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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01370
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01370
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
"BRAN IFF
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AN INDlPlNDEN^:


$cagram$VO. :
J.DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

Now...6 Years Old!

rWENTY-SEVENXH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P- THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Panama Still
CZ Police Scour
Banks Of Canal
For Missing Man
BULLETIN The Secret Police announced this
afternoon that they had arrested Ake TornquUt In connec-
tion with the disappearance fit Gosta Videgaard. Tornqmst
is the shipping broker associate of Videgaard who had the
next room to the missing man at Hotel El Panama. The
arrest was carried out under orders of District Attorney Jose
M. Yasquex Diaz. No reason was given for the arrest.
A Canal Zone police launch was patrolling up and
down the banks of the Panam Canal at the end of Mira-
flores Locks today as the search for 60-year-old Gosta
Videgaard centered in that area following disclosure of
the first scrap, of information regarding the strange dis-
appearance of the Swedish shipping owner.
The only clue to the disap-
pearance was provided today by
Jimenez Pomare. a 32-year-old
Colombian employed by the Post
Engineer at Fort Kobbe who said
he was "almost certain" Vide-
gaard got off a Kobbe bus at Mi-
raf lores Bridge last Friday morn-
ing after he reportedly left Ho-
tel El Panama "to take a walk."
Acting on this information the
canal Zane *e .tewedWery
dispatched a launch to scour that
area in the event the missing
man had fallen Into the canal
and h> body washed up long j arn"bilsi to"hlTwet.~as"wel as
the. bank.
Extra policemen were posted
was secured from Canal Zone
police, and it was noted on the
caption that it was at least ten
years old and that Videgaard was
now white-haired and had a
heavily wrinkled face.
The missing Swedish engineer,
was last heard from Friday
morning at eight o'clock when
his buslnees associate Ake Torn-
A search of- his room revealed
that a considerable number of
travellers' checks, money in size-
Egyptian Cops
To Shoot First,
Rioters Told
CAIRO, Jan. 31 (UP) The
Egyptian government shook up
the nation's top security posts
todas, and warned unruly ele-
ments that the Army and police
forces would shoot at the first
signs of new disturbances.
Interior Minister El Maraghy
Bey said: "Unruly elements have
started spreading untrue rumors
about false incidents to spread
panic among the people, arw
thereby carry out criminal
plans."
He said Egypt was presently
quiet, and that the government
was in firm control of the situa-
tion.
Observers said Premier Aly
Maher Pasha was anxious to Im-
prove the general situation in
Egypt and to complete the for-
mation of a national political
front In order to pave the way
for negotiations on the Western
powers proposed Middle East de-
fense pact.
British officials said In Lon-
don today that signs were good:
for a resumption of negotiations
In the Anglo-Egyptian dispute.
Meanwhile the British Admir-
alty said there was no special
significance to the announce-
ment that Britain's Home fleet
was joining the Mediterranean
fleet at Malta In March.
Police On Guard
A PANAMA POLICEMAN helps his horse back to Its feet after It was toppled while a fellow
mounted policeman looks on, during yesterday's clashes between students and the police.
Press photographer Locksley Ferguson, who was arrested and later released last night, can
be seen atop a vehicle as he takes the picture of the fallen horse.
along the locks to aid in the
search and another boat was
to be launched in the blocked
off canal where the abandoned
third set of locks was begun.
Pomares who lives in Pueblo
Nuevo told The Panama Amer-
ican that he was on his way to
work Friday morning at about
8:30. and boarded a Ft. Kobbe bus
at the Tivoll crossing. As the bus
reached Ancon, a man who spoke
very little English got on and
asked the driver to let him off
at whatever spot he could "see
the canal."
The man who called himself a
"tourist" was wearing a cream
colored shirt, light trousers and
a Panama hat. When he removed
his hat, Pomare said, he noticed
the man had pure white hair.
Just as they passed to the west
side of the bridge, at about 9:30
Friday morning, the "tourist"
got off the bus and headed to-
ward the bridge.
Meanwhile, police were seek-
ing an American resident of
Cocoli who Pomare said con-
versed with the "tourist" all
the way from Ancon to the
bridge.
Pomare explained that the
reason he didn't notify the au-
thorities of the Incident earlier
was because the man he saw Fri-
day was "an old man and didn't
look much like the picture" pub-
lished in this newspaper.
The photograph of Videgaard
By Public Enemy
passport and papers were left \x\[ HAVANA Jan. 31 1951 (UP)
the room by Videgaard. A pair o i High-ranking Cuban government
bathing trunks belonging to the police and armv officials held a
missing man could not be found | ft n r r i e 41 y called three-hour
In the room and It was assumed. meeting laft night at Prime Mln-
that he took them along with lster 0scar aanc' office as a re-
sult of a radio interview given by
Cuba's so-caller! "Public Enemy
Number One," Pollcarpo Soler, to
local nevrman Luis Ortega.
The interview, the first sign of
life from Sold since his escape
from Jail Nov. 25, was a tape re-
cording made by Ortega.
The newsmun said he made the
recording after be accidentally
him.
Videgaard was wearing a tan
shirt, light trousers and a Pan-
am hatwhich tallied with
the description Pomare gave of
the passenger on the bus.
Videgaard lives in Stockholm,
Sweden,.where he owns the big-
gest office building. He also op- encount-red 8oler while travel-
erates a fleet of shrimp boats jng thror.gh the Matanzas Pro-
out of Lima, Peru. He was re- vince.
turning to Stockholm via Cuba
and Florida at the time of bis
disappearance.
CIO To Present
Goodwill Program
Over HOC Today
A 15-mtnute recorded pro-
gram, designed to promote
goodwill among workers of all
races and creeds, will be pre-
sented over HOG this after-
noon under the auspices of
Local 90. GCEOC-CIO.
The recording, entitled "Free
and Equal." will be heard at
5: IS during the "What's Tour
Favorite" request program. It
was produced- by the National
Labor Service.
In the Interview. Soler said "I
have escaped from the enemies,
not from justice. I followed the
advice of the good people of my
town (Matanzas) who have a
great affctlor> for me."
Soler, v.-no is campaigning for
a seat 'n the representative's
chamber, while a fugitive from
Justice, claimed he had saved
the llvei 'it the ex-president. Dr.
Ramn Orau Sanmartn, and
newspaperman Ramn Vasconce-
los when he persuaded their
would-be assassins to abandon
the plan
Czechs Lash Back At US
it-Case
PARIS, Jan. 31 -j (UP)
Czechoslovakia lashed back to-
day at a United States denun-
ciation of the imprisonment of
newsman William Oatis.
Czech delegate to the United
Nations Jiri Hajek. branded
Oatis part of a spy ring sent to
Czechoslovakia "to prepare for
a new war of aggression."
Hajek said it was revolting
that the United States should
accuse his country of violating
human rights, when all Czechos-
lovakia did was to counter "acts
recognized In all penal codes as
elements of espionage."
Anti-Democrats Raided
FRANKFURT, Jan. 3 (UP)
Police throughout West Ger-
many today raided all offices of
the Communist Party and also
of the neo-fascist Socialist
1 Reichs Party.
The United States yesterday
denounced the Jailing of Oatis
as "one or the most flagrant
violations of freedom of Infor-
mation in recent times."
Dr. Channlng H. Tobias, a
Negro minister member of the
American delegation, told the
U. N. Social Committee the en-
tire trial of Oatis. who was sen-
tenced to 10 years In a Czechos-
lavak prison as a spy, "was
staged." .
All the 37-year-old Associated
Press correspondent confessed
to, Tobias said, was "good re-
porting."
The American delegate re-
called the laughter that- ran
through the Prague courtroom
When a Czechoslovak "people's
court" heard the frail reporter
ask for clemency.
He reminded the delegates
that Russia's foreign minister
Andrei Vlshlnsky also "laughed
NY Bandits Snatch $ 194,000 In Gems
From 2 Women In Daylight Holdups
NEWs YORK. Jan. II (UP) _.
Three bandits posing as delivery-
men robbed a dress designer of
more than $94,000 in gems under
threat of death yesterday, in the
second daylight Jewel raid In
fashionable residential areas in
two days.
Two of the men forced Mollie
Parnls to give them the Jewelry
after they invaded her 11-room
duplex apartment on the pretext
of picking up a package of baby
blankets they claimed had been
delivered there by mistake.
They overlooked another $50.-
000 in Jewels, but took $1.000 in
cash that Miss Parnls had of-
fered them if they would not
take her Jewels.
"Why are you boys committing
a crime?" Miss Parnls asked aft-
er they burst Into her bedroom
while she was dressing. "I have
a son your age In college?"
"My mother needs an opera-
tion,'' ona, of the men replied.
Where's^he stuff."
"Don't take my Jewels," she
said. "They were hard to come
by. Pleas, take sons money."
With that, Miss Parnls took a lngston, in the high-priced dress
role of $1.000 In bills out of a manufacturing firm of Parnls-
pocketbook and offered It to the Livingston, was in her night
robbers.
"We'll take that tod." one of
them said. "We'll take every-
thing."
The third man held the butler
and cook at bay during the 30-
mlnutes the other two spent ran-
sacking Miss Parnls' room. Then
the three fled, leaving the de-
signer and her secretary locked
In a bathroom. The butler's wife,
who Is the cook, had fainted, and
he said he was so busy trying to
revive her that he could make no
effort to halt the thieves.
Only one day earlier, Mrs.
Scott Seammel was robbed by
an Intruder and was forced at
knife-point to give him nearly
ilH,M* In jewelry.
The Scammel apartment Is a
mile from the Parnls apartment.
The Parnls apartment U on the
ninth floor of a 12-story build-
ing at 75th Street and Park Ave-
nue.
clothes when the two men enter-
ed her room. Hilda Gould, Miss
Parnls' secretary led them to the
room at gunpoint.
Livingston was at his office
when the men entered the apart-
ment in what apparently was a
carefully planned robbery.
One of the three, all about 25
years old delivered a package at
the apartment's service entrance
at about 4 p.m. Tuesday, police
said. The maid found in It only
some baby blankets that had Just
been cleaned.
The "delivery man" returned
at 9:30 a.m. yesterday to pick up
the bundle. He" said tt had been
delivered to the Livingston
apartment by mistake.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kapp, the
butler and cook, admitted the
man and took him into the
kitchen.
"Do you mind If I wait a few
minutes," the man asked. "My
Miss Parnls, who Is associated i partner is in the building mak-
wlth her husband, Leon J. Uv- lng another pick-up."
A few minutes later, the
doorbell rang again and an-
other man entered the apart-
ment. The pair drew revolvers
rd he couldn't sleep" three
moriths ago when the West of-
fered a disarmament program.
"The world is beginning to
realize that laughter Is the new
Communist reply to all pleas of
the ordinary people of this
earth," Tobias said.
The American delegate de-
scribed Oatis' trial as "so phony,
so staged, so rehearsed that at
times the court Interprete ac-
tually ran ahead of his testi-
mony."
Declaring that he would "un-
mask the hypocrisy of the Unit-
ed States argument, Hajek pre-
sented what he called the facts.
He said Oatis had received
spy training In a United States
Army school.
(Tobias said last night this
consisted of a short course in
the Japanese language in pre-
peration for an assignment to
Tokyo.)
New Steel Cuts
In Britain May
Force Shutdowns
LONDON, Jen. 31 (UP) Many
British manufacturers complain-
ed today that tcey may have to
close as a result of Britain's new
super.-ansterify teel cuts, which
became effective today.
The manufacturers find the
'Joe' Maher
Joseph G.- Maher, well-known
Isthmian resident, died Tuesday
in Toledo, Ohio, according to
word reaching his wife, Mrs. Ga-
briela Maher, here yesterday.
Maher, 42, left here recently
to .undergo treatment in a To-
ledo hospital but Mrs. Maher
said he had already completed
the treatment and was visiting
with his mother, Mrs. Irene
Schlenz, when he died.
Up to today Mrs. Maher had
not received further details on
the death of her husband, ex-
cept for the cablegram she re-
ceived Tuesday, but she believes
his death was due to a heart
attack.
Maher, who was associated
with the Central Plumbing and
Supply Co. here, had been ailing
for some time, having been hos-
pitalized on several occasions in
local hospitals.
In addition to his wife and
mother, he Is survived by four
children: Joseph Anthony, Ga-
briela Victoria, Juliana and
Charles Edward.
Pope Stresses Need
For 'Really Human1
Business Principles
VATICAN CITY, Jan. 31 (UP)
Pope Pius said here today that
Windows Boarded;
Govt. May Declare
State Of Siege
-------o-------
Tension gripped Panamo City today following yes-
terday's and last night's clashes between the police and
rock-throwing high school students.
Some Central Avenue stores, which remained closed
nearly all day yesterday, were open today but their glass
windows remained boarded. Policemen stood at almost
every door.
However, the majority of stores remained locked and
barred.
In usually well-informed politicol circles there was
talk of the possibility that the Alcibiades Arosemena ad-
ministration would declare a "state of siege," suspend-
ing constitutional rights within the next-few days.
The suspension of individual;dependiente of vice presidential
guarantees would give the police,|can{Udate Norberto Navarro,
which up to now have been do-1 Another prlntety on West 4th
tag 'their best to avoid using i su-eet also was sbat at by ma-
force, a free hand to make ar-,raudln(? bands Of unidentified
rests and impose a curfew. (individuals.
Meanwhile. Public Works Min- Around 1 a.m. this morning an
lster Cesar A. Guillen. Liberal iattack was launched on the Na-
Matadero, submitted his resigna-|Uonal institute, which is being
tlon this morning. He gave as'iuaed ag headquarters by the
his reason the desire to return
to hi* seat in the National As-
sembly.'
Pubfle Health Minister Juan
A. Galindo. has been appointed
to act until a new minister is
appointed to replace Guillen.
The city woke up this morning
to find that 25 youths, some non-
students caught in the act of
throwing rocks had been arrest-
ed during the night. Fourteen
policemen were slightly injured
by flying stones and four stud-
ents were hospitalized when the
gas tank of a car they overturn-
ed exploded.

Near National Avenue early
this morning the sound of shots
were heard when a group of ar-
med men. allegedly transported
in government vehicles attacked
a prlntery owned by the opposi-
tion Partido Revolucionarlo In-
high chool students who went
on a rampage yesterday WJmb
they faSed to see President Aro-
(OootfftMd *** g,Ct 31
Coco Slito Woman
Is 2nd Polio Case
Within One Week
The second polio victim in
a week was hospitalised at
Gorgas yesterday afternoon.
The tl-year-old woman
who lives hi Coco SoUto is not
in an iron lung.
She comes from the same
area as the 25-year-old wo-
man of Coco Solo who was
admitted at Gorgas last week
as a polio patient, bat there
is no connection between
them.
Key Federal Agencies Approve
Draft Stay For Apprentices
controls imposed by Winston i there is a need for a greater ap-
Church.ll's Conservative Govern-
ment no more palatable than
those of the Labor government.
"It aeens th?t various boards
and Government departments
who ought to be trying to help
are dolnp; their utmost to iron
plication of Christian and'real-
ly human" principles in rela-
tions between employers and
employes.
Addressing the National Coun-
cil of the Christian Union of
out all business" complained a I Business Owners and Managers,
n^hl^T^o^18 manufacturer,the Pope said the evil of the
'^saf^had asked for ^^T^SicT^^
tons of fteel, ar.d had been allot-1 Ph** technical and eco-
ted one a..d one quarter tons.
Britain'r National Union of
Manufacturers announced:
"The Ministry of 8upply has
taken into account that these
wnere cu^ ^.g join? to cause a certain
they met Miss Gould. |amount of unemployment.
The house telephone rang ahd "Many manufacturers of metal
one of the robbers answered it- goods have b!"i given no allo-
The doorman said another man cation of steel whatsoever, and
nomlc factors.
on the Kapps and took them
into the living room,
was downstairs and the robber
gave instructions to send him up.
A toothless man wearing a
wind-breaker then entered. He
drew a knife and held the cook
and butler while the other
thieves forced Miss Gould to go
up a winding staircase to the
second floor to Miss Parnls'
apartment.
Miss Oould knocked on Miss
Parnls' door and was told to en-
ter.
"What Is that man doing In my
bedroom?' Miss Parnls shrieked
at one of the robbers, while the
other stayed In the hall. "Get
him out of here. I want to talk to
you."
Then both the men stepped
forward and told her they want-
ad her jewelry.
are now l^oklnK round for some-
thing else to do."
Ircn Closes All
But One Center
Of US Information
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31 (UP>
Iran has ordered the closing
of all United States Information
services and cultural centers In
that country except those In
Teheran.
The State Department an-
nounced this move today, but
did not comment on what effect
it might have on relations be-
tween the two countries.
PC Locks To Have
4th Operating Crew
A fourth lock operating
crew will be added at Mira-
flores Looks starting Snn-
ay, it has been announced
v R. C. Stockham, Chief of
the Locks Division.
The additional force is ne-
cessar\ because of the high
volume of traffic, he said.
A total of 4t workers are
being employed for the new
crew, including IS U. S. rate
and 26 local-rate employes.
With the addition of the
fourth crew, two crews will
work on each of two shifts,
on* shift working from 7
a.m. to S p.m. in the after-
noon and the other, from 3
to 11 p.m.
Each of the three crews-
formerly at Miraflores work-
ed en a different shift.
Deferment of labor apprentices
from military service on a basis i
similar to the deferment provi-
sions now in effect for college
students has been approved by;
key federal agencies, according to
story in a recent issue of the
American Federation of Labor's
"News Reporter" reaching the
Isthmus today.
The Panama Canal Company
now has about 58 young men
working as apprentices in vari-
ous crafts, a Balboa Heights
spokesman said today in re-
sponse to a query from The
Panama American.
The News-Reporter said that
an Executive Order" carrying out
the new policy has been submit-
ted for President Truman's sign-
ature.
This step was taken after the
Selective Service System and the
Labor-Management Policy Com-
mittee had agreed on the word-
ing of the new regulations.
The News Reporter's story
went on to say:
"This development is a signal
victory for the American Federa-
tion of Labor's efforts to place
the draft deferment system on a
more democratic basis.
"Originally, .the AFL took a
firm position against seeking
JAMES A. BROWNLOW, Pres-
ident of the AFofL Metal
Trades Department, whose call
for corrective action is getting
results toward draft deferment
for craft apprentices.
deferment for anyone from mil-
itary service. However, when the
Government decided that large
numbers of college students in
the upper half of their classes in
scholastic ratings would be ac-
corded at least temporary de-
ferments, the unfairness of the
sluatlon became manifest.
ticeshlp, called for corrective
action.
"His recommendations were
approved by that committee and
submitted In turn to the Labor -
Management Manpower Policy
Committee. In that group the
new policy was vigorously ad-
vocated by George Lynch. Pres-
ident of the Patternmakers
League of North America; Lewis
G. Hhies. special representative
Not onlv.labor organizations, of the AFL. and Michael Fox, re-
but .educators, public officials presenting the Railway Labor
and the press pointed out that
young men who could not af-
ford to go to college were being
discriminated against merely be-
cause of their economic status.
"James A. Brownlow. president
of the AFL Metal Trades Depart-
ment, who serves on the Federal
Advisory Committee on Appren- tlve order.
Executives Association. Finally
the plan was approved by both
Gen. Lewis Hershey, head of the
Selective Service System and by
the manpower committee
"Details of the new regulation
will not be disclosed until Pros*
ldent Truman signs the exi




"j-JtCE TWO
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tlHl MANAMA AMERICAN -ifa TW>iNtSENT DART iftWSPAPER ______
iOM.....
THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 1951

