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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01369
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01369
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
't BRANIFF
r~w
ONI STOP
I*
SAO PAULO
i
gILT NEWSPAPER
*"**
menean
Let the people know the truth and the country is safe** Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1958
'
FIVE CENTS
I
Student
Flares





nama
READY FOR TROUBLE British troops man a sandbag barricade on a street In troubled
Ismallia, following an order to keep down the current spread of terrorism and anti-British
demonstrations. Meanwhile, in Cairo, the Egyptian government declared martial law in the
naming dty after torch-carrying rioters dest royed millions of dollars In property.
* *- *
British Victims of Cairo Mobs
mVTTX "
TornToPieces,
1SMAJXIA, Jan. 30 (UP) i The fo.JT Wetr "Ipur pf
British victims of Cairo mobs the bodies were Incinerated to
la last Saturday's riot were II- en Kt*t'&greater than
terally torn to pieces, according the state of the club and must
to reports reaching British' actually have been thrown on
ire
headquarters here today.
One account said several of
the ten Britons slain in the
Turf Club were dismembered
and disemboweled and their re-
mains thrown Into bonfires.
These reports were- the first
full and detailed account of the
bloody rioting to reach head-
quarters here.
Press officers did not release
the names of the victims out of
deference to their relatives.
The reports said "the attack
on the Turf Club was well or-
ganized.
"The rioters broke down the
front door with rams especially
brought along for the purpose
and proceeded to break up fur-
niture and set alight four large
bonfires on the ground floor.
"They were led by several eral bodies, many of which suff-
young men of the effendl (up- ered dlsembowelment, and how
the bonfire
"One had a leg chopped off
above the knee and the hands
and forearms were missing.
Another had the top of his
head bashed in.
"One body which was only
scorched, but which has not
been positively identified, had a
compound fracture of both
wrists and was disemboweled."
Another Briton's body was
dragged across the street by the
rioters, stripped of clothing, par-
tially dismembered and thrown
on "a hastily constructed bon-
fire."
The account went on to de-
scribe how many fingen and
hands were missing from sev-
per middle) class and equipped
with paraffin, kerosene and
other fire-raising-material."
Several British members
the Club escaped by the back
door before the Egyptians could
completely Invade it, but others
were aught on the top floors
and viciously stabbed to death
and their bodies thrown on the
fire.
Two men and ene woman
were injured lumping from
second floor windows and a
{ third was stabbed to death aa
I he lowered himself from a
1 third floor window by a rope
I made of bed sheets.
Only nine bodies have been
covered from the charred
Irulns of the Turf Club although
en presumably died there.
Egyptian civilians sheltered Bri-
tons caught in the swirl of mob
violence and hid them In their
of houses while the mobs screamed
for blood outside.
A Canadian hid In a building
next to the Turf Club for two
hours while the Egyptians
searched for him, the report
said.
Two other Britons, both in-
jured, hid in an adjacent gar-
den inside a shed while the
mob tried vainly to break in to
kill them.
The report said another
mob surrounded the J. Arthur
Rank theater one ef the
Iragest in Cairo and started
fires at all exits and en-
trances.
-ifae.reporfcelided, "the m-
aeer, who was known to be ln-
sTBe. was hunted from room to
room for over three hours."
''He avoided discovery by tak-
ing refuge in those parts of the
building where the burning was
most fierce until he was smug-
gled into a next-door building
and then to safety by some
Greek employes."
The report concluded by say-
ing the rioters had destroyed
"practically every cinema, caba-
ret, restaurant, bar and wine
shop in the town's center.
"As a result of this destruc-
tion between 10,000 and 15,0*0
people have suddenly had
their employment taken away
from them with no prospect
of regaining it In the near
future."
Preliminary estimates of the
damage by "expert observers,"
range from between $58,000,000
to $140.000,000.
British Council offices and
the British Institute building
were among tl; buildings nam-
ed as destroyed.
Original sources of the report
described as official were not
given.
Messages* from the British
Embassy In Cairo said the Egyp-
tians are making a determined
effort by the most stringent
censorship to prevent full de-
tails of the riots from becom-
ing known to the rest of the
world.
The bodies of six Britons
were to be buried in Cairo this
afternoon. The Embassy report-
ed all quiet in Cairo today with
the Egyptian Army patrolling
the streets and the Egyptian
cavalry with their "wooden
lances" guarding the British
Embassy building.
RP Police Horses
Thrown To Ground
Sections of Central Avenue reeked with tear gas
fumes this afternoon as police tried to rout bands of de-
fiant students.
At 1:30 p.m. Minister of Government and Justice
Miguel A. Ordonez stated police had the situation under
control, but sporadic rioting continued.
Students were still parading in Central Avenue shout-
ing: "Down with Carles!" (Minister of Education Rubn
Dorio Corles).
Earlier the students broke through police cordons
and threw police horses to the ground, sending the
mounted policemen sprawling.
An unexpected "dry season" shower came at the
height of the uprising, aiding considerably in dispersing
the mobs.
Business was at a standstill as!
shopkeepers closed their doors |
and boarded or barred their glass
windows.
Several students were injur-
ed in fights between opposing
student bands and at least two
have been arrested by the po-
lice.
Disturbances started about
mid-morning following a student
demonstration at the Presidencia
to ask President Alclbiades Aro-
semena to revoke an executive
decree closing the school term
tomorrow.
The demonstrators were met
by Presidential Secretary Ofilio
Haxera.
Hazera "told ^mem the I
Word received here today from
a/ well-informed source in New
orkquoted the Kennecott Cop-
as saying that
. dlflcoreredln
dent did not now of their eem-4 &?*? bu{ **** enoueh
Ing. and was fulfilling an ap-
pointment with representatives
of the United Fruit Company.
Hazera said Minister of Edu-
cation Rubn D. Carles offered
to speak to the students, but the
demonstrators angrily refused
this offer.
Several students spoke to the
demonstrators on the extension of
the school term to make up for
the days lost during the unsuc-
cessful school strike and reiter-
ated the student demand for
Carles' ouster.
The demonstration then start-
ed back up Central Avenue, with
student delegations visiting shop-
keepers requesting them to close.
8ome students stopped off at
Santa Ana Plaaa and held an Im-
promptu meeting, but the main
body of demonstrators continued
on to the vicinity of the Banco
Nacional and started to hold an-
other meeting.
Copper Survey
Finished; Data
Must Be Sifted
for us to get excited about
But Kennecott's geologist, John
R. Bogert, who returned early
this morning from a week's pre-
liminary survey of the property
in Tole on which copper has been
discovered, refused to make any
comment on the value of the
land.
The property in Tole belongs
to Egisto Antnori, a Panamanian
who accompanied Bogert on the
trip.
Today Antinori felt confident,
from all Indications, that Ken-
necott would find it worthwhile
to send their officials to Inves-
tigate further the possibilities of
mining the territory.
