The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01420

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
\M*
"* BRANIFF
NEW ORLEANS
ROUND YllP
FIRST LASS $210.00
TOURIST l'0
TWENTI-8EVENTH IEAB
*YN INDPENDEN^
.Y KEWSPAFR
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country h tafe" Abraham Lincoln.

PANAMA, E. P., FRIDAY, MARCH SI, 1952
SeagramsYO.
9 CANADIAN WHISKY
ifawtfU'Utt Vfit&i'fat |wjr
OTE CENT'
Gun-Toting Shrimpers Head For Mexico
i
RIOGWAY:
UN Saved Japanese
From Red Invasion
TOKYO, March 21 (UP>
General Matthew B. Rldgway.
UN 8upreme Commander, said In
an Interview today that by going
to the aid of Korea against the
Communists the United Nations
had staved off the threat of an
Invasion of Japan, as well as
request for Information on some
53,000 8outh Korean troops be-
lieved captured but unaccounted
for on prisoner lists.
A UN spokesman said the pro-
posal offered "absolutely noth-
ing new."
However, despite barely per-
snuth Korea entibie progress, UN staff offi-
The UN commander warned cer Col. George W. Hlckman
also that Russia has S.S00
fighter planes stationed In
Asiatic Russia and a powerful
submarine fleet in the Jarnn-
ese Sea. ,
He urd the Japanese people
to consider these fact* In weigh-
ing the merits of disarmed neu-
trality against rearmament on
the side of the free world.
Speaking to Japan's leading
newspaper publishers. Rldgway
referred to the Russian buildup
In Siberia and on the Island Just
north of Japan
He aid Japanese Communists
already have begun following the
same pattern as the Chinese
Reds marked out for victory over
the Nationalists.
The UN commander warned:
"This Is a manifestation that
the alms of Soviet military pow-
er are now directed toward con-
trol of Japan."
He said U.S. troops would re-
main In Japan after the peace
treat**Wy "to oppose sueh So-
viet imDitton*nUa} threat of
Soviet military power."
In Korea, meanwhile, Com-
munists in the Panmunjom
truce negotiations presented
their first formal version of a
eetapretnlse" proposal for
prisoner exchante, but the of-
fer repeated the Red demands
for forced repatriation of cap-
ti-=.
It u.:.-^ bwdly hinted that the
Communists are ready to drop
their demands for some 44 pris-
oners of war they claim the Al-
lies hold but did not report.
In return the proposal indica-
ted that the UN must forget Its
said after a 57-mlnute morning
session that the Communists
were being "frank and open and
cooperative."
At the same time the UN In-
fantry enjoyed one of the quiet-
est days of the Korean war to-
day as both sides exchange*
only desultory and Intermittent
artillery and mortar fire.
A heavy overcast limited 5th
Air Force planes to 300 sorties,
during which Thunder Jet*
caused heavy damage to a small
freight yard near Chinnampo.
That the Reds might be
planning to try a new attack
was Indicated by the increase
in airpowcr farther to the
North, whence supplies for
any new effort would have to
come.
The 5th Air Fotc disclosed
an entire flight of new "Type
19" high-wing Red Jets was
spotted over Slnanju in "Mlg,
Alley* yesterday, but they re- Ic,
ike May Return |p|orj(|a Boab
To US Between1 ,
May 15 June 1 All Riled Up
GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS Members of the board of directors of the Inter-American
Press Association sat down to the first session of their annual meeting here this morning and
heard a report from Andrew Helskell. chalrma n of the board. After approving the report the
IAPA board named working committees to dra ft the Important decisions to be taken at the
meeting. ______;________________________________
----------------
PARIS, March 21 (UP) Reli-
able sources here believed today
that Gen. Elsenhower probably
will be going home between the
middle of May and June 1.'
These sources said that the pe-
riod was "logical" and was the
time his supporters picked as the
best time for him to return.
Elsenhower's disclosure that he
was rexamlnlng his decision not
to ask for release from his North
Atlantic Treaty Organization
post, led to speculation that he
might soon finally request to be
relieved from duty.
Observers pointed out that If
he does ask for a release it will
be some time before the May 15
return date suggested by his cap-
porters to permit the 14 nations
in the Atlantic Pact to agree on
his successor.
Heiskell: Let's Attack Perils
Facing Latin American Press
Life
fused to light.
This was not so with older
Mlg-IS Jets, Which tangled with
U. s. Sabres end came out on
I the wrong end of an 8-0 score.
South OfT he Border
SAO PAULO, March 21 (UP)
The chairman of the Sao
-H Maaacine's Andrew Heiskell today urged the InterAmer-
PreasTftsociatloa to take acfloe Mains the continued dan-
ger face* by the press In several Latin American countries
brought on by the serious shortage of newsprint and insistent
attacks against freedom of
member to bring before public
opinion any abuses, restriction
and violations of press freedoms;
2. IrtieffM activity to Increase
membership with a high goal "to
count amonf us within five years
MIAMI, Flo., March 1 (UP) Florida shrimp boots
sailed for shrimping grounds off the Mexican coast to-
day "armed to the teeth/' and the U.S. Coast Guar'd mov-
ed to prevent an international incident.
"This business of Mexican gunboats firing on our
unarmed shrimpers and running them into Mexican ports
has got my boys all riled up," said shrimp fleet operator
Wally Parnell of Punta Gorda, Fia.
'And when they get riled up, they are pretty mean."
Parnell, owner of one of four
boats seized and Impounded by
the Mexican government, said
two of his Parnell Fish Co. boats
sailed today "armed and ready
to repel any boarders and pro-
tect their rights."
State Rep. John M. Hathaway,! boat.
Meanwhile, Britain's Field Mar. ^ J?nt* tZdf- "W n* Although
shal Lord Montgomery removed u"d*r.stod *h*501ta JSJ"?
had been taken from them,"
Parnell declared.
The four vessefs wefe seized
last Sunday on charges .of
"pirate fishing" and escorted
into the Mexican harbor of
Campeche by a Mexican gun-
another obstacle which might
bar Elsenhower's return to the
United States by promising to
serve under the officer Eisen-
hower believes should replace
him If he leaves.
^ 15*?5v 4 ?- m .f th. *,M the publications"of this hem-
_ I contributed to it arter they had i,nhr. that fr. nr hii*.v
Speaking In. his capacity as made g00d their eontract. 'p?rJ
chairman of the executive com- Heiskell pointed out that the af, i?',,.,,,. r~,,t h. h,,*
mlttee, Heiskell told the board question Is: "Howare we going to Ql"fLHl^L?,1r.^rtl*n* ^"d
of directors of the association at jo It?" adopted a resolution to express
theif first meeting this morning He then urged that the mem- **}*??,?? f. S/S2
the bers work out the details at this ^res'drte"tnc,J"1? 'Jiat*o "f1*
meeting so that they might waste 1 "Pr"s, a "J22J
no tim? in outtlngthe plan Into .hope fohis ^mediate re cover,
Israel Demands $1 Billion
Recompense From Germans
In Hotel El Panam that
time was at hand for immediate
. action to combat the problems of
Paulo City Council today order- the press In Latin America.
ed lady stenographers to- use Regarding newsprint, Heiskell
uniforms because the "scan- outlined the basis of a plan of
daleusly low" cut of their his own to alleviate this problem
blouses disturb the councillors land asked the members to iron,
out at this meeting details of the
Blan so as to put It Into effect In
e near future.
and hinder discussions.

LONDON, March 21 (UP)
The Israeli government today
demanded that the West Ger-
man government pay $1.000,000,-
000 as "collective recompense"
for the Nazi persecution of the
Jews.
In their opening statement at i step forward
an Israeli German meeting grave Issue."
which opened at The Hague this
morning, the Israeli delegation
said:
"While the claim put forward
in the above note (of March 12,
1951). amounting to $1.500,000.-
000, is directed against Germany
as a whole, the portion of that
claim advanced against the Ger-
man Federal Republic amounts
to the sum of $1.000,000.000."
The Israeli statement said
that "the claim advanced by
the State of Israel is both min-
imal In sise and symbolic In
character," and added "for set-
tling the historic account the
hour baa not yet came."
The Israeli delegation headed
bv Dr. P. Shlnar ad'lcc to the
Israeli Ministry of Foreign f-
faira on Immigration orobleni.-
opened the first meeting of the
conference with a lone state-
ment setting forth the principles
on which they wished to nego-
tiate.
The statement consisted raaln-
lv of the text of a note which
the government of Israel sent to
the Western Occupation powers
in Germany March IS. 1951.
Dec. 6, 1951 West German
Chancellor Kenrad Adenauer
informed "r. Ha hum Gold-
mann, chairman of the con-
ference en Jewish material
claims against Germany, thai
the Weat German government
was prepared to proceed with
negotiations with Jewish repre-
sentatives on the basis of the
claim put forward in the note
f March 12.
Adenaaer also said In the
Bundestag September 27, 1951
that the German Federal Gov-
ernment was ready "to find by
negotiations with representa-
tives of the Jewish people and
the State of Israel a solution of
the material aspect of the repar-
ation problem."
Israel said in this statement
that these two declarations by
the Germans were "a significant
in Kgard to this
operation.
As regards the violation of
press freedom Heiskell said it
was quite clear that the Argen-
tine government will take no
measures to rectify Its action
against La Prensa and he urg-
ed that the members move to
maintain before the public
opinion of the Americas "this
crime against freedom of the
press."
He proposed the creation of a
Canadian suppliers Tribunal of Freedom of the
Press to Investigate all facts and
report findings of the La Prensa
case.
Heiskell then suggested that
this Association commit Itself to
fight with all the means in Its
power to regain for its rightful
owners the newspaper La Prensa
The proposed plan, to be un-
derwritten by several concerns in
the United States, is to guaran-
tee a' contract for a number of
years with
for a substantial amount of
newsprint to be supplied to Lat-
in American publishers willing
to enter Into a contract at a price
approximately equal to cost.
Those buying under this plan
would have to put up a nominal
amount of money per ton which
would form a reserve to protect
the underwriters and this money now in the hands of the Argen-
would go into a trust fund to tine government.
be returned to publishers whol Heiskell also urged the crea-
tion of a special committee to
study a plan for the exchange
The IAPA Board set up several
working committees at today's
session.
Among them was the commit-
tee of resolutions, headed by Dr.
Harmodlo Arias, of The Panama
American, John OTtorke. of the
Washington Dally News and
Raoul Alfonso Oonse of El Mun-
do, Havana.
(IP's Argentine
Congress Reporter
Exiled to Uruguay
MONTEVIDEO. Uruguay, Mar.
21 (Iff) Agustn Pedro Pena,
for II years congressional cor-
respdhdent of the United Press In
Buenos Aires, said today he had
nay a pian '"'""""= i beer expelled from Argentina as
of personnel or the.creation of g ..undeslrabie foreigner-
He arrived here by plane yes-
one or various scholarships for
the training of active newspa-
permen who believe in the
principles and the program of
action of the IAPA.
terday. Pena said he was picked
up it the entrance to Congress
in Buenos Aires, and kept over-
signed, and was put aboard a
plane for Montevideo.
Pena was also a correspondent
He pointed out that this group night by the political section of
also could studvthe feasibility of the Federal Police. He said no
organizing seminars in the Unit-1 specific charge was brought a-
ed States and in Latin America, gainst him, but he was not al-
to study the problems of the lowed to communicate with
press In the various countries of friends or bring any baggage,
the Hemisphere. Yesterday he was told that a
Helskell stressed that since the,decree for his expulsion had been
highly successful Montevideo
meeting last year there has been
tremendously increased interest
In IAPA and suggested the mem- jor Time magazine
bers now think In long range
terms about the future of the
association.
He said he felt confident that
In five years the IAPA will be a
truly vital organization with the
power of Its Influence felt
throughout the hemisphere.
To achieve this goal Helskell
submitted two requirements:
I) The Intense activity of each
. tne charges were
later acquitted, port authorities
refused to grant clearance until
autholzed by the Mexican Navy
Mlnlsty.
The State Depatment la
Washington said today that
the four American boats were
released last night, after U.S.
Ambassador William O'Dwyer
protested to the Mexican For-
eign Ministry.
Earlier yesterday, the Mex-
Myers, Fla. yesterday, armed to
the teeth with shotguns, pistols
and rifles.
Meanwhile, Coast Guard of-
ficials dispatched a plane
fren St. Petersburg, Fla. to
airdrop messages to the
shrimper to "keep cool."
The conflict between the
hrlmpers and Mexico arose lean Navy "released airee other
when four boat* were confiscat- htmpers from Brownsville Tex.
ed, when they showed up in and Morgan City, La. which
Mexican waters. were held In the non fo Ou-
Crux of the matter V* dispute tlrrez Zamora
between the united States and I
Mexico as to
The boats pat Into port there
what constitutes | last Friday during a storm and
HAPPYGen Dwight D Elsen-
homer Indicates his feelings
with a smile after learning in
Paris of his strong showing In
the Minnesota primaries. Ike,
whose name did not appear on
the ballot, placed second to
Harold E. Stassen with a wave
of "write-in' votes which even
supporters termed "amazing."
RP's Anti-Malaria
Campaign Halted
By Lack of Funds
"territorial waters
The United States contends
they extend three miles from
the coast, while Mexleo observes
a nine-mile limit.
However, Parnell charged his
and other shrimp boats had
been fired on by Mexican ves-
sels as far as 20 to 25 miles at
sea.
The shrimp company official
said htree crewmen of the
Wally Parnell, one of his Intern-
ed ships, had Informed him by
also were beached due to
clearance red tape.
port
The
Judges' Bench
.
The charge of burglary against
two teen age Panamanians,
Ralph Robinson. 19, and James
marine radio they had not been 'Emanuel Davis, 18. allegedly in-
Jalled but were confined to the
boat.
"They said they had been
'pushed around' by the Mex-
icans and that their 'papers'
CIO Jleelworkeu
Postpone Strike
Until April S
WASHINGTON, March 21 (UTM
The CIO United Steelworkeio'
postponed their national strike
today until April 8, leaving it
|up to the steel Industry to ac-
Panama's antl-malarlal cam- >\ ih one-half cent wage
paign was said to be In Jeopardy '2f5L*n*. uJl*?n ?*}??.. ri2?-
volved In the theft of silverware
from Sue Core's apartment, wae
dismissed this morning by a mo-
tion made by the government.
The charge of burglary against
the third man Involved, Marcos
Gabriel Rice, 32, Panamanian,
was continued until Tuesday
morning. Attorney J. J. McGulg-
an will represent the defendant.
Also heard this morning in the
Balboa Magistrate's Court was a
battery case filed against a Puer-
to Rlcan soldier by his wife. Je-
dro Martinez Ruiz, 25. was fused
$25 for the offense.
For driving without an opera
ter license, George Henry Ro-
driguez, 20, Panamanian was
fined $10.
For following too closely,, an-
other Panamanian, Clarence Jo-
seph McAlman, was fined $15.
today because of a shortage of
money to repair spraying equip-
ment.
It Is reported that the majori-
ty of DDT-spraying machines are
In need of repairs, but for several
months now a request of $600 to
purchase spare parts has been
denied by the Comptroller's of-
fice, which claimed a lack of
funds.
The Panama Anti-Malarial Di-
vision has sufficient DDT on scheduled to leave for Key West
hand for spraying purposes but Fla. to confer with President1
the number of serviceable ma-, Truman on the offinal iigue 0f
chines is said to be inadequate, steel prices
mnded by the Federal Wage
Stabilization Board.
The union's 170-man wage
Kllcy committee accepted the
ard's recommendation shortly
after 2 a.m., but warned it will
call a strike If an agreement Is
not reached with the steel com-
panies by the new deadline.
The steelworkers postponed a
walkout for the fourth time
onlv hours before Defense Mo-,
blllzer Charles E. Wilson was
Balista Ain't Talkin'
HAVANA, March 21 (UP)
The Cuban Propaganda Min-
ister, Ernesto de la Fe said to-
day that General Fulgencio
Batista Salvldar has cancelled
all week end appointments due
to an attack of laringitis.
He said however, that Batis-
ta was at his country home
outside of Havana drafting nu-
merous decrees which will bt
submitted to the Council of
Ministers scheduled to meet
Monday.
CALIFORNIA OR BUST Traveling on foot. Joseph"rcs-
ppa his invalid wife are shown as thev pe-sed near Newar
r.J.. en route from their home in New Haven. Conn to
Temple City. CaW.
+
answer
the call
Bogie Goes To Africa, Bags An Oscar
HOLLYWOOD. March 21 (UP I
Humphrey Bogart and Vivien
Leigh won the annual Motto"
Picture Academy "Oscars" for
best actor and actress honors of
1951 for their performances In
"The African Queen" and "A
Streetcar Named Desire," respec-
tively.
Best movie of the year "Oscar"
went to MOM's ballet film, "An
American In Paris."
Bogart's victory was a stunning
Bogart. but the second for Viv-
ien Leigh, who won her last
one 13 years ago for her his-
tory-making Scarlet Ollar
role in the fabulous "Gene
With the Wind."
"An American In Paris" is the
third musical to win an "Oacar."
"American In Paris," inspired
by the late George Gershwin's
tone poem, collected seven
honors, including a special a-
ward to Gene Kelly for his
dancing and choreography.
Its producers, Arthur Freed,
became the first producer of mu-
ones were steals to win the Irving Thalberg
that he thought "Otean"
were a let ef nonsense.
In accepting the award Bogart
said he had not changed hlj
mind.
He said: "This award does not
prove I am the beat actor of
the year. The only honest way
would be to let everybody play
j 1SS2 KD CtOSS FUND j
The previous
Broadway Melody" (1929 and award as the best movie"maker Hamlet'and leVthe'bit win" Of
"The Great Zlegfleld" (1938). of the year." kouree. you would get some fun-
The presentations were made I Bogart was present with his ny Hamlets that way."
at the Pantages Theater before wife, actress Lauren Bacall to Other awards included:
upset ror trie film colony, which 2.812 of the movie Industry's get the gold statuette bu I Wh' Beat foreign language -i-Sla,
had predicted that Marlon Bran- elite, who paid $6 to $12 per seat was 3.000 miles away in New "Rashomea" (Upantes);
do would win with his perform-1 The critics had predicted el-1 York where she and her hus- Best special effects. Para-
anee in "Streetcar." in which he ther "A Place in the Sun." based band. Sir Laurence Olivier, play- n ..unt's "When WorMa Collide;
co-starred with Miss Leigh on the late Theodore Dreiser's tag a 16-week engagement of Beat full-length documentary
However. "Streetcar" swept the | "An American Tragedy" or Shakespeare's "Anthon and "Ron Tiki":
best supporting actor and ac-1"Streetcar" would win the best- Cleopatra" and Shaw's Caesar; Beat original nation picture
tress awards with Kim Hunter picture award and Cleopatra."
who played Leigh's slater and However. "A Place In The. t iar crowd apaasad-
8un" won the prize for the best ad Sagart't victory, recalling
screen play. ?' it year he trawl-
In all, the technical musical ed hi a magasint
portrayed
Karl Maiden, who
T e's's shv wcoer.
It was the first "Oscar" ft
story. "Seven Baya to Noon" by
Paul Dehn and James Bernard;
Beat sound recording. Doaglaa
Shearer, wand director far
Great Caraee," (HGMJ.



wrwp -^ :--K*<*f PAr.t r\vo
IBt PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILi NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, MARCH 81, IMS
T tHt PANAMA AMERICAN
WNI6 NO KUILllHtD TMI MANAMA A-eICAN eftlSS. INC
suNBtn |y NKLSO** ouNveLi >b >
HAKMODIO ARIA tc "0
" (V h mm P o o S4 nu A a.
Ttkl'MONI PANAHA K.0 I 0140 LiMI'
CAILt Aoc.> ANAMCNICAN. >''"
tlfflfc OfICI It 179 CIMT*>| vn. it lll> ItTH AND 13th tiiii
I*1 rotiN KtPMlthTtTivtl JOSHUA 8 POWe* INC
>H Mai-i"on AVI MfV> vo
% M6MTH IN ADVANCE -______
FO* tl MCNTN. IN 6vt.rl
rOk ONI VIA. IN ABVANCI____
HTi N V
IOC.
I 70
80
IA SO
v nAil
i 0
If 00
14 OO
iiroAdway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
i Subbing for Winchell
A high diplomat, who has fed us valuable lowdown hereto-
{ fore, quotes Sec of State Aeheson, In Lisbon before the NATO
conference, as having told statesmen Schuman and Eden: "I am
In position to assure you that President Truman will run for
'! reelection. You must help me make sure the Lisbon Conference
is a success .. Think what It would mean to you if it failed
' and you got Taft as the next President of the United State!
In the brief interim between "Winch-hitting for Walter"
Jobs, I had time for some reading. Two new books struck me
' as especially worthwhile. I separate from the grist of the med-
; locre product "I Never Grew Up," by Coblna Wright, and "Hold
{ Back the Night," by Pat Frank.
1 Cobina's autobios is an amazing American sagaof an Ore-
. gon rancher's daughter, a descendant of Puritan Massachusetts
stock, who became a concert star, married Owen Johnson, the
novelist, and Bill Wright, the Wall Street millionaire, during her
i career she was the foremost hostess in the land and her daugh-
1 tor Coblna, Jr., became a Page 1 debutant* though she never
' had a debut. As a name-dropper Cobina Is supreme. She meets
! and knows at close range the great In society, political life, roy-
. alty and art of the world; he is switched In fortune from H -
told millions to scrabbling for her next sandwich, and through
' it all she is a woman, which dominates her stor>, iu. ... i u^u
' of passion love, frustration, faith, all but complete despair. She
' loves the adjective "gallant." and she wears it iustly. She cud-
' gels herself for her mistakes, is humbly grateful for great luck
' and kindnesses. .She confesses muchbut not her age. Its a
high-powered book which dizzies you with anecdotes first-hand
about the miracle people of three generations.
Frank, whom I do not know, has come up with a script that
could be likened to "All Quiet" In that It Is the first truly great
, story of the Korean warthough Frank a seasoned correspon-
dent on many a front, had never been in Korea. The stark
, tale of a"lost" company and its inspired, hard, soft and purely
American captain would be heroic if skeletonized. But the mass
of detail, which cannot be other than authentic, makes it a
masterpiece. This Frank can write and he stays this side of
melodrama in "Hold Back the Night," a title scarcely hinting
? gt what he unfolds. This Is best-seller stuff, a great film and
a document which, wherever he got it, will live as long as people
remember the tragic "police action" in remote, terrible South
Korea, where our men scarcely guessed for what they fought,
but fought as Americans always have.
. Hedy Lamarriage and her then bridegroom, Ted Stauffer,
ware very romantic when I last encountered them in the Mex-
, lean sea-shore resort where he ran a hotel. The Acapulco atmos-
I phere tends thataway. It is a favored weekend resort for Am-
bassador Bill O'Dwyer and his beautiful Bloan. The best folk
of Mexico CItv fly there in private and chartered and airline
flanes. Hedy in a bathing suit did not draw gasps and stares
rom the visitors. Refined Mexicans do not gawk. They have the
| charming old-world manners of Spain and France, and, though
v volatile Latins, they are not demonstrative In public.
The late Sir Malcolm Campbell's historic racing car, Blue-
i bird, which will be exhibited, at the International Sports Show
' (Grand Central Palace, opening March 29) will be kept here
I so beauty Betty MacDonald, a Texas speedster, can try it out
. on the Utak salt flats. The British don't like the Idea o a gal
going after the records of their great driver, and she could
break some, for the long demon has been fitted with a "jet assist"
; engine. Betty Is better known as a bronc-rlder, but she may have
". what it takes behind a wheel.
Rep. Mann; Celler of B'klyn, chairman of the House Jud-
' ielary Committee, Is cold on TVIng session Of Congres. Tb >oh
' he Is show-buslness-Oiinded, he fears such projection wuld lead
J to "a degree of ham acting of the members of the House and
, ome members of the Senate." (Why "some" Emmanuel?) He
feels that "only the spectacular, the clrcus-Iike performances
{ would be Interesting to the public," and that the Kefauver mardl
4 gras was a "lot of entertainment" which produced "not one con-
( structive bill." Celler Is a Democrat, a Fair Dealer and, ap-
, parently, unconvinced by the New Hampshire returns.
Labor News
And
Comment
Pietro Barbati, a student at William and Mary College,
walked out and returned home to Naples. That's where the
' screen-blaze, Alida Valll. arid he had been rather close.Mrs.
! Clalremont Crane, of Mass.. divorcee, reported the new Interest
'of Prince Bertll of Sweden. .Betty Grayson's role in "Oolden
Boy" could mean reconciliation with husband Clifford Odets..
{Betty Dodero and Jerry Talshoff seen at Manny Wolf's. Bar-
bara Hutton is build'ng a home at Cuvernavaca, Mexico, and
' It' said her next husband will live thereSenor Corcuero Her
J son, Lance is staying with Cary Grant.
~ Ted Briskin. the Chicago camera millionaire, is taking
close-ups of Terry Moore, recently cut out of all-Amerloan
twin Davis' picture and Ted's ex. Betty Hutton, will "do a
' Judy" at the Palace, occupying the whole second half of the bill
' beginning April 12. She'll brenk In on her honeymoon with Char-
lie O'Curran to start rehearsals this week. British actress Joan
I Button and Vic Genoa, former Notre Dame grldder, at Chateau
Madrid together.. The Franchot Tones were to star In "Jason"
at Miami Beach, but Barbara (Peyton i unexpectedly grabbed
a plane for the Coast. Tone didn't like it a little bit when I
.wrote weeks ago, that their union was not all chuckles and
cuddles.
By Victor Rletel
There's no longer a Ford in
the future of the pro-Soviet
operatives in underground De-
troit.
But if you're at all concerned
over the future of this country,
just watch how 150 strategically
placed men, directed by a cen-
tral 8ovlet activist, captured con-
trol of the world's largest union
localand planted enemy cells
Inside every vital section of the
nation's arsenal city.
It took us years to rip this
network wide open despite
exposure in this column which
were Ignored by most of busy-
busy Washington encept the
House Un-American Activities
Committee.
It can now be reported that,
as far back as early 1050, a chap
by the name of Max Chait told
the Communist Michigan 8tte
organization conference (under-
cover) that the Party controlled
the auto union Local 600 at
Ford.
Now that Walter Reuther has
moved in swiftly to destroy
what's left of the Communist
network at Ford, Detroit's work-
ing Joes and businessmen are
toughening up. too.
Seven of those named as Com-
munists at the recent hearings
of the House Committee have
been fired.
It various plants around
the city, spontaneous com-
mittees marched 10 other
comrades to the plant gates.
Another lefty was forced to
Quit. Two others were served
with eviction notices and
told to get out of their
apartments in public hous-
ing projects.
All this seems like rather be-
lated and frustrating indigna-
tion. It moved Walter Reuther
and his colleagues in the lead-
ership of the United Automo-
bile Workers (CIO) to warm
against individual violence.
However, he added:
"While committed to the de-
fense of the right of workers to
earn a living, regardless of their
political beliefs, the UAW recog-
nizes that the security of the
nation transcends the rights of
any individual and, therefore
where the security of the na-
tion Is Involved, provisions must
be made to permit such indivi-
duals to earn their livelihood
on work and under circumstan-
ces that will not Jeopardize the
security of the nation."
That's a charitable approach
These men are our enemies,
and whether or not they earn a
living be a matter of little con-
cern.
We Hepe He Gets Along With the Rest of the Fomily
Presidentia
By BOB RUARK
Prose
"

