The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01412

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"BRANIFF
mm//
DAILY NEWSPAPW
.menean
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe*' Abraham Lincoln.
flmouAi1hmtt0wt,
PANAMA, R. P.. THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1952
fife CENTS
Army Trio Here To Decide On Summit
Reds Flip-Flop
Once More
In Iruce Talks
Truman Foresees
US, China, Russia
Working Together
- _____ negotiations on broadening the
truce to Include a ban on a pos-
PHILADELPHIA, March II |omic and military measure hewijLjL8- "'"de or China or
(UP) President Truman thlnksbelng taken by the peoples of the <^" Uf i.mM fa.. -,,i,
the American people some day,free world will discourage fresh'.J^^.,JSfJKSfjL..;
will be able to work with all aggression. Already thanks to our 1^.onJhe..,reem?nL_0PP?8ed
PANMUNJOM, Korea, March
IS (UP).The Communists, In
an abrupt about-face, Insisted
again today In Korean armistice
Washington Group
Expected To Rule
On Area Transfer


(NBA Telephoto)
*. ArF SCENERY A tank and a truckload of soldiers patrol outside the presidential pal-
lifta HavanXcuba. With the government overthrown in a lightning coup, Gen. Fulgen-
cio Batista if taking no chancea on a counter revolt.
Ex-President Prio Leaves For
Mexico; Only200 At Airport
other peoples of the world. In-
cluding the Russians and Chin-
ese, "r the common welfare."
In a letter to Leigh Mitchell
Hodges of the Phlladephla tven-
Ing Bulletin the President wrote:
"There are a great many rea-
sons for optimism. None Is great-
er than our confidence in the
future wellbelng of our children.
steadfast course Communist ag-
gression ha* bean checked.
"I believe," the President said,
"that our children will have a
better opportunity even than we
had."
"Oreat stride* will continue to
be made In education and health
services will be greatly Improved.
Meanwhile, atomic energy and
other scientific wonders will re-
Press Association
Directors To Heel
In Panam March 21
I believe first of all that they will' volutlonlze for the better o.ur way
Uve In peace." of life," the President foresaw.
Mr. Truman declared: "Icon- Mr. Truman added, "we are
on the threshold of tremendous
changes In transportation, com-
munication, agriculture, build-
ing and production of energy."
"I believe we will some day be
able to w o r k with all other
peoples of the world. Including
the Russians and Chinese, for the
common welfare," the President
affirmed.
HAVANA, March ft fUFI
Ex-Preetdent Carlos Prio Socar-
res left here today for Mexico
aboard a CMA plane.
He was applauded by a crqsvd
of'leu trnm
The
Judges' Bench
at Rancho Boyero airport
Three times previously Ms
departure had be*n delayed, re-
portedly becua* he and Gen.
Fulgencio Batiste, who over-
NBW YCsMC, March 1S*(UP>
Inter-American Press Aatocla-
terrace: HeXctufcd Prio Of planning *!
to "force the- results of the
(June 1) election" If It went a-
galnst his party.
, "yrio converted himself Into
the electoral agent of a poU-
threw Prio in a military coupxtlcal party, abandoned his func-
Mondy, were deadlocked over Won as a moderating power, and
the status of Prio as an exile
in Mexico.
It was reported Prio refused
to resign the presidency as a
price for a safe conduct guar-
antee.
Batista, who rode triumph-
antly from the Camp Columbia
lowered the dignity o* his of-
fice."
day that 24 oftlcer' an;4t*
tori would attend the seml-aw*
nual meeting of the board of di-
rectors starting m Panama Mar.
11.
The 24 Include honorary prea-
ldent of the association, Tom
Wallace; president Luis Frann-
Ousted
streaming
exile.
Most of the
been going by
politicians were
out of Cuba into
refugees have
air to Mexico.
On a petty larceny charge EH-
ha Alfred Nlckerson waa sent-
ffiKrUrtCoS* ** ^'umed.the post o. prime mln-\ja?*-^*K
military base to the Presidential Others have gone to Florida.
STSGew^id PanamanhIHtfr just
-*pe | palace for
years.,
stole 38 feet of galvanised Pe|P*ex
worth $12.54 from the Dlafto eight
after entering
the first time
the
in
tancourt. Himself an exile In
gymnasium. He had one prevMUs
petty larceny conviction, accord-
ing to Canal Zone record.
turnea w puwn uwhuk wic
The case against Emiliano Vil- Republic was "op the brink of
lar, 38-year-old Panamanian who chaos."
Is charged with returning to the xhe office of president, which u
Canal Zone after deportation l Batista once held, was left va-
was continued until tomorrow ^nt f0r the time being.
gime would not be as friendly
to him as Prlo's. He arri<""> to-
He then addressed a crowd,
of B.000 from one of the palace day In San Jose, Costo Rica,
balconies, telling them he re-
turned to power because the
Another recent departure was
another Venezuelan ex-presi-
dent, Romulo Gallegos and hie
rnornlng. Villar is in Jail pend-
ing the posting of $200 ball.
On a vagrancy charge a Costa
Rlcan who was released from Jail
less than two weeks ago, was
back in the clink for another 20
ays
The defendant, 20-year-old Je-
fe Lula Portuguez, had Just com-
pleted serving a 10-day vagran-
cy sentence early this month. On
a similar charge this morning,
he was given 20 days In Jail.
A Batista spokesman said the
Prio reportedly rejected Ba- v^*n Jn^^ "??-
tuta>> manila that th nnt-nlzeil the new Cuban regime,
listas demanas _mat lne oust- _,.__,__ _. tn th. rwninican
ed president, before leaving for
Mexico, first sign his resigna-
tion and waive safe conduct
for his military aide Col. Rafael
Izquierda, wanted by the pol-
ice on a charge of slaying a
pro-Batista lieutenant In the
only bloodshed of the revolt.
Batiste, In his balcony ad-
dress, also said he was back
In office "to restore law and
running next to the Dominican
Republic In taking such ac-
tion.
Emetrlo Santovenia, former-
ly Batista's minister of state.
left the country at the same
time as Prio.
including the word "Korea" in
a paragraph prohibiting a naval
blockade of the war-torn penin-
sula.
Such a deletion would have
had the effect of extending the
blockade ban to the coasts of
China or Formosa if desired by
either party.
The Red interpreters said to-
dav they have been instructed
the matter should be turned
back to staff officers.
Meanwhile. UN truce negotia-
tors demanded that the Com-
munists turn over a new "com-
plete and bona fide" list of pri-
soners before discussions go any
farther on how prisoners will be
exchanged during armistice.
The Allies are attempting to
get an accounting of 53,000
misting UN soldiers captured by
the Reds.
Three representatives from the office of the Secre-
tory of the Army arrived on the Isthmus today to inves-
tigate the possibility of turning over a military ana to
enable the Pa nomo Canal Company to abandon its oi-
roady-laanched $10,000,000 new Summit townsite.
Tbe trio arrived from Washington whore discussions
over possible military area transfers have been hold dur-
ing the past few days.
No announcement has boon modo concerning any
specific areas which are under considoration but the turn-
ing over of Fort Amador to the Canal Company has been
considered the likeliest move, although Quarry Heights
has also boon soggested.
Puttie Invited To
Morris' Farewell
On Saturday at Port Kobbe, a
Wallace; presiaew.uu.. '- joint Military "Farewell Review
nl of El Dla. Montevideo, vice Ceremony"ls being given in hon-
preaidents John Knight oi ine or of the retlrtng Commander In
.I___1 TI.rnlH ini< QUlilermO nl,Urnf P.i-lhkun rnmmanH It
MtomT Herald nd O^Uerrno
Martines Mrquez of El P.
Havana; secretory Carlos Lacer-
da of Tribuna da Imprensa. Rio
de Janeiro; treasurer Thorn*
Kerney of the Trenton Times,
Executive board members An-
drew Helskell of Life Magazine
Cuta, who thought Batista's re-, New York, Floyd Miller of the
B was K1VCU v uavo in jtui. ----- ---------- ----- ...
Three more offenders who fall-order, and return the country
ed to have valid certificate of in- to peace, security and confi-
spectlon on their vehicles were dence."
fined In court this morning. They i He aid circumstances had
were Daniel Enrique Rivera, 30,1 forced him to assume power
Panamanian, Alcldes Valladeres,[ "without previous consultation
33 Nlcaraguan, and Luis Adolfo of the popular will, as was my
Caizales, 39, Panamanian. On a desire."
second charge of falling to an-
swer a citation before March 10,
Caizales was given a six-month
suspended sentence and placed
on one year's probation.
And a Panamanian who has
IS previous convictions of traf-
fic violations, today added two
more to his record.
He was 40-year-old Carles Al-
berto TruJUlo who was found
guilty of falling to dim his light*
when within 200 feet of another
car coming in the opposite direc-
tion on OaiUard Highway. He
was given a six-month suspend-
ed sentence and placed on one
year's probation. | found guilty on a charge of fall-i
And for falling to satisfy him- lng to keep to the right when!
self that he could start his car meeting and palng another
Soldier Fined $25
For Causing Wreck
Along Bruja Road
An American soldier was fined
$25 this morning In the Balboa
Magistrate's Court for causing
the complete demolition of the
front of two cars.
S-it. Donald Lee Billings was
Two Blind-Flying
SuDerforts Crash;
All Aboard Dead
NEW BRAUNFEL8, Tex., Mar.
13 (UP)Two bllnd-flylng Su-
perforts from Randolph Field
collided In flight, crashed and
exploded yesterday on barren
brush country near here.
All 15 men In the two planes
were killed.
Royal Oak Tribune. Michigan;
Dr. Harmodk Arias of Tbe Fan-
imi American;
Board directors Alberto Galn-
za Pas of La Prensa, Bueno
Aires; Jules Dubois of the cni-
cago Tribune; Joshua Powers of
the Editors' Press Service, New
York; Carlos Mantilla of El co-
mercio, Quito; Earrls Flhit of
Famous Features Syndicate New
York; Angel Ramos of El Mun-
do, San Juan; John Bregan Jr.
of King Features, New York.
Herman Robleto of La Flecha.
Managua: Raul Alfonso Ponce of
El Mundo. Havana; Ernesto Fon-
frlaa of the San Juan Helices;
John ORourke of the Washing-
ton Dallv News; Leo Permuy of
the Guardian, Trinidad; Jesus
Maria Pelln of La Religion. Ca-
racas and Max Chauvet of L
Nouvelllste. Port au Prince.
Hugh Herbert, 68,
Dies In Hollywood
HOLLYWOOD. March 13 (UP
Movie star and vaudeville
Roberto Heurtemalf e
Again Heads Panam
Insurance Company
EachDUne had covers over the comedian Hugh Herbert M died
cockpit as part of Instructing, of a heart attack at his home
student pilots In blind flying. here today..
American Woman, 47, Gives
Birth To Daughter At Gorgas
with safety, before pulling out,
TruJUlo was fined $15.
Four trespassers each received
a $15 fine In the courts. They
another to her first daughter yesterday
I morning at Oorgas Hospital, and
'* just wonder-
the wife of
car. I morning at uorgas i
Billings was responsible for an today thinks "It's j
accident early this morning, ful"
While he was driving his 1952 Mrs. Helen Flood.
a io uie iii wic tuuivo. .He, vvnue ne was anving nis io _.-. ..--------------. -
were Berta Moreno de Frazer, 30,! Hudson sedan south on Bruja Douglas Flood, American Consul
Dolores Snchez, 51 and Cesar Road, he failed to keep to the
Ernesto Tesia, 23, and Gonzalo
Esteban Castillo, 23. All are Pan-
amanian. Frazer and Sanchez
were caught to the La Boca
Commissary, and Testa and Cas-
tillo were apprehended In the
Tlvoll Commissary without priv-
ilege cards.
BALBOA TIDES
Friday. March 14
High Low
1:2$ sjb. 11:15 a.m.
iiSl fjm. 11:17 pja.
uuueias noun, American wwuw
_ keep to1 the in BarranquiUa, Colombia, Is In
right and crashed Into a sedan excellent condition today and
going north. The crash occurred l bursting with pride at the men-
a stone's throw from the-CocoU1 tlon of her eight-pound daugh-
Pollce station. I ter, Anna Edna Jean.
Although there were no per-1 "Now I'll really be able to spoil
sonal Injuries, police report, the her," she beamed. Then looking
left front fender, grlfi, wheel at a picture of her son, who Is 24
years old. she said:
'I couldn't wait for him to
bumper and hoods of both cars
were completely demolished.
The other car was driven by
St. Frederick Richard Loman ..
the 74lat Signal Corps. Fort1 Mrs. Flood, who says the baby
Clayton. Billings is attached to looks exactly as she did at that
the 531st Quartermaster Detach- age, has already notified the
ment at Coroza!. proud papa in Colombia, as ell
make me a grandmother, so I
had my own "grandchild "
Chief of Caribbean Command, Lt.
Gen. W. H. H. Morris. Jr. The
eneral public If both the Repub-
c of Panam and the Canal
Zone are Invited to attend.
The schedule of events Is as
follows:
Upon General Morris' arrival
he will be greeted by a band and
fifteen gun salute; following
which he will Inspect the mili-
tary formation drawn up In his
The group Is beaded by Peter
Beaaley. Special consultant to
the Secretary of the Army, who
spent several weeks hefe earlier
ing work at the townsite whs
temporarily suspended last week
pending a final decision on the
transfer of military areas sulta-
Ihl.i year In connection with;ble for townsite development
matters of concern to the Board nearer the Pacific terminal of
of Directors e. the Panama Ca- the Canal. ,
nal Compel*.
The location for a.new U.S.
and Col. E. .
tive Officer of the Requirements
Division of Q4. Both officers are
on duty in the Pentagon Build-
ing.
The first conference of the
group headed by Beasley with
Canal and Army officials was set
for this afternoon In the Board
Room of the Administration
Building at Balboa Heights.
Panamanian Ambassador to
Washington. Roberto M. Heurte-
matte, was re-elected president
of the Panama Insurance Co. at
yesterday's annual stockholders'
meeting in the company's new
building on Via Espaa.
T. Gabriel Duque was re-elect-
ed first vice prealdent. Carlos
Eleta was elected second vice
Dresldent and Eugene C. Mc-
Grath. managing director of the
Additional building sites on the
Pacific side will be required both
because of the extensive demoli-
tion program and plans for a
considerable reduction in the
density of population In the ex-
isting towns.
Injured Horseback
Rider, 65, Brought
In By Helicopter
w.ooo.uw, A M-year-old Panamanian
band of fifty-three pieces; com-ho^ri replacement end expen-i rrom Nombre de Dioawho fell of 1
posed of the 71st Army Band and,,, ,-,. The heavy grad- a horse, fractured several
the 776th Air Force Band. The w :----------- h > nonsihle
band will be followed by the U.S.
Army Caribbean marching group
of over 2600 men. Participating
in the Army's part of the parade
will be the Special Troops, a unit
from For Amador; Battalions of
the 33rd Infantry Regiment;
45th Reconnaissance Battalion,
two companies of the 370th Engl-
honor. After the Inspection, the
Commander In Chief will make a
farewell address to his Com
mand.
Immediately following the
farewell address, the military pa-
rade will begin. This parade has
been divided Into three distinct The decision of the Washing-
parts, entitled the dismounted,! ton group will settle the ques-
mounted and aerial portions, tlon of the future development
Leading the dismounted parade 0f the new townsite of Summit
will be a massed Joint military part 0, the Canal's $80.000.000
21 Jap Embassies
Planned: Legations **$<%*
To Reach Eighteen
mu cunifiaim w n* mm a,iib.i~ TOKYO, March 13 (UP) Ja-
neer Amphibious Shore Regl- an intends to establish embas-
ment; Batteries of the 784th AAA J. 21 n0n-Communlat capl-
lA:tols and legations In 18 other
countries, under a plan to re-
sume dlolomatlc ties cut 1
Oun Battalion and the $03rd AA
Automatic Weapons Battalion;
and last, the 37th Combat Engi-
neer Company.
World War n.
and a possible punctured lun.
was brought Into the Amador
Guerrero Hospital this morning
by a 1st Air Rescue Squadron
was Jos
Manchn, who was picked up by
the helicopter this morning and
treated, while aboard, by Al-
brook's flight surgeon, Capt. Paul
Langeller.
The mercy mission was corn-
Dieted at 10:15 todav. An ambu-
lance that was waiting at o
Solo, transferred the raen te the
tapltal immediately._________
Next in line of march will be
three companies of Sailors and
Marines In a massed marching
ieVmatlon; followed by five
squadrons of over 1200 Airmen
in squadron formations.
The mounted portion of the
.. Darade will follow the marching
Grath. managing director of the tr ^j. wll, conglat 0l tanks,
company, was re-elected treasur- n>]f.tracKg_ jeeps, amphibious
er. Other members of the board equiDment and mounted guns of
of directors are: James C. Smoot, tne rray.
Roberto Motto and J. M. Byrne. | following the mounted por-
Mrs. AmeliaR. de Fabrega Is sec-, tlon, an aerial salute will be pre-
retary of the board. sented. The air display will con- ronce uiuff
Due to the extra space afford- ist of light p'anes of U.S. Army [secrecy today over their mow-
ed and to give the stockholders Caribbean. B-17's. C-47's, L-13's, ments to track down the mur
a preview of the new Raymond b-SB's, a helicopter of Caribbean I derer of Arnold Schuster nps
Clinic, the meeting was held In'Air Command and two PBM's ter to the capture of ***** roto
the ultra-modem waiting room from Coco Solo .The..erial lute: ber W I'1 Su^n^n order
of the clinic, on the first floor ^ conclude the "Farewell Cer- prevent further underworldire
Cops Cloak Moves
In Hunt For Killer
i*fw YORK March 1$ (UP) have their Interviews conduct-
.pSce jy" curtain of, ad outside Brooklyn.
of the Panama Insurance
building.
Ambassador Heurtematte,
Co
In
emonv.
Commpnder of Troon* tor the
i.,nrce.lon 1 Brl". Oen. Frwl" A... ~-.
the-presldent's annual report | Mar-h Chief of Staff. UB. Army,year JUI panto $
cited a teady arowth durin the CP'lbbean. the events
venge against police informants.
Police said that the March
8 revenge slaying of the 24-
aaa
had
ri"_-^."f nr^ra I Parkin sDace and seatln c-jreceived too much puoucicy.
and a significant growth In gen- e*'or or Vmak._ _ho WM ,,
A "young" lady of 47 gave birth as scores of god-parents scat-
- tered all over the world.
"Judging by us, It's the first
baby ever bom to the Foreign
Service." she Joked.
Mrs. Flood mentioned the fact
that in September she was oper-
ated on for a possible "tumor"
"but that tumor is now abve and
kicking In there, and weighs
eral underwriting
oremlums.
facilities and
eight pounds.
The new mother U delighted
at the thought of bringing up
her little addition in the tropics
as she feels its the best place in
the world to Uve. OriginaUy. he
halls from New York. 8he will
return to her home in Colombia
within ton days.
It was not known todav whe-
ther she holds any sort of recoce
at Gorgas for becoming a moth-
er at age 47.
+
answer
the call
US2
-^
ttnd are urged to arrive prior
to 0:45 am
a -..<*#%H u,ant
j, ******
lAIAVfC'rtl a*n f*^fc
1t fV* H "??wat"
nil. *-I^V-a ?..? -?
.I. r-.l1 ^- # >*m !
tn m.^^ a aa a Van.
|>*t .. Ka fc- W-- ~*m
V. 1- .) A-mn 1* *?-
lara S a^ aa "
h.~-A, U, +.*mrm *-? *~>
wfc-, ---war*- a*V *^-*
,,-a fMa M V -***
m+ hmi4 t im-i --
|,.-n ......**4 r HI
^jk Ha'" A"''**'
r.rM< w--' *"?'--
1 Fraack and Dwteh compettag.
8 M. Fallka. who was summon-
ed by neighbors after the body
of Schuster was found on the
sidewalk near his Brooklyn
home. The letter was Intercept-
ed by postal authorities and
turned over to the FBI.
Louis Warsoff. Brooklyn Col-
lege professor and Democratic
district leader, told police his
life also was threatened by an
anonymous telephone caller yes-
terday before he took a sound
truck Into Schuster's neighbor-
hood and asked crtiaena to
mm* forward with talorma-
tton. ,_ "
Warsoff said he only hnwh-
ed at tbe threat and carried
out his plan.
Detectives working on the
case took no chances on eedan-
sering persons they have been
questioning. They arranged to
WANTED FOR MURDER
Convicted murderer Frederick
J. (The Angel) Tenuto la being
sought byNew York poltaa la
connection with the slaying of
Arnold Schuster. 24-yeer-old
Brooklyn pants salesman, who
aided police in the capture f
Willie Button. Tenutoveeeaped
with Sutton from the Castora
State Penitentiary a Philadel-
phia to 1947.



