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1958': October
November
December
1959: January-
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
November
December
5(C, P, S), 12(C, P, S), 26(C, P, S)
16(C, P, S), 23(C, P, S), 30(C, P, S)
7(C, P, S)
4(C),
i(c),
l(c,
5(C),
3(C),
7(C),
5(C),
16(C)
13(C)
28
22(C,
11(C), 18(C), 25(C)
8(C), 15(0, S), 22(C, S)
S), 8(C), 15(C), 22(C), 29(C)
12(C), 19(C), 26(S, C)
10(S, C), 17(C), 24(C), 31(C)
U(S, C), 21(C), 28(S, C)
19(C)
P, S)
IN ADDITION TO THE ABOVE LIST OF ISSUES,
PAGES AND SECTIONS MISSING THERE WERE IN
THE ORIGINAL FILE, PAGES CONTAINING MUTILATIONS
AND OTHE DEFECTS. THESE UNAVOIDABLY CONSTITUTE
PART OF THE FILMED FILE.


rnnnMn rHNHHH CITY
m pmm msxm
JANUARY
1952
THRU
FEBRUARY
29
NP11IJ
MICROFILMED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
PHOTODUPLICATION SERVICE
1980


Panama /"
. /
ft
Panama City '
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
September 3, 1951-December 31, 1959
C=Comics
P=Pastime & Pictures
S=Sunday Supplement
NOTE: From January 1, 1929 to September 2, 1951,
each issue has an English language section,
The Panama American and a Spanish language
section, El Panama America,
Beginning September 3, 1951, The Panama
American and El Panama America are printed
and sold separately.
Sunday issues are titled The Sunday American.
Missing Issues, Pages and Sections:
1951s November
1952:
1953:
1954:
February
March
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
January
February
March
May
June
October
November
December
February
March
April
4(8)
17(C)
2(C)
4(C), 18(C), 25(C)
29(C)
6(C)
10( s, c)
7(S, C)
19(C)
2(C), 9(C)
7(C)
25(P, S)
1(C)
1(C), 15( first two pages of C)
10(C), 17( first two pages of C), 24(C),
31( first two pages of C)
7(C)
25(C, P, S)
1(C, P, S), 22(C)
6(C, P, S), 13(C, P, S)
21(C, P, S)
7(C, P, S), 14(C)
11(C, P, S), 18(C, P,S), 25(C, P, S)


.

1954: May
June
July-
August
September
October
November
December
1955! January-
February
March
May
July
August
September
October
November
December
1956: Febuary
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
1957: January
February
March
April
July
August
September
October
November
December
1958: February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
2(C), 9(0, P, S); 16(C, P, S), 23(0, P, S),
30(C, P, S)
6(0, P, S), 20(0, P, S), 27(C)
4(C), 11(C, P, S), 18(S, C), 25(S, C)
8(0, P, S), 29( 6pp. of C)
5(C), 12(C, P, S), 26(C, P, S)
3(0, P, S), 10(C), 17(C), 24(0, P, S)
7(C, P, S), 14(0, P, S), 21(C, P, S), 28(C)
5(C, P, S), 19(S, C), 26(S, C)
9(C)
6(0, P, S), 13( last 4 pages of C), 20(C, P, S),
27( last 4 pages of C)
13(0, P, S)
8(0, P, S)
17(C, P, S)
28(0, P, S)
4(0, P, S), 11(C, P, S), 25(c)
2(C, P, S), 9(0, P, S), 23(0, P, S), 30(0, P, S)
6(0, P, S), 13(0, P, S), 20(0, P, S), 27(0, P, S)
4(0, P, S), 11(0, P, S), 18(0, P, S)
12(0, P, S), 26(0, P, S)
11(0, P, S), 25(0, P, S)
1(0, P, S), 8(C), 15(0, P, S)29(C, P, S)
6(0, P, S), 20(0, P, S), 27(C,P, S)
3(0, P, S), 17(C), 24(C)
1(C), 8(C), 15(0, P, S), 22(0, P, S), 29(0, P, S)
5(0, P, S), 12(0, P, S), 19(0, P, S), 26(C)
2(C), 9(C), 16(C), 23(C), 30(C)
7(C), 14(C), 21(C), 28(C)
4(C), 11(C, P, S), 18(0, P, S), 25(C)
2(C), 9(C), 16(C), 23(0, P, S), 30(last 4 pages of C)
20(0,
24(C)
3(0,
21(0,
7(C),
4(0,
8(0,
6(0,
3-4(
1(C)
P, s)
P, S), 6, 17(0, P, S), 24(0, P, S)
P, s)
21(0, P, S), 28(0, P, S)
P, S), 11(0, P, S), 18(0, P, S)
P, S), 29(0, P, S)
P, S), 13(0, P, S), 20(P)
possibly not published), 24(C)
Not published: February 1-27 because of a
printers strike.
16(C), 23(0, P, S), 30
6(0, P, S)
23( possibly not published), 25-26(not published
due to strike)
1(C)
13(0, P, S)
17(0, P, S), 31(0, P, S)
14(0, P, S), 21(0, P, S), 28(C)


PRNDMH PRNHMR CTTY
the mum flMERirm
J A N U A R Y
1952
THRU
FEBRUARY
29
pud
MICROFILMED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
PHOTODUPLICATION SERVICE

1980


' t
JAN U A R Y








The Panama American
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01398
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01398
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
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'"BRANIFF
NOW VIA
MIAMI
HOVSTOfl
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HiePanama Canal Library J
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JAN 2* J(
NEWSPAPER
AN INDlPNDE^/fT(f]B^^^n.x hewsfafek x
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country U /" Abraham Lincoln.

TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
M
PANAMA, R. P TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 1952
UN Artillery Opens 1952 With A Bang
Rickety Red
DraftToScoopWide AndDeep
In Early Months Of This Year
WASHINGTON. Jan. 1 (UP) Local boards will reaume ln-
Drat calla will continue heavy duel ion of men tomorrow after a
in at least the first few months
of 1952 and thousands of youths
previously deferred or rejected
will wind up in uniform, a sur-
vey showed today.
The New Year also will con-
front Congress with the difficult
lection-year problem of deciding;
whether to lounch the proposed
Universal Military Training pro-
gram.
Under UMT, 18-year-old youths
fould be Inducted for six-months
raining and then spend seven
years in the reserves.
The Army and Marine Corps
already have asked Selective
Service for 59450 draftees in
January and 55,000 In Febru-
ary. After February draft calls
are expected to run at least
40,000 men a month as the ar-
med services build toward their
4,0**.0O4-man goal .
Air Force-Navy
Join In Cape Mala
Rescue Operation
Air Force and Navy rescue
teams combined resources to aid
a disabled Mexican vessel which
holiday suspension which began
Dec. 21 to permit Inductees to
spend Christmas and New Year
at home.
In line with this policy, the
December draft call was cut to
onlv 19,000 men.
But the big January and
Febr nary call* underscore
warninga by Defense Depart-
ment officials and Selective
Service director Lewis B. Her-
shey that they will be scraping
the bottom of the manpower
barrel in the late spring or
summer of 1952.
In explaining the need for con- j
Jear,eoffffi !nted*o5t "hatj Panamanian Youth
the draft terms of men '"ducted rf_ f\ CLI.
at the start of the Korean war JlOWaWay \Jt\ flip
will start running out soon and ii J J c C
they must be replaced by vo- NeQeO rOT GO
lunteers or new draftees.
81nce men were being Induct- A 15-year-old Isthmian boy
ed at the rate of about 80,000 a | spending New Years far from
month when Selective Service home today,
first was revived, the rate of In-1 The master pf the New Zea-
ductions may have to run even land Shipping Co.'s passenger
higher than 40,000 In march and; ship Rangitoto radioed his
succeeding months to fill military agent here that young Ivan
manpower needs. j Kennedy was found aboard af-
re-exemlnlng in January some
3H.000 4-F's rejected by the
armed services for mental rea-
sons .About 25,000 will be call-
ed up monthly until all of
them have been checked again.
The action was ordered after
Congress lowered mental stand-
ards last summer.
The new draft law cut the
minimum mental score on the
general classification test from
70 to 5.
Hershey said recently that
some 1,800,000 men had been
examined by the armed services
(Continued on Page 6. Col. t)
toh^IrtHfirJE!? ney A^ we*?is are wnonstrated by soldiers. At left is the new
ihAy .8ht ?iie' shown a Aberdeen- M- Pro vine Grounds by Cadet Robert White (left), of
ttln ? iittbJSS i,Moore- ordnance engineer. The rifle weighs 1% pounds leas
ftS""^ *rand nd "T horter, llgnter JO caliber cartridge. At right. Sgt. Donald
Rtr;f Mu?W>n, Mich demonstrates a new submachine gun that can fire around cor
H!inn~ .r%P^n.L'!*2d*rd "bmchn[Km fitted with a special curved barrel, was
developed at the Detroit Arsenal at the requ est of fighting forces in Korea.
Planes: Four Lost;One Found Jealous Husband
Persons: 30 Dead, 38 Missing Kills Wife Near
While they have no present
Silans to ask Congress to induct
athers or World War II veterans,
officials said deferments will
have tobe tightened and mental-
have
Tty> Ooaat Guard radio station J* J5S^23L"S51 1
at <&pe Mala reported the 5-' 8*IM>tT' wtro* " '
at Oape Mala reported the 5-1
foot fishing vessel Alaci Perez
In distress to 15th Naval Dis- |
trict headquarters.
Rescue teams went into ac-
turn.
From Albrook, a 1st Air Res- i
cue Squadron B-17 was dis-
patched and located the ship
off Cape Mala. Then a crash
boat attached to 1st Air Rescue
waa sent out to take her in tow.
tort
ter the vessel left Balboa for
New Zealand.
Kennedy Is believed to be a
Panamanian of West Indian
parentage, but Norton Lilly Jt
Company, agents for the ship,
NEW YORK, Jan. 1 (UP) scheduled Commando stunMed
Thirty persons were killed in out of the mountains yesterday
three ajr crashes as rescue to direct searchers to the wreck-
teams today, searched for traces
of four planes missing with at
least 38 persons aboard.
Balboa Garden
RP Teachers Plan Continuing
Strike In Secondary Schools
The rescue of 14 persons from
the wreckage of a non-schedul-
rt ed Commando near the Peno-
have'not bien able to learn rivania few Ioi>t oad*,ta
where he Uves on the Isthmus. Wight tlwH hope that other f
survivors might be found.
Another Commando, missing
on a flight from Point Barrow
to Fairbanks, Alaska, was the
latest crash added to the list-i
Transocean Airlines, owners
Panama teachers were deter-
but the disabled vessel was tool mined today to carry the 93-
heavy, and no headway was
made.
The Navv's tug USS Recovery
was alerted, and yesterday ar-
rived at' the outer anchorage at
Balboa wlth-the Alacio Perez in
tow.
Local agents for the ship,
.Payne and Wardlaw were noti-
fied.
The disabled vessel was head-
ed for Salina Cruz from Vera
day-old school strike well into
the new'year and announced a
meeting for tomorrow morning
in the National Institute to dis-
cuss further measures for con-
tinuing the walkout.
A handbill distributed by the
strike committee today said
"due to the intransigence of the
Minister of Education the strike
continues.'
Continuation of the strike
JUIl Ul HUE nnC l-e-J'
Cruz with a nine-man Mexican]will mean that the National "
crew. Captain of the ship is University and all high schools
Rene Lumd Perez. 'will remain Inoperative tomor-
row when the Christmas vaca-
tion ends-
Education Minister Ruben D.
Carles announced yesterday that
primary schools will resume
classes tomorrow with pledges
from sufficient teachers to op-
erate almost normally.
Carles added that all pri-
mary school teachers who fall
to be at their posts tomorrow
morning will be summarily dls-
The New Year had Its first
By Nig
TOKYO, Jan. 1 (UP) The United Nations |g_
forces in Korea opened the New Year with a tremendi
artillery barrage which discouraged the Reds from lauiK
no more than a single probing attack last night.
But the Reds staged a minor celebration of th#9
own by sending three or four ancient PO-2 single engine*!
biplanes over Kimpo airfield, near Seoul, and neighbour
Inchon harbor.
Two Migs were damaged by United States Sal
during today s air fighting, but the United Nations
one Mustang and one Corsair to Red ground fire.
The United Nations artillery] Included In the 50,000 are 1,0M
attack opened up on selected i United States troops,
front-line targets shortly after After the New Year's Dav sea*
midnight. sion United Nations negotiate*
Then tanks moved up, as if to United States Rear Admiral M
attack, then added their high . Llbby. said-
velocity shells to the artillery "We had a very amicabW
bombardment.
meeting, singularly enough.
"They apparently were follow*
lng the old Chinese philosophi
tots at oA
New Year."
large-scale attack. But the other truce subcorm
Radio Pyongyang claimed that, mittee, working on means of no*,
the rickety Red night bombers licing an armistice agreemensj
Intercepted Red radio mes-
sages showed the Communists of paying all their de
thought the barrage heralded a time at the
destroyed 24 United Nations
Glanes parked at Kimpo. There
; no United Nations report on
what the Red planes achieved,
or didn't.
Meanwhile In the prisoners
subcommittee at the truce talks
at Panmunjom the Communists
seemed to have made a New Year
resolution of sweet reasonable-
ness.
They agreed to release all In-
terned civilians i including diplo-
mats and missionaries i after an
had another day of complete '
stalemate.
Red POW's Mail
Claimed UN Frau