Local metal men said this
would seem to imply that the
copper found was of sufficient
quantity to interest the world's
largest copper producers.
Bogert who left exactly a week
Then a f ightbroke out between ago surveyed all of the 55 hect-
Judge Says Law Protects Cleopatra
Whose Love Led "Creep' To Larceny
NEW YORK, Jan. 20 (UP) summed up her current feeling
A Judge ruled today that a
jp veis taken from her apartment.
t( Insurance money for furs and
B oadway show girl has a right
but he called her a "Winter Gar-
den Cleopatra" for accepting the
fliery from a stage-door-Johnny
who stole to please her every
Aim.
/Justice James B. M. McNally
I declared that the law protects
[ 'the chorus beauty as well as the
poor working girl, and awarded
ravishing Rosemary Williamson
$2 500 for a mink coat and dia-
mond ring that were stolen from
her Third Avenue apartment a
year ago.
But the Judge told sobbing
Miss Williamson that she was a
"Winter Garden Cleooatra" and
Just as much of a thief as Sidney
. Levy, who admitted stealing
more than 153.000 m 13 months
to shower hey with the finer
tilings In life. Rosemary has
for Levy by calling him a "creep."
The Judge's award was made
In the form of a directed verdict
to an all-male jury to find for
the showgirl to her week-old suit
against the Northern Fire Si Ma-
rine Insurance Co. She sought
$3,850. '
McNally. a fatherly looking
man, lectured the weeping show
girl aa. she covered her e/a
with red-painted fingernails.
She ware a turtle neck purple
sweater, brown plaid skirt and
low-heeled shoes.
"There can be no doubt," Mc-
Nally aid, that Rosemary knew
the money for the gifts was "not
honestly come by." Takln the
gifts "puts her in the same boat
as Levy, the confessed thief, and
makes her morally as guilty of
lTceny as If she had taken the
money herself." he said.
Levy, whom Rosemary de-
scribes! as a "creeep," "coage-
nital idiot," and "pea*," when
he was arrested, was given a
suspended sentence last month.
He was placed on 10-year pro-
bation and ordered to help get
his gifts back from the girl.
Miss Williamson, who said she
Is 24, Is a native of Dayton. O.
Attorneys said her parents have
a home in Corpus Chrlstl, Tex.
McNally, In bis directed ver-
dict, described the whole case
this way:
"Boy wants girl. Girl wants
diamonds. Jewelry, furs, and mo-
tor cars. Consequently, larceny,
embezzlement, forgery, and ro-
mance walks hand In hand along
91st 8treet."
McNally said that Levy "claims
he was so Infatuated, bewitched
end enslaved bv the potent and
visible charms of trli Winter
Garden Cleopatra." that he em-
bezzled through a phony nykm
yardage deal.
the demonstrators and other
students opposed to the demon-
stration.
The police Intervened and two
students were arrested.
The students thereupon
threatened to turn over auto-
mobiles. Others linked their
anas and dared policemen to
lay a hand on them.
Some students were reportedly
armed with burlap bags filled
with rocks and Iron bars wrapped
In newspapers.
Some 100 policemen tried to
maintain order without resorting
to force. Por a time they were
successful despite the defiance of
the students.
Tension mounted as a cordon
of policemen trying to block
the path of the students down
Central Avenue toward the San-
ta Ana Plaza was broken by stu-
dents.
Corporal Charged
With Involuntary
Manslaughter
An American corporal was
charged with involuntary man-
slaughter th's morning in the
Balboa Maght rate's Court The
case Was continued until Friday
afternoon
Clifford M Docken, a 23-year-
old enlisted man who is charged
with being responsible for the
death of Mrs. Jessie Blanche
Myers, a 72-year-old American
woman who was killed when
Docken': car crashed into the
car in which she was a passenger
on January 18
On a recommendation made
by the Asst. District Attorney
the defendant was released to
the custody ot military authori-
ties.
William J. Sheridan appeared
for the defendant.
ares of land that belong to Anti-
nori and made It clear today that
the value of the property would
be decided after his samples were
assayed and his reports checked.
Earlier last week Kennecott's
geologist explained that he wasj
merely making a preliminary!
survey of the landand that'
should the deposits prove vast
enough, Kennecott would be pre-
pared to sink millions of dollars
in Tole and employ thousands of
men.
However, today, after Bogert
returned from the arduous nine-
hour auto and nine-hour horse-
back trip from Tole, he stated i
that any results or conclusions'
farmed must originate from the
New York office.
In an earlier Interview Bogert
had said that If the deposits
proved to be a dud, Kennecott
would take his word for It, and
the matter would be dropped.
But Antlnori's confidence (ex-
pressed today, that other offi-
cials would be coming down)
seemed to indicate that the cop-
per deposits on his land might be
of sufficient value to Interest
Kennecott.
Antinori expected to return to
Tole early next week where he
said he would await further word
from Kennecott's office in New
York.
Fort Randolph
Being Renovated
Officials of the U. S. Army
Caribbean announced today
that portions of Ft. Randolph
will be partially renovated to
provide a measure of upkeep
and prevent farther deteriora-
tion of the buildings.
An Army spokesman said
there la a possibility that the
repair of the buildings may
provide a limited number of
quarters for Army civilian em-
ployes and military personnel.
STUDENTS MARCHING In a tight circle and carrying Panamanian flags approach a mount-
ed police cordon during the demonstration pro testing the closing of the school year tomorrow.

POLICEMEN AND HORSES give ground before the determined march of the students. Police-
men refrained for some time from using their weapons, but one officer tin foreground had
to be held back from using his nightstick by a fellow policeman.
SUCCESSFULLY breaking through the police line the students continue their march along
Central Avenue while the girls and boys at th* back of the circle whistle catcalls at the
policemen.


PAGE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAItT NEW8rAPER
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY SO, l5t
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWMD NO PuiLliHtO Y THE PANAMA AMMICAN PRIM. INC.
rOUNOIO V NIUON ROUNIIVIL.L IN tail
HAHMODIO ARIAS, DITO
B7 M mill P O BO 134. PANAMA, n. ar P.
TtLirnoNt Panama no 2-0740 '8 Linoi
C COLON ornei. I2.l7t Cintkal Avinui itwiin I2tm and I3tm bt*it
FOhon >tr>iatNTAlivt JOSHUA 8 POWER. INC
4.1 MAOISON AVI N(W YOltK. 1171 N. V.
LOCl iBA*
PI MONTH. IN ADVANCE -------- '-7 ei'JK
PO (IX MONTH. IN AOVANCI --------------------------. 8.80 ,22
POP ONI VIA. IN AOVANC----------------------------- 18.BO 2 OO
Walter Winche
In New York
MEMOS OF A GIRL FRIDAY
2 Dear WW: The AP confirmed another "den.aT 1th its piece
from Hollywood about Jolson's widow winning a second $1.000.-
000 from his will. When we said she woold try to upset his be-
ueits o $3,000,000 to charities several dupes denied It This new
illllon has to come out of those three!.. .Connie Mack's daughter
tot her final decree out there the other day Her merger name
Is Mrs. Marshall Breedlove.. Prince Alexis Romanoff, recently
divorced from Phyllis B. Brown of here, teds friends his next will
be Barbara Fldler of Clncy...Oen. Pat ton's widow will be urged
to campaign actively for Taft, but she is not very likely to be
"used" that way. Something about an Elsenbower-Patton feua.
etc.
