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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01375
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01375
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

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AN IKDIPENWWT^
L *$B1LY NEWSPAPER

NOW
ONE STOP
H
SAO PAULO
Panatrra American
*'Let the people know the truth and the country is gafe1* ' Abraham Lincoln.
fSeagranrsYOr
* CANADIAN WHISKI C*
DittaUi,mfttmtbenU4tm Cmmt tmlm C< O* rtnmtm *
rWENTV-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, S. F, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1951
FIVE CENT*
Truman
Teams
RrscPK AT 8BA The second engineer oUhe ill-fated Colombian hooner Gloria w
the fl ol the four .imen^ rescued yesterday to clamber up the Jacob's ladder of the, U
Nwr cargo ship' PVt: John F. Thorson. The other three crew members of the Gloria can be
seen,ln their lifeboat as they clung to the side of the rescue vessel. (Msg) ph#to)-
* *
NAVT RESCUE SHIP sights the lifeboat (circle) and speeds
to the rescue of the four survivors of the Gloria.
(MSTS Photo)
COLOMBIAN SAILORS, picked up in the lifeboat after five
days without food or water, pose with their rescuer, Capt.
Wm. H. B. Cowan, master of the Thorson. From left, Anto-
nio Pawklns, Carrington Femare. Cowan, Tennyson BTOwn,
and Benjamin Howard.
________- _______________(U.S. Navy Photo)
30 Rebels Killed In Indo-Chino
Hope Fading
For VOtoria/
Passengers
Hope faded today that the 18
fiassengers on the ill-fated Co-
omblan schooner Gloria were
still alive.
This morning two search
planes from Albrook were inten-
sifying the search of a 1200-mile
area in the Caribbean where the
87-foot vessel was last seen.
Yesterday one of the airmen
sighted a red oil drum floating
about 90 miles out of Cristobal.
This confirms the report given
by four of the Gloria's crewmen
who were rescued from a lifeboat
vesterdav morninsr by the USNS
Pvt: John F. Thorson, that two
oil drums that were lashed toge-
ther to make a raft had detach-
ed themselves and floated away.
The four men rescued stated
that the Gloria, which ran out
of fuel Jan. 30 on her way to Co-
lon from 8an Andres Island, was
also without food or water and
due to a storm, lost her main
most and rudder. The survivors
left the ship in a lifeboat in or-
der to summon help.
Meanwhile the Thorson which
was ordered vesterdav to remain
in the area in case their assist-
ance would be needed, arrived at
Cristobal at 1 this morning with
the four Colombian crewmen a-
board. They were turned over to
the Colombian consulate in Co-
lon by Naval authorities.
First Air Rescue's Flight B aent
two SB-17's out early this morn-
ing to search the area. The 15th
Naval District ordered their PC
486, a patrol craft, to stand by
at Coco Solo ready to leave on
*an hour's notice, in case the
Gloria is sighted by Air-Sea res-
cue teams.
According to the four surviv-
ors, there is one local bov Ray-
mond Steel. 17 aboard. The ste-
wardess. Nldis Livingston, is the
only woman on the Gloria. The
comnlete list of the crew Is:
Arlstldes Newball. Captain of the
Gloria; Dudley May. Navlrator;
Carlos Venner, First Engineer;
Carrington Femare. Pe-ond En-
eineer; Antonio Pawklns. Oiler:
Plxev Davis. Oiler; Ten->vson
IBrown. Cook; Dessv Duke Con-
tadera: Velasquez Hooker, car-
penter; NMls Livingston. 8fe-
wardessr Benfamin Howard,
carpenter; Nidi* Livingston.
fUewprdess; Benjamin Howard,
Cornclio Hawkins: Joseph New-
love; Brie Brilton: Arturo
Forbes: Augustus Archbold: U-
san Mow: Chfistt"- Femare: Br-
aesto Arrhbold; FjSarrd Marti-
nez and Raymond Steel. Seaman.
~~BAl.BOA Tir>FS
Wary
panmunjom, Korea. Fab. 5
(UP) Truce negotiators here I
quickly settled more'minor de-
tails of the Korean armistice to-1
day, but the United Nations
Command in Tokyo warned that|
the Reds still haven't shown a
real willingness for a fair peace.!
A broadcast by the '.'Voice of
the United Nations Command"
said:
"The Communist concessions so
far have been a sfep in the right
direction, but there is still a long
compromise between the Red de-
sire for only five teams, and the
United Nations proposal for 15
teams.
4) The negotiators reached
general agreement on a parole
clause for released prisoners nev-
er to fight in the Korean war
again.
5) They agreed that sick and
wounded prisoners would be
granted priority in the post-ar-
mistice exchange.
\
8V Agreement was reached on
made before, and each period of exchanging information about
optimism has been followed in prisoners who died in captivity,
turn by weeks of utter frustra- 7, ^ accord was reached on
"on- -.. | Red cross workers on both sides
"This is part of the Commu- assisting and visiting prisoners
nist war of nerves. Hopes may be of war. instead of handing the
raised and dashed according to ,ob ovfer to the International
schedule in the hope that soon- committee of the Red Crosa,
er or later the On ted NatUms; 8( orates agreed that civil-
Command will give in complete-, lans should be assisted to return I
Kf-" ... I to their former homes. The Reds]
way to go.
'W
ogress of sorts has been
Swedish Sleuth,
Local Police
Pressing Hunt
The strange case of Panama's
missing man entered the 11th
day todav with police of three
nationalities engaged in the
hunt.
Harry Soderman. top-ranking
Swedish detective, spent his sec-
ond day in Panama poring over
pers and belongings of
the pa
Gosta Videgaard, the Swedish
businessman who walked out of
Hotel El Panam on Jan. 25 and
hasn't been seen or heard from
since.
Soderman, who is chief sleuth
of the Swedish government, is
officially on vacation from his
Job. He was retained by Vide-
gaard's family In Stockholm,
where the missing man owns one
of the biggest downtown office
buildings in the city.
The foreign detective, who
has written a book on crimin-
ology and is regarded aa one of
the outstanding crime investi-
gators in Europe, said today he
could not yet make any com-
ment oa the strange case but
he was high in praise of the
cooperation already shown by
the local authorities,
"The police are most coopera-
Permits His Name
On Democratic
Primary Ballot
WASHINGTON, Feb. 5 (UP).President Truman
today decided to permit his name to remain in the De-
mocratic primaries in New Hampshire.
. His action is interpreted as a move towards seeking
re-election.
Mr. Truman has been under mounting pressure from
leaders of the Democratic Party to make an early state-
ment about his political intentions.
Mr. Truman's action came as
the executive committee of the
Democratic National Committee
met in Washington.
He acted on the advice of
Democratic chairman Frank
McKinney and "many good de-
mocrats in New Hampshire who
are of the opinion that my
name should be left on the
primary ballot."
The President had stated
earlier that he objected to such
primaries because they are not
A full dress session of the ar-: tiff'resisted Unitedi Nations "ef-l Uve," he said.
scheduled JortatTwrtS safeguards into the: Soderman spent most o ves-ending. Therefore he thought
with
mlstice conference is
for tomorrow tp take up the fifth cir)aa programs against chat*-1 terday and this morning
and final Item on the confer- eg of Violating the armistice by' Hector Valds, chief of the Pan- not to
ence agendarecommendations not ri,Uinln* all civilians. ama secret police. I till he
to be made to belligerent gov-
Latvian Eludes
Stockholm Reds
In Wild Chase
a final peace set-
of speed
ernments for
tlement.
thetwo^rW*
terday and today, in
with the snail's pace of recei
weeks, produced these develop-
ments:
1) Agreement that each side
should return prisoners as rap-
Idly as possible after an armis-
tice Is signed; and that prisoner
exchange should be conducted at
another point besides Panmun-
jom to speed up the process.
2) Agreement that displaced
persons may be allowed to settle
in defense areas after a truce.
3) An agreement that 10 truce
teams shall supervise a truce In
the demilitarized zone between
the opposing armies. This was a
0) The United Nations offered
to eat tatelr monthly rotation
pa'nd temporary
ity assignments. They would
tut the figure to 40,000 with rest
and recreation excluded. The
Communist figure Is 25,000 a
month.
10) The United NaUons offered
to scale down the number of
ports of entry to be Inspected
from 13 to 10 behind the lines of
each side. The Reds insisted on
three for each Side.
mipp
The daily United Nations com-1 Universal Line.
On the other side of the boun-
dary, meanwhile, the Canal Zone
police were still checking stray
leads but had nothing, to report.
Vttegaard's boat, the Crtstma,
tied up in Cristobal' bay was
checked without results. The
ship has been there since Jan. 27.
Bengt Videgaard, 21, son of the
missing mah. is now in Panam
awaiting results. He Is one of
three of Videgaard's children by
his first wife. He came to the
Isthmus Sunday from Per where
he had been connected with his
father's shipping company, the
it would be better for his name
appear on any ballots1
was ready to announce
whether he will seek re-elec-
Uon.
Mr. Truman's only opponent
in tty: .New Haranat
crati primary will be Sen. tx
tes Kef a u ver, of Tennessee.
Contesting t h e Republican
primary are Gen. Dwight El-
senhower and Sen. Robert A
Taft, Ohio.
STOCKHOLM. Feb. 5 (UP)
A burly Latvian refugee fought
Iil- way out of the Russian Em-
bassy here today and ran wildly
through the street pursued by
two men in a Soviet Embassy
car until he was taken Into eus-
Demo- toeV-k* the Swedish police for
questioning.
munlque said that the session on
prisoner exchange was "the most
Broductlve of the 53 sessions" on
lat problem.
Llbby, the scrappy little admir-
al representing the United Na-
tions, showed his first optimism
in weeks of futile bickering.
"We may be ready to go to the
staff officer level In a day or
two," he said. "I may be com-
pletely wrong, but I think we are
beginning to make progress."
Deportee Vanishes
At Tocumen On Way
Home To Ecuador
Cable Thieves Gel
Penitentiary Terms
From Judge Hancock
Two cable thieves were sent-
enced to the penitentiary dur-
ing this morning's session of the
U. S. District Court at Ancon.
On a first count of petty lar-
ceny with a previous conviction,
24-year-old Sergio Rodrigues, a
Panamanian, was sentenced to
serve three years in the peniten-
tiary for stealing 28 feet of cable were SMlrchlng today for an resting on a river bed In eight
The other two children, Vide-
gaard's second wife and two
daughters by her all reside in
Stockholm.
Soldier Drowns
While Swimming
In Cocoli River
A 21-year-old Puerto Rican sol-
dier drowned yesterday after-
I noon while swimming in the Co-
coli River.
Three soldiers who were stand-
ing'on shore nearby noticed only
fingertips nn
the surface of the water, and
his fingertips protruding out of
from the Army in Curundu, on
Dec. 1. The cable was valued at
$19.80.
Judge 3. 3. Hancock pointed
out to the defendant that he will
have to serve 15 years If he Is
convicted of one more felony, ac-
cording to the law.
The defendant admitted steal-
ing over 900 feet of cable only
one week before he was caught.
He had three previous burglary
convictions in Canal Zone courts,
and several petty larceny charges
in Panam.
threw a wire cable to assist him.
However, the body then disap-
peared from view, and they re-
Panam and Canal Zone police, covered it shortly afterwards
n resting on i
Ecuadorian deportee from trie ieet or water.
United States, who apparently Artificial respiration failed.
walked out and vanished while and he was pronounced dead at
the plane that was taking him to: tne port Clayton Hospital. The
his homeland was refueling at downed man was assigned to the
Tocumen Airport. 504th Field Artillery Battalion at
Panam police said today Jose Fort Kobbe.
Antonio Garcia Santander was. _=-----------------------------------------
one of five deportees who got off
a plane which landed at Tocu-
men two weeks ago to refuel.
When the plane was ready to
depart it was discovered that
Santander was missing, Panama;
Mexican Electric
Workers Call Off
Nationwide Strike
MEXICO. CITY, Feb. 5 (UP)
A Mexico-wide strike of 8.000
electrical workers which had
plunged this city of 3,000,000
into a blackout at the height of
the tourist season ended today
as the union ordered its mem-
bers back to their Jobs
The Mexican government had
called the strike "Illegal."
The union sent its members
back to work after accepting
Federal Board of Conciliation
and Arbitration orders for the
resumption of normal opera-
tions.
Eden Says Fear
Of War Lessens
LONDON, Feb. 5 (UP)
British Foreign Secretary An-
thony Eden told the House of
Commons today:
"Most observers In Europe
would. I believe, agree that
though anxieties remain,
fear of immediate war
The refugee, a huge woodcut-
ter, was being interrogated lata
today by the Swedish Espionage
Section.
Police refused to give his
name or to release any details
about the alleged kidnaping at-
tempt. The refugee, however,
told his story to a Swedish civ-
ilian before the police came for
him.
Shortly
heavlly-bi.ilt
after 10 a.m. tha
man wearing a
torn leather Jacket, dashed Into
the courtyard of the Exstrong
corporation In one of Stock-
holm's most fashionable dist-
ricts.
not increased,
less."
and Is Indeed
The man was running so fast
he knocked over Nils Wiklund,
a -technician employed by the
company. Then he turned
back to Wiklund and shouted:
"They're after me. Can you
save me? Can I phone the po-
lice?"
The man was shown a tele-
phone and he called the police-
While waiting for them he told
Wiklund that a Latvian whom
he had never seen before asked
him to come along and have a
look a. his "apartment."
As soon as he entered the
building he became suspicious
and when he saw the word "So-
thelviet" in big letters on the wall
has i he decided to leave Immediate-
ly. He
bassy.
was in the Soviet Em-
,, police said. An immediate search
Rodrigues also faced the Court: fitht airport failed to find html
on a second count of returning i d tne pfant WM forced to take
to. the Canal Zone after deppr- 0 w|thout tne missing deportee.:
tatlon. For this he *^ tf* Santander had been deported ABBEVILLE, La., Feb. 5 (UP)
two-year suspended sentence up- tne v 8 u an "undeslr- >^^" ,h 2nn nmsrUrtlve
on the condition that he does not 7."He was last seen by .ro^^'XnTfulUwo-dav
return to the Cana Zone He was Imrnlgration authorities at Toe- uet fffi wTne and lo^ un-
placed on probation for five ,._ "in^in out the main door "let r l"?' w,"e 8na "ye un
5MJMSSSSL5 S^^Jfe*. ~ %*VSM S5-SS
Food, Wine and Love Bought
Louisiania Votes In 'Bullpen
Manuel Belmejo, who claimed he
stole 52 feet of telephone cable
valued at $32.13 from Fort Clay-
ton out of "dire necessity" be-
hldlng
in Panam City.
Egypt Now Ready
cause he didn't have food for his "Tn N PflOtlO tP
family, was sentenced to serve, O ncgOTIUHS
one year in the penitentiary
The Judge, when pronouncing; LONP"-. ".'
sentence on the 21-year-old Pan- i'h of flete Is said
amantan, said' that In view of that thay believed
Belmejo's f 1 nanc lal elrcum-'now ready to seek
stances it "would be better" to; promise In fresh
let the government take can of
him for a while.
vestigatlon here today.
The Inquiry Into the "wild
bullpen party," which Is not un-
usual for the Cajun country of
southwest Louisiana, was
launched by District Court
Judge A. Wllmont Dalferes and
(UP) Brit- District Attorney Richard Put-
here today nan-
the
Egypt was
some eom-
negotlations
Anglo- Egypt-
HANOI, Indochina, Feb. 5 Red River delta last night re- Wedensday, Feb. I
(UP)A clash between a French' suited in 30 rebels being k lied. Mich Law
Union Commando unit andfaccording to a French high "!: a.m............ f:32 a.m. _
Communist rebel, troops en tha command communique. 1:M p.m. :S7 p.m. guilty of stealing cabla.
Belmejo, who pleaded guilty to
the charge, which was petit lar-
ceny, after a previous conviction,
was also represented by Public
Defender Sheridan.
On the date of the crime. Jan.
17, the defendant had Just been
released from Jail after serving
two sentences for petit lareeny.
On Dec. 4, he had been found
Original charges that the
"orgy camps" were staged by
an unidentified politician were
made by Stanley Pearson, co-
chairman of the Cltlxens for
Better Government Committee,
one of five to appear before
in a closed session to-
for setUlng
Ian dispute.
It Is obvious from all official
comment here that the British
government is anxious to avoid j Dalferes
any comment which may or*-[day.
Judlce the Egyptian govern-1 The other four were Warren
ment's efforts to restore law crest well, also co-chairman of
and order, and to bring about the committee: Joseph Choate.
a calmer atmosphere in which Sanford J. Laborde. and Ralph
negotiations might usefully be Bienvenue, editor of a weekly
Originally, the meeting was, Abbeville and so on. Before the
scheduled to be public. last move Monday night, the
Putnam declined to give out population had increased to
any Information of the meet- 200," the guard was quoted as
lng, adding merely that "this Is I saying. "They were taken In by
twos, by fives, by the carloads.
"Man and wife, street bums,
drunkards and prostitutes
were being entertained with
started.
I newspaper
I
_ criminal investigation.
Pearson earlier had said he
was told of the parties by
three men who said they were
hired by politicians la the
Jan. 15 primary as guards for
the "bullpen" orgy.
In the past, "bullpen" parties
have been traditional in some
communities of this southwest
Cajun country. Prospective vot-
ers are herded together for one
or two days and showered with
free food and entertainment. In
return they "vote right"that
Is in accordance with the polit-
ical sympathies of the party's
sponsor.
Ih his statement. Pearson
quoted one of the guards as
saying:
"We started out at a camp
north of Abbeville near Milton
in Vermilion Parish (County)
on Sunday before the election.
"At 3 a. m. the next day we
ii ns
fine food, drinks, tubs of beer,
cigarettes, string bands and
dancing in cramped quar-
ters."
Pearson said the guard related
that the night before the elec-
tion, the party turned into a
wild drunken orgy "with Just
about everyone engaging in sex
relations."
He told Pearson that the par-
ty ended about 0 a. m. election
day when the groups were taken
away, supposedly to the polls.
Pearson said the duties of the
three guards wart to "keep some
form of order" and to keep tha
group together until election
day.
He said the guards becama
disgruntled when the politician*
got orders to move south of I did not pay them oft.





sSMaflkntSM
PAGE TWO
. M -
THF fAlMMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 19*
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
SWNID AND niKIWID BY TMB PANAMA AMBKICAN FMU. IMC
FOUNDED ar HILWN HOUNBBVLL IN 1*11
MANMODIO AMIAS. IDITO
7. H fTMIT P. O. OX ISA. PANAMA. *. Of P.
Tr.lWOKI PANAMA No. S-0740
CASLI ADD! PANAMBMICAN. PANAMA
COLON OPPMJ 11.17 CINTHAl AVfNUI CTWCCN I8TH AND I3TH STRCfTD
FOROON RlPNESINTATIVIt- JOSHUA B. POWEliS. INC.
34* MADISON AVI. Naw VOBK. II" N. Y.
local. l
I.70 2.80
.SO 13.00
14 00
I
PIA MONTH. IN ADVANCt
ro kl MONTH*. IN ADVANCt
ro ONff VCAR. IN ADVANCt
Labor News
And
Comment
I Know Muscle When I See.lt'