TOKYO, Jan. 1 (UP)Com-
armistice, and to supply all pos-'munlst Pelplng radio tod.iV'
sible information on 60,000 Unit- charged that the United Na-
age where they found 13 others|murder approximately three
of the plane's 40 passengers I hours after midnight last night
still alive. when a Jealous husband found
George Albert of Miami, Fla., his wife with another man near
who was flying home with his the Balboa beer garden,
mother from a family reunion1 ed Nation prisonera of war1 tions'had "nlanda cvnicai an
In, Pktafcvrgh. reaohed the Dytaj aim** Instant* from known -h*w tatanm*o their 5*.^.!!
rmhouae of Georga Byant at tab wound In the back in- hands, but missing from the prW
Sawmill Run", to telephone- the fluted by Efraln Ramos G. 23 !oner JUts they have handed to
first news of the plane which wa8 jjj^ Quays Solano lUnwn Uhl'ted Nations truce negotiators.
22.
of the plane, sa)d that at least
two persons .the pilot and
the co-pllot were aboard Mae
ship.
disappeared on a flight from
Pittsburgh to Buffalo.
It was presumed the other
26 persons aboard died tn the
crash.
"We need all the_octors- that
can get in here.* ^a sheriffs
'' tputy reported by walkie-talkie
radio from the scene. "We can't
remove some of the survivors
until doctors arrive."
New Year Storrn Blasts
Icily Across Midwest
Carles has already fired at
least one teacher who want on
strike when teachers and pro-
fessors voted to Join striking
A five-man rescue team re-
turned from a Jeep search of
the Superstition Mountain, near
Phoenix, Arizona, to report no
trace has been found of the
military C-47 believed down In
the area with 28 persons
aboard, Including 19 West Point
cadets.
Tht party* made its way to
the spot rher* an Air Force trucks to help clear the way
observer reported he spotted the over slippery, wlfl&g roads.
Ramos apparently gave his
wife permission to attend a
dance in the Balboa Garden.
1,000,000 Jam
Times Square
For New Year
cruel trick'' by handing ow
the communists "pheny" le
ters from Red prisoners of war.
In a broadcast. Alan Winning-
ton of the London Dally Workef
said that among open post cards
and letter carda which wgr*
"claimed" to have come
Chinese Powa, the maj
carried only the words 'Merty
Christmas, I am well" and many
cards were obviously written Dy
the same persons.
He claimed that "In many
Ambulances churned "ough
the snow-laden baekwi oun-
try of the Allegheny mountain
area to within two alies of the
crash, and calla pre sent out
for snow plows ji,nd cinder
pl^n,''VTr,T:ll."1ge .. There" wu no iiKcatien""how
The Civil Air Patrol reported many miles Albert-trudged be-
a burned out spot had been I fore he finally Wlched the
sighted-on a mountain 50 miles farmhouge.
southwest of Tucson which'
might be the scene.of a Mus- He was aim
tang missing since Sunday. |from the har
A Haggard suVvivor of the .since the crash,
students in protest against the'foothills of the Alleghany thorltles the
appointment of Carles and >1- Saturday night crash of 1 non-survivors.
Around 3 a. m. Mrs. Ramos. |
left the terrace, going out into
Calle Estudiante accompanied NEW YORK. Ja. 1 (UP)_ ?h\1,^,u, ""?, ,m2I
by an unidentified male part- Thla city had Its noisiest post- Z?? HtinV -1
ner. war New Years celebration with writing.
nearly 1.000.000 people Jamming, For the Chinese to wrtt
the Times Square area. Merry Christmas, I am welk*>
Winnington said, "is about as
The square was filled with probable as for an American
throngs from building., hne to war prisoner to write his family
building line when the tradi- Festlvioua Lunar Festival i ant
tlonal golden globe began its well.'"
drop on the mast atop the Times He said that not one Chinee
Tower several seconds before would ever write such a messag
midnight, signalling the passing,since Christmas means nothing
They went to*a lonely spot
on the street and were In an
embrace when her husband ar-
rived a few minutes 1 a t.e r
Without any preliminaries he
stabbed her with a knife he
was carrying in his hand. She
fell to the ground and was put
Into a car by bystanders. She
died enroute to the hospital.
of 1951.
I In China. Korea or the Far
leged partiality in the-govern-
ment of President Aclbladei
Arosemena..
Natividad Carreo, director of
the Liceo de Seoritas, was lm-
CHTCAGO, Jan. 1, (UP)The (dense fog that grounded all mediately replaced by her as-
New Year rode In today behind planes at Chicago's Midway air- slstant as soon as she went ..on
a spreading cold mass that la!port an dat landing iields else-
expected to bring a drop In|where. Sleet glazed highways
temperature of as much af'* in the northern mdlweat.
degrees, and great Increase I Dreary rain pelted the West
in the already hazardous drlv-CoasL and portions of the
inr conditions. Southwest.
The highway death toll stood
at 201 far below the Na-
incoherent
gave "au-' Ramos ls heing held incom-
wf themunicado at police headquarters
here.
Hundreds of thousands of tin;East,
horns blew, cow bells clanged. The broadcast charged that
and shrill screaming began the "Americans ordered som'
when the golden ball vanished Chinese puppet to select a iewt
and the giant figures of 1952 names on the list, write ttt
appeared against a dark sky at short Christmas message anS
the stroke of midnight. hand this rubbish over."
_________ i______________________________-*" " " uuigui.,__________uan mi ruooisn over.
Big Peaceful Projects Were Built nT95
tlonal Safety Council's estimate
of 350 deaths, but It was ex-
RBCted to mount with today's
ollday.
In addition. 34 died in air-
plane mishaps, 38 died In fires
and 78 perished In miscella-
neous accidents.
Meanwhile the cold weather
moved east, ending the unsea-
sonable warm spell which caus-
The midwest fog, which cut
visibility many places to sev-
eral hundred feet, was blamed
for at least five traffic acci-
dent deaths.
The winter storm was' ex-
Dected to kick up local blizzards
In eatsern Colorado, bring blow-
ing snow to the northern plains
and lay a 10-Inch blanket of
snow on portions of Iowa, Wis-
consin and Minnesota.
The advanolng cold wave was
ed snow and landslides In the,was expected to drop tempera-
Colorado 'mountains. At least tures to 20 and 30 below zero
one man, and possibly five in the Dakotas by today,
died in one of the worst storms Warm air wafting over the
in Colorado's history. j Midwest's snow cover was blam-
The fate of several others was ed for the fog.
strike with the other educators.
-r----------------MX--------,---------------
Happy Arid Proper
New Year
Canal Zone Style
Canal Zonlans gave them-
selves an "A" for good conduct
on New year's Eve.
Cristobal police reported that
not a single person was arrest-
ed In their area last night.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 1 En-
gineering and' construction
throughout the world In 1951
waa keynoted by expansion of
production facilities of the ba-
sic sinew of all modern phy-
sical works of man steel,
the National Geographic So-
ciety reports In a year end
summary.
The Uiited States, the world's
largest steel producer, with a
r?rV*gedTth,fi2.'on ralI:'inK kllowatl Production at the'of Africa's Ivory Coast. The south China almost at the IsorVLJ
?tJhrt 5Sr.,HVa,H'?eS Joach,ms" Chenaux. and La port was created by digging a der of strategic Indochina, now'
untouched ore fifi, and the Cave developments in Ontario channel through a mile-and-a- ~
Orinoco River in^Jinezuela is I In the Philippine Republic half-wide sandbar off Abidjan
being dredged togfllow ocean- three new hydroelectric plants opening Ebrle Lagoon to the
going ships to apSoach Cerro
Bolivar, Venezuela1! mountain
of high-grade Iron ore.
OIL REFINERItS .
went to work
In addition, electric power
plants opened in Portugal, 81-
largest ships.
Also opened In 1961 was East
Pakistan's Port Jinnah, created
cily, Pakistan and Austria, and to relieve the overtaxed port of
a steam generating plant was Chlttagong.
A world that Is dependent
dedicated in Puerto Rico.
upon steel cannot'operate with- IRRIGATION
out oil. and refinery capacity
was expanded generally.
Two new refineries one of
current capacity of 195,000,000
tons a year, led the expansion
program.
The peaceful fields of Bucks
County, Pennsylvania, blossom-: them the largest In Europe
Twn ,m. -vu, ,i. i, f*1 wUn the beginnings of the opened In England, and a plant
shhTwer??ak.n tn .^.nt^fi immenK new Fairlew works of to proceas lubricating oils and
Balhna n5K" rnortS" United States Steel Corpora- hlgh-o-tane gasoline from Mld-
minor^rClTn miii? "or., a $400.0000 project die East oil befan operation In
i-Sr. k -*un mde- Other steel compasees oined in Trieste.
Inn, %*,t.r0t,nS "er'Ua ,he Pension, amo* them Na-
enough to tangle anyone very ,lon,| ".i a*ma3.\rm whirh
still in doubt as rescue teams
pushed through the deep snow
seeking stranded motorists and
vacationers who had sought
refnge from the storm.
Forecasters said that the cold
Thawing of the snow uncov-
ered a murder mystery In Chi-
cago when the body of a man,
shot twice in the head, was
found in a snowbank.
Blowing snow blocked high-
wave would move into the At-1ways tn South Dakota ana cut
alntlc states by tonight ending vlsibi'lty to almost zero in the
warm spell which sent the
Itures up to 49 degree?
Few England basked in the
in New York, while most of
same pleasant weather.
As the New Year approached
^,s wintry storm swept eastward
tightly in the colls of the law.
Gorgas' First
Debuts At 7:55
No prize was offered, bat
yry tlonal Steel Corporation, which HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS
had there been one Mr. and i at Denaln
Red River valley of Minnesota
and North Dakota.
Farther south in central Wis-
consin and portions of Minne-
sota the sleet put buses far
behind schedule.
The South, meanwhile, en-
e-ross the great plans on wlndsjjoyed warm weather and the, la at irht pounds six ounces
" of 30 miles per hour, bringlngimereury at Memphis, Tenn. Peter 5i
snow and cold.
Mrs. Paal Peten waald have
won ten money far being par-
ent* ef the first babv bora at
Gorgas Hoapltal in IMS.
They waleaased a san at 1:K
a. m- but havaaH named hlaa
yet. The yanngater weighed
an Army clerical
tapped a new Mi-ton openj
hearth at Welrton, West Virgi-) The network of electric po-
n'J- |wer Unes was extended in all
In Great Britain the largest parta of therotld as new hy-
steei mill in Europe, a $18.00Q.
Canada reported that the
newly completed St Mary Ri-
ver dam near Lethbrldge, Al-
berta, the key to irrigation of
Philadelphia and Houston put
new multimilllon dollar piers
Into service, and BaltimoNr in-
stalled a new S5.000.000
fighting
vplt.
Communist-led re-
in Russia ltsalt work was said
to be progressing on
mile Une paralleling the Trans-
Siberian Railway from central;.
European Russia to the Urals
and southern Siberia.
In Belgium the first Unk or
a connection between lines
coming Into Brussels from the j
ore- north and from the south wa.
completed, providing rail ser-
vice through the Belgian a-
pltal.
A short but important new
RAIL LINKS
000 mill in Wales, started pro- went up
du-tlon. .; ~
France opened its first con-
tinuous hot strip rolling mlfi
Russia claimed 1951 steel ca-
pacity expansion of 9.700,000
tons, bringing total output to
some 35.000,000 tons a year
fcbmt the same as the u. 8.
Steel Corporation.
The Immenst appetite for zona-Nev
steel pushed dewjlonsnent of ore fM a c
sources to repAceTtfke dwind-,200.000 kl
unloader to handle iron ore
shipments from Venezuela and
Liberia.
Brazil dedicated its first Jet-
the 510.000-acre St. Mary-Milk.ty pier at Rio de Janeiro, andIPeruvian rail link completes the
River Irrigation project, la the a new petroleum terminal was line from lofty Lake Titicaca
country's largest earthfill dam'opened at, Port Moresby, New to the Pacific port of Mata-
In California water from the Guinea. rani.
Immense Shasta Dam started
Its 500-mile trip to the rich
Central Valley in August. Pump-
ing and carrying Sacramento1 Vast new railroad construc-
River water into the same area tion was reported In 1951 by
,ln which the San Joaqun Ri- Soviet Russia and Communist>into operation,
plantsiver flows, the new Central Val-!China. In Saudi Arabia, a 350-mlle
ley systetfl ls one of the world's Reports filtering out f r o m railway from the port of Dam-
18 years of planning most ambitious Irrigation pro-1 China had work in progress on'mam to Inland Riyadh, the
and construe|Jon. tbe eighteenth'Jects. ja lona Une from Lanrhow. In kingdom's capital, started ope-
and last generator started ope- Among other Irrigation works central China, through Sinkiang ration across the desert,
ration at wand Coulee Dam completed in 19S1 were thelProvlnce northwest to a con- The Alaska railroad cnt close
giving the central Waahingtor Horsetooth Dam near Ft. Col- action with the Siberla-Turk-lto a glacier to eliminate its
power plan! a world's record Una, Colorado, the Cedar Bluff estan line at Ayaguz (Sergio- famous full circle loop SO mile*
capacity of 1.975,000 kilowatts. Dam at Ellis. Kansas, and the poli in Russia. (north of Seward.
To the south, generators were shadehill Dam on the Grand' Also reported was construe-1 Railroads continued to go t*
started on the Colorado RiverRlver near Lemmon. South Da- Mon work on a link between sea on specially built ferries.
A 300-mile.Bolivian stretch of
the railroad from Santos, Bra-
sil on the Atlantic to Arica.
Chile, on the Pacific, was put
and steam
Davis Dar
straddling the Ari- kota.
boundary, to oro-,
city of more than POR TS
ratts.
Lanchow and Paotow, to the Two 94,000,000 seatralns were
northeast. launched for Atlantic and Gulf
The Chinese Communist gov- Coast work at Cheater. Penn-
ernment announced completion syIrania, and the French Ngi
wnaa mweaseo ns nyoro-: nance aeaicatea a new man- of a new rail line from Liu-
electrlc pfwer output by st*rt-|mad* port at Abidjan, capltaljchow to Yungnlng (Nannlng) tal
The"nnUdwest groped in rt'SaV iTdS^Z***0* W,h T** "V*" Ft" **> ^JtM^l **** *H vcnadj <**" it- hydro-! France dedicated a new man- of a new rail line from Llu-ltional Railway., put "the world's
perlor region. telectrlc pfwer output by star-Imada port at Abidjan. caoltaLehow to Yunanina (Nannln ml (Caattaned en Fag* a, Catunf)





~
var two
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
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MONTH. IN ADVANCE _^_
SIX MONTHS.. IN AOVANCE
r-;t >'AW in *DV>NC
S 1 70
9 SO
8 ^O
S 2.SO
13.00
24 OO
Walter Winchel
In New York
Labor News
And
Comment
"Resolved: Not to Get In Too Deep"
By Victor Riesel
KEVY YEAR'S EVE IN NEW YORK
Happiness is the triumph of life. Yet the grandest emotion is
UK most tiluiculi lo defino, (t Is mystical and poetic, romantic
and intellectual. It can be the souna of laughter or the deep
jileiice of inner contentment. The sight of a beloved face or the
sweeping panorama o a glorious landscape.. .Joy has a qulck-
.(Uvei >|........ mat cannot oe imprisoned within words. Bui. one
[aspect oi happiness remains constant and clear: It Is always
iJBuiporary. id that brief delight reaches a singing climax on
[Sc\. Vean tve in the Big Town. For a short timethe fabulous
|ni.-.ropoiM becomes a huge playground.
The m>sterious telegraphy of merriment moves as lmper-
ceptioiy as time. It is communicated from heart to heart. The
town has a Mardl Gras atmosphere. There Is a nervous. Jigging
tempo.. .Broadway's customary raucous circus Is Intensified and
tjxu-iiuea. Amid tne gnaerlng pageantry there is a swirl of con-
tusion ... house par,i- ignite residential districts with a bright
air of restivity.. .Tne oii-icey chords of traffic add to the silly
ympnony...Personal and international problems are briefly
isolated, ihe lives of merry-makers are bounded by mirrors re-
flecting their own pleasures...At midnightthe orchestra of
nappiniicss strikes a deafening crescendo.
Times Square celebrates with a wild and dramatic spec-
lacle wnen me in year diesand a new one is cradleu in
ine arms of mankind, in the split second of past, present
' and futurethe crowd roars a welcome that senas echoes
tumbling uown side streets .. Waves of cheer roll across an
ocean oi no.se-... ine horn-tooting stabs ears and pierces
! nerves... Many find a certain exaltation in the untamed
1 exuberance, strangers composing the mob discover friendly
'. warmth in a mutual experience... Some deplore the ex-
plosions oi gayety as sheer maduess. But it is well to re-
* ii.i-miK . intv the com.c spirit is always slightly ridiculous.
;,....out i,the world would never near the blessed sound
> Ot laugnier.
Rejoicing is rampant in nightclubs. They generally attract
pcopie wno .CitiOhi ninaoii joj.hj um rcai <^i uie jcr. ...a.,y
naie Ine evening seem like a gay adventurefull of happy
cascovei.es. Ouieis uno ine gay<-ty is artmcial. Happiness is
purusueu witn grim desperation, iney take u like medicine
oping it wiii inane mem ieel better. But this type of therapy
is moje- o an oroeal man a cure... Despite tne massy hoop-ia,
ith crowns, the iancy ieestnis experience usually oecomes a
happy occasion In retrospect, 'ine memory tends to noard pleas-
ant loments and oiscaid tiresome nouis... this is the nlgnt
wnen tne moso conventional humans will dispense with Inhibit-
ions. Piace a slliy paper hat on the most dignified peopleand
they aie .ruiioio.-iiieu into clowns.
Motierate drinking enh.tns spirits. But this Is a time when
moaeiution seems aiiwost UKtal. rfoocn-guzziing Decomes a con-
test wnerem me winners are aruni nrsiano lose all sense of
reality anu dignity... unoer the iniruence of fiery beverages
orne arc iruiy gay. strangers are Duacn-.swno won't remem-
ber e.icii onur me next morn.ng... nut many are grotesque
anu uovnugnt ooiiuxious. iney giggle at noming and shriek in
the nigiit. me aiconoi.c hai...- ui~*oris and perverts pleasure.
Vvi.r.i. b>aind as a nice sen-ual i-Ap^rience bocomea an acning
sen.-...ion. me ua aite. .ne oHiei,ixmorse can oe as agonizing
as .... ..i. ... .iu.i0v..i.
The carnival spirit dances across the town. But there
are people who tinu mocking echoes in the sounds 01 merri-
mem. iney are tne lonely ana dispossessed... Ihe sur-
roundiag jollity increases tne torment of loneliness. And it
cau me* mure painiui than a llestt wound... The tyranny of
i-.ia.ioii nun, suuis and makes every moment tortuous,
li .spiir is a prison... Amidst a crowded, jubilant citythe
friendless are lost in a jungle of trait ay... Every melody
becomes a mournful song and the laugnter of others in-
spires tears... solitude is frequently the ally of heartbreak,
'Lie tuiure presents only empty promiseswhen you are
haunted i>> gnosts of dead hopes.
This is a sentimental occasion In numerous homes. It exudes
the .ypo oi anu emotion mat revives every spirit. The lights
in Un- windows are eaecuons 01 luminous hopes... Funda-
mental joys arc an huenai part of tne reunions, 'iney repre-
sent the living oeilmtiona 01 sucn beautiful words as home,
family, irienosnlp anu love. Tne happiness they inspire con-
stantly renews i.\.n... ft is a time wnen young lovers collect
a treasury oi memories tnat will gieam as long as they live. It
is a ume wnen tne aged discover a comiortlng radiance in the
giow oi nostalgia... ine only lasting gayety is rooted in the
companlonsnlp 01 peopie we love, it nngntens youthful lives and
lightens tne near.s 01 older loins.
Happiness is democratic. Laughter is not based on mo-
netary value. Friendship must be earnednot bought. Love
is as popular on one side of the tracks as it is on the oth-
er... ihe fact is wealth often dissipates the essential quali-
ties of joy; simplicity and sincerity. Luxuries do not guaran-
tee joy... On New Year's Eve you'll frequently find more
honest happiness at beer parties than in champagne sprees
...The suostance of joy is the ability to appreciate what
you have. It Is one of life's strange ironies that having
everything ma>'tes It difficult to appreciate anything.
. The vibrations of merriment have been stilled when dawn
tints the sky. What stirred the mind and provoked an excited
response just a few hours beforeis almost forgotten. The en-
chantment of a memorable night has almost vanished... The
harsh chords Of a million sounds are replaced by a hushed
charm. Streets that were clogced with humanity take on signs
of normalcy. Tht/j are crumpled paper hats in the gutters and
strips of tinsel rioe with the winds... You can spot seme merry-
makers in subwaysfaces etched with evidences of weariness.
There is nothing that seems as bleak as the end of a festival.
It is like the end of a love affair... The Joyous binge has ended.
Those who danced and sang and laughed and drank too much
re reaching their home. The firecracker activity of the night
has been conquered by the blessed opiate of sleep.
The horns avd confetti, the music and noisethese are the
frills of the annual celebration. New Year carnivals symbolize
the Spirit of Hope. It is humanity's way of reassuring Itself
that the desire for happiness will survive the prophets of doom.
It is the promise that the future will be carved In the image
of our faithnot fear. And It is a ringing challenge to those
who would forever destroy mankind's brief opportunity for mo-
ments of bliss... Only with such faith in the future and hope
within ourselves can we make a reality of the classic greeting;
Happy New Yearl________________^_^_______
I got into this argument with
Vyacheslaff (The Hammer) Mo-
jlotov in San Francisco, back
In *45, when he picked on me
I during a press conference and
I have been grateful ever since
to a tall slim kid from Texas
who saved me from getting a
Red blackjack across my mouth.
The big fellow was an Army
Intelligence officer out of Hous-
ton who nudged me out of the
debate and later told me that
the Soviet secret police guards
around the Russian foreign
minister were becoming fidgety ^
with their truncheons.
So the debate never finished.
And now comes Comrade VI-
shlnsky, saying pretty much
what his boss, Molotov. tried to
tell us away back then.
Old big-jaio is saying that
the V. S. is interfering in
Russian affairs and that
we're being unfair because
the Soviets never, never do
thai to us. Therefore, I rush
to pass on to all of you the
details of a pro-Russian
nettoork which used a labor
front as its "cover" (which
some ex-Soviet agents tell
me is the proper technical
jargons used in the espion-
age rings).
For years, a man by name
of Irving Charles Velson. an
undercover pro-Commie, suc-
ceeded in capturing Important
CIO posts until discovered and
ousted.
While I was In Washington
last September he was being
questioned by the Senate In-
ternal Security sub-committee
for he was the organizer of
special propaganda jaunts by
Red labor leaders to Moscow.
Minsk and points between.
The matter of -Molotov's spy-
master In this country came up.
This espionage agent, J. Pe-
ters, ran the vast series of In-
terlocking rings which reach
into several key U. S. cabinet
departments. The Senators'
counsel asked the bland, unper-
turbed Irving Charles Velson
the following question:
"Is it not true that while
vou were employed at the Broo-
klyn Navy Yard. Alexander
Stevens, known as J. Peters
used your Brooklyn address, un-
der vour name s a letter
drop?"
"A letter drop." should you
not be up on the latest spy
iive, i* an address to which one
spy addresses his reports and
picks up Instructions
The address Is listed under
a name other than the soy's to
thro*, off the counter-intellj-
gence police.
To this question Velson re-
torted:
I decline to answer that
question on the ground that I
mizht be incriminating my-
self."
"Who is, or was. J. Peters?"
the Senate prober, Dick Arens
asked.
"The same answer," snapped
Velson.
"Is there a man by the name
of J. Peters?"
"Same answer," was the sul-
len reply.
"I put It to you as a fact,
and ask you to affirm or* deny
this fact, that J. Peters was
in charge rt Communist es-
olonage in this country for a
great many years," Arens ask-
ed slowly.
"I decline to answer that
question on the ground that
I might be incriminating my-
self."
Do you know anvthlng about
the Communist espionage by J.
Peters," was the next weary
query.
I decline to answer tha
4
'
Lousy Year
By BOB RUARK