When the Orecchio home in New Jersey (It's hi trial that
-Frank Costello tried to duck) was raided, a lot of contraband
; was found which would have Interested the postal censors more
I than it did the gambling sleuths. The tipster who helped turn
In "Waxey" Gordon, the dope racketeer, has been asked to do
;the technical supervising on a quickie film, "The Waxey Gor-
,don 8tory." There Is a Hollywood code provision against mak-
Ing pics primarily dealing with narcotics. Gordon has been in
I on every underworld angle.
Brig. Gen. William P. Nnckols Is now the top bras speak-
; Ing for the U. N. truce delegation Maybe the Reds can't take
it on the chin with Brass Nuckols.
TNI IS rOU FORUM HI RIADERi OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tha Mall iai it an oaan toruir lor rcoduri at Til* Panamo Amar
kan Left ti ara ratal vid arafafull, oa ara ka na" lad Ir whally can
fManl.sl mamar.
If an contrlfcau a lattai don't ba important it dotn t appaat tila
tat day Latttrj ora publuhed la tht erdat racarvM
Piapa try to haap thr latan limitad te ana pop* ttngth
Idantirv a* latttr writart htld in iftictert confirfanca
Thh n.w.papat oiiumai no raiponsibility ror rtoranianM or opinion.
aproitod in Itttan from i
SOMETHING DIFFERENT dom. how do you how vour ap-
W. .**? M1'Box w .. '-* Thought
In reading where the Freedom ______
Cruaad Fund totaled $7,015 I be- ITGLY pi i.rrres*
Ijran to wonder what we a indi-,Mail Box Editor-
vidual do. not Just hi money but! a few days ago marked the
by our every day lives, for this, end of the fourth six weeks grid -
purpose |lnK period for high school tu-
In analyzing myself I find dents. A* report cards were dl-
'thre are mere thing* I could i trlbuted there were sevemral dis-
discontlnue buying, economize appointments among the stu-
ad there would be more worth-dent, pertaining to their grade
Vhlle things I could begin con-'Rome tesrhnrt seem tn rer-ist m
ributlng to in time and money keeping the students off the
We know there is not always honor roll and alvina them a
quality on this earth because urade lower than thev deserve
politic and favoritism cause As conduct cannot bt considered
many unfair dealings amnog ev-. m the grading, evidently there
jery race but I am glad people must be some personal dislike a-
*ve to raap what we ow whe- mnng th tesrhers towrd dudIM
thtr we are a Ganeral. PFC OS- We. as students believe that
i t -15. Protestant Catholic, this subject of extreme lmport-
JEtnubllran, Democrat or what ?nr> pr>ot-id be tlven x reme
isjtionality consideration and that It oe
As Christ died on th c-om for -ought to the attention of the
our iris and people die and PTA
uffer day after day for our free-' Discouraged Scholars
However, there can be no
disagreement over the fact
that even a network operat-
ed bv ISO men out of 70.000
employes in one plant does
jeopardize the security of
our country. That, it seems
to me, should end forever
the sneerinas of those who
ask patronizingly, "What
harm can a handful of
Communists do?"
Before we get to that, let me
report how the Stalinists oper-
ated.
They moved their Party ca>
dres Into Detroit bit by bit, all
disciplined fanatics.
Then they organized a spe-
cial section of the undergr/:nd
Party to operate in Ford as
though it were a big city.
Each bui ding at the huge
sprawling Rlevr Aouge plant
was considered a separate pre-
cinct. It had its own party
structure and Its own officials.
These then had one section
leader who sat In on a central
governing body which ran all
underground Communist activ-
ity at Ford.
This miniature Politburo, ac-
corldng to testimony, was eon-
trolled by Biliy Allen, editor of
the Michigan Worker (official
Communist sheet).
Comrade Allen has nothing
to do with Ford officially, nor
has he ever worked there. He
was the Party's representative
in chrrge of all strategy, gather-
ing of Information and other
vital functions.
At the same time, tht 150
mem'-ers Inside Ford were kept
secret from even the regular
Party functionaries so Im-
portant was this operation. It
had the highest priority in Par-
ty circles.
Similar organizational setups
and chains of command effec-
tively planted men In the
Dodge. Chrysler. Bohm Alumi-
num, Packard. Plymouth, Cadil-
lac and every other vital plant
in the city.
They worked through a spe-
cial Communist dfvlsion called
"Auto-Miscellaneous Seetlon."
for what purpose? Well,
just the other week, the
Executive Board of the Ford
Local passed a Party-lint
resolution urging that we
pull out of Korea immedia-
tely, in effect losing that
war automatically. A copy
was sent to President Tru-
man in the name of "70,
000 Pord workers" Word of
this was flashed across the
world.
The American proletariat
seemed suddenly to be pro-
Soviet. It was all phony. Just
a document written by the Com-
rades. I
And. of course, they arsn't
blind.
They see Our newest machine
tools, aircraft design* and pro-
duction schedules. Enough said.
frandma may be interesting to the relative but
t crams the craw of strangers.
The Information that a man fell in love with
his wife as a boy, and regards his child as peer-
less, Is noble in concept and admirable In pres-
entation, but even on a President it ain't unique.
Nor are routine letters of thank to strangers
apt to Jar you out of your seat.
The closet thing to a start that I was able to
pull out of Harry's album was the flat state-
.-....., ...c .,.,.., *..c .,... ,..., ....,.>. v.. ment made last year to Mr. Hlllman, when the
turn the dross into gold, but after a hasty skim curator of Trumanlana asked the President to
through of "Mr. President" (Farrar, Strauss and summarize the most Important achievements
Young) I feel like I have been Idly leafing of the Administration.
through the snapshot album of a reasonably. The President said and possibly with a
stuffy middle-class family. And I suspect f am straight face: .
right. All we need, to jound It ff is a bespec- ki ,. J, <_
tacled baby on a t>eafikin. > We have Prevented a third world Wat1. And we
NEW YORKFor the past several days, ev-
er since the postman fetched the bulky package,
I have been circling as warily as Pandora around
the President's much-bruited book, fearing to
dip into the forbidden secrets until the release
date said go.
I don't know what I expected to find, after
all the buildup on Bill Hlllman's five-buck col-
lection of Harry's hopes and fears and letters
and old dance programs.
Maybe the secret the alchemists sought, to
right. All we need to jpund It fit is a bespec-
' cled baby on a bearskin. > "*="*"= vi.ttii-u '"
Mr. Truman Writes a mlddn' dull letter, nt kePl American economy on an even keel.
cklng considerable of Ben Franklin's pith, and _Th,s ls Xery nivC tojtncw, since every timi
lacking
his diary entries could be called less gripping
than excerpts, say, from Mary Aator's men>oirs.
He managed to draw a fiery snort of denial
from Jimmy cymes about a former scolding,
but that target is a fairly static bird.
And he did touch Congress in the raw with
his Unes to the effect that "12 years In Wash-
ington ls enough for any man"Mr. Truman
. time
Harry needs another chunk of taxes he finds
the Russians under his bed, and cries doom In
a voice fit to frighten the birds.
And as for keeping the economy on an even
keel, we would pray that the good Lord help Us
if the water ever really gets rough.
But we did not come here to carp at the con-
tent of Harry's scrap-book.
It ls a handsome volume, suitable for lending
Iilgl/Ull lO CHUU|I1 1UL ally llltlll JVJl lllllllDIl *v ** iii has been around for about 18 years himself to people, and It ls full of pictures which will
this being a statement once attributed to him
by Jonathan Daniels and roundly denied by his
press secretary.
The letter to Bernard Baruch, upbraiding him
for not Joining the slush-fund collectors, is also
there, as ls a prideful reference to Harry's rude
threat to the music critic who knocked Margar-
et's singing.
There is also a spicy bit written to Gramma
Moses, the ancient painter, and a detailed des-
cription of how a president ls fed, which
seemed to impress Harry. Butlers In white ties
must be still summat of an oddity in Indepen-
dence, Mo.
It ls possible that something fine ls lacking
in my nature, but other people's letters and
diaries, with rare exceptions, have always failed
to strike sparks off my tired old eye.
A long dissertation on somebody else's freat-
at least allow you to recognize most of the
Truman cousins and nephews and nieces on the
street.
It does bust some precedent, since It ls releas-
ed while the man ls still in office, and preaches
a profound sermon to the experts in its impli-
cations.
Its publication means that (1) Harry will
run for office again or (2) he will not run for
office again.
Being a cagey man he doe not blow any whis-
tles that might hurt his chances If he runs, un-
less he Is worried about the esteem of J. Byrnes
or the hurt feelings of the reformed zealot, Mr.
Wallace.
The only-sllghtly expurgated memoirs of Har-
ry S. Truman don't figure to upset the national
mind beyond the point of realisation that we
hired an average man to do a giant's Job. And
this we have known for some time.

Rail Rates
By Peter Eison
WASHINGTON (NBA) The Federal court to
Junction to halt the quickie New York Central
railroad strike by no means solves what'*
wrong. If anything, the injunction only aggra-
vate a generally bad railroad situation that
has been growing worse since the end of World
War II.
81nce August 1950. railroad peace has been
maintained only by the technicality of govern-
ment seizure and operation.
In addition to this complicated wage, hour and
work ng conditions dispute that ha been going
on since 1949, the proceed-wlth-cautlon blocks
are set on at least four other main Unes:
di Recommendations of a presidential emer-
gency board that all railroad employes be
brought into a union shop agreement.
N. Y. C. B. & O. and some other eastern roads
now have such contracts. But the railroad em-
ployers as a whole may turn down the recom-
mendation. If they do, it will be the first time
since the National Mediation law was passed that
they have rejected a finding.
(2) New bills now before Congress to increase
unemployment and sickness benefits to railroad
worker, without Increasing the present 6-L
per cent of payroll now levied against employ-
er and employes.
This legislation Is expected to pas, though
the railroads oppose It. They claim it will ev-
entually lead to higher payroll contribution.
Present benefits range from a minimum of
$1.75 a day to a maximum of $5 a day for em-
ployee earning $2500 a year or more. Proposed
new benefit would be a minimum of $3 a day
to a maximum of $750 per day for employes
earning $3500 a year or more.
Railway rates and wage acales have both
been splrallng upward in a iueceuien of jerks
over the past six years. For the traveling and
shipping public, they have meant steadily in-
creasing transportation costs.
It ls the need for applying the brakes, some-
how, to prevent a runaway and possibly a wreck
that ls drawing so much attention to the exist-
ing railroad condition.
Average straight-time pay for all railway em-
eloyes was 93 cents an hour In 194, according
A.A.R. figures. On Jan. 1, 1982 th* average
was $1.81. This represents a 94 per eent average
Increase.
There have been nine increase* for non-op-
erating personnel, totalling 88 cent an hour
There have been 12 increases for yardmen, to-
taling 89.5 cents. There have been 10 Increase
for roadmen, totaling $7.6 cent.
On the other side of the picture, freight, rates
today are 88 per cent higher than in 1845. There
have been four main freight rate increases lnce
the end of the war They were 17 per cent in
December 1946, 23 per cent in July 1948, nine
per cent in August 1949 and seven per cent in
August 1951.
Railway mail pay rates have been increased
95 per cent since 1945.
Basic one-way passenger coach fares have
been increased by areas. In the east the increase
has been from 2.2 cent to 8.375 cents a mile In
the south from 2.2 to 2.76 cent a mile. In the
west the Increase has been from ;.2 to onlv 2 5
cents a mile.
First class passenger fares, excluding Pullman
fares have gone up In the east from 3.8 cents
to 4.5 cents a mile. In the south from 3.3 to 3 86
cents a mile. In the west from 8.3 to 3 8 cents
a mile. All this offer a perfect example of how
Inflation works.
^tm WSHINGTOH
MERRY-GO
If P8.IW PIA8.30H
Drew Pearson says: Four U.S. fliers ransomed from Hun*
gory almost court-martialed; Food processors plot end
of price controls; Taft's most vulnerable point is arms
voting record.
WASHINGTONThe complete tory of how th four U.S.
flier were forced down over Hungary and later ransomed for
$120,000 ha now been reported to Washington.
The report came when the top Air Force command at
Wiesbaden, Germany, proposed court-martialing the four men
for incompetence.
The truth ls that the four fliers were not on a secret ml$-
i0n as the Communists claimed, nor did they get lost in a fog,
as the fliers claimed.
Furthermore, their compass was not Jammed by Russian ra-
dio, as the fliers claimed.
The official report forwarded to Washington by the Air
Force in Wiesbaden shows that the trouble was stupid naviga-
tion.
The Air Force crew was flying on a clear, sunlit day, butr
as a result of poor navigation, got lost over Hungarian territory
on a routine flight from Germany to Belgrade, Yugoslavia.
The official report also shows that the fliers signed a state-
ment in either the Russian or Hungarian language which they
couldn't read.
Obviously they have no Idea what was in the report, and
Washington is waiting to have It blasted out on the air in th
form of propaganda.
As a result of all this, the Air Force command in Germany
proposed court-martialing the four men on a charge of losing
a $75,000 plane and costing the United States $120,000 to ran-
som money.
When this was referred to the Pentagon, however, the
court-martial was ruled out on the ground that th* men had
suffered enough.
SABOTAGING PRICE CONTROLS
Premature publicity hampered but did not break up a meet-
ing of cattle men and food processors In Chicago the other day,
called to put the skids under price controls.
The meeting was held In the Crystal room of the Hotel
Sherman, at the Invitation of the Corn Belt Livestock Feeder
Association.
Though some of the largest food groups in the nation had
made plans to attend the "secret" meeting and 125 people had
accepted, fewer than 40 people actually showed up.
C. B. Watson, president of the Livestock Feeder, blamed
"unfortunate publicity" for the small turnout. The full story
of the secret meetingand its purposehad appeared in this
column the previous day.
Chicago newspaper reporter, assigned to cover the meeting,
were given the cold shoulder and told that the gathering was
a private affair.
A few minutes after the meeting was called to order, how-
ever, three of them entered the room through a aide door and
started taking notes in the rear.
They were asked to leave. The food companies and cattle
feeders made it clear that they did not want their plans for
undermining OPS made public.
However, here ls a summary of the proposals to sabotage
price controls which were agreed to behind "closed doors":
1. A nation-wide propaganda campaign will be launched
to discredit OPS. Radio, TV, newspapers will be used to "get
the message across."
2. Millions of posters will be distributed condemning OPS. Th
posters, plus auto-wlndshield stickers, will be displayed by "every
producer, distributor, manufacturer, apartment-house owner and
stock-holder."
3. Industry will send a "steady stream" of delegates to
listen to us if we put enough heat on them," said one mem-
ber of the group.
4 If Congress renews the Price Control Act, the group pro-
posed buttonholing delegates to the Democratic and Republican
Conventions to persuade them to adopt platform planks de-
nouncing controls.
5 A committee was appointed to raise the funds necessary
for this campaign.
TAFT'S WEAKEST SPOT
Taft strategists, holding a post-mortem on the New Hamp-
shire primary, figure the thing that hurt their candidate mot
was the speech of Gov. Sherman Adams in which he claimed
that Taft hit Eisenhower below the belt.
This gave Adams a, chance to come back and review
Taft's own record in voting against national defense, agalntt
European cooperation, and against various policies aimed to pro-
tect the United States from Soviet Russia.
"Where he President," governor Adams said oi Taft, "he
makes it clear that he would follow the same isolationist phil-
osophy which turned Vandenberg against him. In following
this course, he would rob America of friends we simply must
not lose."
Some of Taft's own best friends, together with some of hi
vigorous Democratic enemies, both agreewithout comparing
notes that Taft's voting record and consistent campaign against
the arms program is what will hurt him most not only in
the rest of the pre-conventlon campaign, but in any election
campaignif nominated.
TWO NEVADA SOLONS
Nevada's hoary-haired Sen. Pat McCarran openly paraded
his power over his Junior Nevada colleague, Sen. "Molly" Malone,
the other day on the Senate floor.
McCarran was anxious to get on with Senate business when
Malone started Interrupting with long-winded dissertations con-
demning the reciprocal-trade theory.
McCarran tapped hi foot Impatiently, finally whispered to
8enator George of Georgia that he would "put an end to thl."
Deliberately talking across the front of the Senate cham-
ber, McCarran planted himself In front of Malone and fixed him
with a cold stare.
"We gift-loan to foreign countries money to enable them
to outbid us in the world market, "Malone droned on, oblivious
to McCarran' performance.
Then the senior Nevadan caught his eye. Not a word was
whispered; McCarran simply gave him a withering look.
Malone sputtered like a motor, out of gas, shrank meekly
Into his seat.
McCarran turned on his heel, strode majestically back to
his seat.
Malone looked sheepishly around to see whether anyone had
noticed.
The whole Senate was watching. Some senators laughed
openly. But Malone chose to swallow his self-respect rather
than defy his powerful colleague from Nevada.
NOT 1Once before. Malone got In trouble with McCarran
for talklrlg too much. While McCarran was back in Nevada,
Malone made the unfortunate decision to filibuster the antl-
alot-machlne bill.
This focused so much national attention on the the bill that
the Senate was forced to vote against slot machines. This in-
furiated McCarran who had planned to use his Senate influence
to kill the bill quietly.
When McCarran got back to Washington he gave Malone a
private dressing down that almost made Senate history.
Note 2Though McCarran is a Democrat and Malone a
Republican, they vote almost alike. This ls because McCarran
generally votes Republican.
LIONS CLUB
RAFFLE TICKETS
1st PRIZE:
4 Apt. House, "Campo Alegre"
2nd Prize:
Bedroom House,
"El amrrejo"
3rd Prize:
2 Bedroom House,
"El Coco"
>&&*' CASS/fD
SUNDAY
Pltyin Mrrh 23, 1952
FOR SALE, until Saturday, at:
C.Z. Pharmacy
Aneen Liquor Stor
Angeltni
Pete's Piafe
Tlvoli Travel Ajeney
Duran

I
I




FRIDAY MARCH 21, 1B5
i i'mi -" -.i
____
ami,
me PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE
ii~ ~ T TTTf
"-j iT
Taft Yells Double -Cross, Ducks
New Jersey Contest With Ike
WASHINGTON, March 21.(UP)Sen. Ro-
bert A. Taft pulled out of the New Jersey primary
contest with Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower yester-
day and the General hinted he may return and
wage a personal campaign for the Republican Pre-
sidential nomination.
Simultaneously, President Truman told a news
conference at his Key West, Fla., vacation retreat
that Eisenhower can step down from his post as
commander of the North Atlantic Pact forces any
time he feels it is safe and proper.
Taft turned his back on the April 15 New Jersey
primary, Where Eisenhower and Harold E. Stas-
sen also are entered, with an angry charge that
Gov. Alfred E. Driscoll had double-crossed him
by endorsing the five star general.
The New Jersey voting offer- cause he had hoped the contest
ed the only direct primary con- for delegates to the Republican
test between the Ohio Senator national convention would be
and Elsenhower except for last "kept In the open as much as
week's New Hampshire primary
In which Elsenhower defeated
Taft.
Mr. Truman again refused to
say whether he will seek four
more years In the White Houie.
Ha threw down a statement
Wednesday by Democratic na-
tional chairman Frank E. Mc.
Kinney that peace in Korea
would reduoe chancea of his
runninr.
In another development, Sen.
Richard B. Russell of Georgia
announced that he has decided
against enterjng the California
Presidential primary because he
can not spare the time from his
Senate duties.
Mr. Truman already has or-
dered his name withheld in Ca-
lifornia. ..
Taft said that as of: March 12
the deadline for withdrawing
from New Jersey Driscoll pro-
claimed neutrality In the Taft-
Elsenhower fight but that on
March 17 he "reversed his posl-
posslble."
"Apparently those who are do-
ing the manipulating prefer to
keep It underground," Lodge said.
Stassen said Taft's decision "is
undoubtedly Influenced by his
very weak showing in the Min-
nesota primary."
Taft got about 24,000 write-in
votes In Minnesota, compared to
mote than 100,000 for Elsenhower
and almost 130,000 for Staasen
whose name was printed on the
ballot.
Sen. James H. Duff (R-Pa.)
another top Eisenhower back-
er, said "it is exceedingly dif-
ficult to understand the refusal
of Senator Taft for a show
down fight with Eisenhower in
the New Jersey primaries where
the people alone would be the
Judges of which man is the bet-
ter candidate."
Taft was bitterly critical of
Driscoll In his statement an-
nouncing his withdrawal from
the New Jersey primary.
The Ohio Senator said he was
urged by New Jersey Republican
tlon by announcing his own sup-
port of Eisenhower."
Taft said he will "let the pub-
lic Judge" whether Driscoll was
eullty of "political trickery." .
Meantime, Elsenhower said at his Paris headquarters that the,"'8 own slate of delegates In the
amazing write-in vote he got lnlNew Jersey primary on the
the Minnesota primary Tuesday B r ou nd s that ^all candidates
forces him to "re-examine my
personal position and past deci-
sions" on his candidacy for Pre-
81 Hi^'paat decision Was to take now has "broken his word "and
no personal part In the battle has obviously taken steps to cor-
for the Republican Presidential rupt the intent of the preference
would be given fair considera-
tion.
But, Taft' protested, Driscoll
Hotter Model Sabre Coming
Off Production Lines Soon
WASHINOTON, March 81 (UP
A new Sabre fighter expected
to have more speed and power
than the Russian Mlg-13 will
start rolling off the production
lines next month, the Air Force
disclosed today.
Undersecretary of .Air R. L.
Oilpatrlc said he did not know
when the improved model will
reach Korea. It usually takes
three to six months to get a
new fighter plane into combat
duty.
The Russians presumably are
testing a new fighter In Korea.
A United 8tates pilot said he
engaged a new high-wing Com-
munist Jet In a dogfight yester-
day.
Several Sabre pilots have re-
ported seeing enemy planes
which differ from the Mlg 15 In
that their swept back wings are
mounted high on the fuselace.
First Lt. James D. Carey of
Las Vegas, Nev., however, was
the first to claim a hit on the
co-called Type 15."
Oilpatrlc said the new model
Sabre will be equipped with a
more powerful Jet engine, the
central electric J.-47-7. This
will Increase both its speed and
altitude.
Air Force experts rate Sabres
now In combat about equal with
the Mlg-15, each having an ad-
vantage at certain altitudes and
In different performance char-
acteristics.
8abre pilots, however, have
maintained a superiority of
about seven-to-one over the Mlg
pilots, mostly because they are
better filers.
Military aircraft planners
have been crtlclzed in Congress
for not turning out a superior
plane to the Mlg and for not
producing more of the types
available.
One congressman said recently
the entire program has "failed
dismally."
Oilpatrlc said firepower as
well as speed will be improved
In the New Sabres.
They will have guns and rock-
ets that excel the present 50
caliber and 20 mm. guns.
But it will be at least a year
before any of the fighters are
equipped with guided missiles.
Oilpatrlc said. .
He said better engines will be
put Into other combat planes
without slowing production,
which Is expected to hit a peak
of about 900 planes a month by
the middle of this year.
The United States currently
Is turning out about 600 to 700
planes a month, compared with
Russia's 1,000.
r
&hey re scarce....
but we have received a large
shipment from Scotland of
JLadies LPringle's
100% fure Cashmert
Sweaters
(Moth Proof)
PULLOVERS CARDIGANS
Sold separately or in matched Sets
White, Black and beautiful colors!
At both Stores
FELIX B. MADURO, S. A.
21 Central Avenue
6 Tlvoli Avenue
Bethel Mission
Church To Observe
35th Anniversary
The Bethel Mission Church
of Red Tank will delebrate Its
35th anniversary on Sunday at
3 p.m.
The anniversary program will
Include greetings from pastors
of several denominations and
an anniversary address by Rev.
S. N. Brown, with Elder J. W.
O'Neal acting as chairman.
Other Items on the program
Includes anthems by the Pa-
raso Methodist, Bethel Mlaslon
and Salem Mlaslon church
choirs and a male quartet, and
elocutionary Items.
: 17
BORN UNDER FIRE '.".
BOSTON, (UPi. Mrs. Ethel
Murray, 35, gave birth to a baby
in her apartment even as fire-
men were fighting a fire In the
uppr efloors of th building.
nomination.
As for the New Jersey situation,
a Taft spokesman said the Sen-
ator would like to take his name lie endorsement of Elsenhower,
primary of New Jersey."
Taft referred to Driscoll's pub-
off the New Jersey ballots. But
a New Jersey election official
said lt could be done now only
by a court order.
Taft said he Is cancelling his
lans for campaigning In New
ersev, however, and is asking
his friends there to shut down
their state headquarters and
refrain from any activity in
connection with the preference
primary.
Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.,
and a statement by Secretary of
State Lloyd B. Marsh that the
State Republican organization
would campaign for the general.
'This can only mean that the
Republican workers and party
members In New Jersey will feel
in no uncertain degree the pres-
sure and power of. both the state
organization and the governor,"
Taft sld.
"It is an atmosphere In w^ich
(R-Mass.) manager of the Eisen-; there cannot be a fair contest In
hower campaign, said he was dis- New Jersey's Presidential prefer-
appolnted at Taft's decision be- ence primary."
La Moda Americana
JUST RECEIVED .
DRESSES
Beautiful Bemberg
7.95 & 8.95
LINGERIE
Fine Nylon and Rayon
"Lady Marlene"
BRASSIERES
all sizes
SANDALS
different styles.
All wonderfully low in price!
La Moda Americana
102 Central Avenue Panam
SECOND FLOOR
AVEH\da
We are unpacking

