The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01380

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

^BRAUlFF


Wltfr -p.
------^D^LT NEWSPAPER
Patmttui-merican
"Let the people know the truth and the country b safe*' Abraham Lincoln.
rpSeagranrsY
- CANADIAN WHI9
Distill*, f* ana bet tied Caw* amm CmnedUm Genrnme* tafvisien
rWENTX-SEVENTH *EAR
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 15Z
TEN CENT!
US Banker
The beach at Paltllla Point. Bhar* Infested water... and clothe* on a rock.
Clothes Found;
Say Videgaard
Eaten ByShark
Swedish Crime Investigator
Harry Soderman and Panama
police turned shark "hermen
today In an effort to find the
bones of osla Videgaard the
we-lthv Swedish shipping owner
who. went quote for a walk un-
quote on Jan. 25 and vanished
from the ttb.mlan scene.
ira,* d bytedjermao.
were twt-<*W*~ fishing trr
morning off Paltllla Point where
the missing man's clothes were
fc'.ir-d
All of the. evidence points to
thi theory Videgaard walked
down to Bella" Vista from the ho-
tel ben along the bepch at low
tide aM the way (about two
piiloBf to- Paltllla where he went
for a swim off the rocks. The
w>'er In that atea has been
shark Infested ever, since the
government built Its abb^toir
there and police believe It Is
practically certain" the missing
man was devoured by the. man
easing fish.
Soderman said he felt sure
VMegaard's death was "not
criminal."
The clothing was located by
the 8ecret Police Saturday night
after one of the well known Pal-
tllla Point hoodlums, being grill-
ed by Chief Hector Valdes. broke
down and admitted he had help-
ed bury the man's clothes In the
sand on the beach. His compan-
ion, also under arrest at the
time, corroborated the story af-
ter being confronted with the
evidence and both directed po-
lice to the same spot at Paitillu
and told exactly the same story.
Valdes said he grilled them
at different times to be certain
they were telling the truth.
The hoodlums told police they
were in the Paitilla area the
mo-.-nlng of Jan. 25 wnen one
of them spotted a pile of dom-
ing on the rocks far out at the
point. He called his companion
and they said they watched for
three hours and after spotting
nobody In the area decided to
take the clothes.
In them, they said, was a
wristwatch and five dollars.
The one who made the dis-
covery said he took the watch
and three dollars and his com-
panion got two dollars. The
clothes they burled In the sand.
Police recovered the watch
Irom the purchaser.
The pair of hoodlums were
among 18 known Paltllla hang-
ers-cn rounded up by Valdes
since the Investigation into VI-
aegaards disappearance was be-
gun.
Soderman today was hiring
more boats in the Canal Zone
to help in the shark fishing and
gaid he would go out In a heli-
copter tomorrow and drop a
steer carcass Into the water.
"I want to see what hap-
pens to it," he said.
The 8wedish detective hopes
to find Videgaard's bones inside
a shark to prove how the
wealthy man met his untimely
end and put the finishing
touches on the baffling case.
The authorities claim this is
possible despite the fact 17 days
nave elapsed since the shipping
owner vanished.
All agreed, however, that there
was only a slim chance of find-
ing even parts of-Videgaard's
body but Soderman said one
thing was certain:
"The hunt for a live man
la aver. Mr. Videgaard la
lead."
The 58-year-old missing man
had arrived here Jan. 23 from
Secret Police Chief Valdes, with the clothes found > the beach.
Peru, en route to his home In
Stockholm. He registered at Ho-
tel El Panama and slipped a note
under his secretary's door early
in the morning of the 25th that
he was "going- for a walk."
Police assumed he took his
bathing trunks with him sujee
they were no found among his
belongings.
Among the clothing dug up by
Secret Police Saturday ntshtl
were calling cards and some oth-
er personal papers of Vlde-
saara's. In addition his son.
Bengt. 21 positively identified
the white nylon shirt, pants and
shoes as belonging to his father.
There was no trace of blood, on
the clothing.
Police said there Is. In fact,
no evidence pointing to mur-
der.
Earlier on Saturday Secret
Police nabbed one Carlos Runll-
ancich after he had promised
Videsaard's son to tell him his
father's whereabouts for $1 500.
Rugllnncich wrote a note to
young Videgaard. telling him to
put the money in the barrel of
a cannon at the National Mu-
suem on Avenida Cuba and then
he would get the information.
The boy told the Secret Police,
who fixed up a package to be in-
serted in the cannon at the ap-
pointed hour.
Shortly after young Videgaard
en tried out the instructions Ri>
glianclr-h walked up to the rrn-
seum took the package (It wr
paper) and was nabbed by tl
cops.
Secret Police Chief Valdes .*
the would-be confidence m
was grilled at length but he i
patently knew noihlni at all a-,
bout the missing man.
Maj. George Davis,
Top US Jet Ace
Shot Down In Korea
TOKYO, Feb. U (UP) Major
George A. Davis, Jr., the united
States' leading Jet ace, was shot
down yesterday in a dogfight
with Mlgs only minutes after he
** -ot down two more of the
Red jets.
' u-..-. 31. Is officially listed as
missing in action. But he Is be-
lieved to have no chance of sur-
vival.
His wingman said Davis did not-
Earachute from his crippled Ba-
re, which plunged to the ground
during a sub-stratosphere dog-
fight T>etween 100 Mlgs and five
Sabres.
In the Korean war Davis is
credited with shooting down 11
Mlgs, three Tu-2 medium bomb-
ers, and with probably destroy-
ing one Mig and damaging two
more.
During World War II he shot
down seven Japanese planes.
He began his assault against
the Communist air force last fall.
Six weeks after his arrival in
Korea, he spearheaded the Unit-
ed Nations' greatest-yet assault
on a Red air fleet, Dec. 13.____
E. B. llopis, 30,
Charged With Theft
From RP Warehouse
Jan American, reportedly a re-
sident of Ancon, Is In Jail in Pan-
am, today facing a grand lar-
ceny charge.
Enrique (Edward) Broce Llo-
pis, 30, Is being charged with
breaking into a warehouse owned
by Ki H. flkahani, a Panama
merchant, tfcice during' the
month of January, and stealing
14.700 worth .of goods.
Uopls was arrested in Costa
Rica. Panama police had re-
quested his arrest, and Llopis re-
turned here voluntarily to face
the charge.
He claims the goods was
bought on credit. Shahani's
warehouse Is located at Paitilla.
Meanwhile It was learned that
Llopis has a record with the Ca-
nal Zone pollc* dating back to
Sept. 18, 1948 when he was fined
$100 for violating the lottery
laws. And on April 6, 1950, he
was found guilt* of forgery, giv-
en a two-year sentence, and plac-
ed on five years probation pend-
ing good behavior and the pay-
?Sent of obligations amounting to
400,
The Panami Canal records
show that he was employed as a
Customs guard for a short while
and discharged in March 1944 for
repeated absences from work.
American Society
Elects Officers
Tomorrow Night
The American Society of Pa-
nama will elect new officers at
x meeting scheduled for tomor-
row night at the Panama Golf
Club.
The meeting is scheduled to
; -,tart at 7 p. m.
Indications are that Capwel),
nanager of the Fuerza y Luz
here, will run unopposed for
he post of president of the So-
; clety.
He shot down four Migs him-
self, while other UN pilots de-
stroyed nine to bring the day's
kill up to 13.
Meanwhile in Paris today Maj.
James Jabara, who shot down
six Mlgs to become the United
States Air Forces first Jet ace,
said he thought Russians were
flying the Migs.
Jabara said that while he had
seen none of the Red pilots, he
believed many of them had pre-
vious combat experience, and
their radio orders were some-
times given In Russian,
Don H. (ox Named
VA Representative
In Canal Zone
Veterans Administration to-
day announced It has named a
new representative to the Pana-
ma Canal Zone.
He Is Don H. Cox. a contact
officer for the last 4V4 years at
the VA Regional Office In
Manila.
Cox succeeds Charles R. Van-
dcr^rlft. who resigned to enter
private business.
Cox is scheduled. tp arrive in
the Canal Zone this week with
his wife, macea Rose Cox.
A native of Oklahoma, Cox
joined VA in 1945 as a contact
supervisor in the former VA
branch office in Atlantic, Geor-
gia. He was transferred to the
Manila Regional office In July
1947 as chief of the contact divi-
sion. .
Cox served in the 8th Armor-
ed Division of the Armored
Forces, U. S. Army, during World
War H.
He Is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan and the
Atlantic Law School
Tells Critics
Panama's Economy
Helped By Hotel
.WASHINGTON, Feb. 11 (UP).Herbert S. Gastn,
president of the U. S. Export-Import Bank today defend-
ed that institution's $4,000,000 loan to El Panama Hotel
of Panama City when he appeared recently before the
House of Representatives Subcommittee on Appropria-
tions.
The Subcommittee's hearings were published today
disclosing that Representative Gordon Canfield described
the hotel as "perhaps one of the greatest and most luxuri-
ous hotels in all this world and one which to me was quit*
inconsistent with the surroundings it now serves."
Gastn replied:
"In the first place I would not
could do anything
more capture the
that would
imagination
call It one of the most luxurious and enthusiasm of the people of
hotels in the world. I think it ls'~
a very striking hotel In design. I
think it is a modern hotel. I
would call It right abreast of the
moment.
"The architect of that hotel
recently received the h\ghest a-
ward for architectural design, an
Panama than a thing of this
worth, which is unique."
Canfield commended Gas-
ton's statement as "forthright"
but commented:
"I hope the people of Pana-
ma will come to under*'and
award given hy. I think, the why our money Is In that Ipb-
Amertean focicty of Architects,
for the met uomsupI and signi-
ficant job done bv an American
architect In this last year.
"The hotel b not Intended
far the accommodation M the
local population primarily. It
was intended to attract the
tourist trade.
"Now. why did we get Into it?
"Because the Republic of Pan-
tit utian. beca n- e when | was la
Panama students of the uni-
veraitv were In rebellion and
the siegan.was 'Panama (or
a&tNt&S&n
Rep. Benjamin F. James, an-
other member of the Subcom-
mittee, told Gastn:
"I have heard it said in Pana-
ama wanted a hotel as a tourist ma that the financing and
attraction. That was the one i building of Hotel El Panama was
thin" they desired most and this
hotel nroject was being promot-
ed In Panama. There was quite
a little pubHc subscription to It
nd the government was behind
it.
one of the nice little squeeze
plays that the Republic of Pana-
ma is thinking up from time to
time and that in this particular
Instance it now becomes necessa-
ry to tear down the Hotel Tivoll
Oh, Deer!
Following a report that a pet
! deer had been shot, Cocoli Shore
| Patrol and a Canal Zone police-
man went to Quarters 811-A to
Investigate the accident.
The report was turned in to
the station by the frantic owner
when the little deer disappeared
Irom the home in Cocoli yester-
day.
A policeman's knock on the
door brought a speedy response.
"^ the maid opened the door,
the policeman saw the deer
......... off the daybed.
Apparently he had Just stray-
ed from the house yesterday,
and returned this morning.
Man eating shacks, ef the type is Patulla waters.
BALBOA TIDES
Tuesday, Feb. 12
RICH LOW
4:45 a. m. 11:M a. m.
5.M p m. 1 11:11 p. m.
"They mode certain guaren-in the Canal Zone because of a
tee* as to the earn'ngs of the provision in our treaty with the
nroject. They hired a verv mo-,Republic of Panama,
dern and. I should say. verv ex-j "Do you know whether that
cellent American architect to was taken into consideration or
bvIM it. I not?"
"The cost of the hotel as was Replying to James, Gastn
true In so mny laree structures sa|d:
For disturbing the peace Mar-
tina Arauz de Icaza, a 25-year-
old Panamanian was fined $10
in the Balboa Magistrate's Court
this morning, and Antonio N.
Urquilla, 23, Salvadorean who
pleaded not guilty in the case,
was found not guilty.
On a vagrancy charge, 30-
year-old Jos Antonio Girn, a
Panamanian, was found guilty
and placed on one year proba-
tion.
And for loitering In a La Boca
camp Vlncente Martinez, 29, Pa-
namanian, was fined $5.
A truck driver, Darlo Duque,
29, Panamanian was placed on
six months probation when he
was found guilty of falling to
have a certificate of Inspection
for his truck.
Today Is Last Day
For RP Assembly
Panama's National Assembly
was scheduled to hold Its last
session this afternoon, ending
the term for which Deputies
were elected In 1948.
Tne next session of the As-
sembly .will be on Oct. 1 when the
new Assembly meets for Its first
three-month sitting of a four-
year term.
Many of the members of the
present Assembly are expected
to seek re-election in the May
elections. As In the past, some
new faces will be seen in the
new Assembly as a result Of the
elections.
^o*i t/*
In recent v<>rs. went 'r bevond
what thev had ori<*hrllv expect-
ed. The sire of tne hotel Is un-
der what they had originally
contemoMM.
"The hotl eon be Justified nn-
h as a promotion activity of the
F-nvihlic of Panama."
fj~*on added:
"The ee"omle Jnetiflratl*n
would he n tir,"-lng of dol-
lars d'>"ectl to the eountr
from American tourists and
other traveler.
"There's some lustlflcatlon
here. Their hone wm to make
Panema an important stooover
nolnt and an important recrea-
tion point.
"Thev have been inereasln the
number of conventions down
there which have had pret'v
"We are quite conscious of
that. Tivoll Hotel is an ancient
firetrap which was built at the
time of the construction of the
Panama Canal.
"There was an agreement be-
tween the 8. and the Repub-
lic of Panama that whenever
Panama was able tb offer first
class hotel facilities, the Tivoll
would no longer he available to
the general public.
"I think the Panama Canal
Zone administration baa ac-
cepted the fact that Hotel El
Panama complies with that
requirement and they are not
providing space at the Tivoll
any mere."
Replying to other questions.
roon aw""- 'Vthi h*mis- G"ton said he believed It was
ifK^e,^?hit thev are atresl tenlte part of the U. 8. pol-
PnhBevPrlst^lv aether with ley that a new Tivoll could not
& 13 ret
prises. But it is a Republic of
Panama project."
"It might be that you could
pick out other wava to invest
to compete with El Panama.
He told the Subcommittee the
bank's money In El Panama is
guaranteed by the Panamanian
M 000.000 that would do more for government and that the bank
the economic welfare of Pana-1 is not presently considering ad-
ma but I do not know how you dltional loans to Panama:
Brffc, Sirens Will Sound
Freedom Crusade Tomorrow

The Inauguration of the Cru-
sade For Freedom Campaign to-
morrow at 6:00 p.m. will begin
with the ringing of all sirens and
bells In Panama and In theCa-
nal Zone, both on the Atlantic
and the Pacific sides, through-
out the interior of Panama, way
up into Chiriquiv
The President of Panama Don
Alclblades Arosemena. v/illad-
dress the people- vernr.JrK"
els Newcomer and Lt. oen. w.
H H Morris will address the
Zonians on the English network
consisting of stations both on
the Atlantic and Pacific sides,
under the direction of Fernando
Eleta. _,
Activities to be promoted will
be a Crusade for Freedom Ball
on the Atlantic and Pacific sides
Th- Pamlval Qi-een at the Ho-
tel SI Panama, will be named
Miss Crusade for Freedom. Sha
and her court will reign through-
out both balls on the Atlantic
and Pacific sides.
Baseball games by the All-
Stars' Panama team and Canal
Zone teams will be played at the
Balboa and the Cristobal sta-
diums Sunday.
A Crusade For Freedom Movie
Picture Premiere Is also part of
the program for this campaign
Other special functions, such
as dances and cocktail parties, to
raise funds, will be promoted by
Individual organisations repre-
sented bv members from the
Board of Directors.
A film entitled "The Big
Truth" will be available for or-
ranlsational showings both in
Panama and the Canal Zone by
calling Dean Ferris and making,
appointments at Telephones Bal-
boa 1246 and 2655.


"'


