The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01392

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


V

* BRflHIFF
**-
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*>&***
AN INEPBNDlN% rpAlLT NEWSPATO
Panmira American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
ScaqvamsYO.
I WilllU UIIISK1
Now... 6 Years Old!
TWENTI-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. F., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1958
FIVE CENTS
7th US Jet Ace
His 5th
C
arnwa
'o ^Mead ^tart
RP Politics Seethe
As Leaders Discuss
National Candidate
Unusual activity that may
cause drastic changes In the lo-
cal political panorama, was re-
ported today In connection with
the recent Panamefilsta bid for
a national candidate.
Two opposition leaders, former
President Enrique A. JJmenez
and vlce-presldentlal candidate
Norberto Navarro, are In Chlrl-
aul for possible conferences with
Panamefilsta leader Dr. Arnulfo
Arias.
A third, opposition president-
ial candidate Roberto F. Chiar!,
Is also In the Interior, but his
whereabouts are not known. It
is speculated that he, too, Is
headed for Chirlqul.
Two more political figures,
Conservative presidential candi-
date Pedro Moreno Correa and
Conservative Party president
Luis Garcia de Paredes, were al-
so reported heading for David
todav for a rumored top-level
W. 6. Brady, Jr.,
National City Bank
Chaonan,
WILLIAM GAGE BRADY, JR.
political parley with Arias at his
Boquete retreat.
Garcia de Paredes' name is
one of those mentioned among
the choices for a national can-
ate. Another name is that of
elderlv and influential law-
r. Eduardo Chiart, an uncle of
civilista presidential candl-
Ste. The elder Chiarl is also a
imlnent member of the Con-
servative Party.
All rumen today In usually
ll-inforaied political sourc-
indlcatd an agreement ba-
r the Panamelstas and
four parties of the Nation-
al Civility Alliance for the for-
mation of a "super civility al-
liance'' to support one candi-
date, not ret selected.
Senator Hints
Hydrogen Bomb
Work Near Goal
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23 (UP)
Sen. Brlen McMahon (D.-
Connj, chairman of the combin-
ed House-Senate Atomic Energy
Committee, today came as close
as a responsible spokesman
could to saying the United
States' hydrogen bomb is get-
ting close to reality.
McMahon's committee keeps
alose watch on the U.S. atomic
program, and is constantly prod-
ding the Atomic Energy Com-
mission to greater efforts.
He said recently: "It is not
the business of my committee
to be satisfied with atomic pro-
gress."
H-
Asked last night about
bomb progress, he said:
"I am not dissatisfied. That's
Rumored agreements between about all I can say."
cVtne'Khug6 rname! He said he' could not give any
na Assemblyman Norberto Zu- Progress report on theJl-bomb.
Ita as candidate for Panam!.u ta. one of, }ne thlns we
have to conceal.
iblyma
rita as candldat
City Mayor o! the new alliance.
This would indicate that plans .
to launch Fente Patritico As-' ^v" ve%s since Resident Tru-
semblymanJIrgellluecaandPa-'njan fold thei AEC to go ahead
nMumtaro l.artor Anoel VeB*i"ltn lhe H-bomb. *
^i%WorW*fcn?4 7$at wort hM now been
C^will be shelved, .t |S5^*S years' 4t
Te Panamelst*i Party early
this week launchfjf a ma
urging both CJijfl and
DOllMLah
plraOons Ifaftavor oTa rlatl
candidate "agreeable to all par
He noted that it had been
an
AEC is at the i
fledged H-bomb
hinted,
rcea
m t"
have been sch
But US Plane
Losses Still r-:
3 Times Reds'
TOKYO, Feb. 23 (UP).Moj. Williom Whiner shot
down his fifth Mig today to become the United States' se-
venth jet ace.
His victory brought the total of Red planet destroyed
over Korea to 361.
But United Nations losses so far total 1,153 planes,
all but 15 of them American.
This figure does not include United States Air Force
planes lost on operational flights while not actually en-
gaging the enemy.
Rescuers Fight
To Free Three
Trains In Snow
ST. JOHNS, Newfoundland, J
[23 (UP). Rescue crew fj
rough towering snowdr
minor hll1 Afrdas
United Nations losses revealed
in an official announcement to-
day are:
United States Navy, including
shore based Marines, 654.
United Stases Air Force, 484.
Non-United States units, IS.
The high Navy figure is be-
cause the Navy announced its to-
tal losses, including planes lost
during landings on aircraft car-
riers.
The number of UN planes to
fall to Communist fire was 293.
The other 361 were operational
losses.
The Navy total includes 3:
shore baaed Marine planea lost.
A breakdown of United Stater
Air Force losses revales 4 .s
15 prdSejfcr drive
[ver
ties."
Remn rejected the Paname- year.
lsta bid, declaring that he
would "press on to the end.''
Chlari, on the other hand, was
not available for comment.
Crusade For Freedom
Will Receive Gifts
Through Next Week
Enlwetok if not this spring,) One of the trains, carrying 1001 Air Force
ground fire
t
possibly In the autumn this passengers was three days over-
due on a scheduled 28-hour trip
Cnes shot down by
uded 151 Jets and
Meanwhile In Moscow, Soviet from St. Johns to Port Aux Bas-
Maj. Oen. Peter Korkodinov|ques.
wrote that Russia has built and
tested "atom bombs of various it left here Tuesday, and po-
callbers." lice said it might still take sev-
eral days to finish the Journey.
Korkodtoiov's article was one, ... _
of many appearing In the Rus-' The train stalled half way at
I sian preas on the 3411 anniver-jthe tiny hamlet of Kitty's Brook.1 united Nations planes were lost,
This was the worat February
propeller-driven planes.
Some 31 Air Force planes were
lost to other causes.
UN claims against the Com-
munist air force are 361 Red
planes destroyed (including 226
Miga), 53 Mlgs probably destroy-
ed and 294 Mlgs damaged.
In the week ending today 1
sary of the Red Army today.
He said: "Aware of the cus-[storm to hit Newfoundland in
| toms of aggression, the Soviet several years,
government saw to it that our
state would not be caught un-
Although the Isthmian Cru-1 PrePared-
sade for Freedom campaign
William Gage Brady, Jr. chair- '^^"^^"^'"^"S^drivi iwlth aU '**&$* weftPns
.an of the Board of Directors of 2*^ C^FfJL &,?f 7.1! I this, purpose the state has
while UN pilots claimed 10 Mlgs
shot down.
Top Air Force officials have
repeatedly' pointed out that
Two other trains have been united Nations air losses are
idled by the storm. One, an east- greater than Communist losses
bound train from Port Aux Baa-' because:
ques, has been bogged down since i) The United Nations ar put-
Thursday night at Humberworth ting more planes Into the air.
met
For Tnursaay mgnt at Humoerwonn i ting
or-Ion the West Coast, and another! 2) United Nations planes fly
1 The National Cltv Bank of New 8a,d today.that the,YMCA .f,flce. I ganized and tested atom bombs was almost completely snowed! more ground attack missions
I i.i."*"*'?' VO1? r*... ". will remain ooen for donations'*. ___..... ..hk-.. j._ .* v.. miii.,i~ thiw- ... ..., (.rri^r,, ttt.n rin ttu
will remain open for donations 0, various calibers.
WORKMEN PUT THE FINISHING TOUCHES to the plat-
form, and throne, above, on which Queen Marltza I of El
Panama's Carnival will be crowned tonight amidst the gay
holiday rejoicing of the first night of Carnival festivltes^
The fantastic giant-size figures that add splendor to the
cene of the Coronation were designed by Panamanian
architect Gaspar Pacheco. .
Meanwhile. tlwIRUf "devils" of Panama below are al-
ready on the loose as they roam the streets with their wierd
napler-mache deVU masks and big sonorous drums danc-
ire the popular "tuna" dance. For them Carnival Is on
though the older "devils" probably will not be unleashed
until Monday or Tuesday. Several cantinas in the Calldonia
section seemed to be doing a thriving business at 8 R-m. to-
da* as early-birds came in for a head start on the celebra-
tions And throughout the town today carpenters are busy
nutting the. finishing touches on the toWoa the nuge
wooden platforms ihat will accommodate the holiday-
bent populace who will dance to the rhythmic native music
all through the nights.
Simultaneously with the crowning of Queen Marltza I,
there wlU be the coronation of Queen Llcky at the Union
Club. Various other groups and clubs will also fete their
qUe The three-day Carnival season starts officially tonight.
Sunday will be "Pollera Day" and Monday night costume
night Tuesday is the last and maddest day of revelry.
Musician From India Is Isthmian Visitor
w p Balakrishanan, a well I On leaving Panama he will
known musician from India, who,continue his tour to the West to-
lVon a world tour, is now in Pa- dies and then on to Brazil, Ar-
nama in the course of a tour to gentina, Chile. Ecuador, Mexico,
the Americas. j USA and Canada.
He is well known.to All-India
Radio listeners.
Balakrishanan is a graduate
of the Government Teachers
College of Music at Madras. .
He has broadcast sianv times
over all India Radio stations at
New Delhi, Madras and also over
Colombo stations. i
In the course of his present
tour be has already visited Cey-
lon Burma. Malaya. Singapore,
Slam, Sumatra, Java. Borneo. TEHERAN. Feb. 21 (UP). An
Ball. Fiji Irlanda, New Zealand,Iranian army spokesman said a
and Australia. Tudeh (Communist) Party net-
Iron Finds Red
Network In Army
ty i
He is to give a public perform-)work had been found in the a
i
Hll _
133 Central Avenue. Panama Cl- I rested, and 20 are under Investl-
ance tomorrow at
Hindustani Association Hall
I p.m at the;my this week
El,
at
ght officers have been ar-
Canadian Police
Find Tot, Kidnaper
On Downtown Street
MONTREAL, Feb. 23 (UP)Po-
lice today found three-year-old
Barbara Nemlroff and her kid-
naper walking hand in hand
along a busy downtown street,
unharmed.
She had been snatched from
her crib only last night by a
masked kidnaper who demanded
$50,000 ransom.
York and Mrs. Brady will arrive ^"fr.'^S. T
on the Isthmus today in the unlu Marcn
of the bankVlSn Vt Carinan I tra e3tteD8ton of tlme ta
of the Dank in the Caribbean the cru8ade to combat Commun-
n.M. *k. h-..,M, in o....*,j l*m was given to accommodate
City Bank in the Caribbean arealuala tnat "*<* "
are two In the Canal Zone, three' .___ v. *.i, ,.tu, *
in Colombia, ten In Cuba, two In .tAom.0"?>nt^tJl*&rlSfh&
Mexico, seven In Puerto Rico and "cfUwho attended last nigh s
one in Venezuela. Crusade tor Freedom Ball at Ho-
UN Jet Crashes
Over Village
In Korea, 16 Die
PUSAN. Korea, Feb.- 23 (UP>
Police found her this morning
with an 18-year-old.youth who iai ||._.tl_ai- -
CtKT5i2f SSA Wrec' Neflotaftons
that the youth was the kidnap-
er. They found the pair In a
crowd of shoppers oh busy St.
Catharine Street. CAJRQ ^ ^ ^^
The three-year-old daughter mler All Maher Pasha today
of a wealthy Montreal couple said direct Anglo- Egyptian
With British Soon
was kidnaped last night from her
home, an apartment In the fash-
ionable West End section of this
Angl
would
negotiations
next week.
His announcement
name of Ambassador John Wl- here tody-
ley.
The pilot and 15 civilians were
killed*
e in Venezuela. 1 ElPanamawere Chareid Af- A United Nation Jet fighter
Brady has been associated with *** J? p^SKEJ'm wit* o? the crashed when it flew Into a high
ty Bank since July 191^when^ Murray M Wiseof the ten8ton wlre oyef near
he ioincd the Foreign Depart- UB- *~~-
men I.
He was appointed vice-presi-
dent in January 1021, senior vice-
president in September 193,
president and director in July
1940 and chairman of, the Board
of Directors In March 1948.
Louis Naetzker, vice president
In charge of the .bank's opera-
tions In the Caribbean District
is accompanying Mr. and Mrs.
Brady.
Egypt Premier Sees
A current report of the funds
collected for the Isthmian Cru- _, ,_ ._
sade for Freedom will be an-!, rlre jBestroyed 17 houses, an-
nounced early neat week when lured eight civilians^ and caused
all contributions from the Atlan- "
tic and Pacific sides
counted.
wiU be
an estimated $50,000 damage.
under at the MUlertown Junc-
tion.
Passengers and crewmen on
the train and at Humberworth
were cared for by local residents.
The Royal Canadian Mounted
Police said that none of the
marooned passengers appeared
to be in danger.
Three rotary snow plows have
already been derailed, but a
fourth continued to buck the
weather.
BALBOA TIDES
Sunday, Feb. 24
HIGH LOW
2:33 a. m. 9:13 a. m.
3:08 p. m. 9:29 p. m.
over enemy territory than do the
Reda.__________
12 Killed, Many
Injured In Riots
In Pakistan
KARACHI. Feb. 23 1 UP). Re-
liable reports received here from
the Pakistani provincial capital
of Dacca said 12 persons nave
been killed and at least 50 In-
jured In two days of student riots
there.
The riots started when police,
fired an students demonstrating
for Bengali to be made one of
the official state languages of
Pakistan.
RP Police Recover
Stolen Pick-Up
Truck Minus Tires
A pick-up truck and a private
car were stolen in Panama early
this morning, but Panama Pol-
ice report that, the pick-up has
been recovered, minus the tires.
The truck, a 1949 green Chev-
start early rolet belonged to the McDonald
Construction Corporation In the
set off! Canal Zone. It was narked last
city while her parents, Mr. and negatlotlons for beginning the night by the compnay's general
Mrs. M. Nemlroff were \way for second half of Moslem week 1 superintendent, Jose Guardia, in
the evening. I which starts today. It was ex-1 front of his home in San Fran-
Police Immediately doubled thei pec ted they would be carried on, cisco, and was not there this
uards at all bridges leading into between Maher himself and Sir morning,
lontreal and began an intensive Ralph stevenson, British Am-
aearch of the efty. bassador to Egypt.
The groundwork for the re-
The hysterical maid described
the kidnaper as "about ftve-feet-
six, and about 25 years old." She
told police he ordered her to
Panama police that imme-
diately bagan a search found
sumption of negotiations, can-: the truck, minus two tires, on
celled since the outbreak of 11th Street In San Francisco.
hostilities between Egypt and
not* behind which demanded
that 950,000 ransom be left in the
ty.
gation.
of the 1938 Anglo
rofan'E^todi^'^O^^^
department store.____________ ta UJ-yg^^*.
_ proved situation
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Dc fosse.
Egyp
achli
The private car that Is still
tlan missing belonged to Olga del
ved Busto Espino, an of flee helper
in the National Assembly. She
the lm- parked her 1951 Chevrolet 8e-
were British dan with a blue body and
Foreign Secretary Anthony' cream color hood, tn front of her
den and former Egyptian Am- home on 84 central Avenue late
bassador to Britain Abdel Fat- ; last night. She Usted the value
imfe Paths. 'of the ax a* $2JOO,
TYPICAL OF THE HIGH SPIRITED COMPETITION tamed oat In the Caribbean Baseball
Series being staged at Panama's Olympic Stadt urn Is this shot showing Luis Olmo, of Puerto
Rico, sliding Into third base headfirst in a valiant but futile effort to advance from second
on a fly out to right field In the game with Venezuela last night. Luis Garcia is about to
put the tag on Olmo after receiving the throw from Wllmer Fields. Umpire Walter Ryan
U calling the piav which occurred In the ninth Inning. Venezuela won 3-J in 11 inninga
to keep alive In the serias, close behind the pace-settlnj Cuban champions who came iron
behind to down Panama. 4-2, _
* *




