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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01396
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01396
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
*BRANIFF
AH
NOW VIA
MIAMI
OR
HOUSTON
Panama
ILT NEW9PA7BB
an
"Let the people ferite the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lineo.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
i '
PANAMA. R. P. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY M, 1951
iwuui7)
riVE CENTS
RP To Become Air Training Center
More Withdrawals
Seen ln^ Indochina
(NBA Telephoto)
blank tt a cowering dog during
Antl-ftbles drive in East St. Louis, Hi. Roysten and a partner werp ordered to shoot all
uneofltined dogs and cats on eight .after health officials found 24 rabid dogs in St. Clalr
county since Jan. 1. They killed 18. ; ________ "
DOOMED DOO Detective Cornelius Roysten fires point
Roj
CZ Commy Thief
Who Grabbed $15
Gets One Year
A Panamanian who stole $15
by force from a young girl was
erring one year In the peniten-
tiary at hard labor today.
Americo Oarcs, 26, was found
guilty in the U. S. District Court
on the charge, equivalent to
grand larceny, on Tuesday.
He pleaded not guilty to tak-
ing the money from a young
anten girl, Judith, More-
Tivoll Commissary.
Jant had been h>
passed. Oa,
ted In court by Pu!
ifender William J. Shi
It
PARIS, Feb. IS (UP)Prance
may be forced to abandon all
of Northern Indo-Chlna to the
Vletmlhh Reds as a result of
disastrous week-end defeats,
authoritative French sources
admitted privately today.
A decision to withdraw from
theatres where Communist re-
bel forces have Jolted French
Jit pushed the French perl-
fieter to within 20 miles of the
onkin capital of Hanoi. And
ont reports said the Vietminh
rebels are massing for new at-
tacks along the French with-
drawal route to the south.
From Salgnon today. General
Raoul Salan, Acting Comman-
der in Chief of the French Un-
Uhion defenses would roll back Ion Forces In Indo-Chlna, prels-
the French defense Hnes 250 led the "splendid maneuver" by
mile* to the south to the narrow*-*-'
"waist" of the country in An-
nam.
Private sources said
quarters consider such
official
fa ove
would be a severe set-back for took command on the death of
the entire
world.
antl-Communlst
But the withdrawal to An*
nam, in Central Indo-Chlna,
would give the French a con-
centrated, 150-mlle8-wlde de-
fense Une in defensible moun-
tain ridges.
Official government sources
would not speak for the record
of such a possible withdrawal.
But. last week-end's retreeft
from strategic Hoa Bink left no
doubt of the gravity of the
French position.
,which 20,000 French and Viet-
nam troops withdrew to form
a '-ring of steel" around Hanoi
It was the first order-of-the-
day Salan has issued since he

The
Judges' Bench
(NEA Telephoto)
FALLS SIX STORIES Dr. Fuad Dlrbas examines 3-year- ,
old Roberta Renny, who fell six stories from a Brooklyn
apartment, hit a television aerial and a clump of bushes,
and miraculously escaped unharmed. The tot was taken to
*>*?" a hospital for Internal observation.
3 Catholic Nuns
Spent 11 Months
In Chinese Prisons
HONO KONO, Feb. 28 (UP)
Catholic quarters said today that
three Canadian Catholic aun i
who arrived here today were in
five Chinese Communist prisons
In 11 months.
The nuns refused to talk to
the press, but a Catholic source
gave'the following resume of
their experiences:
The nuns were arrested In
March of last year, and accused
The- case against Jorge Anbal
dntenegro, who is charged
with assault with a deadly wea-
pon, was continued until tomor-
row morning In the Balboa Ma-
gistrate's Court today.
The 33-year-old defendant Is
in Jail pending posting of $500
ball. Montenegro is accused of
wounding Francisco Soto with a
pen-knife following an argu-
ment. The injured man, whose
condition Is not serious, is still
In Gorges Hospital.
6 Zonians Retire Tomorrow
Six Canal employes whose
periods of service range from
nine to thirty-seven years are
retiring tomorrow
The retiring employe, their
positions and periods of service
art:
Raymond O. Banner, wood
and steel carman in the Me-
thanlcl Division, sixteen years
nine months and nineteen days;
George E. Matthew, chief of
the Meteorological and Hydro-
graphic Branch, thirty-seven
eyars, five months and twenty-
five days;
Mrs. Margaret C. Perry, of-
fice appliance operator In the
Finance Bureau, nine years, one
month and twenty-two days;
f
of Public Motor Transportation
thirty years and one and qfpe-
half days; and
Mrs. Helen M. White, ac-
counting clerk In the Finance
Bureau, sixteen years, 2 months
and 5 days.
Banner was born In Oriole
Pennsylvania. He was employed
as a weaver inspector, car re-
pairer and machinist In Penn-
sylvania and New York for
about 20 years before coming
to the Isthmus. He served In
the Army In France in world
War 1. He was first employed
by the Canal March
_Robert N. Ruley, Supervisor! (Continued on Page , CoL
as a carman In the Mechanical
Division.
Mrs. Perry was born ln\De-
!n\E
A youthful "old-time" of-
feader faced the Judge this
morning M B vagrancy
charge and was sentenced
te serve 20 days la Jail.
Praneisce Thomas, a II-
year-old Panamanian, start-
ed his "career" when he was
IS. and se far has idled up
>ZFl'J8& i- ** lBrcen* eonTtetieni
fhmanfi2U!htV.2'ien5.W?*V and has serred a total of
who died In their Immaculate m* dava in lall Tint youth
Conception Orphanage In Chn- Wa. wesUaoed in Tear
times and food (two meals a M .hr.
days) "was very, very bad.
They had meat only seven
times since they were arrested.
There were two trials. Ob Nov.
30 they were given a Private trial
with no audience present at
which four of the girls from the
orphanage were "foreed" to
testify against them.
They never got a Judgment at
that trial
C Dec. 2 they had a mass trial
which was broadcast, with thou-
sands screaming Chinese In the
audience.
At that triar only one girl from
the orphanage testified, but there,
were many "witnesses" from the
audience.
When the trial was' over, they
were marched around the huge
Red celllnged Sun Yat Sen Me-
morial Hall while the crowd spat
Marshal Jean de Lattre de Tas-
slgney last month.
The general praised the
"bloody checks" Inflicted on the
Vietminh Communists during
the three month-tenure of the
Hoa Binh outpost, but added:
"You are now needed for
other tasks. You must continue
on other battlefields, the work
so well begun on the Black
River Front.
Meanwhile, on the other side
of the battle line the Vietminh
commander Issued an order in
honor of the Red Army anni-
versary eulogizing his force as
"men marching at the head of
forces lighting for* peace and
democracy."
He pledged "to overcome alii
difficulties and exterminate the
enemy in the'Jong strul
talnet French coteanuliets
American interventionists
In Paris, inMrsnetf sources
also said the French are wor-
ried by the possibility of Red In-
filtrations in a wide flanking
movement through 290 miles of
Slam's wUd eastern bilge to at-
tack the southern Wlo-Chln-
ese provinces of Cochinchlna
and Cambodia. Such a move
admittedly would spBt French
defenses and leave only a thin
line-'of resistance units.
ECOSOC Hears
RP Stand On
Freight Rates
Panama's point of view on pre-
sent freight rates, considered
discriminatory by local Interests,
was aired Tuesday before the ad-
hoc committee on .'reights and
insurance of the Inter-American
Economic and Social Council in
Washington, by Julio E. Heurte-
matte, economic counselor of the
Panamanian Embassy In Wash-
ington.
Reports reaching here today
Indicate that Heurtematte stress-
ed (hat cargo destined for the
Canal Zone enjoys special freight
rates which put Panama at a
disadvantage and are harmful to
the general Interests of Panama-
nian commercial activities.
A large group of Panamanian
businessmen are organizing a
rotest through the Panama
Ihamber of Commerce, in an ef-
fort to obtain more reasonable
freight rates for Panama.
Businessmen here claim that
the high freight rates paid by
Panamanians are responsible for
the rise in the price of certain
goods imported from the United
States, especially automobiles.
The ad-hoc committee will
make a study of the Panama
point of view and. later submit
recommendations to the Econo-
and Social Council.
r
US Firm To Back
School At Paitilla
Panam is to become a Latin American aviation train-
ing canter.
Col. John C. Adams, prominent figure in Panamanian
aviation circles, cabled from New York today that he has
completed arrangements for one of the largest aviation
schools in th United States to finance immediately train-
ing schools for pilots and mechanics at Paitilla, together
with the stablfshment of a general repair basa there.
Tha operation of the new enterprises will be under the
management of Aviacin General (AGSA), the domestic
Panamanian airline.
News of Adams' deal was released today by AGSA
manager Jason D. Stefanis,
Colon Stores Cur
; Prices Five To 15
^fWHecnt Tofrwrtrwfsa^"
Adams has, also arranged for
his own organization, Adams
Enterprises .(AESAi, to get
similar financing for a parallel
project In Colombia.
Private foundations havo
promised to make arrange-,
ments for the awarding of
scholarships to the Paitilla
aviation schools.
Adams has also arranged for
backing for agricultural avia-
tion projects (spraying, crop
dusting and so forth) In Ni-
caragua.
These projects were original-
operate in Panama, but
menu
Freeze' On
CZ Quarters
Is Extended
on
as-
n
tree announced that all
stores-ew he Atlantic Side wHI
ttfoi
The Colon Chamber of Cosn-
d tl
tte(
give a redaction of from ftte
to 15 per cent on all parchases
made teenorrow.
Practically all the tores In
Colon have accepted tfete ene-
dav redaction plan, an* It Is
Relieved that many Panama
shoppers will avail theeajfelves
of the opportunity.
Adams has called on Stefan-
Is for an immediate survey of
all planes available In Panama
for the operation of the new
schools.
He had also called for cabled
recommendations of the equip-
ment needed to set up the
new workshops and mechanics'
training facilities.
The temporary freeze
stgnment to family quarters
Balboa, Gamboa and Pedro Ml-
Eiel has been tended through
arch 31, it was announced to-
day at Balboa Heights.
The freer* has been In effect
since Jwr 15 and Was originally
Ide suUselent housing for Ca-
na* families in Cocoll, who muse
Move because of the transfer of
that town to the Navy, end Ca-
nal employes who wish to move
from type 201 houses in Diablo.
While the temporary freeze is
in effect. Canal families in Co-
coll may transfer to other house*
In Balboa. Gamboa and Pedro
Miguel and employe families In
type 201 houses In Diablo may
transfer to Balboa.
0/ Recipes and Robbers
Willie Was Slick But Baker Bayless Tops Him
NEW YORK, Feb. V (TJP)
Bank robbers are funny people. In New York as he stepped off a
They're experts at collecting the trans-continental plane. The
big loot...and yet there's an- FBI said he carried more than
othi
impress Of Scotland'
Arriving With 410
The cruise ship "Em
Scotland" arrives in
tomorrow morning with
passengers aboard.
ipress of
Cristobal
410
The Canadian-Pacific Une
|p will leave early Saturday
ing after the passengers
m enjoyed shore wave and
burs of both Colon and Pana-
uiClty.
The empress of Scotland Is
Ipund for Havana on a 14-day
cruise that eventually will take
the tourists back to New York.
ier side of them which makes
them readers of Freud or experts
on the art of cake baking.
Suave Willie (The Acton Sut- Bayless carried a gftw .
tonarrested in New York last he never got a chance t. use. He
Bayless was arrested yesterday them called for large amounts,' pound of batter."
as would be used In prison bak-' Florence Brobeck. a New Yorlt
lng. But there were plenty of, home economist and author of
family size i five cookbooks, listened to some
One agent asked Bayless why of Bayless'recipes and then com-
he collected recipes., .and Bay- mented:
less muttered something to the "Well, I would say they all
$19.000 with him.. .money which
they said came from a Holly-
wood bank, robbed Monday.
Bayless carried a gun which
weakwas the Post Office De-
partment's number one pin-up
boy...wanted for bank robbery
in Long Island. But slick Willie
carried books on psychology
along with a gun. He ah took
roses to bis blind landlady In
Brooklyn...and he worried, he
said, about the mother he hadn't
seen In 17 years.
But even the fabulous Willie
has been outclassed by a younger
man.
Thirty-seven-year-old John
Richard Bayless. the latest al-
leged robber hauled into the FBI
net, is a skilled chef and collect-
or of recipes.
One veteran cook and home
economist took one look at une
ass carried a small blaek book,
of the loose leaf variety, filled
with recipes he told authorities
had been collected in the 12 years
he was head of the baking de-
partment of Alcatraz prison.
Bayless had been serving a 25-
year sentence on the "Bpek." as
Alcatraz la known, for robbing a
Mansfield, Missouri, bank of $591
In 1937. He once had tried to es-
cape, but was caught, and later
transferred to the Federal prison
at Leavenworth, Kansar. He was
released last August.
The FBI said Bayless guarded
that cookbook as carefully as If
It were a recipe for escape.
"Take the money, but dont
take the cookbook," he1 told the
effect, "You'll see."
Most of the recipes were for
Ctries, ranging from Jellyroll
lady fingers.
By a recipe for doughnuaieaun
with yeast, be had nuTir utas)
de
sound time-tested."
She added: "HI recipes for
things like peach chiffon tarta
and pineapple upside down cake
d like he reads a lot of the
sn's magazines. They are the
MS 1 "
kitchens.
made with yeast,
notation which could have a recipes which come from teal
double meaning once Bayless
shows up in court. It read: "Full
rise (for the dough), punch, rise
one hour and take to the bench."
Beside a recipe for pound cake,
he had scrawled a two-word no-
tation: "No good."
Bayless also had filled some of
the pages with cooking tips, ap-
plicable in prison kitchens or, The FBI noted that there "were
others. dozens of blank pages in Bay-
A sample: "The weight of su-1 less* cookbook.. and one agent
gar should equal the weight of remarked, "I guess he'll have
flour In most baking." | plenty of time to fill those In
Or, "In creaming, the proper-' now/
, .not the ones chef a
themselves dream up."
Bank robber Bayless also
sprung one recipe on cookbook
writer Brobeck which she'd nev-
er heard of. A recipe for rasp-
berry ice cream pie.
After seeing it. Miss Brobeck
decldedjJ'Maybe crime does pay."
.The ship is being handled i ton and1 said:
mSleUlv wet P* >*** *'" S*"7 by agent W' Andrew* ta* "*> certaln* kn "** he's
npieteg/ wet." dolng m ^ nk^-
of the recipes in Bayless* callee- agents. "It took me years to get| tlons should be two parts sugar As for Bayless, someone asked
those recipes together.
There were about 100
them.. .neatly typed.
es of
of
to one part shortening." him how the cooking at Alcatra
Or, "A fruit cake should be waa Said he, "The pastry's fine
baked, slowly, one hour for every .. .the rest not so good."
THE CITY OF COLON, which celebrates its
lOOrii anniversary tomorrow, has grown considerably
during the last two decades and continues to spread
as the years go by. Although it is the Republic's sec
ond most important city. Coln is only third popula-
tion-wise. However, what Coloeites lock in numbers
they moke up for in determination to keep the growth
end solvency of their "Windy City" abreast of the
times. Several new, modern buildings hove bee built
in Coln during recent years,
of the city's many imposing s
of Commerce building, the
pitol end the central fire station.
hove eve three
tk Chamber



THE PANAM AMERICA? AN INDEPENDENT DAlt NEWSPAPER
____ '-- __ iM^ni'^^**
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 198$
n
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
>...-.._- ... aa D4Uiyt aMfHTCAN PRE*.
INC.
0WNIO *N6 PUtLISHIO Y THE PANAMA AMtmCAN f*l
POUNOtt> Y NILWN OUNHVILL IN KM
HARMOOIO ARIA. I0ITOB
7 H StlWtT P. O. ox 'S4' P"*"*. " or p-
TtLIPMONI PNMA NO Z-O740 CL AOOMM PAMAMtWICAN. PNAM -_.
FontlSN RtPUntNTATIVM- JOSHUA 8. POWERS. INC.
349 MA0I8ON AV. NIW YORK. (17) N. Y. ,.
*. MONTH. POM IH MONTH. IN AOVANCI------------------------- ? Vi
.. POP ON VIA. IN A6VANC1----- 'ao ___
tirodtway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
Labor. News
And
Comment

