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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01439
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01439
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
**BRANIFF
SSSS
'>>
f.
KANSAS CITY
ROUND TRIP
FIRST CLASS $842.00
TOURIST *-0
AN INPgPBWDgX^nW I^PAIL^ N1WSFAPE
Panama American
"Lei the people know the truth and the country U $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
Seagram's YO.
WHISKY
triaras*
-S/moufiUit ft'Ove*
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, APRIL , 1952
riVE CENT!
RP Deputies Seek To Use Ship Radio
Sfeel Workers
Find Gate Shut
PITTSBURGH, April 9 (UP)
I s The United States steel Industry
despite government seizure lay
virtually Idle today, although
50.000 CIO United Steel Workers
called off as a result of Presi-
dent Truman's seizure of steel
properties. ' __
The men were ready to work
but only a handful found Jobs
ready ior them. ,
The task of getting the mills
back into operation was under
way at some places, but many
others remained closed awaiting
"orders.*' -
Republic Steel id it would
not open any plants pendln*
> eourt test of the President s
seliure order.
Republic said It would not be
"feasible" to start resumption
until a hearing held in Wash ng-
ton federal Court on the comrja-
ny's petition for an injunction
gainst the enforcement was
'""he director of the CIO Steel
Union, represen ting
union members in the
area, charged
"I hope the Government takes
the plants over and keep them
for two years, "one disgruntled
worker said, looking up at the
long row of dead stacks on the
open hearth furnaces.
Another said: "We will slow
down on them when we get back
In."
Another rejoined: "No, we
won't. Not ~.t the Government
is running the mills. We don't
do anything against the Gov-
ernment."
Bolivian Revolt
Overthrows
ilitary Junta
LA PAZ, April 9 (UP)Bolivia
had a new government today.
Radio Illimanl announced this
morning that a coup de etat stag-
Taft Wallops Ike
In Illinois Primary
CHICAGO, April 9 (U?) Sen-1presidential race. Senator Estes
ator Robert A. Taft, won his most'Kefauver on the Democratic pre-
impresslve victory In the Illinois sldentlal ballot was an easy vlc-
Republlcan presidential primary, tory. A write-In effort for Gov.
today, and Gen, Elsenhower suf- Adlal Stevenson of Illinois lagged
fesed his worst defeat. I far behind.
Taft took a commanding lead
ed by the National Revolutionary at the outset and made the race |ai%a|iaa A dinar
'a runaway. With about 2/3 of the I Jc.ffl.neSe All inCi
precincts counted he Held a lead
Movement (MNRi has been sue-1a runaway. With about 2/3 of the I
cessful all over Bolivia.
A new government Junta has'of better than five to one over
taken over, headed by Hernn; Harold E. Stassen oh the Repub-
Siles, as civilian representative;
Gen. Antonio Seleme, as military
representative, "with the full,
agreement of Chief of Staff of the 50 delegates up for elee-
" the ra-|tlon. Ten more will be selected at
With 37 Aboard
'Courier'
To Transmit
Daily Programs
The sea going transmitter
"Courier" will begin a series of
programs tomorrow from 5 to 11
p.m. dally over 1510 kilocycles, In
cooperation with local radio sta-
tions.
llean ballot, with Elsenhower In
third place on write-lrt votes. ..R.-.J-J IJJ#.i--
n addition Taft captured 48 KCpOnCfl PlISSinQ
Humberto Torres Ortiz,"
military Junta headed by GenJoi them.
Hugo Balllvn, which took
when President Mamerto
Industry sources blamed the
delay In reopening on the fact
that the .mills had been com-
pletely shut down m anticipa-
tion of the strike. Blast furfiac- lagoltla rejlgned last year
es and coke ovens prime steps been arrested,
in making steelwere banked.
Company officials said It may
take two weeks to restore full
production.
President Truman announced
the seizure action In a radio-te-
levision broadcast to the nation
last night.
TOKYO. April 9 (UP) A Jap-
members of the ten-man!and TVftVe^med"sure to get alianese Airlines Martin !
dlo said.
the state Republican convention.,aneM ^^ ^^ ^
liner with 34 Japanese and three
. I Americans aboard has been miss-
took off
The radio said the revolution held thus far. ^^ZZi* ,*,"/ f?om
was successful in Oruro, Cocha- It was the third Midwestern f *th .?>?."" lea8ed from
bamba, Potos, Trinidad, Sucre/victory in a week in the torrid '
Santa Cruz and In 51 mining dis-
The Voice of America will fea-
ture a "Salute to Panam" to-
morrow, beginning at 5 p.m
with records of the different na-
tions in the Hemisphere, Ameri-
can and Panamanian folk music,
sports, news, classical music, and
special features.
Good Friday will be observed
with programs commemorating
airport this the holiday, "The Passion Ac-
cording to St. Matthew," selec-
tions from the ArchbUhop's Pas-
toral Letter, "Mass in B Minor,"
music and news.
trlcts.
Hernn Siles proclaimed the
victory of the MNR revolt over
Radio Illimanl and said:
"Bolivia has broken her chains
Workers
125.000
Chicago
workers scekln-r to return to loo* m7jt^n Board and still clear
...4. #_> tl,. 1 nuilVIH HUB UIURCU lies GJ
Blaming the Industry for'the, after s|x 0{ secu_
deadlock, he said the steel com-, tton ,.Del but ,n tls hour
panies could grant the full 26-'
cent an hour wage increase re-
commended by the Wage Stab-
n "locked out" by steel
CS?tctr oseph (terrnan. hv
out U.S. Steel for
profits of about $17 per ton on
steel without any price increase.
Meanwhile, mass. mertWB of
of triumph the MNR calls on the!
people to remain calm because'
the MNR does not harbor ran-
cor."
Beatings In Panam
Believed Results Of
Political Campaign
Former Police Judge Orlando 'fig*** 1U"
Last Christmas Day It began
flights as The first commercial
air service permitted In Japan
since the occupation in 1945.
i Meanwhile In the United States
12 persona are missing In two
planes.
A United States Air Foree Mit-
chell, with eight passenger and
disappeared af-
f 25 miles east
three crewmen,
Saturday's program-; will; com-
iays pr
te "Da
memrate "Da de Turismo" with
a Pan-American theme, a salute
to Lima, Per, and the Tourist
Congress there: "Travel in An-
cient Panama," the "Hft Parade."
and remarks on freedom of trav-
There will be a special Easter
Sunday program which will' ln-
Messlah." Negro
-Y
fried
eel for tne>non_,,rik,nI te|ephone vWThits
'lockout" charge, Sunougrr -in)h gjfoe 400 exchanges through-
apokesman for the firm said out tne Un.ten States were or-
maintenanc* erews were return-
ing to start "an orderly return
to operations."
The gates of Jones and Laugn-
lin Steel's huge southslde Pitts-
burgh plant were locked to all
but maintenance men.
Guards turned back all pro-
duction workers, telllns them to
contact their foremen for order.
Italian Expedition
To Try Rio-Lima
Crossing Over Mts.
GENOA, April 9 (UP).Mem-
bers of an Italian expedition
going to Brazil for an attempt
to cross the Mato Grosso and
Andes Mts. by automobile from
Rio de Janeiro to Lima, Peru,
left today aboard the Italian
liner Blanca ma no.
The expedition, headed by
Italian sportsman Count Leo-
nardo Bonzl, Will try the cross-
ing following trails never be-
fore used by motor vehicles.
They expect to cover the dis-
tance of 10,000 kilometers from
Rio to Lima in about four
month. *
dered, threatening to tie up
long distance calls and elimin-
ate service in 43 states and the
District of Columbia.
The meetings were called for
1 p. m. today by leaders of the
Communications Workers of
America (CIO) to discuss the
three-day old strike of 68.000
CWA mnbers against Western
Electric-' and Bell System com-
panies In New Jersey, Michigan,
Ohio and-' northern California.
In Fairmont, W. Va., an out-
break yicket line vlolencej'dle
was reper&d as West Virginia's
telephone ftrlke spread to nine
cities.
One woman picket was ar-
rested for allegedly tearing
the coat of one of seven wo-
men being passed through a
picket line under police escort
at the local office of the
Chesapeake and Potomac Tele-
phone Co.
In New York, results o voting
by 5,000 non-striking Western
Union telegraphers In New York
and New Jersey revealed they
will remain In the American
Communications Assoc 1 a 11 o n
(Independent) and not Join the
seven-dav old strike of the
Commercial Telegraphers Union
(CTU) against Western Union.
Passenger-Packed
Truck Plunges
Over Cliff, 40 Die
A plane
Army offU
piloted by a
is missing since re-
t throe mile south
de la Guardia. Panamenlata can-
didate for the Panam City
Council sported a swollen nose,
tW and right shoulder and sev-
eral bumps oft.'tfis head today as
a result of a belting he said was
Inflicted by a fob of more than vel ""'
Shortly after de la Guardia was Alp RaH SlTCUS
beaten, Carlos Ral Morales, a *
lawyer and former heavyweight
wrestler known as "El Fantas-
also was badly beaten by a
elude Handel's
reserve spirituals, and
Choir.
Hope To Thwart
Suppression'
By Panama Govt.
Sixteen Panam Assemblymen today asked to be al-
lowed to speak over the "airwaves" of the powerful float-
ing U.S. sea-going radio station "Courier," which arm-
ed here Saturday on a shakedown cruise.
The deputies made the request in a letter written
to Capt. Oscar Wev of the "Courier."
The Assemblymen said they were making the peti-
tion because freedom of speech is being suppressed in
Panama and because there are other "curtains" to pene-
trate besides the Iron Curtain of Communism.
They said Panama had a "De Roux Curtain," refer-
ring to Minister of Government and Justice Ral de Roux
who recently cancelled the licenses of several opposition
radio announcers and who was empowered yesterday by
an executive decree to revoke radio announcers' and com-
mentators' licenses "when deemed convenient."
Paullst Fathers
A snowstorm blankets the Den-
To Be Sounded
VERACRUZ, Mexico, April
(UP) A speeding truck loaded.;ma-
with almosf 75 persons plunged group of men who "lMd him l\ks*HM.rM*#
over a 21-foot cliff 80 miles in much the same manner as the ||| Rp lOUlOITOW
southeast of here yesterday. j attack on the former police
First reports today said that 40 J"dg*.
of the passengers were killed and
at least 20 more injured. .
Several persons were mangled
so badly they were expected to
The occupants, who were pack-
ed In the huge truck so closely
they were forced to stand, were
making a pilgrimage to the town
of Catemaco to observe Holy
Week.
Officials at the scene said the
truck careened from the highway
and tumbled down a rook-strewn
cliff, throwing passengers over a
stretch of 50 yards.
Plice said the truck driver
aparently lost control of his
vehicle on a curve.
BAtBOA TIDES
Thursday, April 1 \
High Low
3:40 am.............. 10:01 a.m.
3:53 p.m.............10:22 pan.
Churchill's Troubles
Mount; Labor Party
Racks Up Triumphs
LONDON. April 9 (UP>The
Labor Party Is continuing Its
series of sweeping wins in na1
tlon-wlde county council elec-
tions*
Yesterday, for the first time.
Labor won control of the great
industrial county of Lancashire.
I six; Murray Insisted that the steel-1 wanted the profit-average f lxed ,.Labor ga.lnl'?", "rnnnr
sure workers were entitled to the ap-, higher than 85 per cent showed e ^wiS i mjwUv of M-50
Big Steel Companies Stuck Together
Against Wage Recommendations
BY DREW PEARSON "Totally inadequate," snapped I fltable years, those betwetn 1945
Murray. "We can't accept any- and 1950.
WASHINGTON. April 9 In thing like that." The fact that the companies
negotiations with labor, the six
big steel companies made
there wouldn't be a recurrence I proximate 22-^-cent increase,] that they expected prof its to re-
of what happened during the spread over an 18-month period, main high, argued Murray.
1949 wage talks, when Bethlehem!recommended by the Wage 8a-1 He added that under the gov-
broke ranks and made a separ- billzatlon
Both attacks have been attri-
buted to the present political
campaign.
De la Guardia said he was pis-
tol-whipped, blackjacked, kicked
and beaten with Iron bars by
two groups of men who descend-
ed from two cars at the inter-
section of H and West 17th
Streets.
He said the men took his watch,
fountain pen, flashlight, money
and some medicines he had in
his car after beating him. De la
Guardia said two policemen stood
by while the group attacked him,
but failed to Intervene.
De la Guardia said the doctors
at Santo Toms hospital have
diagnosed a possible fracture of
the nose and Jaw and he said
they may have to extract some
of his teeth which were broken.
to establish a majority
over the Conservatives.
The count* elections
the
Panama'* new air raid
sirens will begin sounding to-
morrow at noon, according to
Lais Enriara, Panama's repre-
sentative on the Joint Civil
Defense Council.
The sirens, which are locat-
ed at El Panama Hotel and
at the Centre Medico, will be
sounded for ten seconds every
day of the week, starting to-
morrow, and for 34) seconds
on Fridays.
This will synchronise Pana-
ma's air raid warning system
with that of the Canal Zone.
Endara cautioned residents
to remember that a three
minute siren, if sounded,
means a roal attack. The all
clear would be signified by
three one-minntc blasts.
New Decree
Issued By
* President
QftPaniAprericgn Day o Mon-
day ft* "Courier* will present a
Pan-American Day Fiesta and
program dedicated to the 211
American republics featuring La-
tin music. L
Other programs will be an-
nounced later.
The "Courier" will be open for
inspection today from 3:30 to 5:30
p.rn for the last time. Monday tokened licenses of
President Alciblades Aroseme
na yesterday Issued an executive
decree which empowers the Min-
ister of Government and Justice
over 1,500 visitors Inspected the
ship. ^____
Pinay Forgives
Tax Dodgers
trol room operators, who must
submit to a test by the technical
telecommunications engineer.
Issuance of the decree followed
the suspension of the licenses of
a numbjr of announcers who
vernment opposi-
prqffwtf d
Death Sentences
For Atom Spy Pair
Upheld By Court
nouncers and commentators
"when convenient."
The decree, which modifies an
earlier one issued In 1940, said all
radio commentators must be
Panamanian citizens.
Foreigners, whose countries of-
fer similar opportunities to Pan-
PARtq Anril I (UP) Pre- amanrans, will be eligible to re-
m,VnPe%mayU won Na- cj^Ile dto commen-
tlonal Assemb^approv,al early ^^.s^eady6VorWng a. ra-
today of his 1952 bud get which announcers wi w permit-
assures France's full participa- fa continue as long as they
tino in Western European de- have bwn ^4^^ ot the Re-
iense. pub||c f0r at least five years. I ^u," the"^. S. 8upreme Court
.. j The decree provides that am wa. __ ?- d^.!,. trnallv the
Pinay won 10 confidence totes radlo announCers will be submit- ** *" ntd
from the Assembly in a pro- ted to written and oral tests for t J ^ di-th
longed session which ended;voice, diction, general culture ^SSr onunSv
shortly after midnight. I and the correct pronunciation of n tn*>r ninirV-
His defense-heavy budget Is name8 of foreign persons and f^manhueIfnrt""J"'
keyed around a plan to forgive DiaCe8, before they are issued a for the husband and-wlfe spy
all former tax evasions to en-'license. ^T'h.^niH L ? Si.M
of current The decree also provides for that he would take the caso to
licenses to be Issued to radio con- the Supreme Court
NEW YORK. April 9 (UP).
A rullnf of the U.8. Circuit
Court of Appeals today denied
a second plea for mercy from
atom spies Ethel and Julius
Rosenberg and held that the
couple must die In Sing Sing
Prison's electric chair for grvtxg
wartime secrets to Russia*
The court denied a petition
for a rehearing on Its Feb. 25
ruling upholding a Federal
Court espo n a g e conviction.
for
s ever
spying
attorney
courage
taxes.
payment
Leopold Is Busy Stuffing Bird,
Gives Reporter Royal Brushoff
By HINDI DIAMOND
aboard. Second, If I wanted per-
mission to be here. I must first:
So now I've been booted off an ask for it.
ex-klng's yacht The major said Leopold '
Alongside Pier 7 this morning, busy and doubted
all was peaceful. I climbed down' had time to see the press,
a little lac
he
and
.adder of the apparently definitelyno pictures,
deserted "Young Joe" to request, Then there was a heated als-;
an audience with former King of cussion between El Capitn and;
another official, all In Geman.1
ato. settlement with the steel-
workers, eventually forcing the
rest of the Industry Into line.
the
penny
"We've
The county ejections me Belgium Leopold III
unlon;.would not accept ^^-^^^thJ las,^October* -ra.^ecUons g- ^roundVy the govern- and the quickest .ns of expe-
started with an overwhelming
Labor victory rn the London
County Council, the worlds
largest municipal Government.
Party politicians have been
Quick to Interpret Labor's Lan-
select a drafting committee to, "That's less than your Mr. ashire victory as a result of
start writing a contract." Fairless said we were entitled to' discontent In the Lancashire's
Stephens replied that this was [because of the cost-of-llvlng rise big textile industry, where hun-
out of the question unless the since October. 1950," argued Mur- dreds are out of work.
been at this long 15 cents an hour, since the full
As the wage talks In New York i enough." Murray -pleaded. "In ,72-Vi cents applied only to the
got under way astute Ben Fair- the national Interest, let's get to- last six months of the proposed
\ess of U.S. Steel got an agree- | gether on the Increase recorh-! 18-month contract,
ment from spokesmen for the mended bv the wage board and
*Blg Six" that there would be no
deviating this time.
To bind the pact, it was fur-
ther agreed that John Stephens,
U 8. Steel vice president, would
do the talking for all six com-
panies in the secret sessions.
He was an unhappy choice
Churchill's troubles within
this own party multiplied yester-
day when 48 Conservative mem-
bers of parliament signed a pa-
companies got some "price as-'ray. "According to his figures
surances in Washington," au- we should be getting an average
tl;orizing a price increase for increase of 16 cents an hour."
steel to compensate for the wage NOTE: It didn't get out but at
from the standpoint of, union boost. one stage the steel companies; per- ailing for Immediate de-
spokesmenCIO president Phil; Murray and Goldberg argued were Informally offered a pricenationalization of the steel and
Murray and CIO general counsel j in vain that the steel Industry's boost of $5.25 a ton by former De-1 trucking industries.
Arthur Goldberg profits in recent years were suf-ifense Moblllser Charles Wilson. At the same time 16 Conser-
Best Stephens would offer was | ficlent to absorb the pay hike re-1 The companies turned It down as | vatlves also signed a demand
a 15-month contract calling for:commended by the government. not enough,
a fetal wage Increase (Including. The best evidence that steel
;e benefits) of 18 cents an'profits will continue at a high However, when they came back
level this year and next. Murray later to "talk It over" with Eco-
ment, Just try this sometime.
First a sunburned seaman ap-
dltlng my exit
Once more I triedcould they
However, the union contended contended, Is the fact that the nomlc Stabilizer Roger Putnam,
that the offer actually added up companies have refused to ac- after Wilson had resigned. Put-
to only 14.4 cents an hour he-cept the Eric Johnston "earning nam refused even to go as high
cause of a divergence in calcu- standard" formula, whereby1 the:as $5.25.
latlng fringe benefits for paid Industry would be entitled to( He has been refusing any wage
holidays, overtime, and so forth, wage relief If profits fell belowjboost other than about $250. as
proached rne timidly as If he ask the King if he would see me
thought I might be contaminat- Or make an appointment? That
ed Would I please' wait right was rather difficult to say. but
where I was and not move? would I go ashore Immediately,
Next a Jovial round-faced lit- and wait there? __
tie man Invited me Into his cab-, One hour later I was still wait-
In Now who ever gave me the.tng. The ship's agent bustled past
idea there was a king aboard? me. ,
Well, as a matter of fact there 1 "No publicity, he waved, as he
was but .. my request would boarded the vessel,
have to go through channels. Capt. Freytag poked his head
He obligingly stamped his out occasionally to smile and
S^^rnVr^uffrdeaae"wan *I^a^a5taK rULTwe could Soon we learned they had no dor Sanz Esparza pretender to
Freytag, and could I please wait From a ^^**ffin^1^ie, plans for disembarking, but were the Spanish throne and his
Scattered throughout the tiny,standing abound a table ooserv-' walthig for minor repairs by the wile. Dominique Lam botte.
cabh? were American magazines, lng the ex-King stuff a bird. It Jkt^tical Divtetor^ Pr,eBc^ f^.f"1*^
police thrillers and such. The looked like A slow-motion pic- J*0**-. ^J n Auz.1 sclentliteJir10m Belgium, Oar-
ltself, badly in need of ture. To a sld* sat a dark-haired *.,.. 1 .K.V. 4L. &J.. mny and France.
THE "YOUNG JOE", a 314-ton yacht now being used by Leo-
pold m, awaits minor repairs at Pier 7 Balboa before she can
leave for fishing at the Perlas Islands.
dor
the
It was angrily rejected.
85 per cent of the four most pro- 'under the Capehart Amendment,> cratlc controls.
that the Government remove
the purchase tax on textiles and Mbt .,
clothing as a means of combat- p.^ ,,, a'good scrub-down, Is damsel in slacks and moccasins1.; ls/ a cruise jin,
lng:the mounting unemploy- an ex-minesweeper. 188 net, 314 the Princess Marie Lilian and Kint has Men n"1"*.
ment In the Lancashire mills. ?rQM tons and 138 feet long. she turned to flash me an Inqul-, the Ban Bias^ isianos^wii
Younger Conservatives feel Thirty minutes later a stern- sltlve look, but otherwise no one
that -Churchill has not pushed looking Britisher, Major Echvard moved. _
ahead with a positive Corner-, Rowland Aristn appeared to tell One of the crew members of ^L^"^,,,
vative program, but Instead has! me to leave at once. First of all. another ship rem.rksd. "What do The "" ^rt ll
If anything expanded Weau-1 claimed the ex-klngs alde-de- vou know, he's a taxidermist taclud,e erman p
I had no right to be loo.' 1 ween uayern, */,
camp,
cruise. The former Loo|dnf ovpr the ^
11 fish at shore toRether with the ex-
nd after returning P'led V** was a police ofneial
to Panam for a week will head, wh remarked. If I were the
, captain. Id sure throw the
yacht whole crew out and get soma
Kince, Al- men who could keep tho ship
m Selva- clean."







