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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01409
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01409
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
* BRAN IFF
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PanamaiSttcncatt
"Let the people know the truth and the country Is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
1" WIN! I -SEVENTH TEAR

PANAMA, B. P., MONDAY, MARCH 10, lSt
riVE CENTS
Batista Throws Out Cuban Regime
Kussia Hands Od Guns
Ouer To Korean Reds
^Xm'u^to^toU eV. now supplied mostly b, M.
,nd neutral satellite nations.
the bulk ol: the Soviet weapons reports, however, hate
?omwor Id WT and' oSe show that the mam source, of
76mm, howitzer was designed in
1927
The report, compiled from
many sources, said many of these
weapons have been "more than
adequate," despite their age
The report said he North Ko-
rean army has "been entirely
equipped and re-equipped with
lovieTarms," except for a email
amount of Japanese material left
over from the Japanese occupa-
ti0NnoMoreans have also used
the case of Chinese Commun-
ist forcee." the report said
When the Chinese entered the
war they were equipped witn a
supply for the present equipping
and re-equlpplng of units In Ko-
rea or earmarked for Korea Is
from Sovlet-furnlshed material,'
the announcement said.
US Sabres Shoot
Down Seven Migs
In Three Battles
Impressive Victory
Scored By Adenauer
In German Elections
KonrSd Adenauer wonj an lm-
.vlctory yesterday In a
considered to be .
uropean army.j
Travel Cul For
Soviets In US
Starts Shortly
WASHINGTON, March 10 (UP>!
The United States will clamp
travel restrictions on some 235 j
Soviet officials and their faml-,
lies this week In retaliation for
curbi placed on Americans as-
signed to Moscow, It was learned
today.
The restrictions are scheduled
to be announced tomorrow bar-
ring unexpected developments.
SEOUL, Korea. March 10 (UP)
U. 8. Sabres shot down seven
Migs today In three battles ov-
er North Korea, the highest
total In more than a month.
Some 80 Migs swarmed across
the Yalu River from Manchur-
ia this afternoon in an attempt
to drive off more than 100 Finn
Airforce fighter-bombers, which
were staging an all-out attack
on the railroad east of Sunchon.
The Sabres shot down seven
Red Jete.
On Jan. 25 American jets
destroyed 10 Russian-built Migs,
probably destroyed one and dam-
aged three. Three more Migs
were damaged during today's ao-
dat ..ic c
ticl
days that
YalU
(NEA Telephoto)
rnKWMKN FSCAPE BURNING BOMBER S moke pours from a blaring B-38 bomber at
EXSnAlrForce bwmhFort Worth, Tex.. after the craft burst Into flames when an
X caiWto hortW^iteiending. 'The plane was destroyed, but 14 crewmen escaped
Injury. .... -------------------------
No Tax Hikes In Election Year,
Congress Committee Declares
WASHINGTON, March 10 (UP)
The House-Senate economic
committee hat agreed that
there should be no general in-
crease In tax rates this year,
He said In a stateajeo* trial
a majority of the committee hadi
"indicated approval" of a pre-
viously published tentative draft
report calling for a flO,00WO0.-
000 cut In President Truman
$85,400,000 spending budget
with cuts in both military and
civilian needs.
The statement coincided with,
iredlction by the Chamber of
bombs on'"a 15 mile stretch of
track about 75 miles south of
the Yalu River possibly the
heaviest rain of explosives ever
dumped on one stretch of rails a prediction by the C MtnM
The Sabres jumped a flight of commerce of the United State
Migs which were -attempting! that the record hlg_h .tax,bW
,t unofficial retumslj!
way' __, [Red Jets had crossed" the
^JjljgrfChristian perno-^ tangle with the Sabres.
CoMtitueVAaim^^ and. 8hw>Untj
and unnamed southwest Ger- Stars dropped,500,01 -lunu m M5400000 8Dending budget,
man state. In the German peo-
ple's first opportunity to ex-
press themselves at the polls on
the policies of the government
party.
The Socialists also polled a
large number of' votes and won
38 seats, indicating considerable
opposition to the governments
rearmament policies.
The Communists won four
seat by a recount In Wuert-
temberg-Baden, which cost Free
Democrats one seat and upped
the assembly total to 123 In-
stead of 120 members.
Trieste Expulsion
Of Amler's Daughter
Brings Token Strike
by
7 Ships Lost;
Total 0/56
Men Missing
Military Coup
Evicts Prio;
Little Shooting
HAVANA, March 10 (UP) A military coup d'etat
headed by formar president Fulgencio Batista today Over-
tea aeveiopments. irwwMww j r....... - --.- .--, --.
in "addition, a majority of the threw the government of President Carlos Prio Socarras.
North Atlantic Treaty nations . ."
are preparing similar orders but
all will not be announced sim-
ultaneously.
The Soviet Embassy here re-
cently informed the 8tate De-
partment that 407 of its citizens
are in the United States. These
Include 144 officials and their
families living In the New York
area because of United Nations
assignments; 37 radio and press >.
correspondents and purchasing. a.m.
officials and their families.
The U.N. Russians are not ex-| snarpiy
Dr. Carlos Saladrigas will reportedly b* nstoMcd a*
new president this afternoon.
Prio Socarras and members of his cabinet art report-
edly held m the Havana fortress, across the harbor from
the city.
Two members of the Presidential palace guard were
reported killed and seven wounded in an outburst of firing
some time before the Presidential Palace surrendered at
at 9 armored cars,
Struckloads of ln-
>?d lr, ,rom,*;n
- four mam streets leadlnrto the
Presidential palace.
pected to be Included formally | support
m the order.
out'that "regulations permitting
to this country
i the $105,000,000,000 U col-a the North Sea area, and many
d will, as ow.be the low of them were feared to have
middle-income pwpl* who dewiMd trrt*g\a,whlch have
were
to protect the track.
In the first of three battles,
a small group of Mls tried to
knock down one reconnalsance
plane escorted by Sabres. Dur-
ing the fight three enemy Jets
were destroyed and two damag-
ed.
At the same time Sabres bat-
tled two enemy formations for
30 minutes near Uijujust south
of the Yalu river. The Sabres
sent four Migs spiralling to the
ground and damaged anotner.
In today's three actions 80
Sabres took part. It was prob-
ably the first time In the Kor-
ean air war that Sabres have
ever fought Migs at anything
approximating even terms
I major fight.
In a
TRIESTE. March 10 (UP) , _.
Communist-led workers went on fjiieefl .JV6S
a token 15-mlnute strike today VUCCii vv w
to protest the expulsion of Mrs.
Nell Cattonar. daughter of U.8.
Communist Israel Amter, from
Trieste Free Territory.
The strike was only partially
effective because the Italian
Chamber of Labor ordered Its
members not to Join the stop-
Mrs. Cattonar. who Is an
Tips On Toasts
LONDON, March 10 (UP).
Queen Elizabeth has approved
the following form and order
for Royal toasts'.
1. The'Queen; 2. Queen Eliza-
beth, the Queen mother; J.
-..,Queen Mary, 4. The Duke of
American citizen, was expelled, Edinburgh and the other mem-
f rom the American zone of Trl-1 bers of the Royal Family,
ate March 4 by the military,
povernment, on the grounds her
documents were not in order.
She and her two daughters went
to Venice.
Her husband. Antonio Catton-
ar Trieste Communist leader,
attributed his wife's exDulslon to
"orders from Washington." He
was deported from the United
States last November.
borne by the people "will weigh
heavily" In results of this year'
elections.
The chamber said in its publi-
cation, "Economic Intelligence,
that In fiscal year 1B*> the
period of Mr. Truman s big
budget federal, state and lo-
cal governments will tap the
taxpayers for $105,000,000,000.
The House-Senate committee
believed that, with the surpluses
which go into government trust
funds, a $10,000,000,000 cut
would balance the government's
"cash budget."
The trust fund transactions
are not part of the Presidents
annual budget which envisage
a deficit of more than $14,000,-
000,000.
O'Mahoney's statement was
released after a closed session
Of the committee.
"While the closing of tax
loopholes was discussed by mem-
bers of the committee," he said;
"there was agreement that n'
general increase in tax rates
should be discussed."
Mr.. Truman's annual econ-
omic report asked Congress for
legislation to close "loopholes"
and to raise tax rates by what-
ever additional was necessary to
IT
boost government Income
$9,000,000,000 a year.
The Chamber of Commerce
said that the chief sufferers
when the $108,000,000,000J col-
lected
ate "blissfully unaware" they
are paying billions in hidden
faxes, In addition to regular in-
come, excise and social security
leVels. ^_^___
Reds Moving Slowly
In Tibet, Austrian
Engineer Reports
KANDUM, Nepal. March ,10
(UP) Austrian engineer Peter
AMSTERDAM. March 10 (UP)
A total of 58 seamen were mis-
sing today in seven ship disasters
menaced nJrvlgsliV for two days.
One ship was' known to have
sunk and two others were dam-
aged in a collision. Two ships
were missing and at least two
others were in trouble, according
to radio report.
The
. sinking
German trawler.
of the 433-ton
., Thor, resulted
In 16 men missing, while one sur-
vivor was picked up and one body
recovered. The ship sank Satur-
day morning.
Off the fifth of Forth 22 sea-
man were aboard the missing
utechnaltr, who "spent eight'Swedlsh ship Rossoe, and the
Tibet, said today that Finnish freighter Edna, was mis
them to come .
for U.N. work already restrict
them to the New York area.
The U.S. regulation on future
travel will apply primarily to 87
Soviet Embassy officers, 74 wives,
55 children, and five members of
the 80viet Amtorg Purchasing
Mlseion and four dependents
a total of 235.
Romanian officials assign**
here cannot travel more thartfSo
miles from the boundaries of ge.
District of Columbia" without
asking the State Department
Hungarian diplomats cant trav-
el more than "18 miles from the
White Hodse" without permis-
sion.
As the armored cars approach-
ed white sheets appeared from
Communists are sing bet
Hokkaido Suffers
'Strong' Temblor
For Second Time
TOKYO, Majeh 10 "strong" temblor shnk up
southern Hokkaido for the sec-
ond time in a week today, col-
lapsing 113 houses already
weakened by last Tuesday's
shock and Injuring; 17 persons.
Polio Downs Actor
I.IMOGFS. flanee. Marrh IS
(IT) Pieifr Cntot. Se-year-
Id aetor. eHs*'1 oust re
last night wbH nWvtne the
role of a paralysed mtent.
Dftcter* Hartia'erl hW ail-
mnt a* a aeverc attack of crip-
Unc pell*.
ht
Norway and Scot-
years in
the Chinese .
moving slowly in extending their land with 130 men aboard
control of the mountain state
NEW D.A. SWORN IN Roland K. Hazard (left) isms the
oclh of office after he was sworn In this morning as the
new District Attorney for the Canal Zone by District Judge
loseph J. Ha:u.ock (right). Hazard, who Was acting as DA.
since the departure of Daniel E. McOrath, was sworn In at
a rormal three-minute session of the Ancon District Court
in presence of court officials and members of his office.
they seised last year.
Aufschnaiter. 52, arrived In
Nepal after hiking out of Tibet
throagh the Kutl Pass. He had
beenTn Tibet since 1944, when he
fled from a British Internment
camp in India.
The Austrian said, "The Chi-
nese Communists are going very
slowly in taking over Tibet. They
realized they could not change
Tibet quickly because of the nar-
row outlook of Tibetans toward
^sffelfnera."
j He added that the Tibetan
army was disbanded last^ear
and all the soldiers haveTwen
Stnt home.
Aufsahnalter said the entire
Tibet-Nepal border is still free
from Communist soldiers, but the
fsds have moved troops Into the
Ugate-Gyantse-Lsala triangle,
more heavily populated area of
Tibet.
-The Austrian was at one time
secretary of the German Hima-
layan Foundation and a mem-
ber of German mountain climb-
ing expeditions in India In 1W9
sad 1031. He wsa interned by the
ffitlsh in 1939 when the war
broke out. ^^^___^
HST. Vandenberg
Confer Secretly;
White House Mum
KEY WEST, PU. Mareh It
was keeping the atamt reserve
today on hidden secret confer-
ence between President Tra-
maa and Gen. Hoyt C. Van-
; denberg. Air Force Chief af
fa* saaersl flew down from
WaahlagUn in a special plne
aad bath talked alone for two
hears. Vandenberg retornad to
Washington immediately after
the aWeting.__________
BALBOA TIDES
Tuesday, Mareh 11
Hiah **"
3:42a.m. ........... 10:00 am
The last message from the
Edna said "We are sinking and
we must abandon ship." It was
Elcked up on the AAlesund radio
i Western Norway.
A British alr-ea rescue unit In
Scotland announced It had a-
bandoned the search for the Ros-
oe. which nke the- Edna was
cautht Fridajr in heavy weather
In the North Sea.
answer
the call
85 Killed, 23 Hurt
On Train Sabotaged
By Reds Near Saigon
SAIGON, March 10 (UP) --A
total of 85 persons were killed
and 23 Injured when Communist
saboteurs derailed a train 170
miles northwest of here three
davs ago, it was revealed today.
The disaster occurred near the
village of Komponn Lat. 30 miles
northwest of the Cambodian ca-
pital of Pnompenh.
The train hit a section of the
track torn up by saboteurs, ex-
ploded several mines and plung-
ed over a bridge Into a ravine,
the announcement said.
Slansky Grilled
In Russia: Sent
Back To Prague
VIENNA. March 1,0 (DP)
Rudolf Slansky, former sec-
retary-general of Czechoslo-
vakia's Communist Party, was
taken to Moscow for question-
ing, the Refugee Press Service.
"Interreporteast," said today.
While Slansky was recently
returned to Czech authorities,
other top Czechs charged with
plotting against the regime are
still held in Moscow, the report
said.
the windows and on the roof of
the palace.
As the Infantrymen followed
the armored ears mora white
flag appeared.
Not a hot was fired at this
stage.
The Midiera aad police, whe
had boon guardia* the palace
yu ^fkta^htMAfjrMssU ssflt IHsV \Ml*
4:01 p.m.
7 Sailorgirls Seeking Latin Lovers
Have Themselves Coast Guard Convoy
H*VEn*- j watching us." cooed shapelv Pat-
Seamen aboard the Coast f Briges. 2. manipulator of the
Ouard cutter Nemesis were or- mainsail.
dered to keep a constant watch i of fleer
on the 43-foot "rebel yacht" and SnappedI salty,petty officer
the seven young secretaries a-,of the Nemesis. This Is strictly
board her official.
rroplcalr again was an 11- at^a?M foresail and staysail, said the
Coast Guard aaea will aenre
as aa "excellent appetiser" ier
All were lined up. sesrched.
then shoved back Into the pal-
ace.
The Cuban armv has taken
over Rancho Boyeros. Havana's
international airport, presuma-
bly to prevent members of the
Prio government from fleeing by
plane.
But the airlines report their
services to be funnins;.
Batista, slace he headed the
"Sergeants' revelation" of" INS,
has overthrown fear presi-
dent*.
Todav he struck at 3 am. at
Camo Columbia. Cuban army
headquarters Just outside Hava-
na.
He addressed troops there,
telllnr them he was takfci* com-
mnd of the Army because he
felt the Prio government had
become a collection of political
ward heelers.
Prio, in a statement issued lat-
er from the Presidential Palace,
called on the fighting forces and
the entire Cuban people to re-
main loyal to the government.
It was uncertain whether Prio
was In the palace at this time,
or on his farm near Havana.
Batiste told the ansrv that
Prio had beca teBsag latJmatea
that if his eassdtdaU Carlee
Hevia failed te whs the forth-
coming presidential election
and Batista was? elected. Frie
would stage a eean of his own
agaiast Batiste.
Between Batista' coup at
Camp Comumbia and the Issu-
ance of Prio's statement, nation-
al polk* and army officers oc-
cupied til radio stations to pre-
vent news of the coup being
broadcast.
Civic Council
Meets Wednesday
The regular monthly meeting
of the Pacific Civic Council win
be held on Wednesday st 7:30
p.m. m the board room of the
Administration Building.
A lie siu|/i<*ii k*>ji vtuue* " "
legal entry. Just as It was in the
race last year when it became
lost in the Glf bf Mexico .and
10:30 pjn. touched off a three-day Coast
tren n*-."* "v "^7I ^^^Iw *
sponsors who disqusltfled us tnat
a girl can handle her rudder and
lib Just as well as a man," pouted |
Norma Traux. 32. m
The husband of Mrs. Mary
Copeland. the onbjr married,
member of the crew, planned to
fly from St. Petersburg to Hava-
"''he doesn't trust those Latin
men." Mary said "I think he's,
a darlmg. for feeling that way.
GIVE!
The Bed Croes helps reduce
deaths ea the highway by
traiamg volunteers whe man
z.l#e hichwav Iks* sad asalteas
aad UIN seaeBa first aid
alts. Lat year veluateers i"
such unite ave emergency
care to l,7at accident letbaa.
Tour roatrfbutton to the Bed
Crees herpe support this llfe-
savMf program. Give geaer-
sIt to vour lMt Bed C
Fund Campaign.
/


--
RAGE TWO
TOT; PANAMA AMERICAN AX INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, MARCH H 1*51
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWN! ano PuiLimn er TM> MNM AMIRICAN nni, INC.
FOUNOIO BY NILMN MUNIIVILL IN 1111
* HARMOBIO AMAS). FOITOH
7. H itmit P. O. Sex 134. Panama, R. or P.
T-' psn Panama no. 1-0740 ( Lime;
i . r. ABORUli PANAHMICAN. PANAMA
C04.0N OrCI-R: 12.17S CBNTIVAL AVENUC MTWifN 12TH ANO 13TH STBItTl
FomiV! RrfHllNTinvn JOSHUA B. POWER*. INC.
S4 3 MAOIMN AVI. NIW YRHR. (171 N. Y.
LOCAL V H!L
MR MONTH. IN AOVANCI-_____________i. '.70 t 1.801
TOA. IX MONTH. IN AOVANCI------------1 IS .00
PC* ONI Y!**. IN """frT IB.SO 14.00
Labor News
And
Couimeiit
Now That He's Had a Chance to Look Into It
-r-
roadway and Elsewhere
Jock Loit
By Victor Riesel
is
y
AMBLING OBSERVATIONS

