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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01422
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01422
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Sunday supplement
        Supplement 1
        Supplement 2
        Supplement 3
        Supplement 4
        Supplement 5
        Supplement 6
        Supplement 7
        Supplement 8
        Supplement 9
        Supplement 10
        Supplement 11
        Supplement 12
        Supplement 13
        Supplement 14
        Supplement 15
        Supplement 16
Full Text
% TAeSUNDAY
Jtmsncatt
"Let the people know the truth and the country it $afe*' *** Abraham Lincoln.
Scaqram'sYO.
i \\\IH IN \S III ski
Now... 6 Years Old!
fWENTT-SEVENTH TSAR
PANAMA, R. P.. SUNDAY, MARCH 2S, 185
TEN CENTS
Snowstorms, Floods Join Tornadoes
(NEA Telephotoi
PASSIVE RESISTANCE Truck were lined up for almost
t"o miles along U.S. Route 20 at Conneaut, O., as truckers
halted in protest against a Pennsylvania law limiting truck
weights to 45.000 pounds. The blockade began at midnight
and scenes like this were re-enacted at many points along the
state border.
IT'S A GOOD TRICK, BUT CAN YOU DO IT?Most compli-
cated trick in the collection sale at Al's Magic Shop in Washing-
Ion, O. C, is an Income Tax Return service. AI has vanishing
coin tricks on hand all year around, but none of (hem works as
smoothly as does Uncle Sam's Automatic Wallet Disintegrator.
Proprietor AI Cohen draws attention of Robert Greenberg to
his window sign.
-v!l ,h^ ean ln, ,he w,nd of a sand storm- Handkerchiefs
ver their faces protect them from the stinging particles and
enable them to breath Sand is an enemy that gets into every-
thlngfood, clothes, bedding, eyes and lungs.
Little Champion To Gel Big Feed
Eddie Armlstead. speed way
champion of Panama since Fri-
day'night. Is getting dinner at
El Panama tonight in honor of
bis efforts.
Also qualifying for the multi-
lap course round the El Panam
menu are Ray Magan and Jerry
Fox. second and third men
lorn* after Aimlstead.
Laurie Moulton, winner of the
lightweight event Friday night,
a..d Saul Alvarado, only Pana-
manian entrant in the cham-
pionship, are to be there too.
Army Secretary Pace
Here For Inspection
Dean Acheson Slaps Gag
On Polish Propaganda
Frank Pace, Jr.. Secretary of
the Army, arrived at Albrook Air'
Force Base yesterday at 6:45 p.m.
by military aircraft for a rout-
ine inspection tour of military
Installations on the Isthmus.
Brig. Gen. Robert L. Howze,
chief of staff Caribbean Com-
mand, greeted' Pace and Intro-
duced him to Rear Admiral Al-
bert M. Bledsoe, Commandant
Panam Area, MaJ. Oen. L. J.
Whttlock, commanding general,
VS. Army Caribbean and Col.
Robert R. Conner, chief of staff,
Caribbean Command.
Traveling with Pace are: Fred
Korth, deputy Department of the
Army counselor; Col. A. R. Fitch,
office of the assisant chief of
staff G-2: Lt. Col. Walter J.
Bryde, office of the assistant
chief of staff, G-3; Lt. Col. John
R. Deane, Jr., military assistant
to the Secretary of the Army and
1st Lt. John R. Davles, Office of
the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army.
An Honor Ouard for Pace con-
sisted of members from I and L
Companies, 33rd Infantry Regi-
ment, under command of Major
Harold M. Kennedy.
During hU brief visit Secreta-
ry Pace will be quartered at
Quarry Heights.
WeelTsIlrkore
In Korea: 9-4
In Our Favor
TOKYO, March 33 (UP).
United States Sabres found
themselves dogfights five days
out of seven last week over Ko-
rea.
They shot down nine Migs
without losing a 8abre in a dog-
flght.
However, Mlgs got one pro-
peller-driven Mustang during
thfl week, while two Thunder-
jets were lost to ground fire,
and a 8abre is missing on oper-
:ion.
The total of Communist
ilanes of all types shot down
n the 21-month Korean war
now stands at 394.
WASHINGTON, March 23 (UP)
-Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son told the Polish embassy yes-
terday that all Its publications
FRANK PACE JR.
Broadcasters Tell
Balista They'll
Defend Free Speech
Directora of the Inter-Ameri-
can Broadcasting Association,
meeting in Panama yesterday
notified Oen. Fulgencio Batista
of Cuba that they would defend
the right of free speech and free
enterprise in Cuba "at all costs-"
In a letter to Batista, who took
over the Cuban government in
a lightning coup recently, the
IABA council of directors said
only with "a constitutional gov-
ernment can people attain liber-
ty and progi-ess -and preserve
their existence."
The IABA said it spoke for 3.-
800 private radio stations of the
American continent
The council of directors said
hflwevtr.-i.that it wasfonly con-
cerning Itself with the basic Is-
sues within the Jurisdiction of
IABA, because lt would be im-
proper to meddle in the Internal
affairs of any country while lt
continued to guarantee freedom
of expression and enterprise.
Deputy Held Up
One Hour By
Ft. Kobbe Sentry
Manhattan Parable
A Cabbie and the Rich Truant
And Guys, Dolls, and Horses
By WADE JONES
NEA Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK. March 22 (NEA)
There was this rich kid lived
up on Park Avenue. Only 15 years
old and had so much dough he
didn't know what to do with lt.
Had so much he wouldn't go to
school.
His daddy had lots of money,
tod. Had an office down around
Wall Street and every day the
same taxi driver picked him up
at home and drove him to the
office.
This cabby was a character.
Talked out of tho corner of his
mouth and everything. Right out
of Damon Run yon.
The daddy and the cabby got
so they talked about this and
that as they rode downtown ev-
ery morning. One day the daddy
told the cabby he was worried
about his son. Wouldn't go to
school.

The cabby said to the daddy
why don't you hire me to watch
out after the boy. Fifty dollars a
week. I'll see he goes to school,
see? I'm great with kids.
He was great, all right.
Soon as the cabby took over,
the boy began showing up at
school even less than before, if
you can Imagine it. The pair of
them went every place but
school.
The cabby knew a good thing
when he saw lt, and his vision
was 20-20.
The cabby and the boy would
start for school in the taxi In the!
morning and the cabby would
say before you start studying'
your Greek today lets drop over
to a Greek's I know and get a
cuppa cawfee.

So they'd get the coffee, over
around Times Square. The taxi
driver character would Introduce
the boy to some other characters.
Like chorus girls. And horse
players.
Everybody liked the boy fine.
Who wouldn't? Under the spell
of a chorus girl, the boy would
accidentally drop more money on
the floor while fumbling for the
coffee money than most of the
characters made in a week.
The Broadway guys and dolls
said coffee was very well but
what heand theyreally need-
ed was some- race horses. So race
horses it was.

And how could a man be ex-
oected to gp to school and study
his Greek when he and his very
interesting friends had to be out
8t the Jamaica track watching
their horses perform?
The boy had the stars In hts
eves, all right. When last heard
of he had headed West. West to
inspect the beauties and beasts
of Hollywood.
That's all.
Eueene Cavanaugh. the Board
of Education's chief attendance
officer, which Is New York for
truant officer. !>ays It's the dog-!
"ondest case lr> ever came across
In 15 years of attendance offi-
cering.
Assemblyman Pantaleon Hen-
rique Bernal, presl dent of
the Legislative Committee, de-
clared today that he was "un-
necessarily" held up for more
than one hour by military
authorities in Fort Kobbe Fri-
day night.
Bernal said he would file a
formal protest through the
Panama Foreign Ministry over
detention.
The Assemblyman declared
that Friday he went to the
town of Camarn, which is
In Panama territory but only
is accessible by land through!
the Fort Kobbe military es-
tablishment, after he had been
made to understand that he
would not need a pass because
his car bore official license
plates.
He said he waa allowed to
enter the gate at Fort Kobbe
without being challenged. But.
on his way out, he was stop-
ped' by a guard and asked to
produce a pass.
Falling to do so he was held
voder technical arrest for o-
bout 48 minutes before he was
itakn, to- Fort QJaitan where-
Sc*i apologetically per-
ttedhim to leaf* after he
learned that Bernal was chair-
man of the Legislative Commit-
tee. '
For a long time, residents of
Camarn have been campaign-
ing for a road by-passing Fort
Kobbe, in order to avoid the
rneonveiece of having to re-
quest a pass from military
authorities to go through the-
post. _____
nd press releases criticizing the
U.S. government or Congress
must "cease Immediately."
He said he gave the order be-
cause the embassy had made an
outrageous and improper" at-
tack on the government and
Congress in a March 3 press re-
lease distributed In this coun-
try.
The release roundly debated a
House committee which is in-
vestigating the wartime massa-
cre of 10,000 Polish soldiers In
Poland's Katyn Forest.
Most of the testimony before
the committee blamed Russia for
the slaughter.
Russia claims the Germans
were responsible.
The Polish press release de-
scribed the investigation as a
"cynical attempt to prey on
these tragic deaths.''
Acheson explained at a news
conference that the order ap-
plies only to statement* critical
of the United States and Its In-
stitutions and only to the in-
formation activities of the em-
bassy In Washington.
He said Polish propaganda
work at the United Nations in
New York Is not affected.
The State Department already
had forced the Polish research
and Information service In New
York to close In retaliation for
the shutdown of the U. 8. In-
formation office in Warsaw.
Most of the Polish pamphlet-
eering activities, however, were
transferred to the embassy.
The U. 8. note said the Katyn
forest press release accusing the
House commltte of taking part
In a "criminal action aimed a-
galnst the peace of the world"
was a "calculated and complete-
ly baseless attack."
The note said the United
States views the Polish release
as "a matter of serious coneern"
because It dealt wjfck "the as-
!orations of the United State
or peace and international se-
curity." ., .
The embassy claimed the
massacre was committed by
"Nazi genocidal criminals" that
U. 8. authorities in Germany are
now releasing from prison.
The House investigation also
has drawn a formal protest
from the Russian embassy and
an angry blast from Radio Mos-
cow.
Ky., W. Va., Tenn.
Next In Line
To Take Drubbing
CHICAGO, March 22 (UP) Port* of the Unite*
States were suffering today from snowstorms, flood* and
tornadoes.
It was predicted that bad weather would continue
tonight.
States affected were Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri
and Mississippi, where hurricanes caused at least 200
deaths, tore houses from their foundations and whisked
automobiles through the air. .
The hurricanes also injured hundreds and caused
tremendous losses in cattle and crops.
The Red Cross has alloted
$150,000 to aid those left home-
less by tornadoes In- the South,
and has sent workers. Including
nurses and doctors, to the zones
affected.
The Weather Bureau predicted
that more tornadoes might hit
central Kentucky, central Ten-
nessee and north Alabama fol-
lowed by blows to eastern Ken-
tucky *nd eastern Tennessee,
reaching west of Virginia and
the western part of West Virgi-
nia later tonight.
In an effort to identify bodies,
relatives of missing persons are
visiting schools and other public
Buildings still standing which
are being used as morgues.
The number of deaths is still
un tallied.
The force of the tornadoes
was so tremendous that in the
little village of rooter. Mo., 30
homes were totally destroyed.
Another Instance illustrating
the force of the tornadoes oc-
curred In Searcy. Ark., where 34
persons were killed.
Mrs. Cora Lee Barr told how
he was looking oat the window
and saw a neighboring house
"come rolling down the street
toward us."
"I made my mother He on the
floor and yelled to my husband
for help.
"When the hurricane ended
our house had disappeared and
my mother and I were lying in
the garden In front of what used
'a be our home," she seed.
The situation of the people In
the states affected was worsened
by torrential rains which caused
floods in Tennessee where sev-
eral persons drowned.
To the north, wind and snow-
storms swept Kansas. Iowa. Ne-
braska, both Dakotas and Min-
nesota .
In some eaaea the wind*
reached as high as 55 mph.
The snowstorms isol tied
large quantities of cattle in
Dakota and Nevada *M^H
steps are beinr taken to B
them using military planes.
All means of transportation
have been interrupted as well as
communications between some
points.
About 160 families are snowed
i in in North Dakota. Pood, cloth-
ing, medicine and fuel are being
sent In by plane.
| In Nevada the snowstorm was
the worst In 0 years.
Lack Of Support In Air Bases
Weakest Link In NATO Setup
that
By RICHARD HOLLANDER
NEA Special Correspondent
PARIS. Mar. it (NEA). It Is a tragic and dangerous fact
,-. in this Air Age, in which the United States is presumed to
be the leader, the weakest Unk in our Immediate Itaeup oppo-
site the Russians In Europe is close air supportfighters and
,?hrisa't'becaae we lack the planes. It's because we lack the
rkrht kind of air bates in the right places.
sheer luck that we wouldn't have
most of our planes caught on the
ground.
And then, the slim Allied
If the balloon were to go up
the war start, as the military
puts Itour ground forces, and
those of our allies, would be In
dire trouble.
We are well fixed for strategic
bases, or will be when the prea-
ground forces In Germany would
be left without air cover until
planes to Britain could be
brought into action. But they
o^teT^h^Sln BrU-" STtS far" awa'yfor eKeS
KorKica aTd'elsSwhere. ground, support in Central
New Place
For Theft
BALBOA TIDES
All these boys raced on Brit-
ish-made BSA machines, and
are being dined by grateful Pa- 123 a.m.
namuslca. local BSA agents.
Sunday, March 23
High Low
i.........7:47 a.m
1:Mjh..............;20pjn.
SHEFFIELD. Alabama. Mar.
fUl*).A 84-year-old Ne-
gro has been arrested on
charges of steaUng a cash box
from the police station.
Police say Charlie Hayes en-
tered the police station while
the officer on duty was ab-
sent momentarily. He picked
p the cash box containing
mere than Sl.SM and fled.
Police arrested Hayes today
in Florence, Alabama. Moat
of the snonejr was recovered.
from which long-range heavy
bombers could take off and plas-
ter most areas In Greater Rus-,
sia.
Bat we're sitting ducks as
far as bases for intruders, in-
terdicte, intercepten and
ground support strength are
concerned.
If the blame can be placed
anywhere, lt must be placed on
Eu-
rope. Bases In France would be
close enough to be fully helpful
and far enough away to be de-
fensible.
The daily life of our ground
units in Germany is one of al-
most constant alert.
Like the airmen, our ground
troops are fully aware that they
would have little or no warning
the French, who have been flirht- in the event of attack from the
lng a strategic battle against | Russian Zone of East Germany.
construction of bases in France.
They've been fighting against
the cost of construction and 3-
gainst the use of good, arable
land that is earmarked. Lately,
Their lives are more nearly those
of active combat troops than any
Americans are experiencing to-
dayexcept, of course, in Korea.
Dally, missions of these units
In Lisbon, they seem to have Involve border patrol along sev-
come around to agreement about j eral hundred miles of the West-
the extent of their responsibility. East German frontier. They are
but much precious time has been trained to be prepared at min-
wasted. |utes' notice to throw blocks a-
Most of our air strength tn gainst an enemy, and their only
Germany Is located at two old hope Is to delay him long enough
Luftwaffe bases near Munich, to let our rear forces get set
where two Jet fighter bomber If the moment of invasion
wings are Just about six minutes should come, these young
from the Czech border. In the
event of a "Pearl Harbor'' at-
tack, lt would be only through
men and their officers have no
Illusions about their ablUty te
survive.
They know that the Russians
have at least 150 divisions of
their own, plus scores of satellite
divisions. They know that our
allies along the rest of the Iron
Curtain perimeter are Just as
weak as we are. They know tHat
those allies are ready to fight
in Just as unsatisfactory a pat-
tern of strategic retreat as we
face. But our young men have
only to look at a map to know
that an eastern enemy's quick-
est way to the Channel Is right
through them.
The circumstance of our sol-
diers In Oermany is not made
easier by the relatively small but
active minority of West Germans
who are Communists or who do
the Communists' work by using
every device to make it clear
that the Americans aren't want-
ed.
But in the last couple of years,
the feeling of the average Ger-
man toward the Americans has
changed slightly. Not so very
long ago he seemed to feel that
i the very presence of American.
lor Allied troops, in Germany was
'an open invitation to the Rus-
sians to accept a challenge to
battle.
Now. although the number of
Allied troops In Germany lent
enough to hold against a major
Russian effort. Germans seem to
1 agree that maybe their very pre-
sence has been a deterrent to the
Russians The Allied show of
, strength In the Berlin airlift had
a good psychological effect
Germans, of course, are in-
creasingly aware that no Eu-
ropean army can be a complete
aetes without them, and that
no European political and eco-
nomic federation can possibly
work unless they take part.
This has given them great bar-
gaining power, and Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer has made
[complete use of lt at every turn.
The upshot is that. In so far aa
many American military and ci-
vilian leaders In Germany are
i concerned, the Germans coma
: off best in any squabble with our
closest European allies.
| The recent agreements at Lls-
bon concerning the character of
i Germany's contribution in troops
and money to European defensa
seem to mean that the Immedi-
ate military side of the picture
| will be paramount, and the gen-
! erais responsible for the defense
of our "front" in Germany will
have won their point.
Separate from the rest of
West Germany, the Western
sectors of the divided city of
Berlin become shinier month
by month, and the shops have
more goods to sell than many
of those in Britain.
But that Is only on the sur-
! face. Berlin is truly a dying city,
and lt will die altogether unless
it becomes a whole city again,
and connected with its hinter-
landthe rest of Germany. This
isn't likely to happen before rig-
or mortis sets in. Without Its
hinterland. Berlin's lndu s t r y
ean't support the city now. nor
will It ever be able to.
The Americans In Berlin are
more relaxed than they were
even a year ago. They used to
feel that the war. If It came,
j would start there, and that they
I would be Its first combatant vic-
tims. Now they don't feel that
way They feel that they're al-
ready strategically enveloped,
and that, one morning, they'll
wake up and find themselves of-
ficial orlsoners Instead of unof-
ficial unes.


1

.PAGE TWO
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, MARCH tS.lMt
! Weather Fliers
Challenge
HOUSECLEANER MORRIS PUTS
Silver Foot In His Mouth
'I ; Tropic Turmoil

COLOMBO. March 22 (BIS)
A three-year programme of
Investigation Into monsoons
and tropical weather condi-
tions has Just been completed
by a small Royal Air Fcrce
Unit, No. 1301 Meteoroloylcal
Flight, which, from Its base in
Nevombo. Ceylon, has flown
over nearly half-a-mllllon
square miles of the Indian
Ocean.
NO SIDESTEPS
_. From Its formation early In
1949 It was part of the Flight's
policy that no alterations from
course would be mdae because
of adverse weather along the
route.
This decision has resulted In
a gain of much valuable exper-
ience In thundercloud flying
Such clouds are not at all un-
common m the area covered
and during the transitional pe-
riod between the northeast
and southwest, monsoon, in
October and November, they
have been encountered with
tops estimated to be over 40,-
000 ft.
They provided the worst fly-
ing conditions experlr-nccd by
the Flight
AIRCRAFT TYPE
Aircraft used were twin-en-
gined Brigands, which are ba-
sically similar to the strike ver-
sion of this machine at present
In use against bandits in Ma-
j laya.
Certain modification-; had
< necessarily to be carried out.
The guns were removed and
! de-Icing fluid tanks for propel-
; lera and alrframe1: fitted in
/ place of ammunition boxes.
Special Instruments were also
Installed.
VIOLENT RAW
Most of the sea nrei within
50 miles of Ceylon has been
', covered, but normally recon-
naissance sorties were flown in'
the direction of the prevailing
; monsoon at varyine heights.
A special technique was
I worked out flying through
i thunderstorms.
On occasions heaw rainfall
I experienced in the lower sec-
j tions of these clouds made It
impossible to see even the en-
~flne cowlings from the eock-
~t)lt. reduced the wire mesh of
the de-leers to ribbons and dirt
severe dp mage .to parts of the
propellers.
TROPICAL FRONT
Main oblect of the flleht was
-to examine the behaviour of
what is known as the Inter
tropical front, the area of de-
i markation between the air
' masses generally associated
, with the northern and south-
| era hemispheres, atid often
#


i
i
t

\
I
I
By MURRAY DAVIS
NEW YORK, March 22 (NEA) If not being bound
to any political party will help, Newbold Morris, new spe-
cial U.S. Attorney charged with cleaning up corruption
in federal government, is the man for the job.
British Kids Hope TV Can Make
School As Good As The Movies
The BBC Intends to carry Into
television the techniques which
it has developed during 2S years
of successful broadcasting to
schools on sound radio.
At the present time 14,000
schools listen daily to programs
ranging through advanced
courses in Modern Languages,
Literature and History for the
intermediate grades, and Mu-
sic and Rhythm for the tots.
Programs of the "Our Town"
type are also done on a regional
basis for local schools.
All of these programs are run
in consultation with the School I
| Broadcasting Council, a body
whose members are nominated
by the Government, the BBC,
and the various organizations
Years ago he might have been
taken for a Republican. His fa-
ther was one. And Newbold's first
political office was an appoint-
ment in 1934 to a Republican*
held Beat in New York City's
Board of Aldermen.
Since then no one, not even
the towering 50-year-old Morris
himself, seems quite sure of the
political convictions of this des-
cendant of a signer of the De-
claration of Independence,
Instability
This apparent Instability la
traceable to three Important In-
fluences In Moris' early career:
His almost fanatical worship
of New York's late Mayor La
Guardia, whose masterful politi-
cal maneuvering Morris didn't
understand but thought he did.
His first wife's devotion to
tournament bridge, which Mor-
ris didn't enjoy;
The depression, which tied up
the Morris wealth somewhat and
caused the young scion to seek
an outlet for his energy.
a reference to his wealthy back-
ground and his failing for saying
politically wrong things.
Morris enjoys a good laugh
even though It's on him.
His sense of humor has saved
him from complete despair on
several occasions when victory
suddenly turned to defeat.
Joke
Outlet
The outlet Just happened to be
politics in an era of political
change which put La Guardia In
connected with British Bduca- ofi'.ce-,
tion. - Morrl8 naa trle LONG-TERM PROGRAMS lLa G"ardla pattern.
From this national council I The result ha ^en two de-
there has now been drawn aifeats as candidate for mayor of
small professional group to ad-|New York while running under
vise on the problems of teaching the entwined banners of the Re-
by television. publican-Fusion Independent-
This committee, which has | Liberal and New Deal parties,
been working on the question
viewed by aircrews with anxiety
A great amount of valuable
information on air masses and
actual weather was accumula-
ted bv the Flight.
It was generally found that
while excellent fiymg condi-
tions lasted for much of the
time, large build-ups of heavy
clouds often occurred without
warning.
The inter-tropical front
could be violently active one
day and on the following give
no sign of Its existence.
for some time, has come to the
conclusion that twe years of
experimental television broad-
casts will be required before a
foil program can be evolved.
Since It is expected that tt will
take a further year before the
schools in Britain can be
equipped with receivers. It will
not be until the autumn of
1954 that the country can ex-
pect to see educational televi-
sion on a national basis.
At the moment Britain is serv-
ed by a single network and the
only alternative programs are
those provided by regional sta-
tions opting out of the national
network, but the priorities of
both educational and broadcast-
ing authorities is such that
schools broadcasts form the first
busis of a national alternative
program.
While he has been suffering
defeat at the polls. Morris has
been supporting Republican can-
didates who have ran against
the wishes of the party leaders;
liberal and Independent candi-
dates of many kinds, and even
indirectly and directly. Demo-
cratic cadldates.
Morris says simply: "I'm non-
political."
He once told an audience of
very limited education an In-
volved Joke about two mathema-
tics professors from Harvard and
Yale meeting on a train.
Sensing the error, Morris, a
Yale man. broke into the story to
remark "Why, oh why, did I ever
start this here?"
But he went right on and fin-
ished the story and dryly re-
marked, when no one laughed:
"I should never have gone to
Yale, or else I should have stayed
out of politics."
Although this self appraisal
never seems to come in time to
aid him in his office seeking. It
has made Morris one of the best-
liked figures In New York politi-
cal circles.
'Oil Boat Olga'
His almost boyish freshness
makes him attractive to women,
Including "Oil Boat Olga," one of
the figures In the tanker deals
under Investigation, who testi-
fied he thought Morris charm-
ing.
when Morris was called to tell
about his part In the tanker
deals, he in turn said he thought
Olga was "fascinating."
At that hearing, he again "put
his silver foot in his mouth" in
the eyes of investigating sena-
tors, who accused him of "clown-
ing."
Most of the time, however, his
honesty and sincerity charms
"even his enemies.
HIGH PRIORITY
In the initial stages of the exr
periment. which begins May 5,
there will be four weeks of daily
afternoon programs.
There will be five short series
of subjectsScience, Current Af-j
fairs. Travel, Aesthetics, and the
Industrial Scene.
The main purpose
ect Is to try out a variety of'pr-
gram techniques with special;
j emphasis on their effectiveness
in presenting educational mate-j
| rial to children viewing in class-
: room conditions.
Six schools have been selected
Ambition
But to those who know him, he
Is very political.
They know that he burns with
the ambition to be Mayor of New
York.
They know that, if history re-
peats, he will come close to win-
ning but won't because he in-
variably makes an Important
campaign boner when It hurts
the most.
Morris calls those boners "get
ting my silver foot In my mouth,'
Honesty
Washington At War
swwsfclOn Starlings Again
WASHINGTON. March 22 (DP)
The latest battle In man's
struggle against nature Is tak-
ing place 1b Washington.
The battle has been brewing
l as partners in the experiment,i for the last 30 years or so. Dur-
11 of them near the BBC's trans-ling that time, Washington build -
mltter at Alexandra Palace in
North London, and all of them
Secondary Schools, or High
School as they would be called
here.
They will receive the pictures
on a special frequency and for
technical reasons the sound will
be fed to them by direct land
line.
FILM PLAYS BIG PART
lngs have become the roosting
places for approximately 14,000
members of the family lcteridae
or starlings.
These fat little black birds
have become a complete nui-
sance.
Science has come again to the
aid of suffering humanity. A
"bird-proof" wire has been de-
vsed which makes things "hot"
Techniques to be used in the for these twittering pests,
presentation of the programs will The device, described bv its m-
include laboratory demonstra-ventor as "an electronic system
tlons from the studio, the use of of parallel wires run Into areas
animated diagrams, and photo-;where birds roost, nest or-con-
micography. Igregate," gives the bird a mild
It Is intended that consider-,..hot foot when lt attempts to
triai ma-,pause under an eave, on a ledge,
Honesty almost cost him re-
election as president of the City
Council in 1941, an office he held
mainly because La Guardia
headed the ticket.
Financially strapped, Morris
turned down an anonymous
$2500 campaign contribution, de-
claring:
"The Lord knows I need the
money," he finally said, "and I
there are plenty of candidates I
who would take lt and no one
would ever be wiser, I guess I!
could get away with it, too, but l|
have to live with myself. Get;
that money out of here."
There Is no compromise in
Morris' makeup, which may be
one of his major political handi-
caps.
Another 'political handicap
comes from being born on the
right side of the tracks and
therefore unaware of what
makes the vast majority of vot-
ers tick.
Trust
Also, Morris is a t rusting soul
Many of his friends are sure
that Morris' firm belief that La
Guardia would pave the way to
the mayorshlp for him turned
out to be his biggest block.
La Guardia promised he would
step down, and on this promise
Morris became an unpubllclzed
public servant and a rubber
stamp to La Guardia.
The promise never was kept.
Some of his friends are fearful
that the same sort of fate may
befall Morris in his present Job.
And, despite his declaration
that he will quit and go home if
he doesn't get complete Presiden-
tial backing, they wish he never
had taken the assignment.
Yanks Tops
Oxford's
Talkers
OXFORD, England, March
22A 28-year-old Illinois gra-
duate has been elected presi-
dent of the Oxford Union, stu-
dent organization of the fa-
mous British university and
folltical training ground for
undreds of top-rank members
of the House of commons.
He is Howard Shuman, son
of the county farm agent of
Whiteside County. 111., Frank
H. Shumnn. His home la in
Morrison, Illinois.
Howard Shuman is the
third American to hold this
office, which has been filled
In the past by such historic
personalities as Gladstone
and Asqulth.
The first was W. J. Bland in
1913, later killed on active ser-
vice during World War I; the
second, a Manhattan lawyer,
R. M Carson, In 1922.
Bhuman is a graduate stu-
dent at 14th-century New Col-
lege.
He Is engaged on a thesis on
British trade unions, with par-
ticular emphasis on engineer-
ing.
He Is In his third year at Ox-
ford and on completion and
submission of his thesis hopes
to be awarded a doctorate.
He went to Oxford on a Rot-
ary Foundation Fellowshlo for
one year and remained for a
three-year course.
Shuman was & lieutenant in
the United States Navy during
the war.
He was t Illinois University
when he was drafted, served In
the 8upply Corps and during
his training was sent bv the
Navy to Harvard.
He also did a one-year course
at Michigan University which
later awarded him a B.A.
Shuman's Interest In Oxford
was awakened in 1947 when an
Oxford University debating
team visited Illinois. At that
time he had planned a teach-
ing career.
8ummer 1948 took him on a
Europe tourist trip and to Ox-
ford where he renewed the ae-
ouaintance with the Warden of
New College made during the
Oxford debating team's visit to
Illinois.
He sought admission to the
college but acceptance that
year was impossible so he re-
turned home for a year and
worked for the Rotary Fel-
lowship for entry into New
College.
Shuman's researches for his
thesis have taken him to most
of Britain's industrial areas.
He has met trade unionist,
shop stewards and workmen.
Rotary clubs In all parts of the
country have helped with in-
troductions to managements.
He has been the guest speak-
er at a number of British Rot-
ary clubs Just as, when at
home during the 1950 summer
vacation, he addressed 20
American Rotary clubs.
The new president has al-
ways taken a lively Interest In
the activities of the Union.
He has shared the debat-
ing floor net only with ex-
French Premier M. Reynaud
and Lord Stansgate, Social-
ist peer, but with such dis-
tinguished visitors as Clem-
ent Attlee, Lord Haibham,
Sir DavM Maxwell Fyfe and
others. __.
There are at present 225
Americans at Oxford, mostly
graduates.
Melodies Linger On,
And Lyrics As Well
By RICHARD KLEINER
NEW YORK. March 22 (NEA)-
"Gee, that song takes me back."
About the only people who
don't get that reaction once In a
while when they listen to popu-
lar music these days are people
born In 1951.
If you're any older, you're al-
most certain to hear an old mel-
ody sandwiched In between the
commercials on every disc Jockey
show.
That's because we're right
smack In the middle of an era of
song revivals.
For proof of the trend, look at
the latest list of record hits as
compiled by Cash-Box, a mag-
azine of the Juke box industry.-
.
Of the top 25 most-played Juke
box records, six are songs that
have been exhumed"T1 g e r
Rag," "Broken-Hearted," "Char-
malne," "Undecided," "Garden in
the Rain," and "Anytime." '
Of the top .50 best-selling rec-
ords, 12 are old-timersthe
above-named six plus 'Perfidia,"
"Chinatown," "Tenderly," "Jeal-
ousy," "Babalu," and "Tempta-
tion."
The reason behind the Interest
in decrepit ditties Is obscure.

"We are In a 'sound phase' In
the record Industry," says a top
recording official. "There's a
passion for unique sound effects
like the harpsichord behind
Rosemary Clooney's record of
Come on-a My House.' That
turned a strictly ordinary song
There are other top records
that rly on unusual noises.
One of the biggest recording
stars of the moment Is Johnny
Ray, who howls into voice boxes
and echo chambers to get his
effects.
Pattl Page stags duets with
herself.
Les Paul and Mary Ford
whose big hits like "How High
the Mooh" and "All the World is
Waiting for the 8unrlse" were
revivalsplay around with
echoes. Harpist Bobby Maxwell
currently represented by "Chi-
natown"uses a triple record-
ing to get unusual effects.
"All this preoccupation with
sounds," the record man contin-
ues, "means that the song is sec-
ondary. The song writer is less
important than the sound en-
gineer.
"Whether this is the basic
cause or not, the new songs are
simply not as good as the old
ones.'
That's one opinion. Another
man says the recent movies on
lives of song writers, like the cur-
rent story of Gus Kahn, 'I'll See
You In My Dreams," automatic-
ally brings back the songs war-
bled in the film.
In this Instance, Doris Day's
record of the title song Is com-
ing on fast.
Another theory Tlxes the cause
as the revival of the "Miller-
type" band, patterned after
Glenn Miller's highly successful one up, too.
DREAMS: Doris Day's a hit
with a Gus Kaha old-tuner.
orchestra of the late "308 and
early '40s.
"All of a sudden," says this
theorist, "the bands all want to
play like Miller played.
"And the only arrangements
they can get are the stock ar-
rangements made for Miller-
things like 'At Last' and 'Kala-
mazoo.' So you go to a nightclub
and all you hear are 'At Last' and
'Kalamazoo.'"