MUMt.
Mus TWO


-
THE PANAMA AMERICAN A* INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
r..NtO NO r-nniKlo y TNI PANAMA AMERICAN PagSa. INC.
ounoid v NIIMN ReUNMCVBLL IN >'
NAMMOBIO AHIAB. CDITOR ,>
7 M STRICT r> O. OX 134. km. W. c> *.
TcLirHOM Panama No. a-0740 is Lima'
CAILI AOOACMi PANAMIIIICAN. PANANA
IION OrWC. 12.17 CNT*L AVINUI MTWIIN 12TH ANO IJTH STRUT*
. roana n PrrNTATivs Joshua s. powrns. inc.
SAB M*0lON AVt NIW YORK (171 N, V.
LOCAL - Mt!L
i 1.70 S .30
S.SO 13.00
< 0 14 00
^ .^~, ---------------
> MONTH. IN ADVANCE ______
rm |U montmr. in advanci
B -AfT. VfAR IN ADVANCt...
THE MAIL BOX
To Riil Sea n a* aaaa t.,um In reatan at fa* Prrrrrr Amar-
icen. LRtttn art nin.i retafarrr saa* ara beatMe* ir a rhaff cn-
tte>r,fial manner. f
I* you contribu* left.. eWt be lataor.ont (t a hmn< .*.., the
r.i da Letter* ara ublrihee' in Iba rear reserve*.
pIrrir try fa keea th. lattara limito*" re ana aaaa leneth.
**"* ? *" *'fn MM (a tfncrett caarWanaa.
-j.-T** ,"*T2!'* *,U""J " '"H*li *t .t.tom.nt, H ..{.hum
e*>r*ti*o in latttn (ram raedera.
Labor News
And
Comment

WEDNESDAY, APRIL I, M5I
rL
MCk^CQWR
L (fab ikTweB&i

N,
mi.
PANAMANIAN SAMARITAN
raS--RolUmlnB fr0m tne Interior March 26 I had a blowout, near
.i-Th,stn,?s "^ aPare and my second blowout I had no extra
tire, no tools and was in a bad way
th..mhth.uSl Vnl,ght 1Se.a_bl* t0 t,humb a ride m o*uy,^lre,
on Ta,-ld' bfk anl ""Z?, hop* wmeone witb..to op. I was on the road waiting about four houre
t -hel dr0V' UP' *topped- but w"8 ln t00 muchof * hurry
?urii0f "i,y feUo ,Amerlcim Passed nd did not even'stop.
hP ..?fE *iKma7,a? taxl drlver CRme by' 8tPPed and when
he saw the situation lent me a apare wheel, told me where his
tand was and witnout talcing even my name, left.
i.*, .got. ntt Panma city all right but my taxi driver had
Jen uis stanJ when I went to return the wheel.
The otner drivers told me where he lived and I went there
expecting to pay through the nose, but figured the service had
been worth plenty.
I knocked, the driver came out and I returned the wheel and
asked how much I owned him. "Nothing," he seemed surprised,
tf.e >ou wm,Id d0 as much for another fellow."
, who was the Good Neighbor and the Good Samaritan?
Gratefully.
Viva Panama
- Balboa
IOW you know wfiat fo do about the A-bomb.
WouW you like to tee m again at a Mova
Star tfcowimj your who! school how to DUCK
and COVER. Juit ask your teacher to how you
my OFFICIAL film c.H.d "Duck and Cover".
Bif:
JOE BLOW'S CONTRACT
Regarding Joe Blow's letter of April 7: Public Law No. 7?4,
79th Congress, 2nd Session, (H.R. 8987), approved August 13. 1946.
covers the travel expenses of State Department employes and
does mention vacation travel, also specifically exempts the 'mo-
ney spent under that law from Federal Income Ifcx. I
mn. However, I assume Joe Blow has reference to Public Law No.
600. 78th Congress. 2nd Session, which covers among other things,
authority for the traveling expenses of most Government em-
ployes with the exception of State Department employes.;
This law makes no specific mention of vacation travel; liow-
ever. Section 1, Paragraph (a) states Is part: "Provided further,
That no part of such expenses shall be allowed or paid from
Government funds where the transfer Is made primarily for the
convlence or benefit of 4he officer or employes or at his request."
If Joe Blow wishes to look up and read th* entire law here
is the full reference! Public Law No. 600, (H.R." 6633); United
States Statutes at Large; 79th Congress, 2nd Session, 1946,
volume 60, Part 1, Public Laws, Chapter 744, Page 80e\
Joe Blow does not have a contract, therefore there can be
no "breach of contraot." v
He does have a working agreement that ean be terminated
or Matured by either party at any time. In other words, his
"cy-mct" is a worthless scrap of paper.
Pin the ca'e of most Government employes Congress has the
pcyer. and urea that power from time to time, to change the
rp=C of '..... '"" -s '-> be worked per day or week, vacation time
A lot of the people who are
being talked of as "the labor
*ote" want a lot of the poli-
ticos and their own leaders
to know that nobody delivers
them,to anyone who doesn't start I
taking the Capone clan off their (
necks. Right now I
Scarface may have died in that
yellow and tan mansion on Bis-
cayne Bay but the mobs are [
tougher than before and are still
leeched onto a lot of unions all)
over the U. S. despite what you
thought you saw on TV last sea-1
|sdn. t
,The boys can prove what they
say. Just pick your spots. They
have their grim tales. J
There Is, for example, one big,
midwest steel mill city not very
far east of Chicago. Not too long
age, a sound-equipment tech-
nician walked into the regional
headquarters of a big union and
with the aid of the regional la-
bor chief, wired the room lor
sound.
Then he left to pick up his pay
from the Mr. Big of the gambling
syndicate which operates there,
mulcting millions every week out
of the thousands of steel-work-
ers.
Hours later the sound expert
returned, picked up his record-
ing machinery, went borne and I
beg-an replaying the disks. He
almost fell out of bis car. One
of the voices be heard was
that of bis priest. It was
mingled with the voices of
other citizens, all members of
a crusading anti-crime com-
mittee desperately fighting to
save as much of the workers'
pay envelopes as they could
from the gambling racketeers.
The sound expert- rushed theT
reaped whaf h*i "h^ed^ L WASHINGTON-For the first time the M-
"ShVrerirmallia** "KEFhan entil ndidacy of Sen. Estes Kefauver. is be-
invu- thi nrLc ?L th. Jr! S'"?'"* to * en llttle bit eriotuly by the
invited the priest and the other, professional politicians.
crusaders into the regional un- Not long ago the professionals almost unani-
mously laughed off Kefauver's efforts. Now
they are at least showing signs of hedging.
The tpain reason Is quite obvious. The Demo-
cratic race more and more resembles the an-
cient roundelay:
BERT SAYS:
"If you ara outdoors when the A-bomb eaptodes, DUCK test behind
a wad or into a doorway. Even a hollow in the ground wM help protect
yew. In a car or bus, dud under or bahtnd the seats. COVER UP.
Remember: Don't trend nd lookDUCK end COVER .... as quick
esthettUsh." p J------
c** WSHWGTON
MERRY-GO-ROUND
The Federal Civil Defsnie Admrnittration made'
it end your local Civil Defame official can help
your teacher get it. Your teacher can she help
Cget m/ new book "DUCK end COVER" to
p. Goodbye now. You're good puptril"
A CIVIL DEFENSE STORY FOR SCHOOL CHILDRFN released by FCDA
.,'.
The Kefauver Candidacy
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
ion headquarters to come and
tell all. Trusting the labor chief,
they did tell all in great de-
tail they related what they had
learned of the crime syndicate
there.
All the while the regional la-
bor chief knew that the voices
of the men who trusted him were
"Pour green bottles a-hanglng on the
wall, '
"If one green bottle should accident-
ally fall.
"There'll be three green bottles a-
fauver may pick up a fair slice of delegates from
Pennsylvania,
New Jersey, also previously accounted a sure
Stevenson state, may have a split delegation too.
And despite organization opposition, the Kefau-
ver forces count on a number of delegates
Irdm Ohio.
Some observers are predicting that Kefauver
will go to the convention with 250 or even
300 votes on the first ballot, although it is dif-
ficult to see where he can find this sort of
strength.
At the same time Stevenson's probable first-
ballot strength is being reduced by the crop of
favorite sons which has sprung up since Tru-
man's withdrawal.
Sen. McMahon will be Connecticut's favorite
son, and Sen. Hubert Hdnbrcys, Minnesota's.
,,W; ,Awrell Harriman Is AflFJlkelf>|oet New
York s first vote, and Michigan's tflv. G. Men-
to tr giiiued. ov.erume rates to be paid, traveling expenses to
be f Ilowed. and in gwieTal, all conditions concerning employment.
If Joe Blow had a contract for a period of two years, let us
ay. and during the life of that contract Congress granted a pay
raise, or any other change in working conditions, favorable or
unfavorable to him he would not be entithJd-to the changes in
worMng conditions during the life of his contract unless his cbn-
trapi had a specific clause In it regarding the matter in question.
I fully agree with Joe Blow, the "morale factor" is a very big
Item and has cost the United states Government thousands and
more thousands of dollars of our tax money through dissatisfied
enrbloves.
[Mant; of these employes have been given "half-truths" and
"half-statements" at the time of employment, and of course the
local Brass Foundry Is noted for its distortion of the laws of
Congress m favor of Its choice few. while the majority are re-
quired to live up to the letter of the law.
Here IV Tears Too Long
being recorded for the intel-
ligence, if that's what you'd call ging on" the" wall"
it. of the gambling goons so! withm the last two weeks, two.-?green bottles
theyd know to deal with in no have fallen off the wallPresident Truman,
Beetle way. and Sen. Robert Kerr, who can only recover by
The regional labor chief was;a miracle from the trouncing he received at Ke- nen Williams is toying with favorite son' ideas
rossiTig his own people. Only I fauver's hands in the Nebraska primary. wtth one eye on the vice-presidency
That leaves two green bottles a-hanging on These are some of the reasons why the Bro-
t?e,.wa,U"vrauver,and v-Alai Stevenson fessionals are beginning to take the KefaSver
of Illinois. This simple process of elimination ex-
plains why the professionals no'-'longer laugh-
off the Kefauver candidacy quite 'so blithely as
they used to.
v BIIW
Drew Peorson says: Politics busts out all over; Easter po-
litical paraders provide healthy competition.
WASHINGTONThis Is the time when politic, like spring
in the nation's capital, Is bustln' out all over.
No^ for 20 years has there been such preening of Presi-
dential coat feathers, such a parade of hopefuls toward the De
mocratlc altar.
Competition is the spice of politics as well as of American
urn, and this is the healthiest thing that has happened to the
Democratic Party ln two decades.
.. Tp help the American public watch the parade, here is a
thumbnail review of the Easter political paradersin order of
VICE PRESIDENT ALBEN BARKLEYage 74. Kindly, as-
tute, popular, Alben once heard an Egyptian fortune teller at
the Pyramids outside Cairo tell him he would Uve to be 103.
.. Barkjey gave the fortune teller S5 extra and has believed
the prediction ever since.
In spirit, Barkley is still a young man.
SPEAKER SAM RAYBURN of Texasage 70. Called "Mr. De-
lnocrat, he pioneered some of the earliest New Deal legislation:
the Holding Company Act; the Securities and Exchange Com-
mission; tne REA, which brought electricity to farms.
Bam is revered and respected on Capitol H11L but both he
and Barkley automatically give the Republicans their best ar-
gument for nominating General MacArthur, aged 72.
SENATOR PAUL DOUGLAS of Illinoisage 60. Despite re-
peated protests that he is not a candidate, Douglas has a tre-
mendous popular following.
A Quaker Douglas enlisted in the Marines at the age of 60,
came out badlv wounded, has great political as well as physical
co.irage and, like Kefauver, has built up such popularity that
^e has incurred acute White House displeasure.
SENATOR ROBERT KERR of Oklahomaage 55. A big oil
and gas man, Kert traded all sorts of votes on vital Issues in
S2**S to-?*** .hta Kerr Natural Gas Bill permitting an increase
in tho price of gas.
^P.^/v?8*?^1 ,P"onallty and good campaigner, any
Ln3?tlon Sf.hta tobbylng- record during an election campaign
would result in certain defeat.
fciDwFiAT2E 1PW!U> """ELL of Georgiaage 54. Able and
5i?i?fi7BpeCiSf' he !f"fcbSfn the leader ' tne Republican-De-
m)^.mLfoalIti0^.wh,ch has successfully fought Truman on
I
OLD PANAMA BOOK POR SALE
have an old. very old (95 years) leather-bound volume of
Hamper's Monthly Magazine, dated Dec. 1850 to May. 1889 (six
issues i. contamine a lengthy, factual article by Oran, titled "The
Pa?ma Railroad."
2ln the article are 48 columns with 24 illustrations, all de-
scriptive of Panama, the railroad, its depots, trains, .towns, etc.,
as :fhey appeared to the author nearly a century ago.
Pictures are all the railroad's officers, i.e.. John L. Stevens.
WiHiam H. Aspinwall. Henry Chauncey, James L. Baldwin. George
M. Wotten and John C. Trautwine, with a short biography of
eaeK
. Also pictured and described are David Hoadley. president:
Alexander J. Center, vice-president; railway equipment. Mt.
Hope, the station at Gatun, "Steven's Tree," Bujlr Soldado.
Steven's Cottage, the bridges at Barbacoa. Mames Station. San
PaWo Station, Matachn. Monument Hill. Basaltic Cliff, Paraso,
etc.'
There is considerable text giving the description and his-
tory of each illustration.
'Local characters of note are written up, like Old Joe Prince
and his Tavern.
The book is an interesting, valuable historic Item for anyone
in Panama. It is large 7 x 10 x 2 weighs four pounds
and has a total of 8*4 pages. The pages are yellow with age,
but the book Is in excellent condition. There is no mutilation.
It is offered postpaid for 825.00 U. S. funds. In any corres-
pondence about this book, It Is Important that reference be made
to #o. "B-l."
pi have before me a letter from the American State Dept.
saying: "These documents would Indeed be of value to a local
public institution or an interested individual" in Panama. They
suggested that I contact your paper.
E. B. Walker
1888 Laurel Glen Rd.. Rt. 3
Santa Cruz, Cal.
Stay as beautiful
as a bride
with
the fact that the sound record-
er's priest was hi the room
frustrated the mob and prevent-
ed the colossal double-cross.
Lest you believe that the
mobwhich was part of the
Capone banal hasn't sought
warmer climes, let me tell you
of bulk boy Max CaldwelL an
ugly little man who, under the
protection of the Capone hoods,
specialised in throwing com-
plaining Women union mem-
bers down the stairs of Ms eld
Chicago retail union headquar-
ters. Also he lifted some $900,-
00 out of the treasury. But
apparently this isnt enough to
buy him coffee and danish at
Mammy's down in Miami any-
more, so he's been moving In
and out of unions these past
few years, changing them like
Durocber does infielders.
Now this bundle of bone and
black Jack has landed in Miami
Court of Crimes. Seems it was a
slight matter .of reckless display
of firearms and use of combina-
tion tear gas guns and billies.
That's the soul of a Capone
mannever change the artille-
ry, even ln this atomic age.
He used the arsenal ln a col-
lective bargaining conference
with an unenthuslastlc contrac-
tor. Maxie was there officially
as the organizer for the AFL La-
borers' Union.
This goes on in a score of ci-
ties to which the boys scattered
in the past few years. But the
home grounds are Just as tough.
Seems that in Chicago, a llttle
over a year ago, an alderman by
name of George D. Kells decided
politics was just too strenuous.
He retired after his ebtef
lieutenant, Big Jim Martin,
was shot, his billboards were
mutilated and he was warned
he'd die. He took the bint. He
quit. A year biter, on Feb. I
last, Charlie Grose, a Republi-
can eommitteeman in an ad-
joining district, was knocked
off on the street.
Now I could take you from one
character to another ln these
weird, lethal politics, but it would
wind up with the successors to
Gross and Kells being part of the
crowd which now runs politics on
the West Side.
And they are in the same band
which was guaranteed a Job for
candidacy a little serlousrj, V ; "i-'Ui"
li^l tney st,u -uote *T"re*v* odfs against
the Tennessee Senator. Kefauver'Is almosVun-
animously disliked by the Northern organiza-
Other green bottles may, of course appear on tion: and the labor groups, as In Ohio for ex-
ample, largely oppose him.
In his native South, he is generally regarded
as a dangerous renegade.
What is more, Truman has made no secret of
his intention to do whatever he can to stop a
Kefauver nomination. It is even being said by
insiders that Truman will reconsider and run
the wall before Convention time, but it is bard
to see who they may be.
Sen. Richard Russell has never been given
much of a chance for the nomination, simply
because the Northern, New Deal whig of the par-
ty still exercises a veto power.
His age almost certainly rules out the well-
liked "
Vice-president AJben Barkley, and prob- again himself if there Is no other way to stop
ably House Speaker Sam Rayburn as well.
All the other hopefuls, like Connecticut's Sen.
Brlen McMahon, are really candidates for the
vice-presidency.
Moreover, it Is now clear that Kefauver is
likely to go to the Convention with a respect-
able block of delegates.
He is sure of Tennessee, Wisconsin and New
Kefauver.
5* ve,ni?n .te no.w h1",? ""J**1 to i""* state-
ment clarifying his position, soon.
He is being urged to explain that he will ac-
cept the nomination if It Is offered; and that
he intends therefore to make his position on
rJ0".81 lssues clear ln a number of speeches.
II Stevenson does take such a stand, the ten-
e*S8^'J$*?Sft certainly Oregon and dency to laugh off the Kefauver candidacy may"
California, with Its 88 delegate vote. > become general again -.., }
,H Washington Maryland Florida and Nebraska threatening rival has shown ever? ata ofT52
(a though Kerr h trying to hang on to eight ulne reluctance, cannot b" entirely laMhedg0?f
delegatis there, despite, his defeat!. And he v Moreover. Stevenson's reluctance ta T&ely to
Civil Rights and his name would automatically alienate the bie
woes of Negro voters which can swing elections in New York.
Chicago and other Northern cities.
..llS?3y?L0S'A?lr., 8T*VKNSON of Illinois-age 52. The top
a&SJLSSSrEi. ^""an, has been an A-l governor, knowi
*JffffugB* 'rom having served in the State and Navy de-
Lb^Tnd'courageou?. f ^ pnMtnt f the Unlted "**
miMam!&Phe*. dlv,orce which though not of his choosing,
would make him the first divorced man to ser in the White
House; he also testified for Alger Hiss.
v ^SeHSS E81i?S KEfAUVER of Tennessee-age 48. A pro-
ven vote-getter. His performance against the well-organized
Suh-JK m,ach ne in rw Hampshire" was nothing short of a
^2a*m*KacIe' Howerer, since it's always customary to throw
stones at the man ln the lead, Kefauver Is getting rus share-
especially from Jealous colleagues. *"s m snare
,.A^,ally.KKerSuvfi; has 8hown m courage on Civil Rights
5i ^o.th.er.^outnunl senator, pioneered 6n public housing;
y-nftdHa#alnst th< po ttax'. has campaigned diligently for a
United Europe, and saw the importance of a corruption cleanup
pouticta. don^ Q anyne The P*0*16 bke him but thS
SENATOR BRIEN MCMAHON of Connecticuta*e 48 Has
don* more constructive work for peace and foreigVaftairs thai
any other Senator. Had the vision to see to^KStSiHl
Atomic energy and establish the Atomic Energy Committee
ln^a,.?gf.nref 'n 'he Justice Department8ne too Wash-
ngton as few others. Unfortunately, religious prejudice havlna
^SpcdA^AWmc^ ^ *&& acarno^
GOVERNOR MennTn WILLIAMS of Michigan-age 41 One
maMwf* me5.1.the Peniocratlc Party. HeStartled nor-
?nrir^nSllc1a^al1nCh$an # wlnln* the governorship in 1948
fi that state Democratic governors get re-elected
.v2r..' WIf.am8' P?lltlcal success ln a record which
M*^imaKny ,RePubllcns vote for him. Scion of the Williams-
Mennen shaving soap family, he's called "Soapy;" learned about
tES5leSniJinaer *e ^te iusttce and attorney gSI Frank
Murphy. Williams says he doesn't want to run, but he'd be a
great vote getter as vice president. w*
Girls in Songs
HORIZONTAL
certainly pick up scattered delegate strength
elsewhere.
National Committeeman David L. Lawrence,
of Pittsburgh, for example, Pennsylvania's De-
mocratic leader, strongly favors Stevenson, and
Pennsylvania has been accounted a sure Stev-
enson state. But Lawrence now believes that Kev
T^?"i* or* inulne and more obvious If Gen.
Dwlght D. Elsenhower is the clear Republican
In this case Kefauver may be the Democra-
tic nominee simply for lack of any other t(e-
hower1 n the iormt^able EIs*n-


