The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01383

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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menean
CANADIAN WHI
L#f i/te pwp/> /mot (/be truth and the country it a/V* Abraham Lincoln.
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suiMiHMrtMWhi
rWENTT*8EVENTH IEAR
PANAMA, P.. THTJBBDAT, FEBRUARY 14, IMS
FTVE CENTS
1 P
PC
Cola'
Clarke To Be Freed On Bail;
Kubski Said 'Much Better'
'- o
(NEA Radlo-Telephoto)
CORNERING A RIOTER Pails police close In on m fleeing rioter In the CommunW-called
teuton? the huge Renault auto pUnt. A force of 80,000 rlotSpncmobUlze|Fas 7000 strik-
ers tried to prevent about 38.000 workers from returning to their job after lunch. Strikers
hurled scrap metal and stones at the police from rooftops._______________ ,
iwt
WANTS TO STAY M. A. Nassef, former press attache of
the Egyptian Embassy In Washington, wants to stay In the
VS., although he's been recalled by his government. Nassef,
shown with his wife, denounced the Egyptian government
for trying to force his wife, thrae children and himself to
return home.
CAB Reports
2 Motors Out
As DG-6 Fell
ELIZABETH, New Jersey; Teto
14 (UP)-One engine was not
working, and the propeller o a
second engine was spinning In
reverse when a National Air-
lines DC-fl crashed here Monday
with the loss of 33 lives, Civil
Aeronautics Board investigators
reported today.
The report said malfunction-
ing of the two starboard en-
gines caused the DC-8 to crash
Into Elizabeth' residential sec-
tion shortly after taking off
from nearby Newark airport.
The starboard outer engine,
which stopped completely before
the plane crashed, had lea than
87 flying hours to go before be-
ing due for a major overhear
under CAB regulations.
Vlbert Clarke, star Panaman-
ian baseball pitcher who was be-
in* held bv Panama police since
last Friday when he slugged Al
Kubskl. American player-mana-
ger of an opposing team, was or-
dered released on ball today.
The judge of the Fifth Muni-
cipal Court here set Clarke's bail
at $100.
Meanwhile. Kubskl. although
still In Santo Tomas Hospital
under observation, said today he
was "feelins fine" and expected
to be out of the hospital in a few
days.
However. Dr. Adolfo Malo, who
diagnosed a probable skull frac-
ture when Kubskl first entered
the hospital could not be located
today for a report on the player-
manager' true condition.
A hospital spokesman aid to-
day that Kubskl was "much bet-
ter."
Kubskl was punched on the
head by Clark when the former
turned to walk away following
an argument in which Clarke
challenged Kubskl to fight.
Kubskl answered that he would
If Clarke took sil the things he
had out of his pockets. When
someone >t between trie two
men and Kubskl started to walk
wav Clarke swung his fist. In
which some witnesses ay he
held a closed pocket-knife.
The blow caught Kubskl on
the head and knocked him to the
ground where he hit his head
against the pavement.
5th AF Defends Wises;
Counts Gains In Combat
o
STH AIR FORCE HEADQUAR-
TERS, Korea, Feb. 14 (UP)
The U.8. 8th Air Force has lost
nearly twice as many planes as
It has shot down since the be*
tlnnlr.g of the Korean war, but
he losses are "not high in com-
parison to what is being aceom-
lished," Lt. Gen. Frank F.
verest, commander of the fore,
aid today.
Communist plaste, loss*
woul* have been peajnr-lf rKrf
not accomplished with their air
force anything comparing1, to the
ccomplishments f the 5th Air
Force/'
He said the 5th Aif Fore ha
been meeting the Communists
very successfully in the, air
while carrying out "Operation
Strangle against enemy sup-
plies and communications at
wesamejime.
he last ilTmon'S
Currency Revalued
In Israel's Move
To Hall Inflation
we have been, Everest said in
an Interview. "But the Com-
munists have not been flying
offensive missions over our ter-
ritory as wa have over theirs.''
He said the 5th Air Force has
lost 488 planes since the start
of the war. compared with 343
Communist planes definitely ac-
counted for by 5th Air Force
pilots.
"The only place where there
is a basis for comparison be-
tween the 5th Air Force and the
Communist Air Force is in re-
suits of air-to-ait combat be-
tween the two," Everest said,
"and in that field their losses
are more than four times great-
er than ours."
He said 5th Air Force pilots
have shot down 186 Communist
MIO-15 jet fighters while los-
Panama C Of C Lists
Charges Against Zone
l While members of the Panama Chamber of Commerce were complaining in a
special meeting yesterday that the Commissary Division's manufacture of soda drinks
was a breach of the 1936 treaty between Panama and the United States, the Panama
Canal Company announced it was discontinuing the manufacture of bottled "cola"
products.
The Chamber of Commerce complained that the US Government activities in this
line caused "an appreciable decrease in the opportunities" of the Panamanian sod*
bottling industry to benefit from the Canal Zone market.
The PanConal announced that after present stocks are exhausted, only "cola"
products bottled in the Republic of Panama will be sold in retail stores in the Zone.
TEL AVTV. Israel, Feb. 14
(UP)The new State of Israel
ridden by economic crisis
has revalued its currency in a
drastic bid to curb Inflation,
encourage the flow of foreign
capital, and Increase product-
ivity. '
Premier David Ben Grion,
speaking In the Kneset (Par-
liament) announced these "halt
Inflation" charges:
The pound sterling,, offlclally
valued at $2.80 will be cut to
$1 per pound for foreign In-
vestments.
It will be cut to $1.40 par
pound for tourists and diplo-
mats, and for Imports of such
commodities as meat, fish, cof-
fee, tea and medical supplies.
Investors will no longer have
to turo over $1 at the official
rate of exchange for every
dollar's worth of captol trans-
fer-
'" enorinous. Look at the* 5*.
"[, ** cuts, 18,000. Troop
killed, 18,000. Locomotive des-
troyed, 200and 240 more dam-
aged. There have been 210
bridge knocked out and 77
more damaged. Twenty five
thousand Vehicles have been de-
stroyed, and some 285 supply,
ammunition and fuel dump
W. F. Houx, 83,
Dies In States
fwWof(l*.,,t8 been received on
the Isthmus of the death In
2? Bernardino, California, of
William F. Houx, former resi-
dent of the Canal Zone.
Mr. Houx who died last Sun-
day was 83 years old.
He is irarvived by a daughter
Mrs. J. H. Richardson of Gam-
boa a son. Allen Houx who
works for the U. 8. Army at
corozal and five grandchildren.
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
lng 39 Jets and four
driven planes In air
propeller-
ir ba
ven planes In air battles
with the Reds. Besides these de-
finite "kills," the 5th Air Force
has listed 35 MIO-15s as prob-
ably destroyed and 369 as dam-
aged,
"Instead of risking planes by
attacking targets in South Ko-
rea, the Communists have re-
mained pretty much at home
and near the Yalu River." Eve-
rest said. "Therefore, they have
Freedom Crusade
His $527 Al End
Of Drive's 1st Day
In the first day of the Isth-
mian Crusade for Freedom drive
over $527 was collected, accord-
ing to a report today from the
chairman of the Fund-Raising
committee William Schmltt.
The ten-day drive which ends
February 22 will raise funds for
the Freedom Stations combat-
ting Soviet propaganda.
Tesjterday the solicitation
committee1 teams were collect-
ing signatures for the Crusade's
Freedom Scrolls, as well as ac-
cepting centributlons to the
But the Panama Canal Com-
pany made no such prompt an-
swer to the Chamber of Com-
merce's formal and Informal
allegations of treaty breaches
In upwards of a dozen pther re-
gards.
Attending the Chamber of
Commerce meeting was Peter
Beasiey, personal representative
In the Canal Zone of the chair-
man of the. board of directors
of the Panama Canal Company.
Beasiey, who Is also con-
sultant to Araay Secretary
Frgnk C. Face, Jr., said he at-
tended the meeting an his
ewn and wrtheat any definite
authority. He said he only
wanted to hear the claims f
keth Canal Zesje aetherlils
*sM II
Fletares of the situ
The meeting, at which Beas-
iey was handed a memorandum
containing five specific com-
C'nts on practices by Canal
e authorities which are con-
sidered detrimental to the best
Interests of Panamanian busi-
ness men, was called by Foreign
Minister Ignacio Molino.
After listening to a lengthy
dissertation by former President
Ricardo J. Altaro. Beasiey asked
whether the problems outlined
had ever been carried "on a
governmental level to a govern-
mental level on the other side."
This and other questions
brought some replies from In-
dividual businessmen who at-
tended the meeting, but ef-
forts to get an official word
from Molino proved fruitless.
Molino said: "As Minister of
Foreign Relations I cannot give
an opinion. You businessmen
must prove these (treaty) viola-
tions to Mr. Beasiey directly."
' la addition to the five spe-
cific charges presented by the
Chamber of Commerce, a num-
ber of businessmen got m
daring the meeting to air in-
dividual complaint* against
the Canal Zone government.
These complaints included:
1The illegal manufacture of
ceramics and tiles In the Canal
Zone by a private company.
2.Discrimination agaihat gra-
duate Panamanian engineers
who are employed In the Canal
Zone at lower salaries than
Americans of the ame expe-
rience .
3.An attempt by the Panam
Canal Company to deal directly
with VS. magazine publishers in-
stead of through Agenda Steers,
local magazine distributing a-
gency-and
4 The operation of building
contractors in the Canal Zone
after their contracts had explr-
M
because of the fact that authori-
ties of the Canal Zone have de-
cided to undertake the same in-
dustry, or to expand their activi-
ties In the same line of business."
In this connection, the memo-
randum cited two cases:
La Estrella Company, milk pro-
ducers, was promised a large or-
der from the Zone. After ft had
enlarged Its plant and bought
additional equipment, the com-
pany was advised "that the Gov-
ernment of the Zone would not
purchase the additional amounts
which lt had Indicated lt waa
ready to buy."
A spokesman at Balboa
Heights today said that the
Canal I
La Esto
would appoint a com-
draft a petition to Ca-
nal Zone authorities.
1) The enforcement in the Ca-
nal Zone of the Buy American
Act, which "provides that all
goods and products of the same
quality as those produced in the
united States must be bought in
the Canal Zone at a price at least
25 per cent under the prevailing
prise in Panam.. The practice
imposed by that law has natur-
ally had the result, highly re-
sented in the Panamanian com-
munity, that, for example, ce-
ment, ceramics, and other con-
struction materials, which are
products of Panamanian indus-
try, are sold in Panam at a price
25 per cent higher than in the
Canal Zone.
2) "...The Government of the
United States in the Canal,Zone
has gone Into commercial or in-
dustrial activities for the pur-
pose of producing In the Canal
Zone those articles which Pana-
manian commerce and industry
have shown themselves capable
of supplying...There have been
placed _
company
Their ewn milk net-
tling plant, that Is new being
modernised, waa first complet-
ed In 1918.
3) The award of a contract t*J
a private bus company to oper-
ate between the Navy west Bank
base and the Panam boundary.
"By virtue of this contract,1' the
memorandum said, "the private
company which furnishes this
service obtains its gasoline and
possibly other materials In the
Canal Zone, i.e., duty-free, thus
enjoying exemptions and privil-
eges that can be claimed only by
the Government of the United
States...The concessions made
by Panam to the United States
are not transferable to third par-
ties, entities or governments. On
the other hand. Article in, Sec-
tion 5 of the Treaty of 1938 and
the notes exchanged on Marsh
2nd on that year on the* same
question, stipulate flatly that
after the Treaty went Into force,
no new private enterprise may be
established in the Canal Zone
that has no direct relation to the
operation, maintenance, sanita-
tion and protection of the Canal,
ffV-il- *.** M*c ucou *..*#.. *.,w i# ^nv-ww,i wa Mac \smiimi,
cases in which a given (Panama- or that is not a concern engaged
nlan) industry...haa faced loss-1
es or dterrsptton of its buslne.- (Continued on Page 3. Cel. 4)

Panama's First Dog Showing Success;
Best-ln-Show Gets CupAnd Dogfood
'Panamanian nnlfhmm,!," ,rf^ /-TI..U ...__. n_______._ ~. F
yeatorday with blooded Dalma- show, for charity. ^
a^kLSTHL^ "** kenBeU ot Doa HeUodora A. de Arose-
pKS"'- .. .., mena, the First Lady of Panama
e/0dles exonan- d Mrs- Francis K. Newcomer.
o!52^niook?. *lfe of ^e Governor of the Ca-
hJ3r^ mn poBce d0Ka led tne nal Zone, headed a large crowd
t i .n -, .* 4.*. of notables, dog lovers and exhib-
.?'L***-*11 ** of th* Pfct"* itors who took over the track
the Inter American Women's
_ (NA Telephoto)
WALKED AWAY Preparing to leave Elisabeth. HJ., Gen-
eral Hospital five-year-old Patricia Clausen has her new
bonnet tied on by student nurse Margaret Kaylor. The girl
was traveling to Florida with her parents on the ill-fated
DC-8 which crashed in Elizabeth. Her mother waa killed,
and her father la till Hated In critical condition.
Two trespassers were fined
$10 each in the Balboa Magis-
trate's court this morning.
Alejandro Carrasquilla, 3t,
was found trespassing in the
Tivoll Commissary and Miguel
Espino. 44, was apprehended in
the La Boca Commissary. Both
defendants are Panamanian.
Fiar failing to keep to the aft
of the road when she was pass-
ing a car on Fourth of July
Avenue, a 38-year-old American,
Helen Hazrell, wa fined $15.
Pre-eampaign pledges Tues-
day totalled $350 The additional
$177 was gathered during yes-
terday's solicitations.
Two all-star tesms of the At-
lantic Little League will play an
;hlbltion game of three in-
nings Sunday afternoon a a
benefit for the Crusade for
Freedom campaign.
This game will be played prior
to the one at the Mount Hope
Stadium between the Panam
All-Stars made up of the Spur
Cola team and the Cervecera
teams of the, Panama Profes-
sional League.
Official Rawings baseball*
worth about $028 were donated
by Martin Olaagall of the Uni-
versal Sport Company.
La Boca Boy, 8,
Runs Into Avio,
Fractures Leg

The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
BALBOA TIDES
BTJGH
$:$ a. as,
ueep.,.
To "Queenle" russet-
brown Irish setter entered by A.
O Mills, went too honors a
cud and a can of "Dash" dog-
food.
The second Drize, blue' ribbon.
run end rations, went to
"Chamo." a German Shenherrt
Doe. owner. John F. Drnck: Sd
prize to Nlcolette Akl. a ftamo-
yede owned bv Mrs. H. E. Whoel-
hoTJmf i. nSaTiiSSS?^ *k 4th w* Boxer "Mis."
after kJ'iJrTCte xi%E? l^^J,r?2.^*S2oJ Terrier Orenarer* Genoveva.
taMonwafon on La Boca Road' ned ^ ^ o.^,,. 0 *
The injured child. WBUsun "VT,0- W1___
Harewood. ran tato the left front! .ther bJue Potocos were won
fender of a Chevrolet tatta!*1' Mercedes Tonne's Prt"^w8.
wagon driven by Joan ArrochsJ*an8rn'1 Poorh Class: M's. Ptttn
de Obarrlo's West HfcrMend
White Terrier Aree of Cran-
btvnrne: Robert McCrath's Ldv
JIH nf roco del Mar: Rosario Or-
thj de ytrwllo. heeww* ton Bull rhiim: Geoeus, BU*1
Boston vil Loca' Pto: M-ria
. .An,y*n* J"* ." Lady* tool's Boston Pn Linda Lou:
handbag in Diablo? Or a stnaj|n,TM c RT,n-a nreat Tane
and a hammock? InorheM Not* < nPwa: RoKert
a 34-year-old Panamanian.
Lady1! Hurfta* _
Amono; kens Fond
The Balboa Police are looking
for the owners of this utoueitj,
and thd Items may be claimed
ic at the sta-
LOW
11:14 p m. by Identifying
le>rtmate's DHmation nuttnn
Tft Dr Manuel CenrM-'a Col-
lie nw Abraham B*ndett!'s '"Id
*ngllsh Shepherd Doe. Don Pis-
co
m BOG'S SMALLER than yours, but he's Just


mta

THE PANAM AMERICAN
INC.
WMir MB Uui St TM MANAMA AMUHICAN PSISS
rauNMk iv NKkSON HUNIIVIU iN in
MODIO ARIAS. IPITOA
t M STRUT O 6* <>!* P*" *
riit#iJ6*t lNs N6 S OT40 'B UNlt>
CU ADSRt MUA*t#lCA*. >*NM
0L* OrtlCt- 1 17 ClTRl AvfXUl BITWIIX 11TM NB ISTH STRirT
roRtfSW rRttNTlvM JMU* B OWtl! INC
S4R MniON AV NkVk YORK. 11*1 N V.
toei Van
ID MONTH IK bvMOt -------....... i t '<> 1S 00
SIX MONTHS. IN *0VN8S i .. .55? & "
4NF V* THE PANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT lMlt ffeWSPAPW
THURSDAY FEBRUARY 1, 195
s.
re*
THI> i> rOUl OHUM TMI KIAMM 0W*r C0A.UMN
THE MAIL BOX
Labor News
Add
Comment
Looks Like We Are Being Taken for a Ride

TthV Mall Ae n on opsn foran to iwmii of Ths mo Asmk-
Ma Len.n Si c.irtd srsreMly .nd or. honal.s Ht wfcoMy COS-
tlsVntial manntr.
I ou contribus Irtte. don I bt imparwRT I H MM pps ***
soiI d> Istlsll en ssblishcd m th order rretived.
Prssts try Is keep th NrtUn limiltd lo bM pOf Itsffh.
IdenMry t MtM WMsn n MM in trlct conl.s.net
Th Rwpssi iiiumn no rstpomrkillfy for ttotsmenti oi opinion!
SSi ...! I* MtfWI Vas* rssssrt.

STAMPS WANTED

Miss Jan Harman
c/o Mrs. A. Morrison, .
169 Connels Point Rd.,
South Hurstvllle,
NSW, AUSTRALIA.
DMr Mr:
I Ana A nurse and try to help patients collect stamps. I am
writing to see If you could help me through your paper, as some
of ycur readers may have stamps that ar of no use to them.
Jean Harman.