Due to Recede About March Twelfth
All OVER THE MAP
H S T won't ay yes or no.. .But the presidential private car
is beuig equipped witn transmitter, amplifying sound systems and
loua sweaters to carry short speeches from mechanical records.
Ihis is costing a lot 01 money. It could be useful only on a whlstie-
stop campaign.
Luisa Kriendler, widow of the famed "21" head man, has sublet
her new Yon apartment and departed for Europe .RUBira-
tter ol Swt-aen Tage Erlahder will arrive tft Idlewlld Apr 2 via
bcanu.nav.an Air System, for an ofiicial visit .Tony Curtis who
just unisnea "r'iesh ana r'ury," and his wife, Janet Leigh,.are re-
enacting some of the fury in toe nesh. privately.. rhe jealace has
a uemenaous aavance sale for the two-week bill headed by Lau-
t wl ily ior a Key West vacation at the Casa Marina Hotel, for
some acnting.
Film iar John Howard and actress Marguerite Chapman plan
to id. nwneo....Oli heiress Irene Wrightman and jewel heir
i-ie* d caruer may merge tnelr moolan Lloya Bacon the turn
oirector, wires me he kuows Oracie Fields feil for and mair.ea
mat Roumanian raoio repairman sue called in lor a job. buh
her raoio wonting ?...Dlca Haymes solemnly announces, through
a-thoruative channels, that he Is cutting ol his mustache.. Booo
Roclceieller spent the fourth anniversary of her marriage at ner
- parents' u-U inoiana iarm. No party; not even a reporter.
I
borne years ago, when I exposed a larcenous racing-tip service,
I got lour lechers complimenting me and mayue 4oo asKing tne
aauress of the swindling racket.. .Last week 1 laid bare the^ sor-
'Oio. secret* of "vanity publishing'tne expense and lutility ol
paying to nave books and songs which professional nouses muse
itoViaudle manuiacturea...Result: A few tales ol woe and How
K.e.H You Arel" But dozens of inquiries as to where fiustratea
'buc optimisuc amateurs can find such Institutions. .They are
; "sure''they have "sleepers" which will break througn the systCui
< Wising up suckers seems to be a challenge to them. Barnum s
Siiirnate of Their birth-rate was far too low. But mayoe the breed
has ncreasea since his primitive period.
! Much hooting In the mail, MWHIW announcement that
LaJt anu Mon.mtr baa autographed 34,000 fly-leaves for ".8. A.
CJnflatntial." Mathematicians got out their pencils and calculat-
ed that it would take a solid week, without time out tor fooa or
s.eep, and that the human art* and hand could not endure it...
My ligure was accurate. But there's a trick to it.. .Time consumed
was aoout five hours, divided into two sessions.. There isa m-
chine winch writes 24 fountain pens simultaneously. It is ranark-
obly light, too...The signatures are boa fide but t kiimuit
to write t'iem except in one unbroken l.ne. That tends a1*o to
; speed up the chirography. We wrote our names less than 1,500
times.
x*nx Ho Ming, in a Korean magazine, wrote an article, "Am-
erlca as deen 'nuough Tne tils." Tne lpllowing are excerpuj;
< "xhe first impression is that Americans never boast or speak
about democracy Americans seem to have little interest, ta. poli-
tlcs. They look lute people immature in political training contrary
to the communists, they who are occupied mostly with indoc-
trination, no such course can be found among American troops.
From their viewpoint, American democracy is not a political loeoi-
oay to be debated or propagandized; it has developed so far ft has
permeated their dair, lives and become In fact the very custom of
tne people."
"Thett'loyalty to their duties, however trivial, and their strict
Tjunctuallty cespite their incontinent drinking and noise-rrfalsing,
are not questions of punishment or supervision. This loyalty to
duty among GIs Is a deep thing... What makes the Korean people
marvel Is the principle of equality in the Army. They "e equals,
officers and men; not masters and servants. The officers dignity,
however, Is fully preserved. This struck great attention among
Koreans, who had witnessed the master-serf relations among Rus-
sian solalers."
The Koreans had been told scores of stories about the per-
secution of Negroes and Asiatics in the U. S. I never have witness-
ed any conflict among American GI's caused by the difference of
color.. .Tney neither look with contempt on the devastated
Korean farm-houses with straw roofs, nor do they Insult the beg-
gar*like Korean refugees. They usually look upon them without
expression or sentiment."
Yang concluded that the "Inspiration and courage to over-
come hardships, natural zeal for work and sense of responsibility,
have been and still-are sustaining and developing the U.S. and
keeping her people energetic arid optimistic."
Many are falling for a rumor of mysterious (and cruel) origin,
that, by saving pounds of the thin red cellophane cigarette pack-
age ribbons which cut open the wrappers, a Seeing Eye dog can
be obtained, free, for a deserving blind person ..Beauty shop
and cigar stores all over the country have jars for the deposit ot
the gadgets.. .1 have Investigated and find no foundation for such
an Idea.
Lorry Raine, whose echo-haunted version of "Harbor Lights"
brought hack that song and brought forward the singer, two years
ago, has done a similar job on that sentimental oldie. Am I
Blue?" on her Coral etching (recording). This is the song Amos
n'Andy kibitzed around with for years... Lorry put emotion and
coloratura Into her renditionof. as it Is termed In the trade, she
"put gooee-pimples In the grooves." ... ... :,
-'-iAClano Tajoll, romantic Italian tenor, will fly In from his
native land for his American concert debut at the Brooklyn Acad-
emy of Music 'March 7. Because of a polio attack when he was an
WKrnt. Tajoll has to walk with the aid of a cane. When he sought
to enter an amateur contest In Milan, the manager told him he
did not rate a chance, that audiences would concentrate on his
farm. But he Insisted. "I sing with my throat, not with mv leg "
He ran away with the contest and became a star on the Conti-
nent, like Perry Como, Tajoll Is an ex-barber.
Which calls for a comment on some comics, notably in televl-
: there Is a growing tendency to try for laughs by crossing
limping and otherwise aiming to wring amusement out of
t human afflictions.. Mothers and handicapped, depressed
iren, in their own homes, are tortured by such grisly "humor."
ally Varietv reports: "Hollywood physio-therapist Doc David
Janes needles us with, 'Not only do kisses spread germsthey also
lower resistance.'"
By Victor Rieiel
Hours, perhaps days, before
the American Communist Par-
ty's Inner commissions can re-
lay Its latest orders from Co-
minform headquarters in Bucha-
rest to its disciplined and fa-
natic cadres in this nation, de-
tails of these orders are known
to Wilted SUtes security in-
telligence agencies.
On the international
front, it it known that the
Party hat been directed to
spread its forces down from
- Guatemala into Chili where
recently discovered uranium
deposits, added to the an-
cient copper piles, make
that Pacific strip the new-
est gambit in this grim
chess game.
Nationally, on a front be-
tween New York and Los An-
geles, with diversion* south to
the new war plants which are
making the Mason-Dixon line
vital to the Party line, it Is
known that the Party is under
orders to Speed the shifting of
Its people Into war Jobs.
From conversations with ex-
FBI undercover agent Matt
Cvetic, I hear this inside story
of one area of life and death
Importance to our defense ma-
chine, the Pittsburgh steel belt.
Let's follow a single directive
right into Pittsburgh on a sul-
try, smoky afternoon In July
1948.
A well groomed, neatly dress-
ed Negro, carrying in his five-
feet, HVi Inches the dignity
of a Doctor's Degree, School
of Pharmacy at Howard Uni-
versity, arrives at a building
in downtown Pittsburgh. He's
Henry Winston, now on the
lam from the Justice Dept.
then national organization se-
cretary of the Communist Par-
ty.
Western Pennsylvania has
been declared doubly strategic
he tells the comrades, and "one
of the Party's best organizers
Steve Nelson" (now sentenced
for sedition in that state), Is
coming in to take over the NEW YORK__The literary output of the people
Infiltration of the basic in- who write the whodunits for the two-bit paper-
dusrries necessary for Party ac- backs Is as vast as ever, but either I am getting
Private Eyesores
By BOB RUARK
tivlty.
In comes Nelson, a specialist
In gathering Information about
secret radiation labs, accord-
ing to Congressional testimony.
Of course, this vetera Com-
munist functionary immediate-
ly declares the East Pittsburgh
Westlnghouse plant triple A
priority on Infiltration and In-
formation.
There's where they're dab-
bling In atomic motors.
At Party headquarters In the
Bakewell Building, all moves of
the pro-Communist union for-
ces at the plant are discussed
with Nelson's lieutenants.
At every lebor board elec-
tion, Nelson personally goes outi
much older or the writing is getting much lousier.
Maybe both.
We had a Golden Age of the detective story a
few years back, after Dashiell Hammett invented
probably an admirable trait, if a touch treason-
ous to the Southern school of chivalry.
But before Mr. Hammer shoots them he falls
in love with them, or they with him, and I regret
to say that Mr. Hammer has a set of morals that
might gag a goat. _,,..- ..
He la a he-pushover, with the best beveled heels
the private-eye and the tough-dick school of in private detection, and the girls ar forever at
mystery writing, and when Hammett faltered to him. He skips from boudoir to boudoir with the
devote himself to bright pink politics, a disciple nimbleness and general effectiveness of a now
named Raymond Chandler wrote some mighty who cares not where morning finds him leaving
fine tough stuff a wake of tears and tattered peignoirs behind.
It was a fur, fur piece from that vapid ass, There Is something peculiar In Mr Hammer s
Philo Vance and was literature of a pretty clean chemistry that so affects ladies that they lm-
character mediately begin to strain at their garments and
But the imitators took over and defiled the heave mightily in the vicinity of the thorax
formula, until I am beginning to wish that Mr. Between killing people and wrestling witn giris,
Hammett and Mr. Chandler had never populariz- Mike is always tired and generally drunk
ed the brutal beating and the cold killing and The only living man who is tireder than Mike,
the klss-'em-first-and-kill-'em-later method of at the end of the book. Is me, and I thinK nis
dealing with' dames, shameless hussies though amours weary me more than his manslaughters,
they be. The eager Imitators have coarsened the murders, and self-appointed executions,
tou-di school into a fatuous farce. But the doings of Mr. Michael Hammer sell m
The newest titan of the belly-shooting breed of the millions, so I guess the people who pillage the horses, while he rides one
^nhy WSUINflOH
MERRY-GO-ROUND,
Drew Pearson Says: Truman unpopularity in Southwest
similar to Hoover's in 1932; Tom Connolly's case of
"the shivers" not so bad now; Ranching, big business,
still needs cowboys.
VERNON, Texas. Out In the Southwest, Harry Truman'
name Is so besmattered with mud that you almost feel sorry for
him.
At the giant W. T. Waggoner ranch near here, a cowboy who
was told he was going to get a raise in pay protsted violently.
"No air," he exploded. "I ain't a gonna take it. I don't want
do increase in pay, and they can't make me take it.'
The foreman explained that no extra work was expected, but
that "Mr. Bob,' referring to Bob Anderson, manager of the Wag-
goner estate, wanted the boys to be given a raise.
"It don't make no difference," protested the cowboy, "if I
get a raise It means I pay more social security to the government,
and I'm not going to give one more dime to that man Truman.'*
This sounds like an exaggeration, but it isn't. It's about typical
of how a lot of folks feel out here about the President of tha
United States.
The situation is probably similar to that which exulted in tha
latter days of the Hoover administration when. Just before elec-
tion in November 1932, Hoover took a train to California to vote.
Sitting for months In the White House, Hoover had had no
idea of his rapidly mounting tide of unpopularity. Callers and
advisers had assured him of election success.
But, as he crossed the continent, his train stopping for rear-
platform appearances, the meagre, hostile crowds for the first
time gave Hoover a portent of things to come. A few days later he
was overwhelmingly defeated.
What Price Connally?Texans are intrigued over the sen-
atorial reelection race of caustic, crusty Tom Connally, who has
represented the Lone Star State In Congress for more than a
quarter century.
Originally, when Gov. Allan Shivers was scheduled to run
against Connally, it was said Tom had a bad case of "the shivers."
but now precocious opportunistic Price Daniel, Texas' young at-
torney general, Is running against Tom and the Senator Isn't
shivering any more.
MENTAL MEANDERERS
Some of Tom's mentally meandering,colleagues in the Senate,
however, would certainly like to see his caustic tongue bridled,
and know that defeat Is the only thing that will ever do It.
Such a mental meanderer Is GOP Sen. Watklns of Utah, who
tangled with Tom recently during debate over the admission of
Greece and Turkey Into the North Atlantic Pact.
Watklns raised a question regarding article 11 of that pact, to
which Connally replied:
"To those who can read, and also think and those two
Justifications do not always go together this article should be
lear."
"I want to know if article 11 means that the provisions of this
treaty are to be implemented by Congress?" Watklns persisted.
"How does the Senator think they are to be Implemented?"
stormed the Senator from Texas. "Does he think they are to be
implemented by the bootblack in the barbershop?
"Anyone who would not want to agree with the Senator from
Georgia as against the Senator from Utah can neither read nor
write nor understand."
NOTE: Those who know Texas politics are betting that Long
Tom's caustic tongue will be heard in the Senate for some time.
Beef Is Big BusinessThe second biggest ranch in the U. 8. A.
spreads out over 570,000 acres of North Texas near here, in a farm-
ing operation that makes an easterner rub his eyes in bewilder-
ment.
Owned by W .T. Waggoner, who drilled weU*-ior water and
got sore when he struck oil, the ranch now has enough oil well*
to bring in millions regardless of beef, and enough cattle to
bring prosperity regardless of oil.
Still short of water, the Waggoner estate has damned up
streams to form three- big artificial lakes and has scooped out a
couple of hundred ponds to water cattle during the dry season.
COWBOYS STILL NEEDED
Though ranching today is big business, even the most modern
rancher can't get along without the rapidly vanishing cowboy.
I drove about 30 miles out on Texas prairies to the heart of
the Waggoner ranch, where eight cowboys were rounding up
mavericks, chiefly bulls that had strayed off and escaped being
branded and altered.
Each cowboy uses six horses on a Job like that, resting five
n therniarrt U:"direct last'private eyeris a young "frtlow''named Mickey Spil- magazine stands" In the stations and airports
mmuS sff&y ftr hlf forces. I fane, who turns out eplcs^bout a_priv^ richard know MJ^^tJ^^^ f
THERES MONEY
IN THE STRANGEST PUCES!
Orandma'i trunk
was full of funk
and cluttered op the attic.
A PA classified ad sold the loi
to happv antique addict I
Every month ... every week . vitsy y ~"
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE CLASSIFIED
ADS than all other dairy papen ta Panam combined!
Buf tears ore won by more
than atomic energy these
days. The Party is inter-
ested in the area's steel
and electronic plants too.
ThU is handled by a cha-
racter by name of Roy Hud-
son, one-time overseer of
all Commvnis's in CIO.
Comrade Hudson, now
somewhere on the west
coast, is fascinated by the
steel plants V. S. Steel
(in Duouf.""', Braf'docfc and
Homestead), Claireton Steel,
and Jones and Laughlin
mills.
He asks for the number ol
employes In each plant, In each
depnrtment, near each furnace
_ and the work they're do-
ing also how much Is being
produced and where it goes.
Since all this can't tie be
obtained by telephoning the
management. Party people must
be infiltrated.
So Hudson goes to the com-
rade who works in the U. 8.
Employment Service Matt
Cvetic, the undercover agent
(whose story, "I was a Com-
munist for the FBI", will be
told on a coast-to-coast radio
hokim starting early .In March)
Cvelc placed abut 25 com-
rades In speciel areas, but they
were under constant sui
lance.
Hudson even asked that Par-
ty people be placed In the
Atomic Bomb Manhattan Pro-
ject but the FBI forbade
Cvetic to do this.
None of these operations
were hit or' miss. Cvetic
met frequently with Hud-
ton and Helton to discuts
the precision pinpointing of
comrades in the exact areas
from which the technical
information could be drawn
and patted on to Nelton't
and Hudson's tuperiors.
There were other gatherings
such as those on the third
Wood
named Mike Hammer vrith the alarming rapidity
of a rabbit preparing for Eastertide.
The gory exploits of Mr. Hammer sell like fool-
proof formulas for making money, based largely
on the fact that Mr. Hammer disdains juries and
the due process of law.
Mr. Hammer likes to kill people, largely, I ga-
ther, as other men fancy golf and stamp-collect-
Mr. Hammer Is Impatient with the com, who
are too slow and stupid to please him, so he fans
his big .45 and shoots everybody who ruffles him,
Sometimes he shoots off their faces.
If he dislikes them very much he shoots them
through the belt buckle, so that they will have a
painful little period of sin contemplation.
Chiefly, though. Mr. Hammer really likes to
shoot dames, although he professes a certain fin-
icky distaste for dealing distaff death
Mr. Hammer Is all the time getting tied up with bedt their private rlchards to a pulp, anc
dames who need killing, so h& lack of hesitancy general result Is Just that. Pulp, and of a
in slapping a slug into their buxom chassis Is low order.
stark sex. solid sadism, and bum writing.
I love the detective junk, and I wish there were
more guys around like young Dick Starnes. a
relative newcomer whose three I've read"When
She Was Bad She Was Murdered," "Another Body
in Grant's Tomb," and "Another Mug for the
Ripr "
They prove that a man with wit, knowledge and
plot can make a lady out of the seedy trollop that
most detective writing has largely become.
I assume no credit forr M. Stprnes' general
excellence, even though he began his literary
career as a copv boyand an indolent oneun-
der a portion of my benign influence.
Rather, I would say that Dick has triumphed
over his early, low associations and has infused
some definite class Into a very trashy medium.
But most of the others.. .wow.
They cast their dead broads upon the waters,
and the
very
More Munoz-Marin
By Petei Edson
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico. (NBA) .Behind the
charges of "dictatorship" now being hurled at
Puerto Rico's first elected governor, Luis Munoz-
Marln, are a variety of motives;
The charges have been made on the floor of
the U. S. Senate by Republicans Owen Brewster
of Maine and John M. Butler of Maryland, ana
by Democrat Olln F. Johnston of South Caro-
lina.
Puerto Rlcan officials say Senator Johnstons
Interest is easy to account for. It is traced here
to Leonard D. Long, a Charleston, South Caro-
lina, builder. He and bis brother. J. C. Long,
have been frequent and heavy contributors to
Democratic political campaign chests.
In Puerto Rico. Leonard D. Long has had con-
tracts for six housing projects containing in all
some 11,000 units and valued at See million.
Two of these projects were federal low-cost
housing developments to help rid Puerto Rico of
Its worst slums. Four apartment hotels and a
duplex bungalow project are still under con-
struction.
Leonard D. Long also has pending hi San
Juan a lawsuit against the Puerto Rlcan gov-
ernment, claiming one million dollars tax ex-
emption for the development of a new Industry.
This claim has been denied by Federal Court
In'the summer, when horses have to grase for their own feed,
each cowboy has a string of from 14 to 18. Sometimes, when the
work Is touch, he will use two or three In a day.
On the Waggoner ranch, branding and altering is usually done
on the open prairie without a corral. Frequently it takes too
long to herd cattle into the corral.
But on the day I visited the ranch, the mavericks then being
rounded up were so wild that they couldnt be herded any place.
They were roped, tied, then hauled to the corral by Jeep.
Even though a modern ranch can't get along without cow-
boys, the profession is one which doesnt seem to enlist new re-
cruits.
Few youngsters at least in the west want to become
cowboys. They become mechanics, salesmen or go to college.
The spring or fall crop of steers on the Waggoner ranch If
sometimes sold to one buyer months in advance.
He will place his order at a certain price per pound, and on
the day of delivery an entire train will back into the ranch, load
up the cattle and steam north.
Biggest boon to the Western catleman was high war wages,
plus the meat ration fed to GI's during the war.
Today the cattle population of the nation is higher than ever
before. But so, also, is the demand for meat.
As long as Eastern wages are kept high, the once lowly white
face will continue to be king in Texas._______________________
Answer to Previous Purria
r-JKI-JCHOlfflClE iFJ
Mi3EllulW 3DW"WMHI"
'-'i '-II II f*
a - ir-i -' !>.
HORIZONTAL VERTICAL
1 Depicted bird, I Domestic fowl
Franklin's
UL taSSSf*? ntann eta- Bnd b* the Fedral Court 0i Ao*^ ta BOet0n'
dio This was the party s col- ^ EventuaUv ^ may take R to the Bu-
lege.
Professors In courses on slow-
ing production, Infiltration and
strikes Included men now un-
der arrest.
There, the comrades were
told of the importance of slow-
production In stiatagir spot*
at strategic moments, and tha'
It took only three men in. ke^
departments to cripple a pant
Today, there may be a re
"collee" campus, but again th
comrades are back in the re
volutionary elasa
Eventually
nreme Court.
Senator Johnston's interest fa this million-
dollar lawsuit Is of course the natural Interest
of any solon in the welfare of a constituent.
Back of this, however. Is another story.
When Leonard D. Long first proposed h
Puerto Rlcan housing developments in 1846,
.here was no Puerto Rican tax exemption law
o aid new industries.
After the law was passed In 1847. Long got a
tter from Jesus T. Pinero, then governor of
uerto Rico, saying that in his opinion, the
ong interests were entitled to this nrnmytWn.
".fter his term as governor expired. Pinero went
to work for the Long interests.
5,8 it------a
small black
Ulroquolan
Indian
II Harem room
14 Gaelic
18 Merited
17 Cede*
19 Scoffs
30 Concedas
SlEaet Indies
ZJ Sun god
23 Era
88 Onager
2t Babylonian
28 Neg.Uve reply
SO Measure of
The new governor, Luis Munoz-Marin, took
the position that Indians had been building
houses in tuerto Rico long before the Span-
iaros and the Americans came. Housing was
therefore not a new industry and not entitled
.o tax exemption.
Tnis position was confirmed by the govern-
ment's Executive Council and the Industrial De-
velopment Corporation.
Long's reaction to this was to charge that he
was being persecuted. He hired a press agent
in Miami and began to charge the Muoz gov-
ernment with dictatorship.
"El Mundo." leading Spanish dally In San
Juan, investigated the charges fully and In a
series of articles showed that, far from being
persecuted, Long had been shown every con-
sideration in modifying building codes to get his
projects going.
Back In Washington, Senator Butler's Inter-
est In Puerto Rico Is explained solely on the
grounds of his interest In government economy.
Senator Butler admit* he has never been in
F uerto Rico. He estimates that U. S. govern-
ment expenses in Puerto Rico have been as high
as a billion and a quarter dollars for the last
10 years.
Senator Brewster says bis interest In Puerto
Rico Is based solely on his concern Over the is-
land's position as a competitor seeking new In-
dustries and luring some from Maine and New
England.
This Is the heart of Puerto Rico's famous "Op-
eration Bootstrap." conceived by the Mufioa-Ma-
rln government to raise the standard of living
and put the island on its financial feet.
This program, under Teodoro Moacoso, hopes
to bring 700 to 800 small industries to Puerto
Rico by I860, to provide 100,000 new Joba In di-
rect employment and many more Indirectly.
Puerto Rico builds new factory structures and
leases them to its new industries with an option
to buy. The rovernment offers also the advent- M"** .
tge of a lover wage scale and exemption from) 8Jpeasesjeve
taxes until 1888,
(pL>
2 Muse of
astronomy
S Italian coins
4 Smooth
5 Scuttle
Paid notice in
a newspaper
'.'.' 1 It
is -;
'- on i
'
Mis C'
IIU -n;-
niisnc is'j -i'-ia-.
2"K
24 Machine part 40 Weary
7 Icelandic tale 25 Auricles
Give ear to 26 Poker stake
9Sea eagle
10 Flowers
11 Javanese
community
18 Symbol tar
1118
27 Cleansing
substance
32 Puffs -up
34 Segregate and
detain
35 Flake
18 Royal garrison 37 Taut
(lb.) 39 Routes (ah.)
41 Correlative at)
either
42 Bird's home
43 Kind of cheese)
44 Symbol for .
frffp<"T
4SLargeplsnt I
46VentHatse '
51 Daybreak
(court). iorxOf
31 Symbol for
tantalum
22 Bitter veteh
S3 Roof flnlal
38 In its proper
place (ab.)
38 Symbol for
48 Landed
471
48Coiosabiaa
auu
48 Ogle
80 It Is s-----
bird
83 Makes
mistakes


THtmSDAY, FEBRUARY J. 19H
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DA1LT NEWSPAPER
PAOE
Big Industries Face Strikes;
Tycoons Face Anti-Trust Suits
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28 (UP) The oil, ship-
building and electric industries are tangled in labor
disputes, and 'seven commercial firms. tangled up
with government prosecutors.
The Justice Department has brought civil suits
in New York gainst the seven companies and two
financiers on charges that they violated the Clay-
ton anti-trust law.
The government says they held interlocking
directorates in the competing firms.
J. M. Hancock and s. J. Weln-
berg are named In the suit,
which involves the B. F. Good-
rich Compnay, Sears Roebuck,
the Kroger Company, the Jewel
Tea Company, Bond Stores, W.
T. Grant Company and H. 8-
Kress and Company.
On the labor scene:
CIO workers at 60 General
Electric plants plan a work stop-
page next Tuesday. They say
the company has not brought
enough pressure to have the
Wage Stabilization Board okay
a raise negotiated last Septem-
ber.
CIO shlpworkers representa-
tives meet today with the Beth-
lehem Steel Company to nego-
tiate wage raises for 32,000
workers In eight Atlantic Coast
ship yards.
The union has voted to put oft
a scheduled strike until March
30.
And, In the big oil Industry,
Federal Mediation chief Cyrus
Chlng says the tjIO ollworkers
are considering his request that
they postpone for one week a
strike scheduled for Sunday
midnight.
Chlng says the union also has
accepted an Invitation to an
"exploratory" conference on
wages with himself and com-
pany officials today.
I'M OS^fX P/G
Klssin' Jim Folsom
Quickly Acquitted
Of Drank Driving
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Feb. 28
(UP)Towering former Ala-
bama Gov. James E. (Klssin
Jim) Folsom. was acquitted of
drunken driving charges here
today in a speedy end to a trial
which had promised to drag out
for several days.
County Judge G. C. Boner
freed the former governor of
the charges after a short recess
In the trial before a crowded
courtroom .
Boner said he felt there was
no need to drag out the trial
with some 20 witnesses promis-
ed by the proseoution.
Highway Patrolman L. E. Neu-
man, who arrested Folsom near
Morris, lAa., late on the night
of Feb. 8, testified that the
former governor was "very much
under the Influence" and that
he had radioed for help In tak-
ing him to Jail.
Folsom denied at the time of
the arrest that he was drunk.
He said he was on his way to
his home in Cullman, Ala.,
where he is engaged In the in-
surance business when he not-
iced the unmarked "sneak" car
driven by Neuman following
him.
The former governor, a strik-
ing 6-foot 8-lnch figure in a
wide-brimmed white sombrero,
charged that his political ene-
mies were behind the arrest.
Neuman said it was a routine
arrest and that he did not know
Folsom "from Adam" at the
time of the arrest.
In an Interview before the
trial today, Folsom said: "1
hadn't had a drink In three
hours."
Neuman testified that Folsom
told him: "You fellows have
be* looking for me for a year.*
Auto Workers Wages Climb
Along With Cost Of Living
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28 (UP)
The government reported to-
day that one of its cost-of-llvlng
yardsticks remained unchanged
last month but the other Index
Inched upward enough to give
more than a million CIO auto
workers a 3-cent hourly pay
boost.
The announcement also has
the effect of raising the Federal
wage ceiling formula from 14.6
per cent above the January,
1B50, wage level to 14.7 per cent.
The Bureau of Labor statistics
said its old-style cost-of-llvlng
Index rose one-tenth of one per
cent from Dec 15 to Jan. 15,
hitting another all-time high of
190.2 per cent of the 1938-39
average.
The old Index Is used by most
unions to compute cost-of-llvlng
pay rises under so-called "es-
calator" clauses In labor con-
tracts.
The new index, which seeks
to reflect a more up-to-date
living pattern, remained at 189.1
per cent of the 1935-39 average,
a point It reached on Dec. 15.
while this was the first level-
ling off of either Index since
last summer, the bureau was
quick to note that most of the
price halt was due to seasonal
price declines In clothing and
home furnishing.
Most other prices, Including
food, rent and fuel, went up
between December and January.
House Democratic leader John
W. McCormack of Massachusetts
hailed the news as a "victory
for our antl-lnflatlon program"
but said it was no occasion for
complacency because "Congress
has not yet plugged the holes"
In the price control law.
He said "powerful lobbies"
will try to use the report as an
argument for "letting our guard
down," and urged his colleagues
to strengthen the present con-
trol law rather than weaken It.
Most CIO auto workers will
start collecting their added 3
cents an hour the first week in
March.
Their cost-of-llvlng pay fac-
tor Is figured every three
months, and the small Index
mike In January will be added
to hikes In the two previous
months to give the 8-cent in-
crease.
It brings the total cost-of
living hike won by the auto,
workers under their "escalator'
pay clause of 24 cents an hour
$9.60 a week for a 40-hour
week.
Some 150,000 other salaried
workers In the auto Industry
will get roughly similar in-
creases.
B-50 (rashes After
Trip From Honolulu;
Hitchhikers Aboard
OMAHA, Neb., Feb. 28 (UP)
A four-engine bomber lost a
wing and crashed while coming
in for a landing today at Offutt
Field killing five men and.In-
juring 12.
Air Force officials plaoed a
security guard at the wreckage
because the B-50 bomber, at-
tacked to the Strategic Air Com-
mand, carried secret squlpment.
The ship lost Its wing about
20 yards from the end of the
runway, plowed into the ground
and burst in to flames at 2:30
a. m. after a flight from Hlckam
Field. Honolulu.
The plane touched the ground,
"then It bounced In the air for
some distance, then crashed."
said 8gt. Forrest McDowell, who
was on duty at the base guard
house.
Flames and smoke billowed
from the plane "as men tried to
climb out," Sgt. Billle R. Hough
said.
He said he and other members
of the guard crew helped several
persons from the burning plane
and "all were conscious but cut
and dazed."
Hough said the plane left a
trail of flaming fuel from the
the spot where It first hit to
where it came to a stop.
It was learned six of the 17
men aboard may have been ser-
vicemen who "hitched" a ride
from Honolulu. The Air Force
said It could not be determined
Immediately if any of the men
were Korean War veteran.
Children's Room
Al Canal Library
Enlarged, Renovated
. The Children's Room at the
Panama Canal Library has been
enlarged and renovated.
It Is now located In the two
open sections of the second floor
reading room of the Civil Affairs
Building, in rooms formerly used
as a periodicals room and librar-
ian's office.
The librarian's office has been
moved to the first floor of the
building and the periodicals,
which are In constant demand,
re being shelved on racks a-
round the periodicals reading ta-
bles.
Low shelves have been placed
m the new children's reading
room, and the seating arrange-
ment is more spacious than be-
fore. The children's librarian's
desk Is located In the same area.
New children's books placed In
circulation during the past week
follow:
CHILDREN'S FICTION Luc-
KV year, Aldls; When Jennv lost
her scarf, Averill; The apple and
the arrow. Buff; The Ghost Hol-
low mystery, Carter: Five boys in
a cave. Church; Let's go shop-
ping with Peter and Penny,
Combes; Treasure on the John-
ny Smoker, Comfort, Winter on
the Johnny Smoker, Comfort;
Sandy's spurs, Davis; The hap-
py family, Duplalx; Mystery at
Boulder Point. Jewett; and Dan-
iel in the Cub Scout den. Kohler.
Mystery trail. Lane; Stripe, the
tory of a chipmunk, McClung;
Dig for a treasure. Marshall; The
Invisible island, Marshall; Tom-
my's wonderful ride, Palr/ier;
Bobbv and his airplanes. Palmer;
Finders keepers, RIohardson:
Gypsy. Seredv; The mystery of
the gulls, Whitney; Guess who
lives here. Woodcock.
CHILDREN'S NON-FICTION
People are' important. Evans;
The pled piper of Hamelin.
Browning; Christopher Colum-
bus and his brothers, Hoge-
boom; .
REPLACEMENTS John ny
Crow's garden. Brooke; Babar
the King, Brunhoff; Andy and
the lion. Daugrherty: Mrs. Mal-
lard's ducklings. Delafield; The
wonderful locomotive, Meigs;
Berta and Elmer Hader's picture
book of Mother Goose: Mother
Carey's Chickens, Wiggin.
GIFTS Around the corner,
Ousley: On Cherry Street, Ous-
ley; We are neighbors. Ousley;
Life with Alice. Richards; Well
and happy. Brownell; Clean and
strong, Brownell; Fit and ready,
Brownell; Safe and sound, Brow-
nell; Hale and hearty, Brownell;
Llvln gand Doing, Brownell;
Health problems; how to solve
them. Brownell; Adventures in
growln? up. Brownell; Record
brer! - of the air. HubbeD; The
land < \ he little colonel, John-
ston; cowboys north and south,
Jame.
Don't Miss
D
'
1
HOG
. Lindas First .