18.SO
Broadway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
ALL IN THE FAMILT
Ed Fitzgerald, who with Pegeen. Invented the husband-and-
wiie brekfast broadcast, demands publicly that I writer more a-
bout Duffy the Goat.
Duffy was a slugger and killer, a merchant of mayhem and
murder, "for hire on either side of any cause that could pay for
bis services. He died in tbe Jollet pen, doing life.
You wouldn't think that decent folks would want and urge
more about him. But I get more response whenever I recall the
deeds of the Goat than I do when I pontificate about politics or
economics or brotherly love.
His right name was Dufay. He had been run off the Montreal
waterfront by the police. .
He came to Chicago, where they hung his monicker on him
because he was short and muscle-bound and one of his best
methods of attack was butting with his hard head.
But he was deadly with his fists and feet, too. If he could get
In the first clout, which, as a professional, he regarded as his
prerogative. ..
I saw him. while he was supporting a strike, grab the owner
of the plant as he started across the sidewalk to his car, pick
him up under the armpit from behind, swing him oer his head
and break both his shins on the edge of the curb-stone.
The next week, working for the man he had crippled, he gave
one of the union pickets the boots and staved in his ribs.
The Goat, vulnerable to blondes, had a case on Margie C, a
pint-sized pugnosed cutle who was singing at a saloon on Twenty-
Second Street one Summer.
Every night he came there and wept and applauded as sne
gave with sad ballads.
If others did not loudly show their appreciation he glowered
at them, and once, when a listener did not bring his hands to-
gether at all. the Goat socked him. ....., A
Dave Carew. who owned the place, chlded him and made it
clear he would tolerate no more such violence.
Dave was an ex-cop. had been discharged from the force for
killing a man without valid reason, and was tough.
A nightlv patron of the place was a mysterious fellow we all
caUed Charlie Fabst. A table was reserved for him. He was al-
ways alone. He would drink onlv beer. The waiter was ordered
to itaek all the empties on the table, and not until it was com-
pletely covered would he leav. i ,L. uk^i
Something Margie had sung struck a chord In Charlie s heart.
He broke out into continuous, conspicuoui applause. He even stood
UP and banged his Dalms together.
Up leaped the Goat. He walked over to Charlie and shouted:
"You're claopln' too much. It ain't becusyou like the slngin,
You eot other Idees!"
Whereupon he floored Charlie.
Dave picked his pet customer up and spoke soothingly to him.
Then he went back of the bar and reappeared with a base-
ball bat which he used for crushing ice and disorderly conduct.
He strode over to the Ooat and said:
"Next time you lay a hand on anybody In this Joint. Ill
scramble the insldes of your thick skull And what's more. Ill
fire lwlftrffie **
Few people talked that way to Duffy and survived to see an-
other sun rise over Lake Michigan. .
But Dave had the bludgeon noised and stood at just the right
distp-cc to in M at Its most efftive range. . v.
Moreover. M> thonrht of Margie out of a job. where ne
rouKnt si >nd li:teh and adore her, wa a damper against des-
perJ" aHloi.
jthe Goat he.-It'-id one mom?nt.
hen he got out of his chair, turned, and shuffled out of the
P "tin the street. It was long past midnight, he looked up and
down. Few pedestrians were abroad. 4 -
But in time he saw a hobo making his way east from the
8tate Street skidrow. to seek his slumber on the grass of Grant
Park.
Duffy waited for him to come up.
He steDped from the doorway, seized the bum. beat him fierce-
ly, then threw him. senseless, into the gutter.
The light was again in Duffy's eyes and he carried his bulky
shoulders square as he turned and went back into Dave's and
mad*- his way again to his chair
You could see the, Goat felt like a man once more.
And Margie's Job was safe!_______________________________
TMI; VOUR FORUM THI READIRS OWN COLUMN
""the mail box
Tk. Msil Ssi M on sp" ?rum Or r..far, .? Tbs r.nima Amar-
Irs Hen re rctiv*s ratsrsttv t nbMM I" s VRWp "-
fiaWr' -I manner.
II ,ou tsartHsuts tone* ssn't b Isrsstaan I Mini aaaaar m
a av LsHn or* ublitfcsa) in Ik sasst racaives.
PtssM try I kass Iks Wtin liila Hj saw pat* lanfrk.
Issntiry ST SN wrilan M ImJmJ in trierM caafiSanca.
This nawssss! anuira, no raipennailrfy tal italamtnti r slats*
a'****' in IsNsra tram asedar*.
HOW MANY HOURS A DAY IS LEGAL FOR BUS DRIYER
Coco Solo
Mail Box Editor
Panama American
Deaf, Sir:
Will you be so kind as to let me have the use of your
column to publish this letter? It may be of use for the safety
of the people of the Canal Zone.
On Jan. 29th I took one of the buses of the (deleted) bus'
line with my wife and two kids, after visiting in Coln. About
11:30 p.m. all passengers got excited and started to scream as
the bus wobbled from side of the street to the other.
At times it would seem that for sure he was going to ram
an dhcomnig vehicle. Everyone thought the driver was drunk
and figured to report him to the police. But we found out
the driver was tired and sleepy. He had been driving for 18
hours.
Are there no labor laws on the Canal Zone to take care of
this situation to help those poor drivers. The owner of that
bus line really has no consideration for his employes and cer-
tainly does not care anything about his customers. Guess he
1 only interested in getting the dimes.
If this situation continues sooner or later there will be
a serious accident on the road caused by a sleepy and tired
driver.
Thoi poor drivers are afraid to report this situation be-
cause if they do their boss gives them a time check or gives
them time off as be usually does.
Sincerely,
Raymond Fugerson
OF BEARDS AND DOGS
Gamboa
Editor, the Mall Box.
The Panam American.
Ancn, Canal Zone,
Dear Sir:
Well, Ed, they dood it again. Just lately. They heaped one
more straw on my (the camel's) back. In the shuffle to the
new location of the barber shop here they made my favorite
barber so unhappy that he had to pull up stakes. They are very
abort of toilet facilities in the new set-up, too.
They also made it almost impossible to cash a pay check
here* They do not have a paymaster here on taxpayer's pay
week, and as I have no ear and don't belong to the Golf Club
what should I do?
Than there la the old subject of the untaxed dogs again
The are allowed to roam and destroy and disturb and some
employes are allowed to take their animals to work with them
great unhapplness of guys like me not to mention the
y reaulrements.
as this shirt sleeve meeting with the Brains, I meant
that I read about ever look Into the Mail Box complaints?
Does It sound like
Lever of rets (en a farm)?
By Victor Riesel
It happened during one of
those moments when the leo-
nine John Lewis had the coun-
try in a crisis.
Al! nerves but Lewis' were
frayed. Suddenly the tension
went beyond the usual Lewis
crackling point. He summoned
a government official to his
hotel room followed by a
battalion of newsmen, who were
barred-
The doors closed.
Three hours later, Lewis and
his companion pushed then-
way through the eager report-
ers.
No comment, gentlemen.
No comment.
We didn't learn until
much later that there could
not have been any. Lewis
had settled the strike be-
hind the scenes long be-
fore he and the govern-
ment man reached the ho-
tel. When they got into
the room, John L. merely
said: "Ed. let's go to sleep."
And they didfor three
hours. Later they gave the
impression that all prob-
lems had been solved In
that inaccessible room.
So I've learned never to ac-
cept Lewis' publ'c statements
as reflective of what really
went on behind closed doors
somewhere else.
To understand that Is to
understand what to me was one
of the most important political
developments of the past week
during which there was a
moment when John Lewis and
Senator Taft badgered each
other at a mine safety hear-
ing before the Senate Labor
sub-committee.
As Lewis stepped off the
witness stand, he met the Sen-
ator on the way out of the
big room.
"You're a fine and honest
man, Senator, and I have a
lot of admiral Ion for you, but
you Just don't understand the
problem of my working peo-
ple," the coal diggers' chief
said.
The Senator grinned and
they walked out both aware
that only a few days earlier
John L. had sent some of his
legislative boys up to see Taft
to ask for his aid. Further-
more, they had got the help
they wanted.
Lewis asked his men to drop
in on the Ohloan shortly after
the union chief had heard that
some Ohio coal mine operators
had sought out the Senator,
asking for support in opposi-
tion to the position the minen
were taking on safety in the
pits.
The issue was simple.
Lewis wants the govern-
ment to have power to
close down. all pits found
violating certain safety
codes. He wants these
mines hut first and
then he wants to argue the
legal niceties. Lewis knows
that death doesn't wait.
Its toll is exactly four dead
men in the pits on an aver-
age day.
Some mine owners' associa-
tions Just don't want the gov-
ernment armed with power to
tell them when to shut down
their properties.
They're saying that with
Lewis' influence over the Bu-
reau of Mines, he will, in ef-
fect, dictate which shall be
sealed. And these owners say,
Lewis is slightly careless with
power.
However, a fellow by name
of Ed Schorr, speaking for the
Ohio Coal Assn. as well as four
other groups, dropped in to see
Sen. Taft to say that his peo-
ple were ready to accept Lewis'
safety laws If the owners
would be guaranteed the right
to appeal directly to the courts
If the operators disagreed with
the Federal inspectors' ruling.
This would mean the disputed
mine would stay open until
all arguments were over.
To this Lewis says: Shut the
pit first, then appeal to the
Bureau of Mines, and then to
the courts so that no ex-
plosion meanwhile makes the
entire matter academic with
time out for mass funerals
This is what Lewis' lads told
Sen. Taft, Just a few days be-
fore John L. and the man who
now appears to have the Re-
publican nomination sewn up
got to needling each other
publicly.
After listening to both
sides. Taft sent word to
Lewis that he thought there
was greater merit in the ,
union's argument than in
the operators. So he backs
the United Mine Worker
on the point.
All of which makes more
than coal industry history.
These vignettes make political
history.
Every labor leader faces the
same problem John Lewis now
lis tackling on mine safety and
(Federal Inspection a few
words which make the differ-
ence between widowhood and
happiness in a thousand min-
ing patches.
If labor stays In national
politics, it begins to develop
certain shibboleths and old
slogans never die.
Garrison Statement
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK.I see they are still chewing the
same universal military training cud, after some
several years of rumination, and have got no-
where much beyond the original premise, which
is that umt is a bitter political pill and this is
an election year.
You gather that it is still all right to send a
tender young man away to be shot in an emer-
gency, nut training him en masse for such an
emergency is apt to impair morals and build him
into either a bum or a dictator.
Now we see the words "garrison state" kicked
around freely and with the bitter connotation of
"Iron Curtain nation" and "Socialist state" and
"Fascist state."
What is a garrison state, anyhow, that's bad?
Roosevelt kept yelling about America being an
"arsenal of democracy" and everybody from Tru-
man to tbe tax collectors keep stressing "pre-
paredness."
Every time they need him for political em-
phasis, old Lew Hershey the draft man, runs
up his string and raises the ante on the number
of draftees he figures he'll need day after to-
morrow.
A garrison state is bad, I gather, while pre-
paredness Is good when you talk of taxes and
guns and ships and A-bombs and the inflation
that comes with all the other aspects of "pre-
paring." Preparing for what? Peace?
The "arsenal of democracy" only becomes a
garrison state when you start putting the arm
on Mama's Willie to teach him to be a soldier
on the off-chance you may need him someday.
In the meantime, you draft Willie and send
him overseas pretty green and gawky, or yon
reach out and slap the collar on Willie's big bro-
ther, who has already been to one war in the last
10 years and is getting real sick of providing the
manpower for this arsenal of democracy that
cannot be a garrison state.
I am told that universal military training will
give us a militaristic point of view, as a nation,
which Is deadly.
But if a militaristic point of view is deadly we
are dead already, because we have been wearing
a military look for over a decade, an don't figure
to lose the look in your time and mine.
It seems to me that only a hypocrite can strong-
ly advance the "impairment of morals" argument
against general military training for the young.
There is nothing an 18 ^-year-old can learn
in a barracks that he can't learn as handily in a
college dormitory nothing that he probably
hasn't picked up already around the local drug-
store.
And there is an added difference in personal
supervision. Sergeants have more time to devote
to moral uplift than mothers.
Junior is apt to have less leisure as a trainee,
to investigate the potentials of boose, babes and
bad companions than under Mama's jurisdiction.
Deviltry is easy for the young to come by, or so
I recall, no matter what the supervision.
Concerning the youngster's late whack at col-
llegethe delay would not be appreciably da-
maging. Some slight maturity, resulting from
military training, 'might enable the young man
to appreciate more fully an education when he
gets around to it.
His character will have been molded along
slightly sterner lines, and his receptivity to learn-
ing Increased.
I keep remembering that parents used to pay
large moneys to send their spawn to military
schools, in order to prune down way-wardness
and the brats for higher learning. The govern-
ment proposes to do this for free.
And as for the general moral degeneration of
the nation, under compulsory training.. .well, I
doubc that anything is worse than the uncer-
tainty of today, in which no young or mlddle-
yeared man of military susceptibility knows
where he stands.
I doubt if taking all Is worse than taking some
and leaving others.
I doubt if it is worse to Impress military basics
on a youth than to snatch away his brother for
the second time, thereby successfully interrupt-
ing his life twice before he touches forty.
Let us consider the young wives and mothers
who have seen their husbands take off twice for
war and whose small children recall very little
but family uncertainty.
I don't say universal military training is good.
I Just say it ain't as bad as what we've got. either
as a peril to the individual, to society or to the
eventual fate of the nation.
<** WSHWGTOH,
MERRYGO-ROUND
e OKIW MASSOH
I

We Are Losing The War
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
WASHINGTON. It Is time to face up to a
simple, bleak fact. The Soviet Union is cur-
rently outproducing the United States, and by
an incredibly wide margin, in modern combat
planes.
Since air power is certain to be the decisive
factor If war comes, this Is frightening, to put
li mildly. Yet It Is easy enough to prove thai
it is a fact.
The air war of the future will be fought with
Jet-powered planes. And here the figures tell
their own disturbing story.
First, take jet interceptors. Soviet production
cf tbe Mlg-15 jet fighter, plus newer models,
reached during the last year, according to most
reliable estimates, an annual production rate of
between 5,500 and 6,200 really astonishing
achievement of the Soviet aircraft industry-
American production of the older Thunder jet
was In the middle hundreds, and of the Sabre
in the low hundreds the very low hundreds.
The Mlg-15, it must be added, is a first-rate,
modern jet Interceptor, which has already out-
distanced the Thunderjet. Pilots who have
fought Thunderjets against Mlg-15s In Korea
report that combat between tbe two planes is
murder for the Thunderjet.
Thus the Thunderjet is now considered obso-
lescent, and the newer Sabre is rated the only
American plane capable of holding its own in
combat with the Migase.
And American production of truly modern je-
interceptors will not have reached a -thousand
by the end o this year, while Soviet production
is still on the increase.
Thus, even by the end of this year, the So-
viets will have an enormous six-to-one advant-
age, at least In the let fighter field.
The comparable figures on Jet bombers are
hardly more reassuring.
During the past vear. the Soviets are reliably
estimated to have attained an annual produc-
tion rate of about 780 Jet-powered medium
bombers. They have approximately 480 such
bombers actually In combat groups.
Last year the United States produced con-
siderably less than fifty Stratojet bombers
this is the only American all-Jet bomber actual-
ly m production.
The-British (who are concentrating on com-
mercial jet carriers) produced one Jet bomber,
which crashed.
DUrlng the coming year it is believed that
more than 300- StratojeU will come off the as-
sembly lines, plus a handful of British jet bomb-
era
This means that hoped-for Western produc-
tion for the coming year will still represent less
than half the production rate reached by the
Soviets during the last year.
Nor do even these somber figures- at least
six-to-one for Jet fighters, at least two-to-one
for Jet bombers tell the whole story.
The supersonic plane is tbe plane of the fu-
ture, which will make subsonic planes obsolete
as surely as the Jets are rendering obsolete the
reciprocating engine.
According to highly rated intelligence, the So-
viets now have actually in production a combat
plane which will fly faster than sound. Tbe
American Air Force hopes to get such a plane
but not before IBM.
Here the dark picture must be balanced by
certain other factors. '
The same Intelligence sources which report
the frlghteningly high production rate of Soviet
jet Interceptors and bombers also report that
the Soviet radar and ground control intercep-
tion systems are still Inadequate.
Thus it is believed that at least for a time
the long range reciprocating engine bombers
like the B-36, with jet assists and refueling
techniques, could still reach Russian targets In
case of war.
Moreover, tbe Soviet jet bomber Is- believed
short on range, and the Mlg-15 la known to
have a very short range indeed. The Mlg-15
only operates really efficiently in one function
interception at very high altitude in reason-
ably clear weather.
The Soviets are only just starting on all-
weather fighters, and the United States prob-
ably has an advantage in other types of planes.
for example for ground support.
Overall, counting civilian planes and trainers
(which make up almost halt the total) as well
as the obsolescent reciprocating engine types,
American and British aircraft production is now
about two thirds Soviet production.
Drew Pearson Says: It doesn't pay to go to Washington
parties; Washington brass hats glitter more thaa
, they bite; General Vaughan finally gets congra-
tulated on a Democratic .Latin American medal
WASHINGTON. Sometimes I tell Mrs. P. that it just doesn't
pay to go out to parties In Washington. sw
You meet some of the nicest people, but also some of the
darnedest people. Especially you meet people that vou've takes
the shirt off of, editorially speaking, the day before
And If you're not awfully careful and awfully hard-boiled,
you end up thinking that the people you've taken the hide off
are not so bad after all.
The other day, for Instance, I dropped in on a reception at
the Cuban embassy. .
I didn't know exactly what the reception was all about bol
Louey Machado, the ambassador, la a great friend of the U. 8. A-
and I have been doing around there ever since I used to cove?
news for El Mundo in Havana, and watched old ambassador Ores-
tes Ferrara practice dueling with the Italian ambassador on the
slippery embassy floor.
On this occasion no sooner had I checked my hat and got up-
stairs to the receiving line than I got a faint perception of what
the reception was all about.
In the receiving line was a long and glittering row of Amer-
ican brass with more stars on their shoulders than there are in
the milky way, and more decorations on their bosoms than on
Christmas tree.
' WASTE VS. GLITTER
With a gulp I remembered that, on the radio the night be-
fore, I had blasted military waste from the Aleutian islands
to the Pentagon and from Fort Huachucha, Arizona, to Morocco.
However, taking a hitch In my belt, I started down the line,
The ambassador, an old friend, was easy to talk to.
I noticed, however, that he seemed amused, and. glancing
up at the man alongside him, I readily understood why.
The next guest on the receiving line was Gen. "Lightnln'
Joe" Collins, Army Chief Staff, who, only the night before I
had told several million people,, used four able-bodied GJj
as personal servants.
Lightnln' Joe grinned, I complimented him on his youthful
appearance and had no alternative but to continue down the
Next was Rear Adm. Robert Lee Denlson, naval aide to Pres-
ident Truman.
Just tbe night before I had told how the Navy had accumu-
lated enough anchors to last 50 years, plus 132,000 oyster forks,
Was hoarding machine tools and had spent $215,000,000 on 01
Snes for "administrative purposes," which usually means rides
brass hats.
However, the admiral looked quite cordial, possibly even
amused at my discomfiture.
We shook hands and I continued with as brave a show as
possible down the receiving line.
Then Brig. Gen. Robert Landry, Air Force aide to the Pres-
ident. ^
Just 24 hours before, I had told how the Air Force kept a
pool of 82 planes for the purpose of taking generals and congress-
men on special flights; also had ordered 900 machine lathes
though It needed only eight. The general grinned. We shook
hands.
GENERAL VAUGHAN CONGRATULATED
I was how somewhat like the fraternity initiate who faces
a gleeful line of peddlers.
Fore and aft of me was a gleeful Une of generals and ad-
mirals. I couldn't retreat. I had to go forward.
Coming up next, right In front of me, was MaJ. Gen. Wallace
Graham, the President's personal physician.
"All those critical things I have written about his commodity
speculation!" I moaned to myself. "And just last night I wrote
another-one about his intervention to keep Malaxa, the famous
Rumanian, in the United States."
. Fortunately, Gen. Graham, though able to read patients*
symptons, was not able to read my mind. He smiled. I smiled.
We shook hands, and I passed down what seemed like the endless
line,'
By this time my dazzled brain began to catch up with what
was going on.
Obviously I had not read the Spanish on my Invitation care-
fully. The beautiful new ribbons and medals on the bossoms of
the generals could mean only one thing. They had Just beep de-
corated by the Cuban government.
Just as I realized this, I glimpsed straight ahead, and right
hi my course my old friend. MaJ. Gen. Harry Vaughan.
A lot of memories flashed back in that split second before
we met my protest four years before when he accepted a de-
coration from dictator Peron of Argentina... a rainy evening
when I stood in front of the Argentine embassy writing down
the names of those who came to pay tribute to Vaughan and
Peron at the medal-pinning ceremony... a Senate Investigation
of Vaughan... my testimony there... deep freezes... the Tan-
foran race track. . _
Yet here was I at another embassy, with Gen. Vaughan re-
ceiving another medal, and with me almost In front of him.
Gen. Vaughan. who, after all. is celebrated for his humor,
appreciated the humor of this occasion as I congratulated him
on his new medal. _
LIKABLE HARRY
"After all," I said to myself, "a medal from democratic Cuba,
one of the best friends of the U. 8. A., is a lot different from t
medal from a dictator who has kicked us all over Argentina"
Furthermore and I would not dare admit this to anyone
except my wife I am afraid that if I met Harry Vaughan a
few more times even I would like him.
So I guess I'd better not go out to parties any more.
Next I shook hands with my old friend Erie Cocke, past com-
mander of the American Legion, who also had a big, baby-blue
Cuban ribbon round his neck which brought me, still on my
feet, to the end of that star-spangled line. '
"I wouldn't want to do It over again, but I'm glad I went," I
remarked to Mrs. P. as we went home.
"It serves you right." was her somewhat unsympathetic com-
ment "You shouldn't be so mean to those military men. They
deserve a few perquisites such as servants to help their wives
"I fully realize,'; said I, as haughtily as possible, "that I can
get no sympathy from you. Your father, I seem to recall, was a
general." .
BRING
INTO YOUR HOME WITH Tj
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apply. Wide range
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GENERAL PAINT CORPORATION
MATERIALES DE CONSTRUCCIN, S.A.
ARIAS Y CIA. David
W. 17th and "H' Streets Telepheoes: 1-1891, 2-1SSI Panam
1*14 Herrera Aveaee Phoae SIS Colee.