Plastic dlnnerware in
colors...........set 8.50
MAYNARD rustproof
egg beaters......... .75
ON slf attaching pic-
ture hooks ......... 0.20
Plastic shelf trim yd. 0.20
Plastic shelf and edge
............... Roll 1.50
Toilet brush and hanger ..... 2.00
Nylon baby bottle brush...... 0.60
Venetian blind brush ........ 1.50
Dish mops................... 0.35
Toilet bowl brush............ 1.25
Bedroom lace curtains ___... 6:75
Plastic refrigerator crlspers ... 1.95
Aluminum 7 In. frying pan ... 1.15
Aluminum 5-ln-l Combination
cooker ..................... 3.50
Aluminum Griddle toasters .. 2.95
Buy NOW
SECOND FLOOR 5* AVENIDA

HX "OUSEHOID EXCHANGE
THE ONLY STORE OF ITS KIND
IN PANAMA
We Pay Spot Cash for Your Furniture
We Sell Reconditioned Furniture
We Accept Your Old Furniture -
On a Trade in Basis.
COME IN AND SEE OUR BARGAINS
FOR YOURSELF
Living Ron m. Bedroom and Dining Room-
Sets, Porch Furniture, Odd Chairs, Beds,
Tables. Dressers, Sideboards, China
Closets, etc., etc.
Open from 9:00 to 12 -2:00 to 6:00 p.m.
and Saturdayg from 9:00 to 6:00 p.m.
41 Automobile Row Tel. 3-4911

i
I
lew
and JLovely
DRESSES
A Gorgeous
collection
with the
latest styles
and colors,
MADURITO S
I. L. MADURO JR.
100, Central Avenue
ONLY I DAY LEFT!
THESE HOUSES CAN BE YOURS
FOR B.20.00 ONLY
SECOND PRIZE
PRIZE
PRIZE
> /' 1 asaaflflMapi"^^^^^^ m
3 Bedroom Chalet in "El Cangrejo
i
4 Apartment-House with turo Bedrooms
e*eh in Campo Alegre.
2 Bedruom Chalet in "El Coco'
WHERE TO BUY YOUR TICKETS
ferretera de lima
auto service
cantina ancn
cantina pete's place
BAZAR INTERNACIONAL
LA INNOVACIN
LUIS
ALMACN PINOCHO
BOTH DURAN STORES
PROPAGANDA, S. A.
CASA MIKE
KIOSCO LA LOTERA
CASA ADMIRABLE
BUY YOUR TICKET
TODAY
FOR MORE DETAILS CALL TREASURY OF LIONS CLUB TEL 22454 2-4812
matam.___


p*Vf. fopb
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 195*
If! HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSK1KE JOHNSON
S'DE GLANCES
By Galbrait!
.YWOOD. (NEAl The
Laugh Parade: Rehears-
er a movie short, Spike
couldn't get one of his six-
I to make what he consld-
the proper sound for a rou-
ihe band was playing."
's get going. Spike," yelled
roduction boss, "we're be-
;ime."
ke went on carefully re-
s; the revolver and said:
i. Heifetr. was out of tune
vtaf have to wait."
MacDonald Carey checked in-
to We swank Coronado Hotel In
SaYi Diego and the room cleik
sieT? "Carey. 1 can give you a
re*rn" overlooking the garden.
Writeri do you prefer?"
"What I really prefer." replied
Carey. "Is a room that overlooks
the rent."
wod movie fur designer last nighl
to be glazed."
Aspirations of Hollywood cow-
boys and Texas wranglers are
vastly different. Arthur Kenne-
dy. playing a cowboy in "This
Man Is Mine," had a line which
read:
"Before 1 die I aim to toss a
rope over my own cow. just
once."
From somewhere behind the
camera, a Hollywood extra play-
ing a cowboy Intoned:
"Before I die, I aim to loss a
skid chain over my own Cadillac,
just once.'
Bette Davis, having a long
conversation on the telephone
ear the hat check stand at the
Siptftin's Table, was mistaken
r the check girl by a sllghtly-
tiaded male patron. After fid-
jwtinfc for a couple of minutes,
aitd getting madder with every
tfdeet. he finally looked up the
manager and wailed: '
* "If your hat check girl will
ait talking to her boy friend on
fhat telephone and get my hat.
rB be on my way."
Tack Paar says he has a great
Idea for an afternoon program.
Its not going to be on radio or
n television." says Jack. "It's
for lonely housewives. I'm going
^o so from door to door."
Robert Q. Lewis recently gave
Robert Jordan, one of his cam-
eramen on "The Show Goes On,"
fcermission to miss one program
n order to take an examination
or Air Force pilot training
Next dav. Lewis received a wire
eading: "Hymn 314. lasl verse.
ast line."
Turning to the Bible. Lewis
ranslated It:
' "Sorrow vanquished, labor end-
ed. Jordan passed."
I Director Henry King and Cam-
Iranian Leon Shamroy werei
hown shots taken in Africa of:
hvena th will figure in "Thei
nows of Killminjaro." The first
av the two men saw black and;
hite film footage of the beast
(nd the next day they looked at
olor shots.
, Say." muttered King, "that,
jivr-v looks a lot better today",
'He ought ro." aid Shamroy.
?l hnd him sent over to a Holly-
Jane Wyman was introduced to.
an admiring male fan at Warner
BMW.
"How do you do. Miss Wyman."
the wide-eyed gent said. "I've;
seen you in so many pictures you
ought to recognize me."
A Hollywood physio-therapist.
Dr. David H. Jones was giving
advice to an aging movie actor
who still plays the role of the
gay bachelor in private life. "II
suggest moderation and relaxa-;
tion," said the medico. "Lay off i
the night-clubbing and late
hours and dating young actress-
es. That's the best advice I can
give you."
Replied the wolfish actor:
"Doctor, what else can you sug-
gest. Really. I don't deserve the
best advice.''
fERlt*-
FRIEND OF A FRIEND
3-3
?* /^\
T. M. Rb. U. 1. M. 00.
"That money you loaned your cousins surely is a con-
tributionthey ntvar have mentioned it as a debt!"
Lou Costello has a hilarious
memory of when he was a $30 a I
week carpenter at MGM in the,
early '20's.
"The studio." Lou tells it. "had|
a purgatory for carpenters whO|
were no good. They put 'em on I
the nail pile, straightening nails.
I was so bad they put me on a
tack pile, straightening tacks, j
"But I got even with the stu-'
dio. One day I was fired, but no,
one advised the paymaster. II
went back to the studio every]
Friday for six months and pick-
ed up my $30 check before they |
discovered I had been fired."
i
GIVE!
Some of the TV fraternity were
discussing a producer who keep3f
using his girl friends In Import-
ant role's even though many of
them are horrible actresses.
"He probably was a sailor be-
fore becoming a producer," ob-
served John Cameron Swayre,
"the way he Insists on a sweet-
heart in every part."
1952
RED CROSS
HIHD
TAGAROPULOS
INDUSTRIES, S.A.
Phones:
1002 1003
4041 Feo Boyd Ave
Coln R P
FRESH MILK
FRESH BUTTER
RICH ICE CREAM
Everything
Inspected by the
Health Department
HOME DELIVERY
CLUB
S1.50
Weekly
23 or 60 cycles
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIEND
Please Go "Way!
BT MERRILL IftOBflm
You dot \ Mope, too ,
THINK MUCH MUttrWPIN
Of MR ABOUT WORK
WILSON'S
LECTURE.
HUM^
UTS FORGET
it even.
malt!
Look WHOS mere '
SHALL We JOIN THE7
LACHES, WEARY?
tVE BEEN WALKlM' THE DOSS "KO LONG---L )aitSf^t
FEtL ANOTHER SIESTA COMING ON /
7T
hit oop
Wrong Word
Vt ?. T. HAMT.IR
- ...
I THOUGHT FOOZY/ ANO
COULD BETTER ( HE DOES/ HE SHOULD.'
GUIDE HOLLIS IN \ KNOW / WHATCHA
A TIME ERA WITH > MOO.' I RECKON THEY'RE I
7110
Bolivar
you should have
'this V-M tri-o-matic 955!
your home entertainment picture just Isn't
complete, without facilities for playing
your favorite recorded music and the tri-o
matic 955 fits the picrure perfectly! Equipped
with a six-foot plug-in cord and a four-foot
phono-cord, the tri-o-matic 955 plays through
the amplifying system of any T-V set or radio.
Completely automatic for all records all sizes,
all speeds and shuts off automati-
cally after last record has played I
RADIO CENTER T
ROOTS *NT> fTFTt BIDDIES
BY EDGAR MARTN
A\_\_ THE. R^.ST
EXPLODED!
' .
Ili
3"
CAPTAIN EAST
In They Go
BT LESLIE Tl'RNEl
DON'T WORRV- JANE... T AH. HE'S
I'LL BE AT AJ.REDS OK LEAVING NOW,
'SOU I NICK'. WELL.
WAIT TILL SHE-
GOES UPSTAIR*
AMD TURNS ON
HER LIGHT.
IHK1S WELKEN. Planeteet
Tifht Squeak
BY RUSS WINTERMOTHAM
[VER I WANT A ROOto.Tt STILL HAVE
LADY... IF VOU GOTA / OWE VACANT.
GARAGE TOR MV CMC. JUST PRWE
AROUND TO
THE BACK.
1
VIC FLINT
New Business
BT MICHAEL OMAI.LET
TORSO, GOT AN J/AND WHAT
IDEA FOR KEEPIN"*\ IS THIS
OURSELVES AMUSED) BRIOMT
WHILE WE'RE LAVIKJ'^U IDEA?
LOW THIS WAY
ILLA'S

Reasonable Facsimllr
HY Al VERMEEB
UESS WHAT I
WANT FOR fcfr\
BIRTHDAY/ <
HOLLYHOCK?;
IT'S ftKV..^
AND IT SNORTS
AND STOMP
WHFN IT OET
UP IN THE
MORNIN<3-_.
9-1'.

-' mnm-:jr.' i a
wmRvm.
ol'R BOARDING HOI St
With
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAT
By J. R WILLIAMS
Wronjetl
YA OWHTA X WHAT M A*HAMP \ HA SONS O'YStSSBLT, 1 AMI*t VLVBSTBR. A. MRS ^ PUSSYCAT' / VOU ^^___ ^AP PRESSING
j*. ^ ^~ 1 Brt
,0 \"iJB
Ur-^^M^.'

_i\ V\ T~jfl ^^
PAINTIN' AMJTACWB* \
ON POTER^ 1^
ONE THINS, SOT '
RUTTIN' 'Eivv \*-
ON STATU*
IN TH' CITT
RARX iS fjo
s. fab/ y1
W If M A \/3 \ i /
V]P^""
(W WORD,TWlSG>s/y&U'RE-J
A6 iMSENllOU AS A FOX
FLEEIMS THE PACK-
KeH-HEH/-
advertising for
a sir walter
raleish pipe-
to CAPTURE .
:A curio,
PAKFR //
Ttf
-THE INK WASN'T DRV Ohi Twe^
PAPER WHEN) UMHORM t.
WAI^ZED llJTO A\V tiOTBL
coom With a pho^v pipe/,
-*- JUST TO NlP AMV *
V'lOLEMCE, X HAD A PlANlO
M.OVER T5RE55ED LIKE A ,
SHERIFF AWD WAMlMS A ^
<5BT OP MATCHED JAIL-
HOS6 BRACELETS/
gEFORE IT WAS OVER,
OUMHORM WANTEp
TO INlCLODE ME
IN HIS
WILL.'
,\ Xf \ CIar-eumph/:
/ I \ COLONJ T
/ HAVE DONlE-
' 3 u gETTER MS6ELF ~ ,,**. ^ ^^
^,
I'LL KEEP
AFTER MY
PA AN' MAYBE
<3IT HIM TO
PLAWT A 6.
BUSHY TREE,
SAY ABOUT
HERE, EH?
'BOY. OU DON'T KnOW
HOW HORRiftLE IT IS
TO HAVE TH' ONLY HOUSE
OKI TH' STREET WITH
A BAY WINDOW.' MY
KAA AW GRAMMA LIVE
IM TH' THINlGi WHY
I DASSW'T DO
ATHIKX3.' xt.
z
I'LL. SEE MY
BA ABOUT A
i TREE THERE
OKI OUR SIDE,
TOO.' MY (XS
iSOT REASONS
WHY HE DON'T
UKE THAT
9AY WINDCR,
HISSELF.'
? al,* H" 5r"^i i
1 c"--^''" '

:-Jo.
1
J^iiJ?
?^-Wi
Vbi*.;

*-ii
XRvy-wLAMJ,
BORN THIRTY YEARS TOO SOON f-JafiZSL


----------------
{'Rinsv v.Aprq 01 v-o
THE PANAMA AMERiriV AN INDEPENDENT DAILT fflTWsTArr.lt
riotmn
r act fix Jorietu
t
&, ,7. &tl~ DA &&~ 3521
m H r 9 Kr3
V 'V
T*
1 I 1' II .H

MKS. SAMUEL P. COMLT, JR., wife of Capt. Comly, com-
manding officer of Military Sea Transportation, shown dur-
ing cocktail hour In their quarters on the 16th Naval District
Reservation, capt. and Mrs. Comly, who have been socially
active on the Isthmus, will leave next Thursday for new duty
in Philadelphia.
PRESIDENT AND MR8. AROSEMENA ENTERTAIN
His Excellency the President of the Republic of Panama
and Mrs. Alclbiades Arosemena entertained last night at the
P-esidencla with a banquet given in honor of the members
of the Honorable Diplomatic Corps accredited to Panama
and their ladles.
General And Mrs. Morris
Leave Tomorrow
The Commander-ln-Chlef of
the Caribbean Command, Lieut.
General William H. H. Morris,
jr., announced yesterday that he
and Mrs. Morris would make
their departure from the Isth-
mus tomorrow morning.
His itinerary Includes a stop at
Puerto Rico for\an official visit
before continuing on to Wash-
ington, D.C.
A brief plane-side honor guard
ceremony will take place at 9:30
a.m. at the Albrook Air Force
Base following which the gener-
al will depart.
Ambassador And Mrs. Stambonl-Reenan
Ilcurtematte Leave For Marriage Tonight ,
Washington Tne wedding of Miss Beulah L.
The Ambassador of Panama to Btmbonl and Chief Yeoman
the Ustted States and Mrs. Ro-!Charles W. Keenan, U8N. both
berto Heurtematte left bv plane formerly of Baltimore, Maryland.
Coleen Gray, Is from a socially
prominent Australian family 1p
Sydney. She is known here for
the Interesting and charming
dinners which she gave fre-
quently. Their many friends in
the Republic of Panama and the
Canal Zone will regret to see
them go.
Captain and Mrs. Comly will
leave the Isthmus next Thursday
on the US8 General Goethals
sailing from Panama Railroad
Pier 9. Cristobal, at noon. Their
new address will be C-O Stalf
Commandant Fourth Naval Dis-
trict, U.S. Naval Base, Philadel-
phia. 12. Penn
chlaon. Mrs. Ewing Journey,
Mrs. Richard Abell, Mrs. T. B.
Coleman and Mrs. C. R. Melss-
ner.
Cruise Passengers Visit Here
A family reunion and dinner
were held Wednesday evening In
the Fern Room of the Hotel Tl-
voll in honor of Mr. and Mrs
Val Ooble of Brooklyn, N.Y.,
who are cruise passengers a-
board the "Empress of Scotland."
Among those attending were
Mrs. Molly V. Johnson of Ancon
and Mrs. Glen Lewis of El Vol-
can.
Covers were laid for eighteen
Miss Scott To Visit Parent!
Miss Joan Louise Scott, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald F.
Scott of Curundu Heights, will
arrive for a visit with her par-
ents on Sunday by plane from
Los Angeles, Cal.
Roberto Healy Here For Holidays
Roberto Healy, son of Mr. and
Mrs. J. Edward Healy. Jr., ar-
rived recently by plane to spend
the Easter holidays with his par-
ents.
Visitors Sail On S.S. Panama
Mr. Edward H. Harms, assist-
ant to the vice-president of the
Panama Canal Company In the
New York office, and Mrs. Harms,
accompanied by the freight ana
traffic manager for the Panama
Line, Mr. William M. Lloyd,
sailed today aboard the S.S. Pa-
nama for New York after a visit
of several days to the Isthmus.
Sadie Hawkins
Dance Tonight
Daisy Mae and Little Abner
will be crowned tonight at the
Sadie Hawkins dance to be held
In the upper gym of the Balboa
High School at 7:30 p.m.
and Mrs. M. H. Merchant. m,,, ..,,,,,, ,
Before returning tj .. lath RUTH MILU SVS
mus in June Mrs. Calhoun plans n"' "1
to tour In southern Europe.
Altar Guild Will Meet Monday
The Altar Guild of the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke In Ancon will
hold Its regular meeting at 7:30
6m. Monday In Bishop Morris
all.
Children Of American Revolution
To Meat
The teenage group df the Will-
lam Crawford Gorgas Society of
the Children of the Amrelcan Re-
volution will meet tomorrow af-
ternoon at 4 p.m. at the home
of Mrs. Albert F. Daniel, 2025-B
Second Street, Curundu.
Ball Tonight At Union Club
The annual St. Patrick's chari-
ty ball sponsored by the Pana-
ma-Balboa Council 1371, Knights
of Columbus, will be held tonight
at 8 at the Union Club.
Music will be by the "Martl-i
Men" orchestra. Door prizes will
be given. Tickets may be pur-
chased at the entrance for $1.00
per person.
Tour Of Summit Gardens
Tomorrow Morning
A conducted tour of the Exper-
imental Gardens at Summit will
be held tomorrow morning, be-
elnnlng at 9. The tour Is oper> to
the public and residents of Pa-
nama will be especially welcome.
There will be no charge for the
tour.
Moonlight Cruise Tonight
The Moonlight Cruise sponsor-
ed by the Elks In Balboa will be
held this evening at 7. Admis-
sion Is $2.00 per person and in-
clude refreshments, sandwiches
and dancing.
The public Is Invited to attend.
It doesn't matter how much
you know, If you don't know how
to get along with others without
making these mistakes:
Telling your friends unpleas-
ant facts ''for their own good."
Never being impressed by any-
one else's story. The way you
show you aren't. Is by such re-
marks as: "If you think that's
something, wait till you hear
what happened to me!" Or, "I
still think my story about such-
and-such Is the best I ever
heard."
Always having to have the last
word In an argument.
Always seeing the flaws In
what the other person has, and
delighting In pointing them out.
Building yourself up by tear-
ing other people down.
Always giving advicebut ne-
ver asking for it.
Always wanting to do the talk-
ing Instead of being willing to
listen quietly and attentively to
the other person.
Putting the other person-In his
flace and enjoying his dlsoom-
Iture.
Expecting the worst Instead ot
the best from other people.
Never being willing to admit a
mistake. '
Always being too busy for the
small kindnesses that smooth the
way for others.
Having feelings that are easily
hurt.
Never wanting to assume re-
sponsibility. ,
Never wanting to accept an-
other's help.
Never wanting to share credit.
Always being eager to blame
someone else tor your own fail-
ure.
National Honor Society ,
Has New Members
The new members of the Na-
tional Honor Society include
Edith Beauchamp, Joyce Chen-
alloy, Carmen Mann, Arllne
Schmidt, Julene Page, Joyce Col-
linge, Norlne Dlllman, Judy Mc-
Coy, Sharon Garrison, Richard
Abbott. Raymond de Paredes,
Fred 8111 and William Kaska.
Wednesday morning to return to
Washington. DC
Captain and Mrs. Comly
To Leave Thursday
Captain Samuel P. Comly. Jr.,
USN. United States Naval Aca-
demy, class of 1923. has complet-
ed his tour of duty as command-
ing officer, Military Sea Trans-
portation Service, and Naval
Control shipping officer. Balboa.
Canal Zone. He will transfer U>
the staff of the commandant of
the Fourth Naval District at
Philadelphia. Penn.
Both Captain and Mrs. Com-
ly have taken an active part In
social activities In Panama,and
the Canal Zone during their stay
here. Mrs. Comly, the former
will be solemnized this evening
at 6 p.m.
Chaplain W. W. WhVer, USN.
will officiate at the ceremony,
which will be held In the Coco
Solo Naval Chapel.
Chief Keenan Is attached to
headquarters, Fifteenth Naval
District.
Mrs. Dombrowsky Entertains
Mrs. J. A. Dombrowsky of Pe-
dro Miguel entertained recently
at her home with a luncheon
given In honor of Mrs Donald
Howerth, before her departure
for a vacation trip to the United
States.
The guests included Mrs. Ed-
gar Gunther, Mrs. Donald Hut-
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panam No 58 Justo Arosemena -Ave.
Foot Treatments. Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails,
Arcb Supports. REDUCING Treatments Massages,
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators. For information call: 8-3117 Panam.
812 a.m.: 84 p.m.
Beta Sigma Phi
To Meet Tuesday
Alpha chapter of Beta Sigma
Phi sorority will hold their bi-
monthly meeting Tuesday at the
sorority house In Curundu.
Guests At Hotel Panamonte
Recent guests at the Hotel Pa-
namonte In Boquete Include Mrs.
R. J. Long, Mrs. Edith I. Nelson
and Mrs. Junea W. Kelly from
Los Angeles, California; Mr. and
Mrs. C. O. Kelly from Colon:
Mr. and Mrs. Harry K. Filler
and Mis Nell M. Filler from Co-
lumbus. Ohio.
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Gest
from Santa Parbsra, Cal.; Mr.
and Mrs. Earl Fldanque, Mr.
and Ms. H. B. Fldanque. Mr.
and Mrs. Felix Maduro and son,
Mr. Larrv Maduro, all from Pa-
nama; and Mr. Victor M. Mn-
dez from David.
Isthmians Visit San Bias Islands
Residents and employes of the
Fifteenth Naval District visited
the San Bias Islands recently on
a tour sponsored by the Colon
Chamber of Commerce under the
direction of tour director Fred
Busch.
Those attending Inc 1 u d e d
Francis Mlnton, Don Boyer, Cla-
ra Boyer, William O'Connor, Jay
81ms. Paul Karst, Henrietta
Karst. Zoanne Karst. Dorothy
King, William Oyen. Lillian
Oven, Ellle Smith, Mary Smith,
Edwin Wall, Martha Wall, Ed
Carlton, G. O'Connor. Michel
Gasso. Elizabeth Gasso, Aubrey
Heathcoate. Mlrtle Helm. Ernest
McKay. Ellen McKay, Dorothy
McKay and Gerry McKay.
PAUL J. KIENER
offers
Fresh Killed LAMB
Direct from ASGER KIERULPS
farm in LA VENTA
Leg of Lamb.................. .85c. lb.
Loin of Lamb..... .............75c. lb.
Rib Chops or for Crown Roast___60c. lb.
Shoulder Chops or Roast.........60c. lb.
Breast of Lamb.................30c.
Lamb Stew....................40c.
ALSO A NEW SHIPMENT OF
SNOW CROP FROZEN FOODS
Special for this Week
FRENCH FRIED POTATOES.....29c. pkg.
Arriving for Friday & Saturday
Direct from Cerro Punta (Volcn) by
our own refrigerated truck
FRESH CRISP LETTUCE
ARTICHOKES AND OTHER VEGETABLES
PAULS MARKET
Mrs. Calhoun
To Tour Southern Europe
Mrs. Crede H. Calhoun of Be-
lla Vista sailed this morning a-
board the S.S. Panama for New
York en route to Lisbon, Portu-
gal, where she will visit her son-
in-law and daughter, Lt. Col.
THREE HOUSES FOR
ONLY $20.00
In the Monumental Raffle
of the Panam Lions Club
Ero Colonias Infantiles
te be held March S3.
DON'T FAIL TO OET
YOUR TICKET TODAY
Vigour Restored,
Glands Made Young
It I no loncer nHMnr; to suffer
i Ion or vigour and manhood,
nd body, nervouaneer,
,"" memory ana body, nerv___
Impure blood, aickly skin, depression,
and poor >1md. because an America..
Doctor han discovered a quick, easy
war to end these trouble.
This discovery Is In pleasant, easy-
i,"iSf* UJ1M ,orm- oiuttV
nrmlM, does away with (land op-
erations and to brlnrln new youth
andI visour to thousands. It work* 41-
reetly on the stands and nerves, and
put. new, rich Mood and energy a.
your veins. Tou can eoe and reel yoor-
elf ratting younger. Tour eyes
youthful vigour and power.
And this amaalng, new gland and
vigour restorer, called VI -Tabs, he*
been proved r thouaanda and la so-
Vi-Tab?/mv'yV,
w chemist today
far*, mmmkm. ? Vitmllt,

FELIX
That good to eat
CREAM
WHEAT
Do a* millions of mothers have done
daily. Use this favorite cereal food for
your baby, for yoor growing children,
for yourself. Cream of Wheat is deli-
ciously nutritious snd easy to
digest Try it today.
RKQUTSRC TRADC MARKS,
/
Faltering Philip!
fhi.'ip's Hie i (Uled with braises
Weil-worn step sad rags be oses
Repairs would leare Ma home Hke new.
". a. Classifieds, fast tbe debt clue!
Look forward to tempting desserts?,,
Get AvoMt today. Discover the ric*-
taste it givei to pics, cakei, ftaajf,
salads, and other desserts. Pure*
country-fresh Avoset is sterilized-'
for safety and long-keeping. Oace
you try you'll never be without re,
Ala try AVOSIT Table Orad*
fee coffee, cereals, and mitt.
AVOSET
STERILIZED CREAM
somm cham that
kten rot mouths
just unpacked
a beautiful selection ot
iOressu C<
ottons
Sophisticated prints and
plain colors!
STRAPLESS DRESSES TOO!
At both Stores
FELIX B. MADURO S. A.
XI Central Avenue
Tirn Avenue
Platter Fans.. You'll Welcome Oui
Club
Fot S little as J |00 o. 200 Week|v
You can be the proud owner o) the latest 'hits"....
ot what ever type ot music vou enfov mostl

Ca. Cyrnos Cyrnos Gilt Shop
Ne. 1 Jos reo. de la Osea No. Iff Trvell Ave.
(TtoII Crossing) (Aerees from Anron Plarsbed)
INGREDIENTS FOR
A WONDERFUL EVENING!
Take Chef Douth's culinary creations, mix well with sparkling
company, topped by the danceable rhythms of ANGELO JASPE's
orchestra, with a dash of organ tunes by AVELINO MUSOZ
and what do you have?
THE SUNDAY EVENING BUFFET
at 6:30 p.m.
In El Panama's Patio.
'TOILER'S REWARD..."
;..It's not the name of a new cocktail, but it Is what
awaits anyone who drops into the air-conditioned
BALBOA BAR at 5:30 pm. daily
when the cocktail hour finds weary workers relaxing
to soothing melodies by AVELINO MTJAOZ at the
organ.
bB
inflmfl
Tune In le HOG at IS p m.. Tur->.,
Thurs., and Sat. to hear Joseph
Siidy and his orchestrs elsyla*
from Ihe Bella Visto atoen.
A Klrkcby Hotel

Visit the Wonderful Apartment House
1st PRIZE OF LIONS CLUB RAFFLE
PLAYING MARCH 23, 1952
% It i. located at Gerardo Ortega St., Cam-
po Alegre, near the El Panama Hotel.
You can buy your lucky ticket there for
$20.00. Open Dav and Night.
9 Visit also the 2nd prize chalet at El Can-
grejo and the 3rd prize chalet at El Coco.
REMEMBER your housing problem is over.
Don't mies the chance to win 3 wonderful houses
for $20.00 on March 23.
NOTE: Tickets sold also at Ancon Inn, Pete's
Place and C.Z. Pharmacy, and Marina, Tel.
2-0740 up to 4 p.m. 2-2653 after 4:30 p.m.
mfrtofQK R FA/T <&r*rtrf, fatttint, %
Jkid fatttfampj, firtMdav, HbtthwtHr
ant athptfo tftke? tfm wtk wt are tbwfHf **#
fMifipiiie Zafan fifM/fon
COM*** *M* mu O AM tiU T*tiT T/i. *-*#*
4iS0 IM C0LQM- fS0*r STMHf in .MtHA Of CQlQH BI/UOIMt ~ rit.ilt$E


ir;p six
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, MARCH tl. 115*
-mi.

