The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01427

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
' BRANIFF
AN
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Sea^ratnsV.O,
H A V A IS A
ROUND TRIP
PIRST CLASS $119.00
TOURIST 141.10
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is tale** Abraham Lincoln.
CANADIAN
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rWaNTI-SEVENTH *BAR
PANAMA. 1. P.. FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Parcel Bombs Posted To Adenauer
PANAMA TRUST REOPENS President Alclb
thrO"|B the Iron doors of the Panama Trust
Maicli 7. 1C61. Comptroller General Henrique
lster Galileo Soils (faclnt camera) accompanl
depositor (unnamed) to reach the paying tell
drawing the sum of $8,000. A long line of de
opened its doors to withdraw money tied up f
lades Arosemena (top photo) Is about to go
Co., which had been officially closed since last
de Obarrlo (fourth from left) and Finance Min-
ed the President. Lower photo shows the first
er when the bank reopened this morning, wlth-
positors gathered outside the bank before it
or more than a year.
Likely PC Budget Cut
To Slow HousingPlans
The Canal Zone housing pro- submission of budget estimates
gram for the coming fiscal year! for the fiscal year 1954.
may be curtailed considerably If i At Balboa Heights yesterday
Congress approves the recom- Canal officials said that toil
mendatlon made by the House;rates would undoubtedly be first
Appropriations Committee to ell.'on the agenda at a meeting of
mnate $3,000,000 from the hous-'the board of Directors scheduled
Ing project. Monday in Washington.
The House committee yester- with regard to the recom-
day also called for an Increased mended boost In toll rates, it
tolls rate for ships transiting the w^g recalled the Canal adminls-
Panam Canal, and cut the ap- tration originally proposed such
propriatlons requested for the lncreases to meet mounting op-
Canal Zone government by l-;eratlng costs m 1948.
e75 u (h.( <-h. However, this was vigorously
tire^tTflhro^on^ ft gg-fcg^E.'ffiffiS ?
erly reimbursable to the Treas lpolicy 8gkm(? the president to
The Canal Comnanv was also delav the tolls Increases,
chareed with sTco3etely un- A further studv of the problem
rSlc Spproa'chTV Us- by the Burea,.of the Budge^re-
ing problem." I commended that the Caiiai-Kau-
The effect of the committee's road business activities be com-
recommendaUon to slash the ap-'blned into a single government-
proprlatlon if passed, would be owned corporation, which was
an immediate "slow-down" In done when Public Law S41 of the
work on the planned $80,000,000 81st Congress was paesed.
housing program that vas to| officials at the Heights ex-
cover a six-year period. olained that Public Law 841 fix-
Top Canal Company officials es a formula for setting the tolls
could not be located this morn- rlte and change of the law Is
tag to determine just which areas neP->ssarv before that formula
mild be most affected can be altered.
With regard to mcreastng tolls The prMent rate Is DO cents a
the Governor and the Board of to, an5 the law fixes no ceiling.
Directors of the Panam CanJ|Tci^ must be set at sufficient
Company were charged with, recover the cost of oper-
"lethargy by the Comm ttee or, and maintenance, as well
"n^muuffaS.-,*I'ldtary functlons of he
.r^dlrectel^ke^Sr/nd Canal, plus inter* oa the lo-
Pg^nSnin^^ -mmRtee charged
The increased toll rates are ex-]
Navy Plans 300 Aircraft
Every Month By Mid-1953
WASHINGTON, March as. (UP) since Korea, but dirf not ay for
The VS. Navy plans to pro- the record how many planes were
duce 300 planes monthly by the delivered.
end of fiscal 1953 (June 30;, In- Kimball told the committee
eluding seven models superior to: the Navy has "in redaction
Russia's Mlg-15 Jet fighters, it thto year and next year abeat
was learned today. i aeran modela of airplane* that
Navy Secretary Dan A. Kim- re superior to (he Mi*-15."
ball and Adm. William M. Fech- Cassady said "certain of these
teler, chief of naval operations, planes will be operating In the
reported these goals In recent I fleet during the present calendar
testimony on the record-break- year."
ing $52,100.000,000 defense budg-
et, released today by the House
approprirtlons committee.
Feehteler aid naval aircraft
procurement has been sched-
uled en a two-year basta under
which "aircraft deliveries will
rise evenly to about SO* per
month by the end of fiscal 1953
and will be held at that level.*-
Batista Lists
'Important'
Meeting Mon.
HAVANA, March 28 (UP) A
Cuban Ministers council meeting
scheduled for today was post-
poned until Monday, at which
time Gen. Fulgencio Batista will
preside and present "Important
measures" for the council's con-
sideration.
The announcement came after
-" O
One Kills Expert,
Second Suspicious
Package Arrives
He said all of the new long- Minister of Foreign Affairs Mi-
range fighter planes requested
by the Navy will be able to deliv-
er small atomic bombs.
Cassady added that "a number
8uel Angel Campo told newsmen
at five more nations had re- j
cognized the new Batista gov-
ernment established In a light-
of our fighter and attack planes ning COup against President Car-
have already been built and are iqj pri0 socarras' government on
beine built to achieve the same March 10.
capability."
r'We now have On our carriers
He said that the five brought
the total of governments which
Vlce-Adm. John H. Cassady, liverlng the atomic bomb,'' Cas-
deputv chief of naval operations sady revealed, "and a greatly lm-
for air, said that at the time of i proved carrier attack plane Is In
the Korean outbreak, the Navy production."
was getting about 80 to 70 air-, Meanwhile, air under-seere-
HJ*LZ 2 ?? have ncognl
planes per month."
He said last January was the
month of the highest deliveries
pected to be in effect before the j f
Cup Record
DANVERS. Mass., March 28
(UP) Ropes drag tore,
jrhere three guards sipped cof-
fee while their armored car
was looted of $6Sl,Mf, featured
a special "sale" today.
A cap ased by one of the
guards bung by a red ribbon
ver the counter with the in-
scription :
-S28UM cap."
Quake Recorded
At Balboa Yesterday
An earthquake lasting two
minutes was recorded by the
seismograph at Balboa Heights
yesterday at about 5:03 p.m.
Residents of Balboa and vicin-
ity Imagined that heavy trucks
were passing outside during the
duration of the quake.
Epicenter of the earthquake
was about 43 miles from Balboa.
that except in 1937, the toll rates
have never been revised since
the Canal opened. It said the
ships using the Canal should
bear their fair share of the cost
of operation, maintenance and
amortization of the original In-
vestment.
"That this la not being done Is
obvious," the committee stated.
US Agriculturists
Seek To Invest
In Panam lands
A. group of U. S. agriculturists
are seeking a partnership or as-
sociation with one or more laree
land-owners in Panam for' in-
tensive agricultural Investments,
according to a letter received
from Fort Morgan, Colorado, by
members of the Panam Rotary
Club.
The letter was distributed to
Rotary members yesterday at
their weekly meetlnc, and spe-
cified that a group of agricultur-
ists would Invest In large tracts
Of land In Panam.
They explained that they rea-
lized most of the land would re-
quire at least five years of de-
velopment before thev could ex-
pect the following yields:
1) Two bales of cotton per acre.
2i 420 cwt. potatoes per acre.
9) 120 bushels of corn per acre.
4> Seven tons of alfalfa hay per
acre.
5i 90 bushels of barley per
acre.
The U.S. agriculturists stated
that "we prefer land in a terri-
tory where adequate rainfall will
produce these yields, but we will
consider land that lacks suffi-
cient rainfall and could be irri-
gated by pump or flood irriga-
tion."
They said their reason for
wanting to leave the United
States, although thev have been
-uecessful operators, was the
ever-Increasing burden of ln-
coute kaxea.
FBI Probes Anthrax
Outbreak In Nine
Midwestern States
WASHINGTON, Marsh 3d 'UP)
FBI agents sought today to
determine whether sabotage was
the cause of the current outbreak
of anthrax, a livestock disease, In
a number of Midwestern states.
The FBI announced It has be-
gun an investigation of the cur-
rent attack of the disease to see
if It has "Jurisdiction" In the
case.
One phase of the investigation
Is to find out whether the disease
has been spread through anthrax
spores in Imported bone meal.
Anthrax, which is usually fatal
to livestock and can be passed
on to humans, has already killed
250 animals In Ohio and spread
to nine states.
It Is caused by spores which
cannot be eradicated after they
penetrate the soil. _
Although a successful vaccine
has been developed, It is used
only In states where the disease
Is known to exist.
Anthrax Is not common to the
states that have been hardest hit
In the current outbreak Illi-
nois, Indiana and Ohio.
Members of the UB. Livestock
Sanitary Association and repre-
sentatives of 16 states told Fe-
deral officials that imported bone
meal has been traced as a
spreader of the disease. Normal-
ly m a Sack of livestock feed
there Is some bone meal.
The
Judges' Bench
tary Reawell L. Gilpatrie said
it will tafee nearly four mere
years fee the Air Force to have
121 modern combat wings un-
der the "stretched-out" arms
program.
When "budgetary limitation*"
foreed the latest reduction In
Meanwhile, the Partido Cuba-
no (Ortodoxo) announced that It
had appealed to the Organiza-
tion of American States in Wash-
ington to Intervene in the situa-
tion created In Cuba by the Ba-
tista coup.
The party said In Its letter
that the new ejoveraaient had
cancelled general elections
called for Jnna 1, that Preei-
BONN, Germany, March 28 (UP) Federal Security
Chief Hans Egidi revealed here fnat another suspicions
package which may contain explosives arrived today at
the office of Chancellor Konrad Adenauer.
It is believed others have been posted to him.
Eoidi told a press conference that the package, ad-
dressed to "Honorable Chancellor Adenauer" arrived
only a few hours after a Munich explosive expert was
killed while opening a similarly addresed parcel which
contained "donalit," a black gun powder.
dkiate Robert* Agramonte had
shown the greatest possibilities
of winning, with government
candidate Carlos Hevia running
second while, according to the
party's communication. Batista,
as candidate for the Partido Ac-
cin Unitaria, appeared to hold
third place in public sentiment.
It was expected that the new
government will make a state-
.rnent of foreign policy soon, al-
though it Is not expected there
28 would be any radical change
from that of Prio's government.
It was pointed out that Batis-
ta In one of his first statements
after taking over said Cuba
would honor all International
commitments.
However, some observers be-
lieve Cuban diplomatic relations
with the Dominican Republic,
Venezuela and Nicaragua
strained under Prk will im-
prove an'd that relations with
Peru will be resumed.
Two minor traffic accidents
ended up as fines for two Army
enlisted men this morning in the
Balboa Magistrate's Court.
Both men were charged with rioters and
following too closely
Mat hew Stanley Ceterski. 21,
was fined'$10 when his car was
Involved in an accident on Bruja
Road.
The other defendant. Angel
Manuel Romn, 27, Puerto Rlcan,
plane production schedules early dent Prie and members of his
this year, the peak goal of MO government had been foreed I
planes monthly was fixed forj to emigrate and that Congress
sometime in 1953. Gllpatrlc saw had been suspended,
in "Planee," publication of the, it claimed jiaibe*0** the coup
Aircraft industrias Asweiatkw. i ^ ortacorfs presidential can-
v^The Ate Force's abre K now dkJl
the only U. S. fifhtar ranked on
a par with the Hlg-g.________
More Fatal Rioting
Breaks Out As Reds
March In Teheran
TEHERAN, Iran, March
(UP). At ldaat ten persons
were reported killed and 100
believed injured In pitched
street battles between 10,000
Communist youths and police
and militia m central Teheran
Police Chief General Hoasein
Danshpur confirmed that two
policemen were among the dead.
About 50 Communists were
reported arrested.
Riots and guh battles broke
out when the rioters wrested
rifles and pistols from police
and militia as authorities tried
to block the Communists' march
into the central part of the city.
Upon being captured by police
and militia, the Communists
opened fire, supported by a bar-
rage of paving blocks and sticks
hurled by other youths. Three
policemen fell wounded or kill-
ed under the first fusillade.
In the first half hour of the
clash staged In front of the
Communists' "Democrat" Club
at least 16 Communists and
three policemen were carried
away from the battle badly
wounded, with blood streaming
from their faces.
Police and militia reinforce-
ments were rushed to the battle
area In trucks and regained
control of the situation by
heaving more than 50 tear gas
bombs into the midst of the
firing over their
heads.
Bomb Destroys USIS
Rumor Britain-US
Exchanging Data
On Atomic Power
LONDON. March 28 (UP).r-
Informed sources said today
that Britain and the united
States are exchanging Informa-
tion on atomic power as a re-
sult of Prime Minister Winston
Churchill's recent visit to the
United SUtes.
Exchanges so far are said to
have been limited to develop-
ments of electrical power from
nuclear sources and using ato-
mic power to drive ships.
There has been discussion of
exchanging Information on ato-
mic weapons, but no informa-
tion has yet been passed, the
sources said.
To do so would require amend-
ment or repeal of the Mac-
Mahon Act passed by the U. S.
Congress in 1946, banning ex-
change of all secret informa-
tion and materials.
The Ministry of the Interior,
meanwhile, warned the German
public that there may be other
attempts to deliver such pack-
ages to the chancellor.
At the same time Western
Germany's tap criminal police
moblbeed te traek down the
man whose mail order bomb
addressed te Chancellor Aden-
auer exploded in peliee head-
uarters here last night, kill-
ing on* official and injuring
fear otHkja,.
The Federal Ministry of" the
Interior warned against further
"acts of terror" and the Bavar-
ian state government declared
Germany will be "driven to an-
archy If political battles are to be
fought with bombs and assass-
ination attempts."
A nationwide manhunt was
concentrated In Bavaria, with
all police alerted te look for
palefaced man with nicotine-
stained fingers, long sideburns
and a anapbrlm hat, who yes-
terday paid two boys three
marks (75 cents) to snail the
lethal package.
The boys, Brunp Bayersdorf,
13, and Werner Breltkopp, 12,
said they became suspicious
when the man accosted them in
front of Munich's main railway
station and gave them what they
told police was "too much money
Just to take a packaee across the
street to the post office."
They took it to police head-
quarters, Instead, and demolition
expert Karl Relchert began to in-
vestigate the brown paper par-
cel In a room In the headquar-
ters basement.
Relchert, 46, father of three
children, accidentally tripped
the firing merhantom con-
cealed in an encyclopedia la
the package and set off a blast
which tore off bath his hands
and Injured four others In th*
raom. He died a few hours lag*
er.
Informed in Bonav]
evening o the pip
en his Rfn.
Adenauer expmsserj his gaiet on
hearing of the casualties and
said. "I will do what I can for
them."
Elizabeth's Crowning
Might Gel TV Relay
Over Atlantic I US
LONDON, March 28 (UP>Mil-
lions of persons In Britain,
France and the United States
may witness the coronation of
Queen Elizabeth II on television.
The queen Is expected to give
the British Broadcasting Corpor-
ation permission to televise the
ceremony In Westwlnster Abbey
when BBC applies st the end of
the period of court mourning
June 1.
The coronation program might
I be relayed across the Atlantic by
hlgh-flving alrolanes equipped
1 with relaying sets.
,, umce i uamdscus,
truck too closely to the preced- # sa a a
"i-s-SSB-JSLi JM Radio Operator
driver was found not guilty on a
charge of reckless driving this DAMASCUS, Syria, March 28,
morning. The defendant, George (UP) A bomb explosion des-
Ezeklel Bailey, was Involved In troyed offices of the U.S. Infor-
an accident in which Panam matlon Service today at 2 a.m.
Canal employe George Benjamin and killed a local radio operator.
Sulsman, was hit on Galllard The bomb had been planted in
Highway on March'4. the USIS garden, and the ex-,
On a vagrancy charge GUber- plosion was described as "most hfm on Santa Cruz island, we
to Dlxon. a 14-year-old Panama- severe." miles southeast of Panam, was
nian, was sentenced to 10 days in1 The Syrian government Pressback in health today following
jail. He has two previous vag- and Propaganda Department Of-!some short wave treatment from
rancy and one petty larceny con-fices as well as the neighboring Dr. Keith S. Wemmer o i
Medical Cure
By Ham Radio
Proves Success
Bud Devine, radio amateur <
victlns. buildings were also severely dam-
Three unlicensed Panamanian aged.
The dead man. George Dulik,
32, was an Arab-Palestinian re-
fugee. As soon as the explosion
occurred, police cordoned off the
premises and immediately began
an Investigation.
They were hopeful of quick re-1 and what he had on Santa crux
ed an additional $10. And Alex- suits since they said the author-to fix it with.
ander Francis, 35. was given a $5;ltles knew the license number oil Penicillin did the trick. Last
f'ne for driving his motor scoot- the automobile believed to havelnigh Devine radioed that he was
er without a license, (brought the boenb. icured.
drivers were fined this morning.
A $10 fine was meted out to Oar.
los George Mora, 33, and Dioni-
sio Flores. 24. both Panamanians.
On a second charge of not hav-
ing a valid certificate of inspec-
tion for his truck, Flores was fin-
boa dispenssry.
Earlier this week Devine got In
radio touch with fellow ham P.A.
White at Gamboa and reported
his leg was Infected.
Workine through White's sta-
tion, Dr. Wemmer got from De-
vine the details of the trouble.
SHADES OP YESTERDAY! A photographer caught this wo-
man returning to her home In Rio Abajo yesterday with a
roblet and a gallon bottle of water drawn from a nearby com-
munity pump, during a break In the water main which left
he suburban areas of Panama Citv without running water for
at least seven hours. Water service was restored about 1:30
nm. after the break, discovered around 8:13 a.m.. had been
repaired. The break was caused bv a split in a section of a
18-lnch hlgh-oressure water line on the west side of the
rrans-Uttunlan Highway opposite the National Distillery.


rvo
THE fANAMA AMERICAN AN iVnEPiNnENT Aft* WBWSPArtR
k*-
FRIDAY. MARCH 8. 1W*
T;:F. PANAMA AMERICAN
W*IP up 'i.tulHID > THt PANAMA A*-niCAN FBI. INC
VOUOI > NlkSON l0llNrvLl IN 1*1*
NAKMODIO ARIAS. tO"OB
tl M TII1 P O SO ISA PANAMA R O P
rtllPMONI PANAMA NO I 0740 '9 LlNC
cili Aorr PAr.'AMtmcAN. panam
COLBh OrriCI II 17 CtNTAl AvINUI 111*11" lTH ANB ITH TAItT
POPIiSN Pt'ltN-'ivr JOSHUA B POWERS. INC
14B MAniAON AVI Nl* YORK II'. N V
L6CAI. ""-
PA MONTH IN AOVANCt '70 '.J.'S
PO til MONTH. IN A0VANC1 ---------- S BO 13 O'l
O-Jt YA IN AVANCt_ -------------- 'I" _________"
viwdway and Elsewhere
Jack Lait
Labor News
And
Comment
by
Oov. Tuller Warren, of Florida, has relentlessly kept alive a
ffcud with Senator Estes Kefavuer, which grew out of the way
the Senator's committee handled the Florida gambling-crime
Situation...And now that Kefauver has qualified as a candidate
tor President in the May Florida primaries, Warren has compos-
ed a statement, challenging the coonskln-capped Tennessean
to debate with him his "fitness to be President? The Governor
raws up a bill of particulars in question form, Inviting Kefau-
ver to publicly answer his 21 Interrogations.
The foUowing, throughout, is verbatim quote, without use
of repetitive quotation marks:
A candidate for public office in America cannot avoid dis-
cussion of his record. A candidate s fitness for public of-
fice most be largely determined from his record.The Amer-
ican way to determine the truth about public questions or issues
Is debate. Lincoln debated Douglas about great issues which vi-
tally affected the existence of America. Lincoln became Pres-
ident largely as a result of his debates with Douglas.
The United States Senate settles great issues by debate
Many vital public questions are debated in newspapers and over
radio. Debate is the democratic way of settling public questions
No candidate with courage and honor will decline to debate
the question of his fitness for the office he seeks.
Accordingly, I Invite Senator Kefauver to meet me in joint
public discussions on the question of his fitness to be President
of the united Btates. I will meet him In any city or town he
selects. I prefer that the first debate be held in Jacksonville.
Where there is a fair newspaper which would truthfully report
the facts. But, if Senator Kefauver insists, I will meet him in
Miami, either in the Bay front Park bandshell or in the Orange
Bowl stadium.
Senator Kefauver's record of making a fortune for him-
self out of his crime committee indicates he will want to in
in on the debates. If he is not willing to admit the people witn-
o-t charge to the debates, I would he willing to hold them in
ths Orange Bowl, in the Gator Bowl. In the Clear Bowl, and
In the Tangerine Bowl, and donate 90 percent of the Proceeds,^v Bnyder's Tret
Cross and let Kefauver take a 10 percent cut ^ 5ept ?hat BoWet fu? mVrchin?
Jdlse was preps red by "slave, prl-
Tbere wonld be something ironic about Kefauver collecting son and indentured labor."
By Victor RleMl
Let their citation read "For
distinguished service to the en-
emy in the face of heavy fire
which has cut short the lives Of
over 18,000 American OIs."
Their award should be a Con-
fresslonal Medal of Dishonor
or they have supplied the en-
emy, in the past year, with al-
most $75,000,000 worth of Ameri-
can currency. And no one cares.
The Dept. of Commerce still
sends its speakers about the
countryside saying we're control-
ling trade with the Sovietized
enemy forces.
State Dept. officials, quick to
retort that they're being per-
secuted, still entertain in tnelr
embassies the Oriental suppliers
of equipment to the Red Armies.
And some of our merchants
still buy furs for the backs of the
ladles from the same economic
commlss'ons that supply the
armies throwing bullets at the
guts of our soldiers.
Evidence? Stashed away In
the files of our Commerce Dept.
Is a new report revealing that
while Manrhorian bases were
be'nr used by Soviet Migs for
aerial war on UN troops, our
government permitted certain
American merchants to bay
$6,487,000 worth of goods from
{Communist China and Soviet-
Ired Manchuria.
They got the cash. We got the
casualties.
From Russia itself, a handful
of American merchants bought
$27,369,000 worth of Soviet slave
labor goods, it now is disclosed,
despite pledges by secretary of
Commerce Sawyer, despite an-
nouncements by the White House
that this would cease, and de-
spite an official declaration by
Solving the Tax Problem
BCOfto5-1r /Awful taxb
/acs killing
frtB.'WHYD0E?N'7
At AN alhAX9Kcne
WILL4WZ. CO ZXftibW"
himself.
money from the people of Florida for his campaign fund. He
defamed Florida generally, and slandered Miami in particular,
lie was paid a reported $100,000 by the Saturday Evening Post
for putting his name on a series of ghost-written stories in
wYch he stigmatized Miami as a "polluted Paradise." This cru-
8" T-for-riofit slander Miami as a veritable cesspool of
cr'-ne In s)ite of the fact that official F.F..I. reports showed its
crime rate was much lower than that of cities of comparable
' ats in other states. The crime rate in Miami is much lower
than in Kefauver's home city, Chattanooga, where crimes such
as murder, robbery, burglary and assault were much higher in
percentage in 1951 than for the nation as a whole. And in Chat-
tanooga open gambling is operated on a mass scale, while it has
been suppressed In Miami, which Kefauver branded as a"Pol-
luted Paradise."
Among the questions affecting 8enator Kefauver's fitness
to be President, which I shall discuss, are the following:
1. In what ways did Senator Kefauver exploit his so-called
crime committee to promote himself for President. .2. How much
. money did Senator Kefauver collect from sidelines developed af-
ter he became chairman of the crime committee?. .8. Why did
Senator Kefauver keep his crime committee out of Tennessee?
4. Why did Senator Kefauver refuse to take action against the
one-hundred-million-dollar-a-year, ($100.000.000) gambling syn-
dicates which openly operated In Washington, D.C.?
Why did Kefauver oppose the Federal tax against gamblers,
which has done so much to suppress gambling?. .8. Why has
fambi ng continued to openly operate In Tennessee, as shownCorp. of 174 Phayre St., Ran-
7 F.B.I, agents' seizure of hundreds of slot machines In 23 goon?
Now the Commerce Dept. tells
us that such sules are barred ef-
fective Jan. 5, this year. This Is
untrue.
Just like that. Untrue.
A new law, passed after pres-
sure from a non-partisan bloc of
Congressmen working with this
columnist, has a loophole deli-
berately put into it which will
oermit the Soviets to sell mil-
lions of dollars worth of furs In
1952.
Who knocked the loophole
into the law? Almost six
months of Investigation has
failed to reveal just who in the
Commerce Dept. or the White
House did It. I do not impugn
the office of the President of
the U.S. The law was signed in
the belief that It plugged up
some holes. Who hi the White
House unplugged It?
As for the sensitive State Dept.,
why, for example, Is the secre-
tariat of our embassy in Burma
so social with a trading gentle-
man by name of Y. H. Kwong,
head of the JIng Hong Trading
Tennessee cities on March 3, 1952... 7. Why were certain wealthy
witnesses excused from testifying before Senator Kefauver s
c-lme committee?... 8. Why did Kefauver refuse to investigate
gangster control of the Hudson & Manhattan Railroad?
9. Whv did Senator Kefauver sell to the Saturday Evening
Pcs' me erial gathered by his crime committee before it was
presented to the United States Senate, as required by law?..
10 Was sny part of the money received from the Saturday Eve-
ning Post remitted to the taxpayers In reimbursement of the
monev used to procure such material?. .11. What cut or percent-
age does Kefauver receive from the Arco Publishing Comnany,
o* *0 Lexington Avenue, of New York City from the sale of
copies of the official report of his crime committee? 12. What
c'ner private publ'rhinrr company firm sells copies of the official
report of Kefauver's crime committee?
IS. How much did Senator Kefauver collect from the sale
Of TV right? to his crime commltee hearings?. .14. On what
date was a deal made between Senator Kefauver and a Miami
mob to promote him for President?.. 15. Who Is financing Sen-
ator Kefauver's costly national campaign for President?. .16.
who put up what the New York Times described as a "generous
bankroll" for Senator Kefauver's New Hampshire campaign?
17. What cltlsens of Florida have contributed to Senator
Kefauver's campaign fund?.. 18. What were Senator Kefauver's
relations, until recently, with ex-sheriff Burch Biggs of Polk
to get 3,223 votes in Polk County as a candidate for Congress-
man in 1940, while his two opponents got only 30 votes?. .20. How
did 8enator Kefauver manage to get 3,444 votes in Polk County
as a candidate for Congressman In 1946, while his opponent not
only 80 votes?.. 21." Why is Kefauver against state rights? Why
does he want to reduce sovereign states to the status of Feder-
al dependencies? Why is he willing to force FEPC on Florida
and other states?
A series of Joint discussions between us of these and other
questions would enable Senator Kefauver to get before a large
number of Florida voters. (End of statementi.________________
YHr> 1$ TOUB OBUM THI KIAOW CWM COLUMN
THI MAIL BOX
SW
Th. M.il e tt an leram oi tM*m o Th. Panama A*Mr-
L*ttn n racer** roWfull> and at* RoimImnI ir whll *-
Ml mtmmm.
If yu HliMt Itftti on h >RiW1 M If MMl Mtt
t day ls*mi mm puhluht ta rh f*i <>
rlssii try r Km letter limit* to mm tanfrii.
Idtlh of letter antier m r*M In strict!* #*.
Till IMWtr ttMMMI ft rlNBn>llft> tf StStSMMRH ST flmMtW
m Mifer re rs#off.
HOW COME "ORINOS"
I have heard the word "gringo" used many times with re-
ftrence to American people here.
Would you please advise retarding the origin and meaning
of this word.
Samuel L. Ounselth.
Balboa. C.Z.

