The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01413

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"BRANIFF
MONTEVIDEO
ROUND tw
mrr class $741.10
TOURIST '0
DILT NIWSPAPHt
Panama American
**Let the people know the truth and the country U $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
Scaqrams VO.
< l\\l>l i\ Mil ISk>
Now... 6 Years Old!
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAT, MARCH 14, 1952
FIVE CENTS
A-Powered Bomber
(NEA Telephoto)
MAN OF THE HOUR Cien. Fulgencio Batista la all smiles as he leases a Havana^uba,
radio station with a ring of police escorting him. after making a nation-wide radio-TV ap-
pearance Ousted President Carlos Prio Socarras took refuge In Havana's Mexican Embassy,
and then was granted safe conduct out of the country.
* *
m
Batista Describes Himself
As Dictator Of The
Hancock Resigns
District Court
Judge In C.Z.
Joseph J. Hancock, judge of the District Court in
the Canal Zone, announced today that he has tendered
his resignation to the U.S. Justice Deportment.
Hancock said he sent in his resignation yesterday,
the effective date to be set by the Department.
The judge, who is 65 years old, gave ill health as
his reasons for resigning.
Batista has once again loos-
plied
the people."
He said the seeds of revolu-
tion were planted by the Prlo
fovernment, "and we are the
rult."
The plane taking Prlo to Mex-
lTftlco had barely taken off from
said that the month ana a nair h Vporf)Bv when the Renub-
suspenslon of const 11 u ti o n a 1 {}!an PaVtv one oP the cartles
guarantees by his regime was u
necessary "because there may be
trouble, and we need 45 days
the Cuban communist Party, but
he would keep a sharp eye on
them.
Batista, now in uncontested
control of Cuba with the de-
parture to Mexico of deposed
President Carlos Prlo Socarras
to prepare."
He did
d not elaborate.
The
Judges' Bench
EmlH.no VI- -- loy^
Probable cause was found this
morning on a charge of return-
ing to the Canal Zone after de-
portation against
Car.
The 38-year-old Panamanian
defendant waived preliminary
hearing this morning, and was
being held for trial In the U.S.
District Court. Ball was fixed at
|200.
Meanwhile a burglary charge
against a teenage Panamanian
was dismissed today, on a mo-
tion made by the government.
Marsimlno Secalda, 17. was re-
leaaed after the burglary charge
was dismissed.
And for stabbing his common -
law wife with a scissors blade,
Florencio Caceres, 33. Colombian,
was found guilty and sentenced
to 30 days In jail. He was also
fined $30.
Three Panamanians were fined
$10 for trespassing In the Balboa
Commissary Annex. They were
Ana Luisa Arosemena. 32. Julia-
na Tang de Wong. 30 and Felicia
Montero de Sllvera, 27.
Batista collaborated with
American gangsters who soon
may be running the country."
Conservative Party
represented^ PHoWmllstra- ^ PaiMill Htf L0S6
^ZZZTLlcZ Presidential Choice
Prlo predicted Cuban public ., _.
opinion would force Batista out The Conservative Party of
or power without a counter-re-' Panama, which Is making a des-
o
volution.
Prlo said Batista succeeded In
overthrowing his government
"only because of the treason of
the lower segments of the army
the sergeants, lieutenants and
captains.
perate bid to stay alive after
the next elections, found Itself
In trouble today with its candi-
date for President.
A request for the nullification
of the candidacy of Conserva-
tive Judge Pedro Moreno Cor-
, rea has been filed with the Na-
The high command wasjoyal. i tlonal Electoral Jury by Jose
" del Rosarlo Rivas, a private ci-
tizen.
Rlvas claims that Correa
handed down a sentence as one
of the judges ".of the Court of
Administrative, Litigations on
Feb. 20. He pointed out that
electoral laws prohibit presi-
dential candidates from occupy-
Tne high command was loy
All the top government officials
al. They were betrayed
Hancock was appointed to the
$18,000-a-year Canal Zone post
on June 19,1948, and arrived here
July S of the same year.
One of his first cases was the
famed suit against Joseph Sachs,
the Communist-labeled special
representative of the CIO-UPW
union of local-rate workers on
the Canal Zone who was accused
of libelling the then district at-
torney, Daniel McGrath.
Hancock sentenced Sachs to
nine months in Gamboa Peni-
tentiary which he served after
the Canal Zone decision was up-
held by the U.8. Appeals Court.
Hancock's Canal Zone appoint-
ment had four and a half more
years to run.
In announcing his retirement
day t*tliticlaeeetl that kor
has been isrierlng from stomach
ulcers fot many years and that,
In addition, his wife had express-
ed a desire to return to Louis-
ville. Ky^to be nearer her rela-
tives.
Cigaret Story'
Lands Second
Newsman In Jail
Another
tenced to
newsman was
19 days in Jail
sen-
yes-
torlay
JUDGE HANCOCK
Hancock Is
Louisville.
also a native
India Governor
Visits New Delhi
-With 11 Wives
t*
terday on a charge of "disres-
pect to the President."
Ramon Jurado, associate edi-
tor of the opposition dally
"Prensa Libre" and political
radio commentator, was placed
in a cell of the Secret Police
headquarters yesterday after-
noon and later taken to the
Crcel Modelo to serve his sen-
tence.
His cellmate for the next nine
days will be Ramon B. Reyes,
a columnist of the same news-
paper, who was sentenced to 15
days on the same charge late
last week.
Reyes was Jailed following
publication of an Item which
said President Alclblades Aro-
semena had collected $25,0001
from persons Interested In
blocking the establishment of
a cigaret factory here, and I
$3,000 from those interested In,
Its establishment. He claimed
It was a rumor he had heard!
in usually well-informed circles.
Jurado echoed the rumor on,
his dally radio news program
"Libertad" and for several days!
evaded a citation to appear be-,
fore Mayor Alberto Navarro.
When he flnaky apdeared be-
fere the mayor ha asked for an
Investigation of the bank ac-
dfsvnMffor. ind of the
at whose home It was claimed
that the deal was made .to
block the contract authorizing
of i the establishment of the cigaret
factory. Requests were not
granted.
Yesterday Mayor Navarro
handed down the 15-day sen-
tence to Jurado.
Beer Shortage In
Buenos Aires Brings
Government Action
Giant Machine
V
May Be 5 Years
In Construction
WASHINGTON, March 14 (UP) The Defense
Department disclosed today that it has awarded a con-
tract to the Boeing Airplane Company aimed at construc-
tion of a huge super-bomber capable of housing an atomic
engine.
Boeing will work in close cooperation with Pratt &
Whitney Co., of East Hartford, Conn., which will build
the engine for the atomic airplane.
Pair Jailed For
Sue Core Burglary;
Silver Recovered
Two Panamanian youths were
In Balboa Jail today after they
were picked up by Canal Zone
police in connection with the
burglery of $1500 worth of sil-
verware stolen exactly three
weeks go to the day from Mlas
8ue T Core's home in Alteon.
The case
No details of the Boeing con-
tract were disclosed, but of-
ficials said previously that both
the plane and the Pratt St Whit-
ney engine will be a "different
type" from the airframe and
engine being developed by Con-
solidated-Vultee Corp., and Gen-
eral Electrict Co.
The Air Force announced late
last year that Consolidated-Vul-
tee and GE were working on an
atomic-powered plane. Today's
announcement may mean that
an Important step had been tak-
en toward putting a second ato-'
mlc-drtvea craft In the sky. -
It
NEW DELHI, March 14 (UP)- 'und the. a Na*t too strong
His Exalted Highness General Sir 5Jd asked Prasad to cut
Mir Osman AH Khan Bahadur, Imlng short.
Harvey Parker Jr.
Dies Suddenly Al
Home In Gamboa
Funeral services for Harvey
Weston Parker. Jr. storekeeper
In the Dredging Division who
died at his home In Gamboa ear-
upj
ifte
recognized as the No. 1 rajpa-
mukh (governor) of India, arriv-
ed here today and beamed In ap-
preciation for newsreel and
newspaper cameramen.
The Niaam, making his first
trip to India's capital in 18 years,
arrived with an entourage of 72,
including an estimated 11 wives,
aboard three chartered planes.
Other members of his staff
precedec* the airborne party by
train toTeady Hyderabad House,
Impositions of authority after the ni^,.,, New Delhi residence,
st3L.mon,tn% bei0Tre eltctlons- for a fcjur-day stay during the
iT?!. EJvCtorS' JU,T has trans- current ^Governors' Conference,
mltted the charge to the 8u-
Yesterday upon his arrival at
the airport the Nizam's first
words on stepping from his char-
tered Constellation were: "Where
are the females?"
Holcombe, Munch
Get Appointments
By Chirilanco
BUENOS AIRES. March 14
(UP). The Ministry of Industry
and Commerce today decreed
Eovernment Intervention in all
reWerles of Argentina to In-
sure compliance with official
regulations regarding the distri-
bution of beer.
The Greater Buenos Aires
area has been suffering an acute
shortage of beer for the last
three months, aggravated by the
fact that this Is the hottest sum-
mer on record, and by a short-
age of wine.
Argentine dictator Peron de-
clared that the beer shortage
Is due to the fact that the
breweries are sending it to the
Interior, where they are getting
better prices.
uel Davis. 18, who face the
glary charge.
According to the Panam Se-
cret Police, the loot was pawned
in Panam City through a
"fence" and netted the defend-
ants from $30 to $50.
Boeing saldifhad been award-
ed the contract for the atomic
plane "last year" and that a
special group of scientists and
engineers already is working on
the project. In a carefully-word-
ed statement, It said the con-
tract called for "an engineering
study of the application of nu-
Mlss Core's apartment in build- clear power plants to aircraft."
ing 313 on Fourth of July Ave- If the "study" Is successful
nue In Ancon was entered some- and Boeing finds that It can
time during the night of Feb. 22. build a plane capable of housing
Miss Core is a school teacher the Pratt k. Whitney engine, the
and well-known Isthmian writer, government then will give the
In addition to about $1,200 company a construction go-
worth of silverware, a valuable ahead.
400-day clock, a radio and two Both the atomic plane and
cases of whiskey were also stolen, submarine, protects have been
Everything was recovered ex- given high priority because of
cept a few pieces of silverware the near-lncredlble perform-
and the radio. anees each would be capable of.
| An atomic-powered plane prob-
Accordlng to the Canal Zone abIy coud circle the globe non-
police, both youths have admit- ?52.p^wlthut,4 rcTueUinK and at
ted that they had possession of'8***-*1* and altitude general*/ re-
the stolen goods at one time but8aed {antartic- The sub-
have denied that they pawned lt:mft*ne._0UJd cnue ior
in Panama City. The
previous police recoru-
m and the Canal Zone. ,
MaJ. George Herman, chief of
Zone police.
thev nawned itmftrine could c""* *<"" vast
rhev bothhave, distances without refueling and
coros la. Pan" sto/ *"ost lndefln-
7nna I llWy.
the Canal Zone police, today
firaised the cooperation given
Re Zone detectives by the Pan- Saturday,
ama Secret Police. He said their High
work was "of great value In solv- 5:58 a.m.
Ing the case." '6:11 p.m.
BALBOA TIDES
15
Low
12:09 p.m.
preme Court for a decisin.
Yesterday the
completed another move which
they hope will garner sufficient
enea ai nis nome in uamooa ear- voteg ^ teep #the party a,lve
ly this morning from a heart at-by launching Angel Vega Men-
tack, will be held next Wednes-1 dez, erstwhile Panamelsta can-
day, at 4 p.m. In
Union Church.
R. A. Holcombe has been nam-
lUv w.Uv. ed manager of the Chiriqui Land
At tho opening of the confer-> Company to fill the vacancy left BQ*l|rt Mfttrnw
ence todpy the Nizam was seated, by the recent death of O. A. My- l\ JUIO IV105CO
Conservatives on the left of Pres. Rajendrai rick.
Prasad. n the president's right:
was Prettier Jawharlal Nehru. Holcombe served as assistant! t
The Hzam is the only "Exalt- manager of the company In
among the govern- Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui, for
In real- the past 12 years and Is well
ed Highness"
ors. He never succeeded
the Gamboa didate for mayor of Panama Izlg his ambition to become known by the'people there and
He was 37 years old.
The body will be sent to River-
side, New Jersey, for burial.
A native of Camden. New Jer-
sey, he had been employed hi the
Canal organization since Febru-
ary 19$5. He first came to the1
For falling to carry valid cer- isthmus in 1821 with hta parents.
tlflcates of inspection on their
vehicles Julio Ernesto Rodriguez,
33. Antonio Espino. 28. and Na-
thaniel Fitzgerald Brown, 38,
were each fined $10 this morn-
ing. They are all Panamanians.
+
answer
the call
1952 KD CROSS FUND
He was first employed as
salesman In the Commissary Dl-
vision and later served as meat
cutter and commissary assistant. I
He left Canal service for a short
time In 1041 and was reemployed
In the Dredeglng Division, where
he served as Junior foreman, dis-
patcher and material foreman.
Mr. Parker served in the Na-
vy from June 1944 to June 1948
and was reemployed the follow-
ing September as material fore-
man In the Dredging Division.
He was named Storekeeper in
July 1950.
City on the Conservative ticket
Sword & Ploughshare
HANOI, March 14 (UP) A
French soldier uncovered and
took a Vietminh soldier pri-
soner near here today with a
bulldozer.
The rebel offered no resu-
tsnee. He had no clothes on.
"His Majesty," although he has in Bocas del Toro.
been on the Hyderabad throne
for 40 years Oeorge D. Munch, at the same
The Hlzam, who Is reputedly time, was named manager of the
the world's richest man, did not Bocas division with main offices
bring his favorite automobile, an In Almirante,
elderly Ford, to New Delhi with I ,..
him Munch has been serving with
The potentate made no audl- the company In Honduras. He
We comment while bein* ohoto- formerly fo^ed in Puerto
gr- '--1 tnr'iy but reported he mn, Cos'- ^<-a.
Brands Eleanor
Enemy Of Peace'
Ll-i
I
WASHINGTON. March 14
(UP) Radio Me ew has
branded Mrs. Eleanor Roose-
velt a "sworn enemy of peace
and democracy."
A broadcast intercepted here
said that See. of State Dean
Acbeson has ordered her to
tour India and Pakistan "for
the formation of a pobee force
for combatting the peoples'
strartle for freedom.''
Anti-Prostitution Campaigner Gets Death Threat
if Parliament passes her bill to
abolish legalized prostitution in
Italy.
The Senate approved the meas-
ure last week and the 70-year-
old leftwlng Socialist senator
He is survived by his wife and said threats or no threats, she
four-year-old daughter, Lillian, hoped to see It passed by the
who returned Monday from a Chamber of Deputies within a
ROME. March 14 (UP) Sen- am turning It over to police for the Chamber of Deputies would
a tor Angelina Merlin said tr day investigation not because I am not take more than a tew weeks
she had received an anonymous afraid cut because I think people, to act.
letter threatening her with death i like these should be eliminated
vacation in the United 8tatcs;
his mother, Mrs. H. W. Parker,
of Camden. New Jersey; one son.
Harvey W. Parker ITJ. two sls-
Senaior Merlin, who
been isampalcning ag a I n s t
prostitution for years, said
that since the Senate approv-
ed he bill she had received
"hundreds" of letters ere*
from prostitates praising
her action.
The only protest came,
said, from an anonymous
respondent, who said he hoped
to see her "slain with a dagger"
few weeks.
She said the threatening let-
ter, bearing a Milan postmark.
apparently came from the own- if the bill became a law.
ters. Mrs. Thelma Burnnsm of er of one of 700 or so lrgal houses It took the Senate four years
California nd Mrs. Jenolia Mc- of prostitution in Italy ito epprove Srnator Merlin's bill.
Gonlgal of Camden. N.J. The woman senator said,- I but she said she was confident
She said." The Deputies are
younger than the Senators. I
lam sure they will better under-
stand the spirit of my project
i and approve It very soon."
Plans are already under way
to set up special centers to "re-
orient" 3,000 legal prostitutes In
Italy as soon as the "houses of
she tolerance" are shut down, the
cor- senator said.
Religious and civic organi-
zations are now providing
funds for this program, but
the government will eventual-
ly contribute. r''e revealed.
The senator declared, "We
will not force worne to ea-
ter tbeie centers. Those who
want to come will be wel-
come. We will stady their
ease* carefully and try to
find them decent employ-
ment."
Senator Merlin disputed the
claims that abolition of legal*
houses would only make ven-
ereal disease more widespread
In Italy, but she agreed that
law or no law streetwalklng
would continue.
She said that prostitution
will be eliminated only when
the present social system Is
changed. "There Is no doubt
that prostitution Is a conse-
quence of social injustice," she,
stated. i
(NEA Radlo-Teiephoto)
IKE LEARNS OF ITS TRIUMPH Gen. Dwlght D. Elsen-
hower reads results of the New Hampshire primary elections
handed him by a reporter Just before the NATO supreme
cummander left Parts on a flight to Frankfurt Germany.
"Tie" said his decisive victory over Sen. Robert Taft and
c'her Republican aspirants made him "very proud," bat I
scill does not plan to return to the US. in the Immediate
future


"
TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AW DmiTENDFNT DATIT NEWSPAPER