Sleeping- pill addicts should appreciate this- It happened to
Comedian Harviy 8tone. Been talking; phis f"r years because of
Insomnia. Desperate for slumber this da7 (because he hadn't slept
the previous night), he took four, not a iPthal dose. However, in
trying to shake a cold earlier he took twc emrirln and then used
trong nose drops. He started choking, turned purple, and fire-
men took ten hours to revive him.
Federal Judge J. W. Waring of South Carolina achieved quite
a reputation for his stand on racial questions last year. Landed
In Collier's and the newsweeklles with his fight. He retires Just
10 years to the day he took office.. .He wax called "The man they
love to Hate" in S. C. vilified In the papers there, ostracised so-
cially and his Charleston house was stoned fur opening the De-
mocratic primaries in South Carolina to all citizens. He is 74.
Ethel Merman Is reported deflnltelv Gettit u, a divorce. When
you said so six months ago the same opposition paper said It
wasn't true. How stale can they get?...8am Ocldwyn's unhappy
about the way you handled the Molra Shearer thing. 8am Gold-
wyn's always unhappy about something. End of Yawn...The
twice-postponed Sugar Ray-Bobo Olson fight In San Francisco is
now listed for Reb. 14. The Runyon Fund gets most of the gate
.. .Sacha Ouitry, the French playwright, Is getting his 5th divorce.
The French recognize only marriages, so he weds his next here.
Jane Russell's friends wonder why a cnlld (with passport la-
fid by Eire and a U. 8. quota number should become of such
.nterest to His Majesty's gov't. Especially, when both Irish par-
ent gave full consent for the tot to remain here Jane and her
husband pretty unhappy about it all.. .Money teIks with million-
aires. Howard Hughes gave Ed Grainger a 5 year contract be-
came hla flickers prospered. Hughes gavi Wald At Krasna, whose
films didn't, only a one-year renewal.
Tip came In that a model named Sh'rim Devrim works in a
"rh Avenue dress shop (Passel's) and that he is the dghtr of
Iraq's acting Regent. I didn't check, dearie, becuuse I don't glva-
sinb .Must be awful to be an actress. Carol Stone dines in Gal-
! -.(Cher's every 4:30 p. m. (except matinees and Sabbaths) on only
a IVi lb. steak. That's all she eats before the curtain goes up on
'Desire" across the street.. .Ed Barrow, former gen. mgr. for the
1 ankees. is still In the Portchester Hospital following an opera-
t on New Year's. He's S3...A sealed indictment has been return-
r I against a cop In Bklyn. They'll act on It any edition.
The Nielsen still has you among the First Ten. Godfrey beats
.u by one-tenth of a point. Many of the favorites, however, are
irted by only that much...Cliff Steward, the Coral recording
ar, married Helen Magulre yesterday. He's also a bartender In
rieera. His top record is "San FrancUco Buys"...I see you've
< en boosting Darvas and Julia, the Latin Quarter dancing stars.
! ; has a degree from the Univ. of Budapest. spaks 7 languages.
( e makes with nine...The stage mgr of 'Pal Joey" is supposed
t' inherit millions March 30. He's only 21 now The wealth comes
. an the Thomas Fortune Ryan estate.
Kid Gaviln won his point. I see, and will have a Cuban as
. :e of the Judges when he fights Bobby Dykes In Miami on the
i. He says your Sunday night tip that h; would demand a
Cuban Judgemight have saved hla title We shall see... Big
>. 'lie when Conductor Guido Cantelli of the Ph'harmonic swung
r i baton so violently at rehearsal it btoke and scratched his
9 :lst. He fainted from fright.
Your Girl Friday.
' :l 1$ VOUK rOtUM THI R.AOIRS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
th Mail *o It on p forum fi raders ot Tha Pimmo Amer-
an Latter* art racatvaa aretalully and ara handlae In a whall eon-
Jeal.al mannar.
It rea cant riba la a letter a an I ba i m pa riant it It daunt aseeai the
r.st do Letters ara published M the erer received
Pleasa try te keep the latan limited ta ana pas* lansth.
Identify at latter anriten it htld la strictsit confame.
Thr* atpaper ananas na retpenilhlllty lar atarntente, ar epiniena
c trailed la latter* treta readers.
PAPERS WOULD FLY IF CANAL STARTED OVER
Gamboa, C.Z.
itor,
aama American,
^ ar Sir:
Would you be so kind as to let an old timer have the use
* your column for a little while. See by the paper last week
it another of the governor's assurances have gone by the
ird and the powers that be are raising the price of gasoline
i cigarettes. .
Since the good old commy has taken over the selling of gas,
t i price has nearly doubled.
If the idea Is to raise some money, I have a few concrete
I. estlons that should be adopted and Derhaps this Canal
(. mpany can be put on a paying oasis.
For years this place got along with an Engineer of Mainten-
.;*, who represented the Governor in his absence. Eliminate
: present job for the Great Mogul and his staff, including his
; ;#eUry and two or three executive assistants and the savings
1 i their salaries alone would be more than a nickel raise on
I zh pack of cigarettes and gallon of gas.
Also for years the Personnel Department of the Canal was
si.ned by a director and two clerks. Now you cannot cover all
personnel in a weeks visit.
The solution, as an uninterested Individual sees It, is to get
. t ut the ex-school, teachers and professors, and hire one per-
itiel man with practical experience.' (Boy the budget la al-
i. jst balanced.)
The third solution Is to get rid of the ex-army officers
i.ostly colonels, who are drawing good pensions as dlsablees)
to are heading the so-called divisions of the Canal, and also
ell1 numerous assistants, whose duties as far as can be seen
, to draw their salaries, and issue circulars at the whims of
I .air bosses.
This Canal was built with the minimum of paper work, but
U they started to dig again, papers Instead of dirt would fly.
Sincerely,
Dick Rogers.
Foreign
Program
Its Own
Aid
Pays
Way
BY PETER EDSOS
Where the Down Comes Up Like Thunder
WASHINGTON (NEA) Any
time a government program
pays its own way and returns
a profit of $190,000 to the U.
S. Treasury, brother, that's
news. But It has actually hap-
pened.