.ru\t rv.'
i
fHR PANAMA AMERICA)* AN INDEPENDENT DAIIT N1WPAPER
' i ''ill- if'Ti 'I ill
THUR
BOAT, MARCH IS, 1951
V;;t PANAMA AMERICAN
MAHMCDIO AMIAS. IBI'O
7 H III1 O IS* ^H "
tiupmon HM NO 10740
CLt ADC.. ^ANAMtHICAN. PNM a,..-.
eeie Ore.el i 17 eNTi AvtNui iitwiw '*". nd Sin stater
MMiGl *ieeiet"ttlVt JOSHUA B OWE*S. INC
49 M0ieoN AVI. NtW VK. 117. N. V.
LOCAL
0>NTn It) BV*NC* '
ro (IK HSNTNS. IN DVANet tSvK
O* OH| t. IN ABVANC la.ao_______
Walter Winchell
In New York
BPoADWAY DfGEST
the Pulitier Prise Playhouse profru> cancelled;' ^'s
Cabin" on the grounds that "It is too entroversial_ .The Mtt-
ma Legion will best its drums lor "My Son Jhn, the Helen
HaSe fib, because of its handling of Reds. "* *dS
wh, ANTA's matinee seat, for "Golden Boy'^"tftfi
hen "South Pacific" (with stars) charts lots lessDR get
the neftiest h.ndelapping In the current newsreel flaflacks
candidates The revival of "Pal Joey" at the adhurtMT
inr a mightier box office business than the or,f*"';rtiJff
spots remain the contagious son of Rodger & Blrt.J^
revealed that the average player worked only 10 weeks last ea-
Jon You cant eat greasepaint.. Truman Wte. fcn rtrolon
evotee. refused to let "The Grass Harp" go Intorehearsal untH
the stars above "were favorable" .The only theater in town
where the Etors' calls (half hour and "> g
nounced in French is at the Fulton, where "Gigi is the hit. lo
maintain the Parisian atmosphere.
-The Continental." the character via the cameras who coos
at females, has been attracting considerable attention in trie
papers and mags. Harriet Van Home, the tecvy reporter, de-
frmed hto as lust another beadwalter you mlght encounter n
the fiind Street places. How he manages to do his stull witn
a straight face eludes this giggler... Katharine Cornell told an
lrteiviewer she reads only the good notices. Snubs the snubs...
The new ormandl^movle temple on West 57th Street Is W.
If roffee lounge is more lavish than many swank spots... Tne
cVr-.era work Is de luxe over at "Viva Zapata. SomeMW
Photographic stunners are worvh framing, Dorarigit*8*jl
Have a skeleton-rattler: Theater Art* mag disclosed that Herald
Trlb drama critic Kerr co-authored k Broadway flops.. .The^up-
coming drama called "Josephine" will revolve about a 16-year-
old harlot.. .Oh. please!
DeMille's "Greatest Show on Earth" (Ms 69th film) Is char-
acteristically colossal. It includes 85 circus acts. .One; Tune
mag's reviewers listed every flaw in a film before the final line
aesvribed It as "slick entertainment". Sam Goldwyn is no easy
audience. Twenty-two scripts of hi "Hans Christian Andersen
picture were discarded before one was considered usable. ..Artel
songs that rate being encored: Gershwin's delightful "Someone
to Watch Over Me ...Leo MeCarey had >nly partially completed
"Mv Son John" (starring Helen Hayes) when Robert Walker
died The studio not onlv found someone with a voice like
Walker's but also a visual double...Sol lesser, producer of the
Tar/an films, is on the prowl for an unusual glrlfor his next
RKCpus. "Cave Girl." She must swim like a fish, run like a
deer, fight like a tiger, climb like a monkey and hug like a bear.
Sylvia Sidney makes up from the dressing table once used
by Sarah Beruhardt. Takes It with her wnerever she plays.
Her mother purchased it at an auction 22 years ago. When Syl-
via went to ifflth Century-Fox to appear i "Les Miserables she
Uad It shipped there. ..These ears were-delighted with a new-
eom'r comedienne named Oal Oarber via Bui Williams recent
midnight dlse-jockey menu. A witty woman, who Impressed as
being comical without a script. W'tn a straight-man she would
be welcome satirist, especially kidoing the Mr. and Mrs. pro-
gram*.. .Of the manv teevy offerings we encountered recently,
^ni i -My Llne?" *nd "Th N Ule ?% Ba2L^ !
dlsSS nwi&A%**S^f&J&i 'Venus Ob-
served." one line of which rolls on for 293 words Before clashing
with a period.
June Allyson rates a cookie for candor. Described her film,
Too Young to Kiss," as "awful." June is always expert even
when the scripts betray her...If you lose courage easily, paste
this on your typewriter: Six years went Into the writing and
re-writing of 8. N. Behrman's play, "Jane," before it entered the
Mtih Arena.. Fred Robbins, of the disc-jockey tribe, Is the glib-
best. He articulates attractively on "Songs for Sale "... What in.
rerested us most while viewing newsmen was Don Hollenbecks
de.ivery via CBS. The legend (among some teevy people) is that
newsmen shouldn't read the bulletins. Hollenbeck reads them
and gives the impression of authenticity. .The fellows who read
theirs from teleprinters look worried. As though the machines
out of the viewer's sight) might break down and then what?...
The one to feel sorry for is the masculine chap whose lips often
make like a nance. ,
.
Labor News
And
Comment
l -mi-----1-----1---------
By Victor Riesel
George Britton's pinzalng in "South Pacific" is fine. A lusty
voice that gives out with thunderous vibrations...The songs
from "Paint Your Wagon" are all glistenable. but our pet is "I
lovtd You Once and I Always Will'.. .The movie industry is in
tur a terrific further upswing at the expense of teevy..."The
Banetts of Wlmpole Street" was rejected by J7 producers before
it tecame a super-click.. .A bargain is the album called "Lena
Home Sings." You should hear the way she fondles "Where Or
Wnen".. .It you are in the word business the all night NBC sym-
phony makes a delightful accompaniment for playing the type-
writer.. Shakespeare was a show-oaf. From "Love's Labour
Lost"; "Thou art not so long by the head as honorificabilitudl-
nltatibus".. .Onowlookaherel
"The Shrike," starring Jose Ferrer, is romping along to hefty
' business and will rate high among the top mints. This thrillo-
: drama was produced for less than $56.060.. The differenee be-
twe*n klieg lights and footlights: The "Hans Christian Anfler-
ten film has one setting that cost 1200.600. That's the price of
the average Broadway musical show. Shelley Winters, the Poor
. Mans Tallulah (and her romancing). Is the theme for several
- current movie mag features. Bombshelley... Showfolks back
; from aboard are still in stltchea over the British actors heard
'.. on Orson Welles' radio drama offerings. They impersonate
- American gangsters with What-He! accent The new torchant
called "Did Anyone Call?" as Rosemarv Clooney renders It, is the
- ort of song you want to hear again Peggy Lee comes over the
. teevy set gracefully, too. She looks like the girl moat girl sing-
e> mi wish they looked like.__________________________
THIS IS rOUB SQRUM TMt MAPI OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
"he Mall an kl an fen lenim lor ra.tt.ri of Th. anana Amar-
kan eften ara facer**) gtIsluBy ana ara haadlad ir a hairy
fair il mmm.
If ran eentiiaute a latter dea't ba impartan* il It aaaaa't eases the
aaat day Latteri ara aabUeked la Hn arder tateme
Wean try te keep the letters limited te ewe aatj lanetn.
Ideotfry el Utter writer kl held m rtnetatt eeatleiasa.
Thai aaweaaaa aaiamat ne taaaaaiibilltv tat ttatamaatt er aaaiieM
aaareaaad la lettari tram raaaare.
SECOND ELIZABETH?
Cristobal. Canal Zone
i Mail Box Editor:
It Is only a miracle that Bal-
!' boa has not suffered more ca-
.. aualtles from air traffic than did
; Ellaabeth. New Jersey. The irate
m cltiaens of that city were able to
have the Newark Airport closed
after the third crash within its
limits that claimed a large num-
ber sf Its eitirens among the vic-
tims
The setup in Balboa ensures
that the citizens to suffer there
ar gotta to be school children.
I have beep in Balboa on several
ocf-.!iens when planes, both fo-
lng and corning, barely cleared
- the tree tope on Roosevelt Ave-
ote and mane one eringe as they
giassed overhead
It la a dangerous condition
'.hat uniWbtedly will not be
corrected until a high price has
been paid in the lives of school
children.
Why wait until this haDpens?'
How about the safety program
that the Governor Is supposed to
endorse so highly?
Isn't it the duty of the safety
engineers to recommend a cor-
rection of a dangerous condition!
BETORE the accidents happen?>
Who will fill in and sien the
accident reports that will have to.
be made out: the Governor, or
the Commanding General?
And as to cause of the acci-
dent ta>e eta tarn* i,, -Lack of
foresight."
SafetT Conscious
The closed room hung heavy
with off-tnt-record taU.
One of the cars.ully selected
newsmen present turned to the
guest of honor, a high British
diplomat, and asked Just how
much steel President Truman
had promised Prime Minister
Churchill for the guns, tanks
and planes needed to whip
England into a fighting ma-
chine again.
The foreign visitor reported
the figure as somewhat under a
million tons, and the question-
ing columnist snorted and said
that we could have spared mil-
lions of tons, maybe ten million.
There was a polite silence at
first. Then the other newsmen
laughed. Real loud. Until today,
this columnist nursed his intel-
lectual wounds.
Now it can be reported
that Mr. Truman has been
told by his braintrust
and if he trusts their brain
after this he's less shrewd
a man than reputed that
all steel will be decontrolled
in the next 10 months. By
then ice'll have encw/h
steel for everything. We
have enough now. Yet the
military p'anners have
created such chaos that bil-
lions of dollars in potentitl
profits were lost, hundreds
of thousands went jobless
and m'serable and 1 miles
lived in economic terror.
Hospitals, schoos and roads
were not built. Apartment and
private home construction was
constricted much to the
h;srtbreak of millions Of fa-
milies.
All because the Pentagon in-
dulged itself in the most care-
less, most irresponsible, most
fantastic planning any vital
service of this* government ever
engaged in.
And all the time labor and
business technicians and Charles
Wilson were screaming that
this was happening. But the
brass wasn't listening it just
hoarded metal, every kind.
Last Laugh?
Hunting Call
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. It will be of scant comfort to This was the beginning of Leatherstocklng
Mrs. June Smith, hunting widow, to learn that Smith, mighty hunter and absentee husband.
Irte conversion of her husband, Rex, from Mr. Smith talked for 17 consecutive hours
m.Z5L examp'e- some, r'vf Jjunge lizard to outdoor man occurred with no concerning the fine point* of pheasant shoot-
montris ago the planning' ljnaUce on tne part 0f her spouse's corrupters. lng, the delights of living in the open, and the
agencies, if you 1 excuse the ex-1 AU we vnn tryln|, ^ do wa8 keep the boy stupidities of city-dwelling,
pression. suddenly became hys- iut of tne poolrooms, and the effort backfired. Over the evening he made some nine collect
tericai. They didn t have enough, Untii gome time after he passed his 60th sea- telephone calls to brag of his prowess in the
lead in their plans son Mr Smith had been busy HvinR up to his field.
So they reported a "desperate 'imputation of the "Charwoman's Prince of
shortage of this metal vital to Wales," a title bestowed on him by another Over a period of two days he had arranged
many civilian industries. They
called an emergency session In
Washington to which rushed
leader of. the united Automo-
bile Workers (CIO), especially
from the lead-battery locals
which had heavy unemployed
ranks.
The planners told them all
how tough things were. And
that they'd be tougher. Just not
enough lead. Civilian battery
supplies would simply be slash-
ed. Auto production would suf-
fer.
ellow named Smith. for membership in a skeet .club, had opened a
charge account at Abercromble & Fitch, and
Mg. Rex Smith's vices were few. Ha. was a bad booked three duck hunts, a quail shoot and
vice-president of American Airlines. He had an African safari for ne*t year,
been a colonel in the Air Forces. He was known Mr. Smith's evil companions called his wife,
as anOathlete on one occasion he was observ- the aforementioned June, to inform her that, at
ed to walk all the way from the "21" Club to lengthy last, her lord had finally achieved a
the Stork Club, a distance of nearly two blocks, hobby.
Mr. Smith was a fair crapshooter, but craps '
was the only thing he ever shot until Just re- "Oh, my," Mrs. Smith was heard to mutter
ly. Crtips, perhaps, and the brewe. And weakly on the other end of the phone. What
I i fate took a hand. will become of me and the "children now?
At the end of last week, Mr. Smith was wear-
Mr. Smith's fall from the pleasant estate of ing a coonskln cap to work, and had already
Ity alickerism occurred after a short train ride placed orders for several grades of shotgun, a
What haDDened What do vm. "dm the city of New York, on the pheasant double-barreled express rifle for shooting ele-
thmkhappened? The othe? da reserve of a man named Lou Schweirer, who ohants. and was heard to utter the scornful
the planner"decontrolledf leaf wUes a hunter's haven for Jaded New York- opinion that any man who used a gun larger
We've Just too muen or, h.r^^ a called Sandy Hollow, Just outside New Lon- than .410 for quail was a boor, a cad and eon-
Then there are the faS < '" Conn., where the submarines grow. rtderable of a rotter,
chances l? Sai ermt.-1 Some bad companions named Wright, Stone ,_
ordered hv th.^.^^t nd Ruark kidnaped Mr. Smith from the cozy He had cast off his ancient associates and
lust m the IhrtE Shi-I <>fort f a table la Toots Shor's and carried was seen mingling with a new coterie of friends
are iSiirmfna ii ft il* I tti struggling and kicking to a train. the kind of people who wear badge studded
ere beginning to roll off the*'" ^"* leather hatbands on a Hombure hat and whose
"ni ^ \lt '".v" We unleashed him. once he was in the woods, reading is limited entirely to "Field and Stream."
. "sav whether these! ^ ave n.m R BUn. The gun contained one it grieves me to mention that the lovely June
are justified changes? Point is tTift 0T safety's sake, and eventually spon- must now cease buying clothes and food, and
tnat whole plants are shut down -* euw>. nMmnu .m/wi t.h ahnria- Ht.t.i n* ran evner.t no further laraesse from
whl'e new blueprints are whip-
ped up, new designs molded
models built and tested and
meanwhile raw mterll pU&<'Vuse -ybody else is hiding under a rock
ored^Mr. Smith's nickname among the aborig- little Rex can expect no further largesse from
nalsV still Inhabit Northern Connecticut. -unta Claus. because no single budget can
"Lp 1 Mangoon," Smith is called, meaning maintain a hunter and a family at the same
'I,ont 4 er." or "he who shot by himself be- time.
up, hoarded while business
starves for the stuff.
But not always, I must
admit. There's the Detroit
Arsenal which is making
tanks in which Korean
commanders just won't bury
their men. Turrets stick and
don't swivel, and fire (shnot-
i nthem. That arsenal uses
its raw material. You bet.
It fust continues to roll out
unusable tanks, unapproved
for duty by Army field for-
ces.
Where are they going, these
tanks? Into ordnance storage
deDots, that's where.
Who knows, Hollywood may
want to whip out another war
film. Make realistic props
these tanks.
It's only been 100 days or so
since the Detroit Ordnance De-
pot discovered the "bugs." Oive
them time.
By the way. the civilian mo-
blllzers, on being questioned
told me that that's s'rictly a
military matte'. Dne^nt come
under defense mobilization, you
know. So the tanks #e being
stored.
There's also the business of
metal rllotment tickets. This 1<
omewhere." Mr. Smith' work is bound to suffer, and his
Mr Smith took his shotgun and floundered conversation will be even more single-tracked
orth among the drifting snows. He floundered than in the day when he fancied bullfight for
ack, ome hour later, clutching a couple of relaxation.
edraggled pheasant, which, mlrabUe dletu, he The Messrs, Wright, 8tone and Ruark apolog-
lad assassinated all by himself. ire for the downfall of your old man, Mr.
Thi wu the end of Smith, the debutante's Smith, but the ad truth is you've lott him for-
lellght Smith, the cafe-ociety butterfly. ever to The Oreat Outdoor.
Foreign Aid
By Petet Edson-
WASHDiQTON, (NXA).The 'iruman admin- lion request. But If thee data are presented
lstration now face it meanast battle of the in executive eBslon, the publie will not be let
year In Congre. It i to get $8 billion worth of in on what if all about.
military and economic aid for friendly foreign One year ago. when General Etaenhower as-
governments. sumed his NATO eommand he had to start from
It Is impossible for Washington reporters to cratch.
find out who in Europe 1 going to contribute The progress he ha made in this one year
what, and how much each country' share of can be indicated by a comparUon of forces
the total burden will be. available then and now. and what he can look
forward to one year hence.
Cabled new dispatches from European cap!- A vear ago. General Eisenhower could scrape
tais are obscured by an even thicker fogglness. un onlv eight divisions. Two were American.
The reason given for all this mystery 1 that three French, two British, one Belgian plu mla-
mllltary security makes it necessary. European ccllaneous brigades and battalions in Italv. Den-
governments are said to be insisting that their mark, Norway, and The Netherlands. He had
military budgets and defense strengths be kept practically no air force.
And the U. 8. government refuse to give a Today General Elsenhower Is believed to have
r^^;^uc%-u^^ jft ffiSS* TU^2L1it,|eTa-sixa
.nd y give you tick, t. ^h* is^year ^^^^Sendi" ^750 dM**. envisaged for the end of thi
tare i necessary *ear *'ould represent a doubling Of the present
The folk at home hava to be shown that EU- around force. .mj* .> ... .
i pean countries are doing all they can for their This doe not include the 12 division ar-
cwn defense marked for Germany. Nor doe it include a
tia#slr'le SO divisions in being in Oreece. Turkey
There is a wave of pessimistic feeling in Con- and Yugoslavia The total it 121. net eount-
iress and elsewhere that France 1 falling apart, ing neutral forees In Spain and Switzerland.
Britain is believed by me to be raady for ___
tiklng over bv Mr "Annoying" Btvan and hi If thi much progreu can be made in a year,
neutralist* '* u argued that the iltuatlOn in Europe la ndt
Italv 1* again considerad ripe for Communist at hopeles a manv pessimists have nertrayed
Im? predicted Western Germany wo-t hava Oeneral EUenhower. from hi* Part bead-
t>y troops in uniform before 1954 ,1?*"'. e0Htmue to r**1*u *' ** W
aS a? "ca^tet. SMS*, to dJ*rO*e "lEtvH,. nobady an thi, 14. of the oceaa
.fonal Foreign Relations and Appropriations nnmdiM much a* Ike ba* lifted than for
Icommittee considering the President' bu- the European.
for your allotment.
Naturally, the manufac-
turers put in for more than
they needed since they
heard that metal was scarce
and believed they'd be tup-
plied with less than they
asked for. Result was that
the mobilization people,
never really investigating,
thouaht they had a hor-
rendous demand on hand
and crea'ed new hysterii
by predic'ina crippliw i
shortages of raw m leialt.
Wh n the tickets were
turred tn tcr whit ws ae-
tually needed, the shortage
disappeared.
^why WSUINOTOM
MERRY-GO- ROUND
__________lf_ BIIW MAMON
I
Drew Pearson says: Sen. Russell may veer toward Gen.
Eisenhower; Senators refuse to support tax clean-up;
Assistant Secretary of State receives Strange reward.
WASHINGTONDon't be surprised if you see the Senator
Russell boom veering over toward General Elsenhower at the
last minute.
Though the Dixlecrats are hell-bent to have Russell tal in
the race and even head up a splinter party, the senator from
Oeorgia is too smart to do that.
He is out not to split the Democratic Party, but to accom-
plish two things: Block Truman and block civil rights.
And close friends say that if President Truman bow out of
the race, Senator Russell is more than likely to lead a drive to
draft Eisenhower on the Democratic ticket.
This Is presuming, of course, that old-guard Republican con-
tinue to treat Ike as if he had bubonic plague.
A good many Democrats, including even the President, have
been watching the battle inside the Republican Party with In-
terest, inter-mixed with glee.
They remember the oliva branche ent to EUenhower
months ago suggesting that he run as a Democrat.
And even tne President dropped a word the other day indi-
eating that it wa not too late to bring Elsenhower into the
Democratic foldif the Republican continued their isolationist
foreign policy.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
Ben Tata of Standard Brands, untiring promoter of Tait for
President, say: "The only thing deceitful about Bob Taft is the
way he comb his hair."
Taft goes In for the MacArthur hair-do, letting his lde-hair
grow long and combing it over the top of his dome to hide the
sparse spot.
Though Congressman Frank Boykln of Alabama is under
Investigation by the Justice Department in connection with RFC
loans, about 400 fellow congressmen attended his birthday din-
ner at the Shoreham Hotel. Boykln still insiste that "All la made
for love."
Cleanup-man Newbold Morris is so intent on starting with
a clean slate that he refused to accept used office furniture.
The Army's field manual 21-14, which coat several thous-
and dollar to publish, consists of twenty pages devoted to the
subject of how, when and where to salute.
Washington has a new problem: Trying to figure out
whether Afghanistan. Greece or Spain produces the beet sheep-
herders. They're needed to Increase our wool supply.
The nickel shortage will oon be overcome as a result of new
reduction at the U.S. government nickel plant at Nicaro, Cuba.
lckel is essential for Jet engine.
Senator Kerr of Oklahoma has promised privately to up-
port Senator Russell If Truman doesn't run.
NO TAX CLEANUP
Georgia friends of Senator George of Georgia who have
watched his vehement opposition to reorganizing the Internal
Revenue Bureau remember his battle with Franklin Roosevelt
over the appointment of revenue collector and other Federal
officers in Georgia.
After Roosevelt's attempt to defeat Senator George in the
Democratic primary in 1938, FDR appointed a committee of three
men, Governor Ed River, U. 8. attorney Lawrence Camp and
State Democratic chairman Gllli to handle Federal Job in
Georgia.
The plan was to keep Federal Job away from George, there-
by prevent him from building up a powerful local machine.
In the end, FDR became engrossed in the war, Truman did
not carry out Roosevelt's patronage policies and Federal Jobs in
Georgia drifted back to the old-time tradition by which the sen-
ators recommend .candidates and the White-House accept them.
The collector of internal revenue is tare-most powerful pol-
itical Job in any state. As shown by the recent tax scandal, ha
can forgive taxes or collect them.
And the senator who appoints a tax collector has more pow-
er than is derived from appointing a dozen postmasters.
That's why at majority of the Senate expenditures committee
voted against putting tax collectors under civil service.
In other words, senator blast Truman and Internal revenue
for tax scandals, but refuse to go along with Truman In clean-
ing up the source of those scandals.
REWARD FOR A DIPLOMAT
Assistant Secretary of State Ed Miller, who has done mora
to promote the good-neighbor policy than anyone since Sumfter
Welles, was visiting in Puerto Rico and went to the town of
Juncos, where he waa born. *
This was a great occasion for Juncos and the Mayor pro-
claimed a holiday.
Moreover Miller was welcomed with a series of gala event*
which Included the presentation of the most important gift the
people of Juncos could think ofa prize-fighting cock.
The Assistant Secretary of State accepted the gift gracious-
ly and made an appropriate speech thanking the people for thus
honoring him.
Not quite knowing what he would do with a fights* "**y
back in the State Department, nevertheless Miller started to tuck"
the rooster under his arm. when Governor Luis Munoz Ma.*-, v-i
Puerto Rico whispered to the Mayor:
"These Americans do not appreciate the value of a fighting
cock. They're liable to eat htm. You had better keep the rooster
here and tell Miller he can make trips down to see him."
The Mayor took the hint. The Assistant Secretary of State
looked relieved.
AMBASSADORIAL SWITCH
Mike Pearson, the Canadian Foreign Minister I burnt up
at Sir Oliver Frank, British ambassador to the U.S., for turning
down the key Job of Secretary General of the North Atlantic
paet.
This all-important position was offered first to "...... "'t
he graciously phoned Sir Oliver from Lisbon proposing that he
take It instead. Franks hasn't been too happy as or*. .
sador in Washington and has been reported desirous of leaving.
During the phone call, Ambassador Franks indicated he
would like the North Atlantic pact post, only to change hi mind.
Now Foreign Minister Pearson must persuade the British to
forget the original agreement to give the Job to a Britisher o
it can go to Norwegian Foreign Minister Halvard Lange instead.
SIDE GLANCES
Bv Galhraitlr
Mlll'lt
tn.. 1W >7 mi ttrtm. .
"Tall 'am to come ovar and we'll play Canastawe |
wouldn't dare drive clear ovar to their olace in thia load" I