(Id. The most popular American version of the
origin of thai word Is that It' a corruption of an M-
tlma song, "Groen Grow the F" '**, Oh." which Ameri-
cans Introduced into Latin Am' v The Latins had a
little troub.e In pfwunetation. f < that's how "gringo."
The Lathu. en the other ha"-', have the same word
\ in the 8paniih language, meaning "gibberish or unjntel-
Urible sp-h."
Take *our pick, according to wbjeh side of the bor-
ne from. It ain't what you say, hut how you
II).
dor y
asritl
From informed labor circles
there in the Orient comes word,
and documents showing that Mr.
Kwong, an esteemed chap es-
teemed by the Sovietlzed'Chlnese
embassy there as veil as the
Russian diplomatsis frequently
purveyor of strategic materials
to His Excellency, the boss of
Red China. Mao Tse-tung.
His Jlng Hong Corp.. I see by
official Burmese "Daily Lists of
Exports and Imports" on several
days last year, moves vitally
needed transport material from
London to Communist China via
Lashio and Mongyu. And In
qusntity, too.
Yet, Mr. Kwong is a frequent
visitor at our embassy. He is on
limate terms with embassy of-
ficials. He has been entertained
chere by the hignest American
diplomats. Why?
Apparently it's the diplomatic
mode not to take seriously the
nature of the enemy, or the
thrert of Red Armies.
Our own Senate is slashing
completely the funds of the
O'Conor committee which has
probed into this stench pile of
international trade with the So-
viets. The Committee's time and
appropriation runs out on Mar.
31. After that no one watches
it's wide open.
"Our "allies" in Hong Kong
not only are shipping the Chi-
nese steel, sine and other pre-
eleus metals, but they've raised
a f'ind for construction of fac-
tories Inside China, up near
Canton.
There, our enemy has now
licensed the building by the
British of 26 plants (supervised
by the Chinese Soviet's Muni-
cipal Commerce and Industrial
Bureau). Our friends have
shipped them surplus Ameri-
can planes.
The Dutch, who make so much
noise In Oen. Elsenhower's NATO
operation, have Just permitted
their shipyards to take Russian
orders for five refrigerator
freightersall destined for sup-
ply routes to the Orient.
Our Italian friends have just
signed, In Rome, a contract to
dispatch $11,000,000 worth of
food and industrial equipment to
the Iron Curtain countries.
They take the cash. We take
the casualties. Doesn't anyone
care?
IH FRANCE
Guest Right
By BOB MARK
NEW YORKWe of the scolding trade find
it reasonably rough to gouge the glands Into a
daily spate of anger, mock or otneiwise, and
occasionally a little pollyanna creeps through
the shrill cries and the steady thud of the
ftVPl
I had something fairly nice In mind for to-
day, aince it la the old exception which cripples
the cliche.
Bloke I know named Euan Lloyd, a Londoner
has just come back from his first tour of this
country. He has not, it seems, run to the first
available correspondent with the usual plaints
of the Britisher abroad.
He has not condemned America's steam heat
as too stuffy, nor beefed because we eat too
much and waste too much of what we eat.
He has visited Hollywood, and found It pleas-
ant. Instead of the formal Engllsh-eye-vlew of
artless madhouse.
He has condemned nobody, so far, for being
too rich and too proud of it. He has made no
cracks about Texas, and has laid off our pol-
itics, regarding them as our own business.
'mere have been no pointed remarks about
our corruption and our gangsters and he has
not blanket-condemned either our press or our
accents.
He says that everywhere he has found people
rather astoundingly kind, gracious, considerate
?enerous and polite. He hasn't even drawn any
nvldlous comparisons between American and
British women.
All in all, he thinks we're a fairly decent set
of coves, even by his staunchly English stand-
ards, and Is pleased to make our acquaintance.
This Is most amazing for these times, when
everybody knows that In the visiting view we
take a poor perspective, being a race of cross
vulgarians, hairy barbarians, bullet-stuffers, dol-
lar-worshippers, Hollywood idolators and steam-
heat stifled colonists who spend all our time
figuring out ways to enslave ths world because
we got bucks and the world ain't got bucks,
Podner.
I am grateful to Mr. Lloyd for the first char-
itable estimate of this wild and woolly land
that I have heard from visiting lips for quite
a spell, and am pleased to discover that not. all
of us are bandits, cowboys, gangsters and sex
slayers, who chew gum ceaselessly.
It is even nice to know that all Yanks do not
preface every remark with "Why, say, Bo, yew
are all-fired wrong about that dod-rotted dag-
nabed gazabo.. "wnlch seems to be the way
most visiting Britons translate American slang.
There is also a friend in town from Cairo who
has brightened the day a bit, since he has
amply demonstrated that we may have made
some impact abroad aside from dollar diploma-
cy and ingrained hatred.
Among us at the moment is Mr. Hassan
Bahl El Din El Samra, who works for the TWA
people In the Cairo office.
During the recent riots in Cairo, Hassan play-
ed a One-man re-enaction of Horatio at the
bridge, in order to protect American property
from his own countrymen.
They fired nearly everything in the Shep-
heard's Hotel area except the air-line offices,
and they committed no violence against this
chunk of American property only because Has-
san repeatedly risked life and limb to stand off
the mob.
He even burnt off most of his clothes while
rescuing American equipment and vital files
from a building that was flaming all around,
with chunks of the roof dropping In on hit own
otherwise-untouched offices.
I doubt very much if many of us would risk
painful dismemberment by attempting to di-
vert a full-scale fanatic riot If our own people
suddenly descended on Rockefeller Center and
we were employed by some foreign firm.
Yet, that's just what Hassan did, and It makes
me believe that maybe we all aren't such aw-
ful people in our business relationships abroad
as some would have us think.
Which accounts for the sweetness-and-light
department today.
Cheers, Mr. Lloyd. Salaamn, Mr. E. Samra.
Nice to have you both among us heathens,
because even a very few of you can do us more
good than the whole European Recovery Plan.

Lollipops At 40 Paces
By Peter E-:on
answf the roll
(0+
1*52 RED CROSS rUND
WASHINGTON (NEA) It appears that de-
fense mobillaation planners, accused of pro-
ducing lollipops, as well as guns snd bu ,er,
seem to have anticipated some such develop-
ment. _
At least Secretary of Defense Robert A. Lov-
ett, Defense Mobilization Director Charles E.
Wilson and Oen. Omar Bradley, ehalrman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, have been out on the hust-
ings explaining that they are not producing too
little too slowlyand why.
This was before Texas Sen. Lyndon Johnson's
Preparedness committee threw lollipops at them.
The lollipops were wrapped up In the committ-
ees latest report.
After pointing to a lack of "the sense of ur-
gency that previously goaded Americans into
their preparedness achievements," It said:
"On every hand the slogan of mobillaation
planners appears to be: 'Don't disturb the civ-
ilian economy... The result has been a small num-
ber of guns and a great amount of butter, with
a considerable number of lollipops thrown In."
In a pre-lolllpop speech out in Pasadena,
General Bradley said:
"When Korea gave us the third alarm in this
International fire call, we had three choices
Total mobilisation of all our resources, no mo-
bilisation at all or A middle course somewhat
between the two.
"We chose the middle conree," the General
said "Total mobilization would have eaused
large-scale industrial disruption. It would Mve
put us through the cycle of unemployment,
peak employment with Its inefficiencies add fi-
nallywhen we were completely readyback
into mo.e unemployment."
In another of the widely separated pre-lolll-
pop statements of defense planners, Defense
Secretary Lovett, In Detroit, reported on the
speed-up In defense outlays:
"Actual expenditures between the first of Ju-
8, 1960, ano the present time have gone up
om about $500 million a month for hard gooos
like aircraft, ships, tanks, guns and ammuni-
tion, by something over 500 percent, to a fig-
ure of approximately $1.6 billion a month.
Current total expenditures are running
at the rate of $3.4 billion a month and by the
end of the year will reach $4 billion a month."
Lovett further pointed out that U.S. military
forces have gone from 1.5 million to 3.5 millions.
"The Navy has more than doubled Its combat
vessels, from 200 to 408 and the Marines have
been nearly tripled to two and a third com-
bat divisions and the same number of Marine
air groups.
"The Air Force, he said, starting with 411,000
men In 48 wings now has 900,000 men in 90
wings.
So there you have it. In a sense, the Johnson
committee's lollipop crack was like socking the
defense brass on the other Jaw.
One Jaw wat previously well-bruised with
charges of wanting too much, wasting too much,
causing too much unemployment In civilian in-
dustry, interfering unnecessarily with basic bus-
iness like automobile production and home-build-
ing. Defensers art defending themselves lusti-
ly.
Looks like a good duel, lollipops at 40 paces
$&+- CASS/fED
cu*"" WASHIHOTOH
MERRY-<30-RND
I* BMW MARION
I
Drew Pearson says: Defense Mobilizer Wilson has no pro-
duction schedule; Our bogged-down military program
continues; Russia may make Manchuria a separata
Soviet state.
WASHINGTONDefense mobiheer Charles E. Wilson, the
man chiefly In charge of rearming the nation, has written a
letter to Sen. Lyndon Johnson of Texas so far conndenthjj,
giving the shocking admission that he has no schedule lot
' ThK'te the equivalent of running araUroad without *tline-
table. And It points to the probability that the
will have to get a new moblUaatlpn chief or else let arm pro-
duction continue in its present bogged-down helter-skelter
condition.
When Wilson flew to Key West last December to discuss the
arms program with President Truman, he told the press that
arms production "was right up to our own schedules and in-
creasing at the rate of $1,000,000,000 a month. _____..........
But Senator Johnson, chairman of the 8enate Preparedness
Sub-committee, doubted this.
He had previously warned that production was
which was one reason Wilson made hi* hurried trip
West. o. following Wilson's statement, Senator Jeta--
the mobihrer and asking the pointed queetlon: "What are your
production schedules?"
On Feb. 21, Mobiliier Wilson replied In a brief but revealing
letter. Slightly paraphrased, it read: .... ,. _.M.
"I presume you are referring to my statement to tne press
at Key West. The word 'schedules' was not meant to be taken
literally. As a result, my meaning was misunderstood.
"I meant to say that the military production is keeping up
to my expectations." .... .* ..*
In this confession, Wilson revealed the amazing fact that
he has no military production goals.
\ He also revealed the basic reason why aluminum Is now
"running out of our ears," and why there is so much steel on
hand that the steel Industry privately would Just as soon hava
a strike in order to use up-the surplus. .
In other words new raw-material plants were set up with-
out any coordinated scheduling with military production.
LAGGING ARMS
On top of this, the military program Is bogged down far
worse than the publie realHes. >^. .,
To illustrate, here are some shocking facts that the enemy
already know about, but which the American people dont:
1) In Korea today the Communists are firing twice as
many artillery rounds as we are. Obviously they are well sup-
8lied, while our troops have to hold back. In fact, we are to
lert of shell that the Army has given shells priority over
* 2) The only Jet fighter plane we have equal to the Rustan
Mlg is the Sabre. Yet Russia is now producing Migs at the rate
of 3,500 a year while we are producing Sabres at the rate of
only 200 a year. In other words, Russia is outproducing us at
the rate of 18 to 1. ,. .....
3) According to our estimates, the combined airplane ft**
ductlon of the United States. Britain, France and all other
NATO countries is not equal to Russian plane production and
will not be for another year.
4) Russia now has a combat air force of 20,000 planes, over
half of them up-to-the-minute Jets. Probably we have a blg-
Eer total force when it comes to bombers and transport planea
ut we are about 50 per cent below Russia when ft comes to
combat planes and Jet fighters. .
5) Russia has about 10,000 planes In mothballs, ready for an
emergency. We have only 8,000 planes In mothballs, arid mee
we have run out of spare parts of these older plane, we are
now canniballilng the mothball planes in order to get parts.
6) We have sent Europe less than half the military supplies
we promised one year ago. NATO was organized on the theory
that Europe would supply the men, we would supply the mater-
But though we have supplied mendespite a huge unem-
ployment problem in some parts of Europewe have fallen
down on supplying planes, tanks, weapons.
It is our recent about-face and the demand that Europe
supply more materiel that has disrupted European economies
and led to the government crisis in France.
These are some of the facts that the public doesn't real-
ise'
' Also why United 8tates industry suddenly finds itself with
surplus aluminum and some surplus steel at a time when ma-
terials were supposed to be tighter than ever.
CHINA VS. SOVIET
The Pentagon has Just received an intelligence, report, r-
!rded as highly reliable, that Russia plans to cut off Mancnur-
a from Communist China and set it up as a separate Soviet
state.
This would strip China of its richest province check-rein
Its growing military might and keep it under subjugation as a
Russian-Communist vassal state.
It is no secret that the Kremlin is uneasy about China's
surge to power, and that Stalin personally doesn't trust the
wily Chinese Communist dictator Mao Te Tung.
The Korean war has not only strengthened Mao at the ex-
pense of Russian equipment, but also has made him a popular
Communist hero.
As a result, Stalin sees In Mao a possible Chinese Franken-
stein who might eventually challenge Russian supremacy.
To block this, the Kremlin has cooked up the scheme of
setting up a rival dictator in Manchuria and splitting Mao's
strength in half.
The powerful Jet air force and Russian military tocks, now
based In Manchrla. would probably go to the new Manchuria
satellite.
However, Mao is reported to have got wind of the Soviet
scheme and Is rushing trusted political lieutenants to Manchuria
to take over the political reins.
At the same time, his agents are keeping close watch oc
the military stockpile, In Manchuria, though the air force ii
still under Russian control.
Stalin's choice for dictator of Manchuria would probably N
Mao's rival, Li Li-san.
For "years, Stalin has backed Li to run the Communist
Party in China, but Mao held on to his control until LI wat
actually forced to flee to Moscow. When the Russians marched
into Manchuria, Li came with them and served as their Chi-
nese puppet.
Being realists, however, the Russians not only recognised
Mao as Communist dictator of China but worked closely with
him.
But Mao hat alarmed the Kremlin by haggling and grasp-
lng for military supplies to build his armies and strengthen his
personal power.
As a result, the Russians apparently have decided that it
Is about time to dip Mao's wings.
THERE'S MONEY
IN THE STRANGEST PUCES!
Grandma's trunk
was full of luak
and clattered up the attic
A Pit classified ad sold the lot
to a happy antique addlctl
Every month every week every dty
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE CLASSIFIED
ADS then all other daily papers in Panama combined"!


FRIDAY, MARCH M, lftSt
Til PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAO
r
I
Owen Lattimore Again Accused
Of Taking Stalin Line In IPR
I___Ctrtol Sfory 5
i\_._________ ____
Anevw to Praviou Puzzle
HBy -<-' I MW.VrJiiW
OMSONTAL
1 Cereal uwd in
i bread
Wheat-IB
canal
11 Aecus*
12 Supplies food
14 Bluer
15 Bloodletsncfi
! 16 Weaponi
17 Leas
18 Malea
20 First woman
21 Cereals uaed
In breakflit
foodi
,2J Judicious
'Clr/in
Missouri
26 Tilt*
26 Oriental coin
IT Pail to
remember
28 Pacific isle
SI Sea eagle
I Ancient Trojr
SI Double-
Pitched roof
S7 Mouth parts
SI Specks
SI Legal
profession
40 Sign of the
tod lac
41 One of the
little
Women"
42 Popular
Chinese cereal
41 Store for
fodder
48 Omita
4TWaDt *
unsteadily
(48 Lapels
41 Marsh
grasses
ISO Predictors
VERTICAL
1 Flywheel
2 Injured
3 Units of
energy
4 Era
5 Battlegrounds
6 Glances over
7 Gasp
S French
summer
Arctic rodent
10 Adriatic
seaport
11 Clothes
(Scot.)
II Soundest
mentally
II Greek letter
21 Oil
.v irais'pj
laj-iRiis ; _-r 3*!8iidiii:r-ji j
Miai^r;
WASHINGTON, Mach 28 (UP)
Far Eastern expert David N.
Rowe told Senate Investigators
yesterday he considers Owen
Lattimore "probably the prin-
cipal agent of Stalinism" among
22 Cautions
24 Lichen spore
case
25 Cereals hogs
27 Plumes
28 Cereal used
for forage
21 Property
transferrer
SO Return thrust
33 Witty remark
34 Stayer
35 Speeders
36 Attire
38 Horned
ruminants
41 Lost blood
42 Split
44 Follower
(sufflxlj
46 Sheltered side
Far Eastern specialists In
United States.
Lattimore, reached in Balti-
more retorted that "when the
Russians disagree with some-
body they call.him a warmonger
or an agent of Wall Street ca-
pitalism. Ppfessor Rowe seems
to have the same standards ot
debate."
He said Rowe's assertion
Far East. The American view,
he said, "was right down the
Russian line/'
Rowe said the institute's po-
licies in this country were for-
mulated by U. S. ambassador
Final Slam-Bang Rounds Coming Up
In Pivotal Wisconsin GOP Primary
MADISON, Wls., March 28 senator from MacArthur aym- vialon In the Democratic forcea
(UPiThree Republican Presl- pathlzers. may allow Kefauver to breeze
dentlal hopefuls, Robert A. Taft, Today the three candidates in.
Earl Warren and Harold E. Stas- centered activities in the pop-1
sen, headed today Into th home ulous Milwaukee area with a i Another Imponderable In the
stretch of a slam-bang, no-holds- schedule of speeches that will Wisconsin race Is the tendency
barred battle for votes In the continue until decision of the of Democrats to vote In the Re-
Wlsconsln primary next Tuesday, electorate is made at the polls, publican primary, which Is per-
Paradoxically, the Intense cam- The only candidate aloof from mlaslble under the law.
ong mutated by U. S. t nbassador Palgn was hinging more and all this was Sen. Estes Kefauver | Since the Democrats long have
the Philip c. Jessup, former lnst.-'mre on tne strength of a man (D-Tenn.) who quit the state been in the minority in the
who Is not in the raceGen. after a final hand-shaking tour state, they often cross nartv
the California governor has no
chance for the nomination.
All of this exasperated Taft
who said:
"In one case, the delegates
seem to have abandoned their
candidate (Warren) and In the
other, the candidate (Stassem
seems to have abandoned hli
delegates."
Stassen, meanwhile, denied
that the division of hi dele-
gates In favor of Elsenhower
meant that he Is considering- a
"llble running mate place with
ie general. '
"I am engaged in a strong
campaign for the presidency"
he said.
tute secretary-general E. C.
Carter, Harvard University pro-
fessor John K. Falrhank, Wil-
liam W. Lockwood, Knight Blg-
gerstaff and Lattimore.
Dwlght D. Eisenhower. To a cer- and
tain extent,'Gen. Douglas Mac-
Arthur also figured in the tur-
moil.
Both Stassen, former governor
He described Fairbank as a [of Minnesota, and Warren, gov-
"conslstent backer of the Chi-'emor of California, were bld-
nese Communists" and said he ding openly for Elsenhower
and others felt they must back votes to bolster their cam-
the Chinese agrarian reform Paigns.
- went to Nebraska to fur-' fines' to exert "influence on the
ther his ambitions there. GOP choice.
Kefauver was rated a goodl
chance to capture the Democra- The Staasen-Warren battle for
tic race because of a split in his Elsenhower votes developed li-
fe-
,,_jji------ jTi J* "c ^icae agrarian reiorm h*".
Pno1dcL^oroTv?hl^hP,,0t.ratvenrvt mv OPS Puts Price Ceillings
On All US Restaurants
WASHINGTON, March 28 (UP)
Tne government imposed
flexible dollars-and-cents price
ceilings on the nation's 500,000
restaurants and drinking places
today and ordered them posted
for the public.
The order, effective April 7,
said the ceilings will be geared
t the government's coat-of-
living Index and will be ad-
justed up or down on the basis
of "significant changes" in the
index.
No general change in overall
restaurant prices is expected.
The Office of Price Admin-
istration said the new ceilings
will be the restaurant's selling
rices during the week of Feb.
-I. The posted price lists must
niclude the restaurant's 40 prin-
cipal food and non-alcoholic
items.
tels that do not make separate
charges for meals, Institutions,
hospitals, colleges and bona fide
non-profit membership clubs.
Restaurants must continue to
keep records of food costs and
sales to "determine whether
quality and quantity of food
and beverages servings are be-
ing maintained."
If an establishment serves
drinks, it must post prices of
lip to 20 alcoholic beverages.
Until now the half million
eating and drinking establish-
ments affected by the order
1 have been permitted to figure
out their own ceilings on the
basis of food costs with only
their gross margins controlled.
1 They have not been required to
post ceilings until now.
OPS said this type of regula-
tion "Is Insufficient, standing
by Itself, to do the Job. Enforce-
ment has been difficult, it said,
especially since consumers have
had no way of knowing ceiling
prices.
In issuing the regulation,
Price Stabilizer Ellis Arnall said
he does not anticipate any
"general change in overall
restaurant prices at the present
time."
OPS explained that It has not
ngs for restaurants until now
cause of the difficulties In-1
olved. The OPS can not con-
    ' oditles so long as they are
    iling under parity.
    The agency said It Is now,
    laalble" to set dollars and
    its ceilings because some
    'ces have reached parity and I
    ces of most foods bought by
    jtaurants have stabilized. In
    dditlon, prices of meat which
    accounts for about 45 percent
    of restaurant's food costs are
    under control.
    The order affects all eating
    and drinking establishments ex-
    cept dining cars, board i n g
    houses and American plan ho
    Lorn Hnos. High
    Bidder For Former
    Garun Commissary
    Lam Hermanos of Colon was
    the apparent high bidder on the
    former commissary building at
    Gatun, on which bids were
    opened Thursday morning In
    the office of the Superintendent
    of Storehouses at Balboa.
    A contract for the sale and
    demolition of the building will
    be awarded following an analy-
    sis of the bids.
    Apparent high bid on the for-
    mer commissary was $1,168.88.
    Other bidders were T J.
    Butler Sz Sons, Chain Singh y
    Cia., and Compaa Repblica
    de Construcciones y Reparacio-
    nes.
    The building, No. 218 on
    Jadwin Road, Is a one-story
    frame structure built during
    World War II to replace an old
    frame building near the locks.
    It has been vacant since last
    July, when the Gatun Com-
    missay was relocated in the
    Clubhouse building.
    enough for anything but a very
    short statement."
    But Rowe, a Yale University
    professor, emphasized that he
    was not accusing his Johns Hop-
    kins University colleague of be-
    ing a member of the Commun-
    ist Party or an actual agent of
    the Russian government.
    He explained that by agent of
    Stalinism he meant "ideas and
    idelogles, and the promoting of
    those ideas and ideologies."
    He said he regards Lattimore
    as "the principal agent for
    the advocacy of Stalinist
    ideas" in the field of Asiatic
    studies, but did not mean that
    Lattimore operates in the
    general field of Communism.
    Rowe testified before the Sen-
    t Internal Security committee
    which la investigating the Insti-
    tute of Pacific Relations in an
    effort to determine if subver-
    sive forces influences U. S. Chi-
    na policy.
    Both Lattimore and Rowe
    have served as trustees for the
    institute, a private research or-
    ganization. Lattimore spent 12
    days before the committee re-
    cently and vigorously denied
    charges by former Communist
    editor Louis F. Budenz that he
    was a Communist.
    In 1950, Sen. Joseph R. Mc-
    Carthy (R., Wls.) accused Lat-
    timore of being Russia's top
    agent In the country. A Senate
    Foreign Relations Subcommit-
    tee reported It found no basis
    for the charge.
    Rowe, a professor of political
    science in charge of foreign
    area studies at Yale, said he
    resigned from the institute in
    1950 because the staff seemed
    to oppose his Ideas about the
    Far East. He said he advocated
    U. 8. Intervention in the Chinese
    civil war to help the Nation-
    alists.
    He said the U. S. delegation
    Irritated French, British and
    Datch members at' institute
    international conferences by
    opposing colonialism in the
    Plans For Summer
    Recreation Program
    Off To Good Start
    Indications point to a brilliant
    success of the forthcoming Sum-
    mer Recreation program. Judging
    from the response of volunteers,
    who turned out to a meeting
    Thursday in 8ilver City.
    All present orerd ideas and
    helped formulate plans for an
    elaborate program of activities In
    a wide field of arts and crafts
    subjects.
    Subjects In this branch of the
    program include various types of
    needlework, molding, tie-dying,
    textile pamtlng. basketry, wood-
    craft, cordcraft and ahellcraft.
    crnoy
    HOT MRtL's
    WfCms CHOCOLATtTLA**
    If yon knew her secret
    you, too, could be more
    charming, lovely, attractive
    ...snd the lecret 0/ her utrtaiveness
    it Odo-Ro-No. Don't let offending
    underarm odour spoil your natural
    freshness.
    Odo-Rn-Nn safely stops ptnpi-
    ration and odobr for full 24 hours.
    Odo-Ro-No stays creamy longer
    -never gets gritty even in open jar.
    No deodorant cream is so harm-
    less to fabrics at Odo-Ro-No.
    No deodorant cream it gender
    to even sensitive skin, and it is so
    easy to use.
    0D0R0-170
    C R E AM
    Th*
    deodoront
    without
    OORHAM
    TOWLE
    Heirloom
    Stieff
    Norwegian
    at O'ci'aeo 7f. S. prices
    (flSR FfliTLKH
    PANAMA
    (0L0N JEWELPYO.'
    Front ol Itopic Ret>aurant>
    COLON
    Pains in Back!
    NERVOUS!
    Rheumatic!
    Wrong foods and drinks, worry, ovar
    rorlc, and frequent colds often
    train on th* Kidneys, and Kldne
    work, and frequent colds often put
    ---.------> Kidneys, and Kidney and
    Bladder troubles may cause Excess
    r -- -- v.w j v**uw j*m>\.vmm
    Aridity. Strong. Cloudy Urine, Getting
    1 Up Night*. Burning Passages. Leg
    : Pains, Nervousness. DUslness, Swollen
    Ankles, Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids and
    feeling old before your tima Help your
    kidneys purify your blood wiihCystei'.
    Cyttex goee right to work helping your
    kidneys I ways: 1. Cleans out poisonous
    ----------'-'-> rf a *^ !* vui at **
    acida. I. Combata germs In the urinary
    system. I. Soothe and calms Irritated
    been taken over by the Reds. |st,eP tnls week of offering half
    But Rowe insisted that "this ?lJW delegates he wins to Els-
    saying
    is far different from saying a
    man is a Communist 9r that
    he Is sympathetic to commun-
    ists in general."
    Fairbank as well as Lattimore
    has denied before the commit-
    tee that he ever was a member
    of the Communist Party.
    enhdwer.
    He said he was Interested pri-
    marily in stopping Taft, who is
    strongly backed by the regular
    OOP organization in the state.
    Taft blasted Stassen and War-
    ren as "hybrid" candidates, but
    pne of his own backers earlier
    bid for support for the Ohio
    "favorite son" opposition.
    Kefauver will be opposed by
    Charles Broughton, who Is align-
    ed with so-called "old line" De-
    mocrats in the state, and Jer-
    ter the general's huge write-in
    vote in Minnesota. No write-in
    vote Is counted In Wisconsin.
    Warren has said little about
    the campaign, but his backers
    ome Fox, who represents a new- have been more outspoken
    or and more liberal wing of the! They are chiefly pro-Elsen-
    SS.Hu,r?"gltonBan& T?XJ" nower men *nd the Warren
    stand-ins for President Tru- delegates have said they will
    n"'. v. L Iswitch their votes to the gen-
    But observers believed the di- eral at the GOP convention if
    BE READY FOR OUR
    GREAT SALE
    MONDAY, 31st
    VILANOVA
    nm
    VALUES
    on our ANNIVERSARY SALE
    STARTING MARCH 31st
    10% to 50%
    DISCOUNT

    New Summer
    DRESSES
    Cottons .Rayons
    Shantui.yj -Silks
    BOTH STORES
    FELIX B. MADURO
    choose from our fascinating and varied
    collection...

    Fine TABLECLOTHS from Gfriin*
    Limoges" DISHWARE
    "Saint Louis" CRYSTALWARE
    "Lend," "Cacciapuoti" Ceramic FIGURINES
    Crystal MURANO adornments from Italy
    ROYAL DOULTON Mugs
    Artificial Flower Asthtrays.


    6 Tivoli Ave.
    SECOND FLOOR
    'AVENIDA
    We are unpacking
    Collar and sleeve Ironing
    board................ ijj
    Bumproof ironing board
    covers ................ 3.95
    Cotton Ironing board cov-
    er................... 1.15
    Plastic damping bags.... 2.10
    Metal Ironing boards....
    especial...............U4>5
    Metal bread pan........0 20
    Metal biscuit pan.......o.40
    Metal cake pan......... 0.85
    Metal checkered cake pan 1.10
    Ateco icing sets.........8.50
    A Tlvoll Ava.
    25lo DISCOUNT
    on CASH SALES:






    STEEL
    NAILS
    ELECTRIC TUBES
    TOILETS
    ZINC
    FIR-TEX



    Aluminum frying pans .. 1.15
    Plastic butter dishes ... 0.30
    Rustproof egg beaters ... 3.75
    10 pc. kitchen knife seta 8.50
    Metal pull-up tables.....3JO
    tlaaura. And thai you qulrklr sat on th*
    road to anjoylnf flfa aaala. Oat Qyata
    rom tout aruaalat today.
    Buy NOJt
    SECOND FLOOR 5* AVENIDA
    AGENCIAS GLOBALES
    121 Va Espaa Tel. 3-1503




    I
    I
    iage vmm

    THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
    FRIDAY, MARCH M, 1H
    Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
    Shipping & Airline News
    New Prt Opens
    In Dominican Republic
    NEW YORK. March M (UP)
    The Dominican Republic Infor-
    mation Center today announced
    that the new port of Ha ma, 15
    miles west of Ciudad Trujillo be-
    fan commercial operations with
    the arrival of the British freight-
    er Athelfoam the first com-
    mercial vessel to enter the port
    now taking on a cargo of $500.000
    worth of molasses from nearby
    Rio Halna sugar central.
    The announcement said the
    new port, with the other sugar
    export ports of Barahona. San
    Pedro de Marcoris and La Roma-
    FLY TO
    10$
    ANsaes
    VIA GUATEMALA
    PAA offers you the only
    direct flights to LOS AN-
    CELES, non-ttop from
    Guatemala above the
    clouds, in the luxury of a
    spaciousConstellation-type
    Clipper*, with no change
    of plane on the way.
    WOULD 1
    MOST IXFUIINCID
    MUNI
    Pan American
    liamn /1/xh 1>\
    Pneme: I Slrttl No. 5,
    Ttl 1-0670
    Colon: S.l.i Bid, Ttl 1097
    kX-ll-32-F- ... inc
    na will partlolpate in hipping
    some $80,000,000 worth Of sugar
    this year, mostly t Britain.
    K.L.M. Opens New Building
    At Schiphol Airport
    At Schiphol Airport m Amster-
    dam this week. K.L.M. Royal
    Dutch Airlines opened a modern
    air freight building.
    The new edifice has been erect-
    ed on the site of the first air
    freight hangar which was open-1
    ed for service just 32 years ago
    when K.L.M. s first air freight
    consignment was a parcel of
    English newspapers and a letter
    from the Mayor of London to the
    Mayor of Amsterdam.
    The construction of the new
    I depot was prompted by the tre-
    mendous expansion in air freight
    traffic since the end of thej
    World War II and the fact that
    K.L.M. is convinced that cargo;
    will continue to grow in import-,
    anee to the airline Industry.
    Because of the growing num-
    ber of live animals transported
    by K. L. M., in the past few years,
    Hotel for Animals, occupies
    space in the new construction.
    This hotel is equipped with
    running water, heat, electrical
    connections, a ventilating system
    and temperature control and can
    be furnished to accommodate
    any number or kind of animals
    at a moment's notice.
    Specially trained animal ste-
    wards arc In charge of the live-
    stock at the Hotel and accompa- .
    ny all K.L.M. animal shipments
    aboard the aircraft. \
    A strong room for valuable
    consignments with a vault like!
    door is also In use In the build-
    ing.
    Dutch Customs Officials and
    Custom House Brokers have of-
    fice space in the building and
    every effort has been made to
    make it the most modern and ef-
    ficient air cargo terminal in the
    world. _
    I wo Jima Hero Weds
    Blind Dale On TV
    NEW YORK, March 28 (UP)
    The nation's youngest Medal of
    Honor winner and a girl he met
    .on a blind date were married
    today on a nationwide television
    program, and the groom said
    the experience was more nerve-
    wracking than a Pacific battle.
    "Look at me," said Jacklyn
    Harold Jack i Lucas, 24. "I
    wasn't this nervous at Iwo
    Jlma."
    The bride, Helen Solley Rus-
    sell, 27, was calm throughout
    the ceremony performed on
    "Bride and Groom," a Columbia
    Broadcasting System show on
    which 1,400 couples have been
    married.
    Lucas, Winston-Salem, N. O,
    Veterans Administration em-
    ploye, received the nation's
    highest military decoration at
    17 for action Iwo Jima In 1945.
    He enlisted in the Marines at 14
    by concealing his age.
    The marriage climaxed a
    courtship that started last June
    when Lucas visited Birming-
    ham, Ala., his bride's home
    town. Friends arranged a blind
    date, recommending Lucas as a
    former Marine with a red con-
    UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
    Greal White Fleet
    . ,
    Arrivei
    New Orleans Service _______________Cristbal
    S.S. Fiador Knot..............................April S
    A Steamer....................................April f
    'S.S. Qulrieua ................................"April 13
    S.S. Levers Bend ..........i..................April 18
    'lUneilni Refrigerated (hlllc and Genual Cars*.
    Arrives
    New York Service_______________________Cristbal
    S.S. Talamanca............................ .March 2
    S.S. Hibueras ...............................Mroh 29
    S.S. Cape Avinof ............................March SI
    S.S. Metapin .................................April 1
    S.S. Cape Cod ................................April >
    Weekly Sailings New York. Mobiles, Charleston, Loe Amele. .
    San Francisco and Seattle.
    Frequent frclfht sailings from Cristobal to West Coast
    Central America* ports,
    Cristbal to New Orleans via Sails from
    Tela, Honduras_________________________Cristbal
    S.S. Qulrieua .................................April 1
    A Steamer ...................................April 8
    (Passenger Service Only)
    CRISTOBAL 2121
    TELEPHONES:
    PANAMA 2-2804
    COLON 2
    FAST FREIGHTER SERVICE BETWEEN
    EUROPE AND NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COAST
    (A Limited Number of Passenger Berth 1
    TO EUROPE: SI
    7

    TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, S S. Rouen ............. PERU CHILE: ... April 4
    rO CENTRAL AMERICA WEST COAST U.S.A. ... April 11

    PASSr.NC.EK SHIP PROM NEW TORK TO n,YMOUTH Lb HAVRE:
    1

    PASSENGER SERVICE from CARTAGENA to EUROPE: 4

    Cristobal: FRENCH LINE, P.O Ho Hit ttl 3-2471, 181k
    Panam UNDO V MADURO. A. Boa IBM
    Tel Panama 1-lhiO l-IMI
    TERBE
    LOW ALTITUDE HAZARD
    ** 1
    ERECSLES AND isTS FRIENDS
    Too Good?
    BT MERRILL RLOSBRB
    W/MM-ADeAl
    NOU BUV A
    SECONO-HAMO
    BOOK FOR A
    BUCK.AWD
    find a map of
    juried
    TRttSUK.'
    ^'Come-
    on UP
    TO MY
    ROOM
    AND WE'LL
    give rr
    A CLOSE
    GANDHI /
    WOTTA YA KNOW--
    THE LOOTS RttMT
    HERE CLOSE *>
    SHADYSIDE /
    TIE CLUES A*ff
    PLAtM EMOUGH
    acmrk.
    am old wme
    TfcEE J
    Ml El OOP
    Sock's Empty
    BT ?. T. HAMT.m
    vertible automobile and a lively
    personality.
    Lucas took a summer Job in
    Birmingham while on vacation
    from Duke University. After re-
    turning to Duke, he became so
    lonely for Helen that he trans-
    ferred to a Birmingham school.
    Then he quit, got the Veterans
    Administration job and then
    popped the question.
    "I was so frightened," the
    hero said, "that I mailed her
    the ring with a note."
    She said "yes," and they de-
    cided to apply to be married on
    the television program. Their
    acceptance meant an all-ex-
    penses-paid wedding and honey-
    moon in the Pocono Mountains
    of Pennsylvania. They were
    given their rings, silverware,
    sheets, towels, a camera, a
    washing machine, gas range
    and cook book.
    The Rev. Jesse W. Stitt of the
    Village Presbyterian Church
    performed the ceremony. Mrs.
    Marie S. Boone, sister of the
    bride, was matron of honor.
    Oharles Looper, former Duke
    University roommate of Lucas,
    was best man.
    The couple will live in an
    apartment in Winston-Salem.
    BOOTS AND HER BUDDIE
    Dory Buys It
    BT EDGAR MARTIN
    M> W! ,0V '. MR. U*CVKU> WNpUp),
    CPf COORQfc .tsMSI VANS ftVOOf lOtXVfefc CK
    XOtMC HP fcvovau vJP-fcO/WHWX. G0\SM0RTW
    pw> u*oi Vein, ny^^c------------------ist
    MR.fcUNCH-lc* XWl MKCWIWBON
    WfctO HWs VbCKV, MOKItV '. r-t
    WWW f i1 M-----.J.
    THEM TWO T\Mr\\...V
    opt ^oo*X5Tr=-
    HA!
    J
    .
    CAPTAIN EAST
    Hold On, Lady
    BT LESLIE Tl'RNE


    rPIUAY, MARCH 2, 195*
    THE PANAMA Uif.>
    moensmBNT DAILY NKWSPArB**

    I*
    -^acific ^Jo( te
    t
    y
    *
    &. 17, Bati. D.t &/L. 3521
    ITALIAN MINISTER
    AND BARONESS DESANDRE TO ENTERTAIN
    The Minister of Italy to Panama and the Baroness Ros-
    tet Desandre hare issued (notations (or a reception to be
    fiven tonight at 7 p.m. at the Legation.
    Minister's Wife Honored
    At Farewell Luncheon '
    Mrs. Oscar Benltez Bone, the
    wife of the Minister of Guate-
    mala to Panama, was honored
    at a farewell luncheon Tuesday
    at the Panama Golf Club by a
    group of her friends.
    Consul General And
    Mrs. Jimenez Entertain
    The Consul-General of Costa
    Rica in Panama and Mrs. Ger- 6:30 p.m.
    ardo Jimenez entertained re-
    cently at their home with a fare-
    well dinner given in honor of the
    Minister of Guatemala to Pana-
    ma and Mrs. Oscar Benltez Bone.
    will have as their special guests
    this evening the officers of Coral
    Chapter No. 3, Gatun and other
    members of the chapter, at a
    meeting to be held in the Scot-
    tish Rite Temple In Balboa.
    The visitors will fill the sta-
    tions for the initiation ceremo-
    ny. Mrs. A. R. Lombroia will
    preside.
    Ihe meeting will be preceded
    by a "covered dish" supper at
    Phi Theta Kappa Dinner
    Held Wednesday Evening
    The annual scholarship dinner
    of Phi Theta Kappa was held
    Wednesday in the Fern Room of
    the Hotel Tivoll with the lieu-
    tenant governor of the Panama
    Canal. Col. Herbert D. Vogel. as
    the fiuest speaker.
    Guests included Lt. Oov. and
    Mrs. Vogel Dr. and Mrs. Law-
    rence" Johnson, Dean and Mrs
    Roger C. Hackett pnd Mr. and
    Mrs. SubertTm-byfill.
    Members attending the ban-
    ouet ware Cecilia Baverstock. Jo
    Anne Fischer, Margaret McCub-
    bln. Edgar Plummer. Carmen Re-
    cuero. Annie Nlccolson. Barbara
    Ely, Pat Kelly, Sonia Menrileta,
    Mrs. June Plummer. Jlmee Seate
    and Gerl Snodgrass.
    Mr. And Mrs. McGaffey
    Br'I For New Orleans
    Mr. and Mrs. Neal S. McGaf-
    fev. who have been t*e house
    guests of the commanding gen-
    eral, Caribbean Air Command,
    BrlsPdler General Emll C. Kiel,
    and Mrs. Kiel for the nait sever-
    al dr-yn. salld Tuesday aboaid
    the 8.8. Chlrlauf for New Or-
    leans en route to their home In
    Montgomery, Alabnma.
    f*. Heaslev Leaves
    F Washington
    Mr. Peter Bensley. the special
    consultant to the Secretary of
    the Army, left the Isthmuo yes-
    terdav morning by plane to re-
    turn to Washington, D.C.
    Mrs. Clagir Honored
    At Farewell Luncheon
    Mrs. Mabel Clagg. who sailed
    this morning for the United
    States after a visit of several
    weeks wlMi her son-in-law and
    daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Walter
    Dryja of Diablo, was honored be-
    fore her departure with a faewell
    luncheon given by Mrs. Richard
    Abell, Mrs. Frank Bryan and
    Mrs. W. F. Younr Wednesday In
    the Fern Room of the Hotel Ti-
    voll.
    Amon Mrs. Dryja. Mrs. Paul Barnard,
    Mrs. J. A. Dombrowsky Mrs. T.
    T. Ebrton. Jr.. Mrs. R. C. 8toek-
    hpm. Mrs. Edward Barlow, Mrs.
    William Block, Mrs. J. H. Mil-
    lion Mrs. Gray den Brown. Mrs.
    R. Cramer Mrs. Herbert Bath-
    man. Mrs. Erl Sears and Mrs.
    Truman Hoenke.
    Collected Poems."
    All members and prospective
    members are Invited to attend.
    Pedro Miguel
    Country Fal rTomorrow
    The Pedro Miguel country Fair
    will open tomorrow morning at
    10 a.m. at the ball pak under
    the auspices of the Pedro Miguel
    Civic Council. There will be a
    variety of entertainment Includ-
    ing baseball games, a merry-go-
    round, pony rides and a minia-
    ture bowling alley.
    Food and soft drinks will be a-
    vPilfHe durin? the entire day
    until the fair closes at 6 p, m.
    Visitor To Leave Tomorrow
    Mrs. Enrloue Miro Quesada of
    Lima, Peru will leave tomorrow
    by plane to return to her home
    after a visit of several months
    with hr mother. Mrs. Francisco
    \rias, P.
    Mr. And Mrs. De Sabia
    Return To States
    Mr. and Mrs. Theodore De
    "abla of Elks Park. N.Y.. sailed
    Tuesda" for the United states to
    return to their home fter vara-
    'Innin? at 'he P"*"' El Panama
    for the winter months.
    Mr. Younr To Leave For Texas
    Mr. W. F. Young of Pedro Ml-
    gel will leave tomorrow by
    plane for a four-month vacation
    to be spent in Houston, Texas
    Second Half Of Drama Festival
    Tomorrow Ninht
    The Isthmian Drama Festival
    presented in honor of In'erna-
    tlonal Theater Month will give
    the second half of a group of
    one-act plays tomorrow at Cris-
    tobal High School at 8 p.m.
    The theater groups partlclpat-
    "tit In tomorrow night's enter-
    tainment are Balboa High School,
    which will present "A Mirr'-?
    Pronos* 1." directed bv Miss Pa-
    tricia Farlev; e^d the Theater
    Ororp which will offer "The Old
    Lady Shows Her *ed>)"H under
    the direction of Mrs. Gracelyn
    jo^n ton.
    Po'towine- the program awards
    will be made to the best actor,
    the best actress and for the best
    pl"v of the festival.
    No admiiIon will be charred
    and no seats will be reserved.
    Mrs. Favmond Loaves
    For Florida
    Mrs. Fnnk Raymond of Vista
    del Mar left by olane Tue""iy
    morning for St. P*t*r-bnrg, Flo-
    rida, because of the serious ill-
    ness of her aunt.
    Mrs. Floo* Returns
    To Colombia
    Mrs. Douglas Flood, wife of
    the United State cons"l In Bar-
    ranquilla, Colombia, left hv plane
    Ti-esdav with her m'aK daugh-
    ter to return to her home.
    Governor Newcomer
    Is In Washington j Organisational Meeting
    Thp Governor of the Panama.) For Curundu Cubs
    ranal. Franci1; K. Newcomer, left Curundu parents of Cnh Scout
    Wed"esday night by plpne for a>e boys are remlndpn of the Cub
    Washington. D.C, to attend a'scout pack ornanb.atlo^l meet-
    ing to be held next Tnesdav at
    7 n.m. In the Curundu Civic
    Center.
    CaBTtl ZoneVotiegetlub
    To Mpet For Tea
    n",-Ntin of the Panama Canal Company.
    Oovernor Newcomer plans to
    return to Panama toe first week
    In April.
    r i An(] Mr,, Connor
    Etertaln
    1 a-.d Mrs. Robert R.
    Con-
    fre rvr*l Zone College Club
    will hold Its monthlv meeting
    -nd tea pt th Jewish We"r"
    ror were hosts to a group of Hoard-U.S.O. on Monday, April
    th?!r friend' Wed"esdpv even'-": 7, rt 3:45 p.m.
    f* a vvjrts'l bvffet given at the
    Albrook Officers Club.
    n-r*ld Chanter
    Ti Fn'Mtalr. Guests
    Orchid Chapter,
    OES, No. 1,
    The pwrpm Is to be In chare-e
    of the Book Review group. Dr.
    Dorothv Moody will review Her-
    man Wonk's "Calne Mutiny,"
    Rachel Carson's "The Pea. A-
    round Us" and Marianne Moore's
    SCHOLL'S SERVICES
    Panam No 68 Justo Aroaemena Ave
    foot Treatments. Corns, Callouses. Ingrown Toe Nalla
    Arch Snnnort. REDUCING Treatments Massages.
    Slenderlrlng Machines. Turkish Baths Male and female
    operators For informaron call: MM7 Panama.
    812 a.m.: 26 p.m.
    Mr. Abell Sail For States
    M\ P'-hord Ahell sailed today
    ttf the United Ptate. where he
    w'll vcation with relatives and
    friends In Kentucky.
    Cradle Roll Has New Addition
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mason
    of Wblttlnsvllle, Mass.. announce
    the birth of a daughter. Heidi,
    on Thursday. March 20.
    Mrs. Mason Is the former Dl-
    "ne Yost, daughter of Mr. and
    Mrs. Stanley F. Yost of Balboa
    Heights.
    DRASTICALLY REDUCED
    A VA^'^D ACS^TMFNT of
    LAMPS
    enjoy your
    home more...
    with one .
    of these
    beautiful
    Lamps
    choose the
    one you like
    most today!
    'hrsndtsen Line Starts
    New Banana Route Service
    Two fruiters, the Blue Ocean
    and Washington Express have
    been chartered by the Isbrandt-
    sen Copipanv Inc., line to carry
    hanpnas from WWdor to New
    York.
    The Washington Express be-
    gins service April S When she
    leaves New York for Ecuador.
    Fenton and Company are lo-
    cal agents for the ships.
    Divisa Institute
    To hhve Visiting
    Dry On April 6
    Visiting dav will be held April
    6 at the National Institute o'
    Agriculture In Divisa, as part of
    the tenth Point Four anniver-
    sary, mission director R. P.
    Bartholomew announced today.
    The main purpose of the visit-
    ing day Is to give the people, of
    Panama an opportunity to ob-
    serve all projects at the Insti-
    tute.
    Visitors to the Institute will
    be able to see all research snd
    production projects now under
    way. They will be given an Il-
    lustrated leaflet with a man, a
    program and schedule ot follow
    during the excursion.
    Technicians will be stationed
    at every project to explain the
    work done and its purpose, and
    to answer any questions from
    the excursionists.
    Baha'i Lecture
    A lecture will be given Sun-
    day afternoon at 4:30 in the
    Baha'i Center in the Lux Build-
    ing by Artemus Lamb of Costa
    Rica.
    Lamb will speak on "Some
    Interpretations of Christian
    subject-
    More Comfort Wearing
    FALSE TEETH
    Rere It pleeeant ray to SSJfSJSBW
    inoae plate discomfort FASTDTTH, an
    improved powder aprlnkled en upper
    ind lowei Plato hold them firmer so
    lhai the (eel more comfortable No
    rummy, sooey. party taste or feeling. It's
    alkaline (non-acM' Does not our Cneck
    "plate odor" (denture breath) Get FAS-
    lU'lH today at any drug tore.
    SIDECLANCES
    "It's no fun watching Mom's bridge) parties, but listen-
    ing to Dad'a poker games we really see life in the raw!"
    Children love
    Cream of Wheat
    Your child will ask for more of this healthful-
    tasty cereal that is full of energy-giving food
    elements.
    As the first solid food and during the tjme
    when growing teeth and bones ask for extra
    nourishment, Cream of Wheat h*s proved to be
    an excellent, easily digestible cereal food.
    The "5 Mnate" Cream of Wheat Has been
    enriched with extra food iron and calcium.
    By Calbrair./ RUTH MILLET? Says
    Says Olivia de Havllland about
    TV:
    "Television now seems a god-
    send to many working people.
    Think of the trouble and expense
    lt savesbaby-sitters, parking,
    and things like that.
    "But after so long a time there
    comes a day when these people
    Just have to get out of the house.
    Hollywood will go on producing
    (treat movies and people will go
    on attending them."
    She's certainly right if she is
    speaking for the women of the
    country. Radio hasn't been able
    to sell women on the Idea of a
    steady diet of evenings at home
    and television isn't likely to.
    The main reason is that wom-
    en get tired of looking at the
    same four walls. So their idea of
    real entertainment includes get-
    ting dressed up and getting out
    of the house.
    There are some minor factors,
    too. As long as. a woman Is at
    nome she is never free of res-
    ponsibility.
    ?Fiien.d! may drP ,n *nd have
    to be fed and entertained. The
    kids may get quarrelsome. The
    nouse may cry out for attention
    So for complete relaxation a
    woman often needs to get away
    irom home even as a man needs
    to get away from his place of
    business.
    Also a woman gets a lift out
    of having her husband take her
    to a movie that she'll never get
    put of staying; home and watch-
    ing television.
    When he takes her out she
    feels like a girl on a date. When
    she stays home she keeps right
    on feeling like a housewife.
    There Is one other thing. Some i
    wives already seem to have built I
    up a resentment against their
    husbands wanting to do nothing
    but stay home and watch televl- I
    slon night after night.
    It keens cropoin up in the
    letters thev write to me. As one1
    wife says bitterly in a letter re-
    ceived today:
    "No comment brings a reolv
    'rom a husband engrossed In te-
    levision. And nothing that hao-
    nens is Important enough to in-
    terrunt his favorite nrograms
    -Mv husband didn't have much
    to sav before we cot television
    But now tha we have ltwe
    can't even talk to him."
    AGE m
    Platter Fans... You II Welcome Our
    For es little >
    $ |00ot 2
    00 Weekly
    Ton eon oe tht proua owner oj the latest -futa"...
    or what ever type ol music vou tnfov most!
    Ca, Cyrnos Cyrnos Gilt Shop
    No. I Jose ro de la Ossa No. 16 Ttvoll Ave
    (Tivolt Crossing) (Across from Anron Plarjhed)
    rMEDICAL TEST PROVED^
    this simply great to refeve "PEMOMC"
    FEMALE PAINS
    with uncomfortable fullness
    Are you troubled by distress of female func-
    tional monthly disturbances? Does this
    make you suffer from pain, feel so nervous.
    restless, cranky, weakat such times? Then
    do try famous Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
    Compound to relieve such symptoms I
    In a recent medical test lt proved remark-
    ably helpful to women troubled this way.
    You owe it to yourteU to try it.
    Pinkham's Compound is what Doctors
    call a uterine sedaUve. It has a grand sooth-
    ing effect on one of woman's most important
    organs. Taken regularlyPinkham's Com-
    grrad, pound helps build up resistance
    girts! against such distress. Also a great
    stomachic tonic!
    NOTE: Or jvu may prefer LYDIA
    I. PINKHAM-fl TABLETS arltk
    added iron.
    Lydia L Pinkham's VEGETABLE COMPOUND*'
    tts
    Cream of Wheat
    . DELICIOUS...
    * .NUTRITIOUS
    fADD GLAMOUR TO YOUR DESSERTS
    ass.
    ON DISPLAY-NOW!
    1
    J
    REAL WHIPPING CREAM!
    You'll love rhe way Avosei pure dairy cream
    whips quickly and stays firm for hours sad ,
    hours.
    Luscious whipped cream glamour .
    pure, safe country-fresh Avoset Whipping
    Cream is perfect for pies, cakes, and pad-
    dings. Also delicious on hot chocolate
    or cocoa. Use the economical quart-
    size for parties.
    Abe try AVOSIT TeWe Ore*
    *er coffee, cereeh, mi fra.
    Wiser
    /if}*.1* (RIM
    '*
    ultima,
    AVOSET "SS^"
    THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFUL CAR
    THE NEWTUmaJl 1952
    The first American car styled by
    PININ FARINA
    The world's foremost car designer
    See and Drive this magnificent achievement
    of beauty and performance the product
    of 50 years of research and improvement


    NASH AGENCY

    One block from Tivoli crossing
    Panam

    c/wmn diodjyiami
    MORE EFFECTIVE LONGER


    Mot n
    ft PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILV WEWSPAPBR
    FRIDAY. MARCH lMf
    You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
    I pave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices iu No. 57
    No. 12,179 Central Ave. Colon
    "H" Street Panama
    Lewis Service
    t Tivoli Ave.Phone 2-2181. and
    Saln de Belleza Americano
    #56 West 12th Street
    Carlton Drug Store
    10,058 Melndez Ave.Phone 355 Coln
    irth of July Ave.Phone 2-9441
    Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones Propaganda, S.A.
    #! Lottery Plasa Phone 2-319 'JCSV^SltK^ *
    Minimum for 12 words.
    3c. each additional word.
    FOR SALE
    Household
    ~FCF.
    SALE-^lleochfd solid maho-
    flcny diningroem set; slab tcp
    Z tobie 42 by 84. 8 hostess chairs;
    5 bullet, plontine. box. S385; klleh-
    n tble with two choirs $16. Coll
    Z Curundu 42b3 otter 4:30.
    FOR SALE: Refrigerator, stove,
    . bomboo srttinflroom set. child's
    bedroom set. Sonto Isabel Avenue 8
    I -2 St. House 8069-A, eportment
    2. "Segundo Bello" house. Coloa
    i FOR SALE: DUPONT Points and
    verriishes
    "Covers more orea"
    "Stay on longer"
    at
    HOGAR MODERNO
    104 Central Avenue 104
    FOR SALE
    Automobiles
    FOR SALE:Dining toble. 8 chairs.
    Buffet. Twin bed:trods. dresser,
    chiffonier mahogany, modern de-
    sign. Perfect condition. House
    0954 Amador Rd. Phone 2-3708.
    FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
    ator. 9 ft. 60 cycles, good condi-
    tion, 10-8 Margorita St. New Cris-
    tobal.
    FOR SALE:Solid mahogany settee,
    two, lorge chairs, two foot stools,
    cushions foir condition. $200.00.
    8215-8. Margarita 3-2598.
    FOR SALE:Solid mahogany dining-
    room set and other household sr-
    ticlee. Coll 2-2337. Bslboe.__
    FOR Sr*>LE: Mople livingroom set.
    Radio. Wall cabinet, pick-up and
    records. Quartermaster furniture,
    lamps. 1948 Pontioc. 2 door Se-
    den. 0435-F Frongipani. Ancon,
    phone 2-3417. ______
    FOR SALE:Coldspot, 6 ft. 25 cycle,
    running condition. S26. Bolboa
    3752. 0584-D, Mindi St. Ancon.
    FOR SALE: General Electric Refri-
    gerators, washing machines, radio
    receivers, mixers, tooster, waffle
    nd clocks
    at
    HOGAR MODERNO
    104 Centrol Avenue 104
    FOR SALE:Electric refrlgerotor. au-
    tomatic wosher, console combino-
    tion radio ond record player, baby
    pen, other household furniture,
    reasonably priced. Phone 6-320.
    House 125-A. Gamboa.
    'FOR SALE:All porcelain refngerot-
    er; unit recently rebuilt. Either 25
    r 60 cycle. Price $100, delivered
    1 to your home. Phone Gamboa 6-
    322.____________________________
    FOR SALEElectric vacuum sweep* .
    kitchen toble $3.50; ce cente-.
    table. $2.00. buffet $15.00; I
    S service table $3.00. House 94 Pe-
    dro Miguel. Phone 462._________
    rOR S/fflE:Porch screen:,, maho-
    gany china oloset, ehifforobe. desk.
    W nlght-toble. misc. articles. Curun-
    du Heights 2244.
    Service Personnel arid Civilian
    Government Employes
    be safe
    for your Automobile Financing
    Insist an
    Government Employes Finance Co.
    of
    Fort Worth, Texas
    new office at
    Na. 43 Automeail* Raw
    Next door to the Firastone Buildinfj
    also through your outo dealer
    Wa save you money on
    Financing ond 'lnsurar.ce
    alto direct loans on outomobiles
    AGINCY DIHLINSER
    Phene 3-4984 3-4985
    Agencias Cosmos. Automobile Row
    29. will solve your Auto buying or
    selling Problem. Tel. Panama 2-
    4721. Open oil day on Soturdoys.
    FOR SALE:Buick 1950. black se-
    donette, dynoflow, rodlo. nylon
    covers, excellent condition, duty
    free. Call Criitobol 3-1547 even-
    ings.
    MISCELLANEOUS
    Da yen have a aWakens ajtssliaaT
    Write Akefcelki **
    2011 Aaeaa. C. Z. ,
    TRAVEL OPPORTUNITY: Enjoy
    your vacation in cool Costo Rico.
    Fly LACSA, PAA offlliote, only
    $35.00 round trip. Inquire Pan-
    ama Dispatch. Tel. 2-1655. across
    from Ancon bus-stop.
    FOR SALE
    Miscellaneous
    FOR SALE:25 to 60 cycles 1 KW
    motor generator, 25 cycle Deep
    Freeze, BC-348 receiver with
    speaker and 25 cycle power sup-
    ply. TBS-50 Tronsmitter, Meters
    and Test equipment, miscellaneous
    Audio Transmitter and surplus
    geor. 61 I-B Ancon_ Blvd., Ancon.
    FOR' SALE:One mohogony China
    closet, excellent condition, 1 smal
    draftsman's desk. One Q. M.
    dry clothes closet. One table small.
    One hospital serving stand. 822-B,
    Empire St.
    RESORTS
    Phillies. Oceonstdt cottage. Sonto
    Clero. Box 435. Belboo. Phone
    Ponomo 3-1877. C'isfobol 3-1673
    Williams Sonta Clara Beoch Cottooej,
    Two bedroom. Frigidaires. Rock-
    gas range. Balboa 2-3050.
    STAY ot the Hotel PANAMIRICANO
    IN COOL EL VALLE.
    FOR RENT
    Apartments
    ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
    Modern furnished unfurnished oport
    ments. Maid service optlonol. Con-
    fort office 8061. 10th Street. New
    Cristobol. telephone '386 Colon.
    COMMERCIAL b
    PROFESSIONAL
    We hare everything
    to keep vour Lawn
    and Harden beautiful
    daring the dry season.
    fools
    Hose
    Fencing
    Sprayer*
    Sprinklers
    Wheelbarrows
    insecticide
    Fertilizers
    Weedkillers
    Fungicides


    GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
    279 Central Are. Tel. 8-8148
    (
    FOR RENT: Furnished apartment
    2011. Melndez Ave. Apply Balin
    De Abate. 6029 Balboa Ave. Co-
    lon, phone 475 or 517-J after 6
    p. m. _____'
    FOR SALE:1951 V-8 Studaboker
    Landcruiser 4-door sedan; radio,
    overdrive. W. W. tires. Perfect con-
    dition. See at 2256-B, Curundu or
    call Hearne. Curundu 4288.
    FOR SALE:DeSoto 1951. convert-
    ible, new tires, rodio. good condi-
    tion. Cash sale only. Tel. 3-3044.
    TROPIC TOPICS
    We are pleased to onnounce that we
    hove o SINGER ROADSTER ovoiloble
    for immediate delivery off floor.
    Get o demonstration of the perfect
    economical little car. Tropical Mo-
    tors.
    FOR SALEYou ore planning to tra-
    vel USA or Europe, we can make
    deliveries of HILLMAN MINX ou-
    tomobiles. sedan, convertible, sta-
    tion wagon, ony important city.
    Enjoy your trip, ond save money
    driving an economical, ond com-
    fortable HILLMAN. For informa-
    tion consult your dealer AGEN-
    CIA LUMINA behind the Lux
    Theater. Tel. 3-1033. .
    FOR-SALE: Dodge Sedan, $195.
    Good radio, good tires, appearance
    fair. Economical 1939. Phone 6-
    322.
    FOR SALE: Chicken, fine bred
    "Hampshire," 4 months old. Er-
    nesto Lefevre Ave. Porque Lefe-
    fre 32.
    FOR SALE:New Crosman Air Pistol,
    with ammunition. Call ot 2020-C,
    2nd St. Curundu. ofter 5 p. m.
    FOR SALE: Cor, bicycle, tricycle,
    toaster, rug, lomps, shaver, rodio,
    Misc. 1446-D, Owen. Balboo.
    LOST & FOUND
    LOST: White mare, black mane
    and tail, brand "PH." Reward. Via
    Espaa No, 112-A. Tel. 3-1795.
    FOR SALE:'41 Chevrolet Pick-up
    $200.00. Currier 167-A, Gamboa.
    Phone 6-459.
    FOR SALE:1949 Buick convertible
    in good condition. General Elec-
    tric refrigerator. 25 cycle. Cheap.
    Telephone 25-3236 or house 602
    A, Cocoli.
    FOR SALE
    ____Real Estate
    FOR SALE:Modern concrete block
    cottage ond two guest cottages.
    red tiler floors, bathrooms, gordens.
    fruit, electricity, in Arroijan I 1-2
    miles right side Internotional High-
    way. Johnson.
    FOR RENT
    Rooms
    FOR RENT: Furnished room with
    private bathroom ond entrance.
    Kitchen privilege. 43rd Street No.
    13.
    Help Wanted
    WANTED:Nursemaid for two pre-
    school boys. European preferred.
    Experience ond references neces-
    sory. Privte, comfortoble quorters.
    Good salary. Coll Tel. 3-4619,
    From 9 12 o. m., 3 5 p. m.
    PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
    Hotel El Panam
    Selling; Korestal Product*
    Fueraa y Lnr. (preferred)
    Panam Insurance Co.
    Buying: Aceite Urraca and Brewery.
    Tel. 3-4718 8-1660
    MODERN FURNITURE
    cm wm awn.i
    Slipcover Reupholsterv
    vtsn ove show-xoomi
    alberta Hera
    l r a la free aattautet
    TaL -4f I i
    77 (AateaaebUt atow)
    - Ptclrae Delivery
    i:ea a.a. ta Ties a.m.
    COOK NEEDEDWith recommenda-
    tion, to sleep in. 49th St. No. 17
    Phone 3-4408.
    WANTED
    MigcellaneoiiP
    WANTED:Live snakes, boos, poi-
    sonous snakes ond others. Toucans,
    jaguars, pumas, tapirs, etc. Top
    prices paid. House 239-B, phone
    4-337. Box 16. Pedro Miguel.
    WANTED TO BUY:20 inch boy's
    bicycle. 1556-C. Telephone 2
    . 3235.
    FOR SALE: 1948 Nash Ambassador
    Coupe, leather upholstery, new
    tires, radio, in excellent condition
    throughout. Cotl 83-5238 or house
    555-A, Curundu Hgts. 2-0740.
    FOR SALE4-pc. Rottan Livingroom
    set. two mahogany end tables.] FOR
    Rattan Diningroom set. Telephone
    3-1909 evenings.
    FOR SALE:1941 Ford Tudor So
    dan. Duty paid. $200.00. 83-
    7291, Curundu.
    FOR SALE
    Boats & Motor
    FOR SALE:Boot 25 feet. Excellent
    condition: Phone Curundu 7194.
    F- See at Diablo Sea Scout Landing,
    Sunday. No. 530. Also 47 Ford
    Convertible, loaded.
    FOR SALE
    Motorcycle
    FOR SALE:2 vertical twin Indians,
    $400. I Indian ScOut 45, $100.
    House 171-B, Pedro Miguel. Phone
    ; 4-567.
    VFOR SALE:1952 NORTON, A.J.S
    NSU motorcycles. Quick delivery
    n all models. Write Box 635. An-
    cn or phone 2-1471 after 4:00.
    PLASTIC LAMINATING
    Protect tout Identification
    Cards, Snapshots, Drivers
    Licenses. Business Cards
    With "Sealed-in-Plastic" for
    Soil-Proof. Wear-proof Pro-
    tection'One Oay Service
    - at -
    Smoot y Hunnicutt, S.A.
    COLON. R. P.
    Call Phone 1. Coln.
    SALE: Late 1949 Mercury
    convertible, excellent condition, ex->
    tras, reasonable. Phone Curundu
    83-6179.
    FOR SALE:1948 Nosh Ambossadir
    Coupe, $750.00. House 76C-C,
    Barnebey Street, Balboo Tc.
    2984. _________
    FOR SALE: 1947 Ford Tudor 6,
    one owner, 31,000 miles A-l con-
    dition, $750 cash. House 357
    Apt. 2 Mamei St. Ancon.
    FOR SALE1951 Studebeker Cham-
    pion 4 door sedan, 6,000 miles,
    radio, climatizer, hillholder, un-
    dercoated, vinyl interior. Perfect
    condition. $1.975.00. Call Albrook
    4240.
    TOR-SALE:1949 Renoult. 4 doer,
    sedan. Duty paid. Good condition
    Phone PAD 3188.
    FOR SALE:Owner leaving, house
    in good condition gnd *-rieop. fur-
    nished or unfurnished, situated In
    12th Street No. 60, San Francisco.
    See Isabel de Miranda. Tel. 3-
    3933. Panama._________
    FOR SALE AOfNCIAS THOMAS
    BIENES RAICES. CENTRAL AVE-
    NUE 259. TEL. 3-1069.
    VISTA HERMOSA: Brand new chalet.
    $11.000. SAN FRANCISCO: Cha-
    let beoutiful, small, $4,500. INGE-
    NIO: Large house with good rent,
    $10.000. BELLA VISTA: Cholet
    on 48th Street. $22,000. EL CAN-
    GREJO: Mansion-Chalet, $40.000.
    00. 2 bedrooms chalet. $31.000.-
    00. 900 m2 lot. good location ot
    $8.00 m2. CALIDONIA: House
    tenement Domingo Esplnor Street,
    $12,000.00. CARRASQUILLA:
    800 m2 lot on mainroad. $2.600.-
    00. PARQUE LEFEVRE: 1.000 m2
    lot st $2.80. GOLF HGTS.
    An American home with 3.000 m2
    ond private rood, $25,000.00.
    We buy and sell SharesMort-
    gages. AGENCIAS THOMAS,
    Real-Estate Brokers. 259 Central
    Avenue, Tel. 3-1069.
    LESSONS
    FOR SALE:Pontioc 6 Cyl. 4 doer
    1937 or in good shape, tires,
    good all around. 2 extra tires and
    wheels, radio. 5359, Davis St
    Diablo. Phone 2-2365.
    PLASTIC LAMINATING
    Protect your Identification
    Cards, Snapshots, Driver's
    Licenses, Business Cards
    with "Sealed-in-Plastic" for
    Soil-Proof, Wear-proof Pro-
    tection___One Oay Service
    - at -
    Smoot y Hunnicutt, S.A.
    colon, n. p.
    Call Phone 880, Coln.