Col. Shaw Again
Heads Military
Red Cross Drive
Col. V. F. Shaw has been se-
lected for the second straight
year by the Commander In
Chief, Caribbean Command, Lt.
Gen. W. H. H. Morris, Jr., to
head the 1952 military Red
Cross fund campaign.
Col. Shaw, Director of Logis-
tics, Caribbean Command, was
again selected to head the Mil-
itary Fund Drive because of his
successful operation of last year.
Shaw brings to this position
of committee chairman a wide
background of active participa-
tion in community affair.
He has organized a Joint Mil-
itary Committee whose respon-
sibility will be the operation of
the military Red Cross fund
campaign which begins on Feb.
29 and extends through March 1.
The military committee is
comprised of Col. H. H. Schulz,
Chaplain, U.S. Army, Caribbean,
Capt. E. F. Barker (U.S. Navy)
District Supply Officer of the
15th Naval District, and Major
T. C. Jones. Sanitary Engineer
of Caribbean Air Command.
Howard Ross, Director of Op-
erations of the Caribbean Com-
mand Red Cross, will assist the
committee with advice concern-
ing the campaign.
Tobin Says Unions
Are Best Salesmen
Of Democracy
WASHINGTON. Feb. 28 (UP)
Secretary of Labor. Maurice J.
Tobin. told Congress today that
the labor unions are the na-
tion's best "salesmen' 'of demo-
cracy.
In the Labor Department's
39th Annual Report to Congress
Tobin praised both labor and
management for making sacri-
fices "under the government'
emergency mobilization pro-
gram."
But Tobin reserved hi high-
est commendation for the trade
union.
Judge Tributes Jailer Who
Violated Prisoners Rights
COLUMBIA, S. C, Feb. 28.
(UP) The former Sumter
County Jailer was found guilty
today of violating the civil
rights of prisoners but he es-
caped a jail sentence and got a
mild tribute from the Judge.'
A. U. S. District Court Jury
found stocky Reuben L. Irby,
37, guilty on three count of an
original 16-count indictment.
Federal Judge George Bell
Tlmmerman, 8r sentenced him
to six months in prison or a $100
fine. Irby paid his fine and
went free.
Judge Tlmmerman comment-
ed that some of the evidence
against Irby seemed question-
able and that the defendant had
an excellent record as a jailer.
At times, however, "you may
have been a little rough," Tlm-
merman told Irby.
Irby had been Jailer and pol-
iceman In SUmter County for
more than six years.
H was accused of flogging a
young Negro girl who was clad
In her underwear and of hang-
ing a white prisoner from the
celling by his feet.
An additional chargethat he
had coerced a white woman pri-
soner Into sexual relations in
; the Jailwas dismissed by Judge
Tlmmerman earlier In the tra
for lnufflcient evidence.
1 The government produced 84
witnesses, most of them Inmates
or former Inmate of the Jail,
to describe What ast. district
atty. Louis' Schlmmel called "a
picture from the dark ages." The
defense vigorously attacked tha
credibility of the testimony.
Despite hi word of com-
mendation for the defendsmt,
Judge Tlmmerman declined to
grant Irby a new trial.
In his unusual statement, the
JurUt said that Irby had "main-
tained the best Jail In the state,
especially from a standpoint f
cooperation with other offi-
cials,"
"To my mind there is some
Incompatibility in the testimony
In this case and I don't think it
is a bad a has been pictured.
You may have been a little
rough at time."
Hospitals Do Business
BOSTON. (UP) The secre-
tary of state reports that 9.9
per cent of all babies born m
Massachusetts during 1951 were
delivered In hospitals.
Queen Elizabeth
Pins Cross On
Korea War Hero
LONDON. Feb. 28 (UP)
Jueen Elizabeth II yesterday pin-
ned the Victoria Cross, Brit-
ain's highest military award,
on the chest of nervous Ko-
rean war hero John Speak-
man In her first semi-public
act since her father died three
weeks ago.
The slim young queen was
dressed in a simply-cut black
dress, as a mark of mourning.
H % HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
The ONLY store of its kind in Panam!
We Buy and Sell FumHtire
EVERY ARTICLE WE PURCHASE IS EXPERTLY AND*
SKILLFULLY RECONDITIONED TO LOOK LIKE NEW.
RATTAN, WICKER AND ROPE FURNITURE, '
BEDS, DAY BEDS, CHAIRS, TABLES,
DRESSERS, RUGS. ETC.
COME IN AND SEE THESE BARGAINS
FOR YOURSELF
You'll be convinced that yon can't
beat our prices anywhere in town.
41 Automobile Row Tel. 3-4911
;

.
Drive li
(r
Yourself!
COM
Sponsored by
PAIA ALFARO
840 KCS.



STARTING MONDAY
i
AT
6 PM
ON
.


HOG
840 Kcs.
Take thewheelto gettiuJedf this amazing
Tew hava to take ths wheel of a Du.l-Ranse* Faatiac
yowreeif before you can completely enjoy the thrill of
having, at your finger-tip*, two entirely different types
of pei for manes: quick, easy acceleration for traffic
or economical, almost aUent cruising for the opsa road.
Whoa you do, you'll say, "This Is Itr"for nevar hetera
has suck spectacular performance been combinad with
etch remarkable economy Coma in todayipsriencs
: exciting driving in all the world.
Opiionml ml trm emH.

r\mtiae
WITH SPECTACULAR JDtBl'lli*tMBfe PerfOOTtUlllC^
far Firtsr Yam Cmmfi Burnt m
PANAMA
ATTENTION! PANAMA CANAL, ARMY & NAYY PERSONNEL
We are now in a position to offer IMMEDIATE DELIVERY of new Pontiacs
in New York and for IMMEDIATE C.Z. direct shipment.
WIDE SELECTION OF MODELS AND COLORS AVAILABLE !
CIV A, S. A.
Your PONTIAC CADILLAC Dealer
COLO


________
______
np .




TO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILt NEWSPAFBR
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY M, IIS
xo Shipping & AirLine News
SIDE GLANCES
'"FJ'bltig; Boat 3
With Broken Tail Shaft
""aitl Up at Dock 14
' The 'Louise H," a flshlriR boat
brlonjina: to the Hifth Seas Tu-
na Company in San Pedro, Cali-
fornia was laid up at Dock 14
this week after it wrb discovered
thait there was a broken tall
shaft. Arranitements are belnn
1 trade to transfer the tuna fish
aboard the ship.
Panamanian Freighter
Sinks Off Formosa
. TAIPEI. Formosa. Feb. 28 'UP"
" A Panamanian freighter Bien-
venido carryinn a carRO of 7100
tons of fertilizer bound for For-
mosa sank three miles off Kelimt!
in North Formosa yesterday.
There was no loss of lives.
Crewmen were saved when they
took to lifeboats. /
The Bienvenido hit Sitlnro
Rock, three miles off the Kee-
lun* breakwater, and shortly af-
terward broke in two. The en-
tire cargo of fertilizer was being
' hipped in under the Mutual Se-
curity Administration.
And the 157-foot Honduran
motor vessel Taboga was report-1
ed In trouble about 200 miles
southwest of the Singleton near
Cape San Antonio, Cuba.
Search On For Disabled
Vessels Off Cuba
And Gulf of Mexico
MIAMI, Feb. 28 (UP) United
fates Coast Guard search planes
! took off at dawn yesterday to aid
* two, cutters in searching for a
disabled shrimp boat In the Gulf
! of Mexico and a Honduran ves-
. gel in distress off the western tip
i; of Cuba.
San Bias Trip
Planned Sunday
There are eight seats left for
the tour of the San Bias Islands
planned for this Sunday. Anyone
Interested in taking this one-day
tour that leaves Tocumen at. 8
a. m.. mav contact Fred Busch at
Balboa 4394.
MArtin^Lewls
HOLLYWOOD'^ KINGS
3BI
OF COMEDY
JACOtT ON BRIDCI
BY OSWALD JACOB*
Written for NEA Service
Penny Singleton, a shrimp boat
out of Tampa. Florida, was re-
ported drifting helplessly about
150 miles west of Key West. Flo-
rida.
2000 modern room
bathradioMuzak
spotless comfort
Itap?
7th AVI.
tSOthSt.
NEW YORK
W TIMES SIUARE IT MM HTT
Mtti In*. _r -_ I Ml .
NORTH (D)
_A7S
V AK
? KQ1076
4.K83
WEST EAST
AJ1098 2 *K6
V8743 9852
? A4 ? 52
*72 AAQ1064
SOUTH
_Q54
VQJIO
? J98 3
*J95
North-South vul.
North East South
1 ? Pass l NT.
2N.T. Pass 3N.T.
Pass Piss
Opening leadA J
"There are only two sound rea-
sons for failing to return part-
ner's suit," ran the rule of old-
fashiorWd bridge players. "The
first reason is that you have no
card in the suit to return; the
second is sudden death."
We're not so rigid about rules
In modern bridge. You return
your partner's suit more often
than not, but you may switch to
a different suit without fearing!
that people will talk about you
behind your back.
The hand shown today illus-
trates a successful switch that
was based on sound reasoning.
I'm afraid most players would
miss the correct play because It
goes a little againsl the grain.
West opened the Jack of spades,
dummy played low, and East wonj
with the king. East knew that his
partner had led the top of a se-
uence, so South obviously had!
' e queen of spades. This meant
that spades could not be estab-
lished quickly, and only fast
tricks could possibly defeat the
contract.
East therefore shifted to clubs
by leading a low club up to
dummy's king. He knew that this
would defeat the contract if West
could get In and could lead a
second round of clubs. It was also
clear that the contract was un-
beatable If West could not get In
at an early stage.
As It happened, South had to
knock out the ace of diamonds
to have any play at all for nine
tricks. West returned a club aft-
er taking his ace of diamonds,
and that was the end of South's
chances for game.
as
FAS1 HCr IliHTUi SKRVICk. BETWEEN
EUROPE AND NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COASTS
(A Limited Number or Pimenaer Berth*)
TO EUROPE: n

TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR AND CHILE: ........... a. 25

TO CENTRAL AMERICA WEST COAST USA. IB
PASSENGER SHIP rROM NHW VORK TO PLYMOUTH 4, LE RAT DC DC Franc* ..........................'.'..TV........ March KB:
Criatobal: FRENCH UNE, P.O. Bo Mil til. I-MTS A lil
Panam: LINDO Y MADURO, 8. A, Boa ISM
Tel. Pannm 1-1*83 S-IM1
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
CrowMrv uMctvx.fe storv
Qnestlonable
BT EDGAR MARTIN

Samuel Smug!
Samuel Smug is mart, 'tb true
If too were be. too would fee tool
Sam can alwaTi find good buys.
His secret Is to advortisol
CHRIS WELKEN, Planeteer
What's Boleron Up To?
BY RL'SS WINTERBOTHAM
OUBPIB4TJOBrS
"TO LOCATE OUR
OWN SUN SOWS
CAN FIND THE Wy
RACK TO EARTH.
WHERE* AMAIZA?J
_____
OM/W Htl MAVBB
HE THOUSHT THAT
WAKMIH6 VOICE- WE
UBABO WA* A CHAM-
BER OP COMMBBCE
WtLCOMlU COMMTTei
!!
RJSCILLA'S Puf
Sorry! Wrong Party
T AL VERB
I'D fiRAB A
&A__BAlL BAT
AND COME OUT,
SWINSINS)
/ WEH, HEM! SO
_____
CAPTAIN EAST
Cops Again!
BT LESLIE TURNE!
JANET, PONT
YOU THINK ITlB
TIWE YOU EXPLAIN
THAT SHOOTING
ESCAPADE ft)
WOHTHKEY
"OW DON'T DRAG THAT OR AYl TOCAY
has wen so rg*cmit...we*vB lost
I OUR UV5TERI0US SHADOWIER. AND
EN SEEN APOUCENAU'

VIC rLINT
Stymled
bT MA. __. _). T. M. %_ U. t. HI. W3K
BT MICHAEL O'MALLET
Kb RAIL ANO
MlSME_&PEED
-WAV FROM
THE V_3B~_-
MC HC_E,
tmev oeDB-
SRRTELV J.IDE-
WPE THE
A-PBOACHIMS
POLICE CAR.
0*AH. WE M16HT
) WAVE MAC* A
/_TT1_ TROUBLE
EXPLAINING THIS
r *aoc of jewel*
.DOWN AT I APQUARTERS
TWOS CSROOKsYwRSOT THBR
IN THE DELIVERVN LICENSE NUM-
TEUCX DID THAT \Bt IM SONNA
ON PURPOSE AND) PHONE WEAD-
OUR RADIO ON / QUARTERS
71
/
COME IN 1
QUICKLY!
O'
BOOB BUNNX
Good Indians
rnrm wuX_ m_vr
Rr blow R_ro it,
ACKOW/ T V NO#f/
_W / R6TTBK SCRAM. IT UP, ) m/ CCBRO/ L HBARX J fj PETUN*. CA_UrJ' ^----- ^ VA AS. I -OVE J
%JSp^~~~ ffHooe^>
iBk* "i A *B^^
W__C" '" ijv '^ wP\S^^
ev^T^-^^-C*^ CS?^^
Pli/' \//$^H$&&
HUlfrul-3^
^^$fy^'k>'?
I -UES WE'RB
THROU4H r*_-*M'
<_IAN FOR
TOCTRY, AAELVIN/
>~
OUR BOARDING HOI SK
- .
MAJOR HOOPLC OCT OCR WAT
By J. R. WILL1AM8
now that we've bou&ht
lo napoleom'6 vest,
VOu HOLD The CROWD
Back and well tell' v?
you why vJE've ecrr v.
A CUSTOMER VMHO'U-/
ToRU off ;
-the 6teaa '
geFOPS'^u
pop A Rivet.'
--VOj PUT
fue 6TC*1E-
CUTTeR.'S *
TOOLS 0MU6
FOR A *IOO
C0MMI44ON.'


THURSDAT, FEBRUARY 88. 1WI
Aim
Te PANAMA AMERICA! AN nCQEPBNDENT DAIXT NEWSPAPER

racihc Society

&. 17, &/L. 3.1 &/L. 3321
MISS MARGARET ELIZABETH WARD
WARD-RYBICKI ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Captain and Mrs. W. H. Ward of Gamboa have announc-
ed the engagement and approaching marriage of their
daughter, Margaret Elisabeth Ward, to Mr. Joseph C. Rybl-
ckl of Bayonne, New Jersey.
Miss Ward graduated from the Balboa High School with
the Class of '48 and attended the Parsons School of Design
in New York City. She is presently employed at the V. 8.
Naval Supply Depot In Bayonne. New Jersey. Mr. Ryblckl
attended the Jersey City Extensin of Rutgers University
and served three years with the U. S. Navy Seebees daring
World War II He is employed at the U. 8. Naval Supply
Depot in Bayonne, New Jersey.
The wedding will be solemnised In Jersey City, New Jer-
sey, on April 19.
Reeeption To Honor Departing
MlnUter And Wife
The members of the Honorable
Diplomatic Corps acciredltPd to
Panama and their wives will give
a reception this evening at 8:00
at the Panama Golf Club In fare-
well to the Minister of El Salva-
dor to Panama and Mrs. Joaqun
Valdes. who will leave In the
near future for their new post In
Lima, Peru.
the National City Bank of
York.
New
Governor And Mrs. Newcomer
To Entertain
The Governor of the Panama
Canal and Mrs. Francis K. New-
comer will entertain this even-
ing with a dinner at the Gover-
nasSk^fisldfince fo * ffiyp- '"'
hBoTdjtne Chairman of 'the
Bfera of Tho Nrto '-1 Clt
nf New York and Mrs.
Gage Brady, Jr.
Salvadorean Mlnhter And Wife
Honored At Cocktail Parry
The Minister of El Salvador to
Panama and Mrs. Joaqun Val-
des, who are leaving soon for
their new assignment ki Peru
were honored at a farewell cock-
tall party on WednescTv evening
given by the Ambassador of Pe-
ru and the Deri of the Diploma-
tic Corp. and fin. Emilio Ortiz
de Zevallos at the Embassy on
La cresta.
Kariger-Llpscomb
Wedding Plans Announced
The marriage of Miss Marian
Ann Kariger. daughter of the
late Captain and Mrs. Frederick
Ksrlger. to Corporal Hudson
Brltt Llpscomb III. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Hudso.i B. Llpscomb.
Jr., of Sweet Hall. Virginia, will
be solemnized on Saturday morn-
ing at 9:00 in the Sacred Heart
Chapel In Ancon. Immediately
following the ceremony a recep-
tion will be held in the Church
Hall.
No Invitations have been Issued
but all friends of the young cou-
ple are Invited to attend the
wedding and the reception.
Tuesday Club Has
Luncheon At Hotel Tivoll
The Tuesdav Club held their
regular monthly luncheon meet-
ing on February 28 In the Fern
Room of the Hotel Tivoll. Yellow
and green snapdragons were
used for table decorations. Mrs.
E. R. Baltozer and Mrs. J. D.
Loesdon were co-hostesses for
the affair.
Those attending from the Pa-
cific Side Included Mrs. H. B.
Yard, Mrs. H. J. Qulnlan, Mrs.
W. C. Hesron. Mrs. R. H. Ot-
ten, Mrs. James Bryant who la
the house guest of Mrs. R. G.
Currle, Mrs. N. E. Rocker and
Mrs. Ira L. Wright.
Atlantic Side guests were Mrs.
B. C. Stevens, Mrs. H. C. An-
derson Mrs. J. J. Edge, Mrs. .
J. Frledrlck and Mrs. John
Crone.
PAGE n%
^/tlantic S^ocietu
nu mm j~ tu
&t 195, (Ulm* D*Utsm, (Um* 37$