It has l-ippened. of all
places, In wh>t used to be the
Marshall plan Economic Coope-
ration Adminis ration, now the
Mutual Security Agency. Thev
! have variously be n described
by their opponents (.3 i~'erna-
tlonal give-away and do-good
programs, financed by the
American taxpayer.
It should not be understood
that the whole Marshall plan
has paid off with a profit. On-
ly one small part of It.
This particular part had to
do with dollar guarantees on
the sale of American magazines
abroad. It has been frequently
and heavily criticized as a gov-
ernment subsidy to certain
favored American publishing
firms. ,
But the way it has work-
ed out, to nearly everyone's
surprise, is that it has turn-
ed out as a profitable en-
terprise for the Marshall
plan. So it is now being ex-
panded by MSA to the
Middle East, Asia and all
the free world to combat
the flood of Communist
publications found there.
The whole thing began In a
little-noticed section of the
Economic Recovery Act of 1948.
It authorized the Marshall plan
administration to make con-
tracts with American publish-
ers,, guaranteeing that any for-
eign money they received from
the sale of their magazines,
books or movies abroad could
be converted into U. 8. dollars.
The Marshall plan would of
course furnish the dollars.
On this basis, contracts were
made with such magazines as
Harper's, Omnlbook, Collier's,
Saturday Evening Post, Read-
er's Digest, Time, and Life.
^w"* WASHWOTOH
MERRY- GO- ROUND.
y DMW riAIIQM I
Televoting
By BOB RUARK

WHO IS A DEPENDENT?
l pan Letter to the
tirrau Of Internal Revenue...
1. Why is it that a U.S. citizen cannot claim a non US clti-
;-n parent as their dependent, even though the parent is not
* jrklni, Is fully dependent upon them, and resides with them?
t. Why is it that a U.S. citizen can claim her Panamanian
liaband as her dependent when she la working for the Qovem-
ent, and he Is working in Panama? Are not husbands always
i wldered the head of the family, and therefore not dependent?
S. Why l it that when the Government needs mor money,
< ny do not try to cut costs and economize; they just pass new
ix laws and demand more money.
There mav be laws to cover discrepancies if so, they
-ould be corrected. Please quote full excerpt* and number and
.ate of laws, that I may write to my Congress.
Making Out Return.
Knopf, Doubleday, Harcourt
Brace. Lippincott, B a n t a is
Books, Pocket Books and other
publishing houses got In on the
act.
Harvard, Princeton and Yale
University Press, McGraw Hill,
American Chemical Society and
other publishers of scientific
works were included.
Even the movies cashed
in on it, with such com-
panies as Columbia, Para-
mount, Republic, RK o.
Qoldwin, Twentieth Cen-
tury-Fox, Universal Pic-
tures and Warner Brothers
signing contract. Most Of
their rouble in converting
foreign profits into dollars
was in Qermany. But as
the movie companies have
been increasing the number
of films made abroad, thet
have been solving their
own currency convertibility
problems, and they're gra-
dually dropping out of the
government guarantee pro-
gram.
Contracts to convert up to $12
million worth of foreign cur-
rencies have been signed in the
nearly four years that the pro-
gram has been working.
Only $5 million has been
paid out, however, as some of
the contracting companies have
found uses for their earnings
abroad to cover foreign expen-
ses.
The $5 million paid out by
the Treasury on the guarantees
has not been a loss nor an
Item o expanse, for two rea-
sons.
First is that the foreign mo-
ney received from the sale of
magazines and books has been
turned over to other U. S. gov-
ernment agencies operrs. ing
abroad, agencies such as the
Army and State Department to
cover their local expenses.
The second point is that
all publishers and movie
producers have been charg-
ed a service fee of one per
cent a year on the face
value of their contracts.
Consequently, this world-
wide information service
has never cost the Ameri-
can taxpayer a cent. On the
contrary, it has taken in
more than $190,000 on th*
deal.
The program is run now by
one man, Gilbert Simons, a
former Ivy Lee public relations
expert. As a result of the pro-
gram, some 30 million Europ-
eans will this year read Ame-
rican magazines and more than
a million and a half American
books will be read.
The titles run all the way
from the most attractive chil-
dren's books to highly technical
medical, engineering and pure
science works. These books and
magazines were not given away,
but sold.
"If a European buys an Ame-
rican publication," says Simons,
"he Is probably Indicating a
enulne Interest In the United
tates. The purchaser may not
have much money to spare.
"Such a man Is strongly In-
clined to believe what he reads
because what he finds Is r
candid, critical picture of thr
United States."
NEW YORK.The coonskln-cap kid, who al-
most might be called the Hcpalong cassioy of
cne Senate, Is going to i..-/e ah us aial-twidulers
an acute and neeaiul index to the state of the
nation's political concupiscence this year.
Sen. Estes Kefauver if Tennessee has offered
up his fair white frame .is guinea pig in a vital
experiment affecting national well-being. He is
goihg to run for President of the United States
on the strength of a hefty television rating.
The nation's pulse-feelers have been fretting
about this TV medium as a political weapon ail
along.
But as In most complicated scientific experi-
ments, we have had no subject who qualified as
the perfect experimental tontici Estes Kefauver
is it.
His qualifications can oe said to rest almost
entirely on public acceptance as crime-buster,
the scourge of the underworld. His fame twines
round the coaxial cable a ivy to a tree.
Understand we do not knock the senator's le-
gislative behavior since tie whipped the Crump
machine In Tennessee and came to Washington
to make law. His committees were neat but not
gaudy, and it was not u.'.til he Joined the vigi-
lantes and took his act on the road that his
name crept into the kitchens of the country.
The Keiauver crime commission road show got
heavy billing, and he nit the jackpot when the
American Broadcasting Co signed up the hear-
ings for the TV audience.
You may recall that Kefauver and Rudolph
Hailey and Senator Tooey and Frank Costello
and Virginia Hill made ;;ome sort of entertain-
ment history. On Virginia alone, the sponsors got
their dough back.
Overnight Kefauver was as famous, say, as the
ood captain of the Flying Enterprise, Donald
luck, or any other top-drawer celebrity. As a
TV star he had competed successfully with the
best in puppets, Berle and Hwppy
At first Kefauver waa a cnlid of the front
pages, and then he was a television standout,
and finally he was a rntuiazlne writer and a true
celebrity as a crime bust He had the face and voice for it, tooa big,
calm, faintly craggy man. with ah overdose of
dignity and an ley poise.
Yet there is some dlseemlb'e kindness in Ke-
fauver, too, and considerable humor. As a per-
former he is classic, as a shrewd publicity grab-
ber, great.
Other men have become President on less.
Kefauver has seen his sidekick, Rudy Hailey,
walk tato the vice-mayoralty of New York City
solely on a television ret.utatlou and his associa-
tion with Kefauver's crime commission.
He came In, so to speak, on his press notices,
and it will be intriguing to see if Kefauver can
rassle up a nomination on a background that
has been largely thespl.in so far as the voters
know him.