"Lucky" Luciano suffered a heart attack in Italy. He's con-
valescing... Ex-King Zog of Albania, now a Long Island re-
sident, will send his aon and heir to public school... Joyce
Mathewa' tirst date overseas was with Cllve Sammon. It may
interest Billv Ros tp hear... "Are you a Communist? Answer
yes or no!" That'will put it squarely up to Paul Robeson, Jr., next
month before a Congressional committee... Marlon Marshall and
Stanley Donen will wed in May... Teresia Gracia, sister of the
late Maria Montee, married her Ives Manuel, as here forseen.
Anonymous letter-writer who communicated with John J.
Mclntyre last August on government business about matters m
Passaic, N. J. Please write him again or phone his New York of-
fice, REC (tor) 2-787S.
Dilly DefinitionsBy ~Bwter Rothman, who contributed
some hash-house jargon here last year: U. S. A.-J*iccor nation.
Lend of Opportunity... Ambassador-Guy sent to bring home
the bacon without pilling the beans... toerlia-AlinawMn
people in one generation can rise from a plain eablnto a cabin
plane... communism-Opiate of the M"."^-
Llberty plus groceries... Dictator-Hero plus Nero, equalling
rero... U. S. TreasuryBingo with billions.
If Florida were to legalize off-track betting, which could
conceivably happen next season, machines would be rigged up
ao that each wager would be punched on the premises ofBMMM
bookmakers so It would instantaneously register at the track,
and thus enter the mutuels calculators and share Httln|1M
odds... such a contraption was tried out in New^Yorksome 16
vears ago and it demonstrated its practicality... It could be ex-
tended to do its work at longer distances even a national
hook-up If the time ever came when aanctionlng such Rambling
muid become widespread... There 1 little chance of such a pos-
sibility in sight.
Week-end wedding reservations at St. Thomas' Church, on
Fifth Avenue are being recorded for the next six month*. .Hey
quit shoving!)
Robert Merrill, the "batTboy" of the Metropolitan Opera,
will be welcomed home tomorrow in "II Trovatore." He was last
heard on the Metropop stage on Feh 23 lift....During the
Spring tour of the company that year he "Jumped to Hollywood
to appear in "Aaron Slick from Punkin Crick,' instead of stick-
ing with the troupe. There was some difference as to whether he
wasorwa not under contract to make that tour. The 'feeling'
was emphasized when Rudolf Btng. the tytapresarlo^ heard
the undignified title, and he dismissed Merrill. The warbler has
apologized for his defection and will resume in all his standard
roles, a repertoire reminiscent of Caruso's.
You have two days of "rave "thta f**l MJ5K
come taxes. No penalty if you get your papera in on St. Patrick s
Day. Monday. March 17.
Dolly Martin, who plays leads on Bob Monroe-'s TV programs,
and Bill La Reine, importer, will announce their engagement
tonight at a party In the Heartheide Restaurant. They win wed
In June Carolvn Phillips, model, and Mark Van Buskirk. who
inherited considerable dongh recently, are making the rounds
together James Kirkwood. who was a screen and stage star,
and who was married to Lila 'Cuddle*. Lee, does bit In "Front
Page Detective." _,y .,1
Election year Is warming up. and in a little while
* The politicians will emote in Daniel Webster style.
And while they strain their tonsils in the gentle evening glow
The TV fans will leave their homes to ee a picture show.
v iRn* ..ce.,, ;. n,alr, hi Daily Variety
Isabel Leighton, author-actress, after doing "How Did They
Get That Way?" a psychological quiz-show on TV. for eight
months, will discontinue it temporarily after next week, to work
out a new program aimed at the femmes. In uh" castMonday
night will be Alma Archer. New York Mirror charm expert. The
tudy will be on "Glamor."
Joe Derlse. leader of "4 Jacks and a Jill." on a national tour,
is a plgeon-fancler. He sent this column a note from 200 miles
awav. via carrier-pigeon to his Manhattan pen. A very ancient
means of communication and a very new way to get his name
printed.
For 14 years, while he was Director of Aviation nnder four
New Jersev" governors. Gill Robb Wilson advocated ne air-
strip in the Newark port, paralleling the railroad tracks, and thus
touring planes away from the congested area of Elizabeth. Wil-
son resigned ot become editor of the magazine. "Flying." Now.
after the third crash, the plan he battled for is being carried
ut, full speed
Samuel Goldwyn will invest about 14.000.000 In the film he
Is now shooting. "Hans Christian Andersen." This courageous
and artistic showman thus throws his challenge into the face
of television as he backs his faith in a type of movie heretofore
largely in the realm of Disney, though not In his medium...
This is a biographv. not a fairy-tale. But I doubt that Andersen
had much"In fiis ftfe to dramatize "beyond his immortal works.
And Goldwyn Is a slave to authenticity.
Judy Garland left here elated but exhausted. The brave lit-
tle honey made theatrical history in her Palace comeback, which
was the high peak of her exciting and vlclsaltudinous career.
During her vacation in Florida, before returning to do the same
show in Los Angeles, she has been virtually voiceless But she
Is resilient Judy will follow the stage for a considerable time.
as she has fallen In love with it again, before attempting further
films.
THIS I YOU eOHUM THi KUDMS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
The Mail U* it an opea *awai ? Mason * Tfc* Panama Amar-
kan. Lattan arc receive*1 t"'Mll a* aaaalaal wfcaltr -
Meara I HMti.
H yen centrrfcute ratter eeVr > imeeh.nt if aeein't (Mat the
sat eey LatMn art paklukaa w rhe ereer iKli'id
Platas try fa keep) the lattan limrraa ta ana eaa. larnth
Identify af letter writers a htU in atricreat canfleertce.
m newaaeper eammef ne reieonmilRv rer erorenienri er epwHUMi
FINE DISPLAY OF WASTE
The Soviets' "Action
killing our men folk.
Some day it may atom-blast
our cities.
No mumbo-jumbo is this "Ac-
tion H." no cloak and dag-
ger operation.
It's cold, hard, methodical!
Russian activity, details of
which are in government In-
telligence files and in the hands
of some u. 8. senators who
contacted refugee technicians
from Iron Curtain lands.
"Action B." Is the process by
which the Soviets' armament,
transport and atomic bomb
commissars suck vital equip-
ment out of our Western allies
equipment without wiiich
thef couldn't produce either the
conventional weapons now be-
ing used in Korea, or the trans-
ports to carry them there, or
the fuel for its industries, or
uranium from its central Czech
sources.
So successful is "Action
B.". according to Senate
probers, that it obtains far
its Soviet strategists the
most vital items of alt by
airmail from France even
while we're rushing war ma-
teriel to the Parisian gov-
ernment to halt some day,
soon perhaps, the very So-
viet forces the Trench (and
other western lands) are
equipping.
In this game of supplying the
enemy, according to workers es-
caping from the Soviets, are
Britain, Finland. Switzerland,
as well as France our friends
From sources who were deep
in the Soviet production ap-
paratus as recently as six
months ago. Senate probers
have put together the following
story of "Action B."
Basic is the fact that the
controls on importation of war
materials Into the Soviet Union
controls which came .after
constant exposure in this co-
lumn have forced a desperate
shortage of raw materials, spare
parts a.d scrap in the Russian
MVD-controlled industries.
Most vital shortage, threat-
ening ail Soviet production, is
the scarcity or ball bearings.
Few products of modern ln-
rw811"*,. ?an Perte without
these little steel pellets. Trains
couldn't run. Guns couldn't
shoot.
So grave Is this crisis that the
most brilliant Czech experi-
mentalists, the Senate found,
actually have been, attempting
to devise substitute types 0f
v. .be*rlnM from plastics
wnicn, of course, pulverise after
use.
Since all machinery and
railroad rolling stock in the
Soviet land including the
famed Skoda armament
works were threatened
by this shortage, the So-
rter purchasing agents fan-
nedyut. Today, French ma-
- nufacturers are atrmaiHng
ball bearings to the Rus-
sians.
More recently It was discov-
ered that "the best supplier of
bal bearings for Czechoslova-
kia 'is an Italian firm now be-
ing Investigated by "the appro-
priate agencies of the TJ. S
government."
Which may or may not wipe
out Action B. depending on the
agency were using. Lhfortun-
ately. the FBI now is kept from
overseas operations.
Then there is the slight mat-
ter of uranium. The Russian
have been digging the fission-
able atom-bomh stuff like mad.
But now they're short of dyna-
mlttlng equipment, and acci-
dents have been pulverizing
their miners as well as their
mines.
Czech fuses are unreliable,
frequently exploding prematu-
rely or not at all until the
workers get down to see what's
wrong Then the miners are
blown into grim mixtures with
the uranium ore.
cu*"* WSIIftOTOH
MERRY- GO- ROUND
y OtIW MARION
I
Jim Rivera
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK.The so-called national pastime
of baseball has been noted in the past more for
its hypocrisy and timidity at precedent-setting
than for courage or Justification of its proud
title as the people's sport.
This was especially true of major league ball,
which busily maintained a bland mask of purity
on the surface while condoning many a shady
deed at the bottom.
But over the last few years I have been lik-
ing baseball a little better as the sport of the
American people.
It proved Itself, a little, after it allowed itself
unwillingly to be conquered by Branch Rickey
and the ban against Negro players was chopped
down without hurt either to the sport itself.
or to the pioneers In racial equality/*
It has looked particularly good, so far. In its
handling of Jim Rivera, a rookie outfielder with
the St, Louis Browns.
Rivera Is a New York boy from the city's
Puerto Rican belt. He comes to the majors with
a four-year jolt for attempted rapeone of
those military court-martial sentences which
often are clouded by technicalities.
Rivera'a stay in the jailhouse was portion of
a 20-year sentence for attempted attack on an
officer's daughter who was, I believe, herself
an officer.
Rivera was a child of the poverty-bitten
slums, a boxer for a bit, and always, a cohtest-
"then he has already been punished.
"If the purpose is cure or Improvement, then
this man has a greater chance to make good
being allowed to live as others live.
"Since Rivera came into baseball his conduct
has been beyond question. If in the future he
shows he has not profited his experience, this
office will take action."
This Is a distant departure from the old atti-
tude of baseball toward anything that might
reap a frown, a direct result of the old Black
Sox scandals that made the game supersensi-
tlye ot any criticism from outside.
Baseball never gave a nickel for morals, real-
ly, so long as infractions were kept quiet. ,
I have known a few playera for instance,
whose off-field conduct might have made an
attempted-assault charge seem mild exercise,
and some of the fancy shenanigans of the own-
ers, In player deals and chain-Rang, enforce-
ment of hirelings would shock the side whiskers
off the anti-trust laws.
Which is why I see no reason for Rivera's
past to be hurled at him if he sticks In the big
time. What the boy did, he did, and he palo
for It.
The bench jockeys of the Pacific Coast League
have already worked him over as thoroughly as
only baseball players can scuff sand into sore
spots.
He has taken abuse and held still for It, and
probably will take a lot more, because baseball
Mrs:
I sit at my radio and listen to the Armed Forces tell how
Rev are trying to save the tax payers money.
X think It is a fine Idea, but now I read that on March IS
Itoey were to have a big review for General Morris.
Jow much gas was used hauling soldiers and trucks from
ifferent Posts to the review field at Kobbe?
slow much oil was used and what about tire wear? Seems
that this is a fine display of waste.
Yours truly,
Jeho Taxpayer.
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Nails
Panam No. si Justo Aroaemena Ave.
feat Treataaeaita, Cams, Callsaaea, Ingrown Tat
nil lMaais REDUCING Treatments
stamaerixiag Marbmae, Tarkieb Baths Male as, teaman
fiar taarsaeUe- tal: f-2217 Paaaana
IIt am.; t pan
BBBMBBBBBBBBmWBBBBBBBMBBBBBBBBBBBBMBBWBBm
lhfrf,h.nr?U8CuS? TheV're Wore
than the Czechs'. After lnter-
J2S2 aomeJ workers and
technicians who ran from the
WrSa 1Carned 35 the
3*23? now I ir this sort
or mining equipment which
can be brought only from the
west our Western allies.
m This accounts for Russii
fap"S2 mcre,se n propaganda
ior tne promotion of East-West
trade, the Senate Investigators
Of course, the "come-in-
to-my-market1 technique is
tubtle But ifs working -
on all levels mostly be-
cotue our government
ham t clamped down on all
trade channels. Such as the
fur trade, for example,
whilh stUI is siphoning mil-
5S* / toltaft mo ffce
USSR so iU purchasing
commissars can pay more
easily in avidly sought
American dollars.
The Russians now are selling
American merchants more furs
than ever before.
This country is Importing So-
viet-slawe labor furs alone at
the rale of 27,000,000 a year.
So the attitude abroad is
if the Americans can deal with
tnem. why shouldn't we? A buck
j a buck to that crowd whether
U a squeezed out of furs or ball
bearinp.
Nobody seems to bother about
the casualty lists aay mora.
ant in the same ring with hunger when he was players as a class are remarkably lacking In
chivalry. But I would like to see persistent refer-
ences to Rivera's criminal past downplayed.
If he doesn't behave they'll fling him out. If
he does behave he will have earned some sort of
right to forgiveness, and to critical estimate as
a performer alope.
Baseball always has been ready to parrot its
own praises as a character-molder of the very
young. It Is now faced with a full-scale test
of its powers as a rehabilitate of the mature.
a kid.
He is also, by every account, a whiz of an out-
fielder and a fine hitter.
He is happily married now and is evidently
sincere in an effort to shape a new life for
himself with baseball as the fulcrum.' .
There was pressure, from religious and civil
quarters, to bar Rivera from baseball because of
his record, and the pressure was rejected by
both BUI Veeck of the Browns, who owns Ri-
vera's contract, and by Ford Frlck, commission-
er of baseball.
Frick'a answer to the pressure, for the
record, was one of the fine utterances of our
time, in sport or out of It
"If the purpose is punishment,'' Frlck wrote.
If it allows Its own people to drive Jim Rivera
off the reservation again, the game Is apt to be
more at fault than the man whose record, so
fsr in the sport, seems a clear case of emphatic
effort to make good.
Crime Story
By Petei Edson
WASHINGTON (NEA) Congressman Frank
Leslie Chelf, of Kentucky, had good training
for his new job as chairman of the House Ju-
diciary Subcommittee which will investigate At-
torney J. Howard McGrath and the Department
of Justice.
Back in 1941. as the boy prosecuting attorney
of Marion County. Ky.. Chelf first won national
fame by solving the Lover's Lane murder mys-
tery of blonde and blue-eyed Mrs. Lillian Lam-
me. Then he prosecuted and won a conviction
of the murderer.
The big mystery in the current Department
of Justice investigation is where all the bodies
are burled.
But in Chelf s original Kentucky murder mys-
tery, the body was found by a Lebanon grocery
clerk, driving early one March evening along
a stretch of old road, off the main highway,
a few miles outside the town.
The body lay sprawled face down on the road
shoulder.
The grocery clerk raced for city police, state
police, coroner and Prosecuting Attorney Chelf.
When they all got there they found four bullet
holes In the back of the tight-fitting red jacket.
The body was still warm. When they turned it
over, they all recognised Lil Lamme of Camp-
bellsville, 20 miles away.
In the grass nearby they found the empty 45
cal. automatic shellsthree Remingtons and
one from Frankfort arsenal. In the ground un-
der the body were the four bullet holes.
They dug up the bullets for ballistics exam-
ination. All they had to do then was find the
gun and Its owner.
A telephone call from a tavern keeper gave
Chelf the tip that the murdered woman had
been in his place with two men early on the
night of the killing. The men had left first,
Mrs. Lamme afterward.
As Chelf drove up to the tavern keeper's
place to talk to him. the two men themselves
relumed. They expressed surprise at the news
of the shooting, but offered no explanation.
Later, County Attorney Chelf had them ar-
rested.
In the car of one was found a whole arsenal
of firearms and ammunition, but no .45.
The other had a .38 revolver in a shoulder
holster. He said he did considerable target
shooting and gun trading.
A detective noticed that the holster fitted and
was worn down by a .45 automatic. Under ques-
tioning, this second man admitted he had just
traded a .45 for the 38. He gave the name of the
man he had swapped guns with, and police
recovered the .45.
They got a setback, however, when ballistics
tests showed this .45 was not the gun that had
been used for the murder.
Attorney Chelf then went to the cell of the
first man in the pair and told him he was
under suspicion. The only way he could clear
himself was to tell what he knew.
From this man Chelf got an admission that
there had been another .45. The first one had
been planted to throw the oollce off the trail.
Chelf reasoned that the man who had the
first .45 might also know where the missing
gun was. He was locked up on suspicion. And
after a few hours in the cooler, he agreed to
lead the polile to the swamp where the murder
weapon had been hidden.
The case cracked wide open when paraffin
tests showed that the man with the Jl had not
recently fired a revolver, but had fired*an auto-,
matlc. The powder stains were on the Inside
of bis hand. >
On trial, this man changed his plea from not
guilty to guilty. And his conviction was assured
when hack-saw blades were discovered In the
hollow Iron leg of his jail cell cot.
Today, 11 years after the crime. Rep. Chelf:
doesnt want the name of the murderer publi-
cised. He has served out his sentence, been pa-
roled. Is married and has a family.
Give him a chance to make good and lead
a useful lite." says his prosecutor. "I don't want
to rise to fame on some other fellow's mis-
fortune." That's the kind ot a guy he is.
Drtw Ptorson says: Dcfenst Secretary Lovc-tt double-talks
on lie detectors; Peace Crusaders discuss penetrating
Iron Curtain; GOP plans attack on military aid pro-
gram.
WASHINGTON. Secretary of Defense Lovett did some neat
double-talking recently when he promised Senators to abolish He
detectors.
What happened was that Sen. Wayne Morse. Oregon Repub-
lican, ailed Lovett on the arpet before the Senate Armed Ser-
vices Committee after discovering military investigators were
using lie detectors on loyalty suspects.
Morse objected that He detectors are frowned upon by United
States courts, following which Lovett promised to stop using
them.
In contrast, here is the actual order sent out by Lovett:
"I desire that all use of the polygraph (lie detector) for pre-
employment and security clearance purposes within the Imme-
diate office of the Secretary of Defense be discontinued."
A Defense Department spokesman admitted to this column
that the secretary's "Immediate office" includes only nine civil-
ians and 11 military personnel.
In other words, the He detector cannot be used on the 20
people in Lovett's "immediate office," but is permissible anywhere
else in the Defense Department.
Result is that lie detectors are still In use as much as ever,
though Lovett publicly gave the Impression they would be out-
lawed.
Senator Morse Is now toying with the idea of suggesting that
a He detector be used oA the Secretary of Defense to make sure
he doesn't give evasive answers.
INSIDE THE IRON CURTAIN
A group of realistic peoe crusaders, many of them Iron Cur-
tain refugees, listened to some plain talk last week on how we
can win the Cold War against Russia and restore world peace
by using a weapon Stalin fears more than the atom bomb the
resistance of people he has enslaved behind the Iron Curtain.
Sparked by three forthright Congressmen O. K. Armstrong
of Missouri. Republican; Brooks Hays of Arkansas. Democrat;' and
Charles Kersten of Wisconsin. Republican the meeting ans
ailed the conference on psyhological strategy.
However, it all added up to people-to-people diplomacy of
the type being practiced by thousands of United 8tates school
children right now in writing messages to Russian school chil-
dren to be broadcast over the Voice of America.
All speakers agreed that too Uttle was being done to gain
the good will of the common people behind the Iron Curtain,
and that a good first step would be for the State Department
and the Pentagon to quit stalling on the $100.000.000 program
approved by Congress last year to provide aid for Iron Curtain
refugees and strengthen underground resistance in satellite
countries.
The State Department was riticized chiefly for Its so-called
"policy of containment" toward Russia.
"Communism cannot be appeased," keynoted GOP Congress-
man Armstrong.
"It cannot be contained. So long as this world-wide cons-
piracy exists, it will eek to destroy human liberties. There re-
mains only one conclusion: Communism must be defeated, ft
must be destroyed. Its virus must be eradicated."
In liberating the captive peoples of Communism, Armstrong
warned, however, that the United States "must move boldly with
Ideas, not guns.
"Our first task will be to give assurances of hope to these
hopeless millions that we Intend to work unceasingly for their
liberation. Out next and continuing task will be to employ the
best methods of strengthening resistance among the victims of
Soviet enslavement."
Edward O'Connor of the displaced persons commission als-t
advocated a cehtral psychological strategy agency, with "boM
and daring leadership," to develop a "hard-hitting campaign of
truth" behind the Iron Curtain.
NOTEState Department officials have enthusiastically co-
.operated with many people-to-people projects such as haviner ,
the youth of Ameaipa broadcast over the Volca of Americaami
such as the rubber friendship balls now being sent by Amyetd
to the children of Italy and other countries. rt*
However, the over-all policy of the State Department has
been to confine Russia, not penetrate Russia.
GOP FIRES ON MILITARY AID
OOP policymakers are quietly loading Republican Senator*)
With ammunition In order to open fife on the military aid pro-
gram.
The GOP theme has been set in a confidential memo to every
Republican Senator from the Senate Minority Policy Committee,
headed by Senator Taft. ,
"Within four years the Truman Administration has directly
committed the United 8tates to the defense of 41 countries," thl
GOP memo declares.
"With a total population of 155 million people, the Unlterl
States is bound by treaty or by military occupation to defenil
a foreign population of over 560 millions.
"American armed forces must not only plan for the defense
of the United States and Its territorial possessions, but also fof
the defense of more than 45 per cent of the Inhabited area of
the world outside of the United States.
"The United States has also been Involved Indirectly, through
military missions, military bases or the extension of military aid
in the defense of nine additional countries with a population of
over 170 million," the memo adds.
"Military technicians are scattered throughout the world In
24 countries Including five nations not yet include in formal
treaty arrangements: Iran, Indonesia, Indochina. Thailand and
Liberia. J.
"Over a hundred American air bases are scattered through-
out the world In ten different sovereign nations or their colonies
including two nations not otherwise covered, Saudi Arabia and
Libya.
"In total." sums up the confidential memo, "some fifty na-
tions or 730 million people, almost one-third of the world's total
population, look to the United States for their military defense.
"No nation in the history of the world, not even Britain at
the height ot its empire, ever entered upon such far-reaching
commitments."
Commented one pro-Eisenhower Senator:
"It would appear that the GOP policymakers are against
stoDDing the Communists until they arrive on America's shores.
STATUE OF LIBERTY
Oregon's bristle-browed Sen. Wayne Morse blazed back th*
other day at a suggestion that he should help tighten the locks
on America's gates to ban foreign refugees,
Morse wrote a classic scorcher in answer to a letter from Mrs.
Kathryn James of Seattle. Wash., who urged him:
"The immigration laws are entirely too liberal. No true Amer-
ican wants this country over-run by the unasslmilable hordes.
'It would be tantamount to treason for any Senator or Re-
presentative to vote to liberalize the immigration laws at this
UA
in reply. Senator Morse quoted first from the inscription on
the Statue of Liberty:
"Grve me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearn-
ing to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempst-tost to me, I lift my lamp be-
alde the golden door."
To this Morse added:
"Unless you are a descendant of the native Amerlans who
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me. I lift my lamp be-
sume that your anestors came here as Immigrants, no doubt
with high hope of living a fruitful and useful life.
"What would have been their reaction If they had been turn-
ed back and told, 'You annot enter; Amerla la for Americans'?"
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT ADS
CAN FILL YOUR SEEDS!


