The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01419

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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NEW YORK
ROUND Ttl
FIRST CU $115.10
TOURIST MM
ILY KSWSPAFKft
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth ana the country Is tale** Abraham Lincoln.
SeaovamsYO,
I \\%IH l\ It lim.rO
Now. 6 Years Old!
rWKNTT-SEVENTB TEAR
PANAMA, H. P., THURSDAY, MARCH 88, 18S
PTVB CENT*
Ike Thinks Again About Homecoming
JOHN K. BAXTER, first editor cf The Panama American,
emoys persuasive evidence of his old paper's continued well-
being as reporter Hindi Diamond conecta his remlniscenses
In the coffee shop at El Panam.
* *
Panama American's
1st Editor Returns
The first editor of The Pana-
m American. John K. Baxter,
arrived In Panam this morning
after an abaence of 21 years.
Baxter, heavy-sit, clear-eyed,
and nearlng 70, Is now retired
and writes for the Panam Can-
al Recorda Canal employes'
publication In Florida.
ing Impression of bis
elgn, fr&rrt ittttolflf,
la that "we were constantly on
the verge of going broke."
"JK.B."as he was known,
won popularity during those days
for his dally column "Pro and
ConMoatly Con" which dis-
cussed the controversial Issues of
the day.
A former cable editor who
worked for Baxter way back
when, and Is still on the isthmus
today recalled that his bos was
considered "an outstanding writ-
er, and columns that have fol-
lowed since then were patterned
after his."
Baxter came down with the
Isthmian Construction Corpora-
tion In 1905 and was Chief of Ci-
vil Affairs for the Canal before
be waa persuaded by Nelson
Rounsevell, publisher and found-
er of The Panam American, to
Join the newly-formed staff as
editor.
Though Baxter today consid-
ers himself "undoubtedly the
laziest man In the world," old-
time Isthmians remember him as
a taard-workhig, prolific writer
who often attributed his dally
inspiration to his favorite liquid.
Rum Azuero, of which he always
made some mention In his col-
umn.
After leaving the editor's seat
here, Baxter lived in France for
five years where he says he "pre-
tended to write."
Before his retirement to Co-
coa, Florida, six years ago, he
headed the Social Security Board
at South Bend, Indiana.
The first Issue of The Panama
American, dated Oct. 7. 1925, In
describing the staff, had this to
say about Baxter:
"The responsible editor will be
John K. Baxter, old-timer on
the Panama Canal, from which
he haa made excursions from
time to time Into the United
States consular service, the Great
War and the merchant marine.
In recent years he wrote a col*
umn "Goulash" which waa rel-
ished by some, execrated by oth-
ers, but read by all."
Baxter's column "Pro and Con,
Mostly con" that also appear-
ed In that first Issue aald in
"If you ever beeaawr a "fitrftr.
gentle reader, which is an acc^
dent that can happen to any
man, you doubtless felt some cu-
riosity as the fateful hour drew
near, with respect to the proba-
ble appearance and character of
your offspring. Whether It would
be a boy or girl, whether Ita eyes
would be blue or brown, and pos-
sibly, in extreme cases whether
it would be black or white.
"Since I stand more or less
In loco parentls to this present
rag, I feel exactly the same tre-
pidation concerning it, and
nobody will Inspect the first Is-
sue more curiously than I.
"As the father of an Infant
newspaper, I now have certain
responsibilities, which I fear
may prove Irksome.
"Of course I will not attempt
to take care of the child single-
handed. I have competent peo-
ple to warm Its milk, wash Its
bottles and change Its diapers.
"But nevertheless It is up to
me to see that no mistakes are
made and If anything goes
wrong I will not only get the
blame, but deserve It."
"I fear that my gay, carefree
days are over, and that I will
have to cut out souse parties,
trips to Colon, week-ends to
Taboga and all that sort of
thing, since paternity Is a seri-
ous matter.
"It ha been Intimated to me
that his new sobriety will not
agree with me and that when
the alcohol- has evaporated from
my system there will be noth-
ing much left.
"However, even though It may
inconvenience me seriously, I
must do the right thing by the
child Signed J. K. B."
Panama Trust
Opening Near;
Loan Arrives
The Panam Trust Com-
pany today seemed certain
to reopen within the next few
days.
It has been closed lince
March 1951.
Henrique de Obarrio, Pan-
am Comptroller General,
announced at noon today
that he had been notified by
the Chase National Bonk
here of the receipt of a check
for $1,500,000 from the U.S.
Export-Import Bank, to pay
off the creditors of Hotel El
Panama.
The hotel's largest creditor
is the Panam Trust Co.,
which will collect a total of
$1,018,000 from the Chose
Bank.
The manager of Panam
Trust said the bank will re-
open next week as soon as
the money is received and
the government lifts the
year-old closing order of
closure.
iree Held In
Remon 'Plot'
Ordered Free
Judge Manual Burgos of the
Fourth Circuit Court yesterday
ordered the release of three per-
sons held in connection with an
alleged plot to "assassinate"
presidential candidate Jote A.
Remn last Sunday.
Burgos ordered three others
held In connection with the
"plot" to answer charges of car-
rying concealed weapons.
The judge ruled that the ar-
rest of Eladio Andrs Berguldo,
Len worth N. Este and Mrs. Fran-
cisca Cordero Valencia was Ille-
gal.
Mrs. Valencia was accused of
"agitating," Berguldo of "warn-
ing that the police were coming"
and Este of "driving down a *ide
road."
Burgos said the charges did not
justify their arrest.
Federico Barrios, Joseph A.
Bernard and Jorge P. Raflnler,
who were found to be carrying
guns without a license will an-
swer charges before the Govern-
or of Panam.
The six were apprehended by
the police near a political center
near Pan de Azcar In Pueblo
Nuevo and accused of "plotting
to assassinate" Remn, who was
scheduled to attend a meeting
there.
Five of them were said to be
members of the parties oppos-
ing Remn. The sixth, Este, who
has no known political affilia-
tion, reportedly offered Mrs. Val-
encia a ride In his car and pick-
ed up the four men along the
road to Pan de Azcar when the
woman said she knew them.
(NEATelephotos)
SUSPECTS IN RENO ROBBERY Two women have been
airested In connection with the (1,500,000 robbery of Reno,
Nev. millionaire La Vere Redfield, In Loa Angele, Mrs.
Leona Rogers, (left) a Reno cocktail waitress, waa charged
with transporting $9100 of the loot across the state border.
And, in Flagstaff, Arte., Mr. Marie Jeanne D'Arc, (right) a
French-Canadian writer-artist, waa arrested with $50,000 In
cash and considerable amount of Jewelry In her possession.
(NBA Telephoto)
THE ACTOR STANDS TRIAL Willie (The Actor) Button
deft) confers with his attorney, George W. Herz, before en-
tering Long Island City, N.Y., courtroom to stand trial on
charge Of bank robbery. The trial is being heavily guarded.
West Wants
Germ War
Story Checked
UNITED NATIONS, New York,
March 30 (UP) Soviet Rus-
sia, maintaining Its propaganda
charge that U.S. force* are wag-
ing germ warfare against North
Korea and Communist China,
faces a challenge from the West-
ern Powers to permit the Red
Cross to Investigate, when the
UN disarmament commission!
meets again this afternoon.
UN delegate Benjamin V. Cohen
did not present a formal resolu-
tion yesterday to force a UN In-
vestigation, although observers
believed such a move would come
later.
When the commission meets
today, delegates from National-
ist China, The Netherlands,
Greece, Chile and Britain are ex-
pected to repeat the Invitation to
Soviet delegate Jacob A. Malik to
have Russia support such an In-
vestigation.
Malik renewed germ warfare
charges against the United States
before the commission yesterday
and demanded that the 12-na-
tlon group condemn the Amer-
icans for such alleged practice.
But he pointedly ignored the
direct challenge for Russia to use
its good offices to persuade North.
Korea and Communist China to
accept the proposal of the in-
ternational committee of the Red
Cross for an Impartial Investiga-
tion of germ war charges.
Onetime CZ Teacher
Dies Id Wisconsin
Miss Bertha Jones, former
Canal Zone school teacher, died
last month In Wisconsin, accord-
ing to Information received re-
cently on the Isthmus. She was
59 years old.
She was a second grade teach-
er at Balboa Elementary School
from 1920 to 1923, when she re-
turned to the United States.
She was born In Sparta, Wis-
consin, and taught in grade
schools in Minneapolis before
coming to the Isthmus.
Truman: He Can
Come.Any Time
He Deems Safe
PARIS, March 20 (UP) Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower
said here today that his impressive showing in the Mir-
nesota primaries forces him "to re-examine my personrl
position and past decisions"on the United States Repub-
lican Presidential campaign.
Meanwhile in Key West, Florida, Mr. Truman sai I
Eisenhower was at liberty to return from Europe at err/
time he deemed safe and proper.
Thus the President left it squarely up to the gene, -
al as to when he leaves his post as European defense corr-
mander to seek the Republican Presidential nominarte i
actively.
Earthquakes Damay
Sicilian Villages
Mr. Truman said he
had told Eisenhower per-
sonally that he could use
his own judgment about
returning to the United
States.
He praised the job
Eisenhower was doing in...
Europe, but said be w^ZASSSSS^^SS
not interested in the po-!
litical fortunes of the
general, who has shown
imposing strength in the
New Hampshire and
Minnesota Presidential
primaries.
BALBOA TIDES
Friday, March SI
High Law
ll:S9 a.m. 5:23 a.m.
.......... 8:01 p.m.
CATANIA. Sicily, March 38
(UP)Local authorities todtv
ordered the destruction as 'dar
gerous" of 80 per cent of tl
buildings and homes of thn -
towns rocked yesterday mornlr. ,
earthquake
0 -
tembl .
Gustavo Cumin, director of ti i
Etna Volcanologlcal Institut ,
i said the quake was both horicor.-
tal and vertical.
Hamlets such as St. Maria Mar-
chia and Ammalatl also suffe -
i ed damage from quakes, ar J
while some walls cracked no ca -
ualtles were registered. Polk >
officers roped off homes whlc
can be repaired.
The cemetery at Zafferano,
which has been wiped out mo >
than a dosen times In past can, -
urles by violent eruptions of M .
Etna, was entirely flattened 1 '
the earth shocks. Not a sing ;
tomb was standing today.
Hemispheres Newspapermen
Still Arriving For Conference
6 Airmen Back In Labrador
After Week In Sunny Panama
Six airmen stationed at Goose
Bay Air Base, Labrador, experi-
enced a change in temperature
of 110 degrees In less than a week
recently when they arrived at
Albrook to ferry an SB-17 to
their home Dase.
The six, men from Flight C of
the/Sixth Air Rescue Squadron
experienced a rapid transition
from the frigid and barren Arc-
Monkeys, Mice Rocketed 80 Miles Into Space
As Tests For Earth's Forthcoming Rocket Men
WASHINGTON, March JO The U.S. Air Force announced
today that five monkeys and ten
mice had been rocketed Into the
universe 80 miles from earth in
initial efforts to assure the safe-
ty of human beings who will man
and ride space rockets.
Four of the five monkeys were
later killed when parachutes at-
tached to their capsule contain-
ers failed. The fifth monkey
landed safely, but died of heat
exposure in a western United
States desert because of delay In
locating his capsule.
The mice survived and appar-
ently suffered no 111 effects.
Special Instruments recorded
no 111 effects and no significant
changes In the heart and blood
vessel system of the animals.
Medical researchers are con-
. confident that space rockets can
' and will be built. They are seek-
| lng answers to such problems as
the hazards of cosmic radiation,
absence of oxygen and escape
and survivalfrom a spaceship
disabled '400,000 feet or more
from earth.
Dr. H. Strugsold of the space
medicine department of the Air
Force School of Aviation Medi-
cine, Randolph Field, Texas, said
that man already is In transi-
tion from conventional aviation
to future space flight and "tech-
nical development clearly points
to the final conquest of free
space."
The monkeys and mice rocket-
ed to heights of 80 miles, from
which they fell Inside capsules In
a gravity-free or weightless con-
. in wr^t-t niifht. Their*
free fall lasted two to three min-
utes.
The evidence of the test sug-
fited that "a state of sub-grav-
wlll not lead to physiological
ficultles," according to prs. J.
P. Henry and E. R. Balllnger of
the aero medical laboratory of
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.
Another report substantiated
comic strip theories that a
man coekl climb at of a
spaceship and walk around a
the surface some ZOf.aot te
4H.ee* feet from earth.
The force he would encounter
would be about like a 25-mlle-an-
hour wind through a spaceship
moving at ten times the speed of
sound.
There would be other compli-
cations, however, according to
Dr. Frita Haber of the Randolph
Field space, medicine department.
who said that while air resist-
ance would be negligible, the
temperature would be 5,000 to
8,000 degrees Fahrenheit.
A man would be hot. but could-
n't fly because the low air dens-
ity makes heat transfer small.
A.man might freese when he
hit the air ocean at around 30,-
000 feet, and would land any-
where within a 360-mlle radius
Of his earthly aiming point be-
cause of the forward momentum
at the time of balling out.
Dr. Hans George Clamann of
Randolph Field said that sealed
cabins carrying sufficient oxy-
!:an would be the "only solution'
or flight In a rare atmosphere.
He added there also must be
some means of eliminating ex-
cess water vapor, carbon dioxide
and other waste asses.
tic to tht warm, lush tropics and
then the reversefrom sunny
Panama to the Almost sunless
winter of Labrador.
When the men boarded the
ilane they ferried to Labrador
ast week, the thermometer had
Inched up to over 90 degrees.
As they flew northward their
sweat soaked summer weight
flying suits were shedded for
suits made out of heavier mate-
rial.
As .the flight progressed the
men were forced to don heavy
suits of alpaca-lined clothing
and fur-lined boots.
Heaters In the SB-17 unused
while the plane was In use here,
had to be turned on full blast as
the plane neared the end of the
journey, until finally the men
stepped out on the Ice-covered
runway at Goose Bay Air Base
with the temperature hovering
at minus 20 degrees.
During their short stay here
the men, Capt. R. F. Thomas, Lt
E. H. Sobe'man. Lt. H. Bonson
and Sgts F. Karlsen, R. F. Tuck-
er and E. J. Fayette, visited his-
toric places in Panam and did
some shopping in Panama City
stores.
Costa Rica's
President Hurt
SAN JOSE, CJU March *
(UP) Cesta Riean President
Otilio UUte suffered a serious
acident today when he was
struck dewa by a Meyete. He
received several grave Injuries
Prominent newspapermen of
the U.S. and Latin America were
still arriving in Panam today
for the annual meeting of the
board of directors of the Inter-
American Press Association
which gets under way at Hotel
El Panam tomorrow at 3 p.m.
Twelve board members were
In Panam this morning for the
meeting. The others will arrive
between tonight and tomorrow
morning.
One of the main Items op the
meeting's agenda will be free-
dom of the press.
Already here are Dr. Harmo-
dio Arias, The Panam Ameri-
can; Tom Wallace, Louisville,
Ky Times; Luis Franzlnl, El
Dia, Montevideo; T. L. Kerney,
Trenton. N.J. Times; Leslie High-
ley, IAAP executive secretary;
Carlos Lacerda, Tribuna da Im-
prensa, Brazil; Andrew Helskell,
Life Magazine; Floyd Miller,
Royal Oak. Mich., Dally Tribune;
Alberto Galnza Paz, exiled pres-
ident of La Prensa, Buenos Air-
es; S. G. Fletcher, Dally Gleaner,
Jamaica; P. F. Gonse, El Mun-
do, Havana; and John Brogan,
Jr.. King Features, N. T. '
The second biennial meeting of
he Council of Directors of the
(nter American Radio Broad-
casting Association got under
way this morning at Hotel El
anama with nine prominent ra-
llo station owners in the U.S.
-ind Lathi America present.
Freedom of speech, radio
broadcasting problems In Amer-
es and the combination of radio
ind television faculties are a-
nong the items on the agenda
of the council.
Attending the meeting axe:
Ooar Maestre, association presi-
dent, CMQ and CMQ-TV. Cuba:
Jose Quiones. WABA, Puerto
Rico; Felix Cardona. Cora ven
network Venezuela; Gllmore N.
Nann, Nunn Station. N.Y.; Joe-
Luis Femandes. XSW, Mexico.
Boris Eserrt. TSKB. El Salvador:
Fernando Eleta. Panama and Ra-
mon L. Bonachea. association
lawyer.
ARRIVING FOR MISTING D- Alberto Gains* Paz. pub-
lisher of the expropriated Buenos Aires newspaper La Pren-
sa, steps down from the PAA plane at Tocumeh. Galnza
Paz. whose newspaper (one of the best known hi the world).
wus taken over by government of Juan D. Peron, arrived-
yesterday afternoon to taha part in the meeting of the board,
of directors of the Inter-American Press Association at HotsJ
B Panama.