,.>7
ivvn
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11. 195
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OA-.lD NO o.L,.HIO THt PANAMA AMBHICAN MMI. INC.
rOUSOIO NLON NOUNMVCLt in l(l
HARMODIO AMIAS. EDITO*
7 M STKCn P O BO 134. PANAMA. R. Of P
TELEPHONE PANAM> NO 2-074O 'S LINEa
CA.E ADORES PANAMBICAN. PANAMA
COLON OMICt. 12.17 CENTRAL AVENUE TV-EtN 12,H O 13th STREET.
ro.eiON P.EPXE.ENTA1IVE1 JOSHUA B 'OWIM. INC
34* MADI10N AVE NEW YORK. CI7I N. Y.
LOCl **"
1 70 2.80
I MONTH IN AOVANCl---------------- ,'.0 13.00
'> SIX MONTH*. IN ADVANCE ,' 24 00
o'o-ir n(r in nvNCE--------------------------------________~___ __^___________
'-------------------------------------
Labor News
And
Comment
The Eternal Optimist
oroaaway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
4S YEARS AHEAD, 40 YEARS AGO
Eddie Cantor left for Chciago last night with David Green
He ha. a dale there lo sign a **:*"'"""t^tf J%lfe!
Welch's Wine show. He sternly denied to me that it is a use
time' commitment "It will He me up only until im MhiM
said "After that I'm at liberty. Anybody want a rising young
actor In 1992V___________
I nave known this man Cantor for more than forty years
lasstsm s-msfta rSlB
ksvs rjs Axn as stra-
Ragtime Band." ^_______
Bert Williams Jolson wasn't yet billed.
Judy Garlands Palace "g^^X^^
another week to Feb. i. Yw*fIL".nd back. He never
One touching .story <*A&ggjg?i5i *
got her opportunity e^to^ J? Uie me supporting
follow her New-Yflrt ^"SXhefopeiltag here, l enthused
acts In Los Angeles. I eoweonw y tlie wpl of
about verythhig except her clothes inaiM old Pa ace
much buzzing. bMtaW *nand worshipful, ventured to
usherette, named Elgee to c. awea ami d her ideas
discuss the matter w tii he i ur. g ,-hich she did... And
The girl said she *od sketch tomeout robe for the mg
this child was commissioned to design
Coast opening.__________
and Uouy O'rirlen hough other menas e p &re rum.
Serge Rubens.ein >-* ~^ fag ljF&
which he denies w^rically that heOTWJ *' controinng
evr'.ln any deal -e5kin2j;J^qu're now^ u Bopposite of the
tot* ta KKO... Someoody u, tejung me uc w of
truth... 1 ro my information, llrsi nana mjm Rubenstcln
my'line of commerce is a big deal.
John Reynolds. Jr.. born Into the real ^tf^SSSmZ
standing role in a forthcoming play.
KUFJSf&S. &T& SU8? who shares the bill
With her. He's a femme thriller.______
T'm told that Moria, of the dance-team. Moria and Kiko,
at th?WWel is Mary Brown (sounds too wholesomely-homely
iimnle to be' true, of Spokane, Wash. She was graduated as
arse at Harper Hospital, in Detroit, and was discovered by
FrSk Blrbe7o,PwhHsed to operate the Bowery night club
ttere (Why do press agents dig up so many ex-nurses?)- .,
John Perona. owner-host of El Morocco, will soon go to
Florida to let out his Italian racing car... Billy Mann, who was
One of the Yacht Club Boys, a famous floorshow act in spaak-
easv days is a broker. I hear he's making customers rich dab-
bling in two stocks... District Attorney Frank Hogan rarely
seen in sporty restaurants, dined in Toots Shor's and was
viewed with mixed emotions by other patrons. Even the exuber-
ant Toots appeared subdued.
A Standard Oil heir (genuine!) has his folks and friends
Jittery. He walks out barefoot, refuses to shave, pours ketchup
on his head when he's drinking, which seems to be all the time.
Uncle Sam cautions: "Don't buy more than you needl"...
who's talking.
Look
THIS IS YOU r0UM THI RIADMS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tli* Mail It ii an om" Hnm Im in(m ? Ta asma Amer-
ican. Utter art rccfid arattfully and ara handlsd i a wheil )
tidenti! aunnar.
If *au caatriawti a Mttai aba' aa imp runt H it doin t MM*' r
ul i Lattari ara publnhad in tba ardu received.
t PUasc try ta kaaa tha lattara limited t* wn MM !"*"
' Idaatrry t lattar writer it held in trktaat centioenc.
i Tab aawiMM aattiaaat aa raaamikility tor aratameat* ar aiaiam
apr WHY NOT LET SOLDIERS DO IT?
Balboa. C.Z.
f tee in the paper, the Panama Canal Co... haa found
aomething else to raise the budget so they can fire some one else
and'add more lo the expense account.
JThe aoldiers were sent down here, to do guard work, so now,
instead o letting us do the work, they want to hire some big
hotj to do the work for us, which will cost the P.C.C. plenty of
money. Is that is helping, the tax payers? I can't see It. Every
month there is a change of the guard. Enlisted men and officers,
w.'.x are detailed on lock guard, and the civilians resent this.
So why spend the money?
aao the rates at the Tivoll. are being raised. If half of the
peopl* leave, on account of this raise... what will be the gain.
Soams like they would rather have all rooms rentad at the
present price, than half rented at a higher rent.
If the P.C.C. do not need the Army here, why are we here?
and^ if the new Company Is under the Army why are we being
thrown oat of our Qts.?
Jf we are not needed here, why not send us all, to Korea
and take the Army brass from the building with ut?
When Mr. Bruckner was Comptroller, there was no need for
a director. Why not get one man, who can handle both Joba...
and save more plata?
As the old saying goes, "Jump at knats. and swallow camels.
A Ditf usted Soldier Bay.
By Victor Kiesel
When the lights go on again
all over the underworld, some
of its most notorious charact-
ers will be missing includ-
ing the chap who has never
taken the nickname "Execu-
tioner" as a personal insult.
Not that the missing will be
inconvenienced they'll mere-
ly be retired.
Some, whose homes all over
the Eastern seaboard are dark-
ened these days, Just won't re-
turn from Florida.
Others, like Albert (ffte
Executioner) Anastasia, wilt
simply follow recent orders
from what's commonly
known as the Mafia. They
will speed their retirement
from legitimate businesses
their rancid reputations
don't stench up the multi-
million dollar investments
of the new mob chiefs.
Mr. A., in fact, has already
"sold" his interests In two big
dress factories in Northern
Pennsylvania the Madison
Dress and the Nuremberg Dress
plants in Hazelton and Nurem-
berg, Pa.
Meanwhile. Mr. A is living a
peaceful, sunburned existence
in Florida, whither he was
chauffered by his special aide,
a fellow named Jlmmle Macri,
brother o another Macri who
was tried and freed of the
knife slaying of Willie Lurye, a
Ladies Garment Workers Union
organizer.
All this is known to several
sets of authorities, including
the Federals.
But it's of little comfort to
the cleanest of all unions, the
crusading International Ladies
Garment Workers, led by pep-
pery David Dubinsky and sev-
eral lieutenants who's been
lighting the mobs since the
torpedoes invented a little gim-
mick called Murder, Inc.
This fight's been without bene-
fit of police protectionand the
crusade's about to be launched
again as the spririg season
starts and the mobs try to cut
In on the billions the industry,
makes from dressing your lady
and mine.
, In fact, experiences with
the New York police con-
vinced the' union that it
had better prepare to pro-
tect itself, a chore which
Paul Hall's husky AFL sea-
faring lads are ready to
perform even against the
knife squads thrown into
the garment district with
the season by the mob.
Not too long ago, for ex-
ample, the goons simply
walked into one of the
headquarters of the Dress
Union and beat the breath
out of one of his aides, not
to mention removing some
yardage of skin.
And another Ladies Garment
Workers vice president, Charles
Zimmerman, for the third sea-
son, is ready to supervise the
unionization of the shops, some
of them under protection of
the newest and toughest and
most successful syndicate chiefs.
For three seasons now. the
inexorable, and, permit me the
word fearless (for that's
what he is) Zimmerman has
been following these mob shops
and others into Massachusetts,
New Jersey and Pennsylvania
Areas.
Many of these plants art
hidden. Dress mo .
chased and cut by jobbr.
in New York, is loadC
aboard trucks (mostly mob
operated) and delivered to
outlying manufacturers icho
contract secretly to sew the
stuff topether so it can
get out to your main drag
store.
These protected truckers are
vital to the mob operators.
They run stuff to shops so
carefully concealed that even
the original Jobber In New York
Isn't aware of their locations.
All he knows is that his stuff
Is loaded in the raw and
returned as a finished garment.
Nor can Zimmerman's union
organizers follow the trucks-
These huge vans merely draw
into a central depot at night
and the next morning, a
dozen other trucks disperse the
stuff.
So it takes persistent hawk-
shawing to even locate the
shops before the union can get
at them, organize them and
raise wage rates so that the
legitimate manufacturers are
not hit by low-priced competi-
tion from the mob shops.
There's millions for the Syn-
dicate in this game. And they
don't want themselves handi-
capped by over-publicized char-
acters such as Anastasia.
So they've told him to go
West while he's still a -com-
paratively young man.
And he's going. But the mobs
aren't. They're here to stay ap-
parently.
Kings Aren't Aces
By BOB RUARK
CHICAGOI don't know how the death of
the good Xing, George, hit you, but even here
in the town mat devoted passionately Its 1920s
to keeping Bertie Windsor's papa in his place, it
is possible to feel real sad.
Not so much for the monarch himself, a sick
man who died easy and I expect content, since
he saw his klos grow up, his daughter married
and the succession assured by^a lusty male
grandson.
But George VI was the last of the major
leaguers In the king business, and it is entirely
possible that he,was the last real first-chop
ing'we will see. "
My generation was raised In an fra when ro-
yalty was big stuff, and even Marie of Roumania
was a hot celebrity. I have already lived long
snough to see the king business go bankrupt,
and the divine-rignt concept largely. Swept away
by new times ana new forces.
It is very possible there will be no such thing
as kings or kingdoms by the time Bonnie Prince
Cnarlie Is of age to take the scepter from the
queen who was only yesterday a child.
It is a-pity, really, that so few modern kings
have been able to stand firm before polities.
George was one who sweated out a span of
socialist government, and saw his own prefer-
ence returned to power, If only by a slim mar-
gin.
But there Is no real room In a socialist world
for kings, because kings, by blood and heritage,
are not as other men. They are supposed sym-
bols of superiority, and in socialism and its two
headed brother, communism, there is no official
room for hereditarily superior beings.
Royalty gets out of line, and they fire 'em over
the border with a poke full of dismantled gems
and grandpa's portrait.
Kings have not really amounted to much since
they became confused with people. Even the
model monarch. George VI, lacked the impact of
true royalty, due to the purely human accident
that created him Rex Imperator.
When big brother Prince Charming, David
Windsor, the long-time Prince of Wales tossed
away a throne for a commoner and a twice-
divorced Yankee commoner, at that, a -lot of
divine fire dampened the King-can-do-no-wrong
department.
George ascended via his brother's romanticism,
I
^niy WSIflWTOH
MERRY-CO-ROUND
____ T *1W MARION

and the old, .inflexible habits of monarchy,
which had even condoned Idiots and degenerates
on the thrones of many countries, suddenly be-
came old hat.
Also, a king-emperor ain't much of a king-
emperor unless he has a flock of loyal subjects
across the. seas who drop to one knee and tug
at the forelock at the mention of his name.
It was George VI's sorrow to see his empire
go bust from Granny's span to his own to see
the far-flung subjects howling and rioting and
spurning the Union Jack under unshod feet.
He saw his klnry in office on the hurried lam,
fugitive from their own peasants gone political.
As a figurehead monarch, paralyzed by Parlia-
ment, George was secure in his own people's
love, but even he couldn't say for how long.
The plushy panoplies of royalty, even figure-
head royalty, have small place in the shifting
world as we know It today. A king may be
God's divine representative on Monday and
strung up from a high pole on Thursday.
People have a way of cherishing rulers so long
as they bow to rulers as superhuman so long
as the people feel strengthened by an earthly
godhead of monarchy. But when the awe of
monarchy diminishes before political agitation,
unrest and dissatisfaction pfft. His Majesty
went thataway.
I personally bemoan the passing of any era in
which aristocracy is no longer respected, and
"equality" of all is the goal.
Equality for all generally turns out to be noth-
ing much for a great many people, because the
sad fact of life is that while people may be born
equal, they do not wind up equal.
Enforced "equality" means dragging down the
topmost to the level ot the inept, Instead of 'up-
grading the Inept to competition with the top.
I am sad. too, that kings, like so many old
standards, don't count for much, alive or dead,
in the brave new world of apathetic anarchy
and free false teeth.
I admired the old-fashioned loyalties that
clothed royalty with admiration and a sense of
responsibility of rank and duty, and grieved a
little at Its sudden collapse.
I hope little Charlie, the grandson, makes full-
fledged king, but doubt he will. I think the lit-
tle prince Is in an old-fashioned businets which
has already seen its best days.
Armed Service Shopping
By Petei Lu.on
WASHINGTON, (NEA)There's a new 'Cham-
ber of Horrors" in the Old House Office Build-
ing.
The name was given to the room by Rep. F-
Edward Hebert of Louisiana. He is chairman ol
t House Armed Services subcommittee Inves-
tigating the buying of supplies by Army, Navy.
Marine Corps and Air Force.
"There ought to be a sign over the door," says
Rep. Hebert, Abandon Hope All Ye Who Ente,r
Here.'"
On a dozen exhibit boards In this Chamber of
Horrors are examples of bad buying of standard
Items of supply at widely varying prices paid by
the four services.
Take 60-watt light bulbs, as an example. Hu-
bert's Chamber of Horrors exhibit shows the
Army Transportation Corps bought them for
seven cents apiece. Army Ordnance bought
them for 14 cents. Army Signal Corps for 12
cents.
On 25-watt bulbs, Army bought tbem for l
cents, Marine Corps for eight. On 40-watt
bulbs. Army paid 16 cents apiece while General
Services Administration was buying for nine.
All these exhibits are to be carted Into the
main House Armed Services committee rooms
for hearings which the Hebert sub committee
will open Feb. 11.
Under-Secretary of Defense William C. Foster
will be first witness. He is in general charge
of all armed service procurement and produc-
tion.
After him will come the heads of the various
procurement services and finally the people who
do the buying and write the specifications for
these conflicting contract policies.
"We're not charging there's any crookednesi
in this." says Chairman Hebert. Speaking for
himself only, he declares that tha number of
(rafters and crooks In government Is small.
"But the examples of waste and bad manage-
ment are without number. By showing them up,
we believe we can save government money."
The example of black, low cut men's shoes is
cited. Air Force buys then for $7.19 a pair.
Navy buys almost exactly the same shoe for
56.08 a pair.
Only difference Is that the Navy shoe haa a
straight seam at the back, while the Air Force
shoes has a little leather overlap.
Air Force stockpile of these shoes Is 1,750,000
pairs. The men are Issued three pairs of shoes
a year. Since this figures to over five million
pairs a year, the saving at one dollar a pair,
would be over five million dollars.
This exhibit in the Hebert's Chamber of Hor-
rors shows what savings can be made by a small
Drice differential.
Consider what's Involved In almost Identical
field boots for the men in Korea, bought by the
Marines for $18.80 a pair, by the Army for
$24.65.
"If the Marines can buy boots that much
chaeper and they offered to why not let
em buy for both services?" asks Hebert.
Cotton undershirts which the Marines buy for
4o cents, the Air Force buys for 50 cents and
the Army for 72. Navy has a fancy wool under-
shirt it buys for $2.75 each.
Barracks bags range In price from $1.14 to
3.90. Eight types of blankets vary in price from
$9.89 Marine issue to $14.15 Air Force and $19.57
Medical services have a special white blanket
they pay $21.75 for. but that may be justified
as this blanket will take 100 steamlngs for steril-
ization.
But for soup bowls, the Air Force pays 18
cents, the Navy 22 cents and the Army 23 cents.
You cant tell one from the other.
But the Medical services have a lob with a
red band around the top which costs 46 cents.
If the red band adds to the morale of the pa-
lente, baybe It's worth the double price.
But these are some of the things the armed
service procurement officers will have to explain
to the Hebert committee.
Drtw Pearson Says: Voice of America plans broadepsts by
school children; McCarthy's advertising boycott
could backfire; Grand Jury Investigates shakedown
attempt by Senate employe.
WASHINGTON. A lot of people have long figured they
could run the Voice of America program much better than the
men who are running it.
This applies to about half the members of Congress, any on
of whom will tell you exactly what should be said on the broad-
casts reaching behind the iron Curtain.
Actually, however, the State Department haa welcomed ideas
from all sorts of people, Including congressmen, as to what should
be on the Voice of America.
Furthermore It Is now open to a unique idea.
This is to have the school children of the United States
broadcast to the school children behind the Iron Curtain.
The most important objective In winning the peace and
preventing war is to convince the people on the other side of
the iron Curtain that the American people truly want peace.
Every day the Moscow radio pours out a torrent of propa-
ganda aimed at doing exactly the contrary namely, convincing
the Soviet peoples that the American people,want war.
Obviously this is to help steel the Russian people to bear the
tremendous burden of war preparation and the virtual slave labor
of the armament factories.
It's also to mould public opinion for the day when the Krem-
lin decides war is to be declared.
Soviet propaganda has been especially directed at the youth
of Russia on the theory that if you an bring up the next
generation steeped in the Idea that the American people are its
chief enemies, then you don't have to worry about propagandis-
That's why the schoolchildren of the United States can do
a great service for their country and for future peace by cooperat-
ing with the Voice of America in getting the truth behind tha
rnThey can tell the school chlldrer of Russia what life is really
like In our schools, how American children have the friendliest
feelings toward other children all over the world, and how they
have contributed generously to help their friends In other coun-
tVl**
The method of sending these "messages to Moscow" is now
being discussed with state school superintendents.
Obviously there will not be room on the radio channels to
carry a message from every American student. But tentative
plans are under way to have local school officials pick the most
appealing messages written by the children of that city or state
and have them transcribed for use on the Voice of America.
A recent series of Interviews with Russians escaped from be-
hind the Iron Curtain showed that Soviet propaganda had mada
Its biggest Inroads on the children. They are rapidly becoming
completely Communized.
That is where the school children of America can do a great
Job for their country In helping to tell the truth to the children
of Russia.
JOE'S ADVERTISING BOYCOTT
I Statuesque Sen. Guy Gillette, the Iowa Democrat, has got
himself betwixt and between regarding his friend, Sen. Joe Mc-
As chairman of the subcommittee charged with investigating
McCarthy, Gillette was the only Senator who privately opposed
the secrecy of the committee he argued that McCarthy
would get his revenge ore committee members and indicated that
he, Gillette, partially agreed with McCarthy.
In the final showdown, when Gillette saw that all other com-
mittee members were against him, he switched and voted for the
Investigation. But he has never been enthusiastic.
Other Senators figured that the Iowa Senator's reluctance
was partly because Col. MeCormlck's Chicago "Txlbuoej strong
McCarthy supporter, ha a big circulation in Iowa and might
hurt Gillette's re-eleetlon. __L,
However, an Interesting thing has now happened.
One of Col. MeCormlck's editorials has now attacked, sen.
McCarthy for advocating an advertising boycott of Time maga-
*,neThls was in retaliation for Time's criticism of McCarthy.
Detcribing McCarthy as "low blow Joe," MeCormlck's New Yorlc
Newt, largest circulating paper In the world, commented:
"The Senator now threatens to try to persuaded Time a ad-
vertisers to withdraw their business._____
"You're no blushing oratorical violet, Joe. and youve got
the whole U. S. Senate aa a soundine board
"How about settling your squabbles that way. without get-
ting suckered into fouling out?'* ..
NOTE McCarthy also used the safety of senatorial immun-
ity to call the Saturday Evening Post pro-Communist
"This article," he said, referring to the post's criticism ol
McCarthy, "Is almost 100 percent In Une with the official in-
structions Issued to the Communist and fellow-traveling mem-
bers of the press."
BIGGEST FEE IN INDIAN HISTORY
A Federal grand jury is now investigating charges of another
alleged $500,000 shakedown attempt.
This time the man Involved Is an $8,600-a-year Senate em-
ploye, Albert A. Ororud, who drafts Indian legislation for the Sen-
ate Interior Committee. '.'_,,
The charge placed before the Grand Jury is that Grorud
tried to shake down a former Washington attorney, Ernest
Wilkinson, who had collected one of the largest fees ever award-
ed by the courts $3,000,000 for winning a 20-year $32,000,-
000 legal battle against the government for the destitute Ute m-
'aiThe story made the front pages two years ago. But before
the Utes could spend their $32,000,CX), Congress had to pass a
aneclal law okaying It.
Ororud Is charged with having the idea that Wilkinson
(couldn't collect his $3,000,000 fee until the law was passed.
The irony Is that Ororud was mistaken, that Wilkinson s fee
did not reqnire Congress' approval. However, Wilkinson com-
plained to the FBI that Ororud tried to shake him down for a
Wilkinson's story t& the FBI was that Grorud had pointed
out his strategic position as the staff expert who drafts Indlian
laws and had claimed to be able to Influence the outcome of the
special law for the Ute Indians.
In return tor this influence. Grorud allegedly suggested that
Wilkinson contribute $500.000 to a "campaign fund" to re-elect
the Senators on the Interior Committee __*_. .
The FBI Investigated, and found that the Senators had not
authorized Grorud to collect a "campaign fund" and had noth-
ing to go with Grorud's alleged proposal.
Wilkinson Is now president of the Grlgham Young university
In Provo Utah. Grorud Is still on the Senate payroll.
One Senator haa gone to bat for Ororud Nebraska's Hugh
Butler the Interior Committee's top-ranking Republican, He ben
protested privately that the charges against Grorud are "ridl-
NTE When this column did the courtesy of asking Grorud
for his side of the story, he first repeated: "I dont know what
you're talking about:" later claimed that this column had seen
a transcript of the Orand Jury record.

PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT *D$
CAN FILL YOUR, NEEDS!


w^^W^m/y^K-i" s^F'
MONDAY, Fr3PU*RY 1!, 195
ME PAMMA AWOMWCA! AW TYDF.PFNDENT OAII.T NEWSPAPER
PAOI
pacific S^ociet

ft. C*~M .KJ~
MISS SUE CORE ENTERTAINS FOR FRIENDS
Miss Sue Core entertained Saturday with a luncheon at
her home in Ancon In farewell to Mr. William F. Ossenfort
whs left the Isthmus Sunday for the United States where
she will make her future home, and in welcome to Mrs. Jo-
seph J. Hancock who recently returned from a vacation in
Louisville, Kentucky.
Covers were laid for twenty five fuests.
Dr. and Mrs. Townsend
Honor House Guests
Dr. and Mrs. James Q. Town-
send entertained with a dinner
Saturday evening at their home
Martha Lu Hackett
Celebrates Wh Birthday
Miss Martha Lu Hacket cele-
brated the occasion of her 14tn
birthday anniversary with a
in Bella Vista given in honor of swimming party and supper ai
their house guests. Dr. and Mrs.ithe Army-Navy Club on Friday
evening.
The attending guests included
William F. Ossenfort who sailed
Sunday aboard an Armv Trans-
Crt to make their home In Dal-
;, Texas.
Louis Bromfield
To Visit Isthmus
Mr. Louis Bromfield. well-
known author. Is expected to ar-
rive this evening by plane for a
three-day visit to the Isthmus.
Parents Asked
To Sponsor Girl Scouts
The parents and friends of
'would be" Girl Scouts of Pedro
Miguel are Invited to attend an
Three Dead In Oil Barge
Explosion At Tuscaloosa
the
TUSCALOOSA. Ala.. Feb. 11 owner who tried to rescue
(UP)__Dragging oper; lions be-; trapped men, were Injured. .
gan today for the bodies of two Five explosions, four within 20
RUTH MILLET? Says
"There's no such thing as a
green thumb" said the sweet-1
faced woman who has a way
with flowers after a friend re-
marked "I wish I had your green
thumb."
And then she went on to ex-
ages of 7 and 18 are welcome for
membership.
Miss Mary Patton, the Execu-
tive Director of the Girl Scouts
In the Canal Zone, will h* pre-
sent to answer any and all ques-
tions on-Girl Scouting. Colo. I
movies on the same topic will be
shown and refreshments will be
served.
The attending jws '""!" Rosary Socletv
Miss Paula Sullivan, Miss oDUyjToMeetTomw
Cotton. Miss Louise Tate, Miss rhe ref,ular monthly meeting
Margie Ely. Miss Frances Brandl. of the Altar Rosarv So~lety of St.
Miss Janet Stockham. Miss car- Mary.s church wm meet at 7:30
men Smith. Miss Dixie Stroud- 0 0n Tuesday in the St. Ma-
ner. Miss Dorothy Sandrone.. Hall
Miss Elizabeth Howze, Miss Nan- y ______
cy Wilson. Miss Janith ^''t00; I oaviime Cookln%cu
Miss Peeav Ann Donovan and -
Miss Duckv Esser.
David Mcllhenny And BUI Elton JJJjjSf*1
Entertain Informally
Mr. David Mcllhenny and Mr.
Bill Elton were hosts at an ln-
Colonel and Mrs. Hewitt
Hosts for Cocktail Party
Colonel and Mrs. Leland H.
Hewitt entertained a group o
their friends Friday evening at a--------. ..--
cocktail party given In the formal gathering for sixty or
Driftwood Lounge of the Albrook their friends on Saturday even-
Officers Club. tng at the home of David s oar-
___, ents, Mr. and Mrs. I. F. Mcll-
Tocktall Party henny on Ridge Road.
Honors Mr. and Mrs. Hall
Dr. and Mrs. Wlll'am Henry Miss Gardner Hostess
Grant entertained Thu r s d a v For Birthday Party .,_
evening at their home in Diablo Miss Joyce Gardner entertain-
wlth a cocktail oartv eiven- In ed In honor of Edgar and Oscai
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kourany en the occasion or
Hull who are levin- in th" near their Joint birthday anniversary
future to mnke their home hi the on SaturdPv at 4:00 P.m_ at tne
United States. Morgan Estate a Mirflores with
a swimming oartv followed by a
Tho-e Pttendi-iff the'oartv In- bprbecue supper,
ri'irlc" Mr and Mrs. Oeo--e Friends rttpi' in* the cel-nra-
roii Mr and Mrs. Ar-tin F. Mon included Fdna Jenkins.
Voder Mr end'*'". Albert Viet. Richard Ost'ea Ro-emarv hoi-
Mr ani Mrs Gre~o Grfm- lander, Jennve steohens Hugn
li<-i Mr rdM's Will'<"n Ver- Turner. Fred Rnyboume.Mrrllyn
ner'Mi* C-ell Pl's. *l**. He- Ford. C'chl Tronclo. An-i Oor-
lfn Rhode. Mr. end >*" Fr-n- man. Eileen Blakely and Jerry
cis I now "d Mr. and Mrs. Pe- Halman. ______
ter Shrrpnel. I .
-------- I Visitors Leave
pi-** + A- VMtor. Here Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Reynolds.
^he Rt Rev ^"vld E. R'eh- of New Orleans, who have bean
rrt, an-'M's Rl-hnrds -"-rived -iiiests for the nnst several d-vs I
this m^Ti'"" 'rom New VorH- a-'pt the Hotel El Panama left by
bo--d the S. crlrtoba' for a olane yesterday morning to re-
vHt to th*- Ist>"""s dvr'"" turn to the United States,
which time thev wl" he the
To Begin Thursday
Mrs. Mercedes Alegre Smith
a new class in Pana-
manian cooking on Thursday
from 9:00 to 11:00a.m. Reglstra-
lons mav be made by calling
Balboa 1844.
Rev. D. B. Reed
Will Be Ordained
AI SI. Luke's
BrHre Tournament Tonirht
The regular Bridge Tourna-
ment will be Dlaved this evenint i
In the Card Room of the Hotel
Tivoli at 7:00. All Interested
bridge players are Invited to at-
tend and plav in the tourna-
ment. Prompt attendance Is re-
quested.
The body of a third victim was; last flame. (experimenting all the time. A
recovered minutes after flames The furiously burning fires een,HLurnb. is Te*n J",?1 know'
began soaring from the highly I sent flames and smoke billowing"1? *?a e flu ?i --.,
combustible oil yesterday. I hundreds of feet Into the air and1 JP f,, at,wayt ,, V1 ?
Tv.o other men, including a tug endangered the entire .Warrior actually. We talk about people
Asphalt Co. plant where the ;PVl"5 ? kn"ck. for this or a flair
barge tied up to be unloaded. 1* that or being a "natural"
A Warrior executive said-: "For, lhiJ or the other,
a minute I thought the fire would1. But when vou *et right down
spread over the entire plant. i "* ne person who does a job
"Sparks flew to the too of ?as"V and well has usually just
some 60-foot pine 'trees which Put his intelligence to use.
grew around a 400-foot long The "natural" cook can get a-
pipsline." | long without a recipe because
The company Spokesman said "he has a background of expe-
the dragging operations today "knee and of experimentation,
were hampered by the oil spread Th,e woman who has a "knack"
over the surface of the Warrior Tor fining up a house has a
River and the deDth of the water background of taste. even
: v/herc the barge settled to the 'hough it has all been self-
bottom, i'aueht, pli's the willinene-s fo
At that point, the river is 30 '"O'-k hard to produce the effects
feet deep. i'-he sees in her mind's eye.
The bodv of Will James was
pulled from the fire by Tom Fln-I. So It Is foolish to epw one;
dley, owner of the tug Black woman's preen thumb or an-
Warrior. He had towed the barge -flier's flair for dress-making or
to Its mooring and was aboard decore ting or whatever,
when the first explosion sent him| The knack and the flair are
hurtling through the air to one onlv rart natural talent. What
end of the barge. |"e*s the job done successfully is
The bodies of James' brother,''mowledge plus that nnromantlc
Jack, and William W. Evans,Hn"redlenthprd wo'k.
about 48, were still missing. The Most of us don't like to admit
three victims lived in the Tusca- that. Because it is easier to en-
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCKHOLDERS
OF
THE PANAMA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
The Annual Meeting of the stockholders of The
Panam Coca-Cola Bottling; Company will be held on
Tuesday, March 4, 1952, at 4:00 p.m. at the main
office of the Company located at No. 19-A Jos Fran-
cisco de la Ossa Avenue, Panam, Republic of Pa-
nam.
Music Group Meets Tonight
The Music Group of the Canal
7cne College Club will meet at
7:30 this even'n* at the home of
Miss Gladys Elk'rs. House 5547-
K ooDOslte the tennis courts In |
Diablo.
SCROLL'S SERVICES
Panama No 58 Justo Arosemena Ave
Foot Treatment. Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails,
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments Masures,
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators. For information call: 1-2217 Parian
_____ 12 a.m.: 2V p.m.
loosa area.
Firemen were handicapped by
lack of proper chemical equip-
ment In fighting the fires and
police and state troopers had
W another a little, we sav to our-
selves: "t could do that. too. if I
were willing to stud" the subject
thoroughly learn all about It
that I can from others, and then
.their hands full, keeping back'nitch in ann work herd until I
hundreds of residents of this col-:*ave accomoli'hrd the effect I'd
;lege and industrial town from HV to accomplish "
the raging flames.
Rev. David Benson Reed win be
ordained to the sacred priesthood
Stamp Club Meets This Evening .a the Cathedral of St. Luke, An-
The Caribbean Stmo Club on, on Thursday morning at 9
meets this evening t 7:30 p.m. | j'clrck, as one of the events of
In the Library of the Jewish Wei- Convocation Week,
fare Board Center in Balboa.
Visitors are welcome.
boi'tfl wests o' the PVh* Pev Mr. Haln leaves For Argentina
pnri Mrs. P. HeN* Gooden
their home in Ancon
at Mr Irving Haln has been a
(visitor on tbe Isthmus for n short
I time and left yesterdav fo- Pue-
"hoo Rlrh<"-ds U the En'sco- nos Aires, Argentina bv plane.
npl Pl-^oO of t*e D'oee^e nf Al-l j. --------
h"" New Vnrk nnrt will ** the "Stork Clnb"
m-'n inekP'' the """'ill Welcome New Merrner
Pf*r. on we-r..ar- is t t^e! Warrant Officer snd
ra'hedr-l nf ft. L-'re "f the Penttl Johannes Hekpl^
Eoiscopal Church Auxiliary.
Vi \tmr% Honored at I nchoot,
Mrs.
Fort
kobbe announce the birth of a
son Pantti Johannes.HikPla. Jr..
on Januarv 28 at the Fort Clay-
CaotH s^d M. PP-i'l V-m- to" Armv Hosoltal
morwl who prrlved on th H.fl. Warrant Officer Hakah is the
Mcu'etanln fn- a short vlP on'-on of the late M-. and Mrs.
the rsthmi's were w*s of Mr. (Frederick J. HK'' a of Manprd.
sr-1 Mrs Georee L. Cnwell PtlMass8chu-etts. His wife is the
a hinchen" *''"> f>i.turdv at 'ormer Pettv Prh"mtcK. f'-"'gn-
the Hotel El PPnama. |te- of Mr. and Mrs. Jes-o J.
_____ Isrhumuck. of York Pennsylva-
Cr-^sto^s Sail For T-lted S*es nla.
pri^atiier General prd Mrs.l -----
Jo-eph A. CrP"Sto* wo ive il"r Valentine Coffee
heen he house "npts of her hro- Is 'niurs-'nv .,^_.
ther-ln-lw P"d s'sfr t*. "ov-l The cUver valentine cy'ee
pmor ft thp P"am" C"n0' pidi'nn-o-ed bv the me^hp's of th
M's. He-nert n. Vo-pi "i-h opHrn Mi""el Woman'" Cl"h mu
fjn-irlov PboprrI a Na" T-'-n't huhjIW at the ho-n of Mrs. Tr"-
fo- their home in Washington -^-'vHo-ov-e. iR. P/'oM;"*'
DC. if*r a visit of several in fhursday from 9:30 to li:so
weks on the Isthmus. f.m.
IAWC Picnic Tomorrow
Members, of the Inter-Ameri-
can Women's Club will meet to-
morrow morning at 9:00 at club
headquarters to attend a picnic
at the home of Mrs. Jaime de la
Guardia in El Caney. Those
nlarning to attend are reminded
te ~bring a picnic lunch and
bathing suit. .
omen &
uu
By GAY PALLEY
. Handsome Group of
PHILIPPINE RATTAN FURNITURE
just received
COMPLETE AND VARIED STYLES. .
THE CHOICE IS WONDERFUL
Pure RATTAN from tbe Philippine Islands,
the modem and elegant furniture of the Tropics.
20% Discount for this month.
CASH
CREDIT
CLUB
NEW YORK. (OP) Fashion
still Is spinach, in the opinion of
the woman designer who coined
the popular phrase 15 years ago.
Elizabeth Hawes. who made
the expression a part of Ameri-
cana, still Is sounding off on the
subject of fashion versus style
and the way American women
dress, despite the fact that tem-
porarily she is out of the dress-
making business.
"Fashion." said Miss Hawes, "Is
what Is here today and gone to-
morrow. Style is what sticks."
The designer, observing there's
always room for Improvement,
said American women are bet-
ter dressed now than they were
immediately after the war, or
even as late as a couple Of years
ago when styles "simmered
down" a bit.
"They've finally come around
to the silhouette I was preaching
before anybody ever heard of
Christian Dior." said the pint-
sized designer. "Back in the "30s.
I was making dresses with snug
bodices and full skirts .. the
same thing women are now
wearing. If anybody says I'm
bragging, lot 'em look at some of
my designs on exhibit at the
Brooklyn Museum."
It's that silhouette fitted bo-
dice and full skirtwhich Miss
Hawes contended will last sever-
al years before It's the one best
suited to the American woman's
figure.
"In the future let us soften the
lines a bit." said the designer.
"Some of those stiff, full skirts
are so determined. Let's have
the fullness in a softer drape.
More beguiling that way."
Miss Hawes. before she closed
her New York shoo hi 1949. ca-
tered to the social set 'and to
such shew business names ai
'Lynn Fontanne. Gladys Swart-
hout. Ingrld Bergman and Kath-
er ine HeDburn.
Since 1949. she's been living
and resting In the Virgin Islands.
setting for a new travel book she
has written, called' "But Say It
Politely."
Now back m New York, the
designer is lob-hunting she
won't reveal what type of work
According-to-the order of serv-
ice, the sermon follows the pro-
cessional hymn, and will be
preached by the Venerable Rob-
ert W. Turner, Archdeacon of
Western Panam.
The Rt. Rev. Reginald H. Good-
en, S.T.D.. Episcopal Bishop of
the Missionary District of the
Panam Canal Zone, will ad-
vance Reed from the dlaconate
to the priesthood. He will be pre-
sented by the Ven. John H.
Townsend, executive secretary of .
the District and Archdeacon of '
northern Colombia, for ordina-
tion.
Other clerics taking part in the:
service will be: Rev. Moultrie H.
Mclntosh, who will read the pre-
face before tbe presentation;
Rev. William A. Glenn, litanlst;
Rev. Arnold C. Waldock, eplstol-
er; Rev. Lemuel B. Shirley, gos-
peler; Ven. William L. ZiZadle,
Bishop's chaplain; the Very Rev.
Raymond tT Ferris, master of
ceremonies; Rev. James A.
Echaffter and the Rev. Milton A.
Cookson, servers; Rev. Mainert J.
Peterson, organist for the clergy:
choir.
Crucifera, first and second, will
be Wi'liam 'Baldwin and John;
LESTER
Befsij%c>
SPINET
Fields, respectively.
Reed graduated from Virginia
Theological Seminary of Alexan-
dria. Virginia. He assisted at the)
Church of Our Saviour, New
Cristobal, last August while the,
pastor was on vacation, and has!
also been substituting at the!
Church of the Good Shepherd,
San Jos, Costa Rica.
After his consecration to the
priesthood. Rev. Reed will be ap-
pointed priest In charge of St
Andrew's Church, Cocol!, untlj'
the bishop finds it possible to
send him to Colombia.
BInituRE STORE
ENTRALAVE.at21tE.ST. ? PHONES^ 2*183C
* 2-1833
the finest Swedish hand
cut full lead crystal.
All patterns in open stock
at
SK
aws
Panam
Coln
she wants and also being out-
spoken on a variety or subjects,
including jewelry, makeup, and
the way Princess Elizabeth and
Margaret Truman are gowned.
"A piece of Jewelry has one
purpose," said the designer. "Toj
draw attention to the spot it's
worn. What a confusion a wom-
an creates when she wears ear-
rings, necklace, several dangling
bracelets, a clip and two or three
rings."
"Same thing with makeup."
she added. "Women overdo it.
and all faces are made up in the
same pattern. They all look a-
llke."
About the British Princess and
the President's daughter. Miss
Hawes said the clothes of both
"are Influenced too much by
their position. Too staid and ma-
tronly."
"I wish they'd Just let Marga-
ret Truman go out and buy what
she wants, instead of what thev
think she ought to have," said
the designer, a bit wistfully.
Fhe Big 1952 Ford
Will Soon Be
On Display
m
COLPAN MOTORS
Tsl. 2-1033 2-1036
PANAMA
Extraordinary
Offer
Direct Delivery to the
Canal Zone
placad in your home
and tunad.
Mahogany___$575.00
Blonde....... 590.00
Take advantage of this
marvelous buy which is
several hundred dollars
below States selling
price.
ONLY PIANO
FOR THE TROPICS
(Factory equipped with
new "Damp Chaser")
Hurry! Placa your order
now from stock models
in our atora. Approxim-
ately 6 weeks delivery.
Easy Credit Terras
New low Panam price:
Mahogany-----$690.00
Blonde....... 708.00

PANAMA RADIO
CORPORATION
It Central Avenue
Phones: 2-3304 t-SSM
That i* whv w cred't .o msnv;
of o"r friend.' with *ift that c-
tullv are reallv not gifts at li-
mit a cnmhi^atlon of ambition
Mid hard work.
Raises Lemons In Alabama
TU?cTjnr(<'v A1p. (ttp _!
"s. T. M. Mu""->It nf iiburrnn!
Alherta C>tv. decided to raise!
*er own lemon:. *H a"* earn*
o w'**i Oifs o' them, "h" Vent!
*he sbfh m her Teer^ome
ivH^ff the w'nte*. vie s*W t^e
*H*H. IT! r)orfAt],. 'n"*r!H yel-t
low and exceptionally large. .


