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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01376
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01376
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

' BRANIFF

AN WDBPEND
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
cagramsYO.
(\\\I)I\\ WHISKI
/hnatottd i
Now... 6 Years Old!

TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA. R. t., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1961
FIVE CENT!
World Mourns
THE DUKE OF WINDSOR, in New York, said he was "pro-
foundly shocked" by the death of his brother. A statement
i&sued by his secretary said that "His Royal Highness is
calling Buckingham Palace."
POPE PIUS XII expressed "deep sorrow" at news of the
King's death, according to Papal aides. Vatican quarters
said the Pope always had the "greatest consideration and
esteem for the British sovereign, whom he considered a man
of great wisdom."
ITALIAN PREMIER ALCIDE DE GASPERI: "We fully
understand the sorrow of a friendly nation at the passing
v/f a king who was held In merited devotion and affection.
I the Italian people and the Italian government, Join in the
sorrow of Britain."
BELGIAN PRIME MINISTER JEAN VAN HOSTTE Will read
a special message to the House and Senate this afternoon.
The Belgian radio, said: "Belgium associates itself with the
great friendly British nation daring this terrible day of
mourning."
FIELD MARSHAL MONTGOMERY, vacationing in Switzer-
land, said he was deeply distressed.
BRITAIN'S NEW QUEEN, her husband the Duke of Edin-
burgh, and her two children. On the left Is Prince Charles,
3, as of today first in succession to the British throne. In the
.Elizabeth's arms is Princess Anne; now second In s^easlon.
UNITED NATIONS ASSEMBLY PRESIDENT LUIS PADILLA
VERVO OF MEXICO: "The news came as a big surprise.
We had Just had reports he had regained his health.
"I am convinced that this news will be received with
/ery great sorrow, as he certainly had the respect and af-
fection not only of his people but of others all over the
world.
"He had led an exemplary Ufe and had a very heavy
task during the war and had dedicated himself completely
to It.
"I believe all governments and peoples will Join the peo-
ple, the government and the Royal Family In England in
their sorrow."
QUEEN JULIANA AND PRINCE BERNHARD of the Nether-
lands cabled their condolences to Buckingham Palace.
UNITED NATIONS SECRETARY-GENERAL TRYGVE LIE
HtiL BrtUaJ^Pflreign Secretary Anthony Edep a telegram
GENERAL DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER expressed "solemn re-
gret" to Prime Minister Wlrftton Churchill, and'also sent
condolences to the British Royal Family.
PRESIDENT THEODORE HEUSS of the West German gov-
ernment has cabled his condolences to Queen Elizabeth and
Prime Minister Winston ChftrchUl. He also spoke for Chan-
cellor KoanKi Adenauer.
INDIA'S PREMIER NEHRO cosrtryina news of the King's
death to Parliament said: "As we all know. His Majesty has
been unwell, but recently recovered and was thinking of
undertaking a Journey to repaperate his health. This further
news therefore come a. a surprise and shock."
A sickly, yonng Prince Albert grew up in the shadow of his
more colorful, high-spirited brother. Edward, Prince of Wales.
The world knew much about the dashing Prince of Wales
years before he succeeded to the throne; it knew little about
his younger brother, Albert, the Duke of York. The portrait
above, was the official coronation photograph of King (corre
VJ. It was the portrait of a king destined t fax t
- crtieal y%ars in Empto history. ^
LONDON,Feb. 6 (UP)-King George
VI died quietly in his sleep today at the
Sandringham country home where he
was born.
His 26-year-old daughter, now Queen
Elizabeth, is due to arrive here by air
from East Africa tomorrow morning to
claim her throne.
The 56-year-old King of the British Commonwealth
was round dead in his bed by his valet at about 12J0
this morning. '
The tidings were kept within the Royal Family and
the highest Government circles till Elizabeth, in gay holi-
day mood at the beginning of her Empire tour with Princa
Philip, could be told privately of her father's death.
Then the news was flashed
round the world that the mon-
arch who had reigned through
15 stormy years was dead, and
that the greatest of all remain-
ing thrones now has its first
queen since Victoria.
The princess became queen in
constitutional theory upon the
moment of her father's death.
But the Privy Council has been
summoned to a special meeting
6 p.m. today at which the ac-
cession of the new queen will be
proclaimed.
The House of Commons will
halt Its stormv debate on foreim
affairs when It meets this after-
noon and will adjourn immedi-
ately.
(NEA Radio Telephoto)
KING. QUJTN AND PRINCESSKing George VI, who origin-
ally plan imE to make the trip himself, was on hand at the
London 'tSjlit M Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edin-
burgh left a ffve-month tour of Ceylon, Australia and New
Zealand. (jfen HHsabeth (right) and Princess Margaret
sited with the King at the airport.
The House will reconvene
other members of the bouse
will swear allegiance to the
new Queen.
The King, who underwent an
operation for the removal of a
lung last Sept. 23, roamed a-
round the Norfolk countryside
yesterday -morning and after-
noon, and having retired in ap-
parent good health and spirits.
His wife. Queen Elizabeth and
daughter Princess Margaret. 21,
were on hand at Sandrineham.
They were aulte apparently not
at his bedside when he passed a-
way In his sleep.
Dr. James Answell. surgeon
Apothecary to the King was
summoned and confirmed that
the monarch was dead.
The news was immediately
relayed to Buckingham Palace,
but It was decided to keep it
from a public announcement
until his daughter Elizabeth
could be told the news private-
ly and not endure the shock of
hearing It on the radio abroad.
A telephone call was put
through from London to the
Royal Lodge m Kenya where
Elizabeth and Philip had gone
*fter spending the entire night
'n a treetop roost watching ani-
is come to the watering hole
New Queen Weepi
NAIROBI, Kenya, Feb. <
(UP). Queen Elizabeth of
Great Britain broke down and
wept when a radio-telephone
call from London informed
her that her father, King
George VI, was dead.
The official call waa rent-
ed through a small country
post office in Kenya, and tea
nearly 30 minutes to get
through.
in the Jungle of the British pro-
tectorate.
The King's death came as a
stunning blow to. "titon*, for
they had. felt that b
way to fair if not ItfL
People were weeping openly as
the crowd at the gates of Buck-
ingham Palace in London swell-
ed by the hour.
The flag was lowered to half
mast on the Victoria tower of
the Houses of Parliament against
a sombre background of a cold
and cloudy grey day.
Theaters, movies and the stock
exchange were closed and de-
partment stores put black drape*
on the windows.
No Official
Word On Funeral
LONDON, Feb. 8 (UP)
There was no official word to-
day as to funeral plans for the
late King George VI.
Court circles said, however,
it was likely that a funeral
service would be held in Vest-
minster Abbey, where a long
line of monarchs lie buried.
But King George will prob-
ably be burled alongside his
father, King George V, in the
family chapel at Windsor
Castle.
At hbi father's funeral in 193*, Albert (In light coat) walked
l? nK_,two other **' behind the new King Edward
VIIIa king who was to give up his throne In less than two
year in order to many "the woman I love."
The Duke of T.rlt happily married In 1843 to Lady Elisabeth
Angela Marguerite Bowrs-Lyon and father of two lovely
daughters, found the life of an English country gentleman:
much to his liking. King Edward's abdication in 1937 forced
* bert into a new and much more strenuous role. As the new
King George VI, he drew heavily on the strength of two wo-
menhis wife. Queen Elizabeth, and the iron-willed Dowager
Queen Mary.
Albert ts seen above u year-old baby and as the young
flying PHnce of the Royal Flying Corp* in World War I. He
was born at iork Cottage, Sandringham, Dec. 14, 1395, chris-
tened Albert Frederick Arth.r George Before becoming .
flyer, he saw action as a naval gnnnery officer in the battle
ef Jutland. As a child and youth, Albert was by nature .ulet
and shy, where his brother, the Prince of Wales, heir-apparent
to th. throne, was gay and charming.
r.Z?.hJ,* te*df"toess torto* England's trying years of World War II that bronght King
^^^Xu^SS }~^ of Ws subjf:ls- The kiM* w** * *?his rvYce and
bto.toM^?*tl!Ed "tftota. ken Buckingham Palace was bombed, Ms people loved the
ktog as another victim ef the bate. But. still he remained the svmbei *f England's great
I^^.-i2l tm^5e'. E^ff ,n ** year following World War II, Britons still took
till .?L .w tr Va5I- bei Kener* the Drtf TjMtobiS:1* f ,bmrmet,r WiU U" n ta *r,nCew *"* hi insert,
El TLt ,am,Iy ta n intormal family gathering at Balmoral Castle, Scotland, in August
iMji. History will recn.d tbat George \ I. assum-n; a heavy borden he was not born to ear-
th" arid, indwn,ub, mal "* devotion to doy won the lav* ef hie people and respect ef


MM TWO

THE PA*MA AMFMCflN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
WNID AND ruiLUHiD BY TH PANAMA AMERICAN PHUI. INC.
FOUNDID BY NIKON ROUNSIVILL IN l.li
I HARMODIO ARIAS. IDITOR
87 H STRUT B>. O. BOX 134. PANAMA. R. OP P.
TELtPHONB PANAMA NO. 2-0740 IB LlNI.l -
OILE AODRI... PANAMUtlCAN. PANAMA
Colon ofi ice 12.17 Cintkal Avinui trrwiiN IStm ano iSth Ithiii
POMION KlMI.ENTATIVI. JOSHUA B. POWIRS. INC.
34S Madison AVI NfW YORK. (17) N. Y.
IMM <'"
f" MONTH. IN AOVANCt 1.70 2.80
1*3* IX MONTH. IN AOVANCt S.SO 13.00
J" ON VIA*. IN AOVAN________________ IS.BO 24 OO
roa away and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
CNDRY SUNDAY SUBJECTS
.This will be news to Wall Street and to Howard Hughes. The
fact was reported here thai "foreign money" was out to buy
Hughes' controlling Interest In RKO. A topmost Industrialist has
giver, me the Inside: The promoter of the scheme is Serge Ruben-
stein, millionaire ex-convict speculator. He approached several
financiers, seeking an American "name" to front for the syndicate,
which is composed mostly of sharpshootlng investors In Switzer-
land. They lapped up all the stock available In the open market
without shooting ihe price too high. They planned to make
Hughes a proposition for enough more to let them take over, j
Hughes will not sell. Bui Rubensteln Is still finagling.
Beauteous Ruby Keeler is here, to appear with Ken Murray
oh video. It made me blink to learn it is an "old-timers" program.
Ruby was the child charmer In Texas Oulnan's troupe until she
married Al Jolson. She became a film star, then retired. But she
is and looks youthful, and I resent classifying her as a memory.
Vivian Blaine calls me to say yes, she did quit twice in the
midst of a "Guys and Dolls" performance, and her stand-in sub-
bed during five shows. "But," she says, "I am not 'emotional.'
That stuff went out with high button shoes. My vocal chords
choked up. And I am not battling with Pinky Lee on our television
program. Oh, a few script differencesbut that's show business.
Please, Jack, straighten that outthat I am not emotional,"
Vivian asksemotionally.
People Deserve
More Voice
In Primaries
By BRUCE BI08SAT
At a recent news conference
President Truman dropped a re-
mark about wishing we could
have a direct national primary
for the selection of presidential
nominees.
No one can be sure the Presi-
dent meant what he said, since
he gets pretty flippant in these
bouts with the press over his
1952 intentions. But it- might
well be argued that there Is
some sound sense in this pro-
position.
In only IS states of the 48
Is there now a "presidential"
primary, and In several of
those 16 the popular expres-
sion of sentiment Is purely
advisory instead of binding on
the delegates to the national
convention. The other 32
states select delegates in state
conventions, where the peo-
ple's voice is heard only in-
directly.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, IS
^i^yWSIINGTON,
MERRY-GO-ROUND
PMW PlARtON
The Miamis may be the next cities hit by jewel robberies.
Many of our bad boys are there now. With horse gambling down
to chlckenfeed here, they flocked down to Florida, where they
found the situation about as lean They have to get money. They
are accustomed to high incomes. Not a few of them are cokeys,
arid supporting the habit costs from $50 to $1,000 a week for those
who are hooked deep. So they get guns and go on the heist. Their
confederates in black market stuff and table-games (which have
increased as bookmaking faded) and at the track "finger" the
"prospects'' who have the valuables. They then know where to
go and when, so they can strike oil Instead of dry holes.
Rosemary Williams is perturbed. She is 24, a blonde from the
stage, and owns the Toast of the Town cafe, doing fine. Then
cernes Rosemary Williamson, a brunette, splashed with ink in her
imbroglio with her $56,000 "Creep." People read too fast. 8o there
is confusion, and Miss Williams (not "son") knows people look at
her strangely and whisper, "She looks like such a nice girl, too!"
Lorry Raine, the dream-voiced recording star, got panicky
and fled to Baltimore for a physical re-check. She has been diet-
ing strenuously. Bob Eberly, who was to follow her at Chubby's,
in Philadelphia, collapsed after a weight-control course and had
to cancel. That scared Lorry green.. .A top public relations man
has a girl rep on the way for a talk with Tito. Will It be a cam-
paign for the Yugo dictator here?.. .Florence Desmond, English
comedienne, instead of playing the Roxy, Is In Doctors Hospital
with bronchitis.. Elsie Janls is gravely ill, too.
Churchill Kohlman, the Pittsburgh night watchman, father
of three, who wrote the gold-mine Number 1 song-hit. "Cry," came
to New York on business therewith. His wife wired him to come
right homeor he might lose his job!
Anyone who understands the
workings of politics knows that
state party conventions are
largely under the control of the
party machinery.
The slate of delegates which
emerges from such conclaves Is
in almost every instance the
product of party organization
decisions.
The successful rebellions
against organization control are
relatively rare.
Actually, the conventioi:
method of choosing delegates,
.epresentatlves and even no-
minees is a carry-over from
earlier American history.
It reflects the compromise
made by the Founding Fathers
between those who wanted true
democracy and those who fear-
ed too direct expression of the
popular will.
(NEA Radlo-Telephotos)
GEN. DEAN IN PRISON CAMP These are pictures of MaJ. Oen. William F. Dean, the for-
mer commander of the 34th Division who was captured by the Reds in August, 1950, in his
prison camp at Pyongyang, North Korea. At left, he keeps in trim by shadow boxing, and,
at right, he relaxes by playing Korean chess with a Red guard. Taken by a Communist
photographer, these pictures show Dean apparently recovered from an Injury which for
months prevented him from raising his arm.