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY S. 19S
pacific Society

THE r AN AM A AMERICA! AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
. .
FA4UT
& ,7, &!l~ V.I &&~ $S2t
AMBASSADOR WILEY
HONORS AMERICAN JOURNALIST
The Ambassador of the United States to Panama, John
Cooper Wiley, was the host for a stag luncheon -Wen today
at the Embassy Residence on La Cresta in honor of Mr. Ed-
ward TomlinsoB, an American Journalist *' * or
of numerous books and articles on Latin America.
Coven were laid for twenty.

McShane-C outure Marriage
Is Announced
During, an impressive wedding
ceremony held during High Mass
on Saturday, at the Fort Clayton
Chapel. Miss Ida Mcflhane,
daughter of Mrs. James Mc-
Shane. of Hastings, Minnesota
became the bride of Corporal
Laurence T. Couture son of Mr.
Philip D. Couture, also of Hast-
ings, Minnesota.
Wedding vows were exchanged
before an altar lighted bv tail
white tapers and banked with
vases of pink carnations and ba-
bv'a breath. ,--_
The Rev. Father Louis 8. Lar-
range officiated at the ceremo-
nVA program of nuptial music
was presented by Sergeant Mary
Townshend, organist.
Oiven in marriage bv M-Sgt.
The former Miss McShane ar-
rived on the Isthmus from her
nome In Hastings, Minnesota on
Jan. 31 and was the house guest
of Sergeant and Mrs. Loren
Simpson of Cocoll until her mar-
riage ..
Following the rehearsal for the
wedding on Friday evening Mas-
ter Sergeant and Mrs. Joseph
Jakublk entertained with a re-
ception-buffet for the young
couple.
Mrs. Trotter Is Visitor Here
From North Carolina
Mrs. John Bcott Trotter of
Charlotte North Carolina, ar
rived on the Isthmus Sunday
morning aboard the BM. "Quirt-
gua" from New Orleans to visit
her son-in-law and daughter,
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew T. King*
horn of 'Gamboa.
National lanntr
iurorise Coffee Honors
Mrs. Bergerhofer
Mrs. Richard Bergerhofer was
he guest of honor at a surprise |
coffee given on Friday morning
oy Mrs. James L. McCrory and
Mrs. Fred McCarty at the Mc-
carty home at Albrook Air Force
Base.
The coffee table was centered
with a cake decorated in pink,
blue and white and flanked on
either side by pink tapers and
candle holders.
Those attending included Mrs.
Phil Rlley, Mrs. Cork Sietz. Mrs.,
Bill Williams, Mrs. Cedric Smith.
Mrs. Dale Davis, Mrs. Howard!
Voigt Mrs. Leroy Chadwick, Mrs.
Walker Horn. Mrs. Charles Will-
iams and Mrs. M. Arnold.
Bnffet Supper Compliments
Recently Wed Couple
Mr. and Mrs. Winfield Fearn
of Balboa entertained on Satur-:
_ day evening at 7:00 with a buf-
fet supper party complimenting
" Mr. and Mrs. John J. (Justin
who returned recently to Pana-
ma City (rom a wedding trip to
New Orleans. Louisiana. Phoe-
nix. Arizona and Mexico City.
Mrs. Oustln is the former Sylvia
Ludwigv
Those attending included Mr.
and Mrs. Carl E. Hall, Mr. and
Mrs. Rav Caldwell. Mr. and Mrs.
marriage to Mr. George Ratcliffe
win take place on Friday even-
ing at Albrook Chapel was the
guest of honor at a mlscellan-
Marle. Mr. and
Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Ernst
Koref. Mrs. Joe Medlinger and
Mrs. Roberto On.
Joseph Jakublk. the bride wore a
ballerina-length gown of white Mr and Mrv Leadbttter
ChantiUv lace and nylon net, i Return From Boquete .
made strapless with a fitted bod- Mr. and Mrs Jasper M. Lead* Jonn w^ght BP(j their daughter.
ice and-a bolero. She wore elbow bitter returned Sunday from Marl M g Mrg claude
length mitts of lace. Her finger i vacation of two weeks spent lr)
tip length veil of illusion was of Boquete.
nvlon net and was fastened to a _--.. '--
Juliet caD of lace. The bride carr Luncheon Honor*
ried a white prayer book and an Mrs. O Dougneriy
old fa^hoiieri bouauet of garde-' Mrs. Edwin O'Dougherty of
Mrs. Loren E. Simpson, the i rived on the Isthmus aboard the
matron of honor, wore a gawn of S.S. Ancon on January 28 for a
pink nvlon organza embroidered visit of one month to be spent
with tlnv white flowers and a with her sister, Miss Florence Q.
picture hat of natural straw. Kelly of Balboa, was the henor-
She carried an old fashioned ed guest at a luncheon given on
bouquet of r>l"k carnations and Sathrday at the Hotel Tlvoli by
blue hydrangeas. Miss Kelly. Covers were laid for
Corporal Vircent Sercu as,eighteen.
the best man and Sergeant Lo- \ ^^jr______..
ren Simpson and Pfc. ^w^l^"sL2uVT2i-SII,wer
Diorio served as ushers. *?"0 MU" .*"*, _,
A wedding breakfast was serv- Miss Lorraine Terry whose
Catholic Daughters of America
Give Banquet
The Catholic Daughters of
America, Court Santa Maria No.
447. honored new members Sun-'
day evening with a banquet giv-
en at 7:00 p.m. In the Ballroom
of the.Hotel Tlvoli.
Guest speakers included the
Rev. Father Daniel Renaldo, the.
Rev. Father Gori of Panama, the.
Aev. Father Burns who was the!
Master of Ceremonies for the'
occasion, Mrs. Marie McCona-
ghy. Territorial Deputy and Mrs.
Mary Joyce. Grand Regent, and!
Mrs. Borden. Vice Grand Re-
gent.
The new, members present
were Mrs. Martha Carriker Miss
OKIXONTAL
Depicted is
the Eat
f-JU
The------Isa
largo rivor in
this republic
II Growing eld
14 Merciful
II Limb
UOf thoftsak
II Auricle
II Area mossur*
M Tested depth
31 Cerium
(symbol)
as Poker stake
IB Wiles
27 Flesh food
XI Disorder
2 Mount (b.)
MPart of "bo-
ll Indian
mulberry
15 Samarium
(symbol)
IS Leer
Quote
SI Ogle
II Distinct part
41 Not (prefix)
41 Ice
47 Sun god
4J Strength
30 City in
.Nebraska
51H.sdg.sr
U Makes
possible
MBarter
MApsa
87 Painful spots
vi an cal
i Obeisance
XIpralM (var.)IK
SEqulp
It is
Levant
Exchange
premium
I American
educator
7Pecuse
Formerly
I Nickel
(symbol)
10 Golf mound
11 Make, into
bw
12Emphasii
17 Lutecium
(ab.)
20 Pioneers
21 Its capital
is------
the
Answer to Previous Puigla
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Lovett: Joint Chiefs Given
$ 79 Billion Less Than Asked
14 Mexican dish
26 Stay
13 It produces
14 Sign of zodiac
26 Harangue
37 Storehouses
42 Tropical nut
41 So be it!
44Russisn news
agency
45 Exclamation
46 Rodents
41 Man's name
SI Vehicle
33 Two (prefix)
IS ArUflcial
language
Good Example Is Best Teacher
Child Can Have On Tooth Care
day from 2.00 to 4 00 p.m. hj crane, Mrs. Ruth Harris. Mrs.
J^SL l.^lLouise c. Hsrtman. Mrs. Irene;
ed immediately following the
ceremony In the- Blue Room of
the Fort clavton NCO Club for
members of the bridal party.
The bride wore a lone sleeved
emb>-oldere bouffant black taffeta skirt and I Mrs. James L
a corsage of white gprdenU for:home in Balboa M Fulton
her weddine trip to the Hotel El was assisted bv her sister. Mrs.
Panama. The young coupJ* are Walter Gorman. .
now at home to their friends in The Valentines Day motif was
Panama City {followed'in the decorations for
Mrs. Couture attended the,'the'refreshment table with the!^taST'wrkjth"
Guardian Angel paro ch Tabeen terplere of red carnal Ions! _____
School and tie Hastlnvs Htah >nd baby's breath and re-) tap-|BeneW Card Parly Is Tomorrow
School tar Hastlnes. MWsotR. ers twined with-white coral vine. I The BeUa V,SJU oijHd-g^^
Corporal Couture atteded t*e St. The punchbowl, candelabra and,k0rr|e will beneiit from a Card
How proper taothbrushing
helps prevent dental decay is
discussed in this second of a
series.of articles published by
The Panama American, in co-
operation with the Panama
Canal Zone Dental Society in
observance of National Chil-
dren's Dental Health Day.
he and President Truman trim-
med the fiscal 1953 military bud-
get about $19,000.000,000 below
the amount sought by the joint
chiefs of staff.
Lovett warned an economy-
minded Congress that any fur-
ther cuts would be unwise be-
cause budget planners already j
have taken all the "calculated
risks" considered 'prudent" in
view of the menacing interna-
tional situation.
He testified that Mr. Tru-
man's request for 152,101,1m,-
IN for the armed services in
the fiscal year-starting July
. 1 "represents the minimum
calculated risk that a coantry
of this size and importance
the last stronghold should
take."
"This Is the very thin edge of
any acceptable calculated risk,"
he said. "I am deeply troubled,
by It."
Lovett also detailed for a Joint
meeting of the Senate military
j appropriations subcom m 111 e e
and the Senate-House economic |
committee the steps which the
Defense Department is taking |
to eliminate waste and save the
taxpayers money.
He likewise disclosed that
the United States now has in
production planes, "which per-
form in tests better" than the
Rassian-built Mig-15 which
the Communists are using in
Korea. He denied that the
Mlg is a better plane than
the Sabre, the top V. S. fight-
er now in combat.
Lovett was echoed by the;
civilian heads of the armed ser-i
vices Navy Secretary Dan,
. Klmball. Air Force Secretary
Thomas K. Finletter and as-1
sit ant Army Secretary Karl A.!
* Benede~en, whose statement
Children always like to know!,- by Army Secretary
the 'why" of things so as soon-Frank C. Pace, Jr.
as they are old enough to under-1 Lovett and the civilian chiefs,
stand, they should be told thejwere mindful that some mem- <
WASHINGTON, Feb. 5 UPI j ness" this year. But he said his culated"
Defense Secretary Robert A. office knocked out 116,000,000,-I mind.
Lovett disclosed yesterday that000 and Mr. Truman and the' Lovett said
budget bureau trimmed another planes now in
13,000,000,000.
risk Lovett had in
He said this was done by
stretching oat" the time in
which "readiness" is to be
achievedor by moving back
the target dates for such
things as a 145 group Air
Force a, 411-ship Nary, a 21-
d i vision Army and a three-
division Marine Corps.
He did not say when the Arm-
ed Services now expect to reach i
these goals, but did say that it
will net be in fiscal 1953 or!
even fiscal 1954.
It was reported previously that:
the military budget was pre-
pared on the assumption that
there will be no general war for
two yearsapparently the "cal-
the improved
production will
not see combat for several
months. He did not elabora.
especially after sen. Joseph
O'Mahoney (D-Wyo.) pointed
out that a representative of
Tass, the Russian news agency,
was in the room.
The defense chief assured tha
committee he was not disclosing
any secret information.
Slim Fat Away,
If fat ruins tout asura or nu_>
ou short of br_th and ndni*r
vour hil- ii. you will And It amity
lo loso a half pound a day with tha
aaw Hollywood method callad
PORMODE. No drastic dialing- sr
zarcisa. abialutaly aaf*. Aak your
rhamlat for FORMODE and
ailmmins tomorrow.
E. Johnson, Mr. Leonor Lomba-j imitation of only Is the aln-
na. Mrs. Rosemary A McKeon,cerest form of flattery, its the
Mrs Mary. A. Morrell Mrs. Tay- best way to teach a child how to
da O Connor. Mrs. Celia Parker, brush his teeth
Mrs. Cecilia E. Waldorf and Mrs. For the child to learn the
main reason for toothbrushing.
When one eats, tiny bits of
food cling to tooth surfaces.
Within a few minutes, some of
this food changes Into an acid
that attacks the tooth enamel.
u unh time alfr raiin ih* child to brush. Different mouths and
Boniface Pr-rocbJl School and flower bov.a were olm^Mr^ . sponsored by the IrUer- "rwt ltelv to do so dental conditions call for differ-
Hastin W bers of Congress havt? called for
cuts in military as well as non-
military spending to reduce the
anticipated deficit of more than
14.000.000.000. Proposed cuts in
funds for the Armed Services
_,.- jnged as.Irish as 15,000,-
If the surface Is cleaned, this 000,000. !|
destructive process Is prevented.! Lovelt countered by revealing
Brushing also gives a "clean; that the joint chiefs orglnally
feeling" mouth. Improves wthegou_ht 7i;ooo,000,000 to put the
toothbrush habit, it's easiest for beauty of the teeth and helps, country in--state of "readi-
hlm to eppy good toothbrush! ke'D e"ms health.
habits of adults. Hence. If the )v,Con rarv '" "op.ilar ^"f ,
parent doesn't brush his teeth Jner LVmI?Jhan .one K?9d w"_
eJJirectlu from Bretaa

Linen Sheets and
Pillow-Cases
- i
. '

MOTTA'S
Panam Coln
...
HPstlncs. Minnesota and is now punch bowl.
with the HQ. and HQ. B AAAI The guest book was signed by
Battery Group at Fort Clayton. ? approximately sixty tueats.
.jTrti/ How
beautiful Silk uKhd
Cotton {Dresses .At 9.75
34th Street Lux Building
Tel. 3-ISI7
SIMMONS
COMFORT and LOUNGING
Studio
NOW i the time to invest in ret.
" _. -.
'/, ja*-
Beauty Rr
ad
Bou Sn
fes''* "' '*
Play will bgfn at ^.00 p.m. and
tea will be served at -.'Co p.m:
and is included in the price Qf
the admission ticket which la
$1.00..-
Card players are reouested to
bring their own cards, 'score-
Dad. pencils and poker chips fof
Brido-e. Canasta or Poker.
Included in the entertainment
for the afternoon will be a
'white elephant" table, the raf-
fling of a Pointe de Venlse table-
cloth and door prizes rsngjng
from a seventaen-.iewel ladv's
Bulova watch to a ham., as well
as other valrable orize's.
Mrs. Frpncis K. Newcomer.
the wife of the Governor of the
Panama Canal, is tha Honorary
Chairman of the Committee In
Charge of the Card Party with
Mrs. A. 0. Medmger arid Mrs.
Beniamin Chen serving as active
I CC-Chairmen. Chairman for the
Sic of tickets is Mrs. J. Wendell
reene.
Ameic',?,W.omen's Clu4b wn,chi The" p'ractice" of "'brushing" the nt methods. If there is any
will be held tomorrow at.the Ar- teeth was In vogue much before question, your dentist will advise
my-Nayvtub at Fort ipnador. the modern toothbrush appear-,yu.
ed-m_ at The first ''toothbrush" made t,u ht to D h tn ^^i
^SSSSSS *_- efo'ri ^ a inward motion and
f_ ii" Bton_i iT__ the lower teeth with an upward
that time, people cleaned their
OF OUR GREAT SALE at
'-..'
teeth with twigs or roots.
8pongee, cloth and sheep's
wool also were used commonly.
However. It has only been with
the last, couple of generations
that the use of the toothbrush
hns become widespread.
Nevertheless, many people to-
day still don.'t know the proper
use ol a toothbrush or the im-
portance of teaching their chil-
dren onl cleanliness.
Toothhrii.ihlne; should
When all' of a child's first teeth
appear, usually between the ages
of "two and two and one half.
Once the habit is implanted pro-
perly, it should last through life
with a little prompting.
motion. Each surface should be
riven at least eight good strokes.
After brushing, the mouth
should be rinsed with water.
As for dentifrices, it should
be emphasized that the "when"
and "how" of brushing teeth are!
Infinitely more Important than
the kind of dentifrice that Is
used.
Tooth pastes and powders
make the task more pleasant but
start they are merely aids to the

brush
(Tomorrow: How what the
child eats affects hb teeth.
Ton will want toread the third
in tbU authoritative series on
dental health.)
Queen Contestants Leste
For Costa Ki
Queen of Carnival for the Ho-
tel El Panama. Marit_a de Oba-
!rrlo, accompanied bv Miss Mary
Watson Fabrega. Miss Sonia
Mantovanl and Chaperone, Mrs.
ILuda. Ehrman de Obarrio. will
' leave today for, San Jose. Casta
Rica, on the first lap of their
tour which will also include
stoos at Miami, Florida and Ha-
vana. Cuba.
Mrs. -Audrev Klein will reort-'
*ent the HoM El parama along
the rout as Tour Director. .
Mia Cerilla Hear terns tit
Hostess For Tea
Miss Cecilia. Heurtematte was
hoste** to a,group of her frle ids
recentl at tea and card warty
given at her home In Bella Vista.
rsthfHe Daughters of America
To Meet
The rewlar .meetln< of Court
anta Maria wlllhe held at 7:30
this evening in St. Mary's Hall
ljiBplboa.
After the meeting s social Mil
Si held With Mrs. Ivdla P;-t'lck,
rs. Anita Thompron *nd Mrs.
P.sr.Mn servina as co-hostesses
for the occasion.
"Jnnt> j|~" price To nek
"Junle Jim" price will be the
"uest sneaker at a morni cof-
fee to he rWn bv the BalMa
Women' Chib on Feh. 13. Mr.
Price will spesk on "Panama.
(ASH CREDIT CLUB
mItuI!E STORE
.ENTRALAVE,2f'E.ST. PHONES 2-183C
* 2-1853
sew ftarr. fib!
T *4eM "Pot-v i-^k"
The Sacred Heart Chaoel In
'Continued en Page SIX)
ass
^ . .' J '

(
M '*
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your record changer
with tbdl amazing new
WIISTER-CHICACO
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7-inch and 10- sod I 2-inch sices, too.
Your present single-speed changer is
depriring yoo of some of the finest re-
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library iexible by having s Webster-
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installed in your console this week.
Mm crmf'n iulaJ/tmm 1 tlifhl atrm ml.
$t SYLVANIA
#1 Via Espala (Casino) Tel. 3-0383



TERRIFIC REDUCTIONS and many new attractionst
..a
-4


SANDALS
2.99
Fine LINCERrE
at vary low prices,
Ladies DRESSES
from 1.95
BEACH WEAR
for Ladies and Girls
at slashed prices
"CORO" JEWELRY at real bargain prices
Come And Enjoy Our Drastic Reductions
LA MODA AMERICANA