resses
Casual & Smart
Come see our outstanding
new collection of
go-everywhere frocks, today.
You'll love their styling!
All sizes.
Panama M01 TA S Colon
Mi.
1*1
veryboy?ea* Qassifief
THEY'RE RUSHING TO TAHITI'S
C/o see all those
off,
SPECIAL OFFER
iderful bargains
"ed there.
Beautiful Diamond
Engaaement Rina With
Matching Cold Wedding Band
FOR ONLY $27.50
SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY

TAHITI
T HE
157 I w E L R Y 9 T 0 R
V n i r a t Ot V e.
157


Mn ror
' IE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
i
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, ItSI
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
TEHRI--
MARKED MONEY
Shipping &
Ah Line News
M British Mice Fly
To Jamaica School
Eighty white mice have just
arrl\d in Kingston, Jamaica,
after a 5.100-mile air trip from
London In the interest of
science.
It will not be a round-trip.
The rodents will give their lives
in medical experiment* at the
new West Indies University Col-
lege in Jamaica.
The shipment was arranged
by Dr. Ken HU. World Health
Organization consultant and
professor of pathology at the
college, Olaxo Laboratories of
London donated the mice, which
were flown by Pan American
World Airways to New York and
thence to Kingston by PAAs
affiliate, Aerovas Nacionales
de Colombia lAviancai.
The medical college was form-
ally opened In February. 1950.
and the first class will be1
graduated in 1954. Admission Is
limited to 30 students a year
but the school is expected to
relieve the chronic shortage of
doctors in the West Indies In
future years.
JACOtYOHjW
By OSWALD JACOB*
Written for NEA Servfca
Aquatic Bird
Anawr to Previou, Puizle
JdlMTIfL.
? 8841
vie
? KJII
K104
SMth
1
34>
4
NORTW t
A3T
104*
? 711
ixii
EAST
AQ1088
vtss
? .
* torra id >
x
/AKQJ
? A104
*A72
Neither fide vul.
Wot* North EM*
Pan 1*
Pas* S
Pass Pats
Pa
Pass
Psss
Opening leadV 7
3 Small draught
4 Symbol for
tellurium
5 Termini
Harvest
7 Roman
emperor
Ingots of
metal
Symbol for
radon
10 Crook letter
11 Acrid
12 Card game
27 Croan
32 Abrade
33 Hot
35 Plant spores
38 Drees
Here we have a fairly simple
hand. Strangely enough, how-
ever, it didn't look so simple to
:the experienced declarer who
played it not lonR aeo.
West got off lo a trump lead, a
fine idea. South won l-.i his own
I hand with the ace of hearts,
HORIZONTAL
l.lDopicted
aquatic bird
11 Transferee
14 Capar
15 Snooze
18 Challenged
13 Indonesian of
Mindanao
It Displaced
person (ab.)
20 Btamlihes
21 Troop (ab.)
22 Compass P*nt? X^T (LatTn)
H 822L M BMt oi w40 ^^o,,,
Genuine 24 Separated 41 Sun god
28 Proceed *"* M B00t,' Gt,Ue
Either
30 Behold!
31 Near
32 Let it stand
34 Genus of
water
scorpions
37 Lettuce
38 Period
39 Railroad (ab.)
40 Goddess of
peace
45 Lieutenant
(Ab.)
48 Craft
48 One who cares
48 Fourth
Arabian caliph
50 Portion
52 It is a good
IWII
itjr.Mir
i K*
\m
-;il -;
'-'! i.VMi;
71 I
49 Eft
44 Silkworm
47 Golf device
4 Friend (Fr.)
51 Tomorrow
night (ab.)
5J Millimeter
(ab.)
54 Paradises
55 Worsted fabric
I VERTICAL
IRoam
2Pais by
Guatemala Extends
Tourist Card Life
In a new gesture of hospital-
ity to visitors, the Guatemalan
government has extended the
validity of tourist cards from 90
days to six months.
Pan American World Airways jcashed the king of spades, got to
has been notified that visitors .. h .
to Guatemala can stay an ad- dummy with the ten of hearts
ditional six monthsone year in and discarded a club on (he ace
allby applying for an exten- of spades. He then drew one
ion at least five days prior to j more trump and went afier the trump to South's kinR, whereup- though the diamonds broke un-
xpiration of their tourist cards. diarnonds j-, ,ne n0De of eettinglon South would lead diamonds favorably West would be unable
The new rulina applies to all for the third time. to lead a third trump. West
previously issued tourist cards ""* "rea* w0u,d naye t0 fet QUt wlth
Showing the former 90-day
limitation.
The tourist cards may be Ob-
tained from Pan American Air-
ways at the time of departure
by citizens of the United States
and most other countries.
Exceptions are British sub-
jects and citizens of the Do-. ^, k
mlnlcan Republic, Nicaragua, Pfnd s0JeIv m 3-3, or*
Peru. Spain and Venezuela, who|diamonds. South should have
must obtain the cards from a ; tried for a diamond ruff in dum-
Guatemalan consul. my.
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS'
On the Air
BY MERRILL BLOSSHR
HwaeTov decides that
VANDYKE MEE0S A LITTLE
"A/g/A/ff '
Easy dois it, vandyke/
we got some broadcasting
to do on station r-a-z-z/
^
ITS TiME FOR A NEW
HEADAROUNOMEBE-
--ONE WITH .
WVMISKtRS ON ir/
ALLEY OOP
Tn a New Land
BY Y. T. HAMLIK
He ws rioomrri to disanooint- There was nothing wrong with spade or a club and South could
? d0m l" ""i. a Pla" lf the diamonds hap- easily get to his hand to ruff his
ment. The diamonds broke un- Dened t0 break 3.8. The advan- last diamond with dummy's ten
favorably, and he had to losejtage lay in the fact that even of hearts,
three diamonds and a club. All;
was lost save honors.
There was no reason lo
de-
in
S/S "TOSCA"
Accepting Passengers
lor
LOS ANGELES,
Calif.
Sailing on or about
FEBRUARY 13th, 1952
Apply
C. Fertile & Co.
The correct play Is to win the)
first trick with the ace of hearts,
cash the king of spades, and then
take the ace of diamonds and
give up a diamond. East would
win the diamond and return a
Cristbal
3-1772
Balboa
2-1657
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Mew Orleans Service
i.-..
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Quiligua.................................Febr. 17
..Febr. 22
S.S. Levers Rend
S.S. < hiriqui ...'.
S.S. ((urrigna ....
Febr. 24
Mareta 2
Handling Refrigerated Cklllci ni Ganara Carga.
Arrives
New York Service Cristbal
---------'-----------------.' ----------:------------:. <. '.r,. s,----------
S.S. Junior....................................Febr. 12
S.S. Talamanca ..............................Febr. IS
S.S. Cape Cumberland........................Febr. 16
f.S. MetapAn.................................Febr. It
S.S. Cape Ana ...............................Febr. 22
S.S. Veragua .................................Fefcr. 23
Weakly Sailing! la Naw York, New Orlean*. Lot Angelas, San Franciaco,
Swill* r'renueni freight .lltng< friitebal in Weil CMst
Central American Ports.
Cristbal to New Orleans via Sails from
rela. Honduras_________________________Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui .................................Febr. 12
S.S. Qulriirua........................... -----'.Febr. IS
S.S. Chiriqui.................................Febr. 26
S.S. Quirlgua ........................March 4
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 26
BOOTS AND HER BTOOnrS
Could Re
-
BY EDGAR MARTIN \
Or*CVl OHU *
OMCVl
OrSN?!
r\N*> \\. n1*hm
VVViWO WO
MtKrt\OK> TrVKt
Wt. VVfl> OKU
l^WMs.
WrtVV-lV.rTtRIBl VRife Ut'feVlM
HftMei\K>' OMUrMUK. OK. TW
RftCVt *\Ot Of ^V\' tpM\tt< IR
__ ^j a' mm wv8t
V \_________ ^nvv *ovl
'-II!
r.mi atrswwm, m. T. m. ag
CAPTAIN EASY
Another Tale
CHRIS Wr.TK.EN. Plane leer
A Flash to Boleron
BY RCSS nINTERBOTHA.M
In the _yi*Je>
CONTMOL.
(ZOOM
TBIAISKE-*
m
\t cant be "YrWriRtiMWwosrerrl
IN *0NTERWf.WU TO BC RBCOONIZED AMD
SAID YOU WBRK \CAlt)jMI|TTuai*
in PMi wore k wsouise
so
ALSO IK**,
n 10V THOUOrlT
I VMA Kl rANGEK
"iOU'D 8W.KE THIS
TRIP TO PROTKT
GOSH.fOU CMANOe TSBB.L'. *Tr
V#TORIE$ SO OPTEN. t*T THfVW
1JMBT. 1 WIMNO /STOfYiNa W
/what to seiHWBi/EAT'. tw# ay
irOOfTTM'STIff
TATHeCR
m
*Z2
VIC FLINT
Treatment With Knucks
BY MICHAEL O'MALLEi
I WANT A PTV-FirrvJ/ WHY
*f*UTOrJTMR VAfgPSiMKrBK WAUL Y TUB,
and BVBRv anmkj anvthin
JOB V9U FULL/ r-V ~*1 AAV...
PR ILLA'S POP
Strife With Father
BV AI VERMERR
8JUGS BL'NNI
i
OLE BOAKUINU HOUSE
1th
MAJOR BOOPLE OL'T OtJR WAT
The Sufferer
K*
vSuoTUV IN
A KMCOKP rn^fYBS AND) AN Ai-BUAS OF w____^C
^I^^K^A
^0^mL
r^^i^H
MERE One iOCIU-
Lltte, MKX&-~~-
A POCKeTCOM-
PA4S USED 6V
COJCe DE LEOM
INl Ht6 56ARCM
r?h Trte
FOON3TAIW
OF
VOOTH?
fEGAD^GASTOM-'
I that's Worth a
PCETTY pennv/,
,-a.- T MISKT
gORROvJ IT A0O
COnTinIUE- THE
. <50EST -^THPfT
is, ip x vOErze,
AW OLD
MftN- .
HBA-rBrUJ
HOWTX>Yi?U
kMOW M7UR c%
KCL1CS ARe
80nDD TUFF.
MR. GUWlHORrJ ?j
TO THiMK. *
1MEVO BE AS
HARD TO
TffftCE M>
6MEEZE
, IN A '
LEEPlkiS
CA*'
Bj J. R WILLIAMS
NO, NOT W6TIMCT 1
-iTSMCMoary/ I
IT JUST CAMEi
TO THE BULL
THAT WHEN HE
VMASAVM3RK-
AAAn HEPNEVE3J
CALL TK CBANC
IF TH'BOSS
\MASUSIN'
IT.'


MONtoAT. FEBRUARY 11. 1MI
..... i- *
TU! PANAMA AMEllICArf AH INOirENUINT DAILT NFWSFAFIR
FACW HP
^/itlantu ^>ciet


&, 195, Gal** %Lfkm C*tim 37
months visiting In California.
3he visited In Los Angelas with
the vice-consul of Oreat Britain
and Mrs. William Milne Quthrle.
The Guthrles. who were formerly
stationed in Colon, sent their
best wishes to their many friends
on the isthmus.
EPISCOPAL TEA VERY SUCCESSFUL
The annnal tea liven by the ladies of the Church of Our
Saviour, was held Saturday afternoon at the home of Mrs.
William E. Adams of Bratos Heights. Ladies from the At-
lantic Side communities called during the hours from 4:99
to t:M p.m.
Receiving the guests were the
wives of the two Episcopal min-
isters, Mrs. Milton A. CooKioni
and Mrs. Malnert Peterson. Mrs.
William E. Adams and the pres-
ident of the auxiliary, Mrs. C. J.
O'Bullivan.
Mrs. Charles H. Whltaker wasi
In charge of the edcoratlng of
the tea table. She used five-
branched Silver candelabras with
red tapers and silver pheasants,
with a floral arrangement of red
and pink blossoms.
The ladles who alternated at
the tea table were: Mrs. Antho-
ny Raymond. Mrs. Henry T.
Taylor, Mrs. Robert Neely, Mrs.
R. A. Koperskl. Mrs. Prank L.
Scott. Mrs. Harold White, Mrs.
Mary Engelke and Mrs. George
Mngelke.
Mrs. Michael P. Greene was!
in charge of the silver donations.
The organization wishes toi
thank the ladies of the commu-
nity for their patronage in mak-
ing the tea a success.
ui," for dinner at the Hotel El
mama.
They were joined by Mrs
Blgelow. Jr., and Mr. Bromilow.
Bon Voyage Party
lor MM. Folk .
Mrs. W. P. carey. Mrs H. T.
Jones and Mrs. K. H Roder
gave a bon voyage coffee for:
Mr. J. J. Polk at the Carev re-
sidence on the Coco Solo Naval.
Station Wednesday morning,
The honoree was presented j
nalr of earrings as a aift from]
the group. Chief snd V*s. Fo)k;
left Saturday for Norfolk. Vlrgl-I
nla. where he will receive hi or-
ders I
The friends who attended the,
farewell party were: Mrs. Anna
WarrMc Mr. T.. H. Becky's*.
Mrs. A. M. PechPnce Mrs. F. 8 '
j-.awson.Mrs. B C. Pill. Mra. D.|
E. Sab'.n and Mrs. John Crone.
Doliente Brldee Gme
Duollcate bridge Is olaved ev-
ery Monrtav evenlne- at the! Mar-
garita clubhouse. Anv Atlantic
Side residents, who ara mtere^t-
ed in the came, are cordially In-1
vlterl to loin the foi'D.
The winners of last week's
pames were: North and Soi'Mi.
Mr*. Garland *"d Captal" Tohn
Fahnestock: *>nd. Mr. anri M'-.
L. I. Cottrell: 3rd Mrs K- W.
MlHapaugh with Mrs. Irl San-
der*. Jr. Ran and West Mrs,
Henry Hartwlg and Mra George
Poole, Jr.. and tied for second.
Mra. Porter McHan With Mrs.
Samuel Rowley and M
Loeb with MjMssTt 0- Brown.
Margaret Leigh Celebrates
Birthday with SuBper Party
Mr. and Mrs. Robert O. Leigh
entertained Saturday evening at
their residence on Roosevelt Ave.,
with a buffet supper and even-
ing of dancing for their daugh-
ter, Margaret, on her fourteenth
birthday anniversary.
The young friends who cele-
brated with the honoree were:
Susie Plncus. Mary Morland
Shirley Peterson, Pat Leach, Er-
da Kuhrlg. Marcella Lelgtiadier.
Sandra Motta. Donna Jeanne
Humphrey. Pessrv Roddy, Mary
Orr, Mary Jo Aycock. Madelon
Garrett-, Judy Tipton. Dick
Home. John Coffey. Luke Pa-
lumbo. Dick Tatelman. Robert
MacSparran, Allen Roblnette,
Mickev Whltaker. John Knott,
Rolando Vlllalas. Dirk Orassau,
John Wall, Bobby Brown and Da-
vid cralg.
Mr. and Mrs. William Cardoze
of Panama City, sister and bro-
ther-in-law of the honoree and
har aunt and uncle.' Mr. and
Mrs. Derek Lansjman. were also
present.
Rcbekah dub Meeting
The Cristobal Rebekah Club
met Thursday evening at the
home of Mrs. Elisabeth Willisms
of Margarita Mrs. Betty O'-
Rourke was co-hostess for the
meeting.
Mrs. William Wray. president,
presided at the meeting. The
dark horse was wan by Miss
Grace Williams.
Games were played and the
orlr.es were won by: Mrs. Freda
Boydstrom. Mrs. Roger Deakins.
Mrs. Leta Robinson. Mrs. Robert
Thomas and Mrs. Olive Hallor-
an.
The other members present
were: Mrs. HE. Pihlgren. Mrs.
J. A. Cunningham. Mrs. Sam-
uel Cralg, Mrs. Leta Brown. Mrs
Jlmmie Redmond, Mrs. Semon
Therlot. Mrs. Al Turner. Mrs.
Marv Lou Tolbert, Mrs. Anna
Crandal. Mrs. Edna, Purr. Mrs.
Margaret Schofleld. Mrs Maude
Lawrence. Mrs. Farnk Estes and
Mrs. B. IT. Stems.
Chaplain Hoffmeyer
Ordered to France
Lt. Colonel (Chaplain) Will-
iam T. Hoffmeyer of Baltimore.
Maryland, has been assigned to
duty in France Chaplain and
Mrs. Hoffmeyer with their chil-
dren will leave in the near fu-
tur.
Chaplain Hoffmeyer was for-
merly the Atlantic Sector Chap-1
lain and he and his family en-'
red Into the activities of the
j civilian, as well aa the Army
communities. They have a wide
circle of friends on the Isthmus.
Mr*. KernIck Returns from
Vacation
Mrs. John Kernick of Brazos
Heights, arrived Fridav on the
BatoCerrpfmm California Mrs.
Kernick hftiiPwthe pan two
Visitors Transit Canal
Mrs. Dean Peaboody. Mrs. Ed-
mund O. Bromllcjw of Pans ma
City. Mr. Henrv Biselo?. Sr;,
Mr. Henrv Blgelow. Jr.jransit-
ed thi'Canal StWday on the "Ya-
\Jo
LUX THEATRE
IM 4:17 S*7 Ofl
STEWART )li;TRICH
'*T%
ff'GHWAr
s/cy
Jtf
BELLA VISTA and TROPICAL
IS* :- litS S:IS m.
James
Cagney
PHYLLIS THAXTER
Come Fill
the Cup^
SmaMkMK> i*aiuajai^rwai
Dr. and Mra. Gilder
Return from Costa Rica
Dr. and Mrs. Wayne Gilder of
Cristobal, arrived yesterday on
the S.S. Hlbuerae from a two-
week visit in Queposj C.R.
Legion Auxiliary
To Present Boy
Scour Broadcast
COLON, Feb. 11-A radio pro-
gram will be presented by the'
American Legion Auxiliary to-
morrow at 8 p.m. over radio sta-
tion HP5K.
Pour Boy Scouts, well known
for their fine work in Scouting,
will be presented on the program
in a question-and-answer ses-
sion. Following there will be
Scout songs hy the troop present
at the program.
Participating In this program
will be Barry Davlson, Brian Cox.
Charles Thompson and Larry
Cox.
This program Is dedicated to
the American Legion Auxiliary-
Department of Panam Canal
Zone to Boy Scout Week. Feb. 6 to
18 and also In honor to the mem-
ory of Abraham Lincoln oh his
birthday.
Radio Programs
Your Community Srorion
HOG-840
Whir. 100.000 aoestt Moot
Pr$}$*nt$
Today. Monday. Feb. U
ffjfc
3:30Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:16 David Rose Sho w
4:>0-What'a Your Favorite
9:00Stand By for Adventure
Cie. Alfsro, 8.A.
fl: 16Evening Salon
7:00Calling All Forces
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:46Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and commentary,
8:16Halls of Iw (VOA>
8:46Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00The Man In Black
(BBC)
9:30Symphony Hall
10:00The World at Your Win-
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
Midnight-Sign Off
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY EKSSINE JOHNSON
CENT HAL
John Btrrymore. Jr.
Coxinne Calvort, In
"QUE*EC"
SKCTAC1XAB SIGHTS'
B O M A H C I!
APTBJm.BE!
CECILJA THE AT RJ
rUNNIBl THAN ANY BSTORI!
"EXCUSE MY DUST" (Colors)
St* SKtXTON Sslly rOBBEST
Also: Dick Pewoll Pa ala Ba>mM
THE TALL TARGET"
ENCANTO THE AT HE
Abbott and CosteUo, In
"COMIN' 'ROUND
THE MOUNTAIN"
Jeff Chandler. In
"SMUGGLERS
ISLAND"
TIVOLI THEATRE
Brrol riymi. in
ADVENT!KES OP
CAPTAIN FABIAN"
Also BUI Elliott la
JffOWDOWW
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Mystery and Romance"
Richard Basehart, la
-HOUSE ON
TELEGRAPH HILL
Betty Orable. in
"MEET MB AFTER THE
____ SHOW"
VICTORIA THEATtE^
Another Triara* of
Uto Junlo King!
TABZA.N AMD THE
MAOIC FOUNT ArN-
Also TABSAN
BRONCHIAL
ASTHMA
Sleep Sound All Night
ft largest soiling medicine- to
Bronchitis end Asthmo In all or oils
lareHy-eold Cnido Is Buckloy's Co-
rcodlol Mixturo itrfplo acting) s
blesuna to thousondt and now sold
in a drugstorei.
Thsr H nothing a safe one our
in the world 2 or 3 dotas in sweet*
nod hot water lust before bodtlms
ond many o suffsre* from tronoJIn
choklno Aithmo ho ound relief
ond a oood night's rost ana that
bod, old. oorsiittnt. bronchial oougf
has left ou ^ M veo don't belitvo
it gtt o bottlo at ony good druools)
'or you can dootnd on Buck lev' Co-
nodlol Mixturo to givo doflnlto. aulel>
rollof from that choking, gasping
itrugglt for breath.
Tomorrow. Tuesday, Feb. lt
AM.
6:00-Bien On Alarm Clock
Club
7:80 Morning Salon
8:16News (VOA)
8:30Crasy Quilt
8:45-Hawaiian Harmonies
9:00News
9:15Sacred Heart Program
9:30As I Bee It
10:00News
ll:05-Off the Record (Contd.)
11:00News
11:08Off the Record
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:11Personality Parade
1:48 Rhythm and Reason
2:00 A Call From Les Paul
2:11Date (or Dancing
2:30Spirit of the Vikings
2:48Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3: ISThe Little Show
3:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Panamtuica Story Tim*
4:15Promenade Concert
4:30 What's Your Favorite
8:00Stand By for Adventure-
da. Alfaro, 8 A.
8:15Evening 8alon
7:00Ray's A Laugh 'BBC)
7:18Musical interlude
7:30-PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:48HmSession
8:00HBWS (VOA) and
Commentary
8:15 The Jo Stafford Show
(VOA)
8:30Time For Business (VOA'
8:45Commentator's Dlfest
(VOA)
8:00Musical Americana
(VOA)
/
t:30-Pride and Prejudice
(BBC)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:16Musical Interlude
10:80Variety Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
HOLLYWOOD (NEAl Be-
hind the Screen: Frank Sinatra's
lavish fence-repairing party for
the press following the preview
of TJI's "Meet Danny Wilson,''
didn't give him much chance to
meet the scribes only a few
showed up.
Most of the press admittance
cards, like mine, were tiled In the
wastebasket.
Frank's co-star. Shelley Win-
tera, showed up for the preview
but skipped the party.
Insiders claim that Frank fail-
ed to send Shelley an invitation,
(they feuded throughout the pic-
ture i, and the studio finally gave
her a bid after she screamed:
"It's my picture. Why wasn't I
invited?"
Oh well, Ava stHI loves him.