THIS IS YOU FORUM THI MAPMS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
The Mail If. I* on oaea rom o rsoden ot TImi in*m. AfMr-
|rN Letters art rtcatcl frattfoHy and ara heae'lee' ia a wholly cea-
flaVatial maaner.
If you contribute a latter dan'r be imaotieat If i dosin't appear the
tu doy. Lettora ara aubluhsd la the orear received.
'lease try keep tbe letter* limitad to cae Itneth.
Idanfrty of letter wnteri is held in strict't conridtncE.
Tfctt Mwsaeaa' assumes na reseensibrlky far etatameats er misas
isrfsssd ia laar* tram readers.
FROM A FWEND IN KOREA "From 194(5 to 1960 I served In
The holiday card bore the the US Army in Panrma I en-
face on an Indian In a white joyed every day of It. During
tar on a black shield, and it;that time I made hundreds oi
was ringed by red -berried | friends In the Republic of Pa-
holly-wreath tied with a red, nama. 80 here it Is the Sea-
bow. So Far it was similar to son's Greetings to all...
many others. But the wording "SFC Jacob Scbnabel"
below was different. It read: --------
"From Korea. 1961 Second (Editor's Note: 8fc. Schnabel'a
to Hone Second Infanflry address is Co. O. 36th Infantry
Division" Regiment. 2nd Division, APO
On the back was a more per-1248, c/o Postmaster, San Fran-
onal message for UthmlnMl claco. Calif J
question on the ground that I
misht be Incriminating my-
self, under the fifth Amend-
ment to the Constitution."
Later a Senator asked:
"Do you know Alger Hiss?"
Again Velson Reclined to
answer on similar ground.
He did this also in reply
to questions asking him to
deny that he had been a
Supervisor" of "espionage
activity in the Canal Zone."
Finally, Arens carefully ask-
ed:
"I put It to you (Velson) a*
a fact that, while you were In
the Armed forces of this gov-
ernment, you were chief as-
sistant to Alexander Stevens
also known as J. Peters, In the
placing of Communist Party
members in the Armed forces
and ask you to affirm or deny
that fact."
1 decline to answer that
question on the grounds pre-
viously stated," Velson said very
flrmlv.
Now, this man Velson is
still organizing union fronts.
He has been working along
the industrial trail from
New York to Detroit, where
he spent considerable time
recently. He is the man who
has been dispatching dele-
aations to Russia and thus
became the central figure In
the Senate's exposure, last
week, of the Red passport
mill.
What Isn't understandable Is
the failure of Federal action-
If Arens can sav to Velson
that It Is a fact that he was
chief assistant to the Soviet's
master spy, why can't the Jus-
tice Dept?
Or don't we want to irritate
the old virago, Vlshinsky?
(Copvright 1951 Post-Ran
Syndicate. IncJ
NEW YORK. 1951 was been a lousy year in
a great many respects, and I bury its corpse
with precious little walling at the bier.
Its Imperfections were numerous, its problems
multifarious, and its conduct somewhat scandal-
ous.
It may be known as the year of the scientific
miracle Tor the first time mink was success-
fully crossed with skunk, and not even chloro-
phyll could kill the odor.
It was one 0f those years of decision, I truly
believe, and there Is no pollyanna In me when
I say that I think all the unpleasantnesses
roused a sudden wakening among the yeoman-
ry. s
,We lazed along In,the belief that destine was
Over the a, when 11 the time it was crouch-
ing: on the doorstep.
Our complacency was bounced and battered
pretty good. In 1951.
We had a sudden, shocked peek at ourselves
at the corruption of officials, at the cynicism
of government, a tthe weakening of moral fiber
among most of us.
We stood aghast before a collapse of ancient
values, arid in the waning motnhs i.t seems to
me we suddenly realized that this Is happening
to US. Not to him or her. To me, John Citi-
zen.
We staggered through the age of the fix, the
bribe .the collusion of politics and crime.
We wepft, somewhat over the downfall of Ideals
among thl young, and observed apathy In all
quarters. '
We despaired over any sound1, eventual solu-
tion to a global nastlness that seems intent on
reducing the world to a smoking slag heap on
one hand, or else a vast poorhouse of bare ne-
cessity, where only the keepers live like men.
In past we' have pondered the decline and fall
of empires the Greeks, the Romans, the Car-
thaginians as ancient happenstances that
touch us not.
It Is only in recent days that we have reflect-
ed that In one man's span we have seen Ger-
many wrecked twice. Russia rise from anarchy
to a vast slave empire, and England reduced
from world-ruler to an Impoverished second-
class power.
We have been on hand as Asia surged upward.
and as America touched its peak among the
titans of the globe.
We suddenly realize that we stand solidly on
the threshold of what could be our decline and
eventual fall.
We have ridden herd on the greatest age of
history the scarred old world has seen and J
believe that ft as the first year, 1961, that
many of us realized it.
I think we have taken a very brutal Inventory
o our jhort comings in the past 12 months
not so much on the high-dome plane as on the
level of the working stiff and th enteek-mlened
middle class.
Many things shocked ua into unpleasantly
We were shocked bv (he futilitle f our gov-
ernment in the handling of our personal affairs.
We were shocked by runaway inflation, by
cverymountlng taxes.
We were shocked by scandals in athletics, by
dope addiction among our youth, by graft among
our cops and elected officials.
We were shocked by scandals in tax*collect'on,
scandals that have been typified by Iceboxes
and plane rides and free jars of jelly and mink
coats and free hotel rooms things that we
can understand better than we understand the
billions the statisticians toss at us.
Never have I heard so much complaining as I
heard last year.
Everybody had a beef.
Never have I seen a people so serious, so lack-
ing in spontaneous gaiety, so short of sense of
humor.
People seemed angry angry and impatient.
It was the year of the tart temper, the strident
voice, the frustrated desperation.
It was the year of heavy drinking and fever-
ish escape.
It was also the year of a definite grasping for
God, a year of reaching out for some sort of
reiterated faith on which to lean in a world
that Is buffeted by uncertainty.
It was a mean year, a sad year, a puzzled year,
but it was not a wasted year.
It was a year of coming to close/ grips with
unpleasant reality.
On that score, alone. I think It was a good
year, if only because It argues that we might
be able to do a better job on 1962.
); Eisenhower's Success
By Stewart Alsop
.WASHINGTON. It is astonishing to return
from a three-month Journey of observation
abroad to find a great many people convinced
that General of the Army Dwight D. Eisen-
hower's mlsasn in Europe has been a failure.
The lmprefllon of a total lack of any real ac-
compllshmerMIn Europe, of the whole European
defense effeS bogged down in confusion and
inertia, seeH to be almost universal. Yet it
is simply rtafirue.
The truth is that Eisenhower has scored a
downright surtling success.
it is hardly- surprising that most Americans
should be unaware of what the Eisenhower mis-
sion Is really accomplishing. Until very recent-
ly, the European defense leaders themselves had
no idea how much was really being, done.
These men came to the recent defense talks
in Rome In a mood of near despair, miserably
reluctant to ask their governments to make the
greater effort which is required In the period
Immediately ahead.
Eisenhower's brilliant deputy, Gen. Alfred
Oruenther, altered this whole atmosphere of
gloom at a single stroke.
At a secret briefing he showed the European
leaders in hard terms what had already been
accomplished. He described how much more
could be accomplished in the near future with
a determined effort
And when tie 'tmd finished he left the Euro-
peans convinced that the job of building a real
defense of Western Europe could be done, and
ready to get on with the Job.
Consider, first* .what has already been done.
As of today. Elsenhower has under his com-
mand some 2tJ divisions, the great majority al-
ready organized in conditions of combat readi-
ness.
He has a functioning, rational supply system
for these division*), and a still inadequate but
growing tactical air force.
Almost this whole by no means contemptible
little army has been created In less than twelve
months, as It were out of thin air.
When Eisenhower arrived on the European
scene he found no more than seven divisions
worthy of the name. Even these divisions exist-
ed in part on paper.
They had no real tactical air support, And
they were scattered about in tactically mean-
ingless positions, often with their supply depots
between them and the potential enemy.
In brief, there was simply no real defense In
Western Europe at all. and every European know
It.
What has already been accomplished can be
summed up In a single sentence.
The Soviets cannot now launch a surprise at-
tack in Europe.
A year ago, the Red army was In a position
to lunge forward at the word of command.
Without a day's preparation. Soviet forces could
have started a raold. virtually unopposed march
to the Atlantic. This is no longer so.
The existing NATO forces constitute more
ground strength than the Kremlin has available
in attack position in Eastern Germany and else-
where.
This means, to quote one estimate from a
highly expert source, that a full two months of
preoaratlon and reinforcement would be requir-
ed before a successful Soviet offensive could be
launched.
These preparations would of course be detect-
ed very soon, well before the fatal hour struck.
The importance of this change in the Euro-
pean military situation is absolutely funda-
mental.
It means that for the first time since the war
Europeans can begin to feel some sense of se-
curity not for the whole future certainly
but for tomorrow, the next day, even the next
month.
(Copyright, 1961. New York Herald Tribune Ine.)
C1UDAILY WASHINGTON
MERRY-GO-ROUND
gy ORIW PIARSON
ft,
Drew Pearson says: Recommended resolution for people
in high places; Year 1952 is most crucial since Pearl
Harbor; Diplomats expect U.S. leadership to stall dur-
ing election year.
WASHINGTON. Here are some New Year's resolutions re-
commended for people in Important places:
President Truman Resolved that I will apply the rule of
George Washington to all my staff namely, those bearing gifts
to public officials should deposit them with tne State Depart-
ment until after they leave office.
Senator McCarthy Resolved that I wlil quit pinning the
Communist label on rural telephone users who listen in on the
party line.
John L. Lewis Resolved to cut mv eyebows more and the
public less.
General Elsenhower Resolved not to keep Senator Duff
and the American public waiting any longer.
Gen. Wallace Graham of the White House Resolved not
to trade on the commodity market except in dandelion seed.
Gen. Harry Vaughan Resolved to put all Influence ped-
dlers In the deep-freeze.
Senator Kefauver Resolved to keep all rackets on the ten-
nis courts.
Lamar Caudle Resolved to travel only by train.
Senator McKellar of Tenn. Resolved to limit my fighting
spirit to public Issues and leave unsuspecting callers alone.
Frank McKinney - Chairman of the Democratic National
Committee Resolved that having been given a new broom, I
will use it.
Congressman King of the tax proDe committee Resolved
to subject my colleagues In Congress to as much scrutiny on in-
fluence-peddling as the other people I put on the grill before my
committee.
Sen. Russell And Rep. Vinson of Georgia Resolved not to
let the combat bonus pay for GI's in Korea languish longer in
the Armed Services Committees.
Attorney General Howard McGrath Resolved to dust off
the cases that have long been hanging fire in the Justice De-
partment. .
The Alfa Romea Company of Italy Resolved not to give
baskets of fruit and wine to our workers on Stalin's next birth-
day.
CRISIS OF 1952
Most Important prediction the American people want for
the coming year Is whether 1952 will bring peace or war.
My prediction is that 1952 will bring no wcrld war; neither^
will it bring complete peace. I
Intermittent hostilities will continue in Indc-China; perhapl
in Iran, possibly the Egypt-Palestlne-Syilan .rea.
More Important than these small, isolated wars, however, Is
a test of the American people which the Kremlin has been wait*
ing for ever since 1945.
After VE day, Kremlin planners predicted the United States
would suffer a serious depression from the end of war orders,
then would proceed to fall apart at the .seams.
It would not be necessary to declare war on the U.S., pre
dieted the men of Moscow. The American people would be so
disorganised, so divided by Internal bitterness, so shorn of lead-
ership that Communism would merely pick up the pieces.
This did not happen. It did not happen largely because the
United States proceeded to exert wise and difficult leadership
in the rest of tbe world through the Marshall Plan; through
the North Atlantic Pact; and through military aid.
However, diplomatic observers, who have the advantage of
looking at us from a distance, begin to detect some of the things
that Moscow wanted in 1946 rumblings of bitterness. Internal
strife, lack of confidence, growing isolation, disillusionment.
The year 1961 witnessed devastating debates which split the
nation Into bitter factions the deba'.e over MacArthur, the
debate over an ambassador to the Vatican, the shock at income-
tax scandals.
Even before these wounds have healed, the nation now faces
a new and always difficult debate over who will be the next
President of the United States.
During the coming year names will be called and passions
will flare. *"
During 1952, also. American leadership in the rest of the
world will be slowed to a snail's pace. We will be too busy with
our own problems.
That is why diplomatic observers are worried.
That is why the Kremlin is reported matching the U.S. more
Intently than ever.
That is why the year 1952 may be the most crucial since
Pearl Harbor. *
THE AMERICAN CREED
Here is a resolution written In 1917 by William Tyler Page,
former clerk-of the House of Representatives, which all Americans
might keep In mind for 1952:
"I believe in the United States of America as a government
of the people, for the people, by the people; whose just powers
are derived from the consent of the governed: a democracy in
a republic; a sovereign nation of many rovereign states; a per-
fect union, one and Inseparable: established upon those prin-
ciples of freedom, equality, justice and humanity for which Am-
erican patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes.
"I therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it;
to support its Constitution: to obey its laws; to respect its flag;
and to defend It against all enemies."
DIPLOMATIC POUCH
It was definitely an order from Moscow that put the four
American filers in Hungary on trial for espionage.
The Moscow order came as a surprise to the Hungarian for-
eign office, which had Just indicated to the American embassy
that the fliers would be released.
Averell Harriman still hopes General Elsenhower oan be per-
suaded to run as a Democrat If Sena1 or Tsrft gets the Repub-
"-~n nomination. Harriman recently talked to Eisenhower in
Paris.
Swedish Intelligence has learned that the Russians have im-
prisoned a Swedish diplomat who's been missing for six years.
His name is Raoul Wallenberg and he's been absent since HHS
when he vanished In Bulgaria.
General Eisenhower is boiling mad at the Belgian govern-
ment for holding up plans to increase Atlantic Pact defenses in
1952. Ike has had two tough-talking sessions with the Belgian
representative in the past two weeks, has made It plain that
Belgium must do twice as much as it is doing or else.
President Syngman Rhree has warned John Foster Dulles
he will never consent to any truce which permanently divides
South and North Korea. Rhee told Dulles that his troops will
never rest until the last Communist has been driven out of all
Korea.
-
PANAMA AMERICAN
'fcCpAgj
AjosNassc^ro.
CAN FILL, YOUR NEEDS!
%
*


--T"-
'W^'^


'..-
/
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 1952
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DATLY NEWSPAPER
'4fe
Canal Zone School Activities
C.H.S. News
Your reporter would like
have this opportunity to wish
the many Tigers boosters, who
have given so tirelessly o their
efforts In the past year to help
us, a very Happy and prosperous
new year. Many of them work
to to decide the third and fourth
place teams, C.H.S. marked up
their 3rd vacation victory, win-
ning by a score of 37-32. Bob
Bailey was high point man with
10 points. In the championship
game the Albrook quintet proved
behind the scenes where no one! their superiority for the third
knows about it, but we'd like i time that week by defeating the
them to know we really appre-lj.C. hosts 42-38 Congratulations
elate what they are .doing and
we thank them from the bottom
of our iiearts.
Basketball was definitely the
highlight on the athletic sche-
dule- for this week. C. H. 8. play-
ed four games and won three,
which chalks up a good average
for four days. Wednesday night
saw the opening game of the
Canal Zone Junior College Invi-
tational tournament at the Bal-
boa gym with CHS playing the
Balboa workint? boys. The first
two quarters were close ones, the
ilnal score of each CHS leading
by one point. The third quarter
we pushed ahead to a good lead
but it son dwlndeled down in the
4th quarter and when time ran
out CHS led 43-42. Roy Wilson
was hlgn scorer for the blue and
gold with 20 points to his credit.
While the varsity boys rested
up Thursday night, the Junior
Varsity took to the floor at the
Margarita, gym and really show-
ed themselves a remarkable
team. They played the Army Ca-
ribbean School at Ft. Gulick and
showed -hem who was the mas-
ter of tne game, as the final
score o! the name read 62-43.
High scorer in the game were
Eugene Pidier 13 points and John
Hatgl 12 points. The jayvees
made a very line showing for
their first game of the season.
Keep up the good works, boys.
Friday night, CHS'ers' Tig-
ers agnin burned up the Isth-
mian highway going over for
the tournament semi-final. A-
gain we played the opening
game, this time against the
owerful Albrook Flyers. The
igera got off to a slow start
but finally caught up and led
the scoring in the final quar-
ters. But In the end the Blue
Jays proved to be two points
better as the ending score was
47-45 in their favor. Again Roy
Wilson led the scoring With 14
Joints. C.H.S. played good ball
at were up against one of the
strongrst teams seen on the
Isthmus in many a year.
to Scalfinl and his 1951 tourna-
ment championship team. Also
thanks to the Junior College for
the invitation to the tournament
and good luck with your cham-
pionship runner-up team.
Thanks too. for the lovely plague.
Special Mention should be given
to the Fighting Tigers Roy Wil-
son, Arnold Manning, Captain
Bob Bailey, Vernon Bryant, Sklp-
py Anderson, and the Salters
Talmadgc and Bob for three
wonderful games and let's keep
It up with our aim at the schol-
astic championship.
Everyone celebrated the holi-
day season, many in party
form. A "stagless" party was
given Wednesday night by Lois
and Dlene Scheidegg at their
home in Gatun. Some of those
in the group, who went first
to the show and then came
back for refreshments and talk
were Carlo Newhard, Alice
Chambers, Dale Roberson, Bar-
bara Egolf,- and Louise Ed-
mundson.
Early (ohhh!> Thursday morn-
Libya, three times the tise of Texas, eeaaists of three territories separated by wide
end of the war, two of them, TripeUUnla, boasting SOI.Mt of Libya's 2.15t,*M
Cyrenalci, fell to EngUnd. France aaramod responsibility for administration of the Fe
farm land and mineral resources, Libya's Importance to both countries to strateaie.
as Tobruk, Tripoli. Bengasi, and modera air bases, Libya is a key link la the West'*
(hard thing to find?) and a-1922
penny made themselves scarce.
Donna Geyer and David Lane
were the lucky winners of the
prizes.
The youth conference also had
their share of fun at a party at
the Cristobal Union Church.
Games ike passing the orange
from chin to chin and "who-
dunit" really were corkers for
Joan and Paula Holgerson and
Rita Howard, participated.
Pat Howard, Carol Coleman,
ing found Mary Ann, fice and Blanche Bland. Nancy Karlger,
Diane Hannigun, Ann Thomas,! Bob Bal-ey. Irma Leignadler, and
Noel McGinn, and Sheila Mc- David Ru belli helped Owen Ka-
Namee on their way to El Valle ;flger rln.f in the New Year which
with Father Lynch. They all had also was her eighteenth birth-
fun, but there was some com- day.
plaint about the fish biting, and '
not at tr>e hooks either. Alumna Jane Deboyrle, home
Alumnus Jimmy Nellls was for the holidays, was a New
host for a party last week where I Year's Eve hostess also. A won-
Ardis Willoughby sfnd John Fah- derful meal was served at the
nestock, Ann Thomas and Leslie | Deboyrle home and then Ray
Rlnehart, Nina Nix and Jody Ro- Pinto, Jeb Wllkerson and Joanne
berso had a swell time. What did Parsons, John Fahnestock and
they do with that mistletoe??
SIDE GLANCES
By Galbraith
., -#
n
Thursday night gatunltes like
John Albright and Diane Mc-
Claren, nnd Bobby Williams and
Alumnu.i Buddy Thomas turned
up at .he gym for the teen-age
dance sponsored by the Gatun
Civic Council.
C.H.S. then met B.H.S. Satur-,.
day night In a preliminary game a left-handed monkey
Anna Fisher. Andre Llm and
Helena Deboyrle .and Tom Kelly
and Rita Fisher proceeded to the
Golf Club for mucho dancing
and fun.
That's how some CHS'ers spent
their vacation. Did THD seniors
really work on their anthologies
Friday night Donna Brown's or were they too busy working on
house was the scene of much I the "Caribbean" and basket-
merrlmert. Sylvia Dinkgreveandlball?
Dale Cockle, Elcctra Rosanla and |
Tommy Cantanzaro, Charlie Don't forget the basketball
Thompson and Margaret Joud- game Filday night, January 4 at
rey gathered for a hamberger fry the Cristobal gym, the opening
and then scrambled off on a game of the scholastic season,
scavenger hunt where items like Happy New Year to all and to
wrench all school tomorrow!II
O
'You had a big red wart on your nose last year, Santa! Did
you have it operated on?"
Legion Auxiliary
Watches Progress
Of UMT Measure
Progress of the Universal Mil-
lltary Training bill now before
'Congress Is being watched with
^Interest by women of the Amer-
ican Legion Auxiliary through-
out the nation, according to Mrs.
George Feist. Legislative Chair-
man of American Legion Auxi-
liary. Department of Panama
Canal Zone.
The bill represents more than
thirty years of effort by The
American Legion and Auxiliary
to establish Universal Military!
Training as the foundation for
i an adequate and democratic na-
tional security system for the
United States, Mrs, Feist said. It
is the result of a bill passed last
year which created a commis-
sion to report a UMT plan to
Congress .This report is embodied
In th new bill on which hear-
ings were scheduled to start Jan.
9.
"The strongest step toward se-
cure peace which our country
could take would be to provide
military training for every abled-
bodled young man." said Mrs.
Feist. "This would show the ag-
gressor nations that the United
States intends to maintain de-
fenses strong enough to assure
their defeat snould they ever at-
tack the free world and. If any-
thing can, will turn their thlnk-
Inc Into more peaceful channels.
"UMT Is a long-range plan,
designed to create a large force |
of trained reserves .constantly re-
plendished, ready immediately to
defend America. It would place
every young man In the reserved
forres, not Just the patriotic few
who have been called to duty in
the Korean War. and would train
them for the highly technical
duties of modem war. It would
provide a broad, democratic basis
for a national security system
which, by Its very existence,
would make dictators more eager
to talk peace than plan war.
"In Its present form, the UMT
calls for six months training at
the age of eighteen, to be follow-
ed by seven and one-half years
In the reserve forces, for all
qualified young men."
UNKNOWN DESIGNER
The desginer of the Cologne
cathedral In Oermanv is un-
known. There Is a tradition that
a nameless youth bartered his
soul to Satan for the design and
a promise of everlasting fame.
Cverybodu r\ead L^laifiecl
MECHANICS consult and check Panam American
classifieds all the time. They market their skill*
through them, buy their cars and Stinsons through
them. Spark your message by publishing it In
P.A. classifiedsalways at your service!
Every month . every week . every day THE
PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE WANT ADS
than all ether daily papers in Panam eombined !
Everybody Reads Classified
This is a part of our Bonded Warehouse
..... *


where Gold Label, 7 Years

and Casino. Rums are aging
under very strict supervision


of the

1
YOU ARE WELCOME TO VISIT US AT ANY TIME

^w
A
\c ,]
c/o &ur
friends ana (clients
Diers & Ullrich. S.A.
w
Panam
Coln
MAKERS OF QUALITY PRODUCTS"


1
-
'
paok rom
'.' W-'^BJP^PPP
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY. JANUARY t Iff
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED NY ROYAL CHARTER 1840

