The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01446

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
' BRANIFF
JLT NEWSPAPER
TO
WASHINGTON
ROUND Til*
FIRST CLASS
tourist
i. to
Panama American
"let the people know the truth and the country it $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
vcagram'sYO.
( WUHAN WHISKI
Now... Years Old!
PANAMA, B. P.. THURSDAY. APRIL 17, 1*51
rivi even
Deputies Denied
AFGE Asks More
Information On
New Governor
INavy Chief
Found In RP
Hotel Dres
The VS. Navy chief who was
| believed to have taken an over-
dose of sleeping pills In a room
at the Hotel Central died at Fort
----- o ----- Clayton Hospital last night.
Further background ma^lLcUon t thisUmr The Inquiry ^rc"^"?"iwe'ra^o
on the newly nominated. Got- was sent to the National AFGE t.echri,clftri wltn the Navy's Com-
ernor of the Panam Ca"f'vof<*'" ^,"SJ Utrhett nfmunication.s Station st Balboa.
Brig. Gen. John States Seybold.l Meanwhile E W. Hatchett of authorities re-1
was requested last night by the the Central ^r ^on-MeM ** out any Informa-;
American Federation of Govern-1 Trades Council said today that jw a apparent suicide
ment Employes Local 14, In a he received word earlier in.4he "^ Hotel Central clerk said Car-
cablegram sent to Washington .week ^m >*">VX?n' ter registered Tuesday morning
Rufus Lovelady, President of atlye William Pi Ire In Washing- nd le?t word at the desk that he
Local 14. brought up the ques-1 toni that the change was about ano disturbed,
tlon during the monthly meeting to happen, but he "didn't expect a
of AFGE members held yester- action so quickly."
day. It was unanimously decid-
RP Assemblymen
Sought To Tear
De Roux Curtain
Yesterday a hotel employe re-
ceived no answer to continued
(NEA Telephoto
SAFF ON MAN-MADE ISLAND *^?JA^W^ ^wj'hasT-
ron of the dike protecting the Municipal Auditorium Ini Sioux City. io hag g() Jar guc.
ed'to request further Informa-
tion on Seybold.
The nomination of an Army
officer who has not had pre:
vlous serice with the Panama
Canal came as a surprise to re-
sidents of the Isthmus. It is,
the first time In the Canals
history of eleven go7.2rnors.tnat
the lieutenant governor has not.
taken over the post.
Reaction at Balboa Heights
and other civilian communities!
was one of. Immediate surprise. [
"We don't know anything a-
bout this new general." aid one
clerk, explaining further: 'Were,
anxious to find out what kind
of man he Is." I
"Personally." remarked a wary
government worker. 'I d prefer (
the chance to look at the man1
In action for two or three years,
bfor* I knew 11 he wa the one
(dbyr3
...imittee. It
[If be a matter of a few week*
before the nomination c
approved.
Capl. Roe Services
Set For Tomorrow
A request by a group of opposition Panama Ae>
semblymen for the use of the facilities of the U.S. trans-
mitter ship, "Courier," to "broadcast a mestage to the
people of Panama," was denied yesterday in a letter writ-
ten by the vessel's commanding officer.
Sources close to the 16 Assemblymen, who delivered
block, "on ca^'aooTfolced the request to Capt. Oscar Wev aboard the Courier on
the lock and found the Navy Monaoy soia \A/ev denied the request on the grounds
hief in a semi-conscious cm ^ JJj^ ^ ^ ^.^ ^ ^ ^^ ^
directives from Woshington concerning the ships oper-
ations. t
Text of the letter hos not been releosed by tha
Assemblymen^___________
tlon.
A Navy ambulance, notified
shortly after, sped Carter to Ft.
Clayton Hospital.
District Attorney Alejandro Ca-
lar of the First Circuit Court
voiced objections today because
Carter wss delivered to Navy au-
thorities before an investigation
&#?'& -..or wMurn- Oil Untoiu Threaten
ed over to the Navy by Night
Judee Miguel Concepcin, who
had no authority to order his
^s&&rs WS1Ghres Up
Nationwide Strikes
'l burgh, Pa., had been on tn istn-
mus ainre Aug. 27 of last year
The Assemblymen had re-
quested the use of the trans-
mitter ship's micro phone
calming that freedom of speech
was being curtailed in Panama
and that a "De Root Curtain"
existed here.
The request came after Min-
ister of Government and Justice
Raul de Roux canceled the 11
censes of Ave opposition radio*
(NEA Telephotol
AaSTRACT.ON BT FLOOD ^paging ^ood waters ^n^^^Zr^^.
Bff SSXtffMA SrSn^t.iS'&SSl.. which are ravaging an eight-
state area. 4r '
Turbulent Missouri Threatens
To Undermine Sodden Levees
tu>iness Done
RLontrence
DEB VER. April 17 Majo? U B. oil workers unions,. news commentators
l warneti tftfay, that a qntlofc HL Awemblymen *
i wide aril
*>ril m
tHatlhjy were ota*
Ap-
rt was released *T
"reluctanlv "agreed to the third but was not delivered to Wev
nostDonement of the threatened until Monday because the letter
"\ i. l_l-l .r*AX *Wa JIJ \*ns tita !>* *-! fmrn f\4
Funeral
-MSSI^ISj
did
p>g>rovecl. Pollce Captln samtiel Roe who ""cent Soviet-sponsored Interna- porarlly" Kavup effortsto set
i?rTnt ronSmpite v rh'dled yesterday afternoon at his S|?onomlc Conference ac- tie the critical wage dispute,
id not contemplate any------- ... to-,-..,,, af.-,iino in Rohert Chamberlain.
did not. have the signatures rt
all the A.ssembly who drafted
the request.
oruHiin; v^umcic". The Courier Is on a shake-
home, will be held tomorrow at cord|ng to Robert Chamberlain. dime was ori- down crnlse and making test
4:30 p.m. at the Masonic Temple ^tary-general of the confer- The *'*lX"\n*w- broadcasts here before being
at Cristobal. ence's permanent bureau glnally set ,rWo?keM' demands stationed in European waters to
Services will be conducted by He said other transaction, were port of the on two^" a send messages of truth behind
thesoiouimers'l^ge. A.F. and still pending between representa- :or a -cent nouny gene curtain.
A M under the direction of tives of Western countries and wage Increase. ""*'"________
Worden B. French, worshipful CommunUt nations. ^ ^^ MPd|atlon chief
m^!rh*, .. ? h. cremated Many cables from Western na- Cyrus Ching obtained a weeks
I L*%%. tVreri as senior de- tlona have been received pledg-< postponement and then Presl^
Capt. Roe retiredlas^""n-t Uig support to the conference, the dent Truman asked that the
tectlve In the Pollce Division at "}P1,'gl(| Among them was a lrlke be put" off for sn lnde-
CAPETOWN. South Africa. A- Cristobal last Oct. 29 after 3B,^We from M Mexican business flnlte period to allow time for
prll 17 IUP-The three largest years of service. ___ lmen repreaenting 45 Mexican Federal hearines
South African organizations or He suffered a f ,Hctriai nncerns. who en- Un. (h. wsr
'White Supremacy'
South Africa Govt.
Faces Opposition
The
Judges' Bench
OMAHA April 17 UP 'The
turbulent crest of fee Missouri
River was beating today against
the water-soaked levees pro-
tecting Bast Omaha and Coun-
cil Bluffs. Iowa.
The United States Army
warned the dikes might be Un-
'Thls' new peril arose as the
river downstream at Pheips
Citv and Watson, Missouri, lap-
ped at the top of dikes there,
spilled ovar then, burst through.
All levae workers. National
Guardsmen and soldiers joined,
the townspeople in their flight
before the onrushlng waters
along a 16-mHe stretch of river-
Dikes, towns and farmland
were abandoned to the angry
waters.
The crisis at Omaha is ex-
pected later today.
The Missouri swept south.
deepening and growing wider
all the while, as President Tru-
man flew back to Washington
at the conclusion of an aerial
survey of the etrlcken region,
followed by a conference with
the governors OT seven affected
states.
Mr. Truman was met here by
Lt. Qen. Lewis A. Pick, chief of.
A'iny Engineers, who told him|
that the floods have caused
damage of "as much as $200.-1
000.000 and no doubt it will go |
Pick said that 87.000 persons
have been driven out of their j
homes, 50 cities and towns have
been flooded and 2.000.000 acres
of farmland put under water.
Obviously shocked by what he
had seen over the flooded Mis-
souri and Mississippi River
vallays. the President said that
it's Worse than I thought lt
would be."
'it's. Just as bad as lt can be
He emphasised he was "not
running for office" and was
speaking only as a "lobbyist for
155,000,000 Americans when he
called upon the governors to
Join him In a program to win
Congressional approval Of his
fiscal 1953 flood control budget
It Is time for action," Mr
Truman said. "We have fooled
around long enough.
This is the breadbasket of
the nation. It ought to be pro-
tected and It can be protected.
Mr. Truman pointed out that
because of the Insistent pressure
of Southern Democrats, flood
controls have been ample on
the southern reaches of the
Mississippi River below Cairo,
He said he wished there had
been a similar unity of purpose
' and opinion among the govern-
ors of the states in the upper
part of the Missouri basin.
lapsed two-thirds of Council
Bluffs would be flooded.
Mr. Truman said that what
he saw on his Inspection flight
confirmed his belief that the
nation needs an "overall" flood
control program "from Pitts-
burgh to Denver, from Minne-
sota to the Gulf of Mexico."
The Mississippi, which also
has received flood waters of
the tributary Minnesota River,
aimed grave threats at down-
stream Minnesota and Wiscon-
sin communities, as well as
Illinois, Iowa and Missouri.
e
Floodwatera already were
i reaching southward as far as
Chester, 111., near St. Louis and
forcing advance preparations.
Mr. Truman flew over the
flooded Mississippi Valley from
Rock Iiland, 111., northward to
St Paul, Minn., then southwest
to Sioux City. la., In the Mis-
souri River valley and on to
Omaha.
He saw swamped towns, vast
flooded areas of farmlands and
the desolate tops of houses
floating In the water.
Pick, directing an army of
more than 8,000 soldiers, guards-
men and volunteers fighting to
hold the Omaha-Council Bluffs
dikes, told Mr. Truman that
the floods would not have oc-
curred if his own Pick-Sloan
p'an for dams had been carried
out.
A total of some 40.000 persons
have fled in areas of Omaha
and Council Bluffs that would
be flooded If the dikes let go.
The chief danger point was
on the north bend of the river
at Council Bluffs where one
leaking dike takes the full force
of the river.
If the north "bend dike ccl-
The Missouri began to drop
upstream from here.
Sioux City business places be-
gan to re-open but Mayor Ralph
Henderson estimated damages
at $2.500.000.
Farther north in South Da-
kota, Missouri River damage
was put at $25000.000.
Housewife Gives
Birth To Babies
-Nos. 21 & 22
WORCESTER. Mast.. April 17
dtp) A 46-year-eld Millbury
housewife gave birth to twin
tiris at a hospital here today
her 21st and 2?nd children.
Mrs. John F. May and her
textile worked husband now
have 20 living children 12
girls and eight boys. Two other
boya died when infants.
The other children all had
arrived singly aad this was the
first multiple birth for the
Mays, who have heen married
27 yeera.
"""". ne uiiei=u "V".!!Tt industrial concerns,
white men opposing Premier taclc 8hortly after a party that 1(Jorsed tne conference.
Daniel F Malan's "white aupre- was given in honor of his retire-,-------------------------
macV government formed a Unl-jment In October. nJD/innmrininn I nrl
ted Front today. 1W ', Captain Roe was working on Panamanian LOO
The United Party and the hi, tamp book yesterday aftor- i
South African Labor Party, the ^ wh(.Pn ne comollned he was ^-IQPcIv In Ured
fwo%poslMon parties in Pf-rila-:fimg ill. Mrs. Roe rushed to _
ment and Torch CommandoaLet him some medicine, bu n f-Q|| rTOtYl I Tee
Ubertv organization of 100.006, f01ind when she returned that
I war veterans announced they he had collapsed. He died at 4:20 An eight-year-old Panama
lhve lolned forcee to fleht the!tt (neir home in Coco Slito nian bov who fell 30 feet from
1 National Partv government. Surviving him. besides his wife a mango tree yesterday was on
Thev were brouiht together are Samuel. Jr. a policeman at the serious list today at Gor-
InrlmaflW bv tha government- Balboa, a son James who lives at ga., Hospital,
announced Intention to push le- haine another son Robert who -
Station through Parliament to jv,s m Grenada Hill. California., t^ injur^ chUd s Gerald
nrevent the nation's courts from Uh nis Mster.Mrs. Olea Streu- Burke. Jr., who lives In Parai-
oiitlawing Its racially disrrimln-,fr nnd another daughter. Mrs so. According to a police report.
Strirv law, Ellen Blahiuk of Key West, Flo- he fell down in front of House
The United Party, leader, sue- ^a. U9 in Paratao yesterday at 606
J". 1 the late prime minister Capl Roe was born In Ayre- p. m. t ,
fnri flekl marshalttn C Smuts. shlrey Tndiaria about 60.years The boy was immediately
i^iafmedthe alrft* of the Uni-.aR0. He joined the United States taken to Gorgas Hospital, where
teTFronUnaspe#atacrowd hies In W08 and served in hla Injuries were diagnosed1 as
I eV meeting Orpetown City the Unltcd states and Cuba un- fracture of the right thigh-
Hainastnieht. Ill 1912. I bone and severe Internal in-
He said "We are determined to He was first employed as a po- juries,
'..nhort law agalnt lawlessness llceman ln the Canal Zone at:
nrt to defend th constitution j^p^ ln ,9,3 and became a de- He Is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
hem.ea'herlbv our-fathers, both tKftn four years later. Gerald Borfce. 8r. ___________
Enellsh and Afrlrt-peaklnic. as
:uciai iii'*-
Now the WSB lias abandoned An Amerlcan ao)dier Is In the
Its efforts to conduct hearlnes Ba,bo(l Jft today servlng a 15-
and to recommend a settlement dav sentence.
In the wage dispute. the 20-year-old enlisted man,
Robert William Lange was found
Most of the 75 oil companies su)lty of drun|{ driving on Diablo
Involved in the dispute refused and Berth Roads and fined $100
, to participate in hearings set tn)s morning ln the Balboa Ma-
! un by the board. By a 10 to 2 gistrate's Court. In addition he
vote, with AFL members dls- was given the Jail sentence.
- __~.1%i.m *i. Wnni'J hnmaH tn fill! e una mha ir ntllh l^nmn
sentlng. the board bowed to oil Lange. who Is with Company
company demands and voted to -d" of the 33rd Infantry at Fort
return the
bargaining.
case to
Cold, Cold Hearth
SAVANNAH. Ga.. April 17
(UP).Katie White saed to-
day for annulment of her
marriage to the man who
didn't come home for sup-
per.
When she was a bride of
three months, she said, her
husband walked out savin
he would be back at meal-
time. He hasn't come home
yet. That was 47 years aro.
r,...... v.. u |)| t|(T7 J.1IU Itiiailttjr nb J-viv
collective Kobbe. was driving a Jeep while
on duty, and crashed through the
fence at the Diablo ice plant.
Also on this morning's calendar
was a petit embezzlement case a-
galnst Alfonso Coronado, 23-
year-old Panamanian. Coronado
was found not guilty.
Rosa Brenes filed a complaint
that the Coronado took $20 front
her at the Tlvoll Commissary In
order to purchase a book. She
claimed he never gave her the
book or the money back.
However, there were no wit-
nesses on her behalf, and a caab-
ller at the commissary failed to
identify the defendant as having
purchased a book that day.
evidence of our hyd-won llber-
U Kane Berman. afcretary of U>e
Torch Commando movement.
Told the crowd o&ls 'canha-
tions plans to stage a day of
protest" unless the Malan go -
ernment droppejlits plans to
override the courta.
Spain ReciHJinize:
Ingrid:
vltWas Not My I ntention To Fall In Love
LOS ANGELES. April 17 ingrid Bergmans first intima- wouldI like to! to^1'*"" bUt!h0.!fjur p,^ (Llndstrom insert- Lindstrom accompany the glrL
tion to her former husband, Dr. that seems ridiculous^ nut* savlna that was the Llndstrom also Ja seeking modi-
Peter Llndstrom. that she was In "It Is not altogether my fault ed a note saying aih*"next flcatlon of the lolnt custody rul-
love with Roberto Roasellinl came and how can y" 'orglve that I $llypl$eTpu?n in* granted at the time he dl-
In a letter which the Swedish want *o sUy with RD*rtf? ?* mid wUh sacXv and help on vorced Miss Bergman, after she
April 17- doctor made public today at a was not V tagton ew'" "u? pa rt, "nd nowyou s?and first got a Mexican divorce In
ruV VolVla^Velen Affairs court hearing, s ^BufVoVV^I help" K or alone In the ruins and I am un- order that he mlgh^Uke the girt
S?S S3 SrKo- ^iJS&J&iM. bto.d^f Ch Si .Hollywood how m,,^ ^^S^SaS^S ^^ '^
last week after tie bricf_ but selIin,i conquer the feeling I had for hint shouW_be P^ff.0'^^"^'.^'^ Plism untlijune S In the
Bolivion Regime
High
10:02 a.m.
10:34 fin
BALBOA TIDES
FrMay. April 1$
summer Bergman W y i more about him at home than I and he ^W*11,^
"It will be very difficult for you feeling
Low
3:55 a.m.
4 35 p.m. to read this letter and It Is diffl-
peaceful settlement
ed.
Llndstrom explained that he
disclosed contents of the letter in
an effort to clarify his stand be-
cause Mtas Bergman "has util-
ised every avenue of oubclty la
an attempt to vindicate her aa
wlln* contact witn nobsfiiiiii. \" --- --i
Mln Petter, I know how this Miss Bergman asked that the Uuns before the wodtf.


