever, was finally stopped by In- to be the beat on either side of
termlttent rainfall at the end the Isthmus are long ball hit-
bt the third with the score
knotted at two runs apiece.
In the first meeting the boyar The series between Harlem
:-----------.r-*r~-------------i--------------------------------------------------'-------------------
Yale Quintet Makes Final
Local Appearance Tonight;
Visitors Whip A rmy Five
The visiting Yale University
basketball team will make its
final Isthmian appearance to-
night against the R. P. cham-
flons Lord chesterfield at the
anama Gym.
Before the feature contest
between Yale and the Lord
Chesterfield five, a girls' game
will be played. The winner of
tonight's international game
will receive the Panama Olym-
pic Committee trophy which is
being'donated bf-Alejandro "To-
ri
to
the
eraon, who will throw out
first ball and present the

F. S. RUDESHEIM
ta. I Jernimo de la Osss Street
Td. 2-2S$r 2.2451
PANAMA
Yesterday's Star Lefty
Bill MUler of the Yankees,
who pitched a five-hit 5-2 vic-
tory ever Detroit with relief
help from AUie Reynolds, and
drove in a key run with a dou-
ble.
trophy after the game. -
The following playera will de-
fend the Panama Basketball
League's hopesFernando Tom,
Alfonso Prazer, Isaac Peltlno-
vlch, Carlos Cells, Carlos Mag-
daleno. Alfonso Smith, Pedro
Simpson, Augusto Harrison.
CJeorge Sewell, Alfonso Quio-
nes, Alfredo Sereno and Billy
Cohen.
vTale University moved eat
into an early lead and then
held the margin for the re-
mainder of the contest to de-
feat Special Troops 54-43 be-
fore an estimated 2.6** fans at
the Fart Clayton gymnasium
last algbt. Por Yale, it evened
their record during their stop
in Panasaa at ene victory and
ne defeat.
Coach Howard Hobson'i team
moved into a 13 to 4 lead during
the first quarter when bis son
Dave tossed In eight straight
points to give the "Ell" com-
plete charge of the game. Tom
Williams hurled in three points
just before the quarter ended to
make the score 13-7 in Yale's
favor at the first intermission.
Yale Increased their lead to
ten points at halftlme when
they held a 28-16 edge and then
a retched the margin during
e third period to go into 44-
20 lead as they moved Into the
final eight minutes. The Bull-
dogs took a 19-point lead during
the first few minutes of the
final frame before the Troopers
started finding the range to
close the gap as Don Khlers con-
nected for eight pdttn#,:aflr4
the high scoring forward had
been scoreless during the first
three quarters,
Hank Roas set the ecorinr
pace for the evening with 12
points while Tom William*
was high for, the Troopers
with ten. Both teams missed
many close-in shots, hat the
spoed of the con tost called for
toe much harry on shot-mak-
ing to allow high percentage
accuracy.
The box score:
SPECIAL TROOPS
PO FT p
Williams
Ehlers
Hey
Andrade
Murphy
Linsemeyer
McCarthy
Verstrate
Totals

Demcak
rsobson
Dlshnow
Schlff
Schnaltter
West
Morgan
Yellln '
Ross
Totals
4
3
3
0
3
0
0
0
TP
16
9

3
9
2
0
0
IS
vs
TALI
3
S
1
0
3
3
1
3
5
14 15 4Z
6
S
3
0
T
10
3
6
12
a 12 it 54
trs who can field with and
throw as hard as anybody.
Around the Infield, manaeer
Arthur Lee, has -built his de-
fense around a hard-throwing,
sure-armed Robert Humphrevs
PoweUs y*BBlbgft. .
;> vr-iandtr: ..
Unlsport vs Maduros
An interesting doubleheader
:jwill be offered Pact tic side bas-
i. 3 *etba*l fan* .tonight at the Bal-
2P boa Oym atk'WnSPiO pan.
In-'the first game, Powells
from the Atlantic League will
meet the High School squad.
Most of the members of Powells
squad will make up the Cristo-
bal High School squad this com-
ing year. Big John Hayes, Top-
per Dld'cr. John Hatgl and
"H'M
leagues. Add to this
that Maduros will feature jtie ]
leading scorer, Noel Onion,
from the Atlantic League, and
you have the makings of a top
attraction.