i mi
FRIDAY, MARCH 4. MSI
THE PANAMA AMERICAN

WMIB AMD SUSUSHSO S* TMI MNAHA AMtWICAN PRM. INC.
IrouNoie iv nilion houniIvill in <>
HARMOOIO ARIA*. IDITOR
B7 M mm P O BOX 134. PANAMA. I. OF P.
TtLIFMONI PANAMA NO 8-0740 LINI>
CASH Aocnn PANAMBICAN. PANAMA
' COLON OfFICt It 17S CfNTRAL AVINUI BSTWtlN 12TN ANO 1STH TtT
POSSiSN Ptl**ISCNT*TIVIS< JOSHUA B POWER. INC.
345 MADISON Avt. NrW YORK. I IT I N. V.
LOCAL V MAIL
PCS MONTH. IN ADVAMC 'll? ''mS
SOS SIX MOUTH. IN ABVANC1 S-BO .'JS
fon ONt VAS. IN ABVANCI la.BO_______________
THE MAIL BOX
The Moll Bos Is on ops" torum ot rsodsrs 0 Tks Panama Amer-
lean. Lstttn ara receh-ad aratafully and os handlsd Ir. a wholly eon-
?idanfial manner.
I yos contfrbufs hrttv *>"' bs important It It doesn't appsir Mis
nml doy Letters are published in the order received.
Piste try to keep ths lsttsn limited to one poit linsth.
Identify of letter writers n held in strictsst confidence.
Thii newtpoper assumes no responsibility for itofsments or opinions
xpreitad In letters from readers.
O
SALUTES WITHOUT THE SIR
Balboa, C. Z.
0>t.ilemen:
As Joe Williams would say or rather writeAdding one lit-
tie observation to another n whatever became of the basic con-
ceu of military courtesy as regards the salute?? Like Joe, I've
>>een around for quite a spell and have had the good fortune
of lii'ving an-on-the-spot-vlew of a lot of this Ole Terra Firma
of ours, including most of the farflung and ever increasing
military locales of the U.8. Armed Forces.
Also like Joe. I've taken considerable pride and satisfaction
lr these duties and associations, that isuntil and until (I
nttn both of 'em I arrived in the Caribbean Command.
In this Command. Lo and Benold. I witness a dally spec-
tacle that until "Mine Eyes Have Told Me So" no one under
Hea\en could have convinced me, was possible under the Stars
aha Stripes.
Nevertheless it happens at the entrance to every military
reservation at least a hundred times each dav and I have refer-
ence to the debasing sight of an enlisted man saluting an auto-
mobile because the automobile happens to bear a decal sticker
Indicating ownership bv a commissioned officer.
Moreover, the salute Is accorded regardless of the dress of
the driver or the other occupants!!
This practice Is not covered by any known written directive
and apparently Is rent'i red by the Command on a sort of an un-
written-law basis, and I'm positive it Isn't Just an oversight nor
a "Toosv-jest Grew" thing.
I believe that Joe would agree with me that, legallv a salute
is properly required when and only when both the enlisted man
and the officer are In uniform out-of-doors or in a dutv status
ind'.ors and Is accorded on the concept that the commissioned
uniform and its Insignia. NOT THE PERSONAL MAN OR WO-
MAN, rates the courtesv.
This is verv pronablv a little late to expect the soon-to-be-
rttired CG of the CC to take the necessary corrective action
as he has reallv been thru the mill in thp past few weeks, with
the continue 1 whirl of social events in his honor and the soul
s^o^in<' duty of receivine the Klss-on-the-cheek medals *n com-
r. e.-.datior*. all of which are a military recess'- and a sort
cf a cushion, as It were, for the repose of the six stars tYes
that's right, three for each shoulder) and the Cher resplendent
ornaments that In the too near future mst follow the uniform
Into the mothballs and be replaced by those, above all things,
civilian clothes. ba"rv pants 'n spen!!!
But if he is stm with me. the good General could take a
leaf ro-n the AFRS around-thc-world admonition to service
men. "Whnt. other neonle think of vour -Country depends on
wh*t thev think of you."
It's hlfrh time some one did something to remove this "Iron
Curtain" smi'dee In our military behnvlor. lest goodwill be lost
In Irese parts to the detriment of our Defense and State De-
partments. ,
So far Drew Pearson's operatives have not been called,
BTTf------
-------Ima Insult.
COMMITTEE OrToOOD CITIZENSHIP
Dear Sir: Z
There wa< JbUabed recently in this column a letter con-
^conditions in the local schools, partcula^-
,tie writer suggested that the Committee on
*s look into the matter for the purpose of
..Cura of correction.
Let me first explain that the Committee on Governmental
Aflilrs is NOT-in anv way an official committee, nor Is it in
anv respect legitimately attached to the local government, or
to tne Federal Government In Washington. ,
it Is not an instrument of any official government.
It Id simply a committee made up of representatives from
the lour affiliated Women's Club on the Isthmus, each member
o* which is vitally interested'In good citizenship.
The plans for the work of the committee are both long-
rmnge and immediate In scope; we hope to be able to look into
matters of purely local Interest In the future, but this being a
presidential election year In the United States, our first duty
lies in our larger responsibility which is, first and foremost, to
our country.
Hence, we are currently undertaking a campaign to assist
*>ve-V United States citizen residing here to assume his share in
that responsibility by voting this year. If it is possible for him
to do so.
That Is whv we have set up Voting Information Booths each
Saturday in Balboa and Cristobal Commissaries.
Meanwhile, there are organizations already set up In our
communities to look into problems of local interest; I refer,
chiefly, to our civic councils. We do not Intend to Infringe
voon their fields of activity, but we do offer them our support
Ad full cooperation wherever we may be of assistance to them.
rhe school situation is Indeed regrettable still if the matter
were looked Into one would probably find that in 75% of the
cltlts and communities in the states, schoolc are equally as
crowded If not more so. That, however, does not excuse our
situation here, but it simplv means that our cause for alarm In
this respect is not greater than In most American communities.
The Committee on Good Citizenship, many of whose mem-
bers are mothers, recognizes this problem, as well as many
other problems of local import which people have been kind
enough to brins again to our attention. We are grateful for
the Interest of the public in our work, and we shall continue to
etH/e for better conditions in our communities and in our coun-
tries
We shall appreciate It very much If you will kindly print
thl? reply In your Mail Box column. Thank you.
Very truly yours.
The Committee on Good Citizenship.
Mrs. John M. Brown. Chairman.
evrnlng the cr
ly in Margarita
Oi.tprnmenta! A
e>ff"ctine some m
Amazing Hew Wax discovery!
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jomsoil'l WAX OS mmd Laborararfea. In rMe
ImmotsM Towr, acMnoe and r wearer! umse la
dinlsp rAe orla" near Wax PlHUll
Johnson's PRIDE
Labor News
And
Comment
By Victor Rtesel
To track down the Inside sto-
ry of the most dramatic rail re-
volt since the Army shot it out
with strikers some 0 year* ago,
you've got to travel far j.ast the
nundreus of carloads ot valua-
ble meats that rotted this week
when striking pickets kept ice
vans from the rail yards.
You must go beyond ihc im-
mobilized war equipment on rail
Slaings in desolate yards. -
yond the hundreds of little
towns along vne main line *.nv...
feeds them dally.
Beyond even the unhappy
travelers who dragged their bags
out of sleeping cars and bumped
their way home by bus.
Go beyond the men laid off.
the Inconvenience, the stalled
shipments in Buffalo, Cleveland,
Chicago, Columbus, Indianapolis
St. Louis, Detroit, Toledo, Cincin-
nati and points east the crip-
pled heart of one-third of the
nation.
The real story is in Mr.
Truman's guarded Key West
beach, in the fact that the
Pentagon, which nominally
runs the nation's rail line,
actually didn't know there was
a strike for 24 hours. In the
fact that, although first word
came in the early Sunday
dawn. Pentagon officials did
not meet on major policy de-
cisions until 10 a.m. Monday.
The real story is in the exper-
ience of one top railroad execu-
tive whose 27th wedding anni-
versary fell on Sunday.
He rushed down to Florida to
spend it with his wife, got off
the train, saw her for an hour,
got a phone call from New York
and flew home. He took for
granted that the military would
be in equal haste.
But It was the week-end. And
they didn't move for 24 hours
though arms were being kept
from the front lines, millions of
dollars worth of meats were
spoiling, millions more in wages
were being lost and profits
slashed.
The real story, therefore, Is In
the dismal failure of the hand-
ful of men around Mr. Truman
who let him down each time by
falling to develop anything even
remotely resembling intelligent
policy until the crisis moment.
It was so in steel. It was so In
bomber aircraft. It is so on the
rail lines.
It will be so in scores of crit-
ical strike situations, one of
which may soon deprive the na-
tion of oil.
Since August 27, a brigadier
general, 12 colonels, 15 It. colon-
els, 14 majors, one captain, three
first loles, a sergeant and eight
clerks have been "running" the
nation's rail lines.
Every day the railroad* would
telegraph the colonels lit charge
bf each region saying all was
peaceful.
That happened d u r i n g the
very hours thousands of men
were being ordered not to report
for their runs.
All right, so we check the
55 military men running the
lines, and we find that ne one
bothered with intelligence
work. Good! no spying on the
unions. But the military could
read. They could at least have
read the official newspapers of
the railway unions.
"Labor," mothpipr- if '*-
unions, one of the best informed
and most in.'i
workingmen's publications, had
a front-page piece on March 8,
Just a few days before the strike
which quoted one of the strike
leaders, Locomotive Firemen and
Englnemen's chief, D.B. Robert-
son, as warning the nation that:
"Ill-advised and misguided
intervention by the White House
In railroad labor disputes is lead-
ing the Industry deeper into tur-
moil. Only by a prompt reversal
of such policy can far reaching
damage to labor relations be
avoided.
"Surely both management and
the White House know that re-
sentment is increasing daily a-
mong the engine service employ-
es. It Is a resentment which
has been held In restraint for
more than two years.
"Only a fair and equitable set-
tlement of the issues can halt
the infection, and unless it Is
halted soon, Irreparable damage
will be done."
As this was rolling off t h e
press, the three strike leaders
(of the englnemen, the conduc-
tors and locomotive engineers)
were meeting in the Cleveland
office of the Engineers' Grand
Chief. J. P. Shields.
It was he who devised strat-
egy of picking on one railroad so
the nation's transport wouldn't
be completely crippled.
Over the week-end they set up
a quiet headquarters in Cleve-
land's Hotel Hollenden and wait-
CO.
For what? For a n a 11 q,n a 1
crisis which would force the
fovernment to get a court in-
u net i on which eventually
would go to the Supreme Court.
There it would bt decided
whether the President has the
authority to seise rail lines and
private property and whether
the Army has the right to get
an injunction forcing mea to
work.
It all added up to a grim col-
lapse of labor relationswhich
now are political relations.
First comes the technique of
artificial crisis. The rail unions
or any other union announces a
crisis.
Then everybody goes throurh
the motions of bargaining.
Then the unions reject a gov-
ernment recommendation
Leas, they cant get. More,
mavbe.
Then there's political pressure
on the White House and Con-
gress.
Then. When all this falls nd
everybody is helpless, carnes the
real strike, the real erlsts, the
multi-million dollar losses.
That's the real story.
After Years of Wandering m the Wilderness
Arnold Schuster
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORKHaving crept out of town for
a few days In Mexico, I was almost knocked
down on return by public reaction to the brutal-
ly mysterious slaying of Arnold Schuster, the
young fellow whose sharp eyes were shot out
for the act of recognizing a show-off bank rob-
ber named Willie Button.
When you climbed off the plane at LaGuar-
dia, the hot blast of indignation almost suffoca-
ted you. ;
Only once in my memory has a single mur-
der stirred a people so. That was the kidnapping
of the Lindbergh baby, in another era when
gangsterdom had reached an abnormally lofty
rule.
..' The law-abiding folk had become accustom-
ed Whoodlum rule in those days.;too, and were
intrigued by the colorful carryings-on of the
Sangsters, so long as the torpedoes transferred
elr affections to one another.
There was a feeling that the citizen was Im-
muneuntil lawlessness reached Into the home
of a private citizen of high public esteem.
When they snatched the Lindbergh child
and later abandoned him dead, there was a sud-
den realization that nobody, high or low, was im-
mune to violence.
The innocent baby, son of a hero, became
the symbol of helplessnessand a sharp accuser
of the cynical tolerance for evil that we had
nurtured during the gaudy Prohibition days.
So, I think, the wanton murder of the Schus-
ter boy has become a similar symbol, even more
so than little Charles Lindbergh, because Schus-
ter was the embodiment of the common citizen
who does his duty and gets mangled for his pains.
Schuster saw a crook on the subway, and
recognized him from his "wanted" pinups.
He hollered copper, and the law collared
Willie Button.
And now Schuster is dead, rewardless, for
his act of citizenship.
It makes no great deal of difference who
shot Schuster
It could be almost anyonesome warned
moron, inspired to action through idealization of
violence; some old pal of Button kill-crazy for
laughs; some local punk with a stolen gun;
some minor hoodlum hoping to impress the lo-
cal "organization"or possibly some paid gunner
who was hired expressly to Impress others with
the futility of informing.
There have been no real clues, and the odds
are fair that the murderer may go free.
But we have been building an anger at law-
lessness for some time, now, needing only a
sharply focused incident to touch it off.
All unwitting, a boy from Brooklyna nice
looking kid who worked for his father's pants
shop and played the girls in his eveningsbe-
came that incident.
Schuster has been made the martyr to the
Implied threat of modern time, of an age when
crooks can control cops and politicians and big
businesseswhen a man like Kefauver can make
himself a Presidential candidate by simply saying
to to a people that lawlessness Is bad instead of
not-so-bad or mere routine expectation.
It Is ironic today that Schuster died with-
out receiving anything much but lumps for his
pains, even before his death.
The cash rewards for Button's apprehen-
sion proved to be nonexistent. 8chuster's part
in Sutton's capture at first was denied by the
very policemen who finally slipped the cuffs on
the crook.
Button himself, a publicity-happy little thief
received more of a hero's reception after his
capture than did the young man who nailed
him.
And now, of course, the O. Henry ending
gets written by the offer to date of some $37,000
bona fide rewards for the capture of the young
man's killer.
Now of course, anonymous tips from everyone
flood the police stations, and anonymous threats
have been filed with others close to the odd tab-
leau. The "good" citizens are on the rampage.
It is a most peculiar story all the way, not
lessened by the fact that the killer shot out the
Schuster boy's eyes. It Is almost as If he had to
give his eyes to make many million people see.
Risk In Asia
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
WASHINGTON. There are more ways than
one for the Communists to gain control, of
Southeast Asia, which would confront the West-
ern world with a worse disaster even than the
loss of China.
One way Is by simple open aggression against
Indochina, which is the key to Southeast Asia.
Another way la for the French, who have been
carrying the brutal burden of the war In Indo-
china for six years now, simply to throw up
Ihelr hands In despair and to decide to cut their
losses there.
The first possibility chiefly worried the Amer-
ican policy makers up to a few weeks ago.
It Is the second possibility which has now be-
come the subject of anguished concern, especial-
ly since the recent French crisis, the most dan-
gerous since the war
Already, in Influential French government and
military circles, there is much talk of reaching
a "settlement" with Indochina's Communist
chief. Ho Chi-Minh, and his Chinese communist
backers.
What Is being discussed is a settlement super-
ficially comparable to the proposed Korean
truce.
The French would retire to an easily defen-
sible pass called the "Col des Nuages," well
down the IndOchlnese coast, above Hue, and
near the Sixteenth Parallel. Hanoi, and the
vital, rich delta area would be turned over to
the Communists, while 8algon and the South
remained in French and Nationalist hands.
Thus the terrible drain of the Indochlnese
war could be reduced, and most of the 130,000
cr so French trooos In Indochina could be sent
back to strengthen North Africa an* France it-
self
Thii would, of course, constitute In itself an-
^wiY WASHINGTON
MERRY-GO-ROUND
______ oainr piarion
I
other major Communist vletory, with worldwide
repercussions.
But the greatest danger is that Laos, now
safely non-Communist, would be sacrificed, and
most of the long border between Indochina and
feeble Slam exposea.
In brief, anv such deal with the Communists
would in all likelihood be the beginning of the
end for Southeast Asia, and ultimately, no
doubt, for all Asia.
The French are currently spending well over
a billion dollars annually on the indochinese
war. In the past thev have spent more on this
war than the total of United States aid to
France. And this huge drain has been a chief
rnuse of France's endless series of financial
crles.
The French armv is more dependent than any
other armv on its amsll hrd core of profes-
sionpl soldiers, the prest bulk of whom are now
Dinned down In the Indochlnese war, half a
world awav.
Until nuite recently, the French were wllllne,
though by no means eager, to shoulder this twin
hi'rrlpn.
But. in the French view, the NATO decision
to rao'm Germsnv has chanced evervthint.
For if th Indochinae war continues to drain
French miHtarv strength, then the French be-
Hev t""* h oermans are sure to dominate all
Western Europe.
This i s prospect which sends a shiver up
everv French snine. As one Frenchman put it:
"PYppna is more Important to us than Indo-
eNna."
The 'set mls-ht as well be faced that the risk I
cf another rrest Commun't victor* in Asln. and
a m,o'- df"t. for the West in the Cold War.'
\* nov erv rp*i
(Copyright. l5l. New Tork Herald Tribane toe.)
Drew Pearson says: Truman entered New Hampshire pri-
mary to save doubtful Democrats; Kefauver s sincerity
wins friends against Scott Lucas's sour revenge; Son.
McCarran is right in backing Ukrainian refugees.
WASHINGTON.One of the paradoxes of politics is that
President Truman allowed his name to be placed in the New
Hampshire primary to save a Democratic National Committee-
man who consistently plays ball with the Republicans.
The Commltteeman, Emmet Kelley, was certain to lose his
post and with him other organization Democrats, if the President
didn't run.
Now, however, this little group of Democrats may lose out
anyway.
Kelley, for whom Truman did this favor. Is so close to New
Hampshire Republicans, that OOP Gov. Sherman Adams has
consistently appointed him racing commissioner.
In return, Kelley has frequently thrown his weight behind
Republican policies In order to get Democratic members of the
New Hampsnire legislature to support the Governor.
Kelley Is also backed by the hanking Interests through the
First National Bank of Boston, the utilities through Lawrence
Whltmore, and works for the staunchly Republican Brown Paper
Company of Berlin, N.H.
These are the same powerful Interests which used part of
Kelley's machine to attempt to defeat Senator Tobay, though
Tobey supported so many of Truman's policies that his GOP en-
emies called him a Democrat.
Thus Truman bared his breast and let his name stand in the
New Hampshire primary; to save a leader who has consistently
opposed his basic principles.
KELLEY'S EFFORTS
Kelley did the following:
(1) Lined up the state's best Democrat vote-getter to run
as Truman delegates, and the smartest politicians to manage
the Truman campaign. In contrast Senator Kefauver's delegates
were unknown, while his political workers were amateurs.
(2) Cracked the whip over Federal Job holders. Jim Farley
once said that every Federal worker was worth 40 votes, count-
ing his friends and relatives, and, in a small state like New Hamp-
shire, the 2,300 Federal jobs were thought enough to swing a
Democratic primary.
(3) Swung the labor unions behind Truman. This was ac-
complished by a 7-to-3 vote of the United Labor Policy commit-
tee which includes the AFL, CIO, United Mine Workers and an
Independent shoe union.
Despite this, no AFL representative showed up at the Man-
chester meeting at the Rice-Varick Hotel featuring ex-Sen. Bcott
Lucas of Illinois and ex-Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan;
while Adelard Cotey, chairman of the United Labor Policy com-
mitteethough it may be denied was a secret Kefauver support-
But by getting out and meeting people, the senator from
Tennessee won fank-and-flle support.
Though not a stirring speaker, Kefauver's sincerity, modes-
t\ and honestv made a deep Imprint, and his whirlwind tour
of the state left a trail of supporters behind.
SOUR SCOTT LUCAS
Kefauver completely nonplussed Emmet Kelley by sending a
personal messenger to assure him that there would be no hard
feelings after the primary. This was done so quietly that It didn't
leak to the press. ,
But one of Kefauver's aides marched right Into Emmet Kel-
ley's strong-hold and delivered the message. Kelley was so flab-
bergasted that he almost sputtered.
In contrast, ex-Senate majority leader Scott Lucas, still nurs-
ing a grudge against Kefauver, Invaded New Hampshire to get
revenge.
Lucas poured out his bitterness at a secret meeting of Demo-
cratic leaders at the Rlce-Varick hotel in Manchester.
About 45 leading Democrats came in response to wires from
ex-Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan, but the meeting was.
brief and dispirited, with Lucas whining about his defeat In Illi-
nois instead of delivering a fighting, pro-Truman speech.
Lucas, an able citizen when he is able to forget the past,
complained that Kefaover had cost him his Senate seat by bring-
ing the crime investigation to Chicago, that Kefauver wouldn't
have embarrassed the Democratic Party If he had been a good
Democrat. .,
Lucas concluded that President Truman Is "invaluable in
this hour of peril" and "should be persuaded to run again."
BEHIND THE IRON CURTAIN
Almost unnoticed in the military appropriations bill passed
by Congress last year was $100.000,000 to be used for underground
operations behind the Iron Curtain. This is something which this
columnist has been urging for years. __
Most Americans have sat back and followed the policy f
letting Communists penetrate the USA, without penetrating tha
Iron Curtain In return. >
This was one reason for the Freedom balloons launched over
Czechoslovakia and Poland last summer which had amaatng res-
ults in giving hope to people who believed they were forgotten.
However, following the $100,000,000 appropriation by Con-
gress last year, almost nothing has been done to use It for pene-
trating the Iron Curtain.
It nas been snarled, partly in a bureaucratic controversy over
how the money shall be spent, partly In a controversy over Rus-
nRecently,'however, Sen. Pat McCarran of Nevada has been
applying pressure to break this stalemate.
He has thrown his weight behind the Ukrainians, some of
whose leaders are activ in the USA.
While other Russian refugees in the United States are op-
posed to the Ukrainians, claiming they are so rabid that they
play into Stalin's hands, nevertheless it's a fact that, more than
any other group Inside Russia, the Ukrainians have the national-
FOTyearTthey have sought to be independent of the Soviet.
Last winter, this writer, surveying conditions alongside the
Iron Curtain, interviewed Ukrainian refugees who reported that
that part of the Soviet.
While actual fighting against Soviet officials had been crush-
ed the refugees reported that resentment was still smouldering
the under-ground movement was still reasonably strong inside
and could be fanned again. ,..._.._.
It would appear therefore, that, despite the risk of antagon-
izing other Russian refugee groups. Senator McCarrah is right
in urging that a start be made with the Ukrainians toward the
all-important Job of penetrating the Iron Curtain.
NOTE^-Ever since the Freedom ballon operation of last sum-
mer which dropped 22,000,000 messages over Poland and CBeh-
oslovakla, I have been trying to persuade key officials In Wash-
ington to permit another operation of this kind.
The Crusade for Freedom has been doing likewise.
' But permission has not been forthcoming, largely because
of crossed wires between different government bureaus regard-
ing the problem of penetrating the Iron Curtai*-
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rtlDAT, MARCH 14. 1958

TH PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER
Truman 9s Tax Bureau Shakeup
Overcomes Senate Opposition
PAO
Cairo Students
Demand Abolition
Of Martial Law
WASHINGTON, March 14. (UP) The
Senate gave final Congressional approval to Presi-
dent Truman's tax reorganization plan yesterday
despite angry Republican charges that the Chief
Executive had "insulted" critics of the proposal and
was an "exemplar of corruption."
The roll call vote was 53 to 37 to reject a
motion to disapprove the Presidential plan. Critics
needed a constitutional majority of 49 votes to kill
the plan or 12 more than they got.
The House defeated a similar veto resolution
Jan. 30.
SIDE GLANCES
By Calbraitf/
The Presidential plan for
overhauling the scandal-plagued
Internal Revenue Bureau now
will go Into effect automatic-
ally at midnight tonight.
But Mr. Truman has said that
the new system for preventing
"Improper conduct In public
service" actually will not be In
complete operation until Dec.
Under the plan, the present
64 politically-appointed In-
ternal Revenue Collectors will
be replaced with up to 25 dis-
trict commissioners who, like
all other bureau employes ex-
cept the top tax commissioner,
will be unaer Civil Service.
In addition, some 70 deputy
district commissioners would be
established in areas now served
by the tax collectors. They
would be in charge of actual
tax collections.
Internal Revenue officials be-
lieve this system will eliminate
much "red tape" and make it
easier fdr some business firms
to pay their taxes. Individual
taxpayers will not be directly
fftcted.
On the final showdown, 30
Democrats and 23 Republicans
voted against the resolution to!
kill the proposal while 18 Re-
publicans and 18 Democrats
favored it. Nearly all the De-
mocrats opposed to the plan
were Southerners.
The Senate approved the plan
after two days of some of the
most heated debate of recent
times,
Most of it grew out of Mr.
Truman's statement that the
ilnal vote would show which
Senators were Interested In wip-
ing out corruption In govern-
ment and which were lnterest-
d in playing politics.
In the final debate, Sen. Henry
C. Dworshaw (R., Ida.) told his
colleagues Mr. Truman should
be awarded "first prize as the
examplar of corruption." He
said the present administration
Is the most "corrupt and venal"
in history.
The President's plan was de-
fended by Sens. Estes Kefauver
roney (D Okla.) and Blair
Moody (D, Mich.).
They said it was needed to
"reform" the "discredited" tax
collecting system and take It
out of "partisan politics."
They referred to the fact that
most tax collectors have been
appointed on the recommenda-
tion of members of the Sen-
ate and that the posts have
been regarded as choice politic-
al plums.