There's been so much delay on
the Rita Hsyworth movie, says
Alan Wilson, that they're calling,
it "Affairs in Trinlgranddad."

rankle Lalne's doctors now
eve that a throat operation
will be unnecessary. But he has
to be as silent as Jane Wyman In
"Johnny Belinda" until he opens
t a Miami Beach night cltlh at
the end of February.
OOO
Jane Russell has been ordered
by her studio to be silent on the,
subject of her cravings for an-
other adopted child, it whittles
down the glamor. Jane was even,
told not to bring lfl-month-old
Tommy Kavanugh to tne studio-
again.
0*0
The romanee is too hot to be
kept mum, so I'm telling you that,
lt was gorgeous, blonde Diane
Garrett who brought Robert Tay-
lor back from Europe in such a:
hurry. It's developing into a bon-
fire. #i
Medics have strapped up Ida
Luplno;s back and advised her
that she may have to take to bed;
to insure her stork date.
*
For the first time in Holly-,
wood's publicity-mad history
producers are insisting that their:
names be left off the screen. TV's
the reason.
All credits are being deleted byi
movie producers leasing then-
films to television to avoid
squawks and boycotts from the-,
ater owners.
To wild-eyrd exhibitors who
complain about the sale of mo-
vies to TV, the producers have a!
bland, innocent, explanation;
"We leased them to a fellow;
for distribution and he leased
them to TV. We're as surprised;
as you are. But there's nothing,
we can do about It."

Some of Li Taylor's pals are
saying that the Michael Wilding,
influence Is showing In her new
British accent. Aw, maybe she's
just getting resdy to do a picture
With Doug Fairbanks, Jr. .
Doris Day Is in a pout because ft!
fan magazine vetoed a cover
photo without the Day hair,
bants. The editor said her fans
wouldn't recognize her In a dif-
ferent hair-do.
o
Dress designer Taffy consulted
an interior decorator about re-i
doing her living room.
Let's make It old English,' she
told the decorator, "to match the,
movie on my television screen.''

OrouchoMarx as a straight ac-
torsans moustache, mad leeri
and loping walk?
Now that he's off to funnyman
business in "Double Dynamite"
and "A Girl In Every Port" with-
out his famous brothers, Oroucho
Is saying that he'd like a turn at
some serious emoting.
"Not 'Hamlet.' mind you," said
the comedian. "Just a straight
dramatic, part. I don't know
whether audiences would accept
lt. i
"Zasu Pitts tried It aad audi-
ences got hysterical. I suppose
the same thing would happen to
me."
Oroucho admits that he's as
"morose and morbid" as the next
rib-tickler when the curtain goes
down. He tells the story about a
man, troubled with melancholia
and suicidal impulses, who con-
sulted a famous psychiatrist in
Paris.
"Tonight," the psychiatrist told
him, "go to the circus and see
Salvlni. the famous clown. It will
lift you out of yourself."
"I can't," said the patient, "You
see, I am Salvlni."'
T
m
anama
Canal cJheaters
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
AW-COBOSttOSMS
tHfft'ff
DIABLO HTS.
ItS VM
! I !
COCOLI
Silt 7 lit
!
GAT UN
itce
H.v MILLAND Gone TIBBNSY
"CLOSE TO MY HEAT"
Chirlo McGBAW Joon DTXON
"ROADBLOCK"
Toooay "roUBTSSN KOUM"
Red CAMBRN o Wayne MORRIS
"Stage To Tucson" (Technicolor)
TM4y JIM THORW-ALL ASSBBICAW^.
"Appomtmont With Dongsr"
LAADCAPIT A Ro RANDBLL o Juno VINCENT
WE "Tht Lone Wolf And His Lady'
o ToooOsv TBTTHDM ON THE HILI. '
CRISTOBAL
ABt*C*$tBmi*9i94
S:U S.-St
Kirk DOUdLAS o Blosnor PARKER
"DETECTIVE STORY"
Ta*sy "GBOOM WOttt BfVBSV
TONGOLELE
SENSATIONAL AMERICAN STAR
with her ennal dance*
will he at the
TROPICAL THEATRE
iseginning with a midnight show
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14
Appearing with '
SILVESTRE MNDEZ
topo in rhythm,
and the HERMANOS PAZ
14-man Orchestra
The ame how will be presented
at die regular hours from
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14
PRESIDENTE THEATRE
BAMBOO FURNITURE
Recommended by
E .
MUEBLERA EL DIABLO
If you belong to the Armed Forces or If you have
a steady job come to oar Store and you can
choose your own terms to boy on credit
The Store Where You" will rind the Largest Aaaortsaeot
ai Osase ad Linoleum.
M Central Ayen.e TeioBROM t-Mtt
S the Furniture business since lfSt"
i
OFFICIAL LISI OP THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Prize-Winnisf Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1718, Sunday, February 10, 1952
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two series "A" Jk "" of 32 pieces each.
First Prize
9
Second Prize
Third Prize

6 7 61
8522
6449
I

$ 44,000.
$ 13,200.
$ 6,600.00
Moo Friso Mm Prsso> i No* S IMM 2MI Mse> t IMM 1 No rrtassiaias IM.M 4001
Ml mm MSI MM
SI 1JI.M IMI lll.H SMI 11S.M net 1M.M Ml
essi uj.se IMI ores' msi IMM SMI IMM MSI
Ml ISS.M IMI I.12.M SMI IMM MSI iM.ee Ml
SSI ijs.ee MU I3S.M SMI IM.M | MSI IM.M MSI
esa IMM MSI IMM SMI IMM MSI ISS.M Ml
MSI I3Z.M IMI IMM SMI IMM MSI ISS.M Ml
c 2.SO.M IMI Z.MS.M nil asease SMI 2.JOO00 Ml
isase imi IMM MSI IMM MSI IMM SSI
Ml UCM [ IMI 1SI.M SMI IMM MM IMM Ml
I
1M.M
IM.M
IM.M
IM.M
IM.M
IMM
IMM
2M*m
IMM
IM.M
MSI
SISI
SMI
SMI
SMI
SMI
SMI
S7SI
SMI
SMI
mscino. fries iriso Nos. Prna was. ertss
t > S S s
IM.M SMI 1M.M IMI UZM SMI 1M.M Ml IMM
imm tiei IMM T1S1 IM.M SMI IMM SISI IMM
ISMS1 MSI IMM 7MI IM.M SMI IMM Mm IMM
IM.M MM IMM TMI IM.M SMI IMM MOl IMM
IM.M MSI IM.M 7401 1M.M SMI IMM Mei IMM
IMM Ml IMM 7M' IM.M MSI IMM SSSl IMM
IMM Ml IM.M MM IMS SMI IMM son IMM
2.2MM 7SI MMOM 77SI 2.MSM SMI 2.2M.M trsi 2.SM.SB
IM.M Ml IM.M 7MI IMM SMI IMM MSI IMM
IM.M Ml IMM 7M1 IMM SMI 1M3M MM IMM
Approximations Derived From First Prize
S7S2
SIM
SIM
SIM
TM
7*7
mm nil
M.M MSB
S7M
ens
MM 7 MM
M.M I 7M
t
MM
n
e7
7M
M.M MM
M.M em
Approximations Derived From Second Prize
BUS I ISM Ull I ISM Mi:
Ml* I ISM i MM I ISM MM
IS
I1S.M
ne.M i aui
IIO.M MM
ne<
1IS.M j I
IIS M .
ue.e
ue.e
7ia
i
us.
ue.M
ne.M
AptfttYtnttiiotr Derived From fhird Prize
US.M IMS IMM
MM
S
IMM
MM
IMM SOS
SMlMSl
MM UH
.....
IMM1 TMS
t
IMM
IMM
Frise-winning numbers of vesterday's Lottery drawlns were told: first, second aad third in Colon.
The Bias kBMtrod whole tickets eadinc a 1 sad Ml IbI oded in the save Mat wia Facty-Feur Dollars (Sit.) a,
a The whole ticket baa 44 pleoas which cos&prue the two aeries "A" and "B."
Signed by. ALBERTO KLMUAH Governor of the Province of Panam.
ANTONIO MOSCOSO B RoproaenutiTM of the Ministry of Treasury
JrTTNESSES
Manuel Vicente Palma OCd. 47-21199
Juan B. Crdenas S. -Cdula No. 1-3390
CABLOS CRI8MATT
Notary Public. Panam.
PABLO PQIXL M.
Secretary



I>


raor six
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
ataVi
ii Tim i
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 19S
You Sell em When You Tell em thru PA. Classifieds!



Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our
Offices
LtWl tfRVIO
am-
MORRISON*
m. fawn m *
** -*al
SALON l)B KEIIKZA
No. H Wat lit SU
AMERICANO
FOR SALE
HollM'llolil
BOTH A JAKLTON
OR SALE
Automoliit"-
IHE PANAMA AMERICAN
Na. 7 "H- Wilt Pa
s ii.17 Caatral lin Colaav
12 words-
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE:Weslinghouse outoma-i
tic wishing mochine. Perfect con-
dition, $125.00, bedroom set, U.5.
$100.00, dininjrom set, $75.00. ^
' No. 4] .A, 43rd street.__________j'"
FOR SALE25 Cycle Fhgid.ire. ex-
esllent condition, $100.00, Easy
Spindrier, 25 cycle washing mi-1
chine. $65.00 White Rotary Elee-j
trie Sewing Mochine 25 Cycle, ...
$35.00. Electric Iron, good con- tu-
djtion. $3.00. Smill table Rodio, you.
$6.00. Tel. Balboa 2-31 15 or
. 0778-D, Williamson Place._______
FOR SALE:Brown horse with black,
stocking feet, western saddle and1------
. bridle. Borgiin. Phone- 6-184, F
. house 120-D Gamboa.
MISCELLANEOUS RESORTS
Da yen bav* aiinkmi roblim? Willioms Santo Clan Beach Coftoges.
Writ* AlMMNr* Anenymem | Two bedroom. Frigldaires, Rock-
Bo 2091 AM*. C. Z gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
FINANCING
a =". ^P,yes AQUARISTS: stock <*"*f!^ 0^
new used car through
-N. cumOYEa FlNANCf
"Jb
Fort Worth, Texos
Also Direct
Loans Automobile
juxonneiii employe* and
Tionne in *ne Cano' one
,j ,eor.. Witr 3UI fmonemg
insurance automatioolly adjusted
to U. S. coveraq*-
ARRANGMINTS CAN Bl MAOI
THROUGH LOCAL AT0MOBIL
MAIM
HX
Household Exchange, Automobile;
row No. 41 has: Rottin sets and'
xtfo pieces, bedroom sets, rugs.
SALE: One 1947 Pontiic
Convertible, new upholstery and
roof, four new tires, one good
spare. Cell Bolboo 2857 or can
be seen at 823-X Apt. B, Crotn F0R SALE._
cottigo. Sonta
Clara. Box 435 BUboo Phono
Panamo 3-1871. Cmfobol i lo7J
$1.50. $1.75, $2.00 Pr. Gold
Fish food, 30 cts. can. Amazon
sword plmt, $1.00 each. Banana
Plant, 35 cts. Large variety Tro- r",er W mpl.l, furn-sh-
ed, one. two or three bedrooms,
picil Fish; .75 to $2.80 Pr. Fish
food, .50 cts. can. Aureo Manna.
$3.50 per 1 -2 Lb. Vitomin bricks
35 cts. each. AcuarioTropicil, op-
posite Juon Franco Stables, Tel.
3-4 i 32.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
linens, gas refrigerators, gas
ranges, dishes ond kitchen wore.
Half a mile beyond Santa Cloro
private rood to beach, For In-
formation visit or phone Dagmar,
Tivoli Avenue No. 6, 2-0170,
Panomo.
BATTERIES
For your cir or truck from $13.00.' fqr
FOR RENT
Houses
Bittrili do Panam
Avenida Central No. 224
RENT:To responsible person.
Street. Balboo
Siudeboker
lieces, DKirau... ..-, -- |g-0
,oter heiters. g.s stove* wash-) J A Doo, Scdan. Abs0.
ing machines '60 cycles end many
other household furnishings. All re-
conditioned, rebuilt and reasonably
priced. Phone 3-4911.
FURNISH your horre for $475. 3
piere sectionol courh. matching,
cheir. 9 x 2 rug with 4 matching
rugs, statecycle, rodio phonograph,
dropes, curtainr. bed, spring*, mot-
tress, baby things, kitohenwire
misc. tables ond household things.
Pay now or if you like spreod
It out. And if you desire you con
sove $500 on o 1951. Power
Glide Bel Air Chevrolet. Call Co-
rotal 4100.
FOR SALE
Boat- & MoHr*
8. C00
Balboa
Champion.
lately perfect condition,
mile'. Can bo financed.
1588 or 300.?
FOR SALE: 1949 Chevrolet sedon
A-1. $1.250. 1949 Pontiac con-
vertible, extra-.. SI.450. 1949 Ply-
mouth seden, like new, $1.350.
1947 Crosley. Bargain, $16 0.
1947 Pontiac Station Wagon,
$775. 1948 Plymouth sedan.
$900. Mony others. FINANCE
AVAILABLE. Eisman Used c a r
lot. No. 8 Peru Avenue. Tel. 2-
4516, Pinami.
FOR SALE: 1947 4 Door black
Frazer. 5647-L, Diablo Heights
Tel. 2-3022.
FOR SALE: American Bosh fuel
pump for diesel motor, Budo o _
Superior. 6 cylinder. Marcos Vil- Stop
lareil. No. 34 "H" Street. Tel '
2-1746. Ponomi.
FOR SALE:1950 Chevrolet 4 door
Sedan, excellent condition, bor-
aofn, $1.375.00. Phone Ft. Kob-
be 5219 or 4283.
Position Offered
costly repair bills. Line up
with our new BEAR MACHINE
the must modern equipment and
service in town Tropical Motors
S. A.
Big stove with oven
and broiler A-l condition. Parque
Lefevre No. 28. -
FOR SALE
Real Estate
Furnished residence: livingroom
diningroom, office, 3 bedrooms,
garage, porches. Telephone 3
3143, Panomi.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMMA APARTMENTS
, Modern furnished unfurnished opart-
FOR SALE:Beautiful lot of land, menf5 Mfl,a rvic. op,:,,. Con-
6,800 sq. mts. with 32 mts. along ,ac, off|c, 806, l0tn street. New
front street leading to Hotel Pan- Crisfobo, telephone 1386 Colon,
americano and 32 Mts. along-----------------------------------------------------------------
Anton River; 220 mts. eoch side FOR RENT:Well ventilated opart
from street to river. 8.0.75 per ment.
sq. .mt.
1809.
J. G. Botillo, Tel. 2-
FOR SALE:Two story residence, 3
bedrooms with bithrooms and ter-
race. Bottom floor: diningroom,
livingroom, office, kitchen, gbr-
age, yord, garden. 50th St., ex-
tension, near Son Francisco. 9th
street No. 39. For informotion
2 bedrooms with bath
rooms, living-dlningroom, mold':
room, hot water, good neighbour-
hood. Bello Visto. No. 32, 44th
Street. Tel. 3-0815
WANTED
Miscellaneous
Via Espaa No.
Tel. 2-2146.
2034 Geneteou;WANTED;For irnmediare occupan-
cy, if possible. FURNISHED two
or three bedroom apartment or
house in good residential oreo.
Please telephone Panama 2-1662
FOR SALE:Save $500 on a Power
Glide. Bel Air Chevrolet by calling
Corozol 4100.
V/ANTEDSecretary female. Amer
lean, for responsible position, must
be capable, willing to work and F0R SALE:_194o Chevrolet two
aood moral chancier. Apply Bex ^ ^ overhauled.
Ancon. Canal Zone. g^ ^ New insurance fu .
bility $300. 124-D New Cristobal.
log ige. experience etc.
PERSONALS
PERSONAL:Want partner for trip
through Central Americi in mo-
dal A-Ford. Leave Februiry 26.
write Box 5006, Margorito.
Position Offered
Office Minager-Accountant Position
is offered to U. S. Citizen. In-
come Tox
future w
Coeds Pad Weights
To Donate Blood
For Wounded GIs
2036. Ancon
MEMPHIS, Term.. Feb. 11,
UP) Two slender Memphis
,, State College coeds, who lacked
x free. Salary. Excellent requlred weight to donate
,th Construction Co. Box g^ Jg wound( 0.LVl ln K0-
Woman's Auxiliary
Of Union Church
To Meet In Balboa
Tomorrow at 9 a.m.. the
Woman's Auxiliary of the Balboa
Union Church will hold Its Feb-
ruary meetine m the church
narlors.
Breakfast will be served by the
Mary Martha Circle.
The program Is In charge of
the Rev. and Mrs. Louis Fiske.
The devotional will be given be
two students from the, Seawall
Mission and Flske will tell the
group about his work ln the
*Obureh Of All Nations" in Los
Angeles.
rea made the grade with 15
I pounds of pennies and lead
\ weights.
Myrlle Fenner of Greenbrler,
Ark., weighed only 98 pounds,
12 pounds under the 110 pound
I minimum for blood donors. Yon-
nie Ergle, of Whitehaven, Tenn.,
weighed 107 pounds.
Myrlie turned up at the mid-
south defense center With two
dollars in pennies in her blouse,
another dollar's worth ln each
shoe and slugs and weights ln
her pockets. Weight: 111 pounds.
Yonnie, who had to gain only
three pounds, borrowed some
lead weights from the campus
scales and reported at 110
pounds.
The girls said they both had
good reasons for wanting to
give their blood.
Myrlie's father Is a master
AD women of the church are sergeant with 26 years service
eordiallv invited to come and In the Army. Yonnie brother
bring their friends. I Is in the Air Force.