CTH
t\ut two
lu MNAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILV NEWSPAPER
Thursday, april i?, nwi
i Hi PANAMA AMERICAN
WNIC NO -uSUSHIO m< TM PANAMA AMKftfCAN PftKM. INC
reuNDco ar nilmn muniiyri in isss
H>HMD*IO ARIAS, ronop.
7 H STKEI1 O 0 134. P. P) OP P
iiitPHonr Panama no 2-0740 C1ILC AOOWtf.5 PANAMSWICAN, PANAMA
COLON OFFICCi II.I7S CENTRAL AVKNUC SR.TWSSN 12TH ANO 13th STRICT
PORIISN RlRRIHNTATIVrS' JOSHUA POWERS. INC
348 MADISON Avt NIW VORK. 1171 N. V
LOCAI T "It
R MONTH IN AOVANCS______________________ 1.70 .BO
FOR SIX MONTHS, IN ADVANCE S AO 13.CIO
flP nik *TA IN AflVANCt- ____ *** ** fQ
TH-. H TOU rOBUM TMt KtAPH OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Th. Msil fa* it as span lam et reatan at Th Panana Amet-
ican Lsfftn art lece.viS arefetully ana' ara h.nrfles ir wholly csa-
fiential manner.
It reu csntnkuit a Itrrai asm b. impellent It 'an t appear rfce
cal 4a* tetters ata publishes1 ia ihe arder tacana*.
Please try keep tht Irfterj limites' Is ana pee length
Uenlitv at letter writers is held in strictest ce-nfleence.
This newspaper assume* na respenilbilitv tar statement* si epmieni
expieitsS in letters tram readers.
SOME MORE POR NEXT TIME
Sir.
I noticed in the Mailbox April 12 a reply by "All till next time"
to the April 4 Mail Box letter signed "Three GI Guardian*.," of
Fort Kobbe.
It seems as though "All till next time" resents OIs using
amusements located in the Zone.
His letter referred to post swimming pools and clubhouses.
It's true the armed forces have one pool per post, but they
are open for enlisted men during the hours those men are on
duty.
For civilians and dependents the pool is there when they
want It.
I have been here in the Zone two years, and have been in
most every service club. I have yet to see one of those $2,000
Hammond organs "All till next time" writes of.
We didn't ask to come here to the zone, but now that we are
here I think It only right to use to the maximum what few amuse-
ments there are.
Dflllnger.
Labor News
And
Comment
By Victor Riesel
Which Twin Has the Halo?
Sir:
I believe the time is here for someone to come forth and set
"All till next time" straight on issues involving both, his selfish
neck and the future of our country.
Since you, "All Mil next time" like frankness, 111 be frank.
' First, "All the next time," till men such as you rid yourselves of
this greed and selfish attitude, how can we ever expect the less
fortunate peoples of this troubled world to adhere to our Demo-
cratic way of life?
Think. "All till next time."
Good men are dying every day to try to preserve a way of life
that permits you to live and think only of your personal needs.
Do you realize this, "All till next time"? No, apparently not,
for even a 16-year-old can tell you Just why an officer's uniform
demands respect in the form of a salute.
Will your type of character ever recognize the boy in khaki as
your neighbor's son or the lad down the street?
No, even this recognition is beyond you, "All till next time,"
for it is constantly displayed, and not only In the clubhouses!
You are a real morale booster, "All till next time."
To further enlighten you and your social outcast type of the
Canal Zone. I will try and explain the proper outlook toward the
military that you knock down every day.
.The Canal Zone, Mr. "All till next time" is regarded as a choice
tour of duty, and only because it Is of the permanent typenot
due to your outstretched hand, "All till next time."
Consequently, three out of five of your G. I. guardians, both
enlisted and officer, are men that have gone through more hell
on earth than your mind is capable of conceiving.
These men have earned the privilege to serve in a theater
that has "million dollar pools" and $2.000 Hammond Organs in
their service clubs.
Instead oi complaining of soldiers' benefits during Holy Week,
I suggest you thank God you have these type of men that have
fought and will continue to stand up and fight while your element
stays behind with your petty grievances.
Ne Coaapinint,
VtiCONDfTl6t I befleve that Harry Truman
has now created class warfare in
America.
The flag flies over some $40,-
000,000,000 dollars worth of prl-!
vate industryas a result of gov-
ernment interference In strike
crises.
Somehow the country, and e-
ven the railroad executives, have
forgotten the yellowing Army:
notices pasted on the walls of all I
rail lines headquarters. The do-
cuments have been there lor over
two years. Now It's steel.
Mr. Truman's Defense Dept.
operate* the railroads so this
action can travel and move
military cargo. He runs the
steel industry so our armies ean
shoot It out with the enemy.
Soon hell have oil on his trou-
bled waters. But nothing will
be soothedcertainly net the
class War.
Why? Well, a group of men,
leaders of -the AFL, CIO and In-
dependent oil workers across the
nation sat down recently, under
the chairmanship of the soft-
voiced, erudite CIO vice-presi-
dent, Jack Knight.
This was the first united front
of 4?il workers' unions In the In-
dustry's history. They demanded
a $10 a-week Increase for their
people.
They are now at the stage the
steel dispute was in a month ago
before Nat Feinsinger's Wage
Stabilization Board.
This board, it can be expected,
will recommend a substantial
wage increaseand certain oth-
er benefits. It ean also be expect-
ed that the companies will balk
at automatic acceptance.
At that moment word will be
flashed back to the White House
that in a matter of days the na-
tion will b* paralysed for lack of
fuel and natural gas.
/ J
Sir
Sec. Sllc, Title 5, Canal Zone Traffic Code specifies that any
person involved in a traffic accident must immediately report
same to the police and furnish the police with all desired facts
and information relative to the accident. Failure to do so will
result in the commitment of a crime.
The information which the party Is forced to furnish to the
police will of course be sufficient to convict him of the crime.
Article 5 of the S. Constitution specifies that "no person
shall be compelled to bear witness against himself."
Sec. 51, Title 18, U. S. Code. Civil Rights, makes It a felony to
"intimidate or deny any citizen of the u. S. the free exercise or
eniovment of any right or privilege secured to him by the Con-
stitution or laws of the United States."
Will somebody tell me how they do it?
Dumb.
The .government, ender Mr
Truman's precedent, will be
forced to seizesince no union.
In or out of CIO. will now ac-
eces* less energetic support
from the President of the V.&.
than was shown to CIO leadrr
Phil Murray. Then the flag will
be raised over some sixty bil-
lion dollars worth ol nrivnte
pronerty. as near as the ex-
perts can reckon.
If we roll on oil, wp may be
forced to do it in the browned-
Peasant Revolts
By BOB MARK
NEW YORK.It has been my misconception
that a Justice of the Supreme Court was stuck
up there on the bench to serve as supreme re-
feree, and not to play pitchman for somebody
else's side show.
But a faint ringing in the ears tells me that
it was none other than Associate Justice Wil-
liam O. Douglas with his mouth wide open the
other day, in a most remarkable piece of pecu-
liar business.
What the good justice was preaching was what
he called a "peasants' revolt" In underdeveloped
lands, obviously referring to the East and Mid-
dle East and possibly Africa.
Instead of helping the administrators of the
out light of coalless citiessince' nations we are currently helping with money
BIG TRIAL
Sir:
Being temporarily unemployed a short time ago and seeing a
large crowd entering the Balboa Magistrates Court I decided to
ait in on a session and compare it with Stateside courts.
Apparently a very important case was coming off, probably a
bank robbery, gang murder, or something of the sort, as the
courtroom was crowded I found a seat near the rear to be handy
to an exit In case shooting started.
Soon two policemen escorted in a young boy of about 15 or 16,
Amerir-n, neatly dressed, and of very good appearance. The boy
was not handcuffed or leg-irons.
One of the police sat, near the apparently notorious criminal
while the other stood near the door. Exits were fairly well guard-
ed as a number of court attaches were standing around.
However I was surprised by the total absence of police ma-
chine gunners usually around in such important trials.
Although the courtroom setup gave the appearance of the
trial of a notorious criminal, the criminal himself was tense,
nervous, and on the verge of crying. Further, the kid did not
have a defense attorney and the court apparently was not going
to give him one.
After the very formal entry of the judge, similar to the U. 8.
Supreme Court in the recent Communist trials, the court attache
read the indictment.
I could not hear what the indictment was nor the criminals
name but It was the Canal Zone Government versus someone. The
boy was told to rise and listen to the prosecution.
A poll.'e officer told his story, which I also couldn't hear but
It appeared to be a very grave offense. The boy, now nearly in
wars over hundreds of eyes on him, the formal grand jury at-
mosphere, police all around, just said the word "guilty."
The judge mumbled something and a policeman escorted the
boy into another room, probably bound for years in a penitentiary.
I certainly was interested in this case and on Inquiry here Is
what I found.
The boy was guilty of speeding on his motorcycle and was
fined $5.00. What a let down.
I would estimate that the overall cost to the Canal Zone for
the above Supreme Court trial was about $100.
Stateside it would be like this:
The boy would take his duplicate ticket to a window in the
City Hall or police station. An old man would say, "It's two bucks
h* yam don't want to argue It out."
Two bucks would pass hands, a receipt would be returned,
and the Supreme Court trial would be over.
Timeapproximately 1 minute; costabout 25 cents.
How do i know? I done it lots of times.
Disgusted.
Dog Tired Dave!
IPBVM ws a Mt} fellow.
Thanking never left him mellow.'
Warn oat, weauy. tirad and brave
Thr not rand 0 Want Ads. Saver
Brother John L. Lewis is waiting
down in Pine Island. Florida for
the strategic moment, to threat-
en a coal cataclysm. And he will.
That would put th more billions of pHyAt^swperty
and have over 8,500,000 workers
ostensibly taking orders from the
government.
So on Into electronic*, metal
mining, construction and other
vital industries. In other words,
the President has now put the
White House in the direct busi-
ness of labor negotiations and
there are scores of highly olaced
labor leaders, as well as the in-
dustrlallsts, who hate the
thought.
They want to bargain directly.
They do not want to take orders
from Mr. Truman, or any presi-
dent, even if he's on their side
now. Of that there Is no doubt.
Just ask members of the'AFL Ex-
ecutive Council.
This thing may splatter all
over the international front, as
well.
Inside the White House last
week, there was much Dersonal
and unrecorded discussion be-
tween John Steelman. Harry
Truman and his brilliant trou-
bleshooter and ghost writer,
Charles Murphy (one of the most
competent lawyers any president
ever had).
These three had to decide who
should seize steel. They shied
away from use of the Army for
two reasons. First, it would look
like storm troop action ol uni-
formed men moving in on steel,
which after all doesn't have the
public utility role of the rail lines.
Then if Mr. Truman moved
under his Selective Service Act
powers, he would have to declare.
In effect, that there Is a war on
in Korea.
He aaay yet have to do that
If the government leees to the
steel industry in the courts and
the current emergencv powers
are declared invalid. Any insi-
nuation that Korea Is more
than a police action would un-
loose tumult in Congressright
In the dead center of the pres-
idential campaign.
As It Is, Mr. Truman realized
he got a break on timing. He
seized the maze of steel mills
lust as Congress was breaking for
home over the Raster holiday.
Congress will have time to cool
off unless It finds Indignation
over the seizure back home. Then
it will return and Junk the Wage
Stabilization Board and all wage
and price controls.
The powerful Senate Banking
Committee, made up of angered
anti-Truman Democrats and Re-
publicans, Is set to do just that.
This will leave Mr. Truman
with only a policy of settling
labor disputes by seizure. Peace,
ful free collective bargaining will
have disappeared.
Truman will have become the
spokesman for one class against
another In each successive crisis.
Certainly this gives too much
power to one man.
has consist ed of exactly what Justice Douglas
advocates as a policy for the United States to
pursue.
Intervene in the inner lives f countriesin-
cite the people to riot, up with the poor, down
with the rich, set this faction against that, en-
courage religious conflicts, stir up trouble every-
where and then, when things are in complete
contusion, step in at key positions and grab con-
trol.
And keep ft, with an iron conscience and a
quick gunshot for the objector.
That is the practical way of administering
what Douglas preaches. That is the Russian way.
The impractical way would be what Douglas
suggests for us that after all the strife and.
clatter was over, some more equable division of
wealth might be made and everybody lives hap-
pily every after With, prsumably, good old Mo-
ther America to stand, by with a willing purse
and equipment, we should literally stir up revo-
lutions among the peasantry and encourage
them to unhorse the chosen few who rule that
destiny of the many.., ., ,
The eventual 4.1m* of the peasants"T-tleJl." and benevoleo> ater eye.
business would mean the bust-up of large es-
tates, a redistribution of land, and presumably
a millenium, with everybody ir. possession of 40
acres and a mule. This sounds rather like one
of Henry Wallace's feather-headed flights for
a second, but all of a sudden it doesn't sound
that way at all.
"Peasants' revolt" is not a phrase that sits fa-
miliarly on the American ear, because we do not
But the complete clinker in Bill Douglas' pro-
position is that what he preaches would be the
swiftest and most expedient blow we could strike
for the Communist cause.
We provide the riots and the wherewithal to
revolte, and also reap the blame for meddling
with other peoples' lives. The Communists are
the equipped with one more potent propaganda
deal in peasants in this land, and we do not con- weapon against us, and they would be Justified,
sider the armed robbery of private property as And that ain't all: As soon as Mr. Justice
a stroke of social justice.
What it sounds like, oddly, would be the stilt-
ed statement of the same Dolicy that the Krem-
lin has been practicing all over the world for
many years but not ragging about it, just
doing it.
The simDlest and most effective arm of the
Russian plan for eventual world enslavement
Douglas' plan of International anarchy Is in
fruit, the Communists step in and reap ^xe
whirlwind. W have created the unrest and
chaos they desire: they slide In under cover of
the clamor and knock off the nation.
Mr. Douglas' plan is not unique. His exact
recommendation are being practiced by the Rus-
sians in Africa at this very moment, and are
succeeding rather admirably.
Cost-Cutting Presses
By* Joseph and Stewart Alsop
WASHINGTON NEA. Revolutionary de- After listening to the arguments of Air Force
velopments in metal-working are now being fin- Undersecretary Roswell Gilpatrick R*d John F
Taber. the New York Republican ecVomSe*;
ancd by the U.S. Air Force and Army Ord-
nance for aircraft and munitions manufacture
They involve the forging and extrusion of hot
and cold metals in multi-million -dollar presses
and punches exerting forces of up to 50,000 tons
the weight of a battleshipconcentrated on a
single ingot of metal.
Peacetime applications of these prcesses to civ-
ilian manufacture are believed to offer great
possibilities for savings In materials and oper-
ations costs. x
The new processes were pioneered by the Ger-
mans during World War fi.
Three of the German presses were brought to
the U.S. at the end of the war. Thev are now
in operation at Bohn Aluminum, Adrian, Mich ;
Alcoa at Cleveland. Ohio; and Wyman-Gordon
North Graf ton, Mass.
Incidentally, the Russians got the biggest of
the German pressesa 36,000 ton job. With the
help of German technicians they are undoubt-
edly utilizing this press in their aircraft build-
ing.
The three German presses in the U.S. have
served as models for the design of 17 additional
presses, with capacities of 15,0 to 50,00 tons,
now under construction.
Plans for one 75,000-ton press have been drop-
ped.
The original estimate was that these presses
would cost $210 million. But in Air force ap-
propriation bill hearings, just released, it is re-
vealed that an additional $179 million will be
required for dies and equipment, making it a
$Jb* million program.
To appreciate what these machines can do, a
typical job for which one of the biggest presses
is being used gives the best example. In the
Thunderjet fighter there is a wing spar 18 feet
long. It has customarily been built by a com-
plicated Job of forging, machining and riveting
which took many man-hours.
was moved to remark: "Well I
to let them go ahead.''
guess we'll have
. ln general, the presses are being built for
two different types of operation. For forging 25,
000 to 50,000 tons pressure are required and
pieces nine feet and longer will be handled. For
extrusion, or squeezing metal into form and
shape, pressures are from 8000 to 25,000 tons
and pieces up to 11 feet ln length will be hand-
led. ,
One of the greatest present uses of extrusion
presses Is In the making of artillery shells. The
process is used in the shaping of cold steel In-
stead of the heated ingots of aluminum and the
lighter metals used in aircraft manufacture.
The Germans first started to make shell cas-
ings by cold extrusion of steel about 1954.
One German Schuller press and three Ger-
man scientists were brought to the U.S. at the
end of the war. The first experimental con-
tract was given to Heintz Mfg. Co., of Philadel-
phia. Since then. Mullins Mfg. Co., of Salem
O., and Norris Stamping of Los Angeles have
done developmental work.
The best the Germans were able to do by cold
extrusion was to make a 40 mm. cartridge case.
In the VS., however, up to 105 mm. howitzr
shells have been made ln a 3000-ton extrusion
press.
Experimental work has been done on larger
zines. anti-aircraft shells and rocket bodies.. Sav-
ings In materials and costs of up to 40 per cent
have been reported. The 40-odd operations pre-
viously required in shell manufacture have been
reduced to four.
A big scramble is ln the making for the use
of these machines when the defense production
effort is ended.
Though the presses are now government built
and owned, they are being set up In or adja-
In one of the presses, an ingot of hot metal cent to some of the biggest U.S. metal working
111 Wm r\U..ri T\*...i.. h.,11 41.----------_-. .L. nnrvinn rit... 1a *.!__ V-.___ n .*
will be placed. Down will come the press on the
die and in one gigantic whoosh, wham and zowie
the job will be done, stronger and better.
In each Jet fighter there are 10 to 30 of these
for gin gs.
Nortnrup Aircraft, in building the Scorpion,
estimates that the saving from one of the new
presses will be 200 to 300 pounds of metal,
thousands of rivets, 15u hours machining time
and $2000 ln costs per plane. On 500 planes
this means saving a million dollars.
On a B-36 bomber, savings of $800 a plane
are estimated.
companiesAlcoa. Bohn, Dow, Kaiser, Reynolds
and the big aircraft jlants.
Very little private capital has gone into this
development Most of the Investment will be at
the taxpayers' expense.
But the day Is certainly coming when pri-
vate industry will want to buy this as govern-
ment "surplus" at ten cents on the dollar.
Present plan of Defense Department officials
Is to hang onto it as government propertyfor
later peacetime lease to private industrybut
not for sale.
<*** WASHINGTON
MERRY -GO-RMD
y OKtW PIARSON
J
Drew Pearson says: Senator Russell may consider com-
promise on Civil Rights; Labor leaders less tough than
Truman regarding price increase for steel; Chief op-
ponents of Pennsylvania Democrat McGranery are
Pennsylvania Democrats.
WASHINGTONSenator Dick Russell of Georgia who has
been more effective than any other Southern senater in block-
ing the Truman Civil Rights program now gives indications that
he has changed his mindat least In part.
Now that Russell is a Presidential candidate, friends say
that he might be willing to compromise somewhatthough he
would never accept a compulsory FEPC.
Tlp-oif on this possibilityand it's only ln the preliminary
stagescame when Senator McFarland of Arizona, the consci-
entious Democratic leader, began sounding out minority groups
about a compromise.
If such a compromise can be worked out satisfactory both
to Negro leaders and moderate Southerners, McFarland will
bring it up in the Senatewith Russell s blessing.
STEEL SHAVINGS
"Hello bass," was the way Ben Falrless, head of the giant
U.S. Steel Company, greeted Secretary of Commerce 8awyer when
he walked into Sawyer's office after the government seized the
steel Industry.
Sawyer was munching a grapefruit in Detroit when a call
came through from the White House telling him to stand by
because the President wanted to take over steel. He flew back
to Washington.
At a meeting of Defense Department officials, Secretary Lov-
ett emphasized the absolute importance of keeping the steel
mills running. He said a closedown would be a disaster to Korea
and the defense effort.
Senators Maybank of South Carolina and Robertson of Vir-
ginia have been pulling backstage wires to give the steel Indus-
try a price Increase regardless of the effect on inflation.
Robertson has had calls from the steel lobbyists. Maybank
Is chairman of the powerful Senate Banking and Currency Com-
mittee supposed to help hold the line against price increases.
Even labor has been exerting some quiet pressure to increase
steel prices modestly.
Toughest man to move regarding prices, however, Is Pres-
ident Truman himselfalong with OPS administrator Ellis Ar-
nall and stabilizer Roger Putnam.
DEMOCRATS VS. DEMOCRATS
Pennsylvania Democrats dont want to stick their necks
out publicly, but behind the scenes some of the top leaders ara
doing their best to block to confirmation of their fellow Demo-
crat Judge Jim McGranery as attorney general.
Pittsburgh's mayor David Lawrence, top Democratic leader
of Western Pennsylvania, let off a telephonic blast to Demo-
cratic chairman Frank McKinney against McGranery.
So did ex-senator Francis Myers of Eastern -Pennsylvania
in a call to Senate friends on the Judiciary Committee.
Neither one wanted to be subpoenaed and forced to take $
stand publicly, though they were glad to drop a few hints
about McOranery's record to the newspapers.
Interesting tact is that the once rock-ribbed Republican ci-
ty of Philadelphia which hadn't had a Democratic mayor since
shortly after the Civil War, last November elected one.
It was the biggest clean-up of graft-ridden Philadelphia pol-
itics in years and a real triumph for clean government.
But the leaders of this new Democratic administration, May-
or Joe Clark and district attorney Dick Dllworth, not only were
not consulted by the White House regarding McGranery, but
are vigorously opposed to him.
Yet McGranery is supposed to clean up the Justice Dpart-
ment.
TOBIN'S RED FACE
The Secretary of Labor is supposed to know more about la-
bor unions than any other man in the cabinet; which was one
reason handsome Secretary of Labor Maurice Tobin. former
governor of Massachusetts, was invited to officiate at the pre-
view of the new film "With These Hands."
The film is the history of dynamic David Dublnsky's Inter-
national Ladies Garment Workers Union, which previously pro-
duced the Broadway musical hit "Pins and Needles."
The ILG Is a rival of Jacob Potofsky's Amalgamated
Clothing Workers, the latter making men's clothing ana belong-
ing "to'The CIO, wnile Dnbinsky's ladies garment workers make
ladies' clothing and belong to the AFL.
A notable gathering of Senators and congressmen, includ-
ing Italian ambassador Tarchianl, gathered in the Interior De-
partment auditorium when Secretary of Labor Tobin rose to
tell about the new ILGW film.
"This film." said the Secretary of Labor, "is in honor of a
great union which has done so much for the working people, so
much for thade unionism, so much for the American peopleThe
Amalgamated Clothing Workers."
Bill Green, president of the AFL, looked horrified. Ambassa-
dor Tarchianl looked uncomfortable.
David Dublnsky, whose union should have been named,
was about the only one who remained Impassive. A murmur
ran through the audience. But the Secretary of Labor kpt
blithely on.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
Boss Crump of Memphis is seriously considering ditching
85-year-old 8enator Kenneth McCellar of Tenesse for re-ele -
tion. Crump thinks it would be difficult for the Democrats to
win if McKellar were nominated, is trying to get McCellar to
admit his health is not equal to running again.
Te House of Representatives last week unanimously voted
a contempt citation against Henry Grunewald, the wire-tapper
and wire-puller. In contrast, the Senate District of Columbia
Committee last year ducked a contempt citation.
Reason: Senator McCarthy persuaded Republican members
of-the committee to reverse themselves and go to bat for Grune-
wald after he had been linked up with Senator Brewster of
Maine in tapping Howard Hughes' telephone wires.
Last winter, after President Truman had already invited
Judge Justin MUler to be attorney general, Truman tola a iriend:
"I just feel too sorry for this guy iMcGrath). I can't fire him
Pros and Cons
Answer to Previous Puzzle
HORIZONTAL 2 Australian
1 Connect .!?"*
8 Propagate s Congeal
11 Provides Pronounce
charm Configurated
12 Shouted .Ji?17"*
14 Continuations 'Charcoal
of collars *urners
15 Wingless Confine with
insects hemp
1 Blackbird of 8 Consume
cuckoo family Probably soon
17 Contract of "> Produce 27
madness
Wlli-i[-:n -)
U BlinBt-JMMRIBr- ^ ~,
rent
18 Household god11 P*n sPce
20 Expired in wods
22 River in India ll Moved swiftly
2J Habit 18 River in
24 Provided with Switzerland
ears 21 Profounder
28 Condign 23 Controlling
reprisal
28 Goddess of the
dawn
30 Protruberant
31 Concrete
example
34 Prolapsus
35 Condensed
aria
17 Proverbial
outcast
41 Contend by
boxing
42 Article
44 Auction
is
48 Produces hand
25 Consummate
idiot
Container
21 Colonists
31 Belts
32 Canadian land
measures
33 Florida citiren
38 Confident
ejaculation
38 Produced
misery
39 Seniors
40 Com
43 Memorable
time
48 Scottish
gadfly
47 German
admiral
(1881-1814)
50 Musical
direction
52 Dutch dry
48 Cretan mount
Isolate
1 Unlocked
SSGreek coin
*4 Conceden
55 Obstacles
58 Considers
YKrncAL
J Astronomy
'. muse


