The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01426

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
t BRANIFF
GUAYAQUIL
MUST CLAM $211.20
TOURIST 17.40
BUT NEWSPAPSft
Pauattiaainericati
"Let the people know the truth and the country h gafe" Abraham Lincoln.
Seagrau'sYO.
t CANADIAN WHISKY
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., THUR8DAY, MARCH !7, IMS
ElVE CENT!
Reds May Try UN Fliers For Germ War
Angry Citizens
Stone, Pummel
Mayor To Death
TLACOLULA, Mexico, March
87 (UP) Angry anti-tax riot-
ers stoned and beat to death
Mayor Dlodoro Maldonado of
this southern Mexico town and
Federal officials were Investigat-
ing reports today that three oth-
er mayors of Oaxaca cities had
"met the same fate."
Maldonado died yesterday of
injuries suffered Tuesday nlgnt
at the hands of crowds who at-
tacked him near the gate of his
home.
He was the eighth victim of
the bloody riots which started
In the state capital of Oaxaca
yast weekend in protest against
or. Manuel Mayoral Heredia's
tax program.
Authorities attribute Maldon-
ado's death to the extension of
"illegal demonstrations" from
nearby Oaxaca. where seven
Earsons died and at least 22 have
een seriously injured since the
riots broke out last Friday.
Irate citizen groups who oppose
the taxes on personal possessions
imposed by Mayor Heredla said
the rioting would halt only if the
governor resigned.
IN OPEN SEA off Cape Mala a Grumman Albatross amphibian of Flight C, 1st- Air Rescue Squadron, rides smoothly yester-
day as a small boat brings Vincent T. Rose across from the Ilshing vessel Sherry Ann. The Sherry Ann had radioed for
help when it was believed Rose, engineer of the vessel, had ap pendicitis. But when the Albatross brought him to Oorgas hos-
Dltal It was found to be a stomach upset that ailed him.
The governor continued to
blame "Communists" for the
disorders, and refused to va-
cate his office. Federal troops
are keeping Oaxaca state in a
State of siege and business life
has come to a standstill.
MeanwbJflRfh Mexlao <3tty Er-
nesto P. Uruchurlu. MJnfcler o(,
tha Interior, made a statement,
that "petitions accompanied by
acts of violence over proper gov-
erning authorities cannot be hon-
ored, regardless of how legiti-
mate they may be."
He intimated that petitions
have arrived for Mayoral Here-
dia's dismissal. He said the Fed-
eral government has Intervened
to "eease acts of violence and
disorder."
The minister added that the
fiscal code tax to which Oaxa-
ca state citizens have vigorous-
ly protested has been abolished
and "important officials" be-
lieved responsible for it have
been dismissed.
Students from three Mexico
City colleges and the university
planned a mass demonstration
parade against Mayoral Here-
dia's government today.
The student grourjs also
threatened a strike at the Insti-
tutions until Mayoral Heredla Is
ousted. More than 30.000 stu-
dents are enrolled at the univer-
sity and normal and polytechnl-
cal schools.
Ciannini Banking
Empire Threatened
NEW TORE, March 27
(UP). A Washington dls-
Sitch of the New York
Imes said today that the
Federal Reserve Board has
decided to dissolve the 87,-
M,tM,M Gianninl banking
empire,
The newspaper said the
board ruled en a 3-2 deci-
sion that the banking em-
pire's Transamerica Corpora-
tion was violating the Clay-
ton Anti-Trust Aet "through
stock ownership or other
control of 41 banks with 67
offices in California, Oregon,
Nevada, Arfcona and the
State of Washington."
International Lions
Convention Opens
Tonight In Panam
More than 460 "Lions" will
take part hi the 10th Interna-
tional Convention, which will be
Inaugurated tonight with a
dance at the Union Club in hon-
or of the visiting delegates.
Nlcaraguan and Salvadorean
delegates arrived last night and
those representing Costa Rica.
Honduras and Guatemala were
due In Panama this morning.
The Lion Club will continue
their activities until Sunday.
Amllcar Trinados of Panama
was elected governor of Isthma-
nia District "D" yesterday; Ma-
riano Candanedo of David, vice-
eovernor and Vicente Pascual of
Panama, international relations
representativa.
Italian Vets Take Over
Trieste Demonstrations
ROME, March 27 (UP) Ital-
ian war veterans took over from
young students today in Italy's
popular demonstrations for the
return of Trieste.
Rome, students after three
days of noisy parades and riots
began returning to their desert-
ed classrooms, partly owing to
plain weariness and party due
to subtle threats by authorities
that their report cards would
suffer if they continued to re-
main away from classes.
In Milan, however, war veter-
ans called a big rally for tonight
in a downtown park to demand
that the Anglo-Ajueelcan and
Yugoslav zones, of Trieste be re-
turned to Italy.
The Milan ally, which was au-
thorized by police, coincides with
factory closing Hours and police
planned to be out m force In
case It developed into a riot.
Rome war veterans also Invit-
ed citizens to attend a similar
rally tomorrow In the big Piazra
del Poplo.
The war veterans' demonstra-
tions may well arouse greater
passions than the students' de-
monstrations of the last three
toys.
Speakers were certain to re-
call that Italv lost half a million
soldiers in winning Trieste from
the old Austro-Hungarlan Em-
pire in World War I.
Italv. as an Axis partner, lost
control of Trieste In the World
War II neace treaty, but the
United States. France and Brit-
ain formally declared In 1948
that It should again revert to
Italv.
The current demonstrations
began in Trieste a week ago
when pro-Italian Trlestines stag-
ed a riotous rally marking the
fourth anniversary of that still
unfulfilled declaration. /
65 Vacant Positions
Now Open For (anil
Qualified Employes
It's Moving Day
Up At Trumans
Place Today
WASHINGTON, March 27 (UP)
President Truman may be so
inspired he will carry Mrs. Tru-
man over the threshhold when
they move back Into the White
House this afternoon after three
years of "roughing It" In a
smaller mansion across the
street.
There are 65 vacant positions
In tht Canal oirajojauatlon to
which qualified ofltlbh em-
ployes may transfer, according
to the latest issue of thj trans-
fer-vacancy bulletin
Peraonel Bureau.
Members of the White House
staff ar not sure the President
will go. that far, but at any rate
they expect him to make a ee-
remony of it.
Mrs. Truman plans to meet
Use Chief Executive at the elr-
frotn^lhe Prt wh*n he returns from Key
West, Fla., so they can enter
There are 17 vacant classified Itne renovated executive man-
and related positions arffe 48 In sio" together.
US Recoqnizes
Batista Regime
HAVANA. March 17 (UP)
The United States government
announced officially that .to-
day it will recognise the regime
of Gen. Fulreneto Batista, who
overthrew Cuba's elected pres-
ident Carlos Prlo Socarras In a
comb d'etat recently.
Less Care For Red Heads
MUNICH, March 27 (UP)
Barbers in Communist Czech-
oslovakia have been forbidden
to massage scalps, wash hair
or offer brllllantlne since hair
cutters have become employes
of the state, according to Radio
Free Europe.
The radio said Prague bar-
ber colleges now teach that
former courtesies are remind-
ers of "servile bourgeois days"
and are out of fashion.
AH clients under the new
Communist orders for hair
treatment must receive the
same treatment.
The keeping of private razors
for steady customers Is an
"egoistic relic signifying a ae-
cret craving for a return to
clerical-Fascist days," accord-
ing to Radio Free Europe.
James (When's The Next Train Out?) Mason
And Wife Re-Edit Hollywood Social Register
HOLLYWOOD, March 27 (UP) i never get to know Zsa Zsa Gabor
James and Pamela Mason said I unless you are in Hollywood's
today they've found Hollywood's
social cliques harder to crash
than the Back Bay 400.
"We belong to the riffraff in-
ternational set," said Mason, cur-
rently starring In "A Lady Pos-
sessed."
"I guess we're not cchi-cchl
enough to make that smart. uls
tra-British set. the type that play
games and toast each other at
parties," said Pamela. "This In-
cludes Ronald Colman. Brian
Aherne. Joan Fontaine, Richard
Green, the Charles Boyers. The
set's head mogul is Doug Fair-
banks, Jr."
"The only guy in Hollywood
with tails," interposed James.
The Masons type in Hollywood
Is a sort of semi-smart, seml-ln-
tellectual set that Includes dlrec-
film executive and moneyed set
the Darryl Zanucks, the Sam
Goldwyns, the Jack Warners, the
Louis B. Mayers, Irene Dunne and
the Huntlngton Hartfords.
"Then there are the 'breeders'."
said Pamela. "To get into that
set, your main hobbv has to be
raising children. Among this set
are the Bob Mitchums, Wendell
Coreys, Roy Rogers. Blng Cros-
bys, MacDonald Careysand on
the distaff side Jeanne Craln,
Susan Hayward and Dorothy La-
mour."
Rita Hayworth. Marilyn Max-
well, Lana Turner, Gloria Ora-
hame and Ann Sheridan are in
the bachelorette set.
"If you're a woman." said Pam-
ela, "you can't make this set
These gals hate women "
, You've got to be a culture vul-
.tor John Huston, Humphrey Bo. ture to be friends with Joan
"They spend their time read-
ing the covers of books," quipped
Pamela.
If you take creme de menthe
In your morning coffee. If you
appreciate stormy love lives. If
the craft group.
The classified and relatad po-
sitions are: Accounting clerk;
electrical engineer; mechanical
engineer; fireman; construction
inspector; physical science aide;
policeman; postal clerk; tabu-
lating equipment operation su-
pervisor; and training officer.
Vacant craft positions
Wood and steel carman; chief
towboat engineer; road locomo-
tive engineer and road and yard
conductor; hoisting and portable
englneman; electrical meter
inspector; machinists, Inside,
outside and refrigeration; oper-
ators, machinists and wlremen
qualified and unqualified; Watch
maker and wlreman.
The
Judges' Bench
Before going Inside, they will
pose for photographers on tha
north portico. Staff members
said they expect Mr. Truman
will "say a few words."
The President couldn't have a
nicer place to come home to
from his Florida vacation.
Landscapera were out in fall
force today giving the grounds
a final manicuring and spend-
are'ing the last of the $5,700,000 It
cost to rebuild the White House.
Mr. Truman will not have to
go back to Blair House at all
The last of his personal ef-
fects were being moved today
from the temporary residence
the Truman took when it was
discovered the White House was
about to collapse.
By some spell of gardening
magic, the calendar at 1600
Pennsylvania Avenue has been
set ahead at least a month. A
RP Land Cash
rcr Lana ^asn r\ i\ I*
Goes Besnm, Paper Predicts
'" wshing'" Nuremburg Style
WASHINGTON, March 37 (UP)
The International Claims
Commission said today it Is hav-
ing a hard time getting rid of
$400,000, which Panam has
agreed to pay to Americana who
lost money on a Panamanian
land deal that fell through In
1920.
The commission said there
are about 3M eligible claim-
ants but that only about a
dosen have bothered to fue a
formal application for a slice
of the money.

The commission originally set
February 29 as the deadline for
filing claims, but there has been
so little Interest that the date
has been pushed back to June
2 and a new appeal made for
claimants.
The commission said it had
been able to locate only 100 of
300 potential claimants. It hopes
through this appeal to locate
some of the others.
The original claimants were
mostly from California and
invested in a land develop-
ment deal after World War I.
They lost out when the deal
failed to materialise and the
Panama Supreme Court ruled
m 1931 that the land was Pa-
namanian property.
Many of the original pur-
chasers have died, but the com-
mission said their legal repse-
aentertlve nty fe etarnw for
them. It ssdd any money not
claimed will be returned to Pa-
nama
French Soldiers
Grab Initiative;
Bear Down On Reds
HANOI, March 27 (UP) The
French Supreme Command in
Indo-China grabbed the initia-
tive from the Communists today,
launching the biggest offensive
in months against the Reds
threatening the rich "rice bowl"
delta.
In a dawn attack Gen. Gonz-
lez de Linares in command of the
vital Tonking defense perimeter
around Hanoi threw "thousands"
of his crack troops Into battle In
Hearing In Korea
VIENNA, March 27 (UP) The independent Grar
newspaper "Kleine Zeitung" predicted today that Com-
munist charges that UN forces in Korea are using bac-
teriological weapons would be followed by the trial ef
captured UN airmen.
The newspaper said that Heinrik Brandewiner, head
of the Communist body "investigating" the charges, and
professor of ecclesiastical law at the University of Graz
would "provide the basis for a war crimes trial pattern-
ed on the Nuremberg trials." ,
The newspaper said plans for o trial "seem obvious"
because Brandweiner's report "so heavily stressed inter-
national law, militar law and the Nuremberg trials.
Socialist members of Parlia-
ment demanded an explanation
of Issuance of a passport per-
mitting Brandwelner to o to
Korea, but the government aha
not yet given it.
Brandwelner was an at.lve
Nazi and member of a Germoi.
military court during the war
New War Minister
To (lean Out Reds
Second Storm Hits
Veraguas Province
Another storm of hurrican*
proportions struck in Veragua-
yesterday afternoon, wreakln-
destruction In the little town of
, CaQazas.
Like the at
iownof La
.he high winds-1
but caused no e_
Reports reaching htt itHicatr.
that the roofs of the MWrh dts-
RIO DE JANEIRO. March 7t-\ RTZntonZt? ther buUd_
General Ciro Espritu San- ** "*re wrn "'
to Cardoso was taking over his
new duties as Minister of War
today, with full expectations that
he will continue his campaign of
cleaning out Communist infiltra,
tion In the Brazilian army.
Even the opposition press hail-
ed ths new minister as an excel-
an effort to diside Commune P^^%J[V' K^fS
Viet Mlnh Elite Div. No. 320. PrMldent Oetulto Vargas for his
Strong winds, accompanied b"
rain and lightning, began around
3 p.m., carrying sheets of zinc
and trees flying In its wake.
Meanwhile, organizations were
being formed In Panam City to
- send aid to the victims of the de-
lent choice to succeed Gen. New- struction wrought by the rain
ton Estillac Leal, whose resigna- and hailstorm which struck La
on was accepted yesterday. Mesa in the same province Tues-
The new minister took his oath day afternoon.
of office last night and was to I________________
begin his duties today upon re-
ceiving the mantle of office from
his predecessor at an official cer-
emony this afternoon.
Gen. Cardoso faces two imme-
diate tasks: first, patching up a
political split in the army; and
second, erasing Communism
from the army.
whose spearpoint Is only 20 miles
16-acre patch of spring-time off Hanoi.
beauty has been created in the After withering field and na-
mldst of a city still drab from
winter weather.
Trucks shuttled back and
A 17-year-old American boy
was lined $40 lor reckless driv-
ing this morning in the Balboa
Magistrate's Court.
The defendant. Joseph Lyle
Fuller, was Involved In an acci-
dent with his motorcycle on
March 15 In which he was thrown
into the back window of a pri-
vate car on Galllard Highway.
Fuller suffered a broken right
wrist and was released recently
from the hospital. He Is a stu-
dent at the Balboa High School.
Also called before the Balboa
"courageous" solution, In ap-
pointing Cardoso.
All referred to the new war
minister as a sound democratic
element who believes the army
should stay out of politics, and
generally expressed the belief he
will be able to patch up the army
val aitlllery fire followed at day-
break by aerial bombing. French
and loyal Vietnamese units went
forth today bringing green grass Into action over a 700 square Ml- ,
for the north and south lawns, ometer area of dense Jungle and rift, which radiated around the
Workmen were digging a hole rice paddles. | former minister of war over his I
near the front gate to trans- Naval units turned close to political utterances and his al-
plant a 15-foot tree already shore and brought guns to bear; leged blindness to Communist
fully budded. ion Viet Mlnh concentrations. infiltration of the army.
Judge Metes Out
Punishment To Fit
Teenagers' Crime
HAGERSTOWN, Maryland,
March t7 (VTItm ven 11 a
Judge Evan Croasley believes in
letting the punishment fit the
crime.
Crosslev found eight teen-
agers guilty of stealing about
5 pigeons valued at S3M from
three bird raisers.
As a sentence, he ordered the
eight defendant to clean the
raided pigeon coops for a pe-
riod of six months.
Crossley said taut if the
teen-agers didn't like the sen-
tence, they could serve tune 1st
the county jail.
Ice Maidens Come To Town, Mechanized
BT HINDI DIAMOND
Those ethereal beings you may
see floating around Panama
>, a WXVH| IrMinhl* foz-.l^ll, (mu v
lomblan who
two charges.
For driving his
Thatcher Highway
! reasonable facsimile thereof. For
the delectable damsels feel more
truck on at home on ice than they do Just
without a walking around on tierra firma.
driver's license, he was
a
$10.
An additional $6 was imposed for
falling to have a valid eJfctlfl-
cate of Inspection for his vehi-
cle.
A trespasser. Esllda Roaea, 38.
The gals 25 of them are
part of an Ice-show that's com-
ing to Panama for the first time
and opens at the National Sta-
dium Saturday night.
read bA^^^Z^^***- w" Sied ""toi Tb prob,em of where theJ'n
a?ho*y'*o\, sui^Thance* of' *- In the La Boca Com- get the Ice-rink U Intriguing but
being accepted in this town's mlaaary-_________________i-
Bohemlan set. __. _.,
Charles Laughton Is the kine VatlCOn PO rlCMS
of this set. said Pamela, and his
cohorts are Marlon
VATICAN CITY, March i7
(UP) The Vatican Cil} po*t
Bob Hope and Marlene Dietrich oiflc WU bortly issue a ucw
of the cabaret set will never ask eries of stamps to corcuwa-c-
you to Join their table at Clro's, rate tne first centennary U the
Greta Garbo puzzles the Ms- adoption of postage stance t-y
sons. the Papal postal service
. .. "She's kept everyone wonder- The new Issue will reproture
fiLS* "* ^"^ and Joan Craw/ord. Shelley Winters and tag for years what set she be-: the first postage stamp put ^o
The? claim you'll probably I cto?" MOn' ** M"OT" H Sr^*3"L**SSwlth M,e **** *l ln **
are Marlon Brando,
Franchot Tone, Ruth Roman.
Paulette Ooddard, conductor Igor
Stravinsky, director Jean Renoir
and Burgess Meredith.
Unless you're prettv "hep" and
sophisticated, said the Masons.
To Issue Stamps
For Centennary
i her spare time," said Mason. ruary, 1852.
easily solvedthey brought their
own.
The refrigeration unit was In-
stalled last night, and within 12
hours, the 80-ft. stage will be
converted Into a skating rink.
As explained by brunette Mary
Maclnnis of Boston, sand la
packed on top of the pipes of the
refrigeration unit, and brine
runs through these pipes at an
even temperature.
The Ice floor can last as long
as they need It and Is protected
during the day from hot trpica]
sun by heavy canvas.
As far as rehearsals go. the ballet for ice-dancing."
troupe of 25 girls and 20 boys on- This troupe Is one of three op
Jy practice once a week, but all eratlng for "Holiday On Ice
agree that "you definitely need touring South America. Europe
THREE OV THE ICEMAIDENS of the "Holiday on Ice" show
relax in the sunshine while warming up for Saturday's per-
formance. Shown above (left to right): Mary Maclnnis, Jean
Arlen and Marie Purvlance.
The young blonda star of tha
show, Jean Arlen explained that
she's been skating professionally
since she was nine.
Small wonder, since her par-
ents, Norris and Naomi Wald,
were featured in the Ice Follies
when they first began in the
SUtes.
Agile Jean portrays a yellow-
bead princess with a broken
heart.
Another number which tha
whole troupe enjoys is "Sophis-
ticated Blues" a vary "ballet-
lsh" rhythm dance In which
stars red-headed Marie Purvl-
ance.
According to the skaters. "Son-
la" is still tops for their money
and they say vou've only passed
your prime in skating "when
you feel it."
Most of the talented artists are
amateur photographers, all of
the girls knit In their dressing
rooms several oalnt and all a-
Toe that travelling throughout
thse countries make von feel
"almost as if you're home."
The reception thev've received
has been very encouraging. So
much so that next year, they'd
ind the States They opened In like to do an encore.
labana last July and so far have i The troupe will give 10 showa
overed all the countries south of he border. 'here for two week*.


PAGB TWO
-----....--
fW PANAMA AMERICA* Alt IKDIFtKnKNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WaaVl
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Thursday, march w, in
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
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eouwoto v Ntv*ON *ounbivll m ieta
HAHMODIO ABIAS. DITO
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TiLt'MONi Manama no t-0740 < Lixta)
Cat* aopi* PANAHWICAM. Manama
LOM Or*ICI< IT CIKTAAt AvtNU MTWClN 1*TH NO 1TM
ro-liON RCMiacfcTATlvtS JOSHUA B FOWHS, INC.
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THE MAIL BOX
Ttia Marl lo M on optn forum foi raadara a tlM Pono" Aaae-
iee*. Letter at* raetir.a aroratall, and aro haMM It a wfcollv
fidintiSl manner.
I yoa contribute letter tart ba impotent M A tam't apptar Hie
nl Jay Utter art publnhta In th. rdii ntcaitao.
Haote try to kaao in lettan limitad to ana pat ***).
Idantity o latrar writer hold M itriet*t conliaanca.
Thii ncwipoper iniimn na rtiponilbillty fat thtlMMh or eainran
aipranad in lattt rt from raoeara.
Labor News
And
Comment
Sir.
SUNDOWN CEREMONY
American History tells us that past and present generations
have fought under the Stars and Stripes and many brave men
have given their lives to protect the rights for which the Stars
and Stripes stand.
Yet I begin to wonder If the Stars and Stripes they refer
to ar of the same type I Aw o sacrilegiously lowered at sun-
down yesterdav by shore patrolman In front of the base police
stitldn at Cocoli.
It Is the custom of the Navy to run down the Colors at sun-
down (and I mean run down), roll them Into a shapless wad,
and treat them AS If thev were a nll of mechanic's waste?
Is this procedure for lowering the Colors standard thruout
the Navy or Just a method devised snd used at the Cocoll Navy
Bae police station?
if this method Is standard thrurut the Navy, wha tis the ce-
remony called 'Striking the Colors?
We of the Army render honors to the Colors at sundown
that we call "Retreat." But then again we are a sentimental
lot that put too much faith In ceremonies.
I shudder al the thought of what would happen to a base
policeman if he were to give the Admiral's flag the same treat-
ment he gave our Stars and Stripes, at Cocoli.
There are those of us in the Armed Services that hold a
high regard for the American flag, and resent any disrespect
shewn toward that flag.
Im Navy tradition is so poor that they hold no respect for
the flag under which they remain a tree people, we of the Army,
and I'm sure I speak for members of the Marine and Air Cores,
will gladly volunteer our services In rendering to the colors the
.tspect they so richly deserve.
Just Plain Mad.
_-------------
RECKLESS DRIVERS
Sirs:
I can understand snipers (people who kill others from a
vantage pofnt) In Korea or other combat areas, but I can't see
why people should "snipe" at our children here or In any peace-
ful town Ilka ours.
Every dav ar.d night, esperlallv from 4 to 6 p.m.. cars drive
at an excessive rate of speed along the streets and around cor-
nets, with no concern but getting someplace a few seconds
esiner.
I imagine It Is prettv hard to hand a parent a child's broken
body and say. "I'm sorry. I ran over your baby" but I know
It would be worse yet to pick my child up In that condition my-
self.
Let's think It over, drivers, while driving rn Cocoli. Thank
yod.
L. E. Jacobson
Cocoli, C.Z.