NOW... 6 Years Old!
..
But No Increase
IN PRICE
"You'll enjoy Seagram's V.O.
r-wp^'" Whisky even more now
' that it is 6 yean old! Honoured
the world over, Seagram's V.O.
; is the lightest, cleanest tasting
' whisky you have ever enjoyed.
,; Try it... it's aged longer.
compaa cykmos, s. a.
ScagramsYO-
: CANADIAN WHISKY

, ., i
! WANTED:Royal Doulton Hunting
. ,---------ond Coaching Pattern. 2-2670 or
-Young girl, light Span-, A ^^
work caring for two____________________________________
WANTED:
ish wishes
children, Will do light. House WANTED TO BUY:A Fox Terrier
keeping and light wash. Sleep in. dog or similor, suitable to take
if preferred. Come to 0778-D. care of and play with little girl.
Williamson Place or call 2-3115 | Puppy preferred. Call Panama 3-
Balboa. 2624.
DiSalle Hints Controls
Will Get Softer Shortly
WASHINGTON, Feb. 11 (UP
Retiring price chief Michael V.
DiSalle set up a seven-man com-
mittee yesterday with orders to
begin an "Immediate" study of
the advisability of ending price
celings on some consumer goods
such as shoes and clothing.
But he Indicated no price de-
control action is likely for sev-
eral months.
His action was understood to
be designed in part, to head off
efforts by Congress to write
mandatory decontrol provisions
In the next controls law.
Simultaneously, Secretary of
Commerce Charles Sawyer said
that "not too long from now"
the nation should "begin to ex-
pect an overall reduction and
elimination of controls."
Interviewed on the Gannett
news service's weekly radio pro-
gram. Sawyer said he believes
controls still are needed "in
certain areas" so prices will not
rise further.
But he added that such areas
"grow smaller and smaller as
time goes on." He did not say
what he meant by "not too long
from now'' in predicting an
"overall' end to controls.
Defense moblllzer Charlee E.
Wilson has expressed the hope
that controls can be ended in
about two more years.
DiSalle named Edward F.
Phelps, Jr., assistant OPS direc-
tor tor price operations, as
chairman of the new decontrol
committee.
Its other six members are of-
ficials of the Office of Price
Stabilization.
DiSalle said one of the ques-
tions to be considered ln any
price decontrol move is whether
wages of workers ln those in-
dustries also should be free from
government regulation.
He cautioned that appoint-
ment of the committee "should
not be taken to mean that we
are preparing to recommend
decontrol of any important seg-
ment of the economy."
DiSalle, who is quitting Feb.
IS to run for the Democratic
U. S. Senate nomination in
Ohio, has said publicly that
clothing, shoes and textiles are
among the top items to be con-
sidered for decontrol action.

Snowslides Bury
Town In Alps;
11 Lives Lost
VIENNA. Feb. 11 (UPi Nine-
teen persons were killed last
night when the snow rolled down
the Hochisen mountain and bur-
ied the town of Sklresort near
Melkoede. Austria, bringing to
28 the death toll in the past few
days ln the Alps.
Meanwhile reports from the
European continent as far north
as Denmark told of fierre snow-
storms which buried the coun-
tryside under huge drifts and
brought railroad services to a
standstill.
The snow fell all night long
in trie lower 8axony province
of Northern Germany, and 30
snowplows had to be drafted
into service tp open railroad
lines, particularly in the Harz
Mountain area.
All of the" Injured and 16 of
the dead ln the Melkoede dis-
aster were German enthusiasts
from Frankfurt. Darms'adt and
Ludwigshafen who had arrived
at the village only yesterday
afternoon.
^uMMtKUAL (7
PROFESSIONAL
We have everything
to keep vour Lawn
and Harden beautiful
during the dry season
'"noli WrtPPlbarrnvr/
Hose insecticides
Fencing Fertilizers
Sprayers Weedkillers
Sprinklers Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-S140
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. S-1713
#22 E. 29th St.
The HX
WE BUY
WE SELL
WE BARTER
The very best ALWAYS in
reconditioned FURNITURE.
HX (Household Exchange)
41 Automobile Row
Tel. Panam 8-4911
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panam
Buying: Abbatoir.
Selling: Fuerza y Lu
(preferred) and
Fuerza y Lot (common)
Tel. 3-4719 3-1680
MODERN FURNITURE
CUS IOM BUIl-l
Supcover Reunbolsterj
VISIT C*'H SHOW-BOnMI
AlafTfo llulal
i r at la OKa TT {MMaaMat awl
v"ra* KMimatw Pickup Deliver*
Tal -4f *1I am M liM m
FISHERMEN !
According to the latest re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIO ONES with FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit vour
FIRESTONE STORE
at #38 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0383 3-4564
.3wi cuar
INSTANT
Fat-Fret PovxUred Mtik
cfoi-'f'-rf with Vitamin O)
for
DRINKING
e for
COOE1NG
' for
WHIPPING
Farm Fresh
Flavor!
On Sale In
Commissaries.
Ike's Men Know Of No Plans
For Homecoming From Pari$
Kef a.uver Jabs
At Truman's
Background
WASHINGTON. Feb. 11 (UP)
Sen. Estes Kefauver carried
his campaign for the Demo-
cratic Presidential nomination
into New Hampshire yesterday
with what some observers con-
strued as a sharp lab at Presi-
dent Truman's political back-
ground.
In a speech before a dinner
meeting of the Nashua, N. H.,
Chamber of Commerce, the
Tennessee .Senator said the
"moral tone" of a Governor,
Senator, Ambassador, or Presi-
dent "usually is 6et by his early
experiences in politics.
"If the community is one in
which the racketeer is the man
to see when it comes time to
elect an Alderman, Judge or
Mayor," Kefauver declared,
"then we are fortunate if in
later service this man arises
above the moral tone of his be-
ginning."
While Kefauver did not ela-
b o r a t e, political observers
thought he referred to Mr. Tru-
man's early connections with
the Missouri Democratic mach-
ine headed by the late Tom
Pendergast.
Pendecgast helped Mr. Tru-
man win a seat in the Senate.
He later served time in jail.
Yesterday's blast by Kefauver
was the second in which he
criticized the Administration
handling o corruption ln gov-
eernment.
When he announced his wln-
or-lose candidacy, Kefauver ac-
cused Mr. Truman of failing to
take adequate steps against
corruption ln government.
Kefauver is competing with
Mr. Truman for New Hamp-
shire's eight votes at the Demo-
cratic nomination convntion
in Chicago next July.
Mr. Truman originally said he
would withdraw his name but
later left it in at the urgent re-
quest of Democratic Party lead-
ers.
Other political developments:
1) Sen. Paul H. Douglas (D-
111) predicted that both the Re-
publican and Democratic no-
minees for the Presidency will
be picked "by a small group of
proiesslonal pollticans."
He said "delegates to these
(national political) conventions
will not really represent the
people.
In a radio Interview over Illi-
nois stations, Douglas proposed
that Congress provide financial
support to states that hold pri-
maries. Only 16 states hold pri-
maries now and some of these
are merely advisory.
2) David 8. Ingalls, chairman
of the Taf committee, said Sen.
Robert A. Taft (Ohio) is gaining
ln popularity with the rank and
file.
"The cheering reception he la
getting from overflow throngs
at every stop these days." In-
galls said, "buries for good" the
"canard" that Taft can not win
if nominated by the Republi-
cans.
Ingalls said Taft showed "ab-
solute fearlessness" in entering
the New Hampshire Republican
PARIS, Feb. 11 (UP) Reliable sources re-
ported today that Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, who
has said he would respond to "a clear-cut call to poli-
tical duty," has' no plans to go to the United States
within the foreseeable future. k
The supreme commander was represented as
cold-shouldering the mounting demands that he go
home and campaign for the Republican Presidential
nomination before the convention.
Reports that he was planning
a trip to the United States in
April found no encouragement
ln responsible quarters. -
Some Republican leaders, In-
cluding top aides of Gov. Tho-
mas E. Dewey of New York, have
voiced concern that unless
Eisenhower goes home and
starts slugging, he may find his
convention chances steam-rol-
loed by other candidates.
The general gave that Idea
thoughtful consideration, in-
formants reported, and decided
tb stick by his guns, at least for
the time being, and stay out of
the pre-convention campaign.
Elsenhower didn't even listen
to the Madison Square Garden
rally Friday might, broadcast to
Paris for him to near.
Douglas MacArthur and it for
all others represented.
Walking a diplomatic tight
rope with considerations for all
Atlantic members sharply in
mind, Elsenhower has been
careful of what he says. But he
has made clear to friends how
he stands on a lot of issues hs
has had to face over here.
They say he is getting fed up
with European political wran-
gling that Is slowing up con-
tinental unity as well as delay-
ing formation of his army.
He thinks it is downright
unfair, friends say, for the
United States taxpayer to shell
out billions of dollars while
Europe goes on squabbling.
While solidly behind European
Had he llstned. the mere pas- federation, Elsenhower wishes
slve act possibly could have somebody could find another
been used as political ammuni-
tion back home.
Supporters here cited Friday's
unofficial primary ln West
Hartford, Conn., as evidence of
Elsenhower's wisdom in keep-
ing aloof.
He ran up 3,109 votes, against
1.183 for Srn. Robert Taft, 16
for Harold Stassen, 39 for Sen.
way out, according to those who
should know. He Is behind the
federation plan because it is the
only solution he or his staff can
dig up at the moment.
The here mention of "Reds'
ln the U. S. government around
Elsenhower's headquarters pro-
duces angry blasts of opposition
from the top men down.
Brush Fire Licks At Old Dog Track
\ BRUSH FIRE THAT WENT WILD yesterday afternoon in
Panama, damaged cables in a warehouse belonging to Servi-
rlos Elctricos. S.A. Three fire-engines from Panama's Bom-
be; os rushed to the scene after the fire was reported. The
warehouse Is located behind and adjacent to the old Dog
Track on the Via Espafta. In the background can be seen
he skeleton of a new apartment house under construction
in El Congrejo district.
Threats Against
Truman's Life
Increased In 1951
Harry J. Slnnott,
Local All-America
Chief. Goes to NY
WASHINGTON, Feb. 11 UP)
"Threats" against the life of
President Truman Increased
sharply last year, according to
Secret Service ChieT published, execuMve headquarters in New
Harry J. Smnott, manager for
many years of All America Ca-
bles and" Radio on the Isthmus,
will leave here this week to take
by the House
Sub-Committee.
Appropriations
York City.
Slnnott was guest of honor at
a large farewell party last night
Taft's chief opponent."
Look Out For
The Big 1952 Ford
COLPAN MOTORS
Tl. 2-1033 2-1036
PANAMA
TACAROPITLOS
INDUSTRIES. S.A.
Phones:
1002 1003 .JLtije evening.
.
*404i feo Bovo Ave
Onlrtn R P
FRESH MILK
FRESH BUTTER
RICH ICE CREAM
Cverrthint
Inspected kv the
Health Departaaeni
HOME DELIVERY
YOUR HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CUNIC
7th St. A Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
Baujhman said that the Se-
v^h----------crel Service which Is chanted at B1 Rancno oarden, attended
primary because on the surface with protecting """Soq^S. hv All America employes of Bal-
the state appears to be strongly Presidents, received 3.629 cases
organized foV Gen. Dwight D. "Involving> threats against the
Eisenhower "with all thJj blue- President" during the year end-
blood politicians sponsoring tog last June 30.
That is a 43 per cent Increase
over the number ln the previous
12 months. The cases ranged
from the attempted assassina-
tion of "Mr. Truman at Ballr
House on Nov. 1. 1950 to a large
number of "Intemperate oral or
written outbursts" from persons
who proved harmless upon In-
vestigation
Door Prizes Await
Winners At Navy's
Dance For'Dimes'
As holders of neither the first
or second number drawn as door
prizes Fridavtilght were on hand'
to claim them at the Naval Sta-
tion's March of Dimes dance at
West Bank. Rodman, two attrac-
tive prises now await claimants.
About 500 Navy people and
their friends enjoyed a turkey
dinner and auction, wel' *?
dancing to the music ot Viet
Stoudner's orchestra, which tfie
musicians contributed free lor
Number 1195. drawn as prize
was a Westinghouse waffle iron
Oddlv enough. Number 1196 came
out for the econd nriae. a Yard-
lev toilet set. ,
Both prises msv be claimed by
calling Mr. Wynshaw at the Na-
vy. 25-3852 and presenting the
stubs.
The third prize, a Shulton toi-
let set. was won bv Mrs. Elliott
of the Supply nd Fiscal Depart-
ment. Coco Solo.
U.S.KEDS
LITTLE LEAGUE
BASEBALL
SHOES
Approved by
Little League
Baseball Inc.
at
Sportisf Goods Store
47 Central At
Baughman said the Increase
was "undoubtedly due to vari-
ous controversial Issues, charply
differing opinions as to govern-
mental policies,-%nd worldwide
unrest."
boa. Cristobal and Panama City.
He was presented with a Rift
as a token of the high esteem
which all his subordinates feel
towards him.
Boy Scouts Run
Meridian; Sheriff
Arrests Intruder
MERIDIAN. Miss.. Feb. 11.
(UP)Boy 8couts ran the city
of Meridian yesterday in an "ex-
periment ln government." .
But none of the young offi-
cials received the experience of
Scout sheriff John ZlUer.
Acting on a complaint that ah
"LS'I^hJL^k!???. w"^ intruder had broken Into the
arrested for alleged threats, and
79 were convicted and sent to
prison or to mental hospitals
during the year ending last June .
30. He did not give any com- \.'" "". K
paratlve figures for the previous ^
year.
T auderdMe Presbvterlan Church,
Scout Zlller arrested CUff Flu-
ker. a Neero, and booked him
unlawful
Teenaae Burglars
Used County Jail
As Headquarters
Wintergreen Drink
Sends Woman, 26,
To Hospital
A Panamanian woman who ^7^. ?* fit^SJ
drank a small amount of winter- w"{ blush today that
green liniment was being treat- m,1lUio"-doU*r1 Jacl?on Co2,,ii!
ed in Oorga, Hospital today. \" was used as *murtm
Lilla King, 2. of La Boca, was ** r^Ji wh0 P11!*^ thf
under observation after having 1 clt*.0r the P**"10"11- ...
Officers, perplexed by tht
looting wave were without a
suspect until they found a
report, "large" sum of money and a

in an
been brought to Gorgax
unconscious condition.
According to s plice
she and her husband. Archibald ""* of toten vsluablas in
Livingston King, had been argu- the cell of two Magro JnvtnUt
ins after a drinking spree. When delinquents yesterday.____
her-husband slapped her Mrs. The tesa agen, who wtft
King drank some of the liniment locked up after confessing an
and Immediately fell Into an un- earlier series of robberies tan
conscious state. month, admitted they were the
She is not in serious condition, culprits. They said tbev had m%
investigation in this case is con- the Jail at will by crawling dow*
Unula* an open "dumb waiter" shaft
I