THURSDAY. APRIL 17, 195

p J. C-/

" THE PANAMA AMERICAN AW INDEPENPKWT DAILT WEWSPAPKR
PAGE


'iO\. AND MR8. NEWCOMER ENTERTAINED
The Governor of the Panama Canal and Mrs. '""I* *
Newcomer were guests of honor Tuesday "'"*' dInner
I ven by Bishop and Mr. Retfneld Heber <*". .
Members o the Cathedral Chapter and their wlvee were
entertaiend with Got. and Mrs. Neweemer. ______
Cocktail Party
Held Recently
The Vlce-Preiident of the Re-
public of Panama and Mr. Jose
Ramn Quizado were hosts to
a group of their friends at a
cocktail party given recently at
their home on La Cresta.
Minister Leaves Por Per
The Minister of Agriculture
and Commerce, Mr. Jernimo
Almilltegul, left the Jsthmus
by plane Saturday for a short
visit to Urna, Per.
Admiral Bledsee
Leaves For USA
Rear Adm. Albert M. Bledsee,
Commandant of the Fifteenth
Naval District, left Monday by
ilane for an official viait to the
&'
inlted Btatts.
"Da Del Polica" Celebrated
The commanders of the Na-
tional Police entertained with
a reception Monday evening for
high officials of Panama and
the Canal Zone to celebrate the
occasion of "Da Del Polica."
Mr. and Mrs. Prager At Tivoll
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome F. Pra-
ger are guest* at the Hotel Ti-
voll in Ancon until their de-
parture Monday for Berkeley,
Cal., aboard the Olga Maerak.
Visitors Return
From Boquete
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Damerau
with their daughter, Eileen and
Mildred, returned recently from
Boquete where they were the
guests of Mr. and Mra. Thomas
Preteld dutlng the Esater holi-
days.
Visitors Sail For
New Orleans
Mr. and Mrs. James Ross Cof-
fev and their granddaughter,
Patricia Ann Walker, who have
been- visitors on the Isthmus
for the past month, sailed Tues-
day aboard the 8. S. Qulrlgua
for New Orleans, en route to
their home In Austin, Texas.
Pan-American Day
Danes Tonight
The Inter-American Women's
Club is sponsoring a dinner
dance this evening at 8 p. m. at
the Union Club In celebration
of Pan-American Day. Tickets
are $2.50 per person.
All members of the Inter
American Women's Club and
their guests are invited to at-
tend.
Visitors Leave Isthmus
Mr. Richard Bee of New Or-
leans left by plane Tuesday
morning for Ecuador. Mrs. Bee
left Wednesday morning for San
Jos, Costa Rica, to visit with
relatives there.
Mr. and Mrs. Bee, who are
former residents of Panama,
have been guests at the Hotel
El Panama during their stay
here.
Bryans Hosts For Dinner
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bryan of
Pedro Miguel entertained with
a dinner Monday evening at
their home.
Quests included Mrs. Richard
Abell and her children and Mrs.
W. F. Young and her daughter.
Miss Heurtematte
Visiting In Peru
Miss Cecilia Heurtematte of
Bella Vista left the Isthmus
Saturday morning by plane for
Lima, Per, where she will visit
with relatives.
Visitors At Hotel Panamonte
Week-end guests at the Hotel
Panamonte in Boquete included
Mr. and Mrs. Lula C. Rodriguez
of Panam; Mr. and Mrs. How-
ard Flnnegan, from Colon; Mr.
Jim Price, from Panama; Miss
Aloha Hannah, from Berkeley,
Cal.; Mr. Frank H. Scott, from
Colon; Mr. Alfredo Miranda,
from Coln; Mr. and Mrs. B. A.
Surez and their children, from
Panama; Mr. Peter Q. Orlemon,
from Remedios, and Mr. and
Mrs. J. Kenday Keith, from
Cristobal.
ecent arrivals at the Hotel
include Mr. and Mrs. David
Lewis, from Panama; Miss
Jeanette Marshall from Pana-
ma; Mrs. H. Jorgensen, from El
Volcan; Mr. Barrell House and
his family, from Fort Clayton;
and Mr. and Mrs. Tracey K.
Hastings, from Panama.
Tower Clab To
Meet Monday
The Tower Club of the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke in Ancon will
meet Monday evening with din-
ner at 8:30 p. m. In Bishop
Morris Hall. _
Chaplain W. W. Winter, UBN,
will be the guest speaker.
Franeeys Change Residence
Mr. and Mrs. Perry Francey
changed their residence on
Tuesday from Bella Vista to Co-
lon, where they are now
home at Calle 10-A.
Women's Club To Hold
Benefit Card Party
The Balboa Women's Club
will sponsor a card party Fri-
day, April 25, in the American
Legion Club at Fort Amador
for the benefit of charity and
the Maltland Twin Fund.
The Maltland Twins, who
were born at the Palo Seco
Leper Colony two years ago,
have been provided for through
the contributions of the club.
Tickets are $1.00 and may be
purchased at the door or from
any club member. Refreshments
will be'served and door prize
awarded. ..a
The public is cordially invited
to attend.
Beaux Arts Ball May IN
The Canal Zone Art League
will sponsor its annual Beaux
Arts Ball on May 10 at the Hotel
Tivoll. Admission to the "dream
boat" ball will be $2.00. Prizes
will be awarded for the best
costume, funniest costume and
the most original costume.
For further Information phone
F. R. Johnson, 2-3484; Bryan
Vaughn, 273-3185; or Miss Bea-
trice Bturtevant Gardner, 2-
1457. ______
Y. F. W. Bingo Tonight
Bingo wHl be played tonight
at 7:45 p. m. In the V. F. W.
Home on Curundu Road.
Legion Bingo Tonight
Bingo will be played tonight
at 7:30 p. m. In the American
Legion Club at Fort Amador.
Members and their guests are
invited to attend.
Arrangements have been
made with the bus drivers to
take players directly to the club
on request.
by YTVCA Beauty
Salon
with
Latest
Hair Stylet
from
U.S.A.
featuring
EDITH EBELING
your former beautician
will be at your service
again.
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bldg.) Balboa
tmm
New Books
Simpsons Hosts Per
Cocktail Party
Mr. and Mrs. William L. Simp-
son of Bella Vista entertained a
group of their friends on Tues-
day it a cocktail party given at
their home.
Mrs. Altman Guest el Hener
At Farewell Party __
Mrs. Saul Altman of Fort
Kobbe will be honored tomorrow
night with a farewell party at
the Beneficencia Israelita of
Panama. Over ,70 friends have
been invited.
Mrs. Altman plans to leave
Saturday night for Philadelphia
for a month's stay.
Mr. and Mrs. Sehwarti
Celebrate t5th Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Schwartz
of Cocoli are receiving the con-
gratulations of their friends to-
day on the occasion of their
25th wedding anniversary.
Bake Sale Scheduled
On Sunday morning, begin-
ning at 8 a. m., the members
of Court Santa Maria No. 447,
Catholic Daughter of America,
will hold a bake sale in St.
Mary's Hall In Balbo. They will
be assisted by members of the
parish. Proceeds from the sale
will be used tor the benefit of
Radio Station HOLY.
Mrs. Vivian Hay del, who is
chairman of the committee,
may be contacted by telephon-
ing Balboa 3384.
Spring Festival Saturday
Tickets are on sale for the
Spring Festival sponsored by
the Cathedral of St. Luke, which
will be held Saturday at Mor-
gan's Gardens. Admission will
be 25c and children under 12
will be admitted free it accom-
panied by an adult.
Tickets may be obtained at
the cathedral office or from
Individual membere of the
parish.
Plans for the festival Include
THESE THREE YOUNG WOMEN trying out the shot puts and
discus will hold sway tomorrow night at the Balboa Relays.
Queen of the Relays 1 Miss Beth Lockridge (center) and her
attendants are Miss Joyce Gardner (left) and Miss Edna Hart
(richt). Miss Lockridge, who Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
o C Lockridge of Balboa, was elected to her royal position by
the boys of the Balboa High track team.____________
Annual Observance Of Boy Scout Week
By IBSCZ Begins In Zone On Sunday
"Mr. President," by William
Hlllmsn, Is one of the new books
placed in circulation during the
past week by the Panama Canal
Library.
The book is a personal revela-
tion of the President from the
personal diaries, mem o r a n d a
and private papers which were
turned over to Hlllman for this
candid presentation of the life
and thinking of Harry S. Tru-
man.
The book is Illustrated with
exclusive photographs by Alfred
Wage, $2 of which are in full co-
lor.
The complete list of new books
at the Library follows:
Ethics Should I retire?, Pres-
ton.
Social Sciences The United
States and Turkey and Iran,
Thomas; Defender's Triumph,
Lustgarten; and Making Confer-
ence Programs Work, Stlgers.
Applied Science 200 Miles
Up; the conquest of the upper
air, Vaeth; The Joy of Cooking,
Rombauer; and Training Em-
ployes and Managers, Plenty.
History and BiographyBirth
of a World; Bolivar In terms of
hi peoples, Frank; Qustave
Courbet. Mack; The Prodigal Fa-
ther; Dumas pere et tils and
"The Lady of the Camellias."
Saunders; Mr. President (Pres.
Truman's story). Hlllman; Back
to Mandalay (Wingate's raiders
ha Burma), Thomas.
Fiction My Cousin Rachel
(romance of Cornwall). Du
Maurler; Cork on the Water,
Hastings; The Citadel of the
Lakes (historical novel of the
days of John Jacob Astor and
the Northwest fur trade). Orr;
The Nymph and the Lamp '
voung woman's adjustment to
life on a tiny island off Nova
Scotia). Raddall; Veronica Died
Monday. Trot.ta; King's Arrow
(sea story of smuggling In Co-
lonial days), Walsh; Back of
Town (the Impact of a Hollywood
lamor girl on a small town),
JoUt.
Added to Reference Collection
Sweet's f lie E n g lneertng,
Sweet's catalog erviee; Thomas'
register of American manufac-
turers, 42d ed.-l952, Thomas
Publ. Co.
TONIGHT
COME EARLY COME ALL t
Friends and well wishers. Take part in the fan
at our rally starting at 7 a.m. today, April 17.
CHORRILLO CHURCH OF GOD
27th Street Building 57
Boy scout week will be observ- display for sponsors and a short
ed bv the International Boy!program with light entertain-
Scouts of the Canal Zone from
Sunday. April 20, through Satur-
day 28. .
This has become an annual ob-
servance, aimed at selling the
{Best resses II
ews
Just Arrived
COTTONS
to make a lovely you...
SKIRTS <
in a selection of styles
you'll surely be thrilled with I
HANDBAGS
all different styles and colors
In plastic, straw and fabrtel
MADURITO'S
1. L. MADURO Jr.
100 Central Avenua
merit.
Saturday. Field Day. Scout
from both districts will partici-
pate in a field day at Qatun.
Awards will be presented
nTovSto the public and win- the leader and the -IjcaUftj.
TRAVEL BARGAINS!
A. FLY to near-by COSTA RICA
I $ 35. nwnd trip (90 day*)
($ 25. one way)
B. TO MIAMI
VIA COSTA RICA i CUBA
Enjoy all day time flying
and see more for your travel dollar*
Only S 83. one way
($150.75 round trip)
ning increased support.
The program for this year is
patterned after last year's:
Sunday, Duty to Ood Day. All
scouts should attend services In
their respective churches.
Monday, Community Service
Day. Civic organizations are in-
vited to request the service of
scouts during the week.
Tuesday, Service to School Day.
principals are asked to have as-
signment tor all scout to per-
form. m .
Scout Day. All
rood sale, motion picture show
with several changes of pro-
gram, pony rides, a bazaar, a
religious book sale, parcel post
and white elephant auctions,
fortune telling and a silhouette
booth.
The committee in charge of
the coming benefit afalr in-
cludes Col. Virgil F. Shaw, chair-
man; Mr. James M. Hunter, co-
chairmen; capt. John Brown,
fiubllc relations; Mr. C. F. Hinz,
lckets and finance; Mrs. E. O.
Abbott, Mrs. W. H. Alves, Mrs.
Leonard Martin, Mrs. V. F.
Shaw, Mrs. W. H. Peterson and
Mr. B. J. Lucas.
Plans for the festival include WedneId,T g>out Day. All
a native "bohio-," a pet ^9.^fiZE& wear uniforms to
fnnrt *al mnt.irm nlcture snow r" ___.-j. i_ .mHnnni in
Year" at the field day exercises
in Oatun, with congratulatory
letters going to the runners up.
Bverald B. Walker, neighbor-
hood commissioner for Oatun,
was elected "Leader of the Year."
and John Pascal, scoutmaster for
Troop 3. Oatun. as runner up.
Alfred Griffith, senior patrol
leader of Troop 7, Paraso won
recognition as "Scout of the
Year," followed, by Courtney
Thornhlll, patrol leader of Troop
S, Oatun.
The cuberee at Camp Coiner
on April 24 will M featured by
Sol-TSad Tin unlfoTm. to presentation of the Cub Certill-
tne afternoon- give demonstra- cate to Rocky Boyee. cub from
Ifons^ofaTriaed out meet- X*J.9&+2*2S
in* in each school.
the year," anda congratulatory
'Thursday Cub ay. There will letter to a. Patrick, sixer from
be^? cubSree at Paraso and FaafcJHPWr City, rtgny aft
Camp Coiner from 5 to p.m.
for 'services to troop sponsors
Bach troop is expected to arrange
VIA
PAA AFFILIATE
DAILY FLIGHTS 7 a.m.
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
Tel. 1-1666
Panam
Or see your travel agent
Opposite
Ancon Bus-stop.
BIRDS EYE
PEAS
Because they are garden-fresh'
Shelled! Washed! Ready tocoekl
Regardless of season, they're al-
ways tender and delicious I
Guaranteed to be the finest uni-
form quality, every time!
V7darL.yalt7D.yriSett'.s.de oca. dte Mr, during Boy
scout week.
American Legion
Observes April As
Child Welfare Month
The American ^! **a
will observe April as "Child Wel-
fare Month," Commander Eulie
M. Bennett of Panama Canal
Post No. 1. anounced today.
The American Legion will car-
rv on peclal activities here and
elsewhere during Anrll, to focus
public attention on child welfare
need, Bennett said.
In addition to the physical
needs of children, the April pro-
gram will emphasize the Import-
snee of religious training of chil-
Through its nationwide organ-
ization The American Leelon "
able to keep abreast of child wel-
fare needs throughout the U-S.
and to develop services and le-
gislative programs to cope wtin
ever-changing problems.
Anril is observed annually as
"Child Welfare Month." he ex-
plained, in order to focus public
attention upon the needs of ail
children and partlculwlv uoon
the Importance of religious
training. .
One of the main principles of
The American Legion's child
welfare nrogram Is the preser-
vation of the American Jam"v
home, the commander said.
In order to cam out this orln-
clple. the American Legion
throuahout the nation spends
$5 000.000 to 7.000,000 each year,
nrlmarllv in emergency prants.
to keen families together during
times of economic crisis.
In addition, state and nation-
al legislation is supported which
will achieve this same end.
WHAT MftT* wSOhBUKI
van Qww V tan* Cittyiz A
William ump. president of the
NOW IS
THE BEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
*PAA
SPRING FESTIVALS IN
MEXICO CITY, APRIL 11-2?
The best lima to visit Me-
xico's capital, and PAA of-
fer the only daily flights
LOS ANGELES
CHICAGO

Fly PAA to Lo Angele,
via Guatemala, for only
1380.80. combination fare.
Chicago is just half a day
way. vie Miami, with
DC-6 service all the way
Str yew Tnttt Agent m
Pan Amerkan
Amtways
L Sheet Ne J.
Tel t-OSTO
Tel 10*7
XK-ieJl*
<
ew
-an
a St
ave-
New FABRICS
just unpacked.
* Crinkled Nylon
in lovely colore
Very fine
* Embroidered ique
all color
* Tucked Fabric
new selection of color
ZIG-ZAG
108 Cantral Avenue Telephone 2-3418
Headquarters of VOGUE and McCALL Patterns
SEE ALL 3
FOR 1952
AMBASSADOR STATESMAN RAMBLER
In this, its 50th year, Nash proudly
presents its finest achievement ... the
Golden Airflytes for 19521
Here sre cars more beautiful than
America has ever seen before .
hat are fabulous interiors with spa-
cious sofa seats and automatic heating
i and ventilation by the famous Nash
Weather Eye Conditioned Air System.
Here is superb road-hugging ability...
feather-touch handling ... smooth power
. traditional Nssh economy.
We invite you to test-drive the Golden
Airftyte of your choice Ambassador,
Statesman or Rambler and discover the
most exciting ears in the world today!
Only in
Airftyte Construttien
Weather Eye Conditioned Air System
Twin Beds
Airliner Retiming Seats
Dual-tang Hydra-Mafic Drive with Sele A if flex Front Suspenden
SEE ... DRIVE ... THE WORLD'S MOST IEAUTIFUL CARS T0DA
can you get
all these
features
CIA. CYRNOS, S.A-
NASH AOENCY
On* block from TivoU Crossing Panam



f *r,r pop
rtan: panam American an rvr,rprvT>Fvr daily newspaper
TRTJRSDAY APRIL 11. UH
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
New Manairr Appointed
Por Andrews and Co.
Perry Francey has been named
general manager of the Andrews
and Co. and Payne and Wardlaw
hipping agents.
Prancey succeeds T. N. Dagnall
who la retiring after SI years of
service with the firm and is re-
turning to England.
J. P. Roberts has been ap-
pointed manager of the Balboa
office of the shipping firm, suc-
ceeding Prancey.
Braniff's Manager
Returns from Lima
.Braniff's manager of the Pan-
ama office. William Taylor re-
turned yesterday from Lima. Pe-
ru where he" 'was attending a
tourist conference.
Also returning with Taylor was
Panama's Minister of Agricul-
ture. Jernimo Almillategui. who
attended the same conference.
8.S. Cristobal
Leaves Tomorrow
The S.S. Cristobal will leave
the Isthmus tomorrow with 1S1
passengers, according to the ad-
vance passenger list from the Pa-
nama Line offices at Balboa
Heights,
Among those on the ship will
be four United States Represen-
tatives who are now visiting on
the Isthmus.
They are Representatives John
W. Byrnes. Republican of Wis-
consin; Chester B. McMullen.
Democrat of Florida; Winton L.
Prouty. Republican of Vermont:
and Brent Spence. Democrat of
Kentucky.
The complete advance list fol-
lows:
Mr. and Mrs,. Stanley Ander-
son: Paul B. Andrews; Miss Flo-
rence T. Appin; Mr. and Mrs.
George W. Bates; Mr. and Mrs.
Fred J. Bauman; Miss Ruth
Bennett; Mr. and Mrs. Charles
R. Bowen; JohnM. Brown; Will-
lain T. Burns; Mrs. Alice L. Bu-
shong: and Honorable and Mre
John W. Byrnes.
Miss Katherine M. Childs; Mr.
and Mrs. Miguel Coreo; Mr. and
Mrs. William W. Conrardy; Miss
Schella Coyle; R. A. Davidson;
Sgr. and Mrs. Bnrlco DePrlsco
and daughter; James J. DeVault;
UNITED fRUIT COMPANY
Great Wbite Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrive
Cristbal
S.S. Chirkrai ,...............................April M
S.S. Levers Bead .............................April SI
S.S. Quirigiia .................................April S7
S.S. Fiador Knot ..............................Ma
S.S. Chirlwrf ....... .......... ...............Hay 4
R*rli-atr* ChHM aa
HHi
New York Service
Oaaaral Cart*.
Tives
istbal
S.S. Cape Ann ................................April M
S.S. Yaam.................................. .April 1
S.S. Reredia ..................................April St
S.S. Cape Avinof .............................April H
S.S. Sixaola ..................................April H
Wttkl; SaiHn- la Nrw Vnrk. Mobile. CharUat. Lt* Aagataa,
San Pranctaro an* flaatna.
r'rraai
l rrtifhl utUni* fraai CrMoaal
Ceatral Anertcaa para.
( Won Coat*
COPA
Announces that the following change
in schedule will be put into effect on
May 1st.
Daily Departure from Tacamen......... 8:00
a.m.
Departure from David:
Every' Jay except Tuesdays & Fridays. .10:00 a.m.
On Tuesdays and Fridays...... ..... 12:45
Compaa Panamea de Aviacin, Si.
r25 Per Avenue
Tal. 3-0097
Cristbal to New Orleans via
Teta. Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
S.8. Chu-km .................................April It
S.8. Qoirigaa .................................April Z
S.S. Chiriaui ..................................May
(Passenger Service Only)
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL-2121 PANAMA I-2SM
- COLON 2
TUB a *
LAM MART
-^iT V- ..V, ,VV V
ffr. ^
PRECRLES ANT) BIB
Infringement
Mr
ILL
Atlantic Side
College Women
Plan Organization
Miss Bette J. Farrall; Mrs. Ethe-
lyn T. Fearn; Miss Cha riot le
Frieberg; and Miss Edna Fried-
man i
Russell L. Oallaher: CWO and
Mrs. Harold W. OosUn; Harvey
Oregon-; Mr. and Mrs. Casey 3\
Hall- Mrs. Gertrude Hoffman;> Atlantic Side college women.
MissUrsula Hoffman; Miss Edith"^^din forming an organ-,|
C. Husted: Miss Mary L. Jones: Ration are invited to a no-host
Miss Pauline Kearney Mr. and|tea in the lounge of the Hotel,
Ms SrlM F KXme and three Washington Monday at 4:30 p.m.
children: ant Mr. and Mrs. Ciar-! *> "scuas plans for such a group,
ence H. Knowles.
Lard eor away from -**-
pull okayHe's jusr
conkbdout
All FT OOP
Heavy?
BT P. T. RAMLBV
CArOWABECARBFUL \ AW, NUTBTIP
wrrHTKaruppvou YOuocrrmai
DWP CVA HAR FILL/ WHAT I PUT IN
MY AN WITH OCK5 / YOUR FAN.
_
ram cNKHiirrKH
xiaorr. aim north an oini pacinc coasts
(A Limitad Km-bar of Paaitr Barita)
TO KUROPK:
.S.S. AvranchM ..
S 8. Trim ........
M.S. Washington