102 Central Avenue Panam
7
ere is more t
nan
one
Q)ress trial will
Jo things for you....
in our collection of
lie 0
Junior sizes: 9 to 15
Miss sizes: 10 to 42
Half sizes: 14-1 to 2*1
in
COTTONS
RAYONS
PURE SILK
NYLONS
AT BOTH OUR STORES

resses


FELIX B. MADURO, S. A.
21 Central Avenue
6 Tivoli Avanus>
-.it
rr
"IS





page ron
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIL* NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY S. list
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
Italian Stowaway Found I by Pan American World Airways
On "P.mmina" as freight planes in La In Am -
A 23--ear-old Hallan stow- rica and by domestic all-freight
awav Gian Silvio Capuzzo was lines.
found aboard the United Fruit' The three accidents referred
sWPaXtaa yesterday alter fap by the board, all involving
it transited 1 he Canal bound for Commandos .were-
New York. The 12-passenger
li Miami Airlines at Eliza-;
freighter arrived yesterday irom.beth. N. J.. Dec 16 56 deaths.
Sai Francisco The stowaway 2; Continental Charters near
was taken off the ship into pol- Little Valley, N. Y., Dec. 29, 26
ice custody.
deaths.
3i North Continental Airlines,
Pa.ifir Unitv" landed in a field out of gas near.
Arrived in Balboa Coburg. Out., Canada on Dec,
The Pacific Unity a Fumess 20, en route from Chicago to.
Wiihv ship arrived last night Newark, N. J., with 44 persons1
in Balboa from the United aboard. There were no Injuries.
Kingdom, carrying a general Investigations
careo She is bound for San cidents,
Francisco an is handled locally 'apparent laxness in some or
by Fore. Shipping Company. all chese -peets.^^ ^
Civil Aeronautics training and proficiency at a
Board Kinds Luneta desirably high
2> Failure lo ensure
of these ac-
CAB said, showed
aircraft
225,000 Guardsmen
For Field Training
In Xon-Scheuuled Airlines I 2. Failure lo ensuie aneen
\V\$riNGTON Fcb 5 iUP> and engine maintenance at a
The'civ'ii'Aeronautics Board to- desirably high level.
day said It had found -apparent' 3. Failure by companies and
ltxness in operating practices" personnel to follow certain
or "on-scheduled airlines in- operating procedures establish-
volved in thiee recent accidents, ed In accordance with the Civil;
Two crashes took 82 lives. The Air Regulations including those
third was not fatal. .pertaining to maximum operat-
Thc CAB made the comment ing weights."
in issuing a new -special civil
air regulation" which ordered a
1'- ton deduction in maximum
take-off weight of passenger-
carrying Curtiss Commando air-
planes.
The "emergenev" ruling Is
temporary, to be in effect pend- COLUMBIA, S. C. Feb. 5 HJP'
lng further investigation which _Maj. Gen. James C. Dozier.
could result In making the rule state adjutant general, said to-
permancnl or bringing about dav more than 7,000 South
further weight reduction. Carolina National Guardsmen'
Kan-scheduled airplanes fly wlli attend encampments this |
83 Commando i in passenger surnmer.
service. CAB said. Most of the men are mem-
As passenger planes. Com- bers of the 51s* National Guard
manc.'os could not meet rules division, which consists of South
governing scheduled airlines. Carolina and Florida at guards-
Operating weight was reduced men. and will train at Fort Mc-
from 48.000 to 45.000 pounds. A Lellan. Ala.. June 15-29.
CAB exam'ner has calculated The 678th anti-aircraft ar-
that a con-mando meeting lully tlllery automatic weapons bat-
thr rules applied to scheduled talloii will attend field training
airliners would be limited to a camp Stewart. Ga July 6-20.
35.000 pornd.'.
The new CAB rule does r.o;
affect 66 Commandos operated
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Greal White Fleel
Arrives
New Orleans Service _________Cristohal
S.S. Fiador Knot .............................Febr. S
S.S. Chlriqui .................................Febr. 10
S.S. Quirigua .................................Febr. 17
S.S. Levers Bend .............................Febr. 22
*S.S. (hiriqui .................................Febr. 24
* Haadllni ftefrlferaltd Chilled .net Geaera Cargo.
Arrives
New York Service__________ Cristbal
S.S. Fra BerUnga ............................Febr. S
S.S. Jamaica .................................Febr. 9
S.S. Yaque ...................................Febr. 9
S.S. Cape Cod ................................Febr. 10
S.S. Junior ...................................Febr. 12
S.S. Talamanca ..............................Febr. 16
Weekly Sailings to New York, New Orleans. I.o Angele*, San Francisco,
Seattle Frequent freight sailings Cristobal lo West Coast
Central American Forts.
Cristbal to New Orleans via g | rom
Te la. Honduras________________Cristobal
S.S. Quirigua................................ .Febr. S
S.S. (hiriqui .................................Febr. 12
S.S. Quirigua .................................Febr. 19
S.S. Chlriqui .................................Febr. 26
(Passenger Service Only)
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
TEHRX
AFTER/THE HORSE IS STOLEN
FRECKLES AND BIS FRIENDS
Overruled
BT MERRILL Bt.OSSR
S/S "TOSCA"
Accepting Passengers
tor
LOS ANGELES,
Calif.
-
5 Sailing on or about
.-FEBRUARY 13th, 1952
S Apply
C. Fertile & Co.
The entire National Guard
will send some 225.000 guards-
men from about 3,500 federally
recognized Army units to the
annual field training sites this
summer and fall.
The 51st Division this summer
will go to camp under a new
commanding general.
He is Brig. Gen. John C.
Menagan of Dillon, who was
succeeded Ma]. Gen. Sumter L
Lowry of Tampa, Fla.
MOST HARMFUL,
The harmful effect* on absin-
the are worse than the effects of
any other form of alcohol, ac-1
cording to the Encyclopedia Brlt-
annica.
Get Prompt Relief From
ITCH
Cristbal
3-1772
Balboa
2-1657
Use Hospital-tested Cuticura
Eciema? Scabies? Enjo.
prompt relief from rrita-
use with Cuticura Soup
SOAP a-.d
INTMENT
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BS ROYAL CHARTER 1840
Royal Mails Lines Ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA______________
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SARMIENTO"...............................Feb. 9th
M.V. "SALAMANCA" .............................Feb. 18th
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA,
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUA,
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
MV "REINA DEL PACIFICO"' (18.000 tons)... .March 1st
NOTA: Tae sB.r. "REINA DEI, PACIFICO" will not call al Kingston
on the March Voyage._____________________
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. FLAMENCO".........'.......................Feb. 6th
M.V. "TALCA"....................................Feb. 13th
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
M.V. "DIEMERDYK"..............................Feb. 17th
TO UK/CONTINENT
M.V. "DRINA" ...................................Ek
S.S. "LOCH AVON" ............................ .Feb. 18th
Accepting passengers in First. Cabin and Third Class
Superior accommodation available for passengera
All sailings subject to change without Botica.
PACIFIC STEAM NAV. CO., Cristbal, Tel. 1*54 -1*55
FORD COMPANY Inc.. Panam TeL 3-1257/1268: Balboa 1950
Excess War Prolil Suit Filed In Tampa
CUTICUR
TAMPA. Fla.. Feb. 5 (UP)
The Federal government filed
suit in district court here today
to recover $161.565, plus interest,
from three Sarasotans It charg-
men>Wni.nU"Cura 2E. > with making excess war pro-
mem Often recommended | .,._
by doctors. For best result uls*
The government named Ar-
thur T. Stone. G. M. Stone and
R. A. Stone, all of Sarasota and
co-partners of the Screw Mach-
ine Products Co. of Detroit, as
defendants.
The complaint alleged that
war contracts of the company
were studied by the war con-
tracts price adjustment board
under provisions of the Renego-
tiations Act and that the board
had found two Instances of ex-
cessive profits.
AW,SUeAR,l DON'T UKF
HALF OF .HESE MODERM
DAMCES.' THEY'RE
MOTHING BUT / ,
HUGOING SET / WHAT DO
ALLEY OOP
How OldT
BT ?. T. PIAMLIN
5CMT'5>OU,N0T/ 'YE6...IT*5TO BE
BRONSON.WH05' AS COMPLETE A
DOING THE I COVERAGE OF
WORK ON THIS \ EARLY HUMAN
ETHNOGRAPHICAL 1 MIGRATIONS
\ PROJECT"____ \ AS POS5IBLE
V TO MAKE.... /
Swr* \ yh\\
mm Kh^4*r,?sa 1 pfl-w m "';*.: -'-'* Hu t 1
'vSk -- -^ZZ^j
THISlSINDQ- XI MUST AX
EUROPEAN... PRE-\ HOLUS, FOR
hSUMERlAN...THEN / AVOUNS
HERE'S ANOTHER ( MAN VOUW
POINT OF POSSWi\CERTAINLY
RADIATION, NORTH^ LOADED/
WESTERN
JROPEAN.,
BOOTS AND HER BDDIB8
Too Much!
BT EDGAR MARTIN
MW.GOLOWOSHK ,\V\
CKICWI' Of 1V\Kt DtAV
VftOkHfc OOR vttXl
"ttNOVX*"'
nnstw<
DCY.\ I H\ SAVft TH*
tH\K lUftUKV. fcOCX A
yoo'ui Ssbbm vvoua
UYtfXiVV ss^s-I RVbUVMl
SU6VK.VO6'. I Ml
UH -\0 OAK. FrTttft "WIR ."VVTfc AN)'
Ft VAVT--WV.V NMftVXWtM WS
OOOftVt l\ilVTVftr4 .tKCtl>I>\to'
RWWiAYWfcVfci H\ KV0 WNS
VOCH-A1VORCH. PK* Vtt\
\NSOR AHCt
CAPTAIN EAST
"Little Brat"
BT LESLIE TURNE!
CBRIS v\ u.Kiv Planeteer
t
Searching Space
BT ROSS WINTERBOTHAM
WHY IM THE BUIiS wo
VOU TEU. THE SHERIrf
YfXrO KNOW* ME FOR ,
YSARS, JUST AFTER ID
ADMITTED WB WERE FRAC
TICALLV STRANGERS?.".
NOW HE* EYEMJG Mi
0UPICIOULY
EA5Y. I'VE BEEN HOPING
VOITO RNAILY REC06NTZE
URSEtPl BUT I 5UP-
VOU-RE TOO 6TUIB0R!
DO 100 J VAGUELY. THEV HAP A 5POU.ED.
RECALL WHO/ 5PWDLY- LE3SED IIULS BRAT WITH
tlUED M TH\ BRACE* ON HER TEETH AMD A MOP
OLD WKMsV " TEUOW- 6 house wile Nfc^-voii DOtrr mean WuiJ
VOU WERE M
HIOH SCHOOL
i toi anoimmsrouoi/m there* the
MOW IF YOUU KltrOLY GET CONVMCTBU1 IWT
ULHAPTAwAJTKX
A BETfER CHANCE
,T0 RSCOWtR WHAT
mAPTERi
VIC FLINT
Gems for Madas
BT MICHAEL OTWALLET
TWEVC6 LOVEt-V.'
PtC POC4^BTO
,*URE, TORSO,
WHICH
wou-Pyou
r YOU PSClPBv BAM.
APTEHT ALL, VOU
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
with
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAX
B, J. R. WILLUM8


TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 5 INt
mB
.... t -----------------------------------
ID PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEFENDENT BAILY NEW8PAFER
~/itlatic ^ocietu
&. /9i, C-' VJtfkmu (*lu* 378
SURPRISE BIRTHDAY DINNER PARTY ,
HONORS MRS. HOCK
Captain Leo J. HMk. of Fort Davis, arranged a rani*
birthday dinner party nt the Fart Dark Of ficen flu, Sat-
urday evening, to honar hU wife an her birthday annle.
The friend who were fathered at the club upon the ar-
rival of Mn. Hack vera: H.B.M. Cenan! and Mrs. Raymond
Kirwin, Mr. and Mm. Stanley Kidd, Lieutenant Colonel and
Mr. William J. Bennett, Majar and Mra. Mile Gardner, Mr.
and Mra. F. F. Lawaon, Mr. John Kerniek, and Jane Beverly
Hack,
Miss MeKeown Wine Coveted
Honor
At the counting of votes hi
Cinco de Noviembre Plaza. Sun-
day evening. Miss Jeannette Me-
Keown was declared the winner
of the title. Queen of the Carni-
val de Centenario of Colon. Miss
McKeown hd a total of 175,775
ry with a party at the Oatun
Clubhouse Sunday afternoon.
After the refreshments were
served, the group attended the
matinee.

Episcopal Auxiliary
Entertainiur with Silver Tea
The Women's Auxiliary of the
Church of Our Saviour is having
their annual Silver Tea at the
home of Mrs. William E. Adams
at Brazo* Heights Saturday,
from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.
Mrs. Julius Diets and Mrs.
Ruasell Weadc are co-chairmen
for the affair. ,
All friends of the Church on
the Atlantic Side are cordially
Invited to call during the after-
noon.
Canal Zone School Activities