THURSDAY. MARCH IS. IflSZ
TBB PANAMA AM-BICAN AM INDEPENDENT DATLT NEWSrAFKR
PAOR
IMMia^BAi
Rail Strike Crumbles Slowly;
NYC Gets Some Trains Running
CHICAGO, March 13.(UP)A rebellion of
railroad strikers .prevented the Nejv York Central
from resuming service today.
tut the revolt was breaking up.
More than 1,100 Toledo workers, who had
?'seceded" frem their unions in defiance of a court
injunction and the orders of leaders to end the
strike, vote grudgingly to returning to work.
But another 1,800 workers at Elkhart, Ind.,
remainded out. t ,
The NYC prepared to move its major bast-
,West trains through Elkhart with supervisory
crews in the engine cabs.
The Toledo workers said pick-
et lines would be withdrawn,
allowing through trains to pass
through the key division Joint.
Elkhart also is a major divi-
lon joint where long-haul crews
re changed. _,
Earlier Toledo workers voted
to secede from three rail broth-
erhoods who called the strike
Sunday on the NC system
west of Buffalo.
The unions had bowed to a
court injunction Issued at Cle-
veland Tuesday and the strikers
returned at other,cities.
A union spokesman at Elkhart
said there was "discussion but
no conclusion" at the mass
meeting there. He added that
"from the men I talked to In-
dividually, I can say no one
wants to go back to work until
this is settled."
Meanwhile, the first NYC
freight train to move out of
Cleveland, bound for New
York, was halted at Erie when
M can were derailed. No one
waa hurt hut four main line
tracks were blocked. The rail-
road termed the mishap a
"routine accident."
The strike, called Sunday a-
galnst the NYC system west of
Buffalo, ended at most cities
after the brotherhoods of loco-*
motive engineers, firemen and
conductors bowed to the court
Injunction.
The strikers engaged in heat-
ed meetings in some cities, in-
cluding Chicago and St. Louis,
before they agreed to go back
to work. The walkout also end-
ed on the vital terminal rail-
road at 8t. Louis.
i.i.
But at Toledo the strikers
called an "indignation meeting"
'and voted to secede from their
national organizations.
"We are now an Independent
union," said R. L. Johnson, lo-
cal chairman of the engineers
who resigned to head the rebel
group.
Johhson headed a new or-
Killation called "The Model
ilroad Club," which was In-
terpreted as a device to es-
cape Jurisdiction of the in-
junction.
An NYC spokesman called the
club "an obvious device to get
out from under Tuesday's court
ruling." He said the railroad
would refuse to recognize the
club.
A brotherhood spokesman at
Cleveland said that "we strong-
ly urged the men to return, but
the sltuaUon is in their hands."
He termed the situation at To-
ledo and Elkhart a "strictly lo-
cal affair, over which we have
little control."
Union obedience to the in-
junction allowed the NYC to
move some commuter and other
local trains today, start freight
switching in its cluttered yards
and resume service on its subsi-
diary lines.
But it admitted that the de-
fiance at the two cities serious-
ly crippled its main East-West
through service.
Division points on the rail-
road are centers where long-
haul crews are changed.
CALL RAIL STRIKE The leaders of three operating rail-
road brotherhoods meet in Cleveland as they called a "legal
strike" against two lines, the Terminal Railroad Association
of St. Louis, and the New York Central Lines, West of Buf-
falo. They said that the surprise walkout is a "practical
way" to enforce wages and rules demands. Left to right
are: J. P. 8hields, of the Engineers; D. B. Robertson, head
of the Firemen and Englnemen; and R. O. Hughes, of the
Order of Railway Conductors.
Christ Church Has
Lent Sermon Series
COLON, March 13 Topics of
the sermons to be heard at Christ
Church By-the-Sea have been
announced by the Rev. Mainert
jr. Peterson, who has been de-
livering a series of special Len-
ten sermons on the doctrine and
discipline of the Church.
At the 9 a.m. choral Eucharist
on Sunday the rector will speak
on "The Inner Sacrifice for God,"
and at the 7:30 p.m. service of
Evensong his sermon will be on
"Do We Have to Continue in
Sin?"
On Wednesday evening at 7:30
p.m., he will deliver his third
sermon on "The Good News A-
bout God, Man and Eternity,"
and will speak "The Inner Voice
Of the Holy Spirit."
"Our Love has Faded Away" Is
the subject listed for next Fri-
day, March 31, at 7 p.m.
____________x---------------
WHY OF REDS STUDIED
OMAHA (UP>Crelghton Uni-
versity will offer special classes
on the general subject "against
Communism." School officials
Local Red Cross
Drive Going Good,
Chairman Reports
The Red Cross drive for funds
Is proceeding satisfactorily In
every way. I. F. McIJhenny,
chairman of the fund cam-
Slgn committee announced
lay.
Total contributions by mem-
bers of the, Armed Forces to
the Red Gross now stand at
$6.273.72.
New contributions from Indi-
viduals and private organisa-
tions are aa follows:
$10 Frank Ullrich. $50
Mrs. Ida Ullrich. $35N. E.
Parker, Emanuel Lyons and H.
I. Homa Company. $10John
O- Collins, Jean Doble and
John F. Phillips.
$5Christian L. Nielsen, O.
E. MaUbury, Mrs. E. W. Nelson,
M. B. Hostetter, P. W. Reese,
Karl P. Curtis, and F. M. Von
Krusenstlerna. $3Mrs. Mary
M. Toone. $3Harry Chan.
BRONCHIAL
ASTHMA
Steep Sand All NifM
said four classes In a new adult
program will trace the history of
Communism and try to "fathom
the philosophy behind" it.
rhe lorgest Mlline medicina, Mr
oronchitu and Aithmo in oil o* bin
iordly-coid Canada is Buckley's Co-
nsdiol Mixture 'triple eetmfll a
bituino to thousond* and now tet
in oil drugstore
There Is nothlne/ o sot and sun
n tho world 2 or 3 doset in sweet-
ened hot water |uit before bedtime
ond mony o suHerer trom trongflnf
choking Aithmo no *ound relief
and good night's rest ana that
bod. old. persistent, brenchlol cough
he left you I* vos. don' believe
it get o bottle onv good druggist
for yeu con depend on Suck lev' Co-
nodiol Mixture re oive definite oulex
relief from that choking, gasping
*rrugft# for breath.
Miami 'Bra Bandits Paroled;
lord's Prophet' Faces Chair
A "RAIL" PROBLEM Sud-
den work stoppage on two
midwest rail lines doesn't per-
plex Alice Darby of Syracuse,
N.Y., as she waits for hei
homebound train at Grand
Central Terminal.
TALLAHASSEE, Fla., March 13
(UP)The State Pardon Board
today was on record with con-
ditional pardons to three con-
victed "Bra Bandits" of Miami
but turned down a plea to
save the life of a convicted
murderer who wanted to work
"for the Lord" behind prison
bars.
The Board also granted a full
pardon to Mrs. Gladys Delbert
of Plnellas County, whose tear-
ful, passionate appeal so moved
one attorney yesterday that he
suffered a nervous attack and
died later.
Mrs. Diebert, convicted of a
forgery charge, said If she fail-
ed to get a pardon she didn't
want to see another sunrise.
Attorney J. Henry Harrell of
Tallahassee, who attended the
hearings, said he suffered an
attack of "sympathetic nerves"
while listening to Mrs. Delbert.
He died today In a local hos-
pital.
The "bosom bandits,", given
one year sentences for stealing
telephone company money by
stuffing silver change In their
brassieres, were placed under
the supervision of the 8tate
parole Commission for one year.
They were Betty Corrigan, Mar-
ie Orr and Blllle Ruth McNabb.
The board refused a plea of
clemency for George W. Story
of Jacksonville who waa sen-
tenced to the electric chair In
the slaying of his ex-wlfe and
her husband. .
Story's attorney asked that
his sentence be commuted to
life imprisonment because Story
wanted to devote his time to]
being "a prophet for Jesus
Christ behind bars for the rest
of his Ufe."
The pardon board placed con-
victed lottery operator E. J.
Becton of Orlando under parole
commission supervision for one
year but passed over the case
of Charlie Kuhn of Orlando,
another convicted lottery oper-
ator, for further Investigation.
Former State Sen. E. Bert
Riddle was granted a full par-
don. He was free on parole af-
ter serving 14 months of a
three-year term on a morals
conviction. Riddle told the board
he wanted his civil rights back
so he can vote.
for
your Ibaster uJress

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ZIG-ZAG
108 Central Avenue Telephone) 2-341
Headquarters of VOGUE and McCALL Pattern*

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OF THE
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BEAUTIFUL... SENSATIONAL... NEW...
1952
MODELS
CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH
"THE FINEST ENGINEERED CARS OF ALL" ON
FRIDAY, MARCH 14th, FROM 5 TO 9 P.M.
AT
HEURTEMATTE
AND
ARIAS, S. A.
(NEW DISTRIBUTORS)
No. 10 Automobile Row


r:v,t. Hun
THK PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & Airline News
"Geppersrn Maersk'*
Still Open For Passengers
The brand new Maersk Line
ahip Geppersen Maersk, which
made her maiden voyage through
the Canal a few months ago, will
leave Cristobal lor New York
Mareh 24. There are still pas-
sages available for passengers
who desire to make this trip.
Fenton and Company are the lo-
cal agents.
Snake Expert Flying
To South America
Ross Allen, Internationally
known reptile expert fro mSilver
Springs, Florida, is flying by Pan
American World Airways and its
affiliates on a snake-collecting
and movie-making trip to six
Latin American countries.
Allen, whose Reptile Institute
at Silver Springs attracts approx-
imately a million visitors each
year, plans to make a number ol
television films while collecting
rare snake in British Guiana,
Surinam, Brazil, Peru, Panam
and Costa Rica.
Allen, accompanied by his wife,
Is flying from Miami to Montego
Bay. Jamaica, next Monday.
He is being Joined there by
Ken Goodman, a television Cam-
eraman, and Mr. and Mrs. How-
ard Morrow, owners of the new
Montego Beach Hotel
pen dates are held for flights
by PAA and its affiliates, Panair,
So Brasil and Pan American-
Grace Airways (Panagra), to Be-,
Jem and Manaos, Brazil; Iquitos
ind Lima, Per; Janam and
Costa Rica.
return the same evening. Furth-
er details may be received from
Fred Busch at Balboa 4394, any
evening.
_ JACOtY ON BRIPOt
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
Serpent
H
Anawr to Previous Punle
IVI i llEIBI i^iaiuisWpi
HORIZONTAL
. Goodman is returning to Mia-
the Aliens
fci from Iquitos;
are
NORTH
*K4
VAQ72
? Q72
*AK4
25
if 04
? AK1095
? J1053
M
WEST EAST
AA2 A6S
VK10853 )
? S
872
SOUTH
AQJ1087
? J
? J4
>'?.
*'Both sides vul. 4
West North Kaat Sooth
I4> Double IV 1*
Pass 2N.T. Pass 4*
Past Pass Pass
Opening lead? K
8 Male
7 Circle part
SEskers
9 Remainder
10 Roman date
12 Fore* air
through nose
violently
1J Treadles
18 Narrow inlet
,20 Infirm
21 Girl's name
22 Tangles
23 Asiatic desert
24 Footless
animal
25 Cotton fabric
11 [
When the hand shown today
was played In a recent tourna-
ment, most of the declarers were
back to Miami from San allowed to make four spades. One
#0^ Costa Rica, and the Mor-1pair of East-West players man-
tows are boarding a PAA flight [aged, however, to defeat that
Jn Costa Rica for Los Angeles, contract by proper use of the
Arrangements are being made trump echo,
to fly the snakes Allan collects! The trump echo consists o
In each country back to Miami
by Pan American's cargo planes.
playing a higher trump than ne-
cessary when you are just follow-
ing suit and not trying to win
the trick. If you get a chance,
you complete the echo by play-
ing a tower trump on the second
round of that suit.
The point of the trump echo is
to show that you hold three
1 Serpent of
South America
C Polynesian
aborigine
11 Wakes
13 Analyzed a
sentence
14 Punish
15 Box
18 Interest (ab.)
17 French
department
19 Rights (ab.)
20 Continued
stories
23 Strong breeze 27 Large plant
28 Gifted 28 Level
30 Uncloses
32 Perish with
hunger
33 Fish
35 Reeling
36 Worships
39 Unaspirated
40 Erodents
42 Brazilian
wallaba
45 Plexus
46 Rebound
49 Masterful
52 Wily
54 Aftersongs
55 Storehouses
56 Remarried
57 Exhausted
VERTICAL
1 Gudrun's
husband'
(myth.)
2 Type of gun
3 Hops'kiln
4 Wrong
(prefix)
5 Solitary
29 Take out
31 Mix
34 Atlantic
Island group
37 Netherlands
dty
38 Caterpillar
hairs
41 Pauses
42 Asserverate
43 Tuba
44In aline
46 Gun
47 Solar disk
48 Nuisance
50 Fish
51 Conducted
83 Light knock
3T
~
?T
7 M
IERRE
THURSDAY, MARCH 13. IMS
BUSINESS AS UNUSUAL
AAotNINS AT T A ** AN A*
FOttE CtSWt MMtS* A HWT7N* NOWKW
THAT A FCHSI6N CIVILIAN CARGO PUNS
HAP TAKSN OPP AT OOOO HOIK.
NbAMV, A GX rXtlVHl K MH.VLY PVTZLSO
y INP1CATION* THAT fOMBONS HAP USP
Hf TRUCK CWN* TH* NIGHT.
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
Our Pal
BY MERRILL BLOSBEE
(VVETtP TSN P0INT5 BE-
HIND we'll never,
CATCH KINGSTON/
drift
Space Open For
San Bias Islands Tours
f Another one-day trip to the
Ban Bias Islands is planned for
Saturday, and several seats are
till available. The combined
!a2eoad olIlrrt0lrlFmm11TntraJt tiumps" aitogethe'rT That sort" 01
EJ .air^rt^S?ftnSrt^m toiormatlonta often more help-
men airport, and the tourists will \ ^ declarer ^^ ^ your own
i innrtner so you dont automati-
cally echo in trumps whenever
you have three cards in the suit.
You pick a time when It is Im-
portant for your partner to get
the information, usually a time
when you want to get a ruff with
me of your trumps.
In today's hand most. West
players led the king of diamonds
but never touched the suit again
when they saw the threatening
diamonds in the dummy. South
was able to draw trumps safely
and eventually give up a second
diamond trick.
At one table, West opened the
king of diamonds, winning the
trick and then shifted to the
nine of hearts. Dummy won with
the ace, and East followed suit
with the discouraging three of
hearts. The king of spades was
next led from dummy, and East
carefully played the nine of
spades.
West wondered whether this
could be a singleton nine of
spades, but decided that the con-
tract would be unbeatable If
South had an eight-card spade
2000 modem rooms
bofh-rodio-Muzo*
spotleis comfort
at son. st. HEW YORK
w vm mm a mm tin
mM in, sti sm 1 imi m.,mmim
suit. If the nine were not a sin-
gleton, East was surely making
use of the trump echo.
Why was East bothering to
show that he had three trumps?
Obviously, he had ruffing ambi-
tions. The situation could hardly
be clearer, so West took his ace
of trumps and went right back
to the diamonds to take the dia-
mond ace and give his partner a
uff.
Old Specs Donated
CHAMPAIGN, 111. (UP) The
Church of the Brethren has
started a drive to send discarded
eye glasses to relief centers in
Austria and Germany. During
the first weeks of the drive, the
church collected 200 pairs of
glasses and shipped them over-
seas.
I'D RAT
ON ME
OWN
MUDDER
FOR*
ALLEY OOP
rooty Volunteers
T ?. T. HAMI.ni
BECAUSE OF ORCUMOTANCE ARWNS
FROM OOP REFUSAL TO ACTAS A TIME-
GUI DE FOR OR.HOSAe.THE
SHIP-SHORE
RADIO-TELEPHONE
SERVICE
PANAMA "HPC 22" 2506 Kct.
LISTENS FOR SHIPS
ON 2110 KCS.
1200 to 0400 G.M.T.
TROPICAL RADIO TEL CO.
s IVKI.KKN Planeteet
Overheard
BY RUSS WINTERBOTHAM
TUAMK THE
*TB*rr*
you, cita'.
KKPWUB ]
VOICE LOW.
AVlALZA.TUB
CVAHOmNB*
MAY HAVE
SHARP EASeS!
IOONTTHINKHOU-IS
IS BEING QUITE FAIR,
BUT NEITHER 16 OOf?
WHO
[A3 A GUIDE FOR \bUT.FOOZY.'
HJM.OOP REFUSED) MY STARS,
TOBLbUT DCWt/TTMETRAVEL
'2?sliPUVE r IS DAN6EROU0
trnu. got MEI7 it takes
EXPERIENCE!
HE'S GOTTA BE SHOWED W
OOP ISOUT.QOmTHE
L.OB TO TAKE TK lOUTf
IM
BOOTS AND HER BDDIB
Delirious?
BT EDGAR MARTIN
n's "root. 1 awo w&tefc WIVV
MR.SOWCl-IWWYXH* TO ttOW .'
MOLO .WE *1 \WN3tSt A voovit
ftRV WEWfcSXTOl MOOfcST *VK> IS
IKS V0OR J AMOOKiT tasu.
WAfc\C Jmm TOR A 0 w
TONAC- HAYY
-^gfl iktcykest: r ^^x
X

CAPTAIN EAST
Hew About Aired?
BT LESLIE TURNEA
LET*ETTW6
STRWGHT JANE...
YOU HEW
Of STEALING SOME-
THNS FROM SIMON
ALREO THAT"
BEEM5TCUN AT
HW*. AIRED MUST BE A RK5T CLASS T OH SUT IT
HEEL, JAME. SUT THAT WA* M0 EXCSC J WASN'T A
JOR. HOOTINfi WM LATER, IN MEWCOi/DSSIRE FOR
RWENae THAT
CAUSED *E TO
SHOOT MKA-ER-
CIDENTAUVi
K5VI
c\-in
VIC FLINT
To Manny Scragg"
BY MICHAEL OTMALLEa
T*
'I.LA'8 POf
A Let of Sugar
BY AL YERMEEK
POP CAN y NO, PRISC1LLA!
I WAVE A )\ 'TOU MUST
NICKEL^Z-i LEARN AOT
FOR >->,tO SPEND
CANoy/T V money;
MAKES M3U STOPJ
AND THINK,
DOESNT IT?
S!
^r/^flwmO-
SOMEBODV MUST
BE C3ETTINQ A
MORE CANDY
I'M QETT1NG1
1ST_^\
THAN y
Lr-?JK
THATViOvVAN WHO
JUST LBFTM3UK
yxrre sumvou.
KNOW WHO SHE ?
dU*T ANOTH-
ER OJ6-
TOA^E.
NEVER 5AW
W JTHOUHT FOB A
AOWBNTI
HER. THANK* ANVWAVV
^- MR. SRA !)BTJG8 BONNE
Individual Service
TH'aAR# HA,*
AAESHBC/ I JUST
co*auu*msc7
a surat'
IPBA/
THBE AINTNOTHII
T' wowrv A*OUT
NOW, OR UNTU.
OUR BOARDING HOI'SE
with
MAJOR nOOPLB OUT OUR WAY
By J. R WILLIAMS
=&AD,,>OL> boonTjers/ IT
WAS VDUC <3etrTHAT
LET5 -THAT FAKE VEST, HOPING '
TO -SELL. IT FOR 1,000/
. NOvO THAT VOU4^ <
BEEN BILKED. SOUS
AVABIC& CRIES OUT
FOR THE pA.LTRYlCO-
FEE T SOT AS ASEKTT/
"- \0u'Re THAT
TYPE/
LiE lOit THAT
SHOULD WlM US '
A *1EEK'$ RUN
OH PAGE ON*
AS AAOOERN
>OE6CEJOANT6
OP SIMPLE -
emotf
JlFVJeWON
TH CASE-
1 WlETJ GET
PATDOPF 1
/1HOV6TER.
ICRACKERS/^
66ESS|0N
.fe ELEVEN
Jf&tNTSOP
1hELA>1


