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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01377
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01377
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
"BRAMIFF
AN INDPENDXN^
DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAULO
Panama American

9 CANADIAN WHISKY
/AmauAuC ie, Mht (%&c I

Let the people know the truth and the country in safe" Abraham Lincoln.
?*,,.*;
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAH
PANAMA, R. F- THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1958
FIVE CENTS
To List Charges Against PC Company
Gen. Clay Urges
Use Of A Bomb
To End Stalemate
MINUTES AFTER THE FOOD PACKAGE dropped from an
Albrook Air Force plane touched the sea near the Gloria, a
crewman set out in a dinghy and brought it aboard. The
white spot in the sea at the stem of the "Gloria" la the one-
man dinghy dropped from-the plane In a low drop near
. the vessel.
NEW YORK, Feb. 7 (UP)
Gen. Lucius D. Clay believes the
Korean war should be brought
to a successful conclusion by
the use of the atom bomb and
air attacks' beyond the Yalu
river if the Communists refuse
a United Nations ultimatum to
end the war.
SURVIVORS are shown aboard the Navy patrol craft USS
PC-4W5 immediately after docking at Pier 9, Cristobal last
night. At the left is Lieutenant Roy Nielsen, commanding
officer of the US8 PC-486. The survivors, from left to right,
kneeling: Cornello Hawkins and Using Mow; second row
Ernesto Archbold, Nidis Livingston, stewardess; Arturo Forbes,
Chester Femare, Eduardo Martinez. Joseph Newlove and
Carlos Venner; back row Raymond Steel of Colon, Dudley
May, Velasquez Hooker,. Dessie Duke, Capt. Aristides Newball,
Rlxejr Davis, Augustus Archbold and Eric Brltton.
(U.S. Navy Phptoj
* *
Survivors $pfe Here; Gloria
Drifting, Hazard To Shipping
ions
abled schooner Gloria were safe
in Cristobal yesterday evening
due to the combined efforts of
Air Force and Navy rescue teams.
The successful rescue of the
survivors of the 87-foot schoon-
er that was missing for three
days was accomplished through
the speedy cooperation of 1st Air
Rescue Squadron's night "B" at
Albrook Field that directed the
search.
Sighted yesterday morning by
a Navy PBM that was about 90
miles out of Coln, the mastless,
rudderless schooner Gloria that
ran out of fuel, food and water,
was abandoned by the rescued
persons and now awaits the a-
gent'a decision as to what should
be done with her.
As soon as the Navy bomber
radioed that it had sighted the
Gloria early yesterday, three
Flight "B" 1st Air Rescue search
planes Immediately covered the
position, and food and water
supplies, as well ar a dinghy
were dropped by parachute near
the Gloria.
Shortly after 2 p.m. yesterday
the Navy's patrol craft PC-486
reached the Gloria and brought
the 18 survivors back to Cristo-
bal. Except for one Panamanian,
Raymond Steel, they are all Co-
lombians, and were turned over
to the Colombian consul in Co-
ln.
ivy
the Gloria Is considered to be a
"navigational hazard" with her,
engines inojferatlve, rudder dls-|The
abled, and" mainmast washed could '
Local Flags
Half-Masted
For King's Death
The American flag at the
United States Embassy in Pa-
namaone of the first offices
on the Isthmus to learn of the
death of George VIwere hoist-
ed at half mast early yester-
day morning, an embassy
spokesman id today in reply
to a newsman's question. The
flag At the U. S. Embassy re-
sidence was also hoisted at ha^
mast.
consui of the Brit-
ish Commonwealth countries
and at Republic of Panama gov-
ernment offices and establish-
ments.
Failure of a message sent
oat from Washington to each
Headquarters Caribbean Com-
mand delayed the half-mast-
ing of flags at military estab-
lishments en the Canal Zone.
A spokesman said today that
under.standing Instructions the
Command was not authorized to
lower its flags until so instruct-
ed from Washington. The Pana-
ma Canal Company and the Ca-
nal Zone government also said
that they are governed by
Washington directive in these
matters.
This morning, when no In-
structions had come through, a
Caribbean Command official
telephoned to Washington and
received verbal authority to
lower the flags, in line with the
earlier message that had gone
astray.
By noon, orders had gone out
locally for half-masting Ameri-
can flags at 8 establishments
until further notice.
(For complete details on the
King's death and Queen Elisa-
beth's return to England,
please turn to back page.)
Oil Strike Looms
As CIO Demands New
$2-A-Day Pay Hikes
ncesrions toda?' I "tranM ~ disa'ppearance of the I sVdThat they* meet taew'or'-' r^mfitrd^n^n^/tvf"^^?*1 *,me* ** ' resfawsiWl-
wealthy Swedish engtaeer. Gpsta' leans, u permitted to-enter the Republic; m*. of Its predecessor organi-
away.
With the rescue of the 18 per-
sons yesterday, all hands aboard
the Gloria are safe. Four other
crewmen were picked up in a
lifeboat at sea Monday morning
when they were spotted by the
Military Sea Transport Ship
USNS Private John F. Thorson.)
They had put out in a small craft
Jan. 30 to seek hel
Please, Think
Of The Flowers!

Has anyone lost some rubber
hose? Police today are looking
or the owner of a 50-foot
tngth.of red rubber hose that
was stolen before November of
last year.
It was recovered some time
ago. and is still sitting in the
Balboa Police Station awaiting
a claimant.
Come and get it if its yours.
The search involved about 40
lve
DENVER, Colo, Feb. 7 (UP)
threat of strike which
cut -deeply" into the
United States vital oil produc-
tion loomed large today after
the CIO Oil Workers Interna-
tional Union announced an im-
mediate strike vote would be
conducted among 300 bargain-
ing units.
The union accused the indus-
try of "arrogant refusal" to
negotiate the workers demand
for a $2-a-day general wage in-
crease.
A union spokesman estimated
The former chief of the U. 8.
occupation forces in Germany
told a national assembly of the
leading members of the construc-
tion Industry that present nego-
tiations In Korea have passed a
stage not in keeping with the
dignity of the U. 6.
Clay said the time .has come
for the U. N. to discontinue the
Korean negotiation and deliver
an ultimatum demanding the
cessation of the war.
"If this ultimatum is rejected,
we should use all the means at
our disposar to achieve out ob-
jective, which is the physical1
containment of Communism |
while we construct to assure a
free world."
He said that meant bombing;
raids on Red China and the use
of the atomic bomb "if the re-
jection of the ultimatum made
that our alternative. We should!
use Whatever means need be
used, Including the atom bomb."
UN. Communists
Nike Concessions;
Agreement Closer
PA^MOTjUOM, Korea, Fob,, *-
alHeaand thltX&M
Korean truce
bringing agreement closer op
the exchange of prisoners and
rotation of troops,
The was no meeting of the
full delegations on Agenda Item
5 first discussed yesterday
when the Reds submitted a
three-point proposal calling for
k "political' eonference after
the armistice, apparently to
solve many of Asia's problems.
The United Nations Command
in a staff officers' meeting
dropped the demand that more
than 100,000 captured Commun-
ists be traded one-for-one for
displaced civilians in Red Korea
who want to return home to
South Korea. The Communists
had bitterly opposed the pro-
gram.
United Nations negotiators
also abandoned their demand
that neutral or Red Cross ex-
aminers Interview civilians on
each side to insure that all dis-
placed persons who wish to be
returned home are allowed to do
so.
In the air war, a Jet pilot da-
maged two Communist Mlg-
15s in j^ three minute fight be-
tween seven Sabers and 30 Red
Jets.
On the ground, UN artillery
plastered a Communist-held
hill west of Chorwon to pave
the way for an attack by allied
Infantry.
The US Navy announced the
27,000-ton oarrler Philippine
Sea was back in action in Ko-
rean waters on her second tour
of combat.
Communist Radio Peiping
charged "two propeller-driven
US planes "made an illegal
over Panmunjom neutral zone
5,oee REWARD Anybody with information leading to the
rliscovery'nf the above man. dead or alive, will get the re-
ward. He is Gosta Vldegaard. This photo, taken with his
voungest daughter in Sweden, is one of the latest photo-
graphs of the missing man.
Police, Soderman
Say 'Nothing New
Tivoli Hotel'
Operation Flayi
By Panama Cofffl
A complete report of the alleged Panama-U.S. M
violations made by the Panama Canal Company and!
agencies on the Canal Zone will be given to the MM
of Foreign Relations Monday by the Panama Chamber of
Commerce, it was learned today.
One of the points covered in the report wfl refer to
the Tivoli Hotel which is now considered a guest house.
The report charges that this hotel should have been
closed simultaneously with the opening of the new El
Panama in Panama City.
It Is claimed in the report, ac- of Panam. According to a Nav*
^1,gtODChKifm^rSf0mmerce oif.,clal- their contract is "revoc-
secretary Pablo Abad, that many
persons not entitled to privileges
have been permitted to stay at
the Hotel Tivoli recently. He said
some of the guests are not even
able at the will of the Secretary
of the Navy and the license is
within the purview of the treaty
existing between the U. S. and
the Republic of Panam.'
Meanwhile, in Panam yester-
day Foreign Minister Ignacio
,31
i-rgaTrre^tedTBofj "net
developments"
in the
Americans.
Another allegation of a treaty
t^i^hPcv,"1! W rei!f8 1 Mllno Jr. "said" that the Foreign"
the establishment of a private Ministry "has no dealineswith
taxlcab company within the Ca- the s/called Panam" Canal
-rvfi? ;.. .v, . Company, recently formed, to
This company the American! which the Ministry attaches no
Transportation Service.received! official status In relaUmuT be!
L1.1lelfe.,r0m,,thfJo %v.Navy *tween Panam and the Govern-
2S?tf.5:J5{.,WO-rheJSom"ln,ent of the United States of
pany is owned by an American,'America for the reason that t
2.F7 ?raHm' Sfd W SW1- h" no record of tne^onSny.
tRn1^i?der ?5Fh and 5*1VV exlstnce and offlcial atatusT
dor Ripoll, and its operation is
restricted to the limits of the Ca-
' Zone.
wn
VJWW
At Baft Heirhts today Act-
ing Governor Herbert U. Vogel
Panam Can,
Vldegaard, last Jan. 25. Local in-1 The missing Swede also wrote
vestlgators reported no new: another letter the day before he
leads vanished, leaving only a note
Yesterday Soderman announc- saying he was going for a walk
ed that the reward for informa- to Mrs. Saga Skafte Lindblom In
tlon on the whereabouts of Vide-, Jacksonville.
Saard, dead or alive, had been
ncreased to $5,000.
The detective said any infor-
mation on the Swedish engineer's
whereabouts will be kept strictly
confidential.
Lemon Saks, to whom Vlde-
gaard had written in Denver,
Colo., the day before he disap-
peared from '
Arnullo's Release
Expected Today
He told Mrs. Lindblom that he
would be leaving here "tomor-
aDDearMtVrlle~;d2yhewd'f- rl* Probably will be released
appearedand expected to be ln'.n. Mm. t^H>v ft.r oimn.t
Former President Arnulfo A-
ly b
his.
Jacksonville at the verv latest
.Sunday evening after stopping in
Cuba and Miami.
In both letters Vldegaard
mentioned not being able to
some time today after almost
nine months In Jail.
President Alclbiades Aroseme-
na signed into law at noon today
a bill granting amnesty to Arias
and all others implicated in the
aet a "favnrohi. rnVti^ * a omers implicated m me
for rfrl.?Sb,5.JK0,Ss,t former President's bloodv over-
aatton, including conforming to
the treaty previsions.''
Speaking for the company Vo-
gel said he firmly believes that
"they have conformed with the
revisions of the Panam-U. S.
eaty, and if any violations are
noted, they should be specifically
outlined."
The Acting Governor said "we
are most interested in oar
friends on the other side of the
invisible border, and are only too
willing to give them our full co-
operation."
He pointed out that last month
the Board of Directors of the
Canal Company voted unani-
_ -torn his room in Hotel El! ?" r:fHirate ,?rop,1 T'
Panam, arrived here today to. Csrlhhe*if" g ,n the throw on May 10.
aid in the search for the Swedish ^ The bill was passed In a second mously to "authorise no "rate
engineer. entered ?he investiga ionsTOirad.ln*,1t n,lht by he samei changes that would affect ad-
-aw*'. w ? "day withthe" dtarnVew"thai NatlonaI Assembly that convict- versely the Republic of Panam.
Vldg*aLd had written Saks to ge wwn tne say ffif'Jf" u0uid inT,Mfc:some monthsfien and h5 SS* constitutional powers. dorlng charges, handling charges
sonvllle. Fla., by Sunday;. Jan. 27|"Jvws wllhgWni h5d.?!i1l The Assemble then recessed and across-the-dock charges
and wanted to talk to him about Jn ^ wlHl.!lood!. an afe.nt land met Immediately after mid-| Oil handling rates for petro-
night to oass the bill in a third leum products going to tr|e Re-
reading. Both opposition and ad- public of Panam will not be ln-
mlnlstratlon deputies voted for; creased.
Mauritania Due
Saturday With 700
for Panama Oceanic Unes who
lived in Bella Vista but Is now
in the u. S.
Investigators found a tele-
phone number among Vlde-
gaard's belongings which prov-
The Cunard White Star Une telephone kf Sffln-rmiif
cruise ship Mauretania arrives l0ecS2a J? , 8J?Kmenl
in Cristobal early Saturday w her "* "'
mornlnVt on a 14-day cruise of wir#r snrou -__^.
the Caribbean. Over 400 passen- of the %exaf r? L m2ar
There will be about 700 r"""-! number from Wood.
gers aboard the Mauretania and
plans for a shore excursion have
been made for 400 of them.
They sail early Sunday morn-
ing for Havana.
got
passage.
The signed bill will be return-
ed to the National Assembly this
afternoon to be proclaimed legal.
Meanwhile, the Supreme Court
has been officially notified that
the bill has been passed and ra-
tified by the President. The
Court is scheduled to meet this
afternoon to take the necessary
Vogel explained that the fact
that they are now a company
does not change their obligation
to comply with the Buy America
Act which was passed in March
of 1933.
This act applies only to con-
struction materials and not to
sugar,' rice, coffee or anything for
i resale. The stipulations of the
steps to clear the way for an or- act are that construction mate-
der to release Arias and the rest nals bought from Panam must
of the prisoners granted amnesty | Be 25 per cent less than . S.
by the bill. prices, freight Included.
yesterday, but the charge was X Ppnn|P Perish
not accompanied by usual bit- CUfilC reriMl
______ I In Australia
ter overtones.
UN Warned That Soviet Line
Shifts To '3rd W ar Is Here
hours of actual flying time, and tntlt 5o;o0o oil workers would be
covered about 20,000 sduare miles
over the Caribbean.
Five US 'Spies'
Killed By Czechs
VIENNA. Feb. 7 (UP)-Five
alleged spies for the United
States were executed in Czech-
oslovakia recently, after their
appeals had been rejected by
the Supreme Court, according
to the Prague newspaper "Rude
Pravo."
The five were found- qullty
Akee Poisoning
Case In Ancon
Set For Feb. 28
Due To Bushfires
directly affected if the strike is
called and "such a strike would
cut deeply into the output of
refined products."
President O. A. Knight said
the union Is "in a position to
move rapidlyas quickly as the
strike votes are taken and these
should be completed by Feb. 15."
Communist-Led Huks
Kill 7 In Ambush
MANILA, Feb. 7 (UP)Three
soldiers and four civilians were
killed yesterday when Com-
munist-led Huks ambushed a
last montn of spying for the Philippine Army truck near In-
I .united 8ffte* and wer sen- fanta, a town kn the Quezon
Itenced to death after the trial I Province of eastern Luzon.
PARIS. Feb. 7 (UP) Philip! lorussla. which are both mem- I
|C. Jessup. U.S. delegate to the bers of the United Nations.
MELBOURNE, Feb. 7 (UPV United Nations Assembly, today! Jessup said that large parts of
Four more persons died In the cautioned that Soviet propagan-other four Republics are also out1
last 24 hours as a result of Vic- da Is moving away from the|of bounds to foreigners 43 peri
toria bushflris, bringing the peace theme and swinging over cent of the territory of Byelo-
I total this summer to eight. to the line that the Third World russia is entirely closed to all
The death roll Included two War is here. foreigners as is 41 percent of the the Far
Trial of the $20.000 damage four-year-old children who He told newsmen that the "So- .area of Ukraine: $4 per cent of Stalin's
suit against the U.S. government,were trapped with their mother viets areno longer arguing. They the Russian Federated Republic;
filed by five young American
children was set for Feb. 28 in
the U.S. District Court.
The plaintiffs are John. Allan,
Eleanor, Franklin and Aura
Townsend, brothers and sisters
who were allegedly poisoned by
akee seeds that grew on a tree
behind their quarters in Ancon.
Attorney Wood row de Castro is
representing the Townsend chil-
dren in the damage suit which
was filed June 25 of last year.
while racing for a dam in the are'the peace boys'but there's a
Nullarwlll district on Tuesday, j fundamental conflict with
The children died in the hos- non-Soviet world."
pltal.
the
He
Benefit Gambling
At El Rancho
and 30 per cent of Georgia
added that:
"This Is the kind of a picture
He warned that the "conflict which bothers us In terms of I nationalism
may not be fought by armies in; making progress in the whole I Communist
Jessup said that the Russians
were not interested in nego-
tiating through a compromise.
He added: "You've got to
come all the way to meet them
before they are Interested."
Referring to Soviet tactics In
East. Jessup recalled
statement on how to
move on Asiatic countries, name-
ly, first to promoto nationalism
In order to throw out the colon-
ial powers, then to develop inter-
in the sense of a
international and
for
Benefit gambling games
the Centerrary of .Colon will be Soviet tendency to tighten the
held, tomorrow and Saturday,Iron Curtain and said that 80
It is being claimed that one of nights at El Rancho Garden. per cent of the total Soviet pop-
the children suffered partial pa-j The gambling will be in the ulaion is now In effect closed to
ralysis as an outcome of the seed form of a complete Casino, with foreigners
poisoning. jdlce tables, roulette, and black He said the entire territory
The others were hospitalized
for several months after they
played with the seeds, it was re-
ported.
Jack.
The committee in charge has
also scheduled ttoor show enter-
tainment.
the field of formal war, but they disarmament field... it Is this: finally to move them into a
feel there's conflict between background of the Iron Curtain Communist sphere.
their system and ours, and they .that worries us."
are going to press it through de-1 Jessup said he attached a Jessup said: "that's the pat-
vlous methods. "great deal of significance" to a tern which I think has been
Jessup pointed to the growing recent remark made by Soviet borne out by their actions all the
Union UN delegate Jacob Malik way through when they find
In the latest United Nations As-1 that a country Is following this
r.emblv that the Third World nationalistic revolt against co-
War had already started which lonlallsm and is not also moving
was "directly contrary to the be-1 Into the Communist sphere,
lief to which we have constantly Then they quickly change aa
fdhered that there is no necessl-1 thev did In the case of rndone-
r of another war. that It Is not. sia" where they are now de*
Iinevitable and that it can benounclng Soekarno as a traitor
Iprevented." ito the causa of nationalism.
of 18 Soviet Republics is com-
pletely closed to forelrners. as
well as the capitals of the two
Republics at Vkraijt and Bye-
.