Sa royan Cast
By Petet Edson
WASHINGTON(NBA) Recall of Henry W.
(the Dutchman) Orunewald for testimony before
california Congressman Cecil King's investiga-
tion committee is a smart effort to pry some in-
formation loose before a District of Columbia
Federal Grand Jury goes into the tax fraud case,-
beginning this week.
little formal education. Yet he succeeded where
Nathan failed. He Usted a score of profitable
businesses.
He was rich, but he denied indignantly, "I
never carried no $25,000 in cash."
Whether Orunewald la the central figure a-
round whom all the other characters revolved
The Palace Thatre Is iram'eally searching for an attraction
to foo.v the scn.aUonal run of Judy Garland, who closes there
Feb. 17. Judy not only came in at a bargain percentage (only bet-
ween $12,000 and.$15,000 a week!) but she had an appeal far be-
yond even her great talent; it was a come-back, she had been a
naughty girl, and she had never" played her dream-theatre or any
other on Broadway. Everyone was pulling for her.
The logical solution would seem to be another film star. But
there are few who are without commitments that would inter-
fere with a run or even a limited engagement. Most of those who
can do anything on a stage have played the big picture-houses
across the street. And they took down fantastic pay, more than
the Palace could gross.
Sophie Tucker declined, pleading that she has a routine aimed
at the cafe trade and it would take her weeks to perfect one for
a return to her old love, vaudeville. (It would require even longer
to dry-clean the material she's using now, maybe.) Most other
cabaret performers lack drawing-power. Jimmy Durante, Joe E.
Lewis and Martha Raye are fighting each other In Miami and
not turning 'em away. Joey Adams at the Five O'clock Club, is
more than holding his own with them all. Durante would be a
good Broadway gamble, but he Isnt free. Danny Kaye will be
booked lp, but is not yet available now. Stars like Bob Hope and
Bing Crosby make $50,000 to $60,000 a week on personal appear-
ances these days. The Palace cannot take in more than $40,000
doing 15 capacity shows a week.
Shelley Winters and her guy, Vlttorla Gassman, are due in
today. She'll plug her pic. "Meet Danny Wilson"...N. Y. Atomic
Energy Board chairman Murray S. Levlne set this week-end for
his marriage to a wealthy French girl, of the Luwenstene family
.. .Marilyn Monroe, screen siren. Is being monopolized by Nick
Ray, the director.. .Yvonne De Carlo seen dining at Majors Cabin
with picture executive Charles Slmonelli.. .The Sterling Haydens
withdrew their divorce papers, but that doesn't mean things are
smoochy there.
THIS IS TOUR FORUM THi MADUS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
l Mail B It an open lorum ftt raasn ol Tha Pi Mm Ami-
tean Utter on rtctivtd arat.fully ass aia hondl.d in wh.ll, cea-
tiaVatiel ataaaar.
M you contribu. latts dan' .. imp.ti.rrt It k doain't .pp... rita
MSI day. Lett.,, .,. pualnhad l rear rec.iv.d.
| Bit ry ta kaaa th. Isttars limit., t. en. p.,. i.nath.
Msattfy of Icrt.i writer, a) h.l. in strict** ceafioaac*.
Tali n.-ipopcr ouum.i no rdponsibilitv far rot.m.nti ., aaiaiaa.
axp...Md la letter, .om raodets. "I ' aa.aiea.
NATIONALISTIC THOUGHT
4
The Mall Box Editor. Balboa
Panama American.
Panama.
Dear Sir,
. .Now1that..t5e.top bass oi the Panama Canal Company, and
2,.MLArmed F0rfMl have clearly demonstrated by recent re-
ffiiti SSSSFPf w'k annu*i leave- and <:: leave that
ftrfif if 2eilnlteIy lesser ******* It confidently expected that
SSpSiYn^in,? ?on,certed ah n their part to meet Elizabeth
anfl Philip Mountbatten. when they come through next June
One ef the Lesser Breeds.
Mail Box..............
SAN ANTONIO BUGLE
Well, the "medicos" finally got me.8*11 ADtni' TeX"'
Went to the hospital January 20th at 4 pjn. and they began
at once to get me ready for the trimming that would take olace
t 9 am. next morning. ^^ p*
The first "dope" peddler showed up at 8 am. and began his
aft with two shots in the spine, followed by a trip on the wagon
to the operating room where the big shot was waiting and when
hay thought I had no feeling south of the center of gravity
they began trimming.
I could see them moving but couldn't see what they were
doing, but after about one hour they Informed me they had re-
moved my prostate gland and the nurses would take over
The operating part was tame, but when the "hypo" girls took
over it was Just one hypo after another, until there was not a
place left for another shot. *
Managed to get back home Monday, Jan. 28, weak, but with
the old water-works again functioning fine.
From the results of the operation I see here. I would sav
Hs worth the price. Glad its over with. mia **y
Sincerely,
W. i. "Pep" Wright.
Gradually this fear lessen-
ned, and machnnery was estab-
lished to give the people closer
control over selection of their
representatives. Only a few
decades ago senators were still
being chosen for nomination
by state convention; now they
are picked in direct primaries.
The primary method finally
began to be adopted in the pre-
sidential race as well, though
its application there is still
sharply limited.
But Insofar as it does help to
measure genuine popular senti-
ment as to candidates, it must
be counted a gain.
The present primary system
is handicapped not only by
limited application but by cer-
tain attitudes that have grown
up around It.
As Is evident lr the current
campaign, there seems to be a
notion, for example, that the
"favorite son" principle should
operate In states where a lead-
ing political figure is a can-
didate.
In other words, it Is contend-
ed that the home state candi-
date should be conceded his
own territory without a fight.
Senator Taft has indicated
he will not go Into California
where Got. Earl Warren has
declared. Warren does not In-
tend to Invade Ohio, though
Harold Stassen declines to
observe this gentlemen's
agreement and hence he Is
going into Taft's bailiwick and
possibly Warren's.
Whatever the outcome reopening of the King has yet to be revealed. They all knew him He
commUtee^ hearing^ will revive interest Isas seemed to know everybody
He is the most interesting actor In the drama
because he talked the least before the King com-
mittee.
bizarre a set of characters as was ever assembled
on any stage, even for a William Saroyan play.
Key to the mystery which the King committee
has to solve Is how they all got togetner.
What a psychiatrist would do, trying to ex-
plain their behavior patterns against the widely
varying backgrounds of their environments, is
something only a psychiatrist would know.
The government lawyers in the case are all
Orunewald first came into Washington pro-
minence during the Howard Hughes w-e-taDolne
Investigation In i960.
-,S.r,inewal<1 testified then that he had charged
$750 for two days' work, then $1500 for four days'
TIIAPV t^_ ara V^____B.A- wax____- & a
But can't It be fairly argued
that this hands-off policy in
favorite-son states simply nulli-
fies, the value of the primary?
Of what purpose Is a resort
to the polls if there Is to be no
real contest among the leading
contenders?
What does it prove if Warren
takes California or Taft wins
Ohio without a real test?
Offhand it seems about as
significant as a "yes" vote in
Moscow, where there are no op-
position choices on the ballot.
If there are logical grounds
why senators and representa-
tives should be nominated in
direct primaries but presidents
should not, they ought to be
heard.
The people are supposed to
^ffffVnreign' and ll a "k
difficult to see how they can
be when they have normally so
small a voice in the choice of
major party nominees for their
highest office.
ine government lawyers in the case are all work for Sam Pryor, Panamertcan Airwavs vice
well educated They come from good families president, who thought tachone was tarmed
with respectable middle-class background. and that he was betag followed ^
None of them had much money beyond his gov- It was brought out In testimony before a S#n-
emment career salary of from $10,000 to $15,000 ate subcommittee headed bTMatth1wVel7of
a year. It was enough to live on and raise a fam- West Virginia that Joseph W. Shimon a Wash-
**JSVSSttl!S3& 1? ftJ9%: r ***** P0"" lieutenant accudrtwl^-UppWg
cS^^JS^tS^S^^& .runewald's Washington ho,
claim to distinction.
Charles A. Oliphant, ex-chief counsel of Bu-
reau, of Internal Revenue, Is a mldwesterner He did tell th* NpMv mmmittn atwuit th. -u
^counsel ** ***** "*"* TreMUry ^^^J^^Sm9tS^Si
cruei counsel he is called on to testify.
Abraham Teltlebaum whose charges of a He called it "riivrttrrinti *,* .m it .,.
h^ht^n SSffKH "2 o*" cbWter. P?^StonoS^Xg wUh a tem?
brought on this whole exposeis another law- perature of 107 enough to kill most men Onina
hYrdTJT^lr' SCh0oL He Came UP thC ^ "uXr ocscffi thf dlSSSe aS ? a'n
He wal attorney for Al Capone and helped aPPentUX- "'" ba*S' and l *ot of them"
seven weeks.
But nothing was ever hung on Orunewald hlm-
did tell the Neebz commi..
particularly when
get the late gangster's income tax law sentence
shortened.
' Another Chicagoan. Bert Naster, was an elec-
trical engineer who had built up a successful
manufacturing enterprise, sold It, retired, start-
ed another business in Florida.
He, too, had been In trouble with the govern-
ment over taxes. That seems to be the common
denominator for all characters in the play.
Frank, born Froy Nathan, came up from the
Pittsburgh slums. Not much education. He seems
to have been in debt most of his life.
Yet he somehow got money to bet heavily on
the horses, gambling away even the money his
wife got from the sale of her Pittsburgh house.
His life story Is mostly an Horatio Alger book In
reversehow to live by your wits without work.
JLJUTyJCnohl the New Yorker, like Nathan, had derwflter.
Orunewald was born in South Africa In 189$
and came to the U. S. when 17. He was In the U.
S. Navy -for five years. He worked for the NavB
Y. M. C. A. for a While, then got a job as in-
vestigator In Department of Justice, before there
was an FBI
From 1918 to 1921 he was a prohibition agent.
He was discharged, though later acquitted, for a
conspiracy to violate the prohibition laws.
Then he became, successively, an Investigator
'or the Foreign Relations Committee and the
Republican National Committee. Today he claims
to be a Democrat.
He was a private investigator from 1922 to 1928
without regular Income.
Then he became sn Investigator for the late
Henry Marsh, New York marine Insurance un-
Why Are We Losing?
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
Happy Harvey i
Relax Barvey, all is weU,
A Job yon found, as we can tell!
Our Want Ad you answered to a
*eu youll be president, wait
WASHINGTON. The frightening disparity get important monej until six month after Ko-
between Western and Soviet production of mod- rea. : ~
em Jet combat planes two-to-to-one for Jet Then comes the problem of design. Air Force
bombers and six-to-one for jet interceptors at procurement officers are such fussy perfectlon-
the end of this year was recently reported IsU that designs are endlessly alterei so that
T*S,.5ISeHi -., i ,, productton is constantly delayed or stopped.
The same disparity exists In all weapons ex- The Army's Ordnance officers are worse
cepnl..at0mlc bom_bfl- notably Including tanks. some expert judges believe that only Stalin's
This means that we are terrlfylngly far be- simple system would work witn them
hind in the arms race in which we have been Here it is worth recalline- the Oerman a*.
iorced to engage. And it Is time to ask why perlence. """n W
this should be so. Oerman Defense Minister Albert Speer actual-
It Is not an easy question to answer. ly doubled German aircraft production in 1943-
The top men have great ability and drive. , while Germany was receiving the explosive
This government has rarely enjoyed the services equivalent of about fifty ato nic bombs
ot more able public servants than, for example, Speer wrought this miracle, according to ex-
Secretary of Defense Robert Lovett, Secretary pert Judgment, simply by taking procurement
of the Air Force Thomas Finletter, and Under -Ight out of military hands, and accentini in
Secretary of the Army Archibald Alexander. effect, about 2 per cent short of the ida In
The Pentagon has, more-over, all the money design In order to gain a 100 Der cent imnrovn-
it can spend at its disposal. And there Is no ment In production. vy,
reason on earth why this country should be out- Yet on the civilian side as well the Drocure-
produced by a country with, for example, leas ment problem Is complicated bv 'the fart thai
than a third of our steel production. In the present national mood, really able men
Then why are we being out-produced? The are interested only in the very top Jobs
answer to this llfe-and-death question apparent- Thus the procurement and allocatton' agencies
ly falls into several parts. are largely staffed with Peckaruffiap^unior law-
In the first place, we are still paying, and yers or clerks, unwilling to take responsibility
shall continue to pay, for the follies of the and interested only In keeping their noses clean
Louis Johnson era. finally, the booming civilian eSmomy com-
It takes as long as two years or more between petes directly with rearmament, despite all the
the time when money Is voted for aircraft pro- the talk about "guns and butter too Offered
curement and the moment when a modern com- high prices and good profits for television sets
bat plane Is produced and ready for combat, or automobiles, manufacturers are naturally re-
Thus the Air Force Is largely living even now, luctant to accept less profitable government
a year and a half since the Korean aggression, contracts. ..!
on the Johnson-imposed starvation diet. The pressure to "go easy" is further lncreas-
Yet this is not the whole explanation. Even ed by labor leaders like Walter Reuther who
allowing for this "lead time" we shall still be are equally reluctant to accept temporary un-
greatly outdistanced by the Soviets two, and employment resulting from conversion.
three, and probably even four years after Korea. These are some of the reasons why so little
One key to the trouble lies in the fact that has actually been spent for arms; why even
out of $48,000,000,000 appropriated for defense now, with the Soviets outproducing us by a huge
(including Mutual Security) since Korea, only margin, the aircraft industry still largely oper-
about $17,000,000,000 have actually been spent ates on a one-shift basis,
for weapons and other "hard goods." But there Is a deeper reason than all these.
Thus our rearmament program has been more Despite blunt warnings, for example In the
nearly a $17,000,000.000 program than a 968,000.- able reports of Sen. Lyndon Johnson's lnves-
000.000 program Part of the trouble certainly tigatlng commlttae. the country simply cannot
lies In the cumbroumess of our appropriation, be brought to believe In the reality of the dan-
allocation, design and procurement systems. ger.
Before the war, Josef Stalin called in his de- There has been so much self-congratulatory
signers and ordered them to produce the best talk about "the miracles of American produc-
tank in the world. Designs were submitted to tion" that the simple fact that the Soviets are
him in which speed was sacrificed to armor and now greatly outproducing us in such categories
fire-power, or vice versa. as combat Jet planes is dismissed as inherently
Stalin calmly ordered that the Soviet tanks incredible,
should be superior to Nazi models In every way- Yet the facts are as stated, and they mean
speed, firepower armor. Otherwise, unfor- Just one thing. Unless this country can snake
tunately, the designers would have to be shot oft its complacency soon, and prepare to make
as wreckers. a real national effort, we shall for the first
Stalin got his tank, the M-34, and It Is even time in our history be in acute danger of de-
now one of the best In the world. feat In war.
Drew Pearson Say$: Military battles civilians for control
of economy; Secretary Lovett is ignored by military
procurement; Small contractor saves taxpayer'
money. r '
., Y,tStHh^2I?.N^TheactorsJare no* th "*e ten years
ago but the stage and plot are Identical to one of the most vital
dramas fought during World War II namely the battle h
tWee,nJ5,,V,manf and the mllltarv of cntrol of American economV
On the outcome of this battle depends the questlonfVhethe*
StVfifiUS B0 dn*wly mto the, red; also whether wi?wuT
SLB2 over * s.ome of the totalitarian systems we have
so consistently opposed in Europe. '.V aT*
The present tug-of-war In the Pentagon isn't as dramaMn
during World War II. Not much of It has even leakedta the
But the basic conflict Is there Just the same and Is one
ur2S?MWi2r J? mi"ta.ry are duplicating orders, contracts and
supplies between the Army, Navy and Air Force in a manner
costing the taxpayers billions of unnecessary dollars. manner
n niS^l marH' 1fader owthe notary clique was Oen. B,
.Bomerven. His opposite number on the other side was Donald
Nelson, (malrman of the War Production Board. uazm9
tw- ^-l"8fi*fP V* whther th military were to dominate
Tr?lreni^.ln,Hlutrla ?"*"& ontro1 ow factories, decidehow
much goods the nation could have.
Today It Is mild-mannered, hard-working Secretary of De.
if"?6 if1?; uPposa to be the boss of the military, who now
finds himself their quiet target. Lined up alongsldThunJack
Small perspiring, efficient chairman of the Munitions Board
There is no personal sniping on the part of the military.
&&J'Jal!& u-t>-isntle campaign to remove the controls
which the Secretary pf Defense, under the Constitution, is sup-
posed to exercise but doeent. ^^
tw.?1-.,BadIe?.*nd. thet ot chlef8 of **f are not part of
S2L*2SStf^*S? ^Sf ledJ,y the Procurement arm of the mil-
itary which Is that part of the armed services which spends two-
thirds of our national budget and can,really wreck the nattcm
At present, they have adopted the subtle tactic of warning
up to the Budget Bureau, of going over Lovett's head of the Di-
rector of the Budget.
jJ0-*?1*''^. mUiUry *n want to report on what they've
done after they've done it, thus freeing themselves from the
direction of Lovett, of Deputy Secretary of Defense William C.
Foster, of the Munitions Board, and research and development.
Meanwhile the military are over-ordering with almost no
regard for American economy. For Instance, they have called
for more nickel than the world's entire supply.
And despite the demands for aluminum, the Air Force re-
cently released 15,000,000 pounds it couldnt use.
Despite the huge orders of machine tools, also, all three ser-
vices found they didn't need certain multipurpose lathes which
they over-ordered by 300 and 300 percent.
The Air Force, for Instance, ordered 900 and accepted
Tnle may sound like a humdrum, prosaic problem. But It gets
right down to the root of high taxes, Inflation, and the whole
question of whether the nation can keep up such spending and
SAVING. THE TAXPAYER
One congressman who has worked day and night to keep
military toes to the fire re surplus spending la rough, tough, fair-
minded Eddie Hebert, Louisiana Democrat.
sor^c6,!*^ '
waste is Sen. Lyndon Johnson of Texas. *
Illustrating the way the military throw money around with-
out regard to the taxpayer or civilian economy is a saving ofJ
94SS.00O recently made by Congressman Hebert in the Navy's
purchase of water-distilling machines. The incident also il-
lustrates how one lone taxpayer can help save money.
The lone taxpayer Is John E. Pottharst. of the Meco Co., New
Orleans, who, when he bid low on a Navy contract, yet didn't get
the contract, notified watchdog Congressman Hebert.
The Cleaver-Brooks Co. of Milwaukee bid 9900,000 higher on
the distilling machines than Pottharst in New Orleans.
But despite that, the Navy, apparently unconcerned about
saving money, instructed the Army engineers to award the 79
percent of the contract to the high bidder.
The other 25 percent went to Re finite of Omaha which was
about 9100 lower than Meco of New Orleans.
However, when Pottharrst of Meco protested to Congressman
Hebert, the Navy finally began to have some slight consideration
for the taxpayers' money.
As a result, Cleaver-Brooks reduced Its bid by about $955,000.
This was a slice of about $2,000 on each water-distilling unit.
So while bidder Pottharst dldnt get the contract, he cud help
his fellow taxpayers have a lot of money.
For, In addition to the $355,000 directly saved on the bid,
lethargic Rear Adm. Joseph Jelley of the Bureau of Yards and
Docks has Anally waked up and Is planning to squeeze about
$100,006 more out of earlier contracts.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
A bill to force tax settlements into the open has been intro-
duced by California's alert Sen. Richard Nixon.
It is now against the law for the Internal Revenue Bureau
to report the final settlement of tax cases, though the cases
themselves are made public.
In other words, whereas the public has no way of double-
checking on the tax fixers, as of today, under the proposed Nixon
bill the Treasury would be forced to reoort all future tax settle-
ments to Congress, plus all the tax settlements dating bask five
years
SIDECIANCES
By Galbraitb
Consider our system. What with Concession-
al debate, the Air Force did not really begin to
(Cepyrlgbt, 1993, New Terk Herald Tribune Inc.)
t. a. ihf. a. rm. it-
tuf. m.f aan*-,*. y
"The bees Just turned off a light that wasn't being
, get sot for Me lecture on the national debtl

asm


.--------------------------------------
'



WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY , 1S5

THE r AM AM A AMERICA! AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
1
II! HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
HOLLYWOOD. (NEA> Mil-1 during his entire Hollywood c*-
ton Berle's hint to Hollywood ,reer.
friend? that thl will be his last. That"? a real eye-opener tor
season tor his Texaco sponsor film stars who are still sneering
has posed the question:
Wilt Milton Berle be uncrowned
as the king of telerision in 1952?
at the small-screen entertain-
ment.
Joan Davis is set for an NBC-
It/s the biggest on-the-quiet. TV show starting in the fall,
behlnd-the-cameras story of the i Now the ..big argument is whe-
new video year. There are twolther it will be on film or live,
versionsand take your choice, jJoan's holding out for celluloid.
Uncle Mlltle's story Is that the | Goodman Ace. about TV mys-
show has, been "nothing but itery shows:
headaches," and that he's had a "Just plain murder.". ..Holly-
long series of differences with aWOod's latest antl-TV propagan-
vlce president of the Advertising da line: "TV.la better than ne-
agency handling the account, ver."... George Raft and Lou
One of his beefs was Sid Stone's | costello are the latest telefilm
JACOBV ON BRIDOf
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service ,
middle commercial. Sid recently
was dropped from the show.
The other version is that the
King of TV for the last three
vears, and stUl the top man, will
be sliopmg In the rating now
that Hollywood's big-name big-
time comedians are moving into
video contention.
If and when the sponsor's axe
partners. Lou will finance
Oeorge as a two-fisted but gun-
lets television detective. The
first half-hour picture releases
Feb. .14.
Mercedes McCambrldge. who
dpes "Defense Attorney" on thei
air, will do the telefilm version |
.. Crai*; Stevens replaces Joel i
"Texas Hangars." Joel, who
makes only one or two movies a
vear. lust didn't want to work
faMs on Berle's head, he'll still do, McCrea in the video version of
an hoar show for NBC. where he
is under long-term contract.
Oily Madison and his pal. An-
dv Devine, are set for five years
of Wild Bill Hickok films. Andy,
veteran of 25 years in the mov-
ies, claims he's received more
fan mall since the show went on
the video waves last fall than
nob
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Wast North
Pass l*
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Eaat
Pats
Pass
Opening lead4> Q
that"hard... WiUiim "f. Broid"^ ttg ^Temembr. *&
kok films, is shooting his second -
TV series. "Consultation Room,"
dealing with a doctor's cases.
Gamboa's BHI Kern
Earns B.Sc. Degree
With'Distinction'
Karl William (Bill1) Kern, son
of Mr. and Mrs. James C. Mac- j-
Plans of Peter Shaw, husband
In a hand. They'd be even more
surprised if they saw the experts
at a tournament, discussing ev-,
ery hand that they have played,
each expert remembering the
of Angela Lansbury. to film the "", Toclt on"",'eachcard in
"Tish" stories for TV with ZaSu "! S.n0i eaCh Card to
Pitts and Lea Penman have
struck a snag.
A New York producer claims
that authoress Mary Roberts
Rlnehart gave bim the rights' to
the "TJah" stories. Watch for le-
gal fireworks
very single hand.
This Is not as difficult as It
sounds. TQ the expert, every'
card tells a story. If a much eas-!
ler to remember a meaningful'
story than to remember a series
lot unrelated facts.
'. t- The contract In today's hand
Now that he's making fllms'is not'particularly exciting, but
Aulay of Gamboa, graduated | especially for TV. circus star u gives me a chance to show
'with highest distinction" onlCIyde Beattv and attorneys' are how each card tells a story. It's!
Jan. '27 from Purdue University conferring about; those old Beat- all so logical that South has no
with a bachelor of science. de- ty movies showing on the home i reason to forget what has hap-
gree in chemical engineering.: screens. Beatty claims the dls-!pened.
Tht commencement exercises; trlbutor failed to get his permls-
at which BUI received hla de-
gree were attended by his mo-
ther. Mrs. Edith MacAulay, and
Mr. and Mrs. John MacAulay of
Michigan City, Ind.
Since his graduation he has
been affDlated with the Shell
Petroleum Co. In Houston, Tex.
sion for their revival. west opened the queen of
-------- I spades, and East had to win
Rochelle Hudson, a pre-war .with the king. When East went
f Um star. Is set for a comeback I into a short huddle and then re-
in. The unexpected." a drama- turned the three of diamonds, it
ic ewes. ...Oale storm will was perfectly clear that East had
star in 13 half-hour reltglous.no more spades,
films.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Ginger Rogers is the winner In
Now South knew that West had
-.started with A-Q-J-8-3 of
a Uve-vs-film battle. All herspades. Nevertheless. East had
shows, starting In September,'not opened the bidding. Hence
will be on film. Shooting starts he could not have the ace of dia-
1 in April on the first 13. all dra- monds as well as the strong
matlc shows. spades
, W. 100.080 r.fi. Moa
Presents
.-tiiitlA *--' ..i*... ...... ..
-Today, Wednesday, Fob.
Jtaffl*
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15French In the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorite
: 00Happy The Humbug Cla.
Alfaro. S.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Paul Temple rBBC)
7:80BLUE RIBBON 8P0RTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and commentary by
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Jam Session (VOAi
8:30The American Book
Shelf
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:00The Human Body (BBC)
9:30The Haunting Hour
10:00The BBC Playhouse
(BBC I
11:00 The Owl'a Nest
Midnight-Sign Off.
Thursday, Feb. 1
A.M.
6:00Sign OnAlarm Clock
ClUb
7:30Morning Salon
8115NBWS (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEWS
9:15SACRED HEART PRO-
GRAM
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
ll:QONEWS
11:6aOff the RVord (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEWS
M*.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popuar Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1U5EXCURSIONS IN
BNCE
2:00<;all for Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamuslca Story Time
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite -
6:00Happy The HumbugCla.
Alfaro. S.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7-80Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:J0BLUE RIBBON 8PORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:1)0 News and commentary
(VOA)
8:15Arts and Letters (VOA)
8:30Radio University (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:80Take It from Here 10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The OWl'a Neat
la-.tD-Slgn Off "
Explanation of Symboli
VOAvoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasts
Corp. 7 .
RDFEadiodiifuslon rranoabe
First firm in- a new science-
fiction series, "Rocky Jones.
Space Ranger'1 goes before the
cameras at the Hal Roach stu-
dio in February Ditto Cesar
Romero's "Passport to Danger"
films.
Teleforum: Olivia de Havil-
land. about TV:
^evlawn W fane a tod-
send to many worWrfc people.
Think of the trouble and expense
It aave.v-babv sitters, narklne
and things like that.
"But after so long a time there
"omes a day when these oeonle
Ins* have to'get out of the house
Hollvwood will go on nrod'iring
great movies nd people will go
on attending them."
Comedian Hennv Youngman Is
-<* for IS telefilm shorts titled.
"Hennv Youngman's Plav-
Toimd."... Film produce Sol
Lesser h* added three TV films
*o his 195? Drortuction slate-,..
John Hod'ak's the latest film
star lumolng to TV. One of the,
reason wh" he ta'k-ed Mmelf
out of his MOM contract. Is that]
there w* a "no TV" clause in
the small print.
So South put the king of dia-
monds to win the second trick.
Now South was sure of a dia-
mond, two hearts, and either
three ot four clubs. He needed
four clubs to make his contract.
How should he play the suit?
Since he was doing his plan-
ning early. H was easy for him
.to Terr)ember what hadhappen-
;ed On the previous trick. East
'had led the three of diamonds.
Evidently, East had only four
'diamonds.
This meant that West also had
four diamonds. Since West was
, known to have five aades, it was
clear that West could have only
four cards in hearts and clubs
together.
South decided that West was
short in clubs. He therefore led
a club to dummy's ace and re-
t' rned a club to finesse the ten.
When this finese succeeded the
contract was safe.
If you have trouble with your
bridge memory, just try to read
every nossible meaning from
ea^h nlay. Your memorv trouble
will disappear completely.
LUX THEATRE
(AIR-CONDITIONEDi
OPENING TOMORROW
A HIQH-VOLTAOE MELODRAMA WITH YOUR
FAVORITE MOVIE ACTORS I
ATC Comes Up WithCost Conscious Idea
SHOULDER TO SHOULDER ACAINST TRUMAN Repub-
lican presidential hopeful Sen. Robert Taft, left, and leading
Soulhero Democrat Sen. Harry Byrd of Virginia stood "shoulder
to shoulder against the growing socialism and government control"
of the Truman administration. The two adminit'ratlon critics made
a joint appearance before the American Medical Association con-.
vention in Los Angeles.
The Army Transport a 11 o n
Corps recently came up with a
coat consciousness idea which,
when in full operation, will pro-
vide direct express service of
fully loaded truck trailers from
inland depots In the United
States to overseas depots.
The first shipment, consisting
of three trailers of standard
commercial design, each carry-
ing complete Individual ship-
ments, was received early this
month at San Francisco Cal.
The trailers were hauled by mo-
tor vehicle of a commercial
trucking firm directly to ship-
side. There the trailers were
lifted aboard freight vessels as
cargo for the Far East Com-
mand.
Operation "Vanex." which the
,new aervlce Is called. Is designed
to meet several cost conscious-
ness objectives. Loading and un-
loading from one carrier to an-
other is unnecessary. Storage
and rehandling is also elimina-
ted.
In addition the operat ion:
speeds up shipment-of priority
materiel, assures better cargo se-
curltv and provides for exped-1
tlous movement of high value;
cargo and completely assembled!
equipment.
The "Vanex" express service j
Is another example of cost con-i
sciousness thinking throughout]
the United States Army.
ITS MOVUtTIME...
{Panama (^anal /heaters
Showing Tonight!
TERRIFIC REDUCTIONS continue af
LA MODA AMERICANA
GREAT SALE
GIRLS DRESSES
from 1.99
NYLON HOSE
954* 1.25
BALBOA
Air-Condition*
S:15 :!____
Robert HUTTON o Stive BRODIE
"THE STEEL HELMET"
_ALSO SHOWING THURSDAY
DIABLO HTS.
<:1S 7:45
Ron RANDELL o June VINCENT
"The Lone Wolf And His Lady"
rharadajr "The Man Who Cam T Dinner"
COCO LI
:15 8:M
Btte DAVIS, o Monte WOOIXEY
"The Man Who Came To Dinner"
rburacay "LAW OF THE BARBARA COAST"
GAMBOA
Audie MURPHY a M.irp.uerlle CHAPMAN
"KANSAS RAIDERS"
__________ BRIGHT VICTORY"
MARGARITA
.' <:15 T:45
ii ii 1i
Kirby RANT Marpu-et FIELD
"YUKON MANHUNT"
Thurtday "ARSENIC. AMD OLD LACK^_
fPKTORAI AvB GARD!- FR J->me MASON
(.niJIV/OMI. rANOORA A THE FLYJNG DUTCHMAN"
Alr-Con1ttaned iTcchnl-lori
tilt A If Al-SO SHOWING THURSDAY
Gory Cooper in "DISTANT DRUMS" (A Must)
.COMING SOONM! .. COMING SOON!!!
Ladies and Girls BAGS
at very low prices
Fine LINGERIE
at prices you can't beat
"CORO" JEWELRY 99<
SANDALS Fineknitted
from 2.99 BAGS
3.25
BEACH WEAR
for Ladies and Girls
and many more articles at slashed prices.
Remember:
Few days left for our Croat Sale.
LA MODA AMERICANA
102 Central Avenue Panam
THE ATLAS
GARDEN
IS NOW OFFERING
DAILY FROM I to S P.M.
Tom Collins ..............25
Ram .............I.Z5
John ..............25
Ward T...............MS
Frozen Daiquiri .........i.3t
" Mint Julep ......it
Orange Ade......|J
" Lime Ade ........t.2t
Martini Cocktails ........J
Manhattan Cocktails ...tvtt
Rum ft Coke............IJ
Atlas Special ........... 5
Wall of China............75
Skull and Bones.........75
Planters Punch .........1.79
Scotch and Soda.........I.M
FROM OUR KITCHEN
"Fresh Sea Food
at all times"
Broiled Lobster .........1.7S
Shrimps ........1.25
Shrimp Cocktails........IJSt
Lobster Cocktails ........I.5t
Oyster Cocktails ........M
Ceriehe Cocktails........%M
Grilled Tenderloin Steak 1.71
" Sirloin Steaks...1J
. Bib Steak .......1.25
" Pork Chops....... 1.15
Broiled Milk Fed Chicken \M
Arroz eon PoUo..........1.75
SPECIAL TODAY
Patacn con Puerco......1.25
Chile con Carne...........35
Curiosidades de Mono... 1.25
Tea, Coffee or a Glass of
Beer with the above meals
Curb Service at all hours
around Dance Row.
Good enchanting music
NIGHTLY
ii

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"HE RAN
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BELLA VISTA
SPANISH PROGRAM!
The Extraordinary
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"LA ORQyiDEA"
- Starring -
LAURA HIDALGO
CECILIA THEATRE
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INCOMPARABLE DOUBLE PROGRAM)
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"SECRET EVIDENCE"
Also: Abu NAGEL. In
"DAWN" EXPRESS"
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Eric
PORTMAN
Nadia
G RAY
ENCANTO THATRk
" Vivian Leigh, In
"A STREETCAR
NAMED DESIRE"

Burt Lancaster, in
MAN OF_BBONZE
riVOLI THEATRi
Bln( Crosby, in
"A Connecticut Yankee"
Also
Alan Udd. In
T^E GREAT. GATSBY^
CAPITOLIO THfATRE
"ROAR OF THE IRON
HORSE," (4-5)
Wreck Of The Hesperus"
and
"CYCLONE FLRY"
*"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Ray Miiland
"SEALED VERDICT"
and
Richard Denn
"gg*EN WBBE SAVED
Tomorrow Thursday
at 8:00 a. m.
3,000 GIFTS
will be given to Inaugural Customers
IMPORTANT NOTICE: Any gifts left over tomorrow
will be handed out Friday

Justo Arosemena
An.
THE LIQUOR DEPARTMENT
of MERCADO VASCO will carry the
best assortment In tha Republic.
E. 29th Street
lo
<



PAr.r ron
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DATI.T NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY t IMS
Cargo and FreightShips and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine NeWS Supreme Court To Rule On
W Ban On Rossellini Film
TERRY-
THE ACCUSED
P. DeLong; Mr. and Mrs.
Franklyn M. Dessart; Frank C.|
DiCrosta: *Sfc Edwin F Drew:
dT4o-oa ancc ol partial* Cu and Mr, Alfred M Du Tne pteme Court agreed yes- rector and professional cast, all S '
k?H tu froniafnllnlv nark- bar and Mr and Mrs Vincent teldav Lo rule the constltu- cl whom are devout Roman Cb- S S-1
S ttSW SSASrSi Duntnd Mr and M1S f:*ri-^ :hollc_!::theappea> .aid. =
Coast Guard Puzzled
Over Tug's Disappearance
MOBILE. Ala., Feb. 6 iUP'
The
sunken
ed spot
Coast Guard as disconcerted as
a doa thai can't rind its bone. HM3 and Mrs Clifford R.
When (he 31-ton tugboat Red Eckhardt; Mr. and Mrs. Simon
Taylor sank beside a ship chan- Friedman. Mrs. Alice Glassall,
nel in Mobile Bay. Coast Guards- William Grush. Mr. and Mrs.
men marked the protruding,Phillip Hartigan: Mr. and Mrs.
wheel house with a red Mag. James E. Heady: Truitt G.
But when they went back two Hickman; Mr. and Mrs. James
davs later to secure the marker D. Hightower and son: Mr. and
With a buov thev found no flag. Mrs. P. A. Hutehinson; Miss
no vheelhousc not even a Lois H. Kennedy: Mrs. Marga-
Jiull. ret Kloiber: and Mr. and Mrs.
Since then thev have looked a- Wood row Kloiber.
' round the bay without finding
anv clue, although the craft was Sgt. Cornelius Lee: Mr. Fran-
believed to be too well made to els J. Leonard: Cpl. Raymond
break up and too heavy to be J. Maylle. Mr. and Mrs. Edgar
moved without attracting atten- G. McCallen: Mr. and Mrs Ro-
lln, bert C. Metcalf and three chll-
Thc tug owned by the Nelson;dren: Chester E. Nesheim: Mr.
Brothers Co. of Cltronelle Ala., and Mrs. Erwin Oppenheimer:
had been damaged in a collision.Mr and Mrs. E. L. O'Reilly;
and was beins brought here for and Cpl August J. Pa tricla,
repairs when it sank. Miss Sara Lou Sanders: Sgt.
_____ and Mrs. Ervin Sehrunk: Mr
Two (arro Clippers and Mrs Joseph Shulkin: Mrs. duction and divorcing KKO's ex-
Become Moviiu Vans Joseph H Sinclair: Sgt Robert hibilion business from its pro-
When a" oilman was transfer-.J. Spangler: Mr. and Mrs. Ma- duction and distribution activl-
red recentlv from Panama to.rion M. Striker; Albert A Teet- ties.
'Puerto Rico, his household goods er: Mr. and Mrs Rudolph Wei-
'and automobile made the trip ler: Victor D. Young; and Mr.
qv'-ker than he did. 'and Mrs. Paul Zabin.
1 Two Pan American World Air-
WASHINGTON, Feb. 6 (UP);writer, the producer, the dl-
law under which censors banned,
Rpberto Rossellini's controversial: f !-_ f|A.._ UJ_
Ti^MiTade."motion p*cture :3iriKC }iows worK
The New Yorlc law gives thai!
Stale's board of regents power i
to forbid the showing of any
film it considers Indecent, Im-
moral or sacrilegious.
The United States distributor
ci "The Miracle" argued that
the statue Is unconstitutionally
vague and a restraint on free-
dom of expression.
Before recessing until March
3. the court also:
1> Reversed a three-Judge
federal court In New York and
ruled. 7 to 0, that millionaire
Howard Hughes may retain $,-
000,000 worth of stock in the
New RKO theater company. The
dispute stemmed from a 1948
court degree divorcing RKO's
wavs ear^o Cllopers picked >'"
the furniture and personal ef-
fects of DonrId M. Cameron or
the Isthmus and carried them
nonston across the Caribbean to
San Juan.
' There 1' no direct air service
bv passen->er plane* between Pa-
U^maand Puerto Rico.
The cargo included 167 piece.*
of furniture and a H'llman Minx
cf.
Cameron i* assistant <;eneral
manager for Esso Standard Oil
S.A .Western Region.
SS Panaro Advance
F**enger I'st
The complete passenaer list of
the Panama as announced yes-
terday follows:
Mr. and Mrs. Albert A Al-
levrie: Pat. and Mrs. Robert L
Ambrosier: Peter Ben lev: Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas L. Dartnell-
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Davis: Guv
Argentines Admit
'Error' In Firing
At British Tars
PORT STANLEY. Falkland Is-
land, Feb. 6 The Argen-'.
tine government today Inform-1
td the British ambassador in'
Buenos Aires thai the Argentine
commander at Hope Bay. An-1
tarctica. 'acted in error" Frl-
dav in firing on a British party |
there.
Radio reports received here
ay the Argentines at Hope Bay
have relanded the stores which
Monday they brought back to
the Briilsh supply ship John
Biscoe.
The John Biscoe is reportedly i
now proceeding with the dls-.
Charge of the rest of her cargo '
at Hope Bay.
Friday. Argentines on the
hqre a i Hope Bay fired warn-
; lng shots over the heads of Brit-
lsh sailors, and later drove them
Off the beach at gunpoint.
On Keesler Field
Expansion Program
BILOXr, Miss.. Feb. 6 (UP)
All work on a $35,000.000 expan-
sion program at Keesler field
was halted today as 1200 civilian
construction workers struck for
a second time In a year in pro-
test of an open shop order.
The FLA carpenters, plumb-
ers, electritlclans and ironwork-
ers threw up picket lines before
all gates to the sprawling air
field at 5 a. m.
only 50 workers were allowed
exhibition business from Its pro- LUTnJinr rin..CC?rda.nce
riuriinn r,H riivnrrin. uvo'. v. wllh a Prlor agreement, to store
equipment and material to pro-
tect It from weather damage.
No violence was reported.
The public information office
at Keesler said all work on a
vast building program of labor-
atories, handers, barracks and
dining halls valued at $35,000,-
000 was halted.
Last-minute mediation ef-
forts, which continued until 4
a. m.. failed to reach an agree-
ment.
Walter rush, mediator for
Keesler contractors, said the
men members of the Blloxl1
Building Trades Councilstruck
in protest to the Insistence of
the Cowan Lumber Co. upon
an open shop.
The same issue caused a 13-
day strike last August.
(NEATelephoto)
JAILED Denis W. Delaney,
former collector of Internal
Revenue for Massachusetts,
is shown before he was sen-
tenced to two years In Jail
and fined $10,500 in Bos-
ton. Delaney was convict-
ed of accepting bribes while
collector.
2)Agreed to consider the ap-
peal of Tomoya Kawakita, an
American-born Japanese con-
victed of treason In Los Angeles
lor inhuman treatment of U. a.
prisoners of war in Japan dur-
.ing World War II. Kawakita
| moved to Japan before the war
and returned to California in
1946.
The New York board of re-
pents voted unanimously to ban
The Miracle," produced by ac-
tress lngrid Bergman's Italian
husband, after Roman Catholic
waders protested that It made
.. mockery of the Immaculate
JonceptioQ.
Francis Cardinal Spellman,
Archbishop of New York, order-
ed Catholics to boycott the Illm.
A number of Protestant church
leaders disagreed with the Ca-
tholic viewpoint.
The film deals with a simple-
minded woman who is seduced
by a stranger she believes to be
Saint Joseph. She imagines that
her child was conceived Imma-
culately.
The New York Court of Ap-
peals upheld the ban and Joseph
Byrstyn, Inc.. U. S. distributor
of the film, asked the high court
to intervene.
The film told the court that
the movie was Intended only toi
aepict the story of an "abuse of
a deep and simple faith."
"This was the intent of the
FIRST CO-ED COLLEGE
Oberlln Institute, now Oberlin
College, Oberlin. Ohio, opened
Dec. 3, 1833, with an enrollment
of 44 students, of whom 29. were
men and 15 women, making It the
first 100 per cent co-educational
college in the United States.
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKVS&
1TALANTA BRAISD
are offered by
"ACAROPUIOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Quiet!
BY EDGAR MARTIN
MKMiN.l GOT MR.R.
OTTA TVS' HOOK ,SO VM*
AA TW.' MACPVfc*04S
SO\\K* OOft tfftX-
ACT \S
CON-
SAFE FOR
BABY'S SKIN
LARGE 35< SMALL 21k
Wd NNft WWt.T>AW<-P*' Stt
VKfX HNPPtW
CAPTAIN EA8Y
Smitten Gal
BY LESLIE TURNE!
duns WELKE.N. Phuieteet
ONLY TWELVE WHEN YOU WERE THE
I SCHOOL KJ0TEAU.-STfR.eASy. JO I*
WERE PRINCE CHARMING HIMSELF....
YOU HARDLV KNEW I EXISTED !
LISTEN TO THIS ffl M FROM MY MEMORY BOOK.
"OH.THWUS! I PASSED HIM OV THE STREET TOM!
IT MAPPENEO SO SUDDEN I SWAUONED MY SUM
AMD FEU OVWt A TRICYCLE, BUT HE WONT
KM TO NOTICE .?j-/
TO
Amaiza Speaks Up
Cm *&*** dr. moo mmuooop tw
iPlgOlH& FLMN6 TRl4M6tE 0MMA6ETI-
OLCD SMOC*. WUtCH PREVENT M1WCWUWE
Pi** FROM -**& THE* MR) AIBLEV.,.
SMvrryLE^^^. ^ yo^fc^o^om
iFUMrKMOHrSTME \*KDSrES IT A PU5H
BT RUSS WINTERBOTUAIU
m
HUE
AL COQUINA
I* WAITING.
APATI6NTLY
ACROSS THE
^ STREET
\:
""if- j
W MV 0REAM4 YOU WEKE THE/ COMFOUHO THE
KMGHTMSMMWS ARMOR/ LUCK'. OP ML THE
who *v*o me m ne mck i car heamd for
OF TIME. AH0 I HWEK GOT \ THE ORPfR.I W0>
OVERIT.EASVt THE SCW\ TO PICK THAT OWE
wro WOE THE STUFF
EXPtOlTS THAT IV
KEPT THRU THE YEARS..
far.
VIC ELINT
RISCII L AS POP
The Spoil-Sport
BY AL VERMEEK
Secret Vault
BT MICHAEL OTWALLEl
UGS BINM
Jackpot
NOW 70 CLQSe UP" THE
'9AWK'. 7WE eUVTHifr
iHJLT THIS Ot-17 JOJT
ANI7FURBP'CX'T
THAT SECRET VAULT
SURE WAS A
A RAC PRESSES THE PUT-
TOW, THE CBMTRR SECTION
OP THE FLOOR OBSCENOS.
SNUO
AS A
SUO
AJ A,
Rue>/
#
OUB BOARDING BOUSE
with
MAJOR BOOPLE OUT OUR WAX
By J. R, miXIAJMS