GRINGO OBJECTS TO COLOMBIAN'S CRITICISM
or COLON
Colon, Rep. of Panama.
Mail Box Editor,
Tie Panama American Publishing Co.,
Panama Rep. of Panama.
I Sir
This is not a complaint: it Is Just a friendly warning to a
; IMui.rdo Castao C, General Manager of Parke Davis Inter-
. American Corp operating In the Free Zone of Colon.
This unusual person should refrain from making such gross,
I out-of-proportlon statements As printed last week In a newa-
p*pei of this locality. This is not the first time he has knock-
1 ed this small but beautiful city of Colon, both in print and
. otherwise. The situation as exists, financially and morally.
I vltht be a Uttlt rough around the edges In this here little town
(After all isn't It worse the world over?i bat not as bad as this
I character paints It.
The sooner Castao gets off his high horse and realize that
I he definitely Is not the Redeemer of Colon, the better off he
; would be. Should he maintain this attitude, I am sure he wHl
I bt run out of town, much to the detriment for Parke Davis
fnteramerlcan Corp. thru bad publicity, but perfectly justified
; for this *roud City.
A Gringo.
..... o
NAVY MAN DISLIKES QUARTERS POLICIES
t
Editor:
I would appreciate a logical answer to the manner in which
the Navy is assigning quarters in the townslte of Cocoli. There
seen.* to be some inconsistency In the method they are current*
using. The Navy has gone on record and established a de-
finite policy on the assigning of quarters. This Is understand-
able Any operation of necessity requires an operational pro-
eedure. Once this procedure Is set up it should be the govern-
ine tactor In administering the operation. Any person subject
i to the procedure once it is adopted can resign himself to the
tact that this procedure must be followed.
I WAat happetis when th* procedure Is modifies, to accommo-
jLfat* the desires of the enforcing personnel?. t
The answer Is simple; loss of respect for the persons,respon-
sible for the procedure and general discontent among Nivy per-
sonnel.
.
: The Army, Air Force and Panama Canal Company respect
the service, grade and value of the persons to whom they aa-
; sien quarters. These are established rules and are followed.
Not so in Cocoli. The rule as set states that to occupy a
duplex you must have a family of not less that three members,
I in addition you must be a petty officer of the first three pay
firades. Civilians also should be of a certain grade and meet
the same family requirements.
Yet civilian employes who do not meet these requirements
are /ranted assignments to duplexes and cottags. Possibly these
i. assignments are intended to be the exceptions to prove the rule.
The Army, Air Force and Panama Canal consider the com-
, fcrt and morale of their personnel realizing the benefits to be
derived from such consideration. Would these agencies assign
choice quarters to non agency members? The answer Is obvious
and why should they?
Their individual morale problem Is their own and realizing
thi thev endeavor to arrive At a solution beneficial to their
, eency. Asslenments in Cocoli are made to Army and Air Force
. personnel both military and civilian completely oblivious to the
I rights of Naval personnel.
Also assignments to select civilians are made; these aaslgn-
; ments are made despite the set procedure which requires a fa-
j sBilv of not less than three persons.
What possible right does an Army man have to occupy Navy
OUkiters when these same ouarters are requested by Naval per-
sonnel? Would the Army or Air Force assign like quarters to
Navy men?
I would appreciate answers to these questions. I doubt that
I am alone, many persons are Interested in the answers. The
jet procedures are being violated dailv: if these procedures are
to be the determining factors in quarters assignments I believe
thev should be followed.
Equality to the essence of contented personnel thinking
i long these lines a satisfactory solution can be attained.
N**y Ma.
By Victor Riesel
Now here's a real switch. The
comrades have tapped the FBI.
And they're so pleased with
what they got on their tape
recorder they've broadcast It
across the Pacific on a Hawai-
ian territory-wide radio net-
work.
Of course, they only threw
on the ether the censored ver-
sion of a talk between two
FBI agents and a former Ma-
rine whom the FBI had good
reason to believe put his coun-
try before Harry Bridges.
Since the comrades scream
so against censorship, this is
just the place to tell the full
story while they're crowing
over their coup and make
them eat a little of It.
Let's take it from the be-
ginning. Which it the af-
ternoon of last t>ec. it in
Honolulu. Two FBI agents,
Jimmy Condon and Dick
Burrus, have an appoint-
ment with David Thomp-
son, educational director on
the Island of the Parly-
line international Long-
shoremen's and Warehouse
Workers Union, led by
guess wholHarry Bridges.
This icos one of many ren-
dezvous between the agents
and Thompson, a chap with
a Marine Corps reserve com-
mission. Thompson had In-
dicated he wanted to break
with, the pro-Soviet crowd
Since this was a chap off the
Marine Corps' medically re-
tired list, the Bureau peeled
off two of Its agents and they
worked closely with Thompson.
When he invited them to his
home after several sessions,
they went hardly naive..
men, these trained agents.
But they had reason to be-
lieve that Thompson was will-
ing to help his government's
effort to clean up the vital
Hawaiian outposts.
Had Harry Bridges' publicity
director on the Islands, a fel-
low called Robert McElrath,
been a better technician, his
recording would have proved to
the network listeners, as well
as to Brother Bridges, that
Thompson was cooperating with
the FBI and had given the
agents considerable valuable in-
formation.
In fact, there Is the general
Impression that Thompson did
not, know that his talk was be-
ing ',-"bugged." However, only
Thompson can clear up that
one.
[flff MERRY- (50- ROUND
The Stakes Were Big
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
Voo don't hive l.
it from thr
KMMtopt. Sell by
Mferttiat in oar
tow cost wast ad
flctioa... the fist-
on. most coflvoni*
eat way to reach
L Every moot* every week every day
THE PANAMA AMEITfCAN carries MORE WANT ADS
*aa all other daily papers in Panam conUaed !
// he did know and will-
ingly permitted McElrath
to hide a microphone in his
livingroom, run a wire down
to the basement to a tape
recorder and deliberately
set out to deceive repre-
sentatives of the FBI, and,
in effect, the Justic Dept.,
then let's have- it on re-
cord. Make a mighty fine
thing to hand down to his
kids. They'll be so awfully
proud of htm.
At one point, one agent said,
as simply and sincerely as he
could, that the FBI was not In-
terested In legitimate trade
union activities nor in splitting
a union.
The Bureau was interested in
Communist Infiltration, it was
said. And any fight against
Party dogma and control was
a fight for clean and effective
unionism.
Furthermore, It was pointed
out to Thompson that since
Harry Bridges' union waa split
over Communism, the ex-Ma-
rine could do himself and his
union a great service if he
could get the Hawaiian division
to go on record against Com-
munism at a convention then
scheduled to open Feb. 2.
Thompson pointed out
that the boss of the union
was Jack Hall, whose com-
radely discipline is only
slightly less rigid than Har-
ry Bruges' devotion to the
dogma. In Hawaii, Hall it
boss of all operatitns. and
Thompson indicated that
nothing could be done
without his tupport. The
agents then asked Thomp-
son to be their intermedia-
ry tn an attempt to con-
vince H0 to break with
Bridges. The FBI men said
they hesitated to approach
Hall Jest he expose them.
This is the way Agent Con-
don put It:
"Well, our big worry would be
in talking with him in the
hope that he would be enough
of a man's man Just to talk
and If there was nothing there
for him, that's all there is to
it."
"If there's something for
him. to get in touch with the
guy who can lay It on the line
for him."
(Thia waa a reference to cer-
tain authorities who can grant
immunity if Hill told what he
knew of pro-Communist ac-
tivity in that midway point to
th* Orient, i
That's the "crime" of the
FBI in the comrades' books.
Just tmartne how 1 o n r
Thompson and McElrath and
Bridges and F*D would ]st i
they operated In the land the*
'ove, further west v^en 'i r
-n MVT hoot in the lace aw
i bullet In the neck.
WASHINGTON. Few ordinary voters have
ever neard of the Federal Power Commission, and
certainly no one knows Dale E. Doty, the career
official from the Interior Department whom the
President has just nominated as a Federal Pow-
er Commissioner. Yet this nomination represents
a vital turning point in a truly tigerish political
struggle, Waged for money stakes that should
impress anyone.
For example, just one of the Power Commls-
sion's recent rulings, freeing natural gas produc-
ers from* Federal control, is due to Increase the
bill of the nation's gas consumers by a couple of
hundred million dollars annually.
advisor Clark Clifford, who Is no a lawyer, with
the Phillips Petroleum Company among his
clients.
Besides these, other agents of the industry
worked to put over the industry nominee who got
the biggest play. Nelson Lee Smith's assistant,
William 8. Tarver.
There are excellent reasons to believe that the
word was passed, through subterranean chan-
nels that $600,000 of oil and natural gas money
would enrich the coffers of the Democratic Na-
tional Committee within a week after the day
Tarver's name went to Capitol Hill. Tarver was
warmly supported by^ the President's own aides,
And this same single ruling, Recording' to the ftrtd the consumers' candidates were damned, by
the same powerful voice, for "not being team
estimate of former power commission chairman
Leland Olds, Increased the value of the proven
natural gas reserves of just one corporation, the
Phillips Petroleum Company, by a cool of $700,-
000,000.
The Issue in this struggle was, very simply,
whether the natural gas and oil people would re-
tain control of this commission which IS sup-
posed to regulate them.
Some time ago, the Federal Power Commission
was captured for the natural gas industry by the
President's oil and gas millionaire friend, Sen-
ator Robert 8. Kerr of Oklahoma, who Is now
aspiring to the Presidency himself.
But the control was Jeopardized when Presi-
dential crony Mon C. Wallgren left the commis-
sion chairmanship, reportedly to take a fat Job
with a natural gas pipeline company.
Furthermore, the President then chose Thomas
Buchanan, the only commissioner who voted for
the consumers in the Phillips Petroleum case, to
succeed Wallgren in the chairmanship.
Hence it was essential for the Industry to get
a friend into the vacant commissioner's Job, in
order to hamstring the dangerous Buchanan.
The roster of the industry's forces In the fight
says a lot about the frustration of President Tru-
man's Fair Deal.
Senator Kerr, a serious aspirant for the Demo-
cratic Presidential nomination, was general-ln-
chlef on Capitol Hill. Federal Power Commission-
er Nelson Lee Smith, who had helped Kerr cap-
ture the commission for the natural gas people.
was Inside man on the commission.
And the allies at the White House were Presi-
dential aides Matt Connelly and Donald Dawson
and the man they used to hate, ex-presidentlal
players"a cardinal sfn in the Truman lexicon.
Moreover, when the President rejected Tarver,
the tactic of beating down the consumer's can-
didates, one by one, was adroitly used.
Nelson Lee Smith meanwhile, produced a swarm
of other candidates. And Senators Lyndon John-
son of Texas, Warren Magnuson of Washington
(who also produced one of the swarm of Industry
candidates from his own back office), and the
feeble Herbert O'Conor of Maryland were mobil-
ized to help the industry get Its way.
On the consumers' side of the fight, besides the
lonely Commissioner Buchanan, the chief forces
were a number of Northern Senators from nat-
ural gas consuming states; the labor groups: Sec-
retary of the Interior Oscar Chapman, and, sig-
nificantly enough, the new chairman of the De-
mocratic National Committee. Frank McKinney.
Before McKinney entered the struggle, the in-
dustry's friends had already knocked out the first
consumer-minded candidate, C. W. Smith, an able
nermsnent official of the power commission staff.
But McKinney waged a determined fight for the
second choice of the consumers' friends.
It may well be that even Doty will be fought
by the natural gas Industry's powerful friends in
the Senate. The Senators may also try to defeat
Commissioner Buchanan, when he comes up for
reappointment this year.
when so many hundreds of million of dollars
are involved, In bills for the nation's gas con-
sumers and/or profits for Phillips Petroleum
Company and the rest of the Industry, these bat-
tles are naturally hard-fought.
It must be added that they are a great deal
more Important than the doings of Theron Lamar
Caudle.
Guerrilla Fighters
ly Pete. Ed:on
WASHINGTON. (NEAi The question Of what
Is the most decisive weapon of the present cold
war, or what It will be If there is a hot one,
was raised recently at a War College lecture In
Washington.
The quick and easy answer was that it would
be the atomic bomb. Or maybe its successor,
the hydrogen bomb.
But William S. B. Lacv, who was delivering
the talk to future generals, admirals, staff offi-
cers and diplomats, had another answer.
It might be neither of these mass-destruction
weapons, he said.
Instead, the most effective weapon might be
found to be the single guerrilla soldier, flght-
The French have spent nearly three billion
dollars on tnis war. U. 8. arms Aid has amount-
ed to 300 million.
French, colonial and native Viet-Nam troop
have nevertheless been fought to a statemate by
the Viet-Mlnh Communists In the hills.
French casualties in the six years have been
ever 100,000, with 40,000 killed a fourth of
them Frenchmen.
It is no wonder that the French are tired ol
this war. Foreign Minister Robert Schuman hat
.nid that France would like an honorable peace.
The alternative Is more help. Time seams tc
p!av on the side of the guerrillas.
The number of Hukbalahaps, or Filipino Com-
Ing In loosely organized small bands In the jun- munlsts, is now believed to be going down grad-
gles and mountains of Asia.
At first the War College students were inclin-
ed to scoff at this idea. The more they thought
about it, the more they liked It.
William 8. B. Lacy makes no pretense of be-
ing a military authority or tactician. He is head
of South East Asian affairs in the Department
cf State.
He watches what goes on in the area from
Burma to Indochina and beyond to the Philip-
pine and Indonesian archipelagos. It is the
area where Jungle fighting is now general.
Against guerrilla fighters who can strike like
cobras and then fade into the Jungle, atomic
bombs are completely Ineffective, it takes a
different kind of warfare to win in this area.
The Japanese knew this. In their march down
the Malay peninsula, across the Philippines and
Indonesia almost to Australia, they fought jun-
gle warfare.
And It took Jungle warfare to drive them out.
Ask anyone who fought In the South PacUlc li-
la nd hopping.
In the past six yean, the Freneh and Vtet
S asneas forces in Indochina have had super tor-
v of firepower, though they mav net always
v* had superiority of manpower.
.oday their forces art About equal with ,-
pofimen apiece.
ually. At the start of this guerrilla insurrection
vhfch has now been going on over five years,
new recruits to the movement about equaled Its
casualties.
The Huks are now believed to number TOM to
8000. But they are backed up by 20,000 to 30,000
civilian sympathizers.
From April. 1950. to the end of 1M1, in which
the war against the Huks has been intensified,
the Philippine government has reported nearly
4000 Huks killed, 9000 captured and 5000 sur-
rendered.
But still the armed Communist guerrilla move-
ment persiste.
In recent official pronouncements since the
visit of British Prime Minister Winston Church-
ill to Washington, there have been intimations
that if the Communists opened any new offen-
sives, there would bt immediate reprisals.
The natural question is, "With what?"
The obvious conclusion Is that there la no
master strategy to step any such aatreaslon.
If there had been, it would have been used be-
fore.
MHW MAMO
Drew Pearson Says: Fertilizer shortage menace* food sup-
ply; Wedemeyer declines fat fee from Chinese; New
Hampshire test may damage Truman.
WASHINGTON.Secretary of Agriculture Brannan informed
a recent cabinet meeting that United States farmers would have
to get more fertilizer next year or the United States public might
get less food.
He aimed his remarks in the direction of Defense Moblllser
Wilson, complaining that at least three big fertilizer firms had
received tax-amortization certificates to build new plants then
failed to build them.
Meanwhile, the fact that they had received tax benefits from
I the government discouraged other companies from expanding
Wilson expressed complete agreement with Brannan's vlewa.
promised to investigate.
Simultaneously, Secretary Brannan's experts have come un
with some shocking statistics.
For every four people sitting down to a meal In this country
today, there will be a fifth person at the table In 1976.
Feeding the fifth mouth alone would take all the pork slaught-
ered last year In Nebraska and Iowa, plus all the cattlt market-
ed in Texas, Oklahoma and Minnesota, plus all the lambs sent
to market from Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Nevuda, plus all
the milk produced in Wisconsin, Michigan and New York, plus all
the eget produced in California, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois and
Pennsylvania.
Secretary of Agriculture Brannan Is so alarmed that he haa
ordered a drive in every rural country to step up farm production.
One of the factors handicapping him Is the manpower short-
age on farms which will soon be worse than the fertilizer shortage
if the armed forces keep up the present rate of calling men.
WEDEMRVER'S HUGE OFFER
The Inside story has never been told, but the Chinese Na-
tionalists secretly sounded out Lieut. Gen. Albert C. Wedemeyer
in September, 1949, about quitting the U. S. Army and taking
command of Chiang Kai-shek's retreating armiesfor a $5,000,000
fee.
The famous American general replied tactfully that, if the
Nationalists had that much money to spend, It should be usad to
improve Chinese living standards and strengthen the home front
against Communism.
Wedemeyer was sounded out by an American Intermediary,
aluminum magnate Louis Reynolds, who had close ties to Chiang
Kai-shek and called on the general twice. Wedemeyer later de-
livered his answer directly to the Chinese Embassy.
Next day, Chinese counselor Chen Chl-mal cabled a top-seetet
report to Chiang KaUshek, dated Sept. 16, 1949.
This column has been able to obtain a copy which reads as
follows:
"Yesterday my humble self, Chen Chl-mAi, met General Al-
bert Wedemeyer. General told me that an aluminum magnate, Mr.
Reynolds, relayed a message to him that the Chinese Oovernmtnt
intended to hire him at $5 million. If he would give up his mili-
tary career In the U. S. government to go to China to assist us in
the anti-Communist activities.
"Gen. Wedemeyer said he always has great sympathy toward
our anti-Communist policy, and especially holds you In great
esteem as a leader.
"He is willing to try his best whenever possible, if he finds
himself in a position to be of service to you as an individual.
"However, his opposition to the present U. 8. foreign policy is
a well-known fact. Therefore, If he comes to China as a private
citizen In a private capacity, it will be certain that he would not
be supported by the U. 8. government. So nothing can be accom-
plished.
"He also said he could get by financially. If we have such a
large sum of money, private or public, it should be used for the
welfare of the people in order to-ehhanee he forte against the
Communists."
WEDEMEYER AND SOAK THE RICH
When Interviewed by this column, Wedemeyer substantiated
the Incident, and also told how he had once tried to raise $10,-
000,000 to improve Chinese living standards by taking up a collec-
tion from .wealthy Chinese Nationalists.
As American commander in China, Wedemeyer said he obtain-
ed a confidential list of wealthy Chinese, then went to Chiang
Kai-shek to urge that these Chinese millionaires make personal
sacrifices to build schools, roads, and communications.
Such personal sacrifices from top Nationalists, Wedemeyer
argued, would restore the confidence of the Chinese people in the
Nationalist government:
Instead, the Generalissimo demanded Wedemeyer's list
wealthy Chinese, and hit the ceiling when Wedemeyer refused.
He explained that the list had been given to him. In confidence
and that Chiang should have no trouble compiling one of hie
own. The result was that Wedemeyer's plan was dropped.
Ironically, many of the Chinese on Wedemeyer's list reversed
his idea and grew rich on American aid. supposed to be used to
rehabilitate China and prevent Communism.
One of Chiang's brothers-in-law, H. H. Kung, blossomed from,
a Y.M.C. A. clerk to one of the wealthiest men in the world while-
handling U. 8. aid money.
Some Chinese millionaires have transferred their riches *e
the United States, Switzerland and BrazU while mora aid Is raised
from American taxpayers.
NOTESix months ago. this column exposed how the No. 1
Nationalist, Gen. C. J. Chou. put $460,000 into a private, fictitious
bank account out of funds supposed to be used to buy airplanes.
NEW HAMPSHIRE MISTAKE
From the point of view of the over-all Democratlc-Republlean
Presidential race, savvy Washington polticos privately agree that
President Truman made a serious error when he stayed in the
New Hampshire primary.
While he may be able to lick Kefauver, they say he will be
shown up as trailing far behind Eisenhower and Taft.
Reason is that New Hampshire primaries bring out a heavy
Republican vote, only a email portion of the Democratic vote.
With the annual town meetings held on primary day in 249
small towns throughout the state, rural residents quit work, pile
the children In the car, and head for the local town meeting.
Seventy per cent of the rural population votes Republican.
But In the cities, where Democrats are strong, no town meet-
ings are held, and only a handful of voters goes to the polls for
the primary elections.
As a result, some New Hampshire observers have warned the
Democratic National Committee privately that Truman will end
up with only a small fraction of the Taft-Elsenhower totals
about 8,000 against 50.000 for Eisenhower and 30,000 for Taft.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
When Maine's Sen. Owen Brewster showed up at the Senate
Foreign Relations committee after touring the world and paying
special homage to dictator Franco bf Spain. Sen. Tom Connelly of
Texas remarked: "Welcome back. General Franco."
Judge Oliver Carter, who ordered the Grand Jury investiga-
tion of the San Francisco Call-Bulletin after It exposed tax irregu-
larities, was put on the Federal bench as a reward for faithful
service rendered. He was chairman of the California Democratic
Committee.
Army Secretary Frank Pace is so disgusted with graft In the
Army's procurement division that he has suggested placing an
FBl man alongside every Army purchasing officer.
Field Marshal Montgomery has Indicated he may resign ra-
ther than serve under Field Marshall Alexander as British defense
minister. Montgomery and Alexander were wartime rivals for
the top command of the British army.
. Chinese-Americans arent the only ones paying blackmail to
the Communists to protect relatives behind the Iron Curtain. The
State Department also haa evidence that Hungary. Czechoslo-
vakia and Rumania are practicing the same shakedown racket.
~ PANAMA AMERICAN
WANf ADS
CAN MIL YOUR NEEDS!


THURSDAT, FEBRUARY 14. 195S
THE PANAMA AMHMCAW AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
PMtt
ZiggingAnd Zagging Hots Up
Amid Truman Mind Readers
WASHINGTON, Feb. 14 (UP) Sen. Clinton
P. Anderson (D-N.M.) said yesterday after a White
House call he is convinced that President Truman
will run for re-election because the President has
failed to "build up',' another Democratic candidate!
Anderson, former member of the Truman cabi-
net, made the statement after two other White
House visitors gave conflicting reports on the Pre-
sident's intentions and Presidential presa secretary
Joseph Short put a damper on their, remarks.
Benjamin O. Browdy, presi-
dent o! the Zionist organization
of America, said Mr. Truman
told him he definitely will de-
cide "within 10 or 15 days"
whether to run again. Browdy
was sure the President will seek
re-election*
But New York, hosiery manu-
facturer Abraham Felnberg, who
followed Browdy Into the White
House, quoted Mr. Truman as
saying he "hadn't made up his
mind, that he hadn't had time
to, and didn't plan to for some
time." ,
Pelnbrg offered his state-
ment as an "almost" direct
quotation from the President.
Anderson's "views" were closer
to those of Felnberg than to
Browdy's.
Me predicted that Mr. Truman
would hot propel himself Into
the race, but that the Demo-
crat* would nominate him at
their Chicago convention in
July.____
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
I, Whs.. 100.000 Nop I. Mm*
Presents
Today, Thursday. Feb. 14
P.M.
i 3:30Music for Thursday
. 4:00Panamusica Story Time
4:19Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
0:00Stand By for Adventure
0:15Evening Salon
7:00Crusade With the Crosbys
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
' 8:00World News and Com-
mentary (VOA)
8:15Arts and Letters (VOA)
8:30Radio University (VOA)
8:49Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00The Country' House (BBC)
:30Take It from Here (BBC)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:19Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
FrWay, Fab. 15
A.M.
0:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:16News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
0:15Come and Get It
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10 0ftOff the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
P.M. .
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (V(
1:15Songs of France (RDFi
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Banda
3:00All Star Concert Hall
8:15The Little Show
l: 30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA 8tamp Club (VOA)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Stand By For Adventure
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Barchester Tower (BBC)
(VOA)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News, Commentary
(Voice of America)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
1:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
MI-8hort Story Theatre
(VOA)
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of PC 48
(BBO)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Of
Explanation ef Sysabols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting Corp.
RDFRadlodlffuslon Francalse
"My guess is that he Is going
to run when the time comes,"
Anderson said. "I haven't seen
any evidence anywhere that
persuades me the President has
urged anyone else to get Into
the race."
The Democratic Senator
said he felt Mr. Truman would
have started a build-up "long
ago" for a successor if ho
planned not to run himself.
Anderson indicated he did
not expect an announcement
from the President any time
soon.
Short offered little help in
clearing up the conflicting state-
ments from the White House
visitors.
He said he hadn't the
"vaguest Idea" when Mr. Tru-
man will announce his political
plans, and added:
"A great many people go in
and see the President and some
go out and do a lot of talking.
I invite your attention to the
fact that the President has not
said these things. The President
has made no such public re-
marks."
Short suggested that "some
people, in their enthusiasm,
confused their own remarks with
those of the President."
Meantime, the Republican
spotlight turned on Pennsyl-
vania Republicans campaigning
for Oen. Dwight D. Elsenhower
were expected to announce this
week that their candidate will
enter the state's YOP Presiden-
tial primary on April 23. The
deadline for fUing is next Mon-
day.
President Truman has been
urged by Democratic national
chairman Frank E. McKlnney
to declare his intentions by
March 29, date of the annual
Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner
here.
Mr. Truman himself has
said he may announce before
April 29, the last day for fil-
ing- in the Democratic sena-
torial primary in Missouri.
Short emphasized that Mr.
Truman did not authorize the
statement by Browdy nor the
one offered Tuesday by Rep.
Adolph J. Sabath (D-ill.) after a
visit with the President.
Sabath said Mr. Truman was
willing to seek re-election if he
thought It would aid world
peace.
Neither Browdy nor Sabath
claimed to have Presidential
National Flag
Answer to Previous Puul*
HOEIEONTAL
1 Depicted li the
flag of -----
-----isa
university city
of this country
13 Interstices
14 Willow
5 Singing voice
6 Aromatic
ointment -
7 Distribute
9 Pedal digit.
9 We
10 Fro*
11 Retainer
15 P.ddle a boat P1'"*
16 Vestige ingredient
18 Scottish river
19 Any
ll
-i a : sin
20 Infidel
22 Mixed type
23 Mince
25 Retired.
27 Oanos over
28 Orifico
29 "Oreen
Mountain
sute" (ab.)
JO Measure
31 Hebrew deity
32 Not (prefix)
33 Knowledge
35 Cape
38 Vases
39 Clutch
40 Note of scale
41 Proffers
47 Pronoun
48 Nod _
50 Elevate
51 Mlmie
52 Fragrant rosin
54 Made Into law
56 Tears
37 Bank
employes
VERTICAL
1 Electrical
units
I Satiric
3 Fresh
4 Behold!
17 Cerium
(symbol)
20 Mildest
21 Young trees
24 Cave
26 Water heater
33 It produces
much------
34
38
37
42
43
44
Bird
Smirk
Races
Goddess of
discord .
Natrium
(symbol)
Food regime
45 Domestic slave
46 Actual
49 Benign tumor
51 Goddess Of
lnfstuatlon '
93 Physician
58 Chlorine (ab.)
authorization. In fact, Browdy
said he expected to "catch hell"
for what he said.
But he said he urged the
President to' seek re-election
and told him he found a "de-
finite sentiment" favorable to
his candidacy during a recent
cross-country tour.
"As usual, he did not give me
the answer but he said he would
make up his mind in the next 10
or 15 days," Browdy added.
There were Indications that
the White House staff went out
of its way to have Browdy's re-
marks modified by Felnberg.
Felnberg, who was chairman
of a big Democratic dinner In
New York last November, spent
some time with Matthew J. Con-
nelly, White House appolntmnt
secretary, after his talk with the
President.
While he was conferring with
Connelly another White House
aide suggested to reporters that
they ask Felnberg whether he
asked Mr. Truman "the $64
question"an open Invitation
to get Felnberg's account of
their conversation.
But Felnberg volunteered the
answer before he could be ask-
ed.
A Requiem Service
For
His Late Britannic Majesty
Kins George VI
Will Be Held At
The Cathedral of Saint Luke, Ancon,
On Friday February 15th at 11:30 a.m.
65th Ack-Ackcrs Fight Off
'Enemy Assault9 On Canal
An "enemy" assault on the Pa-
cific entrance of the Panama
Canal was successfully "fought
ofi" by units of Fort Clayton's
65th Antiaircraft Artillery Group
recently.
Headquarters Battery, 903d AAA
Battalion and elements of Bat-
tery "D". 764th AAA 'Battery,
and 1st Training Detachment of
the 903d Battalion temporarily
dropped their basic antiaircraft
mission to engage in infantry-
like combat training,
A powerful "aggressor" force*,
consisting of elements of the
83rd Infantry Regiment and the
Both Group, attempted with
tanks, infantry and aircraft to
drive the "ack-ack infantrymen"
from their hilltop positions.
The field problem consisted of
night infiltrations and Infantry-
tank onslaughts during the day-
light hours. The aggressor tanks
were held roadbound because of
the rugged terrain and became
easy marks for the artillerymen's
bazooka teams which were sit-
uated at vantage points along
roads leading to their positions.
The aggressor daylight opera-
tions were supported by low-le-
vel air assaults. These aircraft
"bombed and strafed" the de-
2000 modern rooms
bolh-rodiO-Muzok
spoilen comfort
Itapt
7th AVg. ryrui VAMf
t sota at. Htif Tlmn
* tiws mm it ram cut
Mb*. *>.. M| Ilk). M..ftM0MI
fenders'as tanks and Infantry at-
tempted to breach ack-acker's
defense line.
The umpires for the problem
ruled the aggressor tanks neu-
tralized and their infantry dis-
persed before they had penetra-
ted the depths of the AA men's
defensive positions.
A night Infiltration attack a-
galnst the 903d Battalion Com-
mand Post failed when the ag-
gressors attempted to attack and
capture It In the early hours of
the second morning.
This exercise Is part of the Ar-
my-wide training based on re-
ports from Korea and Intended
to acquaint all troops with com-
bat tactics and individual de-
fense.
In charge of the field problems
as chief umpire was Major Oli-
ver J. Cejka, Operations Officer
of the 903d.
Observing the field exercises
and aiding the chief umpire was
the 903d AAA Battalion Com-
manding Officer, Lt. Col. James
D. Shearouse.
Flex-the household finish of
thousand uses both inside
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Do not accent substitutes.
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7494 Herrera Avenue Phone 94 Caln.
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with a Festive tfuturt
every one with a dressed-up flattering Air,
with MATERIALS from Zig-Zag.
* Gorgeous CoUon Lace
* Swiss Organdy
Embroidered and Plain
* Linen
Embroidered and Plain
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108 Central Avenue Tel. 2-3418
Headquarter* of VOGUE and McCALL Patterns
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the new slippersock sensation
for men, women, boys, girls
Nappers
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the sole! So comfortable, so 'lightweight, so
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minute 'round the house. And only Nappers are
completely washable, quick to dry, can't shrink.
Get Nappers for the family todayl
Men's sizes: 1013; Women's sitos, 8-11; Junior
7-10.
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* Larger, Stronger Brakes

