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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01430
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01430
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
"BRAHIFF
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APR 1 m
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Panama America
"Let the people know the truth and the country t$ tufe." - Abraham Lincoln.
Seagrams V.O.
CAI
HIHT
'MnmU it* tite &*,*
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, MARCH It, 1192
nm cents)
Panama City Was Wide Open Target
Democrats Start Scramble
* *
President Rests Up
? *
Bess Played Big Part In Swinging
Harry's 'I Won't Ran' Decision
By HVTH aUttNER
WASHINGTON, March 81
UP) Bess Truman, the only
weetheart Harry Truman ever
had, undoubtedly Is the person
who moat Influenced his decl-
lon not to seek reelection.
Mrs. Truman has never liked
the role ot First Lady. In her
own words she has merely
"stood It" for seven years.
(Naturally reserved, almost
shy, she does not like the lime-
light. And since the attemDted
assassination In November, 1950,
she has looked forward to the
end of her husband's tenure
with undisguised eagerness.
Mrs. Truman's desire to leave
the White House Is motivated
chiefly by an overriding con-
cern for her husband's welfare.
She Is all too aware of the
physical toll the President's of-
fice takes.
For more than her husband.
Mrs. Truman has been hurt by
the criticism hurled at him.
And there Is the constant wor-
Canal Storehouses
@8K Cash Business
Items
for cash any
items which are -readily aval-
ftble in the commissaries. It was
announced today at Balboa
Heights.
This and other changes In the
procedures of the Storehouses In
making cash sales will go Into
pf'ect tomorrow.
no of the ltrr.i.3 which for-
merly ccuki be purchased for
cash in the Storehouses and
will now be available only in
the commissaries include laun-
dry soap, matches, toilet paper,
paper towels, ball-point pens,
screw eyes, cleaning powder,
small hardware, etc.
Storehouse Items similar to
those stocked by the commis-
saries wi be sold by the Store-
houses only when the commls-
sarita are -out of stock or, in
(^exceptional cases, in which It
^awjg imperative that customers
have certain brands of goods
available only at the Store-
houses.
Nails, screws staples, oil, etc.
will be sold by the Storehouse
only in standard packages In-
sofar as practicable. The pack-
ages either packed by the
manufacturer or packaged by
the Storehouses will be one
pound, /five pounds, gross, dozen,
bag, bundle, quart, gallon, etc.
A minimum surcharge of ten
cents will be made on all cash
sales at the Storehouses except
those for scrap or obsolete
equipment and material.
BALBOA TIDES
ry that another assassination
attempt,might succeed.
There are grounds for suspi-
cion that Mrs. Truman believes
It will be good for her daughter
Margaret, too, when the Tru-
mans leave the White House.
She undoubtedly shares the
President's desire for a grand-
son, and will be glad when Mar-
garet decides to get married.
But whatever Margaret want*
to do will be all right with her.
She has watched with obvious
pride .her daughter blossom out
from t egawky college girl of
1645 Into the poised young car-
eer woman of today.
Mrs. Truman has won distinc-
in as First Lady by her very
anonymity.
The public knows almost no-
thing about herand she seems
to have won favor for that rest-
son.
The First Lady Is basically
still the same Bess Truman who
seven years ago received word
in her second-floor walk-up
apartment that her husband
was the New President.
In appearance, she is smarter.
She Is some 20 pounds slim-
mer. Her clothes are better tail-
ored and she holds herself more
erect. She is more poised In
public.
easy
fers a
friends.
She was never become used
to her constant guard of secret
servicemen. She patronizes her
old hairdresser and, when shop-
ping in her accustomed shops
around Washington, prefers not
to be noticed.
But if Presiden* Truman had
made the opposite decision and
announced he would run again,
the public would never have
had a sign of disappointment
from Mrs. Truman.
As she told reporters after
the Jefferson-Jackson Day din-
ner. "What he says goes."
WASHINGTON, March 31
(UP) A scramble was on
today among Democratic
hopefuls to become President
Truman's successor but a
member of his official family
said the Chief Executive will
throw his support behind Il-
linois Gov. Adlai Stevenson
for the Democratic nomina-
tion.
Mr. Truman himself had no
word on his choice for his suc-
cessor, however, and Stevenson
was standing firm on previous
statements that he is a candi-
date now for governor and noth-
ing else.
But he has not ruled out the
possibility of a "draft."
This uneeuivocal statement
from a man who knows .the
President's thinking eatne as
Vice President Alben W. Bark-
ley was saM to be considering
entering the race tor the White
House and Sen. Richard B.
Rassell, already a candidate,
urged Mr. Truman net to try
to handplck the party's nomin-
ee*.
The other avowed Democratic
candidatosSen. Estes Kefauver
(Tenn.) and Robert 8. Kerr
(Okla.) predicted that their
candidacies will be helped great-
ly by Mr. Truman's electrifying
Saturday night announcement
La Bocan Held
For Trafficking
In Marihuana
Tuesday, April 1
Him Lew
ft:It a.m. !: a.m
8:12 p.m. 8:27 pjn.'drug.
_ so far as their party Is
concerned because any Democra-
tic nominee would have to run
on the Truman administration's
policies.
Sen. Robert A. Taft thought
the Democrats might have to
"draft" Mr. Truman because any
other candidate would be weak-
er.
But the big majority of Demo-
cratic bigwigs were taking Mr.
Truman at his word that noth-
ing "whatsoever"could make
him change his mind and seek
another four years in the "na-
tion's toughest Job."
The party's political leaders,
already In the capital for the
Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner at
which Mr. Truman dropped his
I won't run" bombshell, hud-
dled In big and small groups
throughout. the city to map
plans fot the future.
Despite jockeying by rival De-
mocratic camps In what almost
amounted to a preview of the
,. Democratic convention in July,
arJ hoMhii lutiJr^ffitJ? n ne member of Mr Truman oI"
are noicung uitner waiters, an n.,ai famiiv airi fiatlv-
unemployed 19-year-oltf La Bo- .i^f'pSrfSeht ill' .uooort
ea resident, on a charge of -t-I support
trafficking In marihuana. !?B-A*ii.i..tun .rri
Walters was arrested yeoter- J4f^.1^"5^*?i|2LB!2:
day when a policeman caught *Ub *** 8tr*n,on;
In smoking the "weed," innt " ket" ***%** J*
company of others, behind the Went and Russell at his
government garage near the *"B"A*. "**; O""* "* *
Olympic Stadium. possibility ef teaming up Ste-
Nearby. the policeman found ;eoson with Rerr. Both groups
28 packages of marihuana, 81 figured the moves would clinch
cigarets and three booklet* of *" Senthern vote.
cigaret paper. But they also realised that at
The police said the large; this point such matters were on-
uantlty of marihuana found ly for discussion and that Russell
Walters' possessions lndl-'and Kerr probably will make a
cated that he did a big bust-! running fight for the top spot
ness In the Illicit sale of th* I right up and through the early
ballot at the convention.
By MERRIMAN SMITH
----- o
WASHINGTON, March SI (UP)
-r- President Truman lounged
hi his rooftop solarium for a
while yesterday and comtem-
Sated for the first time since
illdhood the prospect of a Ufe
without struggle;
But even on Sunday and
on the day after announcing
his decision not seek re-elec-
iton the President couldn't
call much of hi* time hi* own.
He spent moit of the morning
with his friend and biographer.
Jonathan Daniels, editor of the
Raleigh, N. o, News and Ob-
server.
In the afternon, he attended
a reception in his honor at the
Mayflower Hotel by Democratic
national chairman Frank E. Mc-
Klnney.
It was only in the early hours
yesterday that Mr. Truman had
a chance to savor the prospect;
of unlimited freedom after se-
ven years in the White House.
The Chief Executive get up
about 4:86 am. and poked
around th* furbished Whit*
Hence, admiring the hew furn-
ishings and chatting with th*
help.
At 9 o'clock he want to hi*
(lass-walled sunroem en top
of th* White House to have
breakfast with Mr*. Truman
whom he still think* of a* "a
beautiful little girl with
?"
Actress: xHe Lifted My Skirt
And Bea. Me With His Cane
HOLLYWOOD, March 31 (UP)
Sheriff's deputies said today
they will take no action on
charges by actress Ann Sterling
that she was beaten by "a rich
and powerful" man until she
signs a complaint against the
Hollywood playboy she accuses of
beating her.
The platinum-haired starlet
admitted yesterday that ner tale
of assault last Monclry by foui
men was a phony and charged
In a statement that the real as-
llant "threw me down" In his
droom, "lifted my ballerina
Irt and beat m* with his carte."
The captain of the sheriff's
homicide detail handling the
case-said Miss Sterling's state-
mean was not sworn nor subs-
cribed to legally and therefore
did not constitute any ground*,
for action against the playboy
she accuse* of giving her the
beat ng which sent her to the
hospital.
The spokesman said deputleslplalnt against the actress unless
new are working on the ease in she attacks Him in court firat.
an effort to separate the
the chaff" and that
'wheat
from the ehaff" and that "we'll
consider any necessary action
when a clear picture of this
whole thing evolves."
"I wish she would file a com-
plaint," he said. "That's Just
what I'm waiting for."
He said her "vicious and pre-
posterous lies" had blackened his
reputation to an extent "I never
Miss Sterling told deputies she:will be able to erase."
had Invented the story about be.1 "It's an awful thing," he said,
lng beaten by four men because i "that a girl like that can ruin
the real aeeallant told her "no ~
one will believe your story" when
one will believe your story" wh
she threatened to expose him.
I tried to do the decent thin
. thing;"
the actreas who wa* born in Mi-
lan, Italy, lamented) "but every-
thing I do goes wrong."
She said she would confer with
her attorney before signing a
complaint against the "man with
the cane," but as yet. deputies
said there has not been an ln-
dlcatlon that she will
charges.
the Uves of Innocent people. The
whole thing stun* and nor
me:
rrlflee
The "rich and powerful" man
admitted only that Mia* Sterling
came along on a party at hi*
house early Monday morning,
with a "film executive" and two
movie starlets.
She had been taking heavy
doses of brandy, he said.
He said they had a slight, non.
file violent disagreement about her
refusal to go home when the
ed through the tinted glaa*
panel*.
Mr. Truman drank in the
greening vista stretching down
from the White House to the
mall and the white-domed Jef-
ferson Memorial on the banks
of the Potomac River.
Over his coffee, the President
smiled and chatted with his
childhood sweetheart who was
Orie of the most powerful factors
In hi* decision not to run again.
Persons close to him said he
looked to the future with a new
sense of relaxation.
Mr. Truman is a product of
adversity, starting with the days
when, as a bespectacled child,
he dusted bottles for 88 a week,
climbing serious and Intently
from shelf to shelf of a drug-
gist's shoo on the town square
at Independence, Mo.
Throughout hi* life, Mr.
Truman ha* followed essen-
tially the same pattern, climb-
ing seriously and Intently
from shelf to shelf from
bankrupt haberdasher t* su-
perviser of a county road
crew, from a Senator who had
to struggle mightily to stay
in office to the Presidency
where he ha* served In con-
tinuing erial*.
Now at the age of 67, he
doesn't have to worry about
anything but hi* health and
even that Is good.
He has no financial worries
for the future, and his daugh-
ter. Margaret, la a money-mak-
ing success in the entertainment
world. Mr. Truman truly has se-
curity for the first time in bis
Ufe.
His years of crisis, struggle
and adversity have marked him
amazingly little.
He still enjoys a good story, a
good drink and a good meal. At
rare Intervals when a President
can get away with uch didoes,
he likes to drive a convertible
with the top down and at break-
neck speed.
A* much a* he like* the idea
f retirement, the President
will mis* some of his White
House "toy*- hi* private
swimming pool and gymna-
sium, his speedy DC-* plan*
that can whisk him aero**
continent In relatively few
hours, hi* yacht and hi* pri-
vate tram and his fleet at
gleaaaing limousines.
But he will be happy to com-
pensate for the los* of these
physical thing* In being able to
go to church without a pewful
of plalnclothes guarda, to wln-
dowahop without stopping traf-
fic, to read a newspaper with-
out seeing himself hammered by
Out seeing lampooned by car-
toonists.
Mrs. Truman Is girlishly
happy about his bowing out.
She has yearned for years tu
go back to the low-voltage, sew-
ing circle sort of social life in
Independence.
And the 28 shots fired In the
attempted assassination of her
husband in front ot Blalr House
on Nov. 1, 1950, formed an ugly
and lasting echo for her.
Mr. Trumah's decision not
to run agate was hard to come
by. He has been In Democratic
politics since l*22,when as an
impoverished merchant, he
was picked up by the machine
of "bo**" Tom Pendergast and
put *v*r as Democratic can-
didate tor Judge of the county
court for th* eaitern district
f Jackson County.
For* all his contacts with th*
seamier aide of politics, the
President Is prouder of his own
integrity than about any other
factor in his life.
He told this writer some years
ago that after his death, he
l
lie servant;
Mr. Truman was well aware
that history may not rank him
with the greatest Presidents
(Continued on Page 8, Column 4)
Italian Calls
Yugoslavian T
Tommygun Duel
ROME, March SI (UP) -VI-
cenao Coputo, self-styled pre-
sident of the Italian Nationalist
Party, today challenged Jugo-
slav Deputy Vellbor Ljubic to a
tommygun duel anywhere ne
likes, Including Yugoslavia.
Caputo sent to tne press a
typewritten communique jcui-
lng a rubber stamp of a so-cal-
lea Italian Nationalist Paity,
but giving no address, in watch
he charged that Ljubic pau
two days ago in the Yugoslav
dumber of Deputies strongly
attacking Italian natlor.a.isn.
over Trieste and "expressing tlir
wish of getting supporlcxs of
ItaUan revindications face to
i ace with a tommygun In
hand."
Caputo said In his comm uni-
que that he wrote to Ljubic u-
day telling him he waa r-udy
to give him the satisfaction r.e
desires.
The communique said LJuoic
had been given 15 days to An-
swer the challenge.
Real Raid Alert
Bewilders All
Except Military
'Holiday On Ice'
Shaw Here Awans
The
Judges' Bench
Meanwhile, the sportsman said;party broke up and finally he
he did not intend to file a com-' drove her borne.
Sinking Differences
GENOA, Italy, March 81,
(UP) Thirty Italian work-
men today stated an underwa-
ter sit-down-strtk* for higher
pay in a pressurised caisson at
th* bottom of Genoa harbor.
Th* worker*, building a con-
crete foundation for a pier,
sent up word they would not
come up until their demand*
for pay increases have
met.
The 88 were without
and water.
A 32 year old Panamanian
charged with petit larceny this
morning in the Balboa Magis-
trate's-Court was sentenced to
serve 10 days In jail and fined
810.
The defendant. Virgilio Hono-
rio Gonzlez stole eight forks, six
teaspoons and three soup spoons,
valued at 82.72 from the Panama
Canal clubhouse division.
Three loiterers found In the
same building 912 at La Boca
were sentenced this morning.
William Adolphus Davis, 2d,
Panamanian was given a 10-day
suspended sentence and placed
on one year probation.
Wilfred Atwell. 59, Barbadian
was fined 810, and John Ander-
son Blanchard, 20, Panamanian
Was sentenced to serve five days
in Jail.
An unidentified aircraft flew over the Panama Ct
, nal last night. .
The event was warranted serios enough to rate
full air raid alert in the Canal Zone. But
1) Though the mystery plane fleer over Coco Sold.
Pedro Miguel and Miraflores, no shots wore fired at ft
It could have bombed at leisure;
2) Though the Army imposed a blackout, in its areas
the lights of Panam blazed like a guiding star;
3) Though the 250,000 residents of Panam City art
within the danger area of any bomb aimed at the Canal,
scarcely one of them knew an air raid alert was on. Or
what to do about it if there was a raid;
4) The navigation aids at Tocumen, expressly design-
ed to aid aircraft fix their position, remained in opera*
tion throughout the alert.
Th Isthmus' second genuine clear, ample time for a bomber
air raid alert In a little over a to drop Its load and be well on
year found the civilian popula-.the way home,
tion of Panama end the Canal The majority of residents of
Zone in almost as complete , military post* took shelter either
state of contusion as in the first in the basements of their con-
Mid IW l jfo mUlt>rv *'f:"\ WtrfWJtJfr TUT iW
Air raid sire,, andrteeta wltfi which to cover
Wurmen were busv today r*- Pm- *n' the *u cteir 8jfmaI themselves.
This preparedness was due to a
great extent to recent first-aid
courses, survival lectures and
programs that have been stress-
ed to military personnel here
and their dependents.
It was the civilian populace of
both the canal Zone and Pana-
ma that was lacking in prepar-
edness.
According to Canal Zone po-
lice who turned out in force at
the Balboa Station, there was
"considerable concern" In evi-
dence throughout civilian com-
munities. Although some peo-
ple were seen wandering a-
reund In the street* looking
(Continued on Pag* 8, Co!. 5)
Defense Mobilizer
Wilson Resigns;
Mad At Gov't
WASHINGTON, March 81
(UP) Charlea E. Wilson re-
signed today as defense mobtl-
rier. He said th* government
plan for settling the steel
ehriVe violated hi* "sense of
Jo* lee."
pairing the Ice-making machine
which broke down yesterday
caualng a third postponement of
"Holiday On Ice."
The ice-skating extravaganza
was originally scheduled to open
Friday night at the Olympic
Stadium, but Installation of the
Ice-making machine was de-
layed when some parts failed to
arrive in time.
The opening was rescheduled
for Saturday night but lighting
trouble caused a second post-
ponement.
Everything wss all set for the
delayed debut last night when
the machine broke down.
The manager of the troupe,
which staged several successful
shows in South America, said It
will take a few days to repair
the machine, but the show
should be ready for its first pre-
sentation before the end of this
week.
It also was announced today
that persons who want refunds
on their tickets may turn them
in at Mauricio'* store oq Cen-
tral Avenue.
came through at 12:08.
A military spokesman foe
Caribbean Command today
said that the "unidentified ob-
ject was probably a local plane
off its course.
It was picked up by the radar
screen over Coco Solo, and
tracked as flying south over Pe-
dro Miguel and Miraf lores.
After it passed over Pedro Mi-
guel, according to the spokes-
man. "It faded away."
The military spokesman said
nothing of the plane's height or
speed, which can supposedly be
estimated on radar screens.
Prom all indication*, the mili-
tary were better prepared for
this alert than on Feb. 25, 19S1
when a mysterious plane was re-
ported travelling at a high alti-
tude and fast speed over the
Qatun Lock* area.
This time, the Armed Forces
Radio 8tatlon remained on the
air throughout the alert, cau-
tioning listeners that this was a
real air raid alert and that they
should "go to the nearest place
of safety."
Panama residents received r>i
such warning till Just on the all
Batista Did Not Think Up Cuban Coup;
Inside Story Only Involves 15 Men
HAVANA, March 31 (UP) | His answer at the time was a
Sources close to Gen. Fulgencio flat negative, they said.
Batista's refusal took much of
Batista, Cuba's new chief of
state, disclosed the Inside story the
of his March 10 military coup to-
day.
Two things stand out from this
rebelliousness from their
spirits. Their restlessness was
tempered also by Prio's removal
of Major Gen. Genovevo Peres
inside account: 1) The idea of Damera as Army Chief of Staff.
the coup waa not born with Ba-
tista, but came from younger of-
ficers of the armed forces; and
2) Not more than 16 men were
Involved In the revolt, which took
only two hours and 16 minutes
to reach a successful conclusion.
The coup was so swift, In fact,
that people first believed a deal
between Batista and deposed
President Carlos Pro Socarras
had brought It about. But such
wa* not the case.
Three weeks of Intensive pre-
paration and secret planning
Coded the barrack* coop,
task waa accomplished by
several group* net known to
each other.
It wa* not until March 8, two
day* before the coup, that all of
the 15 conspirators finally met.
Then they made a death pact
stipulating any leakage of plana
by one or more meant instant
death at the hand* of the oca-
era.
This resulted In what U now
known as the "best kept secret in
Cuban hl*tory."
A* some of the plotters tell It,
Batuta was secretly approached
as far back as eight month* ago
by Junior officer*, who sounded
b*m out on his willingness to lead
a military coop.
According to the account, a de-1 two afternoon newspapers make
cisin was made to approach Ba-"their appearance,
tista within the next 48 hours. Third, It had to be at a time
During that time Batista was when one of the plotters was of-
approacned also by two other fleer of the day at the big Camp
groups,
pletely
said to have been corn-
unaware of the others*
existence. They told him a story
too au-! similar to that of the first group
He had been getting .
thorltarlan, they said, and ap- and urged him to act.
parently Prio shared the younger All agreed on one point: senior
officers' feelings that the Major army officers were planning a
General might be receptive to an
offer by senior officers to take
over the presidency.
Three weeks before the March
10 coup Batista was said to have
been approached again by a
group of six captains and lieut-
enant*.
They warned him that se-
nior army officers were plan-
ning a coup for April and that
Gen. Ruperto Cabrera, who
succeeded Peres Damero as
chief of staff had been invited
to be leader.
Cabrera was said to have re-
fused but senior officers were
considering offering leadershlo
of th* movement to the gener.
There were half a doxen con-
spirators at this second meeting
described a* a representative
croa* section of the armed
forcea: one was an agent of the
Bureau of Investigation: anoth-
er, a police lieutenant; a third, a
coup.
The Junior officer* toM Ba-
tista they were tired of corrup-
tion In government. They stat-
ed they had nothing against
Carle* Hevia, the government's
candidate for the Jane 1 pres-
idential election, but that they
considered him net strong en-
ough and doubted hi* abttfty to
win.
They were afraid the opposi-
tion Orthodox < Reformist i Party
would win and that this would
touch off even greater civil dis-
order.
Batista finally agreed. He drew
up a master outline tor the coup,
set the stage and fixed the date.
His chief consideration was to
make it swift, dormite and blood-
less. Public resentment and re-
sistance resulting from bloodshed
were to be avoided by all mean*
Other Important considera-
tion* were: firat, silencing the
top general; another was with radio to prevent confusion and
the motorlxed section at police! possible disorder: second, because
headquarters; the fifth, a young no morning newspaper appear In
army captain attached to the Havana Mondays, the coup had
General Staff; and the alxth was to be pulled off between midnight
a former newspaperman. Sunday and noon Monday, when
Columbia military base.
Batana personally planned
and dictated the mass of intri-
cate details surrounding the
execution of the coup.
Since Camp Columbia, Cabana
Fortress and smaller military and
naval installations around Hav-
ana house nearly two-thirds of
Cuba's estimated 32,000 armed
men, Batista gave little thought
to provincial garrisons.
In its basic fundamentals, the
master plan was a simple one.
It called for seizure of every
Army, Navy and police top offi-
cial. It provided for armed occu-
pation of Cuban Telephone Com.
pany offices. It stipulated simul-
taneous occupation of all radio
broadcasting stations.
It provided that neither "Aler-
ta" nor "Crisol," the Monday aft-
ernoon papers, should be allowed
to appear If fighting developed.
All these thing* were carried out
to the letter.
The only casualty was one of
"the conspirators: Lt. Julin Ne-
grete of the National Police. He
commanded a prowl car which
tried boldly at 6:30 a.m. that
March 10 to high-pressure sur-
render of the presidential palace
by It* guard*.
Batista's first proclamation as
he took office was to promoto
Negrete posthumously to the
rank of captain.