The Universal Sport players''
familiar to the Isthmian bas-
ketball f ans include Arnold
Manning, Cptl Simons, Paul
Mosher and Buckey Conover. i '
In addition to Noel Gibson,
M2duros will have his brother
Bob Gibson, Jim Brady. Ired'
Dudley 8mlth will lead Powells. Raybourne, Jack Ruoff, Frenchy
' For Balboa, Jim May, Tom Coycault, Edgar McArthur, and
Davidson, Bill Martin and Lar-
ry Bllch will take on from last
year's varsity squad.v
Powells was one of the sur-
prise squads of, the Atlantic
League posting wins over Naval
and a very steady Eddie Good-1 station, Unlsport, and Gllbral-
ing at second baa*. The catch-tar Uf.
lng of Edear Parrls. who also
Dlayed in the RBCMSL, was the
best in either league.
The Sporters on the other
hand have not played the power
ame for the whole season, but
have kept the opposition off
balance with dazzlln* speed and
timely hitting. The Harlem pow-
er, what little there Is. is spread
out evenly and wisely through-
out the line-jp. Mot a team to
knock off the runa scored a-
galnst them in the "biir/t In-
nings, the Sporters comoensate
!heir shortcomings with bril-
lant defense.
Around their inner defense Is
the neeriess Hector Richards at
third; at shortstop is the hus-
tling Oscar Hall who teams
smoothly with Wally Anderson
at second base. Their first base
will either be Hugh Charles or
their all-round Carl Thorn*. To
back this brilliant array of ln-
flelrters are three of the fastest
outfielder George "Teats"
Atherley In left. Alelandro Bo-
vell in center and Rodman Nu-
nez m right.
All hi all the big story of to-
night's eame is the eight letter
word pitching. Who will It be:
"Mr. Pitcher" Wetland or "The
Remarkable" Chyba.
Weiland's outstanding feats:
Won five lost none (in La Boca).
In RBC be won two without a
toss. In La Boca: He fanned 64
hitters in 32 Innings. In the fl-
Sl play-off series he pitched
r*e consecutive shutouts.
Chyb* outstanding achieve-
ments: In RBC, he won five
without a defeat. Pitched two
consecutiva corlees innings
16 of which were consecutively
"hltles*. I
Balboa has won four games In
the- Pacific League so far and
umortunately is In a slump at
the present. An old opponent
like the Cristobal bunch may
revive them however, as it win
take their best to stay In the
game Friday nite. .
The second game of the even-
ing will feature th*'two number
two teams of their respective
the KOurany twins.
It la expected that a good siz-
ed delegation of Atlantic side
fans will accompany vorites tonight. They will be
welcomed and challenged by an
equally partisan group of lusty
Pacific slders.
"THOR" WASHERS
SALES Service Parts
CASA SPARTON
Cenlr.l Av* 223 (ntxl tt
Enrult TIlMtT)
i.
. '
-

J<
Ball Players
Told Ta Work
On Strong Points
ST. Louis, Aug. 4 (NEA)
Walter Shannon tells ball play-
ers to work on their strong
points If they want to get any-
where In basaban.
This is in direct canteadle-
tion to the preachings of all
other learned baseball men.
"It's a man's strong points
that pay off In this game;" the
Cardinals' minor league direc-
tor stressed "Sanolotter or big
leaguer, he should find out what
he does beat and try to Improve
even more.
"A player will enjoy work-
ing harder on things he does
well becamn he naturally likes
to do them better "
' ,n \,%
The De VILBIS COMPANY
of Toledo, Ohio,
takes pleasure in announcing
the Appointment of
EPSA
EMPRESAS PANAMEAS, S.A.
N< 36 automobile Row
as Exclusive Distributors in the Republic
of Panama and Canal Zone.
Pro Football League
To Play 36 Charity
Pre-Season Contests
By UNITED PRESS
Commissioner Bert Bell says
National Football League teams
will play 36 pre-season exhibi-
tion games... mostly for cha-
rity.
The exhibition schedule is on*
of the largest in the league's 34-
year history. It starts tonight
when the Los Angeles Rama
take on the Uth Naval District
team .at Ban DlegO.
Next on the hat la the annual
gam* between the pro cham-
pions the Detroit Lions and
the College Ail-Star*. They'll
meet a week from Friday night
at Chicago.
The All-Stars are working out
at Lafayette, Indiana, under
Northwestern coach Bob Voigts.
This year's team, says Voights,
has "better backs and better
runners" than laat year's All-
Stars, who lost by only three
points.