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SECOND FLOOR 5 AVENIDA
CAIRO, March 1,4 (UP)
A crowd of 12,000 students mas-
l2;d,.V)d?y ln the ha o Fu"
El Walt University and caller!
on the government to abolish
martial law and release stud-
ents now being held on poli-
tical charges.
.. ny one disturbance marred
the hour and a half meeting,
when a student rose and shout-
, ea slogans. Other students rush-
' Jllm,and a wiId "ve-minute
fight followed.
Chain Gang Escapee
Nabbed In Hot Car
CHARLESTON, S. C, March
14 I in i A 24 vear old es-
capee from the Horry County
chain gang was in the county
Jail here today after being cap-
tured high atop the Cooper
River bridge.
After order was restored the
Moslem brotherhood of stud-
ent leaders called on labor un-
ions and professional groups to
Join the students in what they
called "one big party."
The students also asked the
government to reduce transpor-
tation fares and cut the price
of woolen cloth to make life
easier for them. The meeting
broke up peacefully.
David Washington, a Negro,;
led officers on an elRht-mile1
chase before being halted on
the bridge. Highway Patrol Cpl.
H. B. Rlchburg stopped his pa-
trol car in front of Washing-
ton's vehicle on the bridge and
threw both doors open.
The Negro then surrendered
without a struggle.
Officers said the car Wash-
ington was driving had been
stolen from Georgetown, -
Washington waR wanted in
Charleston County In connec-
tion with several auto thefts
and in Orangeburg County for
burglary ana for beating a de-1
puty sheriff during a Jail break
four years ago.
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|- -wm LIBBY'S ^ -*
.JJ Si ox. m\JQ

TEA
EL SOL
2 oz.
J A FRESH ^ ^
I J SHRIMP J
)LLAND #* m
IEESE J A
b. .OH-
HOLLAND
CHEESE
T
SOUP
SHANK
lb.
.23
THE PANAMA COCA-COLA
BOTTLING CO.
FREE HOME DELIVERY


#Af5F POUR
THF fANAMA AMERICAN A* INDEPENDENT OAII.T NEWSPAPER
PRTDAY, MARCH II, It
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
Pacific Steam Navigation Co.
Official To Arrive Here Today
A F. Howard, manager lor
Central America of the Paci-
fic Steam navigation Company,
announced today that Walter
C Warwick, chairman of uie
PSNC group, will be arriving
t Cristobal today In the "Du-
rango" en route to Vancouver.
Warwick, in addition to be-
ing the chairman of the Royal
Mail group. Is also chairman
of the Houlder group and the
Kaye group of companies, and
holds directorships in many of
the other leading British ship-
ping companies.
In addition to his shipping
activities, Warwick is promin-
ent In the insurance world.
He is a member of the Port
of London Authority, of which
he is chairman of the finance
committee. He is also mem-
ber of the council of the Cham-
ber of Shipping of the United
Kingdom, a member of the
general council of British hip-
ping, a member of the British
Liner committee and a mem-
ber of the London General
Shipowners Society.
Warwick was appointed one
of the first Directors of Royal
Mall Lines, Ltd., when that
company was formed and took
over the assets of the Royal
Mall Steam Packet Company.
s! S. Panama
Advance Passenger List
The Panama is scheduled to
arrive at Cristobal Monday with
105 passengers, according to the
advance passenger list from
the Panama Une offices at
Balboa Heights.
The complete advance list
follows: -- -
Dr. and Mrs. Abraham Alpm.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Alpin; Mr.
and Mrs. Ralph Bates Florian
Blelklewlch; Mr. and Mrs W.
E. Blttle; Pfc. Robert K. Bohan-
non; Msgr. John P. Boland;
Mrs. Edna P. Bowser Dr. Elmer
W Bradley; and Mr. and Mrs.
8tanley Bright.
Jdhn Campaign; Mrs. Jenny
Larsen Castro; Mrs. Mary Dal-
lin; Mr. and Mrs. Fred ElBlng-
er: Mr. and Mrs. Albert Forst
W. C. Franklin; and Miss Judith
M. Franklin. _
Mrs. Carol Oeslk and 2 chil-
dren; Sic. Mary L. Olllespie;
Morris H. Gold; Miss Mac Gor-
don; Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Half, Mrs. W. E. .enderson;
BUS Cadltt Review
Ta Honor Bledsoe
The Balboa High School cadet
battalion will hold a dress re-
view in honor of Rear Admiral
Albert M. Bledsoe, Command-
ant of the 15th Naval District,
this afternoon. __. A
Shis ceremony, scheduled for
I p.m. in the Balboa Staad-
lum, wUl Include the presenta-
tion of the "Best All Around
fcmpany" streamer to Com-
pany "C," commanded by. Ca-
det Captain Michael McNevln.
Music will be furnished by the
1st Army Band, directed by
Warrant Officer Thomas E.
Golder.
After the review, Admiral
Bledsoe will inspect the train-
ing facilities of the ROTC at
Balboa High 8chool including
the classrooms and rifle range.
Mis. R. W. Jackson; Fred C.
Johnson; Gerrlt Joustra.
Dr. and Mrs. Lester Karlltz;
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kayser and
2 children; Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Kent; Major and Mrs. Chester
H. King; Miss Emma E. Kling-
er; Mrs. Desale D. Knox; Mr.
and Mrs. Mai Kurtls; Frank
Lascla; Harry G. Lindsay; I.
P. Lord; and Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph R. Luna.
Mrs. Irene W. Mcllvalne; Mr.
and Mrs. Anthony Mann; Mr.
and Mrs. Leo Jay Margolin; Mr.
and Mrs. Hal Meadoff; Mr. and
Mrs. aamuei S. Miller; Miss ana
Paine; Mm. Dorothy S. Parsons
and 2 children; Mr. and Mrs.
George F. Peck; Dr. Thomas
Penhale; Harold C. Poole Mr.
and Mrs. A. J. Porter; and Dr.
Herbert Prentice.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl B. Salmon
and son; Mrs. Marion Sawyer;
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Schonteld;
Mr. and Mrs. Elvln Selbert and
3 children Sgt. Robert J. Span-
gler; Mrs. Vera L. Stevens; Sgt.
Robert P. Stewart; Mrs. Waite
Stoddard; and Miss Betty
Strable.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Teller;
Miss Paulette Toussieh; Mr. and
Mrs. Alexander Watt; Mr. and
Mrs. James Well; Mr. and Mrs.
Howard Wenegar; Miss Mary E.
Wynegar; Mr. and Mrs. C. H.
WllheTm; Mrs. Patricia L. Zone;
and Mrs. Mary J. Zimmerman.
Vatican On Way Out,
Soviet Writer Says
FRANKFURT, March 14 (USIS)
In a sharp attack on the Cath-
olic Church a Soviet writer main-
tains that the Vatican "undeni-
ably is living through its last
days."
Paul Pawlenko, writing in the
monthly magazine, "Soviet Li-
terature," reflects the hatred of
Communism for the Church and
all that pertains to it. Copies of
the German edition of the maga-
zine have reached here from
Moscow.
Writing after a visit to Italy,
Pawlenko says "It is high time
the Vatican disappeared."
The Communist writer also at-
tacks Cardinals of the Church,
not one of whom he has met or
seen. He refers to two Cardinals
in the United States who are no
i longer alive as "members of the
Rogue's Gallery," and makes si-
Imllar remarks about Francis
I Cardinal Spellman of New York.
Referring incidentally to re-
lief aid given by the Vatican to
the Soviet Union in 1021 during
a time of famine, Pawlenko con-
tends that this assistance was
merely a means "to aid the ca-
pitalistic Intelligence agencies to
send their spies to our country."
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Greal White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrives
Cristbal
8.S. Quiligua ................................March 1
S.S. Chirhrai ................................March 3
H.ndllnt Refrl*enttS ChllltS n OMtral Csrf.
New York Service
Arrives
Cristbal
...................March IB
...................March IS
S.S. Yaque ...''...,..........................Mstrcli.15
S.S. Slxaola.................................March 22
S.S. Veragua .........
S.S. Fra Berlanga ....
Cristbal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
S.S. Qnlrlgna ...............................March 18
S.S. Chlriqui....................,...........March 25
(Passenger Service Only)
TELEPHONES: /
CR18TOBAL 4l21 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON SS
SHIP-SHORE
RADIO-TELEPHONE
SERVICE
PANAMA "HPC 2606 Kct.
LISTENS FOR SHIP6
ON 2110 KCS.
1200 to C 0 G.M.T.
TROPICAL RADIO TEL CO.
Shake on Mexsana, enjoy
cooling relief. It quickly
checks torment of minor
kin motions, dufe, Irri-J
tiled feet, itchy toes. Tts I
special Amjlum base is |
super-soothing to skin.
MEXSANAifc--*^
Bologna Archbishop
Dies In Italy
Of Heart Attack
BOLOGNA, Italy, March 14
(UP) Giovanni Cardinal Bat-
tlsta Casalli-Rocca Di Cormelia-
mo, archbishop of Bologna, died
today at the age of 80 from a
heart ailment.
His death caused the member-
ship of the Sacred College of
Cardinals at Vatican City to
reach a low of 48 members.
In the last few years, with the
Sacred College steadily decreas-
ing, It has been expected that
Pope Plus XII would hold a new
consistory for creation of new
cardinals.
The Pope has held only one
consistory In his 13-year reign
In February. 1947 when he creat-
ed 31 new cardinals, bringing the
Sacred College up to 69. Since
then 21 Cardinals have died.
answer the call
0+
1952 RED CROSS FUND
Worry of
FALSE TEETH
Slipping or Irritating?
CHI?is WELKEN. Planeteer
TEBRX-
PRIZE PACKAGE
ALLEV OOP
Set to Go
T ?. T. BAMLD
ALL RIGHT, FOOZY, /WaXA.WHAnAVO)CW,ALLRlGHT...l
IF HOLLI6 WANTS 1 SAY? OH/SU. WE BE/STILL THINK irS
TO GO ON A TIME \ ON OUR WAY?V A HOAX, BUT I OWE,
TRIP, HE'LL HAVE ^-^ __^^VOU THE OPPOKTUNirY
TO TAKE NOU A9 JW JB B| TO PROVE ME WRONG
HIS GUIDE
I*'1
saw,
00l
fwBJ^DOYOU 7Y.OCXX.A.
think holl( rw quite eupc
WILL RETURN V HfiWILL BE.'
CONVINCED
p
'Oil
BOOTS AND RElt BTJDDIBS
Too Much
BT EDGAR MART }
CAPTAIN EASY
And Be Got In the Way
BT LESLIE TURNER
if vou wtHtsVr
OUT FOG RBJM6E
AFTER M.WD
RAILROADED YOU
TO PRISON. WHY
WD V0U SHOOT
HUA.JNftl
PR I SO ILLA'8 POP
BUGS BUNN


FRIDAY. MARCH U, MS
M
WHS FANAMA AMERICAN 'AW INDEPENDENT DAIIY NEWSPAPER

PAGl

racific J^ocietu


l'RFSIDJENT AND MRS. AROSEMENA
lO ENTERTAIN THURSDAY
Hit Excellency the President of the Republic of Panama
and Mrs. Alclblades Arosemena hare Issued invitations to a
banquet to be given next Thursday evening at the Presiden-
cu In honor ot the members of the Honorable Diplomatic
Corps accredited to Panama and their wives.
General And Mrs. Morris
Entertained
The officers of the staff of
headquarters, Caribbean Com-
mand and their ladles were hosts
at a dinner given Wednesday
evening at the Quarry Heights
Officers Club In honor of and
la farewell to the Oommander-
lu-Chlef of the Caribbean Com-
mand, Lt. General William H.
H. Morris, Jr., and Mrs. Morris,
who are leaving In the near fu-
ture to make their home In
Washington, D.C.
Farewell Review
To Honor General Morrto
The armed forces of the Carib-
bean Command invite the gen-
eral public of the Republic of
Panama and the Canal Zone to
witness a farewell review arrang-
ed in honor of the Common der-
ln-Chlef of the Caribbean Com-
mand, Lt. General William H.
H. Morris. Jr.
The ceremony will be held at
Port Kbbbe. Canal Zone, tomor-
row morning. The parade and
inspection will begin at 10 a.m.
Visitors are encouraged to ar-
rive before 9:45 a.m.
Secretary And Mrs. Leadbltter
Honored
The First Secretary, Informa-
tion-, of the British Legation and
Mrs. Jasper M. Leadbltter. who
sailed this morning aboard the
8.8. Anton for New York en
royte to their new post in De-
troit, Michigan, were honored
before their departure at a buf-
fet supper given by William Tay-
lor at his home on the Sabanas.
Visitors Entertained
At Cocktail Party
Mr. and Mrs.1 Edward M. Fu-
cik of Chicago, 111., who are visit-
ors on the isthmus and guests at
the Hotel El Panama during
their stay here, were the honor-
ed guest Wednesday evening at
a cocktail party given by Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard W. Forgeson
at their home on Balboa Heights.
Doctors Wives Club
Has Meeting j
The Doctors Wives Luncheon1
Club held its monthly meeting
on Wednesday at the Albrook
Officers Club. Hostesses were
Mrs. Julian R. Hunt, Mrs. R. W.
Bonifacl, Mrs. William H. Clln-
chard and Mrs. E. R. Osterbertr.
The speaker was "Jungle Jim"
Price, who spoke on "The Life of
the Indians."
The following ilfiw facets
were elected: president. Mrs.
Earl C. Lowry; vice-president,
Mrs. R. P. Hughes; and secre-
tary-treasurer. Mrs. S. A. Kay.
Guests at the luncheon includ-
ed Mr. Marlon Wood and*Mrs.
M. Johnson.
Thoe attending were: Mrs.
Rice, Mrs. Clifford G. Blitch,
Mrs. W. T. Bailey, Mrs. F. H.
Blber, Mrs. F. R. Carrlker. Mrs.
A. Chartock, Mrs. J. E. Doug-
lass, Mrs. J. H. Draheim. Mrs.
E. B. Erman, Mrs. R. P. Hughes,
Mrs. M. Johnson, Mrs. D. Jut-
zy, Mr. C. H. Lasley, Mrs. L.
8. Leland, Mrs. J. E. Marshall,
Mrs. J. R. Mitchell.
Also Mr. R. H. Mitchell, Mrs.
L. I. Parker. Mrs. F. W. Reg-
nler. Mr. T. W. Davis, Mrs. J.
B. Gale, Mr. D. G. Klevan,
Mrs. David Senzer. Mrs. R. Ma-
then v, Mrs. George Hesner, Mrs.
L. E. Fontaine, Mrs. H.* C.
Deerlng, Mrs. William Brown,
Mrs. E. de Alba, Mrs. c. A.
Zarzeckl, Mrs. N. J. Takos, Mrs.
R. J. Strumpf, Mrs. G. M.
Shannon, Mrs. H. W. Shreck,
Mrs. R. B. Slgafoos, Mrs.V. O.
Sebren, Mr. W. W. Smith, Mr.
F. D. Buckley, Mr. F. 8. Blan-
ton, Mrs. W. D. Graham and Mrs.
J. G. Boyd.
nama for the past several day,
left yesterday for Lima, Peru by
plane.
Mr. Juan de la Guardia and
his grandson, Camilo Porras, Jr.,
left Wednesday by plane for New
York. They will spend several
weeks vacationing in the United
States.
Mr. Ensebio Morales, who has
been visiting for the past several
weeks with relatives m Panama,
left Wednesday by plane for New
York en route to Europe.
Mr. Latham Is At Home
Mr. Charles Louis Latham of
Ancon has been confined to his
home for the past week due to
illness.
Work Party To Be
Saturday Morning
Attention, all able-bodied men
of Pedro Miguel!!! There will be
a work party at the Pedro Mi-
guel Girl Scout House Saturday,
to begin at 8 a.m. and continue
throughout the day.
Those planning to attend are
asked to bring a hammer and
any other tools necessary it put-
ting up new screens. Any time
and effort given toward this
cause will be greatly appreciated
by the Girl Scouts.
Art Exhibit To Close Tomorrow
The public Is reminded that
the exhibition of water colors,
monotypes, and drawings by Se-
ora Cristina Chai upczynski.
which has been on display In the
Little Gallery of the Hotel Tivoli
for the past week, will close to-
morrow. *
lecture this evening at 7:15 at
the Balboa YMCA. Mr. Ernest
C. Jeppson will deliver a speech
covering all phases of the Point
Four Program In Panama.
The lecture Is open to the pub-
lie.
Medical Association
To Meet Tuesday
The Medical Association of the
Isthmian Canal Zone will meet
Tuesday evening at 7:30 In the
Gorgas Memorial Laboratory In
Panama City.
Building Workers Win Right
To 15-Cent Hourly Pay Hike
Tower Club
To Meet Monday
The Tower Club of the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke will meet Mon-
day evening at 8:30 In Bishop
Morris Hall.
Jaime Ingram
To Give Concert
Jaime Ingram, talented young
Panamanian pianist, will be pre-
sented in concert Monday even-
ing at 8:15 In the U60-JWB.
Police Ball Is Toitht
The Balboa branch of the Ca-
nal Zone Police Association will
hold Its annual ball tonight at
the Hotel El Panama.
Building Controls
Slashed Again In US
As Production Swells
WASHINGTON, Mar. \i (UP)
The government, In another
drastic relaxation of controls,
is ready to give a go-ahead for
construction of new stores, of-
fice buildings, hotels and fac-
tories in the fall, it was dis-
closed today.
Building of most of these pro-
jects has been held up since last
year due to a shortage of ma-
terials.
WASHINGTON, March 14 (UP)
The Government today au-
thorized more than 3,000,000
construction worker to seek a
15-cent hourly pay Increase this
year and to negotiate for a
health and welfare plan.
The policies for the building
industry, largest In the nation
except for agriculture, were laid
down by the Wage Stabilization
Board on recommendation of its
construction commission. They
differ somewhat from rule In
effect for other Industries.
The board placed a $.07'/2 an
hour limit on employer contribu-
tions to the health and welfare
plan, which was opposed by
management members of the
wage board.
The $.15 general Increases cor-
respond to the cost-of-Hving
raises allowed employes In other
Industries. The board originally
allowed all workers under Its Ju-
risdiction a 10 per cent "catchup"
raise and since has added an-
other 4.7 per cent.
The board said the 4.7 per cent
for the construction Industry
would amount to $.12 an hour.
The additional $.03 will take care
of such things as holiday and
vacation pay and other fringe
benefits not counted against the
general wage board ceiling.
The board still must approve
all new wage agreements and
welfare plans negotiated by the
Industry and Its workers before
they may be put into effect. The
board acts on the recommenda-
tions of its construction com-
mission.
The commission said lt will
consider on a case-by-case basis
any requests for employer wel-
fare contributions higher than
the $.07Vi cent celling.
Under the general health and
welfare policy laid down in Jan-
uary, the board did not fix con-
tributions to such plans.
Employer contributions to the
fund will not be counted against
the employes' general wage In
crease celling.
The board said the new gener-
al wage policy for the Industry
was figured on a cents-per-hour
basis rather than a percentage
formula because of customary
practice In the Industry.
Too Cold For Fish
BEAUVAL. Sask, (UP) The
fish in northern Saskatchewan
are feeling the cold. Veteran
fishermen report a 30 per cent
drop in their catch compared
with last year as the shivering
fish cleave to the bottom of
lakes.
D.A.R.'s Meet Tomorrow
Pacific Side memfiers of the Pa- _
nama Canal Chapter. Daughters l surrender more steel, copper and
of the American Revolution, will aluminum to civilian Industry
Now, however, expanded pro-
duction of materials has en-
abled government planners to
Journey to the Gold Coast tomor
row as guests of their Atlantic
Side sisters for the regular spring
meetme of the organization.
The meeting will be held at
2:30 o.m.. at the home of Mrs.
Rudolph W. Rubelll. 611 Second
Street, in the De Lesseps Area.
All ladies eligible for member-
ship in the D.A.R. are cordially
Invited to attend.
Mr. and Mrs. Cox
Are Visitors Here
The advertising manager of the
Cateroillar Tractor Co. of Peo-
ra, 111.. Mr. W. K. Cox. and
Mrs, Cox arrived on the Isthmus
Wednesday for rstljPw several
days at the Hotel El Panama.
without cutting into the stretch-
ed-out defense program.
Defense Production AdmM-
istralor Manly Fleischmann is
expected to announce the new
building program soon so pre-
liminary work such as financing
and exacavatlon can begin with-
out delay.
Actual allotments of building
materials will not be made be-
fore Jury, and some project*
may have to wait until late fall
or early 1953.
But officials said most ap-
plications already filed for com-
mercial and' industrial building
will be granted.
They estimated there are about
1,100 applications for stores, of-
fice buildings, banks, hotels and
other commercial projects.
The number of applications for
new factories and industrial

n
New arrivals
KCM
#i
WASHABLE CARDS
last a lifetime! ,
HENCKES
of "Solingeii"
stainless teel
MANICURE UTILITIES
Scissors Nailclippers
Penknives
AT BOTH STORES
FELIX B. MADURO, S. A.
II Central Avenue
Tivoli Avenue
RUTH MILLETT Says
A Kentucky couple both 61
years of agerecently married
each other for the fifth time.
After four failures they still
found they couldn't get along
without each other.
The only thing unusual about
this couple is that they went to
the divorce court every time they
thought their marriage was a
failure.
Most couples face such times in
their marriages. 8ome of them
decide to call it quit for good:
get divorces and go their separ-
ate ways.
But the majority of married
couples manage to live through
the bad times, keep up a good
front, and wait for thing to
straighten out.
With patience they usually do.
The truth of the matter Is that
when we talk about a happy, cr
a successful marriage we mean
that lt Is happy or successful
MOST of the time.
But the happiest, most devoted
old couples you know probably
saw their marriages "fall" more
than once. The reason they are
happily married today is because
they sat out the failures Instead
of calling lt quits.
The Kentucky couple were
news because every time their
marriage "failed" they got a di-
vorce.
But they were never able to
make the divorce stick, and so
will probably end their days as
a happily married couple.
It's not the "failures" in a mar-
riage that are important. It's
whether or not those "failures"
are permitted to separate a cou-
ple for good.
aOoa Hoar
Complete Assortment of
DOG SUPPLIES
at
16 Tivoli Ave.
Tel. 2-380?
Former Residents
Arrive For Visit
Mr. and Mr. William Macon.facmtles^waa nofavailabel'
Michaux. former Canel Zone re-]
'sldents and now of i Peters- Construction has been permit-
burg, Florida, arrlyed on the
Isthmus last night for a visit
with their son and daughter-in-
law Major and Mrs. Macon
Craig Michaux, D.D.8., of Far-
fan.
Mr. Michaux entered Gorgas
Hospital today as a patient
there.
World Club
To Meet Tonight
The World Club will sponsor a
rSBBBBJBJSBBJBBJSJBSBSr--~'aSBSJ
Departures From Isthmus
Colonel J. R. Harper, who has
been a guest at the Hotel El Pa-
THREE HOUSES FOR
ONLY $20.00
in the Monumental Raffle
of the Panam Lions Club
Pro Colonias Infantiles
to be held March 23.
DON'T FAIL TO GET
YOUR TICKET TODAY
ted heretofore of factories listed
as "essential" to the defense
program.
Builders whose protects take
only small amounts of steel and
copper do not need federal per-
mission to build.
The new building order will
be the latest In a series of let-
ups on construction controls
since the postwar boom was shut
off! last year and building ma-
terials were shoved into defense
plant work.
Officials said the program to
expand productive capacity
principally the output of steel,
aluminum, power and railroad
equipment is well along and
will be "over the hump" by July
as far as building materials are
concerned.
charming
Glands Made Youno
-Vigour Renewed
Without Operation
If you feel old before your time or
suffer from nerve, brain and physical
weakness-, you will find new happiness
and health In an Amarlean medical
discovery which restores youthful
rigour and vitality quicker than
Cland operatlona. It l* a Imple home
treatment In tablet form, discovered
by an American Doctor. Abeolutely
harmless and easy to take, but the
newest and moat powerful lnvlgoura-
tor known to selenoe. It acta directly
en your (lands, nrvea, and vital or-
gans, builds new, pura blood, and
works ao fast that you oan sea and
feel new body power and vigour. Be-
cause of Its natural action on glands
and nerves, your brain power, mem-
ory and eyesight often Improve araaa-
'ngly.
And this amaslng new gland and
called Vl-Taba, has
HX
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
If we didn't tell you our furniture was
second hand you'd think H was new.
Chair .................from 6.00
Upholstered Chairs ..... 32.50
Beds (with spring & mattress) 22.50
Tables................. 7.50
Buffets :............ 25.00
i
and many other bargains