-
y
PAGE T>0
THE MNMA AMWUCA* AN rNDl>P*Nnr-NT OAIT.T NtWrAPR
' ii*i m i i i- > i nn am ft i i ii mi i
MONDAY, MARCH SI, 1951
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13.00
t4 o
roatway and fclsewhere
by Jock Loit
Tobacco heir R. J. Reynolds will tour Norwegian waters
this biuiur in tris ioo-.on vacil. hes having built to his order
In ngland... Nelson Eddy will hit the baritone comeback trail
in the movies. (With a song in his heart, no doubt i. .Erie Stanley
Gardner, the top defective mystery writer, came here on 30 min-
utes' notice to cover the Button trial for a mag. But he's due
In El Paso Monday, at sunrise, to take off en an expedition
1r:o a virtually u.i-explored section of Mexico, with mules
placid strategic points that can be reached by plane.Paul
W.i.t-man has a birthday tomorrow1, says Ted Saucier.
The mystery which has our top musicians goggle-eyed to
% your._ fellow named Johnnie Ray. They scream that he "can t
tot- And yet he is a sensation, and his platter of "Cry" has
old 2,000,000. I've never heard or seen him In the flesh, and if
\s has a press agent I've never heard from him... He just tum-
id down $15,000 a week to play the Roxy, single. He will ap-
pear at the Copacabana here Apr. 10..I was dragged to hear
lis recordings. He Is an uninhibited enthusiast who "gives' as
ao one to whom I had ever listened before, except Eva Tanguay.
i could visualize him gesticulating, tearing his hair, writhing
over every note with "body English." Perhaps it's because
nost of us are subdued, afraid to act emotional, the young Ray
sxcites so many with his all-out delivery. This is no bobby-sox
phenom. The man who kidnaped me and insisted I hear that
record is rich. Intelligent, discriminating. He told me he had
played it dozens of timesand caught one of his maids
neaking it on while he was shaving. .Th's columnist who gave
Frank 8inatra his first widespread attention, will keep an eye
and ear on this latest discovery and report on him in the first
person.
Kim Hunter, who won the Oscar with her "Streetcar" per
formance, and who Is all over B'way on screen and in person
this week, to known as plain Janet Cole In her native city, Mi-
ami. Patricia Smith, ingenue in "Point of No Return" seen at
Little Bohemia with Phil Arthur. Johnny Johnston and Shir-
ley Carmel, who, thev say, are washed up, didn't act like it at
the Little Club... Robert Quariie, supposed to be No. 1 in Ver-
onica Lake's life, dating actress Constance Ford. Jo Sullivan,
petite performer, who leaped from a chorus to soloing at the
Downbeat Club, will wed Don Jacobs, advertising man, in June.
Bin Tabbert, of "8o. Pacific." was screen-tested by 20th-
Fox in a set specially designed to set him off..Five days after
Isabel Leighton's program, "How Did They Get That Way?",
which was lauded here, went off TV because sponsors didn't
agree with us, the show was nominated for the Peabody award...
Screen-writer Leonard Neubauer planed in from H'wood to
prooose to Carole Ingersoll. She said sure. .Dick Estes, cousin
Of Sen. Kefauver, would like to have Jo Anne Daum, of the
textile tribe, join the family... A big movie studio has a problem.
One of its newest stars has a new wifeand the first one says
there's been no divorce that she knows about. The second mar-
riage was secret.
Labor INewa
And
Comment
By Victor Rletel
No Comfort in the Crystal Ball
Nicky Pennud, pretty niece of the ex-Premier of France,
get around the town with Don 8immons.. Martin St Lewis,
on last night's Colgate Comedy Hour, scored 48.1 on Tendex
tec-city rating, a new high for the tireless team. Ramon
Kovarro, who made his mark as an acting idol, auditioned for
NBC as a singer. No verdict yet.. Caswell Massey, oldest phar-
macy in the country, celebrated its 200th anniversary yester-
day with a party and disnlay of pharmaceutical antiques..
Nina Foch escorted by producer Robert Joseph at Fay Ross's
Been at Gogl's: Anna Buckles of "Mrs. McThing," and Mar-
lene Dietrich with Iva Patcevlch. Cloris Leachman, stage ac-
tress, hopes there'll always be a George Englund... And the map
of John Ireland sagged when his ex demanded more alimony.
Sonja Henle flew to Havana yesterday to Join her company
Of 200 to play the Blanaulta Theatre, biggest in the world, for
21 days.. .I'm sorry to disappoint my New York fans," the gra-
cious star said. "Circumstances over which we had no control
prevented our appearance here this year. But we'll be backand
we'll skate in the streets if necessary." The Blanqulta, larger
than the Radio City Music Hall, has its own iced stage, 128 feet
by 80 feet.
Big-wigs of television and radio will get together in Chi-
cago next Wednesday, from all over. They will be entertained
by Lou Holtz, Pattl Page, Kay Thompson, Whiteguards Quar-
tette (don't know 'emi, and Lew Diamond and orchestra.. Not
one of these ever scratched the surface of radio or TV.
When spring training starts for
John L. Lewis' squads, he goes
south. They swing north.
And I mean swingbaseball
bats, ice picks and assorted clubs.
They've been pitching, too.
Rocks, rotten eggs and, here and
there, the noisiest dynamite
sticks.
' Lewis can rest that old gray
name easily down at Floridas
Pine Island. His boys are going
like a house afireand those
words are not loosely chosen.
Apparently the police of at
least four states aren't over-en-
thused by John L.'s flying squads,
nor the bloody riots, nor the ex-
plosions, nor the destruction of
property, right up from Ken-
tucky, to Virginia, to central
Pennsylvania and into the Bronx
itself, in which there's nothing
deeper than the subway.
In these areas the police are
looking Into a wave of violence,
during which hundreds of
thousands of dollars worth of
equipment has been destroyed;
men's homes have been invad-
ed; men's wives and mothers
denounced as prostitutes;
streets bloodied by riots;
houses set afire; cars destroy-
ed; and men told they'd never
survive going to work in cer-
tain areas.
Yet the old Hamlet muses qui-
etly in the sun of Pine Island.
Why no word when. In duly
sworn and filed statements, one
of his ex-officers in Virginia at-
tests in a case soon to be tried
that said official, Charles Min-
ion, was ordered to murder two
mine owners?
Why the noisy and noisome si-
lence when the Virginia author-
ities have arrested six of his ex-
officials and soon will try them
on a series of charges of willful
destruction of property, amongst
other details?
Why silence when Pennsylva-
nia's Atty. Gen. Robert E. wood-
side orders the State Police to
probe into 12 instances of dyna-
miting, arson and blasting of
equipment worth $500,000?. The
last "incident" blew sky high a NEw YORKIt strikes of a sudden that yon
$73,000 shovel belonging to theldo not eennany fat ladles around any more,
Cavalier Coal Co. at Coupon, *nd that, ln the cltle* at le**t, the comfortable
Thick Thoughts
By BOB RUARK
A beer brand and an auto company are finding their week-
end tele tab too heavy. They may alternate and go once-a-fort-
nlght. .The nightclub union and John Rlngllng North will come
to terms before the Circus opens..Harry Ricnman, in his Mi-
ami engagement, showed the effects of living on a Nevada
ranch, didn't seem to be the fashion-plate of old. Al Hudson,
former public -relations head and vice president of Colonial
Alr'ines, has Joined the David E. Green publicity organization
. .General David Samoff, the top NBC boss, world-famed for
his engineering genius, is now busy with only two major phases
of televisionsales and program.
Joey Bishop, Latin Quarter comic, was in Hollywood two
years, worked right along, but not in the movies. Now the night-
club critics have discovered him and screen scouts are on his
neck and whispering ln his ears. Shirley Temple's little daugh-
ter looks like her and has precocious talent. But Shirley wants
her to lead a normal lifeno show business, for several years,
at least. .Convicts may not be photographed by civilians. So all
the "prisoners" in Stanley Kramer's ''My Six-Convicts" were
played by San Quentln guards.
Western correspondents have alerted their home desks to
Siclal codes which will flash the death of Stalin, when censor-
Ip will clamped on news from behind the Curtain.
The truly valiant trouper of them all to Grace George, here
ln Somerset Maugham's adult comedy, "The Constant Wife,"
with Katharine Cornell and Brian Aherene. She has played
more parts than most of the current crop of actresses ever
read. For more than a half-century she was the wife of the
great showman, William A. Brady. She looks frail, but she is
still durable. Miss George has elected to make the road tour
with the company. Some say this will be her last play on Broad-
way, the street she has graced for generations. But I hope
that to not true.
That eoffee party the three money-guards had ln the drug
store near Boston cost more than the Boston Tea Party.
THIS IS YOU pOIIUM TMI MAQUIS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
p torum far r.od.r. of Th* Panama Amr
oi4 hapdlaa ir a wholly can
The Mail Ban it
can Letter* era rataivao araratully
MantMl maanar.
I yto awtrfctiH a tattai aWt be impartan* if n atoa**'!
tat alar* lattar ana p.klnhta ia Km ., ,,
ftaajM ry to kaaa fHa latNn limit.4 to on, aaaa tapath
laaPttty a lattar wrftan a) Mid In rtnctttt caaddanca
T** .'"y."" " mftmtmi fa atamaati at .pipto*.
OateajM m latfau tram raaaan.
, 0
Cambridge County, Pa.
This terror spread right Into
the heart of New York City
when John Lewis' organisers
raided a plant which was al-
ready unionised by Phil Mur-
ray's CIO Steel Workers. John
L.'s District W organizers sim-
ply walked Into a meeting, gave
It the old treatment, forced
Phil Murray's man to adjourn
it, took over the platform
and elected their own officials.
Jnat like that. Then they claim-
ed the onion. Real fraternal
spirit. Unity of the working
class and all that, while Mar-
ray is busy on the steel wage
front.
Caught in the middle was the
employer and the CIO steel un-
ion (at the Art 8teel Co., 585 East
170th Street. New York City) Dis-
trict 50 called a strike and the
ensuing mine workers' riot forced
the owner to call the constabu-
lary.
In the words of the proprietor:
"This rioting became quite se-
rious. The police went Into ac-
tion. It resulted in several split
heads, mouth Injuries and other
Eersonal injuries to the workers,
everal arrests were made."
From affidavits filed in court,
I learned that one worker was
told the Lewis squads threatened
to weat him and his family. An-
other Lewis goon said, "Go ahead
and tell the cops, I have some-
thing here and we'll fix you
good."
Another worker was told he'd
never be permitted to sleep if he
stayed with the CIO. Still anoth-
er was approached by a Lewis
man and told they'd break up
his car with clubs and then come
to his home and "finish the Job."
Another ClO'er saw goons giv-
ing his auto a going over with
Ice-picks. Tires were slashed on
other automobiles. Fenders rip-
ped off others.
When the female employes
tried to report for work, one
Lewis organizer said, "Now
we'll go after the girls and get |
each and every one of them."
Men loyal to the CIO were hit
types who are generally described as "motherly"
are I have not yet made up my mind whether
this to good for the nation or not. but I think
it is bad from -a personal standpoint.
. I love fat ladies. They look tike ladies, and
they are generally Jolly and they were 'most
always magnificent cooks.
They never ate much at the table, maybe,
but they were always tasting things in the
kitchen, and tasters do not generally feed out
of cans.
A lot of the ladles I see around are pinched
ln the face end severe around the lips, due
the Charleston. It would make me insecure.
It used to be regarded as one of the boons of
living to grow comfortably old and allow thing*
to slide a bit.
After the old man began to shine high on
the head and the kids were coming along ln
sufficient numbers to assure the succession, the
lady of the house was supposed to quit count-
ing calories and playing Tneda Bara roles around
the Saturday party.
An overblown femme fatale to a nerve-rack-
ing thing to have around the house, especially
If she keeps playing filly when ah* starts nudg-
ing on the fifties.
It to undignified for parents to stay kittenish
too long. It shames the young, because no mat-
ter how sharp the old folks try to be, they can
to not having eaten a square meal ln years in never quite handle that new slang,' and
a misguided effort to stay lean and actively
competitive with the upstarts.
I am not a little girl, but if I were a little
girl, it seems to me I would resent a mother
who was all the time wearing my clothes and
shining up to the boy friends in one of those
semi-false efforts at pretending to be sixteen,
too.
As my own shadows lengthen, I keep running
across a woeful amount of coy grandmothers
with poodle haircuts and the generally restive
air of a grass widow making the final desper-
ate stab at the obdurate bachelor.
Miss Gloria 8wanson and Miss Marlene Diet-
rich are mighty cute, but I will not wish to own
either as a grandmother. They would make
can still hear the old bones creak when
band plays too long.
The gents are still a little less -apt to fret
about figures and multiple chins than the la-
dles, but It seems to me the males are off on
this extended kittenish kick, too.
They are, in many cases, trying to pretend
that they are still devils if left unwatched, and
as nimble as ever on a tennis court. A lot of
'em drop dead from overexertlon at both sports.
There Is something a touch phony and a lit-
tle sad about this clutching for eternal youth,
and trying to stave off the autumnal frosts
forever.
Nobody likes to grow old, but it does include
some of the boons of moderation, relaxation
?- ^T-ui 0VeI thu .lonf..iau1' always dieting and freedom from spirited competition.
and doing up the hair different and working
on the make-up.
When I see the word "grandma" It connotes
something along the lines of white hair, am-
ple bosom, honest wrinkle* and a generally
satisfied expression born of unleashing the
whalebone and spreading comfrotably.
I do not see shoulderlea* gowns and uplift
The young must beat their brains out and
fly off ln an directions. The mellowed man or
woman walks the shady side of the street and
quits taking the stairs at a gallop.
I blame this fanaticism for extreme and
permanent thickness on a lot of the strife that
afflicts that middle-aged.
The addition of comfortable flesh to normal,
and at all times prevents a headlong fling at
nSSSt^ JSX^^ !n2 l""" ,0 tifht <""ter, nee undue exartien in any direction
Grandmother daren't set and rock. is too much trouble.
IwWfulr_,nftJUk' any frandma of mine out The fact that I have recently gained -15
n^SSViS^f1^^*.1 * ?* ,d ,*oat*. *5 the Pundi hM notnln* whatsoever to do with the
neighborhood, kicking up th heels and doing writing of this piece.
Disarmament
By Peter Eoson
WASHINGTON(NEAlNew efforts by the
is. government to obtain United Nations a-
Ti.!<,r,JWwY,.eywwer;.lL" ^aewtnt on toUraational ESSuEStomu
body and told thev had no i
1 aft*T^nt0n tip?. hSri ?ntJ?',k. ^L8 P",cl" in Korea' Prop!* tor a $81 billion U.S. de-
iP.^J^.RlwtK^ten; ? hi -U *nd tne bulldln UP of General EisenhoweF's
wife and kids. Told him not to go European armjr, any talk of reducing armaments
ity Council would give Russia veto power ovar
every proposal.
The American-British-French disarmament
plan, en the other hand, offers a workable for-
mula.
What's more, this plan has been approved
by the military authorities of the major West-
ern powers. It to a plan they are prepared to
carry out as proposed and live with after
Its adoption.
This plan would involve first a census and
i ciulvuly VSUM4T0H,
MERRY-00-ROUND
I* OMW MAMN
I
Drew Pearson says: Brewster-Grunewald financial deal
needs probing; King committee reluctant to query
Senator; Maine Republican also dabbled in wire-tap-
ping.
WASHINGTONSenatorial colleagues figure there to more
than meets the eye behind the $10,000 transaction between Sen-
ator Brewster of Maine and Henry Orunwald, undercover lob-
byist, wire-tap expert, and tax fixer.
The senator from Maine appeared briefly before the King
Subcommittee last week and testified he had paid Grunewald
$10,000 ln order to cover up two $5,000 contributions given to
the primary campaigns of Senators Nixon of California and
Young of North Dakota. Grunewald, Brewster claimed, had
served as the conduit to pass the money on to their campaigns.
However, Senators Nixon and Young knew nothing about
the deal and were sore as blazes when Brewster sprang his out-
of-the-blue testimony.
It would be a matter of mere routine investigation tor the
King tax-fraud committee to have delved deeper into the
strange relations between the senator from Maine and- Wash-
ington's most unusual tax-fixing lobbyist.
Nevertheless, Brewster was asked few questions by the King
committee.
He was not asked why he had saved Grunewald from a con-
tempt citation by the Senate; or why he had used Grunewald
in a wire-tapping deal; or whether he, as chairman f the
Republican committee on Senatorial elections made It a prac-
tice to Ignore the rules of his party and contribute to one
Republican's nomination as against another Republican.
Furthermore, Brewster will be asked none of these questions
later. It's against the rules of the club. Members of Congress
Just don't embarrass each other.
Other witnesses can be grilled, day after day, they can be
Insulted and badgered on the witness stand. Tney can be
thrown Into Jail If they refuse to answer questions.
But the unwritten law of Congress is that you don't ask
embarrassing questions of a fellow member of Congress. The
King committee has done an excellent Job on othef matters, but
It won't violate this rule.
STRANGE FRIENDSHIP
However, since the public Is entitled to know all the facts
regarding the men who write the laws which the public has to
follow, it to altogether fair to point to some highly significant
facts in the relationship between Senator Brewster and mystery
man Henry Grunewald which the King committee passed over.
Grunewald, who has refused to name the source of about a
uarter of a million dollars, was such a familiar person around
rewster's office that Brewster and staff called him "Henry." ,
He was also on familiar terms with Pan American Airways '
for whom he admits "checking" telephone wires.
Brewster also happens to be close to the giant Pan American
XT*/8 ,comb,nein fact, has done so many favors for them
that he is sometimes called "the Senator for Pan American "
.... n "I4?."!7, Brew!f,r was Push'ng his "chosen instrument"
bill to abolish competition between different U.S. airlines over-
seas putting all of them in the hands of one company instead.
Pan American wanted this bill passed, was lobbying vigor-
ously for It figured Pan Am would be the "chosen instrument-
to handle all U.S. air traffic overseas.
But Trans-World Airlines, headed by Howard Hughes, was
opposed
Hughes figured that under the Brewster bill TWA would be
amalgamated with Pan American. He favored free American
competition.
Brewster whose business was to legislate, not negotiate pri-
vate business deals, made an amazing approach to Hughes, ask-
ed him to sell out to Pan American Hughes refused.
STRANGE INVESTIGATION
Brewster was atoo chairmanIn 1947 of the powerful
senate Investigating Committee, lonnerly under Sen Harry
iruman. *
And with the Republicans controlling congress in 1B47,
?hIt"^ri,SgRn. Vrobe of ?owa.rd Hughes. Many people fe
fihi. ijfii al tie ean3rk8 o a blackmail probe to far*
Hughes to do business with Pan American Airways. -
lean Jt ? wLl'^t' *!"&* f'80 ^P**1 to the Un-Amer-
f. a n iLtt^.ln. ^e Washington police tap the telephona
wires of Howard Hughes and his attorneys at a wSfifigton
th. i^tt if ame. 9&duS5?* the wire-tap investigation b
1950 District of Columbia committee In the summer of
rv. ft1!.!*-?"* where runeyald was voted a contempt citation
trim King8 to ja"? (,ue,ttons' and where Brewster saved EK
m.T!*aa,:lng.hmBvabout the wire-tap on Hughes' telephone
riJaL*!? d01* .by the Washington police, with Brewster
and Grunewald operating in the background. """vswr
.PtiiY5 cLiflcer wh. PPlled the teP and listened in tes-
tified that reports went to Grunewald. They were also lruitrue.
The'S1en n^hC?iIViln?rmaUo.n abo^Waier^lane deaL
H.mn?n^ *r?J, ^hese Washington policemen occurred ln a free
democracy not in a police state such as Russia or Argentina
th.i A. .kman wno got them assigned to the job wu nona
other than the senior senator from Maine
AMATEUR SLEUTH PROM MAINE
for the^an olfr8ttCaliledT,? attoney Morris Fay, and asked
ror tne loan of Lt. Joe Shimon. Fay refused to enonaeat
.ir,,fr*.W.8L,tnenJwen,t dlrect to chief V Wlfflwit
Shrt J'*ted.undir iire' and ^l *ot the use of Lt -ShimSn
iTStthexp?rt wlre-tAPPer of the police squad Bnunon'
mi^ 5 S!f committee under Matt Neely of West Vir-
&^V^TVTA^W^ 8-"tar/thaWe hd
A policeman also said that Shimon exhihited si dm <...* ~
Gerewfa?dm hus? ra^xw^S^?
Hendrickson a place on
V

to work. All ln the heart of New may sound like a w'aste of "time. But" in thlspre-
ft.a.^J--.J5J.agjffssr.wnass ^-affwiSi?
porary injunction against Lewis
LETS GET ORGANIZED. GRANDMAS
Sirs:
IJUad_HLe *rtlole to Thursday's Mail Box from P'or Ole
Grandma with a great deal of interest. I car. see rand nos-
tfUUtlM to a club for grandmas where handicrafts Ire taught
fBe.bJ'0!?nl m' trav,li Tandil to Plnu of Interest, e\rd
games neia, etc
^ ."i* l .,uWe*t t P'or Ole Grandma since it was her Idea
thai he give a box number where we grandmas can writ, to
enroll and* thus get started. HI be the first to nrell *
Grandma Twice.
Mrs. 0. O. Parker
Box 771
Ancon. C.Z.
proletarian crusaders.
The miners' union went in on
appealand hired "Wild BUI"
Donovan's law firm. That's big
time.
But the steel workers, coun-
selled by their lone attorney,
William Auerbach, fought the
combination. And won.
And learned that Lewis' squads
had hired these nationally prom-
inent attorneys because this was
to be the klekoff for a series of
raids on CIO across country. But
they lost.
This time the muse of Pine Is-
land was not above the law. But
though the blood to off the slde-
wplks, It's still on his hands.
What sort of unionism to this?
oriswf; the tall
00+
1952 RED CROSS FUNI
The United States, Britain, France and 39 other
non-Communist countries made a lot of hay in This proposal would check anv Roviat Mffa
issrs.'SKis's'tti Wirssiisss ass* '"**"*"""3 ""e "* -n-
itructlons straightened out by Moscow -**
later, he changed his tune. But what cama
out was the same old song of a Rustan ai.,u
plan.
It called for: l) prohibition of all atomic
weapons, with all countries revealing their atom-
ic stockpiles within 30 days.
._?'.R*duetlon 0I m,Jr Powers' armies by one
third.
form by the new 12-natlon Disarmament Com-
mission now meeting in New York
Bonjamin V Cohen to the principal U.8 rep-
resentative. Vishinsky to not there, but his place
to taken by Jacob Malik.
While it to true that Russia will have a veto
in the approval of this treatythough not in
its later executionlt is pointed out that any
W^iSSLSSL
i
ThS gfmmlck. m this Rus-ian plan have long Piito ^^ B^U ^ Ach" * *
been apparent
First, Russia
has inferior
bomb
ln urging the Russians to accept this pro-
posal "It contains no tricks."
If the Russians don't take it, the rtsponslbll-
w'" a wienor atomic
Uffta&e16 bMm* thelf "* WyUJd * m TiM -oTtheTr"heidT andThe'~WesTwl
SecoXRuwa. never demobiltoed after World SSt "^ *"**** -Commuhtot argu-
buyv\ia/
Opportunity knock*
every day In oar want-
ed section. Hard to
find items and amaz-
ing bareains in even
issue. New classified
ads appear... old ad*
disappearreason..
QUICK RESULTS!
Torn and check n-
want-ad now I
in
a
Every month . every weak . every aay
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE WANT ADS
than all other dairy papers in Panam combined t