"WVve also got better line-
backers and better defensive
ends," says Voights. His line-
backers-are Donn Moomaw of
UCLA... Bill Forester of South-!
era Methodist... Don Rhoden of
Rice... Roger Zaatkoff of Mich-
igan >.. and George Morris of
Georgia Tech. Voigts slneles
out Jack Alderton of Maryland
and Tom Scott of Virginia as
his best defensive ends.
A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS!...
the GRAND DEBUT;
of the famous stars of
Hollywood and Television
The
* *
OLD RIVALS
Enanaton, ni (NEA)
Northwoatem and Illinois foot-
ball teams hav* been meeting
sinceJ*l
ALL-CONQUERING
State College, Pa. (NEA)
Pennsyh anla State College golf,
wrestling and gvmnestle teams
jail finished the 1953 season un-
beaten, H
Nicholas
Brothers
They Dance, They Sing.
They laugh, they make you dance, sing and laugh.
With the stars of our regular Show..
CHELO RICO, beautiful Spanish dancer,
ONELIA and EMILIO, acrobatic dancers.
HUMBERTO LEWIS, M. C, and the rhythmic orchestra
of the Happyland night club.
Happyland Ce n t r a I
NIGHT CLUB
at 11;00 p.m. and 1:30 a.m.
NO COVER CHARCE

c.v.
THEATRE
tM ;f*
at 9:00 p.m.
GENERAL ADMISSION $1.00


fPWPv*
Phillies On Two Hits]
.Read story on page 9
Hope Abandoned
For 14 Missing
B-36 Crewmen
LONDON, August 7 (UP)
Hope was virtually abandoned
today for the 14 American air-
KSlrtS missing in the, crash
of a RB-36 bomber In the
North Atlantic Wednesday.
Four survivors of the 23-man
rrew that ditched the burning!
plane were en route to Canada:
and England aboard Britisn
rescue vessels. Five bodies were
recovered from the sea.
The master of the Britisn
freighter Manchester Pioneer
saW he was filing for Mon-
treal, where he would land the
three men he saved from the
"Another survivor was sched-
Bled to ari-.ve at Britains
Manchester ship nal today
aboard the Manchester Shipper.
One survivor said yesterday
he clung for 10 hours
small rubber dinghy.
Master Sgt. Roy Speers, 26.
an aerial photographer or
Bennlniton, Okla.. said most
of his 22 companion aboard
the burning plane *VV*n}?
parachuted before it Bit the
water and were scattered o-
ver a wide expanse of water.
Speers remained In the plane
AN DTOSPINDBN^
fBfe
DAILY NEWSPAW5*
Panama American
"Let the ptopleknow the truth and the country I* safe*' Abraham Lincoln.
French Civil Servants Stage
Biggest Strike Since 938
TWENTI-EIGHTB IEAR.
PANAMA. R. P., FRIDAY, AUGUST 7,195J
FIVE CENT
Russia Reinforces Occupation Army
As Hungry Germans Turn Rebellious
BERLIN, Aug. 7 'UP) East I
.German railway workers aid;
a today the Soviets are transfer-
ring troops from Poland to East
Germany to strengthen their
occupational army In the face
of growing antl-Communlst un-
rest.
Kailway workers who came
to West Berlin to pick up free
American food parcela said
train after train loaded with
Soviet troop reinforcements
crossed the Polish border Into
since last
zone Minister rejected work-
ers' demands as "exaggerated
and impossible." He said ar-
rested workers will remain In
JH.
Selbmann warned that the
government "knows and Is
watching" East Germans who
have picked up food and who
are slowing down and sitting
down in plants throughout the
Soviet zone.
Despite Communist threats,
restrictions and confiscations,
an estimated 150,000 Germans
from Soviet-occupied territory
received food packages in West
Berlin today. About 50,000 of
them came from outside of East
Berlin,
crew cruei. o ovruuuauu^. -~froln my sources. Altogether, 1.900,000 persons
Five bodies have been recov:("Canwhile East German have received the packages in
red. A fleet of five aMps nd, emse d Kbemous the 12-day program.
25 U MrTJ 'toS Xd worters and S food-seek-
crossed a 200-mile long anu j-a saboteurs
200-mile wide are In ^''an^ enemy agents todav and
others. A near gale w blow-,and enemy^ ,
as it crashed.