PAGE TWO
TUT PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDPNT DAIXT NEWSPAPER
I. -.4 .
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNtO NO u*LltHID V THI MANAMA AMIBICAN r*CS. INC.
r*>UNBIO IV NrL*ON ftOUNSSVILI. IN l*i<
HAHMODIO ARIAS. IDITO
? H STKlli O Sea 13*. PANAMA. C e
Tiiimoni Panama No 2 0740 >B Lini> '
C4BLI DDl> PAMAMIHICAN, PANAMA
COLON O'flCI 12 17* CINTAAl AVtNUI (IfwcIN I 2TM ANO ISTM TI[T
P0tl9N RrfWtHNTATivil JOSHUA B POWERS. INC
34B MAOIAON AVI NlW YORK. IITi N V.
lOCl Silt
Rt MONTH IN """ 8 1 70 I (10
* SIX MONTH*. IN '""" SO 13 in
* ONI VIA. IN ""> ie go t* OO
THUR8DAT, MARCH 20, 1*51
Wolter Winche
In New York
Labor News
And
Comment
I MAN ABOUT TOWN
i
Doris Duke has fine Cupid* ffy over Joe Castro, a young
Hollywood musician. He inn to her in Hawaii regularlyso
breathless is It.. The Robert Mitchums are Counting Ten.. Dan
Dailey and Marie Allison hare gone berserk... HMy Lemarr has
'taken her romantic problems to a psychiatrist.. .The F. Sinstra-
'Ara Gardner idyll is not fading, as their knockers are saving.
They are diraier about each other than ever...That the Walter
Wangers (Joan Bennett) will reconcile before his trial (for shoot-
ling her friend) is difficult to believe.. .J. P. Kennedy's dghtr Pat
and Gavii Welby (of the Scotch whiskv elan) are intoxicated
abcut each other.. Mr. Justice T-m Clark and dghtr Mi mi art
' tifflnp because ahe writ a H'woh career... Gloria Grahame's
long-distance phone b'lls are heftier because of a Cleveland sport
inronncer.. If BMiy Rose's case r.rslntt Art Jarrett flops, he will
turn his guns on Eleanor and a young society attorney.
The Washington Wire: An ambassador' son. on a 3-day launt
In New York, left a long trail of rubber checks.. Alger Hiss is
.delivering lectures topripon-mates.. Chas uckman has the con-
tract to build the Edwsrds sir bes, large. in the world. He is
; e!so chlpfin? the building of CBF's Te'evision City in Los Angeles
for ?5 minion., .^rnker tc'l you that the most alnrming figure
In th p-tlon Is the totfl mimb"r of pers^npl lonns taken by up-
per-brocket snlarled mBn to heln ppy their taxes.. Internal Re-
vengers wi'l thoroughly rheek every tax return of 60s and better
...When tp imi tells th comn'ete .*orv of that Ropo robbery
(of over $1,500,000) you won't believe it. And the ccrn?dy relief!
Pesrl BaMey's pert husband (she's urMnein* In I,s Vegas)
will probeMv be a wMfe nun. *e w*s i*neer In one of her hows
' .. .Brian Dp"levy' form*r wife. Mr*orte. t"d a medico wl wed
In the ?rlne. .Yonne d* Carlo's lt* ronu**t i Carlos
;A-.f*or>v. the Card'"n 'r<-'ir rint. .N-el C""-rd w*ll write
,reil m*1-l 'or B. "?'' Potree d**___ K""*h Pried*.
vyr. rc--rt wife. W#f>Wj Tilt1*"*, win > Op' next, is
jfotmf'j Powe- A'-efnl Fr-s Jih-*".. .Meiov Thorn l
,r polnc to PI Moroco with p^p-wrl* Hi Block. l-el of
with Cha. A"d#m-< p of last nlrhri.. Aribo' Mnrr"'* *Ptlfnl
il"str>'"res. .Tone Re^an, notor to wvk dally In a cusom-bniit I
c^aoffeur-drlven Cadillac. Snaps her fingers at movie contracts, '
etc.
The i"ap's: The 17. fl, buried thp feitim pn^le in the Oen.
i Grew *orv The German W"r PrM of nn Amriran rodio o'*'e'il
thpfted P'w''* H|prv prcerota fo- Ru^'an P"ents.. Oracle Fields
i th b"'W o* libe' "nd "ins In Torpn e** over her mrn-ria^e.
|FhP Is n'TP'-'T s"its.. 0n. A. R. nfwford's dn'i"hter Jonn (in
Berlin) and vie Jprnr-1 heck In N. v.) are a transatlantic ro-
;msnc. 0<"-bo c""iled *> le* on that Canrl cottage.. The
.Pober Tvlo- nd Orson Welle "feud" is over ballerlns T.udmll-
1'* Tch"rt". Taylor's crush 1 the one she nrefer.. .Another key
fiirli'e in Batista's Cuban set-up is a former B'way night club
prop.
Olee: ^-'t'. *n* nkno'tPd hv Cpp Tifnpv. w exnRCted
.f> ip*?~" in*-'- -rp'-ii. mndPl J->e Mvpp (of rb'cuco^ ap-
rir to b ?* *. 1 m-nn-'-'iin ppd womsnVIti n hl "fp...
.?'*cy'R id ch tlU"i*ttit mt.. The AP's m. rbHf<^fn Is reroverlnr fwn hi
,'r*c"n<* serloix oneration.. .Tht O'oria Balaban hnd^li; In
. Beeknn Towpr cornr with D'ck Hoffman, pt'anged f">m
P^dpe heire Cromwell... Cona lovelv vora OTIriei and Hal
;>,,.,n confirmed h ror"-"*lc rtn^rin. Retrnthed last week..%
Pbonv rH.p.,,,. Vnrth" Kit. te Village V-nmard star, will
;r"rrv M-hl de M'e. Be'ripn pel k'n Whll scpd of res*
j*n*Tp'ifi, !''' (nfi nch) waited in vpIi at the Penn
SttnMartin A lewis w. I. v. over at Grand Central.
,!. j... Wr.nij S|n~*n's POl'ticnl Hmtar-V eoe Rom^'^ine
,l'k this: If E'-enhowpr movp Into t>> Whlt House, Gov. Dewev
"'!!! rpcmn'pnd Mr Hoan for the GO" nomin"t'n as'Movnr. If
jt>t f"s, F"~an wl" nnnof T,p->r,,, jnspnh for thp Demmy no-
'rp.ipstton.. .Tpv av Mavor Tmniiittri h"pp for thi Dmocra-
Hlc nom*ntin to run ap|pt Pnator Ives Whn EH Flvnn 'rs
,.., i^_^,^ i, Ppr,<,rt^i coiH; "t am compiirtert to Jim Mad"..
,r-.t| t-b. Mfttor fmnanUs r> proonlnt nvpr the cafp slump.
f-XMt tn hrs and rhth pre of* 90* so fpr t^ls yen'.. .The unenm-
Jp.w weterf'ont rr-r-ra] has ched m""t ton dock hood to Fot
Snr'nvs.. .A^oth^r reason for ptrv'g t-r n>- *'mo-t hlf the
resl e**t it tax free.. .Brookin mile In the Flfltb"h pr*a are
hytln fn n ry madman. Police have warned parents to escort
their tots to school.
By Victor Rlesel
How arrogant can a Commun-
ist get?
I have for you a Communist
union leader of Federal em-
ployes In some of our most sen-
sitive agencies, on less who
refuses to deny before a Sena-
torial hearing that he used his
outfit to supply the Soviet
Union and the American Com-
munist Party with confidential
government material.
So annoyed Is this chsp
who was In the highest Com-
munist Politburo circles all the
time he led 35,000 Federal em-
ployes that he called the
Senate probers "filthy, dlrtv,
indivious" for daring to ask
these auestlons.
Thet was right after his
former wife, whom he deserted
for Party activity, revealed he
was a Communist, ttot orders
on tacties and policy from
Communist Party chiefs Jack
8tachel (now in jail) and Roy
Hudson (now free to roam the
West Coast).
Nothing can be more ghastly
than the actual record Itself,
just revealed by the McCarran
Committee on Internal Securi-
ty:
"Have /ou ever put Com-
munlst Party lmd*rg in
touch with people in ov-
ernment agencie who have
furnished them informa-
tion of a clamifted nafre"!"
Special investigator Don
Connors asked thU question
of the Communist leader,
fbram Flax-r, head of the
United Put'ic Workers, in
closed session of the Mc-
Carran committee on the
2j* 0/ oct. $, mi.
Will you repeat that ques-
tion again?.. g(Julfmd ,
ft was repeated and reworded
with a/ve you em Wr m mmunIst prty leader,
or with Communist Party mem-
bers, the availability of official
Information of the u S gov-
ernment through employes of
K 8v,ern,ment Wenclesr
Finally, slowly and politely
Connors put It another way-
Have you at any time dis-
cussed with Commun Paay
Ceon,eewKnhe Pa"'""'* tha
RSiP't w.h0 are members of the
United Public Workers of me-
",urrieis: or purveyors
Rrantors of classified
merit information for t
ol^VV^ Cmmunlst Pariy
Ru.4aV0Untry and fr Soviet
It was then that ttaiV* sen-
ator Arthur Watklns'snapped"
ir you have never had such
a conversation or discussed It
IZ nh.?.n .he ot*? and, ft
Toking the Patient for a Ride
I
or
govern-
the be-
Svlvi? i'*nf' former hnsbapH. ^e'lton Arob. d'" L*Rn*
with hi* bri-e-to-be. a l*s nmed MiMhAi Jack* G'epon's
P'oducer J*ck Fnrdl and des'^ner Grace McMrn pr iwAdia-
pisie-hnnrd.. 'ion pri'*!. the rew hprt of Arthnr Little. Jr.,
1 fit*!" to Doori"* MR'Arthnr A hakerv Is prorioln; it* "ew
pro*"!" hre"d for dletp's H n",np free lves to doctor* oupd
J"w. Thp nsod p 'tR'e rp-'ng list, so th bread is thl* h'gh n
'"'erw UaTion of'ke*... Whv ores agent* gray voting: The
OMtIppb, who detect bp'n Interviewed, refused a profile to P*d-
er> D'ppRt nlant-r One pf the Broadway places l n"W In hock
f->r tlOOSOO.. The Bernsrd Rlmo" of the legit (h' > Par.
moi"-t mMiivi pre dM^ln.. .The "nvon Cancer Fond has
the f'rt nnn 0f l#- 7h Million.. Jim Symington's lad Is alr-
Btlia; Flfl Pord at the V. of Arlsona.
TH" < rOUg OWUM THI ID> OWN COLUMN
THI MAIL BOX
Th. Mil > Is n earn tertim t. ra*ri ot Th* *** A*Mr
kan -ttsnart r.,.td (mMully and am hanrflaa hr wkallv *an
her I minntt.
If van ontribut a lattst >' ia*Mi*at It H 4*m*'t
eat Hay LaNan *wa publi'had In tht ord*> 'tctivcd
laae Ny to baap tk* tartan limitad te an paga lapa**
Idrntit* af lattt- writan li 11*14 In it"tt,it contnl.tic.
1 "IMind
Thh naiMpapa, .um Mjspoaalblllhf ta atstaitMNti m letaot
M i* lattan tra* waaisaa
ORGANISATION REQUIRED
Irs:
Lims Penj
March 4. 1852
I wish to eall vour attention to
4 subieet which I feel Is verv lm-
wlth me in sending out an 8.O.8.
to the Ministry of Education.
Dept. Art. and Culture for help
in fomenting and organizing a
Society of Authors and Comnos-
ers ot Panama, which I suggest
be officially called Sociedad Pa-
! namefln De Autores v Composl-
lortant lp the advancement of tores he artistic culture of our coun- national recoaflEen
py and which In my humble
epmion will benefit all parsorui it Is my firm belief that with
Jlrsetry eoneernod with same. (such an organisation In our
...... ..^.country a) our artistic eultura.t
I>e been offered a splendid Imus'ca 11 v and otherwise would
ppertunltv. but I stani to lose be elevated; b) our author* and
Ahat opportunity, including econ-'composers would all acquire In-!
pmieal or fnanetal benefit*, due terntlonal preatiae- d) we:
Jo the fact that I'm not a mem- would all h-neflt artistically uid
c2L thhVe^y?,u wnl Probably
claim the privilege (of not an
HSr '"criminate you "
p y,%b0ard. becaue he was an
?aso presldnt, *a
Yet Plater and his pro-
piping stories condemning
the loyalty program. His
"^tenants have followers
tn the Argonne Laboratory
"JUt0.'*,, wm reesarch
Pot, followers ison of
them concentrated in the
gyfgfe Bureau of Engrav-
ing (the mint) of the U. S
Treasury, learning all our
money-printing techniques
and secrets, followers in
Hawaiian agencies, follow-
ers in the State Dept. and
followers in m*st of the vi-
tal government bureaus. Of
course, they hate the lo-
yalty program.
This man Flaxer was no or-
dinary Communist. He was
ngn.
Especially on Feb. 8. 1944 it
can now be revealed. Then, at
litTrth. Tetiiig pIace' he 8"
P.*?. ?mKmerican Communist
f. ty, p^'tb"re (the Party* Na-
An,ita>m1l,ttee) ttt -
sion at which it put on trial it*
Party chief. Ear! Browder
ln^,h.e.Kdh11Ver?1 a lon "P^h
in n-nich he wat ph th.*-
Friends And Acquaintances
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. It was Just a little shocking
to see the pictures of the smiling Japanese Ad-
miral Kichisaburo Nomura being piped aboard
the battleship Wisconsin, with full honors
sldeboys, bosun's whistle and smiles all around.
You remember Nomura he and another Jap
named Kurusu were the flimflam artists who
were pedaling peace to kill enougn time to allow
the Jap naval air arm, leave Its carriers to fiat-
:en Pearl Harbor.
li was diplomatic deceit of a high order that
Nomura-san and Kurusu-san practiced, and they
practiced It so well that tney became trie tlrst
popular wnipplng boys o the American people
wnen we atarieo off to war.
It was only 1(1 tiny years ago, and sometimes
it seems a million years in tne past. Those
were the days when the Japs were changed
overnlgm Irom poUieiy hissing Daseball fanciers
to yellow rau wltn saber teeth, vermin to be
mercilessly exterminated.
Now we are all friends again, I see, with No-
mura playing honored guest, and over 400 Jap-
anese war criminals being ae-purged from Mac-
nrtnur's old lisis. The Japs are valued allies In
tne East, and once again our little brown bro-
thers.
Forgiveness is divine, I know, and wars are
not made by people, I know, but It still feels
:unny to see the "global criminals" once more
as honored members of polite society.
It is almost possible that If they found Adolf
Hitler hiding in a little mohntain town some-
where they would fetch him forth with honor.
It seems almost a shame, in that light, that
we executed so many war criminals, for obvi-
ously what was bad yesterday does not have to
be bad today, and yesterday's villains are to-
morrow's chum-buddles.
But it's a queer feeling for those of us and
there were quite a lot of us who spent two,
three, four year* overseas, dedicated to the kill-
ing of our present allies.
The Germans are our friends now, too, and
that feels funny.
Ten years ago I was riding an ammunition
ship in the North Atlantic, and you could play
leapfrog on Nazi periscopes from Sandy Hook
to Loch Ewe.
It seems odd to recall that 10 years ago one
of my nice, fresh-faced kids asked me seriously
if it would be okay to shoot Germans in the
water. -.
My friend Frank Far/ll went through a bit-
ter siege against Japs, on Pelellu a rat hunt
so awful that Frank's face served as a model
for Artist Tom Lea when Tom wanted to palnfr^
a picture showing what a combat captain real-
ly looked like after k few weeks of Jungle war-
fare. A
It must be a weirdNeeling tor'Hi the Far-
rells today to realize that Wat they fought so
relentlessly on government order i now a cher-
ished friend and ally.
1 know it Is wrong of me, and certamly un-
christian of me, but I don't believe I am ever
polng to be real Joyous about Japs or over-
tuddly with Germans. Individuals possibly, yes,
but masses, no.
I was afraid too much afraid in air raids
in London, afraid at sea of submarines, afraid
and monstrously bored on islands.
It was a long, long time before I quit leaping
out of beds at night when whistles blew or
planes flew low.
You cannot live on bitterness, of course, and
tnere is no sense in prolonging a finished feud,
especially when they tell you you've won it, but
I bet figures on the brotherhood of man as felt
by veterans toward our new allies would sur-
prise you.
It Is physically Impossible to tell a man con-
stantly for several years that one thing is good
and the other bad, and then expect him to
switch his views to fit a fresh political com-
plexion.
We need the Germans, and we need the Japs,
and the war is over, and all is well, but I would
personally like to see a little less of this Joyous
orotherhood between the likes of Nomura and
our current fighting men.
War may be a game to the professionals, with
ell forgiven when the final whistle toots, but to
amateurs it seemed pretty serious at the time.
We pipe Nomura over a battlewagon's side to-
nay, in friendship and in honor. Ten years ago,
but for diplomatic immunity, we would have
cheerfully strung him up from the yardarms.
European Timetable
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
fcer of any recognised "Society
tot Authors and Composers It i
verv natursl that if there existed
feueh an o'ranization In
eoimtrv (Panama) I would
Jdoubtedhtijbe t member.
economically.
Thl* nrtiole leads to a series
mv of article on How to improve
un- our musical and ar'iatlc culture"'
In general, which, with '-our v*rv
^md permisin, i hen forward
, Due to sue* eircmstances I'm to vou from time to time
requesting that all Panamanian Ths-kln vou kindly I am
Jiuthers end composers. lrHnd. Respectfully
n the poets, pltvwrights "ov-
lists and tomposers of both Erie V. TalH M.
classical a:.d popular music. Join (Psnameno Ced. 4730236)
..wh'fh hf walled that:
After the war the prospect
2-2. cl?8s. Conf"ct ""I no
strikes is to say the least,
sometimes very depressing "
He called for the sharpening
of class conflict. Then they
SS?"Sf K"7 Browder wh0 id
been too soft on Capitalism.
This Is the man who leads
government workers.
Shall there then be no
loyalty program? Shall a
man who refuses to deny
that his union gathered in-
formation for the Soviet
Union enjou the protection
of the labor laws of the
landf other testimony be-
fore the McCarran Com-
mittee on internal Security
revealed that "high eche-
lon of the Communist Par-
ty" gave him "specific man-
dates" and settled the
union's strategy in Com-
munist national headquar-
ters because the forty con-
trolled this union of Feder-
al employee.
It would be simpler to make
out all our government docu-
ments in triplicate: keep one
set, sand another to Party head-
quarters and ft third abroad.
Why is that sillier than per-
mitting this man to run a
"union." which receives equal
rights with legitimate unions?
WASHINGTON. Sometimes a great, historic
rrecess takes place so haltingly, iliogically, and
amidst so much confusion that it goes on al-
most unnoticed.
It is extraordinarily difficult to take serious-
ly the notion that the ancient dream of a fed-
eral union of Western Europe may actually be
lealleed there are so many excellent reasons
for believing that it will never happen.
Yet sober and experienced men. like former
Ambassador to France David Bruce and even
General Dwight D. Eisenhower, seriously believe
that it may well happen, and quite soon.
The agreements reached in general terms at
the Lisbon conference, Including the European
army plan, should be worked out In detail and
formally approved by the participating govern-
ments by the end of April.
This will set the stage for the ratification ol
the European army agreement, by the parlia-
ments of France. Germany, the Low Countries,
and Italy.
It is hoped again, perhaps rather wishfully
that all these parliaments will have ratified
by July 1. or a little later. The Schuman Plan
will almost certainly have been ratified already
by July 1.
If and when these two agreements come into
legal existence. Western Europe will have taken
an enormous step forward, at least on paper,
towards federal union.
The military significance of the European ar-
my plan lies, of course, in the fact that Ger-
many will thus be enabled to make a contribu-
tion to the defense of the West.
But even if all goes well, the European army
7.111 not make a great deal of difference militar-
ily for two years or more.
The over-riding, immediate significance of the
European army plan is political rather than mi-
litary-
European leaders like French Foreign Minia-
er Robert Schuman and German Chancellor
:onrad Adenauer are perfectly aware that the
ln thev have hatched cannot possibly work
without some sort of European Federal Union.
A nation without an independent army can-
not have an Independent foreign policy. A
group of nations collectively supporting a col-
lective army must have Joint economic and fin-
ancial policies.
For such reasons, it is now intended to eall
a conference of the governments of the six par-
ticipating nations, shortly after the European
army plan Is ratified, in orde* to try to lay the
roundwork for actual European federation.
It is intended to consider at this conference
such matters as a central European political
authority limiting each nation's sovereignty; a
joint taxation and financial policy, and the low-
ering and eventual elimination of customs bar-
riers.
All this sounds extraordinarily unrealistic
pnd it may well be.
In the first place, any one of a number of
perfectly possible developments another ex-
Plosion over the Saar issue, the triumph of a
Charles de Gaulle in France or a Kurt Schu-
macher in Germany, the emasculation of the
mutual security program by the American Con-
mss could cause the whole flimsy paper
structure to fall to the ground.
And the Soviets are already doing everything
possible to tear it down.
In the second place, the whole movement to-
ward European union has beep Illogical, acci-
dental, and through the back door.
The European army plan was proposed ifti-
t'aliy by the Frenen, essentially at a device for
delaying or preventing the creation of a sover-
eign German army.
No one took the idea very serious until last
summer, when General Elsenhower, after a good
look at the European scene, embraced the plan
enthusiastically.
Eisenhower's support for the European army
plan In turn shifted the movement toward Eu-
ropean unity from the realm of vague, high*
minded talk to the area of practical planning
And thus what started as a French tactic for
delaying a decision on a German army might
possibly end with the federation of Western fu-
rope.
(Copyright. 1952, New York Herald Tribane Inc.)
f
*wx WSHWOTON
MERRY-60-ROUND
t MIW MAMN________
Drew Pearson soys: Auto industry now has more steel
than it needs; Motor moguls tone down their once bel-
ligerent demands on government; Defense program
slow-down makes materials plentiful.
WASHINGTONA significant, unpubllcised meeting of
motor moguls with government mobilization officials took place
the other day at which the auto Industry was allocated more
steel than it really needed.
What happened at that meeting indicates a slight deflation-
ary trend in business; also that steel has suddenly loosened up;
and that the defense program, supposed to use up steel, has
slowed down.
On Dec, 29 a similar meeting took place at which motor
moguls talked tough, moaned over Detroit unemployment,
brought in Sen. Blalr Moody and Gov. "Soapy" Williams to help
them get more steel.
"Gasoline Charley" Wilson, head of General Motors, was ev-
en caustic with his old friend, "Electric Charley" Wilson, former-
ly of General Electric, who now heads defense mobilisation, and
scoffed at the idea of giving the motor industry only 630,000 tons
of steel for the 2nd quarter of 1852.
At the recent meeting of motor moguls, however, it was a
different story.
This time auto manufacturers were quiet and cooperative,
weren't too anxious to have the government drastically Increase
their steel quotas.
Deductions from the meeting were twofold:
1. That there was now ample steel on hand.
2. That motor moguls were not sure they could sell too many
more cars. It appeared that they had reached the leveling off
point.
ROLLCALL ON PRODUCTION
These deductions came from questions asked by Courtney
Johnson, director of the National Production Authority motor
vehicle division.
When he asked whether the industry would use up its quotas
on steel and other materials already given it for the first quar-
ter of 1062, L. L. Colbert, president of Chrysler, answered a
confident "yes."
But Irving Duffy, vice president of Ford, was not so confi-
dent.
"Late deliveries on equipment may slow us up," he said. "We
may not use all of our quotas."
H. H. Curtice of General Motors replied that his firm would
use up all its materials for the first quarter, as did S. G. Baits
of Hudson.
But George Romney of Nash. Leroy Bpencer of Packard and
Harold Vance, president of Studebaker, Indicated that they prob-
ably would not use up all the material already allotted them
by the government.
MORE BUTTER THAN GUNS
Finally, NPA's Johnson asked whether the auto industry had
any problems getting sufficient steel, aluminum and copper.
Though copper still was tight, all auto executives replied
that they had ample supplies of steel and aluminum.
The mills are now trying to sell us steel," commented Duffy
of Ford. "We may even have to shut down some of our own
mills." (Ford operates steel mills to supply its needs for caf
manufacture.)
"Steel is so abundant, it may result in some steel-mill shut-
downs," replied Colbert of Chrysler. "I can't understand the cop-
per shortage." he added. "I believe the shortage is due to mal-
distribution."
Baits of Hudson said his company was okay on all materials
except copper, and suggested that a little copper be taken out
of the stockpile for the time being.
Net conclusion gained from the meeting was that the auto-
mobile industry, though howling for steel and aluminum two
months ago, had more than tney needed and could produce
/more cars than they could sell.
In other words, the raw materials of the nation, except in
a few cases such as copper, are far ahead of the slow-moving
procurement officers in the Army, Navy and Air Force.
To paraphrase one government official: "We now have
plenty of butter but not many guns."
NOTEAs a result of the meeting, the automobile industry
was allocated 1,050,000 tons of steel for the second quarter, as
against 030,000 for the first quarter. '
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
Senators O'Couor of Maryland and Wiley of Wisconsin have
Joined the demand that Dr. Well, Hungarian minister who super-
vised the drugging of Cardinal Mlndszenty, be sent back to
Hungary.
For two weeks Senator McCarthy tried to hire a new sten-
ographer. Four girls backed out when they learned who their
boss was going to be.
Congratulations to Sgt- William Barnes of Clarksdale, Miss.,
lust back from Korea, for spending his first leave at home col-
lecting clothing for Korea's ragged children.
Treasury agents are preparing for a sweeping, nation-wide
crackdown on liquor dealers who have been evading the new
whisky tax. About 10,000 cases of whisky will be seized in raids
on dealers who have falsified inventories to escape taxation.
The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem was barred from Egypt be-
cause he appears to be in the pay of Soviet Russia Just as he
once took money from Hitler.
The Grand Mufti has organized a Communist Mohammedan
university in Warsaw, Poland, in order to spread Communism
in the Mohammedan world.
TAFT MEMO ON IKE
Though Senator Taft issued a public denial in New Hamp-
shire that he had attacked General Eisenhower, there Is no
question but that he has been knifing Ike's work among Repub-
lican senators.
The Senate Republican policy committee, which Taft heads,
recently sent a confidential memo to all Republican senators
attacking Elsenhower's North Atlantic organization.
"A North Atlantic organization has been set up with Gen-
eral Elsenhower as Its head, but all reports indicate that mem-
ber nations for the most part are dragging their feet, especial-
ly where funds are concerned," the memo noted.
"Western European nations (excluding Britain) are contri-
buting less than 10 per cent of the total military expenditures
of the North Atlantic Pact nations.
"To date, approppriatlons by Congress to the Truman Admin-
istration to shore up the defenses of our allies total about $11
billion.
How much,of the $7.9 billion Mr. Trumah wants for 195S
for Mutual Security will go for military aid, is a secret at the
moment," continues the confidential memo.
"On the other hand, the French defense minister has Just
indicated that France contemplates only 10 divisions for the
European Army, of which none is presently completed and half
of them are only 50 per cent recruited," the memo adds.
"No battleworthy Oerman divisions are in sight. The British ,
have announced that their four divisions on the continent will
not be a part of the European Army but that they will coop-
erate.
"The United States has about the equivalent of six divisions
in Europe."
Of course Taft knows that If the NATO army is discredited
Elsenhower will come home a failure.
NOTETaft forces are secretly delighted over the French
refusal to collect taxes for their share of Europe's defenses. They
consider this a body blow to Elsenhower's leadership that win
have political repercussions at home.
LIONS CLUB
RAFFLE TICKETS
1st PRIZE:
4 Apt. House, "Campo Alegre"
2nd Prize:
Bedroom House,
El Cangrejo"
ti
3rd Prize:
2 Bedroom House,
"El Coeo"
SUNDAY
Playing March 23, 1952
FOR SALE, until Saturday, at:
C.2. Pharmacy Pate's Piafe
Ancn Liquor Store Tivoli Travel Agency
Angelini Durin





m
THK8DAT. MARCH fi, 1SSI
.
THIT PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWfEAfER
PAOI

Ike Boosters Elatedly
Minnesota Results Are
Claim
'CaW
Drivers' License
To Be Issued By (Z
Al Cristbal Office
, WASHINGTON, March 20. (UP) Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower's Presidential boosters hail-
ed his huge write-in-vote in Minnesota yesterday
as a clear call from the grass roots for his nomina-
tion and election on the Republican ticket.
Simultaneously, National Democratic chairman
Frank E. McKinney predicted at Key West, Fla.,
" that President Truman probably would run again
if just peace were achieved in Korea.
The twin developments came as Sen. Richard
B. Russell of Georgia broadened his campaign for
the Democratic Presidental nomination and said he
has a-better chance of winning it than any other
Democrat now in the field.
The heavy write-in for Elsen- nouncement will be made
>wer in the Minnesota pres- ^*g*fi* fcJS
hower
IdenUal preference primary
running a close econd to for-
mer Gov. Harold E. Staasen
whoae name waa on the ballot
waa more than his Jublllant
backers had ever expected.
It brought from Elsenhower
boosters such expressions as
"political miracle" and an inter-
pretation that it is a clear cut
demonstration that the Amer-
ican people want the general as
their next President.
Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio,
the other leading candidate for
the Republican PresWentlalno-
mlnatlon, was pleased to have
made a good showing In the
write-in too particularly since
his friends put forth no effort
In the campaign.
Taft Interpreted the outcome
as a "definite rebuff" to Stas-
aen, who ran as a. native son.
Stasien, who said he was
"very pleased" with the re-
ulta, especially the poor show-
ing by Taft, has caused Taft
considerable irritation by fil-
ing against the OhW Senator
at every opportunity.
Taft'a campaign headquarters
belltlted the Elsenhower show-
ing with a statement asserting
that "despite weeks of feverish
effort and expenditure of large
sums of money." the Elsen-
hower camp failed to get more
votes than stassen.
Elsenhower-for-Presldent na-
tional headquarters objected
when Minnesota enthusiasts
filed the generals name for the
primary and cheered when It
was removed from the ballot by
court order on a technicality.
National head quarters
claimed that it neither en-
couraged nor discouraged the
write-in campaign, which de-
veloped after Elsenhower won
the New Hampshire primary
last weak. No attempt waa
nade, however, to hide the
enthusiasm over its success.
The suggestion that a Korean
peace might take President
Truman out of the 1952 election
contest was made by McKinney
after a long talk with the Chief
xecutlve.
McKinney told reporters co-
vering Mr. Truman's Key West.
Fla., vacation that he got that
Impression, although the Pres-
ident didn't say so specifically.
The party chairman said Mr.
Truman hasn't told him yet
whether he will, run for re-
lectlbh, nor 'when the an-
ln Washington March 29. at
which Mr. Truman will make
a political speech. But, he
still hopes to get it by the
middle of May.
Russell told reporters at the|
opening of his national cam-1
palgn headquarters in Wash-
ington that he doesn't think;
Mr. Truman Is going to run
again.
The Georgia Senator, the
choice of anti-Truman Southern
Democrats for the Presidential
nomination, also said he might
enter the California primary
June 3, from which President
Truman Wednesday ordered his
name withdrawn. .
Russell, who already laces
Sen. Estes Kefauver of Tennessee
In the Florida primary May 37,.
said he would decide about Ca-
lifornia in a day or two.
Kefauver, who beat President
Truman In New Hampshire last
week and got a sizeable write-
in In Minnesota, already has
filed for the California ballot-
ing.
Appraising his chancea, un-
der the label of "Southern
Senator," Russell said:
"I think I have the best
chance of any candidate at
this time to win the nomina-
tion. I believe I have mere
support now than any other
Democrat."
Elsenhower's tremendous
write-In showing in the Min-
nesota primary brought new
claims from his backers that
the general la the most popular
candidate the Republican Party
can offer.
"The Republican Party at last
has a candidate the people
want," said Sen. James H. Duff
of Pennsylvania, a leading
Eisenhower booster.
Sen. Henry Cabot Led
Jr., (R., Mass.), national ch
man of the Eisenhower cam-
paign, called It "the most
spectacular political upsurge
within the Republican Party
since the days of Teddy Roose-
velt."
Sen. Frank Carlson (R., Kans.)
said there never was a clearer
call to higher duty In American
history.
8en. George D. Aiken (R.,
Vt.) who hasn't declared him-
self for any candidate, anti-
cipated that Elsenhower "will
be home soon" to put still more
verve Into the campaign.
CANBY, Mirm. Everson. a farmer, dislikes fish.1
That was all he had to eat over a
week-end, however, when a thief
stole Everson's grocery purchases
from a truck.
iW TWIST TO AN OLD WRINKLENow it's men in beauty
sslons getting their face "lifted." In West Berlin, Germany, a
malt patron prepares to undergo treatment aimed at removing
facial wrinkle. The new wrinkle-, moving machine, called the
"Nemectron," is supposed to rejuvenate worn-out muscles under
-4 .the skin by yacimtmcallyj!pnjt>lled..eiectrical impulse*"____,
All classes of Canal Zone driv-
ers licenses' will be Issued by
the Policeman-Driver Examin-
er at Cristobal as well as by
the License Section at Ancon
starting April lJ It has been an-
nounced by Colonel R. Sefee,
Civil Affairs Director.
The additional servlee for At-
lantic side residents Is being:
established to avoid the delays
Involved In the present system
of sending applications, made to
the Cristobal office, to the An-
con office, where the licenses
are Issued.
Establishment of the new ser-
vice is a partial answer to nu-
merous public requests for a
branch of the License Section
at Cristobal.
- License renewals will be hand-
led slightly differently at the
Cristobal office than they are
at the License Section at An-
con.
At Cristobal driver whr wish
to renew their licenses should
take* their old licenses with
them when they apply for
renewals, together with the
usual two pictures and the fee
required at either office.
It will be necessary for drivers
o have their old licenses with
them when they apply for
renewals at Cristobal because
complete records of all licenses
will not be maintained on the
Atlantic side as they are at the
Ancon License Section. At An-
con. License Section employes
have access to the former license
when there are requests for
renewals.
This slight variation In- the
system to be used for license
renewals at Cristobal will pre-
clude the necessity of duplicat-
ing for that office some 25,000
records now maintained at An-
con.
The Driver Examiner's office
at Cristobal is located In Build-
ing 1029. the Red Cross build-
ing, next to the cable office.
The office hours are from 7:15
to 11:45 a.m. and from 13:45 to
4:16 pm.
FOR RENT
i
Spaoe under 9-story apartment house. Under con-
struction in El Cangrejo; appropriate for Dentist's or
Doctor's Clinic, Beauty or Flower Shop. Can be built
to customer's dsslrs.
I. L MADURO JR.
Tsl. 2-2844
dge,
lalr-
-Pretty-
ks a Picture I
For that wonderfully smart and well-groomed
outlook you must wear the Finest Materials.
Come and make your choice from our wide and
gorgeous collection of
* Cotton Lace
* Silk Orgawsa
Lovely plaids and tripa*
* "Dan River" Chambray
* From Switzerland
Lovely Embroidered Organdy
ZIG-ZAG
'
108 Central Avenue Telephone 2-3418
Headquarter of VOGUE and McCALL Patterns
IIBHP
.
Look Your Bait!
Feel Your Best!
There are happy busy days ahead for yon when
you're dressed your fashion-wise best. And you
are your best when you choose a new suit from
our collection of latest models. Here's a host of
favorites to pick from in a huge range of sizes
insuring you a perfect fit from the very first try-
Choose from our wide selection on ... .
on.
TV
SHARSKINS
TROPICALS
LINENS
NYLONS
GABARDINE
ALSO
Dinner Jackets and Pants
WELCOME.
to the
Inter-American Press Association
Members.