'
m^

^
-
Till PANAMA AMERICAN A* IMDEPEHBWT OAltT KiWiMfW
paof nrare

Ex-OSS Man Icardi Challenges
Italy To rCome And Get Me
>
PITTSBURGH, March 31.(UP)Counsel
for a former OSS lieutenant accused of matermind-
ing the cloak-and-dagger slaying of his command-
ing officer while on a secret wartime mission in
Italy today blasted an announcement by the Itali-
an Justice Ministry as "an admission of defeat."
Ruggero Aldisert, legal counsel for Aldo Icardi,
who along with former OSS sergeant Carl LoDolce
of Rochester, N. Y is accused of murdering Maj.
William V. Holohan, said his client would "wel-
come" any attempt by Italian officials to have him
arrested.
"This is the beginning of the end aB far as
extradition attempts by Italy are concerned," Al-
disert charged.
All Isthmian Drama Festival
Awards Won By Theater Guild
LoDolce was picked up Friday
in Rochester and presently u
being held without bail pending
hearing on the murder charge
next Wednesday.
Earlier today, a spokesman
for the Italian government said
LoDolce's arrest did not mean
Italy had given up Its efforts to
have Icaral extradited.
"We regard our eaae against
LoDolce to be the stronger,"
the spokesman said. "It would
tern futile to take legal ac-
tion against the other man
(leant i) If we eannet gain ex-
tradition for LoDolee."
Icardi, when Informed of the
statement, immediately an-
nounced he would make no ef-
fort to evade arrest.
"I hope they do come and get
me," the 31-year-old lawyer
said. "It would give me the op-
portunity to lick the Italian
government on its own ground."
Meanwhile, Charles O. Notarl,
Italian vice-consul attorney
here, said he expected word
from the Italian Justice Min-
istry "possibly tomorrow" order-
ing" him tb file a Federal court
xiSltlbii for Icardl's arrest.
Aldisert disclosed he expects
to" confer with LoDolce's at-
torney; Thomas O. Presuttl, In
Pittsburgh over the weekend. He
did not disclose what Joint ac-
tion h arid Presuttl may take.
Italy began extradition pro-
ceedings last year after the
I!. S. Defensa Department
named Icardi and LoDolce as
Ms>. Holohan* layer. The
~*we former OI's Will be tried
%i Italy along with two Ital-
ian partisans provided ex-
tra 4 111 o n proceedings ara
cleared.
Refused ball oecanse of the
"seriousness" of the charge
against him, 10-year-old Lo-
Dolce revealed through his at-
torney Presuttl that the !*"*
'undoubtedly" will have to go
to the highest court of the land
t6 determine whether he can be
extradited.
"The case has a million rami-
fications and there Ik very lit-
tle Judicial precedent In this
thing," Presuttl said.
The attorney said he wanted
to determine whether any
American court has Jurisdiction
over his client, and whether
Lift Up Your Hearts

(A Lenten feature of the Pa-
nama-American prepared by the
Rev. M. A. Cookson, Episcopal
Cristobal!
"A STUMBLING BLOCK"
"But we preach Christ cruci-
fied.... a stumbling block."
Read I Corinth. 1:19-31
"A stumbling block," Is what
St. Paul calls the Crucifixion.
That God should let men kill
Him was an impossible situation.
Tet It happened. It happened
as goodness is usually crucified
by the forces of evil; by blind
men who cannot see beauty; by
corrupt men who cannot let
righteousness flourish else It
would destroy them; by proud
men, who cannot bear to let any-
thing stronger than themselves
live; by common men. such as
we,'whose lives are so dull and
complacent that any threat to
our elf-securlty, any upsetting
force, must be done away with.
To the disciples who thought
this Jesus of Nazareth was the
Christ, the Crucifixion was de-
feat and the end of hope. To the
rulers of the Jews. It was at last I
the end of a trouble msker who
taught disturbing and dlscon-
terthnr truths.
To the Roman officials, it was
to make more secure the estao-
llshed order of things. It was
dene for the sake of peace and
quiet.
The Crucifixion was the result i
of sin. It was the ultimate con- '
sequences of man's sin. It Is a
picture, drawn In stark, realistic
terms, showing; us what our sin
does to God
How did God respond from the
Cross? Not with thunderbolts
and hailstones, nor with cursing,
but with love, praying, 'Tather,;
forajfere them."
BV absorbing and accenting all
that was thrust upon Him by ,
man. God was Illustrating, In '
way even the most Illiterate of
men could understand, that "God
so loved the world." Here Is a
picture of God's love In action.
Ale knew what was In man."
four Lord knew that man will
never turn and be saved unless
he la loved into submission and
responds In faith to God. The
Crosa is a "stumbling block" to
many paople. because they have
no faith, no understanding of It.
to meet suffering and sacrifice
which Is a part of life.
the present Italian government
had any Jurisdiction in the
Alps territory where the killing
allegedly occurred.
In a surprise move, U. S.
marshals look LoDolee Into
custody Friday as he waited
for afternoon class to begin
In the main corridor of the
Rochester Institute of Tech.
nology.
LoDolce surrendered readily
and was whiskey away to Buf-
falo immediately by aptomoblle.
He didn't even have time to
telephone his family.
Assistant U. S. attorney Mi-
chael J. McMorrow said his of-
fice has no official Interest In
the proceeding at this point.
"Tnls merely throws the Uni-
ted States courts open so that
a determination In the matter
can be made In accordance with
American Judicial procedure,"
McMorrow said. "The disputants
are the Italian government and
the individuals concerned."
The charge against LoDolce
was "highly-aggravated homi-
cide and aggravated robbery."
Dr. Carlo Rama, Investigating
magistrate of the high court
of Verbania, made the inquiry
and Issued the certificate for
LoDolce's arrest. ,
The prisoner Is scheduled to
complete a course in mechanical
engineering at RIT in about two
weeks after three years of part-
time study and work.
His wife, Ruby, said he Is sup-
posed to graduate May 17 with
honors. They have two children.
The Italian government has
been trying for several months
to extradite LoDolce and Icardi
m the murder of Holohan. The
trio parachuted behind Ger-
man lines to organise and arm
Italian partisans.
When the Defense Depart-
ment released details of the af-
fair last August, It said the
major was murdered after he
and Icardi argued over how
much American aid should be
given to Italian Communists.
icardi allegedly felt they
should get immediate help while
Maj. Holohan wanted to move
nore cautiously.


Jkt-tUJ
NANCY DARLINGTON
The Theater Guild came out
of the Isthmian Drama Festival
at Crlstobsl High School last Sat-
urday night with all three blue
ribbon awards for the best ac-
tor, actress and direction.
Nancy Darlington won the
"best actress" award (or her por-
trayal of the old lady In "The
Old Lady Shows her Medals," the
play which also earned Mrs.
Gracelyn Johnston the blue rib-
bon for directing the "best pro-
duction ."
Douglas Maduro, who had the
male lead in "Old Lady," was the
winner of the "best actor" award.
Others in the cast of the prize-
winning production were: Peggy
Sylvestre, Kathleen Flnnlgan,
"Catsy" Taylor and Rov Gllcken-
haus, who assisted Mrs. John-
ston with the direction of the
play.
The Theater Guild won out
over the Cristobal Thespian
Troupe 217, which presented
Mooncalf Mugford;" Cristobal
Little Theater, "The Boor"; C.Z.
Junior College Dramatics Class,
"The Drums of Oude," and Bal-
boa High School, "A Marriage
Proposal."
The Isthmian Drama Festival
was presented last Thursday and
Saturday nights in observance of
International Theater Month,
instituted by UNESCO.
Anti-French Riots
Kill 3 In Tangier
TANGIER, March 31 (UP).
Police guarded all strategic
points in this international oi-
ly today after at least three
persons were killed and scores
more Injured In anti-French
rioting yesterday.
Police fought a two-hour pitch-
ed battle yesterday with
thousands of Moorish demon-
strators armed with clubs, rocks
and knives.
me re uri
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-
page rom
'
THIC PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAII.f NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, MARCH II, 1MI
i inn"
Cargo and FreightShips and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
.______. .-*._______-__^______^___.____.___________-____,__________________I__
None But The Most Callous
Disturbs Irish Leprechauns

WASHINGTON. March of ft leprechaun mound on the
Nighttime is the time for thei grounds of a housing project
i..little people to be abroad, danc- near Limerick. Workmen order-
* lug their dances, doing their ed to bulldoze the mound re-
Jf.work and repairing damage fused. They had no desire to
- Sone by ordinary people. [ disturb and displease the little
.. Nowrere, observes the National people.
Geographic Society, Is this bet-. Outside workmen were called
i ter known than in Ireland.1 in and soon had the hill half
There the little people are removed. That night the mound
' household familiars. There was rebuilt. The newcomers
many floors are not swept be-j then wisely abandoned the job,
tween sunset and sunrise for! and the project was built
'. fear of dusting the tiny guests arounV the mound.
out the door, and there food Is The workmen were only fol-
left by doorstep or hearth when lowing their good Irish sense,
ordinarv people go to bed. and custom of long standing
Ireland's little people arc when they refused to level the
mostly beneolent. even helpful/mound. None but the most cal-
and guiltv only of Innocent mis-'lous or unmindful will distrub
chief, such as keeping butter: the haunts of the little people,
from churning, or teasing nor- be they mounds or lone thorn
aes in the stabes. trees "fairy trees."
But the little little people Respect for tltr little peo-
School Days
Answer to Prtviou PuzzU'
are. not to be crossed, be
they leprechauns, the shoe-
makers and keepers of trea-
sure in the fairy world, or
any of their numerous kin-
folk.
pie is not confined to Irish
workmen. A dignified pro-
fessor of geography at
Queen's University in Bel-
fast wrote:
"A venerable thorn, pink-
A captured leprechaun. If held| HoTering. stands under my
firmly and looked straight in window as I write and casts its
the eye, has no choice but to ha'iow into the senate room of
tell the location of buried gold.
But he Is tricky, and can always
divert attention. When his cap-
tor glances away as the Iit-
the university. But no one will
remove It or even lop off its(
ranches, and the story goes
that when the buildings were!
tie man will make him do bemK erected the plans had tol
be changed in order that the
thorn should not be interfered
with."
Padraic Column, the Irish
poet, in "The Road Round Ire-,
land," tells of an agricultural [
laborer who refused ground of-i
fered him for his own farm be-,
cause there was a "fort" or
mound on it, "and on no ac-i
count would he interfere with1
the fairies' home.''
Not all people of the other
Hansen^was walking across a, world are benevolent The. late
water-lev! bridge when a deer Dorm Byrne, in the National
came outiof the lake and attick-' Geographic Magazine, declared
ed him. i that "the most terrible demon
Hansen fired his shotgun at in all Europe is the Irish Ro-
the leprechaun disappears, no
matter how firmly he is held.
There is a recent news story
Hunter Gets His
Venison Hard Way
MYRTLE BEACH. S.C.. March
39 i UPi Carsten F. Hansen had
venison fjjr*dinnep but he came
by the mR,the htroV.way
HORIZONTAL
- 1 Tirst reader
7 Popular school
period
13Grad- again
14 Satiric
15 Fends off
16 Hail
17 Number
18 Fencing
words
20 Operate
21 Goddess Cu
discord
23 Hotel
24 Decree
25 Lines in
trigonometry
27 Italian poet
28 Spelling ------
29 Billowed
30 Multiplication
33 Border
34 Went astray
35 Knee-cap
39 French friends
40 Foreguard
41 Union fees
42 Folding bed
43 Pivotal point
45 Coins (ab.)
46 Gap
48 Descendant of
i Ham
50 Coarse herb
31 Mountain
spurs
62 Lessee
53 Buries
s VERTICAL
1 Talks idly
2 Venerate
3 Peaceful,
4 Damage
5 Suffix
6 Intermissions
7 Ascended
8 Ages
9 Mountain pass
10 Accustoming
11 Place
12 Perfumed
19 Abstract being
22 Costly furs
24 Cultivated
2fi Require
27 Song for two
29 Ship forcibly
30 School room
boss
iadr.3wraig'nigMig''=*i=j
aBBHi=4i24nMI=ild"J^"
raOMEMHill^eidWW -i
BOIr-lllKflH
31 Cupboard
32 British empire
35 Cooking vessel
36 Plastic
compound
37 Part of the
alphabet
38 Rate for
taxes
40 Cap part
43 Immense
44 Merit
47 High explosive
49 Encountered
>
COfi-AHY has beooeo Jo
eNUST Foecxies AM> uko
IN TH TREASURE HUNT-
-AMt> IF WE DO
"ME DIGGING.
WiMV'tLGlVB"
US 20%OF"ME
fMMMi
*9
WOW/
twar
klWDA
CABWGC
I'D DO
AWVrWNG-
Evew
WORK
So 6E rr.' but we oorr] mum
WANT A STAMPeoe, SO
Kjuve earth swear
TO CUM UP.'
iAmd we wont have it>_o*s- "'
iAu5lks HE TALKS IN HIS
X*-
nuxr oop
Work? Aw, Doc!
BT P. T. HAMLrW
the animal but the pellets only
infuriated the deer.
Hanserj'fled to the ocean a few
yards away with the deer in hot
pursuit
Hanson's boots filled with wat-,
er and 'weighted him down, so he
turned and kiUed the deer with
the butt of his gun.
"His comment: There must be
an easier way."
GIVE!
1952
RED CROSS
fUHD
bert Artisson, who was the fa-
miliar of the dreadful Lady
Alice Kyteler of Kilkenny, foul-
est of, witches."
Death-Dealing Bee
Wipes Out Parrot
PORTLAND. Autralia. March
(UPiWhen Mrs. Deneese Min-
ogue. a Portland telephone oper-
ator, came home from work her
pet Rosella parrot usually greet-
ed her with "Hello, number
please."
One night it didn't. It lay dead
on the floor of Its cage. In its
beak was a bee, still alive.
The bird had been stung on its
tongue, which had swollen and
choked it.
Police Oblige
FORT WORTH. Ter. (UP)
The longer a shivering 54-year-
old man talked, the more con-
fused he got about ftie robbery
he was trying to report to police.
Finally, he asked officers to let
him stay in jail until he could
"warm up" and get his story
straight. Police accommodated
with the warmest cell in the
house, and a charge of drunken-
ness.
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840
Royal Halls Lines Ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA _________
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SALAVERRY" .............................April 3rd
M.V. "LAGUNA"..................................April 18th
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA. KINGSTON.
HAVANA. NASSAU, BERMUDA, CORUA,
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO'" (18,000 tons).. ..May 31st
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. "CUZCO" ..................................April 46th
M.V. "SALAMANCA" .i\...................f.K.s..April 27th
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
BOOTS ANT) HER KIDDIES
Now What?
BT EDGAR MARTIN
M.V. "LOCH.RYAN"

.................March 31st
S.S. "DONGEDYK" ..___..............----March 31st
TO UK/CONTINENT
8.S. "DIEMERDYK" .............................April 4th
AD sailings subject to change without notice.
PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO., Cristbal Tel. 1654/5
FORD CO. INC.
( PANAMAAve. Pern #55 Tel. 3-1257/8
I BALBOATerm. Bldg. Tel. 2-1905
fcOVfi ,\ SO SOR9.V P*OOT
NOOP \WJM>TM*NS\ '. I--------
CAPTAIN EAST
Coming Out
BT LESLIE Tt'RNl
fveryhoAy Hea$ Classfie J*
CHRIS WELKEN. rianeteer
Fire Treatment
BT RLSS WINTERBOTHAM
AS TUt Wy FBOM TME CH6WCAJ
Fiee BXTiHbuwee strike* the
CARBfM-WVR AMAZIHG THIN6 HAPPEN5--
(XDU'T I MEAR SOU *CREAM
WHEN YOU WE*IT OUT TO
GET MY OVERWGHT CASE ?
OH, DEAR! THATSNOT
THE ONE I
VIC FLINT
Rail Is Not at Home
cy. mi i, w< t~^-. khiw. u. t:rx. <
BY MICHAEL O'MAU.ET
priscilla's pop
B Sharp
BT AX VERB
LGS BUNNT
And No Sale
W*MM.' THBKS aint
NONS ON TH' 4W-*U/
X'U. HAVS T WON*
in A CAM TO
-n-ffTOm *oo*v'
-. fUrf- I HAPCT. P THt*
OUT oe A LOT O'OnHWC
tuff, cicweo/
HOW AAANV-
nscKAM*
I WANT TO MAKS
A COPY OF TUB
0O% TOP*, 40
I CAN ENTER
A CONT*T
THaTr'Re,
OUR BOARDING HOI SE .... with .... MAJOR BOOPLE OUT OUR TAT
B] J. R. WILLIAM!
how are you
COMInS \nith-
fHEr tuck away
TIE FOR. CHRONIC ,
GRAVY DROOLERS abqut Ready
hro FLOOD
THE
.MARKET/
ROLLER
HOLLOW
KNOT
THAT
POLLS
TIE OP
LIKE
NIWDOW
SHADE
E&AD.TWI666/ A CAPITAL NAME *^
FOR THE PRODUCT/THE PROJECT
HAS REACHED THE STAGE WHERE
I'M PREPARING T> RIG UP A
WORKING A\ODL PROW THl k
desist.'m/ at least it will plant in martha's
Mind The idea that i'M
Busy, Afjo she v^/on^t
BUZZ. ABOOT V EARS^
dLUJii, chores/
THE
TIE
PULLED
UP INTO
KNOT
&>i
'Me
SbNT
BET On
^THAT
. Though


MONDAT. MARCH 31, 195
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT IMIf.T NEWSPAPER
PAGE rivi
l^arific S^otietu
*
&. 17. #JL. D.l &/U, 35Q1
\r
OFNERAL AND MRS. McBRIDE
TO BE ENTERTAINED
The Coinmsnder-in-t'lilef of the Caribbean Command,
Major-Gen. Horace L. McBrlde and Mrs. MoBride 111 be the
honor guests at a reception lo be given tomorrow evening
at the Albrook Uflicera Club by Brigadier Gen. Robert L.
Howze and Mrs. Howze.
Countess de Rabago
Gives Farewell Luncheon
'i he wife of the Ambassador of
Spain to Panama, the Countess
de Rabago. was hostess to a
group oi her friends on Thurs-
day at a farewell luncheon anil
card party given In honor of Mrs.
Enrique Miro Quesada at the
Embassy.
French Bankers
II niurrd At Cocktail Party
The French bankers. Messieurs
V. Monlelro. Rene Darquler, A!-
rede Pese and H. Lebay wtre
honored at a cocktail party Sat-
urday evening given by the
Charge d'Affaires of France In
Panama and Mrs. Marcel Olivier
at the Legation on La Cresta.
Mrs. H. Vance Howard. Jr.,
will lead the devotlonals.
Mrs. Campbell To Return Home
Friends of Mrs. W. W. Camp-
bell of Albrook Air Force Baf.e
will be Interested toknow that
she Is to return to her home to-
morrow from the Fort Clayton
Army Hospital, where she has
been a patient for some time,
and that she expects to win the
grand prize at bingo Wednesday
evening.
<*
*'
A'
-
jrr"
fi-
ri*
r
A
r-
t*:\
a'