You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
I eve your Ad with one of our Agenls or our Offices No. 57 "H" Slreet Panama
No. 12,179 Central Ave. Colon
Lewis Service
#4 Tivoli Are.Phone 2-2281, and
Morrison's
Fourth of July Ave.Phone 2-9441
Saln de Belleza Americano
#55 West 12th Street
Carlton Drug Store
10.059 Melndez Ave.Phone 255 Colon
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones Propaganda, S.A.
*l Lottery Fia Phone 2-3199 "*^K%?lff* ^
FOR SALE
; Household
Ffe SALE:Chromium Dinette tobl*
Ond 4 chairs, enamel tap. 45th
Street No 28. apartment 2.
FCfe SALE:Frigidaire. 11 cu. ft.
1950 model 60 cycle $325.00.
phone Albrook 6295.___________
FOR SALE:Beds with spring and
mattress, B.22.50. Dinette sets
B.0.00 and B.75.00. End tobies
8>.T50. Also bargains in upholster-
ed !nd porch furniture. 41 Auto-
mobile Row. Tel. 3-491 I. Panam.
FOR SALE
Automohilek
FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
ator 9 cu. ft., mahogany chiffonier,
vacuum cleaner and other items.
Phone Cristobal 3-1852.
FOR SALEG. E. Refrigerator, 25'
cycle, 8 1 -2 cu. ft. $50 00. House
. 3-F. Coco Slito._______________
TOR SALE:Quartermaster dry clo-
set; mahogany chino cupboard;
small velvet rug; 2 small tables,
desk; 2 hospital serving stands.
Miscellaneous household articles,
822-B. Empire St., Balboa.
Service Personnel and Civilian
Government Employes
be sate
for your Automobile Financing
Insist en
Government Employes Finance Co.
of
Fort Worth, Texas
new office at
No. 43 Automobile Row
Next door to the Firestone Building
also through your outo dealer
We save you money on
Financing ond lnsurcr.ee
also direct loans on outomobilos
AGENCY DIHLINGER
Phone 3-4984 3-498S
LESSONS
UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA
Spanfsh Closces fcr Americans. Six
weeks course in Beginners Spanish
starts April 1st. Monday through
Thursday. 5:00 p. m. to 5:50 p. m.
Registration fee: $10.00. Registra-
tion now open.
FOR SAL:
Real Estate
FOR SALE: 1 lot at New Pueblo
Nyevo. $1.00 per meter 1.610 me-
ters. Cash or credit. M. Holl, An.
con Ave., Leode Address No. 6.
FOR SALE: 1949 Chevrolet
Styline Deluxe, 4-door Se-
dan, new tires, seat covers,
perfect condition at Smoot
y Hunnicutt. s.v 16th
Street Central Ave.. Coln
Tel. 800.
I'VE COT TROUBLES7-A1-
letta Du Pont Bredin. eight
months old, is unaware that she's
f interest to the Department of
Justice, but she is. Alletta,
daughter of the former Octavia
Mary Du Pont and J. Bruce
Bredin of Wilmington, Del., is
the youngest of 188 members of
the Du Pont family wbo are con-
cerned with the outcome of a suit
Hied by the Anti-Trust division
f the Department of Justice
snore than two years ago. The
uit charges that the Du Pont
family controls flve corporations
with assets of more than six-
billion dollars.
answer the call
0T+
952 RED CROSS FUND
mercurio
Next to thr Central Thfitr*
for
Russel Wright
dinnerwore
and glasses
FOR SALE: 1948 Chevrolet
Stylenuster 4-door Sedan,
perfect condition, new
, paint-Job. S-new tires, scat
coven, at Smoot v Hunni-
cutt. S.A. 16th Street Cen-
tral Ave.. Tel. Coln MO.
Agencios Cosmos. Automobile Row
29. will solve your Auto buying or
selling Problem. Tel. Panama 2-
4721. Open all day on Saturdays.
FOR SALE:1937 Ford Coupe. Folr
condition. 4 good tires. $125 or
beat after. Call 3-2643.
FOR SALE: Chevrolet 1939 with
radio; Chevrolet 1942, perfect
condition; Chevrolet 1948 sedan;
Plymouth 1948 sedan, bcth in
perfect condition; Pick-up Inter-
national 1942, 1-2 ton; Pick up
Dodge 1942. 3-4 ton.
Before selling your cor. visit us.
We pay the best prices, CASH.
TRADE INS ACCEPTED.
FINANCING AVAILABLE.
Eisenman's Used Cars
Peru Avenue No. 8
B?side Iris Theatre
FOR SALE:1951 Ford. Seat cover-
ers and radio. Call Sgt. Noles. 84-
2290.
FOR SALE:1950 Chevrolet 1 Ton
Ponel Delivery Truck. Used 10
months, like new. Tel. 2-2777.
Molino Ferreinal, Calle Monteserin
No. 10.
BARGAIN: 194 8 Bulck
Special 2-door Sedan, two-
tone green, all new tires,
radio, seat covers, very
good condition. For sale at
Smoot y Hunnicntt, 8.A.
16th Street Central Ave.,
Coln Tel. 800.
LITTLE LI
With some men o girl should
eat. drink ond be wary $nu
Live Dangerously
-Cross On
AMBER or RED LIGHT
MISCELLANEOUS
TRAVEL OPPORTUNITY: Enjoy
your vacation in cool Costo Rico.
Fly LACSA, PAA affiliate, only
$35.00 round trip. Inquire Pan-
ama Dispatch. Tel. 2-1655. across
from Ancon bus-stop.
Let us help you crate your individuo!
hairdo for Easter's pert sailors and
tilt hats. Holiday specials. Genell
Bliss Cocoli Beauty Shop. 4-557.
Willioms Santo Clora Beoch Cottages.
Two bedrooms Frkjldolres. Roek-
gos ranges Balboa 2-3050.
Do rou nor a Vinkin* arealtm?
Writ. Alcoholics Anonymoas
o> 20il Anea. C. X.
We buy old magazines and clean
rags. SABINO STUDIO, Rochet St.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:Set of electricians tools
with chest, one white enamel baby
tub, baby high chair. House 5647
apartment K. Mogoon St. Diablo.
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid 'service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone '386 Colon.
FOR SALE: Cottages, completely
furnished. Santo Claro Beach.
Terms available, for Information.
Phone 6-441.
FOR SALE:1949 RCA Victor Con-
sole (60 cyclel with new VM 3-
speed record changer in good con-
- dition. Also "Penfield" gos water
heoter, 20 gal. capocity. Can be
seen at "El Cangrejo" Calle "C",
No. 53, Maduro family, after 6.00
P- m. j
FOR SALE:Fairbonks Morse 5 HP
Kerosene engine. Also G. E. Gen-
erator 110 V.D.C. 3 3-4 K. W.
Belt drive. Box 57. Ancon.
FOR SALE: Dalmotian, 4 months
old. No. 2367, 4th Street. Rio
Abajo. Tel. 3-1274, Panama.
Position Offered
AUTO SALESMAN WANTFD
Fine opportunity offered by Chrysler,
Plymouth, Fargo Dealer, experience
required. Essential submit written
application first to Heurtemotte
& Arias Box 293. Panama.
RESORTS
Stoy of the Panamericano Hotel in
cool El Valle and enjoy the native
Fiestas during this week.
w
Minimum for 12 words.
3c. each additional word.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Phillips. Octonslde cottages. Sonto
Claro Box 435. Balboa. Phono
Panomo 3-1877. Cristobal 8-1673
Gromlich's Santa' Clara beach
cottages. Electric ice boxes, got
stoves, moderate rates. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR RENT:Modern aportment in
Pasadena, near the University, 3
bedrooms, spacious porches. Mo-
derate price. Telephone 3-3491.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:Nicely furnished, large,
clcon ond cool room; all modern
convenience and garage if desired.
To respectable and responsible
lady. Per Avenue No. 65. Lower
left.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
We have everything
to keep vow Lawn
and Garden beautiful
during the dry season
fool Wheelbarrows.
Hose insecticides
Fencing Fertilizers
Sprayers Weedkillers
Sprinklers Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
FOR RENT: Commercial space
suitable for store or office. Jose;
Feo. de la Ossa Ave. No. 36. Tel.
3-3404.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Salesman, salary and
commission. Write Box 722 Pan-
amo, giving references.
WANTED:English-Spanish steno-
grapher. Write Box 722 Ronama.
Giving references and experience.
Bilingual Panamonian with business
ability. Write opartodo 1890,
Panama, stating age. education,
experience and starting salary de-
sired.
American woman with executive abi-
lity capable of managing a large
store, handling employes and
meeting the general public. Excel-
lent opportunity with chance for
advancement unlimited. State ex-
perience, age and salary expected.
Write Aportado 1833. fonema.
WANTED:By April 15, 2-3 bed-
rooms, completely furnished, run-
ning hot water, in nice district, by
responsible North American couple.
Phone 3-4629.
----------------.---------,----,;------
WANTED:Tea cups and saucers.
"Hunting and Coaching" scene.
Royal Doulton chino. Also Old
Leads Spray. Phone 2-1577 Bol-
boo.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- i ,.
Help Wanted
WANTED:Good cook, to sleep in.'
Apply house 8, 46th St. Bella Vis-
ta, upstairs.
1949 BUICK Super 4-door
Sedan, with radio. Dyna-
flow, seat covers, 5 new
tires, back-up lights, ex-
cellent shape, for sale at
Smoot y Hunnicutt, S.A.
16th Street Central Ave.,
if you go through an amber or
red light you are living dan-
gerously. You can scare the
pedestrian and may smash up
another car.
We don't advine driving don-
geroualy. We have found that
courtesy paysthat the cour-
teous driver is the safe one. We
write automoble insurance for
courteous drivers.
V
OYD BROTHERS, INC
No. 3 "L" St. DeLeaseps Park
Tel. 2-2008
Gen. Agents United States
Fidelity V Guaranty Co.
IN HAPPY MOOD-Mrs. Elea-
nor Roosevelt is all smiles aa
she dons a dopatta presented to
her In Karachi, Pakistan, by the
All-Pakistan Women's Associa-I
tion. The widow of the lateI
President Is on a tour of the I
Near and Far East. j
1950 Ro-admaster Riviera
with Radio, White Wall
Tires, very low mileage, for
sale at Snoot y Hunnicutt.
8. A. 16th Street, Central
Ave. Coln. Tei. 800.
West Bank Residents
Organize to Sponsor
Cocoli Scout Troop
A group of West Bank resid-
ents have organized to sponsor
Boy Scout Troop 13 In Cocoli,
It was announced today by E. W.
Zelnick. Pacific district exten-
sion chairman, Boy Scouts, of
America.
Edwin H. Eaton was elected
institutional representative and
troop committee chairman.
Troop committeemen elected
were Norman H. Pedersen and
Walter G. Larsen.
Major K. E. Flake. USMC, was
elected scoutmaster and Thom-
as P. Hayes was elected explorer
advisor.
Charter members of the Troop
are Boy Scouts: Edwin H. Eaton,
Jr., Pat Hayes, Nils Llnfores,
Normas H. Pedersen, Jr., and
Edmund W. Wilson.
Tahiti Movies
To Be Exhibited
At Club Meeting
"ImpreiBlons of Tahiti and
French Oceania" will be given
by Edwin F. Rigby, chief of the
purchasing section of the Bal-
boa Storehouse, at a meeting
Of the Panama Canal Natural
History Society next Wednesday
at 8 pjn. at the Gorgas Me-
morial Laboratory In Panama
City.
Mr. Rigby made a recent trip
to Tahiti in the 72-foot ketch
"Palmosa." He will show color-
ed motion pictures of his trip,
accompanied by sound record-
ings as well as souvenirs of the
island. The meeting is open to
members and their guests.
PRACTICALLY NEW 1950
Chevrolet Styline Deluxe,
4-door Sedan, new tires,
seat covers, easy payments.
For sale at Smoot v Hun-
nicntt, S.A. 16th Street
Central Ave.. Coln Tel. 800.
FOR SALE: 1947 Buick Su-
per 4-door Sedan, in very
good condition, easy pay-
ments at Smoot v Hunni-
cutt. S.A. 16th Street Cen-
tral Ave.. Coln. Tel. MO.
1946 OLDSMOBILE 2-door
Sedan. Hvdramatlc trans-
mission, radio, seat covers,
good tires, excellent shape,
for ale at Smoot v Hunni-
cutt. S.A. 16th Street On.
tral Ave.. Coln. Tel. 800.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panam
Selling: Cement and Abattoir.
Buying: Brewery.
Tel. 3-4719 8-1660
RUTH MILLETT Says
It's like his:
It's important, of course, for a
woman to know how to save her
husband's money.
But It may be even more im-
portant for the happiness and
welfare of the entire family for
her to know how to spend 1
wisely.
A happy wife does more for
her husband than the most "per-
fect" wife who ever lived.
When a man splurges on an
expensive necktlejt's a sure sign
his ego needs a boost, and a
smart woman will get busy
boosting.
In Grandma's time it wasn't
j unusual for a wife to slave and
save, and for the widower she
left behind her to find a young
second wife who would make the
savings fly.
Now the usual story is for .a
man to slave and save, and for
his widow to spend winters in
the south.
RANDOM THOUGHTS ON DO-
MESTIC PROBLEMS
When a man tells his wife the
children are her responsibility
and leaves their upbringing in
her hands it is probably because
he has never stopped to realize
that children, like puppies, love
the person who looks out for
them. '
When one woman telephones
another and says, "I'm dying tp
talk to you. How about lunch?"
It's dollars to doughnuts she has
just got hold of an Interesting
tidbit about a mutual friend.
When a man asks his wife anx-
iously* what she is going to wear
to a party, it's time for her to
Culminating weeks of planning ers in all sections of the post splurge on some new clothes,
and Instruction disaster control called in Ireports of casualties When a wife keeps cooking big
officials of the' Post of Corozal and damages. These were posted meals for an over-weight hus-
were given a chance this week to on a map and the necessary re- band It is probably because she
ct th CUBAN OFFICIAL WOUNDED Aureliano Snchez Arango,
former Minister of State under deposed Cuban President Carlos
Prio Socarras enters the Mexican embassy In Havana with his
arm in a sling. He was shot while attempting to flee Havana in
a private airplane after Cuba's strong man, Gen. Fulgencio Batis-
ta overthrew the government in a revolution. (NBA Telephoto)
Corozal Shows Readiness
Against Atom Bomb Attack
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM-BUIL1
Slipcover Reunholsterj
VISIT OUH SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto Here
. W. la On 77 (Automobile Kowt
free Estimate* Mckop Deliver*
Tel. S-4B2S *: a n a /a <
INSTANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(fortified ultb Vitamin D)
I arm H rc.li
Flavor
Touches only
stainless steel
In proresslns
) Dissolves 1ns-
i lantly In cold
or Ice waler.
On Sale In ft. Co. Commissaries.
dr. b; l. stone
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. ti Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
Transportes Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
We pack and crate or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
were given a chance this week: to on a map ana me necessary re- band it is prooaoiy oecause sne
test their organization in action lief teams dispatched to the doesn't object to his putting on
in a post-wide air raid alert and area. In this mannar every per- weight.
disaster control exercise held son involved in the exercise was But when a man kids his wife
Wednesday morning. t | accounted for at all times and about dieting, it isn't any real
Military' personnel, civilian the utmost use was made of all indication that he wouldn't mind
employes and dependents resid- workers. |her letting herself get fat.
lng on the post all pa^'l51. ^, .K. I If a man forgets to bring his
in the event, which was based on Nothing wasdone hi a haphaz- lfe ,ft on an important date
a simulated atom bomb attack on &rd manner The reports o des- t JustBmeans one thing. That
Miraflores Locks. | traction which came In were |f f n d to M, remind
At 9 a.m. an air raid alarm p armed In advance and based ., .. A mmtn.
sounded and personnel of the on accumulated knowledge of him that the date was coming
entire post, Including the engi- the extent and intensity of an UP-_________________________k*,
neer and ordinance repair shops atomic blast. i .,... ,
of the Depot section, moved into a volunteer fire-fighting team'bright red helmet liners, the si.t
shelter This passive defense made up of enlisted men of the men charged down the street
Dlan organized In the first weeks Engineer Reproduction Plant was and put the fire hose into action
of the disaster control planning,! put into action during the exer- In a very few minutes,
moved to be adequate, since {;tee. Using an old-fashioned The exercise continued until
everv person found shelter in the hose-cart, these men were called 11:30 a.m. and was concluded bp
nrooer place in a matter of mln- to put out a simulated fire at the a critique held to discuss UM
ute i Depot side of the post. Wearing day's activities.
Following the sounding of the
all-clear signal ten minutes lat-
er, disaster control teams went
into action. The disaster control
center, located in Building 29,
served as the clearing house for
1 all communications and tieaci-
! quarters for disaster control
' Military dependents residing
', on the post made up the first aid
' teams which circulated through-
out the area treating simulated
casualties and transporting them
to a central holding station for
medical care. These women were
assisted by a first aid team from
Fort Clayton, which was dis-
1 patched to Corozal to assist in
i the exercise. ___
The women, who have com-
pleted or are now enrolled in first
'aid classes, contributed greatly.
! in making the exercise a success.
Displaying enthusiasm and in-|
! terest, they bandaged the "cas-
; ualties" as though they were
really injured and conscientious-
ly followed their first aid in-
Is'tructlons to the letter. Some;
I even carried first aid manuals
with them as a check to their
I actions.
Major George H. Weiss, zone;
coordinator, and a group of as-:
sistants conducted the exercise
In the disaster control center.
After the all-clear signal, work-
ONCE IN A LIFETIME
COMBS SUCH A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY
TO BUY AT SUCH BARGAIN PRICES
LAND FOR YOUR RETIREMENT
LAND IDEAL FOR ALL TYPES OF FARMING
A COUNTRY PLACE OF YOUR OWN
For The First Time Offered At "ROCK-BOTTOM"
Cost In
COOL. BEAUTIFUL HEALTHY
EL VALLE
15c. PER SQUARE METER
(Hectare Lots)
ONLY 20 HECTARES TO BE OFFERED
W. T. LUMNo. 61 4th of July AvenueTel.: 2-2446
Man Will Conquer Space
SOON/
As "Revealed
by
TOP SCIENTISTS
PAGES OF
ILLUSTRATED
FACTS
IttrT Word Startling TrtMlil lry Word Most Reo.ingl
In this weeks COLLIER'S (now on sale) leading'
international scientists blueprint a new satellite sure
to sutler the imagination... a wheel-shaped spin-
rung outpost in the sky. a man-made moon that will
sweep around us above the stratosphere t 15.800
miles an hour! From such a satellite every single
mile of the earth's surface could be watched.
How will it speed a new revolution in our knowledge
of outer space? Can man really build such a plat-
form? Yes, say these scientists. And they reveal the
latest results of new American rocket research and
tests in jet aircraft at supersonic speeds. To go on
the adventure of a lifetime, the final, inevitable con-
quest of space, read:
aaa^Sl
MALAYA'S BOSS-Gen. Sir
Gerald Templer arrives in Kuala
Lumpur to take over the post of
British high commissioner of Ma-
laya. He replace* Sir Henry Gur-
ney, who wa slain in a Com-
munist ambush last fall. ,
AMERICA'S NATIONAL WEEKLY MAGAZINE-MARCH 22nd ISSUE
m**^ Collier's
FOR SALE: 1949 Olds-
mobile 2-door Sedan, with
radio, Hydramatic trans-
mission, seat covers, very
Kood condition, easy pay-
ments at Smoot y Hunni-
cutt, S.A. 16th Street Cen-
tral Ave., Colon. Tel. 800.
PRICE. 15c.
FOR SALE: 1949 Chevrolet
Deluxe Business Co ape,
very rood condition, new
seat covers, 5-new tires,
easy payments at Smoot y
Hunnicutt. S.A. 16th Street
Central Ave., Coln Tel.
1946 DODGE Pick-Up, very
food condition, easy pay-
ments. For sale at Smoot
y Hunnicutt. S.A. 16th
Street Central Ave., Cola
Tel. 9H:
BARGAIN: 1950 Baick Spe-
cial 4-doer Sedan, with
radio. Dynaflow. new seat
covers, excellent condition.
Far sale at Smoet y Hunni-
cutt, S.A. 16th Street Cea.
tral Ave.. Tel. Cale