The folk sehg trend, at its peak
about a year ago, made people
conscious of old melodies, too.
It's slackened a bit, but Gordon
MacRae's new record Is an'.an-
cient folk-song, "900 Miles," and
is looked on as a coming hit.
There are many other old songs
bombarding the air waves.
Some of the money-makers?are
"Always," "A Kiss to Build a
Dream On." "I Hear a Rhap-
sody" "Sleepy Time Down
South," "Down Yonder"and
there's even a fancy new record-
ing by Johnny Long of "Down
By the Old Mill Stream."
Even the new songs fire often
dressed-up oldies.
"You'll be hearing a lot of
"Hambone"It's a new tune,
with lyrics lifted right out of Old
folk songs.
And "A Guy Is a Guy," a big-
budget Doris Day record, is bas-
ed, muslo and Words, on an old
sea chanty.
So music, maestro, please, and
why not? They're digging that
l-ITTUC UIX
Opportunity may drop in your
lop, but not unless you get your
lap where opportunities ore drop-
ping. M)M
OWLS: Johnny Ray makes anguished noises in echo
chambers.
terlal.
In some cases travel films
will be presented by the people
who made them, commentators
will make use of film In report-
1 Ing on Current Affairs, and
film will also be integrated In-
to remote broadcasts as well as
studio interviews.
A SOLDIER GOES HOME
I HF HEARS MUSIC and It's tbe telephone ringing. Teddy, the
j nhone-answering terrier, cocks an eager ear at tbe sound.
-----o-----
phone-Answering Mutt
Eats Pickles, Olives
0
2?EJFOFFLD .v March J2-h" a right to expect from a dog.
EE^T You mlgh,l thlnk that Then WM tlme when Teddy
HTeddy Is an unusually intelligent used to nose off the receiver, as
Hiog, Just because he can akswer well as barking.
Phon.e But one day he got too enthua-
But its not so unusual, as that Hastie and chewed up the cord.
t?*5.o tn n rul!s in his family. Now the phone is kept out of his
His uncle Cricket used to an-[rench
i^fL^S P^.ml tn.i' Tpddy jU8t Teddy has other duties around
jMnherited the trait. the Schneider house.
Mrs. Marie Bchnelder.who owns He answers the front doorbell,
Kf.inVre;0rT T ~tpJrir- k'eryltoo. barking and leading his
telad that Teddy is the phone- mistress to the door.
Bhes deaf in the left, ear and Mrs. Bchneldar, who suffers from
*a5La"y 2 1 her rlght ear a heart condition, by letting
'liJSSii- 1ir- lV"?an.d' FJed ,t wrybody around know when she
orklng, and their two daueh-:ls none for an length of time.
2.tBr? *i Khm^Jt 'cornts bi I For all .this service, all Teddy
ttandy to have Teddy around demands.!* ani unusual diet
Don't get the Idea that Teddy
or In a cornice.
It has been pointed oat, how-
ever, that these winged residents
of Washington have weathered
many previous man made
storms. At various times In the
past, the starlings have remain-
ed at their perches and emerged
victorious over toy balloons filled
The subjects selected for the'with gas. volleys of pistol blanks,
'eginnlng of this project are;noisy rattles, drenehine* with
hose In which the video aspect water, owls placed on window
p"n most usefullv supplement the ledges, gas attacks, and rattling
already flourishing system In cans filled with pebbles,
schools sound broadcasting. me idea of booby-trapping the
.. 'starlings' lodgings has the ap-
The children attending the nr0val of the N Y Socletv for.
schools selected for the Initial Se Prevention of ftudtr to A^ ecOT experiments are said to be locm-|imBll)_ .j^e wire's shock is not fa-
in* forward excitedly to May o.ltnl
School, they say, -"' '--------""'
'...We 've Sort Of Forgotten How To Act Nuts *
By DOUGLAS LARSEN
PUSAN. Korea. Mar. 22 (NEA>
The long line of men inches
forward slowly. They r"rag their
heavy barracks bags with them
as they move and lean wearily
on their rifles when they stop.
They are quiet.
Many bow their heads slightly,
or sit on the ground for a few
"good as the movies."
will be as
pickles and
r*lly speaks into the phone'! olives
lie's short-haired, not shaggy Ordinarily, Mrs. Schneider
When the phone rings he barks would be lnc3bed to deny him
SLS5S,Kd,^'L,to. "ll* the$e unc rhneider and pulls her to the But hr deservs imp rewrri
Pne To her, that* all anyone for all his choTes/?X sljs I
GIVE!
952
RED CROSS
Fl/rVD
again.
They don't look like men who
are going home. Yet they are.
The line moves to a rickety ta-
ble, where a supply sergeant has
his papers weighted down with
stones against the biting winter
wind. '
The men are turning in their
Rob^tTan,? Wiilmm WIUtamT ESfSS; Thtahfm,he "^ 8tP
brothers, have worked out a plan before they go home
Brothers Team Up
To Beat Jail Rap
to avoid serving full time for
larceny charge.
Under an agreement with the
chief probation officer James
Henahan and Judge John W.
Hackett, one brother stays in
Jail and the other Is released to
work off the fine.
It's a Joyous occasion, but
the Joy is bottled up inside
them. There is none of tbe
spontaneous kidding around
you'd expect.. And the soldiers
who are stationed here per-
manently say it's always the
same story no gaiety.
Three of the men In line, Just
off a train from the front, sum
The Williams brothers figured
lti?ro?1J?,51*ab0ft*i77 -ay8 & UP * **nt,ral faction
^laLtththe?e.M,,8H.,ht wipe out their $631 debtfines ,.,,.. ,.,.. ,w^, ._ .., _?_
and costs on both.
train ride," they say. "But most-
ly It's because we've sort of for-
80, it has been decided that gotten how to act nuts and have
27-year-old William will drive big time.
truck, under supervision by Hen- "you get pretty well beaten Jensen, Hall, NY.; Pvt Elmer learn how
ahan, while his 28-year-old bro- down up there and it takes a Thompson. Pulteney. N.Y. 'cared.
PRESENT ARMS: Just off a train from the Korean front, two
CIs hand In their weapons to Sgt. Charles Bagfey, Vandalia,
Mo. The men starting on the way home are Pic. George Jen-
hen Hall N.Y. (left), and Pvt. Elmer Thompson, Pulteney, N.Y.
The three Pfc. Ralph Flem-,table,
lng. Pittsburgh. Pa ; Pfc. Oeorge "Another thing, We've had to
to cover up being
I ther stays la jail.
I while to get over that."
being glad. But you'll nevai
know how glad we are to be get-
ting out of here. Nobody will ever
know how glad."
This place Is a dreary, fenced-
in compound.
It's like almost every Army
camp In Korea, only more so.
The big difference Is the open-
ing statement read to all the new
men as they come In by plump,
lovlal Cpl. Alfred Zalud of Mew
York He starts out like this:
"Welcome to Company B,
8069th Replacement Battalion.
Our mission here is to receive,
process and ship you on yobr
way home as soon as possible."
Suddenly the place becomes a
paradise.
As Cpl. Charles B. Hehman of
Columbia city Ind.. a twice-
wounded Infantryman with mora
than nine months of front line
duty, explains lt:
"Up until you hear those
words, you're never quite sura
that you are actually going back.
The Army changes its muid so
much, even when you're on tha
trata for Pusan. it's hard to be-
lieve. But I believe it now. And
am I happy!"
The men being sent home
from here, with a brief stop in
Japan, rarely have to spend
more than a day or two wait-
ing for the ship to pick them
They embark right bhlndL
and down a hill, from where this/
'move up a few feet toward thej "80 you automatically cover up make their short stop.


Bt'NPAT. MARCH IS, lWt
rot SUNDAY AMERICAN
SMMBa
mtumi
Radio Programs
Your Community Radio Station
HOG-840
Where 100,000 People Meet
Presents
Snnday, Mar. U
:0O-Bltn On Musical Ihtar-
8:1The VBA. In World Al-
falrs (VOA)
8:30Hymns of all Church
t:0O_BIRLE AUDITORIUM OF
THBAIR
1:18Good Neighbors
8: SOLondon 8tudlo Melodlea
(BBC)
10:00In the tempo ol Jui
10:30Music For Sunday
11:0O-NATlONAL LOT TIRI
11:18The Sacred Heart Pro-
gram
11:30Meet the Band
11:00Invitation to Learnta*
(VOA)
PJL
18:30Bait Uke Tabernacle
Choir
liOOThe Jo Stafford Show
(VOA)
1:18The Chorallrs
1:10Rev. Albert Steer
i:00Opera and Sym.phon
Hour _
4:30What's Xour ravorlte
8:00University Theater (VOA)
7:00Musical Notebook (VOA)
7:80Thru the Sports Glass
7:46 New Out of India (BBC)
8:00Sports Roundup, News
and Features (VOA)
8:18Show Time (VOA)
5:30U. N. Review (VOA)
:00The Canterbury Tales
(BBC)
10:00Hotel El Panama
10:30Time for Music
ll:008lKnOff
Monday, Mar. M
AJVL
?: 00Alarm Clock Club
: 30Morning Salon
:15NBWSiVOA)
8:80Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
t:0ONew
: 18Come and Qet It
t:30As I See It
10:00Newa
10:08Off the Record
11:00New _,
11:08Off the Record (Cont'd)
11:30Meet the Band
11:00News
PJL
18:06Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00-Newa
i 1:11 eratllty Parada
I 1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15It's Time To Dance
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:48Battle of the Bands
8:00All Star Concert Hall
8:15-The Little Show
3:30-Musle for Monday
4:00Muelo Without Words
4:18David Roee Show
4:30Whet's Vour Favorite
8:00Linda's First Love Cla.
Altero, 8.A.
18Bveolnn 6*** .,
7:00Bin RWortjy (VOA)
7:80Sport* Review
7:48Here Comee Louis Jordan
8:00News Commentary
lilS-Hallaot Ivy (VOA)
8:45Commentators Digest
8:00Our Mutual Friend (BBC)
8:308ymphony Hall (VOA)
10:00The World At Your Win-
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
Midnight Sign Off
Tuesday, Mar. 88
AM.
S:00-Slgn On Alarm Clock
Club
1:30Morning Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Crasy Quilt
8:45Hawaiian Harmonies
9:00Newt
9:16Sacred Heart Program
9:30-As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:08Off the Record (Contd.)
11:80Meet the Band
12:00News
12:06Luncheon Muslo
12:30Popular Music
ML
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:48Rhythm end Reason
8:00A Call From Les Paul
8:15Dele for Dancing
2:30Spirit of the Vikings
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
8:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Panamuslca story Time
4:15Promenade Concert
4:80What's Your Favorite
6:00 Linda's First Love Cla.
Altero, S.A.
: 15 Evening Salon
7:00Ray's A. Laugh (BBC)
7:30-PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00News and Commentary
(VOA)
8:15Jo Stafford (VOA)
8:30Time for Business (VOA>
8:45Commentators Digest
(VOA)
9:00Musical Americana (VOA)
9:80Pride end Prejudice
(BBC)
9:45-SporU World and News
:45-Sport*
(VOA)
10:00-HOTEL KL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30-Varlety Bandbox (BBC)
12:00-SUm Off
11:00The Owl's Reet
Wednesday, Mar. 86
8:00Sign On
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15 NEWS (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:18Come and Qet It
9:30As I 8ee It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:06Off the Record (Contd.)
11.30Meet the Band
13:00News and Luncheon Mu-
sic
FJL
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:18Personality Parade
1:45Jack Smith Show (VOA)
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:16It's Time to Dance
8:80Afternoon Melodies
2:45Notes on Jau
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:16French in the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorito
5:30NEWS
5:35What's Tour Fevorlte
(Contd.)
6:00Linda's First Love Cla.
Alfaro, S.A.
6:16Evening Salon
7:00Over To You (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON 8PORT8
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary
(VOA)
8:15Jam Session (VOA)
8:30The American Book Shelf
(VOA)
8:45Commentators Digest
(VOA)
9:00Shanties and Forebltters
(BBC)
9:30The Haunting Hour
10:00BBC Playhouse
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
Thursday/ Marl 81
AM.
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:80Morning 8alon
8:16NEWS (VOA)
8:30Crasy Quilt
8:48Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEWS
9:16SACRED HEART PRO-
GRAM
0:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEWS
PJf.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN 8CI-
. ENCE
2:00Call For Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bends
8:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamuslca Story Time
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:80What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cla.
Alfaro, 8.A.
?: 15Everting Salon
:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:80BLUE RIBBON 8PORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News and Features
(VOA)
8:15Arts and Letters (VOA)
8:30Radio University (VOA)
8:46Commentators Digest
(VOA)
9:00Emma (BBC)
9:30Take It From Here (BBC)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:18Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00-Slgn Off
Friday, Mar. 28
AM.
6:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:16News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Come and Qet It
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
PM.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:16Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00 Music Without Words
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cla.
Alfaro, S.A.
6:16Evening Salon
7:00Adventures of Richard
Hanna (BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News Commentary (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8.45Commentators Digest
9:00S h o r t Story Theater
(VOA)
9:30London Studio Concert
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of PC 8
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 em. Sign Off
Saturday, Mar. 88
6:00Sign OnThe Alarm
Clock Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Britain Sings (BBC)
8:45The Duke steps Out
9:00J-News
9:15Women's World
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet The Bend
12:00NEWS
PM.
12:05New Tune Time
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:46Tour De France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Band Concert
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Quest Star
6:15Master works from France
(RDF) '
6:45American Tolk Songs
7:00Gay Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00 Newsreel U.S.A.
8:15Bing Crosby Show. (VOA)
8:45Battle Reports (VOA)
9:00 HOG Hit Parade
9:30VOA Hit Parade
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30Having A Wonderful
Crime (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
(Book
By United Frees
tarw'Will celebrate their first blennl-
Lincoln s ability as a military, um TuMday at the Hotel Tlvoii.
leader is the theme of_ T. Harry Pen Women 0fficera are elect-
Williams' new book. The hlstor- ed for a two-year term, and to
ian concludes that the Civil Wartcomplete the cycle, this club of
Canal Zone Pen Women Plan
Biennial Dinner Tuesday
The Canal Zone Pen Women local column, and Captain Hal
Basham, a successful magazine
president was better tha nany of
his commanders of the Army of
the Potomac except U.S. Grant
and then sometimes Lincoln had
his doubts.
Lincoln And His Generals
(Knopf) goes exhaustively into
the parade of generals who leri
the Army of the Potomac so dis-
astrously until Grant was sum-
moned from the West in late '64.
Williams contends that Lin-
coln came to learn more about
strategy than McDowell. McCIel-
lan, Pope, Burnslde. except the
last, failed to win a decisive bat-
tle against Lee's underfed le-
gions.
Other historians disagree with
women writers, artists and com-
posers will announce awards
granted to members for outstand
frig work in their chosen craft
completed since the club's found-
ing in March 1950.
A Jury of five artists will se-
lect the best paintings in the
Biennial Exhibit, which will open
to the public next Sunday and
will continue to hang in the Lit-
tle Gallery of the Tlvoll until
April 26.
Irene Pauldlng, Mrs. Jean Kerch
Miss Mary Patfon, Paul Colby and
Ama7.a converse, all of them
well known Canal Zone artists.
Another three-man iury, con-
sisting of Dean Dorothy Moody
of the Canal Zone Junior Col-
Wllliams about Lincoln's pbllUyi1 as a strategist but Williams
ature degree from Yale, Pete
makes a plausible case
jolit
""the!Brennan, widely known for his
paunt politician who. from force'
of circumstances, had to assume j
much of the burden of defend-]
ing Washington
London Ladies, by Lucy Poate j
Stebbins (Columbia), contains
six biographical sketches of 18th
century women, each celebrated
in her own way. Mrs. Stebbins
writes understandingly and per-
ceptively of a cabinet minister's
mistress who was murdered bv a
writer, will present two awards to
members of the Pen Women, one
for the best unpublished manu-
scripts and one for a published
work.
A silver cup known as the
Rosamond Gaydash Award, pre-
sented by Mrs. Gaydash, found-
er of the Canal Zone branch
when she left the isthmus In
1950, will be awarded to the mem-
ber who. by popular vote, did
most to-further the club's inter-
ests and prestige from 1950 to
1962.

The Judges and members' hus-
bands will be guests at the bi-
ennial dinner, and the program,
in addition to awards, win In-
clude a cello solo by Margot Lin-
ares, daughter of pen woman
Abble Brink Linares, and a movie
short illustrating the group's ac-
tivities, which was filmed by Pen
Woman Jean Bailey ana her
husband, Dr. William T.Balley.
Food Cheap In Britain
Despite Austerity Cuts
misguided clergyman: a novelist,
playwright and actress who could
never satisfy her driving ambi-
tion; another novelist who be-
came a Quaker; two sisters who
blighted each other's lives; a
Russian princess who became a
rjower in international dlDloma-
cy, and the woman who became
the wife of Thomas Carlyle....
to become a traitor, a thief, an Peek pwjto;
adulterer and at last a drug-
crazed killer. It is also the sto-
rv of Had 11 a, the Arab nirl who
at 15 Is well-versed in selling her
body to the highest bidder; of
Daisy de Valverde, the hashish-
eating Spanish marchioness; of
Thaml, Arab outcast turned
blackmailer; of Jack Wilcox,
American hanger-on in the
black market; and of Tangier it-
self as Bowles knows it....
LONDON, March (UP)
England is the home of austei
ity, and this is what austerlt)
means:
Meat, bacon, butter, margar-
ine, fats, cheese, sugar and ten
are rationed. What there is of
food Is relatively cheap for the
English worker, however.
The average manufacturing
worker makes 165 shillings
($23.10) a week. The average
metal worker gets about 178
shillings ($24.76) and the build-
ing trades worker 161 shillings
($22.54).
The worker gets one shilling
i and twopence (about 16 cents i
18'worth of meat each week for
and the same amount
Meats differ in price but steak
for example, Is about two shil-
lings and eightpence (37 cents)
a pound.
That shows how little meat he
eats, even when the meat ration
goes up slightly over two shil-
lings a week, which it does in
Paul
Tragedy In Tangier
Let It Come Down, by
Bowles (Random House):
novel turns the harsh spotlight htmself m
at realistic fiction on Tangier. ior eacn member of his famli
the international city that has
become one of the last strong-
holds of technlcolored romance.
The central figure is Nelson
Dvar tha New York bank teller
with the murmuring heart who
came to Tangier hoping to be-
come a free and whole man. only
Explanation of Symbak:
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
RDF Radiodifusin Francals*
Corp.'
fysttheHeat^
f/nMex$iMpowder my!
Ease misery of heat rash,
chafe with Mexsana. Sooth-
ing medication in special
Amylum* base checks itch, sting.
You feel marvelofls relief
and feel it fast! Use it often.
Gal anotlna relief fraia
He also gets four ounces
three or four slices of bacon a
week, bacon Is from two shil-
lings eightpence (37 cents) to
three shillings onepenny (44
[cents) a pound.
He gets four ounces of marga-
rine at one shilling twopence
(16 cents) a pound; one and a
half ounces or cheese at around
two shillings (28 cents) a pound
and two ounces of tea at around
four shillings (56 cents) a pound.
Potatoes are two and a half
Grand Right And Left, by Lou-
is Kronenberger (Viking): The
problem was to find something
new for the world's richest man
to collect. His fabulous collec-
tions already ranged from cha-
teaux on the Loire to crooked
roulette wheels. The solving of
this problem brought to his home
a handful of eccentrics notice-
able even among the Indoor maz-
es, musical Instruments and Gu-
tenberg Bibles of previous collec-
tions. A welcome and hilarious
novel by a distinguished critic
who usually writes in a more se-
rious vein....
entsi. A head of lettuce costs
i bout one shilling (14 cents).
Austerity doesnTt much affect
*he night life, sports attendance
nd movies. Since food Is subsi-
dized and cheap, the B r 111 s h
family has money left for some
entertainment.
MODERN WHEEL ALIGNING
AND BALANCING
With factory trained specialist
At attractive rates. No delay.
COLPAN MOTORS, INC
Telephone 2*1035
Thrifty Soldier
Has Feathered
Nest On Retiring
BOONEVHXI. Mies. (UP)
John E. Carter, who made the
U.S. Army a career, has a tidy
sum now that he's retired,
thanks to thrift.
Carter enlisted In 1912 when
the pay scale was mighty low for
men in khaki. However, he start-
ed saving part of his pay witn
the finance department at four
per cent Interest.
He saved every month for 30
years, Carter's pay Increasing
with each promotion.
Carter retired on Feb. 28, 1943,
with more than $20,000, now in
savings bonds.
"I am still saving at least $100
out of my salary (army retire-
ment) and I have In the vault at
the bank $20,000 m savings
bonds," he said.
m
n's fashion
Sc
of the St
eason.
SHIRTS
the very latest in sport wear
color and comfort ;
in eool sheer cottons
In crinkle crepe ead
handkerchief batistes
In novel prints to
delight any sportsman.
Coel "SHORTEE"
Men's pajamas in crinkle crepe cotton, that
takes sleeplessness out of hot summer night*.
MOTTA'S
PANAMA
COLON
forytwdy&ad* Cl&slfd*
The Americans At Home, by
David Macrae (Dutton): A pic-|
ture of America of a century ago
as seen through the observant
eyes of a Scottish preacher. The
Rev. David Macrae was eurlous
about everything and everybody
on all levels of society and had
a talent for transferring his en-
thusiasm to his writings. His
book wae first published In 1871.
but the present edition is its first
appearance in the United States.
I
you cfit stM mxrf U tkt,LATeSTm** HlLLMAN MlNX
omxL you, Cjtt stilt rnore out of it!
The world's most successful
right car now available on
the Atlantic Side
at COLON MOTORS INC.
(Dodge- DeSoto)
101h Street or 15th St. ft Melender
DELIVERY WITHIN A FEW DAYS.
r,
I
Three Cars Crash;
All In Family
ROBBINS. Md March (UP)
It was ell In the family when
three cars were involved in an
accident in front of the home of
Ellhu Abbott on Maryland's eaat-
ern shore.
A northbound car driven by
William P. Abbott of Andrews
collided with a car driven by Rus-
sell Abbott of Lakesvllle. The im-
pact drove the second Abbott's
car Into a parked auto owned by
Thurman G. Abbott of Bishop's
Head.
The owners of all three ears
and Elihu Abbott are all distant
relatives. No charges were filed.
m
All Ml lor wefter sosg!
No woawier tha* -mM** ny-
u their hearts out I Titfn ham
3 h-Mnr-thcyVe f r*3?
Biro Sooa I What caaarr could rub
for matt is taate. tatty ujaro-
dwoo in rary packet cfceaen far a
Sedal Bare Kaeuit atolij
Tttk extra Afca r*at BUM hua'
Mtal
\
WE TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
our appointment as exclusive dealers for
STUDEBAKER CARS AND TRUCKS IN COLON
THE 1952 MODELS WILL BE ON DISPLAY
March 29th and 30th, 1952 (Saturday and Sunday)
A COMPLETE RANGE OF BODY STYLES
WILL BE ARRIVING SHORTLY
U.S.A. deliveries can be effected in approximately
lour weeks from dale of order.
LAM HERMANOS. S.A.
Coln, R. P.
Phone Coln 629


- 1*.
page Form
ntt SUNDAT AMERICAN
SUNDAY, MARCH I IMS
iMusic Lessons Add Richness
And Beauty To Child's Life
By ANNETTE GREEN
NEA Staff Writer)
omen s
WorU
Sukiyaki Is Tasty Thrift Dish
By GAYNOR MADDOX
(NEA ipd and Markets Editor)
$**
oLiglitweiyht Contenders for ^>tyle ZJitle
S^keer Wool AerAeu ordeal for ^Jropic
'Florence Mercur. nationally known concert pianist, marks her
tenth year on the concert stage with vital advice to all parents who
tire considering the possibility of music (raining for their children.
can come later, according to Miss
Mercar.
Once the teacher starts the
lessons, show your confidence by
giving her complete authority.
Never stay in the room during
the session, advises Miss Mercur.
Never question the teacher's
methods. It's a good idea to give
*IEW YORK, March 22 (NEA*
One of the greatest character
V IllWnersonallty builders, in the
u^pilQon of Florence Hercur, not-
fitJd ooncert pianist, is the study
l,(ir5>i"c.
ffj i could only speak to all
theparents of America personal-
ly says Miss Mercur, "I would
HP "Co explain how much music the teacher and pupil at least a'
RTneens in the lives of their chll-iypar to get used to each other, toj
^tJHn," allow their personalities to blend. |
J^Ms>c study develops respon- \ If you are wondering about the
stbtift?, powers of concentration,!best age to start your boy or girl..
TWftory and self-confidence, she Miss Mercur recommends six or:
kinks. In addition, it is a na-seven.
t*fal outlet Tor emotional strains; "Children at this age don't
t ahH-tresses. have too many outside interests,"
, "The piano is the foundation!she says. "This offers them a
*jOi all other Instruments." Miss good six or seven years for deve-,
Stheaiir explains. "If your child i loping. Then, they will be so in-
de'cMes In later-years to be aidoctrinated in music, they will
singer o: to play the trumpet, he'want to continue of their own
or she will be well-prepared." free will.''
An important consideration for
SUKIYAKI HAWAIIAN STYLE nade easily at
dtoh.
When your food budget is In slivers lengthwise. Continua
strained and there's company for .cooking for about 5 minutes,
dinner, turn to Far Eastern cook-' 8tir in kitchen bouquet, then
ery, for a taste treat, and also add contente o can of mush-
food for conversation. This Jap- rooms, celery, radishes, salt and
anese Sukiyaki. is as thrifty as It ginger. Cover and let cook for 10
is delicious. If you have a chaf-minutes. Serve with fluffy cook-
ing dish, you can prepare it right ed rlcg.
at table, the way you see 1 -Ic-Jif
in the "
rants.
better oriWiW festau-
Sukiyaki Hawaiian Style
(4 servings)
Serve a simple fruit ambrosia
for dessert following your suki-
yaki. Pass crisp plain sugar cook-
ies or Oriental almond cookies if
you can get them.
Oriental Ambrosia
(4 servings)
A wool jersey in a Summer weight that holds its shape is used in
three designs, shown here, from top designers. Pale pink afternoon
dress by Jo Copeland converts (left) to short dinner dress with
jacket off. Dress -has full skirt, jacket is embroidered in baroque
pearl honey bees. Claire McCardell does a dress (center) with
bodice in pink jersey decorated in black popcorn knots. Skirt is
black pique. From Mollie Parnis (right) conies a white wool jersey
dress with snug bodice and full skirt.
By GAILE DUGAS
(NEA Woman's Editor)
NEW YORK. March 22 (NEAi
I rayon, acetate and all the syn->
Three tablespoons cooking oil,
' 2 pound lean ports, thinly sliced;
1 clove garlic, minted; 1 medluml __
onion, sliced; 1 teaspoon kitchenI Two, tangerines, 2 bananas,
bouquet, 3-ounce can sliced broil- coarsely diced; 2 slices canned
ed mushrooms, 1 cup diagonally I Pineapple, diced; Vi cup sliced
sliced celery. 1A cups thinly | preserved kumquats,. 2 table-
sliced white radishes or small poons sliced preserved ginger
turnips, l"2 teaspoons sal, y2 tea- (optional /2 cup moist shredded
spoon ginger. Coconut, >/4 cup pineapple juice.
But. the famous pianist goes
on to explain, you cannot expect I
a young child to want to prac- ./ >.
that I J4ow Jj,
parents, once they decide to give
their child piano lessons, is the
ype o teacher to pick. Very of-
v feel that an inexpensive tice. You must face the fact
is best, since they're notjshe would much rather be out]
,e child has any definite playing with her friends,
or rhuSical "tendencies. What you should do is budget
is terribly, wrpng. says the youngster's time so that she'
Florence Mercur. Many so-called has a full day. without too much
teachers have actually destroyed concentration on any One thing,
talent because they did not em- For Instance, when your child
ploy the right methods. comes home from school, you
Helare you allow a teacher to shouldn't expect her to sit down
start working with your young- and start to practice immedlate-
sMrV do a bit Of Investigating ]V. Miss Mercur suggests you al-!
about her background. Find out low a half-hour play period and
where she has studied, 'hen a half-hour practice period
sstt-ls H*o impoi'tenWer. you to This should be followed by
. know what she has accomplished some other activity, until about
J in the musical field. It is very (one and a half hours of practice
simple for a woman to study mu- have been accomplished,
sic for two or three years and The child's mind is open pnly
then.call herself a teacher, says for the first half of the practice
M|a*Merow. period. If you force her to go on
Tf she has a good backgrpund, and on, nothing will be aceom-
she is a wise selection, no matter.pushed. A particularly good time
what she charges. for the child to get in some prac-
Impress upon the teacher you'tlce, according to Miss Mercur, is
do choose that you want your'In the morning, before she goes
child to have a thorough ground-, to school.
ing in the classics. Theory andl Parents shouldn't expect too
harmony are also vital to basic!much from their.children, either,
training. Ishe says. All youngsters cannot
Once your youngster Is well- develop into concert pianists But
versed in Bach and Beethoven, a sound education in music will
her-flapaclty for learning will in- 'add richness and beauty to a
crease two-fold. Popular music child's life.
-1 i
It's become increasingly true accomplished these seeming mir-
that fabric knows no one sea- acles.
son. Women have accepted cot-| Wools so sheer and fine that
ton for winter wear and light- they admit the slightest breeze
weight wools for summer, while are ideal for wear in the tropics.
With these developments, there! the heavier coat and suit weights.
thtic fibers march s t e adllyhave come the processes thatiThe very lightest weight Is fine!
through the year. |make fabrics wrinkle-resistant, i for humid weather In the north Place oil in frying pan. Add Peel and section tangerines.
New fabric developments have soil-resistant, spot-re s i s t a n t. or fof tropical climates, i pork which has been thinly sliced Halve sections, removing any
Thus, an all-wool jersey that1 To this Jersey, another quality, across the grain of the meat. Let seeds. Place in a bowl and add
holds its shape and will not sag has been added, its makers claim.1 cook until nearly done and light- the remaining Ingredients. Tos-
is in good company. This is a crease-resistant char-'far browned (about 5 minutes), lightly together with fork to mix
Further, this wool jersey comes acteristlc that makes it ideal for Add minced garlic and onion thoroughly. Cover and chill well
in zephyr weights as well as in plane, train or car travel. which has been halved then cut until ready to serve.
y.
(L>xercie
FOOD NEWS
by frote** rdtif
M WMfcfy C#rwfWI #f MOp|MA0
To acquire a rounded bust, wasp waist and smoothly curved hip-
line, this young woman devotes herself to helpful exercises. To
minimize her midriff, she chooses a side-swinging routine (left) in
which correct body position plays an important part. With the
help of phonograph records (left inset), shf finds she is better able
to maintain the rhythmic movements which give best' results in
exercises to strengthen the bustline (right Inset) and to erase
lumps and bulges from her hips and thighs (lower right)
WOULD YOU LIKE TO SERVE DINNER WITHOUT GETTING
UP? Make this Tasty Tuna Fish Casserole, and ypu can sit down
until time for desserta welcome idea to every woman. Just
place the dinner plates and casserole within reach when you
sit down for your appetizer or soup, and after that you can serv
the main course without returning to the stove. And this reclt
itself Is wonderfully easy to make. Simply a matter of combin-
ing ingredients which are already prepared! Among them, Blrc
Eye Green Peas are delightful time-savers. These flavor-fres1 *
peas come shelled, washed, and ready-to-cook. What's more, they'i r
double-checked for tenderness. Then the quick-freezing process
seals in all the vitamins, so they are held intact until they
reach you. All the fresh, bright, green color Ls retained also,
and they are uniform in sin... Birds Eye Peas look as good aa
they taste! Keep a few packages in your freezing compartment;
you'll be serving them often, for they're always delicious, And
don't forget about this recipeit's outstanding!
TASTY TUNA FISH CASSEROLE
1 box (12 ounces) Bird Eye Green Peas, thawed
1 can (10 vi ounces) condensed cream of
mushroom soup
1 cup (7 % ounce can) tuna fish, flaked
2 cups Post Toasties, slightly crushed
2 tablespoons melted butter
Combine peas and mushroom soup in saucepan. Bring to a boil,
stirring once or twice. Then add tuna fish and mix lightly.
Turn fnto greased 1-quart baking dish. Toss slightly crushed
toasties with melted butter and sprinkle over tuna fish mixture.
Bake In hot oven (400T.) 20 to 30 minutes. Makes 4 servings.
By ALICIA HART
(NEA Beauty Editor)
WHEN YOU GET UP AND GO 1
for the dessert, why not bring Vx
in a cake? This favorite seems. 1
to make everyone perk up. Bv-
grace as well as to beautify the plains, to keep your body in bal-as you can reach. Bend your right ,* ^ordlnarT'whl""^1 end' V
figure ls an exercise for the anee and to bend with your mus-knee and raise your left hand.|[hem hv e^iovlne a luscious
tablespoon sugar
cup hot water
tablespoons dry skimmed
milk powder
cup lukewarm water
bust-line. This may be done cles in the way that they natur- Stretch and swing your body j S 0f delicate^
part of the either seated cross-legged on the ally go. A, waist exercise ls much I three times to the right and then'P'^ *dd*atafu*not difficult Meanwhile s
1? iV."^ fUEr- ^ standlnK Ml In more than Just simply fiopping.to the left. Reverse the foot po- &1i0w vour rectoS exactly .'!o7erTukewaS,
Not since the early _
century has there been
emphasis upon the womanly fi- a free area.
gureIn the old-fashioned sense! suggests this one, cautioning you
of the termas there ls current-1 Begin by straightening your- to keep your body in Une, avoid-
ly- self into an erect, vibrant posture,lng swaying awkwardly to the
Pacing changing clothes trends, head up, chest lifted, abdomen i front or to the rear.
the ideal feminine form has run In. Place your fingertips upon Stand
them by enjoying a luscious Dissolve Jell-O and sugar la
Cool thoroughly,
sprinkle milk powder
otner tnree times |na] resuit For example. your,Add. to cooled Jell-O and mix
. f0u ,thLB;hs*J?nd J?lps; choice of baking powder is very weii. chill until slightly thlcken-
vlr^wh,>h n^wMKiL ! nr I Important. Many experienced ed. Tnen whip wltg I0lytl
eP?Ci^^^ bowk placed In le and
the gamut during the past half- your shoulder, your elbows point-' ^^FLltf c'SSS&TA^^ fToor. ISTSt ^Bak^SSTy,? So" ^wS, S *e^
featuring constraint here and Inhaling deeply, raise your head;right, then three times to the ing your arms around to he lefti^lni?%" mLres two leav- UP*-
exaggeration there. Now there's a slowly up and back. ie?t. to support your weight. Place' "if* .'tions which work to- HOME WAS NEVER t r thi
return to rounoed naturalness ir Keeping your fingors upon |your palms flat uponthe floor. ^ ra?se yourbatter gent- -be1ore*ANow you?caofJ? I
sA^ffl^n^iSL'l. Ha** your, right leg. t^,^J^t^V^or^m ^ ""^^ ""^^ ^
hips and bust, with a tiny waist your shoulders, bring your elbows
pointing up the Importance of
both
An aid to women who wish to
revamp their figures to fit the
ffi%SrSS?. IS y^^S^^ K ^voTr^ SL1L 2~J?L2PL!SL y-SftLSS ^M?_S?
revamp tneir ngures to nt tne run circle, exnaie lower your el- arm downward; as you move tolknee and then swing your right If bak n* more often because, trvce eit her lust hnv
^s^wW^'oulbv^va^S Si ^^".tatennSSSa1 B J2L2E22L J^!ft**^* dE^lS! crVTly^n thisVoduct i\&^$SE?.Z
clses worked out by Manya Kahn, again from the starting position. sult while your right arm Is again can manage, remembering to ^ccesT every time
body-molding expert who recent- Five times around should he !==?.- h. ..' . ..S.i.. ....._..
Morning Time-Savers
HelpfulHints
should be elevated above your head. keep perfectly straight. Even-
ly published a home course en- enough to give you. after each it is then tune to flow into the tually you should be able to kick
titled "Lovely to Look At.'- exercise session, a sense of taut- final position of this exercise Isufficlently high to grasp your
The first of her suggested "body ened pectorals and loosened Swing back to your original I right heel with your right hand,
rhythms." which were designed shoulders. stance and then Ailft your right This will require torso elasticity
to correct posture and to develop It s Important. Miss Kahn ex- foot away from your left as far as well as llmberness of leg.
to love. It's yummy as whipped
creamyet costs only a few
pennies. And you get all the rich
fruit flavor of tangy strawber-
ries as well. This is just one of
Not to be overlooked In these Allow at least one hour in the To prM>ct your brass from tar- You'll prevent fires In vour the many dishes you can make choose his own.
days of rush and run Is the morning lor breaklast and dress- nihinir clean it anri annlv a thin home If von take pare not to with this wonderful gelatin.______
amount of dressing time you lng. Get into the habit of sched- J^f S ^ wbl" hSSic striae electric cords "wires un- I Since there are 6 delicious flav- ,WANTTO STAY WITHIN YOK
working girls budget for your-iuling your time so that at six coat oi rresn wnue sneiiac. strmgeiecmc coras or ires un yQu ^ ^.^ mrn g va .BUDGET and still serve your
selves each morning. i o'clock you are brushing your, ... ___ .,,,, ,_.. ..__. a r 1U*BU1 ov" "**" riety of desserts and salads. And'family more milk? Why not use
For if you arrive at the office teeth, and at six-fifteen you1w7*7l/tJ'; r "JJ Vh. ,**.l vou'll enjoy the satisfaction of dry milk powder or evaporated
with your hair still up in pin are drinking orange juice. wLil f- ^.r-1?... %S!?. Tf = M h.,m.r (r, ,m, .,. u knowing that each distinctive, milk with Bakor'i Breaklast Co-
curls, your slip slightly askew. At least 15 minutes should be <***' jf, mperature may Iftlew'""' *"" ^^ appetuing dish costs next to no- coa to make a delicious, nutri-
?"""^g'.v.r.e,n. !v.b.ur-n.r.' thing! Penny-wise Jell-O is a, tious. and oe
bm
_ con-
tains 7 different cereals, each in
NOW IS THE TIME FOR JELL-O! an ,nMal package largk
Yes. right atop your cake! For |enough to provide one generous
here is a scrumpUous. new way wliu,-I There are 10 of these in
to serve this thrifty stand-by... " Including 3 boxes of Post
a tempting topping you're sure Toasties and 2 of Posts Orap-
Nuts Flakesspecial favorites
and 1 each of most of the oth-
ed popular ready-to-eat cereals.
Put the handy cardboard tray
on the table, and let everyone
set aside for your make-up i this cause warping.
T
irybodyRsail* Classified
land yur hose hanging haphaz-
ardly, you may well consider tak- Includes your personal dain-
ing stock of the situation. tiness routine, and 15 minutes a devastating effect How much cleaner or wire, and wash in hot sauce goon Jt j^^g >m ^i
To save minutes in the morn- for actual dressing. easier and pleasanter to know. 80*P*UC ,
ing, decide what you will near Watch for stray threads and without having to give the mrt- To induce sleep, relax your eye
I before you go to bed. Be aure lint If you wear seamed stock- ter any thought, just where to muscles by looking at some far
that all repairs such as loose but- ings. be positive they are straight find everything! away object. Then look at your
tons and torn hems have been Keep everything in Its place.. A carefully planned morning,Index finger six inches from your
made. Plan your access orle s Searching for shoes or pins at'routine will make a difference In'nose. Blink often art"d repeat the
thoughtfully. the last crucial moment can have yuur whole day. Try it. lexerclse several times.
."* "SLhS VOZ ^n":to b&T try This
FLUFFY CAKE SAUCE
ablespoons (about
package)
Straberry Jell-O
Vi
economical beverage?
The rich, chocolate flavor of this
pure, fine cocoa makes these
milk products taste so good your
family will really enjoy them.
So get a can of Baker's today,
and use it often. Cocoa made
this way is tasty, thrifty, and
so good for yoa!