Mr. and Mrs. McOrath
Leive For Europe
; G: t'i of El Coco del Mar left for
N2w York Saturday morning by
plTiie en route to Paris and
Rome, where thrv will viMt Mr
McOrath's brother. Father Mark
MeOfath.
V 'ors In Interior
' s. Eugene Damon of Mar-
th-.'s Vineyard. Mass an<1 her
hosts, Mr. and Mrs. Stanlv F.
Yost. wee week-end visitors in
the Inferior.
Hmse Guests Of
M-. and Mrs. Hval
'r. and Mrs. Alfred Hval nf
P loa had as the'r house guest?!
lr- week Mrs. E"ei DHIv of
No-cross. Minn, and Mrs. Vincent
Di"v with ber son and dauphte-.
Prck and V'ffr, o Ramey, A.F.
B.. Puerto Rico.
M'** Roberta Hollander
Is "onor Stur*et
" s Ro^Pria Hollander,
rl- ^'er of M'\ ii"d Mrs. Ch-s.
B. T*"llander of Blbo*i. Is among
the honor 'iic'enta inclrded In
tb'f den's list at the Florldu
S'"> Unlvrsltv at Tallahassee.
"*' Holliirder has pln been
<'--'d as a junior counselor by
th" Women's Senate of F.S.U.
M' -i rerllln "-rfematte
E-'--tains T-a
"'s Cc"'" I'^urtemattp was
h" e^s *o > )"-<*e irroi'n "f hf.r
f''--1s Fr1'''"' H t'1 "pnien of
h h"m in Bcl'a VMa at a te-x
ci'r\ in ho"nr of fid I" frrew-'l
to 't co-sin. Mrs. Enrique Mi-
ro besada.
The honor guests teft the Tsth-
miNMbolnne Sat'ircta". to rat"m
to he^nome In L'rha. Ppi-h. after
a ' 't of wifpp' months with
j,.. ^tner T_S francisco Arias
P. of Panamn.
.li*><- H"'ed
'* Srm-
'?. TdwarH Pei'v o* Wvnnp-
'i Pfnn.. wl is p viUor P"
'-^hnM's a"d ,,1p *iO"s> -"ps*
-- nro"',er a1"1 t,*W**t-l*wi
- -ior Qpn. nd Mrs. Frar>f)s
"--v P"*
l^,h',rp'*<,v pvp"'-*~ pf v*,,r.
>or "iven at their quarters
~t Arfidor
. Re'lev Hans to lorP ev|
-.da" to rptnp-i to her home
he United Ftpfpg.
Dr. Hunt To Attend
! Meeting In Pittsburg
. Dr. Julian R. Hunt of the La
Boca Medical Clinic will leave
Thursday by plane for Pittsburg.
Penn.. where he will attend a
meeting of the American College
of Allergists.
The meeting will begin April 3
and continue through April 9.
Hamadan Grotto
To Meet Thursday
Hamadan Cot'o will hold Us
e-rular business meeting Thurr-
-v at 7:30 p.m. at the new Wlrz
eroorial Building, 808 Balboa
"*oad.
Cf primary Interest In the
business of the evening will oe
'he voting on changes to be
'?.de in the bv-laws. All mem-
bers are requested to attend.
Evening Guild Meets Tonight
The Evening Guild of the Ca-
thedral of St. Luke will meet
this evening at 7:30 at the home
of Mrs. Ernie Payne, 113 Ridge
Road.
Drama Festival Awards
Made Saturday
At the Isthmian Drama Festi-
val on Saturday night at Cristo-
bal High School the best play a-
ward was received by the Thea-
ter Guild, which presented "The
Old Lady 8hows Her Medals." di-
rected by Mrs. Gracelyn Johns-
tori.
The best actress award was
presented to Nancy Darlington
of the Theater Guild and Doug-
las Maduro received the best ac-
tor awprd. Mr. Maduro Is also
with the Theater Guild.
Symphony Concert Tonight
Mr. Walter Myers will conduct
the National Symphony Orches-
tra In a concert this evening at
ihe National Theater at 8:30.
The concetr is sponsored by the
Ministry of Education.
Tickets are $1.00 and $50 and
may be purchased at the Nation-
al Conservatory of Music or at
the National Theater.
Two Firemen Killed In Denver Blaze
DENVER. Colo, March 31 (UP| Damage was estimated at
Two firemen were dead to-more than $125.000.
day and seven were Injured af-
ter a flaming furniture ware-1 The dead firemen were lden-
house collapsed, trapping the titled as Leonard Shire, 25, and
fire fighters in tons of debris. i Fred Erb, 23.
The spectacular fire yesterday
destroyed vhe three-story ware-' Seven firemen were injured
house Denver's historic old La- when they were trapped in the
rimer Street, once the center basement of the blazing build-
of the city's business district. i ing after the Interior of the
Thousands of persons lined the I structure collapsed. They were
sidewalk to watch the flames' in fair condition at Denver Qen-
shootlng 30 to 40 feet in the I eral Hospital,
air. '
STARVING IN A SHOWCASENadl Goya. 32, is a young woman over in Milan, Italy, who Ukta
to go hungry. In fact, she call herself the World's Champion of Starvation. She's pictured, amid
curious spectator, in a transparent plastic booth in which she has Just started another lengthy
fast, hoping to better her previous record of 63 days. _
, First Cry Of, New Bom Child
International Boy i \
Scouts On Program Broadcast On Radio Program
National Symphony
To Feature French
Music Tonight
"'ridge Toumam-"' Tonieht
The ifM-lar br'dTe tourna-
tp'< wi'l be olayed this evening
1 7 In t*e crd room of the Ho-
tel Tlvo'l. AH interested plyers
are invited to attend and rdny.
All are ask"d to be prompt.
Pedro MlTuel A"xil'nry To Meet
Members o' t'-e Ped^o Miguel
Wompn's Auvllhrv of the Union
Church are reqrested to attend
a meetln- tomorrow morning at
the church.
Pen Women To Meet Tomorrow
Members of the Ca"al Zone
hranch of the Nationcl Leamie nf
American Pen Women are invit-
"d to attend a buslne" meet it".'
'morrow "' 7 pm. In the Little
Gallery of the Hotel Tlvoll.
Over HOC Tonight
MADISON, Wl8., March 311 O'Connor said the American
"Scouting at the Crossroads,' mf,. _The birth-cry of a baDy; Broadcasting Co. Is expected to f French composers will be pre-
,a 15-minute program rnaugur-,has been heard on the radlol put the program on the network 'sented tonight at the National
ated recently over station HOO.'by listeners in the first full-in the near future. [Theater by the National Sym-
wlll feature a group from the! length, on-the-spot recording] A recording.of the birth will phony Orchestra under the dl-;
International Boy Scouts.of the'0I tt,e birth of a child. Ibe given to the mother, who in
Canal Zone tonight at 7:45. Radio Station WISC broadcast, later years will be able to listen
The program provides an op- the program, Saturday night It to her baby's first sounds,
portunlty for the four scoring!had been In the making since The father, who paced the
groups in ,the Canal Zone lasi, November. The station gave floor with a radio engineer dur- >zet. Debussy's Petite Suite and
Boy Scouts of America, b. 8.; a preview to a group of doctors lng the delivery, rushed up to 'Cesar Franck's Symphony In D
iGhi Scouts, International Boy here earlier last week. 'the nurse, was told that the (Minor.
As heard by local radio listen- i baby was a boy. turned to the I
ers, a doctor-narrator explained.radio man and asked: It is scheduled to begin at $
what was taking place. The one| "How was the recording?" p.m.
voice that everyone waited for
the voice of the newborn ln-
A concert featuring the music
rectlon of Walter Myers.
The concert will Include the
L'Arlesienne suite of George Bi-
Scouts and International Girl
[Scouts to present their orga-
nizaiton to the public.
The program is presented
every Monday at 7:45 p.m.
Cubs To Meet Tort"tow
Curtindu parents of hovs of
Cub 8cO''t a'"e rre re^'^ded of
the Cub Sco-t pecVo'-'nlzPtlon-
^1 m"etln" ti b he'd torrorrow-
evenln" at 7 In the Curundu Cl-
,vic Center.
All Star Circle To Meet
"The All.St? r Circle will meet
at the Scottish Rite Temple for
luncheon and a business meeting
Wednesday at 1 p.m.
Millicent Niles
~*ies I" Corgas
Burial Tomorrow
Your jeweller sells you
much more, than
a watch when he sells
you a Rolex
Whin you buv a Rolex watch, jrou'rr buying
something more than one of the Kneat
watche in the world. You're buying, too,
the unirinted lervice of one of the beat
(ewellen in this town.
Rolex agenta are choeen carefully, for
their knowledge of their trade, lor their
quallhcationB ai watchmakers, for their
experience and their pride In their craft.
All tbii you are buying.
Their lock of Role and Tudor watchea
ia kept up-to-date and aelective. Their range
^f original apare parts, from watch straps ro
the tiniest screw, is usually complete and
comprehensive.
And when you take your Rolex, or vour
Tudor, growing more precious the longer
you own It, back to be cleaned or srni rd,
you can rest aaaured that It Is in safe hands. A
Rolex, one of the finest watches In thewnrld,
^"deserves excellent treatment, and gets it.
The balance wheelimple,
jet the man Important pan
of jour watch, k makm
4JJ0OO oxilUtloni tit ererj
twtnty-\iHir hours.
ROLEX
^Ca/afasr^lkh
JUVtUTY MAOOUAtTHM
ISTOMI PANAMA
fant came near the end.
The idea for the program first
was submitted to a committee
of tire Dane County Medical So-
ciety, which gave its approval.
A local hospital agreea to the
use of the delivery room for the
recording.
Six expectant mothers gave
permission for the recoraing,
Funeral Services for 14-year-
old MIlHcent Niles. who died Sat-
urday in Oorgas Hospital after al^nd the station set up its equip-
linTerhig illness, will be held to- ment In the delivery room
morrow afternoon at the Corozal | three weeks before the first of
C'hfpel. | the children was born.
Buses will leave from No. 23 ( That birth took only 15 min-
12th of October St. at 1 p.m. to ; utes, and the recording was re-
ital-e mourners to the chapel.
Phe i survived by her father,
Theophllus NUes and her mo-
ther. Louise Wynter.
'Sin-Mi At Fo-' Am-rlor Thursrlav
Binen w"i he nla'-ed at the
Army-Nav" Clr*' ft Fort \ma-
dor Thursday evening at 8.
All me"'''";.' p""* their ouea's
ore corr"-!'" l-"'ted to particl-
iate In the games.
DRIVERS DULY WAKNKI)
8ALTLAKB CITY (UP>- Salt
Lake City drivers had better be-
ware. City Judge Arthur J. Mays
s?ld he will eive a five-day Jail
sentence to anv motorist caught
without his driver's license.
in
!" Howze
H '-ss For Slumber Parfv
"'s Margaret Howz wi hos-
t-- to a orv-up 0f hr f'lends on!
F"' '"y nleht at a slumber prtv
f'-\ at her hn-n in celebration i
of "ir isth birthdnv.
"""s Howze is tb daughter of
Br'-dler n.. and **rs. Robert
L. Howze of Quarry Heights.
M". J. Oulnfer Miller To Speak
"rs. J. Qulnter MIIW vice-
prp-ident nf thp National Feder-
''on of Church Women and a
di,rctor of Christian education
*>ill addredss a joint meetw of
the Womnn's Auxiliaries of Pal-
boa. Opmboa and Pedro Mluel
Union Churches tomorrow morn-
ing pf 9 at tb Balboa Union
Church. She will -wk on "The
Church In Yout Home."
NCT ONLY THE BEST PAINT
It's beautiful and washable too!
New colors
Ready to use.
Easy to apply
S3 North Avenue -
1 Martin Sosa St.
Tel. 2-0616
Tel. 3-1424
Sherwin-Williams Paints
rU*
YOU'RE SURE
TO BE MORE
THAN PLEASED
with the
EASY
Washing Machina

iJ
i L, t 9
;
1 *

YOURS for $50.00
Down Payment
By Club System. ..6.50
60 & 25 cycle
Water
Healer
Now you can
have it at an
Economy
Price!
YOURS
FOR
i-
$25.00
Down
Payment
EUROPEA
Furniture Store
Central Ave. at E. 21st St.
Phones: 2-1831 2-1133
jected because doctors said the
orith was not "normal."
The next birth, in February,
lasted 30 minutes and was cut
to 30 minutes in the recorded
tape. The mother, 24-year-old
wife of a University ot Wiscon-
sin student, experienced a nor-
mal delivery.
Beside the mother,. the only
persons in the delivery room
were an obstetrician, two nurses,
an ancsihesist. an Interne and
the doctor-narrator.
Ralph O'Connor, general rhan-
jager of the radio station, said
, he hopes the program can be
1 used in Instruction for expec-
' tant mothers and possibly In
: high school sex classes.
RUTH MILLET! Says
If you are happily married
steer clear of unhappy married
couples.
Tnat may sound like a self-
ish attitude. But It isn't a ques-
tion of selfishnessJust self-
protection.
An unhappily married couple
Is always, either consciously or
'Unconsciously, selling marriage
. short.
Spend enough time with a cou-
ple who are forever tearing each
' other down, who are always tak-
ing a glomy attitude toward
life, and marriage Itself doesn't
look so rosy.
The unhappy wife usually tries
to make the happy wife think
that men have the best of it
and that men are selfish, Incon-
siderate and unappreciative.
And the husband who isn't
happy in his own marrlaee Is
forever making cracks about
wives and marriage and the stu-
pidity of women.
Any way you look at lt^It's
bad for the morale of a conten-
ted husband and wife to net too
chummy with a couple who are
bored with each other and
with marriage.
They have no constructive
ideas to offer. They aren't plan-
ning and looking ahead eagerly
to the future, but fuming about
the present. Their marriage
holds nothing that Is In any
way inspiring to another couple.
So steer clear of them. Yon
can't do them any good. And
i-they may do a lot of harm.
Search out happily married
rounles for your friends. T*y
won't ell marriage short. The
time you spend with them will
be far more relaxed and care-
frpe thin the hours you sp^rd
with an unhappily married
pair.
Curundu Parents
To Reorganize
Cub Scout Pack 7
An organizational meeting of
Curundu parents of boys of cub-
i scout age will be held tomorrow
at 7 p.m. in the Curundu Civic
Center.
The purpose of the meeting
will be to reorganize the Curun-
Idu Cub Scout Ppck No. 7 for boys
between 8 and 11 years of atre.
This will be the first of three
organizational meetings in Cu-
jrundu.
Just Arrived!
B.F. Goodrich
Tubeless Tire
PROTECTS AGAINST BLOWOUTS! HERE'S HOW:

REGULAR TIRE-AND TUBE BLOWS OUT SUDDENLY
TESTED AND PROVED BY
THOUSANDS OF MOTORISTS
Most blowouts start when you don't
know it. From a sharp blow for in-
stance against a curb or chuckhoie
that bruises cords inside the tire.
As the tire flexes, the weak spot grow
until the inner wall is broken. With a
regular tire-and-tube, the rube bridges
the break. Finally, miles or maybe
months later, the tube is pinched and
blows out through the tire.
CHANGES BLOWOUT TO
SAFE "SLOWOUT"
The B. F. Goodrich Tubeless Tire hat
no rube. Instead, it has an air-retaining
lining that's part of the tire itself. If
a bruise does occur, the tire's flexing
eventually causes pin-hole leaks in this
lining at the point of the bruise.
AUTOS Omphroy, S
Tel. 2-0810 Panam
Instead of a dangerous blowout, all you
get is a slow leak plenty of time to
come to a safe stop bfefore the tire
goes flat.
SEALS PUNCTURES TOOI
A layer of sealant rubber under the
tread grips s puncturing object, pre-
vents leaks. Hole is sealed when object
is removed.
FITS STANDARD RIMS
COSTS LESS THAN REGULAR TIRE
AND ANY BLOWOUT PROTECTING TUBS
Stetumt
K. M. A. POWELL S. A.
Tel. 74 Cotn





/AGE SIX
'
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, MARCH SI, 1HI

.
r

You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
I r\e your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices iu No. 57 "H" Street Panama
No. 12,17^ Central Ave. Colon
i
Lewis Service
*4 Tivoli Ave.Phone 2-3281. and
fldcfisos's
Pourth of July Ave.Phone 2-8441
FOR SALE
Household
Saln de Belleza Americano
*55 Wet 12th Street
Carlton Druf Store
10.059 Melndet Ave.Phone 266 Coln
Agencia Internacional d Publicaciones Propaganda. S.A.
#3 Lottery Plaaa Phone J-31M "H" Street comer Estudiante St.
Phones 2-2814 and 2-2768
w
Minimum for 12 words.
3c. each additional word.
FOR SALE
Antonioiile
ffOft SALE:Three piece livinfroom,
! tet made by Cowei. complete with
1 "Rubber Foem" stats also outomo-1
I tie Frigideirt, ironer brand new.'
Cen be inspected ot 50h. St. and
Aeuil.no de la Guardia. ocross
"from 50th. St. Police Guord Stt-
tten.________________
jfoS SALE:25 cycle Wettinflhouse
refriflratr. porcelain. 8 cu. ft.
. Excellent condition. $90.00. House!
! 601-8. Ancon Bouleverd. Tele-.)
Bhone 8olboo 4478. _______
voffle
Service Personnel end Civilian
Government Employes
be cafe
far your Automobile Financing
latin ee
Government Employes Finence CO.
of
Fort Worth, Texas
new oHice et
Ne. 48 Auftmeallt Rev
Next doer to the Firestone Suildine)
also through your euro dealer
We sove you money on
Financing ond Insurance
also direct loans on automobiles
AGINCY DIHLINGIR
FfctM 3-4*14 S-498S
JFOR SALE: General Electric Refri-
i gerators. washing machines, re0o
', receivers, mixers, tooster,
1 irons nd clocks
HOGAR MODERNO
104 Central Avenue 104
frTsALE:Special for Army fomi- yJJ inftnd buyinfl Q uttd
used furniture ot bargain'
Agencias Cosmos. Automobile Row
29. will solve your Auto buying or
selling Problem. Tel. Penme 2
4721. Open oil dey on Saturdays.
IMs,
prices. Try us and be conv.nced.,
Eeen6my Furniture Store. 12.174,1
Tft-13 fcolivar Ave. Colon 916. j
FOR" SALE:Dining-room set. solid,'
Blonde Honderos mehogany, 6
, carved chair- with cushions. Ex-
: tension toble. buffet, breakfrent
i -afina closet. See or cell Bide.
1 2003-A. Curundu. Tel. 83-6259,
anytime.____________
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, stove,
bamboo sitting room set, child's
bedroom set. 8 1-2 St. Sonta Isa-
bel Avenue. House No. 8069-A,
"Segundo BtHo" oportment 2,
Colon.
the same money you con acquire
a brand new HILLMAN MINX. 32
miles o gollon, 37.5 Horse Power,
trunk spact and beauty. Your
HILLMAN dealer AGENCIAS LU-
MINA. Tel. 3-1033.
FOR SALE:1949 uick convertible
in good condition. General Elec-
tric refrigerator. 25 cycle. Chep
Telephone 25-3236 Or house 602
A'. CocOli.
LESSONS
UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA
Spanish Classes for Americans. Six
weeks course in Beginners Sponi'h
torts April 1st. Monday through,'FQR SALE._,950 Studebak.r Land
FOR SALE:Buick 1950 block st-
donetre. DynoflOw. radio. Nylon
covers, excellent condition, duty
free. Coll Cristobol 3-1547 even-
ings.
Balboe 3492 or 1992.
FOR SALE:1950 Buick SedanTtta.
Dynoflow. radio. Good condition.
0434-A. Frangipani, Ancon. Phone
2-3021.
Thursday, 5:00 p. .m. to 5:50 p. m.
Regist'Otion fee: $10.00. Registra-
ran now open.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle
CruisW. Bargain
Phone. 2-3425.
for quick sale.
FOR SALE: English Austin, lote
1949 model, excellent condition,
tax peid. Fully insured. Phone 796
Colnn
MISCELLANEOUS
IT
ten Dave
Write
See 8081 Abmm
TRAVEL OPPORTUNITY: Enjoy
youn vacation in cool Costa Rico.
Fly LACSA, PAA affiliate, only
$35.00 round trip. Inquire Pan-
ama Dispatch, Tel. 2-1655, acros
from Ancon bus-stop.
RESORTS
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Cottages, completely
furnished. Sonto Cloro Beach.
Terms available, for Informotlon.
Phone 6-441.
FOR SALE: DUPONT Points and
varnishes
"Covers more ario"
"Stoy on longer"
ot
HOGAR MODERNO
104 Central Avenue 104
Ec'ter orders for baby orchids deliv-
ery anywhere United States token
until April 8th. Local orders until
April 12th. Bouquets, corsages for
aH occosions. Telephone Orchid
Garden. Panama 3-0771. Atlontic
Side) Cristobol 1033.
FOR SATE:24 inch Jig Sow with
60 cycle motor, $50.00. 2171-8,
Curundu C. Z.
FOR SALE:Two-month o!d Puppy.
Wirehoir Foxterrier mother. Tele-
phone: Panam 3-4491. After 7:-
00 p. m.
FOR SALE: Piano upright grand
excellent condition. Singer sewing
foot mochine. Simmons double
bed. livingroom set 4-piece. Maho-
gany end tables, baby crib. Phone
916, Colon.
FOR SALE:Evening gowns sizes 9-
10, one suitable for groduotion
Army officer's white. Acetate dress
uniform. Coot 36. Trousers 30.
girls. Schwinn 24 bicycle. Kobbe,
84-322}}, Qrts, 323-A.
STAY et the Hotel PANAMERICANO
IN COOL EL VALLE.
Hlleo. Ocoanstdo cenaos, Sam,
Clero. Sox 435. Balboo. PhaM
Panama 8-187?. Oiatobei 8-IS?)
Will lorn. Sonta Clara Beach Cortte*.
Two bedrooms Frigldelres, Reck*
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
FOR RENT
Apartment!
ALMAMMA aPARTMINTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ments. Meld eervlee optional. Con
?oct office 1061. 10th Street, New
Cristbal, telephone '386 Colon.
FOR RENT: Furnished apartments
available to U. S. military. Phone
3-2051.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
We have everyflitnf
to keep vour Lawn
and Garden beautiful
daring the dry seison.
fools
Res
Peneint
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow*
Inseetteiaes
Fertlliiers
Weedkillers
Funjricldes
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
n Central Ata. Tel. S-8148
FOR RENT: Vacation Quarters 4.
fomily, one bedroom 8034-A,
Morgorita, completely furnished,
$35.00. Month. April 4th June
9th.
FO RRENT: Funished apartment.
Domingo Dioz St. No. 1 & Estu-
diante. Apt. No. 3.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:Nicely furnished, Urge.
clean cool room. All modern con-
venience ond good neighborhood.
To respectable person, Peru Ave.
No. 65. Lower left.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:1952 NORTON, A.J.S..
NSU motorcycles. Quick delivery
on all modela. Write Box 635, An-;
con or phOne 2-1411 after 4:00.!
PClTsALE: 1951 Alloy Triumph
tiger, 1 00 500 cc Motorcycle. Has
full race engine with coma ondi
. cerbs. Has sport fenders, bars ond
lights, good tires end new battery.
Perfect shape. Call 2-1611, any
* time.
FOR SALEYou ora planning to tra-
vel USA or Europe, we can mike
deliveries of HILLMAN MINX au-
tomobiles, sedan, convertible, sta-
tion wogon, any important city.
Enjoy your trip, and save money
driving an economical ond com-
fortable HILLMAN. For informa
tion consult your dealer AGEN-
CIA LUMINA behind the Lux
Theoter. Tel. 3-1033.
\First Phase Of Lang Horn