PAGE TWO
THE PAMAIU AMERICAN AN nmKWWOTNT DARE NIWSPAPBI
- V '
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, U
I
!
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
MARMODrO rIAB. IDITO*
T. N irmr > O. ox is*. rMA. r. oe r.
' TrLPKON Panama NO. 1-0740 B Lin)
CA.UI BOMB r-ANAMBBICAN. PAMAMA ^^
Colon Orr.ei. ll.i? crNTAAt avmui *" "LH..S-.?? *"""
FOMION Mp-IKNTATIVMi JOSHUA B. POWBRB, INC.
341 MMMMN AVB. NW VOUK. N. V. mark
I TO S I.BO
Pt* MONTH IN ADVANCI ___ "in r SIX MONTH. IN AOVANCI __-_ tm'ua
?OB ONI VIA. IN PVANCf "''
Broadway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
THE BIG ALLEY BETWEEN COVERS
. "Show Biz, From Vaudc to Video," this week hit NMintne
non-iictlon list o best sellers. When I elected It as tops In its
field In a column, I denominated It a "compendium. TXUlOT-
ly gleaned from Variety, that wonder weekly. *^ ^"*.'"
Abel Green. Its editor, and Joe Laurie Jr., f*-^-*-d1?yT cm.lca'
whose best act (Laurie and Bronaoni I revlewed "^n^e
Variety staffer.. I was with that paper for years never fu 1 time,
a' it Chicago representative and later, In New York, as Its dra-
matic critic.
. 'when 1 Joined Variety, It an an editorial saying it didn't. kno^
whv a bie bv-llner on a big daily would want to be connected with
J&wSA ofYraVstaLuc/and -mi-literate slang It patota
I ardently admired. It was authentic and originalIt,hasM~
andBu8teidssTd,C oW^TtSSt%r^te.Bnn x
tay downtown" nights." And'tnat It did. for 1. cove re c1 everything
from carnivpls to the greatest stars and shows, when Chicago was
a great theatre-town.
Below are a few incidents from "Show *&"%"*'}*
They are characteristic of the voluminous compilation. Tney re
vpbI o remarkable spread of topes connected with the many
braehe?*? amusement trades as they flourtohedand a>g
changed. Like other Industries, this one "" "WJuUonttea ro
mechanization radio, movies talkies, records TV until tne
plays shows, circuses, vaudeville have dwindled But iney
gone into our national history and they are all integral in the
rise and declension of that unique institution. Broadway.
Boston authorities looking around for something: to forbidI In
1912. selected an actress in the Shubert play, *"" Sf
ponn- shp was under age. Her name was Helen Hayes.. iiic
^Sar^Be^nhardi, whBoSe ^?S?KSSS
a>ts or acrobats on the program, honored W.C Field j maan k
him the first and only Juggler she ever [f imi,'PVh/A^ierican
the bill with her...George M. Cohan, who made the American
I -arm; cr^s'rrHn S&
mmmwm
you one cut for Sam Harris!" Harris was Cohan's partner.
In 1911 Vprietr was hanging out storm slenals with the
head'ltae"' "Buriesoue Getting Too C^V: Con erence May Re-
sult". .Juvenile delinquency ^osn problem In 19nrKmspi..yea
and-Dicttrre house at night ? ask for her son who had romew
the thePtre In the morning. "Do yoiwantjU M g
madam?" lnoulred the manager, with a sigh. No, just give mm
his supper I brought."
,r. wiiiianw famous half of Williams & Walker, was the
e" at the beat hotels. But Willlnms always Insisted on m"
tha beck w so as not to embarrass the management. A 1950
variation ST* I liL'-Eoulty hotels," jadjJch th a|tors'ujston
' s* es an "aooroved'' raster of hostffles acrfTssThe cotBWy
wne?e no co7or line Is enforced.. .WIlKams was the first (and
only) Negro to be buried with white Masons.
Klaw & Erl.nger. In the legitimate theatre met bickering be-
tween stars by listing them on nrocrams In the order of appear
anee instead of prominence.. WIHiam Gane introduced the first
(and last) All-Automatic Minstrels at the Manhattan Theatrem
1908. Except for one live Interlocutor a the minstrels were
dummies with gramophones concealed Inside telling jokes ana
slnelne songs on cue. Res minstrel shows of those days were stin
going s'tron'i-Frank Dumont's were In their 54th com.ecutl sea
on. .Advertising In the sky made Its debut in J* J5^
was flown over Broadway, carrying a dummy on a trapeze and a
banner advertising a show.
Modern nightclubs were prophesied In 1907, when "stauateiirs
resented a few acts of vaudeville after show hours. These soon
Scame known as supper clubs. In the era of the "lobster p^pce^
Which gave wav to the speakeasy of Prohibition.. .Back in i sos
Te pubhc read its first cigarette testimonial, by stars, when M.
tc Arbuckle. comedian Harry Bulger and dramatic star John
Mason extolled In ads the virtues of Murads A fir*theatre
oasis was Hammersteln's. Like in the Sherry's bar oftodayIn^the
Metropolitan Opera House, he served drinks at intermits orin
the balconv of his Victoria. The less tony downtown burlesquerles.
like Miner's and the London, served beer In the audience.
The first split skirt was daringly worn in 1907, by English
songstress Chummle La Mara, whose singing was immaterial
The first vampire slunk across the boards in 11*?.-low5?" S ;
rine Kaelred sizzled fatal sex appeal in Robert Hillard s play, A
Fool There Was," anticipating the movies' Theda Bara and Louise
Glaum...The revolving stage was introduced in 1910 at tne
Liberty Theatre. In Oakland. Cal._____________________________
Labor News
And
Comment
Just Not as Good as the Real "hing
THIS IS YOU WBUM TMt RlADUS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
ik Mall Bo H an opon toruot toi >*an I Th* Piium *"-
!( iHtri M r.cclvd graft fully on* an handled m o wheU am-
(Mr, i minnn.
I >eu confnbuf. a Wtai Ban'l ba imf.fi.nt it f daaan t apaaai a
Mil da, Latf.ii ara publnh.d In the order racarvadl.
PlaoM try fo kaop tin latan limited lo am oaf tanflth.
Idtntlty of lett.r writ. n held In itrieuat aaattdaaaa.
TMt aawaaapar oiunw m rwaomialllry t.r r*.tamantt at epinlaM
rtiied in lattara from raad.n.
WHO IIAS TIME FOR AN EXTRA LETTER?
SMI Emerald St.
Klamath Falta,
Oregon.
Irs:
Is there any place there I could write to for the name of
(.man pen friend? Qr are there many there that speak
Yours sincerely,
Mrs. W. E. Momk.
frn"ifr
Bin:
CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM WELCOMED
Colon. Rap. of Panama
tine* "Another Orlngo" contends that Eduardo Castao c
(a Colombian rated a praise for his first speech to the Panama
BJtary Club, why didn't this parson write the mall box long
iioT I would have written a letter then, had I not felt that
tne author in nls speech had complimented hlmaelf sufficiently,
rating no room for praise from others.
There ta no doubt Castao deserves some credit, since he
bjpm partly Instrumental in having Parke Davis Company trans-
fer their Export Department to the Pree Zone of Colon: which
was a smart decision on the part of the Company, from a busi-
ness point of view. But this does not in any way give him the
light to make out-of-proportion statements about Colon and its
facilities.
Good constructive criticism is always welcomed, but gross
Ustrutements are not tolerable.
until Castao knows Colon better, ht should refrain from
tnaJcing public statement* and limit his civic betterment to ac-
etona only. .__,
A Griago.
By Victor Riesel
There's more hysteria than
planes in the air these days I
hear from the men whose hands
and reflexes guide those long ca-
bins in the skythe members ol
the AFL Airline Pilots Associa-
tion, virtually all of whose lead-
ers are airborne.
The family men who actual-
ly make America's 5,#00,0O0
landings and take-offs each
year (one every eight seconds,
day and night) on scheduled
commercial aircraft and get
back to their wires and kids
regularly hare some pertinent
things to say about the series
of air crashes which has killed
some 200 travelers In recent
months. Let then be heard.
There are some airports these
pilots fear, they tell me, but not
Newark, out of which 116 were
smashed to death recently.
Worst in the land to them Is
the Denver landing field
They dislike Pittsburgh's strips,
soon to be replaced by a new
airdrome.
Kansas City Is much too busy
only some eight minutes from
the center of town, and many a
run Is over Industrial and resi-
dential districts and stock yards.
Detroit's Willow Run has been
crept up on by housing promo-
ters, edging closer and closer to
the field, although it's some 30
miles out.
The union pilots hear that
some citizens tn a Cleveland sub-
urb, the town of Berea, 13 miles
southwest of the cltv. are talk-
ing of demanding flight restric-
tions there.
Best of the airports, to the men
who bring In the biggest air-
craft, carrying over 80 flying
Dassengers, are at Baltimore,
Houston, Philadelphia, Newark
and Idlewlld (take-off point for
most International flights to Eu-
rope, Africa and the West Irr-
dles).
What makes a fine airport fo-
a pllpt? Clear outer and middle
markers on runways, the Instru-
ment Landing System and
Ground Control Approach the
instrument and radar talking
down systemand high intensi-
ty approach and landing lights.
Which accounts for the fear of
Denver's strinsthe approach
lights there take too long to come
up and the plane's almost- on
the field before the lights can
be spotted.
Why. then, the brutal crashes
at a favorite field like Newark
almort?
The union pilots sav the Elisa-
beth dlsastcs were "a scries of
tragic and fantastic coincidences
and nothinp; more." To them,
Newark is safer than New York's
famcrt LaOuardla, and next to
Idlewlld. the best In the East.
The first Elizabeth crash into
the residential area came as no
surprise to the AFL pilots. They
believe It can happen anvwhere.
"ny time, to the non-scheduled
lines.
"These lines operate on a
shoestring." a veteran pilot
told me. "They have so little
dough that thrv cat corners on
maintenance. Rot most Impor-
tant is the fact that some
ground crews aro the 'left-
overs,' the me* who don't suite
make the grade on the majar
airlines.
That's brutal to say, but true,
After all. why not say it? Our
nHots die In these crashes
along With the unfortunate
who must travel and cant af-
ford to nav full rates."
The extreme care which the
regular airlines take was polnt-
nd out in the recent grievance
hearings on the discharge of a
pilot by TWA.
The captain had been flying
big shins for TWA's lnter-con-
tlnental division for over nine
yeprs.
-Then, last March 16. he al-
legedly flunked an Instrument
chppk (tost).
He was dismissed, mind vou,
although he had never had an
accident never damaged an air-
plane nor been In a collisionor
near colll'lon. Never had he been
renrimanded.
A-nd furthermore, he haH cor-
rectly "executed" one of the
problem* given Mm In the in-
strument check but failed be-
cause he rUdnt understand the
"technical aspects of the prob-
lem.
He did It but didn't know why.
oreaumahlv. Yet that was en-
ough to ball him out of a lob
and into s grievance session for
four davs last month.
Bvery minor detail Is recheck-
ed.
For example. French and A-
merlcan lang\""ge profesors
were hired to develop a new
phonetic alnhabet for air ground
communl'-atlons.
The old Able, Baker. Charlie
words used by pilots for A.B.C.
now are Alfa Bravo. Oocon and
bo on through the alphabet so
that a Quirklv spoken word can
not be misunderstoodand all
nllota and radio operators are
now memorizing the new list.
However. shin Is a ma-
chine, and the pilots say that
It takes six or seven years to
tret the bugs out of a new mod-
eland new models are being
rushed in each year. Soon
there'll be jet commercial air-
lines. The pilots stronrlv be-
lieve that reaisicnment of the
airmen to runs with which
they are most familiar, over
terrain they know well and in
stmoapheric conditions In
which thev hsve been virtsallv
raised, would cut the danger of
trashua over crowded cities.
Until then it's a struggle be-
tween men and th* mehme he
creater>"l the m^ch'^e is be-
Shot And Shell Out
By BOB RUARK
,
o
NEW YORK.Although I am not a drinking It takes a very rich man to deliberatelybe-
man myself, since I consider alcohol a basically come a drunkard today, if he uses legal booze,
treacherous fluid, which encourages undue frivol- stamped with the legal sticker.
lty among the young and causes little veins to
bust in the cheeks of the old. I cannot but decry
the high cost of distilled spirits as a grim tuning
fork to the tenor of our times.
This Is not a stand I might have taken In past,
when such an attitude could have been called
prejudiced by an occasional dab of. dandruff-re-
mover of the soul.
Toots used to say that any bum who couldn't
get drunk before midnight wasn't tryin'.
He might add today that anybody who does get
loaded Is either buying on expense account or ta
engaged in illegal enterprise for undercounter
cash.
If we achieved a nation of teetotallers as pure
. as I, the prohibitive tarlff on nerve tonic might
But pure, clear-eyed, unhungover citizen that be called a sin tax- or a powerful force for good,
I bedrat that doctorI think that ID bucks a
gallon in tax ta too danged much for anybody to
have to pay for a jug of hooch. .
I am now prepared to answer Mr. Omar Khay-
yam's querulous query about what it ta that vint-
ners buy that's one-half so precious as the stufi
they sell. They buy battleships, bud, with the tax
on. tipples.
and there would be great rejoicing among my
.lsters in the WCTU.
But, unfortunately, he who cherishes a thirst
md has no dough does not necessarily emulate
i man of high purpose.
What he does Is pry the top off a flagon of
-having lotion or unzip a canister of entrapped
Mat, or sneak into the nearest alley for a jug of
An "employer of Wine, a fellow with little a tell-* suspect 'shine, which wears no man's-tax collar,
tale marks of the lusty liver on his personality/' ~ Ttm, these potions corthggte his innards. nob->
has broodingly compiled a table of national ae- tail his organs and Inflict severe contusions on
cline, based on the rise in booze taxes since r-
Drift]
In 1933 the tax on a proof gallon of spirits was
$1.10. In 1941 it had risen to $4. In 1952 it ta now
$10.50.
That is better than 2.60 per quart of Federal
tax alone, which works out in the vicinity of 16
iiis moral maintenance makes very little differ-
ence. Not if he's real parched of throat and soul.
They say bootlegging is bigger business today
' han it was back in prohibition, and getting blg-
ser all the time. M..t .
Glad cries echo from the swamplands and high
tills and even backyards, as the smell of cook-
cents in the government till for every hearty slug Ing mash fills the wintry air *nd the imminence
if you are not a strict one-ounce man and oc- of stark, sudden blindness lurks like Aladdin in
caslonally waste a little.
If you seek a sermon in Scotch, or basic truth
In bourbon. It is simply that what has happened
to booze is what's happened to just about every-
thing in the era of murder by taxation.
The idea is to tax it, and tax it some more, and
then slap another plaster on it, until nobody can
afford if.
Then everybody quits buying it. and the goose
no longer renders up the golden breakfast.
This, I believe, is called either the law of dl-
a fruit jar.
Gentlemen who used to toy with a suspicion of
bonded stock to ward off a cold are gargling
'emon extract again, and I suspect that the bath-
tub will once more produce a substance more
concrete than cleanliness, such as gin.
Eventually, If the rapaclousness of government
-nproach to its mounting expenses continues,
i here will be such a high tax on everything pleas-
ant that we become a nation of lawbreaker.
Crooks, we'll be, driven to a life of shame by
mlnlshlng returns or how to put yourself out of government greed
business by greed alone, due to removal of (li Haul the cat out of the copper kettle, Maw, I
Incentive to buy and (2) ability to pay. ^^ ihlnk I'll go lh business for mysslf.
Appeal Tp Eisenhower
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
cu!** W4SHWGT0H,
MERRY- GO- RIlMD
y 0ew MAMN
I
WASHINGTON.The need for General of the hower will also take this view, will break the
Army- Dwight D. Elsenhower to return to this rule he made for himself, will leave behind his
country and lead the fight for his candidacy immense present task, and will enter the poll-
has now been accepted on the highest level o tical arena. '.'
the Eisenhower movement. As yet. the question ta perfectly unanswerable.
The leaders of the Eisenhower forces Gov. since the appeal to the General that ta now
Thomas E Dewey of New York and Senators projected will be the first such appeal address-
Henry Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts, James ed to him by His chief supporters.
Duff of Pennsylvania and Frank Carlson ol It will be accompanied, moreover, by the first
Kansas, met in New York late last week and irank exposition of the political importance of
decided to appeal to the Oeneral to come home, the General's early return that he has received
It is understood that the General will be from any authoritative source. And no one can
urged first to make a quick trip to this ooun- now foretell how the General will respond to
try while still in unilorm, and second to doff the grave choice thus put before nun.
his uniform and return as a candidate by May If the General yields to the plea to come
l at latest. home, the Elsenhower leaders are convinced
The reasoning behind the plan is obvious that the public demonstration of his strong pop-
enough. The loose ends of NATO are anything ular following will attract the Republican re-
but tied up, yet the ueuerai'a appearance in gutars to his candidacy.
America is needed now to keep the Elsenhower Without this public demonstration, however,
movement building. may be difficult to overcome the great ap-
Thls need can be met by an appearance be- peal of Sen. Robert A. Taft to the members ol
fore Congress, which the General will shortly the party organization. _-- .JL.
be required to make in any case. Elsenhower holds the Imagination of of the
And besides reporting to Congress on his independent vote that the Republican party
progress in Europe, the General can perhaps needs to win. Taft ta the great hero of thei or-
make a broader speech or statement In the tbodox Republicans, who of course constitute
course of his first return lourney. the majority of Republican primary voters, de-
After this, the Oeneral can tie up the loose legates and delegate-owners. _______,
ends in Paris, and then come home for good. For this very reason, there ta cor^derabl ap-
as an avowed candidate, ready to state, hta prehension about the outcome of the psycholog-
vlews on the Issues and to give leadership to lcaUy crucial New Hampshire primary,
his supporters, who are now weakened by their The Taft forces are pouring money into New
leaderless state Hampshire, and they are stopping at nothing to
Such ta the program that will be put up to make a big New Hampshire ^owtar The pos-
Gen Elsenhower slbility of a setback in New Hampshire is_re-
The appeal that he abandon hta former pod- llably understood to have tanuenced Sen Duff
Uon and actively enter the lists as a candidate to enter Gen. Eisenhowers name to the Penn-
v/ill be made in no spirit of discouragement. sylvanla pr rnary.
Indeed, the potentates of the Eisenhower This decision was aeUcate isince the OU
movement who gathered ta New York are pre- Guard Grundy-Owlett faction ta PennsyWanta.
pared to assure the Oeneral of victory, line while directing the broadest PoaibXt into at
.ill fisht for it Ben. Taft, have also been hinting to certain
wui mm wr Eisenhower leaders that they can count on the
At the same time, all of the Eisenhower lead- Pennsylvania delegation if they win work with
era have been hearing the same plea from the theright people. _____ ___K-tu.ii *a
political grass roots "Can't the Oeneral come The right people, of course, emphatically do
back and tell us where he stands?" and they not Include Sen. Duff ___ ,.-. -
are now convinced that this grass roots hanker- Thus Sen. Duff's action probably ttm
tag to have a look at the candidate, and to bear fight, tfcat might have been ^""^aafY. ***
his views from hta own lips, ta so strong that it the risk is^tacreasedby toe noncoE^ff ny
*111 be highly dangerous not to satisfy the de- taken by Oov Herbert.Am^ an old Duff ally
tag tamed. de^ the hysteria jt and. 'ho has switched hi. allegiance.
In the air. _,_______ The question remains, whether Gem. Bsss-
Drew Pearson Says: "Cynical Americans inclined to lay
nation's troubles on Washington doorstep; Atmos-
phere that created anti-Hoover tide in 1932 now
brewing against Truman; Douglas-Bennett proposal
for nation-wide primary recommended.
CHICAGO, Calif.Traveling across the U. 8. these days
you are struck with a new cynicism on the part of the American
public.
It's a rebellious cynicism, inclined to lay all our troubles on
the door-step of Washington a feeling of frustration, of disgust
with corruption and wearlnes with the Korean war.
It's an atmosphere that lends Itself to any flag-waver or tub-
thumper who fants to take advantage of this cynicism by run*
ning for office.
This Is exactly the atmosphere that swept a lot of Demo-
cratic screwballs Into office with the anti-Hoover tide of Roose-
velt victory In 1932, and it may sweep a lot of Republican screw-
balls Into office this fall.
One dangerous part of the current feeling has been a cer-
tain disallusionmcnt with our electoral system.
.Folks are resentful of the bosses ta both parties and they
figure that though President Truman probably didn't mean to
blurt out what he did about "eyewash" primaries, nevertheless
he was telling the truth.
On the other hand there Is growing interest in the proposal
f Sen. Paul Douglas of Illinois and Rep. Charles Bennett of
Florida to hold a nation-wide Presidential primary, which,
though not binding on the dlegates, might put a crimp in the
party bosses and prevent the traditional picking of Presidents in
the 3 a.m. quiet of a smoke-filled room.
The smartest thing Mr. Truman could do, in view of his
eyewash remark and this public cynicism is to exert some
altruistic leadership and help put across the Douglas-Bennett
nation-wide primary. i
, EYEWASH ROLLCALL
Meanwhile,'here Is the rollcall of states conducting eyewash
primaries or conventions plus some of those which do not:
Bossed DelegatesIn five states It's a fact that the people
have no say whatever in the selection of delegates attending the
Presidential conventions.
In Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia and Louisiana, the
delegates are chosen By party leaders and are simply told how
they are to vote.
In 27 other states democracy fares little better,
These states for the most part follow the plan of state con-
ventions, where the party bosses can railroad the selection of
delegates.
The bigger states which follow this hand-me-down conven
tion system are: Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi,
Missouri, North .Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Texas and Vir-
ginia.
Best PrimaryThe state generally conceded to have the best
primary system Is Oregon, where presidential aspirants are un-
able to keep their name off the ballot If they feel they wont
make a good showing.
Elsenhower's name, for instance, has been kept Out Of the
Wisconsin primary on the belief that he wouldn't make a good
showing there but in Oregon, any candidate's name can be en-
tered without his permission, which makes for a genuine popular
test.
Nebraska voters liad the same "free filing" privilege until
1951 when a reactionary legislature abolished It.
New Hampshire, In connection with which President Tru-
man used his eyewash term, happens to have one of the nation's
fairer primaries, though somewhat complicated by the town
meeting system.
Boss Fiynn's BailiwickIn New York, which controls, the
largest bloc of delegates and therefore is most influential ta
nominating our Presidential candidates, the delegates do not
have to reveal which candidate they favor.
Thus, when New Yorkers vote In a primary, they gre forced
to vote for pledged party stooges. .
They do not know whether those delegates will favor Tru-
man, Kefauver or Stevenson; all they know is that the delegates
will vote the way Boss Flynn of the Bronx and state chairman
Paul Fitspatrick tell them to. ,
Massachusetts and New Jersey have similar provisions making
it possible for the bosses to manipulate HAPltdaflrJ convention
delegateH*s -pawns on a chessboard. 'UW-'.'m
Ohio's TricksOhio has still another gimmick which plays
into the hands of trie bosses. In Ohio, delegates must remain
pledged to a certain delegate only as long as their "best Judgment
and ability" so dictate.
Though it's never happened, this conceivably could mean
that delegates could decide the day before balloting started that
their man didn't have a chance, and switch to someone the bosses
liked better.
Illinois has a similar loophole for countermanding the peo-
ple's choice.
- Thus, in both Illinois and Ohio, Senator Kefauver might win
the primary but have the delegates run out on him If boss Ray
Miller of Cleveland and boss Jack Arvey of Chicago so directed.
These and other boss-dictated Jokers In state election laws
have reduced today's Presidential primary system to a mockery,
which instead of being called eyewash by the President, should
be rectified with the Douglas-Bennett popular primary or some
other reform.
Though the American people elect the President the bosses
frequently nominate, under any fair electoral system the people
should do both.
DUCKING OUT
The King tax fraud committee, in keeping with the tradition
of not embarrassing a Congressman, Indicates it will not probe
tax-fixing in Southern California.
For Southern California Is where the chairman, Congressman
Cecil King lives.
In this area, however, the King committee is passing up one
of the most scandalous tax fixes in the entire U. 8. A.
It Involves the Ouaranty Finance Co of Los Angeles, a high-
sounding name for one of the slickest bunch of gamblers that
ever fixed a race.
Federal tax men in Los Angeles got wise to this bunch two
years ago and worked up what they considered an airtight case.
Then they took it to Washington. They didn't mall it to
Washington, as ta customary: they flew to Washington to present
the case personally and to urge action.
The chief tax official they conferred with ta Washington was
deputy collector of internal revenue Dan Bolich. a personal
friend of mystery man Henry Grunewald, the tax-fixer.
Shortly after the conferences ta Washington, the tax case
against the Guaranty Finance Co. gamblers was compromised.
There was no criminal prosecution.
Later, California state official convicted the Guaranty gam-
blers on another charge, when U. 8. Attorney Ernest Toillneon-
vlcted them for social security tax evasion, but no one has ever
cleared up the mystery of the original Income-tax fix to Wash-
ington. '
Those in the know believe that Frankle Costello played a
background part to the deal.
Yet the King committee, authorized by Congress to investi-
gate, ta ducking out.
THE LIONS CLUB
OF COLON
announces to the public that the
Club's raffle which was to take
place this coming Sunday, Feb-
ruary 24, has been postponed until
the Sunday of June 15,1952.
Please save your tickets.
RAFFLE COMMITTEE.
I aft A W > w*^akVWs *tma am t fn Bfl riaj^.^ i i
(Cepyrlfit, ltSt, New York Herald THbenae toe.) ]