MONDAY. MARCH 10, lMt
Tint PANAMA AMERICAN AN INnFPENnrNT I>A1LT NEWSPAPER
PAOt
pacific ~2>oci
iet
i
*
& 17, &A~ V. &H~ 3321
MNNEE TO HONOR GENERAL AND MRS. MORRIS
The officer* and ladles of the staff of Headquarters,
Caribbean Command, have Issued Invitations for a dinner to
at -iven Wednesday evening at the Quarry Heights Ottlcen
C'uk In honor of the Commander-ln-Chief of the Caribbean
Command, Lieutenant General William H. H. Morris, Jr., and
Mis. Merris, who are leaving the Isthmus soon.
Curundu Girl 8cout Troop 28
was the guest on Friday evening
of the Promenade Club In Ancon.
Mrs. Wesley Townsend arranged
the affair for the girls. She la
directing them In earning the
folk dance badge.
Among those present were Mrs.
Roy Stockham. Mrs. John Hag-
Mr. and Mrs. Mulier Entertain
Mr. and Mrs. Arturo Mulier of
Bella Vista entertained a group
of their friends at their home on
Saturday evening at a cocktail
party. _____
Cardenas River Club To Meet
The Cardenas River Garden
Club will hold Its monthly meet-
Dorg,~Mr3. C. M. Brandl and the ling tomorrow evening at the
following members of the troop:,home of Mr. and Mrs inanes
Janet Stockham, Frances Brandl, p. Morgan at Mirafiores.
Louise Wagner. Kathy Kelsey.i - .
Kathv Stressman, Sheila Snyder.lGallndo-Boyd Engagement
Marian Smith, Linda Morton,]Announced ,.,
Sheryl Speevak. Button Gerhard Mr. and Mrs. Mario Gallndo
Betty Fortune, Kay Monagan. announce the engagement or
Rebecca Lane, Jenette Egllnton, their daughter Teresita Galln-
Carrie Prescott. Barbara Bishop,1 do. to Ricardo Boyd, son of Mr.
Patsy Pires and Eileen Kirchner. and Mrs. Alfredo 1
All Interested players are invit-
ed to attend and play. Those at-
tending are asked to be prompt.
Good Joe' Turns Killer,
Shoots All His Family
COLUMBIA, Miss., March 10room, half conscious. Billy was
(U.P.IPolice hoped today that able to crawl and stagger out-
PhrtorW.rh0of.dBea"iSffiffi^ M"wW%2 lawless, a "mild-mannered
^^p^^'S^i^s^j^^ sri ntaST/'spoXr 'r^ctm
house In Curundu. uu** wh murdered his wife'and cashier for Boyd Construc-
.. ; ~ and 13-year old daugther.ltlon Co., The firm was a pros-
Hamadan Grotto To Meet
amadan Grotto To Meet W0Unded his son and motker-ln- perous one.
The Hamadan Grotto will hold and then turned the gun |
its regular muting Wednesday hlmseU.
evening at 7:30 in the new Win
Memorial, 906 Balboa Road.
William Lawless. Sr., 36, went
on his mad rampage yesterday
Just as his family waa getting
up for breakfast. In a few short
honor-filled moments, Mrs.
Admiral Chandler
Arrives Here mia.
Rear Admiral Alfred W. Chan- Dorothy Lawless and her daugh-
dler Dental Corps. USN. Inspec- ter. Rosemary, were dead,
tor General of the Navy Dental I Billy Lawless staggered from
Corps, arrived at Tocumen Air-his home In this deep Mlsslssip-
port Friday afternoon. He was pi community and gasped to
met, bv Commander Kenneth L. neighbors as blood ran from a
Longeway DC. USN, Fifteenth shoulder wound that Daaays..
No date has been set for the
wedding.
Music Group Meets Tonight
The Music group o the Canal,
Zone College Club will meet ati-'Zonlan' Staff Enor"*?off .-'evening in ineir quarvers *.. tu. ;-;-.,-
7:30 this evening at the home of I The members of thestaff ojv Nay&1 staUon< Rodrnan. at." this quiet town.
J their dates _ut.,i _-rt,, .iv In he
Naval District Dental Officer.
trying to kill us all."
Lawless was then on the .way
to his downtown office where
he deliberately locked his door
US Hands Out
2,500,000 Tons
Of Fighting Kit
WASHINGTON, March 10 (UP)
The United States has ship-
ped more than 2.500,000 tons of
military supplies to Its free allies
ta the first two years of the Mu-
tual Assistance Program. Ma}.
Gen. George H. Olmstead re-
Atlantic Society*M
&. 195, Q*U r Ji&rim* (*t** 37$
CHRISTIAN AND RECEPTION AT FORT DAVIS
Captain and Mrs. Lee Hock of Fort Davis presented their
' Infant daughter, Judith Margaret, for christening gwiday at
the Fort Davis Chapel. Rev. Milton Cookson officiated at
the ceremony, which took place at 3 p.sa.
The little girl was bora In the Coco Solo Naval Hospital
n December 19. Her godparent are Commander and Mrs.
Mason Morris of California, and her nt, Mrs. B. R. George
f Cardiff, Wales.
Serving as proxies for the ab-
sent godparents were Mrs. Ray-
mond Kirwln, Mrs. John Wllker-
son and Mr. John Kemlck.
A rueptlon was held at the
home of Captain and Mrs. Hock
following the ceremony.
A white decorated cake white
gladioli and coffee roses were
used as decorations on the buf-
fet table, at which Mrs. Stanley
Duplicate Bridge Games
Duplicate bridge is played ev-
Paul Beck. Mrs. L. V. Hunnl-
cutt. Major and Mrs. Roy Hay-
den, Mr. and Mrs. Bennett Tip-
ton. Mr. and Mrs. Allen Tuttle.
Miss Laurie Foxhall. Miss Ada-
marv Anderson. Miss Thelma
Oodwin. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Barnes. Messrs John Llngwood,
Walter Peterson. Walter Hunnl-
cutt, Eric Strauss. Captain V.
Mann and Captain J. AngeluaC?
Mrs. Garst Is a columnist for
East and West: 1. Fred
Schwartz and . W. MUlspaugh:
'{. W. E. Gibson and O. O.
Kldd and Mrs. John KemlckBrown; 3 mi*. Shepherd Shine
presided. Mr. Kernlck served the tnd yt, j Talens.
punch and Mrs. Mho 8. Gard-
ner served the cake.
Duplicate onage is piayea ev- the New York Times and her
ery Monday evening at the Mar- "?','* J0!.* Tiw'i',,? ,u. !
garita Clubhouse. The wmnersi^f^^ editor of the^-
of last week's games were: North f": *1\ _thl M,c^J^S5
and South: 1. Mrs. Harry Grun * * *h.'**,
and Mrs. J. A. Cunningham: 2. W"*"*0"; he"M" L*
Mrs. Garland Orr and Captain .["" oi "" Un,ted Fru,t
John Fahnestock: 3. Herbert >"",
Delgado and Sidney Passallague.
Commander and Mr. Longeway
Encmnander and Mrs. K^thjad]*era^ri^e^
L Longeway were hosts to a, ^jd Mrrlces were hldU.-, olmstead. Director of the Of-
group of their friends on Friday day Jo: the three victim* llce o! MUltary Ai8unce, said
cventag In their quarters at the air>ofhoc* rtM hanging ov ..con8lderable progr<.M. nas been
Mrs. Elizabeth Mc.Nevln, House the "Zonian ana
620 Ancon Boulevard. Ancon.
The program, which Is the sec-
ond on the subject "The Voice
and Vocal Music," will be pre-
sented by Mrs. J. E. Schrlft-
glesser.
'.,.?...? a 'cocktail party given hi honor!
were entertained at a barbecue Rear Admlral Alfred w, Chan-
supper last night by Mr. I cum _,,__ ,-------, n..ra\ th
Beauchamp at her home on Am-
ador Road.
dler. Inspector General of the
Navy Dental Corps, who Is a visl
tor on the Isthmus.
Howard Ralston Ross, Jr.
Joins "Stork Club" ', .
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ralston
Ross announce the arrival of <
son. Howard Ralston Ross. Jr.. on
March 7 at the San FernanCo
Clinic.
Chief of Police Ben C. 8trln-
,r said hospital oficiis be-
lieve Mrs. C. F. Hancock, moth-
er of Mrs. Lawless, might recov-
er after an operation. She was
shot In the head by Lawless.
, Billy's wound was not serious
but he haa not bun able to give
ta entertained a group of his
friends at his home on Saturday
.evening at a cocktail buffet giv-
lhllc- ... -t, f .r. en in celebration of his birthday
Mr. Ross Is director of 0Pera"ianniversary
tlons. Caribbean Command, anniversary._____
American Red Cross. He U the (CORRECT,ON
son of the late Mr and Mr*., ne PanamB-Amerlcan
illlam James Ross of Oie
With Cocktail Buffet
Francis Escoffery of Bella Vis- a clear account of the shooting
'* orgy.
*y- ,. ., __,.__pieces, 1,400 planes, 300 naval
v h0Pe.P * ible^H?,^H.v": vessels, nearly 800,000 rifles and
iSd Striri erm WednesdRJ' ,in 1
Mr. Escof fery Entertains
M
"The Whole Town's Talking"
Tonight I '' _. .
Do you know what the whole
town's talking about? Vou can
find out this eveling at the "First
Nighter" production of the col-
lege comedy In the Gamboa Mo-
vie Theater at 8:00 p.m.
Would you like to know why son u> ">r " sr' *~r Sini Tne Fanama-Amencan oner
the whole town's talking? You William James Ross of Glen apolORlM t Corp. and Mrs. body any trouble. He Just went
could find out on Wednesday at Falls. New York. His wife1 is 'h'Arlnur D. Ostertag. U8MC andiJ> Jo Pecu
the Pacific Side production of the daughter of Mr. and Mrs I" Armv T.8et. and Mrs. George E.I ..L.*wWe ^ta^lni, Md mrt;
Anita Loos' comedy In the Dia-'sublett of Bradford. Virginia.
The guests included: H.B.M.
Consul at Colon and Mrs. Ray-
mond Kirwln, Mr. and Mrs.
Stanley Kidd. Dr. and Mrs. John
Wilkerson. Mr. and Mrs. J. C.
,..,Kernlck. Lt. Colonel and Mrs.
made since the first shipment | William Bennett. Major and Mrs.
under the program Hellcat MUo.S. Gardner, Miss Maydelle
fighters and light bombers for
France was dispatched ex-
actely two years ago.
Among other things, he said,
the UnKed States has shipped
more than 7,000 tank and com-
bat vehicles, 30,000 motor trans-
port vehicles, 11,000
Bon Voyage Party
for Mrs. Garst
Mrs. Robert E. Garst. who
has been spending some time at
the Hotel Washington, was the
guest of honor at a cocktail par-
ty given by Mrs. T. LaMarr at
her home In the Arbolx Building
Saturday evening.
The guests Included: Captain
Gardner. Mr. and Mrs. Frank BnaMi>s. E. B. Rainier. Mr. and
Mrs. James Dorow, Mr. ad Mrs.'
iteleamriM 1
tricks ** Mm hww m*** t *
Lawson. Miss Ann Curran, Lt.
Commander and Mrs. John A.
Pease. Dr. and Mrs. Gary Mc-
Kay. Captain and Mrs. James
Jess. Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Dag-
nall. Miss Margaret Dagnall, Rev
rVtierv and Mrs. Milton Cookson and
navaLMJr and Mrs- Wallace Thurs-
ton.
"I can't understand why he
'Lawless) did it. He was a good,
offers quiet boy and didht give any-
blo Clubhouu Theater at 1 p.m.
and 8 p.m.
Don't you want to help with
the whole town's talking? You
can help out on Saturday by at- x .-----.
tending the Atlantic Side pro- late supper at her home
ductlon at Cristobal High School I Tuesday evening.
at 8 p.m. Guests included Mrs. 1
Mrs. Corn Entertains
Bridge Club
Mrs. H. H. Corn of Pedro Mi-
guel was hostess to the members
"^'.7"T"' oJTnHul *hM? wiridln* olr c,d* WM apparently planned at
Ratcliffe, whose wedding pic- vi,,r in rtvance Law
tures appeared with reversed !eaat_ u5,,n ^l"' T*.
captions" In the society section
Saturday and yesterday.
guel was hostess to the memDers * b r j;
of her bridge club at bridge and 5eneS Ut 00110 I
Lectures Begin
This Evening At 8
j.
You will Join the whole towii|Ebdon. Jr.. Mrs. B. B. Powell.
In talking about "The Whole Mrs. H. T. LeUy. Mrs.^R.^-
Town's Talking," as presented by
Canal Zone Junior College.
Eusebio Morales Honored
At Cocktail Party
Eusebio Morales, who arrived
recently for a visit In Panama.
Meissner. Mrs. J. H. Million.
Mrs. J. H. Jones and Mrs. J. A
Dombrowsky.
Altar Rosary Society To Mut
The Baha'i community of Pan-
am will sponsor a series of edu-
cational public lectures by Arte-
mus Lamb. U.S. educator, on
^T^n^'soc^rot orientation In the New Era.
St. Mary's will meet tomorrow! The ieclurM wm be K|ven in
ss rou early dreaud and
rove to work where he obtain-
ed a .38-caliber company pistol
He returned home to shoot
down the members of his.fam-
ily one by one.
Stringer said Mrs. Lawless had
tust set the breakfast on the
able. Her body was found lying
on the kitchen floor. Rosemary
was crumpled in a corner and
Mrs. Hancock was In the living
machine guns and nearly 300,-
000.000 rounds of ammunition.
Olmstead' disclosed the fig-
ures over the National Broad-
Bon Voyage Party
for Mrs. Grnmberg
res over the ! '-|leffd'urfft^w^/ke^forte?
%Jr,1"^0,^^?;!homeYn MiamiW;.shonor,ed
CLASSIFIEDS
given by Mrs. E. W. Bell at her
Coco Solo residence.
The guests Included Mrs. Ir-
ma Burlando. Mrs. Gunther
'"^J," ? ".V^U""1 Hlrschfeld. Mrs. Agustn Cede-
While the Aid Program ta - ft0 Mrg Robert Vo^ TrM, Mri
pected to provide one_of the rjoLeon. Mrs. Herbert Toledant
mlttee prepared to open hear-
ings this week on President
Truman's new $7,900,000,000
Foreign AW Program.
STUDENTS PUT IN PLACE
sharpest battles In Congress
this year, the economy bloc 1
expected to center Its fire on
Mr. Truman's demand for 81.-
700.000.000 ta defense-connect-
ed economic aid and $00,000,000
In outright economic assistance.
While the request for $5,000,-
000.000 In military aid may go
through with only token reduc-
tions. Congressmen are talking
of cutting the economic section
at their home in El Cangrejo.
Visitor Leaves For England
Mr. J. L. F. Manning, who Is
with the 'London office of the
Shell Ott'Companv. left by plane
Frlda'y"fbr,''Ffiglarid after a visit
of several1 days on the Isthmus,
during which lime he was a
guest at the Hotel El Panama.
Mr. Porras Celebrates
Birthday Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Camilo A. Po-
rras of Bella Vlstha entertained
a group ol their friends on Fri-
day evening at a buffet supper
LINCOLN, Neb. (UP>Univer- -
iiu nt Mohra*V students who bv as much as $2.000,000.000.
i Olmstead apparently had this
described the
j. -' icateo." A "TUB" icaiea stuaeni is - >""Bi""" *s ?,",
------------- _-. nesdays and Fridays at 8 p.m.,. prohibited from attending class-, headed, ambitious approach
To Meet Tuesday ,,,: and will be based upon the M for one wk. during which he which gets "a lot of results for
The American Legin Auxiliary teacnlng oi the Oriental age.M, not allowed on the campu. 'a relatively modest Investment."
Unit No. 1 will hold its regular Bana-u.Uan nd his son, Abdul)
monthly meeting tomorrow at
7:30 p.m. in the American Le-
recently for a visit In Panama. St. Mary's will meet tomorrow The ,eclurM wiu be Rlven in re'atedlv violate traffic regula-!, Olmstead appar
was the guest of honor at a cock-1 night at 7:30 in St. Marys an. tne Bana-i center, located In the to areh't finedthey're "rust-: 'n m^d when he
tall party given recently by Mr.-------- _.. Lux Building on Mondays. Wed-1 lcated A "rusticated" student is overall program
and Mrs. Emmanuel Lyons, Jr.,, American Legion Auxuiary lnesdays and Fridays at 8 p.m... prohibited from attending class-, headed, ambltioi
gion home at Fort Amador.
MeirWerti areJrttnrtitd to be
Baha.
The program for thlr. week
Menflert( are'^Wjweited to be wiu he. today -invstigetton of
present for the Important busi- Trutn: Wednesday. "Detach-
ness meeting. There will be an
, election of delegates for the De-
partment convention, and the
1952-53 nominating slate for the
forthcoming elections of unit of-
ficers will be presented.
Bridge Tournament This ETenlng
The regular bridge tournament
given at their home in celebra- will be played this evening at 7
tlon of Mr. Porras' birthday an- in the Card Room of the Hotel
nlversary. Tirol!.
/
Now you can have belter furniture
at belter prices!
We have ENLARGED our SHOP
with new MODERN EQUIPMENT
to offer lower prices for quality furniture.
20 /o DISCOUNT
Truth:" Wednesday. "Detach
ment;" Friday. "A Universal At-
titude."
RUTH MILLETT Says
There are two ways a woman
can stay young-looking, despite
the attrition of the years.
One way is to devote her Ufe
to "taking care of herself"by
never working very hard, mak-
ing a ritual out of a beauty rou-
tine, never shouldering other
people's troubles, unloading her
own troubles on others, taking
great pains ta the selection of'
her clothes.
You meet such women, and,
because they've made a life's
work of "taking care of them-
; selves," they do look remarkably
:young for their years.
Looking young Is about all they.
manage to get out of life, or give
to lt.
However, there Is a method of:
staying young-looking that real-|
;ly pays off.
Women who follow lt meet life
courageously, and with enthus-j
lasm. They lighten the load of
others, and shoulder their own|
responsibilities. Thev cultivate
many Interests, make friendships,
and keep up with the changing
times.
The women who follow this,
method may end up with more i
wrinkles than the ones who stay
voung-looking bv takln care of
themselves, but this youthfulnes
i will be far more real, for lt Is
based on a youthfulnesa of the
spirit.
You meet women like that.
And yop immediately think "ho*
I voung thev are." not Just "how
voung they look."
They ere life's real winners.
,for thev have lived fully and
!roura tlw lived it4
The women who devote their
lives to "tak'ng care of them-
selves" us"Pl'v have little to'
show for their lives, exceot their
own upllned faces. And that In1
truth. !s quite a noor showing
for a lifetime of living.
Just unpacked
EVENING DRESSES-
Ballerina too !
Beautiful SHOES to match!
No. 5 3th Street1
Vista del Mar
DeLeon. Mrs. Herbert Toledano.
Mrs. Raul Herrera. Mrs. Oscar
Vander Dvs. Mrs. Elov Alfaro,
Mrs. Catlta Osorlo and Mrs.
Miriam de Patina.
SCOTCH MINISTER
LECTURES HERE
Subject
"RESTITUTION-
WHAT IS IT?
Al Hi* KojMiriMri Rail
"f sir!. Puuua City
Oa Taacdar, sunk 11, 1*52,
At 7:J p.m.
Fular DANIEL GAVEN fcaa **
valea" aver M yean la Blbl tua>
nm rarrh ami has lclurd ax-
lmiv*ly In F.orapa am America.
Hla Lacrara* ar* aanaarad by th*
laymen*! Ham Mtulnnarv Mav*-
mnt aiul ar* of much lateral to
a traiabl**1 warM. Aliar* lnvlld
SaU rraaNa CalI*tlon.
"Get Arquainted" Coffee
A "get acquainted" coffee was
given bv the C.P.O. Wives Club
last Tuesday at the club. Mrs.
Orace Orr was general chairman
for the affair and was assisted
by Mrs. Nancy Holston and the
members of the decorating com-
mittee.
Yellow tapers in silver holders
flanked a floral arrangement of
hibiscus blossoms. Mrs. Jean
Johnson, Mrs. Dorothy Brlggs
and Mrs. Frances Sterner pre-
sided at the coffee services
Mrs. May Prlen introduced the
following guests: Mrs. Jean Will-
iams. Mrs. Joe Scott. Mrs. Edna
Rials. Mrs. Dorothy Long, Mrs.
Barbara Balland. Mrs. Faye
Barhan. Mrs. Carmen Jones,
Mrs. Elizabeth Owens. Mrs. Mat-
tie Lucler. Mrs. Roma Lawson.
Mrs, Gloria Preedland, Mrs.
Bertie Taylor and Mrs. Donna
Good.
The next regular business
meeting of the club wiy be held
tomorrow at 2:30 p.m.
Densert Bridge Partr
at Fort Davi
Mrs. George Kenned v and
Mrs. John T. Donahue were co-
hostesses for a dessert bridge,
party given at Mrs. Donahue's,
quarters at Fort Davis Friday
| evening.
The euest were Mrs. William
Bennett. Mrs. John H Wlegs,
,Mrs. Albert Plccirilll. Mrs
James Jess. Mrs. J. J. Ctenla.
Mrs James C. Storle. Mrs Oeo.
Poole. Jr.. Mrs. Harrv Green,
Mrs. Waller Skelstnitls. Mrs.
Harrv A. Hartwlg. Mrs Walter
D. Bailev. Mrs. A. E. Hill Mrs.
tv s. Shine and Mrs. Frank
Srb"ltz.
The prises were won bv Mrs.
George Poole. Jr., and Mrs. Hen-
ry Hartwig.
at
New ads appear
Old ad j disappear III
Reason.Quick Results!
GIVE!
Set or Open Stock
CASH CREDIT CLUB
.ENTRALAVE.ai2,E.ST. PHONES 2-183C
* 2-1833
1952
RED C
fUMD
BRIGHT COLORS
for interior and exterior decoration
rUk
\ W r 24 1 lovely LVlaa. Colon .aafl ge*\.''
SmitwiM Williams
EHAMELOID
The All Purpose Enamel
mocouSk
IX North f
WM<
S3 North Avenae Tel. t-Nll
7 Martin Sosa St. Tel. J-1424
SherwihWilliams Paints
for all occasion.
Super Special
handsome styles..
quality fabrics.
These are the frocks
that will see you through.
Come, see our
outstanding new collection
ot go*e\ery where frocks today.
MOTTA'S
PANAMA COLON
i