?"

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ONLY 2 DAYS LEFT! _^
THESE HOUSES CAN BE YOURS
FOR B.20.00 ONLY
;COND PRIZE FIRST PRIZE THIRD PRIZE
3 Bedroom Chalet in *'E1 Cangrejo"
4 Apartment-House with two Bedrooms
e*ch in Campo Alegre.
2 Bedroom Chalet in "El Coco"
WHERE TO BUY YOUR TICKETS
ferretera de lima
auto service
cantina ancon
cantina pete's place
BAZAR INTERNACIONAL
LA INNOVACIN
LUIS
ALMACN PINOCHO
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PROPAGANDA. S. A.
CASA MIKE
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CASA ADMIRABLE
BUY YOUR TICKET
TODAY
FOR MORE DETAILS CALL TREASURY


r *-&- *
page rocs
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENOENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THUR8DAT, MARCH I, lMt
Cargo and FreightShips and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
1XRHY
INTRODUCTION UNNECESSARY
.' "
'I
.
KNUTSEN LINE
Accepting passengers for
BUENAVENTURA, GUAYAQUIL,
CALLAO ami VALPARAISO
by
m.s. "ANNA BAKKE"
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
SAILING MARCH 29th
(All rooms with private bath)
FENTON &
INC.
I
tel. Cristbal 1781

Balboa 1065
New Orleans Service
Arrive
Cristbal
S.S. Chlrhiui
s s. Quirirua
.....
......*. March 2S
..... ..March N
-Handling Refrigrale*- Chilled and General Carg.
ling & AirLine News

American Freighter Strikes Naga. A short stop over was
. Canal Bank Tiirsriav |made at San Bias Point from
The 7,191 gross ton American! which 67 islands are visible,
freighter S. S Benjamin Hawk-1 Other groups interested In
Ins struck the east bank of the | these one day trips are ojrged to
Canal Tuesday afternoon near!take advantage of the dry sea-
Gamboa. but was able to com-'son and the group price. Call, the
plete the remainder of her|Colon Chamber of Commerce,
northbound transit. Colon 807 or Fred Busch, tour dl-
The ship, was carrying 9.350; rector at Balboa 4394.
tons-of wheat, and Is under Next trips scheduled are for
', ;harter to the British Food Ad-1 March 29 and March 30.
ministration. She is en route to
the United Slngdom from Taco-
a. It was believed that the
.damage to the ship was slight.
The Benjamin Hawkins was as-
fisted in the transit by the tug
Ban Pablo
New York Service
Arrives
Cristbal
MACS and Engineers Visit
SanAlas Islands
TJe third group of- military
Winter's Last Kick
Paralyzes Sierras,
Moves To Midwest
CHICAGO. March 20 (UP)
One of .the worst blizzards of
S.S. Jamaica ..
S.S. Sixaola ...
S.S. Cape Ann .
S.S. Junior ____
S.S. Talamanca
Cristbal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
March 22
. March 22
March 23
March 25
March 29
Sails from
Cristbal
flT' 5POTS UKB THB THAT LEAP TO RHBKHAIL
CHBWIKd! X HOTIHOr'4 (XT ALL TH* /WSWBWj
TO CLBAK. iPKAYAHO HAiT VICTO*IA TmMPtT.
VSN GOT 4 PIX ON TUB iTOLBN FLAiMA^-
HGUT UNPBB. THAT TA*P...
... AND THAT GKINNINtj APS WTM THB AATILLKyji
WONT C-BT 5LVV!...IPHSe ONLY KBLAX K A*
CONO, I COULP TAKB A CHANCB OH 6OIN0 OVER
TWS IP... Shim UNDER tVATM ..MAYIB RSACH
.THAT JUNK. OUT C
FP.FCKI.FS -AND UTS FRIENDS
He Stays Put
BY MERRILL BLO!
S.S. Chlricjui.....................u.........March 25
S.S. Quiligua ..................:.......'...:.. .April 1
(Passenger Service Only)
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-204 COLON 20
ANP I RPPSAT, STUDENTS
- MOTWIN& SUCCeEDS LIKE-
HARD WORK! HE WHO
LOAPS is IOST!
Jiemftniiel mrie fhP San Him Is-'-''^ "'lne worst Dlizzaras OI
^nTs Ton, ft week end the wintn halted ra and hiSn"
, .,,.. ._j ___ tw. o70 vada Range in the Far West,
..tacnment and men or tne 70 _u-tv _.._ i.v.j n. u___4
p^l^T^u\r\sXS^Z -rTrrca11ade hM ,a8t
4>y the Colon Chamber of Com-i nclal curtaln caa-
,merce and \mder the direction ofl ^ southern Pacific Rall-
ied Busch to.r director. road sald ltwag forced t0
Islands visited were Iguana. El uspend temporarllv freight and
*orvenir, Pico Feao and Nalal pa5Senger service over Donner
Summit in the Sierra Nevada
mountains in the Califomia-
Nerada border area, and high-
way crews struggled against
mounting snows to reach the
isolated area.
The storm center was gather-
, ing strength In the Midwest last
night and unleashed tornadoes
tn tire Mississippi Valley.
The Southwest, meanwhile,
made preparations for possible
emergency flood conditions as
record snows piled up In New
Mexico and southern Colorado
mountains.
Late winter snows coming on
winter's last official day dump-
ed 300 inches, or about 25 feet.
'of snow In the Donner Suan-
i mtt region of the Sierra Nevada.
Highway crews fought though
mountain drifts to reach 115
persons trapped In the June
Lake resort region there.
Deaths were caused by a
blizzard and accom p a h y 1 n g
snowslides. A 20-foot deep slide
rumbling down a mountain kill-
ed two men and burled a power
company project In the Owens
SHIP-SHORE
RADIO-TELEPHONE
SERVICE
PANAMA "HPC 22" 2506 Kc.
LISTENS FOR SHIPS
ON 2110 KCS. or 2174 KCS.
. 1200 to 0400 C.M.T.
TROPICAL RADIO TEL CO.
ALLEY OOF
Okay So Far
T T. T. HAMLIIt
SO YOU DIDN'T CARE
MUCH FOR THE LWS
OF CAP*N SMITH AND
POCAHONTA6,EH?
BOOTS ANO HER BDM
Whafs Wrong, Buncy?
BT EDGAR MARTEN
We Represent ALL Airlines
SO LET US ARRANGE YOUR NEXT TRIP
BY THE MOSt DIRECT ROUTE.
.. ..
#3 '%* St"
DeLesseps Park
s?, TV
i
UNC
Tel.
2.2008
NWW YWT. t SHV\. VOOW
rTW. VOOR OWtftM
OOMIOV* A% W tt WfcCfc | l WtVV

CAPTAIN EAST
Another Hazard
BT LESLIE TURNE!
River gorge.
A man and his wife apparent-
ly were asphyxiated when they
lett the motor running in their
car after it stalled in a snow-
drift.
SAWDUST INTO BERRIES
KINGSTON, R.'I. (UP)-Blue-
berry production can be increas-
ed by 1,000 quarts per acre)
through the use of sawdust
around the roots of the bushes, a!
horticulturist reports. Prof. E. P.j
Authorities In Utah and Idaho
said fresh snows were adding ,
to near-record snowfalls and Christopher of the University of
Increasing the danger of spring I Rhode Island says the berries
floods, i will be bigger and better, too.
" CHKIS VVELKEN, f la Detect
Too Strong, Rocky
BY RUSS WINTERBOTHAM
BUT IN TH HCITEMNT ROCKY TMBOrVS 1* WHOLE WEtbUTOHTUE PLA^TlCLEVBB mo...
k
\4*50#
4HUT IT MAHUALLV,
DBBVOOll'Ll TAKE
CARE OFTUCnomAIHB
BO*** ,____"
EA.SV, &*t HA5 A GARAGE WB
CAN IOCK THE CAR IN, AMP SAVE
UNPACKING. THBN IT'S ONLY A
SHORT STROLL TO MR. ALREDfe.
BOWSER,
DOWN! the
AKI WAS
ONLV PUTTING
UP HIS CAR!
VIC FI.INT
Horrible Fate
BT MICHAEL OTMALLE1
PKISCILLA'S POP
Worth Looking Into

BY AL VERMERS
HARO FkSHT, BUT
WOMEN P1NALLV
WON EQUAL
RIGHTS AND
PERSONAL
FREEDOM!
I WANT TO RND OUT
WHAT MADAM T02SO
KNOWS ABOUT THE
WORTHMORe KILLIN.
ONE WAV TO &0 ABOUT
IT WITHOUT AROUSIN
H6R SUSPIOOWS IS TO
SEND HER A NEW
III K KOAKUINO HOI SE
Witn
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OL'K WAY
By J. R WILLIAMS
BUGS BINNJ
Look All Yon Like
WB"KB
ONNA
LOOK
*XT
SOMC
TOY*
EGAD.TWlGGS.' I EXULT IN
VOUR FEATCP RECOVERlMG,
HE BOARDERS" MOrtEV. '
t hw.' vou imply
vv'e^t to -The nIearest ,
^5 lar6e city and
advertised for
,-twe crook?
that stra.1n.6
ones cREDULrrV
- HAK-
,KAFF/
^
I
1RAT WA5 Tl-iE PITCH? T
Fished FOR HIM WITH A K&
WANT-AD: "MOSJEV TO *^
INVEST IN CURIOS ***-
ESPECIALLV INTERESTED
IpJ ONE Of SIR WALTER *4
raleksh's Pipes."^
x deduced gumhorn
could fake that
item as easv
COOK UP.
MORNiiMS-AFTER
EXCUSE '
Being
J PR.<&ONAL.,
TWIC5&S2
^
*-">.-..



THURSDAY, MARCH 21. 19
THE PANAMA AMWUCA* AN 1Nnr.PENOF.NT BAIL* NEWSPAPER
PAGE Plfffi
Navy Plane Strikes Down
WomenGolfersOnFairway
JACKSONVILIJE, Fa., Marehi lying together on the fairway
20 (UP) Funeral services were .where the plane first struck.
being planned today for two pro-1 "The pilot went to pieces then,"
mlnent women golfers who were Deavy laid, "saying over and
Wiled yesterday when they were
hit by a smoking Navy fighter
plane which swooped over a golf
course fairway where they were
playing.
NEW ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS FOR THE ALBROOK NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
WIVES CLUB, recently elected, are (front row left to right): Loca Fuller, president and out-
going secretary; Helen Velez, first vice-president: Florence Dusseault, second vice-president;
Jean Slbler, secretary; and Diana Patterson, tr tasurer. Rear row, left to right, are the retir-
ing club officers: Marlon Bchlosser, president; Stephanie RUey, first vice-president; Lillian
F.hoderlck, second vice-president; and Virginia Manning, treasurer. _.. .
(Official USAF Photo)
pacific ^ocietu
flU Cm* J(*L>
& ft, SJL 31 &&~ 3SQI
UNITED STATE8 AMBASSADOR ENTERTAINS
The Ambassador of the United States to Panama. Mr.
John Cooper Wiley, entertained yesterday afternoon at 5:30
p.m. with a tea given in farewell to Mr. and Mrs. J. Leopol-
do Romero, Mr. and Mrs. Boris Spivak and Miss Margaret
Ostrowsky.
The tea was held at the Embasay Residence on La Cres-
ta.
General And Mrs. Morris
Entertained
'i"he Governor of the Panama
Canal Zone and Mrs. Francis
K. Newcomer were hosts at a
dinner Monday at the Gov-
ernor's Residence In honor of
tr.e Commander-ln-Chlef of the
Caribbean Command, Lieuten-
ant General William H. H. Mor-
ris, Jr., and Mrs. Morris.
Covers were laid for 24.
I----------------------!-------------------------
m mem j~ tu
&. 195, Qmlnm Vtlmkm Qmlm
37$
over 'I didn't see them, I didn't
see them.'"
An Investigating board was
called immediately at the near-
fhe plane's pilot, Ens. C. L. by naval air station to look Into
Greenwood of Bloomfield, N. J., the accident,
walked away from the fbunlng
wreckage of his Oorsalt fighter Oreenwood told Investigators
plane that bounced into the I he was trying to stretch his glide
woods beside the golf course, after the single engine of his
without knowing he struck the
two women.
The victims were Mra. Brady
S. Johnston, wife of a prominent
Florida dairy company executive
and past president of the Jack-
sonville Woman's Golf Associa-
tion, and Mrs. William E. Demp-
sey, 38, wife of a construction
firm vice president. .
A Negro caddy about SO- feet
away was unhurt.
8haken, but suffering only a
few cuts and bruises, Greenwood
plane went dead for a crash-
landing In the St. John's River
near the golf course. He didn't
make It.
"The pilot had no choice at
all," a Navy spokesman said.
Mrs. Johnston and Mrs. Demp-
sey, walking up the seventh fair-
way together after shooting their
second shots to the green, never
saw or heard the plane as It
glided In over the trees.
Miraculously, Theodore Rut-
SUfPRISE ANNIVERSARY PARTY
PAR CAPTAIN AND MRS. KOEPKE
A lurprise cocktail party and dinner was given yester-
day at the Coco Solo Officers Club by the officers attached
to the Coco Sole Naval Station, to honor their commanding
officer, Captain L. L. Keepke, and Mra. Keepke en the cou-
ple' sixth wedding anniversary.
A St. Patrick's Day theme was sed in decorating the
dinner table. A silver bowl filled with green roses was
fltnked by silver candelabra and green tapers. Two white
cakes with green streamers carrying "Happy Anniversary
Greetings" in goM and decked with tiny St. Patrick flags
completed the appointments.
As this was the "Iron" anniversary, a meat grinder was
given aa a gift to the honerees. After the laughter subsided
a sift ef champagne glasses to match Mrs. Koepke's Swedish
crystal was also presented.
crawled out of his planes, ledge, Jr., Negro caddy for the
Groundskeeper Pat Deavy of the two women, was walking along
the fairway only 20 feet away
and escaped Injury.
Tlmuquana Country Club found
him standing* by the flaming
wreckage.
Deavy asked him if was hurt. "I looked around and saw the
"No, thank God I" the pilot re- plane coming in low behind me,"
piled. the caddy said. "I hollered and
Two caddies ran up and told [told them to 'look out,* then I
about the two women's bodies,[ducked and run. I saw smoke
coming out of the engine of the
the Union Church, the Boy
Scouts and the Girl Scouts.
nama and Mrs. Elvln Selbert
arrived In Panama Monday and
are at present guests at the Ho-
tel Tivoll.
Philip Thornton, Mrs. S. R. Da
vldson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Barnard, Mra. Frank Raymond,
Mr. and Mrs. David J. Markun,
Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Lamb,
Dr. and Mrs. William BaUey,
Mrs. Stephen Beaudry, Mr. and
Mrs. William Taylor, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Bartley Smith, Mrs.
Francia Feeney, Mrs. Walter
Diamond, Mr. and Mrs. D. 8.
Johnston, Dr. and Mrs. Jesse L.
Byrd, Mrs. Abble Brink Linares
and Miss Mabel Shaffer.
Secretary And Wife Leave
For Guayaquil
The First Secretary of the
Ecuadorean Embassy and Mrs.
Alberto Barriga Ledesma left
Monday for Guayaquil, Ecuador,
Reservations May Be Made
For Biennial Banquet
Mrs. Frank Raymond, Pana-
ma 3-0023. will accept reserva-
tions for the biennial banquet
of the Canal Zone branch of
the National League of Amer-
ican Pen Women and their hus-
band.
The formal banquet will be
held Tuesday, March 25, at 7
p.m. In the Hotel Tivoll In An-
cn. ,
plane.'7
A. C. Welier. playing on the
same course, said the women
"never had a chance." He didn't
hear the plane drop onto the
golf course either.
"I never saw anything so
ghastly," he said.
Mrs. Johnston was Jacksonville
Women's golf champion on 1938
and had headed the local wom-
en's golf association. The Asso-
ciation cancelled scheduled play
at the municipal course today af.
ter the tragedy.
Those who participated In the
party and gifts were: Mrs. J. J.
Jackson, mother of Mrs. Koepke,
Lt. Commnader and Mra. T. L.
Applequlst, Lt. Commander and
Mrs. A. P. Bollera, Ensign and
Mrs. H. H. Chandler. Lt. A.
Davla, Lt. and Mra. L. J. Du-
eoto, Lt. and Mrs. O. J. Ellis.
Lt. and Mrs. P. B. Fitch, U.
and Mrs. W. L. Hall. Comman-
der and Mrs. Davis Henderson,
Lt. J. E. Lepetlch, Lt. Comman-
der and Mrs. I. M. Rowel 1, Lt.
and Mrs. W. D. Ronayne, Lt.
Commander and Mrs. L. B. Jen-
nings, Lt. and Mrs. Michael
Leahy, Lt. and Mrs. Chester
Lucas, Lt. and Mrs. F. B. Moore.
Lt. Commander E. X. Pralno.
Lt. and Mrs. Robert J. Patter-
son, Lt. and Mrs. W. E. Sands.
Lt. K. P. Stafford. Lt. and Mrs.
H. R. Thomas. Commander and
Mrs. W. E. Thompson, Lt. and
Mrs. O. L. Wallace. Lt. and
Mrs. H. E. Walther, Lt. and
Mrs. Fred Wroble, and Ch.Bos.
H. G. Pitta.
The other members present
were: Mrs. Fred Schwartz, Mrs.
William Smith, Mrs. O. K. Wor-
lev, Miss Judy Amon, Mrs. A. A.
Albright, Mrs. Benjamin Brun-
dage, Mrs. Richard Pennlngton.
Mrs. Fred Newhard, Mrs. Henry
Shirk, Mrs. Curtis George. Mrs.
Joseph Irving. Mrs. L. L. Bar-
field, Mrs. Samuel Rowley, Mrs.
William Hughes, Mrs. John
Fahnestock, Mrs. Garland Orr,
Mrs. Leon Egolf and Mrs. Caleb
Clement.
Mra. Clement was honored
with a surprise birthday cake, as
lt waa her anniversary.
Miss Devine Returns to States
Miss Mary M. Devine, who has
been a member of the nursing
staff of the Colon Hospital for
the past five years, left by plane
Saturday en route to her home In
St. Louis, Mo.
Miss Devine has resigned her
position on the Isthmus.
Visitor Honored At Coffer
Mrs. Lewis Welsman, who la
visiting her son-in-law and
daughter, Lieutenant and Mrs.
Arthur Koggan of Fort Kobbe,
was honored yesterday morning!
V. F. W. Bingo Tonight
Bingo will be played tonight
at 7:45 pjn. In the V. F. W. _
Home on Curundu Road. Prizes survived by a l*-vear-old
will be awarded the winners. I William Edward, Jr.
Mrs. Dempsey. the former Mary
Strickland of Columbia, S. C, Is
son,
Captain And Mrs. Comly
Honored At Farewell Supper
Captain and Mre. s. P. Comly,
UBK, who are leaving the latter
part of the month for their
new station, were the honored
guests at a farewell buffet sup-
per Tuesday evening, given by
Captain and Mrs. H. O. Fish,
USN, at their quarters at Rod-
mait.
The attending guests Includ-
ed Captain and Mrs. Robert M.
Peacher, Captain and Mrs. Mar-
vin J. West, Captain and Mrs.'
O. L. Carlson, Mr. and Mrs. E.
H. Eaton, Colonel and Mrs. R.
Douglas, Captain Colon Eloy
Alfaro, Captain and Mrs. C. O.
Guasn and Lieutenant and
Mrs. J. Torbert.
Xr leveralTearsV'seTvTce inl Jft a coffee giver, by Mrs. Howard
Panama Mitchell a their home at Fort
Kbbe.
Among those attending were
Mrs. Charles McCroary, Mrs.
Oliver Parmley, Mrs. Carl Fltz,
Mrs. Harry Newhall, Mrs. Alrick
Hughes, Mrs. Walter Eaaon and
Mra. Charlea Hollander.
Visitors Honored At Tea
Mra- Victor Davis Miller of
HagerStown, Maryland and Mrs.
Daniel Nelson of Greencastle,
Penn who arrived recently on
the Isthmus for a visit here,
were the guests of honor at a
tea given on Tuesday by Mrs.
Miller's daughter-in-law, Mrs.
h '. Miller, at her quarters
a 'a-or.
Presiding at the tea table
vi. ------ Luster J. Whltlock
ai __r. Fian els March.
Former Minister Was
v: or Here
Minister of the United
States to Panama Roy Tasco
. .'..vO on the Isthmus
b,, .. me Monday from Barran-
quiiii', Colombia.
During, his brief stay here he
was a guest at the Hotel El Pa-
nama.
- irst Secretary of the
Luncheon Honored Visiting
Pen Woman
Mrs. Dorothy Betts Marvin,
the national president of the
National League of American
Pen Women, was the guest of
honor at a luncheon given Tues-
day at the Albrook Officers
Club by the Canal Zone Chapter
of Pen Women. Chairman for
the luncheon .was Mrs. Ellen
Eckberg.
Those attending included Mrs,
Lewis B. Moore, Mrs. Ernest K.
Relmer, Mrs. Frank Raymond,
Mra. Paul Barnard, Mrs. Rob-
ert Laatz, Mrs. Charles P. Mor-
gan, Mrs. Philip Thornton, Mrs.
Paul A. Bentz, and Mrs. Abble
Brink Linares.
Mrs. Morgan Hostess
To Visitor
Mid. onarles P. Morgan enter-
tained on Tuesday evening at
her home at Mlraflores with a
buffet-barbecue given In honor
of Mrs. Dorothy Betts Marvin,
the national president of the
National League of American
Pen Women, who was a visitor
on the Isthmus.
Mrs. Marvin gave a short In-
formal talk on the coming na-
tional convention of Pen Wo-
men and also spoke of the home
now owned by the Pen Women
League in Washington, which
was formerly the home of Rob-
ert Todd Lincoln.
Mrs. Morgan presented a
batea to Mrs. Marvin to be given
to the new home In Washing-
ton.
Among those attending were
the following Pen Women and
their husbands; Mr. and Mrs.'
Lewis B. Moore, Mr. and Mrs.
United States Embassy in Pa- Paul A. Bentz, Mr. and Mrs.
TRADE IN YOUR OLD SET
For This New
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n
MONTHLY 7.50 MONTHLY
LIBERAL ALLOWANCE
CLUB 1.25 WEEKLY
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,
RADIO CENTER
7110 Bolivar
COLON 40
Panama Rotary Club Meets
For Luncheon
The Panama-Rotary Club met
today at 12:15 pjn. for their
regular weekly luncheon meet-
ing at the Hotel El Panama.
Mr. David Robles, a past pres-
ident of the group, waa the
speaker.
Pedro Miguel Council
Meets Tonight
The Pedro Miguel Civic Coun-
nal Zone branch of the National
ell will hold a special meeting
tonight 7:30 p.m. in the movie
hall.
Pen Women To Bring Art
Entries Tomorrow
All artist members of the Ca-
League of American Pen Wo-
men are urged to bring their
entries for the biennial compe-
tition of paintings to the Lttth)
Gallery of the Hotel Tivoll be-
tween the hours of 0 a.m. noon
tomorrow. .
Mrs. Jeanne Stauffer Beaudry
will be on hand to accept 'the
paints, which will be Judged by
the painting Jury at 3 pan. to-
morrow.
St. Patrick Day BaU
To Be At Union Club
The St. Patrick's Charity Ball
will be held tomorrow at 8 p.m.
at the Union Club under the
sponsorship of the Panama-
Balboa Council 1371, Knight of
Columbus.
Door prizes will be given, and
music will be furnished by the
"Martin Men" orchestra. Tick-
et are $1.000 per person, v
I
the
Pedro Miguel Woman's
Club Meet
The regular meeting of
Pedro Miguel Woman's Club waa
held Monday evening In the
church parlor.
Following the business meet-
ing a social hour followed. The
co-hostesses were Mr. E. W.
Schnake, Mrs. R. CroWell and
Mrs. Robert Miller.
Country Fair At Pedro Miguel
The Pedro Miguel Civic Coun-
cil will sponsor an old fashion-
ed Country Fair Saturday,
March 29, at the ball park. The
fair will be open from 10 a.m.
till early evening!
Those assisting In the fair
will include the Woman's Club,
the Fern Leaf Chapter No. 4
Order of Eastern 8tar, the So-
cial Club of the Church of the
Assumptions the Auxiliary of
THREE HOUSES FOR
ONLY $20.00
In the Monumental Raffle
of the Panam Lion Clab
Pro Colonia Infantiles
to be held March U.
DON'T FAIL TO QET
YOUR TICKET TODAY
PARIS BAZAAR
Emilio Palomeras
COLON
? .