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* New, Single Carburetor with 4 Barrels

J




On Display All Day February 15th and 16th

CIV A, S.A.
PANAMA
COLON


"

.
--
fjr roc*

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN
INDEPENDENT
.....
DAILY NEWSPAPER

THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 14. 1*51
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & Airline News
TERRY
HURRY CALL
SIDE GLANCES
By Golbraitb
_ Q
*m Tvn of FUh larounds by the liners Queen El-
IMwnenti from Balboa izabeth and Queen Msrv was sel
.Tied ThisWeek *>v the latter ship whe.i she ar-
Troe fishlns boat "Penguin" ar- rived In New York at 4:30 p.m.
rived vesterdav In Balboa from.on a recent trip and sailed again.
Galapagos Island and will 20 hours and two minutes later.
be*in transhipping fresh fish
fillets to Los Angeles. This will be
the first time that "cabrlllos
(deep sea bass are to be shipped
completely packaged from Bal-
boa
The former record of 24 hours,
and five minutes, set February;
4-5. 1948. was also held by the
Queen Mary. ,
In the time between arrival
and departure. 2.177 passengers:
| were embarked and disembark-1
Owner ol the Penguin and its'ed and 12,000 tons of fuel oil. wa-
master is Capt. A. F. de Ignacio, ter. food and careo were oaded
? American Who has a crew of aboard the worlds fastest pas-
if^on^ter^ASSfja^tlme the Queen Ma
J&X ffieup*t_D0* 7. jr^docked ^^-g^-gg
Radio Arrives For Repair midnight, hundreds of dock-;
itoMPttMira Islands workers, freight handlers and,
HwauM there Is nobody in the truckers were engaged in the
pKn Is and! that can repair overwhelming task of again
the one and only radio there, a making the Queen readv for sea.
damaged radio arrived this week
aboard the Rangltikl.
It will be repaired here and re-
turned to the islands aboard an-
other ship. The Rangitiki was:
bound for the United Kingdom!
from New Zealand.
New Turnaround Record Set
Bv Luxnrv Lrnefs "Snens"
A new record for quick turn-
Report On Rocky
Mountain Fever
|r PpTo Be Heard
A reoort on two cases of Rocky i
Mountain spotted fever m Pana-1
ink will he the subiert of one ol
fhree lectures to be heard next
Tuesday nicht at a meeting of
the Medical Association of the
Tstrrmian Canal Zone
The report will be submitted
by Drs. Carlos Calero. J. M.
Nunez and R 6ilvg GoyUa.
The other two lectures will be
On the medical treatment of bur-
itis by Dr. C. D. Brtscoe and;
ome remarks about the Medical
School of the Panama University
by Dr. .J A. Lavergne.
All of .the lecturers are from
the Herrick Clinic.
^JACOHY ON BRIDGE
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
NORTH 4
- AKQJ5 V872 KII *65S
WIST EAST
487832 AA109 None V 9 8 5 ? Q7s tAlOfl *J1094 *087?
SOUTH (D)
44 VAKQJ1043 ? J42 *AK
Both sides vu!.
Swrth 2V 3V 4 West North Eis* Pass 2 4 Pass Pass 3 N. T. Pass Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead*J
T. M. ><| U. t. 'it. on.
Cpr '2 b N (aniot. In.
"The boss just tent me out for a fishing rod ht ordered
you ware right about that southern business tripl"
three of hearts from his hand,
allowing East to win a trick with
the nine of hearts!
This was a weird play, consid-
ering the fact that George had
150 honors in trump. Neverthe-
less, it cinched the contract
East returned the queen of
clubs, and South ruffed high. He
then led the four of hearts toj
dummy's eight, thus acquiring
an entry to dummy. Now he
could cash the krng and queen of
spades, discarding diamonds
from his own hand.
B ONCH1AL
Sleep Sound All Night
George had given up a trump
trick to enter the dummy, hut he
"I can't bear to watch that had obtainedItwo spade tricks in
ni-t of hHriiw said the old een-exchange. Generous George is
?temS.Waa*"lonXPheUlway, willing to give up one
had been watching Generous;trick in order to get two tricks
George, so I walked over to the ror,,u- .. .,., ,.^
table and got the full hand fm..,gjjg* W **jn t
west onened the iar-k of elubs tr>en depend on winning a dla-iGeorge would
nnWteoTR"Cwonhwi\h th X n ^A^Sf SSff-*-*"-
He laid down" the ace of hearts i pened to be badly placed, and tract.
hopefully,. and swli*m*l tot a
Last Call Sounded
For Door Prizes
Still Unclaimed
A last call has gone out from
the Navy's March of Dimes dance
committee for the holders of tic-
ket stubs Nos. 1195 and 1186 to
claim their door prizes drawn at
last Friday's dance.
If no claims are received by
early Monday morning the waf-
fle iron and toilet set will be raf-
fled at Rodman and the proceeds
turned over to the March of
Dimes.
Lucky ticket holders "*n c'^1"*
their prizes by telephonthg Saul
Wynshaw on Naw veit pi: ..c 8>-
3852.
FRECKLES AND RTS FRIBNDS
A Delicacy?
BY MERRILL BLOSRRR
ALLET OOP
It That Choctaw?
BY V. T. HAMLm
HECK.NOI1...IMEAN
M6 FH.-UM 6WELL,
ue,UQ,'WHYSQlMV
A9KUM.EH?
ROOTS AMD HER BUDDIES
That's Unique
BY EDGAR MARTIN
lost three
game con-
Ihe large* telling nedicin toi
bronthifu ond Asthmo in all ot bliz-1
zardly cold Caado is Buckley's Co-1
id'i Mixture "Triple acting) *
blairg^'c thousand? ond now sold1
In all drugstores
There i; nothing safe ana hk '
In the world 2 or 3 oses In sweet
unea hot wter ust before bedtimt ,
and mony a suMetc run tonflltnf'
choking Asthma ha 'ounc relie'
and o good night'* rest ona thei (
bod aid persistent bronchiol cough |
hJ le* .ou if yot, don't believt
it jl o bottle at any good druggls"
ter you ear r*peno on Buckley's Co-
nodiol Whrture tc aiye definite quick
rlief trorr that -holing. aspinc
etruoe'e tor breoth
spado when' he discovered that
East had all the trumps.'
East took the ace of spades at
once (fortunately for him) and
, returned a dub to South's ace.
Geonre now made the play that
1 drove the old gentleman mutter-
ing from the table. He led the


7952
OLDSMOBILE
88 ROCKET 98
On Display Soon
PANAMA AUTO, S.A.
PANAMA
COLON
CAPTAIN EASY
Instructions
BY LESLIE TURNER
M OFFICER...
* YOir rVPTER.
*!** TUU.I5.WHY
WON'T 10U ABREST
HER fttWRAP O'
TRAILW6 U5
PORTHfRMOR, SRf OOWG TO LEAD
TOUIal AMP IP WU WISH TO MOtt>
TROUBLE POR VOURSEIP ANO W5S TULLS
^eu^U 5 W HOTNW* ABOUT TAS TO HER]
CHRIS VVEL&EN Planeteer
Place to Land?
RUSS WINTERBOTBAM
PBISCILLA .s POP
The Gate Crasher
AL VERMEER
O MDU
WAMTTO
%luct rr
oux eh?
THE WINNER- AMP NEW
WORLD CHAMPEE
just roRGEr m fouonns.^ owtt nM\mgA
TRV TO SHAKE rAE A6AIN1 VOUR EnWSYOU?
CAPET* AND HERS.rW,V OEPfNOON /"'OURWOO
THIS MAN'S ARREST. HOW GO PINISM /COtOANO-OH.
BEEM STALKING
US!
V
YIC FLINT
WiU They Be Fooled?
BY MICHAEL OMALLE1
AAR. WORTHMOCR NOT
REBLINA WBLL, SO WERl
NOT t>OAM TO THR
*VMP*HOPJV, JAMBS.i
IF VOU ANT *CMt>
VMDU-t7 STILL I
OURJ1CW
VCK*
COME ON,90RhRi. VVE'KE
PtWARTRLV eOW*. ANf?
NOU M^rv E. TW6 MAfn^M'5
RBTMWSIOAJ TO WEAR A
RUS? COAT X SUrSdESTTWE
MINR--THB RABLB *TOO
IMIB BOARDING BQV8E
with
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OCR WAY
By J. R. WaLIAMi
JCGb B1NM
The Other End
I v*SNT THR
U*UAL
how/ com*.
it pom'-t
iSflO.eWS.' H6RE-S
0,v* OF SASTCXJ'S
DTODEST15ELICS
AMESTOP,
NAPOLttSS!
WHAT 16 TMEr
VALC OP "TMlS
TREASURE,
SASTO5 t
.->>>...^.t^ THE WORJtV WART


1 HUHSDAY. FEBRUARY M. 198
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAttY NEWSPAPER
page prrt
raciflc J^ouetu
L 17, &&~ .L &L* 3521
B! C KHAM-HEKRING WEDDING
TO BE SOLEMNIZED SATURDAY
Miss Shirley Ann Beckham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Harper of Cristobal, will become the bride of Mr.
John Joseph Herring, son of Mr. and Mrs. George P. Her-
ring of Tampa, Florida, on Saturday, the sixteenth of Feb-
ruary at eifht o'clock at the Pedro Miguel Union Church.
immediately following the ceremony a reception will be
held In the Church parlors.
Baroness Desandre
Entertains At Card Party
The Baroness Franca Rosset
Desandre. the wife of the Italian
Minister to Panama, entertained
a group of her friends with a
card DaPty on Monday at the Le-
ga'ion residence.
Bbv Jv.ison Is Christened
The babyson of Mr. a-.id Mrs.
Carl Axel Janson of Bella Vista
was christened Richard Janson
on Tuesday afternoon at the
Cr'sto Re" Church.
The godo"rents were Mrs. Jo-
se Garra of Trov. New Yo'k and
M-. John T. Fogarty of Bella
VlitP .
Following the christening a
rV"mos"rt) narty was held at the
J?nron home.
B*r>, vt-.\^ -a Daughter
V Parents
Mr. andMri. K: M. Ed words
of Ped-o Miguel have their
Florida, who art former Canal
Zone residents.
Dr. and Mrs. Oldach
Have Visitors
Dr. and Mrs. William H. Ol-
dach of Bella Vista, hava as their
house guests her brother and
slster-ln-law. Mr. and Mrs.
James C. Roe of Dallas. Texas,
who arrived on the Isthmus
8undav aboard the 8.8. Chlrl-
qul from New Or lean.
Rigneys Leave Isthmus
For Mexico
Former Isthmian residents,
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Rigney re-
turned yesterday to their home
In Mexico City by plane after a
visit of one week In Panama.
11:00 p.m. In the Balboa YMCA.
Music will be furnished by the
71st Army Band.
V. F. W. Bingo Tonight
Bingo will be played tonight at
the V. F. W. Home on Curundu
Road at 7:45 p.m. Prizes will be
awarded the winners.
Bain Sale
To Benefit Girl Scouts
A bake sale is to be held by the
Olrl Scouts of Oamboa to help
defray expenses on their "Little
House" for the current year. The
sale will be held on Friday at
2:30 p.m. at the "Little House
to Gamboa, coffee will be
served.
Donovans Hosts
For Cocktail Supper
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Donovan
entertained for a group of their
friends recently with a cocktail
daughter Mrs. Hugh Hale pndloarty held In the garden of their
thelf m-andfather of Margarita (home.
as their euests for a few davs.--------
^____ Mlsc Helen Edwards
Forinightlv Bride rih Meets Celebrates Birthday
The members of the Fortnight-1 Miss Helen Edwards of Pedro
1" Bride Cluh met recently at i Miguel entertained a group of
the home of M'e. F'ank Ger- her friends on Saturday evening
chow In Pedro M-"el. [it a buffet supper given In cele-
Menbr-s tt*en*\+>" lncl-,ded/>ration of her birthday annlver-
WF y it;. p)t'r,ei- "Trs. LTW-'sary.
rnce di" t"s. F**'"" Wnnd. Guests ln-lvded Miss Diane
V- i* y Vfwrd. Mr*.. M?-'DRre. Miss Pollv Ann Frasicr,
Balboa High School
To Bold Valentine Danee
A Valentine Dance will be held
tomorrow from 7:30 to 11:00 p.m.
at the Hotel Tlvoli for the stu-
dents of Balboa High School. A
Queen will be selected from five
contestants who are Beth Lock-
ridge. Pat Gott, Joyce Crowder,
Marie Dl Bella and Oeorglanna
Hall.
Boat Club Dinner-Dane*
To Be Satnrday
The Pedro Miguel Boat Club's
monthly free dinner and dance
will be Saturday at 6:30 p.m.
Justice Department Opposes
Revival Of Fair Trade Laws
rinn L-""s Mr.. Mn' JVvies.
>*?. 'VI'H-m Bl"-k, and Mrs
Fnk Br?an.
Twtpv W.-pVl'T
Cbrate 4 Corporal an* Mr. J. C. Bra-
elton of rocoll entertained on
F'-ndf" r"euoon wl*h a nnrtv
honorirt1 their "oun" *on Tom-
n''. o*< th or""-'on of hi fourth
b'-'hdpv pnnlvefory.
tn^giM rMebr'-'"*1' wl'h Tnm-
r"v Included w,wl aid Addle
Ivey. t arrv H"' "orvH ? Jr.. Rl** -nd Rlnh' ao*k rv Toni P'r-*nl. Fdw'n" -"d
Oeoraie Moats. Ch-le Tee
8haw. M*rie e*in .Tnto<- t-jcoH.
son and LucV and Oibr Taylor
ed
M>-s. P^bei
I at nHffl!
Mis.Tu-"er
Ho?es T B'l-'-e Hun
,rt Tu*pr entertein-
; w* l"> s'
the rn-nV1" of fep- M
recently at her home In
Her pi'esta 'iclided Mrs. J. H.
Jones, Mrs. J. H. Million Mrs.
h. h. cog. Mr. J. a. n
nrcfak". Mrs. B. P. Powell.
R. C. M"l?sner and Mrs
Turner. Sr.
Vacationers Return
F'om Costa Rica -
M". and Mrs. S. Hays re'-'rn-
ed We*nefdav from p hort va-
cation spent In Costa Rica,
Mr. And Mrs. Johnston
R**urn From Florida
"ir. and Mrs. Douglas 8.
Johnston ret'.uned to the Ith-
mvs by olane on Saturday after
a visit of two months rn"t vt*h
his nerente. Mr. and Mrs. An-
MIbs Jean Harris. Mr. carl Melss-
ner. Bobby Ll dalio. Mr. Dirk Burns. Mr. Will-
lam Riley and Mr. Frank Bryan.
Garden Club EXhIWt
To Be Satnrday And Sunday
Invitations have bee nextend-
ed to the Queers of the Carnival
to attend the Garden Exhibit of
the Cardenas River Garden Club
at the Mlraflores home of Mr.
and Mrs. Cherles P. Moraran on
Saturdav and 8unday. The ex-
hibit will be open to the public
from 3:00 to 6:00 o.m. on Sat-
urday and from 10:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m. on Svndsv.
A native bohlo will be one of
the many features of the exhibit,
which is helnp substit"ted 'or
tl-e Isthmian Flowe- Show and
will contain exhibits of native
flowers, fruits and hateas.
Crusade For Fre'tfgjM Bull
To Be At Ho'el Efjihsma
The Cru-?d" Fo- Free-.:?m Ball
will be held on February 22 at
9:00 p.m. In the patio of the Ho-
tel.mjtanama. Tlqkels wjll be
$1.80 per perion-and'may beTnir-
Robert nhased at the'door. Musical en-
tertainment will be provided by
Angelo Jaspe and his orchestra
?nd door prizes will be given.
The public is Invited to attend.
Reigning at the Ball will be
Carnival Queen '"ritza de Oba-
rrlo of the Hotel El Panama and
among those attending will be
the Queens selected by the Elks
nlub. the Union Club, the Atlas
Club and Colon.
lAJomen'i
Wori
By GAT PAULEY
United Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK, (UP) A pair of
rabbits her son didn't want start-
ed Mrs. Oraiiam carver of Plain-
field, N.J., In the fur business.
"It began seven years ago
when Bobby was 10." Mrs. Carver
recalled. "A friendly neighbor
gave him a pair of raoblts. At
the time, I told him to keep them
if he wanted, but he would have
to take care of them himself, i
wasn't Interested In rabbits."
Son Robert wasn't either after
a few days but Dad Carver
thought back lo a pair of hit
childhood pets and built a hutch.
Three years and several hutch-
es later, Mrs. Carver was as In-
terested In rabbits as her hus-
band. During the late war years,
she and her husband developed
a thriving business, selling meat,
fur articles and fur.
Books Help.
As the business grew. Mrs. car-
ver began to read books on rab-
bits. She discovered their brood
all were mongrels and she be-
came Interested In rabbits with
pedigrees. The Carvers swept
their hutches clean and started
over with angoras. Than Mrs.
Carver decided she wanted to
Acted grey angora. That-Jjtouired
some book work on gentwes.
"We finally crossed a standard
Shinchllla and a white fcngora,"
Irs. Carver said. "With a few
more cross breedings we finally
got our strain. We call It silver
fivifln."
To use the fur, Mr. Carver
WASHINGTON. Feb. 14 (UP)
The Justice Department tala
today that a fevival of ttat*
fair tradt laws would mean
higher prices for the conaumer
and would serve only at 'cloukti'
for antl-truat law violators
Asking congress to reject Mils
aimed at reviving the legality
of the fair trade Taws, assistant
attorney general H. Graham
Morlton said price fixing agree-
ments would be pegged high to
protect the "Inefficient dealer.
Morison said fair trade laws,
which permit manufacturers
and retailers to enter Into price
fixing agreements on certain
"name brand" items, are con-
trary to the basic American
principle which has, kept our
economy dynamic and free."
He testified before a House
Monopoly Subcommittee con-
sidering several billa to overrule
last year's Supreme Court de-
cision which crippled fair trade
laws In 45 states.
The court ruling outlawed a
provision of the atate laws that
forced all retailers to accept a
mlnlmum\retale price fixed in
an agreement between a manu-
facturer and only one retailer.
Rep. Albert P. Morano (R-
Conn.), sponsor of one of the
bills, said small retailers can-
not sell below cost at long as
the big chaina and department
stores. He said they face ex-
tinction unletai fair tradt laws
are revived.
Morano said the greatest suf-
ferer from price wart la the
consumer.
"Once the ruthless and unfair
methods of cut-throat competi-
tion have destroyed competi-
tion," he said, "the laws of sup-
ply and demand can no longer
frotect the consum/r from ar-
lflcially and destructively high
prices."
The Federal Trade Commis-
sion put itself on record against
the fair trad* revival In a writ-
ten report to a House Commerce
Subcommittee, which conducted
recent hearings on the bill.
A dispute wat thaping over
which subcommittee Mono-
poly or Commerce hat Juris-
diction over the bills. ,
.^ftlantic ^Society
&, 195, Cmtmm Vt+km Q*lm* 379
-Iboa Y To Hold
VplentineV D*v Dances
A ''lentine's Dp.y Dance will
bought an old spinning wheel
and went back to the library to
leam how to spin the yarn.
Not Much Money
"Smce I got Interested In
those rabbits." she said, "I've
been traveling from the hutches
to the library like a scientist.''
The yarn is made into scarves
gloves, bootle. other knit goods,
cap, ear muffs or mitfens.
Mrs. Carver doewit recom-
mend her "hebby' fox aagoue
hunting a Trig money-mtllng,
scheme.
"I turn out a lot of sawable
Roods every year and sell as
much as i can make," she ex-
olslred. "Our returns Jt'st about
oa" for room and board for the
rabbits;*
drew Johnston, of Clearwater. i be held on Saturday from 8:00 to
ant extra-plump,
extra-tender chicken?
-. (UNIfNUD FOR GRiATIR VAIUI IQ0K FOR IMF. RI NO Hill I API I
Fryers and roosters
cledhed, cut,
rtady toctok.
FU,.
Ercy oanc you by
gMSM datable.
> IN YOUR COMMISSARY.
OUR FURNITURE IS THE BEST
If you belong to the Armtd Forces or if you have
a steady job come to our Store and you oan
choose your own terms to buy on credit.
We offer you also
EASY WASHERS
ZENITH RADIOS
SIMMONS SPRINGS
AND MATTRESSES
and
A WONDERFUL CLUB SYSTEM
SAVE! $9-oo
SPECIAL OFFER
A NEW
RCA VICTOR VICTROLA
(For the 45 RPM Records)
Chairman Imanuel Celler
(D-N.Y.) of the Monopoly group
U known to be cool toward fan-
trade laws.
So advocates Jumped the gun
by having the bills heard first
by the Commerce group, headed
by Rep. j. Percy Priett (D-
Tenn.i.
Morison insisted that vicious
price cutting to drive out com-
petition already is illegal under
the anti-trust laws. He said fair
trade laws would serve only to
keep prices artificially high.
He also argued that fair trade
laws do not protect the small
merchant.
"Where the chain stores and
large department stores choose
to compete price wise," he said.
"they can develop their own
brands. This method of com-
petition Is scarcely available to
the small reailer."
RUTH MILIEU Says
There Is one type of woman
who Is never attractive to anybo-
dy long. That Is the woman who
Is one person for show and an-
other person when she thinks no
one Important Is sizing her up.
You are bound to know at least
one woman who has a "best"
personality for special occasions,
and a careless personality for
every day use.
She Is the kind whose voice
turns from sugar to curtnets
when she answers the telephone,
denendln* on whether or not the
-aller Is Mrs. Imnortant invitlna:
her to a. tea. or Mrs. Workhard
waiting to tell her a magazine
subscription.
She is the kind of woman who
treats her children impatiently
until a visitor romes into the liv-
ing room and then statrs calling
them "Darling."
She Is the woman who saves
her comoliments for those who
need them the least. She uses
compliments, not to ive a lift to
those who need It, but to Ingra-
tiate herself with the "right-
people.
TrTg; Bi?STFOR OTBBB8
She Is the wom-n who always
saves the best for comnanvfiR-
urln there Is no nolnt in maklntr
much of a effort for the ff mi-
lt. Yo-'ll find he- fimllv eathrr
In the Mtchen unless company Is
ex^'eted.
She is the woman who 1 "ever
as careful of the feelin< of those
who erve her a of those she
con><'<*<-.. her sunerlors.
Phe Is the woman who can
d'e n to look like a million
wb*" 'he Is romg to a oa'tv. but
ne eroir"d the house looldner
Uk a wreck.
She 's the woman who is more
tntere-ted In buying "show" than.
h\ fcvmg comfort, when she se-
lects the furnishings for her
hrmt.
i'he It not one oerson. but two
dlstir-t and semrate oersontli-
tJe. However, she never wT,t>~-
es to hide her ord'narv self for
Ion. That Is wh" for all hr ef-
forts she never succeed in keen-
!' *iyon* Impressed for any
length of time.
ECEPTION FOR PRESIDENT OF PANAMA
TTENDED BY ATLANTIC SIDE RESIDENTS
Over thirty Atlantic Side residente crossed by special
scooter Tuesday afternoon to attend tht reception given by
Governor and Mrs. Francis Newcomer, at the Governor's re-
sidence, to honor the President ef the Republic of Panama,
ar.d Mrs. Alelbiadea Areotmena. Other guests from the Gesd
Ceast motored ever for the affair.
and
and
and
and
Those invited were: Mr. and
Mrs. EN. Stokes, Captain and
Mrs. William Parsons. Mr. and
Mrs. William E. Adams. Mr. and
Mrs. Ernest Cotton. Mr. E. S.
MaeSparran. Mr. and Mrs. M.
J. Baas, Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Hunnicutt. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
F. Howard. Mr. and Mrs. Mar-
cel Grlngolre, Mr. and Mrs. A.
G. Deisz. colonel and Mrs. H.
F. Taylor and their guests, Miss
Stella Bonade and Mr. and Mrs.
Ward Morrison, Colonel and Mrs.
R. F. Alexander. Captain and
Mrs. L. L. Koepke. Judge
Mrs. E.I.P. Tatelman. Mr.
Mrs. W. K. Newland. Mr.
Mra. R. L. Sullivan. Dr.
Mrs. R. Pernigotti. Captain C.
B. Fenton, Mr. and Mrs. An-
thony Raymond, Mr. and Mrs.
James Piala. Captain and Mrs.
John Seheibeler, Lt. Command-
er and Mrs. Walter M. Vincent,
Mr. M. B. Nickel. Mr. and Mrs.
Andrew Whitlock. Colonel and
Mrs. William Knott. Mr. and
Mrs. 8. M. Belanger, Mr. and
Mrs. Mario de Diego and Cap-
tain Eric Erlksen.
Valentine Coffee
Introduces Visitors
Mrs. Merrill E. Tomlinson and
Mrs. H. H. Chandler were co-
hostesses for a morning coffee
riven yesterday to Introduce Mrs.
Charles F. Kuhn and Miss Clra
TCuhn of Lake ngelus, Mieni-
an. who are visiting Lt. (JO)
and Mrs. George Kuhn.
Mrs. C. B. Reld and Mrs. R.
F. Tucker presided at the cof-
fee and chocolate services. The
buffet table was centered with a
heart-shaped spray of- red bou-
ratnvllla pierced with a white
arrow. Small hearts were scat-
tered around the table cloth and
connected with ribbon stream-
ers.
The other euests were: Mrs. W.
O. King. Mrs. H. E. Schmidt.
Mrs. E. W. Scott, Mra. T. L.
Aonleoulst. Mrs. W. W. Bemls.
Mrs. A. P. Anderson. Mrs. C. A.
Lee. Mrs. C. R. MilW. Mrs Mi-
chael Leahy. Mrs. O. W. pitt-
wao. Mrs. A. L. Jsnsen. Mrs.
W. D, Ronsvne Mrs. T.. E. Sou-
drs, Mrs. J. R. Wolfersherger,
Mrs. R. J. Netro. Mrs F. B.
Moore. M's. W. E. S*nd Mrs.
Tohn *arlow. Mrs. J. J. Humes,
Mr. E. O. Coffe. Mrs. A. P
ollens. Mrs. Donald Pabhl. Mrs.
H. E. Walther and Mrs. J. T.
Edwards of Culpepper. Virginia.
Visitors at Fort Davit
The eommandine' officer of
the Atlantic Sector and Mrs.
Henry F. Taylor, of Fort Devts,
have'as their house guests Mrs.
Tavlo^'s sister. Mis tell* Bon-
ade of Montrose. Colorado and
Mr. and Mrs. Wtrde Morrison
of Gearv Oklahoma nd ?hen-
children, Marv Dee tnd Wesley.
The visitors arrived Sunday by
plane.
Mrs. Edwards Honored
with Morning Coffee
the Coco Solo Naval station, ltd
Monday for a visit in Costa Rica
and Nicaragua.
Rev. and Mrs. Richards
Stopping at Hotel Washington?
The St. Rev. David E. RleB
ards. Episcopal Bishop of the)
Diocese of Albany. N.Y.. and
Mrs. Richards have been stop*
ping at the Hotel Washington
since their arrival Monday e
the Cristobal. They will cross t
L. Sf r> Dnnavn anrf Mfr linc VnsWDBI. iney Will CrOS Ml
n^.^S'h,Jr.te?^n1.JFilth a' Anc0n to tne "* of Rt-
522lf2Rl! "??,?S2J2..! Rev. and Mrs. R. Heber Oooden.
morning coffee at the Sabin re-
sidence Tuesday, to compliment
Mrs. J. T. Edwards, of Culpep-
per. Va.. who lt visiting her
daughter and son-in-law. Lt.
and Mrs. H. E. Walther. of the
Coco Solo Naval Station.
Red hibiscus blossoms were
used in the decorations of the
residence and matching bou-
cainvllla formed the heart-shap-
ed centerpiece, carry out the
Valentine motif.
Mrs. M. L. Leahv and Mrs. B
Rev. Richards has a wide cir-
cle of friends on the Atlantic
Side, where he served the Gatun
Churches for a number of yeart.
Danee at Braaet Brook
Country Club
There will be a dance at the
Brazos Brook Country Club Sat-
urday. Feb. 16 starting at 8:00
om. The dance has been made
nosslble bv the courtesy of the
H. Chandler did the honors at,Clipper Line of Malmo. Sweden,
th enff** tahle who are providing the services of
The lidies who called during the M-V Stella Polaris ore]
the morning to visit with Mrs for.the occasion. The_rchesti
is from the Vivex Restaurant
and the Belle Vue Hotel. Copen-
hagen.
The orlce of admission to the
dance is si.00 per couple.
Walther and her mother were:
Mrs. L. L. Koepke Mrs. Chas.
C. Yanquell. Mrs. R. L. Ware,
Mrs. T. L. Apoleoulst, Mrs. P.
L. Balav. Mrs. 3. F. Barlow,
Mrs. A. P. Bollens, Mrs. E. J. --------------
Rrooks. Mrs. B. W. Clark. Mrs p.- Ne>nnl Ntat
John R. Danly. Mrs. L. J. Du-| T*-IUI JCT
cote. Mrt. W. H. Erbe. Mrs. R. Cftr TnmnrrAw
K. Olffln. Mrs. W. L. HM1. Mrs. T01 I OIT
E, L. Hamon. Mrs. Walter N.
Horiek. Mrs. J. J. Humes Mrs.
L. B. Jennings. Mrs. F. A.
Kraft. Mrs. Chester L. Lucas. The Balboa Union Church has
Mrs. Phoebe Kelly. Mrs. E. J. announced a pie-social for to-
McKav. Mrs. Frank B. Moore, morrow from 5:30 to 8. p.m.
Mrs. Rov Nielsen. Mrs. J. A.
Pease. MM. C. B. Reld Mrs. i Pastries with apole, cheirv.
Fred C. Roeoke. Mrs. I. M. Ro- ral'ln. berrv pecan, pumpkin
well. Mrs. W. E. Sands. Mrs. R. .nd mince filUnva w"l be offered
L. Smith. Mrs. H. J. Thornton, for members and the general
At Union Church
Mrs. M. E. Tomlin. Mrs. R. F.
Tucker Mrs. O. L. Wallace.
Mrs. A. Wallace. Mrs. Fred Wro-
ble Mrs. W. E. Thoruso nand
Mitt Elizabeth Yanquell.
Stew and Stem*"
Dance at Ceeo Solo
An Interesting and amusing
evening has been planned by the
Officers Wives Club of the Coco
Solo Naval Station for Saturday
^venina at the Officers Club. A
"Stew and Stomo" dance with
sauare and regular dan planned. The price of admission
Is 12.50 per couple. Dinner will
be brunswick stew and sople pie
A bamboo screen will he given
away as a door prize. All mem-
bers of the club, Naval Reserve
officers and Armed Forces offi-
eers with their friends are cor-
dially Invited to attend.
public.
The church has suggested that
Pacific aiders "plsn to have their
dessert at the church tomorrow
night."
Children of the American
Revolution Meeting
The Chagres Society of the.
Children of the American Revo-
lution wall meet Saturday after-
noon at 1:00 nm. at the home
of the Senior President, Mrs. R.
W. Rubelll of the pe Lesseps
Area.
All children who are eligible
for membership are cordially In-
vited to attend the meeting.
.t. and Mrs. Wroble
VMtiag m Central America
Lt. and Mrs. Fred Wroble
of
OF LEGEND
COT Y
MrlkaMn: CIA. CYBNOS, S.A.
J-17S1 -1ISS.
The Store Where You will Find the Largest Assortment
of Glass and Linoleum.
"Leaders in the Furniture Business Since lit"
M Central Avenue Telephone t-2445
- -