PAGE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, IMS
"Jt-i
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
ANO niLiiNiD ay TUB PANAMA AMERICAN PBe. INC.
FOJNDID IV NILWN OUN1IVILL IN 1*11
HARMODIO ARIAS. 10ITO*
7. H STUtCT >. O. BOX 114. PANAMA. R. er> P.
Tiliphoni Panama No. 2-074O B LIMBS)
ca*li addhi. panambrican. panama
O'ficCi 12.17 Central Avinuc iiihn 12-ih and istm strut*
fohei8n rcpuccintativi, joshua b. powers. inc.
34*; maqhon av(. ntw vohk. 1171 n. y.
local mail
CM>N O
PCP 'MONTH. IN AOVANCK ____
POP- I MONTH. IN AOVANCI .
PO* T*-F VIA. IN ADVANCC___
S I.70
.SO
s.SO
2.BO
13.00
24 OO
Labor IN ew
And
Comment
Careful Now! Don't Let It Get Out of Cc->ol!
By Victor Riestl
roadway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
-----o-----
BPASOI-KI) saga
. I
accuses .hare always fascinated me. In Chicago, where I got
rly newspaper experience, they were local news. That city
was then the hub of the Big Top world, where all bookings were
handled. Principal headquarters were In Baraboo, wis., and West
Baden-, Ind., and dozens of smaller tent-shows worked out of
Chicago.
Numerous movies have been made, some of them good, with
Circus backgrounds. The rich, colorful atmosphere and action, the
sui generis people, the opportunity to interpolate sensational acts,
made i In- topic a natural.
At last 11 attracted C. B. DeMille, the great producer of spec-
taculars in classic dimensions, the man who has gone on since
the berth of motion pictures, setting the standards with such
worgf-as "The Ten Commandments," "The King of Kings," "The
Sign Ht the Cross," "Cleopatra." and many more. DeMille has a
free hand, unhampered by interference or by costs. He Is the only
one m the field who has never made a small picture and hat
nev^fturned out a failure.
Mm.!.
So' he set out to do "The Greatest Show on Earth." With his
usual fidelity to verisimilitude, he lived with circuses, traveled
with em, made exhaustive research into the lore of this roman-
tic, fantastic field of people who have created and lived by their
own codes, upheld their inviolable traditions and handed these
down through the generations.
:Nesr Yorkers know little about such things. They richly
patronize the Rlngling-Harnum It Bailey show every year In pro-
fitable runs at Madison Square Garden. But the metropolis, the
center of almost everything, is a stand only of strangers to circus
peopleras much so as to the occasional rodeo performers.. .Yet
nowhere has the first truly great film on the subject been more
heartily received than at the Garden of picture-palaces, the Radio
City Music Hall.
Before he turned a camera, circus people knew that DeMille
would pack a lot of color and exciting drama into "The Greatest
Show- on Ear- h But. would he capture the heartbeat and the
way of life that underlies that indomitable institution, the Ameri-
can, circa?.. Would he truly portray the showfolk whose tradi-
tion goes back to old wagon show days, when American ingenuity
sent the first rolling caravans out to battle the elements in a
ceaseless struggle against time, bad roads, complicated move-
meats of people, animals, equipment?
The consensus of circus people who have seen DeMllle's big
Teoiinicofor production Is that he has succeeded amazingly. Par-
ticularly, the Insiders from the world of sawdust and spangles
feef he has caught the driving determination back of "the great-
est show** the indefinable soirit that has kept most traveling
cirqV.ses going in the face of hardship, bad weather and disaster
for well over a century.
k
To demonstrate this tough fibre, resiliency of the circus, De-
Mille centered the climax of his drama on a circus train-wreck
...Hrrc.he aiju on .strong historical ground, for such, crashes have
?laj'-ctl MfcricBu circuses and put their courage and fierce
IdelUy to the test since they first forsook wagon-Wheels and took
to rails, back in the 1870's. "The Greatest Show on Earth" big
train-wreck sequence is a composite of two actual circus wrecks.
One'Was the disaster that
train near Garjy Ad., on Ju
!3i v.-eftt-injuretfJT.No wild
the* eflp n another seen
befell the Hagenbeck-Wallace- (
haJ2, IBIS, when.85 ,
1 atflrnkls were
5n... I ooverel me
But in showing animals escaping in the movie, DeMille culled
the historical fact from a wreck in 1895. near Trvone, Pa., when
the) airbrakes failed on the Walter L. Main Circus train as it came
down aajrep mountain grade. Cards piled up and 18 cages of
menagerie animals got loose. Seven people were killed. Of 180
horres, the Main show lost 52. Lions. Bengal tigers and panthers
escaped into the hills, to be hunted and eventually captured or
killed. But for many years afterward, fanners reported seeing
strange reptiles, birds and animals that presumably had come
from tfte- Main wreck. Even today legends of some of these
escaped circus animals still persist around Tyrone.
The Hagenbeck-Wallace wreck was one of the worst catas-
trophes in American show history and one of the biggest wrecks
In railroad annals. The second section of the circus, traveling
from Michigan City to Hammond, stopped because of a hot-box
near. Gary, Just before dawn. In spite of signals that had been
posted, an empty troop train with all-steel Pullmans ploughed at
a 5i-mile-an-hour speed into the rear of the circus train, cutting
through five wooden coaches full of sleeping show people.
Few were killed outright, but in a matter of seconds the debris
took fire. The people who were pinned in the wreckage could not
be rescued. Clowns, aerlallsts, acrobats, animal trainers and riders,
teamsters, candy butchers, canvasmen, waggoners and razorbacks
perished while friends and relatives looked on. The tire was
deemed too harrowing to be recreated on the screen. But in the
wreck-?Thc Greatest Show on Earth" there are details sug-
gestedlby the H-W wreck.
I _-------------------
The ability of the stricken circus to get up off its back and
fight on under the weight of tremendous odds is a major point In
the. picture. It was that way, too. at Gary.. .Despite its stagger-
ing losses and heartbreaking tragedy. Hagenbeck-Wallace missed
onlV two stands. Skipping dates in Hammond and Monroe, Wis.,
the; circus worked in Bclolt only 48 hours after the smash-up.
On the day the 85 victims of the wreck were being buried in
a common grave In Chicago's Woodlawn Cemetery (as a quartet
aarig "Sojnewhere the Sun Is 8hlnlng,"i the surviving, saddened
clrdus hands and performers were working together at Belolt to
raiie the big top. They played matinee and evening performances.
They ven gave a forenoon street parade.
, Here, in one of the greatest scenes in big top history, the
human fortitude and driving power underlying the American
clrdus Was on display. In amazingly true detail, and with great
drama. DeMille projected it. The master of Biblical themes found
his *fcfsst in picturing a unique human class whose calling Is,
to those In It, almost a religion.
. .NEW YORK With the So-
viet Chinese extortion racket
slashed, let's cut another feed
line pouring still more millions
of American "capitalist" dollars
into the "Socialist fatherland.
The Russians must need
those bucks or they wouldn't
get themselves Into such In-
tricate businesses as the orle
at 35 Broad Street, New York,
right in the heart of that im-
perialist Wall Street financial
sector.
There, on the eighth floor, Is
the headquarters of the Gynyla
American Line,, owners of the
Batory, escape ship for Ger-
hart Elsler, now chief of an-
ti-American propaganda min-
istries In Sovletized Germany.
There, too, using the same
offices, the same telephone and
the same executive personnel.
Is an outfit which fronts for
the Bank Polska Opleki of War-
saw, Poland, whose Army and
also Navy are led by Soviet
Marshals and Admirals.
This unit, the Pekao Trading
Corp., pours about a million
dollars a year into the Polish
bank's account at the Irving
Trust Co. here.
Here's how it's done. One
day you get a pleading let-
ter from an old lost aunt
or long forgotten third
cousin, or perhaps even a
brother in Poland. They
write that they need a W-
cycle, a radio, some cotton
goods, furniture, a watch
or perhaps a sewing ma-
chine. Would you please
deposit a couple hundred
American dollars with the
Pekao Trading Corp., 25
Broad St., N.Y.C.?
Such letters have been re-
ceived, by the thousands, right
across the land. So you depo-
sit the money by mail.
Or perhaps you live within
telephoning distance. You dial
Digby 4-3930. You get a big ca-
talog. You select your gift and
pay for It by check or money
order. (Please do that, sir;
don't come up.)
Shortly, you get a receipt.
You have now been good to
your relatives. The agency says
so. The goods have been deliv-
ered.
Not American goods, mind
you. but Polish goods, out "of
Polish stock. You have simply
paid cash here and gotten your
receipt. No American manufac-
turer makes a nickel out of
this transaction.
The profit goes to the Pekao
TJrading Cdrp., incorporated to
Delaware.
^why VUSIKH6T0N
GO
ftlAISON

No Dough
By BOB RUARK



If you're curious, you tele-
phone again and ask for the
manager. Says his name is
Buckran. Nice sounding chap
NEW YORK. We have been sung a pretty
song of earnings and savings at a new high
around the nation, but all the people I talk to
are pulling a poor mouth about ready cash.
Everybody seems broke big broke, medium
broke, or little broke, but busted all the time.
The steady soaring of living costs, tied to
largely stable Incomes and fresh taxes, seems
to supply the answer.
The day of the big splurge la past, and the
bales of loose money aren't apparent any more.
People seem to be counting money again, in-
stead of throwing it, and tne. consciousness of
taxes tops any other conversational topic.
I hear tell that the winter mecca of Miami
is somewhat less than its old lush self this year
that there are beaucoup rooms to let and the
big night spots, no matter what the aXtnectlun,
areihavlng a reasonably rough Time. The boom
is apparently Over down there, and competition
has set in.
One old-time hotel man. Walter Jacobs o the
show folks' Lord Tarleton Hotel on Miami Beach,
has been spotting trends for a long time, and
ceded in fact, they have crept upward to suc-
cessive peaks during the last four months but
their advance has been substantially slowed."
This may mean something to DiSalle, as he
departs his Job with the Office of Price Stabili-
zation to run for the Senate, but is double-talk
to the hausirau with a surly husband.
I have recently seen the purchase of govern-
ment savings bonds sharply criticized as an eco-
nomy measure, even though the patriotic appeal
still persists.
One Congressman has claimed that the $76
paid 10 yeara ago for a Federal bond are ac-
tually worth just over $58 at maturity, including
the $25 Interest received. With new taxes add-
ed, Rep. Fred Busbey (R. 111.) arrives at the in-
teresting figure of $54.70 in buying power for a
bond worth seventy-five bucks .10 .years, ago.
If his figures are anywhere class to correct
and they must be, l)n terms of dollar worth and
prices paid he has painted a dismal picture
in favor of thrift.
nm h.rH W sounan8 chap be reports that the consta keynote ..Ja care-
Net hard-voioed and heavy,aOr fulness.
com-
TN
ft IS
YOUR FORUM THI READIRS OWN COLUMN
; THE MAIL BOX
i The Mail lei to an afMm Urum fat reeaart 4 Tka Pimbm Amir-
e. Latter arc received raraiMlly ana* art k.nalca m a tally caa-
rievnriel e*aap.
j M yau contribu* a tetter dea't be imtint it it aaata't appear in*
Best day. Utters ara asMnlied is the arder receivBd.
. Please try re he rae letter limitad lo on leasts.
Heat, ef tar writer is held ia strict caafaJaiMe.
Tata swpep> aawwuM ee reao**ility far atafreteati ar epiniea
ss+iaiaed a letter (torn raader.
o
GIBL SCOUT INTRODUCTIONS
f
' Wickenburg, Ariz.
Panama American
Dear Sir:
I As neighborhood chairman of the Girl Scouts In Wicken-
bufg, I would like to know the address of the Girl 8cout
headquarters In Panam as our girls (all ages) would like to
eodrespond with the girls in Panam City and th Panam
Oanal Zone.
cent like the careful lady who
answers the phone.
The conversation goes like
this:
"How much business do you
do a year, Mr. Buckran?"
"Well ah, oh-about a mil-
lion," he replies.
"And who owns the
pany, Mr. Buckran?"
"Well, ah, on, I really don't
know."
"Are you an agent of the
Bank Polska Opieka, which col-
lects the money from you
eventually, Mr. Buckran?"
"Yes, we are."
"Well, are you registered as
a foreign agent?"
"Well, I guess so."
Then you hang up and
call the Gdynia-American
Line, money order division,
Dtgby 4-3930. The same lady
answers. The same Mr.
Buckran answers. He gives
you what information you
want on the line 'whose
ship, the Batory. took that
oaggy little man Eisler off
our hands when we weren't
looking.
t.u's 11 Perfectly legal. But
the appalling thought is that
here is a steamship line whose
vessels have been ordered out
H. e Ert of New york- whose
Eaft he ,Batory. is destined
for conversion as a Soviet troop
carrier and whose properties
are in process of liquidation
tSILV" ?et !t ,s P"nltted to
".tlon n a combine with an
"** I a Warsaw bank con-
trolled by the Soviet Union.
Pekao Trading Corp. uses our
postal system and our public
utilities. (And talking about
public utilities. Just who Is Ste-
fan Mlchalskl, a broker also
Regardles of the legality
Regardles sot the legality
of the operation, it pours
this vast foreign exchange
into the exchequer of what
must be recopnlzed as part
of the Soviet snstem
at war with the
Nations.
As I recall it, "Inflation" used to be a vague
term that applied to some bankrupt European
nation, or some Latin American quarter-acre
where they print the money to suit the mood of
the dictator's mistress.
I keep hearing It today in common talk __
talk that used to be devoted to baseball and
dirty Jokes.
We have been raised with annuities and life
insurance as our household gods of security, but
budget are beginning to peer at grocery bills yu hear the worth of Insurance-buying ques-
and snarl gently at the high cost of staying tloned more and more. "Back when the dollar
People are scrupulously totting up checks
attain scrutinizing totals. They still have
some money but not to bum. Luxury cash Is
tougher to come by.
An Assortment of housewives report that hus-
bands* who never used to question the domestic
alive.
The tendency here is to grumble, an admis-
sion of mild despair at making ends touch*
An air-line pilot summed the general beef for
me. "I'm making more dough than I ever made
In my life." he said. "But I never been harder
pushed for cash. There just doesn't seem to be
enough of It to do what I have to do with It.
The announcement of Mike DISalle's Intent to
contemplate decontrol of prices meets load and
raucous laughter on all sides.
DISalle's statement before Congress, in which
he claimed a sharp check In inflationary pres-
sures, Is greeted with a general sneer. "Prices
paid by consumers," DiSalle said, "have not re-
was really worth a dollar" Is a constant cliche.
A few people have realized for a long time
that the unforgivable sin of wilful currency de-
pletion and, in some instances, callous Inflation
have been visited on the country.
But it had not sneaked broadly into ordinary
small talk until the last few months, when tax-
es ran a dead heat with the expensive outlay
of everyday living.
They may announce in Washington that em-
ployment is at peak, and savings at a new high,
and Income greater than ever.
But ask the next man you meet how he's mak-
ing out and hell chant you a sad, sad chorus
In which profanity and the word "busted" min-
gle equally.

Taft-Lewis

By Petit Edson
/
WASHINGTON(NBA)8en. Robert A. Taft
Ohio, candidate for the Republican presi-
dential nomination, has asked for a private hud-
dle with United Mine Workers' President John
L. Lewis.
of
now
Wiited
\
Thanking you,

Mrs. O. H. Telliver
Box 854
Wickenburg, Arizona.
There are scores of tr-
outfits hidden away m the
woodwork of Manhattan's bin-
buildings, all Intricately listed
under various names, all send-
ing millions of "valuta" (for-
eign exchange) behind the Iron
Curtain to keep Its economy
alive.
Doesn't seem to make sense
ioes it? At least not to the fa-
mlliea of the lads .doing then-
frozen duty In Kofca,
I am quite willing to go along with the law to
improve these conditions," Senator Taft testified.
I know it is difficult to get these safety things
Pert 1*. I am for putting them In."
With Taft thus openly supporting federal mine
This Is one result of their little spat over Taft- safety enforcement that Lewis wanted the mln-
Hartley law interpretation before Sen. Matthew era' leader didn't want to cross verbs and adjec-
tives with the senator too vigorously
. Lher1.was one *** or the toWrehante, how-
ever which wasn't fully reported and Its frag-
ments were widely misunderstood.
This came after Lewis had complained that in
one case where a mine had been closed down
when safety recommendations had not been car-
ried out. the operating coal company had sued
the United Mine Workers' Union for $760,000
damages under the Taft-Hartley act.
. "Mr Lewis." commented Senator Taft, '1 went
to Harvard Law School.
"One of the remarks I remember Mr. Warren
makingand he was professor of lawwas that
Neely'a Labor subcommittee on mine safety.
There were no microphones around to record
what Taft said to Lewis when the rather heated
session was over.
But Lewis later gave his press assistant, Justin
McCarthy, a fill-in on this final scene of what
may now become known aa the Taft-Lewis act.
Taft walked over to where Lewis was sitting
and extended his hand. Lewis rose and took it
and they shook.
Taft assured Lewis there was nothing personal
in what he had said to the mine leader.
Lewis in reply said he admired Taft personally
ex-
but that he bad. no understanding of the labor
question and the problems of the American work- you could sue the Bishop of Boston for bastardy,
lng people. but you could not recover."
Then Taft said he'd like to talk It over with All he meant by It, aa he said later on, was,
Lewis, repeating the request he had made pre- "The mere fact that a man brings a suit does
not mean anything for my money!"
(The expression Mr. Taft referred to Is In ra-
ther common use among law students, as a quick
and pat answer to the question: "Out such-and-
such a lawsuit be initiated?")
Wire news services reported this *uote ac-
curately Some papers edited it out aa being un-
fit to print. .|onr
Radio newscasters muddled up the record by
saying that the language was unsuitable for
broadcasting, which merely made everyone curi-
ous on what happened.
Someof the scandal sheets and rumor mongers
opposed to Senator Taft are now picking up the
quote as being original with Senator Taft. and
not attributing It to his old law onrfessor
o01.* ^JhK WV camPlP whiapertng stories
get started by mis-representation.
vlously for a conference. That ended the
change. It was all over in 34 seconds.
Senator Taft Is having a hard time convincing
union labor leaders that he It the working man's
friend, not his enemy^ This has been true ever
since passage of the Taft-Hartley law.
It is Inconceivable that John L. Lewis will ever
come out with an endorsement of .Senator Taft
for the presidency, no matter what Is said when
the two men hold their private meeting.
If President Truman Is the Democratic nominee,
Lewis is expected to put his usual plague on both
their houses and stay out of the campaign as
he did In 1948.
Lewis really didn't let himself go In his ex-
change with Taft before the Neely subcommittee.
Senator Taft has indicated that he will support
what Lewis wants In this Instance.
Drtw Pearson Say$: Drees visits AmtricarT people ahead
of American Preside*; McGranY pressure dc*ics
caused Congressional investigation of him; Justice
Dept. does vital job of Communist control.
WASHiNQTOIiv It was pushed out of the headline hv
Winston Churchill's visit, but another prime Mmistwwaf Tmui
taneoualy In the U. 8. A., quietly winning the hearts. ot the peo-
ple. He was Netherlands Prime Minister Willem Drees ^
Unlike most visiting potentates. Premier Drees sought no
loans or military supplies. He just wanted to get to know Anierlca!
Visiting prime ministers usually make a bee line for Sie
ffieVSM SS? they *"** "Ut Premter ^ ^ com!
fore' 2$&^&S^ SfSULTcountry *-
So. 48 hours after he arrived, the Dutch prime minister waa
n Bridgeport, Conn., having a friendly talk with officials of tha
local A. P. of L., later visited some of Bridgeport's factories saw
how the typical American worker lived.
"I'm being aducted in one of the world's great miracles the
miracle of the American standard of living," he said, as he con-
tinued his educational campaign. ^^
He chatted with the garment workers In New York: the steel
workers In Pittsburgh; newlyweds at Niagara Falls, and college
students at the University of Maryland.
DEPENDES Or DEMOCRACY.
An American official traveling with Drees said:
Drees has probably learned more about the United States in
7 Y*0*** I*!**1 the average diplomat could learn In a year of
official receptions and ceremonies."
_. T*100*11 the United States seemed to make an impression on
ramlefDrees the -premier also made a profound impression on
the united States.
A simple, though astute man, Drees is no armchair defender
of democracy. During the war, the Gestapo threw him In prison
as a leader of the. Dutch underground, and only through a miracle
did he escape with his life. ,
. * Preml*r of the Netherlands,- Drees is concentrating on re-
building and rearming his country.
The Dutch, suffered more at the hands of the Nazis than any
?u !". ^roP**1 nation, due to the destruction of their dikes and
the flooding of their land with salt water.
.. ,SaUroa ed. Thousands of Dutch patriots were brutally murdered by the
Gestapo.
Dutch humorists had a lot of fun kidding their preauer when
they heard that New York was planning a gala reception for Cap.
tain Carisen, hero of the Plying Enterprise.
"Dont the New Yorkers know," asked the wags, "that Premier
Drees Is also quite a naval hero?
After all, he's stayed at the helm of the Dutch ship of state
for five years while It has been listing as much as 60 degrees!"
Under Premier Drees' quiet leadership, however, the Dutch
SeWSS wSuSrand gettlng under w,y" *mnch
KOTO: Netherlands' Queen Juliana and Prince BemBard will
.1. They'll be the Trumaos' first guests
arrive In Washington Ap
ILthe remodeledWhlte House, Just In time to see thergift lo the
White House 15,000 tulips break into bloom.
PRQBING JUSTICE
Two things turned the tide for an investigation of the Justice
Department by the House Judiciary Committee: >
1) A blunt; Republican ultimatum that they would force a
record vote if the probe were blocked, thus ltttagthe public know
who opposed the corruption clean-up.
. -a) 1?e unexpected appearance of Attorney General Howard
McOrath at chairman Manny Celler's office, requesting the right
to testify before the secret vote was taken. This move, interpreted
as "pressure" tactics, boomeranged. It solidified sentiment for the
prooe. .,,,,_
However, before McOrath showed up, Democrats Prancls
Walter of Pennsylvania aiifl Joseph Bryson ofSouTOCaTWrna both
remarked that they "Were concerned s*mrt hovHRie pwjfle feel
on thl Issue," and that "something should be done by Cogrens" '
in view of the fact that President Truman's weak gestures to clean
up had "fallen flat."
,. ^ *? "i??* meeting began, chairman Celler of New York
lifted eyebrow* by announcing that BfcGrath waa ln-*a eeuenlu '<
office and wanted a "chance to testify." ------ *
DEBATE OVER McGRATH
Republicans Kenneth Keating of New York, author of the
probe resolution, Patrick Hillings of California and other Repub-
licans vigorously objected, as did Democrats E. L. Porrester of
Georgia and Tom Plckett of Texas. '*
"I do not feel that it would be the proper procedure to hear '
the attorney general before we have even completed our discussion
on this resolution to Investigate his department," demurred For- '
rester.
"Also, It would be unfair to McOrath If we heard him and
then voted against him a sense It would be like condemning
him before the investigation started.
"On the other hand, if we agreed to hear him now and then
voted not to investigate the Justice Department, a lot of people
would get the Impression that we acted under pressure from the
attorney general.
Nonetheless, chairman Celler kept Insisting that McOrath, aa
chief of the Justice Department and "the man most vitally con-
cerned In this matter," had a "right to be heard."
But when Celler put the question of MCGrath's appearance
to a show-down vote, there was an overwhelming horus of "no's"
from both sides of the table.
Representatives Mike Pelghan of Ohio, Robert Ramsey of
West Virginia, and one or two other Democrats murmured "aye."
In the end, the committee voted unanimously for the investi-
gation. .:
COMMUNIST WITNESS
Though it doesn't make the same headlines that have been
garnered by Congressional committees, the Justice Department'!
subversive control board has been doing a highly Important and
thorough job of weeding out Communists.
Next week It plans to spring a surprise witness, probably thi
first who will be a member of the Communist Party up until an
hour before he testifies. Since the witness might be spirited away
If his name were known in advance, it cannot be given.
Hitherto, all cooperative witnesses before congressional com-
mittees dealing with subversion have retired from the Communist
Party.
McGRATH DEFENDS HIMSELF
When Sen. Alexander Wiley of Wisconsin dropped in on nil
former Senate colleague, now Attorney General Howard McOrath,
the other day. the latter let his hair down.
McOrath has been weeping on quite a few shoulders around
town over the way he has been kicked around by the White House,
and has become quite bitter over press criticism.
In talking to Senator Wiley he was almost pathetic in plead-
ing that the criticism was unjustified.
McOrath wa# particularly bitter against Max Lowenthal, an
old friend of Truman's When be was Senator from Missouri and
whom McOrath blamed for slipping into the White House and
almost convincing the President that he should appoint Justin .
Miller,-ex-court of appeals Judge, to McQrath's place. ,
The attorney general was also angry at the "palace guard"
whom he accused of prejudicing the President against him.
McOrath, who is one of the most likable men In Washington
from a personal point of view, but who has been anything but
energetic until recently regarding crime and corruption, alto com-
plained that no one had worked harder than he to elect Truman
He pointed Out that he had not gone on the President's
whistle-stop campaign, but had stated behind to work, so per-
haps Mr. Truman did not realize how much energy he had thrown
into the campaign r
Wiley, a sympathetic human being, came away feeling sorry
for his old colleague.'
^^