I have an odd hunch (hat If Harry Truman
decides not to run, the long Tennessee boy in the
coonskin cap stands a be ttei-than-fair chance
to qualify for the Democratic candidacy.
In presence, background itnd reputation, he
already has considerable more muscle than Tru-
man had when they made a Vice-President out
of him. And then of course, the TV.
It Is going to be a long, tough summer and
spring and fall, on the alrluncs and the TV
screens.
There Is nothing to say that a Llncolnesque
politician with elegant IV presence can't make
It over a stiff-necked opponent with the per-
sonality of a claim to obscure his sterling virtues.
(This is a hypothetical opponent. I know of
few candidates whose sterling virtues would ob-
scure their personalities, good or bad.)
We mustn't forget that FDR was an accom-
plished actor before he was anything. So was
Huey Long. There was a lot of ham in old TR, if
I read my history right, and Lincoln seemed to
have a nice way with a phrase. But none of them
had the miracle of television to work with as a
weapon.
Anybody who saw the Kefauver shows or Gen.
MacArthur's "old soldier" speech in Washington
knows what I mean.
Television birthed Kefauver a*, a large public
figure. Be very interesting to see if It can wean
him, and raise him up to a shot at the country's
top job. Funnier things najre happened, and I'm
not betting no.
Cave Of The Winds
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
WASHINGTON. The Executive Committee
of the Democratic National Committee Is meet-
ing ta Washington on Feb. 5.
At the moment, the President Is being strong-
ly pressed by Democratic leaders of all colors to
tell this gathering of the faithful whether he
will or will not run. There Is considerable hope
that he may do so, and If he does, many lead-
ers now expect him to take himself out of the
race.
Already, he Is rather authoritatively report-
ed to have told more than one outsider that he
has firmly decided against trying for a third
term.
Mrs. Truman, always opposed to another can-
didacy for her husband, Is reputed to have a
strong pledge from him. And certain shrewd
and normally sensible politicians are actually
suggesting that the President, whose favorite
predecessor Is John Quincy Adams, means to
imitate Adams' famous example of going from
the White House to Congress.
According to this astonishing theory, Truman,
while still President, may run for the Missouri
Senate Seat now held by the Taft Republican,
James Kem.
And if elected, on next Inauguration Day he
will then step down in the most literal sense,
from the Presidential rostrum to the Senate
floor.
It must be added that the theory Is chiefly
Interesting as Illustration of the noises that may
be heard in the cave of the winds which la
Washington.
Even the more reasonagle report* can only M
tested by events.
There Is no doubt at all that the President
It, being pressed to declare himself. There Is no
doubt at all that an increasing number of those
close to him think he will declare himself pret-
ty soon, and that he will then say he does not
want another term.
But there is no certainty whatever that the
President will actually yield to these pressures,
or, if he does yield, will do what hU friends now
;xpect.
None the lew, there is also no doubt that the
problem of the Democratic nomination Is grow-
ing more interesting by the day. 8en. Eat*
Keiauver ot Tennessee has already announced
his own candidacy without waiting for the Pre-
sident to make up his mind.
Kefauver plainly gambled on the theory that
the President would not run. He came out so
early, moreover, because the episodes of his
meeting with the President convinced him that
Truman would fight him In any case.
Meanwhile, with a more tentative and con-
ciliatory gesture, Sen. Robert 8. Kerr of Okla-
homa is also tosslnK his hat ta the ring.
The occasion Is the Midwest Democratic con-
ference where Sen. Kerr Is delivering a tough,
old-style keynote speech, full of pride In the De-
mocrats and scorn for the Republicans. The
speech is also intended as the keynote of the
Senators own campaign for the party's Presi-
dential nomination.
It will be followed by another keynote speech
to the pre-prlmary convention of the Nebraska
Democ,l^' aitfr whlch Nebraska State Chair-
man William Meyer Is expected to enter Sen.
Kerr s name in the Nebraska primary.
Besides Meyer, Kerr also has Iowa Btate
Chairman Jake More and Kansas National Com-
mltteeman Carl Rice is his corner.
"US" Kefauver's, Kerrs distinctly dark horse
candidacy is on the basis that he will not run
if the President wants to run himself.
e.Hut u..u. an act,ve mdldacy, which In turn
differentiates it from what may be called the
passive candidacy of Gov. Adlal Stevenson of
Illinois. As near as can be made out, the
Stevenson position Is that he will run If the
President wants him to, and will not run if not
asked to do so.
At this critical Juncture, however, the Presi-
dent has Invited Gov. Stevenson to Washington,
and has spent a long afternoon discussing po-
litics with him. These facts alone make the
Stevenson candidacy the most lntereetlng of the
three. ^
Report* have already seeped out of the White
House that the President gave much time to
talking with the Governor about problems of
foreign policy, which are those closest to his
neart.
Drew Pearson says: It takes a long time fot truth to catch
up with denials; Gov. Dewey got favors from Colonial
Airlines though he denied it; General Vaughan likes
Ike too.
WASHINGTON. Some people say that a denial never
catches up with the original news story. However, it also takes
a long time for the real truth to catch up wltn a denial Hera
are some cases ta point:
Cops And Automobiles In November 1949, this columnist
reported that Washington police chief Robert Barrett had bought
three new automobiles In quick succession, reselling them at a
profit in the post-war days when cars were scarce: also tha
Lieut. Jacob Wolf of the D. C. police force traded in a large num.,
bei of new cars.
This was denied. But last week, Lieut Wolf, called to testify
before Senator Neely's D. C. crime probe, admitted he had bought
and sold 22 cars. ^^
Earlier, police chief Barrett, resigning under fire, officially
admitted under oath the purchase and sole of various cars
Coal-Mine DisasterOwner of record of the Orient mine
where 119 miners lost their lives recently is the Chicago. Wil-
mington and Franklin Coal Company.
When It was reported that this firm, ta turn, was owned by
the giant Stone and Webster engineering firm, the latter denied
However, H. A. Treadwell, vlce-presldertt of the Chicago.
Wilmington and Franklin Co.. has now admitted under question-
ing, that Messrs. stone and Webster, Individually, not as a firm,
nave controlled the coal company in the past and,stUl own much
2i m 8tck. He stated that Stone has sold much of hla 110681
Webster still owns a considerable amount.
Stone and Webster Is the firm which iiartlclpated in the
borrowing of $18,000,000 from the RFC to finance Carthage Hydro-
col Co. at Brownsville, Texas, along wl",h such others a Guv
Gabrlelson, chairman of the Republican National Committee, and
the Texas Oil Company. '
.. Dewey's Airplane TripsLast December, this writer reported
that, whereas chairman BUI Boyle -of the Democratic National
Committee got only a $0 bill-clip as a Christmas present from
colonial Airlines, Governor Dewey of New York received .000
miles free transportation from Colonial plus the hospitality of
a Colonial Airlines cottage used by the Oovernor for a vacation
in Bermuda.