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Labor News
And
Comment
By Victor Riesel
j MAN ABOUT TOWN
Orson Welles' current romance is Kits Hayworth's double in
Rome. She is Italian Airlines hostess Gi.ia Lud-.vici. .Joan Craw-
fords most ardent Romeo is San Franci.-c.. NCiuHto Bradley Ful-
ler, who inns to Movietoun regularly to fight MM J*5kV-
Martha Stewarts movie husband has f ny ^ '"e,A"
amicable abrogation. It's a boy for the Wilbam Lowes lies
Loo"s me The Marcus Goodriches (Olivia De Havi'land) are
sorrv to disappoint the rumor spreaders The John Wajne melt-
ing will feature a Mexican movie actress Marilyn Maxwell, the
thins/, has that Lohengrin look. He to**JWN*9M*
Bend in the River" Gary Cooper and Pat Neal are still steady,
inc. Mrs. Coopers coait rendeivous are with Peter UBWW...
Vikkie Dugan. the coyer girl at tiro's. Maml B-ach. establUhed
Fla. residence for her freedom.
The Cables: Anthony Eden and the woman all London ex-
pected him to wed (Mrs. Lionel Fitzslmmons. nave cancelled tt
P Jean Paul Sartre and Emmy Werner an Anirr can. have Pans
buizing .. Just resigned Ambassador to Spain y riff is and Paulet-
te Goddard have hid enough.. Edda ciano.Mussolini's dghtr is
involved In a triangle about to break in It...MHriMul
wMow may merge with Murvln Marvin, a U S. businessman
Prince Stdi Bukl 14 year old Kenya Colony Potentate, married
two belles last week.
Gen Eisenhower's former Girl Friday. Ka> Summersby (now
working in a local dept. store), jilted Tuft forres attempting to
"woo" her Architect Jeffrey Fulton is building Clamsa New-
ten's castles in the air. She's a college gel.. Virgin. Hills new
agony followed threats to snatch her children.. Mickey Rooney-s
persistent pleas for a reconciliation with Martha Vlckers h,s ex.
. re stymied hecause of a sports announcer. Madcap Merry unr-
' Ser 1 tack to sue a renowed dermatologist for a $50,000 invest-
ment that didn't jell...Betsy Cushentarry ex-El Morocco hat-
chick and Peggv Yancie. who clashed over a French poodle, will
fight it out in Supreme Court Joe E. Lewis .ays he hasn't made
a bet since April, the bookies' worst news atece *, H
I Gvpy Rose Ue decides to change rooms fir I Roanoke, Va., high school teacher.
New York SUte license registration (lor the first time) re-
' quires the color of your car. All paint Jobs during the year must
I h. jotted down .. Ruthrauff & Ryan, the ad agency, now has 39
r*0one for eyery doten suffers.... Tho quick closing of
"Month of Sundays" in Philly trapped several mag drama pages
which tried to help it...The Russian Embassy people (Park Ave
in the 60s) must wonder if the street itpairlng out front is a
orm of criticism. Been going on for a season or longer.. .Justice
ert exec Philip Marcos was in Buffalo with Rob't Patterson on
he same anti-trust case. He cancelled his ^""Jg"
.which wrecked) and took the train. Patterson did II III WW
f.nd died.. Some swank university clubs are battling card sharps.
'he technique is to get members (picke.l up at bars) to invite
them over for "badge".. Nati H'qoarters of the Comm.es order-
ed members to "become active in church groups.
" Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck tell chums re-marriage
OTjld be a mistake.. .The Morton Magulres (he's the mag essay-
rt) tried hard, but it didn't click. Sne'.s In Las Vegas .Bobby
arry and Holiywoou's Jacqueline Parks ire a local portrait, but
' ost to get their names In the paper.. .Joe E. Lewis finally gave
iro's Lviiimi ucacui the Hit it needed.. Lena Homes debut at
i M Clover was big. too. Her first time in. the 'IwSoui and
>ie packs the place...The Cholly Knickerbockers jD"rah, Wat-
..-) are beating Gene.Tierney and Brother Oleg Cassinl to the
"; .citing court. Darrah will file in Tennc.is?e... Mario Lanza shel-
1 >d 45 lbs. In 10 weeks. Won't stop until ho scales at *
I naplin who used to frown on newspaper and mag people crash -
- g his studio while making a film, now invites them dally...
' T)R Hyde Park" is the title of a film aoon due. To be shown on
evy and at schools and colleges. The P.unyon Fund will share
; the profits.. .Abdul M. Hassan, press attache for the Egyptian
'. legation at the UN, and songstress Nancy^Kced are Yes In-
. iedy.. ."Mammy" han been banned by a network. Pressure from
i >gro leaders.
Pentagon people are concerned over the fate of our air bases
I No. Africa if France is forced out by Moslem rioters etc. The
:b. Harper's has more on this situation. .The 4th Estate Res-
, urant on E. 41st is backed by some Daily News editors. The
< N. Stablers (both are on the Herald Trlb) will be J in March
'Wish You Were Here," the new Josh Logan musical, wont
'. /out-tour. Three weeks of previews and then the critics.. .The
', knockout in champ Sandy Saddler's life is Rosetta Perry, the
callure with Lionel Hampton's crew. Nwporters are tch-
i aing breathlessly about a socialite, who Is begging for headlines
.ifin-r Navv brass wives...l\ S. Attorney Mvles Lane, one of
burg's most eligible bachelors, has a new c:ise. She's Gloria
- - ess. formerly married to Basil Heatter,
n of the commentator.
l.:e Republicans hope to find campaign dvnimite In the late
I :iatcr Vandenburg's private papers. They'll be published In
ireh Elmer Bobst, top man at Richard Hiidnut. Is the latest
shlfc from Taft to Ike.. .The Wilbur Evanses (In London's "So.
'; i ") will have another Image In the Summe'.. .Looks like Judy
I srland will terminate her Palace run in mid-Fco.. aKer ail...
e K\ ardson. fashion ed. at Look, and Pnntice-Hall exec. G.
i Lukeman were united last week...The Jurtln Gilberts of the
iror have agreed to forget it.. .Mrs. T. Mander. estranged from
r mate (and aufleh British), finds consolation with Russell
.: pe, who Is getting expert at hand-patt'ng.. .Edna Poe Sugar-
-n (he's the ex-chlef at Universal Pictures i will take the Re-
,i vocalne this week. This col'm Itemed their romance, marriage,
I :ed event and now the final.
Walter Wlnchell has been ordered by his own doctor and
1 rt specialists to take an Immediate and complete rest from
i activities. He hopes to resume shortly.
'I.H I rOUI> OltUM THI RtADtWS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
1.* Mail I " term* to, rtaoart t Tk Pnm Amir-
M C.itsn ' rtiv^ rltull and art hsnllM ia a whollj BOB
i J#b..iI ataaaai.
Ir ru conlr,bf leHBf 'out b impatient rt M ain't ap*<*' '
'. n.-x day. Letten an aublnhad IB the order receded
PhMBB try tO kp the latlin limrtad to an page MNBth.
Identity ot letter wrrter n held In itnct'it tontiaincl
Thi newipoper ammii na reipontibilify fat itatementi ar opinlanl
e preued ia letter! trom rendan.
"t X!0 SLITO CIVILIANS MUST
BN IN THEIR FURNITURE
: ill Box Editor
K nama American
J. r Sirs:
The bachelors of Diablo sure
4 ive reason to feel as. they do,
, X listen to what happened to
v chelors and civilian families
jrklng at the Coco Solo Naval
i iae and who rent from the Co-
f j Slito housing project.
A fr Bays before' the New
. jar a%*ote was left on their
i or-stepo Informing each that
; e thty were only civilians
. :elr furniture down to their
:ds would be taken from them
; ; Jan. 15th.
Since Army and Navy families
I Mild soon be due to fill the
i st of the apartments In Coco
', jlito, and since a couple hun-
ed apartments need furniture.
e 20 to 30 civilians would have
i give up their Navy furniture
i help furnish the couple of
i TUltlted apartments. Now, they
Isaid to the bachelors and others,
since we can't get more money
from Uncle bam for furniture,
because Uncle Sam has to give
money away to other countries,
you sleep on the floor or spend
a thousand dollars for your own
lurnlture.
We don't care If you are down
here on an 18-month contract,
spend your extra dough you
have saved on furniture or sleep
on the floor.. Of course don't
forget to pay those $25 to ISO a
week Income taxes from your
salary or we can't throw your
money around up there In
Washington too.
One suggestion, you can go to
the Canal Company and buy the
old termite furniture from them.
The termites win enjoy all those
frame buildings In Coco Slito.
Broii.ers. we sympathize with
you but we got troubles too!
Guess they dont want us down
here I Right?
TharoBghly Dtsfweted.
BOSTON A multi-million
dollar section of the Commun-
is.s' labor apparatus, which
has terrorized small business-
men and department stores
right across the land with 100-
man flying goon squads, is split
wide open today, 1 learn here
from National CIO leaders
gathered fo the convention of
their Retail, Wholesale and
Department Core Union.
// is now possible to rt-
veal that a or~-man rtbel-
lion inside ttu.1 pro-Soviet
union network, v> r^-vi to
deprive the Communist
Party's most fervent sup-
porters, of a huge treasury,
of hundreds of fobs vital to
the very existence of the
pro-Soviet propaganda ma-
chine, of a sprawling build-
ing jocularly known as
"the Little Kremlin" a
headquarters replete with
bars, a night club, special
meeting halls and hide-
away rooms long used for
recruiting and other es-
sential services.
That multl million dollar
rcasury was amassed by a tax
on employers' payrolls. Starting
at 3 per cent years ago It was
Jumped to 8 1-2 per cent of
total wages paid and now Is
about to go to 10 per cent.
Any businessman who resist-
ed was threatened with physic-
al viol(i:('. riotous raids, injury
to elderly relatives and perse-
cution by midnight telephon-
ing.
Exposure In this column of
that terror has led to a Senat-
orial Investigation, results of
which will startle the country
shortly.
So powerful Is this Stalinist
union that the New York Police
simply would not protect busi-
ness offices and factories under
its assault.
There are cases where the
police deliberately turned their
backs as the union's strong
arm men beat women attempt-
ing to enter plants to do a
day's work.
And It's lo the everlasting
shame of a handful of Team-
sters' 11 ion leaders, that they
defied their national officers'
warning and advice, and co-
operated with this leftist com-
bine. Why? You need only one
guess for this payoff answer.
The one-man revolt la led by
a relatively unknown ex-ally
of tho Communists, by name
of Arthur Osman.
To those' Inside labor it will
come as startling news that
he has broken with his Party
friends and Is out to smash
them!
This means that he is at-
tempt I 53 to drive the Com-
monls'.s from control of the
wealthy Distributive, process-
ing and Office Workers Union
(Independent).
This is the outfit Into which
the pro Communists dumped
all their smaller unions after
being ousted from the CIO.
Into this catch-all labor
network went the pro-So-
viet white collar workers
which controlled social ser-
vice agencies and movie
company business offices;
the pro-Soviet Federal em-
ployes union used to infil-
trate our government: the
cannery and fruit pickers
outfit used to exploit for-
eign language communities,
and the retail workers, who
were the basis of the great-
est union take of all.
On their salaries, the union,
known popularly as District
65, would charge up to 10 per-
cent rnd take It from the boss
as a re.lrement fund.
Trouble Is that very, very
few retail workers stay In the
trade more than a few years.
This has left the pro-Soviet
outfit some $8,000,000.
As the Communists lost con-
trol of other unions, their
manpower was dumped more
and more Into District 65.
Finally. Arthur Osman and
his aide. David Livingston, the
man who helped organize the
early pro Communist "Bring
the Boys Back Home" maneuv-
er In the Orient in 1945 so
we'd have no armed forces In
and around Korea, decided to
break with the Party's people
In the union. They began fir-
ing some comrades. The Dally
Worker atacked them. They
counted noses. The score on the
top controlling union board was
17 for the Commle-llne and 7
against.
Leadtng the fight for the
party people is a vtnornus
Soriet-er known as Esther
Let-, the woman who per-
mitted fvqitive Communist
Parly bi*,s, Ous (Dynamit-
er) Full, to hide in her
apar ment She's the one
who led the first American
delenatton to last May
Day's Red Square celebra-
tion in Moscow. Receiving
honors due her, she was
T>laced in a reviewing spot
only 300 feet from the man
in her life, chap by name
of Joseph Stalin.
One night, two weeks, ago.
the Pprty people and the Os-
msn bloc had a showdown.
It is now a fight to the fin-
ish.
/-d the Party can be expect-
ed to use tough tactics, brother
They have no ethics.
A Grava r::.-onsibljty
Cutting Comments
By BOB RUARK


i
NEW YORK. A lady acquaintance by the
Improbable name of Miss Little Eagle has just
swooped in, looking as if she had been convict-
ed of collaboration with the enemy or, at
best, had stumbled into the hands of a student
barber suffering from the nervous twitch.
Miss Little Eagle, an ordinarily handsome
female if you like Indians, ran her hands
through the prickly stubble of her quondam
crowning glory and announced proudly: "How
do you like my new Airedale cut?"
"I thought It was a poodle cut these days,"
sczzl. "No," sez she, "this Is newer still. An
Arcdale cut is shorter than a noodle cut. What
do you think of It?" i
"It is ravissant, not to mention tres sezzl, waiting for a bolt of lightning to strike
me dead.
"It has a certain je ne sals quo! that should
make you irresistible to any Airedale you might
happen to meet.
"If you look like anything at all it Is possibly
Mr. Garry Moore, the actor fellow, who has been
chopping off bis locks that way ever since he
suffered from debilitating dandruff as a small
child.
"I am fond of Mr. Moore," says she, "but I
do not think he is beautiful."
"That," sezzi, "is more or less what I had In
mind."
This seemed to affront Miss Little Eagle whose
ancestors once scalped mine, for which sin of
overexuberance the Oklahoma lady has done
gone and scalped herself, In company with a
lew hundred thousand other female devotees of
high style.
I reckon the priestesses of this new coiffure
tult must be paying penance of a sort, for cer-
tainly no lady In her normal state of self-esteem
would allow such wanton destruction of her
locks as la exemplified by the current vogue In
distaff haircuts.
If you have not yet seen these atrocities at
close hand, they are accomplished by running
the cUppers over the female skull, leaving an
inch or so of bristle. This Is confined Into tight
little peppercorns of curls or else Is allowed to
stick up like a Comanche's topknot.
In either eventuality it is hard to tell that
you are looking at a woman. A poodle, yes. An
Airedale, yes. Or maybe even jerry Lewis. But
not a dame.
I know that some savage ladies painstakingly
shave their scalps with old paring knives or
slivers of glass, but this is not done so much
to enhance the beauty of their knotty little
skulls as to discourage a prevalent of assorted
wild life.
The modern American miss can claim no such
practicality In her deliberate defacement of her
tresses, not unless she publicly admits to the
ownership of lice. She is Just making herself
look ugly for fun.
If I were a mrryln' man, I do not believe
that I would choose up a life partner who had
just screwed her curls Into a neat facsimile of
a Prussian>offleer. '"' "'
All they need-today is a few saber scars and
a straight neck to be a ringer for Eric von fltro-
helm got up in his"aunt's old clottles.
With the new. chic poodle cut, a man suc-
cessfully resists the urge to bury his face in the
glossy head foliage of his beloved. Might as
well stick your kisser in a sandspur patch.
Nobody has successfully explained why women,
and especially American women, do these horrid
things to themselves, unless something weighs
heavily on their consciences for which they wish
to stone.
Maybe they are atoning for the old New Look,
which drove' so many males Into permanent
bachelorhood.
Or maybe that It is just a mass madness, re-
sult of restless discontent, which perennially af-
flicts the female, causing her to do outlandish
things to herself out of progressive pique.
There is not very much to rearrange on the
average female chassis, without running Into ex-
pensive plastic surgery or at least a radical cor-
setiere, and so they fiddle with hair styles and
paint their eyelids green and their fingernails
black.
Whatever it is, it gains them few male cus-
tomers at the box office of eventual matrimony,
which I believe to be the major compromise of
the conflict between the sexes.
A semi-scalped female may be all right In a
side show, but she would scare hell out of you
on the pillow across the way.
Go ahead, girls. Keep monkeying with your
natural resources and you'll wind up talking to
yourselves, because the cat and the canary that
!;o hand-in-hand with splnsterhood won't be
Istenlng, either.
Row Over Formosa
By iostph and Stewart Alsop
WA8HINOTON-The row which has been kick-
ed up in Britain over Japanese recognition of
Chiang Kai-shek is a peculiar parable of inter-
national misunderstanding.
It is being charged publicly in the British press
and privately in British ohslal circles that
Japanese Prime Minister Yoshida has been forc-
ed to recognize the Chinese Nationalists by the
Americans, and specifically by State Department
consultant John Foster Dulles.
It Is being further charged that this pressure
has been brought to bear desplt* a prior Ameri-
can promise that the Japanese woula be left free
to choose between the Nationalists and the Chi-
nese Communists.
By Implication Dulles Is thue being accused of
having acted in bad fa.th In fact, this is simply
untrue.
And because the tensest an'a of disagreement
between Great Britain and' this country is still,
despite the Churchill vhlt, in the Far East, the
true story is worth telllnj
The fact Is that before' Dulles left for Britain
last June, to try to negotiate a Japanese treaty
with the British, the Japanese government had
already made up Its mind. Premier Yoshida had
already signified that Japan would extend at
least limited recognition to Chlcng Kai-shek In
Formosa.
This fact was perfectly well known to the Bri-
SSL fore,8n Office, of courso including then
British Foreign Minister Herbert Morrison.
Morrison was nevertheless still determined If
possible to prevent Japrnese recognition of tha
Chinese Nationalists. When Dulles saw him in
June, therefore, Morrison proposed that Japanese
foreign relations become the responsibility of a
commission in a Pacific pact, which was to in-
clude Australia and New Zca'and as well as
Japan.
By this device, the Japanese government's
hands were to be tied, as far as recognizing
_,nlsn was concerned.
Du' unhesitatingly rejected this proposal.
"Hb said that there was no reason why the Paci-
fic Commonwealth countries should assume the
redponsitmiLics oi uie uii.teu otates, wnicn nan
atttr au p.a>< u uy iar the gieatest part in win-
ning tne i'aciiic war.
Auu ne said also that the Japanese had every
rlghv to cnoose to rtco^mxe the Cninesa Na-
tionalists, u iiii'y wisne-i to (to zo.
Dunes ieit London wunout an agreement, and
then m-i.ison m euect gave in. ne accepteu tne
Japanese pact, ne per-iuueu tne onuiu caoinet
to agree to it on uie uj.-is mat tne Japanese
wouia ne tree to cnoose oetween the two vcuitut
governments.
But ne omitted to potm out the essential fact
that uie Japanese i.aa in enect nireaay cnosen.
Tnereailer, Dunes made a further effort to
reacu a clear understanding with tne Bntian. he
sent State Department Far Eactern expert Liv-
ingston Mercnant to London in order to try lor
a Common lront on ilin.ted Japanese recogni-
tion of tne e-orinoia .-egime. Merchant's nego-
tiations with the oreigu owice officials came
to notnlng.
liieieaiter, last December, Dullee went to Ja-
pan, ana tnea again k, reacn agreement on
the Issue with Sir fcsler Denning, chief Britisn
representa uve in Japaa, ano a principal arcnl-
tect of Britisn policy in Asia.
These efiorts also came to nothing.
Meanwhile, Senators John Sparsjnan and H.
Alexander Smith, who had accurapanied Duiles,
were taking a strong line with Premier Yoshida.
They told nim that, m order to get the Japanese
pac through Congress, there would have to be
some assurance that the Japanese government
would recognize the Nationalist, rathar than the
Communists.
Accordingly, after Dulles had already left
Japan, Yoshida wrote him a letter, promising
that the Japanese would extend limited racog-
ultlon to Chiang Kai-shek's sovernment. as the
effective government of Formosa. This letter ar-
rived during the ChurchlJ visit, and it was shown
to British Foreign Minister Anthony Eden.
^w WASHMTOH
MERRY- GO- ROUND
jrtJtIW MARION
I
Drew Pearson says: Taft strength hit peak prior to San
Francisco meeting, now is declining; State Department
now scrutinizes gifts to White House; Army developing
troop carrier planes to land on open fields.
WASHINGTON. Impartial GOP observers who watched
the jockeying of Taft and Elsenhower foices It the San Frn
Tan los?"ground Strategy I?etlnK' came to the conclusion thai
There were three reasons for their conclusion-
i -j T&t d.lc? n.,ot fh^w up to greet the Polticos."The Senator
had become irked at Chairman guy Gabrlelson for opening up
the conference to all candidates; so ended up by giving the
gathering the cold shoulder. If he had attended, shaken &n*
slapped a few backs, been one of the crowd, nt might atoos.
have sewed up the nomination.
2) Vic Johnson moved Taft's headquarters from the Fair-
mont Hotel where the mam meeting was neld, to the Mark Hon-
klns Hotel. It rained most of the time and a lot of the poli-
ticians did not go outside the Fairmont.
3) Dave Ingalls' speech against "glamor" and "sex appeal"
candidates left a bad taste with the more moderate Republic-
ans, especially the women.
*v. tTh,ough.the Peech was aimed at Eisenhower, It happened
that Gov. Earl Warren of California, a statusque and hand-
Eoine figure, sat on the platform at the time of delivery and
many people thought it was also directed at him.
There was considerable sympathy for Elsenhower and War-
ren as a result of Ingalls' speech.
*. D.urti!g.tn.? F*" Francl:o meeting it was also noised about
Hvi v. n *Si l08t considerable strength, including Louisiana.
Oklahoma, Texas, and Indiana, which he has been listing as
3UTC
Some GOP polticos think that Taft has reached his high
point and that the slide downward has definitely begun
Others counter that the Elsenhower forces are poorly or-
ganized and it will take a lot of fumbles on Taft's part to lose
NO MORE FLAGS
Though the White House has not hesitated about accent-
ing various gifts, including deep freezes, in the past, the State
Department has now stepped in to regulate such gifts as Ko.
rean flags.
i TP,was the h^covcry i freshman Congressman Al 8iem-
inski of New Jersey, the only Korean war vet in Congress, when
he wanted to send a present to President Truman.
. ..v8 em.]5kl' Bn infantry major In Korea, waj invited to an all-
faith religious gathering in South Korea Just before he returned
to the United States.
r. ,e.had Juat been ekcted to Congress and, as a parting gift.
South Korean citizens gave the congrest.man-e.ect a "prayer of
thanksgiving," painted on silk In native Korean symbols
The prayer thanked the American people and their govern-
ment for saving South Korea from "the bestial tyranny of the
Communists."
'TU give this to the President," happily promised Bieminskl.
When he tried to carry out this promise, however, the State
Department put a damper on his plans. Sleminskl was informed
that the "proper" thing to do was to give the silken scroll to tho
State Department's chief of protocol, who would in turn present
it at the White House.
Rather than go through this red tape the Korean war vet-
congressman angrily did nothing.
When he called upon the President recently, however he re-
counted the story.
"That was two years ago," the 39-year-old Jerseyite told
Traman. "But the scroll is still yours it you want it, Mr. Presi-
dent." .-.,-
"I certainly do," replied Truman, ^firing it with you the next
time you call on meand don't bother che Department." ^
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
General Elsenhower told friends in Paris the other day that
the man who ought to be President of the USA. was Paul Hoff-
man, the former ECA administrator, and from the tone of his
vplce he really seemed' to mean B.-
Young Republicans of Allegheny County. (Pltiabflrgh}1; re
raising money by raffling off tickets to a. mink scarf. The tickets
read: "I want to wear a mink tool" Drawing day for the raffle, la
March 15, income-tax day.
Correction: Al Hayes, head of the Machinists Union, was not
present at the meeting with AFL president Bill Green which dis-
cussed labor strategy in the Presidential race. The error is re-
gretted.
The racketeers are raising a slush fund to lobby against Sen-
ator Kefauver'8 bill to charge royalties on juke-box music. (Tho
acketeers have infiltrated into the juke-box ousinessand don't
want their profits cut in on.)
The National Association of Manufacturers will turn on tho
heat uuring the current congress to kill price controls. Senator
Capehart of Indiana spilled the beans on this by talking too loud
about the NAM's secret strategy.
It's been more than a month since Democratic naltonal chair-
man Frank McKinney walked out of the Whit.* House and an-
nounced that there would be a wholesale housecleanlng of cor-
ruption. So far, no results.
TROOP-CARRYING PLANES
A giant new type troop-carrying transport plane which can
land In open fields has recently been ordered that will make the
U.S. Army the most mobile in the world.
One order was placed by the Air Force with Kalser-Fraser for
37S new C-123 assault transports which can carry up to 24,000
Sounds on 750-mile hops, landing on a 400-foot runway and tak-
lg off on a runway of only 700 feet.
The plane, developed at Eglln Field, Fla.. li designed to take
large quantities of troops either behind enemy lines or close to
them.
Simultaneuosly, the Army has ordered test models of a new
"convert-plane" which can land almost v<= rtlcally, yet fly almost
at airplane speed. The models will be mada by Bell and Grumman.
This new tactic of fast-moving troops was developed in part
by Gen. James M. Gavin, now chief or staff, allied forces In
southern Europe, though the concept first saw the light of day
In a memo by Cant. Amos Heacock of the 64ih Troop Carrier
Squadron in World War II. ___
ALIEN PROPERTY PROBE
The Senate Judiciary Committee will decide whether to pry
the lid off another government scandalthe handling of mil-
lions of dollari worth of war-seized German and Japanese pro-
Actually, the investigation was all but ordered behind closed
doors by Chairman Pat McCarran, Nevada Democrat, but Sen.
Warren Magnuaon, Washington Democrat, obtocted that he had
just read the resolution for the first time and wanted more time
He also suggested that Attorney General McOrath should bff
asked for comment.
This brought an Indignant snort from Sen. Homer Ferguson,
Michigan Republican, who pointed out that McC-rath Is In charge
of alien property and shouldn't be consulted sbout an investiga-
tion of himself. .... ^.
This, however, had already been done by Wiley, who banded
out a confidential memo on his private talk with McGrath.
"I had the opporunlty to discuss (alien property) personally
with Attorney General J. Howard McGrath, our former colleague
here on the judiciary committee," Wiley's memo reported.
"He commented In a cordial, friendly manner, and I believe
helped at least partially to clear up some of the points which I
have had in mind. I differ with him on numerous features, but I
respect his personal good faith. 11_-
"Attorney General McOrath made one major recommendatio
which, while I do not agree with It, I feel was constructively in-
tended," Wiley continued.
"He suggested the possibility that the Judiciary committee.
Itself, designate some top-notch private management engineer-
lne firm, which he would then authorize to mak- a review of tne
operations of the vested corporations."
NO McCARTHYISM
The Wisconsin senator also complaiurd about "serious policy
divisions In the Office of Allen Property as to the handling or
patents owned by former enemy-controllt-d corporations as wen
as very serious policy splits as regards sale of such paten.
"These
can people.
Wiley also asked" for an Investigation into 'favoritism" an
"possible kickbacks" In the selection ol personnel to run no
former enemy firms. ....w nrit*
Unlike his colleague from Wisconsin, 8-nat.r McCarthy. Wiley
stressed the "absolute necssslty ot protecting "Pu^tl^*uWf"
dlvlduals and companies from unfair accusations and tottrtoces.
"Every possible prscautlon would have to be taken eoas w
protect the names and raputations of the great many v<*7
spunslble cltliens and firms who have served the Office or Ain
committee.
'.