    OPEL

    A GENERAL MOTORS PRODUC.
    4 cyl. 32 miles per gallon
    SMOOT & PAREDES
    R ana m 4
    SMOOT & HUNNICUTT
    Color
    UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA
    Spanish Classes for Americans. Six
    weeks course in Beginners Spanish
    starts April 1st. Monday through
    Thursday, 5:00 p. m. to 5:50 p. m.
    Registration fee: $10.00. Registra-
    tion now open.
    Salvation Army,
    Trinity Methodist
    To Swap Preachers
    The Trinity Methodist Church
    and the Salvation Army In Co-
    lon will exchange preachers at
    next Sunday's services.
    The 9:30 morning; worship at
    Trinity will be conducted by Rev.
    Norman Pratt, but Sr. Salvation
    Army Capt. Clement Moonsawmy
    will preach the sermon.
    Later at 11 a.m. Rev. Pratt will
    preach the sermon at the Salva-
    tion Army church.
    Sunday evening; worship will
    be conducted at 7:15 bv Rev.
    Pratt. His topic will be "Friends
    of Jesus."
    LEGAL NOTICE
    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    Canal Zone
    UNITIO STATIS DISTRICT COURT
    FOR THE DISTRICT OF THE
    CANAL ZONE
    Division af Balboa
    Irens Virginia Pauldln.
    PWatlff
    vs.
    Elmer Leroy Paulding.
    Defendant
    SUMMONS
    Casa No. S42. Civil
    Civil Docket IK
    ACTION FOR DIVORCE
    To the above-named defendant:
    You re hereby require.! to appear
    and aniver tha complain! filed in tha
    bora-entitled action within NINETY
    day after (he first ate of publication.
    In case of your failure to so appear
    and answer, judgment will be taken
    Sainst you by default for tha relief
    demanded in the complaint.
    WITNESS the Honorable Joeph J.
    Hancock. Jurfae, united State. District
    Court for tha District of the Canal
    Sane, this II., re IS. IJSZ.
    C. T. McCerM.uk. Jr.
    Clerk
    (BAL)
    By Sara de la Pena
    Chief Deputy Clerk
    To Blaser LeRoy Paulrfina:
    The foregoing sumaiona la served
    upon you by publication purauant to
    ihe order of the Honorable Joaeph J.
    Hanr.nl. Judge. United Sutes District
    Court for the District of tha Canal Zone,
    dated March It. lilt aad enterad and
    filed in this aetien In the office of the
    Clerk of said United States District
    Court far rhe Division of Balboa an
    March 12. HI"
    C. T. MrC.rmlch. Jr.
    Clark
    Bv km da Is "ene
    Chief Deputy Clark.
    LEGAL NOTICE
    UNITED STATIS OF AMERICA
    Canal Zone
    Dr. Miller To Be Speaker
    Af Union Church Dedication
    Dr. J. Qulnter Miller. Admin- gation on the subject "If Any
    istrative Secretary for the Na-,one Would Come After Me."
    tlonal Council of the Churches' On Monday morning Dr. and
    of Christ m the U.S.A.. will de-,Mr. Miller will meet with Pro-
    Hver the address at the service of testant Clergy-men and their
    The Panama Federation of Wo-
    men's Societies for Christian
    ,Service will hear Mrs. Miller
    speak on the subject of "Prayer"
    when they meet on Thursday
    morning at the Balboa Height!
    Baptist Church.
    Paraso CIO Chapter
    To Sponsor Open-Air
    Community Program
    dedication for the Gamboa Union
    Church, Sunday afternoon at
    2:30.
    An open air community pro-
    gram, under the auspices of tha
    wives at the Balboa Armed Serv-
    ices Y.M.C.A. at 9:00 a.m. Dr.
    Miller will address the group on Education and Recreation Corn-
    Trie new church building (a-the topic, "Trends in Christian | mittee of Local 900 OCEOC-CIO,
    bovei was recently completed at t unity." in the evening they will,Paraso Chapter, will be held on
    a cost of $35,000 and represents
    the first unit of the final build-
    ing. Pastors of other Union
    Churches will also participate in
    the ceremony.
    Although a church was organ-
    DR. B. L. STONE
    Chiropractor
    STONE CLINIC
    7th St. & Justo Arosemena
    Ave. Coln Tel. 457
    conduct a Union Church Confer- the Paraso School Orounds be-
    ence in the Gamboa Church it I ginning 3:30 p.m. Sunday.
    uZZ?hu!?LtnD?&Ser*m\ The invocation and principal
    The Ecumenical church at ym
    pic.
    M,
    Castor of the Church of our
    ady of the Miraculous Medal.
    Other speakers on the program
    will be E. A. Gaskin, president,
    R. T. Ellis, financial secretary-
    treasurer of Local 900 CIO, and
    Transportes Baxter, S. A.
    Shipping, moving, storage.
    We pack and crate or move
    anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
    2-2562, Panam.
    ized soon after the first residentsiWork" an(j mm. Miller will dia-
    moved into the town of Gamboa CUM -Teaching Them to Observe
    in 1937, there was no building all Things."
    erected. The church group was; The last conference meeting
    small and the only building of the aeries will be held on Frl-
    funds available were those raised dav Aprji 4 at the Pedro Miguel,
    within the community During)Cnurch at 7:30 p m. The topic ^ K^WeJsh.tater^nalj^
    the war years chaplains from ] t0 be discussed by Mr. Miller will
    various military posts supplied ibe me Church's Evangelistic
    the pulpit for regular services of'opportunity Program Plans"
    worship. Sunday School classes gnd Mrs Mlner's topic will be.
    The Laity Genius of Protes-
    tantism."
    Mrs. Miller will be the speaker
    at two meeting of church women
    ilarge growth in membership, the jnext weeij. on Tuesday mornlng.
    church to conjunction with the.sne w,n address the Union
    Cocoli Union Church, called itl<;hurch Auxiliaries at a joint;imcnt station tountf that trees
    first regular pastor, the Rev. meeting in the Balboa Union grow best if trash and Utter la
    Raymond A. Gray. In 1950 the^u,.,.}, at 9:0o a.m. on the sub-lgiiowed to accumulate under
    for children were held In the
    movie hall and later in the Civic
    Center.
    In 1948. after registering a
    presentatlve*. interspersed with
    vocal renditions by the Cleft
    Melodalres and La Boca Junior
    High Glee Club.
    TRASH HELPS TREES
    NEW HAVEN, Conn. (UP.)
    Woodman, spare that trash! The
    Connecticut agriculture? exper-
    church launched a full scale,.ect_
    Lift Up Your Hearts
    (A Lenten feature of The Pa-
    nama American, prepared by
    program designed to make Itself House.
    fully supporting and began to
    make definite plans to build. The
    matured plans are now visible in
    the completed structure built by
    the Hauke Construction Compa-
    ny. S. Martin Ives was the ar-
    ....urn ssscssvesss, lucyaicu */j i,-.
    the Rev. M. A. Cookson, Episco- C1,'l'^-L-..,. hllllt ,. tt_
    pal Church of Our Saviour New Jhe e 'h" Lto It the
    rriitnhai > shape, with -an open patio ai ine
    entrance. Designed as modified
    iSpanish Mission architecture, the
    building is constructed of ma-1
    sonry and tile throughout, with [
    mahogany woodwork. It pro-;
    1 vides Sundav School classrooms.
    Jesus' our Lord here speaks In rest rooms, kitchen, pastor's^stu-
    the Beatitudes of thcie whody and sanctuary-wtth seating
    make peace. St. Paul gives us-capacity for l^Mpe^ie.u
    our true goal: "Let us therefore planned ultimately *o provide a
    follow after the things which permanent sanctuary in thecen-
    make for peace." |ter of the U-shape. at which
    Those people who make peace. I time the present sanctuary will
    the peace that shall prevail, 1 be used for social purposes
    must be carefully distinguished I In keeping with the e"10-
    from the very large number who rmlnational nature of the Union
    talk about peace, and from the, Churches, loans and cash ccm-
    stlll larger number who long. tributlons toward the cost of tne
    for peace. building were made by nine de-
    Nearly everybody desires,nominations in the United States
    include the following:
    'The Church In Your;them. Raking it away slows down
    The Spring meeting of'the growth of the tree.
    WHEN SHALL PEACE
    PREVAIL?
    "Blessed are the peacemakers;
    for they shall be called the
    children of God." St. Matt.
    5:1-12.
    *
    DITTO"
    THE DUPLICATOR THAT DOES NOT USE INK
    PRINTS IN 4 COLORS
    COMPLETE STOCK OF ACCESSORIES ON HAND
    ASK FOR A DEMONSTRATION!
    V
    CTPllrOTHIftS.lltC
    Ave. Tivoli No. 1
    Tel. 2-191
    PLASTIC LAMINATING
    Protect your Identification
    Carda, Snapshots. Driver1!
    Licensee. Business Cards
    with "Sealed-ln-PUstlc" tor
    Soil-Proof, Wear-proof Pro-
    tection. One Day Service
    - at -
    Smoot v Hunnicutt, S.A.
    COLON. R.P.
    CaJl Phone 3 Colon.
    ^n^hone
    peaee; and it Is very easy to
    agitate for peace; but the suc-
    cessful peacemakers among us
    are not easy to find. Yet they
    are the only ones who are called
    blessed and rewarded with the
    title "children of Gold."
    We have tried In the course
    of the world's history to use
    .,, certain "powers" that we hoped
    UNITID STATI DIS1 T wouW ^ke for p^,, These
    "Big Three" powers can be
    symbolized by the personalities
    of Caesar. Plato, and Marx.
    Caesar says that military
    might alone can bring about a
    workable peace among nations;
    Plato symbolizes the idealist, the
    technologist, the brain-truster
    and says that by eliminating
    ignorance and bad social en-
    vironments via education, pres-
    to, Utopia; Marx promises
    Utopia on the materia 11 s t i c
    plane bv using the basic power
    of. self and selfish Interests that
    permeats human actl v i t i e s :
    and making capital of it.
    Mankind has tried them all;
    and what have we got. two world
    wars and the atomic bomb.
    Where then shall we seek for
    peace?
    Peace comes when God's will
    prevails. It is the by-product of
    righteousness, and it is genuine
    and valuable only when it is a
    FOR THl DISTRICT OF THI
    CANAL ZONE
    Division ot Balboa
    Violet A. Jamea,
    Plaintiff
    l
    Leater W. J.msi.
    Defendant
    SUMMONS
    Case No. IS, Civil
    Civil Docket IS
    ACTION tm DIVOkCK
    To taa sKsve-namsd dvrendsnt:
    Von are hereby rseulred to arpear
    an.! answer tae complaint filed In the
    ahove-entitled action within thirty days
    after tha first date of publication.
    In ease of your failure to so appear
    anil answer, judement v. 1)1 be taken
    aaainst you by defsult for the relief
    demanded In the complaint.
    WIIM..-S the HonniahV Joseph J.
    Hancock. Jrilae. UnitV Sutes District
    Court for the Dl'trict of the Canal
    Zone, this March IS. 196:.
    C. T McCarasick, Jr.
    Clerk
    (8AI.)
    By Lai. E Harrison
    Deputy Clark
    To T,ester W. Jame:
    The foregoing summons Is served
    upon you by publication pursuant to the
    order of the Honorable Joseph J. Hen.;
    oock. Judie. United States Dl'triat
    Court for the District of the Cans! Zone,
    dated Hereh 12. 1962 and entered and
    filed In tkia attion in the office of tha
    Clerk of said United State Biatrlel
    Court for the Division of Balboa ea
    Mares II. '"
    C. T MeCenaich, Jr.
    Clerk
    y Lais E Harrison
    Deputy Clark
    PLASTIC LAMINATING
    Protect your Identification
    Cards, Snapshots, Driver's
    lileeniee, Business Cards
    with "Sealed-in-Hastir" lot
    Soll-rreof, Wear-proof Pro-
    tection. One Day Service
    - at -
    Smoot y Hunnicutt, S.A.
    COLON. R. P.
    Call Phone I, Colon.
    These
    American Baptist Convention, i
    Cong regational Christian,
    Churches. Evangelical and Re-i
    formed Church, Evangelical Uni-
    ted Brethren Church. Methodist j
    Church. Presbyterian Church In
    tbe U.S. Presbyterian Church
    in the U. S. A., Reformed Church
    In America, and United Presby-:
    Lorian Church. Each of these bo-
    dies cooperate with the Joint De-
    partment on American Commu-,
    nities Overseas, under whose su-1
    pervision the Union Churches
    operate. Most of these denomin-
    ations have members In the
    UniCT! Churches.
    At the redication ceremony on |
    Sunday the special music will be
    presented by Mr. and Mrs. Webb
    Hearne. The building will be ac-1
    cepted for dedication by J. Stuart:
    McNair, President of the General
    Council of the Union Church of
    the Canal Zone. Following the
    ceremony there will be open
    house at which time a tun in-
    spection of the building may be
    made. The public is cordially In-
    vited to attend. .____.
    Dr. Miller will also be heard
    Sunday morning as the guest
    oreacher at the Margarita Union ,
    Church at 10:45 a.m. His sermon I
    topic will be. "The Future Loons
    to the Church." In the evening,
    sign that man has found Gods h at the Gatun
    peace in his own mind and soul.i"5," rhurf-h at 7:30 P-m- on
    People who are at peace with- {J^^ect "Christian Faith In,
    in themselves are the ones who e,",,^ ictlon "
    can know the things that make Un'la *gj rn in be gue,t of!
    for peace, the'nature and con- th~ CrUtob,i union Church at
    dltinns of true peace in the "* c corning wvice at 10:45
    prSiceTSfe BULBS* ""l^ 8he "" *>"" "* ^ I
    In !20 milHlfeS- vvirtuxif rubbing-
    OlR-PWll vwxk your car wHh
    longer-lasting
    protedion.
    Raindrops prov* it
    ,n t it erf for f esf f
    "Waver beasV
    protecrioni When rsin "beads
    up" on a clean car (see above),
    you know there is a solid film
    of wax on the finiah to give
    tough protection against the
    weather. On a Car-Plate finiah
    tbe wax protection lasts for a
    longer period of time than with
    any ordinary wax or polish.
    When rain flattens into pools
    (see above) on a clean car,
    you know there is little or no
    wax protection left on tbe car's
    finish. When ordinary waxes
    or polishes are used, the wax
    protection doesn't last as long
    as when you
    useCsr-Plsts!
    PLASTIC LAMINATING
    Protect your Identification
    Carde, Snapehets, Driver's
    Li senses. Business Cards
    with "Seatod-in-Piastic" for
    Soil-Proof. Wear-proof Pro-
    tection___One Day Service
    - at -
    Smoot y Hunnrcutt, S.A.
    colon, b. p. ,
    Call Phene j, Colon.
    PLASTIC LAMINATING
    Protect yew Wentifieation
    Cards, Snapshots, Driver
    Licenses, Business Cards
    with -Sealed-iB-Plaatic" for
    Soil-Proof, WeSeT-peoef Pro-
    tection. One Day Service
    - as -
    Smoot y Hunnicutt, SA
    colon, b. p.
    The avatsy Car-Plate way o wax
    your car is the beet way I
    These pictures prove it! In test
    after teat, the Car-Plate finish
    was still smooth and gleaming
    with wax protection after weeks
    of driving... while other waxes
    and liquid polishes had worn
    away!
    Got Johnson's Car-Plate to-
    day! Spread it on the cleaned
    nniah' ... let it dry .. then
    wipe it off. You'll give your car
    the smoothest, brifhteet, longest-
    wearing waxing it has ever had!
    The easy way to prepare the nniah of
    your ear for a Car-Plate waxing is to
    clean it super-clean with JoJaMoa's
    Carnut
    Johnson's CAR-PLATE
    S. C. JOHNSON I SON, INC., IACINC, W1S., U.S.A.


    /RIDAY, MARCH M. 1MI
    Tul PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAtLT NEWSPAPER
    PAOIUTBI
    ^/ftlantic ^ocietu*
    m m~ jl fu
    &, 195, C*t" OittpL**, QmUm 378
    ATLANTIC SIDE WOMEN MEET MRS. MILLER
    Mr. J. Quinter Miller, who arrived with Dr. Miller Snn-
    Uv tot a visit with the I'nlon Churches mi the Isthmus,
    met the women ef the Atlantic Side churches at a mornlnf
    coffee and meeting at the Gatun Union Church yesterday.
    Mrs. Miller received with Mrs. Benjamin Brundage, pres-
    ident of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Gatun Church, Mrs.
    J. W L. Graham, wife of the pastor of the church and Mrs.
    J. W. R. Hall, president of the Margarita Auxiliary.
    A spring color scheme of pur-
    ple and ftold was carried out in
    the floral arrangements in the
    main auditorium of the church
    nod on the buffet table. Bou-
    (ainvilla with the alamanda and
    golden shower clusters were used
    in the decorations.
    Mrs. Phillo Havener and Mrs.Mrs. MiloKissam.
    Henry L. Bell, wives of the min- A Swedish coffee ring, made
    lsters of the Cristobal and Mar- by Mrs. Rogers, was raffled and
    Benefit Coffee
    The women of the Sodality of
    the Immaculate Conception in
    Gatun held a morning coffee at
    I heir church Wednesday to raise
    funds for the organization.
    Hostesses were Mrs. W. P
    Judging of Isthmian Drama
    Festival
    The last night of the Isthmian
    Drama Festival will be held to-
    qui'n\~Mts, HenanRogers admorrow at 8 p.m in the audl-
    IN HOLLYWOOD
    BY ERSRINE JOHNSON
    Mr. Kkrpenskl, the Cubmaster.
    asked the ladles for any odd cups ... *;7*2?-' Weh rip my
    And saucers they might have for ^'u' 'f^ ,Ji. k.ou a'nrf Vail m
    asein the.Cub meeting room. |^Tado-9n^tiatCns
    aren't going on for
    and Barbara Payton
    Organized Reserves
    WHI Not Be Called
    During Rest ef '52
    ner.
    garita Union Churches, presided
    at the tea and coffee services.
    Mrs. Howard Harris was gen-
    eral chairman for the coffee
    Members of her committee were
    Mr*. J.W.L. Oraham, Mrs. Hen-
    ry Hots. Mrs. Tracey White and
    Mrs. Curtis George.
    Mrs. Brundage presided at
    the meeting, which was held In
    the main auditorium of
    the winner was Mrs. John Kla-
    sovsky.
    Others present were: Mrs. Jo-
    seph Coffin. Mrs. Geddes, Mrs.
    George Schelbe, Mrs Joseph
    Dietrich. Mrs. John J. Tobla,
    Mrs. Warren McNamee. Mrs.
    Max Welch and Mrs. John T.
    Styles. 1
    Gullck Club
    the;Haa Monthly Coffee
    S^mAi? S$W&-'toS. G^onnKlrkVooad
    Lavtaia Badders. Mrs. Harriett 0ItJT. ., w,h an current
    Love.ace and Mrs. Frances ft. ^nV^fS^-Twir
    exchange negotiations between
    the United Nations arid Red du-
    na, with Tom slated to play an
    American soldier and Barbara to
    fill out the uniform of an Army
    nurse,
    torium of Cristobal High School. iaM^' T*,1"*?' ''fif' Nea"'
    of Miss Patricia Farley.
    Judges will give awards to the
    best actress, the best actor and
    the best play of the festival ae-
    church. Mrs Alcibiades Iglesias > Members of the Fort Gullck the United Nations educational.
    led the devotions and Mrs. Ca-iN.C.O. Wives Club held their Social and.Cultural[Organization
    leb Clement was soloist. | monthly morning coffee Wednes-
    Reports were given by the day at the home of Mrs. Ernes*,
    three auxiliaries represented, to Beck. Hostesses were Mrs. Mike
    acquaint the visitor with their'Klnnlck. assisted by Mrs. Doro-
    actlvitles. Mrs Gerhardt Lust thy Broon and Mrs. Julie Flo-
    reported for the Cristobal Aux-;res.
    lliary, Mrs. John Palmer for| Three guests were introduced.
    Margarita and Mrs. Brundage They were Mrs. Thomas Boggan.
    There Is no admission fee.
    for Gatun.
    Mrs. Miller was the guest
    speaker and brought an Inspira-
    tional message of the efficacy of
    women's work In the world now
    and during Biblical times.
    Mrs. Edwin Tennlng and Mrs.
    Patrick Cheeny.
    Mrs. David Wolfert was the
    winner of the door prise.
    Members attending were: Mrs.
    John Cousin, Mrs. Domlnlck
    Platt, Mrs. Joseph Cote, Mrs.
    Lester Davidson. Mrs. Rosa Tru-
    Bon Vovage Morning Coffee
    Mrs. Fred Livingston of Fort J tilo. Mrs. Charles Breach. Mrs.
    Gullck entertained at her quar- Austin Tulip, Mrs. Russell Mann,
    ter with a morning coffee Wed- Mrs. Roy Smith. Mrs. Josephiheld at the Saddle Club Club-
    neiday as a farewell to several Gormley. Mrs. Harry Copare.,n0use. starting at 8 p.m. Admls-
    Bob Taylor's clamming It up
    on the set of "Eagle on His Cap
    to all questions about whether
    .... (he'll try matrimony again now
    The festival Is being given WM**'*,*^!?'^?
    recognition of National Theater: up her fina divorce cree.
    der the >f ;Th.reh. nothing fourteen
    gossip columns." ___
    Asked about the stiff allmony
    rap Independently wealthy Bar-
    bara pinned on hlm-a $100,000
    home and 15 per cent of his sal-
    ary until her death or remar-
    riageand he sputtered:
    "Her lawyer must have glten
    that out. I've never discussed H.
    Rudd Weatherwax Is the win-
    , ,., ner In a big be^w^^that
    front of the Knights of Colum- legal wrangle at MOM now tnat
    bus Building and proceed tolLassle's no longerundecontract
    Third St. It will go down Third,to the studio. The dog s moniker
    Street to the parking lot at the was changed from Pal U> L*e
    clubhouse and around the lot by the studio. Now mtht.or
    Saddle Club Fair Event of
    Weekend
    The Brazos Brook Saddle Club
    Fair will be the event of the
    weekend for young and old on
    the Gold Coast.
    The event starts with the pa-
    rade at 4:30 p.m. today in Mar-
    garita. The parade will form in
    Grace, who's a charactershe
    ran for sheriff of Las Vegas
    l^r&SltAfiS 7 WASHINGTON DC.. March
    "She looks great." reports Feter. -Secretary of the Army Frank
    "She looks just like Claude Pace'.Jl' "W today that w ih
    Rains." very few exceptions, no indlvld-
    "Can I print that?" I asked. !u,al n* of the Army's lnac-
    "Surt" rinnert p*tafr "H.'ii ttve or volunteer Reserve or of-
    loveT'" d """'fleers serving in organised Re-
    l itR Turnar'a hnnt tn ha m serve Corps units will be ordered
    broiled h. the middle ^f law"- t0 act,vi mimarv ervl ln"
    sult slapped on Bob Topping by divlduals for the balance of 1952.
    Willis Hunt, his partner in a ?ort of a?v Vor }nJ.H ,n
    plastics company... Insiders in- th current military altuation.
    sist that Louis B. Mayer has been < Two major factors attributed
    exchanging cables with Ingrld bv Secretary Pace to making fur-1
    Bergman and Roberto RossellJni ther recalls of such personnel
    about a picture to be made under unnecessary at this time are, the
    the new Mayer banner___ high percentage of Reserve of-.
    Sprig's In the air. Hedy Lamar! 'leers previously ordered to du-
    has taken up golf. | ty who have extended service
    tours voluntarily and the exoan-
    Alan Ladd and Paramount are'sion and success of Armv Officer
    feuding. The studio wants to!Candidate Schools In developing
    rash him into another movie be-i well qualified young officers.
    fore his eon tract ends. .. .,
    _____, Pace emphasized that It may
    ..Starlet Helen London and her be r.?ceB?,t0 (',?nt.lnu? ?aUlnp
    hubby. Julie Taback, have part- smn'ru 0* unit* to duty as
    ed... George Dolenz received his."*1"3- but th* no members of
    contract release from Howard :s" Hughes. |ordered to active duty.
    tn... a i ------^T .^ There also will be a continuing
    Tv?J??*ntt?*tty &*h,In tor undetermined njjmbers
    TV-minded son to see his first of Dr0feslonal Medical Service!
    m?.e undJ.ne. y0""4" "ld: 'officers such as doctors, dentists
    -J^S" u \ c,r' 1m8.t. be veterinarians and nurses and a
    live from New York I limited number of soeclalists not
    available In the Active Army.
    The British press lads are snip-
    ing at Cesar Romero now. He'll
    Army plans had been based on
    star in "Ladv in a Fog." based exDectatlon.' that manv Reserve
    on a BBC radio serial, m London, 'officers would voluntarily extend
    The news snipers are saying that their periods of service, Pace
    British Robert Beatty. who nlay-inolnted out. but the numbers
    ed the lead on the air. is being;have far exceeded original estl-
    ciieated out of a Job. mates.
    twice, returning to the K. of C.
    Building down Second St.
    Tonight a square dance will be
    Fleet Reserve Plans Dance
    wive who will be leaving dur-Mrs. John Byrd and Mrs. Will-
    ing the spring for duty In the lam Bell.
    States.
    The honorees were Mrs, Clay-
    ton Moore Mrs. Harrv B. Gard- At the regular meeting of the s,m i* $.50 for adults and 825
    ner, Mrs. 'Carroll I. Thompson. Fleet Reserve and Auxiliary,lfor children. The events start at
    Mrs. Rov Wilkerson and Mrs. Tuesday evening at the meeting.3 p.m.
    John Sofka. room on Pier 1 at Coco Solo, The program 1 ti follows:
    Other guests were Mrs. An- plans were made for the dauce!grand march, square dancing on
    -1 1.,..? ...._ .__-_1- ...-11____' 1 ._- 1__!J ...II C Ik. nhl.I>. ?_____,____,_ ^w.J___.... ..dril.
    haggHng, plus a big cash pay-
    ment, give Rudd all rlghU to the
    Lassie name for TV, radio and
    future movies.
    The voices of some of Holly-
    m. -1 wood's top tars pop out of do-
    morVow with pony rides^for thelmestic tabor-wying^ devices In
    children at 8.10 a ride. Admls- |"Allce in mrtomtand .a full
    "The" & PopenPsratni p.m. to- wood^s Top" *ar.;pop,out_pf do-
    BALBOA
    WARNER BROC.
    'IIINI
    STARTS
    TOMORROW!
    length "commerrUl movie just
    completed by Producer Roland
    James Mason's the voice of a
    refrigerator, Lucille Ball
    inner guests were Mrs. au- piani wer maae iur me umicc grafio marcn. square uwicuik uii icihi~. __.---- n'sliil.
    gust Zilkle. Mrs. Joseph Wallace,; to be held April 5 at the Chief's horseback, a grudge race, saddle i dishwasher and ^""n "f .'
    Mrs. David McCracken, Mrs club, and committees were scramble, musical chairs, barrel llvan and Marie "s"
    Raymond Vale and Mrs. Richard
    Carle.
    named to make arrangements.
    Six new members were initia-
    ted into the organization. They
    were Mrs. Grace Runey, Mrs.
    Dorothy Hindle. Mrs. Ernestine
    scmaioie, musita, ui.oi.o. ua...|U>- -----r._. ._j *
    race, flag relay, potato race, a- washing machine and T-
    "At ***<,
    JAMES
    Informal Dinner
    Compliments Visitors
    Mr. andMrj. Raoul O. Ther-iWrlght, Mrs. Evelyn Redmond,]
    lault of France Field' had as Mrs. Louise Thomas and Mrs.
    their dinner guests at the Bra- Doris Vize.
    sos Brook Gun Club.Wednesday 1 Five guests were Introduced.
    Mr. and Mrs. Phllipp Gerhardt They were Mrs. Patsy Bass. Mrs.
    of Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. WlUlam Maxine Hendrich. Mrs. Anna
    Grady and Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Miniard. Mrs Glenda O'Brien
    Kldd. and Mrs. Helen aPtterson.
    M
    mateur polo and grand finale.
    Recant Tornadoes
    Cause Red Cross
    To Increase Goal
    Service* this Week
    SPIRITUAL REVIVAL CAMPAIGN
    of the
    ATLANTIC 1APTIST CHURCH
    Services Friday p.m.. 7:80 Saturday p.m., 7:30
    Sunday a.m.. 11:00 St 7:30 p.m.
    Speaker this week:
    REV. R. G. VAN ROYEN, Field Representative,
    Baptist Home Mission Board.
    SERMON SUBJECTS:
    "Millions Now Living Are Already Dead"
    "JesusSon of Joseph, or Sen of God?"
    "The Church Jesus Organised"
    "What is the New Birth?"
    You are invited to attend all these services,
    and receive a spiritual blessing.
    Mune In Radio Station HON (15301, 8:30-8:00 Monday.
    Wednesday & Friday for the UPWARD LOOK-----
    meditation in words and music.
    THE ATLANTIC BAPTIST CHURCH
    Bolivar Ave. at 12th Street Cristobal. Canal Eone
    The Red Croas has Increased
    lts'national goal by $6.000,000 to
    meet the added cost of relief
    and rehabilitation for victims of
    Jerry (,'olonna may never live
    it down, but he's the volee ef a
    garbage disposal unit.
    Raise Virginia Mayo's mitt as'
    the victor In a battle with a Hoi-
    lvwood portrait photographer,
    shooting her for fashion stiha.
    !he oblected to the way she was
    standing. Virginia finally blew
    her top and sent the bulb presses
    beneath his black cloth with:
    "You stand the way you waiit'
    to and I'll stand the way I want.
    Doms onooN vhoma
    ST* IMY mjfr, NELSON BOMAN
    CAG/fr eSoKR **'&**-.?
    Gibson Harris LovEdOY Norman
    ?mm icon wn re
    NKIU DCXWESSON RONHAGERTHY ssSiruih
    Ku -u.t. JOHN MORE M KARL KAMO ~.^-.fc. wm ^
    1 Pals who know them best vow
    the disastrous[tornadoes which' ^" Swanson and Bran-
    ripped through five etates this ^Jent Were ribbing Holly-
    week, the Canal Zone Chapter aonren ratrriaRe plans,
    earned from Red Cross Na- g~ appoint out that Brent
    isnt the Romeo who's showering
    tional Headquarters today.
    The Increased amount will be
    neede dto supplement funds In
    the cuwent budget for disaster
    aid. The Red Cross has alloted
    $1,000,000 for immediate emer-
    gency assistance.
    A Red Cross survey of the af-
    fected area showed 225 deaths as
    a result of the tornadoes, with
    736 persons Injured. One thou-
    sand two hundred and four
    homes were destroyed and 1.832
    damaged. Food, cots and tem-
    porary shelters are being pro-
    vided by the Red Cross, and
    whole blood and plasma has
    been delivered to the 'stricken
    areas by planes.
    Canal Zone Chapter officers
    have urged generous contribu-
    tions from residents of the
    her with diamond bracelets.
    Grace Hayes, the -vaude-
    ville star who once operated
    night clube in Hollywood and
    Las Vegas, Is the baby eltter In
    New Rochelle, NY. for the two
    children of Peter Llnd Hayes and
    Mary Healy. Thev're in Holly-
    wood working In "The 5000 Fin-
    gersof Dr. T."
    Isthmus to assist the Red Cross
    national headquarters In meet-
    ing the increased goal of 885,-;
    000,000 in the 1952 fund drive.
    Those who wish to do so may
    mall their contributions directly
    to the Canal Zone Chapter of-
    fice at Box 322, Balboa Heights,
    Canal Zone.
    It's Movietimt TONIGHT!
    Panama Canal ofneaters
    BALBOA
    4ir-Con4IUneri
    4:M (:M S:2S
    John WAYNE Claire TREVOR
    STAGECOACH"
    (Salarte?) "TA LUT"'
    DIABLO NTS.
    CIS f:||
    Marjorlc MA Percy KILBRIDE
    "MA AND PA KETTLE SACK ON
    THE FABM"
    (Saturday) "I'LL NEVE* FORGET YOU"
    Hat in "Ut'i D..c."
    A ParaawiMt Pklora
    f / r O I 1 William HOLDEN Nancy OLSON
    mm. ,.n "FORCE OF ARMS"
    (Sahiriav) "Ma A Pa Kattlc Back an Ike Pana*
    PfDflC MIGUEL
    e.is is
    Juna ALI.YSON Van JOHNSON
    "TOO YOUNG TO KISS''
    (Saturday) 'VALENTINO"
    V-8 Has Lively Flavor m
    Wholesome Goodness
    no ting/eju/ce csnmfch
    GAMBOA
    mm
    Ja CHANDLER Evalyn KXYE8
    'THE IRON MAN"
    (Saturday) "FORCE OF ARMt"
    G A 7 U N Dannla MORGAN Virginia MAYO
    ir Painting the Clouds with Sunshint
    (Saturday) "ON THE LOOSE;'
    U A Of A PIT A John RARRYMORf. Jr. a Corlnne CAL VET
    e!Kf fi "QUEBEC" (Technicolor)
    (Saturday 1 "SAMSON AND DELILAH"
    In V-8 there are 8 delicious juices
    f garden-fresh vegetablesnot just
    one. That's why V-8 has lively flavor
    and wholesome gocdness no mngh
    juice can match. Each juice adds its
    Own tempting flavor plus vitamins
    A, B, C calcium and iron. Your
    family will love V-8. Serve it often.
    Vary ajaae af V-S U a aaSaiaw kkwW af:
    T....... CaUry Baart Carral PaxtUy
    Made ay *. maaan a* Camak.ll'. Saaaa. V.S a
    >..-... vaad by CaaaakaH % Camaaay.
    CRISTOBAL
    Ir-Cu-dllfanad
    1:11 A I II
    Mona FREEMAN Edward ARNOLD
    "DEAR BRAT"
    (Saraiaar) WESTWARD THE WOMEN"
    1{+H*Hm ..what a ti-t! Ahvoy.
    Ltr