Faltering Philip!
Philip's Ufe i tllleel antb braise
WeU-wero (tea* ad raga he ases
Repairs would lestSBj hia home like new-
P A. Clasaifledi, tent the right elusl
.:jlM



THURSDAY, FTBRlAST 1, 1152
2
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY F.RSKINE JOHNSON
HOLLYWOOD, (NBA) Bx-
clu8lvely Yours: Columbia ap-
parently doesn't want Rita Hay-
worth talking to the pren away
from the studio.
She scheduled an Informal
talk at her home.
Then she wired her regrets
that ahe was cancelling the talk,
when Columbia beat her to the
punch in announcing her return
to the studio after that walkout
on her comeback movie.
"Under the circumstances." Ri-
ta wired. "I am frank to tell you
there is nothing further that I
could talk to you about."
Meaning, of course, she wont
discuss Aly Khan on or off the
record.
"Just call ne Robert (not to)
Toung."
Warbler Monica Lewis and
William O'Brien, who wrote
"Here Comes the Oroom," are
thinking about an altar trek....
Jane Wyman has a suite reserv-
ed for May 1 on the London-
bound Queen Mary.
The TV debut of "My Friend
Irma" left the audience bugeyed
over Marie Wilson's prim, ln-
character wardrobe. Marie's
comment:
"I'm supposed to be flat-head-
ed, but I dldnt know I was sup-
posed to be flat-chested."
Robert Young, bruised and
aching after a skiing vacation
with his youngsters at Sun Val-
ley:
Televisin may be organized
bedlam; but when Spike Jones
does a TV show lt'a organized
chaos on split-second timing.
Warming up for another All Star
Revue show. Spike let me In on
the secrets of his TV madness.
"Everything is set up bar by
bar and synchronized with the
cameras," he said. "We use 11 ml-
crophones and four cameras.
There's an average of 353 came-
ra setups compared to the nor-
mal 60 for an hour comedy
show."
Is the pace rough on Spike?
"Look," he answered. "I've
even learned to be a high jump-
er. On our last show I had to
Jump over a spinet piano off-
stage to make a fast change. You
know something? I cleared the
piano, and the guy sitting in
front of It, with a foot to spare."
------*
I*
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAM NEWSPAPER
- -

PAGE
Red Skelton to a couple of
mink-coated dolls who asked for
his photograph:
'Tell me. what's new in Wash-
ington?"
Susan Hayward objected to a
scene In "This Man Is Mine" In
which she cusses out Robert Mlt-
chum, so RKO deleted it....
Kathryn Orayson's blushing, but
JACOIY ON BRIPflt
By OSWALDJACOBY
Written for NBA Service
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AKIII
North-South vol.
not talking, about the charge of
biting Mario Lanza's Up during A
kissing scene in "Toast of New
Orleans." The story's making
the rounds now that the Gray-
son-Lanza feud is blazing again.
.. .Robert Merrill's return to the
Met cost him a singing lead in
"The Music Master" at Fox___
It looks rosy for Sylvia Sidney to
make a movie comeback.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG*840
Whet* 100.000 Peah> Meet
Presents
Today, Thursday. Feb. 7
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamuslca Story Time
4:15 Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
8:00Happy The HumbugCla.
Aliaro. 8.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
6:00World News and Com-
mentary (VOA)
8:15Arts and Letters (VOA)
8:30Radio University (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOAJ
9:00The Country House (BBC)
9:30Take It From Here (BBC)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owls Nest
12:00Sign Off
Judge Tosses Out Indictments
Against Old Line Democrats
ITS MOVUTtalK.
(P,
JACKSON, Miss., Feb. 7 (UP)
In a surprise move yesterday
Federal Judge Allen Cox tossed
out perjury Indictments against
five pro-Truman Democrats and
will decide today when to begin
trials for font charged with
peddling Federal Jobs.
The perjury charges against
Curtis Rogers, Forrest Jackson,
Henry Debrow. J. H. Wilkinson
and Roy Brashler were discard-
ed on a technicality the fact
that the Indictments did not
name the person who adminis-
tered the oath to the defendants
m
omen
WU
Pfeea
Pass
?
Pi
Double
Ni
Double
Pass
The bidding of today's hand
was rather peculiar. East and
Wast could have made four
spades, but they sold out at one
heart. North. reopened the bid-
ding on a doubtful holding, al-
lowing the opponents to get to-
gether In spades.
Nevertheless, they sold out a-
gain, this time doubling South
at a contract he made. Rather
Escullar, but that's the way it
ppened.
West opened the jack of
apades, and South played low
from the dummy since he want-
ed East to duck the trick. East
obligingly played low In order to
save his ace for dummy's king.
South won with the queen of
spades, cashed the ace of dia-
monds, and then returned a
spade to put Bast In the lead.
East dldnt have a safe return,
much to his sorrow. Muttering
and grumbling, he laid down the
king of diamond, and South
ruffed. This confirmed Souths
suspicion that West had all the
missing trumps, since East would
have been delighted to get out
safely with a trump If he had
held one.
South's next step was to lead a
low heart. West was. as expect-
ed, void of hearts, but he could
not afford to ruff. Dummy
would merely play one of the low
hearts, -and West would get
nothing of value for his trump.
When West discarded a dia-
mond, dummy won with the ace
of hearts. Declarer next cashed
the queen of diamonds, discard-
ing a heart from his hand. He
then led dummy's last diamond,
ruffing with the nine of clubs
from his hand.
West could not afford to over
ruff with the Jack of clubs. If he
Id so. he would have to return
A spade or a trump. A trump re-
turn would allow South to draw
trumps, leaving dummy with a
!ood trump and only two heart
osers. A spade return would al-
low dummy to discard a losing
heart while South ruffed.
So West discarded a spade, but
It did him no rood. South gave
up two heart tricks to East, but
then West and dummy were re-
duced to four trumps. No matter
what Bast returned. West hed to
ruff with the Jack. West then
had to return a trump, allowing
declarer to win the rest with,
dummv's ten and his own ace
and king.
By GAY PAULEY
NEW YORK. (UP) An
mlnent educator says, it's about
time that child psychology con-
sidered Dad and Mom as well as
Junior.
Dr. Tracy S. Kendler of New
York University's Institute of A-
dult Studies believes there has
been so much attention given to
bringing up happy, well-adjust-
ed children, that unhappy, mal-
adjusted parents are increasing.
The psychologist, who teaches
a course in chfld care for par-
ents only, reasoned this way:
First, psychologists produced
the theory of child care which
might be called the "strict disci-
pline, strict schedule" school.
This one developed early In the
20th century.
Then, the pendulum swung
way off in the opposite direction,
where the child became king in
the home, where every demand
was met. or else he would grow
up Into a bundle of frustrations.
Now, she believes this theory
needs modification. Pare n t s
have absorbed so much child
psychology they're afraid of
making a mistake.
"They've developed nursery
fright." said the youthful psy-
chologist.
"They feel over-guilty, over-
worried, over-fearful," she add-
ed. "My advice for them is to re-
lax a bit. Both parent and child
will benefit.-
"Too many parents," she con-
nued, "feel that they're the on-
. ones shaping a child's person-
ality. Well, until school age they
do play the biggest role. Once
the child starts to school, the
child Is subject to Influences too
numerous to mention."
Dr. Kendler was educated at
Brooklyn College and the Uni-
versity of Iowa. Her husband is
a psychologist also and the cou-
ple has two sonsone 4 years
old. the other 17 months.
'I don't use my children as
guinea pigs for my theories,"
said the psychologist emphati-
cally.
Dr. Kendler said it Is danger-
ous to make blanket recommen-
dations on child care because
each child and each parent pre-
sents a different problem.
"Lots of love is about the best
general recommendation I can
make," said the psychologist.
"Even this can be overdone,"
she added. "I would advise par-
ents to be a little selfish occa-
sionally. Sometimes it does more
good for Mom to take a day off,
away from the house and chil-
dren, than It does for her to stay
home and give them all her at-
tention."
"Superficially, by staying home
she shows great love," Dr. Ken-
dler reasoned. "Inwardly though,
she may resent the day of fun
the child has deprived her of.
And children sense these things.'
Friday, Feb. 8
A.M.
6.00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Come and Oet It
9:30As I See It
10:00News .
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
PJML
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:16Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club (VOA)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The HumbugCla.
Alfaro, S.A.
6:18Evening 8alon
7:00Barchester Tower (BBC)
(VOA)
7:30Sports Review
7:45 Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News, Commentary
(Voice of America)
8:15-ppera Concert (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00Short Story Theatre
(VOA)
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of PC 49
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Of
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting Corp
RDFRadiodifusin Francalse
PRE INVENTORY
SALE
SPECIAL OFFERS LAST
TWO DAYS FRIDAY & SATURDAY
All balance of our $45 suits sold since Jan. 31
at $19.75 NOW, until the last one is sold...
$ 16.50
Al suits till now advertised on this Sale at $13.75
NOW to clear out...
\
$ 10.75
MANHATTAN SHIRTS $2.75
100% Clean FRESH GOODS
SPORT SHIRTS $3.75
Long and short sleeves Solid colors and prints.
100% all clean, fresh goods, some up to $7.50
MEN'S SPORT SHORTS
solid colors
sizes 28 to 36
$2.25

KNITTED "T" SHIRTS
Wonderful values to $3.50
NOWone and all
$ 1.85
LAST TWO DAYS
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
SAMUEL FRIEDMAN, Inc.
LA MASCOTA
Opposite Anean P.O.
You'll Low
the flavor
of this coffee!
The Big 1952 Ford
Will Soon Be
On Display
COLMN MOTORS
Mr 2-1033 2.1036
PANAMA
i. wt com*
WU EVER WSTEP
BECAUSE IT IS
100% tUftf COFFEE
2. MA6C
C09NBUBU
NO r*OT-N0.*ROUN9$
fUAW IN AN INSTANT
3. thrifty: TOO/
USERS Siy.-/M0HE CUPS
THAU A POUND OF 0HOUND
COFFEE! AND THERE IS
NO WASTt
a* MS lMi iriMTWif
PHYLLIS THAXTER
Come Fill
the Cup"^
fSusus HENRY bTaW
CENTRAL-
John B*rrymore. Jr.
Corinne Calvert, in
QUEBEC"
Abo
NATIONAL NEWS___
WMLatvt r-otltkal flat!
borden*
INSTANT
COFF*
THE ATRE
"EXCUSE MY DUST" (Colors)
Rod SKELTON Sally FORREST
AIm: Dick Powell ruli Rajliaad
"THE TALL TARGET"
Tho Myitory Hut Shoot i Notion I
ENCANTC^THEATRE
WAHOO! At i P.M.
Ruth Roman, In
"LIGHTNING STRIKES
Also
Gary Cooper, In
DALLAS"________
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BANK NIGHT!
David Wayne, In
"UP FRONT"
Also
Yvonne De Carlo,
"SALOME,
WHERE SHE DANCED"
TIVOLI THEATRt
"PITTSBURGH"
with John Wayno
And
"THE SPOILERS"
with Marlene Dietrich
VICTORIA THEATRE
TECHNICOLOR DOUBLE!
Lana Turnar. In
"THREE MUSKETEERS"
lather William, In
"NKPTUNB'8 DAUGHTER"
when they testified before a
Senate Subcommittee here last
April. Government prosecutor
Ben Brooks called It a "hyper-
technlcallty."
But Cox ruled that it "goes
beyond a technicality. It was
been essential for centuries."
Cox then said he would begin
trials Feb. 14 for the four mem-
bers of the defunct State Pro-
Truman Democratic Committee
charged with peddling Federal
Jobs through their two-year
control of patronage in States'
rights Mississippi.
Brooks, however, pleaded des-
parately for time and Cox said
he would decide tomorrow when
the trials should be held. Brooks
said the government plans to
appeal Cox's dismissal last Fri-
day of conspiracy indictments
which threw out the govern-
ment's case against Clarence
Hood, former Pro-Truman Na-
tional commltteeman for Mis-
sissippi; Frank Mlze, chairman
of the Mississippi committee,
and Lawrence Yelverton, an of-
fice secretary.
Brooks, obviously chagrined
over the perjury dismissals, de-
clined to comment on a possible
appeal on that charge. He has
already appealed to the Su-
preme Court a ruling of last
September which dismissed job
sales charges against Brashler
and Wilkinson.
Those facing trial on the Job
sales charges are Curtis Rogers,
committee secretary-treasurer;
Forrest Jackson, committee at-
torney; B. C. Beasley, former
committee secretary, and Dewey
McCleod, committee field work-
er.
Minutes before Judge Cox's
surprise ruling, Brooks had com-
mented that "It would be a mis-
carriage of Justice to throw out
these perjury indictments on
these hyper-technical grounds.
This is Just too much detail. We
need to look at these Indict-
ments from a practical rather
than technical standpoint."
Twelve members of the Pro-
Truman Committee were first
Indicted following the 8enate
subcommittee Investigation here
last April into the Job-peddling
charges. Two of them, Mr. and
Mrs. c. V. Murphy, pleaded
guilty to conspiracy charges last
Sept. 5.
Conspiracy Indictments
against the other 10 were dis-
missed by Cox last Friday, leav-
ing only seven facing charges of
either perjury or. Job sales. The
ruling yesterday leaves only I
four, all charged with Job sales.
Conviction on the Job sales
charge could Bring a maximum
penalty of s $1,000 fine or one
year in prison or both.
Cavia/ cfheaters
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
Air-conditioned
1:15 A SMS
Robert HUTTON Steve BRODIE
"THE STEEL HELMET"
__rrWay "LORNA DOONE"_____
Diablo hts.
:IS A m
t
Bette DAVIS Monte WOOLLET /V|
The Man Who Came To Dinner* |
Friday "ArT-OINTMENT WITH DANCER"
C n C O I I Gloria HENRY Stephen DUNNS
Tui*m 'LAW OF THE BARBARYCOAST
Friday "THUNDER ON THE HTLL"
PEDRC MIGUEL
Sill S:1S
(rriday)
'Callaway Went Thatawoy'
GAMBOA
im
t
Arthur KENNEDY r*<
DOW
hur KENNEDY a Peggy DOl
BRIGHT VICTORY"
Saturday "THUNDER ON THE MLL"

GAT UN
'at
(Friday)
ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD*
MARGARITA
S:ll 8:20
t
Cary GRANT Prlxilla LANE
ARSENIC AND OLD LACE"
Friday "KANSAS RAIDERS_______
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Cnndltirmad
S:ll S:M
Ava GARDNFR Jim MASON
"PANDORA A THE FLYING DUTCHMAN"
(Technicolor)
Friday "THE GREAT MISSOURI RAID"
COMING SOON!!! .. COMING SOON!!!
car, cooper, .n 'DISTANT DRUMS' (Technicolor)
Donaldo Gayle, Ex-RP
Resident Earns Gruen
Loyalty Service Pin
Donaldo Gayle, former Pana-
ma resident now residing in
Cincinnati. Ohio, was among the
many employes of the Gruen
Watch Co. who were presented
Bronze pins for one year of loyal
service on Jan. 31.
The presentation was made
by Adolph Menjou and Coleen
Gray of Hollywood.
Gayle. who is employed as a
production clerk In t.he Gruen
executive office. Is also a rt>l
estate student t, the University
of Cincinnati. His last employ-
ment in Panpma wp with the
Panama American Publishing Co.
Diablo Pfento C'nb
Meeting Tonipht
The Diablo Camera dob w'll
hold !? rerulpr month** blac*-
irH-white riooti'no' pt rh rluh'o
*i'dn* H Diablo Heights, at
7:*n tor-Wit. .
Th* wJriplno> en**1" of ?*
*MM TT)t---VC" DV.rNtnf.-pnlv.
''onteet wlJ' he exh'Wf-d ori
niS6Wa41 Tri^e rr'**iO'ro^rie
e'e p*lprt^ front **7 mtnts
*nrl rfmrpe^Ti* *h* Hoot. pf*rt-te In
nhotography by service person-
nel
T> ThiHt h VMpn rp"J
-vsilob' to Ufe* flnh hv T.f Col.
FrenV W TJnn~" Chief Of P~-
"isl 8ervlces. U. 8. Arm" CtIK.
besn who mjon'r fh local Ar_
my photography contests.
Excused
Sjarriaf
SALLY
rMUMiMM-JiniK
^ RED
SKELTON FORREST
and Mac Donald Carey ,
100*2*!*
ormat
-
* Fancy French Lace
* Nylon and Fancy Net
* Brocade
Cold and Pleated
ZIG-ZAG
108 Central Avenue
Tel. 2-3418
Headquarters of VOGUE and McCALL Patterns