^^


THURSDAY. JANUARY 31. 1958

THE PANAMA AMERICAN ' AN "INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
<
FAGI
John L. Leivis And Taft Clash
In *Cussin9 Mad Encounter
USARCARIB School
Marks 3rd Year
Starting Tomorrow

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31 (UP)Sen. Robert A.
Taft got "cussin' mad" at John L. Lewis yesterday
when the author met the critic in their first face-to-
face claBh over the Taft-Hartley labor act.
The Ohio Republican and the United Mine
Workers chief turned a Senate mine safety hearing
into a personal, waspish debate in which mine safety
was only incidental.
What had Taft's dander up was Lewis' state-
ment Tuesday that the mine workers union couldn't
order, miners from unsafe pits without being sued
under "Bob Taft's slave law."
The Senator, who Is running
for the OOP Presidential nomi-
nation, put In a special appear-
ance before a Senate Labor sub-
committee to answer the charge.
Lewis was there to hear him.
Taft agreed the miners, are sub-
ject to suit but he declared
there "is not a chance of a snow-
ball in hell" of them being: held
unjustly responsible for refusing
to work In unsafe mines.
"Tom ean sue the Bishop of
Boston for bastardy but you
cannot recover, declared Taft,
saying he learned the quotation
from a professor at Harvard
law school.
The wrangle ended with a
handshake. After 20 minutes of
sharp debate. Taft walked' over
to Lewis. They shook hands and
talked quietly for a moment.
One of Lewis' aides said Lewis
told the Senator he admired him
In many ways but- could not
agree with his attitude toward
working people. What Taft re-
plied was not Immediately learn- do not become your logic, Sen-
mine Inspectors authority to
close unsafe mines.
Taft wouldn't even speak to
Lewis directly when the bulky
labor leader rose from his chair
and asked to "make an observa-
tion."
The Senator turned to sub-
committee chairman Matthew M.
Neely (D.. W. Va.) and said:
"Mr. Lewis ought to appear as
a witness, not as a casual ob-
server."
But when Lewis did start
speaking as a witness later,
Taft himself interrupted. At
this point, subcommittee mem-
bers more or leu faded Into
the background and let tha
two have it out.
When Taft was talking. Lewis
glowered at him under his bushy
eyebrows. The Senator was smil-
ing most of the time but there
were occasions when his good
humor disappeared such as
when Lewis bellowed:
"Your half baked conclusions
ed.
The Senator's sharp comments
were provoked by Lewis' attempt
to take over the cross-examina-
tion as he had done when other
witnesses opposed giving Federal
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
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There is a certain spot on the
ator."
Once Lewis apparently sought
to "needle" Taft about his Pres-
idential aspirations.
"If you are ever elected pres-
ident, Mr. Taft, and Joe Stalin
ever asks you about the Taft-
Hartley Aet, I don't know how
you are going to explain it,"
he said.
Taft took that with a grin.
"I managed to answer the work-
men of Ohio," he replied. "I
guess I can handle Joe Stalin."
The Senator was referring to
his one-sided re-election victory
In 1950 when the Taft-Hartley
law was a major campaign Is-
sue.
Lewis spoke of the "constant
harassment" miners face from
the law and said "It is bleeding
them white in the courts."
Taft retorted that Lewis seem-
ed to argue that "labor unions
must be exempt from the law
while nobody else in the United
States is exempt."
New Type Photo
Bodge To Be Used
By Canal Employes
A new type of photo identifi-
cation badge will be used by a
large number of Canal em-
ployes starting tomorrow.
The new badges are of dif-
ferent colors to signify the bu-
reau or division In which an
employe works, and also have
the name of the employing unit
Marine Creature
Answer to Previous Puizle
OBtSONTAL
1 Depleted
marine
creature
I It is also
called-----
Ash
It It la found in
the------
14 Net
15 feist
16 Consent
It Scold
leAnent
20 Shocks
22 Two (prefix)
23 Burn
25 Nimbus
27 Gaelic
28 Portent
29 Till sale (ab.)
10 Regius
professor (ab.)
21 Higher
32 Tellurium
(symbol)
33 Facts
35 Therefore
28 War god
MOM*
40 Negative reply
41 Breaks
47 Goddess of
theearth
48 Hint
50 Performer
51 Turkish title
ta Natural tat
54 Attached
56 Distributes
57 Plants again
vmrnxiCAL
1 Infrequent
2 Profession
S Playing eard
4 Chinese
MOB .: M :*nn ^1 "-'
r?r' : .'sal 1
IDMI l
t I .
i '(ira i1
i.i >> :
5 Distant
Baltic gulf
7 Unbleached
Bewildered
9 Direction (ab.)
10 Snare
11 Make possible
12 Military unit Waltzed
17 Measure of
type
20 Encroach
21 Cuts
24 Shrewd
r-T-"!.'! I
rr'i v i
IZKKPi i
Ml 1 ''.V
2< Electrical unit 48 Two (prefix)
i mr* 1.4 ii:i: v.'i ion
ui':\-j :i.tt':u::n:v irise
Hr_'VJ!r_',l-:'-?If-HZ1. ISJL4-1
44 Asterisk
45 Sharpen
48 Sea eagles
4 Greek letter
51 Cutting tool
53 Hebrew deity
85 Bye (Scot.)
34 Waken
34 Throttled
37 Mountain
nymphi
42 Damages
CZ Library Has 19
Slurtevant Gardner
Paintings On Display
Enrollment For JC
Extension Classes
On Again Tonight
The Canal Zone Junior Col-
The Canal Zone Library-1 lege Extension Division will ac-
Museum Is now presenting an cept registrations again this
evening in the College office for
ceiling that some bridge players; written on the face of the badge.
look at when they don't know'
what to do. Some players Just
look up at the celling with a va-!
rant stare, and others find It
useful to scratch their heads or'
rub their chins at the same time. |
These are very fine things to
know, to be sure, but it's even!
better to know the right way to
play a hand. Today's hand shows
the difference.
West opened the ten of dia-
monds, East covered with the
jack, and South won In his hand
with the king. One glance show-
ed declarer that he needed three
club tricks to. make his contract,
since he could make exactly two
tricks in each of the other suits.
South therefore led a club to
dummy's ace and returned a low
club from the dummy. East quite
properly played his low club, and
South had to guess whether to
play the queen or the eight of
clubs from his hand.
South thought about It for a
second or two and then looked up
at the celling. This didn't help
him. for he came out of his hud-
dle by finessing the eight of clubs
from his hand. This allowed West
to win with the Jack, which
meant/that declarer could win!
only two club tricksnot enough
for his contract.
There is a standard method of
playing this kind of suit. It is not
absolutely infallible but it does
eliminate guesswork.
South most begin the clubs by
leading the eight and letting it
ride for a finesse. If this finesse
loses to the king, there Is no
further problem. If it loses to the
jack. South returns to his hand
and finesses through West a sec-
ond time, either by leading the
Bine or the queen.
This method assures three
tricks In the suit If the honors
ire divided, or if West has both
the king and Jack. It falls only If
East has both king and Jack. The
odds are 3 to 1 that three tricks
will be developedand there Is
no need to guess or consult a
rrvstal ball.
exhibit of watercolors by Miss
Beatrice Sturvevant Gardner,
Canal Zone artist and teacher
of art In the Canal Zone Junior
College and Balboa High School.
The 10 watercolors on display
are exhibited In the large light-
ed case in the center of the
museum, and in the mahogany
case on the west wall near the
restaurant;
All of the paintings are of
local scenes and subjects. They
include seascapes, a Porto Bello
processional, flowering trees,
landscapes and a Chlriqul In-
dian head, which was later re-
worked In oils, and used as a
keynote for the salon in Tucker
McClure's yacht, Chiriqui.
Some of the watercolors on
display have had limited ex-
hibit, and some are new and
have not been shown before.
They will remain on exhibit un-
til the latter part of February.
second semester classes begin-
ning next Monday, it was an-
nounced by Dean R. D. Hackett
today.
Classes in business and com-
mercial subjects, English,
French, Spanish, dramatics,
English for Sapnlsh-speaklng
students, public speaking, math-
ematics, woodworking, metal-
working;, clothing, and engineer-
ing, machine, sheet metal, and
architectural drawing are offer-
ed for credit and three special
one-hour non-credit courses In
the history of Panama, personal
finances, and art appreciation
also are offered.
On the Atlantic Side courses
in shorthand, typing, Spanish,
English for Spanish speaking
students, and mathematics are
being offered but no further
evening registrations will be ac-
cepted there until next Monday
when the classes begin.
At LA MODA AMERICANA
102 Central Avenue Panam
SPECIAL SALE -
for 8 DAYS only Starting
TOMORROW FRIDAY
Come in earlier for the grandest savings ever!
DRESSES ... a great assortment for ladies and girls
for all occasions at very tow price.
.
NYLON LINGERIE
SLIPS WITH LACE
NOW
5.4
CM
3.M
Before
8.95
7.95
6.95
NYLON
Before
8.95
HALF SLIPS
NOW
4JS
NYLON NIGHTIES WITH LACE
Before NOW
8.95 Ml
COTTON SLIPS
Before
3.95
BT
SILK LINGERIE
PANTIESdifferent styles
all colors.......9c.
SILK
Before
3JJ5
HALF
SUPS
NOW
1.99
SILK
Before
4.95
SLIPS
NOW
2.99
BID JACKETS WITH LACE
Before NOW
3.25 1J9
4J6. 3.29
FINE SILK PAJAMAS
Before
6.95
8.75
7.95
NOW
4.99
6.49
5.99
SWIM SUITS
for Ladies
Before NOW
7.95 4.99
8.50 6.2
10.50 7.4
BAGS, new assortment
for all occasions.
Large Assortment of
BLOUSES
different pricesfor'
all occasions from......1.95
SWIM SUITS
for Girls
Before NOW
445 2.2
- 595 3.95
625 4.95
. SHORTS by Sets
at 2.56
SANDALS
from 2.99
.
REMEMBER . TOMORROW FRIDAY at
LA MODA AMERICANA
Lieut Col. MYRON D. SMITH,
newly appointed Commandant
of the USARCARIB School at
Fort Oullck, C. Z. He replaces
Col. James W. Pumpelly.
(U.'S. Army Photo).
The combined United States
Army and Latin American
School of the United States Ar-
my Caribbean celebrates its
third anniversary tomorrow at
Ft. Oullck.
A full day's program is plan-
ned, starting with the formal
cutting of the 17-layer anniver-
sary cake in the Main Dining
Hall, and its informal consump-
tion by all Interested School
personnel.
A series of games and con-
tests, for all personnel and their
families, is next on the schedule,
followed by a picnic lunch and
softball and volleyball games in
the afternoon. Music will be
provided by the 60th Army
Band.
The USARCARIB School is
unique In that it provides for
professional courses In military
science both for American and
Latin American officers and en-
listed men. During Its three
years of existence, the School
has done much to promete good
will between the United States
and the Latin American re-
publics, as well as among the
latter nations themselves.
Atlantic Side Girl
Named Snow Queen
Al Colorado College
OREELEY, Col., Jan. 31Miss
Ann Newhard, 21, a junior at
Colorado State College of Edu-
cation here, whose home Is in
Oatun, Canal Zone, today was
recently crowated queen of the
Annual Snow Ball by students
of the college here.
The charming Miss Newhard
was enthroned upon a beautiful
replica of a sleigh while the
ballroom was decorated to re-
present a winter scene.
The dance is given each year
by women students who reside
in .Snyder Hall, the largest of
the women's residence halls at
the college here.
Miss Newhard, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Newhard
of Oatun, was graduated from
Cristobal high school in 1949
and entered Colorado State Col-
lege of Education here In the
autumn of that year.
She is preparing to become
i an elementary
teacher.
high school
LYNDONVHJjg, Vt. (UP).
This Is the only town in the
country with a fluorescent-li- hU
This year she was listed injed main street. The ski rt or
I the book, "Who's Who in Ameri- 'town has ten of the units oi t
|ean Colleges and Universities" main street. Town officials pi-rt
I and is active In numerous cam- to hold their famous sled dog
pus organizations. I races down the main street.
BIG SALE
Beforev NOW
PURE LINEN 72" white ...... 2.50 1.85/yd.
36" white ...... 1.50 0.85/yd.
56" for suits .... 2.25 1.75/yd.
36" in colors for
dresses crease-
resisting----- 1.45 1.20 yd.
CASA FNIX
155 Central Ave. Phone 2-2790
Oistinctively
/ours...."
You, the woman who appreciates and wants
good fashiona dress that tells flatteringly
of graciousness and good looks. . will buy
the finest materials at Zig-Zag
* Silk Organdy
* Embroidered Linen
* Gabardine
Different Colors
ZIG-ZAG
108 Central Avenue Tel. 2-3418
Headquarters of VOGUE and McCALL PATTERNS
Twenty One
Smart Buyers
Bought BUICKS
& CHEVR0LETS

MONDAY-TUESDAY
and WEDNESDAY!
Jack Weir
BIG HEARTED -
this week only
BROTHER


EVEN YOUR MOTHER-IN-LAW
will give you credit for buying
one of these outstanding VALUES

ONLY Five 1951 BUICKS
and



Nine 1951 CHEVROLETS
to choose from-BUY TODAY
Smoot & Paredes
The pioneers of Automobile Road