\ n N* JPflrV o


E6AD,MACK
AND gSTER.'
fr MEET
SASTOfJ
GUMHORM,
ReMowned
INTERNWlON-
AL ANTIQUE
EXPERT/
mello, eovs.' Sf did he &o*i ^ 8b sure to
, THE M A3oe R >CO THE 6eCTl0Mf ASK UlM TO
OP DIKE THE f SEE THAT '
LITTLE OLrrCMjCHUMli OF COAL
soy -stuck; ^ *rwe early
mis thumb Settlers sa
IMTO AMD *1 TOCArtOAlTAS
I

mmm
SB


PAor
_- -
TSI PANAMA AMKEICAN AN INDEPDKNT DAILI NEWSPAPER
racific J^ocietu

TIL C~Jt C J(U~
&, 17, &U D. &&~ 332t
for the United States by plane
and piaiis 10 meet ner ion and
daugnter-iu-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry J. Stnnott on their arrival
in Near York laier in the month.
Canal Company Receives Four JkL
Bids To Supply Native Lumber
anuc
tu
Sc
ocie
tt
m Wm jl tu
& 195, C*t*" Vt^kmu Qmlmm 37$
Offer from four bidders to The types of lumber to be
supply 2,800.000 board feet of bought Include sigua, bamblto,
native lumber at prices ranging cedro granadino, and cedro ma-
from $115 to $170 a thousand cho. Only Aserradero Cerro
board feet were received Mon- Punta entered offers to supply
the oaiuoa union Cnurch are day by the Panama Canal Com- |the five separate Item of cedro A*1 Informal dinner partv was from the University of Texas, at .rmimi. ti.jl.
j sponsoring a "Baby Shower" tor pany. j granadino, a h'gh Quality native Wen at the home of Mr. and;Auatin. Tuesday. January M. She JCElSr_sfrHL- '
I the Nursery Department of the; I cedar which is used extensively i Mrs. Carl Ender. of the Civilian, la at present visiting h--r uncle !__ "\.rjiinav". '
bunaay Scnool. Ail members of The toUl cost of the lumber In fine mill work such 'Area at Port Oulick for Mrs. O'-'and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. J. A
"Mem And Daa l la.
Te Sponsor Shower
mwu ana isad" Class of
.MRS O'CONNOR ENTERTAINED INFORMALLY
Mrs. Morgan P. O'Connor, of Washington, D. C. who is
visiting her family in Colon, has boon entertained informally
by number of friends.
Saturday Mr. nd Mrs. Cecil Alberga had Mrs. O'Connor
a their luncheon guest at their home at Brasos Heights.
Also present were Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ender.
held t the Margarita Scout
Room at the former hospital
building. Thursday at 7:30 p.m.,
for the purpose of organizing
! Cub Pack at Coco Solo
All parents who are interested
are invited to attend
me church are invited to attend I at prices offered would amount shelving and framing- Connor last evening. Their oth- Shields in Houston. Texas
and bring a gift suitable for a> to more than $328,000. This is i The lumber bids were opened er UMt* were Mr *nd Mrg Mf and M,rs Bmefeld
nursery aged t3-5) chlrd on Frl- : the largest Ingle order o na- In the office of the Superlndent'Ralph Lam.
Brownies to Have Picnic
of New
picnic at
noon Saturday at the Point.
They will meet at the home of
Mrs Harry Seaman. House 7,
*'I New Cristobal, at 12:00 m. Bach
"Q KiM 111 u_;_ 1____!__. J________.
day at 7:30 p. m. In tne Church
Parlors.
Raby Bembenek
Christened Saturday
The iniant daugnter of Mr.
and Mrs. Ted J. Bembenek. of
Curunau, was christened leresa
| del Carmen Bembenek on Sat-
! urday afternoon at a ceremony
! hold in the Sacred Heart Chape) I Pascal, of Boquete.
i in Ancon with Father Wye of-
ficiating.
Godparents re Miss Nina E.
Anguizola nd Mr. Stephen
Dili. 1
tlve lumber over sought on bid of Storehouses" Present "were
by the Canal. It Is being bought number o prominent Panama ; **** w\. J*w Arr * /"
to supply the requirement* in'lumbermen or mill operators. m Mr Nell Wardlaw. a former from employment with the Locks
the quarters construction pro- It was announced following Atlantic Side resident, arrived. Division.
gram for the coming fiscal year., the opening of bids that It 2? pJ'ne. !iond?y "om Miami.
i rfav.'She i* visiting Mr. nd Mrs
will Join their daughter m that ^ wl" b*n her hot dog, and
city. Mr Bornefeld is retiring U? *ndthe rttnOimmtM will
fi-nm mnlncnunf nttK t I, I ,.l>o OC UimiSneO
The four bidders were: Ase-
rradero Cerro1 Punta o El Vol-
can; Osmond L. Maduro of Pa-
nama City; Carlos H. Bravo of
Boquete: and Alberto Lpez
MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS CORNELIUS STELLINGWERF
with their attendants after their recent marriage in Los An-
geles. Mrs. Stelllngwerf is the former Miss Patricia Ellen
Kenealy of the Canal Zone. Best man was Mr. Albert J.
Joyce, of the Isthmus, and the maid-of-honor was the
bride's sister. Miss Betty Jsne Kenealy. The bridal couple
now reside in Ft. Sill. Oklahoma, where the groom is
attending the Army Helicopter School.
AMBASSADOR AND MRS. WILE!
ARE BACK FROM COLOMBIA
The Ambassador- of the United States to Panama and
Mrs. John Cooper Wiley returned from Cartagena, Colombia,
on Saturday by plane, from a two day visit there.
probably will be several days
before contracts are awarded.
The contracts will be awarded
only after the various bids have
been evaluated and other fac-
tors, including the ability of
bidders to fulfill contracts, have
been determined. Two of the
bidders entered special stipula-
do is president, entered bids on. tions in their offers,
all of sth 15 separate items Ust- I -n,. i..., ... ...
ed in the contract offer. I, siuile ord" '|
the 15 separate items on which
bids were Invited was 800.000 I Visitors from North Dakota
Orchid Society Meeting
The Oold Coast Orchid Society
Lt. nd Mrs. Bives Leaving
JohnC. Crawford of Balboa, and Lt. and Mrs J. D Rives, ?hf1^ldv^,^m^t^Lm*ft2|
will cross the Isthmus Thursday ;of the Coco Solo Naval Station, T" * at tb
to be the guest of her relatives, are leaving during the weekend, B1? interested residents
Mr. nd Mrs. Frank L. Scott. for the States. Lt Rives has
All
cordially invited to attend.
are
Only the Aserradero Cerro
Punta, of which Gabriel Jura-,
Mrs Wardlaw who makes her.been stationed with Squadron
home In Fort Lauderdale. Florl- VP-45 since last April and will go
da. plans a month's visit on the to Anacostla. DC. for duty.
Isthmus. --
Mrs 8cott Is entertaining for Double Birthday Partv
her house euest with a tea from Lt. and Mrs. Victor Marouez;"^^".^^ meeting hour
4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Thursday. [entertained with a party at their |
Gatun Auxiliary Meeting-
The ladies of the Auxiliary of
the Gatun Union Church are re-
Fort Gulick residence Monday to Tnursday. coffee will be served,
honor their daughters, Myrlam I
located opposite the tennis
court in Diablo.
The program, based on "The
Voice and Vocal Music," will be
presented by Mrs. W. B. Rogan.
All members of the group are
requested to attend, and other
college Club members are also
welcome.
"Stork Club"
New Member
Has
Mr. Henry Frederick, Mr. -. ..,
R. Dupes and Mr. B. O. Brooks ''nm|I(
Winners Of Bridge
Tournament Announced
The winners of the
j I Tournament played on Monday
" in the Card Room of
"People's General"
To Be Reviewed
The regular meeting of the
Book Review Group of the Canal
Zone College Club will be held
Thursday at the home of Mrs.
J. S. Schriftgiesser, 1628-B Ga-
viln Road, in Balboa.
Mrs. Glyde LaClalr will re-
AFL Council Wants
Excise Tax Unloaded
From Many Hems
I In-law. Mr and Mrs. Carl Maedl were given the voting euests.
of New Cristobal. The hostess was assisted by
-------- Mr. Antonio Quesada and Mrs
Visitera Entrtrained John Hlpson .
at Informal Coffee The vounc guests were: Rosie
Mrs. W. R. McNamee of Oa- Vasquez. Allen and Raymond
I tun, had as her guests for morn- Patricio. Archie
vote for
Club will
be held Saturday. February 9. at
8:30 p.m. An admission charge
of fifty cents will be made at-the
door.
Mrs. LA. Larrlson has ostra
ballot books.
Lee Davlson. _
,lng coffee Monday. Mrs. Dean Hector Guiot. Butche and Joyce Ify?". J****!...
Peabodv and Miss Karen Carter. Wilkinson. Tete and Papo Vale. 7J* *"***Uon .
,!who ar visiting on the Isthmus.; Jeffery. John, Jan and Jimmy,. i^a,ftun_f.i,^.Associatlon
view the "People's General," by, '"p'The,executive council of | Also present were Mrs. Henry: Hlpson. Rmlly Quesada. Gladys." 2??,.f_*, "fv*1 he p0,ci
I David Loth. the American Federation of 'Bigelow and Mrs. William Hop-; Nieves. Ray and Rene Casas. 0.1,Ran on ine Gun Club
Bridge Labor called for the end of ex-i kins, with whom the ladles are Christina KWster, Majalia San-;Ro,a1d foi J** members, their fa-
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. Feb.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl-Axel Jan-.are recent arriyals on tne IsthT'] V **?'Ilvolt we lit Mr.; College Club are wslcome.
sen announce the birth of a son-, mus by plane and are guest at " Bon5y f1 /",*.le" *... _. T7T
Rlchard Elliot Calhoun Jansen.lthe Hotel II Panama during 822. .fnd'.**r ..and .**" E. 5f.Si rbi Sorority
on Tuesday morning, February | their visit here.
6 at the San Fernando Clinic.
Members of the group and!c,se ta*es on certain iltems to-. visiting.
ny interested members of the '?>*'* and criticized congress for'
Mrs. Jansen is the former Peggy IIAWC To Sponsor Dog Show
Calhoun. A dog show, under the aua-
pices of the Inter-American * Torres.
The maternal grandparents Women' Club, will be held on j.romDt attendance t TM r.
are, Mr. and Mrs. Credo H. Cal- February 13 at 4:00 p. m. at the LTtrLuVstaSta
noun and Ma. Honorine Jansen Juan Franco Race track. Entries DlByers
is the paternal grandmother. from both ides of the isthmus ^ *______
will be accepted regardless Of
ctassiiication. Equal attention
will be given pedigreed and
mongrel dog, each In Its pro-
Kohn; 3rd, Mr. M Kngel and To Meet" February It
Mr. C. Zelenka; 4th, Mrs. M. The Alpha Chapter of Beta
MacMurray and Mr. O. Mais-1 Sigma Phi Sorority will hold
bury; and 8th Mr. T. A. Orr and
Karen and
Tmara mllles
are to
ches and
Curtis.
The adult guests were: Mrs K.
K. Kolster. Mrs. Raymond P-
limtting public housing. Miss Bornefeld Graduates
The council said excise taxes from Tniversitv of Texas
should be taken off amuse-1 Miss Olorla Bornefeld daueh- triclo, Mrs. Archie Davlson Mrs.
ments, transportation, com-!ter of Mr. nd Mrs. Jullu * Nieves. Mrs. Geraldo San-
munlcatidns. cosmetics and Bornefeld of Gatun, received her | chea and Mr Anna Guiot.
leather goods. Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
nd friends. The members
bring their lunches and
charcoal braaiers will be fur-
nished for cooking.
attending
In our Judgement these ex-
taxes reflect themselves
paternal grandmother.
Visitors From Mexico
Honored At Luncheon
Mr. and Mrs. Ramon Arias P..
who arrived reentry from Mexico per class, nd 11 will he ellgllBe
for a visit with relatives In Pa I to equal honors.
nan, were honored recently at
a luncheon given by Mr. and
Mrs. Alberto Alemn at the
Hotel El Panama.
Mrs. Murphy To Leave-
For California
Mrs, Loula M. Murphy of Cu-
ruodu ill leave Thursday by
plaas totolo oil, Alabama eu
route to GBJifornla. where she
will -make her home.
There will be no fee. to enter
dogs a contestants in the ahow
but registrations must be made
no later than February 11 and
must Include the following in-
formation: l; name of dog; 3
Balboa Woman's Club
Bridge Group T* Meet
The Bridge Group of the Bal-
boa Woman's Club will meet on
Thursday at 12:30 p. m. at the
Jewish Welfare Board Center In
Balboa.
their next meeting on February
12 at the Sorority House at 7:30lclse
p. m. Program for the evening imost seriously upon those least
will be "Design For Living" with able t0 ***r such taxes." a coun-
group participation led by Char-1c11 tatement said. "They havei
Iotte Cagley a strangling effect on business
Hostesses for the evening williand promote nnerriioyrrent"
be Dorothy
Howell.
Taylor and Ava
Womtn
WoA
Announcement for Parents on
the Coco Solo Naval Station
A meeting of Coco Solo par-
ents, of Cub age sons, will be
RUTH MILLETT Says
Bingo Tonight at
Pedre Miguel
Bingo will be played tonight
Eduardo Castao
Is Rotary Speaker
For Atlantic Side
By GAV PAULEY
The council said adequate
housing Is a defense ess.iiu.ai.
The AFL called on Congress
for a "genuine defense hoUslrv
program," if possible by private
builders, to provide low ro*< They're getting home-decorating
commodations in defense areas.'down to such a
Cold drinks will be furnished
by the Association
Games and dancine have been
olanned bv the committee. It tt
hoped that all members will join
in the fun.
NEW YORK. Jan. 30 (UP). .-, ^ ^ ^ QU(Jt#
fine nitvt these com*8 rom a recent talk by a
The AFL also asked tor m, |day. that you're up,E 5 to'C"U,0n, "mostician be/ore
000 unit of low rent
Ofana Jorif Funeral
Services Postponed
"I hve firm conviction that I Funeral services for Mrs. Ofa-
more nervous women are erea-!n* Jorif. 72. who died Monday
ted over the bridge table than morning in Pueblo Nuevo, have
been postponed until tomorrow
at 3 p m.
; housing and approval of special
The Cristobal Colon Rotary a1ds for cooperatives and other
public,able to choose furniture and ^toSSiSWmi. Amerlcmn Me"
pedlgree, if any; 3 turne ol|'uJ: Pfm:h,t th* Poro M'! Club will hold its weekly lunch- i*"?11 housing projects for
owner. An actoission charg of j* Boat Club. eon meeting at the Strangers | middie.1mcoeJamiliei
SOo for adui and 25c for Cotillion Class To
children
BsgUtr;^
the IAWC Cub
madS't
use or through
Visitors At Hotel El Panama
Mr. Edward J. Tomlinson, of {Chairman, Mr. Alberto de Oba-
Washington, D. C, arrived on! rrio, whose phone number is
the Isthmus on January 28 and Panama 3-3o$0; Mrs. Arturo
is a guest t the Hotel El p-Muller: Mr. Lou Simpson or
nam. Mr. Tomlinson, is a noted Mrs. Harry D. Sheibla.
American journalist. ------ -
_ Orchid Society To
Mr. John J. O'Connor, a Vice,' Exhibit Plants
President of Armour and Com-" The Canal Zone Orchid So-
pahy of Chicago, arrived yeter- clety will exhibit orchidaceous
day by plane and is a guests atiplante in conjunction with the
the,Hotel EL Panama. -j Cardenas River Garden Club orr
i ---------^ i February 18 and 17 at which
Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Reyholds time the Garden Club will dii-
of New Orleans former Isth- j play flowers, plants nd pint-
mian residents arrived recently; inga.
by plane for a visit of two weeks --------
to be spent on the Isthmus Mrs. J. H. Bennett
where they are guests at the i Leave For States
Hotel El Pnam. | Mrs. j. H. Stnnott left today-
SCHOLLS SERVICES
Panama No 08 Justo Aroaemena Ave.
f T,re*tents. Corns, Callouses, ingrown Tee Nails,
Arch Supports.- SEDUCING Treatment Massages,
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Mate ad female
operators. For Information call: 1-2x17 Panam
12 s.m.; 2 p.m.
Meat Therfdat
The CotUilon Class will meet co. will speak on
one ffirwm"dirim l.mforma-u?.ali Tnur,d*y ven- Zone and It Influence on the
X e aVSf%e fho"!1.n^at !> m-- ln " Wa%!Future. Prosperity of Cristbal
lngton Salon
Panama.
of the Hotel XI
Club, tomorrow at noon. Maurice J. Tobiln. Secretary
Rotaran. Eduardo Castao, of Labor, conferred with the
Manager of the Parse, Davis and couneH on adequate unemploy-
"The Free ment insurance legislation and
means to cut joblessness during
the transfer from civilian to
defense industries.
nd Colon.'
IAWC To Meet For Plcaxle
The Get-Together of the
month for the members of the
Inter-American Women's Club
will be a picnic to be held on I
February 12 at the ummer
home ln El Caney of Mrs. Jaime ;
de la Guardia.
Kqulpmeht for each person
planning to attend should ln-
elude a picnic lunch and bath-;
lng suit. The group will leave
from Club Headquarters at 1:00
a. m.
Blago At American
Legion (lub
Bingo will be played tomorrow
night at the American Legion
Club at Fort Amador at 7:30;
p. m Member and their guests
are invited to attend. Arrange-'
ments have been made with
bus drivers to take players di-
rectly to the Club on request.
lor scheme bUndfolded and not He mav have gomethln(r there.
make.a mUUIte- v tJ. Certttnlv there's nothing relax-
At least it may be that way ln about ^ afternoon bridge
if you stick with the whole line party.
of home furnishing co-ordln- The women guests don't try to
ted by the Associated Mer- put ch other at ease or in any
FOR SALE
GLASSES H box: 12x44 and 14x44......
ROUND GLASSES: ll'g and 14x44.......
I1I.M
S3(.0 box
"SEMON BACHE" AMERICAN ROUND MIRRORS
Sr..$7. 3l"..t.54 _. M' llt.M 4J"..$12.M
ENGUSH FURNITURE STORE
7th St. and Bolivar Avenue No. CSfs
COLON Tel. 334 COLON
Originally scheduled for today,
the services were postponed te
await the arrival of her son. Lio-
nel, who cabled last night that
he was arriving here tonight or
tomorrow morning.
Services will be held at the
chandising Corp. This outfit .has, way build up each other's egoes. French Society Hall here nd
harmonised the products of ma-.: Mrs. A.. wearing all her dia- burial will be at the Jardn de
nufacturert of furniture, lamp,,mond. always has. some bit of Paz Cemetery,
glassware, china, ceramic; bed- news to make the. other women [
spreads, floor coverings, fabrics, areen with envy. She 1 going to Mrs. Jorif had been a resident
and paint. Vdo over her living room com- ot the Iathmus since 1907 and
The co-ordinated line, called, pletely, or he is going on had been ailing from the limes
"Perspective," hits 100 tore!erulse, or her husband has just which caused her death for 1
across the nation this spring.
All Is- Harmony
"Bach Item 1 in complete har-
mony with everything else," the
merchandisers contended. "A
blindfolded- person could select
all the furniture for a complete
> house and the result would be a
lovely and compatible grouping."
The whole line will be in a
moderate price range.
PROVEN THEORY
given her some expensive pre- years.
sent she pretend* to wtth he
hadn't
Mrs. B.. the. sharpest player . __
In the crowd, asserts her uper- A theory advanced by a Roman
iority by playing a crisp, busi- writer ln the first century, that
nese-llke game and ratting a la- c0*s ted legume hay give more
dv-like evebrow every time a nd richer milk, has been proved
player makes what she considers J** bv experiments of the U. S.
a stupid play.
Mrs. C. always first with
Department of Agriculture.
**
TtlC
HEW
Cf'locUe
(r*Wsru "" 7.95
Wr it eote!Nevtt before
avc you bd c fe,, c^p,,
- wc* tWic line* bnntk
four cIoM-Siuhg inhion.:
The *M br< lift, ffefh.
"Uft ererr MouoA ... yet
"* '"Ml n^iriir m HHn
*lyelsee
** aude or black rlWi *,.
<3M*a,mC^4|ft
Canasta* Tournament
To Begin Next Week
A.c->i-ri Tournament, spon-
sored by Hamadan Grotto, will
odgui on February 14 and will
continue for the next five con-
secutive Thursday ending on
March 20.
An entry fee of 60c will be
charged plus 7sc for each night'
play. Arrangements ere in
charge of Walter R. Morton. No
PAUL J. KIENER
Offers
FRESH CRISP LETTUCE
Direct from Cerro Punta
CARROTS
RED CABBAGE
RHUBARB
also
PUMPERNICKEL BREAD
Imported H* " from Germany
S.
EXCLUSIVE AT
RHODA
MAIN STORE^ 62 Justo Arosenena Ave.
BRANCH STORE: 8 TivoK Avenue
eauty
at its best...
BY PROFESSIONALS
SPKI.V $752
WHY HAVE A HOJHE*
PERMANENT?
.. with Inadequate facilities
no certain finished look, and
no guarantee bes vea eao
have s professional one cesa.
MM* for ealv 17.54: xdi
Utt lonttr. tMi look
... imponen < rom trermanv
fl PAULS MARKET
ThesecrVt of the'.o'-called fool. }> f J"L'.Stf* ""* *J* ,
SSaaLfiSf ed^ound-huf^me^ SSi
mnni tif .nt ^;. J h."i *Tt left-handed. "You're looking
S 5 .- ^e !veral.o well. Mabel," nukes Mabel
of the other, colors used sre t.i -,,11* when ah* Mt> the
brown, myrtle green, *aroK tiZtfiBJ%?
red, avocdo green, pumpkin, -That' good-looking dress
brick red. gold, night blue. Marth. Do you know who has
bright, deep shade, andalwood. one just like lt?" Manv others
a dark grey and beige mixture. tren't even meant to sound sin-
and grige, which Is a tight shade cere
of grey and beige.
Bine Hard To Combine
The merchandisers admitted
Underneath lt all. Is that
fierce desire of each plaver to be
the afternoon's winner. But even
that night blue would be hard the winner may not get to leave
to combine with some of the the party feeling too pleased with
other colors, especially the soft herself. Some woman Is almost
greens 1 sure to remind her that she held 1
"We put blue In the line be-. unbelievably good cards all at-,
cause of popular demand," they.temoon
explained. Nope, women arent at their
Design of the fabrics all re best at bridge parties. Bachj
small and in nfost eases either woman is on her guard, and that (
geometric or abstractions. Most n hardly be called relaxing.
of the fabrics will sell for lesa'
than $2 per yard, although a few,
including the antique satin are'
higher.
SjfP-
the finest Swedish hand
cat full lead crystal.-
AN patten* in opes slock
at
Panam
coidh
Your whole family nee
nourishing
QUAKER OATS
Mtkt your floors shim this easy w*yt
USt GLO COAT-it
stays bright up to
4 tinos longer!
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
These cae be krt
BALBOA
Saae'
Raj*M
appeal 2-2959
BEAUTY SHOP
"teL**!*" Wieassa. Mr.
Keep your tilo, lmoloum or wood floors
bright and gloaming with Johnson's Glo>
Coat Ifs so say to use! Just apply*
dnoi in twenty minutes to a beautiful
durable finish.
And now Glo-Coat is positively wator-
ropellentl Even when you spill things,
they wipe away without marring the thine.'
Save money-buy larger sises. Get woa>
derru water-repellent Qlo-Coat today!
JOI NSON'S GLO-COAT