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, lSi
ii r i
TIE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPER
ii 11111 i i ,. i ''
JAOt
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES
Unitarian
nta
UNITABIAfl
aocnm
MM a.m
JWB ArmaO
force* Servlc
Center Library
Balboa. CX
four Invitation
to liberal
religion.
Baptist
NATIONAL lAfWI C*"V ,
P.nama Baptist.. fjvi M"J.|^
IS. Ditto Servlc*. a* am. ^"5;
vie* 1:1 P>- mi Serving Th* Lm*1
Super" t both ServlcesTlundav School
'enchiva. C, Mvth*
garvlee II *0 am Sunday School ai
'uLiMW. C... Dlvma Service. MU*
a-nTandTa D.m with Sundov School
***"* .twa tala.-
lloil.il B.P. SunOa School al
I: o.m
C0COU1 BAPTIbT CHJJCE.
Building U Bru)a RoaO
v. B. O. Van Kojtn
Bund aenooi .............. J:Jr
Preaching Servlee ........... .a '5.
lTalnlng llnloii, ........... ?.'!n 5 m
Preaching Service .......... m
Brotherhood 1:00 0.a.*%-
Prayer MeMln- Wedn,SS"_
at. a. I. Brawn, atlantes
UDUIrTION BATIBT.CHimCH
M, 1' 8tre*t
(Baaioa the National lmtltula)
Box 1441 Panama City
i Jot Prndo Clderet Pastor
^^iW'SsaisH
Sunday Service
Sunday School..........
Preaching Servir "
Wcdnc-day. Blhlc Study .
(Ultra below ara the Catholic Church*
,n the Canal Zone and those In the ter-
minal cltla* of Panama and Colon whoa*
congregaUon re primarily Bngltth-
ooakina Baaldea thaae. the Cathedral lr
Panama City, the Cathedral o the Im
maculate Conception In Colon, and num-
erous parish church** In bath eltJea wel-
come ngllih tpeaking visitera, hough
theli congregation*-are orlmarlly Span
iah-peaktng >
T Mtlll
Balboa
Sunday Mass*; 5.55, IM. lt:M. 11 I.
1J:00 am.
o?,rtD;.%ar:a1k.l.1.n:l. .1*
e-m
Conf
rrlday-T.OO, 1:00 p
Mlraculmia Medal Novena-Monday at
IM p.m.
Iloaary every evening at 7:W-
sACBKO heabt
Ancon
Sunday Matte*. 5:55. 7:30. :S0 am
Holy Daya: 5:5, 7:0 am.
Confessions; Saturday- :*0. 0 p.m.
7:00, :00 p.m. Thuraday tot first
rrldayTM I:t0 p.m.
Sacred Heart DevoUonaFriday at 7*
"n ST. TKBESA
CocoU
Sunday Maaa: :S0 am
Holy Day: OB am
10:00 a..
7:J0 p.m.
1:30 om
"HflWflt
rlltST BArTISI CHUBCB
, Balboa Heights. C z.
v 07 Ancon Boulevard
Drawer B" Balboa Heights
Phone Balboa IT
-Xwi Church away ram jwese-
wlth wakem* laai a* friendly"
William M (Moby, raatet
Bundav Scbeol ..... *-,u m
MorSlng^orthip .......... 1J;4
Ba^Vam^Un*- .... *M o.m
EvangeUeUe Service........ i o.m
meeting Wednaadayi I on.
w!m.B. BJbia Bhidy
thuraday .................
Mm'* Brotherhood
(Lett Monday IB month)
... ( am.
J:li om
ATLANTIC BAPTIST tmia*
olivar Avenue at 12th StrMt
Cristobal. C.B
Rev Prod U Jona. Pistoi
Methodist
Minister WUitam H. Armttroni
too a.m. Morning Prayer and Sermon
:00 p.m. Sunday School.
4:80 Man's Mwstint.
t:l cm. tvenlna Prayer and Sermon
TB1NIT MeTHODlST CIIUBCH
7th Street and Melnder Avenue.
Rav. Norman Pratt. Mlmstei
Colon. BJ.
Bat*. Norman Pratt. Minister
Sunday Service* at :M a.m. and 1:1
i.m.; Sunday School (ar all age al I
iooday 7:0 o.m.. Weakly Prayw
llSsCXEB METHODIST CHUBCB
Slver City, C.Z.
___iday Servlc** I am. and :1 p.m
jnday School for all aga* at SJO p m
ErumdeylMI ? pITr. Meeting
-Bar ttavHalln T* W.rshl'
.., Schoo'l ............... : em
Worship.................... iiM m
Training Umlon ............ JO p.m
Worthtp ..TT...............jap pm.
raver Maattlng (Thura.) .. 7J0om
Seventh Day
Adventist
11 00 am. rtrst A Third Wed-
iwri-OAY
(Weakly "rvlcee In all Church**,
as follows:
turday Sabbath School :30 a.m.
i Worship 1140 am. Youth's Meet-
Churchet ef the many I.IHii as th* Canal Zaae. and the Urmiaal
cities e. Panama and Cam. Rapuhlle af Psaem*. eirond a weUeme
al all limes le MM and women a* rha armad sarvkat. and te e.vkHaa
neiehbari, friends and ttrangan.
At public service, lh* Th* P*aama American littt balaw, by
denemmetiam. -atieat af hours at warshlB and athet regular attlvrltas.
Listings ara rofated tram lime ta lime. Dn*minaian* beving
only ana ar two congregations ara Ihtad under "Othai Charthae And
Services" A spatial lining it included far tarvket at Army peats.
Air Farce bases and Naval sterlens.
Minitfert. church secretariat and chaplains ara asked to inform
the nawt dtik by Wednatnay ne at the ktoet af any thtnget fat
the earning Saturday' eharcl. paga. f
Episcopal
TOA CATiBoigAV of M LUBA
The Bt. Bay. B. Heber Upoden, Bishop
Ihe Vary Rev Baymond T tarria. Dxf
IM a.m Hory Cotmnunlon
*M em Cathedral School
11:4*Morning Prayer and sermon
I First Sunday of the month Holy Com
nunion and Sermon.) .
7* p.m.-ivanlng Pray and Sa-thon
CHUBCr'oir'oilB BAVlOuB
Bl Bt near 0. N*vy
llton A. Cookaon. Paitos
Holy Communion 7:M In
Church School
Morn
(H.C.
T1
PAClPH SIDE
' rratettaat.
FORT AMADOR
Sunday V.ool ..........
Morning TVarshin .........
PORT CLAYTON
Bun
Catholic
i.m
eaaloot: Saturdty:J0, : pm
1:00, 8:*0 p.m Thuraday for fir*
rrldy-7.00. :00 p.m.
Young
ch School gJ9 am
lUta Prayer-Sermon 11M am
flrtt Sunday In Iba month I
P*opl*a v
Servlc 90
Posts, Bases
And Stations
i
lt:M
:0*
lg:M
tM
Sunday-sioV Wdg. ...
Jif&Mr"' ':......
Surmay Srhpdl ..............}2
c^mI!'oX,,................?
Morning Worship
iUBOOX AIR re
Bible School
FORM BASE
1:M
Morning tVenhlp
routH Qr
Weaneediy. Hoi* Communion gao o.m
Choir Rehearsal IM mb.
A Hot* of Prayer for all paopla
Charch at St. Andrew.
ih Rev David B Mad
Holy Communion 7:J0 am
Sunday School g JO a.m.
Public Worship 10:4 am
(H.C. flrtt Sunday In the month.)
Young Peoplet relldwuhlp **pm
Choir rehearsal Wednesday evenin
at gajg p.m.
Woman* Auxiliary and and tth rhut
'CUBNDIJ CHAPEL
undu
___iy Mti
Holy Days:
Confession
Curut _
_ g:10 am.
5:45 am.
:0 5:00 p.m
ASgUMPTlON
Pedr
Saturday
itur-
,_-o Miguel
Sunday Mam: :S0 am.
Botary: Monday. Wednesday and So
Catechtm ciame- SundayIt* U*t
ajn.
ST. JOSEPH'S
Paralao
Sunday Mam: 1:00 a.m.
Holy Days: 5:4 am.
Confemlona: Saturday-:. 4M m
Rosarv: Tueadty7:00 p.m
Catechism Cllises: Sunday -Ig-Jg, I
m :. YUtcrars
PanamS
Sunday Mattel: 5:00. :M am.
Holy 6ayt: *. *.- t-.
Confession!: Saturday.00, tM.
1:00 p.m.
IM.
Before Hoiy Dtyt: 7:00, J-_
Bio Abalo
__.iday Hum tM. tao am.
Benediction: 4:00 pm.
SAIXI
5:U a.m
aturday-:, 4Jg pm -
Miraculous Modal No-
Noven*
rrlday I:*0
Wedneeday-l.eo
Holy Day Maatet
ConfetMont: Satu
Prldy aftar
vana.
Mlraculou Medal
Botana Monday and
Sunday Mam: i:00 aJnTlfiry Day Mam:
Baerad Heart Devotion* Prldty tlt
Conleatont: tattirday-^llO, ga* tsa.
Roia,ryWev!y avarung except Tueeday at
IM pm.
COCO SOUTO tlAtlB
PMtor. Rev Wm. J Plnn. C.M-
Sunday Mam ............... Jjg
Holy Day Mala.............!S !m
Confession hatore <- _.,,-
Rev William t. Plnn. CM $M
tM
1*:M
Youth Tlroup i.. ijj.-;\JM
U. S. NAVAL STATION.- RODMAN
Morning IVonh.p --i-.-....... ':S
PratetUnt Bunttay Schtml ...... :1
lth NAVAL DlffTRiCT
Morning VTt,hlE1v...........
FORT CLAYTON*
Pally Mart .................
Sunday Man...................
U. g. HOSPITAL
Sunday ftnm ..................
COROZAL
Sunday Mam..................
PORT KOtlBX '
Daily Matt ..........iifiXl 12
FORT CLlV/fON
:15
T:aa
1:S
days at 7Jg_pm.
.lout of Pray* and rellowih! fot el)
oedple
COBOBAL
htengal*
Uaad Shaakerd
b Ven. A. P. Nigh'.^.-
i:00 am. Every IWday: Morning Pry
r.
(M.C it rrlday. i
Saturday -.
ALBROOK AIR FORCE
Saturday...................
PORT KOMBE
Thursday .. .._,.............
JWB Balfxu. C T.
Friday .. .vi.'..............
ATLANTIC SHa
Proteafaat
FORT DAVIS
roRT'ttr1' -"* -
Sunday School ................
CC*0,SLo'rNvA STATTON
R^n^^jrviu:::::: >
4,-gg
1:0
7:0
I'J*
f:tO
tM
\tM
tM
Monuments To Washington
In World Total 35,000,000
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28 '(U81S) I But lnstesd of 10 million trees.
Throughout the United States! nearly 35,000,000 were planted In
and In many other countries of 1932, from Canada to South A-
f.Vit TtrnrlH ntllltAriM r\t (paa iyiApIaq fpnm Tonan anil naiMtnJ
the world, millions of trees
stretch their branches to the sky
In silent tribute to the memory
of George Washington, leader of
American revolutionary force
and first President of the United
States.
They are the result of a far-
flung tree-planting project, one
of the principal features of the
world-wide celebration in 1932 of
the bicentennial anniversary of
Washington's birthday. The A-
merlcan Tree Association spon-
sored the program, adopting the
slogan, "Ten Million Monuments
to a Great Man...evergreen as
Id the memory of George Wash-
ington In the hearts of the peo-
Two Klan Flogging Victims
Appear Before Grand Jury
Cat!
GAMBOA
. Blmoa'i Chareb
Holy Communion .......... MM am
Sunday School............. J m-
youth Organisation COS :0 om.
Evening Prayer A nibble
2nd A 4th Sunday ........... 1! *
Women AiutriUry ........ TJ ata
2nd and 4th Thuraday-
LA BOCA
St Peter's Chareb
Bay. Lemuel B. Sbirl.y. Prlaat
am.Holy Comaatmlon
t am-Cnorai Buaharlat and Barnton.
1 am.Morning Prayer and Chnreh
( p.m -Holy Baptlara.
7:0 pm-Vajnar and
Com
I a.m.
Sunday Mam .................."*
t3wi&*..:..............*
tfajf^i:..............*
COtSSTlOLOrlAVAL STATION .
;:::: m
Sunday Mam,
Naval H Adltal
FORT QVLICK
Tueeday ...
mmunio Saaday ana Thurtdayt,
capers nightly at T. -
I a.m., nimaw
Girl Prlendly I
p.m. Tuesday; V
cept Saturday O
and 7
IM om
Compline
MASO ABITA
"3 15-BtW.
MIBACULOUS MTOAL CTUBCH
New Cristobal. 4th. Q St.
Pastor. Rev Vhwert Bj-an. CM
Sunday Masse. 7. S A 10 m
Weekoiiy Mam tM am-
rfo'y Day Mass** tM A Ma
CoSetTorJrfcamry. nightly I* Ml
Sunday School aftar th. I am. Mam
Miraculous Medal Novena eervteee -
Man. 5:00 A 740 p.m.
itt Sat Devotlor ovary Ut Sat aftar
MMMACULATP TONCBTTION CHUBCB
Sunday Mam. g.-O0_am
eakdt;
Sunday School F*ge,
1:00 pm.
tte Van. ~A. t. -
gvery Mondap gJt am.
munion. ^^^
PABAaSO
Rev D. A. Cabarna
:00 a.m Holy Communion nd Sunday
Sk.paBt^Bs^lMgW.dB.
Saclety.
_ rANK
Be*. D.A. Osborne A Rav
11:00 a.m. Holy Comm_
mon 1st and Brd. Sundays.
11:0 a.m. .Morninj Pray"
tw^x5b
I TM .t-
tad. and 4th.
Weekday
Sat. 7:00 am.
Matsea Thur :M am
l:M o-n
ndayB
Holy Day Mam. 740 am. .
Miraculous Medal Novena eervtee -
Mllt TPriym Confor. Communion
IMe I-ctur. sMp. W.^d- '="^^lon, s., fao A 7,20pm
ST. THOMAS' CTtnBCH
Ottun, Neat Lock
Pastor. Re-. Prencl Lynch CM-
Sundav Mam. g:4 a.m. ..M ._
Waakday Maatea. Tue. A Prl tM m
Holy Day Mtts. tM a.m. ___
Miraculous Madal Novena aarvlee -
Bible Stud and Prayer Ser
%
aclfTc Sida Panam A Balboa
i "hurches B T. Bankln. Dls-
pastor
burches: Cab* Vetde. Ave. J. P. de
,0ms; Jamaica Society Hall; Chorrillo:
h Abajo: Pueblo Nuevo; Balboa Chapel
ag44 Gaviln Rd Balboa (Saturday
Mttng only)
Panam Spanish Church l.K. Cas-
0n, Pastor; Calle Darien.
'.ambo* ano ^rrilole A. A. Grlizle,
Atlantic Side
jllsh Churchs S T Clark*. DIs-
iiurches Colon English. Third Street;
9b* 1 English. lth St. A Bolivar
Cristobal Spanish ltth sl a bo-
i Av
Union Churches
___ire all Pretettanl cooperte wltb
'airily m mtiaUtli, liberty a aeti-
aasMiHah and caattty bs all Uriags
^ CHE ATLANTIC SID
} Tn* Rev Phillip Havener. Pastor
( Pnan* -M. ____
' 18-45 Worship *r*4ee and Church-time
/ 1:00 Toung Paopir Meeting
/ Oalaa .
aur*rf
.' The Kev i. William L. Graham Paatm
*M*"- M Broedcaw on HOB: HPSK
and HON ___
t 41 Sunday S Bill I.
1140 Worabip Service.
:** Chrialian
Th* Bav Henry Bail. Paatar.
Phone S-14SS
IX Bible School
lg I Worship service end Church Umi
sap
Youth Pellowshlp
PACMTK. (BOB
The Bev. Alax.udar H Shaw
Balboa Rd al Sar Pablo St.
Pastor
Phone t-ll'g Ctltirrti Office t-SSM
ajjg Church Sch... Pree bus aarvlea
1*:M Worship enrice. Junior Church
Primar Stary Hour I
r*lC...i:l*2>t*i(
Itt Sat Davotlon, ovary Ut Sat aner
*Um BOL PAMJLT CHUBCB
Margarita, CZ.
Pasta. Rev William J IPtan. CM
Sunday Maaaea. IM A tM la
Holy Day Maaa. **>
Miraculous Medal
Mon. 740 p.m.
Nova
Instructions ios auHm '-P
ConfesMoos Sat 440. : 4 "
"ST. JOSEPH CHL-BCM
Colon, lotn. aVoajtway
Pastor. Rev toynvtmd Maohata, CM
Aaritunt. Bev Bobert Vl^gnola. CM
Sunday Maatea. :4 A :00 am
o^fcMi-mt*'..*..*
lit. Prl Mansa*. S:tt A 140 m
Communion. am
BaptMuns Sun., 44* p m.
Mlreculots Madal Novan
Wed. at 4:15 A 7:00 pm
Novena of the Sacred Heart Ptt I
""enfeenon. Sat. 44. 4 pm *
7:4 to : pm.
Sunday School. 4 pm .^
Discussion Oub Young men Park*
Sun. S40 pm
Instnietlon for adulta slaking .know
ledge of the Catholic Chun*. Mon. A
Thur l 7:1 pat.
let. Sat Devotion ovary let- Sat aftar
VINCENTS CHUBCM
Silver City. CZ
Rev Raymond Les
Maa
Rev Baymond Lewi* CM
Junday Maaaea. 1:41 A 40 aaa.
Waakday Mam 4 am
Paaloi
Sunda
Churcb-Um* Bur
M Chi Rho-aaruor Hi Pallosrshlp
44 Post Hi ral'a!*>
All eet-yicea al O Gamboa Union
Church- corner nf Seillard Highway
The aatv taymond A
Phone -1
J
10J*
Gray. Mlnhner
Sunday Scnael.
Moru-g Worrhrp.
Rev Bayrrend A
_ Gray at Staled Pa*
|g'tS&a>moei
Holy Da Mas* 4 A : am
gunday School. II4g am
Miraculous Meda Navane aarvlee -
rum. 74 pm
Baptlam- Sun 44 gsaa. '
Canfeammts Sat 14. 4S am A IM
to gat p.m _^
Inatructlons ros adulta. Turn A PrU
(40 ta
1st SCt Devotion ovary lot Bet af!*r
OUB IJ4DY OP OOOO COU74SEL
Gamboa. CX.
Pactes Rev Charles Jacob. CM
Sunday Mama. 74 A 4 am
Weekday Macases 4 am.
Hot Day Hies* *:4 4 am
Mtraculou Madal Nov
lus 74 pm.
Sacred Hear) N.
am
Conlenstoe* Sat 7 4 pm.
in Sat OaveOon, ovary let
born. A Rev. C.A Crtgweli
Holy Communion and Bar
Srd. Sundays.
.Homing Pray" ad add-
h- gunaay.
BT.
and" The *n." rjaMnaWJiwMI
VeaeraWe Archdeacon
:oo ta Holy CoamtoaicB *m am
7:0 pm Evaraiongand Sermon
S.T.B. B**t*r '
iUNDAYB;
g am Holy Comnumlan.
am Choral CucharUt and
1040 am. Church School.
74 o Solemn Evensong A lev Mon
W EUNESDA S ^^^^^
7 "p m^ts.torS'a^Sarmon:
40 om Adult ConnrmaUon
Jevrhk
740
Other Churches
Ami Services
Apartment"l"Lua Bunding. 4th Street
Panam Mandar: tactura and Die.
cumien 14 am.
Sunday School :0 a.m.
AT5^Vdrc.kwrr^C-.
at aieeUni announced at torning
vico,
^%-v-S~
^jgcfcWa^
~f!v,0,'*,.-
74tm
Boy Scout Camporee
To Be Held Af Kobbe
From April 18 to 20
The annual Boy Scout Camp-
oree will be held at Fort Kobbe
from April 18 through 20, It wa
announced by Richard E. Cox,
Canal Zone Council camping
and activities chairman.
A hlfhllRht of the Camporee
lg the annual council-wide court
of honor which Is traditionglly
held on the Saturday night of
the Camporee. A special pro-
gram a little different from any
used In the past is planned, Cox
aid.
The camporee Is a schedule of
events in which each patrol com-
petes against a standard set up
by National Council. Among: the
events are knot-tying;, first aid,
Morse signaling, wood chopping;,
orienteering, uniform, camp and
clean-up inspections and blan-
ket roll relay.
Parents and friends are wel-1
corned as visitors on all three
davs. Cox said. They are espe-
cially welcome to the Court of-
Honor on Saturday night and:
the mass events on Sunday af-
ternoon, he added.
Patrols that auallfy in 11 of
the 14 events will earn a stand-
ard or red streamer while five of
the 14 events will earn a partici-
pating or yellow streamer.
merlca, from Japan and around
the globe to the Philippines.
They were started as seedlings,
shrubs, or well-grown trees. In
addition to acreage actually
planted in 1932, numerous sites
were designated as part of the
bicentennial project for later
planting, so that the "Washing-
ton trees" might perpetuate their
growth from one year to anoth-
er for.the benefit of succeeding
generations. '
Trees sprang up everywhere
singly, in small numbers, or as
entire forested areas. Herbert
Hoover. President of the United
States in 1932, planted a famous
'Washington elm' on the grounds
of the White House. The late
President Franklin Delano Roo-
sevelt, then Governor of New
York, had a Washington tree
planted on the captol grounds
at Albany, N.Y., and 1,000 on his
Hyde Park estate.
As the first step In an inter-
national nut tree planting pro-
gram during the Washington bi-
centennial year, a "descendant"
of the walnut trees planted at
Mt. Vernon, Washington's home
on the Potomac River, was set
out on the ground of the United
States captol in April, 1931.
In the fall of that year, Vice-
president Charles Curtis led a
fillgrlmage of Boy Scouts to ga-
her nut seeds at Mt. Vernon to
be planted throughout the world
in 1932. The walnut seeds were
sent by the Department of State
to United States embassy offi-
cials In 41 foreign countries.
They were planted with appro-
RALEIOH, N.C., Feb. 2S (UP)
The victims of a flogging that
led to the arrest of 10 former
Ku Kiux Klansmen by the FBI
were called before a special fed-
eral Grand Jury to testify here
today.
Mrs. Dorothy Martin, 27, and
Ben Orainger, 40, who told au-
thorities they were awakened
by robed and hooded Klansmen
last Oct. at Fair Bluff, N. C,
and taken across the state line
were recognized by a reporter
sa they entered the Juryroom.
Mr. Martin and Grainger en-
tered the juryroom separately
and each was In the room les
than 15 minutes.
When they emerged, they how-
ed their heads and left with
court officials.
It was not known whether,
they came here together or
whether they left the building
together.
Asst. district attorney John C.
Rodman said it wat not likely
that the special Grand Jury
would return any indictment
this week. i
The FBI, acting on the pre-
viously undisclosed case, swoop-
ed'down in dawn raids last Sat-
urday and arrested 10 former
Fair Bluff Klansmen on charges
of kidnaping and violation of
civil rights.
FBI director J. Edgar Hoover
said Grainger was flogged un-
til the blood ran.
The ex-Klansmen, Including
Fair Bluff town constable Early
L. Brooks and a fee deputy
sheriff, are awaiting preliminary
hearings In Fayetfevllle, N. C,
next Tuesday and Wednesday.
The surprise summoning of
the blue ribbon Grand Jury In-
vestigate "misguided and self-
appointed bands who frighten
and flog at night in violation
of state and federal laws."
Oilllam told the special panel
of 18 white men and two Ne-
groes to return indictments if
the evidence warrants, District
Attorney Charlea P. Green of
Loulsburg, N. C, who appar-
ently called Mrs. Martin and
Grainger here, said he Would
seek Indictment and prosecu-
tion at the earliest possible date.
While empowered to return
Indictments, Oilllam told the
Grand Jury that' It "principal
concern will be the investiga-
tion of conditions In the district
as they relate to organized
crime."
He dealt specifically In his
15-mlnute charge with night-
riding terrorism rampant in
coastal Carolina for the past It
months.
Oilllam, veteran Tarboro, N.
C, jurist, did not mention th*
Klan by name.
But he referred to "misguided
men" who have flogged and
frightened victims under th*
guise of upholding "principle."
PUPS IN INSTALLMENTS
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (UP)Faith,
. collie owned by Mrg. W. C.
Smith, gave birth to nine pup-
pleg one afternoon and nearly
four dayg later had seven more.
rney were piantea witn appro- ic ouifusc ou..u....-.B y*
Sri ate ceremonies In 1932 by the Mrs, Martin and Grainger fol-
nlted States representatives or lowed by a few hours Federal
by officials of other governments.'Judge Bon Gllliam's charge that
Piles Hurt Yoy!
Don't suffer from gainful, Itching
Pllaa anotbar hour wltaont trying
Chlnareld. Upon application CNIngrali
Itarta curbing Pile mlaoiie 1 way*: 1.
Daaea pain and Itching. 1 Help* enrink
or, avreUen tlaeue*. t. Belpe nature
hsal Irritated mamaran ana allay Pile
Nerveuaneaa Ask your Druggist for
rairi.ia < -
If any one patrol In*, troop
qualifies In all 14 event and all
other patrols hi the troop quali-
fy fo ra proficiency gtreamer,
the troop will receive the Presi-
dent' award, which Is a red,
white and blue streams*.
fxnfc-ciAiflay?s
^".Ms^Tr
We owl m th* American Legion Ban
,n front of thairt*gj..
Morning Worohr l:tt mm.
MK
tM
rHUBSUAi*S:
Prayei
Oufld.
!m7- Station, of the Crom.
lg a.m. Cmidrent Cenllrmauon Clam
7 40 o St. Oearge's Chart*
Gatun. C.I.
Bev golomon N Jacob.
a:t am Church School.
:*5 a.m. Morning Prayer.
1:00 am Holy fuchariirl and
7:00 Holy Communion (Alee Bely
Oay* and Saint Dayt.)
^ Wtdnaadayai
l:fto pm averting Prayer.
. I *o o .ta St Vrncent's QuBA
IJ0 om Chnrr Behoaraai.
Thuraday-
ca i m. M*nT*v rat
Arehdeacon Walanck Priam m
Morning Prayer .. ..
Holv bieharlat and
Church School .....
Solemn gvenaong
in Charts
* U am
7:0 am
* am
Mom
.man' AuxiHaty:. WjfUaWlav.
Thuraday
Order o St Vincent Aemlte
tumo ay. .
Vaatrv Mealing Ino Thurada:
Holy Caanmun'on. 7 em.
Bvenaong 7 JO pm __,..
Momma Prtyar. am. Prlday
tahearml
BIO ABAJO
St ChrM*aA*r's Charra.
"?N^tS-STL.
tame Pent BIN' *- ._
Holy Caanr^unton .......... TSB in
Butulav Schoat.......... ma
h*llmlls lMm*"
""Renata Prayer-BCe! amadp am
WwS^SS^-A*.th-ehvy,
I C A
CHUBCB
"Sfig&Jtf-*
IM gas- ___
B*sl ChjtajW. Ctwah
Morning dainttou at
Holy Communion at
ea
tM am
Holy Cearmwnlon a.......... tM am.
OWInaService ai ...
W*toa*toyi^Evan*lltlc 'sir-
rrldayt.'tanyl' Pambigi' end
ntjVtVrafrT
law"
S^
tagkga
Id* gun
lao am.
Christian Scientist
rjavjusTiAH ftqffltCT qTOias
ll!wad-d., tM ,
School Satam.
fatat Camrahof Cfcrlat.MmmOMMmt
11th Baraat A Mtva JS*Wf_
Buntfey 11* am. Wodnnsday t gm
Sunday Bmhaot a am.

HoIt Cnmmuntan Wmmmaty*. T am
Lutherin
Salvation Army
4^aB^afwssrs
aa*Vm-
........ Ham tJv
ghha, letfe Saraal .__
as
.
8 reasons why you should visit the beautiful Chalet
in X and 'D' Streets in 'El Cangrejo'
to be raffled coming Sunday:
1) It's the most beautiful house ever raffled.
2) It's completely, most elegantly furnished.
3) All equipments are reliable, well known the world over.
4) The chalet Is located In the town's moat fashionable residential action.
9) At only $8.00 a ticket It's a bargain you can't afford to miss.
8) You'll regret not having seen it and hearing your friends talk about it.
7) Hurry! Only few days left. The raffle Is to take place NBXT SUNDAY.
8) $8.00 won't make you any poorer, but If you win this chalet you certainly
will be rich! _
Don't miss this wonderful opportunity! Drive from Via Espaa Into VI
Argentina one block, turn to the left, drive another block and ttasre U tMs
house of your dreams! '
Tickets may be purchased at the chalet.
NOTi: For your eonveamtjfee thTlBst fleleetii for-the r*h IB b *tft a*
Plaga de la Lotera Sunday. February 94, the day of the raffle.
______________________________,_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________,________________________________________ -- --________,_________- .-_________^^___

A



-







in

"a.