p<;r. ron
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
THl'RSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, INS
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & Airline News
United Fruit Cruise Ship
Arriving Saturday
The United Fruit cruise ship
Jamaica, with 87 passenRers is
arriving early Saturday morning
hi Cristobal. Panama Tours, lo-
cal agent for the tourists, will
accompany the passengersto
Balboa at noon on Sat in day
where they will remain over-
night. Thev sail Sunday after-
noon for Havana.
Prominent Passenger
Due Here On Braniff
Lamotte COliu. ex-president of
TWA who is now chairman or
the board of Consolidated Vul-
tee Airplane Corporation anlves
i Panama tomorrow nigh He
being accompanied by his fa-
mily and his secretary and will
remain until Sunday night v, hen
he'leaves for *>?"*}:
dv the avis'lion of South Ameri-
can countries.
Panamanian Beauties Flying
With Carnival Invitations
Miamians are going to meei
eight lovelv reasons for at tend-
me El Panama Carnival Febru-
ary 23-26 at the luxurious Hotel
El Panama.
Headed by the carnival queen,
the seoritas are arriving In Mia-
mi from Panama today by Pan
American World Airways Costa
Rican affiliate. Lineas Aereas
Costarricenses (LACSA).
The society debutantes, travel-
ing in colorful native Panaman-
ian costumes, will spend two days
extending an in-person ?*-
tlon to Florldians to attend th*
iun at the modernistic hotel.
Cubans will meet the lovely
lnviters over the weekend. They
are flving from Miami to Hava-
na bv'PAA Clipper Saturday. The
group returns to Panama Mon-
day, February 11.
Proposal to Consolidate
Braniff With Mid-Continent
Airlines Underway
DALLAS. Texas. Feb. 7 A
plan for consolidating Braniff
International Airways and Mid-
Continent Airlines has been a-
greed upon by the directors of
both companies, subject to ap-
proval of stockholders and the
Civil Aeronautics Board, accord-
leg to a Dallas announcement.
T. E. Braniff, president and
0 -------
chairman of the board of Braniff
of Dallas and Thomas F. Ryan
of Three Rivers. New Mexico,
chairman o the board of Mid-
Continent in Kansas City. Mo.,
announced the merger simultan-
eously. The arrangement pro-
vides for the exchange of one
and one-half share of Mid-Con-
tinent common stock for one
share of Braniff slock.
J. W. Miller, president and
general manager of Mld-Contin-
lent since Ryan acquired controll-
ing interest in the company in
1936. will become a vice president
and director of Braniff. He will
also be in charge of Integrating
Ithe employes of Mid-Continent
'Into the staff of Braniff Airways
to the maximum extent consis-
tent with proper business man-
agement .
In a joint statement, Braniff
and Ryan said, "We have long
recognized the community of
interest between the two car-
riers, the one serving the cen-
tral and northern part of the
middle west and the other
serving the central and south-
ern part of the midwest and
southwest."
During the 12 months ending
November 30. 1951. Braniff gave
($334.857 in inter-line business to
'Mid Continent and received
i$270.113 in such business from
'Mid-Continent The two lines
have Kansas City. Tulsa. Hous-
ton and Chicago as principal
junction points. "An operation
'under one management will en-
able vs." the statement contln-
ied. "to Improve through service
tween many of the communi-
ties served by the two campan-
iea, such as a new Chicago-Kan-
sas City-Tulsa-Houston service:
[a Minneapolis, St. Paul -Kansas
1 City-Dallas and other Texas
point operation: Denver-New
Orleans through service: and to
inaugurate many non-stop serv-
ices not now available to the
public.
The total domestic route mile-
age of the new combine will be
7.662 unduplicated route miles.
This total, added to Branlff's ln-
\ ternatlonal routes, will place the
operation among the first 12 of
(Continued on Page SIX)
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrive*
Cristobal
S.S. Fiador Knot .............................Febr. %
*SJS. (biriqu .................................Febr. 1*
S.S. Quirigua .................................Febr. 17
S.S. Levers Bend.............................Febr. 22
S.S. Chiriqui................................ Febr. 24
' llandliiiK Refrigerated Chilled .nd Genera Cu|o.
Arrives
New York Service Cristbal
S.S. Jamaica .................................Febr. 9
S.S. Yaque ...................................Febr. 9
S.S. Cape Cod ................................Febr. It
S.S. Junior ...................................Febr. 1
S.S. Talamanca ......... ....................Febr. IS
Weekly Sellings to New York. New Orleans, l.n Angele*, San Francisco,
Seattle Frequent freight sailing-. Cristobal to West Coast
Central American Ports.
Cristobal to New Orleans via Sails fr<*m
Tela, Honduras Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui .................................Febr. 12
S.S. Quirigua .................................Febr. 19
S.S. Chiriqui................................ .Febr. 26 -
(Passenger Service Only)
CRISTOBAL 2121
TELEPHONES:
- PANAMA 2-2804
COLON 2
TERRY-
WRONG ANSWER
t,V-*:---------
ITHWKVCUAIICJfn-^^IDOWYUNPSltSTANC OH WAIT'
ANirVKTWAT UerSTlON I HOP XOTWN6% NAPPaMBC TOs
ui, ummuMtr.r that truckth* colonel asket?
MB TO VOUCH POR LAST NIGHT.)
Where in the world do you want to go!
TO THE STATES? SOUTH AMERICA? EUROPE?
Wherever you want to go come in and let our expert travel
department arrange your trip exactly as you want itat
absolutely no extra cost to you. Take advantage of our
years o experience in the travel business.
#3 "L" St.
DeLesseps
Park
YD MOTHERS. INC
Tel.
2-2098
2-2098
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
flNO'-'.-f'S HKSEMCe &J7SNEW
LIFE IN THE BASKETBALL. TEAM !
Heady Repy
BT MERRILL BIOS
Weu-iNou cam Jusr
BUILD HIM A DO HOUSE
OUTSIDE- ArJO TEACH HIM
10 BARK/
ALLEY OOP
No Like!
BT V. T. HAMLIN
World's
iwst famous
location
2000 modern room
bothradioMuiak
potless comfort
I
.,..;V.V NEW YORK
N THKS SINK II UM CUY
iiM
S/S "TOSCA"
Accepting Passengers
for
LOS ANGELES,
Calif.
Sailing on or about
FEBRUARY 13th, 1952
APP.V
C. Fernie & Co.
Cristbal
3-1772
Balboa
2-1657
Flex-the household finish of
thousand uses both inside
and outside. It's easy to
apply. Wide range
of brilliant, last-
ing colors.
Do not accept substitutes.
Look for the "GENERAL" trademark.
GENERAL PAINT CORPORATION
MATERIALES DE CONSTRUCCIN, S.A.
ARIAS Y CU. David
W. 17th and "H' Streets Telephones: 2-1891, 2-1895 Panam
7084 Herrera Avenue Phone 626 Coln.
CMim. v\ i i ki \ Planrteer
Put Energy
BY KI1SS WINTERHOTHAM
FEISCILLA'S POP
The AgeOld Story
BY AL VERMEER
Step on it. Bud
YAAH,6URE.7.1 AW NOW.OOr?
BUT I AINT/DON'T BE Ot
A-GONN A THAT.' VCANT
DO IT/ /TURN DOC DOWN
UKE THAT.'
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Well, Hello!
BT EDGAR MARTIN
CAPTAIN EAST
That Does It
BT LESLIE TURNE1
LAZES, I WONT DREAM
V0U WERE THAT LITTLE
UEIGHftORrtPOD KID
GROWN BP OR THAT
EVWMAgA
CRUSH OU ME!
. HIE CARRIED A . A TORCH1
|fOR YOU AtL THESE YEAR*
' RASY. SO WHEN THOM
POLICE KEPT NAGGING M*
FOX THe NAME OP MY
ESTRANGED HUSBAND."*.
I BLURTED OUT YOUR*!
rprc*60TTeNim*NC*ACtiaWT*A*L
THAT ITD MA re paper t^i****X,
THEN YOU RUSHED DOWM AD AS HOP#J0l
REPAY MY UNDYING LOYALTY!,--------------~-i
- I'M-ER-SORRY,
JANET. I DIDN'T
UNDERSTAND 1
, ^D NOW THAT YOU'VE HAD tOURT, OKAY, 0
SAY, YOU'EE READY TO ABANDON ,
.ME ALONG THE ROA0-. A MUrVVtU ORNE
TO BANDIT* ORJ-^^V0 * ***
\ A* HOUSTON
.MrfWM
is
1/lsW.
^ND A* THEY ORIVE WAV. COOVSM*
I CAR FOLLOWS AT A DISCWT WSTAWCI
ffjy ^i.vrm^^^^dBbwm^r*--
VIC FLINT
Now for the Symphony
( ( 91DT \M9ERYSMO, RAIL
l> WHAT SAFER HIFIN&
PL*Ce THAW AW m
U
now uxf5n&Tout op
HERE. Or TO PLAN
THE NEXT SYMPHONY
NMEWT JO*-/
YOU'RE A TRAN&tt
WOMAW MAPAM TDWO,
fur i guess youke
r KlfiHT. _
BT MICHAEL O'MALLE
H.VrC/ACUEWT l
A^E A COUPLE OF,
moffy ticket :
Nie>HT.
OUR BOARDING HOUSE .... with .... MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAX
By J. .t WILLIAM!
MRS. HOOPLS, THAT HAM
ANO CABBAGE VVE HAD
TONIGHT WOULD MAKE ,
A TONE LlOfO DROOL'. l/b
%. \ rD LIKE TO MOVE t - |N AWHILE AS A i-*^'
' STEADY BOARDER
: YOU'VE GOT
A SPARE
rCBLL!
THAT CAM BE ARRANGED
IF YOU WAriT TD BAY-
ENTER, MS. SUMHORN
OUR CREDIT MArJAfieR. IS
ON VACATIONS/TMOSe
WHO MESLECT 1HE CASHIER
HERE ARE SIV/6N
EKCLUSlME RIGHTS TO
GO Dlfl THEMSELVES
A SUITE IN SOME
FARMER'S
STKrVNSTACK.'
1^
\i
y
4
i-
i?
_USTO
THE GENERAL,
idea is clear
MY PA SOL&& MY
SHOES WITH CAS>
JINS BOLTIM' HE
&ETS \rVHERE HE
VMORt, AM" I NEVER
Miss a chance like
"THIS TD GRIND 'EM
DOWNTONJOR-
I _\ MAL BV MODERN
'_\. MAWlNERV.STlCOA J
i ( DRAGGW' 'EM
J.L
AIW'T MUCH Y*fTY Sl&TER,
VMORSE' N \ M ARRHEP
RUBBERS- TH-FIRST
I HAFTA *. / GUY THAT .
WEAR 'EM VaSKEP HER.
IF THERE'S **CUZ P*
A CLOUP IM I REPAIRED
TrfSKV.' y OUR SHOES.'
3
J
n i_
r
WT-
/'
>... ~ BOR*J THIRTY YEARS pO SOOH




TM'RSDAY. FEBRUARY 7. 1952
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE PIT
pacific S^ocie
ti
nu c~JtJu,
&. 17, &&~ 21 &&~ 3521
AMBASSADOR AND MRS. WILEY
TO ENTERTAIN AT TEA
The Ambassador of the United Slates to Panama and
Mr. John Cooper Wiley will be hosts at a tea to be giren
this afternoon at 5:00 p.m. at the Embassy Residence on La
Cresta in heno rof Mr. and Mrs. Harry Slnnott who are leav-
ing this month for New York where they will make their
home.
Farewell Party
for Mr. and Mrs Slnnott
Mr. and Mr. Harry J. Sln-
nott of Ancon. who leave within
the next few days for his new
assignment in New York with the
headquarters staff of All Ameri-
ca Cables and Radio. Inc. of the
New York Office, were honored
guests it a farewell cocktail par-
ty Riven Tuesday evening by Mr.
and Mrs. Charles E. Smith.
No-Host Farewell Party Friday
The members of the United
States Embassy staf f will hold a
no-host farewell buffet-supper
at 7:00 p.m. on Friday in honor
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Slnnott.
Mr. and Mrs. Boris Splvack and
Miss Margaret Ostrowskl all of
whom are to be transferred and
will leave in the near future for
new assignments.
Aoproxlmately sixty five guests
Visitor Here From Washington
Mr. Earl J. Donnelly of the
Executive Office of the Presi-
dent. Bureau of the Budget, ar-
rived on Monday from New York
aboard the 88. Panama for a
visit of three weeks on the Isth-
mus.
Silver Tea Honors Mrs. Stark
Mrs. Jess M. Carver and Mrs
William J. Carson were co-hos-
tesses on Saturday afternoon at
a Silver Tea given in the Little
Gallery of the Hotel Tlvoll in
honor of Mrs. James K. Stark.
Mrs. Beulah Barraugh presid-
ed at the tea service and Mrs.
Robert Heddaeus was in charge
of the punch bowl.
The guests attending included
Miss Marie Romlnger. Miss Eden
Fllaon. Mrs. Marjorie Dreiman,
Mrs. J. A. Barbour. Mrs. R. H.
... .HoDowell. Mrs. Julius Henschel,
will attend the buffet to be held Miss Frances Thornton. Mrs.
8/7/ Extending Wage Control
For One Year Before Senate
retary; and Mrs. Vera Phillips,
Treasurer.
Luncheon was served follow-
ing the meeting.
Woman's Club To Meet
Wednesday
"Jungle Jim" Price will be the
guest speaker at a morning cof-
fee to be given Wednesday by
the Balboa Woman's Club. Mr.
Price will speak on "Panama."
Nunery Department
"Babv Shower" Friday
The "Mom and Dad" Class of
the Balboa Union Church are
sponsoring a "Baby 8hower" for
the Nursery Department of the
Sunday School. All members of
the church are Invited to attend
and bring a gift suitable for a
nursery aged (3-5) child on Frl-
dav at 7:30 p.m. In the Church
Parlors.
V.F.W. Bineo Tonight
Bingo will be played tonight at
the V.F.W. Home on Curundu
Road at 7:45. Prises will be a-
warded the winners.
at No. 11 Manuel Hurtado in the
La Cresta area.
Bortle-Sessions
Wedding Plans Anonunced
The wedding of Mrs. Mary
Batchelor Bortle, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis A. Batche-
lor. of Druid Hill Park Drive In
Baltimore, Maryland, to Walter
Warren Sessions, son of Mrs.
Laura B. Sessions and the late
Mr, Varner V. Sessions, of Sykes-
ville. Maryland, will take place
on Friday at 5:00 p.m. In the
Army Chapel ft Fort Amador.
No invitations are being Issued
but all friends of the young cou-
ple are Invited to attend.
Mrs. Bortle arrived this morn-
ing and is the house guest of
Mpb. Francis W. Feeney, an aunt
of Mr. Sessions.
Mr. and Mrs. Akin
To "Receive" Friends
Mr. and Mrs Charles Akin
will receive their friends from
7:00 to 9:00 this evening at their
home in Bella Vista to celebrate
the occasion of their wedding
anniversary.
Edward P. Suarez. Mrs. Harry
Stone. Mrs. Charles Downey,
Miss Irene Brophy, Mrs. Jeeaie
Richert. Mrs. Bell Ross. Mrs.
Marl Fiegee. Miss Grace Yohros,
Miss Maureen Manush. Mrs.
Flovd L. Corn. Miss Helen C.
Kelrv. Mrs. Edward Lew. Mrs.
William H. Bell Jr.. and Mrs.
Charles H. Downey.
Former Resident Here For Visit
Mrs. Neil Wardlaw of Fort
Lauderdale. Florida and formerly
of Cristobal, arrived Monday by
otane for a month's visit on the
Isthmus with her brother-in-law
and sister. Mr. and Mrs. John J.
Crawford of Balboa.
Mrs Wardlaw Is visiting the
Atlantic Side today with Mr.
and Mrs. Frank L. Scott and
will be the guest of honor at a
tea given by Mrs. Scott this af-
ternoon from 4:00 to 0:00.
Mrs. Glasgall Honored
At J'ockUH-Dinner Party
Mr. and Mrs. Truman Hoenke
of Pedr Miguel were host* -on
Tuesday evening at 7:00 at a
cocktail dinner psrtv given at
their home in honor of Mrs.
MartinjOlasgaH of Bella Vista.
who wSraall Friday aboard the
S.8. Panama for a vacation in
the United States.
The attending guests Included
Mr: Martirt Olasgfll, Mr. and
Mrs. Ernest Zelnick. Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Potter and capt.
and Mrs. Howard Johnson.
New Guests
At Hotri El Panama
Visitors Honored
With Sapper Party
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Reynolds,
who arrived on the Isthmus re-
cently for a two-week vacation
were honored at a suoper party
ilven by Mr. and Mrs. Archie
L. Byrne at their home in Bella
Vista. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds
are guests at the Hotel El Pana-
ma during their visit here.
Hamadan Grotto To Meet
The regular meeting of the
Hamadan Grotto will be held this
evening at 7:30 at the Wire Me-
morial Building. 806 Balboa
ROM. Members are requested to
be present.
Pot-Luck Supper Tonleht
The Sacred Heart Chapel in
Ancon is having a "pot-luck"
covered dish supper this evening
at 0:00. All are welcome.
Legion Post No. 1
Sooncors Bov Scout
Picnic Saturday
The American Legion Post 1
will hold a wiener roast for the
Boy Scout Troops they sponsor,
Saturday at the Coroza! picnic
grounds.
The picnic will be held from 2
to 8 In the afternoon. Either gate
8 at the Army Sales Store or the
main gate may be used to enter
the Post. There will be plenty of
parking BDace.
The Commanding Officer of
the Post of Corozal, Colonel Do-
bak, has given permission to use
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7 (UP)
Chairman Burnet R. Maybank
of the Senate Banking commit-
tee has started a bill through
Congress yesterday to continue
for one year the government's
power to control wages, prices,
rents, credit and raw materials.
Simultanously, a top govern-
ment official revealed that price
ceilings on clothing, shores and
textiles way be ended early next
ceilings on clothing, shores and
textiles may be ended early next
Summer. Most of these items
have been selling below ceilings.
Maybank's biH would keep un-
changed all provisions of the
present controls law exoept the
curbs on Imports of butter and
cheese, which would be dropped.
A fight to keep the dairy curb
Is expected. The Senate last
week blocked President Tru-
man's request for its repeal.
The South Carolina Demo-
crat said he U Introducing the
measure early so Congress will
have "no excuse not to act in
plenty of time" before the exist-
ing law expires June 30.
Senate Democratic leader Er-
nest W. McFarland (Ariz.) com-
mended Maybank's action and
said it Is "Important" that the
bill come before- the Senate
soon. Maybank promised to start
hearings on it as soon as pos-
sible.
His bill, which would extend
the law until June 30, 1963.
would give Mr. Truman only
part of what he wants. Although
the President has not yet sub-
mitted his detailed recom-
mendations, he has asked for a
two-year extension with "Im-
provements" In some of the
price control provisions.
Maybank said he is consider-
ing asking the committee to ap-
prove an amendment forcing
decontrol of prices on products
which are selling below ceilings
and which "probably will con-
Stamp Club Elect* Officers
New Officers were elected re-
cently for the Caribbean Stamp
Club and Include Mrs. Marie M.
Gore. President: Mr. 'Robert Ma-
roney. Vice-president; Corporal
}fOanteT Pefryf^eretary: Mr.
Wayne Ogle. Assistant Secreta-
ry; Sergeant R. C. Williams,
Treasurer and Donald Tribe. Li-
brarian .
The next regular meetiur of
the club will be held on February
Mr. A. J. Kinsman. President! Jn the Library of the Jewish
Of travPure Pac Drug Company, Welfare Board Center at 7:30
arrived on the Isthmus on Jan-|P-m
uarv 39 and is a guest at the Ho-
Vlsltors are welcome.
tel El Panama.
Mr. W. Morrison, the Vlce-
President of Pan American
World Airways in Miami. Flori- Tuesday mornhn? for their regu-
Pedro Miguel Auxiliary
Installs Officers
The Women's Auxiliary of the
Pedro Miguel Union Church met
LESTER
SPINET
da. arrived op Monday by plane lar meetine and Installed offi-
and is a guest at the Hotel El
Panama.
Mr. Carlos E. Berguido, pro-
minent Philadelphia attorney,
arrived by plane on Monday and
has been a guest at the Hotel El
Panama since his arrival here.
eers for this vear. The Devo-
tional and Installation were con-
ducted by Rev. and Mrs. Ray-
mond Grev.
New officers "Installed Included
Mrs. Ruby Haves. President;
Mrs. Edna Mathlas. Vice-presi-
dent: Mrs. Clara Jacobson. Sec-
Mi
Card of Thanks
We wish to thank our many friends for the kind-
nest shown to us during our recent loss.
Mr. & Mrs.. A. C. Bower
THE ATLAS GARDEN
ANNOUNCES FOR TOMORROW
Friday, February 8, 1952, the
FASHION SHOW AND, DANCE
fiven by MISS CANAL ZONE, 1952,
%/lnn (orman
QUEEN OF THE ATLAS GARDEN
in honor of
lllaritza de &oarrio
QUEEN OF HOTEL EL PANAMA
and the candidates for QUEEN of the UNION CLUB.
For Reservations, Call 2-2423
PAUL J. KIENER
Off* j
FRESH CRISP LETTUCE
Direct from Cerro Punta
CARROTS
RED CABBAGE
RHUBARB
also .
PUMPERNICKEL BREAD
T.---> -i ,-
from ftyfrtny
PAULS MARKET
Extraordinary
Offer
Direct Delivery to the
Canal Zone
placed in your home
and tuned.
Mahogany___$575.00
Blonde....... 590.00
Take advantage of this
marvelous buy which is
several hundred dollars
below States selling
price.
ONLY PIANO
FOR THE TROPICS
(Factory equipped with
new "Damp Chaser")
Hurry! Place your order
now from stook models
in our store. Approxim-
ately 6 weeks delivery.
I Easy Credit Terms I
New low Panam trice:
Mahogany-----$690.00
Blonde....... 708.00
PANAMA RADIO
CORPORATION
Central Avenas
Phoaes: Z-3M4 1-MtW
tlnue for some time" to do so.
Textiles, some types of cloth-
ing and shoes at present are
the main items selling below
government ceilings. Men's
clothing is as much as 10 per
eent below, work clothing and
undernear 5 per cent. Women's
dresses are at or near ceilings
but price officials said values
at those levels probably are
better than a year ago.
Cotton textiles are selling
close to ceilings but other
fabrics generally are 10 per cent
under.
A top price official said the
Office of Price Stabilization
may suspend controls on some
consumer Items for a test per-
iod of several weeks before re-
moving them entirely.
No actual decision has been
made yet to end any controls,
he emphasized. Outgoing Price
Chief Michael V. DiSafie told
Congress last week he will set
up a permanent "decontrol"
committee to see what items
safely may be freed from ceu-
^Mtlanlic ^c
ocie
li
Win- Wilt- X. fU.
Bo. 195, Clun OJipkon, (mtmn 378',
FAREWELL PARTY FOR MRS. JOHN FREHLE
Mrs. John Prehle, who is leaving with her husband for
duty at Camp Gordon, Georgia, was honored with a morning
coffee given by Mrs. Orville T. Shaw, Mrs. Vincent Oberg,
aad Mrs. Jose M. Nieves at the Fort Gulick Officers Club
yesterday.
Mrs. Myron D. Smith presided at the yellow and white
coffee table. The table cover was In the two colors and the
centerpiece of regal lilies and blue liUes of the Nile, was
flanked by yellow tapers.
Bridge Luncheon for Visito*
Mrs.- Earl Orr of New Orlsto
bal. was hostess for an informal
bridge luncheon given at her re*
jsldence Tuesday to compliment
I Mrs. Dean Peabody ofBrookline,
Mass.
The other guests were: Mrsj
Henry Bigelow and Mrs. E. B.
; Turner.
The ladles of the USAR Carlb
School presented the honoree. a
farewell gift of a silver bowl.
The guests included: Mrs. Ra-
fael Ra mires, Mrs. Harry B.
Gardner. Mrs. Halland W. Han-
kie Mrs. Joseph A. Katalinas.
Mrs. Byron K. King. Mrs. Hen-
ry A. LaBacz. Mrs. Clayton H.
Moore Mrs. Hollls J. Preis, Mrs.
Pascal Adamo. Mrs. Fernando M.
Gulot, Mrs. John C. Hlpaon. Mrs.
Eduardo Muxo. Mrs. Robert J.
Noll. Mrs. Raymond Patricio.
Mrs. Antonio Quesada, Mrs. Jo-
se M. Torres, Mrs. Ricardo V.
Vasquez. Mrs. William S. Cole-
man. Mrs. Virgil Lucky. "Mrs.
Victor Mrquez, Mrs. Lowell
Parker. Mrs. Roy D. Wllkerson.
Mrs. Joseph H. Domlco, Mrs
Mrs. Maurice Webb. Mrs. Walter M rt Addree_
McBride. Mrs. David McCrack- Mr" H
en and Mrs. Gordon C. Knight.
Cristobal Men's Fellowship
The Men's Fellowship of the
Cristobal Union Church met
M JL""."r' Tuesday with forty-five member
onJt Qn ata t.Lvi of and thelr ladles attending. Mrl
Mr- ? *"" Lae.vll Carl Maedl. vice-president, pre-
Colon, held open house at their gided tth business meetln*. A
residence Tuesday everJne to ce-th, u ,fc dec,ded to mak<
ebrate the birthday anniversary th a coupleJ club instead of J
of the hostess men's club. A name and time of
""iiSLSfiSrei~ft,LB;'meeting are to be decided later,
sage of orchids from her husband
for the occasion, with the many[ Mr. Maedl introduced the
other gifts she received. ,guest speaker. Mr. Neville Harte.
The friends who called during wn0 gave a very interesting li-
the evening were: Mr. and Mrs. lustrated lecture on the recent
JacquesLevl. Mr. and Mrs. Abra-,excavations at Venado Beach.
ham Saaso Mrs. Mauricio Attla.iAn open discussion was held fol
Coleman Sasso, lowing the lecture and Judtte El
Mr. and Mrs
Mr. and Mrs. David Kaplan. Mr. !t. p Tatelman assisted m anr
iea'bt he"has*not vei'namedl William Hawkins. Mrs. William land Mrs. Monty Sasso. Miss Es- swerinir the questions.
thp eroun IJ- Logan Mrs. Gerardo Sanchez, telle Sasso. Miss Maritza Sasso. Refreshments were served bp
Mr. and Mrs. Frank de Catro, Lt. John Nolan and Messrs Hugh
Mrs. Esther Aboughanen. Mrs. cassibry. Buel Robinson and
Esther Aboughanen, Mrs. Flory|William Hadarits.
Pauly of San Jose. Costa Rica, --------
Misses- Alicia and Dorothy de Mr. and Mrs. Wibrrr
Castro and Messrs Samuel and Announce Birth of Son
Claudio de Castro. Mr. and Mrs. Ewald A. W1-
berg. Jr.. of New Cristobal an
Ex-Seretary Of State Byrnes
Denounces Negro Politicians'
..