-----
TO''COLOMBIA. KCllADOB.
S.S Port In Baaain ----
rtnv a am*:
May S
rO CKNTRAI AMRBICA WWW COAST II .*.
M.S. Wlnnlpag.................................
April 7
PASSKNGFR SRKV1CB from NKW HOC U PLYMOUTH LI HAVJB:
Be De Franc* .......................................... APr"
FA9Rr.Nr.KR SmVIC* tnm rfttrraCBNA M WRW
Or Graaw ....................:..................
Crtatahal KRKNCII LINK, P.O 8e tl -
r.nam LINDO V MADURO R A
Trt Panama -li
.....May 10
---------------------T-------
ra .i-;*;* a isi
- >> Ia3
_ g-tati
Mr and Mrs. Samuel Lantpr
and daughter;- Mr. and Mrs
William C. Maxwell. Mr. and
|Mr. Beniamln Maxelban'm;
William P. Me.Dougall: Honors-
ble and Mrs. Chester B. McMul-
len: Mr. and Mrs. Lindsley H.
Noble: PaiilT,. Worton: Mr. and
Mrs. A. J. CDonnell: Nicholas
E. Pslat: Mls Owendolvn Pet-
tenglll: Mrs. Delia O. Filkerton:
Miss Julienne Pope: and Honora-
ble and Mrs. Winston L. Prouty.
Miss Mary E. Rabiteau: Mr
and Mrs. William F. Rabiteau:
Mr. and Mrs. K. F, Pandolnh
and daughter: Mr. and Mrs. R.
;L. Ridere ar>rt dai'ghjier; A. C
Sanduskv: Allen W. Shoemaker;
Mr. and MM. fi. D. Soyester;
Honorable Brea-t Bpence: and
Mrs. John S tiriten.
James Telter; Dr. and Mrs.
Daniel M. Thron: Miss Dorothy
Thron: Mr. and Mrs. R. P.
Trembleau: Mr. and Mrs Earl
E. Trout; Mr. and Mrs. A. O.
Turner: Mr. and Mrs. Edgar E.
Weil: Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W.
Wilkinson; and Mrs. Mary C.
Wundradc.
Nahtim Abbo; Guillermo Ar-
noldt: Rodolfo Brenes; Rafael
Corella; Fanny Corella; Revnal-
do Diaz: Mrs. Rosa Paz deLeon;
Jose J. Fonseca; and Miss Jua-
nita Gomez.
Mr. and Mr. Ladislao Her-
nandez; Mrs. Carmen Jawor;
Miss Dalsv Jimenez; Mr. and
Mrs. Guillermo Lopez; Mr. and
Any woman whose credits are
equivalent to one year of col-
lege standing in a Grade A col-
lege Is eligible for membership.
Tickets for the tea are $.75.
Reservations may be made by te- ______ ._ ___ -_-,,
lephoning. between 6 and 8 p.m.'1***07* ANin BrTO
to Mrs. V. L. Morris. 6227; Mrs.
D. G. Peters, 3-1355; or Mrs. W.
E. Rushing. 5-260. Reservations
will be closed Saturday at 8 p.m.
Not Bad
Mrs. Vodal Me]ia: Jose Narvaz;
Ponce; and Alvaro Queslda.
Mrs. Antonleta Rimlo: Miss-
Miss Luisa Narvaez; Toriblo
eg Elena and Leticia Rimlo; Mr.
and Mrs. Leonardo Rimlo; Miss
Zoralda Saborio; Mr. and Mrs.
Arturo Saldana; Mrs. Amella
8choneke; Abelino Siba.ia: Ra-
quel Tourgeifian; and Mr. and
Mrs. Juan Vtnda.
VMMnV tfftVC CERVEZA
vafcYv. 6ttT
rp* "\0
VOMntf AaX
A.WKST OOR
MPt\C
MOO'.
Wfe 3H0W A WET
fimXK of|.3i.*
-----r an i ajj
THfR 312 7 INTOIMX I
o oo itirtWCWUSX *)
v*vCr\ ttifaxv vKtt too
PK> IKS TrVfcSt
BT EOGAIt MAPTP
ko,v\ mosxn't
&a N3vfec CAPTAIN EAST
ate the Oiteh
BT iMm.m TI1RNBI
IMf'ttl WEI .KEN Planeleer

Rune Throws a Strike
OH! AM?. WELKIN") ^ K WtLLWHADCWVA KHOwoutima, ^ BKAINVBO^-MAH! C'MOti IK,WELKIN...
(te^jj^;
^pSj^ 1 i y_aaaPv3kZv^y
H^ti^M mm
^SmW^9ks
^Amm? ***<-"*, B
BV RllSS WINTPRKOTHAM
OKAV.
RUNE
IF
V"IVASTA
PLAY
THAT
IT
WAV!
^
t/rt
r/
'^
, ILL *I*Y M*> CALL MOSHC POUCt, WT
tA APBAIP CO*7UWA' OOTTtht OfA* AWAY
SY NOWl ALSO N0TIPV THE NARCOTIC* Wl
-j-glrJiOVJ TH WJ66LIN6 WA* PO_J
COMMACAR
BUKKNakS UP
weaoAP,
rvavi
riiiirvrtii'
OUBLP.JAWe
THAT JOT
CUTTING a)
PHONT0P-
__*_*
flC FLINT
RRR- Serlpt far Murder
BT MICBAEL OTIALLBE
WAVJT
BtaHT;
WANT
TORSO
PF' CILLA'8 POP
DMtaBt
BT Al
OTSST NrBWT
4-4T
COME NOW, BOTTS!
YOU PO>TT wave to
SHAKE A MAN V "
HARP TO RATTLE.
, mmrv rume
UPSTA/R CrV7>
NOU
wANrr--
^ctont vAOWtv-i'va or
A FOOLPBOC- PL.AN.
IVB VVItJTTBN OUT
pktamjbp nemjcnoN3i
TAKC THBM WITH VOU
ANJP PO WHAT THBV
AV.
nPPBCTOK
BRCWL
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NOTSB
, MAP*A\
ATO-50
HUOCVINJ
I AWAY.
L
OUR BOARDING BOI'SP
riOi -
MAJOR BOOPLB HOT OUR WAI
By i. B. WILLIAMS
BUGS
goort for Elmer
EGAD, MAC* / X
KEEP NO LEDGER
ON TRIPLING
LOAM6,8UT MV
MEMOeV l AS
ACCUBATE A6 .
K ATlsAE-LOCK/
N^ DON'T X OWIE
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KTHAN A.
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COMM gACKWnVI
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gOK i6
YlELDlKkS
DlVlDEMD



THURSDAY. APRIL If, 185
^Atlantic S^ociety
.
-
the rtNAM American aw inpeprnpent part newspaper
PAGE PIT!
Box 242, (jalun JtUpLn* (jatun 472
SUPPER PART* HONORS LONG ISLAM) VISITORS
Mr. and Mr.. Anthe, Raymond -^"'&^Ved.y
City
andhonor guest In beautifully de-
Cther guests were: Mr.
'Mrs. Vincent O. Raymond. Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Roonan, Mr.
tarv was road and accepted with
their children Mary prances and
JDean; Air. ndMw. Jame Rae-
rla with Miss Joanne and Ralph
Recela, Mr. James Raymond
.and Jerry Raymond.
OIK Club Met
at Pahneitock Howe \
Mrs. John M. Fahnestock. Mrs.
Garland C. Orr and Mrs. Sam-
uel Rowley wer hostesses foi
the meeting ol the Gatun East-
ern Btar Chin at the home oi
Cant, and Mrs. John M. Fahn-
leVtMk of Prance Field Tuesday
^Mrs^kerdls Meeks. president
Lof the club, presided at the busi-
ness meeting. Theresignation.at
Mrs. FreAC Wllloughby>u c-
rttary was read nM"P,l^
retreta. Mrs. Curtis George was
elected creUry-treasurer
After dessert refreshments
'were aerved and the Bfoup en-
joyed an evening of cards. Bridge
prizes were won by Mrs. George
,D. Pools. Jr. and Mw Garland
'a. Orr. Canasta prizeswere
won bv Mrs. Starford Churchill,
Mrs. Joseph Irving and Mrs. C.
LeRol Leeser.
daughters are
this affair.
Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Souder
Reeelvlnf congratulations
Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Souder of
Detroit, Mich., announce the
birth of a baby daughter on A-
prll 12. The couple are former
residents of Margarita, where
Mr. Souder's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert Souder now reside.
Mrs. Herbert Souder Is visiting
her on and daughter-in-law at
the present time.
Grace Circle Met Yesterday
The Grace Circle of the oatun
Union Church met at the church
yesterday morning for coffee and
a business meeting. Mrs. Alfred
Gloss and Mrs. Raymond Ralph
were hostesses for the group.
ei Mrs. William Welrauch of
ftJSjle Scot" Fairmont, Ind.. who Is visiting
josepnine o.u", .__ i._. ,a dauahter. Mr.
urged to attend JACQjY ON fRIDflt.
IN HOLLYWOOD
I|UIiVL ene1- -------- -
corated basket covered In aqua
and white and tied with a large
pink bow. It at on a low coffee
\juests Included Mrs. Margaret
Cox Mrs. Margaret Cullen. Mrs.
Gloria Freeland, Mrs. Peggy
Gardner. Mrs. Mary Hyfantls,
Mrs. Jean Johnston, Mrs. Inna
.Tones, Mrs. Dorothy Lowe Mrs.
Grace Orr. Mrs. Rose Tochence,
Mrs. Edna Rials, Mrs. Prances
Bterner. Mrs. Josephln
Mrs. Dorothy Hindle. Mrs Lou-
ise Thomas and Mra. Luciue
Morrero. ,
A game of "States" was played
and a prize awarded to Mrs. Lou-
ise Thomas.
Catholic Tenth Center
Compliments Pettier Ryan
Members of the catholic Youth
Center of the Church of Our La-
dy of the Miraculous Medal, New
Cristobal, gave a surprise party
to compliment the Rev. V ncent
Ryan. cl. on the occasion of
his birthday. .
Miss Carmen Luque was in
charge of arrangements for the
party. Miss Carmen Lee was
chairman of the decoration com-
mittee. Decorations followed a
Chinese theme and colorful lan-
By OSWALD JACOBY
Writttn for__NMA Service
NORTH
S)K10
? KJ106
? AKQ105
A 10
BY
ERSKINE

JOHNSON
WEST (D)
*)A75
VQ3
? .!B5
*>KQ3
^AT^M1^'^^
Barfleld. Mrs. Roger Orvis Mrs
OvoWorlev.Mrs. Harry B. Gard-
ner, Mrs. Fred A. Newhard. Mrs.
J W. L. Graham. Mrs. Henry
shirk, Mrs. William Badders,
Mrs. Benjamin R- BruJn*af''
Mrs. Porter Crawford and Mrs.
Curtis H. george.
Surprise Skewer Given
ferMrs. Cranferd
Mrs. Carolyn Boyer of Coco So-
lo arranged a stork shower at
her home Tuesday evening as a
surprise to Mrs. J. F- Cranford. A
large decorated cake centered
the buffet table and green can-
dles In green holders were used
em each, side of the cake.
Ollta wera presetned to the
Angela Mazza, Sarah aoial.
Anita Chee Chong. Emir Fenton,
Imir Magdelene, Barbara Green,
Carmen Lee. Carmen Calognc,
Lesbia Chong Hilda Fernandez,
pearl Kam Klva Tierra. Blena
Wong, Cecelia Lamuza. Carmella
Salazar. Thelma Rlos, Mldla Ar-
denes and the Rev. Raymond Le-
wis, CM. ______
Brownie Troops te Have
Mother-Daurhter Bananet
Troops 23, 32 and 38 of New
Cristobal Brownies will sponsor a
Mother-Daughter Banquet at 8
pm. next Tuesday. April 22 in
the basement of the Cristobal
Union Church.
All mothers and Brownie
her son-in-law and daughter, Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Pearson of Gatun.
was a guest.
Others present included the
chairman of the group. Mrs. Jo-
seph Irving; Mrs. Dlxon Daniel,
Mrs. Ralph Graham, Mrs. Tho-
mas Pels, Mrs. Tracy P. White,
Mrs Elmer Stern. Mrs. Arthur
Baggott, Mrs. Richard Penning-
ton,Mrs. Howard R. Harris. Mrs
L. Herr, Mrs. Emerson Cottrell,
Mrs. B. R. Brundage, Mrs. Leon
j. Bgolf Mrs. William Badders,
Mrs. Walter Zimmerman, Mra.
Merrill Webster, Mrs. Alice Cle-
ment and Mrs. Samuel Mauldln.
Plans were completed for the
block party and dance which will
be held at Llmon Circle In Gatun
tomorrow evening. Entertain-
ment will begin at four o'clock m
the afternoon. Pony rides will be
available for children and an or-
rhestra will be on hand for
"square" and round dancing.
Cub Pack IS te Meet Tomorrow
The monthlv meeting of Cub
Pack 18 will be held in Building
189, Coco Solo Naval Station to-
morrw evening at 7:30.
All parents and friends of Cubs
are Invited to attend.
EAST
842
V-A8S52
? 84
A.JJ
SOUTH
.QJ881
? 7
7884
Neither side vul.
North Bast Soath
Double IV 1*
3 o Pass 3 A
4 a Pan Pass
Some of the most Important
problems of defensive play deve-
lop as the result of an overbid by
the other side. The result is that
the declaring side gets too high
but it may still take considerable
defensive skill to defeat the am-
bitious contract.
In today's hand, for example,
Souths free bid of one spade is
rather doubtful. If South had
passed to begin with, he might
have wound up playing* the hand
at a pent score contract.
West opened the queen of
hearts dummy covered with the
king, and East won with the ace.
If East had returned a heart.
South would have drawn trumps
at once while dummy still had
control of clubs. South would
easily win four trump tricks, two
hearts, three diamonds and a
club.
HOLLYWOOD (NBA) Exclu-
sively Yours: Zsa Zsa Gabor will
go as far as the movie censors
will allow In her strip-tease scene
In MOM's "LIU," but she's pout-
ing:
"No cheesecake pictures, please!
"I don't sink I have to do
cheesecake. Why should I? I don'
want it. It's enough sat Holly-
wood undresses me In my fourth
movie."
The Gabor answer to movie-
town meow girls who say that
inti-checsecake policy is dlc-
1 by a realization that the
rest of Zsa Zsa doesn't match her
Helen-of-Troylsh face:
"I have a very good figure! 1
had to wear a bathing suit and
be approved by six producers be-
fore I got sis new part. One pro-
ducer looked at me and said It
was a pity zey didn't sell tickets
for zls event."

Liz Taylor's new hubby ean
start blushing. A local theater Is
billing him as "Michael Wilding
Mr. Elizabeth Taylor." Big buzz
in London, incidentally, is that
Liz and Mike already art hiring
the nursery... Director Arthur
Lubln's given up trying to snag
Mae West for a movie "mother"
role. She's saying she'll do a "Di-
amond Lil" character, or nofle
at all.
Kathryn Grayson Is about to
give MOM publicity chiefs a rea-
son for gulping headache tablets.
For the first time In her career,
she's hiring an independent press
agent though her studio con-
tract strictly forbids it.. .Welly's
daughter, Carol Ann Beery, has
pulled out as Dick Wlnslow's
partner in a nltery act. Carol,
dating Tom Drake, told me: "We
split up for a lot of reasons"...
It's not a fish story that MOM
]ust bought a novel titled, "The
House of Seven Files." Buzz, buzz,
bun, buzz.

Joan Evans Is all steamed up
over those rumors that she's on
the verge of eloping with Kirby
Weatherly. "Not so," protests
Joan...An unknown doll named
Maura Murphy has been exciting
TV viewers all over the country
in the Fireside Theater shows.
Until recently, she was working
Ford Foundation
Financing Study
Of World News Flow
St. Peter's Church
SchoolTo Sponsor
Annual May Fete
The church schol of St. Petert.
church. La Boca, will sponsor this
year's May Fete in aid of the
parish.
NEW YORK, April 17 (UP)
The executive board of the In-
ternational Press Institute dis-
closed today how It plans to use
a grant of $150,000 from the Ford
Foundation.
Board chairman Lester Markel,
Sunday editor of the New York
Times, said the money would be
spent on a study of the flow of
news Into and out of the United
8tates. _
The sources and nature of in-
ternational news, Markel said,
wiU be studied through the news j
'.lM ?Kl!d.eWlfMdta" Candidate, for king are James
cles. through a aurvey of dis-, Callend Harol(J Daniels. Irving
patches from special correspon-
dents In and out of the United
Other parochial organizations
of the church are supporting the
effort through the Parish Wel-
fare Council.
A contest was launched among
teen-agers of the church school
to select a king and queen to
preside over the fete. The first
count of votes will take place in
the parish hall Friday night at
7:10.
East saw the threat, so he re-
Emblem fart Ml St MtTnesda, I* -club at the second trick.
STUDEBAKER
FACTORY SERVICE
RtWESErvTATIVt;
is now IfWJirtefr consultation v#KH
Studebaker owners.
LAM HERMANOS, S.A.
Tel. 629
West played the queen of elub.i
and was allowed to hold the
trick. West properly continued
with a club and dummy's ace was
forced out.
Now declarer laid down dum
my's three top diamonds, hoping
to get a discard, on the third
diamond East carefully ruffed
with the eight of spades, a key
play. This compelled South
Coln. R. P.
"
''
mercurio
Emblem Club No. 52 met at the
Elks' Home on Brazos Road Tues-
day evening. Mrs. Alice Dale was
hostess. .
Fourteen members attended
and enjoyed games of canasta.
Prizes were won bv Mrs. Helen
Morrison, Mrs. Jane Huldqulst
and Mrs. Muriel Arnold.
Cristobal Star Club
"% Ski Star Club willlSuH^th^mVa^dhe
meet at the Cristobal Masonlel"* *? later on'
Temle this evening at 7:30. (J d a b ln
All Eastern Star, ar Invited. ^J rXd .diamond In hi.
I Holds Annual Meet heart from dummy. At this stage
South held the queen-Jack-six of
trumps, while West held ace-
seven-five. South set a trap by
ruffing with the queen of spades.
but West saw the danger i
under-ruffed with the five.
If West had over-ruffed with
the ace, he would have been
forced to return a trump from
his seven-five to declarer's Jack-
six. South would have made the
last two tricks, scoring game.
When West avoided the trap
by playing a small trump. South
was forced to lead from his Jack-
six of trumps to West's sce-
ne ven. Hence West made the last
two tricks, setting the contract.
Shelley Winters' latest word on
her romance with Vlttorlo Gass.
man: "He's going great things
for my temperament"... Sammy
Davis, Jr., a big click on Eddie
Cantor's TV show, has been sign-
ed for Tony Martin's next mu-
sical at RKO.. .It's wedding bells
in' September for Frank West-
more, youngest of the makeup
clan, and Ginger Clayton, a red-
haired skater with the Ice Fol-
lies.

Boris Karloff on the plot of
UI's "The Black Castle."
"In the opening scene I bury a
man alive and from then on It
gets gruesome." Karloff goes to
England for a movie ln August.
It may be Poe's "The Telltale
Heart."
Scott Brady's quoting a movie
chorus girl who said she could
hardly wait to see "Viva Zapata "
She told Scott: "I remember Viva
well."
as a waitress In a Hollywood tea
room.