Extra Savings
on Ladies Dresses
200 DRESSES
drastically reduced, some of
them at leas than coat price!
Fine Rayon Washable Cotton
2.95-4.95-5.95-6.95
Hurry in for best lection!
Farewell Luncheon for Mrs.
Balay
Mra P. L. Balay, who Is leav-
ing with Lt. Commander Balay
for a visit In the States before he
alls for Japan, waa honored
with a luncheon at the Hotel
Washington yesterday.
The party was given by a group
of friends who served with the
honoree aa officers of the Coco
Solo Officers Wives Club. A sur-
prise handkerchief shower was
given Mrs. Balay by her friend
during the luncheon.
Those who participated In the
affair were Mrs. L. L. Koepke,
Mrs. W. W. Bemis. Mrs V. A.
Schweltaer, Mrs. J. J. Humes,
Mrs. W. N. Horlck, and Mrs. W.
S. Sands.
MiSS Devi* Honored
with Luncheon
Miss Marv Ruth Davis of
Greensboro, N.C.. waa honored
with a. luncheon and canasta
party given Tuesday bv Mrs, Er-
nest Cotton and Mrs. H. P. Bev-
Ington at the Bevlngton resi-
dence in Margarita.
The gnests for luncheon were
Mrs. Michael Greene, Mrs. Ro-
bert Neely, Mrs. Walter Freudlg-|
mam. Mrs. B. L. Slocum and
Mrs. Anthony Fernandez.
A guest prise of a Royal Doul-'
ton toby Jug was given the hon-1
oree. Prizes for card were won
by Mrs. Fernandez and Mrs.
Slocum.
Gatun Star Club Social
The members of the Gatun
Star Club met Tuesday evening
at the home of Mrs. George
Poole. Sr., In Gatun, with Mrs.
Poole, Jr. and Mrs. J.W.L. Gra-
ham as co-hostesses.
Mrs. Kerdis Meeks, president,
presided and Introduced three
new members, Mrs. Harry B.
Gardner. Mrs. William J. Bald-
win and Mrs. David H. McCrac-
ken.
Mrs. Whitman Oarrett served!
as secretary in the absence of I
Mrs. Fred Willoughby.
Carda were played and the1
canasta prizes were won by Mrs.
Marie Gorman, Mrs. Howard
Harris, Airs. William Badders,
Mra. Churchill and Mrs. Meeks,
Mrs. Oarrett won the door prize.
Bridge prizes went to Mrs.
Gardner and Mrs. Porter Mc-
Han.
PAUL J. KIENER
of f en
.
Fresh Killed LAMB
Direct from ASOER KIERULF'S
farm a LA VENTA
,- .
Lef of Lamb...'..'..............85c. lb.
Loin of Lamb...................75c. lb.
Rib Chops or for Crown Roast60c. lb.
Shoulder Chops or Roast.........60c. lb.
Breast of Lamb.................30c.
Lamb Stew....................40c.
ALSO A NEW SHIPMENT OF

SNOW CROP FROZEN FOODS
Special for this Week
FRENCH FRIED POTATOES.....29c pkf.
Arriving, for Friday & Saturday
Direct from Cerro Punta (Volcn) by
our own refrigerated truck
FRESH CRISP LETTUCE
ARTICHOKES AND OTHER VEGETABLES
PAULS MARKET
Ladiea Bawling League Luncheon
At the conclusion of a series of
gamea covering a period of nine
weeks the Ladles Bowling League
of the Coco Solo Naval Station
held a cocktail and luncheon
meeting at the Coco Solo Offi-
cers Club Tuesday.
Mrs. Roy Nielsen, retiring
president, officiated and intro-
duced several new members.
They were: Mrs. Jane Boston,
Mrs. P. D. Fitch, Mrs. James G.
Gable. Mrs. H. I. Schmidt. Mrs.
A. E. Clemmer and Mrs. 3. R.
Wolfersberger.
Trophies were presented the
winning team, which was cap-
tained by Mrs. Davis Henderson.
The other members of the team
were Mrs. R. L. Smith, Mrs. W.
E. Sands, Mrs. Roy Nielsen and
Mrs. WE. Simpson.
Mrs. Fred Wroble won the
high average trophy, Mrs, W- E.
Sands, the high set and Mrs. P.
L. Balay, the high game.
Officers for the new tourna-
ment were elected as follows:
president, Mrs. Davis Hender-
son; vice-president. Mrs. F. A.
Bonekamp. secretary. Mrs. J. C.
Novak and treasurer, Mrs.
Simpson.
The new tournament starts
next Tuesday.
Miss Klinger Retaras
from Vacation
Miss Evelyn Klinger, a member
of the nursing staff of the Cdlon
Hospital, returned Monday from
a vacation spent with her fapil-
ly In Pennsylvania.
Rosary-Altar Society
Elect Officers
The Rosary-Altar Society of
the Church of the Holy Faipily
In Margarita met Monday even-
ing in the parish haU. with Mrs.
Warren Schultz presiding." A
short talk was given by Rev. fa-
ther Raymond Mchate.
The following officers were
elected to head the organization:
president, Mrs. Michael Brzesln-
skl: vice president, Mrs. Raul
Voight; secretary, Mrs. Cyrus
Field: Mrs. Ralph Grassau was
reelected treasurer.
Following the meeting the
group went to the Knight* of 9*-
lumbus Home for refreshments
to celebrate St. Patrick's Day.
Members are reminded of the
Day of Recollection to be observ-
ed Sunday. Anyone desiring to
attend please contact Mrs. Cyrus
Field.
Emblem Club Social
The Cristobal Emblem Club
held a social Tuesday evening at
the Elks Club. An Interesting
moving picture was shown
through the courtesy of Mr. Fred
Bell.
Hostesses were Mrs. Ruth
Bain, Mrs. Oeraldlne Celluccl
and Mrs. Shlrlev Crumley.
Nineteen members attended.
GIVE!
mi
REO CROSS
* FUND
r
La Importadora Selecfa
COLON, R. P.
Bolvar Ave. #7081 between 7th and 8th Streets ;
Telephone 271-L
Is pleased to announce the opening of thejr-
establishment where they have a big and as-
sorted stock of shoeniaking articles and up-
holstering materials in plastic and nylon
for the benefit of customers on the Atlantic
side, especially Canal Zone residents who
we inform that our prices are lower than
the Commissary prices for similar mate-
rials. You are cordially invited to visit our
store.
She really told me!
Whan I met ray neighbor at the
grocery store, our conversation
drifted naturally to the subject
of food. She's an older woman
than I. with three healthy.
gieew-up children, so you can
imagine how I value her advice
when It cornea to nutrition and
cooking. And there was one
thing- that really surprised me.
"For years," she began. Tve
served my family vegetable
soup at least three times a
week. Not just ordinary vege-
table soup, but a mixture of
more than a doxen fresh, gar-
den vegetables."
"But" I interrupted, "it takes
hour to buy and prepare so
many vegetables!"
She beamed. "Hour? Of
course not, it takes juet minutes
... with Campbell's Vegetable
Soup! Each can, you see, con-
tain so many different, choice.
garden-fresh vegetables, min-
gled in tasty, nourishing br.et
stock. Just add an equal amount
of water, heat and serve. Tour
family win rave about the ex-
tra-rich flavor, and you'll be
sure they're getting plenty of
extra food value. Why, it'a al-
mo* Meal w tfmfl"
Tou win," 1 grinned, "I think
Til treat Bob and Uttle Johnny
to Campbell' Vegetable Soup
tomghtl"
.
Visit the Wonderful Apartment House
1st PRIZE OF LIONS CLUB RAFFLE
PLAYING MARCH 23,1952 .
* It is located at Gerardo Ortega St., Cam-
po Alegre, near the El Panama Hotel.
You can buy your lucky ticket there fur
$20.00- Open Dav and Night.
Visit also the 2nd prize chalet at El Can-
grejo and the 3rd prize chalet at El Coco.
REMEMBER your housing problem is over..
Don't miss the chance to win 3 wonderful houses,
for $20.00 on March 23.
NOTE: Ticket sold also at Ancon Inn. Pete'
Place and C.Z. Pharmacy, and Mewina, Tel.
2-0740 up to 4 p.m. 2-2653 attar 4:30 p.m.



^^^^~"
^

I Vl\
THE PANAMA AMER'CAN AN INDEPENDENT DA1I.T NEWSFAPF.R
THURSDAY. MARCH t, 1!
'
You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
rave your Ad with one ef our Agents or our Offices ,. No. 57 "H" Street Panama
[No 12,179 Central Ave. Colon
Carlton Drug Store
10.059 Melendez Ave.Phone 255 Coln
wfe Service
:4 Tlvoli Ave.Phone 2-2281. and
Morrison's
Fourth of July AvePhone 2-9441
Saln de Belleza Americano
#55 West 12th Street
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones Propaganda, S.A.
m------ .,,.. "H" street comer Estudiante 3t.
#3 Lottery Plaza Phone 2-3199
Phones 2-2214 and 2-2798
Minimum for 12 words.
3c. each additional word.
FOR SALE
Household______
R SALE:Chromium Dinette table
ond 4 chairs, enamel tap. 45th
Street No. 28, opartment 2.
FOR SALE:Friflidaire. 11 at. It.
1950 model 60 cycle $325-00.
. Phone Albrook 6295.
I
FOR SALE
Am.MiHiittlc
FOR SALE:G. E. Refrigerator. 25
' cycle, 8 I -2 cu. ft. $50.00. House
3-F. Coco Sohto.
FOR SALE: Bamboo Bar. House
0429 Fronqipon. Street, after 4
p. m.________________
FOR SALE:Bamboo livingroom set,
. dinlngroom set. stove, refrigerator,
children's bedroom set. Other ar-
. tides. Sonto Isabel Avenue. 8th
St. "Segunda Bello" Building, Apt.
'2, Coln.
FOR SALE: IMS Chevrolet
StyHne Deluxe, 4-door Se-
dan, new tires, seat covers,
perfect condition at Smoot
v Hunnicutt. S.A. 16th
Street Central Ave., Coln
Tel. 00.
Lift Up Your Hearts
(A Lenten feature of the Pa-
nama American, prepared by the
Rev. M. A. Cookson. Episcopal
Church of Our saviour. New
Cristobal.)
GOD'S FORGIVENESS
Read St. Luke 15:11-24
- Service Personnel ond Civilian
Government Employe
be sate
for your Automobile Financing
Insist en
Government Employes Finance Co.
of
Fort Worth, Texas
new office at
Ne. 43 Autemabila Row
Next door to the Firestone Building
also through your auto dealer
We ove you money on
Finonclng and lnsurcr.ce
olso direct loans on automobiles
AGENCY DEHLINGER
Phone I-4M4 3-491$
Agencias Cosmos, Automobile Row
29. will lolve your Auto buying or
selling Problem. Tel. Panoma 2-
4721. Open oil day on Saturdays.
FOR SALE:1947 "Willys" Station
Wagon, good condition, B.850.-
00. Tel. 05 or 3-2146 Panamo,
Carlos Bodgers.
MISCELLANEOUS
POODLE-DO. the pet of fashion, de-
mands deft handling., profession-
al styling. .smart variations. The
Genell Bliss Cocoli Beauty Shop ex-
perts have the know-how. 4-557.
RESORTS
TRAVEL OPPORTUNITY: Enjoy
your vacation in cool Costa Rico.
Fly LACSA, PAA affiliate, only
S35.00 round trip. Inquire Pan-
ama Dispatch, Tel. 2-1655, across
from Ancon bus-stop.
Do you have a drtakloa area'cm?
Write Atconali Aaanrmeaa
Be> 2011 Aacaa. C. Z.
GENELL BLISS' Santo Cloro
House. Overlooks ocean .sur-
rounded by shade trees, .private
steps to beach (2 min. wolkl. Gas
ronge and refrigerator, .completely
furnished except linens, .oecom-
modotes 7. Barbecue, pfn-pong.
outtmg green, croquet, horse shoes
etc. Call '4-557 dafs, 4-230
evenings.
We buy old magazines, and clean,
rags. SABINO STUDIO. Rochet St.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:1937 Ford Coupe. Fair
condition. 4 good tires, $125 or
best otter. Call i 2643
FOR SALE: Chevrolet 1939 with
radio; Chevrolet 1942. perfect
condition; Chevrolet 1948 sedon;
Plymouth 1948 sedan, both in
perfect condition; Pick-up Inter-
notional 1942, 1-2 ton; Pick up
Dodge 1942. 3-4 ton.
Before selling your car, visit us.
We pay the best pnces, CASH.
TRADE INS ACCEPTED.
FINANCING AVAILABLE.
Eisenman's Used Cars
Peru Avenue No. 8
Oiside Iris Theatre
SPECIAL SALE: Electric portable
Singer sewing machine, shortwave
broadcast 5 band Phillips rodio.
mahogany wordrobe, mahogany
drawer, mahogany chifforobe, boy's
bicycle. 32nd. St. No. 6. Expo-
sition, Panamo.
FOR SALE:1951 Ford. Seat cover-
ers and radio. Call Sgt. Noles, 84-
2290.
Position Offered
Bilingual Panamanian with business
ability. Write opartodo 1890,
Ponami, stating age, education,
experience and starting salan/ de-
sired.
Help Wanted
WANTED: Bartender and sand-
wich man. Must be Chinese. Sand
reply ond photograph to Box 239
Coroza!, C. Z.
One sign of love is beinp, ready-
to forgive. If we are really sorry
for any wrong we have done, we
know that we can always count
on God's forgiveness. Since He
cares for us deeply and takes
great pride in what He can make
of u. it brings Him pain when
wfe do wrong.
That is what we mean by 'son'
letting any kind of evil that we
do or desire gel between us and
God. It means turning our back
on Him and forgetting Him. But
no matter how often we do it. He
never stops caring. He never
turns His back on us or forgets
u He loves us too much to let
Aid so whenever we are ready
to turn about and remember the
Great Companion who is waiting
for us. we find Him ready to
greet us and take our hand once
more, because He always refuses
to believe that our worst self Is
our real self".
To feel sorrow for what we have
done and to be welcomed back
by-Godthat is what forgiveness
Is. It cannot undo the wrong wej
have done. It cannot wipe out
the pain we have caused Him.
But it tan give us the chance to |
make a fersh start with His help I
and for His Sake.
Prayer: O most merciful Fa-
ther, who art ever ready to par-
rlen: Grant us, when we have
leat our way. the will and power ^^^^ Marcn ^ (UP)_c,e.
U tarn ta thee, that ""**,.ment Attlee's right wingers have
know the loving welcome of thy mm fl roun(, m ^ LabQr party>s
ftaJIIIHiia; through Jeati curia warfare Within Its ranks by ram-
BARGAIN: 1941 Buick
Special 2-door Sedan, two-
tone green, all new tires,
radio, seat covers, very
good condition. For sale at
Smoot y Hunnicutt, S.A.
16th Street Central Ave.,
British Laboriles
Pul The Squeeze
On Bevan, Rebels
Foster's cotfoges completely furnish-
ed, one. two or three bedrooms,
linens, g o s refrigerators, gas
ranges, dishes ond kitchen wore.
Holf b mile beyond Santo Cloro
private rood to beach. For in-
formation visit or phone Dagmor,
Tivoh Avenue No. 6. 2-0170,
Panoma.
Stoy ot the Panamericano Hotel in
cool El Valle and enjoy the native
Fiestas during this week.
COMMERCIAL Cr
PROFESSIONAL
We have everythinjr
to keep voar Lawn
id fiarden beautiful
lurifie the dry season
I
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURE FOR SALE
For sole to the highest bidder Build-
ing No. 218. Gotun (formerly U. S.
Rate Commissary!. Sealed bids will
be received in the office of Super-
intendent of Storehouses at Balboa
until 10:30 A. M., March 27, 1952,
when they /ill be opened In public.
Form of proposal with full particu-
lars may be secured in the offices of
Superintendent of Storehouses and
the Housing Manager at Gatun.
Phillips. OceansiOc cottage. Santa
Clara. Bo 43b Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. C/fobot 3 1673
Willioms Santo Clara Beach. Cottages.
Two bedrooms Frlgidaires, Rock-
gos rangas. Balboa 2-3050.
Gromlich's Sonta Clara beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, go*
stoves, mpderate rates. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Mothers, child specialists recommend
JUMPING-JACK Shoes for correct
walking habits from cradle to 4
years. Exclusively of IABYLAN-
01 A. No. 40. 44th street. Bella
Vista. Tel. 3-1259.
FOR SALE: Vi ton trailer with cab,
good tires. No. 7 Peru Avenua.
Tel. 2-0406._____________.
FOR SALE:Set of electricians tool
. with chest, one white enamel boby
tub, baby high chair. (House 5647
apartment K. Mogoon St. Diablo.
LOST b FOUND
LOST:Horse, color brown, gelding,
hos brand on left rear leg in form
of a cup. Coll Ponama 3-1376.
Reward.
Position Offered
AUTO SALESMAN WANTED
Fine opportunity offered by Chrysler
Plymouth, Fargo Deoler, experience
required Essentiol submit written
application first to Heurtemotte
& Arias Box 293. Panama.
eur Lord. Amen.
STHMI/ V DATA
BIRTHS
FLOOD. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas
f Colombia, a daughter. Marcn Whlch"threatened"to perpetuate
ming through a set of rules pro-
viding for the ouster of habitual
rebels like Aneurln Bevan.
The Labor members of Parlia-
ment were in session yesterday
wrangling over the party split
12 at Gorgas Hospital.
BROWN. Mr. and Mrs. Leon-
ard of Silver City, a son, March
IS at Oorga* Hospital.
RAVENEAU, Mr. and Mrs.
, George of Panama, a son. Mar.
13 at Gorgas Hospital.
ALLEYNE, Mr. and Mrs. Bel-
ford B. of Panama, a daughter,
March 13 at Gorgas Hospital.
BSCALA, Mr. and Mrs. Man-
uel of Panama, a son. March 13
at Gorgas Hospital.
FODERINGHAM. Mr. and Mrs.
Oscar R. of Camp Comer, *
daughter. Mar. 14 at Colon Hos-
pital.
BARNETT. Mr. and Mrs. Al-
fred A. of Panama, a daughter,
March 15 at Gorgas Hospital.
BETHANCOURT. Mr. and Mrs.
Pedro of Gamboa, a daughter.
March IS at Gorgas Hospital.
JONES, Mr. and Mrs. Prince
of Oatun, a daughter. March 16
at Colon Hospital.
BOSSY. Mr. and Mrs. Nicolas
f Panama, a daughter. March
17 at Gorgas Hospital.
HURTADO. Mr. and Mrs. Ma-
rino of Panama, a daughter,
March 17 at Gorgas Hospital.
DEATHS
WALCOTT Clarence A., 67 of
Galun. March 17 at Gorgas Hos-
pital. _
AMIREZ. Agustn. 72. of Pan-
trip. March 17 at Gorgas Hos-
DENTRS, Norberto. 8 days of
turna March 17 at Gorgas
ofepital
I
the rule of Winston Churchill's
Conservatives.
They voted to impose on them,
selves a code of discipline mak-
ing possible the punishment and
possible expulsion of any mem-
ber guilty of "persistent refusal"
to obey the party majority when
voting in Commons.
The meant Bevan, who bolted
the majority this month by re-
fusing to support the arms pro-
gram, probably would be recom-
mended for ouster if he openly
bucked the majority again.
The adopted rules were those
first drafted in 1939 and tighten-
ed in 1945.
Attl.2 sought approval of a
new set of rules making it pos-
sible to throw out any member
for a single transgression against
the majority of the party.
OR SALE: 1*41 Chevrolet
rlemaster 4-daor Sedan.
jerf rr I condition, aeu
tint-job. 5-new tires, seat
, at taacoc v Hunnl-
fatl, S.A. 16th Street Cen-
tal Ave.. Tal. Celan Me.

FOR RENT:
About 21,000 quart ft.
floor pact (700 square
faet suitable for cold stor-
age). COCA COLA BLDC.
15.134 Central Av Coln,
R. P. For particular* phone
No. 6, Coln, or 2-7050,
Panam.
>
PRACTICALLY NEW 1956
Chevrolet Ktvline Deluxe,
t-door Sedan, new tires,
eat eovers. easy payments.
For tale at Smoot v Hun-
nicutt, S.A. 16th Street
Central Ave.. Coln Tel. 6M.
Shrapnel's houses Santa Clara. Also
in COLD Cerro Compona Moun-
tains. Telephone Balboa 2820 or
see caretaker.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:Unfurnished cencrete
cholet, Golf Heights Areo, 2 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, maid's room, 2
porches screened, spacious grounds.
Tel. 3-1201 afternoons.
FOR RENT:To responsible person,
completely furnished cholet. Tele-
phone 3-2251, Panam.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMIRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone '386 Colon.
FOR RENT;To responsible pa/son
2 oedroom opartment. Iiving-din-
ingroom. kitchen, bathroom, maid's
room and garage. East 5Tst St.,
No. 20, upstairs.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
Seoul Troop. Cub
Pack Sponsored
By Civic Council
The Pedro Miguel Civic Coun-
cil has agreed to sponsor Cub
Scout Pack 11 and Boy Scout
Troop 11. It was jointly announc-
ed today by Mayor Charles W.
Hammond, and E. W. Zelnickm,
Boy Scout organization chair-
man
Troop 11 will have Mayor Ham-
mond as institutional represen-
tative; H. J. Million, chairman;
J. E. Cox. W. J. Hatchett and
H. T. Leisy, troop committee-
man; R. H. Crowell, Scoutmas-
ter and J. A. Blackburn, explor-
er advisor.
Charter members of the Troop
are scouts Roger Million. William
Black. William Hatchett. Lane
Cox and explorers Allen Cox and
Jack Hammond.
After three organizati o n a 1
meetings Cub Scout Pack 11 was
organized. Ted A. Marti was
elected Institutional representa-
tive; Henry T. Leisy. pack com-
mittee chairman: and Lester R.
Norton and Carlton T. Gllsson,
pack commltteemen; Joseph A.
Howland. cubmaster and Mat-
thew T. Wilder, assistant cub-
master.
Den Mothers elected were Mrs.
Rae N. Ebdon. Mrs. Jean C.
Dombrowskv. Mrs. Margaret K.
Coleson. Mrs. Beulah Norton
and Mrs. Dorothy B. Rambo.
Charter members of the new
Pack are Cub Scouts: Richard
Abell. Donald Coleson, Dale
Dombrowsky. Thomas Ebdon,
James Gllsson. Jay Howland. Ro-
bert Norton. James Rambo. Nor-
man Rambo. Burrls Rogers and
Matthew Wilder.
CAR Meetinq
The teenage group of the Will-
lam Crawford Gorgas Socletv of
the Children of the American
Revolution will meet at the
home of Mrs. Albert F. Daniel,
2025 B. Second Street. Curundu,
Saturday afternoon at 4.
WANTED:To rent in Colon, good
modern furnished two bedroom
house, contact McDanlels, Hotel
Washington.
WANTED:$2.000.00 for develop-
ment of newly acquired established
business. Need capital for promo-
tion of new ideo, deposit on new
lease, and Initial working capital,
sound proposition. Offer Vi in-
terest, (active or inactive) Box
873, Ancon, C. Z.
WANTED:Information. Have cor
in Miami Flo.. Wont nom of ship-
ping firm to pick up there and
bring to C. Z. Box I 154, Cristo-
bal______________
WANTED:By April 15, 2-3 bed'.
roOms, completely furnished, run-
ning hot wote'r, in nice district, by
responsible.North Americon couple.
Phone 3-4629.
FOR SALE: 1947 Buick ga-
per 4-door Sedan. In ver\
food condition, easy *?-
tents at Smoot v Honni-
cutt. SJL Mfh Street Cen-
tral Are.. Coln. Tel. 8M.
164 BTJICK Super 4-door
Sedan, with radio, Dyna-
flow, seat covers, 5 new
tires, back-up lights, ex-
cellent shape, for sale at
Smoot y Hunnicutt, S.A.
16th Street Central Ave..
Tel. 800.