CALL HX BEFORE YOU SELL
SPOT CASH FOR YOUR OLD FURNITURE
41 Automobile Row
Tel. 3-4911


Tewr
rigour restorer,
been tasted and
la now aval
proved by thousands
available at all chemists
here. Oet Vl-Taba today. Put lt to the
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panama No 58 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails
Arch Supports.- REDUCING Treatments Massages,
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators. For Information call: S-2211 Panama
II a.m.; 2 p.m.
Platter Fans.. You'll Welcome Our
Club

yIVEI

1952
RED CROSS
Fl/ND
... and the lecrtt of ber charm is Odo-Ro-No. Don't let
offending underarm odour spoil your natural freshness. Your
bath temporarily washes away unpleasant perspiration odour,
but it will not give you the lasting protection you can rely on.
% Odo-Ro-No safely stops perspiration and
odour for a full 24 hours.
# Odo-Ro-No says creamy longernever gets
gritty even in open jar.
6 No deodorant cream is so harmless to fabrics
as Odo-Ro-No.
No deodorant cream is gentler to even
sensitive skin, and it is so easy to use.
// JO priftr tiqmd itodormt,
tih for Odo-Ro-No Utmd,
0DOR0-D0
CREAM
The Deodorant without Doubt
m
teat. See the big, quick improvement.
Take the full bottle, which last eight
Saya, It will make you full of
rigour, energy and vitality, and
faal yeara younger. A special
ottle at t VITaba cost little.
Vi-Tabs ?r.,S"rTo*ub,
*"^ ** SJSsva chemist today
sitaras ." mmd Vltmlit,
:;:>
m.
DINING
AND DANCING
OUTDOORS!
Nothing more delightful than
music with your meals! And when
it's the music of
Avelino Muoz at the organ,
and Angelo Jaspes Orchestra
It's doubly delightful...
Where? At the
SUNDAY EVENING BUFFET
in our lovely Patio
6:30 p.m.
The Cocktail Hour
in our air-conditioned
BALBOA BAR rs becoming- an
El Panam "institution"..*. .
Join us at 5:30 ffirV aarilyftP1
a good time with good frrelfdx.
Tune In ta HOO to hear
Jsaoaa Sady's archeetre
playing from the Bells Vista Boom
at IS p.m., Tase., Than., Sat
: ;
A Kirkeay Hotel
**mmm
nama.
Gm/ooay1^ fa as little as
5 )m o. 2
00 Weekly
Foa can be the prona owner oj the latest "Hit*"
or what ever type ot muttc you enjoy most!
Ca. (nios Craws Gift Shop
"The entrance of the Ward gIveth Ufe"
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Heights, C. Z.
SUNDAY March 16, 1952
10:45 AM "The Fatal Folly of a Fortunate Fool"
. Luke 12:11-21.
chapel choir "Following Jesus"
tenior choir -The King 0/ Love My Shepherd Is"
7.30 P.M. "Go Galatians 3:15-22
Solo "Tf- No Friend Like Jesus"
Afrj. Spencer Smith
\
Everyone Welcome
WE PREACH CHRIST CRUCIFIED RISEN
- COMING AGAIN
^etutfa*?**
NEED!
'#ety
WE SELL ONLY FIRST QUALITY MERCHANDISE
i
If you belong; to the Armed Forces or if you have a steady lob
- me to ear store and you may choose yoor own credit terms.
EASY WASHERS
SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR
FREE ENTRY
WE HAVE THE LARGEST
ASSORTMENT OF BEAUTIFUL
LINOLEUM FROM PABCO.
ElJUABLQ
SIMMONS SPRINGS & MVTTRESSES
The Store Where Yeo Will Find the Largest Assortment of Glass and Uneieam.
8* CENTRAL AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-2465
"Leaders a the Furniture Business since 1909"



n'-r n
TWE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILf NiWSPAPtlt
FRIDAY, MARCH 14 l8t
New York Central Rolls Again
As Strikers Obey Injunction
Two Concessions. 2 Problems
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
We hive everything
to keep your Lawn
and Garden beautiful
darifif the dry season
r\l
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrows
Insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
m Central Ave. Tel. 3-614S
FOR SALE
Automobile
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29 tn St.
Service Personnel and Civilian
Government Employ*
be sote ""
for your Automobile Financing
I niiit en
Government Employes Finince Co.
of
Fort Worth, Texas
new. office *t
Ne. 43 Automobile Row
Next door to the Firestone Building
also through your auto dealer
We save you money on
Financing And lnsurcr.ee
olso direct loons on automobiles
AGENCY DEHLINGER
Phene 3-4914 J-4M5
MISCELLANEOUS
^rVnt# Alcf>lMMict AaxMyfjMV
> 2031 Asm**. C. I.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:Three registered femle
boxers, seven weeks old, $50.00
each. Qtrs. 419-B, Ft. Cloyton,
phone Ft. Clayton, 5247.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
INVITES PROPOSALS FOR
FURNISHING ETHYL ALCOHOL
The Panotao Canol Company invites
proposals for furnishing 10,000 gal-
lons Ethyl Alcohol under sealed bids
opening April I, 1952. Invitotion
No. 8 is available ot office of Su-
FOR SALE:1947 Buick conertibleM
leaving the Isthmus. Coll 2-1636, peHntendent of Storehouses, Balboa.
Panam. telephone 2-2777,____________
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Baying: Interamerican Hotel
and Abbatoir.
Selling: Panam Forest and
Faena y Lu (preferred)
Tel. 3-471 3-1680
Before selling your cor, w. suggest F0R SALE: Smith Premier type-
you poy us a visit. We are the' "J lnrch "r,"\ $ 5 c
only one in the market who pays! APP.^ C'- General de Seguros S
Stay at the Panamericano Hotel in
cool El Voile and enjoy the native
Fiestas during the coming week.
FOR SALE
Household
CHICAGO, March 14 (UP)-
New York Central trains rolled:
on schedule today after scat-
tered groups of strikers ended .. _. e
cVretbeinSct?ogna,n5t a Fe*eral In Lasest Russian Peace Bid
The railroad rapidly restored
full service over lines west of
Buifalo that had been tied up
since Sunday- by a walsoui oi
locomotive engineers, firemen
and conductors.
The trains moved after strik-
ers at the key division point of
NEW YORK, March 14 (UP
World opinion will probably force
the United States, Britain and
France to take a long look at
joesn't
the latest Russian peace propo-
sal for Germanybut it d<
Elkhart, Ind., voted to go back mean the German peace treaty
Williams Sonto Clora Beach Cottages.
Two bedroom. Frigidoires, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
Foster's cottoges completely furnish-
ed, one, two or three bedrooms,
linens, gas refrigerators, gas
ranges, dishes and kitchen ware.
Halt o mile beyond Santa Clara
private road to beach. For in-
formation visit or phone Dagmor,
Tivoli Avenue No. 6. 2-0170,
Panamo. _
Gromlich's Santa Clsra beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rates. Phone o-
441 or- 4-567.
Phillips. Oceonsio* cottage. Sonto
Claro. Box 4i. tsalboo. Phone
Panamo i-iei/i, Cristobal i- 16V*
CASH. We also sell oil kinds of
cars and trucks.
Financing ovoiloble
Trode-ins accepted.
IISIMAN'S USED CARS
No. 8 Peru Avenue besides Presidente
Theatre, Panama
A,." Plaza Herrera, Panama.
FOR RNT
Houses
fdr ;ale- Refrigerator, "Frigi- to work and Chicago crews re-
"daire," oil porcelain. 7.4 ft., covered from a wave of
cycle. Also "Toppan" gas stove, 4 "ess.
burner, oportment size. Both 15
months old, excellent condition.
Slck-
Yesterday Toledo, O., work-
is any nearer.
It is the spectacular conces-
sion predicted from Russia after
the Western Allies agreed In
their recent meeting in Lisbon
ers had led a revolt by "seced- to Include West German forces
ar.d the right to produce such
supplies as are necessary
maintain such forces.
to
2) "The most rapid formation
of a general German govern-
ment" and withdrawal of all for-
eign troops within a year.
The two outstanding stumbling
blocks are:
1) The Russian proposal that
the German,frontiers be fixed in
Tel. Ponama 3-1743. 52nd St.!mg'. from their unions and re- ln 0*n- Eisenhower's European'accordance with the Potsdam
No. 5, Apt. 3. after 6:00 p. m. mainlng on strike, but their
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, dishes wgUiu* evaporated m a later
tobies, single bed, chest of draw-
ers, choirs, etc. Tel. 2-4404.
House 5437-1, Diablo.
FOR SALE:1 Westinghouse refri-
gerator 9 cu. ft. in excellent con-
dition, all porcelain, 25 cycle, 1
General Electric refrigerator, new
9 cu. ft. motor 60 cycle, 1 gas
woter heater with 60 gal. water
tank. 2 new venetion aluminun
shades with removable slats, I
book cose. 5724-D, Diablo. Tel.
2-3541.
A final pocket of resistance
developed today when some
Army.
The proposal handed to repre-
sentatives of the Big Three in
Moscow Monday night offers on
Declaration of 1948.
2t The condition that Germany
pledge not to enter any coalition
the surface two important con-'aimed at any power which fought
crews"*T the"Chicago~unctoY cessions to German unification, against her in World War II.
railway, a city switching line" I? h*s at least two important
party owned by the NYC, report-' Problems
ed "sick." Appealing to the Germans will
FOR SALE:One Coldspot Refriger-
ator 25 Cyl. As is, where is. 0856-
A, Oleander, Bolboo.
FOR SALE: 1939 Oldsmobile 4
door sedan. Also two bicycles. Call
2-1335 after 4 or 5177 Parsons
Street. Diablo Height'
FOR SALE:Baby orchids bouquets,
corsages for hospitals, birthday FOR RENT:Two beoutiful cottages
gifts, all occasions. Also oir ex-l semi furnished, in quiet, residenticl
pressed anywhere in U.S A. Or- section 172 Sabanas Road. Phone
chid Garden, Tel. Panama 3-07711 2-2466 and 3-0702.____________
Atlantic Side. Cristobal, j^R SALE:_ near the river. Easy payments. Coll
2-3078 or 2-4937, Panama.
MODERN FURNITURE
coaroM auu/i
Slipcover Reunholsler* '
VISIT Oil* SHOW-ROOM!
ajeetlo Hera.
j. r. e* la Otea n IAaleeajiWle tew)
tot eetlnaate: fiesta 4 Delivery
Tat s-aezs S*e a.n le T:e em
1952 PONTIAC cam
New Available For
IMMEDIATE DIRECT SHIPMENT
To The Canol Zone
Why Bay OH-The-Floer
And Pay Mare?
See Yeur Peittiac Dealer Tedjy
C I V A, S. A .
C.dillac-CMC -Donti
FOR SALE: 1948 Oldsmobile 2
door Sedan with radio, heater and
Hydramatic. Can be seen at Quar-
ters 5444-G, Diablo Heights, Cpl.
Sam W. Johnson. Must sell.
Jf "A Fine
F Opportunity
to -Learn
From
L The Best"
Want to be
the most at-
xc tlv
F couple on the
"floor? Then
bring your favorite partner to
Harnett Si Dunn NOW and
Improve your dancing togeth-
er. Modern rates use our
Budget plan fits payments
to paydays. 8o come in today
and save. Why miss the fun!
Balnea TM. MS ar
Box IM Balaaa Hamett and Puna
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. & Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tei. 467
Transportes Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
We pack and crate or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
Agencias Cosmos, Automobile Row
29. will solve your Auto buying or
selling Problem. Tel. Panama 2-
4721. Open oil day on Saturdays.
FOR SALE:Will socrifice MG sport
roadster, purchased in August, for
$1,275.00. Call 4-339, 5-7 p. m.
FOR SALE:1948 Buick Roadmaster
sedanette, black, red plastic up-
holstering, radio. $1,080. Phone
Balboa 2-2984. house 760-C.
Barnaby St.
FOR SALE:1939 Mercury, 5-good
tires, very good condition. $350,
Phone Fort Gulick 331, house 152
B. -
Eiids will be received in the office of
the General Manager, Commissory
Division, Mount Hope, Canal Zone,
until 3:00 p. m., Wednesdoy,
Morch 26, 1952, when they will
be opened in public, for all or
part of a 50,000 pound lot of
poultry feed, consisting of wheot
flour with added corn meal and
inedible tankage. Inspection and
particulars may be obtained at
tha Commissary Division Cold
Storage office, Mount Hope, Ca-
nol Zone.
FOR RENT
Apartment*
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished opart
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tort office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR SALENational Receiver NC.
2-40c 490 to 30000 Kc. H. F. 10-
20 Converter. 1505-A, Balboa.
Phone 2-2995.
FOR SALE:Singer sewing foot mo-
chine, piano upright- grand, girl's
bicycle, mahogany livingroom set,
refrigerator 60 cycles, boby crib.
Phone 916, Colon.
Bids will be received in the office
of the General Manager, Commis-
sary Division, Mount Hope, Canal
Zone, or Supply and Service Direc-
tor, Balboa Heights, Conol Zone,
until 3:00 p. m. Thursday, April
3, 1952, when they will be open-
ed in public, for the sole of 50
only high grade Holsteln heifers,
FOR RENT::4-room apartment
9th. St. New Cristobal. Apply 8063
Apt. 1, phone 1225-J, Colon.
Help Wanted
WANTED: Excellent cook and
housekeeper. Solary Is no object.
Apply at Max R. Stempel & Son,
Archbishop's Building, Cothedrol
Plaza. Between 9 to 12 and 2 to
5. Monday Friday.
WANTED: Experienced cook with
best references. Apply 8 e. m.
Sotprdoy and Sunday, morning ot
7th St. No. 1 1. El Coco.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:1942 Dodge Ex-Army
Field Ambulonce, $155.00. Phone
Gotun 5-455.
USED CARS
Trade Yaar OM Car
Per A Ratter One
Ler SeleeMaa Of Makei
on. Modal,
AN Reconditioned Like New!
CIVA, S. A.
Year Pontuc-Cidilloc Dealer
PenaKta Tel. 2-0870
Lodge Meeting
Important business will be
discussed tomorrow night at a
meeting of Court Excelsior
lodge in the Corinthian Tem-
ple on Central Avenue.
Legal Notice
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Canal Zone
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
POR THE DISTRICT OP THE
CANAL ZONE
Divition ef Balaaa
Vioki A. Ja me a.
ruiati
?a.
iMUr W. Janlte.
Deeeeeaaa1
SUMMON
Qua No. 14(1. Civil
Civil Docket IS
ACTION FOR DIVORCE
To the above-naned eefaneant:
You aro hereby required to oar"
and newer tho complaint filod in tea
a)aav-eatitled action within thirty day*
jftar tho fir.t dato or publication.
In eae of your failure to a appear
and answer, judamant will to taken
acainit you by default for tkc relief
' dteeaandnl in the complaint.
WITNK&S the Honorable Joaepk J
Hancock. Judf*. United tutea Diatrict
.our! for the Diatrict of tha Caaal
Zaae, tkia March IS. III!.
C. T McCeraatck. Jr.
Clerk
(SEAL)
By Lota E Harrleoti
Deputy Clerk
To I.eatar W. Jame- -
The fereaoine eanunona la aarved
aman you ay publication purauant tn the
arder of the Honorable Joeepta J. Han-
aaek. Jude. United ota tea Dl'trl .
ourt for the Diatrict of the Caaal Zone,
dated Mareh It. 1SI2 and entered and
a|tad in thia action in the office of the
Clerk ot aid tlnlcod State Diatrict
Cottr* for the Diviaioa of Balboa on
are* IS. IS2.
C. T McCeraoick. Jr.
Clerk
By Lata E. Harriaen
Deputy Cle,
FOR SALE
______Real Ear
FO RSALE:One house Santo'Clora
Beach, concrete block con true
tion. furnished. Includes two ocre
lond, well, garage. Premises fen-
ced, telephone Bo.'boo 1536.
Menush.
FOR SALE Lots in front of bus
route $1.00 per meter. 5 minutes
ride from city 1 at Rio I cheap I
15 x 32. See M. Hall ot 8 Ancon
Ave. No. 6.
in ten lots, from the Mindi Dairy, m/anited- t^TT /
Canal Zone. Form, of proposal WTco,Ti. T.^h. in W MS
-.:.u /..it___.:...!_______Z\ "' v.asf Iron Tube 10 dia. with
bell and spigot. One (1) reduc-
tion, Cost Iron, 10" to 6" dlo.
One (1) "T", Cost Iron. 10" x
10" x 10". Banco de Urbenlza-
cin Engineering Department.
Lift Up Your Hearts
with full particulars, may be ob-
tained in tha office of the Gen-
eral Manager, Commissary Divi-
sion, Mount Hope, Conol Zone, or
tha Supply and Service Director,
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone
FOR SALE:Small iron safe, new,
$75.00. Mueblera Inglesa, Tel.
334, No. 6075, Avenida Bolivar,
Coln,
FOR SALE
Motorcycle
FOR SALE: GIVAWAY PRICE ON
FOLLOWING SANTA CLARA
PROPERTY:
' P'"e-room, tile roofed concrete
block house, completely furnished
tiled floors throughout, garage at-
tached. Own water system, elec-
tricity from Company.
2. fJollhouse used as storeroom
could be converted to maid's
quarters.
3. Concrete block house, asbestos
shmgle roof, two bedrooms, larfe
combined living-diningroom, kitch-
en, bathroom, plenty of closet
space. Completely furnished.
All located on four lots, 5 min. walk
from ocean fenced and compris-
ing 3980 square meters. Mango
ond lime trees, many plonts.
4. Also one fence lot on beach
Owner leoving. $11.500 terms. Apply
Morton. Box 14, Balboa. Canal
one. Telephone Balboa 3148.
Point 4 In Panama
Topic Of Meeting
Ernest C Jeppsen, acting di-
rector of Technical Cooperation
55 Panama, under whose direc-
tion the Point rour Program l.
-onrlw-ted. will be the truest
spe";cr at the World Club meet-
trtR to he held at 7:16 tonirht In
the Balboa YMCA. ^^
Because of Its yltal concern to
Panama. Mr. Jeppsen has chos-
en the topic "Point Four in Ac-
tion In Panama."
The talk will also cover the
.)int Four program In JUalln
America in general.
FOR SALE:Motorcycle 1947 Hor-
ley Devidson 74 O.H.V., new over-
hauled, new 2-tona point, good
, condition. Price $400.00. Sea ot
Apt. 148-B, 8th Street, New Cris-
tobal,
FOR SALE:Cushman Scooter, $25
00. Apply "Cia. Generol de Segu-
ros, S. A.," Plaza Herrera, Pan-
ama.
LOST.-Horse, color brown, gelding,
has brand on left rear leg in form
of a cup. Coll Ponama 3-1376.
Reward.
FOR SALE: Triumph "Thunder-
bird" 1951 extros. Vincent "Black-
shodow" 1952 model. Cosh jr
terms. Phone Bolboo 1471.
LEGAL NOTICE
UNITID STATK Of AMERICA
Canal Zana
UNITID STATES DISTRICT COURT
POR THI DISTRICT Of THE
CANAl ZONE
Di.i.ion af Baleee
Iran VualaU Pauldin,
Plaintiff
va.
later Lroy P.uldia,
UMMONE, D,,M, Ge No. MSZ. Civil
Clef! Docket 18
ACTION POR DIVOKCB
" aboe.nBId defendant;
Yau ara hereby required to appear
and n.-.r tha complaint filed in the
above-entitled action within thirty daya
eJUr the flrit data of publication.
In cat* of your failure to ao appear
and anawer. judarmtnt rill to taken
aaalaat yon by default for tea rlif
demanded In the complaint.
WITNESS,- tto Honorable Joaaph J.
Hanock. Judae, United State- Diatrict
Court for tto Diatrict of the Canal
Zoae, thia March I". It52.
C. T. McCinalck. Jr.
.SEAL, CWrk
By Sara de la Paaa
_ Chief Deputy Clark
To Elmer I.eRoy P.ulifme:
Tto foraaTOina; aummona la aeread
upon you by pub).cation pursuant to
tka order of tto Honorable Joaeph 1.
Hancock. Judge. Unlud Stataa Diatrict
Court for tto Diatrict of tto Canal Zone.
dated March It. 1SSS and entered and
filed in thie action in tto office of the
Clerk of aaid United Stataa Diatrict
Court for to Diviaioa of Balboa ap
Merck It, ItSZ
C T. McCb-aalck. Jr.
Clark
v -*r v Bare 4 la I'en
^PS*"^ ffl i.f Depuly Ckrk
(A Lenten feature of" the Pa-
nama-American, prepared by
the Re. M. A. Cookson, Epis-
copal Church of Our Saviour,
New Cristobal.)
PRACTICAL RELIGION
"In all thy ways acknowledge
him, and he shall direct thy
paths." Read Proverbs S
Here Is a practical religion for
those people who really want It.
Let us think of two or three of
Its characteristics.
First, it Is not easy. On the
contrary, it is most difficult.
There are times when it will
seem intrusive. There are cir-
cumstances in which it will be
an embarrassment. Its exercise
will sometimes be Inconvenient
and the people who practice It
uriDopular.
The Old Testament prophets
were practical religionists. They
said: "Cease to do evil. Learn to
do good. Shape your conduct to
your creed.
But the prophets were not pop-
ular. Jeremiah was slipped Into
a pit. Daniel was slipped Into a
dungeon. The others fared much
the name.
Our Lord came with prmcimes
of practical religion, and they
nailed Him to a tree. Anyone
who is looking for an easy reli-
gion had better not take the
practical kind. A practical reli-
gion demands that we put our
creedal belief into action.
The religion of Holv ScriDture
demands acknowledgment of
God in all our ways: and there
are some ways that we've got to
oult. If we do not want to quit
God.
Second, this uncompromising
religion is consist^ent. It claims
everythingbodv. soul, spirit,
the whole of life. This Is true
and important. Anything which
we do carelessly and half-heart-
edly becomes dull and boring,
and anvthlne into which we
throw our whole hearts becomes
interesting and enjoyable. Do
you have a practical religion or
one of convenience?
PHONY CHECK TELLS TRUTH
MACON. Mo. (UP)The bank
'ias returned a phony $3 JO check
o a grocer here, marked, "no
'tch account." The ch*ck was
gned, "U. R. Swindled."
FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
ator 8 cu. ft., porcelain. 25 cycle
Excellent condition, $100. 2 Vene-
tian blinds, 5x6 oluminun, $16.-
00. Gamboa 0262 -B. Telephone
S-228._________________
FOR SALE: Simmons Innerspring
Studio Couch. Excellent condition.
Phone 2-4498 0777-B, Bal-
boa.
FOR SALE: 6 burner gos stove.
Good condition, $75.00. Tel. Pan-
ma 3-4184
FOR SALE:Special for "Army fa-
milies" used furniture at reason-
able prices. Economy Furniture
Store, 12.174 (12-13 Sts. Bolivar)
phone 916. Colon.
FOR SALE:Fibre Rug 9x12, good
condition, $10.00. 2157-C, Cu-
rundu.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:Room to Miss, Mrs or
nurse. Gentlemen or couple, with
meols. 45 St. No. 46, upstairs.
Such a pledge would, in Rus-
sian eyes, at least automatically
bar Germany from the North At-
But th<> Chlcaao Junction1 V e rlS&t to have national lantlc Treaty Organization, since
workers quicS turned to! Alr "12JS iorc ef5?" *!' H!eZ't.W NATO U tim'
vSSVSSSthe WYCCUcrew,*
here began trooping back.
The reljelllous groups had de-
fied a back-to-work injunction
obtained by the government in
Federal district court at Cleve-
land and the orders of their
union leaders to obey it.
This and That
HORIZONTAL
1 The Prince
and the
7 Arts and------
3 Celestial
4 Tobacco and
5 Adam and
8 Soaks
9 Consumed
10 Starch
11 Crude borax
Most other workers along the
NYC's western system bowed to IS Come
the injunction yesterday. : 14 Wholesale and S*r'*Tant.
The railroad reported that I ------
the passenger trains Pacemaker, 115 Sowed and
advance Commodore Vander-i| ------
bilt and the 20th Century limit-'; IEverlasting
ed left New York for Chicago (poet.)
on schedule. 17 Modify
. I> It Harem rooms J2 Slumbers
Passenger and freight trains, JO Chill 9 Ashes and
also began moving here, al- 21 High priest
though several morning pas- 22 Fruit
senger trains were cancelled: 23Crack
because of delays in getting the | 24 Metric
system straightened out again. measure*
The strike was called over a, 26Repasts
prolonged wage and hour dis-j 27 Regulate
pute between the brotherhoods1 29 Cereal
of engineers, firemen and con- 30Drone
ductors and the carriers. j SI Cicatrices
The brotherhoods, however,, 34Horses'
are expected to oppose the' positions
granting of a permanent in- 33 Thick and
Junction when a hearing is
held in Federal court at Cleve- 39 Grade
land March 21. 40 Cakes and
Anawer to Previous Puzzle
HI JWV.'r? a-_ana- '.VHtyUll
iB.'Hiiiwr-:li,air_T -
* r-'jiHi \^"-"M -i i
IBiJ'ia 2 M'J. .*< |
nr_'iB r ,B.r_ i yltl i
Kid II2IR r iBB-e'i-.dMi-,
f-jwranisiH r- i i in
:H'-JMiaiil>.'. i| iss
OldO' .< -lili i HiaHld
iMii II 'sjrv !'..i '
28 Cat and------ 3 Choice parts
28 Literary art 37 Jewish
31 Barrel parts ceremonial
32 Purity of color meals
33 Corridors 39------and falls
22 Malayan boats 34 Comrade 42 Endorse
23 Alabama city 35 Popular 43 Love god
25 Great oak and singer, Vic 45 Three (prefix)
little------ ------ 47 Age
FOR RENT:Furnished room with
kitchen, to morried Americon
2nd Anniversary
Of Windsor Club
Observed Quietly
The Windsor Social Club ob-
coupie. 43rd St. No. 43 Apt. C. served its second anniversary
quietly yesterday but has plan-
ned to celebrate the event with
an anniversary ball on April 26.
The ball will be a formal
LESSONS
P/ANO PLAYING tought. Privte affair at the Pacific Clubhouse,
instruction. Beginners edvonced.'Armando Bozas orchestra has;
Phone: Bennett ot 2-1282. been engaged for the evening. I
41 Measures ot
area
42 Storage pit
43 Among
44 Musical
directions
46 Distant
46 Come forth
Laundry
device
80 Black bucks
81 Fondle
YERTICAL
1 Severed
2 Interstice
r r- r r r r
ft
w~\ r
w i 1
h m i
u w