THURSDAY, MARCH IS. ME!
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NW8PAP1R
PAOS PIP
r antic ^J
onei
- %
&. 17, &fi, 0.1 &/I0. 3521
GENERAL AND MRS. MORRIS TO BE ENTERTAINED
The Commander-ln-Chlef of the Caribbean Command
Lieutenant General WHIlam H. H. Morris, Jr., and Mrs. Mor-
rb. will be honored at a farewell cocktail partv next Mon-
day from 6 to, 8 p.m. at the Hotel El Panama. _____
Hosts will be the Ambassador of spam to ranama ana
the Countess de Rabat. _____
Ambasaador And Mr. Wiley
Return
The Ambassador of the United
States to Panama and Mrs. John
C. Wiley returned early this
morning by plane from a visit of
several weeks m Washington,
DC.
Lt. Governor and Mrs. Vofel
E ertain
The Lieutenant Governor of
the Panama Canal and Mrs. Her-
bert D. Vogel were hosts to 26
5vests Tuesday evening at a buf-
et supper given at their homp
on Balboa Heights.
The party honored the Coni-
mander-in-Chlef of the Carib-
bean Command. Lt. General
William H. H. Morris, Jr. and
Mrs. Morris, who are leaving in
the near future to make their
home in Washington. D.C.
Colonel And Mrs. Easton
H -.t To Friends
Colonel and Mrs. Robert L.
Er.iton entertained with a cock-
',ail buffet for a group of their
'rlends Monday evening at the
\lbrook Officers Club. .
Mr. Medlnger Summoned
To States
Mrs. Robert Medlnger of Dia-
blo left the Isthmus yesterday
morning by plane for Tampa,
Florida, where she was called by
the illness of her grandfather, J.
M. Turner.
Luncheon Honors
Secretary And Mrs. Leadbltter
The First Secretary, Informa-
tion of the British Legation and
Mrs! Jasper M. Leadbltter were
honored at an informal farewell
luncheon Tuesday by Mr. and
Mrs. Allen Lowrle of Bella Vista.
Also honored on this occasion
was Colonel JR. Harper, who
is a visitor on the Isthmus.
Mr. and Mrs. Gorin
Erf train With Buffet Supper
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Gorin
were hosts to a group of their
friends Tuesday evening at their
home on Golf Heights at a buf->
fet supper given In honor of the
First Secretary. Information, and
M-s. Jasper M. Leadbltter. who
will sail tomorrow aboard the S.
S. Anoon for New York en route
to their new post In Detroit. Mi-
chigan .
Friends Give Farewell Party
The First Secretary, Informa-
tion, of the British Legation and
Mrs. Jasper M. Leadbltter were
the honor guests Monday even-
ing at an informal buffet supper
given In farewell to them bv a
group of their friends at the
home of Gaspar Pacheco In Be-
lla Vista.
Assistant "Veep" Of Panama
Canal Company Is Visitor Here
Edward H. Harms, assistant to
the vice-president of the Pana-
ma Canal Company in the New
York office and Mrs. Harms, ar-
rived on the Isthmus Monday a-
board the B.S.Ancon.
They were accompanied by th
freight and traffic manager for
the Panama Line. William M.
TJoyd.
Mrs. Goldstrhom And Son
Leave For States
Mrs. Maren Goldstrhom with
her son, Karl, left over the week-
end for her home in the United
States, after a short visit with
her uncle and aunt, Mr. and
Mrs. Cecil Banan, In Gamboa.
Prior to her departure Mrs.
Goldstrhom and Mrs. D. Post,
also a visitor in Gamboa, were
the honor guests at a farewell
narty given by Mrs. Robert Low-
8allv Klrbv Is Four Years Old
s"allv Klrby, small daughter cf
Malor and Mrs. Eugene B Kir-
Xl'SSffo".' SiSSf WampumrPennr Hygfj.,
birthday anplvamry with a .oar- ^^tlt^rZ^V^J^
Dinner To Be Held At Boat Club
The Pedro Miguel Boat Club
invites its members to attend the
regular monthly free dinner and
dance Saturday evening at 6':30.
Poweil-Capalho
Marriage Is Solemnised
Miss Joan Powell, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Bronson B. Powell,
of Pedro Miguel, became the
bride of Edgar A. Capalbo. son
of Mr. and Mrs. James Capalbo
George N. Engelke who sang
"Because."
Given in marriage by her fa-
ther, the bride wore a ballerina-
length gown of French embroid-
ered organza made with a bouf-
fant skirt and short puffed
sleeves, and a yoke of nylon out-
lined with applique work. Her
fingertip-length veil of illusion
was draped from a cap of em-
broidered orgama. She wore
long nylon gloves and carried a
bouquet of white gladioli.
The matron of honor was Mrs.
Arden Welch, who wore a gown
of embroidered organza over pink
taffeta, and carried a bouquet of
blue hydrangeas and pink carna-
tions. She wore matching flowers
In her hair.
The bride's other attendant
was Miss Betty Farrell, who was
gowned In embroidered organza
over blue taffeta. Her headdress
and bouquet were also of pink
carnation and blue hydrangeas.
Leo Presho was the best man
and BUI Elmendorf served as
usher.
Immediately following the ce-
remonv a reception was held In
Pedro Miguel at the home of the
bride's nrents.
Mrs. Powell, mother of the
bride, wore a gown of pearl grev
crene and lace with a corsage of
pink carnations.
Assisting In the festivities were
Mrs. John Powell. Mrs. Kate Un-
derwood and Miss Frances Dwy-
er.
The voung couple are now at
home to their friends at House
205-B in Pedro Miguel.
New Guest*
At Hotel El Panama
Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. FU-
rlk of Chicago. 111., arrived on
the Isthmus Mondav nleht bv
plane from Central America and
are guesta at the Hotel El Pana-
ma.
Beta Sigma Phi Has Meeting
The Beta 81gma Phi Sorority
held its regular bi-monthly meet-
ing on Tuesday.
A St. Patrick's Day theme was
followed bv hostesses Virginia
Wlllett and Eileen Adams.
No. 1 Saturday at 7 p.m In the
American Legion Home at Fort
Amador.
Members of the Post and Aux-
iliary and their husbpnds and
wives are Invited to attend free
of charge this old-fashioned fish
fry and get-together.
Mr. and Mr: Jame Ross Cof-
fey and their granddaughter.
Patricia Walker, all of Austin.
Texas, arrived Tuesday morning
by plane for a visit on the Isth-
mus.
During their itav here thev
will be guests at the Hotel El
Panama.
Civic Council To Meet Monday
The General Committee of Ci-
vic Councils of the Onal Eone.
will meet Monday at 7 p.m. In
the board room of the Adminis-
tration Building.
All those Interested In civic af-
fair are Invited to attend.
Unitarian Women's Alliance
Elects Officers
The Women's Alliance of the
Unitarian Socletv met Tuesday
night ot the home of Mrs. Nor-
man W. Elton.
Elections for the coming year
were held and the following of-
ficers elected: president, Mrs.
Norman W. Elton; vice-presi-
dent. Mrs. OtlaC. Myers: secre-
tary-treasurer. Mrs. Norbert H.
McCauley.
Following the business meet-
ing, colored slides of their re-
cent European trln were shown
by Mr. and Mrs. Ernie L. Payne.
Senior Red Cross
Life-Saving Class
Underway At Kobbe
A senior Red Cross life-
saving class, conducted Jointly
by the Welfare, Athletic and
Recreation office of the 33rd
Infantry Regiment and the
Fort Kobbe Red Cross chapter,
began March 10 and will con-
clude March 25.
The 30 hour instruction
course is held every afternoon
at the Fort Kobbe pool Cor-
poral Norvln Roessing, Wel-
fare, Athletic and Recreation
non-commlssloned officer, is
instructor for the class of 80
men.
The prospective life guards
were selected for the duty-hour
Instruction by the Regiment.
Those who complete the course
will receive senior Red Cross
Ufe having certificates from
Nell Clark, Fort Kobbe Red
Cross Director. They will be se-
lected for posta as life guards
at the Fort Kobbe swimming
pool and beach.
RUTH MILLET! Says
M Martin And Orchestra
To Plav For Legion Party
Al Martin and his orchestra
will provide musical entertain-
ment for the birthday party to
be given by the American Le-
gion, Balboa Post No. 1 and the
American Legion Auxiliary Unit
World Club To Be
Sponsors Of Talk
On Point Four
A lecture covering all the
phases of the Point Four Pro-
f;ram in Panama will be de-
Ivered by Ernest C. Jeppson at
the Balboa YMCA tomorrow
under the sponsorship of the
World Club.
The lecmre, which will be
open to the public, is scheduled
to begin at 7:15 p.m.
.Through the years I have not-
Iced one thing about the letters
that come my way from wives
with husband troubles.
When they state, "I have been
a good wife," and staiu UhW.
their reasons for feeling thai
they have been, they always
leave out one Important item.
And that Is: "I have kept our
home life interesting."
They always mention that
they are good housekeepers
They Invariably say that fhey
are neat and attractive. Almost
always they mention that they
work hard and are good mana-
gers about money.
Often they say that they
helped their husbands get their
start by holding down a Job dur-
ing the first years of marriage.
But they don't say a word
about what they have done to
make home life interesting and
entertaining and fun.
This one Item I so generally
overlooked that lt is a safe bet
that, in many of the cases, the
trouble started right there.
When he stope to think about
lt, and it Is probably only rare-
ly that he ever does, a husband
may give his wife full credit for
such virtues as being a good
housekeeper, a good manager a
competent mother, and a neat
and attractive-looking ornan.
He may even realise, If lt hap-
pens to be so, that he owes
much of his success to her
helping him get a start in hi
chosen business or profession.
But that Isn't what's on his
mind during the dally journey
from his place of work to his
home.
On that trip he Is either look-
in* forward to getting home or
dreading the dull evening ahead.
What attitude he has depends
on whether or not, his wife has
been able to make home life
relaxed, and at the same time
Interesting and stimulating.
Take that to heart if most of
your evenings fall Into a dull
routine.
If they do, it's time to put
your mind on Introducing your
family to some new interests,
some new friends, some new re-
creations.
answer the call
#04.
195? RED CROSS FUND
rOR SHUT
HEILTHT Hill
Play safe I Bryicreetu your hair.
Dandruff on your collar, loos* hair
on your comb these re danger
signals thai point the need fee
Brylcreem's double bmtfit :
(1) Daylong smartnsl*.
(2) Lasting hair health.
Manage with Brylcreem stimulatt
the (calp, encourage natural hair
growth, ward offDandruff. Itipurt
emulsified oils put life into Dry
Hair and impart a .plendid gloss.
Don't take any chances, Brylcreear
your hair moat men do I

use
Brylcreem
most men do
confident
appealing
charming
WE SELL ONLY FIRST QUALITY MERCHANDISE

you belong to the Armed Forees or If you have a steady job
me to our store and you may choose your own credit terms.

EASY WASHERS
SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR
FREE ENTRY
dlelltrht ceremony performed by
the Rev. Louis B Storms. CM.
in the parish hall of the Sacred
Heart Chapel In Ancon.
SallPr'^andparenu'^. Jndl While carnations, callar hiles
Mr/ Edrfund PDerocher Bos-' and wit, ^**^
tv at the Fort CUtvten Officers
Club at.whldi 8t Patrick's Day
decorations were used.
Assisting In the festivities were
ton. Mass.. who are visitor on
the Isthmus.
Celebrating with Sally were a
rnher of her friends, including
M-ry and Llndft Helm, JoAnn
p*m Ella Telease. Joe Relman. '
p-'-lcla Reed. Jill nd Stephen
r-rnorHpr, Dickie Fisher. Jean
p-inington. Jerrv and Bukhara
Pt'T"ion. Mlchel and Jimmv
FW. Carolvn Proseta. Michael
P'mlln. Anne Boyce and Susie
Holman.
the hall, which wa lighted by
candles in tall candelabrs.
The church orgnlst. John
Ridge, played appropriate nup-
tial music and accompanied Mrs
Vltw Leave
V" Washmeton
" *r. and Mr*. Frank H. Wellr
a*-'I their children left recenf.lv|
h" nJpne for the'r home in Wash-
l~*on. D.C. after <* visit of ev-
er"! weeks with Mrs. Wei'cr's
p"*ents. Dr. >nd Mrs. Ricardo J
Alfaro of Bella Vlata.
THREE HOUSES FOR
ONLY $20.00
in the Monumental Raffle
of the Panam Lions Club
Pro Colonias Infantile*
to be held March S3.
DON'T FAIL TO GET
YOUR TICKET TODAY
A pERFUM* *
OF LEGEND
01
COTY
Distribuais. CIA CVKNO*. S.A.
Tels.: 2-17*1 2-17*1.
. and the secret of her charm is Odo-Ro-No. Don't let
offending underarm odour spoil your natural freshness. Your
bath temporarily washes away unpleasant perspiration odour,
but it will not give you the lasting protection you can rely on.
Odo-Ro-No safely stops perspiration and
odour for a full 24 hour*.
# Odo-Ro-No stay* creamy longernever get*
gritty even in open jar.
No deodorant cream i* so harmless to fabrics
as Odo-Ro-No.
# No deodorant cream I* gentler to even
sensitive skin, and it is so easy to use.
If yon prtftr liquid dtoiortni,
tit for Odo-Ro-No Liquid.
QDQRQ-DQ
CREAM
Th* Daatdercmt without a Doubt
WE HAVE THE LARGEST
ASSORTMENT OF BEAUTIFUL
LINOLEUM FROM PABCO.
lDiablq
SIMMONS SPRINGS & MATTRESSES
The Store Where You Will Find the Largest Assortment ot Glass and Linoleum.
86 CENTRAL AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-2465
"Leaders in the Furniture Business since 1909"
ONLY10 DAYS LIFT!
MONUMENTAL RAFFLE FOR COLONIAS INFANTILES
Houses For Only $20.00
SECOND PRIZE
FIRST PRIZE 0
mB in
THIRD PRIZE


J BEDROOM CHALET Di "EL CANGREJO"
APARTMENT HOUSE constating ef 4 Apartments, in "Cams* Alegre"
2-BEDKOOM CHALET IN "EL COCO"
OTHER PRIZES: With the last number of the first prize you win one carton of LUCKY STRIKE
With the last number of the second prize you win a Q1LLETTE RAZOR. TO/ul(i,1I.
With the last number of the third prize you win a pass for two persons for one of the principal movie houses of Panam (LUX, CENTRAL, BELLA VISTA or TROPICAL).
WHERE TO BUY YOUR TICKETS: ANCON INN PETE'S PUCE AN0ELINI BOTH DURAN SHOPS OR FROM ANY MEMBER OF THE LIONS CLUB.