i":' '*

pagf rom
^
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY. JANUARY 31, 1951
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & Air Line News
"Flying Dutchman" Spent
1 l...i.O(l Hours In Air
During 151 '
In 1951 Hie uv.olc K. L M.
fleei i/icludiiiK Constellations.
Douglas DC-6'.s. Coavairs. and
DC-3.S, spent no less than 115.000
hours in the air. equivalent toj
a total of over 13 ye rs.
The fleet of 67 akcialt man-,
aged to transport a record,
quantav of passenger, mail and,
freight'traffic to a very efficient;
manner. This is mainly due to,
the higher utilization of the air-
en1 r
In view of the great demand
for transportation. K. L. M. has
decided to increase temporarily
the frequency of its special
freight services between Amster-
dam and New York from two to
three round trips a week.
K. L. M.. which already car-
ries the largest quantity of air,
freight across the Atlantic, will
thus be able to transport 40 tons
of freight weekly on Its special
four-engined freight plane ser-
vices between the old and the
new world.
Movie Stars Stopping
In Panama .
On Wav To South America
Stars" from Hollywood's movie
colony have virtually become
commuters on Pan American
World Airway routes between
United States gateway cities and
La'in American nations.
Iovelv Barbar? Britton and her
husband. Eu-Jene Czukor. flew
frc n Panama to Miami last Sun-
da; .
Screen and stage star Yvonne
DeCarlo arrives in Miami today
by El Inieramericano from Lima.;
Peru. She will continue to Holly-1
wood tomorrow.
Lonetime star Florence Marlv,,
en route to f movie set in Chile. |
bo?rded a Clipper at Los Armeies
early in the week for a flieht to|
Panama, where she took El In-;
teramericano on to Santiago.,1
Sr sTlved ii the Chilean ca-i
pltal yesterday.
P*e of Hollywood's younger!
Iei-:';n2 feminine stars. Donna
ReeH. also oassed through Pana-
ma last Saturday her wav from
Buenos Aires to Hollywood.
r
florid* I
mosi famous
Location
2000 modern rooms
bathradioMuzak
spotless comfort
-/fc^HOTIL
t soth t! NEW YORK
M TIIKS SIIUK AT MM CITY
M Ink, Hi 'Ninm.
I
Truman Asks Congress
For Approval of St. Lawrence
Seaway Project
WASHINGTON. Jan. 31 (UP)
President Truman renewed his
plea to Congress this week to
approve the St. Lawrence Seaway
Project, touching off an angry
row on the Senate floor.
In a special message to the
House and Senate, the President
asked for joint American-Can-
adian construction of the seaway
and power project in the inter-
ests of national security. He said
Canada is ready to go It alone
if this country does not act.
Chairman Toin Connally ID..
Tex. i. whose Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee will consider
the presidential request, im-
mediately rose to his feet and
Informed the Senate, "this Bill
ought not to be passed."
He said the Seaway would
cost $1,000.000.000 and would be
frozen over five months of the
year.
Sen. George D Aiken reported that Connally "should,
resign and let someone lese take
over" if he Is not willing to have
the Committee vote on the long-
blocked project.
Alken said Connally is 'not
entitled to obstruct a measure so
vital to the welfare of his na-
tion." Other Senators also chal-
lenged the white-haired Texas i
democrat.
In his message. Mr. Truman;
said a "relatively safe Inland
waterway" is increasingly neces-
sary to bring high-grade ore
from Canada to the United States
in view of tense world condi-
tions. He said the nation also
needs the vast hydroelectric
power It would produce. |
"I stronglv believe that the
United States should join as a
full partner with Canada In
building the seaway." Mr. Tru-
man said. "We should not be
content to be merely a custom-
er of Canada's for the use of the
seawav after It Is built."
Connally said his Committee
will take another look at Mr.
Truman's request, but he added.
"I verv much hope that the
Committee will adhere to its for-
mer position" In which, he said.
It has never approved the sea-
"...This projeet would be
built in foreign territory. I am'
', very- much opposed to it and my j
people are opposed to It."
Connally said he resented
~t?.lemcnts thot he obstructed.
>e seaway bill. He said he tun-1
ply does what the Committee:
! wants.
He said the seaway "for five|
months of the year would be
! frozen up as hard as the mind
of the Senator from Vermont."
I Sen. Herbert H. Lehman .N. Y.i said he has favored the
l St. Lawrence project for 30 years.
"To allow Canada to develop
i the seaway would be shortsighted
and detrimental to the interest
of this country," Lehman said.
In the House, supporters of the
project planned to ask the Pub-
lic Works Committee for a "show-
down vote" on the measure a
week from tomorrow.
CAPABLE CAGERS
Chapel Hill. N.C.(NEA) _
Frank Redding, Paul Uklns and
Chuck Ellen wood of the North
Carolina basketball team are
straight A students.
If #* I
7. ?'i''^
Ani? minutb latir, th twoc race*
through th air base, st tw homtal,
mb hbai* for, th main ^fijtnnuivai
THE UNITED STATES LEGION OF MERIT waa-presented
I-.ion.day afternoon to Lt. Colonel Ernesto Delgado, chief of
the Ecuadorean Air Force by Brigadier General Emll c Kiel,
commanding general of Caribbean Air Command. In the
photo taken at the Officers Club at Quito. Ecuador, General
Kiel pins the medal on Colonel Delgado In recognition of
his services as air attache to the Ecuadorean Embassy In
Washington. At right Is Brigadier General Reuben Hood,
who is visiting Ecuador.
(Official USAF Photo)
Isthmian Visitor
dinals, is the cousin of BUI
Baker, former Cincinnati and
Red Bird receiver.
REAR ADMIRAL H. LAMONT ,
PUGH. USN, Chief of the Bu- .
reau of Medicine and Surgery, |
Navy Department. Is on the
Isthmus for an Inspection and
familiarization tour of Naval
medical activities.
Navy Photo.
RUNS IN FAMILY
St. Louis Jerry'
Baker, promising Rock Hill. S.-
C, catcher signed by the Car-'
M/S "PRESIDENTE
CAMPO SERRANO"
Sailing on or about
FEBRUARY 3rd, I9S2.
Accepting deck passengers
for
CARTAGENA, Col.
Apply
C. Femie & Co.
Cristbal
3-1772
Balboa
2-1657
ARE YOU AN EXPERT ON TRAVEL!
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Tel. 2-2008
IOYD MOTHERS. INC
BOOTS AND HER BDDI
PRACTICAL ROYS
BY EDGAR MARTIN
I'M IHt OWWY ONfc W WOMfc-P*R>
TvKCl-NflO HO OMl W** -\WSttL
-SO I OSt WPWkWT OTKWtO
TO AWSVJtR V\
met
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L_ ViIm'.too' HMft*9
wetiR.ottl
vt:
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fifiti
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CAPTAIN EASY
A RACE FOR DOPE
BY LESLIE TURNER
CHKIS U LLKIN, Plaueteer
CHANGING COURSE
BY RL'SS WINTERBOTBAM
SHE
CLAIMS
THE CAR
10 MCRS
SHERiPF.
BUT SHE
HAS NO
PAPERS.
YOV AHO OB.BUOD
GIVE THE PRISONER*
A MENTALEXlS
TREATMENT SO THEy
CAM UNOEV&TANO
US. eCKKY.
PR1SCILLA 5 POP
PERILS OF PARENTHOOD
BY AL VERMEER
t !
I RUGS BUNNI
DON'T OO TO- HOLLYHOCK'S
HOUSE, -
Y WELL, HER MOTHER'S X]
GONE TO THE HOSPITAL/
POR A NEW BABY
YPEST1
YOU MEAN ^
ITHEYRE TRADING
HOLLYHOCK IN?
VIC FLINT
A NEW SCENE
BY MICHAEL OIULLEI
TOM, THIS IS VC PUNT.
I PK0AUS6P VOU A
&TOZV. SPORT PEEPERS
ORAR HE WAS
RUNNMOAMtAV
the murper of
a maw who war
supposed to
HAVE OaWWTTKT
SUCtfTB-HAAVODN
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Anp I use TNieHT,
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CURTAIN
PALLS
ON THE
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scene
0HIFT
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vwey
PRIVATE "
ARASE.
OUR BOARDINU HOLSE
with
MAJOR BOOPLE OUT OCR WAT
By J. R WILLIAMS
DECORATED
CMON.CBPRK,
PERK UPV
HERB. COM*
TH'OJW**/
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FROM HIS HBPHCVi IN
AUSTRALIA / ffAOUL MUST
ATTEHO A CONCLAs/e OF
ICC FISHeRMCN AND
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>i FOR THE ANIMAL*
VOltD DOT6 ON THE:
LrTTLE FSLLOVJ*-
TAM6 AS A 1ITTCN
AND BRIGHT i
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 152
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE PTTt
^acific *2)c
tetu
&. 17, &tio* Dei &&~ 352t
SEAMAN FIRST CLASS AND MRS. HOWARD D. JORGESON,
following their wedding ceremony, performed by Chaplain W.
W. Winter, U8N, on Jan. 27, at the U. S. Naval Station Cha-
pel, Rodman, C. Z. Mrs. Jorgenson is the former Doris Lu-
guuer. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herb Lugauer of Howard
Luke, Minnesota. Seaman First Class Jorgenson, U8N, as
stationed at U. S. Naval Station, Rodman, and is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Jorgenson of Cokate, Minnesota.
FIRST LADY TO ENTERTAIN AT T*A
Mrs. Alclbiades Arosemena, the wife of His Excellency,
the President of the Republic of Panama, has issued invita-
tions to a tea to be Riven this afternoon at 5:00 p.m. at the
Presidential PiJace in honor of Mrs. William H. 11. Morris.
Jr., the wife of the Commander-in-Chief of the Caribbean
Command.
General and Mrs. Morris to
Entertain Saturday
Lieutenant General William H.
H. Morris, Jr.. the Commander
Quesada who with their daugh-
ter have been visitors for a short
time on the Isthmus and guests
at the Hotel El Panama during
in Chief of the Caribbean com-1 their stay left Monday for Mexico
mand. and Mrs. Morris have is- City by plane.
sued invitations for a dinner to' --------
be held at Quarters 1. Quarry British Minister Returns
Heights, on Saturday, February
2. (in honor of Brigadier General
and Mrs. Joseph A. Cranston
From Boquete
Mr. Eric Arthur Cleugh, the
Minister of Great Britain to Pa-
a
who are visitors on the Isthmus nama, returned recently from
ai'd the .house guests of-the Lt. vacation of two weeks spent in
GovenorL of the Panama Canal Boquete.
and Mis. Herbert D. Vogel.
Ryter-Dow Engagement
Announced
and Mrs Clifton W. Rytr.
of Gambos, announce the en-
sjpttAftH of their daughter, Vir-
SlBia Ann. to Mr. Louis Fenner
o*r. Jr.. son of Mr., and Mrs.
Lojuls Fenner Dow, of Burlington.
Vermont.
MlssRvter. who was born on
thr> canal Zone, attended the Ca-
nrl Zone schools and graduated
with the class of '48 from the
Balboa High School. She is now
a Senior student at the Univ-
ersity of Vermont where she Is
a member of Kappa Alpha Theta
So-orjty.
The wedding will take place In
Ai'TUtt.
General And Mrs. Rice
Entertain
Major General George W. Rice,
the Health Director of the Pa-
nama Canal, and Mrs. Rice
entertained a greu of their
friends at a cocktail upper party
given Tuesday evening at their
home on Balboa Heights.
Mrs. Mendosa Honored
B'- Friends
"Irs. Humberto Mendoza, the
wi'e Of the First Secretary of the
Chilean Embassy in Panama, was
honored by a group other friend3
at a luncheon given on Monday
at the Union Club. Mrs. Menrioza
will leave for a vacation to San-
tiago in the near future.
Visitors Leave For
Mexico City
The Ambassador of Peru to
Mexico and Mrs. Carlos Miro
Visitors Honored At
Cocktail Party
Dr. John C. Ward, II, was
host at a cocktail party gt*en
Tuesday evening at his home in
Vista del Mar in honor of his
mother. Mrs. Roscoe C. Ward,
and Mrs. Lincoln C. Connelly,
of Bridgeton. New Jersey.
by plane, after a visit of several
weelts spent' with Mrs. Hass'
son-in-law and daughter. Mrs.
and Mrs. Ernesto Jan Guardia.
will sponsor a Fashion Show to-
morrow at the Army-Navy Club
from 5:30 p,m. to 7:30 p.m. for
the benefit of the Infantile Pa-
ralysis Fund. Navy, Army and
Air Force wives have been se-
lected to serve u models. An
admission charge of 60c. will
be payable at the door.
I. A. W. C. Cooking
CTheV mmu\l,^aBrnivda!yTea of e members of the Inter-
thIcanTzUone SSE* ClubU American Cooking Class met
be held on Saturday from 4:00 to; Wednesday for their regular
at the home of Mrs luncheon meeting at tne eiia
Moore 207 Gorgas Vista home of Mrs. Ampara de
Balboa Hetehta All Brostella. Serving as co-hostesses
to were Mrs. Marina de Romero
and Mrs. Natalia de Rivera.
6:00 p.m.
Lewis B.
Road, on
members and guests planning
attend are asked to make reser-
vations before noon Friday with
one of the following: Mrs. B. A.
Darden, Balboa 1671; Mrs. E. M.
Browder. Balboa 1063; Mrs. B.
Rogan. Balboa 1835; and Mrs.
Those attending included Mrs.
Alice Lombard. Mrs. Rosita de
Hernandez, Mrs. Angela de
Guardia, Mrs. Panchita de Pon-
ce Rojas, Mrs. Ursula de Ven-
Robert Motion. Panama 3-3376.1 tura Mrs m.tt MS, MM.
A fee of $1.00 will be charged Luz de Mndez Mrs. CecMa de
for guests of members and all Arias, Mr. Adda de Hermanez.
Alicia de Raudalez Planas.
nos-1Mrs. Gertrude de Arosemena,;
|Mrs. Viene de Burrell. Mrs.
Through the courtesy of the: Martha Anderson Mrs Jo Ther-1
members and guests are asked to.Mrs.
wear carnival costume, if
sible.
Comisionado General de Turis-
mo de Panam, the Conjunto
Pllcet will entertain with a group
of Panamanian dances.
Carol Ann Fischer Is New
Arrival Here
Major and Mrs. W. H.
Fisher of Farfan, announce
rel, Mrs. Angle M. Smith. Mrs.
Ruth E. Doan, Mrs. Helen Adler.
Mrs. Mabel Comley. Mrs. George
V. Daniels, Mrs. Ruth Townsend
and Mrs. T. S. McKlbbon.
Contest Entries To Be
Submitted Wednesday
Artists members of the
Na-
birthiof a daughter. Carol tlonal League
i J
Clayton Army Hospital.
the .
Ann. on Jan. 29 at the Fort I Women who
paintings to
Major Fischer is the Disbursing Nationa
Officer
Office.
at the Corozal Finance
Visitors Here From Florida
of American Pen1
are submitting'
i to the Pen Women's
a Biennial Oil Painting
Contest in Washington, D. C. i
are asked to bring their entries
to the Lewis B. Moore home on!
Cashew Place on Balboa Heights
Ensign and Mrs. A. Raymond between the hours olJ>j00 a _m
'- and 12:00 noon next Wednesday
Miller, of Farfan. have as their
houseguests her mother. Mrs.
Josephine Land, and Miss Ca-
tharine McDonald of Apopka,
Florida. Mrs. Land expects to
stay with her son-in-law and
daughter for a few months.
Mrs. Holkulay Is Hostess
For Coffee
Mrs. Noble Holla way was the
hostess Wednesday at a coffee
given at her quarters at Fort
Amador In honor of Mrs. Frank
H. Stone who plans to leave in
the near future for the United
States.
V. F. W. Bingo Tonight
Bingo will be played tonight at
the V. F. W. Home on Curundu
Road at 7:45 p.m. Prizes will be
awarded the winners.
Reserve Officers To
Meet. Tonight
The Reserve Officers' Associa-
tion, the Navy Pacific Chapter.!
will meet at 8:00 p.m. this even-1
tag at the Officers' Club, Naval
Station. Rodman.
The recently drafted Consti-
tution of the Chapter will be
presented for adoption by the
newly elected officers and all
members are requested to attend
for this reason.
Reserve officers who apply for |
membership before the opening
of business may participate as
Members in this meeting.
Bake Sale To Be Friday
The Gamboa Woman's Club
will hold a bake sale tomorrow
at 3:00 p.m. at the Civic Center
in Gamboa. Free coffee will be
served.
Morning Guild Meets
Tomorrow
The Morning Guild of the Ca-
thedral of St. Luke will meet
Friday at 9:30 a.m. for morn-
ing coffee at the home of Mrs.
R. Heber Gooden in Ancon.
BANANAS IN, BEER OUT
OMAHA, (UP). A merchant
complained to police that every
time he received a new shipment
of bananas, a case of beer would
disappear. Then it was discovered
two banana delivery men always
carted out a case of beer to put
in their empty truck.
All Star Circle Will
Meet Wednesday
The All Star Circle will meeti
at the Scottish Rite Temple next'
Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. for a
luncheon and business meeting. {
wM$&.
m '^H
':. .J, ;'jH
h*1^ 'jfl
SBBBB. "'flNSS
H |r
HKatatak
HM
Fashion Show Tomorrow
At Army-Navy Club
The Navy Officers' Wives Club
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent
Honored Before Departure
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Vincent,
of Miami, Florida, who left the
Isthmus by plane Wednesday
morning, were honored prior to
their departure by Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Martlnz who entertained a
group of friends at a buffet sup-
oer at their home on Golf
Heights on Tuesday evening. f
Visitors Return To Washington
Mrs. Frances Hass and her
daughter. Miss Dorothv Hass. of
Wrsh'ngton, D. C. returned to
their home on Tuesday morning,
Platter Fans... You'll Welcome Our
Foi as little
$ 1oO oi 2
00 Weekly
You can be the proua owner
or what ever tupe o music
o) the latest "Aits*....
troa enjoy mosti
No
Ca. Cyrnos Cyrnos Gift Shop
I Jose Feo. de la (>
(TItoII Crossing)
No. IS Trvoli Ave
Across from Ancon Plarshedl
Can'fS/eepW*!/?
Orink a cup of P08TUM prepared
with hot water or milk before yoo
|o to bed and you'll sleep like a
babyt P08TUM does not contain
eaff ein! Get POSTUM today
ad anjoy a restful sleep!
I WAS FLATTERED
Toung people, for all their new
Ideas, do appreciate old-fash-
toned goodness in a meal. I bad
my two amall grandchildren for
dinner the other day and, as a
Crest, served them chicken soup.
"Say, Grandma," said Jean,
"this is a delicious soup. I hope
someday I'll cook as well a you
do."
Flattered as I was, I answered,
"It's really quite simple, Jean.
This is Campbell's Chicken
Soup . eo delicious, as you
sajr, because Campbell's make
It with fluffy rice, eo /JJ of deep
chicken flavor, and plenty of
real chicken, slow-simmered to
a rich golden broth."
Just then, little Billy, who
hadn't stopped eating all this
time, spoke up. "More please,
Grandma,"
.

>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
.*
^Jlie L~avaica.de of Ckritianitu
EVERY NIQHT........'...7:00
(Except Saturdays)
P.M.
first ffJaptiat Cliurclt
Faltering Philip!
Philip i life u nileo Ufa bruises.
Well-worn step ad rags be uses
Repairs would lacra ais home like new..
F A Classifieds, last the right clue!
Balboa Heights, C.Z.

Presenting
DR. t
I DANIEL
ThursdayCOMINO SOON WORLD WAR III
UNLESS ..."
When anticipated -------- Nations involved
Where to be fought Outcome expected
Who will start it.
Friday"HOW TO KNOW POSITIVELY THAT YOU
ARE SAVED.".
LKe/tgtous c/i Imt
Thursday"HOW A GAMBLER WAS CONVERTED"
Friday"NO OTHER GOD"
Thursday Friday
Sunday School Night Young People's Night
All Steel Waterproof Automatic
Nationally advertised at $71.50 in the U.S.
ONLYS
48

-AT
The Juvenia Watch Agency, 680 Fifth Avenue,
New York, will honor the guarantee we give
with every Juvenia watch.
mercurio
Next to the Central taaj
CAPTAIN WINNIE GIBSON,
USN, chief of the Navy Nurse
Corps, who arrived Monday for
a familiarization tour of Navy
installations.
eusrybouyfoadClassifed'
CHHE
e 'flyhfs


a week


.

tee year travel agent or Paneare't office in Panama: Panama Agencies Co.


.
With Great Pleasure
.4.
We Announce
The Acquisition of





i
New Design Molds for
RECAPS by coodAear



'

i
These New Designs Have Everything:
V Wider Tread
v
V
Deeper Design
Long Wearing Ribs
V Notch Traction



Hear delayed broadcast every night 9:30
V Completely Modern

Goodyear de Panam, S. A.
(Just Below "EL RANCHO")
Tel. 2-1221
Agents: Auto Service Co., Inc.
Tel. 2-1881 Corner of Ancon Avsnue A "H" Street


\
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
T-
THURSDAY, JANUARY SI, 195J
You Sell em ... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices

.1 !>!
ir ..fcKs
HOKKOO.VN
lu- 4 Vean m MR) *
Pheae t-MU
HO 1 HA CAKLTON
l.aae Mil 4
Phoiw *SSCal
SALON 1)E BELLEZA AMERICANO
Na H Wait .21 Street
1HK PANAMA AMERICAN
No. il "B" Streethnual
No 111 Central .vrtotea
SO
12 words
Minimum for
Jc. each additional
word.
/
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobile*
* < .. P !_ j ttc Zenith table
r, c.".. radio. tx:I!i'i condition.,
S3 cv-::-. Hcu-.c 1401-B. Can U.S.
.. t .j;a.
T _:- i"o rea iugi -1' x 6V
I ."<. E::o..- 2-2490 ofter 6
FINANCING
Service Personnel ond
Civilian Governmenl Employes
new used cor through
. i ..... .OTl riNANCi
MISCELLANEOUS
Uo ,ou ha** 4 enrtkini araalaai?
Writ. Alcohohr Aeeayeaaei
> 20S1 Aaeaa. C Z.
WELLS. If you need woter call Ha-
zerj. Tel. 3-2224.
FC
Fort Worth, Texos
Also Direct
Loons Automobile
ai. sinyiwyvl and
. J.....C ii. -ne wanoi on*
,c... .Vilr. Joi tinancmg
Road vJl insuioncc automatically adiusted
to o. 3. coverage.
-----ARRANGEMENTS CAN fll MADE
SALE:Mohcgory diningroom| rHg(,u6M toCAl AUTOMOBILE
-. venetion b:.nds. Mr. P. Levy.1 OfcAllR
; 5 I St. No. 7.
SAL -Venetian blinds 'or 12
-y hou;. Set F.esto Ware,, lerv..
j type bed. 5 small rugs. Sew*.
, clo:k. Most reo-.onobleliui
J74-E, Gan'an
American couple wants completely
furnished smoll apartment, Feb-
ruary through May. Call 3-1697
from 7:30 to 12 ond 1:30 to
5:00.
I
r-Iboo.
Your lampshade problem solved.
Shades repaired, reproduced any
style, to match lamps parchment
tille, plastic. Call Mody's Shop,
ex Foto Ancn, moved to Estu-
diante 142.
f; SALS' oast. Mahogany West-
--,,. ; i.o'e radio-phono-
Q..-S wMi obejt 50 records
StTlCO. Ffion* Albr:ok 5115.
V ir No 31-A.
- oR aALk:1949 FORD V8 Cus-,
torn Club Coupe, Color Block. A
lie ALL, Oood Buy, only $380.00
equirad to FINaNC. Contact
your local FOHO UALtRS LOL-
PAN MOTORS, INC. Tel. Pan-
fl SALE:- j P'ece mohooony dm-, _ama 2-IOSJ and 2-1036._____I
J : o::n set; 3 *V "oor lomp;WAN| , B(JY or sell on outomo-!
st.'OHsr. 0'r<-. 106-B. Ft. Kobbe i y^j jee Agencias Co'.mos, cu-
84-2209. __l torr.^^.ie row 29. telephone 2-,
f-TsALE, High chcr. bobv car-; *U>. Ponoma. Upen all ooy on
g?. p!sv pen. dm .-5 lab!c. four
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous.
Sctuiuoys.
FOR SALE: 3 pairs drapes 2 1-2
yrds. long. 48 inches wide, with
valance. I woll China kitchen ca-
binet. House 1501. Telephone 2-
1766._________________:_________
FOR SALE-Beautiful piano in per-
fect condition, $200. No. 29 Fe-
derico Boyd Avenue. Tel. 3-3356
Panamo.
RESORTS
Williams Sonto Clora Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms Frigidairat, Rock-
gos ronges Balboa 2-30S0.
Foster's cottages completely furnish-
ed, one. two or three bedrooms,
linens, gas refrigerators, gat
ranges, dishes and kitchen ware.
Half o mile beyond Santo Claro
private rood to beach. For in-
formation visit or phone Dogmar
Tivoli Avenue No. 6, 2-0170.
Panamo.
HOUSES ON BEACH Santa Clara
. and m cool Cerro Campana
mountain. Phone Shropnel 2120
or see Caretaker.
Gramlich' Santo Clara beach-
cottages. Electric Ice ooxes. gas
stoves, moderte rote. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Phillips. Oceanside .-ullages. Santo
Clero. Box 435 Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristbal i-1673
Enjoy a vocation ot Hotel Pon Ame-
ricano. El Valle. Phone Ponomo
2-1112 for reservations.
rhrrs. Hcui? 1C4-A. Gamboa. C fOR SALE: 1949 FORD 6 Cyl.
Tutor. Color Green, well equip-
pal with extras. Uown ra,mjnt
sGj.0u. We have reduced price
i 7. Tel. 6-430.
C?"~SALE:Livingrocm end porcr-
ruT.'rure; reS.'woto-. 0 celes
e-s rtcvt: os-, wetei r--te-: droo-
,..- ,e..-.. -- n e": :t or b'-<
c. r.. c rr.cl Jgany
*. ;r r- :-.C" v /-re: ' "S-j
tcb> end bench; Ve-etion
ay e>trf.tf. Me it ot Colpan Mo-
til lie. 'lei. fonamo 2-1033
l.- ^-.uib.
... ^ALE:,..-.j -.-door Chevro-
let 4-door sedon. Good condition.
b'nd-J gl-iswore. Tc'criicre Pan-, b_, Vincent. U. S. tmbassy.
- roa'SAUt-IMS PMO M UIXI
muer 6 Cyl. Goad Paint Job
Lcoihtr UPHOLSTIRY, ewellent
t.ias. Kaally reliable transporta-
tion, i him is a five away with
a small down payaaaat of $270.
00. Your dolan een't buy more,
worth looking over at Colpan
Motors. Inc. FORD DEALERS. Tel.
Penema 2-1033 end 2-1036.
mi
''AMTCD
.\iiti'IHl'l('*
V/'^TEC:Uccd Ch'vrc'c: Pick-
, up. -2 im. Caih. Ecx 775 An-
/ con. C. Z.
FOR SALE:Saw mill with option
to buy 8.0C0 M2 of land, 7
miles from Panama City, on Pon-
om?-Colon Highway. Write to
Fir: 1617, Ponoma City or phone
2-0312. Jose Caamos.
FCR_ SALE: 1951 Buick Special
Club Coupe, Dynaflow, radio, etc.
Will accept older cor trade. '6
mm liblex H-16. with 3 Yvar
lenses. Filters, carrying Cose, Tri-
pod, etc. 16 mm Kodak sound
protector, new. used 8 hours.
Screen and film editor. Call any
day until 8:00 p. m. Qiiorters
229_-A. Albrook. Tel. 2125.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:Chalet in El Valle,
near hotel Panomericano. Tele-
phone Panama 3-3423 or E|jlboo
3763.
osition Offered
W/NTED: Competent Spanish-
Engli:r secretary w-th references
I Wrile Aorrtct'o 2036. Ancon
C--1-1 Zone.
LESSONS
nation
EXPERIENCED accountant auditor.
offers tie services port time.
Write Bit 906 Colon
FOR rALE
itait & Motors
FOR SALE1942 Buick Sedon, per-
fect condition. Recently over-
houled. radio, plastic upholstery.
Balboa Bowling Center. 3 p. m.
II p. m. Tel. 2-3387.
I
FOR SALE:1947 FORD DE LUXE
Tudor 6 Cyl. Color Black. For a
cheap buy; moke us an oHor
we have this cor rightly priced t
let ui surprise yoa, ot yoar fo-
cel Ford Dealers Colpan Meters,
Inc. Tsl. Penema 2-1033 and
2-1036.
UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA. SPAN-
ISH COURSES FOR FOREIGNERS.
Special Beginners' Classes for
Americans will be held every So-
turdoy for o period of 15 weeks
from 10 to 11:30 A. M. Classes
start this Saturday. February 2nd.
Registration fee: 10 Balboas.
fCR SALE2 Cummings motros like
- MW, 190 H P. esch Works with
\t Die:el. 'Will sell ;eparotely. No.
29 Federico Bcyd Avenue. Tel
?-3356. Para .-a
fC^ "SAL:--B:c. tiful \acht. 62 ft'
suitable for o'eosur tr.pj ana
fish'ng. De::l rrctors, 200 H.P.
each. Per'c-t condition. Co.v.lete-'
ly eo.ui-jpec'. Easy payrrent. No.
29 Federico Boyd Avenue Tel ,
3-3336, Pcnomo.
FOR SALE:1947 Ford Station Wa-
gon. Mechanicolly A-l. House
tl-J. Gatun, phone 5-505.
FOR SALE
Mittorrvi'tp
FOR SALE1949 FORD CONVERT-
IBLE Coupe VI Brand new paint
jab. color VarmiU.an. White side
well tires. Cea be financed with
S480.00 down. Must be seen to
bs appieciatcd. See it at Colpan
Motor:. Inc. your FRIENDLY
FORD DEALERS. Telephone Pan-
ame 2-1033 aad 2-1036.
FOR SALE:1949 Renoult. Radio
Good condition Cuty ooid. $450
CO or best offc. Call Ft. Clayton
8"'-4173 or afte duty 37 6121.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
if.
FOR SALE:1949 MERCURY 6
Posaenaer Coupe Color Metallic.
With down payment of $480.00.
You may drive it away. No bet-
ter bay in tewa. See it et Col-
pan Motors, Inc. Tel. Paneme
2-1033 and 2-1036.
FOR SALE: 1950 Buick Sedan,
with Dvnoflow. W-S-W-T. Radio.
S?.200.00. Misc. household items.
Con be seen house 179 New Cris
, robnl.
FOR SALE-1949 NASH 4-Deee
SeJan. Color Light Ton. In n-
celtert eenditiea. FINANCE
AVAIUB'E with $330.00 down
you can drive it AWAY. See it
ot local FORD DEALERS. Colpen
Motor*. Ir-. Tel. Panama 2-1033
ond 2-1036.
,fCR SALE --Vincent Clock Shadow
1.000 c.c. twin ond Ariel Red|
FOR SALE:1949 LINCOLN COS-
MOPOLITAN 4 Door Sedan (Or-
K ^--i.:;/""? nnn . "T Mjinal cost $4.300.001. In per-
feet condition with small mile-
celleit condition, 2.000 miles.
fWiii fi.wr.ee. Coll Mcllvoine. Bal-|
boa 3518 or 1440-B. Owen St.
Balboa.
Secretive Husband
Loses Divorce Suit
LOUISVILLE. Ky., (UP). A
ifcusband just isn't, supposed to
djo such thines.
J A Louisville wife won a divorce
When she told the judge her
husband locked his closet and
dresser drawers, but insisted on
going through her belongings.
She said his "secretlveness"
extended even further In that he
irould not reveal his salarv and
"WtSO.i In the habit of leav-
\ tJMt the house alone."
age. Color Black. Beautiful seat
covets end good rubber, moke as
en offer or try us with a Trade
lac. $ee it et Colpen Motors, Inc.
Tel. Penema 2-1033 and 2-1036.
FOR SALE:Plymouth convertible
'41. good condition, new tires, to
the best highest bidder over $325.
Pedro Miguel Barber Shop. Canal
Zone.
FOR SALE1949 MERCURY 4-
Door Sedan. New paint job Bur-
gundy Red. Plastic taot covers.
Good rubber. Mutt be seen to be
appreciated. Can be financed with
$470.00 down. Contact your lo-
cal FORD DEALERS Colpan Me-
ters, Inc. Tel. Penema 2-1033
end 2-1036.
FOR SA'.E:1949 PLYMOUTH 2-
Door Sedan Color Block. A very
clean car. and an eiceptienolry
good buy. Den't miss thii oppor-
tunity f>r rornthing oood. Con-
tact Colean Motors. Inc. FORD
DEALERS. Tel. Panama 2-1033
and 2-1036.
FOR RENT:For 3 months. Com-
pletely furnished 3 bedroom house
with swimming pool. Golf Height.
Call Ponoma 3-3069 or 3-334).
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished opart
ments. Moid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT:Beautiful, furnished
oportment. Suitable for two mor-
ried couples, screened. Government
inspected. No. 19, 45th Street,
Bella Vista.
FOR RENT:Modern two bedroom
apartment in newly constructed
building on 51st. Street No. 42.
For further information coll Men-
del & Zubieto. Telephone: 2-
3035.
FOR RENT:Apartment, very cool,
near all bus-stops. To married
couple without children. No. 2021
Via Espoo. Tel. 3-0749, Pon-
FOR RENT:3 bedroom cholet with
both, portly furnished, including
light ond water, 8 miles from Fer-
ry. Inquire at Contina Philip's,
Arraijin.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT: Well locoted room
with independent sanitary service
and entrance. Corner 38th St. &
Chile Avenue No. 6.
FOR RENT:Nicely furnished, large
cool, clean room, modern conve-
nience. To refined lady. Peru Ave.
No. 65. Lower left.
FOR SALE:1947 BUICK ROAD-
MASTER Color Block. Good Tires.
Seat Covers. Only $330.00 down.
This cer in rightly priced. Why
not come in end see for yourself
et Colpan Meters, Inc. y a a t
. FRIENDLY FORD DEALERS. Tel.
Panama 2-1033 fir 2-1036.
FOR SALE:1948 CHEVROLET Ta-
dor Color Blue. A NICE CLEAN
CAR. CAN BE FINANCED with
only $300.00 Down. See it at
Colpan Motors. Inc. FORD DEAL-
ERS. Tel. Panama 2-1033 and 2-
1MB).
COMING SOON
I
CHEVROLET
1952
-
SMOOT & PAREDES
PANA? 1A
SMOOT b HUNNICUTT
COLON
FOR SALE
Real Efitate
Attention Colon:For sale houses
No. 2010, 2012. 2014 exception-
ally well situated oh 3rd street
between Bialboa and Bolivar Aves,
with large frontage on all 3 im-
portant thoroughfares. For infor-
mation: Victor M. Ossa. Tel. Co-
lon 210 L or Wolff & Co. Tel.
Ponomo 2-2388.
Mrs. Fanny Wood.
Frequent RP Visitor.
Dies In Costa Rica
Mrs. Fanny Wood, o Limn,
Costa Rica, died at the United
Fruit Company Hospital in that
city on Tuesday according to
reports reaching here today.
With Mrs. Wood at the time
of her death were her husband,
James Wood and her sister and
brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Finlason.
Mrs. Wood has been a fre-
quent visitor to the Isthmus and
in December 1950 she was the
guest of her niece and nephew,
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. B. Hall of
Margarita, and nephew and
niece, Mr. and Mrs. John Finla-
son of Curundu.
Wood Is a railroader in Costa
Rica.
Acheson Makes It Plain US Troops
Will Stay As Red-Blocks In Europe
^iviivltKUAL &
PROFESSIONAL
We have everythine
to keep vour Lawn
ind (larden beautiful
taring the dry season
'OOli
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sorinklers
vVheeioarrnw.
Insecticiaes
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
879 Central Ave. Tel. 3-6149
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29th St.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 31 (UP)'------------------------------------------------------------------------.----
A^hes^'y^rdayThaenediNavy Models For Tomorrow's Show
Herbert Hoover's call for removal | *
of U. S. ground troops from
Europe and made it plain the
Administration plans to keep
them there.
He said Western Europe, with
American help, has made more
progress toward unity recently
than in the past 1,000 years.
This progress, he added, has
convinced Europeans that they
will not be allowed to be over-
run in event of war with Rus-
sia.
Acheson's reply to the former
president's renewal of the "great
debate" on troops in Europe was
made in response to auestlons at
his weekly news conference.
Mr. Hoover said in a New York
speech Sunday that Europe has
made little progress in self-de-
fense during the last year and
seems little worried about pos-
sible Soviet attack.
The former Republican pres-
ident urged the United States to
withdraw all its ground forces
from Europe except those need-
ed to protect its air bases outside
Atlantic Treaty nations, and to
provide arms planes and war-
ships instead for Europe's de-
fense.
Acheson said Mr. Hoover's
speech seemed to repeat the
views the former president has
held for some time, and added
he is entitled to his opinions;
FASHION MODELS for the Navy Officers' Wives Club Fash-
ion Show! to be given tomorrow night at the Army-Navy
Club, Ft. Amador, Include representatives from the Army
and Air Force. Music will be rendered during the exhibi-
tion by the Flamingo Orchestra from Naval Station, Rod-
man. The clothes are the latest creations from Felix Madu-
ro's, with specialities for men from the American Bazaar.
Admission is 50 cents and receipts will go to the March of
, Dimes Campaign.
Chief Clerk Who
Worked With Gorgas
The HX
The Beet values In town
ur furniture Is
REUP1IOLSTEBED
onr Mattresses ire
REBUILT
all woodwork expertly
RMTNIBHED
We B.ij -Srll-B.rlrr
11 \ (Heiwrhold Exchange)
41 Anta or Tel. .1-4111
But he said a review of thej
past year shows tremendous pro-
gress in Europe In the military. \\x*.m |n MemnhlS
political and economic fields, and w,es
prospects of important progress
this year and next.

Harry E. Bovay, who served as
in
chief Clerk In the Health
This progress, he said flrmlyjp'1"}1 underMpo1 9?.rga^u,
resulted from the strong interest Canal construction * U
and support the United Stales mfggjm^^ ggj:
mation recently received or the
has given to European progress
It seems that when we make
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panam
Selling:
(emento Panama ft
National Distiller.
TeL 3-471 1-1690 '
MODERN FURNITURE
cuarost mjilj
Slipcover Reupholstery
VISIT OC HOW-aOOat!
anerwBare.
J. r. el. Oea T7 IM KKlauiei Pick. DaMverj
TeL S-4Z ire ml u I* w
torwarThe M ^^ P" ^SvS worked in the Sanitary
forward, he added. Department from 1805 to 1914
While Acheson did not specific; plater k pa* In^con-
FISHERMEN !
According to the lateat re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIO ONES with FIRESTONE
lurea and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #39 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0363 3-4564
ally say U. S. troops will be kept
in Europe, his remarks made It
clear that Is what he meant.
Atlantic Society...
(Continued From Pave FIVE)
Eugene L. Hamon. USMC, was
elected Commander of the Camp,
and invested with his official
responsibilities.
The group Joined the members
of the officers club tor an even-
ing of dancing following the
meeting.
Birthday Party
Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Walsh.
log New Cristobal, arranged a
birthday party at their residence
Wednesday afternoon to honor
their daughter. Jacqueiyn, cj her
10th anniversary.
across th Mississippi River at
Cairo, Illinois.
After leaving the Canal Zone,
he moved to Stuttgart, Arkansas,
where he entered the rice, farm
machinery and general mercan-
tile business.
He is survived by his wife, one
son, Harry E. Bovay, Jr., of Hous-
ton, and two daughter. Mrs. B.
Cleanup Plan
Gels House OK;
Goes On To Senate
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31 (UP)
The House yesterday approv-
ed President Truman's plan to
overhaul the Internal Revenue
Bureau but Republicans warn-
ed other measures will be re-
quired to "houseclean" the
scandal-shaken agency.
The House action in rejecting
a OOP resolution to veto th*
reorganization was, a foregone
conclusion.
Even when criticizing the
plan, most Republicans said
they would vote for it as the
"first step" toward a tax clean-
up.
Much stronger opposition is
expected in the Senate, where-
the executive expenditures com-
in anruvcioaij. f. ,rri00l v-ar
cetobrajfr were. SJ^3&]ltFSu attacked under a bar-
BurandeSy- W SdS aLS/S barfr0UPS "^
Custer Johnnyy Bobby. Tommy I welldlng iron bars *
and Billy Hanna Carol andJean; e J} to
& SZuL dd FUeeiii were broken a.d typewriter,,
Stohrer Kathleen, and Eileen %n Mhool lMyrniM
Cox, Ann McClelland. Carol | mnd m from lhe off|ce of
Holgerson. Patsy Caul Kathryn Dean Rafael E. Motete were
and Billy Havener. Ellen Chite. mtegnf
Marie Bleakley. Louise Allgaier.1
Cheryl Jackson, Rosemary Cook-
son, Marvel Davlson. Crlsy Wertz.
and Messrs: Paul Doyle, Alan
iNormadm and Max Brandel.
R. Elliott, of Richmond. Virginia. ^.%"re"";Lf^,^"u.r"J^1
and Mrs. F. E. Xarkin, Jr., of nittee opened hearlnfi on the
Memphis.
1
Panama Still Tense;
Police On Guard
(Continued frose Page 1)
semena to protest today's closing
Before the attack on the school
plan today. House action on the
resolution came In the form of
a voice vote.
Unless the Senate acts un-
favorably, the reorganization
will become effective automa-
tically at midnight March 14.
It Is the major plank In Mr.
Truman's anti-corruption pro-
gram.
The rest of the cleanup cam-
paign has stalled for lack of
someone to direct It. Attorney
General J. Howard McGrath
has been unable to find a pro-
minent lawyer willing to under-
take the Jo^__________________
by many of trie 2,000 students ga-
thered outside the Institute.
Hundreds of students gathered
early this morning around the
*w
H "A Fine
Opportunity
to Learn
From
The Best"
Want to be
the most at-
tractive
couple on the
floor? Then
bring your favorite partner to
Harnett Si Dunn NOW and
improve your dancing togeth-
er. Modern rates use our
Budget plan fits payments
to paydays. So come In today
and save. Why miss the funl
Dalbaa VMf A 2-2M er
Box IM Balboa. Harriett and Dunn.
students gathered outside at the! Institute but no new disturb-
intersectlon of "I" and Estudian- anees had occurred up to early
te Streets and overturned a stake I this afternoon.
FOR VOUR HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. St Justo Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Cut
TfwEL mag
IS TiTOM Ave. ftW. -2996
ITS NEW!
a PLASTIC ENAMEL
for every use
Balboa Credit Union ,
Holds Meeting Tonight
The fourth annual meeting of
the Balboa Federal Credit Union
will be held at the Pacific Club-
house tonight at 7:30.
New officers will be elected
and S. C. Hollander, treasurer
of tne Canal Zone Credit Union,
will be guest speaker-
Brush it or Spray it
on Metal, Wood or Plaster
For your car, refrigerator,
kitchen or bath, walls, cab-
inets, kid's toys, etc., etc.
9 Brilliant Gloss
Plastic Smooth Finish
Startling New Colors
Dries In Minutes
For Sale i Panam
A all P.C. Commissaries
and Army Post Exchanges.
body truck and a sedan, both
government vehicles, carrying
groups of anti-student rioters
armed with rocks and iron bars.
The cars were later demolished
However, an uneasy calm hung
over the rest of the city as an
unusually large number of po-
licemen were on duty at nearly
all intersections.
1941 PACKARD

..i-......
Sedan Leather Upholstery. New
Tires. A beautiful car and a bargain!
1250.00
1951 FORD... ........ ...1650.00
Sedan Leather Upholstery.
This car Is like new.
1950 STUDEBAKER..........1450.00
Sedan Radio, Overdrive,
Lots of Extras.
1949 CHEVROLET...........1350.00
Sedan Low Mileage.
A real clean car. v
1949 HUDSON..............1250.00
Sedan Plastic Seat Covers.
New Paint Oood Tires.
SMOOT & PAREDES
Your BUICK & CHEVROLET Dealer
On Automobile Row Panam


THURSDAY. JANUARY Jl, 195?
TUB PANAMA AMERICAN AN TNPEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
+*/ftlantic S^ocie
h
&> 195, (at** Ji(*f>L y*tu*
378
In the hospital.
'Yoke' To Build New
Station For Programs
To Latin America
31.
I their home
| grounds.
A profusion of tropical flow-, w.UIMn_OM Tq_
ers and double hibiscus bios- WASHINGTON "
soms were used in the decorat-l lUSIS.-The Un ted States Rov-
ing of the luncheon table and ernment will bulW'a powerful
the appointment! in the resld-i new radio transmitter in the
ice Southeastern state of North
The other guests were: Captain; cron* t0, ePrTTp5*JR5^t2
and. Mrs. Harvey E. Robins. the Voice of the^United States |
ence.
!Captain and Mrs. Robert Ware,i
of America to Latin America
Lieut. Commander Roy Brooks. anj*Eu0Pe- .._._ ._
(MEC. U8N. and Misses Julia i The J?1*" fiWjS*L""
end Elizabeth Yanauelh nounced tonight that construc-
In the evening Captain and ',the transmitter Is expected
Mrs. Yanquell crossed the Isth- t0 be ready for use in about 18
mus to attend the garden party m0,ntns- _______A
end dinner given by the Com-!, The Department announced
mandant of the Fifteenth Naval last week that a highly power-
District. Rear-Admiral Albert M., ul 'rar?m "er l*uld. & bu"d
Blethoe and Mrs. Bledsoe for -on theNorthwest coast,to carij
Rear Admiral Herbert Lemont .Voice" signals to the Far East
Pugh and Rear Admiral Sher- An,other powerful transmitter
man R. Clark, Chief of the In- will begin operations next
apectlon Team and Director of: month from a U. 8. ship at sea.
Shore Establishment8urvey from! All of the transmitters arede-
the Chief of Naval Operations' toed to cvenme be or
Office in Washington, D. CV
of the Soviet Union to blot out
the U. 8. programs with strong
radio signals.
Dinner and Card Party
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ander-
son of the DeLesseps Area enter- Mrs. Yard as a gift from the
talned Tuesday evening at their group, and a miniature tree
residence with a dinner party held numerous small gifts from
land evening ot cards. .the individuals. Each place had
i a small cake topped with a single
Their guests were: Mr. and candle. v
(Mrs. A. O. Turner, captain and] The members who were pre-
!Mrs. R. W. Rubelll. Captain and sent and participated In
BALBOA
STAGE SHOW 8:00 ?. M.
ATLAS TRIO
OF NEW YORK
FRIDAY!!
NEWLY ELECTED OFFICERS of the Cristobal Emblem Club
No. 52, were Installed recently at the Elks Club in Brazos
Heights. Front Row, left to right, Mrs. Larrisun, Historian;
Mrs. Fagerberg, Financial Secretary Si Treasurer: Mrs. Mor-
rison, Vice-Presldent: Mrs. Cain, Jr., Past President: Mrs.
Reccia, President: Mrs. Huldquiat. Marshal; Mrs. Cellucci,
Assistant Marshal: Mrs. OUayer, Press Correspondent; Mrs.
Homelin, Charter Member and mother of club. Back Row,
left to right. Mrs. Brooks, Organist; Mrs. Arnlod. Trustee, 3-
year; Mrs. Russon, 2nd Guard: Mrs. Henning, Corresponding
Secretary; Mrs. CUnchard, District Deputy, of Balboa Em-
blem Club No. 49; Mrs. Pennock, Supreme Marshal; Mrs.
Bell, Chaplain; Mrs. Ashton. 1st Guard; and Mrs. Waldron,
Recording Secretary.
Screen Attraction
4:30 6:15 8:30
Wendell COREY
Ma. Donal CAREY
Ellen DREW
'The Great
Missouri Raid'
Technicolor.'
NO INCREASE
IN ADMISSION
MR. AND MRS. D. J. LEPORE, JR.
MISS PATRICIA MASTERS
WEDS MR. D. J. LEPORE. JR.
mender Paul L. Balay, USNR.to attend the meeting. He pre-
{he'Al. 1st vice-president; Lieut, i seated the Chapter a "Rapping
Mrs! "Gordon Karlge'r. Mr." and'partylieVe :*m7s7"e\"b". Stevens, Donald W. Dewey, USA, 2nd Block" to match the gavel. hop-
Mrs. William Grady. Captain Mrs Howard Anderson Mrs. J. vice-president; Harold O. Whit- tag It might smooth out the
and Mrs. L. A. Skeels, Mr. and j Edge Mrs Fred Hodges, Mre.;ttagton Mrs. E. C. Brown. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ruoff. Mrs. Norman Ernest L. Slocum, Secretary- ;countered during his term of of-
S .L. Cralg. Mrs. H. E. Plhl- Rocker. Mrs. Jack Logsden. Mrs. Treasurer; Louis J. Kesthcly and flee.He concluded his remarks
eren David Rubelll, Gordon Ka- E r. Baltoier Mrs. William David W, Brumfleld. Color Bear- with best wishes for theprosper-
rlger. Jr., and Bob Turner. Hearon. Mrs Helen Quintan.'era, and Reverend Milton A. lty of the Chapter during the
Mrs Ella Wertz, Mrs Roy Cur-Cookson. Chaplain. coming year.
In a private ceremony at the Coco Solo Chapel yester-
day, Miss Patricia Louise Masters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. \
Ralph Masters of Columbus, Ohio, plighted her troth to
Daniel Joseph Lepore, Jr., of Coco Solo, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Daniel Lepore Sr. of Pittsburgh, Pa. ~ ,
The double ring ceremony was performed by Chaplain
(Lieutenant Commander) E. X. Praino at 9:00 ajn.
ApproDrlate organ music pre-, burgh. He has been hi the Uni- M-J[
ceded the ceremony and Mrs. ted SU-.tss Navy for the past Heei
William C. Parker sa.-,? 8chu-,four years and served on
Informal Dinner Party ,rie. Mrs. Alice Fredericks and
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hodg- Mrs. John Crone.
es. Of France Field, had a few --------
I friends from both sides of the Sojourners Installation
Isthmus, for cards and dinner at Dinner
their home Sunday evening. On Saturday eventag Carib-
Thelr guest were: Captain bean Chapter No. 21 National
and Mrs, William Hearon, Mr. sojourners held their installation
and Mr. Ed. Brown, Mr. and of officer and ladles night at
J Edge and Mr. Chris the Fort Davis Of fleer Club, with
fifty-six member* and guest
The retiring president. Captain i The new president presented
Paul C. Koerner outlined the the retiring president with the
high-lights of the past year and past president- badge, with suit-
expressed his appreciation of the able remarks,
work done by his officers and to! At the conclusion of the meet-
the members for the attendance,' ing a "Heroes of 78" meeting was
and also to the ladles for allow-, held, at which time Major
tag their husbands a night off (Continued on Page SIX)
LUX THEATRE|
Show: 2:3V 4:18, 6:35. 9:00
Admission Prices: 0.60 0.30
CECILIA
e^A&'l^JtfHrcii gr S^fflAlk%9S^^ atSf guests of the Chaptej
N. Lowe sang "Pannts Angellcus." the Isthmus last year.
The bride was escorted and
were Lieut. Col. and Mr. W. J.
Mrs. Florence Yard, a member Bennett, and Lieut. COL W. D. |
of the Tuesday luncheon Club. Cunningham. USAFiR), Region
I i-----1------- i ~ u *,. ur-iiiam cinfiln nri Mr, Yanaurll ;oi me ruesaay uncneon oiud. uunningnam. uonr mi, ncgiuu-
CVparkeTa8hegwboyreMan^ * members al Representative for Netlon.lj
-" I r J ,?.tnntiMo Tt: RearAdmlralH Lamont Pugh with a birthday party at their So ourners on the Canal Zone.i
was fSneVQwath rV n'ec^ * the Hotel Washing- who In.tailed_the.foilowin* o_f-
fitted bodice, and fitted elbow-'Medicine and Surgery of the,ton.
length sleeves. The street-length: Navy Department and Cantata
fleer for 1952: Judge E. I. P.
A handsome purse was given. Tatelman, president; Lieut Com-
IBALBOA
OPENS SATURDAY!
A GREAT PLAY
BECOMES A GREAT
MOTION PICTURE
With These Unfor-
gettable People!
shirt wa very full. She wore Winnie Gibson, USN, Chief of the
beige shantung shoes, matching; Navy Nurse Corps, made a visit
three-quarter gloves, and a halo to the United States Naval Hos-
hat of beige flowers. Her flowers pltal at Coco Solo Tuesday. Fol-
were an orchid corsage and her lowing their tour of the hospital
only jewelry wa a strand of they were the luncheon guests
eafls [of Captain Charles C. Yanquell.
* (MC USN; and Mrs. Yanquell at
Mrs. Anthony Peehence was
Ithe only attendant. She wore a!
Itwo-piece dress of navy blue faille
I with a white pique jacket and
harmonizing accessories, Her
flower were a corsage of plnkj
I carnations.
Chief Anthony Pachence was|
I best man for the groom.
A wedding breakfast was held
I at the Hotel Washington and (
the guests present with the bride
and groom were: Mr. and Mrs. ;
Pachence and Mr. and Mrs.
land Mr. Parker.
A reception was held at thej
(residence of Mr. and Mrs. Pa-,
Ichence at Quarters 238-B, on the
1 Co:o Solo Naval 8'ation. from [
]2:00 to 4:00 p.m. In the after-
Innon for the bride and groom,
"he bride's table was covered
I with an embroidered Canton
linen table cloth and wss cen-
tered with the traditional wed-
ding cake topped with a ml-
Iniature bride and groom and e.i-
Icircled with gardenias.
Mrs Parker served the cake
|atv< Mr. H. T. Jone presided"
let t'~e punch bowl
T-. and Mrs. Leoore left later
in the afternoon for the Hotel
[El Panama where they will spend |
la short honeymoon, returning
iMocdav to the Atlantic Side.
[They will reside at Quarters 5-Ki
Icoco Slito. j
Miss Master arrived by plane
Sunday from Ohio and has been i
the houseguest of Mr. and Mrs.!
|pachence. She graduated from
I the Lyndon -. McKlnley High [
I School In her home town and
Ibas been ehiploved as disbursing
Ifio-k with Kobbackers in that1
leity.
Mr. Lepore graduated from the
|Dr."id B. Oliver High in Pitta-
rrs Movirrm*
[Panama v^anal cJheaters
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
.ir-Coadlllonad
l;H sue
Ava GARDNER e Jipis MASON
PANDORA A Ml FIVING DUTCHMAN"
(Technicolor
Friday 'THE GREAT MISSOURI BAU>"
DIABLO HTS.
:15 S2
. ,P...........-
dry GRANT Privllla LANS
ARSENIC AND OLD LACE
Friday "KANSAS BAU3EB-
IMPORTANT