C.Z. Junior College
ly Russell Piersen
The guests were: Wendy Cot-
ton, Grace Argo. Rosalie and Ra-
, chel Radel, Barbara Thrift. Mar- ^^"3^^^'
and Miss Nancv Sasso. the run-,gie Butcher. Judy Malcolm. Di-i ______
ner-up. had a total of 95,962 aneHannigaiiShirley K"V> Mn.*>rdmMn1Tn.1UehAt
With the new semester under way, many new faces are ap-
I peering in the halls, in the classes, and the lounge of the Junior
I College building. New students, who have enrolled for the sec-
Rebekah Club Meeting na semester, are: Kathryn Jayne Butler. Ruth H. Canepa, Max
The Cristobal Rebekah Club E- de la Guardia, Alexander A. Dobak, Fred A. Durllng, Gerald
will meet Thursday February 7 Hendrlckson, Jerry M. Johnson, Katharine M. Lunetta, Richard
at 8:00 p.m. at the home of Mrs. C. Maqulre, George Metlvler. Lloyd J. Rutledge. and Mark M.
Elisabeth Williams at house 8131 Schulz. Scores ot the new members are also appearing In the
Margarita. Extension Division classes.
Mrs. Betty O'Rourke Is co-hoa- -----------------
6.H.S. Notes
ANNE MORRILL
votes.
A dance was held at the Mon-
teo Garden following the count-
ing of the votes.
F^? hlWnC?^A3El EM** "" * Morning Coffee
loughby. Mickey and Jay Cun- Mrg Herbert A. Kelth WM
hostess for a morning coffee giv-
Returned from Santa Clara
Mr. and Mrs. J". H. Blgelow
Lt. and Mrs. Prehle
Sail Sunday
Lt. and Mrs. John Prehle,
Fort Oullck, will sail Sunday for, son. have returned to their home
en at her residence at Fort Gu-
ilde to honor Mrs. Howard Bor-
den, who is- leaving the Isthmus
In the Canal Zone Civil Affairs building there la an
exhibit of beantifal watercolers by Beatrice Sturtevant
Gardner, Canal Zone artist and teacher in both the Ca-
nal Zone Junior College and Balboa High and Junior
Highs Schools.
Glancing through the large,
wooden-bound scrapbook that is
being compiled by the ROTC;
; sponsors, I found many interest-
ling and astounding facts. For a
,ROTC Corp that has only exlat-
I ed for four short years, I discov- i
; ered what a vigorous outfit Bal-'
boa HI has in that khakl-colored
building across the way.
Did you know that the four1
Battalion Commanders h a v e I
been: '49. Tom Solan; '50. Dito i
Smith: 51. Bill Joyce and '52.!
Richard Abbott: "B" Company.!
'49 Douglas Andrews, '50 Bert:
C.H.S. News
ly Karen Sfroop
"Ring out the old. ring in the new." Yes there Is only a half
a year to go and thenSeniors, we are free!! Owen Kariger,
Frances Geri, Cllft Hayward and Sonla Dietrich are the few who
were parolled before they finished their time, in other words they
are mid-term grads. Ah well some people are just lucky!
Wednesday was a day of joy and sadness for everybody. Some
or tne most fortunate students who made the "A" Honor Roll
for the whole semester were; Jacquie Boyle. Alice Chambers and
Elena Lee. But they aren't the only brains in the school. Some
made the "B" Honor Roll too.
r>*
Seascapes, to mention a few; a view at La Venta, a scene
i Santa Clara, and also other seashore scenes, are on display
with the!r_Fiets-Mr8,^!^'.*" I soon and Mrs. Charles Rlehsrd- I A striking painting, of a woman and small child holding candles,
bidy and Mr. J H. Bigeiow ar. jwn new trrjTti at port Gu-, displays facial emotions of the spectators during the Porto Bello
or;and daughter SlUciC. processional. Each painting is the product of true artistic emo-
The other guests included: tion and Interpretation, i.e., unlike a photo, the watercolore are
New York. Lt. Prehle has com- at Coco Slito from a trio to
pleted a three-year tour of duty'Santa Clara where they stayed
on the isthmus, havlne served at at the Philip's cottages.
Fort Sherman. Fort Davis and'
Fort Oullck. He Is at present
Mrs. David McCracken, Mrs.
William Hawkins, Mrs. John]
Prehle. Mrs. William Clark Mrs.
Walter McBride. Mrs. Gordon!
Knight. Mrs. Ricardo Vasquez.
the artistic concepts of their creator.
J^T-ft p,re,*e.nta';ion.Dav WM Thursday and those who re-
presented C.H. 8 in the Heart Trophy Match were; Victor Fisher
r Pi.ri.r AVi i JES 1**UA&!1* TOt Jodv Rberson. Dale Cockle, Charlie'
San^and^^Comp'an"^ J&Sfa&te* 8ctt' ^^^ Wng' AnMlm Arta"? 5
lTTuZhts mSVSSA "* ,or tadtag service and devotion
McNevln AU three Comninles[ USt" Y Ba"lio" ^WU geant was Terry MeNamee.
have taken thVhonnr rrf S.,t ^ v. Mary Ann Hannlgan entertained a group of her friends at
cSmniv fo the Year- '40 5" h* lMt 8atu,rda>' nlht. The occasion was her 17th birth-
^Kany.^50 2'A'' Co*", ** ^^^ *** ^-tter-fl tttBB,
Sophomores can be seen bnaily at work (?) cleaning a.
the grounds. They, are leading in the contest so far. so thev
say.
All participants who wish to play baseball are urged to at-
tend the practice Sessions which will begin this week. All mem-
! bets and future members must begin practice as soon aa pos-
sible since the first baseball game will take place Feb. 18. The
first baseball game ot the season will be the Junior College
Gatun Auxiliary Meeting against the Balboa High School.
The regular monthly meeting: .----------------.
Mr and Mrs. AT. Cotton ;of ^ woman'. Auxiliary o' the!
r.'.iaS'ln ISatLUnlon Church will teheld On Wednesday morning from 9:30 to 10:15 a.m. there will
Donald Braytqn.____^,^__ |Thuradav morning at 9:00. .'be an "Essay" meeting. The business to be discussed at this
s of the meeting will be on the proposed picnic at the resort town of
Pina on the Atlantic Side of the Isthmus. Probably the date
Cotillion Club Announcement
with the 7470th USAR Carlb The Washington CotlUioa Club,Mrs. Steven Spellman and Mrs
School. *eld their formal dance Satur- Emilio Rodrigues.
Following a thirty-day vaca- day in the ballroom of the Hotel
tion. which will be spent at. Washington.
Rldgewood. Long Island, and Ne-
wark. New Jersey, with their fa-
milies, they will go to Camp Gor-
don, Georgia, for duty.
There will be a Board of Dlrec-
Mr. Wilkinson tors meeting Tuesday. Feb. at I Auxiliary are welcome
Leaving for Vaeatlon '7:80 p.m. at the Hotel'Wash-i .-------
Mrs. M. A. Wilkinson and her ington. All members are urged
children. Grady and Jimmv to be present.
Elaine of the Coco Solo Naval --------
Station will se" Sn-^ev for New Emblem Club Meets Tonight
YotV She ?h v'-lt >-er family, The Cristobal Emblem ClubJ
In Trenton. N:w Jersey.
Hospital Consultant
Arrives To Study
Linn Cnnlthim
H"s Matinee Far'v
Linda Jan* Crnnl n g h a m, .Recela, the president will preside.
daughter of Mr. a*d Mrs. J. A, Hostesses for the meeting are:
Cunr-ngham of Ostrtn, celebrated Mrs. Blllv Crump and Mrs. Wil-
her twelfth birthday anniversa->'bur Dockery.
ICII, Mill, _
No 2. will meet this evt\\\n at ^ailtO I OHiaS Hosmtal
7:S0 at the Elks home. This ls|v","w iwaraei iiuspuai
the first meeting for the new i n .-,. T v.n im....
-orps of officers.. Mrs. Mildred Dr- ern-An. J, Van Orinner.
will be set for this affair, and transportation problem discussed.
It is through the hard work and cooperation of both faculty
ind 6. A. members that many social and extra-curricular acti-
vities, such as the forth-coming Pifia picnic, have been present-
so and enjoyed by all attending these successful and unified
unctions of the C.Z.J.C.
rrs vipviiTn! ..
[Panam y^anal cfneaters
HkV**? Showing Tonight!
A A I A Cl J<* CAMON Ginitr ROGOUT
^ct* "THE GROOM WORE SPURS"
11 *.U Wxl a Thanr'TH STSXL HKLMKT"
Dr. Herman J. Van
Jr., Consultant in Hospital Ad-,
ministration of the technical
pool of the Institute of Inter-
American Affairs arrived In Pan-'
ami yesterday with the purpose
of consulting with SCISP offl-
Although the C.ZJ.C. basketball team lost to both
B.H.S. and C.H.S., no one can overlook the fact that the
team gave all they had to the spirit of a good, faat-
artion, game
The Junior College lost to Balboa High School with a score
cials here, about the selection of of thirty-nine to thirty-three and to the Cristobal High School
a permanent hospital consultant with a score of 35 to 32. The results of the last two games
to cooperate in the administra- caused the Junior College team to fall Into the third and last
tfbn of the Santo Toms Hospi-j place of the interschool score rating,
tal, and to select one candidate
to study hospital administration Many- spectators at the Junior College basketball games, es-
in United States universities. | pecially those who attended the Annual Junior College Basket -
Dr. Van Grinner is stationed at ball Tournament, were thrilled by the fine court action duplav-
ni Atf O WTC Gloria HKNB.Y SUphan niTNBJE
TItS LAW OF THE BARIARY COAST
I ----------1 "tfrlfr '1-0NF Q^ *P ft Hpt"
k?s!F^SvfcTS^
Quito, Ecuador, where he Is the
director of the Maternity Hospi-,
tal "Isidro Ay ora" and Is also co-
operating in the reorganization!
of three hospitals. *. :
During Dr. Van Grinnei-a visit
to Panam, he has conferred
with Mr. Juan de Arco Galludo,
ed by the small but willing College basketball team of 1951 and
19621
GAMBOA
T:tS
Was, -rut. MAN WHO CA TO
During this week the Mid-Winter "TIME" Magazine Current
Affairs Test will be given in room 313. A prise of any book up
to the value of $i.00 will be glv*n to the high scorer In each
. class as well as j. prize to the highest scorer- in the College.
af.Ha%r s^SmP uiSuS1 A;''H*r te chance* for many college students to find a solution
Ith and. M lht problem of purchasing some particularly expensive text
pany and in '51 was "C" Com-
pany. The Outstanding Cadets
i of the Year have all been out-
standing in many other fields
Ithan just ROTC; '49 Tom So-
:lan, '50 Ed Browder and '51
Frank Mavo. "A" Company has
copped all the honors for Best
Platoon under: John GeUinger
In '49, Louie Williams In '50 and
Mike McNevin in '51. "A" Com-
pany won the Best Sguad Com-
petition In '49 with Ed Browder
land In '51 with Sidney Shore.
I"C" Company won in '50 with
j Tom Thompson.
This group should also be
commended for its tatste in
beautiful girls. The sponsors
have all been lovely and tal-
ented. There were no sponsors
in the ROTC's first year but in
'M Gay Hot an was chosen Bat-
talion Sponsor.
"A" Company chose Ann
Howie, "B" Company-Betty Jane
Kenealy. "C" Company-Gemma
IWright. In '51 Gayle MacDonald
was elected Battalion Sponsor
, and Joan Sprague was picked by
I "A" Company. Celeste Powell by
"B" Company and Arlene Mc-
Keown by "C" Company.
This year Coila Goodin holds
the highest post with Nancy:
Wells at "A" Company. Tibby
Nolan at "B" Company and Ma-
rie Dt Bella at "C" Company.
The ROTC is also famous for
Its marvelous dances. These
dances run from the sublime
te the ridiculous; from formal
Military Balls to stricklv Infer*
mal "Conge" hopa.
If any student leaves a piece of paper lying around it la a
demerit against his class. So students beware and clean up those
messes. The winning class gets $20 from the S.A. for a class
party.
The members of the cast of "Corliss Orcher" are working
very hard. This play will be presented on Feb.. 15 and 18. Don't
miss it.
Last Friday the Tigers won another Basketball game
agalnat College. Tea air. all we have to do now is beat Balboa
in the play-off. Come on Team, let's go!
The fairer sex of C H 8. proved themselves not fair when
they beat Balboa last Saturday morning. Both "A" and B"
league brought home the bacore.
So long for knowl Keep those grades ruing andbe good.
'KANSAS RAIDERS'
GATUN
i
Audi* MURPHV # SLirBinitt CHAPMAN
'KANSAS RAIDERS" Technicolor
rrHUy "ANGKLS IN ttB OinTULD"
UARGARITA
s.-i a tm
i ,Ti i
Barry SULLIVAN e Arlant DAHL
'NO QUESTIONS ASKED'
<**4*m CRISTOBAL
rr-CMatttMO)
MMuMsn.
Riv MILLAND a Nuiey DAVIS
"NIGHT INTO MORNING"
V?l. Than. Pandara A Ta Flyla Bateaaun
.Dr. Alberto Calvo undersecreta
ry for PubUc Health. He was ac-
companied by Dr. James G.
Townsend, Director of SCISP,
the Inter-American Cooperative
Health Service jointly organised I
by the Republic of Panam and!
I the United States to Improve i
health conditions in Panam.
After finishing his assignments
[ In this country Dr. Van Grinner
will leave for Brazil, where he'
I will be technical advisor in hy-
giene at the Sau Paulo Univer-
sity.
BAMBOO FURNITURE
Recommended by
MUEBLERA EL DIABLO
GIANT TELESCOPE
In order to see human beings
on the moon, we would need at
the very least a 10,000-Inch tel-
escope, and unusually clear at-1
mospfcerei The largest instru-
ment in existence today Is only
200 Inches.
Blood Prtssirt
U Higa Blood Prfsaura makcx
!od dlzxy, hava aalna around
art. haadachaa, shore braath. in
diaaatlon, palpitation, tnft awollen
anWat, you can g*t almost Inaunt
i altar from thaaa dantaroua aymp-
(oaaa wUh HTNtix! Ask your
haini.t (or HTNOX today and taal
fn rounsar tn a raw daya.
If you belong to the Armed Forces or if you have
a steady Job come to our Store and you can
choose your own terms to buy on credit.
The Store Where Ton will Find the Largest Assortment
of Olass and Linoleum.
* SMtri' **'*'*,_ Telephone -MM
Leaders in the Furniture business since 1909"
AS IT SHOULD ill
Enjoy a fragrant, hearty cup
of Maxwell Henee Tea ... a
aft*. W*W efeAeee CeyleA
and Mia teas. A Tillable akie
LUX THEATRE
Anothar "Gone with the Wind"! A naw
drama of tha war batwaan Uta ata tai!
"RED BADGE OF COURAGE"
i

CENTRAL
Brian
Aherne
Constance
Bennett, in
'SMART WOMAN
aTfllA VISTA
AT 8: SO P.M.
Panonal appaaranc* of the
blind Hungarian pianist
GEZA GOLDVARY
AND HI8
"POLY-VOX"
-n* THE SCREXN-
Garr COORB
Inarld MIOMAK. I"
"SARATOGA TRUNK"
CECILIA THEATRE
Six woman flahtlns foe thair lovaa anairat
- a handful of daaparadoan'
SECRET OF CONVICT LAKE"
Otaa
roan
TEA
Also, each spring vacation ma-
ny of the cadets go to spring
camp where they learn fields
tactics, practical army life and
many other beneficial subjects.
This organisation is one that:
each and every student of B.HS. I
should be and Is proud to call
their own.
Boys, don't forget to make ar-
rangements to take your best!
girl to the Valentine Dance and
to the Carnival Dance Two real-
ly promising dances. Don't delay
a day longer!
Alma Casanova, 65,
Dies At Corozal;
Funeral Tomorrow
Funeral services will be held
at 9 a.m. tomorrow at St. Ma-'
rv's Church In Balboa for Mrs.
Alma F. Casanova who died
Sunday night.
Members of the International
Boilermakers Union will serve as
pallbearers. Burial will be In
Corozal Cemetery.
Mrs. Casanova, 05. was the
widow of Clement F. Casanova,
who died In July. 1950.
Her survivors on the Isthmus
include her sister-in-law. Mrs.
C. M. Casanova and one nep-
hew. Roland Casanova, of Mar-
garita.
She Is also survived by one
brother Karl G. Brodtman of
New Orleans, and one sister in
the United States.
Mrs. Casanova was born in Al-
giers, Louisiana. Her husband
retired in July 1848 as a boiler-
maker In the Mechanical Divi-
sion.
^WEET SUBSTANCE-
Saccharin is one of the numer-
ous by-products of the gasmak-
?r's refuse, and it is S00 times as
- .et as sugar. It is a eoal tar
--ivatlve.
QtULMiu
TODAY
AT 8*30 P.M.
PERSONAL APPEARANCE OF THE ILIND
HUNGARIAN PIAKNST
iM ' GEZA
P?JJ m foldvary
W nfc i AND HIS
ft'W "POLY VOX"
Electric instrument that pro-
duces the sound of S2 lnstrn-
31 menu according to his manl-
pula tion.
LB* **! eft nV 1 aaB aBBaaal
Bb.-'"tsjP
\
ALSO
ON THE SCREEN
A story of violence and
violent love!
GARY COOPER
INGRID BERGMAN
in -
'SARATOGA
TRUNK"
THURSDAY
SIMULTANEOUSLY AT THE'
BELLA VISTA and TROPICAL
THEATRES
MIIL
nJ
HIRO!
"ISLAND of the PIRATES"
JEFF CHANDLER EVELYN KEYES
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BANK NIGHT!
Richard Widmark
"THE FROGMEN"
and
Tyrone Fower, In
"THE ILACK ROSE"
VICTORIA THEATRE