Dewey promptly issued a denial, claimed both the cottage
and the airplane transportation were paid for. Technically he
was right. *
H,0I?ve.r,..rtc?rdj of the clvU Aeronautics Authority now
reveal the following:
On Oct. 4, 7, 12, 26, 29 and 31, 1951, Dewey, while campaign-
ing for governor, flew around New York State in a srxcW Col-
onial Alrllnea plane, running up a total bill of $4,453.34. This bill
remained unpaid for approximately one year
In fact. It remained unpaid until Colonial AlrpUnes got Into
trouble with the CAA. as a result of which the Justice Depart-
ment filed a complaint In the Federal court.
This complaint then became a matter of public record. Only
after this became known to the public almost one year later, did
the Republican state committee rush a check to ColonUl for
$4,453.34 on Aug. 9, 1951.
In April, 1961, Governor Dewey flew to Bermuda where he
stayed at "Rock Merrell," the cottage owned by Colonial Airlines.
Before Dewey took the trip, Alger Chapman of 30 Broad
Street sent Colonial his check No. 1913, dated April 13, 1951, for
$o00 and arranged for Dewey to use the cottage at a rate of $25
a day plus extra charges for maid service, food, and so on.
On June 22, 1951, Colonial rendered an additional bill for
$649.43 covering the cost of maid, food, mall telephone and other
miscellaneous expenses Incurred by the Governor of New York.
This $64943 remained unpaid until the Justice Depart-
ment filed its'-complaint in the Federal court*vOnry after this
became'a matter of public record, was check o. 202 for $649.43,
dated Sept.il, mailed to. Colonial by Devyey,' friend, Alger Chap-
Dewey. a busy man, can be "forgiven for not knowing that
his campaign headquarters or his friends did net pay these bills.
However, denying the facts Is another matte.
1 LIKE IKI"
GOP Congressman Sterling Cole of New York and his secre-
tary Dick Keenan, are strong for Eisenhower.
However, like many Republicans not to mention Demo-
crats the New Yorkers have been confused Lv conflicting news
accounts as to what President Truman thinks about Ike as a
possible successor.
The other day Keenan spotted the uniformed and berlbbon-
ed figure of MaJ. Gen. Harry Vaughan, White House military aide,
sitting In the Congressional Hotel.
Deciding he would do a little detective work, he fished one
of those red] white and blue "I like Ike" battons from his pocket
and approached Vaughan.
"General," he said, handing over the button, "take this and
put it at the top of your other campaign ribbons."
Vaughan looked slightly surprised, then grinned.
"I like lite too," he replied. ''He's got a good Job where he It
and he ought to stay there."
NOTEVaughan kept the Ike button.
MERRY-GO-ROUND
When Los Angeles' veteran Democratic leader John B. El-
liott inquired how things were going In Washington, Congress-
man Clair Engle of California replied: "We're ta turmoil. Billy
Graham (the Exangellst) has half the town dangling between
heaven and hell while Congressional investigators are working
on the other half, separating the mink from the sheep."
Just before his speech to Congress, British Prime Minister
Winston Churchill took time out to slqn autographs for three
comely Capitol secretaries,
"For a than of his years, I'd say he was still quite a blade
with the women," remarked House GOP leader Joe Martin of
Massachusetts.
Besides being the only Korean war vet In Congress, young
Rep. Al Sieminski of New Jersey won the Bronte Star for bravery
in World War II. He also won battlefield promotions from esas,
listed man to major.
SIDE GLANCES
By Galbraitb
i-a ^
"All this
thoto cigart
government rrkM Hadn't you better return
ira the people on your mall rout* itwejeu for
Chriotrnali-*------"*'"
'
jtek.


">
'

WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 3, 1952
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DMI.Y NFWSP4PFR
PAGE
McGrath To 'Gladly Cooperate'
In Probe Of His Justice Dept.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 30.-(UP)The House
Judiciary Committee voted yesterday to conduct a
"non-political" investigation of Attorney General J.
Howard McGrath and his Administration of the Jus-
tice Department
The Cabinet officer promptly issued a state-
ment asserting that he will "gladly cooperate" in
the inquiry.
He said it is a "proper function" of the com-
mittee to make such an investigation.
\ Chairman Emanuel Celler (D.,
. Y.) said the Republican-in-
spired Investigation will be limit-
ed to "specific allegations and
complaints based upon credible
evidence" and not on "mere
suspicion and rumor."
\ Celler refused to disclose the
mmlttee vote because It was
.taken behind closed doors but
! one member said It was unani-
mous. Rep. Francis E. Walter
i(D Pa.) had said In advance
he would vote for the Inquiry be-
cause it Is the political thing to
He referred to the possibility of
election year Republican charges
of "whitewash" if the committee
had rejected the resolution au-
thorizing the investigation. It
was introduced by Rep. Kenneth
B. Keating (R.. N. Y.). one of
McGrrath's sharpest critics.
The inquiry is an outgrowth of
tax scandals uncovered by a
House Ways and Means Commit-
tee. McGrath has been under
fire since President Truman
fired T. Lamar Caudle as chief of
the Justice Department's tax
frauds division for "incompa-
tible" outside activities.
The attorney general told the
tax investigators he considered
Caudle an honest man and said
he did not know even then why
Mr. Truman ousted the former
aslstant attorney general
Informed quarters said tne
President conducted his own In-
vestigation of Caudle without
telling McGrath. This led to Re-
publican charges that the at-
torney general apparently did
not know what was going on in
his own department.
For a while there were per-
sistent reports that McGrath was
on his way out.
After first feeding such reports
by his silence. Mr. Truman fin-
ally nipped them by saying Mc-
Grath would remain and would
head any government cleanup
efforts.
OOP congressmen shot jack
that McGrath could not Inves-
tigate himself and Keating in-
troduced his resolution calling
for a special Congressional In-
quiry.
It was amended in the com-
mittee by Rep. Robert L. Ramsay
(D., W. Va.) to limit the inquiry
to "credible" complaints. Keating
termed the limitation "entirely
satisfactory."
Keating had predicted ap-
proval before the committee act-
ed, although he accused the1 ad-
ministration of putting "pres-
sure" on Democrats to kill the
proposal. ,
A subcommittee composed of
four Democrats and three Re-
publicans will conduct the in-
quiry .
Celler said he plans to confer
with Keating and Rep. Daniel A.
Reed (R.. N. Y.), the ranking
minority member, on the selec-
tion of members within a day or
so.
Celler and Keating said the
subcommittee will hold public
hearings during the investigation,
but that they are still far in the
future. .
Keating said he has eight or
10 complaints against the depart-
ment which he plans to turn
over to the subcommittee "one at
a time." He refused to give de-
tails.