suvoay, March is. h
aim
....-----------------------f....... r
THl SUNDAY AMaTJUCAN
*MH
racific ^ocLetu
&, 17, &IL. D.l AA- 3521
Mrs. Chris Phelps. Mrs. Evelyn
Morriion, Mri. June Anderson.
Mrs. Norm*. Wemmer, Mrs. raye
Bell Hd Mr- Louise Soyster.
MB. AND MB8. CHARLES TOWN8END WALLIS, following
ih.elr wedding at the Llhue Union Church, Llhue, Kaual, T. H.
irs. Wallls Is the former Alloe Rae Johnson of the Canal Zone.
rOBMEB RESIDENT WEDS IN HAWAII
.The marriage of Miss Alice Rae Johnson, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond H. Johnson, formerly of the Canal
Zone and now of San Pedro, Cal., to Charles Tewnsend Wal-
lls, son of Mr. George M. Wallls, took place recently In the
Lihue Union Church In Llhue, Kaual, T. H.
The Reverend Donald Rohrs officiated at the ceremony
before an altar decorated with white orchids, star jasmin,
spathiphyllum and plalaenopsls orchids.
Flowers used in the church decorations Included spider
lilies, tl blossoms, green tl leaves, white astors, white beau-
montia, white begonias and star Jasmin. -
Mrs. Hanson Honored At Shower
Mrs. Helen Hanson was hon-
ored by many of her friends
Thursday evening at a gift show-
er given by Mrs. Marion Herring
and Mrs. R. W. LowreyjBt the
Herring home in Gamboa*.
Esther Breakly
Is Four Xears Old
Young Miss Esther Breakly ce-
lebrated the anniversary of her
fourth birthday with a supper
party Wednesday evening given
by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.
T. Breakly. at their home.
Among those attending were
Margaret Gangle. Helen Frances
Daniels, Claire Spencer, Lellanl
Walston arid Nancy Huldquist.
First Isthmian Drama
Festival This Week
The First Isthmian Drama
Festival will be held In the Cris-
tobal High School auditorium
March 27 and 39 at p.m. The
Isthmian drama groups taking
part In the Festival will be the
Balboa Theater Guild, the Cristo-
bal Little Theater, the Balboa
High School, the Canal Zone Ju-
nior College and the Cristobal
High School Thespians.
They will present the following
one-act plays: "The Old Lady
Shows Her Medals"; "The Boor";
"The Marriage Proposal"; "The
Drums Of Oude" and "Mooncalf
Mugford." v
Ribbons will be presented to
the best actor and actress.
The Festival will be in honor
of International Theater Month.
Admission Is free and the public
Is invited to attend.
Mrs. Bvbieta
Is In Hospital
Mrs. Juan Antonio Zubleta
has been hospitalised and Is a
patient m the Sn Fernando
Clinic.
Given in marriage by Dr.
Samuel R. Wallls, an uncle of
the bridegroom, the bride wore a
white satin strapless dress under
an organdy duster. Her head*-
dress and corsage were of small
white orchids. The bride carried
a white Bible, topped with a large
orchid surrounded by smaller or-
chids, set In a lace handkerchief
an dtied with silver ribbon.
The maid of honor, Julie..
Beerman, wore a dress of deep
blue heneath an organdy duster,
and carried a small yellow or-
chid bouquet.
The flower girls, Mary Marga-
ret. Carolyn and Penny Wallls,
wore pale blue organdy dresses
with rosebud headdresses. Each
carried a tulle basket with yel-
low rose petals.
The best man was William
Hesjflah and the ushers were
John Lyons, Scot McAllster and
J*hn Batchelder.
immedlately following the ce-
ernony a reception was held at
F residence of Dr. and Mrs.
: imuel R. Wallls. The back-
n! ound for the receiving line was
a natural rock fireplace banked
with tl plants and tl blossoms
and white begonias. The room
was further decorated with
branches of yellow buttercup
tree terertrial ground orchids,
white Mexican creeper and pink
lotus begonias.
The bride's mother, Mrs. John-
son, wore a royal blue dress, with
a lavender hat and a large lav-
ender orchid.
The bride groom's aunt, Mrs.
Wallls, was dressed in fuchsia
organza, with a while carnation
headpiece and corsage.
After a short wedding trip the
young couple have returned to
make their home at 1M3-A Wild-
er Avenue. Honolulu. T.H.
The bride is a graduate of the
San Pedro High School and the
Woodbury College In Los Ange-
les, Cal. She is a member of Eta
Epsllon Gamma sorority.
The bridegroom is a graduate
of the Lee H. Edwards High
School In Ashevllle. N.C.; the
Brevard Junior College In Brev-
ard. N.C.: and the University of
Florida, where he was affiliated
He is presently connected with
the Hawaiian Sugar Planters As-
sociation experimental station in
Honolulu, T.H.
Venezuelan Ambassador Returns
Mr. Enrique' Castro Gomez, the
Ambassador of Venezuela to Pa-
nama, returned recently from'
Caracas. Venezuela, where he
Was a visitor for a short time.
Ambassador To Ecuador
Is Visitor Here
Mr. Alfredo de Roux, the Am-
Mrs. Grier Leaves For States
Mrs. C. L. Grler left for the
United States recently by plane
for a lengthy vacation, which
will be spent visiting with rela-
tives and friends.
Mrs. Pennington Entertains
Mrs. 3. H. Pennington of Bal-
boa entertained a large group of
her friends recently at a bridge
and canasta party given at her
home.
THE NAVY OFFICERS' WIVES CLUB, Fifteenth Naval District,
neld election ot officers at their last meeting at the Quarry
Heights Officers' Club. Newly elected officers are from left
to right: Mrs. Betty Arnold, corresponding secretary; Mrs.
Ponnie Dawson, recording secretary; Mrs. Ruth Sweeney, pres-
ident; Mrs. Ellle Billings, treasurer; and Mrs. Marian Flake,
vice-president.
Stolen Auto Found
With New Doodads
NORTH GUILFORD, Conn.,
Human Blood Helps
Hold Totem Pole
^/vt (antic Society
W* Witt.. J*. tu
B*. 195, (mlmn Vtltfkm (ml** $7$

MR. AND MRS. GERHARDT
INTRODUCED AT COCKTAIL PARTY
A cocktail and buffet supper party was given by Mr. and
Mrs. William Grady of the De Lessen Area yesterday to
honor their houseguesst, Mrs. Grady s parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Philip W. Gerhardt of Oak Park, III.
The affair also complimented Mr. Grady on his birthday
anniversary.
ler, who is the administrativo
secretary of the National Coun-
cil of the Churches of Christ in
America, and executive secretary
of its Joint Department of Amet
lean Communities overseas.
Reservations for the dinner
meeting may be made by calling
B. C. Halllday. 3-1706; Ross Cun-
ningham. 3-IMS; Rev. Bell, 8
The buffet table was covered ^STS ol the board of governors.' 1498, or Bruce Sanders, Jr., 8
with a bright cross-stitched cloth They Included Mrs. David Mc- 2396.
and centered with tropical ioll-' Cracken. Mrs. Robert Humph-,
ge. res. Mrs. Clayton Moore. Mrs.
Atlantic side guests Invited to Halland Hankie, Mrs. Vincent
meet the honorees were: Dr and Oberg, Mrs. August Zilkle and
Mrs. Walter McBrlde.
Mrs. McCracke'n, the president,
officiated, and Mrs. Henry F.I
#/ &//<
tj
Mrs. 8. D. Aycock, Mr. and Mrs.
H. C. Anderson. Capt. and Mrs.
John W. Anderson, Dr. and Mrs. ,
J. L. Byrd, "Mr. and Mrs. A. R.I Taylor, honorary president, was (Compiled by Publishers' Weeks?}
Campbell, Dr. and Mrs. 'Harry also ln attendance. Souvenir Fiction
Eno, Capt. and Mrs. Rov A. Fort,! spoons were given Mrs. Roy Wllk-' THE CAINE MUTINY
Dr. and Mrs. W. F French Dr.lerson- Mrs- Vincent Oberg. Mrs.
WASHINGTON, March (UP)
March (UP) James H. Sand- Human blood is used as glue on iue".
bergh Isn't too sorry that his totem pole made by Australian everiv Hllls' c?"' Dr *nd Mr-
"plain blue" automobile was stol- aborigines that Is part of a col- C. A. Ross, Cant, and Mrs. R. w.
and Mrs. Wayne Gilder, Mr. and
Mrs. Michael F. Greene, and
their houseguest, Miss Mary
Ruth Davis.
Mrs. Robert Neely, Capt. and
Mrs. Hector M. Grant, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur F. Howard. Capt. and
Mrs. Gprdon F. Karlger, Mr. and
Mrs. R. H. Koperskl. Mr. and Mrs.'
8tanley Kldd, Mr. and Mrs. C. L.
Llndgren, Mr. and Mrs. J. E.
Noonan. Mr. and Mrs. E. B. O'-
Brien, Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Orvls. Mr.
and Mrs. E. C. Or and their
Mr. James Davidson of
en by a 16-year-old youth. lection on display at the Smith-
When the machine was recov- sonian Institution,
ered, Sandbergh hardly recog-' The totem pole, called the
nlzed it. It had a snappy two- ."Yermerlindl," is eight feet high
tone paint Job and was equipped: a"d made from a bundle of sap-
wlth numerous flashy accessor- lings covered by paper bark. The
ies. In addition, some dents In oark is coated with human blood
the fenders had been ironed out, which acts as an adhesive to glue
the oil was changed and new an- " outer covering of wild bush
ti-freeze had been put ln. The cotton to the pole. On top is a
Improvements cost the thief plume of emu feathers that rep-
about $200. resents the head of a sacred py-
8andbergh figures if the youth thon.
had kept the car a bit longer he1 The 'Yermerlindl" and tha
might have had the engine over- other objects in the collection
hauled. were gathered by an internation-
al expedition to Arnheim Land
Asleep At Switch
WICHITA, Kan. (UP) BUI J.
Brown dozed off while waiting
for his wife to have a baby at St.
John's Hospital. He was sitting in
an open window and fell two
on the northern coast of Austra-
lia
stories. Mrs. Brown gave birth to
a daughter. Brown was treated
for back injuries.
Bingo Tonight At Legion Club
Bingo will be played tonight at
basMdroY PMumato" Ecuador, I0,'" the American Legion Club!
is a recent arrival ln Panama, |t Fort Amador A door prize and
where he is visiting with rent- H> Jackpot are special ac-
tives.
Inter-American Press
Association Entertained
The board of directors of the
IntJer-Amerlcah Press Associa-
tion were the guests of honor
last evening at a cocktail buffet
given by Mr. and Mrs. Jules Du-
bois at their home on the Sa-
banas.
Mr. And Mrs. Knox
Entertained
tractions.
Members and their guests are
invited to attend, and are re-
minded that arrangements have
been made with the bus drivers
to take players directly to the
club on request.
Beta Sigma Phi T Meet
Alpha chapter of Beta Sigma
Phi will hold Its regular meeting
Tuesday evening at the sorority
house in Cumndu.
Mrs. J. A. Knox of Pedro Ml- Altar Guild Te Meet Tomorrow
guel. who returned recently from The Altar Guild of the Cathe-
a vacation of four months spent
in the United States, was enter-
tained at dinner with her hus-
band, by Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Bryan at tberlr home.
Mrs. Davies
Returns To Santa Clara
Mrs. Maude Davies has return-
ed to her home ln Santa Clara
after having been hospitalized
for the past two weeks at Oorgas
Hospital.
Cathy Gray Is Five Years Old
Rev. and Mrs. Raymond Gray
of Gamboa entertained recently
at their home In honor of the
fifth birthday anniversary of
their daughter, Cathy. A large
group of Cathy's friends were
present to celebrate with her.
dral of St. Luke ln Ancon will
hold Its regular meeting tomor-
row evening at 7:30 ln Bishop
Morris Hall.
Mrs. Ryan Hostess At Coffee
Mrs. Virginia Huff was the
guest of honor on Thursday
morning at a coffee given by
Mrs. Vera Ryan at her home ln
with the Alpha Gamma Rho fra- Gamboa.
ternlty. Among those attending we're
SPECIAL SALE
FENDERS
~ for -
Studebakers
International Trucks,
Oldsmobiles, Packard Cars
- also -
a complete line of GENUINE
ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT.
Replacement parts for FORD,
CHEVROLET, PLYMOUTH,
DODGE
and other makes o cars.
PANAMA AUTO.
S. A.
Panam
Coln
Annual West Point Dinner.....
Held AtKobbe...............
The annual West Point dinner
was held Friday evening at the
Fort Kobbe Officers Club. The
affair was m celebration of the
115th anniversary of the found-
ing of the Academy.
Covers were laid for seventy*
Services This Week
SPIRITUAL REVIVAL CAMPAIGN
SERVICES: Friday 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 7:30 p.m.;
Sunday 10:45 a.m. ft 7:30 p.m.
Speaker. Friday A Saturday: Rev. W. H. Beeby, Pastor,
First Baptist Church, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Sermon subjects:
"The Fatal Follies of a Fortunate Fool"Luke l2:l-20.
"Christ's Message at His Second Coming"Solomon 2:1-17.
Speaker, Sunday services: Rev. Fred I.. Jones,
Missionary pastor, Atlantic Church.
Sunday Sermon subjects: i i
"Seven Reasons Why I Am a Baptist"
"A Campflre Meeting With Jesus"
The public cordially Invited to worship with us
in this series of week-end services.
THE ATLANTIC BAPTIST CHURCH
olivar Ave. at 12th St. Cristobal. Canal Zone
Rubelll. Mr. and Mrs. Frank L.
8cott. Capt. and Mrs. LA. Skeels,
Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Stephenson.
Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Turner. Mr.
and Mrs. A. G. Turner, Mr. and
Mrs. R. o. Theriault, Capt. and
Mrs. c. S. Townshend, Mr. and
Mrs. H. I. Tlnnin, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Ullrich. Mr. and Mrs. R. R,
Wilson and Mr. and Mrs. W. L.
Wlllumsen.
Clayton Moore and Mrs. Gordon
Knight, who are leaving the
Isthmus.
The door prize was won by Mrs.
Horacio Locke.
The following officers were
elected: President, Mrs. Jack,
Hlpson; vice-president. Mrs.1
Charles Richardson; secretary,
Mrs. Antonio Quesada; and,
treasurer, Mrs. William Hawkins.
Members of the board of gov-'
ernors elected were Mrs. Myron;
Smith. Mrs. Joseph Demlco and;
Mrs. Orville Shaw. Corsages of
wood roses were presented the
Incoming officers.
Gifts of crystal compotes were
given Mrs. McCracken. Mrs. Ob-'
erg, Mrs. Humphries and Mrs.1
McBrlde.
There were a number of guests.
They lnoluded: Mrs. Gustav,
Bachrach, Mrs. Oeorge Rizos,
Mrs. R. Wilson, Mrs. B. Muse,
Mrs. F. E.YJarr, Mrs. W. A. Jones,
Mrs. 8. Kardonsly. of New York,
guest of Mrs. Zllklns, and Mrs. R.,
Herman Wouk
THE CRUEL SEA
Nicholas Monsarrat.
MELVILLE GOODWIN. USA |
John P. Marquand.
THE PRESIDENT S LADY
Irving Stone.
MOSES .^ Am.
Sholem Asch.
Non-Fiction
THE SEA AROUlfD UB "
Rachel L- Carson
THE NEW YORKER TWEN-
TY-FIFTH ANNIVDMAH*
ALBUM
A MAN CALLED PETtR
Catherine Marshall.
SHOW BIZ
Abel Green and Joe Laurie,
Jr- ~2
THE GREATEST BOOK EVE
WRITTEN
Fulton Oursler.
Those Invited from th. PaM - Theriault, guest of Mrs. Patrl-
U|clo. Sixty members were present.
flc side were Mr. and Mrs. E. I.
Askew, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W.
Smith Of Diablo, Mr, and Mrs. E.
E. Pihlgren. Mr, and Mrs. A. R.
Minor and capt. and Mrs. Macon
A. Turner.
Birthday Dinner Party
Cant, and Mrs. Daniel Drlscoll
of Fort Sherman entertained
with a buffet supper at their
home Friday evening to compli-
ment Capt. Wayne Cecil on his
birthday anniversary.
An Italian motif was used on
the buffet table, which was cov-
ered with a red and white
checkered cloth and centered
with multi-colored tapers ln bot-
tle holders.
The guests included Capt. and
Major and Mrs. Hamon
Leaving Soon
Major E. L. Hamon, USMC. and
Mrs. Hamon will be leaving early'
ln April for duty ln Quantico,
Virginia.
They will visit relatives in
Longvlew, Texas, and Grayson,
Kentucky, before going to their
station.
PAA Official Visiting
In Colin
Mr. Jos Soto, regional cargo
supervisor of the Pan American
Airways, arrived last Monday',
night from Brownsville. Texas.
Mr. Soto will be on the Isth-
mus for a week or more. He Is;
Mrs. cScii; LieutCol. and' Mri laving at the Hotel Washing-
Donald G. 8aurman. Capt. and ton-
Mrs. Howard Duffleld, Capt. and
Mrs. Paul F. Davis, Lieut, and
Mrs. William Healy and Mrs. Don
Blaine.
Railroaders Learn
In Cellar School
MEDFORD. Mass.. March (UP)
A school for railroad engineers,
possibly the only one of its kind
in the world, holds forth in the
cellar of a Medford home.
The schoolmaster Is 72-year-
old Charles H. Evans who learn-
ed his profession during 40 years
with the Boston & Maine before
retiring ln 1945. He figures that
since 1915, when he began teach-
ing, he has helped about 500 en-
gineers pass their state and fed-
eral examinations.
His one-room basement class-
room is equipped with a library
of 300 books and pamphlets, a
complete line of railroad equip-
ment supplied by manufactur-
ers, and two blackboards.
To OUR FRIENDS and CLIENTS
of the Atlantic Side
We are pleased to announce our
appointment as Sub-Dealer*
for the HILLMAN-MINX
(Delivery within a few days)
colon motors; inc.
(Dodge & De Soto)
10th Street and 15th St A Melendez
Dr. and 'Mrs. Miller To Address
Margarita Fellowship
Dr. and Mrs. J. Qulnter Miller.
' who were to arrive today from
Ruff Mr at M.mni ni, i Npw York are scheduled to ad-
XffeTCuppe, was *7v?n bv " meetln* of the Margarita
Mr; u i MrsTj fl.a a^elr.Men's Fellowship tomorrow eye-
home in Mount Hope last night, ^at the Margarita Clubhouse.
it Is hoped that a large number
of Atlantic side couples will take
this opportunity to hear Dr. Mil-
Special Cotillion Club
Members of the board of di-
rectors and all other members of I
the Cotillion Club are urged to!
attend a special meeting to be
held tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. inj
the hotel lobby.
A number of important Items)
will be discussed.
Play Trvout in Gatun
Tryouts will be held at the Ga-
tun Clubhouse tomorrow at 7
run. by the Gatun Civic Theater,
for the my3tery farce, "Murder
In Rehearsal.''
Anyone Interested In Little
Theater activities is cordially in-
vited to attend.
Visiting In Cumndu
Mr. and Merrill Webster and
their son were the week end
guests of Mr. Webster's brother
and family. Mr. and Mrs. J. B.
Webster of Curundu.
Today the members of the
family will have a barbecue at
the Webster residence. They will,
be Joined by Mrs. Webster's bro-
ther and family. Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Blades of Diablo.
PACIFIC-ARGENTINE-BRAZIl UNE
Charity Bingo at Coco Solo
There will be a charity bingo
sponsored by the C.P.O. Wives'
Club, tomorrow night at 8 o'clock
at the C.P.O. Club.
The grand prize will be a
Westlnghouse electric roaster.
Jill
Oil
Enjoy a versatile hair-do
created expressly for yeu
by our expert stylists.
COLD WAVE
Special 70
2-1122
DIABLO HTS.
BEAUTY SHOP
(formerly Aneen Beauty Shop)
LOUISE HARTMAN, Manager
CALL FOR
APPOINTMENT
TODAYJ
A TAIIOT, INC.
ANNOUNCES
For th information of
i
Importers in the Republic of Panam and the
Canal Zone the expected arrival of
Cargo from Pacific Coast Ports on Board the
"P&T FORESTER"
AT BALBOA, MARCH 26th, 1952
._
This vtssel will accept cargo for tha following ports:
CURACAO, PUERTO CABELLO, LA QUAIRA, TRINIDAD,
RIO DE JANEIRO, SANTOS, AND BUENOS .AIRES
GnUck Ladies Club
Elects Officers
A springtime motif was used
at the luncheon meeting of the
Fort Qulick Ladles Club Wednes-
day, when they met at the Offi-
cers Club. Pastel cloths covered
the Individual tables, which were
centered with miniatura ox-carts
filled with spring blossoms.
The hostesses were the mem-
La Importadora Selecta
COLON, R. P.
Bolvar Ave. #7081 between 7th and 8th Strsete
Telephone 271-L
Is pleaded to announce the opening of their
establish ment where they have a big and as-
sorted lock of shocmaking articles and up-
holstering materials in plastic and nylon
for the benefit of customers on the Atlantic
side, especially Canal Zone residents who
we inform that our prices are lower than
the Commissary prices for similar mate-
rials. You are eordiallv invited to visit our
store.

Mf. Andrews A Company
BALBOA
Pheae t-UM
CRISTOBAL
Phsns S.I1II
CHARLES
IS HERE!
Created Especially
for You...
The latest COIFFURES!
i TINTS PERMANENTE
"BRENDA'S
for Beauty"
Tivoli Hotel
Tel. Balboa SS77
TRADE IN YOUR OLD SET
For This New
RCA VICTOR
COMPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
JV
MONTHLY 7.50 MONTHLY
LIBERAL ALLOWANCE
CLUB 1.25 WEEKLY
[
FREE ANTENNA
RADIO CENTER
7110 Bolivar COLON 40
j


r*or 81*
STA-
TUE TODAY AMERICAN
" '
SIMMY, MARCH 23, 1958
5*You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!

y f ere your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices i. No. 57 "H" Street Panama
INe. 12,17<> Central Ave. Colon
Lewis Service
*4 Tivoli Ave.Phone 2-2281, and
Morri sou's
If- Fourth of July Ave Phone 2-9441
I
Saln de Belleza Americano
#55 West 12th Street
Cariton Drug Store
10,059 Melendez Ave.Phone 255 Coln
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones Propaganda, S.A.
#3 Lottery Plaza Phone 2-3199 "H" Street corner Estudiante St.
Phones 2-2214 and 2-2798
$0*
Minimum for 12 words.
3c. each additional word.
hurch
FOR SALE
\utnnibil*>
: FOR SALE
> Household______
F&R'' SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
ator 9 cu. ft., mahogany chiffonier,
vacuum cleaner and other items.
..Phone Cristobal 3-1852.
FCw SALE: Refrigerator Westmg-
_huse, 9 cu. ft. in service, two and
o half yecrs. Dining chairs, kitchen
,t*le enamel top. 0777 William-
son Place. Phone 2-3356.
ALt' PORCELAIN REFRIGERATOR; j Next door to 7he"Fres'toneBuilding
TJPiit recently rebuilt. Either 25 or, olio through your outo dealer
0cycles. Price SI00. Phone Gom- We sove you money on
(MISCELLANEOUS RESORTS
Service Personnel and Civilian
Government Employe
be safe
for your Automobile Financing
Insist en
Government Employes Finance Co.
of
Fort Worth, Texas
new office at
No. 43 Automobile Row
hop 6-322.
FOR SALE: Diningroom set oak,
good condition. Call Sunday 2-3520
Diablo,
'-Position Ottered
Bl'inguol Ponomonlon with business
'd6illfy. Write apartado 1890,
Panama, stating age. educotion,
experience and starting sa'ary de-
sired,
Financing and lnsurcr.ee
also direct loans on automobiles
AGENCY OEHLINGER
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
Do Writ. AlcohoHr* immtnmm
a toil *. c. r
GIRLS! How's your Eoster bonnet go-
ing to look perched on those strag-
gly locks? Run don't walk
to the Genell Bliss Cocoli Beauty
Shop. 4-557.
FOR SALE
Miscelluneou*
FOR SALE:1949 RCA Victor Con-
sole 160 cyclel with n*w VM 3-
Pfclrtiea. Oooonsfde cottage. Santa
Clara Bo 435 Balboa Phot*
Ponamo 3-187/. Cristobal 3-1673
Williom Sonto Ciara Booch Cottoget.
Two bedroom Frigidairei. Rock-
gcj rango Balboa 2-3050.
Gromlich's Santa Clara beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gat
stoves, moderate ratos.' Phono 6,
4*11 or 4-567.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR RENT
House*
speed record changer in good con-; cnD dcmt. r-uli T- T~ "r L
ditlon. Also "Penfielri" ST. F0?.?!1l-Chlet in Los Cumbres.
WANTED: Experienced Stateside
Beauty Operator. Genell Bliss, Co-
coli Beauty Shop, 4-557.
WANTED Amaricen woman with exe-
cutive ability capable of monafing
tonl (tore, handling employes
'ltd meeting, the general public
Excellent opportunity with chance
far advancement unlimtied. State
experience, oge end salary ex-
pected. Write Aportado 1833.
- Panam.
Agencias Cosmos. Automobile Row
29. will solve your Auto buying or
selling Problem. Tel. Panoma 2-
4721. Open oil day on Saturdays,
"used cars
Trade Your Old Cor
Per A Batter Ona
. Large Selection Of Mokes
and Models
All Reconditioned Like New!
CIVA. S. A.
Your Pontiac-Codillac Dealer
Panama Tel. 2-0870
FCR SrET^BTi"ck^l9507~black se-
donette, dynoflow, rodio, nylon
covers, excellent condition, duty
W-"NTED: Bookkeeper, mole, ot
least 5 years experience, bilingua
for construction company. Write
Y: 2036. Ancon. C. Z.
W>.TED:EnglUh-SpTrh steno-
grapher. Write Box 722 Pcnoma.
_ & ymq references and expsrience.j
WANTED: s7le*mon. lory"od'
commission. Write Box 722 Pn-i
_ amo, giving references.
fOlTSALfc-
Reitl Estufe
free. Call Cristobal 3-1547 even-
ings.
DODGE TRUCK? ll-2 Ton. in prac-
fically NEW condition Has Power
Take-Off; good tires; two spare
wheels and tires. An excellent buy
at $750. Phone Gamboa 6-322.
FOR SALE:Pontiac. Hydramafic. 4
door, perfect condition. 1949 mo-
del but out 1950. Bel cash offer
tokes it. 46th Street. No. 32. Pan-
oma.
dition. Also "Penfield" "as water
heater. 20 gal. capacity. Can be
seen at "El Cangrejo" Calle "C".
No. 53. Moduro family, offer 6.00
p. m.
FOR SALENew Stotes dresses. Pink
net and taffeta formal, size 15
Light blue and aquo washable
short dresses, sire 14. Bargains
Tel. 2-1353.
SI00.00 per month, tlnfurnithed.
on two years contract. Write for
appointment to Box C. C Box 134
Panama.
tOK RENT
Apartments
1
We have everything
to keep vour Lawn
and (larden beautiful
dnring the dry season.
JhW
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow
Insecticide
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
79 Central Are. Tel. 3-8140
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished oporf-
Mother.. JUMPING-JACK Children " ^",e *"u'"'s" <<*>"
shoes niv. ,, f... th. .ii.. "*"**._.*****"" P"">- Con-
shoes give young feet the right
start, from cradle to 4 years, sold
exclusively at BABYLANDIA. No
40. 44th Street, Bella Vista. Tel
3-1259.
FOR SALE: Cottages, completely
furnished. Sonto Cloro Beach.
Terms available, for Information
Phone 6-441.
FOR SALE:Angels, crosses, head
stone, ond all monuments, for
Coroza I ond Mount Hope: New
reduced prices, call MARMOLE-i-
toct office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobal, telephone '386 Colon.
FOR RENT:Small furnished apart-
ment, suitable for English speoking
couple. 7036, 4th ond Melender,
Colon.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29th 8t.
RIA. phone 2-2656. Ponoma.
FOR SALE: 6 weeks Old Puppy
wirehoired Fox Terrier, mother.
Tel. Panoma 3-4491, Panama.
FOR SALE:Chalet .in Los Cumbres,
m-lutflng additional half lot. Re-
quired S2.000.00 down ond os-
'sume mortgage. For appointment
- "IfC C. Box 134,_Panomo.
FOR SALE:All concrete hou~:eTo}
four apartments, Rents at $30-
00 apartment. Good residential dis-
trart in Cclon. No' intermediaries
P>'ce $10,000.00. D. J. Phill.ps
ok 'I 107, Cristobal.
1952 PONTIAC CARS
Now Available Far
IMMIDIATE DIR8CT SHIPMENT
To The Canal Zana
Why Buy Off-The-Floor
And Pay Mara?
See Year Pontiac eDaler Today!
CIVA, S. A.
Cadillac -GMCPontioc
FOR SAL:1950 Chevrolet I Ton
Panel Delivery Truck. Used 10
months, like new. Tel. 2-2777.
Molino' Ferreinol. Colle Monteteriri
Nq. 10.
FOR SALE: One English .Raglon
overcoat, one 3-piece suit stotes
weight, both new. Apply ot YMCA.
Tailor Shop. Cristobal.
FOR SALE: Electric Sewing Ma-
chirie. 25 or 60 cycle. 5615-C,
Diablo.
FOR RENT:Apartment, two-bed-
rooms, parlor, kitchen and bath in 1
4-apartment house. El Coco, neor
the ocean; unfurnished. $30.00 a
month. Call Williams at 3-3308.
Panama.
J-------
FOR RENT: Furnished two room
apartment available April 1st. Tele-
phone 3-2051.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
LEARN!!
Ballroom
Dancing;
At Its Best!
Balboa 'V or
write box IM
Balboa
Harnett ft Dunn
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE
Motorevcle
%,
u
a & .
::-
v fl'tSW
FOR SALE:I95 Triumph 500 c.c
Speed-twin, $575.00 mileage 6500.
Also black motorcycle Jacket size
714n5P?0BC' !58 r See r0R SALE^-Tvvo BooT
FOR SALE:One boat 14'5' beam V
3-8 bottom" 1-4" sides plywood,
trailer and hitch. 5 h.p. John:on,
inspected and licensed for four
people. All equipment, good condi-
tion $290.00. 8201-0. 6th. St.
Margarita, Cristobal 3-2407.
FOR SALTTTHP motors. 25~ond
60 cycles $10.00. 2 H. P. 60 Cycle
S40.00; 3 HP 25 cycle $40.00; 5
HP 60 cycle, 3 Dhase $40.00
'445-A Bolboo 2-3630.
FOR RENT: Commerciil space
suitable for store or office, Jose
Feo. de la Ossa Ave. No. 36. Tel
3-3404.
FOR RENT
Rooms
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panam
Selling: Cement and Abattoir.
Buying;: Brewery.
Tel. 3-4718 8-1660
Leader Arrives Here *** "J*
To Visif CZ Union Churches ShaPt 0< Worid
.KAMPALA. Uganda, March 21
(UP) Two American survey-
ors, Philip E. Hoffman of Balti-
more and Donald L. HIgglns of
Bedford. Ore., are engaged on
one of the most Important and
difficult survey projects hi the
world. '
They are surveying the last
link In the chain which will give
the accurate length of the Afri-
can continent.
The figures resulting from the
measurement bf this approxi-
mately 650-mile "gap" which
runs through mountain, bush
and swamp in the heart of the
bl" game area of Africa will en-
able all areas 0? Africa to organ-
ize their land measurement un-
der a -single system. It also will
give new information on the sire
arri shppe of the whole world.
The decision for the United
8tates government to undertake
this project was taken at the
meeting in Brussels last Julv of
the International Union of Geo-
desv and Geophysics.
American help was asked be-
cause of the urgent nature of the
work and the great difficulties
to be overcome.
The two Americans are now re-
connoiterlng the line of survey,
which runs alone the 30th me-
ridian of latitude. Their recon-
naissance, for wh'ch the United
States has voted $75 000.-should
be ended by mid-Aoril. but the
actual survey cannot start before
September. During the present
season the atmosphere over
northern Uganda, where the sur-
vey' begins. Is hizv with the
smoke of bush fires and no sight-
in" Is nossible. Later the rains
will make movement hi the pa-
pyrus-covered swamplands vir-
tually Impossible.
ASHLAND, Ala. (UP) Dr.
.Tosenh Wiley Jordan. 91. has
practiced medicine here for
I more than 61 years. He estimates
he has officiated at more than
4.500 births In the nearby area.
That's enough population for
three towns the ilze of Ash-
land.
t M
FOR RENT:In Bello Visto, large
niceiy furnished rooms. Kitchen
privileges. Mexico Avenue No. 69
neor 43rd St. Phone 3-0553
WANTED
MiscHl.inmM*
The Poefs' Corner
NEfjJYoiW, (UP) The WH-''*
flenstein Galleries that small
elegant palace in the silk stock-
ing; district of New York was COLTS IN SNOW
for half a century the bulwark tm,
W; those who cherished but the I Ijoble.past. The Wildensteins,Lk u u
these fine connoisseurs of past; rn"e,"as "wen snowfall, and the
c-eomries refused to recognize n iaky. colts
anything beyond post-impress- ,prance eingerly. hock-deep lh
loniwn. fluffy white:
Hulls, one
45 x 12' x 3' cne 33" x 10 1-2'
x 2'. Coll B. W. Forgeson. Home
Bblboo 2954 Office Bolboo 2462
See at Diablo 23 Mo/ch, 4 to 6
p. m.
WANTED:By April 15. 2-3 bed-
rooms, completely furnished, run-
ning hot water, in nice district, by
responsible North American couple
Phone 3-4629.
MODERN FURNITURE
cusroM 1111,1
Slipcover Reimhol.sterv
viarr otm sbow-*oomi
Alberto Bon*
LI "Li*"" Aoloajoottv Bow)
^*J^!5",* J rap Deliver
- T
Large Number of $2
-Mux Bills Planned
WASHINGTON. March 22 (UPi
The. tide of modernism grew Jian
tMdlly but the Wlldensteins did apprehension, as insthict-
oot budge. i ivelv
They seek each other's company
wide eyes roll caglly and nostrils The United States may be
headed for 2,000,000 worth of
trouble.
WANTED:By American family vri.
furnished house. 3 or 4 bedrooms,
spoclous garden if possible. Elvin
Seibert, American Embassy. Tele
phone 3-0010. Panama.
WANTED:Material" control suoer-
vlsor moil experience ond Qualifi-
cations record to Box O, Balboa.
*vA.r*Kl/!d 1930 thf Rockefellers
threw the weight of their influx
There Is
Refuge in numbers. They inves-
tigate
enef Into the balance, as spon- ^ tiRate
prs of the Museum of Modern lThe 1?,w whlte worId- 8majU
Art. Within one decade the con- whinnies fill the air;
temporary Parlslav masters and Snrlil questioning of older stock
their American adherents swept L .w,h ?eem
*7th Street. To take the strange phenomenon
in stride.
Under the sponsorship of the while "" tne colts "tare wonder-
Guggenheims. jome pione r_. ln8lv "Pon
dealers ventured Into the No- Tneir mall, safe barn-lot. which
Man's Land of art where the' just overnight
American vanguard blszed the Has been transformed to this
tl(' frriUp rfU^ ttrl.'. 1 Qma/inr. plral-it
amazing sight.
Billy B. Cooper
jew trails. The Whitney Museum'
lollowed and soon the Museum
f Modern Art. too. was standina
on the front-line of Americanism
Backed bv such forces, modem
Amjgcau an finallr Won b--oari
recdfhHfon. One after the other
the critics bowed. The eonnois-'
eurs nftched in. Snobs and pe-
culators did the rest.
Pro"(i- "dented and unvleld-
ln.*'^fJtne dPl ende" ot Alcazar,
the Wlldens'elns held out for the
l*th cMitun .
Than, on Feb 20. 1952 the flag
*** hauled down from the tow-
er of their distinguished palace
Its doott were onened for ani ex-
hibition of the 70 best Ameri-
can paintings done in this cen-
jtury." The show was selected bv
Mie best known New York critics.
It was a great night. Red-
.oUed gypsies plaved. Th
chaunpagne flowed. The Ameri-
can vanguard marched throueh
the gates. Surrounded bv his
taff. Rene d'Harnoncourt B feet
SVmch director of the Museum of I
Modern Art. stood among the
milling crowH like another Dan-
ton on Bastille Day.
The American exhibition was
on the first floor. On the main
floor. In a back room, the gallerv
put on a mall unannounced
how of its best French impress-
ionists
^was^the revenge of the Wll- HERCULES LUGGAGE MFG.
28 J. F. de la Ossa
At least, superstitious persons
and other enemies of the $2 bill
thlik so. An Antl-2 bill group
WANTED:Live snakes, boos, poT-
sonous .snakes and others. Toucans
Joguors, pumas, tapirs, etc. Top
pnces paid. House 239-B, phone
. 4-387, B.OXJ 6. Pedro Miguel.
Keys Lost In Shoe
Worn Through Day
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (UP) A
key left in an automobile lgni-
-. ti n a l a c
INSTANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(fortified with Vitamin D)
NuMilom
Non-fatten-
m
farm rrb
Flavor
On Sal* In P.C. Co. CommUurlos
Rev. Dr. and Mrs. J. Quinter
MiDer will arrive from New York
tonight at Tocumen Airport for
a visit of several weeks with the
Union Churches of the Canal
Zone.
While here Dr. Miller will
meet with the local council o
each Union Church and he and
Mrs. Miller will conduct confer-
ences with the laity on evan-
gelism, Christian education, the
ecumenical church and laymen's
responsibility in the Churches..
Miller Is administrative secre-
tary of the National Council of
the Churches of Christ in the
U.S.A. and has been a leader In
interchurch cooperation for 30
years.
The first week of their visit
will be spent with the Atlantic (
Side Churches. On Monday eve- :
ning Dr. Miller meets with the
Margarita Union Church Coun-
elL On Tuesday the Cristobal'
Union Church Council and on I
Thursday -with the Council oil
the Gatun Union Church.
I
On Tuesday at 3 p.m. he will
address the Spanish sneaking
ladies of the Cristobal Church
on the subject, "The Calling of1
the Church in Cristobal."
Two general conferences will
be held. The first on Wednesday
evening at the Cristobal Church !
Miller will speak on "The Ecu-
menical Church" and Mrs. Mil-
ler will speak on, "Teaching
Them to Observe All Things."
At the second conference on
Friday evening at the Margarita
Union Church Miller will speak
on "The Church's Evangelistic;'
Opoortunity Program Plans"'
anc Mrs. Miller's subject is an-,
nounced as, "The Laity Genius
of Protestantism."
Mrs. Miller also will speak to
the auxiliaries of the Atlantic
81de at a Joint meeting at the
Gatun Church on Thursday
: morning at 9 on "For Such a
j Day as This."
Next Sunday Dr. and Mrs.
Miller will fill the pulpits of the
Atlantic 8ide Union 'lurches at
morning and evening services.
Details of these services will be
announced later along with an
announcement of the Pacific
Side engagements.
In the afternoon at 2:30 they
will participate in the dedica-
tion of the new Union Church
building at Gamboa.