Sabres Down 5 Migs
In Fierce Air Fight
SEOUL, 8outh Korea. March 20
UP) UJS. Sabres shot down
five Migs and damaged five oth-
ers today In two fierce air bat-
tles over northwestern Korea.
There was no mention of a
new-type Communist Jet in re-
ports of today's action. One of
the new planes was hit yesterday
by a .S. pilot.
28 Sabres of the Fourth Fight-
er Interceptor Wing destroyed
three Red jets and damaged two
in a half-hour fight against 40
"very aggressive'' Migs east of
the Valu River near Sinanju.
Two other Migs were destroyed
'ool.
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow.
uuecucio.es
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1718
#22 E. 20th St.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotef El Panam
Selling: Cement and Abattoir.
Buying: Brewery.
Tel. 5-471 8-1680
Possibility Of Space Station
Above Earth Seen By Expert
The world's leading rocket ex-
Krt reveals in Collier's today
it it is possible for the United
States to establish a station In
space which would guarantee
world peace.
The space station would be
man-operated from 1,075 miles
above the earth.
Dr. Wernher von Braun, build-
er of the V-2 rocket, says that it
would take 10 years and cost the
American public $4,000,000,000 to
construct both the space station
and the huge three-stage rocket
ships necessary to carry the ar-
tificial satellite piece by piece in-
to space.
Writing for the first time in
a national magazine. Dr. von
Braun, now technical director of
the Army Ordnance's Guided
Missile and Development Group
In Alabama, claims that the
space station, inhabited by hu-
mans and resembling a slowly
moving star, could sweep conti-
nuously around the earth once
every two hours, traveling with-
out motive power of its own.
If necessary, it can be con-
verted into a terribly effective
atomic bomb carrier, he says
In appearance the space snip
will be a circular, pressurised
machine. a huge. 250-foot-
wide 'doughnut." It will move
at a fantastic rate rate of
speed4.4 miles per second, or
approximately 15,800 miles per
hour,20 times the speed of
sound. .
To its space-men occupants,
the station will appear to be a
perfectly steady platform. From
this platform, Von Braun daims..
furta^^atTenttatewkon pore^n ^M Balance May
distance in space ,_____. | o *
Technicians in the prefabrlca-
Finance Costly Weapons
MODERN FURNITURE
CUB rOM BUIL1
Slipcover Reunbolstery
WIT OUB SHOW-BOOM!
Alante Boras
. a> laOssa-77 (AatwaoMIt *ow)
tree Estima tas ftcka Mhraey
TeL S-4IJ8 l:ai u. ( t* o.m.
THIS MACHINE, says Dr. Wemher von Braun In Collier's is
capable of carrying a crew of several people to a point be-
vound the rear of the moon. Its "home base" Is a space
station 1.075 miles above the earth, operated by human
beings and designed to guarantee world peace.
"A Fine
Opportunity
to Learn
From
The Best"
Want to be
the most at-
tractive
couple on the
floor? Then
bring your favorite partner to
Harnett &. Dunn NOW and
improve your dancing togeth-
er. Modern rates use our
Budget plan fits payments
to paydays. So come In today
and save. Why miss the fun I
Balboa VMf.t Z-2S8S or
Bex tos Balboa Hirnttt and Punn.
signed, powerful telescopes at-
tached to large optical screens
radarscopes and cameras will
keep under constant inspection
every ocean, continent, country
Scientists writing in Collier's re-
gard Johnston Island tiny U.S.
possession in the Pacific. as
one of the most suitable sites for
take-off of the three-stage roc-
Vh'e 7,000-ton. cargo-carrying
rocket-standing 265 feet tall,
the height of a 24-story office
WASHINGTON, March 20 (UP)
Defense Secretary Robert A.
Lovett disclosed today the Ad-
ministration hopes to have $5,-
400,000,000 in foreign military
aid funds left over at the end
of fiscal 1953 but said this Is no
excuse for cutting the program.
He told the 8enate Foreign
Relations committee that the
expected balance depending
on whether Congress votes the
in Europe is the "most import-
ant single item" in Mr. Truman'a
foreign aid budget.
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. St Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
Transportes Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
We pack and crate or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Withoat Worry Ur Care
buildingcan be regarded as aifuU $5,300,000,000 in new mil-
rocket with three sets of mo-|ltary aW tunas requested this
tors; after the first set has given year wlll be needecl to pay
I its utmost and has expired, it i^for complicated weapons which
ilettisonedand so is the second |take a ionf[ time to build.
!set In its turn. The third (nose) President Truman has re-
Ktaee of the rocket continues up-1 quested $5.300,000,000 for direct
ward relieved of all the excess (military aid and $2,600.000,000
'-eight 'ior economic and "defense sup-
Fifty-one rocket motors power port" assistance.
the first stage; when it reaches
an altitude of 24.9 miles this tail
section drops behind, landing in
the ocean. Some 124 seconds la-
ter the second stage, or middle
'section, also drops earthward.
The third and last stagecarry-
ling the crew, equipment and pay
1 laodproceeds under the power
,of its five rocket motors
Velocity is increase by 1.030
miles per hour, bringing the to-
I tal speed to 15,800 miles per hour.
'This is the speed necessary fori
remaining In the orbit perman-
ently. The goal has been reach-
ed bv the rocket's last stage. La-
,ter, it returns to earth under its
ToHraun relates that the _
! flight from the earth has taken demanding that both Anglo-
lonly 56 minutes, during wnicn American and Yugoslav zones of
the rocket ship was powered for Trieste be returned to Italy wlth-
onlv five minutes. lout delay.
Von Braun estimates the space ___ :-----------r
station will consist of 20 sec-
tions made of flexible nylon-
and-plastic fabric. Each of these
sections will be an independent
'unit which later, after assembly
into a closed ring, will provide!
compartmentation similar w,
that found in submarines.
To save shipping space, these |
sections will be carried to the or-
bit in a collapsed condition.
After the "wheel" has been put \
together and sealed, it will then
be inflated like an automobile
tire to slightly less than normal,
atmospheric pressure
Both committees are consider-
ing the President's request to
appropriate an additional $7,-
900,000,000 for foreign aid dur-
ing fiscal 1953.
Harrlman said the "defense
support" fund will act as a
"generator which will make it
possible for Europe to expand
her own military effort... we
will get more actual security for
that item than for any other In
the bill."
Lovett said approval of the
President's request will have
made $16.800.000,000 available
for foreign aid military spend-
ing from fiscal 1950 througb
fiscal 1953.
The anticipated balance of
$5,400,000,000 on June 30, 1963,
he said, will be used for later
payment on such "long-lead
Meanwhile, Krutnal Security
Director W. Averell Harrlman
told the House Foreign Affairs | time" tems as planes and tanks,
committee that $1.800,000,000 -mis is necessary, he added, be-
earmarked for "defense support I cause the "vastly complicated
Students Riot
Seeking Trieste
Return To Italy
TRIESTE, March 20 (UP) A
strong force of mounted police
broke up a demonstration today
by thousands of Italian students
weapons we use" take a long
time to produce.
For example, Lovett said, It
takes 21 months to put a fight-
er plane into production, partly
because of the large amount
of electronic equipment re-
quired.
Meantime, the White House
at Key West, Fla., released a
recommendation from the Na-
tional Advisory Board of Mobi-
lization polcy that Congress
appropriate "adequate economic
assistance" for friendly nations
overseas.
Press Secretary Joseph Short
said Mr. Truman was gratified
by the board's recommendation.
18 Tivoll AV*.
S-S8M
Rose Bushes From
Summit Carden
On Sale In Zone
Several hundred rose bushes
are being offered for sale by the
Exoerlmental Garden at Sum-
mit.
They may be purchased at the
Garden or at the Summit sales
stores In Balboa and Mount
Hope. The Balboa sales store Is
and three damaged in a fight located adjacent to the Balboa
between 26 Sabres of the 51st
Wing and 65 Migs, in a 20-min-
ute battle north of Sinanju.
Stadium: that at Mount Hope Is
behind the railroad station.
The bushes are of the same
The pilots who battled today's varieties which were offered by
Migs described the Communist the Garden some months ago.
Kllots as among
ad ever fought.
the best they
1946 OLDSMOBILE 2-door
Sedan. Hydramatlc trans-
mission, radio, seat covers,
good tires, excellent shape,
for sale at Smoot y Hunni-
cutt. S.A. 16th Street Cen.
tral Ave.. Coln. Tel. 8M.
Some of the stock is already hi
bud.
FOR SALE: 194 Olds-
mobile 2-door Sedan, with
radio. Hydramatlc trans-
mission, seat covers, very
good condition, easy pay-
ments at Smoot y Hunni-
rutt, S.A. 16th Street Cen-
tra^v^^Qtfn^retMjT
Trio Trapped On
Ice Floe Being
Swept Out lo Sea
ST JOHNS, Newfoundland,
March 20 (UP).- A trio of uni-
dentified Labrador seal fisher-
men trapped on a rampaging
Arctic Ice floe were being swept
Into the Atlantic Ocean today
and no hope was held for their
Immediate, rescue
Government authorities nere
said the men had no food and
there was no possibility they
could get off the swiftly-
moving floe without assistance
The fishermen were trapped
yesterday while they were fish-
ing for seal off southern Labra-
dor. A change of wind cracked
the floe and opened a great;
lake of water between tne,
marooned men and land.
As southwesterly winds in-
creased in intensity, the brok-
en ice moved oceanward. while
strong winds churned the seas.
Names of the unlucky trio were
not learned immediatley.
FOR BALE: 194 Chevrolet
Deluxe Business Coupe,
very good condition, new
seat cavers, 5-new tires,
easy payments at Smoot y
Hunnicutt. SA. 16th Street
Central Ave., Coln Tel.
HORIZONTAL
1 Breed of cat
8 Popular name
for a cat
13 Deeds
14 Papal cape
15 Obtained
16 Seine
17 Broaden
18 Obligation
20 Lamprey
22 Hardens
23 Like curly
hair
26 Fortification
29 Perched
30 Drink made
with malt
33 Happenings
35 Trader
37 False show
38 Garment
mender .
39 Measure of
cloth (pi.)
40 Legal point 1
42 Diving birds
43 Ineffectual'
45 Presently I
48 Term used by
golfers \
49 Paradise
53 Month .
55 Oriental porgy
57 Mother of
mankind
58 Lariat
59 Hebrew
ascetics
61 Orifica
62 Gun dogs
VERTICAL
IKind of
pudding
2 Portrait
1 Aleutian
Island
4 Tone E
(music)
5 Eternity
6 Flout
7 Compound
ethers
8 Fibers of
hackled (lax
9 Get up
10 Commanded
11 Fruit decay
12 Desires
(slang)
19 Looks over
21 Burdens
24 Buries
25 Pilfers
26 Plexus
27 Wicked
28 Lairs
Answer to Previous Puzzle
- ic^isr-ii-aluiBiC'ii'-'"
Eiwi 151141 'I SuidaaM
BaMiiP3' r ar-iu ?j uZiiim
r- .< m itiiss M'-'".
Ul HsIISII ti_-T 1 -^lll^'f-1
l.ffeali If J. I -J
,,','!"'r I . PiraiKI If-J ras HSlssE-
astute; n ['jrj.ztii-
Munswrni -.
MUGIMBdE '.f.'.'i>"W'V !
ldNtfJKW;3MWr-.4 na
30 Singing voice
31 Spanish
kingdom
32 Strays
34 Drowse
36 Ascended
41 Laminated
rocks
43 Join
44 Expunge
45 Hindu
garment
46 Unclosed
47 Verbal
50 Low sand hO
51 Always
52 Promontory
54 Column
56 Devotee
60 And (Latin)
1946 DODGE Pick-Up. very
goad condition, easy pay-
ments. For sale at Smoot
y Hunnicutt, S.A. 16th
Street Central Ave., Coln
Tel. 8M.
BARGAIN: 1956 Buick Spe-
cial 4-door Sedan, with
radio. Dynaflow, new seat
covers, excellent condition.
For sale at Smoot y Hunni-
cutt. S.A. 16th Street Cen.
tral Ave.. Tel. Colon at*.

.


THVRSDAY. MARCH 1H5
TDK PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEYEW
Jailbird Trio Flies Away
With Redheaded Inmate
PENSACOLA. Fla., March 20
(UP). A pair oi busy jail-
breakers today were at lain*
, after they tied and locked up
a guard, looted the Jail safe and
freed a red-haired woman In-
mate to keep them company In
ihelr flight.
One of the four original fugi-
tives, W. B. Baxley, wandered
Into a tavern and was captured
a few hours alter the break.
Police said his alcohol-loosened
tongue gave them a tip where
the others might be found.
All South Alabama and north-
t* west Florida officers were alert-
ed to hunt for the remaining
three: Jack Bosley, 23-year-old
leader of the break described as
"slick and mean as a guinea";
Richard Dean, 24, and Mrs. W.
O. McQuagg, 23, the redhead
and apparently Bosley's girl
friend.
The four fled the Escambla
County Jail early yesterday af-
ter the men pounced on jailer
j. H. Holman when he made a
routine check of the men's cell.
"They jabbed knives against
my throat, took my keys and
leit me in a cell tied up with
rope and gagged with news-
papers," Holman reported. They
threatened his life and cut him
on the hand, he said.
The men then went to the wo-
man's section and let out Mrs.
McQuagg. Holman described the
woman as a plain -looking
"shrimp" who had caught Bos-
eye when he worked a ound
tfce jail as a trusty.
Mrs McQuagg was wet ilng a
'yellow T-shirt and blue jeans.
As the ezcapWi 1- It they
i paused at the ._.'; v.iieie prison-
ers' valuables were kept and
rifled It but they were not be-
1 lleved to have obtained much
cash.
Holman thought the prisoners
got the knives and rope for the
break "somewhere around the
,'jail." He indicated that they
, may also have obtained Ilre-
i arms.
Bloodhounds followed the trail
of the escapers for 10 blocks
and "then quit." said Sheriff
R. L. Kendricks. He said this
'indicated the party had hitch-
ed a ride or stolen a car.
The sheriff said Bosley was
a widely known criminal wanted
, In several states on a total of
i 10 lorgery charges. Mrs. Mc-
i QuagR was also being held on
forgery counts 12 of them
after being returned here from
Huntsville, Tex.
Dean was a recaptured escap-
er being held for Ralford, Fla.,
State Prison.
Baxley. 30. was recently re-
leased from the Alabama State
Prison farm at Atmore and was
awaiting trial here for hit-run
drunken driving
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Wh.rir 100.000 People Mac*
Presents
Acheson Sees Korea Truce;
Opposes Foreign Aid Cut
WA3HINOTON, March 20 (UP> i He told the committee that
Secretary ol State Dean | arrangements have been or soon
Acheson predicted yesterday I v. Jl be made with 10 European
that the Korean truce negotla-. countries barring any kind of
lions wlU succeed but he warn-I tax against U. 8. goods or ser-
ed the American people against' vices sent abroad for their de-
etther excess optimism or pes-1 fense. Congress has been high y
slmlsm. critical of such taxes, especial-
He aiso told a Senate Foreign | ly In France.
Relations committee hearing on
Today, Thursday, Mar. 20
PJM.
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamuslca Story Time
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cla.
Alfaro, 8.A.
8:15Evening .Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA>
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News and Com-
mentary tVOAi
8:15Arts and Letters (VOA)
8:30Radio University (VOAi
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00Emma (BBC)
9:30Take It from Here (BBCi
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
SIDE GLANCES
By Galbrairl,
President Truman's $7,900,1)00,-
OU0 foreign aid program that
the situation in lndo-Chlna,
where French troops are light-
ing a Communist-led revolt, Is
"very serious Indeed."
Acheson said the 50-dlvlslon
army proposed by Gen. Dwlght
D. Eisenhower's Western Euro-
pean forces "is already more
than a paper army." naanrt-
He assert-
On the issue of economy, Ful-
bright agreed that the aid pro-
gram is "a very Important part
of the budget." But, facing the
political facts of Ufe, he said
that It Is also "an exposed part
It doesn't have any consti-
tuent here."
Sen. Alexander Wiley (R
Wis.i asked Acheson for infor-
mation on what each of this
ed that loretgn aid spending! country's European partner is
nexL year will run about the. doing to re-arm. The Secretary
same as hi fiscal 1953. said he will give the answers
The Secretary said Mr. Tru- in closed session and that some
man's request would provide the of them will be made public.
lree world only with the ''lowest I --------------------------------------
and that red Q.^ fo^ fa
5-11. Wall of Water
Up Mississippi
RUTH MILLETT Says
Ink spending would be prefer-
able to cutting the aid program.
Reminded by Sen. J. Wil-
liam Fulbright iD., Ark.) that
there is "great sentiment" In
Congress for reducing the
budget, AClvespn replied:
'This is not a good place to
clined on security grounds to r* washpri .,..av nPnri nn
say how much Britatata spend- Ls^'wn^eU Sffi /rom
tag on atomic W *" the Jetty. Stepsen Llchtblau.
say that France Is makingJWO- w f meteoroIoglst of the VA
mlc studies "on a rather small Weather Bureau said today
scale."
Acheson said the long drawn- .. ... wsvP!
oik Korean peac,-talks re "In Vthe h*wS pasTof
'W^'fJSJ! H2 'the river below New Orleans
Gen. Matthew B. Rldgway. Far .yestentay could have been
Eastern commander is conduct- cauged b an earthquake at
lng them with skll and "rm,-jsea or by strong winds,
ness." He appealed to the peo- Howeveri winda dld not ex-
pie to "resist all temptation ceed 35 mtles an hour at tnei
lor over-optimism or pessimism. t||ne
I believe the negotiations will Huge bloclt4 on the Jetty
be successful, he aid.________ weighing more than five tons
la piece were washed away like
|\__. tmmmi UI >%< 'matchsticka. No other damage
Panama Canal Hires !> reported.
15 New Employes
1st Half of March
Four new employes from the
United States and 11 who were
employed locally Joined the Ca-
nal organization during the first
half of March, according to in-
formation from the Personnel
Bureau.
New employes from the states,
their positions and birthplaces
are:
Locks Division John F.
Burch, look operator wlreman at
Pedro Miguel Raymond. India-
fee.
tlectrlcal Division Charles
B Douglas, powerhouse operator
et Madden Dam. Nashville, Ten-
nessee .
industrial Bureau Bralnerd
L. Cross. Inside machinist. Cleve-
land, Ohio: and John H. Kin?.
Inside machinist. Jefferson,
Georgia
New personnel employed lo-
cally and their positions are:
Engineering Division Jos
A Arengo, engineering drafts-
man: Roy C Atwood. construc-
tion Inspector: and Cesar P. Saa-
vedra. civil engineer;
personnel Bureau Margrer-
IteT- Budreah ard Joan K. Sel-
lers, clerk-typisis
Correspondence SectionShir-
ley L. Cozens. Clerk-stenogra-
pher.
Clubhouse Division Agnes F.
Friedel, steward trainee at Crli-
tobal.
Administrative Branch Stel-
la. H. Klusowske, cle k-ste-io-
grapher.
Finance Bureau Gretchen
M. Williams, clerk-typist.
Terminals Division GI ria
M De Raps, traffic clerk; and
Chiquita C Csslbry clerk typ-
let.
Friday, Mar. 81
A.M.
6:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15 Come and Get It
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club (VOA)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cia.
Alfaro, 8.A.
8:15Request Salon
7:00Adventures of Richard
Hannory (BBC)
7:80Sports Kevlew
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00 News, Commentary
(Voice of America)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Commentators Digest
(VOA)
9:00Short 8tory Theatre
(VOA)
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOAI
10:30Ad ventures of PC 49
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Of
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting Corp.
RDFRadiodlffusion Francalse
JACOfsY ON BRIDO!
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
WEST
4.J72
? K 10 fl
NORTH (D) 1
A 108
AX
? AJ7J
? AK853
BAST
l
Q 10985
? Q8843
? Q 10 B 4 2 ? J 8
SOUTH
4.AKQ6543
VJ74I
? 8
7
North-South vul.
Bart Soar* Watt
Pass 1 Pa"
Pats a 4 Pau
Pass Pass Pass
'
North
r*
iN.T.
7*
Opening lead*# 8
t. a*. u. a Pn on.
c. mi k, MA taniM.
"I was showing him how easy it is to get hurt slipping on
soap on ths bathroom floor!"
answer the call
60+
1952 RED CROSS FUND
There Is such a thing as a
woman having too close a friend.
She Is too close a friend If:
You feel you can't ever enter-
tain without including her.
She feels free to tell you the
unkind and uncomplimentary
things that someone else says a-
:bout you.
You tell her all of your per-
isonal troubles. Including the
shortcomings of your husband.
She is always critical of any-
thing you buy if she wasn't along
to help you select It.
She Is'forever offering advice
; She feels perfectly free to drop
in any time
She feels she knows you so well
she can be "perfectly frank" in
everything she says. This is just
an excuse for not bothering to
show you the courtesy and re-
spect she shows others.
BEWARE HER PTTERMENT
PROGRAMS
She is always trying to Improve
you^ Instead of letting you be
yourself. She knows Just how
you should dress. Just how you
should decorate your living
room. Just how you should bring
up your children.
She wants a full accounting of
'any party you attend to which
she was not invited.
She feels free to ask any kind
of personal question, from how
much you paid for your new
dress to how you are getting a-
long with your ln-laws.
She is Jealous of your other
'riends.
She monopolizes your time.
Close friends are wonderful
assets. But too close friend will
m time always become a nui-
sance.
CECILIA Theatre
OPENS TODAY!
I Exciting Double Feature! I
SANDERS CABOT
It, WAITS WANGS
PLUS:
BEYOND BELIEF!... Filmed
in the very heart of India!
"KYOND BENGAL"
MOST AMAZING PICTURE
EVER SEEN!
Canal Zone Entry
Wins In National
Art Competition
A report prepared by Miss Bea-
trice Sturtevant Gardner on the
celebration of American Art
Week In the Canal Zone last No-
vember has won first prize In
Group E of a competition spon-
sored by the American Artists
Professional League, with head-
quarters In New York.
Group E contained entries
from areas outside the contin-
ental United States.
Mrs. Thomas F. Gibson, na-
tional director of American Art
Week, made the announcement,
in a letter received here this
week.
Prize award Is an etching, "An-
cient iron Grlllwork. New Or-
leans," by Mary Eula Sears,
which was donated by Miss A.
M. Carpenter of Abilene, Texas,
directord of Texas Art week.
The awards were made at the
annual dinner of the league held
March 8 at the National Arts
Club In New York.
In her letter, Mrs. Gibson
praised the Canal Zone* Art
League for bringing the work of
local artists before the public
and lauded recognition given by
the Panama-American and oth-j
er local newspapers.
Miss Oardner has represented
the A.A.P.L. In the Canal Zone:
as director of American Art
Week for 12 years. She organli-i
ed the canal Zone Art League
and was lis president in 1949. j
8he has both exhibited and writ-!
ten In the field of art.
With the cooperation of nu-
merous clubs and organizations
in the Canal Zone, she has been
able to win recognition for art1
activities here.
Other areas which participa-,
ted in Group E competition were
Pttttto Rico and Nova 8cotia. Ca-
nada. Mrs. Gibson expressed the
hope that the spirit of Ameri-
can Art Week might spread to
other countries of the hemi-
sphere and become an Inter-
American celebration.
1*0 RAT
ON ME
OWN
Panama Residents
Invited To Tour
Summit Garden
Another of a series of con-
ducted tours of the Experiment-
al Gardens at Summit will be
held next Saturday morning.
The tour will begin at 9 a.m.
and will last for approximately
two hours.
Residents of Panama will be
especially welcome. As Is cus-
tomary there is no charge for
the tours.
How To Hold
FALSE TEETH
More Firmly in Place
Do your fall* teeth anno* and am
Barran by slipping, dropping or wob-
bling when vou eel. laugh or talk? Just
sprlngle a little FASTEETH on your
platea, Thl alkaline (non-acid i powder
holds false teeth more flrntly and more
comfortably. No gummy, gooey, paaty
taste or feeling. Doe* not tour. Check!
"pinte odor" (denture breath). Get FAS-
TEETH today at any drug tore.
M UDDER
FOR A
TROPICAL
TODAY!
Shows:
1:31, 1:2*, 5:1*. 7:15. 1:58
Painting
The Clouds
With
Sunshine
CINIA
6ENE
m
Ettr.ll.., DENNIS
Morgan
"The bidding and play of this
hand took about five minutes,"
reports a correspondent, "but
the discussion with my partner
has lasted five days.
"West opened the six of hearts,
and dummy won with the king.
I had twelve tricks In top cards,
and had to decide whether to set
up a club or ruff a heart In.
dummy.
"If clubs were 5-2, they could
riot be set up. If the hearts were
5-2, It was still possible that the
player with only two hearts
could not over-ruff dummy's ten
of spades.
"On this reasoning, I cashed
the ace of hearts and led the
eight of trumps to my ace. This
was still another chance; the1
jack of spades might fall on this
trick.
"Then I led a heart from my
own hand, and West naturally
stepped up with the Jack of
spades to set the contract. ,
"Was my Une of play correct
.but unlucky, or Incorrect and
unlucky?"
Incorrect. I am sorry to say.
The best play is to run four
rounds of trumps at once, dis-
carding low diamonds from the
dummy. This beginning gives the
opponents some light chance to
make a mistake.
South then cashes the top clubs
and ruffs a club, hoping for a
4-3 break. If the clubs are 4-3,
he can set up a long club In dum-
my.
If the clubs fall to break. South
leads a heart to dummy's ace,
hoping that the queen will drop.
If-this break fails to materialize.
South ruffs another low club and
then leads his last trump in the
hope of developing a squeeze.
As the cards He. with all suits
I breaking badly. South still makes
his grand slam. When the last
trump Is led. West has the high
club and two diamonds. He must
keep the club, so he discards a
diamond.
Dummy can then discard the
six of clubs, keeping ace-Jack of
diamonds This puts It up to
East, who has the queen of
hearts and two diamonds. If he
discards the queen of hearts.
South's Jack wins a trick. If he
discards a diamond, dummy's ace
clears the suit, and the Jack of
diamonds wins the last trick.
BALBOA
OPENS SATURDAY!
ONE SAN AND
2St W0MEN1
Hitk.aa-.nMrr
tprla. aeakiaf a
fitirt-fertttuig
a agatkrariag
aatale aaaftn
Nelson,
EClU.1 NORMAN S.ZSAKAU
M-O-M presents
WESTWARD
THl
WOMEN
lamag
It's Movietime TONIGHT!
Panama Cana/ cfneaters
ROBERT TAYLOR
DENISE PARCEL
HOPE EMBBON^JOBN McINTIRE
r CHARLES SCHNEE
BALBOA
Air-Condltloned
( 15 H ill
John WAYNE Robert RYAN
'Flying Leathernecks" (Technicolor)
Friday "DEAR BRAT"
siwr *t nANs uriA
Knruetr Pt laiai ay
WILLIAM A. WELLMAN DORE SCHAIY
*. PlMara
OlAtLO HTS.
(:IS a S:S
Gary COOPER Ingrld BERGMAN
"SARATOGA TRyNK"
Friday "QUERF.C"
r r\ r r\ i i Gen* autry Ei*na verdugo
?ii,* Tsi "Gene Autry and The Mounries"
Friday "ON THE LOOSE"
PEDRC MIGUEL
:I5 4 8:11
e
(Friday)
Tyrone POWER Ann BLYTH
'I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU"
^s^;
GAMBOA
7:H
Victor MATURE e Hedy LAMARR
Samson and Delilah (Technicolor)
Friday 'NEVER TRl ST A GAMBLER "
GA 1 UN
ISM
(Friday
Gary COOPER Marl ALTON
'Distant Drums" (Technicolor)
MARGARITA
:IS 8:M
Errol FLYNN Vlvcca LINDFORS
"ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN"
Friday "KIND LADY"
Alka-Saltiar't pain-raliavar
tarta to work at one* to bring
you walcoma ralief- Alka-
Saltzar'a f I er mc.net halpa
paf thia reliaf' Don't Mm '..
I at a haadacha "dig in",
take plaatant tatting.
faat-aclinj Alka-
Saltcar right away!
CRISTOBAL
Alr-I ndlo-fird
a is a it
Robert M ITCH I'M Jane RUSSELL
'HIS KIND OF WOMAN!'
Friday "OLIVER TWIST"
-MR
TOROS
AT
LA MACARENA RING
in San Francisco Garden
SUNDAY Mar. 23 at 4:30 p.m.
Presenting the Gypsy Lady Torera
AMINA ASSIS
From Syria Lebanon .
MARIO
APOLO
from Ecuador
and
HERNANDO
ALSATEGUI
from Colombia
veryhoy Reads Ch$$fes
jr.
BELLA VISTA 3 : IS Vl.*
THE HIT EM FIRST HEROES WHO
SPEARHEAD THE WAY TO OLORYI
tUtn Coraran Marl Aldan
- m
"THE TANKS ARE
COMING"
An audacious.
world-wlta
comedy of sex I
You'll
Enioy It... I
"LA RONDE"
(In French.
with Danielle Darrieux
Isa Miranda Slmone Slgnoret
Staaane Simon
CENTRAL
Robert MTTCHUM
O Uxabeth SCOTT
e Robert RYAN. In
THE RACKET"
TROPICAL THEATRE
Dennis MORGAN > Virginia MATO. In
"PAINTING THE CLOUDS WITH
SHUNSHINE"
CECILIA THEATRE
A Thrilling Adeventure That Sweat The Burn-
ing Sand, of The African Desert...!
"SUNDOWN"
trith Gene Tteraay George Sendera
Also: An Amazing Drama Filmed in The Heart
of Bengal Jungle !
___ "BEYOND BENGAL" ____
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Conditioned
At 9 00 p.m. WAHOOI
S115.SS in Prtaee!
Dane Clark Alexia Smith
"WHIPLASH-
Frank Loveloy. Tn
"I WAS A < OMMl NIST
FOR THE F.BJ." ___
TIVOLI THEATRE
LVCKV THURSDAY! "
Two New Picture and
The Opportunity to
WIN A GOOD PRIZE!
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BANK DAY! S2S.S $100.00 at 6 and 9 p.m.
-Also: -
Anthony Dexter, In
"YALENTIHO"
Edward G. Robinson, in
"OPERATION X*
VICTORIA THEATRi
~ TRIPLE PROGRAM! "
"DAWN EXPRESS-
EMERGENCY LANDING"
"SOUTH OF PANAMA"