Three other survivors plckea ^^ GenMny
up by rescue ships werei Air- kmd
man 1C Harold Parker 22 of, The rein,orc,ment of the
Quncy. Calif.; Ma]. 0rgeB 000_man SoViet occupation
Parkes, 37. of Vacaville Calir.j* Mn ^^.aie
and 6gt. Charles pebaven, 24, army u reportea here
crew chief, of Stroudsburg. P_a. ouP
Anti-Communist protest dem-
onstrations (and riots forced a
partial lifting of the Red, ban
on road and rail travel to Ber-
lin.
But there was no relaxation
in the communist drive to
prevent Soviet one residents
from coming to to West Berlin
or taking food parcels borne.
The East German rebellion
spread to Communist police and
SI, a record number, asked for
aslylum In West Berlin yester-
day. Another 37 deserted Wed-
nesday over manhandling of
hungry East Germans coming
here for food.
The nortbewest German radio
reported that 400 freight cars
carrying T-34 tanks, trucks,
artillery and machlneguas have
foiled into a freight yard in
East Berlin in the past three
nlforms also wen reported to
have arrived at the Soviet Sec-
tor's Llchtnberg suburb to rein-
force troops who quelled the
June 17 rebellion.
Allied sources did not know
the purposp of the troop move-
ments but said they might be
carried out as a "demonstra-
tion" to intimidate workers or
they might be in preparation
for gigantic fall maneuvers.
Food seekers reported a slow-
down of (1,000 workers at the
Krupp-Gruson railroad repair
shcp and foundry at Magdeburg
to protest Communist Inter-
ference with the relief plan.
Many workers reported the
davs. Between 40 and 50 tanks Communists had been forced to
were said to have arrived there.
Thousands of East German
police troops in Soviet-type u-
saturate big plants with spies
and strong arm squads to keep
the workers from carrying out
strike threats.
dltlon but still suffering from
shock, was aboard the Man-
chester shipper. He said he saw
"two other men alive after we
ditched the plane" but air-sea
searchers found no runner
survivors today.
test against the arrest of thler
colleagues and a government
ban on receiving free American
food parcels In West Berlin.
to a speech pabUsbed fa-th*
Communist press, the Soviet
Counted His Medals
Before They Hooched
O __a. -_ Afrailar WUU1U UC UA Ul i
TAMPA, Fla.. Aug. 7 (UP> munlty from arrest. DeAgauar m Ume Jm faU mjeguoning by
is the gentleman from Nlcara- told newsmen at the tv Jail, j^ senate Permanet Invest-
gua going to get a medal, or *^^.to. *?fcj:SrJnir!ato *anK subcommittee. He said
Isn't he? Tampa do they throw diplomats mamMt wonld
Spy Agency's Bundy
Gels Passport OK
Despite McCarthy
WASHIKGTON, August 7
(UP) The 8Ute Department
overrode Ben. Joseph R. Mc-
Carthy's objections today and
announced it is Issuing a pass-
port for travel aboard to Wil-
liam P. Bundy, a Central In-
telligence Agency employe
criticized by McCarthy.
Undersecretary of State Don-
old B. Lourle assured the Wis-
consin Republican that Bundy
would be back In this country
the passport would let Bundy
A minor diplomatic Incident, to Jail. Jam suppose tot a -^ ^.p^m,,^ vacation
may be hidden in the answer. I medal from the Ui7**?' Lourie's letter was an an-
Dr. N. Salinas de Agullar, con- Tampa and _we werejust ceie- jw(r to Qne from McCarthy
passport
son-in-
Secretary of
eul from the Central American brating the medal Tell me, why blo republic in Tampa, says he's do the police;of Tampa ijh ^ of Blrndy
scheduled to be given a medal \ such a scandal of this little f Q{ fonner g^,,
this afternoon by the University; matter? rhni State Dean Acheson.
medal but indicated It was an able^ comment on the medal ciAiioDa MDd ^ contribution of
administrator!* to the defense found of
award to make him very proud;for De Agullar
worth a bit of celebrating. A un yersity u^.-^. jormer 8tate Department offl-
dlplomat told Tampa > who would not give his name i^, r Hiss now servlne
hePand Dr. Ellwood C.sald: "As farasIJcnow. he will ^Alger^ Hiss, g**%
The
Nance. gW-W' piSdt of, not receive a medal1 today and i^^cff ^^Bundy
;hf. university, were merely | as far as I know he was not ~*~ :r_~____~_._e
any a- tne charges are true.