Every Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. the CEN-
TRAL THEATRE will present a week-end re-
lease picture and in addition will give the fol-
lowing :

COCOLI
:15 7:1.1
Kiibv GRANT 9 Marfaret FIELD
"YUKON MANHUNT"
Friday "NO QUESTIONS ASKEP-
DEDRC MIGUEL
(:1S S:M
t
(Friday I
'GOLDEN GIRL'
GAMBOA
l3Bornh KERP tawirt GRANGER
"KING SOLOMON'S MINES"
(Tcchnf Tlon
Saturday "NO QUESTIONS ASKED"__
KIRK
Paraara! gratad
ELEANOR
WILLIAM
!!GIAS-PAI!e-Brl)IX
.WILLIAM Wylers
SIDNEY KIN6SLEVS
GA 1 UN
(Friday)
"Across The Wide Missouri"
1stA round trip ticket to San Jose, Costa
Rica on a Luxurious TACA airliner.
2ndA week-end at the HOTEL PANA-
MONTE in Boquete, flying on one of
1 *; i the spacious COPA planes.
3rdLast, but not the least, a full sheet of
the NATIONAL LOTTERY TICKET,
that pays off $44,1300.00 in cold cash.
Enjoy yourself and be LUCKY by attending
the mper-$pecud function at the CENTRAL
THEATRE every WEDNESDAY.
MARGARITA
. : 1:11
Don AMECHE Alice FAYE
"IN OLD CHICAGO"
FrMaj "AIB CADET- |
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Cudltlaned
CIS .:!
Trad ASTAIRE a Sel'y HUTTON
'LET'S DANCE' (Technicolor)
Friday "ALONG THr. GREAT DIVID
CENTRAL
TODAY RELEASE TODAY
Academy Award Winner]
'
Flex-lhe household finish of
thousand uaea both inside
and outside. It's easy to
apply. Wide range
of brilliant, last-
ing colore.
Do not accept substitutes.
Look for the "GENERAL" trademark.
GENERAL PAINT CORPORATION
MATERIALES DE CONSTRUCCIN, S.A.
ARIAS Y CIA. David
| W. 17th end "H" Street Telephone: 2-1M1. 2-1M5 Psnsmi
7M4 Herrrre Avenue Phone 626 Coln.
he was
the three musketeers
in one.,.and one
lover in a
million!
W2
r

WJfr
W* jos|ferreT
yflal ^F* '" Stanley Kremar't Predtxtion of
Cyrano
^^r do Borgoroc
MALA POWERS-
intuit urn mau.li aaa*N anaa
QL^&
-TODAY
WEEK-nTO RELEASE!
Shows: 3:00 5:05 6:50
S:j0 p.m.
*lr HfcT Unk r Fire-
Amd Their Ism Flamedl
A hoc-grenade hero in
muddy boots and the blue-eyed
WACvrhobadhim
walking or velvet!
rWILUAM
NANCY
THieif no IN ALB. TMI
WORLD LIKaT ARMS
THAT l*Tf
'Ilove you!*
FRANK
ItoiDEN Olson Iovejoy
OietCTfO Bv
3ENE EVANS DICK WESSON
^SSi"* MICHAEL CURTIZ




THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPEMttPENT DAUT H1W1PAM
THURSDAY JANUARY SI, 1H*
^
Summer, Davis Return Bout In Panam Feb. 17,
Two Pro iMop Games Set For Panama Tonight
Nicolis-Thomas, Osorio
Vs. Clark Mound Starlen
Teams
BOMBERS
YANKEES
BIUEBIRDS
BROWNIES
PANAMA PROFESSIONAL LEAGUE
The Standings
Won Lost
.... 16
... lfi II
..... 10 1
... 10 16
Pet.
.640
.593
.385
.385
Atlantic Pony
League
STANDINGS OF THE TEAMS
TEAM Won Lost
Bulck............ 5 2
Margarita........ ., 3
C. P. O........... *
Shamrocks......., *
Game of January 29
BUICK AB R
TONIGHTS GAMES Sasso, 2b.......... 1 2
Panama Stadium First Game.: Bluebirds (Nicohs 5-5) Hannigan, ss .. ....... \
vs. Yankees (Thomas 4-1) Matos, cf.......... 3
(Second Game): Brownies (dark 5-5) vs. Bombers (Osorio 7-1 | Lamta, lb.......... S
S ?MSSs w Sartas cs=l~
Clark of the Brownies and AI-j .
BUSUfSSe Philippine Rallan
Light Motorbikes To Be Back
At Races In Colon Sunday '
u-tui. t"...... ""
Smith, p ......... 2
Lightweight motorcycles are
~etting back into the raring act
at Coln Stadium Sunday after-
noon at 3:30.
The short 400-meter oral, with
its sharp curres, gives the small
^achines a chance against the
ig models that need elbow room _._._, TWIIIGHT BASEBALL
to work up full speed and power. PACIFIC TWILIGH^ ggrogj
Gibraltar Takes Over First
Place In Pacific Twi Loop
A Yankee win plus a Bomber
defeat will throw the league race
into a virtual tie for first place
The opposing teams have added
incentive in seeking victory also
Smothers CAA19-5
C.P.O. AB R
"amilton, lb........ 2
art. 2b............ 3 0
\ Newhard, 3b .... ..
rawford, lf-p...... 3 2
:ibson, rf.......... 2 1
Didler, p-lf........ 2 2
Ramsey, ss......... 1 J
Recela, cf.........N
Hawthorne, c........ 0 0
Score By Innings
Bulck 0 1168
C. P. O. 6 10 2 9
Home RunsMatos, Crawford.
The lightweights have been out
f the picture in Panam since
e last road racing meet around
he Juan Dial circuit.
Only entry Sunday with pre-
vious experience of 400-meter
irack speedway racing is Ray
?| Mazan, who has competed in the
"'United States.
11 But Juan Franco champion
3 Choppy White has climbed off
0j his Vincent, too heavy to be nip-
TEAM
Gibraltar Life Ins. 5
Balboa Brewers ..4 8
Pan'm Merchants Z 4
Balboa Hi School.. 1 8
The Insurancemen got back In
the game as they scored four
times in the bottom half of the
Won Lost Pet1 third on three hits, two walks
.8331 and took a 6-5 lead In the fourth
.667 i when they scored two more on
.333! two hitsone a three-base knock
167
H
11 is hotting himself up a Triumph,
01 high compression pistons, racing
0i ,-arburetor and
Wednesday at the Ancon dla-: struckout byBazn 1. R Smith
because they are now deadlocked d the Philippine Rattan1 2. Didler 4. Winning Pltcher-
in third place. 1 team ran aU over the CAA nine, Crawford. Losing Pitcher-R.
Brownie hurler Clark will be vlctory of 19 to 5.!R. smith. Umpires-Badders and
shooting for his 49th Pro League l0phllipplne Rattan scored five Curtis. Game Called-Darkness.
victory and a new record Clark runaln the first, nine in the see-
ls now tied with Pat Scantleburv: md tWQ m the tnlrd and three
for the league record with a total ,n the slxth
CAA scored two In the third
and three in the seventh
In trying out new pitchers,
CAA used three men. Atkinson
started and pitched one Inning,
giving up five runs on two mis,
two walks and striking out none.
He was relieved by Tackett who
pitched two innings and waste-!
of 48 victories.
Last night the Yanks bunched
their runs in two Innings to de-
feat the Bluebirds 8-2 and move
within one game of first place.
The Yankees picked up a half-
game because the first place
Fight Results
(Monday Niht)
1 ~~-------------------"
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
Opener Set Sunday
The ten-team Pacific Dlvlsion-
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Gibraltar Life Insurance 10, Bal-
boa Brewers 9.
SUNDAYS DOUBLEHEADER
(At Balboa Stadium 1 P-m.)
Gibraltar Life Insurance vs. Bal-
boa High School; Balboa Brewers
vs. Panam Merchants.
For the first time this season
the Balboa Brewers dropped out
of first place as Gibraltar Life
Insurance nosed them out by a
10-9 margin with Jack Love of
the Insurancemen notching his
third straight win.
In a playing field that was not
,, in the best condition, the Insur-
calm of the Colon cinder track. ancemen came from behind
twice to tie up the game and
forge ahead.
Due to the rain yesterday the
game got under way fifteen min-
.utes late. _. .
Fastball artist Love, although
Riding the same BSAs on
vhich they kept White P/etty
-.-.uch in order at the Juan Fran-
i meet will be Eddie Armistead
-nd Jerry Fox.
All told, the whiz kids should
considerably disarray the Sunday
Silver City Sports
Intramural Softball (Jr. High) ft
Senior High (Girls)
Los Santos increased their lead
over second place Bocas to two
by Lou Hllzlnger deep into cen-
ter fieldand a free pass.
The rest of the game the Brew-
ers were able to score twice in
the fifth and sixth Innings while
the Insurancemen scored one In
the fifth, two In the sixth to tie
up the ball game and pushed
across the winning marker with
two outs in the last half of the
seventh frame. ml
Ed Scott and Chris Mueller
were the leading batters for the
Brewers with two for five and
two for three respectively. Big
gun at the plate for the winning
club was Lou Hllzlnger with
three for four, with a single, a
double and a triple. Larry Jones
was the next best as he collected
two hits in three official trips to
the plate. The last time up he
knocked one deep into right field
that could have gone for extra
bases but rules only permitted
Jones a single since he drove In
the winning run with that base
knock.
Boxing Commission Okays
Bout; Ted Arrives Feb. 8
The Panama Boxing Commission last night ap-
proved the Federico Plummer-Teddy (Red Top) Da-
vis return bout which is scheduled to be held Feb. 17
at the Panama Olympic Stadium.
The fight will go a limit of ten rounds or less.
The first time these boxers met, in New York, Davis
pounded out a unanimous decision over the local fea-
therweight champion. Plummer, apparently, was not
in his best form. .
Davis and his manager, Mushky Salow, are ex-
pected to arrive on the Isthmus Feb. 8. According to
unconfirmed reports, Davis has been offered a $2,-
000 guarantee with an option to 25 per cent of the
gate phis expenses.
The semifinal will be a ten-round battle between
lightweights Wilf redo Brewster and Leonel Peralta.
These boys signed to make a limit of 137 pounds.
Two 118- pound four round preliminaries will
round out the program. Young Gittens will tackle
Cisco Kid in the curtain raiser while Al Hostin
meets Baby Guardia in the other preliminary.
_____________________________________________________________________________________ ^*

pitched two tonlngsand^fe Bama League, sponsored by, games behlnd the fine pitching
sponsible for nlneunson Q& Physical Education and Re- J Betty FOrte who chalked up
hits. Schilling tossed the last u< Branch 0f the Division ner. fourth win against no defeat
ave up nc o.hnni, MrfnM into actionn.. th. Tninr Hio-h Intramural
three frames and
runs on six hits am
balls.
one base on
BOSTONNorman Hayes, 163,: Philippine Rattan sent a first
Boston, outpointed Jake LaMot- time winner to the mound in the
ta. 169',i, New York (10). person of Gordon Smith who al-
SALT LAKE CITYRex Layne, ,owed otuy five runs on seven
19, Salt Lake City, knocked out hits and tw0 free passes
& J ,._____ Ol- I ,^in*4nn I'll I ,,,i__ ',,,,,., ~c M'OPP' Pi
,,jts and two free(iP^.ssi5.,1Jnr..n. Veneau-s Commissary lads. iles by David
Bob earner, 186, Lexington (3). The sluggers weM^FUlippine ve oUowmg teams with their;ue y
attanHerble Newhouse with 3 *'"_'"""" B ,,niiPH in the r.___tf. rv
of Schools, swings Into action ,m tne Junior High Intramural
Sunday morning, at 9:30, on the. Softball League, which is direct-
La Boca Ball Park, led by the.Physical Education and
Scheduled for a stiff battle in i Recreation Branch of the Dm- ,ure h0wever. A iew errors uj
the lid-lifter are Manuel Tul-|slon 0f Schools. Los Santos car- catcher Dave Sullivan helped the
loch's Army Quartermaster, de- ried off an easy victory by scr-iBrewers.
fending champions, and Roy Ra- mg nine runs against three tai- ---------^_
.^n'n PrnmlMru lads. up K*> r\oviri
McCracken Lost
Altitude Debate
In Pool Of Blood
BLOOMINOTON, Ind., Jan. 81
(NEA) Indiana basketball play-
ers had worried about the effects
of high altitude when they in-
vaded 7000-foot-high Laramie to
meet Wyoming.
Branch .
his men together for
*
Three Alleged
Hoop 'Fixers'
NY
nicked for eight hits, became the
leading Ditcher of the Pacific
Twilight circuit.
The game started as though
Love was going to live up to his
reputation of being wild, as the
Brewers got one run In the sec-
ond and pushed across four in
the third to get a 510 lead over
the Insurancemen. The wildness
of Love did not enter the pic-
ture, however. A few errors by
The box score:
Brewers-
Scott, 3b
Carlin, lb .
Cox. 2b. .
Neckar.c .
Olbson, cf .
McOe, If .
Herring, rf.
McGlade, ss
Mueller, p .
Larrlnaga, p
PROVIDENCE. R. I. Johnny RattanHerbie Newhouse
Bratton, 150, Chicago, knocked for 3, Nichols with 2 for^^Law-
out Bobby Rosado, 146, New York
(S).
ver, Jones, Sutherland. Medlnger,
Jutzy, Woodruff, and Bob En-
NBW YORKVinnie Martinez, geike with one each accounted
149, Paterson, N.J., knocked outfor 12 hits off CAA hurlers (Bob
Mrrio Moreno, 147J4, Havana Lawyer is stUl crying for.a hit In
(g) i the first when third baseman
BALTIMORE Artie Towne.l Malene let the ball pass between
166, New York, stopped Eddie, nlmself and third base). CAA
Marshall, 159, Capital Heights.l Latnam with 2 for 2 Malene with
Md. (1). 2 for 4, and Silva. Polomski and
managers are enrolled In the j
to another victory against
AB
. 5
. 2
. 3
. 3
. 4
. 4
. 3
. 4
. 3
. 1
HPO A
2 0 2
11
1
8
0
n
n
o
n
o
McCracken gathered
"This talk of high altitude U
nonsense," the Indiana coach de-
clared. "I don't want anyone
blaming a bad night on the alti-
tude.'1
Suddenly, just as McCracken
was warming up, he felt a trickle
down his nose.
It was the first of four nose
" I bleeds.
Totals.....32 9 8 20*12 >
RECORD WRECKER
Ames, la.(NEA)Forty-nine
Big Seven basketball records
Caroline Cox's triple and Mar- lombla who took the game 7-4.
league: Building Divislonj H._ J., orie Boyce's double for Bocas
league: Bunaing lhvisiuu, . "m one uoyce auuurc iw i,^..
Nicholls; Army Signal, Sgt. Dar-(declded a g_a tie between Bocas
nell; Army Quartermaster. Man-;and chlrlqui in on* of the most
uel Tulloch- Commissary ( Roy ever-paced game witnessed by a
Raveneau; Kobbe Sales Store. fair_slMd crowd at Sliver City
Central Labor|r ayground.
Atkinson with one each.
The totals: ._ ,
Philippine Rattan19 runs, 12
hits. 8 walks and 4 errors.
CA-5 runs, 7 hits. 2 walks
and 6 errors. .
Winning pitcher was Gordon
Smith, the loser Tackett.
Trotters Attract
NEW ORLEANSKid Centrel-
la, 137, Nicaragua, stopped Lenny
Alvares. 136, New Orleans (1)
CHICAGODave Rollins, 1Z9,
Detroit, outpointed Don Ward,
134, Gary, Ind. (6).
QUEBEC Fernando Gagnon,
118, Quebec, outpointed Johnny
O'Brien, 120, Boston (10).
(Tuesday Night)
TOLEDOArchie Moore, 175'/, ii i
Toledo, outpointed Harold John- ReCOTO MUTUel
on, 170"4. Philadelphia, 10. lftC1
newark, nj-Eddie compo. Handle In 1951
&>&Sttk nS?K I COLUMBUS, O. Jan. 31 (NEA)
* u'iiiTF P1AINS NY.Herbie vious year.
. i7 Flmsford N Y.. out- State treasuries were enriched
";-; t $16,380,584. This was a 29.4 per
cent jump over 1950.
California, New Jersey. Dela-
Ricardo Pinzn; .
Office, Alfred Bowen; Navy Ord-
nance, W. A. 8lnes; Post Office,
Carlos Diaz: Electrical Division ,
Joe Brathwalte; and Corozall team
Sales Store. I Los Santos......
The following games are Ust-.Eoca8..........2
ed for the first week of p^y: coln..
The Junior High standings are:
Won Lost Pet.
Senior High standings:
Co-: Gibraltar AB
Karst, 3b. ... 5
De la Mater, 2b 5
4
painted
York, 8.
SAN JOSE,
Sal Belloise, 168, New
0
1
1
1
2
1
1
2'
1.000
.667
.500
.500
.333
.000
.000
.000
TEAM
Cuba..........2 0
Colombia.......2 0
Honduras.......1 2
Nicaragua......0
Venezuela......0 2
Jones, cf
Hllzinger, ss .
Won Loit Pet.,Sullivan, c-lb..
1.000 Kelleher, If
1.000 Conover, lb-c
.333 Colston, rf. .
.OOOHinz, rf .
.000 Love, p. ...
Sunday, 9:30 a.m.: Army Quar-1 Herrera........1
termaster vs. Commissary. ;Cocl.........". 1
Monday. 5:00 p.m.: Kobbe! Qavtd..........0
Sales Store vs. Corozal Sales chlrlqui........0
Store. a Darin........0
Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.: Navy Ord-! --------
nance vs. Army Signal. i
Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.: PostOI-| jn the Senior High School In-
fice vs. Central Labor Of flee. f ramural Softball League, Cuba
Thursday. 5:00 p.m.: Electrical ^ the lead by defeating Hon-
Dlvlsion vs. Building Division. UTas 3-0 behind the superb
. Friday. 5:00 p.m.: Army Quar-; -itching of Gwendolyn Layne
termaster vs. Navy Ordnance. i8nd errorless fielding support
Saturday. 4:30 p.m.: Corozal fr0m her teammates.
Sales Store vs. Post Office.
Due to the shaky defense by
Captain Manning's outfielders,
^e was unable to pilot her team
Cal.Chico Rosa,
II Honolulu, outpointed Sam- ware. Michigan and New York
MfUMfM 5 Los Angeles, loJ experienced the largest Increases.
SACRAMENTO -Joey Lpex, Eight of the 11 sUtes which
II sVeramento, utpointed sanction pari-mutuel wagering
Riddle'fBabe" Herman, 135, Losl on harness races showed im-
Angeles. 10. provement.
EARLY BIRD DECLINED
New York (NEA) Jacob
Schmitt, young southpaw acquir-
ed by the Giants from Baltimore.
turned down Dodger and Yankee
offers when he was 16.
Silver City Elementary Baseball
The Giants defeated the Dodg-
ers 7-2 to go Into a tie for first
place with the Browns and the
Braves.
Batteries, Winning: E. Cross-
dale and S. Barrera; Losing: G.
Redman and R. Verley.
Edmond Crossdale of the Gi-
ants batted three hits in three
turns at bat.
Elementary Baseball standings
are:
HPO
0 0
J were broken and tied during the y
conference's annual ore-season f(
conference's annual pre-season
tournament this winter.
NEW YORK, Jan. SI (UP)
District Attorney Frank Hogan
of New York City says three al-
leged basketball "fixers" have
been lndkted for "bribery and
conspiracy." They are Daniel
l.amont of Altoona, Pennsylva-
nia, Joseph Scrota of New York
and former Long Island Univ-
ersity star Jackie Goldsmith.
The three are accused of of-
fering a bribe to former New
York University player Connie
Schaff who is serving a six-
month sentence in connection
with the basketball scandal.
The bribery indictment carries
a maximum penalty of five
rears on conviction the ene
.'or conspiracy a maximum of
three years.
f|J
7 5
All Colors
SOFT BALL
JERSEYS
PANTS
BATS
DISTRIBUTORS.
CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.