FTITUY. MAftTH ?1. MS
THt PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDKPBNDrNT DAttT NHW8FAPB*
i
PAOt
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
\
Whcr. 100.00b Psople Mm*
Presents
8:
8.:
9:
9
10
10
lit
1:
Today. Friday, Mar. 21
.M. '
SMusic lor Friday
00Music Without Words
13VOA Stamo Club (VOA>
30What's You) Favorite
00Linda's First Love
Cia. Altero. 8.A.
ISRequest salon
00Adventurer of Richard
Hannoy (BBC)
30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
45Here Comes Louis Jordan
oo-Motorcycle Races t-To ba
broadcast by remote con-
trol from the Olympic
Stadium)
15Opera Concert (VOA)
43_Commentator's Digest
00Short 8torv Theatre
IVOA)
30London Studio Concert
(BBC)
00Cavalcade of America
VOA)
30 Adventures of P C 8
(BBC)
00The Owl's Nest
00a.m.Sign Off
Mrs. Belland Scores UN Child Emergency
PRETTY POPPY-Screen ac-
tress Ginger Crowley of Holly-
wood has been named "Buddy
Poppy Girl for 1952" and will
aid in the annual national sale of
Buddy Poppies, sponsored by tht
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
MTRUTH
[from }bur Daughter
Saturday, Mar. 12
A.M.
6:00-8ign On Alam Clock
Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30As I Knew Him
(BBC)
8:45The Duk< Steps Out
9:00NEWS
9:15Women's World (VOA)
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS ;
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band %
12:00NEW8 ">
r.M.
12:05New Tune Time
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEW8
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Tour de France (RDFi
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00The American Band Con-
cert
8:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Quest 8tar
6:15Masterworks frota France
,i (ROT)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00Gav Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00News and Commentary
(VOA)
8:15Bing Crosby Show (VOAi
8:45Report from Congress
(VOA)
9:00HOG Hit Parade
9:30VOA Hit Parade
(VOA i
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30Having a Wonderful
Crime (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00m.Sign Off
Explanation or Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
DFRadiodiffuslon Francalse
ALL IN JANUARY
WALTHAN. Mass. (UP).- Mr.
and Mr*- John J Molloy call
their three children "January
triplets." John, Jr. was born Jan.
21, 1948: Marilyn. Jan. 1, 1949;
and Robert, Jan. 17, 1952.
Before she merries, tell her
these Intimate Physical Facts!
in these modern times no nirl OT
woman should have o be told
how important douching often
is to marital happiness and to
health, and womanly charm.
But, every mother should in-
struct her daughter on what to
use in the douche.
Tell her abot^t ZoNtTF
ahout bow no oilier liquid anti-
septic-germicide tested for the
douche is So Powerful yet
So Safe to tissues as modern
Zonite. .scientists have proved
this beyond a doubt.
Warn Against Weak
or Dangerous Products
Caution her, too, against the use
of home-made solutions that do
not and can not give the great
germicidal and deodorizing ac-
tion of Zonite. Warn her against
the use of overstrong, dangerous
products. Discovered by a famous
surgeon and a noted chemist.
Zonite is positively non-poison-
ous, non-irritating. Zonite kill
every germ on contact, and keeps
them from multiplying. Yet de-
spite its great strength, use it at
directed as often as necessary
in perfect safety. Buy a bottle
today.
Zom'te
ANTISEPTIC
tor modern
feminine
hygiene
%Hti#vare
ASK FOR
Haig
SCOTCH WHISKY *-*W
n Camera Contest
Mrs. E. N. Belland made a
dean sweep of prizes In the
monthly slide competition of
the Atlantic Camera Club,
which met Monday at the Ar-
, med Services Y. M. C. A.
Mrs. Belland took first, sec-
ond and third awards with her
"Sunset," "To the Sea" and
"The Golden Tree." She also
won two honorable mentions for
"The River" and "The Canyon."
Robert q. Shepard of the
370th E. A S. R., Ft. Davis, also
received honorable mention In
i he photographic contest, which
featured seascapes and land-
scapes.
Subjects for the club's April
competition will be confined to
Panama and the Canal Zone,
and will Include public build-
ings, churches, historical bulld-
. inga, statues and ruins
Mrs. Faye Mlnton, secretary
i of the Diablo Camera Club,
| addressed the group on "How to
Make Good Color Slldesr'
The program also Included
Henry Heppenhelmer's 16 mm.
color movies of the club's trip
to Barro Colorado Island, Ta-
boga Island and a bullfight in
Panama City.
Members were reminded that
prints for the club's annual ex-
hibition must be In the hands
of the committee by Monday,
March 31, at which time they
will be sent to the Photographic
Society of America for judging.
Labor Opposition
Snipes At Tory
Budget In Commons
LONDON, March 21 (UP).
The Conservative government's
hotly debated austerity budget
passed Its first round of tests
In the House of Commons yes-
terday over bristling Labor op-
position.
The House adopted 22 reso-
lutions putting Into effect the
tax changes In the budget. The
Labor opposition challenged five
of them. They were' defeated
handily each time.
The 3howdown debate and
voting on the budget comes later
when the Commons takes up
the finance bill making it law.
Then the Labor Party will
have a chance to hit their pri-
mary target, the cut In food
subsidies.
The budget calls for revenue
Of about $13.051.886.000.
Nearly one third of that sum
will go for defenses already ap-
proved.
The resolutions challenged bv
The" other resolutions dealt
with changes in the gasoline,
entertainment, automobile and
Fund Helps Nourish
Brazilian Bables |
RECIFE, Brazil. March 21
(U8IS) "Church bells do not
loll too frequently these days."
That was how a priest In
northwestern Brazil recently de-
scribe the decline hi Infant
deaths since the United Nations
Children's Emergency Fund be-
gan, to supply milk to many
'thousands of bables m the
drought-stricken areas of the
country.
I The Brazilian drought, now In
Its second year, has driven great
numbers of people from the in-
; terior of the northeastern states
| to coastal cities, such as Recife.
I The government U sending
food to those who remain, but
the International Children's
Emergency Fund Is giving valua-
ble aid by supplying milk to at
least 150,000 babies under the
I age of two years, both In the In-
terior and on the coast.
The milk supply program be-
gan simply as a demonstration
project hi nutrition. But the
drought made it necessary to
distribute the milk, which is In
powder form, to many times the
number of persons .who were
originally scheduled to receive it.
Brazilian mothers have formed
clubs to help insure that the
UNICEF milk Is distributed dai-
ly, according to Mrs. Gertrude
Lutz of Switzerland, chief of the
UNICEF mission In Brazil.
The great hope for the north-
east, which suffers periodically
from drought. Is the dams and
Irrigation projects now being
built to retain the heavy rains
which fall In the wet season.
The drought Is llkelv to last
throughout 1952. Milk supplies
are being exhausted.
However It Is exnected that
when the UNICEF executive
bonVd meets on April 22 It will
be asked to consider further as-
sistance to the Brazilians.
BALBOA
STARTS TOMORROW!
He led 200
women on an
I f adventure
that most en
feared to face!
WESTWARD
IMI WOMEN
Starrlai
TAYLOR -DARCEL
.HOPE EMERSON
JOHN McINTIRK
'\
purchases taxes. The Conser-1
vatives won the first test by 22,
votes and the other four bv 32. |
The other resolutions dealth
with changes In the income,
betting and excess profits taxes.
There was no debater on anv of
them. The preliminary budget
debate was held after It was
presented March 11.
As the budget proposals went
before the Commons. IB or Brit-
ain's top union chiefs met as
the economic council of the
powerful Trades Union Council.
Thev studied the budget pro-
posals In detail, and will present
their report next Wednesday to
the full TUC council.
The report was expected to
attack strongly the cut In food
subsidies and the tightening of
credit.
K.
BELLA VISTA
l:H 2:4 i:M
6:5(1 9:0 p.m.
THE HIT 'EM FIRST IIFHOES WHO
SPEARHEAD THEMVAY TO GLORY I
STEVE COCHRAN MARI ALDON
in -
"THE TANKS ARE
COMING"
LUX.
An audacious,
wnrld-wlM
comedy of sex I
You'll
Enjoy It.-I
"LA RONDE"
(In French)
with Danielle Darrieux
lift Miranda Slmone Sijtituret
Slmene Simon
CENTRAL
a Robert MITCHUM
Liiabeth SCOTT
Robert RYAN, in
THE RACKET
TROPICAL THEATRE
Dennis MORGAN Virginia MAYO
Gene NELSON, in
"PAINTING THE CLOUDS WITH
SHUNSHINE"
CECILIA THEATRE
A Thrilling Adeventure That Sweeps The Burn-
ing Sonda of The African Desert... I
"SUNDOWN"
With Gen* Tlerney George Banders '
Also: An Amazing Drama Filmed in The Heart
of Benin! Jungle. !
_________"BEYOND BENGAL"________
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Conditioned
Montgomery Clift
Paul Douglas, in
"THE BIG LIFT"
. Plus: -
Vivien Leigh*
Ralph Richardson, in
"ANNA KARENINA"
TIVOLI THEATRE
BANK DAY a SIMM
Fraa at S and pjn.
Cantlnfla*. in
"EL 7 MACHOS"
"CARITA DE CIELO"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A GREAT DOUBLE! "
Humphrey Bogart
Marta Toren. in
" 81 R O C O "
- Plus: -
' John Derek Donna
Reed, in
"SATURDAY'S HERO"
as
VICTORIA THEATRE
Triple Program!
"FEDERAL FUGITIVES"
"I TAKE THIS OATH"
"THEY RAID by NIGHT"
....Your Wife ?
How long did it take
you to court your wife?
It's the same with advertising
Yon can't win customers with
one ad.. .you've got to "call
on 'em" over a period ot time.
Consistent advertining in The Panama
American wing customer* for you!
HOTELES INTERAMERICANOS. S.A.
(INTERAMRRICAN HOTEL CORPORATION)
The shareholders of Hoteles Interamericanoa, 8.A.
art hereby notified that a Special Meeting of share-
holders of th company will be held on Friday, April
4, 1952, at two-thirty in the afternoon in the Saln
Panamericano of the HOTEL EL PANAMA in Panam
City, Panam, for the following purposes:
a. Modify Article eight of the Article* of Incor-
poration;
b. Modify Article nine of the Articles of Incor-
poration:
a. Modify Article eleven of the by-lawe;
d. Approve auditore' statement:
e. Consider any other matter properly brought
before the meeting;
Elect Directors.
f.
Panam, March 21, 1952.
ROBERTO EISENMANN
President
!
It's Movietime TONIGHT!
Panama Gana/ of heaters
BALBOA
.ir-Cenditlnnerf
I .10 *:M Ill
Mona FREEMAN Edward ARNOLD
"DEAR BRAT"
Saturday "WESTWARD TRC WOMEN"
Fit AMI ft UTt Jnhn BARRYMORE, Jr. Corlnn. CALVET
e!. a si* "QUEBEC" (Technicolor)
a Saturday "Palntiai Th. Claude With Susnhln."
CCOLI
1:11 l-.Mi
Joan EVANS a Melvyn DOUGLAS
"ON THE LOOSE"
Saturday "QUEUC '
PEDRC MIGUEL
'f:tS a S:l*
e
Tyrone POWER a Ann BLYTH
"I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU'
Saturday NO HIGHWAY IN THE SKY"
GAM 004
7:t*
Dane CLARK a Cathy O'DOrtNELL
"NEVER TRUST A GAMBLER'
Saturday "ON THE LOOSE"
GA7 UN
tut
Gary COOPER Marl ALDON
'Distant Drums" (Technicolor)
Saturday "HOLLYWOOD STOUT"
MARGARITA
IS a t:M
Ethel BARRYMORE a Maurice EVANS
"KIND LADY"
Saturday TORT WORTH
CRISTOBAL
Alr-f nndltlmed
1:15 :!
.chart WEWTON Alt* GUINNESS
"OLIVER TWIST"
Saturday "ELOPEMENT"
Watch th. Httl. lady park
th. beautiful, big car ... a
jind/e ftnfrr on th steering wheel
can do it Itow, with Hydraguidtl
s.*--.- *<9*j*
Now Hydraguide Steering does four-fifths
i
of the work J^ for you!
I
J.HINK of the easiest steering car you ever
drove .. then imagine one five times easier
to steer/ Chrysler's new Hydraguide power
steering regular on Crown Imperials and
optional at extra cost on all New Yorker
and Imperial models gives you
exactly that Here is by far the greatest
single change in handling easeand safety
you ever found in any car. At your touch
on the steering wheel, the car mechanically
provides four-fifths of the energy to turn the
tires on the road. Like so much in these
new Chryslers ... Hydraguide is so basically
new, so basically better than anything before,
that only when you try it can you ever know
what it really does.'
CHRYSLER
finest engineered ceil in the world

Tha teaaatf day's del, you avar
mad. without arm-and-
should.r fatigue at th. and.
Around th. curras orar the
hills Hrdrifutd do torn-
Art*. .< th work!
In Mffht My traffic ... OB awk-
ward driveways and road ...
Wydreduie/. mean rarer sar.fr,
new ease, new mwiitrmm ot sf arindj
control/
HEURTEMATTE & ARIAS, S.A,
(New Distributors)
No. 10 Automobile Row
Tel.: 2-1259


PAGF riGBT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INT>nFNTFNT nAtt.T NEW8PAPEH
FWIDAV, MARCH 81. W
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Birth stones
"SCHOOL'S OUT' for the last two "students
Service (MATS) who have been studying the
ways. Major Robert Wixson o Westover Air
lard H. Bergeron, Kelly Air Force Base, San A
tions of PAA's hydraulic loading ramp at the
right on ground. George Nolan, PAA airport
Captain Bergeron Left to right on ramp; C
cargo men. _____________
from the United Stales Military Transport
cargo operations of Pan American World Air-
rorcc Base. Springfield, Mass, and Capt. Wil-
iitonio. Tex., are shown watching the opera-
PAA cargo terminal in Miami, Fla. Left to
cargo manager, Miami; Major Wixson, and
harles W. Myers and Roderick M. Marson. PAA
JACOBY ON BRIDOj
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
NORTH t
*J2
JA.K6 5
? Q78
*Q5
WEST EAST
AA754 AQ883
VJ973 108
? K4 ?10952
*J97 *A32
SOUTH (D)
AK10
VQ48
? AJ6
*K 108 6 4
North-South vul.
South Wot North Esat
I A Pass 1 Pass
1N.T. Pass SN.T. Pala
Pass Pasa
Opening leadA 4
Shipping & Airline News
Film Called "European i Cerent European countries. One
Hollidav" To Be Distributed such film, however, is the 45-
By KLM |.ninute colored film entitled
There can be few films con-, "European Holiday," the world-
taming shots made in 15 dif- premiere of which took place
BARBER-WILHELMSEN LINE
Accepting passengers for
NEW YORK
by
M. S. "TRAFALGAR"
Sailing March 25th.
(All rooms with private bath)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel.: Cristobal 1781 Balboa 1065
on Curacao on Feb. 1.
Produced for KLM by Carillon
Film (Voorburg), this film Is
based on some ideas of Joop
Rijkens, Head of the KLM Ad-
vertising Division, and there are
versions in English, Spanish,
French, German and Dutch.
The film gives a picture of
Europe from the tourist's view-
point, with its diverse customs,
traditions and ways of life.
An Italian eate different
things in a different mariner
from the Dane, the favorite
spot of the Australian is quite
different from that of the Bel-
gian, dancing in Scotland Is dif-
ferent from dances in Spain and
i all these differences are the
\ very things that the tourist
visiting Europe finds most in-
teresting and attractive.
The film also shows how easily
and comfortably one can tour
Europe by KLM.
KNUTSEN LINE
Accepting passengers for
BUENAVENTURA, GUAYAQUIL,
CALLAO and VALPARAISO
by
m.8. "ANNA BAKKE"
SAILING MARCH 29th
(All rooms with private bath)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
SHIP-SHORE
RADIO-TELEPHONE
SERVICE
PANAMA "HPC 22" 2506 Kcs.
LISTENS FOR SHIPS
ON 2110 KCS. or 2174 KCS.
1200 to 0400 G.NI.T.
TROPICAL RADIO TEL CO.
Mexico Assists
| Tourists Travel
On more snarl In travel red
tape has been untangled this
ame by Mexico, which has
eliminated most of the transit
! documentation required for air
passengers continuing through
lxico City.
Passengers may now transit
the Mexico City airport with-
out a visa or tourist card pro-
. vided they continue on the same
iiighi, or make connections with
auoiiier night without a lay-
over.
For example, passengers on
the Pan American World Air-
ways all-daylight flight from
Houston to Guatemala City via
Mexico City now need no special
I documention.
Other trips simplified for tra-
1 velers include the daily flight
between Los Angeles and Mex-
ico City by Compaa Mexicana
de Aviacin (CMA), a PAA af-
filiate, that connects at the
Mexican capital with the daily
Clipper fligius to and from Cen-
tral American and Panama.
Travelers stopping over In
Mexico City still need a tour-
ist card or visa, and all travel-
ers except United States citizens
must also have a passport, al-
though no visa Is required. U. S.
citizens need only an acceptable
' means of identification.
Some of Larceny Lou's stunts
are very simple. He just makes
it easy for the opponents to go
wrong.
For example, when West open-
ed the four of spades In the
nana shown today, Lou just put
up dummy's Jack. This was a sil-
ly play, theoretically speaking,
lor dummy's jack was no better
than the ten in Lou's own hand.
As a practical matter, however,
the play of the Jack of spades
from dummy induced East to
play his queen. Now Lou had two
spade tricks instead of only one.
After winning the first trick
with the king of spades, South
led a club to dummy's queen.
East won with the ace and re-
turned a spade. The defenders
could take two spades and two
clubs, but by that time South
had three clubs, three hearts,
two spades, and a diamond.
If East had played a low spade
instead of the queen at the first
trick, Lou would have been set.
East wins the first round of
clubs, later, and returns a low
spade.
This enables West to capture
the king of spades with the ace.
West continues spades, and East
wins with the queen. This gives
the defenders three spade tricks
and enables them to defeat the
contract.
If Lou had played a low spade
from dummy at the first trick,
East might have been inspired to
play the eight instead of the
queen. Since Lou does not enjoy
leaving such things to chance,
he played the Jack of spades
from the dummy to make sure
that East made the all-import-
ant mistake.
HORIZONTAL
1 Birthstone for
June
6 Birthstone
for April
IS Girl's
nickname
14 Umpire
15 Gaseous
elements
16 In French
IT War god
18 Cunning
IB River in
Soviet Union
20 Capture
21 Woody plant
22 Employed
23 Conflicts
25 Mimics
26 Dropsies
27 Hail!
28 Small island
29 Revoke
33 Spheres
36 Belts
37 Birthstone for
October
38 Spoiled child
31 Goddess of
the dawn
40 Aged
41 Charges
42 Spanish house
43 Distance
traveled
48 Currency
46 Recurring
annually
47 Worship
48 Abandons
4S Peeled
VERTICAL
1 Atonement
2 Birthstone for
May
3 One-celled
animals
4 Melts (Scot.)
5 French
plural article
6 Unbranched
antlers
7 Angry
8 Competent
9 Unit of wire
measurement
10 Indolent
11 French
financier '
12 Fears
18 Summit
21 Opera by
Massenet
22 Set on end
Answer to Previous Puzzle
f..||f V,M -1'- !|n j U-A
>:--<- i.;, is i-:'.<* r.iissi -i
i mi-j.2 '-; -j '"-
ICT-Ji -i" yyyiiyj

r :f-:>:r d'j .. -1 -
IllSlWMMl- !!
24 Tiny
25 Avoid
27 Operatic solos
30 Queen of
Erfland
31 Land plant
formations
32 Attempted
33 Resounded
34 Fine-grained
granite
35 Dippers
36 Golf courses
38 Procreated
41 Bazaar
42 Fudge finale
44 Compass point
45 Chart
<<2\
Wi
-t m1"" I -*m-^
Meningitis Kills
677 Victims
In Sudan Outbreak
KHARTOUM, Sudan, March 21
(UP) An Egyptian medical
mission arrived here today to
help fight an epidemic of men-
ingitis which has killed 677 per-
sons In three months.
There were 4,620 cases of cere-
brospinal meningitis reported
during December, January and
February, and it was feared this
was only the beginning since the
epidemic hits its peak during the
dusty months of April and May.
BALL COMES BACK
FORT WORTH, Tex., (UP)
Oene Murray teed off at the
Colonial Club course with a
mighty stroke. The ball went 26
yards, hit a tree, and bounced
back. Murray, without moving
from his tracks, reached out
and caugnt it in his hand.

MAERSK LINE
Accepting passengers for
NEW YORK
by
M. S. "JEPPESEN MAERSK"
Sailing March 28th.
(All rooms with private both)
C. B. FENTON & CO. INC.
Tel: Cristobal 1781
"9
Balboa 1065
(NEA Telephoto)
FREED IN SLAYINGAir-
line hostess Betty Lou Tracy,
21, was freed in the St. Louis,
Mo., slaying of Lawrence Keil,
described as her married lover,
when a coroner's inquest re-
turned a verdict of Justifiable
homicide. She said she shot
the 43-year-old airlines execu-
tive after he threatened to tor-
ture her for associating with
other men.
FORT WORTH, Tex. (UP).A
half-pound egg nine inches long
and seven inches around the
middle was laid by a White
Rock hen owned by hte J. W.
Henrys.
PARIS BAZAAR
Emilio Palomeras
COLON


Extra Savings
on Ladies Dresses

Copr. 1M
Borden Co.
Interrurl OVT,
Ml KLIM l> |r*. of. Milk
fl HIM KEEPS WITHOUT REMIGMATION
jjl KLIM quality Is always uniform
U KLIM It e.c.ll.nt far qrowl.q chlldr.il
(J KLIM adds aearlihineal to cooked dlih.t
(V) KLIM ll r.comm.nd.d for Infant ft.dinq
[7J KLIM U tefe la th. ip.cially-pack.d Ma
|t| KLIM It produced HHr irriet.it contr.l
.** "
ll"
200 DRESSES
drastically reduced, some of
them at less than cost price!
Fine Rayon Washable Cotton
2.95 4.95 5.95 6.95
Hurry in for best selection!
(NEA Telephoto)
"WRITE-IN" VOTES FOR IKE
A poster demonstrating how
votis could write Oen. Dwlght
D Elsenhower's name on the
Minnesota primary ballot is
studied in Minneapolis cam-
paign headquarters by voter
Muriel Rles. The two regular
candidates on the ballot were
Harold E. Stassen and Edward
C. Sletiedahl. who announced
his first choice as Oen. Mac-
Arthur Gen Eisenhower's name
was taken off the ballot be-
cause of a technical discrepan-
cy In his petitions but his
write-in campaign turned out
amazingly successful.
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
Of All Types For Your
Office
"Burroughs"
ADDING MACHINES
"Smith Corona"
TYPEWRITERS
"Burroughs"
CALCULATORS
"Burroughs"
BOOKKEEPING
MACHINES
STEEL DESKS
OFFICE CHAIRS
SAFES
DITTO DUPLICATORS
FILING CABINETS
KARDEX
CASH REGISTERS
Y
Tivoli Ave. No. 14Tel. 2-2S1
Tak. pur* water, add
KLIM, stir and you have
ate, pura milk.
KLIM: MILK
FIRST IN PREFERENCE THI WORLD OVER
RHEUMATIC
PAINS
Here is real relief .
Per real relief from rheumatic pains it is
essential to correct that cause When
they are doe to the accumulation ol bodily
mpunoes, it means that your kidneys
which boold help to filtei way these
impur.nesare sluggish and
need a medicine to tone them up.
De Witt'. Pills fee specially
prepared fot this tery purpose.
They have a cleansing nd /
antiseptic action on the kidocys, /
tr^*""g and toning them up so
affatliwili that these vital organs swiftly
rstarn to thou normsJ (unction of clearing
the system ol impurities
De Witt's Pills hare beca widely used
all oval the worid with great success.
This is amply confirmed by many thankful
letters sent to as by people who longed foe
relief from rheumatic pains and found it
after trying De Witt's Pills Why not
try them fot root trouble? Go to row
eh*"""* sod obtain supply right away
De Witts Pills
ant was* wee** a
BACKACHE
LUMBAGO
SCIATICA
lOINT PAINS
RHEUMATIC
PAINS
OUR GUARANTEE
D. Witt Pills it
made ande strictly
hynesac cooditsoas
and the mjTedient
all conform tu npd
staodorao of auntT
DE WITT SPILLS
for Kidney and Bladder Troubles


I '