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11. 1S58
TU PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
HIIIIIW..... Will II HI r
i'in r iin i mi nil irmi in i ......i
PAO!
Tondelayo Wins Annual Taboga Island Yacht Race
Only Four Boats Finish
Under Sail: Nine Start
The Tondelayo, owned by Wally Pearson, yesterday too* first
prlM in the Annual Taboga Island Yaeht Race. Although the
cometed tunes were not officially announced It was assured
that there Is no doubt that the Tondelayo was easily the winner.
The Novia, Stardust and Inca finished In that order respee-
tiTely. These three boats were the only others, besides the Ton-
delayo, to finish under sail power.
Some of the boats were disqualified soon after the start Sat-
urday when George Bobbin's boat f- too close to buoy No. S
and lost its mast with Bobbltt gettl.\ thrown everboard. The
boat* closest to him turned on their motors to aid Bobbttt.
On Saturday the Tondelayo was first orar to Tabora.
The Tondelayo went over In one hour, nine minutes, 85 seconds
one of the fastest times ever registered. Howetor, on the
basis of handicap the Inia was the winner of the first lag.
The Tondelayo also beat the other boats back to Balboa by
a wide margin. She arrived at 3:57 p.m. The Novia got In at
1:51 p.m. The Stardust at 5:35 and the Inca at 5:41.__________
Teddy Davis To Make Camp
At Colons Nunez Gym
Teddy (Red Top)
climbii
Fastlich League
STANDINGS
TRAM Wen Lost Pet.
enejes........I
alomas........ t
Macaws........J
Ocelots........1
Pumas.........1
8
JM
Bombers, Brownies At Colon;
Yankees Win Tenth Straight
Ted Melanson Cops 1952
City Bowling Tournament
All-Events Championship
The Fastlich League Conejos
Saturday dropped their first
game of the season when they
were bested by the Macaws, 7 to
5. While two Conejo twlrlers al-
lowed not one hit for the day,
Macaw pitchers gave up three.
The Ocelots moved up to tie
the Macaws for the league's third
Bumae"Tta^SmSea1 on* tht **curtain was rung down on the 1958 City Bowling touma-
minnd fnr thef^u white nil- '>*. held *""! the sponsorship of the American Bowling Con-
8LT ana Khchnl Wared the ". Saturday evening at too Diablo Heglhts Clubhouse bowling
Considered possibly the finest city Championship held over
r. a period of years, the championship was noted for a new Pana-
jr.il Canal Bowling Association record in the doubles, in which
1 Leo Presho and Bud Balear, also 1981 champions, scored 825 and
0 830 for a new Association record of 1245 scratch.
O Ted Melanson of the Sears (Classic League) team stole the
0 All-Event bowling title for 1952 with a total scratch soore of
pitching for the Ocelots.
The box scores follow:
AB R HPO
Davis, |the This afternoon Oavis was
fast climbing Hartford, Conn | scheduled to box at the Panam
featherweight, will complete his National Gym for the benefit of Totals
aska, lb .
lack, 2b .
Morris, 3b .
Cicero, ss .
Qlassburn, If.
Gray. cf. .
Archie, c. .
Kaufman, rf .
Hllllard. p .
Kirchmier, p.
I
2
1
0
the Boxing Commission and Pan
ama City fans. The exhibition
was slated for 4 p.m.
Sunday's card will be support-
Everardo ed by a ten-round semifinal be-
tween Leonel Peralta and WIl-
top"ranking ltB-pounder fredo Brewster at a 137-peond
a unanimous decision over lhntt and two four-round nrellm-
icr Dae. 17 at the St. N1t Inarles In the llg-pound class
In
tiucinci|ii, ooaoj vb--w -
training for Sunday's ten-round
fight at the Panam lOlympie
Stadlug against Isthmian Feath-
erweight Champion Federico
Plummer at Colon's
Nftei Gym.
The
scored
Plummer _
cholas Arena In New York in
the local boy's only appearance
in the United States. However,
experts claimed* that Plummer
was apparently stale er far off
form.
This bout will clear up the ex-
isting doubt as to whether Davis
Is superior to Plummer or not.
"Red Top" Is already In good
shape for the coming clash. Only
last Monday he whipped Charlie orfc
Rlley, fourth In the world In the M
126-pound class according to ex-
perts.
Pumas AB
Salas, Pedro, is 4
Hill. p.
Rlgby, If. .
Smith, 3b-c
Caeorla, of.
Fears, c .
Drlscoll, 3b
0 1754, edging out Howard Engleke of the PAA (Classic League)
Steam, who scored 1749. Melanson's final game in the single*
was a 284, the highest individual game of the whole tournament,
1 and provided his margin of victory.
0 Henry "Sam" Madeline won the singles championship with
- a total series score of 641, well ahead of J. Damin'a 612, which
39 8 4 21 11 4, was next beat.
Although Melanson had to give way In the handicap dlvl-
PO A E sion to S. L. Spinney of Margarita, both Madeline and the
l 0' Presho-Balcer doubles combination took down the top money In
1 their events.
The complete results of the tournament follow:
1MI CHAMPIONSHIPS (TROPHIES)
.29 7 4 21 3 6
Tommy Shepherd
Sonny Boy West ..
Aaron Joshua
Tommy'Shephard. ,
Amador Mixed Low
Net Foursome Was
Smashinf Success"
The Mixed low Net Foursome
at the Fort Amador Golf Club Julie Kogan .. .
yesterday was a smashing sue- Paddy DeMareo
cess. The winning foursome was! Reggie Martina
formed by Mrs. Virginia Prlnte|Aponte Torres.
one preliminary Cisco Kid DesLondes, 3b
meets Wallace Gittens while Al Huff. lb. .
Hostln tackles Baby Gaviln In Selcls, R. 2b .
the ether. Sel by, 2b. .
Saturday we published the |u11ctonrr8b
first three years of Davis' ring Fu,ton' n
record. The other three years are j-t^jg
listed here: cere By Innings
m. .i. biu i n is ce,oti 1 5 0 1 1 0 0-*
Charlie BHey ..........L.D. 10 pumas 0214000-7
3eorgeDunn..........V;1; Runs Batted InMorris. Earn-
,4. 2...... if?-ia ed RunsOcelots 2. Left on Bases
We Pep .-........L.D. It _0celots e> pumag i0. Three
anl? 2i!m........ sen 5 Base Hlt-Morrls. Stolen Bases-
Albert Higher* .. .. .. -.*!?-; Rian.k Amble. Hill 2. Cazorla 2.
Jimmy Warren
Eddie Compo
DM
Paddy' DeMarco
Snuffy Smith
Ells Ask
?y-,2 Black, Archie, Hill 2, Cazorla 2,
"in to'Huff. Passed BallsArchie 2,
iJ*. is Smith. Struckout byHllllard 1.
'VS.- ia Kirchmier 2, Hill 8. Base on Balls
Draw I off_HiHiard 3, Kirchmier 5, Hill
K a J 9. Losing PitcherHill. Winning
n i: PitcherKirchmier. Doubleplay,
' 7'n i* Salas, Drlscoll. UmpiresHam-
hr. ia mond and Neville. Time of Oame
bp.
Draw II
Wll. 161
W.D. II
W.D. 10
. W.D.
.. R.O. 6
-2:10.
and Lou Prlnte, Mrs. Jo Donley
and Lt. Col. E. I. Donley.
The second place foursome
were Mrs. Connie Oerrans, Dr.
A. E. Oerrans, Mrs. Bea Tyrrell
and Jack Tyrrell.
Third place was taken by Mrs.
Connie Bishop. Dale Bishop. Mrs.
Molly Vandergrlft and Charles
Vandergrlft.
Following the foursome, a buf-
fet-supper was served at the Ft.
Amador Gol.Club.
1951
Archie Devine........L.D. II
Gentry Joseph........W.D. II
Joe Brown..........L.D. II
Art Aragn..........L.D. II
Dennis Pat Brady......W.D. II
Arthur King .. ., .. .. L.D. II
Cliff Anderson......L.D. II
Corky Gonzlez......W.D. I
Federico Plummer......W.D. (
1952
Wallace Bud Smith......L.D. 8
Charlie Rlley........W.D. 19
gamaeJ Wang a snart u trae.
g| yea wots be. roa woald be U
dam cao always find rood bay*.
SB* secret b) to adverttoe!
Conejos
Magee, 11 ,
Scott, 3b .
Hammond, si
Goodln, rf-c .
Reyes, cf. .
Reeoe, lb .
McKeown, 2b
Hamma, c
Sorrel!, rf. .
Hayden. Rich, p 2
Hlnkle, p 0
Totals.....M
'Macaws-
Mead, R., 2b.
Salas, Pablo, ss 3
Norton, lb .
Olud, cf-o. .
Codv, If .
Chaluja, 3b .
Perantle, c-rf
Carlln, rf .
Leasy, rf. .
Elsenmann, p
Bruhn, p. ... 1
Totals .... .24. 7 0 21
Score By Innings
Conejos 1 a 1 0 1 0 0g
Macaws 0 2 10 2 2 x-7
Runs Batted InGoodln. Rey-
es, Reece, Olud, Perantle. Earn-
ed RunsConejos 1, Macaws 1.
Left on BasesConejos 8, Ma-
caws 9. Stolen BasesHammond,
Salas 3, Olud 2. Passed BaU*
Perantle 3, Hamma 1. Struckout
bvEisenman 8. Bhuhn 1, Hay-
den 4. Hlnkle 1. Base on Balls of
Eisenman 8, Bruhn 2. Hayden
8, Hlnkle 2. Losing PitcherHln-
kle. Wlnnlna teherBruhn.
DoubleplayPerantle. Olud. Um-
pires-Neville and Hlnkle. Time
of Game2:05. ^_____
Along The Fairways
A nine hole cross country
tournament and putting contest
for ladles were held Thursday at
the Fort Amador Oolf Club.
Winners of the cross-country
were Dots Oordon, Doris Hamil-
ton and Dorothy Saulds.
The winner of the putting con-
test was Lucille lasan. _
The tournament was followed
by a luncheon and business
meeting at the golf club.
The tournament scheduled for
next Thursday, Feb. 14. will be a
"Blngle-Banste-Bant le" for both
18 and nine-hole flights.
1.
2.
I.
4.
.
6.
1.
2.
1.
4.
8.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Team Obasaataashis*
Max. R. Stempel 6c Son ...........
Nash-WlUy ......................
Sears ............................
Fuerza y Lu....................
H. I. Homa Co...................
Pan-American Airways .......
Doable* Championships
Presho-Balcer ....................
Malee-Morton....................
Kelsey-McCarragher ..............
Colbert-Bartram ..................
Melanson-Dunaway
Scratch Score
.... 2712
2776
2774
747
2700
... 1246
... 1159
... 1140
... 1140
.... 1119
StauffeT-Sptnney ......................... 1107
Singles Championships
Henry Madeline.......................... 641
J. Damin ................................ 612
Ted Melanson ............................ 610
Wm. Morton
Wm. Malee ..
Wm. Jamison
Joe Sartori ........................
Glelchmen ............................
Morrow ...
Shattuck .,
.......
t..........
.........
...........
............
m
565
All-Events Champlonihip
1.
2.
Ted Melanson
I. L. Spinney
1758
1666
195* CHAMPIONS (HANDICAP)
3
4
5.
6
1
t.
3.
4

.
7
8
9
10
1
2.
a
4.
6
6.
7
S
6.
10.
11.
1?.
13
14.
I*
16.
17.
1.
2
S.
4
Team Scratch
Carta Vieja, (Curundu) ........ 2512
Fuerza y Lua, (Major ........ 2747
H. I. Homa Co., (Major) ...... 2780
Max R. Stempel. (Major)...... 2762
Nash-WUlys, (Classic) ......... 2776
Aces, (Margarita .............. 2560
Doubles Standings
Team Scratch
Preiho-Balcer ................. 134
tauffer-Bplnney .............. 1107
Kelsey-MeCrragher........... 114*)
ToTlan-CalB .............'..... 103
Waggoner-Schmidt ............ 1067
Melanson-Dunaway............ Ill
Bugno-Farnsworth............ II
Louis-Stewart ................. M
Colbert-Brtram
Malee-Morton ................. Utf
Hdep.
44
208
224
172
172
112
Tot..
3028
2955
2984
2964
2948
2942
lit
Singles Standings
Scratch
612
TftfAnt
Madeline ..................
Fa rn swo r t h............... <
J. Damin ,......,
Morrow ................i
Torian ..,.......#*<
Melanson ................<
Olelchman ..................
Jamison............<.......... 594
hattuck ...................... 6J
Morton ........................ 607
Burrell ........................ 84
Malee .....................
Turney ..................
Barton ...................
beeves ...................
Bertram ...................... *
Duns way ...................... oaf
* .
All-Events Standings
Team Scratch
ten:::::::::::::::::::::: IS
t^:::::::::::::::::::::: 8S
mm Total 12S7
160 1267
120 1260
216 1254
17 1237
8 1225 1224
12 1222
M 1220
60 121
Hdep. Total
2 889
M ; 667
4 688
90 658
11 868
42 842
10
74
113
80
IS
4
84
sar
126
330
366
839
637
613
832
828
627
622
622
Total
1899
1884
1882
1678
THE 1952 FORD
CONING SOON
COIPAN MOTORS
Tel. 2-1033 2-10361
PANAMA
THERE'S MONEY
IN THE STRANGEST PLACES!
Grandma's trunk
was fun of Junk
and cluttered up the attic.
A PA classified ad sold the loi
to a nappy antique addict!
Every aaonth
ury say
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE CLASSIFIED
ADS tkaa aJI other aily taper ia Paaaau cq*bbhH

PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Tankeos........13 11 .678
Besaban........19 13 .611
Bloebirdi.......II Si .364
Brownies.......11 1 .344
TODAY'S GAME
Coln Stadium (4 p.m.)Brown.
les (Arthurs 1-3) vs. Bomber
(Johnson 3-).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Balboa StadiumYankee 9,
Bluebirds 5 (ten innings).
Balboa Hi, Panama Merchants
Win In Pacific Twilight Loop
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL
LEAGUE (First Half Standings)
TEAM Won Lost Pot.
Gibraltar Ufe.... 7 S .77
Balboa Brewers. .. 4 S .6*1
Pan'snA Merchants 3 6 .333
Balboa Hi School.. 2 7 .222 Merchant
has stated that his team will be
the team to beat in the second
half, but BUI "Casey" Carlln of
the Brewers will have something
to say about that.
The box scores:
FIRST GAME
The second place Bombers to-
day will be faced with the tint
YESTERDAY'S BE6ULTS
Balboa High School 3, Panam
Merchants 2; Balboa Brewers 11,
Gibraltar Life Insurance 2.
TONIGHTS GAME
(At Balboa Stadium7 o'clock)
Panam Merchants vs. Balboa
Brewers.
be la Pea, ef
Ridge. If. .
Franela, 3b .
Tsrflinger, rf
Szlvos, lb .
McOlade, 3b .
Foster, sa .
Medlnger, p
AB
4
2
2
3
3
4
3
3
Rayb'urne. H., c 3
HPO A
0 2?
4
3
1
I
3
3
0
2
Totals
24 2 3 23*16 S
Henderson, rf
Artaa. 3b. .
aHalaall.
Rayb'urne, F., p 2
R
6
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
HPO A
1 1 6
2
5
7
3
3
1
3
0
0
The Pacific Twilight Baseball
of a tough five-game schedule League ended Its first half with'
this week. Today's game will be two games. The standings were BHS
at the Coln Stadium against the not affected since the Gibraltar May, If .
last place Brownies. Life Insurancemen had clinched Napoleon, ss.
Connie Johnson of the Bomb- the first half title Wednesday.! Flynn, c .
er will oppose Stanley Arthurs' However, the games are to be in-! Carlln, R lb
on the mound. The Bomberahave, eluded lln the straight season Rowley, cf .
to play winning ball to keep anve standings. Halman, 2b.
their mathematical chance of The first game, one of the best
winning the pennant. But even, this year, saw the Balboa High
if the Bombers win all five re-, School play inspired ball for their
malnlng games and the Yankees new mentor. Coach Bill Mauzy, a
cop their two last games, Ithe newcomer, by taking; the Pana-
Yanks will wind up a full game m Merchants for their second Totals.....31 24 11 S
abend. I win of the season In the season's Score By Innings
The Yankees, who need only, first extra inning game by a 3-2' Merchants 100 010 002
one more win to assure them- margin. Balboa High 011 000 013
selves at least a tie for the tille. The nightcap was the complete 'Two outs when winning run
last night all but clinched the opposite of the first game, as far. scored. aBatted for Arias in 8th
bunting by winning a ten-inning as baseball thrill and excitement'Inning when winning run s^Oft
Kme from the Bluebirds 9-8 at were concerned, with the Brew- ed. Runs Batted InR;
e Balboa Stadium. I ers trouncing the first half win-
After the Yankes-'had scored ners by a 11-2 count.
three runs In the first Inning
and another in the third, Earl High scnooi, won nis nrsi g,
Ho'der held them to only one run against four defeats. He allowed
in the next six innings but blew only three hits, all singles, for
up In the tenth when the win-, two unearned runs. His team-
ners got to him for four more mates gave him all the support
rum and the ball game. I needed at bat and on the de-
The Bluebird* had tied up the fense. The High School squad
soore In the first inning with a collected a total of nine hits off
three-run rally of their own and, the offerings of Bob Medlnger
went ahead 4-3 in the second; f0r three runs.
with another tally. |
The Yankees tied it up in the, jn the nightcap, the Brewers
third and took a one-run lead in| were j^t too much to the In-|
the seventh. But the Bluebirds gUrancemen as they garnered a SECOND GAME
came back with a marker In the, total of eleven hits for eleven!Gibraltar AB R HPO A
eighth to make the count 5-5. a mm. Manager Dave Kelleher of De la Mater, 2b 4
Yankee four-hit four-run rally the Gibraltar Life nine seemedDedeaux. ss-lb 4
ed. Runs Batted InRidge, Tsr-
flinger. Arias. Earned Runs
by a 11-2 count. BHS 3. Left on BasesMerchants
Fred Raybourne of the Balboa; 8, BHS 8. Two Base HitArias.
Sacrifice HitTarfllnger. Stolen
BasesNapoleon, Flynn, Carlln,
Halman 2. Hit by PitchF. Ray-
bourne by Medlnger. Struckout
byRaybourne 8, Medlnger I.
Base on Balls offRaybourne 1,
Medlnger 2. Losing PitcherMe-
dlnger (1-5). Winning Pitcher
Raybourne (1-4). Doubleplay
Tarfllnger, Francis, Foster. Um-
piresRoberts and New. Tune of
Game1:55.
in the tenth broke the game wide gatlsfled with the first half title Jones, c-ss .
open. tucked away in his hip pocket Hlhanger, 3b
and did not seem to care about Sullivan, lb .
Hlgel 'Pat) Patrick, who work-, the outcome of this game.
Tonight's game at the Balboa
ed the final two Innings for the
Tanks without allowing a run., stadium
was the winning pitcher, Holder
the loser. _____
Juan Franco
Mutual Dividends
FIRST RACE
1Huascasco (Excluded from
betting).
2-Rlslt; 810. 83.80 13.80.
3Rlomar $11.40. 7.
4Sin Pm 83.80.
SECOND RACE
l_Callejera8 I3.40. 30.
2Strike Two 4.40. 82.40.
3Welsh Money 83.20.
First Doubles: (Haascaio-
C alie Jera) 842.
THIRD RACE
l_Petite MO. 8220. $2.20.
2Sirena $4.40. 82.40-
3Tap Lady $2.40.
One-Two: (Petite Sirena)
use.
FOURTH RACE
l_Raymondj7$0. $460. $5.40.
2Bijagual 8S.40. $3.40.
3-Luck Ahead $1.
Quiniela: (Raysnoad Bija-
gual) $13.______
FIFTH RACE
1Tomebamba $. $40-
2Dictador $
SIXTH RACE
1Choice Brand $10.20.
$3 JO.
2-Delhl $3.80. $2.20.
3 Bronx J4___
SEVENTH RACE
1Hurleeano $10.20. $4.20. $2.20.
2Alto Alegre $2.60, $2.20.
3Llrmey Head $2.30.
Sooond Dnales: (Choice
Brand-Horlecane) 358.81.
at seven o'clock opens
the second half race with the
Panam Merchantmen meeting
the Balboa Brewers. The Old-
Timers' manager, Pete Corrigan.
Kentucky Clinches
Ninth Consecutive
SEC Championship
Hinz, If
Kelleher, lf-ef.
Herring, rf .
Colston, e .
Karst, p .
Love, p.....
5
7
0
0
3
1
0
6
2
0
O
*
0
0
0
0
s
j