Louise Rainer, a changed-at-
tltude actress and just turned S5
by her own reckoning, has ner
eye cocked on Fox's "The Dark
Wood," as a comeback vehicle.

Sight of the week: Jane Rus-
sell, headed for the UI hairdress-
lng dept. in tight fitting, red
satin, bullflghter-type trousers.
states and through direct lnqu!
ry among editors and other news
experts here and abroad.
The readership of Internation-
al news will be studied to deter-
mine how well informed the av-
erage reader is about news of
other countries and to consider
whether he would read more if
the news were presented more
understandably.
"Strictly speaking, m this era
there Is no longer any purely 'lo-
cal' news," Markel said.
"The problem Is to discover
whether editors are doing all
Eastmond. Karl L. Harris. Jr*
Lester Smith and Edward Tuck-
nall.
Running for queen are Oleta
Atherton Queenie Berkeley, Ma-
rie Davis. Myrna Haywood. Bel-
tlna Layne and Agnes Webster.
that ean be done to meet the
reader's Interest ln world af-
fairs."
The Ford Foundation included
$150,000 for the institute in
grants amounting to !3i.ttl,7M
which it announced on April 11.
The publicity flooding out of
Rome for Silvana Pampininl is
designed to build up the U. S.
box-office for the fiery movie
queen's new picture, "O. K. Ne-
rone," a satire on MOM's "Quo
Vadla." Silvana plays Poppaea.

John Payne's groans after do-
ing a couple of live TV shows in
New York:
"They give you a script that
weighs as much as the telephone
book and eight days to memorize
.. It's day and night
But when you've stuffed
vour lines
stuff. But -
down that many lines, you get a
new confidence as an actor. You
feel you're learning your trade.
Claudette Colbert is eating
canned U. 8. baby foods ln her
dressing room at a British film
studio and surprised Londoners
are gasping, "Blimey 1"
CHOICE
**
Next Monday Night
The annual meeting of the
general membership of the Sli-
yer Employes Death Benefit As-
sociation on the Atlantic side
will be held at the Silver City
Lodge Hall on Monday next, be-
ginning at 7:30 p.m
Among items listed on the a-
genda for this meeting will be
a financial report, secretary's re-
port of activities for the past
year election of representative
to the board of directors and a
special message by president A.
B. Williams.
Mary Ann McCoy,
Sigma Delta Pi
Member At Bucknell
LBWISBURG, Pa, April Id
Miss Mary Ann McCoy of Balboa,
Bucknell University sophomore,
has been Initiated to membership
in Sigma Delta Pi. national
Spanish honorary fraternity.
A daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John G. McCoy of Balboa, she Is
enrolled ln the liberal arts course
at the University.
^S*S
It's Movietimt TONIGHT!
[Panama (^anal c/heaters
BALBOA
4.1-r.B*lllni
j ranura !
"CYRANO DE lERGERAC"
FrltoT JBgai OT THX ADSW
BALBOA SATTTRDAY "WITH A HONG IN MY HEART"
Ibalboa
STARTS SATURDAY!
Bpmct TKACY KattMriM apaU*N
"SEA OF ASS?
_ fiMar tTAoacoAcy
BALBOA BATUnnAY "WITH A fjC-NO m MY HEART"
COCOL/ "HAVANA ROSE"
. lm ,nd HEART OF THE ROCKIES"
r_______* FrWay "TWO or a amp"
BALBOA SATURDAY "WITH A BONO IN MY HEART"
PEDRC MIGUELDtlTIS DAY tenJ, M5tf VirsJnU MAYO
su st '*s T A R L I F T *
BALBOA SATURDAY "WITH A BONG IN MY HEART"
GAMBOA DEAR BRAT"
, rritor -aiLVKH cakyow
BALBOA SATURDAY "WITH A BONO TR MY HEART"
GATUN
(compacts
hining beauty for all occasions
accessorized with high poliah
Sterling Silvor finish.
ITALIAN vet ENGLISH
COMPACTS also
PILL BOXES
P-nami Colon MOTTA'S
panam tmr
WMYItheaths
Kmxm
Pnnt
/' 4i*.
CUWon WB Ann FRANCIS
"ELOPEME NT'
BALBOA, SATURDAY "WITH A BONO IN MY HEART"
MARGARITA ** -** ^^
S:U A I:
.a.
"WORDS AND MUSIC
FrUUT "PEAK BAT"
sS* AOca-Saltzar's effective pain- #
raliavar starts to work at one* to bring \ ll
you welcom relief...and its effervMotnca
halps apsaa* that relief. Ira aimpla at "one,
two, three"! Onedrop one or two Alka-
Seltser tablets into a glass of water. Watch
how fast it fizxas and dissolves! Two VWA$2$i
drink it down. Yooll like the pleasant M?p*>o>i
taitel T/traesee bow soon you begin to \ in" ^*' I
fed batter! Don't let a Headache "dig in" \ \\W- if,
-take famous Alka-Seltzer right away! '
Keep a supply on hand.
fjsjseseiuSstotaaks
UtNfc*rtN.
Alka-Seltzer
I WASN'T FOOLED...
When you gat to be say age,
you're bound to know a few
things... as my daughter found
out
After she and Tom set np
housekeeping, they asked ma
over to dinner. She started the
meal with chicken noodle soup.
It was simply wonderful, and
I toW her so. "But," I continued,
"dont you try to fool me, young
lady. This is Campbell's Chick-
en Noodle Soup. The minute I
tested the delicious pieces of
tender chicken and those good
egg noodles... the minute X
aaw that rich golden broth
I knew."
-Well, ywfre right 1" Nancy
said, "TheyresJlydonseplump,
full breasted chickens. And
Campbell's Chicken Noodle
Boup is so easy te prepare
you just add an equal amount
f water, heat and serva"
BAIJSOA 8ATURDAY "WITH A HONO IN MY HEART"
/.irTntu Walt DlSITKY'a
CSSS!ii "AUCEmjrVONDERLAND"
:1S 8:1S Also Showing Friday!
BALBOA SATURDAY "WITH A MHOIN^ jntART;
SUSrlN HAYWARD
RORYCALHOUN
DAVID WAYNE
THELMA OTTER,
rima lar tka Jcreta -.
n* Praam av .
LAMARTROI U
The talk of the town!
Marvelous! Fantastic!
Is the General Ofiakw
About the
CARNIVAL ON ICE
rONRjHT and EVERY NIGHT
at the
CENTRAL
Shew*: 1:1, S'.U, (:Z1, t:ee SUM.
MONTGOHMY ci.irr
BUZABSTB TAYLOR. In
"A PLACE IN THE SUN"
With SHSXLY WINTERS
Tf\
AN
AMERICA*
IN PARIS
m Tall S4U" e*
BELLA VISTA
HIS. S:SS, :**. S-JS. S.-SS ..
m
CDttKlUY
a>sM(MBWCkMG
lESUiCAJU*
LUX
A New Screen Scorcher
from WARIlTR BROS.!
Sean -
CRAWFORD

Deaaa>
MORGAN
BRIAN, la
'THIS WOMAN IS
DANGEROUS"
WALTER LANG* ^*- &
J .
OLYMPIC STADIUM
at 8:30 p.ai.
N stars! V6 hears ef entertainment
In the snper Rrodnctiea
HOLIDAY ON ICE
e*.
CECILIA THEATRE >\
Amaims action aa anaaon beautle lead
Johnny Into atranca baUleal
"FOBY OR THR CONGO"
with Johnny Welaamuller
Aleo. Pirata Quean va. Racket Kins!
CHINA CORSAIR"
with Jon Hall LUa rerradar
r*0MCAL
3 MORE DAYS ONLY
PRICES:
GENERAL ENTRANCE.....
PKBPBBENCE .............
MTDDLC ROW SEATS.........
NUMBERED RINK
.....5*.
.......!.
....... tM
....... Me
rrk* ef ehlMren tmr 1 tkket to Preiere.ee
aael Middle Kew Seats ONLY.
Tickets far sale at MAURICKyS STORE, #47 Cleatral Asa.
and at the Stadhnsr-s Tleket Bex from sA an.
Gary COOPER -- Doris BAY
1 Gordon McKAE James CAGNEY
Virginia MAYO Virgin GIBSON, in
"STARLIFT"
ENCANTO THEATRE
' At 9:00 pjn WAHOO!
I115.se In Prises!

Viveca Lindfors, In
NIGHT WTO NIGHT"
Virginia Mayo, In
"G.BL en JONES BEACH"_
TIVOLI THEATRE
LUCKY THURSDAY!
GOOD PRIZES!
- and .
TWO NEW PICTURES!,
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BANK NIGHT!
N.M to the Pnbtk!
At 6 and p.m

"THREE GODFATHERS"
Also: "STRICTLY
^^^DISHONORABLB"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Clark Gable, in
"CALL GASTLE WHJW"
. Also
"THE BLACK


PMi* SIX
TOT fANAMA AMERICAN A! INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY APRIL 17, 1958-