    it* mU milk, k aa.iM.tee.
    .X.J I
    BALBOA Theater
    SHOWING TONIGHT 4 30 6:30 25
    Winner Of two Academy Awards, and rated high'
    among the "best ten" motion pictures of all time
    John Ford's "8TAOECOACH" will be shown once
    again. This picture, originally released in 1939 has
    been re-Issued to allow an entirely new audience to
    view It.
    Never has a picture won such sensational acclaim
    from public and critics alike as did this thrill-packed
    saga ripped from the bullet-splattered pages of the
    frontier west.
    .IPflOFV 'rS'.pi' THOfU' I'Ons THl-H!
    r .
    *aMt JOHN WAV
    O mm nevos nasaiai ntrcnatt
    "STAGECOACH" unfolds the gripping story of
    seven men and two women each of whom harbors a
    burning secret thrown together on a trip through
    untamed plains and mesas and into ah electrifying
    adventure of undreamed danger.
    ExcHement!
    Beauty hi
    every movement!
    "HOLIDAY on ICE"
    presents
    CARNIVAL on ICE
    with the most beautiful stars
    ef Ice skating
    Tomorrow Saturday, March 29
    OLYMPIC STADIUM
    ----------------PRICES-----
    GENERAL ENTRANCE........ $1.00
    PREFERRED SEATS......... 2.00
    RINK ..................... 3.00
    Ticket far sale at MAI RlCIO'a tara,
    47 Central Av.ne. Panam
    There's ream for the family
    -and their luggage...
    TRY HE AND YOU CAN'T HBP BUT
    UK Ml
    Why not take me home with you
    I assure you I won't eost you much
    and viu will sure have fun with me.
    COME SEE ME AT MY NEW QUARTERS
    r No. 43 AUTOMOBILE ROW
    SB
    tlG-i-i"' fclll,n
    HEURTEMATTE & ARIAS, S.A.
    Tel. *-18*44)


    PAG I EIGHT
    THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
    FRIDAY, MARCH W, 1
    Close
    Seen At Gamboa Over Weekend

    Several Tossups On list;
    Both MacMurrays Favored
    Races
    Tomorrow
    Match play In all flight! of the on the strength of his teadllyi JJ^.""^TiolpSoi'oo^^u'V
    PAA Invitational Tournament Improving game; Moranl should *"*. 'J J*
    Balboa High Runs Away With
    Honors In 4-Team Track Meet
    First Race of the Doubles
    1Carenclto A. Mena 115
    2La India C. Chavez 112x
    3Tocopilla G. Oraell 115
    4Opex E. Silver. 115
    8Embustero M. Guerrero 115
    6La Venada B. Agulrre 115
    7Tap Dancer J. Baeza, Jr. 115
    8Danubio B. Pulido 115
    mf AJlvILttLluIiai iwuiuautun ...i,. v..... *...... ,-------------
    will be featured this week end atl win from Workman; Melanson
    Gamboa. Much good golf la in- and Miles will play a close match
    dlcated bv a review of the pair- with the edge In Miles' favor;
    ings and It Is evident that most Lally la favored to take MacKib.
    matches will be decided by close bon; Matheneys lack of knowi-
    fCerei edge of the Gamboa course will
    In the Championship Flight cost him his match with Swoop,
    Johnny Mac meets Tony Jankus Jr.; LeBrun and Hughes will play
    and while Tony should not be a close match. ..
    taken too lightly. It 1 not ex- In the Fourth RgbkOoM
    pected that Johnny will have should wini from BucWey. Oa- Natlvea-IW V*.
    ^^e^^Maury Mu.ler. Sg SSPrtSrleE: 'SSif* ^ 75,00- Poo. Closes. 1:15
    tnd Geo. Riley vs. Perc Graham qulst and Gartner appear to
    should provide Interesting play.be evenly matched and tne
    well worth following. These four breaks will decide the maten
    have been "a-feudln"" on Isth- Gordon will take Essen to tne
    mian goif courses for years; fln- i8th green for decision: Fear*
    al results are unpredictable. is favored over Stevenson ana
    At first glance the Doc Mitten Brown is expected to win from
    vs An'JJel Galindo match looks cox; Bean and Hayden will
    like Mitten all the way. but Mit- provide a close I
    Second Race of the Doubles
    1Politico B. Agulrre 115
    2Ebonv Boy V. Rodriguez 112x
    3Resorte V. Castillo 115
    4Tapsy J. Baeza. Jr. 115
    5Avlvato B. Pulido 115
    JlKC Wilt Lt-Ii ttli uit v**J. *- --- |>i"wi.> n wvi. ----------- ---
    ten Is not under-estimating Ga'-lCan win this one. cnandeck
    Indo, who is capable of par polf.j.s expected to win easily from
    and plays well under match con- Higgenbottom.
    Charlie Mac vs. Toland should paa's Senior Representative,
    ,be a win for Charlie. Eiton D. Todd. is delighted with!
    The 8chmitt vs. Gerrans match tne turnout of 180 golfers to,
    Is likely to prove the most spec- pIay the qualifying rounds,
    tacular In the first round play. Wnlle R is too late to change
    Schmitfs qualifying score of 75 the nunlber of flights in trrts
    indicates his golfing ability ana tournament, the popularity of
    his years of tournament expert- tne event wln no doubt result
    ence will stand him In good in an increase in the number
    stead. Gerrans plays best m Qf night8 m next*year's tourna-
    match ompetltion; he to not ment
    easUv rattled and has a strong---------------------------------
    *Sot\2S i known about Teen-Age League
    ability of Hamilton, but hta qual-|
    living score of 78 la sufficient -a. 11 Porlm
    pfoof of his toughness. Thomp-GaHieS At reOTO
    on should expect plenty of trou.|
    SiStS AJB""Miguel Tomorrow
    breaks will decide the winner |
    In the First Flight, it looks like
    Gardner will win from Hochsted-
    ler; Kulikowskl from Hunslcker;
    Kenna over Goodman; Spain and
    Richmond a toss-up; Williams
    will take Prince; Shaw and Eup-
    er a very close match; .Trim, Jr
    and Saarinen are old rivals with
    equal abilitythe breaks will de-
    cide; Smith should beat Engelke.
    In the Second Flight, Medlnger
    will make Powell play his best
    trolf to win; Flemmfng Is favored
    to win from Box well; Barr vs.
    Nolan match Is likely to be de-
    cided on the 18th green; Dehl-
    lnger with greater experience
    should win from Sandy Hlnkle,
    Thiel and Askew artetWj
    matchedthe better putter will
    win; Bubb Is picked to win from
    Armltage; Harris' greater experl-
    "'rd Rare "F-2" NativesV Tgn.
    Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
    One-Two
    1Brochacito B. Agulrre 112
    2Strike Two B. Pulido 119
    3Romntico Jose Rodgz. 118
    4Cosa Linda A. Mena 112
    5Carbonero J. Baeza, Jr. 116
    6Caaveral V. Rodriguez 113x
    4th Race "H- ImportedVi Fr*.
    Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 2:20
    Quiniela
    1P'rter's Star T.Medrano 112
    2Picon A- Vsquez lMx
    3Paques B. Agulrre 117
    4Betn O. Prescott 115
    5Rlnty A. Mena 112
    8Phlox B. Moreno 112
    7Skyweigen B. Pulido 115
    Balboa High School easily won
    the quadrangular track meet
    Thursday evening at Balboa Sta-
    dium track when they scored
    8834 points to 38U for the Armed
    Forces, 31 li for Athletic Club and
    13'i for Cristobal.From the point
    of few times run, distances
    jumped, etc. this was without
    doubt one of the best meets run
    locally In the past several years.
    Outstanding performance for
    the night was a brilliant 9.7 hun-
    dred yards by Guillermo Torraca
    from the 504th FA. Torraca got
    a perfect start, and was a good
    two yards up on the field 10
    yards out of the holes.
    The expected duel In the mile
    failed to materialize when Leon-
    ard Parker and Anselmo Arlas
    decided not to run. Jos 8alas of
    the AC set the early pace, but
    once Bob Ranson got in front he
    held It all the way to finish with
    the creditable time of 4:51.8. Ed
    Sliva of Albrook was right on his
    tail until Ranson put on a fin-
    ishing kick that would have
    done credit to the great Glenn
    Cunningham.
    Another fine performance was
    Noel Gibson's 21 feet in the broad
    jump. Right along with this wa
    Ramn Rosarlo's 51 ft. 2 In. In
    the shot put, and Claren Bet-
    tancourt's 11 ft. 6 In. In the pole
    vault.
    This meet gave the several
    hundred fans on hand an idea
    of what to expect In the Balboa
    Relays coming up April 18. Witn
    times like these, the Relays will
    be an event that fans will be
    forced to place on their "must
    Elks Break Firemen Win
    Streak With 10-5 Upset
    The regular Fastllch (Teen-
    Age) Legue rames will not be
    plared at Balboa Stadium to-
    morrow. The games will be
    plaved at the Pedro Mlruel
    Ball Park tomorrow as part of
    the country fair to be held at
    the ball park from 10 a.m. to
    The two games scheduled
    will be regular league games.
    At H aan. the Palomas will
    meet the Macaws. The Ocelots
    take on the Conejos in the aft-
    ernoon, game beginning at
    2:30.
    HOLDS HIS 'BURGERS
    KALAMAZOO. Mich UP1
    5th Race "D" Imported 7 Fgs.
    Purse: 1600.00 Pool Closes 2:55
    1Lacey L. Bravo 112
    2Pampero II V. CastUlo 114
    3Polvorazo) F. Rose 118
    4Avenue Road) B. Pulido 114
    5Golden Mine L. Mena 112
    TEAM STANDINGS
    (Second Half)
    TEAM
    Won Lost Pet.
    aSevel........
    Dunn, c.......
    Perry, ss......
    1110
    4 0 11
    2 0 0 2
    6th Race "I-l" Imported 7 Fgs.
    Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 3:35
    First Race of the Doubles
    l_Pla J. Rodriguez 112
    2Rechupete C. Chavez 104x
    G. Prescott 111
    V. Castillo 120
    C. Iglesias 109
    L. Bravo 114
    3Astoria
    4Mariscallto
    5- Walrus
    6Lujoso
    7Forzado
    8Salcedo
    9DJ3.T.
    10Honey Moon
    K. Flores 115
    B. Pulido 115
    A. Mena 117
    M. Aros. 106
    7th Race "C Imported1 Mile
    i Purse: 1650.00 Pool Closes 4:05
    Second Raoe of the Doubles
    1^-Newmlnster V. Ortega 120
    O. Bravo 106
    B. Agulrre 114
    A. Mena 106
    Armltage; Harris greaiei eAF^"- kalamauu, wucm. "< iwewmini
    ence will give him the edge over;For several years a restaurants, 2Paragon
    Whitney if Elmer Orr can con- 0ffer 0f free hamburgers for 3_Beduino
    trol his hook he will cause Pete anyone who could eat 13 at one 4_Notable
    Riley much trouble. I sitting was Ignored. Then John
    In the Third Flight. Hutchings Carey, 21. came in and qualified.
    Is picked to beat Hammond; Pe- Three cups of coffee and two 8th Race "1-1" Imported7 Fgs
    rantle Is chosen over Thompson' glasses of water aided him.
    To OUR FRIENDS and CLIENTS
    of the Atlantic Side
    We are pleased to announce our
    appointment as Sub-Dealer
    for the HILLMAN-MINX
    (Delivery within a few days)
    COLON MOTORS, INC.
    10th Street and 15th St. A. Melndei
    Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
    Quiniela
    1In Time B. Moreno 114
    2G. Triumph V. Ortega 110
    3Miss Cristina B. Pulido 114
    4Black Bull E. SUvera 107
    5Navajo Trail C. Chavez llOx
    8Cradle Song J. Rodgz. 120
    7Armeno G. Prescott 115
    8Clpayo K. Flores 116
    9Curaca A. Mena 118
    10Alejandro V. Rodgz. 109x
    Firemen........7 1 .875
    Pan Liquido.....5 S .625
    Elks..........5 S .625
    Philippine Rattan. 2 5 .278
    CAA..........0 7
    In a thrill-packed game yes-
    terday, the Elks bested the first
    place Firemen's Insurance team
    10 to 5.
    Firemen's Insurance still holds
    first place but the Elks are now
    tied with Pan Liquido for the sec-
    ond spot.
    Lew Hllzlnger and Fritz Chen-
    ey were the opponents on the
    mound. Hllzinger was tagged for
    seven base hits, 10 runs, five free
    passes and hit one batsman. He
    struck out four.
    Cheney gave up five runs on
    six hits and five bases on balls.
    He also hit one batsman and
    struck out two.
    Hllzlnger struck out the first
    two batters in the first. Larry
    Chance was the third man up
    and rapped a long four bagger to
    left field. The fourth batter went
    down via the strikeout route.
    The Lodgemen salted the game
    away In the second Inning with
    a seven-run uprising on four
    safe hits, two free passes, and^
    five errors.
    The box score:
    Elks ABR H El
    Taht, ss........ 3 1 0 11
    Rager, rf........ 4 0 0 2
    Chance, if....... .. 1 2 1 0
    Sovster, c....... 3 110;
    Roberto. 2b...... 4 2 1 0,
    Evans, lb........ 3 12 0:
    Herndon, 3b...... 4 1 0 1
    Copello, cf...... 2 11
    Cheney, p........ 3 1 1 0
    Totals..........29 5 0 7
    aSlngled for Stock In 7th.
    Grapefruit League
    AT SARASOTA
    Cincl. (N> 500 0012019 11 1
    Boston (A^ 100 000 0001 11 S
    Blackwell, Raffensberger (4)i
    and Rossi; Nixon. Gumpert (3*,1
    Taylor (5), Kinder (8) and Nlar-
    hos, White (5), Okrie (8).
    AT CLEARWATER
    Detroit (A) 000 0000202 7 1
    Phila. (N) O02 1O0O0X3 9 0
    Houtteman, Gray (6) and
    Batts; Possehl. Drews (7), Han-
    sen (8) and Burgess, Lopata (7).
    AT ST. PETERSBURG
    N. York (A) 002 001 3028 9 1
    St. Louis (N) 000 0010102 10 2
    Lopat, Sain (7) and Houk; Mi-
    ztli, Munger (6), Beard (9) and
    Rice.
    AT WINTER GARDEN
    Washington (A) vs. Chattanooga
    AT WEST PALM BEACH
    Minneapolis
    300 100 0004 10 0
    Phila. (A^ 000 000 0101 4 1
    Fox, Heller (7) and Early,
    Tompkinson (7); Kellner and
    Tipton.
    Totals
    27 10 7 5
    AT BRADENTON
    Bklvn (N) 01O00011O 3 8 0
    Boston 000 000 0000 1 0
    Wade. Schmltz (8) and Cam-
    panula; Wilson. Jester (7i and
    St. Claire.
    9th Race "H" Imported'- Firs.
    Purse: 8400.00 Pool Closes 5:15
    One-Two
    1Soberana II M. Arosem. 97
    2Apretador K. Flores 115
    3The Dauber G. Prescott 120 j
    4Incomparable A. Enriq. 104x;
    6Levadura V. Castillo 120 j
    BPiragua A. Mena 112 ;
    10th Race "G" Natives4',4 Fgs.
    Purse: $230.00 Pool Closes 5:40
    1Libertino Jos Rodgz. 110
    2Bozo C. Ruiz 110
    3Enriqueta A. Mena 108
    4Galon M. Guerrero 105
    Firemen's Ins. AB R H E
    McArthur, If...... 3 1 1 0
    Angermuller, lb. .. 4 1 2
    Tinner, cf........ 3 0 0 0
    Hilzinger. p...... 3 0 0 1
    '"'.cod. 3b........ 3 0 0 0
    Scheidegg, rf...... 4 1 l 0
    ^JSIC, it........ 2 10 2
    AT LAKELAND
    Buffalo (H.) 000 2110105 17 2
    Detroit "B" 010 000 0304 7 0
    McNeilance, Stump (6) and
    Mordarski; Funk, Marleau (6)
    and Pinkham.
    see" list. Tickets for the Relays
    can be purchased from the of-
    fice in the Balboa Gym or from
    most any Balboa High or Jr. High
    student Tickets sell for 50 cents
    for adults, and 25 cents for stu-
    dents with B. A. cards.
    Records that went by the
    boards last night were: Inter-
    .cholsstlcRaybourne 52.7 lnthe
    440; Ranson 4:51.6 In the mile.
    BH8 RecordsRaybourne in 440,
    Ranson in mile, Godby In discus
    132 ft. 11 In. Canal Zone Rec-
    ordsTorraca 9.7 In 100; Rosario
    51 ft. 2 In. in shot put.,
    Results of Track Meet on March
    27 Between BBS, CHS, Armed
    Forces and Athletic Club
    120 HH: 1R. Ostrea (B); 2
    Hughes (C); 3Abbott (B); 4
    Deeenasr (B). Time: 15.7.
    100 Yards: 1Torraca (AF): 2
    Swaby (AC); 3May D. Ostrea (B). Time: 9.7.
    Discus: 1Godby (B); 2Ro-
    sarlo (AFi; 3Snchez (AF); *
    Robinson (C). Distance: 132 ft.
    11 In.
    Mile: 1Ranson (B); 2Sliva
    AF); 3Kourany (B); 4Salas
    (AC>. Time: 4:51.6.
    440 Yards: 1Raybourne (B);
    2P a r k e r (AC); 3Centeno
    iAF); 4Morley (AF). Time:
    52.7.
    440-Yd. Relay: 1Athletic Club
    (Salas, Herring, Thompson, Swa-
    by) ; 2BH8; 3CHS. No fourth.
    Time: 45.9.
    880 Yards: 1Cruz (B); 2
    Faul (AF); 3Nicklsher (B); 4
    Salas (AC). Time: 2:08.
    High Jump: 1(Tie) May (B)
    and Salas (AC); 3(Tie) R. Os-
    trea (B) and Thompson (AC).
    Height: 5 ft. 9 in.
    Broad Jump: 1Gibson (ACi,
    2Flgueroa (AF); 3May (B);
    4_(Tie) D. Ostrea (B) and R.
    Ostrea - Distance: 21 ft.
    Shot Put: 1Rosario (AF); 2
    Godbv IB); 3Morris (B); 4
    Snchez (AF). Distance: 51 ft.
    2 In. _
    220 Yds: 1Swaby (AC): 2D.
    Ostrea (B); 3Cruz (AF); 4
    Bennett (C). Time: 21.9.
    110 LH: 1Maphis (B); 2
    Ponder (C); 3Fox (B); 4
    (Tie) Armlstead (B). Hughes
    (C), Hatgi (C), Flgueroa (AF)
    Time: 12.5. -
    Mile Relay: 1Balboa Delgado
    Jenkins, Dawson, Raybourne); 2
    Armed Forces; 3Cristobal.
    Time: 3.45.2. .
    Pole Vault: 1Bettencourt
    (AF); 2Herring (AC); 3Ma-
    hls (B) ;4Manning (C).
    [eight: 11 ft. 6 In.
    Final Score
    Balboa High.......... MJ4
    Armed Forces.......... jJ*
    Athletic Club......... 3J V*
    CristoDai High........ 13'/a
    High Point man for the meet:
    Oliver Swaby of Athletic Club
    with 9'A points.
    JOoa USar
    Dance In Honor Of New
    Pro At Brazos Tomorrow
    VI
    TO HONOR NEW PRO
    BOB FRETLAND
    The Brazos Brook Golf Club
    has arranged a "met-the-new-
    pro" party for tomorrow night
    (Saturday, March 29) at the
    golf clubhouse.
    Music for danr.fhg com-
    mences at 8 p.m. The restau-
    rant will be open all evening .
    Fretland arrived to take up
    duties at Brazos Brook last
    Tuesday. He has already given
    a number of lessons and prov-
    ed himself a sound teacher.
    Bob's background Is as fol-
    lows:
    He started golf as a boy in
    Duluth, Minn. He won ten am-
    ateur tournaments Including
    the Northwest Open before
    turning professional at the age
    of 48. Bob scored a 68 in the
    first round of the Tarn O'Shan-
    ter event last year. He also
    scored a record 63 at Miami
    Springs In 1951. He owned and
    operated a golf range for three
    years. Then he has been the
    teaching pro for two winters
    at the "Trial Range" In Miami.
    Juan Franco Tips
    By CLOCKER
    1DANUBIO Embustero
    2EBONV BOYPolitico
    STRIKE TWO Brochacito
    4SKYWEIGEN Phlox
    5LACEY Avenue Road (e)
    6D. D. T. Salcedo
    7_NF.WMIN.STER Beduino
    8 MISS CRISTINA In Time
    9APRETADOR Levadura
    10BOKO Chispeado
    11GOLDEN FAN Primor.
    He served his apprenticeship
    under George Carney who is
    recognized as one of the finest
    teachers in the Midwest.
    For the Information of the
    ladies, Bob Is a bachelor, 26
    ears of age, six feet tall and
    as a fine appearance.
    Along The Fairways
    In an appropriate ceremony
    held at the Rodman Officers
    Ciub Friday, March 14, L. S.
    Presley was dubbed Golf Cham-
    pion of the Supply and Fiscal
    Department, Naval Stal 1 o n,
    Rodman.
    After Cdr. Carter presented
    prices all contestants, H. N. Ar-
    mltage challenged the 8. & F.
    Dept. to meet the Public Works
    i Department.
    The play-off, a Nassau Ag-
    ;grebaie Score match, is sched-
    uled for 0830, Saturday, March
    129 at Summit Golf Club. The
    | teams will consist of the fol-
    ' lowing people:
    Supply and Fiscal Department
    L. S. Presley, Cox, Cdr. Carter,
    Lt. Howes, Lt. Drzewieckl, Jami-
    son, Baker, Brown, J. Presley,
    Smith, Lt. Stabe.
    Public Works Department
    Surface, Baer, White, Arml-
    tage, Epperson, Moses, Lt. Loef-
    fler, Reinhardt, Lt. Schott, Lt.
    As'i ford, Llnfors.
    Spectators will be welcome.
    As a prize, the match winners
    will eat chicken while they
    watch the losers EAT CROW.
    PREDICTION: The green will
    take the beating I
    >
    5Piropo E. Daro 106
    6Chispeado J Baeza. Jr. 108
    11th Raoe "G" Natives4Vi Fg.
    Purse: $250.00
    1Confite V. Rodrguez 109x.
    2Malaya O- Prescott 110
    3Tap Lady B. Moreno 108 i
    4Primor B. Agulrre 110
    5Strike Three A. Enrique 104x;
    6Golden Fan V. Arauz 110
    Now Many Wear
    FALSE TEETH
    With Little Worry
    Cat. talk, laugh or ineeze without fear
    of insecure false teeih dropping, clipping
    or wobbling FASTEETH holds platfp
    firmar and mor* comfortably This Dleaa-
    nnt powder has no gummy, gooev past;
    taste or feeling. Doesn't cause nansea
    It's alkaline (non-acid i Check "plate
    odor" (denture breath). Gel FASTEETH
    any drag tore.
    umplete Assortment ol
    DOG SUPPLIES
    at
    IS Tivoli Ave.
    Tel. 2-SS4W
    <
    fl^**^
    ASK FOR
    Halg
    SCOTCH WHISKY *^
    RACES SATURDAY
    DOUBLES
    1st, 2nd-6th. 7th RACRS
    ONE-TWO
    3rd and 9th RACES
    COLON:
    For the convenience of
    our patrons we are no
    opera ting both at the
    "COPACABANA,, and
    "SAVOY."

    SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
    7th Race "C" Importeds 1 Mile
    Pure: $650.00 Pool Close*: 4:05 p.m.
    SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
    1. 1SEWMI1\STER ..............V. Ortega 120
    2. PARAGON..................O. Bravo 106
    3. BhDVINO .................B. Aguirre 114
    4. 1SOTABIE...................A. Mena 106
    SUNDA Y
    \T
    QUINIELAS
    4th and 8th RACES
    CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
    AT THE RACE TRACK
    SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
    5th Roce
    Purne: $750.00
    "D" Importeds 7 Fgs.
    Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m.
    1. R4THLS LIGHT.............J. Avila 118
    2. ROADMASTER...............L. Bravo 120
    3. WELSH LOCH..............V. CastUlo 114
    4. PAVERO...................O.Bravo 110
    10th Race "E" Importeds V/* Mile
    Purse: $5.50.00 Pool Closes: 5:40 p.m.
    J. SIN CHEER..........V. CastOlo (1) 112
    2. ROCKY.................C.Lino (2) 112
    3. FI.AMBARO...........B. Moreno (3) 114
    5. (HLRLECANO.......... V.Ortega (4) 111
    5. (RIDING EAST.........C. Iglesias (5) 112


    FRIDAY. MARCH 2t. 1W
    THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
    page mm
    Summer
    PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
    FIRST HALF STANDINGS
    TEAM Won Lost
    Police............ 1 t
    Sean............ I
    Lincoln Life........ S 5
    AFGE 14.......... 5 I
    Ilka 1414.......... S 5
    Firemen.......... I I
    SECOND HALF STANDINGS
    TEAM Won Loit
    Scare............ t
    Elka 1414 .......... 8
    Police........
    Lincoln Life.. ..
    AFGE 14......
    Firemen .,........ 2
    YESTERDAYS RESULT
    Police 19, Lincoln Life. IB.
    TODAY'S GAME
    Elka ti. Sears
    ELKS, SEARS IN CRUCIAL
    GAME THIS AFTERNOON
    Park on Galllard Highway the
    Elks and Sears will meet In one the
    sive hit. Barnes opened with a
    single to right and was out when
    Sutherlands hit nipped him on
    the knee as he was running to,
    second. Crook unloaded a double
    to right and the relay, Laatz to
    McOrlff to Bateman caught
    Sutherland at the plate. Kfel-
    hofer singled scoring Crook. Pe-
    derson singled for the fifth con-
    secutive hit but the runners were
    tfft stranded when the next bat.
    er struck out to end the Inning.
    In the top of the sixth Inning,
    with the Lifers leading 15 to 7
    and only three outs away from
    victory, the Coppers put on a
    spirited rally sending sixteen
    men to the plate. A combination
    of three hits, seven walks, a hit il.
    batsmsn and three Lifer errors iine
    produced twelve runs. Klelhofer
    set the Lifers down in the bot-
    tom of the sixth to preserve the
    win. i i
    This afternoon at Little League
    I
    Ing
    of the most crucial games of the with two singles and a double in
    Mike Crook of the Coppers was
    leading hitter of the game
    season. The Mall Order Boys, four trips to the plate. Suther-
    who lead the league and the Elks land, Bobby Barnes and Gussle
    by one full game, are hoping to Durham fattened their batting
    score a win over this team that averages, each collecting two hits
    has handed them their only loss in three trips.
    In the second half of plav. Bateman, league leading bat-
    Thls is a "must" game for the ter, collected only ONE hit in one
    Elks as a win will put them in a' trip being intentionally passed
    first place tie. Each team has three times. Two of his walks
    seven more games to play in this came with the bases loaded,
    half. The box score:
    Jimmle Watson, ace Sears Police AB
    pitcher, whose record is six wins Coln, 2b...... 4
    and no defeats, will be the pltch-l Corrigan P., rf-lb 4
    ing selection for the Mall Order] Barnes, R c .. .. S
    Boys. Pepperpot Tommy Durfee Sutherland, as .. 8
    will do the catching. i crook, cf...... 4
    Jlmmie Lovelady, who doubles Klelhofer, lf-3b-p 3
    between the mound and first pederson, 3b-p .. 4
    base for the Lodge Brothers, Is corrigan, E If .. 2
    the logical mound opponent of seott, A., If
    Watson. Lovelady is the only
    pitcher to hang a defeat on the
    second half leaders. Lem Kirk-
    land will handle Lovelady's
    slants. ---------------
    All in all. it looks like a pitch. Totals........20 19 11 18
    era' battle between the two Jim-
    Robertson, p.. .. 0
    Barnes, J., rf. .. 0
    Priest, lb...... 3
    aAmmiratl..... 0
    Faces Victor
    Of Turpin vs.
    Cockell Bout
    By United Press
    LONfcON, March 28.
    ?romoter Jack So'omons
    yesterday revealed that
    Light Heavyweight
    Champion Joey Maxim
    will defend his title this
    summer in London.
    Solomons says Maxim
    will meet the winner of
    June 10 bout be-
    tween British Empire
    and European Light
    Heavyweight ,King Don
    Cockell and former World
    Middleweight Champ
    Randy Turpin.
    If Turpin loses, Solo-
    mons says he could have
    two championship bouts
    because he might get
    augar Ray Robinson to
    defend his middleweight
    ?rown against Randy.
    CUN CLUB
    NOTES
    At the Balboa Gun Club's reg-
    istered trapshoot Saturday aft-
    ernoon (March 221 Capt. Spen-
    cer, one of our top shooters, who
    GATUN GATORS ATLANTIC MINORS MIDG ET BASEBALL LEAGUE CHAMPIONS 1958
    Second row, left to right: Paul Kunkie, Arthur Lawrence, Leroy Werleln, Gilbert O'Sullivan
    Mike LaCrolx, Brain McNamee, Mike Barfield, Randy Shine, Folaom H11L First row, left to
    right: Bob Oreen, Gary Irving, Bob Williams, Coach Woods. Ovlcky Peres, Ricky Versaggl,
    Walter Skelstaltls, Joe Coffin and Billy Quinn not in picture.
    Only 2 Teams Still In Running
    For PAFBL Second Round Title
    Panama Armed Forces Baseball lead
    League Standins
    Tea:
    33d in'
    504th FA.....f
    370th EASR 8
    Coco Solo .... 8
    45th Bn ...... 6
    AR
    4
    3
    2
    1
    2
    4
    mies and the fans are in for a Lincoln Life
    thrilling ball game as these two McGrlff, ss ..
    evenly matched teams usually Durham, p-2b
    put up a good battle. I J. Dubols, lb..
    Yesterday at Little League Bateman, c-p.
    Park the Police out-tallied the Sander, R., If.
    Lincoln Lifers 19 to 15 in a scor- Million, 2b-c.
    ing marathon. The starting hurl- Laatz, rf...... 8
    ers were Robertson for the Cop. j. Engelke, 3b .. 3
    pers and Batham for the. Lifers, if. Engelke, cf .. 2
    but neither Wa# ah Mrtnd
    the finish.
    Bobby Klelhofef relieved Pe-
    derson in the fourth and gained
    bis second victory. Bruce Bate-
    man took over fronvGusale Dur-
    ham in the fatal sixth inning
    and was charged with the defeat.
    HPO
    2 4
    Is still very much In the groove l Albrok......8
    Save an artistic demonstration of Corozal......4
    Is mastery of scattergun hand-'At. Sector.....3
    ling when he smashed 47 out of | Signal......8
    50 doubles under most unfavor-.Sp. Troops .... 8
    able conditions. 1764th AAA .... 8
    In proof of his sportsmanship, '903d AAA.....8
    24 15 6 18 4
    iritnga
    Police 1 W<12)19 11 3
    Lincoln Life 421 20 015 5 0
    Walked for A. Scott In 6th.
    Winning PitcherKlelhofer
    (2-8). Losing Pitcher-Bateman
    A
    3
    01
    0 Capt. Spencer volunteered to ex. Westbank
    0 plain the niceties of his tech-
    0 nique to the boys by saying that
    0 all you have to do is to stretch
    Oi way out there and touch the tall'
    Vot the clay pigeon with the gun
    0r muzzle and pull the trigger.
    -' Nothing to it, says the tall cap-
    4 to In, who incidentally has the,
    I longest reach of any of the
    3 shooters. ,
    Even Captain "Bill" Hay, who
    Won Lost Pet.
    10 0 1.000
    1
    3
    4
    4
    5
    7
    7
    7
    7
    7
    7
    7
    3
    .900
    .727
    .600
    .600
    .500
    .364
    .300
    .300
    .300
    .300
    .300
    .300
    Wednesday- results Fort
    33d Infantry
    WEDNESDAY RESULTS
    Coco Solo7 45th1
    33d17 8p. Troop11
    Albrok6 764th0
    370th9 At. Sector2
    Westbank5 Corozal0
    504th8 903d6
    In the first Inning the Coppers; (4-5). Struckout byPederson 7,
    put over four runs on two hits.
    The Lifers tied the score in their
    half of the Inning when, with the
    base* loaded, Bateman walloped
    his fifth home run of the season.
    la the fourth inning Lincoln
    Life scored eight times on only
    one hit with the aid of seven
    bases on balls. The Coppers, in
    the fifth inning, did the reverse I Engelke. PcorerRellly. Time of
    scoring one run on five succes-( Game1:45.
    Klelhofer 5, Durham 2, Bateman
    1. Base on Balls offRobertson
    3, Pederson 10, Klelhofer 1, Dur-
    ham 8, Bateman 4. Hit by Pitch
    Crook by Durham, Sander by
    Pederson. DoubleplayMcGrlff,
    J. Dubols. Two Base HitsCrook
    McGrlff, Durham. Home Run-s-
    Bateman. UmpiresLuzer and
    Meet Scotland's
    Favourite Son
    JOHNNIE
    WALKER
    SCOTCH WHISKY
    ohm it-1 mi going irsoMG
    The fashionable drink everywhere
    John Wilker a Soot Lid., Scotch Whliky Dili Wen, Kilmirnock
    Only two teams remain in the
    was trailing behind in second running for the second round
    place with 43x50, admitted that
    we will all need more coaching to
    hold our own against such high
    caliber shooting come the Cham-
    pionship Shoot date. Captain
    Hay won the handicap with 46x50
    topping Captain Spencer by one
    bird in that event. Tom Fogarty
    and P. M. Disharoon. Jr., came
    next with 44x50 and for a change
    T. J. Taasin and P. M. Disharoon.
    Jr. found themselves separated
    from the men at the top of sec-
    ond place.
    title o! the Panam Armed
    Forces Baseball League as all
    other teams lost even a mathe-
    matical possibility to tie for the
    Schoolboy
    Sports
    GATUN
    For the benefit of those who SWIMMING
    did not attend Saturday's shoot, "strange as it may seem" dur-
    Charlle" Disharoon wUl present ing the dry season wb.il the
    another of his po
    fee" shoots at thi
    ipular "hot cof-
    he Gamboa Gun
    "TRADE WIND8" blow, there are
    days that those who participate
    dicap, and doubles for that all-
    ornnnd practice. And don't for-
    to bring your gun to the
    around
    get to
    Cristobal Gun Club
    morning, April 6.
    on Sunday
    you should have
    this V-M tri-o-matic 955!
    your bom entertainment picture just isn't
    complete, without facilities for playing
    your favorite recorded music and the tri-o-
    matic 955 fit the picture perfectly 1 Equipped
    with a six-foot plug-in cord and a four-foot
    phono-cord, the tri-o-matic 9)5 plays through
    the amplifying system of any TV set w Ika.
    Completely automatic for all record- li
    all speeds and shuts off sutomati-
    cally after last record has played 1
    Club Sunday, March 30, starting ln"aquatlcs feel that "they"are
    at 10 a.m. There will be a mixed memDers of the "POLAR BEAR
    program of 18-yard targets, han- CLUB."
    To test the mettle of the ele-
    mentary school swimmers their
    coach established a 8wlm-A-
    Mile-Club. The boy or girl who
    desires to become a member first
    must qualify before swimming
    the mile. The new milers are as
    follows: Leroy Werleln, Linda
    Cunningham, Harry Keepers
    and Mickey Cunningham.
    The following boys and girls
    have completed the American
    Red Cross Swim Tests: Begin-
    nersMike LaCrolx, Joe Coffin,
    Paul Kunkie, Mike Barfield, Bob
    Williams and Andra Nash Inter-
    mediateLeroy Werleln. Swim-
    mersRosalie Radel, Grace Argo
    and Linda Cunningham.
    DEACON STUBS TOE
    MARIETTA, Oa. (U.P.) A
    Negro "rum runner" said he did
    not mind paying the $200 fine
    for transporting whiskey lllegal-
    I ly but he didn't want his name
    I to get in the newspaper. "I'm a
    Deacon in the church and if the
    preacher found out about this
    he'd kick me out" he explained.
    Silver City Sports
    COMMUNITY SOFTBALL
    Under the lights of Mount
    Mope Stadium at 7:00 p.m. Sat-
    urday night, the "Dlablitas de
    Powell" will meet "Deportivo Ra-
    imen Mnlez" In the sixth sche-
    duled Women's Softball League
    ...WITH THESE WORLD FAMOUS *ame of the 8llver clty unlt of
    m,Vi the Physical Education Re-
    creation Branch of Division of
    Schools.
    "Deportivo Ramon Mndez"
    lost their first game to the "Sil-
    ver City guilas," sponsored by
    Martin Bartley, and the "Dlabli-
    tas de Powell" lost to "Deporti-
    vo Thelma King." Both teams
    are evenly balanced and thlt
    game will determine who will
    move from the cellar to third
    position ln the league.
    By special request, the Casa-
    novas from Coln will vie for
    supremacy against the Expe-
    riencia team of the Silver City
    Men's SoftbeV League. This game
    will be played immediately after
    the girls' game.

    7110
    Bolivar
    RADIO CENTER
    ri.
    40
    EI.I/7
    P0WERBlT
    JgflWP SLAM
    and
    after
    were posted. The
    and the 504th Field Artillery
    Battalion both scored victories
    to keep the race running neck
    and neck.
    The Infantry scored its tenth
    straight win by outslugglng the
    Special Troops nine 17 to 11 and
    held its one game lead over the
    504th. The Field Artillerymen
    Ssined an 8 to 6 win over the
    )3d AAA for a second round
    record of nine wins and one de-
    feat.
    With both the 33d and 504th
    teams using the Fort Kobbe dia-
    mond as their home field, the
    schedule for the flnaly play-offs
    has been scheduled. The first
    game will be played at Albrook,
    home of the first round cham-
    pions, on Friday, April 4. The
    second contest will be played at
    Kobbe on Saturday and
    should a third game be necessary
    it will be played on a neutral
    diamond at, Fort Clayton Sun-
    day. Oame time for all three
    contests will be 3:30 p.m.
    The 370th EASR moved Into
    third place ln the standings with
    a 9 to 2 win over Atlantic Sector
    while the 45th Battalion dropped
    Into a tie for fourth with Coco
    Solo after the Navymen defeat-
    ed them 7 to 1. In other games
    played Albrook shutout the 746th
    AAA 6 to 0. and Westbank blank-
    ed Corozal 5 to 0.
    Only two more days of play re-
    main in the second round sched-
    ule with Saturday finding the
    33d at Coco Solo, the 45th at Al-
    brook, Special Troops at Atlantic
    Sector, the 764th' at Westbank,
    Corozal at 903d and Signal at
    504th. The 370th draws the bye.
    Fastlich League
    THE STANDINGS
    *
    TEAM
    Ocelots......!. S
    Pumas........4
    Palomas........S
    Conejos........t
    Macaws........0
    Won Lost Pet.
    0
    1
    1
    4
    6
    Score By Inninr*
    Palomas 1 J 0 0 0 14
    Conejos 2 0 0 0 . LOW
    gnn Runs Batted InBacot, Zam-
    750 bado, Wlnklosky, Reyes 2. Earned
    '3:13 Runs -Palomas 1, Conejos 2. Left
    ce on BasesPalomas 4, Conejos 6.
    - Three Base HitsBacot, Zamba-
    Paloma pitcher Charles kept do Stolen Bases-Brandon 2,
    up hie good form yesterday at; Charles, Zambado. Passed Jall-
    Dlablo when he retired 14 bat- uoodln. Struckout by-Charles
    ters via the strikeout route while 14. Hayden 9. Base on Balls off-
    allowing only two hits to the Co- Charles 4, Hayden 2. Losing
    nejos. The final score, 4-2. for'}t<*er Hayden. Winn 1 ng
    the Palomas. I Pitcher Charles. Doubleplay--
    The Palomas were one run be- Hayden to Scott UmpiresDob.
    hlnd at the end of the first in- on and Hlnkle. Time of Oaane
    nlng. Angstadt singled and scor- 1:*5-
    ngw
    pie
    ed on Bacot's triple for the Pa-
    lomas and two walks and a sin-
    gle by Reyes accounted for the
    Conejos' two tallies. This situa-
    tion was short-lived as the Pa-
    lomas brought ln two, to go a-
    head ln the second. The Conejos
    Sot two men on in the second
    ut failed to score.
    Charles got all the way around
    to third ln the third frame but
    was caught ln a double play
    which retired the side.
    Gambado's triple to deep right
    neld brought ln teammate Hotz
    for the Palomas ln the sixth with
    the fourth and final run of the
    game. The three Conejo batters
    to face Charles ln the home
    team's half were fanned.
    The box score:
    AB
    . 3
    . 3
    . 2
    . 3
    . 3
    . 3
    . 3
    . 2
    . 2
    Palomi
    Angstadt, c .
    Bacot, 3b .
    Brandon, cf .
    Charles, p. .
    Hots, rf .
    Zambado, 2b.
    Hatchett, If .
    Wlnklosky, ss
    Wood, lb .
    HPO A
    2 14 0
    1
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    1
    2
    Episcopal Softball
    League
    THE STANDINGS
    TEAM Wm Loot Pet.
    St. James......1 0 146
    St. Peter.......1 1.000
    St. Simon....... 000
    St. Paul........ 1 JO
    St. Christopher. .. 1 .00
    The Episcopal League win hav
    two games tomorrow when four
    teams will see action.
    At La Boca, St. Paul will try to
    break into the win column
    against St. James in what prom-
    ises to be a thriller. At Gamboa.
    St. Simon meets St. Peter In their
    debut.
    Both games start at 4 pn.
    Totals.....24 4 8 18 3 0
    Conejos
    Magee, If .
    Scott, 3b ... 0 1
    Cotton, Le, 3b 1 0
    Hammond, ss 3 0
    Ooodin, 2b. 2 0
    Reyes, cf. 3 0
    Reece, lb. ... 2 0
    aHamma. ... 1 0
    McKeown, 2b 2 0
    Hayd'n, Reg, 2b 1 0
    Cotton, Lar., rf 1 0
    bSorrell. ...10
    Hayden, Rlc, p 1 0
    HPO A
    1 1 1
    0
    0
    0
    11
    0
    2
    0
    1
    1
    0
    0
    1
    Totals.....29 2 2
    0
    0
    1
    2
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    2
    18 9 Si
    TAGAROPULOa
    INDUSTRIES, 8.A.
    Phones:
    1002 1003
    #4041 ico Boya Av.
    Coln R P
    FRESH MILK
    FRESH BUTTER
    RICH ICE CREAM
    Everything
    Inspected by the
    Health Department '
    HOME DELIVERY
    NEW
    1952 STUD
    A new 120-horsepower Commander V8
    A new Champion in the low price field
    CLUBS
    SOFTBALL BENEFIT GAME IN
    AID OF RED CROSS
    Monday, March 31. 7:00 p.m.,
    the Fort Davis Shore Battalion
    -!** ^^S^S^TSS^
    accuracy. |Silver City Luck Strikers In a
    endorsed by leading pros the special benefit softball game ln
    aid of the Red Cross.
    As an addel attraction the De-
    world over!
    Representative:
    AGENCIAS
    GLASGALL, S. A.
    Ave. Justo Arosemena No. 73-A
    Box 311? Panam City. R. P.
    oortivo Thelma Kin* w"l tackle
    the Denortlvo La FamiUa to a
    five-Inn? Softballgame which
    will be played before the men's
    softball game.
    All nroceeds will be turned over
    he Red Cms. Be at fb< Mount
    Hope Stadium on Monday,
    March 31_at 7:00 p.m.
    jJte nwtcJmnmrjfto '
    ON DISPLAY 29th-30rh MARCH
    (Saturday & Sunday All Day)
    LAM HNOS,S.A.
    BOX 342
    COLON
    PHONE 629
    AGENCIAS PANAMERICANAS
    PANAMA, R. P.


    MAXIM TO DEFEND TITLE IN LONDON
    Panamanians Do Not
    Need Permission
    To Work For Point 4
    Panamanians who are going to
    work for the U.S. Point Four Pro-
    gram here will not need permis-
    sion to accept their positions, ac-
    cording to a resolution approved
    by the government of Panam.
    The Panam government ap-
    proved the resolution In answer
    to a question raised by Point
    Four authorities regarding Ar-
    ticle 15 of Panama's constitution,
    which deals with loss of citizen-
    ship.
    The Article states, in part, that
    "Panamanian nationality, when
    acquired, It lost by express or
    tacit resignation... There Is ta-
    cit resignation when employ-
    ment of a foreign government is
    accepted without permission of
    the government, unless the em-
    ploye it to work in a project in
    which the Republic of Panam
    has a mutual interest with an-
    other nation."
    an nn>
    DAILY Ml JPAPEE
    _ -opta .
    Panama American
    "Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
    TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
    PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1952
    FIVE CENTS
    Benton Answers McCarthy:
    Go Right Ahead And Sue Me
    WASHINGTON, March 28 (UP)
    Sen. William Benton said to-
    day he can prove his "fraud and
    deceit" charges against Sen
    Joseph R. McCarthy and chal-
    lenged the Wisconsin Republic-
    an to bring his $2,000,000 libel
    Sfore the November
    The resolution approved by the
    Panamanian Government said
    there Is no need for permission' suit to trial
    "because the work realized In I elections.
    Panamanian territory as part of | McCarthy, who is up for re-
    the Point Four Program Is in- election this fall, filed suit In
    eluded in the exception that Ar-, federal court rrere charging that
    tide 15 of the National Constitu-1 Benton libeled and slandered
    tlon makes, due to the fact that, him and "conspired" to have
    Panam has a mutual interest I him ousted from the 8enate as
    with the Government of the|a result of his anti-Communist
    United States of America in the activities,
    development of this program." McCarthy acted after Benton
    , ,,. offered to waive his legal im-
    Before the approval of this re- niiinlty from libel or slander
    solution Panamanians who were sujta.
    to work for the Point Four Pro-1
    gram had to ask permission to under the Constitution, mem-
    accept their positions.
    Plane Mishap
    At France Field;
    Nobody Hurt
    The landing fear of an SB-
    17 collapsed as the plane was
    landing at France Field after
    an Operation Readiness exer-
    cise last night.
    None of the crew was hurt.
    bers of Congress normally can-
    not be sued for anything they
    say on the Senate floor or in
    Congressional hearings.
    Several Senators doubted that
    Benton actually can waive his
    Immunity even if he desires. For
    this reason, they thought the
    unprecedented case might never
    reach the courts.
    Others believed, however, that
    a Senator should be able to do
    so lust as a private citizen may
    waive the right to a jury trial.
    Benton was en route to the
    West Coast on Congressional
    business. But in a statement
    released by his dfflce here, he
    said that "Sen. McCarthy knows
    I can prove in court the truth
    of my carefully docu m e n t e d
    charges."
    "His sincerity can hence-
    forward be judged, even by
    those who read as they run, by
    the diligence with which he
    seeks to bring his sul to trial,"
    Benton said.
    "Let him insist upon actual
    trial before his bid for reelec-
    tion next November.
    "An immediate review of his
    tactics is urgently in the inter-
    Carthy before a Senate elec-
    tions subcommittee. Benton ask-
    ed the group to investigate Mc-
    Carthy's fitness to serve In in
    the Senate and recommended
    that he be expelled.
    The subcommittee now Is
    awaiting a vote of confidence
    from the full Senate.
    Benton recalled that he testi-
    fied under oath that McMarthy
    "had knowingly practiced fraud
    and deceit against the Senate
    and the American people" In
    ests of the people of' the United the Wisconsin Republican's
    States and of the tens of mil-! campaign against alleged Com-
    llpns throughout the world In munlst influences In the State
    whose eyes our country Is be- Department,
    lng discredited by his tactics"! Benton said he offered to
    The Benton-Mcthy feud -----
    the first in the memory of Con-
    gressional historians to be tak-
    en Into court stemmed from
    Benton's charges against Mc-
    Best Guess:
    Ike To Leave
    Europe April 2
    The
    Wild West Posse
    Gets Its Man
    waive his Congressional Immun-
    ity 'to bring McCarthy "before
    an impartial judicial tribunal
    a procedure he has avoided by
    consistently shielding himself
    behind his own immunity."
    Next Atomic Blasts
    Expected To Test
    New-Type Warheads
    WASHINGTON, March 28 (UP)
    Forthcoming atomic explo-
    sions at Frenchman's Flat are
    expected to be field tests of new
    weapons resulting from last
    Sear's experimental blasts at the
    evada proving ground.
    It is understood the new tests
    will be carried out jointly by the
    Atomic Energy Commission and
    the Department of Defense.
    The 'weapons to be tested are
    (NEA Telephoto)
    AIR DISASTER Firemen and rescuers search the strewn wreckage of a Dutch airliner that
    crashed and exploded In a wood near Frankfu rt, Germany, killing 44 of 47 persons aboard.
    The ill-fated plane, a four-engined KLM, was bound from Johannesburg, South Africa, to
    Amsterdam when disaster struck.
    MERRIMAN, Neb., March 28
    (UP) A 32-year-old ranch
    hand who killed three persons in
    a midnight, shooting spree was'expected to'be "battlefield mo-
    shot to death In Wild Vest fa- del8 tne feasibility of which was
    shJ?1. ?dl9\ 5L an ?ngrl SS3* proved by "a successful detona-
    which fired 1,000 shots and burn- ft of nuclear devices" of dlf-
    ed down- three buildings to get
    him.
    ferent calibers last spring and
    fall
    These are believed to Include
    PARIS. March 18 (UP)
    semi-official French Press Agen-
    cy said last night Gen. Dwlght| Blaine Ellis, 32, who had ad- .
    6. Eisenhower would ask to be|mitted shooting to death cgtUe-wmparatiyely small atomic
    relieved of his European com- rancher George Messinger, a pro- ;*"* W Piftlf.,!5ry-IJ?r
    mand "on or a little after April minent cattle raiser, his wife, fighter-bombers compact war-
    2, and sources close to him be- and a neighbor, was captured af-; heads for artillery sneiis or
    lieved the report was Just about ter a smoking gun battle 25 miles rocket and warheads of various
    correct. from the Messinger ranch. sizes for guided missiles.
    Amateur Players Stage 1-Acters In Cristobal
    Steel Industry, Union Ponder
    Wage Board Hike-up Proposal
    For hundreds of years the the-
    ater has shown the public how
    other parts of the world live.
    For this reason International
    Theater Month was originated
    by the United Nations Educa-
    tional, Social, and Cultural Or-
    ganization (UNESCO) as a step
    toward better world relations.
    Theater groups from Broadway
    to the smallest community par.
    tlclpate in the movement.
    On the Isthmus five well-
    known theater groups are com-
    bining their talents to produce
    the first "Isthmian Drama Fes-
    tival" of one-act plays being cur-
    rently presented at the Cristobal
    High School Auditorium as their
    part in the celebration of March
    as International Theater Month.
    Each group Is presenting a
    one-act play and as a finale the
    best actor, best actress, and best
    play will be awarded ribbons.
    The Theater Guild tomorrow
    night Is producing a drama. "The
    Old Lady Shows Her Medals," by
    James M. Barrie, under the di-
    rection of Mrs. Gracelyn John-
    ton.
    The story Is of a London char,
    woman who has to hear her cro-
    nies brag continuously about the
    medals their relatives received in
    the war.
    The old lady has no one to
    brae about until one day she
    meets a soldier whom she llter-
    allv adopts and In the end he>
    really gives her reason to brag.
    The Cristobal Little Theater
    WASHINGTON, March 28 (UP)
    Mobilization officials failed to
    agree on a formula f.o avert the
    steel threatened for April 8, and
    Informants said President Tru-
    man may take a hand In the cri-
    tical wage-price dispute today
    Mobilization Director Charles
    E. Wilson canvassed the entire
    steel situation for three hours
    with Wage Board Chairman Na-
    than P, Feinsinger and Price
    Controller Ellis Arnall. He con-
    erred earlier with Economic Sta-
    bilizer Roger Putnam.
    No decisions were reached and
    an "action statement" promised
    earlier by Wilson was cancelled.
    Wilson refused to comment.
    Arnall said, "It's a lovely day."
    Feinsinger said the mobiliza-
    tion boss did not ask him to
    withdraw the wage board's re-
    commendation for a 17V4 cent
    hourly steel wage increase plus
    8% cents in added "fringe" be-
    nefits for the CIO United Steel-
    workers.
    No further official meetings
    were scheduled but a spokesman
    said Wilson will see the President
    at the regular cabinet meeting
    today.
    The'meeting, which will be Mr.
    Truman's first official business
    following his return from Key
    West, Fla.. Is expected to tackle
    the critical steel situation as one
    of the nation's most urgent pro-
    blems.
    Negotiations between the steel
    workers union and two major
    steel concerns Republic and
    Jones & Laughlin recessed
    meantime with the firms sayint
    they want time to think over the
    wage board proposal. The bell-
    wether U.S. Steel Corp. said the
    same thing Wednesday.
    William Donovan, a top union
    negotiator, charged Republic
    with "stalling" and said the com-
    ligm gour
    throat a welcome
    change
    IN MOONCALF MUGFORD, played last night b v the Cristobal High School Thespian Troupe
    217, Nellie Holgerson, as Etta Mugford, is showing summer visitors Mrs. Lowell (Jacquie Boyle)
    One of her hook Vugs while Tabby (Toddy Dlgnam) looks on.
    last night played "The Boor,' a gented last night by the Canal
    comedy by Anton Chekhov which zone Junior College. Subert Tur-
    Paul Beck directed. The plot cen-i byflU directing. This drama is set
    ters around a cruel landlord who,! m india,
    against all dictates of chivalry
    challenges one of his debtors, a "A Marriage Proposal, a mln-
    ooor widow, to a duel which she or classic by Anton Chekhov will
    accepted be dohe tomorrow night by Bai-
    old saying that "the course of
    true love never runs smooth."
    Noble Holladay has the part of
    the young man, Kayleen Vinton
    is the young girl, and Charles
    Walsh Is the father.
    "Mooncalf Mugford" was chos-
    en by the Cristobal High School
    by 1
    In this nlay were Bremer Jor- boa High School under the dl- Thespian Troupe 217 for last
    atad as the landlord. Frances Or- rection of Miss Patricia Farley, night's show. Miss Mary Jeanne
    yu as the poor widow, and Mel
    Booz as the servant. This play is an example of the
    Wiesen directed the play.
    It if the story of a demented
    New England fisherman and his
    wife. In the course of the play
    the wife also loses her sanity.
    Nellie Holgerson and Joanne
    Recela were double-cast in the!
    lead role of Etta Mugford. Jimmy i
    Custer had the part of Johni
    Mugford. Playing minor roles
    were Toddy Dlgnam and Jacquie
    Boyle.
    No admission is being charged
    for these shows.
    ^
    -tt'Oi/fe,
    WWW I
    Linked By Wireless
    BIRMINGHAM. Ala. (UP)
    Everv day when VS. Court Clerk
    Charles B. Crow gets home from
    the office he sits down for a chat
    with his son. who lives a thou-
    sand miles away. Crow and his
    son, Dr. Charles Crow, Jr., of Bos-
    ton, are amateur radio operators
    CHEmors THE BOOR was the Cristobal Little Theater's
    cMr>lee for last night's performance Here Frances Orvls, as
    the poor widow Is accepting landlord Bremer Jors d's chal-
    lenge to a duel while servant Mel Booz begs her not to go
    through with U.
    BALBOA TIDES
    Saturday, March 29
    Hi.i Low
    6:10 jn. ........
    6:24 p.m. X.Vt p.m.
    i
    KAYLEEN VINTON, who Is to
    play In "A Marriage Proposal."
    presented tomorrow night by
    the Balboa High School.
    House Puts Curb On
    Vatican Appointment
    WASHINGTON, March 28
    (UP). The House appropria-
    tions committee wrote into a
    State Department appropria-
    tion biil a proviso in WIect
    forbidding creation af an em-
    bassy at the Vatican prior to
    Senate confirmation of the
    diplomatic representative.
    PEF$KH(NG
    When your mouth feels hot and dry from smoking
    too many ordinary cigarettes that's the time to light-
    up. a KOOL! KOOL'S specially blended finer tobaccos
    bring back long lost smoking pleasure. No matter-
    how many KOOIS you smoke,
    you'll always enjoy their KOOL,
    refreshing flavor. As "Willie the
    Penguin" says--Switch from Hots
    to KOOL cigarettes, for that
    clean KOOL taste in your mouth
    KODL
    n-i-r.1,4!