USED CARS Are Plentiful
"; -JMit-
Come In and See these bargains
1950 STUDEBAKER Champion, Black, 4
door, Radio .....................$1395.00
1950 FORD Custom, 4 door "6", Blue.... 1425.00
1950 FORD DtLuxe, 2 door "6" Gray..... 1350.00
1949 FORD DeLuxe, 4 door "V8" Maroon.. 1175.00
1949 FORD Custom, Club Coupe, "V8" Black 1150.00
1949 MERCURY, Club Coupe, tan........ 1375.00
1947 DODGE, 4 door, new upholstery...... 850.00
COLPAN MOTORS, INC
"Automobile Row"
16.000.000 more of" the note* t,
planned for the comlmr fiscal I?r.L0?V>f ?our <'ar d a police
year.
During a House appropriations
sub-committee hearing. Rep.
Benjamin F. James iR-Pa.) said
he had received only 10 of the
bills In 25 years and has kept
them all. He suggested it would
be cheaper to do away with the
$2 notes and save on engraving
plates, forms and records.
Mrs. Georgia Neese Clark,
treasurer of the United States.
came to the rescue of the bill
which bears the portrait of Tho-
mas Jefferson. She and Walter
L. Funk, budget chief in her of- a
fice, said the bill Is still in de- [listed sex and envy as the major
mand. especially In New England causes of ten-ape violators,
and that 33,742,133 bills re In A boy will steal an automobile
use. meaning onlv to date a girl
Although there are many more whose other boy friends romanc-
ed her in a car. he said. Event-
failed to block the printing of tinniirth ,8n au,m"*U* Rnl-
16.000,000 more of the not 'n,lwltP,h Ls an 00en invitation
for the coming ftecal '" LT^ ^ur rar
record for teen-aged boys and
girls.
Roy c. Nelms US. probationLf
officer, said "kids who wouldn't'
steal a pencil" 0ften find the
temptation ol a key In the Igni-
tion switch too great to resist.
He said more youths than ever
before are ending up behind b^rs
with stiff federal sentence? for,
violation of the Dyer Act by
transporting a stolen car across
state lines.
Nelms. whose job It Is to fur-
nish federal court with a detailed
past history of each person
brought in on a criminal charge.
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
- STONE CLINIC
7th St. & Justo Arosemena
Ave. . Coln Tel. 457
25 lo DISCOUNT
on CASH SALES:
Transportes Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
We pack*and crate or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
exceeding one billion $1 bills
in circulation, the $2 backers won
the dav after explaining it "just
costs half as much to issue one
$2 bill as it does two $1 bills:"
Helps You Overcome
FALSE TEETH
ually the youth will cross a state
line in the car.
Boys and girls sentenced here
for vlolntion of the Dyer Act
commonly are given three year
terms. Some get the maximum
penaltyfive years.
The veteran law enforcement
officer said the best way to com-
I nnc.noct nn>l W Looseness ond Worry aeed car thefts , for d|_
"...lanaar M annoyed or to. .!.-... m^ tQ remme ^ ^ ^
when he gets out of the car. re-
gardless of how long he plans to
be gone.
ALADDIN
KEROSENE MANTLE I.AMF
Burns 50 Hours on 1 Gal of
Ktrosent. U*s 9*' air ana
only 6', kerosene
SS.tS l.uvit.1 Prices
Distributor
WONG CHANG, S. A.
Colon: lh Si. Si H.,ii,a Ave
Tel. 30.1
Panam: S3 Central Ave
Tel. 2-2087
I?;"!: ''"* "* ,oou- wobbly false teeth
FASiEETH. an Improved alkaline (non-
scid' oower. eprlnkled on Tour elate
hold, them firmer o they feel more
comfortable Soothing and eoollna to
urn. made ore br excessive acid mouth
Avoid embarrassment causan by loose
Distes Oat rASTEETH today at any dru
store.
Paul Marnanyl
JShow Roo
im-
Tel. 2-1089"
LIVER TONIC
If a laij fiver cauaea you to
lurrrr from Indication, aaa, heart-
burn, constipation, headaches, bad
"lentil, diaiineas, bllloueneaa anil
;-iln blemishes, sjet HKIAT.tiN
,.r.oni ?our chemlat to da v.
HU.AI.ON Is a real tortte to Ihe
1 v-randmie.-in.s. let HIOAT.ON
">d*-r and feel Better tomorrow.
answer the call
60+
1952 RED CROSS FUND
Baritone, Pianist
To Perform
In Seawall Church
Anton Marco, baritone and
Ricardo Foolkes, two artists of
international fame, will be visit-
ing the Isthmus next week and1
during their stay local music I
lovers will have the opportunity
of hearing them In two per-
formances, scheduled to take,
place at the Seawall Methodist j
Church at 7:30 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday.
Marco is tb principal barl-;
lone ol the famous "San Car-
los" operatic company, the old-
est travelling opera company in
the world, and Ricardo Foolkes
has been solo pianist with lead-
ing symphony orchestras in the,'
U.tiled Stales and Europe.
STEEL
NAILS
ELECTRIC TUBES
TOILETS
ZINC
FIR-TEX

AGENCIAS GLOBALES
121 Va Espaa Tel. 3-1503
LH


INDAY, MARCH M, 1982
i i
*HB sTrtDAT AMERICAN
in

Robert Taylor Leads 200 Women! Private Life Of Jos Ferrer
On Adventurous Trek At Balboa dominated By Hidden Passion
OTETACTRK8S Vivian Leigh appears above in the role
whii-h won her the Motion Picture Academy's "Oscar" for best
E'rformance of 1851 in Warner Bros. "A Streetcar Named
wire," which will be shown at the Bella Vista Theater again
tomorrow night at 9 p.m. "Streetcar" did not cop the best
picture award but it swept the best supporting actor and
actress award for Kim Hunter and Karl Maiden. *
A tumultuous and rousing story
o the perilous trek of 2tj0 women
who leave Illinois and cross a
2000-mile stretch of 1850 pioneer
country to find homes and hus-
bands in a fertile California. val-
ley, is unfolded on the Balboa;
Theater screen In M-Q-M's grip-
ping and exciting "Westward the
'Women," starring Robert Taylor
and Denlse Darcel at the head of
a large cast.
Produced by Dore Schary and1
directed by William A. Wellman,:
who gave the screen the memor-!
able "Battleground." the new;
film Is equally realistic and;
down-to-earth in its vivid depic-!
tlon of the armv of girls who
leave the comforts and familiar-
ity of the East behind to start
their uncertain Journey to a new
life under the guidance of the
tough and experienced guide and
trail-blazer. Buck Wyatt (Robert
Taylor), and a group, of fifteen:
helpers.
Trouble beset* the group at the
very start when one of the men|
breaks the rule f non-fraterniz-
ing and .is shot by Buck, causing
some of the party to desert. But
the rest go on.
The women learn to drive their
; mule wagons, to shoot with ac-
curacy, to chop down trees, to
move boulders. They cross rivers,
mountain passes, streams and
desert.
They face stampedes, thirst,
duststorms, floods and Indian at-
tacks. The trek lends itself to In-
cidents both tragic and humor-
ous but when they finally reach
their destination, having shown
all the valor and stamina of men,
they become women again to
rush eagerly Into the arms of the
waiting California ranchers.
A wide variety of types are
represented in the characters
making the adventurous trek in
"Westward the Women" and they
are ably played by a hand-picked
cast. Robert Taylor is perfectly
cast as the rugged, quick-trig-
gered Indian scout who is afraid
of no man but sometimes finds
himself outnumbered and out-
witted by the spirited and out-
spoken ladles under his com-l _;__(, __
mDenlse Darcel, remembered as!. BURBANK. Calif., March 22' "It's easy to be kind and
the provocative French girl of Women have taught him to mind thoughtful to everyone," he com-
Battleground," has another bit-1 hi business, 8teve Cochran de-; merited. "That's the most impor-
ing role as Fifi Danon, a Chica- clares. But don't get him wrong, tant lesson I've learned from all
* He's speaking of the professional my glamorous teachers!"
life and times of 8teve Cochran.
"I've learned *. lesson from ev-
ery actTess with whom I've work-
20th Century's Controversial Tale
Of Rommel Comes To Lux On Thursday
With Ferrer it was not a wom-
an. It was art.
The fact Is that the successful
actor, director and producer
wanted all his life to be a paint-
er.
He has drawn since his early
youth. He has made a few bril-
liant tries in painting, too. His
other great gifts pulled him to-
ward the stage, however. -
In his hectic life, split up be-
tween Broadway and Hollywood,
Ferrer does not have the leisure
to set up.his easel. He Is lucky if
he has time to do a few furtive
pencil sketches. He did. however,,
In recent years two full size self-i
portraits.
His friend, the photographer
Alfredo Valente, knew about
them. When the New School for
Social Research organised the
dther day an exhibition of self-
portraits by some 30 well known
artists,- Valente succeeded In In-
ducing Ferrer to show one of his
self-portraits.
The artists were so thrilled by
the presence of the work of such
a distinguished amateur that
they asked Ferrer to inaugurate
the show with a little speech.
The actor-artist came and told
about his secret dream and how
he has been yearning to be an
artist all the time.
"I am still a bobby-soxer when
It comes to famous artists," he
said. "Whenever I see one of
them, I follow him in the street.
Everybody who has seen Jos* I watch how he walks and talks
Ferrer acting Cyrano de Berge-'and what he wears. Art Is my
rac knows that Cyrano's life was; unhappy love."
dominated by a great hidden He was overcome with emotion.
passion. i There was still a nostalgic gleam
i In his eyes when somewhat later
Nobody knew, however, until he drove off toward the brilliant
recently, that the private life of lights of Broadway, which beck-
Ferrer was dominated by a se- oned from far through the night
cret love. like uncounted beacons of fame.
'BOGIE' BEST His perform-
ance In United Artists' "The
African Queen" earned Hum-
phrey Bogart (above) the 1951
'Oscar'' for beat actor honors
at the P a n t a g e s Theater
Thursday night. Bogle, who
still thinks "Oscars" are a lot
of nonsense, graciously accept-
ed the award but said "the on-
ly honest way would be to let
everybody play "Hamlet."
NEW YORK, March 22 (UP!-
Women Teach Sfeve Cochran
About Minding His Business
BEST SUPPORTING ACTORS Kim Hunter won an "Oscar"
Thursday night for her excellent performance as Vivien Leigh's
sister in "A Streetcar Named Desire." Karl Maiden, who play-
ed the role of Miss Leigh's bashful swain in the same picture,
also earned an "Oscar" for his fine portrayal.
_ Ji-
go show girl of dubious past, who
sets her mark on Buck from.the
very start. Hope Emerson chalks
up much of the picture's humor
as the hefty and good-natured
widow of a New England sea cap-
tain, who gives an unexpected
saltv twang to the party. John
Mclntlre is persuasive as the
California rancher, who has In-
spired the trek.
Others who stand out In a cast
of more than 200, are Julie Bish-
op as Flfi's close friend, Beverly
Dennis as a young school teach-
er, Marilyn Brsklne and Lenore
Lonergan, as two ladles who start
a no-holds-barred battle, Rena-
ta Vannl as the tragic Mrs. Mor-
oni. Bruce Cowling as "Cat,' and
diminutive Henry Nakamura,
who scored a comedy hit as the
undersized Nisei in "Oo For
Broke I'' and who again steals
many of the laughs in the new
f>lcture as the cheerful and loyal
to. |
Ladles, take a bowl
HOTELES INTERAMERICANOS, S.A.
(INTERAMERICAN HOTEL CORPORATION)
The shareholders of Hoteles Interamercanos, S.A.
are hereby notified that a Special Meeting; of share-
holders of the company will be held on Friday, April
4, 1952, at two-thirty in the afternoon in the Saln
Panamericano of the HOTEL EL PANAMA in Panam
City, Panam, for the following; purposes:
a. Modify Article eight of the Article* of Incor-
poration;
b. Modify Article nine of the Articles of Incor-
poration;
c. Modify Article eleven of tht by-law;
d. Approve auditors' statement;
e. Consider any other matter properly brought
before the meeting;
Elect Directors.
f.
Panam, March 21, 1952.
ROBERTO EISENMANN
President
On The Records
NEW YORK. March 22 (UP)
Bob Crosby's Bobcats have dust-
ed off some of their wonderful"
arrangements of the 1930s and
recorded one of the best Dixie-
land albums in recent years for
Capitol. Clarinetist Matty Mat-
lock, tenor saxlst Eddie Miller,
trumpeter Charlie Teagarden
and pianist Stan Wrlghtsman, a-
mong others, are featured tn
such all-time favorites as "Fid-
gety Feet," "Magnolia 8treet
Parade" and "Bluhv the Blues."
A Thrilling Adeventure That Sweep* The Burn-
ing Sand* of The African De*ert...l
- S U N D o w n
with Gene Tlerney George Sanders
Alto: An Amazing Drama Filmed In The, Heart
of Bengal Jungle...!
________"BEYOND BENGAL"
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Conditioned
~A COLOSSAL DOUBLE!
Ann Myth Davrtl rarrar. In
"THE GOLDEN HORDE"
(In Technicolor
e
Linda Darn til Stephen
MoNatly. in
"THELADY PAYS OFF"
aHB>SBSBa*MBSk*aSBaftaaaaaBl
i
TiVOLI THEATRE
Kirk Douglas. In
"BIG CARNIVAL"
John Barrymore. Jr., in
-QUEBEC
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A Great Double Program I
Jon Hall Mary Casll*. 'in
WHEN THE REDSKINS
RODE"

SdmorKj O'Brien
Elizabeth Scott, in
"TWO OF A KIND"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Randolph Scott, In
"TEXAS 1I7S
Ruth Roman, tn
"STRANGERS on a TRAIN"
ed," said the handsome star who
Is currently" putting all thls
knowledge to work In Warner
Bros.' color drama, "The Lion
and The Horse."
Constance Bennett. Mae West,'
Doris Day. Joan Crawford and;
Ruth Roman are only a few whoi
have contributed to the know-|
how of Coehran's acting range, j
From Miss Bennett, whom he i
appeared opposite on the stage a
few years back for. the Theater
Guild' In 'Without. Love," he
learned to take care of himself,
to be observant ot what others
were doing In a scene and to
deal with them technically.
"It was she," he. explained,
"who advised me for the sake of
my future to get a pair of eyes In
the back of my own head II I
were to hold my own against the
so-called 'busy' actors who try
foul rather than fair means to
dominate a scene.".
From Doris Day, with whom he.
starred in Warner Bros.' "Storm
Warning." he learned to have a
sense of humOr about the small,
Irritating details that come up
In a day's work. .
"Doris has a wonderful sense
of fun," he said. "When some-
thing goes wrong, shes the first
to make light of those tiny mis-
haps so tney never expand in
* Mae West, Cochran believes, Is
the finest exponent of timing.
"I never ceased to marvel at
the brilliant rhythm of her per-
formance all the while I was
with her In New York arid on the
road In Diamond LH, he said.
Joan Crawford, with whom
appeared in
It's Movietime TODAY!.
m
anana
(^anal cJhcaiers
I
DIABLO HTS. 2:30- 6:15- 8:15
Jame* STEWART Marlene DIETRICH
"NO HIGHWAY IN THE SKY"
\RMS"
COCOLI 2:30 6:15 :70
June ALLVSON Van JOHNSON
"TOO YOUNG TO KISS"
Men

CIRCLE

ANGER'
]
PEDRO MIGUEL
7:00
"MA AND TA KETTLE BACK ON
THE PABM"
GAMBOA ?a00
Tyrone POWER Ann BLTTH
"I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU"

nntin "QUEBEC
I
Air'Conditioned
2:00 4:10 6.20 8:30
Also Showing Monday!
BALBOA
200 HUSBAND HUNGRY WOMEN
CROSS WILDERNESS FOR ROMANCE!
M-G M pre
For square dancers. Capitol has
brought out six singles by Paul Cochran appeared in i n e
Phillips with the Oklahoma: Damned Don't^ Cry^MM epi
Ranch Hands and Herb Qregger-
son with Slim and his Country
Cousins. Some are width calls;
WESTWARD THM WOMEN
tome of extreme generosity
"Joan is with you so thorough-
ly In a scene that her reactions
build your performance and spur
you on," he explained. "Illdon't
think she could be artistically
selfish Is she tried."
As for Ruth Roman, who was
his co-star in Warners' "Tomor-
Sw Is Another Day," Cochran
irned to admire her fortrtght-
"She has complete honesty
about herself and takes criticism I
and advice, profiting from both,
he said. "I lfice Ruth because she
is so very definite."
And from all these ladles,
\ Cochran has learned to apprecl,-
some without. For the benefit of
the uninitiated, the calls are
printed on the back of the rec-
ord envelopes.
Nat (King) .Cole bows In this
week with a sure-fire Juke-box
hit lust In time for the Easter
trade, "Easter Sunday Morning"
(Capitol)___ Novelty honors of
the week go to Louis Jordan's
bawlln' and brawlln' "Louisville
Lodge Meeting," with "Work, Ba-
by, Work" on the reverse side
(Decca)___
Tommv Tucker's orchestra and; ate people.
| vocalist Karen Rich offer one of I--------------------------------
the Mat arrangements yet of PA||inkfl SidllS
"Baby Doll." hit tune from the V.OIUI1117IU Jiy
new Fred Astalre movie. "The
Belle of New York." while the
backing is "With No One to Love
Tonight" (M-G-M) .... Dean
Martin does a smooth Job on
"When You're Smiling" and "All
I Have to Give You" (Capitol)...
De Paur'a stlrrlne Infantry
chorus, late of the 372nd Infan-
try Regiment, contributes rous-
ing versions of "Eight Davs In a
Week" and "The Continental
Soldiers" on ColumbiaLe
Icampapnons de la Chanson, a,-;
, group of former French under- "KindI Lady and ro-stonal with
grounders who have sune their J?/""1,?' "J1* '",', .Ptar test
.a,, tn way to fame in both Euroneand New y . Columb!a .
!the TJ.8-. offer Sweet Mane i ... M Arnow to be
%"? "&e %**!*" and an0th" brought to" oriywo* for roles
Columbia single.... in the film
. Mf EuM?;yp 'iarr,s wlth* mt: He will be seen as the British
in* "What's the Reason and inspector of Police in Trinidad.
|"Oh. to Be Young Again" on Cap- .-------------------------------------------
itol, singing an obbllgato as well months has 14-year-old jlve-
"The Desert Fox," Twenflei
Century-Fox's dramatic sterjr i
the man who defied Hitler, ft!
Marshal Erwln Rommel, starri
James Mason in the tltle''ro
will have Its local premier
Thursday at the Lux Theater.
Based on the best-selling bloe>{
raphy "RommelThe Desjsjf
Fox" by Brigadier Des'nrvM
Young, which won wide acetaba
In Europe and the United state
during he past year, the Nun
nally Johnson screen play trace
the career of the comrnfftttfl
general of the Afrlka Korpf wS
became a legend In his own life-
time, a man whose exploits' o
the field of battle captured thf
Imagination- of the entire work*
friend and foe alike.
Here is the adventurous ac-
count of the fabulous Desert,Fm
who chased his hunters back and
forth across North Africa as on
en as they chased him, the wiley-
Fox whose tricks and turns mad
even the British Tommies chut*
kle.
It Is also the story of a
who forfeited his life In a plot
assassinate Hitler and In doc-
mentlng his story Twentieth .
Century-Fox pulls the curtain"
aside on the corruption and) Hi -
pliclty of the entire Nazi feflme.
"The Desert Fox" is expected'
to take its place with the great
screen dramas which speak, s-
quently against totalitarianism,
military conquest and tyranny
over the minds of men.
The film's director Henry"
Hathaway, traveled to Germany
and France for special ort-the-
scenes footage and then under-/
took the biggest project oPrniT
career when he went on location
at Borrego Springs. California, to
recreate the famous batN at El
Alamein in all Its fury.
For his role In "The Desert
Fox," the usually suave Mason
sheds his well-kept locks for-*
military style haircut whlelvjie
Rood-naturedly regards as a
possible opening for an entire!/
new film career..
The English actor, star ot such
noted films as "The Seventh
Veil.'' "Odd Man Out" and th
current "Pandora and the Flyr
ing Dutchman" was awarded a
seven-year contract with Twen-
tleth Century-Fox at the con ston of his performance as Rom-
mel.
For Mason's supporting play-"
era. Nunnally Johnson, who also
produced "The Desert Fox." as-
sembled one of the most talented
casts on record, headed by Ced-
rlc Hardwicke, Jessica Tandy, i
who won plaudits on Broadway
in "A Streetcar Named Do .lire."
Luther Adler, Everett Sloanr. Leo
O. Carroll, George Macready,
Richard Boone and Edward
| Franz.
Johnson also persuaded author
Desmond Young, who taught
Rommel in North Africa and lat-
er was taken prisoner, to pir
himself In addition to narrating
the film. ____j
Short Subjects Job
To Take Cameramen
Around The World
NY Stage Actor
For 'Police' Role
Torln Thatcher. New York
Stage actor, has been signed by
Columbia for one of the two'
principal supporting roles in
'Affair in Trinidad," the Rita
Hay worth-Glenn Ford starring
picture which Vincent Sherman
b directing.
Thatcher, who played the lead
opposite Katherinc Cornell m

BURBANK. Calif., March 2J-
Warner Bros.' camera crews tfln
circle the lobe to film the ihofl-
subjects production schedule for ,
1952-33, it was revealed bv Jacf
L. Warner In announcln-r a nrj
gram of 43 pictures, the .
number as last year.
Among the shorts to be film*-
ed In color In widely scattered
portions of the world are: "Thar
She Blows." story of the whailrt*
industry in the Antarctic; *'Ct)h5
tinenta! Holiday." an alrplan
trip around the world: "AJorul _B
The Mediterranean." which win
be photographed in the palMcear-
hot spots of the Near East: "JaP- i
an Today," to be filmed In that
country; "Tahiti Passage," wbteB
will be photographed in the ro-
mantic spot; and a series, fltv*
sports shorts to be filmed in Ita-
ly. France and Spain.
Included In the varied en
tainment program are: elg
two-reel color shorts; 10
Parades, seven novelty comed
six two-reel black and Whit
shorts; she band musicals, ant,
, six "Joe McDoakes" comedfii
1 featuring George O'HanJcW:
LITTLE LIT.
Martinand Lewis
"1
holl y wood's jnttes.
A few woman throw themselves
away, but most of them tak
pretty coraful aim.__________*"'*'
COMEDY
as the lyric on the latter Jo
Stafford adds to her laurels with
a lovely version of "Heaven
Drops Her Curtain Down." with
"Ay-round the Corner" on the
ster Tonl Harper on "Don't
Send Me Home" and "Blacksmith
Blues" (Columbia) .. Manto-
vani's English orchestra dresses
up "Dancing With Tears In My
reverse side (Columbia).... Har- !Eyes" and "Dear Love. My Love"
ry James' first record In recent in lush new arrangements for
*
mmm