-
age non
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DA11.V NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, MARCH 20, l5t
Webb Hearn Hurls No-Hitter In Pacific Twi-Loop
Merchants Win Over BHS
[Creates Three-Way Tie
" Teams
Gibraltar Life Ins. .
Balboa Brewers. .
hoi High School
lama Merchants
;;: learns
Baliioa Huh School.
Halhoa Brewers. .
-fiibuMtar Life Ins. .
[ |anam Merchants
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL LEAGUE
(Straight Season Standings)
Pacific Divisional Motorcycle Riders Ready For
SoftballJeague Faster Races Tomorrow Night
GLI
x
I
Z
1
BB
I
>
t
BHS
4
4
x
I
PM
5
4
3
x
\V
U
11
I
I
m
I
11
1?
11
12 36 36
(Second Half Standings)
PM
BHS
X
1
1
i
BB
2
x
2
0
GLI
2
1
x
1
1
3
2
x
W
I
5
5
3
I
4
4
4
6
Pet.
.667
.611
.389
.333
Pet.
.556
.556
.556
.333
18 18
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Panama Merchants 5, Balboa High School 0.
STANDINGS
TEAM Won
Army QM......5
Commissary.....6
C'tral Labor Office 6
Navy Ordnance .. 6
Corozal Sales Store 4
Post Office......-S
Building Division. 2
Army Signal .... 2
Kobbe Sales Store. 0
Electrical Division. 0
Lost Pet.
.833
.750
.750
.750
.571
.500
.333
.286
.000
.000
BIG TEN
History was made yesterday
afternoon at the Balboa Stadium
I when the cellar dwelling Pana-
m Merchants, behind the brll-
: Uant no-hit no-run pitching of
Webb Hearn, upset the strong
Balboa High School nine to throw
! the Pacific Twilight League into
a three-wav tie for first place in
the current second half battle.
Pete Corrigan's Merchants fin-
ished their schedule In a blaze
Of glory an they downed the High
School, 8-0, in one of the hottest
second half races in the history
of the Pacific Twilight Loop.
Hearn. a hard working left-
hander, was In rare form as he
truck out ten High School bat-
i ters and did not Issue one free
- pass. A few mlscues spoiled his
chances for a perfect game, but
--fast playing killed any scoring
ideas the High School lads had
'..for not one man reached third
. and only three runners ever set
(t foot on second base.
Hurling the distance an'd
"charged with his second loss of
' the season was Don Morton, who
was nicked for five hits and five
'runs. Morton Issued three free
passes to spell his downfall as he
walked all of them in the third
-'Inning when a mlscue by Bob
Carlin loaded the bases. After I
walking two men In a row, and
then striking out one batter Mor-
ton, with the bases loaded, forc-
ed a run aeross. Ed Francis of
the Merchantmen then singled
'. sharply to bring around two
. jiftore markers. ______
The Merchants added two
more runs In the bottom half of
the sixth on three hitsone a
two base knock by Herbie "Mi-
crobe" Ravbourne for the only
extra basehlt of the game.
Hearn retired the High School
in order In the last Inning, all
via the strike out route.
The bo xscore:
A. Bo wen (CLO).
R. Foster (CLO).
F. Peralta (NO).
A. Porras (AS) ..
O. Burrows (C).
C. Bynoe (CLO)..
V. Wilson (AS)..
M. Mussa (NO)..
L. Edghlll (CLO)
R. Jemmott (FO)
S. Burton (CLO).
AB
23
28
28
24
31
25
23
19
22
20
25
H Ave.
18 .696
18 .571
15 .536
11 .458
14 .452
11 .440
10 .434
8 .421
9 .409
8 .400
10 .400
BHS
Halman, 2b .
May, cf .
Ostrea, 3b. .
Napoleon, rf .
Carlin, lb .
Flynn, c .
Salas, ss. .
Rowley, If.
Morton, p .
Totals .
Merchants
De la Pea, cf
Ridge, II. .
Francis, 2b. .
Medinger, lb.
McGlade, ss.
Hearn, p. .
AB
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
HPO A
0 3 2
2
n
i
7
3
1
1
0
.22 0 0 18 10 3
AB R H PO A E
.410100
2 0 0 2 0 0
3 0 10 12
.300
3 0 0
3 1 0
Army QM took a firmer hold
on first place In the straight sea-
son schedule of the Pacific Divi-
sional Softball League by hum-
bling Army Signal, 9 to 2, behind
the brilliant three-hit pitching
of N. Weir who in four starts has
four successes.
The box score:
Army QM AB R
W. Jules, cf........ 3
R. Richards, c...... 3
A. Ortega, ss........ 4
R. Tucknall, rf...... 4
C. Blenman, 2b...... 4
R. Davis, If........ 2
M. Tulloch, 3b...... 3
E. Lynch, lb........ 3
N. Weir, p.......... 2
Totals............28
0 1
3 1
3
0
Ravb'rne, F., 3b 2 1 0 2
Rayb'me, H. ,c 2 1 2 11
Weeks, rf 3 0 1 0
0
0
1 0
0 0
Army Signal
AB R
Schoolboy
Sports
The Balboa High and Junior
QJjlege Intramural water po'o
season got under way Tuesday
afternoon. March 18 In Balboa
Swimming Pool.
The high school has three
teams in the league and Junior
College has one team competing
which will make for some hard
fought games.
. The first four games are for
practice, and no record will be
kept of the results to determine
team standings. This will allow
all four teams to have two games
to practice, experiment and be-
come familiar with the rules be-
fore the regular schedule starts.
In the first games Tuesday aft-
ernoon, Jaramillo's Wolverines
flefeated Otten's Trojans, 11-4.
High scorer of the game was Ed-
ear Jaramlllo with lx gdals to
bis credit.
The lineups:
WOLVERINES'Jaramlllo, C;
Jaramillo. E.: Pitman, K.; Marti-
nez-, A.: Duran, P.; Shore. D.;
Barrett, C.
-TROJANSBlel, Wm.; Fayen-
baum, S.: Dalsey, R.; Morris, J.;
Kommenteh, Wm.; Shore, R.;
Otten. D.
Captain.
Totals.....25 5 5 21 7 3
Score By Innings
BHS 0 0 0 0 0 0 00
Merchants 0 0 3 0 0 2 x5
Runs Batted InRidge, Fran-
cis 2, F. Raybourne, H. Ray-
bourne. Earned RunsMerch-
ants 4. Left on BasesBHS 1,
Merchants 5. Two Base HitH.
Rayboume. Stolen BasesMay,
Francis. Struckout byMorton 3,
Hearn 10. Base on Balls off-
Morton 3. DoubleplaysH. Ray-
bourne toF. Raybourne; Salas to
Halman to Carlin. Losing Pitch-
erMorton (5-2). Winning
PitcherHearn (3-6). Time of
Oame1:28.
Boxing Commission
Approves Plummer,
Morasen 10-Rounder
The Panam Boxing Commls-|
sion last night approved the pro-
gram scheduled for April 20 at
the Panam Olympic Stadium
with the Federico Plummer-Ciro
Morasen boat as the headlines
Plummer, Panama's 126-pound
champion, signed for a ten-
rounder at a 128-pound limit a-
rahtst the Cuban featherweight
champ who rs also listed.the fifth
contender for Sandy Saddler's
world title by trie March Issue of
"The Ring" magarin*
The semifinal bout of the card
will be between Black Bill and
Babv Green at a 126-pound limit
in another ten round battle.
The mam preliminary brings
together Melvin Bourne and Al
Hostin at 118 pounds In a four-
rounder.
The other preliminary. also *
four-rounder, pits Cisco Kid a-
gainst Beau Jack II at the 118-
pound limit. ...
General admission for the bouts
will be SI (one dollar).
D. Brown, cf........
H. Squires, cf........ 2
V. Wilson, c........ 2
A. Porras, ss-rf...... 3
V. Fitzpatrick, If...... 2
T. Walters, 3b...... 3
R. Hoyte, 2b-lf...... 3
A. Jamieson, lb...... 3
L. Burton, rf........ 1
Vittese, ss.......... 2
McLean, 2b........ 0
C. Blackwood, p...... 2
Totals............24 2
Score By Innings
Army QM 2 5 2 0 0 0-9
Army Signal 0 0 0 0 1 1
Grapefruit League
TODAY'S SCHEDULE
Boston (A) vs. Washington (A)
at Orlando.
Chicago (A) vs. Chicago (N) at
Los Angeles.
Cleveland (A) vs. Pittsburgh (N)
at Hollywood, Cal., (night).
Philadelphia Lakeland.
New York (A) vs. St. Louis (N)
at St. Petersburg.
Philadelphia (AA) at Melbourne.
New York (N) vs. St. Louis (A)
at Burbank, Calif.
Boston (N) vs. Milwaukee (AA)
at Kissimmee, Fla.
Brooklyn (N) vs. Cincinnati (N)
at Tampa. m ...
Pittbnrgh "B" (N) vs. Seattle
(PCD at San Francisco.
EDDIE ARMISTEAD (above) seen practicing yesterday on
the championship track at the Olympic Stadium, is well
savisfied with the track, his BSA and his form. Though still
at high school, Eddie is an established crowd-pleaser in Pa-
ruma's motorbike racing world, and is pushing Ray Magan
as form favorite for tomorrow night's championship.
SAUL ALVARADO, sole Panamanian championship en-
trant, will be having his first competitive outing tomorrow
nl}tit. and stepping straight into the blgtime. At yesterdays
practice he showed form which can keep him there, provided
he can keep It up under racing pressure._____________________
TUESDAY NIGHT'S GA'MES
AT HOLLYWOOD:
Malors 000 000 0044 10 1
Hollywood 000 020 0002 11 1
Carver, Paige, Spencer, pick-
son, Leonard and Noble, Masi;
Lindell, Welmaker, Shepard and
Sandlock.
Elks Edge Philippine Rattan
13-12 In Pacific Softball Loop
PACIFIC SOFTBALL LEAGUE
TEAM STANDINGS (2nd Half)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
In the bottom of the seventh, ^^"h,
Isthmian speedway riders arc
in lasier, sieaater form than
ever before.
Tomorrow night's champion-
ship meeting al the Olympic
staoium should see new records
in all events.
Ibis was foreshadowed at
yive>day afternoons practice
session on the stadium track,
itself faster and leas pot-hoiea
than the Coion oval.
me championsmp entrants
cleariy know lots more aooui
4uu meter speetiway riding now
than they am at the Colon stad-
lum meeting, wnen several
spins per race were per for the
course. 1
lesierday, in practice. Fox
and Hidalgo were lapping the
track probably (aster man they
did in races at Colon, with no
trouble keeping control.
Ray Magan, victor on the Co-
lon track and still favorite lor
tomorrow nignt because of his
greater racing experience, is in
ue form.
Eddie Armistead, Juan Fran-
co favorite who has not previ-
ously raced on a short oval, tried
out the Olympic Stadium track
and found it to his liking.
He feels his BSA is in its
fastest trim ever. Seeing it was
once fast enough to beat the
thoroughbrea Vincent, rid-
den by Choppy White, in a Juan
Franco event, that should mean
something.
Few have worked longer or
harder on their racing mach-
ines than has BUI Hidalgo on
his Harlej-Davidson.
A long run of engine trouble
bad luca has not shaken Hi-
dalgo's faith in the big mach-
ine.
He was taking it round the
Olympic oval yesterday in the
manner of a man who proposes
to be right up in front with the
throttle wide open when the fin-
ishing line heaves in sight to-
morrow night.
Dark horse on form Is Pan-
amanian entrant Saul Alvarado,
aboard a BSA. He has not raced
here previously.
But he seemed to know plenty
about what he. was doing at
practice yesterday.
The Panamanian Motorcycle
Association didn't select him for
nothing. And BSAs still have
more firsts to their credit than
any other make of machine in
Panama's brief motorbike rac-
ing history.
Choppy White, preoccupied
with tnroughts of Tahiti, grass
skirts, etc., may be making his
farewell appearance.
He's due to leave any time
for the storied Pacific island.
Six 126 ce. entries have been
received for the Ughtweight
race. More will be accepted,
right up to race time.
Three of the lightweight riders
are Panamanians, and three
Little
League
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost
Police............ 7
Sears............ 6
Lincoln Life........ 6
AFGE 14.......... 8
Elks 1414.......... 0
Firemen.......... t
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost
Sears............ 4
Elks 1414 .......... 4
Lincoln Life........ 3
Police............ 3
AFGE 14.......... 2
Firemen.......... 1
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Police 6, AFGE 5.
TODAYS GAME
Sears vs. Lincoln Life.
Little League fans were treat-
ed to their third extra Inning
fame of the week yesterday when
he Police came up with a run
in the seventh inning to edge
AFGE, 6 to 5.
The AFGE'rs scored two runs
In the first inning. Their oppo-
nents came up with one In the
second Inning. The Coppers came
within one run of tying in the
fourth as they scored two rum
In the bottom half after the Un-
ionmen had scored two runs In
their half of the inning.
In the sixth AFGE scored one
more run to take a two-run lead
but the Police came back in the
bottom half of the inning with
two tallies that sent the game
into extra innings.
In the bottom of the seventh
Billy Castleman, with three for
four, and Motion, with two for
four, led the AFGE Unlonmen at
the plate.
Crook collected two singles and
a triple In four trips with Bobby
Klelhofer singling three times In
four at bats.
Today the league leading Sears
take on the third place Lincoln
Life team. Sears must win to
take undisputed possession of
flrt place while a win by the In-
surancemen would create a three
way tie with 8ears and the Elks.
Sears will send their ace, Jlm-
mle Watson who has five wins
and no losses, to the mound
while Bruce Bateman appears to
be the logical hurler for Lincoln
Life.
The box score:
AFGE AB R
Salas, 2b...... 3 1
Morris, ss...... 2
Castleman, c.
Wills, p.....
Motion, cf.. ..
Snodgrass, 3b.
Edmondson, lb
Hall, If.....
Elmendorf, rf.
Eberenz, rt ..
Total .. ..... ..27 5 7 5
4
4
4
4
3
1
1
1
HPO
0 0
2
12
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
Police
Coln, 2b...... 3
Pederson, 3b.. .. 4
Barnes, c...... 3
Sutherland, p. .. 4
Crook, cf...... 4
Klelhofer, ss.. .. 4
Priest, lb...... S
AB R HPO A
III uno UVbbVUi VI bile c"i ""! ......
Inning, Barnes walked and was Roe, rf. .. .. ..
forced at second base by Suth-
erland. Sutherland reached sec-
ond safely on a short passed balL
Mike Crook then lined a solid
base hit into centerfleld where
Johnny Motion fielded it and
made a good throw to catch Su-
therland sliding in for the sec-
ond out. On this play Crook ad-
vanced all the way to third base.
Bobby Klelhofer singled to score
Crook with the winning run.
Jimmie Morris came up with a
leaping one-handed catch of
Crook's liner in the second in-
ning for the fielding gem of the
game, ________
A. Scott, If
R. Scott, It
Totals........28 8 9 ill 7
Score By Innings
AFGE 2 0 0 2 0 1 05 7 3
Police 0 10 2 0 2 1 9 1
Winning PitcherSutherland
(7-2). Losing PitcherW ills
(3-4). Struckout bySutherland
10, Wills 12. Base on Balls off-
Sutherland 6, Wills 4. Two Base
HitsCastleman, Wills, Barnes.
Three Base HitCrooks. Unvplres
Dalley and Potter. Scorer-
Mead. Time of Oame1:40.
MRA Presents Atlantic
Midget League Awards
The Margarita Recreation As-
sociation presented small silver
baseballs to the members of the
Margarita Mlu s t a n g s baseball
team, champions of the Atlantic
Midget League, and to one player
on each of the other teams In the
major division of the league who
did outstanding work throughout
the campaign.
The awards were given at an
asembly of all the children of the
Margarita Elementary School
f--om the second through the
inorf.h sixth grades. The actual presen
Firemen's Insur. .. 5
Pan Liquido.....3
Elks..........3
Philippine Rattan. 2
CAA..........
1.000
in the bottom of the seventy ,11", hat after a slowish'?lx"' BraucB- *ff*2S.v5*E
KKat^r fflKLSS 225 5S ** "thto fa' Vlh M^SSr
*
TRAVEL BARGAINS!
A. FLY to near -by COSTA RICA
1$ 35. round trip (90 days)
($ 25. one way)
B TO MIAMI
VIA COSTA RICA & CUBA
Enjoy all day time flying
and nee more for your travel dollars!
Only $ 83. one way
($150.75 round trip)
PAA AFFILIATE
DAILY FLIGHTS 7 a.m.
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
Tel. 2-1855 Opposite
Panam Ancn Bus-stop
Or see your travel agent
AT SAN BERNARDINO:
Giants 000 000 000 022 6 1
pirates 000 000 000033 7 2
Maglle. Bowman, Bamberger
and Yvars, Katt; Pollet, Neckial
LaPalm and Garaglola.
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
AT BRADENTON:
Tleer 002 020 3029 11 0
Braves 010 000 0001 9 0
Hutchlnson, .Trout (5) and
Ginsberg; Thlel, Wall (6), Hall
(ST and Cooper. Parks (6), Bolt
(7). ______
AT CLEARWATER: .... ....
Yankees 000 010 0001 2 2
Phillies 000 001 70X-8 10 0
Schaeffer, Kregan (>. Madi-
son (8) and Houk; Roberts, Rld-
zlk (6) and Burgess.
AT ST. PETERSBURG:
Red Sox 000 003 0003 4
ordinals 200 000 000-5,80
Taylor. Masterson (81 andl Ev-
ans: Mlzell, Boyer (), Yuhas (8)
and Sarnl.
wi? "SS' Id- 9 0
rubs ooo eoi 100-2 o
Pillette. Taylor and Courtney;
KUppsteln. Padget. Simpsonand
ChltL Pramesa. Home Buns-St.
Louis: Rapp 2. Chicago: Ram-
azzotti. ^ .
Cincinnati: Kluszewskl.
Wilson. Home Run-New xorit.
Irvln. ______
ffiiK? "WSffSSU | i
P ates 300 000 00X-3 8 0
P Feler. Brissic. Abernathv Fahr
and Tebbetts: Suchecki, Waugn
and McCullough.
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Elks 13, Philippine Rattan 12
TODAY'S GAME
CAA vs. Pan Liquido.
.600 was walked. Ddctor Jutzy then
.500 came up and rapped a sharp
.400 double down the first base line
.000 which scored Lawyer. Jutzy went
to third when Herbie Newhouse
erounded out second to first. ,*
Howard Engelke then popped a inexperience, have ******
hieh fly to short left center,"Peed and racing knowhow in
which was tucked away by Bob. wholesale quantities.
Taht, but Doc Jutzy tagged up Olympic stadium tomorrow
and crossed the plate for the night is going to see action.
Into 12th ran. Fraser grounded out
new sport.
i behalf of the Margarita Recrea-
There will assuredly be more|tlon Association.
The following
enthusiasts after Friday nignts'^yj receiveci silver baseballs:
meeting. j Margarita Mustangs Won 5, Lost
The 15 championship entrants, n Percentage .833
lering their comparative w WnJ riBnt field.
considering
The Elks team moved .w i^t mu. noaci ^iuuhucu m
third Dlace yesterday when they pitcher to first to end the game.
Y_ _.*:_> nKn Batan hv BVIt r-lionov mas crsrlitprl arlth
defeated "'Philippine'' Rattan by
the slim margin of 13 to 12.
What proved to be the win-
ning runs were scored by the
lodgemep In the top of the first
when they marked up eight runs
on four base hits and three free
P After the disastrous first, the
Rattan nine outhlt and outplay-
ed the Elks but couldnt quite
catch up. ^^____
Fasllich League
Leaders In Tie
Playoff Tomorrow
Contending for top spot In the
Fastlich Teen-Age League at Di-
ablo Friday afternoon the Pumas
and Ocelots will meet to play off
their 4-4 tie of the first game In
the second half of the n. ^
The Ocelots will probably start, RUey. J.,, ci
Klrchmier on the mound while j Cozens rf.
La Boca Girls
Fritz Cheney was credited with
the win. Gordon Smith charged
with the loss. Cheney walked 1?,,
"ob Taht, Charlie Raeer and Softball Ledglie
Dom Roberto, all of the Elks, hit
homers.
The box score:
Elks
AB R
Rattan AB R H
Lawyer. 3b....... 2 3 1
Jutzv, 2b........ 4 3 2
Newhouse. lb..... 4 0 1
Engelke. H., ss .. .. 4 1 1
Fraser, If........ 4 1 1
Woodruff, c...... 1 1
... 4 1 2
%&"55ilig[w'llilK>* :: *ll
may be Hill. Earlier In the sea-
sonyKirchmler hurled an almost Totals .jt^.^lm^J*
TEAM Won Lost Pet
f; Watson Star ... 4 1 Mt
0 Arsi Cola .... 4 1 J0
1 Clifford Bolt Stars 14 .200
0 Bradley.....1 4 .200
0 A record crowd is expected
lion the La Boca Ball Park to-
0 morrow at 5 p.m. for the crucial
0 game between Watson Junior
0 High Stars and Arsi Cola for
0 the first half-season champlon-
ship of the La Boca Girls' Soft-
Totals ..........30 13 10 3 hail League.
J The seasoned Arsi Cola gals
will have on the mound their
Taht, ss........ 3 3
Rager, rf........ 3 2
Chance, If....... 3 3
Soyster, rf-c...... 4 2
Evans, lb........ 3 0
Roberto, 2b...... 4 1
Holmer, c....... 2 0
Copello, cf...... 2 0
Herndon, 3b...... 3 1
Cheney, p........ 3 1
.. right .
J. Will, center field.
J. Essayian, center field.
R. Qulot, left field.
R. Perkins, left field.
K. Mountain, shortstop;
G. DeTore, third base.
W. French, second base.
J. McGloln, first base.
J. Melndez, catcher.
H. Wombel. pitcher.
Margarita Mules: Irl Sanders,
catcher. ,___1^ ..
Pepsi Cola Hornets (Cristobal):
David Owen shortstop.
Critobal Tigers: Paul Freder-
ickson, pitcher.
Certificates of Merit were also
presented at the assembly to
members of the Margarita Mules
and the Margarita Spur Cola
glaze(4)thursdaymarch 20
add MRA PRESENTS .act.tdDtH
Colts. Both of these teams plac-
ed econd In their respective div
isions of Midget League. The fol-
lowing boys received Certificate
of Merit:
'.Margarita Mules, Won 3, Lost I,
Percentage .687
R. Bray ton, right field.
C. Newhard, right field.
D. Phillips, center field,
J. Marcelino, left field.
N. Santiago, shortstop.
" v-"*lc". third base.
W. Melndez, second base.
... x.-;io, lirst base. *
R. Sanders, catcher.
D. Eberenz, pitcher.
Margarita Spur Com Colts, Won
3, Lost 2, Percentage .**
W. Lara, right field.
J. French, right field.
C. Bath, center field.
J. Hill, center field.
P. Dockery, left field.
A. Barcellno, left field.
W. Kleefklns, shortstop.
J. Blalkowskl, third base.
T. Arnold, second base.
J. Tabor, second base.
W. Lust, first base.
D. Clarke, catcher.
J. Alequas, pitcher.
W. Arnold, shortstop.
Upon completion of the award
program, the ball players march-
ed out of the gymnasium as they
were being enthusiastically ap-
plauded by their friends and
schoolmates.
rfect game for the Ocelots
when onlv three batters faced
him in every frame of a seven-
innlng contest except one when
four batsmen came up. |
These two outfits have been,
nlavine verv close baseball all
Sn their first two encounters'
resulting in the same sco.re-J
victories for the Ocelotsand
tie to be olayed off Friday
Game time h 4:30 p.m. at the
Diablo field.
Gamboa Swim Pool
To Reopen Saturday
The Gamboa Swlmmtn Pool
will reopen Saturday, March
2, following a job of cleaning
and repair.
Score Bv Innings
Elks 8 2 2 0 0 1 013
P. Rattan 3 2 5 0 0 0 212
ID RAT
ON ME
OWN
ace, Joyce Anderson who has
0 been rested by Manager Butler
2 for the Important tilt. For the,
5 hustling Watson Star it will be|
5, M. McClure burning over the'
n last ones.
1 The line-ups follow:
*| ARSI COLA (
3
i J. Boyd, ss.
Batson, lb.
D. Rodriguez, 3b.
D. Dlxon, c.
R. Herazo. 2b.
R. Morgan, If.
Kaiser, cf.
McColllns, rf.
J. Anderson, p.
MUODER
.FOR*
WATSON STARS
G. Talt, 2b.
D. Thomas, ss.
B. Arthurs, 3b.
L. Johns, cf.
i D. Sinimons.c.
1. Howard, If.
C. Spencer, lb.
J. VanHorn, rf.
L. Innlss. rf.
G. McClure. p
BRIGHT COLORS
for interior and exterior decoration