Plane Production
By Peter Edson
1 "I'm always
-thinking of
i you-
i VTouTl hear
my call"
13 Vegetables
14 Thinks
15 Latins
1< Patterns
17 Stir
18 Cut
28 Painful
27 Soft drink
29 Most foolish
32 Daedalus' son
WASHINGTON--(NEA>-U. S. military aircraft lower than World War II because nf ar.at.r com
production is now over 135 planes a week. This plexity of new plane design reater corn-
fact can now be revealed from statements by two On a typical ftehter th Wi m<>h ?*. ic
top defense officials. 14,000 pounds as aaainst S.^^'^LP^LS
Roswell L. Gllpatrlck, undersecretary of the
Afr Force, reveals that peak U. S. plane produc-
tion will be 900 planes a month. \
or, TTPjunds as against 8500 pounds for World
War II planes.
^Maximum power today Is over 10,000 horse-
jower thrust, as against an equivalent of 1500
Charles E. Wilson, former director of the Of- horsepower thrust for a World War II nronelleT
fice of Defense Mobilization, revealed that po- driven plane. r "roPeDer-
. pro
ductlon In Frebruarv was 60 per cerft of the plan-
ned peak. This would be 540 planes-a month.
At the end of 1951 the rate was around 480 a
month.
This new production goal of 900 planes a month
takes Into account the "stretch-out" of defense
rearmament to four years Instead of three. The
original goal was 1250 planes a month.
driven plane.
Maximum speed of today's planes is over 600-
WorS Warail compared with 400-500 ln
Maximum altitudes are over 45,000 feet today
asjejfalnst 35.000 feet ln World War H
^pattf fighters has risen from $26,000 to $179,-
eta-a.mo.ti figure is "on" bK ,ro- n^SS^^S^J^TlM^^
ductlon for a presently-planned aircraft manu- The Boeing Stratojet bomber wehrhs 181 owi
fMturin?wfacilltles. By stepping up operations to pounds and costs $3,476.000
two or three shifts, as in war-time, production
could be doubled or tripled.
Russian aircraft production is now .variously
estimated at 1000 to 1800 planes a month, or up
'nicn. !^J ^2f^a JD xr to double U. S. output P
ne o the toughest_C*pone Ob- One reason given for higher Russian production
NEW MATERNITY DRESSES
JACKETS

SKIRTS
Pretty styles and colors
AT BOTH OUR BTORK
FELIX B. MADURO S. A.
f- Charlie (Cherry Nose)
hen he sought parole,
rry Nose was then freed
i Federal pen with the aid
ustlce Dept. solicitor. And
I Nose is one of the gang-
who controlled the AFL
hands at one time and,
[h them, shook the movie
ry out of a million dollars.
Now he's freeand many a
union is nervous.
There's no protection for the
honest union boys anywhere.
That's why in 14 cities, they're
helping to set up anti-crime
commissions and aiding in the
ct-mpaign to raise $800,000
21 Central Ave.
6 Tlvoll Ave.
.
is that the Soviet has frozen its design and turn-
ed to mass production of existing modelsbasic-
ally theMlg-15 jet interceptor.
It is known that the Russians have other air-
craftlater and better modelsunder develop-
ment. But whether the Russians would have to
shut down their present production and retool
for mass production of newer designs is not
known.
In contrast to he Russian program, the U. S.
is holding back on some current models ln order
to get newer and better planes Into production.
This puts U. 8. Air Force and Naval Aviation at
a disadvantage for the present.
The hope Is that within a year, when peak pro-
duction Is reached, or by the end of the present
program In 1954, the U. 8. will have the advan-
fa tage of planes as much superior to the new Rus-
*Bte ^snircrimTcTmrnHT ffijgf the ^^ to Wl(" * *ig-
t*l2M^whv)thani aav that am, _!Ul8 of eourse *' calculated risk. If World
nffldte^ rumSn m rl ?* .m 01"0 Drea* " tomorrow, present U.
prove it to them. They don't *ee| m addition to present one-shift aircraft pro-
duction operation, U. 8. plane output is much
It!
weighs 181,000
Power of the newer piarle is eight times great-
er. Speed and bomb load are two-and-a-half
times greater. Combat radius Is double
Yet the new plane operates with a crew of three
m-n' as compared to eight on a Flving Fortress
Electronic gearradar, rocket-firing and nav-
igational eouipmenthave added greatlv to com-
plexity, cost and production time on the newer
aircraft.
A typical fighter In the last war had 515 elec-
ri5al.wi's' as compared to 5500 now. This gear
adds $77,000 to the cost of the finished plane.
While the stretch-out of the defense produc-
tion Droeram has relieved some of the shortages
and bottlenecks ln the aircraft industry not all
problems have been solved.
Adm. DeWltt C. Ramsey, head of the Aircraft
Industries Association, says deliverv time on ma-
chine tools is still six to 18 months. And some
critical materials are still in short supply
J*ie manpower shortage has been eased some-
what l>y the stretch-out. but'there still arent
enough ensgneers and technical experts.
Engineering time on a new plane Is over a mil-
lion man-hours, as comnared with about 42.000
on a typical World War II plane.
Bv the end of 1952, however. A.I.A. predicts the
U. 8. aircraft Industry will be the nation's big-
aest. with 750.000 employes. This compares with
two million on the job at the peak of World War
Creviced
4 Tibetan
gazelle
5 Taverns
4 Prose writer
7 Shakespearean
hero
8 Footless
SjaalliJ
Among
10 "That's
Peggy------
French island "^c'ray^
urtrsUsn **&iteml 33 City to
Qr Masculina Wisconsin
34 Fissure nickname 34 Landed
28 Ancient Greek2ELi" ,,5"*"? .
, dt- New Orleans 35 Expression of
27 Auctions M Dinner courses contempt
St Spanish article
29 The sun
30 Wile
SI "Sweet as
apple cider"
$2 "Goodnight,
*
35 Football part
19 Container
0 "My gal-----'
41 Not concerted zT
Deed
43 Pertaining
- to morals
45 "Linda-----
48 Market
?SOleoreslni
MLooaen
$1 Most certain
53 Foam
53 Inferior tin
MEM
VERTICAL
1 Mental
condition
3 Of a positive
Pole
Answer to Previous Puzzle
Ml-J 'J-AzA ssflp-JBIEra '
K;j::,iii|i[.in;j' 'v
MUdMM:=i
==ilaii i A mizj ^ iXh;
ISIEIblisis ESfcsIS fttidfe.^ui
=IWIiy Mln K,=4lll A
lia =*-iira;

IJJdlaM&gl
36 Ancient
stone tomb
37 Girl's nams
38 Stirs up
40 Supply fuel
43 Engrave
44 Hint
47 Coin of
Latvia
49 Go astray
STUDEBAKER
FACTORY SERVICE
Representative
it now available i or consultation
with Studebaker ownerr
AGENCIAS PAN-AMERICANAS, S.A.
Esquina Calle Estudiante y Jernimo de la Osea
Telephones 2-0825, 2-0626, 2-0627


WEDNESDAY, APRIL $. 1*52
iK.
-S--
. . ; _____
ij! _ .------... vn l i mm l-*-1'-! -
pacific Society
. 17, &tU DU &t~ 339t
AMBASSADOR WILEY IS HOST AT RECEPTION
The Ambassador of the United State*.to Panama, John
Cooper Wiley, entertained last evening Irom 5:st to 7.se
p. m. with a reception at the Emba. Re8,den,c' ZL2
Cmta in honor of the captain and officer of the United
SUtes Coast Guard hip "Coorler."
All members and their guests
are cordially invited to partici-
pate In the games
General Kiel Leave* Por Ecuador
The commanding general of
the Caribbean Air command,
Brig. Gen. Emil C. Kiel left Mon-
day morning by plane for Quito,
Ecuador, for an Inspection tour
of the facilities of the United Air
Force Mission to Ecuador.
Gen. Kiel was accompanied by
Lieut, Col. Charles W. Johnson,
MaJ. William G. Furth, Capt. Ro-
bert Jardlne and Lt. Roy A. Cu-
ny.
Dr. And Mrs. Miller
Honored At Dinner
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Bharpen-
steen were hosts to a group of
their friends last night at a din-
ner given In the Fern Room of
the Hotel Tivoll in honor of Dr.
Qulnter J. Miller and Mrs. Mill-
er, who are visitors on the Isth-
mus. .
Those attending with the hon-
ored guests Included Mr. ana
Mrs. /.A. Fraser, Rev. and Mrs.
Raymond A. Gray. Mr. and Mrs.
A. R. Grler, Mr. and Mrs. J. 8.
Hearne, Mr. and Mrs. B. A.
Herring, Mr. and Mrs. W- A.
Hope, Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Klen-
wetter.Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Mac-
Aulay, Mr. and Mrs F D.
Spencer and Mr. B. I. Wllley.
elephant auctions, fortuna telling
and a silhouette booth.
The committee in charge oft
the coming benefit affair to*
eludes Col. Virgil F. Shaw, chair-
man; Mr. James M. Hunter, co-
chairman; captain John Brown,
public relations; Mr. C. F. Hinz,
tickets and finance; Mrs. E. G.
Abbott Mrs. W. H. Alves, Mrs.
Leonard Martin, Mrs. V. P.
Shaw. Mrs. W. H. Peterson and
Mr. E. J. Lucas.
Mr. and Mr*. Gate
Have House Guests
Mr. and Mrs. Frank O. Gute
of santa Clara have as their
house guests for several days Mr.
Gute's brother and sister-in-law,
Dr and Mrs. Edwin B. Gute of
ralo wfll be placed tomorrqw night long ago
evening tt 7:3d in the American not a Mavaricioi
Legion Club'at Fort Amador.
Members >nd 'heir guest* are in-
vited td attend.
Lift Up Your Heqris
, REFUGE FROM REAUTT
"Juris* then having receiv-
ed the sop went immediately
out: and H was night." Read
l-M.
Judas Isearlot, as he
Upper Room, on that
Jio. Ht ran away,
ous man running
away from, poverty, not a bad
man running away from good-
ness, but rather a* a cowardly
John 11:11-.
'yfU ee Juda
leaves that Upt
Arrangements have beep made
with the bus driver to take
players directly to the club on
request.
"Moot Outstanding Mother"
log
Still To Be Selected
Name* of candidates for
man running away from reality.
Jeiu* so fully repreented Hfe'*
great, Inescapable facts the
faett of God, of sin. of character
of decision, of eternity, of Judas
own soul
Jada* saw himself for tht flrtt
unit as he really, was, afraid to
"Most Outstanding International commit his life to Christand
i,saves au.i*v*t..i vsaawai .
i i i /. - -i i.-i-i " .i*la****i
HOLY WEEK SERVICES
mm*
PAGE TUNES
'On Maundy Thursday toeaarrew $tr-
vies will b* hfld a', IHMnv LuUitraa
Cliur.h 1 1 p.m with asaclaV isfarSBtS
o Uit liutl.-u.'.en of Holy Communion,
Two strvlcaa will bo hold Good M*
in ah
.IT.
. pactar, tha Rtv. Herbert T.
Win sresant
m.dlutlon
A p.m. anath
an tha urraoo thtmt
fcL_
"Tht ttvtn Wards,
asrvleaalll Safial*.
"OUT."
Holy Communion win a* calabratad,
wWi lh canflrmanda of lot Sunday at-
iandmg far tha flrtt Urn*.
tin*' Nocturnal Adoration Soelaty at
alnt Mary'i Mlaalon will hold IB rasuUr
nttily night of adoration a taint
Mother of 1982" are still being he ought the cover of night. Ha
accepted by Mis. Patsy Ryan,
Box 42* Cocoll, phone Balboa
1947, or by Mr. Ruppel Box $96
Balboa, phone Balboa 2598. The
candidate1 name rnu*t be ac-
companied by material bearing
on the selection. < ,
fled beiule he could not tand
to face himself in the real world.
Juda* not .only resigned frorri
the apostolle company that
night. He resigned from life.
There are times for all of us
when life seems too much for us.
We ran. as Judas did,.for cover.
The General Federation of
ut. ana n. .* "LXLZjT ZZ Women's Clubs and tht General
Milwaukee. Wls who arriwd on FederBtlon CouncU of ihtern
Via TtVimi! hv nlftnC laSt TnUrS- ..___. ,..!.- .,111 hnrvnr k> hnt,
Scottish Masons
Extinguish Lights
Tomorrow Evening
3i annual ebstrvanee of the
mt and obligatory Maundy
Thursday banquet and the, cere-
mony of ewmgulihing theTlght*
will be held by the Canal Zone
Scottish Rite Mason* tomorrow
t7p.ro.
fary'a- Cburan an Hal Thursday -tamar-
row, balnnlng a. 10 p.m.
Thd Holy Naina Soek-:y af taint Mary'i
Million will raoalva Conur.iutilbh on lar.ar
tunday. Jainbn will raealva In body
a( Ota MasMB In thwlr rasssetlvs partab
ehurahaa at tha tima afawintad la aach
Aitar tha Communion tha mambara sf
ha soela.y ara oordlalo' Invita* ta at-
tand a Communion braakfaat at tha Sa-
crsd Haart ChiMl aselal hall. Aneen.
"^uT-LStar at ?hll' brsskfmrt will y
Mr. Wirnam J. tharldan. wublle Da.andar
o tha Canal Zana and formar AarWant
Uattad Stala Attarnay.
Meeting Postponed
The nreetlng qf the.. World
Club, which is usually held the
second Friday of each month at
the Balboa YMCA. ha* been
postponed until Fridav, April IS,
du* to the Easter holiday*.
the Isthmus by plane last Thurs
day.______
"Stork Club"
Admits New Member
Mr. and Mrs. John William-
son Person announce the birth of
a daughter, Lynda Gayle. oh Fri-
day, April 4. at the Rex Hospital,
Raleigh. N.C.
Mrs. Person Is the former Ma-
rlanna Newlln of Balboa.
Cathedral Choir
To Present Oratorio
The Cathedra; Choir will pre-
issued sent The crucifixion" by I
Gallndo-Boyd Invitations
Have Been Issued
Oallndo daughter of Mr. and at 7:80 at the Cathedral or wt.
rdoMjar,B^da,r-o?r^^tUTkh%%^ cordially invited
Mrs. Alfredo Boyd, to be solemn-to attend. ______
teed Saturday. April 19, t :80! T
p.m. In the Santuario Nacional BridgeTonrn mt
del Corazn de Maria.
Sergeant Jack Johnson
Is Visiting: Here
Sergeant Jack Johnson, son of
Mr. andw Mrs. John G. Johnson
of Balboa, arrived on the Isth-
mus by plane from Hawaii via
Los Angeles en route to Fort
Belng, Georgia, where he will
er Officers Candidate Train-
int School on May 4.
He plans to visit with his par-
ents for about three weeks.
Winners Announced
The winners of the bridge
tournament played Mondav even-
In? in the card ro omof the Ho-
tel Tivoll were: 1st, Mr. and Mrs.
W Norrls; 2nd. Mrs. L. D. Bopty
and Mrs. J. E .Davis; 3rd, Mr.
and Mrs. Fred Brady; 4th. M- ,
lor and Mrs. N. Holladay: *M ,
6th, Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Robkn-
so n.
tlonal Club*' will hqnof. the bot-
en mother.
Hamadan Caloren Meat Tonight
Hamadaa CaldWn will ho!4 its
*egular meeting Ws eynjng at
7:$0 in the new Wlra Memorial
on Balboa Road.
Vesper ClreU
To Meet TonrgM'
The Vesper Circle of the Gam-
boa Union Church will meet this
evening at 7:80 at the home of
Mrs. M. F. Herringv Houte 118-
B. All memebx are a*k*d to at-
tend .'.''."
Rev. Graham To Be
Speaker At Rotary
Lunch Tomorrow
we run, as < u,, if.
Some of the commonest refugee*
are found In solitude, in our
work. Other taW refuge from
teallty In day-dreams.
Others seek release upon the
lowest most obvious plane, In
#2m bl?f- aSci? m con! 4onl Temple in Oatun undr
St c-lfectlon Of Arthur a7av
right. Master of Panama Canal
ihapter of Rose Crolx.
ium

a.
This ceremony will be nek*
simultaneously on both sides of
the Isthmus. At the Scottish Rite
Temple in Balboa under the di-
rection of Bel Brown, Senior
Jarden of Panama Canaj^ciiap
way* ol running
._j, such at conT
svht detlre for change'-*, any
ajaee bflt whwjrah|re: the eon-
v%nlence t>t slcfcb< wJien thers
Is something tr. person doesnt ';,_ .
wantlo face-* ~> -VSunday morning the tradltlon-
' A Batter brealfart will be erv
We hav* ap jot to 'face the ad and the chapter service o.,;
Bt *^LHf!K.,?2S m,*,5 "Ht-hNni * J-hta trli be ob- 'fig;
tor of each - ,,r
Mere CwBlfoft Wtwring
FALSE TEETH
tmuvwad aowdsr tprlnlrlad on upsar
saw Iowa plata old tfcrm firmar ao
that thay faal mora comfdrtabla. Na
AU AUTOMOBILE DEALERS
IN PANAMA CITY
wiB CLOSE from Thursday noon
to Monday morning 8 a.m.
(Easter Holiday).
Rtv. William Graham of the
Gatun Union Church whl be the
guest speaker for the Holy
Thurday proajam at the.Crla-
tobal-Colon Rotary lrmcheon
tomorrow noon at the Strangers
Club.
speak on
iflntotry c{
r*n away. JeWsfttppd I
died within a fe# Wtor -- -I;
other. The death of ope is tht
shmt ofwito^toa the death
of the other Is our hope and tut
rtltatton.' .
jesu lived- m ratp worlds
JudM Md in a world M his own
wishing. We ar* thankful that
Jesus stood by, and' showed ut
the way of th* Croat.
i hi "i i i ii
. J S '. T (IN
WALTHAM