KARIGER-LIPSCOMB WEDDING ON SATURDAY
Miss Marlon A. Kariger, formerly of Long Beach, Cali-
fornia, daughter of the late Captain and Mrs. Frederick
Kariger of Gatun, will be wed to Corporal Huttaon Llpscomb
of Richmond, Virginia, at a nuptial man at the Sacred
Heart Chapel In Ancon Saturday at 9:00 a.m.
ATI friends of the young couple, and their families are
.cordially invited to the service and the reeeption whleh will
be held In the parish hail of the chapel following the ser-
vice.
Minister And Mrs. Valdes
Entertain Friends
The Minister of El Salvador to
Panama and Mrs. Joaqun Val-
des entertained with a reception,
as a farewell to their friends on "
Tuesday evening at the Union
Club.
MRS. GLADYS HEURTEMATTE, wife of Julio Heurtematte
the financial counselor at the Panama Embassy, Washing-
ten, was listed In the current lss:ie of "Quick" Magazine as
one of Washington's Ten Most Beautiful Women. Mrs. Heur-
tematte is well-known in Panama dance circles as an ac-
complished ballet dancer. She started the Heurtematte
School of Bailee here many years ago. It still Is In existence
today, brlnelng down student teachers from the Washington
School of Ballet to Panama each year.
Friends Entertain For
Mr. and Mrs. Bishop
Mr. and Mrs. Seagle L. Bishop,
of Corpus Chrlstl. Texas, who
were In port as cruise passengers
on the S.S. "Chlrlqui," were hon-
ored with a dlrfner party at the
Brazos Brook Country Club Mon-
day evening, given by former At-
lantic side friends.
Those who participated in the
Set-together were: Mr. and Mrs.
falter Hunnicutt, Mr. and Mrs.
H. E .Finnegan, Mr, and Mrs. H.
K. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. James
8aiterlo, Mrs. L. V. Hunnicutt,
Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Humphrey,
Mr. and Mrs. Mark White, Mr.
and Mrs. Anthony Raymond, Dr.
Prez and Patty Seaman. Patty
was also celebrating her seventh
birthday anniversary.
The young guests who attend-, _
ed with the Brownies were: Mary fj?, J, S!'1!
Ellen and Sarah Jane Carter of' -
Las Cumbres, Kay Hamilton, Fe-
licia Ladd, Linda Hart, Susan
Peterson, Donald and Linda
Stohrer, and the honoree's sisters
Jean and Carol.
Dances and songs were enjoy-
ed by the children, before the re-
freshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin t$M
formerly of Margarita. She 1
reared in Oatun by her
uncle, Dr. and Mrs. Howard, 1
now reside In Ashevllle, N.Cl
Mrs. Stegman Arrives
From Ecuador
Mrs. James A. Stegman, 1
former Miss Yvonne Martin. <
Old Cristobal, arrived Friday
plane from Ecuador for a
with her sister and brother-ii
law. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Foremaj
of Gatun..
i Elks To Hold
The Elks annual picnic will b
held Saturday, March 1 at 9
a.m. at the Brazos Brook Club,
All members, their families an.
friends are cordially Invited*
attend. Games have been plan
ned and lunch with beverage
will be served at noon.
There will be a meeting of
Brownie Troops 82, 23, and 38 of
Cristobal, Monday at 3:30 p.m. Progressive Dinner
at the Scout Shack In New Cris- A progressive dinner Is to
.. tobal. At this time Miss Kathryn planned for tomorrow night I
i'i"L ,1s- Yestal MorrIa. Captain1 Argo and Miss Betty Tarr, of the the ladles of the Joy Group 0
McBrlde of the "Chlrlqui," Mrs. Senior Scouts will address the the Gatun Union Church Aua
Virginia Knowlton Christlan^Mr.l group. ary. Anvone desiring to atte
and Mrs. Lawrence Calloway.t Plans will also be made for the may secure tickets from
Miss Thelma Godwin, Miss Ada-; Rally in Balboa on March 15.
mary Anderson, Mr. and Mrs.
2
rlai
Fred Newhard
Poole, Sr.
or Mrs. Georgi
Harland Feullle, Miss Thora Bau- Mr. and Mrs. Perry
bllts, Miss Dorothy Kern, Miss Announce Birth Of Son World Day Of Prayer
Dorothy Henry, Messrs. James| Mr. and Mrs. Charles Perry, of! World Day of Prayer will
Fala, R. Jt. Brown, James Rob- Balboa, announce the birth of observed tomorrow at the Gatui
erts and R. Emlllani.
Visitors Honored
Before Departure
Brigadier General Silas Beach
Hays. Deputy Surgeon General.
united States Armv and Colonel
Robert Black, who were visitors
on the Isthmus from San Juan.
Puerto Rico, was honored before
their departure at a buffet sup-
oer glvtn by Colonel and Mrs.
Harold Taylor at their quarters
at Fort Clayton. During their
Rtay on the Isthmus General
Hays and Colonel Black were the
house gr"ts of Colonel and Mrs.
Francis P. Kints of Fort Clay-
ton.
Mrs. Gomales And Children
Leave For U.S.
Mrs. Carlos Eduardo Gonzalez
and her children left recently to
join Mr. Gonzalez who has been
Appointed Consul General of
rosta Rita In San Francisco, Ca-
lifornia.
r.and Mrs. Straus Honored
25th Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Straus
William were the honored guests on
Tuesday evening at,* surprise
dinner partv given in celebration
of their twentv fi'{h wedding an-
niversary bv their sons-in-law
land daughters. Mr. and Mrs.,
Freeland Hollowell and Mr. pnd ??* Mrs- Lawrence Adler
Mrs. Clifford Moore at the Hol-
lowell residence in Diablo.
Reception To Honor Visitors
Tonight
Mr. and Mrs, Lp'gh R. Cramer
have issued invitations for a re-
ception to be "lven this everln*
from 6:00 to 8:00 in the Balboa
Room of the Hotel El Panama hi Among those Attending we
honor of the Chairman of the Miss Marcaret Straus, M' Ida
B.of'd of the National dtv *"nk|trau8. Marv and Kp^-rine
o Few York and Mrs. WHU-rm More. Mr. Dick Edward- Mr
rady. Jr..apd M-. ToH<-d Mrs. Ros Hollowell and
Vice-president of Mrs. Charles Jones.
Mrs. Schnake Hostess
For Bridge Chi
Mrs. E. W. Schnake was hos-
tess to the members of the Fort-
nightly Bridge dub on Wednes-
day evening at her home in Pe-
dro Miguel.
The attending guests included
Mrs, Frank Brvan. Mrs. Ethelvn
Wood. Mrs. William Flack. Mrs.
Mary Davles. Mrs. Marion Lu-
and
Science Fiction." |tlve Thursdays until March 27.
All members of the group are,Those wishing to bring their own
asked to attend and other mem- cards may do so.
bers of the College Club will be
welcome also.
Bingo Tonight l*
At American Legion Club
Bingo will be nlayed this even-
ing at the American Legion Club
at Fort Amador at 7:30 p.m.
Members and their gues's are to- Elks To Sponsor
vlted to attend and arrangements Moonlight Cruise
have been made with bus drivers The Benevolent and Protective
to take players directly to the Order of Elks invites the public
y. r. W. Bingo Tonight
Bingo will be played this even-
ing at V.F.W. Home on Curun-
du Road at 7:45 p.m. Prizes will
be awarded the winners.
club on request.
Canasta Tournament Tonight
At Win Memorial
The public Is Invited to attend
to attend a Moonlight Cruise to
be held on Mrch 21 at 7:00 p.m.
The cruise will begin at Gamboa
and will go through the Cut to
Gatun Lake and back. Admis-
the Canasta Tournament thisjslon Is 2.00 per person and in-
evening at the Wlrz Memorial at'eludes with the cruise, refresh-
808 Balboa Road. The tourna-
ment will continue on consecu- (Continued on ?age SIX)
Mrs. H. V. Howard.
Natzker, the
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^wmKMcoj
The only mask to contain the unique ingredient
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Dries without rigidly .. remaining soft
and creamy throughout Thenyou're ready to,
"go"... moro radiant than ever^
RHODA
MAIN store
62 Justo Arosomena Ave.
BRANCH store
8 Tivoll Ave.
Panama Federation
Advisor Board Meet
The Advisory Bos'd of tho Pa-
nam Federation for Christian
ervlce met in the Pedro Miguel
Union Church on Monday even-
ing to make plans for the ap-
proaching 78th Semi Annual
meeting of the federation.
The board members present
Included Mrs. H. I. Tinnin,
President: Mrs. O. H. Davis.
Mrs. F. M. Boydston, Mrs. J. W.
B. Hall Mr. Clarence Jecob-
son. Mrs. F. 8. Pierce. Mrs.
George Edglnton and Mrs. B. A.
Herring.
The Women's Organizations of
the Balboa Heights Baptist
Church will act as hostesses for
the half-da* session which will
begin at 9:00 a.m. on April 3.
Luncheon will be served follow-
ing the program.
Mrs. J. Qulnter Miller of New
York City, a board member of
the National Council of Church
Women, will give the main ad-
dress of the day. Special music
and brief reports of the activi-
ties of the church women of the
Csnal Zone will be of interest to
those attending.
Mr. and Mrs. Barlow
To Sail Friday
Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Bar-
low and their two children, Di-
ane and Thomas Ross, will sail
Friday aboard the 8.8. Panama
for New York en route to Wash-
ington. D.C.. where Mr. Barlow
has accepted a government posi-
tion and where they will make
their new home.
A round of farewell parties has
honored the Barlows within the
last few days. They will cross
the Isthmus today and will be
the over night house guests of
Mr. and Mrs. William Hoffman
of Margarita. ,
Juan Carlos Ramlrei
I Is Now Arrival
Lt. and Mrs. John t. Rami-
rez of Fort Kobbe. announce the
Wrth of a son, Juan Carlos, on
Feb. 12, In the Fort Clayton Ar-
mv Hospital.
Lt. Ramirez Is with the Medi-
cal Co. 33rd Infantry and is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Franc!tro
Ramirez of Aouadilla Puerto Rl-
oo. His wife is the daughter of
Dr and Mrs. Alfonso Rivera of
Hato Rey, Puerto Rico.
Rook Review Group
To Meet March C
The Book Review Group of the
Canal Zone College Chib will
meet on Thursday. March 6 at
the home of Mrs. William H. Al-
EL.S""8- Cunmdu Heights
ens Alien and her mother. Mrs
Carl T. Hoffman, will be co-hos-
tesses at the meeting.
Mrs. Wait Bryja will review,
Mrs. Gregory Honored
With Bon Voyage Shower
Mrs. R.R. Gregory, who Is leav-
ing Saturday, with Dr. Gregory,
to make her home in Florida,
was honored with a handker-
chief shower and morning coffee
given by the Cristobal woman's'
Club Tuesday morning.
Upon her arrival at the Club
Building the honoree was pres-
ented an orchid corsage bv the
president, Mrs. R. W. Rublll.
coffee was served at a long
table centered with bougainvllla.
Mrs. Leon Egolf and Mrs. George
Poole, Sr., presided at the coffee
services. Mrs. Gilbert Morland
served the punch.
Mrs. Rubelll gave a resume of
Mrs. Gregory's work with the
Woman's Club which she Joined
In 1W2. She presented the hon-
oree the green and gold seal of
the organization, and a picture
of the Gilbert House and extend-
ed the best wishes of the Club
for happiness In her new home.
Then an Individual gift shower
was given Mrs. Gregory from the
members and friends present.
Over forty ladies attended the
party.
their third son at Gorgas Hospl- Union Church with a service
tal on February 19. 10:00 a.m. All ladles in the com
Mrs. Perry is the former Miss
Jeanne Kuller, the daughter of (Continued1 on Page Ot
Quaker
HID
EVERY MUD
Quaker Dairy Ration provides you with
dependable, palatable feed properly balanced
for highest milk production. Adaptability in
i protein requirement is afforded through Quaker
,1%, 20% sad 24% Protein Dairy Ration.
Modo by Tho Oookor Out Compony
Distributor:
C. O. MASON, 8. A.
P.O. Box 893
Panam City 8c Coln
Dinner Honors Visitor
Mr. and Mrs. Fred E. Knox
gave a dinner party last night In
Cristobal to honor Mrs. Cather-
ine DeForrest and Mrs. Armanda
Grumberg.
The other guests were Rever-
end and Mrs. Philip Havener.
Mrs. DeForrest has been visit-
ing her daughter and son-in-
law, Reverend and Mrs. Havener,
and Is returning in the near fu-
ture to her home in New Hamp-
shire.
Mrs. Grumberg has been vlsltr
ing her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Ral Herrera of Coln, and will
leave soon to return to her home
in Miami.
Evening Circle Meeting
The Evening Circle of the Cris-
tobal Union Church held Its reg-
ular meeting Monday at the
home of Mrs. Roscoe Halnlng,
with Mrs. Reynold Vann as co-
hostess.
"Brotherhood" was the topic of
the devotions given by Mrs. Tim-
othy Ladd. Reverend Raymond
Gregory, of Gamboa, was the
?:uest speaker. He gave the his-
ory of a number of denomina-
tional hymns and sang the
hymns. He closed the program
with the singing of the "Lord's
Prayer."
Those who enjoyed the musi-
cal evr ing were: Mrs. T.D. Ladd,
Mrs. Lesleigh Davis, Mrs. Nor-
man Davlson, Mrs. EC. Brown,
Mrs. Lormle iglesias and Sonny,
Mrs. E. F. McClelland, Mrs. R. K.
Hanna, Mrs. Gerhard Lust, Mrs.
J. G. Lusky, Mrs. M. Davey, Mrs.
Bernard Frost, Mrs. Carl Maedl,
Mrs. Anton Holgerson, Mrs. Al-
vln Jones, Mrs. C. Custer, Mrs.
Wlscavage, Mr. and Mrs. T. H.
Zuldema, and Reverend and Mrs.
Philip Havener.
Mr. and Mrs. Aguirro
Leaves For States
Mr. and Mrs. Rosalne Aguirre
and children of Fort Gullck, sail-
ed today for the States. They
plan to make their home In Flor-
ida.
Mr. Aguirre has been employed
by the UjB. Army at Fort Gullck.
With Mrs. Aguirre he has been
active to the affairs of the
American Legion.
N5D 10 GJ)TIR VALUE l0O*?U H< ;\-j Mi 'WUE.lBU
tytfant dcHdously fre,
crisp green beans?
Tuesday Club Meeting
The Tuesday Club held their
regular meeting In the private
dining room of the Hotel Tivoll.
Luncheon was enjoyed and fol-
lowed by an afternoon of canas-
ta.
The Atlantic side members who
went over for the occasion were:
Mrs. E.C. Stevens, Mrs. J.J. Edge,
Mrs. Margaret Cronan. Mrs. H. C.
Anderson, and Mrs. E. J. Fried-
rich.
The other members present
were: Mrs. R. L. Wright. Mrs. N.
E. Rocker, Mrs. R. Q. Curry and
her guest Mrs. James Bryant,
Mrs. R. H. Otten. Mrs. W. C. Hea-
ron, Mrs. H. J. Qulnlan, Mrs. J.
B. London, Mrs. H. B. Yard, and
Mrs. E. R. Baltozer
Mrs. Logsdon and Mrs. Balto-
zer were hostesses for the occa-
sion.
Washed, rood y to
art
r Fronch style.
Featured
hi year CosasDiasary
Bienales Have laveatituro
Meeting
wp32. of 1
Brownie Troop 32. of Now Cris-
tobal, met Tuesday afternoon at
the home of their leader, Mrs.
Harry Seaman.
During the meeting two girls
were invested. They were; Julie
TOE BALLET TAP
Special Oasses for Little Tots 35 Years
Special Classes Just for Boys
Limited Openings for Intermediate Students
DOROTHY CHASE
Call 2-1751
or
Balboa YMCA 2-2759
PAUL J. KIENER
ANNOUNCES
THAT STORE AND FACTORY
will be closed all afternoon
SATURDAY FIRST OF MARCH
Panama's Constitution Day.
PAULS MARKET
PANAMA SAUSAGE FACTORY
Suddenly, on every hand.t
a new and wonderful nail polish.*
CIJTEX %il)iMcmz,'
No other nail polish offers so much not even tho i
expensive polishes!
Amazing wear without peeling or chipping. Alluring,
lading lustre. Array of fashionable, fadeless shades.
Never before a nail polish with so many I
extras. Beautiful "dressing table" bottle. Long-
handled "artist's** brush fee that professional.
touch in application.
lit ft-no. mot oven expenawe nail ps'isftsi ofsr so
ostros es Cuss NmU Britttme. Try it
The World?, Mot Popmlm Nml Fmhk



pact six
r- ..T
THI PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILX NKW8PAWR
THITRSDAT, FEBRUARY M, 1MI
.Tickets Go On Sale
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds i for CHS Production

LfcWl! 3.KVICH
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offkef
ALOft Ok Bal.MCZA AMUUCAMO
n. H Wan ink MM
alUSHO Ufc IJ*Srt
fHH*

MUKKlMIN'k
0OXICA CASU.TON
SCAN
rBE PANAMA AMERICA
a
mm
12 word*-
Minimum (or
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
fOR SALE: B.-oadleom rug 9
12 flowered patrarn. $50.00 rnit-
' cecnecus household items. 1181-
B. Cchrmon St. Bo.boo 2-1483.
AT BARGAIN PRICES aai relfift-
rator ani stovt, mihoflany Jmina
room tet. tt.tl ehs of draweri
Telephone Pamma 3-476'_:___
FOR SALE: So'id mahogany tool*
3 leaves. Just refinished $55.00.
0263-A Gamboo. Tel. 6-247.
FOR SALE:Kenmore wo-hing ma-
chine, like new. electric pump,
new type vis-omotic balloon
wringer. 60 cycle. Coll Fort Gu-
llck 474.
FOR SALE:Upright piano, Wesf-
inghouse retrigerotor, 60 cycle, 9
cu. ft., bedroom set. kitchen tobies
matching cupboards, o s s orred
household items. After 5 p. m.
House 105, 1st St. Las Cumbrei.
9-2 p. m. Sot. and Sun. ____
FOR SALE: 4 piece overstuffed,
tlvingroom set, Philco cobinet ra-
dio, twin beds, innerspring mat-
tresses and box springs Holly-
vood type, 14 cubic foot deep
freeze. Quarters 38 Albrook. Phone
' 5781.__________________________
FOR SALE:Special for "Army Fa-
milies" used furniture at bargain
prices. Try us ond be convinced.
Economy Furniture Store, 12.174
12-13 Bolivar Ave. Phone 916
FOR SALE
An in nn lii If
MISCELLANEOUS
FINANCING
Service Personnel ond
U.S. Civllion Government Employ
new used cai through
OVIftNMlNI MHOYIS FINANCI
50
Fort Worth. Texas
Also Direct
Loom Automobile
Serving jovemmtnt employes and
Service Personnel In the Canal Zene
loi 4 /ton. With out finonclng
your Insurance automatically adjusted
ro u. S. coverage.
ARUANGIMINTS CAN M MADI
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILI
DAALIR
Oo ft* have etrhtkhn
Wrifo AlC4ll#fi#l AOMyrHOI
e 2011 Amm. C I
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Agencias Cosmos, Automobile Row
29, will solve your Auto-Problem.
Tel. Panamo 2-4721. Open oil
day on Saturdoys.
FOR SALE: 1940 W.llys Sedan,
block. Good tires, recently over-
hauled engine. Con be seen at
5347-L Diablo after 6:0(5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1947 Dodge 4-door
sedan, Fluid-Drive, Radio. Call
Albrook 4273.
FOR SALE:1950 Packard Sedan.
Aqua Blue, Automatic Transmis-
sion, radio, leather upholstery,
w/w tiras, $2,000.00. 57II-B
Diablo Heights. Bolboo 2675.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE:Good established In-
come, producing business, self,
operated end interesting deal. For
retired couple wishing to stay in
Panama and be independent, write
Box G. E. 134, Panam for de-
tails.
FOR SALE OR RENT:Two bed-
room cottage In cool El Voile. Tel.
Panama 2-2446.
FCJR SALE:Lond In cool, beautiful
CL VALLE vicinity Hotel Pan-
americano. Large or small lots
rtoderattly priced. Tel. Panamo
-2446 or inquire at Hotel.
WANTED
' Miscellaneous
VVANTED: River going launch
corgo capacity 2 to 3 tons. Die-
Ml Motor. Telephone 3-0475
Jlenamo. Mrs. Jesse
Help Wanted
WANTED:Expert cook. Must live-
in. Salary $40.00. No. 29, Fede-
rico Boyd Avenue.
TROPICAL
The hilarious tale
of the kid who
toddled home with
$100,000.
FINDERS
KEEPERS
//
FOR SALE:Hudson 1948, 4-door
sedan, perfect condition, practically
new tires. Tel. 3-3744.
FOR SALE:'42 Studebaker Coupe
<6) block, very good transporta-
tion. $250.00. Call Cristobal 2453.
FOR SALE:Boick 38, two door,
new tires and bottery, good trans-
portation, Zone employe, $180.-
00. 1952 license. Federico &jyd
No. I, Tel. 3-1516.
WANTED
Automobiles
WANTED TO IUY 3 CARS CASH
Only- 1949 on: 4 door Chevrolet,
Dodge or Plymouth. Not duty paid
Will see them 4 to 7.
ALVARO FONSECA, Hotel Cal*
Panam. Tal. 2-0770.
FOR SALE: Mahogany livingroom
suite; 103-piece set Bavarian
china; mantle and kitchen clocks,
25 cycle; dropes, 48" x, 96".
Coll Bolboo 1323 or 3462.
FOR SALE:I brown horse with
black stocking feat, 3'/i years old
13 hands high $40.00. Phone
6-184.
FOR SALE: Boy's wagon, single
bed. 769-A, Sen Poblo St., Bol-
boa.
FOR SALE: Singer sewing foot
mochine, piano upright Grand,
gas stove, double bed Simmons
girl's bicycle, stroller, boqy crib.
Phone 916 Colon.
LOST tj FOUND
LOST:Eorn $10.00 todoy by de-
livering Passport and papers of
Preston Keathley, fo Lo Vox del
Pueblo, Panama.
RESORTS
Shropnel's houses Sonta Cloro. Also
in COLD Carro Compono Moun-
tains. Telephone Balboa 2820 or
see caretaker.
Enjoy o vacotion ot Hotel Pan Ame-
ricono. El Voile. Phone Panama
2-1112 for reservetlons.
Gromlich's Santa Clara beach-
cottages. Electric Ice boxas, gas
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
PfcHibje, OeeemMa eottatea. Santa
Claro. Box 435 talboo. Phono
Panamo 3-1177. Cristobal 1.1673
Williams Sonto Ciara teoch Cortoges.
Two bedrooms. Frloidolrtt, Rock*
gas rangas. Balboa 2-3050.
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMIRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished oport'
ments Mala) service optional. Con-
tort office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
IBM Office Here
Pays Tribute
To Personnel