Our hobby is collecting postcards, and we would like to write
to other kids in Panama who would like to trade postcards with
gould be very glad to hear frpm,you all. so how about
SRRINE CONW CIINTOI
No. 4 Carter Road R.D. No. 3
lton, N.J. Princeton, N.J.
(Age 13) (Age 13)
Sirs:
Have Just read an item In vour newspaper about "How To
Be Successful As A Modern Grandma." concerning a conference
held by a group connected with the Child Study Assn. of Amer-
ica
It occurred to me that it might be very interesting to or-
ganize a group of "Grandmas" here In the Canal Zone.
I know of two or three cities in the States who have organ-
ized "Grandmother Clubs," holding regular monthly meetings
usu.lly a short business meeting followed by light refreshments
and some entertainment, cards or perhaps Just good talk
either In a meeting hall or at different members' houses, ac-
cording to the sise of the group.
Perhaos there are a number of Zonlan grandmas who would
be Interested. If one of them with organising ability would get
a nucleus together, and writ* a letter to the Mall Box. Inviting
those who wished to loin, to write to her box number, giving
any information desired. Any ids on the subject?
"Poor 01' Grandma*"
("Why'd they have to shoot poor granmaw?")
Sir-
Why vote?
Why should any one llvlna In the Canal Zone be Interested
la voting In the coming elections?
Why should the women's clubs bother to set up votlng-ln-
lormatlon booths in the commissaries?
Isnt It true that the Canal Zone set-up has never (riven Its
emploves an opportunity to practice democratic procedures in
our local government? Certainly none of our higher or lesser
officials are chosen by or are answerable to us?
However, we are still citizens of the United States as well
at residents of the Canal Zone. Our interests and responsibil-
ities are surely not confined to this area.
It is time we wake up to this fact and stop side-stepping
our duties as citizen.
Our country is under fire today not only from enemy bullets
but from enemy Ideology which Is determined to prove to the
world that democracy as practiced In the United States is de-
cadent form of stovemment doomed to failure.
These enemies read with greatest glee In newspapers and
other periodicals about the corruotlon that flourishes in all
levels of government and feel that thev have ample proof that
ear eountry Is going to the dogs politically.
Whether our enemies prove themselves right depends upon
you and me.
Democracy Is a government of Individuals. This IS Its
strength and its weakness
We are In greater danger from our own indifference than
we are from military attack.
The success or failure of democracy In our country or any
eountry will be aetermlned by the attitude of the individual citi-
zen.
If this attitude Is one of cynicism, apathy, fear, laziness and
"let George do It." the political crooks will take over And de-
mocracy will die.
If our attitude Is one of faith in the democratic wav of life,
willingness to sacrifice, work and live for these ideals in dally
eortitructlve wavs. then democracy can endur*.
To vote li the first duty of the eitien. The number of
eligible voters who declined to vet In the last primary and
general elections was aorslllne
Failure to vote la political Suicide. If we fail to vote we
will have government by default rather than government by the
people.
How ean we In the Canal Zone share in a program to help
preserve the democratic wav of lite?
first, we should accept our responsibilities as eltlsans and
vote If possible.
Beyond that there are many other things we can do if we
Just look around us a Mt.
We ean become better informed about what Is goin on IB
our eountrv and abroad; we can teach the Ideals of demperaev
to our children and teach them to resneet our country's laws:
w can patro* ic worth while h-iotic prtmsnis we esn be
willing to nrtt-'"*te and eootvr In fommiinl'v ntweti nation
and activities "bet will heir to be'**r >1 of us. end we mn heln
re dlsnell fear and pessimism with strong persons faith and
eourate.
Beinr a better eltl',en of er cu*r" mlh e"tp **** is
more constructive citizen of the C--' ",o" end ?lit help
tm to find ways to solve some of our lor' !*'-
A Prospective Voter.
By Victor Rleeel
NEW YORK. President Tru-
man may not yet know it, but
on ditierent sides of the same
block In mid-town New York
during the turbulent 48 hours
of the past weekend, his na-
tional machinery began falling
apart on the political and war
production fronts.
The President will long have
reason to remember Manhat-
tan's 34th and 36th street.
On 36th known as the
Jungle to some because the na-
tion's biggest mobs pull millions
of dollars out of Its truck-laden
gutters the gang Syndicate's
executives were fidgety again
for the first time since the Ke-
fauver crime crew poked into
that Main Street of garment
area rackets.
The word was thAt Rudy
HAiiey, Kefauver'i former coun-
sel, had put the finger on
"Three Fingers" Brown. And
Rudy, once started, was expect-
ed to blow the whole story.
While hardly Mr. TrumAA's do-
ing, that's where the Democratic
Party's biggest machine comes
right in. Up and down 36th
Street it Is known that since
Rudy Halley charged this week-
end tnat "Ihree Flligers" is
"more clever and more danger-
ous" than Frankle Costello and
is challenging Prankle's reign
as underworld boss, the crime
buster soon will follow with
other disclosures.
Halley is known to have said
thAt "Three Finge**" has In-
fluence in the Federal gov-
ernment and In Congress, and
Is A power in the New York
Democratic Party. Halley has
told his own political as-
sociates that it wAA "Three
Finger" who introduced seme
f the highest New York (
lie officials to even higher
echelons In the party be-
fore these officials received
their appointments.
And there is no doubt that
Halley's chief sponsor, David
Dubinsky's Ladles Garment
Workers' Union, has been wor-
ried by "Three Fingers'" In-
fluence in the multlmilllon dol-
lar garment area. In those labor
circles It is believed that Brown,
and not Costello and Co., al-
ready Is The Boss.
Should Halley's crusade con-
tinue, it will be a miracle on
35th Street if Mr. Truman's
powerful northern machine
pulls out uncracked.
No less a miracle on 34th
Street will be Mr. Truman's abil-
ity to pull through what occur-
red on the other side of the
block at about the Bme time
Halley was preparing his note
for the Wast on Three Fingers.
There, high in the Empire
State Building, an angered gov-
ernment official was listening
to some furious men. Meeting
in the headquarters of the Iron
and Steel Institute Were War
Mobilizer Charles Wilson and
the executives of the Steel In-
dustry Ben Fairless, of U. S.
Steel, Eugene Grace of Bethle-
hem Steel, Clarence Randall of
Inland Steel and the spokesmen
for eight other companies turn-
ing out the metal on which our
war machines roll and shoot
and fly.
With them ws Economic
Stabilizer Roger Lowell Put-
nam, by this time wishing he
had stood In bed. Never had
a Lowell been so spoken to by
anyone. The industrialists
said, in effect, that they want-
ed Mr. Traman to give them
that priee increase. They
wouldn't yield on a onion
hog in the steel industry.
And that they had on their
desk scores of telegrams
from other industries offering
support if they stand pat.
Back ot Washington rushed
Wilson.
Hi intimates there tell me
he was set to do several things:
Blast the Wage Stabilisation
Board; blast Mr. Truman; and
then, resign. For he said he felt
as the steel Industrialists felt.
"Outraged" was the word he
used.
There was not much anger
with Phil Murray, or the CIO,
for that matter.
Murray was on the other side.
He was delivering to hi people.
There would always be An other
side. That was an irritant to the
Industrialists. But an occupa-
tional hazard.
It was President Truman, for
political reason In a campaign
year, who was withholding a
compensating price increase.
the industrialists charged.
And Wilson WAA told that
since the industrialists believed
the total cost to them would
eventually be 29.8 cents an hour
per man- in wage increases (or
about 112 a week for one mil-
lion workers when the final
settlement Was written i, they
said let there be a strike. It
would be Mr. Truman's fault.
Late Friday night Wilson
wa set to biait the Admin-
istration add fttft. But word
finally came from Mr. Tru-
man thAt erle increase
would be possible. There were
hurried conference. WlkMM
Mid off. But th strike may
eeme anyway eve the ion
bop. Ant even tf th en-
INtge i evwMoel, tow other
crises loom imu, aluminum,
all and rubber.
Anv of theee could cripple all
war pro-'uetlo" If th's happens
Mr. Wilson will quit. So will
scores of other buslneumen
now running war agencio
A nAtlenAJ wage-priee policy
Is nee'ed. The* are not the
days to live by erlaesl
Of Course, He Could Move^
TOMta
i an......a* i
***
id > mi


Howl's Nest
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORKWhile I am a fellow with mus-
ic in his bones (which also react to gout and
weather) I have Just bashed in the radio with
my scout ax, because I do not think that I can
Uve through very much more of this maudlin
mood music that torments us these days.
It may be direct result ot the last tax hike,
but we have com down with a hard case of
the musical sobs recently, and It is getting o
Parade without drowning in A freshet of tear.
One is racked with sobs as he goes about his
humble chores, In sympathy to whatever mi, -
brain is rendering one of the loser'a-weeper
ditties of the day.
There is an affliction upon us, momentarily,
in the form of a singer called Johnny Ray, which
makes you yearn for the dear old days of the
Sinatra swoon.
Mr Ray suffers from some sort of vocal ep-
ilepsy that attacks him violently when he sings
so that he Is forced to rend his garments, moan
plteously and rub ashes in his hair.
He is the new darling of the bobby-soxers,
and looks to make a million unless n= snakes
himself to pieces during a rendition of "Cry."
The tastes of th* music lover are paislng
curious, and generally react directly to the in-
fluence of sun spots and monsoon season.
You will get a rash of hillbilly schmaltz, Ay,
so that all you can hear is Pattl Page and "ten-
nessee Walts," end the thousand Imitations of
same, and then suddenly the mood blackens.
Even the little white clouds no larger than a
man's hand are sweating tears today, and the
suspicion is thAt the whole nation is snugly
tucked in for at least Another six months of
unrequited grief.
For the past few seaion we have been de-
cidedly folk-songish in our popular tastes, which
is to say pretty lugubrious.
Our brand of folk music, whether or not it is
confected in Manhattan, tends to the old dole-
ful lament formula, which fattens on tragedy,
personal or public.
Evidently ft took some powerful disaster, such
as grandma throwing Out her hip, to drench a
ditty out of the anetor with the geetar.
My boyhood *t thrived on th* "wreck of the
Old Ninety-Seven" And th* "The Sinking of the
Titanic," and I even recall a small vogue for
the "Letter Edged in Black" on the Old wind
bok.
The busted heart has always enjoyed a pret-
ty steady play as the basis for versifying, but
I swear I don't recall a comparable period of
downright dolor.
In passing through several eras the early
Oene Austin, the Nick Lucas, the Blng Crosby
and Sinatra-Como-Bllly Daniels epochsconsid-
erable capital was made of grief, but not In
such Job lots, to such dreadful music. The next
time you hear a decent tune on the air the
chance are it was written in the 1930's, or had
you noticed?
I
It is not so much that you mind the epi-
demic of sodden-kerchief coloraturas as that
you live In deadly fear of the reaction.
I know what the reaction will be. As soon as
they've milked the last moisture out of "I won't
Cry Any More" the pendulum will slap back and
we will be in for a siege of those horrible
cheerful songs.
These are the song's with "day" And "sun"
and "early morn" and "get out of bed with a
smile" in them.
Th* average mood Is that life is A lovely
thing indeed, if you will just arise At I a.m..
fling bAck the covers, reach for your teeth, and
smile, stupid, smile If It kills you.
As a man who has not smiled before 4 p.m.
In 20 years, I find these spurious cheer songs
more offensive than the sordid little numbers
that suggest suicide as an antidote to the way
things are.
Anyone reading these lines would assume that
there here is a surly, disgruntled fellow who is
impossible to plCAse, and they would be nearly
The displeasure Also Include the half -suffo-
cated moans of the sexy singer who appear to
be stuck in the fenee; the handclap songs sans
melody, And All the quaver-throated tenor* with
the careful hairdos.
Deti us out a little simple June, moon, croon,
with a tune we ean whistle, and never mind
the palsied accompaniment. Baby here can do
all the ihaking that ha to be don around thl
house without any help from Johnny RAy.
Taxes Here To Stay
By Bruce Biossat
No mAtter who occupies th* Whit* House next
January, w* Are not likely to enjoy Any AAriy
reduction in tax*. .
From the mot conAervgtiv* to th* most li-
beral candidate for president, we Art hearing
pessimism on thAt Aeorc.
Senator Russell of Georgia, n*weet entry in
the presidential lists, is also the latest to dis-
courage hope of A speedy tax cut. He doe see
some chance of a material slash in the budget.
but believes tax relief must be deferred until at
l*aat lt6S.
Neither President TrumAn nor any of the oth-
er Democratic hopefuls talk of eating taxes.
Their emphasis Is on the burdens facing gov-
ernment.
On the Republican aide. General Eiaenpnwr'
specific views on taxes Are not known. It may
be fairly assumed from his general eco.n
philosophy that he would favor reduction
When it is practical.
But he is a strong backer of foreign aid And
rearmament, the two heaviest drains on th fed-
eral treasury, hene he is unlikely to otislder
a "practical- any tax trimming that would en-
dAnger those programs.
senator faff advocate* tax cutting in his pri-
mary stumping tours.
But he 6 trying to mak* It thoroughly un-
dArttood that h does net pretend this goal
could be quiekly achieved To questioner
h* declares th*
ordr of buineu Is to ehep
expense, since tn*y currently outrun revenues
by several bllUoA.
Taft sees no point in a tax reduction until
overnment outlay are below present receipts
ie doe not predict wh*n this might be accom-
plished, but rather leave* th* door open on
th* possibility thAt the job might eonsume a
couple Of years.
The American Citizen thus should realize
that he will not be voting for Immediate tax
cut thl fall.
At the very most, he can cast his ballot for
reduced government expenditures. That Is all
any major candidate Is promising as a tArtr.
Even If a presidential contender should pledge
himself to slash taxes right off, he probably
would b* forced by the sober responsibilities of
White House power to abandon the plan.
To move to pare revenue while they are well
behind expenses would be a foolhardy gesture.
It would push the government into heavy bor-
rowing to make up a deepening deficit, and
thereby drive the national debt higher than
ever.
Somewhere there must be a limit to this
kind of practice, even In the United States.
Most politician* are reluctant to strain the eoun-
try' credit to find that limit.
So file Away those dreams of prompt tax re-
lief For quite a while you'll be working for the
government unofficially for more day a
week than you ear to contemplate.
MERRY-00-RMD
If OH* PIAIION
i
I
Drew Pearson says: Truman visualizas his place in history;
British ambassador to Egypt may resign; McCarron's
"Iron Curtain Bill" booby-traps freedom.
WASHINGTONOne reason why the President 1 private-
ly for Oov. Adlal Stevenson of Illinois to be the Democratic
nominee for President i illuitrated by a remark TrumaA once
made to Col. Jake Arvey, Chicago's atute Democratic leader.
"8tevenson remarked the President, "is about the best-in-
formed man I know on foreign affairs."
He was referring to the fact that Stevenson, after Hrving
As assistant to the late Frank Knox when he was Secretary Of
the Navy, later joined the State Department and played an en-
ergetic part at the United Nations conference In San Francisco.
The remark also Illustrates an Increasingly obvious pride
which the President take* In his foreign policy.
He believes that his place In history will be made by the
fact that he took an unflinching stand against Communist
aggression and built up the defense of Western Europe.
The bickering of domestic politics, he Is convinced, will be
passed over by historians, who will not, however, forget Truman's
courageous battle against the encroachment of Russia.
CHURCHILL ON EGYPT
The United States 1 so engrossed in its own poUtieAl Aqu*b-
blt* and dometle problems that les* and let* Attention is fo-
cued On tome of the sore spots where wars cart brew. Also
less Attention is p*id to those responsible.
In gypt, for lrtitAnee, It isn't generally known that the
British ambassador in Cairo is io sore At Prime Minister Church-
ill' reectionary policies that he is about ready to resign.
Churchill, who one* covered the Sudan war as a young ,nwa-
eapermAn, l* determined that the Sudan, which controls the
pper Nile, shall not unite with Egypt, and has followed *uch
tough policies that Ambassador Sir Ralph Stevenson has noti-
fied London that, if Churchill continues to Ignore his advice,
he will resign. _
Ambassador Stevenson thinks Churchill Is driving Bgypt
slowly Into the arms of Communist RussiaJust as he drove
the Greeks toward Communism by his orders in 1944 to Oen.
Scoble to "treat Athens as a conquered city."
IRON CURTAIN BILL
Sen. Pat McCarran, powerful chairman of the Judiciary
committee, has learned from long experience on Captol hi
that one way to get a bill through Congress Is to make it so
long and Involved that colleagues won't take the trouble to read
It.
McCarran's latest contribution, due for consideration by
both Houses *oon, 1 a record in this respect302 pages long
and with no less than 408 "sections."
It'* also loaded with enough booby traps against our Con-
stitutional freedoms to cause the Founding Fathers to do a mas
turn-over In their grave*.
The NevAda senator calls the voluminous measure a "recod-
lficatlon" of our Immigration and naturalization laws.
However, such stAlwArt congressmen who have manAged
to wade through th* technical mumbo-Jumbo have given It
another name"McCarran's Iron Curtain Bill." since It exposes
foreign-born Immigrants to the same police-state tatles Which
many of them fled to totalitarian powers to escape.
If the bill passes In anything approximating its present
form, we might as well send the Statue of Liberty back to
France. Here are some of the things it does:
ELIMINATING PROFESSORS
1) Makes Communist or Nazi court convictions a bar against
entry Into the United Stateseven If the offense involved no
"moral turpitude" by American standards.
Thus, an ardent churchman who violated a Communist law
against religious worshipor any other offense not "purely po-
litical"and who was sentenced by a Communist court to more
than five years, could not enter the U.S. as a refugee.
2) Stipulates that an Immigrant may apply for a vla to
the United States only in the country In which he had an "es-
tablished" residence. This would automatically bar any rtfu-
fee from a totalitarian nation, since he can never get a visa
rom his homeland.
3) Eliminates college and university professors from the
class of aliens who are admissible as quota-exempt Immigrants.
Yet without the professors who have come to our shores In
recent years, we would not have world leadership In the atomic
bomb. .,
McCarran would also strike some of the distinguished exiles
who have been teaching at Harvard, Catholic University, and
Georgetown, such as ex-chancellor Bruenlng of Germany, who
took refuge from Hitler at Harvard.
4) Since 1917, we have exempted victims Of religious per-
secutions from literacy requirement*.
McCarran's bill Says that such religious exiles, if llllterAte,
are no longer welcome on our shores. Yet McCarran'* Attceitors
fled from Ireland because of religious persecution, And many
of such refugees at that time were Illiterate.
59-YEAR-OLD CRIMES
If the foregoing sounds shockingyou haven't heard the
worst.
The man who more than anyone else In the government
shapes our Immigration policies. Sen. Pat McCarran, has cooked
up some even more sinister police-state medicine regarding the
deportation of immigrant Americans.
One provision of his bill abolishes existing statutes of limi-
tation in deportation cases and gives the attorney general pow-
er to deport any alien who "at any time after entry Is convicted
In the United States of any criminal offense."
In other words, under McCarran's bill an immigrant eould
be deported for e crime he committed 50 years ago, for which
nO witnesses are available. .
Furthermore, since McCArran stipulates "any" crime, this
conceivably could mean a traffic violation. And there l* no
check-reinmuch les judicial reviewto control a possible pre-
judiced attorney general.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
Several Investigators for the King tax-fraud subcommittee
are talking about quitting. They are disillusioned over the way
the committee is hearing the unimportant witnese in open
session, while the big shots are heard behind closed doors.
Congressman Keough of Brooklyn has been conferring be-
hind the backs of other congressmen with ex-commlafloner
Joe Nunan, once of Internal Revenue and a key witness before
the King committee.
The underworld Is trying to talk dope-peddler Nellie Leech
Into testifying that she supplied dope to a commissioner of the
District of Columbia. I understand the story Is a phony.
New York police took no chances on another basketball fix
t the recent big national Invitation tournament at New
ork's Madison Square Garden.
Plain-clothes men were staked out at the Paramount Hotel
whre the out-of-town teams stayed, while all coaches were
called in by the D.A.'s office and told to telephone if they heard
anything ever remotely suspicious.
Three top American scientists have flown to Australia to
teit the tremendous new uranium deposit discovered there. Dr.
Jesse Johnson of the Atomic Energy Commission think* the
Australian strike may be one of the largest in the world.
Greece and Turkey almost pulled out of the North Atlantic
pact when It was proposed to put their armies under an Italian
SenerAl. The Greeks and Turks insisted on serving directly un-
er Eisenhowerend finally got their way.
THERE'S MONEY
IN THE STRANGEST PLACES!
^ ClSS/ff&
Grandma'* trunk
irA* fun ot tunk
And cluttered up the Attic.
A PA classified ad aold the lot
to a nappy antique addict I
Every month tvtry week every dty
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE CLASSIFIED
ADS tha all other daily paper in Panana combined!
*l