McCarthy's threat to inves-
celebrating "the "forthcomingI schedixled to receive
Buy thCy P'Cked UPrPoue tfd De Agullar did not gate ttu> top-secreiMjpy agen-
Tte' Agullar was charged; stop after his accident but was fLJg*% **Si
with driving while Intoxicated chased and caught by Murray J*Xartny ^* oflS.
__a h .ih >, mi, thmiKih: Thomas a railroad employe, an pupuc quesuoning or Bun-
pollce said he ran through! Thomas, a railroad employe,
and p
a recTlight and smashed Into a ^^^XSXS^lmmi Dulles
dy until CIA Director Allan W
Policeman's Suil
For $5,372 Jellied
Oul 01 Court
Attorneys for Canal Zone Po-
liceman C. N. little and Canal
employe John C. Francis told
the U8 District Court early this
week that they had come to a
settlement in a suit filed by the
former seeking $5372. The a-
mount of the damages paid was
small, both attorneys stated.
little suffered a fractured el-
bow and numerous cuts and
contusions when he was thrown
from bis motorcycle on Tlvoli
Avenue at the corner of San
Bias Place. His cycle struck the
curb when he attempted to a-
vold a collision with the car
driven by Francis, a cable splic-
er. It was reported at the time
that Francis was making a left
turn into San Bias Place from
Tlvoli Avenue.
At the time of the accident the
police officer was In pursuit of
another motorcycle on Tivoli
Avenue Little had observed Its
license to be Irregular.
Little sought $5,000 damages,
$353 salary for four weeks dur-
ing which he was incapacitated
for work and $20 for a ruined
uniform.
Attorney Donald J. McNevin
represented Little, and Francis
was represented by attorney
William J. Sheridan, Jr.
According to the Engineer's
Office, a road repair project
will begin shortly at Albrook
AFB. The plan Is to resurface a
car occupied by Dr. Roy Saxon
and his five small children.
There was no damage to the
occupants and only slight dam-
age to the cars but the Nlcara-
(ua's feelings were more severe-
y damaged.
After claiming diplomatic lm-
US-Rate Teachers
In Zone To Get
Salary Increases
Canal Zone teachers will re- total of'portaimatey oe'mUe
tS?,ve 1a a,La,ry,ncreaae HecUveiof streets throughout the Base.
President D. Eisenhower signed:ue ecVon* scheduled to
the bill yesterday providing a {* re-covered Include Hall,
salary Increase for District of Douc.-tt. and Mlnter Streets and
Columbia teachers. This bill Is Can field Avenue, all in the res-
applicable to U.S.-rate teachers ,'dential areas of Albfook. Minor
emoloyed In the Canal Zone. resurfacing plans
The bill provides a 10 Der cent other locations.
Increase on the first $3000. eight; Inasmuch as contracts have
per cent on the next $2000. and not been completed, no target
Ilx ner cent on any amount over Cut.-- for the project's accom-
5000. iplishment was Indicated.
. PARIS, Aug. 7 (UP) -- Some
2,000,000 civil servants and work-
ers In nationalised Industries
stopped work today for 24 to
hours in the biggest general
strike since 1038.
The walkout was directed a-
!alnst proposed economic re-
orms by rlghtwlng Premier Jo-
seph Lanlel and threatened to
cripple France's economy. This
metropolis and other, major
cities were virtually Isolated.
, Strikers Included almost all
government and municipal em-
ployes and mine, rail, gas^ elec-
trical and other workers. Tobac-
co sellers and undertakers Join-
ed the walkout. J '*
It followed a strike by'tele-
phone, telegraph and postal ear-
Sloyes that slashed commurpca-
ions to 10 per cent of normal
yesterday.
The walkout which .began at
midnight was sparked by th
Socialist-dominated Wor k e r s
Force (FO). It got the enthus-
iastic backing of the Catholic
CFTC, Independent and Com-
munist-led General Confedera-
tion of Labor (COT) unions.
Strikers protested reforms
proposed by Lanlel that would
result in widespread firing of
"non-productlver' civil servants,
an Increase in retirement ages
and a hold-the-line salary
policy.
The strike spread to Algeria
and Morocco, where postal work-
ers voted to go out in sympathy
with their colleagues in France.
Lanlel, announced yesterday
a four-point plan of action he
said would "insure food distri-
bution and restore communica-
tions."