You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
I eave your Ad with one o our Agent* or our Office In No. 57
No. 12,179 Central Ave. Colon
"H" Street Panama
Lewis Service
#4 Tlvoli Ave.Phone 2-2281. and
Morrison's
Pourth o July Ave.Phone 2-9441
Saln de Belleza Americano
#56 Wat 12th 8treet
Carlton Drag Store
10.059 Meieudez Ave.Phone 266 Coln
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones Propaganda, S.A.
#2 Lottery PI Phone 2-3199 '^1?}%?* St.
Minimum lor 12 words.
3c each additional word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobiles
Service Personnel ond Civilion
Government Employe
Insist on
Government Employes Finance Co.
When you finance your new
or used car.
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 41 Autama.il* Row
Phone 3-4ft4_________s-4985
To sell or buy your next automobile
see: Agencies Cosmos, Auto-Row
No. 29. Tel. Panami 2-4721.
Open all day on Saturdays.
FOR SALE:Friflid.ire 8 ft. A gift at
$100. However can not be re-
moved before May 1st. Telephone
3-2060, Panama.
SOR SALE:Corctic V* ove. looks
good, condition fair. $15^ However
carToot be removed before May
l FOR SALE:Rattan livingroom set.
mohogany end tobies. Price com-
plete, $100. Telephone Pon.mo
3-1909, evenings^___
"FORT SALE:ak diningroom. meple
livingroom, woshing machine, van-
aos household items, all reasonable.
2232-B, "A" Street. Curundu.^__
Position Offered
"wANflb^Powerful business con-
cern will open offke in th
commercial d.st.ict of Panama
oround the 1st of Moy. Needs.
Competent clerks, accountont.
bookkeeper. English-Spnish sMne-j
gropher. also employe fo- coble in
cod. section. Applicants may send
their employment history and post
e.oerience in English, to P. B. FOR SALE:Ford
"Sed section Box 134. Pono-| motor. Runs well. $200.00. House.
mo. The manoger will orrive In 969-B, Fronte Field.____________
Panama for necessory interviews on F0R sale:Pontioc 1947. 2 door
or about April 20th.______ Torpedo, radio ond heater, good
SECRETAR Y "Experienced. Must write, tires. See Sgt. Hess, 516 M. P.,
and speak fluently English -
USED CARS
For the best ond lowest
priced in town,
see
CIVA, S. A.
Your Pontioc Codillec Dealer.
MISCELLANEOUS! RESORTS
Bw yen have e "rinking areblem?
Write Alcaholics Anenymau. Bex
2031 Aneen, C. 2.
TRAVEL OPPORTUNITY: Enjoy
your vacation In cool Coito Rica.
Fly LACSA, PAX offiliote, onh/
$35 00 round trip. Inquire Pan-
ama Dispatch, Tel. 2-1655, acros*
from Ancon bus-stop.
SPOT-REDUCING:Toke inches off
hips, waist, legs quickly, safely
without diet or exercise. New
courses starting now. Special hours
after 4:00 p.m. presently avoilable.
Coll 83-5245 for oppointment for
the triol treatment.
CASINO SANTA CLARA
DANCf.
Music by Ceiine Aces. Make year re-
ervefieni early. Saturday, April
1. ______
rhlittfAI. OCVQfWtOt COVTeiQ#tH jOfl
Clare. Box 435 Balboa. Phone
Panama 3-187"). Oistooal i-1673
Visit HOTB. PAN-AMfRICANO
COOL BEAUTIFUL. El Voile.
in
Gramllch's Sonta Clara beach
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gos
stoves, moderate rotes. Telephone
6-441 or 4-5.67.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:New 1951 Pont.ac Co
talino. by Ponama Golf Club. Can
be seen of Civa Agency. The ccr
will be sold to highest bidder
through sealed bids given of the
Golf Club office. Friday 18th until
12:00 o'clock noon. The Club re
serves the right to reject one cr
oil bids. Must be poid in cash.
19*1 with' 1947
FOR SALE:Radio-phonograph com-
bination floor model with records.
Very good condition, 25 cycle
$65.00. Deep sea reel, $8.00. Con
be seen at 5658, Apt. K, Magocu
St. Diablo Heights. C.
*:00 p.m.
Williams Santa Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidoires, Rock-
gos ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMMA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished opart-
Z., oiler fnents. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 806). 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone >386 Colon.
FOR SALE:9 ft. Wesfinghous. Re-| --
frlgerator, 25 cycle, perfect condi- F0R RENT:Apartment to married
tion, 3 years guarantee. Also Ve-j couple. Francisco Fifs Street No.
netion blinds for concrete bochelon Vista Hermosa,
quarters. House 356 8, 2nd
floor. Momei Place, Ancon. C. Z.
FOR-
and I Service Platoon, Ouarry Heights,
sa'ni'h. Panomanion preferred. AH FOR"lAlT:^^~BTrickl?o^~MoL-
SALE:Westinghouse Refrige-
rator, 9 cu. ft., 25 cycle, excellent!-------
FOR RENT
Rooms
Amer" "sbles & Rodio Inc., Bol-
boo. C. Z.______________________
K# SALfc
R^IEnttile
ANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURES FOR SALE
For sole to the highest bidder two
items of 44 structures bcoisd (
Comp 8ierd and one item ol 14
Sructres located at Silver City. Seoi-
ed bids will be received in the office
of Suoerintenoent ol Storehouses et
Bolhoa. until '
I
ter, excellent shope, radio heate-,
good tires. Phone 2-3539 Nov. I Sealed Mil
Security Unit, Cocoli. Must sel |0:30
immediately.
POR SALE: ,949 "Hudson" Convei-
tible in excellent condition wi.n
extras. 0767-C, Williamson Placr,
night. Bolboo 2-1902, during do\-
time.
USED CARS
For th- best ond lowest
priced in town,
see
CIVA. S. A.
Your Pontioc Codillac Dealer.
condition, 2 year guarantee. $ I 50. TOR RENTFurnished room. No. 43,
218 Gorgoi^Rogd, Tel. 2-6375. | 43fd Street, Apt. C.
PANAMA CA"l^l7cOMPANY I TOR REhrf:Cool~furnlt|>ed room
S MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE Apt. A. Estudionfe St. No. 105.
will be received unt.ll Entrance next to Ancon Bakery.
April 22, 1952, fo
Motorcycle with side cor locoted at
Section "I," Balboa Storehouse. For
information and inspection contact
Foreman, Section "I," telephone
2-2720. Bid forms may be obtained
from the above source, or from office
of Superintendent of Storehouses
Balboa, telephone 2-2777.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
10:30 o.m., April
952 Wri the/will be opened in CQR SALE:1950 Mercury, about
public? Form ol proposal with ti* 17.000 miles. Original owner. Ex-.
orticulors moy be secured in th cKj' ce||tnf condition. Priced for quick
el Superintendent of Storf-1 sor Telephone 3-2060, Ponama.
Housing F-b---s--_ 9<)9 c__3
tibie, overdrive, radio, etc.. excel
Bolboo. end
Manoo-r t CrirtoboJ.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS FOR SALE MEISEL ROTARY
PRESS AND HICKOK RULING
MACHINE
Seoled bids will be received until
10:30 om., May I, 1952 for one
Meisel Rotary Press and one Hickok
Ruling Machine loc'ed ot Ponamo
Canal Compony Press. Mount Hope.
Conol Zone. FOr information ond
nspecnon contoct Printer. Ponoma
Where 100.000 Paapsa Meat
Presents
Today, Thursday, April 17
r.M.
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamusica Story Time
4:15Negro Spirituals
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
We have everything
to keep vmir Lawn
and Harden beautiful
dnrinp. the dry season
fool
Hose
Fencing
Sprayer
Sprinkler
Wheelbarrow
Insecticides
Fertilizer*
Weedkiller
Fungicides
GEO. F. IVOVEY, INC
17 Central Ave. Tel. S-914
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-MW
#22 E. 2Pth St.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Betel El Panam
Selling :
Panam Trust Co.,
Abattoir, Forestal Products
Tel. 3-4719 3-1860
MODERN FURNITURE
CUBI'OM Ull.'l
Slipcovei Keuobolster?
visn OH* SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto fieros
I run. mob *T (Antoaiobtlt Kow)
ftec tiaMaaata* Plrkap A Delivery
Tel. S-4S2S CM am lo !. em
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th, St. & Justo Arosemena
Ave, Coln Tel. 467
rnall Holds Steel Firms' Demands
Would Cost US Families $300 Yearly
WASHINGTON, April 17 (UP) I U. 8. 8teel Corp., aid in a ly $225,000,000 in added coat,
Price stabilizer Ellis Arnall' statement that the Industry The price chief argued that
aaid today th* steel industry's would fall $3,100.000,000 short of | the Industry's arguments in be-
price Increase demands would
raise the cost of living at least
5 per cent and take $300 a year
out of the average family's
pocketbook.
He made the statement as the
critical steel wage dispute erupt-
ed in an 900-man wildcat strike
in a Republic Steel Corp., plant
at Cleveland, and as Senate Re-
publicans opened a drive for a
earning Its 1961 rate of dlvi- half of a $12-a-ton price hike']
dends if it were forced to payare based on "false premises"!
the Wage Board' recommenda- and would make a "mockery" of II
tions. It also said it would be i price controls,
unable to re-lnvet any money He described as "unreason- J
in its business. I ble" their statements on thi
Arnall, who previously -re- rise of materials costs,
mained in the background in I Arnall told his Press Clubi
the steel dispute, made a audience that a $12 Increase in
double-barreled attack on the steel prices would mean "an*
Congressional investigation
President Truman's seizure of
the industry.
Simultaneously, Com meree
indsutry in a National Prss
of,Club luncheon address
the
and in
Senate
testimony before
Labor Committee.
His statements gave evidence
increase of at least 5 per cent
in the cost of living."
"This, by Itself, would add
$300 a year to the average
family budget and might easily
Secretary Charles W. Sawyer,' that the Administration is | set off another spiralling rise
standing firm in its opposition in the cost of living," he said,
to a price increase after the| A. union official said workers
collapse Wednesday night of ;at Republic Steel's bolt and nut
Government-sponsored negotla- plant at Cleveland staged th
tions aimed at getting the in- wildcat walkout because they
dustry and the union to agree .were "fed up with vicious, false
government manager of the in-
dustry, studied plans to give the
650,000 CIO United Steelworkers
a reported 18-cent hourly wage
boost. A spokesman said Saw-
yer planned no immediate ac-
tion.
Arnall said it would be better
to junk price controls than to
grant the steel industry's de-
mands for a $12-a-ton price in-
crease to offset the Wage
Stabilization Board's proposal
for a 26-cent "package" wage
hike.
He warned that both he and
Mr. Truman feel "there will be
on wage terms.
Arnall told the Senate com-
mittee that the Wage Board's
pay recommendations would
raise steel production costs $4.50
to $6.50 a ton over an 18-month
period.
He said the Industry's earn-
ings, before taxes, are high
enough to absorb $1,200,000,000
in additional costs before it
no peace" in the industry if the would be eligible to qualify for
Erice of peace is a steel price i price Increases beyond the $
icrease.
If the government
anti-union propaganda, from
the steel companies.
Republic countered that tha
workers were defying the gov-
ernment and were protesting
Federal "failure to force a wage
settlement."
The Senate Republican cam-
paign against Mr. Truman's
seizure was laid down in a re-
solution introduced by Senate
GOP leader styles Bridges (N.
'bows" to
the steelmakers, he said, It
eventually would haw to do
the same for all Industries.
permitted under Wage stablllza- H.>.
tion rules. Backed by Sen. Robert A.
By contrast, he said, the pro- (Taft, it called for an immediate
posed wage settlement would | investigation by the Senate
force the industry to absorb on-.Judiciary Committee.
Ike Men Claim Bandwagon
Is Rolling On Irresistibly
toral votes necessary to win thi
Presidency.
Kerr said he could think of
nothing better for his candidacy
than to have his "distinguished I
opponents" pull out and he hop-1
ed others would do likewise.
Barkley said Stevenson's an-
nouncement would have no ef-!
on record against being a Democratic Presidential can- jt ra hi own plans He hw
didate witt; the ilat statement that he "could not c-^SSSSS^^SSS.
cept" nomination to any office but the one he now
holds.
WASHINGTON, April 17.(UP)Gen. Dwight E.
Eisenhower's backets claimed today their New Jersey
triumph shows "nothing can stop" the General, but
Sen. Robert A. Taft said he looks for a first ballot victory
on the Republican Presidential nomination.
Meantime, Gov. Adlal E. Stevenson of Illinois went
The stand of the Illinois gov-
ernor, who had been reported to
be President Truman's personal
choice, was good news for such
avowed candidates as Sens. Estes
Kefauver, Richard B. Russell and
Robert 8. Kerr.
. a >C"| f- r-TillNin ,enr condition. Sacrifice. Curundu, Conal Company Prees, telephone! 4:30What's Your Favorite
1 '' J I V. '1^1/ q.fil70 .u;. 1 3-1787. Bid farm* mou h. k.-i___i flrlHIT.lnrto'. (HnI t n. i
93-6179. evenings.
'FOR SALE:1947 Studeboker Com-j
LOST:In or neor Tivoli. lodies Doxo mander. leather, good tire. A reol
wrrttwotch. Finder
84)3. Reward.
coll Coco Solo bargain. $795.
WANTED
MpeH*jnvt
FOR RENT:- Morried couple desires
1 or 2 bedroom cholet or apart-
ment unfurnished. Locorion, Son
Fronei.co de lo Cileto. Telephone
2-0718. Ask for Leoy.
WANTED:Screened cottage, com-
pletely furnifhed, preferred; for oc-
cupancy before July firrt. Call Po-
nama Cocr-Cola Bottling Compony.
Tel. 2-0750.
Helo Wanted
FCR SALE:1940 DeSoto Sedar.
Plastic seat covers. Drive it owy
for $199.
FOR SALE:1947 Buick, 4 door St
dan Super. Good fires. Runs like
o top. The best buy in Ponomc,'
$799.
FOR SALE: -1941 Hudson Coach.
Good transportation.. $150 full
price.
FOR SALE:- 1950 Ford Coupe. Very
low mileage. This cor Is almost
now. 1.200 miles. $1.195.
______ SMOOT 4V PAMDES
FOR SALE:Studeboker 1947? Sacri-
fice. Phone Cristobal 1839.
3-1787. Bid form may be obtained! 6:00Linda's First Love Cia!
from the above source, or from of- Alfaro, 8.A.
fice of Superintendent of Storehouses 6:15Evening Salon
' 7:00Make Believe Ballroom
I Triumph Speed"-'
Bolboo. telephone 2-2777.
FOR
SALE:
twin, mileage 7,000. excellent"con-
dition. Block, leather, motorcycle
Jacket, size 56. Abo 14 year old's.
new. blue, lightweol suit. Leaving
2-2658 or 714-0 El Prodo, Bal-
boa.
W.' NTEDEnglish speaking middle-
na'fl woman for cook, laundry and
general housework. Must live in.
No heavy cleaning. Apply Wed
ne'doy Peterson. House 176, 7fh
ctvi Roosevelt. New Cristobal.
Former PRR Fnfineer
Dies In Titusville
Richard S Conley. former Pa-
nama Railroad Engineer, /died
Monday in Titusville, Fia. He
Was 74 vears old.
Fis son. Richard T. Conley of
Hey/ Cristobal, left Wednesday
morning by air following notifi-
- cation of his father's death.
Conley had lived in the Unit-
ed States since his retirement
in inlv 1936. He was a native of!
Athens, Ca.. and came to the
Isthmvs from Atlanta, where i
he had been employed for ten
pears v* fireman ahd engineer \
for the Southern Railway.
He was first employed In the i
Canal organization in July 1906
as locomotive engineer for the
Panama Railroad. He served as
roed and mside engineer
throughout most of his ervlce
on the Isthmus.
He Is survived by his wife.
Leah; the one son, Richard T.;
land one grandson.
FOR SALE:Blua formal size 9 ,
While formal size 14, nevar worn.
Boroains! Phone 2-1869, after
5 b.m.
FOR SALE:National NC-57 ama-
teur rodiO practically new, $70.00.
Inquir at 5444-L Diablo Heights,
Music Festival Ready
For Presentation
Next Monday Night
Plans for the "Music Festival'
Owner leaving Canal Zone will se
1940 Pontioc, 4 door. Sedon, good
running condition. Phone 273-
2180, offer 4:00 pm., or coll ot
Qtrs. 221 1-A, Curundu.
FOR SALE; Pick^upTof-
Chevrolet, Ford. Dodge lhter-nave completed ,t WM a.
nat.on.1 In good mechanical condi- ,,,ced ^ / WM Bn
tions. E.cenmans Used Cars, Peru, Tne Col0nial Classical Orches-
tra, a 13-plece band led by Sam
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7; 45Jam Session
8.00World News and Com-
mentary (VOA)
8:15Arts and Letter (VOA)
8:30Radio University (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00Emma (BBC)
9:30Take It from Here (BBC)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owl' Nest
12:00-Slgn Off
AM
Friday, April II
Transportes Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
We pack and crate or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
HX
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
For the best values in both
new and reconditioned fur-
niture.
WE BUY AND SELL
41 Automobile Row
Tel. 8-4*11
nounced he will not run again.
French Alpinists
To Try Himalayas
PARIS, April 17 (UP)
enson's statement encouraged
the three avowed candidates for
the Democratic Presidential
nomination.
Russell said it "points up the PARIS, April 17 (UP) Five I
fact that I am the strongest can-,experienced French alpine climb-1
didate the Democratic Party era. Including one woman, start-i
, But, they may encounter stiff could nominate." ied off today for the HimalaW
competition soon from others like The Georgia senator said that Mountains to scale some of thiL
Vice President Alben W. Barkley. recent polls in 13 states havlngj'iower" giants in the 20,000 ftl
and Mutual Security Administra- i electoral votes show that "Lelas. \
tor W. Averell Harriman |am the only candidate for the1 The group will leave by ship
The prediction that "after New | Democratic nomination who can i from Genoa, Italy, Saturday.'
Jersey, nothing can stop' EIen-assuredly carry those states overjheaded by seasoned Chamonlx
either Elsenhower or Taft."
V _tnn" whlch w'" take Plac t the Ja-
2 'J1"-,malean Society on Monday night
TIRES SPECIAL SALE
This wek nly erontm 25% elh-
'ount tn black 4 ply 800 X 15 tires
far van em CaoiHecs. !*.ikkt. Paefc.
arah, OI4inea>lle> ana* Liacelni.
See v"
Cadillac Dealer CIVA, S. A.
Talephena 2-0870. ^^^
forTale
Roalt & Motor
Gooden with "Pompey" Smith at
the piano, will provide accom-
paniment for the vocalists.
The vocal section of the pro-
gram will be rendered bv the Le-
wis sisters. Mazle Headley, Beta
i Dagemel and others.
i
Elocutionarv items will be
heard from Mrs. E. Morle and
I Mrs. M. Lowe, who will award
the orlzes to the winners of oriv-
es in the elocutionary contest
FOR SALE: 34 ft. Diesel motor i held on February 11.
launch. Cheap. Box 1785. Balboa.,
Meetings
2nd Flower Setting
Oa$ To Be "in At
St. Peter'f Thnnday
A second nlass In flower ar-
rangement v.ill be*jin in the par- si*o. Diiiin. m
leh hall of St. Peter's church1: La ^'Ea^ErE
LEGAL NOTICE
UNIT STATIS Of AMERICA
CANAL ZONE
U.H.a Stare* District Ceurt a The
District Of The Canal Zaaa
altee Divitie*
In The MalUr at th Eatau f
JAMES DEANS.
Deeeaied.
No. 04J erbate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Primrose Benevolent So-
ciety will meet Friday night to
(receive new candidates and
transact other Important busi-
ness, it was announced today.
Unity Lodge No. 1084. IBPOEW.
will hold a special meeting lo
confer degrees Saturday night at
the Paraso Lode* Hall. The
meeting is scheduled to begin at
7:30 p.m.
Thurrdav evening at 7:S0.
r course Is beim given free
Mr. Charles Morgan of An-
i Greenhouse, as a commuiltv
Anvone m"v attend but
i roulrerl to enroll.
actions will be given each
i radar evening for a period of
six to eight weeks.
NOTICE, M karabr airen that all
persons having any claims against the
stale of JAMtS DEANS. Pacaased. BTC
cquirad lo fila thalr claims, supported
by vouetlsr*. and properly verified with
the Ckrrb of the United States District
Court for the District of th* Canal Eon*.
albeia Division, at Ancoa. Canal Eon*.
ris. Catherine Dean.
mires da Castro
p. o. am mm. Anean, ranal Kaaa or Dancing Club of Gamboa will
.r Mfcr. th* th d., f Aotist. mi. ,ponor a port wear dance at
or they will forever he barr*.
Deterf ar Ancon. Clral Zone.
tbia r7tb day ef March. llt.
(5d.) Cacharan* Daana.
KiMulris
iSjd.l W
4itomy rr
ab Castre
Executive.
White Rose Dancing
Club To Sponsor
Sport Wear Dance
The White Rose Social and
the Paraso Auditorium Saturday
nlrht. the president Mr. Maud
Ellington, announced today.
8:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:46Music Makers
9:00New
9:15Come and Get It
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00New
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
i :4&American Favorite
2:00American Journal (VOAI
2:15Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45 Battle of the Band
3:00-AD Star Concert Hall
3:15 The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club (VOA)
4:3(iWhat'* Your Favorite
6:00Linda' First Love Cia.
Alfaro, S.A.
6:15Request Salon
7:00Adventures of Richard
Hannory (BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News, Commentary
i Voice of America)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00Short 8tory Theatre
(VOA)
9:30London 8tudio Concert*
(BBC)
10:00 Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30 Ad ventures of PC
(BBC)
11:00-The Owls Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Of
hower's bandwagon came from
Sen. Renry Cabot Lodge, Jr., of
Massachusetts, the general's
campaign manager.
Eisenhower's comment was:
"When that many Americans
think yaa are fit for office, it
make* ye proud but thought- $|f) GLANCES
Lodge, In Texas on a western
swing to line up convention del-
legates, said the result of the New ;
Jersey primary proved that Els-
\ enhower is the popular choice for
the GOP nomination.
"No juggling or arithmetic, no
I political deals, can hide this vivid
fact or slow the Elsenhower
sweep," Lodge said.
Taft, campaigning in Michi-
gan, said he did "Just about the
way I expected" In New Jersey
but he still expects to have
enough first-ballot votes to win
the nomination when the con-
vention meets in July.
The Ohio senator*! kaeker
claimed a "mural victory" I
getting about 37 er cent of the
New Jersey vete after he repu-
diated the primary and pulled
ont of the state campaign.
The rival camps disagreed on
what it mean in terms of New
Jersey's 38 delegates to the na-
tional convention. They were not
bound by the preferential voting.
Eisenhower boosters claimed 37.
Taft backers hoped to get six in
New Jersey and confidently
counted six more chosen today in;
guide Edouard Frendo.
This will be the first "prlvate
Russell expressed confidence expedition to the Garwhal group
that if he gets the nomination he In the center of the immense
can get the 120 additional elec- Himalaya Mountain chain.
Annual Aggie Muster
To Be Held Monday
At Quarry Heights
The Annual Aggie muster of
former student of the A. and
M. College of Texas who live In
the Canal Zone and Panama will
be held Monday at Quarry
--t.s t0 c'rrv on a tradition
that la 49 years old.
scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m.,
fleers'Club. | A "tabulation of 419 delegates
4V
Keep Them Amased
LYNN. Mass. (UP) Thomas
Angelucria has set up a merry-
Music for the dance win be | go-round horse in hi barber
-la'ed by Alphones and his Me-ahop for use by small-fry cu%-
ortv Bnva > Lomen
A "muster" I held each year|chogen s0 ,_ allowing Taft
force their claim of six each in
New Jersey and South Carolina
and giving Eisenhower the re-
maining New Jersey 32, indicated
a standing of:
Taft................ 2
Elsenhower.......... iJ
Harold E. Stassen...... 21
Gov Earl Warren, Calif.. 6
Gen. Douglas MacArthur 2
Uncommitted........, M
It takes at least 60S votes to
win the GOP nomination.
Eisenhower boosters express-
ed confidence that the New
York and Pennsylvania pri-
maries next Tuesday and the
Massachusetts primary a week
later win eleee Tart's early
lead.
David S. Ingalla, Taft cam-
Kalgn manager, said he didn't see
ow the senator can do very well
In New York but he had higher
hope for Pennsylvania and Mas-
sachusetts.
New York will have 96 dele-
gates and Eisenhower has the
backing of Gov. Thomas E. Dew-
ay's powerful state organization.
The ballot do not provide for a
Presidential preference referen-
dum.
Elsenhower and Stassen are
entered In the Pennsylvania pri-
mary but the preferential vote Is
not binding on the state's 70 del-
by former students of Texas A
and M. to pay their respects to
ffllow A",ies who Jv rr>sscd
on and also as a humble tribute
to the Texans who won the free-
dom of the state at the battle of
San Jacinto near Houston 116
years ago.
The Canal Zone A. and M. Club
muster will be one of more than
374 similar ceremonies held by
thousands of former students
and friends of A. and M. over
the world.
"Pat" Tyre, president of the lo-
cal A. and M. Club (chairman
of muster), will serve as master
of ceremonies. Others scheduled
to appear on the program are O.
Hugh Graham. Maj. C. C. Ste-
wart. Lt. Col. A. D. Schutz,
Mafor Jerry Mann and Lt. Ray
Golden.
Paz Estenssoro
Retains Cabinet
"Oh, no, George, no dance! When Bill toft with
basketball team, he asked me to stay home and bo loyal
rhy don't you drop in and at* ***
4 Cylinders OPEL 6 Cylinders
MADE IN GERMANY BY GENERAL MOTORS
HASMO, S.A.
LA PAZ, Bolivia. April 17
(UP)President Victor Pas Ea-
teriasoro todav rejected the re-
signation of the Bolivian cab-
inet organised after last week'
revolution.
Paz Estenssoro, who assumed legates to the national conven-
irte presidency yesterday, con-
firmed all the ministers in their
posts. He confirmed the cabinet
after returning from Ururo,
where he visited persons wound-
ed during the revolt
tion.
Massachusetts has no prefer-
ential vote but Taft and Eisen-
hower slate have been entered
for the 38 delegate position.
On the Democratic aide, Stev-
SOJOURNERS LODGE A.F. & A.M.
Announcement ef Fuaeral Seevioe
Fee Oar Late Brother
SAMUEL ROE
At The Msente Temple
Cristobal, CE.
On Friday afternoon, April 18, 19*2, at 4:M TM.
JOHN H. LEACH
Secretary
WOBDEN E. FRENCH
Wershipful Master


H(jiSDAY, APRIL 17, U5t
THE PANAMA AMERICAN ATI INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
------1
*a.
FAOf SBTRN
lliott Pays Early Dividends With Two Homers
iaiits' New Outfielder
4ids Maglie In 5-3 Win
By UNITED PRESS ..
NEW YORK, April 17.Leftflelder Bob Elliott, who
only last week was obtained from the Braves in a des-
perate deal after Monte Irvin broke his right ankle,
smarhed two homers to give the Giants a 5-3 win over
tibe Fhillies In the Polo" Grounds last night. Pitcher Sal
Maglie hurled a four-hitter and struck out eight Phils.
The Elllott-Maglle combina-
on enabled the pennant-de-
mding Giants 10 get off to a
ylng start In another day In
htch topflight pitching high-
ghted the program. Maglie, Vic
aschl of the Yankees, Tommy
yrne of the Browns and Cliff
nambers of the Cardinals over-
une hoodoos to record well
irned triumphs.
It was Maglle's ninth straight
*in for his career without a ae-
at against the Phillies while
aschl pitched a two-hitter over
;ie Athletics at Philadelphia be-
ire going out In the ninth to
at them 8-1. His lifetime mark
Ralnst them now is 21 wins
gainst only two losses.
Byrne's seven-hitter over the
tigers at Detroit was his 13th
in against five losses over his
ivorite opponents while Cham-
. srs topped his old mates, the
irates, 6-5, in a 8t. Louis night
ame while yielding only two tal-
es before going out for a pinch -
ltter. It was his fifth straight
gainst them since he was traded
St. Louis last season.
In another game in which
bitching stood out Bob Lemon
mrled a three-hit 1-0 decision
In duel with Joe Dobson as
the Indians made it two in
row ovsr the White Sox at Chi-
earo while Julio Moreno topped
the Red Sox 4-3 in eleven in-
nings at Washington.
The Dodgers and Braves forgot
11 about pitching in a Boston double set the Dodgers' hitting
ame In which Brooklyn made 20, tempo but the Braves chipped in
its to win 14-8. The Reds and with seven errors. However, the
ubs had an open date. I Braves got ten hits including Wll-
Hank Bauer, with a homer and lard Marshall's homer
NOS
American League
Won Lost Pet.
.. .. 1.600
.. .. t 1.006
.. .. 1 1.006
.. .. 1 1 .500
.. .. 1 1 .500
.. .. 1 .N6
.. .. 2 .060
.. .. 2 .000
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Detroit.
Cleveland at Chicago.
New York at Philadelphia.
Boston at Washington.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
000 000 3205 10
000300 0014 7
during two previous Byrne (1.0) and Courtney,
Moss; Houtteman (0-1), Trucks
TEAMS
Cleveland ..
St. Louis ..
New York ..
Boston ..
Washington.
single, and Mickey Mantle, with tw'roH '*
a double and two singles, pacedlrhi. "" '."
the Yankees at bat in a 14-hit
attack against Alex Kellner and
Carl Schelb.
Floyd Baker rifled a bases i
loaded single after a double by
Irv Noren and two walks In the
eleventh to tag the Red Sox re-
lief expert Ellis Kinder with a
loss to the Senators. Kinder had Ht Louis
lost only three in 86 relief ap-:nptrf,it
pearances J
seasons.
Lemon got all the help he need-'i*^ naftq'
ed for his victory over Dobson a# ______
when rookie Jim Frldley got a'New y0rk 000 101 0158 14 0
memorable first big league hit-:pnlladelpnla 000000ooi-i 3 1
a homer. Eddie Ro.nson, with a, Rasch[ ?.?,{?,. S^L*,8^16' got two oi Kellner (0-1), Schelb and Tipton.
the White Sox's hits.
The Browns came from be-
hind to tie the Tigers at 3-3
with three runs in the seventh,
then went on to win when Tom
Wright singled, rookie George
Schmees tripled and Hank Arft
doubled for two more runs in
the eighth.
The Cardinals made It two In a
row over the Pirates by putting
on a five-run rally In the sev-
enth, Including a homer by 8tan
Musial. The victim of the upris-
ing was ex-Cardinal Howie Pol-
let, who has now been beaten by TEAMS
his old mates four straight times Brooklyn.
In the Boston melee, Roy Cam-St. Louis
panella with a two-run homer Chicago.
and two-run double and Duke New York
Snider with four singles and a
Plummer Shoots For Knockout
Against Moracen Sunday Night
Max Stempel Keglers Defeat
Homa For Major League Title
The Max R. Stempel Son'; Individual High Game: J. H.
bowling team defeated the H. I.iSchneider, B. O. Andrews266.
Homa Co. team Tuesday night at ABC Achievement AwardWU-
the Diablo Heights bowling lanes|liam Coffey.
by a total pintail score of 2935 to, Robert J. (Bud) Balcer* who
2799, to win the playoff for the won the Individual championship
League Bowling
Cleveland 010 000 0001 4 1
Chicago 000 000 0000 3 0
Lemon (1-0) and Hegan; Dob-
son (0-1) and Lollar.
NIGHT GAME
Boston .. .i .
Washington..
(11 Innings)
....... 3
....... 4
National League
Won Lost Pet.