Maneuvers Ruled A Success9
. FORT HOOD, Tex.. March 81
IUP> Defending forces, streng-
thened by Increasing air power
and reinforced armored unite,
stopped the aggressor advance
along the entire Exercise Long
porn front yesterday,
r Units of the First Armored
mored Division threw the flrat
effective block on the aggressor
attack yesterday, slamming one
mobile force thrown the enemy
lines for a five-mile gain.
| U. 8. defense fighter aircraft
Sained at least even footing
ith the aggressors, after a
ajeries of air battles and attacks
on enemy airfields.
of rest; then the maneuver will
open again.
The second phase of the 115,-
000-man exercise will concen-
trate on psychological warfare,
with the town of Lampases,
Tex., falling under the aggres-
sor military government this
week.
Aggressor (the 82nd Airborne
Division i leaders plan to take
over the city government, seize
newspapers and radio stations
and use "thought control" on
the central Texas town. If and
when the town is recaptured.
U. S. military government of-
ficers will restore civil liberltles
FOR SALE:GE-washer, 60 cycle;
1-4-HP motor, 60-cycle; Hamil-
ton Beach mixer. fountain type,
25-75 cycles; 1-qt sire insect
sprayer, 60-cycle; unabridged dic-
tionary; Detecto bothroom scales;
and pole type outo aerial, 100-ins.
reasonable prices. Must sell im-
mediately. Coll 84-3205 Ires) or
82-5202 (office).
Officers called the first phase to the people,
tef the exercise, largest In U. 8.! Only 150 women are connect-
military history, "a success." ed with the exercise). Moat of
,, "We have slowed the aggres- them are WAF8 and WACS with
or attack, and have sufficient the various staff sections. Most
Yeservea In the 81st Dixie Dlvi-jof the women are billeted at
ion and the First Armored so Fort Hood, but Army nurses are
that we may be able to mount "working In the field."
a counterattack soon," said one The nurses were handpicked
V. 8. officer. for the maneuver so they could
; The first phase of the ma-1 gain experience to qualify them
heuvers Is scheduled to end to- for overseas duty.
pay, the troops Will get a day To the troops In the field,
150 women just aren't enough.
"I ain't seen a one, not a one.
since this thing started," said
one 82nd Airborne trooper.
The opening phase which
started in a blowing dust, moved
into a rainy, mud-slogging per-
iod, and gave the troops what
Army Secretary Frank Pace
called "real realism."
The men don't seem to mind
the rugged weather. The sick
list has decreased since the men
moved from barracks to the
field.
The mock war was packed
with humorous situations.
An engineer battalion station-
ed near Lampases was sure a
new aecret weapon had been
looaed
OFFICE EQUIPMENf
Of All Types For Your
Office
Burroughs"
ADDING MACHINES
"Smith Corona"
TYPEWRITERS
"Burroughs"
CALCULATORS
"Burroughs"
BOOKKEEPING
MACHINES
STEEL DESKS
OFFICE CHAIRS
SAFES
DITTO DUPLICATORS
FILING CABINETS
f KARDEX
CASH REGISTERS
V
Tlrali Ate. Na. 14Tal. t-Mlt
Radar Flak, Maybe
Russian Controlled,
Knocks UN Planes
TOKYO. March SI (UP).Ra-
dar-controlled antl -aircraft
guns that some officials think
may be served by Russian tech-
nicians caused a sharp reversal
in the Korea air war last week
and the allies were on the short
end of a two to one loss ratio.
The Air Force announced that
nine United Nations planes were
lost as compared to the Com-
munists' four destroyed, three
probably destroyed and nine
damaged. There was no report
on the number of United Na-
tions planes damaged.
In the entire war the United
Nations have destroyed 398
planes while losing 623 of their
own.
The Air Force listed Commun-
ist and U. N. losses from the
start of the Korean war through
March 28 as follows:
Mlg-15s 263 destroyed. 61
probably destroyed. 448 dam-
aged.
All enemy types 308 des-
royed, 111 probably destroyed,
111 probably destroyed, 604 dam-
aged.
U. 8. Air Force Jets 46 lost
In air combat. 164 to ground
fire, 14 to other causes.
U. 8. Air Force propeller-
driven planes 16 In air com-
bat. 246 to ground fire, 27 to
other causes.
Friendly foreign planes 4 in
air combat, 39 to ground fire.
11 to other causes.
Shore-based marine planes
0 in air combat, 40 to ground
fire, seven to other causes.
Total U. N. losses 66 in air
combat. 429 to ground fire and
89 to other causea.
WANTED:About April 15 unfur-
nished 2 bedroom opartment. not
on groundfloor, by American fo-
mily of adults. Phone 3-331^.
between 1 and three.
Help Wanted
WANTED:Good cook, good soltry.
Apply 50th St. No. 5, Apt. 5, be-
tween 8:00 o. m. to 11:30 o. m.
Legal Notice
UNIT STATES Of AMERICA
Canal Zana
United States District Court far rite
PtwHtt a the Canal Zee,
Balbaa Diviiiei
on them, when the in nil matte, of the estate or
EDWAXP MICHAEL. FOLF.Y.
gtaaeeeee
NOTICE TO CBEniTOBS
Probata N. tOIS
LEGAL NOTICE
Publir notice la haraby given that the
Public Adminiatrator f th Canal Sea*
i< the aeminiatrator of th* nmU of
Edward Michael Folty, daceaaed. and all
paraona having claim* afainat the aald
dacadent arc required to fit* them with
the neeaeeary voucher- In the office of
tha Clerk of the United Statea Dlatriet
Court for tha Dtefrlct of ffha Canal Zona
at Ancon. Canal Zona, or to exhibit them
with tha Beeaesar* vouebare at tha
office nf the Public Administrator, Room
201. Civil Affairi Ruiirflnt. AaaoB. Canal
Z..nc not attar than January 24. 1SB8.
( lam- not ao praeented by aald date
-ill ba barrad.
a JAMES MARSHALL
Public Aelwilnletmior
ground in their area shook, and
t weird shrieking bellow sound-
ed.
The man rushed out of the
mess tent and found an escaped
elephant from a circus ripping
up an officer's tent.
An umpire who stopped a man
walking acroas a simulated
bombed out bridge was stopped
himself when the soldier told
him "I'm wearing water wings."
BOBBED WBIIi: PKEAOIflNr.
BT. JOSBPH. Mich. 'UP > The
Rev. Paul Albery, first Methodist
Church pastor, complained to po-
lice that thieves stole his car
* rule he was conducting services.
Gamboa Council
To Vote On New
By-Laws Tomorrow
The Gamboa Civic Council
will meet tomorrow evening at
7:30 In the Gamboa Civic Center
building to vote on a new consti-
tution and by-laws for the Gen-
eral Committee of Civic Coun-
cils.
The council also will vote on a
plan for the reorganization of
future Community Chest drives.
William Ward, president of the
Gamboa Council, will give a re-
Krt of the proceedings of the
it Governor-employe confer-
ence.
PRESIDENT
RESTS
(Continued from Page 1)
who ever lived. He's not that
vain.
But he does feel that he has
been President during the moat^
difficult years ever encounter-
ed by a Chief Executive.
Taking office In 1945 behind
a master showman, the Pres-
ident, plain-looking and plain-
spoken, was a pale contrast at
first to the flamboyant Mr.
Roosevelt.
But over the years, Mr. Tra-
man emerged aa a colorful
figure in his awn right the
way he aware at critics of
these dear ta him, his blister-
ing letters, hit sulky cap and
1*24 American Legion cane,
his laud sports shirts and fin-
ally, bis "give-em-hell" teeh-
niquf that flabbergasted the
political experts in 1948.
Mr. Truman knows that histo-
ry will remember him as the
man who gave the order to use
the first atomic bomb, but he
hopes that history will say more
about his "Truman doctrine" in
Greece and Turkey, his contri-
bution to the United Nations,
his program of assistance to the
free nations and his battle to
contain Soviet aggression.
In the recent book, "Mr. Pres-
ident," the author. William Hul-
mn, asked Mr. Truman what
he considered the most import-
ant achievements of his admin-
istration.
The President answered:
"We have prevented a third
world war. And we have kept
the American economy on an
even keel.
"The Russians had the idea
after 1946 that we would ex-
plode and then the Russians
could have the world to them-
selves. We have managed to
keep that from happening."
Discretion Better
CANAAN. Conn. (XJPi Sum-
moned to the home of Mr. aud
Mrs Clarence Beverly, where a
fight was reported In progress, a
Rite) policeman arrested the wife
fter her husband said he "fear-
-d for my safety."
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediste
Delivery.
Tel. 8-1718
22 E. Mth St.
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel II Panam
ellinr aUrastkl Product.
Faena J LM (preferred)
Panam Insurance to.
eraylnft Ace It Urraca and aarawtr*.
Tel 3-4718 1-1660
MODERN FURNITURE
CUB COM aWILI
Slinceee?. Reaoheletery
ran our snow-arvfiMi
Alberta Herat
t. 9. Se la ueea Tt t Aateeneit* Raw >
free aettaaataa pick Dentar;
Tel. S-4SM x:ea a.aa. to 7:ee e.aa.
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. fe Justo Aroeemena
Ave. Colon Tel. 467
Trmsporttt Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
Wo pack and crato or move
anything. 'Phono 2-2461,
2-2562, Panam.
LEARN!!
Ballroom
Dancing
At Its Best!
Balboa 1 ar
write box Its
Balboa
rlaraett A Dnnn
ALADDIN
KER08CNC MANTLE LAMP
Burns SO Hours on 1 Gal. at
Kerosene. Uiee M% air and
only S< keroeene
Se.ll Lawaal rrteaa
iitrlbiitori: WONG CHA.VG 8. A,
Coln: tth St. Balboa Ave. Tel. SOS.
Panama: 13 Central Ave.
Tel. 1-1047
PANAMA
CITY WAS
(Continued from Page 1)
skyward, laughing ar chatting,
many, others were woadering
what to de.
A Balboa clerk remarked to-
day: "Where were we supposed
to go?"
One Ancon housewife crawled
under her bed and "waited for
the bomb to fall."
Another saw Balboa, which
waa all dark at first "light ap
Uke a Christina tree" when
the alert sounded.
The only precautions taken by
the Panama Canal was to turn
out the lights on the locks.
The lights on the Miraflpres
Bridge were not turned off be-
cause the approaches to the
bridge are part of the street
lightning system, and all the
street lights remained on in the
Canal Zone.
Last night's affair, according
to the director of the Army's Dis-
aster Control School was one of
"passive air defense" in Which
all precautions were taken to
Drotect human life, and people
took the proper measures to pro-
tect themselves.
"The main thing," a mllitaiy
official aald today "waa to get
the people to seek shelter."
Military forces gite as match
aaaiatane* ta ertilian commun-
ities as they can. by eonndlng
the alarm. "From then an,"
according ta the official, "it la
p ta the civilian community
to be informed what ta de.
Anti-aircraft gun positions
were manned last night, but not
shot fired.
According to a statement is-
sued today by the Joint Civil De-
Radio Programs
Your Community Sraticn
HOG-840
WtMre 100.000 Raale Mat*
Presents
Tetlay, Monday, Mar. 81
8:30Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:16David Rose Sho w
4:80What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cia
Alfaro, 8.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7:00The Bing Crosby Show
(VOA)
7:30Sports Review
7:46Scouting at the Crossroads
8:00News and Commentary.
(VOA)
8:16Halls Of Ivy (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
0:00Our Mutual Friend (BBC>
8:30Symphony Hall (VOA)
10:00The World at Tour Win.
flow (BBC)
U:O0The owl's Neat
Midnight-Sign Off
Tomorrow, Tuesday, April 1
A.M.
6:00sign On Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15New (VOA) ,
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Hawaiian Harmonies
8:00New*
8:18Sacred Heart Program
:30-As I Set It
10:00New*
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:06Off The Record (Conto)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00New
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Musle
1:00-News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
3:00-^ Call From Le* Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30-Spirit of the Viking
2:45Battle of the Bands
3: oo-All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little 8now
8:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Panemusica Story Tim*
4:16Promenade Concert
4:30What'* Yonr Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cia
Alfaro. 8.A.
6:15I ven in e Salon
7:00Christian Science Pro-
gram
7:15interlude Musical
7:30PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00New* and Commentary
(VOA)
8:15 The Jo Stafford Show
(VOA)
8:30Time For Business (VOA)
8:45Commentator'* Digest
(VOA)
0:00Musical Amatican
(VOA)
8:30Pride and Prejudice
(BBC)
10:00HOTBL BL PANAMA
10:15 Musical Interlude
10:30Variety Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl'a Nest
12:00Sign Off
Explanation af the Symbol*
BBCBritish Broadcastins Cor-
poration
VOAVoice ot America_______
1 fense Committee which inoludes
1 representative of the Republic
of Panami, the U. S. Embassy,
' the canal organisation, and the
l three armed forces, "air raid sl-
rent in the Canal Zone will be
< sounded, a* they were last night,
i only when it Is suspected by the
I authorities that there is actually
a hostile aircraft in the area."
"Becanse there are limited
organised civil defense units,
individual residents are re-
sponsible far taking shelter
when the sirens sound without
being told ta do so," the state-
ment continued.
"This action aloneindividu-
al* taking shelter when the si-
rens soundcould reduce the
casualties of an atomic attack as
much as 50 per cent.
"Every effort will be made to
transmit by radio all possible In-
formation and instructions when
there is an air raid alert.
"Residents should not tele-
phone radio stations or other lo-
cation* tor additional informa-
tion.
"Neither should they drive to
another location because of the
possibility of creating traffic
jams.
"If a complete blackout is con-
sidered to be desirable instruc-
I lions to that effect will be an-
nounced over the radio.
"None of the local civil defense
plans call for complete blackouts
! since modern aircraft can locate
their targetsparticularly when
I this Involves a waterwaywith-
lout resorting to guidance try
lights or other visual means and
blackout adds only to the diffi-
culties and confusion Inherent in
civilian defense.
"Blackouts are more related to
i the early conditions of World
; War II than to the present day."
Tito Opposes West
In Trieste Dispute
LONDON. March 31 (UP) -
Yugoalav Marshal Tito says
that hie country Is worried a-
bout the fact the West is ac-
ceding to Italian demands for
Trieste and blackmailing by
Italian pollUcans in a dispute
over the Free Territory, ac-
cording to a Tanjug news
agency broadcast heard here
today.
Tito aald Yugoslavia would
never aecept any decision on
Triaste made without Yugoslav
participation.
Take your pick from
the largest selection
of the best
a
used cars
n Panama I
1946 Packard Sedan
1947 Buick Sedan
1940 Hudson Coupe
1949 Buick Sedan
1947 Studebaker Sedan


-
1949 Fords
1950 Fords
1949 Mercury Sedan

1949 Chevrolets

1950 Chevrolets
1941 Pontiac Sedan
1949 Kaiser

-


1947 Nash Sedan
1947 Fords
1948 Plymouth Sedan
I
1949 Frazer



1946 Oldsmobile Convertible
1946 Chevrolet Sedan
1947 Chevrolet Sedan
If we don't have the make and model
you want, we must have it coming in
soon trade for a New Buick
or Chevrolet.
Smoot & Paredes
#
m
\


MONDAY MARCH H, 1IB
TUT? PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DA.TIY NEWSPAPER
Ti '7 ~rtlT"T7
PAGE SEVEH


^Atlantic 0<3
/ tiii W- MmJ* fU
oci$tu &i m Cmtum ^mt ^ j;f
COMMANDER AND MRS HENDERSON
INTERTAIN WITH COCKTAILS
Commander nil Mr*. Davit Henderson of the Coco Salo
Natal Station entertained a lar* aronp of friends with
rerktaile and buffet reh-eskment* at their Barter Saturday
evening.
The buffet tabla waa covered with an ecm table cloth
and mahstanv appointment* were aied, with a centerpiece
, of wood rotee lb b maUhint bowl.
Th guests were: Lt. Com- prlaes were Mrs. Prank admits
mender And Mrs T. L. Apple- and Mrs. SkelsialMS.
qulst, Cap, and Mrs. John An-
the sponsoring organisation.
Chief Pachance expressed the
pleasure his group is having in
sponsoring this program "as an
Investment in youth."
Other Seoul officials present
included: John Barr and R. R.
Arnold, Director of Boy Scuut
and executive commltteeman, re-
spectively; Mr. Knight, Scout-
master of Pack 18; chaplain E.
X. Pratno and Commander W.
E. Thompson, committee chair-
man of Pack II.
The following adults were re-
tferaon, Lt. Commander and Mrs Sorority Meeting at Margarita
A- P- Anderson, Lt. and Mrs J The Beta chapter of Beta S1r
P Barlow Commander and Mr. I ma Pht met Friday evening at ftstered as Cube by Chief Felix
W W Bemls Lt. (1|) and Mr, i tht Margarita Clubhouse with IWplnakl: C. Lumfcy. secretary-
A P BoUene, Ensign J. c. Boy- the nresident. Mrs. Violet Deak- treasurer; Mrs. C. A. Lee; Den
tr Lt. and Mrs f J. Broohi. tai. officiating. mothers and Detii dads Mr. and
Pollowlng the regular buslne< -I"- JosephBallkowskl, Mr and
meeting a cultural talk was given Mrs. Zaborsky, Mr. and Mrs.
by Mrs. Marie Moscarltolo on Mountain, Mr and Mrs R. W.
"The Art of Thinking," H1U. Mrs. Barber, Mrs^F se. Mr.
The members who attended Monnhan and Mrs. Feilic Kar-
lncluded Mrs. Kathleen Huff- penalti. Twenty-seven paren is
(]> and Mrs. P. N.'man. Mrs. Edith Kenning. Mrs. end S4 Cub Scouts were register-
fhir'rv Lt AlDavll Lt and Bttty Hudglns. Mrs. Marie Mos- ed during the evening
Mrs HP iSrrtw of Rodman, caritoio, Mrs. JSan Coffey. Mrs. Chief Karpinskl presidedl ti
& Mia Mrs. L. J. Ducote. Lt. tsrsh Vest. Mrs. Jean Judge, ^ebelow ceremony at which
and Mrs O J BUI* Lt and Mrs. Arden Welch. Mrs. Ann Richard Bird and Robert Maxon
MM TD Fitch V"*. Mrs. Beverly Ruoft and W Cubbing and were/eceWed
Mejor and Mrs. J. J. Oable, Miee Ann Wlchener.
&&\&iR:$: I ^UD-PlieMeBrtdVionlght
IN HOLLYWOOD
BI ERSKINE JOHNSON
commander and Mrs. R. W.
Crter, 6f Rodman.
Ensign and Mrs H H. Chan-
dler. Commander and Mrs. B.
W. Olkrk, Lt. Commander and
Mrs. J. P. Cridar. Lt. A. I. Cur
HOLLYWOOD. 'NBA) Be-
hind The Screen: Scratch off the
names of Gregory Peck and Cor
nel Wilde as prospective mem-
bers of Hollywood's new "18-
month Club" stars planning
to spend 18 consecutive months
abroad because Income earned
there over that length of time Is
not subject to U.S. Income tax.
As Pock sees it "1st a tough
thing to pull off. You have to
set good pictures and be paid in
American money. Its tough
enough getting good pictures In
Hollywood. I may work In a cou-
ple of films abroad, but I have
no plans for an 18-month stay."
Cornel's attitude: "I don't like
money enough to stay out of the
U.S. for 18 months."
Cornel and his wife. Jean Wal-
lace, by the way are aching to do
a movie together. The story they
like Is their own. "Arena," about
a prlse-flghter and his doll. Cor-
nel also owns "Star of India,
which he plans to do as an In-
dependent.
tors who Invaded the Grove In
1931:
"They were wonderful. The1
place was completely redecorated
but people came In and didn't
know the difference."
The biggest tab ever plclted up |
at the Grove? Rouben remembers
that, too. It was for $37.000a
i private party for movie exhibit-
or* given by the 20th Century-,
,Fox studio In 1937.
Next highest tab was for $800,
during Prohlbfltlo.i. for a dinner
party of 24 people hosted by the
Sultan of jaroe. Recalled Rou-
Iben: "He asked fo ra round table
i but we didn't have one big-
enough for 24 people, go we!
built one. The $800 Included the
cost of building the table."
into Boy Scout Troop 18 by Mr.
Knight.
Gold arrow awards were pre-
Larry
,_,. .nd The weekly duplicate bridge sented to the following;
Majo and1 Mrs- H^ L tumor, g jr k ^*_ R KeUh Mounta, joe De-
**:J VII " 5, Horlck ing M the Margarita Clubhouse, 'tore. Mike Zaborsky. David Eber-
Humei -All Interested residents are cor- ens, Jay Ballkowskl and Eric
8: Co'mmSndel'and Mrs." jT!*ato invited t0 ,ttend
Jennings, Lt. M. C Kempker.
Commander and Mrs
Xing
week.-
Thompson.
In the traditional Bobcat cere-
w d mM wer*: North and South: mony a number of boys were in-
1st, Mr. Julius fcoeb and Mr. W. ducted mto Cubbing. The new
wn| ,1. Gibson; 2nd. Mrs, Garlan-l Cubs are Bolly Noonan. James
cm .m un t i KoeDke *"< Captain John Fahnestock: Turner. Edward Monahan. Earl
*%i and Mrs o W Kuhn 3rd- Mr- Banders, Jr. and Scott, Eddie Conn. Wilfred Me-
' id Mrs M L Letv':Mrs- W. Mlllspaugh. lender James Harried. Michael
J.2 n^jLJKS:] last and Wei Mrs. Wal- ohesser and_Edwfcrd Maddox.
- JACOtV ON m
Bl OSWALD JACOBT
Written for NBA Sertlee
Lt. and Mrs. C. L. Lucas. Com*, *_*- Jg j*Mrs Wal- ohesser and
wander and Mrs, K. L. Lunae-I*'fiESS^iS? !E *W
SaJfwT' (J|1 VnddMNrV WlHl ^fiL** Lotb Wl Mr. O.
lkm Patterson, Lt. and Mrs
Lisa Ferradav admits that she
and Zsa Zsa Oabor have been
battling lt out for certain movie
roles, but poohs reports that
there's a raging feline-feud be-
tween them.
It's "Darleeng" and "Sweetle-
Ple" when they meet. Lisa told
me. "It's true that Zsa Zsa is
playing some of the parts that I
wented.* she added, "But there
will always be wars, revolutions
and Gabors, darling*
O. Brown.
Mr. and Mrs. Newland
Leave for Short Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth New-
land Of the Hotel Washington,
sailed during the weekend for a
short vaqallon to be spent in New
fork and the Eastern states.
They 111 return In three
weeks
Roy Nielsen
Lt. Dorothy L Payne. Lieut,
commander and Mrs. J. A.
Pease. ChJc-ah H. G, Pitts. Lieut.
(]|) Sophie A. POdosek. Lieut.
Commander B. X, pralno. Lieut,
commander and Mrs. F, C.
Roepke. Lieut. Bettv t. Rollins,
Lieut. (Jg) W. D, Ronanve, Lt.
Commander Jnd Mrs. I. M. Ro-
wJLyevti.,i) M -?J,l,kf- Itanoertant Neighborhood
CWO and Mrs. D. E. SSbln, Lt. atlx\nt
tndMrs. WE. Sands, Lt Com-I Mothers of Olrl Scouts and
rnander and Mrs. H. B. Schmidt, ir0wnie8 and parents of Boy!
Lt commander and Mrs v. a. gCOuts and Cubs are urgently re-
jehweltaer Lieut, and Mta% E.,guested to meet at the Trefoil
W. cott, jLieut (Je.1 end Mrs. &ouse tomorrow at 7 p.m.
.J. SimdsoB ChBOsnandMrs A flnal deQtaton mu8t bt.[
L. Smith. Ueut rwj ndjreacnt 5LL Ar\ 8n**i' LlutTK'- committee would like to report:
SUfford, Lieut. X,J- pta- on y,, prMent .tatus of the1
*,",. Lieut Commander and Mrs. W. mg. it.
W. Stevens, Lieut. Commander, ~.
jliF. Todd, Lieut, and Mrs. G. RMefr studio* to
. WalUce, Lt. and Mrs. X. E. present Danee Recital
Wlther, Ceptakn and Mrs. R. L.j The Ruoff studios will present
Wtre.Lieut .and Mrs. Fred Wro-:their annual dance recital Fri-
ble end Capt. And Mrs. C. C.
A London Impresssrlo Is burn-
In gover Sonja Henle's business
methods. First Sonja asked for
75 per cent of the boxofflce In-
take to present her loe show In
London. Then she asked that he
raise monev for a British movie
In which she could star.
Then she eabled that she wee
making too much money In
America to dicker any longer.
Cesar Romero will hop to Lon-
don after completing "The
Jungle" In India for a atarrlmc
stint In Edward Nassour's "This
Is Murder," and a second Lon-
don-made film___ Jeanne
Craln's first picture after the
birth of her babv will be "How
High Is Up?" with Scott Brady
as her co-star. Fox postponed the
film for Jeanne___Jack Rey-
nolds Is denying that he and
Msrlorle Reynolds even tried a
I trial reconciliation. Their di-
vorce Is baking to a goldmii
brown.
Bart Lancaster'* hailing "The
Crimson Pirate" as the nearest
movie vet to Douglas Fairbanks'
"The Thief of Bagdad."
"It had better be good." Burt
says. "It took us six months to
make the picture. We used reol
ships at sea (In the Bar of Na-
ples) and took three davs Just to
shoot a scene of me swinging 10
feet Into a ship's rigging."
About hie role of the graying,
reformed alcoholic In "Come
Pack. Little Bheba": "It's quite a
challenge."
'of a canine Riley for the past
.four years. In honorable retire-
ment, he had only one (oh: to
look decorative against the win-
try mountain background.
He was looking especially de-
corative when he was brought to
the attention of the director, An-
drew Marton, who figured him
as an Ideal candidate for the
role of lead dog on Stewart
Granger's sled earn.
Granger plays the lead role hi
the picture, which tells of Cana- '
dian mountle Sgt. Albert Pedley'i
struggle to "get his man" during '
one of Canada's foulest winters.
Actual sites of the story, far a-
bove Edmonton, Alta., will be in-
accessible until June but MGM Is
filming several snow sequences '.
now In Idaho and will continue I
In Canada after the thaw.
Koskl Is still pert wolf, as far *
as his Howl Is cocerned. Granger "J
said the dog growled all the time
during their first meeting.
There's nothing like Indoor ex-
ercise to keep a girl in good
shape. Lovely Colleen Miller.
who appears In RKOs "The
Las Vegas Story," recommends
dally calisthenics to promote
strenath and gracefulness.
Filmfown
Shoptalk
NORTH
AK81I
Q84t
0>KJ8
WEST
10I
AK10S
? K084
*10t
EAST
*AQ4
SJ7BJ
? J8I
*7lJ
Yenquell.
day evening, between the first
and second shows at the Marga-
rita Clubhouse.
The price of admission -Is $1.00
for adults and $.85 for children.
The proceeds will go to the At-
10
1*
4*
SOUTH(D)
4JIM
syNono
? A10S11
? AQI4
Neither side vul.
West North
IV Double
Pass ?
Psss Peas
Pass
Pass
Pees
Opening load? l
The Ambassador Hotel's famed
Coconut Grove, where Bine Cros-
by won his Croon Xing title. Is
dud for a redecorating Job 1th
the strangest orders ever given
painters and uoholsterers. The
swank supper club can't look any
different when they complete the
job.
The room's palm tree decor has
been the same for JO veare
snd that's the wav lt will remain.
The onlv thing that changes at
(he world-famous Grove is that
Rouben gets a little prayer. Rou-
ben has been the maHre d' for 2S
yearsprobablv a world's sunprr
club record. He still remembers
with admiration the last decora-
Ann 8heridan. whose deeo.
"Tallulah" singing tones haven't
been heard since she olavad No-
ra Saves In "Shine On Harvest
Moon." will be herd pgaln In
UI's VermllUon OTools."
It could hannen only rn Holly-
woodWill Rogers. Jr.. floor-
oaclng at his own birth. He plavs
his father In "The Storv of Will
ringer"an." paces the floor
while Jane W*man becomes the
mother of Will. Jr.
Times Change
COLUMBUS, Miss. 'UP) The
livery stable here Is being con-
verted into a parking lot,
Sight Latin Nations Shared
In US Bank Credits In 19SI
IB in I .ding a cement plan In | %%rj?A lrumpS "
Pert Davis Ladle*
Honor Departing Friends
At the weekly meeting of the The proceeds will go to the At- what should West choose $s
Fort Davis ladies for morning lantle Little League. hi* ooenlng lead in today'e
coffee and bridge, a grouo of the' ------_ hand? He fell back on the un-
members were given farewell; cub Pack 18 Reactivated bid suit but waa this a wise
eorsages of lottery tickets. This Friday evening In en Impress-choice? '
a traditional custom and the re- ive ceremony at Building 189 on t.f. not look at the result for
clpionts were Mrs. Walter Skeis-.the Coed Solo Naval Station, Cub moment Consider the bidding,
talus, Mrs. Joseph catante and i Pack 18 was reactivated. Mr. Ior maybe it win indicate the
Mrs. James Jess. William Price. Scout Council- j killing opening lead.
Mrs. Henry F. Taylor presided man, presented the charter to. north's double of one heart
$t 'he coffee service. Chief a. M. P&chahce. president tshows length in heart* and. al-
T'ie winners ef the scoring of the Fleet Reserve Association, rm0et surely, shortness in dla-
"Imonds. North would > *
i a hurrv to double a bid of only
{heart if he had length in his
partner's suit.
i Souths bid of one spade snows
shortness in hearts. Otherwise
he would stand lor the double
of one heart. The rest of the
bidding indicates that both
WASHINGTON. M*r. $1 (USIS) New credits were authorized\v**tM" ViL^Atoi^eXou
- Europe, Latin America and in eight Latin American coun-1 to J"1' "t*rfll2L trumos
Asia .shared almost equally in, tries during the period. Ith"1 "h. P*'JVhort-\n dlf-
the W7.8 million dollars in new; The report listed^ million *nd that.each to nor in a on
credit* authorized by the US ex- dollars for' the development of. 'rent side suit. u'y.'f ?
tort important bank during the, tungsten mines in Bolivia andiclre.r will ptanj croM-ruit^ne
last half of 1951.
This to shown in the bank
Semiannual report to congress Brazil.
Or the six months ending Dec. i Credits to Chile totalled 11.-1 If WMt had opened a trump.
31. The report. Just made pub- 150,000 dollars to two private Eaa, won\a have taken two
lie here, shows that Europe re- companies for the development; lrTfmr,, tnd \.a a third round,
ceived 3d percent, Latin Amer-in expansion of the steel in-i^Vi would then struggle
lea 33 percent, and Asia 30 per-dustry. The credit* are design-1 de.nerately but he would
tent o the six-month total. ed to enable Chile to produce! PVentuallv win only eight tricks.
During the first half of 1951. most of its domestic require- i when West opened the ten Of
the bartk, a US Government ments for steel. i duns thoughtlessly enough, the
agency, had authorized new ere- i A credit of 20 million dollars result was ven different De-
dlts of 108.6 million dollars. was granted to Colombia to fin-, Z.Ji won the first trick in
The report points out that anee shipments of raw cotton dUmmv with the king of clubs,
last October the US congress and 1 million dollars to Ecua- ru{fed heart cashed the ace
Increased the lending authority dor for the development of air-', diamond* and ruffed a dla-
of the bank by 1,000 million dol-, ports. mond in dummy
lars to held finance essential I A credit fo 360,000 dollars was The croS5-ruf f was now well
Economic Development and | advanced to Mexico for the de- under wav Declarer continued
Production of strategic ma- velopment of production of bv ruffing a second heart in his
terlals In other countries. Dur-1 manganese and of 1.6 million ; hand and a second diamond In
Ihg the last half of the year, the dollars to Panama to finance a dummv He next ruffed a third
tank authorized 4. million dol- hotel. heart m hlg hand and returned
Urs for production of auch' Peru received a credit of 650.- tn dummy with the Jack of
critical materials as tungsten, 1000 dollars to develop the pro- ciub8 t0 ruff a fourth heart in
sulphur, manganese and ferro- j ductlon of tungsten and Vene- hi* hand
inganese in Latin American zuela 4 million dollars to ex-1 Bv t hi* time nine tricks were
>d urunum in Africa, |pand the production of cement., ntfy tucked away where the
, mice, couldn't get at them,
South tried the ace of clubs and
'found to hi* Joy that both op-
ponents followed suit That was
his tenth trick.
Just for art's sake. South now
led a diamond and discarded a
heart from dummy. East had
only his three trumps left, so
he had to ruff and lead spades,
to dummy's king. Thus South
made his contract with an
overtrlck. The opening lead
made a difference of three
tricks.
/f'l MovfftJir TONIGHT!
[Panama Lanal /heaters
A A I BOA Dorl DAY O Oordon McRAE Virginia MAVO
BALBOA "STARLIPTB
*ir-(n4M*M
SitS A SiN
(Tunlij) "XOU NBVEB CAM TH.L"
DIABLO HTS.
Silt ? t:SS
COCOLI
S.ll A !:SS
Dick POWtXL t Paul* RAYMOND
. "THE TALL TARGET"
(TaaMUr) 'Plu* BIm* An* Bawtr? Battalion"
Gane AUTBY Elaln* nlLEY
"HILLS OF UTAH"
(Ty**a| -VALBNTIWO"
Ray HILLAND Patricia ROC
'CIRCLE OF DANGER"
CRIKTORAI Robfrt TAYLOR Denalt DARCCL
^.cJnmZ^ "WESTWARD THE WOMEN*
Sil* A 8:21 (TatMar) "TWO OP A KIND"
MARG
\RGARITA
1:11 A 7:1*
BV BEN COOK
HOLLYWOOD, (UP) Very
few films can lay claim legiti-
mately to having an admiral in
their cast. One of the few Is "The
Wild North," now before the
cameras at Metro-Ooldwyn-May-
er.
The distinction Is made no les*
by the fact that this admiral
happens also to be a 14-year-old
Alaskan husky named Koskl.
Koskl was bom in the shadow
of the South Pole during Adm.
Richard E, Byrd's Antarctic ex-
pedition of 1937. To that he owes
his high Navy rank. All dogs
born during the expedition were
dubbed honorary admirals.
Koskl has been Uflng the Ufe
'Porgy And Bess1
To Tour Europe
WASHINGTON "Porgy and
Beis," the popular opera based
on American Negro folk music
by the late American composer
George Gershwin, will be pre-
sented In 11 European countries
this year.
The production will be spon-
sored by two American pro-
ducer, Blevlns Davis and Robert
Breen, and will be offered on a
nonprofit basis.
Ray M1LLAND Gene TIERNET, In
"CLOSE TO MY HEART"
"SNEAK
PREVIEW
At 9 P.M.
CECILIA
The> Army dnfflMt draftees... on a
howl-n-minute spy hunt...!
"BOWERY BATTALION"
- with -
Lett Goreey and th Bowery Boyi
Also: Rod Cameron, in
"SHORT GRASS" _
TROPICAL THEATR
Show: 115 2:45 4:55 1:51 1:81
Bette DAVIS and Errol FLTNN, in
"THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH
AND ESSEX"
ENCANTO THEATRE
^^ Alr-CaaalttoneS
Jame* Cafney Phyllis
Thaxter, In
"COME FILL THE CUP"
o
Irrol Plynn Vlvtca
Llndfurs.in
"ADVENTURES OP DON
JUAN" (In Technicolor)
TJVOLI THEATRE^
Eric Portman, In
-CAIRO ROAD"
Leo Oorcey. in
"GHOST CHASERS"
CAPITOUO_THEATRE
Audf Murphy BillMauldin
- In -
"THE RED BADGE OF
COURAGE"
e
Either Williams Red
Skelton. in
"TEXAS CARNIVAL"
In Tfchnicolorl_________
VICTORIA THEATRE^
Gregory Peck Sun
Ha y ward. In
"David and Batbsheba"
Richard Batthart. In
"House on Telegraph Hill"