    pany was waiting for Wilson "to
    pull a white rabbit out of the hat
    in the from of a price increase."
    Union leaders apparently ex-
    pect the administration to find a
    solution to their months-old
    wage lispute that will please the
    union. David J. McDonald, Steel
    Workers' secretary-treasurer,
    said in Pittsburgh that the union
    is "particularly fortunate... be-
    cause we have a rather flendly
    gentleman in the White House."
    In Congess, Sen. Homer E.
    Ctpehart (R-Ind.). predicted the
    Senate banking committee, of
    which he Is a key member, will
    recommend a reshuffle of the
    wage Stabilisation Board next
    week. He and some other com-
    mittee members have been cri-
    tical of the board's recommen-
    dation for settling the steel dis-
    pute.
    Wilson likewise criticized the
    board proposal as one that would
    seriously threaten the entire sta-
    b 111 z a tion program, but later
    urged the Industry and the union
    to try to reach an agreement on
    the basis of the recommendation.
    Feinsinger said the mobiliza-
    tion phief did not renew his cri-
    ticism of the proposal at yester-
    day's meeting. Asked if Wilson
    asked him to withdraw the plan,
    he replied, "Hell, no I mean
    no."
    The steel Industry has said It
    would cost an additional $12 a
    ton to produce steel if it accepts
    the wage board plan, which is
    not binding on either side.
    But Arnall has thus far refus-
    ed to budge from his view that
    a $2-a-ton price Increase is all
    the Industry can get under exist-
    ing price ceiling mies.
    Wilson prefers to grant neither
    a wage nor price Increase in the
    steel Industry for fear of upset-
    ting the stabilization applecart.
    But he is reported to favor a
    change in price rules to give th
    steel firms a bigger price boost
    if they agree to the wage board'
    recommendations.
    He came back from a confer-
    ence with the President at Key
    West last week with a "series of
    plans" for solving the issue.
    Missions Members
    In Bolivia Praised
    For Rescue Work
    i
    Members of the United Slate
    Army and Air Force Military
    Missions to Bolivia were credit-
    ed recently with saving the lives
    of an American mining executlv
    and his wife who were involved
    in a serious automobile accid-
    ent near Obrajes, Bolivia.
    The rescued Americans were
    Mr. and Mrs. George W. TOwer
    of La Paz, Bolivia. Tower Is gen-
    eral manager of a mining con-
    cern in La Paz.
    Complete details of the incid-
    ent have not been learned by
    Army or Air Force officials her,
    but a letter from the mining
    executive dated March 21. has
    been received by the command-
    ing generals of the U. 8. Army
    Caribbean and the Caribbean
    Air Command in which he com-
    mends the military personnel of
    the Bolivia Mission for their
    prompt actions and assistance.
    In his letter Tower related
    that he and his wife were driv-
    ing near Obrajes when their
    car hit some boulders on the
    road, turned over a nine-foot
    embankment and ended up in
    the river with both occupant
    unconscious.
    Minutes later an Army Mis-
    sions ear came by and Army
    Majors E. Pacheco and Jorge
    Liny and Ah- Force Lt. Col.
    Michael Quirk extricated Mr.
    and Mr. Tower from the car.



Full Text
THTJRSBAY. MARCH 27, 185
TU* P**AMA AMRrVaW AN TNT)EP*jmWfT BAIIT *Tl>SPAPER
r-T i t r----------T- -ff-intiiii _.__ """'"" """" ""*""*...... ^_ ... ........ fAQl Wf*
Five-Team Track Meet Scheduled Tonight At Balboa Stadium
Little
League
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lo*t
Police
Sean......
Lincoln Life.,
AFGE 14 .. .
fiks 1414 .. .
Firemen .. .,
a down hi* shirt front, then
down hi* trouser lee and off the
right to first
touched
Motion.
Top Athletes
Of CZ Listed
To Take Part
Gun Club ISutes
ALBROOK CTJBUNDU
WINNERS IN RIFLE LEAGUE;
CRISTOBAL, BALBOA
JUNIORS 2nd A 3rd
end of hU foot
baseman Randel who
Frertrtv Hall of kVClW rr
Albrook-Curundu
B Oorder .86
E. Bench .... 89
Bin Jeffrey .
v. woraham
:.a
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Loit
r............ 6 1
1414.......... 8 i
icoln Life........ t S
oliee............ S 8
TOE 14.......... 8 8
Fireman.......... 8 8
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
AFGE 11, Firemen 4.
TODAY'S GAME
Police t. Lincoln Life.
The AFGB Little Leaguer
owned the Firemen yesterday at
lttle League Park 11 to 4.
The Union Boys scored two
runs In the top of the first In-
ning when johnny Motion dou-
bled to score Salas and Wills.
The Firemen came back in the
bottom of the third and went a-
head, scoring three runs on one
hit.
However, AFGE came right
back In the very next Inning and
pushed six runs across on six hits
with four of the hits being suc-
cessive singles by Castleman,
Wilis, Motion and Snodgrass. In
the bottom half of the third the
Smokies pushed across their on-
ly other run of the game when
Butch Kintner scored on "Spike"
McNall's single.
The AFOERS added three more
runs In the fifth as they punch-
ed out four base hits.
Alex Eberenz went all the way
for his first win of the season
for AFGE, giving up four runs
on four hits. Alex retired six bat-
ters on strikes and gave up seven Totals
bases on balls. Eberenz. after al-
lowing one hit in the fourth In-
ning, set the Smokies down in or-
der in the fifth and sixth In-
nings.
Don Randel started for the
Flremeh with Herby Schneider
taking over in the third Inning
and finishing up.
The game was featured by a
"one-for-the-book" play that oc-
curred in the fourth frame when
Motion hit a high bounding ball
that Bchnelder attempted to
field. But the ball, bouncing high,
hit Schneider on the chest, roll-
-- The official coro are not
Ti,hf. .-.i, ? .* 4w- comPud! tnd theri *' *tlu ***** TOTAL
jn ,o.,,J.,rtck.."*** ,.th! iom malches to b completed in <
E!.i ^5!KLWHL*? *het'SSf* the Hthmlan Oallary League. So nrPLi
- tlr,^ t^mfrunnLi Vlh^Bu ,ar *he R,fl ***** ot the I Balboa Seniors
rlgC..Ueman, with three for four XtfVre Cr'lsVb. *E&
and Bobby Wills with two for ffi wltE nSf mf VS3
three, led he winners at bat. Mo.l L^tHSi1.SS". ./S
tlon with two doubles and a In- !^!l^ ItHJL^'.SflS
gle in four trips to the plate lrt'wfJSE* L'm'..rt Itif!'rh
the hitters In Total basei for the hu,,?.,w,V, **-" 7l1-8 "
day.
McNall, Bmokle second sacker,
continued to hit the ball for hi
93
84
88
48
3
88
78
87
38
336
161
15
team collecting two singles in
three trips to the plate.
Today the third place Lincoln
Lifers will meet the Police. Bruce
Bateman will go to the mound
for the Lifers while the Police
will send either Bobby Klelhofer
or Orady Robertaon to tha
mound.
The box acora:
AFGE
ye teams running
doubt of the final standings 0f
the top three teams. The Al-
brook-Curundu Gun Club team,
in what la rumored to be their
last appearance ai a team (it is
said thit they have been re-
Actu.lly It 111 be a four-w.y %!PJ2 &ti!$j^%*k
meet, with the two service teams oi.tad th#lf Hfla .eaa^w^th;
combining to form one team-lE,',,/V. ni E w7 V.
With their combinad atrength I fe."ft nX.".'?.? *.,"&
they will rate aa favorite* to eopi*?*ny l0r Meond rilfht
the honors tonight, bnt any of *
the other three teams have tha
strength to make It mighty eloae.
This meat will serve aa an ax.
Th* Cristbal Junior Rifle Chib
Edd Budd
Al Joyce .
C. Braokon
M. Mlllard
P. I.
100 06
.87 87
.87 84
TEAM TOTAL
Marinea
F. C. ThamalU 87
M. Perkins 87
E. Combs .... 88
J. Counislman 96
83
81
S
I.
88
81
8
84
78
74
66
TRAM TOTAL
Cristbal Jniora
i
383
368
1674
373
367
384
369
1067
Atlantic Little
League To Hold
Benefit Show
lost two matches to take second j Sehoibeltr
Salas, 3b......
Morris, 3b......
Castleman, se.
Wills, lb......
Motion, cf......
Snodgrass, o .. ..
Edmondson, If ..
Eberena, p......
Hall, rf.......
Totals........
Firemen
Doran, rf......
Lin for s, aa.....
Schneider, lb-p.
Terry, cf......
Schoch, c......
Kintner, If.....
McNall, 2b......
Fundakowskl, 3b.
Randel, p-lb..
AB R
4
8
4
8
4
PO
80 11 13 18
AB R HPO
10 0 0
4 0 0 1
3 0 0 0
4 0 111
Oeyer .
Balboa Relays and all coaches
will probably do a lot of experi-
menting with their boys In the
various events. Jimmy Thompson
has stated he plans to use this
meet strictly for tryouts for the
formation of his final entry for
the Athletic Club In the Balboa
Relays on April 18.
surgent Balboa Juniors, after alL.
somewhat weak start, completed D
the season with only three losses
to take third plaee. Further de- TRAM TOTAL
tails on the Lomuo standings Crsitbal ROTC
will be published when the of- d Cockle
ficial scores are made available D. ooodhsad
by the League Officials. There vie Ftihsr
are Hill several pistol matches to Bill Stevens
2 0
25 4 4 18 5
Score By Inning*
0 8
AFGE 3 0 6 0 3 0^-11 13
Firemen 0310004 4 1
Winning PitcherEberenz (1-
0). Losing PitcherRandel (1-6).
Struckout byEberenz 6, Randel
2, Schneider 8. Bases on Balls off
Eberenz 7, Randel 4, Schneider
3. Mita and Runs offRandel 8
and 8 in 2 1-3 Innings; Schneider
6 and 3 In 3 2-3 Innings. Left on
BasesAFGE 8, Firemen 8. Two
Base HitsMotion 2, Randel.
UmpiresP otter and Dailey.
ScorerMead. Time o Game-
las.
fonlght'a meet will give local'* *red' wh"eh may nave aome
fans an opportunity to see aome bf,lrln* the "?" iUndlnl.
of the top flight athlete* in sov-"'hu*h ** 'Jfl* con-
eral of the events. Clarence Be- S,1,"',!0" that '" Bib0" Pun
taneourt of Albrook should be cV.b A,m. \,ndeet#<' to_date,
1118
84 77 81
86 80 80
J?8
TRAM TOTAL

Marina*
E. Combs
338
338
333
307
sailing around 11 or 11M feet In1*1" &*& *" Lefue Cham- F. C Thamali*
the pole vault. Oliver Swaby of P'onshlp that they won last ysar.
the AC and George Bennett of
out of the sprint*, and a* If this
wasn't enough the mile will prob-
ably be the best race of tha meet.
This will bring together for the
first time inch outstanding run-
ner* as Leonard Parker of the
AC, Bob Hanson, BHS sensation,
Ed Silva, Walter Paul both from
Due to pressure of other acti-
vities, such as earning a living,
your correspondent has allowed
scores to accumulate for aome
time back. Result* of these re-
cent "Crooihel" matches include
a victory of the Balboa OunlAndy Fraier
Club pistol team over the Al-
brok-Curundu team 1030 to 932
M. Perkins
W. R. Osborne
TRAM TOTAL
D. Ooodhead .
B. Steven*
Albrook,'and Anselmo Arias of!although Captain Bob order oi
Cristobal. This should without a
doubt be the top race of the eve-
ning.
Ramn Rosarlo from the 504th
Wll Ibe the big gun of the weights,
the losers fired Individual high
score of 370.
In the rifle division, the Bal-
boa Gun club defeated the Ma-
wlth practice mark* of better rlnes In a close one, 1074 to
than 55 feet In the shot put and 1067 with M/Sgt Ed Budd's 281
over 140 feet In the discus, he.high score for the winners.
looks like a cinch. His closest
competition will probably com*
from Clalr Godby of BHS in the
TEAM TOTAL
J. Pahnstock
J. Scheibelr .
Donna Oeytr .
John Matgi .
Charlie Thamalis hit 273 to lead
the losers. On the same night,
the Cristbal Juniors took over
Attention, Canal Zone Residents!
NEW
to*
\952
25 CYCLE!
fl'ttfoft* T>txt
7 Cu. Ft. REFRIGERATOR
"Aerois-the-Top" Freezer Hold* 13
Lb*, of Froten
FM*Js
R Moat Ch*t _
Chiller Hold*
Another 15 Lbs.
Frozen Feed*
Refrigerated
from Top to
lettom
EASY
PAYMENTS
shot and Bill Robinson of CRS'the Cristbal ROTC 1118 to 893,
in the discus. I sparked by a 289 fired by Jim
Another race that Ju*t might Schelbeler.
leave the crowd limp from ex-i
cltement I* the quarter mile re- The Rodman Marine teem took
lay. Here team* from the Armed on the Cristobal ROTC the next
Foreea, Balboa High, Cristobal,'evening and won 1087 to 816
and the AC promise to make this with Ernet Comb* top hooter
a real race. Any one of theee.at 274. The Marines also took on
teams must be considered aa a the Cristbal Juniors on the
threat to any exlating local r*c- aame range (Cristbal High) the
ord.
\
328
GRAND
Cok Sports
The second of a three-game
series between the Local-Rate
Amateur League star* and the
Coln provincial Selection will
be played at the Coln Stadium
today at 4:00 p.m.
The first game, won 10-5 by
Coln, was thriller Adamson (Co-
ln) and Smith (C.ZB.) hurled
with Smith fanning *even of the
flrt nine hitters and leaving the
game ahead 2 to 1 In the fourth.
The Silver City then'* and
Ladies' Softball Leagues com-
pleted their full schedule thru
Ladles Results: Opening day-
March 24.
Eagles 8 Mndez 1. The follow-
ing day EStenoz bowed to La Fa-
milia 18-13, Thelma King over
powella 11 to 9 and the defend-
ing champion Eagles outslugged
Esteno* 13-7.
Men's results: C. Y. O. 9, Beav-
ers 8; Riviera 6, Experiencia 6:
Dodgers 8, O T. O. 3 (called at
the end of seven Innings because
of darkness.)
>ge .
same night, but were not so for-
tunate in this one, as the Junior*
took them over 1070 to 1018.
John Fahnestoek with 380 top-
ped the winners, aa Thamali* a-
ain headed the Marine* with
78.
Albrook-Curundu hurdled an-
other obstacle on their way to
the trophy when they Journeyed D- Hoop** .
to Balboa to defeat the Balboa V. Esquerra
ROTC 1110 to 1034. Bob Demlng's
385 sparked the winners In this TRAM TOTAL
one, with Earl Mitchell's 284 close Crl*teb*l gealer
behind. The next night the Bal- B. Blngham .100
Roy P*rkin. ido
TRAM TOTAL
Marine*
F. C. ThamalU Oft
E. Comb* ... 08
Milt perkin* 07
W. R. Osborne 78
TEAM TOTAL

Albrook- Caranda
Bob Doming .00
E. Mitchell ... 08
BobOord*r. .00
Bill Jaffray 00
TRAM TOTAL
Balboa ROTC
O. MendrlekJon 08
H. Jordan 04
V. Esquerra M
D. Hoopes ... 08
TRAM TOTAL

Balboa ROTC
O. Hendrleluon 00
H. Jordan ... 04
..Friday evening April 4 the
Ruoff Studio, under the man-
agement of Mr*. Leo Ooulet and
her sister Mr*. Robert Berger,
will put en a stage show for the
benefit of the Atlantic Little
Leaguer*.
A Western movie along with
cartoons will be show on the
screen. The proceeds from thl*
affair will be used for a Banquet,
held annually for the Little Lea-
guer's.
_ The program, as arranged by
James J. Recela, business man-
hager Of the Atlantic Little
League calls for a Western Mo-
vie and Cartoons at 6:15; Stage
Shew at 8:00 and mete Movies at
nine 'Cloek.
Fans and parents of the Little
Leaguer'* are urged to support
thl* affair. Ticket* for the big
affair are now on sale and may
be purchased from any League
official and Managing personnel
at 31.00 for adult* and .35 cent*
for children.
All Little League player's will
be introduced to the audience On
he conclurion of the Stage
how.
by
JOE WILLIAMS
IT. PETERSBURGTo toft, 4ltr*s**4 tniyera
would have pegged the gentleman a* a free-wkeeUagTwMhmfton
?"Mt.t* F r***- T^oday menoy Isn't worth q**r-
tor".. .But Frank Lane wasn't referring to European aid, Yarn
sabaldy or mink coat*.
Mr Une 1* general manager of the Chicago White Bob. Re
wa* referring to the futility of trying to make b
mere money. He had offered the AAA
to make baseball deal* with
s $200,000 for Bob Rhantg, a
SOO.OOO for the Brewn** Red
l^IRE
pitcher. No eoap. He had gone to 8300,0
Server. No dice.
"I era* using real money," added Mr. Lea*. "At least Ret
passes for money. I had hopes boeau** those two chib trifling
a* it is, can uae money."
On this particular afternoon ho wa* watching the Detroit*
play the Card*. Beside* pitching he can uae tout hitting out.
neider. There had been earlier report* the Tlgeri would deal VU
Wertt or Wlt*r Ever*. Previouly the Yankees had been lnteroet-
d. Rut Mr. Lea* merely sighed.
"Why waate my time? The Briggs family own half the state
of Michigan. P. S. They alee own the Tiger*.
Mr. Lane* di*mal experience with the American dollar doe*
ddt make him unique. Not even la baseball. la en extremity one
ot the poorer club* will apologetically accept money but the fixed
practice today I* player exchange, that* the feme'* foldsund-
ard. Thus clubs with productive farm system* are in store
advantageous position to make deals.
i
1018
n
90
S
08
78
74
70
88
288
!?!
368
I10
381
380
387
387
1034
By BEAN* REARdON
34 Tears in National League
NEW YORK (NRA)4j. What
has been the record number of
injuries suffered by a singl
team in the major*? .
A. The Yankee* of 1040 had
a record Injury list of 71. Jo*
DiMagglo, Tommy Henrleh and
Yogi Berra only played In 17
game* together all that season.
Q. How many World Serle*
have the Yankees won?
A. The Yank* have been in IS
Series, have won 14 times.
Q. How m*ny throw* per game
dee a jejtcher average?
%t
X
08
61
07
03
76
78
67
63
364
363
360
336
Q What ha* been the longest
losing streak In the major*?
A. 88 games, held Jointly by
the Boston American* of 1006,
and the Philadelphia Athletics of
1910 and 1N3.
Q. What is the record number
of years for an umpire staying
in the big ltaguea?
A. Bob Emilio icrved 38 year*
behind the plate in tha National
League, from 1801 to 1030. Tom
Connolly (pent 33 seasons la the
big how, 1800-1008 la the Na-
tlonal, and 19*0-1931 in the Am-
erican.
FAIN MAT SB NEXT
Thl* ha* been mor* er le the cue for eeate year now. por-
he.pii the happiest deal the Yankee* ever mad* w** fee Jee Ol-
Maggie. Only $36,000 la money wa* involved. Any elub ill the
league could have bettered that. Even the Bushwicks, for that
matter.
Rut the Y*nkee. had five player* tea Freneleee needed to
field a winning team. Meetly run-of-the-mill, but good enough
for out there. No other elub wa sufficiently equipped to moot
the immediate demand of the Seel*. This eort of thing happen*
with *gulrlty now. It is likely to happen with reference to Fer-
rie fain of the AAA* befen the year u out, thu being dependent
on how the elub fares.
Nevertheless, Mr. Lene, in eao way er another, ha managed
to become an active and successful David Harum. in three year
h* ha* maneuvered the White Sox from last plaee. 44 gimeiaut,
into contention. Last year they get the pace and led up te Ali-
star geme time, taking the play away from their lntreclty rival*,
the Cub* for the first tlm* in a generation.
Mr. Lane even outsmarted or euttalked Branch Rickey a
phenomenal achievement in either ease, in landing Chiee Ce'rre-
quel, Latin America's greataet gift to the art* sine* Carmen Mi-
randa. For 8 while last aeaaon the press box wee inclined to rate
him over Ty Cobb s favorite shortstop, Phil (Honu*) R&iute. Later
he tailed off and the dugout explanation wae complaeeaey.
it may even be that Mr. Lane gave the Yankees the pennant
when he persuaded Hank Oreonberg to yield Minnie Mlnoeo who**
.326 bat the Indians surely could have u*ed aa they staggered
down the stretch blowing the tight ones.

THE RIVERA CONTRACT
For a hustler who shuffles a fast deck, Mr. L*n* U deceptive
in appearance and disarming in manner. A square-Jawed, la-
nccenteyed, olt-s*ok*n gent, who look* zaer* like an earnest
small-town eivle leader than a big league operator.
It'*-possible he also hastened the exit Of Billy Evan* a* front-
office engineer of the Detroit Tiger*. He got Saul Rogovia from
them in trade for Bob Cain who was soon shipped along to the
Brown*. In White Sox spangle*, the hefty Bwoklynite became a
consistent winner and led the league in earned run allowed.
For the upcoming campaign Mr. Lane ha* maneuvered added
strength, even though he's reaehed a point where his guUoles*
countenance no longer fool* anybody, pitching help la expected
from Charl Stobbs. late or' the Red Sex, and Sherman LdUar,
Brown' fugitive, prep up the etehlng.
"Why hd he passed up the highly touted and highly contro-
versial Jim Rivera?" he wa* asked.
This young fellow, now with the Browns, ha* an un**vOry
record in police and morals courts and hi* contract formally filed
in the eommlMloner'* office, aa extraordinary instrument, tip-
ulates the holder thereof can expeet no financial redrew in the
event of further prosecution.
boa ROTC took over the Cris-
tbal 8*nlors 1022 to 1011, al-
though Bill Blngham fired 381
for the losers to top all shooters
for the match. Gerald Hendrick-
son fired 264 to spark the win-
ners. The Cristbal Senior team
also took on the Balboa Junior
team the same evening, and al-
though their performance came
up somewhat, they still dropped
this one 1055 to 1037. The Balboa
Juniors were weakened by the
loss of Joe Puller, hurt in an ac-
cident. Dick Dlllman fired 286
for high core, while Blngham
and Perkin tied up with 278 to
top the loser.
Albrook Curund' last match
of the season was with the low-
The Silver City Little League *W 5,,51
emission IS planning it* ML???*" '"it .!MU*V th,*
FIRESTONE
No. 39 J. Francisco do la Oesa Avenue
Phone*: 8-4564 2-8383
NOT ONLY THE BEST PAINT
IV beautiful and washable too!
Now colors
Ready, to use
Easy to appl>
Commission it p
lesgue formation meeting. All
representatives are urged to read
this column for the definite date
and place of meeting.
SV#*&
Coln scored a double victory
over Panam in the so-called
"Carnival of Champions" Sunday
as the "1-3 teams'* of the Pan-
ami and Coln Provincial Lea-
gue* met at the Coln Stadium.
Deportivo AA scored a thrill-
ing 6 to 5 win over Chegterfleld
Jr. Cartagena soundly trounced
Fuerza y Lux 12-3 In the battle
of flrit-plaeers.
Cecilio "Lone Johnny" Wil-
liam*, now studying In the Unit-
ed pt.ates on a scholarship, was
lah'd'd ^'outstanding" by the
thletie coach of a Georgia Insti-
tution for his over-all play in
the paat basketball season.
Arriving late In the season,
Wll 11sms hit the basket with
! amazing consistencya feat that
drew favorable comments from
the experts covering the games.
The St. Joseph Chapter of C.
Y. O. traveled to La Boca with a
contingent of athletes that won
practically every event in the
last C. Y. O conference held last
Saturday at La Boca.
Cristbal ROTC at CrUtbaT. Al-
brook-Curundu took thl* On*,
1109 to 838, and they were In.
Bill Jaffray emerged from hi* re-
cent lump to fire high score of
284 for top honors, with Earl
Mitchell's 388 pressing him close.
The Cristbal Senior* also de-
feated the Cristbal ROTC in a
retire of a previous match which
was ruled illegal. The score wa*
1070 to 731. with Bill Blngham
and Maurice Webb tying for high
honor* with 378.
The *corea:
'. Anderson
W. Cotton
N
01
ssss
85
65
67
63
1033
331
356
TRAM TOTAL

Balboa Junior
D. Dlllman ... 00
n. Dlllman ... 08
B. P. Smith .100
J. Schmidt Jr. 07
TRAM TOTAL
Cristobal Santera
B. Blngham 07
R Parkin* ... 00
W. Cotton ... 03
F. Anderson 88
TRAM TOTAL
Albrook-Curand
Bill Jeffrey 00
E. Mitchell .100
Bob Doming .106
E. Bench ... 07
ion
07
04
93
89
96
97
86
01
98
96
95
01
00
78
67
53
386
Crietobal ROTC
Dale Cockle .
D. Ooodhead .
B. Steven* .
A. Eraser .
04
01
81
80
84
78
5?
78
58
87
87
87
73
74
38
28
18
PISTOL
Balboa Gun Club
TRAM TOTAL

Cristobal Senior*
M. E. Webb .100
B. Blnghem 00
F. Anderson 08
R. Perkin* ... 08
1058
273
373
353
338
1037
384
283
383
260
1108
353
308
193
176
*838
fcb
l/larveious/....
It's a PJiiico [Radi-Go\
M. wolehlek .
P. Wen* .
D. Crumpecker
A. Turner .
TEAM TOTAL
S.
.82
75
83
75
T.
87
00
84
01
TEAM TOTAL
Cristobal ROTC
D. Ooodhead .
B. Steven* .
T 'Larry Cox .
292 David Lane .
j TRAM TOTAL
08
87
S3
67
80
07
89
61
77
83
84
30
86
76
81
rr
43
37
17
28
378
378
366
384
1670
%
184
138
Enjoy every miiu
ate of your life
with the sweet-
est music of the
world!
1000
'1*0 RAT
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i OWN
IUDDER
.FOR*
Imported
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AUTOS OMPHROY, S.A.
Ave. Jaste AroAemena ft 26th St. Tel. 2-0810