Rev.
Bridge Group tt.Meet Tomorro*f
The bridge group of the Bal-
boa Woman's Club will meet to-
morrow at 12:3" P.rn. at the
whoae Jewish Welfare Board Center in
Graha
The Meaning
Lent."
Snd
Tea Honors Bride-Elect
Miss Teresita Oallndo.
marriage to Mr. Ricardo J Boyd Balboa
will take place April 19. was the I -,-.r
guest of honor Monday after- V. F,-vT. Bingo
noon at a tea given by Mrs. o-!"0'" i.^ tomorrow
brlriGaUndo at her home on L.jn BRwmbe ^tomorrow
Visitors In Costa Rica
Mr*. Alfon*o Outman y Leon,
wife of the Ambassador of Costa
Rica to Panama, and their chil-
dren are hn 8an Jose, Costa Rica,
on a visit with relatives there.
....... ------------------
Ion Curundu Road.
Binge at Amador Tomenew
Bingo Will be played at tht
my-Navy Club at Fort Ama
tomorrow at 8p.m.
Dr. and Mrs. Muller
Have House Guest
Dr. and Mrs. Adalberto Mul-
ler have as their bouse guests
Mrs. Muller's mother, Mrs. Ro-
dolfo Herbruger. who arrived on
the Isthmus Mondav aboard the
8.8. Panama from New York.
Mr. Pa Rodrigue Is In Cuba
Mr. Ciorlano Paz Rodriguez
left the Isthmus hv nlane Svn-
dav mornlne for Havana, Cuba,
where he will spend a week on
business.
Visitor Leaves For Guatemala
Mr. William J. de Winter of
Minneapolis. MJnn.. who was a
euest at the Hotel El Panama for
several days, left Sunday by
plane for Guatemala City.
Snrinc Festival
Tl'keta are On 8ale
Tickets are now on *sle for the
orino; Festival sprn*ored by
tb cathedral of 8t. Luke, which
will be held April 19 at Morgan's
O'-dens. Admission Is $.25 and
eh"dren tmder 12 will he admit-
ted fre If accompanied by an
Tickets ma vbe obtained at the
epthedral office or from individ-
ua' members of the narlsh.
Plans for the festival Include
native "bohlo," a pet show, a
food ssle, motion nlcture show
with several chances of pm"ram. |
Cy rides, a bazaar, a religious
k sale, parcel post and white I
"
'' >.
Wit] be elesetJ all day tomorrow and"
Friday but will be pen Saturday.
ANGEUNI
2-9SM
\eaudy .
at its best...
BY PROFESSIONALS -
SPECIAl $72
WHY HAVE A HOME
PERMANENT ?
...with inadequate faeUltlet.
no certain finished look, artd
no guaranteewhen yes* ee>
have a professional on com-
plete for onr $7.5.! K xoOl
test longer, and took befftrl
MONDAY thro THURSDAY
' These can be had
BALBOA
2-2959
Early!
Make your
Appointment
BEAUTY SHOP
Mr. Bates Wleman. atglV
Opa* t:a* a m a is s-m
dor
V \ % -a-
JUST AMJV
LIFE JACKETS
'%&;$&?.
MACH BALLS
o W.ASTIC iOATS
mother and <$gle
lUeJoan.
Swim'Suits
Pedal Pu.herg
Polo Shirt*
U'.V
3or
cyatker (ina i
\on
*
Swim Trirnli. .
Cabana Seta
Sport Shirr
Btach Shirts

r-

../'i.
AT BOTH OTJR tJTORBB '^
FELIX B. MADURO 5.
21 Central Avenue V f ffoil Avnd*
.....
m*T-

SCHOLL'S SERVICES-
Panam No 68 Justo Aroaemens Ate.
feet Treatment*. Corn*, CaHoetea, Ingrown Tee Nata,
Arch Sspperte.- RBDCCING Treatment. Massages,
SlenderMng Machtaea. Twrkish Bath. Male and leaned
operator. For information call: $-2211 Panam.
. i12 ajn.: t9 p.m _______
PAULS MARKET
0 P E N: All Day Wednesday
and EASTER SATURDAY.
CLOSED:
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
mercurio
_
ataast
DIAMOND
WEDDING
RINGS-
fi*X**m

r~ tut .
wilt ntmmtin ^~ thT**rk yswr Urrt
Uftthtrn earltr%i risfastai-
/ veer sretA.
tmm
V
PV
mercurio
.

to
festivities our
rt'

I
Friday. -
Uisure

i Good
orders
Canada Dry Pi
in advance.
-
------
^ .
i i i
-J



rw,i rom
THE PANAMA AMERICAN 'AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, APRIL *, 195)
. Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
! I Shipping & Airline News
Tr.KK
ON SCHEDULE
Pan American Increases 117 passengers accordinn to the,
Stratocruiser Service advance passenger list from the
To meet the growing demand Panama Line offices at Balboa
for 8tratocrulser service between Heights.
New York and Buenos Aires, Pan Among those on the ship will
American World Airways has in- be Edward E. Eder Managr1- of
creased Us El Presidente flights the Wholesale Honsewares Sec-
over the route from three to four tion of the Commissary Division
roti nd-trlps a week. at Moun t Hope.
The addition was made possl- The complete advance passen-
ble bvextending one Stratocruis- ger list follows:
er flightheretofore operated | Robert E. L. Anderson: John .
only between New York. Trini-|Barrmgton: Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
dad and Rio de Janeiroon to,ris R. Berger and two children;
Montevideo. Uruguay and Bue-'Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Bowen; Mr. j
nos Aires.
At the same time. Pan Ameri-
can has made travel in these
double-deck aircraft available to
a greater number of persons. The
and Mrs. Albert Breitbart; Mr.
and Mrs. Paul Cave; Mr. and
Mrs. Vernon D. Christiansen
and son; Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick
Crawford; Ernest B. Curling;
seating arrangement in three of, and Mr. and Mrs. Karl P Cur-
the week!'- round-trios has been tis
enlarged to accommodate 60 pas-
sengers. This El Presidente
service Is provided at the stand-
ard tariff.
One weeklv round-trip "Stra-
tocrulser will continue to provide
the luxury El Presidente Espe-
Jearine E. Davenport; Cpclle .
M. Dolan and 3 children; Arietta.
Durr; Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. j
Eder: Mr. and Mrs. Leon S.i
Fishbough; Julia M. Garrett; Mr.;
and Mrs. Joseph E. Gibbons; Eu-
nice Gulick: Mr. and Mrs. Parker \
cial service, carrying onlv 47 p. Hanna f.id S cMldren: Mr.
passengers In extra-comfortable and Mrs. James R. Huhbard: and
Sleeperette seats. It offers ape-|Mr. and Mrs. John W. Huson
cial food and bar service and and 2 children,
such e*ras as orchids and per- Lydia Jones: Lillian Jones:
fume for feminine passengers. ,Mr. and Mrs. RudolohXinchen:
There is a small surcharge on John A. Kruszon. Jr.; Mr. and
1 Presidente Esoecial. Mrs. Milton Lani and daughter;
Ail the PAAStrrtoorulsers are Harriet R. La Rose: Daniel A.
eouioped with lmoerind lower Lawson: Mr. and Mrs. Michcel.
be-lhs for nifht i ravel. Llscoe: Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Lis-
CoincidentTl with the teoprd son; Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Llza-
uo StrafocnMse-fliahts. PAA is'no; Avdrev M. Loutthran aid!
deereasln* It" Fl Turisti service ron; Josenhine H. Lp<*: Gi7lla
between New York and Buenos Maver: Vcrna McCallum; Mr.
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service___________________Cristbal
*S.S. Quirirua ..........,......................ApriiTs'"
VS.S. Chirisjai .................................April 20
S.S. Levers Bend .......................... April 11
S.S. Quirirua................................April 27
5.5. Fiador Knot ..............................May 2
Handling Refrigerated Chilled and Gntnl tn.
Arrives
New York Service___________________ Cristobal
S.S. Esparta ..................................April ~%~
S.S. Cape Cumberland ....................... April 12
H- lt!na,c* .................................AP'H 12
f-g- bao ....................................April 12
!? Comayarua ..............................April 15
S.S. Cape Ann ................................April 19
Weekly Sailing* lo NewYork, Mobile, Chariest**, Los Aagelea.
San francisco and Seattle.
t rrijurni freight sailings from Cristbal lo West Coast
Central American aorta.
Cristobal to New Orleans via Sails from
Tela. Honduras_______________________Cristbal
S.S. Qujrigua.................................April IS
S.S. Chrlejui.................................April 22
S.S. Quirigwa .................................April 2
________________(Passenger Service Only) ___^
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL tll PANAMA 2-2SM COLON M
FRECKLES AND HIS PR IRNOS
Weird Night
Bt MERRILL BtOSSl
WSE 7keASCK HUNT HAS
lftmeaxes /u pooh
CONOJT70NFOK AMY SOC/AL.
UFE BUTJtUM'S STKJ. TUB
wdkpj
Maybe "rout) iiicr
ME TO TtLLTOU A
BEDTIME STORY
BeFORE fOU TAKET,
'rOJRNAf^ JUNIOR/
I'M SORRy JUNE
MAYBE TO
tue son LiSHrs
AN'MUSC".
At lev onp
A Big One
Airdes to two round-'rios week-
lv instead of three. These econ-
omical DC-4 flieht? serVe all the
important cities on the e*st cost
of South Ameri'-s. whre?s the
and Mrs. Vernon C. Miller; Mr.
and Mrs. J. J. Murphy: Mr. and
Mrs. Milton Nash and daughter;
and Miriam North.
Mr. and Mrs o. L. Owen;
Sir? tor-misers s'co onl<- at Port Mrs. Lillian Perlcer and di-ph-
o* St'"- T'lnidari- HIo and.tcr: Mr. and Mr=. O. Wolcott
""onte.v'flso e-i roi't? between Parm'v rid on: Mr. anrt Mrs.;
New York and the Argentine cap- carl H. P*.ul: Conchita E Rel-,
it-'. i chart and 3 children: Ceil Sllver-
PA's third service to the,man: Vera Spah and daughter;
8o"th Amreican east coast re- Edward J. Srocrynski; Betty
?. t. aUMtm
m.lns unchanged in frequency.
This is provided by Constella-
tions flvin" thrie weekl" round-
tr'.os h'tween New York: Pan
Strable; and R. J. Straus and
daughter.
Mr. s;?d Mrs. Trendon R. Ves-
tal and 2 children; Fredrick J.
Juan. Pv"-to R'"": Cnracss. Ve-wainlo; Mr. and Mrs. George J.
nezuela ?"H Belem. Rio and Sao VValdron and 2 children; Mr. and
Paulo, Brazil.
S.. Panama To Leave
Isthmus Friday
The S.S. Panama Is scheduled
to leave the Isthmus Friday with Mrs. Michael Zombory.
Mrs. Edward H. Womble and
son; Mr. and Mrs. Earl W.
Wrenn and 2 children; Mr. and
Mrs. Milton H. Wright; Florence
N. Young; and Mr. and Mr. and
MAERSK LINE
Aoctpting Passenger for
NEW YORK
By
m.f. "HULDA MAERSK"


SAILING APRIL 11 th

(All rooms with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
t^f^TnAFS ATTAT TIQ U
----------- I II l iTaSTaWr-Tn1 I
rAS'l r'NMtiH'l KM SERVICE BETWEEN
CUHOfE AMD NORTH AND SOUTH PACIHC COASTS
IA Limited Number of Paasengar Berth!
ro hlROPE:
S.S. Avranches.................................. Anril
S.S. Port En Beasln....................................... May J
TO COLOMBIA, FCUADOR, PERU CHILE:
S.S. Rouen ......-,........................................ Apr|| ,
ro l'1-.NTKAl AMEKICA TEST COAST U.S.A.
MS Wyoming........................................... Aprll
PASSENGER SERVICE from NEW YORK w PLTMNWrn A LE HAVRE:
ii e.................................................. April U
He De France........................................... Xpril 28
PASSENGER SERVICE from CARTAGENA to NEW YORK:
DeGrlliBe.................................................. May 10
Crktahal: t BENCH LINE, P.O Ros MU Tal. S-M7S UU
Panam: LINDO T MADURO. 8 A Boj 1131
Tel. Panam* 3-1(83 S-1HI
BOOTS ANT HER RBDISt
How Come?
1 FDOAR MARTTf
SHIP-SHORE
RADIO-TELEPHONE
SERVICE
PANAMA "HPC 22" 2506 Kc.
LISTENS FOR SHIPS
ON 2110 KCS. or 2174 KCS.
1200 to 0400 C.M.T.
TROPICAL R\DIO Tel. CO.
^ryfeodyr^aJs 6assifeg
un unto ^'pa o MPv\.*Nwa
CAPTAIN EASY
Free to Ge
BY LESLIE TTJRNE1
>H -IS WKLEEN Planeteer
Plotters
BY RUSS WLNTERBOTUAAI
TIC FLINT

WEIL, LETS
GET t>0WN TO
TH" STAHOW
50MB.ALREP
CAN FILE,
charges!
Did It Get Rail?
BT MICHAEL OWALLBl
AS VIC PKBP*ZtA9 TO FOLLOW
KAIL, AN EXPLOtflOJ I* HCAirp ^
TME PtriVKVMAV.
OCR HOARnmO WOrSE . with
DRA.T -frlAT IHSLTIM6 BAUKER
MAJOR BOOPLE OUT OCR WAT
By J. R. fPHXlAMS
BROWrJ/ LAUGMlMS OFP A\V
TUCKA.WAV Tie AS IF IT
WERE A CHILD'S OJT6
AYlMO/'VMHY MOST
THE C(TAt>EL6 OF CASK
BE CAPTAINED BV
WORT-SlSHTEO
MINC0MP0OP5
M0-MUA\.'IT
THE Aae-OLD
BATTLE lETWEErl
SEMlSES VEARS
AHEAD OF TMeiR
TIME ANO TriOSt
PERCEMTAfiE
AAI6SRS/-*- T'Vb
A CCO rtoTON
LOOKS .
UKEA
DOUBLE-
BARRELED
WANS-,
OVERT
1 "tN'S.
^ATime/
g
Sheer
UP/ THEy
LAU6HED AT
^,.~,g08EgT PULTDM-




WEDNESDAY, APRIL . 1*58
THE FAN AM*. AMERICAN AN TNDEEEDENT OAILT NEWSPAPER
page rm
^/itlanlic J^ocietu