* SHOES
and all equipment
required
for Soft Ball
TEAM
Browns.........
Braves......... J
Giants........ J
Cardinals .. .. .. J
Dodgers........ 1
Indians........ J
White Sox...... l
Yankees........
Totals .... .32 10 10 21
Score By Innings
Brewers 01402209
Gibraltar 0 0 4 3 12 110
Two outs when winning run
scored. Runs Batted InGibson,
McGee, Jones, Hllzinger 4, Kelle-
her 2, Conover, Hinx. Earned
RunsBrewers 3, Gibraltar 8.
Left on BasesBrewers 7, Gib-
raltar 9. Three Base HitHllzin-
ger. Two Base HitHllzinger.
SacrificeHerring. Stolen Bases
Scott 4, Carlin, Cox 2, Herring,
McGlade 2, Mueller. Karst, Love.
Hit by Pitchby Mueller (Sulli-
van) 2. Passed BallsSullivan 4,
Conover 1, Neckar 2. Base on
Won Lost Pet. Balls offLove 4, Mueller 4.
.750iStruckoutbyLove 10, Mueller 5,
.750 Larrlnaga 1. Hits and Runs off-
Mueller 6 and 7 in 4 innings;
Larrlnaga 5 and 3 in 3. Losing
PitcherLarrlnaga tt-1). Wln-
.333'nlng PitcherLove (3-0). Um-
.333! piresMohl and Coffey. Time of
.000 Game2:36.
l
l
1
l
2
2
2
3
.750
.500
.333
the V-M tri-o-matic
..'... tii

USE OUR
EASY PAYMENT PLAN
See The BULLFIGHTS
at
LA
MACARENA
RING

CONCHITA MORENO
4:30p SUNDAY-Feb.3'd
fits ony spot
in your homo I

SUN-KISSED SKIERA cur-i
vicious young mus smiles be-
hind sun glasses at she braves
January weather in a sun suit
testing the Mt. Sunapee ski run.
This i not the recommended ski
habit for milady in New Hamp-
shire's SUte Park at this tima
of the year. The sun is not guar*
- anteed. (NEA)a _^,
25 or 60
cycles
t.<6 V-M tri-o-matic 9701
For bedrooms, dens, rumpus rooms or rec-
ord corners wherever people congregate
to hear their favorite records, the V-M tri-o-
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own superb amplifying system, the tri-o-matic
970 plugs into any AC outlet, affords top
listening pleasure from til your records
all sixes, all speeds, all labels. Shuts itself
off compltttly and tutomttictlly,
after the last record- has played.
ARMILL1TA DE ESPASA
FAREWELL PERFORMANCE
of the distinguished "matadores"
221 RADIO CENTER
Bolivar
Ul.
40
CONCHITA MORENO
and
ARMILLITA DE ESPAA
FOUR (4) BULLS
will be fought and killed.
We re pleased to announce that we have obtained
the bulls from El Rosario Ranch in Antn,
famous for its fighting bulls.
Tickets wUI be on sale at San Francisco Garden
February 1st.


THURSDAY, JANUARY SI, 1958
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAQKKINR
39 Colleges Sought W. Va. Workman, Genuine Fizzle At Start
BULLDOZER__Manolo Contales, cape and sword still in his right
hand, gets the worst o the going here as he is uplifted and shaken
by a fuming bull during a corrida in- Mexico City. The diminutiva
Spanish matador suffered internal injuries and concussion. (NBA)
by
JOE WILLIAMS
Putting one Uttle word after another and whatever became
of Sen. Claghorn? A St. Louis church croup to demanding the
dismissal of Jim Rivera from the Brown's roster, and owner Bttl
Veeek, the Odd Character, may find It impossible to defend the
outfielder'* moral record which is particularly offensive and
Includes a prison stretch. Maybe the White Sox knew something
when they got rid of him without even a tryout. Supposed to be
a teal good prospect, too.

Frank Shields may have disqualified himself as captain of
the Da/vis Cup team by his untimely and ill-tempered castlgation
of Dick Savltt at the ranking session o the tennis fathers. This
is not to question the validity of the charges (poor form and
insubordinaUeiM but.cather the shocking .impropriety of the team
captain's- -approaeh. Whether Ted Schroeder belonged on the
team which bowed to the Australians will continue to be a con-
troversial Issue. One way to avoid such pointless bickering In the
future would be to name only players who competed In our Na-
tionals.

Disappointed was the baseball fan who went to the boat show
looking for show boats like TV umpires. You probably noticed
thai altar completing the deal Mr. Churchill did not say to Mr.
Twman, "and that ain't tin." Throwing the book at a rowdy fight
manager can be wasted effort, so few of them being able to read.
At least Vishinsky, in calling our Gen. Van Fleet a cannibal, did
not add: "Eat those words." Cleaning up Washington politics is
almost as difficult as cleaning up college football.

The stork is hovering over Frank Leahy's residence with No.
8. A special car will carry New Yorkers to New Haven Thursday
when the Yankees' George Weiss will be acclaimed by home
towners. A note from the author, John B Steckbeck, corrects a
statement In this space that no book has ever been written on
the Carlisle Indains of Jim Thorpe's tim<\ This will be news to
Pop Warner, the old coach, who also thought otherwise. Title:
Fabulous Redmen. The author spent nine years gathering mate-
rial. The-Joey Maxim-Harry Matthews match is stU'. very much
alive, despite indications to the contrary. Will be held here, if
and when.

Fable: Once upon a time a radio star sang a request number
and it wasn't about shrimp boats. Rules do not step illegal use
of the hands in football and all this propaganda about the girls'
inflamable sweaters isn't likely to discourage the wolves. It took
a couple of centuries to settle the stymie problem in golf, so the
Korean truce negotiations should not be dismissed as hopeless. A
dreadful hardship ease is that of the Boston baseball writers who
have lost Ted Williams to the Marines. Most absurd of romantic
myths Is that dames bait their traps onlv in Leap Year. This to
the only time of the year the baseball magnates make the head-
lines. Ditto Republicans.
It was first reported here last sprint; that the Yankee foot-
bail franchise would be shifted to Dallas. The Broadway column
Sifluence). One reason Ted Collins failed was that he had so lit-
e time to devote to the team. Any man who has made such a
splendid success of radio and television couldn't have missed If
he had' given sports promotion his complete efforts. Too many
men make the mistake of thinking a sports organization can run
itself. It Isn't that simple. And It can be quite expensive, as the
affable, sports-minded, free-handed nuestro was to learn. From
now on Collins will have more time to ct K*te Smith over that
mountain, a grand lady who Is sports-minded herself.

There Is so much hogwash in the country It Is surprising pigs
lank so low hygenlcally. It is no trick at all to sit tight after the
fifth martini. The new car models are equipped unfortunately,
with everything bnt model drivers. Costello was beaten 11 to 1,
et won the decision and this is what to known a? a moral victory
n the Sir Three. It tarns out Capt. Kurt Carleen to a wrestling
nut, which to added proof there to a skeleton in every man's closet
Students of humor are asked to explain why everybody laughs
when it rains in California.

It did hot become Joe Louis to call Horton Smith "a Hitler."
nor was it in keeping with his past behav.'cr in curb matters, yet
he did win his point and Negro players are now eligible to com-
pete in POA tournaments. Not many of us were aware that the
PGA neople specifically stipulated their tournaments were res-
tricted to "members of the Caucasian race." and their contracts
were so worded. Actually, the golf pros should have a warm spot
In their pocketbooks, if not hearts, for Louis They took him for
Slenty in sucker bets when he had it. Definition of lntoleranoe:
bigoted pen dipped in the Ink of Ignorance.
Beautiful .
Wm. Rogers
Silverware Sets
CLUB or CREDIT
as low a
500 Weekly
Radio Center
7110
Bolvar
40
Coln
Mountaineer
Is To Remain
In Basketball
ft
A Staff Correspondent
On The Alleys...
NEW YORK, Jan. 31 (NBA)
To say that gangling Mark Work-
man of West Virginia is the fin-
est player in the intercollegiate
basketball firmament today is a
I
subject for wide
debate.
U n q ueatlon-
ably he to one of
the best. Cer-
tainly be to the
most impressive
to appear in New
York this sea.
son. Undoubted-'
ly he belongs on
anybody's All-
America.
DIABLO HEIGHTS BOWLING
ALLEYS Stephens
PanCanal Bowling Association I Thomas.
1952 City Championship Tourney Jamison
Schedule for Teams Norria
Sunday, Feb. t5:31 pm.: Engelke.
AcesMargarita.
Cristobal Gun ClubMargarita Totals
Elks No. IMargarita
DeadheadsPacific Cosmopol-
itan Mixed
Whiz KidsAlbrook AACS
Pin SplittersAlbrook AACS.
FUERZA Y LE
230 184 193
154 108 100
192 158 175
203 184 213 600
180 192 192 504
Florida Asks More
Auditors To Check
a Horse. Dog Tracks
Morton
Dailey .
Bowen .
Meianson.
Schneider
. 959 886
vs.
BOYD BROS.
. 183 193 20
187 171 18
TALLAHASSEE, Fla., Jan. II
(UP) The State Racing Com-
mission asked the cabinet yes-
1784 terday for a supplemental ap-
propriation of $50,000 to hire
more auditors and inspectors be-
cause business is so brisk at Flo-
Little
League
580
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
TEAM
Police..........S
fifth to score two runs and raced
to third when Curdts made a
fumbling return to Jimmy Wat-
Won Lost Pet.1 son.
Sunday, Feb. 38:*e p.m.:
DeadheadBalboa Men's
BudwetoerC n r a n d u Men's Totals
Open
EngineersEngineers Mixed Marabella
Poison IvyEngineers Mixed Zebrock .
Woodchueks Pacific Cosmo- Coffey .
politaa Mixed Colston. .
Tops __Paelfic Cosmopolitan Balcer .
aacs OfficersAlbrook AACS
Five-Up Albrook AACS. Totals .
197 176 160 530 season.
184 180 214 578
100 199 203 568
502 rida's dog and horse tracks this Seat .. ..,......J
... 927 918 9152758
MAX R. STEMPEL
171
187
188
201
171
222
193
109
191
170
185 578
168 548
160 517
188 580
202 543
The big trou-
ls that the temptation is over-
whelming to babble along in su-
perlatives. That's the kind of
athlete Mr. Automatic Is. He has
few flaws.
Among Workman's accomplish-
ments is that he owns every
West Virginia scoring record,
fashioned a sizzling 26.1 average
last trip, third best In the na-
tion. Moreover, his prodigious
scoring feats included a 50-polnt
shelling of Salem, W. Va., Col-
lege, 48 against Washington and
Jefferson, 44 against George
Washington.
This season he destroyed New
York University' 12-game vic-
tory skein with a 24-point out-
burst, hit for 30 against Niagara,
37 against Richmond. In the
Maryland game, he flashed more
agility than an angry alley cat
on a binge accounting for 30
Solnts in the Mountaineers' 39-
S win.
Monday, Feb. 47:M pjn.:
BearcatsBalboa Men's Bates. .
Acme PaintCurundu 'Men's Klumpp
Open Walker .
Canada DryCurundu Men's Jenner .
ble in talking 0.en Andrews
about the six- j.ntaenClassic
SearsClassic Totals
PAAClassic
Nash-WillysClassic.
Mark Workman
foot nine-inch, 220-pound center
tl
Tuesday, Feb. 57:36 p.i
MartinsMajor
B.m.:
Almacenes
Boyd Bros.Major
NFFE Local 595Major
H. I. Homa Co.Major
Fuerza y LusMajor
7461st AU SignalMajor
AngellniMajor
Max R. StempelMajor.
Schedule of double and sin-
gles entries will be posted on or Fronhelser
. 918 945
vs.
ANGEUNI
. 191 12
. 202 170
. 158 187
. 215 222
. 147 193
903-2766
193 566
201 573
149 494
164 601
167 507
913 954 8742741
Saylon
Hudak .
Shattuck
Cooley .
Madeline
Totals ,
Filebark
Sartorl
7461BT AU SIGNAL
171
170
148
100
189
151
149
154
180
191
G. Warren Snchez, Commis-
sion secretary, said present ap-
propriations are Inadequate to
cover expenses for policing and
supervising the state's racing
plants. He said the Commission
"cannot operate adequately with
less money than we had last
year."
A three-man committee of Gov.
Fuller Warren, Comptroller C. M.
Gay and Treasurer Ed Larson
was named to report back on the
request at the next cabinet meet-
ing. Warren indicated yesterday
that he Is in favor of granting
more money.
The request for more funds
AFGE 14. '......3
Lincoln Life.....2
Elks 1414......1
Firemen....., .. 1
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
AFGE 7, Sear* 6.
TODAY'S GAME
Firemen v. Police
AFGE defeated Bears yester-
,y 7 to 0 and moved Into a tie
th them for second place. Billy
.750; In the top of the sixth Billy
.600 drove In the winning run when
.600 three Sears players let the ball
.500 fall in short left for a single.
.25 Leading hitters for the day
.250 were Castleman with a double
nd single in three trips. For
Sears, the Durfee brothers each
had two for three, Tommy get-
ting a double in the third.
Today, the Smokies meet the
Coppers. Come on out and see the
fracas.
The box score:
AFGE 14 AB R
Salas, 2b...... 1 4
Morris, 3b.'..... 2 1
five hits and Castleman, p. .. 3 2
Wills, lb-c..... 3 0
Reece, lb...... 1 0
Snodgrass, ... .. 1
them for second pit
Castleman went all the way for
AFGE allowing
striking out ten.
In the last of the sixth, the
Mall Order Boys had the bases Motion ss'
loaded when Billy,walked the gdmondson,'tt
.third man in the inning after
tXvMhJSi ^ ant clp\ted $2'"ltwo were out. Gabe Mendoza hit
?M2J.mp ta raclng rtYenue,a weak grounder to Castleman,
this season. and the play ^ flrgt ende, ^
The cabinet also awarded blds;Bame*
for another $220,878 worth of | Billy aided his own cause by
before Feb. 3.
W. L. NORRIS,
Tournament Manager.
83-3248 or 83-2114.
CLASSIC LEAGUE BOWLING
Last Friday night's match be-
tween 8ears andP
AA turned Into
a red hot battle with both teams
hitting over 2800. The Sears boys
,..,. ioti ax niiTSFT managed to come out on top by
WORKMAN INEPT AT OUTSET. takm tw0 game8 and total pins.
_. ,j ._ .*. PAA has had tough luck these
The 22-year-old senior shows last two weeKSi they have hit six
you how absurdly .simple tnis 900 games Dut were oniy aDie to
lly
game can be, but It took him
tireless toll and determined ef-
fort to scale the heights. The
Mountainous Mountaineer was
horribly inept at the outset, ac-
tually scored only 27 points in 17
games during his sophomore sea-
son at Charleston, W. Va., High.
He was a genuine fizzle. The cus-
tomers saluted him with full-
throated boos.
"Players from the other side
rode him brutally," recalls Clay
Martin, who coached Charleston
High. "They called him names.
He was even spit at.
"In one game a player slapped
him, hoping to start a fight,
maybe get him tossed out. Mark
did nothing, simply bowed his
head and walked away."
Charleston fans dwell on how
the boy had matured by gradua-
tion. His diffidence had been re-
placed by aggressiveness. He was
a leader, head high, a winner.
Thirty-nine colleges from coast
to coast contacted nim soliciting
his exquisite talents.
Howard Cann Is just one of a
legion of coaches who speaks
with moving eloquence about
Workman. "He's positively the
best we've faoed this year,1' the
NYU head man declares. we
tried everything, but there np
stopping htm."
BEST AT WHAT HE LIKES
Mainly through the magic of
Mr. Automatic, West Virginia
dropped only one of its first 10
games this season, an 83-81 over,
flme to George Washington. The
Morgantown quintet averaged 84
points per start, Marvelous Mark
better than 25. Against NYU,
West Virginia became the sec-
ond team ever to reach the cen-
tury figure at Madison Square
Garden. Ironically, the Violets
were the first. It was the worst
defeat In the violent Vilete' his-
tory100-75, ,
workman 1 completely
charming young man -tall, dark,
handsome, sincere, rimllng and
intelligent. He's a picture of
loose, flowing grace loping down
the floor, is remindful of an eag-
er colt freshly turned out to paa-
UAnd now that he's finishing
school: '
"I don't know yet. I can play
amateur basketball with a cou-
Dle of Industrial teams and work
myself Into a solid Job, or I can
erect any one of a halt dozen
pr, o<""-rs. I Just like basketball."
"I guess what you're best at,
that's the game you like beat."
OHIOAN8 HOME-GROWN
Athens, O. (NBA)'Ohio Univ-
ersity's basketball team this win-
ter consists entirely of home-
state boys.
Pierobon
Hermann.
. 844 825
VS.
I. H1V.V1A CO.
. 170 182 148 500
. 107 175 189 531
203 225 175 803
220 178 210 614
187 174 158 519
154 476
189 614
192 494
19 M>1 "" UUWICi U,OIO will Wl Ull DI11J 31UCU 111 OWI1 CaUSC U>
i?Q lia new construction at the crowded! walloping a double to left in the
01 Florida farm colony, Including
an Infirmary wing to take care
179 559;
M-aseSlo, Negro childFen?
Totals ... 953 934 8802773
LOCAL .195 NFFE
... 145 180 175 500
... 176 188 172 534
136 172 144 451
170 172 187 529
207 202 176 585
Malee.
Nolan.
Kelsey
McCarr'gher
Eady . .
Totals . .'
The action was a continuation
of the program to expand the
colony which now has no facili-
ties for Negro children and no
room for hundreds of white chil-
dren now on the waiting list.
National League
Invades Minors
win one of them. Meianson led
Sears with 610. He was given
plenty of help from Norris who
hit 595, and Colston who had 566.
Filebark took the honors for PAA
with 588, and was closely follow-
ed by Schneider with 560, and
Hermann with 503.
SEARS
Meianson. 101 202 247 610
Zebrock. ... 171 178 184 333
ColsWb. . 192 206 168 506
Norria ... 202 170 223 595
Balcer ... 196 190 177 563
833 912 8542599
vs.
ALMACENES MARTINZ
A. Damin 143 147 177 467
Burrell ... 142 204 176 521
J. Damin 159 177 210 546 the National League has invaded
Presho ... 211 185 179 575. the minor league offices here.
Owesne... 190 184 181555! His engagement to Marylea
Price of the minors' staff has
COLUMBUS, O., Jan. 31 (NEA)
The majors apparently can't
refrain from raiding the minors.
With an assist from the ro-
mance department, assistant sec-
retary-treasurer Fred G. Flelg of
Totals
845 897 92226641 been revealed.
MORNING
Don't l.t it become All-Day Misery
tak. Alka-Seltzer
for quick, pleaiant relief
It* alkaline ingredient Mttla
your etomach, while the analge-
tic calina your headache. Alka-
Seltxer'i aparkling ef-
fenreaeeneemake* it
pleasant to taka and
tpaedi the action to
bring you /air relief.
Iim Mi Jem* to*, i
-a* even a
Alk.i Seltzer
Hall, If....... 1
ElmendOrff, rf .. 3
aFeeney......
HPO A
1 2 I
0
0
1
3
0
0
0
Totals........21 7 4 18 6
SEARS
Schwarzrock, If..
Watson, R., p-2b.
Durfee, G., cf-lb.
Curdts, rf-lf.. ..
Watson, J., 3b ..
Mendoza, ss .. ..
Durfee, T., C ..
McKeown, 2b-p..
Watson, John, rf.
Crawford, lb.. ..