'

WONDERLAND
BagaBMBB LirtaUPXAN CHUBCB
-Tne Cmtrch -
H. T. aan-srthal P****
egg Bama* Bead. kaUaaa
gwday Sehnol and Btbt
n WHAOs and Wo TIP oit^rmta
friendly ranimi vtraltt ah tlfati f*m
Prt ta t*jei^r>at seenrm aamdav-aaagj gmtl
- am. gam a gg. -
tmTh.Se.
ata
rhm.
A
a am.
Sat aftar ciigiy ntrati
tsrafcj;
oaieneV*
We-i
"-^^laaTl
T-----
aUvar City
Jewish
malar Peats, trnaa *M
tntrntXHW
aamal Av
Th *mumz things in Uwit Cavr** duu-wag fairy talc ire jut bit vmt tmaa-f
thaa the result boiiesieii ret ttroafh dTertisiBf oo HO, Ptnuu'i EnfKsh ln-
fMte statkn-. Yo. cafj be tare yo.' he pkasetl end rewr4tJ whea ym ft* y
tales throat* H00. With HOQ's audience, you can't miss fire! Rasfie, a prured sales
inedia, is better oo H00. You need only try t to see. Call Panau 2-3wo: tlwt's BOO,
where your advertisios dollars are BKKiER.

Harry A afield
g aa


" p '".', .
-p
page roc
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILf NEWSPAPER

*N


IN HOLLYWOOD



HOLLYWOOD i NEAI-Behind bile on the memorial steps for, ter chams he claims, will survive
the Screen: It may be an eye- the final scene In the Bob Walk- because of big-screen video.
brow-lifter in Washington, but er-Helen Hayes co-starrer, My; ....
now it ran be told Son John." The go-ahead has been given, MIAMI.
a un\uZL i ;,t man lim- it MOM for Clark Gable's next America's
A Hollywood stunt_m.an._jmi-, ......______ __., .rfllllM|mi ,h,h h,. f(lmH m soil
Rich Everglade?
Going To Waste
TERM-
TIME TABLE
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951

Fh.. Feb. 23 most productive farmj
rov in dee ha lewof the! Hollywood's finally admitting movie which will be filmed in; soil the rich Everglades peat
tii,,, ,i Memnrioi mounted on a that television Is BIG compet-'French Africa in the spring. It's that fill "the nations wi
mahogany base bearing the gold
plated inscription: ., lt
"Knocked Off the Lincoln Me-; Fifty per cent of the move
nurial by Jimmy DundeeNov. theaters In the U. S will be_ell-
JkjSSl minated by TV, predicted Charles
; The piece of granite, the size of jKkouras, president of the F o x
a walnut, was chipped off when.theater chain, in a national
ptpdee turned over an automo- magazine article. The large thea-
lure story.
f THE SAVINGS BANK
g
1
Institution Guaranteed bv the State
9 Fsys Z% interest Annually on Savings Accounts
therich Everglades peatiand! I
winter |
ly dis-
appearing through a strange
process of oxidation.
Then he'll do a cloak-and-dag- In less than 50 years it will
ger thriller, "Two If By Sea," the have vanished, leaving a barren
story of a U. S. reporter who \ wasteland,
smuggles his bride a RussianI 'TheFlorida Everglades, which
ballerina, out of SUlln-land. The contains the largest known bodv
latter may be filmed overseas, of organic soils In the world, has
too. keeping Clark, and his mo-
ney, out of Lady Sylvia's reach
for at least a year.
INITlAi DEPOSIT $5.00
We make loins with guarantee on first mortage
other securities.
SAVINGS
25c 50c. $1.00 and $5.00
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety deposit boxes, for jewelry and
document, in different sizes.
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
109 Central Ave. at
renter of "1" Street
. R. I)c ROUX
Manager
COLON BRANCH:
Front St. at corner
of 7th St.
CARLOS MOUYNES V.
Sab-Manager.
HOURS:
From 8:00 a.m to 12:30 p.m
SATURDAYS: from :00 a m to lt:tO p.m
lost as much as six to seven feet
of soil in the Lake Okeechobee
area since 1912," sail John C. Ste-
phens of the soil conservation
LEFTOVERS A LA HOLLYWOOD service.
Stephens, In a Joint report
Hollywood faces life dept: with Lamar Johnson, engineer of
The wife of a star who hasnt the southern Florida flopd con-
worked in months, so the tale is | trol district, urged farmers to till
told, decided to pome to the aid the 400,000 acres of Everglades
of the familv finances by wrlt-lpeat that remain virgin, "before
Ing a cookbook. I the day soon when they'll be un-i
, fit for agriculture."
"It should be a ble posalar The 100,000 acres o fabulously
hit.'1 she told a friend. 'It's devot- rich Everglades soil now produce
$50,000,000 worth of truck crops,
ed entirely to different ways of
preparing left-over pheasant."

The word's out at. MGM that
"The Merry Widow" puts Fer-
nando Lamas, the burnlng-eved
South American. In thp same
heart-bustln? league with John
Gilbert and Rudolph Valentino.
Lamas' sult-T, Latin lover act
Is set for thre more films
"Mevt^aa Village* and a -emaVe
of "F'esh and the Devil" both
with *va fo'dnef and 'titv^-
nns Vpat. Wet" with E*tbr Wl-
liam" And Iams la said to be
Lana Turne-'*: off-screen date.
Lapp's a blonde and Ava's a
brunet.
TV> Latin lovers have a prefer-
ere?
"llv." Frnindo Tinned, "I
don't worry annt lor."
Rum"- l r"mnrln< that Hum-
nhr*v Bocart' "Afri^sn Ouen"
oerformsnee will ge* hlfn an Os-.
rrr riorfiinatton... Elever-vear-
old PHf" Ne'cnn ion of O7,7*e!0_w
or.^ TTer-iflt. will r.iav a rol in; Director George Marshall, same
Mr-M''"ThThr.T^St'>H'''|picture, on whether Bob and
Cs*"~ dh-ee+or Bi"v Ond fcooney tre trylng t0 0utmug one
twped h'm nnqftor oee'" ti" *rf another-
Sometimes. |B|_a <*&"
sugar cane and cattle pasturage
each year.
Stephens said that after years
of research it still remains part-
ly a mystery why the fertile or-
ganic soli of the Everglades Is
disappearing at the rate of al-
most an Inch and a half a year.
"Oxidation seems to be the
principal cause," Stephens said.
"As the soil dries out in times of
drainage, bacteria set to work
and consume the organic matter,
releasing It into the air as carbon
dioxide gas."
Originally, the Everglades con-
tained about 2,500,000 acres of
rich peatland. By the year 2.000,
Stephens said, nature will have
finally reclaimed all of the black
soil which has comprised the
world's most bountiful farming
land in this century.
Mickey Rooney's arms instead of
his in "The Military Pollcelnen":
mils dell needs a Seeing-Eye
:=ons. '
Bob

Hone to the

ro ..
'.i

The Chase National Bank
of tho City of New York
Total resources over $5,607,000,000.00
HE REALLY SAVED MOl
It's not being advertised but
oi.riieoc.:stanley Kramer* latest econo-
when Marilyn Maxwell falls Into my achievement is the film ver-
'slon of the Broadway hit. "The
Fourpoater," co starring Rex
Harrison and, Lili Palmer.
, The one-set film with a two-
I person oast cost $175,000, $800.004
LESS than the average B' film
at s> major studio. Rex and Lilli's
cat was fS5,M each.
.

General Banking
BRANCH
COLON BRANCH
CRISTOBAL BRANCH
Hollywood's oming up with a
rrrew trianglea boy, a jrrl and
i the atomic bombhi "Eagle On
His Cap." It's the true story of
Ool. Paul TibbetU, the pilot who
dropped the first A bomband
how all the secrecy almost cost
him his wife. Bob Taylor and
Eleanor Parker play the leads.

Veteran director George Cukort
angle on Hollywood's rush to
new faces:
"It's a great relief. Hollywood
wore out the old faces with bad
Stories. Now we're getting good
stories. and fresh talent"...
Marlene Dietrich's "Chuck A-
Luck" has a new title. "Rancho
Notorious." Personal choice of
Howard Hughes.
Pretty Eugenia Popoffs answer
when I popped off about her pro-
posed marriage to Steve Coch-

CAPTAIN EASY
Laying the Trap
BY LESLIE TURNF
aWtU...THW
GWe*iLOTSA
TIME. M. I BUT
HOW *)- MNA.
2 "O
= ARE MAPE-mOT BQgM ___


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY M, 1851
THB MHAMA AMERICAN AW 1NDEFENDENT DAILY NRWSFAFRR
J-^acific Society
*
&, 17, &IL. D.I &&- 5521
SIDE GLANCES
By Gdbraitli
ARGENTINE AMBASSADOR AND
MRS. LOPEZ MUNIZ ENTERTAIN '
The Ambassador et Argentine to Panama and Mrs. JaUo
A. Lopei Muftia entertained with a dinner giren at U>e_Em-
haw hi honor of the Saeretary ol the Arrentine Embassy
in Rto de Janeiro and Mrs. Carlo. Cooke. ...__, M
Secretary and Mrs. Cooke arrived on the Istnmas re-
cently ter a vtalt with her mother, Mr. J. Abdlel Ariai.
rreneh Minister and Ml.
Menant Entertain
The Minister of France to Pa-
nama and Mrs. Guy Menant
were hosts at a reception given
on Thursday evening at the Le-
Katlon oh La Cresta on the occa-
sion of the visit of the French
Cruiser "Jeanne d'Are."
Governor and Mrs. Newcomer
Leave for David
The Governor of the Panama
Canal and Mrs. Francis K. New-
comer left by plane Friday for
David for a vacation of one wees,
to be spent in Cerro Punta and
in Boqueta.
Duque-Halphen Marriage
Is Announced
The Rev. Father Angel Marcos
officiated at the private wedding
ceremony which united in mar-
riage Miss Gabriella Altamlrano
Duque, daughter of Mr and Mrs.
Wilbert G. Kodat and Mr. Hum-
berto Halphen. son of Mr and
Mrs. Rafael Halphen of Pana-
ma, on Wednesday at 7:00 a.m.
at the San Jose Church In Pana-
The sponsors were Mr. and
Mrs. Tomas Gabriel Duque. Mr.
and Mrs. Rafael Halphen. 8
the parents of the bride
bridegroom. Mr. and Mrs.
mando Alspurua. and Mr.
Mrs. Teodoro Gormas.
A reception for relatives
close friends was held at
home of the bride's parents im-
mediately following the ceremo-
ny. _____
Mr. Rutherford Honored
At Dinner ...
Mr. Walter Rutherford. Vice-
president of the Chase National
Bank of New York who la a visit-
or on the Isthmus, was honor
guest at a dinner given Wednes-
day evening by Mr. and Mrs. J.
Edward Healy at their home.
Canal Zone for his new duty
with the U.S. Air Force on the
staff of the Commander-in-chief
Caribbean Command.
Film Executives
Guests at Hotel El Panama
Mr. George Weltner. president
of Paramount Films Internation-
al and Mr. Arthur L. Pratchett,
the Latin American Divisional
Manager arrived on the Isthmus
Friday and are guests at the Ho-
tel El Panama.
Ella
and
Al-
and
and
the
Consul General and Mrs. Sanches
Honored at Dance
The Consul General of Pana-
ma in Havana, Cuba and Mrs.
Oscar Sanches were the honored
guests at an informal dance giv-
en recently at the Union Club
by Dr. and Mrs. Luis Vallarlno,
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Boyd. Mr.
and Mrs. Aquilino Boyd and Mr.
and Mrs. Aquilino de la Guar-
dia, s
Mr. and Mrs. Eggleston
Celebrate Wedding Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Maurice
Egeleston of Balboa, received
their friends Thursday evening
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Ar-
my-Navy Club. Fort Amador.
The reception was given In cele-
bration of their fifteenth wed-
ding anniversary.
Bertrand: Chaplain. Dorothy
Ross Abbott; Musician, Lucille
Morris; R.S.N.G... Edith Bp-
pley; L.8.N.G.. Clara Youart;
R.8.V.O.. Lucille Smith; L.8.
V. G.. Elisabeth Stabler; Inside
Guardian, Johanna Pederson;
Outside Guardian, William Dab-
son.
Edith Eppley. as District Spe-
cial Deputy, had as her install-
ing team W. D. Williams. Lu
clue Smith. C. Bremer.
Brown and Clara Youart.
The Cristobal Rebekah Lodge
No. 2 was largely represented,
havlnn motored across the isth-
mus to attend the first installa-
tion in the lodge hall so recently
dedicated. Those attending were
Mrs. Percy Lawrence, N.G.; Mrs.
Frank Estes, P.O.; Mr. Frank
Estes, Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Will-
lams, Mrs. William Nessler. Mrs.
David Marshall. Mrs. Roger Dea-
kins Mrs. F. W. CRourke and
Mrs. Freda Boydstron.
Sasso-Osorio Wedding
Of Interest Hera
The marriage of Miss Vera
Sasso. daughter of Mr and Mrs
Alfredo Sasso, of San Jose, Costa
Rica, to Mr. Geoffrey M. Osorlo.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Oso-
rlo was solemnized Feb. 18 at
8:00 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
Leone Sasso, the bride's grand-
mother.
Escorted and given In mar-
riage by her father, the bride
wore a gown of white sat hi and
lace with a fitted bodice made
with a diamond shaped lace yoke
an dtlght fitted sleeves ending in
points .over fief hands. Lace in-
serts formed panels in the skirt
which ended In a lone train. Her
finger tip veil of Illusion was
draned from a Juliet cap of lace
arid her only ornament was an
hrtrloom diamond pendant. The
bride's bouquet was of white aza-
lees. I
Mrs. MlltoruC. Henriquez. the
matron of honor, and the sister
' of the bride. WorV a strapless
, gown of tangerine taffeta with
an oversklrt anffstole of match-
, lng net. Her bouquet was of deep
re* roses
Mr. and Mrs. Healv
Vacation In David
Mr. and Mrs. J. Edward Hea-
ly, Jr.. left by plane yesterday
for David for a short vacation to
be spent in Boquete.
Navy Officers' Wives Club
Meets for Luncheon
The Navy Officers' Wives Club
of the Fifteenth Naval District
held a "Washington's Birthday-
luncheon on Tuesday at the Ho-
tel Tivoli in honor of new mem-
bers of the club.
The new members Introduced
were Mrs. 8nyder. Mrs. T. B.
Rep Is, Mrs. M. A. Kasworm. Mrs.
F. D. McGlnnls. Mrs. B. Reese.
Mrs. R. H. Dlllahay and Mrs
H. Feenev. Other guests present
Included Mrs. White. Mrs. Will-
iamson. Mrs. Hale and Mrs. J.
P. McLean.
The club voted to give a dona-
tion of $100 00 to the Crusade for
Freedom. Nominations were pre-
sented for the election of officers
to be held Pt a Coffee at the Ar-
my-Navy Club on March 17. A
committee was BDpomted for the
All Navv Spring Production to be
given in April.
Mrs. F. H. Arnp* was the
hostess for the njncheon and
was assisted bv Mrs.vH. W. Vet-
ter, Mrs. R. T. Sweeney, Mrs.
C. W. Golden and Mrs. I. J.
Foote.
!The
a, Miss 7
*',
.Jo HI l,
y. se**
Wonhip
ir bridesmaids were
lasso. Miss Nora 8as-
Ja Qulros. Miss Fell-
d Miss Julieta Ca
Tach wore a different
Xrainins <>V*m gown of lace and
WoMbi land c\tried bouquets
lo Sa so. the bride's
_>re a- gown of royal
P| with a corsage of
irt Osorlo, the brlde-
Jier, was gowned in
mousselame de soir
>chVr orsage.
_ coupv left for Las
e atallnas, a mountain resort
I-car San Jose, for a short wed-
n In? trio And will be at home to
cfiielr friends after March 1 to
'lella Vista,
kf'
c Jolonel ans. Mrs. Gwlnne
I* Tive In Panama
'1 Lt. Colonel and Mrs. A. E.
Ii.3wlnne arrived Thursday in the
i
Following the meeting re-
freshments were served In the
social hall.
Elks To Sponsor "Moonlitht"
The Benevolent And Protective
Order of Elks Invited the public
to attend a "Moonlight" cruise
to be held on March 21 at 7.00
p.m The cruise will begin at
Gamboa continue through the
cut to Gatun Lake and back.
Admission is $2 00 per ^person
and Includes refreshments, din-
ner and dancing._______
Ancn Retired
Employes To Meet
Next Thursday
The Ancon Chapter No. 88, Re-
tired Chapter No 88, Retired Ci-
vil Employes, will meet next
week Thursday night at the Pa-
cific Clubhouse, it was announc-
ed today.
The announcement said the
Ancon chapter of the National
Association of Retired Civil Em-
ployes Is In no wav connected
with any labor union on the
Isthmus.
Retired employes attending
meeting are requested to contact
Cspedes Burke, recently ap-
pointed Inspector of the chap-
ter, for Information on Congress-
ional bills 6294, which allows a
better annuity for retirees and
8008, which exempts retirees
from taxation.
^ftlantic Society
W Warn J~ fls
&, 195, QmUn 3C/U* Qmtmm 378
I
DR. AND MRS. ENO HAVE OPEN HOUSE
The outstanding social event of the weekend on the Gold
Coast, was the "Open House" held Friday evening at their
new home on 7th St. In Colon, bv Dr. and Mrs. Harrv no
Over four hundred friends, from both sides of the Isth-
mui, called daring the evening Largo buffet tables were ar-
ranged on the groand floor of the residence and small tables
were placed In the garden, which was Illuminated with sirrinjs
of lights. A profusion of tropical ferns, and palms, with Pride
of Barbados and bougalnvlUa were osed in the decorating of
the residence. _
Mrs. Stanley Kldd was tn eharge of the gaeot book.
Susan Prince
Celebrate* Sixth Birthday
Susan Prince, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Prince of Balboa
entertained a rroup of her small
friends on Friday from 5:00 to
8:00 p.m. at dinner ad "mov-
ies" in celebration of the occa-
sion of her sixth birthday an-
niversary.
Assisting m the celebration
were Susan's brother, Rlckle
Drlnce. Linda Fawcett. Bobble
Bovd. Ann Marie Deering. Linda
Sclsbury, Eddie Salsbury, Bruce
Hill. Judv Paulson. Marv Howe.
Carla Ellch. Rlckle Mahonev.
Marge ret Mahoney and Beth
Brown.
Rebekah I odge Elects and
Installs Officers
The Isthmian Canal Rebekah
Lodge No. 1, held an Election and
Installation of Officers at the
new Wlrz Memorial. 808 Balboa
Road, on Tuesday evening.
Following the election the new
officers were installed and in-
cluded Marie McNeff, Noble
Grand; Vera Slmonsen. Vice-
Grand; Gladys Harley. Secreta-
ry-Treasurer.
The newly Installed appointed
officers were Past Noble Grand,
Maude Clmchard: Warden, Ma-
ry Holmer; Conductor, Nettle
PANAMA CANAL EMPLOYEES MUTUAL
BENEFIT ASSOCIATION
The regular annual meeting of the Panam Canal
Employee Mutual Benefit Association will be held at
Ratbag Clubhouse at 7:M p.m. February 27th. The
entire membership Is Invited to attend.
"TN best Inauranoa protect I ever hadgrid you had
to ttH him all my Inveetrhents were defend bonds!
RUTH MILLETT Says
It's never a mistake
To tell a man how clever or
smart or Interesting he is.
To tell a woman she looks
beTf.faUy"Idon'tknowMiyou
really don't.
Ago Khan Passes
Disturbed Night
After Attack
CALCUTTA. Feb. 23 (UP)
The Aga Khan passed an uncom-
fortable night following a mild
heart attack, but "there's noth-
ing alarming now," according to
his private secretary.
The Aga Khan's physicians are
attending him in the Govern-
ment's House here, as all en-
gagements have been cancelled.
The 75-year-old religious lead-
er of more than 20,000,000 Mos-
lems suffered a mild Heart at-
tack while en route here early
Wednesday from Dacca, Pakls-
Tne 240-pound Aga attributed
the attadfeta unusual haat.e
staff physician, attending him
at the Government House in
Calcutta ordered complete rest.
Aga movie-actress Rita Hay-
worth's father-in-law. was ac-
companied by the Begum his
fourth wife a former French
beauty.
To ask the advice of an expert.
To praise a meal a hostess has
cooked.
To notice that a woman is
wearing her hair differently.
To Inquire about a woman's
grandchildren.
To turn aside a catty remark
with an aware but good-natured
reply. ,
To discredit the damaging tid-
bit a gossip offers you In the hope
you'll want all the Juicy details.
To send flowers to a woman.
To take the time and trouble
to put another person at eas
To listen politely to a chll
To pay an older woman a com-
pliment.
To let a man who hasn t got-
ten around to proposing know
that he has competition.
To praise a husband for the
qualities you most want him to
have.
To let the host as well as the
Mrs. Vest Complimented
with Shower
Mrs. William E. Adams enter-
tained with a mornhig coffee
and miscellaneous gift shower,
at her lovely home at Brazos
Heights. Thursday to honor a re-
cent bride. Mrs. Wilbur Vest,
the former Miss Sarah Macrea
dy. .
Mrs. A. F. Raymond and Mrs.
John Kemlck presided at the
flower decked coffee table.
The guests included: Mrs.
Samuel Macready. mother of the
honoree. Mrs. Samuel Puller,
Mrs. Oscar Wieberg, Mrs. Will-
lam Mlddlsmas, Mrs. Francis
Alexaltls. Miss Frances Alexal-
tls, Miss Margaret Dagnal. Mis*
Carol Rockwell. Mrs. Michael
Brzezinskl. Mrs. Harold White,
Mrs. Colin Lawson, Mrs. Alvhi
P. Heyd, Mrs. Ray Latourneau.
MM. Eugene Dldler. Mrs, Chas.
Will, Mrs. Herbert Lewis and
Mrs. Cecil Alberga.
Ben Voyage Silver Dollar Shower
for Mrs. Warden
Mrs. E. I. Orr and Mrs. John
V. Boyer were co-hostesses for a
morning -coffee and silver dollar
shower given at the residence of
Mrs. Bover on the Coco Solo Na-
val Station. Thursday, for Mrs.
O. F. Warden.
Mrs. Warden has been resid-
ing with her daughter and son-
in-law. Mr. and Mrs. C. M.
Lowe on the station and Is leav-
ing tomorrow on the "Laura Ma-
ersk" for San Francisco.
The buffet table held thee de-
coated cakes Insclbed with "bon
voyage," "smooth sailing" and
other appropriate remarks. The
gift was presented in an attrac-
tively wrapped container. An au-
tograph book, containing the
names of the ladles at the party,
was also presented the honoree.
The friends who gathered for
Mrs. K. H. Roder. Mrs. R. L.
Stacey, Mrs. F. T. Sustae. Mrs
K. E. Sterner. Mrs. K. L. Wins-
low, Mrs. C. W. Wright, Mrs.
W. W. Utterback. Mrs. E. Ham-
mer and Mrs. John Freeland.
number please call Mrs. Eugenia
Borden Colon 619-L.
Gatan Church Honors
Dr. and Mrs. Gregory
The members or the Gatun
Union Church entertained with t>
family supper at the church
Thursday evening to honor Dr.
and Mrs. R. R. Gregory, who*
have been members of the
church for a long period of
years and have participated to"
(Continued on Page SIX

Visitors from Indianapolis
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin J. Gil-
lespie and Mrs. Estell Taylor ar-
rived Tuesday evening by plane
from Indlanaoolla for a visit with
Lt. Commander and Mrs. J. F.
Crlder at the Coco Solo Naval
Station.
Mr. and Mrs. OUlespie are
Commander Crider's parents and
Mrs. Taylor is his aunt.
Farewell Luncheon
for Mrs. Norton
A no host luncheon was given
Lby a group of friends at Fort
Oullck for Mrs. Robert L. Nor-
ton, who is leaving soon with
her husband. Lt. Colonel Norton
for duty at Fort Bliss. Texas.
The party was given at the Ft.
Gullck Officers Club. A patriotic
color scheme was used on the
U-shaped luncheon table which
held a floral ship a sa center-
piece.
A silver trav m the honoree's
pattern was presented her as a
farewell gift.
The ladies who participated In
the affair were: Mrs. Henry F.
Taylor, Mrs. Maurice Webb. Mrs.
M. D. King. Mrs. Hollis J.
Preiss, Mrs. Kenneth K. Kolater.
Mrs. Robert C. Stump. Mrs.
David H. McCracken. Mrs. Ar-
chie R. Davidson. Mrs. Earl W.
Scarborough. Mrs. Gordon B.
Patton, Mrs. William O. Roberts,
Mrs. Henry A. Labacz. Mrs. E.
D. Habbegger, Mrs. Lee E.
Montgomery. Mrs. Morrla Vllkin,
Mrs. R. J. Noll, Mrs. Pascal
Adamo Mrs. Clayton H. Moore,
Mrs. David W. Brumfleld, Mrs.
Byron K. King. Mrs. Raymond
Patricio. Mrs. Halland W. Han-
a visit with their friend, before ,
her departure were: Mrs. Lowe, kel. Mrs. Orvllle T. Shaw, Mrs.
Mrs A. M. Bunting. Jr. Mr. I John C: Hlpson. Mrs. Robert H.
F Karpenskl Mrs. Major Jones. I Hlpson, Mrs. Vincent O. Oberg.
Mrs W W Bankston. Mrs. D.;Mrs. James B. Humphrey, Mrs.
R Brlgsg, Mrs. Fred Bell. Mrs. | Walter O. McBrlde and Mrs.
R L. Oatrldge. Mrs. W. C. Ca- Gordon C. Knight,
rv Mrs. J. S. Cranford. Mrs. 8
C. Dills. Mrs. C. O. Derrick,
Mrs. F. A. Halnes. Mrs. O. T.
Door Prise at Catholic Daughters
Supper Announced
hostess know you had a fine Daniels. Mrs. J. F. Urle. Mrs. The lucky number for the door
time b. E. Johnston Mrs. O. Grassl, prise at the litney supper given
To praise a woman In front of Mrs. C. R. Hlrscher, Mrs. D. A.jby the Catholic Daughters
A VERY
PRECIOUS PERFUME
DE
COT Y
Distributers: CIA. CTRNOS, S.A.
Telephone 2-1792
Febraary S3, 1932.
W. A. MOORE, See.
+Jhe panam \-jolt L^lub
invites its members to the Tamborito Dance
which will be held at the Club on Carnival San-
day at 12 noon, in honor of the Carnival Queens
from the Union Club and the El Panam Hotel,
Their Majesties Uky I and Maritza I.
Dress: Pollera and Montuno.
Panama, Febraary 1952.
s
CreateJ especially
CTOr. t/o
foil/
her'hibad. Good." Mrs. S. L. Gerszewskl,
Mrs. R. W. BUI. Mrs. J. L. Hol-
To say "I'm sorry," even when;ton. Mrs. G. J. Hysantls. Mrs.
the othe rperson Is In the wrong, g, n. Johnston. Mrs.
To guess a woman's age as five
years under what it could pos-
sibly be. ...
To tell a man you value his
opinion. ...
To tell a parent something
complimentary about his child.
Johnson. Mrs. Carl Knapp. Mrs.
A. Luder. Mrs. A. G. Prlen,
America was No. 355. The up-
per was given at the Parish Hall
of the Church of Our Lady of the
Miraculous Medal on February
14.
Will the person holding this
stop womf ma
start Anting!
Don't worry about thai
first gray strand! Let it be a
"blessing in disguise" a
signal to vou to take action
and do something about ob-
taining lovelier, o a f a r a I
looking new haircolor! So
relax and let Ron* rake
over! Por Rot Oil Sham
poo Tint treatments conceal
every visible strand of doll
or gray hair, give sparkling
highlights and lastre, adds
subtle, natwsl-bokmg color
that changes your worry to
delight'
ROUX OIL
SHAMPOO TINT
COLORS CONDITIONS
CLEANSES
Caution-, use only as directerf
on label.
JULIO VOS
lie. S "A" Street
Telephone 3-SS91 Panama
\
Come in for one of our
new flattering short cuts
to hair style beauty. He'll
love it and so win you.
Better make an appoint-
ment earlier.
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bldg.) Balboa
Announcing THE NEW
DE SOTO FIREDOME 8
America's most powerful engine design!
On display shortly at
COLON MOTORS, INC.
PANAMA
Tivoli Crossing
, COLON
Tenth Street
THE NEWEST
R6A VICTOR
EXPOSITORY PREACHING ASSURES CHRISTIAN GROWTH
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
v Balboa Heights, C. Z.
.
/
SUNDAY Febraary 24
10:45 A. M. "Life's Greatest QuettUmV
Matt. 22
7:30 P. M. "God's High PUm For Holy Living"
Calatians 2:20
Trumpeteers Youth Choir.
Pastor W. H. Beeby-Speaking Radio OutletHOXO-760 Kc
Everyone Welcome
Wl PMBACH CHRIST CRUCIFIED RISEN COMING AGAIN

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Nfiw! Sto
mouth odor______
brighten your teeth!
I'M OUSl-Aftg
COMPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
AVAILABLE ON
EASY CLUB OR CREDIT PLAN
FOR ONLY $10.00 MONTHLY
USE YOUR OLD RADIO AS
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RADIO CENTER
40
Coln
A data breach ee day, a adatad^breadi the
max day-it cao happen to smybOy. So guard
against this hard-to-forgive fault by brushing
your teeth with Ipana aft every meaL
Yea, Ipaanas sweeter, ctone breath
because it stops unpleasant mouth odor TWO
vs, right while ifs deaaelaf yow taathl
1.
awMmi eirffetoa eaa attefcy ***
At the same the, Ipae fata taaoh ***j
" ca i inner U each, a)
dean and bright. So foe
brighter smile-gtt a tube of Ipana.
No other tooth potte, smmoniated
or raguUr, has boon proved bettar
theaaMIM/

IPANA TOOTH PASTE


PS-it SIX
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIIT NEWSPAPER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY tl, ItSt
in i in
You Sell em When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our

.

UWU saKVH.i
Urn -"


*
aiMRU US I^MUtPB
H1IU ,AKl.TO>
S==HS
FOR SALE
Household
TOR SALE:Norgt refrigerator, 60
Wcl.7 8 cubic f..t $75.00. Norge
Z no. $75.00. Call Ft. .CI.Y-
;. ten 4128._________
"OR SALE: Overstuffed soto, 4
Lion".-China clout or book-
Em" moh^.ny coffee table; rna-
hogany nested tobies; cedar eh.:,,
ST wottr heoter; fllasswore;
Yher furniture. Telephone Pan-
ama 2-3067 otter 6 p. m.
Simmon living set.
FOU SALE:
Dovenport open to
Neorly new. 768-D,
Balboa.
double bed.
Bmebey St.,
FOR-"SALE:9 eu. ft. Weetinghous
refrigerator, 3 year guarantee on
unit 2212-B. Curundu. Tel. 83-
5252. _______.
FOR SALE
Autoa-Htt'il**
9ALUN Dft tftOUCSA AMERICANO
iHfc PANAMA 4MEK1CAB
& fli"c22S A^Cele-
MISCELLANEOUS

12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
V
Chennault' Son Says H e Was Fired
For Not Kicking In To Slush Fund
FINANCING
Service Personnel ond
U.S. Civillon Government Employee
new used car through
GOVMNMN1 MPLOYIS FINANCI
90
Fort Worth, Texos
Also Direct
Loans Automobile
Serving jovemment tmploye* end
Service Personnel w *e Ceno Zone
tot 14 /eorv vVHh out nonetng
your insurance automoticelly adjusted
to U. S. coverage.
ARRANGEMENTS CAN SI MADS
THROUGH LOCAL AUT0M0SILI
MALM
FOR SALE: Furnishings, parlor,
bedroom', dinette, modern, new
condition. 2 I 3 8-A, Curundu.
' Phone 83-6179. pfter 4 p. m.
FOR SALE: Studio Couch, rug,
Singer treadle sewing machine,
lamps. 2 beds, tobies, bookcase,
,i,c. Household articles. No. 4.
Apt.
dmo.
2, Domingo Diaz St., Pan-
3-4" pry
83-5281.
after 6:30
FOR SALE 8 foot De Luxe Gener-
al Electric refrigerator, deep freexe
n top, 60 cycle. 8 months old;
Maytag .automatic washer, i
cycle. 10 months old;
wood, lerge piece;
547 -B Curundu Hgts
Saturday.________
FOR SALEMahogany dining table,
9 dining choirs, breokfost table
and chairs; 5 beds ond mattres-
ses, high chair; 3 odd tables, small
desk, lamp. 3 cornice brands 41 ,
new picnic basket,- |ug. Electro-
lux vocuum. 0823 Plank St.
Phone 2-4402. .
Agendas Cosmos, Automobile Row
29, will solve your Auto-Problem.
Tel. Panama 2-4721. Open all
doy on Saturdays.
FOR SALE:1947 Studebaker 5-
pessenger coupe. Good running
condition. New battery. House
163 Pedro Miguel. Phone 4-307.
my* e Me*!* problem?
Writ.
I.. 2011 -(Mem
Aniniwew
C Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellanemi*
FOR SALE: Frtsh broiler mash
$7.00 per cwf. sock. Better price
larger quantities. Casa del Agri-
cultor S. A. 8th ond 9th Street,
Amador Guerrero Avenue. Colon
Tel. 1080-L. ,
SPOT REDUCING
Teke Inches off hipa, waist, or legs
quickly and safely without diet or
exercise. Call 83-5245 for appoint-
ment for a fret triol treatment.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE1949 De Luxe Ford
Station Wagon V8 with overdrive,
new tires. 27,000 miles. $900.00.
Call Ft. Cloyton 4128.
TROPIC TOPICS
DON'T RUN THE RISK: of faulty
mufflers. Come in; let us check
it. Complete replacement for oil
cor. TROPICAL MOTORS.
FOR SALE
RmI Estate
FOR SALE:Building. 8 apartmenH
In Exposition. Produces more than
12% annualy. Eosy payment. For
Information see Mr. Fbrsgo per
anally. No. 18 Eaet 29th Street.
.4 10 to 12 noon end 3 to 5 p. m.
No dealers.
RENT;Two
FOR SALE OR
room cottage In cool El Vollt. Tl.
Panamo 2-2446.
*OR SALE:Land in cool, booutlful
EL VALLE vicinity Hotel Pan-
Americano. Large or mall lote
moderately priced. Tel. Panamo
2-2446 or inquire et Hotel.
FOR SALE:House in New Arreijon
No. 61. 2nd. Avenue. 1190
square feet, tile floor, mahogany
paneling, 1000 mts. Jack Davis,
Box 5028. Cocoli. C. Z.
BARGAIN. .
The biggest opportunity!!
Offer only 20 hectares of rich lond
at cool "El Voile." 15 ets per meter.
Less than 1 I one I hectare 25 <.
See W. L. Lum 4th of July Avt.
61. Phone 2-2446.
FOR SALE: Home ond income
property, concrete block cottage
and two concrete guest cottagee.
all tile red floors, modern beth-
' rooms, one bedroom each, gardens.
fruit, 1 1 -2 miles on Tnterna-
tlonol Highway in Arroijan, John-
son.
FOR SALE:Ideol home, concrete.
City convenience, fruited, fen-
ced lond. Owner Moving. Moke
offer. Phone 1213-J CoMn.
$* SALE:Parque Lofevre, 2 lot*
700 ond 680 meters, $2.25 per
I meter. Aneon Avenue No. 6. 2nd
floor. Hall.
Position Offered
i
WANTED:Experienced English and
Spanish stenographer. Write giv-
ing age, experience, ote. Enclose
small photograph. Writ* E. E.
ox 134. Panoma.
Help Wonted
fVANTED.Good cook with expc
FOR SALE:1947 Pontioc 4-door
odon, good tires, radio. $950.-
00. If Interested cell Colon 723.
FOR JALE: I94g Ford Tudor. 6
cylinder, food condMMe. Tele-
ah.R. Settee 3012.
FOR SALE:Btoutiful Chryiler New
Yorker 1948, 18,000 miles. Phone
Cristobal 3-1454.
FOR SALE:Oldamobile "88" 1952.
information house 25-H Coco So-
lito. Coll 88-358 Fort Gulick.
FOR SALE:Chevrolet 48, with ra-
dio, lights direction, new battery,
and new tire, Flt Drainer, per-
fect condition. 46 Street No. 27,
Apt. 12.
FOR SALE:OeSoto 49, 4 door
new tire, new battery. Perfect
condition. Cuba Avenue No. 58,
Apto. 0A
----~-3-----------------
Atlantic Society..-.
(Continued Prom Pare FIVE
all phases of the work of the
Church.
The group wu seated at lone
tables centered with red bou-
gain villa. The head table was
covered with a fishing net and
had an unusual arrangement of
driftwood and shells as the cen-
terpiece.
Seated at the hed table were:
Dr. and Mrs. Gregory, Rev. and
Mrs. J.W.L. Orahm. Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Chambers. Mrs.
Sallie Foote Allen, Mr. and Mrs.
Leon Egolf. Mr. and Mrs. Em-
erson Cottrell and Mr. Curtis
George.
Informal talks were given by
Mr. Egolf, Rev. Graham and
Rev. Gregory. Mr. George pre-
sented Mr. Gregory a gift of gold
cuff-links from the members
and Rev. Graham presented
Mrs. Gregory a handsome black
mantilla.
Mrs. Ruth Clement sang two
solos to open and close the pro-
gram.
Over a hundred members of
the church and friends with
their families attended the din-
ner, which was arranged by Mr*.
Floyd McDermltt.
Cristobal Star Club Meeting
The regular meeting of the
Cristobal Star Club' wu held
Thursday evening at the home
of Mrs. Amy Sabtn on the Coco
Bolo Naval Station, with Mrs.
Aliene Dills and Mrs. Jeannle
Roder as co-hoetesses.
I*
rience. Apply only If
good. House 10069
Avenue, between 10th and I Ith
St. from 2:00 to 4:30 p. m. Co-
lon.
Following the meeting, at
which the president. Mm. Irma
Jefferies presided, games were
played. The priesa were won by
Mrs. Samuel Roe. Miss Grace
Williams and Mre. Anrella Ha-
darlts. The white elephant went
to Mrs. Patricia Cary.
The other members present
v?" were: Mrs. Mathilda Keely, Mrs.
Rooteveitipauiine Mwrexda of Culpepper.
Va.. Mrs. Mary O. Engelke and
Miss Mildred Neely.
Orchid Society
The Gold Coast Orchid Socie-
ty held their bi-monthly meet-
ing Thursday at the borne of Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas Fels In Gatun.
TNI WNtLI A,Ler business season the
valla Mil meeting was turned over to the
" guest speaker, Mr. Walter Cope
of Florida, who is visiting on the
Isthmus.
Mr. Cope gave a very Interest-
ing ard informative talk on the
shipping of orchids to toe States
and of the growing of the plants
in Florida.
looming plante were brought
In by the members. Edited to the
large collection of Mr. and Mrs
Fels they made a very interest-
ing display.
Mr. H. E. Small. Jr.. brought
* collection of local plants which
p e distributed among the new-
members to assist them In ee-
llshlng their collections
orchid plants were given a*
n prizes. The winners were:
. ..s. Edith StlebriU. Mrs. U.
WANTED to place reliable moid
Good worker. Phone Balboa 2321.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle*
FOR SALE:Harley Davidson "74"
. OHV. 51 model with accessories.
House 5547-G Hoins street, Dia-
blo Heights. Call between 4-6 p.
FOR SALE:Royal Enefield 500 ex.,
750 miles. Special prlee. Inquire
Rodeloo. S. A., Plora 5 de Mayo.
Tel. 2-2847. Panam.
Widening of H-Bomb
Plant In Savannah
Hinted By Senator
ATKEN, 8. C, Feb. 28 (UP)
Sen. Burnet R. Maybank (D-
S.C.) hinted today that en-
largement of the Savannah
River H-bomb plant near here
may be forthcoming
Maybank, who Is Chairman
of the Senate Banking and
Currency Committee which is
conducting a community facili-
ties hearing here, said ''more
money" than had been previous-
ly been asked for by the Atomic
Energy Commission would be
requested of Congress In the
next two months.
Maybank also said he hoped
"any EAC expansion" would be
at the South Carolina plant.
That statement came follow-
ing a report to the committee
by Curtis A. Nelson, EAC plant
manager, who said 45,500 work-
ers would be employed In the
plant itself by September. Nel-
son said 7,500 of these worker
would be permanent employes.
Maybroke broke In to say that
he believed 'from 10,900 to 12,-
000" would be permanent work-
ers.
Nelson said 120.000 new people
would be living in the area
within the next year.
RESORTS
Gromlich's Sonts Clara beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
kill*.. Oceoneid*
Claro. Son 435.
Ponomo I-1 71. Cristobal 3-1673
Foster's cottoges cempMtoh furnish-
ed, one. two or three bedrooms,
linens, get refrigerators, gat
ranges, dishes ond kitchen wore.
Half a mile beyond Santa Clara
private road to beach. For in-
formation visit or phone Dagmar,
Tivoli Avenue No. 6, 2-0170,
Panoma.
FOR RENT
Apartments
CUMMERCIAL fir
PROFESSIONAL
We have everyliilojf
to keep vour Laws
sad Garden beautiful
daring- the dry season
Tool
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrows
Insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
ALHAMMA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished opart-
ment. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT:Bachelor apartment,
partly furnished, private residence,
beautiful pork, Conveniences foi
gentleman wishing home etmos
phere. Coll appointment 3-1484
FOR RENT
Miftcellaneoas
FOR RENT:Magnificent
clol space on Centre! Avenue end
U Street. Cell Ponomo, phone 3-
0769.
LOST b FOUND
Brown, Mrs. M. R. Paine and
Miss Donna Paine.
Quests for the evening were:
L. L. Barfield. Mrs. Esther
Hooper. Mrs. Paine and her
daughter.
The members present were:
Sergeant and Mrs. Allen Lloyd,
Mr. and Mrs L. W. Croft. Mr.
and Mrs. r*. T. Schuberg. Mr.
and Mrs. 17 C. Stiebrits. Mr.
and Mrs. E. E. Orvls. Mr. H.
P. Butcher and daughter. Mr.
P. L. Hooper, Sergeant and Mrs.
David C. Harshaw, Sergeant and
Mrs. M. J. Kelly. Jack Pearson,
Brian McNamee. Mike Dare. Mr.
and Mre. H. E. Small, Jr., and
Mrs. E. A. Cox.
The next meeting will be held
at the Block House in Gatun on
March 6 at the usual time.
Luncheon and Charades
Mrs. J. H. Bow-man and Mrs.
O. J. Kamptner were co-hos-
tesses for a buffet luncheon
Wednesday at the home of Mrs.
Kamptner at Fort Davis.
A large arrangement of red hi-
biscus blossoms were used on the
buffet table and clusters on the
card tables. The group put on
charades in the afternoon.
The guests were: Mrs. Don
lame, Mrs. Paul Davis, Mrs.
Daniel Driscoll. Mrs. Cecil, all of
fort Sherman and Mrs. Clalr
aesel, Mrs. Fred Little. Mrs.
Henry Hartwig, Mrs. Ben Roll,
Mrs. Henry Knlppert and Mrs.
Frank Schultz of Fort Davis.
\Jl1 W
LOST:One ostrich leather wallet
Finder please keep money and
return wallet and papers fo Mrs.
Chorles L. Beeton. Tel. 3-3068.
LESSONS
Want to loam Spanish? Private tu-
toring t your convenience by ex-
perienced teacher. Phone Bolboo
2-1843.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Wkne 100,000 p.* Mesa
Presents
' Saturday, Feb. SI, IMS.
rJO-MoLean's ftogram
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30-What's Your Favorite
6:00Ouest Star
5:1SMasterworks from France
6:4--*\meicen Folk Songs
X 229*y p"ri* x**5 "
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00Newsreel U.S.A.
8:15Bine Crosby Show
9:00HOG Hit Parade
:S0VOA Hit Parade
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30Having a Wonderful
Crime
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 AJs\-Slgn Off.
Sunday, Feb. 24, 1552.
8:00Sign On Musical Inter-
lude
S: 15Newsreel USA. (VOA)
i 8:10Hymns of all Churches
1:00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OF
THE AIR
9:15Good Neighbors
: 30London Studio Melodies
(BBC)
10:00In the Tempo of Jam
10:30Tour American Muslo
11:00NATIONAL LOTTERY
11:15The Sacred Heart Pro-
gram
il:30-Meet the Band
12.00-tovlution to Leamter
(VOA)
P.'*.
13:S0~Salt Lake Tabernacle
Choir
l .00The Jo Stafford Show
1:11The ChoraJiers
l :S0Rev. Albert Steer
2:00Drama and Symphony
Hoar
4 :S0What's Your Favorite
8:00London Forum (BBC)
8:30 Music of Donald Voorhees
(VOA)
7:00Musical Notebook (VOA)
7:30Thru the Sports Olass
7:45Science It The Christian
Man (BBC)
8:08 Sports Roundup and News
815Report from Congress
8:30Show Thne (VOA)
8:45The Letter Box (VOA)
1:00United Nations Review
(VOA)
1:30The Blng Crosby Show
(VOA)
10:00BBC Concert Hall
11:00Sign Off I
FOR USE, NOT ORNAMENT
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (UP) Mrs.
W. E. Rose has more than 400
pit and pepper shakers in her
election but not a single set on
w dining table Mrs. Roee eom-
'ies her salt and pepper and
.eeps it In a single Shaker.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
179 Central Ave. Tel. 8-0148
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Buys: Brewery.
Sells: Abbatoir.
Tel. 3-471 3-1680
MODERN FURNITURE
cueron-Bun/i
Slipcover Reanbolstery
visit oue snovr-RooM<
aiveete BBMs
i.t.**\. Osee n (Aieauetn s)
Free lartsaates Ptesm a Denverr
TeL X-MU ~ I** lakliNMv
INSTANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(fortified with Vitamta D)
for
DRINKING
a for
COOKING
for
WHIPPING
Farm Freeh
Flavor!
On Sale la
P. C. Co. Commissaries.
FOB FOUR HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. x Justo Arosemena
Avt. Colon Tel. 457
Restaurant Robbery
Admitted By Youth
FORT PIERME, Fla., Feb. 23
(UP)A lS-'year-old boy admit-
ted to police here today that
he masked himself In a pillow
slip, then carved bis way
through the roof of a restaurant
and robbed the owner of $2,580
at pistol-point.
A simple mistake over auto-
mobile license plates led to his
arrest, spoiling what had the
earmarks of an almost "perfect
crime."
The youth confessed to deputy
sheriff Vernon Christensen that
be cut through the roof of the
Meadows restaurant while the
proprietor, Johnnie Meadows,
was away. When Meadows re-
turned unexpectedly, the boy
aimed a .38 caliber pistol at him
and forced the owner to give
him the $2.580 from the safe.
The boy then borrowed a car
from a schollmate who worked
at a nearby drive-in theater
and hid the loot. But then he
remembered leaving his spec-
tacles at the restaurant, and he
returned to the scene.
Patrolman Bob Jones happen-
ed to notice that the car had
no license tags, and he went to
Investigate, unluckily, the friend
from whom the boy had bor-
rrowed the car had taken off
his 1SS1 plates and hadn't yet
put on his ISIS tags.
Upon close questioning, the
boya formar employe of the
restaurant confessed the rob-
bery and took officers to the
hidden money.
" De* Gets Teagh ~
WATKINS GLEN. N.Y. (UP)
Jamas 8pader, post office clerk,
discovered that the docile, soft
looking doe is a tough animal to
tangle with. A* "e t0* his first
ride in his new sedan, a doe ran
into the side of the car. breaking
the door and damaging the
front end.
RjhJtlllluJ
liuniw SSeeaiere. nek. etc., m a
TV frmrSm*? hot kurrovs
rletit eaeia. tstreaesi tste akm and sees
ft f the r*ol oaua ef rur trouble.
!Ka"e \Xr wo*'" w,r"' "5? **
HtSSSriUir^->T-v =:-t to*
BATON ROUOE, La., Feb. 28
(UP)Officials denied today a
charge by the son of Gen. Claire
Chennault of Flying Tiger fame
that he was fired as a state
trooper because he refused to
donate $50 to the campaign
fund of a gubernatorial candi-
date in the recent) Louisiana
elections.
The denial was Issued by Col.
E. P. Roy, head of the state de-
partment of public safety.
Simultaneously, be admitted
that several other officers, in-
cluding a one-time bodyguard
of the late Sen. Huey P. Long,
would be fired In March.
Earlier, David W. Chennault,
28-year-old son of the famed
general, had charged at Mon-
roe, La., that he had been dU-
mtssed. effective March 1, be-
cause he refused to give money
to the campaign fund of Garlos
O. Spaht, Gov. Earl Long's can-
didate for governor.
Chennault, a Navy veteran
and father of a small son, said
he was advised yesterday of his
dismissal in a letter from Roy.
The letter, he said, was dated
Feb. 30, the day after the Loui-
siana run-off primary in which
Judge Robert F. Kennon of
Minden soundly defated Spaht.
Chennault said be was re-
Suested to donate $50 by Capt.
x Ensmlnger, commanding of-
ficer of troop F at Monroe, at
the start of the campaign sev-
eral months ago, but refused
to do so.
Roy ridiculed reports that the
troopers were fired because they
failed to contribute to cam-
paign funds for Spaht.
He said the cutback In per-
sonnel was necessary in order
for the department to "live
within Its appropriation for the
remainder of the administra-
tion."
The public safety director
termed Chennault's charge as
one "made by a sorehead."
He contended no officer was
required to contribute, though
"a man might have been asked
to volunteer some funds."
Roy said he was sure that
"some of the men dismissed did
contribute to Judge Spaht's
campaign."
Included in the other "1$ to 15"
who will be fired In March was
Capt. J. E. Dearmond, one-time
bodyguard to the late Klngflsh.
For 15 of the 17 years he has
been on the State police force
Dearmond has been in narcotics
investigation and has directed
the state work to that field.
In his charge,- Chennault's
said patrolmen were asked to
donate $50 to the campaign
fund, sergeants $75 and captains
$250.
When he was asked to do so
by Ensmlnger, he said he told
him he didn't have the money.
He was told he added, that he
could give a little at a time.
"I refused," Chennault said,
"but later he called me back
and stated that he would have
to have the money the next
day."
SC Jury Seems Hung In Case
Of Jailer Who Beat Charges
COLUMBIA, B.C., Feb. 33
(UP) A federal Jury today tp
peered deadlocked in the case of
a 37-year-old Jailer charged
with violating the civil rights of
prisoners by beating them, hang-
ing them by their feet, and oth-
er abuses
Shimmel said the mistreat*
meat! charged In the indict-
ment "recall what Is now going
on behind the iron Curtain and
what our boys are now fighting
against."
But defense counsel Shep K.
Nash told the Jury he had never
Reuben L. Irby was indicted before seen such a "trashy case."
on 18 counts charging violation'He asked the Jury if it would
of the rights of 15 prisoners. Two,take away Irby's liberty "on the
of the counts were dismissed
and the case went to the Jury.
Testimony in the three day
trial was completed this morn-
ing.
fore Judge George Bell Tim-
merman. 8r.. charged the Jury,
testimony of perjurers."
District Attorney Ben Scott
Whaley said "If one-tenth of
what Is In that Indictment Is
true, It is a deplorable thing."
"I didn't believe when I firet
heard it. that such could happen
assistant District Attorney Louis in an enlightened county as
Shimmel described the case as a sumter. But I felt that It wu
"picture from the dark ages and; my dutv to have the matter ln-
not as Justice should be admin-
istered In this country."
vestlgated by the Grand ury," he
said.
Nash said the government wit-
nesses had "pig-tracked" one
another to tell the same story.
He reminded the Jury that the
women witnesses were former
prisoners with "bad reputations."
irby. who was a Sumter po-
liceman for six years before be-
coming jailer, testified for more
! than an hour yesterday. He de-
nied he mistreated any prisoners.
Tlmmerman directed a verdict
of acquittal on two of the 18
original counts. One charged
that Irby forced a woman pris-
oner to have sexual relations
with him and then gave her
drugs to sustain an abortion.
The other charged he beat a
mentally deranged prisoner.
Tlmmerman said there was in-
sufficient evidence to sustain ei-
ther of these charges.
Other counts charged the stoc-
ky, ruddy eomplexloned Irby
with hanging a prisoner from
the ceiling of a cell by his feet
and then beating him: flogging
other prisoners and a number of
other abuses.
WATIR-COOIED C.l.-New-
ett thing in G.I. fashions is this
air-tight suit designed to protect
the wearer against both poison
gas end biological warfare. The
new outfit, called superior to
other impermeable clothing by
the Army Chemical Corps, uses
a water-cooling system to allow '
the soldier to wear it for sev- '
eral hours, in contrast to former
models which were too uncom-
fortable to be worn that long, t
Young Chennault said he quit
about three days later and went
to the district attorney and pre-
sented his case.
Shortly after that, he said,
Ensmlnger offered him his Job
back and he accepted It because
he needed the money.
Then, Chennault said, he was
called down on a drunk driving
case he had Investigated and was _nvv _.,
told by Ensmlnger that he was "g^OSS*.' '^JliSj,
reporting him to Roy. |^2? West pman governmrnt
"I didn't hear any
I received the letfi
was fired." he said.
1,240 Germans SKI
Being Held As POWs
,v more until ^vW that L2 Germans
goslav Jails.
Prague Radio Hints
Chief ol Staff
Dismissed By Reds
More than 2,000,000 German
soldiers and civilians were listed
as missing in Soviet Russia and
other Iron Curtain countries.
About one-half of those held
by the West085 in allare
serving sentences ranging from a
few veers to life Imprisonment in
VIENNA,. Feb. 33 Prague Radio todav strongly In-,war crimes. In Germany Itself,
dlcated Csechoslovakla'a chief of at Landsberg In the U.S. zone
staff. Gen. Jaroslav Prochazka.'as well as. in the British zone
has been dismissed from his post
and purged from the Communist
Party.
On order of the day Issued on
the 34th anniversary of the Red
Army was signed by Defense
Minister Alexei Ceptcka alone.
In the past all similar docu-
ments have been signed by the
defense minister and his chief of
staff.
Today's omission of Prochaz-
ka's name was thought by ob-
servers here to give credence to
earlier reports that he had been
purged and arrested on charges
of complicity w an attempt to
overthrow the Czech Communist
rstase.
The "consplracv" to overthrow
the Red Czech reelme presently
headed by President Wement
Gottwald was allegedr led by
former eecretarv-general of the
Csech Communist Party. Rudolf
Sjlanskv. whose arrest was order-
ed by Gottwald last October.
PhiDDine Trooos
Clash With Hnks
On Estate Raid
MANILLA. Jan. 23 (UP)
Philippine army troops today
clashed with an undetermined
number of Oommunlst-led Buk-
balahap forces who aDparentlv
Intended to raid the canlnbang
sugar estate of Joes Ylo. a
member of the council of state
fe Laguna province.
The estate Is presently the
and In
zone.
ittlich m the French
The German government's fig-
ure showed that the number still
held bv the Western allies is on-
ly about one-third of what It
was two years ago.
On Jan. l. 1950, the figure wat
8,838.
Pacific Side
Policeman's Ball
3 Weeks Away
Only three more weeks remain
to get tickets for the annual Pa-
cific Side Policeman's Ball to be
held this year at Hotel El Pan-
ama on March 14 at 8 p.m.
Funds from the dance will go
to the Policemen's Benefit Fund.
Reservations for the ball may
be made by calling Balboa 1277
and policemen claim It will be a
"first come, first served." af-
fair. Tickets are $1.
A big surprise floor show is be-
ing planned. In which members
of the Armed Forces will parti-
cipate. Music for the occasion
will be furnished by Hotel El
Panama's Joe Sudv and his or-
chestra, as well as Angelo Jaspe
and his band.
Jungle Jim Price has agreed
to furnish transportation from
the Civil Affairs Building that
**ene of a big wedding celebra- night to the hotel for 25 cents a
tkm.......---------------- person.

FINEST
BOURBON
WHISKEY
NATIONAL
DISTILLERS, S. A.
Trans-Isthmian Highway


Mturday, febrtjart si. m
tm PANAMA AMEWCAJ AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAOE SETER
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Ihc Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840
Royal Malls Unes Ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENBK SERVTiS
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PRU AND CHILE
M.V. "LOBOS" ...................................reb- 29th
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAQENA.
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORURA.
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V. "RBINA DEL PACIFICO"* (18.000 tona)... .March 1st
MOT*: Ta .V. BINA DM. PACIPICO'' will Ml all Kins*
Ih. Much Voyaie.
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "SANTANDER" ..............................Feb- al,t
Accepting passengers In First. Cabin and Third Claw
"Superior accommodation available for psssengers
All sailing Meet to change without ootie
PACIFIC STEAM NAV. CO., Cristbal, ft!. IM IS85
PORD COMPANY Inc. fanama Tel. l-IW/lM! Balboa MM
Shipping & Airline News
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
GppbI While Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service_____________ Cristohal
8.8. Chirlan!................................** "
S.S. Quirlgua ................................** *
S.S. Chlrlqui ................................March
HaNlutr Batrliarat* ChllM *4 Omm* Car*o
Arrives
New York Service____________ Cristbal
8.8. Veragua ................................&&.
S.S. 8anto Cerra .............................JJ
S.S. Esffcrta ..................................***
Waakly ailltae to Nw York. ** ttltaat, U* Aaart*.
Sin rranclaro, anille.
*.* beJfM Mlltan Crlatokal to mm Caapt Caatril AaMricu PtrU.
Cristobal to New Oriesn via SsilslrorJi
Telt Hoodurss Cristbal
, i.....ir i' ill in p'HI' i .i i i. i li*.i
S.S. Chlrlaul ................................'I- *
S.S. Qalrigaa :..............................*c5 *
S.S. Chlriaal................................***">
(Passenger Service Only
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL Mil PANAMA 8-1884 *' COLON M
PAA Communications
Studied by Experts
A world-wide communications
system that handles more than
8,500,000 radio and telegraphic
messages a year In Latin Amer-
ica alone U being atudied m Mi-
ami. ,
Attending the second annual
operational communication coti-
lerence of Pan American World
Airways are the top communica-
tions officials of PAA and Its
principal affiliates In Latin
America. ,#.,
Establishment. of unl form
methods and procedures and -im-
provement In message handling
are the chief objective of the
conference. ...
Newest lint in the globe-gird-
ling message ystem was descrio-
ed at the meeting. It U the re-
centlv completed remote radio
receiving and control station at
Qramacno. Brasil. Just outside
Rio de Janeiro. ..,.
A former commercial station
built during the war. the station
has been equipped with the lat-
est communications develop-
ments, including a VHF link sys-
tem with a special tone panel to
rovlde two-way communications
with Ssntos Dumont Airport at
Rio and with the transmitter In
another rio suburb.
Oramacho provides air-ground
radio telephone communication
for flight of PAA and Its aflu-
ate, Panair do Brasil (PAB). It
service Is also available to other
scheduled airline In that area.
The $120,000 station, owned
and operated by PAA and PAB,
has a staff of 80 employes. Ora-
macho ha an operating range
sotuhward to Buenos Aires,
northward to Miami and acros
the South Atlantic to Africa and
Europe.
Capt. Valdo Lynch of New
York, PAA system communica-
tions superintendent. Is director
of the conference, which is be-
ing held at Miami International
Airport.
Other visiting officials of PAA
'and affiliated airlines In attend-
ance include Roland R. Pife of
tACOiV ON ItiDOl
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written fr NEA Service
>
j Country's Flag
the tag of
|I8 Wading bird
HOBBEONTAL 8 Imitated
1.4 Deleted U jaSu.
^ in Italy
8 Bow slightly
8 Hateful
10 Greek slave
n Pito
18 Warns
If Compass point
18 Snake
ISIncideat
14 Age
15 tehee
IT Underworld
Mki
i!?!^ "^'Fastest
19 Reckless J8 Reason,
driver as French cake
S0"* Imposing
JS Formerly M fiZZ Jm
14 M.larial feverc22i
i?oTy "Natural fat
38 Higher
BB Pronoun
80 Direction (ab.)
31 Dow
32 Narrow valley
84 Comfort
87 Rapse
S8 Prosecutes
M Silver
(rymbol)
eOTriteat
Near
7 Beak
49 Attentive
60 Malt beverage
81 Hotel B
attendant
MUter
15 Hangman's
knots
Mfpraa*
TSmTICAL
lCalm
IConrtellation
8 Negative reply
4 Allot
Answer to Previou Puzzle
m i.^hw iPimi=ti
lir j : u ; .(*.'i (
Ml""-T i. : i' ; 5W
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AJI5
1
8
EAST
1074 2
J109I
811
*
41
48
41
45
Scottish
headgear (pi.)
Wings
Cmara part
Comparative
suffix
Musical
direction
48 Show
contempt
50 Goddess of
infatuation
52 Artificial
language
54 Length
measure (eb.
K4
781
7852
WEST
all
?'
4KJS4
4W10III
SOUTH (O)
7AQ882
? AQ10
OAXQ
North-South vul.
South West N.rih
2 V Psse 2* Pass
IN.T. Pasa INT. Pas
6N.T. Pas Pas Pas
Opening lead* J
New York, PAA system, landline
coordinator; O. Lelte de Castro,
PAB superintendent of commu-
nications and Celestino C. Cos-
ta, his assistant, both of Rio de
Janeiro; Adolfo T. Cosentino of
Buenos Aire!, operations and
communications superintendent
of panagra. _
flrnest A. Washington of Bo-
a. Colombia; communications
superintendent of Aerovas Na-
cionales de Colombia (Avlanca);
Manolo de J. Bannatyne of Ha-
vana, superintendent of station
of Compaa Cubana de Aviacin
i Cubana i; Luis Ouyon of Hava-
na, assistant superintendent of
stations for Cubana.
Representing PAA's Latin Ame-
rican Dlvialon are Robert Lock-
hart, communications superin-
tendent; Jack Winn, assistant
lommunlcatlons superintendent;
James F. Roth, chief of landline
communications; Eleaaor A. To-
aores. supervisor of the Central
American communications sec-
tor and Seaburn H. Fischer,
communications services super-
visor, all of Miami: Jame! C.
Shattuck. of Caracas. Venezuela,
supervisor of the South Ameri-
can north coast communications
sector, and Lee-A. Reed of Rio
de Janeiro, assistant chief flight
radio Officer.
Queen Liz Warned
By Press To Stay
Out Of Politics
LONDON, Feb. 28 (UP) The
Daily Herald, newspaper organ
of the British Labor Party to-
day published a front-page
warning to Queen Elizabeth II
to stay out of politics and be
'constantly, on the alert"
against bad advice bv Prime
Minister Winston Churchill,
The article first appeared In
the magazine Tribune under the
signature of Jennie Lee, wife of
Leftist Labor leader Aneurln
Bevan.
Miss Lee called Buckingham
Palace out of date, incidentally.
The significance of the attack
lay not In the fact that the
markedly Leftist Tribune pub-
lished, It, but that the Daily
Herald the official organ of the
Opposition party published It,
under a two-column headline
on the front page.
French Foreign Legion
Soldier Shot By Snipers
TUNIS. Feb. 28 (UP) Snip-
ers fired on a military patrol at
Kef during the night, killing a
EIdler of the French Foreign
gion
STILL IN MINORS
Cincinnati-(NEA)-The Paci-
fic Coast League, International
League and American Associa-
tion have 10 cities among them
with populations greater than
Cincinnati.
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT AD$
There's nothing like a team
match to show up weaknesses in
technique. The slam In no-trump
was made at one table but boot-
ed at the other. Moreover, the
guilty declarer didn't rea libe he
had made a mistake until he
found out how the slam was
played at the other table.
In the first room, South won
the opening lead with the queen
of clubs and cashed the king and
queen of spades. He entered
dummy with the king of hearts
to cash the ace and lack of
spades, discarding diamonds
from his hand. Then he went
back to the hearts.
Unfortunately for him, East
had a natural heart trick and a
fifth spade to cash. South had a
few harsh words to say about hi
luck, bu tnever dreamed that he
had misplayed the hand.
If you haven't already een it,
look for the right way of playing
the hand before" you read on. Its
really very simple.
Is the other room. South began
hy taking the queen of clubs and
the king and queen of spades,
just as the first declarer did.
Then South led a heart, but
played low from dummy instead
of putting up the king.
This was the key play. South
was willing to give up one heart
trick, but he wanted to give It
up at a time when the defenders
: would take nothing else.
East won with the eight of
hearts and returned a diamond.
South took the ace of diamonds,
entered dummy with the king of
hearts, and cashed the ace and
Jack of spades to discard his los-
ing diamonds. It was then a
cinch to return to his hand with
a club In order to cash the rest
of the tricks.
'MOW IS"
THE IEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
*AA
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGILfJ
MIXICO
Wonderful vacation at tna
year'e lowest rates await
yon in Mexico and the
U. S. A. And Uiere's a new
low combined fare to Los
Angele. $3*0.80 round
trip. Chicago is no more
than hah* a day away, via
Miami, with DC-6 service
all the way... Your choice
f 2 service to Miami: "El
Inter Asaerksno" and "B
Turista'' flights.
Tfrtl A/tnl ft
CAN FILL YOiiR NEEDS!
Vm ousj^ix p/a
iiUO ?*
PAN A MEM CAN
Htmtm AsmwArs
*W: L SkM4 N. %,
tsL 8-S8W
Cafas S*Ut SU*. Tat. 1fT
TOROS
. AT
LA MACARENA RING
in Son Francisco Carden
SUNDAY Feb. 24th at 4:30 p.m.
Armllllta de Espaa
Distinguished "Matador"
FOUR
(4)
BULLS
will be fought and killed.
We are pleased to an-
nounce that we have
obtained the balls from
GregOriO Pliebla Miguel An&el arimaloVs
From Mxico Ranch.
Box Scats............. .. $3.00
Shaiif ................. 2.00
General Admittance........ 1.00
{wrybody fogd Classified1*
TODAY
PANAMA CITY
THEATRES
Prmmrt
LUX THE ATK
l:M 1:14 3:11 S:4t 7:22 :M PI
Texas
Carni-
^ i<2aW
C i NT HAL-
MONA FREEMAN
BILLY D* WOLFE, in
"DEAR BRAT"
- Also
Lattst
Political
Succesi
BELLA.VIST A
At 1 30, I;1S, pa.
Fjrrol SXTNN
Vlvcca MNDrOSSS, hi
ADVENTURES OF DON
JUAN" (Tech.)

At 3 50 7:35 p.m.
JAMES CAGMBY
An ShwMra Pat O'Brle.
bi -
TORRID ZONE"
and (ddlUonal Itr.ctlon
Big Day for Chico Carras-
quel at the Yankee Stadium
CECILIA THEATR-E
A NEW TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL HIT!
"RICH. YOUNG AND PRETTY"
Jhm POWELL Danlcll* DARRIKUX
Also: 'THE STRIP"
toiiy roaarsT Mirk boonkt____
TROPICAL THEATRE
Bill WILLIAMS Jane NIGH and Ralph MORGAN, la
"BLUE GRASS OF KENTUCKY"
Toa NEAL and Wendy WALDRON. ha
"NAVY BOUND"
ENCANTO THEATRE
__- A?.tumult -
Ruth Roman
Steve Cochran, in
TOMORROW ia
ANOTHER DAY

In grid Bergman. In
"SARATOGA TRUNK''
TIVOU THEATRE
-MOMENTO
EOLTICO"
Ah -
Zully Moreno, in
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Dick Powell"
Paula Raymond, in
"THE TALL TARGET"
_ Also
Spencer Tracy
Pat O'Brien, in
-PEOPLE AGAINST
OHARA"
VICTORIA THEATRE
"RADAR PATROLS va.
SPY BUNG." 5-1
Also
GRAND CANTON TRAIL
DESTINATION, Rig BOCSE
Panama C^anai c/heaters
Shewing Tonight.'
DIABLO HEIGHTS
1:15 H:5
a) Ji.n PETERS
, Louis JOURDAN
P'Anne Of The Indias"
COCOLI
-15 S:t
Wandell COREY
Elln DREW
"Great Missouri Raid"
nrnnr iumtct Av* GAIIONER ff Jam MASON
PEDRC MIGUEL -panooba a tbt. Avino rnmaniAN"
Sunaaj^LOSWADOONE
BALBOA *5S!...
vtmin'coiao bi
ea'OMTM in
GAMBOA
as
TECHNICOLOR
ALBO j
r A 7 11 kl Richard BASSART Barbara BEL GEDDES
AL "FOURTEEN HOURS"
Jnnkttnou)



/AGE RG1
- ii-------------
1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN A AN INDEPENDENT DAIlf NEWSPAPER
-. ---------------~-i----------------------- "~ *~-'
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 33, 1983
Cuba Defends Series Lead Against Puerto Rico


Osorio Hurls For Panama
Against Venezuela Tonitc

Caribbean Series
Schedule
TODAY, FEBRUARY 23
Puerto Rico vs. Cuba
Panam vs. Venetuela
TOMORROW, FEBRUARY 24
Tuba vs. Venezuela
Puerto Rico ts. Panam
MONDAY, FEBRUARY IC
Puerto Rico VS. Venezuela
Cuba vs. Panam.
First game starts at 6:06 p.m.
No inning of first tame will
start after 8:40 p.m. Last team
Cuba's hard fighting Havana team tonight will send
. either Jack Collum or Adrian Zabala to the mount against
Puerto Rico in an effort to take a firmer rip on first place
in their march towards the IV Caribbean Series champion-
ship at the Panam Olympic Stadium. Puerto Rico is ex-
pected to come back with Jos Santiago, who held Cuba
to a 3-3 tie on opening night.
Ba&&xu-JS SSSbSSHSs'1" Cla$s,c Bowl,n9
SSSi^^fill^^ League At Diablo
rass-asr*- a -wj____ri
opening night.
Last night the fans conti-
nued to get their money's
worth of htrh class baseball.
Besides the tense moments is
the hotly contested battles, the
atmosphere was enlivened with
Thev were Jorgensen and Ed-1 7jton Todd/a PAA quintet
mundo Amors. Bert Haas skied snatched three points from the
to right, the runners holding. Sear8 team of the Classic Bowl-i
Pedro Formental, the next hitter, lng _eague at the Diablo Heights;
lined a base hit to right center clubhouse bowling lanes last
and the ball went through cen- nignt to put but nine points be-
terflelder Johnny Kropfs legs tween the two teams for the
and was boobled by Jim croninleague lead, with but four weeks
mental moved to third on a pass-, an apathetic PAA by a
' Venezuela" edeed"'PuVrto Rico,1 ed ball and scored on Fernando 871 ^ 788 but In the sec
Venezuela eagcu ruciw '"'ff, r;.- dnoi */ center. At this n ii t-n_. rith h.
"SJ'I 871 o in, on in tne second the
^TltarntnnfMtalhe Tirst'l Daz' single to center. At thtelPAA let loose with a barrage of
-n Both teanuf made eight1 Point, Frlcano was removed from strength, with Wilber rolling 232,
Rita andMM errors "oSd?5 game. Al Pointe relieved and ^gefke 211, and Fllebark 206,
Trinidad (CarAoi 'Bracho hurl- struck out Fleltas to end the tn^.rjooW and Schneider taking up
2d tn fnntamf to get edit for ning. _. .. the sfack with 184 and 177 for a
Panam did nothing In their ^^ 0f 1010, the second highest
d game bowled In the league this
'Ita Deal. Puerto Rico's out- SSK^S opened
'Jeanne d'Arc' Net
tb
tire eleven innings for the los-|
>rs. Deal, because of his hitting I
ability, was used in the cleanup!
For four innings Venezuela f_|-WArc U/in OvAf
and Puerto Rico played a runless KlflfGI) fflll WfCI
game, then both broke the Ice in, sai j a
the fifth with two runs. Vene- 4 P|L ||aM-l |]|rlr|ri
suela,got their runs on a walk to |J||| nflfai I/I3lllvl
Bracio, a sacrifice by Patino,
Mozzjll's single,.a base on balls ofilcers of the French cruiser s ar, gm 'gjm witn a M5 ge-
to Benitez and a double by Wil- Jeanne &AXC proved the strength ?. t*me c
mer Fields. 0ja challenge which they Issued
San Juan came right back to ^ 16tn naval District when
With their two markers on a sin- .. .,_.. ._- o _,.-..
In the third game, it was nip
and tuck going into the final
frame, but Engelke's double and
Wilber's turkey in the tenth
frame secured the game by 12
pins, 916 to 904, giving PAA a to-
tal pinfall of 2715 to Sears' 2659.
Engelke's 234 in the third game
was high for the night, as was
his 636 series. Bud Balcer of
The Jantzen team aiao snap-
gle by Almendro,
c.'.lera which moved
irkers on a sin- tney deieated the U. 8. Navy's ped three point 1
a single oy es- representatlves Thursday after- piace Nash-Wlllys
ed Aimenoro to __. in fl asrtea nf tennis match-l Linrton nrctrina a
from the third
team with Bill
"J ""-. ".""," _~,'r_ represenuauvo iiiuiou-, "-; piace aman-mujo wmu -, **-
c-.lera which moved Almendro to n00n m a Krieo of tennis match- Morton scoring a 577 series, ln-
third, then Almendro scored on eg _laye second .baseman "Piper- Dayis tlon Soflam. .led by Owesne with 553. For the
error with Escalera going an tne The matches, one singles and NaSh combine. Bill Malee knock-
way to third. _Jtwo doubles, were comprised ofed out a 571, followed by Jenner
Luis the player who was safe at first. won 0 ^he yrench racquet- <-------- '- '
on Davis' miscue. Jwlelders to the tune of 6-4 and
The next batter grounded out R_0 for tne singles, while the
to the second baseman but Dayis d0UDies matches were won by
" scores of 12-10, 6v4, 6-4 and 8-1
The firtt match was captured
by French Lieutenants Hinden
and Mouren after a long, hard
fought battle against Lieuten-
ants Robins and Lepetich.
had no time for a doubleplay try
and Marques slowed down after
Dlttmer wa thrown out. Mr-
quez allowed himself to be trap-
ped between first and second and
In the ensuing rundown of Mr-
oupz. Escalera scored Puerto Ri-
eo's second run.
mel was no further scoring
until the eleventh when Bracho
led off for Venezuela with a sin-
Sle to left. Sanabrla came to run
or Bracho who hurt his leg while w
running to first. Patino reached never lost his stride afterwards,
base on an error by Bster
with 548.
Bud Balcer still leads the loop
in Individual average with 201.
The results of last night's play
were as follows:
PAA
Fllebark 171 206 178 866
Cooley ... 152 184 146 462
Wilber ... 182 382 180- 564
Schneider 148 177 178 498
Engelke. 191 1 284 686
Clarkson, Puerto Rico's third
baseman, with Sanabrla moving
to third. Moments later, catcher
In the second match, Lieuten- Totait
ant Chaperon vied against Lieut- x"""*"
enant Barlow in a struggle which BEARS
teetered to and fro until Chap- jjec^rr-gher 175 158
on forged ahead in the last Siev "
three games of the first set, and S3E-V
ver lost his stride afterwards. %?*
In the final match, Chaperon S-i-er '
teamed up with Ensign Moigne-1 "***"
teau against Lieutenants (Junior iu.1.
graded Feeney and Stout to car-
789 1010 9162715
189
191
137
1*9
183
172
160
211
170 503
166 518
186 549
167 464
215 625
10 mira, amamanta mmu, ljhi irraaei reenev ana duiuk iu 1-
8t. Claire caught Sanabrla offjry complete victory home to the
third and he was run down for
the first out.
Mozzali walked, moving Patino
to second. Oliveros, who had re-
{ilaced Davis at second with the
atter going to center field, forc-
ed Mozzali at second but Fields
singled to center for the winning
run. i
Puerto Rico failed to score in
heir half.
In tne Panam-Cuba game,
Marion Frlcano pitched great
ball for seven innings as he
held the hard hitting Cubans
to three hits.
During this time Panam held
2-1 lesd by virtue of their two-
run rally In the first Inning. Cu-
ba's run was the result of a bases
empty homer by Johnny Jorgen-
aenhis second of the series.
The Panam runs came when
Frank Austin opened the game
wjth a walk. Forrest Jacobs beat
visiting Frenchmen.
MW/tDS.
________
871 884 9042659
Eady .
Marabella
Jamison .
Owesne. .
Morton .
Totals .
JANTZEN
. 155 169
. 188
. 155
. 199
. 225
194
179
165
183
314 5S
187 564
166 500
189 553
169 577
917 890 9262732
Malee
Thomas.
Jenner .
Plerobon
Madeline
Totals .
NASH-WnXYS
185
160
198
150
150
309
306
309
155
150
177 871
154 530
146 648
171- 487
150 450
838 940 7982576
Ol&TRJBlTOBC, ClA. CYRNOS, S. A.
Juan France
Mutuel Dividends
FIRST RACE
1-Bln Fin 84.60, $2.60, $230.
2Golden Babe 14, $2 JO.
3Don Arcello $2.20.
SECOND RACE
l_Xuck Ahead $4.80, 2.60, $2.20.
2Rio Mar $3.20, $2.60.
1El Mono $2.80. '
First Doables: (Sin Fan-Lack
Ahead) fui*-.--,
THIRD RACE
1Black Bull $9.60. $6.80.
aDelhi $2.80.
One-Two: (Black Bull-Delhi)
$12.M. __
FOURTH RACE
1Filigrana $9.60, $4.20, $20.
3-Villarreal $8, $4.30.
3Raymond $3.60. ____
Quiniela: (Fi-grana-VIUarreal)
I79.M. ______ __
FIFTH RACE
1Phoebus Apollo $4-0. $>_.
a-Royal agftjUt
3 In Time $3 JO.
sbVtNTHRACE
1Montmartre $9.60. $6JO, $3-0.
3Levadura $6-0, $3-0.
3 Mingo $220.____
Second Doables: (Heeior-llont-
m.rtre) $ZCJ$. __
EIGHTH RACE
1Hualro $17, $5 JO, $4.
3Choice Brand $3. $2.40.
3Battling Cloud $1.40. _____
Q-iniela: (H_s_- Choice
Brand) $Z2_s.
NINTH EACE __
1Incomparable $4. $2J0, $2-0.
3-Walrus $340, $3.40.
3Tupac $3.20.
One-Two:
Walra-) t"J._ __
TENTH RACE
1Carbonero $1$.40. $5.4$.
2-Duque $3.M.
ACTION-PACKED SERIES (Top) Forrest Jacobs is out at
third In the third inning of the Panama-Cuba game as
Havana third baseman Fred Benson puts the tag on him
when Jacobs tried to go third after a fly to rtghtfleld. Ja-
cobs had reached second by virtue of double. (Bottom) A
dejected Marlon Frlcano waits for his relief hurler to re-
place him on the mound in the eighth inning of the Pana-
ma-Cuba game. An also sad looking Ed Neville (center)
and Forrest Jacobs (back to the camera) are also In the
picture. Cuba had lust pushed over three runs to Wipe out
out a 2-1 deficit and go to win 4-2.
CERVECERA FETES BASEBALL MAGNATES Ernesto de
la Guardia Jr. (left), Mike Gonzalez (center) and George
Trautman get together for a little chat during the luncheon
offered by the Cervecera Nacional to the visiting baseball
magnates. De la Guardia is general manager of the Cerve-
cera Nacional (National Brewery), Trautman is president
of the National Association of Baseball Leagues and Gonza-
lez is the owner-manager of the Havana team. Mike is also
a former Major League player and coach with the St. Louis
Cardinals.
1
Little League
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
(Final Standings)
(Final Standings First Half)
TEAM Won Lest
Police............ 1 I
Sears............ 4
Lincoln Life......,. f 8
AFGE 14.......... 5 I
Elks 1414.......... C (
Firemen..........
THURSDAY" SRESULTS
Elks 1$, Firemen 5.
MONDAY'S GAME (2nd Half)
Sears vs. Firemen
s
The Elks Little Leaguers clos-
ed out the first half of play in
the Pacific Little League scoring
a 10 to 5 win over the Firemen.
Monday afternoon the Mail Or-
der Boys from Bears and the
Smokies will meet in the first
game of the second half.
In the second half each team
will play each other three times.
Outstanding events of the first
half were Owen Sutherland
pitching two no-hit no-run
games and the .710 batting aver-
age compiled by Bruce Baternan.
The Elks in scoring their win
on Thursday created a three-way
tie for third place in the first half
standings. The Smokies were
trailing by three runs in the sec
with five runs in their half o
the second inning but the Broth-
ers came right back in the third
with three runs to take the lead.
A four-run sixth Inning for the
Elks finished the scoring for the
day.
Johnny Lewis, the winning
K'cher, was relieved by Jimmy
velady in the fifth with Her-
ble Schneider going all the way
for the Firemen.
Donny Ryter led the winners
at the plate with two hita In four
trips with Billy Halvosa collect-
ing one for two and Danny Des-
Londes chipping in with one hit
in three at bats. Herble Schneid-
er with two for four and Don
Terry with one for three and
Webb with one for three were
the only Smokies to connect safe-
ly off Lewis and Lovelady.
The box score:
Elks 1414
TUley, rf.....
Adams, rf.....
Hele, rf......
T. Corrigan, 3b.
Lovelady, lb-p .
Lewis, p-cf. .. .
Ryter, ss.....
DesLondes, 2b .
Trimble, c. .. .
Thompson, If. .
Halvosa, cf-lb .
AB R PO A
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
1
2
1
1
2,
1 11
0 6
1 0
Totals
Firemen-
Terry, 2b .. ...
Llnfors, ss. .. .
Schneider, p .. .
Webb, lb.....
Chase If.....
Schocn, 3b. .. .
McNall, 2b. .. .
Klntner, c. .. .
Wallace, 3b-3b .
Randle, rf.....
39 10 7 18 1
AB R H PO A
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
* w *
The Lineups
FIRST GAME
Puerto Rico
Luis Mrquez, cf.
Jack Dittmer, 2b.
Victor Pellot, lb.
Buster Clarkson, 3b.
Ellis Deal, If. .
Luis Olmo, ff.
Lute St Clair, c.
J. Almendro, ss.
Jose Santiago (R) p
Cuba
Lou Klein, ss.
Johnny Jorgensen, 2b
Edmundo Amors, rf.
Bert Haas, lb ;
Pedro Formental, cf.
Vernon Benson, 8b.
Fernando Das, If.
Andrs Fleitas, c
J. Collum (L) p.
SECOND GAME
Totals........34 6 4 1$ 1
Winning PitcherLewis. Los-
ing PitcherSchneider. Struck-
out byLewis 7, Lovelady 4,
Schneider 7. Base on Balls off-
Lewis 7, Schneider 6. Two Base
HitRyter. Three Base Hit
Lovelady. Hits and Runs off-
Lewis 1 and 5 in 43-3 innings;
Lovelady 3 and 0 hi 11-3. Um-
piresMead and Huddleston.
ScorerLovelady.

only ill
nix drinks
soM
at
K
pnce
from 3 to 7 p.m
EVERY DAY
The Boston Bar

The Atlas Garden
Invitas its friends of the Canal Zona to coma
and participate in the Carnival festival in an
atmosphere of friendship and fun, specially
tonight, at 8:30, to uitnast the coronation of
slueen ^/inn leu
(Canal Zone Beauty Contest Winner of 1952)
Her Highness will be crowned by
Venezuela
Clarence Hicks, 3b.
Chico Carrasquel, ss.
Morris Mozzali, lb.
Wilmer Fields, rf
Dalmiro Finol, If.
Hctor Bentez, cf.
Farrell Anderson, c.
Luis Oliveros, 2b
John Hetki, p
Panama
Frank Austin, ss.
Forrest Jacobs, 2b.
Joe Tuminelli, 3b.
Jfan Cronin, rf.
' Dale Lynch, If.
John Kropf, cf.
Eddie Neville, lb.
Ray Dabek, c.
Alberto Osorio (R) p
* *
CARIBBEAN SERIES
LAST NIGHT'S BOX SCORES
flrat Game
VENEZUELA
ab r k lb It lb bt Ml h H i e
Patino, c 4
Mozzati, lb 6
Benitee, cf 3
Ollv-res, 3b ... 1
Fields, rf. tt
Garcia, 3b 6
Davis, 2b-cf. ...
Vento, If. ... 5
CarrasqUel ss. 3
Brachlo, Jos, p 3
Sanabrla..... 0
Cueehe, p *
TOTALS.
0
2
1
0
3
0
0
1
0
2
0
0_
SS 3 V
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
i
1
0
3
0
0
1
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
e
o
o
0
0
0
0
0
0
0*
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
3
0
1
0
1
0
2
2
0
0
0 S
S !
o e
5
3
a
0
4
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
3
0
1

0
0
9 4 S3 14
I
a
9
0
1
0
0

0
J>
"

PUERTO RICO
ab r h ft tt V bb as pe a
Mrquez, cf .
Dittmer, 2b .
Pellot, lb .
Deal, p .
Olmo, rf .
Clarkson, 3b .
St. Clalr, c .
nimciuiiOj ss
Escalera, tt .
5
5
i
4
S
4
4
s
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1 3
1 1
0
0
2
2
0
1
1
s
2
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
!
0 2
0 s
0 lf
1 0
0 3
1 6
1 0
1 2
0
1
0
4
0
0
3
'
0
Sty g. C. Ward
A cordial welcome awaits you. Com* early.
The fun tarta at 8:30.
TOTALS.....tt S 8 t 1
4 6 33 31
a
"o
1
0
0
0'
1
0
0
9
1
Seere by ianiags:
Venezuela................... 000 030 000 01-*
Puerto Rieo...................... 000 030 000 OSa
SUMMARY
Runs batted In: Field 3, Marques. Earned runs: Venezuela
2, Puerto Rico 1. Left en bases: Venezuela 14, Puerto Rico S. Sa-
crifice hits: Patino 2, Bracho. Stolen bases: Vento. Struekout by:
Deal 4, by Bracho 5, Cueehe I. Base on balls off: peal..I. Bracho
4. Pitchers record: Jos Bracho 3 runs, 7 hits In 10 innings. Er-
rors: Venezuela 3 (Davis, Benitas), Puerto Rico 3 (Clarkson,
Dittmer). Winning pitcher: Jos Bracho. Doubleplays: Davis,
Mozzali, Carrasquel; Fields, Garcia. Umpires: Maestri (plate),
Thornton (lb), Mulllns (3b), Ryan (3b). Time of game: 2:38.
'- PANAMA .
'-: *V
ab r h tb tb 3b ar ab sa y a a
Austin, ss 4 0 0' 0 8 0 3 1 0
Jacobs, 2b... 4 145 10000 120
Tuminelli, 3b. .401100000030
Cronin, rf.... 4000 0 000040
Lynch, if.... 4 01 1 0 0 0 0 32 0 0
Kropf, C....3 0. 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0
Neville, lb... .4 01 100000912
Dabek, c .... 3 9 11 0 0 0 0 9 31 9
Pilo.......1090 0 0001990
Frlcano, p. ..390 090001039
Potato, p. ...90 0 00 00909 99
Reliman. ,,,.190 00 00999 99
TOTALS. ... 35 3 8 9 1
rilo fanned for Dabek In 9th.
Reliman forced Neville for Point* la 9th.
9 3 4 39 19 1
Second Game CUBA
ab rbtbibJbhrbbsepaa
Klein, ss .
Jorgensen, 3b. .
Amor os, rf .
Haas, lb ... .
Formental. cf
Benson, 3b .
DikZ lf ...
Fleitas, e ...
Moreno, p .
Crespo. .'. .
Martinez, p .
3
!
4'
9
I
4
3
1
0
0 3 I 1 1 4 0 0 9 0
1 9 0 0. 0
9 1 1 0 9
1 1 1 0 0
9 9 0 0 0
9 1 1 0 9
9 9 0 9 0
9 9 0 0 0
9 9 9 0 0 0 I 0
0
1,
0
0
0
0
0
9
9
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
3
4
9 11
0 2
TOTALS. ... 38 4 8 3 9 0 1
Crespo struck oat for Moreno in 7th.
0
0
1
0
1
9 9 9
3 37 11
1
3
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
9
Panama ..*
Coba ........
by Innings:
SUMMARY
300 090 000-3
001 000 03-4
Runs batted hi: Tuminelli, Cronin, Jorgensen. Formental
Earned runs: Panam 3, Cuba 3. Left on bases: Panam 8, Cuba
7 Stolen bases: Lynch. Wild pitches: Frlcano. Struekout by: Mo-
reno 8. Martines 2. by Frlcano 3, Pointe 1. Base on balls off:
Moreno 3, Fricaao 6, Pitchers record: Moreno 3 runs, 7 alts in
7 innings, Frlcano 4 runs. 5 hits in 7 2/3 Innings. Losing pitch-
er-Frlcano. Winning pitcher: Martinez. Umpires: Mulllns
(Dlsto). Ryan (lb). Maestri (3b). Thornton (3b). Time of game:
2:06
farfiotyfakQasslfeb
'j
?


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY St, 195
THE PANAMA AMERICA* AW IHDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MOB W
-- .......... "
Baylor's Isabell Favoring Pro Baseball Over Grid Career,
# #
SUTED
leglate
TEXAN__One of (he most sought-after athlete* In Inter-
clrcle It Baylor's stylish Larry Isbell, a star' in both
baaeball and football, (NBA) '
LAKE WALES, Fla.If you had not been briefed yourfirst
impression would be this was just another training camp With
rookies In the familiar chaste white and blue of the Yankees, hit.
ting, throwing and fielding as the appraising mentors looked on.
But It's something more than that. For want of a,looser term
you might call It a remedial clinic, or a school of corrective tech-
niques. Roughly the Yankees own title to 300 ball players, only 35
are here: They are not necessarily the cream of the crop but all
are prospective candidates for the varsity and they are nere be-
cause of certain promises and deficiencies.
They have been carefully screened by scouts and minor man-
agers. Casey Stengel Is seeing most of them for the first time but
is familiar with their problems which have been set forth In a
confidential dossier containing a case history of each player, In-
cluding a summation based on group opinion.
One or two of these players may be ripe for picking this year
and might be brought up as was Mickey Mantle, Oil McDougald
and Tom Morgan last season to become factors, as they were. In
another fierce championship struggle. Others have no immediate
prospects and are deemed to be two or three years away.
It is a measure of Yankee thoroughness and organizational
approach, one of the secrets of the club's consistency of success,
by the way, that It Is never considered too early to start work on
any player who might eventually be good enough to play In the
stadium.