THE SUN1MT AMERICAN
SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 1981
r"-' r""" ..........-- -------------------1 i --------------- "" - '-- ""----------------"' rn . n ------------------------------ "'
Pacific Twi-Loop 2nd Half Playoff Opener Today
...Mi
___
$m Liquido Wallops CAA Sunday's
16-6 To Widen Loop Lead Program
B.H.S. Tackles Gibraltar
Nine At Balboa Stadium
PACIFIC SOFTBALL LEAGUE
TRAM STANDINGS tnd Half)
TEAM Won Lost lct
Slremen's Intur. .. I 1.6W
n Liquido.....4 I
Elk...........S 3
Philippine Rattan. 2 4
CAA...........I
t . Insurance AB R
rthnr. lb..... 2 0
Bowen, lb. ...... 2
Perry, ss........ 0
Ml Angermuller, M-lb.. 4
5M Turner, ci........ 4
.33 Hilzinger, p...... 3
.000 Pescod, 3b..
Bcheldegg, If..
LEADING PITCHERS (Seasonali Sevel, ri
NAME Jt TEAM Won Lost Dunn, c.
Hilzinger (FI>...... 18
Cheney Elksi...... 11
Multar (PL)........ 10
Ehg'elke, H. (PR' .... 6
Catlett, 2b.
1st Race "F-2" NativesISVt Fts.
Purse: $275.08Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Campesino J. Rodriguez 112 i
2Carbonero J. Baeza, Jr, 112
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL LEAGUE
(Straifht Season Standings)
3La Negra
4Callejera
6Romntico
8 Mona Lisa
7Duque
8Strike Two
C. Chong HVx
H. Reyes I17x
A. Mena 114
B. Pulido 120
E. Sllvera 112x
A. Visques 109x
Teams GLI
(. i bra liar Life Ins. X
IHlboa Brewers. .
naiboa High School. 2
Panama Merchants. 1
BB BBS PM W L
3 4 5 "I*
x 4 4 U 7
I x 3 7 11
S x I It
LEADING BATTERS (Seasonsl)
"THratB ft TEAM AB Hits Are. Insurance
Hilzlnger (PI i .... 72 29 .403 Wednesday:
Totals...... .. 3fl 10 11
Next Week's Schedule
Monday: Elks vs. Pan Liquido.
Tuesday: CAA vs. Firemens
!nd Race "B" Natives6! Fgs.
iu'-e: 1350.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1taponazo A. Versara 109x
It (Elksi
(Elks i
yer (PR).
mtay (PLi.
~Sr (ElkM.
. 80
. 78
. 83
. 78
. 87
fc (SlkS)..... 75
Hbnnller iFI> .. 79
Hi iFI'...... 12
Mwlene icaa> .. .- i
mer PLi..... 74
ifcheidegg (FIi.. .. 82
Roberto (Elks' .. .. 82
Snes, L. 'PLi .... 69
imer (FIi...... 66
Sovster (Elksi .. .. 80
7,2
31
23
27
24
26
27
24
10
23
21
24
20
19
21
2Pahchita
3Lollto
4Annie- N.
5Pregonero
7 11 12 36 36
(Second Half standings)
learns BH8 BB GLI PM W L
Balboa High School X t 2 1 ft 4
Halloa Brewers. . 1 X 1 3 5 4
Gibialtar Life Ins. 1 5 X 2 ft 4
I'anama Merchants 2 1 X 3
Pet.
.667
.111
.389
.333
Pet.
.556
.556
.556
.333
Pan Liquido vs..
.400 "Philippine Rattan.
.397 Thursday: Firemen's Insurance
.365 vs. Elks. f
.380 Friday: Philippine Rattan vs. 3f, Kllce
.358 CAA.
.347
| Juan Franco
!sn
.306
.293
.290
263 FIRST RACI
A. Mena 110
B. Pulido 120
B. Moreno 106
G. Graell 112
Muluel Dividends
"E' 'NativesH Fgs.
' Purse: 1275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Sin Fin A. Enrique 107x
2Risita B. Moreno 112
3Wlnsaba B. Aguirre 115
4Luck Ahead L. Pea 105x
5Villarreal A. Mena 114
oEl Mao A. Paredes lllx
&. r. asa SrifssM1
Tan)
1 Tap Gill18, 86.40, $4.60.
Thursday the CAA teafn took 2~^aL?n;?'$2 80
their usual defeat from the *- 3-Cosa Llnda'm
ond place Pan Liquido nine to the T^g. 80
tunaiof 16 to 6.
Bill Muller v
hurter. Ted Jordan was charged
with the loss.
The box score: ___
Psnl-tawldo- AB R HE
Husted. 3b-ss-c. ..411
Aries, L., cf...... 1 2
Stanley, ss-3b..... 4 3 2
Tarflinger, lb...... 3 1
Jacks, lb........ 1 0 0
Skinner, rf...... 3 i i
Cain, rf........ Ill
lane, c-p........ 5 3 2
Olaeser, 2b...... 5 j
Muller, p-lf ...... 5 2 2
Lee, If.......... 2
Totals..........39 16 17
CAA
AB R
Silva.-2b........ J
Olson, 3b........ >
Hobart, lb........ *..
Malene. cf........ 2
Polomskl, If...... 4
McQueary, ss...... 4
Nicholson, rf...... 4
Sores, E-, c......
Jordan, p.
Schilling, p
A :
153.26.
THIRD RACK
1Fulmine $4-80. $3.20.
0 2Juan Hulncho $3.20.
l| O n T w o: (Fulmine Juan
i Hulncho) $18.40.
0 FOURTH RACE
5 1Forzado $15.20, $7.80. $5.
0 2Novelera $4.60, $2.60.
n 3Beach Sun $2.40. .
0 Quiniela: (Forsado-Novelera)
n $49
n FIFTH RACE
0 1-Lacey $8.40, $4.80.
+ 2Flaulbaro $8.20.
4 SIXTH RACE
1Betun $12, $6.80, $5.
2Black Bull $8.60, $6.80.
0 3Navajo Trail $6.-
4th Race "F-l" Natives7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Raymond M. Guerrero 120
2Rio Mar A. Mena 115
3Domino B. Pulido 114
4Diez de Mayo F. Rose 118
5Volador J. Rodriguez 114
6El Mono J. Baeza, Jr. 120
Totals........'...30 6 11
SEVENTH RACE
1Cyclone Malone $4.20, $3.
2_Publico $3.20. .
Second Doubles: (Betun-Cr-
vlone Malone) $28.20.
EIGHTH RACE
. 1Pla $7.80, $5.40, $5.20.
n 2Wild Wire $6.20, $4.
n 3 El Mago $5.80.
_ -Quiniela: (Pia-W4M Wire)
4 $47 80
NINTH RACE
Friday Firemen's Insurance; J"*8| t g-60'
took their sixth straight game of, 2Taques W.w.
the second half when they set "J" TWO-
Philippine Rattan down 10 to 2. in.**- TE((tn| RACf.
(Sismo Paques)
5th Race "OPEN" Natives7 Fgs.
Purse: $1,000 (Added) Pool
Closes 2:55
ERNESTO NAVARRO CLASSIC
1Baby Roi O. Bravo 126
2-Tully Sabs) A. Basan 114
3Blk. Sambo) J. Cont'ras 110
4Helen B. B. Aguirre 110
ftMarsellesa M. Aresem. 96
4 4 4 6 It It
TODAY'S GAME
(At Balboa Stadium 2:15 p.m.)
Gibraltar Life Insurance (Love 6-1) vs. Balboa High School
(Swalm 1-2)
The Balboa High School baseball nine, now a strong con-
tender for the Pacific Twilight Loop crown, this afternoon at
; l.i at the Balboa Stadium will play host to the first half title
holders, Gibraltar Life Insurancemen, In the first game of the
second half playoffs.
Dave Kelhsrher's Insurancemen will have a game on their
nanos because the Improved High School nine will not give up
without a hard fight after climbing to the top in the last three
weeks of the second half schedule.
Slated for mound duty for the Insurance nine will be their
are. Jack Love, who will oppose the High School's Raul Swalm.
These two hurlers were locked In a thrilling pitchers' duel the
lint time they met with Swalm edging the Insurancemen In a
1-0 thriller. It was in that game that Love lost his first deci-
sion of the season after winning five In a row.
Both teams will be full strength with the Gibraltar Life In-
surancemen having the edge. In the six times these ball clubs
have met, the Insurancemen have taken four games. Both of
the High School victories came in the second half. ________
On The Alleys...
6th Race "H" Imported8^ Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Rnty A. Mena 120
2Phlox R. Kellman 120
3Trafalgar C. Ruiz 117
4 -Piragua A. Bazn 120
5Soberana II A. Enrique 102x
8Incomparable H. Reyes I02x
7Batt. Cloud B. Aguirre 114
8Picon J. Contreras 115
9Gaywood B. Pulido 120
1Ariopuro $4.40. $3.40.
2-Blitz Bov $4-60.____
ELEVENTH RACE
Lew'Hilzlnger. on the mound
for the Firemen's, won his 18th
game against three losses. How-
ard Engelke tossed the first five al"i' ifM
frames for theFurnituremen and I^'J^V 910 60
was relieved by Bobby Ganss for 2-Interlude 8iq.su.
the last inning.
The box score:
PhlL Rattan AB R H E
Lawyer, 3b........ 3 1 1
Jutzji, 2b........ 4 0 1 0
Filo, lb......... 2 2 2 2
Gaff, ss-p...... 2 0 0 2
Medfiiger. cf...... 3 0 1 0
Woofruff, e...... 1 0
imltn, G. If...... 1 0 1 J
Frgfar, lf-c...... 3 0 0 2
DeWBsey.rf...... 2 4 0 0
Engelke, H., p-sa. .. 3 0 2
Totals
15 2 5 I1
ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
K
N
s
M
TO EUROPE: -.

DELFT .............................Mar. 2ft
HBWA ............................Art. 1
TO THE CARIBBEAN:
DRLFT ............
mo ...............
...........
.........Mar.Ttt
..Apr. 1
TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:
HESTIA (not calling Chilean ports) Apr. 11
BAARN ............................Apr. 24
KN8M CRISTOBAL, 3-12103-12183-12
BLOR AGENCIES, BALBOA, 2-3719 (Freight Only,
BOY I) BROS. PANAMA CITY, 2-200$ (Passengers Only)
7th Race "F" Imported6Vi Fgs.
Purse: $500.00 Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Montlelito C. Ruiz 116
2Miss Fairfax B. Aguirre 112
3Fair Chance K. Flores 114
4Alabarda V. Rodriguez 11 Ox
5Vampiresa A. Mena 108
6Rocky C. Lino 107
8th Race '1-1' Imported8 'A Fgs.
Parse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Rechupete L. Bravo 113
2Jepnerln J. Baeza, Jr. 109
3G. Triumph C. Iglesias 114
4Walrus B. Aguirre 113
5Breeze Bound J. Parada 104x
8Apretador K. Flores 120
7Honey Moon F. Rose 112
8Miss Cristina B. Pulido 112
9Vermont O. Chanis 107
10DD.T. A. Mena 115
9th Race 'G' Imported1M Miles
Purse: $450.00 Pool Closes 5:1ft
One-Two
1Montmartrei M. Aros. 108
2Prestigio! J. Cont'ras 120
3Paris A Mena 108
4Nehulnco B. Pulido 114
6Mon Etoile V. Arauz 109
6Pincel L. Bravo 112
7V. a Terre C. Iglesias 110
10th Race 'D' Imported6V4 Fgs.
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Pampero II V. Castillo 114
2ondinella O. Chanis 112
3Polvorazo) L. Pea 113x
4Ave. Road) B. Pulido 114
8Golden Mine O. Bravo 112
8Paragon X Flores 120
11th Race "G" Natives I Fgs.
Purse: $250.00
1Chispeado J. Baeza, Jr. 107
2Galon M. Guerrero 106
3Doa Diabla E. Silvers 103
-4Golden Fan R. Ycaza 105x
8Golden Tap V. Arauz 118
Join Frrn Tipf
By CLOCKER
CURCNDU MEN'S OPEN
BOWLING LEAGUE
Wednesday night on the Bal-
boa Alleys Budwelser regained
their winning ways after a slump
of two weeks by using the An-
gelini Liquormen as a chaser In
taking three points to retain first
place and maintain a similar
lead over the second place Carta
Vieja Rummen. Assisted by
Charlie Stahl who had a 503 se-
ries, Ray Walker exhibited, his
well respected potential power in
leading Budwelser to victory
with games of 210,161 and 189 for
a superlative series of 560, high-
est for the night and his highest
for the year. Dick "A"' Colston,
with 503, was high for th Liq-
uormen.
Carta "Vieja snapped the three-
week winning streak of the VFW
Post 3822 team by taking three
points. Roll Glelchman and Dick
Zornes, with 503 and 482, re-
spectively, were instrumental In
Kttlng the ''kibosh" to the Vets,
nnls Mashburn pulled a
"Hannberg" by rolling a 493 se-
ries, 34 points over his average,
to enable the Vets to garner their
only point in the encounter,
Acme Paints applied their
plain white polka-dot paint in
whitewashing the American
Clubmen. Captain Lavallee led
his Painters with games of 201,
150 and 166 for an excellent 517.
Tee Pee Vale, bowling 12 points,
per game over his average for)
the Clubmen tried (to no
"avale") to stem the tide and I
make up for teammate Billy Cof-
fey's bad night.
For the third week in a row,
the Canada Drymen collected
three points. This week it was at
the expense ol the lack-luster
last place Balboa Beermen. Jim
Allen, with 481. sparked the
"fizz-boys" to their victory.
"Mac" Lane of the Drymen roll-
ed 202 In the second game but
fizzled out in the other two.
Murdock .
Hicks. .
Henry .
Allen. .
Lane . .
Handicap.
CANADA DRY
148 145 157 447
115 14ff 112 376
130 170 172 472
186 138 157 481
149 202 105 456
119 119 119 357
Classic League Winds Up In
Near Deadheat For 2nd Place
The 1951-1952 Classic Bowling,
League season wound up in a
blazing finish Friday night at
the Diablo Heights Clubhouse
bowling alleys when the Pan-!
American Airways team, after
holding second place in the|
league all season behind the
league-winning Sears team, was
nosed out into third place by one
point by the Nash-wlllys team,
the 1951 champions.
Friday night. the^PAA teanrl
tied with Nash-Willys for second
Totals.
844 923 8222580
Moss .
Hannberg
Wltzlg .
Mashburn.
Rizzo. ..
Handicap.
VFW POST 3822
143 139 138 420
138 116 144 396
132 137 103 372
170 139 175 493
140 98 138 876
156 156 156 468
785 8542525
VTEJA
180 130 417
106 174 452
133 100 482
172 170 478
170 156 503
101 101 303
Totals.....875 821 9302835
Totals. ... 888
vs
CARTA
Torian
(Blind) .
T. Norris.
Zornes .
Kelsey .
Glelchman
Handicap.
130
172
150
136
177
101
ACME PAINTS
Lavallee 201 150 186 517
Casten ... 151 184 140 464
Corn .... 163 144 126 433
Yarbro ... 148 147 124 410
Borgls ... 135 185 132 432
Handicap. 135 135 135 405
Totals. . 033 905 8322679
vs.
AMERICAN CLUB
169 147 .143 459
KNUTSEN LINE
Accepting passengers for
BUENAVENTURA, GUAYAQUIL, .
CALLAO and VALPARAISO
mA "ANNA BAKKE*
SAILING MARCH 2*th
(All rooms with private bath)
C B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
1Mona Lisa
tPanchita
3Wlnsaba
4Raymond
5Babv Roi
8Battling Cloud
7Miss Fairfax
Csmpeslno
Lollto
Risita
Dies de Mayo
Black Sambo
Trafalgar
Alabarda
8Miss Cristina Apretador
Prestigio (e) Paris
leAvenue Road (e) Pampero II
11Golden Tap Golden Fan
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKVS&
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Colon
HOME DELIVERY
Rocky Bryan
rocks at the boys
in the last game
of the night. This
for the year.
TEAM W.
Budwelser. . 50
Carta Vieja. 48
Acm Paints 42
American Club 39
Angelini. ... 39
Canada Dry 40
VFW Post 3822 34
Balboa Beer 32
of Bud threw
by bowling 212
for high game
Is Rdcky's high
Total
L. Pts. Pins
31 66 68784
33 63 68609
39 58 68467
42 57 68186
42 S3 67867
41 52 68253
45 67177
Vale.
Hellwig. .
Freund .
Reichart .
Coffey .
Handicap.
134 128 122 384
185 113 127 425
173 128 110 406
138 148 159 445
120 120 120 360
Totals. ... 019 779 7812479
BCDWEISER
Stahl .... 102 155 156 503
Steuwe ... 181 140 178- 449
Bryan ... 128 142 212 482
Hovan ... 154 167 140 461
Walker ... 210 161 189 560
Handicap. 112 112 112 336
Atlantic Sector
Wins Armed Forces
Golf Tourney Honors
The Atlantic Sector entry In
the Panam Armed Forces Golf
Tournament walked away with
team honors In the 1952 event
which ended at the Fort Davis
course Friday afternoon.
Paced by Master Sergeant Mike
Kullkowski and Captain A. A.
Zllkle, first and second low med-
alists for the tourney, the At-
lantic Sector team topped their
nearest competitors, the 33d In-
fantry team, by 73 strokes. The
four-man Atlantic Sector team
toured the 72 holes of the tour-
nament in a total of 1244 strokes.
Major H. B. Gardner and Master
Sergeant G. C. Roberts were the
other two members of the team.
ergeant Kullkowski won med-
alist honors by covering the 72
holes in 296 strokes. Captain Zil-
kie's runner-up score was 306
strokes.
Team plaques furnished by
Army Special Services went to
the Atlantic Sector team and the
33d Infantry team which finish-
ed in the runner-up spot. In ad-
dition each member of the win-
ning team received two dozen
golf balls while the members of
the 33d Infantry team each re-
ceived a dozen balls.
Finishing the tournament in
third place was the Special
Troops team with a 1330 score,
followed by the 65th AAA Group,
1335; 45th Reconnaissance, 1379;
Signal Corps, 1379; Fort Clayton
Hospital, 1403; Corozal, 1419:
West Bank, 1494; and 604th Field
Artillery, 1TW6.
The tournament was conduct-
ed in four days with 36 holes be-
ing played at the Fort Amador
Golf Course and the final two
rounds at the Fort Davis Course
on the Atlantic side.
A highlight of the tourney was
a hoie-ln-one shot made by Cap-
tain E. L. Hochstedler of the Al-
brook team. The shot was sunk
last Wednesday In the second
i round of play at the Fort Ama-
dor Course. For this achievement
Captain Hochstedler also was a-
, warded one dozen golf balls by
i Special Services.
Besides Kullkowski and Zllkle,
the other players who turned In
the 10 lowest scores for the tour-
nament were Kenna of the 65th
! Group, 307; Bean of the 33d In-
i fantry, 313; Hochstedler, Albrook,
316; Roberts, Atlantic Sector, 320:
Forrest, Signal, 322; Eason, 33d
! Infantry, 321; Gardner, Atlantic
I Sector, 322; and Thlel, 15th Nav-
, al District, 323.
Slave Bricks Still Good
HUNTSVrLLE, Ala. (UP)
Nicholas Smith lives in a new
home here built of bricks which
were made Ay slave labor more
than 165 years ago. Smith dis-
covered the old bricks on an
overgrown lot and a research
showed they had been part of
ah pre-clvil war home.
place, met the Jantzen team, anr"
lost three points in a match thai
was not finished in any one oi
the three games until the anch-
orman had bowled. In the first
game, a Garrison finish by the
PAA team wound up with a one-
Sln victory by a score of 919 to
18 for the flyers, when Howard
Engelke doubled out. In the sec-
ond game, the same fight ensued
between Engelke and Bill Mor-
ton, anphormen for PAA and
Jantzen respectively, with the
Jantzen keglers coming out on
top by a mere three pins by a
score of 986 to 893.
In the final game, PAA ran up
ah eight-mark lead by the fifth
frame only to see It dissipated by
splits while the swimming suit-
ers were doubling, Jantzen went
into the final frame with a three
mark lead. The PAA team camel
back strong, however, and by thel
time the anchormen were ready,1
the score was again tied right
down the Une, Jack Owesne Just
about sewed up the match for
Jantzen when he laid five strikes
In a row, turkeyihg in the final
frame, and this, coupled with
Jack Schneider's bad luck in the
tenth frame with a 7-6-10 split,
changed the aspect of the match,
giving the Jantzen the finar
game by a score of 945 to 925, and
total plnfall 2759 to 2737.
On the adjacent alleys, the
Sears team, having squelched all
opposition and sewing up the
1951-'52 championship two weeks
ago, was having terrific trouble
with an embattled Nash-Wlllys
team, which, tied with the PAA
team, was fighting for second
place.
The Nash team knocked out a
splendid 964 score in the first
game while Sears' best was 895.
In the second game, however,
Sears came back with a 919 to
889 for Nash. The third game was
extremely close, with Bears fin-
ally winning out by 955 to 939,
but Nash emerged with two
points by the margin of 23 pins
in plnfall remaining from the
victory In the first game.
The two-point win by Nash and
the one-point win by PAA gave
Vash second place in the league
jy one point, with Jantzen wind-
ng up in fourth place.
The final standings of the
teams for the season were:
TEAM Wen Lost
68 40
Nash-Wlllys e o o t 52 56
PAA Flyers ( 0 0 61 57
48' 62
The scores of the play last
night:
JANTEEN
Coffey 207 170 167 542
205 147 192 544
Jamison 165 203 165 533
Owesne 157 204 207 568
Morton . 186 172 214 572
Totals. . 918 898 vs. 9482789
Y PAA
Hermann/ 222 178 159 559
Cooley . 189 202 218 609
Wllber . 168 174 206 548
Schneider 162 148 172 482
EngelkC. 178 191 170 53
Totals. .919 893 9252737
SEARS
Melanson. 168 176 190 884
Colston. 180 191 159 610
Zebrock 294 157 180 184 194 655
Norris 168 532
Balcer . 183 211 244 638
Totals. . 895 919 9552760
NASH-WILLTS
Malee. . 204 220 210 634
Tliomas. 221 157 199 577
Jenner . 204 179 179 562
Best. . 194 173 187 554
Madeline 141 180 164- 486
Totals. ... 964 889 9392792
Robert J. (Bud) Balcer wound
up the Classic League season
with a final average of exactly
200 for 72 games, being the first
Isthmian bowler to hit the 200-
average mark since Chuck Bur-
dette performed the feat three
Cears ago. Bud is leaving for the
hlted States next week to at-
tend the convention of the Amer-
ican Bowling Congress In Mil-
waukee, and to spend a two-
month vacation at the home ol
relatives in Minnesota.
PACIFIC-ARGENTINE-BRAZIL LINE
'OH A TALIOT, INC.
ANNOUNCES
S. S. "P C- 7 TRADER"
On Berth it Balboa
MARCH 26th, 1952
Accepting Cargo for
LOS ANGELES, SAN FRANCISCO
PORTLAND, SEATTLE, AND VANCOUVER
.....a4>*>saa W. Andrews & Company
BALBOA
Phone 2-1251
CRISTOBAL
Phone 3.2161
Totals > ... 927 879
vs.
ANGELINI
138 161
151 172
131 131
173 147
186 170
115 115
47
49 42 67114
McConnell
Bembenek
Woner .
Balutis .
Colston. .
Handicap.
TotalB. ... 51 896 8532887
98727911
157 458
149 472
136 398
113 438
183 503
115 345
GOODYEAR HAS THE WINNING TEAM
Schoch .
Smith. .
Carpenter
Stanley
Cain. . .
Handicap
BALBOA BEER
167 121 147 435
,114 105 146 365
. 133 120 144 397
.114 122 125 361
, 141 132 126 399
. 146 146 146 438
Totals. ... 815 746 8342395
VS.
Rheumatism
Wntn*vr tlM paint or Rheumatism,
Arthrltl, NaurlU, Lumbago, Sci-
atica, tiff muaclti and iwollcn
Jolnta rnaka you mlatrabla. gat
ROMTND from your drurrlat at
one*. ROMIND quickly brings fan-
tastic relief o you can sleep, work
and Uve to comfort. Don't suBar
dlessly. Got BOatlND today.
SHIP-SHORE
RADIO-TELEPHONE
SERVICE
PANAMA "HPC 22" 2506 Km.
LISTENS FOR SHIPS
ON 2110 KCS. or 2174 KCS.
1200 to O4O0 C.M.T.
TROPICAL RADIO TEL CO.
good/year
MOM TOMS THE WOIID OVE All HAUIED ON OOOBTIAI TIMS THAN ON ANT OTrftl
GOODYEAR DE PANAMA
(Just below "El Rancho") Tel. 2-1221 !
AGENTS:
AUTO SERVICE CO., INC.
(Corner of Ancon Avenue & "H" Street) Tels. 2-1748 2-1881


SUNDAY, MARCH 83, IMS
* MJKDAT AMERICA?
mli -
llil *
ma*
MfllBlK
Big leagues Make Googoo Eyes At College CageJDiamondStyfs
Offered $20,000 Bribe, Cy Young Turned
It Down, Pitched Hun To Win Over Bup
Little League Has Grown Into
Giant Of 250,000 Youngsters
i NEW YORK March 22(NBA)In April some 40 brawny
athletes will open the big league baseball season In eight Ameri-
can cities. Shortly- after, a somewhat larger opening Is scheduled.
About 250,000 small boys will begin championship Little League
Baseball competition In more than 1000 communities all over the
world.
The Little League began as a community project In Wllllam-
port, Pa., In 1939. It was not much more than a supervised
andlot proposition. But It stepped out In more formal manner
,a year later with three four-team leagues, and then virtually
hung In a State of suspended animation during the war.
Butoh, brother!how It'was to growl
It grew Into giant sir*, a giant with seven-league boots.
From the original teams In one state It has grown and
' Spread, until last season it had 3,300 teams In 40 states, to say
nothing of Canada, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Canal Zone.
CANT MISS PASSING 75 TEAMS IN 1952
It can't miss passing 7500 teams this year, and may even soar
lar beyond that.
The appeal of the Little League Idea Is almost Irresistible.
Each Little League Is an entity In Itself, locally financed, local-
ly supported, locally governed and locally supplied with person-
nel, what Is more, the entire movement Is strictly non-profit.
The secret of the success of Little Leaguenot one league
has ever failedand the thing that makes It so downright
appealing to those who have no Interest In conventlenal ball
mes Is perhaps the unpretentlousness of the kids themselves.
1 They're quite a show.
Two seasons ago. one young Houston, Tex., batter had the
habit of unconsciously blowing a big bubble-gum bubble every
time the pitcher delivered the ball. Opposing catchers complain-
ed. They said it made it look as though two balls were coming
up to the plate
At Ban Bernardino, Calif., a couple of buddies found them-
selves assigned to different teams. When they played against
each other, the one rode the other to the ball park on his bi-
cycle. He also rode him back home after the gamebut with
tears. In his eyes. His chum had hit a homer In the last Inning
to win a crucial contest.
WASHINGTON, PA., BOY PULLED RUTH ACT, CALLED SHOT
Washington, Pa., a community of 25,000 Is starting its third
Sear in Little League. Billy Lyons Is on record as slamming the
eague's first home run, which is how he picked up his nick-
name, "Confldeent Keed."
Several days after his circuit clout, Billy requested that he
be benched.
"What on earth for?" his manager asked.
"Well," explained Billy, pointing to the left field, "some guy
list parked his car behind the fence and I don't want to
ust a window."
P.8. The car was removed and the next time young Lyons
came to bat he smashed another drive over the left field bar-
rierin the exact spot where the automobile had been parked.
WOMEN PLAYING BIG BOLEAND THEN SOME
Don't overlook the adult phase of Little League. In 1951, there
were 11,842 grown-ups supervising play in one way or another.
And 870 of them were women, why, when one Dayton. Ohio,
Youngster's team ran out of batting-practice pitchers, he ran
ome to mother. She's been flogging 'em across In practice ever
since.
Although good sportsmanship is stressed, Little League was
not organized as a Juvenile-reform measure, though civic lead-
ers enthusiastically endorse it as a wholesome influence for the
small-fry.
Is Little League making better cltisens of our youngsters?
"I don't know what it's doing for the kids," replies Ed
Kemp, Hagerstown, Md., Little League official, "but it certain-
ly is doing a great Job on the parents."
Indians' Pitchers Best Yet
Flop When Real Test Comes
TUCSON, Ariz.March 22(NBA)Cleveland's pitching has
been the best In the majors for four consecutive campaigns.
This puts the finger on the Indians' weaknesslack of pow-
r and the ability to score. ,__
Between them last year, Black Mike Garcia and Early Wynn
lost 24 games. In only one of which did the Tribe score
more than three runs.
Yet when the real test came last Fall the Indians' celebrated
etching crumbled. Robert William Andrew Feller had a five-run
ad against Detroit going into the fourth and blew it and the
Sime like a bloke throwing easy money around in Las Vegas.
8b Lemon and young Oarcla were well whipped by the Tigers
in turn, and when Wynn couldn't finish the next day In Chicago,
the Indians were out of the racebut good.
Al Lopez contributes the Detroit debacle to the Tigers'
wild desire to avenge the Indians having knocked them out of
the scramble the previous Autumn.
"They were as loose and relaxed as Dick Wakefleld," says
I Manager Lopez. The series meant nothing to them. They
j weren't going any place, so could do nothing wrong. We could
Ido.nothing right."
1 Marsh Samuel of the Cleveland high command points out
I that inexperience cost Oarcla a couple of big ones with the Yan-
|kees. the veterans DiMagglo and Mise anticipating that the
young man's hard one would be on the outside, and pok-
ig It to where no Indian was.
| CLEVELAND PITCHING WORKS OUR WAYS
Cleveland's Big Four beats you in as many ways, represents
[four different types of pitching.
Feller hides the ball until it leaves his hand, shortening the
I pitching distance, for the batter can't hit what he can't see.
I At 33, the one-time Iowa Farm Boy. who broke Into the Ameri-
tan League at an exceedingly swift 17, remains exceptionally
I fast. He still breaks off that Jughandle curve has perfected a
IsUder that breaks downward SO degrees.
Senor Lopez considers Oarcla as swift as anybody In the
lletgue. He's heavier and more fearsome than before.
Lemon, the reformed lnflelder-outflelder, Is an exponent of
ie sinker and curve.
A knuckle ball is incorporated Into Wynn's assortment.
The Jimlan*' Big Four Is Joined and challenged by highly-
promising Bob Chakales and Sad Sam Jones, a red-headed
Ireballing, six-foot four-inch Negro who atruck out 248 Pacific
3oast League batters before coming up to handcuff the Tigers
with four hits.
rCHER HAS ONLY TO LOOK LIKE LOPAT
When Robert Francis Kerrigan showed up at Hi Corbett
_1eld here, the Indians first suspected that Eddie Lopat had
come west to plague them some more, or to obtain pre-season
practice at the best thing he does.
For left-handed Bob Kerrigan, up from San Diego at 29,
oks more like Lopat than the famous Yankee southpaw with
ae Jinx on Cleveland.
To further carry out the similarity, Senor Lopez had curly-
ilraa Red Kerrigan Issued a shirt with Lopat's No. 30 on its
pack.
The senor's dark plot unfolded as Kerrigan pitched batting
practice and In intra-squad games. There he was for all the
Jndians' to seeholding his glove like Lopat, with all of Eddie's
lannerlsms and motion and the same kind of rather soft stuff.
The Injuns would belt Mr. Kerrigan around plenty, and thus
|earn to handle Mr. Lopat the same way. This, Indeed, was an
aexpected break.
There was only one hitch. The Indians dldnt hit Kerrigan
iy better thin thev have Lopat.
Thus, with Eddie Lopat' formula, Bob Kerrigan emulated
ther curly-haired Irishman by making the Indians go the
rong way.
\F altering Philip!
utp'i Hit Is filled lib
Pet!-worn ateas ad rags Is* tut
woaM MM* fell fceeae Bk* nev.
A. Classifieds fast the right era*!
Dick Groat,
Jr. ISorris
Lead Pack
By JOHN McCALLV{M
NEA Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK(NBA) For
many years the major leagues
have been worrying about the
fact that their sov/?es of supply
have been drying up.
"The newer generation doesn't
play the game the way the
older one did," Ty Cobb says.
It would be truly ironic if
basketball, a sport baseball men
claim Is harmful to a ball play-
er, would prove to be their
eventual salvation
College basketball has i sup-
Elled organised baseball with
eaps of raw-boned talent
Lou Boudreau, Frank Baum
holts, Ralph Branca, OH Hodg-
es and Howie Schuitz, to name
a fewand now its ready to
send along another corps of
stlckouts.
The starbrlghts most sought
by the majors this year ara
Duke's Dick Oroat. Dayton's
Junior Norris, Duqfiesne's Dick
Bicketts, and Seattle's O'Brien
twins, Johnny and Eddie.
Just for good measure, foot-
ball is tossing in Baylor's Lar-
ry Isbell.
Oroat The Oreat. who stcne
Just about et*?ry cate honor
this season but the coaching
award, la virtually a lead-pipe
cinch to crash the big tent
some day. Pittsburgh's Bill
Meyer admits that the Swiss-
vale, Pa., Sludger Would look
better than alright In his In-
field .
"Branch Rickey thinks Oroat
could move right in and take
over," says the Pirate pilot,
whose 1952 edition is badly in
need of inflelders. "From what
I've seen, he could do the field-
ing Job, but his hitting remains
a question. It may be that big
league pitching won't trouble
him, however.
Junior Norris looks like
hippo among basketball's giraf-
fes, but fpr four seasons he has
really been throwing his 228
pounds around, proof that fat
men can be stars, too.
Oolng almost unnoticed Is
the fact that Dayton's Mr.
Blimp Is also quite some shake
as a catcher. He has been ap
proached by every big league
organization but the White
Sox.
INDIANS AFTER NORRIS
"A year ago," relates Pepper
Wilson, Dayton's dream up,
steam-up man, "Cleveland even
sent a scout to the campus to
talk to Narrls In his dormitory.
Mickey McConnell, who was
Rickey's aide when the latter
was In charge of baseball flesh
at Brooklyn, recalls watching
Norris work out with the Dodg-
ers at Vero Beach, Fla.
"Despite his bulk, he's quick
and agile and has a shot-gun
arm," McConnell says. "We
liked his boundless spirit and
hustle. And be hits the ball for
a country mile. I think he could
make the grade."
Out at Duquesne, they rave
about Dick Rlcketts' amazing
all-around play on the basket-
balleourt, but baseball apprais-
ers are more vitally Interested
in his batting average than his
field goal average.
The slx-foot-slx Negro fresh-
man, you see, pitches and plays
first base, reportedly has been
offered a fat bonus by Cleve-
land. No less than a half-dozen
malor league clubs have been
making googoo eyes at him.
It has been said that their
sise would retard their progress
in professional bash>tbnll, so
Johnny and Eddie O'Brien are
looking to the diamond for fu-
ture glory. They still have an-
other year at Seattle Universi-
ty.
Johnny, who estibllahed a
new cage scoring i-cord with
1030 points, is an inflelder.
Brother Eddie plays the outfield.
The Yankees have been tossing
glances at both.
Football's Larry toben is sup-
ple, swift strong of arm and
totally devoid of professional
experience, but despite the lat-
ter club owners are willing to
lay it on the line for the Bay-
lor backstop. '.
Laughing Larry, was chosen
on the All-America third team
In 1951. hit 346 catching every
Inning for the Waco school.
Deacon Rickey heads the
pack scrambling for Isbell's
signs ture.
Which is further In the way
of evidence that things never
change.
Rickey Picks Giants
To Repeat In N.L.
Branch Rickey is sticking with
the winner.
"I like the Slants," the Pitts-
burgh general manager said. "It
wouldn't surprise me if the
Olants had a bigger lead by Au-
gust than the Dodgers did last
season. Only they'll hold it down
to the end.
"Leo Durocher has the best
pitching in the majors. He has
speed to burn, especially in the
infield.
OUT OF DOORS with
BsM&
Why Dogs Bark At Newspaper Boys
BY JOB 8TBT80N
Dog Editor
It Is surprising how many en-
thusiastic dog owners, real dog
lovers who have had many dogs
through the years, will tell a
novice that the remedy for a
particular dog problem is sim-
ple. .
"Just use a newspaper." they
say. I have heard this since I
was old enough to pronounce
the word housebrken.
They continue (and it sounds
logical): "Roll the paper up and
hit him with It whenever- he
misbehaves. The paper is light,
it won't hurt him and it is ef-
fective because it makes a lot
of noise."
Newspapers have played an
Important part In the educa-
tion of millions of dogs. Every
one of these dogs has developed
strong an aversion to newspap-
ers as a schoolboy does to books
Is it any wonder then that
many dogs bite or bark at paper
boys or mall men?
When a dog is reprimanded
with a newspaper he not only
develops an animosity toward It,
but he is either afraid or he
loses face and feel sembarras-
sed. It Is quite natural then
that he transfer the animosity
for the newspaper to anyone
carrying one. This can be broad-
ened very easily to any delivery
personnel.
Equally difficult is the task, of
getting a puppy, too young to
train out of doors, to use pap-
ers if we bat him with them
when he makes a mistake. He
certanly will be more likely to
shun them and the cracking
noise they make when walked
loses face and feels embarras-
ons against him. Remember,
even though the spread out
papers may not look the same,
he lderllfles them by his sense
of smell.
To encourage a puppy to use
newspapers, It Is best to make
a small enclosure for him which
By E. ( JAMIESON
NEA Special Correspondent
NEWCOMER8TOWN, O., March
22 (NEA) Dentn Tecumseh
one of the three no-hlt
fames he
set game
sturdiest pitcher baseball has j he hurled for the Boston Amerl-
ever known, will be 85 years old cans against Rube Waddell and
after he got on' base, he still wor- Here are Just a few of Young's
ried the heck out of the pitcher big league accomplishments:
because of his terrific speed." | Won 511 games, lost only, 313
His greatest thrill? That was foray .820 percentage.
i March 29. For the Philadelphia Athletics nvsion.
on more than 30 games in
one season five times.
1 Averaged 737 or better ,five
Seasons, three of them In su&es-
his advanced! 1904. Cy modestly reminisces: "I
years, he is en*1 really had the breaks that day."
joying good But Cy Young must have Wad
health a re- "the breaks" on many days', If
flection of the you listen to him. Most of his
clean and records will remain unsurpassed,
wholesome life because of the fact present-day
[ he has led. pitchers do not work as f re-
Cy Young, a nuently as the hurlers did back
i strapping right- in his time.
Ihander who re
Fanned 2832 and walked .only
1102.
Pitched 28 successive hit less
innings.
in 1892, he won 3 and lost
only 10 for the Cleveland Na-
tional League club.
In 1905. he fanned 207 and
walked ortlv 28.
Pretty good, eh?
Is completely paper covered ex-
cept for his bed. He will use
these papers by necessity. After
he has been accustomed to do-
ing this his enclosure ean be
enlarged and papers placed in
one corner.
When he has learned to use
these he is ready to be allowed
his freedom as long as clean
papers are kept at his regular
mace. Be careful to keep the
latest edition off the floor or
he may get the Idea that he
has a two bathroom apartment.
Old newspapers make excel-
lent bedding for grown dogs.
You have probably noticed that
newsprint rfs a grain and can
be torn Into strips more easily
one way than the other. To use
It for bedding, tear it into
strips, shake it out and toss it
into the dog's bed.
A good layer of newspaper
strips is warm and comfortable.
It allows dirt to fall through,
absorbs moisture, and the print-
er's ink has an Inhibiting effect
upon fleas and flea eggs. Fre-
quent chan"lng requires no ex-
pense but jur efforts.
Jorge Quiros Of Panama Top
Fencer At Illinois University
CHAMPAGNE, Illinois, March
23 (U8IS) Strange occurrences'
have led to the position Jorge
Quiros now holds as the top sa-
breman at Illinois and one of
the top collegiate fencers in this
country.
Quiros, son of Mr. Ignacio Qui-
ros y Q., the present Panamanian
three times each without a loss,
and then followed with two vtc-
torlee-over each sabreman. leav-
ing no doubt as to which weapon
was the one to use.
And use it he did. Quiros pro-
ceeded to lead Illinois' 1951 fenc-
ing team to an undefeated dual
season, the Big Ten champion-
Ambassador to Brazil, wished to ship, and fifth place in the na-
attend an American university
to study mining engineering,
states Bob Buchanan. Sportji
writer In a recent article appear-
ing in the NEWS-GAZETTE In
Champagne.
The Panamanian had set his
sights on Stanford or California,
but his father, who had travel-
led throughout the United States,
advised him to attend a mld-
western university. Quiros appli-
ed at Illinois and received a let-
ter of acceptance within a week.
Ilimoia graduates living in Pana-
ma had recommended the Uni-
versity to him highly.
Fencing had not entered as a
factor in selection of a univer-
sity.
Attends Fencing School
In his native Panama. Quiros
had never fenced In competition.
However, he did attend a fenc-
ing school where for more than
six months he learned and prac-
ticed only fundamentals. Quiros
noted that the European style
of fencing which Is taught in
Panama has more emphasis
placed on style and grace than
tlonals held here In Huff gym
last March. Individually, he won
the Big Ten sabre title and plac-
ed fifth In the nationals. The
opening day of the nationals he
was the rave of everyone as he
defeated all 18 opponents.
Avenges First Defeat
This was the biggest day Qui-
ros has experienced in or out of
fencing. His winning streak came
to an end the very first match
the following day when he lost
to Perssilan of Northwestern. He
already has avenged the defeat
this season.
From here on Quiros is looking
to the future. He is looking for-
ward to the nationals again, but
most of all for a chance to be on
the Panamanian Olympic fenc-
ing team. Quiros believes he has
a good chance to be on the team
if it is organized. However, Qui-
ros added that the political si-
tuation is such thai a person
does not know irom week to
week about the entry of any
team io the Olympics.
Already having fenced with
Panama in the Central American
tired in 1911
after 22 years
with Cleveland
In both the Na-
t i o n a 1 and
American Leagues, Boston In the
same two circuits and St. Louis
m the National, admits he gets
quite a chuckle as he scans to-
day's newspapers.
One thing that takes Young's
eye Is the number of stories in-
volving "fixes" and attempted
"fixes."
Cy. the first pitcher elected to
Baseball's Hall of Fame, recalls
that he was once offered a bribe.
He was hurimg in an important
Boston-Pittsburgh series at" the
time and a gambler approached
him with an offer of $20,000 "if
I didn't do my best."
Young not only rejected the
easy money but advised the
bribe-offerer: "If you value your
money, fellow, you'd better bet
it on me to wm."
The very next day, Cy went out
and pitched the series clincher
for Boston. His annual pay at
the time was $2400 far short
of the $20,000 figure offered him
as a bribe.
Young says he also is amused
by the large crop of "sore arma"
and other all*ients among pre-
sent-day moundsmen. He claims
hurlers nowadays are "babied"
and that they spend too much
time on frenk pitches. Cv laucha:
"In my day. we Just reared
back and flogged them through
there."
COBB THE GBEATEST
He recalls that in one eight-
game series for the Boston Amer-
icans he and Bill Dinneen hurl-
ed the entire set and won all
eight games.
A pitcher knocked out of the
box m his day, Cy says, just went
to the clubhouse, rested and got
ready to come back *n the very
next game.
The greatest batter he ever
faced? Young answers without
hesitating: "Ty Cobb he Just
couldn't be fooled. And even
TIPS FROM OLD PROLefty Gomez, somewhat stouter than,
when he was flogging 'em across for the New York Yankees, of-
fers a bit of pitching advice to touted John Podres, rookie south-
pew being inspected by the Dodgers at Vero Beach, Fia. Podre
had a 21-3 record at Class D Hazard, Cy., in 195.. (NEA).
rule go out?
A. In 1940.
Q. Did Clarence Rowland, the
Pacific Coast League ] r-sident,
ever play big league boil?
A. No. But he managed the
Chicago White Sob four times,
1915-19, and toon the pennant
and World Series jtth his 1917
club. 4
ITS NEW!
a PLASTIC ENAMEL
for every use
on scoring points, and that to games against Guatemala he
begin fencing a person In Pana-
ma must practice fundamen'nls
for six months to a year before
beln permitted to enter com-
petition.
After talklne to a friend who
had fencing for a physical edu-
cation course, seeing photo-
graph* of the Ullnl fencers in
the Illio. and then noticing the
fencing "I" letter sweaters wh'l
here on campua, Quiros decided
to give fencing a whirl. The star
Illlnl fencer is certainly glad he
did.
What weapon did he tak un?
No. not sabre, but foil. Foil was I
the weapon he had used in Pa-
nama, but the transition from
European stvle of fencing to the
American stvle. which places
more emphasis on rcorln" thai
on grace, was not easy. It took
Quiros his freshman year to
learn the American stvle.
And m his sophomore year, he
Improved tremendously, taking
second In Big Ten foil competi-
tion.
Then in his iunlor vear last
eason he decided to try out
for sabre.
The first bie chance, and that
waa all he needed, came in a pre-
season round robin sabre tourna-
ment which was, open to fencers
n U we*r>ops.
First. Quiros beat the epee and
foil men who were fencing sabre
last all four foil bouts. Quiros is
sure he can make the Olympic
.squad and If no team is formed;
he feels he will be on the Pana- j
manan team In the Pan-Ameri-|
can games to be held in Mexico
City in February 1953.
t
By BEANS REARDON
24 Years in National League
NEW YORK (NBA)Q. What
is the shortest fence In the me-
jora? What is the longest?
A. Tfu Polo Grounds, home
of the New York Olants, has
both. Down the right-field foul
line the distance i$ 251 feet.
Straightaway to the notch in
centerfield the distance is 475
feet.
Q. Did Joe DiMagglo hit in
more consecutive games as a
Pacific Coast Leaguer or major
leaguer?
A. Be holds the record in each
categoryAl for San francisco
in 1933, 54 for the New York
Yankees in 1941.
Q. When did the sacrifice Cy
. Brush it or Spray it
on Metal, Wood or Plaster
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n-i