Royal Mails Lines Ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA
Famous Statue
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA.
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUflA.
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M. V. "RRrNA DEL PACIFICO"..................March 1st
The m.T. -REINA DEL PACIFICO" will not call It Kingston
on the March Voyage.
TO UK CONTINENT
S.S. "DIEMERDYK" ..............................Dec. 26th
'Accepting passengers in First. Cabin and Third Class
Superior accommodation available for passengers
All sailings subject to change without notice.
PACIFIC STEAM NAV. CO.. Cristbal. Tel. 1654 1655
FORD COMPANY Inc.. Panam Tel. J-12M/12M: Balboa 1950
OPS To Try Out New
Pnce-Fixing Plan
i
WASHINGTON, Jan. 1 (UP>
Price Stabilizer Michael V. Dl-
Salle announced today that a
ner- "community food pricing"
y m requiring grocers to post
dc'Urs-and-cents celllne prices
)U he started soon in three key
elf is.
DiP.'ll indicated that the pro-
mam will become nationwide if
th tests to he held In Fresno.
C"J. Fargo. N.D.. and Jackson-
v1'!? Fla.. are successful. He said
hi" nrlce agencv was wanted to
P'-t it Into effect ever since To-
re-v regulations were Issued last
Mereh. but there were "strong
ob fades."
H said the proaram is aimed
at letting: housewives know ex-
te'lv the highest nrice the*- 1"-
(-?' re b/ charge-* for ?50 to
4W kM iaod items. Some 38 dry
groceries will be included, along
with a number of packaged but-
te" and cheese items.
w%lle p'o disclosed that:
* A recent survey of food
Drives in 2.000 stores Indicates
th*>t thev are about four per cent',
below ceilings
?He has "under considera-
tion" requests by the grocery]
trade for higher ceiling prices,
esnecially on goods selling at or
near the ceiling DiSalle said su-
permarkets particularly contend1
that the price program has low-
red their net earnings lo a "de- <
pr'-^ed and inequitable leveL"
DiSalle said the three-city1
community food pricing program
is scheduled to get underway a-
tout the end of January or the,
first of Februarv. Afler that the
office of Price Stabilization will
Issue revised posters every two
weeks to reflect any price chang-
es.
"The test will provide a basis
for deciding whether such a pro-
gram should be extended to oth-
er cities and towns." DiSalle said
He recalled that communitv
pricing was "the best-liked and
most effective" form of price
control used during World War
II He said It appealed to house-
wives because it gave them "ex-
!act" celling prices. The trade
liked it because it reduced their
bookkeeping chores, he added.
DiSalle said the program has
the "further advantage'' of be-
ing the easiest kind of price con-
trol to enforce.
HORIZONTAL
1,4 Depicted
famous statue,
"The-----of
the-----
9 Sprite
12 Observe
13 Throng
14 Rocky hill
15 Cask
18 Turkish
official
17 Brazilian
macaw
18 Comparative
suffix
19 Ocean liner
21 Exists
22 Heavy cord
24 Formerly
28 Crack
27 Rip
28 Symbol for
sodium
29 -Silver
(symbol)
30 Measure of
are*
31 Tantalum
(symbol)
32 Dancing girl
34 Of the ear
37 Accomplish-
ment
38 Network
39 Sun god of
Egypt
40 Revisers
48 Indian
mulberry
47 Mountain in
Crete
49 Scent
50 Drink made
with mjit
51 Wax (p.eflx)
52 Baby ailment
53 Courtesy title
54 Insect
55 Growing out
56 Remit
VERTICAL
1 Natural fats
2 Nerve cell
3 Lair
4 Pronoun
5 Italian capital
6 Extent
7 The same
8 Cameroon
town
9 Greek letter
10 Cuirass
11 Its sculptor
was James
E.-------
Answer t6 Pre+ious Puzzle
IwIoImISIaITI
BHSEJOirai i"r_i,j -tvm j
:ji. in ., i.;mi'_> '? .;
i-irji.ii-iiW-''
.' sjssjjjapjB .<:-:
. IHha'LJ llflllllMI ii i
MLMU
-L21J
l-U"L jactan
i II-."-: >jjmw < r_v '_i
TJaiUIIiai4|MI2!IIWi2T-r
TERRY-
CURTAINS TIME
fiTUHti, i6 rr not; my colon**.? i po not ,
' IVtM KNOW TJ YA W^tC'S WAMSr, HIT BBCAU*
VX HBLPBP MMl PIH. At OTHB* WOMSW WHO
,HAV MfN MUST FS*L...
MbaxwhilB. ANOTWB* 6fiftJE6 OP BLASTS FROM
THBr AM WO PIW? ANP AH UNBXPLOPEP BSX.KST
I* HUKLEP INTO THB AIR. IT CURVfiS
POWNWARP...
19 Divide
20 Turning
muscles
23 It was shown
at the-----
Exposition
25 Nullify
32 Continent
33 Heavy
35 Italy
38 Vegetable
41 Small flab
42 Press
43 Weight of
India
44 Leave out
45 Contest of
speed.
48 Wile
50 Viper
ANP MILES WAV, WHERE THE SWIRLINS AIR
BATTLE HASPRIPTEP... rr
..Ti
WELL DONE, VASSIiy
THE yANKEE 16
FINISH6PATLAST.
FRECRXES AND HIS FRIEND*
A TTP
RY MERRILL HLOSSER
SPEAKTO RtPA.BABY'
V*IAT DOGS MILOA '
HANKER FOR?
ALLEY OOP

NOT A NICE BOY
BY V. T. HAMLIH
' ^ST^1- A BOYAS HE WAS
WORK?^j BACKINI907/
Shipping & AirLine News
Striking Air France Crewmen i work except for mall planes and
Suspend 10-Day Strike the Indochina run.
PARIS, Jan. 1 (UP). Flight1 The ffcflke was provoked by
crews of Air France yesterday
suspended their ten-day strike,
and agreed to return to work
immediately while negotiation on
their wage demands continue.
The strike started Dec. 21, and
paralyzed lines of the entire net-
Lawn Embellishes
Family Bedroom
the demand for wage Increases
of 66 percent and better social se-
curity flU insurance coverage.
The demands were made by pi-
lots, radio operators and mech-
anics. ''"
The bWsent monthly salary of
an Air France mechanic is $155,
and the. highest salary for a
Constellation pilot is $666.
XHM! TELL YOU WHAT...VOU FOLKS
i'SS&'&SS^PITCH ,N AN'HELP CREWS
^"gtyWPRS V LOAD UP AN1 MEANWHILE!
US HOME,WE'RE
.OUTAUJCK
ft'
w
II-t
V"
ROOTS AND HER BTJDDIRS
UNANIMOUS
BY EDGAR MARTIN
Tour Director Leaves
,. i Fort Short US Trip
Under the program, small fade- Jff.Wtl?tf brtZl^.W; f ^Ty
should he'p those who wish un- M,"*?, "rs for the 9,!
limited sunshine and a view m,1").camb<,er ' ^mme,rc*;Jfn
their homes. u,| yesterday for Cincinnati. Ohio.
Rollo Wheeler, a University of fe fPfCts to be away two weeks.
California architectural student inquines, regarding proposed
has built a unique five-room !to"rs my be made by calling
house for his family of four A[ RDerto Ellis of the Colon Cham-
front lawn grows right In his ber of Commerce at Colon 807.
bedroom.
The young architect "sliced
out a hunk of hill," using the fill
for the foundation of the bed-
room. Then he dug down into it
with a posthole digger and filled
pendent stores no longer will
compute their own ceiling prices
for Items on the charts. This
will be done for them by OPS.
Police Use Poetry
In Safety Drive
AUGUSTA. Me., (UP) Maine
state police have gone poetical In
an attempt to cut down driving
deaths. A sample of their efforts:
Identical twins were Tim and
Ted
With beautiful hair all curly red,
As perfect a pair as peas in a pod.
Tim's still alive; Ted's under the
sod.
What happened? It's simple, Tim
drove with care.
Ted didn't. He liked to speed and
tear
-------------------,
Dog Hijacks Food
And Dishes, Too
WAKPA, Okla.. Jan. 1 (UP)
the holes with cement. In short. Mrs. Ed Geier thinks she has
he said, "the room Is held up by the most unpopular pet in Wak-
plles like a wharf." lta, both with other animals and
Wheeler then planted lawn their owners,
grass in the rug-sized space near, Her dog not only Isn't above
the front plate glass window. \ sjaUchlng food from other dogs
Summer or winter, the Wheel-' and cats in the neighborhood but
er children can take off their\ he also, brings home the bowl.
shoes and squish their toes in the cat dish.dr whatever contains it
cool, green grass. Wheeler's wife and eats' In comfort. *
enjoys doing her sewing on the Mrs. Geler said that when her
OH .P6HPW I VIS" ChKit
PO". MV MIMO TO W.
NOW VK6 60 OVJW* A***!,
TH\6 60\OViOtH..A tttCWfcV
WWW'. ftttfcVfc tXH -OWft'
CAROY.V. \6WC
WB KA6WC >\V&
ttt&tt Kt
*Crt V\ OOKiT COST t*0JOV
ROHM*' *. YT H>V OlA\' WNTH *RW
ttawfc
CAPTAIN EASY
LOYAL LADY
BY LESLIE TURN!
Along the highway. Poor old Ted! h.wn and the dogs, Pat and Mike,, neighbors miss dishes they al-
Tlm's still driving: Ted Is dead, romp on the lawn. ways know where to call.
CHRIS WELKEN. Planeteer
Tcm+AT- 4FACB \*h
I VACUUA4...NEITHCC
I WOT MOK COLC?...HOW(
J COMB THE-SE *WT*
I HAVE MEATIN<& AMI
' COOL\Hj UNIT*?
SAVING ON COAL
BY BUSS W1NTERBOTHAM
WE ABSORB
HEAT FfSOM
Z-VHU&HT,
AND RADIATE
IT IM THE
DARK. KOCKY.
WEtee ONLY 93,000,000 MILE*
PROA4 THE *1>N.CLOSE ENO&H
TO FRY Ot &WN IDE* WHILE WE
FREEZE ON Of R DARK 4DE*i
'I
I'
'BUT THI*
FLyiN6
TE/ANLE I* ,
COMFORTABLE!
&OAAE SPECIAL w
KIND OF PAINT
REFLECT* THE
4ffiNi.MMnr and
HOLPS BACK HEAT
LOSS FROM WITH-
IN THE ship; no
DOUBT.
t
I2-S2' | "
Of .mi It tt.ucr mc____g
CAPTAIM "^ IF I AV. M1E& TULLI6? &URELV.
EASY \S THE XYOVRE MOT SCRIO! HU. L.4
WAWE! IF YOU \IW 10\MS EMOUSK ro tCVUR
ARE MISS TDUIS, HbX **'* DMJflHTERl
IV. HERE TO
DEWM4P AM
EWLAWA
NPREWCTABLE PERHAPSV .
BUT SHE'S A GENIUS...- / WITH A HEART OF GOLD! ( TMT BMMV
AND THO SHES JUST UFT I OLD INIfCH
ME Ml a DREADFUL SITUA- V *9ti'r E
TIONi I WON'T CRITICI-
;c
/-42.I
VIC FLINT
ONE MORE TRY
BY MICHAEL O'MALLEl
'I.LA'S POP
TO EACH HIS OWN
BY AL VERMEER
IGS BUNNY
rve dOT ANJ ACt INI
THE HOL~A HAAAILTON
SCRIBE MVSTBRV BAN
MAMED UBOY LAM/
ol R BOARDING BOUSE
with
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAY
EGAD,mem/ A SIFT prom.
SAMTA/ I DREAMED I WAS
old tfeis keiMGLE, worm- ,
IMG MY WAV DOWN) AT6MT J
CHlMMEYAtOD LO/ MY *
DISIOCA.TED BACKCLICXeDj
INSTO PLACE LIKE A ,
G"EAR ME^HIMG.',
By J. R. WILLIAMS
(THAT'S COMlMG]
OUT Of IT
With the old
Pi M6-fort
BOUNCE YOU j
LOOK AS
, HEALTHY AS
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we're slad
.vou're able
.id Resume
FORMAL.
OPeRATiOM
'LOAFIMO
With your.
CLOTHES
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HE'LL.
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WELL,"OU GOTTH'
CARDBOARD BOXES
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TO FEEL 'EM ANY
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AT-EM, THEY'RE A
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pp^
'