Beautiful
Wm. Rogers
ilverware Sets
CLUB or CREDIT
ai low at
50* Witkly
Radio Center
tftflHl
muni i i
I i r i i i i < <
f if!
7110
olivar
40
Coln
A SHIMMY EXAMPLE
of what this wonderful
polish will do for your shots
JUDGE NOW8 STUFF
NEW HAVSN. Conn. (UPA
lawyer argued, "You've got to
grant my motion. I made the
same one last year and you ap-
proved it." Replied Federal Judge
Carroll C. Hincka: "Are you try-
ing to Imply, Sir. that I have
learned nothing in a year? Mo-
tion denied."
KIWI
WAX SHOE POLISH
jf In Black, Oxblood ind five shades of Brown.
A Kiwi thine lasts longer because the polish
is nude only from the finest warns and dyes.
JOSEPH GROSSMAN, S. A.
1 IS Central Avenue Panama, R. P.
Tnew Champion g
in the low price field
a new Commander
18Q-horsepower V-8
Exciting jeuttrenmed Uylmg.
Spectacular'52 performance.
Remarkable got economy.
Open until 9:00 p.m.
AGENCIAS PAN-AMERICANAS, U
CAlle Jernimo de la Ossa Panam City
(Down the street from El Rancho Garden)




.
TAC.r. EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, MARCH 31, 198
mpic
Basketball Tournament Semifinals Tonite
Survivors To Meet For
Tifle Tomorrow Night
PRESS
-.,
UNITED
o
Druetzler, Richards
Star At Daily News
Track, Field Meet
By UNITED PRESS
Seven Netv Marks Established On The Alleys...
In NCAA Swim Championships
0
I, iy Ihog Allen of Kansas University is taking his team
into the semi-finals of the Olympic Basketball Tournament at ^ former Michigan State run-
New Yorkbut he's doing it With misgivings. ner wno ^ now ln the A rf,
.. .,, cnai.ipions left Kansas- City yesterday morning p01e vauiun Dalson a..' tnP\
after whipp^g SoulUt Missouri Mate, -.2-65 to e2rn a berth ?J0 0fX annual DaUy News
in the ., -unals at .ad.son .square Garden tonight. Track and iie]d M t t *chlca.
.. 1 Aliena iong-inie foe of Eastern basketball official- *-.
Ingdoesn't th.r.k ihe Jay hanks hr.ve a chance of beating La K ; ipntpnnnt
Saiie. in fact, when Allen heard tfiat two Eastern officials had
l.i neu lo w.i k the ame with the Explorers, he threaten-
ed lo p:iil i ne Jeyhawna out A the lournamer.t.
, > w i,, tch was still famine vihen the team boarded
the | ..' i ......ay despue assurances that at least one West-
er, i > i : ii \, ii v.i.rk the game.
a is pecially bitter against Olympic ol'fi al Asa Bush-
nell, v. ni .i,,.i. .i'i Ihe mt n in work the tournament.
hneil .- just a Moose for Ned Irish of Maiuson Square usually does it. The Army lieut-
enant let Don set Lie pa-e, i.ien
Warren Druetzler
beat lamed Don Gehrmann at
his own game to win the Bank-
ers Mne, wnne tne Kever,end Bob
KlchaiQs won tne pole vault.
Druetzlermaking his first
appearance at the indoor show-
ran the niiii" th,p "pv uebpapn
Gart'en,' i s ..lie;..
. he u..' t e 'H says
he is sure his learn doesn't have
i ame on With a strong -kick" to
win In four minutes, nine and
.... J&yhauKci-s :.-t lo liet al three a.m. after plaving five seven-tenths seconds. Otinmann
. >, ..i g ueck." V.ns Allen. "I think we will lose to La was third behind Dewev John-
Si;... La Salle has had two weeks rest since winning the Na- s0" 1 Drake. Druetzlers win
i invi.al i I'ouu.anjcnt, and their travel ci nsisls of 90 encis uenrtnann's sueaK oi tuui,
miles from Philadelphia to New York." straight victories in the Bankers1
iie J.Miavktis got to bed al ihree a.m. after playing five Mile. Don also slumped in the|
compete the i< b of t.n.shing us off." l.OUO-yard run when Lawton
..\ .,- leaving Kansas City yesterday morning, the players, Lamb of Illinois finished in two
Allen, and Kansas Athletic Director Arthur l.onhorg, held a minutes. 13 seconds. Johnson was
secret meeting :( Iheir ii.nel. Duals of the meeting were not
revealed, anrl Allen's only comment was. that "l.onhorg says
tie II ;, a Western officirl."
La S:iile rolled into the semi-finals by defeating a Iravel-
; m e:. hi. John's club, VI-.. Saturday night at New Yoik.
The A.V.I, champion Caterpillar Diesels of Peoria, Illinois
he runner-up Phillips Oilers complete Ihe field for to-
i two games. The Caterpillars defeated the Air Force All
. S.s s I ...i T,rker i .el i. Oklahoma, at New VoVk Saturday
i t. 71-62. Phillips edi;etl the Fibber McGee and Mollys
i. 50 in double overtime at Kansas City.
i" sui < s of tonight's games will meet for the title 'half inches.
v nil ht. Seven plavers from each team in the finals will---------------
second with Gehrmana third.
Richards took the pole vault
easily. The former Illinois star
elimmaiea Don Laz with a vault
of 15 feet one inch, then went on
to clear 15-four. It's the 24th
time that Richards has cleared
the magic 15-foot mark, but he;
.missed when he tried to beat;
of Cornelius Warmerdam's world
record of 15 feet eight and one-
T.e
lie picked to make the Olympic trip to Helsinki, Finland, this
sutnim i.
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
un Frccco
lutuel Dividends
STANDINGS
TEAM
Navy ordnance. 7
( iral Labor Office 7
Army QM......7
Corozal Sales Store (i
Commi arv......(i
Po t Office ..4
I'.i ilii.ii' Division .. 3
Army Signal.....2
Kobbe Sales store. 1
electrical Division. 1
Won Lost Pet.
2 .778
2 .778
78
:i
3
5
'i
7
.fi 7
.144
,3M
.125
.125
NEXT GAMES
Monday. Electrical vs. Kohbe
Sales Store; Commissary vs. Cor-
oza I Sales Store.
Tuesday : Army QM vs. Central
ii or OI fice.
Thursday: Navy Ordnance vs.
\\ inner of Tuesday's game.
Individual batting averages o[
the Central Labor Office team
follows:
AB R II IIP RBI BB
A. Bowcn 23 17 16 0 6 3
R. Foster 28 18 1G
Jemmott 17 7 8
C. Bynoe 25 4 11
"L.Fd-ihill 22 13 9
8. Burton 25 16 10
C. J'rdan 24 7 8
-O. Clarke 18 7 0
Greaves 26 11 8
A. Barter 33 10 8
M. Smith 7 3 1
I. Moore 3 1 0
t hona 3 1 0
j. Ja 3 o n
23
5
5
11
5
6
3
2
3
0
0
0
o
Av.-.
.696
.571
.471
.440
.409
.4')0
.333
.333
.308
.242
.143
nnn
.nno
.000
FIRST RACE
1 -Raymond $9.20. $5.20, $5.60.
2 -Rlomar $4, S3.20.
:. .i Mano S'J 40.
SECOND RACE
1 Rina Hoi $9.40. S2.20. $2.20.
2Helen B. $2.20, $2.20.
Sixaola $2.20.
First Doubles: (Ravmond-Rina
Roil S8.40.
THIRD RACE
1Winsaba F9.60. $3, $2.20.
2Petite $2.20 $2.20.
3- Kin Fin $2.20.
One-Two: (Winsaba Petite)
SI 9.40.
FOURTH RACE
i Portal $2.40, :;2.40. $8.20.
2 -Goldl n Tap S4.20. $2.20.
3 C olden Pick $2.20.
iiinicia :,j< Portal-Golden Tap)
Sil.60.
FIFTH RACE
1Pavero $3.60. $2 20.
2Roadmaster
SIXTH RACE
1 Mr. Foot $7.4(1 i l.tH S2.80.
Wild Wire
-Hit S4.40.
$2 80, $2.40.
Seixas, Savitt
En Miami Tennis
Tourney Finals
MIAMI, Fia.. March 31 (UP^
Top-seeded Vic Seixas of Phila-
delphia and Dick Savitt of Or-
ange. N.J.. earned finals berths
yesterday in the Miami Interna-
tional Tennis Tournament.
Seixas downed Billy Talbert of
New York 6-3, 6-3. in yesterday's
semijinals, while Savitt had lit-
tle trouble in dumping Art Lar-
sen Qf San Leandro, Cal., 6-1
6-1. The winners meet ln this
afternoon's finals.
In the finals of the women's
division, top-seeded Magda Rvi-j
ran of Los Angeles breezed past
Miami's Betty Ruth James 6-2,
6-4.
Minister's Gadget
Gives Kids Close
View Of Baseball
ST. LOUIS, March 31 (NEA-)
Eddie Dyer, the former Cardinal
generalissimo, traces the dearth
of major league ball players to
modern youngsters' late start in
the game.
Little League Baseball is aid-
ing tremendously in the drive to
replenish t'ie sources of supplv.
And Rev. Paul Klehl, of St.
Louis, has invented a gadget that1,
will do much to educate the
small fry on the game. It's on;
the same order as grandma's old
stereoscope.
JAM SESSIONDance time seems to be in order as these two
British soccer players jump for the ball during a match at Luton.
Bedfordshire, England. Luton's Davies, left, seems to prefer the
Charleston, while Arsenal's Smith goes in for the two-step. Game
ended in a tie. (NBA)
Pacific Divisional Softball League
Championship Playoff Tomorrow
STRAIGHT SEASON STANDINGS
Team Won
Central Labor Office ............... 7
Navy Ordnance ..................,- 7
Army QM ................i........... 7
Corozal Sales Store.............----- 6
Commissary ...................'..... 6
Post Office......................... 4
Building Division ................... 3
Army Signal....................... 2
Kobbe Sales Store......'............ 1
Llectrical Division .................. 1
NEXT GAMES
Play-off for straight season championship:
Tuesday: Army QM vs. Central Labor Office
Thursday. Navy Ordnance vs. winner of Tuesday's game.
Play-off for fourth place in championship series:
Sunday; Corozal Sales Store vs.. Commissary
Lost Pet.
2 .778
2 .778
2 .778
3 .667
a .667
5 444
8 .333
7 .222
7 .125
7 .125
1.
2
3.
4.
Atlantic Side Hoop
Meeting Set Tonight
The Atlantic sMe Board of
"Anuroved Basketball Officials
will hold a meeting tonifht at
7 o'clock at the Cristobal
YMCA. Members of the Armed
Forces as well as civilians are
veelcome.
SEVENTH RACE
1 Stemo $4.20. $2 20.
2 i restigio 'c> $2 20.
Second Doubles: (Mr. Foot-
Sismo) S20.40.
EIGHTH RACE
1 Pulgarciio $2.80. $2.80, $2.40.
2-Bartolo $20.80. $7. stereoscope. i .,, DT,,ln
3Lnconico $2.80. Alfred Bowen iCLOi
Quiniela: (Pulgarcito-Bartolo) "Each stereoscope is eqilinped R. Foster iCLO)
3O.S0. with 24 colored slides,'Rev. Klehl R.So)tt (BD>
NINTH RACE explains, "showing Yogi Berra F. Peralta iNC'i
Supers I osa $9.40, $6.20. $3 40 catching. Phil Rizzuto playing V. Tudor (CSS>
Fairfax $7.40. $30. shortstop. Enos Slaughter bat-, o. Burrows (C)f
3 Alabarda $2.20. ting and Sal Maglie pitching." | R. Angermuller (C)
One-Two: (Supersliciosa-Miss Each picture lesson is complete c. Bvnoe (CLO)
Fairfax) SS0.P0. with text. M. Mussa (NO)
1TENTH RACE Rev. Klehl takes the pictures h. Jemmott (PO)
1Rockv $G, $3. | himself with a high-speed cam- l. Lughlll (CLO)
2Flambaro $2.60. era.
ELEVENTH RACE -------------------------------------------
i 1-Eloina $8.60, $2.80. ........____________________
I 2Diana $2.80. ~T~r'~~~~
TEAMS IN CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
Navy Ordnance.
Central Labor Office.'
Army QM.
Winner of Corozal Sales Store-Commissary game.
FINAL BATTING RESULTS
(Players with 26 or more trips to the plate)
By Appointment
^.4Jn Gin Distillers 4^^
To the late King
George VI
Gordon's
Stands SuptetKZ
S. burton tCLO)
G Duncan
A. Porras
Vi Wilson (AS;
C. McNally (KSS)
B. Sellman (PO)
R.- Beckies (Ci
C. Jordan (CLO>
A. amieson (AS)
F. Bailey (BD>
C. Greaves (CLO)
E. Bourne (C>
A. Headges 1BD1
D. Last)lev "NOi
L. lait (PO)
AB
23
28
23
31
19
33
22
25
as
26
22
25
23
311
30
22
26
32
24
31
25
M
26
26
23
23
K
17
18
9
14
5
16
8
4
11
10
13
16
13
4.
8
8
7
8
7
12
11
11
6
6
6
8
H
16
16
12
16
9
la
9
11
11
11
9
10
9
11
11
9
9
11
8
10
8
8
8
8.
7
7
2B 3B HR RBI SB
3
0
2
3
2
1
1
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
2
2
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
a
n
o
0
l
l
0
0
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
(I
o
i
0
0
6
23
11
6
10
l?
5
10
5
11