the swimming pool. Lifeguards
will be provided. itterTy ignored," he added. "To
Members of Post 1, their fam- rjemocrats of the south I
ATLANTA, Feb. 7 (UP)Gov.
James F. Byrnes of South Caro*
lina told a cheering Georgia
Legislative today that it is time
for the south to let the nation
know its electoral votes can't
be taken for granted.
"To those people whose hearts
bleed for minorities, we say that
the Democrats of the south
constitute the largest minority
in this country," said the form-
er Secretary of State.
"It is the only minority with
a large number of votes that is
Ules and parents of the Boy
Scouts are urged to attend.
Brick Defined
BLOOMINGTON, nld.. (UP)
An Indiana University psy-
chology professor received this
reply when he polled a ln-
rage-con*cI6ui class to define
brick:t briti isa someshlnft
used to build with and to hit
tgjth It Is manufactured in vari-
ous shapes and colors and can
also be used for ice cream."
the Democrats
say that we will not be ignored
if we act in concert. We must
let the leaders of all political
day to Georgia's Sen. Richard
B. Russell for the nomination.
The Joint session of the legis-
lature interrupted Byrnes 22
times with applause and cheers
and reacted loudest when he
said:
"For the Demcrata of the
south this may be the last stand.
"We want to remain In the
house of our fathers, but we
are not willing to be treated as
step-children. We want to Join
with Democrats In all states In
an effort to have the party re-
turn to Its fundamental prin-
ciples."
But, he added, the south must
let national leaders know that
"we place the welfare of our
"Come As Yen Are"
Morning Coffee
nounce the birth of a son at the
Colon Hospital on Sunday. Feb-
Parties know that the electoral country above the welfare of
votes of the Southern States can any political party or any polli-
no longer be taken for granted
by any party, or candidate."
Byrnee' speech was the second
to a southern legislature in an
dent Truman by the Democrats.
Byrnes pledged his support to-
.^ifc-***.
-
**?*>-*
SAINT LOUIS
THI MNIST CRYSTAL MADI
All Patterns In Open Stock
/) Easy Terms Available
16 Tivoli Ave.
Mrs. Joseph Irving of Gatun. ruarv 3rd. The baby has been
was hostess for a "Come As You' named Kenneth Owen.
Are" morning coffee, yesterday
for her auxiliary group mem- Mr. and Mrs. (astillo
bers. The garb In which many, Celebrate Wedding Anniversary
of the ladies were dressed at that Mr. and Mrs. Louis Eduardo
early hour lent a great deal of castillo celebrated their wedding
amusement to the affair. 'anlversary with a family reunion
Members who could not attend j at their residence at 7th and
were fined. Those who could at-Santa Isabella Ave. in Cristob!.
tend were charged, the latter The members of the family
group included: Mrs. Merril{who were present included: Mr.
Webster. Mrs. T. W. Fels. Mrs. and Mrs. Agustn Cedefto. Mrs.
Samuel Mauldin, Mrs. Fred New-Morgan P. O'Connor of Wash-
hard. Mrs. Leon Egolf. Mrs. Ca- lngton. D.C.. and Mr. and Mrs.
leb Clement. Mrs. Richard Pen- Ruben catano.
nington. Mrs. E. E. Sterns. Mrs. I --------
Fred Willoughby. Mrs. Tracey i Morning Coffee for Sewing club
White and Mrs. Benjamin Brun- Mrs. Lee Nash of Gatun. en-
THE NEWEST
RCA VICTOR
m
leal candidate.'
For the- first time since he
began his break with the na-
tional administration two years
ctlon year serie*""which'has'lago. Byrnes strongly denounced
been Interpreted as an effort to | "Negro politicians" who he said,
hedd a ouinem fronU^aaUst delivered enough votes in doubt-
anStr? nZiStlon of^PrX ful states in 1948 to put the De-
mocrats across.
"These Negro politicians were
Interested only In race prob-
lems." he said. "They cared
nothing about the effect of the
arjrrdonrwefrfjrthe flrinciple of
the Independence of state
would have upon our political
and economic problems."
He said the Negroes won
adoption of a Democratic plat-
form "more Socialistic than De-
mocratic" in exchange for their
bloc vote.
Byrnes here was speaking the
language of Georgia's youthful
Gov. Herman Talmadge who has
long assailed the so-called Negro
bloc vote.
Mississippi's new Governor,
Hugh L. White, commented to-
day that "we SUtes" Rlghters
will be the deciding factor in
naming a President" this year.
He approved Byrnes endorse-
ment of Russell for the nomina-
tion and said he had talked by
telephone with Talmadge this
morning.
Another Conducted
Tour Of Experiment
Gardens Scheduled
The second conducted tour of:
the Canal Zone Experiment Gar-|
dens at Summit during the cur-
rent dry season will begin next'
Saturday morning at 9. The tour
will last approximately two and
one-half hours.
R. A. Sharp, nurseryman at
the Garden, will conduct the tour
and explain unusual and inter-
esting plants.
The first tour was given late
In January and attracted a good-
sized crowd. Additional tours
will be give later If the public
continues to be Interested.
Added attractions for the last
tour proved to be the three ma-
caws, which make their home
near the Garden entrance, and a
live fer-de-lance. They may be
seen again this coming Saturday,
Mr. Sharp said.
More Power To Us
FRENCH LICK. Ind., (UP)
A General Electric vice presi-
dent. Chester H. Lang, predicts
that by 1970 Americans will tri-
ple the amount of electric power
they now use. That would be a-
bout a trillion kilowatt hours of
power.
dage
Mrs. Richard Pennlngton will
be m charge of the next surprise
coffee.
tetrained the rr embers of her
sewing club with a mornm oof-
fee on the lawn of her residence
yesterday.
The guests included Mrs. H. F.
Frank A. Andersons Paddock. Mrs. Fred Willoughbv.
Announce Birth of Son Mrs. Ralph Graham. Mrs Ed-
Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. An-,ward A. Cox. Mrs. A. Pa'kef,
derson of Margarita, announce Mrs. Carl Nix. Mrs. T. W. Fels,
the birth oi a son on Friday. Fe-!Mrs. Sam Mauldin and Mrs.
bruary 1 at the Colon Hospital. 'Wayne Hatting.
BAMBOO FURNITURE
; Recommended By
MUEBLERA EL DIABLQ
If you belong to the Armed Forces or if you have
a steady Job come to our Store and you can
choose your own terms to buy on credit.
The Store Where You will Find the Largest Assortment
of Glass and Linoleum.
86 Central Avenue Telephone t-MSS
"Leaders In the Furniture business since 1909
COMPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
AVAILABLE ON
EASY CLUB OR CREDIT PLAN
FOR ONLY $10.00 MONTHLY
USE YOUR OLD RADIO AS
DOWN PAYMENT
7110
Bolivar
RADIO CENTER
40
Coln
d
.
Wt Express Our Sinceresl Condolence

To The
alonorable G>ng(isn Co/o/ic/
-
residing on die Isthmus, for the passing away ^
of their beloved King.
Juan Palomeras The French Bazaar Coln




THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 195S
You Sell em
When You Tell em thru P.A. Oftsifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
vlOSKU Ufc UCSSEPh
<' a i.....ii
FOR SALE
MORRISON'S
ste. raanst as Me An,
jSP"
SALON Ufc HLLlfeZA
N.. If W.1 lb Street
amekila.no
BOTICA
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
Na. 17 "H" IIi m m,|
Ke. U.17I Cotral **_CeMa
=5=
FOR SALE
Automobile
i oj can gel genuine parts tor your
icr.gt.ator. Visit our FRIGIDAIRE1
...iteration shop. No. 51 Vio U.S.
L.pano.
FINANCING
Service Personnel and
Civilian Government Employes
new used car through
G0VIRNMIN1
N o.r washing machine does not
>..k.' Tel. 3-0125. FRIGIDAIRE
K... aeration Shop, No. 51 Vio
.-pea. __
rw j.iL.-'One l-ngidaire 25 cycle,
._.. size, i yrs. remaining guar-
os... rnona F. H. Hall, room 335 toi
hotel Tivcii. vour insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. covaropa.
" ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
tMPLOYEi FINANCE
:o
Fort Worth, Texos
Also Direct
Loans Automobile
Serving jovemmvm employes and
Service Oersonne' in the Canoi Zone
14 /eon. With ouf financing
MISCELLANEOUS
12 words-
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
lAWS*"1*Are Most Effectiv
Weapons Against Dental Decay
W/.NiLO:25 cycle woshing
U1..1C. Pnone rort Sherman 87-
ri< jALt:.xelngerator "Norge"
w.3 cycles, 7 cu. ft., porcelain,
pene.i condition. $I2:>.00. Silver
v..ly OI3-C.
DEALER
fc.l SALl:G. E. Reingerotor 60
c>-.o., sewing mochine treadle
I/p., inaiiogany livingroom set.
rnoin calculating macnine, girl's
t.;ycle, stroller, ooby crib. <_olon
S 10.
FOli SALE:Special tor "Army Fa-
;. jiies' usea furniture ot special
prices. Try us end be convinced.
E.onomy furniture Store 12.164.
Lolivir Avenue 12-13 St. Colon
.6.________
FC.i SALE:One Westmghouse Re-
(rigeralor 4 1-2 cu. ft. 25 cycle
Suitable lor bachelor. Hou:e 0764
Apt. J. Williomson Place, betweer
5:00 p. m. and 6:30 p. m.
FOR SALE:Kitchen and bedroom
louvers, wooden droin board.
Double bed frame. 2-4344. _
FOR SALE: Day Bed mahogony
backrest, innerspring mottress, co-
v;r and pillows, storage cupboard
mirror 28 x 30. Phone 2-3161
Balboa.
FC SALE:60 cycle Easy Spindner;
washing machine. Quartermaster!
furniture. 48 Chevrolet sedan.:
Misc. articles. 2140-C, Curundu
r-hon- 835247.
Poh SALS:Ship dock.; $10; Ve-
netian blinds 112 family house*
520; 60 pieces Fiesto Wore Hike
newl $30; 5 small rugsf $10
Mire, dishes glos^-wore. cooking
utensils, cheop. Tel. 2-2667, Bal-
boa.
WANT TO BUY or sell on eutomo-
bile? See Agencias Cosmos, au-
tomobile row 29, telephone 2-
4721, Ponami. Open all day on
Satuidays.
VALSNTINt SPECIALS. Through
Februory our finest $20. creom
wovei are $15; our I5's are $12.
50 end our $12.50 s only $10.
Everything Included styling,
shampoo, set. etc. Genell Bliss,
Cocoli Clubhoose Beouty Shop. 4-
557. ^'
RESORTS
Shrapnel's houses, Sonta Clara. Alsc
in CeM CerrO Campana Moun-
tains: Tel. Balboa 2(20.
^uiViMtKLIAL PROFESSIONAL
eVtafctaa. preMemr
Do rea aere
Write
* J0JI Anean. "jL
Hove your a commercial refrigera-
tion problem? Tel. 3-0125, FRI-
GIDAIRE refrigeration shop, No
51 Via Espaa.
You con get the best refrigeration
service, domestic as well as com-
mercial by calling 3-0125, FRI-
GIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop.
Willioms Sonto Clora Beach Cottoges.
Two bedrooms. Frigidaires, Rock
gas ranga*. Balboa 2-3050.
sillies. Oceoruide cottages. Sonta
Clara Bo 435 Balboa. Phone
Panama 3-1877, Cristobal i-1673
Enjoy a vocation ot Hotel Pon,Ame-
ricano, El Voile. Phone Panamo
2-1 I 12 for reservations.
FOR RENT
Houses
We have everything'
to keep vour Lawn
ind Harden beautiful
lurine the dry season
FOR SALE: Ford Coupe 1940.
House 2110-B. Tel. 83-7242, Cu-
rundu.
FOR SALE: Late model 1950
Olds. 88 Holidoy Coupe. Black
Top With Green Body. White Side
Wall Tires. Rodio and Hydrama-
tic Drive. Excellent condition. $2,-
300.00. Phone 6-128, C. Z. Pe-
nitenfiory.
FOR SALE:Frigidoire without mo-
tor, porcelain box. Telephone 2-
1807. 5 6:30 p. m.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle*
FOR SALE: One 1952 Triumph
Tiger 100. Excellent condition. See
for yourself. Phone Balboa 2-
1658. Between 4:00 ond 5:00 p
FOR SALE: 195 0 Studeboker
Chompion, 4 dr. sedon. Absolutely
perfect condition. Con be finon-
ced. Balboa 1588 or 3002.
FOR SALE:45 Willys" JeepT ExTeT-
lent condition, engine, body com-
plete with power winch, trailer,
radio ond spare parts, can be seen
after 3 p. m. E. Voss. 1449-X
Owen St. 'Jolboo.
ARMY NAVY AND CIVILIAN
EMPLO i i.S
Cheek with the FEDERAL SERVICES
FINANCE CORP BEFORE you
FINANCE your new or used cor.
Let us show you how we con
SAVE YOU MONEY.
Our office is located on automo-
bile row. No. 29 or call 2-4555.
FOR SALE:Practically new M G
Roadster glistening cream finish
and olive green leather. Total
mileage 800 flawless condition.
Extros foctory guarantee. Phone
2-1582 after four.
BATTERIES
For yeur car or track from $13.00.
ateras da Panam
Avenida Central Ne. 224
The FRIGIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop
takes pleasure In announcing that
we are In a position to offer the
best refrigeration service in Pon-
omo. We offer immediate service
for ony kind of refrigerator, wash-
ing machines, electric oppliances.
household or commercial. If you
hove a refrigeration problem Tel.
3-0125 or visit our store at No.
51 Vio Espaa.
FOR RENT:Furnished cholet in El
Voile, two bedroms. Telephone
Ponama 3-3423 or Balboa 3763.
FOR RENT
Apartment
'nol* Wheelbarrow
Hose insecricio.es
Fencing Fertilizers
Sprayers Weedkillers
Sprinklers Fungicides
CEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0U0
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished opart-
ments. Meid service optional. Con-
toct office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
Just received lerge variety ef Jeee-
nese and Chinen eoldfi.h. water
plants, accessories and flsMoed
Jerdin Inmaculada, No. 5, B
Ave.
Ju:f received o shipment of tie
rod ends, water pumps and clutch
ports for oil makes of eors. Tro-
pical Motors Inc.
Having trouble with your motor?
See Tropical Motors S. A.
Help Wanted
WAf-tTH):. Experienced COok-
cleajw with recent recommenda-
tions. Concrete house across from
MtV Hope R.R. Stotion.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
AMERICAN couple desires one bed-
room oportment furnished. With
hot woter, in Bella Vista. Call
Albrook 6152, 7 a. m. to 3.30
p. m.
FOR RENT:Well ventilated oport
ment, 2 bedrooms with bath
rooms, living-diningroom, maid'
room, hot water, good neighbour-
hood, Bella Visto. No. 32, 44th
Street. Tel. 3-0815
WANTED TO RENT:For young
couple without children, small
apartment. Phone "El Ponomi"
room 731.
WILL RENT three bedroom house or
apartment, vicinity Bella Vista.
Phone Mrs. Wilson, room 402
Hotel El Panomi.
AQUARISTS: In stock. Goldfish
$150. $1.75, $2.00 Pr. Gold
Fish food, 30 cts. con. Amazon
swerd plant, $1.00 each. Banana
Plant. 35 cts. Large variety Tro-
pical Fish; .75 to $2:80 Pr. Fish
food. .50 cts. con. Aureb Manno
$3.50 per 1-2 Lb. Vitamin bricks.
35 cts. each. AcuorioTropical, op-
posite Juan Franco Stables, Tel
3-4132.
FOR RENT
Rooms
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery. -
Tel. 3-1713
#22 E. 29th St
The HX
WE BUY
WE SELL
WE BARTER
The very best ALWAYS In
reconditioned FURNITURE.
HX (Household Exchange)
41 Automobile Row
Tel. Panam 3-4911
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:Heovy overcoat, wine
color. No. 14. Inquire No. 3. 4th
of July Avenue Apt. 5. Ask for
Sara.
FOR SALE: Kenmore aufomotic
Sudsaver wosher. 60 cycle. 1 year
'd- 207-X-A. Pedro Miguel.
WANTED: Catholic woman foi
cooking, washing, ironing, smoll
forwjy. Must sleep In and bring
references. Apply San Mortin Ave.
BMq Vista. House 52.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURES FOR SALE
For sole to the highest bidder Build-
ings No. 933 and No. 962, La Bo-
co. Seoled bids will be received
the office of the Superintendent of
Storehouses ot Bolboa until 10:30
a. m.. February 15, 1952, when
they will be opened in public. Forrr
of proposol with full particulars moy
be secured in the offices of Super-
intendent of Storehouses, Balboa
ond the Housing Monager ot Bal-
boa Heights.
WANTED
.Miscellaneous
WAIWED: Unfurnished cholet
M*eh 1st. Albrook, Tel. 4120.
; JTS HIS PROBLEM
81$fecU8E. N. Y., (UP).-Wil-
UamJB. Stark, director of the
Syracuse war memorial, has a
big Job on his hands. He must
fit 92 sets of unmarked keys to
as rrijAny doors In the memorial.
The eys were received from a
JarruMtown. N. Y.. firm which
madt'the doors.
FOR SALE:Beoutiful lot of land,
6.800 sq. mts. with 32 mts. along
front street leading to Hotel Pon-
omericono and 32 Mts. along
Anton River; 220 mts. eoch side
from street to river. B.0.75 per
s 1809.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:25 cycle motors in dif-
ferent sizes ot give owoy prices.
Brand new. Con be seen ot the
FRIGIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop.
No. 51 Vio Espaa, besides Cen-
tral de Lechera.
FOR SALE: Combinotion rodio
floor model. $95.00; Dressing-
table mirror stool, $7.00; Bassi-
nette. $3.00; 2 maternity dresses
$8.00, toys. 83-5166 2153-
B. Curundu, iorner 7 ond 8th.
FOR RENT:Nicely furnished, large
clean cool room, all modern con-
venience. Good neighborhood. To
morried couple or two bochelors.
Peru Ave. No. 65. Lower left.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
FOR RENT.Locaran aa Francisca
de la Osea Ave. Studeoeker agen-
cy. Can Mr. Fi.hchvbtr from 9
to II e. at. Tel. 3-3404.
FOR SALE:Lodies cornel hoir coot.
sixe 14. Nurses uniforms size 14
and 16. All new ond reasonable.
House 5616-C. Tel. 2-2189, Dio-
blo.
M^..C.-ild SDeciolis' recommend
JUMPING-JACK Shoes for correct
walking habits from cradle to 4
years. Exclusively of BABYLAN-
DIA. No. 40. 44th street. Bella
Visto, Tel 3-1259
Shipping &
Air Lim News
(Continued from Paje FOUR)
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panama
Buying: Abba toi r.
Selling: Furria y Lu
(preferred) and
Tiers y Lu (common)
Tel. 3-4719 3-1880
I CHARLESTON, S. C. Feb. 7
! (UP)Two men today drew
sentence* of live years each In
a Federal penitentiary after
pleading guilty to charges of
transporting a stolen auto across
a state line.
Landrum Haney and Harry L.
Bryan pleaded guilty before
Federal District Judge J. Watles
Waring in Federal Court here.
An FBI agent told Waring
that Haney admitted stealing a
car In Charlotte, N. C, Dec. 20,
and Bryan testified that he
voluntarily gave information to
the FBI.
Bryan said "I haven't been
free for the past 12 years ex-
cept for the time that I escap-
ed." He told Waring "I want
you to send me to Atlanta so I
can learn a trade and then set
a regular Job."
Waring replied "that's just
what I'm going to do."
Both men here arrested here
after they had broken Into a
church and stolen some $27.
In another case, Waring sen-
tenced Melvln T. (Sheep)
O'Neale 57, former Charleston
baseball player-manager and
umpire to three years for violat-
ing Federal liquor laws.
How communities can at-
tack the problem of tooth de-
cay among children is describ-
ed in this fourth in a series of
articles published by The Pa-
nama American, in coopera-
tion with the Panama Canal
Zone Dental Society.
"The most effective means
yet devised for the prevention
of dental decay."
That la the way dental scien-
tists have hailed a far-reaching
new ally in the fight against one
of mankind's most common
diseases.
Ttt6 new ally is a process call-
ed fluorldation of public water
supplies, now in use in some ISO
cities and towns throughout the
United States.
Extensive research over many
years has shown that the pro-
per amount of fluorides In a
community's water system will
reduce tooth decay as much as
60 per cent among children.
The effect of the substance
in helping to Improve dental
health Is not a new discovery.
The United States Is dotted with
areas in which fluorides ara.
found naturally in water sup-
fHies. Some 5 million persons
Ive In these regions and re-
ceive a greater or lesser amount
of protection against tooth de-
cay, depending on the amount
of the substance In the water.
Dental scientists have found
that the amount needed as a
safeguard against tooth decay
is very small, only one part
fluoride to a million parts of
water is usually recommended
less than the proverbial dron in
the bucket.
CZ Population Constitutes
'Blood Bank On The Hoof
The Armed Forces in the Ca-
nal Zone will not take part in
the current military blood donor
drive being conducted In the
United States. According to
word recently received at Head-
Juarters Caribbean Command
rom the Secretary- of Defense,
MODERN FURNITURE
cusios. atiuu
(Slipcover Benpholster -
visit oua saow-aooMi
alearte Haree
1. dliS *? n JAateeaeelle new)
ftee Eitlnub Pickup A Delivery
Section Of Ancon
Boulevard To Be
Closed To Traffic
The section of Ancon Boule-
vard from Franglpanl to Mindl
Street will be closed to traffic
starting at 7 a. m. Monday
when the contractor for the
quarters development program
In the Ancon Boulevard-Chagres
Street area will begin work.
This section of the Boulevard
will be closed for an indefinite
period during which time traf-
fic between Balboa Heights and
Ancon will move over Roosevelt
Avenue or Oorgaa and Heights
Roads.
The development of the An-
con Boulevard-Chagres Street
area, which was cleared and
graded last year, will Include
the construction of 48 new
mansory houses with 56 aprrt-
ments.
the world's 250 scheduled
lines.
alr-
ro* SALE: Brond new Wilson
Welder, Stationary Type. 300
amp.. 6 cylinders Chrysier en-
gine. Bogies, four cub. ft. copo-
city with two tires, used in good
condition. Apply f0 VILLANUIVA
Y TIJEIRA CIA. LTOA., ware-
house locoted ot Locerio Road
Tel. 3-3419.
Special Guests,
Speaker Booked
By Legion Group
WA' ,ts regular meeting on
Monday at 7:30 p. m American
Legion Post No. l will have as
guests Commander Leon Car-
rlngton and other officials of
the Legion Department.
A special speaker from the
Crusade For Freedom campaign
headquarters will address the
meeting scheduled at the Legion
Home at Ft. Amador.
Look Out For
Ibe Big 1952 Ford
COLPAN MOTORS
Tel. 2-1033 2-1036
PANAMA
For the 12 months ending Sep-
tember 30,1951. the two compan-
ies In U.S. domestic operations
alone flew 388,002.000 revenue
passenger miles, of which 280,-
779 000 were by Branlff and 118,-
948.000 by Mid Continent's
trunk line operation. For the
same period, domestic operating
revenues of the two lines totaled
$26,140.921. Branlff reporting
$17.411.182 In its domestic oper-
ation and Mid-Continent report-
ing $8,729.789.
The two airlines employ ap-
proximately 4,000 persons In to-
tal operations. Branlff serves 31
cities In nine U.S. states and
nine Latin American countries
via Miami, Fla., and Houston.
Texas, with terminal points at
Buenos Aires and Rio de Janei-
ro. Branlff also maintains off-
line offices In New York Wash-
ington, D.C.. Detroit, Log Ange-
les. San Francisco Mexico City
and Montevideo, Uruguay Mid-
Contlnetn serves 35 cities in 12
states.
The combined fleets of the two
airlines will total 58 aircraft In-
eluding giant, four-engine DC-
s. DC-4s. model 240 Convalrs
and DC-3s. In April 1952. Branlff
will receive the first of 20 new
model Convalr "340's" In 1953.
Both Branlff and Mld-Contih-
ent have outstanding flight safe-
ty records.
Branlff has Just qualified for
Its 19th annual award from the
National Safety Council and has
currently fjown nearly two bil-
lion Dassenger miles without a
fatality among passengers or
crews.
FISHERMEN I
According to the latest re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIO ONES with FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA, visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #39 National Avenue.
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0383 3-4564
overseas areas are not Included
In present plans for the collec-
tion of whole-blood for Korea.
The Armed Forces Medical
Policy Council, advisors to the
Secretary of Defense In medical
matters, has approved local
plans for disaster relief wherein
it is envisioned that the popu-
lation in the Canal Zone la- too
limited to provide sufficient
quantities of whole-blood to
justify the expense Involved of
regular air shipment to pro-
cessing plants.
Sufficient blood Is now being
gathered in the United Stats* to
satisfy needs In Korea.
The Canal Zone Joint Medical
Committee, composed of Major
General George W. Rice, Health
Director of the Canal Zone Gov-
ernment, chairman of the com-
mittee; Colonel Francis P. Klntz,
Surgeon, u. 8. Army; Captain
Harvey E. Robins, District Med-
ical Officer, Fifteenth Naval
District; and Major William P.
Furth, Surgeon, Caribbean Air
Command, advisors on medical
matters to the Governor and
local military commanders, be-
gan a study of this problem on
November 8, 1951.
After lengthy consideration of
the matter,, they recommended
that the problem be forwarded
to the Secretary of Defense for
resolving.
The American Dental As-
sociation recommended fluo-
rldation only after longtime
research and studies in test
cities offered substantial evi-
dence of the procedure's ef-
fectiveness and harmlessness.
"Of all the preventive methods
in use for reducing the pre-
valence of dental carles (tooth
decay), fluorldation offers the
greatest hope for large num-
bers of people because of Its easy
application and Its relatively
low cost," the American Dental
Association's Council on Dental
Health has reported.
There Is unanimity of opinion
on the measure by all authorita-
tive American health bodies. In
addition to the ADA.'a endor-
sement, reports on fluorldation
of public water supplies have
been Issued by such organiza-
tions as the American Medical
Association, the U. S. Public
Health Servlc, the National Re-
search Council, the American
Public Health Association and
other groups.
It Is a highly economical pro-
cess. Costs of fluorldation In a
community range from four to
14 cents for each person a year
often less than the price of
one Ice cream conel And the
cost of initial equipment for
municipal water plants varies
from a few hundred dollars for
a small community to about
$15.000 for a city of two and a
half million persons.
Cities and towns of all sizes
have adopted the measure and
scores of others have approved
plans for the process and are
now making arrangements to
put It into operation.
Among these are Philadelphia,
San Francisco, Washington, D.
C, Baltimore, Cleveland and
Milwaukee. It has been con-
servatively estimated that mor
than 30 million. persons
throughout the nation will be
drinking fluoridated water by
the end of 1952.
(Tomorrow: Another means
of preventing dental decay
among children. Ton will want
to read the fifth In this series
of authoritative articles.)
(fortified
IN8TANT
Fat-Free Ptnodered Uk
Vitamin O)
for
DRINKING
for
COOKING
for
WHIPPING
Farm Fresh
Flavorl
On Sale In
P. C Co Commissaries.
As part of the development,
Ancon Boulevard from the Old
Corral area to the Ancon Thea-
ter will be relocated slightly,
widened from 22 to 28 feet and
repaved; Chagres Street will be
reconstructed to connect An-
con Boulevard with Roosevelt
Avenue; and two new streets
will be built In the area, one
between Venado Street and
Roosevelt Avenue, and the other
from Ancon Boulevard to the
old Reservoir Hill area.
Framorco Inc., the contractor
on the development, Is scheduled
to complete the entire project
within 390 days.
Soviet Inventor
Shpagm Dies at 55
MOSCOW, Feb. 1 (UP)-All pa-
pers In Moscow carried a half-
BULLFIGHTS
column obituary and photograph
M
55, inventor and Soviet automa-
of Georgia Semenovich Shpag
ph
in,
FOR TOUR HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. At Justo Arosemena
Ave. Colon Tel. 457
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TRfVfL SERVICE
It Tivoll Ave. num. -2BM
PLANETS
An
'Inferior" planet Is one
whose orbit Is Inside that ot the
earth, that is, closer to the sun
than the earth. A "superior"
planet is one whose orbit Is out.
side that of the earth.
Wine Floors Beer
GEORGETOWN, Ky., (UP) _
A Jury ruled that Beer and wine
shouldn't mix. It levied a fine
of $100 and costs for drunken
driving against Levy Beer Beer
told the court he had been drink-
ing wine.
tic rifle and many other weapons
designer.
Peasant-born, Shpagln began
as a factory worker In his early
youth and Immediately displayed
Inventive talent. He joined the
Communist Party and was elect-
ed member of the Central Exec-
utive Committee and later to the
Supreme Soviet. i
He was "hero of the Soviet Un-
ion" and a Stalin prize winner.
CHURCH MAKES TOWN
PAXTON, Mass.. (UP). This
town owes Its existence to the
184-year-old First (Congrega-
tional) Church. Early settlers
who found It difficult to travel
to distant communities to wor-
ship to get permission to build
the church.
4:30 pm SUNDAY-Feb. 10th
This King of all
Cough Mixtures comes
From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
The King ot oil couoh'medicinas-
Buckley's CANAOIOL Mixtura
tas been used for yeors In over 70%
of Canodo's hornet, Fost workino
triple acting Buckley's Conodiol Mix-
ture quickly loosens ond raises phlefarr
fcdqed in the tubes clears air oes-
soges soothes rasped row tissues,
one oi two tips ond worst coughing
spasm ceases You get results fost
You feel the effect of Bucklty'i ins
'ontly.
Compounded from rare Cenadiar
'Ine Balsam and other soothing heal-
ing ingredienti Buckley's CANADIC*.
Mixtura It different from anything
/ou evtr tried do get o bonle of It*
veot Cenodion cough medicine to
^v ot any good drug store.
ARMILLITA DE ESPAA <
Distinguished "Matadores"
CONCHITA MORENO
and
ARMILLITA DE ESPAA
FOUR (4) BULLS
will be fought and killed.
We are pleased to announce that we have obtained
the bails from El Rosario Ranch in Anton,
famous for its fighting bulls.
Tickets will be on sale at San Francisco Garden.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1951
'......' ' -%
**
.....----
TB PANAMA AMERICA* AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
'- '" "
PACE SBYEB
Snow Averts Olympic Slalom Courses 'Boycott'
Snowfall Improves Courses
Previously Said Dangerous
OSLO, Norway, Feb. 7 boycott the Roedkleiva and Norf jell slalom
coursessites of the Olympic ski competition-
were silenced today under a blanket of snow.
Both courses were expected to be pronounc-
ed in good shape after volunteers spread the
newly fallen snow tomorrow. Olympic officials
had been faced with a possible "boycott" of the
tracks as contestants complained wat a lack of
snow laid bare icy streaks which would be ex-
tremely dangerous for slalom competition.
But snow started to fall yesterday and fin-
ally drove practicing contestants indoors.
Cristobal High
Ccps Basketball
Championship
Twinbill At Panama Stadium
Tonight; Smith Does It Again
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Yankees........29 11 .w45
Bombers........IS 11 .SI
Bluebirds.......11 19 .317
Brownies.......11 19 .187
TONIGHTS GAMES
Panam Stadium (First Game-
Cristobal High won their sec-
ond straight basketball cham-
flonshlp last night as they de-
eated the BHS Bulldogs 40-37 In
what was aU the game It had ranam Stadium (First Gam The pairings and startlni
been billed tobe. A packed.house;9:39): Bombers (Johnson 3_-7) tsJ schedule for the Mixed Low Nei
.
Ft. Amador Mixed Low
Net Pairings Released
Gun Club Notes
BALBOA AND CBISTOBAL JUNIOR RIFLEMEN
BOTH WIN IN LEAGUE
While the Cristbal Junior Rifle Chin was winning from
the Cristobal Seniors. 109* to 1030, the Balboa Juniors, still on
the crest of a winning streak, were defeating the Rodman
Marines 1109 to 10S3. The Cristbal Juniors hare not yet been
defeated, and are leading the Isthmian Gallery League. Horn-
ever, the Balboa Juniors are getting hotter with evry match,
and will give all the opposition trouble from here ou.
In the match at Cristbal. John Fahnestock fired 283 to
lead the winners, while Bill Bingham's 270 was tops for the
losing team. At Rodman, Joe Fuller paced the Balboa Juniors
with a red hot 290 to beat out his team mate, Dick DDlman.
who had 285. Dick doesn't get nosed out of first very often In
gallery I ootlng, but Joe has been pressing him lately, and his
performance In this match was especially noteworthy as he
iired with Iron sights.
Lt. John Counselman's 278 was high for the losing Marine
team. The scores follow:
CRISTOBAL JUNIORS Prone Sit Stand Total
John Fahnestock ....... 96 98 89 283
Leo Constan tine ........ 96 94 S3 275
Jim Schelbeler.......... 97 92 85 274
Donna Geyer ........... 93 92 79 294
TEAM TOTAL ...
CRISTOBAL SENIORS
Bill Blngham.........
Frank Anlerson........
Maurice Webb.........
Jack OXtonnell ..,.....
98
99
94
99.
92
89
89
90
80
69
67
57
TEAM TOTAL ...........
BALBOA JUNIORS
Joe Fuller ............. 100
Dick DUlman' .......... 100
John Schmidt, Jr........ 98
Norine DUlman .......... 100
98
99
89
92
92
M
80
74
TRAM TOTAL ..;....... ..............
RODMAN MARINES
John Couhselman ...... 94 99 83
Earnest' Omsk* ........ 93 99 79'
Bull Hudgins .ivx;.i3.a .98
Charles Thamalls ...... 88 94 75
TEAM TOTAL
--------------
it*.
1096
870
257
250
243
1020
290
285
267
266
U08
276
262
258
257
1053
of yelling, screaming spectators
started In with the first basket
by Bob Bailey and from then on
hardly even sat down, let alone
stop yelling.
It was a perfect playoff game
as never more than four points
separated the two teams as thev
Bluebirds (Stempel 4-3). Second
Game: Yankees (Thomas 5-1) vs.
Brownies (Burke 4-8).
LAST NIGHTS RESULTS
Panam Stadium: Bombers 5,
Bluebirds 9.
The league leading Yankees
, and the second place Bombers,
battled lt out right to the final, although they won't be meeting
buzzer. The lead changed hands
a total of five times during the
torrid pace of the contest, with
Cristobal in a short lived lead In
the first quarter, only to have
Balboa come back to take a two-
Solnt, 6-8 advantage as the quar-
;r came to an end.
Cristobal edged into a 22-21
front with less than two minutes
left In the half, and were able to
hold this until Balboa took lt
each other, tonight wUl conUnue
their hectic drive for the present
league championship. Two games
are on tap for league fans.
In the first game the Bombers
will again play the Bluebirds.
Last night the Bombers hum-
bled the latter team 5-0 behind
the three-hit hurling of the In-
credible^ Theolic Smith In his
first start at the Panam Sta-
dium.
The Yankees will be meeting
away briefly mid way through the tough Brownie bunch in the
the third quarter. By the tune
the quarter ended, Cristobal had
puUed out to a 31-30 advantage.
Bob BaUey is the lad who ac-
tually broke the back of the Bal-
boa team, when with only two
and a half minutes left to go in
the game, he poured two quick
field goals into the nets. This
was too much of an edge, 38-34,
for the Bulldogs to overcome, and
even thorugh Bob Donahue and
Sam Maphla added the three
final points for the Bulldogs,
they couldn't overtake the Tig-
ers. ,
Foursome at the Fort Amador
Golf Club Sunday, Feb. 10, were
released today.
The pairings and schedule fol-
low:
From Tee No. 1:
12:00Miss Eloise Monroe, Col-
onel Russell SpUlman,
Miss Ann Allnut, Dr. Her-
bert Mitten.
12:06Mrs. Virginia Prince, Mr.
Lou Prince, Mrs. Jo Don-
ley, Lt. Col. E. I. Donley.
12:10Mrs. MUlie Hammond, Mr.
George Dllfer, Mrs. Helen
Hlldebrand. Lt. Col. A. R.
HUdebrand.
12:15Mrs. EUeen DeLuca, Maj-
or Arthur DeLuca, "Mrs.
Alyce French, Mr. Jack
ally. ,
12:20-Mrs. Pearl Trim. Mr. Perc
Graham, Mrs. Evelyn
Judson, Mr. Luther Flem-
the Yanks and Ernest Burke of 12:25Mrs. Ellen Kenna, Colonel
Reb Peacher, Caet.
*9l
second game. Dave Thomas of
gar
inks
the Brownies are the scheduled
pitchers In the nightcap.
The first game hurlers are ex.
fcted to Be Connie Johnson
or the Bombers and Cookie
Stempel for the Bluebirds. These
games are of vital importance to
both top teams In the race.
Smith's shutout last night was
his fifth of the season In seven
mound appearancesa new loop
record. It was also the eighth
whitewashing Job for the Bomb-
er team, also a new mark. Smith
also kept his scoreless earned-
run string of innings Intact and
Immediately after the contest, now Increased to 61 and 2-3 ln-
flnflnished. Col. Richardson Se-
lee presented the American Le-
f ;
~r

Atlantic Midget League
MAJORS
Ma.taps.^Mg.ejS.
Colts 11. Cabs t.
The two Margarita teams met
In their first league game of the
season with the victory going to
the Mustangs at 5-3. Both thesel
teams have shown considerable
Improvement in the last two
weeks and consequently Satur-
day's gams was well played
throughout.
In the Minors, the Margarita
Colts defeated the Cristobal Tig-
teams
glon trophy to Coach Paul Moser
and his championship Cristobal
team. Although Balboa was de-
feated, they have no reason to be
ashamed of their team as they
played their hearts out through-
out the contest. It was Just one
of those cases where one of the
teams had to take lt on the chin,
and this was the Bulldogs' night.
Bob Donahue, Balboa, Arnold
Manning and Bob BaUey, Cristo-
bal, were the three best on the
floor last night. Donahue scored
21 points for his team and play-
ed his best game of the 7a
defense. As always Manning and
BaUey were the backbone of
their club. They each scored
X points, and although Roy
n outscored them with 12
foints, these two boys made
hem when they counted most.
So ends another season in the
orts
er Cubs 11-2. These teams fere' interscholastlo League Sports
made up of the youngest and less program. It should not be allow-
sklllful players In the Midget ed to pass into history without
League and the games represent
the very first basebaU experience
for each of the players Involved.
at least brief mention being
made of the boys that played on
the three teamsCristobal, Bal-
H. Wotnbel, the winning pitch-
er, struck out seven batters,
walked six, and gave up five hits.
S. Niseyteh, the Mules pitcher,
struck out four batters, walked
five and gave Up five hits. Nlse-
vich is steadily Improving his
control And wUl soon be burling
his team to a victory, as the sea-
son progresses.
Same which was
layed in Cristobal, J. Alequas,
e winning pitcher, struck out
8 batters, walked 2, and gave up
6 hits. Blevlns, the Cubs7 pitch-
er, struck out 10 batters, walked
5, and allowed 7 hits.