TWI-LEAGE PLAYOFF OPENS TODAY
Men Crash
More Cars
Than Women
YEAR
TALLAHASSEE. Fla March. 22
(UP) Men drivers had about
five times more accidents than
women, and the hour between &
and 6 D.tn. on a clear Saturday I,
was the most dangerous time to TWENTY-SEVENTH
drive, the Florida highway pa- j "*
trol reported today In a set oil
strange statistics on the record
traffic-death year of 1951.
Men probably had the most
accidents because they drive
more, the patrol said, and that
also may account for the fact
that motorists between the ages
of 25 and 35 had more wrecks
than others.
Strangely, most accidents nap- j
pened when the weather was; B LOUIS BROMFIELD
clear, probably because there
were more cars on the highways. PAnaMA, March The first
Most traffic accidents occur-! sett]ements b tne white man
red between the twilight hours. d P,nama almost a
"Let the people know the truth and the country h gafe" Abraham Lincoln.
PANAMA, R. P.. SUNDAY, MARCH tt, 1MI
_ TEN CENTS
Louis Bromfield Sees Panamo
In Peril Witho ut Middle Class
Politicians Go Forwards, Backwards,
Round About In Primary Skirmishing
century before the Pilgrimr
landed on Plymouth Rock.
Outside \1 modern Panama
City are the tremendous, heroic
and beautifuKrulns of a whole
city, pillaged and destroyed by
the buccaneer Morgan when the
plow had scarcely scratched the
earth In North Atoierlca.
Yet anywhere oiUside the Ca-
nal Zone, Panama Oity and Co-J
Ion, the landscape gives the im-
of 4 and 1 p.m.. but more mo-
torists were killed after dark be-
tween 7 and 8 p.m.
Saturdays and Fridays were
the most dangerous driving days
of the week, Wednesday the lea*t
dangerous.
Patrol statisticians found it
strange that housewives, farmers
and domestic servants have more
traffic mishaps than traveling
salesmen
And most of the persons in-;
volved in accidents come from
cities of 50,000 or more popula-
tlon. ^___
Registration Open
For Courses Under
Point Four Program
Registration for the new In-
dustrial Arte and Vocational
Education courses to be given by
Panamanian and U. S. .techni-
cians working under the Point
Four Program, are now open
at the Servicio Cooperativo
Inter-Americano de Educacin.
The courses will last three
weeks beginning April 14 and
ending on May 2, during the
three weeks the following sub-
jects will be taught: Vocational
Education Psychology, Princi-
ples and Objectives of Vocation-
al Education and Industrial
Arts; Shop Organisation and
Management. In addition
courses in related academic
subjects will be given.
These classes will be two hours
dally, five days a week, (from
Monday thru Friday.
Teachers interested in en-
rolling In these classes can ap-
ply at the office of the servicio
Cooperativo Inter-Americano de'
Educacin (SCIDE> at Calle Ri-
cardo Arlas No. 2, Campo Ale-
gre, (in front of the Hotel El
Panam!, or at the Escuela
Profesional.
THOSE WBRE THE DAYS
NEWPORT, R.I. (UP)An as-
semblage of yachts in Newport
harbor in 1930 represented per-
haps the largest concentration
of pleasure craft in one place in
the world at the same time. The _
attraction was the International! potato sack. And just to prove
Yacht Races for the America's it, the donned the nifty one-
Cup. Some 500 motor craft and piece "creation" above,
about 800 sailing boats filled the -
harbor.
presslon of being new, almost
virgin country.
It is a landscape ofgreat tro-
pical beauty with the high
mountains always in the back-
ground, lying between the
world's two greatest oceans.
SACK TIME-Burned by Hol-
lywood columnists' digs at the
alleged lack of style and smart-
ness in her clothes, screen
actress Marilyn Monroe retorts
tbet she would look good in a
KAYSER ttf&foaat NYLONS
Whether tall, tiny or in-betweenKa> scr has a proportioned
stocking especially for you! Thanks to Kayser's
patented "Strsit-On" heelno more slipping or twisting
of teams. Many fashionable daytime and evening shades.
14M^JwU\
K Air si i?
six individuals have dlsai-
peared in a mysterious fash-
ion, with no trace of them
being found.
The latest was a Swedish en-
gineer who left a note In his
hotel saying he had gone for a
walk. His clQthing was found
later on a remote and almost
unapproachable beach. Nobody
knows what became of him.
A well-known Swedish detec-
tive appeared suddenly, spent a
couple of days, a large part of
them in night clubs, and then
left saying he was convinced
the victim had gone swimming
and was devoured by sharks.
A great shark hunt was an-
nounced but nobody caught any
sharks or found any evidence.
The whole story is rather sil-
ly In the cheapest television
,,! foreign intrigue tradition, and
and there are small u Js thJj amateur detective's
or patches of grazing theory tnat the curk)us charact-
AUTHOR FARMER LOUIS
BROMFIELD vsited Panama
this month heading a group
of United States fanners
who were on a tonr of
South America. The tour
was sponsored by Braniff
Airways.
Bromiield wrote two pieces
on Panama. These are being
widely distributed through
the Bell Syndicate.
This Is his first piece. The
second will be published
next Sunday. ___
v5
i i -a t
l e v i s
n i
Here
farms
land or a great plantation, but
millions of acres of land, some
of it as rich as any land on the
earth, lies unused.
There are some millions
of acres producing little or
nothing which, under the
technique of the New Agri-
culture as developed within
the past generation, could
be producing cotton, rice,
sugar cane, cattle and other
varieties of food. Yet the
state of Panama imports
almost 90 per cent of its
food.
Panama State Is. despite its
age, a new country filled with
opportunity. The first question
one asks Is "Why has it not
been developed?''
There are many complex rea-
sons. Outside the two or three
cities, most of the population is
Indian with very little mixture
of outside blood.
These are a handsome people,
good-natured and hard work-
ing, probably the most handsome
single group of people I have
ever seen anywhere in the
world.
A good many of them are liv-
ing much as they lived, and
farming much as they farmed
at the time of the first Spanish
invasion.
A part of the population Is of
mixed Indian and Negro blood,
some of it blended centuries
ago, and there has been a new
migration within the last half
century of Negro blood from Ja-
maica, Trinidad and other West
Indian Islands.
These are largely clean, bright,
hardworking people who have
made a definite contribution to
Panamanian energies and re-
sources within very recent
times.
Above all these, econo-
mically and socially speak-
ing, is the minority popula-
tion of old Spanish blood
which controls the govern-
ment and most of the wealth
and resources.
Among these people are man'
talented well-educated, gifted
and attractive people and among
these people also lies the heart
of the disease called Politics.
Here lie feuds and intrigues
not only between different par-
ties and individual leaders but
within families themselves.
Democracy in the form of a
republic exists but its function-
ing is erratic and uncertain
and handicaps the development
of the country.
This condition, plus a certain
economic parasitism arising
from the American-controlled
Canal Zone itself, has tended to'
paralyze development of the
country.
Also the country lacks capi-
tal and to some extent know-
how.
But worst of alland this
is the economic and sociolo-
gical curse of many Latin-
American nationsPanama
has scarcely anything that
could be called a middle
class; that economic stra-
tum of modest but solid in-
come which brings stability,
both economic and political,
to any republic and which is
the greatest bulwark against
Communism and the ac-
companying degeneration of
civilization.
There are evidences that
agent* are already at work
spreading confusion and unreat.
Dlayln-r upon an unsound na-
tions ism in exactly the same
ttern which has produced the'
' :ifusion and ruin In Iran and \
n Epvpt.
No one talks about It
much, but fv?>}u>ne feels
that th? i i tire at work
ull iii,iiaui i, .i Within the
past three or four months, 4
er who left notes announcing
to his chambermaid that he had
gone walking presumably so
that she would not worry about
him Is now prowling about Pan-
ama City without having to
check with the police authori-
ties.
...e disappearance, like the
earlier ones, was too well plan-
ned.
The situation Is known to the
American authorities but very
nttle has been done about It.
Any sort of foreign agent
could enter Panama, and,
with a little "hiding out,"
could direct operations de-
signed to produce the same
kind pf calamity that has
been produced in Iran and
Egypt.
Conditions are not healthy
and they will probably never
be cured oh any enduring long-
time basis until many of the
economic conditions are stabi-
lized, the country opened up
for development, and at least
the beginnings of a middle class
are established.
The situation both econo-
mically and strategically in re-
lation to the Zone is of the ut-
most imDortance to the people
of the If. 8. and perhaps even
to the peace of the Western
Hemisphere.
WASHINGTON, March 22 (UP)
Sen. Robert A. Taft moved to
withdraw completely from the
New Jersey Presidential primary
today as Gen. Dwight D. Elsen-
hower's top military aide came
home on a mission with high po-
litical possibilities.
Taft, who pulled out of the
New Jersey race with Elsenhower
with a cry of "political trickery,"
said he will have his name re-
moved from the ballots as soon
as he finds out how it can be
done legally.
A New Jersey election official
| said a telegram would do, if it is
followed by a formal letter re-
questing such withdrawal.
The political possibilities a-
bout Elsenhower were involved
in a flight from Paris to Wash-
ington by his chief of staff,
Gen. Alfred M. Grnenther.
Gruenther is to ask Congress,
in Elsenhower's name, not to
make cuts in foreign aid whicn
would weaken Western Europ-
ean defense forces.
he didn't want them to
"waste" their votes on him in
the primary.
Sen. Estes Kefauver of Tennes-
see, campgignlng In Nebraska
Where he Is opposed by Sen. Ro-
bert 8. Kerr of Oklahoma In the
April 1 primary, charged that he
faces a "strong political ma-
chine" in his bid for the state's
12 convention delegates.
The Invitation for Taft to re-
move his name completely from
the ballots of New Jersey's April
15 primary was extended by sec-
retary of state Lloyd B. Marsh,
an Elsenhower supporter, after
the Ohio senator announced he
had decided to pull out of the
race.
Although March 12 was the
withdrawal deadline, Marsh said
he would extend the senator the
"courtesy" of removing his name
if he really wanted it.
Taft. campaigning In Wiscon-
sin, said Marsh's telegram was
"ambiguous" but he would take
the steps to remove his name a
soon as he could find out what
"the mechanics of the move will
There was speculation la MA "'i,.,.^,* boosters claimed
that Taft's withdrawal from
New Jersev was a sign of weak-
that he also might discuss with
top military officials any plans
of Eisenhower to seek relief from
his European post so he can re-
turn and campaign for the Re-
publican Presidential nomina-
tion.
Eisenhower said Thursday that
his victory over Taft in the Mar.
11 New Hampshire primary and
the tremendous write-in vote he
got in Minnesota forces him to
"re-examine" his previous deci-
sion against taking part in the
pre-conventlon campaign.
Reliable sources in Paris said
Eisenhower may return to the
United States between May 15
and Jane 1 t0 make an active
bid for the nomination.
In other political develop-
ments:
Taft backers in Nebraska start-
ed a "grass roots" campaign tor
write-in votes for the senator in
the state's April 1 primary. Els-
enhower boosters may start one
too. The only names on the Re-
publican Nebraska ballots are
those of Harold E. Stassen and
Mrs. Mary Kenny, who favors
Gen. Douglas Mac Arthur.
The Wisconsin Supreme Court
ruled that Gov. Earl Warren of
California will stay on the ballot
otf the state's April 1 primary.
It had ben challenged by a Mil-
waukee man who claimed War-
ren was merely a "stalking
horse" for Elsenhower.
MacArthur's backers in Wis-
consin said they would not ba
stopped by the general's state-
ment last night that, although
he would accept the GOP pres-
idential neminatton if offered.
ness on the part of the Ohio
senator.
Taft backers said he will de-
monstrate his real strength in
Wisconsin's April 1 voting.
The Wisconsin primary, to
elect 30 pledged delegates, pro-
vides a contest between Taft,
Stassen, a pro-MacArthur "fa-
vorite son" and Warren, who
heads a coalition group Includ-
ing Elsenhower supporters.
Hew Guided Missile
Can Land Without
Hurting Taxpayers
DALLAS, March 22 (UP) A
guided missile which can be
brought into land without de-
struction after test flights is be-
ing perfected by the United Air-
craft Corporation.
The company said the guided
missiles are equipped with land-
ing gear, and are brought back
to land by radlb after being
test-fired.
Experimental work on guided
missiles has been costly In the
past because after each test
the missile has been wrecked as
It fell to earth.
SOMETHING'S BRUIN The beer facts are that Sue Stein-
brenner, of Cleveland, Ohio, and Tom Mlesowltz, of Somervliie,
N. J., had an iteh to rub noses a la the friendly snowbears
sculptured above. The snow sculpture is part of the An-
nual Snowflake Saturnalia staged by Juniors of Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute at Troy, N. Y.

M R.M. Bag Gm*j* n V
atCe.1

ordon's
Stands Supt&fKO.
Gulf Stream Strays
Miles Off Course
WASHINGTON, D. C, March
Nine American oil tankers
have been systematically re-
charting one of the nation's bus-
iest ocean highways, the coast-
al passage between Key West
and Cape Hatteraa.
New evidence has been found
that the Gulf Stream, warm in-
digo-blue river In the sea, does
not hold to a single course. The
Navy Hydrographic Office, on
its latest pilot chart Issued to
mariners, reveals that the cur-
rent regularly meanders hun-
dreds of miles In mysterious
tune to the seasons and the
tides.
Since the days of the Spanish
long the sea lanes leading north
been the key to navigation a-
heavily manned labor political
explorers, the Gulf Stream has
from the Gulf of Mexico, the
National Geographic Society
says. Knowing how to follow
or avoid the great current can
still mean a difference of hours
or days in a ship's passage.
ERRATIC FLOW
Voluntarily cooperating In the
Navy's study, the group of pri-
vate tankers found the Gulf
Stream flowing in one place In
summer, another in winter. Its
force Is strongest in June and
July, weakest in October and
November. Seas are normally
higher in the Stream than to
either side.
Ship captains are advised to
hug the Gulf Stream, parallel-
ing the coast along carefully
charted tracks, on their way
north from the Gulf. Return-
ing, the best courseexcept in
stormy weatheris a straight
line lar out to sea that avoids
the breasting current, the Navy
says.
Ikes Aide Flies
Home To Testify
On Military Aid
WASHINGTON, Mar. 22 (UP)
Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther.
chief of staff to General Dwight
D. Eisenhower, NATO command-
er, flew home today to testify
on military aid before congres-
sional committees next week.
The general said he had no
idea when Elsenhower himself
is coming home. He said If El-
senhower had decided he had
not given any indication of It
to bis staff.
(NEATelephoto)
SEEK TO AVERT STEEL STRIKE Nathan Felnsinger (left),
chapman of the Wage Stabilization Board, huddles with vice-
chairman Frederick Bullen at an emergency night meeting
railed in Washington, D.C.. to discuss the threatened steel
strike. The meeting broke up when Felnsinger collapsed from
fatigue.
*

I dreamed I got caught
in the rain in my
maidenfbrm bra
Nice weather for dreams... especially when it brings
a shower of compliments on my figure! Wind
tumbles my hair... raindrops plash my umbrella
... but every reflection shows my curvea in perfect
shape. No chasing rainbow* for me... I've found the
treasure already... my Maideniorm bra!,
Shown: Maideniorm Over-hire* in white satin;
abo available in nylon taffeta sad broadcloth.
Genuine Maidenf orm brassieres are made only
in the United States of America.
I 56sS) for very type of figure.
IWeU


Brain Buster
MR. GAMESTER was happy
about his llc*na* plate
number last year (or the num-
ber made a very nice poker
handa full house. However,
this year all five figures are
different. Irritated at this, he
unintentionally fastened the
plate on his oar upside-down,
with the result that he In-
creased his registration num-
ber by 78,633. What Is Ma
plate number T
tsaoi i Joe
-urna iim boisjsabi 4q tt I; teeeejoui q ||| WN .isqmn'i
io ai it o* <)|fl|p ***qj tSa uniu uo iqii*AJ a>e Q '#. 'I '*
't "eiJIP *U 1i *IB0 '**
The Game of G-Men Versus Spies
Find the Phrases
REPRESENTED here In rebus
form are five well known
phrases. For example, one Is
"three oh a match.- Study each
detail of the sketches end see If
you can discover their meanings.
jq3|* jo |J., ,,'auo m |0H..
M*quinu *3q V,, i|B|| Sa||K..
,. qjisiu no Bx.. : v
Spending $100
ANEW farmer had 1100 to
spend for livestock. He could
get hogs for $10 each, sheep for
13 each, and chickens for 60c
each. He wanted to get exactly
100 head of livestock for his
money. How could he do It T
Offhand, it might seem simple
enough to answer: let him buy
80 chickens and 30 sheep. That
of course, la not a satisfactory
solution because the farmer
wants all three varieties of stock.
How, then, can he buy 100 head
for $100 and Include all three
kinds?
qai 009 1 nenoiq M
pin :g* 1 dsq* uo :09t jo; jo 'oil
in eloq tiu rVO or three persona can and real entertainment
In thia new game of G-Men versus Spies. In fact,
once you get interested b it you will probably want
to play regularly (in which case we suggest yoo
mount the design on a wooden board or cardboard).
Pennies, dimes and buttons make good counter*.
This Is the wsy It's played:
Lots are drawn to decide which of the three play-
ers shall be O-Men and which player the spy. (If
only two play, three counters are still used but on*
person moves for two.) The 12 numbered circles
represent cities through which the officers pursu*
their quarry until he Is captured or escapee.
Th game staTts with ths spy on o. 8, the G-Men
on Nos. 1 and 9.
The players take turns In moving from one of the
cities to another, with the G-Men endeavoring to
corner their man, and the latter, of course, seeking
to keep thst from oeeurrlng. Each player can move
to only one city at a time and all moves must be
msd* over one of the lino* to an unoccupied space.
It la the object of the G-Men to corner the spy
In the least possible moves. If they fall to do so In
a maximum of 30 moves, he Is credited with an
escape
One example of a cornered spy Is: One G-Man on
4, another on 12, spy on 8. It Would then be ,1m*
possible, of course, for the spy to move.
Some other "captures":
Spy en 8, officers on S and 11.
Spy on 4, officers on 6 and 11.
There are a number of other such traps ths spy
must avoid through 20 mov to eseap*. Flip coins
to see Who starts.
Fence With This Poser
4t-----......150---------
VV7HEN a new highway cut up his farm, Mr.
" Brown sold a plot triangular in s h a p s, as
sketched above. However, he first divided it by
making a new fence along the vertical line; this met
the base at right-angles. The two shorter sides of
the field were already fenced but the longer-side
waant. The two new owners of these divisions want
to know what length of fencing they would require,
each for his different abare of the base side. Can
you tell them? Measurement* in yards.
pjX t*|( pit* pt.ipanq *tK> pa* *pj*4 )*8|N **H*l*ti
*
monkey busi
DOES a monkey mak* a man of himself
on April rool'e Day? Who can say?
All we know it that someone's been mon-
keying around with the statement* below
and only one of the entire 10 Is correct.
Something about each of the othera has
gone haywire.
See) If you can figure out which of the
following la the correct statement, and
point out the flaws In the others. Monkey-
wise, I or more correct Is a good score.
l. A striking feature of the British
Rouses of Parliament is Big Sam.
t. Arab traders cross the Sahara desert
in Brasil.
8. Joe Canuck applied for a job with
the'Northwest rooted Police.
4. John Newcomer waved at th* Statue
of liberty as hs sailed up Boston harbor.
Tie-Up at the Ferry
"1 WILL take you across for 36 c*nt* each," said
1 the boatman at the ferry
"It we can get two more passenger* to com* along
will you make it 20 cents each ?" asked a passenger,
"It's a bargain," replied the boatman, "I shall
then make 10 cents more on the trip."
Row many passengers were there?
II* m | jo 'dnojl i*o|ijo in bi si* u.fi a*(| lmui *jqi
o*lie 01 **3 Of o emoo *Aq Wwi mino *W o> qot
iia*j f jo noponp-j qi '*J*p|J ens* oi iu* inia Join
loes oi *! tuis* I *qi mojj f)B*3 0* P* 0uiioq *qx :***?
T"\ R A W a eon-
"^ tlnuous line
that does not
crosa Itself, but
crosses, once, all
the lines and dots
In the flfure
shown and gat a
speedy answer!
Solution, If you
need It, Is *ls-
w h ere en the
, page. Remember,
your answer
must comply
with th* clue.
Hurry Up or Weight?
"T*HIB poker about
1 an tautsftlve
monkey was made
famoui by LsWls
Carroll.
'Ti* aid a mon-
key, loose in a ma-
chine all op, hap-
pened upon a weight
sttached to a long
rope suspended from
a pulley. Jocko In-
quisitively i*ii**
the rope and started
climbing IL Then he
got a surprise.
The weight of the
metal at ene end of
the rope exactly
equalled til a t of
Jocko at the Other
end. Can you figure
out what happened
when Jocko startsd
to climb? Did the
weight remein sta-
tionary, did it move
up or down?
-pastes
oi iqsi** *qi serosa
nqi pee '.iasi*q
-4)onoi> qi ptXojmp
q.i|t|* mj *m o n'nif
4l* a* jnd i|*)| ijii
oi sei-iexe, Kite*
imoiiipp *m -quiii:i
oi pvrtMuiuioo Xj*.*OUI
Jl(l H (lOO* V 'A*.!
iio|in s*|-nu*j |*ui|
-n qi Stioi s* A'ruo
nqjo IMS* B*MI*|IJ*)
-anoo a*.aOui q pee
iqSi** hx (In )*w
W*tM qX J**MV
6. It's possible to take an elevator to
tne top of the Champe Blysees.
6. Robinson Crusoe will alway* remem-
ber Thursday.
7. Traveling by train In the Transvaal
you'd be visiting South Africa.
S. Leading all the animals alphabetical-
ly IS ths ant eater.
t. "The Voyage of the Beagle" la a
tory of mutiny by Nordhoff and Hall.
19. Hanging around the Hanging Gar-
dens you'd be in Tlmbuctoo
P. g. True or falsa?Th* ohap doing
th* monkey shines with the typewriter at
right Is a ehlmpansee.
'Sin-Iuaie
.iileooM I : s-reAfiee *vtSuojm i Term,
euisiei* iiu. l : ' ft leeawit'tiqj. Ueptftmix }-
I :*jnqinojoqi *iJ*g *l *.<( *dur*q3
iix 9 :joq.i*|| mi *n > '-3noi poenoR
isnqiiON t eiHiv t :*t 18 t uimnj
_l^

J p i_

r
IN ONE sense,
'-drawing a picture of himaelf.
In another, he is doing mors than
that.
A oloee study of thia sketch
should suggest a pun-phi*** that
giv* the correct answer to what
he-Is doing.
,, 0|r.puor> uo *|i| u|mi
im iqSitu -
* *H
no I iiMtlf
Striking Account
F the sacred tower of the
temple of the Dalai Lama In
Tibet's holiest city, there are
three great bella. Day and night,
acolytes maintain a vigil in the
temple, and one bell la struck
every 26 seconds, another every
30 seconds, the third every 36
seconds. If they ere all struck
at 12 noon, Tibet time, when
would they next be truck to-
gether? You don't have to figure
thia out down to the laat apllt
second. 090'i-y9*J*9gt pu of
'91 J lflllinf umuiuoa l***on MM!
pno^** 090-l JO 'il JU mimnui
jlq->ao pit* aiu,i* iv :e*n>r*g
It's a Puzzler
YOU can atlll trip up folk* with
this ancient poser:
A father bought a hall and a
bat for his son. The two together
cot li.t. The ball cott t oenta
more than the bat. Bow much did
each coatt
*li3 Xiju jeq *m :*>o*a
AU-A-IU**** fO ||M) qx :J"*V
v ----" Magic Square
-*>
17 24 1 9 15
s 7 416
4 6 13 20 22 3
10 12 19 21
II 18 25 2 9
/ Q. Test You Can Count On
AS YOU can sonfirm by oheck-
** ing it, this is a magic quart.
That Is, all vsrtlcsl and horlssn-
tal and the two diagonal rows of
fivs boxes add to the earns total.
In this ease the figurs 18 Is In
the center box. Another magic
squar* can be constructed from
the figures 1 through 38 with th*
figurs 1 in th* center box. How
long will it require you to con-
struct it suecssafully ?
member, when complete, all
Vertical and horizontal row* and
the two diegonal rows running
through the center must have the
same totals a in th* above
equare that Is, 66.
ti ' "W ' OfJ 'lien : it '91
| 'oj i*i 01 i or i ti
11-uuu :i i 'i gg 'fr-Jioj mu
n 9 si n toj fox iNitim
My Jeteie K. Smith
ACROSS
I. Midnight reversal.
8. What two and two make be-
sides four.
8. Dat of th* Boeton Tea
Party.
S. What there Is often much
ado about.
- Ons more is unlucky.
It. rive sixes and ons.
II. Bill on Which to sss Lin-
coln.
It. 8t. Patrick fasted for------
daya and ------ nights.
14. The violet ihyly ehowe it face
Per (ho** tiisose birth m the
r And Tutedaye *un for them
do* shttne,
Th*r iuctey number1 eeven
or .
IS. Letter* In name of country
with which the polka is popularly
jssocietsd?
DOWN
1. W* saw the musical 'Tea
for ------" and the movie "------
Tall Men "
3. U. 8. entered World War 1
in 1.
3. Mark Twain said It: "I can
live for ----- months on s good
compliment."
A The length of the "poodle
out" 1 -n c h -1 o n g hair In two
month*, if hair grows one-half
Inch a month.
S Sum of the "th, 8th, 9th and
10th number* following 1778.
7. Count backwards from three.
11. Three fifty-five, a.m. or p.m.
15. Sound of this number is In:
Work for tone.
14. Blind Mice.
16. Riddle: A room with nine
rorners has s cst in each corner,
eight cats in front of each cat
and one cat on each cat's tail.
How many cats i.n all ?
-9r -! 'run -eos-ii :in-i :wu-e
r.-> E-8 Ll-T, U1-1 u*oa MSI
us-n 'oto-ii 5-u ie-01 ei-t 01
8UI-9 tt-t IJ-Ieojav te*||B|*a
CtPE-
IHIIIDI.K
8UI.UTION
Find the Hidden Message
JgJ' PEhha M.KCA
JUNIOR readers will be abla to
J find a message that is hidden
In this drawing by following these
directions: First, Identify the pic-
tured objects end spell out their
names In ths boxee below them.
Then transfer the letter* to th*
correspondingly numbered boxes
at ths top of the design where
the hidden message will appear.
..'MUPOOS
jo oo(to*u*J m 1 Sinaaq rux.. !
Saamui mj, jb*j Xoq pooi -**
MJi -inq 'lin* 'boi* -\J\M :(0> J
SB|BB|i*e -BBll Xq B|| 1U>M 01 lj*|l
iji tiJ[qo puni>|4 *qx 'r
By Cupen* Shelter
HORIZONTAL
, 1Performs.
VLucky number.
10-Who wss sleeted from the
temple in Jerussleas? (Acts
21:80)
14Clock face.
15-rPapal veil.
lCleave.
lV-Near.
18Division* of tim*.
20Wedging piece.
32Printer1 measure.
38In whet *e* were Phareoh's
chariots and host drowned?
(Ex. 18:4)
35Bitter vetch.
2 Dry. as wine.
27Caresalv* touch.
28Predatory birds.
30Preclude*.
33Skid* to the tide.
34Eccentric wheel-part
S5rorsy*.
38Subway.
38What giant was lain by
Dsvid? 11 Sam. 17:4)
41Exclama tioa.
?3Insect
43Eternity.
44Golf mound.
46Topaz hummingbird.
48Sun god.
47-Spadrcee.
SOWhat are believers warned
not to. lie against? (Jas. 3:14>
52Goddees ef dawn.
S3Shabby.
s^g^1
58 Worthless bit.
soLand-mea
_ -Meager.
88Therefore.
ile* Had dwelt In Ar
_ giv
the children of Lot? (Deut
iven
71Whst p*
prior to th* land being
to th
3:10)
73Musician* baton.
75Spikensrd.
7Country reed*
77Curved molding.
VERTICAL
1Jewish month.
3Quote.
3Symbol for tantalus.
4Cunning
5Flies aloft.
8Wanders from truth.
7Duct
8Street railway iabbr.<
aA border city in the land ef
Judah (Josh. 16:38)
10Snoop.
11Ai what place were Joshua's
men defeated? (Jean. 7:4)
13Inner lining of the iris.
ISPeiutentisl sosas
18Lampreys.
31Card sjaaa*.
34-Mistruat.
28Descendants of
37-Oreek letter.
30-Sp}/t pulse.
31College cheer.
SS^Of the moo
SiShoshonesn Indian/
S3Observed.
66Soirit of the sir.
S8 Asparagus.
87To what were the breast-
plates of the locusts com-
pared? (Rev. 8:6)
86Stupor.
60Climax. -
B-Serf.
63Knob
66In addition.
66 Transgression
67How many mites did the poor
widow thro* into the trea-
sury? Mark 12.43)
70Which of Judah'* ons was
slain by the Lord? (Gen. 38:7)
72-Mother.
74Symbol for silver.
3* fatlsnael.
34-Wh
61How man herns has the
dragon? (Rev. 123)
eeProposed international lan-
-luack'bird.
Vho a the reputed author ef
the Psalms?
37Dubious.
StTibetan jaseile.
43Who ewaed the field in w|
Abrahas was buried* '
mm
46WetehfuX
46^ToB?^
46Ooeesv
iw>ni>i. isst. j. r***m* ay*ei*s. iM
e
ffi
3-30
RIDDLES
Why Is a- half
moon heavier
than a full moon?
-mum 1
1 aooui iinj
invag :jmiiv
What beverage
Is always a re-
minder of the be-
ginning of time?
(x> *J. :J***T
Anagrambles
IN THIS challenging word game
you are given a common word
and an extra letter. You must
make a new word with the oom-
bined letters. Por example:
BARD plus E is BREAD. Now
try these
1. TART plus E Is ........?
2. WATER plus H is.......?
3. SHORE plus I Is........7
A OTHER plus Y is........7
8. GRINS plus E Is........?
6. GAINS plus L Is........T
7. SHARE plus E Is........?
8. EAGLE plus L is........?
8. REFER plus T Is........?
IS BTAJR plus G is........?
As a party garas, give guests a
Hat of "Angramblee." set a Urn*
limit and award a prise tor the
best score..
inuo '01 i*j
-j.*jL e :*S*nv "I :*Jeii t eut\vi
I UU 9 a-jo*mx t :jl*o|
I :i|is*js4'g :t**Al I !""'
8BM
c-itrr. ;n : .1 rn?
PV PtECEB^nCC HE
IT ' I -m;:MI'1- r- SI
-, nenrnn
L Ff HBCrE
nn6 i: >*c,r i-
IL'M^BS r-i- k it'

n. vi : ,,k".
r'L'ilt i t*k~ . .tit
:n?tv ..itr,\-.
i-BJuaawuRD ri;nxB suli-tmii
8
Mi i Hi H!