AGf Ml
i*HE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEW8FAPER
THURSDAY, MARCH IS INS
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
.biWlh UKRVltk
leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
SALON DI HKUJSXA AMERICANO
OKRIMIN'S
vlOSKO Ofc LKSSir
BUI HA CAJU.TON
assssa."-
rHE PANAMA AMERICAN
*a.' no CMtm *ci
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
Saboteurs Blow Up Autos
In Tenn. Electric Strike
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobile
FOR SALE: Refrigerator. 'Frlol-
doira." all peretliln, 7.4 ft,. 60
cycle. Also "Topptn" go *e- ?>
burner, oportment in. Both 15
months old. excellent condition,
Til. Ponom. 3-1743. 52nd St.
Ne, 5, Apt. 3, efter 6;00 p. m
Service Periennel ond Civilien
Government Employe
be *ofe
tor your Automobile Financing.
Iriiilt
Government Employe Finance Co.
of
Fort Worth, Texes
new office at
Ne. 43 Autsmskile Rew
MISCELLANEOUS I RESORTS
0 re* have e Viaklnt eralr? hilltai. Oceonke cortaos*. Santa
Write Alc.fcalin Aaeatwiet Clara Sox 435. flaiboo. Phonej
t. 2011 Aasaa C & Ponomo 3-1877. Cn.roool 3-1673
CuivlMtKUAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE;One 5 piece mahogany
bedroom, i!e with inner jpr.ng'
mattress. House 0431, Apt. G. fjtxt loor t0 (ne Firestone Building
Aheon, Tel. 2-3475,___________ also through your outo dealer
FOR' SALE:-Complete et of turni-| We sove you money on
for 12 family quarter*. In- poncing and In.urcr.c.
9 cu. ft. refrigerator ond "\to direct loons on outomobile
ture
eluding 9 cu.
radio. House 0432-J. Ancon. phon
23475.
ACINCY DIHLINGER
fceae 1-4M4 I-4M5
FOR"SALE-~ 25 Cycle retrigerotor,! FOR SALE:1949 Mercury 4 Dcor
ly be seen at 0778-B. Wmiam-'1 Sedan. $1.150.00. 82.. Apt. "A"
son Place, Bolboa.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, dishes,
tobies, flngle bed. chest of draw-
er, choirs, etc. Tel. 2-4404.
buse 5437-1, Diablo.
FORTsAL^ArVestinghowe refriger-
ator 8 cu. ft., enamel, 25 cycle
Excellent condition, $100. 2 vene-
tWn blind, 5x6 ploitic, $16.00.
Ggmboo 0262-B. Telephone 0-
228. ___.
Empire St. Duty paid. Phone Bol-
boa 3406.
FOR" SALE:1 Wetmgheuse refri-
gerator 9 cu. ft. In excellent con-
dition, all porcelain, 25 cycle, 1
General Electric refrigerator, new.
9-cu. ft. motor 60 cycle. 1 flM
water heoter w*h 60 gal. woter
tank, 2 new Venetian elummun
shodt with removable ilots, 1
book cose. 5724-D. D;oblo, Tel.
_ 2=9541._________________________
OR SALE:One Coldspot Refrlger-
-tor 25 CyJ. As Is. whsre is. 0856-
A. Oleander, Bolboo.
FOR SALE:1947 Buick conertible.
leaving the Isthmus. Coll 2-1636.
Panama.
Before selling your cor, we suggest
you poy us a visit. We ore the
only ont in the market who pays
CASH. We also sell oil kinds of
COrs and trucks.
Financing available
Trade-ins accepted.
IISIMAN'S USED CARS
For the best permanent ge to "Solon iWilllom Sonto Clora Beoeh Cortte*.,
de Bellexo Filo'." Expert opera-j Two bedroom. Frlgidoires, Rock-
tors. Call for your appointment. go range. Balboa 2-3050.
Designer and dressmaker, works et
private home. No. 9 Eost, 20.b
St. Call Hotel Ploxe, telephone 2-
1638.-
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
GramlJch'i Sonta Claf beoeh-
cottoges. Electric Ice boxes, go
toves, moderate rote. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
We Have everything
to keep vour Lawn
and Harden beautiful
during the dry season
Shrapnel' houses Sonto Clora. Al
in COLD Cerro Campano Moun-
tains. Telephone Bolboo 2820 or
see caretaker.
FOR SALEDesk Model White Sew-
ing Machine, Desk Model L. C.
Smith Typewriter, Woodturning
Lothe, complete with extra equip-
ment, child's plostic swimming
pool, wardrobe trunk, rocking
choir, electric motor* (51 Albrook
6208.
FOR SALE: Boby crib, complete
2157-D, Curundu. Phone PAD.
5204.
FOR SALE:Three registered female
boxers, seven weeks old, $50.00
each. Otrs. 419-B, Ft. Clayton,
phone Ft. Clayton, 5247.
FOR RENT
House
FOR RENT: Completely furnished
cholet in "El Cangrejo"; 3 bed-
rooms, 3 bathrooms, livingroom,
diningroom, pantry, kitchen, maid's
room, gorage, porch. Inejuire No.
32 "B" Avenue upstoirs. Tel. 2-
2967, Ponomo.
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow.
lnsecticiat
Fertiliser
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
27 Central Ave. Tel. 3-tlf*
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR SALEGermon 400 day clocks
$23.00 each. Conol Zone Phor.
mocy. 4th of July Avenue.
No. 8 Peru Avenue beside, Prndente for SALE: Cottages, completelyiSStobo!".,
Theotre. Ponema
FOR SALI: 1950 Chevrolet
Oe Line Seden, radie, elastic aeet-
cevere, nearly new tires, $1,400,
$470.00 eJewn, $51.00 e month.
Berry Keneety 205-C. Pedro Mi.
eel.
WANTED
Miscellaneow
FOR SALE; 1939 Oldsmobjle 4
door sedan. Also two bicycles. Coll
2-1335 after 4 or 5177 Parsons
Street. Dioblo Heights.
WANTED:To buy <1> length (18
ft. i Cost Iran Tub 10" dio. with
bell and jpigot. One (l> reduc-
tion. Cost Iran, 10" to 6" dio.
On* ll "T". Cast Iron, 10" X
TO" 10". Boneb de Urbanlxa>
cien Engineering Department.
FOR SALE: 1948 Oldsmobile 2
door Sedan with radio, heater ond
Hydramotic. Can be seen at Quor-
ters 5444-G. Dioblo Heights, Cpl.
Sam W. Johnson. Must sell.
Chevrolet 4-door
sedan. Perfect condition, good
looking appearance. Not duty paid.
S850. Call Panoma 3-1682.
WANfe;"Apartment of
3 bedroom in Visto Hermosa, San
Francisco, Sbanos or Parque Le-
fevre. Sox 357 Colon.
PERSONALS
HUMAN ENGINEERING
Corre' -e Adiustment of the
Structure.
George D. Barb. Jr.,
No. 11. 7th. St., .
Tel. 2-3833
By Appointment
Bod>
.Agencias Cosmos,' Automobile Row
'^ 29. will solve your Auto Vjymg or
1, 2 or selling Problem. Tel. PdWam* 2*
4721. Open all day on Saturdays
FOR SALE:Will sacrifice MG sport
roadster, purchased in August, for
$1.275.00. Coll 4-339, 5-7 p. m
FOR SALE:1939 Mercury, 5-good
tires, very good condition. Phono
Fort Gulick 331, house 152-B.
furnihed, Sonto Cloro Beach.
Term available, for informotion.
Phon 6-441.
FOR SALE:Good established in-
come, producing business, self,
operated and interesting ideal. For
retired couple wishing to stay In
Panama and be independent, write
Box G. E. 134, Panama for de-
tails.
AlHAMSRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ment. Male) service optional. Con-
toct office 8061. 10th Street, New
1)86 Celen.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
#33 B. 39th 8t.
MOTHERS, protect baby' feet the
bet sofest way you con JUMPING-
JACK Sho are recommended by
specialists. Sold exclusively at
SABYLAN0IA. No. 4C. 44th StM
Bella Visto. Tel. 3-1259.
FOR RENT: Desirable vocation
quorters in Gotun. April to August.
Call Gotun 5-378.____________
FOR RENT;:4-room aportment.
9th. St. New Cristobal. Apply 8063
Apt. 1, phone 1225-J, Colon.
FOR RENT:To responsible person
2 bedroom apartment, living-din-
ngroom, kitchen, bathroom, maid's
room ond garage. Eett 51t St.,
No. 20.
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Buying: Interamerican Hotel
and Abbatolr.
Selling: Panam Forest and
Fuerra y Lns (preferred)
Tel. 3-4719 J-1860
FOR SALE: Electric sewing ma
chine, knee action, beautiful stitch
and good looking cabinet, $75.00
Phone 2-2688, Panama osk for
Chorhe.
FOR SALE: Smith Premier type-
writer, 28 Inch carriage. $25.00
Apply "Co. General de Seguro S
__A.." Plaza Herrara. Ponami.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle
LESSONS
PMNO PLAYING taught. Privte
Instruction. Beginners advanced.
Phone: Bennett ot 2-1282.
FOR SALE:1949 Crosley Station
Wagon. Radio. Undereoated. Good
mechanical condition. $350.00
530-A. Cocoll.
Taxpayers Here Have
Until June 15, Bui
Whn Interest
FOR SAL:Motorcycle 1947 Hor.
ley Davidson 74 O.H.V., new over-
haul*, new 2-tone point, good
condition. Price $400.00. See at
Apt. 148-B, 8th Street, New Cris-
tobal.
FOR SALE:Cuihman Scooter, $25
00. Apply "Ca. General de Segu-
ro. S. A.," Plaza Herrera, Pon-
ama.
JimC Ingrain GiVCS "te internal Revenue
at both Balboa and Cristobal
fa-aweearl UamsIsi* At f'wlu maintain their regular of-
VefllCen PKHllMT Al hours throughout the "rush
- -.-^ .IE61"10*1" Preceding March IS.
In Balboa WWW;2S?SnrsS
; estimates of tax for 1952.
Jaime Ingram, young Panama- hJhe ?"ice tof"" Balboa Club-
man pianist, will be presented in ^"se'* Pen from 8:30 to noon
concert at the USO-JWB on f"dmifnL1..to 5 P-m- Monday
Monday at 8:15 p.m. throuh ***>*.
h The Cristobal office is open
Ingram who has played many, from 8:35 to noon and from
recitals and concerts with sym- 1 to 4:15 p.m. on Monday only,
phony orchestras has been invit- Returns which are mailed may
ed to plav for the Festival of be postmarked up to midnight
French Music at Sao Paolo Bra-; March 17.
sil as a soloist with the orches-1 Local taxpayers also have the
trt under the direction of maes- three-mont hperiod of grace al-
teo Souza-Lima at the end of J?wed to those outside the con-
tW month ttnental United States. Final
returns need not be made until
Hi.'proeram for Mondav s con- June 15 ln uch cases but ln-
fjrt Is as follows: rltst ** charged for the per-
iod from March 15 to June IS.
' Jfsu. Jov of Man's Desiring bv
ch-Hes; Variations Serieuses
by Mendelssohn: Two Etudes, a
Bfrceuse and Ballade No. 3 bv
Cisoprn: Ft in eral lies by Liszt
Densa Negra by Guarnieri: First
ISlltz bv Souza-Llma and Bug-
gejtion Diabollaue bv prokoffeif. 8EVD2RVILLE. Tenn, March
In keeping with the policy of 13 (UP) An all-male Jury of
D-JWB. admission price will farmers and businessmen
Hillbilly On Trial
Far Killing Own Son
Canal Transits last
Monlh Third Highest
In February Record
Commercial traffic through
the Panama Canal last month
was the third highest in num-
ber of transits of any Febru-
ary in the Canal's history with
507 transits by ocean-going
vessels of more than 300 net
tons, according to statistics an-
nounced yesterday at Balboa
Heights.
There have been only four
Februarys since the Canal was
opened ln 1914 that more than
500 transits by large com-
mercial vessels have been rec-
orded. Last month's traffic was
exceeded in February 1920 with
510 tramita, and February 1928
with 523 transits. The only
other February since-1914 when _.
there were more than 500 tran-.the
sits was in 1930 when 501 tran- battlefront tests last
Position Offered
WANTED:General bookkeeper and
accountant, 25 to 40 years of,
age, who con maintain complete
set of books ond prepare flnanclol
statements. Excellent starting sa-
lary, with wonderful opportunity
for advancement in a well estab-
lished company located In Colon.
Only qualified applicants with ex-
perience will be considered. Give!
record of present and previous
employment in reply.
WANTED:Typist and general of-
fice clerk, 21 to 40 yeors of age.
Must be fost and accurate. Good
salary and opportunity for ad-1
vancement with well established'
compony in Colon. Give full par-
ticulor in reply. Box 93, Colon.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM JIM
Slipcover Rennholsterj
vurr oui mow.mohi
leerte Meea
i. P. la Oast 77 (AateeaeMe Stwi
free Ctttaaatai Pick. A Deliver.?
Tel. S-4ti IM to tM eat.
a n a Ia c
INSTANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(torilties with Vitante D)
0 term freak.
Flavor
O Touches only
tMkttaa eleel
la preecmint
Dissolve In.
lastly In celt
r Ice water
On Sale la P.C Co. Commissaries.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FO RSALE:One house Sonto Cloro
Beoch, concrete* block construc-
tion, furnished. Includes two ocre; |
lond, well, gorage. Premises fen-
ced, telephone Bolboo 1536.
Manush.
Marine Corps Has
New Vest-Like Armor
The Marine Corps recently
demonstrated its new body ar-
mor which is worn by Leather-
necks on patrol in Korea, ac-
cording to an announcement
by Headquarters, 15th Naval
District.
Its primary purpose is to
ammunition, which causea
more then 70 percent of all
combat casualties.
The armor weighs seven and
tnree-quar t e r pounds, sur-
rounds most of the torso, like
a veat, and permits freedeom
of movement Its protection
conies from contoured overlap-
pine multilayered nylon fabric.
The present design is in mass
production on contracts let by
Marine Corps following
aits by large commercial
seis were reported.
ves-
he $1 for adults, 50 cents for stu- ready today to try tenant farm-
dants. 8ervice personnel will be er Thomas Harvey Ball for
tsttpiltted free of charge. : clubbing his six-year-old son to
[death in a mountain cabin.
Opposing attorneys question-
ed 167 veniermen before the
Jury was completed.
Authorities charged that Ball,
CIVE!
Last month was the sixth
consecutive month ln which
over 50 ocean going vessels
have transited. Commerc i a 1
traffic for the first eight
months of this fiscal year was
reported as 4,094, with a daily
^average of 16.78 transits.
The number of transits for
this fiscal year exceeds the
number for the corresponding
period of last fiscal year by
slightly over 400.
In addition to the commercial
traffic of over MM) net tons,
there were 120 local com-
in
952
RED CROSS
HIND
a widower, was in a "drunken marcial vessels
rage" when he bludgeoned lit-ilng February.
tie Eufamous Bill to death with i Tolls collected last month
a broomstick and a rocking "mounted to $2.089.156.00, of
chair arm last Feb. 2. 1 which $7,122.82 was collected
The only witness was Ball'slon the mall vessels. The
only surviving child, Ruby Fay Amount of tolls earned last
4 J "Imonth were exceeded in the
Ball, who said he could notl"SontlM of 'bruary 1328 and
a^lea^^t*'- ,Bl""' Tolls cr^tadto the Canal,
ptfer?; r &&^J?3ffi*&
would "orobablv" uk in. im .February was reported at $403.-
eachdeavenirentannltyw.sH%i?X sh^lEe'tnon? o?
dea'theinMrvM T^d t0 he'EK credited ^ G^rnnen
t! hi h -V "^ also wh'- -hipping this fiscal yea
2LJ /d.u re*.d "ewPPer amounted to $2,141,376.6 ur
accounts of the slaying. 1 through last month.
-----summer.
Operational employment of the
body armor in Korea will de-
termine, from practical stand-
point, how widespread will be
Its use by all Marine ground
forces In Korea.
Development of the Marine
Corps contoured body armor
follows World War II work of
the Navy's Bureau of Medicine /be Club Tropical.
and Burgery. Tests were con- f A special feature of this meet-
tlnued at the Naval Medical
Field Research Laboratory at
Camp Lejeune, North Caroli-
na, the only service laboratory
devoted exclusively to the de-
sign and development of light
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. 8c Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
Transportes Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
Wo pack and crato or move
anything. 'Phono 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
MARTiU, Tenn., March 13
tUP 1 Dynamiters who wreck-
ed the automobiles of two of-
ficials of a strike-harried rural
electric cooperative were being
sought today by the State,
which sent Investigators and
highway patrolmen to "look
things over.''
Officers said the blasts cli-
maxed a three-months series of
violence and sabotage and they
asked Oov. Gordon Browning to
send the National Guard.
Browning, however, said he
would like to study the situa-
tion more thoroughly first.
Both cars were parked and
unoccupied but the blasts shat-'
|tered Windows in the owners"
homes and the town's 5,000 po-
pulation is "really worried," re-
ported Deputy Sheriff B. H.
Ivey.
"Something's been happening
every weekend" since 28 AFL
maintenance workers of the
Weakley County Municipal ilec-
tric Assn. walked out last De-
j comber demanding higher pay
and a written contract, Ivey
said.
"Sometimes It's Just the street
lights going out or the power
off for a few minutos," he said.
"This Is the worst thing we've
ever had."
The cooperative has kept go-
ing with a new maintenance
force.
Today's blasts came 18 min-
utes apart on opposite sides ot
town. The cars belonged to
Brooks Crockett, superintendent
of the association, and Blackle
Lominlcki, construction boss.
Crockett's car was parked In
a garage connected with the
house and weatherboardlng was
1 knocked off the house Itself but
none of the family was In-
jured.
"Somebody planted a couple
of sticks of dynamite under the
rear of both cars," the deputy
said. "They tied a fuse to the
dynamite and set it off."
Governor Browning dispatch-
ed his adjutant general, Sam T.
Wallace, and Public Safety
Commissioner 8am Neal to look
into the situation In this north-
west Tennessee county, as well
las a force of patrolmen to dis-
courage further violence.
The striking maintenance
force belongs to the AFL's In-
ternational Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers. A union
spokesman at Jackson, Tenn.,
Ed Nichols, said the news of
the blasts came as a surprise.
"The union certainly didn't
order it," he said. "I've been!
working to keep down anything
of the kind."
Deputy Ivey said that some-
one fired a hlgh-powefed rjfle
into the substation near here
Monday night, damaging a
transmitter and knocking out
power for several hours. Several
weeks ago, he said, a brick was
thrown through a window of
'an employe's house, slightly In-
juring one of his children.
In December, shortly after the
strike started, power failed be-
tween Dresden, the county seat,
and Greenfield, leaving thous-
ands of subscribers without
power during sub-freezing wea-
ther. Dr. N. F. Porter had to
take one-week-old Loyce Green-
:up out of an Incubator and to
his home where his wife, a re-
gistered nurse, held the baby in
blankets before a roaring fire
all night.
Porter delivered another baby
by candlelight during the black-
out.
The cooperative, distributing
TVA current, serves customers |
throughout Weakley County and
others In adjoining Gibson
County.
Acheson: Immense Difficulties'
Stand In Way Of Disarmament
WABHINOTON, Mar. II (UP)
Secretary of State Dean
Acheson said yesterday that
the United States is willing to
reduce its military forces
whenever agreement can be
reached on a world disarma-
ment plan with effective safe-
guards.
He told a news conference
this country Is ready to nego-
tiate "in good faith" toward
this end ln the hope that mo-
ney and materials now going
for defense "may be liberated
for positive programs of recon-
struction and development."
Noting that the United Na-
tions disarmament commission
begins work tomorrow, Acheson
Sautloned, however, that the
rafting of concrete disarma-
ment proposals covering both
conventional and atomic weap-
ons will encounter "Immense
dlflcultles."
While the secretary did not
say so, there Is no great hope
among American officials that
the commission will accomplish
very much barring a drastic
change ln the past attitude of
Russia and Its satellites toward
the arms Issue.
They do, however, nurse the
hope that the growing military
strength of the United States
and its allies eventually will
accomplish the purpose of
forcing the Soviet Union to
come to terms on world issues
without war.
Acheson conceded that the
labors of the disarmament
commission may be "slow and
arduous."
But he added that the United
States is ready to "cut down
our forces If agreement can be
reached on an effective plan of
balanced disarmament."
One of the biggest stumbling
blocks to any disarmament
program has been Russian in-
sistence that a ltd be put on
atomic arms productions first.
The United States and its al-
lies insist any agreement
should cover all arms, conven-
tional as well as atomic.
The A-bomb is the West's
best answer to the mass ar-
mies of the Soviet Union and
Its satellites. ,.
By agreelngtto atom* con-
trols without .Similar curbs on
conventional %eapons, ^fftdnls
here believe they would be giv-
ing up one of their best guar-
antees against attack.
This country already has dis-
tributed in the United Nations
at
li
id
copies of a specific flve-poin
program on how the worl
should reduce its atomic an
conventional arms.
Among other things, It pro-
vides for a complete census of
the armed forces of all nations
followed by systematic reduc-
tions on a fair basis.
It likewise would call for In-
ternational Inspection of all
weapons something Russia
always has opposed in the past
Colombian Frigate
Returns to Balboa
After Year In Korea
The Colombian Frigate Almi-
rante Padilla returns here to-
i morrow after more than one
[year of service with the u. 8.
; Seventh Fleet In the fight a-
; gainst Communist aggression in
'Korea, under the flag of the
United Nations.
The Padilla, which galled
from Balboa for Korea on Nov.
3. 1B0, will arrive at Balboa
around l p.m. and dock at Pier
I Rodman.
The vessel will be met by
Leopoldo Borda Roldan, Colom-
bian Charge d'Affalres, and re-
presentatives of the U. 8. Arm-
ed Forces stationed in the Ca-
nal Zone.
While the frigate Is here, her
officers and men will be grant-
ed shore leave and liberty. She
will begin the northbound tran-
sit through the canal at g a.m.
next Wednesday morning.
Pakistan Says Weit
Mint Favor Arabs
CAIRO. March 13 (UP) The
Pakistan Embassy said today
that the Western Powers can-
not expect suecess in their Mid-
dle East defense plans unless
they settle Arab-Israeli differ-
ences "lsi akmagjneB that would
satisfy the ffpdafeeltal demands
of the Arab* parjlcjllarly "
The etnblss.vfttliement was!
intended to eliminate what lt|
called "misapprehension" result-
ing from the declaration made
at a press conference in Cairo
February 27 by Zafrullah Khan.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
an 1 y***
II Tieeli Av*. CU. 8-2tM
Cristobal Chapter
Local 900, Meets
Tomorrow Night
The Cristobal Chapter of Lo-
cal 800. O.CE.O.C.-C.I.O. will
meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at
How To Hold
FALSE TEETH
More Firmly in Place
Do your fill* teeth enro end em-
barra* by (llppine, droppins or wob-
bling when you eat. laugh or talk* Just
pi-Ingle little rASTTETH on vour
Dletes. This alkaline (non-acid 1 powder
holds false teeth more firmly and more
comfortably. No gummy, gooey, pastv
taste or feeling. Does not our. Check
"piste tssor" {enture breeuit. Get ?AS-
TEETH today at any drug atora.
La Importadora Selecta
COLON, A. P.
Bolivar Avo. #7081 between 7th and 8th Street*
Telephone 271-L
Is plearied to announce the opening of their
establishment where they have a big and as-
sorted Mock of shoemaking articles and up-
holstering materials in plastic and nylon
for the benefit of customers on the Atlantic
side, especially Canal Zone residents who
we inform that our prices are lower than
the Commissary prices for similar mate-
rials. You are cordially invited to visit our
store.
trS.lt dur:w,,htbody"nor
Romanian Flyers Flee
Red Homeland 'Terror'
BELGRADE, March IS (OP)
Five Romanian flyere landed
here in a Helnkel bomber today
and asked for asylum because of
"the intolerable terror which
reigns In Romania."
lng will be a complete report on
the progress of the legislative re-
tirement fund campaign.
Other important items on the
agenda include a report on the
March 9 session of the executive
board and addresses from Ed-
ward A Oaskin. president of Lo-
cal W0. and Ed K. Welsh. CIO
international representative.
Isthmian Medics
Will Meet Tuesday
The Medical Association of the
Isthmian Canal Zone will meet
PARAKEFT CHIRPS BEDTIME Tuesday. March II, at 7:0 p.m.
in the Corsas Memorial Labor-
WILLIMANSET. Mass. (UP) atory ln Panama City
The precocious parakeet owned A progfram of lectures will be
by Mrs. Genevieve Ralthel is' presented by the Eye. Ear Nose
ree to fly around her bouse all and Throat and Obstetrical Oy-
'ay and is caged only at bedtime neeolov Clinics of Gprgas Hos-
.hen it chirps: "Goodnight" 'pital.
HX
Household Exchange
If we didn't toll you our
furniture was second hand
you'd think it was now!
Chairs........from COO
Upholstered Chairs
from...........32.50
Bods (with Spring A
mattress) from...22.50
Tables........from 7.50
Buffets....... 26.00
And many other bargains.
SPECIAL
Brand new Bamboo Bar
with Wall Mirror and two
Stools..........$178.00
(We pay spot cash for
your old furniture).
#41 Automobile Row
Tl. 3-4911
USED CARS
at
WHOLESALE PRICES
RECONDITIONED TO GIVE
DEPENDABLE SERVICE
Finance Available Liberal Terms
1948 P0NTIAC Streamliner 4-Dr. Sedan
Hydrsmitic, Radio, Seat Cover.
1949 OLDSMOBILE "74" DU. 4.Dr. Sedan
Hydranatk, Radio, Seat Covers.
1949 OLDSMOBILE "76" DU. Club Sedan
Hydramatic, Seat Cover.
1949 PACKARD 4-Dr. Sedan
Overdrive, Seat Covers, WSW Tire.
1910 STUDEBAKER Champion Rejal Mi. 5-P.
Cmbc. Radio, Leather.
ALSO MANY OTHER NICE SELECTIONS.
COME IN AND SEE THEM AT
PANAMA AUTO, S.A.
OLDSMOBILE DEALER
Ave. Jaste Areeessvena A Cau> SO Phone I-75
(Near Olysaplc Swimming Pool) Panam


THURSDAY, MARCH 1!, WSX
-_
T "
fH* PANAM*. AMtrttCA* 4* iNPEPENtJtNT 1>AHT fftWSPAPKB "*""*
i !-
".....- i
MOB BOTH
^/itltxtic ^>ocieti
&, 195, Q*l** OiLfkmt (JmtmM 378
VAREWF.LL TEA FOR MRS. BALAY
The quarter* of the commanding officer of'the Coeo Solo
Nival SUtloa was tilt scene of n elaborte tea Tuesday
afternoon, given by Mrs. L. L. Koepke and Mrs. T. L. Apple-
o 1st to honor Mrs. P. L. Balay, who hi leaving soon for the
* MM. Balaya husband, Lt. Commander Balay, has roMiv-
eo his ardors to report for duty In Tokyo, Japan, and the
family will hare a 3-day leave in the States before hlo de-
oarture.
The friends who attended the ten of the American Revolution,
will piy host to their Pacific
Bide sisters on Saturday for the
regular spring meeting of the
organisation.
The meeting will be held at
the "'ome of Mrs. R. W. Rubel-
11, House 611 8econd Street, In
the De Lessep Area, at 2:30 p.m.
All ladies eligible for member-
ship in the organisation are cor-
dially invited to attend.
Informal Morning Coffea
Mrs. Ralph Graham of Gatun
was hostess at an Informal morn-
ing coffee for members of her
sewing club Tuesday.
The members who attended
included Mrs Sam Mauldln, Mrs.
Wallace Thrift, Mrs. T. W. Fels,
and Mrs. Lee
tea gave the honoree a silver
Guatemalan wedding chain as a
farewell present.
The tea table was centered
with silver pheasants and a flo-
ral arrangement of red slnnias.
Mrs. J. J. Jackson and Mrs. L.
J. Ducote, presided at the coffee
and tea services.
The guests were: Mrs. Charles
C. Yanquell, Mrs A T Bollens,
Mrs. H. H. Chandler, Mrs. O.
J. Ellis, Jr.. Mrs. P. D. Fitch,
Mrs. W. L. Hall. Mrs. Davis
Henderson, Mrs. LB. Jennings.
Mrs. M. L. Leahy, Mrs. C. L
Luoas. Mrs F. V. Moore. Mr.
R. J. Patterson,Mrs. W. D. Ro-
nayne. MrS. I. M. Rowell. Jr..
Mr*. W. E. Bands.
Also Mrs. H. R. Thomas. Jr.,:Mrs. Carl Nix
Mrs. W E Thom won, Mrs G, Nash. .
L Wallace Mrs. H. E. Walther A round robin letter was writ-
arid her house guest. Mrs. H. H. ten Mrs. Fred Willoughby who
Hartland Mrs. Fred Wroble.'ls a patient in the Colon hospl-
Mrs. Phoebe Kellv. Mrs. L. J.|tal.
Unslcker. Mrs. W. N. Horlrk.
Mrs A L Smith. Mrs. T N Mrs. Ashton Visitor In Balboa
Curry, Mrs. J. R. Danlv, Mrs. Mrs. N. W. Ashton was the
F A. Kraft Jr.. Mrs. R Niel- recent guest of her mother. Mrs.
sen Mrs. EL. Hamon. Mrs. L.1 Mildred B. Pate, of Gamboa.
H. Pratt and Mrs. James J. Ou-; The visitor was on the Pacific
ble.
ta, with Mrs. Milton Cookson
and Mrs. Malnert Peterson as
co-hostesses.
Mrs. O. E. Jorstad. president,
conducted the meeting. Mrs.
Peterson gave a talk on "Art
Songs" and accompanied Mrs,
Milton Cookson. who sang sever-
al selections.
The group of songs Included:
Brahm's "Cradle Bong," "Where
My Song With Wmgs Provided,
Hahn: "When Love Is Kind."
"Passing By," Purcell; "Sleep
Little Jesus. Boy," McOlmsey;
"Such a LJ'l Follow," Dlchmot;
and "Ich Liebe Dlch," Orleg.
The other members who at-
tended-were Mrs. John Purvis,
'.Ira. H. P. Bevington, Mrs. J.
F. Meehan.Mrs. William Clute,
Mrs. William CaasweU and Mrs.
George Engelke.
IN HOLLYWOOD
BT ERSKINE JOHNSON
C.P.O. Wives Club Meeting
The O P.O. Wives Club of the
Coco Solo Naval Station held
their regula- business meeting
Tuesdav at the Club. Plans were
made for a charity bingo to be
hell at the club March 24.
It was de-lded to hold the "get
acquainted" morning coffees ev-
ery three mcnths.
St. Patrick's theme was used
Sid to be with Mr. Ashton, who
underwent surgery In Gorgas
Hospital.
Junior College Play at CHS.
Saturday night will mark the
sntic Side production of the
Canal Zone Junior college come-
dy, "The Whole Town's Talking,"
by Anita Loos. The show will be
given at the Cristobal High
School auditorium, with the one
performance sponsored by the
Student Association of the high
school.
All seats are reserved and tick-
ets will be on sale at the box of-
fice of the high school.
Music for the overture will be
furnished by the high school or-
chestra under the direction of
O. I. Jorstad.
Miss Donahue Receive* Honor
Miss Elinor Donahue, daugh-
ter of Mr, and Mrs. William A.
Donahue of Curundu, was chos-
en from her class to represent
St. John Low? Island City Hos-
pital at 'a nursing education
meeting in New York this week.
Miss Donahue formerly resld-
in the table decorations and re-1 ed In Gatun and Fort Oulick
freshments. which were served and graduated from Cristobal
bv the hostesses. Mrs. Elsie'Hir-
sher. Mrs. Ima Jones, Mrs. Fran-
ces Sterner and Mrs. Helen Sus-
tae.
D.A.R Spring Meeting
In Cristobal
Atlantic Side members
High School In 1990. She is com-
pleting her second year of nurs-
es'training.
Mondav Musicale
Holds Monthly Meeting
The Monday Musicale held Its
of the monthly meeting at the home of
Lift Up your Hearts
Panama Canal Chapter, Daugh-Mrs. A. A. Rankin in Margarl-
TROPICAL
TODAY
Sally FORREST- Richard STAPIEY
knaps h OR WOW H* b Wl tm Nati b III
IIMUWJIQMIMMKW
'^J^si^oWsjs^si^eja'^ig^fjjp^gp olaBjoV ^BqpiiBF
(A Lenten featnre of The Pan-
ami American, preparad by the
Rev. M. A. Cookson, Episcopal
Church of Oar Saviour, New
Cristobal.)