PAGE pora
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, MARCH 19, 1951
1
1
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
CHRIS WKLKEN. Plaaeteet
In the Pot
BY RII8S WINTEKBOTHAM
BARBER-WILHELM LINE
accepting passenger for
NEW YORK
by
M.S. "GLENVILLE"
sailing March 11th.
(All cabins with private bathroom)


C. B. FENTON & CO., INC
Tel. Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Heel
New Orleans Service
Arrive*
Cristbal
8.8. Qulrigua ................................March 18
S.S. (biriqu ................................March 23
'Handling aefrlirralrri Chilled and General Cargo
New York Service
Arrives
Cristbal
8.8. Veragua .............................._,..March 15
S.S. Heredia ................................Mareh 11
S.S. Era Rerlanga ...........................March IS
S.S. Yaque ..................................March IS
S.S. Sixaola .................................March 22
Cristobal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
Shipping & Airline News
Santa Luisa
Transits Tomorrow
The Grace Line's Santa Luisa
arrives tomorrow from Valparai-
so headed for New York. Among
Pan American's globe-circling
routes. Trippe recognized that
the future of air airlines was ir-
revocably tied to providing de-
pendable, extensive air transpor-
S.8. Quiligua ...............................March IS
S.8. Chiriqui ................................March 25
(Passenger Service Only)
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804
COLON 2
the Drominent passengers aboard'tation for both well-to-do and
are Cart Edward R Young,moderate-Income citizens of all
chief of the U.S. naval mission countries,
fn Chile Howard A. Tweksbury, He proved It with soundly
U 8 Ambassador in Asunclon.'successful tourist-fare schedules
Paraguay. Miss Doris May. assls-m Latin America.
i ant to Benjamin Cohen of the These moderate fare routes
UN Department of Public Infor-; produced the cold fact that a
mation and Major Luis Barros.' great majority of tourist pas-
who is the assistant of the Chil-jsengers could never have consid-
er naval attache in Washing-. ered swift air travel if a lower
ean navai aisacnc fare hfld M| been avaUable ^
ton- _____ them.
Tourist Flights to Open What kind of passengers are
Atlantic to Common Man these people?
The greatest travel bargain hi They Include mech a n i c s.
the history of aviation Is just a-;clerks, fanners, office workers,
round the corner for the aver-grocers, students, elevator oper-
ate citizen of the Western Hem- ators. cab drivers, salesmen, tall-
is'here ors- D*lcers *nd chorus girls
Pan American World Airways | people from all walks of life and
DC-6Bs are starting tourlat i from all area of the Western
flights from the United States to Hemisphere.
Europe May 1an innovation PAA flight personnel On the 92;
that represents a personal victo- tourist-type flights operated by i
ry for PAA President Juan T. pan American each week In La-1
Trippe in his long fight to bring tin America report that several |
trans-Atl&.ulc air fares within family groups are usually found.
the reach of the common man
-Pan American Immediately
announced plans for a trans-At-
Tel. Cristobal 1781
aboard the flights.
Many of the parents of these
families frankly relate that their
lantic tourist-class service with|vacati0ns would have been im-
ne-v DC-6Bs .possible if a lower fare had not
The all-year one way fare been available. The reduced l,
from New Ycrk to Lc.don is on- rates enabled them to use air.
lv S270 compared to the present transportation for trips that a a. a
$395 reblar fare. The tourist otherwise could never have heen IJorOthV HlCKS
round-trip between May 1 and,Iitted Into a two or three-week I ^^vl
Nov 1 is $*86 a saving of $225 vacation.
older recular fares. The tourist service has also;
BLUE FUNNEL LINE
accepting passengers for
LOS ANGELES
and
SAN FRANCISCO
by
M.S. "AGAMEMNON"
sailing March 12th.
C. B. FENTON & CO.. INC.


Balboa 1065
Makes Dean's List
'-"the8Marsha At Jones University
tli' tourist round-trip la only business version of
Chicles rringln- a European' Scores of small husmeases and GREENVILLE, S. C.. March 10
vacrt'on within the reach of all.Industries in both Lathi Ameri- Miss Dorothy Anne Hicks,
places of people. PAA officialsica and the United States have daughter of Mr and Mrs. Robert
DOln'-rl out two other major|prospered and expanded because!**^ Hicks of Balboa.
be-"efl''s: Isslcmen for their products could
i i A substantial Increase tn!*>e sent on f.-st. economical air
to is' dollTs flowinc to nations -ns to-new territories,
nr- reouivinT la-ge Un 11 e d The resultant flow of dollars*
St~'e-, aid crafts to cloe their '-jetween the Amerlnaa tas ptovtfl
dr"'-r shortn"es "n important p*rt in the fact.?1 \. * ,n " lPelT course M t unusual university."
?. A significant improvement:'ht onlv a small portion of U.S. *
In rnderstr>ndln Sns resulting frcm more people ?d ii Latin America, as compar-
be'~ pblc to travel. ed to huge sums sought bv na-
Ti the long vears of building *lons elsewhere.
HOW TO HANDLE HUSBANDS
PORTLAND, Ore. (UP) Mrs.
Albert Leo Willis told Judge J.
J. Qulllln she didn't know what
to do to stop her husband, who
was accused of driving while
drunk, from drinking away from
home. "Buy yourself a rolling pin |
and knock the stuffings out of
your husband If he comes home
with beer on his breath," the|
judge advised.
Included among students named
on the Bob Jones University
dean's list, which was released at
the close of the first semester.
These students ^^8121-*^-^^^^^; ^^
for the first semester of the
1951-52 academic year.
Miss Hicks is a member of a
student body of approximately
come from 47 states and from
more than a score of foreign
She Is a sophomore at the uni-
versity, enrolled in the School of
Fine Arts. She is chorister of
3.000 vounc people who have 1 Bronte Literary Society.
AND HEADACHY
BY MICHAEL OTWALLEI
-


MOM)
tH
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AW INDEPENDENT DAILT MEWgPAPB*
f aob nf
Rail Brotherhoods Strike NYC;
Traffic Crippled In Midwest
WASHINGTON, March 10.(UP)A sur-
prise Btrike by three railway unions crippled rail
traffic over much of the Midwest today and fed-
eral mediators said the government probably will
seek an injunction if the walkout is not ended
quickly.
The Army, which technically is running the
railroads, immediately promised "appropriate ac-
tion to get trains, rolling again."
The walkout, aimed at the New York Central
railroad, hit hardest at Chicago, St. Louis, Cleve-
land, 0., and Buffalo, N. Y.
A federal mediation official said there is little
doubt the strike will disrupt the defense program
and an injunction appears inevitable unless the
work stoppage is ended soon.
~
Union Leaders
Threaten
Of Dispute
Spread
Money Matters
HORIZONTAL VERTICAL
1 United State* 1 Shot out
monetary unjt 2 Son bird
10
The unannounced strike, which
came as a complete surprise,!
halted all freight and passenger I
operations on the New York i
Central railroad west of Buffalo,'
N. Y.. and crippled operations
of other Unes using NYC facil-
ities In several cities.
The Pennsylvania Railroad. I
largest in the nation, was not)
affected and other roads took!
steps to use other freight faci-
lities wherever possible to avoid |
interrupting their operations.
A spokesman for the New i
York Central in Cleveland said
the strike came as a "complete
In fact, we were
CLEVELAND, O., March
(UP). The leaders of three
operating railroad brotherhoods .
said here today they had called surprise
a "legal strike" against the New | caught with our pants down."
York Central, Western division. Company officials said they
and the Terminal Railroad learned that the three unions
Assn. of St. Louis as the "prac- sent telegrams to their mem-
tlcal way" to force a settlement bers telling them to walk off
In their long-standing dispute the job at 8 a.m. yesterday
with the nation's earners. morning.
They hinted the walkouts could !
spread to other railroads. Picket lines were reported In
D. B. Robertson, head of the Chicago, St. Louis, Cleveland,
firemen and englnemen, J. P. Toledo, O., South Bend, Ind.. Co-
Shields, of the engineers, and I lumbus, o.. and elsewhere. There
R. o. Hughes, of the Order of i were no reports of violence.
Railway Conductor, said In a | The striking unions are the
press conference they had called
out 5,000 of their members.
Robertson said that "our peo-
ple in charge of the situation
decided this was the practical
Brotherhodo of Locomotive
Engineers, the Brotherhood of
locomotive Firemen and En-
glnemen and the Order of
Railway Conductors.
7 English
monetary
units
18 Melodious
14 Specialist
15 Equipped
18 Former
English coin
17 Measure of
weight
18 Tremulous
20 Golf mound
21 Greek
province
23 African river 9 Fasten
24 Swiss 22 Pieces of
mountains ___
25 Former 24 Painter
Russian
general
27 Lock of hair
28 To lend
29 Monetary unit
of Latvia
30 Force
31 Hawaiian
wreath
32 Imposter
35 Most
counterfeit
30 Raise
40 Winnow
41 Weight of a
silver rupee
42 Measures of
area
43 Texas town
45 Headgear
48 Containing
nitrogen
48 Agree
50 Italian city
31 Laundry
appliance
B2 Slants
53 Disorder again
3 Woody tissue
part
4 Ship's record
5 Bewildered
6 Indians
7 Apostle
8 Beasts of
burden
9 Times of
prosperity
10 String
!l Droops (Prov. 32 Coins from
Eng.)
12 Emphasis
Anawer to Previoua Puizle
jll llll III IMM !
U
ISIPM'^ UK* r_iufj
K -' 1 MJ I ' I"1
BBHBBBimi I 115. r-"lBMMtM
'jr-.MUM.-' h='--'
T-V'.li 4'JgiK>mi
IN HOLLYWOOD
Bl BR8KINE JOHNSON
-----o
26 Bleaching vat 36 Early
27 Chinese geological era
monetary unit 37 Harbors
29 Welsh town 38 Small
candles
40 Confronts
43 The widow's
France
33 Television
part
34 Capital of
44 Land measure
former Lesbos 47 Knock
35 Distant 49 With (prefix)
were carrying passengers to De- eat and the Brotherhood o
trolt by way of Ontario, Canada. Railway Trainmen.
Passengers were forced to cross'
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) The
New Movie Faces: Alice Kelly
First dimpled darling to come
along In many a moon and UI's
white hope for glamour honors.
Right now she's being kissed by
Errol Flynn In "Against All
Flags," and sighs:
"Love scenes with Tony Curtis
and Erro!! I'm a lucky girl."
A classmate u! Debbie Reyn-
olds at Burbanlc High School,
brunet Alice was signed by War-
ners a few days after her gradu-
ation. Along with Deoble, her op-
tion wasn't picked up.
UI executives Bob and Leonard
Goldstein spotted her digging In-
to a steak at Chasen's shortly
after and started the ball rolling
for her again.
She'll also be seen In "The Son
Of All Baba" and "Francis Goes
to West Point."

Peter Graves: A husky, blond
"something for the girls'' who
comes Into Important stardom as
Andrea Kings co-star In the
forthcoming "Miracle From
Mars."
Even with a University of Min-
1 nrsota degree In theater arts,
and stock company experience,
Peter got the "sorry, nothing to-
|day" treatment from Hollywood
for 16 months.
Then producer Frank Melford
I signed him to a personal contract
and rushed him Into "Rogue
'River," and "Fort Defiance."
"Westerns are fine and it's fun
to ride the plains.'1 he told me
"but It doesn't give you any act-
ing challenges."

Mona Knox: A brunet beauty
who's looming high with a star-
ring roje In Jack Broder's "Kid
, Monk Baronl."
Mona studied her acting ABC's
] at Pepperdlne college in Los An-
geles, but says that she got oft
on the wrong foot by trying to
crash movletown big-time as a
I beauty contest winner.
She won the American Legion's
! "Miss Firecracker of 1949" title.
j appeared as "Miss July" in the
big calendar musical number In
, Columbia's "The Pretty Girl,''
then found the going tough.
"Producers don't Fake a beau-
ty contest winner seriously," she
said.
from Windsor, Ontario, to De-
troit by ferry or bus.
.Sli^S^S^S!^^^ a Fel I court inj, action,
lowed to proceed those carry- '^'""^Jhe raUroads of-
The Trainmen, who paid out
$101,000 In fines a year ago for
continuing another strike de-
"They take It for granted that
she has no acting ability."

Robert Sherman: A John Gar-
f leldlsh type, but one who doesn't
have to wear elevator shoes. The
rugged six-footer is off In a blase
of glory with his first film, "For
Men Only."
But for three years his breada
was un-buttered while he tried,
to get a movie break. Bob stud-
ted under the GI bill of rights at
a local dramatic school and
worked as a soda-jerk when the
course ended.
Paul Henreid spotted him In a
local little theater play, gave him
his flicker opportunity six
mouths later.
"I've starved, but It's worth It,"
Bob told me cheerfully.

Susan Morrow: A young lovely
with born-for-technlcolor skin
tones and tresses, who's one of
the fledglings in Paramount'.1!
"Golden Circle" group.
Credits: "The Greatest Show
on Earth," "War Bonnett," and
Flaming Forest," the latter as
John Payne's leading lady.
Susan was born Jacqueline Ann
Teresa Bernadette Imoor and
i says that her break came when
her photo accidentally fluttered
out of an agent's portfolio In a
casting office.
Keith Andes, RKO's entry in
the steeplechase to stardom, Is
,jalred with Marilyn Monroe In
1 Clash by Night."
Tall, off-beat Keith was slgn-
' ed by David O. Selznlck after his
war service and a stint In the
'Army Air Force show, "Winged
l Victory," but languished for two
years without facing a movie
camera.
1
Discouraged, he developed a'
singing voice and took to the
footlights in the road companyi
of "Kiss Me, Kate." Now it's a
second Hollywood chance for,
Keith, who assert*:
"I found oat that a sinking
actor can command more money
than a straight actor."