^e ^VaVyVasaPTPlfp i
ComZAWbCb "
SENSATION
James
Cagnev
His re4e ef rele- Lew A

PHYILIS TKAaTER
Come Fill
the Cup
r WMkHNEI BSIOB.
,,HtrYIL*AK



PAOP SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds I
.
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LatWlt afcKVlCfc
lioauMUMin
FOR SALE
Household
rlOKRl.VlNH
fc'
a*
SALON DE BELLEZA
w m watt tarn Mmi
AMERICANO
BOTICA UAKLTUN
IMS mimln *t
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
n*. 0 "V wtras faawi
N Hill Central A Celew
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Aulnuioi.ile*
FINANCING
Service Personnel ond
Via! U.S. Civilian Government Employe
new used cor through
GOVtk mni cMPLOYES FINANCE
:o
Fort Worth, Texos
Alto Direct
Loans Automobile
Your vvoshir^-nTochine does no! >*x*.nw ju.aH.ff.jni employe and
Ic'Tel 3 0125 FRIGIDAIREUervic* -erionr. in rh Cancn ont
Shop. No. 51 V.oiloi 4 rano. Vr but financing
You can get genuine parts for your)
refrigerator. Visit our FRIGIOAIR
refrijerotion shop. No. 5
Espaa. ____________
FOR SALE:25 eyeje W.stmghouse
refrigerator. 7 cu. ft. 3 1-2 Yr.
guarontee, leaving for States, must
sell. Hou'e 516-B. Coeoli.________
MISCELLANEOUS
Do * state a eVinkm prealemr
' Write Alia+alira Aa>t*yMM
a Z01I mm, C. Z.
Have your a commercial refrigera-
tion problem? Tel. 3-0125, FRI-
GIDAIRE refrigeration shop. No.
51 Via Espaa.
You con get the best refrigeration
service, domestic as well os com-
mercial by calling 3-0125, FRI-
GIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop.
Refrigeration
Espaa. ______________
FOR"SLE~G~V Refrigerator. 25
cycle 1 cu. ft Excellent condition
SI 00.00. Call Bolboo 1545.
FOR SALE:-Refrigerator. Westing-
almost new, with freeiei
machine 25 or 6C
of furniture
house,
chest. Sewing
cycle Various pieces
'radios, and household goods
House 1477 Apt. D, Holden St.
Polboa. Telephone- 2-1234.
FOR-SALE: Westmghouse refriger-
ator, 60 cycle. 3 years old. Also
burner kerosene oil stove, with
Telephone 3-4326. House,-
San Fran-; '
to U. S. coverage.
ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
DEALER _
PRACTICALLY NEW:1950 Buiek
4-Door Sedan, with radio, teat
covers, new tiras. Smeat b Hun-
nicutt S. A. 16th. Street, Central
Avenue. Calan. Tel. 100.
BATTERIES
' *\
lateras^ ala Panama
Aveniela Central Ne. 224
St 300.
RESORTS
Phillips Oceoruida cottaga*. Santo
Clara. Bo 435 Balboa. Phone
Ponamo 3-1871. Cristobal i-1613
Enjoy a vocation ot Hotel Pan Ame-
ricano, El Voile. Phone Ponomo
2-1112 for reservation.
Shropnel's houses, Sonto Clara. Alsc
m Cole1 Cerro Campana Moun-
tains. Tel. Balboa 2120.
Williams Sonto Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidaires, Rock-
gas ran|es. Balboa 2-3050.
3
oven.
45. 15
CISCO.
WANT TO BUY or sell an automo-
bile.' See Agencias Cosmos, au-
tomobile row 29, telephone 2-
4721. Panama. Open all doy on
Saturdays.
and 50 Street.
FOR SALEOne Frigidaire 25 cycle
large size. 3 yrs. remaining gur-
ante Phone F
Hotel Tivcli.
P. Hall, room 335
perfect ana* excellent condition
1947 DeeJgt Pkk-ua, with hard
rae an, very leoo1 tire, far ole
at Smeat fr Hunnicutt S. A. 16th
Street Central Avenue Calen. Tal.
800.
The FRIGIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop
takes pleasure in announcing that
we are in a position to offer the
best refrigeration service in Pan-
ama. We offer Immediate service
for any kind of. refrigerator, wash-
ing machines, electric appliances,
household or commercial. If you
hove a
Gromlichs Sonto Cloro beach-
cottages Electric tea boxes, go
stoves, moderate rota. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Wc have everythirif.
to keep vour Lawn
and (larden beautiful
during the dry season
FOR RENT
3-0125 or visit
51 Via Espaa.
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished oport-
menrs. Maid service optional. Con-
refrigeration" problem fiEfe* '< 8061. 10th Street. New
our store at No.
Cristobol. telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR RENT:Beautiful furnished 2-
bedroom apartment for 6 months.
Inquire office Riviera Building,
3rd. street. Melendex Ave., Colon.
CLEARANCE SALE HOUSEHOLD
EFFECTS: Two 25 cycle fan;
$15 each, mahogq/iy Chest-cf-
drowers, 3-piece new Simmon-
overstuffed furniture SI 50. 0314
Cable Heights. Artcpn.'
WANTED:25 cycle washing
Chine. Phone Fort Sherman
"752.
ma-
il-
"Fa-
FOR SALE:Special for "Army
mllies" used furniture at special
prices. Try us and be'convinced
'Economy Furniture -Store V2.174
Bolivar Avenue 12-13 Sts. Colon
9-iji ______;
FOR SALE:Two mahogany.- chair
"which make loveseot. spring cush-
ions,, one Hollywood bed. 30"
vilde with cover, dne bomboo re-
fractory table, one bomboo desk
BjeeptiQnol quality and first dps-
condition. Tel. 3-1568", 8 to 1C
FOR SALE: Ford Coupe 1940.
House 21 10-B. TeL 83-7242, Cu-
rundu.
BARGAIN:1947 luick 4-door te-
da* super. Practically new eeat
cavers, new tires. Excellent shape.
Smeot b Hunnicutt S. A. 16th
Street Central Avenue, Celan, Tai.
100.
Practically aew 1949 Chevrolet
pick-up far tale at Smeat b Hiib-
aicett S. A. 16th Street Central
Avenue, Calen, Tel. 100,
FOR~SALE: Late model 1950
Olds. 88 Holiday Coupe. Black
Top With Green Body. White Side
Woll Tires. Radio and Hydrama-
tic Drive. Excellent condition. $2,-
300.O0. Phone 6-128, C. Z. Pe-
nitentiory.
FOR."SALE: 25 cycle automatic
washing mochine. Good condition
Bolbca 2-3373.
1947 OMsmeaHe 2-dear sedan with
radia, seat coven, aew tiras, ex-
cellent condition. Smeat b Hun-
nicutt S. A. 16th Street. Central
Avenue. Celan. Tel. 100.
Sealed bids, in triplicate, will be re-
ceived in the office of Engineer-
ing ond Construction Director,
Panama Canal Company, Balboa
Heights, until 10:00 a. m. Feb-i
ruary 18, 1952, and then open-
ed in public, for furnishing all
plant, tools, equipment, materials,
labor, and services ond for per-
forming all work for construction
of Project F Clearing, Rough
Grading, ond Port of StOrm Sew-
er Drainage at Summit. Canal
Zone. >:d schedules, forms of
proposals, specifications, and full
particulars may be obtained from
the office of the Contract and In-
spection Division, Room 336,
Balboa Heights (Telephone 2-
3739 or 2-26981. Specifications!
and drawings will be issued on a
deposit of $25.00 per set. De-
posit will be forfeited if specify
cations ond drawings ore not re-
turned within 30 days after open-
ing of bids.
FOR RENT: Beautiful furnished
apartment with Frigidaire, a
screened, for couple or 2 bache-
lors. Via Espaa lost housa be
fore Juon Franco.. No children.
"OOil Wheelbarrow
Hose inseeticioea
Fencing Fertilizers
Sprayers Weedkillers
Sprinklers Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ate. Tel. 3-B14B
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 8-1713
#22 E. 20th St.
FOR RENT:Well ventilated apart-
ment, 2 bedrooms with bath'
rooms, living-diningroom, maid:
room, hot water, good neighbour-
hood, Bella Vista. No. 32, 44th
Street. Tel. 3-0815
FOR RENT:Apartment. Second St
No. 6, Vista Hermosa, phone 3-
2600.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT: Furnished room with
meals. Telephone 3-3921, No. 34,
45th Street, Panamo.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle*
FOR SALE: '49 Indian vertical
twin, terms. Coll 4-567. House
17T-B, Pedro Miguel.
Help Wanted
WANTED Experienced English
speaking maid for general, house-
work and some knowledge of
cooking. Reference required. 745
A Los Cruces St., Balboa.
FOR SALE: 1949 Chevrolet Da
Luxe Panel, very good cendition.
aery payments. Smeat & Hunni-
cutt S. A. 16th. Street Central
Avenue. Catea. Tal. BOO.
FOR SALI:--1941 OMsmebile 2-
deer ledon in good cendition. easy
payments. Smeot b Hunnicutt S.
A. 16th Street Central Avenue
Celan Tel. 100.
AQUARISTS: Limited supply of Brine
Shrimp Eggs at $1.25 per ounce
(liquid measure i. Calle 50 y
Aquilino de la Guardia No. 27.
FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
chickens. No. 52, I4th Street.
Venta Suela) from 8 to 1 I a
m. and 2 to 4 p. m.
FOR RENT:Furnished rooms with
porch, near Commissary and Bus-
ses, kitchen if desire. Apply over
the Chase Bank corner, 11 th and
RWivof, house 10.123. Phone 233
Colon.
FOR RENT: Furnished room for
bachelor, private entrance, balco-
ny. Apply La Cresta, 3rd Avenue
Jos Duque, top floor.
FOR RENT:Furnished or unfur-
otor 7 cu. ft. olmost new. also nished room to bachelor or mar-
electric brooder "Hudson" for 500 tied couple without children. Bella
Vista. No. 74 Central Avenue
apartment 28 lost floor.' 2 to
p. m.
FOR
The HX
WE BUY
WE SELL
WE BARTER
The very best ALWAYS In
reconditioned FURNITURE.
HX (Household Exchange)
41 Automobile Row
Tel. Panam 8-4911
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Selling:
Cemento Panam Be
National Distillers.
Tel. 3-4718 3-1680
MODERN FURNITURE
COs>rOII BUILI
Slipcover Reupbolster
VISIT OVa MOVI-ROOM!
Alberta Here*
11 (ABIoptoBlle Hew)
Ptefcaa Deliver;
I r dr I. Oeaa
Pree estimate*
Tai <-42* a a.aa te I: a.m.
FOR SALE: 19 5 0 Studebker
Chompion, 4 dr. sedan. Absolutely!
perfect condition. Can be finan-1
ced. Balboa 1588 or 3002. -
WANTED Maid. Jomoican pre-
ferrad, to care for 2 1-2 year old
child ond do general housework'
Must live m. References required | rga.
Quarter* 71-A Ft. Kobbe. Phone
84-6179.
ARGAIN: 1951 Wager. Roadmoi-
ter Dyneflow, a goad ai new,
with radia, leather uahalatary.
Five new tires. See it at Smeat b
Hunnicutt S. A. 16th Street Cen-
tral Avanue. Celen, Tel. 800.
FOR SALE:Kodak miniature en-
larger, complete with ferotype
plates, developing pans ond che-
. micals $20.00. Various types pot-
ted orchid plants 80 to 90 in.
lot $65.00. Portable victrola.
hand wired, $10.00. House 0207
Herrick Rd. Ancon. Phone 2-
6393.
WANTED: Experienced cook-
Cleaner with recent recommenda-
tions. Concrete, house across frorr
Mt.. Hope R.R. Station.
SALE:1949 luick Super 4-
deer sedan, Dynaflaw, perfect
cenditian. with radie, seat cavers,
ill new.tires. Smeet b Hunnicutt,
S. A. 16th Street Central Avanue
Calen Tel. 100.___________________I
FOR SAL:Pontioc 49, Sedan 2
Door, 6 cylinder, perfect condi-
tion. Tel. 2-3444. Crdoba."
-R SALE:Radio Amateur Equip-
ment, transmitter 100 Wotts.
Meissner VFO Hammerlund HQ
129 X. Workshop 3 El Rotory
Beam Assorted parts. All for
$350. Owner leoving. Tel. 3-1198
after 6 p. m., Ed. Salmon.
RENT:To two respectable
persons: Large, cleon. cool room
well located, modern, convenience
Peru Avenue No. 65. 'ower left
~F0R SALE
Boat & Motora
FOR SALE: 21 ft. Coyuco $20.
Coll 4-567. House 171-13 Pa-
dre Miguel.
WANTED:Maid to cook and dc
housework. Must live in ohd hovei
references. 3 persons. No. 9. C- FOR SALI:1946 Feed Statien Wa-
lombio street._______________________ ,. D, LuM WB|m1 WANTED:Moid. Light cooking.;
general housework. 2 1 -2 year
old child to care for. Recent re-
- eommendofions. prefernaj to livc|
In. House 1025-A. across frorr
i Cristobal Freight House.
eery payment. Smeet > Hunni-
cutt S. A. 16th Street Central
Avenue. Celen, Tel. 800.
WANTEd
Mist-ell. iiPOMP
WANTED: Unfurnished
March 1 st, Albrook, Tel.
FOR RENT
MiM-rllanrniM
("ethers, hoppy, healthy feet start
in the cradle. Protect baby's pre-
cious feet with JUMPING-JACK
Shoes from cradle to 4 veors. Ex-
cluslvelv at BABYLAND. No 40,
44th, Bella Visto Tel 3-1259.
OR SALE:Heovy overcoat, wine
color, No. 14. Inquire No. 3, 4th
of July Avenue Apt, 5. Ask for
Sara.
FOR SALE:25 cycle motors in dif-
ferent sires at give away prices.
Brand new. Can be seen ot the
FRIGIDAIRE Refrigeration Shop.
No. 51 Via Espaa, besides Cen-
tral de Lechera.
FOR SALE:24 foot cabin cruiser
"Aloha" A-1 condition. 2 -built
m refrigerators, toilet, sleeps four
V8 powered, new rings 6- valves
fresh water heater exchanger. I -2
interest $700.00. Full pnce $1.-4
400.00. Coll 8-8308 Army. (7-
30-4:00 p. m.l contact Sgt. A
Jensen Coco Slito, Apt 7-A. af-
ter 6:00 p. m.
FISHERMEN !
According to the latest re-
ports fish o every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIO ONES with FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete Une AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #89 National Avenue
(Automobile Sow)
Telephones: 2-0363 3-4564
chalet i
4120.
FOR RENT:Location on Frsnoscc
de lo Ossa Ave Studebker agen-
cy. Coll Mr. Fischuber from 9 tc
11 a. m. Tel. 3-3404.
CENTRAL
TODAY
N ALLIED ARTISTS
reduction
i mu
AHERNE
C0ISTAN
BENNETT
IAIIT
SULLIVAN
a
Michstl O'SHfA
Jem.s GlEASON
FOR SALE:G. E. refrigerator 60
cycles, sewing machine treadle
type, mahogony livingroom set
Friden colculotinq machine, girl':
hicvele, stroller, boby crib. Color
916. __________
UNDAUNTED BAT
Young bats cling to their moth-
er's fur and thus are carried
about on all her flights. The
mother is capable of carrying all
her young, even when their com-
bined weight equals more than
her own.
Le^a I Notice
United States District Court Far The
District Of The Canal Zeae
lathea Drvisiea
In The Matter Of The ltete
Of
Jamas Deans. Deceased
Ne. 9043. Probate.
Notice Of Tima Sat ft Proving
Will And Heeriag Application Far
Letter Testamentary
NOTICE ! horahy (Ivan that a pe-
tition for the probate of tke will o'
Jam* Doom, decaaood; and for the
Isaaanee if Lettaro Testamentary to
Catherine Deani rae filed in thie Court
on January ti. 1S5. and that Februa-
ry il. 1S2 at 9 o'clock a. m In the
Courtroom of thii Court at Anco
nal Zone, ha* boon eat for
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE:Parque Lefevre. 1 lot
525 meters ot $900.00. Must
sail before Saturday. Hall. An-
con Avenue No. 6, 2nd floor
leave address.
~PANAMA 'CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURES FOR SALI
For sale to the highest bidder Build-
ings No. 933 and No. 962, La Bo-
co. Sealed bids will be received ir
the) riftce * the) Superintendent of
Storehouses at Balboa until 10:30
a. m., February 15, 1952. when
they will be opened in public. Forrr
of proposal'With full particulars may
be secured in the offices of Super-
intendent of Storehouses, Baboo
ond the Housing Manager at Bal-
boa Heights.
Oafifl/nr
INSTANT
Fat-Fret Powdered Milk
(fortified with Vitamin D)
for
DRINKING
for
COOKING
for
WHIPPING
farm Fresh
Flavor!
On Sale in
P. C Co Commissaries.
FOR rOKR HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. 6 Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Wi.hmif Worry Or Care
STHMA and
RONCHITIS
pn't couch ant* coujli. ustnglr, j, -p
and choke so bad that }ou can hardly
broath* or ol(pdon't suffer another I
IS
mryn vBVICE-
n ii Ave. Paia -to
INVENTED SAW
v^UMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
Christening Cup
Tradition Revived
At Culick Club
FORT DAVIS. Feb. 5 At a
ceremony held Sunday at the
Fort Davis Officers Club, three
young Army couples, who be-
came parents last December,
were presented with silver chris-
tening cups by the officers and
ladles of the 764th AAA Gun
Battalion. Recipients of the
christening cups were 1st Lieu-
tenant and Mrs. John C. Mar-
tindale for their son James Bri-
an; Captain and Mrs. Leo 3.
Hock for their daughter Judith
Margaret; and 1st Lt. and Mrs.
Robert J. Carroll for their son
Timothy Lee.
Presehtlng christening cups Is
an old Armv customs that was
recently revived by the 764th.
Master of ceremonies at the pre-
sentation was Major Milo S.
Gardner, Adjutant of the 764th.
Also present at the ceremony
were Colonel Henrv F. Taylor,
commanding officer. Atlantic
Sector. Fort Gullck and Lt. Col.
William J. Bennett, command-
ing the 764th.
Mrs. Ofana Jorif.
Grandmother Of 22,
Dies At Son's Home
Mrs. Ofana Jorif. a resident on
the Isthmus since 1907, died yes.
terday morning after an illness
of 16 years at the home of her
son. Marcelino Jorif in Pueblo
Nuevo, lt was announced today.
A member of the French So-
ciety of Panam, Mrs. Jrif is
survived by seven children, 22
grandchildren and eight great-
grandchildren.
She was released from Gorgas
Hospital IS days ago after un-
dergoing treatment there for two
weeks.
Funeral arrangements have
not been announced.
Pacific Society...
(Continued from Page THREE)
Ancon is having a pot-luck cov-
ered-dish supper in the social
hall On Thursday at 6:00 p.m.
All are- welcome..
Trojillo Exhibition
At JWB Gallery
' A large group of the members
of the Canal Zone Art League
i met Sunday afternoon at the
JWB Gallery to introduce the
'paintings of Guillermo Trujlllo.
young artist of Panama -who has
|'studied Vn Spain. A self portrait I
land a still life of a cooper lustre
nitcher are the ontv oil paintings.
| The greater part of the exhibit is
o watercolr paintings.
Mr. Wright Kirk, Cultural Af-
fairs Officer of the American
i Embassy and Mrs. Kirk greeted
the guest artist and later at-
tended the regular meeting of
(the Art Leare at which he
i showed two fl^ms from the Em-
ihftssv Library. "The National
Museum." aid "How Young
America Paints." Punch wan
i nerved b" Mr. anri Mrs. Bvron
W Vauchn. Mr. Vairrm is the
President of the Canal Zone Are
League.
The exhibition "f Mr Tn'M-
Uo's oalntines will 'ma1' for
two veles at the JWB Gslery
and an are Invited to view it.
building. .Balboa.
7:30 p.m.
tomorrow
Canal Admeasurer
To Lecture Before
Piloting Class
Walter H. Hebert. Chief Ad-
measurer at the port of Balboa,
will give a lecture before the pi- boat owners and members of the
loting class of the U.S. Power|U.8. Power Squadron are hrvlt-
Squadron. in the Junior College ed to hear the lecutre.
His talk will cover ship ad!
measurement rules in gener
with special emphasis on rule]
in force at the Panama Canal;
both for ships and small craft.]
Members of yacht clubs, smal
FOR SALE
GLASSES H box: 12x44 and 14x44........SlO.tO
ROUND GLASSES: 11? and IS x 44...........130.00 box
"SEMON BACHE" AMERICAN ROUND MIRRORS:
SO".. 17.50 3t"..$9.50 36"..10.f0 4T.. $12.50
ENGLISH FURNITURE STORE
7th St. and Bolivar Avenue No. 6075
COLON Tel. 334 COLON
Foot Itch Cause Curbed
Pain
TK> your feat Itch so badly that they
nearly drive yon, cratyt Does the akin
on your faet crack and paal? Are there
blisters between your loe* and on the
aolea of your feet? Do these blliter
break and run and cause more blister*
to form? Do your feet ret so sore at
Urn tha,t they actually bleed? If yon
suffer from these foot troubles, you
should realize that the real cause la
a serm of fungua. To rid yourself of
the trouble, you have to kill the
larraa that cause thesn.
Overcome trie Came
Fortunately It la poasibl to over-
lome these foot troubles and also even
he most stubborn ring-worm Infection
with Nixederma recently developed
arlearrlSa American fr.rm.ula ana aow
Imported by leadlnr Drocclat*.
Nixoderm hue these three definite ac-
tion: I. lt help to kill the cerma, para-
site, and funarus responsible for three
foot Infection, aa well as rlnaworm, ot
any part of4 the body. S. It atop th
Itch suid soothe end cool the kin.
3. It make the skin soft, clear and
Smooth. ,
Qet Nixoderm from your ruafaial
today. Apply it tonifht and see the bit
Improvement, in the morntn. In a. few
days' time Nixoderm will have attacked
the trerma. parasites and funaua re-
eponaible for your trouble and ,\ou can
ae for yourself that your skin rapidly
I becoming aofj, clear, smooth an
healthy, net Nixoderm from your drug-
arlar tnd i>r. Sf"-4-" traliur ,w
Emm California
Dt Joer>v> Prcdron ff P1-
ma Citv 1 ret'-rrrlr'' to fe Isth-
mus b" nl-na r.Ms pt.rnor-m af-
t-r a six-month visit In Califor-
nia. .
CENTRAL
TOMORROW
PRE RELEASE
JOHN
GARFIELD
SHELLEY
winter:
THURSDAY
WEEKEND RELEASE
Ikatrf
I. ii,.,, -I eka
awTafftaHl II W
fdifstjnptrisscalM'
"Te IfMlrlf. HIM "
* aw I feT>eeaTa
QUEBEC
*%*7&CHNlCCMOIl
A* Misa r-IPem etaerla
MM MUTiMf, H MtUttt HI
IMIattHSI-HiKMIIUS
Mart AreeM Mew
AWWraearai
NIKKI DUVAl
is said to
Talus, the Greek.
. ? 5^0M.Bnrd0.nc.h.'t,hT,Ag,,e.TinteT. hwe InvctU^ . w when he
. the hear- medlcla, recently developed by a found the Jawbone Ot a SliaKe
in of iald petition, when and where pclentlfio American laboratory, work rrjrj employed it to CUt tarOUgn
'" a small oiece of wood.
any peraon hvtereited mar appear an-'
contest the aeme. an I ihow cause, if
any. why aeid petition eaiu'd not be
granted.
Dated at Areon. Canal Zone, tbi-
January 24, 1SI1.
C. T McCermick. Jr
Clerk of Court
SEAL
a, t.ois r. h\biso.s
Deputy Clerk
through th blood, thus reaching your
lungs and bronchia! tube. That why
Maniaco works so fast to help you three
way. 1. Help nature disaolve and re-
moce thick atranRiing mucua. S. Pro-
mote fre easy breathing and ound
clae o yu *oon feel O.K. S. Quickly
Sravle.tea coughing, wheeling, anees-
'.ng. 'et Mendaco from your di ugglst
today. Bee how much better jou may
eleap ton'ght and how much better jou
mas- feel tomorrow.
NON-STOP TRAIN
The longest dally non-stop
train run la said to be that of
the Flvine Scotsman." between
King's Cross and Edinburgh, a
distance of 37.7 miles.
Obrien Lynn Homak
COMING
Marlene Dietrich James
Stewart, in
No Hiihsray to The Sky"
Plus: "WHY KOREA?"




TEiDAT, FEBRUARY 5. 195!
rtiFir
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
$165,000 Windy City II Could Be Arcaro's Derby Horse
Little
League
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE Johnny Engelke also chipped in
TEAM Won Lost with two hits In three trip*.
PoUce
Sears .. ..
AFGE14.. .
Lincoln Ufe
Elks 1414 ..
Firemen. ,.
......
I
3
3
3
3
I
YESTERDAYS RESULTS
Linela life 14, Firemen t.
TODAYS GAME
Felloe ti. AFGE
In a loosely played game, Lin-
coln Ufe defeated the Firemen
14 to 8. The Lifers started the
fireworks In the very first In-
ning. Randel was chased after
the first three Lifers hit solid
smashes for two singles and a
double. Chase came In to relieve
and when the Inning was over
the Lifers had scored five runs
on six hits. Lincoln Life tallied in
every Inning and at the end of
the fifth 14 runs had crossed the
plate.
The Smokies defense was weak
and showed a total of seven er-
rors. Their scoring came as a re-
sult of 13 walks by the Uf er hurl-
ers. As far as hits were concern-
ed, the Smokies could garner but
two.
Leading hitters for the da;
were McGriff and Durham eacl
with a double and two singles.
Bateman had three solid singles
in three trips to the plata.
Today, the Police meet the
ATOE nine In the battle for first
Blace.-Probable pitchers are Su-
erland and Castleman.
The box score:
Firemen AB R H PO
McNall, ss...... 13 0 0
Llnfors, ss..... 0 1 0 0
Huddleston, cf .. 12 0 0
Klntner, cf .. .. 1 1 0 1
Morris, rf. .. .i 0 0 0 0
Webb, lb...... 1 0 1 3
Chase, rf-p .... 4 1 1 0
Townsend, If.. .. 1 1 0 0
Schneider, If.. .. 2 0 0 1
Schoch, c...... 2 0 0 7
Price, 2b...... 10 0 2
Terry, 2b...... 1 0 0 0
Fundakowskl, 3b 2 0 0 0
Wallace, 3b .. .. 0 0 0 0.
Baker, lb...... 1 0 0 0
Randel, p-rf.... 1001
Enthusiasm High
For School Cage
Championship Tilt
Enthusiasm is running higher
by the'day as the big -basketball
Same between Balboa and Cris-
>bal draws closer. The two
teams will battle it out tomorrow
night at the Balboa Gym, with
the toss-up of the first ball by
the referee slated for 7 o'clock.
Gym doors will open at 6:30 for
the fans to be sure of good seats.
Clark, Neville To Get Mound
Duties Tonight; Yankees Win
-

British Champion Reminds
One Of Brilliant Whirlatmy
Brewers Wallop Balboa Hi
To Stay In Twi-Loop Race
A
0
1
0 With the regular season play, GlbraTtarLlfe
0 all finished, the Tigers and the, {T*!"I?-.
S Bulldogs finished in a dead heat, RJSa Merchants i
PACIFIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE
(First Half Standings) '
TEAM Wen Lest Pet.
1 .857
3
4
with Gibson chalking up his sc-
ond win against no defeats.
TEAM Wen Lost Pet.