FRIDAY MARCH t. l8t
i iii
Tf PARAMA AMERICAN AR IRRITEROeRT DAITT NEWSPAPER
rAGt RIR1
^Svtlantie ^)ocieti
nu Mem JL Yl+A
B: 195, (*Un VtLpkm (*U* 378
BOWLING LEAGUE DINNER
AND ELECTION OF OFFICERS
The Mixed Bowling League at the Coce Sale Naval Sta-
tion completed hi tournament and had a dinner at the Caco
Solo Officers Club Wednesday evening for the election of ef-
fieers and awarding of prizes.
Commander Davis Henderson, retiring resident, efftcat-
eit at the meeting. The other retiring officers were: vice-
president Lieut. Dorothy Fayne; secretary, Mrs. O. L. Wal-
lace; and treasurer, Lieut. W. D. Ronayne.
The newly elected officers
were: president, Lt. J. F. Todd;
vice-president, Mrs. Davis Hen-
dersen; secretary, Lt. H. E.
Walther and treasurer, Lt. E. J.
Brooks.
The winning team was cap-
tained by Lt. Walther. The oth-
er members were Ensign J. C.
Boyer, Mrs. O. L. Wallace, Mrs.
Davis Henderson. Mrs. E. J.
Brooks and Lt. J. F. Todd.
The ladles' awardi went to
Mrs. R. L. Bmlth for high aver-
age; Mrs. Henderson., for high
set; and Lt. (]gl Sophie Podo-
sak. for high set.
The .winners among the men
were: high average, Lt. Todd;
high set. Ensign J. C. Boyer;
and high game, Lt. (jg) O. W.
Kuhn.
The following new members
were announced: Lt. and Mrs.
J. C. Novak. Lt. and Mrs. E. Q.
McKay and Lt. Commander and
Mrs. H. E. Schmidt.
Plcclrllll. Mrs. James Jess. Mrs.
David Brown and Mrs, Manning
Hutchlnson.
Visitors Return to Ohio
Mrs. James Smlthson and her
daughter, Valerie Ann, who have
been visiting Mrs. Smlthson's
parents. Mr. and Mrs. James
Denson of New Cristobal, left
during the weekend for their
home in Columbus, Ohio.
Progressive Circle
Honors Two Ladies
The regular luncheon meeting
of the Progressive Circle of the
Cristobal Union Church was held
Wednesday at the church, with
Mrs. Harry Moist as hostess.
Mrs. Philip Havener gave the
devotional. Mrs. Norman Davl-
son. on behalf of the ladles pres-
ent, gave a shower of cards and
handkerchiefs to Mrs. Besse Da-
vis and Mrs. W. T. Jefferies.
Mrs. Davis has been visiting
her daughter, Mrs. RE. Parker
Other members attending In- 0f Colon and is returning to her
eluded: Commander and Mrs.
Davis Henderson. Lt. (Jg) and
Mrs. L. A. Shead, Lt. (Jg) and
Mrs. G. W: Kuhn. Mrs. L. E.
Souders, Lt. (Jg) R. I. Oornlck,
Lt. (Jg) gad Mrs. W. D. Ro-
nayne. Lt. and Mrs. H. E. Wal-
ther, Lt. And Mrs. B. J. Brooks.
Lt. J. F. Todd. Lt. and Mrs.
G. L. Wallace, Lt. Dorothy
Payne. Lt. (Jg) Sophie Podosek.
Bnsign J. C. Boyer and CBos
and Mrs. R. L. Smith.
Fort
Mrs. Hartwlg Honored with
Shower
Mrs. Henry Hartwlg of
Davis was complimented with u
shower and dessert card party
given at the Fort Davis Officers
Club Wednesday afternoon.
The hostesses were Mrs. Wal-
ter Skelstaltls, Mrs. Harry
Oreen, Mrs. Albert Hill and Mrs.
George Poole, Jr.
The gifts were presented In a
pink and blue basket. The same
color scheme was carried' out on
the buffet table, which was cen-
tered with pink carnations, blue
hydrangeas and baby's breath.
The prizes for the afternoon were
won by Mrs. Henry Taylor and
B.B. Saddle Club to llave Fair
The Brazos Brook Saddle Club
is planning a Fair, similar to the
Mrs. Semon Therlot. The travel- successful event they had last
home In New Straltsvllle. Ohio.
Mr. Jef feries has been trans-
ferred to the Pacific Side and
Mrs. Jefferlts and the family will
be moving in the near future.
Four other ladles were guests
of the circle for the lancheon
meeting. They were Mrs. F. B.
Frost. Mrs. K. Lane. Mrs. Free-
man Burgess and Mrs. Frank
Estes.
The other members prdesent
were: Mrs. Anton Holgerson.
Mrs. Howard Anderson, Mrs.
August Campbell. Mrs. E. C.
8tevens, Mrs. W. W. Patton,
Mrs. Joseph Malther. Mrs. R. E.
Parker. Mrs. F. L. Wlscavage
arid Mrs. John Crone.
Mrs. Pate Moves -
to New Cristobal
Mrs. Mildred Pate has moved
from Gamboa to quarters In the
Garfleld House on Colon Beach.
She will be employed by the
Cistobal clubhouse.
Mrs. Pate Is a former resident
of Gatun.
Pacific Security N
Pack Ratified
By US Senate
WASHINGTON. March 21 (UPi
The senate today ratified the
Japanese peace treaty and three
related security pacts aimed at
keeping peace in the Pacific,
Ratification of the historic
treaty came by a vote of M to 10
the Senate had defeated five at-
tempts to amend the treaty and
a move to postpone a vote on lt
cocktails Wednesday evening to indefinitely,
honor Lt. Commander and Mrs.| Thin, by voice votes the Sen-
P. L. Balay. 'ate ratified mutual security pacts
The friends who visited with between the United States and
Se Balays' wore: Captain and
rs. L. L. Xoepke, Lt. Com-
mander and Mrs. T. L. Apple -
qulst. Lt. (Jg) and Mrs. Roy
Nielsen and It. Mark Loy.
the following races: flag, pota-
to, pool and grudge and square
dancing on horses.
Colon merchants will have
booths at the fair and the usual
refreshments will be sold. The
price of admission Is $.50 for a-
dults and $.25 for children.
Informal Despedida Cocktail
Party
Commander and Mrs. L. B.
Jennings had a few friends in for
Australia
the Philippines and
and New Zealand.
Debate was started Immedi-
ately on ratification of a similar
pact with Japan to back up the
treaty. '
r#."I"J"r;0.,.d C'!? i O^ one Democrat, 8en. Pat
ABC and Mrs Charles Rials McCarran of Nevada. Joined nine
arranged a birthday party at,Republicans In voting against
their Coco Solo residence Wed-ithe Japanese peace treaty. '
nesday to honor their daughter, imraedlatelv before ratifica-
Sandra Lee, on her fourth birth-ltIon the 8^,,,^ rejected 63 to 11
day anniversary. U motion by Sen. Everett M.
Easter eggs and balloons wereDirksen (R.-Ill.) to postpone ac-
glven the young guests A color|tlon mdeflnltely on the treaty,
scheme of pink ud white was nia ciettred the way for the fln.
used on the table and the birth- itj vote
daiLc"k8 ,ecotl1on- | Republicans voting against the
The young friends who cele- peace tre|lt were Dirksen and
brated with the honoree were. aeng william E. Jenner of In-
Davld Orr, Barbara and Bobby dlana, Henry c Dworshak of
Freedland, George Hysantis. Pa-;Idaho Zalea M Ecton of Mon.
mela Cranford, Marie Boyer, tana. JamM p Kem of M)Mourii
Franclneand Randy Wright. An-;oeorge W. Malone of Nevada,
nette and Deedee Oakridge. Ma- Joseph R. McCarthy of Wiscon-
ry Jo Scott and Lonnie Pearson. sln Herman Welker of Idaho,
Ms. Rials was assisted by the m Milton R. Young of North
mothers of the young guests.
ing prize stopped with Mrs. Milo year. A parade will bo held at
Gardner 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 2$ In
Other ladies playing were: I Margarita. The line of march
Mrs. William BeneL.MM.. John will be from Espave Street a-
Wiggs, Mrs. Jamei Scarborough, round to the clubhouse and back.
Mrs. Maurice Webb, Mrs. Clar-
ence Strike. Mrs. O video Perez,
Mrs. Milo Gardner, Mrs. John
Donahue. Mrs. George Poole, 8r.,
Mrs. J. A. Cunningham. Mrs.
Leslie Croft. Mrs. Allen Fllnn.
Mrs. R. B. Ward, Mrs. Leo
Hock, Mrs. Frank Schultz, Mrs.
Walter Bailey. Mrs. George Ken-
nedy. Mrs. B. K. Ogan. Mrs.
Woodrow Schmidt, Mrs. Gustav
Kamptner, Mrs. Dudley
Mrs. James Storle, Mrs.
it will circle this area twice.
There will be ah army band and
riders and horses.
At 8 p.m. next Friday there
will be a square dance at the
B. B. Clubhouse. Music will be
furnished by a biUbllly band.
The Fair will start at 1 p.m.
Saturday. March 29. There will
be pony rides for children from
1 to 3 p.m. at $10 a ride. The
Shine, grand parade starts at 3 p.m. to
Albert'open the events. There will be
Gatun Civic Theater Notice
The Gatun Civic Theater will'.Security
have a reading of plays at 7 p.m. I
Monday in the Gatun Clubhouse.
Anyone interested in Little
Theater work Is cordially Invited
to attend.
Dakota.
Although action on the Philip-
pines and Australia-New Zealand
pacts was by a voice
Tennessee Seeks
To Extradite
Ex-Pinkerlon Man
NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 21
Gov. Gordon Browning
today signed extradition papers
requesting New York authorities
to return a former private de-
tective to Tennessee to face
charges of kidnaping the nine-
year-od son of a Knoxvllle at-
torney .
The attorney general's office
in Knoxvllle, at the request of
Atty Jerome Templeton. peti-
tioned Browning for the extra-
dition of Thomas J. Flanders, 27.
former Plnkerton detective of
Albany. N.Y.
Templeton charges In the kid-
naping warrant that Flanders
whisked his son Clarence away
from his school in Knoxvllle and
took him to the home of Temple-
ton's former wife. Mrs. Morton
M. Z. Lynn of Albany.
The youngster, object of a two-
year custody fight between Tem-
pleton and his former wife, Is
still in Albany.
Gov. Thomas E. Dewey of New
York can grant or reject the re-
quest with or without holding a
hearing.
Should he agree to the extra-
dition. Knox County could be-
come involved in a New York
court battle If Flanders decided
to contest the legality of his ar-
rest.
Flanders was released in the
eustody of his attorney after his
arrest In Albany on a fugitive
from Justice warrant.
vote. Jenner said he wanted the
record to show that he voted
"no" on both.
Lift Up Your Hearts
PARIS BAZAAR
Emilio Palomeras
COLON
WE ARE PROUD TO PRESENT
A GORGEOUS SELECTION OF
LADIES DRESSES
Just unpacked lovely crea-
tions, in Cottons end Rey one!
Weshebre COTTONS
$195 .Si 11.95
A lovely selection of
SKIRTS *
too!
CirisI Women! Who Suffer Distress Of
FEMALE WEAKNESS
with Its nervoue
cranky feelings...
) Do fenask functional monthly dis-
euitoant Hake you fael nervous,
fidgety, eraaky, so tired and
Wrssnjadosn'at roen tunear Then
* try Lydta K. Makbam's Tes-
table Compound to reMeve
symptoms. Ifs /otmmm for helping
irk and women in this way!
Taken rtfularly Plnkhama
Compound helps build up tsal
ano* against saeta distress. J**
" if you. too, don't risas rfcalil/
benefit. Also a great

(A Lenten feature of the Pan-
ama-American, prepared by the
Rev. M. A. Cookson, Episcopal
Church of Our Saviour, New
Cristobal.)
GOD'S FAITH IN IIS
"___My grace is sufficient
for thee; for my strength Is
made perfect in weakness."
Bead II Corinth, lt: 1-t.
'We are often told about our
need to have faith In Ood. But it \
is Just as necessary that God
should have faith in us, even
though lt Is a different kind of
faith.
. We need not only the strength
that comes from believing In Him
but also the hope and encour-
agement that comes from know-
ing that He, believes in us.
For all of us need to be believ-
ed in by somebody If we are to
be our best selves and do our best
work.
There must be somebody out-
side of us who knows and trusts
us, somebody who feels absolute-
ly confident that We are going
to succeed. Perhaps it may be a
mother or a brother or a friend.
In any case, when we know we
are believed in it gives us new
life and makes us sure of our-
selves.
Best of all is to know that God
has faith in us. You might think
He would know us too well to be-
lieve In us. for He sees us when
we are at our worst and He sees
how weak we usually are.
But that is not what most in-
terests Him. He Is not so much
interested in what we are as in
whet HE can make of us. What
matter with Him is what we are
going to bewhat we have lt in
us to be.
And believing that with His
help we can be and will be what
He made us to be, He trusts us.
and His trust in us makes our
best selves real.
Prayer: O God, ear Father,
who hast higher hopes for us
than any we havo for onr-
selves; Grant us faith la thy
hope for us; lift as again
by thy right head whan we ara
east down by failure; ead pat
thine own ambition for us In
place of our own; through Je-
sus Christ our Lord. Amen.
Colon Church Has
Lenten Services
Continuing the Lenten obser-
vance, services have been an-
nounced by the Trinity Me-
thodist Church, Colon, for Sun-
day.
Morning worship at 8:30 a.m.
wUl be taken by C. Ogllvle. The
night service at 7:15 p.m. will
be conducted by the Rev. Nor-
man Pratt. Topic of his sermon
will be "Why we Love Jesus
Christ."
Servicio Brouwer
Awarded $6,428
Navy Contract
Award of a $0.428 painting
contract to Servicio Brouwer of
Panama City was announced to-
day by headquarters of the 15th
Naval District.
The contract covers interior
Kinting of the administration,
tiding, bachelor officers'
quarters and ships' service
building, as well as flagpoles at
headquarters and at Navy Shore
Patrol headquarters.
Starting date for the contract
was March 18. and the work is
expected to be finished by May
la
La Importadora Selecta
COLON, R. P.
Bollver Ave. #70*1 between 7th and 8th Streets
Telephone 2714.
Is plcuard to announce the opening of their
establishment where they have a big and as-
sorted -lock of shocmaking articles and up-
holstering materials in plastic and nylon
for the benefit of customers on the Atlantic
eide, especially Canal Zone residents who
we inform that our prices are lower than
the Commissary price for imilar mate*
rials. You are cordially invited to visit our
tore.
confident
appealing
charming
.. ead the secret of her chirm is Odo-Ro-No. Don't let
offending underarm odour spoil your natural freshness. Your
bath temporarily washes away unpleasant perspiration odour,
but it will not give you the lasting protection you can rely on.
# Odo-Ro-No safely stops perspiratioa and
odour for a full 24 noon.
# Odo-Ro-No stays creamy longernever gem
gritty even in open jar.
# No deodorant cream is so harmless to fabrics
as Odo-Ro-No.
0 No deodorant cream is gentler to even
sensitive skin, and it is so easy to use.
If yen pttftr liquid diodrnt,
vi for OJo-Ro-Ko liquid.
0D0R0-D0
C R E AM
The Deodorant without a Doubt
THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS LAVENDER
YARDLEY
LAVENDER
Alto p/rfumtd with the famous Yardlty Lavender:
Snap Bnlh Sails Dusting Ponder Talc and Brillianline
V A P I. I Y IS OLD BOND I T R F. I T LONDON
Tfe1teiATfcafj /rVufi tto/Matt Yac,
SETS ALL-TIME RECORD
31.05
IN 1951 MOBILGAS ECONOMY RUN
MILES
PER
GALLON
Here is proof positive that the Nash Ram-
bler is the most economical fnll-size car on
the road ... official proof that you can go
farther on every gallon of gas in a Rambler.
For in America's blue-ribbon stock car
eventthe 1951 Mobilgas Economy Run
from Los Angeles to the Grand Canyon
the Rambler smashed all previous records
for the Rub ... did the 840.05 miles averag-
ing 31.05 miles per gallon! That's the thrifty
performance you've been looking for.
In setting this all-time record, the Ri_
bier carried 4 passengers with driver .
averaging over 41 miles an hour over
deserts, mountains, in city and highway
driving... with snow, rain and head winds.
Yet never before had any car in this event
gone so far on so little gasoline.
Every Nash Airflyte entrantStates-
man, Ambassador and Ramblerwas a
trophy winner. Real evidence that Nash is
your best bet for the years ahead!
?
I
j
ftoef
3i
,'NMb Mote., f .p-l Dhklm, DWro*, MMrffW, U. A.1
, i-lr -
STAroMAN,26.12ita.,M,a-H.. RAMSUR, 3.OS mltmmmt mmUm AMIAS5ADOR.2S.92 -U~ s t*s
CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
Phone 2-1790
(NASH AGENCY)
One block from Tivoli Crossing
JANE
DRJ6HTED
WITH
NEW MUM
BECAUSE...
MEW MUM with
AJAAZ1N6 iNeaeciBNX M~3'
ves icmur aeoracnon.'
HBW CRIAMIN69/ NW
cSasWANCK, rOO. HARM-
NewfmrMUM
MORE EFFECTIVE LONGER
__


THF PANAMA AMKK1CAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILV NEW8PAPHI
FHn>AT, MARCH II. INI
160 Enter PAA's Golf Tourney At Gamboa
_______________________________________________,______,_______________________------------------------------.-------------------------------------------1-------------------------------'.,----------------------------------------,----------------------------

o
Qualifying Rounds Set
for Tomorrow, Sunday
All roods for golfers will leod to Gamboa' to-
morrow for the first ay of the qualifying round of the
PAA Invitational tournament.
Storting schedules for Saturday and Sunday are list-
ed below. ,
A total of 160 entries have already been received and
post entries will also be accepted.
3:00Enselke. Jr.. Crabb.'Bn-
Races
Tomorrow
1st Race "T-t" Native6'i Fg*.
Furae: 12)5.9Pool Close 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Tap Girl F. Rose 112
2 Cosa Linda A. Mena 112
3Caaveral V. odriguez I17x
4Avivato Jos Rodriguez 112
5Tulra B. Pulido 120
8Hrcules B. Moreno 119
C.Y.O. Track, Field, Softball
Championships Set Tomorroiv
In preparation for the tonrnev!
some of the Isthmus' best, rolf-
-*rs plaved practice rounds dur-
*irii the week. '
". JOhnnv and Charlie MncMnr-
>.rav "Doc" Mitten, Maurv Muller,
"Matt Shannon. Harvey Beajl Stl-
"vester Buhb. Johnny Wrleht.
Jlmmv DesLondes. and Johnny
-Johnson-played Saturday after-
Jorinnv Mac was hlttlna them
atraljrht and far. His 71 with a
ball out of bounds on No. 1*.
erred notice to all players that
h will be tough to beat for med-
alist.
Doc Mitten and Matt Shannon
played again on Sundav morn-
ing. Doc's hook caused him a lit-
tle trouble on Saturday, but on
Sunday he was down the middle.
Several outts rimmed the cun but
he finished with a 74 to let the
bo"s know he will he near the top
when the medalist la chosen.
Matfs Iron plav and putting are
r^ost always accuratehe shot
if
Doctor Stevenson, one of the
builders of the Gamboa Club,
j'aved Sundav with Doctor Low-
rv after which both rents decid-
ed to enter the aullfvlnz ronnr".
TAA Is awrdine beautiful
prizes for all fliehts and those
who have not seen them should
visit, the display at Shaw's on
'Kvoll Avenue.
SATVBDAY, MARCH 22ND
7:23Hod*, Lattln. Hochsted-
ler.
f:30_Tobnd. Super. Becker.
7:37_vounrblood, Ke n n e d y,
Cox.
_. 7:44Set. Hsmma, Williams,
Eberenz.
7:R1Fssen. Nolan. Shaw.
.I 7:5weldenrlch. Hamilton,
Klevan.
1:05Geo. Riley. Barr. Weath-
- ers.
. ... 9:12J. Smith. J. Riley. Trim,
.Tr I
t: 19Cfttron. Wemmer. Col-
lins.
g:2Orr. Huff, Johnson.
1:33Thompson. R. W Huld-
quist. Fred. Gregory.
1:40 Gordon. Prince. Flemine.
1:47Hnldqutst, E., Sanders,
Schuster.
9:54Harley. Workman. Cous-
in. I
1:01.tankus. Armltage, Hal-1
ley. _
1:01Siidy. Brennan. May, E.
H.
9:15PorrMt, Tvrell. Fletcher.
9:22Wright. Bubb. DesLon-
des.
9:2fl Williams. De ma rest,1
Thompson. G. I.
"9:36- Powett. Gagnon, KuH-
kowski.
10:1)0Lslly, Jorgensen. Crab-
tree.
10:15May, W, A.. Spencer, Dll-
fer.
10-30P'sll. Shannon. Mitten.
10:45 TM1, Stroop, Jr.. Baker.
Bill.
11:00Gartner, Croft. Manning.
11:15Herring, B., Shobe. J.,
Corliss. J.
11:30Ives. Dehlinger. Storey
11:45MacKibbln. Walker. Rice
12:00 Matheney, Pete Riley.
Bean.
1:00tevprson. Lowry. E. C,
Oblerto.
J:30MacMurray. J., De la
Guardia. Jaime. Muller,
M., Gerhardt.
gelke, Sr.
SUNDAY. MARCH 23RD
7:30Oickerson, Berry, Casta-
les.
7:37Hardv. LeBrun, Wl?e
7:41Perantie. Goodman, Me-
Danlel.
7:40O-Undo. Wood.
ratl.
7:55Gerran.s, Hlnkle. J. B.,
Hinkle, S.
8:02 Whitnev, Cooper. Med-
lnger, R. E.
8:00Bo\well. Bailard. Kenna.
It: ISMiles. Pire Graham.
8:25Fears, G. W., Melansort, th Race "1-2
Balccr.
2nd Race "F-l" Native 7 Fg.
rurse: 9275.09 Pool Close 1:15
Second Race of the Don I Irs
1Eclipse B. Agulrre 115
2Don Arcelio E. Sllvera 109
3Miranda A. Enrique 104x
4Tin Tan B. Pulido 120
5Golden Babe C. Iglesias 112
8Pesadilla V. Rodrigues 112x
C.Y.O. TRACKSport....... SOFTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
?rd Race "D" Native 7 Fg.
Inamo- Purse: 9300.99 Pool Cloaca 1:45
One-Two
1Fulmine B. Pulido 116
2Juan Huincho L. Bravo 112
3Elona F. Rose 120
4Bljagual J. Contreras 110
5Bagalefto J. Baeza, Jr. 114
Imported7 Fr-
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 2:20
One of the most colorful at-
tractions of the year will be the
C.Y.O. Track, Field and Softball
Championships, scheduled for
the La Boca Ball Park, at 9:30
a.m., tomorrow.
More than 250 athletes are reg-
istered for the championships in
which will participate the follow-
ing Catholic missions: St. Jo-
seph's, Coln; St. Thornaa, Oa-
tun; Our Lady of Good Counsel,
Gamboa; St. Theresa's, La Boca;
St. Vincent de Paul's, Panam
City; St. Vincent's. Silver City;1 Playground Office,
and St. John's, Rio Abajo. Diamond No. 3 (Girls), near
After a parade at 9:30 a.m,'Cricket Pitch,
the athletes will engage in trackl Diamond No. 4 (Boya), Base-
and field event until noon. The ball Diamond,
softball sudden-death series will Umpire
be conducted from noon uhtil
TEAMS
1Panam (St. Vincent's).
:'coln (St. Joseph's!.
3Rio Abajo (St. John's).
4La Boca (St.Theresa's).
5Gamboa (Our Lady of Good
Counsel).
6SilverCltv (St. Vlncent'a).
7Oatun (St. Thomas).
Location of Softball Diamond
Diamond No. 1 (Boys), neat La
Boca Road.
Diamond No. 2 (Girls), near
Winner of Game No. 1 vs. Rio
Abajo on No. 4.
2 p.m., Game No. 5: Winner of
Game No. 2 v. Winner of Game
No. 3 on No. 1. ,
3 p.m.. Final Game: Winner of "w*u,........!
Game No. 4 vs. Winner of Game oat.........
No. 5 on No. 4.
C. H. S. Edges Powells To Take Over
1st Place In Atlantic Twi-League
ATLANTIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE
STANDINGS (SECOND HALF)
TEAM-
( HS
GIRLS
12 Noon, Game No. 1: Silver
City vs. Gamboa on No. 2; Game
No. 2: La Boca vs. Gatun on
No. 3.
1 p.m.: Game No. 3: Panama
vs. Coln on No. 3; Game No. 4:
Won Loat Pet.
3 2 .990
1 .509
4 .499
Score By Inning
CHS 202 000 000 2f
Powell's 210 001 000 04
Track Meet Set
For Thursday At
Balboa Stadium
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
CHS 6, Powell's 4 (19 inning)
SUNDAY'S GAMES
' CHS v*. Fabst (Two).
, Game Time: 1:39 p.m.
Last night the Cristbal High
School nine took a large stride
toward the second half cham-
Quiniela
1Novelera J. Contreras 115
2Cotillon
3Costina
4Beach Sun
5YOrgo
6Forzado
7Bartolo
A. Bazan 115
E. Daro 115
B. Pulido 115
L. Bravo 115
K. Flores 115
F. Rose 115
8:30Cherry. Mumma, P. E
Presley. |
8:37Brown, Goodman, Sar-
geant.
8:45MacMurray, C. Hurdle,
Havden.
8:52Cortnon. Hiiehes. Harris.
8:59Wilkes. Thompson, J. E,
Bushway.
9:06Donlev, Higgenbottom,,5th Race
Geffert. Purse: $556.00 Pool Closes 2:55
913__Shobe. D., Henderson. D, 1Hurlecano V. Ortega 115
Goodin.J. i 2Flambaro B. Moreno 112
9-20Gramlich. D.. Drlscoll. J., 3Lacey A. Phillips 120
Anderson, R. 4Sun Cheer V. Castillo 110
10:00Wood. Chas., House. Don.j ---------
Slegel, C. L. j Mb Race '1-1' Imported6' i Fg.
1:00 Stroop,' Sr.. Forlln, Buck- Pnrae: $375.09 Pool Closes 3:35
"I" Imported 1 Mile grave. L. LaMotte.
four o'clock.
The program follows:
MEET OFFICIALS
Referee: Carlos Bellzalre.
Starter: A.M. Parchment.
Asst. Starter: Chesley Jones.
Finish Judges: Christopher smart.
Cieaves, Robert Pate. Tlroblo
Martin, Theodore Jemmott.
Meet Director: A. M. Parch-
ment.
Clerk, of Course: Pablo Kirven.
Announcer: Herman Bfcvne.
Timers: Rov Ferguson, E. Bel-
Abajo on No. 3. ., J Si'bttfe Sfor t
2 p.m., Game No. 5: Winner ^ 0"e?come the leaaue eadine '"y- and the Athletic Club In a
,Oame No. 1 vs. Winner of Oame >m W' '^mg track meet Thur8day nl^
Chesley Jones, Francis Tayloiv No. 3 on No. 2. Place in the tleht second half at tne Balboa Stadium. Field
Calvin Hall, Newton Lindo, C.1 s p.m Final Game: Winner of P1?
Greaves, Joy Leslie, Herman Game No. 5 vs. Winner of Game
Smart. Theodore Jemmott.
Custodios of Equipment
Diamond No. 1Giorla Hol-
ness.
Diamond No. 2Pablo Kirven
Diamond No. 3Joy Leslie.
Diamond No. 4H e r m a n
No. 4 on No. 2.
High Jump Judges: Joy Leslie,
Scorers
Henry Clark, Pablo Kirven,
Harold Campbell, Carlyle Clark.
SCHEDULE OF SOFTBALL
GAMES
BOYS
12 Noon, Game No. 1: Panam
Bulldogs Going All
Out To Cop Balboa
Relays Team Trophy
Balboa's Bulldogs will be going
all out to win their own meet
when they go in the coming Bal-
boa Relays. This will be the first
Fernando Donalds, Francis Tay- Coln vs.JHmboa on No. 4.
lor.
Scorers: Gloria Holness, Cecl
Ha Parchment.
Inspectors: Herman Smart, r #*
David Burgess. Calvin Hall. New- para,SQ^ ^fg (jy
vs. Gatun on No. 1; Game No. 2: time that a team champion will
ley.
l:I5-t-Armstrong, Hardy, H. J
Youart.
1:30 Hnmmond, J.. Epperson,
Jamison.
First Race of the Doubles
1Astoria Jos Rodrguez 115
2Atason V. Ortega 113
3Alejandro V. Rodriguez 117x
4Navajo Trail B. Pulido 111
5Betun G. Prescott 114
6Black Bull E. Sllvera 105
7Cantaclaro O. Bravo 115
8Lujoso A. Phillips 120
9In Time R. Kellman 120
10 Fright L. Pea 117x
7th Race "B" ImportedV.i Fga.
I Purse: $759.99 Pool Closes 4:95
Second Race of the Doubles
1Newmlnster V. Ortega 110
2Cyc. Malone E. Sllvera 100
3Pho'bus Apollo L. Bravo 110
4Publico V. Castillo 111
5Welsh Loch J. Cont'ras 114
MR. POINTSHe's onty flve-
foot-tune, but Johnny O'Brien
hit on 54.1 per cent of his field
rosI attempts to become the first
collegian in history U> score
1000 points in a season. The
Seattle University All-America,
from South Amboy. N.J.. cored
I OSO in 36 games to be rxacr.
parked the Chieftains tr, the
national Invitation Tourna-
ment. (NEA)