and

A BEAUTIFUL RECORD ALBUM
VALUED AT $29.00
An for
-

$20oo
ONLY 5.00 DOWN 5.00 MONTHLY
Radio Center z
7110
Bolivar




MKstsa
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAITT NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY. FERRUART 14, 15I
When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
You Sell em...
leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices




UfWl MBVlVfc
tggeem
BOTICA UUU.TOM
AIA>N Oft HELUCZA AMKKH ANO

rat PANAMA AMEKI
No. 1.17S Calnl ** Cal
CAN
FOR SALE
Household
TOR SALE:RCA Victor tab* mo-
, d.l combination, like ntw. Coll
,' Army 83-5153.______________
K>ft SALE:"Apex" Washing mo-
chines. 25 nd 60 cycles. "U,
Postal" Central Avenue No. 68.
V/k ftar the best refrigeration ser-
vice In Penoma. If you hove a
refrigerator problem, household
r commerciol telephone us_ ot
S-0125 and it will be solved. FRI-
"StDAIRE REFRIGERATION SHOP
'No. 51 Via Espaa. ____
FOR SALE
Antntunhilo
Your washing machina oo out of
order? Telephone 3-0125 FRIGI-
DAIRE refrigeration shop ond you
will get the most efficient repair
service. _______
FOR SALE:Westinghouse Refriger-
ator. Porceloln inside and eut.
Perfect candition. 7 eu. ft. 25
cycle. Tel. 2-3723. Balboa, C.
I.________________________,
FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
tar 2 1-2 yr. guarantee, dining
table, Ironing board. Zenith con-
ao!e rodio and record ployer, Ve-
nation blinds for and 12 fomily.
5251-L. Dioblo Heights, Tel. ol-
boa 3254.___________________
SALE:One bamboe set, ward-
robe, vanity, child's dressers, crib
and other articles. San Francisco
Read No. 83.
FINANCING
Service Personnel end
U.S. Civilian Government Employe
new usad cor through
eOVIRNMlta* -.Mf lOYES FINANCI
:i>
Fort Worth. Texos
Also Direct
Loans Automobile
serving juvernn-,ni employe and
Service ersonne' e*i *tia Canoi Zone
toi lk r-eor. Witt: out flnonclng
your Insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. coverage.
ARRANGEMINTS CAN I MADI
THROUGH COCAL AUTOMOilll
OIALIR
FOR SALE:Lincoln Zephyr Coupe
1940. Price $225.00. Good^ run-
ning condition. Apply Nestle's Co.
Avenido Cuba, No. II.
FOR SALE:1948 Buick Sedonette.
Duty Paid. Rodio. Excellent tires.
New bottery. A-1 condition, ell
around. Distribuidora Elctrico,
Ancn Avenue corntr H. Street.
MISCELLANEOUS
0e ye
Writ
tee 20
have e
rtaktag
Aaseyssiei
a. C. X.
We are still offering immediote re-
trigeratlen service to eny kind of
refrigeroter, washing machine, etc.
you can get this by telephoning
3-0125 FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGER-
ATION SHOP. No. 51 Via Espo-
If yeur air conditioned unit does
not work well, telephone 3-0125.
Ponoma. FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGER-
ATION SHOP, where we offer the
best repair service in Panama.
RESORTS
Phillips. Oceanstde cortege, Santa
Clera. Box 43S. Beteoo. Phone
Ponomo 3.1171. Crtstobol 3-1673
Gentil Bliss' Santa Clara Oaest
House. Overlooks ocean. .. .sur-
rounded by shade trees...pri-
vte path to beach (2 min.
walk I. Gas range and refrigerator
. .completely furnished except
linens.. .occommodotes 7. Bar-
becue, .badminton. pingpong. .
. .putting green, .croquet, .horse-
shoes, etc. Coll 4-557 doys; 4-
230 evenings.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
BATTERIES
For yeur car or track from $13.00.
Bateras ele Panam
Avenida Cutral Na. 224
ARMY HAVT AND CIVILIAN
EMPLOYES
Check with the FIOERAL SERVICES
FINANCI CORP BIFORI yeu
FINANCE your new or used car.
Let us show you hew we con
SAVE YOU MONEY.
Our office Is located on outomo-
bile row. No. 29 or coll 2-4555.
P. SALE: 60 cycle Spindrier
washing machine, $100.00. Will
tfbde for 25 cycle. Coco Slito
house 27-C. IFOR
FOR SALE:English cor, economic.
Perfect. Special for delivery Truck
Or Taxi. $500.00. "Voz del Pue-
blo," Tel. 3-0471. Panam.
FOR SALE?:Special for Army Fa-
milies, used furniture at speciol
" prices. Try us ond be convinced.
; 12.174 between 12-13 Bolivar
- Avenue, phone Colon 916.
SALE: Chevrolet Pick-up.
$225. Ford Dump Truck, $400.
Good condition. -Tel. 3-1524
3-3021.