AB
3
4
3
4
1
4
3
2
1
2
HPO A
0 1 0
0 I
2 0
0 2
0 2
2 \
0 0
0 0
0 3
18 9
Totals........27 6 5
Score By Innings
AFGE 10 2 0 2 1745'
Sears 0 3 3 0 0 08 8 3
aRan for Snodgrass in the 3rd
Winning P i t c h e rCastleman.
Losing PitcherMcKeown. Basa
on Balls offCastleman 6, Wat
son, R. 3, McKeown 6. Struckou*
byCastleman 10, McKeown 9,
Hit by PitchMcKeown (Snod-
grass). Left on BasesAFGE 6,
Sears 6. Earned RunsAFGF 4,
Sears 1. Two Base HitsCar' >-
man, Durfee, T. Hits offWat-
son 0 in 1 (none out in lath Um-
piresLuzer and Majors. Time of
Game1:28. Attendance10Q,
Totals
Hermann.
Cooley .
Filebark .
Schneider
Engelke. .
Totals .
922 946 9992867
PAA
189 179
188 209
218 150
199 206
178 171
195 563
133 530
220 588
159 566
205 554
972 917 9122801
points closer
they clipped
"Jash,
who has whipped Sears, PAA and
n the last three weeks.
are now only six points behind
Nash moved two
to second place as
Jantzen for three points.
who has whipped Sears, P
Jantzen in the last three weeks.
second place PAA. Jenner was
high man for Nash; he had a 583
series, and also had high single
Same of the evening, a 248. Bill
[alee was right behind Jenner
with 570. Morton and Presho did
all they could for Jantzen with
573 and 570 In that order, but It
wasn't enough to stop the Nash
rambowlers.
NASH
Presho ... 185 188 197- 570
Marabella 154 163 140 457
Jamison . 156 169 194 519
Owesne. . 186 157 154 497
Morton ... 199 172 202 573
Totals
Malee .
Thomas.
Jenner .
Saylon .
Madeline
Totals .
880 849 8872010
JANTZEN
. 193 176
. 179 188
. 156 179
. 150 202
. 172 192
201 570
152 519
248 583
182 534
180 544
850 937 9632750
TAC.AROPUI.OS
INM'STRIES. S.A.
Phoneei
1002 1003
#4041 roo Boya Ave
Colon R P
FRESH MILK
FRESH BUTTIR
RICH ICC CREAM
Everything
Inxnerted by the
Health Department
HOME DELIVERY
Te-m standings are as follows:
T*"*ri Won Lost
.....::::;;!
...... 29 61
-.zen
MAJOR LEAGUE BOWLING
NEWS
In the Major League on Tues-
day night, the league leading H.
I. Homa Co. team maintained
Its four-point advantage by tak-
ing three points from the 7461it
AU Signal team. Lou Pierobon
with a 614 series, high for the
night, and Fronhelser with 603,
paced the Tile Setters. Sam Ma-
deline was high for Signal.
Max R. Stempel's boys hooked
up with Angellni in a close
match, keeping pace In the
league race by taking three
points. Hod Jenner had a 601 se-
ries for Angellni and Dick Col-
ston led the Stempel team with
a 580 series.
Fuerza y Luz turned on the
Kwer to take three pohite from
yd Bros, in another closely
contested match. Stephens with
the night's high game of 230,
turned in a 607 series and Norria
had an even 600 for Fuerza y La.
Morton with 580 and Meianson
with 578 were high for Boyd Bros.
The Almacenes Martins team
fiut together enough pins to take
hree point* from the NFFE, Lo-
cal 595 Outfit. Leo Presho show-
ed the way with a 595 series for
Martlnz. Milt Eady bad a 585 se-
rial for Local 59|
We are proud to advertise
a
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ALLEGED HOOP FIXERS
-*--.-----------------
'The Dutchman'
And His Lawye
Have Troubles
<** n
AN INbEPEND"
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know tlie truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 31 (UP).
A House committee voted un-
animously yesterday to cite
Henry W. (The Dutchman)
Grunewald for contempt of Con-
gress, and raised the possibility
that the House Itself may try
his talkative lawyer on the same
charge.
The ways and Means Commit-1 A
tee moved to prosecute Grune-
wald after he flatly refused Tues-
day to answer questions of a
subcommittee Investigating tax
"scandals."
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., THURSDAY. JANUARY 31, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Churchill Wants No Faraway Wars
When Dangers Are So Much Nearer
The "Silent Dutchman's" name' LONDON, Jan 31 (UP) war in the wrong place at the i "These words do not represent! "It was agreed that clearly a
has been prominently mentioned ,vinston Churchill warned the | wrong tiMM." I any new decisions arrived at dur- serious si'uat'on would arise and
In previous testimony about an West yes, frd'.y against plunging i Churchill had told the U. S.lng our visit. But they do express various contlrgncies had been
alleged half-million-dollar tax into war In Hod China "when Congress that a Red truce breach fully tho spirit in which we shall 'examined without any definite
"shakedown" attempt against dangers are sc much nearer would bring "prompt, resolute j face our ilfflcultles together." or formal commitments being en-
former Capone lawyer Abraham home" and declared Britain had
Teitelbaum. jmade no commitments to reta-
The House must approve Grune- liate if the Communists break a
wald's citation before It is sent Korean truce,
to the Justice Department for! The Pr'me Minister, reporting
and effective" action. The Prime ?.ilnister said the
This had been widely Inter- 'hypothetical question" of what
preted as meaning Britain had should be done If a truce is made
agreed, under certain conditions, j and thcr broken had been dis-
to retaliatory Allied air attacks' cussed before ho left for America
prosecution. rto the House ol Commons on his Ion China. Iamong Britain, the United States
Committee chairman Robert recent visit to America, said the Yesterday, however, he declar- and "other governments who
L. Doughton (D., N. C.) said he'Russians nave "pegged down" in|ed: lhave forces in the field."
will ask the house to act soon.ldistant ureas of the world far
perhaps this week.
The committee put off action,
however, against. William Power
Maloney. Grunewald's lawyer
more Allies troops than are avail-
able to di-fenU the West.
"When dancers are so much
near home," he said, "one does
who talked so much at Tuesday's nt want to see ourselves tied
hearing he was ejected from the down or entangled in war in
hearing room bv capital police. |K?a- sc:" ft? 'n *ar '^i
Subcommittee counsel Adrian1 wc'"'d >e. is General Omar
W. DeWind told reporters that
Federal laws do not cover lawyers
who are not witnesses before
Congressional committees.
If contempt action is taken
against the voluble lawyer, De-
Wind said the trial will be con-
ducted by the House itself, and
uiy sentence likewise will be Im-
posed by the House.
There Is a legal precedent for
such action, he said, in a case
in which the Senate imposed a
sentence. He said the Supreme
Court sustained the Senate's
power to do so.
Subcommittee chairman Cecil
R. King 'D.. Cal.) said no action
will be taken against Maloney
until his group completes tax
hearings slated to being Mon-
day in San Francisco. They are
expected to run for two to three
weeks.
But King said he definitely
Intends to seek a citation against
Maloney, a former Justice De-
partment lawyer, "at the next
opportunity."
Major From Dallas
Draft Board Visits
Office In Zone
Major Douglas C. Prltchett.'of
the Regional Field Office of
Selective Service in Dallas. Is
visiting the Canal Zone Selec-
tive Service organization.
He arrived Sunday, accom-
panied by his wife, and will re-
main on the Isthmus about In
days.
Bradley aid, being in the 'wrong
High
7:45 a.ro.
t:08 p.m.
BALBOA TIDES
Friday, Feb. 1
Low
1:36 p.m.
1:54 a.m.
Duke, Duchess Of Windsor
Now Honorary Floridians
TALLAHASSEE. Fhv, Jan. 311"You have become a Southerner
(UP)Gov. Fuller Warren made by marriage to this gracious
the Duke of Windsor an "hon-llady (the duchess formerly liv-
orary citizen" of Florida today led In Baltimore). If you were
and told him Floridians hope running for office, I'd vote for
HERE IS CONCHITA MORE-
NO. She fights bulls, and
anyone who doesn't think
girls can be bullfighters had
better go right out to the
San Francisco bullring Sun-
day afternoon and see how
wrong they are.
Conchita is stopping over
here on her way from Vene-
zuela to Mexico. Sunday she
will fight bulls from El Ro-
sario ranch. When she gets
to Mexico she will be com-
peting for acclaim with
United States girl bullfight-
er Patricia McCormlck.
"you will become a regular,
full-time voting and tax-pay-
ing" resident some day.
The governor addressed the
duke and his hatlese duchess as
"Your royal highness" and the
duke addressed the governor as
"Your excellency." But the rest
of the ceremony was completely
Informal.
It wound up with the duke
and duchess shaking hands with
several hundred state workers
and citizens who gathered at
the captol.
"I want to assure you of how
much I appreciate the compli-
ment paid me,' the former King
of England told the governor.
"The duchess and I have asso-
ciations with your state which
go a long way back. We have
been coming to Florida for 10
years, ever since I was appoint-
ed governor of the Bahamas in
1940."
"This honorary citizenship
means a good deal more than
had I been a visitor to Florida
for the first time," he added.
Governor Warren replied:
tered into.
"No change was made In this
situation while we were In the
United States In fact, the mat-
ter did not figure to any large
extent in tour discussions."
In cautioning against Western
entangle ment in China the
Prime Minister pointed out the
Communists have overrun half
of Europe and China.
In addition he said, the Krem-
lin coul l compliment itself "on
having pegged down in far dis-
tant areas throughout the globe
a much greater force than the
Atlantic nowprs have so far been
able to cf.the- themselves to de-
fend the civilization of the
West."
r ^
(NBA Telephoto)
THIS IS RIVER AVENUE Pittsburgh's River Avenue Uves up to Its name as Ohio River
_______ flood waters reach a height of 80 feet on the city's north side.
2,380 (Z Voters
Elect Councilmen
For Pacific Side
* *
Nehru's Party
Wins In India
NEW DELHI, Jan. 31 (UP)
Indian premier Jawaharlal Neh-
ru's Congress Party today ex-
pected to secure a working
majority In the legislatures of
all but one of India's nine major
states In- the country's first
major general election that is
now In progress.
Congress Party sources today
said however that Nehru op-
posed the formation of the Con-
gress Party governments in the
states where the party had fail-
ed to obtain a working major-
ity.
Left-wing parties have not
fared as well as expected in the
election which involves over
170,000,000 voters all over India.
you."
The duke and duchess sat
briefly In the governor's chair
an act customary with all vis-
itors to the captol. The gov-
ernor said the act "proved the
courage" of the royal pair "to
take such a chance as that."
The duchess wore a face veil t,
tied in the back with brown **S *$*? *? glve.,the. ?r,l a
velvet ribbons, a beige tweed Prtra,t of P**. life of the Ko-
Pholos of Gen. Dean
Show His Activities
!n Red Prison Camp
PANMUNJOM, Jan. 31" (UP)
Communists lifted the Iron Cur-
suit and brown alligator shoes
and bag.
"Knowing of the wonderful
Florida weather, I didn't bring
a single hat with me," she said.
They came to Florida two
weeks
rean war's most famous fighting
manMaj. Gen. William F. Dean,
hero of Taejon, and former com-
mander of the 24th Division.
Photographs taken by Commu-
nist photographers at the request
of the United Press show Dean
cnra. "I?* J J52&. n the in " Pin-stripe suit looktag
George Baker plantation near burly and healthy! and appar-
ently almost back to the 190
pounds that he weighed before
here.
Uranium Producers
Flay AEC's lack
Of Cooperation'
DENVER, Colo.. Jan 31 (UP)
Uranium producers complain-
ed today that a "lack of coopera-
tion" on-the part of the Atomic
Energy Commission threatened
the uranium and vanadium out-
put in the ore-rich Colorado pla-
teau area.
Spokesmen said the Uranium
Producers Association represent-
ing approximately 150 small pro-
ducers in Colorado. Utah. Arizo-
na and New Mexico would pre-
sent the complaint to the annual
convention of the Colorado min-
ing association here today.
Two directors of the uranium
producers group, members of
which mine 75 per cent of the
uranium and vanadium taken
from the Colorado plateau, out-
lined their complaint this way:
The Atomic Energy Commls-
Ohio River Flood Lessened
By.Near-Zero Temperatures
unced last nightl PORTSMOUTH. O., Jan. 31'it dldlltUe to dlanel the sev.n-
tlng Committee: (UP) The overflowing Ohio'degree cold
, chairman; E.J River coursed through maln| The cold,' which froze many
Final results of the Pacific side
elections for Civic Council mem-
bers were announced last night
by the Nominating
Husted. and Reld Hopkins. Jr. Astreets in two cltle today, but smaller jtre'am's helped Tut dowi
total of 2,380 votes were cast, near-ser o temperatures and K
The councilmen elected were: floodwalls lessened the hazard of
BALBOA Two-year members,
1952-53: Mary Brlgham, C. W.
Chase, Russel Johns, Boyd M.
Bevlngton, Otis Myers.
One-year members, 1052: W.
H. Essllnger, Maybell Clemmons.
Alternates, 1952: Benjamin
Suisman, Edward A. Durham,
further serious damage from a
flood that turned sections of the
Ohio, Valley into a muddy sea.
The river crested at 51.5 feet
at Pompvoy, O., ninety miles up-
stream Irnm here, where 600 per-
sons and 45 business places were
George Fitzgerald, Charles McO. evacuated Water was rolling
Brand!, Charles A. Dubbs.
Holdover members from the
last elections are: Douglas John-
ston, Emmett Zemer, Dr. H. C.
Deerlng.
ANCON Two-year members,
1952-53: Arthur Donaldson, Har-
ry Dunn, Marie Jacobs, Sam Roe,
Jr., Carol Rlgby.
One-year member, 1952: Ro-
land C. Jones.
Alternates one year, 1952: E. J.
Husted, Kurt F. Menzel, Edgar
Clarence D. Howell.
Holdover members: Carl P.
Hoffman, Jr., John W. Towery,
Charles F. Hlnz, Margaret Ren-
nle.
he was captured Aug. 25, 1950.
Dean, 52, was the first to try to
stem the Communist drive in Ko-
rea.
Several of the pictures show he
has now recovered from a shoul-
der lnlury which for months pre-
vented him from raising his arm.
Dean was named a prisoner-
of-war by the Communists last,
December. DIABLO Two-year members,
1952-53: William N. Taylor, R. W.
Griffith. Hazel Matthews, T. F.
Hotz, Frank D. Naughton.
One-year members. 1952: J.
R. Shirley, Eugene I. Askew, Reld
Hopkins, Jr.
Alternates, 1952: John P. Cor-
rigan, Jr., James Doran, Clar-
three to four feet deep through
the city's main, street.
The main business section at
Marietta remained under water,
but it was receding, service to
732 telephones was restored and
damaged natural gas mains were
repaired.
For the first time In 24 hours;
io additional deaths were report-
ed from the flood that struck
Ohio' Valley sections of Pennsyl-
H. Freeman, Thomas E. pencer, yania, West Virginia, Ohio, Ken-
Other photographs of Dean's
prison camp Ufe show him doing
setting-up exercises, shadow box-
ing, reading the camp newspap-
er and his mall, eating a bowl of
rice, and playing chess.
The photographs were obtain-
ed at the request of United Press
photographer James Healy. The
request was made two weeks ago, I ence W. Kllbey, Henry H. Lee,
and the photographs were de-
livered by Communist correspon-
dent Alan Wlnnlngton.
CLOSE. BUT NO SHAVE
MATTOON, 111. (UP). Truck
driver R. C. Tanner. 31, literally
escaped death by his hair. His
vehicle went out of control and
turned over. A wheel landed on
sion tells producers to which mill Tanner's hair, pinning him to
to ship ore, but does not super- the road. A motorist freed Tan-
vise ore sampling. ner.
Vet Says Buddies Paid Little Heed
To Gravestones, Plenty To Living
WASHINGTON. Jan. 31 (UP)
Rep. Edith Nourse Rogers (R-
Mass.) said yesterday that
American fighting men would
go into battle "stronger In heart
If they knew that when- they
fell" their graves would be
marked by a cross.
Her statement Immediately
was challenged bv Rep. Lloyd
M. Bentsen Jr. (D-Tex.), chair-
man of a House Public Lands
subcommittee considering Mrs.
Rogers' bill to restore crosses on
the graves of 13,000 war dead
| In Hawaii's national memorial
cemetery.
Bentsen, 31-year-old World
War II veteran, said neither
he nor his buddies "worried
a bit" about what would hap-
pen to their physical remains
if they were killed in battle.
"We were more concerned," he
said, "about keeping those phys-
ical remains alive."
He acknowledged, however,
that relatives of servicemen
think about such problems.
The Army aroused a storm of
protest among some religious
and veterans groups last Sep-
tember when It removed the
crosses from the graves in
"Punchbowl Crater" overlooking
Honolulu and replaced them
with flat stone markers.
Mrs. Rogers and Rep. John E.
Rankln (D-Miss.) have intro-
duced legislation to force the
Army to replace them. Subcom-
Rep. Fred L. Crawford (R- not used in other national cerne-
Mich.) accused his fellow Re-
publicans of "getting off" en
a money-spending "tangent."
He noted that the Army said
it would cost $770,090 to re-
store the crosses on a per-
manent basis and suggested
the money could be spent bet-
ter on completing the me-
morial shrine at the cemetery.
Rep. A. 8. Miller (R-Neb.)
said he was "hard-boiled" a-
bout spending, but "perhaps
Erejudiced" In favor of restoring
e crosses. Rep. Homer Budge
(R-Ida.) thought the Adminis-
tration picked peculiar items on
which to economize.
Mrs. Rogers said the subcom-
mittee would "break the faith"
if it failed to approve her bill.
She had no objection, how-
over, to a compromise offered
by Hawaiian delegate Joseph R
Farrlngton. He suggested that
the crosses be restored on a
temporary basis pending com-
pletion of construction which
will make the cemetery a "great
national shrine."
Col. James B. Clearwater,
chief of the quartermaster gen-
eral's medical division, said it
would cost 33,000 to restore the
temporary wooden crosses.
Clearwater presented the sub-
committee a statement which
said that restoration of the
I mlttee members generally were I crosses at Honolulu would be
1 divided on the proposal. discriminatorv inr. th. ...
discriminatory since they art stone marker*
teries.
He also said crosses could not
be restored without overriding
wishes of the Buddhists.
Clearwater explained that "a
significant number of the dead
burled to the cemetery are
Buddhists.
Clearwater said the Bud-
dhist stone markers now have
the wheel Insignia of the Bud-
dhist faith, last as Christian
stones are inscribed with a
cross and Jewish stones with
a Star of David.
Mike Masacka, representing
the 442nd Veterans Club as well
as the Japanese American Cit-
izens League and the Hawaiian
Federation of Young Buddhists,
urged restoration of "upright
symbols."
But he asked that "appro-
priate consideration be given to
the use of the Buddhist Wheel
of Righteousness."
Masacka said such a move
would prove "significant" In the
Far East, especially In Japan.
He estimated that half of the
33,300 American soldiers of Jap-
anese ancestry killed in World
War II were Buddhists.
Bentsen said after the session
that he doubted further hear-
ings will be held.
He said the committee will
defer action until the Army do-
cuments its contention that at
one time moat Hawailans In-
dicated a preference for flat
Robert L. Blaney.
Holdover members from the
last elections: John H. Terry,
Rufus M. Lovelady.
Elections at Balboa Commis-
sary were In charge of T. F. Hots,
principal of Balboa High School
and Barbara Shaw and Richard
Abbott, high school students,
took the ballots.
Mrs. Eulle Bennett of the A-
merican Legion Auxiliary was In
charge of voting at the Diablo
Commissary.
At Ancon Commissary, Mrs.
Jack DeVore of the Balboa Wom-
en's Club was to charge of bal-
loting.
The tabulating of ballots was
done by Mr. and Mrs. Charles R.
Bowen of Balboa Junior College
with the assistance or the fol-
lowing students: Patricia Kelly,
Elaine Kelly, Cora Ann Gomez,
Katherlne Colclaaure, Frank
Robinson, Ed Bazn, and Wendal
Spreadbury.
Unexplained Fire
Burns Campaign HQ
Of Aspiring Governor
TALLAHASSEE, Fla., Jan. 31
(UP).A pre-dawn fire burned
out the state campaign head-
quarters of candidate for Gov-
ernor Alto Adams here yester-
day and one of his aides and a
newspaper reporter had to be
rescued by firemen from the
burning structure.
The fire of undetermined orig-
in caused an estimated $30,000
to damages and caught two
men. Bill Melgs of Nlcevllle and
reporter Wayne Bell of the
Lakeland Ledger, sleeping in
Adams' offices to the 46-year-
old structure.
Melgs said a few campaign
records were salvaged but "most"
of the political material and
campaign literature was loet, a-
long with the office furniture,
typewriters and other equipment
at the headquarters. He said all
the equipment was rented.
The blaze broke out in the
basement near the furnace room
and spread under the main floor
up to the roof. The roof was
burned off completely.
tucky and Indiana Sunday, leav-
ing some 9,000 persons homeless.
Nine persons were known
dead and one man was mu-
sing ami pressumed dead.
Bright sun3hlne bathed the
flooded valley lands today, but w 11 h the peak expected some
time Saturday. The water would
White House Guard
Killer's Execution
Delayed By Appeal
WASHINGTON. Jan. 31 (UP)
The District, of Columbia cri-
minal court has stayed Inde-
finitely Friday's scheduled ex-
ecution of Puerto Rlcan nation-
alist Oscar Collazo.
Collazo was condemned to the
electric chair for the killing of
a White House guard while at-
tempting to assassinate Pre-
sident Truman Nov. 1, 1950.
The court order provided t
suspension of sentence till de-
fense attorney's have exhausted
all means of appeal. This may
not be till autumn.
the runoff. River forecaster
quickly began revising crest fi-
gures downward.
The river crested at 53.8 feet
at QalUpoUs. located 10 miles
south of Pomeroy, Only five fa-
milies were affected, although
roads to the city were cut.
The wr.ter hit/54.9 feet here
and was xpectod to crest at 57
feet. The city was safe and dry,
however, behind a 77-foot high,
flood wall. Several hundred fa-,
mllles lu unprotected areas were
evacuated.
The river hit flood stage si
feetat Cincinnati, o., 100 mil*!,
downstream end the U.8. wea-
ther bureau there revised Ito
crest figure for the second* thn
from 59 to 67.5 feet, expected at
4 a.m. tomorrow.
Observers predicted the reduc-
tion from the original estimate
of 62 feet would save thousands
of dollars to property damage,
since only a few waterfront
warehounes would be affected.
At Louisville, Kt. weatherman
O.K. Anderson revised his crest
estimate from 34 to 38.5 feet.
have little effect there, he said.
The dirty Job of mopping up
after the flood was in fall
swing at. Wheeling, W. Vs., |
Steubenville, Martins Ferry, i
and other smaller Ohio towns.
It was complicated by the
freezing of flood-deposited mud,
which is not er^lly removed, even
to Its natural state.
PC Finance Chief
Takes Leave In US
W. H. Dunlop, Panama Canal
Finance Director, left this morn-
ing by air for Beardstown. 111.,
where he will spend a short
leave of absence.
It Is not known how long he
will remain to the United States.
In the absence, Ira L. Wright
wUl act as Finance Director.
*$?
More profitable egg production will
usuaUyfollowwhenafeedingplan
calling for Ful-O-^ep Chick Starter*
Growing Mash is used.
FUL-Q-PEp
Tkei
DistribaUr: C. O. MASON, 8.A.
P.O. Box sag Panam City Celan
Ata far Ful-O-Fa oatiry feeding, wide It's real