GOO THE FATHER

"If ye had known me, y e
should have known my Father
also.' Read St. John 14:6-14.
a e
When we have come to know
Christ we have come to know
God, because God was showing
Himself to men In Christ. He
could not show us all of Himself
because He fills the whole uni-
verse and there Is much of what
i He Is and what He does that we
cannot understand. But all that
we can know of Him He reveals
to us in Christ.
. In Christ He makes complete-
ly clear to us for the first time
just what He la really like and
just what He wanta us to be like.
From what Christ said and did
wo learn that God la our Father,
and that means first of all that
He made us.
He did not make us as a ear-
Cienter makes a chair or a Jewel-
er makes a ring. He did no
make us to be things that He
could own tout to be children
who would grow up to bo like
Him.
Of course, children cannot
know all that their fathers know
or do all that their fathers do,
but fathers and children can be
friends and companions and they
can do many things together.
In Just the same way, though
God's power and knowledge are
way beyond us, we are still His
children, who were made in His
likeness, made to know Him and
to work with Him and to love the
things which He loves. Look up
Romans 8:14, 16, IT.
"Breathe on me, Breath of
God,
Fill me with life anew,
That I may love what Thou
dost love.
And do what Thou wouldst
do."
200 To Graduate
Tomorrow Morning
At Gulick Theater
Approximately 200 graduates
1 will assemble at the Fort Gulick
Theater tomorrow morning to I
Umax the U8ARCARIB School's
:4th commencement exercises.
The graduates Include students
from the meas administration,
unit supply. Military Police, ra-
llo operators and non-commls-
ioned officer's leadership school I
courses.
The program is expected to
;begin at 9:30 a.m. and will fea-,
ture an address to the graduat-
ing class by Col. Robert P. Al-
exander, commanding officer.
370th Engineer Amphibious Shore
Regiment.
Others participating in the ex-
ercise will be Col. Henry F. Tay-
j lor. commanding officer, Atlan-
itic Sector; Lt. Col. Myron D.
Smith, commandant. USARCA-
RIB School and Chaplain Ralph
C. Wilson, Atlantic Sector.
The USARCARIB School,
which consists of six divisions,
offers specialised military train-
ing for officers and enlisted men
of the United States and Latin
American nations.
Provost Marshol
General Arrive
Here On Inspection
Major Oeneral Edwin P Park-
er. Provost Marshal General of
the U.S. Army, will arrive in the
Canal Zone tonight on the first
stop of a tour of military install-
ations of the Caribbean Com-
mand.,
He will be accompanied bv Lt.
Col. John F. Cox. chief of the
Plans and Operations Division.
Office of Provost Marshal Oen-
eral
Parker and oox will Inspect
nrovost marshal end militerv rx>-
lice activities In the Canal Zone
nd denart Monday 'or a similar
in inaction at the military pasts
In Puerto Rico.
HOLLYWOOD. (NEA) Guys
and Dolls: Sylvia Sidney, still
younger than many reigning
movie queens, told me: "I finally
got age-up enough to play a
character part In Hollywood."
The big-eyed star who was at
her film peak two decades ago is
Elaying Fantlne in Fox's "Les
Itaerablea" and denies come-
back plans with:
"I come out and haunt Holly-
wood every few years."
Back in 1931, Sylvia played the
factory girl who gets pushed In-
to the lake In Theodore Dreiser's
"An American Tragedy." She's
unable t comment on Shelley
Winters' acting in the same role
in "A Place In the Sun."
"I didn't see the new version,"
Sylvia confessed, "ana" I didn't
see the one I waa in, either. Some
actresses have a proprietary tool-
ing about the relee they've play-
ed. When I finish a part, I'm
through with It."
"I want to know all there is to
know about television. I want to
become a real knowledgeable
man In the field."
Bddle Albert gave this as hi
reason for accepting a million-
dollar deal as the star of a local
Hollywood marathon daytime
show-4n which he's called upon
to munch his sponsors' cookies
and cheese. Indulge m homey
chatter and pitch in with com-
mercials.
"Fred Allen," Eddie said, "once
cracked that lt may well be that
the television comedian of the
future will limply pull up a chair
and talk casually to people. I
think he was righter than he
thought."
Eddie's contract allows him to
make movies, produce document-
aries for his own production
company and even star in dra-
matic TV shows in his annual
two-month vacation period.
Black, Is a wonderful person.
They belong to the Navy club In
Washington and see mostly Na-
vy people.
'Shirley does her own work
around her home in Maryland.
She has no help at all and that's
: the way she wants it. When she
and her husband go out for an
evening, they hire a baby sitter
Ijvit. like everybody else.
"tne doesn't miss Hollywood
and she doesn't miss being a
' star."
Radio Programs
Your Community Stotion
HOG-840
Whore 100.(100 People Moot
Presents
I SIMTJI
SIMULTANEOUS
RELEASE!
Mario Lansa and Kathryn
Grayson may admit to a crack-
ing feud, but not Tony Curtis
and Piper Laurie.
There are whispers that Tony
and Piper, co-starring tor the
third time. In "Almost Married,"
hate to play those love scenes.
I quizzed Piper, who shrugged:
"iSre known Tony for a long
time, even before I came to I'l.
AH this fend talk la started by
Ctopic who jost get bored and
ave to Invent things. We're
friendsat least I think we are."
Tony tossed an "It's ridiculous"
to me and added:
"I guess that It's more roman-
tic for co-stars to fight. Pipers
a very sweet and talented girl."
Ballroom
Today, Thnraday, Mar. II
M.
30Music for Thursday
00Panamuica Story Tim
16Negro Spirituals
30What's Your Favorite
00Linda's First Love Cla.
Alfaro, S.A.
16Evening Salon
00Make Believe
tVOAi
30BLUE RIBBON
REVIEW
45Jam Session
00World News and Com-
mentary (VOA)
15-Arts and Letters (VOA)
30Radio University (VOAi
45C o m m e n t ator's Digest
(VOA)
00Emma (BBC)
30Take It from Here (BBC)
TODAY!
Regalar Admlaatn
Prices: M.60
LUX
3:60, S:M, 7:90, 9M
Also Showing At Th<
CECILIA
3:60, 1:66. 7:66, 9:60
mission!
G3
THE MOST AMAZING SCREEN ADVENTURE...!!!
IT WILL THRILL YOUNG AND OLD ALIKE ..!
Shirley Temple doesn't miss
one single palm tree or kleig
light In Hollywood, a studio hair-
dresser told me. and I believe lt.
I believe It because movie coif-
fure experts often know more
about a glamor queen than her
hubby or psychiatrist.
Pretty, trim Annabelle Levy,
who once fussed with Shirley's
looks at the studios, went to
Washington, DC with MOMs
"Mr. Congressman" troupe. She
spent an afternoon with the ex-
chlld star and reports:
"Shirley never looked prettier
than she does new. There never
was more expression in her face.
Her husband, Commander Chas.
It's something that television
historians aren't talking about,
but there's a battle going on be-
tween movie queens who are
plunging into live TV and the
powder-puff boys who are as-
signed to make them beautiful
for the home screens.
The Hollywood sirens are hold-
ing eat for their own grease-
paint idea, Ann Sheridan tipped
me off, and the video makeup
esperte are howling.
Ann has been leading the of-
fensive since she faced the TV
cameras back in i960 She told
me while on UI's "Just Across
i the Street" set:
"I Just did the Kate Smith and
Ken Murray show. They tried toi
eive me that dark, horrible1
, make-up, but I got wise to that
years ago. My own screen make-
Up Is better. Those boys raised
Hades with me. They screamed
like squabbling cats. I said:
" "This Is what I'm going to
wear, fellas,' and that was that."
La Sheridan never tights with
TV otoctri&ians. though.
"Thev'ee done a pretty swell
Job of lighting me." she admit-
ted "The way I look on TV
proves that they can five you
good lighting if they want to."
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
ll:Q0The Owl's Nest
13:00Sign Off
Friday, Mar: 14
It's Movhtime TONIGHT!
.
[Panama Canal cJneaters
BALBOA
Alr-C'anSnbtiMS
CIS S:S
Robert MITCHUM Jane RUSSELL
'HIS KIND OF WOMAN!"
frUay "OLIVE*
m A ill n UTC "' fLYNN 0 Viveca LINDfORS
.?. .2 "ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN"
f n*y "kind laoy"_________
COCOLI
SilS 7:M
Richard CONT O Julia ADAMS
'THE HOLLYWOOD STORY"
frlSay "INDIAN TERRfTOHT"
(fTMeyt
Dennis MORGAN Virginia MAYO
HDRC MIGUEL
in a s=i pointing tho Clouds with Sunshino
"gTa MBOA "MADONNA OF THE DESERT"
0
1:0
an
NORTH or THE GRRAT OIVIDB"
frlelay "fORT WORTH"
GAT UN
IMS
irrMav
Ray Mn.LAND Gane TIERNEY
"CLOSE TO MY HEART"
MARGARITA
:1S S:J5
Vivien LEIGH o Marlon BRANDO
"STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE"
frlday "CRHT Of CONVICT LAKE"
CBISTOBAL
Ak-CooOHtoan
IS t:N
Eleanor PARKS Anthony DIXTRR
"VALENTINO" (Ttchnicolor)
frUar "Ma fa KerMe Rack On The farm"
JUL-0-PEP
C. 0. MASON, S.A.
P.O. Box 893
Panam City
A Coln
( arofulty soloeRMl-Righ iie iagrWiaauwita aosermal
rutadas ata oUaMrslsasako
M-O-Pop Lsvt" Mae* fully
afapaoidiaSlr for op ogg P*-
dacRsNi oad few koopiaa vmw
kan ia aaroog physical con-
dition atoadsrd body
WTVe*S-0-R>ep AVI ON
PUDPtANsMvatioa toe high
SModaacttM oabamat-
Oer.gai-tWioaax.Yo.
cHrdroi rol-O-Fai laging.
Hub (or aaore eggo-ooe! te-
gooats.
by Tho Chjohsr OajH Co poor
Aoh #or ol-O-v'op Powliry foodiop oldo-M's frool
8:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Request Salon
;15New! (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
II: 00News
9:15Come and Oet It
8:30As I See It
10:00News
10:06Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
P.M,
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00New
1:1.Personality Parade
1:48American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Band
3:00All Star Concert Hall,
3:15The Little Show
3:30Muslo for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club (VOA)
4:30 What's Tour Favorite
8:00Linda's Plrt Lov Ola.
Alfaro, S.A.
8:15 Request Salon
7:00Adventures of
Hannory (BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News. Commentary
(Voice of America)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Comment atora Digest
(VOA)
9:00Short Story Theatre
(VOA
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Ad ventures ot PC 49
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00amSign Of
Bxplanstlen of gym bola
VOAVole* of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting Corp.
RDFRadlodlffusion Francaise
Anne FRANCIS^
CiSfeBICKFORO '
/.iiiiamLUNDIGANfe
a Oapewteiean MjaVireai tmrnttummi
FrrtWrtfiiUI rtovyUKTE* BenTSJrR
Dog Tired Dave!
David was a busy fellow.
hopping never left htm Bellow!
Worn ant. weaiy. tired and bravo.
(TtiT Ret read owr Want AAa. DrvoT


r.r.F eight
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

THURSDAY, MARCH il 1952
I >'
Yanks' Billy Martin Suffers Broken Right Anide
Pitcher Glenn Elliott
Of 'Nats' Also Injured
By United Press
ST. PETERSBURG, March 13.The New York
; Yankees have lost the infielder they hoped would
: fill the shoes of Marine bound Gerry Coleman.
Pepper-pot Billy Martin suffered two broken
: bones in his right ankle yesterday at St. Petersburg
and will be out of action for six weeks. Martin
injured the.ankle while performing for pictures
; to be used on a future Joe DiMaggio television
; program.
The Yankees had counted on
Martin taking over at third base.
; That would have let Oil McDou-
gald move over to second as a re-
Elacement for Coleman who Is
lng recalled by the Marines.
With Martin Injured, rookie An-
dy Carey shapes up as the num-
ber one candidate for the hot
corner spot in the World Cham-
'. pions' lineup.
The Yankees took the field
without Martin and beat the De-
trolt Tigers, 4-1, for their fourth
' Grapefruit League victory In five
: tries.
Rookie southpaw Bill Miller
; worked five Innings for the
Yanks and held Detroit to four
safeties. Art Houtteman left in
. the fifth Inning with the loss.
jr" Another accident took place
: in the Washington camp at
Orlando, but it was less seri-
' ous than the Martin injury.
. Pitcher Glenn Elliott was
struck a glancing blow on the
! head from a ball hit by Mickey
Vernon. Elliott complained of a
alight headache but prellmln-
t ary examinations failed to
show any serious injury. He is
expected to pitch against the
St. Louis Cardinals on Friday.
The Senators also learned they
can forget about Bob Rosa for
some me. The promising youth
southpaw has received word to
report atFullerton, California, on
March 25 for a hitch In the
Army.
At West Palm Beach. Manager
Jimmy Dykes named the two
southpaws and a right-hander
who will work for the Philadel-
phia A's against the Yankees.
The lefties are Alex Kellner and
Morrle Martin. Dick Fowler Is
the right-hander.
Genera] Manager Art Ehlers of
the A's did some limb climbing
yesterday.
"I think we're going to win
the pennant," predicted Ehlers.
"I'll be able to remind everyone
in October that I was the only
man in the world to predict the
winner correctly. Of course," he
grinned. "If by some chance we
don't win, I'll forget the predic-
tionand so will everybody else."

Cafe Duran
Tourney In
Second Round
P.M. A. To Select Panamanian
Entrant For Motorbike Races
I Jr. Class Captures BUS
Intramural Track Meet i
---- o -----
With a record number of 1541 Results of the Interclass meet:
boys entered In the Balboa High! 70 Yd HH-Abbott Sr Deg-
Intramural track meet, the two-:?naar (Sr. Snchez (Fr.), But-
day carnival was completed yes- ler, l80!*-1- 7. ,Qh > vcQt
terriftv on the Balboa Stadium 1W Yd^May (Soph.), Mata
The Caf Duran tournamen
for "chambones" at the Panam
Golf Club is in the second rount
and matches In this stanza art
to be completed by Sunday.
First round results:
UPPER BRACKET
Raul Gasteazoro (16) defeated
Jim Braid (15) 3-up.
George Dilfer (22) defeated
Bruce Carpenter (17).
Rogelio de Paredes (30) defeat-
ed Alfredo Alemn, Jr. (19).
Carlos Bermdez (25) beat
Roberto Alemn (30) 3-up.
L. Romagosa, Jorge Mendoza.
A. Carrizo and Charles Howell all
won by default.
LOWER BRACKET
Pepe Oiler (30) edged Paul Du-
ran (16) 1-up.
Johnny Palm (23) defeated W.
H. Doel (17) 1-up.
Miguel Monzo (19) beat Phil
Wade (18) 3-up.
V. J. Matthews (15) downed
Adolfo Arias (24) 1-up.
John Westman (15) defeated
Jorge Boyd (25) 3-up.
Miguel Arbaiza, W. Y. Boyd
won by default and Marcelino
Monzo drew a bye.
*_ .- .^k OFF AND RUNNINGBill Nicholson, veteran Philadelphia Phil-
Ine one second round match Ues, ouMleider, watches the ball sail for a safe hit as he breaks
already completed^ L. Romagosa for flrst Dage urIng batting practice session at the club's spring
training camp at Clearwater, Fla. Handling the catching chores
is backstop Del Wllber. (NBA Teiephoto)
defeated R. G. de Paredes.
33rd Cops Sixth
In Row To Retain
PAF League Lead
PANAMA ARMED FORCES
BASEBALL LEAGUE
STANDINGS
(Jr.), Albrltton (Sr.), Von Chong 504th FA
(Ft.), Dawson (Jr.). Time 10.5.
Mile Ranson (Sr.), Tribe (Jr.),
Snchez (Fr.). Time 4:52.5.
449 Yd. RelayJuniors, Sen-
iors, Freshmen. Time 48.9.
441, RunJenkins (Jr.V, Star-
terday on the Balboa Stadium
track. The Junior Class won the
championship with a total of
881-3 points, followed by the
Seniors with 77 5-6, Freshmen
With 651-2, and Sophomores
with 62 1-2.
Bob Ranson, remarkable mller,
was the only record Breaker o,bird jFr.) Shlrerr (SophjK Row-
the day. when he .scampered the ^J^tX WldeU (Jr.). Time 56.0.
four-lap event in the time of' 119 LHArmistead <">.AD"
4:52.5. This Is a new Intramural I bott (Sr.). Degenaar (Sr.) But-
meet record, a new BHS School I ler (Soph.), Raybourne (Fr.).
record, and also betters the rec-;Time 13.6.
ognized Interscholastlc record. It I Shot PutCotton (Jr.), Hen-
Is doubtful, however, if it can be derson (Soph.). Jones (Jr.). Alt-
accepted as an Interscholastlc man (Sr.), Crltch (Soph.). DB-
record due to the fact this was tance: 36 ft. 3 in.
not a regular Interschool meet.1 886 Yds.Ranson (Sr.iNIck-
Ranson also won the half mile.;!sher (Jr.). Prez (Fr.), StevenS|
and then ran a lap on the second! (Fr.. Time 2:16.1.
place mile relay team for a Broad JumpMay i Soph >,
mischty fine afternoon's work. Rowley (Jr.. Blacknall (Fr.),
It took sophomore Jimmy May 1 Mcllhenny (ST.), Abbott (Sr.).
to walk off with individual hon-| Distance: 19 ft. 6 in.
ore. however. May was the day's i
onlv triple winner, taking the 100 22 Yds.M ata (Jr., von
,'ln 10.5. the broad jump with a Chong (Fr.. Dlllman (Sr.i.Zurn-
leap of 19 ft. 6 in., and the high|bado (Fr.). G. Smith (Sr.>. Time
Jump with 5 ft. 9 In. 24.9.
The Balboa High track team is I DiscusTie between Fulton
beginning to round Into shape,! (Soph.i and Davidson 'Sr.\ Al-
and with the termination of the brltton (Sr.i. Nickisher (Jr.),
baseball season some time next Henderson (Soph.). Distance 111
week, they will be at full feet.
strength for the meets to come.1 ,
Their next competition will be. High JumpMay (Soph.\
.the annual Inter Squad meet,IMontovanl (Fr. Butler (Soph.,
and then on the 27 of this month I Sears (Soph., tie between Pea-
;thev will have a meet with the cher (Jr.). Elton (Sr.,
. Athletic Club. Albrook AFB. and I (Soph. < Height 5 ft. 9 In.
the 504th FA. This should be one i Pole VaultTie between Pea-
lo! the outstanding meets of the cher (Jim, Corn Sr. Bell
season for local fans, and will i (Soph.. Sears (Soph., Myers
;glve a'l teams a chance to see! (Jr.. Height 8 ft. 6 in.
lust what thev have for the Bal-1 Mile RelayJuniors. Seniors,
boa Relavs slated for the night Sophomores, Freshmen.
lot April 18. 14:01.5.
TEAM
33d Infantry
Won Lost Pet.
6 0
6 1
370th EASR......5 2
Albrook........4 2
Coco Solo......4
45th Battalion.... 4 t
Atlantic Sector. ..2 4
West Bank......2' 4
903d AAA......t 4
Corotal........2 5
Special Troops.... 2 5
764th AAA......I 5
Signal........1
1.000
.857
.667
.667
.667
.333
.333
.333
.285
.285
.285
.143
On The Alleys...
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
Coco Solo 12, Special Troops 2.
45th IS, 784th 2.
33d 7, 370th 4.
Albrook 17, Corozal 4.
At. Sector 3, Signal 2.
504th 14, West Bank II.
HOMA INCREASES LEAD AS
STEMPEL DROPS THREE TO
7461st AU SIGNAL KEGLERS
The H. I. Homa team not-
withstanding a two-point loss
to the fourth place Angelini
team in Major League play at
the Diablo Heights bowling
lanes Tuesday night, increased
its lead to six points with but
four more weeks of play re-
.. mainlng, when the Max R.
" Stempel keglers, minus the ser-
vices of Marabella, dropped two
games and plnfall to the 7461st
AU Signal boys from Corozal.
The Homa team had a rough
time with the Angelini outfit
as the Uquormen copped the
first game by 925 to 884 when
Ray Walker matched strikes
for a fine 232 game. Homa had
the second game in its pock-
et until after the second man
had bowled for Angelini in the
final frame, but the last three
men on the liquor team dou-
bled out and took the game by
a score of 951 to 91 to put the
Homa boys In the whole. The
third game, however, was a
walkaway for the tllemen who
scored a good 953 to 871, thus
taking the final game and pln-
The 3d Infantry succeeded in fall by only 5 pins
setting back one of its top chai-1 MearwnUe, the stempel
lengers In the Panama Armed'
in-
mo surancemen were also having a
Forces Baseball League by tie- ,.ough tlme wlth the 746st AU
feating the 370th EASR JJJ { fflgnakni. Stempel took the
yesterday for Its sixth stralgnt; flrst game by a score of 866 to
win without a defeat during tne,85))j dropped the second by only
second round of play. The 370tn 8 plns and the thlrd by a gcore
was tied for second place witn of 032 ^ 552.
. for
only one defeat prior to yester-
day's contest.
Boyd Bros,
across with
keglers came
three-point win
The 504th Field Artillery Bat- over Almacenos Martlnz, drop-
talion took over sole possession
of second place, tight on the
heels of the leading Infantry-
Beiimen, by edging out West Bank
in a slugfest 14 to 11. The 504th
victory was its sixth in a row
after dropping Its first game of
the second round to the 33d.
Albrook, winner of the first
round of play, continued on the
trail after dropping
Time
. comeback .
two early contests by scoring a
one-sided 17 to 4 victory over scored a 601, his
Corozal. In other games played series In as many
La Moda Americana