FOR SALE
Real Estate
WANTED
Automobiles
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTUW POR ALt
Per sale to the highest bidder Build-
ing No. 414-X. Aneon. Sealed bids
vMI be JeceivW in the office of the
iij#nntandent of Storehouses at
-MftpjBj uVtll 1**30 A. M., February
.%fc162, when they will be Open-
led in public. Form of proposal with
full particulars moy be secured In
the" offices of Superintendent of
SfOYBheuses. Balboa, and the Hous-
ing. Monager ot Balboa Heights.
WANTID TO BUY $ CARS CASH
Only 1949 on: 4 door Chevrolet.
Dodge or Plymouth. Not duty paid.
Will see them 4 to 7.
ALVARO FONSICA, Hotel Celen
Panam, Tel. 2-0770.
If jyou wont a spacious, comfortable
>ell. situated chalet, here is your
. alliance: We offer you a beautiful
Chalet in "El Cangreja" two
llocks from Via Espaa, olse two
'blocks from the huge opertmen
b'ous now beina constructed In
. that arao. The chalet consists of
rjj bedrooms, 2 bethrooms, porch,
sittingraom, dinlngroom. pentry.
- kitchen, foundry, maid's room
garage, completely furnished. For
Only $1.00 you may be the lucky
Owner of this chalet. Buy your
tlcl.et today at Anco Liquor Store
Tel. 2-0816 or Phormocy Zona
del Canal. Tel. 2-0421. The raf-
fle will be held on February 24.
FOR SALE OR RENT:Two bed-
room cottage in cool El Valle. Tel.
Panama 2-2446.
FOR SALE:Land in cool, beoutilul
EL VALLE vicinity Hotel Pan-
Americano. Large or small lets
moderately priced. Tel. Panamo
$-2446 or Inquire at Hotel.
i,.
Position Offered
WANTEDSecretary
icon, far responsible positien, must
be capable, willing to work and
good morol character. Apply Bo>
2063. Ancon, Canal Zone. Stat-
ing age, experience etc.
FOR SALE:Flexible copper tubing,
for different use In the follow-
ing sizes: 1-4", 3-8". 1-2", 5-8"
3-4", 1' and 2" et attractive
prices. See them at HASMO, S.
A. No. 51 Via Espoa er at
FRIGIDAIRE refrigeration shop.
William Santa Clare Beach Cottoges.
Two bedrooms Frigldaires, Rock-
go ranges. Balboa 2-3050-
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
^OivlMtKLIAL (J
PROFESSIONAL
We have everyfliln*
to keep your Lawn
and Harden beautiful
chirine the dry season
Shrapnel's houses, Santo Clara. Alsc
in Cold Cerro Compona Meun-
tains. Tel. Balboa 2120.
Enjoy a vacation at Hetel Pan Ame-
ricono, El Voile. Phone Ponomo
2-1112 for reservations.
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR SALE:Records of 33 1-3 of
ell makes. Rare items., AGENCIAS
DIAZ 37th Street No. 6-A,
ALHAMIRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished opert-
ments. Me*! service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR SALE:Lorge electric Ineu-
botor, Tel. 2-2814, Ponama.
FOR SALE:Violin, porch shodes
louvers for laundry and bedrooms.
Cabinet type cover far set tubs.
Mahogony porch swing. Tel. Bal-
boa 1536.
FOR SALE:Beautiful linen Pollera
black cross stitched. No. 18 "A'
Street, downstairs.
FOR SALE: Beautiful ernamental
plants. Cheap. 5th St. Melendei
end Central No. 7026 (right-
opartment), Colon.
WANTEDYoung men with me-
chanical or alectricol engineering
training. Applicants call Balboa
3332, between 7:15 and 12:00
A. M., tar employment forms
which must be filled out tar re-
view prior to interview the latter
part of Feb.
Bids will be received in the office
of the Generol Manager, Commis-
sary Division, Mt. Hqp#* C. Z..
until, 3:00 p. mi Wednesday,'
February 27, 1952, when they
will be opened in public, for fur-
nishing 1,005.000 pounds or, ol-
ternatively, 502,500 pounds e
Fine Granulated Sugar. Forms of
proposal, with full particulars, moy
be obtained In the office of the
Supply & Service Director, Balboa
Heights, or of the General Mon-
ager, Commissary Division, Mt
Hepe. C. Z.
WANTED:Bilingual secretary, fe
male, American, tar responsible
position, must be capable, willing
to work ond good moral choracter
Apply Box 2063, Ancon, Canal
oZne. Stating Age. experience, etc
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: Brand new motors.
1-6 h. p.. 1-4 h. p.. 1-3 h. p
1-2 h. p. All st half price. See
them at HASMO, S. A. No. 51
Via Espaa.
Balboa R0TC Cadets
To Perform Friday
For Gen. Whitlock
FOR SALEBuilding, 8 opartments
(Vi Exposition. Produces more than
I9 annuoly. Easy payment. Forj
Rlormetion see Mr. Febrega peri
molly No. 18 East '29th Street.! ROTC cadets at Balboa High
"IC to 12 noon end 3 to 5 p. m.' School will have their first op-
*Jk -----:---------" '-new Commanding General Fri-
tt FOMND day Bfternoon ln the Balboa
ZVARD for return brown w.llit Major General L. J VUUMk,
entain, various licensee etc i Commanding General. US Army
ff^Z JadeTn, oTJiy, RM c"lbbe' will be the reviewing
I
Wilaon, Tel. Calan 41.
Help Wanted
i officer in a ceremony to be held
I ln hla honor commencing at 2:15
p. m.
Classes will be dismissed ln
the Balboa Junior soul Senior
High Schools ln order to allow
the entire student body to at-
4-^
ANTED: Cook-housekeeper. 5
bays, references required, apply tend."bringThV7ereTny"o.
.Wo. 554-A, Curundu Heights. So- whitlock will briefly address
ptrdoy afternoon the student body on the subject
of National Defense Week.
which Is being celebrated on the
this week. The crack
VAUNTEDExperienced cleaner and
Jenerol helper light laundry, must
Maep in. Apply concrete house JlSi115
icVaes Mount Hope Railroad Sto- OTC special drill team Will also
J ^ put on a brief performance for
'the General immediately fol-
lowing the review.
T
WANTED
MiacHlainrom
HUNTED Three bedroom house
Irith hit water and yard, will rant
r buy. Call Hetel El Penema.
jesm 402, Mrs. Wilson._________
fcpjTED: Apartment in Bella
lista rea. Two or three bed
furnished Or
two to three months. Call Ti-
1 Hotel, reom 3K)
Snow falls In Alps
For 11th Day; Cold
Halts Avalanches
FOR SALE:G. E. refrigerator 60
cycles, portable typewriter, gas
stove four burners, girl's bicycle,
double bed Simmons, stroller, baby
crib. Phone 916. CelOn.
FOR SALE: ~~941 Studebdker
4 door sedan, excellent motor.
General Electric radio, long and
short wave. $35.00. Gas stove
Wardrobe. Tel. Balboa 2649.
FOR SAL:25 Cyl. washing ma-
chine motor. 25 Cyl. 1 H. P.
motor; 25 Cyl. phono motor;.60
Cyl. woshing machine motor;
' Federol" enlorger and easel;
flood reflectors; Cine-Kodak ma-
gazine 8 with Telephoto; Revere
projecter; 9 x 12 Kodak Reco-
mar; furniture, household goods;
priced for quick sale. Phone Bal-
boa 3062.
1st of 9 New Scout
Units Organized
in New Cristbal
Explorer Post 6, Boy Scouts of _.
America, which was recently or- erring to that question. Then
i-ii^aW tn Uam r-^J-t.^t.^1 a? ,k.' nlfrakrf tmtr< fof*t "O'Viifh fOTinnt
ryjoli
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow
Insecticiaei
Fertilifers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 8-1713
#22 E. 29 th St.
FOR RENT:Furnished oportment,
one bedroom, porch, etc. Cuba
Avenue, Edificio Laredo. Informa
tion at 5th floor.
FOR RENT:Responsible party will
rent furnished aportment, one or
two bedrooms. Tel.. No. 2-2724.
FOR KENT
Room
FOR RENT:A clean room to a
gentleman of good habits. Juan
B. Soso Street Apt. 1. ,
FOR RENT
Misrellanponp
FOR RENT:Site suitable for any
-Commercial business or office,
corner of Justo Arosemena and
37th. No. 73-A, beside Thel
New-Yorker. Inquire No. 26 East
37th Street.
LISTS CHARGES
PANAMA C OF C
(Continued fro* Pace 1)
temporarily inconstruction
work."
4) ".. .The undisguised compe-
tition from the entity known asj
The Panam Canal against Pan-
amanian Industry.. .An example
...Is the supplying o ice cream
to the Army. Two Panamanian
companies, fully equipped for
the largescale manufacture of
that product, have been supply-
ing ice cream to the Army. Con-
tracta for supplying ice cream
are awarded through competi-
tive bidding...The Panam Ca-
nal, we are informed, has parti-
cipated in this competitive bid-
ding. The spectacle of this im-
portant agency of the Govern-
ment of the United States enter-
ing bids to deprive Panamanian
manufacturers of business Is
something which cannot be In
keeping with the alms of friend-
ship, of cooperation, of assur-
ance of benefits and of the en-
joyment of geographical advan-
tages which are stipulated in fa-
vor of Panam by the Treaty of
1936."
The memorandum reviewed,
briefly the question of commer-
cial activities in the Canal Zone
and quoted treaty provisions ref-:
It
The HX
Hie Best vanes In town
our tur nit ure is
RHJPIIOLSTERKD
our Mattreeses are
RFBl.'ll.T
all woodwork expertly
RWINISHO
We Huv-Sf 11-Barlrr
UK fHorrhold Exchange)
1 Vito Bov< fit 3-4S1I
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Buying: Abbatoir.
Selling: Fuerza y Lu
(preferred) and
Furria y Lu (common)
Tel. 8-4710 I-IWO
MODERN FURNITURE
ctotom nun/i
SHpcra Reuuholstery
visit ova aitow-aooMi
Alberto Bare
J. r. e I Oaee ?? (AotaaMOtle Kew)
frae eatliaata Piekae Deliver
Tel. S-4S2S :tS U> :# ..
FISHERMEN !
According to the latest re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIO ONES with FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #39 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0863 S-4S64
fanlzed In New Cristobal. Is the clted'two fact "which cannot be
irst of nine Scout Units to be' reconciled":
organized during annlveraaryl
month, It was announced recent- "One la the assertion by the
ly by Col. M. S. Shore, Extensin Chamber of Commerce of Pana-
Chalrman. m that, In keeping with the evl-
Post 6, sponsored by the Cris- dent Intention and the clear text
tobal Little Theater Group, Is un- of the various clauses tst the
"k Tint
p Opportunity
to Learn
Prom
The BetT
Want to be
the most at-
tractive
couple on the
floor? Then
bring your favorite partner to
Harnett & Dunn NOW and
improve your dancing togeth-
er. Modern rates use our
Budget plan fits payments
to paydays. So come ln today
and save. Why miss the fun I
Baltae TM< A I-2S3C or
Bra 108 Balkoa Harnett and Pun
der the leadership of Richard E.
Cox.
Treaty of 1936, the merchants,
businessmen, manufacturers and
Explorer Posts specialize in fanners of the Republic of Pan-
land and jungle activities while ama are entitled to a reasonable
Explorer 8hips and Squadrons opportunity to sell their goods,
specialize ln sea and air activi-
ties.
It is planned to organize Cub
Packs in Ancon, Diablo Heights,
Pedro Miguel and Coco Solo.
Three organizational meetings
will be held a week apart. The
first one, for the Coco Solo Pack,
was held at the Margarita Scout
Shack on Thursday evening test.
The second of these meetings will
be held todav at 7:30 p.m. at the
tame location.
products and services to the Gov-
ernment of the United States in
the Canal Zone, to the inhabi-
tants of that territory, acid to
vessels transiting the Canal.
The other Is the various prac-
tices through which the repre-
sentatives of the Government of
the United States carry out a
policy which tends to Import*
produce and manufacture in the
Canal Zone all that the inhabi-
tants of the Canal Zone can pur-
chase, from essential articles to
The Diablo Heights Pack or- luxury articles."
ganization
next Tuesda
meetings
y _
Diablo Heights Gym while the Its "cola" operations the Panama
ngs will start;
at 7:30 p.m. ln the!
In announcing the ending of
FOR SALE
^'slnrrvrlp
ZURICH. Peb. 14 (UP)
,m^4 weather today slowed the wave
1 of the ratal Alpine avalanches.
but weather bureaus reported
that more snow was en route.
Snow continued to fall ln most
of the Alpine areas for the 11th
consecutive day and a thick
snow mantle which set off the
avalanches ln Switzerland, Aus-
tria and Germany also flooded
the French Dlalrs.
Freak west her caused 75 death'
Pedro Miguel Pack organization canal Company said.
Colder will be Inaugurated on Monday, nuance of bottled
SALE:Indian lioht weiaht 49,
rendition. Houae 517-A,
Heights, 83-2131 terms (across Europe.
dlsconti-
"cola" drinks
in the Pedro'Mignel Gym at 7:80 was authorized following a study
of the past several weeks of op-
erations of the Industrial labor-
atory of the Commissary Divi-
sion.
PJB.
Scout Troops are being plan-
ned in Ancon, Albrook Air Force
Base and Fort Gullck. Plans are
also under way to re-activate the' Although bottled beer and soft
Sea Explorer ship Barracuda In drinks produced In Panama have
Diablo Heights. Persons Interest-been sold the Conurisi-i?s.
ed In tolnlng these troops or the't'-e inconvenience of exchsneing
In may contact the Boy Scout emntv bottles at the various ma
ftc for further Information urire plni 1* believed f
.el. 2-371X. have hampered sales.
FOR fOUR HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. St Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
-a-
Ohio Republican Hat chef man
Gets After Taffs Brother
BY DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON, Feb. 14 Re-
publican leaders In Ohio are so
bitter against Charles P. Taft,
brother of the senator, that they
are waging a stiff undercover
campaign to defeat him for gov-
ernor of Ohio.
A letter has been sent to a se-
lect list of Ohio Republicans by
Gen. P. Lincoln Mitchell of Cin-
cinnati, treasurer of the Hamil-
ton County Republican commit-
tee and member of the Republi-
can state central committee, in
which he links Sen. Taft's bro-
ther with the Democrats, the
CIO. the New Dealers, the Fair
Dealers, and almost everything
"3 except the Communist Par-
ty.
.Strategy behind this campaign
is to eliminate Charles Taft as
candidate for governor at the
Republican primaries, or. falling
that, to persuade the Republican
Perty to abandon him. In the
It Is already reported that a
sizable group of Republicans
will be persuaded to bolt to De-
mocratic Got. Lausche. in re-
turn for which Lausehe would
give quiet support to Sen. John
Bricker and defeat ex-Price
Stabilizer, Mike Di Salle,
' Under date of Jan. 28. here Is
the text of the letter quietly sent
N> Ohio Renublican leaders by
Gen. Mitchell:
"As a member of the Republi-
can state central committee, re-
presenting the first district of
Hamilton County. I feel It my
duv to call vour attention to the
candidacv of Charles P. Taft of
Cincinnati for the office of gov-
ernor of Ohio.
"For the past 25 years. Charles
t-. Taft has been continually al-
lied with a local organization
mown in Hamilton County as
the Charter-Democratic Party.
"Whilst he has made occasion-
al speeches for national and
state ReDublican candidates, he
has at the same time, through
his close association with De-
mocrats ki the Charter-Demo-
cratic Partv. done continuing
ornare to the Republican P*r-
tv in Hamilton County and the
state.
"He has represented the CIO
and new steads shoulder to
shoulder with Jack Kroll. the
head of the P.A.C.. who Is the
most Influential member of the
Charter-Democratic Party In
Cincinnati.
"In the last munlcioal elec-
tion in Cincinnati, in November,
the Republic Party elected five
regular Republican* and now
control the city administration.
"Charles P. Taft vigorously
opposed the Republican ticket
and made a strenuous campaign
to defeat it and to elect the.
Charter-Democratic candidates
and a Democratic mayor.
"As result of his efforts, the
following minority roup were
elected on the Charter-Demo-
cratic ticket: Two Democrats
who led the fight for Franklin D
Roonevelt and Harrv S. Truman
in Hamilton County: the third,
an extreme left-wlnv Negro re-
presenting labor: and the fourth
councilman elected on the Char-
ter-Democratic ticket was an-
other candidate representin the
labor bosses, who undoubtedly
suDoorted the New Deal and
Her<*v Truman.
dependent Republican window "I attach here with an editor-
dressing on this.Charter-Demo-
cratic ticket, but no one remote-
ly resembling a Republican re-
ceived any vote of consequence.
"It was an out and out Demo-
cratic P.A.C. campaign ln which
they elected four P.A.C. and
Democratic councilmen and In
which Charles P. Taft took a
very prominent part.
"Several years ago, Charles P.
Taffs political activities com-
pelled that he sever his rela-
tions with his brother. Sen. Ro-
bert A. Taft's law firm.
His political affiliations, in
addition to his lose asociation
with CIO and PAC. Include a
former Cincinnati councilman
and member of the Charter-
Democratic committee who re-
cently and mysteriously resign-
ed from that committee after
investigations revealed that he
had employed a secretary who
was a Communist and that
many of his associates were ra-
dicals believed to be Commun-
ists, who at that time Infested
the CIO.
"CharlesP. Taft's almost con-
tinuous employment in the New
Deal and Fair Deal indicates
that he is exceedingly congenial
in that company.
lal (from the sandusky. O, Re-
gister Star News) which cover!
and documents Charles P. Taft's
entire public record.
"I submit that no person could
hold fifteen consecutive Jobs ln
any political party and be offer-
ed and decline a sixteenth lob,
unless he were a thoroughly loy-
al member of the official fami-
ly.
"He pretends to be a Republi-
can but he Is In effort closely al-
lied with the Hamilton County
PAC Democratic Party, formerly
known as the Charter-Democra-
tic Party.
He is a loyal New Dealer try-
ing to take a ride on the good
name of his brother. Sen. Robert
A. Taft.
"Those who support Charles P.
Taft should know that in doing
so they are supporting a mem-
ber of the Cincinnati PAC De-
mocratic group which will go all
out for Harry Truman or who-
ever Truman nominates.
'I will ask you to pass on this
letter to those who are Interest-
ed In a Republican Party free of
the New Deal principles and al-
liances which Charles P. Taft
has cultivated during the past 28
years."
Grand Larceny
Charge Reduced
To Petty Theft
A grand larceny charge
reduced to two petty larceny
charges today ln the Balboa
Magistrate's Court.
The defendant, James Ma-
nuel Williams. 23, was fined a
total of $30 and given a 60-
day suspended sentence, and a
year's probation.
Williams was originally charg-
ed with stealing a book of 100
meal tickets valued at $80 from
the Survey Branch of the Pan-
ama Canal at Diablo.
On a motion made by the
government this morning the
charge was dismissed and the
defendant discharged.
However, Williams was book-
ed on two petty larceny charges
Instead.
The first one covered the
theft of four meal tickets,
worth $2 and the second charge
was for stealing six meal tick-
et worth $g. jj______
Blaming. Freighteyij
'George Duketon'
Abandoned By.;ew
"There was some so-called ln- position.
MIAMI, Feb. 14 (UPV The
freighter George Duketon, be-
lieved of Swedish registry, caught
fire seven miles off the north-
west coast of Cuba today and
was abandoned..
The Coast Guard herb said the
vessel radioed its position and
the simple distress message:
"Fire on board. Abandoning
hip."
No word has since been re-
ceived.
A Catalina amphibious plane
took off from here, and a Coast;
Guard cutter left from Key West':
for '.".ie freighter's last reported;
Bromlieldr Fanners
Spend Day Al Divisa
Louis Bromfield and SB re-
was presentative farmers who are
here in Panama on a "good
will" tour throughout Latin
America sponsored Jointly by
Braniff International Airways
nd the Farm Journal Maga-
zine left early this morning to
spend the day at Divisa.
They will observe the pro-
gress made by the National
Institute of Agriculture under
the guidance of the Agricultur-
al Mission of the University of
Arkansas; and the Institute of
Mechanic Arts, under the direc-
tion of the Servicio Cooperativo
Inter-Americano de Educacin
(SCIDE) an agency of the In-
stitute of Inter-American Af-
fairs, ln cooperation with the
government of the Republic ot
Panama.
The group will also visit the
Tuberculosis Hospital which Is
being built at La Chorrera, the
Farm Group Experimental
School at El Higo 19 San Car-
los, and the Rxperimentel School
at Divisa, all o whichT are co-
operating with the Point Four
Program in" Panama.
Bromfield and the farmer
group will also visit the vari-
ous privately owned farms In
the Interior.
Ntete cstjMnYaasks m ser-
?etf, se she the oes t best
JtSL--------- *~
A TV film package that win
star Bisa Bid LstsseU. stith Pres-
ton Sturges as director. Is inches
awa freest tbe^fflcial asuaeauaoe-
men't stage. Agent BsTJ Waste
riwaed up the series fee Rewi-
nd, who prefers to Uve and work
n sSrwood in suite of her stage
neceas tas "Bell, Seek as*
a
WE RECONDITION 'EM RIGHT
WE PRICE 'EM RIGHT
THEREFORE
OUR USED CAR STOCK IS THE J.OWEST EVER
TRADE IN YOUR OLD CAR NOW
Get a
NEW 1952 PONT I AC
WITH DUAL PERFORMANCE
HYDRAMAT1C ft POWER-TRAIN ACTION
"Dollar For Dollar You Can't Beat PONTIAC"
CIV A, S.A.
PANAMA
COLON


THirSDAY. FEBRUARY 14 158
tul PANAMA AMsUcAN AN WdSpRTOENT DAILY MtWiPAPt
ii i -* '
PAOzsrriM
III HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
HOLLYWOOD, (NEA> EX-.Alden in Spencer Tracy's "Mas-
clasivelv Yours: MGM's blowing Iter of the Mayflower." cameras
the elust off "Love is Better Than i turn when Spence completes the
Ever" and. after crossing all fin-. current "Pat and Mike" oppos-
eers. will release the picture in lte Katharine Hepburn. Katie's
Franco-German Squabbling
Threatens European Army
April.
Inn film, co starring Larry
Palks and Liz Taylor, has been
still wide-eyed over the success
of "African Queen." She told me:
"It was such fun to do, and so
oj the shelf, marked "Too Hot to congenial, that we thought may-
Handle" ever aftice Larry went to be it would be a fiasco."
Washington as a Red probe wit-
nets.
Charlie Chaplin, who never
talked about retirement seriously
before. 1* saying that "Lime-
light" will be his lat movie.
Sylvana Manaano. the woo-Sheridan's co-star in UI's
woo doll la "Bitter Rice," Is ex- Girl Across the Street."
Hepburn on television?
"Not me," she said. "I still
dont like radio. I don't think
I've done over 10 radio shows in
my life." ... John Lund will play
a romantic plumber as Ann
The
Bv-
pettlng Blgnor Stork agaip. Her'ery t t movie house In Holly-
condition cost her the lead role, wood is getting ready to re-play
in John Hnston's "Moulln,Vittorlo Gassman's old Italian
Rouge." ...Zsa Zsa Gabor wiUimovies if Shelley Winters weds
plav the part Instead. the lad___Note from Mike Con-
-------- nolly: "Frankle and Ava showed
Hollywood studio heads are uo at an eatery with a pair of
aendin* menus forbidding too-,plug-uglies who stood bodyguard
die haircuts to contract clamor outside their booth while they
star. The short, doggy locks ere-1 dined."...(???)
ate a problem In costante period --------
films. Is Mickey Rooney taklne over
_____ Jackie Cooper's tazz drummer
Clifton Webb's new 14-year role when MOM does the film
contract with Fox gives him the version of the Broadway rofne-
rliiht to direct whenever he de- dy, "Remains To Be Seen"?
cides to give uo acting.
Mickev. on Paramount's "Mili-
tary Policeman'' set looked pain-
ed and muttered that the atu-
A line' of purple prose that
would make even Kathleen Win- dio had billed Sally Forrest over
aor Jealous from the script of i him In "The Strip."
"Dream Boat": "MOM." he said, "wouldn't let
"Now he begins the kiss of me even do a cartoon for them
kisses, traveling from fingertips at this point,
to arm lio shoulder to nenk to Joan Caulfield, on a personal
mouth as Margarita wilts like a appearance tour with "The La-
convulsive flower." dy Says No." was asked by a
The author Is Claude Blnyon. Minneapolis reporter to describe
-------- the mink band she wore for a
Paramount won't give Mona'hat,
Freeman sexv roles, but Deanl "Oh." said Joan," It's Just some
Martin and Jerry Lewis Insist. left-over fur attached to a bicy-
Mona had the lead in two oficie clip."
their 16mm. funnies; as the:------------------------------
gangster' moll in "The Reinforc- Watch Dog Pampered
er," and aa the rejected one in u,r.Br,Mrn m. htpi a
"A Snot in thp Shadp a take- WORCESTER, Mass. (UP) A
oft m vou-know-what burglar who looted Oeorge Long-
on on vou know wnat. street's home brought along
Movies are hotter than ever some Hamburg to keep the famUy
dept.: Describing a Oeorge Raft- watch dog occupied.
Gall Russell love scene on the| T.ui.iB7~witi. T.a
beach for Bernie Luber's "Loan Television With Taxea
PF-u the *crlpt tfZa;J!T& MILWAUKEE. (UP) -One in*
hold the embrace until the film ome Ux consultant here la ad-
ignites and we fade out. vertislng "Television entertain-
It's labeled "top secret" at UI.:ment whiiev(ni wait."
but I discovered that four fea-;
ture films and 100 shorts will be
produced for television within a
year's span when the studio's big
Tideo program starts.
Stage 12 has been converted
Into two floors of offices for the
sound and dubbing TV schedule
the back lot is undergoing sweep-
ing changes and .the. eouipment
Is pouring-Into the studio.
June rf.avOc.and Celeste Holm
whom she replaced in "Affairs'
of state" on Broadway, are feud-
ing. Celeste predicted the show
wouldn't run three weeks with
June in the lead.
I'M OUSJUA P/G
Van Johnaon will play John
LONDON, Feb. 14 ((UP)
Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son arrived by plane yesterday
and opened immediate confer-
ences with his top European
aides on possible ways of eni-
ing the mount ng quarrel be-
tween France and Western Ger-
many.
Acheson made formal calls on
the Royal residences In his capa-
city as Piesident Truman* of-
ficial representative to the fun-
eral of "King George VI.
Then he was briefed by the
experta on the increasingly-
serious dispute between France
, a:id Germany.
John J. McCloy, U. 8. high
commissioner for Germany, re-
! ported to the secretary on the
i upsurge of German nationalism
which threatens to upset the
project of creating a single
European army composed of
i units from France, West Ger-
! many, Italy, Belgium, the Neth-
] erlands and Luxembourg.
David K. E. Bruce, U. 8. am-
bassador to France, reported on
France's reaction to German
demands for more "equality" be-
fore Joining in Western Euro-
pean defense programs.
Acheson also heard W. Averell
Harrlman, u. 8. mutual security
administrator, and William H.
i Draper Jr., the MSA chief In
Europe, on Just what the lndlvl-
i dual members of the North At-
lantic Treaty Organization are
prepared to contribute to Euro-
pean defense this year. .
It was understood that Ache-
son, British Foreign Secretary
Anthony Eden and French For-
eign Minister Robert Schuman
1 will begin their Big Three talks
Saturday without the participa-
tion of Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer of West Germany.
Informed sources said Bruce
warned Acheson that France
wou'rt view unfavorably his
meeting with Adenauer before
o.iumbn was had a chance to
discuss Germany with the
secretary.
Acheson will attend King
George's funeral tomorrow, talk
with Eden and Schuman Satur-
day, and probably meet with
Adenauer Sunday.
The West German chancellor
is expected to Join in the eon-
fernece Monday.
The secretary, his wife,. and
seven aides, arrived in Britain
from Washington aboard Mr.
Truman's piarte, the Indepen-
dence. ,
American officials described
Acheson's trip to Europe, dur-
ing which he will attend the
North Atlantic Treaty Organ-
ization council meeting in Lis-
bon, as a "mission of concilia-
tion."
ford Design Men
Began 1952 Model
Four Years Ago
It took about four years and
1130 million to produce the lat-
est model Ford, according to a
Wall Street Journal article.
The result of all this tim and
monev is now selling In Panama
through Ford agents Colpan
Motors
Ray Vlcker and John Williams,
authors of the Wall Street Jour-
nal article, wrote:
"That four year period of In-
cubation is typical of the tre-
mendous Job and high costs
which any auto company faces
when It decides to give birth to
a new automobile. .
"C. L. Waterhouse, Ford's styl-
ing department manager, says
the drawings first started in
January. 1948. ultimately led to
the 19S2 design. .
"Some of those first color
sketches looked like cartoonls'
conceptions of futuristic space
ships, while others were more
conservative.
After the practical were
screened from the dreamy one-
tenth-scale wood and clay mo-
dels were made of the beat draw-
ings. These toy cars were used to
check contours and to Judge how
the various nrooosed new models
might look in three dimensions.
"Ford has about 30 designers
working continually on these ad-
vanced stvling ideas. Rl"ht now
they are developing style lines on
oaper and in clay for 1965 and
later automobiles.
"In February. 194. Ford start-
ed design of the 19S2 chassK the
first step in coordinating all ac-
tivity.
"Meanwhile, the Ford sales
staff had its ears open to deal-
ers' suggestions.
"Here are some of the ideas
advanced bv them: A quieter en-
gine, new door locks, foam rub-
ber seats, easier steer, counter-
balanced deck lids and hood,
and many more.
"On May 26. 1949, Ford's top
El Panama's Buffet
To Feature Fashion
Show For 'Crusade'
A Crusade for Freedom Fash-
ion Show will be a special attrac-
tion Sunday at El Panama's re-
gular buffet.
The show, to be held at 8 p.m..
will be directed by Mrs. William
F. All bright.
Ten beautiful volunteer mo-
dels including two "Harper's Ba-
zaar" models now in Panama.
Sandra Brown and Patricia
Shalley. will lend their charms
to the cause.
Fashions will Include beach
wear, evening clothes, sport and
street clothes. Women's fashions
will be provided bv the French
Bazaar, Motta's. Modas Marcela
and Felix Maduro: and men's
i fashions by the American Ba/aar
and La Mascota.
Local beauties who also Will
management recommended a-
doptlon of all dealers' questions,
and outlined basic objectives of
that new model."
ITS OVUTtMB
?a*" mort mo* notion
ereV re tell thorn
lfcey*e. *
Panama Canal 6/heaters ~
Showing Tonight!
R A I ft fi A Vivien LEIGH O Marlon BRANDO
' \IZZ "STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE"
, f IS a SiSS rrMny^-rOWT WOBTW b|| |
Hi AMD MT< winiam powii.l o Irene ditnnc
" "Lif With Father" (Technicolor)
----------f rM1t7 '.*"WTf model are: Marltza I. queen Of
El Panama's Carnival: Graciela
Campagnanl. Panama's coffee
queen: Julie Halloran, artist and
cover girl for "American Maga-
aine" last year; Ann Gorman,
queen of Panama and the Canal
Zone, Emita Arosemena, coffee
queen of 1950: Llcky Arosemena.
queen of the carnival at the Un-
ion Club and Dorlta Borrel, Pan-
ama's girl of the year.
Estllene Miller queen of Fish-
erman's Grotto In San Francisco
also will model. There will be no
special entrance charge for to
the "Crusade for Freedom" fash-
ion show.
COCOLI
1:11 I*
-
Ch.rlm McCRAW O Joan DIXON
"ROADILOCK"
___Friday TOUBTEKM HOURS"
PEDRC MIGUEL
(:ll ft l:M
(r'rMayi
'ANNE OF THE INDIES"
GAMBOA
tm
ft
Burl LANCASTER PJiyllU BAXTER
'Jim Thorpe All Americon"
___Selnrday "FOURTEEN HOURS"_______
GAT UN
t.-ta
t
(Brfoay)
'GOLDEN GIRL"
TOROS
\ AT
LA MACARENA RING
in Son Francisco Garden
SUNDAY Feb. 17th at 4:30 p.m.
Farewell
Performance
^^ of the
Prince
/ Bull Fighting
CONCHITA
MORENO
Grand Performance
TODAY TODAY
at
PRESIDENTE Theatre
6:15 ft 9:15 p.m.
TROPICAL Theatre
at 10:30 p.m.
MANOLO
ORTEGA
inous Spanish
Matador
OUR
(4)
BULLS
will be fought
and killed
Box Seat.............. $3.00
Shad<............. 2.00
General Admittance........ 1.00
COURTESY ESTRANCE for LADIES
ACCOMPANIED by GENTLEMEN
TONGOLELE
SENSATIONAL DANCER
with SILVESTRE MNDEZ
THE ACE OF MUSICAL RHYTHM.
14 PIECE BAND
CONDUCTED BY PAZ BROTHERS.
PRICES ... $1.00- RESERVED SEATS FINISH
IALCONY... 75f
NOTE: AH courtesy tickets are canceled.