not set
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSYAPt
uoi
"
WEDNESDAY, FJEBRUAKY f, lKf
)
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds I
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
UtWit, stMVItl
vtOKKl.MlfS
. Z-Sasl
aers
K.O W* LKMbtrt

nlllKA <,AHi.lO>
iS.aS MMMlu .
nwir tstcaMa
vMXiN UK BELLEZA AMERICANO
. S Wan i Jib ttraet
I III PANAMA AMKRICA.N
N. *T "H" MM-hMBi
Vo Itl7t Central -0*l*B.
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS
Aiiloiiin'"!'-
You cm get genuine parts tor your
refrigerator. Visit our FRIGIDAIRE
refngerotion shop. No. 51 Via
Espao. ^^^^________
Your washing machine does not
work? Tel. 3-0125. FRIGIDAIRE
Refrigeration Shop. No. 51 Via
Espaa. ___
FOR SALE Westmghouse refriger-
ator, 60 cvcle. 3 years old. Also
3 burner kerosene oil stove, with
oven. Telephone 3-4326. House
43. 15 ond 50 Street, San Fran-
Cisco,
FOR SALE- One Fngidaire 25 cycle
large sue. 3 yrs. remaining guar-
onte.. Phone F. P. Holl. room 335
Hotel Tivoli.
FINANCING
Service Personnel ond
U.S. Civilian Government Employes
new used cor through
;vl mcNi ;MPlOYESf'
:
Fort Worth, Texcs
Also Direct
Loans Automobile
}crvinv ju.cmrtiefi. mpiuyet
iervic* -ersonne- in rhe Canoi
ioi .4 ,aor. vVith out finoncmg
your insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. coveron*.
ARRANGIMENTS CAM BE MADE
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
DEALER
Oe you keive e rinkmt probltni
Write Alcoholici Aaonymetu
. Bo. 2031 Anco- C. Z.
RESORTS
NCI
and
one
Hove your a commercial refrigera-
tion problem? Tel. 3-0125, FRI-
GIDAIRE refrigeration shop, No
51 Via Espaa.
You can get the best refrigeration
service, domestic as well as com-
mercial by colling 3-0125, FRI-
GIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop.-
WANTED25 cycle washing
chine. Phone Fort Shermon
752.
87-
FOR SALEOne double Hollywood
bed, $40. One Singer sewing ma-
chine $50 00. Curundu. House
223! -B. Tel. 83-5117.
WANT TO BUY or sell on automo-
bile? See Agencias Cosmos, ou-
tomobile row 29. telephone 2-
4721, Ponami. Open all doy on
Saturdays.
BATTERIES
For your car or.truck from $13.00.
Bateras de Panama
Avenida Central Ne. 224
FOR SALE: Ford Coupe 1940
House 2110-B. Tel. 83-7242, Cu-
rundu.
FOR SALE
Vlotorcvcle*
FOR SALE: '49 Indian vertical
twin, terms. Coll 4-567. House
171-B, Pedro Miguel.
FOR SALE: One 1952 Triumph
Tiger 100. Excellent condition. Seel
for yourself. Phone Balboa 2-'
1658. Between 4:00 and 5:00 p '
Help Wanted
WANTED Moid. Jamaican pre-1
I ferred, to care for 2 1-2 year old
child and do general housework.
Must live in. References required.
Quarters 71-A Ft. Kobbe. Phone
4-6179.
FOR SALE: Late model 1950
Olds. 88 Holiday Coupe. Black
Top With Green Body. White Side
Wall Tires. Radio and Hydrama-
tic Drive. Excellent condition. $2,-
300.00. Phone 6-128, C. Z. Pe-
nitentiary.
FOR SALE: 195 0 Studtboker
Champion, 4 dr. sedan. Absolutely
perfect condition. Can be finon-
ced. Balboa 1588 or 3002.
FOR SALE:1946 Ferd Station Wa-
gon Da Luxe, excellent condition.
easy payments. Smeet & Hunni-
cutt S. A. 16th Street Central
Avenva. Calaa, Tel. 100.
FOR SALE:1939 Chevrolet 2 door
sedan, new battery and other ports
$115.00. Coll 2-6328 or house
915-K. La Boco.
The FRIGIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop
takes pleasure in announcing thot
we are in a position, to offer the
best refrigeration service in Pan-
amo. We offer immediate service
for ony kind of refrigerator, wash-
ing machines, electric appliances,
household or commercial. If you
have a refngerotion problem Tel.
3-0125 or visit our store at No
51 V,o Espaa.
Just received large variety ef Japo-
nes and Chinese goldfish, water
plants, accessories and frshfood
Jardn Inmaculada, Na. 58, B
Ave.
Enjoy a vacation at Hotel Pan Ame-
ricano, El Valle. Phone Ponomc
2-1112 for reservations.
Shrapnel's houses", Santa Clara. Alsc
m Cold Cerro Compana MoUn-
toins Tel. Balboa 2(20.
loiters cottoges completely furnish-
ed, one, two or three bedrooms
Imens, gas refrigerators, gas
ranges, dishes ond kitchen wore
Holt a mile beyond Sonta Cloro
private road to beach. For In-
formation visit or phone Dagmar
Tivoli Avenue No. 6, 2-0170
Panamo.
Willioms Sonto Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidoires. Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
We have eVerythinf
to keep vour Lawo
ind Harden beautiful
lurine the dry season
Gramlich't Sonto Cloro beach-
cottages. Electric lea Doxes. gas
stoves, moderte rates. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Phillips. Oceanside cottages. Sonta
Claro. Box 435. Balboa Phone
Ponamo 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Experienced cook-
cleaner with recent recommenda-
tions. Concrete house across from
i Mt. HrjJc.R. Station.
WANTECMaid. Light cooking,
general housework. 2 1-2 year
od child to care for. Recent re-
commendations, prefern) to live
In. House 1025-A, across fron-
Cristbal Freight House
WANTED
Miscellaneous
BARGAIN:Chevrolet 1936. New
tires, new battery, excellent me-
chanical condition, $100. Tele-
phone 3-4302, from 5 p. m. tc
8 p. m.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
ANTED: Unfurnished chalet
March 1st, Albrook, Tel. 4120.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURES FOR SALE
For sale to the highest bidder Build-
ings No. 933 and No. 962. La Bo-
ca. Sealed bids will be received ir
the office of the Superintendent of
Storehouses ot Balboa until I0:3C
a. m., February 15. 1952, when
they will be opened in public. Form
of proposal with full particulars may
be secured in the offices of Super-
intendent of Storehouses, Balboa
ond the Housing Manager at Bal-
boa Heights.
Bored Bobbysoxers Set Off
Chain Reaction Of Trouble
NEW YORK,Feb. fUP) The
chain reaction of tragedies set
off by three bored Massachu-
etts school girls who went on a
New York spending spree with
stolen money brought new woes,
last night, this time to the cltv's!
biggest nightclub.
The Latin Quarter opened for
business as usual, but no liquor j
could be served.
;The city has banned liquor
ales at the club for a week as
the penalty for selling alcoholic j
beverages to two of the three
teen-aged girls.
This was the latest in the wave i
of troubles caused bv the girls
lnce they stole $18,000 from a
strong box in the Nahant. Mass.,
home of heart specialist Dr. Al-;
bert Covner last Oct. 18.
Their spree already has re-'
audited in a suicide, serious In-.
Jury to one of the girls, the ar-
rest of two youths on morals)
charges and punishment of the|
bobby-sox thieves themselves.
It took only a few minutes for
the girls to commit the original
crjme.
It tok place while Roberta i
MeCauley. 15-year-old Nahant
girl, was sitting with Covner's
mall son.
*4arilyn Curry. 18. and Aliene
Jefferv. 17. both of Lynn. Mass..
w he girls were bored. Thev
complained that their parents,
were strict, and made them go
home early everv night. They
didn't like school.
8o the three girls took the
strong box out of a closet In Cov-
ner's home. Thev helpei them-
selves to the monev and dvessed
up in Mrs. Covner's clothes
Then they came to New York
on a apree.
The girls bought expensive I
clothes in the best Fifth Avenue i
ahoos and visited Broadwav bars
It was In one of these places
that they met the two young
men who were implicated later.
The three were arrested here
Oct. 19.
A few days later, Covr.er's bo-
dy was found in a lonelv woods
tifr his home. Pcllcr .aid he
killed himself because he had
been "driven to distraction" bv
pranksters who telephoned him
asking him if he wanted to hire
baby sitter
Arrested with the girls were
Sealed bids, in triplicate, will be re-
ceived in the office of Engineer-
ing and Construction Director,
Panama Canal Company, Balboa
Heights, until 10:00 a. m. Feb-
ruary 18. 1952. and then open-
ed in public, for furnishing all
plant, tools, equipment, materials
labor, and services ond for per-
forming all work for construction
of Project F Clearing, Rough
Grading, ond Port of Storm Sew-
er Drainage at Summit, Canal
Zone. B.d schedules, forms of
proposols, specificotions, and full
particulars may be obtained from
the office of the Contract and In-
spection Division, Room 336.
Balboa Heights (Telephone 2-
3739 or 2-26981. Specifications
and drawings will be issued on a
deposit of $25.00 per set. De-
posit will be forfeited if specifi-
cotions ond drawings are not re-
turned within 30 days ofter open-
ing of bids.
FOR SALE:Heavy overcoat, wine
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT: Beautiful furnished
apartment with Frigldaire, all
screened, for couple or 2 bache-
lors. Via Espaa lost house be-
fore Juan Franco. No children.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:Nice cool furnished
room, with telephone, to boche
lor gentleman. Phone 2-1001
Panama,
'onis
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow
insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Are. Tel. 3-8146
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
#22 E. 29th St.
The HX
The Best value* In town
our Eurnltare Is
RH PIIOISTKRKD
our Mattresses are
KKBril.T
all woodwork expertly
Kl I 'MSHKI)
We Hiiy-Srll-Barter
U\ i II ii i-.- ho id Exrhaswe)
41 Aalo Riiv Tel. 3-4*11
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
FOR RENT:Location en Francisca
de la Ossa Ave. Srudebeker agen-
cy. Cell Mr. Fishchuber from 9
te 11 a. m. Tel. 3-3404.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:
color, No. 14. Inquire No. 3, 4thl Call 4-567.
of July Avenue Apt. 5. Ask for! dro Miguel.
o
Sara.
Wayne Eckhardt, 24. New York
and Leo Cusson 21, Worcester,
Mass. They have pleaded guilty
to impairing the morals o a mi-
nor.
After being held in New York
lor weeks, the girls were sent
back to Massachusetts in De-
cember to receive their punish-
ment.
Roberta and Marilyn were
charged with delinquency by
reason of larceny. Eileen was
charged with larceny.
The two younger girls were
turned over to the Massachusetts
Youth Service Board for Rehabll-
tatlon. They are in detention
homes.
Eileen was placed on two years-
probation, oiv the condition that
she spend the first year in the,
House of the Good Shepherd, op-,
erated by a Catholic order of'
nuns.
Soon after Eileen went to the
institution, she fell or jumped
from a fourth-floor window and
suffered serious spinal injuries,
which may paralyze her for life.
The management of the L">-
tln Quarter said that waiters at
the club did not know the girls
were under the legal drinking
age as thev appeared to be old-
er 'han thev were.
The next act in the drarm will
be the sentencing of Eckhardt
and Cusson.
Eckhardt is scheduled to be
sentenced tomorrow and Ontaon
on Friday.
Thev can be sent to fall for r
'o three years fnr their part In
he spree of the three bored bob-
bv soxers.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS FOR SALE MEISEL ROTARY
PRESS and HICKOK RULING
MACHINE
Sealed bids will be received until
10:30 A. M.. Februory 20. 1952.
for one Meisel Rotory Press and one
Hickok Ruling Machine located at
Panoma Canal Company Press,
Mount Hcpe, C. Z. For information
ond inspection contact Printer, Pan-
ama Canal Company Press, tele-
phone 3-1787. Bid forms moy be
obtained from the above source, or
from office of Superintendent of
Storehouses, Balboa, telephone 2-
2-777.
21 ft. Cayuco $20.
House 171-13 Pe-
FOR SALE:25 cycle motors in dif-
ferent sizes at give away prices
Brand new. Con be seen at the
FRIGIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop
No. 51 Vio Espaa, besides Cen-
tral de Lechera.
7& 23e&* *gfagl
... the exaggerated full-
ness of the loose-cut
blouse. Inches bigger than you m the
sienes and waistbut fits like wall-
piper at the shoulders and cuffs. A
wonderful foil for your slim-straight
skiru!
FOR SALE:24 foot cabin cruiser
"Aloha" A-l condition, 2-built
in refrigerators, toilet, sleeps four
V8 powered, new rings & valve?
fresh water heater exchanger. 1-2
interest $700.00. Full price $1,-
400.00. Call 8-8308 Army. O
30-4:00 p. ml contact Sgt. A
Jensen Coco Sohto, Apt 7-A af.
ter 6:00 p. m.
Army Engineers
Donate $655.92
To March Of Dimes
The 370th Engineer Amphibi-
ous Support Regiment at Fort
Sherman, contributed a total of.
S 155.92 to the 1952 March of
imes campaign for an average
of 37 cents per man The Ord-
nance Detachment, proved to be
the most philanthropic organ!-j
zatlon In the regiment, contribu-
ting 84 cents per man. according
to Captain Walter E Beaver,
regimental campaign chairman.
Five other organization out-
subscribed the regimental aver-
age. The Medical Detachment's
average was 57 cents, just a
tenth of a cent per man above:
the averaee of Headquarters
Company. Boat Battalion. Com-
pany at Fort Davis led the
Shore aBttallon and was fourth
In the regimental competition
with 48 cents per man. Head-
quarters and Service Company
gave and average of 43 cents *nd
Company C averaged 41 cents.
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Buying: Abbatolr.
Selling: Fueria y Lu
(preferred) and
Fueria y Lu (common)
Tel. 3-4719 3-1600
MODERN FURNITURE
custom built
Slipcover Reunbobtery
VISIT OUR SHOW-BOOM!
Assart* Bares
jr.tiuon.n (AatoawblUBow)
rraa ntaaales Mckap a DaUeary
Tel. 3-421 :M a.ai le 7:se a.m.
FISHERMEN 1
According to the latest re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into bur wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIG ONES With FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #39 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0363 3-4564
"A Fine
Opportunity
to Learn
From
The Best"
Want to be
i he most at-
tractive
couple on the
floor? Then
bring your favorite partner to
Harnett & Dunn NOW and
improve your dancing togeth-
er. Modern rates use our
Budget plan fits payments
to paydays. So come In today
and save. Why miss the fun I
Balboa TWA 2-2839 or
Box !M Balboa Warnttt and Dana.
FOR YOLK HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. Si Justo Arosemena
Ave. Colon Tet. 457
33rd Infantry Men
See Film About
Their Outfit
FORT KOBBE. C.Z Men of
'he Tank Company.of the 3*d
Noisy Crowd Storms Courtroom
As 2nd-String Reds Go On Trial
-.
*
^.viMhRCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
I LOS ANGELES, Feb. 6 (UP)
Deputy u. S. Marshals threaten-
ed to clear court house corridors
when a noisy crowd tried to gain
entrance to a federal courtroom
where the second mass conspi-
racy trial of American Com-
munists opened today.
inside the courtroom of Judge
William C. Mathews, chief as-
sistant U. 8. Attorney Ray H
Kinnlson opened the govern-
ment's case against 15 "second
string" Red leaders charged
with conspiracy to teach and
advocate tprcelul overthrow of
tne government.
The Federal Attorney laid the
Kitchen Is Starting Point
for Better Dental Health
HOW DIET CAN HELP PRE-
VENT tooth decay is described
in this third of a aeries of ar-
ticles published by The Pana-
ma American in cooperation
with the Panama Canal Zone
Dental Society.
Mother may not realize it, but
the kitchen plays a starring role
groundwork for the govern-ijq dental health,
ment'a charges with a scholarly j Today more than ever before
I recital of the history of Marxism it is known that diet is most im-
portant in helping to prevent
and the declaration that revolu-
tion is fundamental to Com-
munist philosophy.
The defendants displayed iit-
dental troubles.
So far as tooth decay is con-
cerned, it is America's billion-
tle outward interest as Kinni- dollar-a-year "sweet tooth" that
son accused them of plotting a,1s the culprit. It Is that craving
revolution to achieve the vio- for sweets that is responsible in
lent .overthrow of the nation's a large measure for tooth decay.
government.
Named as co-consplrators. but
not on trial here, were the 11
top Reds convicted in New York
last year after a lengthy trial.
Hours before the case got un-
derway, a crowd of about 200
persons gathered outside the
courtroom and demanded ad-
mission. The tiny court has
space for about 125 persons and
only a handful of
were admitted.
The average person eats 18
pounds of candy annually and
rets a lot more sugar from
sweetened drinks, desserts and
other, foods.
Extensive research has prov-
ed that sugar is the greatest
cause of tooth decay and that
excessive use of swgar in tbe
diet definitely is harmful.
Eskimos In the Far North Arc-
rtfr-tatnrsitle wh* have not adopted our
eating habits have very little If
Thus, it can be seen that what
a child does not eat namely, a
low consumption of sweets
has a close relation to lessened
tooth decay.
However, when a chlld'a teeth,
are beina developed, it is impor-
tant that he receive certain
tooth building foods.
For good general health, th
dally diet should include such
foods aa milk and dairy pro-
ducts, vegetables, fruits, eggs and
meats.
These foods will supply the es-
sential protein, mineral and vi-
tamin requirements. Nutrition
experts add that otb.tr foods
such as breads, cereals, potatoes
and desserts may be added to
meet the demands of the appe-
ttie and caloric requirements.
(Tomrorow: What a cow-
muaity can do to help defeat
dental disease among children.
Baa the fourth in this series
ef authoritative articles.)
Catcalls and'jeers greeted per- JJ th decay because; their
sons entering the courtroom and * \ * J 'e""ead.**"*
EKES &XRbSS#B i^t^^Slffii An American Idler was fined,
that Deputy Marshals went out^ M5 tnd flven a 1B^ auspend-
Strf* f. Ju. -!!r,.in Here In the United States the fd sentence In the Balboa Sag-
corridors unless quiet was main- schools can ^ m rlmi ofrend | Utrate's Court yesterday on V
. v j *u ,*-*. Ion this score. It is in the schools| P"y larceny charge.
SS^^^t^^ Clifton Chitto. 23, waa
porting democracy was "a false h*e*%** e?n ^M-HarJth! ^.^J.J'J^|g2
" $1.20 in Ancon. The complainant
was Janet Harness.
The enlisted man. was tim
placed on one year's probation.
And two soldiers that were
fighting were fined $10 each, for
disturbing the peace.
Flix Manuel Dlsdier. 2i-year-
old Puerto Rlcan and Salvatore
Dlbelio, 21-year-old American,
both in the Army, were picked up
at the Limits bus atoo.
front" for a revolutionary con- of the American Dental Assoela
"I?1- % J.c.cal'ed,that ll '^tic-n has cone on record con-
only 50,000 trained revolu-
tionaries to overthrow the czar
and establish the Red dictator-
ship in 1917 in Russia.
The Federal Attorney then
accused the present defendants
of being part of. a similarly
trained and indoctrinated or-
ganization, "awaiting the day
when the command Is given to
paralyse transportation, power
houses and vast industrial
machines at the heart of our
economic system."
He said the Communist Party
sought 'in the chaos and con-
fusion to bring about the estab-
lishment of a dictatorship."
Kinnison said the background
demnlng the sale of candy, soft
drinks and other sweet confec-
tions In the schools.
The National Congress of
Parents and Teachers has urg-
ed that local parent-teacher
associations take action to dis-
courage the sale of candv and
sweetened drinks on school
premises.
And the American Medical
Association's Council on Foods
and Nutrition has spoleen
strongly against the practice. .>
Naturally, children and adults
can't be exoected to forceo can-
dies and desserts entirely. But
the wise mother sees to It (1)
HINT TO MOTORIST
It is difficult to slop rattles o*
an automobile bumper that has
. her children don't get sweets too been sprung or bent, One meth-
of the present case werfl backifreauently. and (2) that their,od is to Insert a place of old In-
mora than 100 years and had its,teeth are brushed immediately'ner tube between the-parts. tt>
roots In Karl Marx' "manifesto"after eating. absorb vibration,
calling for world revolution. He I
said through the years that ,
document had guided Commun-
ist revolutionaries who openly
called for "the forceful over-
throw of all existing social con-
ditional
Hamilton Makes Bid
To Take Over KKK
Leadership In East
LEESVn.l.E, S. C, Feb. .
ihf) 1 nomas L. Bauulion pro-
claimed himself toaay the 'im-
perial Wizard" of the Ku Klux
ivlans in the eastern u. s. amid
reports that his group Is reor-
ganizing In Virginia,
liami..ou a aimuu-.-enieni ap-
parently marked a bid to taxe
uver the Klan leadership of the
ate baniuel Oreen of Atlanta,
imperial Wizard who died three
ears ago. Tbe Kian spill up
into several lactlons on his
aeath.
cnarles H. Klein, secretary to
Imperial Wizard Samuel Roper
oi the Georgia Kians, asserted
mat Hamilton was seexing pub-
nuiiy and that Roper's outnt is
me "true" Kian, with chapters
In 48 states.
Hamilton's Carolines Klan
branch has worked closely wun
tne Florida Klan headed oy Bin
uenciiix of Tallahassee, wno has
announced his candidacy lor
norloa Qovernor.
Tne Klchmond Times-Dis-
patch quoted hendrlx toaay as
~a>mg that he went to Virginia
two wee ago to arrange reor-
ganization gi the Klan in that
slate. The KKK charter there
was revoked several years ago.
Who ?
Who ? Mb ?
Women's Auxiliary
Of Episcopal Church
Announces Meetings
The Exeeutiv* Committee of
-'.ie Woman's Auxiliary of the
episcopal church will meet to-
:-ifantry Regiment. United Sftei "Qrow a make final arrange-
*rmy of the Caribbean, take "ienU for Its Fifteenth Annual
heir tralnlne seriously, even District meeting.
New
... the carefree comfort
you'll know with Mo-
dels. Once you see how velvet-sort,
how smooth-fitting, how wonder-
fully safe Modess isyoull ncvei
use any other Wind ol napkin,,
'dttrme; their off duly hours.
When the motion picure
; "*lere Come the Tanks" arrived
-t the Fort Kobbe theater last
i-wertc. the entire compsny volun-
I --Hv marched to the theater to
rdy the mechanized units on
" rcreen. At their reanest.
- '-'jarry commander. Captain
ian M. Stephen, reserved a
m of the thepter for the ,am
-in* A svgestion. to drive!
?'-24 Tank to the theater was
')sd.
Fome of the Tank Company
:ersonnel oarticl^ated in mele-
na the flllm whll I raining at
Fort Knox, Kentucky. *
Mrs. Milln A. Cookson. Dis-
trict President, has announced
that the guest speaker for the
afternoon session will be the Rt.
Rev. David E- Richards, Suffra-
gan Bishop of the Diocese of Al-
bany In New York, Bishop Rich-
ards was an active priest in this
Missionary District serving on
'he Isthmus, Costa Rica and Co-
The Fifteenth Annual Meet-
:-.g will be held at the C"hednl
f St. Luke. Aneon. on Feb. 15,
'52 All women of the Cnirch
re invited to attend the Dis-
trict meeting on this data.
Library Exhibit
Features American
Boy Scout Display
The Canal Zone Library-Mu-
seum now is presenting an ex-
hibit celebrating the 42nd anni-
versary of the founding of the
Boy Scouts of America on Feb.
8. 1910. The display, a loan from
the canal Zone Council of the
B.S.A.. is shown In the first
lighted case in the lobby of the
Civil Affairs Building.
Various divisions of boy scout-
ing are represented In the exhib-
it. Thev Include flas. lnsi"laa!
and handbooks pertaining to the
branches of scouting. Also in-
cluded in the exhibit are two
bronze statuettesone of the
Boy Scout emblem and the other
of a boy scout in uniform.
This exhibit will be on display
until February 14.
STRAWBERRY SEED!
i
A strawberry is the swollen.
fie-hy part of the flower axis, on
which Is embedded the small,
brown nuts, which usually are
spoken of as seeds, but which are
tbe actual fruits o tbe plant. '
Tm Happy the Humbug. They say Vm
tarring over HOG. I'm looking for my
parents 'cause I'm awful lonely; I have the
head of a giraffe, the body of a turtle and
the tail of a monkey! My friend Willy the
Whiz says the Alfaro boys are sponsoring
me they sell International Harvester Re-
frigerators and Washing Machines en Peru
Avenue.
"If you want to hear my story meet me
at 6:15 tonight.''
v.o.,
Now...YaraOldl


WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY , 1952
i

r.ii '