rmmsDAY, march vi. ims
*i*ir~- -
m PANAMA AMWCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPEH
MOB
Mfcawaa^mjmmhw 11 -
Murray Lashes At rBig Steel9
For Tardy Wage Issue Tactics
PITTSBURGH, March 27.(UP)CIO Presi-
dent Philip Murray said today that the only
''avenue" by which the steel industry can escape
a nation-wide strike of 660,000 workers is accept-
ance of the Wage Stabilization Board wage-boost-
ing recommendations.
Murray, red-faced and angry, went before a
state CIO convention and denounced the industry
for- one hour and 19 minutes. Then he met with
U. S. Steel Corp. negotiators.
However, the session with
"Big Steel" lasted Just one hour
and wu recessed "until further
notice" when 8. Steel vice
president John A. Stephens said
the company wanted more time
to consider the WSB's settlement
formula. There was no indica-
tion when the talks would re-
sume.
Murray's convention speech
left little doubt that he will
order a walkout when J. gov-
ernment-requested truce expires
April 8 unless the steel com-
panies are willing to grant the
26-cent-an-hour "package" pro-
posed by the W8B.
"The thing is over." he told
delegates to the Pennsylvania
Industrial council. "They may
want to force us out on strike.
But the responsibility is
theirs.
As Murray spoke, union repre-
sentatives already were In con-
ference with negotiators for
Jones Laughlin Steel Corp..
fourth largest producer of the
nation.
These talks broke up after
four hours without report of
progress.
Murray charged the steel com-
panies had "dragged" the union
before the W8B.
He said the stele workers
didn't get what they wanted,
but they had accepted "in the
nation's interest" the recom-
mendations, which Include "In-
stallment" wage Increases total-
ing 17V4 cents and 8'/i cents In
fringe benefits.
"Let the industry come forth
Instead of brooding about, spew-
ing vomit and running hither
and yon in a disorganized state
__ and act as good citizens and
men of good will," he told the
cheering delegates.
Industry spokesmen made no
comment.
Stephens, head of U. 8. Steel's
negotlaltng team, refused to
comment on all questions as he
waited for the negotiations to
open. He was plainly irritated
when Murray arrived several
Vegetable Stew
HORIZONTAL
1 Orange-red
vegetable
7 Love apple
1J Oxidizing
enzyme
14 Lariats
Hits waters
av opened for the
^ Israelite -
10 Take Into
custody
17 Profound
18 Capuchin
monkey
Irritate
7 Teachers
8 Over (poet.)
9 The sea
(comb, form)
10 Solar disk
11 Assignment
12 Hops' kilns
18 River In
Switzerland
11 English riv
22 Soils
28 Blow with
open hand
24 Exist
25 Class of
Answer to Previous Puzile
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1 Intends 28 Green (her.)
23 Vassal
27 Comments
82 Glsndular
organs
34 Keep
35 Reluctant
36 Saliferous
28 Husband of
Gudrun
minutes after the scheduled 2 37 Bothers
p.m. starting
ference.
time of the con-
Murray's address before the
state union convention was
taken by many as an "expan-
sion" of his remarks contain-
ed In a telegram to Charles
Wilson after the defense mo-
biliser had blasted the WSB
proposal as a "serious threat"
to the nation's
program.
58 Handled |
stabilisation -fi 87 Peaceful "
He also said that the same
situation prevails now that pre-
ceded crippling nation wide
strikes In 1946 and again In
1849.
"In those two critical situa-
tions," the union chieftain said,
"we went along with the gov-
ernment only to have Industry
back down. The results of those
back downs now are history.
"And here we are again In
1952. Where do we find the In-
dustry this time? of course, we
still find them saying 'no.'
We have accepted the govern-
ment's proposals for settlement,
but up to this moment. Industry
has not."
Pacific War's Sprague
Retires Before Demotion
' WASHINGTON, Mar. 27 OJP)
Vice Adm. Thomas L. Sprague,
World War II hero and com-
mander of naval air forces In
the Paclfle, has decided to re-
tira April 1 rather than accept
a lesser assignment at Mem-
phis, Tenn., the Navy announced
yesterday.
Sprague, whose present head-
quarters are at San Diego, Cal.,
recently was ordered to a rear
admiral's billet at Memphis
where he would have command-
ed the Naval air technical train-
ing; center.
The Navy said he chose re-
tirement rather than accept the
transfer.
It did not say immediately
whether Sprague, 57 and a
native of Lima, O.,, would be
given retirement pay.
Under present law, admirals
and generals must be 62 years
old before they are entitled to
retirement pay. Otherwise they
must have the Defense Secret-
ary's approval.
Sprague has been a naval
aviator since 1921 and has had
continuous duty with naval
aviation since that time.
During World War II, Sprague
took part In the capture of
Saipan and Guam In the Ma-
rianas and of Morotal In the
Halmanera campaign.
He also participated In the
Invasion of Leyte.
Sprague holds the Navy Cross
for extraordinary heroism while
commander of an escort car-
rier task group In the Pacific
during World War II.
Sprague has been Pacific Fleet
air commander since Oct. 1,
1949. The normal tour of duty on
any assignment la generally
three years.
The Navy said flag officers
frequently must step down a
grade when transferred from
one assignment to another.
The Navy haa billets for 23
Tice admirals.
The assignment as Pacific
Fleet air commander calls for a
vice admiral, while that at the
air technical training center
calls for a Rear Admiral.
If Sprague had accepted the
DON'T MISS
THIS OPPORTUNITY
395
TROUBLE LIGHT
Has rubber shockproof
handle and 25 ft. rubber-
covered cord.
GRAND SALI
FIRESTONE
H: St 1. rraacter* I* Cm Ai
J-
change of assignment, the Navy
said he automatically would
have reverted to his permanent
rank as a Rear Admiral.
Except for the ranks of five
star admiral created by special
act of Congress, the highest
permanent rank In the Navy Is
Rear Admiral.
The rank of full admiral and
vice admiral Is a temporary one.
Sprague was graduated from
the U. 8. Naval Academy In 1017.
31 Wash lightly r
40 Periods of
time *
42 Famous
English school
46 Born fa
47 Pasteboard W
Si Armed Sect
53 Trader *
55 Bred
W
52
IT
J7
58 Approached
?bbticali$
1 Stout string
20n the *
sheltered
3 Interpret
.4 Grate
, SMonoMC-
-- aharkte_
li
Precipitation
Ancient
Chinese
Instrumenta
31 To cut
33 Night song
38 Grade of oil
41 Fortlflcstion
42 Auricles
48 Woody plant
17
P
r
r
44 Persian
tentmaker
45 Nostril
47House (Sp.)
48 Wing-shaped
49 Plexus
50------Scott
case
52 Low haunt <
84 Compass point
IT
ICE HABITS CHANGED
AUBURN, N. H. (U.P.) Ice
harvesting, a booming business
in the days of the Icebox, Is be-
coming a lost art. Charles Web-
ster, a life-long Ice harvester on
nearby Lake Massabeslc, attrib-
utes the declina to the rise of

RlJMPP
HERCULES LUGGAGE MFG.
Show Room28 J. F. da la Osea
Tel. 2-1869
PLASTIC LAMINATING
Protect your Identification Cards, Snapshots,
Driver's Licenses, Business Cards with "Sealed-
in-Plastic" for Soil-Proof, Wear-proof Protec-
tion. One Day Service at
SMOOTyHUNNICUTT,S.A.
COLON, R.P. Call Phone 808, Colin.
Fantastic Whirlwind
Computer Designed
By MIT Scientists
25 (U8I8). Scientists at the
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., March
27 lUSISi Scientists at the
Massac h u s e 11 s Institute of
Technology recently announced
the arrival of a new "child pro-
digy" into the mechanical com-
puter family.
Whirlwind One, as the mach-
ine Is called, has a remarkable
memory system made up of
cathode tubes like the viewing
piece of a television set.
A number of 16 digits can be
read Into, or taken out of, this
memory machine In 25-mll-
llonths of a second. The mach-
ine can take Information from
j Its memory, use It to complete
calculation and return answer
to Its memory store 20,000 times
In one second.
If the computer was part of
an air traffic control center,
the sponsors say, it could re-
ceive Information by radio or
radar from hundreds of aircraft
approaching or leaving* at jet
speeds, assimilate data Instan-
taneously, and sort out a flight
pattern for all the various
planes.
Information Is fed Into the
machine by bunched or mag-
netic tape. It Is handled by an
i assortment of 5,000 vacuum
(tubes and other electric devices
and delivers answer either by
; teletype printer on in the form
I of graph picture on cathode ray
tube which can be photograph-
ed.
During the Whirlwind's testing
period, it has worked on a long
range problem for one of the
major oil companies, seeking to
determine the most efficient
and economical techniques for
pumping oil from underground
reservoirs.
It will be put to work on
military problems and on busi-
ness problems of process con-
trol, economic analysis. Invent-
ory control, census calculation
and various scientific and en-
gineering computations. It has
the electric refrigerator and the actually been used to produce
shortage of experienced "wing-1 Instructions for automatic con-
ers," or Ice handlers. trol of large machine tools.'
ir
r
5T
^ 17
F5"
To"
i
HX
HOUSEHOLD EXCHAHGE
THE ONLY STORE OF ITS KIND
IN PANAMA
9 We Pay Spot Cash for Your Furniture
* We Sell Reconditioned Furniture
We Accept Your Old Furniture -
On a Trade in Basis.
COME IN AND SEE OUR BARGAINS
FOR YOURSELF
Living Room, Bedroom and Dining Room
Sets, Office and Waiting Room Furniture,
New Bamboo Bar, Porch Furniture, Odd
Chairs, Beds, Tables, Dressers, Sideboards,
China Closets, etc., etc.
Open from 9:00 to 12 2:00 to 6:00 p.m.
and Saturdays from 9:00 to'6:00 p.m.
41 Automobile Row Tel. 3-4911
NEW TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
EDITION OF 1952
We are very pleased to announce that the new Telephone Directory for 1952 is now
ready for delivery and we will start delivering this to your home or office on March 31.
Please have your 1951 Directory at hand in order to exchange this for your new edition
of 1952.
/
If after April 7 you have not received your new Directory and your telephone number
begins with "2" please call at the Fuerza y Lu Office Building on Central Avenue 105
and if the digit starts with "3" please call at our Branch Office, Samuel Lewis Street, near
the new church, Santuario Nacional del Corazn de Maria, and the new Directory will be
delivered to you.
The sale of the new Directory will start to the general public on April 7.
COMPAA PANAMEA
DE FUERZA Y LUZ
has been and always wilt be a great factor
in tha development and progress of Panama.
\oe JLovely
-/o look at....-
' We have just unpacked
New and Lovely Materials
* Silk Shantung Taffeta
16 Colors
* From Ireland Linen
Dotted Print
* Cotton Lace
For Cocktail Dresses
ZIG-ZAG
108 Central Avenue Telephone 2-3411
Headquarters of VOGUE and McCALL Patterns
foerfooy?ea$ Classified


rAoe ror
rnw PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY. MARCH It, Hi
\ Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
II j Shipping & Airline News
, \ New Grace Line Ship
. Jo" s Service
. .cording; to Hie latest issue
o the Pacific Shipper, the San-
ta Klisa is making her first voy-
jpRr- in the Grace Line run bc-
ftwten British Columbia-Pacific
JCoft ports and Mexico. Central
jAi-'crlca. Canal and West Coast
of "nnIn America.
ActdiHon of the Santa Elisa
>rs the h.ie'.s C-2 fleet total
'10 six and assures two sailinas
Imenn-ilv fce'.ween the Pacific
*Ccr*l end the West Coast of
iso.-.th America, the line said.
M'",, I Ti>p Ancon is scheduled to ar-
M Pt Cristobal Monday with 77
passengers, accordine to the ad-
'va'ce passenger list from the
Pama Line offices at Balboa
H''"hts.
I Amone those on the list is Tboy
m= G. Relihan. Manager of the
^ri-olesale DoROOds Section o
the Commissary Division at Mt.
HThe complete advance passen-
ger list follows:
Mr and Mrs. James Allen; Li.
jo%h J- Bellini. Pfc Frutos
Bol-.nos; David ^s^ezrn^l.
and Mrs. Robert EL. Brown,
M^r^c
Everything Ready
For Country Fair
At Pedro Miguel
Plans have been compleLed for
a country o be held at the
Pedro Mtfuel BaU Park Satur-
day from 10 am. to 6 pm,ac-
cording to information received
K the Pedro Miguel Civic
Council.
The various community orga-
nllons of Pedro Migue will
provide a variety of entenata-
mest for young and old includ-
inu ames of skill for all,
mimefous children's attractions,
S^well as two baseball games.
KtehllghtinK the children's
enlenainmcni will be a merry-
go-round, pony rides, and a
mi'-.iature bowling alley.
m-e l0 autact skilled and.
pc. -su-skilled. .bi-seball nitchecs I
"ll! >> a -annk-.he-victim
at; aoi-on in Web scoiir.g a
bull's eye results In someone
getting doused in a tank of
water. (Spectators wishing to
cool off are welcome to assume,
the victim's role, the counclli1
The two baseball games
acb;:iuled will be regular games
of i he Pmstllch Teen Age League.
At 10 a.m. the Palomas will meet
the McCaws and the Ocelots
and Conejos will play at 2.30
p.m.
Soft drinks. Ice cream, pop
cor \ sandwiches, pie. cake and
col-ee will be available during
1 a: hough the fair will open at
10 r.m. with the first baseball
ano. the bulk of the entertain-
mr n will not begin until noon,
ho: ever, food and refreshments
wi -be available throughout the
d:
,. Cook; Mr. and Mrs. John M.
,Craft; Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
Downs; and Cpl. Michael A.
Drum.
Mrs. Philip G. Eastwick; Ro-
bert E. Frazer; Mr. and Mrs.
Benjamin W. Guernsey; Mr. and-
|Mrs. John G. Haky and 2 chil-
i dren; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
;Hart; Mrs. Estela Herbrugger;
'Miss Ruth Hennessy; Ross H.
Hollowell; Mr. and Mrs. Balmes
N. Hidalgo, Jr. and 2 children;
and Mr. and Mrs. William C.;
Hohman and son.
Lester D. Johnson; Miss Paul-
ine Kearney; Mr. and Mrs. [
Frank Koenigh and 2 children;,
Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. King;
Miss Vilma de la Lastra; Lewi
McIlvaine; Mr. and Mrs Leslie'
C. Mintkenbaugh; Mrs. Jean C.|
Moore; Mr. and Mrs. Clinton
Moore; Dr. Aaron A. Mess; and
Cpl. William E. Muir. Jr.; Mr. i
and Mrs. William T. Nail; and
Frederick O. Olsson.
Oscar Peterson; Louis Reit-
meister; Thomas G. Relihan;
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Ross;
Ki.isev Roos; Maurice Shame:
Mrs Nancy Sidebotham and
son; Harrv D. Soyster and wife;
Mrs. Ver Spah and daughter:
Mrs. Helen G. Sprague; Miss
Agnes E. Sugrue; Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Van Buren. Jr.: Elmo
Wilsc-n; and Mr. and Mrs. Mer-
lin B. Yocum and daughter.
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED B ROYAL CHARTER l4i
Royal Hails Lines Ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA _______^
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SALAVERRY" .............................Apr" 3rd
M.V. "LAGUNA" .................................April 18th
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, KINGSTON,
HAVANA, NASSAU, BERMUDA, CORUA,
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO"* (18,000 tons)... .May 91st
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. "KENUTA"................................March 28th
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
M V. "LOCH RYAN".......................March 28th/29th
S.S. "DONGEDYK" .............................March 31st
TO UK/CONTINENT
S.S. "DIEMERDYK" .............................April 4th
All sailings subject to ehanre without notice.
PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO., Cristbal Tel. 1654/5
FORD CO. INC.
PANAMAAve. Per #55 Tel. 3-1257/1
BALBOATerm. Bid. Tel. -1965
. Do Yon Like To
SMASH FENDERS?
Fool the driver behind you:
come up to the crossing fast
when the amber light is on, then
niter the Telldw behind''has
decided you're going on through
stop suddenly! You'll probably
smash some fenders and earn the
reputation of being a discourte-
ous driver.
But if you are a careful driver
and remember the other fellow,
see us for automobile insurance.
The courteous driver is the care
ful driver.
BLUE STAR LINE
,
M/V DEBRETT

SAILING ABOUT APRIL lit
FOR
f'MTED KINGDOM
Excellent accommodation available.
Apply

PAYNE & WARDLAW
BALBOA
Pacific Terminal Bldg.
Phone 2-1258
CRISTOBAL
Masonic Temple Bldg.
Phone 3-2161
Mi
matrnm
TERSE
THE MACHINE AGE
("HECKLES AND HIS PRIENDA
40BARY v**d. THe tAaesraer mi
TON, /S LOOXIH& /=OKA WAYX3
"^ H.EVHE ARLY IN UKf
Let's See
BY MERRILL BLOBS
TMERe sheis.Preck- A That
-How ib eer rich quick*/) book
INVeSTONE BUCK AMO END /t2*s
'>W,TH MILLION/ /"***
So WHAT? SOMC OF we oto
SCHEMES ARE RlPe TO PAY OFP
A6AIM .' NOW LCttS -
YlPtS LOOK WMATSOMBBOCV
HERE BETWEEN THE PAGES /
A I.I1 OOP
Scientific Outcast
Y ?. T. H AMLIH
...THEREFORE I.UNDOUBT
EDLYTHE WORLD'S
GREATEST PHYWCI0T,
AM SHUNNED AS AN
OUTCAST BY MY
COLLEAGUES-
BOOTS AND HER BUDDlsW
It's Awful
HT EDGAR MARTOT 1
D| 'S WKLREN Planeteer
ritreciLLA's pop
BUGS BUNNY


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, M5
THE PANAMA AM1RICAN AN INOFTENOKNT DAILT NEWSPAPER
;- *
paop. PIPI
pacific J^octetu