.. .. 17 11 .t7
Bluebirds. .. .. .. 11 It .379
Brownies. .. .. .. 11 18 479

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
TONIGHT'S GAME
Panam Stadium (7:38)Yank-
ees (Neville 4-2) vs. Rrownles
Clark 5-5).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Mt. Hope Stadium: Yankees 5,
Bombers 3.
The Brownies' unpredictable
0 for the title. Cristobal, last years1 RaiboVHi a*hooi 1
a tltleholders, will storm the Pa-IB*",* H1 Sth99^ *
a clfic side with a host of fans to
o root their favorites into their sec-
0 ond straight title. On the other
i side of the gym, the Red and
0 White of the Bulldogs will be fly-
iiing high, and so will the spirits
01 of the Bulldog backers 4n hopes
0 that the coveted trophy will be
Lincoln Life-
McGrlff, ss .
Million, c. .
Bateman, 3b
Ramsey, If. .
Durham, p-lf.
AB
S
4
3
0
4
Laata. lb...... 3
Corozal Tops Kobbe
10-6 In Pacific Mr.
Softball League
Corozal Sales Store clipped
Kobbe Bales Store, 10 to 6, In the
second game of the 1952 season
of the ten-team Pacific Division-
al Softball League which Is spon-
sored by the Physical Education
and Recreation Branch of the
Division of Schools.
Kobbe broke through for three
runs oh as many hits in the first
inning and garnered (ingle tal-
lies in the ae<^. tfclW.ad
fourth frames. The Wo.it Bank
salesmen were held to five hits
by Joseph Simmons, the winning
hurler.
Corozal pushed across a Tun In
the lower half of the first, added
two In., the second, crossed the
j>Ute*Krr7hree in "he fhlfd;*lld
boomed for four in.the fourth.
Eleven hits were made off C.
Roberts who dropped the deci-
sion.
The box score follows:
Kobbe Sales Store AB R
C. McNally, as........3
P. Mayornado, If......4
H. Brown, 3b........ *
R. Swaby, c........
C. Boberta, p........3
D. Jemmott, lb......S
O. Bynoe, cf........3
C. Romero, 2b........3
G. Surber, rf........3
Haynes, rf..........1
HPO
3 0
Dubols, jr., 2b.
Conklln, cf .. ..
Engelke. W., cf ..
Engelke, J., If-p.
Sander, W., rf ..
Sander, R., rf ..
Score By Innings .
Lincoln Life 513 14x14 14 2
Firemen 002 042 8 2 7
Winning PitcherD u r h a m.
Losing PitcherRandel. Struck-
out byDurham 4, Engelke 2,
Chase 6. Base on Balls off
Chase 6, Durham 6, Engelke 7.
DoubleplayPrice (unassisted).
Two Base HitsChase, McGriff,
Million, Durham. J. Dubois. Left
on BaseFiremen 7, Lincoln Life
8. UmpireLuzer. ScorerReilly.
Time of Game1:34. Attendance
100.
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Balboa Brewers 7, BBS 3.
WEDNESDAY NIGHTS GA'ME
(At Balboa Stadlnm 7 o'clock)
Gibraltar Ufe Insurance vs. Pan-
ami Merchants.
This scribe would like to re-
STwXht'Le^^ Vibert ark will
ARCADIA. Calif.. Feb. 5 (NEA)
Calumet Farm and the Jones
boys ran into a frightful blow at
Santa Anita.
Hill Gail definitely was their
Kentucky Derby horse. Indeed
'
i
i
by flying dirt, so just stopped
running. Any jockey will show *
you red marks on their arms aft-'
er running- from behind and tall
you that the dirt stings.
"This tune I took him
on the
..nnnr* th Arlington Park Futurity win.; outside all the way and lust loop-
ner of last summer, with earn- ed the field,
ings of $95,740, was so Impressive | "He looks more like Whirlawav
in his first outing here, in which than Whirlawav and he's the
he took the San Vicente Stakes same type. He isn't big, butrwhen
in a common gallop, that 20,000 you are on him he feels big He>
players made the dark brown son I Just the right size to stav sound "
of Bull Lea a l-to-4 favorite In. **mi.
the 319.60C- San Gabriel. | ARCARO HAS LITE ONE
Hill Gall was coupled with A Arc aro will be astride Windy
Gleam, but none of the bridge- City II in the $100,000 Santa An.
Jumpers took the fUJy Into con-,ll* Derby, Feb. 23, and also in the
von may be able to do so still by, ESU."* Mto"SE' filvTlle "s "deration. Dldnt many trainers other 100 Grander, the Santa A-
buying tickets for the gala Mfg"*3!jEl *L? fn 'Vf I r*^ * BhaMe Calumet colt the * Handicap, should Willie Al-
Last night the Brewers remain-
fair which Is one dollar per cou-
ple.
b^?.hL^?lh.!,h.e..0lB3 edTmVhe* thick of th^flrst ha BH1
The box score:
Cristobal, sparked by such out-' Sttta and Tot theirhones aUve Mavis T
standing players as Arnold Man-i 9ttttl-.n nlng and Bill Bailey, who have
AB R HPO A
consistently played brilliant bas-
ketball for Coach Paul Moser, will
rate the favorites role. In spite
of the fact that the Bulldogs
have defeated them In two of
for a tie with the league leading | Napoleon, 3b.
Insurance nine as they set back] Arias, 3b
the High School team 7-3. laKourany, O.
Only a game and a half behind, Flynn, c . .
the Brewers will hope that thejCarlin, lb .
Panam Merchants give the In- Halman, 2b. .
. ...or n, surance team the same medicine> Halsall, rf.
three league games this year, the fh^, r^m,mA ,..? a^0. *>,. *
Tigers are stlu all even with them
2
0
1
4
3
4
3
by virtue of their win in the J.C
tournament early in the season.
u
they received last Sunday when;Kourany, E., rf 0
the Old Timers trounced them I Rowley, cf. .3
13-3 to knock them down a Henderson, If 3
have been playing much belter *"f"te Twlhght Loops first half
basketball during the late part of """ .
the season to last night's tilt, another fast
1
0
0
0
2
1
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
the scheduled
Yankees.
starter for the
greatest three-year-old ever to varado, the Mexican trainer,
Srt nn >i.H itv. oof . campaign in the foothills of the *t to send htm against older
jS^JlthiwSSatrtSh;\Bmntu*manU>aa1 horses at such a Tender age,
th.? Xiiama p2 KJA7 W Wln nnru .?V*KJ&a ^.JSZ hand- outwardly had been a com-, ,t Arcaro is first to tell you that
SSftWS .l^&^*ft V**t but against rather inferior ! far too early to be mikingup
opposition in his first American your mind on a Kentucky Derby
experience, when the Irlshbred mount, but quickly adds that his
ran fifth. well could be Windy city II.
Eddie Arcaro warned the boys "All Windy City ft has to do is
and
and will also be shooting to push1
his mark above the .500 average.
Neville has won four and lost two.
Last night over 3,000 fans paid
their way into the Mount Hope
Stadium and saw the Yankees
wrest the league lead away from
the Bombers, 5-3, behind the five
0 hit hurling of Marlon Frlcano.
nl The Yankees scored single runs
In the second, third and fourth
Innings to cause the removal of
navhnum* n ft o A 0 starter Alberto Osorlo and con-
Raybourne. P _? J J_^ _ _ tinued against relief hurler Con- u d0_ _hU(
nie Johnson for two more runs to tJ^JSrJSS* V2B&2S&
Sir Is not to dismiss Windy keep running like he did in. the
t with one look. i 8an Gabriel," says Eddie Arcaro.
ur-
BOliGHT FOR J2800 who will bid for his fifth victory
Yet the punters permitted the In the Run for the Roses com*
imported colt to go postward atj the first Saturday In May.
7.80-to-l in the seven-furlong I "You don't give up on this kind
San Gabriel Stakes, only to see' hi a hurry,
him rally from the extreme out-1 "At least not until the day aft-
side when roused to close withler tomorrow.''
Totals.....30 3 9 18 8 4
ARMED FORCES LITTLE
LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Curundu........4 9 1.0
Carib Command .. I t .699
Kobbe........i t ue
West Bank......3 3 AN
Clayton.........1 3 .259
Albrook........A. 3 .259
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Albrook 8, Carib Command 5.
Curunda 7, Kobbe 2.
West Bank 6, Clayton 5.
Totals ............27 11
Corozal Sales Store AB
C. Allison, If........ 3
r. McLean, ss........ 3
R. Barrasa, rf........ 2
V. Tudor, cf-c........ 2
8. Selman, cf........ 1
A. ArchibaJdo. 2b..... 1
napkin, lb.......... 2
B. JaramUlo, 3b-2b .... 2
V. West, 2b-3b........ 2
J. Simmons, p........ 3
The Albrook Flybbys rfame out
of the cellar position by defeat-
tog the Caribbean Commandos 8
to 9 to the game at Beam Sta-
dium yesterday afternoon. Bob
Wright twirling for the Comman-
dos was relieved on the mound in
the fourth by Ross Kramer, while
Albrook's Don Schlosser went all
the way. Big guns at bat for the
Albrook attack were Ronald
Thrush, who got four for four,
and Den Schlosser with two dou-
bles.
The Curundu Councllmen kept
their winning streak intact with; man. OT..
a 7 to 2 win over the Fort Kobbe for distance,
nine at the Curundu stadium to varea started on the mound, but
a well attended game. Jerry Cur- had to be relieved because of
slstent players to the league to
Sam Maphls, and a couple of
firebrand roundballers to the
Kourany twins, Edgar and Os-
car. Along with these three boys,
the Bulldogs will have Fred Ray-
bourne, Leon Herring, and fast
improving Bob Donahue. With
long Gene Rlchter gone to the
United 8tatea, it will be up to
these lads along with help from
Ray Davidson, Gus Troncoso,
and Dick Ostrea-to do the Job. -
Ancon Blue Devils
Swamp Diablo In
Shorty Loop Opener
Saturday morning the Ancon
Elementary School baseball team
soundly defeated the Diablo Ele-
mentary squad by an overwhelm-
ing score of 15 to 0. The game
was the first of the season for
both clubs, therefore errors and
wlldness were to abundance dur-
ing the playing of the game. An-
con's "diminutive" Dickie Duran
went the distance for the win-
ners as he pitched a nice one-hit
shutout for the first victory of
the season.
The "big guns" for- the Blue-
devils at the plate were Ricardo
caslra and Fred Harley. the
team's shortstop and third base-
both boys hitting the ball
r the losers, Al-
draw blood when they scored to
the bottom half of the second
Inning three times to take a 3-0
lead on two successive stogies by
Bernle Herring and McGee, a
free pass and a two base hit by
Dick Cox.
The High School saved them-
selves from a whitewashing when
they scored one run to the top
half of the fourth on two hits
and two bases on balls to put
them to the game 8-1.
That was enough, for the
Brewers dented the plate three
times in the same Inning on two
hits and the first High School
mlscue.
It was made by Jim May at
short and proved to be costly. A
balk, and a free pass also helped
to give the Brewers a 8-1 lead.
The High School lads threat-
ened at all times but were, un-
able to bunch their hits togeth-
er. The youngstersrput up a last
Inning effort that netted two
runs on a triple by Abdul Flynn,
and a base knock by Jerry Hal-
man. The High School loaded the
bases but Noel Gibson saved the
Cox, ss.
Scott, 3b.
Gibson, p
Neckar, c
AB
4
3
3.
3
Carita, Wm., lb 3
Herring, rf.
McGee, If .
Weltz, If .
Larrlnaga,cf.
McGlade, 2b .
HPO
1 1
0
1
10
3
the fifth.
Johnson.
who came on with
under mild urging to mid-stretch1 CM* mwIo.
and quickly draw clear to prevail rQITiOUS MeXICCHI
5 2
Totals.....24 7 8 31
Score By Innings
BHS 0 0 0 1 0 0 23
Brewers 0 3 0 3 0 1 x7
aStruckout for Arias to 7th;
bStruckout for Swalm to 6th.
Runs Batted InFlynn, Rowley,
Cox 3, Larrtaaga. Earned Runs
BHS 1, Brewers 3. Left on Bases
BHS 11, Brewers 3. Three Base
HitCox. Two Base HitFlynn.
Sacrifice HitLarrinaga. Stolen
BaseScott. Hit by PitchWeltz
by Raybourne. Struckout by
Swalm 2, Gibson 9. Base on Balls
offSwalm 2, Gibson 5. Hits and
Runs off8walm 8 and 6 to 5 in-
nings; Raybourne 0 and 1 to 1.
Losing PitcherSwalm (0-1).
Winning PitcherOlbson (2-0).
DoubleplayHalman to Carlln.
^SUS^SOTSSSi IWBaSBfM Horse Arete Dies
R!rLf 1SJ h.tt garnerM a meeting for the distance. The r
t0FoVrefstelSshlh1t safely ivJ^hZ^lS?" "*" **f OllOWinO InjUiy
to up his batting average to .338 "gSfVg former' rodeo rid- MEXICO CITY, Feb. S (UP)-
I regain leadership to that de- lni%^n to^hta 4^ purJ''Aret" * world-famed Mexi-
partment over Hctor Lpez who
is H
hitting .333.
day as he caught Dave Hender- Umpires Mohl and Coifey. Time
son's line drive to end the game I of Game1:39.
tls, the winning pitcher, and
Hj Robert Crowder, the loser, both
went all the way.
The best exhibition of the day
was at the West Bank diamond
to Cocoli where the West Bank
0! nine squeezed a 6 to 5 win over
O.the Clayton Little Leaguers for
0 their second game on the credit
l.side of the ledger to the first
01 half. George Barbler was the wln-
2 nlng pitcher, and Herman Wllk-
;------: tason the loser.
Totals............21 10 5] Thursday's schedule is as fol-
Next Games, Wednesday: Post .lows (home team first): Curun-
Office vs. Central Labor Office du vs. Caribbean Command. Al-
(La Boca Ball Park); Thursday: brook vs. Clayton, Fort Kobbe vs. Oesner
Electrical Dlv. vs. Building Dlv. West Bank. Game time 4:30 p.m. I Alvarez
wlldness which was the main
factor to the game's lop-sided
score.
Next week, the Bluedevlls trav-
el to Gamboa where they will
meet the "country boys" to what
is expected to be a real good ball
game. All you parents who have
children participating to these
games should be on hand to help
give your sons that extra support
needed.
The box score:
Diablo AR H
Bruce............ 2 0
Schwalm.......... 1 0
1
1
Gaviln Cops Close Split
Decision Over Bobby Dykes
MIAMI, Fla., Feb. 5 (UP)
World Welterweight Champion
Kid Gaviln, 148*4, of Cuba, last
night retained his crown by de-
feating thin but tough Texas
slugger Bobby Dykes, of the same
weight, by the sum margin of six
points toa savage bout that end-
ed to a wild flurry of punches.
Ignoring the four-to-one odds
against him, Dykes came off the
floor to the second round to score
a near upset. In the final analy-
sis, it was a fellow Cuban's deci-
subsequent round of battering to
make a comeback battle he al- aits
most won. The edge went to Ga- rinh
vllan on a wUd two-fisted flurry
In the final round.
Gaviln admitted "it was a
close fight. I would like to fight
him again." But he added that
ills main ambition is still to fight
Middleweight Champion Sugar
Ray Robinson. He said, "That's
the one I want."
Officials of the International!
Presidents Tourney
Next Week Replaces
P.W.G.A. Monthly
The President's Tournament
will take the place of the asnal
monthly Panam Women's Golf
Association event.
Mrs. Sylvs Carpenter, outgoing
president of the PWGA is spon-
soring a medal play tournament
at the Panam Golf Club on Feb.
16 and 17.
There will be no entrance fee
and is open to all members of
tbe PWGA. The 18-hole event
may be played either Saturday or
Sunday morning with tbree-
Iuartars handicap allowance.
he prise will be a piece of silver
given by Mrs. Carpenter and wlB
be presented to the winner at
the March PWGA Tournament.
Each clnb is asked to selfect its
representative for the PWGA and
notify Grace Dehlinger imme-
diately. Tbe 1952 slate cannot be
set np without this Information.
The Ball Tournament at Fort
Davis has been postponed until
April due to previous rommlt-
of the Fort Davis Golf
chased Windy City II for 700 5,an mpini rh,orM,'lchc guineas, or $2000. as a yearling in PK2 ?*"Ues f *he M*-
Ireiand, where-the chestnut was can Army t*am rode to numer-
yearllng
breTby' US51l. C Atexanderl ^^to^^*Hh0?oean^,lbr notably to the 1948 Olympics
Windy City II is by Wyndham,1 TtSSK^Sf * ]
thus the name, out of Staunton taJE?ftft?.?Und.ay
she by The Satrap, but you'l, fJ&SLF^SJX t5L5e,u,t*t0f-5
have to ask an friah breeder iractu"d riht hoof suffered
about that oreeoer when he waj tccldenU11 kicke4
by "Cordobs," an Argentino
TOP TWO-YEAR-OLD horse, while Jumping in the field
--.. __ Jan. 12. Two operations failed to
Windy City II won four of five save Arete's life.
starts at two, and with them thei Arete performed to Phlladel-
champlonihip of England and phla, New York and Canada
Ireland. He barely missed to Po-I horse shows, winning several
mare in France, when he was. championships with Mariles at
turned sideways at the gate and; the reins. He won the "Prise of
had to make up many lengths.; Nations" at the last Olympics at
He copped the Glmcrack Stakes
to England, Ireland's Phoenix
Plate and was a good second, de-
spite his ill luck, to France's Prix
d'Arenburg.
He was rated the top two-year-
old to the weights for the Eng-
lish Derby.
Bell also bought Ollerton Hills,
four this year, at the Irish sales,
and last October sold the two of;
/ It's a delicious beverage
V it omits me no sshnnlsnt
** It betas yon enjoy s restful sleep
them to Mr. and Mrs. Gus Luel-ie* It's prepared right m tfco eup
London's Wembley Stadium.
TnrBggSSEb
!?,0n.in H* lstfmlxedv,{?iutr^: Boxing Club Indicated, however,
Florida ring history which re- '- -*-.'
talned the title for Gaviln.
the V-M tn-o-matic
V
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matic operation for all records, all sises, all
tpeeds shuts off completely and auto-
mat Jcallv. after last record has played.'
Labiosa.......... 1
Swalm............ 1
Blades............ 0
Mosley............'I
Storey............ 1
R
0
n! Referee Eddie Coachman and
0 one JudgeMark Erwincoun.
n tar-balanced their cards. Coach-1
0 man gave It to Dykes 142 points
n to 141 and Erwin voted for Gavl-
n in by the same score. But Cu-
n ban Judge, Ladislao Nodarse, es-1
that Dykes, who almost pulled
the "Impossible," would get an-
other shot at Gaviln before the,
Cuban steps up in classprob-
ably at Madison Square Garden.1
Indiana State Lifts
Walcott Suspension
INDIANAPOLIS, Feb. 5 (UP)
World Heavy weigh Cham-
pion Jersey Joe Walcott yes-
terday paid a $299 fine for not
appearing for an exhibition
bout In EvansvUle, Ind., last
August.
The paying ef the fine auto-
matically lifted the suspension
of Walcott In 47 member states
of the NBA. Indiana had im-
posed the suspension.
lwita for $200,000. Ollerton Hills
broke a leg to his first start here,
and Inasmuch as he was Judged
worth $35,000, that made Windy
City II a $185,000 item. Luel-
lwltz, millionaire lumberman, is
co-owner of Moonrush.
STRANGE CONDITIONS
Windy City n reminds Arcaro
of Whirlaway sans the long tail.
"You must remember;* says the
famous Jockey, "that in his first
time out here Windy City II had
never before run on a dirt track
always on turf.
"When I took him behind
horses, he was surprised and hurt
with hot water or muk
Oel POSTUM ledey
and try M
Totals............9 1 0
Ancon
AB a
Linares........ .. .. 1
garltogton.. .v...... 1
asira............ S
Chism............ $
Harley............ 9
Leonard.......... 0
Duran............ I
Kline............ 0
Delgado............ 2
Wong............ 0
Meggers.
Zardn..
Brld .. ..
Maroney
Hasera.
5 15
Totals......... ..... 21
Score By Innings
Diablo 0 0 0*
Ancon 9 14
Game called because of tan-run
3-tontog rule.
7110
Bolivar
RADIO CENTER
Tel.
40
KIDNEYS
f ACIDS
Toor beSr eWtn* out wn AeMi
,-ni polaonoua wistsa In >or blood
Ihm million tiny dollot* KlcJn.r UOM -
.r nitor*. PolaoM n> tb KMn*o r
.tWUMir mor mako
i trocir, eloudT urliM
Tou uBor from
. i,i v^mj ..., o)#ttiae ee *neat*,
..N'orvouanooa. Los Pmlno, clrclti TJndor
Brat, BaqKieio, Aohtaf Joints. Acidity
or bumln POMOS Oyftox, now In.
portod from tho ITS.A., Marta working
promptly, noloo moJto you fool younror,
i.troncor. bottor In I war*: 1. Hlp
' our kldnoyo loan out polaonoua arldi.
. Combata corma In th*
3. Soothoa aad cal
am roar
peclally approved as one of the
officials by GavUan's manager,
gave Gaviln the nod 145 to 199.
It was a fist fight all the way
and a good one after Dykes lost
his early nervousnesswhich,
caused him to be dumped on the
floor for an eight count in the.
second round for the only knock-'
down of the fray. And It had two;
surprisesthe lack of a demon-
stratlon over the first mixed
fight to Southern ring annals
and the surprising showing of
young Bobby.
Four policemen were station-
ed at each corner of the ring
but they were not needed as the
segregated crowd comported it-
self perfectly.
"I want to say the people of
Miami were wonderful.'' Gaviln
said later to his dressing room
"They were wonderful." But
when it came to fisticuffs, that
was another matter.
The bout went according to ex-
pectations for the first three
rounds, with Gaviln moving a-
round the nervous Dykes easily
and scoring almost at will.
add GAVILN COPSSports ..
But Dykes proved his game-
nets by oomlng back from that
second round knockdown snd a
0^
foi/ame-

ASK FOR
Haig
SCOTCH WHISKY *^
ta* urinary aratom.
ma IrrlUtod Uaaao*.
t tor Cy*b today. I
roar rossftt tor CyMoit today.
3** how quickly It may bal you.
I


Who ?