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SKIRTS
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Lady Marlene"
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latest styles for girls.
ping the first game, but win-
ning the next two and plnfall.
Ted Melanson knocked out a
256 high game for the night to
aid in the victory.
In the flnnl match of the
evening, the Fuerza y Luz boys
took four noints from Local 595,
NFFE, with Bill Jamison lead-
ing the parade with a 6 2 for
the gashousers. followed by
Melt Eady of the Local who
third 600
nights of
Wednesday Coco Solo trounced play.
Special Troops 12 to 2, the 45th Ray Walker had high series
^mTfarTw^e %& to %* rasnlts of the play:
victory in five of the six games
played Wednesday as the 504th -..,."
was the only visiting team able >*
to come out with a win on ^-f^Xlser
elgn soil. In the other five garaw,**"
played, the home team was the oieD0n
victor. '
Signal will play host to Coro-
zal Saturday while all other
carnes will be played on Sunday
afternoon. The schedule has Al-
brook at Coco Solo, 33d Infantry .
at Atlantic Sector. 45th Battalion!g^,,
at West Bank, 764th AAA at 903d waUce-
Best
I. HOMA CO.
176 171 226
188
211
162
183
100
184
154
200
224
180
180
163
884 915
Jamison
Thomas
Allen
Norrls
Engelke
FUERZA Y LUZ
235
152
144
172
178
201
152
180
177
205
176
164
171
163
178
612
468
495
512
561
881 915 852 2648
ALMACENES
Damin,
Burrell
Damin,
Owesne
(Blind)
154
171
179
153
153
MARTINZ
213 223 590
172
165
153
153
175
181
153
153
518
525
459
459
824 876 881 2581
Morton
Dalley
Bowen
Melanson
Schneider
BOYD BROS. INC.
l7
174
164
135
182
204
188
256
194
190
125
191
183
247
556
460
553
603
576
194 1024 936 2754
Olson To Try
For Upset Win
Against 'Sugar'
Challenger Carl "Bobo" Ol-
son, of Honolul, believes he
has a good chance of staging
an upset tonight. Olson meets
Middleweight King Sugar Ray
Robinson in a lS-round, title
bout at San Francisco.
Both Sugar Ray and Olson
are reported in ton condition
after winding up their heavy
training. It will be Robinson's
first fight since he knocked out
Randy Turpln last September
when he regained his crown.
The Robinson-Olson boni
has been postponed three times
twice because of injuries to
Robinson and once because of
illness of Sugar Ray's mother.
Ray is so confident of victory
that he has already signed for
title defenses against Rocky
Graziano and Paddy Young.
He b also negotiating for a
crack at Light-Heavyweight
Champion Joey Maxim's 175-
pound diadem.
Robinson Is a heavy 3-to-l
favorite.
The newly formed Panam Mo-
torcycle Association is selecting
a Panamanian entrant for the
Panam motorcycle champion-
ship, to be decided under lights
at the Olympic Stadium March
21.
So far Isthmian motorbike rac-
ing honors have pretty well all
gone to Canal Zone riders. .
There seems no special reason1
for this, as the Americans have)
enjoyed no advantages in the
matter of choosing and tuning |
their machines, and racing prac-
tice.
The Panam Motorcycle Asso-
ciation is to groom its best rider
as yet unselectedto ride a
B8A in the championship.
With Canal Zone riders aboard,
BSAs have proved themselves to
be regular winners in all classes
of races since motorcycle racing
hit top gear as an Isthmian
; sport. The Panamanian chosen
should have every chance.
Additional attraction at the
championship meet will be a 125
cc race with three Panamanian
entrants.
Panam Motorcycle Association
speedsters are out to catch op
the leeway a slow start has im-
posed on them in the scramble
for the speed honors of the Isth-
mus.
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Navy Ordnance. .. 6
Army QM......4
Commissary.....5
Ctral Labor Office 5
Corozal Sales Store 3
Post Office......3
Army Signal .... 1
Building Division.. 1
Electrical Division 0
Kobbe Sales Store.
AAA. and 370th EASR at 504th.
Fight Results
(Tuesday Night) ___
LOS ANGELES Bobby Why,
129'--, Los Angeles, topped Torn- Sayion
Walker
Jenner
Andrews
ANGFLivr
176 176
179 148
232 203
17? 230
166 197
925 951
746ST AU SIGNAL
La Moda Americana
102 Central Avenue Panam.
fieryfeodyftg&Jd Classified
Shattuck
Hudak
Coolev
Madeline
my Baker. 129W. Johnstown. N.Y.
NEWARK, NJ.Jimmy Cham-
pagne, 149, Philadelphia, oat-
pointed Charlie Fnaari, 150, Irv-
ington, NJ. (8). M
SAN ANTONIO, Tex. M****
Trigo, 141, Monterrey, Mexico, waber
outpointed Freddie (Babe) Her- CoMeT
man. 138, Phoenix OW. IColston
MIAMI BEACHBill Neri. 141. Bn leer
Bridgeport. Conn, owspointed (Blind)
Norman Thompson, 148, Pater-1
son. NJ. (19).
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y,Charlie
.McGarrity. 127Vs. Brooklyn, out-
pointed Alex.Fnbrea,126,/2. Pho-
enix (8). _____
LONDON Johnny Williams.
1943. London, outpointed Jack
Gardner, London. 15 (for British
National and Empire Heavr-
weigfat title).
173
157
157
202
170
148
19S
196
190
211
216
17*
145
212
186
859 938 932 279
STEMPEL I SON
182 188 181 551
177 178 145 500
181 200 173 554
193 201 190 58
163 163 163 489
896 930 852 2678
LQCAL 595 NFFE
Kelsey 150 176 138 44
Nolan 178 161 139 478
Glelchman 169 181 150 500
Zebrock 140 200 180 529
Eady 222 189 190 601
868 807 797 25721
1 .857
1 .800
2 .714
2 .714
2 .600
2 .600
4 .200
4 .200
5 .WO
5 .09
NEXT GAMES
SaturdayCorozal Sales Store (
vs. CLO (3 p.m.); Kobbe Sales
Store vs. Building Div. (5 p.m.). |
SundayCommissary vs. Navy
Ordnance (9:39 a.m.).
MondayElectrical vs. Corozal
Sales (5 p.m.).
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost
Police............ 7 8
Sears............ 6 4
Lincoln Life........ 5 5
AFGE14.......... 5 5
Elks 1414.......... 5 5
Firemen.......... 2 8
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost
Elks 1414.......... 4 1
Sears............ 2 1
Lincoln Life........ 2 1
AFGE 14.......... 2 2
Firemen.......... 1 3
Police............ 1 4
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Police 8, Elks 6.
TODAY'S GAME
Firemen vs. Lincoln Life.
The cellar dwelling team of the
second half race. Police, knocked
the Elks 1414 from the unde-
feated ranks yesterday afternoon
by handing them an 8-8 setback.
The Coppers got off to a run-
ning start, pushing three runs
across In the very first Inning
and following up in the second
with three more runs to take a
6-0 lead.
The Elks pushed across one
run in the second and one run in
third and came within one run
of a tie when they scored three
runs on four hits In the fourth
inning.
Jimmy Lovelady, on the mound
for the Elks, blanked the Cop-
pers in the third and fourth in-
nings and his teammates tied the
game up In the top of the fifth
with one run on two hits.
However, the Police came back
In the bottom of the fifth with
three straight basehlts. Two er-
rors by the Elks accounted for
two runs and the ball game as
Owen Sutherland retired the
Lodgemen In the top of the
sixth.
Sutherland pitched all the way
for the Police, being nicked for
ten hits and six runs while send-
ing eight men back to the bench
via the strikeout route. His op-
ponent, Lovelady, gave up eight
runs on eight hits, striking out
three Police batsmen but his
teammates were guilty of five
miscues in the field that kept
him continually in hot water.
Pete Corrigan of the Police
made the best fielding play of
the game robbing Don Ryter of
a double with a hard running
catch In right center in the third
inning that put a stop to an Elk
uprising.
Bobby Barnes, Owen Suther-
land and Mike Crook led the
Coppers at the plate with each
man collecting two hits In three
trips to the plate. Terry Corri-
gan with two for two and Wally
Morton with two for three led
the Lodge Brothers at bat:
Today the Firemen and Lin-
coln Life will meet with Bruce
Bateman opposing either Johnny
Chase or Herby Schneider on the
pitching mound.
The box score:
Elks AB R H PO A
He.'e, rf...... 4 0 1 0 0
Kirkland, c .... 4 1 1 4 0
Lewis, lb...... 3 0 1 7 2
Ryter, ss...... 3 1 1 0 0
DesLondes, 2b .. 3 0 1 1 3
Lovelady, p .. .. 2 110 4
T. Corrigan, 3b.. 2 12 3 0
Morton, cf..... 3 1 2 0 0
Thompson, If .. 3 1 0 0 0
Totals........27 6 10 15 9
Police AB R H PO A
Coln, 2b...... 3 1 1 2 2
P. Corrigan, rf.. 3 1 1 2 0
B. Barnes, c .. .. 3 3 2 10 1
Sutherland, p. .. 8 2 2 0 1
Crook, cf...... 3 0 2 0 0
Kielhofer, ss.. .. 3 0 0 0 0
Pederson, 3b .. .. 3 0 0 0 2
Priest, lb...... 3 1 0 4 0
E. Corrigan, If .. # 3 0 t0 0 0
Totals........27 8 8 18 T
Score By Innings
Elks 0 113 1 06 10
Police 3 3 0 0 2 X8 8 1
Winning PitcherSutherland
(6-2). Losing PitcherLovelady
(1-2). Struckout bySutherlend
8, Lovelady 3. Base on Balls off-
Sutherland 2. Two Base Hits
Hele, Ryter. Sutherland, Barnes.
Left on BasesElks 5, Police 4.
DoubleplayLewla, T. Corrigan.
UmpiresPotter and Francis.
ScorerMead. Time of Game-
IMS.
LEADING HITTERS
AB H
Alfred Bowen (CLO) 21
R. Angermuller (C)
V.Wilson (AS).. ..
A. Foster (CLO). ..
F. Peralta (NO). ..
A. Porras (AS).. ..
O. Burrowea (PO)..
B. Sellman (PO) ..
M. Mussa (NO)....
C. Bynoe (CLO). ..
W. Oreenidge (E)..
R. Jemmott (PO) ..
L. Edghill (CLO) ..
16
18
25
24
17
29
19
19
22
17
17
20
Ave.
.714
.563
.556
.520
.500
.471
.448
.421
.421
.419
.412
.412
.400
Navy Ordnance took over first
place m the Pacific Divisional by
blanking Corozal Sales Store 3 to
0 behind the brilliant four-hit
pitching of L. Otis.
Leroy Springer, the losing
pitcher, started for Corozal Sales
Store, but yielded two runs In the
opening frame on two walks and
an error. J. Simmons relieved in
the second. The losing hurlers
allowed but three safeties.
The box score:
Corozal Sales Store AB R H
C. McLean. 3b........ 3 0 1
V. Tudor, c-cf...... 2 0 1
A. Barraza, rf...... 3 0 0
P. Gaskin. lb........ 2 0 1
S. Sellman, 2b...... 1 0 0
V. West. 2b........ 2 0 0
R. St. Louis, If...... 2 0 0
Taylor............ 1 0 0
B. Jaramillo, c...... 3 0 1
A. Charrls, ss...... 2 0 0
Gomes..........-.. 1 0 0
L. Springer, p........ 1 0 0
J.Simmons, p........ 10 0
Totals .. .. '.......20 0 4
Navy Ordnance AB
A. Hogan ,ss........
F. Peralta, 3b......
M. Mussa, cf-rf...... 2
D. Laahley, rf...... 2
Bernal, rf.......... 0
L-Otos, p..........
O. Lawrence, If...... 3
F. Quintero. 2b...... S
F. Donalds, lb......
A. Granger, c...... 2
Visit the Wonderful Apartment House
1st PRIZE OF LIONS CLUB RAFFLE
PLAYING MARCH 23,1952
f> It I- located at Gerardo Ortega St., Cam-
po Alegre, near the El Panama Hotel.
You can buy your lucky ticket there for
$20.00. Open Dav and Night.
% Visit also the 2nd prize chalet at El Can-
grejo and the 3rd prize chalet at El Coco.
REMEMBER your housing problem is over.
Don't mits the chance to win 3 wonderful houses
for $20.00 on March 23.
3 3
Totals............22
Score By Innings
Corozal Sales 000 000 00
Navy Ordnance 210 000 xS
Do FALSE TEETH
Rock. Slide or Slip?
FASTOTH. an unproved powder to be
tprinkled en upper or lower platel, holdi
(alie teeth more firmly In place Do not
illde. lup or rock No ummy. looey,
party taite or feeling FASTEETH I
Ikallae I non-add Doea not our Check
opiate odor" (derfure breath) Gl FAS-
TEETH at any drug tare
DEEP THINKER-Jttsbuh
Manager Bill Meyer is lost 1
deep concentration as he studies
the Buc roster. The veteran
baseball strategist 11 pessimistic
about the 19S2 campaign, doesn t
figure the Pirate to finish in
the National League's first di-
vision. (NEA* j
TO RAT
ON ME
OWN
MUODER
FOR tK
A TOUCH OF GLAMOR
with
^T**^ PAINT
Eaer to
So beautiful! Washable too!
'mtuMuSk
S.
83 North Avenue TeL 2-M10
7 Martin Sosa St., TeL 2-1424
Sherwin-Williams Paints
1
H*


TV RSDAY. MARCF* '". l"M
%HF FAN AM* MFCAW Alt TOOFFENDENT IAIIV NEWSPAPER
Momwi
Cristobal High, BHS Clash Tomorrow In fGame-Of-The-Year9
(MIAMI BEACHDown here at the reee track, th nor*
brassy eockUll parties, the elushier night spots or somewhere
k>Bf the Lite watch yon ineritably fiad yourself In the company
of Mr. Swlfty Morcan, bon rtoant, raconteur and world traveler.
A foateed, bespectacled cane-toting gentleman at 70. Mr.
Morgan Is what Is known as a character, an authentic Runyon-
esque character. Indeed, a recent celluloid epic, entitled "The
Lemon Drop Kid," starring Bob Hope, was inspired by one of Mr.
Morgan's deft exercises In the art of relieving a sucker of his bank
roll.
Mr. Morgan's accomplishments are many and varied, not the
least of which It the consistency with which he has avoided the
dreary drudgery of employment. He might be described as a
gentleman who has lived by his wits off half wits, and in a man-
ner to which he became accustomed at an early age.
Mr. Morgan always had a sybaritic fondness for cards and
the sea, but unlike the purely frivolous he managed to merge hit
hubbies In gainful occupation. So successful did he become that
his presence on a luxury liner immediately evoked suspicion And
is said, unjustifiably, no doubt, to have led to the standard warn-
ing: "Do ljotplay cards with strangers."
But let us not concern ourselves here with morals or cynics.
The'e is something amiss in a man whose eoul does not respond
16 the call of the sea and if he happens to be addicted to cards,
coo, then he's just that much ahead in the matter of pleasant,
gracious living. That was the way Mr. Morgan was figuring In
the spring pf 1910 when a big German liner started its homeward
Journey from New York.
FATHER AND 'SON*
It has long been established that clean living and right think-
ing can be productive of happiness, and Mr. Morgan, whose great
friendliness often expressed Itself in curiosity as to the Identity
and fiscal rating of fellow paaengers, was highly elated to discover
that ona of same was none other than J. Plerpont Morgan, the
fabulous Wall Street financier.
"I know I can't make him admitted our hero, "but there's a
chance I can use him. especially since we both got the same name,
If not the same dough."
Deafness was coming to the financier, who even then was
getting well along in years. In privacy he used a trumpet but
eschewed the Instrument in public. This, of course, was before
the invention of small, modern hearing aids.
"Old J P. was a great one for the sun," relates our Mr. Mor-
gan, "and every day he'd bundle up and stretch out In a deck
chair. He was a big name and the yokels wanted to get a look at
him, so there was a lot of activity. You know, people walking the
deck for exercise but in this case mostly to get a peep at Old
Money Bags.
"By now I knew practically everybody on the boat, at least
everybody I wanted to know, so when I'd walk out past Old J. P.
along with others, I'd say something to him... "Are you feeling
better, dad?..."Don't you think you've been out long enough,
dad?"...and solicitous stuff like that.
"As you know he couldn't hear and I doubt that he ever tried
to learn lip reading, so all he'd do was look at me puzzled-like
and glower, but since he wasn't known to be particularly jovial,
anyhow, this wasn't hard to explain.
"Dad thinks I'm Just a Wastrel. I spend so much time travel-
ing and playing cards and having a good time."
Mr. Morgan Indicated he had a very good and prosperous
time on the trip playing cards with the yokels who easily under-
stood how a man of such charm and gaiety could not tolerate
the unexciting demands of the banking business.
LORD STANLEY'S ACT
At one time our Mr. Morgan married Into an excellent Eng-
lish furiilv and whpn the occasion ig speaks the lan-
guageTBHrrn^WiWHlimself. London nwaTo neone of his favorite
' cities. He found It possible to visit there even when the sea and
cards did not reckon. He was at the ringside the night Mickey
Walker defeated Tommy Mulligan in a middleweight champion-
ship bout. In Jack Kearns, the manager, and Walker, the fighter,
' he found two kindred souls. That's how he happened to become
'Lord Stanley."
Back In America, Kearns matched Walker with one Bearcat
Wright, a Negro heavyweight, in an Omaha ring. It was to be a
nonlethal demonstration of the manly art with the fighters fol-
lowing a carefully prepared script. To make it look good, Walker
was to take a knockdown In the first round, then fight heroically
uphill to a fourth-round knockout. "Lord Stanley," who had
mine Into the possession of $25,000 in "pounds," the product of
' a Chicago engraving outfit, bet accordingly.
"I even grew a pair of sideburns to go with my accent and
stick" the gentleman remembers.
There was unfortunately a double cross, due to the Interven-
tion by the local chief of detectivesnow a Miami businessman,
by the waywho learned of the conspiracy and warned the Negro
heavyweight that if he didn't level he'd be Jailed. The fight went
to the limit, though Walker, unwarned, went down in the first.
Lord Stanley was understanding^ distressed.
"I not only blow the beautiful engravings," he groaned "but
my English act, with sideburns, too, doesn't get me a dime."
6,t /*>>'
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Fastlich League
1 .545
* .550
0 .251
REASON STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Tie Pet.
Conejos......7 4 0 .636
Ocelots......6 4
Pumas.......6 S
I alomas......5 5
Macaws......t 9
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Tie Pet.
Pumas.......t 0 11.D0
Ocelots......t 11.000
Palomas......1 1 .540
Conejos......1 t .333
Macaws......0 4 .000
NEXT GAME
Saturday, March 15 at Balboa.
GAME OF MARCH 11
The Pumas defeated the Ma-
caws 7-3 Tuesday.
In the top of the first Inning,
the Macaws collected one run
off four walks by DesLondes. The
Pumas came back In the lower
half with four runs, highlighted
by singles off the bats of Cazor-
la and Huff, and a home run by
Rlgby.
In the second frame, the Ma-
caws added two more runs from
walks and errors. DesLondes was
then replaced by Pedro Salas as
pitcher. It was now a brother
against brother pitching duel,
with no runs coming across for
either team In the third.
Pablo's downfall came In the
fourth, when his brother hom-
ered into left, Casorla singled for
his third hit for three at bats,
and Smith homered.
Pedro Salas allowed no hits or
runs from the time he took over
until the game's end. Pablo Sal-
as allowed a total of seven hits
and seven funs from the start
to the finish.
The box core:
Macaws AB
Mead, R., Sb 1
Glud, cf. 0
Bruhn, ss ... 2
Norton, lb. 2
Salas, Pablo, p. 2
Cody, If.
Morris, 2b. .
Powell, W., rf
Bouchner, rf.
Perantle, c .
Mead, B., c .
HFO
EARLY RHUBARBCardinal pilot Eddie Stanley gets the finger
and tongue treatment from umpire Johnny Riddle after a first
inning rhubarb In Sunday's Cardlnals-Yanko/i exhibition tilt at
St. Petersburgh. The Redblrd manager was ordered back to the
dugout after protesting the ouster of one of his coaches. Cards
beat the world champs, 3-1. (NEA Telephoto)
Richard Dillman Sets New .22
Rifle Position Firing Record
Richard Dillman, firing In a
regular Isthmian Gallery League
rifle match, Monday night fired
a acore of 200 out of 900 for a
new local record. Dillman, al-
e though only eighteen years old,
Lhas for some time been the most
} Consistent smallbore rifleman on
11 the Isthmus. A year ago last Jan-
0,uary, he won the first Isthmian
Totals.....IS 3 0 0 7 S
Pumas AB R
Salas, Pd., ss-p 2 1
Casorla, cf. 3 1
Hill, rf-ss. ..21
Smith, If ... 3 2
Huff, lb. ... 3 1
Rlgby, 3b ... 2 1
Fears, c .... 2 0
Selby, 2b ... 3 0
DesLondes, p-rf 1 0
Fulton, rf. ..10
HFO
1 3
3 1
0 I
1
1
0
0
0
0
Total*.....21 7 7 12 5 3
Score By Innings
Macaws 12 0 0 03
Pumas 4 0 0 3 x7
Runs Batted InRlgby 2, Ped-
ro Salas, Smith, Huff. Earned
RunsPumas 5. Left on Bases
Pumas 4, Macaws 8. Home Runs
Pedro Salas, Rlgby, Smith.
Stolen BasesBouchner, Cazorla,
Hill, Huff. Passed BallFears.
Struckout byPedro Salas 4, Pa-
blo Salas 2. Base on Balls off
DesLondes 8, Pablo Salas 2, Pedro
Salas 7. UmpiresNeville and
Kearnon. Time of Game1:30.
GUN CLUB
NOTES
CZSA ANNOUNCES BIG BORE
MATCH SUNDAY; FAR FAN
smallbore championship In a
registered National Rifle Asso-
ciation match.
The previous record was fired.ter."
Balboa High School was com-
Setlng under the colors of the*]
alboa Qua Club's Junior Divi-
sion in the Isthmian Gallery
League. His score was fired In
registered competition and will
So on record with the National
:lfle Association. Dick's average
in this type of competition has
been so high as Indicate that he
will bo awarded the top han-
dicap rating of registered shoot-
ing, and will compete as a "Mas-
by Lt Col John (Mr. Bench Rest)
Boles, Jr. Col Boles mark has
stood for four years, and many
had thought that it would never
be broken. His 294 was fired
without a possible. 99 prone, 99
sitting, and 90 standing. Dick
Dillman duplicated the 96 stand-
ing score, while both his prone
and his sitting scores were 100
possibles.
The quality of Dick's perform-
ance may be measured against
the record book. The record for
20 shots standing, held by Ar-
thur Cook of the U. S. Olympic
team Is 196, an average of 98 a-
galnst Dick's 95. Cook's three
position national record, shoot-
ing kneeling Instead of sitting is
297, as compared with Dlllman's
298. Dlllman's 196 prone and
standing ties the U. 8. Junior
record held by Alfred J. Chan-
dler.
Dick Dillman, a student at
Supported also by a fine score
of 289 compiled by Joe Fuller,
the Balboa Juniors put together
a score of 1121 to defeat the Bal-
boa Seniors In this match. Fred
Wells fired 285 to top the Seniors
In this event
Other recent matches Included
a Balboa Senior victory over the
Cristobal ROTC, 1079 to 850, with
Fred Wella again topping the
Seniors with a 278 score.
The Balboa Juniors with Dick
Dillman again leading them with
a 288 score, defeated the Balboa
ROTC 1098 to 861. with, several
of the latter teams best shots
unable to take part.
The tall end Cristobal ROTC
outfit also lost another match
when the Cristobal Seniors took
them over 1014 to 860. Bill Blng-
ham's 274 was high score for the
winners and for the evening.
Detailed scores follow.
BALBOA SENIORS
Fred Wells ........
Al Joyce ...............
Barbara Mlllard .......
Archie Turner ........
TEAM TOTAL
CRISTOBAL ROTC
Victor Fisher ..........
Dale Cockle............
Richard Ooodhead ....
William Stevens ......
TEAM TOTAL
BALBOA JUNIORS
Dick Dillman ..........
Joe Fuller ............
Tommy Tettenburn.
Paul Smith ............
PRONE
100
.100
8 v
99
94
89
89
7
TEAM TOTAL
Johnson's CAR-PLATE
Johnson's CARNU
_____ ***** > O-a-A. ay tfca m*kmt Jiiiiib. Waa.
The regular March match of
the Canal Zone Shooting Asso-
ciation will be a team match
with the military J0-06 rifle over 5AU,* ROTC
the DCM course customarily ffr- Vincent Esquerra
ed here. This is the same course .'J SSJL;.;"'"
fired in the recent registered I J- llaf *v
match, but will be primarily a Leon Hearn
team match, although there will
be Individual prises. Sunday,
Mar. 16 is the date and 9 a.m.
the time.
The Balboa team is favored
for this one. although the Ma-
! rlnes should be given a fair
chance to win as they have been
threatening to do for some time.
Also several of the local military
teams have been spending some _,
time in 30-06 shooting and will 5.C, A 0(Jne undoubtedly be out for this one.1"8"8 ***
The Albrook Curundu outfit,1*
last year's champs, have been
weakened by the loss of M/Sgts
Oil Kemm and Bill Merriman,
and are not conceded much
chance, but they do have a cou-
ple of characters who can still
be dangerous.
\J\jant the tastiest, most
wonderful fish Fillets?
TEAM TOTAL
CRISTOBAL SENIORS
Bill Blngham .........
Noel Gibson ...........
Robert Shepara........
Edward Hodnett ......
TEAM-TOTAL
CRISTOBAL ROTC
99
97
M
M
S
M
7
S
87
96
SIT
97
95
92
94
88
M
89
64
97
3
91
STAND
81
81
77
66
62
Victor Fisher
TEAM TOTAL
BALBOA JUNIORS
Dick Dillman ..........
Joe Fuller .............
Paul Smith ...........
Tommy Tettenburn ....
'00
97
98
96
TEAM TOTAL
BALBOA SENIORS
Fred Wella ............
Al Joy.ee ..............
Clayton Breckon ......
Barbara Mlllard .......
TEAM TOTAL
100
!8
Entries will be accepted until
9 a.m. on Sunday at the range.
All local shooting aggregations
are welcome to take part. Teams
will be either four or five men.
four scores to count. Entry fees.
$2,00 per man. whether Indi-
vidual or team member.
There is a record to shoot for
here. Three Isthmians have fired i
193 over this eourse. Only two atad In 1947.
oolnts to go for that perfect, According to Lieutenant C. W.
score. Just shoot a 194 or 195 in Uphoft. USN. Special Services
this one. and your fame will go Officer of the Naval station, 14
beyond the borders of the Canal women and 56 men finished 36
Zone. State side shooting period-1 holes to qualify for the tourna-
teals are picking up our local ment, which Is limited to club
scores these days when they are members,
newsworthy.
M
64
55
97
89
71
88
7
70
100
100
93
M
99
94
9
88
4
*4
60
53
71
2
55
89
37
S
96
92
83
I
70
TOTAL
278
276
266.
259
1079
244
226
220
160
~m
288
283
254
273
1098
232
226
234
179
"mi
274
264
244
232
1014
234
221
212
203
~8o
296
289
274
362
1121
285
269
269
263
86
Ct#on#r< bonMf
Mm pan.
timy ounce you fear
atoa table.
Unfortunately, notice of this
match U published a little later
than usual. It is hoped that team
raotaln* will make a special ef-
fort to get their tame out to
nuke this the kind of match you
all like and enjoy.
Mrs. (. P. Smith carded a
score of 200 to become low med-
alist in the women's qualifica-
tion round, while Herb Busby,
CS2, U8N. led the men with a
111.
Featured in your Commissary.
The tournament constata of
six flights for the men and two
Seventy aersoas have eem-for the women. The first round
-'eted flus'lfylng rounds for the Is scheduled for completion by
-umsmep. currently in*er way midnight of March 33. the aee-
-t the U. P Naval Station. Rod- ond round on March SO and the
man. Golf Club, which origin- final round on April 4,
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKVS ft
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TAGAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
CHS Victor*
4V
Would Wrap
i/p' 52 Title
INTERSCHOLASTIC BASEBALL
STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Fet.
Cristobal High .4 1 .850
S alboa High.....2 i .5*0
nnior College.. ..1 4 MQ
TUESDAY NIGHT'S RESULTS
CHS 4, JC 3
FRIDAY NIGHT'S GAME
(At Mt. Hope)
CHS vs. BHS.
Tomorrow night Mt. Hope Sta-
dium will be the scene of action
for the "game-of-the-year."' aa
far as lnter-scholastic baseball is
concerned. With Cristobal only
one game ahead of Balboa In
the all-important lost column,
this game couldo well tell the
story of the eventual outcome of
the 1952 season.
The Balboa Bulldogs and Cris-
tobal Tigers will tangle and both
coaches will be sending their ace
chuckers to the hill 'to seek vic-
tory. What will probably result
Is a mound duel between Hughes
and Halman, and the top at-
tendance for the season is ex-
pected for the last inter-scholas-
tic game to be played on the At-
lantic side.
Cristobal High School took a
firm hold on first place in the
Interscholastlc Baseball League'
and assured themselves of at
least a tie for first place when
they came from behind to nose
out the Junior College nine 4
to 3.
Two CHS hurlers pitched bril-
liant ball, allowing only two hits,
but poor support from the In-
field made the going tough all
the way.
Art Blades, who had been in-
active for almost two weeks due
to a sore arm, was Palumbo's
choice for mound chores. Art
pitched near-perfect ball for five
innings, save for three runs al-
lowed by a leaky Infield. Blades
gave up only two scattered hits
and walked a pair of batters.
After CH8 had gone ahead in
the fifth frame, Tommy Hughes
took over on the mound. Al-
though errors also had him in
hot water, Tommy was equal to
the situation, striking out four
In the two frames he worked.
Larrlnaga went the distance
for Junior College, allowing five
hits, and walking only one. Lar-
rlnaga's task was also made dif-
ficult by untimely mlseues, aa his
teammates committed a total of
five errors.
Talmadge Salter, CHS catcher,
who is rapidly establishing him-
self as one of the most consis-
tent hitters in the lnter-scholas-
tic loop, had two for three (in-
cluding a triple) to pace both
clubs In that department.
The box score:
Jr. College
Nlckisher, If.
Oorman, If .
Trembley, 2b
Phillips, as .
Larrlnaga, p .
Welsh, lb .
McKeown, rf.
Roy, c .
Aleguas. 3b. .
MeArtnur, cf.
Totals .
AB R HFO A E
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
ACCURACY!
MEN DEMAND IT FROM
A WATCE...
Cable Just Received;
World famous OMEGA 30mm starts see*
ond million production programme with
new observatory record at Geneva 1951.
Fifth record in seven years of high preci-
sion contest among leading Swiss watch
brands. Omega 30mm scores at Geneva -
individual record 870.3 points series five*-
best wrist cronometers 835.1 points.
Chas. Perret
GENERAL AGENT.
Swiss Jewelry Store Coln, R. P.
Ricardo Jewelry Store
AGENT IN PANAMA.
Cristobal-
Manning, M
Hatgl, 2b .
Bailey, 3b. .
Hughes, rf-p.
Salter, T., c .
Sasso, If .
Blades, p .
Salter, R., rf
Price, lb .
Smith, cf .
Totals
.2* 4 5 21 T 6
Grapefruit League
YESTERDAY'S SCORES
AT ST. PETERSBURG
Detroit (A) 001 000 0001 5 ,
N York (A) 200 00011X4 10 0
Houtteman, Gray (6) and
Baits, Swift (7); Miller, Morgan
(5), Schallock <) and Berra.
AT BRADENTON
Clncl. (N) 000 300 0025 9 :
Boston (N) 100 030 30a7 15 0
Wehmeier, Jordan (5), Perkow-
skl (6), Bevens (8) and Semin-
ick; Donovan, Hoover (5), Thlel
(8) and St. Clalr.
5 3
AT TAMFA
Philadelphia "B" (N)
000 000 000 00
Cincinnati "B" 000 000 0001I 1
Brlttln, Rldzlk (4), 8tuffel (T)
and Wllber, Oswald (5); Exautt,
Nuxhall (3), Blake (8) and Lan-
drlth. ___________________
Along The Fairways
The regular monthly tourn-
ament of the Panam Women's
Golf Association will be held
March 15 at Erases Brook Golf
and Country Clnb. Teebag off
time will be 8:M aja.
After the luncheon, a meet-
ing of aU the representatives el
the clubs will be heM to plan
and schedule the associations
tevaaateats ter the year, ac-
cording to Graee Dehlhager,
president.
Anv woman on the lathmue
Interested in playing with (has
group will be welisaasd Mm
established handicap Is
te be eligible te c
the prizes awarded.
b#Mffaseila$s$eg