&, 17, &tl~ D.L &IL. 3321
AMBASSADOR AND MRS. WILEY
GIVE BON VOIAOE LUNCHEON
The Ambassador of the United Stales to Panama and
Mr. John Cooper Wiley entertained tojay with a bon voyare
luncheon (Wen In honor of Mr. O. Wallace LaRue, who plans
to sail Friday for the United States.
Corers were laid for twentyfour.
PACIFIC SIDE.......* ......
Counselor And Mrs. Wise
Entertain
The counselor of the United
Btates Embassy and Mrs. Mur-
ray M. Wise entertained in their
penthouse reshidence this after-
noon with an informal get-toge-
ther of the diplomatic section of
the embassy, in honor of the
chief of the section, Mr. O. Wal-
lace LaRue, who la departing to-
morrow aboard the 8.8. Cristo-
bal for New York en route to
Washington. D.C.
Admiral And Mrs. Bledsoe
Hold "At Home"
Rear Adm. Albert M. Bledsoe,
commandant of the Fifteenth
Naval District and Mrs. Bledsoe
entertained yesterday at 5:3|
p.m. with an "At Home" at their
quarters on the naval reserva-
tion.
Despedida Honors
Captain And Mrs. Comly
Captain and Mrs. Samuel P.
Comly, Jr., USN. were honored at
a despedida given by the officers
of the Military Sea Transporta-
tion Service at the bachelor of-
ficers quarters. Fifteenth Naval
District. .
Captain Comly was presented
an engraved silver cigarette case
by the officers of M.S.T.S
Captain and Mrs. Comly sailed
todav aboard the U8S General
Goethals for the captain s new
station at the Fourth Naval Dis-
trict, Philadelphia.
Hallorans Honored At Despedida
Commander and Mrs. Edward
Roosevelt Halloran. U8N, were
honored at a despedida given at
the Armv-Navy Club Tuesday
evening by the P.I.O. of the
Armed Forces and Panama Ca-
nal and members of the Pana-
manian press.
Commander Halloran was pre-
sented the medal of the Order of
the Foundation of J. Gabriel Du-
que by Don T. Gabriel Duaue
Commander and Mrs. Hallo-
ran sailed today aboard the U88
General Goethals for Halloran's
new station In Great Lakes, 111.
Mrs. Million Hostess
For Bridcr Club
Mrs. J. H. Million of Pedro
Miguel was hostess to members
of her oridge club and other
friends on Monday evening at
her home.
During the evening Mrs. T. J.
Ebdon. -Jr. was honored with a
farewell handkerchief shower.
Mrs. Ebdon and members of her
family will leave on April 5 by
plane for the United States,
where they will vacation for
three months. .
Ouests attending included Mrs.
C D. Eppley, Mrs. Richard A-
bell.Mrs. H. H. Sorn.Mrs. Tru-
man Hoenke. Mrs. J. A. Dom-
browsky. Mrs. R. C. Melssner,
Mrs. Robert Turner, Mrs. J. H
Jones. Mrs. B. B. Powell and
Mrs. Donald Hutchinson.
National League of American
Pen Women held its biennial
banquet Tuesday evening at the
Hotel Tlvoll.
Members and their husbands
who attended Included Mr. and
Mrs. Charles P. Morgan, Mr.
and Mrs. F. R. Johnson, Mr.
and Mrs. Lewis B. Moore, Mr.
and Mrs. Paul Barnard, Dr. and
Mrs. W. T. Bailey. Colonel and
Mrs. 8. J. Beaudry. Mrs. Gla-
dys Graham, Mrs. Peggy Nash,
Dr. and Mrs. Harry Mitten, Jr.,
Mrs. Virginia Christian, Mr. and
Mrs. William N. Taylor. Mrs. D.
Mai Ian. Mr. William L. Simpson.
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Thornton,
Dr. and Mrs. Jesse Byrd. Mr.
and Mrs. Douglas Johnston, Mr.
and Mrs. Jesse Byrd, Mr. and
Mrs. Douglas Johnston, Mr. and
Mrs. Francis Feeney, Mr. and
Mrs. Byron Vaughn, Mr. and
Mrs. Bruce Lamb, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Wells, Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Diamond, Mrs. Abble Brink Lin-
ares and her daughter, Margo:
Miss Mable Shaffar, Mr. Floyd
Foor. Mr. and Mrs. David Mar-
king Mr. and Mrs. Robert Laatz
and Mrs. Harold Darlington.
Guests attending the banquet
Included Mr. A. Converse, Mrs.
Irene Pauldhig, Mr. Peter Bren-
nan, Miss Margaret Patton and
Mrs. Jean V. Karch.
The new officers are: state
president, Evelyn Moore; branch
president. Agnes (Pete) Johnson;
first vice-president, Jeanne
Beaudry; second vice-president.
Bellamy Laatz; treasurer, Elisa-
beth Bentz; corresponding secre-
tary. Dorothy Thornton; record-
ing secretary, Virginia Christian;
auditor. Gacelyn Johnston and
librarian and historian. Patricia
Markun.
CHS Students Prepare For Primary;
Campaign For Truman, Ike, Kefauver
Pen Women Elect New Officers
Newly-elected officers for the
Canal Zone branch of the Na-
tional League of American Pen
Women .were installed Tuesday
evening at their biennial banquet
by Evelyn Moore, who has been
the branch president since the
chapter was founded in 1950.
Guests At the Hotel El Panama
Mr, Mlllard G. Oamble, pres-
ident of the Esso Shipping Com-
ny and Mr. and Mrs. George
oegler arrived on the Isthmus
by plane Monday morning from
Miami and are guests at the Ho-
tel El Panama.
Mr. Koeglsr Is the executive
assistant to the president of the
Standard Oil Company of New
Jersey.
Mr. Baxter and Mr. Miller
Return To States
Mr. John K. Baxter, former
Isthmian resident now of Coco.
Florida and Mr. Floyd Miller of
Royal Oak. Mich., left Tuesday
bv plane for the United States
after a short visit In Panama as
guests at the Hotel El Panama.
Biennial Banouet
At Hotel Tlvoll
The Canal Zone branch of the
RUTH MILLETT Says
News Item: "Lipstick and oth-
er cosmetics are symbols of fem-
inine deceit and despair." says
pretty, modish Mrs. Andre St.
Phalle of New York, wife of the
chairman of the board of Cali-
fornia Eastern Airlines.
She has made her first adult
appearance with her own face
and Is going to continue to do so
she says.
And then she adds: "I would
like to see more women be hon-
est with themselves and with the
world."
Oh, come now. What's deceitful
about a woman's trying to im-
prove on nature as much as she
can?
There at* a few women around
who may not need the help of
permanent waves. lipstick, and
rouge, to make them look more
glamorous than they are. and to
feel more glamorous, perhaps
than they look.
But most women need to aid
and abet nature more than a lit-
tle. And what's wrong about
that?
If men were "honest with the
world" to the point of doing
nothing to improve their looks
they would have to give up shav-
ing, stop getting hair cutsand
of course, leave the padding out
of their coat shoulders.
They would have to stop fry-
ing to cover up a mlddle-agtd
paunch with a double-breasted
suit.
NATURE NEEDS A LITTLE
HELP
Do women want them to be
that "honest"? The answer is a
loud and emphatic "No." We
want them to look as well as
they can.
And It is a safe bet they feel
the same way about us.
They may make fun of the
lengths to which we go to make
ourselves look glamorous. But
they'd get an awful shock If we
suddenly gave up all of our so-
called little "deceits."
Men may profess to like hon-
esty. But they don't whistle at
ltl
Big TV?
Ml... Only O f\r
OUSHING CLOTH
putt r-c *.
GRAND BALI
FIRESTONE
No. M 1. Francisco as la Ossa An.
Fhom: 1-4144 I-SM1
Want to sleep
like a baby?
V Pat on HOSTUM in a cup
V add not water or milk
** and you'll have a delicioua bev
rage, tree of atimulanta. whio
will help you to enjoy a restful,
soothing sleep
W POSTUM Iowa v ) Iry sM
m
aLovelu vSlouie
oLouetif Styles
oLovelif ^>hac t

Tuesday Club
Has Luncheon Meeting
The regular monthly luncheon
meeting of the Tuesday Club was
held at the Hotel Washington
this week with Mrs. Edward J.
Frledrlch and Mrs. John Crone
serving as co-hostesses.
Members from the Pacific Side
attending Included Mrs. E. R.
Baltozer, Mrs. B. O. Currie, Mrs.
W. C. Hearon, Mrs. R. H. Of-
ten. Mrs. Ella Werti and Mrs.
Harry B. Yard.
Those present from the Atlan-
tic side were the two hostesses;
Mrs. Howard C. Anderson, Mrs.
J. J. Edge. Mrs. Elbert C. Ste-
vens and Mrs. A. N. Ruoff.
Pedro Miguel Auxiliary To Meet
Members of the Pedro Miguel
Woman's Auxiliary of the Union
Church are requested to attend a
meeting Tuesday morning. April
1, at the church.
Marta Patrlcvta Marciacq
Is New Arrival
Mr. and Mrs. Ricardo Mar-
ciacq of Bella Vista announce the
birth of a daughter, Marta Pa-
tricia, on March 24 In the San
Fernando Clinic.
Cathy Kay Kirkus
Arrival Is Announced
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kirkus
of Balboa announce the birth of
a daughter, Cathy Kay, on Mar.
25 at the Panama Hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. Blumberg
Receive Congratulation*
Mr .and Mrs. Zel Blumberg of
Curundu are receiving congratu-
lations from their friends today
on the eighth annlvesary of their
marriage.
romnaign fever Is running
high these days at Cristobal
l ..uvl, where student body
ami faculty are preparing for a
mock presidential preferential
primary election April 18.
Organized by students of the
American problems class as a les-
son for Junior and senior high
students, the project has been
taken up by supporters through-
out the school.
Committees have been set up
to back various candidates in
both the Democratic and Repub-
lican parties, and groups are al-
ready campaigning vigorously for
Taft, Kefauver, Truman, Russell,
Warren and Elsenhower.
"Favorite candidate" speeches
are being made in classes, bullet-
ins read by teachers to students
and campaign ribbons and tags
passed out to be worn by loyal
supoorters.
From time to time*polls are
taken to determine the most pop-
ular candidate of the moment.
Mimeographed leaflets on is-
sues of the election and candi-
dates and their backgrounds and
policies have been distributed
among students, and campaign
posters are plastered on the
walls.
Bi-partlsan and non-partisan
miiterlal Is also appearing regu-
larly. Dally In Senior High home
"' Junior High social
Frank Tourtellotte and Mr.
William Highsmith. ,
Last Nlvht For Try-Outs
Tonlfht at 7:80 Is the* last
night for try-outs for two on'-
act plays and a radio program
fo civilian defense.
The ty-outs will be held at the
Theater Guild Shack at Diablo.
Anyone Interested Is urged to at-
tend.
V. F. W. Bingo Tonight
Bingo will be played tonight at
7:45 In the V.F..W. Home on'Cu*
rundu Road.
Legion Blnto Game Tonight
Bingo will be played this even-
ing at 7:30 In the American Le-
gion Club at Fort Amador. Mem-
bers and their guests are invited
to attend.
Arrangements have been made
with the bus drivers to take play-
ers directly to the club, on re-
quest.
Panama Rotary Club
Has Luncheon Meeting
The Peninv Rotarv Club met
todav for thel** regular weeklv
luncheon meeting at the Hotel El
Panama.
Guest speakers were Major
Pen Women To Meet April 1
Members of the Canal Zone
branch of the National League
of American Pen Women are in-
vited to attend a business meet-
ing at 7 p.m. April 1 in the Lit-
tle Gallery of the Hotel Tlvoll.
studies classes, bulletins on pri-
mary elections In the States, as
well as the school primary, are
read to students.
The bulletins are prepared by
the American problems class and
distributed to teachers every
morning.
In addition, a test concerning
material In the daily bulletins-is
given to students and teachers,
and a passing mark Is required
to qualify for voting In the April
15 primary.
In order to become an eligible
voter, a student must also be
more than 11 years of age and a
member of the Student Associa-
tion.
Registration books have been
prepared, and as a check on the
voter, a space is provided for his
signature upon registration and
again after voting. However, a
statement of party preference Is
not required, since this is an open
primary.
Climaxing pre-election activi-
ties, a political rally will be stag-
ed before April IS, as a final ap-
peal to voters.
Cristobal students realize that
although many Canal Zone re*l-|
dents cannot vote In U. S .elec-
tions it is nevertheless important
as U.8. citizens to have a work-
ing knowledge of the machinery
of democracy.
The Cristobal High election is
patterned after similar primar-
ies being held this year In 16
states to choose delegates for na-
tional party conventions.
Cow Grows Older
8ELMER, Tenn. (UP) Mrs.
Minnie MoCullar owns a Jersey
cow that will be 30 years old on
March 28. The row is now nurs-
ing her 17th calf.
^JACORY ONlRIDOt
BY OSWACD JACOBT
Written for NEA Service
NOETH I
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f A852
? KJ 10S
e>K8
WIST BAIT
? None AQM7S
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? 86S 4>9742
? 107853 *AQ2
BOOTH (D)
? AJ642
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? AQ |
e>J>4
Eatt-West vul.
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1* Pass 2 4> Pass
3* Pats 4 A Pan
Pan Pass
Opening lead4>S
TRADE IN YOUR OLD SET
For This New
RCA VICTOR
C4MPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
MONTHLY 7.50 MONTHLY
LIBERAL ALLOWANCE
CLUB 1.25 WEEKLY
FREE ANTENNA

RADIO CENTER
7110 Bolivar
COLON 40
34th Street Lux Building
tam* TeL 3-M97
Nhe
PEPSODENT
SMILE!
Pepsodent Tooth Paste helps eliminate de-
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tains that collect in aim ... and germs that
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Use Pepsodent: keep tooth decay away and
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salts*
The Australian Olympic was
conducted in many countries last
November, with lo bridge hands
in one session and then 18 more
a week later. Today's hand Is se-
lected from the first set of 16.
West opens the five of clubs,
and East takes the queen and
ace of clubs, following with a
third lub. South's jack wins the
third round of clubs, of course.
South can rio* expect to dis-
card his low hearts on dummy's
diamonds, so that he can afford
to lose one trump trick and still
make his contract. Expecting no
trouble, he leads a low trump to
dummy's king.
West's discard reveals the sad
truth about the trumps. There is
grave danger that South will lose
two trump tricks.
South must abandon trumps at
once In order to run the dia-
monds. On the third and fourth
diamonds South discards low
heart?. Fortunately, East must
follow suit. Dummy next takes
the ace of hearts, and now East
Is down to four trumps and so Is
South.
A low heart Is led from dum-
my, and East Is obliged to ruff
with the seven of spades. Does
South over-ruff with the Jack?
That would lose the contract.
No matter how South continued,
he would then lose two trump
tricks.
South must under-ruff with
the four of spades.
Now East must lead from his
queen-nine-eight of spades. o
matter how he squirms he must
yield the last three tricks to de.
elarer, .
A very Ingenious idea, In my
opinion.
Now...
"DIAPER JEAN"
from Texas
PLAID SHIRTS
LITTLE VEST
DENIM JACKETS
for tots 6 to 12 months ,
Have a little cowboy
in your family!
Exclusive:
MOTTA'S
PANAMA
COLON
CONDENSED FOR GREATER VAIUE 100K FOR THE REO ND WHiTI Urill
W/onf golden, uicy,
quick-frozen peaches?
II
Slieod, sugared
(ady to MTV*.
Every suites yfm I
oekeathatnhU.
Featured in your Commissary.
omingnSoon!)
'.P. Goodrich
Tubeless Tire
PROTECTS AGAINST BLOWOUTS! HERTS HOW:
TESTED AND PROVED DY
THOUSANDS OF MOTORISTS
Msit Mswewts start when yon
don't know it. From a (harp blow
for instance against curb or
chuckholc that braises cords
inside the tire.
As the are flexes, the weak spot
rows until the inner wall is
broken. With a rentar tire-ind-
rube, the tube bridges the break.
Finally, miles or maybe months
later, the rube is pinchad and
blows out through the ore.
CHAMOIS BLOWOUT TO
SATS "SIOWOUT"
The a F. Goodrich Tubeless Tire
has no tube. Instead, it has an
air-retaining lining that's part of
the tire itself. If a bruise docs
occur, the tire's flexing eventually
causes pin-hole leaks in this lin-
ing at the point of the bruise.
Instead of a dangerous blowout,
all you get is a slpw leakplenty
of tune to come to a safe stop
before the tire goes lac
SSAU MMCTUUS TOO)
A layer of sealant rubber under
the tread grips a puncturing ob-
ject, prevents leaks. Hole is sealed
when object is removed.
FITS STANSAaO MMS
COSTS LCSS THAN REGULAR TIM
AND ANT BLOWOUT PROTECTING TUBi
TV*** ~t Ocrn e*
)
AUTOS OMPHROY, S.A. H. A. POWELL, S.A.
Tal. 2 0810 Panam.
Tel. 74 -- Coln.


r MX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT OAII-V NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY. MARCH 27. IWt
----!
You Sell em .'..When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
I eave your Ad with on* of our Agents or our Offices la No. 57 "H" Street Panama
No 12,17*) Central Ave. Colon
1
Lewi* Service
i #4 Tivoli Ave.Phone 2-2281. and
Morrison's
. Fourth of July Ave.Phone 2-9441
Saln de Belleza Americano
#55 West 12th Street
Carlton Drug Store
10.059 Melndez Ave.Phone 255 Colon
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones Propaganda, S.A.
#3 Lottery Plaza Phone 2-3199 '" Stwrt corner Estudiante St.
Phones 2-M14 and 2-27B8
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobile
FOR SALE:Bleoched olid moho-
Oany dlnlngroom set; lab tcp
table 42 by 84. 8 hostess choirs;
buffet, planting box. $385; kitch-
en table with two choirs $16. Call
Curundu 42t>3 offer 4:30.
FOR SALE:Frig^deire. 7 cu. ft. 25
cycle. Very good condition, return-
ing to the States, must sell. Price
$85.00. Cocoli 505-D.__________
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, stove,
bamboo sittingroom set, child's
bedroom set. Santo Isabel Avenue 8
1-2 St. House 8069-A, epartment
2, "Segundo Bella" house. Colon.
FOR SALE:Small Silvertone Radio,
$12.00; Contole Electric Sewing
. Machine with ell the attachments
$175.00. 7 Aluminun Venetian
shades, with removable slats. 54^
by 60, $13.00 each. 1 new Nes-
co Electric Roaster, with automatic
timer. $75.00. 2 straight chair,
S2.00. 5724-D 2-3541, Dio-
blo.___________________________
FOR SALE:Dining toble. 8 chairs.
Buffet. Twin bedstreads. dresser,
chiffonier mahogany, modern de-
sign. Perfect condition. House
0954 Amedor Rd. Phone 2-3708.
Service Personnel and Civilian
Government Employes
be safe
for your Automobile Financing
Insist en
Government Employes Finance Co.
of
Fort Worth, fexas
new office at
Ne. 43 Autemebila Row
Next door to the Firestone Building
also through your auto dealer
We tove you money on
Financing and lnsurcr.ce
. also direct loans on automobiles
ACENCY DEHLINGEft
Phene -49I4 J-498S
De yea heve e eWakktf eraalesaf
Write Altehelto Aaanymeas
a* 2031 ssjseee. C. Z.
Agencias Cosmos. Automobile Row
29. will solve your Auto buying of
selling Problem. Tel. Panama 2-
4721. Open oil day on Saturdoy.
FOR SALE:Bulck 1950. black se
danette, dynaflow, radio, nylon
covers, excellent condition, duty
free. Cell Cristobal 3-1547 even-
ings.
MISCELLANEOUS
TRAVEL OPPORTUNITY: Enjoy
your vacation in cool Costo Rico.
Fly LACSA, PAA affiliate, only
$35.00 round trip. Inquire Pon-
ami Dispatch, Tel. 2-1655, across
from Ancon bus-stop.
Phillie. Oceonside cottages. Sorra
Claro. Bo 43V Balboa Phone
Ponamo 3-1871. Cristobal 3-1673
FOR SALE
Miscellaneono
Willlom Sonto Clare Beach Cottage.
Two bedroom. Frlgldoire. Rock-
gas range. Balboa 2-3050.
FOR SALE:1949 Buick convertible
in good condition. General Elec-
tric refrigerator, 25 cycle. Cheap.
Telephone 25-3236 or house 620-
A, Cocoli.
FOR SALE: Cottages, completely
furnished, Santo Claro Beach.
Terms available, for inffirmotion.
Phone 6-441.
FOR SALE:New 6:70 x 15 tires
ond tube. 25-cycle battery charger.
Guitor, violin, radio code instruc-
tograph, National radio, 173.
House 8029-C. Margarita.
FOR SALE:1951 V-8 Studeboker
Landcruiser 4-door sedan; raoio,
overdrive. W. W. tires. Perfect con-
dition. See ot 2256-B, Curundu or
call Heorne, Curundu 4288.
FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
ator, 9 ft. 60 cycles, good condi-
tion. 10-B Margorito St. New Cris-
tobal___________________________
*OR SALE: Bamboo: settee. 2
chairs, 2 end tables; cheise lounge,
2 chairs, step table $125.00 each
set. All in new condition. Ken-
more electric range, 1951 model,
used five months; with electric
clock, 60 cycle. $250.00. Fire-
stone box springs and airfoam
rubber mofresses, 2 eoch twin sire
$100.00 for the set of 4 pieces.
Mrs. V. Zees. Phone 3-1690
(Cristobal) between 8 o. m. 4
p. m. or 3-2715 after 5 p. m.
FOR SALE:Solid mahogany settee,
two lorge choirs, two foot stools,
cushions fair condition. $200.00.
821 5-B, Margarita 3-2598.
FOR SALE:Solid mahogany dining-
room set ond other household ar-
ticles. Coll 2-2337. Balboa.
FOR SALE: --Mople livingroom set
RodrP>v.Watr-tbinet, pick-up ond
records. Ouortermasfer furniture,
lamps. 1948 Pontioc, 2 door Se-
dan. 0435-F Frangiponi, Ancon,
phone 2-3417.
FOR SALE.'Coldspot, 6 ft. 25 cycle,
running condition. $26. Balboa
3752, 0584-D, Mindi St. Ancon.
FOR SALE:Excellent 1951 Chev-
rolet Powerglide Two Door Sedan.
-Call Balboa 3125. 5515-8. Dioblo.
TROPIC TOPICS
Bargain week, due to having received
o double shipment of brake linings
for oil makes of cars. We are allow-
ing everyone to buy on the special
25% discount rote on this item. Also
received a shipment of King pins,
clutch discs and Bearings for a
mokes of cars. Tropical Motors.
FOR SALE: English Austin 1949
model A-40. excellent condition,
tax paid. Fully insured. Phone Co-
lon 796.
You intend Baying a used cor? For
the same money you can oequire
a brand new HILLMAN MINX, 32
miles a gallon, 37.5 Horse Power,
trunk space and beauty. Your
HILLMAN dealer AGENCIAS LU-
MINA, Tel. 3-1033.
FOR SALE:DeSoto 1951. eonvert-
ible, new tires, radio, good condi-
tion. Cash-set only." Tel. -3044
FOR SALE:Chevrolet Pick-up $200.
00. Currier 167-A, Gamboa. Phone
6*59.
FOR SALE
Weal Estate_______
FOR SALE:Modern concrete block
cottage ond two guest ccttages.
red tiler floors, bathrooms, gardens.
fruit, electricity. In Arraijsn 1 1 -2
miles right side International High-
way. Johnson.
September 17 Is
'Citizenship Day'
September 17 of each year has
been designated "Citizenship
Day'' by Joint resolution of the
Senate and House of Represen-
tative* of the United States Con-
gress.
The day has been set aside to
commemorate the formation and
signing of the Constitution of
the United States in 1787 and in
recognition of all who, by com-
ing on age or by naturalization
have attained the citizenship
status.
The Joint resolution authorises
the President to issue an annual
proclamation calling on govern-
ment officials to display the
United States flag on the occa-
on and to invite the people of
te United States to observe the
day in schools and churches or
other suitable places with appro-
priate ceremonies.
PRACTICE^ Ism .. Fnn ....
Practice Postponed
A practice session ef the
Frotressiye Dancing Club.
which was scheduled for to-
tneirow, baa been postponed
until Monday, April 14.
TROPIC TOPICS
We ore pleased to onnounce that we
hove a SINGER ROADSTER ovoiloble
for Immediate delivery off floor.
Get a demonstration of the perfect
econmico! little car. "Tropical' Mo-
tors.
Canal Co. Offers
530-Horsepower
Boiler For Sale
A 530-horsepower horizontal
steam boiler is being offered for
sale by the Panama Canal Com-
pany. It has been used In the
Industrial area of the Commis-
sary Division at Mount Hope
and is about SO years old.
Bids for the boiler will be re-
ceived in the office of the Su-
perintendent of Storehouses at
Balboa until 10:30 a.m. tomor-
row morning, when they will
be opened In public.
Copies of the bid forms and
conditions of sale have been
sent to 1 known prospective
bidders.
The boiler Is located in the
boiler room of the commissary
Division at Mount Hope. Those
who wish further information
or want to inspect the boiler
should contact H. Fernandez,
telephone 3-2650.
answer the call
0+
19*.? PEO '.POSS FUND
OPEL
A GENERAL MOTORS PRODUCT
4 cyl. 32 Miles per gallon
SM0OT & PAREDES
Panam
SM00T & HUNNICUTT
Coln
FOR SALE
Boat & Motors
ALHAMSRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished opart-
ments. Mttd service optional. Con-
tort office 8061. 10th Street. New
Criitobol. telephone '38* Colon.
FOR SALE:Boot 25 feet. Excellent
condition. Phone Curundu 7194.
See at Dioblo Sea Scout Landing,
Sunday. No. 530. Also 47 Ford
Convertible, loaded.
LOST (j FOUND
LOST: White more, block mane
ond tail, brond "PH." Reword. Via
Espaa No. 112-A. Tel. 3-1795.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle
FOR SALE:2 vertlcol twin Indians,
$400. I Indian Scout 45, $100
House 171 -B, Pedro Miguel. Phone
4-567.
Passover Holiday
Begins With Seder
At Tivoli, April 9
The Passover holiday, known
as the "Festival of Freedom," ce-
lebrated by Jews throughout the
world, will be ushered in with
the traditional Seder to be held
Wednesday, April 9,at 6:30 p.m.
at the Hotel Tivoli. under the
auspices of the National Jewish
Welfare Board.
As in previous years, members
of the Jewish faith of the Arm-
ed Forces and their families will
be guests of the National Jewish
Welfare Board. Civilians who
wish to attend the Seder may
make reservations by contacting
the U.S.O -J.W.B, Armed Forc-
es Service Center, telephone
Balboa 1072, before Sunday, April
6.
The traditional Passover holi-
day, which is observed for eight
da vs. commemorates the deliv-
erance of the children of Israel
by Moses, the great patriarch,
from their bondage in Egypt. For
generations this flight for Free-
dom has been symbolic of man's
quest for liberty.
Memoranda have been issued
by Headquarters U.S. Army Ca-
ribbean, Headquarters Caribbean
Air Command and Headquarters
Fifteenth Naval District author-
izing all unit commanders to as-
sist in making It possible for all
personnel of the Jewish faith to
attend the Passover Services.
Passover services will be con
ducted by Rabbi Nathan Witkln
at the USO-JWB Armed Forces
Service Center in Balboa. The
schedule Is as follows:
Thursday, April 10, at 9 am.
and 7:30 p.m.. Friday. April 11,
at 9 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.., Tuesday,
April 16. at 7:80 p.m., Wednes-
day, April 16. at 9 a.m. and 7:30
pm., Thursday, April 17, at 9
Memorial prayers for the de-
parted will be recited during the
Thursday, April 17, morning
service.
RESORTS
Shrapnel's houses Santo Clara. Also
In COLD Cerro Compana Moun-
tains. Telephone Balboa 2820 or
see caretaker.
w
Minimum for 12 word.
3c. each additional word.
^UMMtRCIAL (j
PROFESSIONAL
STAY at the Hotel "ANAMWICANO
IN COOL EL VALLE.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:Furnished chalet in El
Valle de .Anton, two bedrooms.
Telephone Panama 3-3423 or 3-
1183.
FOR RENT
Apartment*
We have everything
to keep vonr Lawn
ind (larden beautiful
lorine the dry season
nob' vVheeioarrow
Hose msecticiaes
Fencing Fertilisers
Sprayers Weedkillers
8prlnklers Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
Vt% Central Ave. Tel. 3-0146
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
*22 E. 29th St
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment"
2011, Melendez Ave. Apply Balin
De Abate. 6029 Balboa Ave. Co-
lon, phone 475 or 517-J after 6
p. m. ____
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT: Furnished room with
kitchen. 43rd St. No. 43, Apt. C.
FOR RENT: Furnished room for
gentlemon. Balcony, telephone, all
screened. Apply No. 3, Duque
Avenue, La Crests, second house
to left.
WANTED
MisceUaneon
WANTED:Unserviceoble GE wash-
ing machine. Call 84-3205 or 82-
5202.
WANTED.Nice home for 6 weeks
old kittens, block. Telephone 3-
1648. Panoma.
Help Wanted
WANTED:Nursemaid for two pre-
school boys. European preferred.
Experience and references neces-
sary. Private, comfortoble quarters.
Good salary. Coll Tel. 3-4619,
From 9 12 o. m, 3 5 p. m.
COOK NEEDEDWith recommenda-
tion, to sleep in. 49th St. No. 17
Phone 3-4408.
20 Arsonists May
Face Death Penalty
For Cairo Fires
CAIRO, March 27 (UP)Gov-
ernment prosecutors plan to de-
mand death sentences for at
least 20 persons for the burning
of Shepheard's Hotel and Bark-
lay's Bank in the Cairo riots last
January 26, a court official said
today.
The official said the charge
would be willful arson, resulting
in death.
GETS DELAYED ACTION
ORTENVILLE, Minn. (U.P.)
Mrs. Burt Furan finally got a-
round to something she had
been putting off for a long time.
Doctors removed a needle from
the palm of her hand, where it
had been embedded since 1916.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panam
Sel I in r: Rorntal PrMaett
Puerta y Lu (preferred)
Panam Insurance Co.
Buy ni: Aceite Urraca and Brewerjr.
TeL 3-4719 J-1660
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUn/I
Slipcover Reooholstery
visit ova anovr-aooMi
Aikerte Here.
4. r. Se la oesa It (AasoaoMIe *aw)
Pre* tilaill Hckap a Deliver
Tel. t-tm IM ijl lo l o.a.
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. Justo Aroiemena
Ave. ;- CQlgn Tel. 457
Transportes Baxter, S.A.
Shipping, moving, storage).
We pack and crate or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
ALADDIN
KEROSENE MANTLE LAMP
Burns 50 Hours on 1. Gal of
Kerosene. Uses M% air and
only iJ keroaene
SS.95 Lewaat Price *
Distributora: WONG CHANO, S.A.
Colon: 9th St. Balboa Ave. Tel, SOJ.
Panam: S3 Central Ave.
Tel. 2-2087
LEGAL NOTICE
UNIT STATIS Of AMERICA
CANAL ZONI
Unlteet Hete Destral. Cswr fee The
District Or The Canal Zea*
Bafea* Dnrssie*)
In The Matter of tes Estate of
JAMES DEANS.
IRseaaaaS,
No. 9041 Probate
N0T1C TO CREDITORS
NOTICE Is hereby Iran that all
Mruni hsvin any olslms asatnat tea
assets ot JAMES DEAN. Deemed, are
required to tile their claims, supported
by vouohsrs. and properly verified with
ths Clerk of ths United Sute District
Oosrt for the Dlatrtct of the Canal lone.
Balboa Division, at Ancon, Canal Zone,
or with the Executed, Catharine Deem,
r/o Vea blclon. Ramiros A do Castro.
P. O. Box ltd, ancon. Canal So or
or before the tb day of Aucnit, 1SS1.
or they will foreror be barred.
Dated at Aneoa. Canal Eono,
this 2Tth day of March, 1SS2.
CanWiae Doaaa.
Executrix
(Sfd) Woodrow de Castra
At! ty tor Executive.
HIDDON
Solid Glass
CASTING ROD
Price:
$12.50
Same as
1b
The TJ.S.A.
[