&.
195, C^alun "DJfkoH (*lm* 378
MRS. SBEISTA1TIS HONORED
WITH BON VOYAGE LUNCHEON
Mr. Hirry Green, ttn. Dudley Shine and Mrs. Jame
*carborou(h were co-hostesses lor a luncheon and handker-
chief shower flren at the ?hlne auarters at Fort Darts, M n-
dav in honor of Mra. Walter SkeiatalUs, who Is learins. s on
lor the Statei. ,
A black lace mautilU was presented the honor gue-t by
' the hostesses, and the handkerchiefs *-rc indlTidual jilts
from her other friends.
Other nuests were: Mrs. Oeo (must be made by Monday Anvil
Puole, Jr.. Mrs. Henry Hartwig.114. ""hMra. Stanley HJdd, 3-
Mrs. Albert Plcelrilll. Mrs. B. K.;1801. or Mrs. William Orady. J-
Oaan. Mrs Jane Sehults. Mrs. 11435.
James Jess. Mrs. A. E. Hill. Mt.| Members nay bring
Gsorere Kennedy and Mrs. Will- Price ol the luncheon Is $2.00.
lam Bennett-____ Maundy ThurTdTTserrloe
Dr and Mrs. Pease at Margarita
L,e for New Tork A Maundy Thursday service
D- and Mrs O. Norman Pease, i will be held by the Margarita
who have been vlsttlnfr their son Union Church In the gymnasium
and daugl-ter-ln-law. Lt. Cdr. .at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow,
and Mrs. John Pease of the Co-
ated by the Paris
Mrs. Peggy Stngl
the liquor given by the Chiefs'
B.H.S. Notes
ly Ann Morrill
Tills week your reporter Is i email and Beverly Rosan, and for
BSwjf
s Bazaar anci ending yon the n:>vl itralahtthe same offices In the County! JACOIY ON ftftlDQf
eton who won Horn Hk-nail; o Caribbean fiTrla'i of Balcrlst: Gay Bdwarda and -**W WV g"
State, where here at Fort Davis, Jeaneite McKeown.
tefm-lres were elver v *2 girl from Balboa and Cristo- We also chose such officials as
$! Bazikr "bc Ifore^nYl ba,8Hlgh Schools meeting for Watchers to catchJgeo,i r
the fourth annual session. persons who are wondering
Our facilities are excellent and 'around unnecessarily after
Eastern Bazaar, ABC Store and
Jhangimal.
The Easter colors, orchid and
yellow, were used In decorating
the club, A ecu 31 piece of chick-
By OSWALD JACOBr
Written for NBA Service
all the thanks goes to the Army
for their generosity. We have an
enormous building where wa
ens In a basket carried out the glee eat and nave our meetings.
motif on the buffet table.
Members In charge of the ar-
rangements and tlrkets were:
;Mrs. Violet Shank, Mrs. francos
p,
We have the swimming pool, post
exchange (to a limited extent 1
and the theater at our disposal
In the building we have ping-
pong tables, voting booths, and
guests i Sterner. Mrs. Dorothy Hlndle.i other handy Items to make our
Mrs. Carolyn Boyer. Mrs. Na- stay more enjoyable and lnter-
hours 1; Fire Chief (to" enforce
smoking rules'; Chief of Police
(to kcn> down traffic accidents
occuri.? when p jple fall down
when rui.iuiia hiound too fasti;
Chief of Sanitation (to check
cleanliness of roomsi and other,
officers who help work for the
welfare of the citizens of COS.
We have signs up around our
cities which state the speed lim-
it, keep people off the grass, des-
ignate bus stops, names of
streets, and such essential fac-
fow retnrtUn. to their home In buffet supper party at.their re- he Y.M.C.A.
Corona del Mar, Cal.
sldence in New Cristobal Sunday
Mrs. Carolyn Boyer. Mrs. na- stay more enjyame ana mier-
thal Hlckey. Mrs. Mary Prlen,Iesting. The aecond floor Is divid-
ers. Jean Johnston, Mrs. Mar- ed Into two cities, Chiquita Cor-
ion Brown. Mrs. Harriet Love-; ners and Tlpplcanoe which also
lace Mrs. Rose Pachance and represent two counties Vocanl- tors.
to and Balcrlst, respectively. In ,,._,.. (v,. .,., ,,. ., ,,,,
this manner, we get practice in Friday was the first day of this
city and county government. : eaalon. The girls arrived early
the officials for the cities were and began the day with an as-
chosen Saturday. They are: May-; embly where they were we com -
or of Tlpplcanoe, LoM Scheldegg ga by Dean Hackett. Director of
nnrt nitv Clerk. Nlra Reves. 1 Education, Mrs. Nelson Magner.
""The county oS. X were: nirector 0} Girls' State Mr. Pat-
hosen Sundiv on the ballot with' ? *yn. Frealdent of the Amer-
he state officials are: Judge and. 'c,an L,e*,on< Auxiliary and Anne
Mrs. Nina Cranford.
Music for the evening was fur-
nished by the Royal Sultans.
Guests of the club for the
evenlnc were the members of the
who
NORTH 14
44I
K Q 10 7
? 10963
*9J
WEST(DI EAST
Ki ?QJI0B7I
JM4 VA1
? KJ2 #>Q5
1071 AM
Pats
Double
At
vast
? A74
? KQJII
North-South vul.
Nortk last South
Pass 1 3 *
Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead*K
evening to honor Miss Ann The funds received will go t sherlfl for Volcanito: Helen Has- Jrr1":. 19*1 Governor of Carlb-
Haghorg of Fort Gullck. .he welfare and recreational bean Girls State,
f _____ fund of the organization.
Mr. and Mm. Gerharddt
R-'nrn to IMInols .,H,rri. R' 1 Palm '"The" next meeting of the Aux-
oi^&flH have rSSSd t&iSSMeeting utary will be held April 22 in the
?i Their home after Ivlslt wl'h Rpyal Palm Chapter No^ 3, Or- .club room on Pier 1.
the r dn,liter V-l son-in-law der-of the Eastern Star held its --------;
Mhre'ranMrS. William Grsdy of ^"^tbtOW*. jfew|Sh SerVICCITien
the DeLesseps Area.
Masonic Temple Monday even-
ir.
Following the business meeting
"Ceil: Tonight At Tivoli
ed by the officers, with Mrs.
ra Barbre and Mrs. HP. Bev-
inuton as soloists.
Atlantic Side Residents J
Afend R.o.T.f. "'* ,
Amont the Atlantl- Side rel-
dc.-its who attended the Sur>day
evenlna snpoer given bv the R X>.
".''^ "rt^ Ha,TrerW?na Char.tv Dane. Ver, Successful
rolleen Mr end Mrs riol "-j TheVharlty dance given Sat-
S:nca,traln,1dnd Mrs" J, ^?.v even.ng^by ^the Udles
Fahnestock. Mr. and Mrs.JQeo.
Guests At Seder
Light double* are an accepted
That afternoon, after th* girls; SC i0n,!11)ex,?flrt( brldge
unpacked and settled down, the'^"'l^lally In tourna-
lectures began. Dean Hackett.""* Few P'?*5 however.
gave several very interesting SSfct *i w*5 S!2 SL^
speeches. That evening Mr. David w"n th# West hftn<5 Bh0Wn t0-
Spler, history teacher at Balboa,a*Xrv. ,. .. .. I..
High School, was the guest' u wJ??n ,h* West h'nd was held
The greatest number of girls speaker. He talked on County:?v Edward N. Marcus, of New-
ln the history of Canal Zone are! Government. All the girls were1'0"- M"ssv lfV Jhe cent Life
presently enrolled In Girl Scout- ver pleased with hi* talk aftd M"ster palr C-hampionshlp, he
ig_ 894 girls as 0/ March 31. I derived a great deal of Informa-;e*.\"P "1th a double and earn-
Dlreetly related to thU new tlon from it. Afterwards theyfd t>P core. Two clubs was set
Record Number
Of Girls Scouts
Enrolled Here
Jewish military personnel and
their families will be guests of
the National Jewish Welfare
D Cokle. Mr. and Mrs. fl. F.
Hartz with Marilyn and Donnie.
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew B;eakley
ard Marie. Mr. and Mrs. Leo
C--'i with Yvonne incV.Wflvne.
Auxiliary of the Fleet Ree"r"v! "^ Tl'0'1 tonight at 6:30
Association at the Coco Solo P- m-
C.P.O. Club was very success- ^^ Natnan mik[n fl#w
i,_u, . rfm. ,i.. ,.! representative of the National
Sh ir the^winners Jwtoh Welfare Board and dl-
awarded. Among 'rector of the USO-JWB Armed
Ing 894 girls as of March 31.
Dlreetly related to this nt..
high figure is the recent forma- gave him tremendous applause, Pe trick, and East-west scored
tlon of several new troop* and especially the ones who have hlm/^.P^mts
the appointment by the Girl I for daises In BHS. "... y,had pIav,ed the nand at
me auunm jrwisn wriiic council of several new1 Saturday began the campaign- spJi**? ,t1nev could have made
Board at the annual Passover reaXs and neighborhood chair- Ing and primary voting for state eifhttricks against good defense.
Seder dinner to be held at the|ader4 ana neignoornooa cnau | offlcJals'p^^ went^p all over worth only 110 point*. In tour-
" Afta* thre* veara without Girt the buUdlna and you could hearinamertt P'ay fuch slight dlffer-
nrnnta at Pedrr! siSsruel two new:crto ot "Voto for me." That aft-ences are all Important
? 1 hi,, w Srt Tror,n'ernoon the primary election! Marcus opened the king of
.r0fP' .n*-L.H,.t. mil " *e run off, That evening En- spades, and was allowed to hold
a for intermediate Girl Scouts M)1r iormer clt mana(rer; he trick. He continued with his
and Troop 52 for Brownies., nf*Winter Park, Florida .spoke on''w spade, and South won with
Troop 50 for Intermediates nas tne clty mtnager type 0f govern- te ace. Declarer next led a heart
been organized at Margarita andment After this enlightening1 to dummy's king, and East quite
Rt Diablo troop 14 for Interme 1 spwcn the winners of the prim-i property played his deuce with-
diates has been activated. arles gave campaign speeches.'out hesitation. A club wa* re-
aVtisa Sheila McNamee/p'/d Brl
R.andMrs. T F>b*onwih
iTancv. Mr. and Mrs, Roheit
Hastings. Mrs. Mar!" K Fraer,
Mr. and Mrs. S. Alc?u;s. Mrs.;
M. I*mos, M-- Wf>re na and the Ml "es> Jackie Rush-
etter Carol Neuh*d Donna;
Jeanne Humphriv. I Pa t r i c I a
Leach. Donna oJvef. Dlstie De-
laney and Ardla'Wlfloughby.
Rainbow Food Sa^k
The O'der 0/ the Rainbow for
Girls will hold a, food sale Sat-
urday rtibpjinfe fijnm 9 to noon mi
the flrlt floor Of five CrKo'ml
Masonic Teif.ule. Miss Marthft
Graham is chairman.

Returned from Santa Clara
LWnd Mrs. Jttry.NteJfeti have;
returned fEom a weekend trip at
Snnta Claia. Thev were guests
at the Wltfiams Cottages.
Lt. Cdr. fand Mrs. V. A.
8clvweltier.spent the past week
at the Phjfllps Cottages at Son-
ta Clara. Thev returned Monday
to then- residence at Santa Cla-
ra.
Woman's Club to Hold
Annual Luncheon
The annuar luncheon of the
Cristobal Woman's Club will bi
held April 18 at 12:30 p.m. at the
Hotel Washington. Reservations
LUX
';-Cond'itloned
"I
uced I
hus- I
nffovi I
TODAYJONLYI
Joan Bennett
In a drama produced
by her Jealous hus-
band Walter Wanger
About an unfaith-
ful lover!
HOtSE ACROSS
THE BAY"
with;
George Raft,
j Walter Pldgeon
TROPICAL
OPENING
TOMORROW
MSHTftWf
STAG A
l
fROM <,
Starring
HOWARD
FREEMAN
*<
JstP,LE ta
r*ltal*aasrW,er,n"
"k-mv" is ar rsls vm
I UOMat MM ilDDB Ml t Rff
sw* wi !* aw i'( wain
teMbcnnrr Msaikiawou
1
OPENS TOMORROW!
"Masterful... A Compelling
Movie." i
LOOK Magaslne.
Its powerful
drama fires
the screw!
Its provocative,
never-before-
presented \
theme Inspires
l masterpiece!
Directed by .
ANATOLE
LITVAK
who gave the
world The
Sntke Pif
K>C Council 1371
Easter Egg Hunt
To Be Saturday
Tho Panama-Balboa
A new Brownie troop, No. 51. And so to bed.
has been organized at Fort Kob- Next day being Sunday, the
be under the leadership of Mrs. Catholics went to church at Fort
Earl D. Foster. | Davis Chapel and the Protestants
The Qlrl Scout Council also had servioes here in the building.
turned from dummy, and South'r
jack won.
Declarer led another heart
from his hand, West played low.
and South thought long and
ha* announced the appointment All during the morning and first j carefully. Finally, he guessed
of the new leaders on the J*th- part of the afternoon, campaign- rlghtjby finessing dummy* ten.
mu*.
All newhr recruited volunteers
will meet for an orientation class
Council nent week
ng wa* going on fast and furl-land East won with the ace.
ously. Around two o'clock, thei East now led a high spade, and
final voting was taken. South discarded a diamond.
The results were announced at Dummy's remaining trump bloc It-
"v.. wj. .j .), a special assembly. They were:,ed a spade continuation, so East
No. 1371, Knights of Columbus, Pacific Side 'f*aersana neign- g^n,^,, Betty Tsrr. FayeTucIc- led the queen of diamonds, and
will hold its annual Easter egg borhood chairmen will meet at er Mtry DHlort Blleen aiackley. *"
hunt for the children of mem- the Pedro Miguel Scout House on
Ibers and their guests at the Co- April 15 at 9 a.m.
lumbus Club. Balboa Road, on Atlantic Side volunteers will
Saturday at 1:30 p.m. Prizes wllllmeet at the New Cristobal Union
be awarded. Church on April 17 at 7 p.m.
It MovMtimt TONIGHTl
(Panama Canal
ni tu. '
eaten
Th Sir! Fir* Complete Vereleti of U>
Pamon Play
"PRINC! OF ACE"
BALBOA
strXeajMaael
" 'wr*r r,M" "ALIC1''lw wo""""*-*1""
South won with the ace.
Marilyn Bevlngton, Mary Jane South now led a heart, hoping
Sylvestre, Judy McCoy and Marg- to win with dummy's queen and
ie Walsh For Attorney General, get a discard on the fourth
Norlne Dlllman was elected. Kay fheart. East ruffed with the nine
Cross is our new Secretary of|of clubs, however, and led his
DIABLO HTS. John ,"LAf?Tpj|'^R,pJCAMMUDa"
*"* i Thaws "rAuar amp tmb pgvB.;
COCOL/
Ml a i:tt
GAMBOA
14*
Mickey HOONEY Judy OAKLAND
"WORDS AND MUSIC"
,tTnhnlc<.lor> ThunoUy Sttva CAHtPW"
MARGARITA
.IS lit*
_____t ......
CRIbWBAL
*lf- ,miHiMnM
l:|( A Til*
Robert MITCHUM a Jane RUSBBLI.
"HIS KIND OF WOMAN!"
Thareas, QLIVr. TWIST"
Robert NgWTOft Alec OUTNNHM1
"OLIVER TWIST"
Th*.y "EAima >AEAD
Lane TURNM Kilo PTNZA
"Mr. Imptrium (Technicolor)
Thnnday "APACHB DRt'MS"
remaining diamond.
Marcus was able to win the
trick with the jack of diamonds
and continued by leading the
king of diamonds. East could
have been a hero at this moment
by ruffing" with the ace of chins.
South would have been obliged
to follow with a small trump.
Now East could have led a spade,
and West's ten of clubs would
become established by the over-
'lll'IMON PffOBI DAWN
KM fllk'l
Ho b.
NEXT WEEK!
The Academy Award
Picture!
"AN AMERICAN IN
PARIS"
(In Technicolor 1
Best of the year!
8 Osear* It Took!
The talk
of the town!
Marvelous!
Fantastic!
it the general opinion
About the
CARNIVAL
ON ICE
TONIGHT and EVERY NIGHT
AT THE
OLYMPIC STADIUM
at 8:30 p.m.
60 STARS! 21 HOURS OF ENTERTAINMENT!
IN THE SUPER PRODUCTION
HOLIDAY ON ICE
PRICES:
GENERAL ENTRANCE.................%IM
PREFERRED SEATS.................. 2M
RINK .............................. J.M
Tickets for aale at MAURlCIO'a Store, *47 Central
Ave. and at the Stadium' Ticket Box from 6 p.m. on.
State, and Arllne Schmidt Is the
Lieut. Oovemor. Por the highest
position and that of moet impor-
tance, Joyce Collinge wa* elect-
ed Governor of 1952. A terrific
set of. offjeers for the cities,
countiei and Stats werl <*o*m
Already they have proved thelr
capablllMe*.
Sunday night was the Inaugu-
ration of the governor. The audi-
torium was filled with parents, _.
friends and boy friends. The in- ruir position,
augura tlon was headed bv the Actually, East failed to ruff
1961 governor, Anne Morrill. with the ace of clubs, and South
After the invocation by M*y- WM Set. only one trick. The one-
del Oarnener and the pledge pr trick set was, nevertheless, good
allegiance by Nancy Karlger, theIOr a cold too-*core.
governor welcomed the guests
and thanked all the organisa-
tion and people who have made
Girls' State possible by their time1
and money. Then she gave her
farewell address-.
Next Nellie Holgerson sang
"The Bells of Saint Mary," after
which Nancv Ramsey. Judge of
1952 COS. rose to receive the
state officers elect. 8ergeant-at-
Arms tdna Hart announced the!
arrival of the officers and issued
them forward. Nancy gave them!
the oth of office.
As soon as the 1962 governor 1
had received her oath, Nancy
stepped aside and the old gov-,
ernor presented the new govern.'
or with her oermansnt gaVel and
congratulations. Joyce Collinge
In her capacity as the new gov-I
ernor. gave her welcome address,
which was excellent.
Next came the guest speaker,
Jacquie Bovle, who spoke on
Girl' Nation in Washington, D C.
which she and your correspond-,
ent attended last summer as rep.
,ratentatlves from Caribbean:
Orla' State. The 1952 governor
closed the lnauguralton with the
citlaen* singing the Girls' State
Bong. The governor's reception
i followed. .
Then an unsuspected surprise
1 was in store for the visitors and
cltlaens alike, A fiancee of one of
th Junior counselors, having an
excellent voice, wa* aaked to
sing. When he finished his song
and an encore. Nancy Bateman,
one of the citiaens, was also ask-
ed to sing, Since Nancy can ypd-
el. abe also sang two hill-billy
songs. Then, because no one 1
wanted to end the marvelous en-;
tertalnment. John Forbes wa*;l
asked to Imitate Johnny Bay
slnglna "The Little White Cloud
That Cried."
Being that Imitations were m
order. Ruty Stapler was asked
to imitate Oroucho Marx. This
hilarious act led to more and
more. Finally the how broke up.
but not without a great deal of
disappointment for all the 0*0-
ple who were yelling for more.
Now that the officers are chos-
en, the girls will get practice in
running a government. They will
do lt all themselves, with occa-
sional assistance from the coun-
selors.
Today we went to witness a real
court session at the court In Cris- >
tobal. Thia wa* a real experience
for the girl* who have never seen
a trial.
OlrU' SUte will break up to-
morrow, but not without a few
tear* Iron us all. We have had a
marvelou* time, and ther is:
more ahead of us yet to come. All
in all. it Is an experience that we
will never forget. It will live with
all of us. ,
So long until next week.
auoutdovu
fttWHALAOTTOOPUCT
CLUB
$1.50
Weekly
25 or 60 cycles
?
you should have j
thi$V-Mtri-o-matic955l|
your home entertainment picture just isn't |
complete, without facilities for playing \
7-our favorite recorded music sod the tri-o
made 955 fit* the picture perfectly I Equipped
with s six-foot plug-in cord snd s four-foot
phono-cord, the tri-o-mstic 955 plays through
ike amplifying system of sny T-V an or rsdkk.'
Completely automatic for all records all tuce,'
sil (peed* sod shuts off automati-
cally after last record has played I
7110
Bolivar
RADIO CENTER
Tel.
40
CENTRAL
"LUCKY WEDNESDAY"
Ar trip to CottH Rica vl Tc A Chanel Perfume e *"
automatic watch suarantM* by "Tahiti" # Raffle Ticket of
the "Chalet da ParlodlaUa" # A week-end In Tabofa at
Reatlnsa A Lottery Ticket And Th* Relea Picture ..
"THREE STEPS NORTH"
LUX Theofrt
* i i
H* ruled ovar an
empire of crlmel
... But aba ruled
ovtr hi* JitWfH
GEOROE RAFT, In
'THE HOUSE ACROSS
THE BAY"
with IOAN BENNETT
Walter Pldieen Lloyd Nolaa
BELLA VISTA
LATIN* DAY!
MS 4!H > l:M S:4S pa.
Witirr drama... 1
LOPBS
LAGAR

SABINA
OLMOS
- In .

"TIERRA DE FUEGO'
- CECILIA THATHE
The grMteit war drama* of all time
"TBE DESERT EOX"
with JAMC8 MASON
- Alio:
"WESTERN UNION"
with Randolph Vot^^Robert Y.,
iiph
TROPICAL THEATRE
Enrol ELYNN -. Vivera UNOFOR8. in
"ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN"
' IN TECHNICOLOR!
ENCANTO THEATRE
Boris aKrloff, in
"STRANGE DOOR"

Tom Ewell. In
"FINDERS KEEPERS"
TIVOLI THEATRE
Bank $100.00 Bank"
At 5-9 p.m. Al*o:
"GCNGA DIN"
________"CHINA SKY"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Michael Rennie, in
THE DAY THE EARTH
STOOD STILL"
Also: -
NO HIGHWAY IN
______ THE SKY" _
WCTOftM THEATRE
Joan Crawford, in
"FLAMINGO ROAD"
- Also: -
"COLORADO TERRITORY"
Sao the big
And
Ask for a Demonstration
with
Fordomatic or Overdrive
AT
COLPAN MOTORS, INC
Your Friendly FORD Dealer
On Automobile Row
Tels. 2-1033 2-103*