Who ? Me ?


41
I'm Happy the Humbug. They My I'm
tarring over HOG. I'm looking for my
parents 'cause I'm awful lonely; I have the
head of a giraffe, the body of a turtle and
the tail of a monkey! My friend Willy the
Whiz say* the Alfaro boys are sponsoring
me they sell International Harvester Re-
frigerators and Washing Machines on Peru
Avenue.
"If you want to hear my story meet me
at 6:15 tonight."


?
X
4



' '^p^p^fv

GAVILAN-DYKES REMATCH LOOMS
(Page 11
Search Spreads
For Kidnaper
Of US Teen-Ager

FRANKFURT, Feb. 5 (UP). (
Every available member of West I
Germany's 100,000 man police j W_N RrvpvTn vvak
ioree was pressed last night and I '
today Into the search lor the
scar-iaced gunman who kidnap-
ed American teen-ager Mamie
Shelton and molested her at
tun-point before she finally
stum oled to freedom.
The kidnaper, described as
armed, dangerous and desper-
ate," was wearing a U.S. Army
uniform, when he robbed the
18-year-old girl's two male com-
panions and fled with her In
their automobile Sunday night.
Miss Shelton, step-daughter of
M/Sgt. Franklin B. Burns, of Hot
Springs, Va., was found stum-
bling through the snow yester-
day morning by a U.S. military
police patrol near Nielderdorn-
leiden. about eight miles from
Frankfurt.
She told authorities she had
been molested, but not criminal-
ly attacked by the gunman, who
threatened her life with a re-
volver as he forced his attention
on her for 40 minutes in the
stolen car. parked In the field.
West German troopers and!
thousands of United States mi-
litary police concentrated their
search tonight'In-the Franklurt
area, but patrols also fanned out
In blinding snowstorms through-
out all three zones of West Ger-
many and road blocks were set
up throughout the area.
The kidnaper, was said to be
stocky, about 5 feet, 4 inches
tall,.with a scar on one cheek.
It,was not known for certain
whether he was a U.S. soldier
although he wore an American
Army uniform without inslg-
ni.i at the time of the kid-
naping, and was said to speak
good English.
Military police believed he
might be a soldier reported ab-
sent without leave from the
Hanau Army barracks near
Frankfurt. The AWOL soldier
was armed with a .45-callber re-
volver, they said.
IN INDBPWDgN\^fl|E^D^lLY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country i$ safe" Abraham Lincoln.

-*.,
-.*"
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Housedleaning Boss Starts
With Hope, Promise, Slap
Prop-Jet Airliner
To Fly Cheap-Rale
Atlantic Passengers
LONDON, Feb. 5 (BIS) The
new British prop-turbine Brit-
annia airliner, now being built
by the Bristol Aircraft Company
will carry, at coach or tourist
iares, from 90-104 passengers.
It will cruise over 2,500-mile
stages at a speed of 370 m.p.h.
By 1954-57, the aircraft is ex-
pected to be operating over long
stages like the North Atlantic,
run and carrying a large num-
ber of passengers as cheaply as
possible.
Twenty-five Britannia's have
already been ordered by BOAC. '
WASHINGTON, Feb. 5 (UP)
Newbold Morris took command
of the government's cleanup
campaign yesterday with a hope,
a promise and a slap at his
critics.
The 50-year-old Republican
lawyer lost no time in buckling
down to the task of weeding out
corruption after he arrived here
from New York.
He conferred briefly with At-
torney General J. Howard Mc-
Grath and then told a news
conference he:
1) Will deal with the corrup-
tion wherever he finds it, re-
gardless of who gets hurt.
2) Hopes to be remembered
"as the guy who started a new
era of decency."
3) Never associated with Com-
munists fronts or made money
on surplus ship deals.
4) Is willing to "match my
patriotism" with that of his
Congressional critics.
Morris said he would not hold
any more news conferences un-
til he has some evidence of
wrong-doing to report.
"If I run into any evidence
of mis-doing, I'm not going to
keep that a secret and sit on
it," he promised.
His first act was to name
Lewis E. Yavner, former New
York City investigation com-
missioner, to his staff of in-
vestigators.
He met later with Donald
Price, Defense Department em-
ploye who will help guide him
through the complex maze of.
Federal Bureaus.
Price had assisted former
President Hoover on the special
commission for reorganization
of the government.
Morris has said his first ob-
jective In the cleanup will be
the Justice Department, the
ballwlck of McGrath who per-
suaded him to accept the
"housecleaning" Job.
The House Judiciary commit-
tee voted last week to Investi-
gate McGrath's handling of the
department, which has been
mentioned In connection with
tax scandals.
Rep. Patrick J. Hillings. (R-
Callf.) said yesterday the In-
quiry will Include the activities
of "certain Federal judges."
| Other developments:
Rep. Kenneth B. Keating (R-
N.Y.), sponsor of the investiga-
tion, urged Morris to give the
group "any factual data you
discover which you feel deserves
more thorough exploration." He
also offered to make the com-
mittee's subpoena powers avail-
able to Morris.
Treasury secretary John W.
Snyder said he is not aware of
any "flagrant cases" today of
tax collectors engagalng in out-
side activities. He added that he
believes the President's tax re-
organization plan, now pending
In congress, will help prevent
future scandals.
The House Ways and Means
subcommittee which first
brought widespread Internal Re-
venue irregularities to light
opened hearing yesterday in
Sam Francisco. The group will
study the actions of govern-
ment officials in regard to two
Federal grand juries.
Morris will not have aupoena
powers available to Congression-
al Investigators, but he said he
won't need them. .
He said he will go directly to
President Truman if he meets
any obstruction..
in discussing charges by Rep.
Charles E. Potter (R-Mich.)
that he let his name be used by
several Communist-front or-
ganizations, Morris said:
"I suppose this is an open
season on politicians, it being
an election year. Bat I hope to
keep my sense of humor."
He then took up the allega-
tions one by one, saying he had
never heard a thing about most
of the organizations.
He also denied ever making "a
single dollar" out of the China
International Foundation.
Morris is president of the
foundation, which owns all the
capital stock of the United
Tanker Corp., and uses its pro-
fits for philanthropic purposes.

i-**, ^
w*
>
(NEA TelephotO) '
NO AMUSEMENT TODAY The Coney Island Amusement Park, in Cineinanti. O., is flooded
by the Ohio River, which has reached 57 feet. That is five feet over the flood stage. The
river was still rising when this picture was made from a Coast Guard helicopter.
Secret Service 'Hoodlums
Smash Counterfeiting Ring
CHICAGO, Feb. 5 (UP)Secret| torney John 8
Service agents masquerading as County,
hoodlums have smashed a eoun.
terfelting ring that turned out
fake bonds and $3,000.000 worth
of bogus bills In four years, it was
announced today.
Harry D. Anheler, secret serv-
ice agent-ln-charge here, said
three men have been seized and
others are being sought.
:ru
Boyle of Cook
Within a month, Anheler said,
undercover agents made their
first "buy" of counterfeit money
from Skally.
They learned the bills were dis-
tributed throughout the nation
but principally in Chicago, New
York and the states of Pennsyl-
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ginia.
.*
plenty of tender
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CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP,
(ONOfNSfO fOP GRUIfR VilUi IO0K 0R THE RfO f.ND WHITE IAB1

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W \^99ttK w9 sWaw#' -W yen
Those arrested including Wil-
liam Skally, 41, Chicago, who the
agent said made a rendezvous
with undercover agents posing as
hoodlums early yesterday and
turned over $100,000 in fake
money.
The other two arrested were
held Incommunicado and were
not identified. Anheier said to re-
lease their names might jeopar-
dize the chances of making more
arrests.
Anheler said the ring turned
out good reproductions of bills 3 Die As Radio Tower
mostly in $10 and $20 denomina-
tions at a legitimate printing
establishment headed by an
owner who was a leader In the
rlnSL
"We know who printed the bills
and where their plant is." An-
heier said, but he did not dis-
close the location of the plant or
whether one of the unidentified
men arrested was the owner.
He added that six employes of
the firm were not aware that the
printing equipment was being
used for counterfeit purposes.
Besides the huge amount of
money, Anheier said, the ring
turned out phony cities service
bond certificates which were dis-
covered recently In New York.
The secret service, watchdog
arm of the Treasury Department,
began its investigation two
months ago after it was supplied I
tips by the office of state's at-1
"They even tried to get some
into international channela by
peddling to soldiers going over-
seas," Anheier said.
Bills bought by government
agents were obtained at a rate of
seven per cent, Anheier said, or
70 cents for a phony $10 bill.
Collapses During: Repairs
CARMAN. Manitoba, Feb. 8.
(UP)Three workmen repairing
a radio transmitter tower,
weakened when It was struck by
an airplane yesterday, were
killed today when the tower
collapsed.
Three Royal Canadian Air
Force men were killed yester-
day when their plane hit guy
wires supporting the tower.
Crusade For Freedom
Representatives of fraternal
and religious associations on the
solicitation committee of the
Isthmian Crusade for Freedom
meet at the Balboa YMCA 7:30
tonight.
. -' ....



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PLOUGH EXPORT. Inc.. a
recently organized company to
handle the sale of drugs and
other Plough products, has ap-
pointed Manuel Espinosa (a-
bove) to head its Panama of-
fice as general manager.
Under the new set up. all or-
ders for Plough products orig-
inating in nearby countries In-
cluding- Cuba. Ven e z u e 1 a,
Ecuador, will be sent through
the Panama office.
Espinosa has been responsi-
ble for selling Plough products
in the Republic for the last
several years.
George Ellis, 65,
Isthmian Old timer,
Dies At Cor gas
George Ellis, 65, a coxswain-
engineer for aids to navigation
on the launch Heron, died at
5:30 a. m. today at Gorgas Hos-
pital where he had been a pat-
ient since Jan. 26.
Greek-born, he was a natural-
ized Panamanian.
He had been on the Isthmus
for 45 yea, and lived at 111
Central Avenue.
He is survived by his wife and
several children.
Feneral arrangements were
not complete this morning.
Puerto Rican
Assembly OKs
Constitution
4 Defendants Get Suspended
Sentences On Leniency Plea
SAN JUAN, P.R., Feb. 5 (UP)
The Puerto Rican'Constituent
Assembly last night approved by
an 80-to-3 vote a new Constitu-
tion which took four monhts to
write.
The constitution gives the is-
land complete autonomy in ln
ternal matters and defines Its
status under the American flag
as a "Free Associated State."
Voting against the constitu-
tion were Hector Gonzalez Bla-
nes and Ramon Llovet, who are
opposed to Puerto Rico becom-
ing a state of the United States,
and Mario Orslni, Socialist.
The preamble of the constitu-
tion sets "the demcoratlc system
of government as fundamental
lor the Puerto Rican communi-
ty."
The document, which replaces
the present charter prepared by
the U.S. Congress, was drafted
by 02 delegates elected by pop-
ular vote among the Popular
Democratic, Statist add Socialist
parties.
The delegates met for the first
time on Sept. 17. 1951, the day
on which the 164th anniversary
ol the signing of the U.S. Con-
stitution.
The new constitution will have
to be submitted to the people
for ratilfcatlon by means of ple-
biscite, tentatively scheduled for
Feb. 25 to 29.
If it is ratified, as observers
predict it will, it will then have
to be further ratified by the U.S.
Congress.
John T. Waters, 73,
Retired Navy Employe
Dies In Hospital
John T. Waters, 78, a retired
Navy employe, died yesterday In
Gorgas Hospital where he had
been a patient since last Novem-
ber. Funeral arrangements have
not been completed.
He is survived by his sister,
Mrs. Royal, the wife of an em-
ploye1 of the Army Transportation
Service.
IN 6TH UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY
US Notches Unimpressive Points Victory
PARIS, Feb. 5 (UP)The
United Nations General As-
sembly ended its sixth annual
session here today.
It was the most disappointing
meeting on record.
The Assembly's final act was
to postpone all debate on Ko-
rea either till the Panmunjom
negotiators sign an armistice,.or
till the Western powers decide
Chat new measures against the
Communists are necessary.
Shortly before the Korean
decision the United States and
the world's colonial powers suf-
fered an unusual defeat when
the General Assembly adopted a
Soviet proposal that the Human
Rights convention contain a
promise that "all peoples have
the right to self determination."
The Asiatic, Arab and Latin
American countries supported
the five-nation Soviet bloc to
push t h e self-determination
clause through the Assembly by
36 votes to 11, with 12 absten-
tions.
The United States contended
that the Human Rights Com-
mission should be left free to
debate this provision, rather
than being forced to accept the
.i drawn "P by the United
Nations social committee.
The United States managed
to outpoint Russia by a safe but
unimpressive margin during the
sixth general assembly, but the
session itself was frustrated,
mainly by one thing: failure of
the Panmunjom negotiators to
*ri,ange an armistice in Kore.
There were confident hopes
when the assembly opened that!
a Korean armistice would be
signed midway in the session.
Observers agreed that an end
to the Korean war was a "must"
If East and West were to find
any .sizeable area of agreement
on cold war problems.
Soviet foreign minister An-
drei Y. Vishlnsky came back
from the Christmas recess to
demand U. N. intervention in
the Panmunjom talks. Soviet
delegate Jacob Malik declared
last Saturday that the "third
world war has in fact begun."
The United States and the
.Western-led majority scored
their most telling points on dis-
armament, collective security,
the case of United States cor-
respondent William M. Oatls,
who was imprlsloned by the
Czechs, and negatively
through the faux pas commit-
ted by Vishlnsky and his staff.
Russia also scored heavily on
the $100,000,000 United States
appropriation to help antl-Com-
munlst refugees, U. N. member-
ship, and through the rapidly-
developing antagonism between
Arab nations and the West.
Here is the assembly "tally
sheet" In terms of Russian and
United States gains:
UNITED STATES GAINS:
1) Disarmament The West
seized the initiative on disarma-
ment and came into the as-
sembly with a new design foe
arms reduction and atomic con-
trol. The proposal led to secret
Big Four disarmament talks and
a new disarmament commission
which held its first session to-
day.
2) Colleetive security West-
ern powers mustered over-
whelming support for the second
phase of U. 8. Secretary of state
Dean Acheson's plan to bolster
anti-aggression machinery in
the U. N. which cannot be block-
ed by a veto.
3) Oatis case Dr. Chan-
nlng Tobias, a 70-year-old Negro
Methodist minister, branded the
espionage conviction of the
United States newsman as "one
of the most flagrant violations
of freedom of information of
all time." His speech was in-
cisive and Impressive.
Alexel P. Pavlov of Russia
undercut his own cause by
charging Tobias with "Chicago
stockyards" behavior. It was not
a smart move In view of Rus-
sia's traditional role as "cham-
pion" of the American Negro
cause.
4) Vishlnsky's faux pasThe
Soviet foreign minister shocked
delegates early id the session
by stating that the Western
disarmament plan was so funny
that he stayed awake all night
laughing at it. The cynical re-
mark gained Russia no new
friends. .
Later Vishlnsky said he hoped
the four United 8tates fliers
then held by Hungary would be
tried by "our" authorities. West-
ern delegates seized the oppor-
tunity to point out that Vishln-
sky had as much as admitted
that Hungary was not a sover-
eign state, but an outright So-
viet puppet.
RUSSIAN GAINS:
1) The $lN,W,a United
States appropriation for helping
anti-Communists Russia em-
barrassed the United States by
charging the appropriation, a>
part of the Mutual Security Act,
was virtually an act of "aggres-
sion" against the soviet Union.
The United'States denied the
charge and was backed by the
U. N. majority on a' vote. But
many delegates voted for the
United States with tongue in
cheek, observing that Such a
bill should probably have been
passed in secret or not at all.
2) Membership- The political
committee approved a Soviet re-
solution to admit five.Red sat-
lites and nine Western ap-
plicants.
The United States managed
to defeat the resolution in the
full assembly, but there was a
growing belief that Russia's de-
mand for a "package deal" on
membership would have to be
accepted soon or later.
Russia has made It clear that
Italy and other nations will
draw Soviet vetoes in the
Security Council unless the
Western majority agrees to ad-
mit Hungary, Bulgaria, Alba-
nia, Romania and Outer Mon-
golia.
3) Voting Latin American,
European and Arab nations
showed an Increasing tendency
to abstain or vote against West-'
em proposals.
The Arab revolt hardened as
a result of the Anglo-Egyptian
dispute and. France's troubles
with nationalist movements in
Morocco and Tunisia.
Four defendants this morning
were given suspended sentences
in the U.S. District Court at
Ancon when Judge J. J. Hancock
acted upon the recommenda-
tions for leniency made by Act-
ing; District Attorney Kay Fish-
er-
A young American who' was
charged with subsequent of-
fense of taking a vehicle for tem-
porary use was Riven a six-
month suspended sentence and
placed on one year probation.
Charles Robert Norgan, 23. was
found guilty to "borrowing" a
Chevrolet sedan In Curundu last
March. The stolen car belonged
to Mrs. Beverly Dilfer of Las
Cumbres. He and a companion
drove the oar up to the Interior
of Panama but completely de-
molished the vehicle in an acci-
dent. Norgan has been in the
hospital with both legs m a cast,
and was released from the hospi-
tal recently. He limped Into
court this morning.
The defendant pleaded guilty.
He was represented In court by
Puttie Defender William J. Sher-
ldasi, Jr. Norgan had been pre-
viously convicted on two petty
larceny charges, battery, vagran-
cy and taking a vehicle for tem-
porary use.
A Panamanian embezzler who
stole $185 from the Chief Petty
Officers'Crab at Ft. Amador was
given a one year suspended sen-
tence and an admonition by the
Judge to cut down on his drink-
ing.
Celso Rafael Madroera, 47,
admitted taking the money "in
a weak moment." He was em-
ployed as bartender and cashier
slrtce last October. On the night
of Jan. 80 he put $185 of the
club's funds into a paper bag
and spent all but $59 of it on a
drinking spree In Panama.
The $59 was subsequently re-
turned to the club. Madroera
has no previous Canal Zone po-
lice record.
Another suspended sentence
six monthswas meted out to a
Edward Harewood. for a subse-
quent offense of possessing ma-
rihuana.
In acting on the govern-
ment's recommendation, Judge
Hancock pointed out to the de-
fendant that a new bill his
Just been introduced in Con-
gress that provides for life im-
prisonment for any person '
that is convicted of either hav-
in* marihuana in his posses-
sion or trying to sell it, after a
second offense.
Hancock warned the defendant
that If the bill becomes law and
Harewood is ever found with
marihuana again, he will be glv- I
en the life sentence.
The defendant, whose counsel
this morning was J. J. McGul-j
gan. was convicted on the same |
charge in 1943.
And for returning to the Canal)
Zone after deportation a 48-
year-old Colombian, Jose Isabel
Jacome. was fclffa a two-yea^
suspended sentence, placed
probation for five years, and or-
dered not to return to the Ca
nal Zone at any time.
Jacome, who pleaded that
came back on Dec. 11 of lasi
year in order to look for work (t
was picked up in front of tb|
Central Labor Office) was repre-
sented in court by Public De-
fender William J. Sheridan. Jr..
Trial on a grand larceny
charge for 26-year-old Amerlco
Gttrces. a Panamanian, was set
today for Feb. 36. He pleaded
not guilty to a charge of steal-
ing $15 by force from a youn
Panamanian girl at the Tivoli
Commissary.
' Also to be heard Feb. 26 is an
appeal on a charge of driving
while intoxicated charge against
an American woman, Mrs. Kath-
arine L. Kraemer, who was
found guilty In the Balboa Ma-
Jlstrate's Court Jan. 29. fined
100 and given a 30-day suspen-
ded jail sentence. The request
for postponement of the case waa
entered by Mrs. Kramer's coun-
31-year-old Panamanian. Prince sel, William J. Sheridan.
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