ALSO
Many Other
Fishinjr
Supplies
at
C.S.A. Prices.
One ef the
finest. Vet-
feet eastlac
aellttes.
O I a e k
trpa blade
leek. 6V, ft.
MadUus
LEARN!!
Ballroom
Danrint
At Its Best!
v at
write box ltS
Balboa
Hamett A Duna
s
a n a I a c
INSTANT
WHEN PROPERLY DILUTED
CONTAINS:
(fortified with Vitamin D)
Protein..............M.1%
Lactose .............I1J*
Pat ................. Le%
Calcium ............ LS
Phosphorus .........Let*
Sodium Oxide....... .7%
Potassium Oxide .... 1.75%
Nlacin.....4.2 Biff, per lb.
Thlamine .. l.C raff, per lb.
Rlboflsvin.. 9.Z mf. per lb.
Calories .......Mt per art.
Vitamin D M units per C
Oa Sale la P.C Ce Ceanaslesertea.
GRAND SALE
FIRESTONE
No. 39 J. Francisco de la
Ossa Avenue
Phones: 3-4564 2-0363
TBjAyri J-avsCT
Paratroops Hurt In C-46 Drop
During Operation 'Long Horn
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Csre
Truman Friend Denies Favors'
In Govt. Grain Storage Deal
FORT HOOD, Tex., March 27
UP). Secretary ol the Army
Frank Pace checked up today
on the infantry's atomic de-
fenses, which are being put to
their first mass field tests in
exercise Long Horn.
Pace declined comment on
what he saw, but atomic at-
tacks by U. S. forces against
the Invading "Centralist Party
Army," actually the tough 82nd
Airborne Division, has been ad-
Judged successful.
U. S. ground forces have
"killed" 2,200 of the invader
with atomic weapons.
Atomic blasts fired by re-
treating U. 8. forces the 31st
and 47th Infantry and first Ar-
mored Divisions resulted in
stabilization of the U. S. line
after a four-to-slxth-mlle en-
emy advance.
Since the Army specified that
ground forces used the atomic
weapons, it was presumed that
Imaginary atomic artillery shells
were used.
But the Army refused to go
Into detalle on the point, be-
cause it involves "national se-
curity."
Pace also declined to comment
on reports that some officers
of the 82nd Airborne Division
wanted an investigation of a
paratroop drop yesterday in
which one man was killed and
38 hurt. During the drop a 105-
mm. howitzer and a truck
tumbled out of a transport
plane.
Brig. Gen. Lacey V. Murrow,
field commander of the 18th Air
Force, who flew over the drop
in a C-46 said there, was noth-
ing to the reports.
There was absolutely no
dangerous situation," he said.
There will be no investigation
of the pilots or flight.
The 82nd Airborne has not
registered any official protest
or asked for an Investigation
The paratroopers of the 82nd
have indicated they are all well
aatlsfield."
The 18th Air Force dropped
3,000 "aggressor" troops.
One man was killed one suf-
fered a broken back, seven
broke their legs and SO suffer-
ed sprains and bruises.
At first It was thought even
broke their backs, but it turn-
ed out that six of the seven
suffered only sprains.
As to reports of complaints
about the C-468, from which the
drop was made, Murrow said:
"It is an old plane, but It was'
operated as safely as can be."
He said one plane wAs order-
ed to pull out, because It was
gettnlg execesslve propeller
wash from the plane in front
of it and It might have been
dangerous for paratroopers to
lump from it.
Murrow said there was more
propeller wash than normal be-
cause the drop field waa so
narrow the plane had to fly
close together in a "V's-ln-
trall" formation.
If the zone had been wider,
he said, they could have flown
In a "V-of-V's formation, which
would have eliminated most of
[the prop wash.
More than 115,000 men and
two air forces the Ninth and
18th are committed to opera-
tion Long Horn to determine
whether troops can be flown
from halfway across the coun-
try in time to repel an enemy
invasion of the U. S.
Although the defending force's
use of atomic weaopons largely
stabilized lines today, the 82nd
Airborne, dressed In special
forest-green uniforms, surround-
ed and "had nearly wiped out
! the 136th Regiment of the 47th
I Division.______
WASHINGTON, March 27 (UP) I
-A Missouri friend of President
Truman assured Senate investi-
gators today that he received no
"political favors" on a govern-
ment grain deal which netted
him more than $26,000 in 20
months.
Harry Easley of Webb City, MO.,
told the Senate agriculture com-
mittee he had known the Presi-
dent "for a long time" but never
discussed the grain storage con-
tract with him.
Asked if any political favors
were Involved in the deal in
which his firm rented buildings
from one government agency And
leased them to another, Easley
replied:
"On my word of honor, none
whatever.''
The committee is investigat-
ing the entire Federal grain stor-
age program, including reports of
a multi-million dollar shortage.
Easley commented before the
hearing began that "I never
want to see another kernel or
corn as long as I Live."
He is vice-president of the
Midwest Storage and Realty Co.,
Inc., which rented buildings at
Camp Crowder, Mo., from the
War Assets Administration and
contracted a few days later wlth;
the Commodity Credit Corpora-
tion to store government-owned
grain in them.
Easley said the five stockhold-
ers took about $89,000 out of the
company between September,
1948 and June, 1951. He received
$26,866.47 in salary and bonuses;
President Ardis H. Myers, $18,-
949; John Stark, $18,949.02; Dan
M. Nee. $18,904.68, and Paul B
Edwards, $6,033.34.
Easley said the firm "was not
a fly-by-night operation." Mid-
west stockholders personally In-
vested $160,000 In the deal be-
fore any storage payments were
received, he said.
Sen. Clinton P. Anderson (D-
N.M.), former Secretary of Agri-
culture, complimented Easley on
the venture, pointing out that
they had undertaken it without
much experience and had car-
ried out the contract almost
without loss.
Easley said the firm now has
about $25,000 In the bank and
faces an Army claim of about
$69,000 to pay for rehabilitating
the Camp Crowder facilities.
Pressed by Sen. Karl Mundt
(R-S.D.) as to who would pay the
difference if the claim Is allowed,
Easley said a private contractor
has offered to do the restoration
lob for $18.000 or $19.000. He said
the Army has not made a final
decision on that proposal.
Myers, president of Midwest,
insisted the government got "va-
lue received* on the grain con-
tract. He said charges that pres-
sure was brought on the afn-
eles to approve the contract was
a "joke/
The government had a great
volume of grain to be stored at
the time, Myers said, and was
shopping around for someone to
use the Camp Crowder buildings.
He said he did not see any "un-
usual circumstances" In the ar-
rangement.
Sen. James P. Kem iR-Mo.)
Usted several features of the deal
which he thought were unusual.
Kem said it seemed to add up
to a situation where two govern*
ment agencies were doing busi-
ness through a group of "mid-
dlemen," who made substantial
profit, when they should have
been doing business with one
another. ^^^
'March Hire' Dance
Saturday Al YMCA
"Dance of the March hare" is
the title of the Servicemen's
dance scheduled at the Balboa
Y. M C. A. on Saturday.
Music for this spring dance.
wU be by the 71st Army Band
orchestra, directed by Sgt. Stahl.
Dancing will be from 8 to 11
pjn. and there will be an ample
number of Junior Hostesses on
hand.
These dances are a part of the
extensive activity program car-
ried on by the Balboa "Y" for
Service men and women of the
area. Wives of servicemen are
also invited and will be Issued
auests passes, if they will apply.
in advance at the program of-
fice.
Single young women of the
civilian community or working
at Military installations are In-
vited to attend these dances
but must secure guests passes
In advance from Mrs. Abble Li-
nares, program director.
The second of a series of patio
Rartlea at the Y. M. C. A. will be
eld on Tuesday evening, from
7 to 10 p.m. Following a swim
in the pool, the girls and Gis
will have a hot dog roast over
charcoal fires and informal
dancing in the auditorium.
NAS Cub Pack 18
To Be Reactivated
Cub Pack 18 of Coco Solo Na-
val Station will be reactivated
tomorrow night at 7:30 during
A charter presentation cere-
mony in building 189, Coco Solo.
The Cub Pack is being spon-
sored by the Police Reserve As-
sociation, Branch 69.
eRfreshments win be eerved
by the Pack.
25% DISCOUNT
on CASH SALES:
1
STEEL
I
NAILS
ELECTRIC TUBES
TOILETS

ZINC
FIR-TEX
II IivaN Am a*
i-see*
AGENCIAS GLOBALES
121 Va Espaa TaL 3-1503


THURSDAY, MARCH 7. 195
THF PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
rn tm
PAOE
^/Mantle ^>c
tetu