J-^IU
I be decided In the Balboa -Relays
1 p.m.. Gamei No 3: La Boca vs.and the competition Is going to
-i Sliver City on No. 1; Oame.No. 4: be mlghty keen for the trophy.
Slated for April 18, 7 p.m., at
the Balboa Stadium track, the
Relays promise to be bigger and
better than ever before. There
has been a great deal of Interest
shown by the military track,
teams this year and they can be
seen working out almost every
day at the Stadium track.
The Bulldogs, under the direc-
tion of Coach John Fawcett, are
determined to keep the trophy at
Balboa High. This they will have
.778 a tough time doing, with Crlsto-
^bai High having a strong entry,
fi?51 Albrook Field entering: their
'T^ strongest contingent In three
Jg years, and the 504 Field Artillery
1Z5 coming in wdlth a team loaded
with talent.
Silver City Keep Up
CZAL Battle For First
LEAGUE STANDINGS
TF.AM
Canada Dry.
Alemn, Jr.:.
Powell's ....
Spur Cola ..
Reman
Won Lost Pet.
8th Race "T-2" Imported7 Fg.
Purse: 9S75.04 Pool Close 4:49
Quiniela
ton Lindo. M. Abrahams.
Broad Jump Judges: Joy Les-
lie. Francis Taylor, Fernando
Donalds.
TRACK AND FTEID
0 30 a.m.Parade of Athletes.
9:50 a.m.800 Meters. Boys,
CJass "A": 100 Meters, Bovs. Class
"A"; 100 Meters, Bovs. Class "B":
100 Meters, Bovs. Class "C; 100
Meters. Bovs, Class "D": 75 Met-
ers, Bovs, Class "E"; High Jump,
Bovs. Class "B": 50 Meters, Girls.
Class "A": 50 Meters, Girls, Class
"B": 50 Meters, Olrls, Class "C;
High Jump, Bovs, Class "A."
10 25 a.m.400 Meters, Boys,
Class "A"; 400 Meters_Boys, Class ^^ ^^ hdd on ^
olace In the Canal Zone Local-
Rate Amateur League bv virtue
Ace wood.......1
The Paraso Canada
1Wild Wire
2Zevelanla
tAlfonsito
4Gran Dia
5Pla
Hit
7Mr. Foot
8Tamesis II
9El Mago
10England
J.
C. Ruiz 120
C. Chong 1173c
R. Ycafea 112
L. Bravo 116
Rodriguez 116
K. Flores 112
G. Prescott 120
B. Pulido 114
V. Castillo 120
C. Bovtl 120
th Race "H" Imported6!4 Fga.
Purse: S4(M) M Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Sismo J. Contreras 115
SPamphlet R. Kellman 120
3Hechizo C. Ruiz 112
4Porfr's Star V. Castillo 120
5Skywelgen B. Pulido 115
Levadura A. Mena 120
7Paques B. Agulrre 115
Broad Jump, Boys,
"B'"
10 40 a.m.75 Meters. Girls.
Cl*ss "A": 75 Meters, Girls, Class
"B": 100 Meters. Bovs. Class "E":
. -..- i._. "tv. 200
Dry
first
Then there Is. of course, the
strong Athletic Club team under
the direction of Jimmy Thomp-
Thls outfit -won just about
son.
,:. '/"?. un/* Ploss "TV'- 200 wnne sania oruz was aeienMiig
At 8anta Cruz, Chesley Jones
10th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fg.
Purse: $375.99 Pool Close 5:49
1Arlopuro F. Rose 115
2Blitz Boy V. Rodriguez 112x
SMete Bulla J. Chuna 112x
4Islero V. Castillo 115
5Flamenpo B. Pulido 115
8Tartufo H. Reyes 112x
11th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fg.
Purse: $375.99
1 *-' -'e0) J. Cnni'rp 112
JGoylto) C. Ruiz 119
3Saictuo B. Pulido 113
Jumn. Boy, Class "A
11:00 a.m.200 Meters, Bovs.
Class "A"; 200 Meters, Boys,
Class "B." _, ,
11:15 a.m.100 Meters. Girls,
Closs-A": 100 Meters, Girls. Class
"B"- 75 Meters. Olrls. Class "O.'
11:90 a.m.Relay 4x100. Bovs.
Class "A"; Relay 4x100, Bovs.
Class ,'B'\ Rlv 4x100, Girls,
Class "A"; Relay 4x100, Olrls,
Class "B"
4Interlude
5Bendigo
6Miss Matty
A. Vasouez H4x
A. Mena 116
B. Moreno 118
Jus IV~ Tip*
BY CLOCKER
1Tuira
2Pesadilla
3Fatal Ine
4Novelera
5Wnrlecano
ftBetun
Herclea
Tin Tan
Juan Huincho
Beach Sun
Son Cheer
In Time
7Cvclone Malone Newmin*er
9Mr. Foot Pa
9Stomo Pannes
10 Arlopuro Islero
11'Miss Matty Lacnico (e)
of a torfelt victory over the eel......
lar-dwelllng Chagres Agewood everything in sight last year, ana
while Santa Cruz was defeating will have almost the same per-
formers back for another go at
tt this year. Anybody who might
be Interested In running with the
and his La Boca Politicians could i Athletics Club team is urged to
do nothing much against the[contai:t Thompson by phone at
hometowners as they dropped eitner Balboa 4175 or 2086.
their seventh game In nine out-
ings.
Llovd "Mr. Dom Inalr" Smith.
Powell's ace righthander, yielded
two hits to Red Tank while his
mates were gathering seven hits
off the combined efforts of Fitz-
oatrick and ColonaFltzpatrick
taking the loss. He allowed two
runs and one hit In 11-3 Innings
leaving two on In the top of the
third.
Smith gave up his runs in the
first and ninth innings, both be-1night meet,
lnv unearned as Alston threw
wild to third in the first and
committed a passed ball in the
ninth.
Between the second, when
Llovd singled to right, and the
ninth, with one away, only two
runners were able to reach first
off "Mr. Dom Inalr"one being
erased on a 5-4-3 double play
Many of the men who %re
planning to enter the Relays will
have an opportunity to get In a
bit of competition on Thursday,
March 27. On that date there
will be a track meet, at Balboa
Stadium In which teams from
Balboa High. Cristobal High, Ju-
nior College. Albrook AFB, 504th
FA, Athletic Club and any other
military persons that might want
to enter. This will probably be a
Don't Neglect Slipping
FALSE TEETH
Do CalM teeth drop, ilia or wohbl*
when you talk. eat. laugh or neere?
Don't be annoyed and embarrawed by
mch handicap* FASTECTH. an alkaline
- ilnon-acldl powder to sprinkle on your
While the Other watched tWO hit- oUle>, ieeps false teeth more firmly
ters go down Swinging. Smith's et. Give confident feelini of ecurlty
in seven games. '
at the Balboa Stadium.'
The'High Schoofteam now'not elv'nts ^"U'1 undet:way'* *:4?
only threatens to win their first! P--. *"< th Tlrst track event
Twl-Loop crown, but poses as a
threat to do so the hard way
canturlng both halves of play.
The fans were treated to a real
will be started at 7:15.
This meet will serve as an In-
dicator for the coming Balboa
Relays In that many of the ath-
humdlnger. Both clubs sent their !5fi1*.w.h0wWi1.1 TJ" "* ^"V
will also be in this meet. Cris-
tobal High and the Junior Col-
lege might also send boys to go
in this meet which would mala
It an even bigger affair.
As it stands now this could
easily be one of the top meets of
the season from the competitive
top hurlers to the moundTom
my Hughes of CHS and Powell's
George Carty.
Over tne ten-inning route both
hurlers allowed six hits, both
contributed to the scoring with a
fair of hits while Hughes scored
wo runs and Carty one.
game-tying home run in the
sixth frame. Tommy Hughes
struck out 13 Powell's batters and
Cartv sent six CHS boys back via
the strikeout route. Hughes walk-
ed nine and Carty seven.
Carty s ron wa"s the result of a! !'d^B"> thet04th nd Albrook
are loaded with talent this year.
Albrook In particular, has many
former college and high school
stars, and it Is expected that they
will give the local boys all the
work they can handle. Neither of
the Service outfits are In as good
shape as the school boys, but this
meet will give them a big push
In the right direction.
Coach John Fawcett of Balboa
High has announced that this
meet Is open to any Servicemen
who might like to run. It Is ex-
pected that there will be some
The box score:
Cristobal High
AB R
Manning, ss .4
Hatgl, 2b. ... 5
Bailey, 3b. .5
Hugres, p 3
Salter, c. 4
Kuhrt, If.
Blades .
Rinehart, If
Price, lb. .
Anderson .
Smith, cf. .
Grace, rf. .
HPO
0 3
2
1
0
16
0
Totals.....36 6 6 30 7
Powell's AB
Carty, p .... 4
golf, as. ... 6
Ridge, V., 3b-rf 5
Mulloy, c.
Chappel, lb
Highley, cf
Ridge, E., If
Bennett, rf
Hill. .
Engelbrlght.
Dockery, 3b
McCullough
3
. 4
. 4
. 5
. 2
. 1
rf 0
. 1
. 3
HPO
2 2
K
2
1
3
2
n lads from the Navy ready to go
q by this time, and In all probabll-
q Ity some from other military
q units. All these men have to do
q Is to show up the night of tho
n meet. There are no preliminary
q entries needed.
Jimmy Thompson and his Ath-
. letlc Club outfit will be favored
! to grab off most of the first
w place honors, and anyone wlsh-
., ng to run with this team In elth-
, er this meet or the Relays should
q be sure to get In touch with
q Thompson.
St
1
Totals.....37 4 6 30 15
BUGGY SHOWS SPEED
CHARLESTON, W Va. (UP)
5 Police reported an unusual
0 traffic violation. A driver was
0 arrested for drunken driving,
0 running a red light and going
0 the wrong way on a one-way
_ street. He was driving a two-
Si horse buckboard.
Meet
Scotland's
Favourite Son
* isas-iTiu we Te*
JOHNNIE
WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
Tie fkshionable drink everywhere
qaee
RACES SATURDAY
DOUBLES
1st. 2nd 6th. 7th RACES
O N E T WO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON: .
For the convenience of
our patron we are now
|M*ra line both ni the
"TjOP ACABAA" and
"SAVOY."
SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
SUNDAY
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK

I
7th Race <4B" Importeds 6V2 Fgs.
Pure: $750.00 Pool ('Jo***: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
1. 1SWMISSTER ..............V. Ortega 110
2. OCAME MALONE..........E. SUvera 100
3. PHOEBIS APOLLO...........L. Bravo 110
4. PL'BUCO..................V.Castillo 111
fi. U ELSH LOCH............./. Contrmra* 114
SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES

5th Roce (Open) Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $1,000.00 (Added) Pool Clow*: 2:55 p.m.
'ERNESTO NAVARRO CLASSIC"
1. BABY ROl.............O. Bravo (1) 126
2. (TILLY SABA..........A. Batn (2) 114
3. (BLACK SAMBO....... J- Contreras (4) 110
4. HELEN B.............B. Aguirre (3) 110
5. MARSEUESA.......M. Arosemena (5) 96
10th Race "D" Importeds SMt Fgs.
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes: 5:40 p.m.
1. PAMPERO 11..........V. Castillo (1) 114
2. RONDVSFLLA..........O. ChanU (2) 112
3. (POLVORAZO............L. Pea (3) 113x
4. (AVENUE ROAD.........B. Pulido (5) 114
5. GOLDEN MINE ........O. Bravo (4) 112
6. PARAGON.............K. Flores (6) 120


FRTTMT M*HCH M, 198

THF PANAMA AMERICAN AN TVDFTtNDENt DAILT NEWSPAPER
pac.e
Top Motorbike Riders To Vie For Title Tonight
i* >
by
JOE WILLIAMS
LAKELAND, ri"I can go with the pitching I've got," ad-
mitted Rebert (Red) Rolfe, manager of the Detroit Tiger. Few
other manager cao make that statement. Yet It may not ha
enough, quite likely won't, to convert this club, which finished
13 fames out last season, into an awesome pennant threat.
That's a lot of games to make up, and apart from pitching
the Tigers aren't formidable. They have no first baseman of
established merit. The second-base combination Is not exceeding-
ly proficient. There Is no overwhelming power In the outfield
where Detroit clubs have been traditionally lethal. (Johnny Oroth
was tops last season at .299). The catching will be' Improved due
to the addition of Matt Batts, An earnest young workman who is
likely to be remembered by posterity more for the engaging eu-
phony of his name than any resemblance, co-lncldental or other-
wise, his virtuosity may have to Dickey or Cochrane.
tfevertheleas, there are some who profess to perceive pennant
possibilities In the Tigers. They offer them as the dark horse of
the league, "the team to watch," advice which the new owner.
Walter (Spike) Briggs, who Inherited a sound business mind from
his father, no doubt trusts the local clientele will not Ignore at
the customary box-office fee.
But, as Mr. Rolfe, who Is a well man after years of painful
stomach miseries, says, If they do It It must be on pitching. Thare
isn't a great deal else about the club to recommend It with the
notable exception of George Kell at third, who has developed Into
the most consistent hitter In the league.
There are two pitchers on a staff which Includes Trucks,
Oray, Hutchlnson and Stuart, who command attention and for
contrasting reasons. One is Art Houtteman, the other Hal New-
houser.

HOOT MAN HOUTTEMAN
It may be that Hoot Man Houtteman is the best right-hand
pitcher in the league. The 24-year-old, 6-foot-l. 190-pounder Is
back from the Army where he spent most of his time puzzling
medicos who wondered how and why he had been accepted in the
first place. Some months before he had been messlly mangled
hi an automobile crash.
In '90 he won 19 games for the Tigers and was the main dif-
ference between a club going nowhere In particular and a pen-
nant contender. That year the Tigers were leading until past
mid-September and finished only three games behind. Last year,
without him, the Tigers were only briefly out of the second divi-
sion and finished a lethargic fifth.
I saw him work against the Yankees the other day and he
looked excellent. There was a ftp to his fast ball and a deceptive
twist to his curv, though he was having trouble finding the
target with his side-arm pitch. Once ne broke a curve over the
late that was so shamefully misleading the batter, Andy Carey,
Jumped back two feet..."I thought Houdinl was dead," the em-
barrassed young man gasped.
'
DOGHOUSE NEWHOl'SER
At first the casual manner In which Mr. Rolfe dismissed the
prospective help of Hal Newhouser came as a shock. In discussing
his staff in the dugout for the benefit of a roving columnist, the
redhead seemed Inclined to Ignore him until asked: "And what
about Newhouser?" ,
"Oh, I may get some use out of him, here and there, pitching
in spots.1' f -' -
Then you began to realize the Detroit-born left-hander, once
the falr-halred boy of the staff, who paced the league pitchers
four of five years, winning 21 or more, a modern reminder of
Grove, Pennock and Gomez, had been reduced to the level of just
another hopeful name on the roster.
At 31, Newhouser still has the physical equipment and stamina
to win. He has a recent history of arm trouble and was sidelined
lor two months last season when he pitched only seven complete
games and had a .500. 6-and-O record, his worst In the majors.
Naturally a sore-armed pitcher cannot be at his bestbut now
you find critics wondering If his best was ever really big league.
They remind you, that when he waa winning 29, 25 and 26
from '44 through 46, all the power hitters were off to the wars
n;klng communism safe for the Kremlin, Gone were Williams,
DiMagglo. Keller. Vernon, Chapman, Dlllinger. Pesky, Stephens,
Priddy, Valo, Jbhnson, Zarllla, and the like.
This Is a thought, however unjust and uncomplimentary It
may be to Newhouser's record and talents. Yet some fantaatlc
things happened when grown men were away. Even Snuffy Stlrn-
welss led the league in hitting and Dlxzy Trout the pitchers and
the Browns, of all people, won a pennant. _____
AL4--I!M^,YAN,CEf:F?ur "-m Yankee grtata. left. Prank Crosettl, Bill Dickey. Lefty Comet
and Phil RUztito, gather alongside a blackboard showing how 48 veteran iporU writer who had
covered the New Yorkers for at least 22 years, voted to select the all-time Yankee team. Dickey, alone
with Babe Ruth and Joe DiMagglo, led the pack with 48 votes. (NEA)
C.Z. Aquatic Champs To Take
Part In March 30 Swim Meet
, time of a sure double. One was a
I one-handed catch of a liner over, back stroke crown to her collec-
Rnhmt'c hanJ *>t ,lt. ._____if. > Ma> .4 Utl^. ** a. ...
The March 30 Swim Meet at
Gamboa will feature the out-
standing Junior and senior swim-
mers on the Zone.
Arllne Schmidt, Zone 60, 100
and 200 meter free style champ-
'n. w111 be on hand to test her
skill in the 50 and 100 yard free
style events for women, it la ru-
mored that Miss Schmidt will al-
so attempt to add the 100 yard
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF STANDINGS
Tin AMI__ urn- -.4 iCirT"."'" .""?"* "* mici urer,--> -in uumi iu nor cunee-
Police ? LaBt u0bbJ f head'the other wlck> line drive smash so hard It spun diet that the 100 yard free style
Sears............ fl 4
Lincoln Life........ 5 5
APGE 14.......... 5 5
RUwMH.......... 5 5
Firemen.......... J |
SECOND HALF STANDING8
TEAM Won Lost
Sear............ s 1
Elks 1414.......... 4 I
Lincoln Life........ I 3
Police............ S 3
AFGE 14.......... X 4
Firemen.......... 1 s
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Sears 13, Lincoln Life 10.
TODAY'S GAME
Police vs. Firemen.
t
Gun Club Notes
A nearly perfect record was established at the registered
trapshoot held at the Gamboa Gun Club Sunday, March 16, when
u squad of four shooters broke 99x100 targets shooting from 20
to 22 yards on the handicap Une. The target missed for which
the squad didn't get credit, was evidently hit point blankIt's
true that neither the head, tall, nor wing was severed from the
. body but the pigeon should have been a dead bird anyway. It
waa retrieved and found to contain five holes the size of a lead
pencila tough bird In any man's country that the best of dogs
could have found or, as we say In skeet-shootlng language, some
mighty good shooting was tabulated.
Out of twelve shooters who competed, five broke 25 straight
Captain Hay and T. J. Tassm accounted for two strings each,
while Bill Cunningham, "Charlie" Dlsharoon, and P. M. Dlaha-
roon. Jr. tallied one string each.
Captain "BUI" Hay took the 16-yard event with his first 25
straight followed by a 23 to make 48x50. Following were Captain
Speneer and "Charlie" Dlsharoon with 47x50. Seems as though
the boys really had It In for those birds when the handicap event
started. Dlsharoon Jr., Captain Hay. and Bill Cunningham
smoked 43x50 each. Howard Clarke and T. J. Tassln came out
second with a tie of 47x50.
W were pleased to see three representatives of the Cristbal
Gun ClubHarold Rodell, manager; Joe Kueter; and Howard
Clarke who all took part in the program. Many thanks to- Mrs.
Truman Cadwell who was a little nervous in the beginning but
did a swell Job of keeping score for the shooters. Joe and Ger-
trude Kueter were delayed on the way with a miserable flat tire,
but arrived In plenty of time for Joe to enter the shoot.
Bill Kllgallen's scores are showing steady Improvementstay
with It Bill! Lee Carr and Tom Fogarty were there to shoot
every event. Young Mickey Mlchaells came with his Dad to shoot
two rounds. Mickey Is doing well and we expect to see him
breaking all those targets after he has had more practice. Man-
ager Bill Baker of the Gamboa Golf and Country Club, who has
shown a great deal of Interest in the shooters, strolled over to
watch the boys.
A 25-ya.rd misa-and-out event was organized after the shoot
and it seemed that when It was over that all the shooters were
losingthe profit going for the targetsbut it waa lots of fun.
And now, mark the 22nd of March on your shooting calendar
Bill Cunningham has scheduled a registered trapshoot consist-
ing of 50 ATA handicap birds and 25 pair of doubles for Satur-
day afternoon. March 22nd. at 2 P. M. sharp at the Balboa Gun
Club. There will be a $2.00 entry fee to be divided Lewis Class
System, 50%. 80%. and 20% to high gun.
On April 6, the Cristbal Gun Club will hold Its last register-
ed trapshoot prior to the Canal Zone Championship Shoot, com-
mencing at Id a.m. sharp. Call up your friends and tell them
about it. Lets get a erowd at the Cristbal Gun Club on that
date to enjoy the fun.
REGISTERED SCORES AT GAMBOA GUN CLUB
SHOOT, MARCH It
him almost completely around.
Johnny Engelke turned In some
very fine plays around the sec-
record of 1:05.7 set by Joseph-
ine McKlm is very apt to be low-
ered. If so it will be quite an ae-
on? tn Cle>f fcu X3 l0Bm?, I cn>Phment since McKim s
ball a^SSf A?JnoutChatathe *" b"n n the **
6late on a great relay. Gerry
iirfee made a great save of Roy
Watson s bad throw to retire the
runner.
In the hitting department,
Bateman gets the palm with an-
other perfect day at bat. Bruce
rapped another home run and
two singles in three trips.
Gerry Durfee came out of his
1929.
Marilyn Ford, C.Z. breast
stroke champion and present re-
cord holder for the 100 meters
breast stroke event, gives every
indication of having the ability
to erase the 1:21 record for the
100 yard breast stroke set by
Marny Dryden In 1932. Miss Ford
hitting slump to hit some of the! will hae to butterfly It all the
hardest balls of the day. In three way If she Is to be successful. She
8ears downed Lincoln Life yes-
terday at Little League Park by
a score of 13 to 10 and gained un-
disputed possession of first place.
Tommy McKeown started for
Sears and was relieved In the
first Inning following a streak of!
wlldness. Jimmy Watson took
over and after an unsteady start
settled down to pitch masterful er- .
ball. He held the Lifers to one Tbe box score:
run while his mates gradually f*5" ..
cut down a six-run lead and Watson, John, If.
came to win. |Mendoza cf-3b.. 3
It was Jimmy's best perform-, wataon. Roy. ss.. 4
anee and also added another *
has not been forced to push her-
self all the wav In any recent
meets, so it will be a test of her
ability to go all out if she is to
chalk upa new mark.
18 8
f'Hlon, 2b-c.,
Laatz........
Engelke, W., cf..
Sander, R., If ..
Dubois, V., rf. ..
AH
3
3
3
3
4
2
1
2
3
2
HPO
0 3
notch on his belt. It marked his, Watson, Jas. 3b-p
sixth victory In a row without a gurree, a, lb ..
defeat. Johnnv Engelke started *?uriee, T-> c
for Lincoln Life, was relieved by'?,enwarckL. 2b.
Roger Million with Bruce Bate- apwe11' ?D
man finishing up. IP,uE?t8' ct.....
The Catalog Boys started out McKeown, p.. ..
in dead earnestness in the very,
first inning when four solid hits, "otala........25 13 11
rolled off their bats, three of _, ... --------
them ringing doubles, which ,'n0" "fe
were good for three runs. | Mc_r1"' *
The last half of the first in- Durham, 3b
nine had the appearance of a atM"an,- ?:P-
walkathon as fourteen Lifers 2? 8. i-.H.. ..
came to bat. Three hitaone a "DF.V "e- 1- P-2n.
slashing line home run by Bruce
Bateman far over the Sears' sign
in right centerplus eight walks,
the insurance boys were able to
manufacture nine runs.
In the third inning, Sears put
over three runs, followed by one Totals........26 10 7
In the fourth. Bruce Bateman' 8c0*e BT Innings _
went to the mound at this point incooln Life 9 0001 010 7
to try and stop the determined Sears 3 0 312 413 11
Catalog boys, but in spite of his 'Batted for W. Engelke in 6th.
appearance they tied the count Winning PitcherJas. Watson
nine-all by scoring two runs In <6-0). Losing PitcherBateman
the top of the fifth. I <4-4). Struckout by Bateman 1,1
Lincoln Life came back and McKeown 1, Jas. Watson 8. Base
*dded a run to make the score on Balls offJ. Engelke 9, Mll-
10 to 9 In their favor. Once again.' "on 3, Bateman 2. McKeown 3,
the last inning produced a apir-1 Watson 5. Hits and Runs ofl-
ited rallv, this time on the part; McKeown 2 and 5 in 1-3 inning;
of the Sears nine. In this frame Engelke 8 and 7 in 3 1-3; Million
after the first two batters reach-'0 and 2 in 2-3. Hit by Pitch-
ed base on walks, Bateman's of- Million by Watson. Two Base Hit
fcrings were pasted for three Alas, Jas. Watson, Q. Durfee 2,
attempts he collected two dou-
bles and a single.
Johnny Watson garnered two
for three. Bud Curdta hit a dou-
ble and single m four times at
bat. Julio Dubois' record for the
d Today 'it's the0CoSDer. ver.,,.' Bob Connor, young distance
looks like Klelhofer and Schneld-, contestants in the 200 yard event
I something to worry about. Con-
nor is also expected to set a fast
AB R HPO A oace m some of the Junior events
3 1 2 0 0 the "Gamboa Cannonball" has
1 vet to reach his 14th blrthdav.
l! Ida Strauss. Junior champion
0 in the breast stroke and free
2 ityle events, mav ttake a Jump
to the senior division for a cou-
ole of events as well as defend
her laurel in the Junior division.
CPmille Ellis. Mary Alice Hicks.
To Jensen and manv others will
*>'. seen In action In their special-
ities.
Dave Mellhennv, a veteran
competitor, has not as vet decid-
ed on his events but it U a sqfe
net that he will be toueh to beat
in any of the events he enter.
BILL HIDALGO, on hi fast,
heavy Harley-Davldson, dem-
onstrates his distinctive riding
style. He has tuned his ma-
chine as near to racing perfec-
tion as he can get it, hoping to
ahake off a long spell of bad
mechanical luck which has
dogged him In recent races.
Bob Hanson Breaks
CZ Scholastic Mile
Record At Balboa
In the yearly Intersquad track
and field meet held yesterday at
Balboa High School. Bob Ran-'
son, sensational new miler, broke
all existing scholastic records
with a time of 4:48.2. This Is the
best time run in the Canal Zone
since 1943, when a lad by the
name of Acevedo of the Army set
the Canal Zone record with a
time of 4:44.6.
!
Hanson is running for the first
time this year, having never
competed in the sport prior to
the current season. His lap times
in his great run yesterday were
64.5,2:19, 3:33 and 4:45.2. For the
second straight week Bob has
broken the current lnterscholas-
tle and Balboa High records.
Also for the second straight
week he has won for himself a
pen, pencil, and steaki dinner. It
Is doubtful If you will ever hear
his coach, John Fawcett. com-
plaining about this, even If it Is
keeping hi mhustling laying In a
supply of pens and pencils.
The next meet for Ramon will
be Thursday night at the Balboa
track, when his team will take
on the teams from Albrook, 504th
and Athletic Club. In the Balboa
Relays there promises to be a
Keat race when Ranson and
onard Parker match strides In
the mile run.
Winner To Receive Trophy
From President Arosemena
About ten o'clock tonight the Isthnra trill
have its first motorcycle speedway champion.
He will be Ua winner of the final event of
the meeting which starts at 8 p.m. at the Olympie
Stsdium. *
He will have ridden at least
three races, and will probably
have averaged something over 40
mph around the 400-meter oval
in the final.
He will be tired and dusty, but
he will have worked plenty hard
and fast to earn the trophy ha
gets from President Alctbiade
Arosemena.-
The program organisers, head-
ed tirelessly by Po de los Casa-
res, have scheduled eight raees,
Interspersed with stunt riding
display by members of the Pan-
am Motorcycle AseSelatlon.
After the onenlng parade will
be a time trial.
All riders ride one lap lndivi- ,.
dually, and draw starting posl- the Pieepnal Softball League by
tlons for the trophy dash accord- a gcore of 0.....
Episcopal Softball
League
STANDINGS
TRAM Wen Lest Pet.
St. Peter........i f i.eM
St. Simon....... .M)
St. Christopher .. 0 .#
St. Jame...... fl M$
St. Panl........ 1 Hi
St. Peter' softbll team got art
to a flying start by downing St.
Paul in the inaugural game of
Colon Sports
(By Herbert Moise)
18 13
In one of the most Impressive
opening ceremonies held on the
Atlantic Side, the Silver City
Women's and Men's Softball
League opened their activities In
a Jam-packed Mount Hope Sta-
dium last Monday night.
Martin Bartley led his Sliver
City Eagles to an easy 8-1 win
In the women's opener, but In
the night cap the men's Inau-
guralthe fans were treated to
a well played game with the Fal-
cons winning five to one over the
Fourteenth Street Dodgers.
All twelve team paraded be-
fore the large crowd aa the 60th
Army Band of Fort Gullek lead
the march around the ball park
The band stayed on to the de-
light of the fans, rendering
9DproprIate music all through
the game.
The second annual meeting of
'he Canal Zone Amateur selec-
tion and the Colon Provincial Is
stadium, last year's contest went
to the Zone Stars 6-5
i
This Is to be the flrrt of a
three-game seriesthe second
of which will be played In the
Colrm Stadium some time next
week.
trophy i
ing to their times in this lap.
After that the championship
contest starts.
Probable order of events will
be three heats of four riders
each.
First and second in each heat
will go Into the emlfinal, third
and fourth into a consolation
race.
The first four men home in the
semifinal, and first two home In
the consolation race, will tussle
out the final.
This system Insures that a
class rider 1 not excluded from
his chance of the championship
by a piece of bad luck in his heat.
The consolation race gives him
a chance to retrieve any misfor-
tune.
Between the semifinal and the
final, while the topllners are
resting, there will be the light-
weight event for 125 ec machine.
This ha to far drawn half a
dozen entries.
Throughout the meeting, for
the benefit of spectators at their
first speedway contest, there will
be running commentaries in
English and Spanish.
By the time the final comes
around there should be no one
In the stands who does not know
all the riders and their machines.
The raees will be broadcast
over HOG, the first English-
speaking speedway broadcast in
Panama.
Harewood pitched all the way
for the winners and Ml baeked
by some good fielding that kept
the opposition frOm searing.
E. Hurley pitched a creditable
game for the losers, but waa not
given airtight support by hi
mate who were guilty of costly
fielding and mental lapse*.
The league continues tomor-
row with the contendor being
St. Christopher and St. Jame,
at the Red Tank diamond.
Fastlich League
Two game are scheduled la
the Fastlich Teen-Are LeafM
tomorrow afternoon at the
Balboa Stsdlnm.
The first gane, which la
scheduled to get under way at
1 n.m.. will be between the Corn-
ejos and the Macaws.
The second game, betwsW
the Palomas and the Pomas,
1 slated to begin at 8: IS.
TOO RIG FOR RABSm
WHEELING, W., Va. (DI*)
Conservation officers rubbed
their eyes after three giant rab-
bits had been found dead en
roads around wheeling. One
rabbit waa four inches short of
a yard long. It had ear seven
Inches long, a tlx-lneh tail and
a 22-lnch girth.
SPECIAL SALE
FENDERS
-lr-
*
Studebakers
International Trucks,
Oldsmobiles, Packard Cars
- also
a complete line of GENUINE
ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT.
Replacement parts for FORD,
CHEVROLET, PLYMOUTH,
DODGE
and other makes of ears.
PANAMA AUTO, S. A.
solid hits which were good for
four runs and the ball game.
Bobby Sander made the field-
ing gems of the week, coming up
Curdta. Durham. Home Run
Bateman. Left on BasesSears 7,
T incoln Life 5. DoubleplaySan-
der to Durham. UmpiresLuzer
Name Captain "Bill" Hay .......... Bill Cunningham ............ "Charlie" Dlsharoon ......... .. MHdcp 49 Dbh (25 pr) 40
46 40
47 46 St
T. J Tassln ................. 44 47 37
Howard Clarke .............. i
P. M. Dlsharoon, Jr......... 40
Csntein W. apencar ......... 47 41 SS
Bill Kllgallen ................ 43 41 36
Karold Rodell ............... 41
Ise Car ...................... Tsm Fo.rarty ......... I 40 3S 80
J5e Kueter .................. Mary Tassln ................. 36 38 SI
22x33
vitalize Your
:idneys
tel Younger
ook Younger
Nothing man or aman mor.
!,n "f! eauicu throufli bad kidmy
/lion. Thla may muk yau aullar from
if'.!?." 'C"' tJl0"S. eloudr Urina.
^3Lnr if"* Paaaat. Narraa.
. ."'.if1 Rhaumatiam. Backache. Ltg
alna. Clrclya undtr Ss-as. SwolUn An-
Minf^C^hfeii"!^;
ill to throw off arid and polaona, now
spaa to lolnta and muaclea. Cyitai
with, not one but two spectacu-land Potter. ScorerRellly. Time
lar catches, both off the bat of of Game1:88.
Bud Curdt, robbing him each ------------------------------------
Pacific Twi-League
Directors To Meet
At Balboa Tonight
A apecial meeting will be held
tanight at the Knights of Co-
lumbas Rail, Balboa, C.Z., at
7:30 for members of the Board
of Directors and team manag-
era of the Pacific TwiUght
Baseball League.
Plana far the playoffs of the
present three-way tie in the
second half will be made and
the three teams involved will
draw lots to see when they are
to play.
Also on the agenda will be
the discussion of the ehaaa-
nionehip geme between the At-
lantic and Pacific Twilight
Loop champa.
-----v r vr. W'J'SI'
roar kldnaya la I an: 1. fiHp,
out nolaonoua acida. 1. ~
Comhan
Ipa rw
-an
rma In tha urinary ayataoT I
Mhaa and rlmp Irritated rl.ua (iai
. a'.a from any drug-tiM Aet now
<* how much bettar roa foal taw.arrow
...WITH .
WORLD \l
FAMOUS J^
tVORTHINGTON
GOLF BALLS
"SWEET SHOT"
TOMMY ARMOUR'
And
"B-36"
The newest distance <*"'* ball
ResrasentatlTe:
AGENCIAS
GLASGALL, S. A.
Ave. Justo Arosemena Ho. 73-A
Box 3117 Panam City. R. P.
Sunday at 10:00 a.m. in the
Colon Stadium, the Fuerza Y Luz
team, champs of the Panama
Provincial league will play the
Deportivo Cartagena, winners of
the Colon Cireult
This will be the onlyl meeting
of the inter-city chamoions, so
Atlanti- side fans should to out
to see the best amateur teams
plsy
AdmUslon prices will be 3 25
for adults and ten cents for chil-
dren.
Panam
Coln
cur
Complete Assortment of
DOG SUPPLIES
at
Gfty&t
IS Tivall Are. Tel. t-SSM
NATIONAL DISTILLERS, S. A. j
Panama, R. P.
NOTICE OF MEETING
Th stockholders of NATIONAL DISTILLERS, S. A.
are hereby notified that the annual mooting of artoetr-
holdora will be held at th principal office of tho Com-
pany, located on the Boyd-Rooaovart Highway on 2nd of
April, 1952. at 4:30 p.m., for the following purpoeaM:
a) To rood th* minutos of (ho fast rnwormqr.
b) To e/oef or .-ao/oef Director.
4
d To xamln and erpprov the Jwfame thmt.
pro/if, emd loss stcrtomonf and the report sub-
mitted to fhom by th Board erf Dtrmdon.
d) To coneldo/ and act upon all of tb mcrffora
that (he Board erf Dinciors or each Dfreetar
InaMdually, or any stockholdmr may subjtt.
Panama, March 20. 1962
THE 9ECRETAHY.
MOTS: The aniMM at aril with aHHJiiHira at twaaa. ae' I
1 March trri. IMS.
MOB