U
W

r

Only a Few Remaining
"Brand-New" CARS
at
"Used-Car" PRICES
From $1875.00 (CZ)
Ply mouths-
Chryslers- *"$2M5M (CZ)
We urge you to take advantage of these BARGAINS and save several hundred dollars
on the price of a new car. "
Agencias Panamericanas, S.A
Jernimo de la Ossa Street; Panam City
(Down the street from the El Rancho)


FRIDAY M.WCI 14, 195
- r
THE PANAMA AMERICA! AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
^Atlantic S^ocieli
Bo. 195, GJmm "Dillon* (mtmm 378
OU1-TO-DOOR SUPPER PARTI
11IVEN BY MR. AND MRS. ADAMS
The outstanding social event of the week on the Gold
Const was the bnffet supper flTen Wednesday evening by
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Adams at their Braros Heights re-
sidence. Taking advantage of the dry season, the hos s
served their guests on the extensive lawn of their hilltop
home.
The guests Included: the Gov-
ernor of the Panama Canal and
Mrs. F. K. Newcomer, the Uni-
ted States Ambassador and Mrs.
John C. Wiley, Major General
and Mrs. L. J. Whltlock. Major
General and Mrs. G. W. Ric,
Judge and Mrs. J. J. Hancock,
Mr. and Mrs Murray Wise. Lt.
Governor and Mrs. Herbert D.
Vogel. Mr. and Mrs. EuRene
Lombard, Col o n e 1 and Mrs.
Richardson Selee. Captain 'U.8.
N.) and Mrs. Robert M. Peach -
er, Captain (U.8.N.) and Mrs.
L. L. Koepke. Caotaln IU.S.N.>
and Mrs. Marvin West. Cantata
(U.8.N.) and Mrs William
Parsons, Colonel Henry A. Tay-
lor.
Also the American Consul at
Colon and Mrs. Charles H.
Whltaker. the French Consul and
Mrs. Marcel Grlngolre. Mr. and
Mrs. E. N. Stokes. Mr. and Mrs
H. L. Donovan. Mr. and Mrs. S.
C. Moore, Mr and Mrs. L. B.
Moore, Colonel and Mrs. Harry
Schelbla Major and Mrs. B. K.
Kmg. Rev. and Mrs. M. A
Cookson. Dr and Mrs
Ban Voyage Parties
for Chambers Family
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Chambers and Mrs. Chambers'
mother. Mrs. Sallle Foote Allen,
have been entertained at a num-
ber of Informal dinners and lun-
cheons before their departure to-
day for a vacation in Birming-
ham. Alabama.
Mrs. Allen will have an ex-
tended stay at her former home
and Mr. and Mrs. Chambers
will spend some time In Chicago
and the Middle Western states,
before returning In May to Pan-
ama.
Mrs. George Poole, 8r., of Ga-
tun was hostess for a luncheon
Wednesday at her residence for
Mrs. Allen. The guests brought
Individual gifts of handkerchiefs
for the honoree.
Those present were Mrs. India
Parker, Mrs. Leon Egolf. Mrs. Al-
ice Clement and Mrs. Fred New-
hard.
Gilder. Dr .and Mrs. Frank Ray-
mond, Dr.- and Mrs. Harrv Eno.
Dr. and Mrs. Rafael deBoyrle.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Noonan.
Mr. and Mrs. Mathew T. Bass.
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Delsz, Mr.
and Mrs. Carl Janson,Mr- and
Mrs. A F. Howard.
Also Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Ray-
mond, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Mld-
dlemas. Mr. and Mrs. P. G. Van
Dam, Mr. and Mrs Vereker
Mais, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Mor-
land, Mr. and Mrs. Edward
MacVlttle. Mr. and Mrs
Thornton, Mr. and Mrs. 3.
Constantakls, Mr. and Mrs. Ro-
bertBoyd. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Cunningham. Mr. and Mrs.
Lawrence ,Breece. Mr. and Mrs.
Lawrence Callaway, Mr. and
Mrs. James Piala, Mr. and Mrs.
J. B. Dorow. Mr. and Mrs. Fritz
Humphrey, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce
Carpenter. Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Gomez, Mr. and Mrs. E. L Slo-
cum.
Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Ward had
Wayne the family as their dinner gueats.
followed by an evening of bridge
at their Gatun residence.
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd McDermi't
entertained with a dinner party
at their Gatun residence for
Mrs. Allen and Mr. and Mrs.
Chambers,
Rev. and Mrs. J.W.L. Graham
were also present.
Mrs. Van Slclen
Leaves for States
Mrs. William Van
Anderson la the faculty sponsor
for the chapter.
The new members Includes:
Misses Margaret Ridge, Jean
Wong, Nidia Oliver, Elena Lee.
Marlcha Tagaropulos, Paula Hol-
gerson, Joyce Cookson, Henriet-
ta Ferrl, Muriel Morland, Betty
Tarr, Lois Scheldegg, Barbara
Egolf, Alice Hannlgan. Sheila
McNamee, Nancy Karlger. Elsa
Fernandez, Arlene Llm. Glnette
Wachtel, Louise Edmondson and
Virginia Dlgnam and Mr George
Bennett.
Guest speaker for the meeting
was Mr. Robert D. Olson of Ft.
Sherman, who spoke of his ex-
periences as a member of E.T.A.
and as a teacher In Idaho.
Guests Included: Mr. and Mrs.
C. V. Scheldegg, Mrs. Warren
McNamee. Mrs. Leon J. Egolf.
Mrs. Anton Holgerson, Mrs Lee
Karlger, Mrs. Mllo S. Gardner.
Miss Thelma R. Godwin, Miss
Dorothy Kern, Miss Lenora
Smith, Mrs. Thomas McGinn,
Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Goodhead,
Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Serger,
Mr. and Mrs. Reynold Vann and
Miss Jean Walsh.
The members of the FT.A.
present were Misses Nellie Hol-
gerson, Leneve Dough and May-
delle Gardner and Mr. Noel Mc-
Ginn.
Dance, Tour To Be Dunking For $500
Held Over Weekend Diamond Ring Was
By Balboa YMCA Taken In Vain

mib saTatN
The Balboa YMCA completed
plans today for two separate
activities over the weekend.
The first will be the obser-
vance of St. Patrick's Day on
Saturday night with a special
dance which calls for the wear-
ing of green and the "lucky
shamrock." Music will be by
Sgt. Burckhardt's orchestra from
the 71st Army Band from 8 to
11 p.m.
On Sunday morning at 9 pu-
pils of Mrs. Pat Morgan's flow-
er arrangement class will start
GREEN BAY, Wis. Charlie Miller's $500 diamond
ring almost cost h!s Ufe.
Miller. 75 year old retired
farmer, was looking for the ring
when he fell off the edge of a
dock Into the Fox river. Pas-
sersby pulled Miller ashore,
flremti revived him. and a hos-
pital tro *d him.
Miller's f.m. still ii in the
river.
JACOftY ON BRIDO!
out on a tour "of"the Morgan
Gardens.
Mr. Morgan herself will con-
duct the tour.
81clen, Jr.
Philip left by the Estrella Fruit Line
Tuesday for New Orleans. She Is
en route to Locust Grove, Okla-I
Loma, for a visit with her mo-|
er.
She plans to be away from the
Isthmus for about six Weeks.
tun
tne
Also Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Cra-
mer. Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Henrlquez, Mr. and Mrs. Chas.
Perret, 8r Mr. and Mrs. Frank
L. Bcott. Mr. and Mrs. Frank W.j Lawson were married
Scott. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Mot- Isthmus.
ta, Mr. and Mrs. R. Rusodlmos. --------
Mr. and Mrs. Fratak Canavag-'Sorority Holds
Mr. and Mrs. Lawson
Receiving Congratulations
Chief and Mrs. Frank L. Law-
son of Coco Solo are receiving
congratulations on the birth of
a daughter, Bettlna Kay, on
Wednesday. March 12, at the
Coco Solo Hospital.
Mrs. Lawson la a former resi-
dent of Australia. She and Chief
on the
Cotillion Club Dance
The Washington Cotillion Club
will hold an Informal dance In
the ballroom of the Hotel Wash-
ington tomorrow night.
This Is a working dance to
promote fun. Wear something
green!
Food Sale In Gatun
The Sodality of the Immacu-
late Conception Church In Ga-
tun will hold a food sale at the
postoffice tomorrow at 9 a.m.
The patronage of the general
public will be appreciated.
Girl Scout Rally Tomorrow
The Girl Scouts of America
will celebrate the 40th Anniver-
sary of their founding with a
rally at Balboa. In front of the
Administration Building, tomor-
row from 9 to 11 a.m.
In case of rain the rally will
be moved to the Balboa Gym.
La Importadora Selecta
COLON, R. P.
Bolivar Ave. #7081 between 7th and 8th Streets
Telephone 271-L
Is pleaded to announce the opening of their
establishment where they have a big and as-
sorted Mock of shoemaking articles and up-
holstering materials in plastic and nylon
for the benefit of customers on the Atlantic
side, especially Canal Zone residents who
we inform that our prices are lower than
the Commissary price* for similar mate-
rials. You are cordially invited to visit our
store.
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
ft NORTH U
ft 4*743
f f KM
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v. 4>A54
WEST BAST
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? Q10872 CK93
+ J109 *KQ3
Li- 30UTH (D)
4AKQJ10 VA543 A
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t- ? A J
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f^ North-South vul.v "w
Sat*h Wet Worth Raat
1* ?i :n.t. >m
4* PlM ?M Pass
Opening lead4b J
Military Donations
For Red Cross Fund
Exceed Last Year's
Military collections In behalf
of the 1952 American Red Cross
Fund Campaign amount to 7,-
775, Col. V. P. Shaw, Chairman
Of the
lo. Mr. and Mrs, Walter Hun-.Business Meeting
nlcitt, Mr. and Mrs. E. D.' The Beta chapter of Beta Slg- of the military portion
arms. Mr. and Mrs. Kennethima Phi held their regular busi- drive announced today.
del Vallet, Mr. and Mr. Hueene ness meeting Wednesday evening ___
McGrath. Mrs. 3.Z. Wardlaw, at the Margarita ClurJhou, with; This sum exceeds
Mis Nancy Gilder, Mrs. Elsie,Mrs. Violet Deaklns presiding. '* same *d. ^ta"X"
Mohr Sklllman. Miss Thora Bait-' Following the business meeting| and to date over 4;W0 civnian
bllts. Miss Dorothy Henry. Tho- a cultural talk. "Before An Au- employes and military personr
mas James Newcomer and Silvio dlence." was given by Miss Mary
Balazar. i Jeanne Wiesen.
-------- Other members who attended
Bon Voyage Dinner were: Mrs. Arden Welch. Mrs.
Mrs. Mattlson MacAulay was Marie Moscarltolo, Mrs.
honored with a dinner given Coffey, Mrs. Betty Lou Hudglns,,"' n.-flni.ed to ollcit mem-
Wednesday at the Gun Club by Mrs. Kathleen Huffman, Mr. ,onnel org.
collections
and their dependents have tak-
en out Red Cross membership.
Activities of the past week In
,. the Red Cross Drive found wive
of Albrook Air force Base per-
Mrs.
Mr. Anna Miller. Mrs. MacAu- Jean Judd. Mr. Sarah Vest and
lay sailed today for a State va- Mr. Beverly Berger.
cation. I--------
The other dinner guests were Future Teachers of America
Mr. Samuel Roe, Mr. Reva'Hold Initiation
Starke. Mrs. Thelma Lowe and, The Caribe chapter of the Fu-
Mlss Jennie 8atrlale. ture Teacher of America held
The group returned to Mrs. an Initiation In the cafeteria of
Miller's home In Old Cristobal the Cristobal High School Wed-
for dessert. Inesday evening. Misa Adamary
It's Movietime TONIGHT!
Panama L,anal cfheaters
^-*-
BALBOA
ir-Cnn ill linn H
4:25 CM S:SS.
Robert NEWTON' Alec GUTNNKSS
"OLIVER TWIST"
Saturday F.l.oPFlMr.NT"
Diablo hts.
1:111 a l:M
Ethel BARRYMORE Maurice EVANS
"KIND LADY"
Saturday "DISTANT DRUMS"
COCOLI
:ll A 7:45
' Gene AUTHY a Gall DAVIS
"INDIAN TERRITORY"
Saturday "KIND LADY"
PEDRC MIGUEL
f:IS A I: It
Dennl MORGAN Virginia MAYO
Painting the Clouds with Sunshine
Saturday "SAMSON AND DELILAH"
G AMBO A
Randolph SCOTT a PhyllU THAXTER
'FORT WORTH" (Technicolor)
Saturday "THE HOLLYWOOD STOKY"
H A 1 II N **r MILLAND Gene TIBRNIY
it "CL05E TO MY HEART"
a Satarday "SECRET OF CONVICT LAKE"
MARGAQITA Glenn PORD e Gene TTIRNEY
/?' "The Secret Of Convict Lake"
Saturday "THE STEEL HELMET"
CRISTOBAL
Alr-fanirltloaed
:15 1:1
Marjorle MAIN a Percy KILBRIDE
"MA AND PA KETTLE BACK ON
THE PABM"
Saturday "TOO YOUNG TO KIM"
ISow you can have better furniture
at better prices!
We have ENLARGED our SHOP
with new MODERN EQUIPMENT
to offer lower prices for quality furniture
20% DISCOUNT
By SET or PIECES
1ASH CREDIT CLUB
toRiture STORE
.ENTRALAVE.a,21'E.ST. PHONES
bershlp on a house to house ba-
sis. Officer' Wives' clubs also
re making donations to the Red
Cross. The Port Clayton club
donated $100 and both the Fort
Amador and Fort Gullck club
donated $25.
Col. Shaw also announced that
plans are bemg completed to
stage the forthcoming Panama
Armed Forces baseball league!
championship play-off on behalf
of the American Red Cross fund
campaign.
Present plans call for the wln-
!ner of the first half, the Albrook
Flyer, to meet the winners of
I the second half In a two-out-of-
three series play-off.
Atlantic Camera
Club To Hear Talk
On Color Slides
Mrs. Faye Mlnton. secretary of
the Piablo Camera Club, will give
* 'icti"-e on "how to make good
color slides" at the next meeting
of the color division of the Atlan-
tic Camera Club to be held Mon-
day at 7:30 p.m.
Mrs. Mlnton was the winner
^f the first prize In her club's
ilde competition In 1949 and
r*950.
Entries for the landscape and
seascape competition of the At-
lantic Club to select six slides to
be entered In the U.S.A. com-
netltlon also will be received at
the meeting.
Members of the tutorial divi-
sion also will submit their entries
for the spring exhibition to be
held In the States.
I submit today's handplayed
recently by Ed Burns, of Mln-:
nea polls.
West opened the jack of clubs,
and dummy won with the ace.
Burns saw that he had to lose
two club tricks, but that would
not bother him If he could fhid
a way to avoid the loss of two
heart tricks.
There would be no problem at
all if each opponent held three
hearts. South could cash the top
hearts and give up one heart ei-
ther before or after he drew
trumps.
The problem is to provide a-
gainst a 4-2 break in hearts. This
can be done by playing three
rounds of hearts and two rounds
Of trumps. Then South ruffs his
fourth heart with dummy's last
trump provided that the same
opponent has four heartds and
three trumps.
The Idea Is a good one, but how
do you go about it? if you draw
two rounds of trumps and then
i take the top hearts and give up a
heart, you are sure to land flat
|on your nose. East will win the
third heart and return his last
i trump to take the last trump out
of the dummy.
It will do you no good to draw
only one round of trumps and'
then lead out three rounds of
hearts. In that case, East can,
take two club tricks, and then
lead a fourth heart to let West
overruff the dummy.
Ed Burns made the solution;
look very easy. At the second
trick he led a low heart from
dummy and played a low heart
from his hand, allowing the<
opponents to win the tricks.
Now the defenders could take;
their clubs, but they could not
interfere with Ed's plans.
He could safely draw two
rounds of trumps, cash the are
and king of hearts, and ruff his
last heart with dummy's last
trump to make his contract.
BALBOA
pUMfWlrV
For your family' protection, intitt oa K.I.IM-
produced from selected cow'i milk under the most
rigid, scientific controla, and specially-packed to
asure you slunys ot pure, ufe milk.
2. KLIM keeps Kant refrlajeraflea
3. KLIM eaallty is always nifara
4. KLIM Is celleat far ar.wl., aMMraa
5. KLIM aaMl a ear Isa me t ta aakad dlsaas .
Taha era water,
6. KLIM I. r.c.^m.ad.d tar l.fe.t fa.dla, **- '
* r ran aaa aura, ,
7. KLIM li safe ia the saaelallyaaahadMa .
t. KLIM i prefaced aaelar itrlataa caatral
KLIM MILK
" FIRST'IN PRIFIRINCI THI WORLD OVIR
2-185C
2-1833
Fight
HEUMATISK
While You Sleep
If yon auffer harp, tabbine: palna, II
Joint are awollrn. It ahowa your bloo.'
may be poiaonrd through faulty kldn*>
action. Other aymptoma of Kidney Die
ordera are Burnlnsr. Itching Faena
Htrone;. Cloudy Urine, (Tettlnf f|
Manta. Backarhea, I.umbafo. I.ri
Palna, Nervouaneea. Diulnaea, Head
achaa. Colda. Puffy Anklea, Clrclea un-
der Cyaa, Lark of Kneriy. Appeilt
t<\ Cystu flahta these troublea h\
helping the Kldneya In I way*: 1. Help>
clean out aolaonoue acida, t. ('
cerma In the urinary eyatem. S. Boot.
r-na raima Irrltat-"-! ti-aue nr
from any druait >*<-, how quick'"
Mita you on the road te enJorlac H
That good to to*
Cream
Wheat
Services This Week
of the
SPIRITUAL REVIVAL CAMPAIGN
Friday 7:30; Saturday 7:3;
Sunday 11:00 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Speaker: Chaplain Ralph Wilson, U.S. Army,
Fort (iulick, Canal Zone.
Subjects: "Foundations of Faith"
"Constructive Christians"
. "Lost, but not Least"
ATLANTIC BAPTIST CHURCH
Bolivar Ave. at 12th St.
Cristobal, Canal Zone
PARIS BAZAAR
Emilio Palomeras
COLON
Excellent for children. Good
for grown-ups tool Delicious
Cream of Wheat gives you
minerals and vitamins necea
sary to growing children and
adulta Try it today.
jssa
During TWO DAYS Only
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
i
we offer a beautiful assortment r'
LADIES DRESSES
at incredible low prices .
much lower than cost price!
DRESSES SLWHTLY DAMAtfED
Kt
LOVELY COTTON DRESSES,
rayon too, at saving prices!
$5.95 So.95
Dick Powell Pessr Dew Joyce Heldea
in
"YOU NEVER CAN TELL"
LUX and CECILIA THEATRES (Simultaneously)
THE
DAY
THE EARTH <*V
STOOD STILL
TROPICAL
BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB>BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBa^BBBBBBBBBBVBBBBBaHSB|
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
MeUterpiece of Tarrrorl
CHARLES LAUGHTON
e
BORIS KARLOFF
e
SALLY FORREST