Flying Toy
HORIZONTAL STSeth't ton
M Depicted toy Mi"'t)
I It flits in M*mt
Talmadge s Anti-Truman Bill
Squeaks Through State House
ATLAWTA.Jan. SO (UP) -
Oov. Herman Talmadge s elec-
tion bill scraped through the
State House by a one-vote mar-
gin today after administration
leaders barely beat down a sub-
stitute measure which wouli
its friends and enemies as "po-
litical dynamite," would forbid
placing names of candidates
for president and vice presid-
ent on the general election
ticket this fall.
It would also set-up a three-
have "guaranteed the National man election board headed by
Democratic Party a spot on1 the governor with fuU and fi-
Oeor^afs ballot. ti n*I power to pass
The House passed a slightly disputes,
amended version of the elec-
on election
the
IS Some
13 Roman date
14 Iroquolan
Indian
15 Salt
16 Under (pott.)
18 Shade tree
19 For examplt
(ab.)
20 Rotating tools
22 Depart
23 Bristle
25 Accommoda-
tion
27 Snare
28 Sacred bull
29------has a
light
framework
50 Nickel
(symbol)
51 Lutecium
(ab.)
32 District
attorney (ab.)
53 Scent
35 Volcano in
Sicily
M Uncommon
39 Actual ,
40 Part of "be"
41 It Is also used
tor------
scientific work
47 Note of
Guido'* tcalt
48 Strike lightly
50 Exploded
51 Employ
82 Monsttr
54 Meager
allowanct
35 Gerund (ab.)
54 Stagger 1
VERTICAL
1 Meanest
2 Wild ass
3 Wood (comb,
form)
4 Cattle
5 NoUon
Group of
players
7 Italian city
8 Pronoun
9 Anger
10 East Indian
antelope
11 Evil spirit*
17 Tima mttiurt
(ab.)
Answer to Previous Puzzle
i-ii lea meji n- aaa-L, tttlllr- IMsm
"tC BMMWI i
3 2 's i iTZTJ. -i '-1
r : lit-
an": mmtagi-JizKji
Ecstasies
Defames
Suit maker
Drug
Speaker
Injure
Sicknes*
Changes
Mtn's
nickname
Impolite
44 Press
48 Capital of
Norway
46 Shoshonean
Indiana
49 Before
(prefix)
31 Exclamation
of disgust
53 Measure of
doth
Allocation Of Chest' Funds
Cuts Some Agencies7 Quotas
The budget committee of the Community Chest completed
its recommendations for the distribution of funds raised In the
recent chest drive at a meeting held recently.
The plan will be submitted to the executive committee of
the chest for final action.
The plan contains final figures on the campaign and re-
veals that a total of $27,980.18 was raised, of which $19,231.07
was in cash receipts and $8,749.11 was pledged through payroll
deductions. The sum of $3,178.77 was the balance on hand at
the beginning of the campaign.
Providing funds of $1,000 for next year's initial campaign
expenses, $230 for contingencies and $3,408.97 for current cam-
paign expenses, the committee recommended that the balance
of $26,501.98 be distributed to the following agencies for their
1952 programs:
tion bill by a vote of 104 to 92.
One hundred and three votes
were necessary tor passage.
Opponents pulled out all the
stops in an effort to defeat or
drastically change the bUl. Be-
fore debate got underway, ad-
ministration leaders shouted
down a 10-mlnute attempt by
youthful Rep. James I. Wood of
Macon to filibuster against the
But it was Rep. William Free-
man's substitute that almost
handed the Talmadge adminis-
tration its first defeat on a
major bUl in three years of of-
fice.
Freeman, making an appeal
for cleaning up but staying In
the national Democratic Party,
offered a bill which would have
permitted an uninatructed slate
of elector for the Georgia De-
mocratic Party which Talmadge
wants. But It would also have
given electors pledged to the
candidates of the national De-
mocratic Party a berth on Geor-
gla's Presidential election Ucket
this November.
Agenty Quota
Balboa YMCA U80. $3,250.00
Cristobal YMCA USO. . 3,250.00
Talmadge says the object ofijWB USO......... 3,250.00
the bill Is to make electors ofiVCCS UBO. .......... 3,25000
the Georgia Democratic Party|Boj Scouts of America. 3,000.00
"free agents" In the electoraljCirl Scouts of America,. 3,500.00
college and to permit them to international Boy Scouts. 1,750.00
vote agalnta President Truman] Summer Recreation
or any other Democratic candl-j Program....... 3,500.00
date unacceptable to the Tal- Salvation Army...... 4,500.00
madge controlled Democratic Corozal Hospital..... 1,000.00
Canal Zone Civic
Councils...... 1,250.00
Original Revised
Party of the state.
Only three speakers support-
ed the bill.
Rep. Woodrow Lavender of
Elbert argued that the people]
were not given a right by thej
Constitution to vote on Presi-
dential candidates.
"How .can you take away a
rglht to- vote when they have
never had it," he ar.ked.
Rep. Bernard Nightingale of
Glynn said the bill was another
step "In the 1948' Dlxiecrat
movement only It is more vici-
ous."
Quota
$3,250.00
3,250.00
3,250.00
3,250.00
3,000.00
3,500.00
L750.00
3,500.00
4,500.00
2,057.79
240.53
Expenses Net to
& Deficit Agency
$565.28 $2.684.72
565.28
565.28
585.28
538.08
592.49
338.22
592.50
500.00
223.93
2,684.72
2,684.72
2,684.72
2,461.92
2,907.51
1,411.78
2,907.50
4,000.00
1,833.86
240.53
TOTALS.
$31,500.00 $31,548.32 $5,048.34 $26,501.98
The election bill, described by States."
Rep. John Greer of Lakeland
said the bill would permit "Roy
Harris and Buck Murphy (Tal-
madge's legal adviser) to trade
and traffic Georgia's electoral
vote all over the United


I
A
Jr
tc
Br
de:
fb
wi
w
At LA MODA AMERICANA
BEGINNING FRIDAY, FEB. 1st.
SPECIAL SALE...
Ladles'
Dresses
Pajamas
Blouses
Swimming Suits
Skirls
Bags
Sandals
Nylon Lingerie
LA MODA AMERICANA
102 Central Avenue Panam
The quota of the Corozal Hospital was increased to the
1 amount of public subscriptions. This Is in accord with estab-
lished Community Chest policy.
The quota of the Canal Zone Civic Councils was reduced to
t'ie amount of public subscriptions at their request.
Since the quota of the Corozal Hospital was over-^
subscribed, expenses only, and none of the campaign de-
. ficlt, were absorbed on a percentage basis by that agen-
cy.
Due to deaths, resignations and transfers some payroll de-
duction pledges in each annual campaign prove uncollectible,
and the committee recommended that the actual figure be de-
termined In May and that this amount be set-off against final
budget allotments on a percentage basis. This deduction Is to
be shown on the final check to the agencies.