Recognition o the contribu-
tions made by personnel ot the
International Business Mach-
ines Corp.'s Canal Zone office,
to the progress of the entire or-
ganization, was given yesterday
by H. C. wendler from the
company's headquarters in
Dallas, Texas, at a dinner held
at El Panama Hotel.
SUBLEASE: For two months, to
One or two reliable adults with
references, attractively furnished
one-bedroom apartment in boat
section Bella Vista. Occupancy
Mar. 3 Phone Miss Peters, morn-
ings, Panama 2-0740.
Position Offered
WANTED: America Company
needs English-Spanish secretary.
Write to Aportado 134, sending
smoll photo, ond stating age ond
experience.
t--------'-----------------------1---------
US Consul Presents
Cultural Material
To Colon Council
COLON. Feb. 38 A special
presentation of books and rec-
ord albums from the people of
the United States to the Colon
Municipal Library was one of the
features at yesterday's formal
openina of the Colon Centennial
Celebration.
Murray M. Wise, Charge d'Af-
faires, a.l.. of the U.S. Embas-
sy In Panama. Introduced Chas.
Whltaker. United States Consul
in Colon, who delivered the cul-
tural material to Jos Maria
Gonzales, President of the Colon
Municipal Council, for transfer
to the Colon Municipal Library
in the presence of President Al-
clblades Arosemena, Teodoro Na-
vas L., Mayor of Colon and oth-
ers.
In making the presentation of
some 79 books, several pictorial
maps, and a number of albums
and various phonograph records.
Whltaker stated that the gift re-
nresents an expression of the in-
terest of the people of the Uni-
ted States in the continued
growth and future development
of the cltv of Colon, its culture
and its people.
The volumes and records will
form the nucleus of the Juvenile
Section In the Municipal Library
which was recently moved to
new. more spacious quarters at
the office of the Governor of the
Province of Colon.
4200,000 Savings
In Gasoline Use
Predicted By Army
WASHINGTON. Feb. 38 A
savings of approximately $200.-
000 is expected to result from a
reduction in the use of gasoline
,ln Army administrative vehicles
between February and June of
this year, the Department of the
Army announced recently.
Armv commanders in the
Zone of the Interior have been
Attended by all local office
personnel and their wives, the
IBM tribute dinner was one of
the more than 180 similar func-
tions being held throughout the
United States during 1062 to re-
view the company's growth in _
the past ten years, and to out- jury
line plans for the future.
Woodier, IBM district man-
ager, was introduced by Paul J.
Coleman, branch manager of the
Canal Zone IBM office.
Two employes on leave with
the Armed Forces, who are sta-
tioned at Ft. Amador, also at-
tended the dinner.
m i
Balboa Y Begins
Two New Flower
Setting Gastes
Two new flower arrangement
classes will be given at the Bal-
boa TMCA under the direction of
Mrs. Charles Morgan as teacher.
The two new classes will start
on Monday. March 10 and will
continue for a period of eight
weeks. A morning class will meet
each Monday at 9 a.m. For oth-
ers who are employed and un-
able to attend the davtlme class,
Mrs. Morgan will hold an even-
ing class each Monday at 7 p.m.
This special series will parti-
cularly stress the use of flowers
and plants available in the dry
season. The two classes will con-
clude with a combined flower
show open to the public on Mon-
day. April 28.
Classes are open to anyone, ci-
vilian or military both from the
Canal Zone and from Panama.
There Is no charge for them bnt.
registrations should be made in
advance, between the hours of 8
a.m. and 5 p.m.
Atlantic Society...
(Continued From Page FIVE)
munity are cordially invited to
attend.
Klansmen Jailed
Again After Beating
Of Negro Woman
CHARLOTTE, Feb. 28 (UP)
State police and county officers
have arrested 11 former Ku Klux
Klansmen in North Carolina.
They are accused of kidnap-
ping and assaulting a young
Negro woman.
Among the II are alx men ar-
rested recently by the FBI on
similar charges in another case.
All of the 11 have been Jailed
at Whiteville, North Carolina,
and are being held in $6,000
bail for the March SI Grand
We have everything
to keep vour Lawn
and Garden beautiful
dnrinr the dry season.
TOOli
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow
insecticiae
Fertilisers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
2? Central Ave. Tel. J-014
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
TeL 8-171*
#33 B. Mth St
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panam
Buys: Brewery.
Sells: Abbatoir.
Tel. 3-4719 3-16*0
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM UU.l
Slipcover Reanbolstery
van ova snow-aoeMt
Alberto aere*
J. . *e t* On. 77 (AateejeMI* to*
Vtae EMiauie* Pkka DeHver*
Tai. s-eats -MiaaiMM
More arrests' are expected,
though one state official says
that "intimidation and threats"
in Columbus County have made
It hard to get evidence against
those "involved in criminal ac-
tivity."
Sheriff Hugh Nance says that
Esther Lee Floyd was taken
from her home Nov. 1% by robed
men who drew a gun on her
mother and held her tether.
He says, that she was taken
to a wooded area, blindfolded.
When the blindfold was remov-
ed, she saw 15 or 20 robed and
hooded men.
Nance says they "slapped her
a few times with a belt" but
didn't beat her too hard after
she told them she was expect-
ing a baby.
Then, he says, the Klansmen
out a cross in her hair and told
her to go back to town and
"tell all the niggers that the
Kluxers got you."
In Raleigh, State attorney
general Harry McMullan says
that "doubtless other arrests
will follow."
^>anafac
INSTANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(fortified with Vitamin D)
tor
DRINKING
for
COOKING
for
WHIPPING
Farm Fresh
Flavor!
On Sale in
Commissaries.
P.C. Ce
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
1
EWELL-JULIA ADAMS
ELYN VARDEN
The Cristobal Union Church
and the Episcopal Church of Our
Saviour will hold combined serv-
ices for the residents of the Cris-
tobal Community to observe the
World Day of Prayer.
The Cristobal Union Church
will be open from 8:00 ajn. to
8:00 p.m. for prayer and medita-
tion. At 3:16 p.m. there will be a
special service for children with
Jeb Wllkerson as leader. Mrs. Al-
ton Jones will be the speaker and
Mrs. Hugh Casslbry organist.
The service for adults will
commence at 7:00 p.m. with Rev-
erend William H. Armstrong of
Panam as speaker. Reverend
Armstrong is superintendent of
directed
c
to cut
h MsoUn the Panam -Coln Circuit of the
such gasoline WMtni. Mthnf r**.r,.H w
49 More Vacancies
Listed By Canal
There are 49 vacant positions
in the Canal organization to
which qualified eligible em-
ployes may transfer, according
to the latest issue of the Trans-
fer-Vacancy Bulletin from the
Personnel Bureau.
Eighteen are classified and
related positions and 31 are in
the craft group.
The classified and related
positions are: chief of the locks
security branch; clerk-steno-
grapher; clerk-typist; electrical
engineer; mechanical engineer;
fireman; physical science aide;
and tabulating equipment opera-
tion supervisor.
The craft positions are: agent-
operation; wood and steel car-
man battery and ignition elec-
trician; drill barge engineer;
track foreman; electrical meter
Inspector; machinists, inside,
outside, machine erection, re-
frigeration; construction equip-
ment operator; locks operators,
cablespllcer unqualified, mach-
inist qualified unqualified, and
wlremen. qualified and unquali-
fied; tractor-bulldozer opera-
tor; utility operator, and wire-
men.
TRAVEL fpYirr
Tivoll dee. Pa t-20M
onsumption vViE**?^ Women's Auxiliary,
I I (W\ 14
Tonight At 7:30
ST f J?t ,hu Z",h '. h'P erv Mrs. Milton J Cook-
order Si tJi uSSto Id ,on wl" "! '-L0'e Never VU-
"_.L_*PP1e_*._!?-c*U,fl. *d" eth" by Frederick Root. Mrs. C
ministra ti ve vehicles, such asi
passenger sedans, and not to
tactical or training vehicles.
The $380,000 estimated sav-
ings is expected to be doubled
or tripled by an accompanying
cut in maintenance costs since
he gasoline reduction will au-
jmaticallv cause a decrease in
hr extent of use of adminui-
uaiive vehicles.
J. Oenis will serve as organist,
and Rev Milton J. Cookson and
Rev. Philip Havener will partici-
pate in the service.
The offering from these serv-
ices goes to further literacy proj-
ects under home and foreign
A special meeting: of the Wo-
men's Auxiliary. Balboa Chapter
of Local 900, CIO. will be held
at the Union's office at 7:3* to-
night.
Final plans for the proposed
missions of the Nftkmal Council survey of the economic condi-
of Churches of Christ in the it ions of local-rate workers will
United SUtes. 'be discussed.
Caribbean Girls
State Sessions
Convene April 4
The fourth annual session of
the Caribbean Girls State will
convene at building 285. Ft. Da-
vis from April 4 to 10, Mrs. Lois
Magner. chairman and director
of the American Legion Auxilia-
ry, announced at a board meet-
ing recently.
The Ideals and standards as
taught in the session will serve
as a strengthening force to the
young woman of 1982.
Citizens of Girls State will per-
form exactly the same duties as
real office-holders in the every
day world. They elect their own
officers, run their own city, coun-
ty and state government and
learn democracy by doing.
Although the program is under
the sponsorship of the American
Legion Auxiliary, each girl se-
lected from the Junior class of
the high schools is sponsored by
Interested individuals or civic-
minded organizations.
Checks from both the Gamboa
and the Balboa Women's Club
have been the first to reach Ca-
ribbean Girls 8tate Headquarters
to sponsor Canal Zone girls to
this project that safeguards
American principles and ideals.
Pacific Society...
'ftne>ee) Prss Peer FIFE
ments. dinner and all night
dancing. Tickets are now on sale
PaHee stall T. Be March 14
The Balboa Branch of the Ca-
nal Zone Police Association will
hold Us annual Bali on Friday.
March 14. at the Hotel El Pana-
ma. Ticket are available from
mv Canal Zone policeman or at
any Canal Zone Police station.
. Tickets are now on sale for the
opening night of "The Whole
Town's Talking," the Anita Loos'
farce-comedy with which the Ca-
nal Zone Junior College will pre-
sent the all-Isthmian production
for Inter national Theater
Month.
"First .night" ticloets are on
sale under the auspices of the
Gamboa Women's Club, which
group is sponsoring the first pro-
duction at the Oamboa Club-
house Theater on Monday, Mar.
10.
The second performance ot
America's funniest comedy will
be given on the stage of the Dia-
blo Heights Clubhouse Theater
on Wednesday. March 12 and
tickets are now on sale for taht
performance by students of the
local college. All seats are now
on sale for taht performance by
students of the local college. All
seats are reserved, with the eat
stub printed directly on the tic-
kets of admission. A special ma-
tinee will be given in the after-
noon of Wednesday. March 12 for
children. ,
The "run" of the laugh show
wHl close with the performance
at the Cristobal High School au-
ditorium, under the auspices of
the Student Association of the
Cristobal High School. Tickets
are now on sale bv members of
the SA of Cristobal High School
for the production there on Sat-
urday. Mirch 15.
A doaen and a half college stu-
dents have worked on the famous
American farce-comedy for some
weeks and will continue work
under the direction of Subert
Turbyflll. Furniture for the var-
ious showings of the play, ar-
ranged bv contract with Long-
mans. Green and Company of
New York, will be provided by
Philippine Rattan of Panama
and of Colon.
Protestant Women
Observe World Day
Of Prayer Tomorrow
Protestant women of the Ca-
nal Zone Churches will unite in
a series of meetings in obser-
vance of the World Day of
Prayer tomorrow.
The General Department of
United Churchwomen of the Na-
tional Council of Churches ef
Christ sponsors this world-wide
observance; service suggestions
and program material are sent
to 104 countries.
From a small beginning in
1887 this now widely observed
day became universal in 1927.
For Pacific side residents
there will be an evening union
service at Balboa Union Church
with St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, the Union Churches of
Gamboa and Pedro Miguel and
the Salvation Army cooperating.
At Cristobal there will be a
Joint service In the Cristobal
Union Church with the Church
of Our Saviour cooperating; a
special children service in the
afternoon and a service for all
adults fn the evening.
At Gatun Union Church there
will be a morning service with
Margarita Joining.
The hours and programs of
various services will be an-
nounced by the individual
churches.
Offerings in each service are
divided among home and for-
eign missions, where it is a al-
located for interdenominational
literacy work.
Chemical Engineer
Here For Inspection
Of Storage Program
William F. McTeague, chem-
ical engineer from Frankford
Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pa., ar-
rived at Albrook Air Force Base
by military aircraft Tuesday
morning for a 30-day Inspection
of the experimental long-term
storage program of ordance
materials being conducted at
Corossi.
USARCARIB ordance mater-
ials, such as sighting equipment,
fire directors and guns have
been stored in large steel tanks
called "packs" to see how they
will stand up under long periods
of storage.
McTeague, a Civil-Service
employe, will furnish technical
supervision and observe periodic
inspections of the equipment
stored in the packs.
Some of the packs are filled
with gases. Others have no gas
but are for experiment with
controlled conditions of relative
humidity. The packs are large
steel tanks and look as though
they might be oil or gas storage
tanks.
McTeague has made inspec-
tions sucb as the one here at
Aberdeen Proving Grounds Md..
and Watertown Arsenal. Boston,
Mass., but this is his tint trip
to the .Canal Zone.
Plan Crackdown
On 'Unreasonable1
Deduction Claims
WASHINGTON. Feb. 28JOf)
Internal Revenue CetllectoT
John Dunlap says Iftat the
government is planning a spe-
cial crackdown tha year on
businessmen who /make what
he calls "excessive and unrea-
sonable" tax deduction claims.
He says h* office has re-
ceived ntyaferous reports of
businessmen who make unrea-
deductlons under the
MEMBERS OF THE MTH EXPLOBIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL
SQl!AD watch condemned pyrotechnic signals go up in flame
at Venado Beach, Canal Zone. When such signals and other
explosive ordnance becomes unstable or can no longer be de-
pended upon to function as it should, men of the 39th ara
called upon to destroy them.
(U.S. Army Photo)
6 Z0NIANS
RETIRE
(Continued from Page I)
nlson. Texas, and came to the
Isthmus in 1918. She was first
employed by the Canal Nov. 4,
1942, as coupon operator In the
Accounting Department at An-
cn.
Ruley was born In Jonesboro
Indiana. He was first employed
by the Canal April 10, 1918, as
soon after, became foreman,
a commissary assistant and
then chauffeur In the Commis-
sary Division. He left Canal
service in 1921 and was re-
employed in April 1M5 as
chauffeur in the Transportation
Division.
Mrs. White was born In Cor-
ry, Pennsylvania, and came to
the Isthmus in July 1915. She
was first employed Nov. 28
1915, as Clerk In the Account-
ing Division. She left the ser-
vice in December 1917 and was
reemployed in June 1918, as-
suming her former position. She
left the service again in Feb-
ruary 1921 and was reemployed
in September 1940 as a gene-
ral clerk In the same division.
guise of "expense" such
things as entertainnlng custom-
ers, travel, and lavish expense
accounts forthe "top brass."
Truman Launches
1952 Red Cross
Drive For Funds
President Truman has launch-
the 1952 Red Cross fund drive
with a proclamation urging
generous support of this hum-
anitarian cause.
The drive, which begins to-
morrow has been unanimously
endorsed by the top govern-
ment, business, religious, labor,
civic and military leaders, in-
cluding Oeneral Elsenhower;
Secretary of State Acheson;
Mrs, Eleanor Roosevelt; Form-
t; President Hoover; Warren
R. Austin, chief U. S. represen-
tative at the United Nations;
Dr. Raph J. Bunche, educator
and statesman; Mlllard Cald-
well. Federal Civil Defense
Administrator; Dechard A. Hul-
cy, president of the U. S.
Chamber of Commerce; Wil-
liam Green, president of the
AFL: PhlliD Murray, president
of the CIO; Mrs. Hiram Oole
Houghton. presldeht of Che
General Federation of Women's
Clubs; Allan B. Kline, presi-
dent of the American Farm
Bureau Federation; Carl R.
Gray, Jr., administrator Vet-
erans Affairs: and Everett R.
Cinchy, president of the Na.-
tlonal Conference of Christians
and Jews.
tomwm
Highest in quality and condition-
yet lowest in prices!
BEFORE M)W
1948 Packard X
$1425
2 ds. Big beautiful black car-
Radio Plastic Seat Covers
Brand-new tires Duty Paid.
1350
1949 Nash talesman
4 ds. Dark Blue New Seat
Covers New Tires.
1949 Nash Statesman... I35o
4 d.s. Two Tone Green Radio
Leather UpholsteryNew Tires.
$1300
1250
1950 Nash Statesman.
2 ds. New Tires New 8eat
Covers. As good as any new car.
1947 Linela Continental
4 ds. Big handsome 12 cylinder
car in perfect condition. Duty
paid 'bargain at the price.
1600
1000
1500
900
ONLY A FEW BUT THE BEST!
CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
Nash Willys
PANAMA



THtmSDAT. nnMtVARY f. 1IS8
"if IIII
MU MNAJvM AMER1CK AN TNTJP1>ENT>EVT DAILY ffFWSMPElt
It! HOLLYWOOD
1 EMSKINE JOHNSON
HOLLYWOOD, (NBA) Mil- won't-hold up under It....Pro-
ton Berle is burning, out good, I grams In which stars munch on
hear, over not beta* nominated! crackers, potato chips and other
for an "Emmy" in any category i sponsor delicacies___ Comedy
of the fourth annual Academy:stars who dash out to face the
of Television Arts and Sciences cameras In their Sunday-best
awards given Feb. 18 at the Co-! bathrobes after playing skits in
conut Grove. which they've been squirted with
It was the first legitimate, na- seltaer water___ The comedy
tlonwlde popularity poll, wl'hj story format, favored by top
nominations made by 150 TV re- comedians whose writers can't
viewers for dally newspapers and
TV trade papers.
The winners:
Dramatic show: "Studio One."
Comedy show: 'I Love Lucy."
Variety show: The All-Star *e-
Bast actor: Robert Montgom-
ery. Best actress: Halen Hayes, i
Baet ceiaedlan er comedienne:
Ra Skelton.
Sour note: There should have
been two Emmies for best come-
dian and comedienne.
Shame on you, Hans, there's a
leak hi the Hollywood studio
dykes.
But It's good news far televi-
sion fane.
No matter how many theater,
exhibitors smash their teeth,
more and more good movies are
being launched on the TV chan-
neis.
The latest group headed for
snake off old radio habita.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Wfc.r. 100.000 P.opli MoM
Presents
Teda*. Thursday, reb. tt
PJM.
3:10Music for Thursday
4:80Panamuslca Story Time
4:19Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
?,2 mTns *. el?hV?er.n?1, :00-Stacl By for Adventure
tlonal Pictures films, vintage of] : 15Evening Baton
'5?-46i,ln \u\?W^DJtckaB^ V:00-Mke Belfe
The seller: William Ooeti, one (VOA)
of the Hollywood kingpins. Some 7:10BLUE RIBBON
of the stars featured are: REVIEW
Oary Cooper. Orson Welles,] 7:49-Jam Session
Ballroom
SPORTS
Claudette Colbert, Edward O.
Robinson. Joan Bennett, Loretta
Young and Lew Ayers.
Phonevlslon or a coln-in-the-
slot gimmick may sometime In
the future save Hollywood's pro-
duct from the living-room seats
marked "free."
But from the way things look,
a large portion of movietown's
fabulous film library will wind
up on TV tor free looking
and quicker than anyone sus-
pects.
The sews is out that Jack Ben-
ny plana te quit radio, after U
yean, and derate his fall-time
talento neat season to TV.
Bat it's net generally known
that Mary Livingstone will skip
the vtoaal Benny shows to join
the at-home dialers.
8:00World News and Com-
mentary (VOA)
8:15Arta and Letters (VOA)
8:30 Radio University (VOA)
8:45C o m m e n t ator'g Digest
(VOA)
B: 00The Country House (BBC)
9:30Take It from Here (BBCi
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owl's Nest
12.00Sign Off
PUPILS OP THE DRESE WAITES SCHOOL OF DANCING
will stage a 30-minute song and dance program at the Bal-
boa Theater Saturday morning at 9:30. In addition to the
show the movie "Blue Grass of Kentucky" will be shown on
the screen. The stage show will include a toe waits by
Anna Johnson chore, a tap dance by little Janet FUeda, an
acrobatic dance by Lynn Jones with vocal accompaniment
by Vivian Simmons, a mazurka by Sue Mable and music by
the Balboa High 8chool band. Proceeds of the show will be
used for the Pacific Little League. Admission orlces have
been set at $1 for adults and 50 cents for children.
Death Sentences On A Spies
Upheld By Court Of Appeals
tSW. YPRK' Frt>' M (UP) I ***> physlcirt Klaus Fuchs all
m .w "fences of Julius j were members of the spy ring
h.u 5. Ro*enrgewere up- and in 1944 gave Russia plans
cull? ron^"y.by.the V- SfTZ ,or the ^Pe of atomlc m
court of Appeals, which that was dropped later on Naga-
agreed with, > Federal judge's saki. Japan. *
?l?f2Vnat tne man and wlfe Oold ls serving 30 years in
m.hI? bec.'S!i tn* ,lrat Unlted Prl80n nd Fuchs is serving 14
Nations civilians ever to be years In a British prUon.
ex lued for spying on their I Greenflass, former mechanic
coun"y- 1V t the Los Alamos, N. M, at-
me only other American wo- mic proving ground, said that
2n..sewtenced t0 tlie *y Federal i in 1944 and 1945 he gave secrets |
ld.er'Mrs- Mary surat, helped (to his plump, dark-haired sis-'
plot the assassination of Abra-! ter, and that she turned them
hanL'ncoln. lover to her husband.
-,e Rosenberg were convicted I Rosenberg, in turn, passed
SL*. I A*'16*' atomic ae-'them on to agents who slipped
crets to Russia. | them to Russia.
rvniir. "t0"tw. decullon. thei Indicted with the Rosenbergs
?2Ie cour.t.also uPneld the and Sobell was Anatoli A. Ya-
convic ion of Morton Sobell, J4-1 kovlev, former Russian vtce-
Kiwik la\elecironies expert and consul in New York. He left for
childhood friend of RosenbergJ Russia Dec. 27, 1948.
Sobell was tried with the ----------------._____________
couple and was sentenced to 30 __,, .. ._
years in prison. y RUTH MLLETT .AIM
#Emanuel H. Bloch, attorney *"' IWMW' *W
for the Rosenberg, said that
IT Till
PAGE SETtTNI
------ -----.-v ..^..a p9, oniu biisib
within 15 days he will file a mo-
tion for a re-argument before
tne appellate court.
He said the motion would
claim that the court misapplied
Make your reservations early lor
"SPRINGTIME FOR HENRY"
a side-slitting farce
to be presented by Theatre Guild
Thursday and Friday, Marcs 6 and 7
Curtain al 8:00 p.m.
AT THE DIABLO THEATER
Tickets will be on aale:
Dagmar's stores, Tivoli Ave. and El Panam Hotel
Lobby of Diablo Clubhouse (evenings)
Box office, nights of performances.
i From the Ladles Home Jour-,
nal: "According to the American
Institute of Family Relations, for.
every war marriage that took
place because the man wanted it.
ITS UOVTSTIMK...
and misconceived the law and i there were three because the girl I
m l.nritnal-ir*k*t wist---------- ' i., haH mart* utt Vi** m(n4 *-.. ik'
Panama Canal cfheaters___
Showing Tonight!
misconceived his arguments in
behalf of the Rosenberg.
If the motion is denied, he
had made up her mind on that!
point."
That seems like a pretty fair j
aald, the case will be appealed to estimate for the peacetime ratio,
the U. 8. Supreme Court. ,to-
"Were going to fight this i But don't get too set up over
right to the end," Block said- I1"*1- men. It isn't that the girls,
The Rosenbergs, parents of;'hid you mor irresistible than:
two small children, have been you find them. It's because a girl
BALBOA
Air-fond Ittnnnl
:1t MS
Jama STEWART Marian* DIETRICH
"NO HIGHWAY IN THE SKY"
.____ rrur Qiiraic
Diablo hts ..noin shrrct Rob* rounseville
I mm*' 'THE TALES OF HOFFMANN'
S _________________Krlaay "LORNA DOONB"
Friday. Feb. 29
A.M.
A papa watching "Studio One"
to his noisy lunlor:
"It you don't shut up. I'll talk
all through 'Howdy-Doody-' next
time it on."
6:00Sign On and Alar
7:80Request S alon
8:15News (VOA)
80 Morning Varieties
1:46Music Makers
9:00News
9: ISCome and Get It
9:80As I See It
10:00News
io:0ftOff the Record
11:00News
\
ock
.^US Ch,H!I: ^rm016"^':0SOff the Record (Contd )
ett's children.* show, 'Time tor,,, .so-Meet the Band
Beany," which originates In Ca-,,2:0o_New8
lifornia, will be sponsored in New
York by a Florida orange juice
company!... Irene Dunne will
collect $84,000- as emcee of 38 TV
ilUns.... NBC-TV and Barbara
Stanwyck are talking, bout a
dramatic series.... Bill Bendlx
has signed an exclusive deal with
the same network, with a good
chance that "Ufe of Rlley" will
return to the home screens.
The sponsor's bill for telpvls-
lng the national political con-
ventions on ABC-TV$2.000,000.
...Recovery of Reed Hadloy's
wife from a serious nervous
breakdown has their friends,
cheering. He plays Captain Brad-,
dock in Hal Roach. Jr.' film-TV _
show. "Racket Squad." ... Jeff- ^:-Sporte Review
rey Lynn and Nancy Coleman; 2:*5Sere C5mM Louls Jordan
may be in the video version of, 8:00--News. Commentary
radio's "Mr, and Mrs. North."! 'Voice of America j
Their names are on the desk of: .-lSr-Opera Concert (VOA)
PJa,
13:09Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
HOPNews
1 lSU-Fersonallty Parade
ir-Amerfcan Favorites
3:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
3:46Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
9:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club (VOA)
4:30 What's Your Favorite
8:00Stand By For Adventure
8:1bEvening Salon
7:00Animal World (BBC)
Balboa ROTC Holds
Parade In Honor
Of Donating Croups
The ROTC Battalion at bal-
boa High School held a pairie
Sesterday morning at the Balboa
tadlum in honor of the c.v.c
and patriotic organizations
which donate medals, plaques,,
and other awards for the ROTC
Field Day and the Awards 3*11.
The parade had been planned
for Jan- 30, but was postponed
due to an unseasonal thunuer-
shower.
Medal and awards
Canal Zone Shooting Associa-
tion; Reserve Officers Associa-
tion; American Federation cf
Teachers, Local 277; Baiboa
Oun Club; Knights of Colum-
bus; Pacific Civic Council: Slut-
tish Rite Lodges; and Baiboa
Parent Teachers Association.
During the parade the "Best
All Around Company" streamer
and "Marksmanship" streamed
was presented to Company "B"
commanded by Cadet Captain
William Altman.
knows that her best chance at]
getting a superior husband ls.
when she is young.
The longer she puts off mar-1
riage the more she limits her
choice If she waits around, the I,
beet of the crop of young men1!
her age will be gone.
8o she feels the necessity for
marrying while she still has a
good selection.
Not so a young man. He need'
not beln any hurry. He can pro-1
crasttnate long enough to let thei
pick of the girls he grew up with!
to the Srn Sing death" house
for nearly a year.
Myles J. Lane, U. S. attorney
who presented the evidence that
i led to the indictment of the Ro-
senbergs and Sobell, said the
decision demonstrated that "no
I American can betray his coun-
try with immunity by disclosing
, our nation's most vital secrets to
fa foreign nation."
Lane said the information
j transmitted by the Rosenberg
"unquestionably threatened the
'"S^er clvfcU^ong K'S5 ^tWwnVnM
with Sobell, last March 29 anl&Vbe woirhfd d """i
charges of conspiring to ooremlt J For there Is alwavs a new cron'
espionage during World War II. of^Rir' *ijSI hetaSTm?!
Mrs. Wnberg', brother, hisTge Vha8Probably %* mide i
cocn
:1B A S:H
Jack CARSON Ginger ROGERS
'THE GROOM WORE SPURS'
_________tiitay "Atom OAKLEY"
OFDIC MIGUEL
IS *:
oTilaaFl
"CLOSE TO MY HEART'
GAMBOA -...,Av GA*nsrH jm, mason
tM "PANDORA TIR ftTH CHMAN"
I
Tough Far Fight Fans
MILWAUKEE. (UPl The
Wisconsin state boxing commls-
whlch ion has a rule which says spec-;
David Oreenglass, now serving
15 years for his part In the
espionage ring, waa ihe chief
prosecution witness.
He said that he, the Rosen-
irgs, Sobell, Harry Gold and
ber
him more marriageable, instead
of less SO,
So if women are more often
than men the ones who first
start thinking of marriage, there
ls a round reason for it.
64 TUN
FrMjr
"MLLK
Lat tiRAND"
MtM
"ANNE OF THE INDIES'
MARGARITA
:tt in
Ann SHERIDAN Jack CARSON
"THE DOUGHGIRLS"
Friday 'GREAT MRSOITRJ RAID"
CRISTOBAL c Vlc,or "AT"* Hady LAMARR
Air-ciHiitini Samson and Delilah (Technicolor)
^^ FrWay "HOU.VWOOD STORY"
:H 1:28
LITTLi LEAGUE BENEFIT SHOW BALBOA
THEATER SATURDAY 10:00 AM.
be displayed
the parade.
before and alter
!?***..b?.en r?c?,vd t0 toic *Uljttore at prize fights "shall not-
coach the contestants or make!
any remarks or noise while the
bouts are going on." The rule
also decrees that the fight fans
"shall behave in a gentlemanly
and sportsmanlike manner."
Organizations represented in-
clued: Elks; Veterans of Fci-
lgn Wars; American Legion;
John Loveton, who will produce.
A second micro-wave relay Is
being discusses} by network heads
aad telephone tycoons. It will
deubie tne number of Uve pro-
grasas going east and west and
reduce the klaesrepe horror.
8:45 Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00Short Story Theatre
(VOA)
9:30London 8tudlo Concerts
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
Parlor Huzsahs: Dinah Shorei 10:30Ad veotu res of PC 49
warmth and ease, not to men-i (BBC)
On her eye and ear appeal, on 11:00The Owl's Nest
her twice-weekly show. Let's call l.'MW-R-tn-Sign Of
her America's Girl Friend___
The glamor of Maria Rlva,
daughter of Marlene Dietrich. A
zip off the old block.... The
successful transition of "Drag-
net" to TV and the skillful un-
derplaying, of Jack Webb.. ..The
pure Hitchcock terror and lack
of cliche tn the "Danger" series.
.. .The way Andy Devine and
Guy Madispu compliment each
other's personalities on "Wild
Bill Hickok."
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting Corp.
RDFRadiodifusin Francalse
BALBOA
1 STARTS SATURDAY!.
Parents can breathe sighs of
relief over the forthcoming sci-
ence-fiction series, "Rocky Jones
Space Ranaer." No wild, fantas-
tic Interstellar suits for the kid-
dies. Just space jeans and space
T shirts.
Video ventures: Joan Davl
will depart from her radio come-
dy style to dance and sing in her
series for NBC-TV in April...
Jackie Oleason's new contract
with CBS. starting in September, j
will pav him $7500 per week fot
three years with his "Cavalcade'
of Stars" show There's a vi-
deo version of "I Was a Com-
munist for the FBI" in Dana An-'
drews' crystal ball Some of,
the top movie talent agencies are
doing more business in the video
field than with film studios
James Oleason bowed out of a
TV film series built around him
Even Marlon Brando, decided
Oleason. couldn't survive a sche-
dule that called for two 15-mln-
ute films per day.
THEIR LOVE
DEFIED ALL
THI
LAWS OF
NATURE!
Margaret Dumont (remember
her as the haughty dowager
x stooge in the Marx Bros, films?).
ls Mrs Jthlnelender in "My
. Friend Irma."
This Has Oot to Oo Dept: The
designer who whips up Kate
Smiths gowns and elves her that
football shoulders look Frank
Sinatra's nixie domestic referen-
ces to Avs Gardner such as: "A-
va asked me to bring home loaf
o Dumperniekle." va's glamor
urna*
PRICE CAMFIELLtYION
1952
Chrysler Plymouth