RICHARD STAPLE!
- In -
"THE STRANGE
DOOR"
ENCANTO THEATRE
Alr-CeadUiened
Clifton Webb Sblrfey
Temple. In
"MR. BELVEDERE GOES
TO COLLEGE"
Victor Malura Richard
Conte. in
"CRY OF THE CITY"
-
TIVOLI THEATRE
BANK DAT! Slea.H
At IN and l pm.
Dennis Morgan, in
BATON PASS"
Steve Cochran, la
HIGHWAY 3SI"_____
In Technlcolorl
CAP!TOLIO THEATRE
John Wayne, in
"SACK TO BATAAN"
a
Claire Trevor, in
"HARD BEAUTIFUL"
VICTORIA THEAl^f
Triple Program!
CAUGHT IN THE ACT"
"DEVIL'S BAT"
BROADWAY B-*. SHOT"



v>AC.F EIGHT
Tut PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DA1TT NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, MARCR 1*4, W
Pinch Hitting Features Reds' Win Over Cardinals
Cincinnati Triumphs 2-1
Over Redbirds On Homer
By UNITED PRESS
rmns mw some fine pinch hitting In yesterday's *"""
same between the Cineinanti Reds and the St. Lonis Cardinals
at St. Petersburg Florida. __km*
Cincinnati outfielder Joe Adcock came np as a pinch hitter
in the top of the ninth tentar with a runner on >**"
homered to jive the Reds a 2-1 win St. Louis P<* ""
Wallv Westlake homered in the third for the only Cardinal run.
Harr> Breecheen cave up the ninth tanta* four-bagrer and was
the losing pitcher. The defeat snaps the Cardinals four fame
W,n ManaSrer*Eddle Stanky say. he will make his Cardinal debut
at recond base on Saturday with Red Schoendienst shifting; to
At SarasoU, the Washington Senators defeated a Boston
Red Sox scrub team 4-1. The Red Sox rookies will leave for
minor league clubs shortly. The Senators got their winning run
in the second on singles by Pete Runnells, Cass Michaels and
Ed-lie Yost. ^ ... .v
Shortstop Phil Rizzuto made his first 195 appearance as the
New York Yankees blasted the Philadelphia A's 11-6 at West
Palm Beach. Rixruto came on In the seventh inning to replace
Jim Brldeweser. The Yankee shortstop walked and doubled one
run home. Andv Carey, battling for an Infield job with the
Yankees, came up with a double, single and triple.
Yankee Manager Casey Stengel has hi pitching lined up
for a three-game series against Brooklyn in Miami. Stengel will
use Tom Gorman and Harry Schaeffer tonight, Ed Lopat and
Frank Shea on Saturday and Johnny Sate and Jim Mc Donald
Sunday. ...
rhe Philadelphia Phils "B" team beat the Yankee scrubs 7-
at Clearwater. CItat Weaver hit two homers for the Yankees.
Star Hol'mie and Jim Command homered for the Phils.
The Detroit Tlrers snapped a three-rame losing streak yes-
terdav by beating the Boston Braves 8-5 at Lakeland, Florida.
Out'eilder Vic Wertz played his first game at first base for the
Tlrers. Detroit inflelders Georre Kell and Jeirv Prlddv collect-
ed seven of the 11 Tw hits. Kell had a homer a double, and
two imrlc Priddv homered and had two doubles.
Dirry Trout pitched the last ftve innings for Detroit and
yielded only three hits. For the Braves. Warren Spuhn gave nu
six hits, inrludinr two homers In four frames. However, rookie
Murray Wall was tagged as the losing pitcher.
Santa Cruz Sporh
A considerable amount of in-
terest Is developing for the in-
vitational track meet to be held
On March 22 at Santa Cruz Play-
ground.
As far as has been rumored It
Is exDected that La Boca's inter-
scholastlc champions will be rep-
resented once more with Char-
lotte Gooden, Central American
champion, in the 50. 75 and 100
yards dashes open for girls;
George Weeks, Rudolph Hall for
the 880 yards open for boys;
Florence Montan for "C" class
for girls; Gloria Tait for "A" class
girls.
Silver City undoubtedly will
string along .wltH-Valentine De-
. 8ousa, outstanding "A" class boy
runner for the 100 and 230 yards
daefies.
Chagres, it Is believed, will de-
pend on Edward Dennis and Jo-
seph Llnton to secure some more
first places as was done in the
last inter-scholastic meet. Coach
West has not released anything
up to the present.
INTRAMl'RAL BASEBALL
In a fast and snappy game the
Spiders defeated the Wasps 8 to
7 under the powerful pitching of
James Joshua who allowed five
hite to Wilfred Warren's nine.
SOFTBALL /
If plans materializes Mr. L.
Walker hopes to have a softball
game played between the Pacific
teachers and the Atlantic male
and female teachers on the eve-
ning of March 22 at Santa Cruz
diamond.
SOCIAL
The Adventlst Sunday School
oung people under the capable
eadershtp of Sister Florence
Brownie sponsored an enjoyable
night of fun at the Santa Cruz
Gym on Monday the 10th be-
Races
Tomorrow
1st Race "F-2- Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.08Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Mona Usa
2Rio Mar
3Romntico
4Carbonero
5Duque
6Strike Two
C. Iglesias 120
G. Snchez 120
A. Mena 120
J. Baeza, Jr. 120
C. Ruiz 120
C. Chave 117x
7Campesino J. Rodrigues 118
2nd Race "F-l" Natives'/j Ff s.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1Diez de Mayo F. Rose 120
2Raymond M. Guerrero 120
3Miranda B. Pulido 115
4Risita B. Moreno 116
5Volador J. Rodriguez 120
3rd Race "F-2" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Opex
2Cosa Linda
3 Eclipse
4Resorte
5Embustero
C. Iglesias 115
G. Cruz 115
B. Agulrre 115
V. Castillo 115
M. Guerrero 115
4th Race "F-l" in avives6' Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Sin Fin A. Enrique lllx
2Pesadilla V. Rodriguez 113x
3La Negra C. Chong 104x
4Lonely Molly L. Pea 107x
5Domino B. Pulido 111
6Don Arcelio G. Presoott 115
5th Race "C" ImportedSVi Fgs.
Purse: $650.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Beduino B. Pulido 114
2 Pavero O. Bravo 115
3Cyc. Malone B. Agulrre 114
4Paragon K. Flores 114.
Scot Soccer Fans
Start Near Riot
At Ticket Booth
GLASGOW, March 14 (UP)
Hundreds of soccer fans, crazy
for tickets, got out of hand at
7:30 a.m. yesterday and clubwav-
lng policemen moved in fast to
prevent a riot.
The fans had been lined up in
a mile-long queue for persons
waiting to buy tickets for a
match April 5 between England
and Scotland.
They broke ranks repeatedly
and a half hour before the ticket
windows opened emergency calls
went out to every police station
in Glasgow.
Later In the morning two fans
were fined one pound each. It
was reported that they incited
the crowd to resist the police.
tween the hours of 5 p.m. and
10 p.m.
Refreshments were served the
juniors while the seniors enjoyed
playing ping-pong, shuffleboard,
and different Bible games. Music
was furnished by Brother Mar-
tin with his electric guitar for
the evening. Elder Grissel closed
the evening's program with the
Lord's blessing.
6th Race "H' Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Fright L. Pea I02x
2Alejandro V. Rodriguez 109x
3Trafalgar) C. Ruiz 112
4Gale force) O. Chanls 117
5Ventre a Terre L. Bravo 113
6Paques B. Agulrre 115
7Cradle Song C. Iglesias 108
8In Time C. Chong 104x
7th Race "H" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Batt. Cloud B. Aguirre 120
2Pincel
3Hechizo
4Gaywood
5Mingo
8Soberana II
L. Bravo 115
O. Chanls 120
J. Phillips 120
G. Snchez 120
B. Pulido 112
8th Race 1-2 Imported6!4 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1England J. Phillips 120
.Miss Cristina B. Pulido 115
3Tully Saba J. Contreras 118
4Mr. Foot E. Gugnot 120
5Gran Da V. Castillo 120
6Tamesls II V. Ortega 120
7Scotch Chum A. Mena 120
8Canajagua G. Snchez 120
9Pa G. Cruz 114
9th Race 1-2 Imported6V Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Blitz Boy V. Rodriguez 112x
2Antecede B. Moreno 115
3Gay Ariel J. Baeza. Jr. 115
4Astoria G. Prescott 115
5Haste Star A. Enrique 112x
6Cotillon O. Bravo 115
7Costina A. Mena 115
10th Race 1-2 Imported6'A Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Interlude A. Vasquez 108x
2Hit C. Ruiz 114
3Bendigo V. Rodriguez lllx
4El Mago G. Snchez 120
5Alfonsito C. Ycaza 120
6Honey Moon B. Agulrre 119
11th Race "G" Natives 2 Fgs.
Purse: $250.00
1Portal B. Agulrre 112
2Don Jaime P. Ordonez 106
3Golden Tap V. Ortega 118
-Golden Fan V. Arauz 108
5Strike Three A. Enrique 102x
Pro Tommy Bolt Gets Special
'Masters Tourney9 Invitation
Results of CZORA
Outboard Molorboal
Races At Galun
Results of the outboard motor
boat races at the Tarpon Club
Sunday, March 10, are as fol-
lows:
CLASS "M," 1ST HEAT
1Sgt. B. Mlnnler, driving No.
33.
2Lanny Gunn, driving Con-
nie Ann.
2ND HEAT
1Sgt. B. Mlnnler.
2Lanny Gunn.
The first heat was a tie and
the second heat was won by Mln-
nler. Elapsed time for the two
races gave Mlnnler first placa.
CLASS "A," 1ST HEAT
1William EggerRed Bug.
2M-Sgt. Walker HornH-88.
2ND HEAT
1-William EggerRed Bug.
2M-Sgt. Walker HornH-M.
CLASS "B." 1ST HEAT
1M-8gt. Alton Colley77.
2George Egger31.
3Thomas EggerRed Bug.
4T-Sgt. Howell Patterson8.
2ND HEAT
1George Egger31.
2M-8gt. Colley77.
3T-Sgt. Patterson8.
4Thomas EggerRed Bug.
CLASS "C," 1ST HEAT
1J. RamseyC-Sharp.
2A. G. WtakesB-Flat'
3Lloyd KentBaby Jumbo.
2ND HEAT
1Lloyd KentBaby Jumbo.
2J. RamseyC.-8harp.
3A. G. WlnkesB-Flat.
FREE-FOR-ALL
1M-Sgt. Colley77.
2Lloyd KentBaby Jumbo.
3William Egger31. .
In the races Sunday not every-
thing went as plannedJack
King driving Silver Streak
(CU812) met with disaster on the
second buoy while overtaking
Wlnkes' B-Flat. First his boat
jumped out of the water and
came back down again and on
the second jump turned over.
This is the first accident CZO-
RA has had since its organiza-
tion in February. Jack rode the
bottom of Silver Streak back to
the piers and his omments to
the crowd were, The water was
wet and warm." The motor of
this boat was badly damaged and
may be out of the next races due
to be held soon.
Again Number 77 proved Its
superiority over the larger crafts
In the Free-For-AU. Will this
performance be repeated? Come
to the next meeting of CZORA
and find out.
CUN CLUB
NOTES
Jua*" fr,'",n'* fipf
By CLOCKER
1ROMNTICO Rlomar
2RISITA Volador
3ECLIPSE Cosa Linda
4SIN FIN Don Arcello
5CYCLONE MALONE Pavero
6PAQUES Trafalgar
7SOBERANA n Gaywood
8MISS CRISTTNA
Canajagua
9ANTECEDE Cotillon
10HONEY MOON Bendigo
11PORTAL Golden Tap
SARDINE TASTE COSTLY
CAIRO, W. (UP)Two months
after Charles Gray had served a
term for shoplifting at the Stop
"N Shop store he was caught
fiocketing a can of sardines in
he same shop. He was returned
to the state penal farm.
Lots of trapshooting activity Is
scheduled during the next 45
days prior to the last week end in
April when all the suspense will
end and the new champions will
select themselves. As matters
stands right now, there isn't any-
one in particular who could be
classed as a favorite to wear the
winner's crown for the succeed-
ing twelve months after the
championship showdown. All the
shooters are putting forth their
best efforts to win and very high
scores are being posted with lit-
tle marginal differences In the
averages.
The beautiful combination cig-
arette case and lighter trophy
was won by Captain W. Spencer
at the Balboa Gun Club register-
ed trapshoot on Saturday, March
8. Captain Spencer's score of 89
in the combined fifty 16-yard
and 25-palr of doubles program
put him on top of the other
shooters. "Pop" Sanders and T.
J. Tassln trailed right behind
with 88 and 87 respectively. Sec-
ond class high money was won
by Bill Cunningham with 79 fol-
lowed by Lt. Almstead who scor-
ed 78 and Bill Kllgallen who
came through with 75.
"Charlie" Dlsharoon, manager
of the Gamboa Gun Club, will
hold a fifty 16-yard and fifty-
handicap bird shoot on Sunday
morning, March 16, same time as
usual with plenty of hot coffee.
On March 22. Bill Cunningham
will hold another combined 25-
palr of doubles and 50 ATA han-
dicap registered shoot at the Bal-
boa Gun Club Saturday after-
noon.
Sunday, April 6, the Cristobal
Gun Club wlD. hold one of Its
popular registered trapshoots
consisting of fifty 16-yard and
50 ATA handicap birds. These
are all the shoots scheduled up to
date but watch this column for
notice of additional shoots In
April.
T. J. Tassin, who has worn out
several polishing cloths and half:
a dozen boxes of silver polish will1
welcome a challenge for the For-1
rest McNeir Challenge Cup. This
challenge is shot at fifty 16-yard
targets with the challenger fur-
nishing the shells and targets.
Scores at Shoot at the Balboa
Gun Club March 8
NAME- S-
NAME- a w-
P. M. Disharoon, Sr. 48
T. J. Tassln...... 47
C. S. Sanders .... 47
Capt. W. Spencer .. 46
P. M. Dlsharoon, Jr.
W. Cunningham ..
Lt. Almstead .. ..
Bill Kllgallen ....
Ed Francis...... 37
joe Kueter.....
AUGUSTA, Ga., March 14 (UP)
Unpredictable Tommy Bolt,
the pro from Durham, N.C., and
amateur Johnny Dawson of Palm
Springs, Cal., drew special invi-
tations today to play in the Mas-
ters Golf Tournament here April
S-6.
Bolt, who has just put a halt
to Jackie Burkes meteoric streak
by beating him In the La Gorce
Club Tournament In Florida, was
nominated by U. S. Open cham-
pions to play in the elite event.
Dawson was recommended In
a ballot of U. S. Amateur cham-
pions. President Bobby Jones of
the Augusta National Club Im-
mediately invited both men un-
der the regulations which per-
mit the champions to nominate
outstanding players not other-
wise qualified.
Burke, winner of four straight
tournaments on the winter cir-
cuit, qualified for the Masters as
a member of the 1951 Ryder Cup
team. Otherwise he almost cer- a]ong its coastal waters.
talnly would have been picked r-
the outstanding current pro de-
serving an invitation.
In the ballot among 24 Open
champions. Bolt was a narrow
choice ever Ted Kroll, who has
battled close behind Burke and
Bolt this season. Others men-
tioned were Chick Harbert, Jim-
my Thomson, Doug Ford, Henry
Williams and Fred Haa, Jr.
Dawson was an overwhelming
choice of the 24 amateur cham-
pions. Others who received votes
were Francis Wlnlnger, Hobart
Manley, Jr., Rufus King, Bobby
Kuntz and William J. Patton.
Robinson Takes Unanimous
Decision Over Bobo Olson
SAN FRANCISCO, March 14
(UP)World Middleweight
Champion Ray "Sugar" Robin-
son, fresh from his triumphant
defense of.his title against Carl
"Bobo" Olson of Honolulu, said
he is ready to take on Rocky Gra-
zlano in Chicago April 16 but ad-
mitted his six-month layoff
firoved somewhat of a handicap
ast night. However, he won a
unanimous decision.
Robinson, weighing 157 Vi, came
on fast in the closing rounds of
the 15-round title fight to turn
back the challenge of Olson who
weighed 159 ft.
Peru Plans Deep Sea
Fishing Tournament
(Distributed by NEA Service)
LIMA, March 14 (Special)
Per is about to begin capital-
izing on one of its great natural
assets deep sea sport fishing
lie "
A total of 110 have now been
invited to the Masters with sev-
eral foreign stars yet to be se-
lected. The starting field is ex-
pected to number close to 70 in
quest of the crown won last year
by Ben Hogan.
43
43
40
38
25 Pr
25 Pt.
DbU.
38
40
41
43
38
36
38
37
30
32
Calling Alonso
Baseball pitcher Andrs (An-
dy) Alonso of Panam City tt
requested to get in touch with
Gil Morland of Cristobal Im-
mediately. .'_.. ,.
Alonso has been signed up to
playbail rathe United States
this year. Morland has his eon-
tract and transportation reaay
to be delivered to him.
Morland may be "*** "i!
his office Tel. 3-1781 or at bis
residence -2370.
The Touring and Automobile
Club of Per Is pushing plans
for two different types of fish-
ing tournaments. One, which is
scheduled to last from December
1 of this year until May 1, 1953,
will be a deep sea fishing contest
to be conducted under the rules
of the International Game Fish
Association. A surf fishing tour-
nament is also planned, with the
dates to be announced later.
Results of recent fishing par-
ties at Cabo Blanco have been
nothing short of sensational, lt
Is reported. Mr. Anton Hulmn,
prominent North American in-
dustrialist, recently caught three
black marlin weighing more than
700 pounds each during four
days. Two of them, weighing 837
and 918 pounds, were the largest
broadblll fish ever caught in
South or North American Pacific
waters.
Cabo Blanco is the only place
where the three major broadblll
fishbroadblll swordflsh, black
marlin and striped marlin are
found together. Catches even
more sensational than that of
,Mr. Hulmn are expected at any
time, as these waters have so far
been practically unflshed.
Cabo Blanco Is near Talara, an
I important petroleum center in
I the northern part of Per. Pan-
lagra officials report that al-
though facilities are private and
are extremely limited, fishermen
all over the world are exhibiting
utmost interest in coming to this
new "fisherman's paradise."
K!n,nyi&Vny -
Jim
star scorer,
tarings high over Jerry Mc-
Cloekey's head to keep the Vio-
lets in the game against Notre
Dame at Madison Square Gar-
dan. The Irish won in ovar
tima, howavtr, 75-74. (NBA)
RACES SATURDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd 6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
onr patrons we are no*
operating both at the
COP ACABAN A" and
"SAVOY."
I
RACE SATURDAYS STELLAR
5th Rece "C" Importeds 6V2 Fgs.
Purnc: $650.00 Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m.
J BEDUINO................B. Pulido 114
2. PAVERO.................O. Bravo 115
3. CYCLONE MALONE.......B. Aguirre 114
4. PARACON ................K Florea 114
SUNDA Y
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK
SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
6th Race
Purse: $500.00
"F" Importeds
7 Fgs.
Pool Closes: 3:35 p.m.
FIRST RACE OF DOUBLES
1. ALABARDA ............? Rodrigue*
2. SANS SOVC1............J- Contreras
3. IAMPIPFSA ..............O. Bravo
4. FAIR CHANCE...........B. Aguirre
5. MONTIEL1TO____.........O. Chanu
6. CHOICE BRAND...........K. Florea
7.' ROCKY ..................C. Lino
109x
110
114
120
120
112
113
7th Roce "B" Importeds 7 Fgs.
PurPe: $750.00 Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
"Gen. William J. Morris Jr. Handicap"
J. NEW MINSTER............C. Igleaiaa 109
2. ROADMASTER.............L. Bravo 115
3. RATH1IN LIGHT...... .....J- k 120
4. WELSH LOCH.............B. Pulido 122
5. PUBLICO.................O. Bravo 117
, i TMTfl
The battle, staged for the ben-
efit of the Damon Runyon Can-
cer Fund, attracted a record 11.-
000 fans In the Civic Auditorium
which seats slightly more than
9,000.
The gate, not immediately an-
nounced, totaled around $69,000.
Robinson donated his entire
purse except for $1 (one dollar)
to the Cancer Fund. Olson got
$9,000plus a lot of prestige
for his share.
The surprising Olson, who's
eight years younger than Robin-
son, took the initiative from the
start and actually was even or
ahead on points at the end of the
tenth round.
Olson won the seventh, eighth,
ninth and tenth rounds and lt
appeared that Robinson was
about to lose his crown for the
second time in a year. But the
Champion came back strong In
the closing rounds and started to
connect regularly. In the 15th Ol-
son was hanging on at the bell.
Early in the fight Robinson
had been swinging from the
floor and his shots missed their
target so far that the fans were
hooting. It was obvious that the
long layoff had affected the tim-
ing of Robinson who la consid-
ered the finest fighterpound
for poundIn the world.
Robinson said after the fight,
"My timing was off and some-
times I could feel the breeze from
my own misses. But I'll be better
for the Graziano fight." Ray had
nothing but praise for Olson.
He said, "That kid really be-
longs among the top middle-
weights of the world. I'll fight
him again if he wants another
matchbut I won't fight him for
$1 like I did last night."
Turn About Not
Always Fair Play
MONTGOMERY, Ala.. March
14 (NEA) Burly Dick Greco,
Montgomery's slugging outfield-
er back from a short sojourn in
the Puerto Rican Winter League,
can't get over the fans in the Ca-
ribbean.
"The Puerto Ricans average
about four games a week, play-
ing nights and split doublehead-
ers on Sunday," relates the big
fellow who played with Maya-
euez. "They average between
4000 and 7500 per game. Gen-
darmes are stationed about every,
10 feet along the sidelines.
"Once the fans started tossing
pop bottles after a close decision.
One of the cops started throw-
ing 'em right back until his fel-
low officers subdued him.
"The policeman was transfer-
red \o another precinct"


FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 15*
TUP PANAMA AMUMCAN AW fWDEPlWDRNT l>Af!Y NtWSPAPKK
pagc nn
Architect Envisions Dodger Stadium With Roof, Purple Grass
Balboa High Wins 8-0 To Keep j But No Built
In Pennant
For Bums
Twi Loop 2nd Half Hopes Alive
[ PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL
LEAGUE
(Straight Season Standings)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
] Gibraltar Life.. .. 18 5 .706
Balboa Brewer. .11 6 .847
Balboa HI School.. 6 10 .875
| Panam Merchants 4 18 .850
(Second Half Standings)
I Balboa Brewers. ..5 8 .625
Gibraltar Life.. ..5 8 .625
Balboa HI School.. 4 8 .571
[ Panam Merchants 1 6 .148
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
Balboa High School 8, Panam
Merchants 0. .
SUNDAY'S DOVBLEHEADER
(At Balboa Stadium1:00 p.m.)
Panam Merchants (Hearn 2-6)
[vs. Gibraltar Life Insurance
(Bins 6-3); Balboa Brewers (Lar-
rlnaga 3-2) ts. Balboa HI School
(Swalm 1-2).
By virtue of their victory over
the cellar dwelling Panama Mer-
chants the Balboa High School
nine, behind the masterful three
hit whitewash pitching of Don
Morton, kept their chances alive
for first place honors in the cur-
rent second half race of the Pa-
cific Twilight Loop.
Spreading three hits in seven
(frames, Morton, Balboa High's
ace hurler, chalked up his fourth
win against one defeat while the
High School squad won their
third consecutive game, 8-0.
Manager Pete Corrigan of the
Panam Merchants sent Bob
Medlnger to the mound and he
lost his sixth decision while onlyi
winning one. ,
Big gun for the red and white
clad lads was Dick Ostrea who'
collected three hits in four trips i
to the plate, being walked oncej
for a perfect day with three for,
three. Of the three hits given upi
by Morton, Moiss de la Pena gotj
two of them. Herb Newhouse got
the other.
The 1952 Twilight Loop champs
may be decided in Sunday after-
noon's doubleheader when the
Panam Merchants will take on
the Gibraltar Life Insurancemen
in the first game while the Bal-,
boa Brewers must play against
the much Improved Balboa High
School squad.
A loss for the Insurancemen
and Brewers will give the Balboa
High team the lead. This will
make it necessary then for the
High 8chool to play the postpon-
ed game of Feb. 20 against the
Merchants, but If one of the
leading teams wins and the oth-(
er loses, the second half race will
be over. /
The box score:
BBS AH; B H PO
Napoleon, rf 4 !
Arias, 3b. ... 0
By BILL BOEDER
NBA Special Correspondent
VERO BEACH, Fla., March 14
(NEA)Norman Bel Oeddes, the
architect, Is talking about build-
ing an all-weather stadium he
hopes to set up In Brooklyn some
day to replace Ebbets Field.
One feature of It, he said,
would be a built-in toboggan
slide. That is where the Dodgers
are 'way ahead of him.
Instead of concession stands,
there would be a sort of Automat New York "B" (A)
arrangement. You drop coins 1ft I 020 000 0406
a slot alongside your seat and up! Philadelphia "B" (N)
Grapefruit League
YESTERDAYS SCORES
(AT LAKELAND)
Boston (N) 330 000 0005 10 ,
Detroit (A) 801104 00X9 11 8
Spahn, Wall (5), Jester (7),
Cole (8) and Burrls, St. Claire
(5); Hoeft, Trout (5) and Batta,
Ginsberg (7).
Cleveland (A) vs. San Diego
(PCD, canceled, rain.
Chicago (A) vs. Pittsburgh (N)
canceled, rain.
(AT SARASOTA) .
Wash. (A) 110 000 0J04 9
Boston (A) 010000 0001 5
Hudson, Johnson (4), Sanchez
(7) and Kluttz, Echevarra (7);
Atkins, Schuster (4), Kemmerer
(7) and Atwood.
Dick Duran Hurls
No-Hit No-Run Game
\n Shorty League
SHORTY LEAGUE STANDINGS
Philippine Rattan
Defeats Elks 9-
PACIFIC SOFTBALL LEAGUE
STANDINGS (Second Half)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Firemen's Insur. .. 8 I 1.000
Pan Liquido.....8 8 1.008
Philippine Rattan. 2 2 .560
Elks.......... 3 .000
CAA..........6 3 .000
WEDNESDAY'S RESULT
(AT CLEARWATER)
8 3
200103 01X7 11 1
Keegan, Nevell (6) and McKel-
vey; Possehl, Miller (4), Crlstan-
te (7) and Wllber, Oswald (7).
(AT WEST PALM BEACH) .
N. Y. (A) 000 007 10311 17
Free Fish Fry
At Qatun Is
[Huge Success
The annual Free Fish Fry of
the Panama Canal Tarpon Club
on Sunday, March 9. at the Ga-
tun Spillway was enjoyed bv
more than 1.200 men, women and
children. Following the Fish
Fry motorboat races were held
In the lagoon below the Tarpon
Club docks. 1JMl!
The six hundred pound* of fish
eaten Sunday were caught and
contributed by members of the
Tarpon Club. Served with the
fried corbina and snapper were
baked beans, cole slaw, bread and
butter. Members and their
friends served the crowd at the
Tarpon Clubhouse between li:oo
and 2:00 8undav afternoon.
The Food Committee was com-
prised of K. F. Brassel, chair-
man, F. La Rue, W. F. Orady
and E. E. Stern. The Club's se-
cretary and treasurer. W. L'.
Brooks was responsible for hav-
ing sufficient cold drinks m
stock. The Tarpon Club presi-
dent. Lee Sparks, was every-
where, making sure that things
ran smoothly so that all 1,200
could enjoy themselves.
Among others who helped with
the Fish Fry were Messrs. Ge-
nis, Kariger, McDermott. Tinnin.
Gibson. May, Amos, Starke, Bain.
Pennock. Ray and McNamee.
The canal one Outboard Rac-
ing Association, of which ML.
McCullough Is president, spon-
sored the motorboat races.
Former C.Z. Boy
Slars In Swimming
Al Colorado A & M
Jerry Darden, former Canal
Zone boy, Is chalking np many
swimming honors at Colorado
Agricultural and Mechanical Col-
lege at Fort Collins, where he Is
now a senior.
He is captain of the college
gwimmine team, the "Agua Ag-
ries," which has been romping
all over ita recent opponents.
The Aggies have been defeated
onlv once this season in a close
mrtch with Colorado University.
Jerry Darden Is the brother of
Ca".ln B. A. DsrfJen. <"'nO-
er of the Balboa Police District
and Curtis B. Darden, customs
Insnector ? Balboa; and son-in-
law of J. F. Evans, manager of
the Balboa Commissary.
May, cf
Flynn, c.
garlin, lb .
strea, 3b. .
Halman, 2b-rf
Rowley. If. .
aHalsall. .
Henderson, If
Salaa, ss. .
Morton, p .
1
0
1
1
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
pops a beer and a hot dog. Heads
with mustard, tails without.
No grass on the field. Bel Oed-
des has something better, a man-
ufactured fuzz that's just as soft
and doesn't have to be mowed or
seeded. He can make it pink or
purple or a pretty plaid If you're
tired of green.
In case of rain, a roof slides
over the field and the lights go
on. The roof would be of alum-
inum. Glass wouldn't do, Bel
Geddes says, because It Isn't! cinc!. (N) 000000 0022
strong enough and it gets dirty, s. Louis (N) 001000 0001
and most of the time you'd have Raffensberger, Blackwell
to turn the lights on anyway, be-
phiia. (A) 302000003 8 18 2
, Kuzava, Oetrowski (5), Madi-
son (8) and Berra, Houk; Ren-
tier, Fowler (4), Martin (6),
Rume (8) and Astroth.
(AT ST. PETERSBURG)
TEAM
Ancon.....
Gamboa ....
Pedro Miguel
Diablo.....
Balboa.....
Won Lost Pet.
1.000
.750
.600
.200
.000
Dick 'Fireball' Duran hurled
his way Into the Shorty League
Hall of Fame by pitching a no-
hit no-run game as the Ancon
Blue Devils walloped Diablo 11-0.
Duran struck out eight batters
and walked only three men while
twirling the masterpiece.
Duran received excellent sup-
port from his teammates and the
shortstop, Caslra, made the out-
standing defensive play of the
day as he went deep in the hole
behind second to field a batted
The Philippine Rattan team
came from behind to defeat the
hard hitting Elks 9 to at Aft-
con yesterday.
The lodgemen got a four-run
advantage In the bottom of the
first when it looked as if How-
ard Engelke, on the mound for
the Rattan team, didn't have
what it took. However, after the
first inning Engelke settled down
and the Elks failed to score
again until the fourth when they
marked up one more run on three
singles and a base on baUs.
.81 8 7 21 7 1
Totals
Merchants AB R HPO A E
De la Pea, cf. 30 2 3 0 0
Rayb'rne, P\, If 3 0 0 1 0 3
Francis, 3b. ..30
Newhouse, lb.
Medlnger, p .
Hearn, rf .
Phillips, ss .
Silva, 2b. .
0 1
3 0 0
3 0 0
3 0 0
3 0 0
0 0
1 0
Rayb'rne, H., c 2 0 0 4 J J)
Totals .... .26 0 3 21 9 4
Score By Innings
Balboa High School 204 000 2-8
Panam Merchants 000 000 0-<>
aFlled out for Rowley In 6th.
Runs Batted InFlynn 2, Ostrea
2, Rowley. Earned Runs BH8 3.
Left on BasesZHS 5, Merchants
5. Stolen BasesNapoleon, Flynn
3, Carlin, Ostrea 3. Passed Ba Is
Flynn, H. Raybourne 2. Struck-
out by-Medlnger 3, Morton 6.
Base on Balls off-Medlnger 3,
Morton 1. Losing Pitcher-Medln-
eer (1-6). Winning Pitcher-
Morton (4-1). UmP*^;?*0"';
son and Davenport. Time ol
Game1:37.
~p nh-n | r -n- ;t gets dark.
MECHANICAL ROOF
jic root wouiu work as fol-
lows: There would be a perman-
ent ceiling covering about two-
thirds of the park, but the sta-
dium would be so oriented that
sunlight would still bathe the
whole playing surface.
If it rains, Bel Geddes presses
a button and the other third is
covered by a section that slides
out from the top of a building
next door to the park.
In addition to housing the re-
tractable part of the roof, the
building next door would serve
as a garage. It would park 7000
cars. From any level of the gar-
age you walk right into the Dall
park. If you're a season subscrib-
er you don't need a ticket be-
cause you have a key that lets
?ou in any of the dozens of en-
rances. This cuts down on tick-
et-takers.
The park would seat about 55,-
000 for baseball pr football, but
more than 100,000 for such things
as fights, conventions and boat
shows. It would cost over $8,000,-
000, so Bel Geddes would want It
paying for itself all year 'round.
Under the stands he would
have a playground, so that moth-
er could check their kids. And
maybe a shopping center.
FrtT WARMER
Foam-rubber cushions on all
the seats, and they all face the
pitcher's mound or the 50-yard
line. Bel Geddes says he can ar-
range to angle the seats toward
the main action of any event.
If your feet get cold step on
the little button and the heat
goes on. .
The stadium wUl be built when
Byerly (8). 8mlth (9) and Rossi;
Hahn, Beard (4), Barni (5), Bre-
cheen (7) and Bucha.
(4)t ball and threw the runner out
and Jf, meaning the Dodgers get
the money, the site and the per-
mission from the government,
and if Brooklyn President Walter
O'Malley goes for the gimmicks
advanced hy Bel Geddes, and a
co-designer, Emil Preager.
Bel Geddes and Preager have
been at Vero Beach studying the
layout for a small stadium the
Dodgers want to build for spring
training games. For this one, Bel
Geddes wants to use Inflatable
rubber seats. They'd be cheap,
portable and comfortable.
"What If somebody sticks a pin
in >m?" he was asked.
Bel Geddes seemed punctured.
"Gee, I never thought of that,"
he said.
...WITH THESE VVORID FAMOUS
TAGAROPULOS
iNDI'STRIES, S.A.
Phones:
1002 1003
Hi Feo Boya Ave
Colon R P
FRESH MILK
. FRESH BUTTER
. RICH ICE CREAM
Ever; thing
Inspected bv the
Health Deoartment
HOME DELIVER Y
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF STANDINGS
TEAM WO Loat
Police
Sears......
Lincoln Ufe..
APGE14 .. ..
Elks 1414 ....
Firemen ..
1
6
8
S
3
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lot*
Elks 1414.......... 4 1
Lincoln Lira........ 1
Sears............ 1
AFGE 14.......... f
Firemen.......... 1
Police............ 1 *
TESTERDATl RESULT
Linela Ufe 6, Firemen 5.
TODAY'S GAME
Sean n. AFGE.
In the seventh the Elks threat-
ened again when they scored one
run on a single, an error and
three consecutive walks, woody
Woodruff went into a pow-wOw
and sent Gordon Smith 1ft to re-
place the faltering Engelke.
The Ltneoln Ufert moved into
second plaee in the pacific Uttte
League second half standing*
eklnt out a close 6 to 8 in over
the Firemen.
The Lifer scored two runt to
the first second and third in- rirwea- AB R
,, nlngs to take a 6 ,? undrtowki, 8b. 6 0
copelio was at bat when Smith nelJ the smokies until the top of ,_ j .
w,ent ? Fd h,,d ea&_5?enithe sixth toaiag. Ka' '
mound for the winners but waa
relieved by Bruce Bateman in the
sixth when the Smokies put en a
rally to score five runs. Bateman
retired the last two men of the
inning with the tying run on
third and the winning run en
second.
Engelke pitched creditable ball
up to the sixth inning allowing
only one hit while sending fttne
batters back to the beneh via the
strikeout route.
Schoeh of the Smokies vas the
leading batter of the game col-
lecting tve hita 1ft three trips to
the plate with Billy Engelke and
Conklln of the Ufen leading
their team with one hit In tire
trips to the plate.
Bateman was not able to raise
his batting average being pur-
posely pasted three times with
runners on base.
Today Sean will try to regain
second place In th standings
when they tend Jlmmie watten
to the mound against Bobby Wills
of AFOE
The box score:
The win firmly established Ancon
in the league lead.
Pedro Miguel and Balboa tan-
gled in close contest with Pedro
Miguel emerging victorious with
a 6-3 win. The Pedro Miguel
pitcher, Esteban Coln, notched
the win as he went the route
scattering the Balboans hits.
The action this Saturday In-
volves Gamboa at Balboa whUe
Ancon Journeys to Pedro.Miguel
for a tussle. Diablo has the open
date on the schedule.
The box score:
Diablo AB R
Labiosa. 2b........ 2 0 0
Raphael, 2b........ 1 0 0
Eberenz, ss........ 1 0 0
Smith, ss.......... 0 0 0
Schalm, p.......... 1 0 0
Mosley, 3b......... 2 0 0
Ollvarez, lb........ 2 0 0
Thompson, cf...... .. 2 0 0
Bruce, cf.......... 2 0 0
Storey, If.......... 1 0 0
Brown, If.......... i 0 0
O'Leary, c.......... 2 0 0
Barker, rf.......... 0 0 0
Bean, rf.......... 0 0 0
Totals............18 0 0
allowed two balls by Engelke. Butch jrJataer tartid an the
SP'H, *ale. "iP two mS!e **? to mound for the Firemen and al-
fSEI1!riWhlcn 8C-d kV?8 f ". lowed six runs and four Bits to
third. The succeeding batter, Bob1
Taht lined out to Doc. Jutiy at
second base. There was a tense
moment when Doc. Juggled the
ball but managed to hold on to
It to end the game.
Morris, rf.
Price, 2b
2
mound for the rrten.*"? A: Prlee, lb '."..'.'.'. 1 0 0
lowed six ruwaftd four hlU to McNfiL ,,..... j 0
three and two-thirds innings W4j]JJ rt..... i o
with Don RandaltaifairiK* Smith f! } !
finishing up by holding the Llf-'schoch, e...... 3 1 8
ers seoreleaa in two mlaga.
johnny Bftgelke wat on the
AB
4
3
. 4
4
3
Ancon
Duran, p......
Caslra, ss......
Harley. 3b .. .. ,
Chlsm. c......
Delgado, lb .. ..
Humberto, cf........ 3
Wong, cf.......... 0
Darlington, rf...... 2
Zarden, rf........ 0
Meggers, If........ 2
Hazera, If. .. ..... 1
Alcldes, If......... 3
Totals............29 11 10
Howard Engelke was the win-
ning pitcher. Frita Cheney the
loser.
Extra base hits were chalked
up by Dick Soyster with a homer
in the first, Bobby Ganes with A
solid triple in the third and Lar-
ry Chance with a double to the
sixth.
The box aeon:
Elks ABIIt
Taht, at........ 4 1 1 1
Chance, lb....... 3 1 1 0
Rager, If........ 3 8 0 1
Evans, 3b........ 3 2 1 1
Roberto, 2b...... 4 0 0 0
Soyster, cf...... 4 1 1 0
Herndon, c....... 2 1 2 0
Cheney, p........ 1 0 0 1
Copelio, rf...... 3 0 1 0
Totals..........38 ~8 *7 ~4
Philippine Rattan AB R
Lawyer, rf....... 4 0
Eraser, cf........ 4 1
Jones, 3b........ 4 '.
Oanss, ss........ 4 0
Nichols, c....... 4 :
Woodruff, If...... 2 2
Rlley, J., lb....... 3 1
Jutzy, 3b........ 3
Engelke, p....... 4 3
Smith, p........ 0 0
Fight Dope
(By P. *.)
Former Middleweight Cham-
pion Rocky Gratano will meet
Roy Woutert in A tune-up bout
at Minneapolis on March 37.
Srazlano has a title date with
ay Robinson to Chicago on
Pln Philadelphia, Promoter
Herman Taylor saye he has of-
fered light heavyweight Harry
Matthews a $95,000 guarante to
meet the winner of the bout
next Monday between Harold
Johnson and Clarence Henry.
Matthews' manager Jack
Hurley says he It eonetder-
lng the offer.
And, in Newark, New Jemy,
it is anaouaced that welter-
weight Charley futarl la hang-
ing up hit gloves for good.
FOURTH GRADE STUDIES
12 1
TotAlt..........32 0
Score By Innings
Elks 4 0 0 10 0 1-8
P. Rattan 0 0 2 0 13 80
Schneider...... 2
Sandel, p...... 0
Intner, p .. .. 1
Webb........ 0
Towaaead, If. .. 3
Chat*........ 1
Huddleeten, lb .. 1
Totals........ 31
Lincoln Life AB R H PO
Dubolt, V. ,3b. .. 800
MeOrtff.as..... 4 013
Million, 2b-te-c. 3 112
Bateman, 8, e-p. 0 10 8
Durham ,3b .... 1 1 0 0
Latti. ef-rf .... 0000
Engelke, W, cf.. 3 0 1 0
Engelke, J. ,p-ss. 2 0 0 0
Dubolt, J, lb. .. 3 0 0 4
Batem'n, L., rf-cf 1 0 0 a
Sonkltn, rf..... 3 110
indert, R, If .. 1 1 0 0
Sanders, W., If .. 0 1 0 0
Ttala........l""ll
Score By Inalaga
Lincoln Life 222 OOx6 4
firemen 08)0 0088 4 _
Winning PitehetJ. 1
(2-0). Losing Pitcher1
(0-1). B^WCkOttt byJ. BAAjila*
Klntner 9, 8>atnin 3. tww-L
Hite-*enoeh, ^etehneMer, Mil-
lion. Hita and Run* offXlatntr
NAUOATUK, Conn. (UP)
Pupila of the Vance elementary
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in the fourth, fifth and sixth 0 and 0 in 11-3; aatiBM MUt I
gradea are taking Freftch. in an in 51-8. Bateman 0and f 2-3.
experiment being conducted by Vl>i**T****USi 5? %*:
the Coaaeetlcut State Teaehen ScorerRoUly. Time of Game
College la New Britain. '1:38.
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ROBINSON BARELY RETAINS CROWN
UMT May Get
further Chance
On House Floor
WASHINGTON, March 14 (UP)
Speaker Sam Rayburn yester-
day indorsed the idea of giving
the House a second chance to
vote on Universal Military Train-
ing and said he believes the law-
makers might approve it this
time.
Rayburn's remark lent weight
to reports circulating among
House members that Chairman
Carl Vinson has changed his
mind and soon will ask the
House Armed Services Commit-
tee to send a UMT bill to the
House floor again.
Critics of the program, which
is strongly backed by President
Traman and top military lead-
ers, said they are convinced the
House would reject UMT even
If It were brought up a second
time.
IN INDEPENDENT^
,1LT NEWSPAPER
PanaitiaAmericati
Let the people know the truth and the country is safe*' Abraham .Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR;
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1951
FIVE CENTS
WASHINGTON, March 14 (UP)
House Investigators were told
today that one New York federal
tax agent spent $26,000 more
than he listed as income and
failed to disclose possession of
money and a mink cape.
A second New York T-man was
said to have skipped mention of
Only last week, the House vot- his safe deposit box, while a
third refused to answer questions
about bribery or his financial
status on grounds it might lead
to his prosecution.
ed 236 to 162 to send UMT back
to a committee pigeonhole after