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DADLT NEWSPAPER
PAGE
Stempel Keglers Cop ABC Team Championship
Too bad no one's ever done a story of the frantic Florida boom
days of the early 20's. That most have been the most fantastic
chapter in the history of American realty. I remember it most
for the lavish way sports were used to stimulate pdomotion and
sales.
One operator built a near replica of the famed 500-mile auto
race course Just outside Miami, first class in every respect, brought
in all Ule name drivers, put up substantial prize money, used it
once, then abandoned it. That was the topper.
Close to it, though, was the golf match between Walter Hagen
and Bobby Jones for what was billed as the match play cham-
pionship of the world. This was a Joint come-on at which lots
were sold both at 8t. Petersburg and Sarasota.
Jones' old man had his dough sunk in the Sarasota develop-
ment and Hagen was the pro at a course which had been built
especially to add to the glamor of the St. Petersburg operation. At
the time the boom had lost much of its early vitality and investors
were scarce. Hence the Jones-Hagen match as a booster shot.
As history records Jones, still at his peak, took the most fright-
ful licking of his entire career, losing 13 and 11, which is equi-
valent to losing a ball game 18 to 2 or by some Implausible score.
He was 8 down at the end of the first 36. Almost from the start
it was no contest.
THE FAMOUS JONES MATCH
' There were, however, extenuating circumstances in his case
Jones shared his dad's worries. It's pretty difficult to concentrate
on hitting a, golf ball with the family facing bankruptcy. Jones
washt the type to go for ballyhoo golf. Only a desperate situation
such as this could have won his assent. I heard later he had
wanted to turn pro to help carry the load. That would have been
in keeping with the young Georgian's character.
I remember Hagen played the match with a new set of golf
clubs.
"Henry Topping gave 'em to me and hell be offended if I
Golfers are like ball players; they put great store by their
favorite weapons. So this was no small sacrifice on Hagen's part.
He still had an ancient straight-faced iron club in his bag he
had used as far back as 1914. Henry Topping was the father of
Dan, the Yankee baseball magnate, a fine golfer himself and just
the kind of gent who would get a bang out of Hagen's company.
Last time I was with Hagen in Detroit the Jones match came
up for discussion. He was distressed that so much importance
is attached to it by contemporary historians of the game.
"It wasnt a real test of golf. You were there. You know
Bobby wasn't mentally attuned to serious golf. He was Just going
through the motions/'
I agree with Hagen it wasn't a fair test of the players' relative
abilities at man-to-man golf but Jones was giving the challenge
the best he had under the conditions. Jones had too much respect
for his standing and the game Itself Just to go through the
motions.
GAME'S GREATEST COMPETITOR
Still even If Jones had been at his best for the Florida match
I believe Hagen would have beaten him. Not by any 12 and 11
result but decisively enough. Hagen may not have been the great-
est golfer of all time; he certainly wasn't the greatest shotmaker,
but at match play, where the mechanics of the shot are not the
all-decisive factor, he knew no superior on either side of the
Atlantic.
That*s because he was not only a remarkable competitor but
he had a disarming personality and, in his way, was a master
of psychology. There never was a golfer who could do more with
a pause, a remark, a gesture or get more out of a strategic situa-
tion than the Rochester German, and all within the framework
of etrrtcs and sportsmanship. .evun Hagen was delighted when the National Open came to Detroit
last summer and learned the course had been stiffened to put
a more demanding pnmlum on accuracy. That was like it used
to be in his day when a bad shot meant a penalty If the player's
skill was inadequate.
He regards Ben Hogan as the best of the moderns, the best
since the old guard was in command, and he was surprised when
the Texas bantam had a slovenly 78 for his first round and a
struggling 73 for his second. There had been earlier protests by
the stars that the revisions made the course unfair. Hogan had
protested so vehemently concessions were made.
"Trouble with Hogan" Hagen commented as we stood before
the score board after the second round "Is that be is letting this
course play him Instead of playing the course."
Hogan must have been listening. Next day Hogan, though
trailing by five shots, was In a cheerful frame of mind, obviously
relaxed and ready to play the course, prepared to execute the
shot the situation called for and forget the hazards he and others
deemed too punishing. Result: a 71 and a 87 and a winner by two
strokes.
Bud Balcer
Rolls 256
Bombers, Bluebirds Tonight
In Panama; Yankees Win 6-3
The Max R. Stempel bowling
team of the Major Bowling, PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
League copped the 1852 ABC TEAM Won Lost Pet.
team championship of the Isth- Yankees......20 11 .MS
mus last night in the 1952 City Bombers........17 11 .i*l
Tournament presently being held, Bluebirds......11 IS Sn
at the Diablo Heights Bowling
Alleys.
The team, composed of Ted
Wllber, Kelly Marabella, Billy
Coffey, Dick Colston and Bud
Balcer. knocked out a total
scratch score of 2782 for an av-
erage of 924 for the evening. The
Stempel team is at present in
second place In the Major League
boasting a team average of 906.
Going into the stretch third
game, Billy Coffey knocked out
a four-strike final to set up the
spot for Bud Balcer, team cap-
tain and anchor man.
Balcer, finishing up in a blaze
of glory, knocked out the high
individual game of the tourney
thus far with a splendid 256. to
place the Stempel team Just six
pins ahead of the Nash-WUlys
team of the Classic League,
which finished in second place.
The Sears team, also of the Clas-
sic League, finished third.
In the handicap division ("play
for pay"), the Carta Vieja team
wound up in the first spot with a
total of 3028. -Standings of the
teams in the handicap division
were as follows at the finishing
gong:
Carta Vieja '
Fuersa y Luz
H. I. Horn Co.
Max R. Stempel
Nash-Wlllys
Aces
Howard Engelke of the Pan-
American Airways team, Classic
League, -Is presently leading for
the All-Events championship
with a three-game total of 662,
bowled In the team champion-
ships Monday night, with Joe
Sartori following with a total of
618. Singles and doubles play will
start tonight at seven o'clock,
and will be completed Saturday
night.
Sania Cruz Takes
Lead In Local Rale
Baseball League
(By HERBERT MOISE)
LEAGUE STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Brownies.......11 19 .387
TONIGHTS GAME (7:38)
Panam Stadium: Bombers vs.
Bluebirds.
LAST NIGHTS RESULTS
Panam Stadium: Yankees
Brownies 3.
6,
Alemn, Jr. (S.C'i)
Powells (S.l'r City)
Spur Cola Canada Dry Remon (La Boca).
Arewood (Ch'grts)
.67
333
.333
Atlantic Little League
TEAM
TEAM
Little Motto's
Police Pals..
Margarita ..
Powell's.. ..
STANDINGS
Won Lost Pet.
5
I
1
0
1.000
.883
2t
Police Pals 7. PoweU's 4.
The Police Pals defeated the
Powell's club by the score of 7 to
4. Bailey and Davlson split the
pitching duties for the Pals lim-
iting the opposition to four hits
while Charlie French also hurl-
ed a four-hitter for Powell's.
Score by innings:
Police Pals 0 4 0 3 0 07
Powell's 0 3 0 0 1 04
Bailey, Davlson and Pabn;
French and Hanna.
Martarlta 6, LltUe Motto's 8.
The Margarita All-Stars and
Little Motta's played a five-in-
ning tie game 6 to 6. The game
was called on account of rain
and darkness
Roy Perxins of Margarita was
the batting star of this game col-
lecting a single, double and tri-
ple In three tries at bat. This
game was very exciting through-
out and many fine plays were
made.
Score by innings:
Little Motta's 0 0 2 3 18
Margarita 9 0 0 3 06
Wall and Chase; Didier and
Cunningham.
Police Pals 7, Powell's 2.
The Police Pals continued on
their winning streak by defeat-
ing the Powell's club 7 to 2. Frank
Leves starred at bat and at
shortstop for the Pals as Charlie
trench did likewise for the Pow-
tO's nine.
Les Bailey hurled brilliantly
after a shaky first inning and
hung up his fourth victory of the
season.
Score by Innings :
Powell's 0 0 0 02
Police 10 0 3 8 x7
son as the Motta's defeated the
Margarita All-Stars by the score
of 4 to 1.
Roy Perkins, first baseman for
Margarita, was the only batter
to hit safely against Maloy's of-
ferings. Roy hit a solid single to
right field in the first Inning,
scoring Chuck Crawford with the
lone tally for Margarita.
Eddie Marshall, Maloy and
Jimmy Brooks starred at bat for
the Motta's each collecting two
hits.
Score by innings:
Margarita 10 0 0 0 01
Little Motta's 0 12 0 1 x-4
CMtwford, Dldler and E. Cun-
ningham; Maloy and Chase.
Behind the brilliant .four-hit
shutout Job of Clyde "Blanks-
Scott, the revamped Santa Cruz
Juniors scored a resounding 12-0
victory over Silver City Powells
and moved Into the lead in the
Canal Zone Local-Rate Amateur
League.
Scott pitched good ball as he
allowed one Infield bit in the
second inning and then proceed-
ed to retire i5 Powells in order
Edgar Dawkins breaking the spell
with a long double to left in the
seventh.
No other Silver City base run-
ner got a sf ar as second until the
ninth when Chester DeSousa sin-
Sled, stole second and went to
alrd on the catcher's wild throw
Scott was that effective. He
fanned eightthe last of which
came with DeSouza on third.
As Scott breezed the last strike
past Iflll to climax his brilliant
shutout, deafening shouts that
echoed off the hills In deep left
rended the, air. Blanks was car-
ried to his dugout on the mob's
shoulders. This was his second
win over the Champsbeating
them 5-3 last season and reliev-
ing nine scoreless innings, both
while wearing a Chagres uni-
form.
While Scott was subduing Pow-
ells, his mates were slamming
three Silver City pitchers for 11
hits. Phillips with 2 for 3, Taitt
with 2 for 6 and Weeks who scor-
ed five runs in six trips to the
plate sparked the Alemn, Jr. at-
tack against Ersklne (loser),
Hudson and Jones.
In the other CZAL games, Fer.
nando Adler hurled Canada Dry
(Paraso) to a 7-3 win over the
The second place Bombers, who
now trail the Yankees by one and
one-half games, tonight will have
an opportunity to pick up a half
game when they meet the Blue-
birds at the Panam Stadium in
a playoff of a tie game in Coln.
It will be Theollc Smith or
Connie Johnson of the Bombers
against Pete Nlcolis or Earl Hold-
er of the Bluebirds.
Last night the Yankees in-
creased their league leading mar-
gin at the expense of the last
place Brownies and pitcher VI-
bert Clark. Eddie Neville went
the distance, allowing only four
hits for his fifth victory against
two losses. The defeat was
Clark's sixth as compared to five
successes. #
The Yankees clouted eight
safeties off Clarkthe majority
for extra bases. The leading bat-
ter for the night was catcher Ray
Dabek who nit three for three,
including a double and a triple.
Forrest Jacobs went hltless in
four trips to the plate to tem-
porarily surrender the batting
leadership to the Brownies' Hec-
tor Lopes who got one hit in
three official times at sat.
Nathaniel Peoples accounted
for one of the Brownie runs with
a homer.
Balboa, Cristobal
In Championship
Cage Tilt Tonight
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
TEAM- won Loot
Rhodes Best, But No More Than
12 Negro Golfers Play Like Pros
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
Police............4
Sears........,,
AFGE 14..........3
Lincoln Life ... .3
Elks 1414..........t
Firemen..........2
YESTERDAYS RESULTS
Police 20, AFGE 12
TODAY'S CAME
Elks vs. Sears
HPO
0 0
0
14
0
The Police Pals and Little
Motta's are scheduled to play .,
each other tomorrow and Sat- highly rated La Boca PoUUctans.
urday and lota of excitement is' A.nA.tai 5eS 2*?*i CMa Colon
in store as these two teams bat-
tle for first place.
Tonight is the big night for the
Balboa and Cristobal students,
and their respective basketball
teams. For this la the night of
the championship playoff game
between the two schools. The
->ayoff battle will be waged on
the Balboa hardwood, with the
gnie slated for 7 p.m. There is
no prelim to this contest, so fans
are reminded of the starting time
again, 7 p.m., Balboa Gym, for
the basketball game of the sea-
son.
Coaeh Paul Dreska will have
his Bulldogs fired up for this
game, and according to the rail-
birds, It will take a fired up Bull-
dog team to do the job. The other
Paul In this esse, Moser, has a
wail drilled Tiger five ready for
the game, and If both teams Uve
Sto the brand of basketball
sy an capable of, fans will be
treated to a thrilling point for
point ball game.
Moser has his big three primed
for this one. Arnold Manning,
Bob Bailey, and Skippy Anderson
are the lads who will carry the
brunt of the Tigers offense. Sap-
porting these boys will be Roy