Jeffrey Hunter: A fast-mover
at 30th Century-Fox with roles
in "Red Skies of Montana" and
"The Frogmen" to his credit.
Jeffrey attracted talent scout
attention by appearing In a
UCLA play as Henry McKlnnes. a
name that was quickly changed
by studio brain boys.
Married to Paramount's Bar-
bara Rush. Jeffrey, who suggesta
silent star Richard Bartheimesa'
In appearance, says:
"It works out very well. We
study scripts together and critl-;
clze each other."
answer the call
0+
195? RED CROSS FU)
way to deal with the situation." i The approximately 135,000: lowed to proceed those carry- - - "'^t "o-
He added that there was "no members of the three unions, ing military supplies, perish- | *nLcvht' SSX^aiemeraencv
it's Maritime TONIGHT!
Panama Canal cfneaters -
particular reason for the strike|have authorized strikes in sup- abies and the like JESS ^Lthmmu"aU^Tectcd
against the New York Central! port of their two-year-old bat- The company said it will do "" g remen
and the St. Louis Association," [fe with the railroads for im- - h"* *" """> "critical
but made clear it was a "token proved wages and working con-
walkout" designed to force the rjitions.
issue. The firemen recently rejected
Notice ot the walkout went out an emergency Presidential fact
its best to keep "critical"
freight moving, using super-
visors to man the deserted posts.
Approximately one-half the
entire operations of the New
to 5,000
of thajg
and
cond
Al
at* on
the raj
had
n members 3,500 ; finding board's recommendation York Central were shut down,
lneera and firemen that" they accept a long-stand- It continued to run tratar
en, and the others jug company otfer.
4 The wace utas would glvej NewYoxk State aaA eajwhe^aj
#ey did^fot elaBbf-, yard workers Sl'centsan hour
term 'legal strike, and the roadmen 23-V cents.
is said that votes jn addition thev would be en-
It by members ap-, titled to two or three cents more
proving the walkout and since ot recent increases in the cost
they construed the dispute as' 0f living,
on* only between their unions
both passenger and freight in
and the carriers and not the
government the walkout was
legal.
Orders Issued to the general
membership said that "the In-
structions contained In this cir-
cular are Intended to apply not
The money is acceptable to
the unions, whose disputes
with the railroads are closely
linked together, but they have
balked at company proposals
for changes in working rules.
A New York Central spokes-
only on the several railroads man at Cleveland said at least
first to become actually en- 1io.o&d workers are affected by
gaged In the strike, but shall the strike,
govern on every other railroad
10 which the strike may latter | At least 30 NYC trains were
be extended. tied up at Cleveland and the
"If It is determined to extend une cancelled many of its crack
the strike to other railroads,. trains running between New
lull Information will be furnish-' York. Boston, and Chicago, in-
td sufficiently in advance of eluding the famed "Twentieth j to halt a nationwide strike by
the effective date of the strike century Limited." four nnions the three hi-
to enable those In charge to, gome NYC trains, however,' volved in the present walk-
complete all necessary arrange-
ments." 11
In strike instructions, dated
March 8, orders were given to;
permit "...handling and tran-
sporting of finished war ma-
tererlals and supplies, troop
trains, hospital trains and milk
trains."
The walkout, a Joint state-
ment said, "climaxes more than
two years of continuous efforts
by the three brotherhoods to
negotiate a peaceable settle-
ment of their request* for wage
increases and Improvements in
working condition's major rail-
roads art Involved in the dis-
pute," the statement said.
The three brotherhood lead-
ers said "we have exhausted
every possibility of negotlalon In
our efforts to obtain a fair and
honorable settlement.
When It appeared that nego-
tiations and mediation had
fallad, we made a joint offer to
arbitrate the entire controversy.
The .railroads refused to arbi-
trate. That was six months ago."
east of Buffalo.
The key St. Louis and Chica-
go rail terminals, gateways to
traffic bound for the west and*
for the Korean war front, were
not shut down.
But New York Central opera-
tions In those cities were halted,
along with wholly-owned NYC j
subsidiaries such as the Michi-
gan Central. Big Four and To-
ledo and Ohio Central rail-
roads.
Chicago's vital belt railroads,
partly owned by NYC, were not
shut down.
But the St. Louis Terminal
Railroad, which does all switch-
ing into the 8t. Louis terminal,
was Idled.
The government took over
the railroads In August, 1958,
MONARCH
TK FAMILY FAVORITE FOR
ALMOST 100 YEARS
This King of all
Cough Mixture* comes
From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
The King at all cough medicine*
Buckley'! CANAD 101 M,iurt -
hat been used *o. years lnaover 70%
ot Cenodo't home. Fast working
triple acting Buckley t Canadlol Mix-
ture quickly loosens and rutes phlegrr
iodged In the tubet clean air pei-
sagei toothet rasped raw tissues
one Or two tips and wont coughmc
spotm ceoies You get results losi
You feel the effect 0 Buckley's in-
fantry.
Compounded from rore Cenodic
Pine Boltam and other soothing heel-
ing ingredients Buckleys CANADIOl
Mixture It different from anything
you ever tried do get a bottle of th.
g-eot Csnodtan cough medicine 10
day ot ony good drug store
Mows arch finer foods
are today the stand-
ard of quality all over
the world. They are pre-
pared in the moat modern
manner... but retain all the real
old-fashioned flavor..Five generations
have proved Monarch finer foods... the
BEST by TEST. There are over 500
Monarch finer foods. Ask for them in your
grocery store. If your dealer does not
stock Monarch finer foods, inquire of:
MO\ \K< II
World's Largest Family of Finer Foods
COLON ragaropulos. S. A. Tel. 1000
Distributora in the Republic:
PANAMACia. Panamericana de Orange Crush
HOME DELIVERY Tel. 3-3219
COMINO
THURSDAY!
TO THE
LUX THEATRE
AND THE
CECILIA
Simultaneous Release!
distanl
space
it came...
to bring the
world fate-to face
with t most
terrifying
expeliente!
THE
DAY
THE
EARTH
STOOD i I
STILL
Nrr
We
BALBO A
Air-CetteirteiMS
' *'*
Junr- ALLYSON e Vin JOHNSON
"TOO YOUNG TO KISS"
Tneteer "THE TALL TAaOKT"
DIABLO HTS.
fUS A 7:lt
Richard CONTZ e Julie ADAMS
"THE HOLLYWOOD STORY"
TueeStr "KEYS TNUST A GAMBLP.
COCOLI
Si 7.M
Dene CLARK e Cathy O'DONNILL
'NEVER TRUST A GAMBLER'
Taetiey "TOUT WORTH"
GAT UN
(TaeeSeyi __ __
Vivien LllOtl Merlon BRANDO
"STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE"
MARGARITA "MADONNA OF THE DESERT
e:l lit nrl "NORTH OT THE GREAT DIVIDE''
____________________T.~U TWO LOST WOaPL* -----------
CRISTOBAL
Air-CamHMMMS
S:ll A l:!t
Tyrone POWER e Ann BLYTH
"I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU"
'Teehni -flor)
Tueteey -roacr. or arms"
OFFICIAL LISI OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Prize-Winniai Number* in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1722, Sunday, March 9, I9S2
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two series "A" "B" of 23 places each.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
5538
1 859
6082
$ 44,000.00
$ 13,200.00
$ 6,600.00
Mm frtfc- Sm rru I IMM Nee Prtet 1 IMM r- rtae | t IMM MM
ees* IMM IMS MM 'MM MM
mm i M.et UM IM.M 2IM IMM JIM IM.M j 4IM
MM IMM 123* IMM IMS IMM MM i32.ee 4HS
3.1 l3f.M ISM IMM MM i32.te :133* IMM OM
43* llt.M 1M IMM MM IMM Mat IMM MM
MM j.jee.et ISM 2.2M.M MM 2,Mt.M JH* 2.IM.M MM
MM IMM ISM IH.M MM IM.M ;mm IMM MM
73* 1M.M ITM IMM m IMM SIM IH.M IM
MM IM.M ISM IMM MM IM.M MM IH.M UM
em IH.M IMS IM.ee MM IMM MM IH.M MM
v
MM
SIM
l>rlu
I
132
IH.M
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IH.M ; MM
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IMM STM
132 tt MM
I32.M StM
IMM rtee Wtee t*u PrlM. I IH.M Nee. Prleet 1 132.M Nee PMM IH.M
S IH.M MM IHM TMS MM MM
IH.M IM IHM TIM IHM sin IH.M IM in.t>
IH.M MM 132.M 7SM i32.ee MM IHM MM IHM
IHM .:nx IHM IMS 132.M MM IH.M MM IHM
132 M MM 1H.M IUS IM.M MM 1H.M MM 132 M
M.ftMM 5M 2.2M.M ISM 2.2M.M MM 2.2M.M MM 2.2M.M
I32.M MM IHM ISM IHM MM IH.M MM 132.M
IM.M t73* 1J2.M ITM 131 M MM IHM MM IH.M
IHM MS IH.M 7HS IMM MM IHM MM IH.M
IHM MM IHM i THS IH.M MM IU.M MM 131M
Is.
Apffoximattow Derived from First Wie
SMI
SU2
M SMS
I
MS.M
M.M
SMS
SMS MM
SMI M.M
Apffoiiaiatioaa Perivrt) From Second Prix
IMI
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ne.M mm
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IMM IMS IK-
MM MM M.M
mm Mit mm em
t
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Priae-winnina oumber ot resterdavs Letter drawlne were sold: 1st and tad 4n Panam; Srd in Chlrlqul.
The nine aandred whole tlekete eadina in t amd aet iacl uded In the abeve ttst arta rartv-Feeir Dellari The whole ticket hat 44 plecas which comprise the two serla* "A* and "B."
Slined by: ALBERTO ALIMAN. Oovernor of the Province of Panama.
ANTONIO M08C080 B.. Representative of the Ministry of Treasury.
0-IT\Pis:pc. Padro J. Vera O.-Cd #IC-RA- 10300J4I
WITNESSES. Ramn Roearlo-Cd. SFC-RA-30401361
CARLOS CRISMATT
Notary Public. Panam.
PABLO A. PINBL U.
Secretary


"