TOROS
AT
LA MACARENA RING
in San Francisco Garden
SUNDAY Mar. 16 at 4:30 p.m.
Presenting the Gypy Lady Torera
AMINA ASSIS
From Syria Lebanon
GREGORIO
PUEBLA
from Mxico
FOUR (4)
BULLS
win be fought and killed.
Box S*-ats.......
Shade........
General Admittance


ROBINSON OLSON TITLE BOUT TONITE
__________________________________________________________z:----------------------!*
New Hampshire
Results Bring
Varied Reaction
IN !ND15PKNDBn^fH]g^lLT NEWSPAPSt
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth ami the country is ra/c" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
WASHINGTON. Mar. 13 (UP)
Taft and Eisenhower sup-
porters traded claims over the
igniflcance of the New Hamp-
shire voting today and Sen.
Estes Kefauver said he hopes to
parlay his victory over Pres-
ident Truman into the Demo-
cratic nomination.
Oen. Dwlght D. Eisenhowers
backers said his clean sweep of
the state's 14 Republican con-
vention delegates was "proof
that he is the OOP's best pres-
idential candidate.
Sen. Robert A. Taft acknowl-
edged in Texas that he was a
"little disappointed" because
"we thought we'd do better than
that."
p^\^T$*o%o?Zi 86.000 Clet-pfopelled, Comet Bahamas Aii^va.hav^
PANAMA, R. P., THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1952
FIVE CENTS
BOAC Planning Jet Airliners
On NY-Jamaica Run This Year
LONDON. March 13
British Overseas Airways Corpo-
vlsit to the Caribbean area, said:
"Our two subsidiary companies
of Kefauver, who took all or
the state's 12 Democratic dele-
gates from Mr. Truman.
The Senator said the voting
only "encouraged" his belief
that he can win the Democratic
nomination and the election.
House Democratic leader John
W. McCormack (Mass.) said
there "is no question but Ke-
fauver will be a very potent
figure at the (Democratic)
convention, but that would have
been so even If he hadn't car-
ried New Hampshire."
Democratic national chairman
Frank E. McKinney who, like
Taft, first refused to comment
on the election, later congra-
tulated both Kefauver and Mr.
Truman's supporters on a "clean
campaign." He said the Repub-
licans engaged In "personal ex-
changes."
McKinney had urged Mr. Tru-
man to enter the New Hamp-
shire race and said he would
not do so If he didn't think the
President could win.
But Taft headquarters claim-
ed Elsenhower's backers "have
little to cheer about" because
"every natural political advant-
age lay with the Elsenhower
forces." It said "even the form
of the ballot was against Taft."
Taft's lieutenants said the big
test will come In the next few
weeks with the primaries in
Wisconsin and other large
states."
ration plans to operate 500 mph, British West Indian Airways and
85 000 it. Jet-propelled Comet Bahamas Airways, have been In -
airliners on the New York-Ja- currlng deficits that are too high.
malea run before the end of this
year.
Connecting services will enable
"There Is plenty of business
offering and I have proposed
some drastic alterations to the
travellers between New York and a d m i n istratlve patterns. This
the Isthmus of Panam to use should save the British taxpayer
the first jet airliner service In
the Western hemisphere.
The announcement was made
here today by the BOAC chair-
man Sir Miles Thomas.
Comets will also operate BOAC's
New York-Nassau and New York-
Bermuda services.
Thomas. Just returned from a
Panam Canal Pools
Electronic Workers
money and get near a break-even
point or possibly better."
"How right we were to Intro-
duce cheaper trans-Atlantic air
fares for tourists this year Is al-
ready proved by forward book-
ings in the United State.
French. Bankers' Offer
Tc Run Panama Trust
Meeting Opposition
The Panama Chamber of Com-
merce was expected to Issue a
communique within the next 24
hours voicing their opposition to
"In May. the first month o tne offer b a grou_ of pvench
passenger bookings is already re-
corded. This represents an in-
crease of 82 per cent in dollar
earnings compared with the same
month last year.
The electronic functions of
"For June the number of seats
blned as of March 30, it was an-
nounced today at Balboa
Heights.
The eight U.S.-rate and two
Local rate, employes of the Ma-
rine Bureau whose work Is con-
AGENCY DEHLINGER, re-
presenting the Government
Employes Finance Company
m<1 automobile Insurance, has
Opened its new offices at No. 43
on Automobile Row in Panama
Cttv.
Richard (Dick) Dehlinger,
above, has just left the Pana-
ma Canal service after 12
years to devote all bis efforts
to his private business.
Dick, who is well known In
golfing circles, was born la
Buffalo, N.Y., and was employ-
ed by the Canal as a police-
man for two years before
transferring to the Panama
Railroad as a stevedoring fore-
man.
The former office of the A-
gency was In Diablo.
cent and the dollar earnings by
120 per cent.
"Between, March and August
1052 BOAC Is already booked to
carry more than double the num-
ber of trans-Atlantic passengers
as compared with last year.
Vatican Accused 01
Political Meddling
By Political Reds
ROME, March 13 (UP)
Italian Communist leader Pal-
miro Togllatti warned his 2,-
500,000 followers In Catholic
Italy today "not to fall into
the trap set for us allegedly
by the Vatican that the
forthcoming a d m lnlstrative
elections will be "a struggle for
or against religion."
Togllatti, who was a Catho-
lic student and a brillant scho-
lar in Catholic theology, made
month, the two groups will form JJie warning in a speech early
a pool from which men can bel""8 week to a closed session
of the Communist central com-
mittee in Rome.
The 9,000-word text of his re-
marks was carried in the Com-
munist organ "Uni" today.
The Moscow trained Red
leader attacked the "menacing
political Intervention of the
Vatican hierarchy" to the ac-
tivities for the last round of
cerned with electronics will be
transferred to the Electrical Di-
vision rolls as of that date.
Other than this transfer In
rollkeeplng, no significant
change In organisation Is plan-
ned and no reduction of force
Is contemplated, according to J.
B. Smith, Electrical Engineer.
Under the existing system,
electronics workers for the Elec-
trical Division maintaining
equipment on the police radio
cars and the fixed stations com-
municating with these cars and
> also handle all commercial ship
* radio work.
The Marine Bureau electronics
I workers maintain the radio sets
on floating equipment much as
tugs, dredges and launches and
their shore stations, as well as
the portable radio sets which are'
taken aboard transiting vessels
by the pilots.
Under the new plan which be-
comes effective the end of the
Panama Trust Co. and assume
control of the institution.
Opposition to the plan already
has been voiced by Federico
Humbert, president of the Pana-
ma Chamber of Commerce, who
said that the bank has already
passed the crisis and should "be
kept out of foreign hands at all
costs."
The group of French bankers
offered to buy up 80 per cent of
the shares in the Trust Co. for
$240,000 If Panamanian share-
holders would renounce the
right to vote on the bank's op-
eration In exchange for an In-
terest of four per cent on 80 per
cent of the bank's future profits.
The offer would take the op-
eration of the bank, which has
been closed since last March, en-
tirely out of Panamanian hands.
The bank Is expected to reopen
shortly after the company which
built Hotel El Panama receives a
drawn for any electronics work.
It is expected that the new ar-
rangement will provide for
greater work flexibility and bet-
ter administration.
LSM Rocket Ship
Arrives At Rodman
A Navy landing rocket ship, .,
the USS LSM (RI-527. arrived the administrative elections.
this morning at Pier 2 Rodman!
Mrs. Remn's Holel
Reported Target
Of Bomb Tossing
loan of $1.500,000 from the U.S.
Import-Export Bank to cancel
Its indebtedness to the Panama
Trust Co.
In the communique being pre-
pared for publication by Panama
businessmen and industrialists,
specific objections to the French
proposal will be itemized, a
spokesman for the group said to-
day. ,
The French proposal also in-
cludes an offer to lend the Trust
Co. $450,000 to pay of' aome oi
the money owed to government
institutions and the National
Brewery.
Plans For Rural
Inter-American
School Discussed
Plans for the establishment
of a rural Inter-American school
in Latin America were discussed
yesterday between Francisco
Cspedes, director of primary
education of the Pan American
Union, and Panamanian and
American Point Four officials.
Cspedes is en route to Wash-
ington after an extensive tour
of South American inspecting
facilities available for the loca-
tion of the proposed school in
each country.
Hero's Wife
Defies Eviction
-So Far
SPRINGFIELD, Mass., March
13 (UP)A hero flyer's wife who
was ordered evicted while he was
battling Russian Mig's in Korea
today declined sympathetic
neighbors' offers of a place to
live and said she will fight to re-
main in the home until her hus-
band's scheduled return in June.
Pretty Mrs. Conrad E. Mattson
who, with her three children,
was given until April 8 to vacate
their tenement home said she
has been "simply overwhelmed''
by kindly friends and neighbors
who offered them an abode.
But, Mrs. Mattson said, "I want
to stay here. This Is my home."
However, she said she always will
be indebted to her neighbors
whom she described as "wonder-
ful."
Mrs. Mattson, a petite brun-
ette, said she had not heard
within the past day or two from
the dentist who bought and
wants to occupy the house over-
looking Forest Park In the cen-
ter of this western Massachus-
etts city. The eviction notice was
slipped under the door by a sher-
iff.
She said she apparently has
not relented from his demand
that she get out though she ask-
ed him to be allowed to remain
until her husband returns to the
United States. She has hired a
lawyer to fight her eviction in
court. .
"He (the dentist) evidently is
going through with it," Mrs.
Mattson said.
At the moment, Mrs. Mattson
was more concerned about her
husband, an Air Force captain,
IN TUNECrooner Bing Crosby, who owns $300.000 worth of|
stock in the Pirates, was on hand to greet 20-game winner Murry
Dickson at San Bernardino, Calif., after the Buc pitching star
agreed to Pittsburgh terms and signed his contact. Dickson re-1
ceived a big raise, but he still hasn't quite reached the financial-
status of Mr. Crosby. (NEA>
who was credited with destroy-
ing two Russian Mig's and pos-
sibly damaging another.
Her green eyes reflected her
pride In her husband who also
served gallantly In World War
H. "He's a crack Jet pilot and do-
ing i
said.
a really wonderful Job," ahe
The Mattsons were married In
October 1847. She Is the former
Marjorte Morris of Bangor, Me.
Mattson Is a native of Stevens
Point, Wls.
Cesoedes said the site of the
school, which will be for the
preparation of teachers for rural
schools, will be established
either In the Dominican Re-
public, Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil,
\ on\e-made ? waV" Chile. Bolivia, Peru or Ecuador,
portedly thrown early today Into, The school will be establish -
the rear of the Hotel Santiago In e the Veraguas province where 2i American republics, with
Mrs. Cecilia Remn, wife of pres-eight professors and money for
Identlal candidate Jos A. Re- the maintenance of the schoool
mn, was a guest.
The bomb was hurled from a
nearby school building.
A report received by the Min-
istry of Government and Justice
said no one was hurt.
Srovlded by the Pan American
hlon.
Five teachers from each coun-
try for a total of 105 will
be given scholarships to attend
the school by the Pan Amer-
ican Union.
en route from San Diego, Cali-
fornia with 133 enlisted men
five officers aboard.
Rocket ships, according to a
Navy official, are used in ad-
vance attacks on the enemy.
Each of the rockets shot have
the effect of a five-Inch shell.
The 994-ton landing ship that
arrived this morning, is 208 feet
in length and has a 34-foot
beam.
Personnel of the USS LSM
(R)-527 will be granted shore
leave and liberty during the two-
day stay m Panama.
*n'd Wanna Tour Panama? Here's How

**>ier
anddrink?
"$>
****
Mfc
Itzet
When pleasures o the table bring on
discomforts of indigestion rely on Alka-
Seltzer. A tablet or two in a glass of water
makes a sparkling, pleasant-tasting rem-
edy. See how quickly and effectively Alka-
Seltser acts to settle your stomach and
soothe your headache Not a laxative, you
can repeat Ha uae without laxative effect
Take Alka-Seltzer whenever you feel that
you've had too rich a meal.
fsMB Afta Mtar help mate
LllHMfrNlH
Alka-Seltzer

(ED'S NOTE This is the
buildup Pan American World
Airways Is giving Panama In
the airlines' bid to whet the
Interest of likely tourists from
the United States and else-
where.)
There's a lot to see in Pana-
ma but tourists can return home
boasting that In one day they
saw the grandeur of 16th century
Spain in Panama City, then tra-
veled from the Pacific coast to
the Atlantic, viewing the Pana-
ma Canal en route.
Covering this much ground Is
easy to do because the conducted
tour has reached a fine point of
perfection in the country that
links North and South America
Each day. Panama plays hosts to
thousands of travelers of every
nationality. Since the majority
are en route to some other place,
their visits are usually limited to
one or two days. As a result, tra-
vel agencies have designed tours
that skillfully give a rounded
picture of Panama's many at-
tractions yet do not leave the
sightseer exhausted. Moreover,
the cost of most tours is so low
that no traveler could see the
sights on his own for the same
price.
Actually, there are four Pana-
mas One is the modern and cos-
mopolitan world of Panama Ci-
ty, the capital, and Colon, the
republic's leading citv which is
also the Atlantic gateway to the
Panama Canal. Another is the
ten-mlle-wlde strip edging the
Canal. A third is the mountain-
ous and farmland region extend-
ing from the capital westward to
the border of Costa Rica. And the
fourth about an hour's flight
east of the capitalIs a land of
colorful Indians and Impenetra-
ble iungle
Panama Citv draws the ma-
jor it of tourists. The Pana-
manian capital k anly a few
hours from the United Stats*
by Pan American World Air-
ways' Clippers and has become
a major crossroads on the
airline's vast Latin American
network.
One of the most popularand
comprehensivetours offered by
Panama City travel agencies is
the ocean-to-ocean one. It costs
only $12 per person.
The tour starts out from any
hotel in Panama City, proceeds
through the Canal Zone commu-
nities of Ancon and Balboa, to
the Mlraflores locks at the Pa-
cific end of the Panama Canal.
After watching the great ships
raised and lowered by the oper-
jation of the locks, tourists con-
I tinue to Panama City to visit the
Presidential Palace, the Church
of San Jose, famous for Its gold-
en altar, the Church of Santo
Domingo whose flat arch has
stood for centuries, the market
place, several plazas and the
shopping district. Panama City's
residential districts, and the ru-
ins of Old Panama are visited
and then the tour crosses the
Isthmus (a 50-mile drive) to the
Atlantic coast for lunch in Co-
lon. After lunch, the tour takes
in Colon and Cristobal and Oa-
tun Locks. On the way back to
Panama City, stops are made at
impressive Madden Dam and at
the Government Forest Preserve
which vividly typifies the wild
country and rugged terrain that
had to be conquered before the
Canal could be built by the US.
to 1903.
For those who prefer shorter
trips, there are three-hour tours
of Panama City and Old Panama
for $2.50 per person They start
at 9 am. and return to the ho-
tels around noon. There are also
three-hour morning tours to Mi-
flores Locks. Balboa and Ancon,
the Government Forest Preserve,
the Canal Zone Experiment Gar-
dens and Madden Dam. for $2.50
per person.
Twelve miles from the capi-
tal Is Taboga island, rich in
historic Interest and a favor-
ite weekend swimming and
fishing spot. Reached in an
hour and fifteen minutes by
launch, it is featured on the
tours of many travel agencies
but it is Be place tourists can
easily visit on their own.
The countryside of Panama is
well worth visiting. The Pan
American Highway stretches
from Panama City westward to
within a few miles of the border
of Costa Rica. The region it tra-
verses Is one of orange and tan-
gerine groves, picturesque towns,
vistas of the Pacific ocean and
verdant mountains that at times
look misleadmgly like hills.
All-day guided tours, at a cost
of $12 per person, take tourists
to El Valle, a small town located
to the mountains at an altitude
of 3.500 feet as well as to the
beach resorts Santa Clara and
Rio Mar on the Pacific Ocean.
The most exciting trip tourists
can take is to the San Bias Is-
lands, which lie off the Carib-
bean coast of Panama. It takes
onlv 50 minutes by air to reach
these colorful islands where
women wear gold rings to their
noses and their men wear figur-
ative ones. Leaving Panama City
at 7:30 a.m. tourists can visit
two or three islands and return
to the Panamanian capital in
time for lunch. The round-trip
fare Is $50 for a group of three
people. A lone traveler may
make the flight for $18 round-
trip.
Nightlife to Panama City is
gay and inexpensive. A typical
nightlife tour Includes dinner at
El Rancho, a garden restaurant,
and tour of the three night
clubsKelly's Rita. Rlalto and
Happylandon Avenida Central
These spots feature floor shows
everv evening. Coat of the tour
is $12 per person.
Chicken Noodle Soup
Yes Mom, Sis, Dad and Brother all go for delicious
Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup! And no wonder
just wait till you serve this popular soup in your home!
Only plump, tender chickens are chosen then gently
simmered to yield a bright, golden broth steeped
through and through with tasty chicken goodness.
Butter-yellow egg noodles... and plenty of chicken
meat are added, to make Campbell's Chicken Noodle
Soup a treat your family will ask for again and again!
CHICKEN
NOODLE SOUP
CONDNSEO Oft GREATER VALUE ? LOOK FOR THE CD-
t


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