Wh m~ JL YLA
&> 195. Cmlum Vtltflum, (J,Um 378
DINNER HONORS NEW ARRIVALS
Lieut, and Mrs. Fred Wroble entertained with an in-
formal dinner party at their Loco Solo residence Tuesday
frming to honor Lieut, and Mrs. R. K. Meyer, who arrivrJ
that day from Norfolk, Va.
Lieut. Meyer will Join the harbor defense staff at Cie
natal station.
The other guests were Lieut. Cdr. E. X. Prmino, L'rjt.
Joseph Lepetich and (Bos H. C. Pitts,
"Come As You Are Coffee"
at Port Gulick .
The Fort Guile'-. Ladies Club
tare a "Come as you are" morn-
ing coffee at the home of Mrs.
Pauline Marsh Tuesday, Co-hos-
tesses with Mrs. Marsh were
Mrs, Roy Smith and Mrs. Er-
nest Beck.
Miss Charlotte Lawhorne. sis-
ter of Mrs. Robert Moore, was a
visitor at the party.
birthday anniversary vl their
dau-jliter, Edwlna.
Pink and white decorations
were used on the refreshment
table and hats and balloons were
given to the young guest* as fa-
vors.
Mrs. Thomas F. Gibson of
Qatun played the piano and
l?ad the young children In a
song fest.
The young guests Included
son, Mrs. J 3. Edge, Mrs. E. C.
Stevens and Mrs. A. N. Ruoff.
I Stag Party at Elks Club
The activities committee of
Cristobal C.Z. Lodge No. 1512
B P.O. Elks will close their year,
which ends Monday with a stag
party.
The party will be held tomor-
row with dinner served at 8:30
p.m. All Elks and their guests
are Invited to attend.
Retiring and Incoming offi-
cers will be honored at this time
and all members initiated this
year will be welcome.
If] HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
HOLLYWOOD (NBA) Exclu-'But I'm afraid to do that because
slvely Yours: A chill has de- I might let myself go."
scended on Clark Oable'S fresh- Corlnne's long hair frequently
ened-up-romanee with Virginia tumbles down over one eye, but
Grey. Pals who predicted a quick]she s denying any attempts at a
marriage when Gable was divor-| Veronica Lake coiffure,
ced from Lady Sylvia are now "Darling," she let It fly, "I'm
looking foolish about the whole not hiding anything!"
thing.
Fox haa s~be* )>d a movie
Te talk of a impending titled "Something For the Birds."
break-up between Jane RusaeU With Walter Fidget* directed by
and Bob Waterfleld has never Howard Hawks?
been to high-geared. Long over-
due, the tongue waggers Insist.
By BEN COOK
United Press Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD, (UPi If a
traffic light could be said to have
led a glamorous existence, signal
No. 21 It ought to win theprhse.
This old-fashioned signal was
ripped out the other day by a
It's eye-popping, that's what,cre" ,rom ,tne Fs Angeles city
The other members who at- Louis Cabaza, James Bergh. Ka
tended were Mrs. Charles Breschjren Byrd, Joseph Domlco, Don-
Mrs. John Cousins. Mrs. Joe eld Dewey, Yvonne Diaz, Edltli
Oormley, Mrs. Duane Mundkow-iDlaz, Patricia Donnellv. Samuel
ski, Mrs. David Wolfert. Mrs. |Donnelly, Miguel Ganda, Ileana
Thomas Brooks, Mrs. Owen Tol-
bert. Mrs. William Carlton. Mrs.
Harry Copare, Mrs. Russell
Mann, Mrs. Austin Tulip, Mrs.
Clarence Harvey. Mrs. David
Fogle. Mrs. Neville Hart, Mrs. J.
L. Lasslnger.-Mrs. Arthur Cran-
dall, Mrs. Joseph Cote, Mrs.
Maurice Towne, Mrs. Carl Hess,
Mrs, Mike Klnnlck and Mrs.
William Bell.
Mrs. Bresch and Mrs. Mund-
kowkl were the winners
cards.
Mrs. Nix Hostess
for Sewing Club
Mrs. Carl Nix was hostess for
the meeting of her sewing club
Tuesday, at hef Gatun residence.
The grouD met with the hostess
for morning coffee.
Those attending were Mrs. E.
A. Cox, Mrs Thomas Fels, Mrs.
Wallace Thrift. Mrs. Ralph Gra-
ham. Mrs 86m Mauldin, Mrs.
Guadalupe. Bill Hankel, Michael
Keith. Marsha Kennedy, Bill
Klassen. Claudia Knlppert, Rich-
ard Lucky.
Larry Parker, Kate Poole, Enil-
lle Rodriguez. Angle and Sonia
Rodrleuez. Angel Sanchei, Ver-
non Shankel Bill Sherman. Ka-
thy Skeiataitis. Bruce Taylor,
Linda Lou Tolbert. Concetta Ver-
m. Julie Pat Wise. Steven Zll-
kle, Marv Ann Wiaevlch, Moore
at Becharach and Mary Clare Han-
kel.
The hostess was assisted by
Mrs. Ralph Malcolm and Mrs.
Gibson.
Lt. Utter Arrives for
Duty at Coco Solo
Lt. and Mrs. Leon N. Utter
and their two children arrived
I Tuesday to reside on the Coco
Solo Naval Station.
i
Lt. Utter has been stationed at
i Camp Lejeune. N.C. and will be
i attached to the 3rd Guard De-
i tachment of the Marine Corps at
the naval station.
Attending Pen Women's Banquet
Dr. and Mrs. Jesse L. Byrd
and Mrs. Milton Lee Nash cross-
I ed thre Isthmus Tuesday evening
i to attend the biennial banauet
of the Canal Zone branch, Na-
tional League of American Pen
Women.
Lift Up Your Hearts
. 1th some eye-bugging reasons it is. but Errol Flynn wants to trtf,lc engineering department
given. I team up with Charlie Chaplin In *nd hauled away to a weed-cov-
I an Independent movie. The script ere the east side of town,
The Hollywood models who calls for them to plav brothers, the graveyard for such devices,
know her best say that Barbara Oh, well, Hollywood's always said For 26 years lt had done its du-,
Freklng will never wed dress de-! there's a little of Chaplin in ty at the corner of Jasmine Ave.
signer Oleg Casslnl, who'f about;Errol and a little of Errol in and Washington Blvd.. winking
to be divorced by Gene Tlerney.;Chaplin. lita red and green lights to stop
...I checked with Sylvia Sidney i and start a procession of the fa-
Just before she left for New York, its full movie steam ahead for mous passing in and out of Me-
aner completing "L?s Misera- George Raft, now that he's Junk- tro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios,
bles," on whether she'll marry a- ed his retirement blueprint He: it has winked at Clark Gable,
gala after her divorce from will star In movies to be made in: jean Harlow Joan Crawford and
Carleton Alsoo. Her answer: London and Rome before the oreta Garbo Norma Shearer
.'There-., good ^"t^
there's life. Aere'; im." Contino^ .ccordlon records .t'KJ' &TUT aeS
saws** SuTS.S^P.'SsW2K& suJ2
Cary Grant's next at Fox, "Dar
ling, I Am Growing Younger.
He plays a scientist who acclden-
dfug store.
no
switch the red light off and the
green light on.
Two days after It was Installed,
Dr. and Mrs. Miller
Guests of Margarita Men's
Fellowship
The members of the Margarita
Men's Fellowship hd Dr. and
Mrs. J. Quinter Miller as their
guests at their monthlv dinner
meeting at the Margarita Club-
H. F. Paddock and Mrs. Mary,house Monday evening.
Bultman of Cristobal.
Mr. Ross Cunningham wel-
comed the 95 members, theli
wives and other guests who at-
tended. Also present was the
president of the Canal Zone
Union Church Council. Mr. J. 8
Mr-Nair.
Rev Henrv L Bell, pastor of
the Margarita Union Church,
made announcements and pro-
nounced the benediction.
Federation Date Set
Mrs. H. I. Tinnln. president of
the Panama Federation for
Christian Service, has announced
April 3rd as the date for the
78th semi-annual meeting of the
Federation,
An interesting program has
been arranged for the half-day
session. It will be held in the
Balboa Heights Baptist Church. Tuesday Club Meets
starting at 8:45 a.m. The guest at Hotel Washington
speaker will be Mrs. J. Quintar| Mrs. John Crone of Coco So-
Mlller of New York City. lo and Mrs. Edward J. Frledrich
A fee of $.50 will be charged of Margarita were co-hostesses
for the luncheon, which will be,for the luncheon meeting of the
served following the meeting. iTuesdayClubat the Hotel Wash-!
A cordial Invitation la extend-jlneton this week,
ed to all interested friends: Bridge was played following
-------- I luncheon. The Pacific Side mem-
Five-Vear-Old Celebrates ibers present included Mrs E. R.
Sergeant and Mrs. Francisco Baltozer. Mrs. B. G. Currie, Mrs.1
M. Quiones of Fort Gulick en- W. C. Hearon, Mrs. R. H. Ot-;
tertalned Friday, March 21. with ten, Mrs, Ella Wertr. and Airs. I
a "birthday pafty'at the-TortO.Tlarry B. Yrd.
lick Atlantic sector Nursery I The Atlantic Side members
School, to celebrate the fifth present were Mrs. H. C. Ander-
BALBOA Theater
f RID AY ONLY! 4:30 6:30 8:25
Winner of two Academy Awards, and rated high
among the "best ten" motion pictures of all time,
John Ford's "STAGECOACH" will be shown once
again. This picture, originally released In 1939 has
been re-Issued to allow an entirely new audience to
view it. ,
Never has a picture won such sensational acclaim
from public and critics alike as did this thrill-packed
saga ripped from the bullet-splattered pages of the
frontier west.
I UflUlVV AWARDS' THKUl' UPON THfflU
JOHN
ifOftD'S
w** JOHN WAYNf
ClAIM IMVOI tMOMAl MITCMHI
"STAGECOACH" unfolds the gripping story of
seven men and two women each of whom harbors a
burning secret thrown together on a trip through
untathed plains and mesas and Into an electrifying
adventure of undreamed danger.
*
TUX-TODAY
Shows: 3:M 5:00 7:00 8:00 p.m.
(A Lenten feature of the Pan-
ama-American, mepaieu Dy the
itev. M. Aj. uooaaon, fcplscopal
church of uur Saviour, new
unstooalj
CONFIDENCE VS. SKEPTICISM
"if God oe ior us, wno can oe
against us.'" Reaa Romans
This chapter of St. Paul con-
tains sume ot the most, tnrllung
passages of tne nioie.
in tact, uity are so full of con-
fidence ana couiage inai tne
episcopal' unurch has made them
a par of her Bunal umce lor
centuries. They make one feel
nice lacing up 10 any condition
that might, arise, not only facing
up to it, but gomg out to met i
iv, no matter now ditiicuit tne
situation.
St. Paul had no doubt about
God bein. for us. iliat little "if"
carries with it no feeling of skep-
ticism. St. Paul Just couiont
understand why people who be-
lieve In the God of Jesus Christ
snould ever despair or give up.
Didn't God give His only oe-
gotten Bon upon the Cross tor us
all? Surely such a sacrifica is
proof that God loves us with an
unfathomable love. If God is,
willing to stake Hi all on our re-
demption, what chance has even
tne Devil/
There Is no force in the uni-
verso mat can wltnsiand suca a.
love. How, then, can we ever
i doubt? Wny snould wo over
weaken? Or surrender?
R. C. French has caught the
. victorious conviction of St. Paul
I in the championship of God in
"Lord, what a change within u,
one short hour
Spent in Thy presence will pre-
vail to make,
What heavy burdens from our
bosom take,
What parched grounds refresh,
as with a shower!
We kneel, and all around us
aeemi to lower,
We rise, and ail, the distant and
the near,
Stand forth In sunny outline,
brave and clear;
We kneel how weak, we rise how
full of power!
Why, therefore, should we do
ourselves this wrong.
Or others, that we are not always
strong;
That we are ever overborne with ,
care;
That we should ever weak or
heartless be.
Anxious or troubled, when with
us is prayer,
And jov. and strength, and cour-
age are with thee?
Warners said no to Maureen .t
tally dicovers a reversion-to-,o'Hara's request to borrow Steve the dgtial stopped the ear of a
youth formula and winds up cochran as her leading man for Navy captain named Chester w.
roller skating and playing cow- herflrjt )ndependent movie. "Je- Nimlte. The officer, later to be-1
boys and Indians with the kids. hftd > yyatcri for gteve anfl- Hedy come fleet admiral, rolled
How about some stilt walking Iamarr M nfW twosome, by, through the gates Into the studio
Cary's first stage profession? > ;the way when the light changed and took i
* .... part in ceremonies marking the
Stanley Kramer is spiking talk There's a buaz that Mickey official beginning of MOM etu-
that the Rex Harrlson-Lili Pal- Rooney will Join Betty Hutton iot April 24 1924
mer co-starrer, "The Four Post- and Donald O'Connor In Para- mm_ celebrities
er," cost peanuts because of Its mount's "Look, Ma, I'm Dancing"! -._, ,;. i.,.r on o#nt it
one set, and cast of two. The, The very thought of all that r ft!' V*', i-SJifS No
final cost sheet, says Stanley, combined energy makes me tired ?",,," 2s tT Jea
idea up to 1850,000., Rosemarle ...The names of Peter Lawford *'8,An "^ \,\" 5X2
Held, the bathing suit designer,!.nd Rocky Cooper are being ent- Wmston Churchill his son John
her three children, a maid, her wined again on the grapevine. "" W... R He" tjhey tmrt-
stster-in-lawand her mother all lltlziR the studio for a luncheon
eloped to Us Vegas with Danny! Note from aprese agent: "Edgar honoring the man who was to be-
Malloy, singer and stunt man for Bergen Just ordered a plne-and-; come Britain a prime minuter
John Wayne. cellar scented cologne for Charlie I In the same year, the light
'McCarthy and a new-mown hay winked at a car carrying the
Corinne Calvet, the luscious fragrance for Mortimer Snerd." Crown Prince and Princess of
French actress, and Zsa Zse .---------------.------------------- Sweden and at one carrying J
Oabor, the blonde Hungarian Edgar Hoover, the newly-ap-
man-klller, finally met m the MODESTY PROTECTED pointed head G-man.
Fox studio cafe after weeks of if stoplights ever are. No. 8118
hurling barbs at one another In. PHOENIX, Ariz. (UP) A was ashamed on Feb. 19, 1930. It
newspaper Interviews. solid wood railing was placed ln,was out of order when Calvin
Corlnne's account of the event: front of the Jury box in an East Coolldge and his wife came along
It was very peaceful. Every-' Phoenix courtroom after Jus- Washington Blvd. accompanied
one was horribly disappointed, tice Harry Westfall said women by ft motorcycle escort.
Zsa Zsa suggested that we earry iurors complained about specta- ____________,______
on the battle on her TV show, tors looking at their legs.
Uwtsf Prici Aywhf
With MM rbst Fttftrts
V 454.00
Tirtttont
ti Cu. Ft. MFrIGIrATO
Full-Width Frozen Food Com-
partment has 55 Lb. Capacity.
GRAND SALE AT
FIRESTONE
No. 19 J. Francisco it la Oeaa Avenue
Phones: 1-4644 z-0MI
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
WhM*
00.000 Is MM
Presents
BALBOA
STARTS
SATURDAY!
wfcKNn bob.
A. VMARN
DOftl* JOaOON VlROiMA
DAY MM(?AE MAYO
CON* -ATM
NElSWfiOMAN
.LUCILLE
emttltthM.
giioe Bttwx-i
-0AME8
cagney 600per
SbsSn Harris Lovejy norman
LOUBLLA RANDOLPH tMMoY PATHICI
PARSONS SCOTT WYMAN WYMORE
' JAMCEIWLE DKKWESSON RONrlAfiERTKY
SfMllfenWJOHN Kl0ftf**M*t.KAMe iiiUnii tH
Today, Thursday, Mar. 17
P.M.
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamuslca Story Timo
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:10What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cl.
Alfaro. 8.A.
8:16Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(TOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON PORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
*:00World News and Com-
mentary (VOA)
1:15Arts and Letters (VOA)
1:30Radio University 1:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA).
:0OEmma (BBC)
9:30Take It from Here (BBC)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
ll:0OThe Owl's Neat
12:00Wgn Off
A.M.
Friday, Mar. SI
OOBCCTUoYf '
ROY DEL RUTH
Its Moviotim TONIGHT!
[Panama Canal ofheaters
ft A I B /" A Vcra rXLBN David NIVXN
,,rr.S,:? "Hoppy Go Lowly" (Technicolor)
SI :* (Frl.,. -OTAOrCOACW
01 AISLO HTS. Mollwi PWturM cancelled!
BALBOA JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
presents "DATE BAIT" curtain 8 p.m.
f f\ r f\ t I "Twin Action Hit
? .,Jt "BLONDE SAVAGE" and co-
feature "BEYOND BENGAL"
r i iisni Jame STXWART O Marlene DIETRICH
Tef "NO HIGHWAY IN THE SKY"
(rrMajr) -rur raos man"
MAHGARITA
S:H I e
Gary COOPKB Inar.d BEMGMAN
"SARATOGA TRUNK"
(rlaa> i Jl>:<
CRISTOBAL
Alr-( nadllMiwd
S:ll is
Jean WAYNI Bobert UTAN
"Flying Leathernecks" (Technicolor)'
(Friday "DEAB SKAT"
6:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Request Salon -
1:15News. (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
0:00Newa
9:15Come and Oet It
9:30-AaI8eeIt
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
13:00News
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Musle
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
3:00American Journal (VOA)
3:15Songs of France (RDF)
3:3UAfternoon Melodies
3:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club (VOA)
4:30What's Your Favorite
:0OLinda's First Love Cia.
Alfaro. S.A.
6:15 Request Salon
7:00Adventures of
Hannory (BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:46Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00Rows. Commentary
(Voice of America!
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:46Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9 00Short Story Theatre
(VOAi
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of A mor lea
(VOA)
10:30Ad ventures of PC 4
(BBC)
11:00The Owls Nest
1:00a-m.Sign Of
Explanation of Syasaola
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcastln* Corp
9 RDF-Radlodlffusion Francalao
Richard
To OUR FRIENDS and CLIENTS
of the Atlantic Side
Wp are pleased to announce our
appointment aa Sub-Dealer*
for the HILLMAN-MINX
(Delivery within a few days)
COLON MOTORS, INC.
10th Street and 15th St. A Me lender
I
Excitement!
Beauty in
every movement!
i.
HOLIDAY on ICE
//
presents
CARNIVAL on ICE
with the most beautiful stars
of fee skating
DEBUT Saturday, March 29
OLYMPIC STADIUM
---------------PRICES---------------
GENERAL ENTRANCE........ $1.00
PREFERRED SEATS......... 2.00
RINK.................. 3.00


/
AGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 188*

Kansas Captures N.C.A.A. Basketball Tournament
BsL
: Winners^ St. John's In | Pacific Divisional
-Olympic Trials Saturday l Softball League
By United Press
' SEATTLE, Washington, March 27.Kansas
i -won the National Collegiate Athletic Association
,,.,Basketball Tournament bv swamping St. John's
\ of Brooklyn 80-63 in the finals before 11,000 fans
.. .Jast night.'
All-American Clyde Lovellette sparked the
"1:. Kansas victory with 33 points. In the consolation
round, Illinois nosed out the surprisingly strong
"' Sp.nta Cara 67-64.
Pabst, Poivells Clash Tonight
For Atlantic Twi-League Lead
STANDINGS
TEAM- Won Lost Pet.
Army OM......7
C'tral Labor Office 7
Navy Ordnance .. 7
Coroxal Sales Store 6
Commissary. .... (
Post Office......4
Building Division.. S
Army Signal .... 2
Kobbe Sales Store. I
Her trica I Division. 0
2
2
2
3
3
4
(
1
7
7
.778
.778
.778
.667
.667
.500
.333
1"A
.125
Balboa High Is 2nd Half
Pacific Twi-Loop Champ
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL LEAGUE
Teams
Army QM, Central Labor Of- r.ihreit.r ist> ma
fice, and Navy Ordnance wound I HIrW rewm
(Straight Season Standings)
up the straight season deadlock-!
Both
Kansas and St. John's erplllar Diesels and Air Force All, Si2UXtaiSUi .iSi-Vi
d for the Olympic trials'Star teams took the first four ,0'^'^'8 Stores surprise 7-3
Balboa High School.
ed in first place as a result of 1 "f"ch^
rnrmol Oolao Clnrl', .,!.. 1. rapan MfrCOants
victo
ctory over Army QM yesterday. I
In the playoff for the straight
- -.
Teams
Last.
qualified for the Olympic .
which open In Kansas City and spots in the AAU Tournament;
Jiew Xorlc on Saturday night. last week. | ^^ chjim-plon8hlpi Army QM
Kansas will play. Southwest I The Diesels, who won the AAU ^U*"*!? S&aS&SS! J^i"'
Missouri, winner of the NAIB tourney, play the Air Force team "J1"* VHrJRXX.^*WXT Balboa High School
Tourney. In one quatter-flnal. in New Vork on Saturday. The na^e nertThuntev B> Brewers .
ame at Kansas City. The Phil-other half o the New York twin n ^ four teLa go into GibralUr Life In,.
inn kiJmm"The the round-robin championship, Panama Merchants
nd finata will be f'eries- Arn,y ^M' Central Ubor
e Office, and Navy Ordnance have
i '.laliilrii but Commissary and
x
3
3
1
BB
8
BHS
4
4
%
I
PM
5
4
|
W
12
11

C
L
7
8
11
18
.
11
12
38 88
V
Ips Oilers play the Fibber Mc-blll sends St. John's against_La
.. .Gee and Molly team in the other; Salle's Invltai
".. half of the Kansas City double-; semi-finals and
'-." header pn Saturday.. played in New York next Mon-
"; The Oilers. Fibber McGee. Cat- day and "Tuesday.
(Second Half Stand in
BH8 BB GLI
. x I 3
. 1 1
. 1 t z
.:. i
PM
1
3
2
5
8
3
L
4
5
5
6
.
Pet.
jR
.458
.333
.636
.50*
.500
.333

Atlantic Little I cogue
Coroza 1 Sales Store will ensate
in a play-off game next Monday
for the fourth berth In the series.
The box score of yesterday's
crucial game follows:
Army CJM
~