Pag nrx
Till! PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1981


H
You Sell em When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds I
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
kWI!> SavKVlCi
.UttKU 04 UlSgBPa
.OKKiMiN'h
Me. 4 raarn MM are.
WlHI '-441
BO'l'H'A CAKLTON
lw. "5?
-#!*
?
)AU)M Ufe BELLEZA AMERICANO
Ne. U Won 1Mb *eo
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
Na "H" HIIMl rt
iM' Central ^e. ~
sot
12 words-
Minimum (or
3c. each additional
word.
Govt. Cleanup Chief Denies
Alleged Communist Link
By Calbraitl?
FOR SALE
li.lllM'llolll
FOR SALE
Automobile
FOR SALt: -GRAND" flos Hove,
full sue broiler and full size oven,
5175.00. Also De Luxe Storklme
highehoir. SI 5.00. Qtrs. 17, Al-
brook, phone 86-3181
FOR SALE:Refrigerator 25 cycle,
$40.00. 0774-G, Wiiliomson
Place, Bolboo.
WANTED
Miscellaneo'i
WANTEDCaterpillar Troctors Od-
er D-6. Write to J. J. R. Jackson,
Hotel El Panama.
WANTED:--One u-.ed motor scoot-
er with cargo compartment. Tel
3-IM4.
WANTED: To rent 3 bedroom
house, responsible porty. Coll
Mayor Falling. 2-1688, Panamc.
WANTED:Elderly woman wishes to
share cost ond trip in privte ccr
to Dovid, Chiriqui, storting March
13. 14. 15, 16. Reply Box 134
Panama American, A. E. M.
. JACOtY ON moot
Service Personnel ond Civilian
Government Employes
be sate
for your Automobile Finoncing
Insist en
Government Employes Finance Co.
ot
Fort Worth, Texas
new office at
Ne. 43 Automsbilt Sew
Next door to the Firestone Building
also through your oulo dealer
We sove you money on
Financing end Insurance
also direct loans on automobiles
AGENCY DEHLINGER
tiene 3-4914______________3-4915
Agencios Cosmos. Automobile Row
29, will solve your Auto-Problem.
Tel, Panama 2-4721. 'Open oil
day on Saturdays.
,:OR SALE:94," 8 Cyl.PontiacTi
door. Torpedo. Best offer over
$300.00 accepted. 4 new recaps..
Qtrs 17 Albrook. phone 86-3181.
OR SALE: 49 Pnntiac, Sedan 2
door, rodio, Nvlon Upholster,,
Good price. Tel. 2-3444, Mr. Cr-
doba.
MISCELLANEOUS I RESORTS
De rev Mve a eVinkmt arcolen?
Write AleofcaHei Aneeirmem
i 2031 Aneen C. Z
Tronsportes Boxter, S. A. Shipping
moving, storage. We peck ond
crate or move onything. Tele-
phone 2-2451 2-2562. Pana-
ma.
Gromlich's Santa Clare beoch-l
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gat
stoves, moderte rotes. Phone 6-i
441 or 4-567.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:One TD-14 Interno-
tional Tractor with blade ond 6
cubic yards Carryall in first clcss
condition. Call Ponomo 2-2154,
during working hours.
FOR SALE:One professional hoir
dryer, powerful 60 cycle motor in
good condition. Colon 1419-L,
Gaiety Beauty Salon.
Foster's cortoges cowolalal furnish-
ed, one, two or three bedrooms,
linens, g a I refrigerators, gas
ranges, dishes and kitchen ware.!
Half a mile beyond Santa Clarai
private rood to beach. For ln-
formation visit or phone Dagmor,'
Tivoli Avenue No. 6, 2,-0170.!
Panamo.
rUHie.. Oceons.de cottage*. Santo
Clero. Box 435. Balboa Phono
Panama 3-1877, Cntrobol i-1673 I
Williams Sonto Ciara Beach Cottages.;
Two bedrooms. Frigidaires, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
OJMMtKUAL (J
PROFESSIONAL
We have everythinr.
to keep vour Lawn
and Harden beautiful
durine the dry season
FOR SALE:Portoble electric sewing
machine, attachments, button-
holer. $100.00; Zenith table
ms new pink satin toe shoes, acces-
sories, size 1-C, $8.50, Albrook
6143.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:Furnished chalet. Tel.
3-2115.
Help Wanted
BY OSWALD JACOB*
-!- r>r vr\ Service
COOK & MAID Needed. Recom-
mendation necessary. 49th Street
No. 17. Phone 3-4408.
Position Offered
FOR SALE:Baby orchids bouquets,
corscges for hospitals; birthday
gifts, oil occasions. Also air ex-
pressed anywhere in U.S.A. Or-
chid Garden, Tel. Ponamd 3-0771
Atlantic Side, Cristobal, 1033.
FOITSALE
Real Estate
FOR RENT
Apartments
north n
QS32
#7
? K3
? Q109S
InWW EAST
*" *
?AKJH3 V Q 109 62
? QJinl 4>ISS
*' *AJ73
SOI TH
? AK J 10 5
? 5
? A74
0>K(S2
Both side vul.
Se.d Was* North
1 W 2 A
44 Paaa Pa.
Opening leadV K
3^
Pass
Arthur Glatt, of Chicago, who
won the National Open Pair
Championship in Detroit, has
long oeen known as one of the
outstanding players of the coun-
try. The deiensive plays he .rac'e
in the hand shown today explain
wny lie t au ..........
ieliow expert,.
Olatt opened the king of
hca...j it'u.,i uie West hanu anu
then shiited to the queen o dia-
monds. Declarer won with dum-
my's km ot diamonds, drew two
rounds of trumps, then cashed
the ace of diamonds and gave up
diamond trick.
The average defender would
automatically return a club, thus
simplifying declarers play of
that suit. It would then oe pret-
ty easy for declarer to hola the
loss to one club trickwnich is
11 he can afford to lose.
Olatt had taken the precau-
tion of counting, so he knew that
declarer had only five trumps,
three diamonds, and one heart!
to begin with. Hence he must
have started with four clubs in
each hand.
It could do him no good to
discard a club from either hand.,
o Glatt calmly led a second
heart, allowing declarer to ruff I
fea his own hand and discard a
elub from dummy.
vvluus more me Chicago ex-;
pert had taken the precaution of
playing the ten ana Jack of dia-
monds on the second and third
rounds of that suit. He still held
the nine of diamonds, but he had
made it look as though his part-
ner held that card.
South now had to play the
clubs instead of having them
played for him. He led a low club
from-his hand and put up dum-
my's queen. East won with the
ace of clubs and returned a low-
club, whereupon South had to
decide whether to play the king
or let the lead ride to dummy's
ten. !
South stewed about this prob-
lem for a lung time. It looked to
him as Uioug.i West had started
with two trumps, onlj three dia-
monds, and probably six hearts.!
If West had only two small clubs,'
Why hadn't he returned a club'
Ins.ead of a second heart?
South filially decided that
Wt>t must have the blank jack
of cijos at this stage, so he put
up the king from his hand. "Tills
play, induced by Olatt'a unread-
able defense, cost declarer the
contract.
WANTED: Experienced American
Beauty operator, Balboa Y.M.C.A.
Telephone Bolboo 3677.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 People Moat
Presents
Today, Monday. Mar. 10
P.M.
3:30Music for Monday
4.00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Sho w
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cia
Alfaro. S.A.
:15Evening Salon
7:00The Bin* Crosby Show
(VOAl
7:30Sports Review
7:45Scouting at the Crossroads
8:00News and Commentary,
(VOAi
: 15Halls of Ivy (VOAi
8:45Commentator's Digest
tVOAi
8:00The Man In Black
i BBC i
9:30Symphony Hall (VOA)
10:00The World at Your Win
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off
FOR SALE:New Chalet Vi mile be-
yene1 town Chorrara. Three hee"-
rooim; livinf room; har; all modern
conveniences. Two acres titled
lane), right at National Highway.
Completely furniihed. Mr. Voleos.
Tel. 3-1107; er caretaker at pre-
mises.
FOR SALE: -- Lovely lorge house,
large garage, patio breezewoy.
Real Home' tile and cement com-
p'etely furnished ready to move
into, water, electricity, locked
fence. Price $4,500.00. $3,000
cosh, balance terms, inspection
daily, phone Balboa 2-2646, Foster
i Gorgonc).
ALHAMIRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ments Mold service optional. Con-
tort office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone >386 Colon.
LOST b FOUND"
LOST: Pekinese dog, answers to
name Lady, if found return to 4th
of July 45 Tel. 2-4379. Reward.
Position Offered
fool*
Hose
Fencing
8prayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow
insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-014*
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
#22 E. 29th St.
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Buying: Interamerlcan Hotel
and Abbatolr.
Selling: Panam Forest and
Fuerza y Lai (preferred)
Tel. 3-4719 3-1060
z-i
T. m. h v< s. rw. on.
"We're asking you to donate something special for oury,
church bazaar, Mr. Joinstwo pounds of namourgtrl^
-----. e------ |
Mrs. Lew Hostess
To Peruvian Navy
On Florida Tour
WANTED:General bookkeeper ond
accountant. 25 to 40 years of
age, who con maintain complete
set of books and prepare financial
statements. Excellent storting sa-
lary, with wonderful opportunity
for advancement in a well estab-
lished company located in Colon
Only qualified, applicants with ex-
perience will be considered. Give
record, of present and previous
employment in reply.
WANTED:Typist ond general of-
fice clerk, 21 to 40 yeors of age.
Must be fast ond accurate. Good
salary ond opportunity for ad-
vancement with well established
compony in Colon. Give full par-
ticulars in reply. Box 93. Colon.
MODERN FURNITURE
cusmas 01111.1
SUpcovet Reanholstery
visn ova SBOW-snoMi
Alberto Bare
J. r ae m Oaaa T (Aateaioblle lee)
free Esrtiaate Plrknp A Deliver
Tel. 1-4k2X 40 am la t* eat
Silver City Woman
Found Dead At Home
A 45-v-ar-old Silver City real-
dent was tound dead In her
fta.ri.ers early Simony morulnr.
puarerOv from natural ra:=e*.
The rtrsri rvompn Is Alice
Bl?:se a Martmican. ho lived
at Quarters 6067-E in Silver City ;
A:i autopsy has been requested
frv the police.
Tomorrdo*, Tuesday. Mar. 11
A.M.
8:00Sign On Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15News (VOAi
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Hawaiian Harmonies
9.00News
9:158acred Heart Program
9:30As 1 See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off The Record (Cont'd)
11:30 Meet the Band
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
2:00A Call From Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Spirit of the Vikings
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little 8how
3:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Panamuslca Story Time
4:15Promenade Concert
4:30Whats Your Favorite
6:00Linda's First Love Cia
Alfaro, 8.A.
6:15Evening 8alon
7:00Ray's A Laugh
7:15Musical Interlude
7:30PABST 8PORTS REVIEW
7:43Jam Session
8:00News and Commentary
VOA
8:15 The Jo Stafford 8how
'VOA'
8:3dTime For Business 'VOA'
8:45Commentator's Digest
' VOA)
9:00Musical Americana
* 'VOAI
9:30 Pricie and Prejudice
'BBC'
10-00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
0:30Variety Bandbox iBBO
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sin Off
Explanation of tbe Symbol*
BBCBritish Broadcasting Cor-
poration
VOAVoice of America
Mrs. Angela Muoz Lew for-
mer resident of Panama, arrived
here from her home In Jackson-
ville. Florida last week.
Mrs. Lew played a prominent
Dart in entertaining the officers
and men of the Peruvian Navy
who arrived in Florida in time'
for the transfer of three U.S. ,
Navy fighting ships to their gov-
ernment. .
During the ceremonies which
made the transfer official, that
took place at Green Cove Springs
in Florida on Feb. 22. there were
100 Peruvian sailors present.
Fernando Berkemeyer. Peru-
vian Ambassador to the U.S. :
signed the transfer papers and
directed the commissioning of
the three destroyer escorts that
became BAP. Castilla. Aguirre
and Rodriguez, reactivated from
the "mothball fleet" of the Florl- j
da Group. Atlantic Reserve Fleet. I
The three ships will now un-f
, tions in the Florida area and are I
scheduled to arrive in Peru dur-!
lng May.
Mrs. Lew is visltine her family
In Panama and will return to!
Jacksonville within a week.
Unlocked Bank Open
To Monkey Business
gm "A Fine
- Opportunity
to Learn
From
The Best"
Want to be
the most at-
tractive
couple on the
floor? Then
bring your favorite partner to
Harnett & Dunn NOW and
improve your dancing togeth-
er. Modern rales use our
Budget plan fitt payments
to paydays. So. come in today
and save. Why miss the fun I
Balboa VM( A 2-2S3* or
Box Ids Balboa Harnett and Dunn.
DR. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. 8c Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
- I-rETAOIN SHRDL nou onu
NEW ORLEANS, March 10
(UP). Fred Davis walked into
a branch bank to cash a check I
Saturday and found himself all
alone, surrounded by vacant;
desks and empty tellers' cages.
Two thoughts struck him al-J
most at once: 1. it was Satur-
day and the bank was supposed
to be closed 2. Suppose the po-
lice should investigate the un-
locked bank and mistake him
for a bandit.
Suddenly shaking. Davis
reached for a telephone, looked
up the bank managers number
and called him. The manager
wasn't at home.
&3 oTmtn^n'ershed^'^'r Scout troops on the
the bank and through the door ?"nal Za,e ^J1? ,a,part "?
to surround him lhe rallv " ^ held at u,e 10ot
Davis convinced them he was ,thc?,.f?ps S*?,^* ^^ Ad"
just an innocent would-be cus- mtlnaislratlon Bulldln8. Saturday
&L V A.til.
The rally, to celebrate the
40th anniversary of the Girl
Girl Seoul Rally
Scheduled Saturday
WASHINGTON, March 10 Government cleanup chief |J,'t \JI~mi\,l-j
Newbold Morris declared today (| '" "'
he is "not a subversive lndl-,
vidual and am really very care-
ful about my associations."
Morris defended his past In
an exchange of tetters with
Sen. Karl E. Mundt (R., 8. D.).
The letter was made public.
Mundt had asked the anti-
corruption boss on Feb. 4 to'
answer a detailed series of ques-
tions about Communist Front
organizations to which Morris'
name had been linked.
The New York attorney, a
Republican, said "I cannot reply |
to all the inquiries in your let-
ter or Feb. 4." But he denied'
ever being "actively connected"!
with the American Committee t
for Yugoslav Relief, Inc., which
has been cited by the Justice I
Department as subversive and
Communist.
Mundt said he was "disap-
pointed" that the cleanup
chiefs replies had been so "gen-
eral,''
I sincerely hope you have
better success in securing spe-
cific answers to your question-
nalrc to Government employes;
than I have had with my spe-1
clflc questions to you," Mundt
wrote Morris.
Morris is preparing to circu-,
late questionnaires among some |
25,000 Government employes
seeking information on income I
and oiher matters. The first
will go to Attorney General J.
Howard McGrath.
Morris has been called to,
testify this week belore the Sen-
ate's permanent investigating
committee. His appearance may
delay the first step in his
cleanup program, the distribu-
tion ot tne questionnaires.
The Senate investigators are
looking into shipments of Rus-
sian oil to Communist China in
1949-50 by a Chinese-financed!
firm represented by Morris' law
firm.
The shipments were before
the Korean fighting started.
Morris is president of China In-
ternational Foundation, Inc., a
non-profit foundation which in-
directly controlled the ships at
the time.
Charges that Morris' name
was linked to Communist Front
groups first were made by Rep.
Charles E. Potter (R., Mich.),
who lost both legs In World War
II. Potter is a member of the
House Un-American Activities
committee.
Morris, replied then that Pot-
ter's charges were "too asinine
for reply." He was quoted as
saying, "I never have been a
member of any Communist
Front organization unless he
la referring to the American So-
ciety for Russian Relief."
In his reply to Mundt, Mor-
ris said he served as chairman
of the Russian relief society's
New York committee.
"If you look at the member-
ship of that committee," Morris
said, "You will see some of the
leading bankers and Industrial-
ists and businessmen were as-
sociated with me at a time when
Russia was one of our fighting
allies."
Morris said he would not have
replied as he originally did to
Potter's charges had he known
Potter was a legless war veter-
an.
sweredVndt sooner "because Death In Family Balboa High PTA
he was trying to get "the best p^ll. ii '*,-,__-.
possible talent" for his cleanup Lolls Maintenance Meets Tomorrow
,' "Two of tholr boys wert draftednow vva know they'll
i have room if wt want to visit them In the sprint*!''
SHORTS
Chief To Glendale
F H. Lerchen 1 aintenance en ^T^Srs^ocWn %
Engineer, left Thursday by air hold a buslness meetln tomo,._
form Glendale, Cal., beause of ,
Wine Beyond Price
HOUSTON, Texas (UP.) A
roughly-dressed man walked ln-
I to a fashionable Houston liquor
store and asked for a bottle of
cheap wine.
Mrs. Ruby DeLozler, the r-lr-rk
said the store didn't handle that
brand.
He asked for another cheap
brano Again the clerk didn't
have it.
The man put his hand in his
coat pocket as if holding a pis-
tol.
i "This is it . stand over there
by the shelf . now show me
the cheapest wine you got," he
gruffly demanded.
Mrs. DeLozler pointed to a 59
cents bottle.
"What, you don't have any
for 49 cents?" the man asked
in amazement. "Fifty nine
cents is too much."
He walked out.
tomer.
Officials of the Whitney
Branch Bank at Road and Ca-
nal couldn't explain Immediat-
ely why the door hadn't been
locked. But the bank wasn't
such a set-up as it might seem.
All its money rested behind
multiple locks In the vault.
And Davis, if he hadn't got
so scared, could have walked
out the way he came in.
P Vl'KOl M\\ ROKRFO
LINCOm. Neb'. lUP.-ClrtUiff ",h?i* l. "5 r,S*S"lw i " "'ht ' ,:S0 '" ""
KMsr.^eSfiS as fJs&tsssss:-^ -*
NOT
high school students are Invited.
bus, believes In practicing what
he preaches. Warnke has donat-
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (UP)ed 40 pints of his own blood
Cadet Aseron Cadet
Promoted To Staff
For Citadel Movie
Local 900 Holds
Meeting Tomorrow
The Balboa Chapter of Local
900. GCEOC-CIO will hold a spe-
cial meeting tomorrow at the
Pacific Clubhouse.
Reginald Callender. vice chair-
man of the retirement campaign
committee will report on the
progress made up to now.
Other principal speakers on
the agenda will be International
representative Ed welsh and
president Edward Gaskln.
Scouts, will honor the founder
of the American Girl Scout
movement, Juliette Low.
In a colonul ceremony, repre-
sentatives from each troop will
present their troop's contribu-
tions to the Juliette Low world
Friendship Fun.
Nearly $200 from the fund
was allocated from the National
: Girl Scouts In 1951 to the Zone.
It helped to send two represen-
tatives of the newly Informed
I International Girl Scouts to the
Stales to be trained at Camp
' Edith Macy. This fund has been
{used In the past In many parts
_,,_-, -,., _ ' of the world to foster world
_5?L,?i!TO?' SC MaIch 10 friendship between scouts and
r^oi^nSfo ,AKs.er?n. of Ancon; guides and to help new groups
The Citadel, military college of Another feature nf-th all
eTln C?T*K^r^ Ittau^Vieaat0^ahthermg
gr of, The Citadel Corp. o, Ca- |Tdu%? put^a iSL!
He also has been onnnintert o'tlon o iolk dancinK "nder the
phoLgrap^r S^lffSE?." Ji^S .' WeSlCy T0Wn"
^imental public relations e.:-|ac-5~lliedlllle ^
The movie, to be under the *U1 d??ce. "(Hf,re,hWeDO0nu,nd
direction and supervision of the Jhe Mountain the Pacific in-
public relations committee is to tefmuate outs will dance
depict Ufe at The Citadel in the "Fo"r In,A Boat and both
form of a documentary. groups will participate in danc-
Aseron was recently promot- m|. "I wnt l0 Be a Farmer."
ed to the rank of cadet corporal Brownie Scouts attending In
and Is assigned to F Company, family groups will participate in
second ground dforces battalion, dancing "Swinging on a Swing"
He is a member of the NeVrnan and "John Jacob Jlnglehetmer
ANYTHING FOR FREE EMPTY TALK
FORT WORTH, Tex. V(UP-A
poll by Texas Christian Unlver-lr^ warnke, blood donor chair-1 while exhorting others to do tha
slty to learn Just why students)man f0r the Knights o Colum- same for blood banks,
select a particular school drew
this reply from one freshman:
"They sent me a free catalog."
PAYS BY CHECK
FORT WORTH, Tex. (UP>A
cautious motorist who was tak-
ing no chances left a check fast-
ened to his parking meter. The
check was made out to the City
of Fort Worth for 10 cents.
THIEVES LOSE OUT
ALBUQUERQUE. N. M. (UPI
Mrs. T. F. Douglas came out win-
ner In her exchange Vlth three
nervous men she surprised in her
chicken yard. They escaped but
their truck hung on a bridge pil-
ing and they had to abandon it.
JURORS NOT CONVINCED
CHARLESTON, W. V*. (UP)
Sherman McFarland told Judge
William J. Thompson that the 1
bottles of whiskey he had In his
house were only for his own use
and that of his friends. An un-
believing Jury convicted McFar-
land of Illegal whiskey sales.
Club and is a photographer for
The Guidon. Cadet handbook,
and The Sphinx, Cadet yearbook.
He is studying Military Science
and Tactics under the ground
force's department of Infantry,
and is a pre-medical ma'jor.
Schmidt."
Parents and adults are in-
vited to the program which will
start at 9 am. and will be over
about 11- In case of rain the
Rally will be held in the Balboa
Gym.
Highest, Lowest Speeds
Recorded By Science
OTTAWA (U.P.)No speed is
too high, and none too low, to
escaoe the interest of scientists
at the National Research Coun-
cil
NRC scientists are working on
project* involving speeds from
five to 3.500 miles per hour.
The 3,500 MPH work was In
a supersonic wind tunnel where
scientists are testing the
streamlining ot guided missiles.
The five mph work was done by
biologists Interested in finding
out how fast a mosquito Olea.
DISTRIBUTORS: V-1A. V*-YKINVJJV de Ae
m**dLas**m*mtiiiBM


TfJt PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DA1LT NEWSPAPER
FA4M
MONDAY, MARCH M. 1989 "" r...,. w^,^------------------------- - -..-.,..... _........--------- _............ .,_. ------------..........--------
N.I.B. Tournament Living Up To Advance Notices
Thrilling Upsets Feature
Opening Round Of Play
NEW YORK, March 10.(UP)The National
Invitation Tournament nt New York is living up
to, its advance notices. Before the 12-team merry-
,go-round started, the experts said it would be
a wide open affair with any given team having
a good chance to take the title.
Tht first round backs that;up: month: It's the third straight
two of the three favored clubs year that North Carolina has
were eliminated to pave the way beaten Duke In the Conference
for some excitingand Interest-
ingaction in tonight's second
triple-header.
western Kentucky provided
the first upset by dumping fav-
ored Louisville 82-50 In the open-
ing gam. LaSalle of Philadelphia
followed In the second game by
eliminating favored Seton Hall,
80-76. Dayton was the only fav-
orite to pull through. The Ohio
school rolled over New York Uni-
versity, 81-66.
Tenight'i three far the -
priee-of-one schedule features
a first round game between
Holy Cross and Seattle and two
aarter final matchesWest-
ern Kentucky against St. Bon-
aventure and St. John's against
LaSalle.
A crowd of 18,422-the first
basketball sellout at Madison
Square Garden this season-
turned out for the opening
games
They saw two little mensix-
foot Gene Rhoades and five-foot
10-inch Dick Whitesteal the
how for Western Kentucky in
the opener. Rhoades hit for 16
points against Louisville while
White scored 16.
Tom Gola was the standout In
LaSalle i upset over Seton Hall.
Gola dropped In 30 points. Big
Don Mleneke matched Gola's to-
tal as Dayton rolled over NYU.
The Madison Square Garden
court wasn't the only one sup
plying basketball thrills-there
was excitement at Raleigh. N.C.,
and at Los Angeles.
At Raleigh, defending cham-
Ren North Carolina State kept
i Soethara ConfWrtSee title
by b.atinjr Duke. ft-M In the
finals of til Conference Tour-
nament. ^-^^- j
victory gives tsje-Woltpack
an automatic forth IP
tourney finals.
The name of the Pacific Coast
Conference representative In the
NCAA Tourney won't be known
until tonight.
The University of Washington
stayed in the race by beating
UCLA at Los Angeles. 53-50, to
even their best-of-three series.
The two teams meet again at Los
Angeles tonight and the winner
goes Into the NCAA regionals at
Corvallls. Oregon.
Six other berths tn the NCAA
Tourney are unfilled. Princeton
leads the Ivy League race with
nine wins and one loss in league
play, but the Tigers still have to
play Columbia and Pennsylvania.
The Prlnceton-Penn game this
Saturday figures as the key to
the Ivy League title.
The Big Seven champion
should be decided this week.
Kansas leads the way and can
clinch the title by winning Its
final game. The four other teams
In the NCAA will be made up of
members-at-large. And will not
be named until later.
The 14th annual National As-
sociation of Intercollegiate Bas-
ketball Tourneyknown as the
NATBr-atarts today at Kansas
City.
A field of 82representing the
best of some 350 small school
teamswill play during the week
with Eastern Illinois rated as the
6re-tourney favorite. Hamllne
nlverslty of St. Paul, Minnesota
Is the defending champ. Hamline
has won the NAIB crown three
times.
Juan Franco
Mutuel Dividends
The Tic
an autorr
Tourjtam
ent starting
K3
rTfftfr t
AA
this
Atlantic
Pony League
STANDINGS OF THE TEAMS
TEAM Won Last
M.K.fV .** 4 X
Btck....... .. .. t 8
C.P.O............. t S
Shamrock......... 8 8
Game of March :
Shamrocks 18, C.P.O. I.
C.P.Or
Hart, 8b ..
Gibson, c .. ..
Newhard. 3b ..
Crawford, p ..
Dldler, cf-p.. .
Recela, If .. ..
Ramsey, ss.. ..
McJennett, rf..
Hamilton, lb-p
AB R
8 1
1
Competition For
Balboa Relays
to Be Best Ever
Competition will be- keener
this year than anytime In the
past in the Third running of the
Balboa Relays on April 18th.
This big meet, sponsored by the
Student Association of Balboa
High School, Is a night affair,
and will be held at the Balboa
Stadium.
CompeUtlon will be keener
due largely to the tremendous
Interest shown to date by the
various Military establishments
In the Zone. Albrook Air Force
Base, 33rd Infantry, and 504th
Field Artillery are all at work
building up strong teams and
Individual entries for the Relays.
In addition to the military side
of it, there will probably be an
even stronger entry from the
Athletic Club than In the past.
Track and field fans will re-
member that last year the A.C.
team, under the direction of
Jim Thompson, Just about won
everything In sight. Thompson
will again handle the Club boys,
but this year they will have
a tougher time of It.
Balboa and Cristobal Highs
are also expected to have their
strongest teams In the past sev-
eral years, to say nothing of the
new entry In the meet this
year from Panama. Coach Car-
los Belisalre Is working on a
group of school boys from Pan-
ama City to field the strongest
possible group.
Plans are moving along for
the Relays, according to the Di-
rector of the big meet, and the
Third Anniversary of the meet
should be one long remembered
by both fans and contestants.
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
THE STANDINGS

Balboa High, Gibraltar
Win In Twilight League
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL son and Luser. Time of Game
.,
PUTTING IT ON ICC__Sulkie drivers pilot their trotter., eipecially fitted with spiked shoes, over a
half-mile slippery course on froten Trench Creek Bay during a three-day harness racing meet at
________Clayton, N.Y. It's an annual sffsir. hai been going on since 1910. (NEA)
La Boca Captures Local Rate
Interscholastic Track Title
LEAGUE 1:15.
(Straight Season Standings) -----------
TEAM Won Lost Pet. SECOND GAMS
Balboa Brewers. ..11 5 .688 Merchants AB R IIFO
Gibraltar Life.. ..11 5 .688 De la Pefta, cf..
Balboa Hi School.. 5 18 .383 Francis, 3b. .' .
Panam Merchants 4 18 .258 Ridge, If. .
(Second Half Standings) Newhouse, lb. .
TEAM Won Lost Pet. a8mlth ....
Balboa Brewers. ..5 8 .714 Medinger, rf .
Gibraltar Life.. .4 3 .Ml Weeks, rf 0
Balboa Hi School. .3 3 .569 Raybr'ne, F., 2b 4
Panam Merchants 1 5 .167 Hearn, p .... 4
-------- Rayb'rne, H., ss 3
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS < Banton, c ... I
Balboa High School 3, Balboa McOlade, c. . 1
Brewers 2; Gibraltar Life Innur
anee 8, Panam Merchants 7. Totals.....88
TODAY'S GAME
(At Balboa Stadium4:45 p.m.) Gib. Life-
Balboa Brewers (Gibson 6-9) vs. Jones, cf .
Gibraltar Life (Lore 5-1). (Love, lb .
Keenan, lb
o
l
2
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
I
0
1

1

0
0
0
1
1

7 7 18 7 4
AB R
4 2
4 1
0 0
HPO
2 3
1 8
0 1
3Campesino
^SECOf
Totals............1 9 4
Oryls. If ..
Shamrocks
Newhard, 3b ..
Folumbo. 3b .
P-abri, rf .. ..
Cuater, cf-p-cf
Roblnette, lb ..
Rodriguez, ss..
Favorite, c .. .
G. Wetzel, p ..
Totals
4 0
AB R
2 I
3
2
3