ON DISPLAY
AT
POWELL, S.A. 1
Tel. 74 Coln, R. P.


PAGE BOW
** AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAII.V NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY SS, 1951
Balcer

To Set Season Bowling Record
[Homa, Stempel To Play
! For League Lead Tuesday
Bud Balcer, anchorman and captain of the Max
R. Stempel bowling team of the Major Bowling
League, established a new three-game series re-
cord for the 1952 season Tuesday night at the Dia-
blo Clubhouse bowling lanes when he bowled indi-
vidual games of 215, 241 and 258 for a total of 714.
Balcer's
at the
Little League
PACD7IC LITTLE LEAGUE
(First Half SUndings)
TEAM Won Lost
Police............ 7
Sean............
Lincoln Life........ 0
AFGE14.......... S
Elks 1414 .......... S
Firemen.......... %
(Second Half Standings)
TEAM Won Lost
Sears............ 1
Elks 1414 .......... 1
Police............
AFGE 14 ..' ,....... I
. season high record Next Tuesday evening .
was set against intense compet- Diablo alleys. Homa will nwet;F remen ........ 0
on offered by the Fuerza y Luz empel In the final meeting of Lincoln Life........
' keglers, in which his counterpart, the season between the two
Howard Engelke, bowled 222, 235, teams. In play which might well
ftnd 173 for a total of 630, and in decide the 1952 Major League
- Which the gashousers won the Championship
first two games by heartbreaking A three or -few-point win for;
hiKh scores Homa will undoubtedly cinch the
Fuerza y Luz won the first championship, whereas a three -;.
game by a score of 967 to 940. and, or four-point win by Stempel win of the second half of play
fhTlecond by a score of 943 to1 will make it so close as to make Tuesday afternoon at Pacific Lit-
933 Stempel won the final game! the final weeks of play very im- tie League Park by defeating
by a score of 1004 to 882, which portant.
was sufficient to give the Stem-I
peleers two points with the pin- The standings of the teams in
Jail going to the insurancemen the Major League are now as roi-
by a score of 2877 to 2792. I lows:
' On adjacent alleys, the H. Li fin
Homa Co. keglers. leading the; TEAM Won Lost Ave.
league by Just four points, were H. I. Homa Co.. 62
Slaying the last-place Almacenes Max R. stempel 60
lartlnz team, an almost sure I Angelini.......49
cinch for four points for the I Fuerza y Luz .. .. 47
league leaders. 17461st AU Signal.. 37
Perhaps because of this, the Boyd Bros......34
' Local 595, NFFE.. 31
Almacenes M'rtinz 31
Martlnz team came through with
an amazing three-point win
against the Homa team, winning
the first game by a score of 915
to 908, dropping the second by a
score of 890 to 835, but coming
hack to win the third by a score
Of 956 to 863, and pinfall by 2706
to 2661. Henry Burrell of the
Martinz team was the instru-
mental factor in the last game,
bowling a splendid 222 for his
team.
The third-place Angelini team
napped three points from the
7461st AU Signal squad to retain 10Jenner. .
Its league standing, winning two The results
James and pinfall, with "Hod" nlng's play:
enner rolling up a splendid 644' ERZA LUS
28
39
41
51
54
57
57
.909
.870
.892
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Elks 8, Lincoln Life 5.
TODAY'S GAMES
Lincoln Life vs. Sears .
The Elks notched their first
Lincoln Life 8 to 5.
It was a well played and in-
teresting ball game as the Elks
scored one run in the first and
took a four to one' lead scoring
three runs in the third while the
Lifers came up with one run in
the bottom of the third.
The ten leading bowlers of the
Major League are:
Game
1Balcer.
2Engelke
3Best...
4Madeline.
5Marabella.
6Fllebark ..
7Say Ion. ..
8Andrews..
9Stephens.
86
tin
83
fifi
en
fifi
6G
fifi
48
G8
\verage
197- 4
188-10
184-39
183-38
183-26
183-13
183- 7
183- 4
182- 4
180-34
Jlmmle Lovelady was the start-
lng pitcher for the Elks and kept
'878] the Insurance Boys In check,
88o striking out seven and allowing
8591 four hits up to the fifth toning.
In the fifth Lincoln Life tied!
the game with Lovelady giving
up three runs on three hits and
two walks. Kirkland took over,
from Lovelady and retired the-
side. Oust Durham started on
the mound for the Lifers with!
Bruce Bateman taking over in
the sixth inning.
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE FIRST HALF CHAMPION Members of the Police team, win-
ners of the first half season .ace In the Paci fie Little League. J^e hapiW- Victor Colon. Frankle Ammlratl. Walter Brown, Eddie Corrigan, Freddie Roe. Bobby Klelho-
fer and Jimmy Barnes. (Back iow) Manager C. E. Priest, Grady RobertsonAlan Scott
Richard Scott, Owen Sutherland, Bobby Barnes, Norman Pederson, Pete Corrigan, Mike
Crook, Bobby Priest and Coach Herb Newhou se.______________ .____________________
,----------------------------- i. _---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
oi Tuesday eve-
series with games of 197,193, and Stephens
254 for the night. Thomas
. Jamison
Completing the three-point Norris. .
Scle, Local 595 of the NFFE took Kngelke.
ree points from Boyd Broth-
ers, winning the last two games Totals .
and pinfall. Melt Eady, anchor-
man of the labor boys, rolled an
ven 600 serles for the winners, i wiiber
"' The loss of three points by|MaraDelia
--Homa and the two-point win by coffey .
--etempel now places the Homai.Colston
c,:*eam exactly three points ahead Balcer
-3$f Stempel in the league stand-
ftngs, with but six weeks left of Total:
"Play. _______
188
167
177
218
222
183
155
211
159
235
Gibraltar In Extra Inning 11-6
Victory Over Panama Merchants
160 581
167 489
190 578
192 564
173- 630
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL
LEAGUE
In the top of the sixth the Elks (Straight Season Standings)
scored four runs on five hits to TEAM Won Lost Pet
break the tie and go on to win as Balboa Brewers. .. 10 .76
their opponents put across only Gibraltar Ufe. .. "
one run in the hottom of the Panam Merchants 3 8 .272
sixth I Balboa Hi School .3 9 .250
Freddy Dube led the Elks at (Second Half Standings)
the plate collecting two hits in TEAM Won Lost Pet.
I three trips and Terry Corrigan Balboa Brewers. .. 4
Satchel Paige To Take
His Pitching Seriously
BURBANK, Calif., Feb. 28 (UP)
Ageless Satchel Paige of the
St. Louis Browns says that he is
serious about pitching from now
on.
The veteran righthander, who
always has been known as a
showboat, complained yesterday
when a photographer requested a
clowning pose. Paige turned down
the reouest. He snapped: "Im
strictly" business all the way in
from here." ,
Satchel says he's in the best
condition of his long career
which is longer than most fans
can remember. Paige says he's
done more running in the last
few days than he has in the last,
ten years.
Says Paige: "A lot of things
have changed. It's the dawn of a
new era" for the St. Louis
Browns. Old Satchmo adds that
"running isn't bad as long as
there's something to run for."
However, some of the Brownie
Slayers refuse to take Paige's re-
ormatlon seriously. One prank-
ster pasted labels on Paige's
equipment which said "Satchel
Paige is 100 years old this year."
Paige looked at the labels for a
long time and mumbled: "Now
that's what I call real disrespect
for old age."
Big Sal Mage finally arrived
in the Giants' camp at Phoenix,
Arizona, today along with rookie
Hoyt Wllhelm and Marv Blay-
967 943 8822792
MAX R. STEMPEL & 80N
178 168 180 528
172
186
189
215
172
181
171
241
194 538
189 556
183- 543
chipped In with a single and a
double.
Bateman collected three hits
in three trips to raise his bat-
Gibraltar Life.. .. 2
Balboa Hi School.. 1
Panam Merchants 6
2
2
3
.500
.333
ON
LAST NIGHTS RESULTS
ting average from .709 up to .735. Gibraltar Life Insurance II, Fan-
Corbln McGriff batted out a sin- ma Merchante 6 (10 innings).
gle and a double to four trips. SUNDAY'S DOUBLEHEADER
The box score: (At Balboa Stadimn1:30 p.m.)
Elks AB R HPO A Panam Merchante vs. Balboa
13 0 High School; Gibraltar Life In-
Company T Cops
33rd Infantry's
Field Day Honors
940 933 10042877
ALMACENES MARTINZ
A. Damin 163. 155 179 497
Burrell ... 189 135 222-546
J. Damin 186 162 169 527
Pierobon . 188 196 182 586
Owesne. 179 187 204 570
Totals
Trimble, c..... 1
wZ nJiDube, cf....... 3
4 Kirkland. c-p. .. 2
Lewis, lb-lf .... 8
Ryter, ss...... 3
DesLondes, 2b. .. 1
Lovelady, p-lf. .. 4
T. Corrigan, 3b.. 3
Hele, rf....... 3
Thompson, If. .. 1
2
1
1
1
0
V
2
1
0
surance vs. Balboa Brewers.
915 835 9562706
H.
Fllebark .
Sartorl .
Fronhclser
FORT KOBBE, C.Z.Company
"E" walked off with the honors
at the 33d Infantry Regiment's .
Second Battalion Field Day, Payne
Monday, Feb. 25, at Fort Kobbe's Best
Rencher Field.
Outdistancing Its rival Second Totals
Battalion companies, with a to-
tal of 70 points to runner-up "H"
Company's 45, the "E"' Company
entry took first place In four oflgaylon .
the Field Day's six events; Pa- Shattuck.
toon Drill, Tent Pitching, 100-1 Hudak .
I. HOMA CO.
166
193
210
172
168
201
166
163
148
212
174- 540
169- 549
137 510
172 492
191- 571
908 890 8632661
yard Sack Race and 300 -yard coole
Relay Race.
"E" Company's Private First
Madeline
7461ST AL' SIGNAL
150 212 175- 537
147
171
202
168
187
176
169
140
201-
173-
133-
172-
535
520
504
480
Totals ..
Lincoln Life AB R H PO
McGriff, ss..... 4 12 4
Dubois, J., If .. ..4010
Bateman, 2b-p ..3236
Durham, p-2b. ..2111
W. Engelke, cf .. 2 0 0 0
Million, c...... 4 0 1 1
Laatz, lb...... 3 1 0 6
J. Engelke, 3b .. 2 0 0 0
Sanders, R., rf .. 1 0 0 0
Parker, rf..... 10 0 0
24 8 10 18 6
Totals........26 5 8 18
Score By Innings
Lincoln Ufe 0 8 10 8 15 8
Elks 10 3 0 0 48 10
822 900 8542578
ANGELINI
. 160 179
. 182
. 190
. 196
. 174
158
192
193
159
147- 486
156 490
151 533
254644
235 568
Class Jack Ashton and Private Totals
Flem Varney copped the-Gren-
ade Throw for Accuracy with'
perfect pitches in a circle 25 Bates
yards distant. "G" Company cap- Klumpp
tured the Tug-of-War, pulling; walker
the "E" Company beef trust] jenner .
across the line In the finals of, Andrews
that traditional Field Day event.
The winning Company "G" tug- Totals .
Sens were: Master Sergeant -----------____
ames P. McCaughy, Master 8er- LOCAL 595, NFFE
Kant Tony Johnson, Sergeant j Malee. ... 168 182 206556
rst Class Thomas Todd, Private. Nolan. ... 145
Frank Rypka. Corporal William' Kelsey ... 190
4Bow, Corporal James Drigges.lMcCa'rr'gher 224
Corporal George Hanllne, Private Eady .... 158
Donald Con way, Corporal Al- ---------
ehonso Martinez, Private Vernon i Totals 886 918 9602781
903 881 9432727
168
166
169
231
Winning Pitcher Kirkland.
Losing PitcherBateman. Base
on Balls offLovelady 6, Kirk-
land 1, Durham 6, Bateman 1.
Struckout byLovelady 7. Klrk-
In the second extra inning and
longest ball game of this year's
Pacific Twilight Loop, the Oib-i
raltar Life Insure ncemen down-
ed the hard fighting Panama
Merchants 11-6 in a game that
extended to ten innings last
night. ,.
Jack "Wild Man" Love, chalk-
ed up his fifth consecutive win
i gainst no defeats to tie with
the Brewers' Noel Gibson as the
wlnningest pitchers of the loop.
He battled it out with Webb
Hearn for ten Innings.
Both pitchers were in rare
form but Hearn tired In the
tenth to give up five hits, three
singles by Jones, Dedeaux and
-, Sullivan and triples by Lane and
0 Love for five runs, to lose the
ball game.
The teams matched each other
runs all the way to the eighth.
The old timers were never ahead
and had pitcher Love in hot wat-
er many times as they threaten-1
ed in everv Inning after the fifth.
The old timers just could not!
hrlng the runners around as they
left a total of eleven base run-
loossned up in a pepper game.
The three arrivals left only
catcher Ray Noble among the
missing. The Cuban backstop was
reported en route to Phoenix by
boat and train more than a week
ago.
At Mesa, Arizona, Chicago
Cubs Manager Phil Cavarretta is
looking around for a spot to put
rookie Leon Brinkopf.
"I'm going to try him at short*
stop and centerfltld," says Cav-
arretta. "He has too much pow-
er to be sent out to the minors
while we are looking for power."*
The 25-year-old Brlnkoof play-
ed third base for Los Angeles
last year and batted .279. He hit
25 homers and had 93 runs bat-
ted In.
Catcher Sherm Lollar hit the
ball hard as Billy Plerce's team
whipped Ken Holcombe's squad
In the daily camp game among
the Chicago White Sox at El
Centro, California. Manager Paul
Richards pitched for the Pierce
team and was combed for eight
hits and seven runs before get-
ting a man out.
Cadet Skier Faces
Discharge Because
Of Secret Marriage
OSLO, Norway, Feb. 28 (UP)
An American Olympic skier and
Naval cadet who secretly married
a teammate planned to return
home today with the prospect
-------- that he will wear a deckhand's
Cristobal High will rate a de- dungarees Instead of a flier's
elded edge over the host Balboa wings.
Cristobal High
Favorite To Whip
Balboa Tomorrow
team this Friday night at the
Balboa Stadium. This edge is
, gained mainly through the per-
son of CHS's outstanding base-
ball player, Tom Hughes.
Hughes is Just about a one-
man gang, as he is not only the
leading pitcher In the Interschol-
astic League, but he Is also
among the front runners for the
batting crown.
In the previous meeting of
| these two teams, Hughes and the
Bulldogs' number one hurler,
Don Morton, engaged In a real
pitching duel. Hughes was nick-
ed for three hits, while Morton
gave up four. Neither chucker
issued a free pass, and Hughes
sent 12 of the BHS batters back
to the dugout via the strikeout
route.
With these two boys slated to
take on the pitching chores again
this Friday, horsehide fans will
in all probability be in for an-
rtngs.
The Navy indicated in Wash-
ington that Alvln Paul Wegeman
will be discharged from the Na-
val Aviation Cadet Program be-
cause his marriage violated his
enlistment oath.
Wegeman had obtained a leave
from the pre-flight studies at
the Pensacola, Fla Naval Air
Station to participate in the
Olympic-Games in Norway. When
he signed up he swore that he
was single and promised to re-
main so until be got his com-
mission.
While in Norway, however,
Wegeman disclosed that he has
heen married for a year to Katy
Rodolph, a member of the wom-
en's American skiing contingent.
They were high school sweet-
hearts and they were married
last year at Raton, N. M.
Wegeman angrily told about
the marriage when photographs
of bis wife in company with
other well played, tightly con-stein Eriksen, winner of the
(NEA Telephoto)
NEW NEWCOMBE? Brooklyn Dodger rookie Joe Black
(rightt gets some big league pointers from star catcher Roy
Campanella at the Vero Beach, Fla., training camp. The
Dodgers are counting heavily on the freshman hurler to fill
the shoes of Don Newcombe, their ace righthander who has
been drafted. Black, with a 15-6 record, was the Cuban
League's leading pitcher. He did not accompany Havana to
the Caribbean Series in Panama because he had to report
early for spring training._________________
land 1, Bateman 1. Two Base Tiers stranded.
HitsRyter, T. Corrigan, Mc-i Rig gun for last night's affair
Griff, Jules Dubois. Hits and were Love, who helDed his own
Runs offLovelady 7 and 4 in 4
innings: Durham 5 and 4 In 5;
Bateman 5 and 4 In 1; Kirkland 1
and 1 In 2. DoubleplayDurham,
use, with three hits in five
trips to the plate. Lane of the
winners collected two for four,
while the only batter for the los-
Bateman, Laatz. Left on Bases! er8 to get more than one hit was
Elks 9, Lincoln Life 11. Umpires gd Francis, who collected two for
Luzer and Priest. Scorer three.
Kentucky Wildcats Top
U.P. Basketball Polls
Mead. Time of Game1:40.
190 503
162 518
191 584,
211 600!
Hughes,"Corporal Robert Olorel
and Private James Phillips.
Totals
Sergeant First Class Ronald Morton
Thompson led the "E" Company! Dailey .
Platoon Drill team that put on a' Bowen .
flashy show of military precision Melanson.
to open the competitive after- Schneider
noon before Colonel Robert H.
Douglas, commanding officer of
the 33d Infantry Regiment, and
Second Battalion Commander
Major Howard G. Bardes.
Corporal Dessel B. Bartlett and
Private First Class Robert Lack-
$cd of "E" Company were the
wifteat in building a two-man
tort and displaying their full
field equipment In front of It.
Bunner-up was "H" Company,
BOYD BROS.. INC.
174
155
198
164
202
181
144
164
181
188
Alka-Seltzer
for UPSET STOMACH,
184 539
123 422
127- 489
184- 529,
133 523
fill'
ir***-
893 858 75125021
BRONCHIAL
ASTHMA
presented by Sergeant Gerald
rnodgrass and Private First Class
.John McKinney.
Adding to 1st Lieut. Charles
'. Ryan's "E" Company's total were
the winning Sack Race team of
Corporal Justo Mndez-Coln
and Corporal Harold J. Hall.
Xbey beat duos from "H
Sleep Sound All Night
fhe largest Hing medicine to
Bronchitis and Aifhmo in all ol Wa-
and lordly-cold Cenado Buckley Co
Thar* is nothing x sote and tu-
rn Hi* world 2 o- i MM tn sweet
Vwd not wato iusi before badtimr
and many a utter from (tronglme
' Companies, respectively. In I nadan Mixture intpia octmgi a
a close finish with "H" Company, i Waning to thousand and no* eoki
the "Easy" representatives cap- m all drugstores
rtured the 300-yard relay. Head-
quarters was third.
The winning relay team: Pri-
"?ate George Alley. Private Er- ,, ,,,, _...... ...... .
BMto Ortega-Aponte, Corporal choking Asthmo no* *ound relief
Insto Mndez-Coln. Private An- ^0 a good nights rast ono that
tbony Rieman. Jr., Sergeant nod. old. persistent bronchtoi cough
first Class Ronald Thompson1 nas left ,^ H you don't believe
and Thomas Leonard. n gat o bottle t any goad dnjggt
The 71st Army Band enter- t you eon depend on Buckley's Co
- widioi Mixture to Q've dehnlte quicV
eliet from that choking, geepinc;
talned at the Field Day. The fin-
al standings were "E," 70; "H."
T." Si "O," SO; and Head-
emarters 10 points.
struggle to breoth
For over 20 yeera people have re-
lied on Allu-Seluer {or prompt,
eeier relief from add stomach dit-
cotnforti. Prompt because spark-
ling iffirvHctnc* helps
Alka-Seltser go to work '
/eel/ Smimr because
Alka-Seltaer contains no
lexetrve, can be taken
mtyttmtl
wtrjw
seu
The box score:
Gibraltar AB R H PO
Presho, 2b ... 6 1 1 2
Conover, rf-lb. 2 0 0 7
Jones, cf. . 4 1 1 1
Dedeaux, ss 4 1 1 0
Sullivan, lb-c .5 1 1 11
Kelleher, If . 5 2 0 1
Lane, c-rf ... 4 3 2 6
De la Mater, 3b 4 1 1 1
Love, p.....5 1 3 1
Totals.....39 11 10 30 12 S
Merchants AB
De la Pea, cf 6
Francis, 3b .3
aBanton ... 0
Charles, rf . 2
Ridge, if. ... 3
Newhouse, lb 4
Rayb'rne, F., ss 5
Rlley, rf-3b . 4
Rayb'urne, H., c 4
Silva, 2b. . N 5
Hearn, p. ... 4
Totals
HPO
0 15
1 1
2 1
NEW YORK, Feb. 28 (UP) Illinois, which led for seven
The Kentuckv Wildcats have! weeks before Kentucky took over,
been the number one basketball | moved up from third place to
team for the fourth straight, second. The Illinois team won Its
week. 17th game Saturday. It has lost
The Wildcats, who completed twice,
their regular season last Satur-1 Kansas State slipped one notch
day with 24 victories in 26 games, after losing to Colorado on Sat-
head the list of top teams In the urday and Is third in the latest
latest United Press weekly coach- ratings. Duquesne, which suf fer-
es' rating board. Kentucky re- ed its first loss in 19 games on
ceived 28 first place votes and a i Saturday, still clings to fourth
total of 333 out of a possible 350 place. Kansas finished fifth in
points. The Wildcats are almost! the votingfourpoints in front
certain to head the ratings In of St. Louis. The Huskies of
the remaining two polls if they Washington are rated seventh,
can win the Southeastern Con-, St. Johns, eighth. Iowa, loser to
f erence tournament Illinois on Saturday Is the ninth
The ratings were judged on ranking club. Wyoming rounds
games played through last Sat- out the top 10, replacing St. Bon-
urday aventure which drops to 11th.
tested ball game.
The big difference between the
two last time was the ability of
the Tigers to get bits when they
needed them. BHS twice got run-
ners in scoring position, but
weren't able to get the base
knock to bring them In.
Balboa High School has Invit-
ed the Shorty League teams from
Pedro Miguel and Gamboa to be
their guests for this game, and
also arranged for the High School
band to be on hand to liven
things up between innings.
There will be a brief opening
game ceremony to get the big
game off to a good start
With the Caribbean Series now
history, local baseball enthusi-
asts can turn to the Interschol-
astlc League games with the as-
surance of seeing some mighty
fine baseball played by the
younger generation of baseball
greats.
men's giant slalom race, led to
speculation of a romance be-
tween her and the Norwegian
"People don't seem to be able
to stop short of slander in pok-
ing into private affairs," Wege-
man commented.
He said he would return Im-
mediately to Pensacola to learn
what the future holds for him in
the Navy.
Vice Admiral John D. Price,
chief of training at Pensacola,
said that no action would be tak-
en until Wegeman returns to the
command.
"At that time, his status will be
determined and official action
taken," the officer said.
If Wegeman is discharged as a
cadet, he will automatically be-
come a recruit and serve with
the fleet "long enough to satisfy
selective service requirements,*
Price said.
... .50 6 8 30 8 4
Score By Innings
Gibraltar Life 130 100 010 511
Merchants 112 001 001 0 6
aRan fot Francis in 7th. Runs
Batted InDedeaux. Sullivan,
Lane. De la Mater 2, Love 2, Sil-
va, Hearn. Earned RunsGibral-
tar 8, Merchants 1. Left on Bases
Gibraltar 5. Merchants 11.
Three Base HitsLane, Love.
Sacrifice HitsConover, Jones,
De la Mater. Stolen BasesCon-
over, Dedeaux, Lane, Love 2,
Francis 2, Ridge 2. Newhouse. Hit
by PitchFrancis by Love. Pass-
ed BallsLane 5. Sullivan 2. Ray-
bourne 2. Wild PitchLove 2,
Heam. Struckout byLove 11,
Hearn 12. Base on Balls off-
Love 7, Hearn 4. Doubleplay
Love. 8ulllvan. Losing Pitcher
Hearn (2-4). Winning Pitcher-
Love (5-01. Umpires Roberts,
and New. Time of Game2:45.
, ai^^t^^Mk_ arma and leas oat tsM&od up as mast srsaaabora of
th^lJe^YorkcSefs suk^cafo^sjjereer. eoUio. nd to-jbU
during fierce Roller Derby match at M^ Stadium. Tl-is Bert