24
Standings of the teams
Teams
JJttle Motta's
for the Pals, lining out three
-Powell's .
Margarita
Plice Pals
Won Lost Pet. singles for a perfect day at bat,
.738;while Freeman Burgess
.7
.5
3
3
.555 Powell's
J3S twlet.
.333
doubled and
of the
singled
Score by innings:
\rFOWMJL'S
SCORE WIN OVER Police......1 2 0 0 2 38
POLICE PALS Powell's.....0 0 0 0 0 6
The Powell's handed the Police,
*, fi:Is a 9 to 7 defeat Friday after- C. Leves, Bailey and Garcia,
noon assuring them of second French P.
flace position in the Atlantic Kulig P. C. Hitchcock P. C.
itlle League standings for the French, O.
e-ond-half pennant race. i------------
Powell's started off with a-bang A t f
in the tup of the first Inning. MTIOnTlC
scoring six runs, but the Pals
ci-.me rieht back to tie it all up
again, scoring four in the second
and two in the third.
R. Richards
A. Ortega ..
V. Nlcholls .
W.Jules.. ..
R. Tucknall
M. Tulloch..
C. Bienman
E. Lynch ..
A. Milwood .
N. Weir ....
....
....
AB
8
2
4
8
1
1
1
3
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT
Balboa High School 9, Balboa Brewers 8
Balboa High School's looker Jim Frazer at left field when he
room was the noisiest place on threw wild to cut off a runner.
the Isthmus last night as the; Big gun at the plate for the
iubllant players of its baseball losers with three hits for three
q squad and loyal followers were
celebrating their 8-8 win over the
Iboa Brewers to clinch
Totals............24 3 5
Pony League
The teams fought to a tie un-
til the last Inning, Powell's go-
in* ?head when Freeman Bur-'
l2:s led Off with a double, walks
* to Knllg, French and Brians
"co\ '.ed with Max Banna's solid
sir. 'e netted them three runs.
Charlie French who relieved
*' tTer.h Kullg in the fourth inning
- was credited with the win over
the Pals. Both of these lads also
were'the batting stars of the day.
CHAMPIONSHIP PLAYOFFS
TEAM
Corotal Sales Store
A. Charris.........
V. Tudor........
A. Barraza.......
P. Gasktn.........
S. Sellman.......
Pilgrim...........
R McLean.........
B. Jaramillo
AB
3
4
3
4
3
1
8
1
L. Springer.......... 2
strong Ba
the second half title of the Pa-
cific Twilight League and move
into the final playoffs for the
1852 crown.
The High School, who were not
given a nance to come elose or
even put up a fight for league
honors, came through in a story
book fashion by doing it the hard
way. '
Now they are the talk of_the
town and the experts
light Loop circles are
trips, was William McOee and
Noel Gibson with three for four.
For the winners, Ed Napoleon
with one for two and Jerry Hal-
man with two for four, were the
big bats.
The box score
BHS
Halm an, 2b
5
2
5
5
4
3
3
ATLANTIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE
STANDINGS (SECOND HALF)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Pafcat..........8 4 .856
Powell's........8 8 .508
C.H.S.........8 4 AM
TONIGHTS GAME
Powell's vs. Pabst.
The Atlantic Twilight League
1858 season Is rapidly drawing to
a close, and veterans who have
seen the Gold Coast Twl Loop
come and go for most of Its 13
years of existence agree that this
is probably the tightest race In
its history.
Pan Liquido Cops Second Place
In Pacific Softball Second Half
TEAM STANDINGS
(Second Half)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Ittsnrancemen.... 7 8 1.088
Pan Lleuldo.....8 8 .625
Elks..........4 8 .571
Philippine Rattan. 8 .276
CAA..........6 7 .000
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pan Liquido 12, Philippine
Rattan 14.
TODAY'S GAME
firemen's Insurance vs. Elks.
The Furnlturemen marked up
one run In the top of the sev-
enth to set the final score at 12
to 10.
The box score:
Philippine Rattan AB R H E
Jutzy, 2b........ 8 3 4 0
Engelke, H ss-p. ..8110
Lawyer, 3b. .... .. 4 2 1 1
Filo, lb........ 4 0 2 0
Newhouse, cf...... 4 0 1 0
Fraser, If....... 3 0 0 0
Nichols, c....... 3 10 1
Dempsey, rf...... 4 0 1 0
Smith, G., p-ss .... 4330
Totals .....'.....40 18 ~2
Yesterday Oeorge Stanley's Pan >, Liquido AB R
At the conclusion,of each of Llquiao niae came from behind; Fo8ter, 2b........ 4 1.
games In the sec-: to edge the idle Elks out of a tie
iy a different team' for second place when they set
has been on top of the heap, and the Philippine Rattan team down
throughout the constant shift-; 12 toJO.
lug ich team has bad Hs tarn Gordon Smith started on the
In the top slot. At present, the, mound for the Furnlturemen and
Pabst Blue Ribbon nfne Is port- held the Beermen scoreless until
ing a half game lead overTow-l the fourth lnnhig when he was
dra, and only one game ahead ef |"esPns,D'e for ou' "J"* on one
the last place High Sebeol team,1 hit, two bases on balls and two
winner, if tjheflKt half. ] errors on the part of his team-
Tonight Powell's wiU again t *s.
have the opportunity of recap-
turing first place when they take
the last four .
ond half of play,
May, cf
Napoleon, rf.
CaFlin, R., lb
Ostrea, 3b. .
Flynn, c .
in Twi-i Salas, as .
figuring i Rowley. It. .
ire.
AB B
4 1
Morton, p
Buick..........., i o
M.RA............. 1 n
CP.O............. | t
In a playoff game at Mt. Hope!
Stadium Monday Buick defeated
CP.O. by a score of 8 to 3. This
game was. featured by the alr-
ight pitching of Ray Croft of
Totals............24
Score By Innings
' Rales Store 411 001 x7
Won Lost Almy QM 003 000 03
out the odds for the champion-
ship playoffs between the win-
ners of the first half. Gibraltar
Life Insurance, and the Balboa
High School, winner of the sec- Brewers
n ond half title. I Herring, cf
_| The Pacific Twilight League Scott, 3b .
7! championship would be a fitting! Carlln. Wm
reward for the High '
HPO
2 2
0
0
11
1
5
4
3
1
on the leading Pabst team.
At this point of the race, every
game Is played like a champion-
ship contest as all three teams
realise that In a elose fight like
this 1852 race, one game or even
one misplay may cost the cham-
pionship.
With this in mind, the fans can
expeet to see both team's aces go
to the mound. For Pabst, their
hitting Pitcher Noel Gibson will
do the horling against Powell's
,, George Carty. Any sign ef weak-
i' enlng by any of these two slten-
'en will probably bring about
5 more bull-pen action than has
Totals .35 5 27 22 3
been seen thus far In the Atlan-
tic Twilight League.
Game time, as usual. Is set for
7 pjn.
,r\uii Pitcher: Ler
er. Losing Pitcher
: Leroy
: N. Weir
Spring-
each having two hits apiece. Max SKi ZXFttJLJfflvZn^Zi
ared in the" field for ^gff-gg &*$$\
the Powell's.
.Score by Innings:
well's.....6 0 0 0 0 3Bi
ollce......0 4 2 0 0 171
Ki'lig, French and Hitchcock. |
D?.vlson. C. Leves ?r"1 Palumbo
"POLICE F4VD POWELL'S
DEFEAT
In the last game of the At-
lantic tittle League's pennant
race the Police Pals defeated the
Po'-cll's by the score of 8 to 8.
Charlie Leves of the Police Pa!*
lf"hed brilliant one-hit. shutou'
ball until the Powell's batscamn
to life in the last of the sixth
lining. Lester Bailey rame on to
relieve Leves and retiree: the
three batter? to face his offer-
ings via the strike-out route
Keith Kug start-d on the
rr.Jfcnd.for the Powell's r'ne. but
rail Into trouble In th fifth nd
s^rroejl oosltyons with catcher
BBlv Hitchcock who, also needed
help In the sixth, when Charlie
Fren"! came on In reHef td retire
the side.
JJarry Davison starred at bat
team.
support from his teammates,
Crawford was the victim of some
loose play In the infield.
The box score:
Little League
ARMED FORCES LITTLE
LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost
ttgn
izln
AB R HPO A
.40140
.40013
lb 4 0 O 8 1
School's. Neckar, c. 4 0 0 4 1
hard fight and amazing climb to| Gibson, p 4 1 3 0 1
first place. Fans who witnessed; Cox, ss 3 1 1 2 5
the last few weeks of regularl Angermuller, 2b 4 1 0 4 0
scheduled games and the second'Frazer, If .3 0 : 3 0
half playoffs cannot complain of McGee, rf. 3
the brand of baseball that was
played.
Last night it was Don Morton
on the mound for the High
School. He battled'ft but with,
Totals.....33 3 9 27 11 3
Score By Innings
BHS 10101200 05
Brewers 03000000 03
Runs Batted InHalman. Nap-
the experienced Noel Gibson to1 oleon, R. Carlln, Ostrea, Morton,
actually pitch Balboa High to the Frazer, McGee 2. Earned Runs
nick
Burgess, 3b .
Oro/i., p .
Matos.,c .
Lamls, lb. .
i-IarU. 2b. .
Taber, rf. .
Bazn. If. .
Hannlgan, as.
D. Smith, ef .
AB R
3 2
HPO
ff 0
0
11
6
Curundu.......... 8
Caribbean Command.. 5 2
I Albrook.......... 3 4
E West Bank........ 8 4
0 Kobbe............ 2 5
0 Clayton.......... 2 5
0
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Curundu 11, Clayton 8.
Caribbean Command 12, Kob-
be 7.
West,Bank 6, Albrook 4.
Totals.....29 8 3 21 10 1
In the game at the Fort Kobbe
CP.O
Ramsey, ss :
Gibson, c .
Newhard, 3b.
Crawford, p .
Didler, cf .
Recela, If .
Hart. 2b .
McJennett, rf
Cralg ....
Hamilton, lb
AB
4
, 4
. 2
. 3
3
3
1
3
0
2
HPO
1
1 11 0
THE HEAD
; Miami, Fla. (NBA) Jockey
Conn McCreary wears the largest
Totals.....38 3 5 21 11
Score By Innings
Buick 0 12 8 0 0 08
CP.O. 0 3 0 0 0 0 03
Base on Balls offCrawford 6.
diamond Monday afternoon, the
Caribbean Commandos defeated
the Kobbe lads 12 to 7.
Ross Kramer started on the
mound for the Commandos with
Robert Mitchell taking over in
the fourth Inning and finishing
up. Robert Crowder started for
the Kobbe team and he, like
1' Kramer, was not around at the
! 1 finish as Vincent Vasli took over
0 the pitching duties in the fourth
0 Inning.
_| Kramer was the leading hitter
5 of the game, collecting three hits
In three trips to the plate, with
; teammate Tom Pitman getting on an
, three for fbur. Vernon Sander's
triple was the only extra base hit
championship playoffs.
Both pitchers went the route
with Morton winning his seventh
game against two defeats. Gib-
son was charged with his second
loss with six wins to his credit.
Last night both hurlers were
rapped for nine hits, but the High
School lads bunched their hits to
push across more runs.
In this free hitting affair, BHS
was the first to dent the plate.
In the top half of the first in-
ning, after the two first batters
to face Gibson filed out and
struck out, Gibson Issued a free
ass to Ed Napoleon. Bob Carlln
BHS 5, Brewers 3. Left on Bases
BHS 9, Brewers 4. Home Hun-
Napoleon. Two ase HitMcGee.
Sacrifice HitsSalas, Cox. Stol-
en asesHalman, Flynn, Her-
ring, McGee. Struckout byMor-
ton 3, Gibson 2. Base on Balls off
Gibson 5. Losing PitcherGib-
son (8-2). Winning Pitcher-
Morton (7-2). DoubleplayOs-
trea, R. Carlln, Ostrea. Umpires
Luzer and Majors. Time c
Game2:59.
THEY HAVE PAPER
MD-XJNOCKET, Me. (UP.)
?i__________
hen got the first hit of the game
with a single to left to advance,The Orezt Northern rtor Co.,
Napoleon to second. Dick Ostrea largest newsprtat manufactur-
followed suit by hitting safely to er In ^9*^1
short rlKht to score Napoleon, modern conservation methods
Abdul F&nn grounded outshort will Insure a supply of pulp-
to first to end the rally. I wood for at least a century The
The Brewers retaliated to take paper company owns 12 percent
a two-run lead in the second half of ^e to^ area of^aine 1most
of the second with three runs of it northern Umberi ids.
on three hits. Al Neckar struck
out for the first out. Noel Gibson
lined one through second and
moved no as Dick Cox was safe
smile faintly as hi
Stanley's regular hurler, Bill
Muller, was on the bench with a
"charlie hqrse" and Lee did not
appear at the start of the game
so Stanley scraped the bottom of
the barrel and came up with
George Tarfllnger to do the ini-
tial pitching. Tarfllnger pitched
two and one-third Innings and
Save up seven runs on nine base
Its and three free passes.
Lee relieved Tarfllnger In the
third, pitched four and two-
thirds innings, was responsible
for three runs on four hits and
three walks. Lee was credited
with the winhis fifth against
a single defeat.
For the Rattan boys .Howard
Engelke relieved Smith In the
sixth and was charged with the
loas. .
Philippine Rattan was leading
the Liquid Bread team 9 to 4 un-
in the
a
Jones, L cf...... 3
Stanley, ss. .. .. .. 2
Tarfllnger, p-lb. .. 2
Lane, c......... 3
Husted, 3b........ 4
Presho, If........ 2
Cain, If.
Jacks, lb......
Lee, p........
Helsler, rf.....
Glaeser, rf.....
27 12 6 4
Totals.......
Score By Innings
Philippine Rattan 241 200 110
Pan Liquido 000 408 x18
til an eight-run uprising in th
sixth which gave Pan Liquido
12 to 9 advantage.
Don't Neglect Slipping
FALSE TEETH
Do talse teetb drop, lip or wobble
when you talk, eat, leugh or sneeze?
Don't be annoyed and embarrassed by
wch handicaps. FASTEETH, an alkaline
(non-acid) powder to sprinkle on your
olatcS, keeps false teeth more firmly
set. Gives onildent feeling of security
and added comfort. No gummy, gooey,
pasty taste or feeling. Get FASTEETH
today at any drug star*.
BRONCHIAL
ASTHMA
Sleep Sound All Night
&tony te "known m "The Head"' ^ J*b?*,*:
among fellow relnsmen.
3, Croft
I Curtis.
9. UmpireHall and
TRAVEL BARGAINS!
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Only S 83. one way
'150.75 round trip)
Score by Innings:
Caribbean Command 110 52312
Kobbe 000 331 7
-Paul Richards
he watches his
team work "out at Pasadena.
Calif., no doubt highly pleated
with what he tees. The Chicago
White Sox manager predicts an-
other goed year for hi* men,
they may even cop the
pennant. (NEA)
says
The Curundu Councilmen
chalked up a 11 to 0 victory over
the Fort Clayton nine in the
game at the Curundu field for
their sixth consecutive win.
Jimmy Walling was the win-
ning pitcher and Prankie Robin-
son the loser. Both boys went all
the way.
Leading hitters for the Coun-
cilmen were Henry Lavender,
I jerry Curtis and Butch Frangi-
onl.
Snore by Innings:
Clayton' 8 O 0 0 0 0 0
Curundu 0 7 3 11 Jt11
lnheld hit. Ronnie Anger-
muller laid one down and all
hands were safe. Jim Frazer,
with the bases loaded, placed an-
other bunt and a run scored as
the throw from Bob Carlln to the
i plate was a bit late. BUI MeOee
then drove In two runs with his
single to right field and was
caught trying to extend it to a
double. \ jt
The High School kept pecking
away. They scored one run In the
third when Ed Napoleon got hold
of one of Noel Gibson's offerings
for a home run to put them back
In the game 3-2.
The High School tied it up at
3-3 in the fifth on two walks and
a single by Bob Carlln. In the
next frame they pushed across
two run to win the game on
three hits, one walk, a sacrifice
and a costly Brewer mlscue by,
WE HAVE 'EM
AUTOMATIC
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7795
5RICT YOU* TOAST! OM SUCH NAMtS
AS TOASTMASTIR, G.E., CAMMELO, DOAMHIOM
AMD OONRAL MILLSI
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Phones: 3-85M 2-8S83
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bronchitis ond Asthmo in oil of bliz-
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blessing tc thousands ond now sold
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There Is nothing -o sot* and sure
in fie work) 2 or 3 doses in tweet
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PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
Tel. 2-1855 Opposite
Panama Ancon Bus-stop
Or see vour travel agent
Over at the Little League Park
hi Cocoli, the West Bank boys
edged out a 8 to 4 win over the.
Albrook Flyboys. Two victory
placed West Bank in a tie with
Albrook for third place.
Oeorge Barbier started on the
mound for West Bank, but was
relieved in the fourth inning by
Rolando Salva. Don Schlosser
was the initial starter for the
Flyboys, John Desloge taking
over In the fourth and finishing
the game.
The winning runs were scored
by the West Bank lads In the
bottom of the fifth when Tlmmy:
Hays drew a free pass to first,
stole second and third bases.
third on a passed ball and then
scored on an Infield out. Barup
had a perfect day at the plate,
collecting three hits In three at
bats.
Score by Innings:
Albrook 0 0 2 2 0 04
West Bank 2 0 2 0 2 x6
Today's schedule Is as follows
'home team first): Caribbean
Command vs. Clayton. Albrook
vs. Kobe and West Bank vs. Cu- .
rundu. Game time is 4:30 p.m. I


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THTJRSBAY. MARCH 27, 185
TU* P**AMA AMRrVaW AN TNT)EP*jmWfT BAIIT *Tl>SPAPER
r-T i t r----------T- -ff-intiiii _.__ """'"" """" ""*""*...... ^_ ... ........ fAQl Wf*
Five-Team Track Meet Scheduled Tonight At Balboa Stadium
Little
League
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lo*t
Police
Sean......
Lincoln Life.,
AFGE 14 .. .
fiks 1414 .. .
Firemen .. .,
a down hi* shirt front, then
down hi* trouser lee and off the
right to first
touched
Motion.
Top Athletes
Of CZ Listed
To Take Part
Gun Club ISutes
ALBROOK CTJBUNDU
WINNERS IN RIFLE LEAGUE;
CRISTOBAL, BALBOA
JUNIORS 2nd A 3rd
end of hU foot
baseman Randel who
Frertrtv Hall of kVClW rr
Albrook-Curundu
B Oorder .86
E. Bench .... 89
Bin Jeffrey .
v. woraham
:.a
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Loit
r............ 6 1
1414.......... 8 i
icoln Life........ t S
oliee............ S 8
TOE 14.......... 8 8
Fireman.......... 8 8
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
AFGE 11, Firemen 4.
TODAY'S GAME
Police t. Lincoln Life.
The AFGB Little Leaguer
owned the Firemen yesterday at
lttle League Park 11 to 4.
The Union Boys scored two
runs In the top of the first In-
ning when johnny Motion dou-
bled to score Salas and Wills.
The Firemen came back in the
bottom of the third and went a-
head, scoring three runs on one
hit.
However, AFGE came right
back In the very next Inning and
pushed six runs across on six hits
with four of the hits being suc-
cessive singles by Castleman,
Wilis, Motion and Snodgrass. In
the bottom half of the third the
Smokies pushed across their on-
ly other run of the game when
Butch Kintner scored on "Spike"
McNall's single.
The AFOERS added three more
runs In the fifth as they punch-
ed out four base hits.
Alex Eberenz went all the way
for his first win of the season
for AFGE, giving up four runs
on four hits. Alex retired six bat-
ters on strikes and gave up seven Totals
bases on balls. Eberenz. after al-
lowing one hit in the fourth In-
ning, set the Smokies down in or-
der in the fifth and sixth In-
nings.
Don Randel started for the
Flremeh with Herby Schneider
taking over in the third Inning
and finishing up.
The game was featured by a
"one-for-the-book" play that oc-
curred in the fourth frame when
Motion hit a high bounding ball
that Bchnelder attempted to
field. But the ball, bouncing high,
hit Schneider on the chest, roll-
-- The official coro are not
Ti,hf. .-.i, ? .* 4w- comPud! tnd theri *' *tlu ***** TOTAL
jn ,o.,,J.,rtck.."*** ,.th! iom malches to b completed in <
E!.i ^5!KLWHL*? *het'SSf* the Hthmlan Oallary League. So nrPLi
- tlr,^ t^mfrunnLi Vlh^Bu ,ar *he R,fl ***** ot the I Balboa Seniors
rlgC..Ueman, with three for four XtfVre Cr'lsVb. *E&
and Bobby Wills with two for ffi wltE nSf mf VS3
three, led he winners at bat. Mo.l L^tHSi1.SS". ./S
tlon with two doubles and a In- !^!l^ ItHJL^'.SflS
gle in four trips to the plate lrt'wfJSE* L'm'..rt Itif!'rh
the hitters In Total basei for the hu,,?.,w,V, **-" 7l1-8 "
day.
McNall, Bmokle second sacker,
continued to hit the ball for hi
93
84
88
48
3
88
78
87
38
336
161
15
team collecting two singles in
three trips to the plate.
Today the third place Lincoln
Lifers will meet the Police. Bruce
Bateman will go to the mound
for the Lifers while the Police
will send either Bobby Klelhofer
or Orady Robertaon to tha
mound.
The box acora:
AFGE
ye teams running
doubt of the final standings 0f
the top three teams. The Al-
brook-Curundu Gun Club team,
in what la rumored to be their
last appearance ai a team (it is
said thit they have been re-
Actu.lly It 111 be a four-w.y %!PJ2 &ti!$j^%*k
meet, with the two service teams oi.tad th#lf Hfla .eaa^w^th;
combining to form one team-lE,',,/V. ni E w7 V.
With their combinad atrength I fe."ft nX.".'?.? *.,"&
they will rate aa favorite* to eopi*?*ny l0r Meond rilfht
the honors tonight, bnt any of *
the other three teams have tha
strength to make It mighty eloae.
This meat will serve aa an ax.
Th* Cristbal Junior Rifle Chib
Edd Budd
Al Joyce .
C. Braokon
M. Mlllard
P. I.
100 06
.87 87
.87 84
TEAM TOTAL
Marinea
F. C. ThamalU 87
M. Perkins 87
E. Combs .... 88
J. Counislman 96
83
81
S
I.
88
81
8
84
78
74
66
TRAM TOTAL
Cristbal Jniora
i
383
368
1674
373
367
384
369
1067
Atlantic Little
League To Hold
Benefit Show
lost two matches to take second j Sehoibeltr
Salas, 3b......
Morris, 3b......
Castleman, se.
Wills, lb......
Motion, cf......
Snodgrass, o .. ..
Edmondson, If ..
Eberena, p......
Hall, rf.......
Totals........
Firemen
Doran, rf......
Lin for s, aa.....
Schneider, lb-p.
Terry, cf......
Schoch, c......
Kintner, If.....
McNall, 2b......
Fundakowskl, 3b.
Randel, p-lb..
AB R
4
8
4
8
4
PO
80 11 13 18
AB R HPO
10 0 0
4 0 0 1
3 0 0 0
4 0 111
Oeyer .
Balboa Relays and all coaches
will probably do a lot of experi-
menting with their boys In the
various events. Jimmy Thompson
has stated he plans to use this
meet strictly for tryouts for the
formation of his final entry for
the Athletic Club In the Balboa
Relays on April 18.
surgent Balboa Juniors, after alL.
somewhat weak start, completed D
the season with only three losses
to take third plaee. Further de- TRAM TOTAL
tails on the Lomuo standings Crsitbal ROTC
will be published when the of- d Cockle
ficial scores are made available D. ooodhsad
by the League Officials. There vie Ftihsr
are Hill several pistol matches to Bill Stevens
2 0
25 4 4 18 5
Score By Inning*
0 8
AFGE 3 0 6 0 3 0^-11 13
Firemen 0310004 4 1
Winning PitcherEberenz (1-
0). Losing PitcherRandel (1-6).
Struckout byEberenz 6, Randel
2, Schneider 8. Bases on Balls off
Eberenz 7, Randel 4, Schneider
3. Mita and Runs offRandel 8
and 8 in 2 1-3 Innings; Schneider
6 and 3 In 3 2-3 Innings. Left on
BasesAFGE 8, Firemen 8. Two
Base HitsMotion 2, Randel.
UmpiresP otter and Dailey.
ScorerMead. Time o Game-
las.
fonlght'a meet will give local'* *red' wh"eh may nave aome
fans an opportunity to see aome bf,lrln* the "?" iUndlnl.
of the top flight athlete* in sov-"'hu*h ** 'Jfl* con-
eral of the events. Clarence Be- S,1,"',!0" that '" Bib0" Pun
taneourt of Albrook should be cV.b A,m. \,ndeet#<' to_date,
1118
84 77 81
86 80 80
J?8
TRAM TOTAL

Marina*
E. Combs
338
338
333
307
sailing around 11 or 11M feet In1*1" &*& *" Lefue Cham- F. C Thamali*
the pole vault. Oliver Swaby of P'onshlp that they won last ysar.
the AC and George Bennett of
out of the sprint*, and a* If this
wasn't enough the mile will prob-
ably be the best race of tha meet.
This will bring together for the
first time inch outstanding run-
ner* as Leonard Parker of the
AC, Bob Hanson, BHS sensation,
Ed Silva, Walter Paul both from
Due to pressure of other acti-
vities, such as earning a living,
your correspondent has allowed
scores to accumulate for aome
time back. Result* of these re-
cent "Crooihel" matches include
a victory of the Balboa OunlAndy Fraier
Club pistol team over the Al-
brok-Curundu team 1030 to 932
M. Perkins
W. R. Osborne
TRAM TOTAL
D. Ooodhead .
B. Steven*
Albrook,'and Anselmo Arias of!although Captain Bob order oi
Cristobal. This should without a
doubt be the top race of the eve-
ning.
Ramn Rosarlo from the 504th
Wll Ibe the big gun of the weights,
the losers fired Individual high
score of 370.
In the rifle division, the Bal-
boa Gun club defeated the Ma-
wlth practice mark* of better rlnes In a close one, 1074 to
than 55 feet In the shot put and 1067 with M/Sgt Ed Budd's 281
over 140 feet In the discus, he.high score for the winners.
looks like a cinch. His closest
competition will probably com*
from Clalr Godby of BHS in the
TEAM TOTAL
J. Pahnstock
J. Scheibelr .
Donna Oeytr .
John Matgi .
Charlie Thamalis hit 273 to lead
the losers. On the same night,
the Cristbal Juniors took over
Attention, Canal Zone Residents!
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25 CYCLE!
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7 Cu. Ft. REFRIGERATOR
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R Moat Ch*t _
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Another 15 Lbs.
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lettom
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PAYMENTS
shot and Bill Robinson of CRS'the Cristbal ROTC 1118 to 893,
in the discus. I sparked by a 289 fired by Jim
Another race that Ju*t might Schelbeler.
leave the crowd limp from ex-i
cltement I* the quarter mile re- The Rodman Marine teem took
lay. Here team* from the Armed on the Cristobal ROTC the next
Foreea, Balboa High, Cristobal,'evening and won 1087 to 816
and the AC promise to make this with Ernet Comb* top hooter
a real race. Any one of theee.at 274. The Marines also took on
teams must be considered aa a the Cristbal Juniors on the
threat to any exlating local r*c- aame range (Cristbal High) the
ord.
\
328
GRAND
Cok Sports
The second of a three-game
series between the Local-Rate
Amateur League star* and the
Coln provincial Selection will
be played at the Coln Stadium
today at 4:00 p.m.
The first game, won 10-5 by
Coln, was thriller Adamson (Co-
ln) and Smith (C.ZB.) hurled
with Smith fanning *even of the
flrt nine hitters and leaving the
game ahead 2 to 1 In the fourth.
The Silver City then'* and
Ladies' Softball Leagues com-
pleted their full schedule thru
Ladles Results: Opening day-
March 24.
Eagles 8 Mndez 1. The follow-
ing day EStenoz bowed to La Fa-
milia 18-13, Thelma King over
powella 11 to 9 and the defend-
ing champion Eagles outslugged
Esteno* 13-7.
Men's results: C. Y. O. 9, Beav-
ers 8; Riviera 6, Experiencia 6:
Dodgers 8, O T. O. 3 (called at
the end of seven Innings because
of darkness.)
>ge .
same night, but were not so for-
tunate in this one, as the Junior*
took them over 1070 to 1018.
John Fahnestoek with 380 top-
ped the winners, aa Thamali* a-
ain headed the Marine* with
78.
Albrook-Curundu hurdled an-
other obstacle on their way to
the trophy when they Journeyed D- Hoop** .
to Balboa to defeat the Balboa V. Esquerra
ROTC 1110 to 1034. Bob Demlng's
385 sparked the winners In this TRAM TOTAL
one, with Earl Mitchell's 284 close Crl*teb*l gealer
behind. The next night the Bal- B. Blngham .100
Roy P*rkin. ido
TRAM TOTAL
Marine*
F. C. ThamalU Oft
E. Comb* ... 08
Milt perkin* 07
W. R. Osborne 78
TEAM TOTAL