I

MOTORBIKE RACES SLATED TONIGHT
'Battle-Hardened'
Sarge Had 3 Wives,
No Stripes Showing
i
IN INDEPENDEN/^
******
NEWSPAPER
1-vvENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
>CAFFNEY, S.C.. March 21 (UP>
A "battle-hardened" sergeant
who turned out to be a private
with only one year of Army serv-
ice, was sentenced to two years
today after pleading guilty to
having three wives.
Charles Mathls, 24, of Cowpens,
showed up for his trial on a poly-
gamy charge sporting sergeant's
stripes and three rows of battle
ribbons.
He said he had six years Army
service and had been wounded
In Korea.
"My service record speaks for
Itself," he said.
However, a check with Fort
Jackson, where Mathls was sta-
tioned, revealed the young sol-
dier was only a private with one
year of service. He had never
been overseas and had been
AWOL eight times.
Mathls claimed the Fort Jack-
son report was In error and said
"my service record In Washing-
ton will show that my ribbons
and war record are authentic.
When arraigned several months
ago, Mathls denied knowledge of
wives two and three and said "I
must have married them during
a couple of my blackout spells."
Today, however, he made no
mention of the "blackout spells,"
and pleaded guilty.
Judge Steve C. Griffith of
Newberry suspended the remain-
der of the sentence upon service!
St? "SET tahCTS Rector of the Daiias, Tex., of-
was stlf fer than usual because of
his lies.
"As long as a man stands up
and deliberately tells something
he knows Is untrue, there is lit-
tle hope for reforming him,"
Griffith said.
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Member Of Cabinet Got Hat,
Officials Got Sack--Witness
WASHINGTON. March 21 (UP)
Sen. James P. Kern (R., Mo.)
demanded yesterday that Agri-
tulture Secretary Charles F.
Brannan explain why he fired
two department officials for in-
efficiency and accepting "gra-
tuities" after Brannan accepted
a gift hat.
Brannan' office said the
secretary received the hat at
the Kaufman County, Tex.,
vetch festival in May, 1950. A
spokesman said Brannan got
the hat as a gift /or a speech.
The hat Incident arose as the
no Senate Agriculture Committee
Investigated shortages of about
$8,000,000 worth of government-
owned grain in private ware-
houses.
Witnesses were Latham White
and Harry J. Solomon, fired by
fice of the Production andi shortage in government-own-
Marketing Administration. ed peanuts.
' White and Solomon were fired The warehousemen allegedly
after shortages of $3,800,000 sold government-owned grain
worth of government grain were' on a high market, intendin
uncovered in the Southwest.
White told the committee that
"the lack of a national ware-
house inspection policy" largely
was responsible for grain short-
ages.
He also testified that a
Brown wood. Tex., peanut
plant was allowed to pay up
without prosecution when it
was caught with a $22,000
ing to
replace it when prices fell. They
were caught short when prices
remianed high.
Kem questioned White closely
about the Brannan hat but
broke off his questioning when
the witness said he had no per-
sonal knowledge of the affair.
Committee chairman Allen J.
Ellender that Brannan would appear
New Anli-TB Drug
To Be Developed
By NY Manufacturer
Fort Kobbe Plans
Air Raid Alert
Tomorrow Morning
All military personnel, thelr
dependents and civilian em-'
ployes in the Fort Kobbe disas-
ter control zone will participate
in a practice air raid alert and'
disaster control exercise tomor-
row, beginning at 9 a.m.
NEW YORK, March 21 (UP)- According to Captain Fred L.
A fourth drug manufacturer to- Huifi port Kobbe disaster con-
day took up the task of perfect- troi training officer, invalid and
lng an anti-tuberculosis drug to tt\ persons need not be taken to
be tried on the largest possible shelters, but all other persons in
number of those affected with the area will take cover at the
the disease. sound of the air raid alarm. They
S c h e r 1 n g Corporation of wm ]eave shelter only on the "all
Bloomfield, N.J., started produc- ciear" signal or by order of their
ing a drug which will be called Tespective sub-zone wardens.
"Dibutln." The new drug Is Following the raid alert, a dls-
chemically the same as "Rimi-, aster control exercise will be con-
Ion" made by the Hoffman Lar- ducted. Traffic will be held to a
oche laboratories. Squibb's ny-i minimum, and only government
drazine and Pyricidin." .vehicles and those civilian cars
Sobering announced that It j marked with "DC cards" will be
will give 3.000,000 dlbutin tablets allowed to travel In the Kobbe
to hospitals and sanatorlums In; ^ne during the exercise,
the U.S. and also will send ship-
ments to Canada. Cuba, Mexico. | Lights, electric stoves and wat-
Venezuela, Colombia, Chile and Pr heaters will not be turned off
Per.
38 Commuters Hurt
for the exercises, but telephones
will be used only for disaster
purposes from approximately 9 to
11 a.m.
AS R Trains Crash Canal Timekeepers
Checking Cdulas
RIO DE JANEIRO, March 21
(UP) __Two wooden commuter
trains on the Leopoldina Rail-
way today telescoped at the
suburban station of Triagem.
All available ambulances /ere
dispatched to the scene as the
trains were crowded, and it was
beneved that the number of ca-
sualties was great.
Both trains were coming from
the small town of Duque de
Canals, near Rio, famous for the
wild west scenes which fre-
quently occur there.
The first train stopped at
Triagem and the second smash-
ed into the rear. First reports
aald that 38 were Injured
apparently none was dead.
Timekeepers on all Company-
Government rolls are being ask-
ed to determine what type of
cdula I.e. native-born Pa-
namanian or alien is held by
local-rate employes on their
rolls.
The purpose of the survey is
to bring files of the Central La-
bor Office up to date, accord-
ing to E. A. Doolan, Personnel
Director.
All local-rate employes will
be asked to bring their cdulas
to work, beginning March 26,
and to have them in their pos-
session until the papers have
but, been checked and the informa-
tion recorded.
(NEA Telephoto)
TESTIFIES IN GRAIN SCANDAL Latham White, recently-
fired regional director of the Dallas, Tex., Production and
Marketing Administration, testifies before the Senate Agricul-
ture Committee's investigation of shortage in government-
owned surplus crops stored in private warehouses. Camera-
men were banned from taking further pictures when the
____________________ witness objected.__________
_-------
Belgian Throne Faces
Crisis In Parliament
BRUSSELS, March 21 (UP) publicly mentioned that Leopold
The failure of King Baudoutal was influencing his son, the
of the Belgians to attend the
funeral of King George VI of
Britain has alerted Belgian par-
liamentarians to several poten-} ians. Many are in favor of giv-
problem of their living together
in Laeken Palace has been rais-
ed privately by parllamentar-
Make your floors shine this easy way!
use GLO COAT-it
stays bright up to
4 times longer!
Keep your tile, linoleum or wood floors
bright and gleaming with Johnson'. Glo-
t-oat. k. easy to use! Juet apply-it
drieii in twenty minute, to a beautiful
durable finish.
And now Glo-Coat i. positively water-
repellent! Even when you pill thin. more ioylil to hU detnroned fB"
they wipe way without marring the. nine'' th" th*D hl* 8tat* re8PMl-
Save moy-buy kr^r si**. Q won-
derful water-repellent GloCoat today!
tially dangerous questions.
The questions remained un-
settled after King Leopold had
abdicated In favor of his last
July.
Both government and opposi-
tion members have been seeing
the king frequently in an ef-
fort to settle the problems. The
issue could wreck the uneasy
truce on the royal question
which followed Leopold's abdi-
cation .
The most Important question
under discussion between the
king and parliament, according
to parliamentary sources, la
that of Leopold'8 residence.
The status of Prince Alexan-
dre, nine-year-old son of Leo-
pold and his morganatic wife.
Princess De Rethy, is also re-
ported to be under discussion.
The government moreover has
the task of explaining to the
young monarch just who wields
the power in Belgium.
The potentially dangerous
character of these questions
was thrown into relief by Bau-
douln's failure to attend the
funeral of King George. Baudo-
uin was reported to be resent-
ful over Britain's treatment of
his father.
The government mi threat-
ened when the failure led to a
motion of censure against It
by the chamber of deputies.
Public opinion was left with
the uneasy impression that
Baudouin acted without the
government's consent and was
lng Leopold a new residence.
At varlou times It has been
speculated that Leopold would
take u presidence in the Bel-
later and could be questioned
directly.
Solomon complained that
the mention of gifts in dis-
missal letters to him and
White was discriminatory.
Both the witnesses admitted
taking gifts including bats,
belts, Bibles, kegs of shrimp,
cigaret lighters and pocket
knives.
"I get some presents, too,"
EUenoer observed.
"You never beard of a Sen-
ator getting fired for that,"
added Sen. Milton R. Young (R.,
N. D.i who later showed report-
ers a penknife.
A gilt, he said.
White said the slits were
"nominal in value, and it was
customary in the grain trade to
give gifts of this type at Christ-
mas."
He said accepting gifts prior
to a cut-off oraer in May, 1951,
was a technical violation of de-
partment rules. But he said
"common practice was to take
them and we considered that a
policy."
White laso said that only a
small percentage of grain ware-
housemen in the Southwest are
dishonest. He suggested that the
Senators "call some of them up
here to discuss the causes and
cures of grain conversion."
White testified that he could
not remember the name of the
peanut plant that was ahort.
But he denied that It was
either "policy" or "habit" to
settle shortage cases without
prosecution.
Malik Ducks Demand
For Investigation
Of 'Germ' Charge
NEW YORK. March 21 (UP)
The Soviet UN Delegate, Jacob
A. Malik, today clung stubborn-
ly to the propaganda charge that
the United States Is waging germ
warfare in the Far East.
However, refused to give the
Disarmament Commis s i o n a
clearcut reply to the demand for
an International Red Cross in-
vestigation.
His refusal to answer obvious-
ly put him in an embarrassing
position, and he will face more
probing when the commission
meets again this afternoon.
The British and Chilean dele-
gates were scheduled to talk and
it was expected that they would
follow the example of the Neth-
erlands, Greek and Turkish dele-
gates who demanded a reply as
to whether Russia would" permit
a Red Cross inquiry.
BURGLAR HELPS OUT
PORT WORTH. Tex. (UP). .
Nightwatchman Homer C. Sel-
RAY MAGAN (left) swings outside Jerry Fox as the two speedway riders practice for tonight's
first-ever Panama championship contest at the Olympic Stadium. Here they are taking the
sharp curve at something over 40 mph. Tonight's racing speeds will likely be higher. By
virtue of previous experience on United States tracks Magan rates favorite. But Fox here ex-
emplifies the form and determination with which the 14 other entrants plan to outspeed Me-
gan's experience. Details of the meeting are 11s ted on page 11.
'Mystery Man' Cited
As GOP Go-Between
For Vote Fund Gifts
WASHINGTON, March 21 (UP)
Sen. Owen Brewster was on
record today with testimony
that he used Henry W. Grune-
waid, Washington "mystery
man" as a go-between in 19S0
in making $5,000 primary cam-
paign contributions to Sens.
Milton R. Young (R., N. D.) and
Richard M. Nixon (R., Calif.).
The Maine Republican also
told a House subcommittee In-
vestigating tax scandals that he
first met Grunewald, friend of
Congressmen and high admin-
istration officials, through Vice-
President Alben Wi Barkley. He
said he "had every reason to
have every confidence in him."
The Senator testified that
Grunewald, who drew a con-
tempt citation for refusing to
discuss his financial dealings
before the committee, appar-
ently is "known well" among
both Republicans and Demo-
crats In the capital.
Mindful of Orunewald's
penchant for silence, Brewster
jocularly told the subcommittee:
If I had wanted to get a man
with a capacity for keeping his
mouth shut, I apparently could
not have placed my confidence
in a better man."
Brewster said there was noth-
ing "irregular" about advancing
the money to Young and Nixon.
But he added that "If they
hadn't been nominated I don't
know what would have happen-
ed that's where I stuck my
neck out."
Tonight Is KCs
St Pat's Dance
At Union Club
The Knights of Columbus will
hold their annual St. Patrick's
Day dance at the Union Club to-
night at 8:30.
The entertainment to be pres-
ented tonight will consist of
three well-known Stateside mu-
sicians, Bob Pelon, French song
stylist who has appeared with
Ginny Slmms on television; Al
Pinchot, accordionist who played
with Horace Heidt; and Ken Sla-
vins, who ran his own TV show in |
New York.
Jury Told Of Disappearance
Of French Canadian Beauty
glan Congo and recently ques- lers had to borrow a nickel from
tlon8 were asked in parMnment a burglar he captured In a busi-
about renovatin
at Knokle on t
te
the royal villa
sea coast.
neas house so he could call po-
lice to come and get the in-
truder.
KEY WEST, Fla., March 21 the Quebec provincial police, also
(UP)A Monroe County grand appeared before the junf.
Jury heard testimony for five, "The Jury is handling the case
hours yesterday in the strange very well and I am much encour-
dlsappearance of Canadian' aged/' said Perron,
beauty, Mrs. Huguette LeMay. The two Canadians have been
No findings were announced, in the Florida Keys for the past
but the Jury called In a court 10 days assisting Barker with his
stenographer and Is expected to Investieatlon.
issue a report tomorrow. ,.
The Jury summoned CaptJ ^ The 21-year-old beauty left
James O. Barker, deputy sheriff her husband George LeMay,
who led the Investigation of Mrs.'Montreal realtor, fishing On a
LeMay's disappearance while on bridge In the Keys about 85 miles
a fishing trip in the Florida Keys,
and Frank P. Webber, former
chief deputy sheriff.
Prior to his appearance, Bark-
er said that the petite French
girl with long dark hair "is dead,
killed by ah act of violence."
He said he would present the
jury some "highly incriminating
evidence that will clear up the
ambiguities" and implicate "two
persons in this crime."
There were unconfirmed re-
ports that a bloodstained robe,
found burled beneath a bridge
on the Tamianl trail west of Mi-
ami, was part of the "evidence"
uncovered by Barker.
Dr. Dolphe Perron of Vally-
fleld, Quebec, an uncle of the
missing woman, and a friend, Al-
north of
Jan. 4.
nere on the night of
She told him she was going to
their car, about 200 yards away,
to change from her shorts and
halter Into warmer dungarees
and Jacket.
Until today, no trace has been
found of the young bride despite
a widespread search of the Keys,
and reports that she was seen on
the Tamianl highway west of Mi-
ami.
Morris Leaving
Tomorrow
GIVE!
Lt. Gen. W. H. H. Morris, Jr.,
fr'ed Quenneve, retired chTe'f of Commander in Chief, Caribbean
Command, announced today that
he and Mrs. Morris will depart
from the Canal Zone tomorrow
morning.
A brief plane-side honor guard
ceremony will be held at Albrook
Air Force Base at approximately
9:80 a.m., following which Gen-
eral Morris will board hi* air-
plane and depart.
The important world-wide
services performed by the
American Red Crocs through-
out Its existence have been
recognised and commended by
many leaders.
Herbert Hoover, former
President of the United States,
recently made this statement
about the Red Cross:
"I have encouraged every
Red Croes drive for over thirty
years. I have often taken part
in them. I hare done to from
a knowledge of the services it
gives, the suffering itaallevi-
ates and the lives it saves."
The General's itinerary carries
him to Puerto Rico for an official
visit before he
Washington.
proceeds on to
BALBOA TIDES
Saturday, March tt
High Low
12:12 a.m. :39 a.m.
12:5 pjn. 7:18
The troupe is being managed
by Bill Wall, who also acts as
master of ceremonies.
Music for dancing will be pro-
vided by the Martin Men.
JOHNSON'S OLO.CAAi
blllties.
It was Leopold's surrender of
his army in 1940 without the
- overnment's consent which led
o six years of strife and near-
revolution In Belgium u
Although it has ni/er been
III his la "Off* Canywi",
V-8 Has Lively flavor M
Wholesome Goodness
no *sing/ejuice can match!
In V-8 there are 8 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetablesnot just
one. Thaf s why V-8 has livly flavor
and wholesome goodness no at'nj/e
juice can match. Each juke adds its
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A, B, Ccalcium and iron. Your
family will love V-8. Serve it often.
t V-a It Mctai t*m >
> Celery
____ fNEA Telephoto
MOVING DAY AT THE WHITE HOUSE Was hlngton. DC. workmen move furniture back
tato the White House as the job of reconditlc nlng nei .i completion, l.eaident and Mrs. Tru-
man who have been living at the nearby B^aii House, are scheduled to move back on March
23.


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EA5AHTJYM_DII9HI INGEST_TIME 2012-08-21T12:40:44Z PACKAGE AA00010883_01420
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES