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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01385
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01385
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
* BRANIFF
AN
HOW VIA ,
MIAMI
OR
HOUSTON
T NEWSPAPER
ScaflinmsYO.
WIM t\ \\ illslO
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country 1$ tafe" Abraham Lincoln.
Now.. 6 Years Old!
rWENTI-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., IATRDAT, FEBRUARY H, mt
FIVE CENTS
UN Charges
(NEARadio-Telephoto)
PATTING HOMAGE The Duke o Windsor, accompanied by
his mother, Dowager Queen Mary, leaves in a car I
kreeling at the bier of his brother, King George
Westminster Hall.
v!"
Truce
FBI Arrests Mynsmen
In N. C Flogging Cases
HHMM[
WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 (P5-
Federal Bureau of Investigation
director J. Edgar Hoove* an-
nounced the arrest today of ten
former members ef the Pah-
Bluff, North Carolina, Klavern of
the Ku Klux Klan on charges of
kidnaping and violation of eivU
rights. ...
The men were charged witn
the abduction, Interstate trans-
portation and flogging ot Doro-
thy Martin and Ben Grainger of
Fair Bluff In a KUan foray last
Hoover, said the Investigation
started after reports were receiv-
ed of brutal floggings and other
abuses of Negro and white resi-
dents In the vicinity committed
by hooded bands of Klansmen.
Those arrested Included Early
L. Brooks, 40, Exalted Cyclops of
the Klavern and former chief of
police of Fair Bluff, and Horace
Strickland, 38. deputy sheriff of
Columbus County.
Hoover said that Miss Martin
and Grainger were awakened
from their sleep by hooded and
robed armed men on Oct. o who
blindfolded them.
They were driven across the
state line into Horry County,
South Carolina, where they were
both heavily flogged,_________
(NEA Telephoto)
BRIDE-TO-BE DISAPPEARS EdwaroVWlegner, 33, a Chi-
cago engineer, looks mournfully at the wedding picture of
his fiancee, Lois Welland, 28. In Pittsburgh, Pa. The girl
disappeared the night before the scheduled marriage, leaving
a note which read. "I Just can't go through with it.
-------:;------. : > -
Navy Offers Unusual Chance
To Rise High In The Service
WASHINGTON. Feb. 16 (UP)
The United States Navy today
unveiled the "Hopplcopter" a
motor and wings device which
eomeday may propel armed
"blrdmen" through the air.
The bird-like machine has not
been contracted for by either the
Navy o the Marines, but Is "one
of a number which is presently
undergoing a test and Is-being
considered for use bv the Marine
Coros."
The engine and gas tank are
strapped on a man's back like a
knapsack. His legs are the land-
ing and take-off "gear."
Double rotors of the collapsi-
ble machine extend above his
head on a shaft and a single
control shaft Is fastened in front
of him to maneuver the copter.
A spokesman for the Hoppl-
copter Inc. said that the ma-
Cardenas River
Garden Show Opens;
Tomorrow Last Day
The annual flower show spon-
sored by the Cardenas River
Garden Club opened today at
the Morgan's Oardens on Gail-
lard Highway. It will be open to-
day until 6 p.m. and tomorrow
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The public Is Invited to this
yearly event, and cars may be
Krked at the foot of the hill of
e Morgan's home, just beyond
Corozal.
There Is no charge for admis-
sion.
chine can lift and carry a fully
equipped soldier anywhere on
the battlefield.
A Naw spokesman said that
the original model of the Hoppl-
copter part of the National Geo-
graphic Society display of Naval
equipment lifted a man and hov-
ered over the field in 1947 al-
though no forward motion was
indicated in that test.
Tunisians Outraged
At French Cancelling
Of Envoy Passports
PARI8, Feb. 16 (UP)In-
dicant Tunisian officials de-
scribed the French government's
cancellation of diplomatic pass-
ports of two Tunisian ministers
as an, "Incident without pre-
cedent In diplomatic annals."
The Tunisian Minister of Jus-
tice spokesman Salah Ben Yous-
sef, and Minister for Social AN
fairs, Mohammed Badra said
that two protectorate cabinet
members still have not been of-
ficial lnfqrmed of the French
action which blocked their ap-
plication for United States visa.
The ministers had been in
Paris since early January try-
ing to bring the Tunisian case
for Independence before the
United Nations.
They applied for United States
visas last week so they could
be present at Late Success when
Pakistan brings the matter be-
fore the United Nations Security
Council.
Bus Driver In Jail
Following Crash
On Thatcher Highway
Two teen-agers were hospital-
ised yesterday after a bus In
which they were passengers went
over a 20-foot embankment on
Thatcher Highway.
The driver of the bus, Ernesto
Zamora Is being held In Jail hi
lieu of $200 bail after being book-
ed on two count* by the Balboa
DOllcedriving while intoxicated
and driving a vehicle in unsafe
operating condition. .
T-he bus carried 23 young La
Boca boys and girls who were
coming from an all-day outing
In Chorrera. ___ ,
One of the Injured, Emmine:
Waither, 17, of Gamboa was In,
Gorgas Hospital with* a fractur-;
ed right leg,.while the other, Ar-i
thur Yearwood, 18, of Parque Le-j
fevre, Panam City, was treated;
at Oorgas Hospital and trans-,
ferred to Santo Toms this
morning. He is under observa-
tion for a possible brain concus-
"'Police said that the bus went
out of control at 5:30 p.m. yes-
terday near Mile Poet 6, left the
avement and went down a ao-
oot embankment.
A police official remarked to-
day that the PafW" Jere
lucky they weren't all kiiiea.
Investigation also developed
the information that on Oct. 11
a Negro male resident of Chad-
bourne, North Carolina was ab-
ducted and flogged, and that on
Nov. 14, Negro women residents
of the same town were abducted
and flogged also.
On Nov. 14 a Negro woman res-
ident of Chadbourne was seized
from her bed, and transported to, men to secure
Columbus County, North Caroli-
na, by KJansmen,
The Hoggin of another local
resident and other Incidents were
carried out in the same manner
to both North and South Caro-
lina In the vicinity of Fair Bluff.
The method of operation cus-
tomary on such raids, according
fc
to Hoover, was
an isolated area where hooded
men cut a cross In her hair and
threatened to flog her.
Hoover said a number of sim-
ilar Incidents were reported to
the FBI during the Investigation.
They Included the flogging of
a resident of Plreway Section,
or local Klans-
the services for
raids from another areamen
who would be unknown to their
victims.
These raiders would make the
actual entry Into the victims
home and drag them outside,
turning them over to local hood-
ed and robed Klansmen.
DA To Press
Videgaard Case
Indefinitely'
District Attorney Jose M. Vaa-
quez Diaz said today the case of
Gosta Vldegaard's disappearance
will remain open Indefinitely un-
til "the truth is learned."
Vasquez Diaz said he will con-
tinue investigating the myste-
rious disappearance of the Swed-
ish millionaire even if he does
not get help from the Secret Po-
lice
Bullet From Fanatic's
Gun WasForMossacUtgh
TEHERAN, Feb. ! Surgeons attending Hoeseln Fa-
teml, Premier Mohamed Mossa-
degh's Nationalist aide, said this
morning that he is improving
from the bullet wound Inflicted
yesterday by a fanatical Moslem
youth.
Fateml's intestines are punc-
tured in three places. He spent
the night denrlous.
His assailant, Beyed Moham-
med MehdtRalli. spent the night
in Jail chanting Koran psalms
and shonttng: "Attt It great
death to traitors."
Rkfll sa>d he shot Fateml:
Leon Parsons
Dies In Gorgas
Alpine Slide Mils
Skier; Crack Train
Stalls In Drifts
ZURICH, Switzerland. Feb. 16
(UP). An avalanche of snow
and ice killed a skier in the Alps
today to raise the death, toll of
13 days of heavy snow in .Western
Europe to 7.
Colder weather had raised the
hopes that the Alpine slides
would halt, but heavy snows
continued to roll down the
mountain sides in Switzerland,
Italy, Austria and Yugoslavia
All traffic between Italy and
Yugoslavia stopped when the
giant drifts of snow choked off
ttie road and rail facilities across
the border.
Snowfall to Slovenia. Yugosla-
via was the heaviest in 100 years.
In Montenegro, the snow was
reported to be from five to IS
feet deep.
Beasley Finally
Leaves For U.S.
Peter Beasley. Special Consul-
tant to the Secretary of the Ar-1
my. who spent the past several
weeks on the Isthmus, departed
by plane early this morning for
Washington. D.C.
Beasley arrived to the Canal
Zone early last month with Karl
R. Benedeteen. Assistant Secre-
tary of the Army and chairman
of the board of directors of the
Panama Canal Co. He attended
the January meeting of the
Board of Directors held last
month at Balboa Heights j
Leon Parsons, a Panam Canal
employe, died last night at Gor-
gas Hospital after a brief Illness.
Mr. Parsons, who was 43 years
old, first came to the Isthmus in
1934 and worked for' three years
for the Army and Navy.
He became a Canal employe
to March of 1937 and was a clerk
with the old Building Division of
the Balboa Office at the time of
his death.
Mr. Parsons who was a resident
of Balboa is survived by his wife,
and two children, Sarah and
Milton.
He was admitted to the hospi-
tal Thursday.
Memorial services will be held
to the Balboa Heights Baptist
Church, of which Mr. Parsons
was, an active member, at 4:30
p.m. Sunday. Burial will be at a
later date In Rkhford, Vermont.
It Is requested that no flowers
be sent bul that contribution
may be made to the cancer fund
Rancho 'Casino*
Open Tonight
And Tomorrow
Tonight's the second of three
In the gala benefit easine-style
faaabltn* affair at the El Ran-
cho Garden.
The roalette wheels will keep
spinning the ehuck--luck
cage will keep turning and the
Hue will keep roliinr tonight
and tomorrow as lonr as there
are gamblers witling take a
chance to win that big pet
The gambling U conducted
te benefit the Coien Centea-
The committee la eharge has
aba schedeled floor shew en-
tertainate; its Use patreaa.
"Because he did not believe, and
Is an enemv of Allah and Islam."
It Is believed the fanatical Fl-
dalyan Islam sect chose Rafil to
shoot Fateml because he Is a mi-
nor and will get five years Im-
prisonment at the most.
While he was being Interroga-
ted Rafli called for the Koran,
placed his right hand oiv It. and
said:
"The bullet which left my Colt
was meant first for Dr. Mossa-
degh's brain and adother was lor
(former tosttee Mfeister Shaen-
seddto) tt\r*m&vn\ sponsfble for the retention of tror
beloved leader Navahsfavi in a
prison cell.
"I've been gunning for Mossa-
degh and Amir Alai; but they
were elusive.
"Fateml was at hand however,
and when I fired I was sure I
had dispatched another enemy
of Allah and Islam to hell."
Outside Fateml's hospital a
speaker shouted to the crowd:
"Fateml la another sacrificial
victim to the oil struggle, but let
Britain know we are prepared to
give hundreds of such sacrifices
rather than surrender to the for-
eigners.
Final Outcome Of
Talks Hinges On
Russia-Ridg way
PANMUNJOM, Feb. 16 (UP).Tht United Notion*
today accused Moscow of blocking a Korean armistice,
and quickly rejected o Communist move to make Russia
The two Paltlll. hoodlums who Qne Qf f||e $jx ^p found Vldegaard's clothes on
beach and a third man are still
being held bv Vasouez Dia for
questioning.
Harrv Soderman. aee Swedish
detective who came here from
Sweden to Investigate Vlde-
gaard's disappearance, departed
earlv yesterday on a direct flight
to New York.
And Hector Valdes, Jr.. Chief
of the Panama Secret Police, al-
so left here yesterday on a
flight to Costa Rica "to undergo
an eye examination."
Some circles are trying to tie
up the departure of the two In-
vestigators bv sueeestlng thats
they might be following some
new clue to the missing man's
whereabouts.
Mearrwhlle, It was learned to-
day that Ake Tornqulst. Vlde-
gaard's secretary who had the
hotel room next to the one from
which the millionaire disappear-
ed, is free to lewae, Panama at.
anv time,
The DlsWlct Attorney said no
order for Ids arrest has been Is-
sued.
Opera Star Tears
Wigs From Heads
Of Soviet Cast
M08COW, Feb. 16 (UP)The
Soviet newspaper "Art" said
that opera singer A. Ognlvtsev
recently went berserk during a
performance of the "Barber of
Seville" at the Bolshoi Theater,
and assaulted other members of
the cast.
The stories said Ognlvtsev,
behaving like a "premiere star
of the
bopped
and tore off several wigs.
Conchita To Fight
Two Bulls Tomorrow
On 'Ladies Day'
Tomorrow will be "ladles Day'
at San. Francisco de la Caleta
bullring.
As a special gesture to fen-
nine "aficionadas" Veneauela's
dashing matadora Conchita
Moreno -- has arranged to have
one lady admitted free with each
paid admission ticket presented
by a gentleman.
Tomorrow will' be Conchlta's
last appearance to the Pacific
side.
She will handle two of the
four bulls to be killed, sharing
honors with the Spanish mata-
dor, Manolo Ortega.
Chairs On the shady side are
S3, general admission $3. General
admission an the sunny side is
$1. Children pay half-price.
Sponsors of La Macarena bull
old provincial theater" i fights have suggested that pa-
an actor on the head trons bring cameras.
United Nations Far East Commander, United States
Gen. Matthew Ridgway's headquarters said in a "Voice
of the United Nations Command" broadcast from Tokyo
that the final outcome of the Panmunjom armistice talks
now hinges on decisions in Moscow.
The broadcast said:
"The armistice talks have
reached a stage where Moscow
must make up its mind what
the final outcome will be."
"The Red negotiators at Pan-
munjom are stalling while the
Kremlin tries to decide wheth-
er to:
"1) Insist on the right to
build /bomber and lighter bases
in North Korea during the
true*
"2): Agree to allow war prl-
soneta to aay whether or not
they vvnt to be repatriated;
3) Insist that a subsequent
ip-leveli government settle-
ent fcist talk about _JAsian
romarns n
:*ea.
"When a decision on these
points is made to Moscow, the
armistice will be resolved with-
out much delay one way or an-
other.
not directly, related to- ',
33 Soldiers Safe
As Plane Shears
Treetops, Blimps
MONTEREY, California, Feb.
16 (UP) A chartered plane
carrying 33 soldiers on a flight
from Fort Bill, Oklahoma,
sheared off a tree top while
coming .in for landing at
Monterey Airport last night,
shaking up the passengers.
All of the soldiers, en route
to nearby Fort Ord escaped In-
Jury. The plane vershot the
field after clipping a tree and
made a bumpy landing off the
runway.
"Moscow is now at the point
where it must make that
much-postponed choice "
*? Jectlng Russia as a neu-
'rue upervisor, the Unit-
ed Nations truce negotlatora
m.miJ!Ccepted two othw Cbm-
i^ nomlntlons Poland
and Csechoslovakla
inrf h2 ?wme Ume tn Reda
SfcntfLthey wuW cent
of^f ,Nlon "^nation.
Noria? -W6deB *nd
ftfInI 'electing the nomination
of Russia, united Nattons ne-
gotiator Col. Don a Darrtw
told the Red nJyTw
should be jb1ou5*I5*he
"It
did
He
presumably referred to
tne fact that much captured
Communist equipment has been
found to be Russian-made.
Among other things, Russia
fc believed to have supplied
most if not .11 of the tanks,
planes, radar controlled antl-
ffcraft guns, and other heavy
equipment used by the Reda
In Korea.
The Reds have asked that
the neutral armlatlce commis-
sion teams be empowered te
examine the secret tank, plane,
ship and gun designs of each
side, but the United Nation.
have refused.
It added that he incapacitated
one singer, and that such be-
havior is crude, undisciplined.
disgraceful and Impermissible
to the Soviet state.
BALBOA TIDES
Sunday,
HIGH
7:33 a. la.
7:51 p m.
Feb. 17
LOW
1:39 p. m.
1:52 a. m.
Some Monterey residen
with the Elizabeth, New Ji
disasters fresh to their minds
flattened themselves on the
floors of their homes as the
plane's engines droned omi-
nously when the craft came in
low over the town.
Austrian Court
Orders Seizure
Of Nazi Paintings
ten'* Court'
arsr-fl . '
mindi ownwrl
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
KLANFUERT, Austria, Feb. IS
(UP)The Austrian ''People's
Court" today ordered the con-
Ion of 200 paintings once
by the former Nazi For-
eign Minister Joachim von Rlb-
bentrop.
The paintings, valued it
1.800,000 schillings (Austrian
money) were found in the castle
of Teutschach, Carynthia, after
World War II.
\
The People's Courts In Aus-
tria, are set up to punish former
Nazis and confiscate their pro-
perty._____
Charlestons Bitterest Battle Ends
When Non-Conformist Judge Retires
CHARLESTON, 8.C., Feb. ISi And It was J. Waftes Waring,
(UP)Charleston, which has who at the time of the prece-
fought many battles to its his- dent-shattering decision, told the
tory, came to the end of one of people of hi. native state:
the bitterest of them all yester-, "It la Ume for South Carolina
day with the retirement of thei to rejoin the union. It is time to
city's best-known non-conform-
ist, Judge J. Waltea Waring.
Waring, who became one of the
most controversial J
udges
rn fro
to the
m the
%
south, stepped down
Federal bench
Charleston to live in New York
The retirement of the man
many regard as the "black she*
of Charleston society marks
end of a bitter battle between
the Judge and his former friends
and associates. For while Judge
Waring was making legal and
political history to South Caro-
lina, he also was making bitter
enemies ot much of his family;
and friends.
For It was Charleston's own J.
Waltes Waring who. as a Federal
Judge, delivered the fateful dec!-1
skmon Jan. 12, 1047 which open-
f all in step with the other states
and adopt the American way of
conducting elections."
Along with the decision came
graduation from
harleston
the College of
to 1900, he entered
law practice to the city and was
for many years president of the
Democratic Party in his ward.
He was appointed by President
Franklin D. Roosevelt to the
Federal bench on Dec. 18, 1941.
Waring's social life, however,
had put him to Bed with Char-
leston society two years before
and will leave a stern warning from the Judge! his Judicial decision In 1945. on-
that "any disobedience to the ly
letter and spirit of this ruling tl'
will result to contempt proceed-
ings and the parties responsible
for any violations will be pun-
ished by Imprisonment"
Many tidrrt the deci-
sin a tralteroua act for War-
ing to commit against his own
peepie and eertahtty nothteg in
the barkgroMne of the elghta-
gesterattea Charleeteaiaa gives
any indication ef bis later
non-conformity te aecea4ed
southern standards.
He was born Jury 7. llflt. the
recentlv divorced from his na-
ive Charleston wife of 32 years.
Waring married the twice-di-
vorced Elisabeth Avery Mills
Hoffman of Detroit.
This act was deeply frowned
upon in a state which did not
then legally recognise divorce
and when the Warlngs returned
to Charleston, they foand them-
selves virtual social outcasts.
Mrs. Waring, finding herself
shunned by much of the white
Charleston society, formed a new
southern whites "decadent,
stupid, selfish, savage, fall ef
pride and cosaplajeency, Intro-
ed the state's previously all-1 son of a Confederate veteran and
white Democratic Part/
Mm*
to'Ne- was reared to the aristocratic old
, Charlestoaian society. After nisH
verted and met-any weak and'
lew."
Angered Charlestonlans stoned
the Waring house- and kept the
Waring telephone Jangling with
threatening calls.
Waring finally brought the
awkward situation to a close by
announcing his retirement plana.
Many Charlestonlans openly re-
joiced but President Truman re-
Sretted the decision and termed
faring a "great man."
Waring', retirement comes at
a time when one of the most Im-
portant eases with which he was
associated returns to South Car-
olina from the U.S. Supreme
Court. The high court recentlv
ordered a re-hear tog In the suit
to end segregation in the Clar-
endon, 8.C.. public schools.
A special court, to a two-to-
drcle of friends among the city's one decision, had upheld aspar-
Negroes. ate classrooms. But Waring, tt
She farther aneaated herself
when she
VWCA
nddr* seed a Negra
the dlsswstlng opinion of the
three-ludgje court, had called
segregatlOB "toatuati to itaesV
/ /


PAGE TWO
THE PANANA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1958
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
HMD NO nvBLISHIB T TM PANAMA AMtftlCAN '! INC.
TUNOSO > NIUON OUNKVILl IN ISIS
HANMOOIO ARIAS. lOITOa
7. N STMIT P O OK 194, PAN*N. H. >.
TlLIPHONt r>NAM NO 1-07 40 IB LlNSSl
CASLI AODMSS, PAWAMBPICAN. PANAMA
COLON OrriCIi II.ITt CINTRAl AVtNUl StTWISN 1 *TH ANO tSTM
PONIION MINICJINYATIVM, JOSHUA B. POWBM, INC.
S4 MADISON AVB- NIW YORK. (171 N. V.
tOCAL
PIS MONTH. IN ADVANCS -70
POD SIX MONTHS. IN ADVANCS .S0
PO ONS VfAS. IN *-"T _______f .BO
Broadway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
Labor News
And
Comment

ROUND-UP OF GOSS-UP _
My Palm Beach Intelligence Dept. reports, verbatim: Gary
Cooper has been here for a week, at the Brazilian Court Hotel!
On Friday night he and Jon Hall had dates with Ruth Bragg and
Bettye Bosworth at the Music Box. Cooper has been seeing a lot
of Ruth, who is employed at Bchurr's, an exclusive Worth Ave.
shop (for men) and is a model in fashion shows. Cooper visited
her several times in the store...After leaving the Music Box, the
four went to another place and wound up late as guests in JKI
Moseley's apartment.. .Prince Obolensky was there, too. Veronica
Lake was expected, but didn't show up.
What Price Muse! After Maxwell Bodenhelm, whose verses
were famous in the '20s, was pinched for sleeping In the subway,
the poets of Greenwich Village called and held a Bodenhelm Re-
lief Meeting. They collected $11.90. (You can't even rhyme that!)
Princess Margaret Rose's latest "favored" suitor Is said to be
the Barl of Dalkeith, who is on social terms with the royal family
...Gertrude Lawrence's recurrent ailment is pleurisy. ..Spencer
Martin, separated from Pat Smart, is attentive to Pamela Rank
.. Novelist Eric Maria Remarque, still a bachelor, is said to be
wavering; it could be Erica von Hurstig, of the Hohenzollerns...
Tom Neal, who changed Franchot Tone's profile, seen with star-
let Winnie Walker.. .Aly Khan's new delight, it may amuse Rita
to know, is reported (a friend thought It worth a cable from
Brazil) to be Rosla Janletz, down there...And Brenda trazler
Kelly (a friend thought it worth a ten-cent phone call) dined at
Manny Wolf's with Stu Barthelmess. son of Dick, the onetime
movie star.
Lou Walters' Latin Quarter drew a $25,000 rap when it had its
liquor license lifted for a week because those three youngsters
who clipped a Massachusetts medic while one of them baby-sat
for him were served cocktails there. But he will be going in high
again tonight, and tomorrow he is opening a new revue. 'Parisian
Mardl Oras." with continental and native talent and a chorus-
line. .The punks, who had bought grown-up clothes with part of
the loot, didn't look like minors. They came together alonethat
wasn't where they picked up the men, one of whom recently got
a prison sentence: his defense was that the girl told him she was
twenty-two.
Benay Venuta and Fred Clark set the wedding dateJune 1
.But Teresita Montez, sister of the late beauty. Maria, put off
her to the chagrin of Ives Manuel, French businessman. Ana
Betty Lawson, the actress, and Paul Newman, theatre-owner, re-
vealed at Chateau Madrid that they may marry.. .Fernando Mon-
tel the dazzler who will debut for Lou Walters (see above). Is
engaged to Count Devilla-Padlerna, one of the richest nobles in
Spain. (No affidavit or bank reference submitted therewith.)
Greta Garbo seen in the Colony with Baron Eric Rothschild...
Julia Meade will marry Worsham Rudd. artist, March 21...Peggy
Dow delaved Universal's production plans to stretch her honey-
moon In Tulsa.. .Ljuba Welitsch, the Roumanian tornado of the
Met opera, patched up that vendetta with Salvador Dall over the
way he dressed her for "Salome" in London. I saw them dining.
Hollywood HighlightsDan Dalley and Marie Allyson pair up
as a new Sunset Strip twosome: Barbara Whiting Is sulking.
Nancv Valentine, back from India and far from her Maharajah,
needs the rupees: she will be one of the stunners In One piece
Bathing Suit" playing a bit.. .The Ronnie Regan-Nancy Davis
thing looks like a marriage, after Jane Wyman returns from
Europe Jack Dempsey got $5,000 for a three-day Job as a referee
in Bob Hope's next film.. .And Bob's "My Favorite Spy" is a mop-
up, as usual...Paramount wrapped up the legal arrangements
tor the Ruth Etting 107, with RhondFlemlng to p'the torch
warbler. Ruth's jr."Col" Snyder, of Cmeago signed-his waiver
for $15.000.. They say Gloria Swanson pttw^her sixth marriage.
TMI IS rOUR OHUM THI RIADIRS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tha Mill Bo. a span forum ro reeOen ot Tn Panamo Anret-
Iran Leftsn ass retsived erotefully ond ore kosdlee In wfcoNy eOSl-
ldsnfiol Mimar.
If f*s contribu, t letter don'I be impatient It ft doesn't eaeeti the
aest day. Lorian are publuhed In the ardor reserved.
Pleou try to keep Hie letten limited to ana bob* lenfth.
Identity a* latter rrlters is held In strictest ceefiaenca.
This newspaper enrames na raspansibllh> tar statements 01 opinion
empnirsrt In letters tram readers.
MORE CASTAOS FOR COLON
Colon, R. P.
Mill Box Editor,
8ir-
I notice that "A Gringo" did not write the Mail Box when
Eduardo Castao C, General Manager of Parke Davis Inter-
American Corp. praised Colon and the entire Republic of Pa-
nama In his first speech to the Panama Rotary Club, but when
this pioneer of civic betterment makes justifiable constructive
criticism, he gets slapped around for his trouble.
More Castaos for Colon.
Another Gringo.
BOSSES SIT "LIKE SARDINES IN TINS"
Deai Sir.
It appears that the reorganizing of labor and classification
was formulated by high officials to affect only local rate em-
ployes. This is exemplified in many divisions. This device, It
was conjectured, woula contain constructive specifications other
dan principally to deprive certain employes of that which he
or she entitled to by merit or years of faithful service.
It's our belief that the authors of this reorganization are
net vet suspicious or conversant of the abuse of their ingenuous
pians. Their democratic Intentions are being misinterpreted
and the local raters are being utilized as Instrument of frugal-
It by department white supervisors In their efforts to minimize
expenses.
Such action Is indicative that a covenant was formed be-
tween some of these supervlsros, to helnuously deprive un-
fortunate underpaid local rate employes of at least ten per oent
Of their lormet earnings In order to retain their positions and
to Insure them of their continued sumptuous salaries.
For instance, In the Terminals Division the bosses are like
aroines packed in tins. Most of the times the Hitler-like as-
sistant has nothing to do but walk up ana down the office play-
ing the role 01 a watchman, and have a few sheets of paper on
his desk, writing reprimands, suspensions 01 terminations.
How ever slight the error may be, and although most of
the time no financial loss is Involved, it is magnified to such
r. extent and without hesitancy the thickness of your file Is
toci eased
No excuse will be accepted by this Caar of the Terminals
who Is nor yet fully In the driver's seat and who Is beyond re-
proach.
During the absence of these two advoca tor of deprivation,
employes worked without Intimidation or fear of being duped
of their chances to continue earning an honest living; files were
kept clean, production improved; also cooperation and Interest
in the execution of duties enhanced. This was- due to the un-
limited sense of human comprehension and indiscrimination of
the gentlemen who officiated very efficiently during their ab-
Muce.
The world knew why Hitler was wanted. He was not a
man of democratic principles; he deprived and exterminated
those who were opposed to his domineering egoism.
This attitude of democratic defiance that is displayed by a
recently returned Inmate of the hospital, reflects a tinge of
outhern contempt which is contrary to what we fought for.
He 1* fortunate to be vet riding high. Uve and let other Uve.
regardless of creed or nationality.
To show loyalty rather than depravity, charity begins at
tMsne Should his present earnings be reduced ten or twenty
par cent, he would be still well paid lor what he is doing His
recent experience should let him be phllantropic Instead of de-
vising plots and plans to deprive specified group of employes of
two or more hours of the 40 they are now receiving, who are
working loyally and faithfully under existing conditions It's
ent-wtae and dollar-foolish.
By Victor Rieul
Gen. Eisenhower will not dis-
cuss publicly what he believe
should be the Republican Par-
ty's labor policies and platform
in this presidential campaign.
I have been informed at his
request that he considers this
would be personal interference
and participation in pre-con-
ventlon politics and, therefore
he will make no statements on
his attitude towards labor.
This information came
in a letter, dispatched on
his order, from Supreme
Headquarters, Allied Po-
wers, Europe, just the other
day. In it is alto clear in-
dication that he will not
accede to the scores of
private and now public
requests that he return to
campaign personally.
But the letter from his aide,
Gen. C. T. Lanham, speaks for
Itself: *
"Gen. Elsenhower has asked
me to reply to your letter
which asks for a statement on
what he thinks a politcal par-
ty's labor platform should be.
"T h e General appreciates
your thoughtfulness in writing
to him (for) his views on labor.
"In this connection, I am
sure you will recall Gen. Elsen-
hower's announcement on Jan.
7 In which he said T shall not
participate In the pre-conven-
tlon activities of others who
may have such an intention
with respect to me; 'And his
further statement, I shall con-
tinue to devote my full atten-
tion and energies to the per-
formance of the vital task to
which I am assigned.'
"At the termination of this
announcement on Jan. 7. I
told the assembled press that,
'Gen. Elsenhower does not in-
tend to say anything further
or. this matter.'
"Accordingly, U is my
duty to tell you that these
statements still stand un-
changed.
"As an international com-
mander, Gen. Eisenhower
can not possibly participnte.
personally in domestic poli-
tical affairs, even if the
tremendous burden ot his
official responsibilites to
the 12 countries of the
North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization permitted."
Shown to several national
labor chiefs, these two para-
graphs were considered doubly
significant In view of the
knowledge Inside labor that,
for more, than a month now,
the General's backers have
been sending urgent messages,
personal envoys and, of late,
public requests for the com-
mander's return-
However, the General's silence
will beget him only silence
In the highest labor circles.
There will be no criticism
darting at him from the AFL.
and only the more militant
CIO chiefs will attack him pub-
licly.
With these attacks the AFL
will not associate Itself nor
will it go along with CTO Wests
at other presidential hopefuls.
As blueprinted in Miami re-
cently by the Federation's most
powerful chiefs and political
strategists their policy this
time is to wait and see who Is
nominated by both parties.
There now can be no doubt
that strong sections of the
AFL may swing Into the Repub-
lican campaign at the Federa-
tion's next national convention,
openine on Sept. 15 In New
York City.
A survey of political een-
timent among the AFL's
high council members re-
veals that only a few o1
them are for Mr. Truman's
-._..,< virt"nlly all of
them are laughing off Sen.
Kefouver'x campaian. They
"just don't go for" niinoW
Qov. Stevenson.


Death of a Hunter
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. In reading of the circum-
stances surrounding the death of George VI of
England, it la more than clearly apparent that
a real nice, simple gent pushed off just the
way he would have ordered It. I don't mean so
much the general satisfaction with Elizabeth's
marriage and babies, and his royal house well
In order.
I was thinking more ol Bertie Windsor, the
hunter.
All hunters are pretty much alike. Serious
hunters, that is. And the late King was a seri-
ous shotgunner, like his papa ahead of him.
Even when he was confronted by an opera-
tion for cancer of the lung, I notice that George
VI delayed the surgery for two weeks in order
to make the best of the shooting season.
The King died at the end of a day's hunt,
the whistle of birds' wings and the hop of a
big buck hare through the bracken.
He would yawn, and yawn again, and his
eyes would get scratchier, and the papers would
fall from his fingers. The help woula dress him
for bed.
Even with hot-water bottle for his bad leg,
the sheets would be cold and crispy like sheets
always are in the country and It would take
some courage to stretch tull-length Instead of
curling in a ball.
Suddenly he would be warm, as warm aa a
bunny In a nest, as warm as any tired hunter
in any bed.
Of course, the good King knew he was near
death. I Imagine he said some prayers, mostly
cf thanks instead of supplication.
He would have smiled a little as he thought
during which he shot well. He bagged some of his grandchildren and of his big fine daugh-
nine rabbits, or hares, if you prefer it that
way. And he pulled down a pigeon that was
flying very high and fast.
He has some sharp winter wind in his thin,
gray, sick-man's face, and some brief winter
sun on his head.
He would have come in pleasantly tired from
jouncing around In his Land Rover, a kind of
British jeep, and feeling the need of a stout
shove of Scotch-and-splash or a finger or so of
gln-and-french.
There would have been a pleasant sting to
his cheeks, from wind and fire and the pre-
dinner drink. The fire would have been lovely
to see and fine on the feet and fingers.
A certain kind of fatigue that Is better than
any other fatigue, the hunter's weariness, would
be creeping over him, and*a fire-exerclse-
whisky drowse would be pulling at his eyelids.
He would be thinking in terms of a hot bath
and a very early bed, and not too much lupper
ahead of it. Tired hunters, for some reason,
are neither greedy men or generally heavy
drinkers.
The King would have had his boots drawn
off, and a pair of sloopy old slippers on his
feet, and he would have sat before a simple
meal, which probably was no more than some
cold fowl or a slice of beef with mustard and
a wedge of cheese and a pot or so of strong
tea.
The fire would be blinking pleasantly at him.
and he would be blinking back at the fire, and
the state papers be had decided to inspect
atfer supper would keep getting confused with because I am a hunter, too.
ter then fn Africa, where the shooting was fan-
tastic if a bloke just had the time.
But then his thoughts would have run brief-
ly back to that pigeon coming, high and with
the sun glinting and probably a bit o'breeze
lending him another knot or so of speed.
And the King would grin Inwardly as he re-
membered just how far, without thinking, he
had led the bird, and he would re-savor the
satisfaction as the plump pigeon crumpled in
midair and came plummeting down.
The King would be a bit smug as he recon-
structed the flurry of conversation amongst the
gamekeepers:
"Strike me, John, The Old Boy's still a sharp
'un when he sets 'Is mind to It. That last
slighter was a good thirty yard up and buzzing
along like a ruddy rocket."
The King's grin would twist a little as he re-
membered the easy one he missed as clean as
Hitler missed landing on the island.
Already he would begin to lie a little to him-
self about why he missed it. And then he
would think that it is pretty sad to be a dying
king, but the sadness would be lightened by the
prospect of getting up In the morning and
watching the dogs work and taking the clean,
oiled guns out and going into the gorse again.
Already he could hear the cock pheasant
cackle.
The good King would sleep, to never waken.
And he would sleep smilingly into death.
The reason I know these things to be true is
So they're going to sit and
wait for the two groups to no-
minate meanwhile seeking,
to bargain in Sam Gompers'
fashion with every faction In
both parties.
This raises air Important po-J
litical Issue inside labor
important enough to swing mil-
lions of vetes.
The AFL seeks political in-
fluence for Its own members.
It believes that the CIO has
had the ear of the Adminis-
tration too closely and too long.
Under no circumstances will
the national AFL chiefs, there-
fore, join with CIO loaders In
a national campaign for or
against any presidential no-
minee.
In fact, long before the two
national parties are battering
each other, the AFL National
political chiefs will be saying
publicly that the CIO is a po-
litical liability.
And the CIO will retort that
the topside in AFL doesn't re-
present the rank and file below.
These labor giants differ most
sharply and bitterly today over
the practice of tying their
union followers to one party
and one candidato.
Which Is why the AFL will be
illent until the partios threw
their nominos In the ring.
The Glacier
By JOSEPH ALS0P
WASHINGTONThe movement of events these
days Is a little like the movement of a glacier,
grinding, sluggish and all but Imperceptible until
the next avalanche is started by the remorseless
ice.
Today, the glacier does not seem to move. Yet
there are signs of movement for the careful eye North China,
to see; and one such Is a new plan for carrying
the Korean war to the Chinese mainland, when
and if there seems to be no other choice.
The plan, which has been placed before the
Joint Chiefs of Staff by the Air Staff, has no
resemblance to Gen. Douglas MacArthur's scheme
for bombing in Manchuria.
In fact it is a plan for not bombing in Man-
iiurla, since Manchuria now contains a powerful
concentration of Russo-Chlnese air power, and it
is also a plan for not bombing the Chinese cities
and industrial centers, which contribute so infin-
itely less to Chinese military power than the
cities and industrial centers of the Soviet Union.
The basis of the plan is simple enough. For
such a huge country, China Is held together by a
remarkably slender network of communications.
Mine the Yangtse and Yellow Rivers, for
exampie, and the Northwestern provinces and
the rich kingdom within a kingdom of Szechuan
will simply be cut off from the rest of the country.
Bomb out the railroads and mine the Grand
Canal, and South China will be severed from
These are, In fact, the devices now contem-
plsted. They have two obvious virtues.
First, they will do infinitely more damage to
the Communist regime than any other form of
attack, without arousing the violent emotions in-
herent in the bombing of great cities.
Second, they will follow the rule of "hitting
them where they alnt," forcing the Chinese to
Sread out the air power now concentrated in
uiehurla, in a hopeless effort to defend the
whole Chinese land
The Yellow River and the Yangtse, the Grand
Canal, and two or three railroads are the .main
arteries, and there are no leaser -arteries and
capillaries to take the traffic. If the main arteries
are cut.
From the foundation of the Chinese empire
over 2,000 years ago, when the first universal
emperor made the grand canal his top priority
project, every strong ruler seeking to organize
China has first been forced to link the provinces
together by assuring good communications bet-
ween them.
In this respect, the Chinese Communists ara no
different from earlier Chinese empire bulkier*.
Meanwhile, however, the arteries of communica-
tion, have become Immeasurably more vulnerable
to external attack.
It is reassuring, at least, that a military plan
promising both economy and effectiveness has
been designed for use4n the Far East, if worst
comes to worst there.
"Worst" in this context Is defined in three
ways: if the truce talks break down and the Com-
munists then launch a maior Korea offensive; If
a truce is made and then broken, or if the Chi-
nese Communists Invade Indochina or attack
elsewhere.
It is further proposed that the Chinese Com-
munists be clearly warned of what may be In
store, m the hope that they will thus be dis-
suaded from further adventures.
Thus it is at least rational to hope that in the
end the worst will not come to the worst, and
that In the faintly warmer atmosphere following
a Korean truce, the glacier will begin to molt
and will cease it* remorseless movement toward
disaster.
ciUAJLY WASHIHGTOH
mivst1
MERRY-GO-ROUND.
"MlW HAttOH I
Drew Pearson Says: Louis Johnson tells Truman he can't
beat MacArthur; Taft switched frequently on subject
of McCarthy; McCarthy's charges are now two years
old.
WASHINGTON.Louey Johnson, the pleasant, barren-beaned
ex-secretary of defense, has had three private talks with the Pre*
sident, all through the White House back door. Two were at hit
request, the last was requested by Truman. \
What the President chiefly wanted, Johnson later told friends,
was to get the veterans straightened out politically.
He figured that Johnson, a big wheel in the American Legion,
with his law partner, Don Wilson, now national commander, might
be able to swing a lot of the vets back Into Democrat ranks.
But Johnson was quite unenthuslatlc.
"I don't think I could very well go to ihe veterans," he said,
"with my reputation for having been fired, and expect to make a
successful political appeal."
The President didnt comment on this, but asked his ex-sec-
retary of defense what he thought of the political situation.
"I don't think Elsenhower will get anywhere," Johnson told
friends that he replied.
"But I think he has enough strength to block Taft. In the
case of that deadlock I think MacArthur will be the nominee, and
he is one man, Mr. President, you can't beat."
MCCARTHY SQUEEZER TAFT
Fellow Republicans have been whispering behind Bob Taft's
back about the way the senator from Wisconsin has been pushing
>the senator from Ohio around.
What they say is that McCarthy barked and Taft Jumped the
other day when he issued his statement supporting McCarthy.
For exactly three months, the Wisconsin wildman had been
demanding such an endorsementin fact, ever since Mr. Repub-
lican stepped on his toes last October by declaring that McCarthy'
charges had been "overstated."
"I don't think anyone who overstates his case helps his own
case," was what Taft told the press on October 22.
"The extreme attack against Gen. Marshall Is one of the things
on which I cannot agree with McCarthy. I think some crltlcife
of Gen. Marshall was justified, but he should not have been ac-
cused of affiliation with any form of Communism."
This Infuriated McCarthy.
Shortly thereafter, he cornered Taft In the senate and de.
manded a repudiation. At first, the Ohloan sidestepped. He tried
to placate McCarthy by repeating In subsequent speeches:
"I don't agree with everything McCarthy says, but we cant
criticize McCarthy for starting the Communlsts-in-governnMht
investigation."
Of course, McCarthy didn't start the Communists-in-govern-
ment probe at all, but jumped on the soapbox long after Algei
Hiss and William Remington had already been exposed, largely
by the un-American Activities Committee and by McCarthy's fel-
low Republican, Sen. Nixon of California.
Yet even this indirect tribute from Taft didn't satisfy thi
Wisconsin senator.
He began talking tough to Taft and threatening political re.
prlsals. He even boasted about It afterward, until It became com-
mon gossip In the Senate cloakrooms.
Finally the harassed Taft knuckled down and announced on
Jan. 21:
"McCarthy's Investigation has been fully Justified. This Ad-
ministration has been dominated by a strange communist sym-
pathy."
What made this all the more humiliating for Taft was that
It was completely one-sided.
While he announced his support of McCarthy, the senator
from Wisconsin said nothing about supporting Taft, In fact, on
December 14, McCarthy came out for Gen. Douglas MacArthur for
President "and a younger man for vice president"meaning, of
course, McCarthy.
Ironically, it was McCarthy who defeated MacArthur in Wis-
consin's 1948 primary by claiming that MacArthur was "too old"
and by smearing him with Catholic voters on account of hlsj
divorce.
However, the political winds have shifted, and McCarthy
now trying to tie himself to MacArthur's kite.
Meanwhile Sen. Taft explains to Republicans colleagues pri-
vately:
"Joe was threatening to come out for Stassen in Wlscona__
and Wisconsin is very important to me. Also I had pressure from'I
party leaders to support McCarthy."
He identified the other party leaders as Herbert Hoover and
Gen. MacArthur.
NOTEThough Taft indicates to friends that he isn't happy
about his forced alliance with McCarthy, a March of Dimes soli-
citor calling on the Taft home the other evening, discovered Sen.
McCarthy seated comfortably at the Taft dinner table.
ANNIVERSARY OF MCCARTHY CHARGES
It has now been two years since McCarthy made his first
claim, in a Lincoln's birthday speech at Wheeling, W., Va., that
there were 205 Communists in the State Department.
Immediately thereafter, at Salt Lake City, he changed his
figure to 57 and announced that he would supply the names to
Secretary of State Acheson on request.
Later he upped the figure to 81. %
But so far McCarthy has supplied the name of no one who
has been proved a Communist, and Senator Tydlngs of Maryland
still has a $25,000 offer to McCarthy on this score.
The only man who has been barred from working In the State
Department as a result of McCarthy's charges is John Service,
found by the Loyalty Board to have been indiscreet and a poor
security risk in giving Information to a newspaper.
The Loyalty Board specifically stated that It had no reason
to doubt Service's loyalty and made It clear he was no Communist.
MONUMENT TO ICKE8
Senators who praised the rugged honesty of Harold Ickea
when he died last week will soon get a chance to put their senti-
ments Into more concrete form.
For the Lister Hill resolution, carrying out Icke's idea of put-
ting tldelanda oil revenues Into a national educational fund, soon
comes up for a vote.
If passed, this would finally settle the red-hot issue of tide-
lands oil which has fanned the fires between Washington and th
three big off-shore oil statesCalifornia, Louisiana and Texas
ever since the Supreme Court awarded this oil to the Federal gov-
ernment.
With schools needing funds more than ever before and uni-
versities seriously short of money, the Ickes plan to put tldelands
oil royalties into an educational fund Is getting more support.
Also many senators feel it would be a Just tribute to a man
who did more to preserve the national domain than anyone else
in this generation.
V
M/A.
BUY
Opportunity knocks
every day in oar want-
ad section. Hard-to-
Had Hems sad *
injt bargains in every
issue. New classified
ads appear...old ads
disappearreason...
QUICK RESULTS!
Turn and check the
want-ads now I
Every month . every week . every day
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE WANT ADS
than all other daily papers in Panama combined !


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, lftSt
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAOR
33rd Infantry Rescues 4 Lost In Jungle Near Koobe
Efficient teamwork by two
unite of the 33rd Infantry Regl-
I. merit resulted In the rescue of
! four soldiers lost In the thick
|" Jungles near Fort Kobbe re-
cently.
The four men, Peter Van
Hagen, George Valols, Salvatore
Lojo Cruz and Jose Vallafr.ne
Cardona, all privates first class,
left early last Sunday morning
for a hike to Cerro Oalero, the
tropical peak that towers into
the sky south of Kobbe. When
they hadn't returned by 8 p.m.
that evening, they were assumed
to be lost on the Jungle-covered
lope.
Combining their skill and facil-
ities Into a rescue team were
the 38rd's Second Army Aviation
Section and the Intelligence and
Reconnaissance Platoon. Jungle
experts from the I. & R. Platoon,
led by Lieutenant Joseph Mc-
Urane. set out by toot while
Captains George Wlthey and
Frank Sutor of the Aviation Sec-
tion flew over the area seeking
some sign of the men. The 12
man Jungle unit carried torches
to light their way maintained
radio contact with the airplane.
By 9:15 p.m. the officers In the
plane spotted a flashlight point-
ed skyward and began to guide
the rescue team on the ground
to the spot. The Jungle platoon,
cutting their way through much
of the heavy vegetation with
machettes, reached the lost hik-
ers by 11 p.m. and led them
back to Fort Kobbe before mid-
night.
The unexpected rescue work
last Sunday night served as a
timely warmup to a similar field
problem scheduled for six days
next week. In the exercise the
Intelligence and Reconnaissance
Platoon and the aviation Sec-
tion will collaborate on a Jungle
march across the Isthmus of Pa-
nam. Their route will approxim-
ate the one taken by buccaneer
Henry Morgan nearly four cen-
turies ago when he attacked and
destroyed Old Panama City.
The I. & R. Platoon will set
out from a point on the Atlan-
tic side of the Isthmus, Nombre
de Dios, on the northeast coast
3 Hurt As Veiled Women
Hurl Grenades In Tunis
TUNIS, Feb. 18 (UP)At least
three persons were seriously
wounded today when a veiled
Moslem wo'fian threw four
grenades at security police in
front of the French Residency
here. >
of Pr.nama next Monday morn-
ing. They Will then cut their way
back to Fort Kobbe In six days,
with the Air Section collaborat-
ing by droplng supplies and
providing evacuation faculties
In case' of injuries.
LI. C. A. Lemons,
Ex-Kobbe Sergeant
Gels Silver Star
>
Word has Just been received
at Fort Kobbe that a former
1st Sergeant of Heavy Mortar
Company, 33d Infantry Regi-
ment, was awarded the Silver
Star for heroic action in Korea
last July 4.
1st Lieutenant Carl A. L-
Thlef Likes Comfort
GREENVILLE, S. C. (UP) A
comfort-loving thief is at laige.
A Brevard. N.C., man reported
the following articles stolen from
his parked station wagon: a
house coat, two pairs of pajamas
and a pair of house slippers.
mons, raised to his World War
II rank In Korea, won the medal
in combat with Company B, 7th
Regiment, of the 3d infantry
Division, near Chlch-on, Korea.
Two enemy regiments attacked
Company B on Independence
Day. During withdrawal to a
new defense line, Lt. Lemons
exposed himself to enemy fire
and took over a machine gun
when the gunner was hit by an
exploding grenade.
With the rank of Master Ser-
aeant, Lt. Lemons served at Fort
Kobbe with the 33d Infantry
Regimental from its activation
in January 1950 until June of
that year. He is from Chat-
tanooga, Tennessee.
Help Your Piles
Don't aufTr from painful, Itchlnt
Pilas another hour without trylna
CMnai-old. I"!>on application Chlnarold
tarta curbing Pile mlsorlM S vaya; 1.
Raaea pain and Itching 3. Hlp a'hrlnk
ora, airorcn tlaauef. 1, Hlpa naturr
heal Irrltatod membranee and aliar PH.
Ntrvouaneaa. Ask your Druea-lit tor
Chlnarold tadav.
THIRI'S MASK IN
CUTICURA
TALCUM
Nothing else like it! It's
finer, softer, smootherab-
sorbs and deodorises per-
spirationkeepa yoa fresh,
cool, alluringly fragrant and
attractive. Soothing after
sunburn and shaving. Pro-
vents chafing. Buy today.
IN ONLY 8 DAYS

BEAUTIFUL CHALET
SHOWN BELOW WILL BE RAFFLED The Chalet Is Completely Furnished
VISIT IT
At Corner 'C Street In "El Cangrejo One Block From the Huge Apartment House
Now Being Constructed in that AreaFollow the Arrow!


General view
WHERE TO BUY YOUR TICKETS
o{ **.
At the Chalet, at the Office of Padre Sosa (rear of San Francisco Church), from Mr. Jos Retally (Cia. General de Segare*), Mrs. Clementina Arosemena (Tesorera Munici-
pal). Mrs. 01a Leignadier (Smoot y Paredes), Mrs. Eugenia sern Cervera (Clnica San Fernando), Mrs. Nora Pewat Seot| (No. 38, 51st Street), Miss Emelia L. Medina
(Banco Nacional), Almacn El Trbol (N. 70 Central Ave.), Mueblera El Diablo (No. 86 Central Ave.), Ancn Liquor Store (corner 4th Of July Ave. A **J" Street),
Pharmacy Zona del Canal (4th Of July Ave. <* "J" Street), Phr.rmacv Cristo Rey (Ave. Cuba and 36th Street), Tia Licha (Radio Emisora Independiente), Father Maguregui
(San Francisco Church), Duran** Store, Mrs. Edith P. de Garcia (Seguro Social), Duran, Estacin San Francisco (Va Porras 220) and authorised vendors.


.
equipment.
and fa*
,n? Room with k. J^^1^*^
The luxurious wi ^j^yj y^ ^ n^ abk to sell tQ ouf pgitrom preferre(j numbers
because there are very few TICKETS left
Choose from those few YOUR TICKETS TODAY at the BARGAIN PRICE of $ 8.-


I
I
_
.Cf m-t
i
THE PANM% AMERICAN y rVDEPENBrVT nATLY *KWi-AT*R
-jvnmvur ;WKKtKt i, iw*
HOLLYWOOD...
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON : Irene Dunne coaxed Rand* out 80 Bataml Schneider says,
HOU.^TOOD-(NEA M of a Zane Grey series at W; taHong^out her work in mak ng
Her capsule comments on tome
fai.uds ivars:
Diana Lynn"This experienc-
ed actress was petrified at doing
improvisations. I told her she
wasn't an ingenue. 8he worked
hard and her temperament and
warmth came to the surface."
Parley Granger"He's be a
fine actor if he would work and
really be serious."
Ti:im-
PRISONER'S SONG
She was an untidy girl pirate morie queens,
in "Anne of the Indies/' a primi-i "It's a chance to bask in re-
tiva Mexican woman in "Zapata" 1 fleeted glory. When an actor
and now she's dripping brackish; switches to westerns, its not al-
r iron her buckskin costume ways voluntary. I'd have to get
water _
;n "Cry of the Swamp.
"People start looking at you
t coldly, as if you were a piece of
beef," Jean told me. .
"I get into makeup in the
morning. With other MMMi
it's pin-curls and iteff. With me
it's 'dirty up her hair, throw oil
n her face and let's go.'"
a new dress suit, though. The
moths got into the one f owned."

Alas and alack. Shapely, dark-
eyed Carla Balenda won't be bill-
boarded with plunging necklines,
knives in her hands, or Robert
Mttchum gazing at her.
Carla walked out of her RKO
der, Bataml uses the group sys-
tem advocated by Stanlslavskl at
her studio but claims: "I'm not a
dramatic coach. There isn't a
word for what I do."
"It's improvisation," she
Virginia Mayo"She was kind
of reserved. She couldn't break
down emotionally. Now she
knows how."
Piper Laurie"She came to mr
knowing nothing. But her talent
was a natural one."
Lena Home"She was afraid,
ex- She told me that she couldnt
plains. 'I give them the outline; cry. Now it's easy for her. If only
would
of a story and they act it out, I Hollywood
making up their own lines." chance."
give her
She admits that she asked for, contract a few months ago to
a chance to play down-to-earth 1 freelance and explained why she
oarts but "the studio got car-1 stepped out of the line that!
rled away A little temperance,! would have led her to stardom on:
Sooner or later, they're the "Outlaw Women" set.
hare me swinging
, please
going to
; vines." .
Hollywood's 7th ranking mon-
ev-makinK atar on the exhibitor
' poll conduced by the Motion
Picture Herald confesses he'd be
right happy to put his nag to the
atable, and make love to a mighty
movie queen again!
I'm talking apout sagebrush
favorite Randolph Scott, topped
. as a boxofflce magnet only by
and in the order namedJohn
Wayne, Martin and Lewis, Betty
Grable, Abbott and Costello, Bing
Crosby and Bob Hope.
It's been a long time since
Orchid Paintings
By H. A. Purdom
Dim At JWB-USO
! The fourth art exhibit of the
An actress who Isn't given!
parts is like a typist without her
typewriter," she said. "You go
crazy. I wanted to work, but I
wasn't getting pictures.
"Age Is very important to an
actress. I don't want to wait
around and work 10 years from
now. I want to work now."
Faith Domergue, I commented,
had waited for years as a Howard
Hughes contract player. Snapped
Carla:
"I havfn't her patience."

Start worrying, Robert Taylor,
Errol Plynn and Robert Mitch-
um. Sheldon Leonard comes to
on the lover-boy racket in "Deci-
sion."
It's a complete switch for the
dark-visaged, glowering, actor,
who's been giving out with the
"dese, dem and dose" lingo in
gangster roles for years, and has
never uttered anything more af-
fectionate than "dump him to
the river," on the screen.
Now Sheldon's crushing Ann
; JWB Gallery In Balboa, is an ex. You hypnotize yourself into be-
....._ .... __.. .t~.i jieving ahe's the most desirable
i hlbltion of orchids and tropical
4 flower arrangements, in water-
] color, by M. A. Purdom who has
. spent many years studying the
'local flowers.
Eight large panels, each rep-
resenting a single orchid plant,
are of interest both to the artist
and to the naturalist.
One painting depicts the Holy
Ghost orchid, the national flow-
er of Panama.
In addition there are decora-
tive compositions of the red pas-
sion vine, jungle lily, ginger lily,
hibiscus, and the flower of the
Honduras fire tree.
Mrs. Purdom began her art ed-
ucation in the Mary Nash College
In Texas, where she won the lirst
and second prizes for flower ar-
rangements in one year. From
there she went to New Orleans
and worked to the Arts and
Crafts Club. Later, after spend-
ing many years to Mexico and
Central America where she
painted both landscapes and fig-
ures, she came to the Jsthmus.
Here her greatest interest has
centered on orchids. Altogether
she has painted out two hun-
dred varieties, both large and
small, some so small that they
were done with the aid of a mag-
nifying glass. One small orchid
was named for her.
Many of the Purdom drawings
are accurately scientific. These
will be shown later in the library
museum of the Civil Affairs
Building.
The present exhibition will
open Sunday afternoon and will
remain open until March 1. The
public is cordially Invited to visit
the USO-JWB gallery which is
open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 10
p.m.
woman to the world.
"You don't worry how you're
Soing to look on the screen and
she's getting lipstick on you.
You just want her. It comes over
and the sparks fly."

"Actors wear masks. You un-
mask them and find talent that
hasn't been touched."
THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by the State
Pays 2% Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
We make loan* with guarantees on first mortages
% or other securities.
CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
25c 50c. $1.00 and $5.00
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety deposit boxes, for jewelry ami
documents, in 4 different sixes.
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
119 Central Ave. at
corner of "I" Street.
COLON BRANCH:
Front St. at corner
of 7th St
(i. R. De ROUX
Manager.
CARLOS MOUYNES V.
Sab-Manager.
HOOKS:
From 8:90 a.m. te 12:30 p.m
SATURDAYS: from t:M am te I2:M p.m.
FRECKIFS ANT) HIS PTENOS"
On the Loose
BY MKRRILL BLOBSKR
yiKE.'
VANDVKF
FIEWTWE-
coopyws
ROPE'S
CHEV/EP
TUfcBETTtR
\ TSTACK HIM
DOWN
BEFORE
HE GETS IN
TROUBLE/
Somebody>
SCHOOL wk.l
Ft*. THIS
ALLEY OOP
Just a Hint?
BY ?. T. HAMLI*
The Chase National Bank
of the City of New York
resources over $5,6O79W0,OO0M
General Banking
PANAMA BRANCH CRISTOBAL BRANCH
COLON BRANCH BALBOA BRANCH


DAVID BRANCH
We Specialize in Financing Import and Export
CHRIS WELKEN Planeteer
Not a Science Topic

BY RtJSS WINTERBOTHAM
VIC FLINT
PKlSCrLLA-S POT
Shattered Myth
BY AL VERMERB
BLOB BDN.VX
He Can Stay Longer
th*t AL 6AM.'
i turroem "youfme
fiOMfi-roi"
BOOTS AND HER BUDDBS
THANK YOU,6IR...ANO\ WELL NOW, I
I'LL BET YOU'RE ONE WOULDN'T flAYl
OF THE MEN
JAME6TOWN...A
XfRE LOST/
rv*6LOST;..
BUTTHEN.ON
UMWVKNOW
SOMEBODY
MEBBEA
CARELESS
Help!
BY EDGAR MARTIN
CAPTAIN EASY
Quick Deductions
BY LESLIE TURNES
HMM...SO HE'S THE FELLA ME
NOTICED IN THAT MONTERREY
GARAGE! MOD HIS EXPLANATION
FOR TRAILING JANET IS THE
Only PLAUSIBLE-
EA*V! I'VE
JUST HAO AN
INSPIRATION 1
NOW I KNOW
mot
05, AND
$m
THAT $U66LER! MB T IT'S TRUE. VATES WAS
WAS IN THE GARAGE WHILE MATCHING CO WE WERE! VOUR FRIEND | HIS CAR SERVICED,NIT_
SAID SO. WHEN YOU WET ,
HIV, ACROSS THE STREET'


'.-'A
W
tapOUC
DON'T YOU SEE!?
CUSTOMS MEN WONT
FIND THE DOPE ON HIM
RECAUSE HE"> HIDDEN
IT IN THl* LAR,T1LL IT
WAS SAFELY ACROSS
THE BORDER'. NOW ME

'*"-*>. Y9;.^ :^Rm-vmm.'.^-
A Wrong Ti
BY MICHAEL O'MALLEY
look; tmat vwoman'sA I've sebm
leavim ju&t as the! h6je kfoz,
^JMFHOsry is rbatty/vie. now
TC0JF+/N. I -TDU7 < WHERE WAS
YOU SHB HAP THE/ IT AMP WHAT
FWtTSra!!9L M HE*
NAME?
W^MlTirff-! *-"''-
OUR BOARDING BOISE .
MAJOR BOOPLE OUT OUR WAY
By J. K WILLIAMS
EGAD, BOYS/ WHILE GASTN
ISOUTOFTOWN.I'MIN
CHARGE OF SELLING HIS
ANT|QUES/-HeR6,S
THE HEADLIGHT FROM
OLD 38,THE LOCO-,
MOTIVE IN WHICH
THE IMMORTAL
CASY CJOnJeS
TOOK HIS,
LAST
ClDE /
IF VOU'RE MAK-
ING a pitch to
ME, >O'D
\ Better put
in a line of
free samples?
X WOULDN'T t?Z
PAY A DIME:
FOR NERO'S
^-~l FIDDLE.'
>
HOW A0OOT
THAT CAR
OF MINE ?
WOULD
GASTN
LIKE TO
SUV IT?
ITS THE y
FIRST ^
HORSELESS
CARRIAGE/
il
m
R^l
k2-7l
JIET
MSRKET
TODAY.
FOLKS-



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1952
THE MMHM AMERICAI Alt INDEPENDENT f>AIT,Y NEW8PAPBI
r*am
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES
Union Churches
Wh*r*. all Protestante coeperaU rttb
unity In essential*, liberty Ini aoa-
itlah tnd rharttv In all thing
L'Hfc ATLANTIC S1DS
Cnuubui
The Rev r'hilllp Havener i*aetet
Phone 3-US3 _,__. ___
10 4.1 Worship Wrt-vlct mo Cbureh-um
00 Vouiig ?eoole' Meeting
Oaten
"Th riev t William I Uraham. Peale
Phon 5-355 uutu
i oo 9. Broadcast on HOR. HPK
no HON
9:4 Sunday Scnuoi
11:00 Worhlp Servle*.
iM> Chrlstlar Endaavot
Margarita _. ^_
The Rev rlenrv Hell Paato*
Phone 3-1498
9:30 Bible School *__ _,.
10:4 Worship *r*lc* *nd cnurcb-tlmt
oursery
6 JO Youth elluwahlp
rHk PACIPl SIDE
The Rev Aiex.'.u*. "SB*
B*Ibo* Ru l 3i t-ablo St
Phone 2-1486-'.'huu-ri Ofllce i-SSBS
8:30Church Ben.*, Free bu ervlc.
I0:3U Worship > "vice Jun"'jChurch.
Primarv Stnrv -""Ji Church-time Mux
"So Chi Rho-semoi Hi fellowship'
t;;nn Phil HI rsl'owvhis
^""^rv.ce. at lb. O. O o J U"
Church corner ol Jalllard Hignway
Se Irvfe? a -i "-
Phone 6-i30
9;30 Sunday 9'",1/1_
10:30 Mornfrg Wnr*hrp
' Re almond s W S-'*" P
toral Supply _
30 Sun y Sim
7 30 Vrper*
Pasto*
Church.i *t the m.ny talHii in the Canal Zana, and the terminal
crlle af Panama and Colon. Republic of Panamo, extend a wateam*
at all tlmei to Man and woman af the ormad tarvicat. Mai * elyWan
naifhbart. friend and itranaan.
At public larvice, Hia The Panama American lief below, by
denomination!, notice! of houri at wanhip and other re*uler aefiyrtlei.
Lritinai ara rototed tram tima to tima. Danominotiani bavin*
only one or two eonjreoatloni ara Hitad andai "Otfcat Chorehaa And
tarvicat" A ipeciol lirtin*, it ineladed tar tatvkoa at Arm* aaati.
Air Force boiei and Naval Italian!.
Miniiteri, church secretarial and chaplain* ara aiked re mtarm
the newi deik by Wedneiday noon at the iatatt af any chano** for
the comma Saturday'i church MM.
Catholic
i
u
Luted below are toe calbuiu Church
j the Canal Zone and thwa aitba tar-
ol Panama and Colon who
'Callona are primarily English
ng Beside toe**, the Cathedra In
City, the Cathedral nl the 1m
te Conception In Coln and num
Brlsh church* In both cltlee, I
igllsh speaking rlrrtnrs, tho.igh
iheii congregation re orlmaril Span
h peaking '
.:50 :0U. 11:10 II
am
'lr1
I
nifarian
i-Mk.
unitaria
socikti
10:30 in
jWB Armed
(orce* Service
_entei Library
Balboa C.l
four invuatlop
to liberal
reHon
Sunday Mac***
12:00 am
Benediction: SUV pi
Holy Uav Masse 5a
ajn
Conleaaiona. Saturday J:3U, SOU
7:00, 8:00 D.m Thursdays fot r
Friday 7.00. 8:00 p.m
Miraculous Medai Novena Monday
7:00 pro
rtosarv everv evening al IW
HMtiH HRART
Ancon
Sunday Haut .sa. I JO *
Holy Day. 8:55 I JO a-rn
Criiileision." Saturday -1:30, :00 p.m
7:00. 8:00 p.ui. Thuraav lot rlri
Friday 7 00, 8:00 p.m.
red Heart Devotion--fruta* at 1:00
DJ" 1 IUUM'1
Cocoll
Sunday Maaa: 8 JO am
Holy Day: 6 09 am
CUBUMUt CMAPBl
Curundu
Sunday Mam B 3o am
Holy Day: 5:4 ajn
Confel>n 3 Si >' o m Saturday
ABMUMrriUM
Pedro Mlr.ual
Sunday Maaa. 8 81 a.m
Day
fanauiu laawi'' Pruyei
.unit
Meeting >
I..."; ..both Service Sundav Schon
uup*r *t
l:vu o.rn
tm Van
da Schoo -
Me*,'Hope, Chiva-Chiva,
wylces 1100 i Sunda*
mas a. N Utawn. Mtanlei
Cjanioo. Cfe UivuieMrvica
am and 7:90 o.m
Lord Suppet at both Service Sun
Li.L .V.M.
School '
11.IK,
with Sundav Schoo1
W Craok
r Sunda
Kio au-iu "' "!"" er"01
1:00 ooi
cocoLi Rju-rmi cBtJRca
Bullolna II Brui Road
BR*v. R. G. V Ray
Bnolherhood 7:00 p.m Monday
KveT^eVtin" Wedneadav
REDRMPTIO-y MATtin CHURCH
to, I' 8treei
IHailot the National Inatnuiei
Box 1442 Panama City
av jose PrnJ'' Ciuerea Pator
sSviCEiJ W SPANISH
Sundav Serv*
Sunday School ......
PraachinB Servir*
W, Jy Bihlc Study
10 ou am
7:50 pro
7-34I nm
m '-iPn^jiii
rlatS'l UArTlS'l iHtKl
clalbua Heiglu*. C'i.
637 Ancon Boulevard
Drawei B Balboa Heiaht.
Phone Balboa 1727
"Yooi Church away rrotr
with welMimr tual rrlendlv
William u urny roatai
Sunday Scbuol ......... 0 JJ> m
Morning Worahip ......... 1J:6 a.m
BaptliTrinina Union ... ' oro
Uvautteiiaiii. 3*rvic*...... *" o m
Puyer MeeUng Wednaadav ':*> om
vV.MS Bible Study
Ihurnday........ .......... "k-a>
Men Brotherhood
(Laat Monday in month i '' o.m
ATLANTIC B4ITI8I CHURCB
Bolivar Avenue el 12th Straal
CrUtooal. C.Z
Hav rrad U Joa Paatca
Methodist
r-tk .-. HIOUISl LMUKCK
briil-ah ConfrTK
Mlnin-M Wihism U Armalront
l^gji Morruiif PrajrtH >inti Stiimo*
JSma^X8*0"
T:1k o.m Evenln Praym ano Sanaoi,
rklMTi MKIMOUISI CHURCB
7th Street and Malend* Avenu*.
itev Norman Pratt Muutai
Coloo B P
Hev Norman Pratt. Muuatei
Sunday Servtea at 9:K a.m .ano 1:1
pm Sunday School tor all ** at
Monday 'JO om Weeaiv Prava*
ataetln
BtSaXtB MRTHUUiat'l cHUKCat
Slvar City, C..
Sunday Beivica 8 ajn aoo k:lk p.m
Sunday School toi all age at gJO pa
Tuatdav 7 10 om Prayat Meatlna
-**u tavruttaa T* Wanhlr
Bible School .......... 6:4 axo
Worabrp --------............ U*0 *4S
Training Unloo ............ 6 JO p m
WorsbJp ................ J2f BJv
erarT Meatlna Thura.i 'JO om
SI
ARV'S
Balboa
ab 8:00
1640 11:60
8:30 am
Saturday (.It 1:45 om
Wednesday nd Salt
I0JU 11:60
t:06 rali.
Utheran
dUltKHtU LUIHkRAN CHURCH
The Charco oi the Latherar Hmr*
it. 1 Barnthai Paatoi
460 Balboa Road. Balboa
Sunday School ani 1101 CUu am
*orhlp rvlce 10:1 a.m.. Come fnou
Wllh U and Wt Will Do fbat Uood
iriendl welcome awaits all rtautor Put
luck uopei eenno Sunday each nont^
6:60 pm gam* night, tourtb Sunday
I JO pm The Service Centct ope*, Weo
neaday through' Sunday, altano a era
II) wslrnm i" mill)
Tltarv wr"Ti
Episcopal
Wednaadav -7 0
Holy Day
Confufslon
Rosary Monday
day at 7:00 pm
Catechism Clewe Sunday
. MNMcrB'S
paralao
Sunday Mam. i 00 am
Holy Dayi. 6:4 em .
Contwlnn* Saluiday 8 JO. 4 I o.m
Rosarv: Tueiday 7:00 p.m
Catechism Classes Sunday 10 JO II Jl
ajn
VINCkNT'
Panama
Sunday Maa>-> 6:00. 8 JO a.m
Holy Day: 6:00. 8:S6 :m
Confaaaionji: Saturday -3:00
8:00 p.m
Belore Holy Dey II*. 6:60
Rosarv everv evening: 7 06 0"
ST JOBN RAPriST D LA 8AI.L
Rio Abajo
Sunday Masaei.. 6:30. Jr* a.m
Benediction. 4:00 o.m
Holy Day Mane :? ajj
Conleaslon Salurday-:30 *o.m -
Prldav after Mlrsculou Medal No-
vena
Miraculous Med*> Nuvana Fridsv
pm
Rosarv' Mond*> ana
" m ST. rHERKSCO
Sundav Mam: 7:6J) a rn^Holy pay.M.s-
Stcred'Heart Devotions: Friday 7I
Contelon! aanirdav -8 JO. 54 '*
Rom8rv)0evelS; evening ancept Tuesday at
7:00 pm
CHC4I SltLITO PLAkRHrjl)
Pastor Rev Wm I Finn CM
Sunday Maa n S
Holy Day Mae Ml am
Sonrlay School \M am
S*rvlc Thursday olahts '
Cnotsslnns *>efor# Ms
CHtlRt-H O TH HUL* aArnlM
MargarlU CZ
n.v William J Plnn CM
tea *"
MIRACULOUS "W CHLRCB
New Cristobal. >
Pastoi Rev Vincent Rvan CM
Sunday Mase 8 A W'30 m
Weekcfay Mass JO em
Sal 8:00 am
Holv Dav Masse 6D0 8:00 am
Corileaslon. Rosary nightly '^J1
Sunday School aftei the 8 a.m Mas*
Miraculous Medal Novene service -
inn 5:00 A 740 p.m _
1st Sat Devotion every tat Sat fiar
ViMACULATk CONCr^lOh. CHURCH
Bolivar Highway OaUm.CZ.
Pastor Rev rranrt Lynch c a
Sunday Maaa 8-06 a.m
Weekd*] Masse Thurs 6 Jo aja
Sat 740 a.m
Holy Dey Maa. i:00 a-m ^^
Miraculous Medal Novena sarvtee -
"lit Friday? Conteaalon Communion
' Condon Set *;
JT. THOMAS' CHURCB
Qatun, Neai Lock
Paatui Rr Prancb Ltmah CM
Sunday Mas*. 6 4 a m
Weekday Masse Tues Frt 60 a.m
Holy Day Maa 6J0 am
Miraculous Medal Noyene
ANCUN, CZ
rHk IAlllrDBAI O SI i.UK
rhe Ht Rev R Heber Uooden. Blahot.
The Very Riv Raymond I Ferrl Dear-
7:30 a.m Holv Communion
9.30 a m Cathedral School
16:4- Morning Prayer end oerrnon
(First Sunday ot the month Holv Can
nunion and Sermon i
7 40 o m fevening Prava* ho S* -rrioi
cRUrroBAL, k.p
CBURCH OF OUR SAVIOiJk
Ird St neai U, Navy
Rev Milton A Cookson Pasto*
Holy Communion 7:30 a.m
Church School 6:30 a.m
Morning Prayer-Sermon lt:Uu a.m
IHC nrst Sunday In the month
Vming Paonle' Vespei Service 4ti
in
Wadnaaday Hoiy lmiiiiiuiiiim 4Ii o.m
Choir Rehearsal 7:30 am
A House of Praver for el' oeoole
COCOLI
Charrh at St Andrew
fhe Rev David B Read
Holy Conhfiuulor :a0 m
Sunday School 6:30 a m
Public Worship 10 45 ajn
IH C first Sunday In the umuiUi
Toung People Fellowship 4:00 pm
Choii rehearsal Wednesday evenlnr
il 8 3d pm
Women Auxiliary ano no 4th rhur
Jewish
ra "2tIB^Jl*-u
toca Road, Balboa
Wltkln director
Services on Friday
CZ
/JO
Natbar
larvice on Friday I JO Pf__
See also listing ol Jaw* afinca
dar Poeta Basas and SU Jrm
Cotupegauon Rol
uda Cuba and .r"
Panama City Ral
Service on *>li
th israei Ave
Bella V
Harry A Martald
, om
Posts, liases
And Stations
PACIflt SIDB
Pr*test*at
rORT AMADOR
Sunday School .........
Morning Worahin.........
CL1YTON
FORT
Sunday
Stool Pldg 14
Morning Worsh'r.
V. S. HOSPITAL
Morning VVoratrlp
TORT KOhBT
Sunday Srhooi ..
Morning V.'o'ship .
OROZAL
........
9:15
16:30
640
16 JO
6:60
1640
11:00
Cargo and FreightShips and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
New M,H0-ton Ships
Planned For Canard Line
Plans for the construction of
two new passeniter liners for the
Canadian service of the Cunard
Steamship Company Limited
were announced recently by
Frederick A. Bate, chairman of
the Cunard Line.
The ships, which will be built
by Messrs John Brown and Com-
pany. Limited, st Clydebank,
Scotland, will be approximately
20,000 ptrosg tons, with a service
speed of about 20 knots.
The vessel will carry two class-
service, with the second being
commissioned the folio wing
spring;.
The announcement that the
Cunard Company are to build
two 20,000-ton liners specially for
their Canadian Service Is a tan-
gible demonstration of the faith
which the Company places in
the future development of Can-
ada.
Association between Canada
and the cunard Line dates back
over one hundred years.
The tiny unicorn, first ship of
the line to cross the. Atlantic,
es of passengers, first and tour-'and the Britannia, first of the
1st. mall steamers with which Sam-
June 1954 has been- t*ntat1"el" uel Cunard began his rcrular
set as the date when the first service between Europe and the
ship will enter the company's I New World, both steamed Into
COR
Morning woratup ...........
ALBRCOH. AIR ronCR BASK
Bible Schoo; .........
Morning Word-In >..........
Youth Oroup '".uimJim
V. S. NAVA1 il'VriON, RODMAN
Morning Worship ............. .7;
Protaataal SunCiy School ...... S:l
15U NAVAL DISTRICT t
Morning Wor,h'L--..........
rOBT CLAVTON
10:00
6:30
10:46
lay ai 7 JO p.m.
Ho
T.S9
40
........
Daily Mas
Sunday Iff***
U. a HOSP1TAI
SundaV Mna* .
COROZAL
Sunday Msaa
FORT KOBBt
Dally Maar .
Sunday Mas** .
ALBHOOK I" rnRCB BASL
Sunday^Mss.- .' t&W* **
Jew hfa
FORT CLAVTON 4.w
ALBROOR AIR g-ORCf 'AJ' "
Saturday................
TOUT KMUE
Thursday ................
JWB Balboo. C %.
Friday .............
7:4
10:66
7:60
6:60
1:60
7:60
7:66
louse ol Prava* no fellowship toi an
MODI*
COROZA!
need Shepherd
rhe Van A P Nigbiengal*
6:00 m Svarv Ylday: Morning Pray-
(H.C isl rrmay
UAaSHOA
St Slmoa'< Church
av Antonio Ocha* S.
Pedra Miguel -SS6
Holy Conimumor 10:30 am
Sunday School ......... 306 pm.
Youth Orjanbtatlon 6:00 A 6:66 eta.
Evening Prayer A Moble
md A 4th Sunday ........... 140 pm
Woman's Auxiliary ........ 7 46 am
2nd and 4th Thursday
ATLANTIC SIDB
Troteslant
TORT DAV'f- m i
ProtagUnt Worshn Servio* ...
FORT OULiCK
Sunday School ................
Momlng ervlce .. .....^^
COCO SOLO NAVAI STATION
Sunday School .. ,.........
l^trtairtant Wo.-st.l" Service......
CatooHc
TORT DaVIP
Dally Ma' .................
Sunday Mns .................
FORT OOI (CK
Sunday M ............'
FORT SHERMAN
Sunday Maas ... 'JiVAUim'
COCO SOLO NAVAt STATION
Sunday Ms ................. J
Naval H "oitai , ............ ,9B
Jewish
FORT OIILICK _.
Tueaday .................. T B0
6:00
6:00
1640
6:30
11:11
4:16
16:00
840
11:30
rASI rRKIUHTKM dKIVM.> UKTWMCM
eumopf and NORTH ant smrm pgririr consrs
IA Limited Ntrmber of Passenge Barthsi
TO SUROP6.:
MR. Wyoming.................................... February 16
TO COLOMBIA P.CUADOR AND CHILC:
SS. Bemlere ........................... fobruary U
tO t'FNTRAl AMERICA A SFRBT COAS1 4) S.A
8.S. X ................................:.;.j rabruary 36^
PASSGNObH SHIP rmOM NEW YORK TO PI YMOLTH LE HAVEF:
lie Da France ........................_ _- _*^!^t _
PA8SCNORR SERVICE traaa CA6rl*GBNA m EUW*PF
Colombia .............................. ...... .. Fabruary 3
FRENCH LINA P.O Hoi Ml hi 6-M76 1818
P.nami UNDO V MADURO S A Ro HMO
T*t Psnsm* t-lrta* 4-1661
Halifax, Nova Scotia. In the sum-
mer of 18410.
Going even further back. In
1787 Samuel himself was born in
Halifax.
The direct link between Brit-
ain and the Dominion was main-
tained for over'twenty years.
Even In the 1860' when Cun-
ard 's ships ceased to call at a
Canadian port and went direct
to Boston or New York, their su-
perior speed and great reputa-
tion still drew large numbers of
PRSsenfrers travelling; between
Europe and Canada.
In 1911 the company re-en-
tered the Canadian trade when
_-_-.^
they acquired the Thomson Lin
snd built three new ships spe-
cially for the Canadian 8ervke.
The Andanla. Alaunla and the
Ascanla as they were called were
very successful ships, but All
three were lost during; the World
When peace came; six 14,800-
ton liners, the Antonia, Andsnla
Ausonla, Aurania. Ascanla and
Alaunla were specially built to
meet the need for regular prs-
senger freight services to Carna-
da as the Dominion expanded.
During the years between wafi
the six "A" ships became well-

______^________
The Pacific Steam Navigation Comoany
INCORPORATED BT ROYAL CHARTER 1848
Royal Mails Unos ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA________________
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "LOBOS" ...................................Feb. 38th
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA,
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUAA,
SANTANDER tnd LA PALLICE
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO'" (18.000 tons)... March 1st
NOTA: Taw rn.v. "REINA DKL PACIFICO" will a*4 caU at Klngvtaa
a the March Vayagt
M.V.
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
"SANTANDER" ...........................
Feb. 2Ut
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
M.V. "DIEMERDYTC".............................Feb. 18th,
TO UK/CONTINENT
8.8. "LOCH AVON" ......................,........Feb. 17th
M.V. "DRINA" ....................................Feb. 20th
Accepting passengers In First. Cabin and Third Class
Superior accommodation available for psssenaers
AN ailing ubiert to chance without notice
PACIFIC STEAM NAV. CO., CrtatObal. ret 1M 1885
FORD COMPANY Inc.. Panam Tel. S-lttT/1158: Balnea ISM
Seventh Day
Adverts.
Sund*) ii 00 m-iu ftrat Third Wad-
SXVDtTH-OAY-
Waaklv arvleaa t all Oiurabaa,
a* follovri.
Saturday Sabbath Scawu >M ajn
Olvln* Worship 11 60 m Youth* Msl-
ing 4 JO o a.
Sunday 8104a Lactura VM in Wad-
narlar Hltl* Siurl\ and Prayer Bar-
XnaMab "hurcbas
trict Pastor
B T Rankln. D*-
Churchaa Cabo Vida. Av*. J. t. da
I* Oaaa: Jamaica Soctaty Hail: Chorrillo.
Rio Abalo, lueblo Nurvo. Balboa Chapa!
6S44 .avilar* Bd Balboa (Saturday
Maaitna* *wdy)
Panama Spanish Church i. B. Caa-
tanon. Pastor: Call* Daran
Gamboa nu rniolr A. A. Ortaka.
Entlan Church** S r Clark*. D*a.
artct>**to-
Church* Colon SnsllsB Third Btraat:
lain St. Salivar
-Mb St So
Cristbal Enfllsh
Av* Cr*--h*l S|
lavar Ava.
Prl T:l p.m
Con (on
Sat. m 6-611 pi
li Sat Oayonon avary 1st Sa
HOLr l-AMILt VBURCB)
Marcarlia CZ.
Rev William i
*a
>t alter
Paatoi Rev William J firm Cal
Sunday Mass** 7 a* *
Holy Day alaga. 600 a.m
Hiraculou Medal Novan* trvla* -
Inatruciion l adult frt '*_"
Confaasjons Sat 4*0. 4*6 7S
*BT IOS!PH'b VBURCB
Coln, lOtn a Broadway
Panto*. Rev J Raymond Maobata, C to
Aasurtant. Rav Roban VlanpU CM
Sundav Man* : > *.m
Weekday Mass 6:4 s m
Holv D*y Masse* A 6j66 am
(at *ri Mass**. 4 a 666 am
Communion i a m
Baptism Sun 4:60 pa
Miraculous Macal Novan
Wed *t 6:1 7:00 pas
Nnv*n* o tbe -lacrad Haart Prl IOS
"conloa-oni Sat. . 6*6 oa *
J::0 to 8:60 p m
Sunday School. *) pa*.
Discussion Club Toung man ol Pariah
Sun 1*6 pas ______.
Instruction lo adulta ***lni no-
ladf* of tha Catholic Church. Hem A
Thurs al 7:1 pm
1st Sat Devotion every let Sat after
ST VINCENT'S CaTURCB
Sllvar at. CX
P*a*ai R*y rtaymond Lawat CM
Sundav Maasaa. la A om
*.****v Mass 646 am
Holy Day Maas. t-Jfl a 6J6 a*
Sunday School 11*6 am
Miraculous Modal Novan
fu* T4u pa
Baptism Bun. 446 am
Confasaion Sat 6JS I sa A 7*0
to 6*0 cm
Instruction la* adult*, rua a
7 90 pm
1st Sat D_rouon evarv tat Sat
OUB LAST Ot OOOO COUsfBIO.
a. CZ
_rl* acooa. CM
6 A 6 J6 am
W*a*ttay tlaasas, 6J6 am
Holv Day Maasaa. 1:46 A 696 am
Mlraculou* Medal Noven arvtee -
rum 7-66 pm
Sacred Hmui Nn-an* arvtca. Prt 7*0
om
ConlaMoo Sal 1J6 a-m
1st Sat OavoUos. ay 1st aa
St Pat*** Chare*
Rev Umuel B Shirley r*rtagt
6 a.m.-Hvty Ciinarnmlon #
7 a.m.-Choral Eucharist an
10 am-Momlng r*rav*r nd Church
School
I p m Holy Baptism
7 :J0 p m. Vespers *m _
Communion Tuesday and Thursday*.
/ a m Wednaadav and Friday 6 a.m
i Mom
Girl Prlediy 6 and 7 pja Monday
p.m ruaaday. Vesper nightly at T
cepi Saturday Complin* 796 om
St
fttAKOAKliA
Margaret's Chapat.
Maraarlla HnsplUl
Tha Rav M A Cookson
Sunday School 6 *.m Svenlng Prayer
60 om
PALO saco
Char** af Tbe Holy Locator***
Th* Van A P Nighterujale
very Mondao a-SP. aa Holv Com
nunion
PARA1BO
8*v D A Oiborn*
1:00 .m Holy Communior via Sund**
t-M am Sunday School.
S:J0 p.m evening Praver iundsy
Monday / :0ti p-m Voutb laaaUns J
Wednesday 6:60 om al Priondlv
4ocl*ty
ttao ians
D.A Osborn* A Rev C A Crsgwsn
Holy
3rd
no da
rtev
non 1st no 3rd Sundays
II I a.m Momma Prayei
es tnd (nd 4th Sunday
3:00 p.m Sunday School ana etapuam
7:30 pm Evening Pravei nd *ddr**>
tod and 4th Sunday
PANAMA Cm
I PAUL'S CHURCH
A. I Ni|htan(ai*. *> U MRJk
nd The Rev Rlti Resnala AM*
Venerable Archdaaear .
SMI aon Holy Communion 691 m
T9S avaa Evnon nd Sermon
CHRIST CHURCH ST-ma-StA
Colon. R d* P
(Opposite Hotel W*snlntoni
The Rev Malnert 1 P*t*rson
STB Rector
iUNDATS.
a.m Holy Communion
6 a m. Choral Eucharist ana Barmen
1096 a.m. Church School
796 o m Macan Evensong A Sana III
WNaWMVB.
4 am Holy Communion
796 Dm Sunaoaa and 8-tou
690 om Achtlt Confirmation Cla*
muRsuATS
I p.m Pray** Guild
RID ATS:
6 p m Children tUCleMlM
790 om Chan* Practice
SATURDAYS.
16 a m Children Confirmation Crag
796 om CnmoHn nd Meditation
OATUpi
St GaarsC Charcb
tun. C.Z
Re Solomon N Jacobs
4:46 a m Church School
6:46 ajn Momlng Pray*
16:06 a* Hob Eucharist
Tumday*:
196 ajn Holy Communarm lAarss Holy
Oavs and Saint* Day*.i
Wedrvaaday*:
I.-66 pm evening Prayer
69 om St Vincent Ot
I a om Choir Beneamai
rhurdv
Cttarch *l St Mar* The TTefbs
Archdeacon Waldock Prt*sl In Chart*
Morning Praver ........ 6:46 am.
Holy EujcbaviBt and Sarana 196 aaa
Church School ............ 196 aaa
toleran Bianaona ........ 690 om
Woaaaa Auxiliary tnd Miaiayi,
Order af St Vtocani AeoIHe OufUL
Holy Coa-aiHamaav f a
Ivsnaong 796 pm
Me*r-*lna Prayar k am Pridey, Ckotr
Meetina StM Thursday*
6 om
16 St raw
Be* Aata
Holy .
Sunday School
6 *a om
, Pray*r-Blbl* Study
ist and Ird Sunday*
Woman' Auxlllarv Snd A 44
60 pm
Holy Ccanauauoo *
IBS aaa
1696
Other Churches
And Services
HAHAI CENTKal
Ap*rtm*nl 1 Lus buildlnf, 64th htreai
jnun Mondavi Torture *nd. Okv
eo-ion. 696 o.m '
L-berch el *-aa Cartat alL*}* Oa
Saints (Mormon) B*n*** CE
Sunday School 6:t6 m
Service 10:60 am ___ ____
At JWB Armed Pore service Cant**
ran I. Skrcr Road
Evening Service at p-m ata ataca
af maatin announced *t momma w-
a __
CHURCH OT VMRIB1
OKI Baiboa a-oad.^-lboa
W rtorUrjdOI^.>ltanaait
SUNiJAYiStBVICIS
109(1 am
10:46 am
T-on om
VICES
. Wednesday l*. pm
Bible Claa Tburda ** "
Bible Clase lot au a
Preaching and Communion
Preaching nd Communion
MIDWBBE SER
alibi*
UBS
CBURCH O CHRIST-Ota Wkrsiatja.
SUNDAYS
Wa rnaat u th* Amarieap lessor. Han
r. front of baCllsbbouaa.
Morning Worship 16-4 m
Visitor Icorn*
Ladle Btbl Study at Oatun,
Phon. Oarur 416 or Pt Oulick 6SS
CUKUNDU PR*!**!*-1
COMMUNITY CHWRCB
Cheplaln William H Stall
School
Sunday
Momlng Worship
Young People
Service
:4S
196
*:4
iuuii rwvww .-- ....... __-
Evanlnc Worship___. ...... '3
Prayar Meeting Thtnada]..... 6-
Cbolr Practice. Wednesday at
Choi
790 om
and Saturday 69l> aaa
OLD VAHtOLIl UtUBVB
St BaahMl Tba Al*a*a**t*l
13th St Waal No 1
Holy tucharkrt: Sunda a' {*JJZ,
TtMBdays. Wadrvasdsvs nd rbursdav
* t*K^aaMt .01 tJnctJon vie* 1 Prrst Sundav o each month i
___1 Chrksltan
Pansmi B_P
Rt Rav T iarna, D D
officiating
Momlni dovotlo- St .......
Holy Communion at ........
relio-ship Woratun at .....
Sunday School st ..........
Oivtne Service * ..........
Sar-ata) at ..............
Holy Communion I........
Mondays Boll crl and orar
jc mvaa-tinR .....
Wadnaaday Evauaelanlr Ser
rice at ........ .
PrMay*. Utany. Pastiruj. tad
:oo am
6:30 am
UBS am
190 pm.
T9B p.m.
6:30 pm
96 oa*
196 am
Christian Scientist
tllBIBIUI'l SCIkMCk CHUR4.
rTrst Church ol Christ Sctanuat Anear
MM Ancon 6*)ulard
Sunday 1196-, Weortaaday S96 mm
Sundav Sanool 696 .m
ram Vntjrch at t*a, ^a^at. Cria****
Uth Street A Bollv*. Hla*-aj
Sunday 1196 am Wednesday 79S urn
y School 696 -*
ma Bir oc_7, *_-
vie Cantar Bulldlna
Bunch U96 am Plr-t aTThlre Wad
i**day796 ra
Sundav Sef mi 16:1
Salvation Army
Services .
t Wlleoni
CRT. Call* 1 d* **
m lf.m *nd7JSpj (Mai
Sunday School at 6 aaa
_ Service at II am and 791
J*. Sunday School at 696 am
Bad Tank SatiriceHRia 6***d*>
11 am *7 96*-m
^^c^^ito--,;'
M .... 11 am 9 IS
tss,
SUvai Ctty
.'&S
wmdtymw/
m,mp,
%t DODGE
MORE FOR YOUR MONEY
In stjie, beaulj, room i nes, riding turn and dpB-iU Wily
(Q&vtfe j$potc*se0r-
THB DODGi: "SHOW DOWN Wf\Y^
\*1l orljawi grmyt 6
(tvea you raOOrl Tht frt* booklet fafli ol7 leta you com-
para new can 00 tpacinc feature* evaryona wanto in th* car ha
buy. **re* roe th* Toyrdoam" reerur* by featura-oai
wictry wrrnt you're getting when von buy a new car. TouH
atjraa that LVdf* offer* yott inora far your aiooeyl
Cat tba "Show Dow*" an All-
Aroand Boomlnaaa-Look under
Roomincai'' i* the Dofe "Show
Down" booklet. Here'i f<*oof Doda
jivei you aaore headroom, ahoulder
, leg roeen than other car*.
Cattha' _
3 IB1111 I "" rVnd that only
Dodae oCen TJodfe OriBow Rid*.
Only a rid* will fame how Csrtflow
'float" you down road that "ntraan"
and "bounce" you la other oat*.
VW,
iPDODG*,*

ON DISPLAY AT
COLON MOTORS, INC
PANAMA
Tivoii Crow!**
COLON
Tenth Street
We have 15 onito not affected by Price Increwe
of January 30



mop six
TBt PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILf NEWSPAPER
"" ...
You Sell em When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds I I ffTgjHHA/ff
Leave yew Ad with ene of our Agents or our Offices
lKvVM ttOtVKX (
aoHowunm
MUKR ISDN'S
*T
SALON DE BELLEZA
*. Wat 1Mb MM
AMERICANO
BOTICA UAKI.TON
"HE MNAMA AMERICAN
50*
SATURDAY. FEBRUARY II, JM
i in
12 words-
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
ai"
FOR SALE
Household

We offer tht bsf refrloerotion er-
vie in Panama. If you have a
refrigerator problem, housthola
or commrciol telephone u ot
3-0125 and it will be solved. FRI-
GIDAIRE REFRIGERATION SHOP
No. 51 VI Eipona.
FOR SALE
Automobile*
Your washing machine oo out of
order? Telephone 3-0125 FRIGI-
DAIRE rtfriotration shop and you
will get the most efficient repoir
Service.
FOR SALE:On bamboo set, ward-
robe, vanity, child's dressers, crib
and other articles. Sen Francisco
Roed No. 83.
FINANCING
Service Personnel and
U.S. Civilian Government Employe*
new used car through
GOVIRnmIni MPLOYI& FINANCt
00
Fort Worth, Texos
Also Direct
Loans Automobile
lervint jovernmeni employe and
Service Pfrsonnei in 'he Ceno> Zorw
foi M /ears,. With our financing
your Insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. coverage.
AftRANGCMINTS CAN BE MAM
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
MAIM
1
MISCELLANEOUS RfSORTS
^JACOtYON IfUDtfe
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NBA Service
Albrook Chaplains Zone Clubhouses
SKr* I" Se Tickets
To Crusade Ball
0* yeu teav. ertafcine
Write AtaMn AaeMyiM
0e 2011 Mu, C. S.
FOR SALE:WestinflhouseRefriQer-
tor, 7 cu. ft., 25 Cycles, excel-
j lent condition. $85.00. Coll 82-
' 2171. duty hours or Qtrs. 0776-
H, Williamson Ploce, Salboo, C.
2. between 4 end 6 p. m.
Panamo 3-1ST). Cristbal j-1673 [
FOR RENT
Apartments1
COMMERCIAL Cx
PROFESSIONAL
BALDWIN. PIANOS:
Beoutiful AcroeOnic availeble now
in different model. Just arrived. We
receive your old piono in trode in.
We also hove on display a beaut,-,
ful electronic Minsholl Oroon of two M^"M^"** AtTMINTS
monuel end pedol. Tunlnp end re- ?*m mu M ,uoturo"h1 Port-
poiring. Boldwin Pieno Store. 34th T^JWlSF**. Theoter.
Ponomo.
St. opposite the Lux
Phones 3-49473-0672,
act office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristbal, telephone 1386 Colon.
HX
Household Exchange, Automobile
row No. 41 has: Ratten sets and
extra pieces, bedroom sets, rugs.
hot woter heefers. gas stoves, wash-
ing mochines '60 cycles) end many
ether household furnishings! AM re-
onditioned. rebuilt and reosonobty
priced. Phone 3-4911.
ARMY NAVY AND CIVILIAN
EMPLOYES
Check, with the FIDCRAL SERVICES
FINANCE CORF BEFORE you
FINANCI your new or used car.
Let us show you how we con
SAVI YOU MONEY.
Our office is loceted on automo-
bile row, No. 29 or coll 2-4555.
We ere still offering immediate re-
frigeration service to eny kind of
refrigerator, washing mochlne. etc.
you con get -this by telephoning
3-0125 FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGER-
ATION SHOP. No. 51 Vio Espo-
o.
FOR SALE:Pontiac 49. Sedan 2
Door, 6 cylinder, perfect condi-
tion. Tel. 2-3444. Crdoba.
t
FOR SALE:Coldspot refrigerator,
6 ft. 25 cycle. 10 yrs. old, good
condition. 1472-A, Dohrman ot
Holden. Balboa.
FOR SALE:1951 Buick Super Rl-
vtero. excellent condition. Phone
3-1248 Cristobal.
f your air conditioned unit does
not work well, telephone 3-0125
Panama. FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGER-
ATION SHOP, where we offer the
best repoir servio in Panama.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneoiif
FOR RENT:Furnished oportment,
one bedroom, porch, etc. Cub
Avenue, Edificio Uredo. Informa-
tion t 5th floor.
-----------------------------------_
WANTED
Apartments
We have everything
to keep voor Lawn
and Garden beautiful
durinc the dry season
WANTED: Furnished modern one
or >wo room apartment in resl-
denhal section. Phone 2-4906,
from 9 a. m. 12 p. m. 2 5.
FOR SALE:1948 Chevrolet, new
tires, radio, Spot Lights. Perfect
condition No. 27, 46th Street Apt.
FOR SALE:Seven piece diningroom
et. Walnut bedroom set com-
plete boby bed, chest, high choir.
Rodman 3346.
FOR SALE:Generel Electric 8 Ft.
De Luxe Refrigerator, with deep
freeze on top. 60 cycles; Zenith
console radio, phonograph, 3-
epeed, 60 cycle; Moytg automa-
tic woshing machine, 60 cycle;
single bed with new coll spring
and mattress; all items, almost
new. 547-6 Curundu Hots.. 83-
5281.
FOR SALE:1950 DeSoto. 20,000
miles, new tires. Cuba Avenue No.
58. Apt. 9.
FOR SALE:1941 4 door sedan.
Notionol Receiver NC 240c W/H
F 10-30. Coll Balboa 2995.
Position Offered
FOR SALE
RfeaiEsUtfe
J If you want a spacious, comfortable
well situated chalet, here is your
chinee: We offer you a beaut if w
Cholet in "El Cangrejo" two
blocks from Vi Espoa, also two
blocks from the huge apartment
house now being constructed in
thot oreo. The chalet consists of
3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, porch.
, tittingroom, diningroom, pantry,
kitchen, laundry, maid's room
garage, completely furnished. For
only $8.00 you mov be the lucky
owner of this chalet. Buy yeur
ticket today ot Ancon Liquor Store
Tel. 2-08)6 or Pharmacy Zone
del Canel. Tel. 2-0421. The rof-
fte will be held on Februory 24.
FOR SALE OR RENT:Two bed
room cottage in cool El Voile. Tel.
Ponama 2-2446.
FOR SALE:Land in cool, beautiful
EL VALLE vicinity Hotel Pen-
Americano. Large or small lots
moderately priced. Tel. Ponomo
2-2446 or inquire et Hotel.
WANTEDYoung man with me-
chanical or electrical engineering
training. Applicants coll Bolboo
3332. between 7:15 ond 12:00
A; M., for employment forms
which must be tilled out for re-
view prior to interview the latter
pert of Feb.
WANTED':i-Billnguol secretary, te-
male, Americon, for responsible
position, must be Capable, willing
to work ond good moral chorocter
Apply Box 2063. Ancon. Canol
oZne. Stating Age, experience, etc.
FOR SALE:Flexible, copper tubing,
for different use In the follow-
ing sizes. 1-4", 3-8". 1-2", 5-8"
3-4", I' and 2" at attractive
prices. See them at HASMO, S.
A. No. 51 Vio Espoa or at
FRIGIDAIRE refrigeration shop.
FOR SALE:25 Cyl. washing mo-
chine motor, 25 Cyl. 1 H. P.
motor; 25 Cyl. phono motor; 60
Cyl. washing mochlne motor;
"Federal" enlarger and easel;
flood reflectors; Cine-Kodok ma-
gazine 8 with Telephoto; Revere
projector; 9 x 12 Kodok Reco-
mor; furniture, household goods;
priced for quick sole. Phone Bel-
boo 3062.
WANTED
Miseellaneoiip
WANTE DTO BUY:Penny operat-
ed weighing scales. Ancon P. 0
Box 638.
MISC ..... ..........
FOR SALE: Purebred Dolmotion
pups. 10 weeks old, house 2367,
4th St. Rio Abajo. Phone 3-1274.
VisHing Episcopal
Pastors to Occupy
Panam, CZ Pulpits
Mothers, hoppy. heolthy feet start
in the cradle. Protect baby's pre-
cious feet with JUMPINC-JACK
Shoes, from cradle to 4 years. Ex-
clusively at BABYLAND. No. 40,
44th. Bell Vltfo. Tel. 3-1259.
FOR SALE: Three element ten
meter bem, 25 cycle power, sup
ply, phone Curundu 5247.
FOR SALE: Black fur cot. size
18, excellent condition. Ideal for
anyone going bac kto States. Coll
4-555 for any information.
FOR
. _
OR
SALE:Building, 8 apartments
in Exposition. Produces more thon
12% onnuafy. Easy payment. For
Information see Mr. Fibrega per-
sonally. No. 18 Eost 29th Street.
10 te 12 noon and 3 to 5 p. m.
No dealers.
SALE:Lot No. 273 In the
"Los Cumbre" settlement, 2.797
square meters, $3.100.00. Parcel
ef land marked by Ne. 488 ond
No. 489. "Los Cumbre'' settle-
ment. 918 square meters. $2.-
200.00. olso lot No. 23 of Sec-
tion 15 Cerro CerneanPS. A.
Settlement. 5.587 square meters,
$2.400.00. Inquire No. 15. 8th.
Street, Panama. Mr. Carlo Oui-
Jono.
SALE of empty wood cases, various
sizes, good lumber. Transportes
Pntra, Jernimo de I Osso No.
13, beside Goodyear Plant, Pon
am.
Las Cumbres Civic
Council Meeting
Set For Monday
The Las Cumbres Civic Coun-
cil will hold their annual elec-
tions of officers Monday at 8
p. m. In the partially-completed
Civic Council Town Hall.
The building, that was by
members "of the community, to
expected to be completed within
ten days.
New private homes that are
under construction now at La*
Cumbres will bring the total
population of the little com-
munity up to 56.
rooi.
Hose
Fend nt
Sprayers
Sprinklers
wheelbarrow
insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
WESTfD,
AJlois
? 070
AAKJM
Noam
AKTl
/o
? AKQIflJ
? Q107
14
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ate. Tel. 3-0140
SOUTH
AQ5
i
tABT
142
VJ10M
? IS
*5SJ
) AQ74J
0J4I
I
Both sides vul.
ffrtk as* Seat.
>0 Pass if
1N.T. Pan j*
40/ Pan Pan
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Bu vine;: Abbatoir.
Selling: Fnersa y Lu
preferred) and
Fuerza y Las (common)
Tel. 3-4710 8-1080
The Chaplain's Corps at Al-
brook Air Force Base recently
voted to sponsor Troop 18, Boy
Scouts of America, it was An-
nounced by Colonel M. 8. Shore,
Council Organisation and Ex-
tension Chairman.
Chaplain Walter F. Banlak
was elected institutional repre-
sentative for Troop 15.
Troop Commltteemen elected
were 8am L. Powers, Chairman,
Edward E. Powell and Edward
8. Varnadoe.
James H. Pelt and Minis R.
Oliver, jr. were elected scout-
master and assistant scoutmas-
ter, respectively.
Boy members of the troop are
Clark Brooks, William E. Powell,
Donald Schlosser, Roy Stanley,
Garret Stewart, Thomas 8.
Stewart and Charles Vittorla,
Meetings of the Troop ar held
m the former CAirC Headquar-
ters Building on Friday even-
ings at 7 a. m.
Troop IB is second of nine new
units planned by the organiza-
tion and extension committee.
A series of meetings are in
Progress in Ancon, Diablo. Pedro
liguel and Coco Solo to or-
ganize Cub Packs.
Tickets for the Crusade for
Frr!e?ii,ba11- t0 be held at th
Hotel El Panama on the night of
Feb. 22. will be on sale at the
Ancon. Balboa, Balboa Heights
Cocoll. Cristobal. Diablo Heights
Gboa. oatun and Margarita
Clubhouses, according to infor-
mation received from the gen-
eral manager. Clubhouse Divi-
sion.
The sale of tickets at them
clubhouses will continue until
the close of business on Febru-
ary 30. Tickets are |1 each.
The admission price will also
(five him a chance on a worth-
while door prise.
Support to the Crusade for
Freedom helps to insure a world
free from the threat of Commu-
nism.
Shipping &
Air Line News
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSrOM BUIL1
slipcover Reuenolsterj
visit ot)h srinw-aooM
aikert Here*
LI "l0*** n AaloBobllt Kowi
xa sur* .-j?* *DHv*
Tel t-4S2>. mm em to 7:M ,_
When you hear Walter Her-
bert conducting his New Orleans
symphony orchestra you have to
be a good musician yourself to
realize how much solid scholar-
ship lies behind the fire and
boldness.
Much the same can be said of
Herbert's bridge playing. You
have to be a good bridge player-l 'Continued Frew Pare FIVFi
yourself to understand what a known on both sides of the At-
firm base his audacity rests on. Untie.
The combination of bridge All six went to National Serv-
scholarship and audacity 1 Ice during the World War n and
shown in a hand played by Dr. only the Ascania was returned
Herbert at the national cham- to the Company,
ptonships conducted by the To her fell the task of re-ee-
Ameiican Contract Bridge tabllshing the Company's normal
League in Detroit last December, passenger services to Canada.
Incidentally, the combination I After limited refit she operated!
of bridge and music is not a new!from Liverpool, her first sailing;
one to Herbert: he was an inter- being in December 1047 up to her
nationally famous musician and withdrawal In November 1949 for
KrldfVia Ovi\*vt f i.<^ 1U. full ^iAi>JltUi.li.b
250 Attend
St. Msry'o Picnic
A total of 250 attended a 8t.
Mary's Mission picnic at Jack
Ridge's house on Oorgona leach.
Patricia Rose won the door
prize, a statue for the home.
The group enjoyed swimming-
and community singing.
FOR SALE:Potted Orchid ond An-
thurium plants about 90 in let,
all for $65.00. House 0207 Her-
rlck Rood, Ancon. Phone 2-6393.
FOR SALEGirl's bicycle, good con-
dition. House 29 Fifth Street. New
Cristobal.
FOR SALE:Pollero, Pollera-Mon-
tuna. Spanish Shawl, San Bios
dress 9042. Apt. 9, 9th St. Co-
lon
FOR SALE:Angels, crosses, head
stone, and ell monuments; 16
Corozal and Mount Hope. New
reduced prices, coll MARMOLE-
RA, phone 2-2656 Panama.
Court Excelsior
Meets Tomorrow
Court Excelsior Lodge, Ne.
10194, rill meet tomorrow to
discuss "important matters"
at the Corinthian Temple on
Central Ave.
The meetine Is scheduled
te start at 7:30 p. m.
F^MOW if
THE IEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
i" "A Fine
? Opportunity
to Learn
From
The Best"
Want to be
the most at-
tract i v e
rtmple on the
Bnrl?de71 rat" ~ USe O""
Budget plan fits payments
to Paydays. So come in Sy
and save. Why miss the funl
bridge expert in his native Vien-
na before the Nazis rose to pow-
er.
West opened the king of clubs
and then shifted to the lack of
SDades. Dr. Herbert, nlaying the
South hand, won the second
trick with the queen of soades
and then made the kibitzers
raso by faylne down the ace of
trumps to drop West's singleton
Idntr.
After this kev play there was
nothing much to the hand. East
was sure to win two trump
tricks, but Dr. Herbert was sure
to make his contract. Tf declarer
libad taken a "normal" trump
full reconditioning.
A new phase however of Cun-
ard asociatlon with Canada had
been begun by the Aquitanla In
1946.
Throughout 1940 and 1947 she
carried many thousands of Can-
adian servicemen and their Brit-
ish wives and'children who were
beginning new lives In the Do-
minion.
Evidence of Canada's affection
for this famous ship was a bronze
olaque presented to her In 1947
by all ranks of the Canadian
Armed Forces ki appreciation of
her services in two world wars.
In April. 1947. a Thanksgiving
mu wM-ii n riuiHiai irumD " ainii. iiei. a. inanasgiving
finesse, he would have lost his > service for her survival of the
queen to West's singleton kina. war was held in AH Saints Ca-
and East would later take two thedral in Halifax.
more trump tricks to set the con- The Aqultania actually contin
Help Wonted
. The Rev. Moultrle H. Mcln-
tosh of Blueflelds. Nicaraeua in
Sff ..i"1.6 EPlscoal Church's
Indian Missions, will be one of
the guest preachers tomorrow in
the various Episcopal Churches
on the Isthmus.
?hIhrL,vl8,tlI"t cler*v attending
^=T.hirLy".8eccmd Annual Con-
vocation being held today at Ca-
thedral of 8t. Luke. Ancon and
tneir preachine engagements fol-
low:
- Cath,e5ral ' St. Luke. 10:45
:_; The . Wm. L. Glenn
Mary's. Slquirres. Costa
FOR SALE:4 bamboo chairs $45;
1 Chinese Chest $30; 1 Norge
Refrigerator 9 ft., all porceloin.
$100; I Apex washer $80; 1
mahogany dining table, $30; 1
Electrolux vacuum cleaner $60;
6 Venetian blinds 36 x 60, $5; 4
green porch screens $8; 4 chair
brekfast set $20; 2 Mhofony
furniture ond other household, fur-
nishings. Phone 2-4402. House
0823 Plonk St.
FOR TOUR HEALTH
CON8ULT:
Or. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
n STONE CLINIC
7t^fve&crTeto40rn^
Voice Contest
For Soldiers
Here Planned
tract.
The kibitzers may have gasn-
ued m Canadian service
throughout 1948 and 1949 mak-i
*uc mumw muy nave Ba-n ummiwui jw> ana iv*v malt-
ed at the key play, but actually Ing her last voyage to Canada
It. was based on scholarship ra-i before being sold for breaking up.
ther than on oy weird pawer to Altogether in these two vears she
see through the backs of the made 25 voyages to Halffax ca
cards. The plav of the ace. onei^'ntl. many thousands of set-
of p larjre group of plavs known tiers.
as "safety" olavs. is the sort of: Following their release from
maneuver that cannot lose but war service, the Scythia and
mvaln. Samaria also carried thousands
If the kin* had<"ot drooned.lof settlers to Canada before they
Dr. Herbert was still In rjosition followed the Franconla and the
to enter the diirnmy and return Ascania for full reconditioning.
'WANTEDExperienced cleaner ond
general helper light loundry, must RJca'
?ion.
M. H. Mclntosh.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle*
St. Paul's Panama. 9:00 a.m.
The Rev. Wm. L. Zladie of St.
Marks Church. Puerto Limon.
at. Mary's. Silver City. 7:00
* >;mV.Tht Rlv- 8 N Tacobs of
Mark's Church. Bluefields
FOR SALE
Boat & Motoni
FOR SALE: Brand new motors.
1-6 h. p.. 1.4 h. p., 1-3 h. p.
1-2 h. p. All at half price. See
them at HASMO. S. A, No. 51
Vi Espaa.
FOR SALECuihmon Motor
er. General purpose trailer, ideal Nicaragua
for smell beats. Phene 276 or
Colon. st. Georges Oatun 9:00a.m
Fr. Jacobs.
Christ Church, Colon, 9:00 a.m.
Fr. Mclntosh.
St. Peter's. La Boca. The Rev.
L. B. Shirley.
St. Andrew's. Cocoli. io:30
a.m The Rere. David B Reed.
Bt. Rlmon's Gamboa 10: SO
am The Rev Robert W Tur-
ner, in. Archdeacon of Western
Panama.
8t. Christopher's Rio Abajo. 7
>nd 11 am The Rev James E.
chpffter. the Church of the
Good -Shepherd. Ban Jose. C.R
St Jame, rw Tank. The Rev
ID. A. Osborne
FOR SALE:Fairbanks Morse 5 H.
P. Gasoline-kerosene oil engine.
Generator General Electric. DC 3
3-4 KW. 115 V.30 Amp. Belt
driven. Box 57, Ancon.
Maintenance Div.
Cashiers' Working
Hours Chanqed
As a convenience to the public
a light chanae has been made
in the schedule for cashiers at
the field offices of the Malnten"
anee Divisin In Balboa and
Cristobal
Beejlnnlng Monday, the cash-
iers offices in both places will
be open to the public from 8 a.m
until 3:30 n m except for a 30-
mlnute period for Innch between
11:15 and 11:45. The working
hours of the cashiers will be from
7:15 am until 3:45 p.m. with
a 30-mlnute lunch period
Under the new schedule, th
ornees will be open to the pub-
lic throughout the recular lunch
period ol most office employes.
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGELES
MEXICO
Wonderful vacations at the
ymt't lowest rates await
you in Mexico and the
y. S. A. And there's a new
low combined fare to Los
Aneles. $380.80 round
trip. Chicago is no more
than half a day sway, via
Mismi, with DC-6 service
II the way... Yoor choice
of 2 services to Miami: "El
Inter Americano" and "Q
Turista" fhghu.
Members of the United States
2nrM5 bb?an wl" be *lve" '
opportunity to find out how well
their slnKins voices compare with
other members of the Army.
This was revealed in an an-
nouncement bv the Special Serv-
ice Office at Fort Amador. wWh
mm that ail-army ,,,,
unpin* contest will be held.
Thi* i, f** flrtt Mw, fJw an
Nwn hel* anrt |, hM|,tm
e^-^^oo no-tl-lr,olr,n | ,j_
'ir .ln~t~.Y .j .nMi., r|,->^<
.-nrter t*. ,n-.orob,n f thp Ad
"tent Oerter!
Ttrijt forr-m"-"rt i-, tv,,, r-n,
Ihtwa-T **> -wH'l wmrfnr.f thl
lam i-ntit.-t. to Htrmr. ftiB
h rre.t>/-t>to Aor,t-t -.*> th,,
,-"f +*' *-mv Area in t*e
"-Arm" final*.
rnmnet'Hn will h hl-< In !?
i1f- olfl h-r--V.n 0"^"+
-nlHf1 HHtfjluW nn- "tm.
! pKnrp "~\A <-|r.nHr>A lofnon
"litniire ntl hn r-Ur-t.^ y, ,,,
J,,"" prnrn"l "1"rfhr r'r'-'V
*" " contest will be announced
a trump toward his oueen. This
would give him every advantage
that he misrhf derlv* f^om the
siir-ess of a "normal" fines*e
without the rtlsadvantage of los-
ing to a singleton king.
crderol Safety
Council F-ects
Officers For '52
Edward W. Hoopes, safety di-
rector of U.S. Armv Caribbean,
was elected 1952 chairman of the
Federal Safety Council here last
Monday at the annual election
of officers.
Luther Fleming, safetv direc-
tor for 15th Naval District, was
elected vice-chairman and Ron-
ald A. Williams. Corozal safety
director, secretary.
The Council was organized in
1948 and has been steadily work-
ing for accident prevention In
all federal agencies on the Isth-
mus. The fact that the accident
rate has shown a steadv decline
indicates how effective the work
of the members has become.
One major point which the!
council has been pressing is to
Instill into the minds of Canal
Zone residents, both military and
civilians, "safe thinking" and
"accident prevention In the
home. In industry and on the
hiq-hways."
The council is open to anv per-
son or persons on the Isthmus
Interested an "accident preven-
tion." The next meetlne of the
council will be held in the Spe-
cial Engineering Building in Dia-
blo on March 10 at 2 p.m.
Safetv films are available rrom
the council for organisations or
groups wishing to show movies
on highway safety, shop prac-
tice, or safety around the home.
Today these four Cunarders
carrying first and tourist class
passengers in accommodation of
great comfort serve Canada.
Of postwar importance also'
has been the commissioning of
three fast cargo liners, the Asia.
Arabia and the Assyria, all of
which have been and are includ-
ing Canadian ports In their itin-
eraries.
The recentljr-acfluired Silver
Line ships, renamed Alsatia and
Andria, bring two more fast car-
ao liners to the Cunard Heet.
Both will be seen in Canadian
ports this year.
.Local agents for the Cunard
Steamship Company are The
Pacific Steam Navigation Com-
pany, Cristobal.
slop worrying...
start tinting!
Don't worry about that
first gray strand! Let it be a
"blessing in disguise" a
signal to you to take action
and do something about ob-
taining lovelier, natural
looking new haircolor! So
relax - and let Roux take
over! For Roux Oil Sham
poo Tint treatme|rts concegl
every visible strand of dull
or gray hair, give sparkline
highlights and lustre adds
subtle, natural-looiins color
that changes your worry to
delight!
MUX OH
SHAMPOO TINT
COLORS CONDITIONS
CLBANSBS
Caution: use only as directed
on label.
JULIO VOS
Ma. J a street
Telephone X-glWl Panam
Seagram'?
vo.
[CANADIAN WHISKY i
Now.. 6
Jean Old!
Intrata*
U^MMST
fkNAMEKKM
~ WB.IIJ
*l just saw
-rfieNEW
OeSoto/'
;\
Baby-ljusf
rove ft!'


BATBDAY, TCBRl'ARY If. lMt
-^
"......--------
fBt PANAMA AMtWCAU AW rNPlPCTDgNT DAILf NXWSPAPF.R
PAGB
___*.
pacific ^ocietu
>
&, 17, &A~ 5/ &/t- 352/
PRESIDENT AND MRS. AROSEMENA
HONORED AT DINNER
His ExeeUency, the President of the Republic ( Panama
and Mr*. Alcibiades Arosemena were the guests of honor at
formal dinner rifen Friday evening at l:M p.m. at the
Albrook Officers' Club by Lieutenant General William H. H.
Merrii, Jr., the Commander-in-Chief of the Caribbean Com-
mand, and Mrs. Morris.
Cevers were laid for forty fenr.
Ambassador And Mra. Wiley
To Vacation In t'.S.
The Ambassador of the United and Mrs. Jack Torbett. Lt. H. E.
States to Panama and Mrs. John Anderson. Lt. and Mrs. Leo C.
Cooper Wiley left early this,Jones. Lt. and Mrs. Marcus A.
morning by plane en route toLoy, CHMACH and Mrs. L. J
ter, Mrs Beulah Newlin and will
return with Mrs. Newlin on the
Panama Line ship sailing; on the
22nd of February The picnic
supper was la the nature of a
"going away" for Mrs. Newlin
who has been affiliated with the]
YMCA as a volunteer hostess and
part time employe.
Following the supper several;
reels of local and States moving
,_ picture scenes were shown by
'Pi6' i*^ '.nd "'-"tL^W1' Mr. Howard Demarest of the lo-
Lt. and Mrs. W. M. French. Lt. ^ yMCA staff.
Eisenhower Group Collects
Decision In GOP Squabble
Urirlcker,
Washington. D.C.. where they
will be the house guests of Mrs.
Olfford Plnchot.
Mr. Murray M. Wise, counse-,
lor of the American Embassy, Louis Bromfleld And Party
will be Charge d'Affalres during Honored At Cocktail Part,
the Ambaasadors absence Mr. Jernimo Almillategul.
Attending the picnic supper
were Mrs. Bertha Hllller, Mrs.
Mnt!Ea#3'fii.i>tne,yn Wood' Mr. and Mrs.
Mrs. Iris oarst. of New Carl Hoffmey,
urns. Mrs. Lena Hart* Mr
Mrs J. L, Slebelink, Mr. and
Mrs J Howard Demarest and
Mr. and Mrs. Merle L. Piper.
. !,., Carl Hoffmeyer, Mra. Dora Ad-
S&J Mrud Ef,ton.UMI.,Abn * M" Lena IlarhL Mr. and
Riddle and Mr. DavidBeere.
Mrs. Llzotte
the Minister of Agriculture, en-ig-.'iiejjMlj-eit,
Ambassador And Mrs. tertalned Friday evening from: Mrs Aloerta Llaotte. R.N.,
Heurtemstte Visiting Here 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. with a cocktail t Qot u Hospital has as
The Ambassador of Panama to, party In the aalpnde las Amerl- n u Mr and Mrs Row-
the United States and Mrs. Ro-cas of the Hotel El Panama in ll/nA Hawker, of Burlington. Ver-
berto Hturtematte arrived on honor of visiting author-farmer;mont and Klngsfleld. Maine, who
the Isthmus Thursday morning;Louis Bromfleld and a group of visiting on the Isthmus for
by plane from Washington. D.C., I farmers he la accompanying,
for a visit here
Mexican Ambassado
Returns To Panama
Mr. Eduardo Morillo Safa, the
Ambassador of Mexico to Pana-:Bank 0f New York, arrived
ma returned recently by planeicently for a visit on the Isthmus
from a vacation spent In Mexico.
Captain and Mra. Coroly
Entertain
New Guests
At Hotel El Panama
Mr. Walter Rutherford, a Vlce-
Presldent of the Chase National
re-lcoroial NCO Club
To Hold Dance Tonight
two weeks.
Mr. Hawker Is associated with
the Hawker Machine Corpora-
tion.
and is a guest during his stay
hered of the Hotel El Panama.
Mr. and Mrs. Victor R. Des-
part of Syracuse, New York,
All NCO's and their guests are
Invited to attend a dance this
evening at the Corozal NCO Club
from 8:00 to 11:00 fl.m. with
Danny Bishop and his orchestra
providing the musical accompa-
niment.
Watercolor Exhibition^
To Open Sunday At JWB-U90
The Canal Zone Art League
will sponsor its fourth art exhib-
it of the year to begin 8unday
and to continue until March l
and to be held in the USO-Jew-
lah Welfare Board Center Gal-
lery in Balboa.
Captain and Mrs. Samuel P. with their son and daughter-ln-
Comlv U8N of the Fifteenth Na-law. Mr. and Mrs. Victor R. Des-
val District, entertained Friday ;pard. Jr.. of Lancaster, Pennsyl-
evenirrg with a cocktail party at vanla, arrived recently bv plane
their cuartera on the Headqoar-,for a visit with Mr. and Mrs.
ters Reaervation. Robert J. Boyd of La Cresta.
Among the gueats were Rear The visitor* now are guests at
Admiral and Mrs. Albert M the Hotel El Panama.
Bledsoe. Captain and Mr*. Lewis| -
E. Colev. Captain and Mrs. O.Mr. and Mrs. Preston
L CarUon, Captain and Mrs. H. Are Visitors Here
C. Fish Commander and Mrs. i Mr. and Mra. Harrv Preston.
Edward R Hallorati Mrs.. Julie former residents of the Canal
HaUoran Malone, Commander,Zone and now of Baltimore, Ma-,
an^ Mra G M. Fisher, Lt.ryland. arrived on the Isthmusi The exhibition will be of or-
Comtnander and Mrs. P. L. Ba-Thursday by plane from a visit chida and tropical flower ar-
lay, LK Commander and Mra.with their aon and daughter-ln-
H W Vetter Lt. .Commander,law. Mr. and Mra. Harrv Pres-
sed Mra. H. J. Thornton. Lt.jton, Jr.. in Barranqullla. Colom-
bia.
Mr. and Mra. Preston nlsn to
visit for three weeks on the Isth-
mus with their son-in-law and
daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Jar"a
C. Wood and Mr. and Mrs. W.
B. Rogan before returning to
their home In the United States.
Commander and Mrs. Ted A. Al-
doua.Lt. and Mra. F. H. Arnold.
jr. Lt. and Mrs. H. W. Whlp-
Greated especially
dfor yt
ou
I
Come In for one of our
new flattering short cuts
to hair style beauty. He'll
love ft and so will you.
Better make an appoint-
ment earf
Bar.
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bids.) Balboa
Mis* Helen Roberts Wed
To Calvin Lee Stempel
Miss Helen Roberts of Poca-
tello. Idaho, was wed to Calvin
Lee Stemnel m a Drlvate cere-
mony In Panama City on Wed-
nedsav. The bridegroom is the
son of Mr. and Mra. Max R.
Stemnel of this cltv.
Judce German Lopez of the
Juzgado Primero Municipal de
f anama officiated.*
After a wedding trip to Cerro
Campana and Santa Clara, the
voung couple will be at home to
their friends at No. IS, East 37th
Street. Vista del Mar.
rangementa In watercolor, paint-
ed bv Mra. M. A. Purdom and
will be open to the public dally
from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Black And White Ball
Tonight At Union Club
Invitations have been issued
bv the Board of Directors and
the Carnival Junta of the Union
Club to members of the club and
their families to attehd a Black
and White Ball ip honor of Llki
I, Queen of the Carnival thrla
evening.
Five Honored At Picnic Sapper
The Balboa YMCA staff wivea
served a picnic supper on Tuea-
day at 6:00 p.m. on the lawn
adjacent to their staff quarter*
on La Boca Road in honor of two
visiting Stateside couples, along I ration of the tournament,
with one local resident who will public is invited to attend,
soon resume residence in the
Canasta Tournament
To Be Extended
Mrs. J. Joustra of Balboa,
made the highest core on th*
firat round of the Grotto Canas-
ta Tournament on Thursday
evening at the Wlrz-Memorial at
806 Balboa Road.
For those who could not be
present to start the piav on
Thursday evening, the cnmlt-
tee has agreed to extend the
tournament another week. Those
desiring to start may register at
the next round on Thursday,
February 21.
BATON ROUGE, La., Feb. 16
(UPiA Democratic Judge to-
day ordered the Taft-domlnated
Republican state central com-
mittee to promulgate the re-i
turns from a Jan. 15 Republl-,
san election in which pro-Elsen-
hower forces won 10 of 12 vacant
seats on the committee.
The ruling was made by Judge
G. Caldwell Herget on a suit
brought by supporters of Gen.
Dwlght D. Elsenhower to force;
the old guard committee to
certify returns from the elec-
tion.
The committee had declared
the election "null and void." I
Herget ruled that the comi-
mlttee, the governing body of
the Republican Party In Louisi-
ana, was without right to In-
quire into the legality of the
election, and said It was. his
opinion that the committee "wa
and la under a ministerial duty
to promulgate the returna."
Eisenhower supporters saw
the court decision as possibly
having a "direct bearing on the;
determination of the next Presi-
dent of the United States."
A vital role will be played by
the 50-member central commit-
tee Inasmuch as lt will steer
party maehinery In naming
Louisiana's 16 delegates to the
national Republican conven-
tion.
A committee dominated by;
supporters of Sen. Robert A.
Taft of Ohio could turn the de-
legates to him, while one con-
trolled by Elsenhower forces
could do the same for him.
Harvey Fields, a Democratic
attorney representing the com-
mittee, said the court decision
would be appealed, possibly to,
the First Circuit Court of Ap-;
peals.
The disputed primary was
held In Orleans parish (New
Orleans), home of about half
of the state's approximately
1,600 registered Republicans,
and the only place where the
party is organized on a local
The committee ruled the elec-
tion was void and Illegal be-
cause, among other things, the
precincts did not have the five
party commissioners as requir-
ed by state law and because De-
mocrats had signed *ome OOP
return*.
In arguments and briefs sub-
mitted to the court, the com-
mittee said lt did not come un-
der the court's jurisdiction be-
cause It is. by "Inherent rights."
the governing body of the party
in Louisiana.
Led by New Orleans attorney
IJohn Minor Wisdom and GOP
gubernatorial candidate Harri-
son O. Bagwell, Eisenhower
forces contended that thecom-
mltte has a *mTIatriaT"dty"
to perform in promulgating
election returns.
They said any Irregularities:
were not "fatal" and did not1
constitute a "thwarting of the
will of the electors."
In final briefs yesterday, the
Eisenhower faction said the' de-
cision may mark the turning
point in establishment of a "two
party ayatem in Louisiana, or lt
may kill it dead."
OOP national commltteeman
John E. Jackson of New Or-
leans, a Taft supporter, describ-
ed the dispute as "just a tem-
pest in a teapot."
Before todays decision, the
^Atlantic Society

&, 195, (*< DMfkmm Qmtmm 319
MOTHER-DAUGHTER LUNCHEON
COMPLIMENTS MRS. THORNTON
Mrs. L. B. Jennings, ef the Coco Solo Naval' Station, was
hostess for a luncheon for Mrs. H. J. Thornton, who is mov-
teff to the 15th Naval District, and her children, Cathy and
Terry.
The guests were mothers and daughter* on the Station.
They included. Mr*. L. L. Koepke, with Candy and Taffy,
Mr*. P. L. Balay with Linda and Brocal- Jennings.
Kepnlck, Mrs. William Bell, Mrs.
Mary Cote, Mra. Ernest Beet,
Mrs. Owen Tolbert and Mrs. Sue
Harvey.
Valentine Card Party Mrs. O'Connor Guest
Mrs. J. J. Humes was hostess at Luncheon
for a Valentine card party given Mrs. Juan Antonio Nunez and wilim^ AlIesTSr. Ua'rwS
Rainbow Meeting
Well Attended
' The Cristobal Assembly of th#
Order of the Rainbow for Girl
had a well-attended meeting
Thuraday evening. Among the
ouV-of-town guests were: Mr.
at the Coco Solo Officers Club Mra. Julio Nino entertained with, Miiir mm rowrnis
Thursday. a luncheon at the Hotel Wash- "^ Vuee Mm Rnder
Eisenhower faction had won two Her guests were: Mrs. C. C. ington. D. C, who wiB leave byi? m7i, "-"iflgj? a-m a
victories in their feud with the Yanquell, Mra. A. L. Ware, Mrs. plane tomorrow for her home, walker ""-** *
old guard.
The first was when they suc-
ceeded in getting the primary,
and the second was in winning
the contested committee seats.
RUTH MILLETT Says
The- girls who Were initiated
Into the Assembly by the Wor-
th v Advisor. Miss Hazel Grif-
fith were Sarah Bexfleldi
Helene DeBoyrie. Donna Jeanne
Humphrey and Bdlthanh Bek-
I hoff.
W. D. King, Mra. L. B. Jen- after a visit with relatives In!
nlngs, Mrs. Davis Henderson, Colon.
Mra. Robert Hall, Misa Marls The other guests were: Mra.
Kempker, Mra. Vence sehwelt- Agustn Cederlo, Mrs, Luis
zer, Mrs. E. N, Stein. Mrs. L, Eduardo Castillo and Mrs. Ar-
A. Suead, Mra. James Crlder, mando Grumberg.
Mr. Jerome Novak, Mrs. W. W.--------
Stevens, Mrs. William Simpson, Canasta and Morning Coffee
Mr. A. P. Anderson, Mr. A. L. I Mrs. Benjamin Brundage gavej'
-------- Janeon. Mrs. George Dlttman, morning coffee and canasta; oberhoJtaer Annoaar*
"How can voum.ke everybody M- John Barlow, Mrs. Paul Prty at her home in Oatun. BWn ef Son *BnouB"
te%Sr T nneen wb-^a Bal^
ants to know. Henry Thornton Mra. w. E.(AuxiUary of the Oatun Union hoItler of New Crttt<)bti an.
The anawer, of course, is "You S"1*8' Mti' Lhn ?. D,ni>!lMr*. "tSI. i-*u.. h i.u~ -. nounce the birth of a son Hit
can't H- E Schmidt, Mr. Sanford The ladiea who played were: jtn 33 at the Panama Hoepl-
Nor should you even strive to, I Bo"" Mrs. John Pease Mra. Mra Leon Egolf, Mr* George u]/ Maternal grandparents are
for lt la an impossible and ahal-;Gry McKay Mra, F c Roepke, PooleSr.. Mrs. Joseph Irving, Mr and Mrs. Anthony J. Ca-
lowgoal. Mrs. J. R. Wolfersberger. Mr, Mra. Tracey White, Mrs George tanaaro of New CrUtrtal.
You can't be yourself and ex- Robert Kunkle, Mr*. Michael Marcum. Mr. Richard Penning- ternal grandparents ariMr. and
pect everyone to like you. You Leahy, Mrs. G. W. Kuhn, Mr, ton, Mrs. Fred Newhard, Mrs, Mrs. Rusael J. OberholUer of
can't stand up for your own ideas W. W. Bemla, Mrs. Gerald Raymond Re'ph. Mrs. Alfred End well. New York,
and principle and expect every- Brooka, Mra. Donald Sabln, Mr. Glose, Mrs. J. W. J. Graham,
body to like vou. You can't be Phoebe Kelly, Mrs. B. W. Clark, Mrs. Ralph Graham, Mrs. S. B.j Mr. Oberholteer is the former
honeat and expect everybody to Mr. T. L. Applequlrt, Mr. H. Oray, Mr. Sallle Foote Allen. Anita Catanearo. a graduate of
like you For after all, you cer- H. Chandler, and Mra. Roy Niel- Mra. Bill Smith. Balboa High School with the
talnlv don't like everybody you j sen. The prize of crocheted book- claaoof '47.
know. L The bridge prizes were won mark were won by Mra. Poole.i Mr. Oberholtaer ia a member
80 forget about making every- by Mrs. L. A. Suead. Mrs Gary Mrs. Ralph, Mrs. White and Mrs. of the Canal Zone Police Force-
body like you. Instead atart McKay, Mr. J. R. Wolfersber- Rslph Graham. Iserving in Cristobal.
thinking about what you want to'ger, and Mra. F. C. Roepk. Mrs. -------'-
make of yourself, what you want1 T. L. Applequlat. Mrs. W. W. Ice Cream Seeial Tonight
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Margarita Union Church will
give an ice cream social this
evening on 4th Street starting
at 5:00 p. m. and lasting until
to be and what you want to i Bemls and Mra. Donald Sabln
stand for. were the canasta winners.
Develop your own talents and
abilities. Dorft be afraid to be Mr. Paaline Marsh
yourself or to express your own Honored by Of fleers
opinions. Quit trying to please' The retiring officers of the 8:00 p. m. Home made desserts
everybody and concentrarte on Fort Oullck NCO. Wive ClubiwM be on sale a well a Ice
being the kind of person you, gave a surprise morning coffee cream
yourself, can appYove of. | the home of Mr. Brneet Beck
FRIENDLINESS BEGETS
FRIENDS
If you'll do that and treat oth-
for the prealdent, Mra. Pauline; N.C.O. Wivea Club
Marsh, who has been reelected Donates to Polio Fund
president. A food sale was given by the
A gift of a cameo brooch was fort Oullck NCO. Wives Club
with genuine friendliness glven j^., Marsh ^ her offl. to raise funds for the March of
you 11 have plenty of friends. Not cerg n^g ladles who partlcipat- Dimes. At this time $72.90 was
SEEKER t,ik',fy0^ S"1 Hhl'"* were: Mr Bec*- M David arned by. the ladies, with a
.LmaU.1 fy,0"have tl\i Harshaw, Mrs. Arthur Craudall,. donated from the Club, 82.80
H?* Td ?!2 ui,he^0? Mrs. Rov Smith, Mrs. Owen Tol- was turned into the Polio Fund.!
that you genuinely like and re- ^ anv Mrs, Robert Moore. Mrs. Joseph Gormley. chalr-
_____ I man of the sale, was assisted by
Luncheon Honors Visitor Mrs. Charles Breech, Mra. Mike:
The Tournament will be held
at the Wlrz Memorial for the du-
The
United Statea.
The Stateside guests were, Mr.
and Mrs. J. W. Ogg of New York
and Mr. and Mrs. E. L. McAd-
ams of Burlington, North Caro-
'llna Mr. Ogg Is an executive of
the national building and fur-
nishings service of the YMCA as
well as assistant to the executive
director of USO. Mr. and Mrs
Legion Binge
Has flM.M Jackpot
Bingo will be played on Sun-
day evening at 7:30 at the Ame-
rican Legion Club at Fort Ama-
dor. Beginning thl Sunday a
$100.00 jackpot and a door prize
will be added attractions for
players. Members and thelt
gueats are Invited. Arrangement
Ogg are en route to Lima. Peru. | have been made with bus drivers
Mr. and Mrs E L McAdams are to take player directly to the
visiting with Mr. McAdams' is- clqb on request.
dom efar.hion Sh
ow
PlaceT> Patio.
7 Pern***
Partieipauni storw:
Th French laiaar
Mettas
Mods* Maroala
Felix B, Maduro
La llatcota
American Bazaar
p.m.. Sunday, Feb. 17
I
flrllrtifl
Date Sunday, February 17
Tim 8 p.m., during the
SUNDAY BUFFET
FASHIONSBeaoh, evening.
treat and ports
TEN BEAUTIFUL MODELS
Maritsa de Obarrie Chela Campataani
Julia HaUoran Ann Gorman
taaita Aros*oeaa Lieky Aroeamena
Oerita Borrell titilen Millar
Patricia Shalley Sandra Brown
(eourteay of Harpart Baaaar)
Directed by Mrs. Wm. P. AIISrbjKt
No extra tranca chars*.
apect.
The young person whoee main
goal In life is popularity will ne- ...
ver amount tTverv much. For JQ-2l2LK**?'[Jl*i
instead of nourishing and devel- ?(inlB^*t' S.JSi J? tt!
oping hi. own individuality he SL.i"^?^^7!^
will tend more and more to ca- ^,tlJ}^\^ DX.St**?y
ter toother people. He will "yea" an Mrs, Henry Blgelow. Jr.
their opinions and values, in-! Professor Peabody waii the,
stead of living by his own. and engineering Instructor at M I.
end up with a weak Imitation of T. wltti whom Mrs. Noble stu-
acouple of guys named Joe. <"ed. She learned of hU wiles'.
So start worrying less about' visit to the isthmus through the
what others uitak of you and Society Column of our local pa-
more about what you are and per.
what you want to become. --------
Being liked by others isn't Barn Dance at Coco Sole
nearly as Important as being a-' a barn dance, sponsored as
ble to like yourself. a stew and Stomp" will be
given thla evening at the Coco
Solo Officers Club. All officers
of the Armed Forces' and the
Reserves are cordially Invited to
attend.
A handsome bamboo screen
ha been donated by the Phllp-
plne Rattan Furniture Company
to be given as a door prise.
Supper and dancing will cost
$1.25 per person.
TAGAROPUL09
INDUSTRIES. S.A.
CJDfei phonM:
X^yyf 1002.1003
#4041 Feo Boyd Ave ~
Coln R P
FRESH MILK
e FRESH BUTTER
RICH ICE CREAM
Everything
Inspected by the
Health Department
BpME DELIVERY
For th convenience- of our distinguished
clientele of the Atlantic Side, we are now
presenting the new
1952 DODGE and DC SOTO
"PLEASURE CARS"
at our new Display Room
located at 15th St. and Melendez Avenue
(Near Automobile Row)
COLON MOTORS, INC.
COLON
(Open Sunday Morning)
DISTRIBLTORS. V1A VYI\PI\JJ, 3. A.
Visit the
FRIENDLY CITY
- of -
COLON
Colon Chamber of Commerce
For a new motoring thrill drive a
Por the motoring thrill of the
the Finest De Soto of AM.
a date today to drive
Yon will thrill to the flashing- roonone of a big Powermaater
engine . to th* tuperb *ennort>neaa of stew hydraulic trans-
mission and improved Fluid Drive!
See the now De Sot* todny! A ride will convince you!
COLON MOTORS, INC.
PANAMA
TiveH Crotsisf
COLON
Teath Street


pagf non
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIY-T NEWSPAPER
iima- ii
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18. 1951
Cheating Scandal Bared At University Of Florida


Man) Football Players
Included Among Over 200
Caiial Zone Interscholastic League
Must Raise New Crop Of Hoop Stars,
GAINESVILLE, Fla., Feb. 16 (UP)A cheating scandal in-
volving some 200 University of Florida students, many of them
football players set off a searching Investigation today of un-
dercover traffic In quiz questions and answers.
Head Football Coach Bob Woodruff said that "rumors are a
dime a dozen." but said there Is no way be could estimate how
nan/ athletes ire involved.
University of Florida President J. Mills Miller said an em-
ploye and a graduate student were dismissed some time ago
when it was learned they let copies of an examination fall into
the hands of students.
Miller said the plot was uncovered after the school term
ended last summer and the members of the honor court had
gone home on vacation.
"It has been a difficult, time-consuming and serious case,"
Miller said. "What they (The Honor Court) do in tbe way of
conviction mav be appealed, to the facnity and then to the
president."
He adde dthat "justice will be done and all possible con-
sideration given .."
A few of the students involved were reported to be athletes,
but officials said no names could be revealed.
Coach Woodruff said he plans to leave the cribbing probe
entirely up to the Honor Court.
"Outside statements only interfere with the normal function
of student government," he said.
The scandal kept under cover for six months, was admitted
by university officials only after the student newspaper carried
a story about it yesterday.
Miller sarid the university employe confessed that an exam-
ination paper was permitted to get into the hands of a grad-
uate student and then apparently distributed to others. And
the president made it plain the university wants no outside In-
terference.
"This is the kind of business that the university should be
permitted to handle through its own channels," he said.
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
ed, but it didn't take him lone to
establish himself as the most
consistent and hardest working
plaver on the Bulldog five. Dres- itaiw
ka also singled out Sam's play of: Commissary. ... I
the second Cristobal game as his C'tral Labor Office t
highlight of the season when he; Navy Ordnance . Z
TEAM STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Pet
Tired Dave!
iiopping
Vorn ot
wat. oust telloH
never left him mellow:
weaiy tired and brave
read our Want *rl Dave?
It is evident that the Canal School mentor, said of Bob Bail-
Zone Interscholastic League Is ey .that "his general all-around
going to have to raise a new play in the championship game
group of basketball stars, as all at Balboa was his nigh spot of
! five of the boys who were select- the season." In this we heartily
ed on this year's team by the agree. Bob played one of the best
coaches are either seniors or games seen in the league all year m
have already left the Isthmus. in this crucial game, and that said, "In the second Cristobal A""* f1fn"1 ....: i
The two high schools that tied typifies hla play all season. Hej game he displayed fine defensive *-'
for the league title, and then saw was there and had it when hi work, he was second to none un-
Crlstobal win the playoff game, team needed it the most. I der the boards, and lastly, his
also dominated the mythical five.' About Arnold Manning, Moser! fine ball-hawking turned the
Cristobal palced their fine pair said, "His alert and consistent tide in favor of Balboa High
of forwards, Bob Bailey and Ar-' playing in the Junior College- School." Maphls was the driving
nold Manning, while Balboa1 Cristobal game on Jan. 11 was spirit behind the Bulldogs, and
landed the pivot post with Gene! his tops ot the season. He scored he was the lad who set the pace
Rlchter and one of the guards at opportune times,'was tha^or his mates throughout the sea-
with Sam Maphls. The other court leader who directed the son.
ruard post went to the Junior line offense of his team, and According to his coach. Bob
College fireball, George McArth- above all his excellent defensive Mower, George McArthur was at
ur. ; waik." Moser could have said! his best in the second game with
Three of these lads are on the that about Arnold tor almost ev.' Balboa. About this Mower said,
dream team as repeaters from ery game. He never played ai"Thls is the game where he did
the 1951 outfit. Mannin
and McArthur were the
were similarly honored last
That leaves the two Balboa boys ed out in tne interscnoiastic George
as the newcomers to the team. League over the three years of
Another combination of three i the varsity sports program,
were the only unanimous choices; When he Queried Paul ureska
e
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
l.OOt
1.000
.667
.500
.56*
.506
.M*
.338
.000
.000
Albrook Cops 1st Round
Of Armed Forces League
The Albrook Flyers became the the Infield to score Chatham and
first round champions of, the Coycault followe dwlth a boom-
Panam Armed Forces Baseball ing- triple against the right field
League Wednesday when they fence to write finish to MArauez
defeated the 33d Infantry in a' on the mound. With three runs
play-ofl game before an overflow already across the plate and a
the Fort Clayton ball runner on third. Max Carpenter
3. The Flyers, who won! came in to take over the mound
or the past two years ties for the infantry. He start-
crowd at
fark, 6 to 3
he title for the past two years i nties for the Infantry
thus became eligible to partlci-1 ud strong In striking out the first
pate in the final playoffs against batter to face him'but then lost
the winner of the second round control and walked three straieht
which gets under way Feb. 20. | batters to force In one run Tnen
The two teams were forced into on a slow roller to the mound
Carpenter fumbled the ball and"
the fifth run crossed the plate
The Infantry fought back In
o 1 leader of the team throughout
the season, and it is Impossible to
- discount what this meant to his
of the selection group. Maphls,! about his two boys he didn't have, team during the play.
Bailev and Manning won undls-| to hesitate long U> answer, "Uene| There they are, according to
puted places, while Rlchter and Rlchter played his best ball of j the coaches who handled the
the season in the second game boys during the season, and cer-
with Cristobal with his outstand- talnly no one should have a bet-
ing offensive work around the ter Idea on the subject than
McArthur nosed out such capa-
ble basketballers as Jerry Welsh,
Fred Aleguas, and All McKeown
all of Junior College and Sklppy
Anderson of Cristbal High
School. Anderson, only a sopho-
more, was a member of the "AH"
team last year as a freshman.
This is probably one Of
shortest All-League teams
power
basket and his rebound
tm-oughout the contest."
Gene is only a sophomore this
year, and it was a sore blow to
the hopes of future Bulldog bas-
the ketball teams when he shook the
. on mud of the Canal Zone from his
record, as Rlchter is the tallest! size 12 tootsies and departed for
boy at 6-2 and Maphls the only I the States. This was not only a
other lad to hit the 6-foot mark, blow to future teams, but it was
In spite of a lack of height, this also a blow to the 1952 team, as. game.
these men. Following is the team
roster, showing their year in
school, height, position and scor-
ing average:
Bob Bailey (CHS), senior, 5-10,
forward. 8.2 points per game.
Arnold Manning (CHS) senior,
6-8, forward, 0.5 points per game.
Gene Rlchter (BHS),
iv Q
Building Division
Post Office ....
Electrical Division.
Kobbe Sales Store.
TAn&vs i;imi it .M\ __a first round playoff when both
Bid? DW. .Si SallVstor-e: squads ended the round with rec-
,, mi rin n Knhhr <31mIolds ot 11 wins and two defeats.
Mole. I B, teamsi,st ,on the w"1 d,av h? slxtn lnnm* ad'orought the
TOMORROWS GAME (:ot *ne rou"altlf? lose chance Ior Interest of the crowd back with a
a.m.)-,Commissary va. A r m y a ^"^t'e. i three-run uprising but Cotton
The Flyers gained the victory, came in to bring the rally to a
via a five-run outburst In the close and the lefthander was in
fourth Inning^when they^ broke complete control for the rest of
outstanding
choke off any
which thelnfant-
from the mound. They added am rymen might start were turned
insurance run in the eighth buti in bv the Flyers
_ the five runs were more than Dick London, Flyers'shortstop.
1 enough as Mike Romo and Joe brought the crowd to their feet
2 Cotton kept the Infantry in1 twice during the game with
~ of the
Signal.
Lynn, the losing pitcher.
The box score follows:
C.L.O. AB
C. Greaves, cf........ 4
L. Edghill, ss........ 6
8. Burton, If........ 5
A. Foster, lb........ 2
A. Bowen, c......... 4
A. Barter, rf........ 6
C. Jordan, 3b........ 6
C. Bynoe, 2b........ 6
A. Barahona, p...... 4
2 check with the exception of
.-i/Vi ItinitM? mhan IKm< rnr\*Q
sixth Inning when they scored all
three of their runs.
Albroo'c sent eleven men to the
olate in the fourth inning and by
the time the dust had cleared
away they had a five-run advan-
Totals............39 21 16
Building Division AB R
more, 6-2, center, 15.5 points per
. F. Bailey, lb........ 3
sopho-!L. Emmanuel, ss-2b. ..
Is also one of the finest teams he left with two games still to be
ever to be selected locally. A'l of played. He was an amazing scor-
these boys have been standout er, and will most assuredly glad-
players throughout the red-hot den the heart of some despond-
play of the season. Each coach cnt basketball coach In the U.S.
was asked to give his opinion of Sam Maphls was the biggest
the best play or game that his surprise In the league this vear.
boy had. Sammv wasn't rated a topflight
Paul Moser, Cristobal High basketballer when things start-
Attractive Chrome Plated
ORNAMENTS


1952
Motorola
The Car Radio Preferred By
of ilotorit
Sam Maphls (BHS), senior, 6-0,
guard, 7 points per game.
George McArthur (JO, sopho-
more, 5-9, guard, 5.6 points per
game.
right Resulto
Thursday Night
SAN FRANCISCOArt Soto,
15014, Oakland, Cal., outpointed
Robby Jones, 150'', Oakland, 12.
S.Welsh, c.......... J
W. Howard, 2b-ss .... 2
B. Savory, 2b........ A
R. Scott, cf........ *
A.Headges, If........ S
W. Nlcholls, rf...... t
G. Thomas. 3b...... 0
W. Hall, 3b.......... 2
G.Lynn, p........ .. 2
sparkling backhanded stabs of
balls which he turned into put-
outs. In the" fourth inning after'
Lpez had singled to open the
frame, Rivera drove a hot liner
between third and short which
London grabbed in the air with
tage over the Infantry which; a bankhand lunge and tossed to
looked like more than enough as! first to double Lpez off the bag
Romo seemingly had the ~
completely
ever, the L
the sixth and Cotton was called roar wj8, a lightning play on a
smlngly had the game Agam m the sixth inning he ald-
y in his control How-| eJ in cutting short a rally when
Infantry broke loose in he brought the crowd to an up-
upon to put out the fire.
steaming liner.
The Flyers collected six hits
off the combined offerings of
Mrquez and Carpenter while the
Totals
The Flyers scored their runs
when Woerz started the ball roll.
ng with a sharp double down the .
first base line. Chatham ground- Infantry was able to gather ten
ed to Thalin at shortstop and are blows off cotton and Romo.
, both runners were safe when I However, the Albrook hurlers
2 Thalln's throw hit Woens on the i were able to keep the safeties
"shoulder going into third. Scla-, "ell scattered and tightened
fani filed deep to centerfield and down when runners were on
28 i Woerz romped home with the base.
first run of the contest. The Fly-
R. Ortiz hurled Navy Ordnance ers mre far from through though -
a 14-3 victory over Post Office.: ., D(t1h inoieri hmiv through
TERVnXE, Me. Hermie
Freeman, 131, Bangor. Me., out-
pointed Billy Mays, 185, Boston,
10.
TACOMARay Aguilar, 188,
Los Angeles, knocked out Dave
Plttman, 182, Spokane ,8.
NEW YORK (Sunnyside Gar-
>n^ Bill Bossio, 124%, Pitts-
-' * owman, 128! ,
CUffside Park, N.J., drew, 2.
to a 14-3 victor
Long was the losing pitcher.
The box score follows:
Navy Ordnance AB
M. Mussa, cf........ 4
F. Peralta, 3b.......
D. Lashley, If..
R. Ortiz, p.. ..
R. McLeod. r;.
A. Hogan, ss ..
R. Benali, lb..
C. Wilson, 2b..
A. Granger, c.
Totals......

. .. ..
.
.


......
30 14 11
Post Office AB
R, Jemmott, If....... 3
L. Talt. 3b......... 3
M. Kelly, si........ 3
C. Diaz, c.......... 2
Felman, lb......, .. 3
J. Yearwood, cf......
Bushell 2b.
G. Phillips, rf.
I. Clarke, rf..
A. Gusta ve, p.
Long, p......
HeywootLp.. ..
as Binch singled sharply through
Shorty League
STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Pet
Ancon.
Pedro Miguel
Gamboa.....
Diablo ....-,
Balboa .. ..
LOW
LOW
.5t0
.000
.000
Results Games, Saturday, Feb. 9
Ancon 3, Gamboa 9.
Pedro Miguel 12, Balboa II.
Totals............23 3 5
Santa Cruz Seeks
Fifth Straight Win
Tomorrow Morning
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We have a complete line of
Motorola Radios for every car.
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e. r.
By VICTOR M. CAREW
Manager Brownie's Alemn,
Jrs. of Santa Cruz will be shoot-
ing for their fifth consecutive
win without a loss on Sunday.
Feb. 17. when they meet Spur
Cola at Red Tank.
Edgar Parris, Spur Cola man-|
ager, will probably call upon his|
ace, Colona (1-1), to check the
victorious march of the Aleman-
men. Colona's opponent will be
Peterkln, whose record is 1-0.
Godwin Moore's Powell's will
be at home in their game against
Canada Dry of Paraso. This
game will be played at Mt. Hope
and it is expected that a large
crowd will be on hand to see
what should be a very good game
In which two outstanding pitch-
ing prospects will be the feature
rivals. Smith, who battled Flty-
patrick and Colona of Spur Cola
to a 12-lnnlng scoreless tie, will
toe the slab for Powell's. His rec-
ord is 1-0. Fernando Alder, main-
ly a control pitcher, will be Can-
ada Dry's choice.
At Chagres, manager Erie Ca-
rew of the hometown Agewood
will try to break into the win
column at the expense of Cnea-
ley Jones' Col. Remn club of La
Boca. Agewood has lost 4 games
to date, and unless something Is
done about Its deficient mbond
staff, it is hardly expected t
core a victory this season.
Romero win be given his first
starting opportunity fo rAgewood
and Manager Jones will also give
Bowen his first starting Job.
So far Col. Remon's pitching,
which has been mainly Springer,
has allowed only five earned
runs games, but tie club, has al-
lowed twenty-two unearned runs.
This has been the reason for the
club's poor showing this season.
SPREADING FAST
New York, (NBA).There are
4 M1.500 boys between the ages
oi nine and IS in the United
States. A quarter of a million of
'hem are playing Little League
The high flying Ancon Play-
round team edged the Gamboa
'layground squad In a well play-
6 ed Shorty League contest 3-0. It
0 was the first extra inning game
0 of the season as the contest took
0 nine innings to complete. An-
il con's pitcher Fred Hasley. won
0 his own ball game by blasting a
0 r"cr in the top of the ninth
inning for Ancon's first run.
ivi-i..y Darlington followed with
a circuit clout to score teammate
Jeff Kline ahead of him for in-
surance runs.
Coach Henry Lelsy's Pedro Mi-
guel nine outlasted the Balboa
entry In a slugger's duel 12-10.
In their big uprising In the fifth
Inning Pedro Miguel surged from
behind to score seven big runs to
sew up the ball game. Pedro Mi-
guel now shares the league top
spot with strong Ancon led by
Coach Henry Phillips.
Today Pedro Miguel and Dia-
<->n n-in r"eet, while Ancon Jour-
neys to Balboa to tangle with
c* .a Karst's Improving aggre-
gation. Gamboa will have an
open date.
MEET THE CHAMPSVet-
eran Jockey Johnny Longden.
left, voted by turf writers and
handicappers as 1951's outstand-
ing jockey, is congratulated by
two winners of previous years,
Gordon Glisson, center, 1949,
and Willie Shoemaker. 1990. at
Arcadia, Calif. A bronce statue
of the late George Woolf watch-
es over the session. (NEA)
n*cermA*A4*A
Stands Sufft&fK&K




8A1TKDAY, FEBRUARY 16, INI
T ll^JfcfcM
THE PANAMA AMEBICAN All INDEPENDENT DAHT NEWSPAPIK
'
i.r t i- t ' "rTrn*fiaB^ii,l~Ti"iiT"i.
rAOININl
Series Fever High; Yankees Down Brownies To Clinch Flag
C.H.S. Takes Over Lead In
Atlantic Twilight League
ATLANTIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE alter. R., If . I 0 0 1 0 0
STANDINGS Igolf.Vss. ..311111
TEAM-
CBS
Powell's .'.' '.'.'-'. I
Won Lott Pet.
8 .545
I .561
I .455
THURSDAY NIGHTS RESULTS
CHS 8, Pabst I.
SUNDAY NIGHT'S GAME
CHS vs. PoweU'i.
In a free-scoring see-saw bat-
tle, Cristobal High School took
the measure of the Pabst nine to
tighten the torrid battle between
three clubs for the first half title
in the Atlantic Twilight League.
The win put Cristobal a half
fame In the lead and gives Luke
alumbo, CHS manager, the
^anor managing the all-stars
might in their game against
the Pacific Twilight League Ali-
stara.
the win was CHS's third in a
row, and their fifth In the last
six gamesa drive that took
them from the cellar right up to
the top of the heap with only one
Jame left in the first half of
lay.
Tommy Hughes pitched and
batted his team to victory, al-
lowing five hits in chalking up
his fourth win of the season, and
had three hits In four trips to
the plate, while his closest con
Totals.....27 6 5 18 8 f
CHS
Manning, si
Hatgl, 2b .
Bailey, 3b .
Hughes, p .
Halter, T., c
Sasso, If .
Blades, rf .
Price, lb. .
Smith, ef .
AB R
. 8 0
HP.O
0 3
Lopez Edges
Jacobs For
'Bat9 Title
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
(Final Standing!)
TEAM Won Lost Pet
Yankees........28 11 .694
Bombera........21
Bluebirds. .. a .. 14
Brownies.......11
1
28
.660
.466,
JOB
Totals.....80 9 9 21 10
Score By Innings
Pabst 0 3 2 10 0 06
CHS 2 0 2 8 2 0 x9
~~CUN CLUB
NOTES
BALBOA GUN CLUB DROPS
TWO LEAGUE RIFLE MATCHES
A Balboa Gun Club rifle team,
weakened by the absence of sev-
eral members, traveled across the
Isthmus to lose two Isthmian
Gallery League matches at the
hands of the Cristobal Junior Ri-
fle Club and the Cristobal Gun
Club teams. The defeat by the
Cristobal, 1099 to 1025. could not
be considered unexpected, as the
undefeated Cristobal boys are
leading the league at present.
Jim Schelbeler turned In a
sharp 287 to lead the winning
Under for the league batting! team, with Melvln Mlllard's 285
crown, Noel Gibson, went hltless
In three tries.
TONIGHT'S GAME
(Called off because of work being
done on grounds,)
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Mt.Hope Stadium: Yankees 8,
Brownies 3.
topping the losing Balboa squad.
Balboa's defeat by the up and
comma Cristobal Seniors was a
rude blow, as the latter have not
taken a rifle match from Balboa
(until this one) in the recent
memory of man. The score was
close, 1045 to 1036, With each
team having Just the minimum
required four shooters on the
Tomorrow night the Atlantic rang*,
Twilight League will wind up.
their first half schedule in a! Maurice Webb's 278 was high
game between CHS and Powell's.! score for the winning team with
A win for Powell's will put the Lew Ryan, the Balboa veteran,
George Bgolf started for Pabst
Sd went three and two-thirds
lings, giving up eight hits and
Sven runs before being removed
favor of Gibson. Egolf was
charged with the loss..
CHS vs. Powell's Sunday Night
first half right back Into a dead-
lock, while the red-hot school-
boys can take it all with a vic-
tory over the Powell's nine.
This game, originally sched-
uled for 3 p.m., has been changed
to an arc contest, in order that
more fans may avail themselves
of the opportunity to see what
should prove to be one of the
best games of the season.
compiling 271 to lead his team.
Maybe losing this one will teach
Balboa shooters to get a team on
the line, and not expect the oth-
er fellow to get out and save the
match. This-way of thinking
nearly cost Balboa a pistol cham-
pionship two years ago, and does
not add to the prestige of the
club competitively.
The scores:
CRISTOBAL JUNIORS
Prone Sit Stand Ttl.
The box score: Jim Schelbeler 99 97
ABRHPOA-F.J. Fahnestock 98 100
iL. Constan tine 96 91
0 Johnny Hatgl 98 88
0
0
0
91
PABST
Peseod, si-3b
Welch, cf-lf .
Hale, 2b-cf .
Olbson, lb-p.
Bweartogen, c
Hooper, Sb-lb
Jaramlllo, rf.
2
4
4
8
.3
S
I
79
Team Total
287
,281
266
265
1099

only II
mix drink'
sold
at
Yt
once
from 3 to 7 p.rn.
EVERY DAY
The Boston Bar
BALBOA SENIORS
Prone Bit Stand Ttl.
Melvln Mlllard 98 97 73 268
Lew Ryan 97 88 81 260
Babs. Mlllard 96 94 59 249
Ken Mlllard 96 93 59 248
Team Total
1025
CRISTOBAL SENIORS
Prone Sit Stand Ttl.
Maurice Webb 99 97 82 278
BUI Blngham 98
Noel Olbson 96
Jack O'Connell 96
96 81 275
94 68 253
81 82. 239
The Carta Vieja Yankees last
night made it official by virtue
of their 8-3 victory over the Spur
Cola Brownies at Mt. Hope Sta-
dium. Al Polnle, making his first
starting appearance, scattered
five hits for his second win with-
out a loss.
Stanley Arthurs, who started
for the Brownies, was the loser.
Clem Koshorek was the game's
batting star with three hits in
four tripe, Including two triples
to tie the league record.
Both Hector Lpez and Forrest
Jacobs garnered one safety In
three official trips. The result
was that Lpez wound up being
the batting champ with a .8388
average as compared to Jacobs'
.3357. It was the closest batting
championship race in league his-
tory.
As a result of the Yankee vic-
tory, the Chesterfield Bombers
did not file a protest of the dis-
puted umpires' decision to Thurs-
day night's game which was won
4-1 by the Yanks. The protest
was no longer of importance
since It would have no bearing
on the final outcome of the
championship.
Tonight's scheduled game for
the Panam Stadium between
the Bombers and the Cervecera
Bluebirds has been called off be-
cause of work being done on the
Olympic Stadium diamond In
reparation for the forthcoming
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE CHAMPS Members of the Carta Vieja Yankees, champs of the
Panama League for the second time, are pic tured above. Standing left to right are Joe
Nacklo, coach; Marion Frlcano, pitcher; Higel Patrick, pitcher; Al Polnte, pitcher; Al Kuk-
skl, manager-first base; Dale Lynch, outfielder; Jim Cronin, outfielder; Johnny Kropf, out-
fielders; (kneeling) Steve Karas, catcher; Ray Dabek, catcher; Dave Thomas, pitcher; Eddie
Neville, pitcher-first base; Clem Koshorek, shortstop; Ziggy Jazinskl, third Dase, and Forrest
Jacobs, second base. _______
suela and Panama are compet- championship series is flying to
A.F. Golf Tourney
tog. I Panam aboard a special Clipper
^Bisbol" played to the series leaving San Juan at midnight
Is good enough to attract four Sunday (Feb. 17). The team is f|_|__J UawI I4_,aalla
officials o the National Assocla- being selected this week to a tltJlCU NBaI rlOIll
tion of Professional Baseball play-off series at San Juan. The
Leagues, who are flying by Pan I Puerto Ricans will Clipper back
American World Airways from; home Feb. 27.
Miami to Panam Tuesday (Feb. I At the conclusion of the tour-
19Flight 3018
week's stay.
pjn.) for a
s
rlbbean Series.
In Panam next week, it'll be
"uno I dos I tres strikes I you're
out!"
While groundskeepers through-
out the United States eye their
diamonds for spring grooming,
thousands of red-hot Latin A-
merlcan baseball fans are gath-
ering In Panam for the fourth
aAnual Caribbean Championship by PAA Feb. 27, arriving to Mla-
Series Feb. 20-25. Top teams ml at 8:45 a.m. (Flight 300).
from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Vene-' Puerto Rico's entry In the
They are George M. Twrtrt-
man of Columbas, Oblo, presi-
dent of the association; Chas.
A. Hurth ef New Orleans,
chairman of the executive
committee and president of the
Southern Association; Herman
D. White of Ran Claire, Wis-
consin, an executive committee
member and president of the
Northern League, and Robert
L. Finch ef Columbus, public
relations director of the asso-
ciation. Their wives are accom-
panying them.
Another group of six, dyed-ln-
the-wool United State! baseball
fans is flying to the Panam se-
ries with the association officials.
They are Dr. and Mrs. Chauncey
Burke of Birmingham, Michigan;! mnimerm. Biaeah5iae;.aBe, psariaafc,
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Kolter of Li- Foot fuii, Athletes root or
ma (thin and Mr and Mrs I 0Ihr blaml-heo atascare yoitr akin and
S 'ji.o...n,i.. U(S,V embarras* yo-J arto'her day without
Qoodloe Rogers of Pontlac, Mich-, trylr,e Niicojsrm. mu wat -eaici-
loan. eombals the germs and par* im which
The officials and fans, return f2^M&W^
ney Feb. 26, Ral Arango, presi-
dent .of the Caribbean Baseball
Confederation, will present the
winners an elaborate trophy
rpm The Sporting News, "bible'
of the baseball world, and its
publisher, J. Taylor Spin of St.
Louis, Missouri. The trophy is be-
ing flown to Panam by Clipper.
The topnotch quality of base-
ball played In Latin America Is
attested by the fact that a limit-
ed number of players from U. 8.
leagues are given permission
each year to play with teams
from their native countries.
Balboa High Upsets Gibraltar
8-3 In Pacific Twilight Loop
a
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL
LEAGUE
(Straight Season Standings)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Gibraltar Life.. .7 8 .766
Klboa Brewers. ..7 g
Iboa Hi School 8 7
Panam Merchants 8 7 .166
(Second Half Standings)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.1
Balboa Brewers. .. 1 6 1.660
Balboa Hi School 1 6 1.660
Panam Merchants 6 1 .666
Gibraltar Life.. ..6 1 .666
THURSDAY NIGHTS RESULTS
Balboa Hlsh School 8, Gibraltar
Life Insurance 2.
SUNDAY'S GAME
Regular Twilight League game
postponed.
(At Balboa Stadium.)
Armed Services All-Stars vs.
Panam Pro Loon All-Stan.
Benefit game for the CRUSADE
FOB FREEDOM
Flynn, e .
Peacher, c.
Carita, lb .
Rowley, cf.
Ostrea, 8b
Henderson, rf
. 6
:1
. 4
. 4
8
a Weeks.....0
Arias, si. ... S
Morton, p . 4
0 0 0
0 1 0
2 12 0
1 1 0
0 3
n
4 T
0 0
l!!l
Totals
.80 8 7 21 14 0
Pimples Go
Don't lot Itchlnf Pimpla, Beiema,
Team Total
1048
BALBOA SENIORS
Prone Sit Stand Ttl.
Lew Ryan 97 89 85 271
Babs. Mlllard 98
Melvln MUlard 98
Ken. Mlllard 99
93
99
90
68
61
69
259
258
248
Team Total
1036
TOROS
four akin soft, clear, month and at-
tractive. Oat Nlxodsrm from your druaj-
Sit todayaea how. much bet tar /our
la look ami See* tomorrow.__
The Panam Armed Forces
Golf Tournament for 1952 will be
held March 18-21 at Fort Amador
and Fort Wm. D. Davis, accord-
ing to an announcement by the
Special Service Office, Fort Am-
ador, Canal Zont .
The Navy and the Air Force
have accepted Invitations to
compete to the tournament so
all branches of the Armed Forces
will be represented in determin-
ing the championship team and
the low medalist. Military per-
sonnel who have been on active
duty for more than ninety days
are eligible to participate.
The tournament will be run
according to current United
orates tiolf Association rules as
modified bv local course rules.
Pairings will be drawn by Chief,
Special Services, U8ARCARDB,
for the first round and succeed-
ing round pairings will be based
on scores made during previous
rounds.
All posts and large units are
encouraged to enter a team to
the tournament. The team will
consist of five members, one of
whom will be an alternate. Rost-
must be submitted to the
~necli Service Office not later
than March 13,1952.
The Balboa High School base-
ball aggregation looked like the
club to beat in the second half
of the Pacific Twilight League
as they defeated the first half
tltleholders 8-3 Thursday night
before a handful of fans.
The High School under their
new pilot Coach Bill Mauzy,
seems to have finally gotten bold
of themselves. They have played
heads up ball in their last four
appearances, a new keystone
combination of Pinky Arias and
Ed Napoleon seemed to be the
boost the team needed.
Pinky Arias, who handled the
ball eleven times without a mis-
cue, sot a new record for a short-
stop in the current loop. The
High School lads, played error-
less ball while their opponents
muffed five times, three of the
miscues in the first toning, which
proved costly as the High School
plate
Gibraltar ab B
DTMater, 2b-rfT 0
Dedeaux, ss . 2 1
Jones, cf . 4 0
Hllatager, 3b. 3 0
Sullivan, e. . l 0
,lb..; ..31
HPO A B
0 111
Love,
Kelleher, If
Conover, lb-c
Colston, rf. .
Presho, 2b .
Hint, p. . .
2
0
3
1
6
6
0
0
1
3
Totals.....87 8 21 11 ft
Score By Innings
Gibraltar Ufe 001110 08
Balboa High 800 301 01
a Walked for Henderson la 7th.
Runs Batted- InPeaeher, CarUa
3, Rowley, Ostrea, Dedeaux. Hil-
xinger, Conocer. Earned Runs
BHB 2. Gibraltar 3. Left on Basee
BH8 8, Olbraltar 9. Three Base
Hlt-Carlta. Two Base Hit-Bow-
ley. Stolen BasesMay 2, Napo-
leon, Carito, Ostrea, weeks. Arias
3, DeLaMater, Dedeaux. Hit o
PitchFlynn by Htoa; Arias by
Hint. Struekout byMorton 1,
Hlns 5. Base on Balls offMor-
ton 6, Hlns 8. DoubleplayNapo-
leon, Arlas, Carita. Losing Pitch-
erHlns (3-2). Winning Pitcher
Morton (2-0). UmplMs^Luse
and Majors. Time of Oamel :8B.
dented the
five
squad
times.
Don Morton, of Balboa High,
went the distance to chalk up
his second win against no de-
feats as he scattered seven hits.
Charlie Htoz went the route for
the losers and was nicked for
seven hits and eight runs.
The poor support Hlns receiv-
ed was his downfall.
The box score:
BHS AB B HPO A E
May, If .... 5 2 2 1 O 0
Napoleon, 2b. 3 0 1 1 4 0.
AT
Out in front
There it more sod more applause for
"Black A Whit*" sad Its ever teresstag
popularity ii proof that thia fine WMsky, very
drop of wuich it distilled in Scotland, hat omIb-
nined the regard of generation after generation.
Distilled et Bottled in Scotland
BLACK&WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKY
LA MACARENA RING
in San Francisco Garden
SUNDAY Feb. 17th at 4:30 p.m.
Farewell
Performance
of the
Prineei*
of Bull Fighting
CONCHITA
MORENO
B. AfMsMrrtJIMsM
a RH. Kta, Oaarta Vt
m
acate Wahajr I
* Saaaaaa > Ca, tad.
IAMBS BUCHANAN A CO. LTD- GLASGOW. 8COTLAND
Distributors: AGENCIAS W. H. DUEL, S.A.
No. 14 Central Ave. TeL 3-S7M
MANOLO
ORTEGA
' mous SpanV
Matador
FOUR
(4)
BULLS
will be fought
and killed
Box Seat................ S3.00
Shade .................. 2.00
General Admittance........ 1.00
COURTESY ENTRANCE for LADIES
ACCOMPANIED by GENTLEMEN
~""------


INTER-CLUB
OPEN SUNDAY


'
NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 152
CCC Punishes 13 Workers Who
Plugged Politi
WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 (UP)
The Civil Service Commission '
cracked down today on 13 pre-',
sent and former federal tax em-
Kloves In Massachusetts for vlo-
iting the Hatch "clean politics" |
act.
Suspensions ranging from 00
days to six months were handed '
out to nine employes of the
scandal-plagued Internal Re-
venue Bjiireau while four others
were banned from federal em-
ployment for six months.
The action stemmed from a
ticket selling drive for the De-
mocratic Party's annual Jeffer-
son Day dinner In Boston May
3, 1847. The Hatch act forbids
federal employes to receive or
handle political contributions.
The Commission took no ac-
tion against five others, saying
there was no evidence they vio-
lated the law.
Heaviest penalties six
months' suspension without pay
were Imposed on Assistant
Collector John E. Burns and
Chief Office Deputy Jeremiam
W. Taylor, both of the Boston
office.
The commission said Burns
"launched" the move to sell
tickets for the political dinner
and Taylor acted "In concert"
with hlmf *
The commission indicated the
eenalties might have been
eavler but for the fact that it
found no direct pressure to buy
the tickets. It said the methods
used were "mild compared with
what we have sometimes seen."
Suspended for four months
was Arthur Rablnovlth, whose
job was not described but who
was not a supervisor.
**.. .he, it seems to us, with
tome political zeal and acting
'House Of Windsor'
Movie Being Shown
In RP Theaters
"The House of Windsor" a
two-reel documentary film on
Britain's rullne family is be-
ing shown at the Bella Vista and
Tropical theaters in Panama Ci-
ty this weekend, in addition to
the regular feature.
The documentary was released
through the courtesy of the Brit-
ish Legation, following the death
of King George VI.
as a volunteer," the Commls- secution to witnesses. McGrath
sion said "found three busi- said immunity is a "very potent
nessmen, from each of whom power" and should be granted.
he secured in order for 10 2-. Informed sources said Presi-
tiekets." dent Truman will ask Congress
Rabinovitz reported the sales to give Morris an expense al-
to Burns and Taylor, the Com-lowance of $160,000 a month to
mission said, "hoping, whether hire a special staff of up to 200
Justifiably or not, for some bene- investigators,
fit" from this cooperation. 3. Other sources disclosed
In other developments: that two top former Revenue
1. Attorney General J. How- Bureau officials former Com-
ard McGgrath caked an admin- missioner Joseph D. Numan, jr.,
istratlon proposal that Newbold and former chief counsel John
Morris, head of the govern- P. Wenchell obtained settle-
ment's cleanup squad, be allow- merits for clients in "several"
ed to offer immunity from pro-tax cases shortly after leaving
the agency
practice.
Sen. John
for
I.
Del.) whose disclosures touch-
ed off the recent tax scandal
exposes, charged Thursday
that a $636,ao tax claim
against the Indianapolis
Brewing Co., was settled for
4,500 in 1040 after the firm
hired Numan and Wenchell
as its attorneys.
Other sources disclosed that
Numan and Wenchell, now New
York attorneys, represented
other firms in tax cases after
leaving the government.
In the Massachusetts case,
minimum suspensions of 00 dyas
were Imposed on Thomas H.
Dunn, Division Chief at Lynn;
Ralph Inverse, Division Chief
at Springfield; and Michael L.
Daly, Maurice J. Goggin, John
T. McHugh, and Adolph T.
Jouannet, all Division Chiefs at
Boston.
The commission said it be-
lieves that four of the 13 no
longer are with the Internal
Revenue Bureau.
The 1952 Peterson Inter-
Club golf matches get under
way tomorrow morning at the
Summit Hills Country Club.
Panama, second last year,
takes on Fort Amador while
Bracos Brook tangles wtth Fort
Davis. _,
The Summit team, surprise
winner in 1951, will be Idle
while playing host to the other
clubs. .
This year the matches will
follow the same system of play
used so successfully last year.
The team captains may group
their players in any way they
see fit. Play will be In four-
somes with the Nassau system
of point scoring being used.
The 1952 USGA rules for four-
ball stroke play and' the local
rules of the host club will pre-
Dateplacestarting times:
Sunday, Feb. 7, at Summit
Hills.
8 a.m.Panama vs. Fort
Amador.
M:30 Brazos Brook vs. Fort
.Davis. _______
(anal To Open Bids
For Huge Quarters
Construction Jobs
private lai
Williams (R-
BRIGADIER GENERAL William H. H. Morris Jr., is decorat-
ed with the order of Vasco Nuez de Balboa by (left) Di-
rector of Protocol C. Levy Salcedo, and President Arosemena,
of the Republic of Panama. The event took place at last
night's reception for President and Mrs. Arosemena in the
Albrook Officer's Club.
(US Army Photo by Cpl. Kluson)
HARRY L. SUGG
Showrooms of the Col pan Mo-
tors. Inc.. on Avenida de la Os-
as will be opened to the public
after 4p.m. today for a preview
of the 1052 Ford and Mercury
oars.
The public preview will follow
immediately after an advance
showing for visiting Ford and
Mercury dealers '
Harry L. Sugg, for many/years
manager of the Cristobal Branch
Of "the Ford Motor Company, ar- Westlnghouse Electric Corp.. is
ta Panama yesterday to making a rugged daylight signal
Fighting Spreads
Across Colombia
BOGOTA, Feb. 16 (UP) Co-
lombia's Conseravtlve govern-
ment announced today that
there will be no let up in the
armed campaign to put down
the "revolution" which has
now extended practically all
over the country.
War Minister Jose Maria Ber-
nal declared today that clashes
between the armed forces and
"roving bands'* have occurred
In 11 of the 15 Departments of
Colombia.
In a statarnent to '" Liberal
party newsi.per "El Tiempo,"
Bernal desalted the battles
for the time as a nationalist
revolution.
Signal Lamp Defies Sun
CLEVELAND. O. (UP) The
preside over the motor bealers
convention which opened this
morning at Hotel El Panama.
JkuKK is now export manager
for the Ford Motor Company.
with headquarters in New York.
lamp for Navy minesweepers.
The 50.000.000 candlepower type
is capable of sending dot-dash
signals In daylight that can be
Rev. Dannenfeldt
Guest Speaker At
Lutheran Church
The Rev. Doctor Paul L. Dan-
nenfeldt of Fort Wayne. Indiana,
arrived at Tocumen Airport Fri-
day night and is the guest of the
Redeemer Lutheran Church of
Balboa and its pastor, the Rev.
Herbert T. Bern thai.
Dr. Dannenfeldt is the chair-
man of the Armed Services Com-
mission of the Lutheran Church
Missouri Synod which serves in
a supervisory capacity with re-
spect to the work of the Luther-
an Church In the Canal Zone.
A Potluck Supper and Fellow
ship Evening will be held in the
Doctor's honor Sunday evening
at 6:30 in -the Lutheran Service
Center. Members and friends of
the congregation are cordially
invited.
The four, who will be banned
from federal employment during
the next six months, are Edward
J. Scannell, former Acting Divi-
sion Chief at Lawrence; Joseph
Stanley of Worchester; Ray-
mond C. Paten, Assistant Divi-
sion Chief at Boston, and
Michael V. OToole, Assistant
Division Chief at Worcester.
Cleared of the charges were
John J. McDonald, Frank E.
Green, Martin P. Hlggins, Law-
rence W. Chandler and Thomas
A. Kearns.
Jacksonville Mayor
Admits There Is
Prostitution In City
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Feb. 16
(UP)Mayor Hay don Burns of
Jacksonville, unlike many an-
other Southern mayor, admitted
today that Look magazine had a
point when it said .there was
prostitution in Jacksonville and
gave the city a ''poor" vice rat-
ing.
He placed blame for It largely
upon the police force and the
courts.
"The Look story has been at-
tacked by the American Social
Hygiene Association as being
predicted on obsolete and dis-
torted information," said Burns.
The mayor said no delegation
had called on him for informa-
tion on the subject in two and
a half years, but "we admit that
the prostitution activities In
the Jacksonville area have much
to be desired."
*
'1 have repeatedly brought
the matter to the attention of
the public, even to the point of
6resenting the facts to the
aptist minister's conference
and personally directing raids
against known brothels which
the police department and the
courts have failed to suppress."
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
Bids for work In connection
with the Panama Canal. Co's.
quarters construction program
expected to cost in the neighbor-
hood of $5,000,000 will be opened
at Balboa Heights Monday morn-
ing.
The bids are for both grading
and house buildings which are
divided into six major projects.
This Is the second and last of the
major group projects advertised
together in this fiscal year's
building program.
Included in this group will be
the grading and other municipal
work at Summit which was ad-
vertised in the first group. The
bids on this work were rejected
and it was advertised with
some modification of the work
to be done.
Prospective bidders have been
notified that they may enter al-
ternate lump sum- bids for each
project based on their purchase
of construction material in the
open market:
The original specifications pro-
vided that bidders base their of-
fers on the proviso that certain
standard materials on a manda-
tory list be purchased from the
Division of Storehouses at fixed
prices. This will be the first time
that this provision has been
made for bids in the present
quarters construction program.
In addition to the Summit
work, previously advertised, the
following are the five major pro-
jects on which bids will be open-
ed Monday:
Clearing, rough grading, and
site preparation in the new lo-
cal-rate town of Cardenas. In-
cluded in this work will also be
the construction and installation
of an access road and certain
utilities.
Construction of 131 family
quarters, containing 148 apart-
ments, in the Margarita townsite
extension which was graded by
Canal forces last dry* season;
additional grading in other areas
and all streets and utilities re-
quired for the new quarters.
Construction of ten one-family
houses In Gatun.
Clearing. Tough grading and
other site preparation for an ad-
ditional townsite extension at
Margarita, where construction of
quarters is planned for next
year.
Construction of two concrete
water tanks with supply Unes
and a service road ih the new
UB.-rate town of Summit.
All of the houses at Margarita
and Gatun for wrllch bids are to
be opened will be masonry struc-
tures. The houses at Gatun,
which will be located on the east
side of Jadwln Road, will be six
two-bedroom houses and four
three-bedroom houses.
(NBA Radlo-Telephoto)
ANDY'S A CHAMP America s Andrea Mead Lawrence (center!, 19-year-old Rutland, Vt.,
skier, is congratulated by the runners-up in Oslo, Norway, after winning the women's giant
slalom ski race as the Winter Olympics opened. 'Second was'Austria's Dagmar Rom (right)
and third was Annemarle Buchner (left), of Germany. Mrs. Lawrence, when she was 15,
trailed Gretchen Fraser of the UB., who won the event in 1048 to become the first Ameri-
can to win an Olympic ski championship.
8 N.Y. Teachers
Balk At Query
On Red Ties
NEW YORK. (USIS) Feb. 16
Eight teachers who refused to
say whether they were Commun-
|lst party members were suspend-
ed without pay On Jan. 31 by Dr.
William Jansen, Superintendent
I of Schools and will face depart-
mental trials soon, the New York
Timse reported recently.
Last year, eight other teachers
were dismissed after slmilai
hearings.
Dr. Jansen observed that last
year's trials had established that
"the political existence of the
Communist party does not give
Its members a 'cloak of immuni-
ty' to practice un-American ac-
tivities."
Dr. Jansen filed charges of
'insubordination and conduct
unbecoming a teacher" against
the present group and stated
I that the Board f Education
i would receive the charges at a
scheduled public meeting in
Brooklyn before a nine man
board, which will appoint a trial
examiner to announce a date for
the hearings.
Like last year's dismissals, the
suspended teachers are members
or executives of the Teachers
Union. Local 555, United Public
Workers, independent. The un-
ion has been banned by the
Board of Education from all offi-
cial dealings with the public
school system o the ground of al-
leged pro-Communist leanings.
Acceptance Of US
Aid Pact Creates
Indonesian Crisis
JAKARTA, Feb. 16 (UP)
Foreign Minister Achmad Su-
bardjos" acceptance of the Uni-
ted States Mutual Security Aid*
for Indonesia today threatened
to topple both him arid his cab-
inet from office.
The Cabinet was expected to
fall this week-end after the Na-
tionalist PNI Party, the country's
second largest, added Its weight
to those disapproving Subard-
Jos* action- and calling for the
government's resignation.
Subardjos accepted American
aid several weeks ago under cer-
tain conditions without inform-
ing either the Parliament or Ca-
binet.
He said however, that he had
the agreement of Premier Sukl-
man Wirjovndjo.
Moderate Quakes
Recorded Here
Moderate quakes were record-
ed on the Balboa Heights seis-
mograph between 4:03 p. m.
and 4:30 p. m. on February 14.
The estimated distance from
Balboa was 205 miles.
There is no estimate of the
intensity or the direction.
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
Max Stempel's
Mother Dies In NY
Word has been received on
the Isthmus of the death of
Mrs. Doueclne Stempel in New
York City.
Her son. Max R. Stempel, pro-
minent Panama businessman,
was in New York at the time
of, her death.
Mrs. Stempel is also survived
by another son, Paul, of Cara-
cas, Venezuela, two sisters, both
in New York, several grand-
children and one great-grand-
child.
She was 87 years old.
Tickets For Cop's
Ball Going Fast
Tickets for the Atlantic Sida
Policeman's ball are going fast,
it was reported today by Robert
LaPorta, chairman of the ball
committee.
The ball Will be held on Fell.
22 at the Stranger's Club in Co-
lon starting tijun. and will
be the 14th heloTSy cinal Zone
policemen on the Atlantic 81d-.
The $1 admission price will
cover music for continuous
dancing by Lam's orchestra and
the 71st Army Band and severul
novelties and surprises.
Reservations for the ball can
be made by telephone at 3-2111.
This is also extensive to those
who have already bought tickets
but have not made table reser-
vations.
T"
Blds on the first major group
of projects In this year's building
program were opened late last
month and contracts have been
awarded on this work with the
exception of the work at Sum-
SBlt.
Ft. Kobbe Stages Full-Scale
Night Disaster Relief Drill
Dr. Dannenfeldt will address
the congregation after the morn-
ing service and will also inform-
ally speak to the gathering In the
read at five miles, the company Ievening. He last visited the Zone
said. i about two years ago. '
io moa tooth dkay T-
No other tooth pasta, ammoaiated
or regular, has been proved batter
I PAN A
TOOTH PASTE
Under conditions designed to
simulate a real disaster, wives
and dependents of Army, Navy
and civilian personnel living In
the ForACobbe Disaster Control
Zone recently participated ta
the first full-scale night disaster
relief drill to be conducted ta
the Pacific Sector.
A total of 250 women, all re-
cent graduates of Disaster Con-
trol First Aid classes, Joined ta
the problem which lasted from
7 to 9 p. m. Under the super-
vision of-the Disaster Control
Section of the 33rd Infantry
Regiment, the problem was con-
ducted in the same manner as
one held ta the Fort Amador
Zone last December.
The fact that It was conducted
at night gave Disaster Control
planners an idea of how the
teams would react under con-
ditions of darkness.
Organised into first-aid teams,
the women searched their pre-
designated sones for "victims"
of the stuck and treated them
as though they were real
casualties.
Husbands and children of the
first aid workers were placed
throughout the area as "casual-
ties" with their theoretical In-
juries marked on a card.
"Wounds" were treated with
splints, slings and bandages as
though the person Were really
injured.
A part of the drill required
that the quarters area of Kobbe
be blacked out. The area was
divided into 16 sub-rones with
"casualties" placed ta every
section. Each team of workers
was responsible for a specific
one.
Capt. Fred Huff, an officer of
the 33rd Infantry's Disaster
Control Section, supervised the
entire exercise. He expressed
satisfaction with the results and
complimented the women work-
ers on the enthusiasm and
teamwork displayed throughout
the
"Yes, I always order White Horse
For every man whose palate is responsive to fine flavour,
here is the whisky of his choke. White Horse 1 Smooth
to the taste; mellow because it has been so long maturing;
made among those Scottish hills where Scotsmen and
their fathers and forefathers before them have perfected
the art of distilling beyond all comparison. How can you
be sure of always enjoying such truly fine whisky? By
always asking for White Horse by name.
WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky
A pleasure to remembera jay to see again
S*k Di,**-/.- COMPAA CTXNOS SJL COLON & PANAMA
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