*
TIFSDAT, JAM-ART 1, 1SSS
l^acLfLc ^ocie
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
fAOE
**
I
y
!
ft miCjUm
& 17. &Am .L ILL. 3521
MINISTER OF GREAT BRITAIN
HOST FOE COCKTAIL SUPPER
The Minister of Great Britain to Panama, Mr. Eric Ar-
thur death, entertained a small group of friends at the re-
sidence with a cocktail supper given in honor of Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Circuit and Mr. H. Asheton, all of Mexico City,
who are visitors on the Isthmus and are guests at the Hotel
El Panama.
Following the supper, the group attended the gala New
Tear's ETe celekration at the El Panama.
prominent Goeets
At Hotel El Panama
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Bendetson,
the Honorable and Mrs. Gordon
canfleld and their two sons, Mr.
Peter Beasley and Mr. and Mrs.
Matthew Robinson, all of whom
arrived yesterday on the Isth-
mus aboard the 8. S. Cristobal,
are guests at the Hotel El Pa-
nama.
Visitor Honored By Friends
Mrs. R. Z. Kirkpatrick. of Ro-
chester. New York, who is visit-
Inn her son and daughter-in-law.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H. Kirk-
patrick. of New Cristobal was the
guests of honor at a luncheon
today siven by Mr. and Mrs. H.
J. Million, at their home in Pe-
dro Miguel.
Also present at the lunchen
were Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Matthew
and Ladd.
j
a*
Mrs. Capwell Entertains
For Visitors
To honor Mrs. Marie Cagnon,
of Bangor, Maine, who Is visiting
her brother-in-law and sister,
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Vlolette, of
Bella Vista, Mrs. George Cap-
well entertained Saturday with a
luncheon at the Panama Golf
Club.
Balboa Emblem Club Has
Party At El Rancho
The members of the Balboa
Emblem Club No. 49 held their
annual Christmas party on Fri-
day evening at El Rancho Gar-
den.
Those attending included Mrs.
Maude cllnchard. Mrs. James
Trimble. Mrs. Alfred Graham,
Mrs. Dorothy Flint, Mrs. Vera
Slmonsen, Mrs. Marie Days,
Mrs. Anita Lindell, Mrs. Rose
Nlchisher, and Mrs. Frank As-
pect.
The next meeting of the group
will be on Friday. Jan. 4 at the
new Wirz Memorial at 7:30 p.m.
Installation of new officers will
be held and a social hour will
follow.
VaUarino-Hntchings
Marriage Announced
The Cristo Rey Church was the
setting Friday evening for the
wedding of Miss Vally Vallarlno,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alberto
Vallarlno ,to Mr.. Alba Davis
Hutching*. Jr.
The private ceremony was per-
formed by the Reverend Father
Prada.
The bride wore a ballerina
Mr. and Mrs. R.-sson Entertain t* wedding gown of era-
Fo-mer Residents broidered organdy Jg&JS?
Mr. and Mrs. William Russon. round neckline and fitted bodice,
of Diablo Heights, had as their!Her finger P. ^ngth yell of
house guests recently for a short Illusion was held to pHo* _
time former residents Colonel coronet of orange blossoms and
Rubbollis of Cristobal; Mrs. Pat
Ryan of Balboa; Mrs. R. C. Meiss-
ner of Pedro Miguel and Mrs. J.
H. Pennlngton. of Gamboa, who
Is also the Chairman in charge
of refreshments for the affair.
A tour of the gardens will be
conducted by Mrs. Morgan at
9: SO a.m. and coffee will be served
at 10 a.m.
Mrs. Stella M. Price, of Balboa,
entertained informally with a
small luncheon for Mrs. Kirk-
patrick at the Hotel Tivoll on
Sunday.
Buffet Sapper Honors
Mrs. Gardner
Mrs. William Gardner .of Los
Angeles, California, was honored
Saturday evening with a buffet
upper given by her son-m-law
and daughter ,the United States
Vice Consul and Mrs. Anthony
Starcevic. The occasion also ce-
lebrated the birthday anniver-
sary of Mrs. Starcevic.
and Mrs. Perry Lusby.
Miss Ruth Rlckarby
Called To States
Miss Ruth RICkarby left yes-
terday bv plane for Mobile Ala-
bama, where she was called by
the serious illness of her father.
she carried a white prayer book
covered with gardenias.
The sister of the bride, Miss
Dora Vallarlno, was her only at-
tendant and was gowned In green
and white' polka dot organza
made with a bouffant skirt and
off the shoulder effect bodice.
The best man was Mr. Joseph
Burgoon.
Immediately following the ce-
H&ckaby-Maye Marriage
Solemnised In Balboa
Miss Alexis Mays, base librarian remony a reception was given by
at Albrook Air Force Base, be- the brother-in-lawanI sister of
came the bride of Mr. Monzell! the bride. Mr and Mrs- Archie
Kuc&by. of the base ordnance .Byrne .at their home in Bj-
section, at Btibok Union Chtrrch
at 7:30 p.m. last night.
Miss Murdoch Honored
At Cocktail Party
Miss Jessie Murdoch ,of New
York, who is spending the winter
here as a guest at the Hotel Ti-
voll. was the guest of honor re-
cently at a cocktail partv given
Uk Vista for -relatives of -the
couple.
After a short wedding trip the
young couple will reside in Cu-
rundu.
Tear's Eve Celebration
Mr. and J. J. Vallarlno enter-
tained with cocktails for a group
of their friends before the group
attended the festivities to cele-
brate New Year's Eve at the Hotel
El Panama last night.
Those attending In a no-host
group were Mr. and Mrs. Octavio
Mndez Guardia, Dr. and Mrs.
Gilberto Arias, Mr. and Mrs. Ri-
cardo Areco. Mr. and Mrs. Stan-
ton Brown. Mr. and Mrs. Jaime
de la guardia, Jr., Mr. and Mrs.
Jorge Porras, Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Watson. Mr. and Mrs. Aristldes
Romero, Miss Tanla Plza and
Mr. Bernardo Cardenas.
Also attending the celebration
as a no-host group were Mr. and
Mrs. Owen Richards, Mr. and
Mrs. Timothy Woodruff. Mr. and
Mrs. James Clarendon, Mr. and
Mrs. Allen Lowrle, Mr. and Mrs.
Leig Kramer, Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Scurlock, Mr. and Mrs. Vance
Fenton. Mr. Charles Robinson,
Miss Nina Norman and Captain
and Mrs. Robert Peacher.
UMW Pays Out $ 100,000
To 100 Widows, 162 Kfds
WASHINGTON, Jan. 1 (UP) all coal mined, now total $100,-
The United Mine Workers> 000,000.
health and retirement fund an-; It was started in \9Vf aftpr
nounced today that it had paid a long dispute between Lewis
out more than $100,000 to the j and the mine owners. i
100 widows and 162 children of The first $1.000 cheek was
victims of the West Frankfort,'given out,the day after Christ-
Ill., mine disaster. i mas to a 17-year-old" widO'v
Meantime,' I'.rw president with one child. Anothertlwldov..
John L. Lewis was reported to! with nine children, wasUmong
have ordered an additional as-: the earliest paid, n a -3
sessement of $2.00 a month on The defense fund i assessment,
475,000 miners to raise a huge authorized at a recent meeting
"defense fund" for use if ne- of the UMW executive board,
cessary when the union and would add $2,800,000, to the u-
operators negotiate a new con-!nion treasury.
-^ftlantic Society*
Wrs. Witton JL fU
Vox 195, (ja/un Jtliphom (jalu
3 78;
Another celebrating group In-
cluded Mr. and Mrs. John Urey,
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Dugas. Mr.
and Mrs. Fenton Whalen, Mr. and
Mrs. Arwln Janssen and Mr. and
Mrs. Mario Guardia.
Among the many who attended
the festivities were Mr. and Mrs.
George Berman, Mr. and Mrs.
Alfredo Alemn. J4. Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Akin. Mr. and Mrs
Jack Mercer. Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Scrlbner, and Mr. and Mrs. Ro-
berto Eisenmsnn. .,
Mr. and Mrs. Brown Rotara
To Isthmus
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Guy Brown,
of Balboa, who have spent the
past several days vacationing in
San Jose, Costa Rica, returned
today to the Isthmus.
Mrs. Houghton To Be
Honored At Ceffeo
Mrs. Hiram Houghton, the
president of the General Federa-
ffw^^^sswsaurvi
Pavne at their home in Bella
Vls'ta.
members of the Federated Wo-
men's Club will be the guests of
honor at a coffee to be given
Gordonlers Are Hostso Fr lolntly by the members of the
Ear Nog Party Federated Women's Clubs of the
Caotain and Mrs. V. F. Gor- Isthmus on Saturday morntag at
donler were hosts Saturday even- the Morgan Estate^**S
lng at their home on the Naval The coffee has been arranged
Reservation to a group of }&\*&g*ff*JS*J!
friends at an Egg Nog Party. lerated Clubs who are Mrs. R. W.
Be sure of the word
GUARANTEED
for your new '52 furniture
Yours . J125.00 down
Always ask for the year's
GUARANTEED CERTIFICATE
to buy MAHOGANY LIVING ROOM SET
with ''Duran" plastic. .
the best mahogany furniture
at best prices.
CASH CREDIT CLUB
FURNI
1NTRALAVE.^21TET CLONES
TURE STORE
2-1830
2-1833
Raymonds Entertain With
Barbecue Party
Dr. and Mrs. Frank Raymond
of Vista del Mar entertained a
group of friends at a barbecue
party at their home on Saturday
evening.
All Star Circle To Meet
Wednesday
The All Star Circle will meet
at-the ScotUarwRile Temple in
Balboa for a luicheon and busi-
ness meeting on Wednesday at
1:00 p.m.
Gamboa Vesper Circle
To Moot Wednesday
The Vesper Circle of the Gam-
boa Union Church will meet on
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the
home of the chairman. Mrs. W.
H. Ward, at quarters 104-B. Co-
hostess for the meeting will be
Mrs. R. K. Soyster.
All members and their guests
are Invited to attend.
tract next spring.
Josephine Roche, director
of the welfare fond, said that
Jlsee death benefit cheeks al-
ready had been paid over lo
every widow or nearest re-
lative of the 119 men who
perished la the West Frank-
fort Mast.
In addition, the first month-
ly benefits of $30 a month plus
$10 for each child have been
paid out.
The welfare fund, supported
by a 30-cents-a-ton royalty on
HOLIDAY EGG-NOG PARTY AT COCO SOLO
Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. H. J. Thornton and
Lieutenant and Mrs. M. A. Ley, Jr., gave an egg-nog party
at the quarters of Lieutenant and Mrs. Loy from 12:00 to
Z:M p.m. Sunday afternoon.
A Christmas tree made of red ezoria. flanked by red
tapers in silver holders centered the refreshment table, and
Santa Claus candles were used with the flowers on the
buffet
. | -^
Their guests were: colonel and Worthy, Patron. They will install
Mrs. Henry F. Taylor, Captain Mrs. Lavinla Badders and Mr. CrrlAAliAa/riAr I ara*
and Mrs. L. I. Koepke, Com- Fred Willoughby in these respec- JlllUUIIvGLilGf L0)G)
mander and Mrs. C. L. Balay, tlve positions.
Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. | All Eastern Stars are cordially
L. B. Jennings and their guests, i Invited.
Mrs. and Mrs. Edison Marshal,!
votes were counted for the
dldates for Queen of the
nival de Centenario de Coln
The candidates, according
the number of votes receive
now stand as follows: Miss Narawj
Sasso. Miss Rosita ArmempJH
I Miss Mercedes Moreno, and MUM ,
Jeannette McKeown.
Leg In Starter Blast
MT. AIRY. N. C Jan. 1 (UPf
A mysterious bomb, wired Ifr-
Lleptenant Commander and Mrs.Miss Karlger Entertains
V. A. Schweitzer and Mrs. Marie Teen Agers
Berry, Lieutenant and Mrs.j Miss Gwendolyn Karlger. who the ignition, exploded and toa
Chester Lucas and Mrs. Phoebe is leaving on January 15 to enter off the leg of an agricultura
Kelly, Lieutenant and Mrs. Roy Martha Washington College at teacher todav as he stepped oi
J Nielsen. Lieutenant and MrsJFrederlcksburg, Virginia, was the starter o his pick-up t
to about 800
miners who died In mine ac-
cidents last year, anidaverage
of more than four deaths for
each working day.
She said M.sot miners ave
injured each year while mat
death toll over the last sa
years has averaged seven por
working day. She said that
while the welfare
pays benefits to inja
en, "rehabilitation
are a tragically la
substitute for preven
maiming and crippling
I in their prime."
"No substitute at all hU been
i evolved for those wM_ wore
fK5rS?2Sk stfriiSSii BbaaaJdlMt mr"! fatality
WthTrrSS S'SSL^X i5*fti? *** Increased 21 percent w
n1SSttt&r64 US morp than one death per l.OW,-
fidrftnWgL 2W2 O0 man-hours-worked ~ over
riders killed the wrong man" In 10V1 wrien au minert mkr* t\v-
that case, Tuskegee Institute re- gf wnen M5 mmer* w1" kl^
""SSS t& i mi, II , J The west Frankfort .disaster
The Negro institution, to the WM th. 25th g Jjg
A special assessment of $20
per miner, after thei- wage in-
crease last March, brought in
$9,500,000. Dues are H a montn
from each working nilner.
Miss Roche Jjaldl the 119' Fred wroble~ Lieutenant and Mrs' hostess for a teen-age party. Physicians said amputation
deaths at West PranHfort JMing. W.E. Sand, Lieutenant and Mrs. |KlVen at the home of her pa- the other leg may be necesaa-
the ntimbei _0X;Oe0rge Ellis. Lieutenant and rents, Captain and Mrs. Gordon to save the Ufe of William Horn
Mrs. Paul Curry. Lieutenant Do-
Tuskegee Institute
Reveals Only One
US Lynching In '51
annual report on mob violence r."~ '"..,
compiled by its records and re- :neltIfpasl ^
Moh ri.mrim.ni in (v,. -. ; resunea in
years that have
search department, said the na- u!a nu ?"?!.,"SP-.S?
turn's lone lynching of last year *g h^JLtSJSw2S2
occurred In Orange County, Fla., mln have been killed tofcat
where Melvln Womack, 26, oftune.- .. .. 'r__
Winter Garden was fatally beat- Mlss Ro?h' *ld thos* W9Te
en by a band of masked men government figures.
March 31.
However, it listed three other
cases In which death at the;
hands of a mob was prevented
and a fourth in which a man was
SafnotbatlyScftog''teChnlCtUy,,|,W """* ,,,SI,,"*I* Pinochle and canasta *ere
Womack ttie rebort said died' CHICAGO. Jan. 1 (UP) *** At played after dinner. The pinochle
in an nraiido Pia hnsnita'l two least 20 states passed measures! prizes were won by Mrs. Pihlgren.
days after being' "torced h? tnls *"* to r^* mon forJMrs. Rubelll and Sergeant Ba-
masked men from his home." highway construction. *spite
"However, it Is thought that growing shortages of matejlalsi..
the night riders lynched the
Stales Raise Funds
To Build Highways
rothy Payne, Lieutenant (jg) and
Mrs. John Danly with their
guests, Mr. and Mrs. Thilo H.
Danly, Miss Adamary Anderson.
Lieutenant Ken Stafford
CBM Harold Pitts.
Mr. and Mrs. Craig Entertain
with Dinner and Cards
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Cralg. of
Margarita, entertained Saturday
evening with a buffet dinner and
card party at their residence, to,
Karlger of Fort DeLesseps. last Cochrane. a teacher at WhitJ
evening. Plains school near here. PolL
The guests included: Misses said no motive for the apparel
Pat Howard. Blanche Bland, Ca- murder attempt was learned. '-.
rol Coleman. Jackie Boyle, Le-i The blast blew pieces of the'
and neve Dough. Nellie Holgerson. truck onto the top of a four*
Mary Ann Hanlgan. Nancy Ka-' story apartment building 50 fee
rlger and Messrs: Herbert Bar-1 away and shattered 17 windows
nes. David Rubelll. Terry Mc- In the building where CochranO
Namee. Jeb Wllkerson and Bob lived.
Bailey. Police chief Monte Boone said
-------- the high explosive was placed un- >
Carnival .Vote Counting der the driver's seat and e'j
During the dance at the Mo- ploded as Cochrane started to
honor Sergeant and Mrs. Edward, naco Garden Saturday evening, drive.
V. Bacon and daughter, Jean;
Ann, of Fort Amador, and their
daughter and son-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. Kenneth N. Woodcock
of France Field.
The buffet table was covered
with a painted Christmas cloth;
and centered with a crystal bowl
filled with fern. Mexican poln-,
settlas and white pentus. flank-,
ed by red tapers in crystal hold-
ers.
The guests were: Captain and!
Mrs. R. W. Rubelll. Captain and
Mrs. Gordon Karlger, Captain,
and Mrs. Luclen Skeels. Mr. and:
Mrs. Howard Anderson, Mr. And
Mrs. H. E. Pihlgren, Mr. and Mrs.,
Leslie Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
lace Bain, and Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Estes.
According to the American woodcock.
wrong man,"-the Institution con- '* Works Association, nearty.
eluded. I a dozen states passed new or in-
Train Hits Truck
But Driver Escapes
NEWHAKA. Neb.. Jan. 1 (UP>
When a pickup truck is struck
in the middle by a train with en-
ough force to tip it over on Its
side and push It along the tracks,
the truck driver usually doesn't
live to tell about It.
Charles Attebery walked away
from such a wreck when his
truck was struck south of here
and dragged about 60 feet. Both
the train and the truck were
traveling at about 10 miles per
hour.
Attebery said he "Just hung on
In the cab and rode It out.'
Pvt. W. E. Trout
Coes To Ft. Dix
Pvt. Walter E. Trout, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel B. Trout
of Balboa has been assigned to
Fort Dix, New Jersey for 16
weeks of training. With the
47th Infantry Regiment there
he will receive instruction In
general military subjects. In-
fantry weapons and tactics.
Trout attended Balboa High
School until 1048. was graduated
from the Canal Zone Junior
High School this year.
His parents reside at 713
Prado In Balboa.
Tuskegee researchers pointed! eased truck taxes or registra^
out the death of Sarauefshep- on fees. They lnctoded iMnota^
herd and the wounding of Walter indl,an*'T, JfiblgS,i *3S
Lee irvln at the hands of a Flor- North Dakota. Ohio Oregon,'
ida sberil Nov. 6. They were shot, uV^id.W-es^BvH; wW
while being transferred from WW *n Raiford State Prison, to Tavares, r weight-mileage taxes base*
Fla.. for a new trial ordered by i on gross weight of ".
the U.S. 8upreme Court to the' In Massachusetts, thegMoline
alleged raping of a 17-year-old tax was boosted from three
white lrl cents a gallon to 4.3 cents. With
The 'sheriff claimed the two the toereaseS^WSSl
sought to escape and he was ex- meat of a $300,000,000 highway
onerated by a coroner's jury. bond issue.
"This technically Is not con- i*i--a
sldered a lynching/' the report Seven other states lr>oreasod
concluded. motor fuel levies. Ililnols.w}ovJd*.
The three near-lynchlngs were d foran increase toIts gas tax
listed as- i from three to four cents per gal-
l-Near Brundidge, Ala, June Ion effective Aug. 1. 1951, u4W
21 when a mob moved In on the cents per gallon effective Dec
home of Forrest Jones, 35-year-31. 1852. _
old Negro farmer accused of' Michigan raised its, tax rate
kidnapping a white woman."! from 3 to 4 5 cents while!Ww
County police verified the Ne- Hampshire North Dako^Boutti
gro's claim that he merely hadi Dakota,.Utah and Wyoming aU
given the missing woman a ride., raised their rates from 4. to 6
Holiday Morning Coffee
A holiday morning coffee was:
I given tor the members of the N.
C. O. Wives Club of Fort Gullck.
by Mrs. Francis Bremer at her
residence on the Post.
con. The canasta prizes went to
Mr. and Mrs. Clarke and Mr.
A colorful grumdrop tree for-
med the centerpiece for the cof-
fee table flanked by 8antas for-
med from apples and marsh-
mallows.
Two guests, who were not club
members, were: Mrs. Wtlllan
Dodson and Mrs. Joseph Martin.
The club members present were:
Mrs. George Marsh, Mrs. G. L.
Smith. Mrs. Virgil Lucky. Mrs
Arthur Crandall, Mrs. Ernest
Beck Mrs. Joseph Gormley. Mrs
Thomas Cousins, Mrs. RusseU
Mann. Mrs. R. R. Agulrre, Mrs.
Paul Volght, Mrs. Mary Cody,
Mrs. David Harshaw, and Mrs.
Melville Hart.
"%n for New Pilots
buffet luncheon was given
main and Mrs.
2At Colonial Beach, Va.,i cents.
Sept. 2 when town policeman Eight states approved P/ope-
Charles white and another offi- sals for new or broadened au-
0ttwWrt^SSpS5l tout* to issue highway bonds. He, l0r Grant t their Margarita
from a mob" of 500 personV in-. They were Alabama Delaware, residence for a number of new
censed about "alleged mistreat- Maine, NewHampshlre, ojegqp, P.nama Canal pilots and their
ment of a prisoner."
3At Washington, N. C, on
Nov. 22 when Lafayette Miller,
Negro parolee, was removed to an
Eastern State prison because "he
probably would have been lynch-j
ed" after being charged with'
Tennessee, Washington and ^a"1
Virginia. '____________,.
CHEAPER ALUMINUM
wives.
Their guests were: Captain
and Mrs. William E. Hopkins,
Captain and Mrs. A .T. Wilder,
Captain and Mrs. Arthur J. Mc-
Lean. Captain and Mrs. C. W.
Aluminum, which now sells for;Lewls. Captain and Mrs. A. L
slaying a young white farmerless than 25 cents a pound, was Logan, Captain and Mrs. Cla-
and abducting the victim's wife,worth $25 a pound in ISM^hoirence Chambllss. Captain and
in the trunk of a stolen automo-ithe aluminum cap was placed on Mrg c M Houston, Captain and
bile.
i the Washington monum

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Mrs X" S. Roscoe. Captain and
Mrs. J. F. Meehan. Mr. and Mrs.
Merwyn French and Captain
Starrett.
Open House at Fort Sherman
Captain and Mrs. Paul Davis.
of Fort Sherman, held open house
at their quarters last evening.
Officers and their ladles from
the Post and other Atlantic Side.
friends dropped by during the,
| evening.
Buffet Supper for Vlsiters
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Genis enter-
tained with a buffet supper at
their residence In Margarita last
evening to honor their house-
guests. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Evans
of Balboa.
Coral Chapter Installation
Coral Chapter No. 3. Order of
,the Eastern Star. Oatun. will In-
stall the officers for 1952 at a
special Installation ceremony
Thursdav. at Slbert Lodge, stort-
ing at 8:00 p.m.
Mrs. Mae Fahnestock Is the re-
tiring Worthy Matron and Mr.
William Hughes the retiring
SAINT LOUIS
THI MNIST CRYSTAL MADI
All Patterns In Upen Stock
Easy Terms Available
16 TivoU Ave.
BULL FIGHT
in "LA MACARENA RING"
TODAY at 3:45 p.m.
(San Francisco Garden)
4 BULLS
Farewell to
the famous bullfighter
MANOLO ORTEGA
and return of
ARMILLITA DE ESPAA
JOSEULLO de COLOMBIA
new in this ring.
Tickets on sale at San Francisco Garden.
Prices:
Shade: Box Seats $3.00 General Admittance: $2.00
Sun: Box Seats 2.00 Gencrol Admittance: 1.00
( I




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"W
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,*i:"H _-. -X-.

f vix
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
u

I -
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 1951

'.>
-;
-3
Ycu Scii em .. When You Tell n thru P.A. Classifieds!
iA'.fi year Ad with enc of our /jents or our
'.VS fliVlf.
i. 4 ThM' *.
-it MWI
v'OSKti UK I KSSKPS
arqui OV l.r**
Parnrta
MOKKIMIN'S
V I Fourth of Jut} Aa
"hnn. J-OMi
Kfiri'M MtLION
III.il,4 Mrl.rdri Ava
Pimmic Cir. C'oln
SALON l>K BK1IKZA AMtKKAMl
No *S Wot I'lh Sir.el a.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No 7 "H" StraeiP.ama
No 12.17* Central Avr Colon
FOR SALE
Household
FCR SALE: Set of Lover.. v.ide porch, duplex. Hou>e 130
Apt A. Gomboo.
FOR SALE~-Cne We-tmehou:e 25
cycle Ice Box, 9 cube Ft. G^od
conci tion. othrr hou:rl'c'd r he ~c
Mitzlsr 625-X Ancon Blvd. Tel
2-31 16.
MISCELLANEOUS
o you hare drinking prco'emr
Writ* Alcohohrt Anonyirioiia
Bo. 7CI Aneen C. I
FOR SALE
Itliscelluneoitti
CS SALE: Scott Radio Vic trola.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
Scivict Personnel ond
Civilian Government Employes
FINANCE
your new Of used cor through
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYES FINANCE "to
CO. PD-
Fort Worth, Texas.
Serving Government Employes ond?
Sonta Cloro beoch-
Electric lee ooxes. gas
moderte rates. Phone 6-
oi *-i>67.
Ofceonside
a 43b
HelpYVcnted
WANTED: Reliable, oil oround
English ond Spanish speoking
rra d. Week-end at beoch. 826b
Empire Street, Balboo.
'I <: sfllNiD
OST OR STOLENA B. F. Goodrich
b'ue. airr** bicycle. $10.00 re-
< word. 3-2280.
Console model. Con be seen ot,,
'Almacn Romero." No. 50 North -e,vice Personnel m the Canol Zone
Avenue, Pcnomo. I,or l4 veors. With our financing
FOR SALE
Motorcycle*
Triumph Motorcycle 650cc.
1951 model. Extras. $200
new mochine. Phone 2-1471
boo.
lote
below
Bol-
your insurance automatically adjusted I
to U. S. coveny-.
ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
DEALER
mm
L JACOBY ON BRIDGE
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Servir
DRAFT TO
SCOOP WIDE
(Continued from Page I)
OR SALE:Fordor 1942 Ford 1948
engine body upholstery good. Tires
good, duty poid, no spare. $400.-
00. Tel._2-2506, Bolboo.
FOR SALE:Buying or selling cm
outomobile? See Agencias Cosmos.
Automobile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-
4721, Panama.
since June. 1950. when the Ko-
rer-n war started.
12 words
'i'.ininvjn for
3c. each additional
word.