Lror ^outn, /or spring, ror _Jw#
ummtr...
tJ^) the Pertest Prints on
BEMBERG SHEERS
flM 12.
COTTONS
you'll want te Uve in.
Adorable Dressy and Evening Frocks
for that most important party.
AU sisea- to 15 It to it il>, to **' .
AT BOTH OUR STORES
FELIX B. MADURO, S. A.
21 Central Avente
TlvoU Aveno*
MARGARITA
1:1 a Sll(

Ann SHHIDAN O Moni WOOLLCY
"The Man Who Came To Dinnor"
Friday ArromTMKXT WTTR DAWOEB_
CRISTOBAL
Alr.rMSltkmed
CIS IS
Robert HUTTON Sltvc RRODIE
"THE STEEL HELMET"
rrMay -'LORNA DOONF."
DIABLO HTS^^ioSoJL.
GARY GRANT,
INGRID BERGMAN
in ALFRED HITCHCOCK'B
NOTORIOU
BALBOA 0PENS SATURDAY)
St t%e CuU to Adventure!
U
A UNITED STATES PICTURES
I ^La-LenaaC JLa^sW a a^aw^at* fcaattfta^aW iaoaW
LUX TODAY
SHOWS: 3:00 4:48 6:53 9:00 P.M.
SOCKO in
IROCCQ
... mm k ea isrt, m
MbaaM-MMay.
i aw-ca tswt, socases*
fraa tkt levlTs ssonrtv!
KW-

Humphrey BOGART
vtocco
M1WIEE16/
-Emit SUM MINI. ZriIWEI /
COMINO!
TEXAS COMPANY"
(In Technicolor)
hrwrrt
PANAMA CITY
TODAY |THEATRES
Protent
LUX THEATRE
As lona as it gets dark ... he rets
what he wants! .. .
"SIROCCO"
HUMPHREY BOGART
L*c J. COBB Marta TOREN
CENTRAL- BELLA-VISTA
I0AN EVANS
MELVYN MISLAS
LYNN Mil
1:0, 4:01. t 30. 8 55 Dm
Storming the Scrim with
Pinion and Drama I
ShaUtr
wnVTRBf
Bichar*
COMTI
SrNAtXT. la
"RACING TIDE"
Alan The Brillan Documental
THE HOUSE OF WINDSOR
CECILIA THEATRE
t.
The civil war drama! Human I
"RED BADGE OF COURAGE"
Aadle MVBPaT BW MAUUXN
Abo. Sarrr TBACT Pat O'BBIEN, hi
PEOPLE AGAINST O'HARA"
CECILIA THEATRE TODAY
AN EXCITING DOUBLE FEATURE!
HUMAN! MOVING!
ACTION-FULL!
COURACI
ahiiTmmphy
lili NAUIW
PLUS:

a^*w^t_wtjaas
TiSCY
Ificrccfu
*AMST
fHAIA
O'lteq lYW IHBreN
TROPICAL THEATRE
"CAROLINE CHERIE"
French Diaiotue Spanish Sub-titles,
PLUS
TONGOLELE at 10 30 p.m.
ENCANTO THEATRE
WAHOO at P.M.
Brie lHctaBeU*. In
THE SPIDER AND
THE FLY"
- Aha -
Claudette Colbert, hi
"Family Howeywioon"
CAPITOLIO THEATRl
BANK NIGHT!
Loretta Younc. In
"HALF ANGEL"
Ateo
Olann Pord. In
FOLLOW THE SUN"
TWOLI THEATRE^
~ ejhel Baniwi. la
"RIND LADY"
Alao
Dei id Brtao. la
INTRUDER In the DUST"
VICTORIA THEATRE
VIOLXNT DOUBLBI.
Mark Stewart, hi
STRUT WITI NO NAMV
Vioeem tria*.
SHQCR"


I
pe not
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILf NEWSPAPER
fHL'RSDAT. FEBRUARY 14, MSI
^
President Of International Olympic Committee To Retire



lAvery Brnndage* Now V.P
Recommended For Top Job
By United Press
OSLO, Norway. Feb. 14 J. Sigfrid Edes-
troem, Swedish president of the International Olym-
pic Committee, after announcing last night that he
would retire after the Summer Olympic Games in
Helsinki, gave his blessing to the candidacy of
Avery Brundag, I.O.C. vice-president from the
United States.
Speaking at a banquet of IOC delegates, Edes-
troem said, "After having worked together for so
many years, I believe it would be a fine thing if
Mr. Binndage succeeded me in the presidency."
Edestroem was elected as the first-post-war
president of the IOC in 1946 for an eight-year term.
In event of death or retirement of the president, the
full IOC congress elects a new one at the first plen-
ary meeting. But the retired president would con-
tinue as a member of the committee for life.
bk Edestroem's speech added a new element to the
presidential race in which official quarters report
that Brundage is the leading candidate along with
Armand Massard of France and Lord Burghley of
Britain.
Plummer Slight
Favorite To Whip
Ted Davis Sunday
Theolic Smith Hurls Against
Yanks Tonight; Bombers Win
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Panama Featherweight (ham- Yankees.. ...... tS 11 .676
plon Federico Plummer Is a Bombers........21 13
slight betting favorite over Teddy Bluebird!.......13 21
(Red Top) Davis for their sched-
uled ten-round 130 pound battle
Sunday night at the Panama
Olympic Stadium.
Despite the fact that the
visitor pounded out a unanimous
eight round verdict over Plum-
met-, local fans have installed
the Panama Mol as the betting
favorite.
They base their action on the
reports that Federico was not
well acclimated and not himself
Dec. 17 when he bowed to Davis
at New York's St. Nicholas Are-
na in an eight-rounder.
Both Davis and Plummer have
caused rave comments
Bronnies.......11 23
.618
.382
.324
TONIGHT'S GAMES
Panam Stadium: (First Game
6 o'clock)Bluebirds (Stempel
5-3) vs. Brownies Burks 4-7);
(Second Game)Yankees (Tho-
mas 6-1) vs. Bombers (Smith
7-1).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Balboa Stadium: Bombers
Brownies 2.
CZSA .22 Pistol Championship
At Cristobal Gun Club Sunday
The first pistol match of the
year to be sponsored by the Can-
al Zone Shooting Association will
take place this coming Sunday,
Feb. 17. at the Cristobal Gun
Club's range. This match will be
1118-1059 score. Earl Mitchell,
who Is currently doing some ex-
cellent shooting, hit 288 to top
the riflemen for,the evening's
festivities. High man for the Ma-
rines was Earnest Combs with
for the team championship of j 277. This boy Combs Is coming
i the Isthmus with the .22 pistol along, and will give local rifle-, third same In a ix>w yesterday by
^toh^Jr1' ?\U"daL"iB3 tiriag twice over the Nationsl! men some hot competition In defeating the Federal Boys by a
Match course. Each shooter will, days to come, and not far off score 0f87 to 4. Jimmy Watson
fire sixty shots, twenty slow fire either!
The Balboa ROTC team, led by
Little
League
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost
Sears............ 8
Police ..i......... 5 I
Lincoln Life........ 4 4
APGE 14.......... 2 4
Elks 1414.......... 8 4
Firemen........... t S
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Sears 7, AFGE 4.
TODAY'S GAME
Police vs. Firemen.
The Catalog Boys won their
Patat Takes Half Came Lead
In Atlantic Twilight League
------- O -------
ATLANTIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE thirds of his team's hits.
STANDINGS All the hits garnered off Pes-
XJBAM Won Lost Pet.' cod were singles and two of the
Pabst..........6 5 .545. three were In the second inning
f.H.S..........5 5 .500 when Powell's scored twice. Pes-
Powell's........5 6 .455 cod also walked three batters,
I and two of these were In the
TUESDAY NIGHT'S RESULTS
Pabst 8. Powell's 5.
TONIGHT'S GAME (Thursday)
CHS. vs. Pabst.
of their brilliant tune-up drills.
Davis' speed in exceptional while
Plummer seems to be concen-
trating on a kayo punch. Fred-
die has shown power never be-
fore displayed by him.
The interest shewn in this
fight is so great that the Sun-
day night Panama-Colon night
train will be held 50 minutes in
order to enable Atlantic side
fight fans an opportunity to re-
turn to their homes early.
Meanwhile, semlftnallsts Wll-
fredo Brewster and Leonel Pe-
ralta are hard at work pounding
themselves into tip-ton condi-
tion. Peralta is the favorite to
whip Brewster in the ten-round
137-pound sub-feature.
doubleheader at the Panam
Stadium will get under way to-
night at 6 o'clock Instead ot 6:3Q
because I The first game will be between
Silver Cily Sports
JUNIOR HIGH BOYS SOFTBALL
at fifty "yards, and twenty each
timed "fire and rapid fire at twen-
ty-five yards at the Standard
National Rifle Association targ-
ets for the distance.
In view of the highly success-
ful center rifle match held at
Cristobal late last year, associa-
tion officials decided that this
match would also be held there.
The Cristobal Gun Club's faclll-
the Bluebirds and Brownies, the
second between the pennant
contending Yankees and Bomb-
ers.
Classy Theolic Smith, the loop's
leading pitcher, will hurl against
the Yansees. It will probably be
Smith's last appearance here
unless the league race ends In a
tie. Smith last night received
word from St. Louis Browns
prexy Bill Veeck that he must
report to the Browns' training
camp by Feb. 21. Smith says he
will leave next Wednesday, Feb.
20.
If Smith defeats the Yankees
tonight, It will leave the Bomb-
ers only one full game behind
the leaders. This would force the
Yankees to win against the {^tled* to"7po"rt the" corre-
Dave Hoopes with 260, took the
measure of the Cristobal ROTC
1006 to 816. Bill Stevens' 230 was
high for the losers. The scores of
these matches follow:
PISTOL
CRISTOBAL
Slow Timed Rapid Ttl.
P. Stewart 83
E. W. Scott 85
ties are excellent for thlB type of D. E. Barck 83
W. B. Huff 75
Team Total-
match, and the center fire match
held there was greatly enjoyed
bv all contestants and their fam-
This match Is known locally as
the National Match Qualification
course, because it is the same L. H. Pratt 74
course used for NRA outdoor pis- j. Denham 75
tol qualification ranking, and e.L. Hamon 74
those firing adequate scores will a. Brumflel 81
00
85
81
88
96
84
84
81
269
2541
248
went all the way for Sears, al-
lowing only three hits.
AFGE scored in their half of
the first on a walk, passed ball
and a single. In the second Sears
scored three times on a hit bats-
man, an error, one hit and two
walks, in their half of the third,
the Catalog Boys pushed four
more runs across on three walks
and three hits.
Watson had a one-hitter go-
Snodgrass and Morris teamed up
on two nice plays in the fifth re-
tiring Alas and McKeown on at-
tempted steals.
Today, the Coppers meet the
8 m o k 1 e s. Probable pitching
choices are Robertson and
Schneider.
The box score:
SEARS AB R HPO A
Watson, John, If. 1 0 0 O 0
Schwarzrock, If.. 1 0 1 0 0
Watson, R., 88 .. 2 0 1 8 9
Durfee, T.. c.. .. 3 0 0 2 0
Rlgby. c .. .. .. oo 0 4 0
Durfee, G., lb. .. 3 0 1 7 2
Curdts, cf..... 2 2 0 0 0
Watson, Jas., p .. 4 2 2 0 3
Mendoza, 2b .... 4 0 0 2 0
Alas, rf...... 8 2 800
McKeown, 3b. .. 0 1 0 0 2
Totals........23 7 8 18 Id
AFGE 14 AB
Salas, 2b...... 0
Morris, 3b..... 2
Castleman, p-ss.. 3
Wills, lb...... 3
Snodgrass, c. .. 2
Motion, ss-rf.. .. 3
if- lng in the last of the sixth, but Stelner, cf..... 2
Z4*i experienced a streak of wlldness.'aReece........ 0
COCO SOLO MARINES
Slow Timed Rapid Ttl.
1
83
84
82
80
86
78
79
76
Here, Balas and Morris were glv- HalL If. .
1U1 en free passes. Castleman forced1 Elmendorf, rf
Morris at second. Wills came'Feeney, p.. .... 1
through with a double to left-'bEdmondson.. .. 1
center scoring two runs. Snod-
1
Brownies at Mt. Hope tomorrow
night to clinch the league cham-
pionship.
Last night the Bombers kept
spondlng NRA brassard showing
their standing. The match is pri-
marily a team match, with eith-
er four or five shooters named
SvLeAr "M*^0?? to each team, four scores to
Team Total
TEAM Won Lost,Pet' by defeating the Brownies, 5-2, t ^ e wlll ^ teftm awards e. Mitchell 99
" 1.00 at Balboa Stadium behind the "th_ t.-. tFflm. R1ii Tflffrav qq
.75. six-hit pitching of Alberto Oso- < ^^'eXes will also bel MmtaVn 98
.667 rio. Humberto Robinson, whoted from M interested Bob Demlng 98
.333 gave up eight hits, was the loserMjfooolw,. These individual shoot-
RIPIE
ALBROOK-Cl HINDU
Slow Timed Rapid Ttl.
2*3 grass walked. Motion singled to Totals........21 4 3 18
2J center scoring Wills. Reece walk-! Score By Innings
10 ed loading the bases and putting Sears 0 4 3 G 0 07 8 0
the tying run at the plate. But,'AFGE 14 10 0 0 0 34 3 2
Watson finally settled down and| aWalked for Stelner In the 6th.
forced Hall to foul out and Ed-: bBatted for Feeney In 6th. Wln-
mundson grounded to R. Watson nine PitcherJas. Watson (2-0).
for a force at second. i Losing PitcherCastleman (2-3).
Leading hitter for the game Struckout byWatson 5, Caatle-
216
"mi:
8C
7B
7A
8A
71
SB
I first when Powell's scored their
first two runs.
C.H.S. Plays Pabst Tonight
Cristobal High School, the hot-
i test team in the loop right now.
The Atlantic Twilight League will have their first opportunity
entered its last week of play in to move into the league lead to- "times at hat DeSotnj
the first half race. In this first night when they take on F*bst urh m?' DJ"_ hits in Sr
game of the torrid home-stretch at Mt. Hope at 7 o'clock. ?,- ^t?*
drive last night at Mt. Hope, the ^. ,
Pabst nine came out on the long The High School nine has won
end ot an 8 to 5 score against four'of their last five games and
Powell's to regain the lead they,as the season progresses they
had lost to that team on Jan. 22. c?n,lnJ?e1.to *et rougher. Bucky
hii Tiphst manager, knows he
'Hctor Lpez accounted for'^'y^i,0' Q't"he el'ielble "for" team
.001 three of the six Brownie hits to J*[$*for the
widen hisi margin to the league JS3ivg,ii place medals. Entry
7B edged 8A, 5-4. Basil DeSou- batting championship race. L- m f both Individual and team
sa toed the slab for 7B and Na- pez now is hitting .347 as com- 3SL.. ,n 1nr Aorh con-
thanlel Vasquez for 8A. pared to Forrest Jacobs .324.
G. McDonald, right fielder for, Granville Gladstone got two
the 8A outfit,;had three hits In for four. Frank Austin led the
97
97
98
7
90
85
83
77
Team Total-
four
er.
bat.
Score by toning.:
8A 110 0 10 14
7B 3 2 0 0 0 0 05
ELEMENTARY GIRLS
SOFTBALL
Saturday, the Silver City Ele-'
_ jjbers at bat with two for four.
ablo Bernard homered for the
liners.
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
THE STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
j Hall. Pabst
The win put Pabst half a game has no easy job on his hand*. He
ahead of the Idle CHS. team and. has therefore saved Gibson from
moved Powell's to the cellar spot, mound duties Tuesday and will mentary School girls from grade
Just one game off the leader's send him to the hill tonight. |8 traveled to La Boca to repre-
pace. The loss was Powells fourth | sent their school in the Elemen-
ta 5 row, the longest losing streak Opposing Gibson will be the tary softball tournament They
suffered by any team In the loop league's top hurler, Tom Hughes, first met Paraso girls and! Commissary .... 8
this season. who has been tough on hitters trounced them to the tune of. Building Division 1
Jackie Pescod was Bucky Hall's ail season. All this adds up to a 10-2. Winning pitcher was Betty; central Labor Off. 1
choice as pitcher for this all-im- brilliant pitching duel between Forte who went all the way. Ruth Army Signal. 1
nortant contest, and Jack came the two leading hitters. Both top,Thomas, shortstop, had three hits; Corozal Sales Store 1
through with a neat three-hit pitcher* are also first and s*e- in four times at bat. Marva Army Q. M. I
performance. Poor support In the, ond In the batting average de-'. Hawkins accounted for three hits Navy Ordnance 1
early Innings had Pescod in partment.
trouble, but once the Pabst nine The box score:
had settled down, and moved in-; Powell's AB
to the lead In the second frame,' Carty, 2b. ... 3
they were never headed. Dockery, ss 3
Chappel, rf 4
Left-hander Freddy Hill start- Muloy, c .... 3
d for Powell's, but didn't get be. Thomas, lb 3
yond the first frame when Pabst, Hlghley, 3b 3
sent a total of nine batters to the! Watson, cf. 1
Elftte. Hill was nicked for four Troutman, p. 1
its and an equal number of runs' Bowers, pi. ... 1
before removed tor Troutman. En?lebrlght, If. 3
HPO A
2 4 2
0
0
3
8
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
also. Post Office. 1
The second game was played Kebbe Sales Store.
E between Santa Cruz and Silver Electrical Division, t
0 City for the championship. The
0 winner of the maten being Santa
0 Cruz.
ELEMENTARY BOYS
BASEBALL
0 The Elementary boys also c
AB
. 1
. 3
. 3
. 4
. 3
. 4
, 1
2
HPO
1 1
Jroutnian lasted only until the; H1. p.....1
third. Although he gave up only Bryton.....1
two hits, he allowed three walks,
and three runs and was charged; Totals .
with the deteat. "Bingo" Bowers
relieved in the third and gave upi Pabst
only one hit. though walking five Egolf, ss
and allowing one run to score. Welch. If. .
Noel Gibson, second highest. Hale, cf .
hitter In the Atlantic Twl-Loop, Gibson. 2b .
added points to his batting aver- Swearingen, c
age with two for four and Hughie Hall, lb .
Hale had two for three for the Hooper. 3b. .
Pabst team Both players are on Jaramillo, rf.
the All-Star squad that plays at Pescod. p. ... 3
Balboa Saturday night in the
March of Dimes game. For the Totals.....24
losers Georpe Carty, another All- Score Bv Innings
Star selection, had two hits in Powell's 2 2 0 0 0 0 15
three trips to account for two- Pabst 4 12 0 10 x8
0 companied the girls to La Boca
0 to defend their colors. The first
1 game was between Red Tank and
1'Silver City with the latter de-
0 feating Red Tank, 12-4. Jerry Es-
1.088
1.008
1.000
.508
.501
.50
.500
Team Total
D
shooters wlll be $1 for each con-|E. Combs 98
testant taking part. Firing will; j. C'nselm'n 94
start at 10 a.m. on Sunday. m. Perkins 98
This is one of the two big .22 pfc Watson 90
pistol matches of the year. NRA
rules wlll apply. It will be con-
ceded that the Balboa Gun Club's
fine team, last year's champions,
will be hard to beat In this one,
strengthened as they are by US.
champ Huelet Benner. Every
shooting fan will want to see
Benner In action, and this wlll be
posslblv the best opportunity to
do so. The big competition will be
between the Rodman Marines
and the Cristobal Gun Club team
for second place. The Balboa w. Stevens 08
second team and Albrook-Cu- R. Goodh'd 85
rundu are the dark horses to this, rj. Cockle 87
one. The Albrook-Curundu team v. Fisher 81
Is weaker' than It has been to
RODMAN MARINES
Slow Timed Rapid Ttl.
94
96
88
83
8?
81
76
76
was Alas with two doubles and a
; single in three trips. Watson got
1' two for four. Wills had a double
and a single to three trips.
In the fourth Motion made a
nice toss to Morris retiring G.
Durfee trying to stretch his dou-
ble. McKeown came up with a
brilliant, stop on
smash to retire
t
272
ITS
277
271
262
249
1059
up '
Wills' hard man.
the runner. Oame
man 3, Feeney 2. Base on Ball*
offWatson 6, Castleman (1,
Feeney 3. Hit by PitcherCurdts
by Castleman. Hits and Runs Off
Castleman 4 and 7 In 3 tonto"*;
Feeney 4 and 0 In 3. Two Base
HitsG. Durfee, Wljls, Alas Jl.
UmpiresJ. Morris and Bate-
Scorer Rellly. Time of
-1:29.
Hoopes 97
F. Roddy 95
H. Jordan 96
V. Esquerra 90
BALBOA ROTC
Slow Timed Rapid Ttl.
97
93
100
81
66
70
59
62
Tommy Hughes Heads List Of
Atlantic Twi-Loop All-Stars
Team Total
CRISTOBAL ROTC
Slow Timed Rapid Ttl.
260
258 Young Tommy Hughes, Crlsto-
255 bal High School's 17-year-old 6-2
233 pitcher, Whdhasbeen burning up
the Atlantic Twilight League
1006
79
76
83
63
both on the mound and at the
plate, heads the list of All-Stars
that will play at Balboa Satur-
.500
some years, but the Balboa No. 2
outfit may show up to have un-
"Zo expected strength.
2S Novel Prise System Set
0W For Far Fan Rifle Match
The Balboa Gun Club an-
nounces one of their popular big
bore rifle matches over the DCM
course for Sunday, Feb. 24, at
Far Fan. This wlll be an Indivi-
dual match over a familiar
^^Sl8nal8hookof its slump; ggggj C^o^ho^ who'
TODAY'S GAME
CX.O. vs. Bldg. Division.
TOMORROWS GAME
Ordnance vs. Post Office.
Team Total
Two Special Races
Sunday Al Sabanas
For Moforcyclers
Would-be speedway racers are
take the
which featured two home nu K^^SrKt'SS SET "*"|K '**
by Jamleson. ____| |ome consideration was given
and crushed Electrical Division,' comwted to the recent registered K'ven chance to tak
16 to 5. with a 13-hlt barrage:^^^m^nerecenr* ^.plunge pretty gently_ at
B^k*^.w.enLlh.L^Lsa^to the use of the new type 'A-jo'two Plunge.
In fact they have the choice
caloa" was the winning pitcher; for "the" winners and yielded five { "?f throghThe"'match.L Th.ev,4can n.ter JP*^*1 race
27 5 3 18 10 6 with Edmund Crosdale doing the safeties. Taylor, the losing pitch-, t*^***t makes a more diffi-:for u8ht machine of 125 c.c. or
1 10
1 0
1 1
0 0
catching.