The plan, disclosed after
two-hour emergency meeting of
the cabinet, called for:
1) Drafting ot all-long lines
telephone personnel whose
strike has paralysed 80
firemen also belong to the strlk-
^R
M per cent
of the nation's postal, telegraph
and telephone facilities.
2) ''Necessary measures'* to
assure electricity and power
supplies despite the threat of ed
112,000 gas and electricity work-
ers to stage a 48-hour walkout.
3) Immediate suspension of
any. worker who defies the draft
order. This would apply to near-
ly 220,000 communication work'
era who st r u c k throughout
France
4) A guarantee of
of work" for any employe who
wants to defy the strike called
by three of France's major
unions.
The government acted In the
face of growing labor unrest
and demonstrations by' more
than 100,00b angry wine growers
who blockaded roads in. four
against the government decision |0 AtfCIld PtsflCV
not to purchase surplus wine, ,w "'" rfjlWf
The 2,200,000 strikers included _^-,,- -.t___,__.,
the tobacco and match Indus- ^g*'.8wi*?,r^2{.ITfi
tries, hospital worker*,' streetfl 'r. A leading delegate to
unions.
ellable sources said harsh
and bitter words were exchang-
ed at the extraordinary cabinet
session and that Lanlel criticiz-
ed Economy Minister Edgar
F a u r e for his high-handed
methods. The sources said the
government was worried and
"virtually in a panic" about the
strike.
Lanlel Issued a back-to-work
appeal yesterday and radio ta-
tions broadcast it every hour.
It warned of "sanctions" If the
strikers refused and said strik-
ers wouM receive no pay.
Jews In Some Latin
Countries Afraid
Bird Brains Tie Up
Wall Street Traffic
his own recognizance after be- j bakf.round: tl_ ,. .,
inn charged Dulles subsequently told Mc-
mg cnargea. _________ earthy -that Bund/ belonged
Air Force Plans
Road Repairs
At Albrook AFB
to only one organization ac-
cused of "Communist In-
fluence" and resigned from
that group after only two
months. He said Red charges
were not leveled against the
group until six years later.
95 Proof
MARKET LAVINGTON, En*,
Aug. 7 (UP) George Dob-
son, 95, was convicted of driv-
ing bis motorcycle without due
care and attention after be
collided with a car while try-
ing to retrieve a bottle of liq-
uor slipping out of his pocket.
The court ordered him not to
drive until be is N.
'Cornavalito'
Set Aug. 22
At El Panama
Other Wards?
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UP) A
motorist recently flagged down
also cover the Illinois Central's streamliner
"City of New Orleans" and asked
the train crew to pull bis car out
of the ditch. One of the words
of reply from the conductor was
"no." "
___________________
On Ant. **. Hotel El Panama
will hold a "Carnavallto While
the hotel has celebrated a suc-
cessful 4-day Carnival in the
traditional Panama manner the
last two years, this Is the first
time that a Carnavallto, or small
Carnival will be held.
The Carnavallto Is like an en-
core of Carnival for the benefit
of the college students and oth-
er folks who missed the real
thing test February. And to
many people new to the Isthmus
and its customs, this will be a
"pre-vue" of next year's Mardl
Gras. For one thing is certain,
the Carnavallto, a costume dance
presided over by Queen Aurlta I
and her gay court will be a night
of music, fun and frolic In the
Panama Carnival manner.
Weather permitting. the'El Pa-
nama carnavbUto will be held In
th hotel's patio.
NEW YORK, August 7
(UP)Thousands of spectators
tied up city traffic yesterday
as a determined man with a
net crept along the ledges' of
Wall 8treet skyscrapers In
pursuit of a fugitive tropical
bird.
Crowds throughout lower
Manhattan gathered to gawk
at the contest between Rufous,
a turkey-sized escapee from a
pet shop, and Joseph Schleilng-
er, a nimble and daring em-
ploye of the American Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Animals. '
The sight-seeing bird flew up
Broadway, looked in on mem-
bers of the Bankers' Club, and
loused up the weather bureau's
weathervane.
Schleslnger crept along the
ledges of four financial district
buildings In pursuit of Rufous,
but the fugitive's ability to
fly made It an unequal contest.
At about 10 sun. the would-
be captor was wondering where
the large Rufous Hornblll had
gone when meteorologists at
the New York weather bureau
noticed a strange phenomenon.
The instrument which shows
the wind direction abruptly
changed from light variable to
true northwest.