/HURSDAY, MARCH 26, 1952
TE PANAMA AMERICAN Alt INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
paos man
C.f.S.5 Powells Battle For Atlantic Twi-Loop 2nd Half Lead
i 'j
>
by
JOE WILLIAMS
MIAMI.This report on the state of the Brooklyn Bum will
begin with the Information that Walter O'Malley hat recovered
from writer's cramp and Charlie Dretaen'i multiple soul wounds
re tidily healed. Sate for occasional nightmarish apaamt of
clammy horrors, neither it experiencing any aeriona after effects
- of the BT's.. Bobby Thomson's homer.
Ordinarily the position of a mere president of a ball club in
the preseason picture is monumentally unimportant, but Mr.
O'Malley's systematic campaign, to retain the patronage of his
disillusioned clientele after the shambles of last fall when his ball
club lost a pennant it couldn't possibly lose, was of such high
merit as to command at least passing attention.
"I must have got a million letters from indignant fans, all
blasting the tar out of us, and I answered every one of them,"
the comparatively new baseball executive said.
Evidently the gentleman did an excellent salvage job, for
advance sales for the oncoming season are nearlng record-break-
ing proportions.
T'I got some letters back and, believe It or not, the writers,
most of whom had been in favor of putting c torch to the park
and throwing Dressen in the Gowanus Canal, said they were real-
ly sorry for us, and besides we hadn't been beaten by a better
team; the Giants were lust lucky stiffs, as, of course, they were."
In the grim and gloomy aftermath It was duly noted that
the Bums had lost a World's Series pot And Dressen no little pres-
tige as a mastermind, but It was overlooked that Mr. O'Malley
had been nicked for $200,000, the difference between owning half
the series and having to pay to see it. To him, then, a bow for
the sporting, good-natured and philosophical way he took the
blow.
el
'OUT OF EVERT EVIL'
Not since Napoleon dropped the decision at Waterloo has a
battle leader been pilloried more than Mr. Dressen as a con-
sequence ot Thomson's blast in the Polo Grounds' stands. Here
again Mr. O'Malley rates a bow. If he had submitted to clamor
and fired the manager It would have been the most popular move
since the Invention of off-the-shoulder gowns. A Club owner with
less Integrity wouldn't have hesitated.
There is nothing reticent about Mr. Dressen and his disposi-
tion to concede the excellence of his talents in superlative phrases
l not universally applauded, a fact which complicates an open-
minded, detached review of the record. There are many who find
It impossible to reconcile a brassy manner with a sound opera-
tion, but once in a while this can be deceptive.
Whether It is deceptive in Mr. Dressen's case is a matter yet
to. be answered. Mr. Dressen gives the Impression he Is indif-
ferent to criticism and serenely sure of himself and his destiny,
yet this could be but a brave pose. Certainly any normal person
In similar circumstances would be hurt, humiliated and chasten-
ed, and would profit by the ordeal.
Diplomacy In manner and discretion in speech are not qua-
lities for which Mr. Dressen Is noted. Just the other day he was
telling the ballplayers and the writers the umpires beat him last
season, a charge which Is not likely to endear him to these gentle-
men In the future. Last summer, well In front, he explained the
Bums were winning because he was a better manager than old
Burt Shotton.
This would have been better left unsaid, or less blatantly
phrased, but even so I thought him correct. At that, the inter-
view would have been forgotten if Mr. Dressen had continued to
breeze along 13 games In front. There is this to be said for the
gentleman: He never falls to give you an answer. To the baseball
writer he must be a delight.
i
TEAM'S ALL SET BUT
Nothing that happened that dreadful afternoon last fall has
seemingly affected his optimism or cocksure manner. Once again
you find Mm sticking his bruised and mangled neck out, picking
the Bums to win, despite the loss of Don Newcombe. How the
Bums can do It without Newcombe when they failed with him Is
a question that is worth considerably more than the conventional
Em.
Well find the pitching somewhere," he assures you.
For the first time in the past 10 years the Bums seem com-
fortably set everywhere else, with Billy Cox, greatest glove man
in baseball, a fixture at third, and Andy Pafko. physically sound,
ready to win serenades from the Sym-phony Band, a higher dis-
tinction In Flatbush than knighthood, even If the ceremonials
are not so majestic.
Clem Lablne, 25-year-old curve bailer, who was 5 and 1 at
the end of the season, stands with high in Mr. Dressen's esteem
...'T think he'll win 18 or 17 anyway "...If so, It will be more
than the young man ever won In his, Ufe including the minors,
and he started in '44.
Mr. Dressen talks hopefully of Ben Wade, 29-year-old right-
hander who was 18-16 with Hollywood last season. He has been
up previously with brief adventures in Chicago and Cincinnati.
A change of pace pitch and newly developed curve are his re-
commendations.
Mr. Dressen privately doubts that Joe Black, 28-year-old
giant Negro right-hander, can make It..."But if he does my
worries are over. This fellow can pitch morning, noon and night.'
Even in Brooklyn that would be a novelty.
Sania Cruz Sports
Three outstanding clubs have
registered their entries for the
big track and field meet to be
held at the Santa Cms Play-
ground Saturday, March 22 with
over 100 athletes.
Stiff competition is anticipat-
ed with the return of George Mil-
ler, TheophUus Peterkln, Prince
Phillips and 8ydney Dryden who
have been getting into condition
to oppose the newcomers like Ru-
pert flooding, Charles Jarvis.
Vincint Stultz, Henry Thousand
and Carlos Wilson on the cinder
path over the 100, 200, and 4x100
yards events.
The girl division has not shown
any veteran runners, but we hope
to see some thrilling event* with
reasonable time established.
List of the teams entered by
the Clubs Monticello, Jolly Boys
and Las Qulntetas are as follows:
IM YARDS
Oeorge Weeks, Thomas Scott,
Henry Thousand, Donald Sobers,
Albert Waithe.
M-1M YARDS, BOYS
TheophUus Peterkln, Georee
Miller, Richard Grant, Arsenlo
Morales, Frank Waithe. Sidney
Ktchards, Rupert Goodlng, Or-
lando Scott, James Holton. Al-
fonso Peterkln, Mrito Secald,
Lester Payne, Mervln Grant,
George Thomas, Carlos Scott,
Prtaee Phillips, Sydney Dryden,
Prince Grant, William Peterkln,
Alfred Jones, John Top pin,
Charles Baxter, Victor Payne.
50-100 YARDS, GIRLS
Sylvia Daniels, Alberta Blake,
Carmen Welsh, Sybil Thomas,
Theresa Malcolm, Margarelt
Welsh, Gloria Myrle. Helen Rob-
inson, Theima Stevnson, Sarah
Ramsey, Meta Bella ray, Alma
Amantlne, Roma Jean Grant,
Sonla Ramirez. Iris Chambers,
Clementina Jarrl*. Mabel Wilson,
Violet R*id, Joyc* Chambers,
Jeanette JfcFarltme, Betty Jean
Smart, Rots Alln. Ellen Wade,
Edith lewis, tle:ior McParlane,
Gloria Brock,.', and Dolores Beck-
le.
415 YARDS
Albert Barton Horace Steven-
sen. Oeorpe weeks, Renlel Smith,
Sydney D.yden, Henry Thousand
Bertram Ramsey. Carlos Wilson,
Jimmy Eversley, Albert Waithe.
220 YARDS
Hatgi, Catty
Slated For
Mound Duty
STANDINGS
(Atlantic Twilight League)
Second Half
Won Lost Pctg.
Powells ........3 2 .600
C.H.6...........2 2 .800
PABST .........3 4 .428
TONIGHT'S GAME (Truriday)
Powells vs C.H.8.
Cristbal High School, first
half winners of the Atlantic Twi-
light League and at present only
a half game behind the second
half leaders, tonight will be pre-
sented with the opportunity of
taking over first place in the
second half race.
The lads from the Gold Coast
High School have one of the most
potent squads that ever played
local high school ball. With the
inter scholastic championship
now safely tucked away for the
second consecutive year, they
can concentrate their full ef-
forts towards copping their first
Twilight League crown.
Johnny Hatgl, Cristbal High's
all-arounder lnfielder pitcher
(and what have you), will be
tossing them up for the first half
champs. Johnny is strictly a con-
trol pitcher. Though his duties
have been limited, he has been
effective. Powells will counter
with George Carty, their leading
moundsman, who was kept out
of action Sunday in preparation
for tonight's game.
Cristbal High has >a pair of
hitters tha thave been terror-
izing the Twi-Loop pitching since
mid way down the first half
when they started their drive for
the crown. Tommy Hughes, slug-
fer, and Talmadge 8alter, one of
he most consistent hitters In
the league, will be in charge of
the offensive department.
On the other hand, George
Cariy will be charged with dou-
ble dutyon the mound against
the Cristbal bats, and at the
fate where he is equally as el-
ective.
For the past three games, Po-
wells have been handicapped by
the absence of their top lnfield-
er, Harry Dockery, who has been
111 for over a week. Dockery has
been the spark-plug of the club,
performing throughout the sea-
son at his short-stop position.
Game time tonight, as usual, 7
p.m. at Mt. Hope Stadium.
PISTOL PAKIN' JUNIOR--Roy Campanella Is held up momen-
tarily from Spring training chores at the Dodgers' Vero Beach, Fia.,
camp by the playful antics of his three-year-old son, Roy, Jr. From
the looks of things, young Campanells is going to follow his tal-
ented father and take up catching as a profession. (NEA)-
Gun Club Notes
8ydney Dryden, Noel Trulck,
Jimmy Eversley, Clifford Llnd-will bring together Percy Folde,
ISO Athletes Ready
To Participate In
C.Y.O. Track Meet
The Fourth C.Y.O. Track Cham-
pionships will get underway, Sat-
urday, at 9:30 am., on the La
Boca Ball Park where 150 ath-
letes, from seven Catholic mis-
sions, will compete.
Powerful squads have been re-
gistered by the following mis-
sions: St. Joseph's, Colon; St,
Vincent's 811ver City: St. Tho-
mas', Gatun; Our Lady of Good
Counsel, Gamboa; St. Theresa's,
La Boca; St. Vincent de Paul's,
Panam City; and St. John's,
Rio Abajo.
Leading the pars.de of youth-
ful stars is Charlotte Gooden,
Panama's brUliant girl champion
sprinter who recently excelled
in the Bolivarlan Games In Ca-
racas. Charlotte will be seen in
action in the 50 meters and 100
meters for Class "A" girls.
The Class "A" sprint for boys
say, Herrington Thousand, Car-
los Wilson, TheophUus Peterkln,
Pallu Jarvis.
INTRAMURAL BASEBALL
The Solders swamped the June
Bugs IPO to remain undefeated
In the Santa Cruz Cradle Base-
ball League. Fltzroy Payne show-
ed plenty of form in winning his
second game in this league. Fer-
nando watler, barely SV4 feet In
height, displayed fine art In run- Wnrrv at
nlng bases and sliding. He stole ""'V,
five bases and scored three runs.
Carlos Allen doubled for the los-
ers.
St. Joseph's; Alfred Richards, St.
Vincent de Paul's, Antonio Dud-
ley, St, John's, and many other
promising youngsters.
At nopn the softball cham-
Kionships for boys and girls wUl
e conducted. Each of the seven
missions will field a team of ball
hawks in the sudden-death
series.
FALSE TEETH
Slipping or Irritating?
Winning batteries art Victor pent e#
Payne and NOrbert Waldron. For JJj* RgfJ
tot losers: Carlos AUen and Lu- Kit mtu fast
ellen Bowen.
tmbaiiTMMd by li
dropping or
faMt
wobblln
TtCTH on your pistos
XI i
Llnescore:
Spiders
June Bugs
i
0 0
5 2
- 0
-11
CIVIL AFFAIR BUREAU
Physical Education and Recrea
tlon Braneh.
Santa Cruz Track land Field
Program:
1880 Yds., BoysOpen.
280 Yds., BoysClass "B."
350 Yds.. GirlsClass "B."
4Discus, GirlsOpen.
575 Yds., BoysClass "A,"
875 Yds., OlrlsClass "A."
7220 Yds., BoysClass "A,"
8Shot Put, BoysOpen.
976 Yds., BoysClass "B."
1075 Yds.. OlrlsClass "B."
11440 Yds.. BoysClass "A,"
12100 Yds., BoysClass "A."
11100 Yds.. GirlsClass "A."
14160 Yds., BoysClass "B."
15Stewards' walking race-
Men.
1850 Yds., Olrls Fat (Classic).
LUNCB
174x440 Yds., BoysClass "A."
184X110 Yds, BoysClass -.-
184x110 Yds., GirlsClass "B."
204x110 Yds BoysClass "A -
214x110 Yds., GirlsClass "A."
This piooum powder slvta a remarkable
arise of added comfort and eeeunt
M mo
non"-ie"ld)"Orl VSTrmT > any dnif
holdin plitw moro firm
or! and
nly.
eeeurity by
No lummy
It'ii alkali
This King of all
Cough Mixtures comes
From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
Xht King ot oil eough medicina
tfuckley'i CANADIOL Mistura
->o baan ujeo for yeori In ovar 70%
ot Canodo's homes. Fast working
'ripia acting Buckley's Conodlol Ml-
rur* quickly loosens and raises phlegrr
odctd In tha tuba clears olr pet-
togei soothes rasped row tissues.
xie or two sips ond worst coughing
spasm ceoset You get results tost
rou feel the effect of Buckley's Ins-
ontry.
Compounded from i rare Cenodlor
'ine Boliem and other soothing heel-
no ingredient* Buckley's CANADlOt
fixture Is different from anything
ou ever tried do get o bottle of thta
root Cenodion eough medicine to-
oy ot any good drug store.
BRECKON TIES ISTHMIAN
.10-06 RECORD, LEADS
BALBOA CLUB TO WIN
Sgt. 1st Class Clayton Breckon,
of the 45th Iron Horse Cavalry,
firing for the Balboa Gun Club,
Sunday became the fourth man1
to fire a score of 193 over the I
DCM course since the Canal Zone I
Shooting Association has been!
keeping records. Breckon looked
for awhile as if he had a new
record In the making, but mirage
and pressure combined to cause
him to drop one shot sitting,
which In addition to the one he
dropped standing kept him In
the 193 class.
The first two shooters to reach
this record, Bob Harris of the
Marines, and Gil Kemm, Air
Force Master Sergeant, are long
gone from these snores. The lone
civilian record holder, Bill Jaf-
fray, Is still very much here, and
In fact was running the range
while Breckon tied the record.
In fact, seeing his rival, Breck-
on, tie his record, must have
blown Jaffray's cork, because he
fot up on the range, and care-
ully placed his first shot in the
middle of some one else's target,
thus making "Knock off Jaffray
Day'' official and unanimous. At
any rate, he had a good excuse
for not tying the record.
In second place with a score of
189 was Earl F. Mitchell ot the
Albrook-Curundu team. Mitch
started slow, but fired a "possi-
ble" rapid. Third and fourth were
Col. Henry Ross and 8. Todhunt-
er Tocid, both firing 188, with the
colonel taking the nod on a high-
er rapid fire score. Todd has fir-
ed so many 18B's lately that he
seems to be in a 188 rut, what-
ever that Is. Maybe he can save
ammunition and stay home, If he
can convince the officials that
that's all he can shoot. Al Joyce's
188 put him In fifth place, his
"possible" rapid bumping three
other gentlemen with the same
score out of the money.
Although Breckon's record ty-
ing job put the emphasis on the
individual performance, this was
actually a team match. With
three shooters in the first five,
the Balboa Gun Club team put
together the highest four-man
score ever fired here, if memory
serves the writer correctly. Their
score of 752 received a nice boost
from Breckon's 193, but even
then represented an average of
188.
Albrook-Curundu showed up
with a couple of substitutes, and
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKIS&
ATALANTA BRAND
ars offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Colon
HOME DELIVERY
I'D RAT
ON ME
OWN
MU00ER
FOR A
while not conceded much chance,
surprised everyone by taking sec-
ond, in spite of Mr. Jaffrayi Im-
pressive performance on the
wrong target. Albrook-Curundu's
740 was well ahead of Balboa No.
2 team's 734 score In third place,
but the latter Just squeaked by
the Marines, who compiled 733
to breath dankly down their
necks.
An epidemic of crossfire on the
wrong targets mangled quite a
few scores to look before they
yank, I mean squeeze, the trig-
ger the next time.
Miss Barbara Mlllard, the lone
gal shooter who-tackles the big
rifle, also had her disappoint-
ments. First returns on her score
showed her with a score o 172,
which would have made her the
first woman In recent local his-
tory to qualify as an "Expert"
with the Dig gun.
However, the official scorers
(heartless characters, with an
adding machine In place of the
missing organ) hacked away at
the score until they knocked It
down to 170. Barbara Is. there-
fore, officially a "Sharpshooter,"
but she Is a determined girl, and
Uncle Sugar Able can start pol-
ishing up one, each, sterling sil-
ver medal, because all the local
marksmen are betting she makes
it the next time out.
Scores follow:
BALBOA No. 1
Slow Rapid Total
Clayton Breckon 88 135 193
Sturtevant Todd 56 133 188
Al Joyce 81 135 186
J. V. BaUey 54 131 185
Team Total
752
ALBROOK-CURUNDU
Slow Rapid Total
Earl F. Mitchell 54 135 189
Bob Oorder 66 130 188
BUI Jaffray 62 132 184
Virgil Worsham 64 127 181
Team Total
740
BALBOA No. 2
Wayne Lucas
Lew Ryan
Archie Turner
Mel Mlllard
Team Total-
Slow Rapid Total
82 133 185
81 133 184
82 132 184
50 151 181
734
MARINE BARRACKS
Slow Rapid Total
Milt Perkins 84 132 186
Bob Newton 85 131 188
John Couns'lman53 130 183
Chas. Thamalls 66 128 178
Team Total 733
INDIVIDAULS
Henry Ross 64 134 188
A. Demetrop'lous 52 132 184
Fred Wells 51 132 183
Boyd Ferry 80 130 180
Ken Mlllard 49 130 179
Frank Hlrt 49 128 177
Barbara Mlllard 46 124 170
J. N. McClure 60 118 168
Ernest J. Combs 43 115 158
The next big bore match, by
special request, will be twentv
shots slow fire standing, and will
be held at Far Fan at 9 a.m. on
Sunday March 30. This match
will be strictly Individual, five
place awards, and will be held
under the auspices of the Balboa
Gun Club.
Somebody was overheard to
remark that this match would
separate the men from the fea-
therweights. Without doubt It U
s toughle, but the writer hesi-
tates to use that "men from the
boys" business. The last time he
did It was when the Balboa Jun-
iors double-crossed him and won
the four position .22 match some
years ago.
Shooters wishing to prepare
for the next monthly official
team championship match may
take the scopes off their .22 targ-
et jobs. April 20 1* th date for
the Herrington Trophy Match
over the Dewar course (20 shots
prone) with iron sights No glass.
Tough for the old men, but we've
| got to give the young eyes a
i chance, too.
Cristbal High Pins
Balboa Relay Hopes
On Sprint Teams
Although It is a bit too early
to definitely come up with his
various relay combinations.
Coach Paul Moser of Cristobal
High feels that his sprint teams
will be his best. Moser has been
working his Tiger tracksters
hard so that they will be in the
best possible condition for the
Balboa Relays on April 18.
This is the third running of
the Relays, and the Tigers have
always been well represented In
the big meet. In addition to his
Srlnt teams, it is possible that
oser will be able to come up
with a potent medley team, an-
chored by his see distance run-
ner, Anselmo Arlas.
Arlas might do double duty by
running the open mile also, and
It is more than likely that George
Bennett will enter the 100 In ad-
dition to his relay chores.
In addition to these boys, Cris-
tobal has strong personnel in the
weights, with Bill Robinson be-
ing the big gun of the discus cir-
cle, aided by such veterans as
Roy Wilson and Arnold Manning.
Manning, of course, will be re-
called by most Isthmian track
and field fans, as the top pole
vaulter from the CHS campus.
In the shot put the Tigers will
have the likes of Bob Bailey and
Bob Blakely. Both these boys are
seasoned performers in local
track and field, and will be
counted on heavily to bring
Joints Into the scoring column
or their Alma Meter.
Don McLaughlin, quarter mile,
Don Ponder, hurdler, and Bob
Grace, high Jumper, will help to
round out the Atlantic side entry
In the Balboa Relays, and all of
these boys must be considered
threats to annex individual ti-
tles. It also follows that if they
can take enough individua' and
relays places, they can win the
meet.
This will be the first time in
three years of the Relays that a
team champion will b declared,
and the Tigers will be out to gar-
ner the honors.
List of Gamboa
Swim Heel Events
Released Today
The list of events for the swim
meet being conducted at the
Oamboa Pool at 4 p.m. on March
30 was released today.
Entry forms are available at
all U.S.-Rate pools and gymnas-
iums.
200 Yds. Freestyle, Men Un-
limited.
26 Yds. Backstroke, Girls 10
and under.
25 Yds Backstroke, Boys 10
and under.
25 Yds. Freestyle, Girls12 and
under.
25 Yds. Freestyle, Boys12 and
under.
10 Yds. Breaststroke, Women-
Unlimited.
100 Yds. Breaststroke, Men
Unlimited.
50 Yds. Backstroke, Boys 14
and under.
50 Yds. Backstroke, Girls 14
and under.
25 Yds. Freestyle, Boys10 and
under.
26!Yda. Freestyle, Olrls10 and
under.
100Yds. Freestyle, Women-
Unlimited.
100 Yds. Freestyle, Men Un-
limited.
25 Yds. Breaststroke, Olrls12
and under.
25 Yds. Breaststroke, Boys12
and under.
60|Yds. Freestyle, Olrls 14
and under.
50 Yds. Freestyle, Boys 14
and under.
100 Yds. Backstroke, Women
Unlimited.
100 Yds. Backstroke, MenUn-
limited.
26 Yds. Breaststroke, Olrls10
and under.
28 Yds. Breaststroke,Boys10
and under.
25 Yds. Backstroke, Olrls 12
and under.
25 Yds. Backstroke, Boys 12
and under.
S0|Yds. Breaststroke, Olrls14
and under.
50 Yds. Breaststroke, Boys14
and under.
50Yds. Freestyle, Women-
Unlimited.
50 Yds. Freestyle, Men Un-
limited.
This Is not a tesm meet. No
one may participate in more than
three events. Age of contestants
as Of March 1, 1952, will be used
to determine classification. En-
try forms must be mailed or de-
livered not later than March 28,
1952, Ito either Oamboa Swim-
ming Pool, Box "X," Gamboa,
Canal Zone, or to Balboa Swim-
ming Pool. Drawer 3001, Balboa,
Canal Zone.
OUT OF DOORS with
MA
Spoon Lure Began As A Teaspoon
By AL MCCIAN
jutting Editor
We sat up through the wee
hours this morning listening to
a fellow talk about a new lure
he's putting on the market.
It's a spoon whose shape oro-
ides a high-lift hydrafoll, Allow-
ing for maximum motto
throguh any speed .-
cause of its calculated instab-
ility under induced spin, it
breaks rotation from one direc-
tion to the other.
A spoon, in case you forget Jis
a metal blade looking much MM
the busines end of a eewed-off
teaspoon. Fish grab a spoon un-
der the impression that they are
grabbing a smaller fish who*
suffering from a hangoer or a
broken landing gear as he wob-
bles under the cannibal's nose.
Getting Just the right wob-
ble is not simple these days
because fish and fishermen de-
mand more realism in their
baits Modern lure makers
spend months ealculstlng the
relation of weight to mass in
thousands of eurvatures before
marketing a finished prodduet.
Spoons are the oldest fishing
lures In the world. The prob-
able date of their origin Is shout
3000 B.C. The ancient Romans
used polished clam shells equip-
ped with various types of me-
tal and stone hooks, later mint
crudely carved metal dlse.
The progress of spoon design
never was elong well-deflnea
lines, it wasn't until 18M thet
an American angler really did
something to qualify for the
title of "spoon inventor."
The student was one Julio T.
Buel, a man of unlimited and
xtravagant imagination. Julio
selected pure silver for his ar-
tificial!, as he reasoned that
this was the nearest to the co-
lor of a fish's belly. But this la
getting ahead of the story.
Around 1610, young Julio
Kullkowskl Shoots
68 To Give Atlantic
Sector PAFGT Lead
Master Sergeant Kullkowskl
fired a four under par 68 Tues-
day "afternoon at the Fort Ama-
dor oolf Course to pe.ee the
Atlsntlc Sector to an eirly lead
In the Panama Armed Forces
Golf Tournament which will
continue until Friday afternoon.
The Atlantic Sector team ended
the first day's competition with
a total of 307 to barely edge out
the Coeo Solo Naval Station for
the lead. The Coco Solo team
came up with a total of 308.
Two Other golfers toured the
course in below par figures as
Captiln Starret of Albrook and
Lt. Commander Applequlst of
Coco Solo ended the eighteen
holes with totals of 69.
The golfers will continue the
tournament Wednesday at Fort
Amador and then the final two
days of the meet will be played
on the Fort William D. Davis
course on the Atlantic Side.
Team totals at the end of the
first day of play are: Atlantic
Sector, 307; Coco Solo, 308; 33d
infantry, 817; Albrook. 17; 65th
AAA, 320; 46th Reconnaissance
Battalion, 329 Special Troops
333; U. S. Army Hospital, Fort
Clsyton, 334- signal( 336; Co-
rozal, 344; 504th Field Artillery
Battalion. 379, and Westbank.
380.
tossed some white pebbles in a
brook as kids wUl, but the Ver-
mont youngster noticed tfowt
rising to them. Theseed of tat-
tntlon was sown. While eating
his lunch bb A lake ene 047,
he accidentally dropped s tea-
spoon Overboard. As the spoon
sank, he noticed the peculiar
twists and turns It Me ill the
water.
Julie had been experimenting
en bits of bright tin with a
hook soldered oft, whleh re-
volved in the water when re-
trieved, but the convex feed is
a new idea.
Young Julio's first effort was
in Lake BOmosdth, the lure
an old brass teaspoon on which
he had soldered s hook. The
line was tied to the broken
handle end His estoh was phe-
nomenal Nobody reported whet
he caught, but we etn assume
the kid knocked himself out,, as
he Always did things In a big
way. *'
Being a perfectionist, Juno
spent several years la weTWng
over the finest details of PriSer
spoon design. He applied tV,
end received, the first patent
for trolling btits in 1814. The
result was that the manufac-
tura of spoons as begun by
him in 1846 et Whitehall, new
York. To this dgy Buel spoons
are still taking fish.
Army Sporti
t FORT KOIW. C. With
three win! Slid no losses Com-
snv I leads the ltd Mfgntrr
egbnent's M Battalion 8ftbaYl
League, followed dosel? by ace
beaten K Company.
The winner of the 3d Battalion
loop will contend with Compsmy
A, 1st Battalion champs, and
Company I, 2d Battalion tltllsts,
for the right to represent Frt
Kobbe's 33d Infentry in the U8-
arcarib Softball Tournament
next month.
3D BATTALION SOFTBAIL
STANDTNOS
TEAM
I Company. ..
K Company. ..
L Company. ..
Hq. Company..
M Company ..
Wen Lost
.8 0 l.(
In 3d Battalion games played
to date, March It, M Company
romped over Headquarters, 19-8;
Mereh 12, K Company beat L
Company, 23-11. and I Company
downed M, 19-8; Mereh 7,1 Com-
fany nosed out Headquarters,
-2; Mereh 6, K Company de-
feated Headouarters, 10-3; March
5, L Company beat M come'
8-1: March 4, I Compdny
K Company, 8-8, and L Con
ripped M Company, 13-1; Tit
try 28, K Company downed L
Company, 11-7.
warrant Officer Junier Orado
Michael McDonald is offlcer-tf>-
eharge.
WMTM
tHT\
SU
BUY
\Tt*K\
NATIONAL WSTILLERS, S. A.
Panama, H. P.
NOTICE OF MEETING
Tha steokhofder* of NATIONAL DI9TILLP, S. A.
aro hereby notified that the annual moottn of stock-
holders will bo held at the principal office* s? the Com-
pany, located on tha Boyd-RoosoveK HWhway en tnd of >
April, 14>52. at 4:30 p.m for the fdHowlnt rpooe*:
a) To read lh minutos ol fho Je* iliilffi.
b) To het or /-oie*f ftroefora.
el To xcrmina and approve) the) tetarte shoe*,
pr?til and /en statement and rho roport susV
mined to (tea by (ho Board of Dfrooters.
d) To oonttdt and act upon o/J or tb
that ih hoard at Director* or each Director
inMduay. or any stockholder may submit.
Panama, March 20, 1*62
THC MCfttTAKY.