eTrstarted'but relinquished to ^^ the^sad-^-
the first Inning to R. Jordan.
The box score:
Army Signal AB
The second game was with Pa-
raso who was defeated at the
hands of Silver City by a 10-7j Nelson, ss.......... 2
score. This win enabled 8ilver Evelyn............ 1
City to be eligible to play the ;w. Brown, 2b........ 3
11 championshi
8 8 21 12 8
game
P -
Boca, hut. the Silver City boys
were tired after two straight wins
and suffered defeat at the hands
of the La Bocans.
INDIGESTION
^HEADACHE
t doubU relief with dovblm acting
Alka-Seltzer
Petit Nips Howell
In Pacific Side
Singles Finals
against La Hoyt, 2b............ 1
Wilson, c......'.. .. 4
Porras, cf.......... 3
Walters, 3b......... 3
Fitzpatrlck, rf...... 3
Burton, If.......... 2
Jamleson. lb........ 3
Black wood, p.
Blare, ss ,. .
Totals
1
n
26
! vantage of handicapping the less
experienced shooter to a greater
extent than it does the experts.
These little buzs-bouts cannot
work up the speed of their
brawnier brothers, but they can
racers
With the machines more or less
Another noveltv to this nartl- eo-uallv powered, it should be i
.^^SSman will beP the: of the better rider winning
Electrical Division-
Tuesday at the Paraso tennis, c- ^eke8' cMf.....
courts a fair-sized group of ten- S vf?.
nis enthusiasts saw one of the
best singles matches in a kmgi_
time when Achilles Petit defeat-1PJf?"10,; .
An upwt stomach ofton bring* on a throb-
bing boadache. Thai j why more and mar*
people rely on Alka-Settzer to fight both
discomforts at once. Do as millions do
at the first sign of dittreas drink a glass of
sparkling Alka-Seltzer! It gives you the
relief yon want slue the gastric alkalizei
you may need. Pleasant-tasting Alka
Seltzer wnket you feel better faster!
Beep s supply on band.
fmm lia -Mb* hs* mm
utHs*rt.
Alka-Seltzer
ed George Howell by the score of
8-0, 7-5.
A beautiful trophv will be don-
ated by Walter Drakes, to Petit
and an unnamed prize to Howell.
Presentation wlll be made Sun-
day at the Camp Bierd court.
The doubles matches now In
progress will end tomorrow, Feb.
15. The first played match was
between the Wason-Headley vs.
Petit-Howell teams on Sunday
and after exciting plays ended
8-8, 8-0, 8-1 to favor of Petit
Howell.
Doubles remaining are Callen-'
der-LaMotte. Brown- Simmons:'
Douglas Yard and Eli Dlxon
teams. The mixed doubles team
to represent the Pacific side will
be Lorenzo Howell-Oscar Sim-
mons and Lurllne Fergus de
Smith-Wilfred Wason.
The singles and doubles semi-
finalist plus the mixed doubles
will meet the other setnlflnallst
of the four other towns at Camp
Bierd to decide who wlll play the
finals on Feb. 22 "Tennis Day"
at Paralao.
The winners and runners-up
will receive trophies from the
Canal Zone Tennis Association,
who is striving to popularize the
game among C Z. residents.
B. Allen, rf........ 2
C. Jones, c......... 1
Leacock," lf-cl....... 3
FarrelL 3b........ 2
C. Jordan, 2b........ 1
C. Bovell.......... 1
R. Wilson, lb........ 0
R. Jordan, p........ 2
F. Taylor, p-lb...... 2
AB R
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1 : in the interest of ecor- take novice racers round the
V^SS^^&^At^U3vfn ?*nc0 cometer at atWjr
tarSetii will1 be retained for this rate of knots nevertheless,
o; match.
Anotl
2 nrivi duSffln" There wUl1* So any Panama or Canal Zone
}. ^tomvTduaVTri^TheWLa1 owners of 125 ex. motorbikes
ffleeSd P!.ce,eanddtnerre^"b^ WiSS owne.S
0 tenth place, twentieth place and,the track and Paying It.
-.-. 7Z' thirtieth place. If there are not And If hes right, hell get a
^SS^nPkto^^Si* "ternatlve *"
man p p riders is to the open races, when
H^hprizewlnnerwlUtoivethe ^ey^/ace to heats against
2 -holce of a medal, or the equiva- opponents of their own experl-
n lent value of the medal In mer- enc*-
^c-handise from the Gun Club's; ^ estawuhed tars
I stock. The total value of prizes teft to ^ mt heat
0 wiU be about fifteen balboas En- among themselves as best they
u +_:._ ..ill ka Ano rtrular ann rn, .. **
0tries will begone donar, andj;e-lcan
entries win be accepted at fifty,
" cento. However, only the hlgh| But to tne clua B rtdera wno
" score made by each shooter wlH;trlumpn ta thetr heats ^ plck
' count for prizes, as low score up experience accordingly, will
- ca=d wilI55e!!?K?\nt<* -in1*0 the the rt** w take on tht
^ Scores fired to this match wUllt0Djinerj tt naJs.
Totals............2 5 6 also ^ flled to appiy to eompe-, pune m "" ""**"
tltor's national DCM rating, so| These topliners, know the com-
thls is another chance for those petition Is getting hotter every
who havent compiled that 172,meetlM
out of 18* that Spells "expert'
f^stf
Jb*'
THE WM0L1
OIL! 0VE1
for 1952. That sterling silver mil-
itary expert medal la worth hav-
ing.,
aaWy Leagwe CosapeUtioa
Well into Second Hah*
Recently fired matches to the
Isthmian Gallery League brought
55 230 day night against the Pacific
60 221 Twilight All-Stars In a March of
37 207 Dimes benefit game.
14 158' Tommy's .448 batting average
------' is tops for the loop. Hughes has
18 figured to all of Cristobal High
School's five wins for the season,
having a 3-2 record, and having
relieved In both of the other two
CHS wins. If the lad can conti-
nue the pace he has been setting
he Is certain to be voted Most
Valuable Player at the end of the
season. In addition to pitching
Tommy Hughes has played the
outfield and has turned In more
than average performances in
his field position.
Another outstanding selection
for the All-Star aggregation Is
one that Is likely to cause con-
siderable debate In Saturday's
all-star game. Another pitcher,
Noel Gibson of the Pabst team
has been pounding the ball hard
and far throughout the first half
of play, and has been the cog In
the wheel that has kept the beer-
men In the thick of the fight.
Noel's batting average Is .429.
But the point of disputo wlll
come up If Noel Is selected for
the Pacific Side All-8tars, and
his choice for them Is a certain-
ty. When Gibson is not playing
for Pabst he also hurls to the
Pacific side loop, and plays first
base when not on the mound on
both sides, and to addition he
possesses not one. but two fat
batUng averages. If Gibson plays
for the Atlantic Twilight All-
Stars, he will probably start at
first base, while Hughes performs
the mound duties, which wlll glte
the Gold Coasters two better-
than-.4O0 hitters.
They say that everything good
comes to threes...and this is
true of the Atlantic Twilight
loop hitters too; for their third
leading hitter Is another all-
around man who leads his team
on the mound. George Carty,
whose batting average of .355 Is
third In the loop, already has a
no-hit no-run game to his credit
this year, and has been the
workhorse pitcher for the Powell
nine. When not pitching, Carty
plays an excellent game at third
base. He will add plenty of power
to the Gold Coast squad.
Four other three-hundred or
better hitters make up the At-
will be
honors
On the Atlantic side, nothing
Is known of what selection will
be fielded by the Pacific side
team, but all three managers ars
to accord on their opinion that
the Gold Coast entry wlll corns'
up winners in the All-Star con-
test.
Game time, 7 p.m. Saturday al
Balboa Stadium. All proceed i
from the game wlll go to the 1951
March of Dimes fund.
NOW IS
THE BEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
"JPAA
If they think they are lust
imagining this, they can look at better mttera rnaae up is *j-
the^nds that are slashed offjUnUc^ht League All-SUr.
.3*0; Hugh Hale, .333; Harry
the record times at every Juan
Franco turnout.
Sunday's meeting, with more
the teams well along into the riders, and more experience,
second half with stondtags still should produce more miles per
unchanged, to the pistol division hour
the Cristobal Gun Club took over]
the Coco Solo Marines by a score
of 1015 to 931. Paul Stewart fired
289 for high acore of the evening
leading his team, to the win and
cementing his position among the
leagne'stncUvidual leaders. Lt.
Pratt's 343 waa high for the los-
The ARvook Curundu rifle
team Journeyed to the West
Bank to meat the Rodman Ma-
rines on the latters range, and
emerged on the high cad of a
Dockery, 313 and Buckeye Swea-
The Atlantic Twilight nine will
be managed by the manager of
the team winning the first half
of play. As of this writing, and
with only one week of play left
In the Twl-Loop, all three teams
are deadlocked with five wins
and five losses each, so no man-
ager has yet been named for the
squad. All three managersHall
of Pabst, Palumbo of CHS. and
Brayton of Powellsare making
preparations and figuring out
starting line-ups for the Gold
Coast entry, but neither will be
able to put their plans Into ef-
fect untfl the first half winds up.
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGELES
MEXICO
Wonderful vacation* at lh
year's lowest rates await!
you in Mexico and the
U. S. A. And there's a new
low combined fare to Los
Angeles. $380,80 round
trip. Chicago is no mora
than half a day away, via
Miami, with DC-6 servict
all the way... Your choice
of 2 services to Miami: "El-
Inter Americano" and "El
Turista" flights.
Set yur Tnrel Arnl er
Pa fit American
Ummtrr
L See* Me. 5.
Tel. M.70
Celee, Ssie. 8W,., TeL 10W


THURSDAY. FEBBTJAKT 14, 1151
TU PANAMA AMEBICArf AN DfDBPKNDBNT DAILT NFWSPAPDt
PAOg
.3
Winter Olympics Get Underway In Norway Today
by
JOE WILLIAMS
Putting on* little ward after another and whatever became of
Lsmar (Sweet Thing) Candle? Tho fabulous Half tu not only
itwe-*t*d spender but In hli youth an ambldeateroos pitcher,
ddle Arearo Is the biggest name figure In sport* today and the
bluest dough earner. He can do more with a horte than Hnppe
ean with a billiard cue. Wilt finally beat oehrmann In a photo
but you'd hardly eall It a negative performance.
Frank Shields, captain of the Davl* Cup team, whose realism
bristles the moaabacks who still cherish the stuffy Newport con-
cept of the sport, would liberante the amateur stands.... "The
Australians have the right idea. They permit their tennis stars to
work for sporting goods manufacturers, to sell and give exhibitions
as representatives of the company. This is decent, respectable
work and the young men aro paid according to their talents and
labor. What on earth is wrong with that?.. .Nothing that I can
see. Only over here it constitutes vulgar professionalism. The
tennis fathers seem to prefer hypocrisy in the form of phony
expense accounts. And yet they piously deplore the tennis bum.

In this connection. It Is poacllng to note that the main rap
against Ted Sehroeder aa a member of our Cup team, which lost
to Australia, Is that he hadn't played In the various summer tour-
nament*. Sehroeder Is a family man who Is trying to establish
himself In a young and struggling business. There are two reasons
why he made the long trip: (1) He loves the sport. (3) He was
patrlotlcallv hopeful we eould regain the Cnp. To him tennis Is a
diversion. Apparently he wem'd please the tennis fathers more If
he made It a profession. But how en he do that and remain an
amateur? I a-ree with Shields. It's time we re-eamned our
amateur policy and adjusted our thinking to The facta of modern
Itfe- .
Without benefit of formal announcement Joe Louis seems
finally to have retired from comoetttion. This week he launches
a new enterprise at which movies of his past heroics will be aereen-
ed while he demonstrates with a spar partner the high moments
lrt a ring. Doesn't sound too exciting but Just seeing the old films
may be thrilling enough. They offer abundant diversity. Louis not
only foueht more often then en? heavyweleht champion but he
was on the floor more times. There never was a blg-tlm* fighter
who waa so easy to reach with a right hand.

Ferris Fain, a hold out, mmol-ins the AAA's try to operate on
a shoestring. On any other club this would be inviting the boot.
You know you're getting on wh*n a king's death reads like a
thrlee-tofd tale. Meha'ma Ghandi seems to hv* had the right
Idea; the price of steaks niver bothered him. Ton cn say what
you want about the rravy train hwt K' alwevs crowded and has
never had a strike. Listening to Malik and Vhmlnskv so Inns, we
never knew there ever,was a hsn on Im-ort-d narrte. Tb* do*
show has move* Into the Garden bet prise fighters with fldo In
them are not eligible.
Amused bv Herman Hlckman's drolleries about Catholic foot-
ball piafar*. Cardinal Bpellman, guest at the sportcaaters dinner
the othlr evening, murmured to Herbert Bayard Swone, toast-
master: "Ash-th* voungWanWhe knows any Ptoteftant stories."
Previously His Eminence had amssed the audience by his me-
mory, recalling theJlueups, man by. man. of JJ\e first big-league
know 1 checked the iups In tneoook-^u*
was right."

In nicking the Red Sax to win, yen If he's la the Marinea.
Ted Williams Is not making Lou Boudreau's Job aa new manager
any more enchanting. Could thla be by Intent? Williams' esteem
for Boudreau dronped precipitately when the snanarer put him
on the block the day after he took over. New York's 3*f years old
this month. So Is the smoke menace. Several helpful helpers wrote
In to rem'nd me whv tha number 13 Is considered unluaky. There
were 13 at the Last Sapper, Inclnding Judas Iscarlot, the betrayer.

Ho hum! We are to have another government probe of sports.
Congressman Sabath. who at 88. has Just discovered the pub'lclty
values of such things. Is going to investigate everything, college,
semlnro and pro. How much longer is the taxnayer exoected to
put ud with tn corruption at ita worst: a million-dollar under-the-table deal in
Washington Is clever statesmanship. How much does it cost to
rent a padded cell?
J5
Jim Thorpe, a twin, has four sons, none athletically Inclined.
Those Dallas people who took over the Yankee football franchise
didn't make a mistake In signing Jimmy Fhelan as coach.. "He
did the boat Job In the league lst season," Is Steve Owen's triante
to the old Notre Dsmer. Two Harvard students set a new record
f *r shipping each other In the face. Slap happy la, of coarse, the
obvious comment. In M yean there's never been a scandal In the
Boy cents, this being the penalty of Immaturity. It may yet turn
oat th> Bay Robinson-Carl Olson match In 'Frisco, twice post-
poned, was not postponed often enough.
to see If the book
PEPSODENT
SMILE!
Pepsodsex Tooth Past* as*
ooly iMlpt mop formulo*
of omul iifddbu
also removes the doll atalas
hat collect la film...aed
gorma Out anua bad breath.
No other tooth pana coa-
calas Irium*...ao other
cao duplican Pepsodenc's
alas removing formula.
Us* Pepiodaat; k**p
wath free of film and keep
* bright aasila.i.th*
Pepeodeot SsaileT
!T'"i'?Ty'lv'r^
Over 1,000
To Tuko Part
In Ice Game
By UNITED PRESF
OSLO, Norway, Feb. 14Thla
viking capital burst With ex-
citement today as more than
1,*0 Olympic athletes from M
countries greeted the opening
day of the Sixth W"
with Oslo's 4M,*0
inter Games
HI residents
and thousands of provincial
and foreign visitors.
Lights biased late last night
in Oslo's eafes and dance halla
as the eitleens forgot tem-
porarily Norway austerity and
skaaled" their foaming beer to
the honor of sport.
Seldom in history, even In
sports conscious Norwa. ha*
a eonntry gen* a* all out In
interest In an Olympiad. Here
there's no topic except the
Olympics for men. women and
children.
Balboa High,
Insurancemen
Clash Tonight
On The Alleys...
Homa Hold* Lead hi Major Bowl
Ing League.Angellnl move*
Into Third Place.
The H. I. Homa keglers held
their four-point lead In the Maj-
or Bowling League last night at
the Diablo Height* Clubhouse
bowling lanes when they defeat-
ed the Fuersa y Lur team two of
the three games with a point for
plnfall, while the second-place
Max R. Stempel team, newly
crowned City Champions, drop-
ped the third game to the Alma-
cenes Martlnateam by four pins.
A strong Angellnl team mowed
down the NFFE'* Local 595 team
ALMACENES MARTINS
A. Damin 147 178 la- 493
177 129 145- 451
191 182 198 548
142 177 148- 463
187 185 205 537
durrell
P. Damin
Presho .
Owesn*. .
In The
Letter Box
Sports Editor
Totals ... 24 806 84*3478 The Panam American
BOTD BROTHERS, INC.
Morton
Dalley .
BOwep .
Melanson.
Schneider
156
180
146
192
188
194
188
150
161
150
I am really puzzled as to the
181 531 dilierence between the La Boca
190 558 Community Softball Leagues
165- 46
237
179- 517
Total*
862 843 9532657
in-
tuit
Colored Communities.
in all three games for four points
to move into third place in the
weeks orHudak
place in the Saylon
league with but eight
pity remaining, and Boyd Broth- .Shattuck
ers cam* to life long enough to n
snatch three points from the
849 903 8893641
long enough to Cpolev
,jint* from the Madeline,
strong 7461st A Signal group. I ^^
Fronhelser'of Homa was the
leader of his team with game* of
187, 223 and 198 for a 6W total, Bates
while Stephens led for Fuem y Klumpp.
um with in. ja;
Balcer maintained his lead in Andrews
the individual average group bv
knocking out a 616 total with Totals .
games of 211, 314 and 191 for
Stempel, while P. Damin waa W>CAL 595, NFFE
high for Martinz with 546. Ow-Male* ... 77 79 59-515
esne's strong finish In the third Nolan 76 38 169- 473
game waa the winning factor in gSffi,.-,;- ij 1?. \Bh &
the single point taken by Mar- McCarr gher 194
To enter Into the various
leagues in La Poca there Is al-
ways an exo-'itant entrance
rate, ranging from $7.50 to 115
for each team. Considering the
facts, that the government sup-
plies all the necessary equlp-
7461ST AU SIGNAL
163 303 178 543
149 198 154 511
174 159 333 566
174 147 165 486 ment such as ball. bats. etc. and
180 196 159 535 the league does not pay it* um-
pires, and also the trophies are
donated by businessmen and
sportsmen all over the Isthmus.
also by various organizations
such as the CO. and Justice
Lodge No. 832 etc.. It can be
ANGELINI
. 184 177
. 131 141
. 158 171
. 177 149
. 216 200
tin*.
Andrews of Angellnl snapped
out three splendid games of 316,
arfsnr-Twit intrr n L ao *nd ai* ,or a total of 630,
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL h)gh ^ ^ ]eague fw tn n,|nt
... MJ if, a.nrfin,,. while McCrragher led for Let-
Ujtnjt mmmgpjbfij ^ m th< m ^ m
&&!%].' 1 I Vn m the final match, Ted Mel-
fSHZFSEZfcrtk 1 1 spa anson. new City All-Evente
tZSEluurtSSt i 1 Mi champion, led for Boyd wlh 193,
Balboa HI School.. 7 J#- ,fll fc*d M7 t t tU1 0l i90
(Second BkTs't.ndln,.) $$&** hlh OT th*
Ba^Uees. "i" VI ^ A% "* "
SSJfEP::l i^iw
Panam Merchante 1 .* gurst .
Fronheiser
Payne .
866 838 9152619
Eady
Totals
180 154 180 514
180 541
160 432
168 497 readily seen that such entrance
193 519 rates are not necessary.
314 630
At the close of each season
and also at the beginning of
the others no financial report
Is given to the representatives
of the various teams a* to how
much money was spent and as
to how much remained in the
league funds.
852 790 8352477
TONIGHT'S GAME
(At Balboa stadium r7 o-cloek)
Balboa High School ('Morton 1-6)
vs. Gibraltar Life Insurance
(Love 4-6).
The rejuvenated Balboa High
School squad who finlahed their
first half schedule with a 3-a
win over tho Panam, Merchante
last Sunday, will try to start out
on the right foot against the Gi-
braltar Life Insurancemen in a
game that promises a.lot of
thrills m tonight'* Pacific Twi-
light Loop game at the Balboa
Stadium. .
The Insurancemen wm be out
to win this half also. Player-
manager Dave Kelleher Intends
to take tonight's game and will
send his ace hurler, Jack Love, to
the mound to face the young
High School squad. Although the
High School has not lived up to
expectations In the first half
race, they seemed to have found
themselves with Coach Bill Mau-
zy at the helm.
The High School will be a
strong contender for the loop*
second half race If they continue
to play the way they have in
-eap
, ail
their last three appearances. The
r copping the
rested their
Insurancemen, after cop:
first half, have reste
pitching staff In i'eadlnesifor
the laal lap of the Pacific Twi-
light League round, and will be
out in full force to take on all
comers.
Sunday's doubleheader has
been postponed in order to make
the stadium available for the
benefit game between the Armed
Services All-Star baseball team
and the Panam Pro Loop for
the Crusade for Freedom fund.
The regular Sunday doublehead-
er offered by the Twilight LoopJ
will be played at the end of the
regular season scheduled game*.
Interclub Sterling
Times Changed
For Opening Round
Tha Panam Golf Association
has announced a change of
starting time for the opening
round ot the 1952 Peterson In-
terclub Tournament to be play-
ed at the Summit Hills Golf and
Country Club an Sunday, Feb-
ruary llth
The first match between Ft.
Amador and Panam will tea
off promptly at 8:M a.m. in-1
stead m* l:M a.m. aa previously
announced. Matches between
Brasea Brook and Ft. Davis wID
satrt off at 19:36 a.m. Tho
"Sweater Girls" front Summit,
defending ehamr win be Idle
n opening day i -d will have
the opportunity o sise up tha
strength of their opponents.
All playera are urged to be on
hand early to enable their
tetrn captains to pick their line-
ups and get the matches started
with a minimum of delay.
Best.
189
198
IS
172
160
189
223
210
173
175 524
177 534
198 608
173 550
171 615
Totals
913 934 8942731
FUERZA T LTJZ
Stephens 200 196 186- 811
Allen. ... 150 173 170 493
Jamison 154 186 169 109
Norris 181 147 80S- 533
Engelke. 180 190 301 573
Total*
865 893 9333689
MAX R. STEMPEL A SON
Wllber
Msrabella
Coffey .
Colston. .
Balcer .
Total* .
166
199
182
157
311
146
183
191
158
214
183 498
138 509
181 354
161 476
191 616
915 801 8443660
Atlantic Pony
League
ATLANTIC PONY LEAGUE
CARNIVAL
Mr. James Campbell, Presid-
ent of the Atlantic Pony League
announces that the League will
hold a carnival at the Margarita
Gymnasium on Friday. Febru-
ary 1 at 7:00 p.m. to rala*
funds to d*fray the expenses
Incident to the operation of
the League.
The word. PONY stands for
"PROTECT OUR NATION'S
YOUTH" and the Atlantic Pony
League which Is In Its first year
Of organisation In the Canal
Zone provides an opportunity
to boys between the ages 13
through 15 to play baseball and
fills the gap between Little
League and High School ba*e-
There are four teams to tho
Atlantic PONY League. Bulck,
C.P.O.. M.R.A. and Shamrock
The Bulck team Is sponsored oy
8moot and Hunnlcutt; the C.P.
O. team by the Chief Petty Offi-
cers of Coco Solo; the M.R.A.
team bv the Margarita Recrea-
tional Aaaoctatlon and tho
Shamrock tesm by members and
friend* of the Knights of Co-
lumbus.
You are assured of an in-
teresting evening and your
support of thla carnival wlH *
of Invaluable assls'anee to the
ATLANTIC PONY LEAGUE
which is doing a v y creditable
Job with your boys baseoau ac-
tivities.
Standing*
now as follows:
TEAM
H. I. Homa Co. .. ..
MaxR. Stempel.. ..
Angellnl.........
Fuerza y Lu......
7461st Au Signal.. .,
Boyd Brothers .. ..
Local 596, NFFE ....
Almacenes Martinz..
of the team* are
Won Lost
. 58 22