Wilson, elongated center, and
Vernon Bryant. Should any of
those lads be "off tonight, Moser!
wlU be able to call on basketball-,
Totals........36 20 13 18
t with one for four were the only
2 others to connect safely against
3 the Police pitchers' offerings.
3 The box score:
3 POLICE- AB R
4 Coln, 2b...... 5 1
Kielhofer, ss-p 45
Barnes, c...... 4 4
Sutherland, If-p. 5 3
Crook, If...... 2 2
Corrigan, E., rf.. 4 1
Pederson, 3b.. .. 4 l
The Police took over top potlRobertsonVp'.*. ".2 0
[&&i&kJ defeating AFGE 14 yesterday In' Barnes, J If n
a free scoring game 20 to 12.
Each team scored in the first
three innings at the end of which
found the AFGE leading 11 to 10.
After a scoreless fourth for both
teams, the Police collected three
runs and then iced the game
with a seven-run uprising in the
top of the sixth.
Owen Sutherland took over the
pitching duties for the Coppers
in the fourth and held the
Lodgemen to one run in the last
three innings while sending eight
of the men who faced him back
to the bench via the strikeout
route.
Orady Robertson started on
the mound for the Police being
relieved by Kielhofer who finish-
ed up the third inning.
Billy Castleman pitched five
Innings and was relieved by Jim-
my Morris in the sixth inning.
Billy had poor control all day
which Is something unusual for
this up-and-coming classy ball
The Police had their batting
eyes on the ball collecting thir-
teen hits off the AFGE pitchers.
Sutherland led the hit parade
with four hits in five trips, one
of his blows being a long home
run over the left field fence in
the third inning with one team-
mate on base. Kielhofer had
three for four and Bobby Barnes
collected two for four.
Castleman led his team at bat
collecting three hits in four trips
with two of the hits going for
TUCSON, Ariz., Feb. 6 (NEA)
The life of the touring profes-
sional golfer is one raucous rhu-
barb after another.
The tournament committee
and its directors have few tran-
3ull moments, for the tremen-
ous road show down the fair-
ways lends itself to beefs.
There was no excuse for the
rip tide of agitation in connec-
tion with Negroes competing In
doubles. George WiUs with two PGA tournaments, the old rule
for four, Jimmy Morris with one .should have been rewritten years
for one, and Johnny Snodgrass ago.
Colored players have compet-
ed In the United States and oth-
er Opens for several years. If
that wasn't enough, the PGA, no-
torious for sticking out its chin
in the direction of a bad press,
should have taken its cue from
baseball.
AFGE 14 AB R
Salas, 2b...... 2 3
Morris, 3b-p .... 1 3
Castleman, p-3b. 4
Wills, lb......
Snodgrass, c .. ..
Motion, ss. ....
8telner,cf.. ....
Hall, If........ i
Elmendorf, rf. .. 1
The pros tell you that there are
not more than a dozen Negroes
capable of competing with the
superior golfers.
The principal reason Is limited
opportunity.
The Negroes who participated
in the $10,000 Phoenix and Tuc-
7 son Opens list on the fingers of
| one hand courses, other than
HPO A public links, where people of
0
1
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
1) their race feel free to play. They
2 mention nine-hole layouts in At-
1 lanta, Jacksonville and Chatta-
0 nooga.
ll
0 Fashion Plate Rhodes
0 Is Sponsored by Louis
Totals........21 12 7 18 5
Score By Innings
Police 3 4 3 0 3 720 13 1
AFGE 2 4 5 0 0 112 7 3
Winning PitcherSutherland.
Losing PitcherCastleman. Hits
offCastleman 11 in 5 Innings;
Morris 2 in 1; Robertson 3 in 2;
Kielhofer 3 in 1; Sutherland 1 In
3. Struckout byCastleman 8;
Robertson 2; Sutherland 8; Mor-
ris 1. Hit by PitchCrook, Peder-
son by Castleman. Home Run
Sutherland. Two Base Hits-
Wills 2, Sutherland, Snodgrass.
UmpiresLuzer and Huddleston.
ScorerMead. Time of Game-
las. Attendance250.
RIDING PRESIDENT
In February, 1909, President
Theodore Roosevelt created a
temporary newspaper sensation
by covering 98 miles on horse-
back between daylight and dark.
He made use of three horses In
his 17 hours of riding.
Albrook, 33rd Again Deadlocked
In Armed Forces Baseball League
All agree that Ted Rhodes, a
fairly good looking, mustach-
ioed 32-year-old fashion plate
originally out of Nashville, where
he was a caddie, is the best Ne-
gro golfer in the world. His fath-
er was the locker room man at
a Memphis club.
Although Rhodes finished far
In the ruck in the Phoenix party,
his initial PGA test, the colored
shotmakers are confident he'll
be in the money consistently.
There is a lazy rhythm to hisj
swing that spells distance.
Rhodes, who stands five feetj
10 Mi Inches and weighs 180
pounds, has been sponsored by
Joe Louis since the former heav-
yweight champion's Open, car-
rying his name, was renewed In
1946 in DetroiJ.j -where it was
launched in '40 and interrupted
by World War II.
Rhodes finished in the coin in
Chicago Tarn O'Shanter's All-
America the past two years and
the Los Angeles Open for three.
SplUer Trails Rhodes
In Negro Tournaments
Bill Spiller, the other Negro
pro who competed in the Arizona |
Opens, is 37 and an alumnus of.
Texas' Wiley University, where I
he excelled in basketball ana
track. Spiller. a nice-looking,
man standing five feet 11, did'
just about everything befdr
turning pro five years ago. He
was a red cap and a waiter.
8piller gives lessons to affluent
Negroes when not competing in
summer colored Opens, where
purses range from $1000 to $5000.
Rhodes wins most of the lat-
ter, but Spiller has bagged a cou-
ple and is never worse than fifth.
Louis Still Packs a Potent
Punch in Golf
Alabama-born Willie Moseley
35, a Negro crack who did not
play in Arizona, is an assistant
pro at Rackham. a public course
on Detroit's north side. He has
competed in the Michigan Open.
Eural Clark, 26, one of three
amateurs who played here, is a
clerk in a Los Angeles novelty
store and a 1 and 2 handicap
man. Joe Louis and his 30-year-
old secretary, Leonard Reed,
have shot 67s. Reed produces Los
Angeles musicals on the side.
Joe Louis may no longer be able
to lick a Rocky Marciano, but he
won the decision from the Pro-
fessional Golfers' Association.
Oefling Up Nights
If rouI toTot from GtttTij Vp
NlShU. Backache, Ler Pln7Loi
of Vigour, Nervousness or weak-
ness you should help your Prr state
Oland Immediately with ROO UNA.
This wonder medicine make!
roa feel younger, stronger and
sleep without Interruption. Oet
ROOENA from your chemist today.
"tisfactlon guaranteed. ^^
ra
prevail Unen rurning
yellowto keep it white m
now, you need to ase oniy-
littlc .
PANAMA ARMED FORCES
BASEBALL LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Albrook........ l
33rd Infantry .... 9 1
Special Troops. ..7 3
Coco Solo.......( 4
45th Battalion.. .. $ 4
594th FA....... 4
744th AAA......$ 4
Hlrd AAA......6 4
374th Beat......S 5
Signal.........3 6
Atlantic Sector. .. $ 7
West Bank......2 7
370th Shore......i 9
Corosal........$ 19
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Coco Solo 11, Signal 6.
504th 23, Corosal 3.
993rd 9, 37th Boat S.
Sp. Troops 19, West Bank 9.
45th 5, Atlantic Sector 2.
33rd 8, Albrook 2.
Albrook 1, 379th Boat 9.
Played on Sunday.
out to be top battle with the
Flyers taking a 1 to 0 decision to
pull back into a tie for the top
.999 position in the standings.
.900 Only three games remain to be
.700 played by both teams during the
.600 first round. The Flyers must face
.6001 the 764th AAA. the 45th Batta-
.609 lion and Special Troops while the
.690 Infantrymen oppose Special
.699 Troops. Coco Solo and the 45th |
.500 Special Troops, the third place
.333 team, held its position Saturday
.399 by squeezing out a 10 to 9 deci-
.222 sion over West Bank. The Troop-
.100 ers are still in position to cause
099 trouble in the first round race
with games against both leaders
remaining on its schedule.
THE NEWEST
RCA VICTOR
Five other team's still have a
mathematical chance at a tie for
first place with records of six
wins and four defeats. The teams
tied for fourth place are Coco
Solo. 45th, 504th, 764th and 903rd
Battalions. The 370th Boat Bat-
talion was dropped out of con-
Plenty of excitement was on'tentlon by virtue of its two de-i
era lik* nil Smith Talmadre r,B"*J OI wcuemeni was on venuon Dy virtue oi its
sSter Bob Saltand LeoCoEl %? over toe wek end ^ the feats over the week end.
2^rif-^.",^V.^.Pn*nis Armed Forces Baseball Other games played I
Cager Wat Terribly
Inconsiderate
OLEAN, N. Y.. Feb. (NBA) -
When St. Bonaventure tied
school hoop record with nine
wins in row a few seasons ago.
Coach Eddie Melvin became pro-
gressively rabid.
So when the Bonnie* went out
to extend the string to 10, Mel-
vin exhorted his players passion-
ately^sven though they led by
Suddenly, the/iery coach spot- ..
ted Kenny Murray, the school's the leading scorers of the loop.
all-time scoring great, * D- -** - -
pitched Red Tank to a 6-3 victory
over the last place Chagres.
Isthmian Sports
The feature sports event in the
Pacific Clubhouse Monday eve-
ning was the three-game cage se-
ries opener between the Red
Whigs and the Blue Wings for
honors m the Pacific Boys' Club
Basketball League. The contest
was keenly contested and was
won by the former team.
All the member sof both out-
fits tried to tarn points with the
view of swelling their individual
totals. A beautiful medal will be
awarded the top individual
er. Both squads are mad* up of
dashing By virtu of scoring eight
off the court. 'points In this game, Vtaeent
Where re you going?" cried White maintained his lead for
high-point honors with 131. He
Sanders and
and Pabn.
Hanna; Bailey Murray replied.
Melvin.
"My pants are falling down,"
Little Motta's 4, Margarita 1.
Gary Maloy hurled brilliantly
allowing but one hit and one run in the center of the court where
"How do you like that?" Melvin
asked, turning to the bench.
Couldn't they fall Just as easily
is followed by Rafael Espinos of
the Blue Wings who has 126.
oOo
Chagres was jubilant Sunday
.enlng following the cricket en-
ement between Fen wicks C.(
hlch represents the villrge an
stentine. Manning and Bailey are
two of the top players In the In-
t -scholastic League, and both
will be playing their last game of
basketball for the Tigers.
Balboa will have an almost all
senior team on the floor, with
Edgar and Otear Kourany, Sam
'Maphts, and Fred Raybourne all
la their fourth year at the Ball-
dog school. Bob Donahue. 8.3
center, will be the only under-
classman In the starting five in
an probability. Most of the Bal-
boa bench will also bo veteran
players, with Gns Troncoto be-
ing the only Junior, and Dick Os-
trea, Leon Barring, and Ray Da-
vidson all playing In their final
gWtt. ______________
Blerd as the result of Fenwicks'
victory over their rivals in their
initial match of the season play-
ed on the local Kent sward.
The homesters taking first
knock at the wickets amassed a
total of 161 runs for the loss of
five wickets, and dislodged their
opponents for 64. Top contribu-
tors to the score were C. Scott
with 54 runs, J. Gittens with 32,
Norman King 24 and Jlmmie
King 17.
to score bis third win of the sea-1 he'd still bt in the gme?" | the Moreland C.C. from cnip bos.
Physical Director Clinton Par-
ris of the Chagres Playground
has been kept busy these recent
days, whipping his school ath-
letes into shape for the big field
day to be conducted on the La
Boca Playground this Saturday.
Every play area in the town is
being used for the various drills
the kids have been undergoing in
C,; preparation for the big event that
lcf, win Include games for girls and
games played Saturday
League and when the dust of, found Coco Solo defeating Signal
battle had cleared away the Al- 11 to 6, the 504th FA trouncing
brook Flyers and the 33rd In- Corosal 23 to S, the 903rd AAA
fantry were thrown Into a tie for; edging out 370th Boat Battalion
the league leadership with rec-'9 to 8, the 764th AAA scoring an
ords of nine wins and one de-easy victory over 370th Snore
'eat. Battalion 8 to 2, and the 45th
The scene of the two tension- Battalion won over Atlantic Sec-
packed games which changed the tor 5 to 2.
picture was the Albrook Air Wednesday's contests find Co-
Force Base diamond where the co Solo Journeying to Fort Clay-
two games of major Importance ton to face the 45th Battalion,
took place. Saturday the 33rd, Special Troops playing host to
infantry moved into a one-day the 33rd Infantry, Albrook cross-
least of first place In the stand-! lng to the Atlantic side to play
tags by coming out on top of a 3] the 764th AAA, 370th Boat Bat-
to 2 decision over the Flyers In talln entertaining Atlantic See-
the top game of the year for the! tor, Corozal at home against
league fans. However, Sunday's West Bank, Signal and 370th
contest between the Flyers and Shore playing at Albrook, and
the 370th Boat Battalion turned the 504th host to the 903rd. I
COMPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
AVAILABLE ON
EASY CLUB OR CREDIT PLAN
FOR ONLY $10.00 MONTHLY
USE
7110
Bolivar
YOUR OLD RADIO
DOWN PAYMENT
RADIO CENTER
AS
40
Coln

e gus
a week
via Pana ora
PAH aMftlCAN AC* a^m Al
All WAV*
t Penagra't office In Panama: Pneme Agencio* Ce.