The box score:
Mules
W. Melndez, If ..
D. Eberenz, 3b ..
A. Nisevlch, p. ..
D. Dills, cf ..
I. Sanders, c .. ..
D. Phillips, lb. ..
j. Marcelino, 2b.
C. Newhard, it...
H. Santiago, as ..
R.Perkins,If.. ..
. R. Baryton, rf.
AB R
2 0
irr
cCi
3
3
3
2
2
I
1
1
1
1
HPO
0 0
Every attempt is made during boa, and Junior College. Not so
the games to explain mistakes much from the athletic abUity
to the players on the spot whUe side, but from the sportsman-
situations are still fresh in their ship shown by these young men
minds.
In Saturday's
in
under the most extreme and try-
ing circumstances. It was truly
tremendous, and most certainly
reflected a great credit on the
men who coached them, and on
the schools they represented.
The box score:
Tiger Cubs
Geddes. ss.....
Leignadier, 3b ..
Sellars, lb. .. ..
R. Frosst. lt
AB
1
3
3
3
Aubert, c...... 2
Engstrand, cf. .. 2
Rudge, rf...... 2
Leon, 2b...... 1
Freeman, 2b.. .. 1
Blevlns, p...... 2
HPO
0 0
1 1
1 1
1 0
1 10
0 0
Totals........ 20 2 6 13 1
Margarita ColtsAB
n J: Alequas, p ..
41 M.Lara, If. ..
JjW. Arnold, If.
0
1W. Lust, lb
W. Klfefkens, as.
3

3
HPO
2 1
0 0
T McCullough.pl _0 _0 0 _1, jf
If.O 0
3 0 13
3 0 11
Totals.........21 3 6 12 7
Mustangs
W. French, 2b. .
j. McGloln, lb .
H.Wombel, p.. .
j Melndez, c .
O. DeTore, 8b. .
K. Mountain,.
> 3. Will. 1.....
r. Gulot, If .. .
j Essavian, cf .
W. WUl, rf. .. .
AB
3
1
3

2
2
1
1
2
1
HPO
0 0
T. Arnold* 3b.
BarceUno. cf..
Hill, cf......
C. Bath, 2b
J. Taber. 2b..
P. Dockery, rf
J. French, rf..
Totals
Totals........10 5 5 16 5
24 11 7 14 1
The Pepsi Cola Hornets of Cris-
tobal also took on the Gatun Ga-
tors In a practice game at Mar-
garita last Saturday morning in
order to give the Gatun lads the
feel of the diamond. With this
experience under their belts, the
Gators wUl be ready to play their
first league game of, the season In
the Minors against the Margari-
ta Colts this coming Saturday
morning.
Next Saturday's games at Cris-
tobal:
Orange Crush Tigers vs. Mar-
garita Muatani
gs
Hornets
Morton, Matee Top
Doubles Bowling
Play At Diablo
Bill Morton and BUI Malee led
the parade in the doubles play
last night in the 1952 City Bowl-
ing Championship at the Diablo
Clubhouse Alleys. Morton bowled
a total of 603, and Malee 556, for
a total of 1159 scratch.
In the doubles handicap, Wag-
goner and Schmidt, with scratch
totals of 1067 and a handicap of
170. led with a total of 1237, with
Malee and Morton second with
1219. Shattuck and Klumpp were
third with 1177, and Turney and
Reeves fourth with 1172.
Morton also led In the singles
with a total of 607 scratch, fol-
lowed by BUI Jamison with 594.
In the handicap singles. Morrow
was first with 656, followed by
Turney with 827, Waggoner with
621, Glelchman with 646, Jami-
son With 644. Shattuck with 639,
and Morton with 635.
Morton is presently leading In
the race lor the 1952 All Events
title with a total scratch score
of 1684. Reedes leads the handi-
cap all-event race with 1858.
Prize money wUl be awarded
after the bowling events Satur-
day evening.
nings. Smith gave up only three
hits last night.
Joe Tuminelll and Joe Montel-
ro aided Theolic with homers.
These were two of .only five hits
collected by the Bombers off the
combined services of Pete Nlcolis
and Justino Salinas.
Crusade For Freedom Game
Accorded
The Panam Pro League offi-
cials yesterday approved the
Claying of games at Balboa and
loun Hope stadiums on Feb. 17
to aid the Crusade for Freedom
program which will be held soon.
At Balboa the Bombers,
strengthened by players from
- the Yankees, will meet an Arm-
ed Forces All-Star team. At
Meant Hope, the Brownies
strengthened by Bluebird play-
erswlU meet another service
All-Star aggregation.
The league officials also ap-
proved at their meeting yester-
day the playing of a benefit
game for local amateur baseball
(R.P. league). The game wUl be
played Feb. 18 between the local
pro all-stars and the foreign pro
all-stars.
Stanley F. Grlswold, Mrs.
Inez Taylor, Mr. Bruce
Carpenter.
12:30Mrs. Marge Jones, Sgt.
Donald Kenna, Miss Mar-
tha White, Mr. Richard L.
Dehllnger.
12:35Mrs. Pat WlUlams, Lt. Col.
R. C. WlUlams. Mrs. Mar-
garet Gorman, Lt. Col.
George Gorman.
12:40Mrs. Clara Walters, Major
H. L. Fowle, Mrs. Doris
Hamilton, Major Ernest
HamUton.
12:45 Mrs. Eleana Harrington,
Capt. James Harrington,
Mrs. Ruth Lincoln, Mr.
Spencer C. Lincoln.
12:50Mrs. Connie Gerrans, Dr.
A. Earle Gerrans, Mrs.
Bea Tyrrell. Mr. Jack H.
Tyrrell.
12:55Mrs. Peggy Drumm, Lt.
Comdr. h. Drumm, Mrs.
Dot Gordon, Capt. H. W.
Gordon.
1:00 Mrs.
R. M. Peacher, Mrs. B
ie Hewitt, Col. L. H. Hew-
itt.
1:15Miss Toby Ely, Col. F. P.
Klntz, Mrs. Grace Dehlln-
ger, Mr. D. C. House.
1:30Mrs. Louise Williams,
Capt. Jack L. Williams,
Mrs. Helen Howell, Mr.
Harvey Beall.
From Tee No. 19:
12:00Mrs. Irene Eason, Capt.
Walter Eason, Mrs. Bev-
erly DUfer, Mr. Archie
French.
12:05Mrs. Bernice Sprlngall,
Dr. A. N. Sprlngall, Mrs.
Grace Morris, Mr. Fred
Hunsicker.
12:10Mrs. Connie Bishop, Mr.
Arch D. Bishop, Mrs. Mol-
ly Vandergrlft, Mr. Chas.
R. Vandergrlft.
12:20Mrs. Jean Ladd, Lt. Col.
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost
Polke............ 4
gears . 3
afge'iV. .. .*. .'. '.'. 3
Lincoln Lile........ 3
Elks 1414.......... 3
Firemen........... 2
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Elks 9, Sears 4.
TODAY'S GAME
Lincoln Life vs. Police
The Elks 1414 Little Leaguers
topped the Catalog Boys from
Fastlich League
Herbert Ladd, Mrs. La-
Merle Coates, Col. Philip to beat the challenging Palomas
Coates. 3 to 1.
12:25Mrs. Nancy Brown, Capt. The play was featured by dou-
Rees Jones, Mrs. Sylval ble plays; both team taking cre-
Carpenter, Major R. W. dlt for two. Palomas pitcher
THE STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Conejos........5 9 1.999, _
Palomas.. ...... 3 2 .999 four trips.
Pumas.........1 3 .258
Macaws........1 3 .259
Ocelots........1 3 .259
The Fastlich League's hustling
Conejos came through in the tened
clutches Tuesday pulling them- three hits In three trips and Jer-
selves out of several tight holes ry Durfee connected for two dou-
Sears 9 to 4 yesterday at the Pa-
cific Little League Park in Bal-
Doa. The win created a four-way
tie for second place in the tight
first half race.
The winners jumped on Mc-
Keown in the very first Inning
garnering three runs on five hits
to take a lead from which they
were never headed. The Elks salt-
ed the game away In the second
Inning when they sent ten men
to the plate and five of them
scored. A single run was added
in the fourth Inning.
The Catalog Boys were held at
bay by Elks pitcher Clem Kirk-
land, collecting one run in the
first and one in the second in-
ning. Two more runs in the fifth
finished their run producing for
the day.
The Elks had their batting eyes,
coUectlng 16 hits with pitcher
Klrkland having a perfect day
at the plate with four hits in
ps. Terry Corrigan col-
lected 3 for 5 and Johnny Lewis
chipped in with 3 for 4 one of
which was a double.
Jimmie Watson of Sears fat-
hls batting average with
Walters.
12:30Mrs. Wllma RUey, Capt. T.
W. Essen, Mrs. Margot
Holcombe, Comdr. Chas.
Holcombe.
12:35Miss Mabel Snelder. Lt.
W. May. Jr., Mrs. 8. J.
Jorgenson, Mr. S. J. Jor-
genson.
1:00Mrs. Roz Kincald. Major
Norrls Kincald. Mrs. Else
Miles, Major W. A. Miles.
1:05Mrs. Bobby Qulnn. Mr. J.
R. Qulnn, Mrs. Marion
Mallory. Mr. W. B. Mal-
lory.
1:15Mrs. Katie Klntz, Col. H.
W. Taylor, Mrs. Lucille
Essen, Mr. Jack Morris.
1:30Mrs. Louise Jones, Mr.
Charles Howell, Mrs. Er-
na House, Colonel Percy
H. Brown
Charles retired nine men by
bles in four at bats.
In today's game the Lincoln
Lifers wUl send Bruce Bateman
to the mound in an attempt to
stop the first place Police team.
His opponent wUl be Owen Suth-
strikeouts and aUowed only two; erland, who topped them last
hits for three runs while Hinkle time with a no-hit no-run game,
of the Conejos struck out four With these two big fellers on
and allowed three hits for one, the mound, the fans should be
run. treated to a real snappy pitch-
No game Is scheduled for to- ws' duel. Game time, 4:30 p.m.,
day. The league's doubleheader at Little League Park on Galfiard
on Saturday wUl start out with Highway.
The
Ocelots vs. Pumas and the sec-
ond encounter wUl be between
the Conejos and Macaws.
Box score of Tuesday's game
follows:
Palomas AB R H PO
Hatchett, If . 4 0 0 0
Brandon, cf-c 4 0
Hotz, c-cf. ..21
Bacot. 3b ... 2
Charles, p. 3
Zumbado, 2b. 3
Lpez, rf. . 2
Angstadt, ss . 1
Gibraltar Clinches Pacific
Twilight League First Half
Isthmian Sports
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL
LEAGUE (First Half Standings)
TEAM
Gibraltar Life .. 7
Balboa Brewers .. 1
Pan'm Merchante 3
Balboa HI School.. 1
Won Lost Pet.
j .871
3 .r;
5 .378
7 .185
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Gibraltar Life Insurance 11, Pan-
am Merchants 7.
SUNDAY'S DOUBLEHEADER
(At Balboa Stadium 1:99 p.m.)
Panam Merchants vs. Balboa
High School; Gibraltar Life in-
surance vs. Balboa Brewers.
The Gibraltar Life Insurance
Softball League ..
All avenues wUl lead to the ,
Chagres ball diamond Monday ne cT,e*led1 the RHjSS I
afternoon for the inauguration, !%*> Loop first halr title last
of the local softbaU league which night at ^Balboa Stadium as
this year is made up of five they walloped the Panam Mer-
teamsEsquires, Ramn Mndez.! chants 11-7 In a free scoring
Clenfuegos, Speedmasters and game,
Teniente Dosman.
Clenfuegos and Ramn Men-
Uvan, De la Mater, Conover 5,
McGlade, Francis. Earned Runs
Gibraltar 1, Merchants 2. Left
on BasesGibraltar 8, Merchants
12. Three Base HitConover. Two
Base HitsConover, Medinger.
Stolen BasesJones 2, De la Ma-
ter, Conover, De la Pea, Fran-
cis. Hit by PitchKeUeher by
Medinger. Passed BallsSullivan
2, Raybourne. WUd PitchesLove
2. Struckout byLove 5, Hlnz 2,
Medinger 6. Base on Balls off-
Love 13, Hln* 2, Medinger 7. Hits
and Runs offLove 2 and 5 in
1 2-3 innings; Hlnz 2 and 2 In
12-3. Losing PitcherMedinger
(1-4). Winning PitcherLove
(4-0). UmpiresMohl and Cof-
fey. Time of Game2:23.
.24 1
AB R
. 2 0
Winklowsky, lb 3
Totals ....
Conejos
Magee, If .
Scott, 3b .
Hammond, ss
Goodln, c .
Reyes, cf. .
Reece, lb. .
SorreU, ri. .
Cotton, Lar,, r
McKeown, 2b
Hinkle, p .
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
0
box score:
Elks- AB R
Hele, If ., .. .. 4 1
Scott, If...... l 0
Corrigan, T., 3b.. 5 1
Ryter, ss...... 4 2
Lovelady, lb.. .. 4 2
Trimble, c..... 4 2
Lewis, cf ....... 4 1
Thomson, rf.. .. 4 0
Klrkland, p .. .. 4 0
DesLondes, 2b .. 3 0
PO A
1 0 8
0
3
2

3
0
0
0
1
Totals........37 9 18 18 8
. 2 O
t 0 0
2' 1
1 0
3 18 4
HPO A
0 0 0
2
3
4
1
5
0
0
5
1
Sears
3 Capwell, 2b ..
E Alas, 2b .. ..
0,Crawford, lb..
0 Watson, R., ss.
Totals
9 4
.....29 3 2 21
Score By Innings
Palomas 0 0 0 0 Q 1 01
Conejos 10 0 0 5 0 X3
Runs Batted InScott. Earned
RunsConejos 1. Left on Bases
Palomas 7, Conejos 3. Stolen
BasesReece, Hinkle, Scott. Base
on Balls offCharles 3, Hinkle 5.
Struckout byCharlea 9, Hinkle
4. Passed BallsHotz 2. Winner
Hinkle. LoserCharles. Double
PlaysCharles, Hots, Winklow-
sky; Bacot (unassisted); Reece,
Ooodin, McKeown; Scott. Mc-
Keown. UmpiresNeville. Ham-
mond. Time of Game2:05.
Durfee, T., c
Durfee, G., lb-cf.
Curdts, cf-rf.. ..
Watson, Js.. lf-3b
Mendoza, Sb-2b..
Pearson, rf .. ..
Watson, Jn., It ..
Schwararock, If..
McKeown, p .. ..
Totals........
AB
2
2
0
4
4
4
3
3
2
1
0
O
1
HPO
0 2
A
1
9
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
18 3
.......29 4 0
Score By Innings
Elks 3 5 0 10 09 18 I
Sears 10 10 2 04 6 4
WinnerKlrkland. LoserMc-
Keown. Struckout byKlrkland
3, McKeown 8. Bases on Balls off
Klrkland 3, McKeown 1. Hit by
PitchDesLondes by McKeown.
Two Base HitsG. Durfee,. 2,
Lewis, Klrkland. First Base on
Catcher's InterferenceJohnny
Watson 2. DoubleplayT. Corri-
gan, DesLondes. Umpires F.
Mohl and Priest. ScorerMead.
Time of Game1:25. lj
des are listed for the Initial en-
counter.
S. G. Loney
THE 1952 FORD
COMING SOON
(OLPAN MOTORS
Tal. 2-1033 2-1036
PANAMA
ngs.
Muli
Margarita Mules vs. Pepsi Cola
At Margarita :
Gatun Gators vs. Margarita
Colts.
A'l first games will start
promptly at 9:00 a.m. with sec-
ond games getting under way 15
minutes after the conclusin of
the first game. Parents and the
general public are invited to
come out and root for these
fledgling ball players.
The PX & R. Branch encour-
ages your child.
"'HMDACHE 100:
\lka-Seltzer
' 1 you
Add, UpMt Stomach aad Head-
ache often itrika at the sama
tita*, yet each must be relieved
hi a diierent way. Alka-S*lter
works two ways at onee! Alka-
Hne inaredientt settle
your'stomach while ita
pein- reliever soothe*
way your Headache!
-MRS* saw*.
The win put the Insurancemen
two games ahead of the second-
place Balboa Brewers with only
two games left In first half play.
They will be played In Sunday's
twiribW.
Although wild- as usual. Jack
Love came through with his
fourth win of the season without |
a defeat. To win this one he
needed the help of CharUe Hlnz,
who relieved him in the bottom
half of the sixth frame when
Love gave up five consecutive
bases on balls.
Both teams left many runners
stranded on the base paths In
last night's comedy of errors
the Merchantmen making nine
while the Insurancemen made
three.
The big gun at the plate last
night was Francis Conover who
had a perfect night as he col-
lected four hits In four trips, get-
ting two singles, a double, and a
triple. Bill De la Maters string
of seven consecutive games with
! hits was snapped as he went zero
for three.
The bo* score:
Gibraltar AB R H PO A
Presho, lb ... 3 1 0 0 3
Dedcaux, ss . 2 1 0 2 0
Jones, cf. . 2 2 0 1 0
HUzinger, 8b. 6 2 1 0 4
Sullivan, c ... 4 0 0 7 0
KeUeher, If 3 1 2 2 0
De la Mater, rf S 3 0 0 0
Conover, lb,. 4 1 4 9 0
Love, p.....3 0 0 0 1
Hinz, p. .... 1 0 1 0 1
Totals.....83 "g 21 ~9
Merchants AB R H PO A
De la Pea, cf. 3 2
McGlade c-2b 2
Francis, 3b. . 2
Ridge, If. ... 3
Salvos, lb . 3
Tarflinger, rf 2
Phillips, ss. . 4
Medinger, p 3
Rayb'urne, 2b-c S
Alka-Seltzer
Totals.....85 7 4 31 10
Score By busings
Gibraltar Life 900 012 311
Merchants 110 003 3 7.
Runs Batted InHUzinger, Sul

..