Albrook- Caranda
Bob Doming .00
E. Mitchell ... 08
BobOord*r. .00
Bill Jaffray 00
TRAM TOTAL
Balboa ROTC
O. MendrlekJon 08
H. Jordan 04
V. Esquerra M
D. Hoopes ... 08
TRAM TOTAL

Balboa ROTC
O. Hendrleluon 00
H. Jordan ... 04
..Friday evening April 4 the
Ruoff Studio, under the man-
agement of Mr*. Leo Ooulet and
her sister Mr*. Robert Berger,
will put en a stage show for the
benefit of the Atlantic Little
Leaguer*.
A Western movie along with
cartoons will be show on the
screen. The proceeds from thl*
affair will be used for a Banquet,
held annually for the Little Lea-
guer's.
_ The program, as arranged by
James J. Recela, business man-
hager Of the Atlantic Little
League calls for a Western Mo-
vie and Cartoons at 6:15; Stage
Shew at 8:00 and mete Movies at
nine 'Cloek.
Fans and parents of the Little
Leaguer'* are urged to support
thl* affair. Ticket* for the big
affair are now on sale and may
be purchased from any League
official and Managing personnel
at 31.00 for adult* and .35 cent*
for children.
All Little League player's will
be introduced to the audience On
he conclurion of the Stage
how.
by
JOE WILLIAMS
IT. PETERSBURGTo toft, 4ltr*s**4 tniyera
would have pegged the gentleman a* a free-wkeeUagTwMhmfton
?"Mt.t* F r***- T^oday menoy Isn't worth q**r-
tor".. .But Frank Lane wasn't referring to European aid, Yarn
sabaldy or mink coat*.
Mr Une 1* general manager of the Chicago White Bob. Re
wa* referring to the futility of trying to make b
mere money. He had offered the AAA
to make baseball deal* with
s $200,000 for Bob Rhantg, a
SOO.OOO for the Brewn** Red
l^IRE
pitcher. No eoap. He had gone to 8300,0
Server. No dice.
"I era* using real money," added Mr. Lea*. "At least Ret
passes for money. I had hopes boeau** those two chib trifling
a* it is, can uae money."
On this particular afternoon ho wa* watching the Detroit*
play the Card*. Beside* pitching he can uae tout hitting out.
neider. There had been earlier report* the Tlgeri would deal VU
Wertt or Wlt*r Ever*. Previouly the Yankees had been lnteroet-
d. Rut Mr. Lea* merely sighed.
"Why waate my time? The Briggs family own half the state
of Michigan. P. S. They alee own the Tiger*.
Mr. Lane* di*mal experience with the American dollar doe*
ddt make him unique. Not even la baseball. la en extremity one
ot the poorer club* will apologetically accept money but the fixed
practice today I* player exchange, that* the feme'* foldsund-
ard. Thus clubs with productive farm system* are in store
advantageous position to make deals.
i
1018
n
90
S
08
78
74
70
88
288
!?!
368
I10
381
380
387
387
1034
By BEAN* REARdON
34 Tears in National League
NEW YORK (NRA)4j. What
has been the record number of
injuries suffered by a singl
team in the major*? .
A. The Yankee* of 1040 had
a record Injury list of 71. Jo*
DiMagglo, Tommy Henrleh and
Yogi Berra only played In 17
game* together all that season.
Q. How many World Serle*
have the Yankees won?
A. The Yank* have been in IS
Series, have won 14 times.
Q. How m*ny throw* per game
dee a jejtcher average?
%t
X
08
61
07
03
76
78
67
63
364
363
360
336
Q What ha* been the longest
losing streak In the major*?
A. 88 games, held Jointly by
the Boston American* of 1006,
and the Philadelphia Athletics of
1910 and 1N3.
Q. What is the record number
of years for an umpire staying
in the big ltaguea?
A. Bob Emilio icrved 38 year*
behind the plate in tha National
League, from 1801 to 1030. Tom
Connolly (pent 33 seasons la the
big how, 1800-1008 la the Na-
tlonal, and 19*0-1931 in the Am-
erican.
FAIN MAT SB NEXT
Thl* ha* been mor* er le the cue for eeate year now. por-
he.pii the happiest deal the Yankee* ever mad* w** fee Jee Ol-
Maggie. Only $36,000 la money wa* involved. Any elub ill the
league could have bettered that. Even the Bushwicks, for that
matter.
Rut the Y*nkee. had five player* tea Freneleee needed to
field a winning team. Meetly run-of-the-mill, but good enough
for out there. No other elub wa sufficiently equipped to moot
the immediate demand of the Seel*. This eort of thing happen*
with *gulrlty now. It is likely to happen with reference to Fer-
rie fain of the AAA* befen the year u out, thu being dependent
on how the elub fares.
Nevertheless, Mr. Lene, in eao way er another, ha managed
to become an active and successful David Harum. in three year
h* ha* maneuvered the White Sox from last plaee. 44 gimeiaut,
into contention. Last year they get the pace and led up te Ali-
star geme time, taking the play away from their lntreclty rival*,
the Cub* for the first tlm* in a generation.
Mr. Lane even outsmarted or euttalked Branch Rickey a
phenomenal achievement in either ease, in landing Chiee Ce'rre-
quel, Latin America's greataet gift to the art* sine* Carmen Mi-
randa. For 8 while last aeaaon the press box wee inclined to rate
him over Ty Cobb s favorite shortstop, Phil (Honu*) R&iute. Later
he tailed off and the dugout explanation wae complaeeaey.
it may even be that Mr. Lane gave the Yankees the pennant
when he persuaded Hank Oreonberg to yield Minnie Mlnoeo who**
.326 bat the Indians surely could have u*ed aa they staggered
down the stretch blowing the tight ones.

THE RIVERA CONTRACT
For a hustler who shuffles a fast deck, Mr. L*n* U deceptive
in appearance and disarming in manner. A square-Jawed, la-
nccenteyed, olt-s*ok*n gent, who look* zaer* like an earnest
small-town eivle leader than a big league operator.
It'*-possible he also hastened the exit Of Billy Evan* a* front-
office engineer of the Detroit Tiger*. He got Saul Rogovia from
them in trade for Bob Cain who was soon shipped along to the
Brown*. In White Sox spangle*, the hefty Bwoklynite became a
consistent winner and led the league in earned run allowed.
For the upcoming campaign Mr. Lane ha* maneuvered added
strength, even though he's reaehed a point where his guUoles*
countenance no longer fool* anybody, pitching help la expected
from Charl Stobbs. late or' the Red Sex, and Sherman LdUar,
Brown' fugitive, prep up the etehlng.
"Why hd he passed up the highly touted and highly contro-
versial Jim Rivera?" he wa* asked.
This young fellow, now with the Browns, ha* an un**vOry
record in police and morals courts and hi* contract formally filed
in the eommlMloner'* office, aa extraordinary instrument, tip-
ulates the holder thereof can expeet no financial redrew in the
event of further prosecution.
boa ROTC took over the Cris-
tbal 8*nlors 1022 to 1011, al-
though Bill Blngham fired 381
for the losers to top all shooters
for the match. Gerald Hendrick-
son fired 264 to spark the win-
ners. The Cristbal Senior team
also took on the Balboa Junior
team the same evening, and al-
though their performance came
up somewhat, they still dropped
this one 1055 to 1037. The Balboa
Juniors were weakened by the
loss of Joe Puller, hurt in an ac-
cident. Dick Dlllman fired 286
for high core, while Blngham
and Perkin tied up with 278 to
top the loser.
Albrook Curund' last match
of the season was with the low-
The Silver City Little League *W 5,,51
emission IS planning it* ML???*" '"it .!MU*V th,*
FIRESTONE
No. 39 J. Francisco do la Oesa Avenue
Phone*: 8-4564 2-8383
NOT ONLY THE BEST PAINT
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Easy to appl>
Commission it p
lesgue formation meeting. All
representatives are urged to read
this column for the definite date
and place of meeting.
SV#*&
Coln scored a double victory
over Panam in the so-called
"Carnival of Champions" Sunday
as the "1-3 teams'* of the Pan-
ami and Coln Provincial Lea-
gue* met at the Coln Stadium.
Deportivo AA scored a thrill-
ing 6 to 5 win over Chegterfleld
Jr. Cartagena soundly trounced
Fuerza y Lux 12-3 In the battle
of flrit-plaeers.
Cecilio "Lone Johnny" Wil-
liam*, now studying In the Unit-
ed pt.ates on a scholarship, was
lah'd'd ^'outstanding" by the
thletie coach of a Georgia Insti-
tution for his over-all play in
the paat basketball season.
Arriving late In the season,
Wll 11sms hit the basket with
! amazing consistencya feat that
drew favorable comments from
the experts covering the games.
The St. Joseph Chapter of C.
Y. O. traveled to La Boca with a
contingent of athletes that won
practically every event in the
last C. Y. O conference held last
Saturday at La Boca.
Cristbal ROTC at CrUtbaT. Al-
brook-Curundu took thl* On*,
1109 to 838, and they were In.
Bill Jaffray emerged from hi* re-
cent lump to fire high score of
284 for top honors, with Earl
Mitchell's 388 pressing him close.
The Cristbal Senior* also de-
feated the Cristbal ROTC in a
retire of a previous match which
was ruled illegal. The score wa*
1070 to 731. with Bill Blngham
and Maurice Webb tying for high
honor* with 378.
The *corea:
'. Anderson
W. Cotton
N
01
ssss
85
65
67
63
1033
331
356
TRAM TOTAL

Balboa Junior
D. Dlllman ... 00
n. Dlllman ... 08
B. P. Smith .100
J. Schmidt Jr. 07
TRAM TOTAL
Cristobal Santera
B. Blngham 07
R Parkin* ... 00
W. Cotton ... 03
F. Anderson 88
TRAM TOTAL
Albrook-Curand
Bill Jeffrey 00
E. Mitchell .100
Bob Doming .106
E. Bench ... 07
ion
07
04
93
89
96
97
86
01
98
96
95
01
00
78
67
53
386
Crietobal ROTC
Dale Cockle .
D. Ooodhead .
B. Steven* .
A. Eraser .
04
01
81
80
84
78
5?
78
58
87
87
87
73
74
38
28
18
PISTOL
Balboa Gun Club
TRAM TOTAL

Cristobal Senior*
M. E. Webb .100
B. Blnghem 00
F. Anderson 08
R. Perkin* ... 08
1058
273
373
353
338
1037
384
283
383
260
1108
353
308
193
176
*838
fcb
l/larveious/....
It's a PJiiico [Radi-Go\
M. wolehlek .
P. Wen* .
D. Crumpecker
A. Turner .
TEAM TOTAL
S.
.82
75
83
75
T.
87
00
84
01
TEAM TOTAL
Cristobal ROTC
D. Ooodhead .
B. Steven* .
T 'Larry Cox .
292 David Lane .
j TRAM TOTAL
08
87
S3
67
80
07
89
61
77
83
84
30
86
76
81
rr
43
37
17
28
378
378
366
384
1670
%
184
138
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TRACK MEET ON TONIGHT AT BALBOA

IS WD
KBWSPAPE*
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe1'. Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, K. P., THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 152
(NEA Telephoto)
TORNADO VICTIM Mrs. Harry Waller comforts her husband
after he was brought into a Dyersburg (Tenn.) hospital.
Seretse Khama Will
Not Return As Chief
Of Bamangwalo Tribe
Have One
Witness Who Saw
$681000 Stolen
African | DANVERS, Mass., March
(UP) A retired truck driver
stepped forward yesterday as
perhaps the only witness to a
fantastic daylight $681,000 arm-,
three men.
13 Persons Hurt As
Landslide Derails
Chicago-Bound Train
WINVEMUCCA, Nevada, March I LONDON, March 27 (UP)> i
27 (itThirteen persons were Britain announced today that!
i.tno treated for injuries today;Seretse Khama can never again
of2? J Tanrislide derailed a o- return as chief to the African
"fLL rH threeoars of the'tribe he led before his marriage
comotive and three cars oi ine, wQm former Um_
Chicago-bound Western Pac Ruth wnUams
fie Railway train California g^'g ,ormer chle{ of the
Zephyr.' w; Bamangwato tribe in Bechuana- ored truck robbery, which he said
The accident took place asi, lftnd wfls of fere(j a poSt by the was staged by four rather than
night as the streamliner was Jamalcan government instead. "
traveling about 40 miles per.
Lord Salisbury, new Secretary
for Commonwealth Relations,
announced the decision in the
House of Lords and when it came
up in Commons, the speaker
agreed that it should be debated
as a matter of "urgent public
Importance" later this evening.
Cristobal Office
To Begin Issuing
Licenses Tuesday
The policeman-driver examln-
censes starting Tuesday, it has ">* are captured.
Sriee vn?f5yDtoStSrel *". K the truck doors J*ed
ffin.tCc?,hrtn^
tlon at Ancon. is being establish- tntnt/irv maximum for lar-
day when company and union."^,, r.,,ofKo,iH i ence.
hour through a cut in a remote
hilly part of the desert aboua
40 mtles west of Winnemucca.
Aboard the train were 149
passengers and 31 crewmen. All
including the injured remained
on the train.
Nine upright coaches were
hauled to Flanagan. Nev., from
where the train will continue to
Chicago.
Tons of storm-loosened earth
lid onto the tracks, tipping the
locomotive and baggage car to
a 45-degree angle. A railway
spokesman said two coaches
were also derailed.
NJ Bell Telephone
Strike Called Off
NEWARK, N. J., March 27
(UP). A strike of 3.000 em-
ployes of the New Jersey Bell
Telephone Co. ended early to-
B4NK GUARD Pvt. James Dedman of the Arkansas Na-
tional Guard stands watch over what remains of the Judsonla,
Ark., bank.
On Your Next Trip to New York
See CHICAGO Too!
Naturally you are going to New York. New York is
big business. New York is the theatre, the gay white
way. New York is Mecca. But you haven't rttllf tees
the United States until you see Chicago. Chicago it
big, busy and beautiful toobut with a difference.
It is a friendly mid western city with the spirit of
youth. You'll love it.
Braniff routes offer you the opportunity to see them
bothat little extra cost. Fly to New York through
Miami. Return via Chicago and see the real heart of
the United States, all on one round trip, ticket.
John Gustin, 63, gave Investi-
gators their first possible "break"
in the theft of $681,000 from an
unattended U.S. Trucking Corp.
truck Wednesday while the driv-1
er and two guards were sipping
coffee in a drugstore.
Gustin who was on the side-
walk said he saw virtually the
whole thingfrom the time the
thieves passed the money bags
out of the truck to their escape
In a speeding automobile.
He said one of the men entered
the cab but whether by a key or
other means he was not sure.
However, police said this point
(NEA Telephoto)
TOWN DEMOLISHED Carrying their chlldre n, residents of Judsonla* Ark., leave the town
to seek shelter elsewhere.
made at Cristobal.
At Cristobal, drivers should
officials reached an agreement
on a new contract In night-long
negotiation sessions.
Officials of the Independent
Telephone Workers Union or-
dered union member.' Vack on censes will not be maintained on
the Job starting with the 6 a.m. the Atlantic side as they are at
ahift. I the Ancon License Section.
Even as Gustin related his
m th.i,-iniiUSS. withTthPm story, authorities swarmed over
for renewal! a ** ln Boston's north end
years ago. _^_
Both Brink's and VS. Truck-
garage their trucks

t
fUL- 0'PEP
C. 0. MASON, S.A.
P.O. Box 893
Panam City
A Coln
Keep your hens ata high
rate of egg production,
and maintain them in good
physical condition. The
oatmeal in Ful-O-Pep
Feeds and Masbes for
starting, growing and egg
production contribute*
toward more profitable
results.
Moateky
Tha Quaker Oats Company
Ask far Ful-O-Pa Poultry Faoding Guiaa-it's fraal
ing Corp,
there.
Employes were questioned on
the theory that duplicate keys
perhaps were used o open the
looted vehicle might have been
fitted while the truck was park-
ed In the garage.
Hoshe Shared Pays
Visit To Vatican;
Received By Pope
VATICAN CITY, March 27
(UP). The whlte-and-blue
flag of Israel decorated with
the Star of David appeared for
the first time in Vatican City
today on the black limousine of
Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett,
who was received by Pope Pius
|xn.
The offleial announcement
Issued by the Vatican secretariat
of sute said curtly that Sharett
had "asked to pay a visit of
courtesy and homage to His
Holiness."
Sharett, garbed In full dress
suit, was accompanied by his
wife and bv Israeli Minister ln
Rome Moshe Ishal. All three
were received together ln the
papal Itinerary for 15 minutes.
There are no diplomatic rela-
tions between Israel and the
Vatican, and It was speculated
MacCarthy Files Libel Suit
For $ 2 Million Aga in$t Benton
WASHINGTON, March 27 (UP Accepting the challenge, Mc-
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy filed. Carthy filed suit ln Federal Dia-
a $2,000,000 libel and slander -
suit against sen. William Ben-
ton today and accused the Con-
necticut Democrat of "conspir-
trlct Court here. He told a news
conference he will serve as his
own lawyer In the case so he
can cross-examine Benton u-
ate for his anti-Communist acti-
vities.
Benton sponsored a resolu-
ing" to oust him from the Sen- der oath during the trial and
ln pre-trial examinations.
Benton was en route to the
tion calling for an investigation West Coast and not immediately
available for comment.
McCarthy asked for $1,000,000
damages for injuries suffered
"in his official capacity, profes-
to determine McCarthy's fitness
to serve ln the Senate. He has
accused McCarthy of "fraud and
deceit" and recently offered to
waive his Congressional im-
munity if the Wisconsin Repub-
lican wanted to take their
months-old feud to court.
Russians Describe
Frederic Chopin As
Karl Marx Disciple
tics in the campaign against
Tydlngs.
McCarthy fired back that Ben-
ton was a "mental midget" and
the "hero of every Communist
crook in and out of govern-
ment." Benton then filed with
a Senate elections subcommittee
a 30,000-word "bill of parti-
culars" challenging McCarthy's
"integrity and character."
The subcommittee is consider-
ing Benton's anti-McCarthy re-
solution and has asked the Sen-
ate for a vote of confidence.
McCarthy refused last Satur-
ate! and reputation" as the re- I day to carry his objections to
suit of Benton's charges and, the inquiry to the Senate floor,
another $1,000.000 on grounds,He said the subcommittee has
that Benton conspired "illegal-
ly" with unknown persons to
libel and slander him.
He charged that Benton's
"malice and ill will" grew out
of his "action in exposing as
pro-Communist friends of "Ben-
ton ln the State Department
the right to Investigate charges
of improper conduct against any
Senator.
But he also challenged the
subcommittee's right to "spend
vast sums of money investigat-
ing the life of McCarthy from
birth to date." He said the group
was collecting material to use
ln the political
and "in exposing other friends
of the defendant for security against him
reasons." Benton is a former campaign.
Assistant Secretary of State. I Benton previously accused Mc-
Carthy of waging a "campaign
The Benton-McCarthy feud of fraud and deceit" and of
WASHINGTON. March 27
(USIS) Frederic Chopin, the
Polish composer who strongly
opposed Union between Poland
and Russia, Is now described by
Soviet propagandists as a philo-! erupted last Aug. 6 when Ben-. committing perjury in his ef-
sophical disciple of Karl Marx, ton demanded that McCarthy I forts to prove that the 8tate De-
This was told to a Georgetown resign and called for a Senate' partment is Infested with Reds
University audience Tuesday by; investigation of his role in the and pro-Communists.
Polish political exile Jan Karski, 1850 Maryland senatorial elec-1 In his complaint, McCartny
now an assistant professor of tlon. In that campaign, Repub- charged that Benton has "de-
Political Science at the Wash-! Mean Sen. John Marshall Butler fended various persons ln the
lngton School. | defeated former Sen. Millard E. State Department against
The Soviets claim that Cho- Tydlngs .
pin's music is in philosophic |
harmony with the Communist i a Senate subcommittee has
charges... that they are Com-
munist and/or pro-Communist
and that their presence ln the
that Sharett's visit may be the that Chopin never heard of the
manifesto. Karski pointed out: accused McCarthy and his staff j State Department is dangerous
first step
lishment.
towards their estab-
A Vatican source said there
was no discussion of political
matter such as the Internation-
alization of holy placea, a prob-
lem known to be larored by the
pantlXi.
manifesto.
Nevertheelss the Soviets are
producing fraudulent documents
ln an effort to prove their point,
he said.
Karski, who was a prisoner of
war of both the Nad and Red
armies, arrived ln the United
SUtes ln IMS.
of engaging ln "despicable" tac- and detrimenUl to the Interests
BALBOA TIDES
Friday. March 8$
High
5:28 a.m.......
5.44 p.m........
Low
of the United SUtes.
He said Benton has acted "as
a defense witness for persons
attacked for security and other
reasons and has used every
means at his command to pro-
tect persons who are bad
11:83 a.m. curity risks ln the State Depart-
11:57 p.m. ment and elsewhere."
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