TRACK MEET ON TONIGHT AT BALBOA

IS WD
KBWSPAPE*
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe1'. Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, K. P., THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 152
(NEA Telephoto)
TORNADO VICTIM Mrs. Harry Waller comforts her husband
after he was brought into a Dyersburg (Tenn.) hospital.
Seretse Khama Will
Not Return As Chief
Of Bamangwalo Tribe
Have One
Witness Who Saw
$681000 Stolen
African | DANVERS, Mass., March
(UP) A retired truck driver
stepped forward yesterday as
perhaps the only witness to a
fantastic daylight $681,000 arm-,
three men.
13 Persons Hurt As
Landslide Derails
Chicago-Bound Train
WINVEMUCCA, Nevada, March I LONDON, March 27 (UP)> i
27 (itThirteen persons were Britain announced today that!
i.tno treated for injuries today;Seretse Khama can never again
of2? J Tanrislide derailed a o- return as chief to the African
"fLL rH threeoars of the'tribe he led before his marriage
comotive and three cars oi ine, wQm former Um_
Chicago-bound Western Pac Ruth wnUams
fie Railway train California g^'g ,ormer chle{ of the
Zephyr.' w; Bamangwato tribe in Bechuana- ored truck robbery, which he said
The accident took place asi, lftnd wfls of fere(j a poSt by the was staged by four rather than
night as the streamliner was Jamalcan government instead. "
traveling about 40 miles per.
Lord Salisbury, new Secretary
for Commonwealth Relations,
announced the decision in the
House of Lords and when it came
up in Commons, the speaker
agreed that it should be debated
as a matter of "urgent public
Importance" later this evening.
Cristobal Office
To Begin Issuing
Licenses Tuesday
The policeman-driver examln-
censes starting Tuesday, it has ">* are captured.
Sriee vn?f5yDtoStSrel *". K the truck doors J*ed
ffin.tCc?,hrtn^
tlon at Ancon. is being establish- tntnt/irv maximum for lar-
day when company and union."^,, r.,,ofKo,iH i ence.
hour through a cut in a remote
hilly part of the desert aboua
40 mtles west of Winnemucca.
Aboard the train were 149
passengers and 31 crewmen. All
including the injured remained
on the train.
Nine upright coaches were
hauled to Flanagan. Nev., from
where the train will continue to
Chicago.
Tons of storm-loosened earth
lid onto the tracks, tipping the
locomotive and baggage car to
a 45-degree angle. A railway
spokesman said two coaches
were also derailed.
NJ Bell Telephone
Strike Called Off
NEWARK, N. J., March 27
(UP). A strike of 3.000 em-
ployes of the New Jersey Bell
Telephone Co. ended early to-
B4NK GUARD Pvt. James Dedman of the Arkansas Na-
tional Guard stands watch over what remains of the Judsonla,
Ark., bank.
On Your Next Trip to New York
See CHICAGO Too!
Naturally you are going to New York. New York is
big business. New York is the theatre, the gay white
way. New York is Mecca. But you haven't rttllf tees
the United States until you see Chicago. Chicago it
big, busy and beautiful toobut with a difference.
It is a friendly mid western city with the spirit of
youth. You'll love it.
Braniff routes offer you the opportunity to see them
bothat little extra cost. Fly to New York through
Miami. Return via Chicago and see the real heart of
the United States, all on one round trip, ticket.
John Gustin, 63, gave Investi-
gators their first possible "break"
in the theft of $681,000 from an
unattended U.S. Trucking Corp.
truck Wednesday while the driv-1
er and two guards were sipping
coffee in a drugstore.
Gustin who was on the side-
walk said he saw virtually the
whole thingfrom the time the
thieves passed the money bags
out of the truck to their escape
In a speeding automobile.
He said one of the men entered
the cab but whether by a key or
other means he was not sure.
However, police said this point
(NEA Telephoto)
TOWN DEMOLISHED Carrying their chlldre n, residents of Judsonla* Ark., leave the town
to seek shelter elsewhere.
made at Cristobal.
At Cristobal, drivers should
officials reached an agreement
on a new contract In night-long
negotiation sessions.
Officials of the Independent
Telephone Workers Union or-
dered union member.' Vack on censes will not be maintained on
the Job starting with the 6 a.m. the Atlantic side as they are at
ahift. I the Ancon License Section.
Even as Gustin related his
m th.i,-iniiUSS. withTthPm story, authorities swarmed over
for renewal! a ** ln Boston's north end
years ago. _^_
Both Brink's and VS. Truck-
garage their trucks

t
fUL- 0'PEP
C. 0. MASON, S.A.
P.O. Box 893
Panam City
A Coln
Keep your hens ata high
rate of egg production,
and maintain them in good
physical condition. The
oatmeal in Ful-O-Pep
Feeds and Masbes for
starting, growing and egg
production contribute*
toward more profitable
results.
Moateky
Tha Quaker Oats Company
Ask far Ful-O-Pa Poultry Faoding Guiaa-it's fraal
ing Corp,
there.
Employes were questioned on
the theory that duplicate keys
perhaps were used o open the
looted vehicle might have been
fitted while the truck was park-
ed In the garage.
Hoshe Shared Pays
Visit To Vatican;
Received By Pope
VATICAN CITY, March 27
(UP). The whlte-and-blue
flag of Israel decorated with
the Star of David appeared for
the first time in Vatican City
today on the black limousine of
Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett,
who was received by Pope Pius
|xn.
The offleial announcement
Issued by the Vatican secretariat
of sute said curtly that Sharett
had "asked to pay a visit of
courtesy and homage to His
Holiness."
Sharett, garbed In full dress
suit, was accompanied by his
wife and bv Israeli Minister ln
Rome Moshe Ishal. All three
were received together ln the
papal Itinerary for 15 minutes.
There are no diplomatic rela-
tions between Israel and the
Vatican, and It was speculated
MacCarthy Files Libel Suit
For $ 2 Million Aga in$t Benton
WASHINGTON, March 27 (UP Accepting the challenge, Mc-
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy filed. Carthy filed suit ln Federal Dia-
a $2,000,000 libel and slander -
suit against sen. William Ben-
ton today and accused the Con-
necticut Democrat of "conspir-
trlct Court here. He told a news
conference he will serve as his
own lawyer In the case so he
can cross-examine Benton u-
ate for his anti-Communist acti-
vities.
Benton sponsored a resolu-
ing" to oust him from the Sen- der oath during the trial and
ln pre-trial examinations.
Benton was en route to the
tion calling for an investigation West Coast and not immediately
available for comment.
McCarthy asked for $1,000,000
damages for injuries suffered
"in his official capacity, profes-
to determine McCarthy's fitness
to serve ln the Senate. He has
accused McCarthy of "fraud and
deceit" and recently offered to
waive his Congressional im-
munity if the Wisconsin Repub-
lican wanted to take their
months-old feud to court.
Russians Describe
Frederic Chopin As
Karl Marx Disciple
tics in the campaign against
Tydlngs.
McCarthy fired back that Ben-
ton was a "mental midget" and
the "hero of every Communist
crook in and out of govern-
ment." Benton then filed with
a Senate elections subcommittee
a 30,000-word "bill of parti-
culars" challenging McCarthy's
"integrity and character."
The subcommittee is consider-
ing Benton's anti-McCarthy re-
solution and has asked the Sen-
ate for a vote of confidence.
McCarthy refused last Satur-
ate! and reputation" as the re- I day to carry his objections to
suit of Benton's charges and, the inquiry to the Senate floor,
another $1,000.000 on grounds,He said the subcommittee has
that Benton conspired "illegal-
ly" with unknown persons to
libel and slander him.
He charged that Benton's
"malice and ill will" grew out
of his "action in exposing as
pro-Communist friends of "Ben-
ton ln the State Department
the right to Investigate charges
of improper conduct against any
Senator.
But he also challenged the
subcommittee's right to "spend
vast sums of money investigat-
ing the life of McCarthy from
birth to date." He said the group
was collecting material to use
ln the political
and "in exposing other friends
of the defendant for security against him
reasons." Benton is a former campaign.
Assistant Secretary of State. I Benton previously accused Mc-
Carthy of waging a "campaign
The Benton-McCarthy feud of fraud and deceit" and of
WASHINGTON. March 27
(USIS) Frederic Chopin, the
Polish composer who strongly
opposed Union between Poland
and Russia, Is now described by
Soviet propagandists as a philo-! erupted last Aug. 6 when Ben-. committing perjury in his ef-
sophical disciple of Karl Marx, ton demanded that McCarthy I forts to prove that the 8tate De-
This was told to a Georgetown resign and called for a Senate' partment is Infested with Reds
University audience Tuesday by; investigation of his role in the and pro-Communists.
Polish political exile Jan Karski, 1850 Maryland senatorial elec-1 In his complaint, McCartny
now an assistant professor of tlon. In that campaign, Repub- charged that Benton has "de-
Political Science at the Wash-! Mean Sen. John Marshall Butler fended various persons ln the
lngton School. | defeated former Sen. Millard E. State Department against
The Soviets claim that Cho- Tydlngs .
pin's music is in philosophic |
harmony with the Communist i a Senate subcommittee has
charges... that they are Com-
munist and/or pro-Communist
and that their presence ln the
that Sharett's visit may be the that Chopin never heard of the
manifesto. Karski pointed out: accused McCarthy and his staff j State Department is dangerous
first step
lishment.
towards their estab-
A Vatican source said there
was no discussion of political
matter such as the Internation-
alization of holy placea, a prob-
lem known to be larored by the
pantlXi.
manifesto.
Nevertheelss the Soviets are
producing fraudulent documents
ln an effort to prove their point,
he said.
Karski, who was a prisoner of
war of both the Nad and Red
armies, arrived ln the United
SUtes ln IMS.
of engaging ln "despicable" tac- and detrimenUl to the Interests
BALBOA TIDES
Friday. March 8$
High
5:28 a.m.......
5.44 p.m........
Low
of the United SUtes.
He said Benton has acted "as
a defense witness for persons
attacked for security and other
reasons and has used every
means at his command to pro-
tect persons who are bad
11:83 a.m. curity risks ln the State Depart-
11:57 p.m. ment and elsewhere."
For Information and
reservation! see your travel agent a
call tout Braniff reeteetntathw.
Avenida TWoM #18
Telephone 2-0729
novai Ei i unwind
Via Espaa. Ill
Tetepham 3-4726
or 316*0 Ext. 130
Coktai Tick* Office .TaWphone 779 I


/
AGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 188*

Kansas Captures N.C.A.A. Basketball Tournament
BsL
: Winners^ St. John's In | Pacific Divisional
-Olympic Trials Saturday l Softball League
By United Press
' SEATTLE, Washington, March 27.Kansas
i -won the National Collegiate Athletic Association
,,.,Basketball Tournament bv swamping St. John's
\ of Brooklyn 80-63 in the finals before 11,000 fans
.. .Jast night.'
All-American Clyde Lovellette sparked the
"1:. Kansas victory with 33 points. In the consolation
round, Illinois nosed out the surprisingly strong
"' Sp.nta Cara 67-64.
Pabst, Poivells Clash Tonight
For Atlantic Twi-League Lead
STANDINGS
TEAM- Won Lost Pet.
Army OM......7
C'tral Labor Office 7
Navy Ordnance .. 7
Coroxal Sales Store 6
Commissary. .... (
Post Office......4
Building Division.. S
Army Signal .... 2
Kobbe Sales Store. I
Her trica I Division. 0
2
2
2
3
3
4
(
1
7
7
.778
.778
.778
.667
.667
.500
.333
1"A
.125
Balboa High Is 2nd Half
Pacific Twi-Loop Champ
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL LEAGUE
Teams
Army QM, Central Labor Of- r.ihreit.r ist> ma
fice, and Navy Ordnance wound I HIrW rewm
(Straight Season Standings)
up the straight season deadlock-!
Both
Kansas and St. John's erplllar Diesels and Air Force All, Si2UXtaiSUi .iSi-Vi
d for the Olympic trials'Star teams took the first four ,0'^'^'8 Stores surprise 7-3
Balboa High School.
ed in first place as a result of 1 "f"ch^
rnrmol Oolao Clnrl', .,!.. 1. rapan MfrCOants
victo
ctory over Army QM yesterday. I
In the playoff for the straight
- -.
Teams
Last.
qualified for the Olympic .
which open In Kansas City and spots in the AAU Tournament;
Jiew Xorlc on Saturday night. last week. | ^^ chjim-plon8hlpi Army QM
Kansas will play. Southwest I The Diesels, who won the AAU ^U*"*!? S&aS&SS! J^i"'
Missouri, winner of the NAIB tourney, play the Air Force team "J1"* VHrJRXX.^*WXT Balboa High School
Tourney. In one quatter-flnal. in New Vork on Saturday. The na^e nertThuntev B> Brewers .
ame at Kansas City. The Phil-other half o the New York twin n ^ four teLa go into GibralUr Life In,.
inn kiJmm"The the round-robin championship, Panama Merchants
nd finata will be f'eries- Arn,y ^M' Central Ubor
e Office, and Navy Ordnance have
i '.laliilrii but Commissary and
x
3
3
1
BB
8
BHS
4
4
%
I
PM
5
4
|
W
12
11

C
L
7
8
11
18
.
11
12
38 88
V
Ips Oilers play the Fibber Mc-blll sends St. John's against_La
.. .Gee and Molly team in the other; Salle's Invltai
".. half of the Kansas City double-; semi-finals and
'-." header pn Saturday.. played in New York next Mon-
"; The Oilers. Fibber McGee. Cat- day and "Tuesday.
(Second Half Stand in
BH8 BB GLI
. x I 3
. 1 1
. 1 t z
.:. i
PM
1
3
2
5
8
3
L
4
5
5
6
.
Pet.
jR
.458
.333
.636
.50*
.500
.333

Atlantic Little I cogue
Coroza 1 Sales Store will ensate
in a play-off game next Monday
for the fourth berth In the series.
The box score of yesterday's
crucial game follows:
Army CJM
~

24
Standings of the teams
Teams
JJttle Motta's
for the Pals, lining out three
-Powell's .
Margarita
Plice Pals
Won Lost Pet. singles for a perfect day at bat,
.738;while Freeman Burgess
.7
.5
3
3
.555 Powell's
J3S twlet.
.333
doubled and
of the
singled
Score by innings:
\rFOWMJL'S
SCORE WIN OVER Police......1 2 0 0 2 38
POLICE PALS Powell's.....0 0 0 0 0 6
The Powell's handed the Police,
*, fi:Is a 9 to 7 defeat Friday after- C. Leves, Bailey and Garcia,
noon assuring them of second French P.
flace position in the Atlantic Kulig P. C. Hitchcock P. C.
itlle League standings for the French, O.
e-ond-half pennant race. i------------
Powell's started off with a-bang A t f
in the tup of the first Inning. MTIOnTlC
scoring six runs, but the Pals
ci-.me rieht back to tie it all up
again, scoring four in the second
and two in the third.
R. Richards
A. Ortega ..
V. Nlcholls .
W.Jules.. ..
R. Tucknall
M. Tulloch..
C. Bienman
E. Lynch ..
A. Milwood .
N. Weir ....
....
....
AB
8
2
4
8
1
1
1
3
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT
Balboa High School 9, Balboa Brewers 8
Balboa High School's looker Jim Frazer at left field when he
room was the noisiest place on threw wild to cut off a runner.
the Isthmus last night as the; Big gun at the plate for the
iubllant players of its baseball losers with three hits for three
q squad and loyal followers were
celebrating their 8-8 win over the
Iboa Brewers to clinch
Totals............24 3 5
Pony League
The teams fought to a tie un-
til the last Inning, Powell's go-
in* ?head when Freeman Bur-'
l2:s led Off with a double, walks
* to Knllg, French and Brians
"co\ '.ed with Max Banna's solid
sir. 'e netted them three runs.
Charlie French who relieved
*' tTer.h Kullg in the fourth inning
- was credited with the win over
the Pals. Both of these lads also
were'the batting stars of the day.
CHAMPIONSHIP PLAYOFFS
TEAM
Corotal Sales Store
A. Charris.........
V. Tudor........
A. Barraza.......
P. Gasktn.........
S. Sellman.......
Pilgrim...........
R McLean.........
B. Jaramillo
AB
3
4
3
4
3
1
8
1
L. Springer.......... 2
strong Ba
the second half title of the Pa-
cific Twilight League and move
into the final playoffs for the
1852 crown.
The High School, who were not
given a nance to come elose or
even put up a fight for league
honors, came through in a story
book fashion by doing it the hard
way. '
Now they are the talk of_the
town and the experts
light Loop circles are
trips, was William McOee and
Noel Gibson with three for four.
For the winners, Ed Napoleon
with one for two and Jerry Hal-
man with two for four, were the
big bats.
The box score
BHS
Halm an, 2b
5
2
5
5
4
3
3
ATLANTIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE
STANDINGS (SECOND HALF)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Pafcat..........8 4 .856
Powell's........8 8 .508
C.H.S.........8 4 AM
TONIGHTS GAME
Powell's vs. Pabst.
The Atlantic Twilight League
1858 season Is rapidly drawing to
a close, and veterans who have
seen the Gold Coast Twl Loop
come and go for most of Its 13
years of existence agree that this
is probably the tightest race In
its history.
Pan Liquido Cops Second Place
In Pacific Softball Second Half
TEAM STANDINGS
(Second Half)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Ittsnrancemen.... 7 8 1.088
Pan Lleuldo.....8 8 .625
Elks..........4 8 .571
Philippine Rattan. 8 .276
CAA..........6 7 .000
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pan Liquido 12, Philippine
Rattan 14.
TODAY'S GAME
firemen's Insurance vs. Elks.
The Furnlturemen marked up
one run In the top of the sev-
enth to set the final score at 12
to 10.
The box score:
Philippine Rattan AB R H E
Jutzy, 2b........ 8 3 4 0
Engelke, H ss-p. ..8110
Lawyer, 3b. .... .. 4 2 1 1
Filo, lb........ 4 0 2 0
Newhouse, cf...... 4 0 1 0
Fraser, If....... 3 0 0 0
Nichols, c....... 3 10 1
Dempsey, rf...... 4 0 1 0
Smith, G., p-ss .... 4330
Totals .....'.....40 18 ~2
Yesterday Oeorge Stanley's Pan >, Liquido AB R
At the conclusion,of each of Llquiao niae came from behind; Fo8ter, 2b........ 4 1.
games In the sec-: to edge the idle Elks out of a tie
iy a different team' for second place when they set
has been on top of the heap, and the Philippine Rattan team down
throughout the constant shift-; 12 toJO.
lug ich team has bad Hs tarn Gordon Smith started on the
In the top slot. At present, the, mound for the Furnlturemen and
Pabst Blue Ribbon nfne Is port- held the Beermen scoreless until
ing a half game lead overTow-l the fourth lnnhig when he was
dra, and only one game ahead ef |"esPns,D'e for ou' "J"* on one
the last place High Sebeol team,1 hit, two bases on balls and two
winner, if tjheflKt half. ] errors on the part of his team-
Tonight Powell's wiU again t *s.
have the opportunity of recap-
turing first place when they take
the last four .
ond half of play,
May, cf
Napoleon, rf.
CaFlin, R., lb
Ostrea, 3b. .
Flynn, c .
in Twi-i Salas, as .
figuring i Rowley. It. .
ire.
AB B
4 1
Morton, p
Buick..........., i o
M.RA............. 1 n
CP.O............. | t
In a playoff game at Mt. Hope!
Stadium Monday Buick defeated
CP.O. by a score of 8 to 3. This
game was. featured by the alr-
ight pitching of Ray Croft of
Totals............24
Score By Innings
' Rales Store 411 001 x7
Won Lost Almy QM 003 000 03
out the odds for the champion-
ship playoffs between the win-
ners of the first half. Gibraltar
Life Insurance, and the Balboa
High School, winner of the sec- Brewers
n ond half title. I Herring, cf
_| The Pacific Twilight League Scott, 3b .
7! championship would be a fitting! Carlln. Wm
reward for the High '
HPO
2 2
0
0
11
1
5
4
3
1
on the leading Pabst team.
At this point of the race, every
game Is played like a champion-
ship contest as all three teams
realise that In a elose fight like
this 1852 race, one game or even
one misplay may cost the cham-
pionship.
With this in mind, the fans can
expeet to see both team's aces go
to the mound. For Pabst, their
hitting Pitcher Noel Gibson will
do the horling against Powell's
,, George Carty. Any sign ef weak-
i' enlng by any of these two slten-
'en will probably bring about
5 more bull-pen action than has
Totals .35 5 27 22 3
been seen thus far In the Atlan-
tic Twilight League.
Game time, as usual. Is set for
7 pjn.
,r\uii Pitcher: Ler
er. Losing Pitcher
: Leroy
: N. Weir
Spring-
each having two hits apiece. Max SKi ZXFttJLJfflvZn^Zi
ared in the" field for ^gff-gg &*$$\
the Powell's.
.Score by Innings:
well's.....6 0 0 0 0 3Bi
ollce......0 4 2 0 0 171
Ki'lig, French and Hitchcock. |
D?.vlson. C. Leves ?r"1 Palumbo
"POLICE F4VD POWELL'S
DEFEAT
In the last game of the At-
lantic tittle League's pennant
race the Police Pals defeated the
Po'-cll's by the score of 8 to 8.
Charlie Leves of the Police Pa!*
lf"hed brilliant one-hit. shutou'
ball until the Powell's batscamn
to life in the last of the sixth
lining. Lester Bailey rame on to
relieve Leves and retiree: the
three batter? to face his offer-
ings via the strike-out route
Keith Kug start-d on the
rr.Jfcnd.for the Powell's r'ne. but
rail Into trouble In th fifth nd
s^rroejl oosltyons with catcher
BBlv Hitchcock who, also needed
help In the sixth, when Charlie
Fren"! came on In reHef td retire
the side.
JJarry Davison starred at bat
team.
support from his teammates,
Crawford was the victim of some
loose play In the infield.
The box score:
Little League
ARMED FORCES LITTLE
LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost
ttgn
izln
AB R HPO A
.40140
.40013
lb 4 0 O 8 1
School's. Neckar, c. 4 0 0 4 1
hard fight and amazing climb to| Gibson, p 4 1 3 0 1
first place. Fans who witnessed; Cox, ss 3 1 1 2 5
the last few weeks of regularl Angermuller, 2b 4 1 0 4 0
scheduled games and the second'Frazer, If .3 0 : 3 0
half playoffs cannot complain of McGee, rf. 3
the brand of baseball that was
played.
Last night it was Don Morton
on the mound for the High
School. He battled'ft but with,
Totals.....33 3 9 27 11 3
Score By Innings
BHS 10101200 05
Brewers 03000000 03
Runs Batted InHalman. Nap-
the experienced Noel Gibson to1 oleon, R. Carlln, Ostrea, Morton,
actually pitch Balboa High to the Frazer, McGee 2. Earned Runs
nick
Burgess, 3b .
Oro/i., p .
Matos.,c .
Lamls, lb. .
i-IarU. 2b. .
Taber, rf. .
Bazn. If. .
Hannlgan, as.
D. Smith, ef .
AB R
3 2
HPO
ff 0
0
11
6
Curundu.......... 8
Caribbean Command.. 5 2
I Albrook.......... 3 4
E West Bank........ 8 4
0 Kobbe............ 2 5
0 Clayton.......... 2 5
0
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Curundu 11, Clayton 8.
Caribbean Command 12, Kob-
be 7.
West,Bank 6, Albrook 4.
Totals.....29 8 3 21 10 1
In the game at the Fort Kobbe
CP.O
Ramsey, ss :
Gibson, c .
Newhard, 3b.
Crawford, p .
Didler, cf .
Recela, If .
Hart. 2b .
McJennett, rf
Cralg ....
Hamilton, lb
AB
4
, 4
. 2
. 3
3
3
1
3
0
2
HPO
1
1 11 0
THE HEAD
; Miami, Fla. (NBA) Jockey
Conn McCreary wears the largest
Totals.....38 3 5 21 11
Score By Innings
Buick 0 12 8 0 0 08
CP.O. 0 3 0 0 0 0 03
Base on Balls offCrawford 6.
diamond Monday afternoon, the
Caribbean Commandos defeated
the Kobbe lads 12 to 7.
Ross Kramer started on the
mound for the Commandos with
Robert Mitchell taking over in
the fourth Inning and finishing
up. Robert Crowder started for
the Kobbe team and he, like
1' Kramer, was not around at the
! 1 finish as Vincent Vasli took over
0 the pitching duties in the fourth
0 Inning.
_| Kramer was the leading hitter
5 of the game, collecting three hits
In three trips to the plate, with
; teammate Tom Pitman getting on an
, three for fbur. Vernon Sander's
triple was the only extra base hit
championship playoffs.
Both pitchers went the route
with Morton winning his seventh
game against two defeats. Gib-
son was charged with his second
loss with six wins to his credit.
Last night both hurlers were
rapped for nine hits, but the High
School lads bunched their hits to
push across more runs.
In this free hitting affair, BHS
was the first to dent the plate.
In the top half of the first in-
ning, after the two first batters
to face Gibson filed out and
struck out, Gibson Issued a free
ass to Ed Napoleon. Bob Carlln
BHS 5, Brewers 3. Left on Bases
BHS 9, Brewers 4. Home Hun-
Napoleon. Two ase HitMcGee.
Sacrifice HitsSalas, Cox. Stol-
en asesHalman, Flynn, Her-
ring, McGee. Struckout byMor-
ton 3, Gibson 2. Base on Balls off
Gibson 5. Losing PitcherGib-
son (8-2). Winning Pitcher-
Morton (7-2). DoubleplayOs-
trea, R. Carlln, Ostrea. Umpires
Luzer and Majors. Time c
Game2:59.
THEY HAVE PAPER
MD-XJNOCKET, Me. (UP.)
?i__________
hen got the first hit of the game
with a single to left to advance,The Orezt Northern rtor Co.,
Napoleon to second. Dick Ostrea largest newsprtat manufactur-
followed suit by hitting safely to er In ^9*^1
short rlKht to score Napoleon, modern conservation methods
Abdul F&nn grounded outshort will Insure a supply of pulp-
to first to end the rally. I wood for at least a century The
The Brewers retaliated to take paper company owns 12 percent
a two-run lead in the second half of ^e to^ area of^aine 1most
of the second with three runs of it northern Umberi ids.
on three hits. Al Neckar struck
out for the first out. Noel Gibson
lined one through second and
moved no as Dick Cox was safe
smile faintly as hi
Stanley's regular hurler, Bill
Muller, was on the bench with a
"charlie hqrse" and Lee did not
appear at the start of the game
so Stanley scraped the bottom of
the barrel and came up with
George Tarfllnger to do the ini-
tial pitching. Tarfllnger pitched
two and one-third Innings and
Save up seven runs on nine base
Its and three free passes.
Lee relieved Tarfllnger In the
third, pitched four and two-
thirds innings, was responsible
for three runs on four hits and
three walks. Lee was credited
with the winhis fifth against
a single defeat.
For the Rattan boys .Howard
Engelke relieved Smith In the
sixth and was charged with the
loas. .
Philippine Rattan was leading
the Liquid Bread team 9 to 4 un-
in the
a
Jones, L cf...... 3
Stanley, ss. .. .. .. 2
Tarfllnger, p-lb. .. 2
Lane, c......... 3
Husted, 3b........ 4
Presho, If........ 2
Cain, If.
Jacks, lb......
Lee, p........
Helsler, rf.....
Glaeser, rf.....
27 12 6 4
Totals.......
Score By Innings
Philippine Rattan 241 200 110
Pan Liquido 000 408 x18
til an eight-run uprising in th
sixth which gave Pan Liquido
12 to 9 advantage.
Don't Neglect Slipping
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Do talse teetb drop, lip or wobble
when you talk, eat, leugh or sneeze?
Don't be annoyed and embarrassed by
wch handicaps. FASTEETH, an alkaline
(non-acid) powder to sprinkle on your
olatcS, keeps false teeth more firmly
set. Gives onildent feeling of security
and added comfort. No gummy, gooey,
pasty taste or feeling. Get FASTEETH
today at any drug star*.
BRONCHIAL
ASTHMA
Sleep Sound All Night
&tony te "known m "The Head"' ^ J*b?*,*:
among fellow relnsmen.
3, Croft
I Curtis.
9. UmpireHall and
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'150.75 round trip)
Score by Innings:
Caribbean Command 110 52312
Kobbe 000 331 7
-Paul Richards
he watches his
team work "out at Pasadena.
Calif., no doubt highly pleated
with what he tees. The Chicago
White Sox manager predicts an-
other goed year for hi* men,
they may even cop the
pennant. (NEA)
says
The Curundu Councilmen
chalked up a 11 to 0 victory over
the Fort Clayton nine in the
game at the Curundu field for
their sixth consecutive win.
Jimmy Walling was the win-
ning pitcher and Prankie Robin-
son the loser. Both boys went all
the way.
Leading hitters for the Coun-
cilmen were Henry Lavender,
I jerry Curtis and Butch Frangi-
onl.
Snore by Innings:
Clayton' 8 O 0 0 0 0 0
Curundu 0 7 3 11 Jt11
lnheld hit. Ronnie Anger-
muller laid one down and all
hands were safe. Jim Frazer,
with the bases loaded, placed an-
other bunt and a run scored as
the throw from Bob Carlln to the
i plate was a bit late. BUI MeOee
then drove In two runs with his
single to right field and was
caught trying to extend it to a
double. \ jt
The High School kept pecking
away. They scored one run In the
third when Ed Napoleon got hold
of one of Noel Gibson's offerings
for a home run to put them back
In the game 3-2.
The High School tied it up at
3-3 in the fifth on two walks and
a single by Bob Carlln. In the
next frame they pushed across
two run to win the game on
three hits, one walk, a sacrifice
and a costly Brewer mlscue by,
WE HAVE 'EM
AUTOMATIC
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Phones: 3-85M 2-8S83
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blessing tc thousands ond now sold
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There Is nothing -o sot* and sure
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Tel. 2-1855 Opposite
Panama Ancon Bus-stop
Or see vour travel agent
Over at the Little League Park
hi Cocoli, the West Bank boys
edged out a 8 to 4 win over the.
Albrook Flyboys. Two victory
placed West Bank in a tie with
Albrook for third place.
Oeorge Barbier started on the
mound for West Bank, but was
relieved in the fourth inning by
Rolando Salva. Don Schlosser
was the initial starter for the
Flyboys, John Desloge taking
over In the fourth and finishing
the game.
The winning runs were scored
by the West Bank lads In the
bottom of the fifth when Tlmmy:
Hays drew a free pass to first,
stole second and third bases.
third on a passed ball and then
scored on an Infield out. Barup
had a perfect day at the plate,
collecting three hits In three at
bats.
Score by Innings:
Albrook 0 0 2 2 0 04
West Bank 2 0 2 0 2 x6
Today's schedule Is as follows
'home team first): Caribbean
Command vs. Clayton. Albrook
vs. Kobe and West Bank vs. Cu- .
rundu. Game time is 4:30 p.m. I


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