Robinson Kay oes Graziano
To Retain 160-lb Crown
Philadelphia
Cincinnati..
Pittsburgh..
Boston ....
1.060
1.000
1.000
1.000
.000
.006
.000
.000
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Boston.
Philadelphia at New York.
Chicago at Cincinnati.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis.
CHICAGO. April IT (UP*
drld Middleweight Champion
ay "Sugar" Robinson, 15714, lst
light knocked out challenger
loeky Graziano. 190*4, in one
Unirte 53 seconds of the third
ound with a terrific right to the
iw.
The rapid end of the battle was
great surprise to the large
rowd that crammed the Chicago
tadlum to establish a new at-
ndance record. Some 23,875
ersons squeezed themselves Into
he stadium to wipe out the pre-
ious record of 23,322 which was
et In 1932 when Jack Dempsey
net Kingflsh Levinsky.
The gate was approximately
$266,666topped only by the
422.666 paid for the second
Graslano-Tony Zale fight at
the Chicago Stadium in 1947.
The Grasiano-Zale fight drew
16.547.
Referee Tommy Gilmore doled
ut the ten count while Graziano
ung on to the lower strand of
ope and waved his right leg In
he air In a futile attempt to re-
ain his feet.
The two fighters starred slug-
ing from the opening bell. Gra-
iano shook up Robinson with
wo solid lefts to the Jaw right
fter the gong but Ray came
ack with three hard rights that
nocked Rocky against the ropes.
Robinson took the first round
rlth a series of rapid fire blows
o the fce and mid-section In
he last minute of action. Sugar
tarted piling up more points In
he second by completely outbox-
g Graziano and stabbing him
peatedly in the face with lefts
nd rights.
Graziano, however, earned a
draw in the second round on
bis rushing tactics and aggres-
siveness. The Rock came out
fast for the third and contin-
ued on the offensive. He caught
Robinson with a terrific right
to the head that knocked the
Champion into the ropes and
to the canvas, but Sugar Ray
sprung to his feet without
count. '-
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 425100 00214 20
Boston 300 040 100 8 10
Van Cuyk (1-0), King. Wade
and Campanella; Surkont (0-1),
Johnson, Donovan, Burdette,
Hoover and Cooper, St. Claire.
1951-'52 Major
Championship.
The match was played before
the largest crowd of spectators
of the season, and provided thrills
in local bowling as have not been
seen for many years.
By mutual arrangement, the
match was conducted on a three-
game, total pinfall basis. Alleys
were drawn for and play was
conducted on alleys 7-8.
The two teams had wound up
in a tie for the Major League
Championship after seven
months of weekly play, with both
teams having won 74 games of a
possible 112. The final three
weeks of play found the Homa
team losing 10 of 12 points, while
the Stempel team won 10 of 12,
resulting in the tie.
With the president of the Pan-
am Canal Bowling Association,
Wllber L. Norrls, presiding, team
and personal awards were made
prior to the match play for
awards won by teams and Indi-
viduals for season play.
In the first game, Joe Filebark,
Panam Featherweight Cham-
pion Federico Plummer will be
shooting for a convincing knock-
oat against Cuban 126-pound
Champ Ciro Moracn Sunday
night at the Panam Olympic
Stadium when they clash In a
12-round battle for the Central
American featherweight crown.
Plummer has announced that
he will be going all-out In an ef-
fort to regain a position in the
top ten in the featherweight div-
ision in the world. If he succeeds
in stopping the fourth ranking
Moracen it will be a groat stride
in the climb baek up the ladder.
Despite Plunmer's Impressive
workouts, the yisltor continues to
be a slight favorite of the experts
to whip the elongated local bat-
PACIRIC LITTLE LEAGUE > stars will travel to Margarita
FIRST HALF STANDINGS Saturday to play their first game
TEAM Won Lost In the round-robin series with
Police
Sears ..
Lincoln Life ..
AFGE 14 ..
Elks 1114 ....
Firemen
7
6
5
5
5
t
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Wen Lost
and high series awards, is the
captain and anchorman of the
Max R. Stempel team. He is at
present representing the Pana-
ma Canal Bowling Association at
the ABC Championships and ..
Convention in Milwaukee. Hls,"V',.
services did very much to ad-1 ^ff?*tlh*!pe.?*I,Un2
vanee his team Into the cham- """"'"^*7^n"^'""n*
pionshlp during the season, but'B"n,Umwel5*,.t f "* g"en
his absence duFlng the fina two ""J^SjS^SS&iSt It
weeks was adequately taken by,"e. ""'JJ^ef 4P^n"V "
the services of Christ Hermann,!*0 the outcome of this bout. Both
who substituted In his place as J* ^'I "!.*.In tne" best
anchorman. Hermann did splen.''" nd, honM mmu-
dldly In the playoff In Bakers *BIe eont-
absence, knocking a fine 582 for'
Sears.....
Elks 1414 ..
Police ....
Lincoln Life
AFGE 14
16

7
4
4
Firemen.......... t
3
4
6
6

16
nls final effort.
Thumbnail Sketches
Of Pacific Little
League All-Stars
Bobby BarnesAge 10, catch-
er-outfielder; second year In Lit-
the Police and Gussle Durham to
toe the mound for the Lifers.
Friday the league leading Cat-
leadoff for Homa, sparked hisitle League, bats right, throws \J Q111C IUIIIUI "* *** 'rom SeS8wn?1eet!1"
team with a tremendous 264'right, batting average .333. J S!taJn. R I "I game:
game, with Payne following wlthl Bruce BatemanAge 12. pitch- Ti,ANTir twii if t ifachf The Elks must win to stay In the
a 21. Homa found itself six'er-catcher-lnfielder; secorxl year ATM!ELS^KL!*,i E race for the second half bunting
marks behind going Into the lOtbJman; bats right, throws right,
The program will be rounded
out with two evenly matched
preliminaries over the fonr-
reund roate.
CHS Wins Series
Opener; Second
Game Tonight
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Firemen 13, AFGE 6.
TODAY'S GAME
Lincoln Life vs. Police.
The Firemen scored a 13-6 win
over AFGE yesterday at Little
League Park.
The Smokies, after scoring .
three runs in the second inning, erage .633.
the Atlantic Little League and
the Armed Forces Little League.
Officials or the Pacific Little
League announced today that the
motorcade will leave the Little
League Ball Park, on Gallhud
Highway at 11:30 Saturday
morning. All persons who have a
car and are driving over to the
Atlantic side are requested to
come to the Little League Park
before that time and assist In
taking players and rooters to
Margarita.
The probable line-up for the
Pacific Little Leaguers Is as fol-
lows:
Jimmle Lovelady, Elks; right
field; batting average .410.
Don Ryter, Elks, shortstop;
batting average .410.
Owen Sutherland, Police, pitch;
pitching record 9-3; batting av-
came up with seven in the third
which was more than enough to
win the game.
Johnny Chase pitched all the
way for the Smokies to score his
first win of the season and help-
ed his own eause along by col-
Bruce Bateman, Lincoln Life,
catch; batting average .777.
Bobby Wills, left eld; batting
average .531.
Billy Castleman, AFGE, second
base; batting average .457.
Corbln McOrlff, Lincoln Life,
lecting four singles In four trips third base; batting average Mt.
to the plat. I Gerry Durfee, Bears, first base;
Billy Castleman led the losers batting average .404.
at bal wit'i a double and single
in three trips.
The Lincoin Lifers and the
Herb Schneider, Firemen, cen-
ter field; batting average JO*
Coppers meet today with Owen Reserves who will see action In
Sutherland slated to pitch for ?he game are:
NIGHT GAME
Pittsburgh......'.. ,. 5
St, Louis.........."... 9
The knockdown
maddened Robinson and he wad-
ed Into his adversary with a two-
fisted attack, getting him Into
corner against the ropes. After
landing a series of lightning
swift blows, Robinson landed a
tremendous right to Grazlano's
Jaw that felled him like a pole-
axed steer.
It was aDparent that Rocky
was badly hurt, his eyes were
glassv and his right leg seemed
rjaralyzed as he waved it In the;
NIGHT GAME
Philadelphia 000 030 000-3 4
New York 000 30101s5 7
Roberts (0-1) and Burgess;
apparently Maglie (1-0) and Westrum,
BRIGHT COLORS
for interior and exterior decoration
VOA Starts Nightly
'Sports Roundup'
To Latin America
NEW YORK, April 16 (USIS)-
Slmultaneously with the openlni
al7ir^aTefTorrtoTeVam'his'feet>f the 1?62 "18Jr l***ue basebaj
season in North America, April
_______,_______________________115, the Voice of America has In-
augurated a dally English-lan-
guage "Sports Roundup" to Latin
America at 8 p.m., Panam time
on the 16. 10, 25, 30. 31 and 49
meter bands, short wave.
(The VOA broadcast is car-
ried locally each night over
Station HOG, 840 kilocycles.)
Bob Allison, Voice of America
sports editor, will serve as com-
mentator.
The premiere broadcast fea-
tured reports of "Opening Day"
games and color commentary on
the 16 major league teams in the
National and American leagues.
Subsequently, the Monday
through Saturday "Sports
Kounaup" will bring southern
listeners nightly radio score
sheets. On Sunday the series will
feature a prominent sports per-
sonality as guest.
ShkkwimWilliams
ENAMELOID
Tbe All Purpose Enamel
mi. 1
S3 North Avenue Tel. 2-6C16
7 Martin Son St. Tel. 3-1424
,H*>'
Sherwin-Williams Paints
"with Latin America growing
-~m-\ qnd more interested in
baseball as a sport, we welcome
.. u^pcriunlty to present sum-
maries of diamond battles at the
Polo Grounds, Yankee Stadium
and other major league parks,"
comments Mr. Allison.
brfft
mosf famous
Location
2000 modern rooms
bothradioMuzak
spotless comfort
TAFT
7th avc. yruj VADIf
atsotfcst. ntn I UK A
11 TIIRS HIAK AT IAIN COT
* iw*. a* Mi l n M Mpa
frame, and made almost suffi-
cient strikes to tie the score, but
the Stempel lnsurancemen were
not to be denied, and wound up
the game In a brilliant scoring
Biree for a total of 1026, while
oma lagged 26 pins behind with
a score of 1000. Marabella led the
Stempeleers with 215, followed by
Coffey with 211, Hermann with
208 and Colston with 201, while
Wllber was low with 191.
In the second game, marks fol-
battlng average .777, eight home
runs; has hit safely In 19 straight
games to date.
Billy castlemanAge 12; can
play any position on the field;
first year In Pacific Little League,
bats right, throws right; batting
average .457.
Terry Corriga
..<2FRfE* 8TA>JDniG) land "win for Sears will practi-
f ~~ i" .-'-ically cinch the second half race.
CHS..........-I 1.6 Th hnY i/*nr*
Pabst.
TONIGHT'S GAME
(At Mt. Hope7:36)
CHS vs .PABST.
15- trnrx Tmmy Hughes Cristobal High
,*mSu.M' S School ace and leading pitcher
!.M rHna 2?*i ant batt 0 the At,n" TWl"
arks, with the : xk "ffuT^te^^-^S g-% ?* gh*K
Se aft! a'if dIn,nthehfeinalgt^o|attlnB """^ -44- male aW^d.^hftTheCt 195
SS.?* SeSel" SSta'ftflSl Gusrfe Darham-Age 13; car>tside-the-park home run.
away slightly to take the game'play any position, bats right, HiirhM blasted a Olbson nit
UdathCPVmr^,6 t^inrh7,A(5,OWS rlghtl batt,nB "Veraie hSC^the^-footTar'k in
led the Stempel team ln thlSiAOO. riiht fiairi nrt ms nunri un
Plerobon followed with 180. The Isft, throws right; batting aver- *truck out e,gm FaMt ""
remainder of the team fell belowiage .410.
180. I Corbln "Cortina" McGriff
In tl
went In
The box score
'" AJTGB
Salas, 2b .. ..
Morris, 3b.. ..
Castleman, ss.
Edmondson, lb
Wills, lb .. ..
Motion, cf...... 2
Snodgrass. c. .. 0
Eberenx, If-p. .. 3
Hall, rf....... 3
Elmendorf, If.. .. 6
Feeney, p...... 2
AB
2
1
3
2
1
HPO
0 2
Bobby Barnes, catch; batting
average .333.
Jimmle Watson, Sesrs, pitch;
8 wins, 0 losses.
Lem Kirklsnd, Elks, pitch; f
wins. 2 losses.
Terry Corrigan, lnfielder; bat.
ting average .415.
Gussle Durham, lnfielder; bt-
ting average .400.
The averages above are based
on the twenty games played In
the Pacific Little League up t
end Including April I.
Totals........17 6 6 12 2
For Pabst, Noel Gibson was bit
the final game. Stempel'a"l;' ctalT-ioVuSr"^^^ iMiot XVaM
in with a 40-pin pinfall lead, catcher; bats right, throws rlght;0^n*nhot water .hnost
batting average .364.
Frame followed frame, but Stem-
pel again went on a scoring spree
and led 27 marks to 19 in the
fifth frame.
Homa, by dint of splendid scor-
ing, cut the Stempel lead down age .410.
to eight marks by the eighth Her by SchneiderAge
frame, but the Stempeleers again piteher-lnfielder-outflelder;
constantly throughout the game,
he was for the most part tight in
nlft^sCrL^^^
baserunners in league: ba ts hmer. might have been a win
right, throws right; batting aver-iner-
,. Second Series Game Tonight
2 Tonight at Mount Hope, at 7
has,o'clock, these two teams will
good fast ball on the mound :!ln d0 battl9 for the im At.
bats right, throws right; batting iantic Twilight League crown.
average .386 Pab8t wlth their backs to the
u v0w.en .SftherlandAge 12;!wa]i, will probably have to send
and Homa dropping thehustling all-around player; bats|Jack' pesC0d to the hill, thereby
In
se-
began scoring doubles and tur
keys while Homa ran into misses
and splits with Stempel wind-
ing up with another fine game of
973
game and Major Leap;
pionshlp with a game
final total for Stempel was games games for pitchers; pitching rec-
of 1026, 936 and 973 for 2935, and ord (9 and 3) with two no-hit
Homa with games of 1000, 922 no-run games,
and 877 for 2799.
;ue Cham- right, throws right; batting *ver- leavln_ a bl(, gap to be'filled
of 877. The age .533; has pitched in most the infield. Cristobal High's
The results of the playoff
match were as follows:
H. I. HOMA CO.
Filebark.
Pierobon .
Fronheiser
Payne. .
Best. .
Totals. .
264
167
166
211
182
208
180
179
177
178
156 628
213 560
.1000 922
vs,
MAX R. STEMPEL
Wilber ... 191 191
Marabella. 215
Bobby WillsAge 12; catcher-
pitcher-lnfielder; first year in
Little League; bats right, throws
right; batting average .531.
Jimmle WatsonAge 12; pltch-
158- 503 er- lnfielder; has outstanding
180 568(pitching record of eight wins and
170 540.no losses: one no-hlt no-run
ame; bs right, throws right;
tting average .340.
Coffey
Colston. .
Hermann.
311
201
208
169
211
181
184
8772799
ft SON
164 546
187 571
226 648
206 588
190 582
Totals. .1026 936 9732935
As can be noted, Billy Coffey
ran a splendid score of 648 for
the evening, and justified his
winning of the American Bowling
Congress Silver Award for
Achievement in the Major Bowl-
ing League, which was presented
to him prior to the match play.
Coffey ran his average from an
entrance of 146 to 174-64 at the
finish of the season.
Awards were made by Presi-
dent Norris prior to the match
play as follows:
Third High TeamAngellnl
Fourth High TeamFuen y
Luz.
Fifth High Tem7461st AU
Signl.
Sixth High TeamBoyd Bros,
Inc. >
Seventh High TeamLocal 595,
NFFE.
Eighth High TeamAlmacenes
Martins.
Team Tigh 8erles7461st A
Signal.
Second High SeriesMax R.
Stempel ft Son.
Third High Series Fuersa y
Luz.
Team High GameFuersa y
Luz.
Second High Game74lst AU
81gnal.
Third High GameMax R.
Stempel ft Son.
Individual Champion: Robert
J. Balcer196-55 average.
Individual High Series: Robert
J. Balcer-714.
Silver City Sports
Totals
FEMALE SOFTBALL LEAGUE
It was a deadlock ball game
when Deportivo Ramn Mndez
nine met Almacn La Familia ln
the thirteenth scheduled female
softball game of the Silver City
Softball Female League, sponsor-
ed by the Physical Education ft
Recreation Branch of the Divi-
sion of Schools and played at the
811ver City playground before _
three hundred eager fans. Thewertz'~ri
gme ended 6-6. Groth, cf'. .
LEAGUE STANDINGS iSOUChOCk, If
lection for the starting berth will
ln all probability be Art Blades,
who won three games for Luke
Palumbo's charges during the
regular season.
Burned By Byrne
St. Louis AB R R PO A E
Young, 2b ... 3 0 0 0 1 0
bKryhoski ...101000
Marion, ss ... 9 0 0 3 3 0
Goliat. 2b ... 0 0 0 1 1 0
Rivera, cf ... 4 0 2 2 0 0
Wright, If ... 4 1 2 2 0 1
Schmees, rf 4 1 1 3 O 0
Arft, lb .... 4 1 3 9 0 0
Thomas, 3b 3 1 1 3 3 0
Courtney, c 3 0 0 3 0 0
aRapp.....1 0 0 0 0 0
Byrne, p .... 4 1 1 0 3 0
Moss, c.....1 6 0 II 0 0
.36 5 10 27 10 1
Las Agulas .....4
La Familia .....4
Dep. T. King ..4
Dep. Powells___3
Dep. R. Mndez .4
Dep. Estenos ...3
P. W.
L
I
1
).
2
2
3
Pet.
1000
.667
.500
.333
.333
.000
AB
3
0
4
4
3
3
4
Batts,c. .... 4
Dotroit
Berry, ss. .
Upon, ss. .
Kell, 3b .
Kolloway, lb.
cGarbowski.
Priddy, 2b .
Houtteman, p
Trucks, p .
HPO
O 2
0 0
0
15
0
MALE SOFTBALL LEAGUE
In the men's League, C. Y. O.
took the lead scoring 15 runs to
the Falcons' 5. The Falcons now
drop to second. Riviera third.
Beavers fourth, with Experiencia
and Dodgers trailing.
Totals.....33 4 7 27 19 0
Score By Innings
St. Louis 000 000 3205
Detroit 000 3000014
aPopped for Courtney in 7th;
bSingled for Young in 7th; cRn
for Batts in 9th. RBIByrne,
Kryhoski 2, Schmees, Arft, Groth,
Souchock 2, Batts 2. 2BByrne,
Arft, Kell, Souchock. 3BRivera,
Arft, Schmees. SBRivera.
Wright. DPGoliat, Marlon and
Arft. LeftSt. Louis 6, Detroit 4
Tonight under the arc lights
of the Mount Hope 8tadlum, the
public is Invited to attend a ape- >.... ~.-.. ~~u~. ... ->.
clal double header of men's soft- BB offByrne 3, Trucks 1. SO by
ball games.
Byrne 3. Houtteman 5. R and
Tbe first game will bring to- ERHoutteman 5 and 5; Trucks
gether the Dodgers and Riviera. 0 and 0. Hits offHoutteman 10
The second will commence im-lin'7 3-3; Trucks 0 in 11-3. HBP
mediately after with the Beavers i Houtteman (Young). WPHout-
and Experiencia ending the first teman. WinnerByrne (l-0>.
half of the pennant rsce. | LoserHoutteman (0-1). UBer-
The doubleheader begins at 'ry. Honochick and Rommel. T
7:00 P.DS. |2:11. A-5,524.