0
1
a
Total*.....31 3 1$ 10 1
Brewe
A R
ATLANTA, Feb. 11 (UP)Ken
tucky headed toward Its fourth!
straight Southeastern Confer-Totals
ence eh
Gibraltar
championship today after
blltslng Georgia Tech 93 to 42
Saturday night.
Cox, ss.....2
Scott, 3b. ... 3
Neckar, c. $
Gibson, p. ... 4
Carlln, Wm., lb 4
Herring, If.
Angermuller, 3b 3
Magee, cf S
Patterson, rf. 3
. ss n iT
Score By Innings
4
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
2
HPO A
2 1 3
0
8
0
6
3
4
0
0
E
1
0
O
0
1
0
1
0
o B
1 S
000 030 0 3
$4.30
EIGHTH RACE
1Paris $4.00, $4. $2.40.
2-D.D.T. $3.40. $3 JO.
3-Pia $330.
Quiniela: (Parls-D.D.T. $$.66.
NINTH RACE
1-Flambaro $8.60. $3.40. $3.40.
2-Superstlclosa $4.40. $3.30.
Sana Souei $3.60.
One-Two: (Flambare-Seaer-
stideaa) $38.
TENTH RACE
1-Mandlnga $4.60. $3.30. $3.30.
2-Annle N. $3.30. $3.30.
3Manolete $3.30.
ELEVENTH RACE
1Bagalefio $10.20. $8.
2Juan Hulncho $$.30.
Special Caribbean
Serta tax Seals
Go On Sale Today
The officials of the Carib-
bean Ceafederalloti tas* night
that today 18 "Ja-
Brewwfs 330 133 x11
Runs Batted InDedeaux,
Although the Wildcats face Jones. Scott, Olbaon 8, Carlln 3,
three more conference tussles Herring, B. Earned RunsBrew-
there wasn't a chance to loae ers 7. Left on BasesGibraltar ,
since Louisiana State knocked,Brewers 10, Three BaseHHDaw
out the only other mathematical deaux. Two Base HitsCox, Fat-
possiblltty with Its 79-66 victory terson. Sacrifice HitCox. Btol-
over Tulane Saturday night. en BasesKelleher, Carlln. Her-
That left Kentucky with three ring. B. Hit by FitchCox
conference games In Its own tar- Karst. Passed Ball-Oolaton. W1M
rltory before the SEC tourney|PitchLove. Struckou
ey
starts In Louisville Feb. 28. It
winds up March 1. On Its own
court the Wildcats have a string
of 107 straight win.
The Wildcat victory Saturday
night extended its unbroken
chain of regular season SEC vic-
tories to 36.
Karst 3, Gibson 8. Base on Balls
offKarst 11. Olbaon 1. Hits and
Runs of fKarst 10 and 11 In 8-
2/3 Innings; Love 1 and 0 In 1/.
Loilng PitcherKarat (0 -]1).
Winning PitcherOlbaon (3-L
DoubleplayDedeaux, De la Ma-
ter. UmpiresMajors and
Time of Game1:45.
fax the Caribbeaa Sortee wbJeh
gota adatway WoeaeasTay,
Feb .26 at the Panama Olym-
pic Staatasa.
The seats win be oa the
nawty.......Han station, la
float of the hie ataaeL Tfcay
wW be reserved fat $4 (faar
aattars) per gasaa bat far only
$24 for the entire Series which
laclados six alghta, __._
,
CLUB
SUt
Weekly
25 or tf cycle
?
you should hovo
this V-M tri-o-motic 9551
your home enteruinment pktare jase isn't
complete, without facilities for playing
your favorita teencaad ssaak-and the tri-o-
soatic955 its the picture perfectly! E|aif|li
with a six foot plug-in caed and a four-foot
liman una das tri-c-*aatic 955 play thi
he osapltfysng aireasen of any T-V sat or i
Completely eusosnatic for all nrois aO I
ll speeds sad shuts off auwsnorl-
coily slur last record has ptayod!
7110
olivar
RADIO CENTER
To.
40



Iranian Tribal
Clashes Leave
Toll Of 9 Dead
-
... '
l.'-llll 'I. '------1----------------------.'
AN INDKPENDSNT^
TABOGA RACE
Panama

V
ILT NEWSPAPER

George Vis
TEHERAN. Feb. 11 (UP) The
Iranian General Staff today said
M least nine persons were killed TWENTX-8EVENTB YEAR
and 35 Injured In Sunday's elec-l
tlon clashes between fierce rival
tribesmen at Zabol.
Reports from the province yes-
terday said 55 were killed and
more than 200 Injured.
A general staff spokesman said
the army was awaiting further
reports.
Army reinforcements were
rushed to southeast Iran to crack
down on the two tribes.
our o tne neada local gov-
ernor. an elections inspector and
two members of the electoralI LONDON, Feb. 11 (UP)King!
board at Zabolwere beheaded George VI came to London today i
by members of a rival tribe. I for the last time.
Both tribes are seeking seats in; The train bearing his body ar-
the new Iranian Majlis (lower; rived at King's Cross station here'
House of Parliament). |at 2:44 p.m.
Martial law was proclaimed His body was borne in stately,
throughout the Zahldan-Zabol, procession through the rain-sod-
area, but army units there were |den streets of the capital he
not strong enough to maintain joved from King's Cross to the|
order. great Hall of Westminster, where
The outbreak, which began as'fie will He In state.
a protest against local election------'------------ -------
machinery, had developed Into a __ .,, ,
virtual tribe war between follow- Th|A| HlflflAtl Id
ers of two chieftains who are llllvl IIIUUvll III
running for office. _. rl -
Throughout the day, tribal LiftWStAr xheilt
bands clashed freauently wlth'HvfIvl JIIOII
knives, swords, clubs or rocks.. as i
Several houses were set afire. IniChAH ]/| llpjith
Gen. All Garzan, Iran's Chief i VI IIMKU IU I/CO III
of Staff, visited Shah Moham-
med Reza Pahlevi last night to TOKYO, Feb. 11 (UP)A 20-
brief him on the situation. Pre- year-old thief who had hidden
mler Mohammed Mossadegh an-|in an elevator shaft in a Tokyo
nounced that local officials had bazaar was crushed to death to-
"Let the people know the truth and the country is saf
ncati
- Abraham Lincoln.
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1958
nil 11 II i i i !!
FIVE CENTS

Citizens Line Rain-
been ordered to take "drastic ac-
tion to curb lawlessness and pun-
ish the culprits."
Chain Singh, Butler
Seem High Bidders
Fer Old Buildings
Chain Singh y Ca. was the ap-
m
day when the elevators started
functioning this morning, ac-
cording to police reports.
The boy was discovered when
the girl operator observed that
blood was dripping from the
celling of 'the apparatus one
hour after the store opened.
Investigators found body
crushed from the waist up and
about $100 of stolen merchan-
dise on top of the elevator.
The police believe that the
thief hid with his booty at a
parent high bidder on the Ancon late hour yesterday oft the roof
Theater building and James But-1 of the elevator expecting to be
ler it 8on, on a email building able to leave the atore during
back of the Cristobal High School i the earlv rush hour, but he must,
which was offered for sale at the i have fallen asleep and was
ame time. | crushed against the casing when
Bids were opened Friday at the &Sg the flrrt trt>
office of the Superintendent of
Storehouses at Balboa.
Contracts for the sale and de-
molition of the building will be
awarded following an analysis of
the bids.
Chain Singh's bid price of
$2.881 for the Ancon Theater _
Building was the highest of four fl|Ar In KACtAlt
submitted. Other bidders were l/lw I DUMUII
Paredes y Ca.. Cja. Repblica de
Construcciones y Reparaciones,
and James Butler Si Son.
There were three bids on
Building 195 at the rear of Cris-
tobal High School. The high bid
was $707. submitted by James
this morning.
Mrs. Alice Nichols,
Wife of Admiral,
Mrs. Alice L. Nichols, wife of
Rear Admiral Philip G. Nichols,
former Marine Superintendent,
died February 8, in the Chelsea
Naval Hospital in Boston, ac-
cording to information received
Butler." Other" bidders wweChilbv fr'ends on the Isthmus. She
Slneh and Colchonera Here* Ofiwa 52 >ears /d- w ,,,
Colpn Funeral services will be held
The buildings are tobe remov-'Monday in Nashua. New Hamp-
shire, where Admiral and Mrs
Nichols have lived since his re-
tirement In June. Burial will be
In Arlington Tuesday.
Mrs. Nichols is survived by her
husband, vho served as Marine
Superintendent in the Canal or-
ganization from 1947 to 1950,
LONDON, Feb. 11 (BIS) The and two daughters, Mrs. John
largest helicopter In Britain. ] Mayles of Panama, and Mrs.
the twin engine Bristol type Ellen P. McClelland of Mon-
ed within 90 days of the date of
purchase.
Big Helicopter
Makes 1st Flight
173, recently made Its first
flight
Built for inter-clty use. It will
carry more than 12 passengers
or 24150 lbs. of cargo.
terrey. California.
Mrs. Mayles left about two
weeks ago to be with her mo-
ther Her husband left Sunday
by air.

Today is RMS77$
Belkkm. Post' Toti iaonly
t of 7 varieties of nourishing
OKKBALB i> POST-TENS I 10
)w<-kafM give the entire family
its favorite choice ef cereal at
breakfast! Try orne today!
e
'Posf-TSNS
A mighty assemblage of peers
and commoners gathered In
cold wet mists, which turned
the afternoon Into twilight, to
begin the ceremonies of solemn
grandeur with which the
NEW CROWN: As Princess and heir to England's throne,
Elizabeth wore a coronet for this picture during her visit to
Washington last Fall. Now she'll wear a crown as England's
first ruling queen since the reign of Victoria.
AN ANCDENT CEREMONY Standing on the balcony of St.
James Palace, In London, Sir George Bellew, Garter Klng-of-
Arms, delivers the first reading of the proclamation hailing
Elizabeth II as Queen. Forming an honor guard In the
courtyard are Grenadier Guardsmen. The new Queen had
taken her oath of accession Inside the Palace.
Conchita vs. Toro
J*fl3
mourning peoples of the Brit-
ish Empire win lay their mon-
arch to rest.
From Sandrlngham, where he
was born and died, the special
train carried the body of the
King and members of the Royal
family 103 miles, to London
through silent crowds gathered
bareheaded at stations and along
Che right of way.
At 2:44 p.m. the train slid slow-
ty Into platform 1 of King's Cross
station, where 16 years earlier
the body of George V had also re-
turned from Sandrlngham.
Guards of honor of the Royal
Navy, Army and Royal Air Force
saluted as the train arrived.
Outside the station a crowd of
thousands huddled beneath um-
brellas, as did hundreds bf
thousands of others along the
route to 885-year-old Westmin-
ster Hall.
Quien Elizabeth IL the Queen
Mother and Princess Margaret,
all veHed in black, left the train
first, and went bf car to West-
minster,
Theft an officer and. 10 men of
the King's Company, Grenadier!
Guards, took the Royal coffin
from the train and strapped it to
a gun carriage drawn by the
King's Troop of the Royal Horte
Artillery.-
A paUce official stepped fer-
ward and placed en the coffin
the Imperial crown. Its thou*
ands of diamond glittering
even under -dull skies.
The guardsmen too* up sta-
tions on either side of the coffin,
mounted police preceded It. and
behind walked the Duke of Glou-
cester, and the Duke of Edin-
burgh* as they had walked from
Sandrlngham Church to Wolfer-
tbn Station in the morning.
With them through London
walked several officers Of the
Roval household.
Meanwhile, beneath the oak
celling of Westminster Hall the
lords and commoners of Parlia-
ment and prelates of the Estab-
lished church gatherer! with the
Royal family to receive the body.
Before they left their cham-
ber, members of the House of
Commons had heard Prime
Minister Winston Churchill say
the Ring had always been dis-
appointed tHat total victory In
World War n had not brought
relief from International anxi-
etiesa reference taken to
mean Russia.
Churchill aid:''If only na-
tions could let each other alone.
"If this could happen the world
would see an era of lasting peace
and prosperity and culture.
"May the accession of our
young Queen be the signal for
such an age.'' __
Then the Lord Chancellor In
the House. .Qf Lords, and the
speaker in the House of Com-
mons, "Ad Identical messages
from the pew Queen.
The message said: "I know
that the House is mourning with
me the untimely death of my
dear father. In spite of falling
health h upheld to the end the
Ideals, to which he pledged him-
self, of service to his peoples and
the preservation of constitution-
al government.
"He has set before me an ex-
ample of selfless dedication
which I am resolved, with God's
help, faithfully to follow."
j
Toro vs. Conchita

CONCHITA MORENO slew
her two bulls at the San Fran-
cisco bullrlnr. yesterday after-
Stton. but this bull was no gen-
eman with the Veneiuelan
torera.
Above, Conchita Is seen
calmly poised to make the kill.
Right, neither calm nor
poised, she is perhaps ponder-
ing on whether bullflghtinr Is
any sort of rame for a girl,
anyhow. She escaped unhurt
from this slight upset went on
to earn the applause of the ca-
pacity crowd with her kill,
ConchlU's co-star on yester-
lav's program was Manolo Or-
tega.
There Is as yet no announce-
ment a "to whether Conchita
will fight here again before
movin en to Mexican rings.
w------r-r*------'-----------i--------------------
Third Crash In New Jersey;
30Die, Newark Airport Closed
ELIZABETH. New Jersey. eb. 11 (DP) -The third passenger
liner to crash here within two months early today hilled N per-
sons and Injured creating such a wave of public alarm and
Indignation that adjoining Newark airport, one of the biggest
and busiest in the United States was shut down immediately
'in the light of these tragic events, and pending farther inves-
tigation."
But only the heavy wheels and
the landing gear struck the
building.
The wings and fuselage slid
across the roof, flip-flopped,
and landed upside down in the
muddy playing field of an or-
phanage.
Flames were licking along the
outside of the fuselage, fed from
the wing gas tanks. But the Im-
pact checked these flames long
enough for surviving passengers
to save themselves, and to rescue
some too severely injured to
move.
Passers-by rushed into the
wreckage. One of them rescued
vi.c Miss Taylor, who was hanging
stewardess, Miss Nancy Taylor,1 upside down from the safety belt
Today's disaster plane, a Na-
tional Airlines DC-6, smashed ta-
to a four-story apartment houseJ
to which 60 families were sleep-
ing, two minutes after taking off
from Newark for Miami.
Some 58 passengers, Including
three babies in arms, and four
crewmen were aboard.
In a S* passengers, three
crewmen and, three residents of
the apartment house were killed.
Some 31 passengers and nine
residents were In hospital, some
gravely injured.
In addition, rive persons were
missing and may prove to be
dead.
Several passengers and the
22, were scarcely Injured.
The DC-4 crashed two min-
utes after .'takeoff, and was in
trouble practically from the
instant Its wheels left the rua-
Miss Taylor said: "All of a sod-
den the engines spluttered and
stopped, then we went down."
A passenger said he saw the
propeller of the starboard outer
engine turning In reverse.
Pilot Waymj G. Foster radioed
the control tower: "Lost an en-
gine. Coming back."
Passengers, knew in the few
seconds before the crash that the
pilot was fighting to keep the
plane In the air.
Some said he got no higher
than a few hundred feet, but
Miss Taylor said it was from 1000
feet to 1500 feet
Then suddenly the heavy plane
"dropped like a snot" as one pas-
senger put It.
Foster jettisoned his gaso-
line, and it showered down on
the roofs of an apartment
house..
The plane wavered on, skim-
ming the rooftops.
It barely cleared the roof of
an orphanage In Which 60 chil-
dren were sleeping and smashed
Into a second apartment house,
four and a half blocks from the
first.
It seemed to explode with the
Impact showering flames over
the roof of the building.
OIT OF THE PAST Londoners ring historic Trafalgar, quare as a colorful procession
halts and the proclamation hailing Elizabeth n as queWJ. is read from the traditional
coach. Following that announcement, the ba nd played "God Save the Queen."
Cash On the Barrel
NEW yore. re*. 1
Richard CaDahan, 46. was Jail-
ed today after admitting to
police that he sold guns "on
approval" to stoMv men.
Pottos soM havers paid ac-
cording to the proceeds of
their robberies oe returned the
fosas without paying the fee if
Use hoMups didVt
setts. -------
of her "Jump'' seat.
Meanwhile the top floor of the
apartment house wa already
roaring with fire. The three oc-
cupants of the apartment which
the DC-oi wheels hit direcHy
were killed.
Foster and his co-pilot C. S.
Singer were among the dead.
Flight Engineer I. R. Shea was
missing and presumed dead.
The weather had nothing to
do with the crash. It was a clear
night.
Morse Code Class
Starts Thursday
At JWB, Balboa
The first of a series bf weekly
classes of instruction in inter-
national Morse code will be held
at 6:00 p.m. Thursday, in the li-
brary of the J.W.B. Armed Forces
Center on La Boca Road. Balboa,
it was announced today by Roger
Adams, president qf the Canal
Zone Amateur Radio Association.
The chief instructor will be
Prentlss C Combs who operates
amateur station KZ5PC.
Combs has had considerable
experience teaching code to be-
ginners, Including his wife and
daughter, both of whom now
hold amateur radio operators li-
censes issued by Headquarters,
Caribbean Command.
The code instruction classes
are designed to enable class
members to pass the 13 word per
minute code test required for the
General or Class B Amateur Op-
erator License.
There will be no fee charged
for the series of classes and all
persons Interested in amateur
radio and interested in obtaining
an operators license are Invited
to attend. J
Travel Insurance
Before You Travel
To Any Place In the World
Buy A Travel
INSURANCE POLICY.
ON SALE AT ALL TRAVEL AGENCIES
OR AVIATION COMPANIES
AN AT MOTTA'S TOCUMEN STORE

Ca. Internacional de Seguros, Si.
Telephone 2-16*1
P.O. Box 1036
PANAMA, R. P.
L. E. G. de PAREDES
Manager
/


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