HASTY PUDDING YANKEES
One of the obJectlv*>*ftnB)*yp*of camp Is to expedite the
development of the raw jookle, to spot his shortcomings or cru-
dities-early i subjecUhlm to concentrated schooling and hopefully
reduce his preparatory course by two or three yeari.
With this in view the entire Yankee faculty of specialists
which may very well he, as Stengel proudly proclaims, the best
in baseball, Is here.. BUI Dickey, Frank Crosetti and Jim Turner,
along wlth.Paul Kritchell, the head scout and John Neuh the did
first baseman who la a sort of general trouble shooter. .
This camp does not present the usual scene of scrambled,
chaotic activity. Instead the personnel Is separated into little
froups, the members of which either sit and listen as one of the
acuity speaks, or simulate plays, time after time, following In-
structions of one of the gray beards.
The Yankees haven't had a thoroughly satisfactory first base-
man since Lou Oehrlg. For some odd reason there lsji general
dearth of first Backers. There are seven would-bes In camp. Over
at first base you see Neun holding class. He Is centering his at-
tention at the moment on Clint Weaver, a six-foot left-hander,
who played the outfield for Blnghamton last season. First base
play calls for quick deft foot action In touching the bag. Neun la
trying to teach Weaver the knack.
' #
BLUEPRINT FOR MANAGER
Crosetti la working at third base with Andy Carey, a more
promising student, who has better than an outside chance to
make it this year, especially If Bobby Brown and Jerry Coleman
wind up in the service. One of the most difficult plays for a
third baseman is to field and throw a alow rolling bunt In one
motion. Crosetti Is schooling him in the play.
Back of the plate Dickey has four young catchers in class.
One of them Is named John Blanchard, only a year out of high
school, originally tagged as an outfielder, a six-footer who hit*
the long ball; Dickey seems to be alone In vlslonlng catching
greatness In the youngster but he had so much success with-
4____ 1.________lll^J 1. > uu_. 1IF1*W Tllnxkarrl fMnbntl.
Draft Pick Of
Redskins To
Stay In School
By Johnny mbcallum
NA Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK, Feb. 23 (NBA)
Down in Texas they tell you that
Larry Dale Isbell has an extraor-
dinary chance of becoming the
most famous grldder since Sam-
uel Adrian Baugh rocketed out of
the prairie country and began
filling the air with footballs.
And like Sammy Baugh, he is
headed for the Washington Red-
skins. But like the ancient Texas
Christian graduate, he favors
baseball over the hard knocks of
pr foootball. .
Baugh, you'll recall, pictured
himself something of a shortstop,
had a trial run with the Cardi-
nals In 1938. He stuck around lust
long enough to realize that hit-
ting his ends with needle-point
passes was so" impier
than hitting a curve ball.
Now its -.....- J,maJL
the decision. Or, li*e Baugh,
have It made for Bim.
ALL-AMERICA CATCHER
Baylor's All-America passer Is
some shucks as a catcher. He
sees a brighter future In baseball
than footDall. Moreover, he s nuts
about the game, hit .346 catch-
ing every inning for the Waco
school last trip. He made the All-
Firemen Take Lead
In Pacific Softball
IN THE TRIMLovely Wllla Worthington McGuire, left, women's world water ski champion, euU
low as she roeedTover the Lake Eloise slalom course at Cypress Garden, Fla. Wane Van Dusen,
Florida State College ski queen, does a backward swan. Both-are members of Florida's crack water
ski team which scored high In the Mexican Invitational Water Ski Tournament at Acapuleo. (NBA)
South Carolina-Clemson Big Thursday
Football Game Comes Closer Reality
By O'NEIL HENDRICK
United Frees Staff Correspondent
America third team.
Like Duke's Dick Groat,
Laughing Larry has a train of
baseball scouts from all over the
country camping on his doorstep
making googoo eyes at him with
8ri8beU to supple, swift, strong of
arm and totally devoid of^^pro-
fessional experience, but despite
the latter club owners are willing
to lay It on the line for such a
tidy bundle of rich, crurtchy
8 h Branch Rickey, that matchless
appraiser of baseball flesh, hei.de
the pack scrambling for the
young man's signature.
General Manager Buster Chat-
ham of the Pirates' Waco farm
piloned Dub King, Baylor's tub
thumper, and said, "We caneer-
talnly find a place for Larry in
the Pittsburgh organlzation-we
need catchers. Mr Rckeyfeeto
he has a real baseball future if
he wants to put baseball ahead
^bKclosert to the .lo-
tion, says. IabeU hM iustjrtwt
decided not to join the Redskins
next fall.
PRO FOOTBALL OUT
"He Intends to play pro base-
ball instead/King relates.'Since
he will not have quite enouch
credits to graduate In JttaVM
must return to Baylor in Sep-
tember and finish. I say must,
because he's In the ROTC pro-
gram, must continue making
normal progress toward gradua-
tion or be drafted. He has no al-
ternative but to stay out of pro
f0Nobadoubt the Redskins'wul
COLUMBIA, B.C., Feb. 23-The
University of South Carolina-
Clemson College 1953 Big Thurs-
day football game was a pen-
stroke away from reality today
as it was dropped on the desk of
Gov. James F. Byrnes.
The Senate bill, to require the
two state-supported schools to
meet on the gridiron on Thurs-
day of State Fair Week, received
third reading passage In the
House yesterday and was sent to
the governor for approval or
veto. .
The measure #ame about- as a
result of punishment meted out
to Clemson by the Southern Con-
ference for the Tigers' accept-
ance of a bowl bid last New
Year's Day In the face of the
conference presidents' dtoapprov-
Clemeon was banned for one
howl lrTangulsh when they get a
load of this. They
've been mak-
greatness In the youngster but he had so much success witrr SVIS t nVrfecti Texas has
Yog) Berra he to permitted to carry on. With Blanchard Dickey^ thing to ""5S^h*
must start from scratch. As I looked on he was adjust ng the Tr^e2a,ffiIT ghouldn't lose
youngster to a comfortable stance..."That's the first thing you hJrt gtarshave tried
thing you
want to get," he's telling him.
In the outfield Stengel himself has paused to loin BUI Bklff,
till another aid, -in class room work. He to watching one Dick
Tettlebach, Yale '50 captain, shag files. The confidential book
6raises the youngster's mobility but deplores hto lack of power
itting. Stengel to soon talking with him.
"Ever play the infield?"
"I played a little shortstop."
"Good. You know how old Rlzzuto to? He'll be 34 this year.
Get me?"
The former Yale captain got him. Rlzzuto can't last forever.
He moved to the Infield. _
Something new has been added to the school which was In-
novated by general manager George Weiss a year ago. The farm
managers are here. They watch bow Stengel and his aides do It
1 on the field, they attend skull sessions at night In the hotel,
with Stengel presiding. Thug not only the young players but the
young managers are fitted to the Yankee mold.
Is there any wonder why these Yankee clubs are so hard to
shave, year after year?
6ryUy Read's ClasstfcdV
ig big plans for the aerial ace.
Talented?
"He's so skillful he can palm
an elephant and hide a house on
a 50-foot lot," remarked one
Texas writer. "The s^-foot-two.
180-pound senior to the nearest
hope. Many grid star have tried
to chuck the sport for the dla-
m And they cant touch the curre
ball yet.
year from playing conference
schools In football unless re-
quired to play by law.
Both Houses spent yesterday's
session clearing the desks .for
completion of state-wide busi-
ness by next week.
The House passed and sent to
the Senate a local option liquor
bill to permit counties to vote on
whether or not they want legal
liquor within their boundaries.
Three state-wide bills were
given second reading passage In
the House. One was to exempt
poultry from the sales tax, an-
other would require Imported
milk to be Inspected at the out-
of-state production point and
the other would recodlfy the
state game laws.
Ordered ratified by the House
was a bill to license physical
therapists.
The Senate paesed and sent
to the House a resolution by
Sen. George L. Grantham ef
Pickens proposing a constitu-
tional amendment to eliminate
the prohibition against in-
creasing the talarles ef Su-
preme Court justices and cir-
cuit judges during their terms
of office.
The upper chamber also ap-
proved a House Mil which would
have the Highway Department
take over a percentage of county
roads each year and contract
with counties for building and
improving farm-to-market roads.
And both Houses sent to the
State Tax Commission a concur-
rent resolution asking the com-
mission to lower its assessments
on merchants' stocks of goods.
The resolution, which does not
have the force of law, asks that
the commission's allowance for
depreciation be raised from 40
per cent to 50 per cent. .
PACIFIC sWHBAU. LEAGUE
TEAM Won Leet Pet.
sr*:"~::
Pan Lleeldo.....10 4 714
Phlllppfne Rattan 11 .Sit
caa ... rvTT. u .m
Wednesday Firemen's Insur-
ance went to first place by de-
feating CAA t to 4 in the last
regularjme of the first half.
Lew Hllslnger, on the mound
for the Inaurancemen, won hto
tenth game against three losses.
while fed Jordan of the CAA out-
fit marked up his tenth loss.
Hilzlnger allowed four runs on
four hits, three walks and struck
out seven.
Jordan gave up eight runs on
eight hits and three walks but
truck out none.
Leading batters for Firemen's
Insurance were Turner with 3 for
4; Pescod with 3 for 3. HtlUnger,
Bevel and Stock added pne each
One of Turner's was a ur-hg-
sr in the bottom df th4 second
lnlng with o mate board.
The four safeMet oft Hllslnger
were- chalked up by Oleen with
two for four and Nicholson and
Jordan with one each.
Elks Shut Out Pan Liquido
In Playoff Game
Thursday the Elks, behind the
splendid hurling power of Frits
Cheney, wrested second place
from oeorge Stanley's Pa* Li-
quido nine by shutting them out
to 0.
to hto beet game of the year,
Cheney allowed no runs on only
two base hits and four bases on
balls. Tarflinger and Skinner
were the only Beermen to con-
nect safely.
Bill Muller, hurling for the Li-
quid Bread boys did an excellent
job but Just could not keep the
ball away from the anxious Elic-
imen.
Mailer gave up six runs en sev-
en hits and one free
Thursday's lox score:
Pan Llealde AB B
Poster,........-4 0
Jones, L, f...... f
Stanley, u......
Tarfl
WP..:-:r.\\
Lane, lb'........ t
Muller, p
Preshe, 3k......
Hunted, it......
Murphy, e.......
lOlaeeer.......,
u

?
X
0 o
o 0
It
TUr
-in for Skinner when
Iitcher in fth. Pinch hi
lurphy in 7th.
lor
mm, m.. ..
Jhanee, ft ..
vans, lb ..
Roberto, la..
Hale, If. ..
Rager, lb. ..
Soyster, cf ..
Herndon, c ..
Cheney, p.. ..
Tffl
III!
I ft 1 0
3 0 0ft
TACAROPULOS
INDUSTRIES. S.A.
S3&
Phones:
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Representative:
AGENCIAS
GLASGALL, S.A.
Ave. Justo Arosemena No. 73-A
Box 3117 Panam City. R. P.




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9
Lucky Strike Super Contest4
' *BV 2
The drawing will be held In accordance with
the National Lottery Drawing off
APRIL 20th, 1952





BE HAPPY
/

60 LUCKY!
Smoke

LUCKY STRI


OSORIO HURLS AGAINST VENEZUELA
RESCUE AT SEA

AN UiUKPENDINR
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
rWENT*-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 83, 195*
FIVE CENTS
Army, Air Force Pour Millions
Down Drain, Congressmen Say
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28 (UP) .has been "poured down the
(NEA Telephoto)
AS THE BOW HALF of the split tanker Fort Mercer tips upward In storm-swept waters off
Cane Cod Mass., two crewmen are pulled toward the Coast Guard cutter Yakutat In a life
raft (left). The seamen, Vincent A. Galdn of New York and Willard Fahmer of Winthrop,
Mass.. huddle together in the raft upper right) and, at lower right, Fahmer Is hauled
board the cutter by a rope. Two other crewmen were rescued from the bow of the ship,
but 13 of their shipmates stayed put on the stern.
*
Split Tanker's Doughty Stayputs'
Want To Ride Hulk On To New York
House investigators charged
yesterday that at least $2,000,-
000 worth of materials has been
stolen during the building of
u. 8. air bases in North Africa
and that as much as $50,000,000
Korea War Veteran
Off For Carnival
In Barranquilla
NEWPORT, R. I., Feb. 23 (UP)
Thirteen doughty seamen rode
the storm-battered stern of the
tonker Fort Mercer to safety
here yesterday and nine of them
volunteered to stay put some
more until the severed hulk
Is towed to New York next week.
"We brought it this far we
might as well bring it the rest
of the way." ship's electrician
Earl T. Smith of Philadelphia
said with a grin as the men who
held the Fort Mercer against
the sea completed their epic
voyage.
"Me too." chipped in oiler
Lionel Dupuis of Fall River,
Mass. "It's in my blood."
Only four of the heroic crew
two of them severely ill and
a third in his 70's decided
that five days and two fierce
northeast storms are enough
on the wallowing stem half of
a ship.
Their battle against the sea
started Monday when the first
nor'easter tore the Fort Mercer
in half off Cape Cod and also
sundered a similar ship, the
Pendleton.
Fourteen seamen perished in
the twin disasters.
The Coast Guard rescued 32
men off the Pendleton's stern,
four from the bow and 21 from
the aft end of the Fort Mercer.
But the 18 stay-put seamen
elected to remain for a perilous
voyage in tow through a second
nor'easter to the temporary
sanctuary of Narragansett Bay.
With broad grins splitting
their clean-shaven faces, the
Fort Mercer's men turned oat

(NEA Telephoto)
WARMING UP C'.Icd crewmen from the tanker Pendle-
ton, which split in two off,Chatham, Mass., warm themselves
and down hot coffee at the Chatham Coast Guard station
shortly after their rescue.

WESTCLOX
BANTAM
Alarm Clock
A really dependable timepiece in a small "package"
. Westclex newest, only 3 Vi" tall. And what a
beauty he it, too, with a two-tone dial, cieor-cut
brown numerals and hands that are so easy to rood.
Modem moulded plastic case is handsomely finished
in ivory. The alarm Mil sounds clear and bright to
woke you up, get you out on time. Your retailer hat
the new Bantam and other quality-famoui Wettdox
electric alarms and wall clocks, spring alarms, wrist
pocket watches. See them on display today.
in neat though damp work
clothes as the tags M. Moran
and Foundation Josephine
hauled their hoik Into the
bay and nudged it inte a Navy
anchorage between Newport
and Jamestown.
Then they were- brought as-
hore here In small craft to tele-
phone their families, buy some
personal supplies and receive
congratulations and pay ad-
vances from a representative of
the ship's owners.
Di;puis was met here by his
wife and promised to go home
to nearby Fall River with her
last nltfht.
But he insisted he would be
back today to reboard the hulk
for the towline voyage to New
York that will start Sunday or
Monday after the tanker's fuel
oil cargo is pumped into barges.
"He'll go back," his wife as-
sured his crewmates. "He always
goes back."
Chief engineer Jesse T. Bush-
nell, 39, of Pasadena, Tex., sen-
ior officer aboard the hulk, led
the move to remain with the
ship even before it was anchor-
ed.
"I'm going ashore, but Just to
all my wife," he said. "Then
'm coming back. I plan to stay
aboard until we reach New
York."
"She's a good ship," echoed
first asst. engineer Howard S.
Colby of Houston, Tex. "I want
to stick with her to the end of
this thing."
"I'm going to stay, Just to help
them out," said wiper Byron L.
Mathewson of Concord, N. H. "I
had a chance to get off during
the week and I dldnt."
In their happiness, the men
showed few signs of the ordeal.
"As a matter of fact, we ate
like kings," one grinning sea-
man confirmed Only a shortage
of fresh water bothered them,
and company agent Theodore
Lefler promised to remedy
that before the bulk goes to
sea again.
"The fact that they stayed on
the ship in the first place shows
what kind of men they are,"
Lefler said proudly.
"We had to stay," Smith re-
torted. "There were the two sick
men aboard. That left only 11
of us to handle things."
The incapacitated men who
will stay ashore at least tem-
porarily were messman Colt A.
Howard of Bristol, Conn., suf-
fering from pleurisy, and chief
steward Samuel Barbosa of New
Bedford, Mass., with two broken
ribs.
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
drain.".
Branding the construction
project a "fiasco," chairman
Porter Hardy Jr. (D-Va.) of a
House Executive Expenditures
Subcommittee said It will cost
more than $500,00i,000
double the amount Congress
appropriatedif present con*
ditions continue.
Hardy, whose group conduct-
ed an on-the-spot investigation,
sent the report to the Senate
Preparedness S u b c o m mlttee
even as it was hearing top of-
ficials of the Air Force and
_ Army Engineers defend the
I huge air base building program
in French Morocco.
Assistant Air Force secretary
Edwin V. Hugglns said the pro-
gram was put on a costly "ur-
gent" basis because of fears the
bases would be needed even
more desperately than similar
facilities were needed in World
War II.
But Brig. Gen. J. C. Hardin
of the Army Eglneers said the
Air Force cooled off on the pro-
ject by last December and ad-
| vised the engineers there was
"no longer any urgency in the
program."
He said the Air Force said the
remaining work should be con-
An American soldier left by
plane yesterday for Barranqui-
lla, Colombia, where he will re-
present his fighting countrymen
in Korea In the city's annual
carnival parade.
The soldier, who fought for
twelve months in Korea, Is Mas-
ter Sergeant Clyde Burns Clem-
ens, a platoon sergeant of the
Heavy Mortar Company, 33rd
Infantry Regiment, Fort Kobbe,
Canal Zone. ,
Sergeant Clemens left on his
good-will mission by invitation
of the American Society of Co-
lombia.
The society has constructed
and designed a float to symbo-
lize Colombian and American
participation In the Korean con-
flict, and wanted to complete the
float with two Korean veterans,
one from each nation, who
would ride on It In the parade.
The society requested an
American veteran from the Uni-
ted States Armv Caribbean.
Sergeant Clemens was the
man elected. He served with the
24th Division in Korea, to which
the Colombian battalion fighting
In Korea is attached. "Maybe
that's why I was elected," said
the sergeant.
A medium sized man with
black hair. Sergeant Clemens
left on his four-day trip from
Tocumen Airport at 8:15 this
morning. "I think I will have
both a good and Interesting
time," he said, before leaving.
He also pointed out that the trip
would undoubtedly have fine ef-
fects on good-will between Co-
lombia and the United States.
Peripatetic Poles
Fail To Enter US
After Hunger Strike
PROVIDENCE, R. I.. Feb. 23
(UP) The tanker 8trathbay
sails for Buenos Aires today with
two "men without a country"
who failed to get Into the United
States by staging a seven-day
hunger strike.
Authorities explained that it
was Impossible for them to be
admitted into the United States
because they had no citizenship
papers nor passports.
Sockosky, and Czarneckl, both
Polish veterans of World War II
fled through the Iron Curtain.
They said we are Polish people,
but we do not recognize the pres-
ent Polish government."
Their difficulty npw is that no
government will recognize them.
They begged Capt. Edward E.
Butler to take them aboard the
Sthathbay In Buenos Aires last
fall, and since then have been
trying to get off in England,
Germany, the Netherlands, Cape
Verde Islands, Venezuela, New
Orleans and Boston.
Mexican Matador
Debuts Tomorrow
At Bullfights
Mexican matador, Gregorio
Puebla, will make his debut to-
morrow at the Macarena Bull
Ring in San Francisco.
Four bulls in all will be fought
and killed by Puebla and Arml-
lllta of Spain during the per-
formance which is scheduled to
get underway at 4:30 p.m.
Conchita Moreno, the glamor-
ous girl bullfighter; will not ap-
pear on tomorrow'* program, but
is tentatively scheduled to ap-
pear next week. '
Armilllta. who also doubles as
one of the organizers of the San
Francisco "fiesta brava," said he
hoped Canal Zone customers will
bring their cameras along to
take pictures.
ducted "on a business-life and
efficient basis."
Lt. Gen. Lewis A. Pick, chief
of the Army Engineers, indig-
nantly denied a paving expert's
report that five of the bases
will have only 50 or 60 per cent
of their normal life because of
poor construction.
He said It is impossible to
"stand and look at that runway
and say whether it will last 10,
15 or 20 years."
He maintained that "a pretty
good Job" had been done on the
rush-order project considering
the materials available.
But Hardy said his investiga-
tors found a different story.
He said they can testify "not
only that at least $2,000,000
worth of materials have been
stolen in the course of unload-
ing and storage, but will relate
In detail the wholly Insufficient
protective measures which have
made such loss possible."
He said they also have "ac-
cumulated much evidence to
support an opinion expressed
by a high Air Force official
that between 125,000,000 and
$50,oae,000 has been poured
down the drain on this pro-
ject."
"In fact," Hardy wrote, "it has
been estimated that if current
conditions are permitted to
continue the total project will
cost over a half billion dollars
as contrasted to the $250,000,000
"Huggins said it was realized
that the rush program would
cost more than normal construc-
tion.
But he said the Air Force
wanted the bases in shape to
handle minimum plane traffic
within six months after the first
construction equipment was
landed last May.
"There was no question about
the urgency," he said.
He were in an urgent pro-
gram where it was thought we
might need it (the bases) even
worse than in World War IL
Certainly we wanted the facili-
ties as soon as we could get
them."
The North African facilities
are part of a world-wide net-
work of' air bases from which
counter thrust* could be launch-
ed against Russia In case of a
surprise Soviet attack against
the West.
f AL OF BUTTON Thomas
Kllng, who police say was
planning "another big bank
Job" with Willie (The Actor)
Button, Is shown after his ar-
rest in New York. Listed as
one of the nation's ten most
wanted crimnala, King was
manacled by one of 19 pair of
handcuffs found In his apart-
ment.

The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
"FINGEHED" BUTTON Arnold Schuster of Brooklyn sits
with New York Police Commissioner George Monaghan (left)
after being tevealed as the man who pointed out bank rob-
ber Willie Button to police. For his aid in the capture, the
24-year-old clothing salesman will get police cooperation in
his quest for rewards believed to total some $70,000. Stand-
ing behind Monaghan and Schuster are Detectives Louis
Welner And James McClellan; Harold Weiss, Schuster's
attorney; and "Detective Donald Shea.
Navy Flier Offers To Replace
GOP Victim OfGanglandGuns
CHICAGO, Feb. 23 (UP)A
young, decorated Naval flier de-
fled the Chicago underworld
today and offered to take the
place of a Republican office-
seeker who was slain by gang-
land guns in the fear-ridden
31st ward.
caused a Democratic commit-
teeman to quit under hoodlum
pressure last year and two pre-
cinct workers In Gross' ward to
resign this week.
One of the latter had been
beaten by hoodlums.
"If everybody gives up, that's
GOP leaders promptly gave .exactly what those guys want,
tentative approval to Lt. Cmdr : he said,
Thomas s. Chuhak, 32, a veteran
of World War n and the Ko-
rean conflict who lives a few
blocks from where Charles Gross
was slain Feb. 6.
WE5"CLOX
Famous Family
fFlM
LaSalle. Illinois. USA
1Uprntti: rwrvmsAi
at yrlilltil Ot to Out. OUt "Q" No St. Frnwl City. n> to T
wnviaui. or KxrcwTACiow
SU> iUM and Bjlbo. Cotn B. 9.
Grosi was acting committee-
man id was seeking election to
the party poet in a ward where
underworld hoodlums reported-
ly were' trying to muscle in.
His slaying touched off the
biggest wave of public indigna-
tion in years.
Civic leaders demanded a
cleanup at conrUUonj that
"What If I an threatened?
I've been shot at before."
Chuhak holds the Distin-
guished Flying Cross and
eight Air Medals from his ser-
vice in World War II and in
Korea.
A lawyer, he now is a legal of-
ficer at Glenview naval air base
but is due for release from ser-
vice in July.
The flier had an audience with
John Leonard Bast, chairman
el tit Cook Cosnar QOft? a-
t ral committee and other county
party leaders.
Chuhak told them he was "not
politically mature," but that he
had done precinct work in the
ward and "I do know right from
wrong."
The party chieftains unani-
mously indorsed him, but said
the final decision of his candi-
dacy must -rest with ward lead-
ers now acting for Gross.
There also were complications
of whether he should be a write-
in candidate, which might tend
to split the vote, or run in
Gross' name and be appointed
to the post i| Gross wins.
Groas' name Is scheduled to
remain on the ballot against one
other office-seeker.
Chuhaks wife, Jean, 39. said
she would back him "all the,


Be sure they ate White Horse"
There is no whisky like Scotch Whisky and no finer Scotch
than White Horse. It is distilled amidst the highlands of
its native Scotland; aged, matured and watched over with
unceasing care by men who have the inherited instinct of
generations to guide them. At the dub, at home, wherever
you may be, you show wisdom by ordering Scotch whisky
... and prove your experience by asking for White Horse
byname.
WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky
A pleasure to remember a joy to see again
Si DiTtrimms: COMPAA CYMNOS, S^4. COLON e> PANAMA.
iii '

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