I
3-WAYTIEIN PACIFIC TWI-LEAGUE
Air Force Said
Staging 'Mad
Spending Rush'
WASHINGTON, March 30 (UP)
House investigators charged in
a scorching report that the Air
Force grabbed more funds than
It needs or can use during the
"ripe opportunity" of the Ko-
rean emergency. .
As a result, the group said,
the Air Force has been making
a "mad rush" to spend money
and has been guilty of "shame-
ful waste" in its $5,780,000,000
building program.
The charges were made In a
subcommittee report adopted by
the full House Expenditures
Committee.
It was made public as the
Senate Preparedness Subcom-
mittee heard testimony that the
United States is "just throwing
money away" on Air Force bases
In North Africa.
Both House and Senate groups
have been investigating Air Force
construction
The House investigators, hav-
ing completed their Inquiry, are
cooperating with the Senate sub-
committee in the North African
The House committee used An-
drews Air Force base in nearby
Maryland as an example of the
"utterly ridiculous" way the Air
Force has spent part of Its tund.
Congress had granted $80,000
for WAF barracks at Andrews,
the report said, but the Air Force
had no plans drawn up. So it
used a set of Alaskan barracks
Pi808 .._ L .fc.
The difference was that tne
Alaskan plans called for 40
rooms instead of the 81 need-
ed and cost $170,000 instead of
of $80.000.
In addition, the Air Force paid
a $7,000 premium to get the
building in 60 days instead of 90
days.
Thirteen WAF8 were housed in
the 40-room barracks at a cost
of $13 a day each, the commit-
tee said. It said this was "more
than double what It would have
cost to put them up at the best
hotel In Washington on a two to
a room basis."
About $22,000 of the extra cost
was traced to the Air Force's fail-
ure to inspect the barracks site
"which was almost a swamp"
The committee accused the
Air Force of a "breach of faith"
with Congress and said the
whole thing was 'a' comdey of
errors although a taxpayer
might find it difficult to see
any humor."
Testimony on the North Afri-
can bases was presented by John
W. Leahy of Bronxvllle, N.Y.,
former chief engineer for Atlas
Constructors, the contracting
combine.
IN INDEPl^S^^^iBr^^IT.T H1WSPAPW
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
HVENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA. R. P.. THURSDAY, MARCH 20, M5t
FIVE CENTS
Investigator Says Tax Agent
Got $36,700 Plus Out Of Job
oifiy
60RDEN5 eomt
HAS SUCH
SUPERB FLAVOR
i. wsxcofm
YtEYERWSTEP
BECAUSE IT 15
IOO% PU*E COfltl
%. MAOiC
OftVENIfittt
NO POT- MO ROUNDS
HEAVY IN AN INSTANT
3.THRIF1Y1O.'
USERS SM-fAOUCUVS
TIM* A POUND Of StOUND
rOfrll': AND THERE IS
NO WASTE
t* ft SOKMMS. Iti tOTTOtt OOO !
lOOX PURt
WASHINGTON. March 20 (UP)
A government investigator was
on record today with testimony
that a suspended New York tax
agent borrowed $8,550 from an
official of a firm whose tax case
he handled, and never repaid
any of It.
Rosario Glunta, an internal
Revenue Investigator, also said
that tax agent Adrian Ash spent
or saved $36,700 more than he
received in income from his $8,-
000-a-year government job from
1945 through 1950. Ash was em-
ployed In New York's Third Tax
Collection District biggest re-
venue-producing district in the
nation. ,
Giunta further testified that
during the period In question
Birth-Dale Files
Transferred To RP
From PC Company
Birth and death records for
Panam City and Coln for the
period from 1904 through 1949
were transferred yesterday from
the Canal Zone Government to
the Panam Government.
The records were moved from
the Administration Building at
Balboa Heights to the Civil Re-
gistry Office on Avenida Per in
Panam City.
As a result of the transfer of
the old records, all applications
i for certificates of births or
| deaths in Panam City or Coln,
regardless of the dates, must be
made at the Civil Registry Of-
fice in Panam City.
However, the transfer will not
affect the keeping of birth and
death records for the Canal Zone.
The Vital Statistics Section at
Balboa Heights will continue to
Issue birth and death certificates
for the Canal Zone, and for the
New Cristobal, Coln Beach and
De Lesseps areas, regardless of
nationality.
An agreement for' the transfer
of the Panam City and Coln
records was reached between
Panam and Canal Zone authori-
ties several months ago.
Ash worked on a $20,000,000 tax
refund claim filed by Universal
Pictures Co. He said Ash recom-
mended substantially the full re-
payment, but that it was not ap-
proved .
The investigator said that In
December, 1947, Universal paid
the plane fare and hotel bill for
a 20-day visit by Ash's wife and
son to Los Angeles. He said the
bill at the Beverly-Wllshlre ho-
tel came to $1,049. but that It In-
cluded a room and service for a
Universal official and his wife.
Glunta testified before a tax-
Investigating House Ways and
Means subcommittee which has
heard amazing stories of how
minor New York Internal Reve-
nue officials lived on a scale far
beyond their modest Federal sal-
aries.
Meantime, President Traman's
corruption chief Newbold Morris
Indicated he will stay on the Job
despite a slap from the Senate
judiciary committee. The com-
mittee refused to grant Morris
subpena powers and recommend-
ed that the cleanup drive be
turned over to an "Independent"
Investigator.
But Morris went ahead with
the task of mailing out question-
naires seeking to determine the
financial dealings of government
officials. Attorney General 3.
Howard McGrath, who Is under
Congressional scrutiny himself,
was the first to receive one.
Returning from a trip to Rhode
Island, McGrath was tight-lip-
ped about the questionnaire or
about a House subcommittee's
request that It be permitted to
borden*
INSTANT
Britain Protests
Spaniards' Attack
On Protestant Church
LONDON, March 20 (UP).
Minister of State for Foreign
Affairs Selwyn Lloyd told the
House of Commons today that
Britain has already protested
the attack on a Protestant
church In Seville, Spain and will
consider further representations
when more details of the Incid-
ent are available.
During a quesUon period an
Ulster Unionist representative
asked Lloyd If he was aware of
the attack March 4 on the Brit-
ish-owned church.
The Ulsterman said the min-
ister was knocked down and
furniture and hymn books set
afire.
He demanded that a protest
be made and compensation ask-
ed.
Lloyd replied: "Her Majesty's
ambassador at Madrid has re-
ported this most regrettable act
of hooliganism and has deliver-
ed a note to the Spanish gov-
ernment reserving the right to
claim compensation for damage
to British property.
"As soon as fuller details and
the exact assessment of the
damages are available, I will
consider what form our repre-
sentations to the Spanish gov-
ernment should take."
The Ulster member said the
attack was the culmination of
"a whole series of attacks" on
Protestant churches, and waved
a list of nine. He said the last
was on a Protestant chapel,
blown up by a bomb.
Laborite Anthony Greenwood
asked: "Will he (Lloyd) bear
in mind that previous attacks
have been made against Pro-
, testant churches in Spain and
emphasize that we In this coun-
! try are Irrevocably opposed to
! religious persecution, whether
of Catholics In Hungary or Pro-
testants In Spain?"
SI. Patrick's Ball
Tomorrow Night
At Union Club
The Panama-Balboa Council
1371 Knights of Columbus, will
hold' Its annual Saint Patrick's
Charity Ball, at the Union Club
tomorrow at 8 p.m.
The guests will dance to the
music of the "Martin Men" or-
chestra.
Door prizes will be given away
Tickets at $1 per person may
be obtained at the Columbus
Club on Balboa Road, or by con-
tacting anv member of the com-
mittee and at the entrance of
the Union Club.
Reservations may be made by
calling C. K. DIBella, general
chairman. Balboa 2506, or the
Columbus Club, Balboa 3466.
Sub-committee chairman as-
sisting the General Chairman
are: Leo Ardolf, Tickets: John
Wolfe and Ed Greene. Entertain-
ment; Business Managers WM-
lam Mummaw and Daniel Hen-
nessy. Milton J. Halley. Tony
i_ Bartecchi and Charle* A. Garcia.
i Featured in your Commissary Publicity.
90 Arriving
On 'Cristbal'
Ninety passengers are sched-
uled to arrive on the Isthmus
Monday on the S.S. Cristobal,
according to the advance passen-
ger list from the Panam Line
offices at Balboa Heights.
The complete advance list fol-
lows:
Mrs. Catherine Alleback. Miss
Florence Amirault. Miss Virginia
Amirault, Mrs. Isabel Bertrn.
Lt. Juntous J. Blelman, Miss Ann
Boniello, Mr. and Mrs. Luther G.
Bradshaw and three children,
Dr. and Mrs. Irvih Brenner, Miss
Eleanor Brown, and Mr. and Mrs.
Louis N. Brownell.
Mrs. Angela Chac|n and
daughter. Dr. and Mrs. Andrew
Crofl, Mrs. Mazie T. Daniel and
two children, Mrs. Mable H.
Demarest, Mr. and Mrs. J. D.
Dltzler, Mr. and Mrs. Bart J. El-
ich, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ellis,
Mrs. Georgina Erno and daugh-
ter, and Miss Elaine Evans.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Fulton,
Mr. and Mrs. 8. King Fulton, Mr.
and Mrs. Richard L. Gray. Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Gruber, Mr. and
Mrs. John Hennessy, Mrs. Flor-
ence B. Hepburn, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Hlgglns, Frank J. Hud-
on, Mtes E. A. Hughes, and Ger-
ald J. Kelley.
BIRDS
Cat Green
EYE
Beans
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Law,
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Liscoe,
Francis C. MacDonald, Mr. and
Mrs. Carl G. Mann, Mrs. Ger-
trude Morse, Mrs. Shirley W. My-
ers and two children, Mr. and
Mrs. C. H. Neuswanger, Harry
Noble, Mr. and Mrs. E. N. Och-
roch, and Mrs. Louise Oeters.
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer W. Pape,
Mr. and Mrs. Carlton B. Payson,
Miss Joan Pierce, Mr. and Mrs.
Edward F. Pinney, Mrs. Kather-
ine Rlchter, Mr. and Mrs. Emlle
Roasseau, Frederick L- Schneid-
er, and Mrs. Eve M. Sprague and
two children.
Mr. and Mrs. R. K. Tyler, Mr.
and Mrs. Hobart Van Dyne, Mr.
and Mrs. A. A. Vestal, Capt. Louis
A. Vlgglano, Mrs. Pearl J. Wynn,
see the Attorney General's In-
come tax returns for recei
years.
Glunta told the Ways and
Means subcommittee his investi-
gation disclosed that Ash obtain-
ed loans totalling $8,500 between
March. 1947 and January. 1951,
from Alexander Ostrlker. former
vice president of the Duplex Fa-
brics Corp.
Giunta said Ash audited the
firm's returns In 1945. Under
questioning, he testified that an
Investigation of Ash's audit re-
port showed nothing out of the
way. But he said that Ash had
repaid none of the money.
Glunta told the subcommittee
that from 1945 through 1950 Ash
either spent or put into savings
a total of $76,800. During the
same period his declared Income
amounted to only $40,100.
He said Ash explained that he
had borrowed from his friends
and on his life Insurance, receiv-
ed gifts from his family, reduced
his cash on hand and won $5,-
800 gambling.
Ash, who was suspended Mar.
7, now is m a New York hospital
for an operation.
Heart Attacks
Blamed For Two
Deaths Yesterday
Two deaths attributed to heart
attacks were reported to the Ca-
nal Zone police today.
One occurred aboard the Navy
tanker Mission Santa Cruz at
3:15 a.m. when an American
boatswain's mate tripped on deck
and fell overboard through an
open gateway.
The dead man was 44-year-old
George Tipton McMillan, Jr., a
native of Texas,
A seaman who saw the acci-
dent Jumped Into the water im-
mediately to assist McMillan.
Both McMillan and the seaman
were taken from the water only
a few minutes later. Artificial
respiration was given McMillan
at once, till Dr. David Senzer of
the Balboa Dispensary arrived at
the scene and pronounced him
dead.
Dr. Senzer believed that death
could have been due to a heart
attack because of the short time
McMillan was in the water.
Master of the ship, Orls W.
Chaffee, was allowed to proceed
to a confidential destination to-
wllford and McKay, local
agents for the ship, are notify-
ing the dead man's mother in
Port Worth, Texas.
Mortimer Shuffler, 56-year-old
Barbadian employed as cook on
the Dredging Division tug Cule-
bra, died at Gorgas Hospital yes-
terday afternoon two hours after
he had a heart attack while
THE COURIER, dockslde after commissioning ceremonies, ready for 1U shakedown cruise In
In the Caribbean.
* *
Free Peoples' Radio Ship To
Make Panama Goodwill Visit
WASHINGTON, March 20
(USIS) The new radio ship
designed to carry the free world's
message to peoples behind tne
Iron Curtain will call at ports
in Venezuela, Colombia and Pan-
am within the next few weeks.
The coast guard vessel Cour-
ier" will then remain in the Ca-
ribbean area for several weeks of
testing of its equipment before
proceeding into the Atlantic.
The ship is equipped with a
powerful transmitter which will
relay programs of the "Voice of
the United States of America
broadcast from New York.
The ship will make goodwill
visits to these ports: La Guaira,
Venezuela, on March 27; Carta-
gena, Colombia, on April 1; pro-
bably both Cristobal and Balboa
in the Canal Zone on April 15
At each city broadcasts will be
arranged with local radio sta-
tions to demonstrate the opera-
tion of the floating transmitter
The transmuting eqolpmtiit
Is the most powerful of Its Una
ever installed on a ship. It
consists of one 150-k.w. me-
dium wave transmitter (three
times the power of the largest
American broadcasting sta-
tion), two 35-k.w. shortwave
transmitters and supporting
communications eiu|Pm,en.t-
It will pick up Voice of Amer-
Commanded by Captain Oscar
C B Wev U.8. Coast Guard, the
5800-ton, 338-foot vessel will be
manned by a Coast Guard crew
of 80, including ten officers
trained in radio. Voice of Amer-
ica engineers will supervise the
operation of the transmitting
equipment.
Although capable of broadcast-
ing from the open sea, the
"Courier" also can operate while
anchored, using either land-baa-
ed antenna or antenna support-
ed by a captive barrage balloon
filled with helium. The ship will
carry a supply of balloons, 69 by
35 feet in size, and 150,000 cubic
feet of helium. A winch under
the flight deck will spool the
balloon cables in and out.
The ship will be used to relay,
rather than originate, programs
Better Eight
Than Never,
Say 29 Suitors
LONG BEACH, Calif.,
20 UP). Mrs. Agnes -
35, said today she's had 29 mar-
lage proposals in five days.
Her unfailing lure to eligible
males: Eight little Income tax
deductions.
The attractive widow an-
March
Roche,
111 pick up Voice of Amer- nounced recently that she was
lea signals transmitted from|warching for a new husband
Stateside "facilities and beam
them directly into target coun-
tries. ______.
and Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Young, working aboard the tug, which
r i was tied up In Diablo.
Repairs Completed,
S.S. Panama To
Leave On Schedule
The S.S. Panam will depart
on schedule tomorrow at 10 a.m.
for New York, since emergency
repair to the engines have been
completed In time to allow the
regular departure, Panama Line
officials announced today. i
Earlier the company had salc|
the vessel's departure might be
delayed 24 hours for the repairs.
The Panam has o passenger,
list of 123 persons and will also!
carry a large consignment Of
bananas.
who would "really love me and
my brood.
But none of her 29 admirers
filled the bill.
Many of them failed to win
Mrs. Roche and her eight chil-
dren because they were "namby
pamby," she said, and she wants
"a real man."
Interested suitors must be
'about her own age and at least
5 feet 2 Inches tall.
although lt is equipped with *
small studio and control center
should program announcements
or originations become required.
One hold of the vessel contains
diesel engines capable of gener-
ating 1,500,000 watts of electrical
power for the radio equipment.
The dlesel-powered ship is a
former Navy cargo vessel owned
by the Maritime Administration.
It was demothballed and trans-
ferred to the Department of
State, then transferred to the
Coast Guard when commissioned.
Resignation Asked
Of South African
Premier Dr. Halan
JOHANNESBURG, fjputh Afri-
ca, March 20 (UP).The South
African opposition today de-
manded the resignation of Pre-
mier Dr. D. r. Malan, as a re-
sult of his critical reverse in a
showdown before the Bupreme
Court on racial segregation.
3. G. N. Strauss, leader of the
party of ex-Premier Smuts, said,
"The people of South Africa
should act they should im-
mediately demand the resigna-
tion of the government, as I
now demand In their name."
The Malan faetion suffered a
seaback early today when the
nation's highest court upheld
the appeal of four native voters
in a test case.
The five judges unanimously
ruled unconstitutional a Malan
law to remove colored voters
from the common voters' roll,
and thus keep them from taking
part in parliamentary elections.
Because all the work is done;
there's no waste to bother with 1
The most delicious beans-
ready to cook, and serve!
Guaranteed to be the finest
uniform quality, every time!
confident
appealing
charming
INTERNATIONAL BOY SCOUTS of the Canal
from Jamaica where they attended the First
to 17 at Up-Park-Camp. The group which co
Commissioner Romeo G. Miller, participated m
tatlves from twenty-three other countries, lnc
contingent was greeted by a large number of
loner Miller, speaking for the group, express
tended them in Jamaica and lor the spirit of
Zone arrived at Tocumen on Tuesday night
Caribbean Jamboree which took place March 5
nsisted of ten scouts and their leader. District
the Jamboree program along with represen-
ludlng the United 8tates and Canada. The
relatives and friends at Tocumen. Commls-
ed high praise for the manv courtesies ex-
fraternity which prevailed at the Jamboree,
... and the secret of her charm s Odo-Ro-No. Don't let
offending underarm odour ipoil your natural freshness. Tfour
bath temporarily washes away unpleasant perspiration odour,
but it will not give you the lasting protection you can rely on.
Odo-Ro-No safely topi penpiratfoti and
odour for a full 24 hours.
Odo-Ro-No stay* creamy tonger-nerer gets
gritty even in open jar.
No deodorant cream ii so harmless to fabrki
at Odo-Ro-No.
9 No deodorant cream it gentler to even
sensitive skin, snd it is so easy to use.
If yu pnftt Uiuid dtoior**,
i* for OJo-Xo-N Ufid.
0D0R0-IK)
CHAM
Th
wMwwt m Daub



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