* *f t r m r w

<



IM^--............IIIIIM ! .I'll"................. I.
-----HI *ttMH|.....I'T' '" "f|'"^.v^":';r ----
e
in
jjljlJIJiilJiiiW : j:;ii .,: ::..:. :^/- N ,;,.,. -......... T^.., ,' ..-^.'. i^r.......V, ... ^-v,, MM^. > ..
:.:-:..:.M.:.:.W,m.-K.|-:-WX.;.|-v. ;:- -....
HBtglESS OF THE STARK BEAUTY of the valley below, two Marines relax for a few minutes
-*t tfceir observation post on hill not far iron the front lines somewhere in North Korea.
FIRE FIGHTER PERCHES ATOP aerial ladder of a Are truck and directs stream of water over a
warehouse wall at a Detroit, Mich., gasket firm, but flamet finally destroyed the building.
irr
BLOOMING of spring shows
up in this scoop bonnet of
Milan straw (top) and disc
silhouette bonnt of gray and
yellow Milan straw (bottom),
from the Vernal collection.
SLIDING DOWN THE WAYS at a shipyard near New Orleans Is the world's first "amphibious" sulphur mining plant. Free-
port Sulphur company will operate it at Bay Ste. Elaine, La. Other barge-based plants also are to be constructed soon.
, ..-,._

AT CONTROLS of a B-50D flight simulator, Maj. T. W. Bow-
n : at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, O.
ONLY CHURCH IN THE WORLD where worshippers enter through Ihe belfry is St. Elizabeth's
Catholic church in Eureka Springs, Ark. R. C. Kerens built church in memory of parents.
King featurtt ByiidtemU
TO the SHORES of WAIKIKI
RACING THROUGH the waves on a surfboard off world-famous Waikiki beach in Hono-
lulu sounds like an invitation from a travel agency folder instead of the off-duty rec-
reation enjoyed by some" lucky United States Marines. Naturally a Marine's life is not an
easy one, but S/Sgt. Yokobaitis will quickly agree that duty with the Fleet Marine Fore*
in the Pacific isn't too rugged. Uniform of the day after hours is likely to be a pair of com-
fortable slacks, flashy aloha shirt and a floppy cocoanut hat, even at Honolulu night spots.
But, unlike tourists, Marines aren't on vacation. They must be ready for action anywhere;
At company PX, YokoboiMs looks ovor a now slack of bright sport shbts offered by dork.
Surf boat riding h favorito sport at Waiklkl boat*. Marino must kooo weapons In sbapa.


Canal Zone policeman Jim H atcher, president of the Canal
Zone Police Association, chai rman of the Policemens' Ball
Committee and foremost figh ter for back overtime for CZ's
finest.
to Ti f T)
American
Supplement
PANAMA, B. r, SUNDAY. MARCH U, 1M
.>
H


0
Review Of The Week
WORLD-WIDE
ISTHMIAN
SPORTS
IKE LOOKED TO be headed for the Presidential
nomination just about as fast as six years ago his
forces, headed by Gen. George Patton, carved through
the opposition in France and Germany.
At that time the question was how long before Ike
hc^geT/back1* qUe8,l0n seems to be how lon& before
WH^5a.yv.'r Mi"i!e^ta;^prJmary' ln wnlch h|s ame -
7tT,22\1 Ji* n the ba,lot. Eisenhower pushed faver- over to a French banking oncern as soon as it re-
.L?Lcandidate Harold Stassen within a few thous- opens.
Miici votes. ^_ o ..
._...-,. _, The cigaret factory "affaire," which sent two news-
w a,I,ihe Elsenhower votes had to be written in , who apparently spoke out of turn, to-jall re^
c1.tbe.v?tinP PaPer cently was still making headlines last week.
SEVERAL THOUSANDS OF dollars may be back ln
circulation ln Panam this week, depending on how
bad the depositors of the Panama Trust Co. need the
money which has been hog-tied since March 1951.
The Trust Co. bank was well on the way to reopen-
ing this week following receipt by the Chase Nation-
al of $1,500,000 from the U.8, Export-Import Bank to
pay off money Hotel El Panam owes the bank and
other creditors.
How many depositors will make withdrawals when
the bank opens, probably Wednesday, is over-shadow-
ed by the fact that control of the bank will be turned
EDDIE ARMISTEAD, a 17-year-old Balboa High
School student, Friday night raced to a thrilling vic-
tory in the first Panam motorcycle championship
trophy race held at the Panam National Stadium.
Armistead took advantage of a break when favorita
Ray Magan fell after leading for more than half tha
distance in the big race. Magan, however, earned tha
plaudits of the crowd by getting back on his Wke to
make a brilliant recovery and challenge Eddie for the
lead in the final lap.
The Cristobal High School Tigers battled ten innings
Thursday night at Mt. Hop Stadium to edge Powells
6-4 and take over undisputed possession of first .place
in the second half of the Atlantic Twilight League.
The CH8 team are first half champions and now
J&SSffilS l f the VOters had trouble ^Bra'ndon* SttS? o^TfTheTr.ncTp'ata in the ^rC' H^l^l^l^n^S^^
7E i'tolf.eral '"am!: e_election author- bid to open a cigaret-making factoryW. blistering* %*?^^&tVZ\Z^? pthet thUr8"
ltles accepted -Ike' as a vote for Elsenhower.
howtr in^7le ne uncce"fnl stand against Eisen-
nnhu o ?w jiamPshi". the second principal Re-
SelrwVt^lll^' 8en:uRbfrt A. Taft made a stra-
tegic witnarawal from the New Jersey primaries no charge against President /.rosemena and one of
doubt according to those pre-arranged plans which Ministers.
Prominent newsmen from the U.S. and Latin
America were very much in the news here this
charged that "a deal was obvious" when President
Alciblades Arosemena's cabinet agreed to grant Elsen-
mann a much-revised contract to open the factory.
Eisenmann not only hurled the charge, but he called
names as well and took steps toward filing a formal
his
are held accountable for ail precipitate withdrawals!
i ?17 T?n lsan 0ld and wllv Political bird, and
is not Jikelv to Suffer rout hnmhlu
week.
Inter-American Press Association officers and
directors set up camp in Hotel El Panam for their
annual meeting and, among other things, accept-
ed 2* application* for membership but tamed
thumb* down on the Cuban Communist daily,
"Hoy," for obvious reasons.
Among the new members were Time and For-
tune magazines and the dally N.Y. Journal-Amer-
ican.
Most important decision adopted as the week
ended was a plan to organise a newsprint "pool"
to alleviate newsprint shortages in Latin America.
not likely to suffer rout humbly.
^J^"*" hf ducked a fight with Ike ln New Jersey
lllalc0,m|r,8.-up Kv"*l Primaries In which,-unopl
P^'n^LE'?''rlth10we.r' n? ls pretty sure to roll up some
impressive looking totals.
*w~ .Kfr' wher> lke"s forces were surging across
Europe they ran out of steam a few times The same
might happen politically.
-JIB ks to be rolling wen right now, but there
2ukLbc,Som geni tne Republican presidential nod in the end there When Lenworth N. Este, a Panamanian office worker
could he a lot of ebbing and flowing of fortunes be- employed by the U.S. Army here, left home last Sun-
lore hand. day he had no Idea he would be slapped in Jail on a
o ----- charge of "attempted assassination" of a presidential-
The Korean peace talks continued In an cxemplarl- candidate,
ly peaceful matter, with nothing occurring to disturb ^te complied with a request of a lady friend to
the tranquillity of the deadlock. drive her to a place called Pan1 de Azcar. Being some-
what of a neutral where politics are concerned, he
Ambitious young officers in the United States forces dldn't mind what her political affiliations were,
might do well to learn up on fan tan, mah Jong and U turned 0ut that she was a member of an opposi- ^"S?"!? hi1? W"shp J^t Tf i8UiVna,m,.d ?S
other Gh new pastimes, because by the time they get "on political group and that she was going In the defe ndents Ihe I B of New York t* IB C Illinois,
some seniority they're likely to have to stand watches eW ^".cal meeting in favor of candidate ^/oV^^^^^X, wirff^f rhi, Z Nn, ru
in the truce tent at Panmuniom and it would h* Co' Jose A. Remon.
hnndv tn hi o^ro ~ _____LJ ... .." Prcthi innti 1, ..,
day while Georgy Carty was the loser.
In the Pacific Twilight League the Balboa High
School alfo took the spotlight in their loop by play-
ing good ball In the second half to earn a tie for first
place with the Balboa Brewers and the Gibraltar Life
Insurance nines.
Wednesday the Panam Merchants whitewashed the
High 8chool team 5-0 behind the brilliant no-hit
hurling of Webb Hearn to create the triple tie.
Panam Featherweight champion Federico Plum-
mer Wednesday signed to meet Cuban Featherweight
Champion Ciro Morasen ln a ten-round bout April 20
at the Panam Olympic Stadium.
Morasen, rated fifth 126-pounder in the world in
the March issue of "The Ring" magazine, will arrive
in Panam during the second week of April to com-
plete hie training heft. He will be accompanied by his
manager and trainer.
The complete program to be promoted by Carlos
Delvalle, will be presented to the Panam Boxing
Commission for approval tonight.
The Government has aimed a knockout blow at the
king of the boxing world.
The Anti-Trust Division of the Justice Department
filed a suit in federal court in New York Tuesday. In
it. the International Boxing Clubs of New York and
Illinois are charged with conspiracy to "restrain and
!?.?."/&to ha,ve1_somi common ground with the repre-
sentatives of the other side.
As has been the case for five months now, the air
war was the only fighting department ln which much
business was done.
-.wbre8 Scored a 9" wln over M,W ln k'"s fr the
The United Nations lost four other planes, how-
During the week Sabre pilots encountered a new-
type Red fighter which is probably undergoing
evaluation trials under combat conditions.
For both planes and pilots the Russians have found
the Korean war a convenient and effective proving
With the belief already prevalent that the present
S?L .f 'Of ?dge in Performance over the present
babres, the United States authorities hastily follow-
ed up the news of the arrival of the new Red plane
with a promise that a better-engined Sabre would
i*' in the air soon.
mZFB }l no stress on the uct that the reference
was to the air over the United States
ML.lh.i!tL Vu .K,rea Lhe outnumbered United
Slates fighter pilots looked as though they would
nave to fry the present model Sabres for another six
ri:onths at least.
J& an eruption of a war much older than that in
hr3*' 7k Pean Parted asking, presumably
. on 8abre Pilots, where were all the Navy being kept secret, so far.
Pretty soon he was in the jug and accused of "going
down a side road."
The judge, however, couldn't find any legal
grounds on which to hold Este, the woman and an-
other friend of hers, but ordered three more, whom
Este had not seen until they were brought together
ln jail, held for carrying concealed weapons. -,
Brought before the Governor the three strangers to
Este were fined $600 each.
Bones found last weekend in Old Panama
awakened some hope that a trace had been found
f Gosta Videgaard, the rich Swedish mining en-
gineer who disappeared on Jan. $5.
The bones were found to have been there for
too long a time to be Videgaard's, so attention
was turned toward proving whether they were of
Bolivar Sacre, who disappeared several years ago.
A dramatic plane crash two miles off the San Bias
isle of Allgandl ended on a happy note as all three
men aboard lived to tell the tale. The lucky three
were Victor Indiausu. Alberto (Negro) Arias and Dr.
Ignacio Fabrega. Cool-headed Fabrega, a plastic
surgeon by profession, borrowed a $2 camera to record
the story a short time after it happened.
Speculation was still rife this week as another
Army post came under discussion in the possible
transfer site for the Panama Canal Company. The
latest spot named was Coroza 1.
Two Army members of the Secretary of the Ar-
my's office have already returned to Washington to
file their report, although their recommendations are
Smt'* * mUCh Was heard of at tne tlme of the
unification controversy?
blf !>r Forct over Korea has so far shot down
about 250 Migs to the Navy's three, which, it ls held
in some quarters, is no mighty Justification of the
N&vys claim to be the United States' No. 1 mobile
!lc Jrce' in th.atKrea la Just such a distant area
as the Navy claimed Itself best able to cope with.
The Navy replies that it* Jets are doing plenty of
tn k but, so It happens, where the Migs ain't
..i this Air Force vs. Navy, the score happily enough
tul seems to stand at 0-0 planes shot down
li^Cub** Wltled flulck,y a"0" comfortably Into power
The second week after his latest revolution saw no
divident votes, of any caliber, registered.
in Europe, though there was a lot ot criticism of
M-i.nnameiU programs the French and British Houses
< KPi-resentatlves approved their countries' defense
Two freak accidents and three deaths were record-
ed this week in the Canal Zone. A young motorcyclist
who flew off his cycle and through the window of a
passenger car was recuperating at Gorgas.
While the Pedro Miguel Housing Office workers
were thankful that they escaped unhurt when an
unhinged carryall crashed into an eight-inch con-
crete wall of their building.
. 2SS ub2ux ali tht United States taxpayer cam
"'i1!' aak.
He can hardly deny to others a Tight toe o
< iierwhes himself the right to gripe himself hoarse
V( IfcXi:
Ji/iL so long at, the money it forthcoming the ariD-
ls strictly permissible,
..ACL: of same is almost suspicious indeed.
------------r-^-
' K TWO

ls president of the I.B.C. and Wlrtz is his right hand
man.
What the anti-trust suit claims is that the I.B.C.
has a stranglehold on title bouts and that other pro-
motional outfits are being frozen out. It also claims
the I.B.C. has a monopoly on radio, television and
motion pictures rights to those title scraps.
The Anti-Trust Division lso charges the I.B.C.
with insisting on fighters signing an exclusive con-
tract with the outfit before getting a chance at a title.
A federal Grand Jury Investigating professional box-
- ing recommended a "restraint of trade" suit two weeks
ago after filing a presentment to Judge William Bon-
dy. The Grand Jury has been sitting since last Octo-
ber and has questioned about 30 witnesses.
Special Justice Department Assistant Harold Las-
ser. who prepared the case, says the "suit has been
brought... to remove the monopolistic control of...
boxing imposed by these defendents." La'sser says that
Chairman Bob Christenberry of the New York State
Athletic Commission gave the Justice Department his
full cooperation in the investigation.
Norris or other officials of the I.B.C. have not been
reached for comment.
The Physical Education and Recreation Branch will
sponsor a swim meet at the Gamboa Pool on Sundav.
30 at 4 p m. The program will include both junior and
senior events. Entry forms for the mee,t may be ob-
tained at any US.-Rate gymnasium or pool.
The attention of all contestants and spectators is
called to the change of starting time of the meet. The
meet was originally scheduled to start at 2 p.m. but
has been changed to 4 p.m. to avoid conflicting with
the dedication ceremonies at the Gamboa Union
Church, i
This mett is expected to attract an outstanding group
of swimmers from all Zone communities as well as the
Armed Forces.
Young light-heavyweight Harold Johnson ls ask-
ing for another change to avenge the family name.
Johnson wants a second try at Heavyweight Cham-
pion Joe Walcott following an upset decision over
Clarence Henry Monday night in Philadelphia. Wal-
cott holds wins over both JohnsonsJunior and senior.
Johnson's other choice is Light Heavyweight Cham-
pion Joey Maxim. Johnson weighed only 178 pounds
Mondsy night snd would rather stay In his own divi-
sion.
A near-upset took place in Boston Monday night
where Featherweight Champion Sandy Saddler had
to come off the canvas before kayoing Tommy Col-
lins in a non-title go. Collins dropped Saddler in the
first round the only time the Champ has aver been
down as a pro but couldn't keep him there. Sad-
dler caught up with Collins in the' fifth round and
the bout was stopped.
It was a close call but the mint julep apparently
will be around again for the Kentucky Derby in May.
Members from "dry" countries tried to gang up on
the mint Julep in the Kentucky House of Representa-
tives. They wanted the 1ulep outlawed and came
within one vote of turning the Derby into a 'lunch
basket-' event.
The pro-Julep bill passed the House and is expected
to meet, approval in the Senate so the trademark
of the Run for the Roses probably will stay.
i i i i
SUNDAY^ MARCri 23,' 62


a,ibiaaaaaaaaaa^. i ^waaa^a^aaaa^^a^^aaa^^^ n- i--i i ... ., -
Premier Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle
rPHE DARDANELLES have been fought over by empire builders
* since the Trojan War. Persian conqueror Xerxes crossed from
Asia into Europe over the straits in 460 B.C. and Alexander went
the other way In 334 B.C. The Crimean War was fought to keep the
straits from Russian control. In a more romantic vein, Leander is
alleged to have swum the Dardanelles (then called the Hellespont)
nightly to visit his love, Hero. His swimming feat was matched once
by the English poet Byron and also by the late adventurer Richard
Halliburton. But, it te Soviet pressure on Turkey that brings the
historic waterway in( the news today. Russia is sensitive about
the Dardanelles because they offer a sea gatewaythe only one
from the Mediterranean to the Soviet Black Sea shores. As one of
the losers in World War I, Turkey was forbidden by the Lausanne
Treaty to fortify strip along the Dardanelles and Bosphorus. The
Montreux convention of 1936, noting the ominous rise of Hitler, per-
mitted the Turks to refortify the area, and, if at war or threatened
by aggression, to close the straits. With Turkey likely to be admitted
to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Russia Is taking an even
harder look at the Dardanelles. The Kremlin recently warned that
Turkish entry Into the Atlantic alliance would be viewed as "an act
of aggression" against Russia.
New Swim Suits Show Less,
But Girls Still Rate Stares
MIAMI BEACH, Fla.. March,
(U.P.i A leading swim wear
designer reports that once-
ii-hionable nudity Is being Hid-'
den at the bathing beaches this
ye- . I
. or that reason, paradoxically
p .. are getting more ogles than;
be "ore. i
... adoxical, perhaps, but pret- i
ty, certainly, were Marglt Fell-
er's 1952 Cole of California de-!
signs as displayed on a covey
oi curvy models at the ocean-
side boardwalk of the Roney
Plaza Hotel. To the untutored
eye, they looked just about as
iii' iressed as ever.
nevertheless petite Miss Fell-
u, stoutly maintained that her i
lttle suits were clear lllustra-!
ions of an alleged new feeling
' n the fashion world that "nud-
tv is no longer nice.''
-he pointed out that Virtually
tli of her designs this year raise
he suit in back by a few verta-
>rae. block the view of hips with
i bit of scalloping or cuffing,
ind make milady bather's decol-
ctage loom less. Bold Bikinis
ind tiny two-piece affairslike
hose back In the good old days
ire now taboo, she said.
"Even though nudity is be-
nt hit hard," said Miss rel-
ief, "men are looking at their
women more intently than in
the season of the Bikini.
" "ou see, the American man
s, bless his heart, really embar-
rassed by exposure. BacK In Bik-
ini time, he would look, blush,
land look away. Now, with pru-
dence returning in women's
swim suits, the man has a good
ixcuse for looking longerS
he American malo llkej
that little Cobean man in The
New Yorker cartoons sees ln|
his mind whatever he wants to
e. nnj-way," she Said.
The designers said over-brief
wim suit styles in reeent years
aye served only to show "how
mazinely few women have good
gures." The Cole fashions this
ear are engineered to make
hem look less lumpy.
There is, for Instance the
"wing-dlng bra," built with a
flange out front for use In crea-
ting an optical Illusion. If fate
has been unprovldentlal. you
flip the flange and right away
you look like J. Russell. But if
you look like Jane in the first
place, you flip the "wingding"
flange the other way and then
you're what you can "eclipsed."
and girls who want to go on TV
or book Jackets should never
give It that second flip.
Miss Fellegl said he sees no
likelihood of deflation In busts In
the near future. For one thing,
women are exercising more and
are bustler by nature now than
they were a few years ago.
"It's encouraging to note that
our women are now having to
depend less on artifice than on
themselves," Miss Fellegl said.
Army imposes Curb
On War Souvenirs
WASHINGTON, D. C, March
(UP) A deluge of dangerous
Korean war souvenirs into the
United States has prompted the
armed services to announce a
new military regulation pro-
hibiting the Importation of
more than one wen ponpistol
or rifleby returning service
men.
The order, In addition, bans
other Korean 'liberated" Items
such as objects of art, private
civilian articles, and other types
of war loot unless the service
man can show title to them. Ex-
cepted from the ban are swords
bayonets, and knives, but com-
manding officers are also given
the discretion to limit the ser-
vice man's accumulution of the
latter.
The joint service directive Is
a revision of a World War II
Army regulation. Its primary
aim Is to prevent.the killing and
maiming of American civilians
by Communist-made weapons,
either through their own care-
lessness or at the hands of cri-
minals.
A strict plan has been set-up
whereby the returi in? military
personnelenlisted and officer
must subject their weapons to
inspection and registration so
that they c*n be traced should
any find their way into the
underwork
The new precaution Is not
foolproof, but Is as close to it as
the military can vision and Is
being publicized with the added
purpose of frightening the pub-
lic Into an awareness of the
danger of havinc these lethal
trophies around their hom"c
HORIZONTAL
1- -Minulc 53- -Biblical 92- Summit
particle character 93- American
5- -Reckoned 55- -Bristlclike patriot
chrono- organ 94- -Portended
lomcally 56- -American 95- -Occupied
10- -Has humorist a snug
courage 57- -Inquiry retreat
15- -Crowlike for a 97- Cultivated
birds missing 100 Wall
19- -Italian article sections
resort 58 Kettle. 101 Rear
20- -Pointless drum append-
21- -Avoid 60- -Human age
22- -One of the being 103 -North
Great 61- -War American
Lakes vessels rails
23- -Dill 63- Student of 104 -Placed
24- -Sell heredity 103 Countv in
25- -Character 65- Possessive England
in "Oliver pronoun 109- Rodent
Twist 66- -North 110 -Pertain-
28- -Movie American ing toa
27 Rubbing perennial shore
gently 67 -Estimates 114- -"Utilizer
29- -Pastry again 115- -Seraglio
31 -Bleach 74- -Saviors 117- -Egg-
33- -Rave 81 -High shapod
31- -Pert inning priest .of 119- -Protuber-
to sound Israel ance
36 -All of an 82 -Indcate 120 -Unusual
organism 83 -Escapes 121- -Summon
except the 84- Exclama- forth
germ cells tion of 122 -Black
37- Pertaining disgust bird
to old age 83 -8port 123 -Charles
40 Publisher 67- -Oriental Lamb
42- -Appraisers guitar 124 Mascu-
46- Ascended 88- -Ascertains line
47- Resound deduction name
48 -Sailor of weight 123 Prevent
slang i 89- -Sheltered from
50 -Survival inlet action
61 -Failed, 90 Metal 126- -Begin
to keep tag of 127 Son of
52- -Rank a-lace Adam
1Exclama-
tion of
despair
2Color
3River In
Germany
4Automo-
bihst
5Heavenly
6Concerning
7Pungent
odor
8Conclusion
9Plunderers
10Vanquish
IIHumming-
bird
12 Storm
13Prepares
for pub-
lication
14Elder
15Collapses
16Melody
17Droop
18Covered
with
small
figures
(her i
28Kind of
cabbage
30Tavern
32Persian
poet
34Merchant
30Ecclesias-
tical rep-
resentative
37Vegetable
mixture
38Wear
away
39Sense
organs
VERTICAL
40Cessation
of hos-
tilities
41-Style of
type
43-Fragrant
oleoresin
4MCere-
monies
45- Meager
47Ask
earnestly
49Small
child
52Engrosses
53Ugly old
woman
64Persona
belonging
by birth
67Union of
three
59 Dwells
62Definite
article
64 -Vehicle
67Daughter
of King
Lear
68Encomium
69Grinding
machines
7-Single
thing
71 Revolving
part
72-Military
store-
houses
73Weight
of India
74Explosive
devices
75Exalts the
spirit
76 Grimly
terrible
77Certain
days in
the Roman
calendar
78Species
of lyric
poem
7--Untwist
80 Rude
structures
86 ShacU
89- -Pardons
91Rip
94Lure
96Served
98Previous
99 Masculin.
name
100 Evident
102Depart
104Metric
unit of
capacitv
105Swell of
the sea
106 GeolOk.if
ridge>
107Nothing
more
than
108Jogging
pace
110Fluid
rock
IIIActor'
part
112 Mine
entrance
113Feminine
name
116Piece
out
118 -Cistera
Avrraf* time ml l.ltlo- M n.lm.,1Dlitrtoultd > Km* Ptaiuraa Syndic!
,Answer tc bt found eatewhere h the Sunday Aanertcaa)
Male Carvers Boost
Wooden Platter Fad
STURBRIDGE, Mass. (UP)
A wood turner at Old Sturbridge
Village considers the mounting
popularity of wooden platters
one of the major victories of
the male side In the battle of
the sexes.
Tony La Rocco says harried
males can now relax while they
.carve elusive roasts on the
plates, some of which are made
with Imbedded spikes to hold
the piece de ri stance in place.
But that's not all. The wood-
en platteiu made at the operat-
ing prototype of a 1790 New
England village can be turned
over and used for pie when It's
'*" for dessert.
Cl Lists 4 Girls
He Wants To Marry
OAFFNEY, 8. C. (UP) The
.weaker sex may be famous for
abrupt changes of m+nd. but a
young soldier has put In a bid
for the "change of heart" prize.
The 20-year-old soldier home
on furlough, filed applications to
marry four women.
The Casanova in khaki learned
while filing his original appli-
cationthat South Carolina law
didn't require him to marry the
first girl, ao, he promptly filed
out three more Intentions to
marry
His comment ... "I'll make my
choice later."
Strange Disease
Kills Philippine
Coconut Trees
MANILA, P. I. A mys-
terious disease is caus'ng $750,-
000 damage annually to coconut
trees In one of the Philippines"
principal copra producing re-
gions.
Known as kadang kad..ng,
the disease la prevalent in
southern Luzon and is not
known to occur in any other
part of the world
A survey showed that more
than 1.500,000 coconut-bearing
trees are dying from the disease.
Dying trees produce few or no
nuts, which are the source o
copra, one of the Island's prin-
cipal export crops.
TOW? tyW&iV
SuMfwV
.;**5fl(t*ii #**a
StffawtaMsit
fAGE THREL
O/'i



THE PANAMA AMERICAN
fWNID ANO> PUBLISHED BY TM PANAMA AMKMCAN PKEM, l"J.
FOUNDED IY N*X90N ROUKSaVKU. IN MM
MARMODIO ARIAS, E0IT.ON
T. H SrffftVf . O. BOX t4 PANAMA, "f. Or P.
TtLrpHONt Panama no 2-0740 B Lineb)
CABIE Adoris- PAMAMBMICAN. PANAMA
CWON OrFlCBi 12.17 CENTRA!. AVENUE BETWEEN 12TH ANO 13TH STREET
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LOCAL * *lt
PElT MONTH. IN ADVANCE ____________I______________ t.70 .SO
.'O! III MONTH. IN ADVANCE .80 13 OO
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POETS' CORNER
LOOKING
doVvn
TICTT FROM A MILE VT
(From The Ken yon Review)
ON CONNEC- Sharp as his thought, undimmed
by compromise.
Still In his Tennessee gaze, yon
might surprise
Below me the broken ribs of Con- The last untarnished glance
nectlcut from Priam's crown;
Wallow In the bed o Lake Sal- And when he speaksby infidels
tonstall. | ringed round
The vast sea-stubble of antiquity The hom ol Roland sounds Its
Summer Is over, the trees rust, it
is Fall
Below me farmland spreads Its
tapestry.
Darned and patched, over kwt
mountain spines.
Under me cities, Meriden. Mid-
dle town.
Cluster and fume, as rich as pla-
tinum mines.
This tapestry to the ragged edge
of towns,
These towns to the russet edge of
the tapestry- -
The Chamber of Commerce an-
nexing geology.
X see the cities hired on hurled
bones
Give off their swarms a soot
black pennant swirled
Above the bier of the fallen war-
rior.
The antique splendor of the phy-
sical world.
L Merrill Moore
THIS SIDE OF APRIL
(From The Christian Science
Monitor)
This side of April
and the far side of March
I sow In the thawing woods,
under pine and larch.
wider birch and hemlock,
under tamarack,
on a windless morning.
Spring came back.
Vv through the moulder,
through the melting snow.
I saw the grass, young grass,
thin grass grow.
Noiseless through the still wood,
wild things came;
rahbit and red fox.
a fine buck, lame,
but with him a shy doe
a-Jd with her, a fawn.
Thev stood trembling
In the gentle dawn.
Frances Frost
SONNET FOR A SOl'THERNRR
(From The BeMt Poetry Journal)
1/ vou can bring yourself to
meet his eyes.
You'll face a pair could look the
devil down
Rer-'v to smile, but not afraid to
frown.
last apprise.
You still can see them as you
turn aside
Into the old Confederate burial-
ground:
Six white Ionic pillars rearing
tall.
Gone Is the house of which they
were the pride;
But there they stand, on bedrock
based profound.
With nothing mortal to uphold
at all.
k
Eurene flaan
ON THE HEATH OF MY
GREAT-AUNT
(From KaleMegraph)
When I was very young, my
great-aunt, proud
Of her stern fathers, told me how
they plowed
From dusk to sun-up; how their
cows were sleek
From care; how white the cra-
dles were; how neat
The hearth was laid; ho* trim
the eaves were thatched.
She tod how wide the little door
unlatched
To driven bard or saint; how
sparse they fed
On tea and kale, and how they
mixed the bread
Less sweet on days of fast; and
how they danced.
For all their toil, whenever mu-
sic chanced.
O much is lost since first she
.praised my sires.
My great-aunt, now herself, has
left her fires
And teacups to re-clasp her. sto-
ried dead
And to become what she inherit-
ed.
Dear scattered lords, past fid-
dling and past keening.
Past all but peace, receive her
now she's leaning
This moment on your centuries
for rest.
Receive her. ancient fathers,
tired and blest.
And make for her a holy room
in death
As she made one for you of living
. breath.
So wide her praises were that
gave you honor.
So narrow is the grave they fold
upon her.
Marie MeAnMff
, . ANO IT COMES OUT HEREThis complicated array of tubes and other apparatus at Oak
Ridge, Tenn., National Laboratory, merely siphons off one of the by-products of the bf atomic pile.
B. J. Massey Is sealing off a tube of tritium, which has made its way through lh man-made
"jungle." This was one of the Oak Rtdge operations shown'to newspaper reporters and photogra-
phers for the first time, as they watched how the atomic pile "cooks" and processes radioactive iso-
topes for medical and Industrial uses, as well as for atomic bomb production._________
Pearson's Merry Go Round
Herewith find solution to Sunday Crossword Puz-
zle No 417. published today
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Dl>lriko(4 ?, KIM Pmibtm SynIiCAU
Drew Pearson says: Plentiful civilian goods re-
sult from alow military production; I/.S. Air
Farce getting behind Rasnia; Military and
civilians debate gans or batter.
WASHINGTON./ Last week the most Inter-
esting economic development since June 1950 took
place.
Until last week, government officials in charge
of military production had been warning that
the second quarter of 1952 would be the tightest
of alL
This was the period when industry would re-
ally feel the pinch of scarce civilian goods, would
be drastically curtailed on the manufacture of
radios, TV sets, refrigerators, autos and buildings.
This was the warning that came from the of-
fice of Defense Mobillaer Charles E. Wilson and
subordinates of Secretary of Defense Bob Lovctt.
Next week, however, the second quarter of ,1952
begins. Yet, as it approaches, materials. Instead
of being tight, suddenly have loosened up.
Instead of cutting down on autos, government
chiefs last week called in the motor mogus and
handed them more materials.
instead of cutting down on building construc-
tion, the builders were given more steel.
Meanwhile aluminum was available for storm
doors, farm gates, civilian window sashes.
There were plenty of radio and TV sets on
hand. Other civilian goods seemed plentiful.
In other words, the dire prediction of Washing-
ton military and productions chiefs was all wet.
GUNS OR BITTER
Behind this has been one of the most import-
ant inner administration debates in all the gov-
ernment.
It has been kept so quiet that few people have
known about it, but it gets lo the bottom of both
the nation's security and the nation's economic
prosperity.
In brief, it's the debate over which to produce
guns or butter.
The same debate raged under Roosevelt prior
to Pearl Harbor, but was solved In part, by a
stronger President, in part by the Japanese at-
tack on Dec. 7, 1941.
Today the debate is between the Joint Chiefs
of Staff who favor guns; and certain production
men with long association in private business led
by Secretary of Defense Lovett and Defense Mo-
bilisier Wilson, who want both guns and butter.
The above, of course, is an oversimplification
of the Issue
The case is neither black nor white. It is gray,
with something to be said, on both sides.
The leaders of both schools are sincere, patrio-
tic men.
Furthermore, the military have helped to de-
feat themselves by being alow on production.
However, the results are inescapable, and can
be summarized as follows:
D'The U.S. arms program has bogged down
We are way behind Russia in airplanes, and have
fallen far below the military equipment pro-
mises we made Europe. This is one reason for the
economic and political crisis in Europe today.
2) Because the arms program is so far behind.
" defense material with the notable execu-
tion of copper is now surplus Actually the
aluminum companies, to use the words of one
executive, "have aluminum running out of our
ears," This is the reason why automobile and
construction companies suddenly have had un-
expected materials dumped into their amazed
laps.
DONT STRAIN THE ECONOMY
The full story goes back to the days right af-
ter the Korean Invasion when the new arms pro-
gram was thrown together.
At that time the let's-not-straW-the-economy"
advisers urged that rearmament be spaced out
over a longer period of time, that if rushed too
suddenly it would throw civilian economy out of
gear.
We should mobilize gradually, they urged,
rather than in a sudden spurt which would leave
civilian industry starved for materials.
In brief, civilian leaders said: "If we tak*
things gradually, we can have both guns and
butter."
Though the Joint Chiefs of Staff didn't like It,
their chief, Secretary of Defense George Mar-
shall, himself a general, concurred with this idea
and It was adopted.
Later, last fall, the situation was reviewed
again.
By this time it was apparent that the Com-
munists were sending superior jet fighter .forre
to Korea, and reports from behind the Iron Cur-
tain Indicated that the over-all Russian air
strength was ahead of ours.
Because of this. Gen. Hoyt Vandenberg. air
chief of staff, argued Inside the Joint Chiefs of
Staff'that the Air Force must have 143 air
groups, and the Joint Chiefs supported him.
SLOW MILITARY PROMOTION
In the final showdown, however, Defense Mo-
bilker Wilson urged a slower build-up, and when
the matter went to the White House, President
Truman backed him tip.
Instead of building 143 air groups by the end
of 1953, they will now be built by the end of
1954.
What happened regarding airplanes also hap-
pened regarding other military goods.
The entire program was stretched ont. The ulti-
mate goals remained the same, but the number
of years for fulfillment was prolonged.
This was partly the fault of the military. Their
own slowness of production cut the ground from
under the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Por, though the Joint chiefs continued to- urge
Quicker mobilisation, their own military produc-
tion men could not decide on types of planes and
tanks, dickered back and forth over blueprints
and did not spend the money they had.
Arms production. When bossed bv the military.
always has been inefficient.'and today $39.000-
000 of last year's appropriations remain unsoent.
In other words, though the Joint Chiefs of
Staff want quicker mobilisation, the generals and
admirals in charge of ordnance, orocureraent and
planning have not been able to get into high
gear.
Thus the Joint Chiefs of Staff are nulled back
by top civilians on one hand and their own pro-
duction generals and admirals on the other.
That's why we've sent only a trickle of weapons
abroad, and that's why the Air Force is so far
behind Russia! today that we probably couldn't
afford to risk bombing China.
wu ***,* * '' .im-Mfc-WiJ i

Labor News
And Comment
ly Victor Riese!
One of the secreta of Ben. Kefauver's successful New Hamp-
shire campaign against President Trumanand his basic power
in each state from now onlies In a flying squad of bright
Eubliclty men supplied by the Influential Teamsters' Brother-
ood, the world's biggest union.
After a long distance phone call from the Teamsters' lead-
er, Dan Tobln, to his executive command, who Is Dare Beck, a
team of eight Teamsters' publicists, combining their techniques
and talent With the manpower and strategic Influence of their
unions, sped quietly into New Hampshire to fight for Kefauver
and against President Truman.
So Influential have all these men been Inside the Democra-
tic Party that Franklin D. Roosevelt would kick off his tough-
est campaigns with a speech at their annual banquet. ,
And they showed power In New Hampshire. They trounced
the United Labor Committeea coalition of the top AFL and
CIO chiefs who urged that Kefauver be forgotten.
There Is no doubt that National Democratic Party Chairman
Frank McKinney, knew Mr. Truman would be beaten. At least
30 days before the New Hampshire primaries, he urged Mr. T.
to withdraw, but the president believed this would look ludi-
crous
Now It's apparent that the single, most powerful union In
the land is anil-Truman and most of Its officials will swing to
the Republican Party if Mr. T. is nominated, regardless of what
the rest of labor does.
However, Mr. Kefauver's glamor may be tarnished Just a
little.
All that quietude In Albany. N.T., has simply cloaked the
privately devised strategy of Gov. Dewey for a devastating probe
of the nation's toughest mobsreminiscent of the days when
Dew>y smashed into the national headlines with his racket
bunting.
This time he's set to attempt to prove that despite the
5rand TV drama provided by the Kefauver committee, the un-
erworld is intact and more prosperous than ever. Also freer.
Dewey's probers will tear Into the garment, "dock, truck-
ing and waterfront gangs.
The Governor believes that the biggest names will lead in-
to the highest political circlesnational and inter-natlonal.
Whatever revelations result will hit the front pages at the
height of the presidential campaign.
There's another foreign airport construction scandal at
Wheelus Field, Tripoli, which apparently needs a new landing of
the Marines. .
Millions are being lost. Here's what one eye-witness has told
Investigators:
"I saw men He on their beds with no work to do or supplies
for them to work with.
"I saw civilians castigated for daring to mention this to Air
Force officers. I saw men get drunk and get paid overtime for It.
'Overtime was paid for work done by four men, where one could
have finished easily.
T also saw the parties given for the visitors, all at govern-
ment expense. The job can be done for 10 per cent of what's
being spent
The Garden, State of New Jersey Is growing new- plants,
steel plant*.
Giant steel installations are now springing up along the Jer-
sey shores at such a rate that it will shift much of the Indus-
try from the Pittsburgh areaalso union -strength since some
16,000 new steel workrs soon will pour into the Jersey sector.
However, It mal all be delayed by a steel strike this
week.
The CIO steel workers are already setting up national pick-
eting abedules, captains, strike headquarters and indicating
that they will not supply standby maintenance crews.

The entire Impact of Communist line propaganda Is being
shifted by the agit-prop York and Los Angeles Inland to Chicago.
Labor commissar John Steuben, an old China hand now
running something called the March of Labor, Is moving his
headquarter to the Windy City.
Before the actual shift is made, Steuben will summon to
New York for a series of secret meetings on pro-Commie labor
policy such pro-Stalinist leaders as Harry Bridges, Maurice Tra-
vis. Paul Robeson. Joe Belly and others who lead unions in the
most strategic defense industries.
They'll meet on April 4 at the Park Royal Hotel In New
York City and then go down to a banquet to camouflage their
activities.
It must be spread throughout the country that the Commun-
ists are ordering their people to get tough with American cor-
Enations, especially In the electronic, Jet and atomic energy
eldsand to strike If necessary.
Incidentally, the Communists were able to turn out 1.000
people at a rally ror convicted atomic spies In New York.

There were at least 600 major strikes In January and more
In February, Including the 48th crippling atomic energy stop-
page, all called by non-Commie leaders.
Scores of unions supplied accountants' to their members for
the filing of income tax formsone big auto union charged 40
cents for the service, except for those members who operate
real estate or other outside businesses.
The vital labor fight against Communist infiltration into
South America, and the Panama Canal Zone, was disrupted by
Col. Batista's coup in Cuba.
Havana was the headquarters for this operation, and now
our labor people can't find'their friends who escaped from to-
talitarian terror In other Latin lands.
The AFL has been trying frantically to contact these people
In Havana, especially Francisco Aguirra, who headed the antl-
Communlst labor headquarters there.
The pro-U.8. labor federation In Cuba has the greatest, most
beautiful labor building in the Western Hemisphere.
Batista has occupied It and destroyed the anti-Communist
labor movement. And he has a record of playing with the
comrades. ^
Where's our 8tate Department?
IWybodV tiaftb Classify
WalterWinthelllnNewYork
THE BROADWAY LINE
There will be 19 mere premieres befare the
dismal season chokes on Its final gasp...Bea-
trice Lillle's enjoyable capers on teevy make you
tender why she hasn't her own sponsor.. .Love-
ly Mona Freeman, who plays a 14-year-old In a
movie, has a 4-year-old dghtr.. .The Owen Con-
ger listed as co-author (with N. Benchley) on
"The liress of Dr. Lao" play, Is John Stein-
beck's ex-wife. Her first dramatic try...Tew
wonMn't believe It by scanning the long roster
of NBC comedians, but network execs have ta-
lent-scon Is searching for more... Sonja Henie's
personal accident Insurance Is for a million via
Lloyds..."The Little White Cloud That Cried"
Is practically "I.lebeslied" by Krelster and Rach-
maninoff How i the movie ah? The Mute
Hall and Rosy grossed over s qaarter-ef-a-min
last week.
When Jndy Garland arrived In town to begin
her "comeback" at the Palace the newspapers
were invited to Interview her. Only one lad
showed up... After the opening show and the
raves that followed interviewers had to apply
in writing for months.. Pinza Is one opera star
who really works on his programs. Most of the
others render a song and retire.. Ezio pitches
a full 9 innings. .Ella Fitzgerald, now at the,
Paramount, starts a concert tour In Sweden on
the Friday.. .The girl who did the bits with Will
Rogers In the Zlegfeld shows was beautiful Mary
Lou Carstairs. In the film about him sow being
made the girl la June Robblns, daughter of Mary
Lou.. .Theater Arts mag has the sassiest feature.
The author heckles the drama critics. They
suspect he Is confrere R. 8.
Vera-Ellen's terpiiehore (In black negligee and
nylons) in "The Belle of New York" flicker is
the scene you remember... Another addition to
teevy eye-lotion Is Judy Johnson on the Sid
Caesar shindig... Martin ft Lewis will gross at
least $2 million this year...They could get lots
moTe zing Into D. Garroway's "Today" stanza by
skipping the repetitious news bulletins.. ."The
Gandy Dancers Ball" Is one of Frankle Lalne's
best sing-a-llngs.. .Portia Nelson's accompanist
at the Blue Angel (Billy Roy) did the score for
"Maggie" due In the Fall. The musical is based
on the play, "What Rvery Woman Knows"...
The hottest ticket in town should be the Sad-
ler's Wells Ballet when It opens at the Warner
(Strand) soon...You haven't seen a poddle cut
until you've seen Sophie Tucker's.
The Theodore Roosevelt book, "No Room for
Mr. Roosevelt," was adapted for teevy show.
The sponsor, a rabid Republican, made sure
witnesses wouldn't think It was about FDR, so
be had them change the title to > "Make Way
For Teddy!".. .The legit theatre press agents
union will start their fireworks early this year.
The oldtlmers wUI fight the heavy influx of ap-
prentices. .Ada Sheridan, John Lund and How-
ard Duff (the stars of "Steel Town") arrive
soon to plug it. Reason: They all have a ehuak
f it In February, newcomer Johnny ("Cry"!
Ray earned $57,00* (rom recording royalties. ..
Cable's divorce terms with Lady Ashley call for
anunal payments nnlil she re-weds. Not one
big package of coin.. "Something To Uve For0
is doing big Ms at the Normandle on 57th Street.
Proring thst the patrons are the best critics. It
gist mixed reviews.
Variety revealed that a one-minute eommer-
-hlll on "Your Show of Shows" costs a mere
s lease... Lindsay Crowe are making libe
Rodger* At Hammerstein. Their steeuth produc-
tion. "One Bright Day," get raves hi the tryeut
bargs... Fifteen people showed up for a pre-
miere of a downtown spot featuring a "name"
attraction. ..Bogart and Hepburn, who received
no wages for "The African Queen" flicker, will
split terrific profits.. "Dragnet"4s one whodanit
that seems to be written with a typewriter in-
stead of a mimeograph.. Shelley Winters Is the
l>est press agent her boy friends have. Her
Italian flame appeared in the film hit. "Bitter
Rice," but was anknown here until she made
him her darling Although their shew. Two
On the Aisle," prospered, producer Arthnr Lesser
and star Bert Lahr no longer acknowledge each
ilher'a existence.
Brad Crandall and Elmo Ellis, unknowns, have
.mashed through with a religious hit. The title:
"They Locked God Outside the Iron Cura tin". ..
Capitol Records Is among the backers of 3
Wishes for Jamie'. . When Olga San Juan
shelves "Pamt Your Wagon" (to resume in
Movletown). her leading role may go to Pat
Marand, of the "South Pacific" chorus The
trend in bands has swung back t othe Sweet
Daneeable style. The crew that led the swing
away from swing 8 years ago is doing it again
Frankle Carle's.. Burt Taylor, a Valentino
vlth a voice, appears to have arrived. His Col-
umbia platter of "Solitude" peddled 50,000 in Its
first fortnight.. Pattl Page's 18th write-up in a
year will appear In Seventeen".-) Anril issue ..
Big talk about "The Young and the Damned."
due at the 52nd St. Trans-Lux. It will be that
implex first foreign-lingo film.
Peter Edson In Washington
NKA Staff Cortesdent
*^My, VOmS i, M:
*f# m ffi
WASHINGTON, March 23 (NBA) Six-foot-
six Rep. Lowell Stockman of Oregon biggest
man in Congress is being kidded a good bit
this week because the man at the head of the
table on the March 15 Saturday Evening Post
cover looks like him.
As a matter of fact It Is him big as life and
twice as natural. That's Mrs. Stockman at the
foot of the table.
And on her left, blowing out the 16 candles on
tha Chocolate birthday cake, is the daughter
Mary, who was 16 last summer when the picture
was posed.
Four of the other ffve people on the over are
real life people, too.
They're Mr. and Mrs. Martin Hayden and their
two sons. Martin Hayden la Washington corres-
pondent for the Detroit News. The "Grand-
mother" character at Mrs. Stockman's right is
Imaginary and was filled in later by artist John
There was a vacant chair there when the pic-
ture waa posed. '_,.
Story behind the picture is that Falter came
to Washington last summer with his Idea but no
models. Hayden supplied the models.
It was July and hotter than blazes. They all
had to put on winter clothes to pose while Fal-
ter took dozens of color photographa.
Most of them were out of focus, but one was
good enough to copy in paint. -
VIP'S vs. CASUALTIES
There's a row on between Korean Evacuation
Service and MATS the Military Air Transport
Service over allocation of new DC-6 transports.
Most of these planes have been assigned to
MATS and are used for hauling VIP'S to and from
the XJJS. and Japan.
Because cabina of the new planea are pressuriz-
ed, Korean Airlift thinks they should be assign-
ed to hauling lung casuality eases from combat
areas to the rear.
What Air Bvac. has to relv on now are older
unDressurnwd DC-4'a. When they have lung cases
to haul, they have to cruise at 5000 feet or under.
Sometimes that becomes dangerous if the wea-
ther isn't Just right. _____ ....
EUROPE TO REAP TRAVEL DOLLARS AGAIN
Steamship companies and airlines In U.8.-to-
Eurone service report the heaviest advance res-
ervations In a long time for this spring and early
summer. .. .
Some bookings are still open for May and At.
June and July schedules are almost completely
European travel dropped from 302 000 pas-
sengers in 1950 to an estimated 270.000 for 1951
about 10 percent.
Dollar volume-iwas down, too--from $225 mil-
lion to about 990E million. Steamshin romoanles
carried about 65 per cent o the traffic, airlines
35 per rent.
si it* #
^amamamasTaf AflMAMM
Heavy advance bookings indicate 1962 volume
may be up to new records.
American travel is a great dollar earner for
European countries. Big trouble Is that Europe
doesn't have enough modern hotels to-take care
of the influx.
There haa been little new hotel construction in
Europe since before World War I.
WEST INDIES EYE GAMBLING TRADE
West Indies tourist resorts are making a big
play to attract U.S. gambling trade, in the wake
of Kefauver crackdowns In many parts of the
country.
Casinos are legal on many of the islands and
they make hotel operation profitable.
Dominican Reoubllc, for instance, openlv ad-
vertises It has four legalized casinos. Its latest
dodge to attract the sporting element Is a olan
to install slot machines on passenger olnes
making the four-hour flight from Miami to Ciu-
dad Trnilllo
The Dominican government Is not sponsoring
the project, It Is explained, but it does -norove
ft ___
REDS INTENSIFY VOICE JAMMIvr.
Soviet government Is now spending tw'e-e as
much to lam "Voice of America" broadcasts a
th- U.S. puts into its who' Information ororem.
This Is statement of Wilson Comnton. in-me-
president of Washington State college, now h*d
of the State Deportment's new interna?,',,', To-
foTnatlon Administration.
In spite of Ismmtn. Dr. Comnton > "" to
75 ner rent of "Vr>i<-" rjroernms et th'oi'-*
ltest efforts of Communists to ston ]iqtni~
to the "Voice" makes it crime to * n 't.s.
news reports.
Czechoslovakia hs such a ""ot*t'' ft fV>e
peaee" isw. with 25-ve" neneltv fr>* " nw.
eerln." bv relavln otsld news. *n n,ii"ira.
the electric nower is tamed off d'"-'*' hours
when th" "Wo*" is cm
TIMBER PROBLEM IN OREGO"
Two million dollars in .Wnge t --J > >*'?
million dollars worih of f-nn rim*-- '" w-r-
ern Oregon nnbltc lands will he p*** ** n- ne-
pprimer-f of Interior.
The timber was blown rfiwn ) hurricrr.es
whieh struck: the area las* Deeem*.
Manv of the trees were Doveles f'- 250 '*?
hl*h._ On the ground, the Umber wlU be a fir*
ha7fi next summer.
But s worse menace comes from fl v*n-
clamare. The Insects burrow under *'X of <*-4
trees Multiplying rapidly they can destrov whole
forests.
Mueh of the wind-throw* timber is I" pam-M
areas *0 Which roads wouW have to be hH
There is atoo a manpower shortage for sal*e
or*t'ons.
Bft If r-r estima ten" 7A9 ml"lon po*"1 fe />e
imher eoW he ssveH. HI would nrovM wi-h
wood for 70.0*0 new houses.
....
PAGE FIVk,


Sunday American Attends A Coppers Ball
(Pictures and Story by
Ralph K. Skinner)
The 14th Annual Police Ball
was favored with clear skies
and good weather In the evening
and the patio of the Hotel El
Panama was jammed.
The police expected a good
crowd, so preparations were made
for. 1500 people. When more than
2000 showed up, rescrvat ions
got bogged down but everyone
got a table and was comfort-
able.
No doubt about itthe Hotel
El Panama Is the place to han-
dle a party like this, because it
Is set up for it, and built for It.
R looked as though most of
the Canal Zone Pacific Siders
went to the Ball. Service per-
sonnel were sprinkled through
the crowd. Officials from the
Canal Zone Indicated their ap-
proval by attendance.
Only soar note was the ab-
sence from the Police Ball of
any representatives of the Pa-
nama Police, though members
of the force did a superb Job
handling the traffic outside.
Panama Polite officials were
, invited by the Committee, bnt
none appeared.
Indicative of the general in-
terest in the affair were two
tables of prominent Chinese res-
idents of the capital city.
Since so many were present,
and had a good time for them-
selves, we are more Interested
In presenting something about
the Canal Zone Police Associa-
tion wlch spnsored the Ball.
It was founded October 10,
1938 by a group of Canal Zone
policemen attempting to find
the best way to work for the mu-
tual betterment of themselves
and their comrades.
ii has grown steadily ever
since and the great majority of
all Zone policemen belong, mak-
ing the outfit truly representa-
tive of this group of employes.
The purpose is well set forth i
In the words of the preamble to
the Canal Zone Police Associa-
tion Constitution, as follows:
"To promote the welfare and
enhance the improvement of our
service; to cultivate good fellow-
ship: to develop unity of action
in all matters affecting the mu-
tual interest of its members; to
perpetuate itself as a fraternal
organization, and to provide for
its government."
o advance the moral, social
and material standing of the
members of the Canal Zone Po-
lice Force Is the object but this
end Is sought "by cooperation
with Government officials and
bv honorable and legitimate
means."
' a financial way the Asso,
ciation pledges itself to "pro-
vine an annuity, death and dis-
ability benefit, and to aid and
assist worthy and needy mem-,
bers of the Association, their wi-
co s and orphans."
Now. what does the Assocla-
t.Oil do With the money It makes
at the Police Ball?
.fie objects above should an-
sv -r this question, but well take
one shining example as Indica-
te of the whole.
t iseph Ryan was a policeman
In the Canal Zone for a short
t.; if when he was retired for
physical disability. Because of
his short service his retirement
was less than $40 monthly. The
Canal Zone Police Association
helped him with their moral
suooort. They sent financial sup-
port to enable him to have
the best hosoitalization possible
in the States.
-he resal? We were told
that Ryan recovered complete-
ly from his disability, Is now
enjoying 100 per cent health
and is profitably employed by
the State Police of Massachu-
setts as a traffic officer. Ring
up a credit for the Police Asso-
c 'tion!
The Association gets credit
(i-long with the help of local
officials i for the legislation al-
lowing Canal Zone police offi-
cers with 20 years service to re-!
Ure at age 50.
And don't forget the Police1!
overtime claims won after a'
three year struggle.
.-re's where Hatcher comes
In. Jim Hatcher Is President of
th- Police Association. He was
also chairman of the Police Ball.
H is usually very active in all
things concerning policemen and
th Assoc'o^'-'n and Is a go-get-
te.
c.k in 19*8. Jim Hatcher
started the ball rolling for the
A full squad of policemen handled Hie Police Ball!. Here's Hie Committee, from left to right, Bill
Adams, Herbert Holmer, Freeland Hollowed, Tony Malagutti, Jim Hatcher, Al Hermanny, Morton Le Vee
and Dave Heilman.
Typical of the many friendly groups making up tables at the Policemens' Ball were Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Hunsicker, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Wynne, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Musselman and Mr. and Mrs. Z. K. Esler,
shown above.
lined up Congressmen and con-
tacted King and King, the law-
yers.
It is public knowledge that on
July 1. 1950 news was received
that the case was won, and
That the policemen recog-
nise Jim Hatcher's efforts
in their behalf was establish-
ed when he was later reim-
bursed for the personal funds
he had expended in the fight
Not only was the overtime
changed to the present 40-hour
week. -----
Frequent get to gethers by
the members on both sides of
the Isthmus help the new offi-
cers get acquainted wit the old-
timers and keep a cordial spir-
it alive. Business meetings are
p merit of back overtime many Canal Zone police are
claims for Canal Zone coppers j the wealthier for It, with some ..~ .w
p* made several trips to Wash-lstill due to receive their adjust- scrap won. but the 48 hour work!with an executive council meet
inrton at his own expense and ments from Uncle Sam. *" r""' "ce was ing quarterly.
Back to the Police Ball at El
Panama long enough to say
that a spokesman for the Com-
mittee said thav the Interest of
the community in the plice as
evidenced by their whole-heart-
ed support of the Ball was a
gesture of friendship that they
surely appreciated.
*H
^wfti,/> nun' ljiu -
'^mh^tw^2


MCf-
,_
El


Despite the fact that aH of the Canal Zone* policemen seemed
to be at the nail, the SUNDAY AMERICAN photographer
found Jesse It. Martie vigilantly guarding the postofflee at
Balboa in the early morning hoars while the Ball was stHI
rolling!
Sorreandeo by hlo chiefs k Herb Holmer, in charge of the floor committee, with
Col. Richardson Solee (left) and Ma lor George Herman, Chief of Police.
Kcim:...-....,; .. ^......_ -......,.ip>i as Otilio Hazera, Sec-
retary General of the Presidencia, (left) shown with Canal
Zone Governor P. K. Newcomer and Hatcher.
Charge d'Affalres Morray Wla* represented the American Embassy. Be o
with Preelaad HoMawell of the Police Committee.
For the Best in Fotos & Features
... It's The Sunday American
'
'.
aaetag staters Shirley and Kay Batter of Balboa ware Mm
oaly Canal Zaaers in the otherwise professional How show
and they raited a Mg hand.
SNDV, iRtt, 1962
: it
'^Mfc^ g^-^^f Jj^glg^gml
PAGE SEVEN




ITS SIR OLD IRON LEGS NOW! Champion talker, John 'Old Iron Legs" Stahl receives the
medal making him a Knight of St Gregory, from the hands of Archbishop Francis Beckman of
Panama. The presentation took place prior to a St. Patrick'- Day party at St. Mary's Mission in
Balboa. The distinction, conferred upon John Stahl by the Pope, mentioned his outstanding ser-
vice to the Roman Catholic Church. Stahl was personally received by the Pope in Rome after
walking from Fatima, Portugal, to the Eternal City. He later walked to the shrine at Lourdes.
Outside the Church, Stahl is known for his walks alone from the Canal Zone to Texas, and later,
from Mexico bock to the Canal Zone over the route of the Pan American Highway.
1


5%. SUNDAY


1
Comic supplement
wiimi* V,!, Fm*b OS**.
-:-
Starring Popeye
jyej
- A STRANGE SMELL, _
.FROM WMPyS MOUSE
FIRST WE Ml* OKJIOK JUJC6,
AMP GARLIC JUICE, ANP
MOW WE ADD
>i ESSENCE OF
A BLUE CHEESE
-i''
^^^^^^*Si^. 0^^S

3QOC01 LUCK, tiMpy I !? J THANK VOU, SIR? A W VBRIEP STROLL AROUND r-IHE BLOCK MAY f 1 J f BRING THC BRST
^fcl*\l'.l
ftc-Bl
^*I^B

rHELLO, COIMRy. TCCMAB IN. AAV ***
COMA'S GOtN' < FREND. I A* ON
OM MERE?? ) THE VERGE OF A
'GREAT WSCOVeRY'//
^



K
fORALOHG CASS/DY




ARE YOU
SURE?
- YOatAM STOP W0RRVIN6 ABOUT
LlTTLt ANNIE ROONEV- I BLUFFED
DAN OHAME INTO 6MN6 ME
HIS PROMISE TO TAKE HER,
OUT OF TOWN- TODAY
HE'S KEEPIN6 HIS
PROMISE *?,

ABSO -BLOOMlN- LUTELY
HE'S DRMM6 HER OVER
TO GREENVILLE WHERE
HE WILLED HER A FONDi
FAREWELL AND COME
BACK ALONEa
FINE.' FINE/
'riddance
TO BAD
RUBBISH -
THE LITTLE IMP WAS STEALING VWHILE IM YOUR
ALL MY PUBLIOTY- NOW PERHAPS 1 PUBLICITY A6ENT,
I CAN <3ET A LITTLE ATTENTION JTHE PUBLIC WILL BE
.FROM THE PUBLIC*^ FULLY INFORMED
-ABOUT YOUR
ACTIVITIES *
".i- i
Iff'.^


"HIS IS A TRICK ON MRS. ^^V-SHE ^NTED
TO SENO YOU TO AN ORPHANAGE, BUT I HAD r
PLANS. TO GAIN TIME FOR THOSE PLANS
NOU OlTTOF
T PROMISED ID TAKE
TOWN AND SAV
ADIEU
YES-ADIEU-MOTSOOO-BYB-NOW I'VE
KEPT MY PROMISE- BUT THERE'S NOTHIN6
TO STOP YOU FROM TAKIN6 THE NEKT,
BUS BACK TO TOWN-YOU
UNDERSTANDS^ YES-1
^UNDERSTAND]
EVERVTHIN6"
npi
NOW WHATLLT DO? MR. DAN IS &RAND- HE
WOULDN'T BREAK A PROMISE, BUT HE DID
PLAY A TRCK- IF I 60 BACK EVERYBODY WILL
LAU6H AT MQ. SNOOPLEY- 6HE'LL BE TERRIBLE
MAD AN' MAKE LOTSA TROUBLE,
FOR. MR. DAN *
now we just otta so away an' -keep mr.
dan promi6e- mrs. noopley -wont be
mad at him then ~ an
everybody wk-l be
terrible happy-
Fation

H
WAO
A




OMJOHNNV^ V JOMNEE-E, YOU H ALL RIGHT? X-I MAPESUCH A MESS 1 ^k OP THING/ jF! F 9RANPV man, far as I'm COMCEfcNEC? VXJ CAN GO RIGHT AHEAP M|54<&vUI1>Nv-.JUT TWW WMfM fc. WHAT BEAUTIFUL BLUNPERCR / ^^
^KRIVING ON 1W6 BNE ** tmb I NICK OF TIME, MMNPVfWHMJMNMV 1 AMP SCOTTV FROM THE FIRING 1*0 5 y #
At*> EFFECT* TME CAPTURE OF CHR 1 ANP MK TWO COMQtm.. C /'*'":



I ALREADY HAVE AN
EXCELLENT ENCYCLOPEDIA,
MY GOODMAN-"
IN FACT THERE ARE
SEVERAL FINE
SCIENTIFIC
^22 ARTICLES IN
Bb T THAT I ,
WROTE/
\
A
YES, BUT THIS IS A NE\^ UP-
TO-DATE VERSION HAVING
5000 ILLUSTRATIONS ....
MERE -EXAMINE
STHE FINE BINDING,
K EASY-TO-READ
5r TYPE PRINTED
&fc ON QUALITY
\ PAPER/
"TJT
BUTl
SAID,
SIR-'
^
r
EXCUSE ME,
SIR I'LL BE
BACK IN A
MOMENT-
M-I THINK
I'VE GOT THE
HARD OUTER SHELL
OF HIM STARTING
TO CRACK/
'r
vj
BY COINCIDENCE, I TOO
AM A BOOK SALESMAN/-
AHM, KM- NOWHERE
15 ONE OF 3 VOLUMES
OH TME HI-STORY
OF ART/
N
$i
THEY COVER TMP 1
FIELD OF ART FROV
THE CAVE DRAWINGS
OF PRIMITIVE
MAN UPTOTHE
PRESENT/
THE REASON IM m
NOT SELLING TCKKY
IS BECAUSE IM
WAITING FOR A NEW
SHIPMENT OF
BOOKS/-SOLD
TO SETS THIS J
HOwb I HAPPEN1
TO LET THAT OC
CARIBOU TALK ME


, jTS
ASPR
TOOTS,1 MISLAID THE ENVELOPE
CONTAINING THE SPEECH I V^OTE
LAST MlHT FOR THE BOS6 TO
DEWVER AT THE BOARD OF
"DIRECTORS'
MEETlN.'
7C7
OH, IT MUST BE
AROUND THE
HOUSE SOME-
WHERE, CASPfcfl.
VOU NEVER
CAN FIND
anything.'

, I'M SURE THIS IS WHERE T LEFT THAT ENVELOPE
CONTAIN I No THE PAPER I WAS TO READ AT THE
LADIES'CLUB LUNCHEON
-0H.6OODNESS,
X HOPE CASPER
DIDN'T TAKE IT
BY MISTAKE/
m,
SOI MAKE A FOOL OF ME, WILL VOU?"
HAVE ME REAP A "RECIPE
FOR UPSIDE-DOWN CAKE
TO THE BOARD
OF DIRECTORS//
MAYBE \OU*PUT IT IN
yOUR OVERCOAT PO0KET
SO YOU WOULDN'T
FOR6ET
rr TODAY.
I'LL
LOOK.1
OH/TOOTS, Cg>NT BOTHER LOOKI
IN MV C&fl I'VE FOUND THE
ENWCLOPE/
CASPER, I'M ALMOST DUE
AT THE BANK TO DELIVER
THAT SPEECH. I HOPS
YOU WROTEj
AOOD
ONE/
BOSS, THlS'LL 61VE
THE DIRECTORS PLENTY
FOOD FOR THOUHT/
/'AND WIN MEA
',.RAISE, I HOPE.'
V 1
MR. PLUNKER MU6T BE 6TARTIN6 HI6 ADDRESS
RI6HT ABOUT THIS TIME/ *N A FEW MINUTES, THE
OTHER DIRECTORS WILL BE ROARIN6 THEIR
ACCLAIM/--1 DO THE WORK-- BUT HE 6ETB
THE CREDTT/ t^-v <-^ <*
OH, CASPER, I FOUND YOUR
SPEECH IN THE DESK DRAWER.
DID YOU TAKE THAT ENVELOPE
I LEFT ON THE MANTEL?- IT
CONTAIN6 A BAKIN6 RECIPE f -.
I WANTED TO TELL THE
LADIES ABOUT.
' .
OH,KlO?/"ILL
HAVE TO RUSH
OVER TO THE
1 BANK
6ooD-Bye.'
IF I ET MY HANDS ON
YOU, I'LL TURN yOU
UPSIDE-DOWN '
"^'"V'.'XVMMj^L
LtCtiiia^wc* .ai^i^