CZ HOOP TITLE AT STAKE
Blood Clot May
Have Killed King,
Doctors Observe
LONDON. Feb. 6 (CV>
Widespread but unofficial me-
dical opinion here today was
that King George VI might
have died of coronary throm-
bosis a blood clot having
formed after his recent lung
operation.
Another less likely medical
theory was that the King suf-
fered a stroke.
It is most unlikely that the
exact cause of death will ever
be officially revealed.
Gangland Style
Blast Kills
Ex-Capone Man
AN INDEPETJDS^
r,n,
(PtfeT)
SPatmma American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH fEAR
PANAMA, K. P., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 195*
FIVE CENTS
The Colombian schooner Glo-
ria was located this morning
_ 90 miles northwest of Colon
I^MAnA nA-.-> and "there is life aboard"
'LdUOilfi Hnl A u s Navv PHM one of
VUfJUIIV/ IUI I four planes engaged in the
search, radioed the discovery
I at 8 a. in.
SAN MATEO, Cal., Feb. 6 (UP) I It said crew members could
Thomas Keen, dog racing fig- be seen on deck signalling. At
ure and former associate of Al least 14 of the 18 persons
SI',Lf,ed n 8nS'and!aboard were moving ajound on
irthnn tyh2l^?LWfnh^est?p-ithe sh'P- Seventeen are Co-
that blew him through the roof'81"1' ", ls J Panamanian.)
of his garage. i ..Tne .Alr Force immediately
Assistant district attorney,
Fred Wyckoff said the death of
the 56 year old sportsman
"looks like one of those gang-
land killings you hear about."
The blast rocked the neighbor-
hood.
Keen had interests in dog
tracks throughout the country
which authorities said dated
back to the 1920s when he was
connected with dog race enter-
f'rises in Florida controlled by
he late hoodlum Al Capone.
He also was president of In-
ternational Totalizer of Belmont,
Calif., manufacturers of tote
boards for race tracks.
Keen's wife, Sophie, told po-
lice her husband had just left
their home to get into hit car |
when the explosion was touch-
ed off, apparently as he step-
ped on the starter of his Olds-
mobile.
The walls of the garage were
shattered by the blast. All that
remained intact of Keen's new
auto was the rear end.
The concussion shattered win-
Navy Plane Spots Life Aboard
'Gloria; C-82 Drops Food
a three-day air and sea search, i US Navy cargo ship Pvt. John
The 87-foot schooner left San F. Thorson. They reported that
Andres Jan. 23, but ran out there was no food or water left
of fuel Jan. 30 on her way to on the Gloria.
Colon. Earlier the Gloria had Earlier this morning four
lost her mainmast and rudder, planes combined efforts to ln-
Four crewmen who set out tensify the search for the mlss-
for aid in a lifeboat were pick- ing schooner when they off at
ed up Monday morning by the I dawn.
| dispatched a C-82 from Albrook
Field to drop food and water
to the survivors.
A Navy vessel, the PC-486,
standing by on alert status at
Coco Solo, shoved off within
, minutes and was speeding to
I the scene to pick up the sur-
vivors.
The boat was spotted after
2 Teenagers Draw
Penitentiary Terms
In US Disl. Court
Two teen-agers drew peniten-
tiary terms yesterday In the
U. s. District Court at Ancon.
One of them, 16-year-old Elias
Brown, a Panamanian, was found
guilty on a mail-theft charge and
sentenced to serve one year in
the penitentiary.
The young defendant had been
arrested for taking mail matter
. .vltu ..,- from locked boxes at the Ancon
dows In Keen s house and of the j Pose Office, after having pried
t door, scattering glass | open the doors, and was specif 1-
ior 75 yards. Keen was blown "to
bits" through the roof.
Keen's current interests were
said to be connected with the
Multnomah Kennel Club in Port-
land, Ore., and the Mile High
Club in Denver, Colo.
Police said one report indicat-
ed he was a "major stockholder''
In both dog tracks.
At Denver. Mile High Kennel
Club president George McCarthy
said Keen had no connection
with the Denver track other
than that he had installed one
of his tote boards at the track.
Police said there were indi-
cations that Keen had been
facing increasing opposition in
his business enterprises in
Denver, Phoenix, Ariz., and Mi-
ami, Fla., but that nothing yet
pointed to a definite reason for
his apparent murder.
William P. Kyne, general man-
ager of Bay Meadows horse race
tracks and a friend of Keen, de-
scribed the sportsman as a "high
type fellow...he was definitely
not a gangster."
Kyne said that he and Keen
only recently had reached satis-
factory agreement on dates for
the 1952 season on horse and dog
tracks they run in opposition to
etch other at Portland. Ore.
Keen's neighbors in the unpre-
tentious section of the peninsula
(NEATelephoto)
ANGER IN THE COURT Attendants restrain Norman Tar-
diff. 31, after he became enraged at the sight of a news
onotographer in the Hartford, Conn., police court where he
was being arraigned on a manslaughter charge. Tardlff is
___________accused of stabbing his wife to death.
As soon as the Gloria was
spotted by the PBM, the other
planes were notified and ord-
ered to remain in the area of
the ship. Radio contact with
the Navy patrol craft is being
maintaned.
The rescue marked the sec-
ond three-day search for the
Gloria. The first occurred ex-
actly a year ago when she was
found safe near Costa Rica.
Freedom Drive Gels
1st Donation As VFW
Post Gives $100
Although the Isthmian Cru-
sade for Freedom still ls a week
away, a $100 contribution is ai-
read yon the books.
The donation the first to be
made by an organization In the
Canal Zone cime from Post
3822. Veterans of Foreign Wars,
of Albrook Air Force Base. The
$100 contribution was voted unV
animously bv post members a
ter listening to an address by Al-
fred Gauvin, chairman of the
Crusade for Freedom Committee
The Crusade, which has re-
ceived official support from top
dignitaries of Panama and the
Canal Zone, ls scheduled to start
February 12. It will last through
February 23. its purpose is to
Deputies Call
Birth of New CZ
Unfriendly
Firms
cally charged with having rifled
Box 662 belonging to Ellen S.
Sc hirer.
Brown also stole $139 in Ancon
last year, as well as other prop-
erty, the court was told, but be-
cause of his age, according to the
District Attorne
Acting District Attorney Kay
Fisher, he was not charged. How-
ever in 1950 he was convicted on
two petty larceny counts in the
Magistrate's Court and served
time. Panam police records
show a petty larceny conviction.
Judge J. J. Hancock, acting on
the prosecutor's recommenda-
tion, sentenced him to serve one
year in the penitentiary.
The other teen-ager, Panama-
nian Frank Adolphus Skeete, ls
also an "old-time'' offender, al-
though he will not be 15 years
old until later this month.
After he was found guilty of
burglary yesterday, he said that
he preferred to serve the time in
Gamboa where he could learn a
trade, instead of Pedro Miguel
jail. The Judge granting his wish,
sentenced him to serve six
months there.
Skeete had entered the Navy
Shore Patrol Building at the
Limits and taken a projector,
some material and a $20 bill. All
of the loot, except the money,
was recovered.
Skeete has been convicted sev-
US Government Decides
To Re-Try Judith Copln
----------..~.T iio |/ui ijimc IS IU I ---"" - ----- m in -
raise funds to help finance the the time the treaty was signed.
Seething national indignation over the Canal Zone
Government's alleged attempt to "annihilate" Panama's
"precarious economy/ boiled over last night in the Na-
tional Assembly when 33 Deputies signed a resolution
denouncing a lack of "friendship and cooperation" on
the part of Canal Zone authorities.
The resolution accused Canal Zone authorities of
helping to create "greater anguish in our country" and
"stabilizing a .. propitious situation for the growth of
international Communism."
Last night's discussion was
brought about by recent charges
by the Chambers of Commrece
of Panama and Colon and by
private Individuals, that the Pa-
nama Canal Co. Is offering un-
fair competition to the Republic
of Panama by permitting the
formation of new commercial
enterprises In the Canal Zone.
The most recent of these
charges was that the Panama
Canal Co. has given permission
for the establishment- of a new
bus line m the Canal Zone In
violation of the 1936 treaty be-
tween Panama and the United
States.
The Spanish-language news-
paper "Estrella de Panama" pub-
lished two editorials analyzing
the problem and pointing out the
serious repercussions that conti-
nued "treaty violations" by the
Canal Zone could cause in Pan-
ama's economic structure.
Yesterday "El Panam Am-
rica," the PA's Spanish-lan-
guage sister, also editorialized on
the problem of commercial com-
petition In the Canal Zone.
The editorial said that accord-
ing to the 1936 treaty the united
States government had agreed
not to permit any more private
commercial firms in the Canal
Zone than those that existed at
Installation of radio stations In
Europe and Asia to combat Com-
munist propaganda.
The Isthmian Crusade Is pat-
terned after a successful move-
ment started In 1950 In the Uni-
ted States and which already
has raised hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars.
Waere.be lived described him as'en times since 1949 on charges
a quiet man. of petit larceny and loitering.
*-?e. ? now,n,toh,av?been'"-' Both defendants were repre-
tercsted in politics, but never assented by Public Defender Wil-
a candidate._______ liam j Sheridan, Jr.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 6 (UP)
The government has decided to
try ex-government girl Judith
Copln for a third time on charg-
es of spying for Russia, it was
disclosed today.
The Justice Department has'
given up any idea of retrying the
petite brunette on her New York
spy conviction, but will move
soon for a new trial here.
The one-time Justice Depart-
ment employe was convicted here
June 30, 1949, on charges of
stealing Department secrets with
intent to injure this country and
help Russia, and of unlawfully
removing confidential papers
from government files. She was
sentenced to 40 months to 10
years in prison.
She was convicted In New York
on March 7. 1950, with Russian
engineer Valentin A. Gubitchev,
of espionage for the Soviet Un-
ion. Both were sentenced to 15
years, but Giusitchev was per-
mitted to return to Russia. Miss
Copln has remained free in
bond pending final disposition of
her case.
Now married and expecting a
baby in about a month. Miss
Copln had appealed both con
victions. The case reached the
Supreme Court which, by refus-
ing last week to overturn appeals
court decisions, virtually assured
her a new trial.
The Justice Department is not
expected to produce any new evl-1
dence in the second trial here. It
will present the same case it pro-
secuted successfully before a Jury
here In 1949, taking pains how-
ever not to tap the defendant's
phone conversations with her
lawyer.
Armour Official
To Speak Tomorrow
Al Rotary Luncheon
**nw-
Europe-Wide Manhunt Intensifies
For Armed Kidnaper Of US Girl
tier before military police had an
opportunity to scour the Frank-
furt area.
The gunman's footprints and
scent were blotted out a few
lions and drove off with herj yards from the abandoned car by
' ling snowstorm which fell
Mamie's
snowstorm which ..
night of lonely
fnin?nn,fnaeTfQrecllaStnig,h.t?'dier' AWOL from hla unit at
fSirmn nnu S Army a5d w?rt nearbv Hanau since Sunday-the
German police in a manhunt for night a tough-looking man in
ad a'nrVttv' iMfr"?*^^ "l"0 he,d UP and robbed M"
ed a prettv red-haired American mle's two Army sergeant com
high school senior and forced her, panions and drove off with
toOr?P en,Sneo,aufr-ely T^ lnto tne '"Shrouded night. "1 "swirTln
ar8n5r^?fau ".hSS, Amfan Army aVthorltles- admitting he during
uv. rJn if,fw^r1 wlthout was merely one of several ius-1 terror
SniirS ?rf StS?1 \l \ Eects *'anted for questioning.!
can Army unlform-who left IB.1 The missing soldie? thev irt tot. a?heizd 5* gunpolnt fiom
year-old Mamie Ruth Shelton in ls Pvt EuK F Wten M nf1!5^/^"" h"' *%* *." an abandoned car Sunday night1 Batterv C Mth ftoM rtiu. h Ians-' wh.en 'hey halted their
on a country road afterforcing battalion h 'd arUUery!?arrJlg,ve tnc hitchhiking uni-
te 40 mln'utes "nd ^"^ *" \ ? "'* ' stolen jeepj 'X^hadVen' dating the pret-
^ttned girl said she ''lth etLbw feS^/^ h*h i2^
*Vc >& ass? aKgd,t,ve J tii^rsx^1^^' yrr**** an
Kht^-e^aVd^rpfe
5 avsss. for Jj^^&^^^^ws^issr^
tlrl to Identify him however, be. eunmanTwarrdnff to ta^tn IhI iJlhe W8u unable to *et a *<**
cause she *ald he kept hU cap car or he ka,r.nrilng t0 ,tay m >'toc-kat the man. she said, and
on "even while trying to make1 She Sit hmMii in k "ld not tell the color of his hair
*" I thrmfch the huw 5,Jhe, cAr b.ecaiise he "*' his cap on con-
V*. MUitary Police said Ma- JSW, tV^tll a^ter ttlmSove!'^ *** ^ '
The Appeals Court here, In rul-
ing on Miss Coploh's appeal, up-
held her conviction but ordered
a hearing on her phone-tapplnir
complaint. It said If the corn-
paint was true, she had been de-
nied her Constitutional right to
counsel and should get a new
trial.
The Justice Department haa
admitted listening in on her
phone talks with her lawyer at
the time, explosive Archibald
Palmer. Therefore it Is not ex-
pected to block her forthcoming
request for a new trial but rath-
er to go ahead and prosecute.
,.Th* Department may argue
that it learned nothing of use
from her phone talks. But the
Appeals Court has held that
the mere fact she was over-
heard would mean a denial of
her right to counsel. Defense
attorneys may try to make use
of the wire-tapping issue in
the new trial.
Miss Copln is expected to file
a motion soon for a hearing be-
fore the Federal District Court
here on the wire-tapping issue.
When the legal formality of es-
tablishing the facts Is dispensed
with, the court Is expected to or-
der a new trial.
The Justice Department could
have let her go free by declining
to prosecute again and dropping
the case. But now it must go
through the procedure of again
presenting the full evidence to a
Jury and seeking another convic-
tion.
There was no Indication who
will be Miss Coplon's lawyer In
her new trial here. She parted
company with Palmer after the
first trial and is now married to
one of her New York lawyers, Al-
bert H. Sokolov.
She was arrested by the FBI
in New York on March 4, 1949, as
she was walking with Gubitchev
In her purse were found FBI data
slips and personal notes on Jus-
tice Department affairs. <
Her New "York conviction was
upset on grounds that the FBI
agents had no warrant and the
government had failed to prove
she was about to escape. Such
firoof then was required by law
or arrests without a warrant. It
i since has been tightened. '
The Important obllgat ions
which were negotiated between
nations XI Panam America's
editorial said, 1* now In the
hands of a corporation "which
as such seems more Interested in
functioning with commercial,
lucrative alms, even at the ex-
Dense of our republic, thus vio-
lating the spirit of all inter-
oceanic negotiation."
The editorial recommended
that the government of Panama
make "incessantly active and
sincerely friendly" efforts In the
highest circles of the Washing-
ton government to "obtain the
recognition of our rights."
, Last night's action by the Na-
tional Assembly is expected to
! result m President Alclbiades A-
| rosemena giving specific instruc-
'tions to the Panamanian Am-
basador In Washington to put
; the matter before the State De-
partment, according to informed
sources.
One Dead In Zurich
As Avalanche Hits
Barns And Houses
ZURICH, witaerland, Feb.
6 (UP) Avalanches thun-
dered down Swiss valleya to-
day, reportedly killing one per-
son and detroylng an unspec-
ified number of barn and
houses.
Only BRANIFF Hies
DIRECT TO HAVANA
Stop-over in Havana on your next trip north
via Braniff. Thrill to tWe g*y Latin charm that
hs made it world-famous as an international re-
sort. Both Braniff services fly direct to Havana:
deluxe DC-6 Conquistador, and low-cost El
Intercontinental. Either way, you enjoy Braniff
comfort and speed ... and the assurance of flying
with experienced "million-miler" pilot*.
The guest speaker for the
Panama Rotary's Club meeting
tomorrow will be John J.
O'Connor, Vice President in
charge of foreign sales of Ar-
mour and Company.
Invitations have/been extend-
ed to a number of distinguish-
ed guests both from Panama
and the Canal Zone to attend
the meeting to be held at El
Panama Hotel at 12:15 p. m.
tomorrow.
Miss Vivian Simmons accom-
panied by Rotaran Alberto
Galimany will provide a pro-
gram of music.
A special menu will be pre-
pared which will Include meats
produced in Panama for the
benefit of a demonstration for
the guest speaker.
O'Connor, who has worked
for Armour since 1912, is re-
sponsible for the management
and sales of six Armour plants
Tocated in South America, and
the operation of plants, branch-
es and sales outlets everywhere
beyond the borders of the
United States.
He is making a special trip
to Panama to preside at the
formal opening for the new
quarters of Armour and Com-
pany_______________________
BALBOA TIDES
Feb. 7
LOW
7:41 a. m.
8:05 p. m.
Thursday,
WIGH
1:11 a. m.
1:59 p.m. ,
Morris Retires;
Horace McBride
To Succeed Him
Lt. Gen. William H. H. Morris,
Jr., commander in chief of the
Caribbean Command.thls morn-,
ing announced his retirement1
from the United States Army.
He will be succeeded as Carib-
bean commander by MaJ. Gen.
Horace L. McBride, presently
commandant of the Army Com-
mand and General Staff College,
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.
Dominica Prtesis
Cuba's Criticism
01 'Quetzal' Dispute
PARIS, Feb. 6 (UP)The Dom-
inican Republic protested before
the United Nations today over a
recent Cuban statement which
criticized the Dominican version
of the dispute over the arrest of
five Cuban crew members of the
hip "Quetzal."
A Cuban note to Secretary Gen-
eral Trygve Lie had charged that'
the Dominicans gave a biased in-!
terpretatlon of the case In thelr
note.
Max Henriquez Urefta, chief of
the Dominican delegation pres-
ented a "rectification"* of the
"inaccurate and unilateral alle-
gations" contained In Cuba's Dr.
Ernesto Dlhlao's communication.1
Urea's letter said his govern-
ment furnished an exact text of
the Joint declaration signed by
Cuba and Dominica before the
Inter-American Peace Committee
In Washington Dec. 25.
3 Living Queens
LONDON, Feb. -* (UP)
Britain has never before had
three queens living at the
same time.
King George VTs widow may
become known as the Queen
Mother, and Queen Mary as
the Dowager Queen.
Fot Information and
rettmtion* tec your travel fleet m
call rout Braniff rapwentath*. -
Avenido TivoW #11 *
Telephone 2-0729
Hotel El Pooamd
Via Espato, 111
Telephone 3-4726
or 3-1660 Ext. 130
plow Ticket Office Telepfcoae 77,