m<;e six
fllF PxNAMA MFRICAft AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, INS
You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
C eave your Ad'with one of our Agents or onr Offices iu No. 57 "H" Street Panama
No. 12,179 Central Ave. Colon
Lewis Service
#4 Tlvoll Ave.Phone 2-2281. and
Morrison's
Fourth o July Ave.Phone 2-9441
Saln de Belleza Americano
#66 West 12th Street
Car It on Drag Store
10.060 Melndez Ave.Phone 25S Coln
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones Propaganda, S.A.
#8 Lottery Plaza Phone 2-3199 "H" Street comer Estudiante St.
2-2214
Phones 2-
and 2-2798
Minimum for 12 words.
. 3c. each additional word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobile
Service Personnel and Civilian
Government Employ
be safe
for your Automobile Financing
biiis an
Government Employes Finance Co.
o*
Fort Worth. Texas
new office at
Na. 43 Automobile Raw
Next door to the Firestone Building
also through your auto dealer
We save you money' on
Financing and Insurcnce
also direct loans on automobile.
AOINCY OIHLINGER
FOR SALE:Ona <1) Phllco rodio *** ,"4?14 ____________*'****
with record ployer, records, and FO R5ALE:1949 Mercury Conver-
record stond. One I 1 ) Norge i tibie, excellent condition, over-
eo, ft. refrigerator porcelain insice drive, rodio, etc., table radio. Cu-
and outside. Can be seen at Quart- ruYidu 83-6179, evenings.
ers 544-B. Seaforthie Avenue, Co- ,
coli. C. Z.
FOR SALE:I refrigerator. 1 chif-
fonier. 2 dressers, 4 bed-side stands,
I sideboard, I oir compressor, 1
livingrcom bamboo set. House
0767-F Williamson Place. 3:30 and
6 p.m. _________
FOR SALE:Child bed. Mahogany
twin beds beauty rest "mattress.
Clinical Microscope, portable type-
writer, leaving, opjrtment avail-
able. 807 1. 8th Street New Cristo-
bal. Cr. Homm.
MISCELLANEOUS
Wrift
Bm 2011 Ammm
M-Ma*
Aaiaraaeea
. c. r.
FOR SALE:Two-piece upholstered
livingroom suite, $50.00. Quart-
ers 427-B, Ft. Clayton 87-5209.
TRAVEL OPPORTUNITY:-----En|oy
your vocation In eool Cotto Rico.
Fly LACSA, PAA filllete. only
$35.00 round trip. Inquire Pan-
orna Dispatch, Tel. 2-1655. across
from Ancon bus-stop.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
RESORTS
Oceomtoa cottegea. Sonto
Clara. Box 435 Balboa Phorw
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
SPEND EASTER SUNDAY
at
CASINO SANTA CLARA
with
Aicarrago & Hit Orchestra
Make your'reaervotions early.
FOR SALE:Twin englander inner-
spring mattresses, coilspringss on
rolling metal frames. 150 0"- .
ven piece ratten set, $150.00;
Maple chest, i ...... .
Golf Clubs Forgan made In Scot-
land. 3 woods, 9 irons, bag,
$125.00; Voltage regu I a t o r.
$10.00. Panama 3-2351, after
7 p.m. ,
or buy your next automobile
see: Agencies Cosmos, Auto-Row
No. 29. Tel. Panama 2-4721.
Open all day on Saturdays.
FOR SALE:Six piece bamboo set,
two strand with innerspring cush-
ion. Phone 2-2857.
FOR SALE:Bomboo House Bar; 2(
tobies, 2 night tables; one dresser;
one chiffonier. House No. 0429, \
Apt. A. Frangipani St.. Ancon.
WANTED
Miscellaneous'
WANTEDFurnished apartment 2-3
bedrooms for military personnel.'
Contact Sgt. Young, Albrool: A.F.B.
5155.
FOR SALE:Jeep Willys, perfect
condition; Chevrolet Sedan 48, ex-
cellent condition; International
Pick-up Vi ton.; Chevrolet Pick-
up ft ton.; Panel Ford 47. WE
BUY YOUR CAR CASH. Easy terms
AVAILABLE. TRADE INS AC-
CEPTED. Peru Ave. No. 8. i Te
2-4516. EISENMAN'S USED
CARS. NexJ to Theater Iris.
FOR SALE: 1950 Pontioc"Catalina
Super DeLuxe. eight cylinders,
completely equipped with all ac-
cessories, undercooted. Quarters
124-B Ft. Kobbe. Phone 84-2134.
FOR SALE: 19491oidsmobie~98
Convertible, rocket ngine, rodio,
Conal Zone car, excellent condi-
tion, one month gudVintee. Con
be financed. Call Panomo 3-2986
noon hours.
FOR SALE:Ptono upright grand,
gas, stove, 4-burner, Singer sewing
machine, boby crib. Phone 916,
Colon.
----------------- i, i
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
W. lbo.000 Nee* M
Presents
Visit Santa Clara, Rio Mar. and other
beach resorts, with our Mercedes-
Beni elr conditioned buses, Safest
and most luxurious. We pick up
passengers anywhere.. For reaervo-
tions and additional Informotlon,
call Ponomo 2-4859.
We have even'thinjt
to keep vonr Lawn
and Garden beautiful
' dnrinjt the dry season.
1 CASINO SANTA CLARA
DANCE.
Music by Casino Aces. Make your re-
servations early. Soturday, April
. 5th,and 12th.
fools
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow
insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. IVOVEY, BVC
Vtt Central Ave. Tel. 2-9148
Visit HOTIL PAN-AMERICANO
COOL.BEAUTIFUL, 1 Voile.
in
FOR RENT
Houses
WANTEDIndian 45 primary chain
ond cover complete. Tel. 4-567.
House 171 -B. Pedro Miguel.
American couples no children needs
small furnished aportment. Will
accept vacation quarters. Call Ho-
tel Panama room 203 or leave
maisoge with hotel Operator.
Help Wanted
WANTED:Moid for general house-
work with good references. No. 7
Ave. Peru upstairs, Mrs. Petra
Hoquee.
FOR SALE:-Beautiful blue 1951*
Ferd Victoria. May be seen at
goreges across from Balboa YMCA
4 to 6 p.m. daily. Benson.
FOR SALE:1950 Buick Sedonette.
excellent condition, radio, plastic
teot covers. Coll Bfclboo 2-2300.
FOR SALE-_l?5rTc7ulse7stuxleba*aV
Lend Cruiser, excellent buy. Call
Balboa 3425.
FOR SALE
Boat* & Motor*
FOR SALE:1950 Mercury Conver-
tible, excellent condition, 15,000
miles, mony extras. Bfcst offer. Cell
82-3137 before 4 p.m.
LOST & FOUND
LOST:Hunting dog white, block
and .ehocolote color, Sunday, March
31 ot Cascados, Canil Zone.
Reward. Telephone 2-4783 or
2-2872.
WANTED:Boat for outboard mo
tor. Lightweight yet sturdy enough1
3^Wtt^l% Will Build
Cap!. W. E. Weigle, 2 Destroyers, Said
Canal 'Oldlimer/
Dies In Washington
Capt. William E. Weigle, an
"Oldtlmer" on the Canal, died
March 30 at his home In Wash-
ington, D. C, according to word
received here today. He was 82
years old. _______
The captain was well known
both In the Canal Zone and In
the Republic. He came to the
Isthmus In 1905 and was em-
ployed by the Department of
Sanitation for several years.
Later, he resigned and started
construction business In the
republic, which he operated for
many years.
He was also associated with
Judge Palrmani n the prosecu-
tion of the long drawn out
"Playa de Flor" case.
Capt. Weigle was a 8panlsh-
Amerlcan War veteran of the
Philippines Campaign. He was a
member of the Veterans of For-
eign Wars and the Masons.
He is survived by his wife,
Vera; three sons, William E.
Weigle. Jr., of Margarita; George
.Weigle and Richard O.
Weigle of Washington, D. C;
and a daughter, Mrs. Elaine D.
Allen of Washington, D. C.
Today, Wednesday, April t '
3:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Panamuslca Story
Tim
4:15Promnade Concert
4:30 What1 Your Favorite
5:30News
6:35 What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cla.
Alfaro. S.A.
6:15Evensong Salon
7:00Rays A. Laugh (BBC)
7:30Sports "Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00News and Commentary
(VOA)
8:15The Jo.Stafford Show
(VOA)
8:30Time For Business (VA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
8:00Musical Americana
(VOA).
8:30Pride and Prejudice
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Variety Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest.,
MidnightSign Oft.
Thursday, April 10 '
8:00Sign On
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7: SO--Morning Salon
8:15 News (VOA.)
8:30Morning Varieties .
8:45Music Makers
8:00News
8:15Come AndOet It
8:30Fads and Fashion's
10:00News
10:05As I See It
10:30Off the Record
UrOONews
ll:05^-Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
FJtt.
12:30Popular Muslo
1:00-News.
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA>
2:15It's Time to Dance
2:30Afternoon Meldica
2:45Notes on Jan
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15French in the Air (VOA)
4:80gnat's Your.Favorite
5:30News
FOR RENT;-rChalet with modern
conveniences In Lo Crestq No. 11
Jose Gabriel Duque Street. Tel.
2-1456, Panoma. .
FOR RENT
Apartments
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1715
#22 E. 29th St
AlHAMBKA APARTMENTS
Modem -furnished unfurnished opart-
merits. Maid service optional. Con-
?pct office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobal, telephone >386 Colon.
FOR RENT:Furnished apartment
available to Americon military.
Phone 3-2051. \
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
SeUtBf: florestal Pradoets
Fuetra jr Un (preferred)
Panama Insurance Co.
Buyii: Aceite Urraca ana1 Brewery.
' Tef. 3-4719 8-1660
FOR RENTScreen furnished oport-
ment. Quiet couple prefered.
7035. 4th. St. Clntrol-Melendei,
Colon.
FOR RENT
Room
tycf
1
THE WHOLI
WORLD 0VEI
Largest In World
ROME, April 8 (UP) Italy
plans to build two destroyers
the first since World War II
which appear to be the largest
ever built in the world, according
to Italian naval sources.
The two destroyers, the "San
Marco" and the "Ban Giorgio,"
will displace 3,600 tons and have
a weight of 5,200 tons when fully
loaded. They will have an overall
length of 450 feet, width of 45
feet and will be capable of speeds
upwards of 30 knots.
The United States is building
four destroyer leaders which
have a standard displacement of
3,874 tons, but will only carry
fully loaded a weight of 4,400
tons.
The Royal Navy recently com-
missioned the "Daring," Britain's
heaviest destroyer, which dis-
places 2,610 tons standard and
approximately 3,500 fully loaded.
Two other Italian destroyers
with 2,700-ton displacement
standard and 3,500 tons fully
loaded will be started this year.
They are the "Impvido" and
"Impuso,' 400 feet long and 58
feet wide.
Details of specifications for
the four ships were published in
"Corrlore Militare," official or-
gan of the Italian armed forces.
Sources said the heavy destroy-
ers may have originated with
plans from Mussolini's regime,
which called for "light cruisers"
of 3,100 or 3,400 tons built for
speed and with enough arma-
ment to engage heavier ships in! BBCBritish Broadcasting Corp
FOR RENT:Cool furnished -room
Apt. A. Estudionte St. No. 105.
Entrance next to Ancon Bakery.
Memorial Service
For Navy Employe
At Amador Tomorrow
Memorial services for the late
>hn Louis Mater; Navy em-
ploye who died at 8ummit Radio
Station, March 31 wijl be held
at the Chapel, 15th Naval District
Headquarters Reservation at
4:30 tomorrow afternoon.
The body will be returned to
the United States for burial.
THEY WERE HOT ONCE
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (UP.)
Cmdr. James C.McCoy one of the
oldest active Navy fliers has a
picture of the old Curtiss "Jen-
ny" which he occasionally shows
Jet pilots at the naval air sta-
tion hire. On the picture' is a
note: "Yeah! We know it's old,
hut we were considered hot in
our day, too."
MODERN FURNITURE
custom nun,!
Slipcover Rennholstery
VTSn Otm 8HOW-ROOMI
t .P. dt I* Osaa 77 (Aataoau Bow
Pna Cftbnate Ptekaa DeNrery
TeL -4SI I* ut k IM bjb.
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St & Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln TeL 457
Transport Baxter, S.A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
We) pack and orate or move
anything. 'Phono 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
HX
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
OPEN on Easter Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
We deal in both New and
Reconditioned Furniture.
41 Automobile Row
Tel. 3-4811
Floods Pour Down Missouri,
Mississippi, Red Rivers
SOUTH SIOUX CTY, Neb
6:35What's Yonr Fawor'lt Ap " **>oa waters
^Contdi rBTOrlte|pqured down the Missouri, Mls-
.u. TLjT,___..__.. _.. laissinni anrf bh Rtvsrs inH,v
8:00Linda's First Love Cla
- Alfaro, .8.A.
6:1ftEvening Salon
7; 00Over to You (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Hera Come Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary
(VOA)
8:18Jam Session (VOA)
8:30The American Bookshelf
(VOA)
8:45-rCommentator's Digest
(VOA) .
8:00Shanties and Forebltten
(BBC)
9:30The Haunting Hour
8:46Sports and News iVOA)
10:00BBC Playhouse
'11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
VOA
Exptanatlo of Symbol
Voice of America
a sea fight.
TACAROPULOS
DVD1STRIES,S.A.
Phones:
1002 1003

RDFRadlodlffusion Francalse
#4041 r-co
coln
a FRESH
Soya ave
R P
MILK
a FREPH BUTTER
i RICH ICE CREAM
Kverrtbin
faaapeetd b the
Health Drnartment
HOME DELIVERY
Dr. E. A. PEREZ
Veterinary Sargeon
Graduated from Kansas. Cornell
and Ohio State University.
Day anal Night Service,
42 Via Belisario Porras '
Phone: 3-2113
slsslppi, and. Bed Rivers today,
threatening to smash upper
Midwestern levees and drive
thousands ol persons from
their homes.
Residents of the Missouri
valley faced their worst flood
threat in 70 years.
The Missouri raced past this
city laden with telephone poles,
chicken coops and other debris
and officials warned 125 fami-
lies In a 14-block area that the
levee would not-hold.
The Red-River of the north,
which flows northward to Hud-
son's Bay, meaaced a hundred
homes at Moorhaad, Minn., and
threatened to overflow into
Brecklnrldge, Minn., and Wah-
peton and Fargo, N. D. .
The Mississippi River also-]
was rising and forecasters said
it would top flood stage at
Altzkln, Minn.
The Minnesota River threat-
ened the towns of Montevideo
and Mankato in the southern
section of the state.
The Missouri rose so fast at
Union, N. D-, that farmer Olen
Woods awoke just in time to
fish his shoes out of the water
in his bedroom and escape front
his house.
Farm hand Arthur Zumbaum,
50, was trapped in his home
near Bismarck for 44 hours be-
fore he smashed a hole through
the roof, climbed out. and was
rescued by a helicopter.
One man was killed and two
other persons were injured at
Washburn, N. D when a Boo
Une track washed out Just as a
passenger train passed over It.
plunging the locomotive down a
' -loot embankment.
The Missouri threatened
knock out power plants at
Pierre, 8. D., and at Ft. Pierre,
across the river. Workmen race,d
to bolster protecting levees.
About 1,400 persons forced
from their homes at Sioux Falls,
S. D., delayed returning because
new crests were building up on
the Sioux River to the north.
Riverside homes along the
Missouri were being sandbagged
at Yankton, S D., as the river
rose within four inches of
spilling into town.
South Sioux City engineer
James Cashman warned resi-
dents that a seeondary three-
foot emergency levee was need-
ed to protect $750,000 worth of
property because present levees
couldn't hold back the expected
crest.
The weather bureau said the
Missouri was so loaded with top-
soil that the flood was running
about half water and half
mud."
Below freesing weather gave
Montana residents a brief re-
spite from floods on the Mis-
souri's upper tributaries.
The cold slowed the runoff
along the Milk River and city
engineer R. C. Fargo of Glas-
cow, Mont aid: "We're now
winning the fight against the
flood."
Eisenhoiver, Lodge Won't Say
What Gives With Resignation
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
2-Cent Postears Blamed
ST. LOUIS. (UP) The St.
Louis County Water Co., a public i
utility seeking a rate increase.!
cited an operational Increase off
$3.6-13.38 in its application. It I
blame the two-cent postcard on
which it malls its bills to cus-1
to tomers.
PARIS Abril 9 (UP). gen.
Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., left for
home last night" very encour-
aged'' by his talks with Gen.
Dwlght D. Elsenhower, but with-
out answering the $84 question
has the general already re-
signed to go home and cam-
paign?
Both Eisenhower and Lodge,
his campaign manager, kept
mum on a Washington report
that the supreme commander's
iequest for relief from duty
would be in the office of \De-
fense Secretary Robert A. Lovett
today.
Lodge told a newsman that "I
am not at liberty to divulge"
whatever he might know about
Eisenhower's plans for his re-
signation or to make speeches
later in the United States.
Just beiore boarding the plane
for New York to take personal
command of the Eisenhower
campaign In the New York Jer-
sey primary April 15, Lodge
said:
"I leave here feeling very en-
couraged. I feel I have been
talking to the next President of
the United States the man
who will bring a Just and en-
during peace to all mankind."
He added that his trip to Pa-
ris had been "very successful"
rrom every standpoint
Lodge talked for nearly an
hour yesterday afternoon with
Eisenhower at SHAPE head-
quarters.
But he steadfastly refused to
w.(5,ki.'!0Wn or "PPOrt the
Washington report that the
general had taken the plunge
on his resignation,
thl?.*"' w0W "ytMng about
L*.,rep ,S ** nothe" he said he
couwnt disclose whatever he
might know about It.
Elsenhower himseir, after i
round of conferences and an
almost unprecedented two hours
H.T?me at SHAPE' a^ de-
clined to comment on the re-
port.
wA.h,*h ranking aide said
nmi 8ton WOuW handle any
Possible announcement of the
Sanrt|HAPEe8lgnatl0n- "*'
.n!raTdubted the
general would issue any state-
Senl here8UPP,ement*fy "
Red Cross Plays Active Role
In Aiding Prisoners Of War
The American Red Cross has
a long tradition of acting as an
auxiliary to the government in
the matters of prisoner of war
assistance.
Services in World.War II in-
cluded preparation of food par-
cels and Invalid parcels, pre-
paration and Shipment of med-
ical kits and capture parcels.
The American Red Cross act-
ed as the agent at the request
of the military in the Shipment
of bulk clothing and other sup-
plies for our military services In
sending these relief supplies to
prisoner of war camps.
There also were miscellaneous
services such as provision of
eyeglasses, dentures, etc. A
monthly newsletter was prepar-
ed with the cooperation of vari-
ous organizations, printed hi
the U. 8. and sent through
Geneva for mailing to POW
camps.
There were assistance pro-
grams in the U. 8. including the
publication of a POW bulletin
for the next of kin and the
operation of a speakers bureau
to provide information to the
interested families.
By the Geneva Conventions,
signed by 71 countries, the care
of the prisoners of war is the
responsibility of the detaining
power. While by these conven-
tions the prisoner has the right
to communicate with his family
and to receive relief supplies
from his own country, this Is
done usually through the Inter-
national Committee of the Red
Cross, the neutral intermediary
specifically mentioned in the
Conventions and the Organisa-
tion which has devoted many
years to this humanitarian task.
The United Nations Command
has accepted the International
Committee in South Korea, ac-
cepted Its representatives, per-
mitted inspections of camps,
and provided official lists of
prisoners names. On the other
hand, only two official lists of
American POWs were submitted
by the Communist authorities
to the International Committee
with a total of 110 .names. Other
names appeared on propaganda
broadcasts and In a list ex-
changed by the negotiators at
the truce talks.
Unfortunately, the Interna
tional Committee has been un-
able as of today to perform its
normal and traditional services
on behalf of POWs in North Ko-
rea. The efforts of the Inter-
national Committee have been
many and continuous.
Their services were offered to
both sides In the first hours of
the conflict and accepted by the
Government of Korea and the
United Nations Command. Ap-
Kals were dispatched to non-
Uigerants such as the USSR
in the hope of obtaining as-
sistance in entry of delegates of
the International Committee
into Korea.
Headed by president Ruegger,
delegates of the Committee went
to Peking. Contact was made
with the North Korean authori-
iest in Panmunjom. All these ef-
forts, however, failed to result
in permission for the Interna-
tional Committee to operate In
North Korea.
From the first moment of
conflict in Korea, the American
Red Cross has made efforts to
have available emergency relief
supplies in the Far East to sup-
plement food being given our
men held by the enemy and to
protect their health. As early as
the fall of 1950 standard Red
Cross food parcels were sent to
the Far East and the Interna-
tional Committee of the Red
COrss notified of their availabil-
ity.
With the development of the
truce talks In Panmunjom, one
of the principal Items on the
agenda was prisoners of war. At
the request of the United Na-
tions Command, Galle Galub,
Assistant Director, Foreign
Operations, was sent to the Far
East to consult with United Na-
tions and Red Cross officials on
the possible role of the Red
Cross. The present development
is the latest step in the progrses
bf these long efforts.
French Tipped Alger Hiss
As Soviet Spy 13 Years Ago
REVERSE GEAR-Carjm Dale
Karmazin, 22 months old, was a
little confused as to proper use
for this indispensable bit of
equipment, and everyone
thought it a fine Juke. That is,
everyone but the firemen who
bad to turn plumber's helper
and rescue her.
--------k___________ ll' '
eensej Speeded Up
WALTHAM, Mass. (UP) The
Raytheon Manufacturing Co,
has thrown a hlgh-frequenc*
"shake" into the salvage of es-
sential metals for defense. A new
ultrasonic vibrator hakes vital
metals free of insulating mate-
rial, doing the work of 10 people
under former methods ki less
time.
WASHINGTON, April 8 (UP)
William O. BuUlt. former U.S.
ambassador to Russia, testified
yesterday that Premier Edouard
Daladler of France warned him
in 1838 that Alger and Donald
Hiss were Soviet agents In the
State Department.
Bullltt told the Senate Inter-
nal Security committee that he
laughed and told Daladier that
Hiss wasn't even a nameit was
a noise made by a snake."
Bullltt added that he never
heard anything against Donald
Hiss, now a Washington attorney,
beyond this original charge.
But he said he learned in 1840
that Alger Hiss was employed in
He said he laughed at the re-
port at the tune but changed his
view in February or March, 1840.
At that time. Bullltt said, he
was talking with Dr. Stanley
Hornbeck, chief of the State De-
partment's division of Far East-
ern affairs, when a young man
entered who was identified as
Dr. Hornbeck's chief assistant
Alger Hiss.
Bullltt said he then repeated
what the French premier had
told him and advised an imme-
diate investigation of Alger Hiss.
The committee is investigating
Lattlmore and the Institute of
Pacific Relations, in which he
was a trustee, to see whether
IPR exerted subversive influence
the State Dept. and urged an,on the formation of U.S. policy
Immediate investigation. Alger in the Far East.
Hiss now is serving a five-year
sentence for lying about Com-
munist activities.
r
The former ambassador also
charged that Far Eastern expert
Owen Lattlmore of Johns Hop-
kins University is a "charlatan"
and "a man interested in promo-
ting conquest of the Far East by
the Soviet Union."
Bullltt who served as this na-
tion's first envoy to the Soviet
Union from 1833 to 1837, said Da-
ladler told him In the autumn of
1838 that French Intelligence re-
ported there were two Soviet a-
gents in the U.S. State Depart-
ment two brothers named
Hiss.
During his testimony, Bullltt
charged twice that Lattlmore
was either a phony expert or was
promoting Soviet Interests in
Asia.
On Jan. 16, 1848, Bullltt said,
he debated with Lattlmore on a
radio program in which LattU
more said Chinese Communists
in Mongolia were armed chiefly
with American equipment sur-
rendered by war-weary National-
ist troops.
Bullltt said that anyone who
read the New York Times knew
there were no Chinese Reds hv
Mongolia on V-J Day, but that
Russia brought in 250,000 of them
and armed them with surrender-
ed Japanese equipment.
1952
1952
lluMighCompressionII ft
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WEDNESDAY. APR?T. 9, 1958
THE UN AM A AMERICAN A! INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
PAGE StTRW
Sad Sam Jones' Arm Soreness Sours Tribe On Winter Ball
Indians Send Promising
Rookie To Daytona Beach
(Reprinted from The Sporting
News.)