COMMERCIAL Cr
PROFESSIONAL
cottage. Santo
Balboo. Phono
1877. Cristobol i 1673
onto Clora Beoch Cottages,
drooms Frigidairet, Rock-
Ages. Balboa 2-30SO.
R RENT
Houses
(A APARTMENTS. Soon
lavailojle chalet, live room duplex
vrrth Irot and cold water, two
bethrdpms, maid's room. Apply
intime
FOR RENT
; Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
NORTH X5
4,141
I
? KQ7
a>5432
WEST EAST
452 A1017
KQJ94 VA107
? J94 ? A 1086
A1097 *QJ6
SOUTH (D)
AAKQJ9
IMS
? 332
AKI
Neither side vul.
South West North Eut
1* Pass 1 N.T. Pass
3* Piss Pass Pass
Opening toad K
2
least 36 months.
As for UMT, its advocates be- Modern: furnished unfurn shed oport-
lieve they have the votes to win menfs w*'d se,vice optional. Con-
About 45 per cent have been Senate approval. But they ex-'at*HHi1ce *06J l0!h3O^,fei'-, New
rejected for physical or mental Pect to run into trouble in the Cmtoooi, telephone 1386 Colon.
rea on. House.
The February draft call will
brine to 849,320 the number of
men actually inducted into
service. The army tapped 782,-
000 of them an dthe Marines
67.320. The Navy and Air Force
have filled their manpower
needs throug hvolunteers.
ISN'T SHE SWE-E-E-T?U took SO pounds of sugar, among other things, to make this replies
of the Cunard Line's famous Queen Elizabeth, shown being admired by Reginald Guest, the luxury
liner's veteran confectioner. The model was among Cunard entries that won two first prizes In the
.............._83rd annual Salon of Culinary Art In New York. City.
It is actually cheaper
to buy a
P.r.l. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Besides Protection Against
injury, they save many
times their value in cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
FOR RENT
Rooms
Among other t.h|r~s fct's "-"
bern complaints that a UMT
program vsoulu oc u...au' .u ...e
youths at thi stlme. ennaa*, van ami-----
It was pointed out that if UMT oo*w-available
is enacted some 60.000 18-year-1 .""7 ?
olds would fret six-months train- *""" "',
ing under UMT and the rest' *- "
Light, cae'
and wall fur-
reasonable. Bache-
Inquira at The Ama-
Club toeing Da Lettasr
Draft officials hope to fill fu- would be called up for longer! "
ture needs under the present service in the draft where they' ***
draft law with its exemptions for would face combat service. Local cr_ ..._~-!---------------TT
veterans and fathers. draft boards would decide which RENT;furnished room with
But some Quarters have spec- youths go where privte bathroom ond entrance.
Hated that it may be necessary Congress has approved UMT in "K,,chen privilege. 43rd Street No.
to extend the term of service for orinciple. But it still must act on' '3-___________________
draftees. the six-months training pro-
The service period now is 24 ram laid down by the special
months. Volunteers enlist for at "UMT commission.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
#22 E. 29th St.
* Looking at a hand In a news-
paper is not quite the same thing
as holding it at the bridge table.!
As a player, you Ret only one
chance to make the right play;
Bs a reader, you get as many
chances as you want.
Even so, here's a little chal-
lenge. Imagine that you hold the;
East cards and that your partner
opens the king of hearts against
the contract of three spades. Find;
the right defense. Take as many
tries as you like; if you find the
correct defense you're one player)
In ten thousand.
While you're thinking, let's see
what happens if the defense Is a
matter of routine. Hearts are
continued, and South ruffs the
thi.d round. South draws three
rounds of trumps (two rounds of
trumps would be slightly more
expirt, but it doesn't matter in
this case', cashes the top clubs
and gives up a club.
Maybe the defenders come to
life so that West manages to win
the third club trick 'East drops
his jack and queeni. He leads a
Tourih heart nd South ruffs
With his last trump. Dummy
saves the last club and the two
diamond honors. Dummy must
get in with a diamond to cash;
the established five of clubs. That
Is declarer's ninth trick, so he
makes bis contract.
. Are you ready with the right |
answer by now? Make your mind
up before you read any farther.
East should overtake the king
Of hearts with the ace of hearts
at the first trick. Trun East re-
turns the six of diamonds at the
second trick.
Simple. Isn't it? But also quite
devastating This defense holds
8outh to only eight tricks.
West plays the nine of dia-
monds, forcing dummy to win the
second trick with the queen of
diamonds. 8outh cannot prevent
West from gaining the lead with
a heart. And West will then lead
the Jack of diamonds, giving the
defenders two tricks in that suit.
The defense thus surely takes
two hearts, two diamonds, and a
club, setting the contract.
Incidentally, don't dismiss this
defense as an impossible play
Robert de Nexon the great
French expert, actually made the
play in a European tournament
some years ago.
ENGAGEMENT
ENGAGEMENT
TODAY
PRE-RELEASE
PRE-RELEASE
LUX
Air-Conditioned
1:05. 3:04. 5:B4, 7:0E.
Als Showing At The
CECILIA
THEATRE
SIMULTANEOUSLY I
he loves and times
of RUDOLPH VALENTINO
-the greatest romantic idol
FOR RENT
Mixrellaneoii"
OBDOBV Modern two room suite
: near Free Zone. Inquire Alhom-
bro Apartments 8061, 10th Street.
Telephone 1386. Colon.
ISTHMIAN DATA
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel r> Panana
Selling: Abattoir. Panam
Forest (preferred). Clay Pro-
ducts. S. Fernando Clinic.
Tel. 3-471 3-1860
MODERN FURNITURE
CUB TOM BUII.T
Slipcover Reupholitery
VISIT Ol 8HOW-BOOHI
Alberta Hone
t r. So la Oasa TT (AatoawMIe owl
Freo Rillmaln Pickup A Deliver
ToL 1-4IJ8 N:M a.BL 10 T:M or.
SeHSATIOMlOfm!
me iMeimc tin s:och msiSMUl
_> i'jBC'OCOil
BIRTHS
ARAUZ, Mr. and Mrs. Gertru-
dis of Panam, a son, Dec. 18 at
Oorgas Hospital.
. THOMPSON, Mr. and Mrs. Hu-
bert Aj of La Boca, a son, Dec. 14
at Gorgas Hospital.
JOHNSTON. Mr. and Mrs.1
Jmese of La Boca, a son, Dec. 15
at Gorgas Hospital.
*8SS?f-$g. Diesis SAVES 30% IRONING TIME!
Fit all v.indard aire Ironinf boorda.
Color flit. Stalnproof
coiumoia ncruets
AIENTIN0
-EDWARD SMALL__________
ADDED Al TRACTION AT THE LUX THEATRE
"GENERAL McfiOING BOING"
The Cartoon That Won Last Year's Aradeovy Award!
,
For
AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE
SEE
V
MVBMOTMRS..NC
Do lsaeps Park
Tel.: J-iOOB 2-2098
TOMORROW LUX
M-G-N presents
yfte mystery.thnllei
shook the
Nation 1
Yu never
at lot target
til l*e very tee
OPENING THURSDAY
LUX THEATRE
The 'Gone Witi The Wind"
Of The Musicals |
fflaVflilTABSH
at Oorgas Hosvltal.
'ESTRADA. Mr. and Mrs. Al-
fonso, of Panam, twins, son
and daughter, Dec. 15 at Gorgas
Hospital.
fCUMBERBATCH. Mr. and Mrs.
CD.of Sliver City, a son, Dec. 15
at Coln Hospital.
i MUIR, Mr. and Mrs. J, A. Of
Silver City, a son, Dec. 15 at Co-
lon, Hospital.
'MCLAUGHLIN, Mr. and Mrs.
Tom of Panam, a son, Dec. 16
at Gormas Hospital.
BRATHWAITE, Mr. and Mrs.
George of Red Tank, a son, Dec.
IB at Gorgas Hospital.
GONZALEZ, Mr. and Mrs. Ju-
lio W. of La Boca, a son, Dec. 16
at Oorgas Hospital.
BLACKMAN, Mr. and Mrs. Al-
fred of Paraso, a son, Dec. 17 at
Gorgas Hospital.
WILLIAMS, Mr. and Mrs. Oeo.
o. Parque Lcfevre, a daughter,
Dec. 17 at Oorgas Hospital.
0REENE, Mr. and Mrs. Eric A.
of La Boca, a daughter, Dec. 19
at Goreas Hospital.
DEATHS
WRAT. Frederick, 29. of Pan-
ama,; Dec. 14 at Gorgas Hospital.
BLACKWOOD, Arnold, 41 of
Rio /Abajo, Dec. 15 at Oorgas
Hotplal.
LEACOCK. Martina. 54, of
panam, Dec. 17 at Oorgas Hos-
pital.
Waterproof, keen* pad dry.
No Knrrh marka. attractive lookinc
indefinitely.
Laboratory teated not to acorch at
*O0 defreaa heat.
Only S3.75 each Poatpali.
Send Money Order to
Dunmore Agency
XatifeU Instituto Nacional
PANAMA. R.P.
SHORTS
TECKVlVcOtOR
-Nmmim..ak.n
KATHRYN
HOWARD
6RAYS0N GARDNER KEEL
with -.
JOE E. BROWN'
MARGE and GOWEB
CHAMPION
AGNES MOOREHEAD
WILLIAM WARFIELD
Chief producers of anthracite
coal In the world are Great
Britain and the United States
according to the Encyclopedia
Britannica.
Rain is called ")lquld sun-
shine". In Hawaii.
Construction and equipment
of a battleship requires the use
of 76 tons of tin.
Among pets in the United
State, dogs rank first, canaries
second, and cats third.
A loud belch by a dinner
guest after a meal on the is-
lands'of Ball signifies that he|
think* the food was satlsiac-i
tory.
"Au jus," as stated in cook
books, means with natural
BTBvy.
CHAMPION BOXER
AT STUD
Mr-rnalre-a Model Model
Faraoaa deep real fawn to*
producing boxer.
Owner: lather G. do Velasquez.
Pat Hoiplial Vic Porras 41
Tel.: J-124< 3-312
Bargain For Sale:
PRE-FABRICATED
ALUMINUM HOUSE
Living Dinlngroom, three
Bedrooms, Kitchen and Bath.
Four Closets.
PRICE: $3,950.
AGENCIAS LUMINA, S.A.
Tel. 3-1B33
<&m O
(MBMSTLKH
JMIEAWrMCAlttTS.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
je^USfcttflfit
IS Tivoll Ave. Pas. Z-tBBS
BIG PEACEFUL
PROJECTS WERE
(Continued from Page 1)
largestvcar ferry Into operation
between Dunkirk and Dover.
AIRSTRIPS
Brazil completed its 12th and
final airstrip of a string lead-
ing from Manaus on the Ama-
zon southeast to Rio de Janei-
ro, a route designed eventually
to cut Mlaml-Rio flying time
substantially. The newest strip
is in the Jungle-surrounded T-
palos River country.
The world's highest commer-
cial airport at La Paz, Peru
acquired a new 16,000-foot run-
way, one of the longest In the
world.
In Africa new airports were
completed at Entebbe, Uganda;
and Durban, South Africa.
Another new airfield was put
into operation at the Greek
island of. Corfu, and In the
United States a new Broome
Country, New York, airport was
dedicated.
BRIDGES
Relief from mounting high-
way congestion, particularly in
the eastern United States, was
achieved through construction
of numerous large bridge pro-
jects.
Among those finished in 1951
were the new Delaware River
bridge near Wilmington; the
Penrose bridge over the Schuyl-
kill in Philadelphia; a new via-
duct channeling traffic out of
the Holland Tunnel Into New
Jersey and viaduct connect-
ing Long Island, In Boston
harbor, with the mainland.
Other bridges completed in-
cluded a fifth causeway from
Miami to Miami Beach, a new
structure over the Patuxent Ri-
ver In southern Maryland, and
Important highway bridges at
Danville, Virginia Asheville
North Carolina, Day tona Beach,
Florida, and Point Pleasant
New Jersey.
Abroad, bridges completed In
1951 included those at Berlin;
at Branau, Austria, over the
Inn river; at Coyuca in Mexi-
co; Santiago de Com pos tela
Spain; and Capetown, South
Africa.
SUPERHIGHWAYS
Outstanding in highway con-
struction was completion of
most of the New Jersey turn-
pike, a 118-mile high-speed ex-
pressway from New York to the
new Delaware River bridge.
Pennsylvania extended its fa-
mous turnpike from Irwin, Just
east of Pittsburgh, to the Ohio
border, and also completed the
first section of a Harrlsburg-
to-Baltimore high speed
throughway.
In New England, a 22 1-2
mile bypass around Boston was
opened, and a new expressway
leading out on to Cape Cod was
dedicated.
Maryland opened the first
stretch of the Baltimore-Wash-
ington expressway, and Virginia
completed the Shirley Highway
routing northbound traffic In-
to Washington.
North Carolina built a road
from Nags Head to Oregon In-
let, to make the Outer Bank
fishing grounds easily accessi-
ble.
In the western United States,
Washington's new White Pass
highway offers a short route
through the Cascade Moun-
tains; I'lih's Alpine Loop opens
up a rugged section of the Wa-
satch Mountains, and a section
of U. 8. Highway 6 was built
across a glacier near Silver
Plume, Colorado.
Late Point-4 Administrator Saw
Earth's Potential Barely Touched
In a special article for Okla-
homa papers, Columnist Drew
Pearson termed the late Dr.
Henry G. Bennett who launched
the Point 4 program m Latin
America and elsewhere a "Mis-
sionary For Democracy."
Pearson wrote:
The homely philosophy of Dr.
Bennett, who died in a blinding
snowstorm in Iran during Christ-
mas week, was outlined to per-
sonal friends Just before he left
Washington.
"The plain fact is. we have to
show the world a better life If w,e
want to survive," said the fa-
mous Oklahoma educator. "Two-
thirds of those who live in what
we call the 'Free World" are hun-
gry, sick and desperately poor.
They are rebelling against those
conditions, and the Communists
are taking advantage of their
ignorance and discontent.
"What we're doing in the point
4 program Is to show them there
is a way out and it Isn't the
Communist way. We can show
them how to double food pro-
duction and wipe out disease.
Ours is a program for people who
are barefoot, hungry and sick."
One of Dr. Bennett's last-acts
before leaving on his fatal in-
spection trip was to advocate a
revolutionary land-tenure policy.
He told a world conference, "the
farmer must be able to own his
own land or use the land he tills
under fair conditions and terms
of tenure. He must have access
to reasonable credit and modern
techniques."
When State Department as-
sociates spoke wearily of the
world's uncertain future, Ben-
nett replied: "We haven't touch-
ed the possibilities. The Good
Lord has given us an earth ca-
pable of producing far beyond
the fancies and dreams of men,
if we'll use our brains and our
heart and conscience to shan
what we have with our neigh-
bors around the world."
'Murder In Junior
College' Will Open
New Theater Year
"Murder in the Junior ColleRe"
will open the new year of theatre
work with one performance at
the Little Theatre building on
Carr Street in Balboa, on Wed-
nesday, Jan. 9 and another per-
formance at the Cristobal High
School building auditorium on
Thursday. Jan. 10.
A score of college students
enrolled in the Class In Dra1
matics. will appear m the three
act murder-mystery-comedy. 8u
bert Turbyfill, director of "Mur-
der in the Junior College" also
doubled as editor and nrranger
of the novel, unusual laugh
show, which was written by Paul
M. Jamison.
While the play will present a
leading lady, a blackface co-
median ,an ingenius villain, the
inevitable maid, and other stock
sta"p characters, there are un-
usual features in that the prop
boy, the stage manager, the
bookholder, and others also ap-
pear.
And In addition, the president
of the college S. A., the star of
the basketball team and other
local personalities are lntrodfted
into a situation locale. The Bal-
boa Clubhouse is concerned In
the mystery, and there is even
a "fake" character.
The first performance will be-

eln at 8 D.m. on Wednesday, Jan.
9, in Balboa, with admission at
hands, and if we have enough 50 cents.
QL^j^
TODAY!
Shows: 1:SB I:JB!. 5:20
7:1* 9:M p.m.
SPFCIAL PRE-RELEASE!
A COMBINATION OF OPERA AND BALLET IN
GLORIOUS TECHNICOLOR!
MOIRA SHEARER LUDMILLA TCHERINA
- In --
Mrs. Mara Morgan
Dies in Panama
Mrs. Maria Morgan of Pana-
ma died 8unday at her home.
She Is survived by her son.
Dr. Eduardo Morgan, and three
daughters Mrs. Ruth Bozeman
of Arraijan. Mrs. Mery Abra-
hams and Mrs. Zurita Morgan
Davis of Panam.
THE TALES
OF HOFFMANN
Imported
Canned Hams
PER
DREWS
KRAKl'S &
ATALANTA BRAND
v offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
WITH AN ALL STAR CAST
Robert ROUNSEVILLE Leonide MASSINE
Robert HELPMANN
And Tht Royal Philarmonic Orchestra
EXQUISITE!... GORGEOUS!...
A FILM THAT YOU MUST SEE!



TUESDAY, JANUARY 1. 1M
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
paos ua
- -

U.P. Coaches Still Rate
Top Hoop Team
Kentucky 2nd; Kansas,
Indiana 3rd And Fourth
NEW YORK, Jan. 1.(UP)The 35 coaches
on the United Press basketball rating board still
rate Illinoi8~ES the number one team in the-country.
The latest poll finds the defending Big 10
champions on top for the third straight week. Un-
beaten Illinois polled 302 points. Kentucky finished
second with 259 points. Unbeaten Kansas, witji 10
victories, is the third ranking team. Indiana, also un-
beaten after seven games, holds down fourth place.
Washington, with 10 wins in 11 games is the
fifth ranking club. Then comes St. Louifc New York
University is ranked seventh. N. Y. U's 12 games
winning streak is the longest in the country. Kansas
State is ranked eight, St. John's, ninth and North
Carolina State, tenth.
Teams Like NYU Make Fans
Forget Basketball Scandals
!
NEW YORK. Jan. 1 (NEA)
Nothing foul enough can happen
in athletics that fine perform-
ance wont erase.
Babe Ruth's booming bat
brought baseball back like an
ft\ election repeater after the Black
^fl Sox mess.
kflHi^fe Now we have a smashing New
VYork University team doctoring
m U1 '
Bv HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sport Editor
highest
in the
Cincinnati had the
scoring college average
nation last trip, 77.
That would win 6 of 100
games, but It's not enough to
beat the boys from the Bronx.
Holy Cross' 78 fell short. Arizona
poured In 70.
This NYU team Is Just getting
a running start, too. Four of the
Jftte
75-Year-Old Ex Jockey's
Excircise 'Boy' Caywood Rode
s Horse's Back;
n And For Czar
Bv HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor r
NEWYORK, Jan. 1 (NEA)
Probably the last thing In the
world you'd expect a 73-year-old
man to do is climb up on a
horse's back and gallop him a-
round a race track.
But that doesn't apply to Wil-
liam Caywood. That's the first
thing he does after reporting to
his doss at the Hialeah Race
Course most mornings. He sets
them down for a fast workout,
too.
It was a privilege to meet BUI
Caywood, when en route home
from Venezuela we dropped off
for a day of racing at Tropical
Park. The grand old-timer takes
you way back there, and bridges
the gap with wonderful memo-
ries.
As a Jockey, Caywood was a
contemporary of the one and on-
ly Tod Sloan, Danny Maher, Win-
nie O'Connor, Oeorge Odom and
Fred Taral. He remembers Max
Hlrsch, the famous King Ranch
trainer, when he was a rider of
60-odd pounds. For three years
he was contract rider for Czar
Nicholas. He also was under con-
tract to Sam Hildreth, one of the
top all-time trainers.
U8ES LONG STIRRUPS
ntorK university team uuuiwms;a u.......* . -~ -
up basketball at Madison Square1 eight active combatants are so
Garden, where the college game' phomores six-foot slx-lnch Bo-
was given its greatest impetus.
This violent Violet varsity cap-
tured the public's imagination in
games two nights apart, edging
Holy Cross, 87-78, and smacking
Oklahoma, 78-66. -
So it was like old times at the
Garden, when on a week-day
night 14,19*. the largest turnout
of the early season, sat in on a
double-header between NYU and
Arizona and Brooklyn St. John's
and Utah.
The lads from University
Heights definitely were the at-
traction, and fully lived up to
the advance billing by scoring
108 points, the most compiled by
a college side at the Eighth Ave.
nue amphitheater in 12 winters,
against a good Arizona squad.
All games are won on defense,
pundits tell you, but It Is also
true that a team doesn't lose
when It outscores the opposition.
NOTTIMETtfR DEFENSE
The Palisaders are simply too
busy doing that to bother with
attempting to check the other
feuows.
That Is what makes this group
so exciting, and Howard Cann's
young men have won 12 straight,
including three on the road, or
more than the 1950-51 band cop-
ped all the way along the route.
rls Nachamkln. Ralph Nalmoll,
Ted Elsberg and Hal Weltz. An-
other is a Junior, Mark Solomon.
Mel Seeman, six-foot six cap-
tain, and Jim Brasco and Dick
Bunt are seniors. .
The difference between this
season and last are the kids giv-
ing Tactician Cann depth.
IT'S A BROOKLYN JOB
Six of the sharpshooters are
from Brooklyn, three from Con-
ey Island's Abraham Lincoln
High, which gave the White Sox
their Saul Rogovln. Bunt Is from
across the East River In Queens.
Nalmoll Is the only furriner,
and he can get from his Phila-
delphia home -to University
Heights almost as quickly as the
Coney Island lads.
The latter spend three-and-a-
half hours a day in the subway.
An nour Is required to transport
them from the seashore to the
Washington Square branch of
the University. It's another hour
to the Heights for practice and
an hour-and-a-half back to the
beach.
It long since has been estab-
lished that there Is nothing quite
like workouts In New York's sub-
way, especially during the rush
hours.
Caywood's appearance In the
saddle has occasioned chuckles
and snickers from young exer-
cise boys because of his long stir-
rups and disregard for the so-
called acey-deucy style popular-
ized by Eddie Arcaro. But they're
only Johnny-Come-Latelys to
this very active member of the
Old Guard.
fi
"I use a long stirrup because I
believe a horse should be ridden
with the legs instead of the feet,"
explains Pop Crawford. "It gives
you a better grip, makes for bet-
ter balance. Some of the boys
carry the short stirrup style too
far."