4
3
8
2
9
6
6
12
2
2
7
0
9
8
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
t
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
3
3
2
0
0
I
0
2
2
4
2
TEAM BATTING RESULTS
Team AB, R H
Central Labor Office 257 115 101
Building Division 219 66 7o
Commissary 290 96 90
Autiy QM 189 58 58
C'j.ozal Sales Store 208 62 63
Nmv Ordnance 239 63 71
Araiv Signal 250 70 84
Posl Office 22"9 63 62
Electrical Division 177 43 48
KobDe Sales Store 205 39" 64
2B 3B HR RBI SB
9
6
9
4
I
8
I
4
2
0
10
7
10
7.
9
7
11
8
6
2
70
41
65
36
43
45
49
38
31
23
11
15
17
13
18
11
If
11
11
9
B.A.
.696
.571
.522
.516
.447
.455
.455
.440
.440
.423
.409
.400
.391
.387
.367
.364
.346
.344
.333
.323
.320
.308
.308
.308
.304
.304
Ave.
.393
.342
.310
.307
.303
.293
.292
.271
.271
.263
By UNITED PRESS
Intercollegiate officials will
have to bring their record "books
up to date as a result of Satur-
day night's final program of the
NCAA swimming championships
at Princeton. New Jersey.
No less than seven marks were
erased as the swimmers brought
the three-day meeting to an end.
Burwell Jones of Michigan
7461st All Signal Kegiers Swamp
Horn Tilesetters Wltb Bates .
High Series Klumpp
The 7461st AU Signal team Walker .
knocked out a sweeping four- Jenner .
g)int win Tuesday night at the Andrews
labio Heights bowling lanes
when they ran a new season high Totals. .
ser,ies of 2980 against the H. I.i
Homa Co. bowling team.
The win was even more lm-j Jamison
presslve because the Homa team Thomas,
bowled splendidly, running Indi- Allen,
vidual games of 939, 889 and 926 Norrls .
for a total of 2754 for an average Engelke.
of 918 for the evening. This was1
to no avail, however, against the Totals .
ANGELINI
. 169 206
. 160 134
. 169 158
. 199 220
. 170 113
204 579
80 474
168 493
144 563
180 483
867 831 8762574
FUERZA V LUZ
203
167
173
147
189
167
168
202
180
161
157 527
179 514
162 537
190 517
157 507
879 878
va
BOYD BROS., INC.
8452602
983 908 9032794
highlighted the performance by 950, 992 and 1038 games for the
winning the 130-yard individual new total series record of 2980
medley in one minute, 29 and for the 1951-52 season. Morton ... 218 196 172 583
four-fifth seconds. Jones' time Is Henry Madeline was high man Dalley ... 193 190 162 545
one full second better than the' for the winners with 198, 227 and Bowen ... 175 178 193 546
old American NCAA and inter- 215 for a total of 640, followed by Melanson. 203 183 200 591
collegiate marks set by Joe Ver-IEaylon with 170, 225 and 238 for Schneider 197 156 176 529
deur of LaSalle three years ago. 632. Herb Cooley also ran over 600
Jack Taylor of Ohio State set i with games of 220, 187 and 204 Totals
another NCAA mark by taklngi while Shattuck ran a close 595
the 100-yard backstroke In 57.3 with games of 194, 200 and 201. LOCAL 595, NFFE
seconds. John Davies of Mlchl-:Had Hudak been able to get a Malee. ... 196 197 174 597
gan posted new NCAA and inter- good score Instead of his 502, the Nolan. ... 147 108 169424
collegiate marks ln the 100-yard I record might have passed the Kelsey ... 163 143 126 432
breast stroke when he was clock-13000 mark. Zebrock 203 158 138501
ed in 58 and one-half seconds. For Homa, Earl Best with 598 Eady .... 148 176 135 459
was high, followed by Joe File- -----------
Ford Konno of Ohio State Just bark with 59l and Fronheiser Totals. ... 859 782
missed setting another mark. I with 565. Lou Pierobon, subbing vs.
The great Hawaiian swimmer for Sartori, ran a good 545. but ALMACENES MARTINZ
missed by one-tenth of a second'Payne was left out with 455. A. Damin 195 168 177
as he won the 440-yard free-l '. Burrell ... 168 151
style event in four minutes, 30.3; The standings: |J. Damin 190 190
seconds. Konno probably could TEAM Won Lost Ave. Presho ... 185 177
have set at least a meet record; H.I Homa Co.. .72 32 .899 Owesne ... 164 195
had he been pressed. However,! M. Stempel & Son 87 37 .907
the 19-year-old Hawaiian easily!Angellnl.......59 48 .871 Totals.
outdistanced the pack ln the first Fuerza y Luz .. .. 55
7422383
540
173 490
179- 559
186 548
214 573
300 yards, leaving the rest of the
field to fight it out for second
place.
7461st AU Signal.. 48
Boyd Bros.......47
Alm'cenes Martinz 36
Local 595, NFFE.. 35
37
48
49*
58
57
68
69
900 881 8292710
.885
.868
.854
.859
The ten leading bowlers of the
league as of Tuesday night:
NAME Games Average
By BEANS RF.ARDON
24 Years in National League
Balcer........ .78
Engelke...... 78
Madeline.. .\ .. 78
Best........ 75
Fllebark...... 78
Saylon........ 78
Marabella...... 63
: Malee........ "42
NEW YORK(NEA)Q. How Morton..-...... 63
many bases did Hector Rodri- Stephens...... 51
guez, the White Sox' new speed! ------------
merchant, steal last season?
196-55
187-18
185-39
184-65
184-14
183-72
183- 4
182-35
182-11
181-45
Grapefruit League
BY UNITED PRESS ^W
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
Baltimore (Int.)
000 300 1004 11 2
Phlla.'(A) 100 000 50X6 5 1
Greenwood, Casagrande (7),
Donnelly (7) and Al Lakeman;
Shantz and Tlpton. LPCasa-
grande.
A.'The 31-year-old Cuban Ne-I
gro. playing at Montreal, led the1
The Tuesday night play:
International League with 26. Saylon
Q. Did Bob Cerv, the Yankees' Shattuck
rookie outfielder, ever play col- Hudak-.
lege ball? I Cooley .
1 Madeline
A. Yes, at Nebraska. He also
7461 ST AU SIGNAL
Totals.
Filebark
Flerobon
starred in basketball. The Amer-
ica Association's 1951 batting
champion, the only boy in his
family, learned his first'baseball
from three sisters, all good en-
ough to" play in> a West on, Neb., Fronheiser
softball league. | Payne .
Best. . .
Q. Is Sammy White, the rookie'
catcher the Boston Red 8ox art: Totals. .
so high on, the same youngster I
who played basketball at the
University of Washington? MAX R
WUber .
A. Yes. Seems as though col- Lawless. .
lege basketball is producing lots Coffey .
of pro baseball material these Colston. .
days. White was the Huskies' top'Balcer .
All-America candidate for three)
seasons. 'Totals. ,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
Braves (B) 1001100115 9 0
Atlanta (8AI 000 000 0000 4 0
Conley, Liddle (7) and St.
Claire. Parks 17): Crone, Rear-
don (6), Wyatt (9) and Kennedy.
WPConley. LPCrone. HR
- 632 J0hnny L0gan lBOg>-
595 ^..^a^^ _
180 502 TAMPA, FLORIDA m
204 611 Phillies 000 100 0001 t4 0
215 640'Rds 0OC00O0112 7 1
--------------1 Rldzlk, Meyer (7), Konstanty
950 992 10382960 (9) and Burgess: Blackwell. Hil-
ler (7i,'*>rdarM9> an*eininlck.
WPJordan. LPKonstanty.
205 201 185 591
133 178 234 545
309 191 165 565
155 140 160 4551 Yankees J50 200 00X8 8 0
237 179 182 598: Surknnt. Donovan (5) and
no
194
168
220
198
224
200
154
187
227
vs.
H. I. HOMA CO.
Sf. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
Braves 000 013 0026 10 3
939 889
---------------Cooper, Burrls (7); Raschi, Kuz-
9262754! ava (8i and Berra, Houk (6). WP
i Raschi. LPSurkont..
STEMPEL & SON ORLANDO, FLORIDA
. 154 167 222 543; Tigers 100 000 020 3* 9 1
. 151 164 163 4781 Senators 110 000 40x6f 6 0
. 154 193 174 521 Johnson, Littlefield (7) and
. 190 175 179 544 Batts; Hudson. Grossman (7)
. 194 154 202 550 and Grasso, Klutte (7). WP
-------------------------------Hudson. LPJohnson." HRMl-
. 843 853 9402636ichaels (Wash.).
.'
25% DISCOUNT

on CASH SALES:


STEEL

'
NAILS



PITCHERS' RECORDS
Won
A Savory (BD i .......,............ 2
A. Davis (NO) .................... 1
A. Barahona (CLO) .......'....... 1.
1. Moore (CLO) .................... 1
, N. Weir (AQM) ............'......: 5
8. Brown (C) ..................... 4
L. Otis (NOi ...................... 6
L. Springer iCSSi ................ 3
E Smith ...................... 2 '
J. Long (PO)...................... 3
O. Clarke (CLOi .................. I
Lost
0
0
0
0
Pet.
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.833
.800
.750
.750
.67
.800
.600
DUKE DRIVESThe Duke of
Windsor follows his ball closely
after driving off in the Seminle
Golf Tournament at West Palm
Beach. The Duke was in fast
company, veteran Sammy Snead
zooming up from 27th place to
cop the $10,000 competition with
a neat 138 total. (NEA)
Faltering Philip!
Phi'^ Ufe u rilled with bruises.
Well-worn lepa ad rags be naei
Repairs would laavt Us home like new.
P. A. Classifieds, fast the right clue!
ELECTRIC TUBES
TOILETS
ZINC
FIR-TEX
t
AGENCIAS GLOBALES
121 Va Espaa Tel. 3-1503



MONDAY, MARCH 81, 1951
' !
THI PANAMA AMERICAN AN INIUFKNDKNT DABLT NZWtfAPRR
PAGE NINI
Lean. Hungry Indians As Strong As Brace On Easter's Knee
hKiU.TnlNilLUT^rCI);eJClul'' Washington catcher, guirded
home plate like a brick wall throwing runner Everett KelTof the
. MW.'nd the" piCVnJl s,i" ,no'her bate-runner off flrttbMe
ji an exhibition game at West Palm Beach. Philadelphia won
however. 3-J. (NBA) '
Only BRANIFF Flies
DIRECT TO HAVANA
Stop-over in Havana on your next trip north
via Braniff. Thrill to the gay Latin charm thai
has made it world-famous as an international re
sort. Both Braniff services fly direct to Havana
deluxe DC-6 Conquistador, and low-cost El
Intercontinental. Either way, you enjoy Braniff
comfort and speed .>. and the assurance of flying
with experienced "million-miler" pilots.
They'd Like
MiosoBack
In 'Tepee9
By HARRY ORAY80N
NEA Sports Editor
TUCSON, Ariz. March 81 (NEA)
The Cleveland question mark is
Ring-sized.
It la Luscious Luke Easter, all
six feet four and a half Inches
and 235 pounds of him.
The Indians, leaner and hun-
Srler this trip, ar as strong as
le special leather brace, com-
plete with inflate valve, on Luke
Easter's left knee.
For the Tribe to win, Easter,
Rosen and Doby have to swat the
long ball, and the records show
that the Indians just aren't in
business when the affable and
laughable first baseman la una-
ble to do a full share of the to-
mahawking.
Fastlich League
With and without the big bat
In his hands, Easter means as
much to the Indians as Joe Dl-
Maggio did with the Yankees,
He's their big fella.
While Easter was sorely hand-
icapped by a tightly-wrapped
knee last season, the Indians
played .648 ball with him, at a
miserable .414 clip when he
couldn't even get out there on
one leg. He missed 29 games en-
tirely and the Lakeslders drop-
ped 17 of them.
BRACE BRINGS BLISTERS
Dr. George Bennett, the Balti-
more surgeon, took some cartil-
age out of Easter's knee last Nov.
fle, and the beaming Negro show.
ed up at Hi Corbett Field with his
protective device. This is design-
ed to keep his leg action straight
ahead and to prevent the knee
from collapsing right or left.
By the time exhibition games
started, however, the contraption
rd caused blisters to develop, so
was removed, and there was
outfielder Harry Simpson at first
base.
Suitcase Simpson, who blasted
ball parks apart with Wllkes-
Barre and San Diego, has not yet
disentangled major league pitch-
ing.
with Easter sound, Hank
Greenberg would still be seeking i
a right-hand hitting outfielder
precisely like the one he traded
away only a year ago In Minnie
Mifioso.
Oddly enough, Miftoso depart-
ed Municipal Stadium for pitch-
ing, the one department In which
Al Lpez Is pleasantly overload-
ed. At the time the brass con-|
curred that a left-handed relief]
pitcher was necessary, so on
came Lou Brlssie.
55 TWO SETS AND THEN SOME
Now Manager Lpez has a Big
Four in Feller, Lemon, Garcia
and Wynn, and a Little Four in
Chakales, Gromek. Brsale and
Sad Sam Jones, a Negro striker.
outer from San Diego and the
Puerto Rican League. Behind
them are a half dozen others
considerably beyond the prospect
stage, Including the holdovers,
right-handed George Zuverlnk
and southpaw Dick Rozek.
The principal hope In right
field at the moment Is Jim Frld-
ley, a large young man who play-
ed tackle for Bill Kern at West
Virginia. He can run and throw
and hit doubles and triples for
Dallas.
Then, of course, there is al-
ways Bob Kennedy, who probably
is the No. 1 man in Lpez' book
right now.
DOBY SHOCLD LOOSEN UP
STANDINGS (SECOND HALF)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Pumas..........4 1 |.M0
lomas........4 1 Mt
Ocelots........ I I .75*
Conejos........J 4 At
Macaws........ 7 .1
Results of the Fastlich Teen-
Age League games at the Pedro
Miguel fair on Saturday shuffled
the positions of the leading
teams in the league. The Palo-
mas' n to 5 win over the Macaws
put them In a tie for top spot
with the Pumas. The Ocelote' de-
feat at the hands of the Conejos
by a score of 10 to 4 brought
them down to third, with the
Conejos and Macaws still hold-
ing fourth and cellar placet re-
spectively.
The Palomas were not long In
the hit department taking only
four singles, but fourteen stolen
bases, two sacrifices and eleven
walks off Eisenmann all helped
to bring In the runs. Every In-
ning saw Palomas crossing the
plate with two tallies in each of
the flrtt three Innings, one In
the fourth, three in the fifth and
one In the sixth.
The Macaws didn't connect
safely until the fourth when
Chaluja brought In one and
three more were scored in the
sixth with one In the final sev-
enth inning.
An autographed baseball pres-
ented to the hitter with the most
bases went to pitcher Charles
after a toss-up. He had tied with
Pablo Salas with two singles
each.
The box wort:
Macaws AB R
Mead, R, 2b. 2 0
Lelsy, 3b. . 2 n
Salas, Pablo, is 4
PO A I
Chaluja, cf
Boughher, ef.
Norton, lb .
Bruhn, lb .
Cody, lf-Sb .
Morris, 3b .
Carlln, If .
Powell, rf .
Perantle, c. .
Mead, B., c .
Eisenmann, p
t 1
1 1
0 0
with five bates, having get
it for a single at well at hit
red.
61W-
. box score:
Conejoa AB B
-ft*. If ... 4 I
Mat.., ..
Scott, 3b.
Hammond, at
if
1 0

Little League
AIMED FORCE! LITTLE
LEAC
Ooodin, e . 4
Reyes, lb. ... 4 1
Harden, Rl., cf 4 0 l 0
Cotton, Lr., rf 4 1 I i
MeKeown, 2b 4 1 l i
Hlnkle, p . 1 0 1 0
Totals.....35 10 10 21 5
Ocelots-
Black, 2b. .
Kaufman, lb
Fearn, ef. .
Klrehmltr, p.
Kugler, lb-ss
Cicero, st .
Kttkt, lb. .
Gray, rf. .
Morris, 3b ... S 1 I
Archie, c . 8 6 6
Henderson, If 1 0 0
Glaasburn, If. 10 0
Nahmad, If . 1 0 0
Hilllard, p-cf. i 0 0
kGUE
TEAM
la........
NAB Command
Won Lost
.7 1
. I t
IS
I
5
I
I
0 0
0 1
1
Totals.....35 S S 18 10 4
Palomas
Hatchett, c-lf
Zambado, 2b. 4
Charles, p . 4
Hotz, cf . . 0
Brandon, cf . 1
W'klosky, D., it 3
Eder. If .... 3
Angstadt, c . 0
Wood, lb. ... 3
Cox, 3b .... 1
Bacot, 3b. ... 1
W'klosky, J., rf 1
Powell, rf . 0
AB R
3 1
1
HPO A
0 0 0
1 1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0 0
1 10
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
Totals.....31 11 4 31 10 3
Score By Innings
Macaws 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 5
Palomas 3 3 3 13 1 X11
Runs Batted InC a r 11 n,
Hatchett, Zambado 3. Charles,
Bacot. Earned RunsMacaws 1,
Palomas 4. Left on BasesMa-
caws 8, Palomas S. Stolen Bases
Salas 4, Boughner, Hatchett,
Zambado 3, Hotz 3, Charles 3,
Angstadt, Wood. Cox, Wlnklosky
2. Passed BallsHatchett 3, B.
Mead 2. Struckout ByCharles
0, Eisenmann 6. Batee On Balls
OffCharlea 7, Elaenmann 11.
Losing Pitcher Eisenmann.
Winning PitcherChaxlet. Um-
piresCarlln and Hlnkle. Tint
U Game2:00.
For information and
rttervation Mt your travel agent oi
call your Braniff npreatntattvt.
Avanido Tivoli #18
Telephone 2-OT29
Hotel El Panam
Via Espaa, 111
Telephone 3-4726
or 3-1660 Ext. 130
Colon Ticket Office .Telephone /19
If Luke Easter's knee stands up
and Larry Doby acquire! one.
third of his looseness and an
equal amount of Roy Campanel-
las philosophy, the Indians can
take it all, at they should have
In 1951.
Certainly, the Cleveland club Is
in position to prove that pitch-
ing Is from 75 to 90 per cent of
baseball, as Connie Mack and
other pundits long have con-
tended.
This is something the Indians'
staff failed to do last season.
when It showed the way to big
league pitchers for the fourth
straight campaign.
RED BIRD GETS TOUGH
MEMPHIS. Tenn.. (UP). A
redbird here is either mirhty
stubborn or mighty pugnancious.
For 17 months he's been battling
hit own reflection in Mrs. James
Pidgeon's picture window. The
bird gets set and flies into the
window several times a day.
SECOND GAME
Showing that they are still full
of lignt aesplte four losses in the
second half, the conejos knocked
the Ocelots out of their chance
to stay In first position by de-
feating them 10-4 in the after-
noon game.
The Conejoa took eight hits
and seven runs off Hilllard be-
fore he was replaced with one
out in the fifth by Klrchmier.
The Ocelots first score came la
the fourth when Cicero got on
on an errorhe scored ahead of
Gray who caught one for a hom-
er. Gray put a lot of steam be-
hind his clout which hit the far
side of the top of the carrousel
in deep right field... good two
hundred and fifty yards.
A single tally brought the Oce-
lots up to four in the fifth but
they went down one-two-three
in both the sixth and last in-.
nlngs. A snappy double play from
Reyes on first to Hammond at
second back to Reyes closed the
ball game.
Gray of the Ocelots carried
home the autographed baseball
Totals.....25 4 5 21 S 4
Score By Inning
Conejot 0 10 4 4 0 010
Ocelots 0 0 0 3 10 04
Runt Batted InMagee 2,
Hammond 2, Ooodin a, "Reyes.
Hayden, Cotton, Ofay i Earned
RunsConejos 4, Ocelots a. Left
on BisesConejos 11, Ocelots 6.
Two Base HitHammond. Home
RunGray. Stolen BasesOood-
in, MeKeown. Fearon. Patted
BallArchie. Struekout byHln-
kle B, Klrchmier 3. Base on Balls
off-Hlnkle 4. Hilllard 8, Klrch-
mier 1. Losing PlMherHilllard.
Winning PitcherHiftkle. Dou-
WeplaysKugler. Archie: Ham-
mond, Reyet, Hammond. Um-
piresNeville and Hlnkle. Time
of Game3:00.
Atlantic
Pony League
Wednesday evening, April 2, at
8:30 o'clock at the Margarita
Clubhouse the Atlantic Pony
League will hold its first annual
banquet. The players, managers,
coaches, umpires and officials of
the league will be the guests of
the league at a turkey dinner.
All parents and frlendt of the
Pony League are welcome and in-
vited to attend. The price for
tuetts will be 11.36 and reserva-
lons should be made by tonight,
March 31. After the dinner, a
movie, the World Sertea of 1881,
will be shown.
As this will be the last get-to-
Kther of the Atlantic Pony
ague It It hoped that a large
turn-out will be present.
Those desiring to attend are
asked to get In touch with the
following persons and make their
reservations:
James F. Campbell, 3-1383 or
3-3139; Carl Newhard, 3-2345 or
3-1500; Michael F. Greene, 8-3808
or 3-2139; Gene Didler, 8-1910 or
3-1748; Noel Gibson, 3-1749; Jeff
Roblnette, 3-230 or 3-2139.
THURSDAY'S RESULTS
Curundu 14. West Bank 8.
Kobbe 16, Albrook 14.
Caribbean Command 14, Clay'
tea 4.
The Curundu Councilman aeor-
ed theli seventh straight victory
J'hen they defeated the Wett
lank lsdl 14 to 3 Thursday at
the Little League Park In Ooeoli.
George Barbler hurled for the
Wttt Bank team and Butch
Franglonl wat on the mound for
the Councllmen.
Jerry Curtis wai the leading
hitter for the Councllmen, col-
lecting three hits In four trips
to the plate. Timmy Dayi led the
lotera at bat, collecting two for
three, with teammate George
Bkrbler garnering two for four.
Score by tunings:
Curundu 3 0 5 0 0 714
West Bank 3 0 0 0 0 03
The Fort Kobbe Little Leaguers
pounded out a 16 to 14 win over
the Flyboyi in t free scoring
time at the Albrook Little
eague Park.
Two Albrook hurlen taw ac-
tion In the contett. John Desloge
started on the mound, but wat
lifted in favor Ronald Thrush
In the fourth Inning, who fin-
ished the game.
William Martinez started on
the mound for the Kobbe boys,
being lifted in the fourth by Vin-
cent vail, in turn being relieved
by Lance Douglas.
The Flyboys' defensel crum-
bled In the third Inning, and a
combination of walks, nits and
errors let the Kobbe dirt pound-
ert push eleven runs icroes the
plate. The Kobbe lads came blck
in the fourth Inning to score
three runs, only to have the Fly-
boys unloosen a hitting barrage
in the bottom of the inning,
which netted them eight runs.
The Kobbe boys tcorew two runt
in the top of the sixth frame and
the Flyboys came up with a bat.
ting rally which wat nipped by
the Kobbe lads with some beau-
tiful fielding plays, but not be-
fore the Albrook lad had scored
five times.
Score by innings:
Fort Kobbe 0 0 (11) 3 0 216
Albrook 0 0 0 8 1 814
In the game at Russel Field on
the 15th Naval District reserva-
tion, the Caribbean commandos
walloped the kids from Ft. Clay-
ton by a score of 14 to 4.
Ross Kramer was the winning
fltcher and Herman Wilkinson
be-loser.
The Commandos got off to a
running start In the bottom half
of the first Inning when they
pushed aerost nine tallies, and
every Inning saw at least one
Commando cross the plate. Kra-
mer held the Fort Clayton boys
In check until the third inning
when Robinson ttarted a rally
that produced two rum.
For the winners Kramer col-
The Golden Girl's gone off the gold standard. Sonja Henla
It losing money. That's a new experience for her and, under-
standably, not a happy one. Theer are mitigating circumstances.
For the first time rhc is en her own as a promoter and she hat)
not been lucky.
Up to this year her butlneti associate was A. M. Wlrts of Chi-
cago whose connections are tuch her Ice spectacles were auto-
matically booked Into the better-known and more spacious arenas
around the eountry, including Madison Square Garden.
She could not get Into the Garden this season, Wlrts and his
associates having formed a rival troupe, headlining Barbare Ann
Scott, who was optimistically presented as successor to the Gol-
den Girl. Art took a beating but the box office thrived.
Undaunted, Sonja booked her show' into the Klngsbrldge
Armory, which Is 'way uptown, but cancelled out because ef a
hasty demand that she pott a $1,000,000 liability bond. Improvised
stands In Baltimore, the show's last previous stop, had collapsed,
Injuring many, and the armory people were taking no chances.
These things never happened to Sonja before. She had A
closely knit schedule, playing in Indianapolis, St. Louis, Chicago,
Detroit and here, In arenas all controled by Wlrtz and the Norria
(IBC) Interests. It was a smooth, professional operation and the
money rolled In. But now?