By HAL LEBOVITZ
EN ROUTE WITH INDIAN8.
The mysterious pain In Sam
(Toothpick) Jones' right arm has
created a note ot mystery con-
cerning the composition o the
Indians' Little Five.
The Little Five is the name the
pitching staff has given those of
its members not In the Big Four.
The Big Four, of course, includes
Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Early
Wynn and Mike Garcia.
After the regular season gets
under full sway the Indians are
expected to carry nine pitchers.
Hence the question: Who will
make the Little Five?
Jones was expected to be a
cinch. Many experts considered
him the best pitcher in the min-
ors last year. Both Hank Green-
berg, the Redskins' general man-
ager, and Al Lpez, the manager,
had boosted Jones all winter.
Then the pitcher came to camp
with a sore arm. Although Jones
maintains silence on the subject,
the general belief is that the
soreness resulted from overwork
last year, when he pitched a to-
tal of 435 innings. After pitching
for San Diego and one game for
the Tribe, he finished up at Sah
Juan of the Puerto Rican Winter
League.
Sent to Daytona Beach
In an effort to cure Jones, Lo-
pez sent him to Daytona Beach,
where the Tribe's minor league
cerno is located.
"No use having him travel with
us," explained the ihanager.
"We'll run into cold weather on
our way north and It might ag-
gravate his arm iriore. In Day-
tona he can get some sun, keep in
condition by running and when
he feels like It, he can start to
throw."
While with the Indians he tried
to thrw a few times, but with a
sldearm and underhand motion.
His speed was missing complete-
ly.
The Jones experience undoubt-
edly will prevent other promis-
ing rookleti%lbe pitchers from
bordea in'fh? f ut JtreiT^e "Tribe
brass will refuse permission.
Should Jones' arm respond
Eroperly to the Florida climate
e will rejoin the varsity as one
of the firttle Five. If not thereTl
be a scramble to replace him.
Certain members of the Little
Five are Lou Brissie. Steve Gro-
mek, and Bob Chakales. Dick Ro-
zek is expected to be another,
since his options are used up and
waivers appear to be unobtain-
able on the southpaw. Fighting
for the opening createdat least
temporarilyby Jones' absence
are Oeorge Zuverlnk and Bob
Kerrigan. lit
At the moment it's an even
battle. M ,
Bill Abernathie, a rookie hurl-
er still with the Indians, has
shone brilliantly in all his ap-
Searances, but the belief Is that
ell benefit by a season at In-
dianapolis.
Most of .the club's opening day
positions are set. But there re-
mains a doubt at two outfield
spots. Lpez has set up a rotation
olan for the remaining exhibi-
tion games In his attempt to
solve the problem. Bob Kennedy
and Harry Simpson take turns
in right field as the Tribe heads
home against the New York
Q?n fft field Jim Frldley and
Dale Mitchell alternate. The
rookie Frldley has so Impressed
Lpez that the manager declares
"If he keeps stinging the ball
he'll be in the starting lineup
somewhere."
Lpez also has been impressed
by Simpson.
"He's Judging the pitches bet-
ter," said the manager. "He Ian t
being fooled by bad balls."
Tribe Tidbits: The Giants-In-
dians exhibition tour has been so
thrilling that Alvln Dark, the
captain of the National League
champs, said, "It's a pleasure to
play nine innings every day, even
though the games are exhibi-
tions.". .Charley Berry called
the Tribe's 8 to 5 victory over the
Giants In Los Angeles, Sunday,
March 30, "one of the greatest
games I ever worked In. It had
every thing."... The game was so
well-played some Pacific Coast
League observers commented,
"Nobody will want to see our
league play after watching games
like this.".. The tour Is packing
'em In... Bobby Avila continues
to demonstrate he has lost none
of his ability in kicking the ball
out of the hands of would-be
taggers. He astounded Blackie
Dark when the Giants' shortstop
attempted to tag him out trying
to flteal second. The umpire call-
ed Bobby out, then reversed him-
self when the ball suddenly flew
into center field. "A great slide,"
was Dark's comment... D1 n o
Restelll was left In Los Angeles
with permission to try to make a
deal for himself.
Outfielder Paul Lehner was
sent to Daytona Beach to wait
for Greenberg to decide his fate.
If he Isn't sold, he'll play at In-
dianapolis... After the first 20
games, Simpson led the club with
355. Frldley was second with 351.
...Al Rosen's home run output
zoomed to seven at the end of 20
games...The Tribe drew more
fans per game in Tucson than
ever before in its six years of
training In the sun city. .Bobby
Wilson balked at being sold to
Indianapolis and tried unsuc-
cessfully to talk Greenberg Into
being allowed to make a deal for
himself.. .Pete Reiser got on base
six successive times as.a plnch-
hltter, twice with triples, once
with a single and three times on
passes.
Sandy Hinkle Holds
Lead In Intramural
Golf Tournament
l Young Sandy Hinkle, a fresh-
TltettR B^lbo High Schoo-I, shot
a Win the first round of the High
School and Junior High Golf
Tournament now being conduct-
ed at Summit Hills course. Jack
Hammond Is right on Hlnkle's
heels with a nice 81.
In the Junior High division,
James DesLondes and Jeff Good-
in are leading the pack with an
87 each for the first eighteen
holes. .
There are still 54 holes left >to
play, so It Is still a long way from
being over as far as most of the
boys in the tournament are con-
cerned. The next three rounds
were scheduled for April 8, 9 and
10 starting at 8 a.m. each of
these days.
TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
(First Round)
Handy Hinkle........ 79
Jack Hammond...... 81
Fernando Martinez .... 87
Harry LaBree........ 96
Richard Gramlich .. .. 100
Dick Shobe........102
Jim Suddaby........103
Bruce Qulnn........105
BlllDawson..........109
Dave Sundqulst......103
Bob Hughes..........129
Junior High School
Jeff Goodln.......... 87
James DesLondes, Jr. .. 87
Tyrone Hammond .... 99
John Hamma........105
Michael Weber.......120
Grapefruit League
BY UNITED PRESS
Exhibition baseball scores:
New York Yankees 3, Charlotte 1.
Philadelphia A's 4, Boston Red
Sox 3.
Washington 10, Cincinnati 9.
Brooklyn 4, Boston Braves 1.
Chicago White Sox 8, Pittsburgh
Pirates 4.
Cleveland Indians 5, New York
Giants 0.
Balboa Relays
To Feature R.P.
Olympic Hopefuls
This year's edition of the fam-
ed Balboa Relays will have on
Olympic flavor fitting of this
year of the 13th Olympaid. It is
entirely possible that several of
the performers in the Third An-|
nuaf Balboa Relays might see,
action in the Olympic games in
Helsinki this summer.
Chief among these, of course,
Is Charlotte Gooden, the dimin-
utive sprint sensation. Reports
from all sources Indicate that
this young lady might well be
one of the representatives of the
Republic o Panam in the
Olympics. *
Charlotte will run in the spe-
cial exhibition 100 yard dash a-
galnst such outstanding oppo-
nents as Dolores Worrell, 50 mts.
champ, of the Central American
Games, Constance Warner, 'Es-
ther Stewart, Adelina Bernard,
and Gloria Talt. These six girls
will make this exhibition 100
yards a mighty interesting race,
fans can be assured of that.
Gooden, of course, Is the star
of this sextet, and Is probably
best remembered for her bril-
liant work In the recent Boll-
varlan Games, held in Venezuela
last December. In these games,
against the cream of the Central
American countries, she won the
50 meters, 100 meters, and was a
member of the 400 meter relay
team that took top honors. Also
members of this relay team were
Esther Stewart. .Dolores Worrell
and Adelina Bernard.
Bernard garnered 3rd in the
50 meters in this same race, and
second in the 100 meters. Wor-
rell pulled up second In the 50
meters to almost give Panam a
clean sweep In these two events.
Local fans will have the chance
to see these girls go all out in
the Relays on April 18. Tickets
for this gigantic track and field
extravaganza are priced at 50
cents for adults and 25 cents for
students with S.A. cards. These
ducats may be purchased at the
Balboa Gym office, or from most
any of the Jr. Hi., and High
School stldents.
----------------------------
Sports Briefs
BASEBALLSouthpaw Curt
Jlmnion* ays he rxpeot an
rmy discharge this week; which
would let him rejoin the Phila-
delphia Phils for the April 15
opening of the season. Simmons
flew in Monday from Germany
and reported Immediately to
Camp Kilmer, New Jersey. The
Boston Braves didn't do so well.
Left-hander Chet Nichols passed
a final physical and was Induct-
ed into the Army.
Stempel, (Toma Tie For Major
League Title; Playoff Tuesday
Around the
Majors & Minors
Pint-sized Clem Koshorek dou-lfor the regalar job at first base
bled and scored a run March 311 with the Tigers. Taylor hit In the
at Corpus Christ!, Tex., as the fourth or "cleanup" spot.
Pirates and Browns battled to a
7-7 tie. March SO Clem went hit-
less in three times at bat.
oOo
April 1 Frank Austin, batting
third for Portland, was held hit-
less In three trips as San Fran-
cisco blanked Portland 2-0 be-
hind the one-hit pitching of
Reeder.
oOo
Also on April 1, the Yankees'
Don Bollweg went none for two
as the Yanks whipped the* Sen-
ators 5-2. Conrado Marrero start-
ed for Washington but Tom Fer-
rick, who finished the game, was
charged with the loss.
oOo
Lou Sleater hurled the last
four Innings of the March 29
oOo
March 27 Chico Carrasquel got
a single In four times at bat and
scored one run as the White Sox
lost to the Cubs. Chico came'tonm
back March 29 to bang out three'
safeties ta five trips. He also
scored a run and batted in an-
other as the Cubs again whipped
Carasquel's team 7-6. On April 1
Carrasquel hit one-for-three.
, oOo
RAFAEL (SON) NOBLE don-
bled once In four trips March 17
as the Piratea edged the Giants
2-1. Noble also
Last night at the Dia-
blo Heights Bowling Al-
leys, the Max R. Stempel
& Son team wound up
1951-32 bowling season
in a tie with the H. I.
Homa Co. keglers.
Going into the last
night of play but two
points in the lead after
27 weeks, the Homa
dropped three
points t* the Boyd Broth-
ers quintet while the
S t e mpel insurancemen
took three from the Lo-
cal 595, N.F.F.E.
A three-game playoff
being arranged
Big Steve Bllko garnered one
fame at Alpine, Tex., In which' single In four trips to the plate
he Browns took the Pirates 6-3.1 March 27 as the Yankees wallop-
Sleater gave up two runs. The ed the Cardinals 8-2. Steve got
winning pitcher, however, was one for three March 31, scoring a
RACINGThe Juvenile chain-
Elon of 1951Tom Foolwon the
iigh Quest Parse Monday at
Jamaica In his first start of the
year. Four other Kentucky Derby
hopefuls were entered. Tom
Fool's next Derby test is the
Wood Memorial at Jamaica on
April 19.
SOCCERChairman Walter
Clesler of the Olympic Soccer
Committee says "the- squad is
very goodwith a lot of youth
balanced by experience." Six St.
Louis players were named to thej
squad after yesterday's tryouts at
St. Louis.
scoring two runs. Taylor is giv-
ing Don Kolioway a hard fight
run and batting in another when
the Cards nipped the Phillies 8-7.
starter Cliff Fannln.
oOo
BEN TAYLOR led the Tigers to
a 10-4 victory over the Yankees
March 28 by eoUeetlng three sin-
gles in five trips to the plate and .off Mickey Harris March 28 at
. hfd* S^i1 is teing arranged for
two at-bats March 28 when the' rr. j ,!L:. .*
Giants whipped the white Sox1 next Tuesday evening at
I the Diablo Bowling Al-
leys. The public is cor-
dially invited. More .de-
tails will appear in this
paper later.
A home run by Hank Edwards, HOOP L63gU6
following a double by Dick 81sler,
Tampa, Fla., gave the Reds a 5-3
victory over the Senators.
Pan Liquido Defeats CAA
9-3 To Gain On Firemen
PACIFIC SOFTBALL LEAGUE
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Wen Lost Pet.
Firemen's Insor. .. 9 1 JM
Pan Liquido..... 3 .727
Elks........... 5 .5*0
Philippine Rattan 2 8 .200
CAA.......... 2 .182
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Pan Liquido 9, CAA 3.
TODAY'S GAME
Elks vs. Philippine Rattan.
Oeorge Stanley's Pan Liquido
nine, intent on giving Don Bow-
en's Firemen's Insurance a run
for their money, set the Civil
Aeronautics boys down 9 to 3 yes.
terday.
Bill Muller won, his 12th game
against eight losses.
Ted Jordan was the losing
pitcher.
Oeorge Tarfllnger Increased
his lead In the batting depart-
ment by chalking up two bits In
four trips to the plate, one a
round-tripper in the fifth with
one on. His batting average is
now a robust .425.
Al Husted of the Beermen rap-
ped a long homer in the fifth In-
ning with one mate on.
On the CAA side, Nicholson got
his first four-bagger of the year
when he pinch hit for Moore in
the seventh.
The box score:
CAA AB R H E
Clayton, If-3b..... 4 1 1 0
Silva, 2b........ 3 0 0 0
aBaker.......... 1 0 0 0
Cox, cf.......... 2 1 14
bTackett........ 1 0 0 0
Polomskl. rf-lf .... 2 0 1
McQuearyjp.. ..... 3
Jones, E., n-c ..' .. 3
Olson, lb........ 2 0 0 1
Moore, c......... 2 0 0 0
Nicholson, rf...... 1 1 1 0
Jordan, p........ 2 0 0 0
cDalton.......... 10 0 0
H
night at the Balboa "Y"
ell played and interesting
Little
League
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF STANDINGS
TEAM
Won Lost
Police............ 7 S
Sfars............ ( 4
Lincoln Life........ S 5
AFGE 14 .. ........ 5 5
Elks 1414.......... 5 5
Firemen.......... 2 8
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lqst
Sears............ 9
Elks 1414 .. .. t..... 7
Police............ 5
Lincoln Life........ S
AFGE 14.......... 4
Firemen.......... 2
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Elks 10, Lincoln Life 7.
TODAY'S GAME
Police vs. AFGE.
ISTHMIAN LITTLE LEAGUE
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lot!
Twin City.......... 7 1
Monticello......... 7 2
Hill.............. 2 S
Fergus............ 8
YESTERDAY'S RE8ULT
Twin City 2, Fergus 0.
TOMORROW'S GAME
Twin City vs. Mill.
Twin City assured themselves
of a tie for the second half
championship of the Isthmian
Little League with Monticello by
whitewashing Fergus 2 to 0 on a
one-hitter. Monticello, who haa
played all her scheduled games
in the second half, has won 7 and
lost 2. If Iflll should defeat Twin
City tomorrow, this will cause a
Monticello and Twin City playoff
The Elks kept their hopes alive; for the second half title,
for a shot at the second half The box score:
bunting by defeating the Lincoln,Twin City AB R
Lifers 10 to 7 yesterday after-1 A. Villarreal, 3b-p
noon. At the present time Sears A. Titus, c.
leads by two full games and the
leaders and the second place Elks
have four games left to play.
The Lincoln Life boys got off
to a three-run lead in the top of
the first Inning when Bruce,
Bateman powered his ninth clr-
cult smash/high over the center
field scoreboard with two mates Totals........28
aboard. The Elks came right back' .
in their half of the Inning and Fergus__
L. Gordon, p-lf..
C. Reyes, lf-3b-p.
O. Moreno, 2b ..
O. Cox, rf.....
H. Gil lings, ss. ..
T. Murrell, lb. ..
R. Blades, rf.. ..
HPO
A
2
0
!
1
0
0
2 7 8 7
tied the score on three walks, two a. Oalllard, 2b
fielders' choices and singles by a. Brown, ss ..
Johnny Lewis and Danny Des- A. Bowen, 3b..
Londes. w. Forde, cf ..
In the third inning the Lifers'a. Gayle, If
added a run to break the dead-1F. McKenzie
Last
two well
games were witnessed by a good I lock but the Lodge Brothers came | B. St.'cTair, c
sized crowd of spectators. The
first game was very closely con-, of the same toning when they|T. Lavine, rf.
tested throughout. 504th FA put
on a great rally during the last
three minutes of play to down
the Navy Harbor Defense to the
score of 41 to 33. During the fin-
al period the score was tied on
three different occasions. Lpez
was the high scorer for the 504th
while Kennedv led the Navy out-
fit with 12 points.
The second game was a thriller
from start to finish. Air Base
AB
3
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
HPO A
4
0
0
0
0
0
collected six hits. A three-run'c. Atherton, rf
rally In the fourth by the Lifers; *_ __
brought them within one run of Totals........17 0 1 13 9
the Elks, After the Elks pushed! Runs Batted InReyes 2. Two
across two more runs the Insur- Base HitReyes. Stolen Bases
anee boys went Into the last in- McKenzie, Glillngs. Base on Ball!
nlng trailing by three runs. offGordon 5, Villarreal 5, Her-
In the top of the sixth the Llf-| bert 3. Errors Gatllard, Brown,
ers threw a scare into the Elks by umpiresCampbell and Fields.
loading the bases with only one Time of Game1:39k
out but Lem Klrkland retired the
next two batters without allow-
Along The Fairways
Winners of the Point Tourna-
ment held last Ladles Day
, (Thursday, Jfottt 3) at the Fort
jLperlod Schlaghter made the win- the Lifers and In losing evened Amador Golf.Club are: ---*.
inning basket from beyond the four his season's record at one win First Flight
line area. Final score Marines 33, and one loss. | Alyce Frencrm .....42 points
Air Base Group 32. Referees were DesLondes, George Trimble, janelle ChartocI 38
Oroup led at half time IS to 16 ing a run.
over the Marines. At no time was Klrkland went all the way on
there more than that margin be- the mound for the winners pltch-
tween the two teams. With six ling his sixth victory In eight de-
seconds left to play in the final cisiona. Roger Million pitched for
Tdtals..........27 3 5 3
Pan Liquido
Tarfllnger, rf-lb.
Jones, ., cf ..
Stanley, ss.....
Muller, p
AB R H E
4 2 2 1
3 10 0
3 12 0
4 12 1
Lee. If'.......... 4 1 0 0
Glaeser, 2b...... 4 0 1 G
Lane, c.......... 4 1 0 1
Husted, 3b........ 3 1 2 1
Jacks, lb........ 1 0 0
Heisler, rf........ 1 1 1 0
Sgt. Williams and Batterman. | Lewis and Klrkland were the
Tonight's games will bring to- leading batters for the Elks with
gether Battery _;'D" 784th and l each player collecting two hits In
Total..........31 9 10 4
aFlled out for Silva in seventh.
bGrounded out for Cox in sev-
enth. cGrounded out for Jordan
in seventh.
5700th M. & S. The second game
should be very close with Comp-
troller A.F.B. and Naval Station
Rodman matching baskets for
the first time this year.
Willie Mays To See
Draft Board About
Possible Deferment
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., April 9
(UP)Willie Mays, New York
Giants outfielder, was scheduled
to arrive here by plane last nights T ,
to talk to his draft board about ? f^V8, "
three trips to the plate.
For the Lincoln Lifers Gussie
Durham and Billy Engelke were
the batting stars with each man
having a perfect day at the plate.
Durham hammered out four hits
in four trips and Engelke collect-
ed two for two.
The box score:
Lincoln Life
R. Sander, If.. ..
McOrlff, ss.....
Durham, 2b ....
Bateman, c.....
J. Dubols, 3b.. ..
Million, p.
AB R HPO
Welterweights Chico Vejar of
New Haven and Red De Fazio of
Eayonhe, New Jersey, will meet
In Cleveland on April 18. Vejar
scored an eight-round TK.O.
over De Fazio earlier this year In
New York.
TENNISNational Singles
Champion Maureen Connolly de-
feated Dorothy Head, 6-1, 6-4,
Monday to win the Bay Conn-
ties Tennis Championship at San
Francisco. Tom Brown won the
men's crown with an 8-6, 6-3, 6-3
victory over Fred Hagist.