Caywood started riding races
for a living in 1896 after riding
match events at county fairs in
his native Iowa. At the time he
became a full-fledged Jockey he
weighed 60 pounds and the addi-
tional 50 he has put on through
the years wouldn't disqualify him
as a rider today. He's naturally
small and Is apryer than most
men 25 years his Junior.
NO POPPED 08SELET8 FOR POPWUHaaa Caywoodi like 11 good athlete, Uke. care hta
leiVB^ore bre^KilS aferiS.'. Hialeah Rae. WJJC^, SE^fcS*KlE
underpinning; from kle to Knees. The 75-year-old former Jffkey.mow an exercise soy. orerors
this type of relaxation to sitting In a rocking chair. (NEA)
DEVELOPED ROMAN BATH
Caywood's big day as a Jock'
came In 1897 In New Orleans,
when he rode five winners on a
six-race program. He carries sev-
eral frayed newspaper clippings
as proof.
After Caywood gave up riding
he took to training. His last pre-
vious appearance at Hialeah was;
a couple of years ago with thel
John Marsch stable. One of the
superior ones he developed for|
the Chicago contractor was Ro-
man Bath, a highly-regarded Ju-
venile which failed to stand
training at three.
Caywood retired from racing
several times, but the track lured \
him back. Last summer, after
several years In retirement In
California, he came to Chicago
and attached himself to Buck
Hazzard. His principal job Is that
of groom, but he volunteered for
galloping, and Hazzard let him
have his way. He claims he Is
still a little out of condition, and
Is slowly working himself back
In shape, after which he'll show
those young whippersnappers
something.
NO POPPED OSSELETS
Like all good athletes. Caywood
takes care of his legs. He pre-
Eares for a workout by wrapping
la underpinning from ankles to
knees to prevent chafing. No,
popped osseleta for Pop. His rld-j
lng ensemble consists of an old
pair of khaki dungarees, a denim
shirt and a weather-beaten Pan-
ama hat. He scorns boots, pre-
ferring an old pair of sneakers.
At a time when most men his
age consider a walk to the post
office for the mall the limit of
their dally exercise, Bill Camwood
Today's Bowl Program
NEW YORK, Jan. 1 (UP)
Facts and figures on today's
football bowl games, showing
name of bowl, site, opponents
, with won, lost and tied records
In brackets. Eastern starting
_llmes, probable attendance and
radio broadcasts if any:
ROSE BOWL, Pasadeha, Cal.
Illinois (8-0-1) vs. Stanford <9-
1-0), 5ra., 100,000. Broadcasts:
radio, NBC.
8UGAR BOWL, New Orleans-
Tennessee < 10-0-0) vs. Maryland
(9-0-0), 2:45 p.m., 85,000. Broad-
casts: radio, ABC.
COTTON BOWL. DallasKen;
tucky (7-4-0) vs. Texas Christian
(6-4-0). 2 pjn., 76,549. Broad-
casts: radio, NBC. .
ORANGE BOWL, Miami Ge-
orgia Tech (10-0-D vs. Baylor
(8-1-1), 2 pjn.. 65,000. Broad-
casts: radio, CBS.
'GATOR BOWL, Jacksonville,
Fla.Miami (Fla.) 7-3-0) vs.
Clemson (7-2-0) 2 p.m., 38,500.
Broadcasts: radio, mutual.
SUN BOWL, El Paso, Tex.Col-
lege Of Pacific < 6-4-0) vs. Texas
Tech (6-4-0), 4:16 p.m., 14,000.
Broadcasts: radio, local.
TANGERINE BOWL, Orlando,
Fla.Arkansas State (10-1-0) vs.
Stetson (8-1-2), 8 p.m., 12,000.
Broadcasts: radio, Liberty.
SALAD BOWL, Phoenix, Ariz.
Houston (5-5-0) vs. Dayton (7-
0-2), 4 p.m.. 21,000. Broadcasts:
radio. Liberty.
OLEANDER BOWL. Galveston,
Tex.San Angelo, Tex,. Junior
College (6-2-0) vs. Hinds (Miss.)
(8-2-0), 11 am.. 10,000.
STEEL BOWL, Birmingham,
Ala.Texas College (4-2-1) vs.
Bethune-Cookman Junior Col-
lege (6-0-2), 3 p.m., 5,000.
PRAIRIE BOWL, Prairie View,
Tex^-Pralrle View College (8-1-
0) vs. Arkansas A.M. it N. (6-2-1),
3 p.m., 10,000.
Terp Comes Bock
To Haunt Navy
COLLEGE PARK. Md.. Jan. 1
(NEA)Jack Scarbath was de-
nied admission to the United
States Naval Academy because he
was color blind In his left eye.
Scarbath entered Maryland on
a Charlie Keller scholarship.
Against Navy in 1950, the quar-
terback passed to two touch-
downs, scored a pair himself.
This past trip he passed for two
more, punched one across and
set up a fourth with an aerial.
The Terps have scored 12
touchdowns against the Mid-
shipmen the last two campaigns.
Scarbath figured prominently In
eight.
World's highest capital is La
Paz, Bolivia. 11,910 feet high in
the Andes mountains.
The femur, running from hip
to knee. Is the largest bone In a
man's body.
handles yearlings with the exub-
e>----, of vountrster.
The horse's back is his rocking
cl.au.
Motorcycle Races
Al Juan Franco
Track This Sunday
There will be motor-
cycle races this Sunday
at the Juan Franco
Race Track.
The races will be
held during the morn-
ing. The exact starting
time and other details
have not 'yet been an-
nounced. There will be
races for each of the
different class groups.
rrs Movienw*
0><
anama
Canal Clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
Alr-CsnettlMMS
Ml 131 ': S:S
Deborah KERR Hewart GRANGER
"KING SOLOMON'S MINES"
AUo Shawlnr Wedn*aay
rtlAOIr-l UTC Dm DOTYTSA Oalt TOM*
0,?}tM "AL JENNINGS of OKLAHOMA"
- " (WataefSaj) "THK LK NOOSE"
COCOLI
CIS It
Da-teX WAYNE Tar. EWCLL
"UP FRONT"
(Wedneadaj) "ROUGHLY SPEAKING '
Si ii a A i Rsndclph SCOTT fMe.e JKRCENS
ij "SUGARFOOT" (Technicolor)
(Wednesday)
MARGARITA
111 l:H
CRISTOBAL
*: 1:15 SlM
Richard BASEHART a Vslentina CORTESA
"HOUSE ON TELEGRAPH HILL"
(Wed-eeday) "HAM. FAIT and KEAtJTErUL
Donald O'CONNOR Piper LAURIE
"Francis Goes To The Races"
AUo Showing Wednaeday
THURSDAY!
AT THE
CECILIA
v*Tmson
- -TU. ^Mri
Russia has a disturbing sports problem, too. Only it's sen e-
what different from ours. There are protests o-er here that re
overemphasize and pat indecent emphasis on victory. Pal Joe r'e
grip* Is precisely the opposite; insufficient emphasis, not enon ;h
uccese.
Pravda, the Reds' Journalistic bible, recently prodded I le
athletes in an angry editorial, calling upon them to win m< re
world's championships and demanding extraordinary efforts
the Impending winter sports...
"The Soviet public justly demands from them that they o<
come stagnation and participate for new and greater triumpl
The type may be Pravda's but the voice belongs to Pal Jr
This is an ultimatum from the Kremlin In a country wlr
claims practically every Invention of importance In the world of
| science, it should be ridiculously simple to turn out an endless
'iine of human record-breakers in sports.
Pravda does not describe the nature t the stagnation which
must be overcome. Perhaps it's a form of inertia (medically char-
act erzide as lead in the pants) which common'v afflicts some of
our athletes. In baseball, at least, a popular prescription to to
change the manager. It doesn't always work. The Brooklyns-still
failed under Charley Dressen and yet he was supposed to be three
times as stimulating as an electric eel.
On second thought, I wonder if I properly understand Prav-
da's meaning of the word stagnation. Is anyone ever permitted to
Indulge this luxury In the Worker's Paradise? Would any one be
permitted to survive who indicated a desire for the pause that
refreshes?
a
THE BEST ICE SKATER
Pravda's reference to winter sports may be enlightening. It
may mean the Soviets will show up for ihe snow and Ice Olym-
pics at Oslo, Norway, in February, although their official com-
mittee has only made its bid to the summer games. Not much is
really known about the Reds as athletes. The Iron Curtain ap-
plies to sports, too. '
What do you suppose they think they can gain by hiding a
weight lifter, a shotputter, or a woman Javelin thrower? These
surely must be the most exasperating people Odd ever created.
The unmannerly Yakov Malik completely Ignored a most cour-
teous letter from this department requesting an Interview on the
subject; his successor, Semen Tsarapkln. has shown no greater
familiarity with Emily Post's best .seller.
Of course, we do know considerable aoout Marie Isakova,. who
Is probably the greatest woman ice skater in the world and the
fact that she Is authentically topnotch Invites the belief the So-
viets will compete at Oslo. There is little doubt that Maria would
come away with the championship and it may be that Pal Joey
has some other skaters and skiers of high ability. Russia has
never competed In the Olympics.
The Pravda editorial. In spite of the admonitory note, did
not take a dark view of Russia's prospects In international sports,
claiming 32 world records (naming none) and 435 all-union rec-
ords, all created In the past 12 months, .nd calling attention to
"more than 800 stadiums, 13 institutes of higher physical learn-
ing, and 37 of secondary rank." Adding: "In our country great
state significance is attributed to the development of physical
culture and sport."

ITS OLD STUFF TO THEA
Pravda's editorial blast insisting that the Ruskies get out
and hustle up a mess of world championships was new only as to
source. In 1948 the Central Committee of the Communist party
issued a similar directive and when the Central Committee
speaks the commisars and the peasants Jump.
A tremendous campaign. Involving h"ge sums and thousands
cf muscular young persons was launcher*, schools, factories, col-
lective farms and army units participating. Since the Soviet's
eight-hour day and six-day week leaves little time for specialis-
ed training, there were rumors, seemingly with substance, that
the better prospects were being professionalized in one way or
another, by gifts, preferred positions and mock labor hours.
There was no way to get the fac*s and when the Russian
delegates presented their application in Vienna last spring the
Olympic fathers asked no pointed questions. Pal Joey's office *
said they knew and agreed fully with -he Olympic rule'"
calls hopefully for pure amateurismand tliat ws
word was good enough. There are some statesmen
cannot do business with Stalin but obviously the Olym;
seem to believe otherwise. *
America's Avery Brundage pointed o.:t after the Vlen
sion that if the Olympic committeemeri were rhteifstfl
lng the Russians at all they simply had to take fjteiafei
statements at face value. It was like saying: "W dont
'em but we're going to try. anyway." How familiar this snus|
to the weary statesmen of the free world!
"A
Streetcar
Named
Desire"
muni____.jummm
t
STARS
VIVIEN
LEIGH
AND
MARION
BRANDO
And Is THE
Most Exciting
Warner Bros.
Picture!
Atlantic Little League
Assigns Players To Teams 1
STARTING;
THURSDAY!
AT THE |
BELLA VISTA
TROPICAL
I i THEATRES I
The Atlantic Little League
baseball organization held their
Selection of Player System at the
Margarita Clubhouse Friday
night at 7 o'clock.
The following members were
present at the Auctioning of
players: Ernest C. Cotton, presi-
dent of the Atlantic ittle League;
Harold P. Bevlngton, 2nd vice-,
president; James J. Recela, busi-
ness manager; Jim McGloin, sec-
retary; Worden E. French, player
agent; Thomas M. O'Connor,
sponsor of Margarita All-Stars;;
Vince Ridge, manager of the:
Powell's club; Harry Dockery andl
Carl Newhard, manager and
coach of the Little Motta's; Max
Sanders, manager of Margarita
All-Stars; George Tully, manag-!
er of the Police Pals; Chief Petty
Officers Karpinskl and Dills
were also present at the auction.
The following boys listed were
assigned to these teams and are:
hereby requested to contact their
respective managers as soon as
possible:
LITTLE MOTTA'SJ. Mar-
shall, P. Dockery, F. Chase, C.
Chase, W. Wall, R. Bath, J.I
White, M. Cunningham, R. Mor-
land, J. Brooks, F. Corrigan, J.'
Will, B. Will, P. Hadarlts. R, Phll-
; lips, D. Phillips, G. Maloy D.
Clarke, G. Cotton. C. Newhard, K.
I Mountain. H. Tompkins, R. Bray*
ton, J. Taber.
POWELL'SC. French, W.
; French. T. Wllliford, Hitchcock,
: R. Deakins, Bennett, E. Daniels,
! E. Elwell. G. Waldron. M. Sand*
. ers, R. Kullg, F. Alberga, D. Eb-
erenz, T. McCulIough. D. Corri-
gan. F. Burgess, H. Womble, R.
Womble. .1. Cronan, J. Hanna, M.
flanna. B. Welgle, B. Rathgaber,
D. Smith. P. Apolayo, J. Ketch-
em, R. Weade. R. Thompson, R.
Sanders.
POLICE PALSJ. Palumbo, C.
Leves, F. Leves, M. Brians, B. Da*
vlson, D. Garcia. E. Pabn. L.
Bailey. D. Humphrey. B. Krieger,
J. Smith, E. Dolan. W. Dolan. E.
Folse, W. Harrison, L. Runey. J.
Bailowski, E. Meeks. T. Blllison,
J. Kenway. R. Favorite.
MARGARITA STARS Roger
1 Perkins, Roy Perkins. J. Cun-
ningham. E. Cunningham. W.
Gibson, L. Dldier, R. Ogden, C.
Crawford, J. McGloin, M. Field,
R. Blevlns, J. McGraw. W. Craig,
D. Dills, J. Detore, F. Karpinskl,
R. Hottal, H. Hawkins, J. Da-
min!. B. Lust, J. Essayian.
BIG STRIKEConnie Powers uses bowling pins to write out the
huge 987 series she rolled during the National All-SUr Match Game
Tourney^ at_ Chicago. The 3-vear-old Detroit kegler banged out
scoresj>f_234, 247, 247 and 23, greatest four-game series in the
x classic's 11-year history. (NEA>r
BELLA VISTA Pre-Release!
Starting-: From ll:M a.m.
The Moat Bichantinr. Lavish and
Imaginative Picture of The
Century ..I
"TALES OF HOFFMANN"
(In TECHNICOLOR)
LUX, and CECILIA
SIMULTANEOUS PRE-RELEASE!
The Intimate, behlnd-the-srene* story of the
man so many women loved I
The greatest romantic Idol of all time!
"VALENTINO"
(In Technicolor)
ANTHONY DEXTER
ELEANOR PARKER
LUX I 05 3: 5:13 7: t:M
CEC1:H 3 II 5:12 7:13 IN
CENTRAL
SPECIAL PRE-RELEASE!
WaluDisneys *
in WQNPEKAND *
aTFjPi'r|Ja]|.ij '
| %,e.f. Hiwmi n m ncnai
TOR EVERY BODY"
ENCANTO THEATRE
^^_ Alr-C-atUUoned
A COLOSAL DOUBLE!
Gregory Pack Virginia
Mayo, In
"CAPTAIN HORATIO
HORNBLOWER"
tin Technicolor)
Also: Dennis Morgan
Stave Cochran, In
"RATON PASS"_____
TIVOLI THSATRE
Spanish DoubU PropamI
RoalU Quintana la
"NOSOTRAS LAS
TAQUGRAFAS"
Plus: 'De Mujer A Mujer"
TROPICAL-Pre Release
ABBOTT COBTBLLO
in the super-comedy
'Comin' Round The
Mountain"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BANK DAT SZM.M
$100.00 at 6 and 9 p.m
Also: Wayne Morris. In
THE TOUGHER THEY
COME"

Lisa Farrady. In
-FLAME OF STAMBUL"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Joel MrCrea. in
RETURN OF THK
FRONTIERSMA-V
David Bnari. in
INSIDE THE WALLS Of
roLSQM rsusoN
t
_ . '


!r"~ '
W* 'ft "fT *
.*

ILLINOIS TOP U.P
Safety Rules
Ignored In Mine
Where 119 Died
By DREW PEARSON
AN INDEPEND
s*

^D^ILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
RATING
(Page 71
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY. JANUARY 1, 195
Captain Stays Alone On Bridge