Firemen AB R
McNall, 2b..... 4 3
Schoch, e...... 3 3
Schneider, ss. ..
Terry, cf .. ..
Webb, lb ..
Chase, p....... 4 1
Fundakowski,, 3b. 3 3
Klntner, If..... 3 3
Randel, rf...... 3 1
Nine Final Entries
In Rich President
Classic This Sunday
o 0
4
0
2
2
Totals........24 13 11 13
Score By Innings
AFOE 10 5 06 1
Firemen 0 3 7 313 11 1
PACIFICLITTL* LEAGUE
NOTES
The Pacific Little League All
HPO A .
2 2 1 Tho owners of mm aseses
0 3 0 *ld e 1N starUnc; fees
2 3 od reported Jockeys for Sam-
1 0 win be ran at the Jaan France
1 O Racetrack.
0 2 The entries, jockeys, post pe-
0 o sitions and weights:
ICbaeabnco Y. Ordenes 110
8 SNotable A. Mea* 103
t .Main Road J. Bravo Itt
4Pavera O. Bravo MS
5Keyhaven B. PatMo HI
6Ct Malone B. Agnlrre IM
7Rathlin Light L. Brava lit
8Phsord Jos Rodriga lit
9Headmaster C. Iglesias Mt
BALBOA RELAYS
TOMORROW NIGHT
Balboa Stadium
7:00 P.M.
Adata.......SO*
Students......25*
Featuring tho top athletes from tho Armed Forces,
C.Z. and Panam Schools.
THE NEWEST
RCA VICTOR
COMPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
AVAILABLE ON
EASY CLUB OR CREDIT FUN
FOR ONLY $10.00 MONTHLY
USE
7110
Bolivar
YOUR OLD RADIO
DOWN PAYMENT
RADIO CENTER
AS
40
Cotn


ATLANTIC TWI LOOP SERIES TONIT
US Army Bets
Taxpayers' Cash
On TankWins
AN INDEFEND'
DAILY NSWSPAPfl
Washington. April n iup.i
i lie Army atiiiu.inceu loaay
I lu. 1..S Cuui>*0 tabliluil khlln. lias ui-en aiiuiiitu
icr i.oinbai. giving me nailon a'
Vastly Miptiiur wtapon tnat was
conttffveck a3 a calculated risk
Mid oiiiii. s.s i gamble.
'ine ueense ue^aument said
i tie occisin means Army orci-
iia'ice won twice wuen 11 oei Its
j augment against me taxpayers'
money and valuable time in the
hi'tnamcnts tace oespite strong
rin-gr.'iii* in some private ano
i-oir.;i-fssiOnal circles.
the department said the
vi-1 is oetter than auj-
lliin* Russia is known la
hart. It asserted that the
new tank is (aster snooting,
better protected and mare
maneuveralile than any me-
dium tank in the world.
Wniie itie Army gave no pro- |
Panama American
"Let tin people know the truth am! the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
rWENTY-SKVKNTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P.. THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 195
FIVE CENTS
Air Force Reserve Pilot Gets
2 Years For Refusing To Fly
"mt*
M
the Americanjpeabodv Mass anrI Ias rucesiGoodwIn's father-in-law, said made an example of my son-in- child he gets two years. We are
ducilon tigures.
Locomotive Co., promptly an-
nounced that It Is preparing
"many hunareds" of the new
tunks lor smpmtnt at its
Sciitnrcaci.v. iv.i., plant.
It said to-t'i s are coming off
i he production lines as last as
ma! rials will permit.
Ine company's announcement d'r Investigation,
added that it now holds about Col James Y. Parker, com-
$1.0(10,0011.000 in tank orders. mandant of the air base, an-
EL PASO, Tex., April 17 put the baby < Roger > in a nurs-'
An Air Force reserve pilot who|ery and get a Job. We both want-
refused to accept flight duty was led our child so badly that we
sentenced to two years In prison didn't see anything wrong with
without pav yesterday and or- Verne asking for a ground as-
dered dismissed from the serv- signment before Roger wasi
Ice brn "
First Lt. Verne Goodwin. 30. of Parker Ciillom, of Las Cruces.
Finally, last Dee. 17, he aid,
he was ordered to co-pilot a (,'-
124 cargo plane to England
and back. Fearing his wife
i onld not stand another flight,
he refused.
"I feel that the Air Force has
a general exodus from the mili-
lary service.'
Tve heard of persons in Chi-
na and Russia being encouraged
to murder their children." Cullom
sal, "But I've never heard of
anything like it in the U.S.
When a man tries to save his
SOUTHPAW IN THE BOX President Truman shows good pitching form as he tones out
the first baseball of the 1952 season as the Washington Senators met the Boston Red Sox In
Washington. From left to right, Vice President Alben Barkley, Chief Justice Fred Vlnson Mr
Truman, Washington owner Clark Griffith, Washington manager Bucky Harris and Boston
manager Lou Boudreau.
N.M.. was convicted by a court I Goodwin explained to the court jlaw because of the other alt- an very bitter,
martial at Brlgps Field.
He was the first of 13 reserve
ollots to be court martialed for
refusing to flv in a "stav down"'
vtrlke which has hit three Air
Force bases. Nine others are un-
that his wife, who has an RHldown pilots,".Cullom said,
blood factor that makes preg-; "The Air ForceprosecUtor told
nancy difficult, nearly lost the the court that "The eyes of thej
baby twice because she was so world are on you... If you don't j
(inset by his flying. sentence this man. there will be1
nounced that Goodwin was sen-
tenced at ?:30 a.m.
The verdict and oart of Good-
The new tank also is being
proouced at the Aimy's Detroit
arsenal but there was no indj-|
cation ot the volume or produc- win testimony was disclosed hv
lion there. hi father-in-law. who was al
The Army candidly admitted lowed to attend the trial.
New Jersey Jail Warden Set
To Starve Out 68 Mutineers
thi the M-47 was a gamble.
In otic derision, the Army
took the calculated risk of
spending its post-World War
II development money on
major tank parts rather
than on a few complete mo-
dels. The ether gamble was
to by-pass testing stages be-
fore rombining proven hall
and turret mechanisms.
Goodwin told the court mar-
tial that he refned to flv be-
cnsi he feared thai his nerv-
ous and orenant wife would
le her baby.
TRENTON, N.J., April 17 (UPM-he Prison for many years, Carty
A mutiny of 88 "desperate' was named warded last -year.
Soon after he was promoted, a
prisoner assaulted him.
Word of the trouble in the two-
story stone print shop spread
convicta spread through the New
Jersey state prison today, when
1.300 prisoners demonstrated by
I As It was. he said, the baby,hammering on their cell bars and
was born two months orema-; shouting Insults at their, guards. I through the prison grapevine ra-
tureh In .Tanuarv when 25-vesr-i The 68 original troublemakersjpidly and Carty had the other
old Mrs. Goodwin heard h> was|were barricaded in the prison 1,300 convicts locked in their
Eight reserve officers, all but
one in sports coats, met secret-
ly near Randolph Field last
night at a tavern and demand-
ed a Congressional investiga-
tion of "that Boy Scout camp
they're running out there."
"Randolph is now stacked with
high-ranking, free-loading regu-
lars who never had any overseas
time," they charged.
All of the fliers who have re-
fused to flv are combat veterans
of World War II and most of
th"At SeUmewe were recalled. Committee was called off when
we thought the reason was to|fcwer fchan four members turned
replace regulars who had gone to u
CZ Civil Defense Planning]
Moves Ahead; RP's Doesn't]
The Canal Zone civil defense
program took some steps forward
in the last couple of nights.
But Panama civil defense re-
mained Just where it was today.
A meeting of the seven-member
Panama National Civil Defense
eoine to be court-martialed.
Godwin was confined in the
"The Army feels that Ihe risks 0ffleer's ouarters at Brings Field.
taken on the M-47 have proved ol Mlowed to visit his family
wise." a Defense Department todav
announcement said.
"Despite the anxious moments
and hours spent because
of them, at least a year has
been saved In the production oi
the new medium tank."
In addition, to Goodwin, six
reirrve officers at Randolph
Field. San Antonio. Tev and
at* at Mather Field, Calif., have
refused to fl
Mrs. Goodwin said
war." they said.
"When w got here, we found
some of the same ones we ran
into in the last war, when we
ware sent over, waiting here to
send us overseas again."
''Let the ones who haven't been
over go over and do their bit.
Another meeting of the Pana-
simple Instruction in atomic at- a committee member. "But therl
tack presenvatlon measures, are other things that can hapf
A number of first-aid classes|pen to cause heary casualties 1
were formed with Instruction to i the most peaceful communities.
begin this week, at the request of
the meeting. Gamboa residents
who wish to Join the class can
contact Morrison, who will teach
flrst-ald to groups of 15 or more.
The Gamboa volunteer air-raid
wardens are Mesdames Cooke.
ma body has been summoned for Fertig, Frltts, Engelke. Lattln. If we did, people In all walks o
Well be here ready to go when communities.
print shop, and they held four cells to keep the rioting from
prison employes as hostages. spreading.
The convicts had gone without i _. x, ,
food or water since 10 a'.m. yes-i The men did not like being|thcv fet 0ack."
terday and Warden William H.'kept to they cells, and being de-1 one pilot accused regular Air
Carty said he would starve theml.Priveo of their yard exercise, din-iForce officers at Randolph of
Into submission. ,nS room meals and shop work. ,._ k
But in ati interview with state Periodically throughout the'
next Wednesday
Principals of Silver City, Cha-
gres. Santa Crux, Paraso, Red
Tank and La Boca met last night
to decide the next civil defense
preparations to be made in their
"Suppose a ship blew up u|
burned outside or even insld I
one of our harbors many o
the injured would need transfu |
sions.
"We have had no hears earth!
X
quakes here for a long time. Ru
authorities, a spokesman for the, n.l?ht a rid day-they made a rack-
rebels boasted
maman for the."*'"' "Tiney mac a lies- orid|Ict unbecoming an
they were the'etln protest The^ demonstrations^^ f,,^ds"jJ 2?^ oi_
The department said it took h- ,0"serve Ms sen- *>" up easily
that If her "scum of oclety" arid would not lasted up to38 minutes.
10 months from the initial deci-
sion to build the tank which
lt claims to be the world's best
armed and armored medium
type io the actual production
of the machines.
"Bugs" inherent in any new
design, usually eliminated before
a vehicle is ordered in produc-
tion, remained to be dealt with I
tenee, she will put the
nursery and support herself
They screamed and hollered]"dont care point.
discrimination" against efccn home on Saturd,y
""d Surveys of the locar rate towns'
needs are being conducted and
air raid wardens are being aa-
ficer at Randolph was at tne signe .according to t A.Gaskin,
Lowry, Millar, Whltehead and
Yates and the Messrs. Felps,
Gangle, Orier, Blava, Connor,
Davis, Brown and Rev. Gray.
Before the meeting Russel T.
Wise of the Panama Canal Safe-
ty Section showed two civil de-
Circulars instructing residents i,?^0^, J^1"!? 2 ?'*
what to do in event of raid *J5?- S*SL2d. 2&*fc
will be distributed by children to
servatlon in Case of Atomic
tack."
Meanwhile, American Legion
Post No. l, has announced it
would help build up rtn Isthmian
Blood Bank for emergencies.
Post No. 1 will cooperate with
life would be needing blood."
w Zealand
Volcano Erupts
WELLINGTON. New Sealant'
April 17 (UP). Volcanic Mt
Ngauriihoe erupted today, hur
ing boulders down Its slopi
while a cloud of smoke rose tj
20.000 ft.
The volcano, which stands
the barren center of the Nort
Island of New Zealand, ha
been steaming for weeks befoij
lt broke into violent activity
day.
The eruption was first repor
inn .ten- -,,_. .ii-.j ,,ii; 'lie; Kimuicu mm huiicicu dont care point. who is In charge of the local rate .... : tooperaie witn
babv in a tu^mnteW 2, $,* would d rTMe 0n ce" d00rs wltn Lactey B Cral"n' Pre?ldent of fl program. ratc c vil defense and health authori-
se and *u ,a!lP.f-i'?'Vw"?,tnn7ero.nd;t^PlateS.cupi and anything elseoallas, Tex., chemical company p B
asecre- f, "l^Irinvestigation tneY cc,u,d ,Ry thelr nand* on.;out up *10Q as a defense fund for, Gaskin said he would preset
iLmWmCo^C' The *uard8 l*n?re "! .notae tl rebellious fliers and askedihis program to Lt. Col. M. Jl
fore she ^The^tat rDllM today with"a"'"!* sent ln meala *a]*r*y 'for contributions. cobs, military assistant to the' "We are not getting ready for *ne "UP?,
Wichita memorandum CdeTthUgn I the men' S think they should get a fair, governor, by /ext week. lanatomolc bombing here," saldl ^ *&$; ? '0m wtnf
K t. broken window to the strikers city policemen and tate troop- trial." he aaW "I dont believe Meanwhile, at Gamboa, real- \~ -------- ftn xt^yM, IiX^.ft.
a b o u t promising a "complete hearing" ers surrounded the print shop'in this railroading business and denta filled the Civic Center a a ki; ij U^--.
"He'son their grievances, if they would where the m.rtineers had pushed I'm afraid that's what they are building to capacity for a civil MClNOir INeW fleOC
.^ ^h..?.h ... o .lout i.r, 's"h a decent sort of person thatlfree their hostages and return to^inting equipment against doors going to get if they don t get cl- defense meeting Tuesday night! /\r -jr -y l_
after production actually .start- he ?nnIdr).t hf trlfd and 8en. their cells. and windows to fend off possible vtllan counsel." and 17 people volunteered toactjUt One TeOCherS
, ,M ,......,., iiv,.t tenced like a criminal. There was no acknowledgement tear gas assaults.------------------------------------------ as air raid wardens for the ones
cano shook his aircraft
flew near the mountain.
as hi
Bui this fact was not allowed
to halt or even slow up produc-'
tlon, the Army said. Output was
maintained and troubles cor-
rected by normal automotive:
processes without returning the
tanks to the production line.'
As fast as engineering tests
could trace down the cause of a
deficiency, a .corrective modifi-
cation was Introduced In the
tanks at the line.
City fire equipment also was on
I can't see anvthlne to do bul of the convicts' demand that the,
rioters go unpunished exceptihand, in case the men set fire to I Cw f.. r.AfAwn 1
that they would not be beaten. Ithe building. tX-^eOigeiOWn U.
The rebellion was the third at, carty said yesterday that 58
the prison In 17 days. A guard at
Cabaret Beauty's
Dead Body Lies
(anal Co. Receives
Gorgas Hospital
Laborer Run Down
By Doctor Driver
Month undiscovered 22 Bids On Scrap
Valued to $Mf000
PARIS April 17 (UP> The
body of Jeanne Berger. beautiful j
Viennese cabaret singer, was-j
found todav in her gas-filled.
luxury apartment after lying i The Panama Canal Co. todav
undiscovered for nearly one WM examining a total of 22 bids
month on m it of 300910 pounds of fer-
A Gorgas Hospital laborer who
ran in front of a car on Herrick
Ropd yesterdav afternoon was
Scrawled in a note on the
tablp was a paraphrase of the
Bblica! quotation: "May God
forgive them: they
what they do."
rous scrap, valued at about $67,-
000 to $80,000.
The bids were opened y eater-
know not;day j,, the office or the Superin-
tendent of Storehouses at Balboa
Friends said they thought, a contract for sale of the scrap
MIS.S Berger was on vacation |wU1 be awarded following an
; Police sought to determine ana|vs| of the bids.
frVm, PosTibt1 skll fracture.^ KSd* r&^mtaln^Ior" o!, ^ V" 2"^ **? T"
^.injured man was Nicolas ^ ."""X m* .Iir^',rom "*e Smtth* of Co,0n:
del Rosarlo 28. Panamanian.; popularity and a bank account
who allegedly ran through a sh(, apparently killed herself
atop siwi at the Intersection o,i in vew ()1 i^e absence of a<
Gorgas Road pnd Herrick Road knoW suicide motive thev' The other bidders all from the
The car was being driven by sough, lo learn whether she or ly"'1*0^8^, ere: Southwest
Dr. Donald Arlhu- lutzy who someone else ripped Ihe gas pipe Mital C- Dlvlf,n of Southwest
^.itUtal. *.l~ ft... _1. i^ bk..1 r* T QtraI Pnvn f! Gemul Danrt
men were InvolvedTn the demo-lStudentS IO Meet
stration. but a new count of noses | | r\ k \ ">3
showed that 88 men were in the Mere Ufl April Zj
building, where usually there arej *
no more than 30 at a time. An former students of
He said fee group included: ^XnZ^cSt^eZ
"some of the most desperate men2eyi i u.ttrtTi5S
we have in the institution." "" !*! Medicine. Aits and
The ringleader was August B.'?,e"ces' N"rLnl' Dentistry or
Doak, 32, a life-term k-irinaperi" Graduate Schoo are lr.-
who once was a member of De-'^tod to an informal reunion lo
trott's notorious "Purple Gang."i*>e held at the Union Club on
William Dickens, serving 12 to Wednesday, April 23, at 8 p. m.
21 years for robbery, acted as The first meeting of the group Nineteen new employes joined
spokesman for the rioters. was held March 26 and was at- 'he Canal organization in the
_, !tended bv more than a do".en f'st half of April, ten of them
Dickens promised authorities H_Saaxj ranging from the "om the United States and nine
Class of '16' up to the Class of employed locally.
51 The new States employes, their
It Is estimated that there are Positions and birthplaces are:
over 40 persons in the Republic Navigation Division Hubert
and in the Canal Zone who D: Clayton Jr..jjilot-ln-training
Hear Ye, Zonians;
Wrap Your Garbage
Before It Hits Can
into which Gamboa has been dl-i Stewart J. McNair was elected'
vlded. president yesterday of the Amer-
Leonard Morrison presiding at;i"n Federation of Teachers on!
the meeting, explained that the *he Canal Zone moving up from I ,
purpose was to form a standbyi?'8 l0Trn^ position as Secretory.: Residents of Canal towns
skeleton organisation to provide H ^ professor of mathematics, asked to place their garbage Ul
at the Jr. College. newspapers or paper bags befor|
The new first vice-president la, throwing it into garbage can.
C. P. Anderson of the Balboa: In making the requeal
High School and second vlce-pre- i Grounds Maintenance Dlvisioi'
sldent is Ethel Ferguson of the l Balboa Elementary Grade School, tion will reduce odors from gar
10 U.S. Raters,
Nine Locallfes,
Hired In April
The other positions of secretary
and treasurer were filled by Em-
ma Wall Baum of the Balboa Jr,
bage cans, help prolong the lift
of the cans and, by reducing th>
iquid residue left when cans an
High School and Alice Candee, emptied, eliminate a commot
respectively. breeding place for insects.
no harm would come to the host-
ages, guards Orls Roblson and
Charles H. Smith, and instruc-
tors Peter Buch and Myron Diu-
dlck.
Panama Metals and Salvage.
Inc., of Panama" 6nd Lam Her
manos, 8.A. of Colon.
connection in Steel Corp, GUssport. Penn ;
Pellew Wilson Sons and Co., Inc..
Immediately took Rosario to th loose from Ihe
hospital. He was treated for her apartment
lace-atlops and possible frac-: She came to Paris in 1945 ar-'ot New York City; United Iron
ture. | e, speodlng the war years with *nd Meta! Co., Inc., of Baltimore:
Furtner polic investigation is. her parents in South America .'Bars and Co.. Inc.. ot Phlladel-
being continued.
A sister lives In Venezuela.
doubtygssJJ
and deVieicU.
phla; Bav State Smelting Co..
Inc.. of Somerville. Mass.
The Philip G. Smith Co., De-
troit; Nathan S. Cohen and Son
Inc.. Los Andeles; Goldish Metal
Co.. Cleveland: American Smelt-
ing and Refining Co.. New York
City; Keystone Metal Co., Pitts-
burgh: Beniamin Harris and Co.
Chicago Heights: Metal Reclaim-
ing Co. of New York Inc.. Brook-
lyn.
K. Hettleman and Sons. Inc..
iBaltlmore: Henning Bros, and
Smith, lnc Brooklyn: The Atlas
Metal Co.. Cleveland: Harrv J
Abrams. Washington. DC; The
George Sail Metals Co., Inc.
Philadelphia; North American
Smeltlne Co.. Wilmington, Dela-
ware: and Hudson Smelting and!
Refining Co. of Newark.
1 ^^t ave attended"iTolaeXcaTh- j Cristobal Richmond, Virgil
the hostages
trouble, and
who have
sandwiches
were
nave vn..uc\j *<.*- **-*. vw.. ,
oiic college In the United States. "'*
are lri- Engineer Division Stuart A.
sent to the four prison workers) J*r K^^rwlwea'and >*^*3&1 Sww "t
three or four times a day. v,led to oung tneir wivesana nlho u.i,. r,...-.,. i
feco^1
,1 in "*
(ocomalt
raoDoct or i s pArs co.
Legion Auxiliary
Unit 1 Presents
Program Over HOC
The American Legion Auxiliary
Unit No. 1 will present a Pan
American script read by Mrs. Do-
rothy Loehr over station HOG
tonight at 7:45.
The script will be a Salute to
Carty said he had no way of:ase requested > communicate ^ Heights Luverne, Ala-
knowing whether the hostages: with Frank Oakley. Cristobal William C
were getting the food, but that it UM on th: At mite Side; and Hohman. Ic^k c^atoV wi^ma^
would not go verv far. If dlstri-l John T. McGrath 3-0498 or Paul p u| N v t
buted among the rebels. Pifia 2-0710 on the Pacific Side. ^tyV^sluV G MTntke.maugh
lock operator wireman at Cris-
Itobal Cincinnati; Clarence E,
I Reames, lock operator wireman
at Cristobal Deerford. Louisia-
na: and Heyward A, Shlngler,
lock operator wireman at Gatun
Warrick Worth. Georgia.
I Industrial Bureau George E.
I Mitchell, marine machinist at
iCristobal Saco, Maine
Health Bureau Thomas C.
Lear, funeral director at Ancon
Monesson. Penn.
| Terminals Division- Randolph'
M Wiklngstad. foreman steve-
dore at Cristobal Paraso, Ca-]
:nal Zone: and Merlin B. Yocum.
ichecker storekeeper at Cristobal|
Akron.
New local employes and their j
positions are:
Wage and Classification Divl-4
sion Dorothy A. Andreas, clerk-'
stenographer.
Commissary Division Ken-
neth N. Woodcock, commissary
assistant at Cristobal; Marian A.
Pynan, commissary assistant at
Cristobal: and Earl M. Stone,
commissary assistant at Sliver
City
Locks Division Howard H.
Alexander and Frank Koenlg.
patrolman guards at Pedro Mi-
guel.
Terminals Division Mitchell
K o g u t, stevedore foreman at
Cristobal.
Contracts and Inspection Divi- i
(NEATelephoto) R|on Thomai S. McKtbbon
NW ITS OFFICIAL President Truman smiles broadly a* general supervisory construction
he holds up the Japanese peace treaty which he signed ln a Inspector at Balboa.
oriti ceieinotiv ai the White House. The President's signature Fire DivisiouChester A. Whlt-
sonstitute the United Slate* lormal ratification. ___ |jnore, fireman at Balboa. _, .
PEPSODENT
SMILE!
Rttular hrujhing wiih Pep
dtm Tooth Put* help top
(ormition of tnaracl-oaring
acid ... rtmom dull Miioa
tht collect ia fllm... 4
grnai that caajc bd braatlw
No other toothpaste cao do pi it
enc PeptodVtu'f atm-reaiovt
ing formuUno other COM
taiat Iriam*. mt
Uec Pepaodent; keep teeth
free of him aad keep a brigbt
amile... lb* Pepaodeat Smile I
'Irimm it Pu*mJm*'l I ipMma1


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