1
2
........ 20 4 IB
Home RunsCuster, Favorite.
Two Base HitsReccia, Craw-
ford. 8truckout byWetzel 3,' 1Panchlta $3.20, $2.40.
riRST RACE
1-Golden Girl SAM, 85.20, $2.20.
2Romntico $5$0. $2.20.
".20.
DRACE
1Mintnda 314,-35, $4.80.
2Tap Girl $3.80, $2.60.
3Embustero $3.60.
First Doubles: (Golden Girl-
Miranda) $49.48.
THIRD RACK
1Belfarset $12.60, $3.
2Honey Moon $2.20.
One-Two: (Belfarset Honey
Moon) $19.89.
(FOURTH RACE
1 -Tupac 339.80, $5.60, $5.20.
2Doa Elelda $5. $5.
3-Tully Saba $6.60.
Quiniela: (Tupac -Dona Eleida)
644.64.
FIFTH RACE
1Cyclone Malone $4.60, $2.40.
2Avenue Road $2.20.
SIXTH RACE
1-Paques $7.40, $4.40, $8.40.
2-D.D.T. $5.80, $3.40.
3Apretador $4
SEVENTH RACK .
1Paris $3.80, 32.60.
2Hechlso $3.40.
Second Doubles: (Paeues-Par-
is) $18.89.
EIGHTH RACE
1Main Road $5.80. $3.60. $2.80.
2Dictador $8.20, 83.60.
3Keyhaven $2.60.
Quiniela: (Main FosH-Dirts-
dor) $42.99.
NINTH RACE
1Mon Etoile $12.60. $6-60, $5.
2Gaywood $3.80. $2.60.
3Trafalgar $2.60.
One-Two: (Mon Etoile-Gsy-
wood) S3S.I9.
TENTH RACE
Panam Retains Lead
In Interclub Matches
Won Lest Pet.
Team
Panama.
Amador. . .
Brazos Brooks.
Summit Hills.
Fort Davis. .
STANDINGS
At Summit Davis Amador
16
14
19K
14
17
18
10* -
tev
lOVs
If V
Braios
22
25
8
8
Tntsl
78'/
86
46
40 Yt
19
Average
19-5/8
18-2/3
15-1/8
13-1/2
6-1/3
Panama virtually clinched the 1952 Peteraon Interclub
Tournament yesterday when their Interclub team, out in full
strength this time, walloped Summit Hills 22 to 8.
Yesterday's was the Panama club's last match In thei
season standings when they n|ng .Runs Batted InNewhousa
handed the Panam Merchants 3 Medinger, H. Raybourne, Lov
a 9-7 setback In a free scoring 3 Dedeaux, De la Mater, Hlna
. ffnlK r*_u-..J ft.... UaMhanl \ (Hh.
dashes. I Life Ihsurancemen kept alive Totals
In the Junior Hlgh-Elementa- their chances to tie the Balboa
ry division, La Boca in winning.1 Brewers for the second half title
had stiff competition from the, and succeeded in going Into a tie
vastly Improved 8anta Cruz for first place in the
squad and the plucky Chagres
runners.
The scores follow:
HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION
School No. of No. of No. of Ttl.
lsts 2nd 3rd Pts.
La Boca. .9 6 7 70
Silver City 3 4 3 30
JR. HIGH-ELEMENTARY
DIVISION
School No. of
lsts 2nds 3rds Pts.
28 9 8 31
Score By Innings
Merchants 2 01 3 0 0 17
Gibraltar Life 0 2 2 3 2 0 x9
aRan for Newhouse in 7th in-
affair.
Balboa High, with a timely
plnch-hlt triple by Jerry Halsall,
with one out in the bottom halt
of the seventh Inning, pushed
across the tying and winning
markers for a 3-2 victory.
Flix Larrlnaga of the Brewers
Earned RunsMerchants 3, Gib-
raltar 3. Left on Bases Mer-
chants 6, Gibraltar 5. Home Ru
Love. Three Base HitDe-
deaux. Two Base HitDe la Mat-
er. Sacrifice Hit-Francis. Stolen
Bases-De la Pefta 2, Francis 2,
Ridge 2, Newhouse, F. Raybourne,
i,unBniiini reux i.rniig ui nic dicwcio Ridge 2 Newnouse, r. niywun,
ISION lost out to High School ace Don | Ravbourne, McOlade 2, Jones,
No. of No. of Ttl. Morton In a red hot pitching nilalnger, De la Mater. Hit by
2nda 3rds Pts. duel. i PUeVwHulltven bv Hearn. Basa
La Boca
Sta. Crux.
Chagres
TEAM
Commissary .... 8 1
Army Q M......8 1
Navy Ordnance. .. 8 1
C'tral Labor Office 4 1
Coraaal Sales Stars 3 1
Post Office......8 8
Army Signal .... 1 4
Building Division. 1 4
Kobbe alas Store. 9
Electrical Division. 9 5
LEADING BITTERS
Alfred Bowen
R. Angermuller (C).
V. Wilson (AS) .. .
F. Peralta (NO)".. .
O. Burrows (C) .. .
R. Foster (CLO).. .
A. Porras (AS) .. .
B. Sellman (PO).. .
C. Bynoe (CLO) .. .
M. Musa (NO) .. .
W. Oreenldge (ED).
8. Burton (CLO).. .
R. Jemmott (PO) .
L. Edghlll (CLO). .
AB H
(PLO) 16 12
16 9
18 10
22 12
25 12
19
17
19
32
17
17
17
17
15
833
SIS
.883
.899
.759
AM
a
Ate.
.800
.563
.559
.545
.545
.474
.471
.421
.419
.412
.412
.412
.412
.400
tournament' They have now piled up 78Vt points for the four Red Tank-
matches. Paraso .
Sunday at the Panama course the second place Ft, Amador Sliver C
club will try to do what seems unlikely whip Brazos Brook
22Mt to 7'/i. This la the score Amador must make in order to
tie Panama,
The Summit Hills contingent, which was expected to offer
the Panama club stiff opposition, dropped to fourth place five-
and-one-half points behind Brazos Brook. However, Summit
mee'.s Ft. Davis Sunday ana Is expected to regain third place.
Amador, like all the other clubs, came through to a lop-
dded 26 to 6 win ovar Davis yesterday.
Yesterday's lesuBs:
AMAD<7* FORT DAVIS
Oardner-Hayden...... 1
Kulikowski-Forrest. ... 0
Pacheco-Storis......0
Rrberts-8hine.......0
Powall-Wood......
Livlngston-KUkle. .
Belvey-Mlller.....
Snead-Crum.....
DeBraal-Hlgglnbotham
Hurdle-LaBaoz. . .
snawv'
Lombrioa-Starrett. Jt. .
Hinkle-Graham. .
Kenna-J. Rlley. .
Roblnson-Smlth.
Oaxriel-Lally. .
Highsmlth-Aikew.
Flemmlng-May. .
Halley-Mlranda. .
Beall-Moran. .
Qordoh-Prlnce. .
3
8
8
2'i
2*4
iff
it
lia
la
0
0

'Most Home Runs
O. Burrows (C), 4; A. Jamieson
(AS), 3; R. Foster (CLO), J.-
Most Stalen Bases
S. VanBattenburg (C), 4; D.
Lashley (NO), 4.
PANAMA
J. MacMurray-Morrice .
MiU en-Arias.......
C. MacMurray-Bubb. . .
J. de la Ouardla-Medlnger
Shannon-Westman. . .
C. de la Guardla-Chandeck
Schmltt-Hunslcker. .
Dehllnger- Arias......
Cltsbee-E. de la Guardia.
Valdes-Estrlpeaut.....
I
ltt
Vt
i
8
3
3
2'2
3
3
SUMMIT HILLS
George Rlley-Colstan. 0
Shirlough-Lewter..... 1!4
Jankus-Saarflnen..... 2'2
Trim Lebrun....... 1
Thompson-Hochsterler. l'/a
Judson-Toland...... 0
Boxwell-Muller...... 1
Durham-Bishop...... Va
Harris-Thompson..... 0
Hammond-Collins..... 0
LEADING PITCHERS
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Ouster 1, Crawford 9. Base on
Balls offWetzel 11, Crawford
10. Winning PitcherWetzel.
Losing PitcherCrawford.
2 Mr. Espinosa $5.20.
ELEVENTH RACE
1Filigrana $6.40, $2.80.
2Fulmine 33.20.
College Hoop Results
(Saturday Nlghl >
(FIBjBT ROUND)
Western Kentucky 82, LouisviUe
8*
LaSalle 89, Seton Hall 78
Dayton 81, NYU 46
EA8T
Villanova 66, St. Bonaventure 89
Holy Crass 62, Fordham 58
Penn 76 CoraeU 62
Yale 71, Harvard 65
Princeton 66, Lafayette 51
(lamba 88, Dartmouth 55
Penn State 88. Backnell 67
Amherst 87, Williams 68
Grove City 61, Allegheny 58
Siena 67, Caaisias 58
Colgate 92, Rutgers 88
KP172, Union (NY) 69
Providence 84, Brown 66
Pairleifh Dickinson 69, St. Pet-
ers (NJ) 59
N. Y. IN8TITTJTE TOURNAMENT
(Finals)
Now Yerk Aggies 76, Biagbamp-
toa 73
(Consolation Final)
White Plains 68, Cebleskilt 58
(Third Flsce Playoff)
MorrisvUle St, Brooklyn A. OS 81
Albany State 78, New Falte State
48
Bt. Joseph's (Fa.) 95, Mnhteabcrg
4
Fredonia 64, McMaster 46
Cathedral (NY) 68, Yeshiva 56
Newark Engineering 82, Panzer
73
Lemoyne 72, Hartwick 61
Utlca 52, Oawego State 45
SOUTHERN CONFERENCE
TOURNAMENT
(Finals)
North Carolina State 77, Duke 68
MASON-DIXON TOURNAMENT
(Finals)
Baltimore Univ. 41. Roanoke 48
NCA. and 2. 86, W. Va. State 76
Virginia Union S3, Johnson C
Smith 81
MIDWEST
Wisconsin 58, Illinois 48
St. Lewis 68, Talsa 66 (overtime)
Iowa State 69, Colorado 62
Falrbary (Neb.) 87, Kansas Tack
66
Oklahoma A. A M, 57. Haaston 48
Beloit 55, Washington (St. Louis)
PAR WEST
Utah 61. Brigbam Young M
Washington 53. UCLA 59 (Best-
of-three series for Pacific Coast
conference title tied 1-1)
Wash. State 67, Honolulu Univ-
ersity 54
S. Brown (O ..
A. Ware (AQM) ..
A.Davis (NO).. ..
A. Gusta ve (POi ..
A. B'rahona (CLO)
B. Savory (BD) ..
L. Springer (CSS).
L. Otis (NO) .. ..
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
1000
1.000
1.000
.800
Games Far This Week
Monday: Central Labor Office
vs. Commissary.
Tuesday: Army Q.M. vs. Cen-
tral Labor Office.
Wednesday: Corosal Sales
Store vs. Navy Ordnance.
Thursday: Post Office vs. Ar-
my Signal.
Saturday, 3 p.m.: Corozal Sales
Store vs. Central Labor Office; 5
p.m. Kobbe Sales Store vs. Build-
ing Division.
Sunday.9:30 a.m.: Commissary
vs. Navy Ordnance.
Dan's Dilemma !
Dan's pockets had as stiver
hning.
For some monet he was pining!
Then a P. A Want AS h
atente*.
Got a Job.. now he's delighted!
Geo. Stewart Holds
Four Tennis Tilles
WILBERFORCE, O., March 19
The National Public Parks
and Playgrounds Tennis As-
sociation, K. Mark Cowens, Elk-
hart, Ind., President (USLTA)
released this week Its 1951 ten-
ais rankings, and George Stew-
art, Junior, Central Stste Col-
lege, Wilberforce, O., the only
colares player in the seventy-
five net stars listed, ranked
third and was the ranner-up
for the national men's singles
title against WaSa Herrn af
Birmingham, Alabama who
ranks first with the Associatioa
for 1981.
The first ten rankings for the
men's singles for 1951 with the
National Public Parks Tennis
Association (USLTA) are Wade
Harrea, Birmingham, Ma.. Clyde
Hippcnstlel, San Bernardino,
Calif., George Stewart, St. Louis,
Mo., Lynn Rockwood, Prevo,
Utah, Ronald Barnes, Kansas
City, Mo., Tom Chambers, Las
Angeles, Calif., John McCarthy.
Washington, D. C, John Fow-
less, Flora, III., Jerry Glade, Salt
Lake City, Utah, and Bob Light,
St. Louis, Mo.
This new rating places Stew-
art in the anlejue position af
holding tha men's singles cham-
pionship with four associations:
National Intercollegiate Negro
Tennis Association. American
Tennis Association. Municipal
Tennis Association, and the Na-
tional Public Parka Tennis As-
sociatioa.
5
5
3
1
2
6
2
4
3
1
4
5
3
2
2
RESULTS
High School Division
869 Yds.: 1Rudolph
47
36
30
16
15-
Hall
duei. pitchSullivan by Hearn. _
In the nightcap, a free scoring, on p^hs offHlnz 5, Hearn 3.
game In which both teams tied struckout byHlnz 3, Hearn 3.
up the score twice, the Insur- Losing pitcherH e a r n (2-6).
ancemen finally forged ahead In winning PitcherHlns (6-3).
the bottom half of the fourth to Umpires- Levy and Hartnhslm.
lead for the remainder of the Timeof Game1:46.
Same. The Merchants managed
> get a rally started, but was In
vain.
Today's game will be the first
twilight game of the loop with
(LB); 2Wilfred McLeod (SC); ,,
3R. Innls (LB). Time 2 mln. 6 -the two leading teams battling
sees. it out.
DiscusBoys: 1M. Sandlfordl The box score:
(LB); 2F. Walthe (LB>; 3W.I FIRST GAME
Brewers
McLeod (SC)Distance 96 feet.
DiscusGirls: 1T. Manning i cox, ss.
(SC); 2-D.-Johnson TLB r 3E.'Scol
Wilson i LB)Distance 69 ft. 4 in.
66 YdsGlrle: 1C. Gooden
(LBi; 2 C. Warner (SC); 3-D.
Joseph (LB). Time 6.2 sees.
199 Yds.Boys: 1V. DeSpusa
(SO; 2W. Jordan (LB); 3r.
Rider (LB), time 10.3 sees.
75 Yds.Girls: 1C. Gooden
(LB); 2C. Warner (SC); 3E.
Pollard (LB). Time 9 sees.
229 Yds.Boya: 1V.DeSousa
(SC); 2
AB R
3 0
_J0. 3b. .
Nockar, c .
Gibson, 2b .
Carlln, lb .
Herring, If.
McOee, cf .
Angermuller, rf 3
Larrlnaga, p . 3
Totals.....25
i.Dvji, *w. ***-- B.H.S. Afc
W. Jordan (LB); 3F. Napoleon, 2b-ss 3
Myrt (LB). Time 22.8 sees. May, cf. .
1 Mile; 1G. Weeks (LB): 2 Flynn, c .
W McLeod (SC); 3A. Clarke carlln, lb .
(LB). Tune 5 mln. 8 sees. I Ostrea, 3b. .
109 YdsGirls: 1C. Gooden Rowley, If .
(LBi- 2E. Pollard (LB); 3 C. Henderson, rf
Warner (SC). Time 11.9 sees. Arias, ss-2b .
44 Yds.Boys: 1R. Hall aHalsall. .
(LB; 2R. Inniss (LB); 3 H.1 Morton, p .
Brawn (SC). Tune 53.1 sees. -------.---------------
RelayGirls4x114:1La Bo- TotaU.....25 3 6 21 11 6
ca (E Pollard. D. Joseph. M score By Innings
Bannister, C Gooden). Time 55.7 Brewer 010 O00 02
sec" BBS- 100 000 2-3
RelarBoys4x119:1La Bo-1 one out when winning run
ca (W Jordan, F. Myrle, H. Ax- scored. aTripled for Arias in 7th.
rher F Alden. Time 47.0 sees, j Runs Batted InHerring, B. Car-
Jr 'High-Elementary Division I un. Halsall 2. Earned RunsBBS
S9 Yds.Class "C"Girls: 1 3, Brewers 1. Left on BasesBHS
n Thomas (SC); 2F. Morgan 4, rewers 4. Three Base HitHal-
1LB1 3C. Francis (R-P). Time sbij. sacrifice HitsWm. Carlln.
6 n MCJ I McGee. Stolen asesCox, Gibson
54 YdsClass "B"Girls: 1 2. Hit by PitchFlynn by Larrl-
T Stevenson <8ta. C); 2G. Tart ^gg struckout byLarrlnaga 6,
11 Br 3E. Cox (Ch.). Time 6.3 Morton 1. Losing PitcherLarri-
?. naga (3-2). Winning Pitcher
54 YdsClass "A" Girls: 1 Morton (3-1). UmpiresRobert-
j. VanHorn (LB); 2-B Brath- -
waits Time 6.5 sees. ___ x..< ,
160 YdsClass "C"Bays: 1
r Baker (LB); 2L. Holder
?Ch^* 3M. Seealda (Sta. C.).:
Time 12.3 sees.
ISO Yds.Class "B" Boys: 1
j. Lynton (Ch.); 2-C. Lindsay
r-P,; 3T. Nurse (Sta. C).
Time 11.2 sees.
THE MAHATMA Caneral
Manager Branch Rickey, match-
less appraiser of baseball flesh,
sits obscurely in the grandstand
and studies some of the Pitts-
burgh organization's promising
new rookies at San Bernardino,
I Calif. Rickey is on record aa
I picking the New York Gianta
' to win the National League
pennant again. (NEA)
Grapefruit League
Isehl
(7).
(7i and SUvestrl. Oswali
Phila.
(At Saraseta)
(Ni 300 004 06013 14
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 1 A) 7, Philadelphia Boston (A) 5, Cincinnati (N) 0.
; "v*H:irii is "A" Boys: 1 New York (A) 11, St. Louts (N) 5.
u F.miheHtLB)- 2J Eversley Boston "o* mlJin ondina (Sta Cj. Washington (A) 8, Philadelphia Boston (A 1 810 000 001 4 7 4
: O000"1* iO*- 1 1A1 7 I Fox, Church ), Konstanty
TlmeL._!!?? "A- Girls- 1 Chicago ;
a 'rLnifrieteC ) *2B Brath-1 Team 4. Scarborough, fllsner (4), Master-
3Ra^rh i a^j'VanHorn (LB). Cleveland (A) 11. N. York (N) 2. son (7. and Evans,
walte (ChJ. 3-J. vannora ^^ (A) 7 p,ttsburih (N) 4 --------
""SS ti._!ri Claw: 11 Chicago (N> vs. Chicago (A) at' (At Tampa)
. 'iLn^Tiata C ) 2--0 Mil- Pasadena, Cal., cancelled, rain. Detroit (A) 000 000 000-0 4 1
E.TOwnsend!SU.C._>,_3=;aa^ ^-------- Cinci. (Ni 001 000 00x-l 3 0
rer^S^.7^C^aker'(LB.Tlme
ie2t6Td.-Ctem-Br^VL
C. Lindsay (R-P): 2 KWd
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
(At Miami)
;. L1UU..J Boston (Ni 200 001 3006 11
(LBI, j_v. Stulte (Sta. C). Time Br.k,yn (N( ^ uo 000_2 g
23.4 sees. _____. Nichols. Wilson i5i, Jester
224 Yds.Class "A W-J-t and 8t. cialre; Podres. Wade (4),
Denny (Ch): 2K. J0ffP" schmltz 17) and Campanella.
0
1
I)
Stuart, Newhouser (2>, Trucks
(6) and Batts; Blackwell, Bev-
ens (7j and Seminlclc.
X Denny Ch.: *-* '" Schmltz
LB); 3J. Eversley (R-P). Time Wa.ker
D.
MM Wa-Clnsa -J- Girls: 1-G.
Thomas (SC); 2-T. Macota
iSta. O: 3F. Morgan (LB).
Time 94 seer
la* YdsClass "B"Girls: 1
(7)
Walker (7).
CAGE DARLING Senior
Chuck Darling is breaking so
many Big Ten basketball scor-
ing records it has become diffi-
cult to keep up to date. The six-
foot-eight. 220-pound Iowa cen-
ter from Fort Logan. Colo.. ha<
averaged better than nine field
goals per game. (NEA)
Attorney Frank Summers and
Prof. Richard Hudlin of St.
Louis, Ma. both officers of the
American Tennis Association
are directly responsible tor_____________________________
breaking down a twenty-six year
eld policy of segregation in that hold municipal honors. He Is
city by the Municipal Tennis also the first colored player to
Association, and George Stew- have his name inscribed en the'ea. 2Chagres,
art is the first colored player to Dr. Clark Memorial Trophy. i Time 49.8 sees.
(At Orlando)
Phila. (A) 030 000 0014 12 3
Wash. (A). 000 000 2002 9 1
16* Ydsciass-tww-i Fowler. Msrtin (4), Kucab (7)
q. Tait "LB>; 2 O.Joseprt tata. anfl. MurrBy: juiott. Lane (4),
C); 3 R- Davy (SC). Time "-I'sima <7> and Klutzz, Sacka (7).
sees i
146 Yds.Class "A-*Girls: 1 (At 8I Petersburg)
A. Blake (Sta. O; 2p. Bakerst.L'uls (Ni 010 000 0203 4 *
iLBi; 3B. Brathwalte (Ch.). N York (A) 010 000 000 1 8 2
Time 12 Mea. Munger, Collum <4>, Bokel-
444 Yds.Class "A"Bays: 1 mann (7, jnj d. Rice; Lopst.
E Dennis R-Pi; 3K. Joseph (LB). Time r, Houl (7)
446 YdsClass
I
(
55Retey8-l-4xll9Girls: 1-Santa
Crua; 2-La Boca; 3-Chagres.
Time 54.8 sees.
Relay4x119 Boys: 1La Bo
(At Clearwater)
Cin. (Ni B 010 010 200 5 9 2
Phi. (Ni B 000 061 50x12 13 2
Nuxhall, McPhail ,5), Curly
3Silver City. f8T; Blake (7), Zlester it) and
Folies; StueL, Rldzlk (4). Poa-l



UPSETS FEATURE NIT OPENING ROUND
____________ __________,____________. (P*re 7)
_________________________________ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------~ ^1^^___^^^^^^___^^^^^^^^^__^^^^^ .. ._._rT_------
Jailed Narcotics
Kingpins Sing';
Six More Sought
SAN FRANCISCO, March 10
tUP) assistant O.&. Attorney
n-o.ph Kie.Mi tOOhy preuicteu
the eariy anest di anchor nail
IU./.U1 liapoiiant "seconu string-,
era" in tne Luciano-Gordon In-
ternational narcotics ring as,
kingpins aireaoy oeiunu oaio be.
gan to "king."
sourt, live or six more "inipor-l
tant violators' are ot.ug inves-!
Ugitveu, aocoruing to Kan-sh, wno
Is nanaliog tne lAaUer beiore a
leoernl gn.Au juiy ileie. i
*wenty-uiree top naicotes II-
gu.ua mrougiiout tne couj.iiy
were lnaicieu oy me urana jury
Fnuay. 'iwenty oi mem have
been taken Into cuStoay.