Of Storm Stricken Freighter
WASHINGTON, Jan. 1 Most
shocking conclusions to be drawn
from the Investigation of the
West Frankfort, Illinois, coal
mine disaster Is that the 119 vic-
tims probably would be alive to-
day If the Federal government
had the Dower to enforce, as well
as recommend, mine safety stan-
dards.
Federal Inspectors did every-
thing but hire a sound truck to
warn of conditions that led to the
explosion.
These were heavy concentra-
ffeent0' IJrMk*dStfa-*noflnpSar NEW YORK' Jan" l ,UP)- A 37- sent *8 out at lnter-
dustboth of them illeeal under brave caPta|n who stood alone vals by the freighter's emergency
Federal Mine Safety code, which, on the bridge of his imperiled, radio/epocting on the precarious
however, cannot be enforced ship after sending everybody else plight of the ship which had been
Following the inspections of aboard to safety appeared today in trouble throughout the week-
last January and February, and to be winning his lonely battle end.
again in July, Federal men telso against the sea. I Nearly a dozen other ships were
reported that some miners were The waves calmed, and gales lost, wrecked or seriously dam-
smoking In this highly danger- which reached velocities of 100; aged In the same storm,
ous mine. miles an hour slowed, easing the Under the law of the sea the
Copies of these reports were; worst Atlantic storm in a decade freighter would become a dere-vl vori-and the U. S. transport
sent to John L. Lewis, as well as and bringing hope the captain lict once it is abandoned, the General Greeley took off another
to the United Mine Workers dls-l would win. prize of anyone who could takelthreejiassengers and crew mem-
trict office in Illinois, also to the lit In tow. bers-Jiie of whom died.
Chicago, Wilmington and Frank- Skipper Henrik Kurt Carlsen As ionR aa the captain remains | a Ofrman merchant ship and
lin Coal Company, owners of the of the almost helpless freighter aboard. however, the ship re-: a Norwegian tanker each re-
mine, and to state inspectors. "Flying Enterprise" remained mains the property of the steam- ImoveOBone.
However, little or nothing was aboard with the courage of his sriip Hne, regardless of its condl-l
done to remedy the situation. | sea-going Danish ancestors after tion. Some of the survivors of the
Federal Inspectors even postedsending 51 passengers and crew! Entesirlse were to land at Cobh.
their findings on the mine bul- members to safetv In life boats. Carlsen's chief worry. Isbrandt- Onajof the first messages from
letin board in August and spoke in New York. Hans Isbrandt-1 sen reported In New York, was carlsfi was tapped out to his
to the miners about smoking on-lsen. head of the line that oper- for the safety of his crew and'wife ard two daughters: "Don't
thc-job. ates the cargo-passenger ship, passengers and the worries of his worry... lam well... keep your
Their reports also warned 01 turned from the latest message I wife and two children at home in
Improper ventilation, the use of|from Carisen cranked out. on Woodbridge New Jersey.
FIVE CENTS
through danger before. All we
can do is wait and pray. ,
"I keep telling myself other
ships, are standing by and will
rescue him if the enterprise goes
downy
In the weekend battle to save
those aboard the Flying Enter-
prise the American merchant
ship Southland removed 15 sur-
on a crew member to save his
life.
And in Woodbridge, Mrs. Carl-
sen sat by waiting with their
daughters, Sonja. 11. and Karen,
7.
She did not try to keep Carl-
sen's plight from the children.
"They believe in their father,"
she said. "They know he is a
good man and a brave man. He
has come through danger be-
fore."
BE )T Considers Filing Formal
nargeAgainstHungaryln UNI
WASHINGTON. Jan. 1 (UP)
President Truman is giving "very
strong" consideration to
sals that
mall
not Intend
mall."
to take this black-
Mansfield said the UN action
could result In a resolution con-
demning the Hungarian action
and, in any event, would lay the
case before a world forum. The
Congressman just returned from
Paris as a delegate to the Dec. 24
UN meeting there.
Mansfield did not 'say what
"other measures" Mr. Truman
has in mind, but he noted that
open-type (sparking motors: an emergency radio and said:
near gassy workings, loose roof- .,He. eltner take the ship in...
lng and obstructed escapeways ln|or he. ^ her down."
the ill-fated mine. The U. S. Navy sent the destroy-
However, nothtog was done be-. John w. Weeks and the Navy
cause the government had no Qo]d t(J th
power to enforce Its recommen- p h 7n.ton brandtsen
freighter, disabled and listing 60
degrees 250 miles southwest of
Ireland.
Carlsen. a veteran captain at
da t ions.
The obvious answer, which I
have advocated for years, Is a
strong Federal mine safety code
that would permit the govern-1
ment to shut down unsafe mines
until the danger is corrected. jr Pftin* 4 U*n
But when men like Congress-1 CO rUIIU-t IflCIl
man Mel Price of Illinois and
Senator Matt Neely of West Vlr-|TA- I oai/O Ffir
einia sponsor such legislation I w fcCfl fC W VI
they are hooted by cries of "so-
clalism" from the coal industry I ofjn AiltGMCS
and "invasion of state's rights" i
from state legislatures, the latter I
often controlled by the coal in-1
dustry.
lred-fifcckers
Refuse To Work
Hungarian Hams
WASHINGTON, Jan. 1. 1952
(USIS) Some 26 technicians
scheduled for U. S. Point Four
work of technical assistance in
15 countries of Latin America,
the Near East and Africa have
finished a four-week orineta-
tion course given by the U. S.
State Department.
Eighteen are agricultural spe-
four are to work In
NEW YORK. Jan. 1 (UP)
Angry longshoremen refused to I clalists,
unload 100 tons of Polish hams health programs, and the others
worth $300.000 from an inbound j will serve in the fields of metal-
ahip today because the cargo lurgy, education and census,
originated in an Iron Curtain I The orientation course em-
country, phasized understanding of the
The dock hands said they ; customs, religions, cultures and
Were ired because Red Hungary j languages of the people among
demanded and received $120.000 whom the technicians will live
lor the release of the four im- I and work. Wives of most of the
prt'oned American fliers. men also took the instruction.
"He's operating the emergency,"
Isbrandtsen said. "All he's asked
us has had to do with his auxlety
about the people he sent off the
ship. One passenger died.
"The only personal note from
the skipper was to asks us wheth-
er we have calmed his wife. We
told him she was all right.
In Woodbridge. the wife of the
37-year-old skipper prayed for
his safety.
"We are trying hard not to
worry," she said. "He has come
15-Year-Old Faces
Judge Three Times
In Last 30 Days
Fred Kenrlck Bostick. a 15-
year-old Panamanian boy. faced
the bar of justice in Balboa
Magistrate's Court for the third
time in a month yesterday.
On his latest appearance, he
was booked on a charge of loit-
ering around the women's
bachelor quarters on Empire
Street in Balboa.
Bostick was released in his
parents' custody and his case
continued until tomorrow morn-
ing.
Early in December, Bostick re-
ceived a 30-day suspended sen-
tence on a charge of having
stolen 15 cents. Two weeks later.
he was fined $10 for stealing
a copy of The Panama Ameri-
can valued at 10 cents.
chin up... love."
CarlSen proved his versatilly
Unloading Continues
On French Freighter
Damaged In Canal
Enough wheat has been re-
moved from the forward holds
in lM-when as master of the &* TErU'thw-
Thr*H.r, "Pivino riinner" h* inanes l. L>. to permit tne ves-
IsbrKitsen "Flying Clipper" he
performed a delicate operation
Stalin Turns
New Year Smile
On Japanese
MOSCOW. Jan. 1 (UP) Sta-
lin's.New Year's message wish-
ed'the Japanese people com-
plete success in their struggle
for freedom and Independence
from foreign occupation and for
the preservation of peace.
In the post-war period, while
the United States and the West-
ern allies had been more or less
wooing Japan. Russia frequent-
ly has taken steps which hurt
her with the masses.
They Insisted that Emperor
Hirohito be tried as a war
criminal, and were vrey slow in
repatriating Japanese prisoners
of war who surrendered to them
and bave still not accounted for
more than 300,000 Japanese
citlaens.
All this tended to build up an
ill,feeling in the Japanese mind
against Russia and Communism.
The Stalin
quarters to believe that Russia
reAfled her mistakes, and now
launeed a drive to win Japanese
friendship.
sel's bow to rise four feet out
of the water, according to her
agents.
A representative of, the firm
of Payne and Wardlaw said to-
day the unlaodlng of the wheat
would probably continue until
the end of the week.
Meanwhile, La jos Bene, the
25-year-old Hungarian stowa-
way aboard the Charles L. D.
when she arrived in Canal Zone
waters, has been lodged In Cris-
tobal jail until repairs to the
ship are completed.
The bow of the vessel was
badly smashed when she ram-
med the canal bank last week
during a northbound transit.
Truck Rams Into
Tree In Colon;
Occupants Take Off
COLON, Jan. 1.One Pepsi
Cola truck will never be the
same again since it rammed a
tree trunk on the Colon Beach
Road shortly after 3 a. m. to-
day, according to witnesses who
saw the wreck this morning.
Some fOur occupants of the
truck were said to have scatter-
statement led some >ed before investigating officers
arrived; but blood stains here
and there in the wreckage In-
dicated some might have been
hurt.
propo-
he file formal "black-
charges against Commu-
nist Hungary In the United Na-
tions for its treatment of four
U. S. airmen, it was disclosed to-
day.
Rep. Mike Mansfield (Dem.,
Mont.) also revealed after a
White House conference that Mr.
Truman is considering "other
measures" in retaliation for the
$120,000 "ransom" Imposed on the
fliers for Inadvertently crossing
the Hungarian frontier.
Diplomatic officials indicated
that the United States will issue
a stern warning to Moscow to
stop Russian satellite countries
from holding U. S. citizens for
"ransom." They said this would
be the most effective way of pre-
venting a repetition of the Hun-
garian incident.
Mansfield made his statement
as one of the airmen. Capt. John
Swift of Glens Falls, N.Y., arrived j President Peron asserted that
here en route to Syracuse, N. Y., Argentine was the sole nation
to see his ailing father. As a re- where happiness was not limit-
suit of his experience with the ed to a private possession by a
Communists. 8wift told reporters j few individuals,
these two sentences should be
dropped from the English lan-
guage:
"The case is far from settled [ Hungary could be charged w|
as far as this government Is con- | a breach of international law. 1
cerned,'' Mansfield said. "W o' The State Department airead
Happiness Has No
Limit In Argentine,
Pern Asserts
BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 1(UP)
The New Year's message from
"This can't happen to me.
can't happen here."
It
Swift said he and his fellow
airmen were treated "pretty
well" during their 40 days Im-
prisonment. But he said they
were questioned two hours daily
by Russian officers, including
two generals, on "every subject
in the world."
"When I heard of the $120,-
000 yon could have knocked me
over with a feather," he said.
"I never thought I was worth
that much But I would have
borrowed $30,OM if I had to
work 30 years to pay it off."
Swift, co-pilot of the plane,
said the crew members did not
know they were landing in Hun-
gary and though! they were in
Yugoslavia until the Russians
began questioning them. His
statement appeared to spike
Communist reports that the
United 8tates knew where the
fliers were all the time it was
looking for them.
Mansfield, who previously urg-
ed Mr. Truman to take the fliers'
case before the United Nations,
said after about a half-hour talk
with the President that he is
considering it "very strongly...
as well as other measures."
Probing Mind Of Stalin Is Tough Job
On Hands Of US Intelligence Agents
wiuivr.mv ti.> i p, .,, i^..i-,.k. i__,.- (;... __i__j_____. .________i ... .. J9K..,. . _4,__.__ . ... ... ... ..
WASHINGTON, Jan. 1 (UP)
One of the toughest jobs in
Washington Is trying to figure
out what Stalin is going to do
next week or next year and why
he did what he did yesterday or
a month ago.
The extended cold war between
East and West has involved a lot
particularly in peace-time, are
"inept" at intelligence work. It is
trying to build up intelligence
analysis as a profession separate
from mere intrigue and the more
lurid sides of espionage.
It Is no secret that CIA seeks
answers to many problems af-
fecting American security. It's no
of government agencies in crvs- secret, either, that the biggest
tal-balling Stalin's mind. The
major effort is pulled together
by the hush-hush Central Intel-
ligence Agency, located here be-
hind an eight-foot wire fence
topped with three strands of
barbed wire.
The security-conscious agency
part of the Job is determining questions
Soviet offensive capabilities and
intentions.
burdensome rearmament on the
United States?
The best an intelligence agen-
cy can do under the weight of
these and more questions is to
draft a pro-and-con balance
sheet with conclusions for us by
policy-makers and strategists in
the field.
One agency could never tackle
tance of the CIA estimates to the
nation's security.
Any intelligence expert win
trll jou that the studied ap-
SrfMh to long-range problems
i net always possible.
maintains a 24-hour duty
system capable of starting Intel-
ligence wheels turning immedl-
alone in prepa
calls "national intelligence esti-
mates." It does not have the staff
Russia's success in harnessing i or the material and never could
atomic power in A-bombs and have.
their possible use outside Soviet
borders is a new factor to be tak-
5s on tap day and night, working! en Into grave consideration
on the business of looking into, Some serious study la going on
the future, with peace or war as
possible stakes. If CIA bobbles a
final estimate, trouble could re-
sult, since its evaluations are
used by policy-makers. If it hits
the mark, world tension could
drop.
Intelligence todav is not mere-
ly a statistical survey of the
number of divisions, tanks, air-
?lanes, or submarines that a po-
ential enemy has under his con-
trol. It isn't based solely or even
substantially on clandestine re-
ports of undercover sources spot-
ted in key world areas.
Everything available to Indi-
cate a potential enemy's capa-
bilities or intentions is tossed in-
to the intelligence kettle. Sta-
lin's thinking, or a guess at it, is
part of the exercise.
'Stalin's state of mind is a
more important intelligence
Item than the location of mam
Soviet divisions." Allen VV.
Dulles, CIA deputy director,
Mid.
The intentions of the Kremlin
are fact* which are mast impor- Korea )
tant and the hardest to ascer-
tain."
CIA has been on the job only
four years trying to overcome the
historic stigma that Americans,
at CIA over related questions
such as these:
Does the existence of the A-
bomb in Soviet hands mean they
may start a general war? If so
-when, under what conditions,
where, and for what purpose?
Will the atom bomb suddenly
come crashing down on New
York, Detroit, Oak Ridge,
Tenn., London, Paris, South
Korea or Belgrade?
It is mire likely that the Rus-
sians will keep the bomb in re-
serve as a bargaining weapon
and continue their policy of
moving in the shadow of satel-
lite aggression plus new Red in-
filtration and subversion inside
non-Communist countries'
Or could it be that the Rus-
sians are whipping up some sur-
prise end-around play based on
ige:..
of these proportions ateljr if alarming situations are
preparing what CIA reported in the making any-
where In the world. To use CIA
parlance, this may call for
"crash estimates." These emer-
gency*estimates are the excep-
tion rther than the rule. How-
ever _
keepttte experts working 48 to 00
hour without a break to meet
the requirements of an estimate
that Mides policy moves.
Normally. Gen. Smith briefs
The result is that representa-
tives of all "sensitive" govern-
ment agencies with separate in-
telligence staffs are drawn to-
gether in an intelligence advis-
ory committee under the CIA tu-
rnen to talk with these private
citizens when time was a factor
and they could not get to Wash-
ington.
It is possible'that some of CIA's
hiring problems trace to the
heavy security and secrecy de-
mands on every employe from
chauffeurs and stenographers to
New Governors
Named In Panam
President Alciblades Aroseme-
na yesterday named four new
Governors and appointed five
more to serve in the nine Pro-
vinces of the Republic.
Alberto Alemn was named as
Governor of the Province of
Panama to fill the post left
vacant by Homero Velasquez
(PRI), who resigned last Oc-
tober following a split between
the parties supporting the gov-
ernment.
Alberto Mazzola, who acted as
Governor since Velasquez" re-
signation, was appointed as
first alternate.
Other new Governors were
Oscar Teran, Colon; Abel Apon-
te, Veraguas, and Francisco
Achong, Darien.
Reappointed were: .
Aquilino Tejeira, Cocl; Ju-
Alludlng to Argentina's so-
called "third position," he said
bitterly that "once we commit-
ted the mistake of offering in
all our naivete, a peace solution
to warring nations implicated
in the world-at-large but they
disregarded the proposal"
Peron added that "since then
we have preferred to deal with
peoples (Instead of govern-
ments) and despite imperialistic
Interests, the truth has gradual-
ly enlightened the people."
Peron repeatedly described
the third position as based on
neither capitalism nor Com-
munism, but on social justice.
Egyptians Attack
British Troops On
Stroke of Midnight
I8MALIA, Egypt, Jan. 1 (UP)
The British troops in Egypt
saw the New Year in with a
three-hour running gun battle
with Egyptians along the banks
of the sweet-water canal.
No British casualties were re-
ported, however, and Egyptian
casualties were not known.
Almost exactly at midnight a
band of Egyptian terrorists
crept out of a dark Arab town
and opened fire on positions all
along sten Gun Alley bordering
the Canal.
The British were not taken
by surprise however, and red
and white lights lit up the area
as British guns and rifles blazed
back at the terrorists.
the director. All prospective em-i0 Arosemena, Los Santos; Luis
ployes undergo rigid investiga- Berbey, Herrera: Jos Antonio
tions to weed out lovaltv and se-lGrlmas- Bocii del Z.r?' and
variations of these and scores of
other possibilities?
What do the Russians think
rector, Gen. Walter Bedell Smith.! President Truman once a week
Represented at meetings held at on Intelligence developments but
least once a week are the Army,' the main channel of CIA-White
Navy, Air Force, Joint Chiefs of House co-ordination is through
Staff, Atomic Energy Commls- the National Security Council, to
slon, State Department and the whfcwttlA reports.
Federal Bureau o Investigation.! On . CIAs major headaches
The Job of the separate agen-' has been a shortage of experl-
cies Is to provide their best eva-, enced personnel. It traces to the
luation. based on all information. pre-wa]r lack of a single lntegrat-
at hand, of the situation that ls'ed intelligence system when the
up for study. The material Is
drawn together by CIA special-
ists who draft the "national in-
telligence estimate."
From CIA's mill, the product
goes out through the Intelligence
advisory committee, where It Is
reviewed before being channeled
to policy-makers to become the
basis of decisions.
It is reasonable to assume,
though CIA will say nothing, that
curlty risks, plus anyone who
has a tendency to be too talk-
ative after working hours. If an
employe quits, he is reminded
, that any future disclosure of ln-
surprlse development can telllgence information that came
to his attention could be cause
for prosecution.
Few people In'the agency know
everything It Is doing. The prin-
ciple is that the fewer people who
know, the better the security.
Employes do not talk shop about
their individual problems with
Victor M. Alvarez, Chlriqul.
Escaped Killer
Nabbed In France
AMIENS. France, Jan. 1 (UP)
Leon Meurant, who escaped
from the death cell here, was
arrested this morning just seven
miles east of Doulens.
Max Brille, examining magis-
trate who had been investigat-
ing the escape, announced that
Meurant, the self-confessed
Russian spy, and his cell mate,
were arrested by the police.
Meurant, a bogus Belgian
count who was sentenced to
death for the slaying In 1945
of the beauteous Countess
Moussla Sauty de Chaln, es-
caped Sunday night from the
death cell together with his
cell-mate, after overpowering
four guards. They fled on two
bicycles after they stole the
guard's uniforms and guns.
Eisenhower Camp Readies
'Significant Announcement'
WASHINGTON, Jan. 1
Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge .Jr.
.manager of the Elsenhower-for-
others inside the CIA unlessthere President boom, today schedul-
?itAmericancounter- actions? such a atudy was compiled for
KrmMn f opinion is that the the State and Defewe Depart-
Kremun miscalculated on this in! ments on whether Red China
various 'agencies were gathering: the other
their Own. information for their [ (This is re
own uses. This scattered process,
y experts believe, made pos-
sneak Japanese attack
arbor.
forced a new co-ordl-
lllgence effort but it
'ben trained person-
to private life. Con-
gress Mt up the present agency
under the National Security
Council tn, 1*47. ^ .
CIA seeks to meet the short-
age of permanent, experienced sions are under any clrcum-
ls clear reason for an exchange
of Information.
Curiosity, for example, is not
reason enough for one employe
to ask another"What's new on
your J^b?" It is perfectly permis-
sible for*a^cIA man to question
's need to know,
to as the "need
to know"
CIA will talk \bout the struc-
ture of the agendy and Its liaison
with other government agencies
gathering Intelligence data from
their sources. That Is
to reassure the public that Intel-
ligence work Is being handled on
a co-ordinated basis "under one
roof" as directed by Congress in
1947.
It won't say what Its conclu-
ed an extraordinary news con-
ference for Sunday noon amid
reports that a "significant an-
nouncement" Is in the works.
There was no indication how
far the Massachusetts Republic-
an) will be entered. If he falls to
withdraw, this will be consider-
ed evidence that he Is a bona
fide candidate, whether he says
anything publicly or not.
Some Elsenhower backers have
Indicated they do not expect
any public move on the gener-
al's part before the North At-
lantic Pact conference sche-
t, ... wuuiu cun me nuicmi rmi. ai>
.an* u X pe d? th.e Rui~ u aUo S8,e to awume that a slm-
L^mnft if fh.?n hu MarXl8m "ar 8tudy hM b"" ta "ten"
rollante nn I l ,cap,ta.,te!n Wi"l,or 80me tlme on th* chances of
rSih the ddu k ^y,1^11* to! Russia entering the war. This
rusn the day by forcing over-1 process demonstrates the lmpor-
would enter the Korean War. It personnel by keeping a file of I stancesso far as the public Is
scholars, scientists, businessmen,
labor leaders and others In pri-
vate life who can help out from
tlme-to-time on a consultant ba-
sis. CIA ha* flown some of its
3

T
Elsenhower for the Republican
Presidential nomination. Elsen-
hower himself has refused to
say whether he will run.
The announcement by Eisen-
mitted' hower headquarters coincided
" with a statement by Gov. Sher-
man Adams of New Hampshire
that Elsenhower backers can
expect news of "great Interest"
within a few days. He said he
was not at liberty to elaborate
at this time.
The twin developments raised
concerned. Thus, while CIA Is speculation that the Sunday
trying to build up a trust In A- news conference may involve
merlcan intelligence ability, it Elsenhower's position In the New
can't say whether It has hit the Hampshire primary March 11.
mark or failed. i His supporters have said be
an would go in spelling out the duled for Lisbon in early Feb-
avallablllty of Gen. Dwlght D [ruary,
Once that is out of the way,
they hope Eisenhower will an-
nounce his Intentions.
If he does, they are confi-
dent the word will be yes.
In this connection, some sup-
porters of Sen. Robert A. Taft
voiced belief that Harold E.
Stassen's GOP Presidential bid
may be primarily a stop-Taft
move aimed at helping Eisen-
hower's White House chances.
They concede that Stassen
could cause them considerable
trouble If the former Minnesota
governor succeeds in capturing
any delegates to the Republic-
an national convention in Chi-
cago next summer.
has retaliated against the Hu
garlan government by closing
consulates in New York si
Cleveland and banning Amer
travel In Hungary.
There seems little likelihood <
economic sanctions since U.
trade with Hungary already
almost non-existent and Hung!
rlan assets In thi scountry a|
more than offset by previous
S. claims against Hungary.
The State Department is nfl
Inclined to break diplomatic rs
latlonsas some Congressme
have demandedbecause Buds
pest is a valuable "listenli
post" for this country in
Communist world.
Most diplomatic officials lean-
ed toward a warning to Moscow/
As one diplomat put it, "if w
are going to prevent a recur-
rence of this high-handed busi-
ness, Moscow Is the place to go."
The State Department got ac-
tion In the airmen's case soor
after it protested directly to th<
Kremlin. Charges against the fil-
ers were dropped from "spying"
to border crossing and terms fol
their release were announced
shortly after.
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