At about that time a scien-
tist walked Into the bureau and
announced, "Hey, there's a bird
upstairs."
Rufous was making like a
weathervane. He was perched
astride the weather arrow, 454
feet above the financial dis-
trict. ^Z
Schleslnger came running. He
put some raw meat and sliced
cantaloupe on the tower plat-
form, trying to lure Rufous
down.
Schleslnger then mounted
the tower and took a swipe
cleaners, garl
civil servants.
dignified gnUefflM* were dining
38 floors above Broadway.
VHe soomed around the build-
ing like an airplane what a
filer," D. C. Wilson, assistant
treasurer of the Santa Fe Rail-
way Co, said admiringly.
Shortly afterward^ something
went wrong with Rufous' di-
rectional equipment and he
whanged Into a closed window
high in the National City Bank
Building. There he perched on
the window ledge, peering In
at the office workers.
The woskers peered back.
After a minute, the bird a-
galn took off, gliding gently
toward City Ball Park.
The weary Schleslnger spent
the rest of the afternoon In
the Irving Trust Co. building
and other tall buildings looking
for the fly-away.
Subrenie Soviet
Resumes Debate
On New Budget
MOSCOW AOg; 7 (UP) The
union council of the Supreme
Soviet today resumed its debate
oh the new Russian budget with
top leaders of the government
again attending.
Yesterday's discussions In th
grand hall of the Kremlin last-
ed four hours ias about a dozen
speakers voiced their approval
of the budget. The final speak-
er,' T. Bakradie, premier of the
Georgian Bopabllc, denounced
ousted Lavrenti Berla and In-
troduced a discussion of for-
eign affairs. He spoke of the
"anti-SovU* movement abroad
by capitalist encirclement and
countries *s their economies
grow wo***"__________
Kin Of Princess
Margaret To Marry
LONDON, August 7 _(UP)_
Another of the dwindling eli-
glbles of Princess Margaret's
generation announced he will
marry in a few weeks.
Lord Montague of Beaulieu,
28, who recently lectured In
the United States, announced
he would marry Miss Ann
Caroline Cage, 21. whose mother
is an American.
Only a few men considered
eligible for the princess re-
main unattached. The most
prominent at the moment Is
wealthy Lord Carnegie, son of
the Earl of Southesk and heir
to the Duchy of Fife.
_ eadlng i
World Jewish Congress
yesterday that Jewish
in certain Latin Amer-
ican countries are afraid to at-
tend the Jewish Congress a*
present in session here "for fear
of reprisals that could be taken
against them."
Abraham Schwartz, of Uru-
guay, editor of the dally "Volks-
blld" categorically asserted here
to the assembled 300 Jewish
delegates from 60 countries that
In several Latin American coun-
tries "Jewish communities are
living under the Influence of ra-
bid nationalism and unstable
governments recently established
by revolutions."
4 "I speak as a Jew from the
freest and most democratic re-
public in Latin America," he
said. "In these other countries,'*
he added, "Jews are affected of
policies resulting from nation-
alisation and expropriation of
property and they ar afraid to
be represented here because
they will have to report on the
realities of the situation In their
i countries with possible
results to the future free-
fttc^enl"
Jewish position in
Dtsaase^S"18
'trXnuetaittOng caused
ivoluttonary changing reglmi
and not on natural constltu
ttonaljsov/'
Bchwarta poke in the nami
of one of the largest Jei
communities in South Ame-
Uruguay has a population
40,000 Jews. Jewish representa'
tives from Argentina BrasUV
Chile, Venezuela, Panama, Ni-
caragua and Peru are parti-
cipating In the present congress,
third plenary session which
concludes here Aug. 11.
Balboa Tide*
Saturday, Aug. I
High Lew
2:55 a.m..............0:06 a.m.
3:05 p.m. ....*........8:29 p.m.
THE WORLD'S MOST DISTINGU!HEJ> LAVENDER
with the net.' Rufous departed.
The next stop was the
Downtown Athletic Club, some
200 yards away. When Schle-
slnger got there. Rufous had
decided to do some more sight-
seeing
At about noon the bird was
sighted over lower Broadway,
the "Hero's Canyon" where
returning celebrities are hon-
ored with tickertape parades.
Schleslnger got one story a-
bove where the bird was perch-
ed, took careful aim, dropped
nls net and meseci.
Rufeus then winged past the
Bankers' Club, where several
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