Stufus Suptem&i


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY II. 195
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
-ta
ktuaeji
Stobbs Deal, Bolstering Chisox, UnbelievableRichards
JOE
by
WILLIAMS
LAKE WALES, PI*There camel a time when a wife wearies
' "*1^** btseb* chatter, eren the wile ol a huiband who has
wen three itralfht championship with the World Series flags to
mate*. "If be does not quit baseball this year I'm coma to leave
him," nutated Mra. Casey Stengel, "and I want yon to put that In
the paper,-too."
The attractive missus of the Yankees' veteran manager spoke
asif she meant It Just before she stepped into a California plane
hdtheward bound; out the subject of Stengel hanging 'em up Is a
nardy perennial and you know what they say about the ladles and
how they change thelf minds.
During the World Series last fall an afternoon paper In the
nig Town carried a banner line, page-one story that Stengel was
quitting. I happened to catch up with his missus as she came into
the park thai afternoon.
Ill shoot him if he does,"
she laughed, and there wasn't too
much mirth in the laugh, either. "I'm"Just getting used to World
Beries life and I find 1 like it." .
It's a far cry from a cold, damp day hi bleak Florida to the
citing hoopla of a World Series setting in October and the ef-
fect such a calendar change can exert on the female whim is said
to be remarkable.
, The fact is, baseball has known no happier romance than the
8tengeli, which had Its beginning after the '28 series when Ole
Case stole the spotlight with two game-winning home runs for
the Olanta against the Yankees. Even then he was an old hand
and the next year the Giants had traded him to the Boston
Braves.

EVEN A MESSY AX MURDER
-.J?ft $?*."l*8 hadn't met Casey," Mrs. Stengel said, a gay.
warm light In her eyes. "But they were Interested in baseball and
followed the series in the Los Angeles papers. It didn't help much
when one of you writers (it was the late Damon Runyon) describ-
ed him as an old man who tripped over his long gray beard as he
was running out one of those home runs. I guess dad made allow-
ances for the writer's fancy literary flight but it must have hor-
rified mother.
"When we got off at the station back home dad took one look
at Casey and snorted: "Humph. You can tell he's a ballplayer all
right, he's got bow legs."
Wasn't to learn until later that dad's favorite ballplayer
was Hans Wagner." 4
The Stengels are quite well off. They have a luxury home In
Olendale with the Inevitable swimming pool and Mrs. Stengel has
understandably been looking forward to the day when they might
settle down to the enjoyment of comfortable middle-aged su-
burban life.
"It would be nice to live a different sort of social life for a
change,' she said with great earnestness. "You know Casey Is all
baseball, and, of course, to me the most wonderful man In the
world, but..."
The tall, slender, graying lady shuddered.
"For 27 years all Tve heard is baseball talk. This boy can't go
to his right That boy can't hit a curve ball. You can run on this
fellow. You can pitch to that fellow. One man Is a Kraut Head,
another Is a Road Apple, and still another is a Fancy Dan and
last year I learned, or tried to. all about switch hitters because
Mickey Mantle was on the team.
- "If Just once in a while We had some other topic for conversa-
tion around the house, even a good messy ax murder would be a
relief."
DEATH, WHERE IS THY STING 1
After the baseball writers' dinner this year Mrs. Stengel per-
suaded Casey to fly to Puerto Rico for a short vacation.
I figured that change would, da,hlm good, that down there
Pale Hose Add
Strength With
Every Starter
By HARRY GRAYSON
NBA Sports Editor
PASADENA. Calif., Feb. 28
(NEA)-Charlea Klein fltobbs
was amazed when traded by the
Red Sox to the White Sox.
So was everybody else except,
obviously, member of the Bos-
ton Americans' high command.
The Chicago club gave up
nothing more than 84-year-old
Randy Gumpert, who Is finished,
or thereabouts, and Don Len-
tiardt, a poor outfielder who can
be kept from pulling the ball to
left field. In addition, the South
Biders obtained Mel Hodrleln, a
versatile and switch-hitting ln-
flelder.
HEAP FUNTed Williams is hilarious t the effort* of Jim Thorpe
to hsndle a tricky fly rod s the Boston Red Sox lugger and
'amou* Indian meet at the Boston Sportsmen* Show. Both are
taking part in the exhibition. (NEA)
"I tfgur
vouidn't
he Woucn't know anybody and we could get away from baseball,
But the first night we are there he can't go to sleep. Not too far
off there is a familiar muffled roar.
"Sounds like a baseball game," Casey said, peeping over the
covers.
"I urged him to go to sleep.. .'It's probably some sort of fes-
tival. These people are great for festivals. They have them every
nleht. Now turn over and get some rest."
"Well, three hours later he's back in the room and telling me
about a pitcher and shortstop he saw. and he's cursing George
Weiss.
"We have both of these guys signed up as prospects and Weiss
don't tell me nothing about 'em and he knows I'm coming down
here.'...Of course, George knew nothing of our plans: I had
purposely kept them secret.
"That was the end of our baseball sabbatical. Every day he's
out at the ball park, every night he's on the radio and in-between
times he's giving Interviews to the baseball writers, and it's Just
like being back home. This fellow cant go to the right. That fel-
low can't hit a curve ball. And on and on and on.
"Flying back to the states two engines on our plane began to
sputter, and finally went dead. Casey had picked up a little bug
down there and was half sick and half asleep, and no little
worried.
"Think we're going to make it. Edna?" he asked.
"At that moment I was so thoroughly angry I hoped we would
cot."
But Chuck Stobbs is a prize.
Pall Richards couldn't con-
vince himself that the deal had
been wrapped up until he reach-
ed El Centro for the early traln-
g and saw Stobbs In person,
en, every time the telephone
rang Manager Richards was
afraid someone would tell him
that the 22-year-old left-hander
had leprosy, or something.
"It Is unbelievable," says Rich-
ards. "It looks to me as though
the Red Sox kept Stobbs Just
long enough for him to learn
how to pitch, and then turned
him loose."
STOBBS IN KEY GAMES
, Stobns, a strapping six-foot
one-lheher weighing 185 pounds,
has known nothing but the Bo-
Atlantic Midget League
TEAM STANDINGS
MAJORS Won Lost Pet.
Marg. Mustangs
Margarita Moles
Pepsi Hornets
Cristobal Tigers
MINORS
Margarita Colts
Gatnn Gators..
Cristobal Cabs..
840
.600
.0
.MO
Won Lost Pet.
. I 6 1.000
.1 1 .800
. 0 I .000
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Margarita Colts 23, Cristobal
Cubs 4: Margarita Males 18, Cris-
tobal Tlgerj 5; Margarita 'Mas-
tangs 18, Pepsi Cola Hornets 0.
It was a clean sweep for the
Margarita Midget teams last Sat-
urday morning. The Spur Cola
ox since h Joined their Lynn,; colts started the ball rolling by
Mass., New England League farm defeating the Cristobal Cubs An
club five years ago as a rapid outatan
bonus baby fresh from a Norfolk,
in the field. He allowed but two
hits in the game, struck out six
batters, and walked three. The
Hornet pitcher, Owen, struck out
four batten, walked six, but al-
lowed 18 hits.
The box score:
Marg. MottangsAB R HPO
W. French, 2b .. 8 4 S 1
J. McQloln, lb .. 4 3 4
H. Wombel, p. .. 3 3 2
J. Melndz. c .. 4 1 1
O. DeTore, 3b. .. 3 2 2
K. Mountain, as.. 3 1 1
W. Will, rf..... 1 1 1
J. Will, cf...... 3 1 1
J. Essayian, ef .. 0 0 0 0
R. Ouiot, If..... 2 2 1-0
R. Perkins, If. .. 0 0 0 0
Ohio Farmer Cops
200-Mile Motorbike
Race For 3rd Time
DAYTONA BEACH. A., Feb.
38 (UP>-Dlck Klamfoth. a 23-
yeftr-old farmer from OrbvtpOH,
Ohio, won his third victory in
four years Monday in taking the
20J-mile motorcycle ehamplon-
snlp race for expert* at the tide
ana wind-swept Daytona Beach
course.
Klamfoth rode an Engllah-
built Norton to hi* second
straight victory in the time of
two hours, 17 minutes and 6.08
seconds. He averaged 88.10 mile*
per hour on the 4.1 mile asphalt
and beach course.
The young farmer-motorcyclist
first won tne event in 1949 and
placed second In 1950.
C. A. Farwell of Puvallup,
Wash., also riding a Norton,
placed second and Jim Phillip*
o South Pasadena, Cal., aboard
a Triumph, was third.
Norton-riding Bob Michaels of
Pomona, cal., and Al Ounter of
Stockton, Cal., who was on a
B8A, placed fourth and fifth, re-
spectively.
Because of the two-day rain,
which caused postponement of
the event from Sunday, the
sllcky marl-covered turns were
hazardous. Most of the speed-
sters throttled down on the two
turns and as a result there were
no spills.
Also the rapidly incoming tide
threatened one side of the course
before the lait of some 118 driv-
ers finished the race.
Mike Dittero Hurts
No-Hitler Against
Coco Solo Semen
PANAMA ARMED FORCES
BASEBALL LEAGUE
STANDINGS
Police ................. i
I, Start...............\l
ton ..................10
otin Ufa..............io
-,................10
S
0
0 A TiAM
6 of""!
Va^, high school.
The youngster, who definitely
has a major league arm and
doesn't have to resort to
ng performance was
turned in by Jlmmle Alequas who
struck out nine batters, which
accounted for all the outs credit-
to the Colts. Jlmmle" only
8jgr- walked one batter and
thing other than a fast -BHl, four hits. Blevlns, the Cu .
eurve and change, pitched kfy of, struck out three batters, walk-
THE.NEWEST
RCA VICTOR
Sames for the Gold 8ox under
oe McCarthy and 8teve O'Neill.
He makes his first baseball
switch with a big league record
of 33 victories and 23 defeats.
Frank Lane strengthens the
Pale Hose with every barter, and
with a minimum of money spent.
Chico Carrasquel came from
the Brooklyn chain for $35,000,
Nellie Fox from the Athletics for
Joe Tlpton.
MINOSO THE DIFFERENCE
Minnie Mifkoso would have won
the flag for Cleveland hands
down, but General Manager Lane
Gt the Havana Special and Paul
hner In a three-way transac-
tion that cost him only outfield-
ers Ous Zernlal and Dave Phil-
ley, with whom the White Sox
were going exactly nowhere.
Eddie Robinson came from
Washington in a package deal,
Saul Rogovln and Billy Pierce
from the Tigers in exchange for
Bob Cain and Aaron Robinson,
respectively. And when the
White Sox required a durable
catcher of all-round worth, they
landed Sherman Lollar of the
Browns, with Jim Rivera, the Pa-
cific Coast League batting cham-
pion, as the principal bait.
If they don't watch out, the
Comlskeya" rivals will trade them
smack dab into a pennant, or a
string of the same.
Indeed, they may already have
done so.
gave up
jb pitch-
ed three, but was tagged for 12
hits.
The box score:
Spar Cola ColtAB R
Alequas, p.. ,.
Dockery, cf ,.
Kloefkens, at.
Clarke, c .. ..
Lust, lb ..
Bath, C, 2b ..
Balkowakl, 3b.
Lara, M., rf ..
Tabor, if :.
French, J., If.
Totals......
4
3
4
4
3
4
3
2
2
0
HPO A
2 0 0
0 0
0 0
9
0
0
0
0
0
0
Totals........28 18 18 12 8
Pepsi Hornets AB R
Owen, p...... 3 0
Thompson, c. .. 3 0
Guegen, as..... 2 0
Tompklns, lb. .. 1 0
Enders, 3b..... 3 0
Pretto, cf...... 2 0
Murray, rf..... 0 0
Smith, If...... 2 0
Rosabel, 2b .... 10
HPO
0 1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
(Second Roand)
Won Lost Pet
1AM
1.6ft
u
33d Infantry .,
310th EASR ..
Albrook ...... 1
Coco Solo...... 1
Signal........ 1
Wet Bank..... 1
48th Rn....... 1
S44ta FA...... 1
0 Atlantic Sector ..
Special Troops .. 0
0 7*4th AAA..... 0
0 303d AAA...... 0
0
0
: i
3
2
X
as
8
Totals.. .. .. .. 14 0 3 I 2
Next Saturday'* Games
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
5 o "* 10, Coco Solo 0.
Coroaal 12, 764th I.
Signal 10, Special Troops 1
SMth 13, 4847;
33d 13, M3d 1.
West Bank 5, Atlantic Soetor 0.
at
Cristobal Cubs
Sellar*, 2b.....
Oeddes.ss......
Lelgnadler, c. ..
Aubert, 3b. .. ..
Hllty, cf......
Frost, If ....
Frankel, lb .. 7.
McNeil, If......
Freeman, rf .. ..
Blevins, p.....
Pepsi Cola Hornets vs. Marga-
0 rita Mules: Spur Cola Colt* vs.
0 Oatun Gators: Cristobal Tigers
0 vs. Margarita Mustangs
0 All game* will be played
0 Mai
0 will
O.The
! der way 18 minutes alter com-
' 0 pietlon of the first game
The P.E. At R Branch Bacon-
ages Year Child!
Margarita. The first two games
|;et under way at 9:00 am.
ast game listed will get un-
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
FIRST HALF BATTING AVERAGES
18
7
14
16
'J
4
4
11
7
IS
11
I
?
I

13
7
6
8
10
9
4

11
i
4
i
,0I
4
8
6
1

18
0
6
0
i
I
a
4
i
3
S
1
0
NAME
S^Mwl5WF.^.te.^.:::-lS
O. Sutherland, Police .......... io
W. Cattleman, APoI ............w
G. Durham, Lincoln Life..........io
Jas. Watson, Start ............... S
L. Klrklana Elks
Alas, Stars....................... 7
Lovtlady.Elks............/.lUii
Schneider, Firemen ..............w
Ryttr, Siks.......................Jo
Kitlaoftr, Folie* .................j}
c. McOmf, Lincoln Lift.....'..
G. Durttt, Sears .................lfl
Scott, Elite ....................... j
J.Ltwis.Bik*...................., a
P. comsa*. tm.................t
T Correan, Eits ................ 1
Motion, AiGE ...................10
B. Barnes, Fouct.................yj
Cirat*. Start ...
M. CrOOk. Police
feoerson, police
Roy Watson, Si
W*b, r utrr.en
Million, unooin
'inmole, JCias .
Coion, froiict___ ................10
Laats. Lincoln Uto ...............10
T. Duriet, Stars ................. a
kngeike, uneoiii ufe.......... ft
Paricef, ufccoin Lire..............u
v*i, ***.......................
Aflama, lias ..................... 4
erry, Foramen ...............10
siamonaosn, ArOE
Haivosa
J
OS*
cnast, rlrtmen ..................io
ijntti. Pone.....................10
Elmtndorf. AFOE ................ |
Menooea, (Mart ..................10
Tdlay.Eiitt ...................... 3
**ujtnu,uu..................10
Morris. AIGE....................10
Morton, inks...................... 4
Uniors, Kiremsn.................10
KooerUon, Police................. 5
E. Corrigan, Police ...............10
Wallace, Firtaitn .......... .....10
Scnocn. Firemen ...........>.....10
Saiaa/AFOR.....................10
Crawiora start.................. 7
Kintner, Firemen .................i
Btt^.::::::::r::::::::::;j
Engelke, W Lincoln Lift ........10
dnodgras, AFOE ................10
ftehwariroe*, Sear* .............. g
Randal, Firamen......,.......... 9
laexaowB, Start.................10
liamonooan, AiGE ............... u 17
Haivota, Eixt .... ............. 7 i
. DUOOtt, JUuCOitt Lift ...........10 u
rfonn wacaoB, start.............. 9 14
I rttit (.Ivaman a *>
I
AB
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
HPO
2 O
Totals........13 4 4 9 2
COMPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
AVAILABLE ON
EASY CLUB OR CREDIT PUN
FOR ONLY $10.00 MONTHLY
USE YOUR OLD RADIO
DOWN PAYMENT
AS
7110
Boffvar
RADIO CENTER
40
Coln
The closest game of the morn-
ing went to the Margarita Mules
who downed the Cristobal Tigers
12-6. Dave Eberenz, the winning
pitcher, struck out seven batters,
walked five and gave up six hits.
Frederickson, the Tiger hurlar,
struck out nine batters, walked
nine, and also allowed six hits.
The box score:
Marg. Mules AB R
W. Melndea, 2b. 2 1
D. Phillips, cf
HPO
1 2
2 2 11
8. Nlsevich, 3b .. 2 2 1 4
D. Dills, lb..... 4 0 0 1
D. Eberenz, lb .. 2 2 0 0
Santiago, s* .. .. 2 2 2 0
Sander*. I., c. .. 1 2 1 7
Marcelino, If.. .. 3 1 0 0
Newhard, C, rf.. 1 0 0 0
Brayton, rf .. .. 1 0 0 0
Army Sports
FORT KOBBE, C.Z. In 33d
Infantry Regiment softball play,
"A" Company maintained a slim
lead over "D" Company in the
First Battalion race, and "E" and
"H" Companies were still unde-
feated to the young Second Bat-
talion league, as a result of
?ames played during the past
wo weeks at Fort Kobbe.
FIRST BATTALION STANDINGS
TEAM
A........
D........
Headourtors
C........
Woa Lost Pet
9
<
3
2
1
Corporal Mike Dattero hurled
the first no-hit, no-run game of
the season in the Panama Armed
Force* Baseball League Saturday
afternoon when he set the Coco
Solo swingers down without a
safe blow In pitching the 370th
EASR to a 10 to 0 victory. It
marked the *eeond straight win
for the 370th in the second
round of play and cava evidence
that the Joining of the Shore and
Boat Battalion teams makes the
370th a strong contender for sec-
ond round honors.
corozal, the soft-touch of the
first round, continued to show
Improvement as it chalked up Its
second straight victory of the
second round by defeating the
TMth AAA 13 to g. CorotaT and
the 370th are tied for the top
spot with the 33d Infantry,
which tied for the title In the
first round but dropped the play-
off game to Albrook. The 33d
made It two In a row by trounc-
ing the 803d AAA 13 to 1. Al-
brook, the only other undefeated
team during the early stages of
the second round, waa Idle Sat-
urday.
Signal, West Bank and the
-7M 504th FA Battalion entered the
333 win column Saturday after drop-
" Ptof thelr openers. Sismal hand-
143 ed special Troops tts second con-
secutive setback with
ST
Moo
Tut.
Thu.
Prt
Toa.
Wad.
Thu.
Ftt.
Mob.
Tua.
Wtd.
Thu.
Fit
. S
1
?
10
11
w
It
10
.875
TOt.
Wad.
THu.
Frt.
Man.
Tua.
Wad.
Thu
Ftt
Apr.
1 wv* # w mm o lev 10 I
A Company beat Headquar- ashing on the Fort Amador dia-
" downed "C," mond West Bank shutout Atlan-
Company! tic Sector 8 to 0 and the 804th
and p scored 4 13 to 7 victory over the
8-4, Thursday. "A"
trounced "B, 22-10,
kept pace with the leader by de- tn^ ReorTnait*anee Battalion.
featlng Headquarters, 10-4 Tues-
day.
SECOND BATTALION
STANDINGS
Totals........20 12 6 18 8
Cristobal TigersAB R HPO A
Krleger, e..... 3 13 8 3
Bechan, If...... 2 0 0 10
Apolayo, 3b .... 1 3 0 0 0
Frederickion, p.. 3 12 2 1
Arosemena, 2b .. 2 1 0 4 3
Dotan, lb...... 3 0 3 0 0
Mike. If....... 2 0 0 0 0
Peterson, ss .... 2 0 0 0 0
Green, rf...... 1 0 0 0 0,
_____________-: H" Company also defeated
Totals........19 8 0 7 4 D'? tdqHSrtOT,t' *:*'.."!*' Company
In the final game of the day, slaughtered "F"
a .. . .. ..
j........
-7........
SeaAsjaarters
G........
The schedule for Wednesday
afternoon calls for Coco Solo to
face the 764th at Fort Wm. D.
Davis, the 370th to Journey to
Fort Amador to Oppose Special
, Troops, the 43th to play host to
Woa Lost Pot corozal at Fort Claytoa, Signal
3 t 1.400 takes n the 33d at Fort Kobbe,
? f L5S Albrook entertains the 804th aBd
-Si the 908d crosses the Isthmus to
2 ! tace Atlantic Sector at Fort Ou-
. 8 1 JOtiiieij,
(Home team it last team named)
OMB TEAM FO POCLOTfTNO GAMES TO BE 1
BY MANAGERS TOSSING A C(
com
Wad.
Thu.
Fri.
Sat.
ml
Ei vs. Flrtmon.
vt. Llncom Lift.
its AFOE.
Uneom Ufe va.
GOOD FRIDAY
Firamen va Police.
In games played to date "E*
*n (mines piayea w aate "s nt r ._
Company beat Headquarter, 10- P ayqrOUnd DOITS
>\ "H" Company also defeated I ' r
in tne final game or tne day. --' , *-*, ana -lat
the Margarita Mustangs defeat- * una?**ted with an 11-7 plon,
ed the second place Pepsi Cola wia w Company. ; fh, ,
"H" Campany Saturday mor ala g Raima
30-4, and "E lat winner and Now Cham-
Tut.
Wed-
Moa.
Tut.
Wtd.
fS1-
Etta,
re. Ponce.
Sears va
Firemen va, AFOE-
Uaeoin Ufa vs. Pone*
Elks v*. Soars.
Bata vt. Firemen.
AFOE vs. Uaatla Ufa.
Elks vs. Pottoo.
Firemen as. Uaeoin
Sean va. AFOE.
ft
16
16
16
IS
10
8
8
IS
11
ia
10
u
10
1
8
?
10
8
6
?
6
8
1
7
4
6