<

mmofa -_.
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth an*! the country i mi/a" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P.. MONDAY, MARCH It, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Cops Hunt Willie Sutton's Pal
- m
AsVengeanceSlayingSuspecf
NEW YORK, March 10 (UP)
The big city's 19,000 policemen
District Narcotics cluei Ernest pressed the biggest manhunt In
Gentry said tne satcn was con-[New York history today for a
tinuing or tne three at large, scar-faced penitentiary pal of
laey are ttobe.t L. Kcynolds, ott, bank robber Willie Sutton sua-
of iinneapoiis, jonn R. Pneips.j pected In the slaying of a young
43 oi Isieton, Calil., and Peter pants-presser who put the finger
S. Raines, &o, of Paio Aito, Calif. on the notorious holdup artist.
Tne new suspects are West Coast Amid outraged cries from civic
figures. Karesn said. Tnough lm- officials, authorities stepped up
portant cogs in the heroin smug-1 the search for short, stocky
giing organization, they are "sec-, Frederick J. Tenuto, convicted
ond-stnngers" he lndiated. i murderer who broke out of East-
"Thls is Just an oifshoot of ern State penitentiary with Sut-
la.v week's roundup." Karesh ton on Feb. 10, 1947.
said, information against the Because he resembled the pop-
new suspects was obtained from,ular conception of the devil, the
"men who talkeo" and from eyid- underworld gave Tenuto the
ence piked up when the others ironic nickname
were arrested, he said. | and the "Angel."
He Is stockUy-bullt, has black
hair, dark brown eyes, dark com-
plexion and an Inch and a half
scar over his right eye. He also
has a flattened nose presumably
the result of a fight.
He uses a dozen aliases.
Tenuto had been serving a 20-
year sentence when he and Sut
the FBI had 11 letters sent to
Schuster from all part of the
country. Some were typed, and
others were crudely written. AH
threatened that Schuster
would be shot to death.
Ten of the letters had been
mailed and one had been shoved
under the door of Schuster' fa-
^*
Mlixion DOLLAR FIRE Firemen train their hoses on an automobile dealers' building during
a fire which swept at entire city block in Lebanon, Pa. Damages were estimated at $1,000,000.
ion broke out of prison. He had ther's clothing store.
a previous record of 12 arrests. Police Commissioner George P.
Police were looking for a sec- Monaghan, personally directing
on* man but refused to identify the search, would not speculate
him. as to whether one of Sutton's
They were so alarmed over the buddies killed Schuster, but de-
slaying that they posted an tectlves said they expected a
around the clock guard over "break" shortly,
members of Schuster's family They were "certain" it would
and every employe of the New provide the key to the murder.
behind his left ear and lodged In
his brain. The fourth entered the Panamanian 1*0X6 S
left side of his abdomen. ruilUiilMiiiMii uvw
Near the body police found at _,
ticket to the March 7 perform Attempted Rape
anee of the television show, r
Winner Take All."
Schuster's father, Max, after
hearing what happened, rushed
to the scene.
Elated over the fact that i
tome members of the ring were
persnaded to inform on others,
the Federal Attorney said It
"kill that old legend about
honor among thieves."
Several of those picked up in;
the roundup last Friday will ap-
pear in Federal Court here to-
day to make their pleas. Judge
Louis E. Goodman has set bail at
Tenuto was seen in Brooklyn a
short time beiore 24-year-old Ar-
nold Schuster was shot to death
In an alleyway Saturday night a
few doors from his home.
Police suspected he might
hare been the victim of an old
confederate of the bank rob-
ber, seeking revenge because
Schuster led police to Sutton
last month.
Police were printing thousands
of "St. John"! York bank Sutton
with robbing.
They feared a vengeful bud-
dy of the "Babe Rath of bank
robbers'' might try to kill em-
ployes who have identified Sut-
ton as the man who held up
the bank.
The sight of his son's body
on the street drove him to anch
an agonized frensy of grief
that he started banging his
head into the wall, screaming,
"I'll kill you," obviously mean-
ing Sutton.
Charge; Bail $500
A 21-year-oM Panamanian was
in Balboa jail today on a charge
of assault with Intent to com-
mit rape.
The defendant Is Rafael del
Cid. A policeman patrolling the
old incinerator Gaviln area ear-
$10.000 each.
When the indictments were re-,
turned Friday U. S. Narcotics of pictures of Tenuto and dls-
Chlef Harry J. Ansllnger said I tributing them to every station
thev would * '* *
^crack the heart" of house, bus station, air. and train
narcotics traffic in this country.
Yesterday Ansllnger's assistant,
George W. Cunninghham, said
Charles (Lucky) Luciano, one-
time New York vice overlord now
in Italy, was "definitely" behind
the U.S. ring.
Luciano controls the Italian
heroin traffic. Cunningham said,
and that country was the source
of the US. supply.
terminal and other public places.
Tenuto, who is on the FBI's
list of ten most wanted men. Is
described as about 37 years of
age, five-feet five and one-half
Inches tall, weighing about 170
pounds. ____
is charged Whoever -did the job obviously
was a crack marksman.
An autopsy showed today that
three bullets from a .3$ caliber
! revolver hit Schuster in the head
land one In the abdomen as he
reached an alleyway 10 doors
Police said they had a "hot from his home about 9:10 p.m.
lead" to the killer and revealed Police said they believed the
Schuster had received several killer had been lurking in the
death threatsone only Satur- alie .
day. The first shot hit him under
Schuster spotted Sutton on a the left eye and plunged through
subway last Feb. 18 and told po- his head. The second went
lice, who seized the man who had through the top of his head,
eluded the FBI for five years. The third, which the police
Officials revealed today that said was the fatal one, entered
throwVmsel? WVseSond0 IV this morning came upon Cid
floor window, and it took three who was apparently
detectives to restrain him.
It was revealed that Schuster
had refused a bodyguard after
turning in Sutton, but police had
a detective visit his home night- nreiimlnarv hi
ly for the last two weeks -just Cid Is awaiting prelim nary near
on a hunch," Ing Wednesday morning.
with Blasina Pinzn, a 22-year-
old Panamanian.
Ball was set at $500 and del
*-*'- MR ISSSSI
$25,000 And Cadillac Bribe
In Chicago's Horsemeat Row
Vatican Denies
Fake Photos Used
Of Fatima Mirac'e
VATICAN CITY. March 10
(UP i A high Vatican source
reaffirmed today the "rigorous
authenticity" of photographs
published in the Vatican organ
"Osservatore Romano" last No-
vember, allegedly showing the
"miraee of the sun," which re- \
portedly occurred at Fatima,
Portugf 1 35 years ago.
The Vatican source said. "The
two photographs published "by
the Osservatore Romano are au-
thentic."
He denied reports abroad that
Vatican officials admitted they
w-re fake."
However, the source said he
understood "other photos" des-
erlhed as originating in Portugal
and purporting to show the same
m'racle have been proven to*
have been taken at another place
and st another time of the day. |
A church source here said "The
Voice of Fatima." a pilgrim's'
publication published at Fatima.
Portugal, said In essence in an
Issue several weeks ago that
"photographs published abroad
allegedly taken of miracle of sun j
were taken three vears later and
at another nlace." at sundown.
A copv of "The Voice of Fati-
ma" publication was not lmme-
diatelv available In Rome.
DROPS HIS MATCHES Al-
leged underworld csar Frank
Costcllo watches his matches
drop to the floor as he enters
a New York court to show
cause whv he should not ap-
pear at the trial of Michael
Orecchio in Hackensack. N..I.
Orecchio has been charged
with misconduct in office while
he was a detective chief.
Senator Demands Navy's
xOil To China' Policy
WASHINGTON, March 10 (UP).
Sen. Karl E. Mundt demanded
to know today whether the Navy j
favored a set-up under which:
surplus U.S. tankers were leased
to Russia to carry vital oil to
Communist China in 1949 and
1950.
then defense secretary Lewis
A. Johnson was trying to stop
the ail traffic at the very time
Jarvis said he thought Naval
Intelligence approved.
He said Jarvis' testimony indi-
cated that "Naval Intelligence
was rather encouraging what the
In a sharply-worded letter to Department of Defense was vlg-
Secretary of Navy Dan A. Kim- orously protesting against."
ball, the South Dakota Republic-! The senator asked Kimball to
an said he was "seriously dis- provide "as promptly as possible"
turbed" by testimony before the. information on:
Senate's Permanent Investigat- 1) Whether during 1949 and
lng Committee that Naval Intel- 1950 the Navy or Naval Intelli-
gence was "looking with favor"
on the Soviet oil traded for "un-
usually fat profits" by United
Tanker.
2) Any "written records" that
might show the Navy's "exact
poney" on the subject at the
time.
Mnndt said he had "no reason
to question" Jarvis' sworn testi-
mony "but I am seriously dis-
turbed by the apparent conflict
? rowing out of the evidence be-
ore our committee."
llgence "rather approved" the
shipments.
Mundt said that if the state-
ment was correct, "this is a
case of 'Pearl Harborism' at Its
worst."
Mundt is a member of the Sen-
ate group that is investigating
surplus tanker deals in which
former Rep. Joseph E. Casey Mass.i and a group of big-name
associates made $3,250,000 on an
original Investment of $101.000.
Two of the tankers wound up
in the hands of United Tanker
Corp., a Chinese-financed firm
represented by the law firm of
Presidential cleanup chief New-
bold Morris who is expected to
testify tomorrow.
The two vessels made a total
of six trips from Iron Curtain
ports to Northern China In 1949
aiNoneroyf thevoyage. was made',t CONCORD. N.H. March 10
after the Communists Invaded New Hampshire s first-
South Korea in June, IBM. in-the-ciation primary neared
David B. Jarvis, the New York the balloting stage today with
broker who handled the leasing the bare knuckle blows of Presl-
arrangements, said he got the dentlal contenders still ringing
idea that Naval Intelligence "ra- n the voters ears,
ther approved" of the shipments. The forces of Sen Robert A.
He said one of the ship* was Taft and Gen. Dwtght D. Elsen-
commanded by a Naval reserve hower took the gloves off as they
officer and crewmen were in- ended their campaigning with
tervlewed by intelligence agents what they hoped were their
CHICAGO, March 10 (UP)
The Cook County grand jury
has Issued a subpoena for Gov.
Adlal Stevenson's former ex-
ecutive secretary for question-
ing about a rumored $25,000
bribery attempt in the horse-
meat racket,
today.
Assistant state's attorney Mar-
tin Brodkln disclosed that the
subpoena was Issued Feb. 28 for
James W. Mulroy, last reported
vacationing in Arizona. Efforts
to serve the subpoena have
failed, he said.
Brodkln said the grand jury
wants to question Mulroy about
a rumor that racketeers last
year offered hm a $25,000 bribe
and a new Cadillac.
true bill vote by the Cook County
grand jury last week In Its In-
vestigation of an alleged multi-
million dollar racket In the sale
of disguised horsemeat for pub-
lic consumption.
State's attorney John 8. Boyle
it was announced ordered an indictment drawn
up charging malfeasance and
nonfeasance.
Shortly after Boyle's an-
nouncement, Bundeaen and
attorney Richard B. Austin
visited the mayar. After a lang
conference, Bundesen left the
city hall with tears in hit
eyes.
The mayor, emotionally shak-
en, issued a statement express-
ing the highest confidence in
the veteran health officer, and
Brodkln said the grand jury,caIllng upon chlcafoans to
OFF TO VACATION LAND President Truman bkCs fare-
well to Secretary of State Dean Acheson in Washington,
D C, before boarding his plane for Key West, Fla. The
President will vacation in Key West until March 29, date of
the national Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner.

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Mundt noted, however.
that

convlncers" for tomorrow's vot-
ing.
But only the voters of this
; snow-covered Granite state
' who listened to all comers with
! apparent impartiality knew
whether the blows had any
j telling effect.
The Elsenhower corner, which
.earlier had concentrated on sell-
ing the popular strength of Its
: contender, finally adopted a
strategy of offense toward Taft
who appeared to be the general's
, principal opponent.
For the sake of post-primary
unity, each side denied "attack-
ing" the other, but it was appar-
ent both knew where the chief
! threat to their causes rested.
In the latter part of the drive
, Taft had been pounding away at
;what he called the "assumption '
that Elsenhower could win with-
out taking a stand on controver-
sial issues of the day.
"Eisenhower did not vote a-
galnst the rebuilding of Western
Europe to prevent the spread of
Communism." he said.
"Elsenhower did not say that
Hitler and Stalin were no men-
ace to the United States of Ame-
rica.
"Elsenhower did not propose
that the defense program of this
republic be reduced after the
start of the savage war In Ko-
rea.
"Eisenhower did not ue the
floor of the Senate to oppose a
70-group Air Force.
Elsenhower did not say that
forecast the results of the No-
vember elections.
Conceding that Taft has made
gains by his hand-shaking, ques-
tion answering campaign, the
Elsenhower forces now contend
that the Important part of the
primary Is the number of favor-
able delegates secured.
Taft estimates he may win only
four of the state's 14 GOP dele-
gates acknowledging the fact
that many of the state's best
known Republicans are running
as delegates favorable to Eisen-
hower.
Supporters of the other Repub-
had heard unsubstantiated ru-
mors of the bribery attempt
form two sources.
Both of these sources had
learned of the rumored attempt
through others, and had no di-
rect knowledge of it, he said.
Brodkln said he feels that the
bribe offer is "hearsay," but
nevertheless want* to question
Mulroy about it.
The Investigation Into the
muiumillion dollar horse-
meat racket has uncovered at-
tempts to bribe several stats
food inspectors.
Dr. Herman N. Bundesen be-
gan a leave of absence as pres-
ident of the Chicago Board of
Health today to prepare his
defense against malfeas anee
charges In the horsemeat scan-
dal.
Mayor Martin H. Kennelly
granted the leave after the 89-
year-old physician, one of the
nation's foremost public health
authorities, submitted a letter
in which he said: "I am guilty
of no wrongdoing in the con-
duct of my office."
Bundesen was named in a
withhold Judgment until Bun-
desen has had an opportunity
to answer the charges.
Bundesen's office has been
accused of laxity In the preven-
tion of fraudulent horsemeat
sales.
.----------------------------- |
VtaSa rsocbaa Wh **
vwr aigat out has 1 as fsMewa
by a day in._______.
HIS DIARY DAMAGING
MaJ. Gen. Robert W. O row,
former military attache In
Moscow, whose diary was pho-
tographed by Communist a-
gents and published in Europe
In an effort to show that tha
U.S. Is preparing to unleash a
third World War, Grow has
been recalled and the incident
Is being investigated.
Today is
It Is time wasted to go after the lican possibilities Harold E
Independent vote without whlcn | stassen and Gen. Douglas Mac-
a Republican victory Is not even; Arthur have been conceding
remote possibility.
"Eisenhower did none of these
thing.
"The senator from Ohio did all
of them"
Taft. however, counte red
with an assertion that be "did
not in any way attack Eisen-
hower."
Be said he- "merely pointed
out that the tbeorv that he will
be a strenr candidate is tbeorv
only and that no ene can tell
haw strong a candidate he will
be til he takes a definite po-
sition an many controversial
issues."
He accused the Eisenhower
Oov. Sherman Adams, chief of i ramp of basins its empaign on
replied
ELD FOR MURDER Har-
old Lorentson. 13. of Smith-
town. N. Y.. was arraigned on
a murder charge in the death
of 12-year-old Lyde Kltch-
ner, whose body was found
n a field last November Po-
stee scy the boy confessed
stra',-1'ng the girl aftei she
refused to kiss bias.
the Eisenhower forces,
with scathing criticism of the
Ohio senator's record on foreign
affairs and an assertion that the
general "towers" above Taft.
Adams said the accusation that
Elsenhower was under obligation
to the Democratic Administra-
te obvious fall^-v that I cant
win in November."
"I have always won," he add-
ed.
Taft left the state With the
hope that he had ganrred _
enough support for vi c t o r v I oeople and doing his best to
throuPh his scores of street cor- jr-min'eraet the strength of Pres-
jtfon or in sympathy with Its for-'ner addresses and the fact that tdent Truman's democratic ma-
elgn policy was "baseless and! the Eisenhower forces were work- [ rh'ne
nothing.
The MacArthur men. who did
not enter the general's name
in the "popularity contest"
have been counting on his
acknowledged strength in ru-
ral communities to win dele-
gates who would undoubtedly
prove influential at the con-
vention.
Stassen. who ran second to
Thomas K. Dewey in the 1948
New Hampshire primarv, ended
his criss-crossing of the state
vesterdav and went to Boston for
a television address in which he
concentrated his fire on Taft.
He said Taft has been "wrong"
on foreign policy for the past 12
vears and has Been "silent" on
that subject during the New
Hsmpshlre campaign.
On the democratic side of the
Drimary. Sen. Estes Kefauver was
still knocking on doors, meeting
.grossly unfair." |ing without a flesh-and-blood
Then he Invited a comparison'candidato on the srene.
of Taft and the genrpi by list- | Neprlv 100.000 voters of both
Ing Taft's stands on "issues of opium are exDec'e* to t"> out
Isupreme importance.'' 'lor the balloting which may
Virttmllv all the "regulars" of
the state democratic organiza-
ron have been working to get
the exoected 25 O00 votes of their
party Into the Truman column.
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