54 36
43 37
41 39
36 44
8 47 53
27 53
No receipts of purchases or
expenses are presented. Instead,
every new season these entrance
rates are repeatedly paid which
means that the expenses of the
league are always equal to the
money collected. As much as
twenty to thirty teams parti-
cipate in various leagues In La
Boca.
What happens to the $200 or
3300 collected each seaion?
WlUle Stark
U. S. Sled Team Forced To Get
To Olympics Best Way It Can
By RALPH HALL '
NEA Special Correspondent
LAKE PLACID. N. Y. Feb. 14
(NBA) Uncle 8am v.'.ymplc
bobsled team is touted to win the
four-man and two-man crowns
Olympics, and the other nation*
Judge accordingly."
A point well taken. No for-
eign teams have faced trouble la
at the 1952 Winter Games at Os- financing the Olympic trip, do-
lo,.but it was nip and tuck whe- spite the fact that they are coa-
Vmerlcan sledders would sli
rer get there to prove the point.
The U. 8. team enters the big
show a mere 35000 short of the
$11,500 needed to finance the trip
and 1th three men fewer than
n: 3ssary to complete a
squad.
ther the American sledders would sldered well below the United
ever get there to prove the polpt.! states In the stock-pile of wam-
pum.
The three US. team member*
who won't make the trip are alt-
ernates, but it's more serious
full then it sounds. Let one American
crew have an accident in prae-
rtu*. a team that has been one tice or actual competition" and
of our strongest winners once the US. chances of retaining tho
more found Itself virtually forced titles will go to the hospital with
to "bum rides" so it could com-! them,
pete. I The alternates would bdv*)
"Bqbsleddlng is the orphan of been Insurance against such a
the American Olympic team*."
says Jack Garren, chairman of
the US. Bobsled Committee and
builder of America's only bob-
sled run at ake Placid. N. Y.
calamity,
Assurance that the American*
would be there for the '52 games
was given a "lift' by the armed
force*, who transferred sledder*
,.m. CaPl DlcK Severlno and Capt.
i^ss^affi;ssAar """"
can use their manpower and
connections to obtain funds for if8 too bad that the govern-
the Olympic expenses. Bobsled- ment cant find means of trana-
dlng has no one but a handful of porting the team overseas on one
Individuals, Including the actual 0f our planes or ships that hap-
team members themselves.
"We've always had trouble ob-
taining funds for bobsleddlng. In
1936 some of the members of the
pens to be going In that direc-
tion," Garren anorta.
A* for the US. chances in the
bobsled competition. Garren ro-
te am had to sign notes to get! ports:
money for the trip. There wasn't | "The current team Is one of the,
enough money for the US. team best balanced ev*r to represent
to get Its sled back from Europe America in the Olympic*.*
in the world championships last
Oarren and other bobsled ex-
perts figure Switzerland, Oaf.
many, Belgium, and France* in
that order, will give America tha
toughest battle for the crown*.
All will be razor close, mero
seconds apart.
year.
"Trouble is," Garren relates,
"Is that Americans think bob-
sledding is confined only to Lake
Placid and the Adirondack*.
They forget the team represents
the entire United States in the
^
e.
/m6J^mm^/
NEW^ DODGE
i
REVISED SCHEDULE
ATLANTIC PONT LEAGUE
February
12 Tue.C.P.O. va. Margarita.
" l vs. B
13 WedMsr
Sulck.
d.Margarita va.
14 ThuBulck vs. Shamrock.
16 Snth*m)/:ks vs. CF.O.
II Man.C.P.O vs Bulck.
19 Tue.Margarita vs Sham-
rocks. ^ .
21 ThuBulck va. Shamrock*.
33 Frl.-CP.O. v*. Margarita.
6 Mon.-Bhamrr ks VS.C-FO.
STue Marga / vs. Bulck.
Thu.Shamrocks vs. Mar-
39 mBulck vs. CFO.
"a***1 ~-~
3 Mon.-Msrgrita vs. CFJO.
4 Tue.-Shamrocks vs. Bulek.
6 Thu.CF.O. v. Shamroel.
7 mBulck va Margartta-
16 MenCF.O. vs Butek.
(Gam* of Feb. 9 ealled on
account of rain).
All games to be played at Co-
os Slito Oaa* tttx: 4:11
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Dodge with other cars allows you to sea bow you
could pay hundreds of dollars more and still not get
11 Dodge gives you. Be sore to gat your FREE copy
Or the show Down" book
Omx of the grandest things about
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Jan moro for a em and not tot
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and dependability
Naturally, you're invited to drive
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Tour eye* wfll open wide, ton,
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Well be locking for yen. Coca*
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PANAMA
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We have 18 unit* not affected by Price
of January 30


HAVANA PULLS AHEAD IN CUBAN LOOP
HAVANA, Feb. 14 (UP)The
Mehtag of Bill Ayen and the
nttting of Alejandro Crespo
re vital faetn In the 8-8
V4otory of Havana over Almen-
dares teat night In the Cuban
Fro League. __
The win moved Havana a fall
Ene ahead of Cienfneros in
e race for the pennant.
It was Ayer' 12th success of
the season against six setbaeks.
He has scored ten of the wins
against Almendares. Ayers also
sided his own canse with a sin-
le that became a run when
e scored.
Crespo batted in three runs
with a single and a two-run
homer (his fourth )i besides
scoring two runs himself.
Tom LaSorda offered his
eventh setback against three
wins. ,
Linescore:
Almendares 2tO.H.90et 7 J
Havana 0*4 9M.40xI S 1
LaSorda. Robert (3), Mayor
(7) and Fernndes; Ayers and
Katt_____________ ,
House Probers
Hunt
Of Pentagon'
WASHINGTON. Feb. 14 (UP)
The armed services hope to
put their final stamp of ap-
proval today on a money-sav-
ing plan to buy all their cloth-
ing through one central buying
office.
House Investigators prompt-
ly instituted a search for the
phantom of the Pentagon"
who, they said, held op the
KB over an "extended Lost
eekend" between last Ang-
us* and new.
At the same time they squab-
bled with an admiral over who
is the spark-plug behind new
military penny-pinching moves,
Congress or the military them-
selves.
The special House subcom-
mittee on military waste yester-
day trained Its questions for the
second straight day on Rear
Adm. Morton L. Ring, vice-
chairman of the office of supply
management of the Munitions
Bond. The board has overall
supervision of military buying.
Rep. Edward F. Hebert La.l, subcommittee chairman,
has accused military buying ofT
ilclals dt "playing Ring around
the rosy" with his group.
Then he took out after the
"phantom of the Pentagon."
Noting that the clothing-pur-
chase plan was recommended by
lower officers last August but
did not get to the Munitions
Board until Jan. 28. he de-
manded:
"What happened to it during
that extended Lost Weedkend?"
Ring was not sure.
He said it was "somewhere
In the Army, Navy or Air Force"
until Jan. 28 when It was ap-
proved by top buying officers of
all three.
That's an illuminating
statement." barked Hebert.
"It Just flattered hither,
thither and your at the Pen-
tagon.
"Who was responsible?
ghat's the phantom of the
Pentagon we're trying to
ftSBt
King replied that undersecre-
tary of Army Archibald S.Alex-
ander probably could tell what
happened to the plan.
-Hebert ordered Alexander to
Appear soon, and said grimly
he will keep looking until he
finds out who Is responsible for
the delay.




IN INDEPEND

.T NKWSPAPEE
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is tafe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 105*
FIVE CENTS
US Steel Wage Case Branded
NEW YORK, Feb. 14 Philip Murray, president of the
CIO, charged the steel Industry
today with making a "filthy,
lying, deceiving" argument
against a guaranteed annual
wage for steelworkers before &
Wage Stabilization Board panel.
Murray, also president of
the CIO united Steelworkers,
said the steel industry report
on the onion's guaranteed an-
nual wage demand was "the
most represensible, filthy, ly-
ing, deceiving presentation
that has ever been presented
to a government agency in
my lifetime."
He made his protesU-the most
heated in two weeks of hearings
on the steelworkers demands for
a guaranteed annual wage and
wage increasesalter Bradford
Smith, U. S. Steel economist,
denounced the guaranteed an-
nual wage as interference with
government, dangerous to the
Incentive to work, and harmful
to Industrial progress.
As soon as Smith finished
his report, Murray angrily
rose from his seat and ber-
ated the economist as a "fool."
John A. Stephens, vice presi-
dent of U. 8. Steel, then got to
his feet and told Murray that
Smith is "a gentleman and a
reliable representative of the
steel Industry" and should not
be called names.
Stephens continued, telling
GS-7 And 6S-9 Jobs
Open With Naif
According to an announce-
ment today by Headquarters
Fifteenth Naval District, the
Industrial Relations Office, U.
S. Naval Station, Rodman is
now accepting applications for
employment at that activity In
two positions presently vacant.
The first of the positions,
which is rated as GS-9, Is that
of Safety Program Administra-
tor (Safety Director). Appli-
cants for this Job must have an
employment background of hav-
ing actually performed safety
work.
For the second vacancy, Or-
ganization and Methods Exa-
miner (0S-7), applicants must
have representative experience
with building and utilities
construction and maintenance,
statistical progress evaluation
and some experience with Ini-
tiation and/or installation of
new methods and procedures.
Applications for these posi-
tions should be submitted to
the Industrial Relations Office,
U. S. Naval Station, Rodman,
C. Z. V
Murray that even though em-
ployes of steel mills work hard
and under hazardous conditions,
he had fewer cares when he was
a workman in the Industry than
he has now as an executive.
-8jetp Xisnormi aax unn
ed the industry with making a
"filthy, lying, deceiving" report.
"It is beastly In every true,
absolute, honest sense of the
word, and the gentleman who
presented it is either ignorant
of the facts or he is calculat-
edly contriving to place the steel
workers who sweat and bleed
- 'i die In these operations In
the category of despots, and I
resent it with 11 the power
within me," he continued.
Smith had called the steel-
workers "economic royaltoti"
who earned higher ages
than 90 per cent of other
manufacturing employes. They
should be "among the Very
last" who should ask protec-
-*-
22 Held In Havana
For Gangland Killing
HAVANA, Feb. 14 (UP)Police
today said that 22 men were
being held following the ques-
tioning of almost 100 leaders of
the so-called revolutionary
group in connection with Tues-
day night's killing of Alejo Cos-
slo del Pino, ex-Minister of the
Interior, ex-Congressman and
radio station owner.
They said that the 22 men will
be brought up for Indictment
on charges of the illegal pos-
session of firearms and ex-
plosives.
Police said that new arrests
were expected as the hunt con-
tinued for the killer of the 47-
year-old Cosslo.
Meanwhile, President Carlos
Prlo Socarras appointed Lt. Col.
Juan Consuegra as Police Chief
succeeding Col. Cecilio Prez
Alfonso who resigned early
Wednesday in a widespread pol-
ice shakeup as part of the move
to halt the crime wave.
* Principal government leaders
today rallied behind President
Prio in condemning the slaying
and strongly supported the
measures taken to end the
crime wave.
Among the measures were the
reinforcement of police forces
with marines and soldiers, and
conferences held among police,
marine and army officers with
the aim of coordination the
drive against the activities of
agitators and terrolsts.
Joining the law enforcement
drive was Carlos Hevla, the gov-
ernment's candidate for presi-
dent at the June 1 elections who
said he strongly supported the
proposed energetic measures to
stamp out the crime wave and
the search for Cosslo murder
suspects.
Government minister Segun-
do Courtl said that the "plot
against Cosslo was not only a
plot against him, but also
against Cuban citizenry."
'The government Is disposed
to take extraordinary measures
to convict the guilty parties and
exterminate these murders,"
Court! added.
Senate President Manuel An-
tonio Varon said that Congress
stands ready to pass new laws
If the present ones are not suf-
ficient to cope with the present
crime situation.
The police shakeup also re-
sulted In the ousting of the
Chiefs of Bureau of Investiga-
tion and Police Radio Control.
Upper level changes were also
expected In various divisions of
the Police Department.
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
v
FUL-o-Pup
(NEA Telephoto)
MURDER WEAPON In Milwaukee, Wls.. Deputy District
Attorney John Tlerney holds the murder weapon In front of
John Schultz, 16, and asks the boy If lt Is the one which
killed his mother, sister and brother. Police say Schultz ad-
mitted killing them in a rage after he was denied use of
the family car.
tlon gainst unemployment,
he said.
Smith suggested that the
steelworkers start saving the
difference between their pay and
the pay of other manufacturing
employes instead of asking the
industry to guarantee them a
wage.
e said the savings "woula
build up for each worker, disre-
garding any interest accumula-
tion, to ft substantial sum in a
Short period of years."
The steelworkers have, .de-
manded a guaranteed annual
wage of $3,000 a year and an
18$ cent an hour Increase to
wages.
The steel industry contends lt
cannot raise wages without rais-
ing prices.
President Truman ordered the
WSB panel to hear'arguments
from both sides in the dispute
and try to avert a strike threat-
ened by the union.
Cost Consciousness
Prize Winners Give
Cash To Polio Fund
The first and second prize win-
ners of the USARCARD3 Cost
Consciousness slogan contest
have both donated their cash
prizes to the March of Dimes.
"It seemed like the natural
thing to do," said Mrs. Ruth C.
Rice, supervisor of the Identifi-
cation Section at the Provost
Marshal, Fort Amador, who won
the top award of $35. "This way
the money will do some good,"
she added.
Mrs. Alice R. Waxman, secre-
tary to the Quartermaster, US-
ARCARD3, also turned over her
second prize of $30 to the battle
against infantile paralysis. She
said that "the March of Dimes is
a wonderful opportunity to help
those stricken; polio can strike
anywhere, anytime, and' we
should all help in whatever way
we can."
Mrs. Rice is the wife of Roger
Rice, of the Texaco Oil Co. They
live In Panam City. Mrs. Wax-
man lives with her husband,
Robert M. Waxman. an account,
ant In the Finance Bureau of the
Panam Canal Co., In Balboa.

Memorial Services
To Be On Saturday
For Mrs. Edwdrds
COLON, Feb. 14.A memorial
service for Mrs. Iola Jones Ed-
wards, Who died Tuesday at her
home following a prolonged Hl-
ness, will be held at 4 p.m. Sa-
turday at the Trinity Methodist
Church.
The body will lie at the church
from 2 p.m. until the time of
the service.
Burial will be at her home
town of Mebane, North Carolina,
and the body will be flown early
Monday morning. Her husband,
Dr. Hubert E. Edwards, will ac-
company the body.
The family requests that no
flowers be sent.
The Crusade For Freedom
Is Our Best National
Defense.
(NBA Radio-Telephoto)
REHEARSAL A gun carriage leaves Westminster Hall (right) during a rehearsal for the
King George VI funeral procession. At left is the Big Ben tower. The King lies in state at
Westminster Hall for four days. He will be buried at Wtadsoi Castle tomorrow.
(NEA Radlo-Telephoto)
OATH IN KOREA Lt. Col. J. Vallee. (left) commanding officer of the Canadian Royal
22nd Regiment in Korea, administers the oath of allegiance to Queen Elizabeth H to his ju-
nior officers, all company commanders of the 22nd Regiment. _J
* *
200,000 Britons Defy Icy
Weather To View King's Coffin
LONDON, Feb. 14 (UP)Brit
ons filing by King George VI's
coffin in Westminster Hall pass-
ed the 200,000 mark today, as
thousands more-waited patient-
ly in snow, ajeet and rain ior
their turn. >
It was the King's sorrowing
subjects' last chance to pay a
tribute to the late monarch as
he lay to state to the vast hall
adjoining the Houses of Parlia-
ment. .
Tomorrow the coffin will be
taken to a majestic funeral pro-
cession from Westminster Hall
to Paddington Station for the
train Journey to its final resting
place to St. George's Chapel to
Windsor Castle.
Some 10,000 troops and 1,426
detectives will Une the circuitous
three and a half mile route
through central London's streets
to keep back crowds expected to
total 2 million persons.
Representatives of all the
world's remaining monarchies
will take part to the funeral
procession.
They include at least six sov-
erlgns the greatest collection
of royalty to assemble anywhere
since before World War It
Cristobal Memorial
Service Scheduled
A special service WHl be held
7:30 pjn. tomorrow at the Amer-
ican Episcopal Church of Our
Sarlour to New Cristobal, in
memory of King George VI of
England.
s --- ;
Sr 3*
Kxxn:
Distributor:
C O. MASON, S3. A.
P.O Box 883
Panam City Colon
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** rate of egg production,
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Feeds and Mashes for
starting, growing and egg
production contribute*
toward more profitable
results.
1
Re-trial Opens In Violence-Stained Rape Case
A.It If l-0-aa F.lf,y P.arfi.i Ovlaatt't free*
OCALA, Fla., Feb. 14 (UP)
Calm, attentive Walter Lee Ir-
vin told a circuit court Jury yes-
terday that "I'm not guilty5* of
a charge that he joined three
other Negroes in assaulting a
19-year-old housewife to the
violence-stained Groveland rape
case.
The state rested at noon af-
ter five hours of testimony and
the defense completed Its case
a short time later, after placing
the 24-year-old Negro on the
stand to testify for himself to
his second trial.
Defense attorneys also pre-
sented a witness, Pfc. Lawrence
Burtoff of Fort Jackson. 6. O.
who testified that the alleged i
rape victim told tatas on the
night of the Incident that she
could not Identify any of bar,
attackers.
The victim identified Irvln
"positively" yesterday as one of
the four Negroes.
Irvln told the court, packed
with about 300 white persons
and Negroes, that he and Sam-
uel Shepherd went to several
"clubs" and drank beer to three
or four towns the night of the
alleged rape.
He said they went to Orlando,
40 miles east of Groveland. and
"saw a lot of people" before
returning home and going to
bed.
Shepherd and Irvln were
convicted and sentenced to die
in the electric chair daring the
first trial in 194* but the V. 6.
Supreme Court held that the
verdict was returned sn an at-
mosphere of race prejudice
Shepherd was shot and killed
and Irvin wounded when, being
returned from state prison to
Lake County for a new trial
last November.
Sheriff Willis McCall, a cor-
oner's Jury said, shot, them to
self defense and In line of duty.
Irvin testified that he did not
know the dther two Negroes ac-
cused of raping the white wo-
man Ernest Thomas and
Charles Greenlee.
Thomas was shot by a posse a
few days after the assault in-
cident and Greenlee pleaded
guilty to rape and was given
life imprisonment.
"You have been accused, of
kidnaping and assaulting a
white woman," defense attorney
Alex Ackerman of Orlando said.
"Are you guilty?"
Tb not guilty," Irvin said,
maintaining; the calmness he
has shown throughout the trial.
Burtoft. whose father operat-
ed a tavern near the scene of
the crate in 1849. testified that
the rape victim came to his
house first and asked him to
help her find her husband.
He said she told him that four
j Negroes hit her husband on the
head and kidnaped her.
"She did not cotnpalta about
having been raped," he said. *
asked her if she could identify
the Negroes who kidnaped her
and she said, 'No.'"
State attorney Jess Hlnter
cross-examined Burtoft in an
attempt to prove that Burtoft
la "prejudiced against the State
because you were in bad with
the sheriff's office." Burtoft de-
nied lt. _,
After hearing crhntaologlst
Herman V. Bennett of Miami,
the defense rested.
The sute said it would pre-
sent more debuttal witnesses
today before, beginning final
arguments.
An eerie daytime darkness
hung over London today when
the massive wooden doors of
Westminster Hall swung open at
8 a.m. for the third and last
day of King George VI's lying to
state.
Swathed in winter clothes a-
gainst temperatures of 32 de-
grees Fahrenheit (freezing
point), and huddled beneath
umbrellas, the mourners, in a
queue stretching across the
misty River Thames and along
the South Bank, shuffled into
the cold grey hall past the pur-
ple draped coffin surmounted by
the Crowp Jewels and flanked
by Yeomen Gentlemen at Arms
and Guardsmen to ancient
dress.
Like the-185,092 who had pre-
ceded them during the previous
two days, the people who enter-
ed today to ones and twos were
the plain citizens of Britain,
who regarded the Feb. 0 death
of King George VI as a personal
loss.
Last night the Dowager Queen
Mary, mother of George VI, vl-
s'ted the catafalque with her
eldest son the Duke of Windsor,
the King's predecessor on the
throne.
The 84 year old dowager
queen reluctantly agreed not to
take part in tomorrow's state
funeral on account of her age.
The Duke of Windsor, who
ruled briefly In 1038 as Edward
VII before abdicating to marry
American divorcee Wallia War-
field Simpson, had arrived ear-
lier in the day from New York.
Already here, or on the way.
were six rulers: Kings Paul of
Greece, Gustaf of Sweden,
HaakOn of Norway and Freder-
ick of Denmark, Queen Juliana
of the Netherlands and Duchess
Charlotte of Luxembourg.
Queens Louise of Sweden and
Ingrtd of Denmark were accom-
panying their husbands.
Then there were princes and
princesses representing at least
seven other ruling houses of Eu-
rope, Africa and Asia, plus Pres-
ident Vincent Aurlol of France
and President Ivan Ribar of
Yugoslavia.
United SUtes Secretary of
State Dean Acheson, represent-
ing President Truman,. and at
least IT other foreign ministers
were also here or coming.
RP Ambassador
To Attend Funeral
The Republic ef Panama
will be represented at the
funeral of King George VI hi
London tomorrow by Jaaa R.
Morales, Panamanian Ambas-
sador to Great Britain.
LEADING BRITISH
MANUFACTURERS
of Radio Receiving Sets, Valves
areha, rpate ark*** their
wkt aseaaaU tale* SmtUiHf aaa experience.
aUsle
EXCLUSIVE AGENCY far tka
Af-r/*
Box 10, ERWIN, WASEY A CO., LTD.
4* Sil4s
ISWaa: BOISE, FAB LAW. UMMM, WJ.


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