8
4
7*
8
6
4
8
6
1
4
8
1
8
1
SECOND HALF SCHEDULE
TEAMS
Uaeoin lift vt. Sears.
Flremta va. Fattea.
AFOE vs. Elks.
Sear* vs. PoUot.
Firemen vt. AFOE.
Lincoln Lift vt. Folleo.
Elks vs. Stan.
Elks v. Firamtn.
AFOE vs. Lincoln Lift.
Elks vs. Pollct.
Firemen vt. Lincoln lila.
Sears vs. AFOE.
Firemen va. 1
Lincoln Ufa v.
AFOE vt. POttoe.
Soar* va Uaeoin Ufa.
Police vs. Flremea.
va.,
Police vs. Star.
AFOE vs. Flremea.
Police vt. Lincoln Ufa.
Soar vs. Elks.
Firemen vs. Elk*.
Uaeoin Ufo vs. AFOE.
Police vt. Etta.
Lincoln Ufo va, FlraiBtB.
AFOE vt. Soars.
frerfoojy Esads Qassifes
EMBER OF LODGEP*ul
taor join* baseball'* exclu-
sive lodge of immortal* being
: named to the Hall of Fame.
Hero the 50-year-old former
1 Pittsburgh groat how* the
batting grip he used to collect
3183 hits for a 30-yesr lifetime
833 average outside hi* Sara-
sot*. Fl*., home. (NEA)
Hornets 18-0 again displaying
the teamwork which has put
them in the number one slot of
the league. The game itself was
a disappointment to everyone
concerned, however.
Three of the regular starting
players of the Hornets failed to
put in an appearanee at game
time and coach Arnold Manning
had to make some last minute
ehanges in the lineup. This fact
may well cost the Hornets the
championship since they could
have tied up the lead hi the
league by winning this game.
Harrell Wombel. the Mustang
oitcher, did a fine lob and had
good support from hit teammates
defeated Oatun 23 to 18 in
final game of the Elemen-
tary School Oh-la Softball Tour-
nament. The two teams played
excellent throughout the gama.
also the players art compliment-
ed for their fine sportsmanship.
The opening iraaie Oatun took
the lead by thefceunt of 8 to 2, in
the second and/Third inning* the
score was tied five-all and eta-
all. The fourth Inning and tat
fifth inning was the "Waterloo
for the Oatun player a* the vie
tors scored 17 to their 13 run
BALBOA TEAMBar
dy, Elntham, Herr. Hie! .
Mendosa, Skinner. WtketMd
GATN TEAMArgo Butcher
Cotton, Cunningham,
Kunkle, Radei
PCT.
.10
:32
.471
SS
:}
.406
.3di
.888
.888
:S
.310
.388
.886
.tii
:*
.340
.290
.WO
.388
m
.31a-
.-14
.itWJ
.190
.167
.1/8
:!S
.148
.148
.1MI
.124
.1*4
.138
.117
.114
.111

.180
3
i

Announcing THE NEW
DE SOTO FIREDOME 8
America't moat powerful
Ob Atpla? shortly t
COLON MOTORS, INC
PANAMA
Tivaa Creasing
CL08
Tovrt*


CHS, BHS NINES CLASH TOMORROW
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AN INDBPENDEN^

,T NEWSPAFE*
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" r- Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAB
PANAMA, *. P., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 88, 195t
five CENTS
Panama Transfer Key Mo ve
In $ 3,000,000 Tanker Take
WASHINGTON. Feb. 28 (UPt
The Nation and Congress got
a lesson yesterday in how to
make more than $3,000,000 on a
$101,000 cash Investment.
The teacher was New York
financier E. Stanley Klein.
He testified before the Senate's
Investigating Committee now
studying surplus tanker deals.
The deals were made by a
grdup headed by Klein and for-
mer Democratic Representative
Joseph Casev of Massachusetts.
One of the first things you
need, Klein said. Is 15 corpora-
tions to handle eight ships.
One corporation bought three
ctf the vessels from the govern-
ment.
But the money. Klein said, was
furnished bv another firm back-
ad by Chinese Nationalist money
This brought in $450.000 profit
on a $1,000 Investment.
Klein then told the committee
that his group set up a Panama-
nian firm to handle five other
ships. One reason, he explained,
was the favorable tax status.
Students Reminded
Of March Deadline
For 'Draft' Exams
A. C. Medlnger, State Director
of Selective Service, today re-
minded college students that ap-
plications for the April 24 Selec-
tive Service College Qualification
Test must be postmarked not
later than midnight "March 10.
The deadline is necessary to
allow the administrators of "the
test, the Educational Testing
Service at Princeton, N. J.. time
to process the applications and
assign each applicant to the
testing center requested by the
student or to the closest pos-
sible alternative center also
to make administration arrange-
men consistent with the num-
ber who will take the test. There
are more than 1.000 testing cen-
ters throughout the United
States and its territories.
National Headquarters esti-
mates that upward to 100.000 will
make application to take the
April 24 test. This will be the
last test given during the cur-
rent academic year.
Application blanks may be
obtained by students from the
nearest local board.
T6 be eligible to take the Se-
lective Service Qualification Test,
an appltcant, on the testing date
(1) must be a selective service
registrant who Intends to request
deferment as a student; (2) must
be satisfactorily pursuing a full-
time college course under-
graduate or graduate leading
to a degree; (3) must not pre-
viously have taken the test.
Under this set up. the group
leased the tankers at a loss to
Its own Panamanian firm. The
foreign corporation then re-leas-
ed them at a profit.
As result, the group showed a
loss and did not pay United
States income taxes.
The Panamanian firm made
money but it was exempt from
taxes as a foreign company.
Republican Senator Richard
Nixon of California said the
group thus saved $1,438,000 In
taxes.
__
Fur Starts Flying Early
As House UNIT Debate Opens
Draft Chief Savs
Exemption Seekers
Should Be Ashamed
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28 (UP),
Draft director Lewis Hershey said
today that Americans ouht to
be ashamed of themselves for
trying to get so many young men
exempted from the draft.
Hershey said In Washington
that there are about "after the
pressure groups run over us.
fcsre isn't very much left."
Tickets For New
rbeater Guild Play
Do On Sole Friday
"Tickets will be placed on
ale to the general Dublic
Jting Friday for the Thea-
tar Guild's presentation of
"Springtime For Henry," a
farce, which will be presented
to Isthmian theater-eoers at
ihe Diablo Theater, Thursday
nd Friday evenings, March 8
and 7.
Tickets may be Durchased at
BHgmar's on Tlvoll Avenue, at
I Panama Hotel and in the
lobby of the Diablo Clubhouse
tartlng Monday between of
and 9 p.m. Tickets will also
be available at the box offlc
on the nights of the play. All
eats will be reserved.
ahis three-act British eomedv
remises to be rlb-tickltn"
Kb its sly Innuendoes and
uMle dialogue.
Jlie Maduro is director, as-
lated by Rufus Smith, nd
Douglas
WASHINGTON. Feb. 28 (UP)
The House opened the debate on
universal military training yes-
terday and immediately the
fur began to fly.
Chairman Carl Vlnson of the
House Armed Services Commit-
tee, a Democrat, said UMT and
Its accompanying reserve system
would save the nation $3,000,-
000,000 a year In defense costs.
And Representative Leslie Ar-
enas of Illinois, a ranking Re-
publican on the same committee,
sarcastically called Vlnson
"Georgia's greatest mathemati-
cian ."
Vlnson argued that unless the
United States UMT. can event-
ually get most of the young men
of the country into a vast or-
ganized reserve, the country will
have to keep a large standing
Army under arms Indefinitely.
This he aid, could bankrupt
the nation and make us lose the
Cold War by default.
But Arena replied that he
couldn't see any way around it
that UMT would cost the tax-
payers billions every year even
after the emergency Is over and
most men under arms can be
sent home.
Besides, he said, vast armies
won't be needed so much in the
next war as machines and train-
ed men.
In other developments on Cap-
itol Hill:
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee recommended quick
approval of the Japanese peace
treaty and the mutual security
pacts tied In with It._______^^
Duke of Windsor
Sails Back to US
LONDON, Feb. 38 (UP)The
Duke of Windsor ended his sad
Journey to this land he once
ruled, and boarded ship today
for the lonely voyage "home" to
the United States.
He had come here without
his wife two weeks ago for
the funeral of his brother, King
George VI, and left today.
His reception for his family,
his Immediate circle of old
friends had been a loving one,
but the British press largely
ignored the slender man, now
57, who 15 years ago was their
King Edward VHI.
Dressed in black as a mark of
mourning for his brother, the
Duke slipped quietly out this
foggy morning from Marl-
borough House, the home of his
mother where he had been stay-
ing.
He went by car to the port of
Southtampton where he board-
ed the Cunard Liner Queen
Elizabeth scheduled to sail for
New York this morning.
This afternoon he would look
back on the shores of England
as he did when he sailed away
15 years ago, giving up the
throne for Mrs. Wallls Simpson,
the American divorcee and "the
woman I love."
The Duke could come back
here to live, but it appeared
doubtful that he would. He went
to Paris last weekend "house
hunting."
A new monarch, symbolized
by the new young Queen, who
has always been close to her
"Uncle David" has taken over
in Britain, but there Is still a
group which if It did not pro-
test his permanent presence,
would at least be cool to the
Duke and his Duchess.
The problem of the Duchess'
rank Is reported to be a com-
plicated one. While Windsor is a
Royal Duke, second only to his
brother the Duke of Gloucester,
the Duchess has no title of "Her
Royal Highness" and could not
have precedence with her hus-
band.
There is no official word as
yet whether arrangements have
been completed lor fixing the
new income for the Duke.
H:s anni r.l allowance was un-
The House Social Service com-
mittee has approved a bill to
transfer the job of screening
government applicants from the
FBI to the Civil Service Com-
mission.
And Chairman Walter George
complained today that his Sen-
ate Finance Committee hardly
ever has enough members pres-
ent to take a vote. Too many of
them, of both parties he explain-
ed, are out trying to win the
nomination for president.
Students Declare
Niemoller Speeches
'Anti-American'
MIAMI, Feb. 28 (UP). Stud-
ents at Florida Southern College
say they were forced to listen to
"anti-American" speeches by a
famous German clergyman.
He is Dr. Martin Niemoller
the famous pastor Niemoller who
was thrown into a concentration
camp for defying Hitler.
A petition signed by more than
100 Florida Southern students at
Lakeland. Florida, demands an
apology from college authorities.
The petition says Pastor Nie-
moller now on an American
tour "criticized" the United
States, "its form of government
and the religion within" the
country.
Dr. Charles Thrift, a faculty
spokesman, says that nothing in
either of Pastor Nlemoller's two
talks at the school could be
called "antl-Amerlcan."
400-Year-Old Brick
Among New Exhibits
Added to PC Museum
Several interesting Items have
been added to the Panama Ca-
nal Museum, at the Civil Af-
fairs Building In Ancon.
The additions Include:
A bedside table ami food
carrier from old French hospi-
tal, a gift from Miss Elizabeth
Telfer, retired Chief Nurse of
Gorgas Hospital.
An early derrlnper pistol, a
gift from Major Herman, Chief
of the Police Division.
Pre-Columbian celt and carv-
ing of human figure, a loan
from Miss Forest B. Wise.
A Jaguar skull, a gilt from
Armando de Sedda.
A 350 to 400 year-old brick,
imprinted with two cat tracks,
found In Fort San Lorenso, a
gift of Sergeant S. D. Mann of
the Police Divisin at Cristo-
bal-
A souvenir of construction
days made by George W. Stumpf
in 1909. It It made of part of a
railroad tie and copper from
a French engine and contains
earth samples from the Canal
In a glass tube. The souvenir
Is a loan from Mrs. Josephine
Booth.
'A picture of a French loco-
motive which was reconstructed
by the Americans and a sou-
venir shovel, believed to have
been made of French scrap
metal In the Gorgona foundry
In 1904. These items are a gift
from Otto Kozak, a retired
Canal employe.
. petrified wood excavated hi
the La Cresta area, a gift of
John J. Kennedy of the Con-
struction and Maintenance Di-
vision.
By WADE JONES
MIAMI. Feb. 28 (NEA) If
a little surprising at first to see
the burly aircraft mechanics
daintily manipulating bottles of
apple-red nail polish.
But then, to the first-time vis-
itor at the giant overhaul basa
of Pan American World Airways
here, everything is a little sur-
prising.
About the nail polish. The me-
chanics are not. as you finally
note with relief, putting the pol-
ish on their nails.
They are daubing it on tne
electrical, gasoline, and oil line
connections of newly overhauled
airplane engines.
The Idea is that if a connec-
tion works loose in the futute
the bright daub of polish wlH
break, which is a trouble sign
plainly visible to any mechanic
from here to Helsinki.
S. Johnson Is tfrei-
and box office man" derstood to be 870.Q0C which au-
. charge of ticket arrange-1 toma i^siiy expired on the
j death of his brother.
Anti-Wetback
Goes On To Senate
WASHINGTON,Feb. 38 (UP).
The House has approved a bill
designed to keep the so-called
"Wetbacks" from swim m i n g
across the Rio Grande to enter
the United States Illegally.
The b..: now goes back to the
Senate, which passed a slightly
different version of-the measure.
The House knocked out a Sen-
ate provision authorizing the Im-
migration Service to Issue search
warrants for its agent.
But it provided that the agents
could get warrants under oath
from "any court of competent
Jurisdiction."
The House bill, like the Senate
- easure. provides that agents
may search any property with-
in 25 miles of the Mexican border
without a warrant.
7-Months Daughter
Of Donald Jacksons
Dies In Indianapolis
Word has been received on
the Isthmus of the death. of
seven-month-old Carol Jackson
in Indianapolis, Indiana. She
was the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Donald Jackson who left
the Canal Zone about a year
ago to make their home In the
United States.
Carol's maternal grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hatchett
of Diablo, and her paternal
grandmother Is Mrs. Ann M.
Jackson of Balboa.
Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have a
son, Kenneth, two years of age.
Open Arms
HAVANA. Feb. 28 (UP) A
yoang woman carrying a eaa-
machine run mad a .45 calibre
automatic pistol in her luggage
was arrested today when abe
landed in Havana after a flight
front Mexico.
Francisca Negrln. M. Insist-
ed she didn't knew the anas
were In a eatt ease.
he said they had been given
to her last lafate the toft Ma-
ice ay a stranger to Aeftrvar to
a CMs
'Cry-Baby Division'
Asks Home Folk
To Quit Griping
SAW BERNARDINO. Califor-
nia, Feb. 38 (UP) Men of
California's National Guard
40th Division have written a
public letter to their folks at
home.
They want their relatives to
stop protesting the assignment
of the division to the Korean
front.
The men say the protests are
turning them into the "Cry-
Baby Division."
Most of the families have
agreed although reluctantly
to abide by the wishes of the
soldiers.
They point out, however, that
many were signed up alter
being assured they would never
leave the States.
1952 PC Directory
Out; New Security
Number Listed
The new 1952 edition of the
Canal telephone directory h
now being distributed.
Deliveries to subscribers start-
ed Thursday in Canal offices.
The directories will be de-
livered or mailed to all sub-
scribers as soon possible.
They may be purchased from
the vault clerk in the Engi-
neering Division on the third
floor of the Administration
Building at Balboa Heights. The
price Is $1.
Copies are furnished to sub
Bribers for each telephone and
all extensions in of floes and
one copy each for each te-
lephone and one extension for
private telephones.
A new emergency number for
Civil Intelligence has been ad-
ded to the listing of numbers
for emergency calls on the front
cover of the 1882 directory.
This Is a special cumbernot
to be used for routine callsto
report any information con-
cerning sabotage, espionage, or
any subversive activities affect-
ing the security of the Panama
Canal and its operations.
The public is urged to we
this number (2-4400) at any
hour of the day or night to
report anv such Information to
civil intelligence authorities.
Mechanics Seek Perfect Safety
That one little trick is but a
drop In an ocean of know-how
applied daily here to the main-
tenance of the mighty engines
which power our modern airlin-
ersa phase of the total aircraft
operation which as much as any
other thing means safety In the
air for you and me.
Here in Pan Am' W0-foot-
long Building 121. the world's
biggest airplane engine overhaul
shop under one roof, air safety
Is not a couple of words read in
an editorial, heard on the radio,
or spelled out in a CAB ruling.
Air safety here Is a thing you
can touch with vour own hands,
aee with your own eyes, smell
with your own nose.
In that space over there on the
side, with the rubberized curtains
around it. 61-year-old Charles
Russell holds forth with an ul-
tra-violet light as Inspector of all
aluminum parts off the torn-
down engines.
Working; In darkness, behind
dark goggles and a rubber apron,
he looks for cracks and flaws in
the parts, which have previously
been dipped in a special chemi-
cal dye.
The dye works Into the metal,
and under the ultra-violet a
crack shows up as a vivid yellow
streak often invisible to the nak-
ed eye.
If the flawed part can be re-
machlned to perfect condition.
It is routed to the proper station
for the Work. If not, it is thrown
out.
All steel engine parts go
through a similar testing with a
magnetic device.
I
At a long, high-workbench
three men in the almost stand-
ard uniform of white T-shirts
and multi-hued sport caps are
freezing valve seats and guides
In dry ice to a temperature of 20
below zero.
At the same time they are
heating the cylinder tato which
the valve seats will fit to a tem-
perature of 400 degrees Fahren-
heit. i
The ice-contracted valve seats
will thus slip easily into the
heat-expanded cylinder. And la-
ter when the two reach the same
temperature they'll fit together
likewell, like a valve in a cy-
linder.
All Pan American airplane en-
gines are completely overhauled
after 800 to 1100 hours of use, de-
pending on the type:
The giant R-4380 engine, four
of which power a Stratocrulser,
costs $18,600 to overhaul.
Which is not surorlslng when
vou consider its 35O0 horsepower,
28 cylinders, seven magnetoes.
and 66 sparkplugs.
Each engine, traveling one of
the four 900-foot assembly Unes
in Building 121, Is completely
disassembled down to the last
bolt, cleaned. Inspected, unusable
parts replaced or remachined.
reassembled and thoroughly test-
ed in a special cell.
The complicated equipment, a-
lone, required tor the engine job
is worth tVBOOflOO.
The entire aircraft gets a com-
plete overhaul every 8000 hours
of Its operation.
Besides engines, this overhaul

CRADLE FOR AN ENGINE helps
trocuiser at Miami, Fla., overhaul
line operation.
remove the 3500-horsepower, 7868-pound engine of a Stra-
base. Maintenance of these engines Is vital to safe air-
takes In wings, control surfaces,
landing gear, instruments ev-
erything Each is sent to a par-
ticular shop specializing in its
maintenance.
Pete Parham, sprightly 58-
year-old foreman of the acces-
sory overhaul shop, who Hew
the "Hump" 33 times while on
loan as a maintenance specialist
to the China National Aviation
Corp. during the war, presides
over much of this work.
Pete Is a great believer in the
senses of touch and smell as in-
dispensable aids to the complica-
ted testing machines.
"For Instance, the Vlckers pis-
ton hydraulic pump works un-
der very high pressure," Pete
says.
"When It's on the testing
stand we lay a, hand on it to see
If we can feel any vibration. If
we get vibration that way, we
will reject the pump whether
other tests show anything or not.
"Same way with certain piec-
es of electrical equipment. We
can smell whether the winding
on one of the Stratocrulsers 50
or more little motors has gone
bad or not. A testing machine
might have passed it as O.K."
As a further safety check, a
complete biography is kept on
every part of every plane that
goes through the shops, showing
its life expectancy and what
flaws, If any, It has developed.
The Pan-Am maintenance and
overhaul operation here can be
considered fairly typical of the
kind of care other airlines give
their planes.
Each believes It has the best
system, but for the layman to
compare them Is a little too
much.
The work and planning and
brains that go into maintenance
and overhaul Is impressive.
Whether it is enough, only an
expert and the air accident flg-
ures can tell.
Figures from the National
Safety council for 1950. the lat-
est year for which the complete
Information is available, show
that scheduled air transport
planes had 11 passenger deaths
per 100 million passenger miles
tliat year, autos had 2.2. buses
0.17, and railroads 0.58.
And how do the airlines of this
country stack up from a safety
standpoint from those of other
countries?
The International Air Trans-
port Association reports that fig-
ures based on the operations of
57 of its member airlines
throughout the world, including
several American, show 2.48
deaths per 100 million passenger
miles in 1950.
GeneraHv speaking, this gives
our airlines about a 2 to 1 per
cent safety edge eevr those of
other countries.
mnNEST
CARE IN THE WORLD
As you sit relaxed in the deep seat of your Brarifff
Liner you hear the confident throb of the plane's
great engines You feel the tremendous power that
enables you to fly over oceans and continents, even
the mighty Andes How easy it ia
Hundreds of men, the finest technicians in the
U.S.A.. have worked thousands of hours to assure
your easy, safe, dependable flight Every part of
the giant plane is tuned like a fine watch and kept
that way by constant vigilance. It's just one more
reason why the world's most experienced traveler*
prefer Braniff.
FINAL
the vtreit
legg. At tie*
to the riant -power egg"atherwk* eallel
fcy Machine shoe foreman Mirtv* Bel-
li. Fla., overhaul base, anciaea gat a
periodic check-trp.
For Information sag
reiervtriont tt rout travel aftat or
till root Bnniff ftpraatoterive.
Avenida TrroK #11
T oto phono 2-072*
Hostia
Vw Etpofto, 111
Tslspaans 3-4726
or 3-1460 Ext. 130
Coln Ticket Offko.Ts