becoming snarled in a parlia-
mentary tangle. The Georgia
Democrat said at that time that
UMT was dead for this year as
far as he was concerned.
But Rayburn said lie has heard
reports tnat Vinson has changed
his mind and now favors a sec-
ond try on the bill. The speaker
The House Ways and Means
Subcommittee investigating the
nationwide tax scandals delved
into the cases of the three "small
fry" New York tax men prepara-
lili* *l iPh KPf J --" .....- ..--- m--------
the Hnusp now torv to an intensive quizzing of
wouldhaePprhovnekUMT wMiTertota:^r Internal revenue commls-
changes.
Under the original bill, all
qualified 18-year-old youths
would receive six months basic
military training followed by
IVi years In the reserves. The
House changes would end the
law on Jury 1, 1955when the
draft law expiresand ban
UMT unless the draft is halt-
ed.
Armistice Talks
Hit 'Dismal Low'
PANMUNJOM, Korea, March
D.
sioner Joseph
other former top
imit
utan
T-men.
The subcommittee plans to
start closed-door questioning of
Nunan and the others within the
next week or two.
George Klemman, former tax
agent at Brooklyn, who has been
on leave without pay since Jan-
uary, refused to answer when
asked if he had received a
"bribe" while a T-man. He said
can prove that a -
which was vital to the prosecu-
tion's conviction of the former
State Department official on per-
jury charges was a "fake mach-
Chester T. Lane said the mach-
ine, "a deliberately fabricated
ob, a new type face on an old
jody," was planted at the trial
"by or on behalf of Whlttaker
Chambers as part of his plot for
the false incrimination of Alger
Hiss "
Hiss, former high state depart-
ment official, was convicted on
charges of lying when he said he
never gave Chambers secret pap-
ers for transmission to a Russian
SPWitnesses at the trial *estl"er^
id his answer might tend to "In-1 venue agent in the second New that the documenta enters
criminate" him. York division, had spent or In- J2 ^ typed on the dis-
He refused on the same vested $26,000 more than he re-^"[Xmachlne
grounds to tell the subcommittee ported as income during 1946- p Hlsg now serving a five year
how much he Is worth. 1950. rison' term, has asked for a
Three T-Men Get Caught Up
In Revenue Bureau Scandals
Alger Hiss Seeks Third Trial;
Vital Typewriter Claimed Fake
NEW YORK, March 14 (UP)i Lane Introduced his statement
Alger Hiss' lawyer said today he I today on the typewriter in Fe-
that a typewriter | deral Court to back up his de-
Offlclals did not say what, if
any, steps might be taken a-
gainst Kleinman because of his
refusal to reply.
A special agent of the Internal
Revenue Bureau told the inves-
tigators that Albert Cohen, a re-
Federal Court Again Rules
Segregation Constitutional
last May and the court ruled
he reversed his story and pro-
duced the Baltimore (pumpkin)
documents as a defense to the
libel suit."
Hiss brought a $75,000 libel suit
against Chambers.
"The fact that between Novem-
ber and April, neither the de-
ousion, wnu exunuuea mc oiu fense nor 35 agents of the FBI
Woodstock typewriter and eight could find the machine suggests
'mllar machines. ithat It was during this period
Dr. Norman said the typewriter that further work was being don*
mand for a new trial.
He presented an affidavit by
Dr. Daniel P. Norman, president
of Skinner and Sherman, con-
sulting industrial chemists of
Boston, who examined the old
Woodstock typewr
similar machines.
Introduced in evidence at Hiss
trials "show positive signs ol
having been deliberately altered;
In that many of Its types are re-
h
CHARLESTON. S. C, March u
14 (UP)-A thretjdge Fed- 2-1 that segregation is not un- questioning people about^their
eral court which 10 days ago constitutional. Income and not to beln- asked
reheard the Clarendon County But the court ordered Claren-to give the answers myself.
segregation case In Columbia don County to take immediate! Subcommittee counsel Adrian
today reaffirmed its original de-i steps to bring about equality w. DeWtnd said Cohen previous -
cisin that segregated school]of its Negro school facilities, ly had given his net 5rtri_as.a."
nrUon term has asxea iur
Rosarlo Quinta, the special a- KEJJ trlal n grounds that the
gent, said Cohen failed to list on 'documents which helped convict
a financial questionnaire a mhik hlm could naVe been forged,
cape In his possession.
Guinta said Cohen told him
the cape belonged to a relative,
but that he insured it for $2,000
for safety's sake.
Cohen admitted today, when
questioned by subcommittee In-
vestigators last July, that he
failed to mention $12.000 he had
in a safety deposit box in 1946.
He explained that he was
"highly nervous" at the time be-
cause "I've been accustomed to
fore the House committee (on
, un-American activities) in Aug.,
one of the most "fluenttal -
facilities are constitutional. The Negroes appealed directly
The unanimous opinion, writ- to the Federal Supreme (
Asked specifically about Ray-
burn's remarks, Vinson declined
to comment.
But Rep. Charles B. Brownson
(R., Ind.), who wants to substi-
tute a high school military train-
ing program for UMT, said he
talked to Vinson Wednesday and
When the Supreme Court re-
turned the case to South Caro-
lina to consider the progress
,..,ten by Circuit Judge John J.
14 (up) Armistice talks be- Parker of Charlotte, N. C, and
tween UN and Communist ne-jconcurred in by Circuit Judge,----- ~ ------
eotlators hit a "dismal low" to-lArmistead M. Dobie of Norfolk, i report, the rehearing wasjrtiift-
day, a UN officer reported after,va., and District Judge George ,ed to Federal court
a fruitless meeting of more thanlBell Tlmmerman, Sr., of Colum-'bla. ...
four hours on the subject ofibia. S. C, was filed In Federal| District Judge J. Watles war-
bout $4.000 Or $5.000 in 1946. Co-
hen said today It probably was
nearer $25,000.
Testimony also was received
that Robert W. Selden, revenue
In Colum- agent In the upper New York di-
vision, failed to tell subcommlt-
truce supervision.
that the Georgian apparently! dismal new low_in^progress,
has changed his mind about re-
viving the issue.
He quoted Vinson as saying:
"I'm going to bring out another
bill pretty soon That even you
(Brownson) can support."
Col. Andrew J. Klnney said,
"We touched, I think, a dizzy
new height in Communist In-
transigence and ill logic, and a
smal new low In progre^_
There was some hope, however,
that the long meeting laid the
groundwork for future progress.
Both sides indicated they might
be willing to re-examine their
views on disputed Items if the
other would make concessions.
district court here. tng of Charleston, dissenting
The three-Judge court reheard member of the original panel,
the case March-3," after Negro retired Feb. 15, and his place
parents of Clarendon County, S. was taken by Doble.
C., who brought the original I Parker and Timmerman i
lacements of the originals, and
lave been deliberately shaped."
The court papers said Skinner
and Sherman firm tests metals,
chemicals and papers for the
armed forces, federal, state and
municipal departments and ma-
jor Industrial firms.
Norman said the work was done
"sloppily" as though by an ama-
teur outside a factory.
Nineteen of the letter faces on
the typewriter contained ele-1
ments not present in metal used
in Woodstock typewriters ot the
same type, he said.
Lane said the alteration of the
machine must have occurred be-
fore the machine was found by
Hiss's defense staff on April 16,
1949.
"As to when It was done there
are, of course, various possibili-
ties," he said.
"One, with considerable logic
to support It, is that the Initial
alteration was made between the
on the type, In an effort to re-
move at least the more obvious
tool marks," Lane continued.
These marks would have betray-
British Union
Attacks Budget,
Demands Raises
LONDON, March 14 (UP> tim Chambers 'fFrst tesUed be-
The National Union of Mineifore the House committee (on
Workers, Britain's largest and
unions, attacked the Churchill
government's budget bitterly to-
day and announced the union
would demand wage lnreases.
Leaders at the national con-
ference of the 700,000 member
union unanimously declared the
budget was "an affront to tne
people and tantamount to a re-
duction In wages."
The action heralded a wave of
wage demands, which would set
off inflation if granted and
might lead to widespread strikes,
especially In important coal min-
1948, and Nov. 17, 1948, the day
tee investigators or the Internal lng areas, If refused.
^ ------- n>o tHat Ho hoH II nm.*. n^ur^hm ffhvp
had appealed the first on both hearings with Parker nearing.
._ a. *.- v.j.i e..n.m* t.Vip pninr iiirist rnrn time.
Revenue Bureau that he had a
safe deposit box in the Manufac-
turers Trust Co.. under the name
of Robert Sheldon.
Selden did not appear at the
case .. ---------
decision to the Federal Supreme
Court
e high court returned the segregation and granted an in-1m from mental breakdown,
to South Carolina for con-,junction directing equalization! gn gaid ne wlli ^ available
ation of "additional facts," 0f school facilities. if m t a 8ubpoena tomorrow.
The high court returned the
case
sideratlon -
which were in the form of a
progress report by Clarendon
County school officials telling
of progress made toward equal-
ization of Negro schools In the
county. .
The Negro plaintiffs, backed
by the NAACP, challenged the
constitutionality of segregation
on the public school level and
asked that separation of the
races in public schools be ruled
out.
The case was first heard here
the senior Jurist each time.
The opinion Issued today de-
nied an injunction to abolish telephon'ed"to"sav he was suffer-
segregatlon and granted an in-1m rom a mentai breakdown.
DeWmd said Selden's wife had
facilities. ,'to accept a subpoena tomorrow,
rehearing March 3, _.._., M on, ,, be ,erved.
Starring In "Ualraa Start. Marl",
ramaunt Plctvn
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Goodyear Man Tells
Rotary Rubber May
Come Back to West
Rubber may return to the
western hemisphere where It
started. Hugh Allen, public rela-
tions executive of The Goodyear
Tire and Rubber Co. of Akron,
Ohio, told members of the Pan-
ama Rotary Club at its lunch-
son at Hotel El Panama.
Allen who Is making a tour a-
i round the Caribbean area de-
scribed the 17-year experimente
if his company at a 2500-acre
ilantatlon In Costa Rica.
i Allen said his company has no
intention of going' Into large
-cale production itself but hoped
' hat if the program was prac-
lcal small owners would take It
p as an additional cash crop.
)ther crops could be rplsed be-
tween the rubber trees during
he five to seven years that it
takes rubber to reach tapping
3tage.
Uncertain political conditions
in the Far East make rubber cul-
tivation on this hemisphere par-
ticularly Important. Allen point-
ed out.
Allen was the guest of V. R.
Wetzel. managing director of
Goodyear de Panama and Law-
rence Adler. president of Auto
Service Co., during his toy In
_ Panama.
At the .
Thurgood Marshall, NAACP at-
torney of New York, asked that
the court rule segregation out
because Clarendon County "has
not yet equalized its Negro
schools."
But Marshall admitted that
progress toward 'physical' equal-
ization was being made.
Today's olnlon said 'the de-
fendants have complied with the
degree of the court to equalize
facilities as soon as humanly
possible, and no good could be
accomplished for anyone" by the
court ordering an end to se-
gregation now.
DeWind said one will be served.
cTvTi
Because of Its long expe-
rience In assisting victims of
disastersome 4,500 disaster
operations in the 30 years
the Red Cross Is actively
participating in the national
ehril defense preparedness
firorram. You can help in
hese expanded training and
preparedness plans by con-
tributing generously to the
1952 Red Cross Funds this
month.
v ai cao, ii iviMMw*-.
The Churchill government has
maintained an uneasy truce with
the trade unions since the elec-
tions, but the mine union action
spotlighted the danger that has
lurked ever since the Conserva-
tive victory that the unions
would use Industrial strikes to
fight back. *
The 163 delegates to the con-
ference said the reduction in
food subsidies. Inadequate
changes in family allowance pen.
sions and income taxes and an
increase in the bank rate all
would lead to are deduction in
wages. ,, ,
The action came on the heels
of a surprise announcement by
the National Union of Railway-
men, Britain's fifth largest, to
give Aneurin Bevan Its support
in his fight against Socialist
Party Leaders on the size of the
rearmament program.
The announcement said the
union was solidly behind Bevan
i in his contention that the de-
fense program is too big and will I
wreck the British economy.
1500 To Attend
Policemen's Ball
It was estimated today that
at least 1500 people will attend
the 14th Annual Police Ball to-
night at 8 at El Panama Ho-
tel.
Tickets may still be purchased
at the door, and tables will be
held on reservations until 9:30
p.m.
Joe Sudy's and Angelo Jaspe's
orchestra will provide the mu-
sic tonight, and a floor show
and door prizes will be some of
the other attractions.
Don't forget the time at 8
tonight!
ed the deception."
Arguments on Hiss' motion for
a third trial have been schedul-
ed for April 8 before Federal
Judge Henry Goddard, who pre-
sided over the second trial which
resulted in his conviction.
'Everybody's Mother'
Aboard Panam Une
Ships Dies In N.Y.
The S. S. Cristobal sailed from
New York Wednesday minus one
of the ship's warmest person-
alities. ,
Mrs. Louise Klrchner, who has
mothered many present young
Isthmians and their parents be-
fore them as a long-time Pa-
nama Line stewardess,' died
early Tuesday morning at the
Marine Hospital, Staten Island,
N. Y. at the age of 74. She had
been ill for about six weeks.
New of her death was re-
ceived on the Isthmus by her
son-in-law, Carl Belner, Chef
on the 8. S. Ancon, now docked
at Cristobal.
Her brother. Joseph Carl Volk,
is steward department store-
keeper on the 8. 8. Cristobal.
Many passengers on the Cris-
tobal who knew her only as
Louise recognized her as a Pa-
nama Line institution. Fellow
crew members called her "every-
body's mother."
Because of her habit of feed-
ing the cats, dogs and pigeons
on the docks at Cristobal and
New York, others referred to
her as "the Pled Piper of Pier
4."
Funeral services for Mrs. Kirch-
rrer will be held Friday in New
York.
Gravestones Win O ver Crosses
In Hill Of Sacrifi ce Debate
WASHINGTON, March 14 (UP) l the crosses would be contrary to ed tli subcommittee's action "a
A House Interior Subcommit- policy established for national very j.jor way to economize,
tee killed a bill today that would I cemeteries. She added that "I haven't glv-
have forced the Army to restore! There are no crosses, except'en up the fight.*
white crosse on the graves of those engraved on head stones.l She said she believes the Sen-
13,000 war dead in Hawaii's "Hill in any of the national cemeter- ate will take action on a bill to
of Sacrifice." | ies controlled by the Army. restore the crosses and that "In
With no objection from any of time the House will do so too."
the seven subcommittee members. The Army used temporary Rep. Wayne N. Asplnall (D.,
rsent, the group voted by volca wooden crosses In the Hawaiian Colo.), who offered the tabling
table the legislation "without cemetery, in Punchbowl crater, motion said he could "under-
overlooking Honolulu, from the! stand the motional feeling" of
time it was opened in January,: the Hawaiian people
initl until lost foil TViall tHo Bt 1. k..kul tki
3J Fly by Speedbird to
f
lit!
-via New York and London
further consideration." The ac
tlon came In open session.
Although she did not object
during the vote, Rep. Reva Beck
Bosone (D., Utah) said afterward
she thinks that perhaps the Ha-
waiian people are entitled to the
crosses if they want them be-
cause It Is their cemetery. -
Rep. John E. Rankin (D..
Miss.), sponsor of legislation to
restore the crosses, said the
subcommittee's action "does
net end the battle. The Chris-
tian people of the United
States want the crosses restor-
ed and I will carry on the firht
as tons as I am in Congress."
Rankin said he has not decid-
ed what his next step will be.
The vote was taken after Col.
James B. Clearwater, chief of the
1949, until last fall. Then the
crosses were uprooted and re-
placed with flat marble mark-
ers.
The action evoked protests
from a number of Hawaiian
groups and resulted in introduc-
tion of the legislation to force the
Army to restore the crosses.
Hawaiian delegate Joseph R.
Farrington read a letter from a
mother at Hilo, Hawaii, who re-
cently lost a son In Korea.
She protested that the cem-
etery now looks "like a baseball
park" and said Army officials
"picked the flat cold stones to
match their flat cold stone
heads."
Rep. Edith Nourse Rogers (R
Tmy"q*uartermaster corps mem- Mass'), a leader in the House
oftal division, said restoration of fight to restore the crosses, caU-
NOWKAY5
P60PORANT
15 NON MUM
PBCAU9E:
New-finer MUM
MOS EFFECTIVE LONGER
But he backed the "Uric" of
Rep. Fred L. Crawford (R.,
Mich.), whs said, "I am not ge-
tog to let my emotions ran
away from me. We've still got
some responsibility to the liv-
ing as well as to the dead."
Crawford noted that the Army
has estimated it would cost
$740,000 to Install crosses of mar-
ble or some other lasting mate-
rial In the cemetery.
If the Army Is forced to re-
place the crosses in Honolulu,
said Clearwater, "we're going to
have pressure for the same thing
In this country.'" '
Farrington argued that the
Hawaiian issue was a "special
situation" and that "no one was
proposing a change in policy."
Asplnall's tabling motion was
approved despite what subcom-
mittee chairman Lloyd M. Bent-
sen (D., Tex.), termed "almost
unanimous" support for the leg-
islation from Hawaiian civic,
veterans and labor groups.
They sent letters and tele-
grams to the subcommittee ask-i
Tng for restoration of the cross-
Farrlngton said "the Army re-
moved the crosses in a most
shameful disregard for the wish-
es of the Gold Star mothers and
others who have relatives or
close friends burled In the cem-
etery."
Although the Army does not
use crosses In the cemeteries It
controls In the continental Unit-
ed SUtea and territories, the
Battle Monuments Commission
does use them in the American
military cemeteries on foreign
sou that it control*. __ |
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from your loeal travel agent.
i-i


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