INTER-CLUB MATCHES OPEN
flP^^H"
The 1952 Peterson Inter-Club
matches will start at the Summit
Hills Golf Club on Sunday, Feb.
IT it was announced today by the
Panam Golf Association. Match-
es will be played on five Sundays,
but each tram will compete only
four times and will not play on
their home course. Each will be
composed of twenty players di-
vuird into ten two-man teams.
This year the matches will fol-
low the same system of play used
so successfully last year. The
team captains may group their
players in any way they see fit.
Play wl'l be In foursomes with
the Nassau system of point scor-
ing bring used. The 1952 USGA
rules for four-ball stroke play
and the local rules of the host
club will prevail.
Datesplacesstarting times:
Sunday. Feb. 17, at Summit Hills
9 a.m.Panam vs. Ft. Amador.
Brazos Brook vs. Ft. Davis
Sunday. Feb. 24, at Fort Davis
9 a.m. Panam vs. Brazos Brook
Ft. Amador vs. Summit
Hills.
Sunday, March 2, at Fort Amador
9 a.m.Panam vs. Fort Davis
Brazos Brook vs. Summit
Hills.
AN INDEPENDENT^

J>lLT NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe'* Abraham Lincoln.
King's Medics
List Cause:
Thrombosis
rWENTY-SEVF.NTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Elizabeth Returns To Britain
To Rule; Churchill At Airport
LONDON, Feb. 7 (UP) Queen!Queen prepares to meet her Min- round the world wherever the
Sunday, March 9 at Brazos Brook Elizabeth returned to Britain listers and advisers.
9 a.m.Panam vs. Summit Hills from British East. Africa today to j Tomorrow morning she goes
Fort Amador vs. Ft. Davis be proclaimed monarch of the'before the august privy Council
Sunday, March 16 at Panama British Empire. to take her oath at St. James
9 a.m.Summit Hills vs. Ft. Davis The blue-and-white Argonaut Palace.
Fort Amador vs. Brazos airliner bringing Elizabeth andj An 11 a.m. announcement
Brook.
(Z Schoolchildren
Prize Winners In
U.S. Story Contest
Several Canal Zone children
were successful competitors In a
character development story
contest sponsored by the La-
tham Foundation for the pro-
motion of humane education,
with headquarters in Oakland.
California, according to prize
lists recently received at the of-
fices of the Superintendent
Schools.
Prince Philip home landed at proclaiming the reign of Eliza-
London airport some 36 hours beth II will be read by heralds at
after the death of King George the palace, at Charing Cross.
Prime Minister
Churchill and the Duke of Glou-|and in cities and
cester brother of the late King
led a handful of Britain's
greatest men who stood bare-
headed on the field to meet the
darkhalred young woman who is
now their Queen.
Union Jack flies.
Only then will the gracious
young woman be free to go
to the embrace of her mother
at Sandringham.
The new queen, who had
wept bitterly yesterday when
news of her father's death was
.. broken to her by her husband, |in Uganda, where the British
.iJKfin 2"he oval Ex-j was regally composed last Overseas Airways Argonaut At-
Wlnston|change in the City of London, night when she left the hunt- lanta, which brought her to
hamlets a- ing lodge in Kenya Colony,'Africa as a Princess waited to
fly her back as Queen.
according to a dispatch from
Nairobi.
With Prince Philip, she drove
in a closed car eight miles to
a small airport near the town
of NunyukL
There she took off In an East
African Airways C-47 to Bntebbe
Police ringed the seven-mile
boundary of the field, and all
planes using the airport were
grounded more than a half hour
before the Queen's arrival.
The queen entered her Clar-
ence House residence in London
of |at 5:05 p.m. (GMT).
Elizabeth had flown from the
Adenauer Issues Warning:
Soviets 'Ready To March'
crasas sriL^tss^^^^^s^stfj^uff^a
A tropical thunderstorm at
Entebbe delayed the departure
of the Queen's plane for more
than two hours.
The Atlanta touched down at
the Royal Air Force Bast at El
Adem in Libya (near Tobrak)
when RAFT planes were stand-
escort the Queen's
Writing on such subjects as iungle airport of Entebbe in only hope of salvation is to build sorically denied he had UMa weens party passed through
the "The Kind Child Becomes a British East Africa.
Good Citizen," "Share w 11 h | Although tonight she will be
Oihers," and "Democracy Our'onlv 80 mlles from her mother at
Torch of Liberty," Canal Zone Sandringham. royal duty comes
up a defense so fast that Russia I these demands to
will realize aggression Is too! the western allies,
sky. Adenauer warned
"blackmail'
that the
171
students received 18 out of
prizes offered.
The contest was divided into
two sections, one for pupils of
grades five and six, and the
other for students of grades
seven to nine.
Fifth and sixth grade winners
were: First prizesBurris Ro-
gers of Pedro Miguel and Violet
Gaskln of Red Tank.
Second prizes Mary Melva
Of Diablo Heights, Lynn Wald-'The Duke
schmldt of Pedro Miguel, and
Heraldo Wllharden of Chiva
Chiva.
Third prizes Shirley Till-
man of Diablo Heights, Janet
Mulligan of Pedro Miguel, Billy
Hayes of Margarita, Marion
Clarke of La Boca. Jacinta
Griffith of Chagres, and
Thomas of Silver Cly.
Adenauer spoke at the begin- great danger Is that some davi arv "lcers-
At the airport only a small
group were allowed inside. They
were principally police and mlll-
above all calls of emotion as the nlng of a two-day foreign affairs public opinion in the United i
debate of the Bundestag. states might say that "we Euro-f/rhe TeeiJ'.er, faci showln*
Throughout the two hour.peans don't want to realize the ihe straln of th* lMt hours' waa
speech he was subject to a con- danger we are in, and that we dressevJ.m-* mple beige dress
tlnuous Communist barrage of keep on squabbling among our-
Twenty-fiv'e others
certificates of merit.
In the contest for students
of grades seven to nine-prizes
went to:
First prize Wilma Black-
man of Sliver City.
Second prize John Dongan
of Cristobal High School.
Third prizes Dorothy Hauser
of Cristobal High School, Alma
Amantiene of Santa Cruz, and
Norma Spence of Silver City.
Fourth prizesFelicia Feme-
nlas of Balboa High School and
Ethelyn Gillings of Red Tank.
Fourteen others received cer-
tificates of merit in this divi-
sion.
Philippine Claims
Afcainst Japs Unchanged I eGn
MANILA, Feb. 7 (UP)For-
eign Secretary Joaqun M. Eli-
zade indicated today that
Philippine reparations claims
against Japan are fundamental-
ly unchanged. He added that
speculative stories to the effect
th^ey might be revised had no
basis in fact.
The Philippines have asked
lor more than 16 billion pesos
from Japan.
Duke Of Windsor
Sails For England,
Leaves Wally Behind
NEW YORK, Feb. 7 (UP)
of Windsor, stunned
at the news of the death of his
brother. King George VI, sails
for England today aboard the
liner Queen Mary, leaving his
American-born Duchess behind.
The first word of the death
reached the Duke when a re-
porter called his six-room suite
Grace on the 28th floor of the Waldorf-
Astoria Towers at 6 a. m. The
interruptions.
Strong police forces armed
with fire hoses blocked off the
whole area around the Bundes-
tag building as a precaution a-
gairust 2,000 Communists, many
of whom had been brought sev-
eral hundred miles by truck and
bus to demonstrate against Ger-
man rearmament.
Adenauer reiterated demands
Hazard Nominated
By Truman For (Z
District Attorney
received Duke's secretary awakened him
to relay the news;
The Duke, who would be King
Edward VIII, if he had not ab-
dicated in 1936 to marry Wallis
Warfield Simpson, immediately
telephoned the British Embassy
In Washington and then made
a trans-Atlantic call to the
King's private secretary at
Buckingham Palace.
Later, he announced his plans
to return to England for his
brother's funeral. The Queen
Mary is scheduled to arrive at
Southampton, Feb. 13.
Anne Seagrim, the Duke's
secretary, said the Duchess
would remain in New York.
Twice-divorced when she mar-
ried the Duke, she never has
accepted by the Royal
Family.
"I would say it was her own
decision to stay behind," Miss
Seagrim said when asked who
had decided that the Duke WASHINGTON Feb. 7 (UP)
Th;S 2M!2 one- . President Truman yesterday sent
thl, 1 d .een Peculation to the Senate the nomination of
that because the new Queen of- Rowland Keough Hazard as Dis-
t u cal ,d the Duke her trlct Attorney for the Panama
favorite' uncle that the faml-Canal Zone. The White House
lys attitude toward the Duchess secretariat in announcing the
selves over side Issues. Then they
might withdraw their help from
us."
The
Judges' Bench

Two Panamanians were found
guilty of disorderly conduct this
morning In the Balboa Magis-
trate's Court and sentenced to
serve 39 days in Jail each.
The defendants, Ramiro Anto-
nio Muoz, 23, and Eric Alonzo
Jordan, 25, were found guilty of
committing an Immoral act In a .
car parked at the Limits parklnlBtcr a night spent In a tree-
lot. A previous charge of com- *P bungalow watching big
mitting an Infamous crime "ame ">"nals go to a Jungle
and white hat.
She and her husband stood
talking to Lt. Gen. Sir Alex-
ander Cameron, British com-
manding general in East Africa,
while their luggage was rushed
aboard the plane and the flares
at the corner of the field were
lighted for the after-dark take-
off.
The new queen mounted the
ramp leading to the door of
the plane, turned and man-
aged a smile for those who saw
her off before she disappeared
Inside..
Only a few hours before, she
had returned to the forest
lodge presented by the people
of Kenya as a wedding present,
SANDRINGHAM, England
Feb. 7 (UP)The death of King
George VI was due to coronary
thrombosis authoritative medic-
al sources revealed today.
It is expected that late today
the body of the late monarch
who died In his sleep will be tak-
en to the little Paris Church of
St. Mary Magdalen on the Sand-
ringham House grounds and
placed before the altar.
The body will be removed to
Westminster Hall, adjoining the
Houses of Parliament this week
end to lie In state beginning
Monday until the day has been
fixed for the funeral.
If precedent is followed, the
funeral will be held in St.
George's Chapel, .Windsor, but
the new Queen will have to de-
cide this.
Today the grieving Queen
'Mother Elisabeth and her
daughter, Princes Margaret,
left the royal residence and at-
tended a brief service at the
little church on the grounds.
Meanwhile, messages, of con-
dolence poured into Buckingham
Palace In London. Flags were
flown at half-mast throughout
the British Empire, In many cap-
itals and on the United Nations
headquarters building in New
York.
Celebrations and various fes-
tivities were halted in respect to
the dead King. There were mo-
ments of silence and prayers for
George and for the new ruler of
the British Empire.
The Russians limited their re-
action to the King's death to a
broadcast report that said only:
"King George VI died."
President Truman extended
his deepest sympathy to the
British Royal Family and the
British people.
BEAUTIES
From both
sides of the
border will
be on hand
at the
Atlas Garden
this Friday.
lt will
be a dnce
and
fashion 'how
iiv .i by
the Queen
of the Atlas,
Ann Gorman,
pictured here
In all her -
loveliness.
The Show ,
Is In honor of
Maritia Obarrlo,
Queen of
El Panama,
and the
candidates
of the
Union Club.
against nature was dismissed on
a motion made by the govern-
ment.
Both men entered a plea
guilty.
waterhole.
She and Philip now her
Prince Consort were to have
0f left by sea tomorrow on the
next leg of their tour of Com-
For trespassing in the Ancon monwealth countries.
Commissary Carolina Guerrero
de Arosemena, 37, and Marcela
Alvarado, 19, both Panamanians
were fined $10. And for a similar
charge of trespassing in the Tiv-
oll Commissary 21-year-old Vi-
cente Trudert, Panamanian, also
was meted out a $10 fine.
And ball amounting to $15 was
forfeited this morning in court
by Conchita Snchez, 20, Pana-
manian, who failed to appear to
answer a charge of trespassing.
night soften.
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? ASr.i.l NII. ih. ,.t*tan4 ui. n,i
| ** Omil n irt MU. C l~u
HAIR
TONIC
nomination said Hazard replaces
Daniel E. McGrath who resign-
ed.
The new District Attorney Is a
native of North Kingston. Rhode
Island. He was graduated magna
cum laude from the Holy Cross
University in 1934 with a bache-
lor of arts degree and then en-
tered Georgetown University In
Washington. He was graduated
in law there.
Hazard Is a member of the
District of Columbia bar and la
licensed to practice in the Uni-
ted States Court of Appeals. He
had several years of specialized
legal work before hjs appoint-
ment as Assistant District Attor-
ney in the Canal Zone In Febru-
ary 1948.
During World War II. he spent
several years In counter Intelli-
gence work for the United States,
serving In France Belgium. Hol-
land and Germnnv and received
the bronze medal for merilorloua
service in Belgium.
Prior to his Army service Ha-
zard served a year and a' half as
Clerk of the Second District
Court at Wickford. Rhode Island.
Tn 1942 he was employed in the
U.S. Immigration and Naturall-
, zation Service of the Justice De-
partment where he served until
, entering the Armvin 1943.
Durine his service with the
Tustlce Department he attended
and wps graduated from the
Special Inspections School of the
Immigration and Naturalization
Service in Philadelphia.
He entered this service after
'he end of the war and was sta-
, lioned as special Investigator In
.. New York Citv. ,
iing.
A 22-year-old Panamanian girl,
Beatrice Abigail Agostlni, was
given a suspended sentence and
8laced on six months probation
Us morning for falling to keep
to the right of a vehicle when
passing. The traffic violation oc-
curred on Roosevelt Avenue.
First New Comet
Of The Year Found
By 2 Astronomers
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7 (UP)-
The National Geographic Society
announced today the discovery
of a new comet by two astronom-
ers of the California Institute of
Technology.
,. T5e. c0.met. mere Point of
light invisible to the naked eye
was the first new constellation
found this year and was named
the Harrington Wilson Comet
after the discoverers. Dr. Albert
O. Wilson and Robert G. Har-
rington.
The scientists discovered the
speck of light on a photographic
plate exposed on the night of
Jan. 30 at Palomar Mountain.
Cadet-Midshipman
Training Grant
Open to HP Student
The Maritime Administration
of the U.S. Department of Com-
merce has announced the avail-
ability of Cade t-Mldshlpmen
training grants for qualified can-
didates from Panam.
One student from the Republic
of Panama will be selected for a
course of study In the U.S. Mer-
chant Marine Cadet Corps and
its Academy at Kings Point, New
York (about 20 miles from New
York City) under a 1948 Public
Law which authorizes the in-
struction of not more than 12
persons at a time from the other
American Republics.
Under this program, any Cad-
et-Midshipman appointed from
Latin America will be subject to
all the requirements and regu-
lations applying to Cadet-Mid-
shipmen from the United States
of America.
The four-year course of In-
struction in the U. S. Merchant
Marine Cadet Corps and Its Aca-
demy which begins In August
1952, Includes twelve months
training as Fourth Classman at
the Academy, twelve months as
Third Classman in United States . ,
merchant vessels, and twenty- NATO Conference
"God bless Queen Elisabeth
and may her father's exempla-
ry memory provide the courage
and inspiration she will need
in the great responsibilities
that lie before her," Mr. Tra-
man said in a public state-
ment.
The President also sent private
messages of condolence to the
new Queen, her mother, and her
grandmother. Queen Mary.
The U.S. House of Represen-
tatives adjourned at 12:55 p.m.
EST, out of respect for the late
King.
Premier Leslie Frost of Onta-
rio, Canada, said he was shocked
and grieved.
Australian Prime Minister
Robert Gordon Menzles an-
nounced the news In parliament,
interrupting a debate on the Ja-
panese peace treaty. The House
promptly adjourned.
The King's death caught Aus-
tralia near the climax of prepa-
rations for Queen Elizabeth's
first visit there.
Flags flew at half-mast at the
UN temporary headquarters In
Paris. At Gen. Dwlght D. Eisen-
hower's North Atlantic Treaty
Organization headquarters near
Paris, the national emblems of
the 12 member nations also were
at half-mast.
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt said In
Paris:
"I am terribly grieved and
shocked to hear this news be-
cause I always had a personal
affection for the King and
Queen." The royal couple had
been guests of the late President
Roosevelt at Hyde Park, N. Y., In
1939.
In Korea, Gen. James A. Van
Fleet, commander of the 8th
Army, said the death was "an
Irreparable loss In an age when
we can 111 afford the passing of
such a man who has been wholly
devoted lh the cause of peace."
In New York Ctly, the bells of
St. Paul*' Church In Trinity
Episcopal parish tolled for three
hours In mourning for the King.
A requiem service was held at
noon In the lower Manhattan
church.
In Washington, Sen. Tom Con-
nally (D., Tex.), chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, eulogized King George as
"a man of unblemished charac-
ter," and said "the free world will
grieve at his passing."
Britons May Seek
Postponement Of
Britain Protests
Cairo Riots Had
Official 'Backing'
LONDON, FFeb. 7 (UP)
Britain today charged that the
circumstances and details of the
bloody Cairo riots of Jan. 28
"strongly indicated official con-
nivance ."
A note handed to the Egypt-
Ian government in Cairo yester-
day expressed Britain's "strong-
est condemnation" of the mob
actions which brought death to
ten Britons and property dam-
ages estimated at over 1,000,000
pounds ($3,800,000).
The strongly worded protest
charged the oterttment of for-
mer Premier Mustapha el Nahas
Pasha had given "overt and cov-
ert encouragement" to "criminal
elements" and that "shocking
occurrences" were "the logical
outcome" of Nahas' policy.
The note said the Egyptian po-
lice made little or no effort to
restrain the looting, burning and
murdering mob and that "in
some cases the police even as-
sisted them."
The note cites "the sudden
and clearly deliberate" cut In the
police guard at the Cairo Turf
Club when feeling was running
high in the city and charged that
the Egyptian government appar-
ently had "no desire to maintain
law and order.". .
Maid's Suit Against
Ingrid Thrown Out
ROME, Feb. 7 (UP). A sulk
against Swedish actress Ingrid
Bergman brought by a maid
who alleged maltreatment and
the receipt of an "abusive" let*
tr from her former mistress,
was thrown out of the Rome
Prefecture today.
Nursemaid Berta Kupelwleser
was In turn castigated by the
court for violating her trust
and conniving with a news]
photographer last year In an |
attempt to photofttph Miss
Bergman's son, Robertino, and
her husband Roberto Rosselllnl
away from home.
29 French Villages
Inundated By Floods
AGEN, France, Feb. 7 (UP)
No accurate figures are yet
available on the number o
fatalities caused by the week-
long floods which have driven
farmers from flooded villages
along the River Geronne.
An estimated 1,675 houses
sheltering 3,500 persons were
flooded, and some 1,500 of these
had to be evacuated.
Inhabitants of the 29 Inun-
dated villages were huddled in
the school buildings at Agen.
A^^^^oiim
^tU^
four months as a Second and
First Classman at the Academy
at Kings Point, Long Island, New
York.
The courses of study under-
in
tlon Berenices.
LONDON. Feb. 7. (UP) A
British Foreign Office spokes-
man said today that the possl-
_ blltty of the British govern-
k.?.-. ' sue y. a -^ssa^^^^,^
electricity, ship construction, na-
val science and tactics, as well as
courses in economics, business
administration, language, histo-
ry, science and other subjects of
a cultural nature.
Graduates of the U. 8. Mer-
chant Marine Cadet Corps and
its Academy are qualified as
Deck and Engineer officers in
merchant vessels.
New French Premier
Faces Confidence
Vote Tonight
./ARI?' Feb- 7 Edgar Faure today faced his vote
of confidence since his govern-
ment came to power 18 days ago.
The Assembly convened this
afternoon at 1500 GMT to vote
n Faure's proposal that the So-
cialist-supported "sliding scale''
..ulmed to keeP waie in line
with the rising cost of living, High
should be treated as a matter for 2:M aj*.
urgent debata, j;u pjsa,
BALBOA TIDES
Friday, Feb. f
Low
:M s.m
1*7 p.m.
The conference of for e 1 g n
ministers, including British For-
eign Secretary Anthony Eden, is
scheduled to open in Lisbon Feb.
10.
.-----------------------
Army Reveals Name
Of Drowning Victim
The Public Information Office,
United SUtes Army Caribbean,
announced today that the sol-
dier who drowned while swim-
ming Monday in the Cocoll River
was Pfc Raul Cruz-Castillo. Be
was assigned to "B" Battery.
504th Field Artillery Battalion.
ifA^pbbe; -
^ti-*^'^
mm
Reasons why
II in furff.
Chicken Soup
You
You can taste it in every
brimming spoonful the
fino chicken flavor of
Campbell's Chicken Soup
- so tempting so deli-
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Plump, full-breasted
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chicken richness. Fin
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the broth. And finally,
pieces of chicken are
measured in generously-
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