THE SHOW COST HER 88M.048
"But now?" repeated Sonja. "I do have some misfortune,
yea. Baltimore, yes, It was terrible. I have 200 suits and I do
not mean the kind I wear, and they are asking half a million
dollars. But they do not whip me. I mean these promoters. I
will ttay in busmest."
She was speaking of the future. She may go to Havana with
her troupe for a booking, then end her current season and at A
heavy lost.
''It cost me $600,000 to produce the Ihow," the told me. How
much her first season on her own will coat her the did net dis-
close. Not counting the suits, It will come to what economists
like to call a pretty penny.
She assured me, rather repetltiously, that she does not worry,
that she does not need these other arenas but then she added,
chllenglngly, "Why can I not play in the Garden, the Garden of
all placet?11
Somehow mention wat made of the government'! antitrust
suit pending against Jim Norrls of the IBC and which, in a re-
duced tense, also concerns Wlrtz.
"How serious it that?" the atked, leaving the thought back
of the question to the interpretation of trie listener, who was un-
able to decide whether It went beyond mere curiosity.
Sonja's financial position It tuch that the can take a mon-
strous lots and still give you those charming dimples, but It is
clear that her pride ta an artist has been wounded. Nobody knows
better than the Golden Girl that Klngsbrldge Armory is not the
Garden.

THIS MAY MEAN THE END
When Sonja protests the Garden taboo (If that's what It
amounts to), she speaks from considerations of sentiment as well
as box office, for that's where she started back In the '30a; that'a
where the introduced a new form of ahow business that was to
bring her Immense riches and lavish fame.
She talked wistfully of doing something about it... "You've
got plenty of dough, why don't you build your own New York
arena," I suggested.. ."I'm not that, disturbed and I'm not that
crazv," the laughed. It did not seem a mirthless laugh. Never-
theless, I feel that If she doesn't get back in the Garden next sea-
son she will retire.
8onja's still a good-looking dish, trim and chic, but even If
she deceives the eye she must find the calendar more penetrat-
ing. I saw her win a world championship as an amateur In the
Oarden In 1930 and this Is the 16th year she's been on tour. There
came a time when even Sara Bemhardt quit. Indeed, it was
Sonja's threat to quit last spring which led to her present prob-
lem.
In any case, she wat the best, the best by far. She won 10
consecutive world figure skating titles and three Olympic cham-
pionships, and when she turned pro she became an entertainer of
the first magnitude and banked no telling how many millions.
Nor was there ever a more magnificent trouper.
"I never missed a performance." she reminded me. The proud
boast of an old pro, if the little lady will pardon the expression.
leeted four hits in four trips to
the plate, with teammate Jimmy
Snider getting two doubles in
two trlea. Leading the losers at
bat was Frankle Robinson with
two for three.
Score by innings:
Clrabbean Command 912 llx14
Fort Clayton 002 003 4
All games scheduled for today,
have been postponed, and will be
played on Monday, April 7.
OFFICIAL LIST OF HE NATIONAL 10TTFPY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Priie-Winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1725, Sunday, March 30, 1952
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two series "A" As "B" of 22 pieces each.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
4421
3003
9774
$ 44,000.00
$ 13,200.00
$ 6,600.00
FOR BRONCHITIS
COUGHS, COLDS
It's Triple Strength
Loosens Things Up
Do FALSE TEETH
Rock. Slide or Slip?
FASTOTH. an improved pearler le b
prlnkltS oa upper or lower platan aoMe
""" Mara upyw ua iuarr btaita. rnirn-
'-'a tteth mora firmly In placa. Da not
lid, alia a* reck. Na ummy. aaaay
ojaty taita or faattns- TASTTtirfil |.
ilkallM (noo-add, Doe* not tour Chata
' E' oc*" <*antnra ttaath). Oat faS-
TKXTB at any drag atora.
If* dlfttrent It'l taste In
M compounded on aupe* madicn
tact find.no* navai before heard rf
in this country.
Juekley't Conodiol Mlatura tripla,
itrangthl Is the noma of this omel-
Ing cough and cold prescript on mart
"octt lika o iloah" yei a ea pun) en*
tree from harmful Oruga *0t a eh'1*'
con toko It. .and top coughing.
One littia alp one the ordinary
:ough It gone o raw deesa end
thot tough old hong on cough )
haord na mora Mi really *n-
dorful to watch new ajnrkh. pad.
'ingarin, cold* ora ,put out Of Puat-
Right ewoy thot rlejhtneei
up. .the ererx-hiol potsoges
you're on your lean ogetn.
brooming sealer Gat e avsttts a
Buckley's Conodiol Mia tura today.
Moa n7aa a iTtr- >aa fra* a. ten it. Net rtaaa Nee FtW aiM tr\rr rlar Nae rviaw a Prlaea
i I i 1 > I
tan i3t.es itn ut.M tan m.M m.M Mil 111M sail m.M ten Ut.M 7M1 U2M MSI Ut.M Mil U2.N
tin ltt.M ii*i U1.M mi in. tm m.M un 1I1M 1111 UtM tin UtM Tin 132.M 1121 U2.M 121 m.M
tan UI.M ii*i mat tan me 1111 m.M 4M1 m.M 1211 UI.M 221 UtM 72 m.M 221 Ut.M M21 Ul.N
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Frise-winnln*. nampes? Of resterdari Lottery drawtn* were told:
la the Interior.
first In Coln; second in Panam; third
the alna huarea] whett tickets eatUas in 1 sad net lael ded eg the bore list tria Forty-roar Dollar* (844.) ml
The hele ticket has 44 piece which comprise the two series "A" and "B."
Slfried by: AJJSOtTO AXIMAN Governor o the Province of Panam
AMTOiad MOeCOBO B. Represent a tire of the Ministry of Treasury.
WITNESSES: ZfiOfit***-*"- "> 4T'7m
CARLOS CRISMATT
Notary Public. Panam.
RAPAIL TBRAN A.
SecretaryAd-hee
l.!l,l,J .
MA.! ! --


^^^Mk^^S



GLOBETROTTERS TO
Famed Hoopsters
Plan Further
World Tour
NEW YORK, March SI (U6I8>
-^One ol the most skillful and
picturesque athletic groups In
the United States, the Harlem
Globetrotters basketball team,
leaves In mid-April on another of
It International tours.
The Globetrotters, Negro ath-
letes who have entertained big
audiences in many countries,
currently are making a 15-clty
tour of the United States.
-R-fter this tour they will leave
to* of their international tour.
Their trip will take them
through Latin America, and on
to Europe, the Middle East,
Korth Africa, Japan, Guam,
Hawaii and other Pacific Is-
lands. It win last Into October. .
The manager of the team. Abe I
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is aafe" Abraham Linela.
rWENTl-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAT, MARCH 31, 5t
Army Has Guided A-Missiles

To Knock Down Enemy Aircraft
1The,mlan,ager"of the0team Abe! WASHINGTON, March 31 (UP) | army has developed a guided It.was; discussed In off -the-re- alreadyhadI been published In a
Saperstein, recalls previous sue- ^g army ha5 g0nc into actual I missile which can take off from cord testimony. ^?^L4nmYhlv referred te
cesses the team has scored on production of two guided missiles the earth and track anddestroy i .wmin. mm ...rtiri* which said the armv
.,-.. t.it. ii:.hi. nf ^orrvino atnmir war-Inn alrolane f vine 10 miles awav However, subcommittee mem- asj article wnicn aara wing
overseas visits. capable of carrying atomic war-Ian airplane flying 10 miles away However sj^bcommittee mem-
While the Globetrotters usually heads and is "organizing units" at an altitude of more than six Iben 'nd,c*^dJ^'^0} 5*K|g
win the majority of games they to use them, a House subcommlt- miles. I it U by complaining that details
plav Saperstein pointed out that tee disclosed today,
much of their satisfaction does. Testimony given before the
not come simply from athletic Appropriations Subcommittee re-
victory but from playing a part cently indicates that one of the
in the role of sports as an inter-:missiles U tor an -aaft use
In the roie oi sports as an unc- imMura *?. *"'. "-"----
national common denominator, land the other for use as artillery.
Saperstein also sees the Globe-
trotters as a living refutation of
Communist propaganda about
Nesroes.
"When people see a grewp of
Nwrroes who are well-dressed
An Army spokesman said In
a heavily-censored statement
Just made public that the mis-
siles can use either convention-
al or atomic warheads.
"For many years army ordnance
7,000 Soldiers To Take Part
In Atomic Tests Next Month
WASHINGTON, March 31 (UP)
HWtroes no are weii-aresaca. ..por many years army oronance ","D"":"iv"^"*i" "_.XI1'
well-fed. and who show the best people appearing before this sub- -The Defense WIE? that
t training." he said, "their con- --J >,- imniv talked naunced at the weeken
eepiion of Negro youth is chang-
ed."
The team's itinerary in La-
tin America includes Panama,
Venezuela. Brasil. Uruguay,
Paraguay. Argentina, Chile,
Bolivia, Ecuador. Colombia. Er-
cept for Bolivia. It baa visited
bH these countries before.
In Europe, the Globetrotters
will give repeat performances in
England, Belgium. Prance. Ger-
many. Italy. 8witaerland. Spain
and Portugal, and will make
their first appearances rn Swe-
den Norway. Denmark, Luxem-
burg and Greece.
In Alrica and the Middle East,
they have scheduled appearances
ittehave" simply Talked nounced at the weekend that
"futures thC- ?i^-n SE*S^ESrt S"S?
said. "Now some of these mis-
siles are a reality."
He said they are "considered
usable missiles at this time" and
that the army can get "good re-
sults from them."
Testimony also indicated tne
Negro Doctor Named
To Staff Of 'While'
Southern Hospital
MIAMI BEACH, Put./ Marcn
aa article which said the army
will have a stockpile of nearly
l.eoe of this type of missile by ;
the end of the year.
Brig. Gen. S. R. Mlckelsen,,
chief of the special weapons,
branch of the army's research!
and development division, agreed
with members that whoever In
the Pentagon made the dis-
closure should be "summarily
dismissed."
The article^ hitherto uncon-
firmed, gave alleged details of
Army atomic specialists will In- M which^howed the missiles
doctrnate the troops before thei,, ._, * hitting an airplane
exercises as to what to expect. i ftfrht.
FIVE CENTS
(NBA Telephoto)
SURROUNDED BY WATER One hundred an d fifty families had to be evacuated from their
homes in Prlnevllle, Ore., after rapidly rising waters from Crooked River flooded the area.
mtc explosion test in Nevada
next month.
The Atomic Energy Commis-
sion announced that a "limited
number" of news reporters andislons.
photographers and civil defense All of these divisions are re-
civilians would be permitted to ceivlng atomic training_nJE*er
xercises as to wnat to expect. flight
Army troops, participating ln!'"T" ,
the tests'wHI include two batta-!,,^.,. .
lion combat teams and support-Lf vict,0rv
ing service troops from the 82nd ", ,__ t.
Arlme, First Armored, 31st In- {gj Mrtt
fantry. and 47th Infantry divl-
"in Turkey, Israel, Casablaneai .."jr*;f_ aSouthern
observe one of the tests from a
point on the AEC's proving
ground at Frenchman's Flat,
Nev.
The teats will be held during
the fourth week of April.
The Defense Department said
that "within the safety and se-
curity requirements" the tests
are designed to indoctrinate,,
aren members of the armed services Camp Pendleton, Cal., and the
hite m atomic warfare and to test | other from Camp Lejeune NC.
Air Force representation, total-
else Long Horn In Texas, the an-
nouncement said.
Army participants will total 4,-
500 and include Individual ob-
servers from throughout the
United States.
The Marine Corps will furnish
two provisional composite In-
fantry battalions of about 1,000
men each. One will be from
lll&V \J* |S,S1I*J MiVfc.iwVM w -
elude Australia In the itlneraiy
but had to abandon the plan be-
cause It would then be winter
there, and no suitable hidoor a-
ren- i>re available.
Mount Sinai Hospital, a pri-
vate Institution supported by
voluntary contributions, extend-
ed staff privileges to 32-year-
old Dr. Aubrey W. Henry and
assigned him to the care of Ne-
gro patients. Dr. Henry recent-
ly became the flnt Negro mem-
ber of the Dade County Medi-
cal Association.
Walter White, executive secre-
tary of the National Association
for the Advancement of Color-
ed People, hailed Dr. Henry's
appointment as a "demonstra-
tion of vision and courage" by
the hospital.
"This rise above the color
line Is particularly heartening
In view of the recent violence
against minorities in Florida,"
! White said. 'It'll demonstrate
to ourselves and to the world
that in a democratic society
there is courage and human de-
cency as well as prejudice,
which too often makes the
headlines to the detriment of
our nation and democracy."
Max Orovitz. president of the
hospital's board of trustees, felt
that "in taking this unprece-
dented step, Mount Sinai... .Is
marking a milestone in medical
history in the South."
Dr. Henry, a native of Aucilla,
Fla.. received his Bachelor's de-
cree from Florida A and M Col-
The troops will prepared and
occupy positions at "pre-deter-
mined positions of safety," the
Defense Department said.
The Navy will have only indi-
vidual observersJat the test.
The Defense Department said
that the test, named" "Desert
Rock IV," will be a sequel to
cense ueparuneiu reiu. ii~"* i'.'j ._ .- ,"! "
After the explosions the groups.those held in Nevada teat Ww-
will simulate an a 11 a c k "near ember when an army .battalion
'ground ero,"" the approximate
center of the burst area.
Philippine Labor
Chief Gets Life
For Huk Connections
MANILA, Mrch 31 (UP) A-
mado Hernandez, former presi-
dent of the Congress of Labor
Organizations, was found guilty i
of "rebellion" against the govern-1
ment today and sentenced to life
imprisonment.
The suspended Manila city
councillor headed a labor group!
outlawed by the government be-
cause of alleged Communist
activities.
The court ruled It served as a
"propaganda army" of the Com-
munist party and that Rs offl-
cera conspired with the Huks in
attempting to overthrow the
government.
Ten other defendants in the
combat team participated.
Informed sources have said
that included in the spring ato-
mic test will be field firing of
It said the missile called
Nike" after the Greek goodess
ory was guided to its
, target 35,000 feet above
the earth by radar and in the
final seconds by a different
'guidance" mechanism.
Rila Hay worth Says
She's In Mxico
For Rest, Not Aly
EL PA80. Tex;. March 31 (UP)
Actress Rita Hayworth was va-
cationing in Mexico today, but
she said it was for a rest and
not to meet her estranged hus-
band, Prince Aly Khan.
She arrived here with Margaret
Parger, her secretary, and Robert
Schlffer, her agent. They left
Saturday for Chihuahua City,
Mexico, en route to Acapulco on
the West Coast.
"I dont want to talk to any-
one," she said. "This la a vaca-
tion and a rest for me and I'd
like to keep it that way.
1 am not going to Mexico to
meet my husband. You can make
that ]ust as strong as you want.
miC lesi Will oe iwra luuig, uiiHnijp. ,.*i.. rf
atomic weapons perfected as a That rumor is Just not true
result of experimental shot* last Miss Hayworth, Miss Parker
spring and fall.
The explosion will be the first
atomic detonation witnessed by
press and other "uncleared ob-
servers" since the Bikini A-Bomb
tests of 1948.
and Schlffer had a box lunch
prepared while they were having
lunch and took if with them
when they left for Mexico.
She said they would be In Aca-
pulco about six week._________
Blinded Navy Flier Lands Safely
With Radio Aid From Seeing Eye'
cree from Fionoa a a a vw- ^^'an^SncSV tan
lege and was graduated In me-**"?1,^one da^ torment
Seven oi uiem were unuiun o i nre over worm ivure wn >
the Congress, of Labor Organiza- canopy off his plane and lacer-
OPFERS ADVICE James P. ..i,.-*-* in me
Warburg of Greenwich. Conn lef * *> "d"^, n m|yeara and one day imprisonment | bMnded by blood when ground
a foreign affairs writer, told dicine from Meharry College in j^yen of them were memberg 0fiflre over North Korea tore the
the Senate Foreign Relations He. SL. <- anisa.., #
Committee to be "extremely
wary of reducing the amounts
requested for Western Europe
at this time." The committee is
considering the proposed $7,-
900,000,000 foreign aid program.
TOKYO, March 31 (UP) A
wounded Navy pilot bunded by
his own blood made a safe emer-
gency landing at a Korean emer-
gency airstrip, guided by the ra-
dio -voice of a fellow pilot who
hovered behind him and check-
ed his every move, the Navy dls.
Ens Kenneth A. Schechter,ur7lnju'fed. He felt pretty good
flying a Sky raider dive-bomber I about it, too.
off the carrier Valley Forge, was, ____
wheels up because he could not
find the proper control within
the plane. He skidded to a safe
stop on the belly of the dlve-
bombar.
Schechter was recovering from
multiple lacerations around the
face and body, but otherwise was
Nashville, Tenn. He served for
a time as resident instructor in
obstetrics and gynecology at
Hubbard Hospital In Nashville
and performed post-graduate
work at Cook County Hospital
in Chicago.
tlons.
NOW... Years Old!

But No Increase
IN PRICF
You'll enjoy Seagram's V.O.
Canadian Whisky e-en more now
that it is 6 years old! Honoured
the world over, Seagram's V.O.
is the lightest, cleanest tasting
whisky you have ever enjoyed.
Try it... it's aged longer.
Otattuiktmrnm ay.
COMf AMU CYRMOC, f. A.
CANADIAN WHISKY
Jewish Group Claims
Credit lor Bomb
tent German Leadelr
PARIS, March 31 (UP) A
trroup calling itself "Organiza-
tion of Jewish Partisans," to-
day claimed responsibility for
the bomb package sent to West
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer
last week, because the German
people are "still trying to en-
slave the world."
A typewritten communique
mailed from Geneva to the
United Press said today, "Our
comrades have executed the
first action on German soil."
The group claimed it was "at
war'1 with the German people
'lar cold-bloodedly murdering
six million Jews" under Hitler.
It said "the war will last and
will be felt bv German fathers
and sons in the flesh."
The group said "the explosive
book was addressed to the
Chancellor of the r"."- people. Adenauer. By chance
ated his face.
"I'm Wind," he-called Into his
radio. "Someone tell me where I
Lt. (Jgi Howard Thayer heard
the cry for help, spotted 8chech-
ter's plane m a shallow dive and
got on his tail.
"If you're the one, wiggle your
wings." Thayer aaid Into his mi-
crophone.
Schechter wiggled his wings.
Thayer calmly told him what
to do as he followed close behind,
building him through the clouds,
circling him back toward South
Korea where he could parachute
in friendly country.
Thayer Instructed him to Jet- -~ ;r**
tison his bomb load, corrected terday for the carefully control-
each wing dip and anticipated led experiment^ to det
each aerial hazard.
"You're doing fine. Ken" he
whispered. "Nose up a bitthat's
good. Now drop your right wing
Six Little Girls
Are Guinea Pigs
For Woe Weeks
BATON ROUGE, La.. March 31
(UP) Six little girls from six
to 11 years of age were off on a
nine weeks' adventure as human
guinea pigs today so that scien-
tists can learn more about Vita-
min A.
The children moved to Louisia-
na State University campus yes-
O.K.. boy. well be there short-
ly. Hang on."
They crossed the battle line In-
how efficiently their bodies con.
vert chemical carotene Into Vi-
tamin A.
Diet specialists also hope to
learn how much food containing
chemicals pre-adolescent girls
to friendly territory and Thayer should eat in order to get the
suggested that Schechter ball amount of vitamin necessary to
out. The blinded pilot would have improve their vision and keep a
none of that. healthy skin.
"Negative," he told his seeing- -__. Ji
eye pot "Take me to King Pif- Parents consented to "lend"
ty their children to university home
King Fifty is an airfield m economics specialists on condl-
South Korea. tlon their names would not be
neopie. Aoanauer. asnee J^^^^nl ^^^^T0^1^
th,emb;^lt olWh wno^Vas^r5r^en^dlonhe The girl, will Uve under strict
of the *<"",l'ei ponc' whoi tall of the ottered Skyraider supervision In a cottage right be-
opened the book and j^ed ,t M though he were side the laboratories.
Je^sh leaders in Switzerland! g^in- hlt own p]ane down.
-i-fcimed any knowledge tA -piM* down. Nose her i
*" "Organisation of Jewish
-rtisans
They aid they believed the
letter wax a hoax or the work
of some crank.
'Flaps down. Nose her down' The experiment Is being con-
some moreleft wing up. up, ducted by the university home
Hold her steady, fellow. Throttle economics department, under the
back more. Easy boy, aaayleaparvtaaoo of Mrs. Dorothy Mos.
that's it. You're on the ground."ichetta. associate professor of
Schechter landed with his'home economics.
2-Cent Postal Cards
Will Be Issued May 1
By CZ Post Office
The Director of Posts of the
Canal Zone has announced the
issuance of a two-cent postal
card May I.
The new cards will be regular
United States two-cent postal
cards overp r 1 n t e d "CANAL
ZONE."
' Stamp collectors desiring first-
day cancellations of the new
postal card may submit orders to
the Postmaster, Balboa Heights,
Canal Zone, with money order or
cash remittance to cover the face
value and return postage at the
rate of three cents for each 10
cards requested.
In addition, a covering enve-
lope suitably addressed must be
enclosed with each order for
canceled postal cards. The can-
cellation appearing on these
cards will read in the circulation
portion, "Balboa Heights. C.Z.,
May 1, 9:00 am., 1952" and in the
bare "First Day of Issue."
United States postage stamps
should not be affixed to the en-
closed covering envelope to cover
return postage, for such stamps
are not valid for postage in the
Canal Zone and the order will be
reduced by an amount sufficient
to cover return postage If sucli
stamps are furnished or affixed.
Remittance shall be made in
cash or money order. Postage
stamps or personal checks can-
not be accepted.
All orders and communications
should be sent to P08TMASTER.
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL
ZONE. _
Stale Depi. lakes
Hands Off Position
On Burma Question
WASHINGTON, March SI
(UP) Burma has "every
right" to take military action
against Chines* Nationalist
guerrilla troops within her
borders, the State Dept. said
today.
The department took a
"hands off* position after the
Burmese government announc-
ed It had launched an offen-
sive against an estimated 9,000
Nationalist soldiers who were
forced into Burma two years
ago by Chinese Reds.
T'roops under Nationalist
General LI Ml have refused to
eve up their mountain atrong-
>ld in Burma near the Slam
border. ,
A spokesman said Burma a
decision to try to .oust the Na-
tionalists does not Indicate the
Burmese government is chang-
ing its "neutral"" policy in in-
ternational affairs and siding
with the Chinese Communists.
Ito7$iramle^
Arctic Ice Floe
Rescued By Plane
POINT BARROW, Alaska,
March 81 (UP) Nuw m*"
who had been stranded on an
Arctic ice floe, 779 miles r.oitu
of Point Barrow since Thurs-
day, were rescued today oy a
ski-equipped patrol bomer.
All survivors were In B$e>-
conditlon, the Navy repOited
today.
The successful pick up was
made late Sunday
The men survived the Sib-
sero temperatures In good >-.n-
dltlon, because extensive pie-
paratlons for such a mlsliup
had been made well In advan-
ce of the flight to the lec U>*.
the Navy said.
They had normal food rations
for four days and emergencj
rations for ton more.
They also had plenty of iucl
for warmth, as well as, surv.val
tents and the shelter of the lh
fated plane In which they weic
travelling and whose undenar-
rlage was damaged In a take-
off, leaving them trended.
(NEA Telephoto)
THE ACTOR TAKES AN OATH Willie (The Actor) Button
shows photographers how he wl be worn in Just before
filtering Long Island City, NY., courtroom to testify. Button
is on trial for a I960 rboery of almot $M,000. H}J
Fly by Speedbird to
-a New York end London
Vour flight by pressurized" Speedbird
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