THE
MORRIS MINOR
A salesman itself, in its distinction, economy,
performance and reliability.
*
ON DISPLAY
at
M. A. POWELL S. A.
Central & 16th St Coln, R. P.
A BRIGHTER EASTER
WITH A NEW EMERSON!
PAHAMUSKA, SA
No. 127 Central Ave.
a deferment.
Mays left the club in Houston,
Tex., yesterday to fly to Birming-
ham. His plane was due here at
7:20 p.m.
The star outfielder said he will
appeal to his draft board to defer
his induction because of hard-
ship. Mays said he supports his
big family of brothers and sisters
In Falrfield. Ala., a suburb of
Birmingham.
The draft board In Falrfield
said it had no knowledge of a
special meeting to hear Mays'
appeal. The board met in its reg-
ular meeting today and is not
scheduled to meet again until
next Tuesday.
Mays was notified to report for
j induction May 18.
FIREMEN NEED HELP
SPOKANE. Wash. (UP)Fire-
men who went to someone else's
aid wound up needing help
themselves. A new Ore truck
found only a minor blase at a
construction site. Then the new
truck burst into flames. Another
fIre cre^ snuffed out the blaze.
4 0 0 1
3 2 0 1
1 4 1
13 14
4 0 12
000
3 0 0 2
Laatz; lb...... 3 0 0 4
W. Engelke, cf .. 2 0 2 0
Second Flight
Bea Tyrrell........33
Mary Agnes Slgafoos. 32
Inex Taylor.......'.. 32
Tie.
The points were scored on the
basis of four for two under par.
three for birdie, two for par and
one point for a bogey.
Winners in the semifinal round
of the annual Club Handicap
Tournament are:
First Flight
Ellen Kenna, Connie Bishop.
Second Flight
Janelle Chartock, Millie Ham-
mond.
The finals will be played Sat-
urday, April 12. The champion-
ship flight will tee off at 2 p.m.
The first flight will tee off at
2:10 pm. '
Totals.........28 7 8 18 7
Elks AB
Hele, f....... 4
Dube. rf....... 0
Ryter, ss...... 0
Morton, 3b .. .. 2
Klrkland, p .. .. 3
Halvosa. ss-3b .. 3
Lewis, lb...... 3
DesLondes, 2b.
Lovelady, c ..
Trimble, c. ..
Thompson, cf.
Tomorrow's Ladies Day tourney
I will be a nine-hole "tee-to-
R H PO A green'* tournament at one-half
1 2 0 0 handicap (keep score of putts,
0 0 0 too). There will also be a putting
0 0 1 0 prize.
10 0 0 Buddy Hammond will lead a,
3 2 0 4 discussion on USGA rule and lo-
2 1 2 11 cal modification. This will be fol-
1 2 10 0 lowed by a business meeting. Tho
0 2 0 2 luncheon has been postponed un-
O 0 2 01 til the following week, April 17,
0 2 3 0 at which time prizes will bo
0 0 awarded for the annual Club
Handicap and for the Ringer
7 Tournament.
Don't forget the Ladles Best
6 Ball Tournament is coming soon.
Totals........24 10 12 18
Score By Innings
Lincoln Ufe 3 013 0 07 8
Elks 3 0S0 2X10 12
Winning PitcherK1 r k 1 a n d
(6-2). Losing Pitcher Million
(1-1). Struckout byKlrkland- 3,
Million 3. Base on Balls off
Klrkland 6. Million 7. Home Run
Bateman. Doubleplays Mc-
Orlff, Laatz. J. Dubols: Halvosa. MEMPHIS, Tenn. (U.P.) Tht
Lewis. Left on BasesLincoln newbdm son of Mr. and Mrs.
Life 10, Elks 7. UmpiresLuzer j. T. Tapp arrived almost ready
and Francis. ScorerMead. Time to eat he was born with a
of Game1:20. tooth.
Qualifying rounds will be played
I on April 17 18,19 and 20. See the
Bulletin Board at the Amador
Golf Club for further detalla.
BORN WITH TOOTH
.
I
Hq&. 6 Years Old!
1952
1952
, 101 ftp High Compression
MILEAGE MAKER
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BOWLING LEAGUE PLAYOFF TUESDAY
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ <* "I
tr-W Dorarla rPl'7^ n/ictni.' At Cln*,*t.
East% Parade
Planned Sunday
MB Panama
A big Easter bunny named
"Joe" will Join the Easter Pa-
rade t the El Panama this Sun-
day and a bottle o champagne
will be given to the lady wear-
ing the prettiest bonnet.
Although ihe ladies of the
Isthmus have no need for the
fur pieces or spring coats that
grace -the Stateside Easter pa-
rades, they can hold their own
with frivolous headgears and
lovely clothes. The parade will
be something to see.
lo make things more festive
this year, Joe Hecht El Pana-
mas comedian. wl!l don a rap-,
bit suit and make like a' live
bunny.
will

AN INDEPENDEN^
mam *
NEWSPAPER
fPilot Disaster9 At Clayton
Tests Forces9 Raid Routines
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
rWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Washington To Ask Morris
ut Post-Firing Pop-Offs
WASHINGTON. April (UP)
Newbold Morris has been or-
"Easter Parade music will dered tQ appelir bcfore a House
play in the background and-the .Turilfin.-u Hnlvnmniltt.ee tomnr-
bar will serve such Easter
special t If as eggnog and
blossom" and Joe the bunny will
add a Joyiul hop or two.
Dinner will be served from
12 noon until TO p.m. The
menu includes turkey, ham,
steak* and all the trimmings.
A display table heavily laden
Judiciary Subcommittee tomor-
row to explain under oath his
public statement, since he wasi
abruptly ousted as government
clean-up chief by J. Howard
McGrath.
Chairman Frank L. Chelf (D-
| that would require an answer
'lrom McGrath, Chelf replied:
"I Just don't know. Your an-
swer is as good as mine."
Among other things, Morris
has said that "everything was
cozy, cordial and comfortable"
In his clean-up drive until the
out I
called te give the-"tnll ln-
sWe story" o the quarrel that
blasted both of thm out of
government and touched off
one of the biggest Washing-
ton political mysteries in
years.
Chelf said the subcommittee
has no Intention Of summoning; Administration "found
McGrath, however, until it digs; meant business."
Ky.) said the subcommittee has up more fact or untilit Is con- | He also said he never found
no immediate plans to calllvinced "there is something McGrath "panting to help me
McGrath who was fired by Presl-1 wrong" that requires an ex- out."
with festive foods will help dent Truman only four hours planatlon from the former cab-
dinners to make their selections. I after he summarily dismissed I Inet officer and long-time pol-
Durlng dinner the Easter bun-!Morris in a feud over financial itlcai ally of President Truman.
Ky will hand out Easter Eggs questlonannalres. Asked if it Is possible Morris
and chocolate rabbits to the Chelf said the Investigating might "raise some questions"
ohlWren. group unanimously agreed that
The El Panama holiday cus- Morris should be asked to re-
tom of carving the turkey at a P*81 under oath his statements
table of'six or more will be in v, press, radio and television
force as will the other nice boll-|slnce he was fired.
day habiti half price for chiJ-l He aid this includes Morris1
dren under twelve, for grown-
Morris also has said that
the blow-up with McGrath
came when he sent -an aide
to McGrath'* office with a
request for his diary, office
records and telephone calls.
Chelf said the group so far
has received no word from the
White'House on Its dual request
for the tax returns of McGrath
and 19 other key Justice De-
Birtment officials and Justice
epartment files on 11 specific
cases of alleged misconduct or
mismanagement.
In its most vital and realistic
field exercise to date, the Armed
Forces Disaster control center
yesterday morning conducted
"Pilot Test for Jackpot," a pre-
liminary to. the Isthmus-wide
"Operation Jackpot" planned for
May 8.
Stressing two facets of. disaster
control planning whleh had ne-
ver before been tested In a field
exercise, the pilot test gave com-
manders of the exercise a chance
to see how fast the "automatic
wave" of workers would respond
to a disaster situation.
It also was concerned with
testing procedures for on-the-
'spot control of disaster opera-
tions.
Conducted near the Fort Clay-
tdn Hospital, the exercise was de-
1 signed to uncover snags and dis-
crepancies in present disaster
control plans and procedures.
The problem showed a need for
greater speed by the elements of
the "automatic wave" of work-Ismail handy-talkie radios almost
statement that "official Wash-
ington doesn't want to be ln-
j vestlgated."
"The committee is entitled to'
know," Chelf said, "if there are
i any facts there.'
He said Morris, who Is sched-
1 ult'd to address the National
Press Club here today, was "In-
vlted" to attend the public
, session tomorrow. He added,
i however, that the New York Re-
BELGRADE. Yugoslavia April1 Publican will be subpoenaed if
? (UP) High-grade uranium he "0M "ot ""P1- _
r has been discovered in Yu-1 *: Kenneth B. Keating
fsslavlaand Ills location must C'.lY^ fd d!mn?.e.d 11*hSt
bath Morrii and McGrath be
ups the dinner is $5 per head.
Uranium Found In
Yugoslavia Musi
Be Tempting Soviet
make, the site tempting to en-
vious. Russian*.
The find is In Yugoslavia's
"hot eorner." in the mounfain-
oua Strumlca Valley, where the
Bulgarian. Greek and Yugoslav
frontiers meet.
The valley is one of the an-
cient invasion routes through
the B'lkans. most recentlv ued
In 19*1, when German armies
drove through It to the sea cut- j WASHINGTON. April 9- Sec-
*Lofsever1al Qrk divisions. 'rftary of the Army Frank Pace.
tJ1" Slrumlc.^ Mo"ntains ,orJ" Jr.. said recently that with very
tne southern tip of a north- few exceptions, no Individual
south chain which has already members of the Army's inactive
provided considerable uranium or volunteer reserve of officers
fethjs Soviet TJnMn. serving in Organized Reserve
It was learned Ihe discovery, Corps units will be ordered to ac-
was made In earlv autumn, 1951. !tlve military service as indi-
The alte was immediatelv sealed vlduals for the balance of 1952,
inactive Reserves
Not To Be Called
In 1952, Says Pace
The
Judges' Bench
An American Marine charged
with robbery this morning in
the U. S. District Court at An-!
con was ordered
! Gorgas Hospital
observation.
British-Russian
Textile Deals
Brew In Moscow
MOSCOW, April 9. UP) A
confined to spokesman for the British dele-
for 30-days
The defendant, 19-year-old
gatlon attending the Moscow
Economic Conference announced
here today that Soviet purchas-
ing organizations are interested
Eferl C. Grant, was found guilty' In ordering large quantities of
of holding up a Panama autolst,, British consumer goods for im-
1Leonardo Marn, forcing him at mediate delivery.
off as a military reserve and
large groups of workers, largely
prison labor, were brought In.
a small scaleIs believed alrea-
dy under way. Prospecting al-
ready Is eolng on In other parts
of the valley and there also have
or-en several finds of low-grade
re
short of any major changes In
the current military situation.
Two major factors attributed
Actual productionat least on' by Pace to making further re-
calls of such personnel unneces-
sary at this time are the high
percentage of Reserve officers
previously ordered to duty who
have extended service tours vo-
luntarily, and the expansion and
success of Army Officers Candi-
Z^'l**?*"??}*,!^ date Schools (n developing well
with the ore could not be learned
They are obligated under var-
ious economic aid agreements to
give the United States a fair
hare of all scarce raw material*
xnorted from Yugoslavia, but
thev have a nuclear physics re-
search institute and may use it
exclusively there.
qualified young officers.
Pace emphasized there will he'
a continuing need for unde-!
termlned numbers of profession- >
al medical service officers such;
as doctors, dentists, veterinar-
ians and nurses, and a limited
number of specialists not avail-
able In the active Army.
Naval Aviation Cadet Henri
R. Dejan (above) 21. son of
Mrs. Louise V. Seheibla of Pan-
ama, graduated recently from
the U.S. Naval Pre-Flight
School at Pensacola, Florida.
In.addition to a thorough
physical training program, the
15-week pre-flight course
which Henri completed in-
cludes aeronautical and naval
subjects aimed at preparing
officer candidates for flight
training and eventual commis-
sioning as naval officers.
Dejan graduated from Ora-
tory Prep High School of Sum-
mit, New Jersey, in June 1948.
He attended Georgetown Uni-
versity and entered the naval
service in September 1951 prior
to being selected for pre-flight
training in November.
He Is how assigned to the
U.S. Naval Auxiliary Air Sta-
tion, Whiting Field, Milton,
Florida, where he is engaged
in primary flight training. Up-
on completion of this training
at Pensacola and Corpus Chris-
ti, Texas, he will be awarded
the gold wings of a naval avia-
tor and assigned to duty with
the fleet.
gunpoint to take off his clothes.
The incident occurred April 2
near the Far Fan
on an Army road. Marin was
rescued by two men who were
hunting orchids.
Grant drove the car away
, but police captured him In the
Naval Hospital area on the At-
lantic Side several hours later.
Two British seamen, Stephen
Leonard Jewell, and William
Charles Norton who were found
The spokesman said the Rus-
sians want quality suits gar
bardines and serge suitings
Intersection ] and large quantities of dresses
,and coats. He said some of the
contracts have already been con-
cluded and others are In the pro-
cess of negotiation.
The Russians also were said to
be Interested hi many other tvpes
of consumer goods which British
exporters here cannot now sup-
ply.
The British spokesman said:
"8ovlet importing organizations
have Indicated In private conver-
guilty of burglary this morning nations their interest in purchas-
were each each given a three- jng women's coats, dresses, un-
year suspended sentence, and | derwear. men's overcoats and
placed on five years probation, j^its and a wide variety of chll-
The defendants are being held
in the custody of the police un-
til transportation is arranged
for them back to England.
They stole equipment worth
$570 from the Electronic Radio
Repair Shop at the Balboa pier
drens' wear."
He said the importers have a-
greed on several million pounds
sterling worth of British textiles
He added: "Soviet authorities
are also considering offers of
British delegates for printed
piece goods. The Russians want
area. Police' said that $407 'was good quality in each category
Some of the contracts for these
recovered, and the two seamen
paid the Canal the difference.
Also on tne calendar this
morning was a burglary convlc-
commodities have already been
agreed on."
He declared: "It is confidently
anticipated that the Russians
will place orders which will a-
tion against 17-year-old Carlos mount to several million
Antonio Stewart, a Panamanian
who stole cigarettes and other
small Items totalling $30.8C from
the Veterans of Foreign Wars
clubhouse near Curundu. Stew-
ard was sentenced to serve 18
pounds."
LONG TIME ON JOB
SOUTHBRIDGE, Mass., (UP.
Miss Marie D. Therrien, 73,
. claims one of the longest work-
mnnths in tall ranal 7nne r. hiB" records for women in Amer-
, months in jail, canal Zone re- ^ ,ndustry mss Therrien hag
cords show several previous, ^en employed .'or 60 years by
burglary sentences. the American Optical Co.
A BOY AT CALVARY
By Jay Heavilin and Walt Scott
Howmtii rang out os Sokioa nadna1 Km inamiit of GelaanW
Jam wmi two nWM, Piiarn ad Gastos, cihsiimJ to *
with Him. wort being aoilaa to their cienos. .'
Dork was the *ky and bright tkt blood that trickled
pitreos poli and feet of the tero* awn os tkt croatas
BOtkod upright into ooomg hole*.
A sign above Jesus' hood cast a thadow on three tolditn rattling
dice for the garment of tkt "Messiah." Sokron mode out the
Jetut ot Nozoroth, the King ( the Jewt"
Wisconsin Rep.
Sails On Cristbal
United States Representa-
tive John W. Byrnes, Repub-
lican of Wisconsin, and Mrs.
Byrnes are among the pas-
sengers who were scheduled
to sail on the Panama liner
Cristbal from New York this
afternoon.
Congressman Byrnes is one
of several members of the
House who are expected to
visit the Isthmus during the
coming week while Congress
is taking its Easter recess.
Congressman Byrnes Is a
native of Green Bay, Wiscon-
sin, and has served In the
past eight years. He is a
member of the Ways and
Means Committee.
ers In reporting to their respec-
tive control points and in dis-
patching them from the control
Ipolnts into the disaster area it-
self.
Approximately one-fortieth of
the disaster workers and equip-
ment which will be Involved In
the May 8 exercise. "Operation
Jackpot" participated in yester-
day's trial run.
The exercise was based on the
theory that In the event of an
atomic attack, control points
must be set up on the outer
fringe of the blast area, and
worker must penetrate into the
area as fast as radioactivity con-
ditions permit.
A segment of the area affect-
ed In a simulated atomic blast
at Mlraflores Locks was the
scene of the operation. At 9 a.m.
elements of the "automatic
wave" rushed to the pre-deslg-
nated control point, located
Impossible.
From this it was learned that
In future disaster planning it
will be necessary to use messen-
gers to a greater extent.
The control point for the exer-
cise was commanded by Air Force
Col. P. D. Coates, with Air Force
Lt. Col. Herbert Ladd as on-slte
chief of operations.
Observers of the exercise in-
cluded Gayle O. Kellar and Rus-
sell T. Wise of the Canal Zone
Joint Civil Defense Committee.
the Fort Clayton skeet range.
The commander of the Con-
trol-Point first dispatched moni-
tors with Gelger Counters into
the area to determine radioacti-
vity and send back reports of
43 Killed, 110 Hurt
As 5,000 Faithful
Panic In Church
CARACAS, April 9 (UP)Forty
t three persons were killed and 110
Injured this morning when panic
brought on by the threat of a
fire, bfoke out In the Santa Te-
reslta church here where 5.000
people were attending a Holy
Week service.
damage and casualties at var- J%,Sren'and one*
ious points within the area. "g| man cnlldren and one n
J\*^y^lS*S' VJle\ 8everai ca,M of Phyri.. were
received, the control point com-paused by the intense heat from
mander dispatched dis a s t e r
teams to handle the situation.
First aid teams were sent out
to handle "casualties," flre-flght-
lng squad to extinguish simula-
ted fires, heavy equipment teams
to remove reported debris and
so on.
The greatest difficulty encoun-
tered was In maintaining radio
contact between the Initial crew
of monitors who were sent into
the area.
hundreds of candles creating
consternation among the people.
Panic broke out when a light-
ed candle fell on a piece of cloth
and started to burn. The fire waa
put out quickly but cries of "fire"
sent everybody scurrying.
The multitude, fighting their
way out of the church, left It
strewn with shoes, prayer-books
and other objects.
The majority of the church-
goers, who were dressed In black,
As they got farther way for suffered torn dresses, bruises and
the control point, interference other Injuries to their faces,
made continual contact with the arms and legs.
LIKE
CHICKEN-SOUP!
You'll taste at once the tempting flaypr of fine
chicken in every golden-gleaming spoonful,
and you'll know why Campbell's Chicken Soup
is such a universal favorite! Plump, full-
breasted chickens make a rich, glistening broth.
Fine white rice fluffy light makes every
delicious spoonful extra satisfying, extra nour-
ishing. And you're sure to enjoy the tender
pieces pf chicken so generously added! Serve it
toon for just as surely as you like chicken,
youll like Campbell's Chicken Soup!
*-
trnam
ME
1
CONOENSED fO* GREATER VALUI IOOK FOR THE REO-AND