These uncollectible pledgee are usually small; last year's
cancellations amounting to three-tenths of one percent of the
campaign total.
Pointing out that some of the agencies would shortly
fee In need of these funds, the committee recommended
that 75 per cent of the sum allocated be paid to the
agencies on March 1 and the balance paid on or before
June 1.
Subscriptions to the agencies specified by the donors are:
Balboa YMCA USO, $539.24; Cristobal YMCA USO, $710.73; Jew-
ish Welfare Board USO, $223.25; National Catholic Community
Service USO, $749.52; Boy Scouts, $895.48; Girl Scouts. $763.74;
International Boy Scouts, $1,411.7; Summer Recreation Program,
$1 359.22; Salvation Army, $3,352.52; Corozal Hospital, $2,057.79;
and the Canal Zone Civic Councils, $240.53.
E. D. White, Jr., chairman, said that the committee had
originally planned to hold meetings with representatives of the
agencies and determine the distribution of funds from close
scanning of program requirements, but that the final report of
funds derived and the recent action of the civic councils in
waiving their quotas had made such detailed budgeting unneces-
sary. A copy of the budget report will be sent to all participat-
ing agencies within the next few days, he said.
F. J. Moumblow, chairman of the Community Chest, said
that the Executive Committee would meet on Feb. 15 to take
final action on the plan. Representatives of the agencies may,
if they desire, attend this final meeting of the 1951-1952 Com-
munity Chest board.
Faltering Philip!
Phllip't Ufe la filled with braises.
WtU-mon tepe and rags ha asea.
Repairs weald leave hit heme like new.
* A. Classifieds. tswt the right cite!
fftcgflHAND McCarthy Says White House Aide
.McoyoNas.DOi. Is Named Communist In FBI Files
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
NORTH U
4874
VK7543
? 43
? A 3.2
WEST EAST
AA1032 4>KJ9
10986 WQJ
? 5 ? J10B76
4>KJ87 +Q109
SOUTH (D)
AQ65
*A2
? AKQ02 S.
<|>654
East-West vul.
Sonth West Norm Eaat
14 Pass IV Pus
2 ? Pass Pats Pass
Opening leadW 10
Most bridge players think of a
trump coup only when they are
in a very high contract. Occa-
sionally, however, this rare play
can be employed In a lowly part
score, as may be seen from to-
days hand originally played by
Alexander Nuslnoff, New York
bridge expert.
The bidding was very tame,
logically enough, and Nusinoff
won the opening heart lead in
his own hand with the ace, not
expecting any fireworks in the
play. He promptly laid down the
ace and king of diamonds, dis-
covering the bad trump break
when West discarded the eight of
clubs.
Unshaken by the bad break,
Nuslnoff entered dummy with
the king of hearts and returned a
heart through East. This put
East on the horns of a dilemma.
Whether East ruffed or discard-
ed. South could fulfill the con-
tract.
East actually ruffed with the
ten of diamonds and Nusinoff
discarded a club. East next re-
turned a club to dummy's ace,
and another heart was led back.
What was East to do now? If
he ruffed, South could over-ruff
and draw trumps. Hence East
discarded a club, whereupon
South ruffed with the deuce of
diamonds. At this point South
had already won six tricks and
could afford to lead ann black
card from his hand.
The defenders could take their
clubs and spades, but eventually
South would make his queen-
nine of trumps, fulfilling the
contract.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 30 'UP) sevelt. McCarthy said he earns approval, the latter board re-
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy charg- $17.500 a year. quested another check of hW
ed yesterday that one of Pre-; McCarthy said that when,record.
"ONE MORE SANDWICH" says Sgt. James B. Bravard, as ha.
passes through the impromtu chow line at Rio Mar. Bath-
ing suits were the accepted costume at this buffet lunch.
Left to right are. Sgt. Bravard. Pfc. Humberto Morales-Alices,
Cpl. Lee R. Wilson, and Cpl. Reinaldo Mulero-Gonzlez.
(U.S. Army Photo)
sldent Truman's assistants has Nash's clearance by the White
been named In FBI reports as a House loyalty board was sent to
Communist and "close associate"' the Loyalty Review Board for
io members of a Canadian Red _
spy ring.
The Wisconsin Republican
identified the White House aide
in a Senate speech as Philleo'
Nash, who also comes from Wis- |
cousin. Nash's White House du-
ties center on minority groups
and problems.
McCarthy said FBI files re-
port that Nash joined the Com-
munist Party "in the early
1940's."
At that time, McCarthy said,
members of the Canadian spy
ring were using Nash's Toronto
home "as a rendezvous."
McCarthy also said that Nash
was cleared by the White House
loyally board. The Loyalty Re-
view Board has not made a fi-
nal decision on Nash, McCar-
thy said, because Donald S.
Dawson, Mr. Truman's patron-
age adviser, has not returned
Nash's files to the top loyalty
review agency.
It was learned that Nash's
sister, Jean, has been active a-
gainst McCarthy in his home
state. McCarthy is up for re-
election this year.
Miss Nash was one of 13 De-
mocrats and Republicans who
recently paid for advertisement
in the Wisconsin Rapids Tri-
bune which condemned "the
menace of McCarthylsm."
The ad contained quotations
from the "Declaration of Con-
science" of Sen. Margaret Chase
Smith (R-Me.i. which was re-
garded as a slap at McCarthy.
McCarthy told the Senate
that he disclosed the details of
Nash's case on the Senate floor i
"principally for the benefit of
President Harry Truman." He
said he assumed Mr. Truman i
had not been advised of the:
situation.
Other information In I he FBI
files, McCarthy said, includes:
1) Nash was "in constant
touch with the Communist un-;
derground in Washington."
2) He was "a close friend of
a-convicted Canadian."
3) Nash contributed "to the
support of the Canadian Tri-
bune, official organ of the Com-
munist Party in Canada."
McCarthy said there were
nine separate points in the FBI
files on Nash but that four of
them should not be read into
the record.
Nash joined the White House
staff In June, 1945, several
weeks after Mr. TAiman suc-
ceeded the late President Roo-
McCarthy said Dawson pick-
ed up the files and they wer*
ever returned. __
Infantrymen Enjoy Holiday

Unlike Postman's At Rio Mar
FORT KOBBE. Jan. 30They
cave an infantry platoon a holi-
day and, unlike the proverbial
postman's, one mucho good time
was had by all.
First Platoon, Charley Com-
pany of the 33rd Infantry Regi-
ment, led the First Battalion hi
the Department of the Army
platoon tests which were con-
ducted during the past three
months by the 33rd. These test
determine the maneuverability,
firepower and accuracy of a rifle
platoon and 57 mm. recoiless rifle
squad under combat conditions.
Battalion commander, Major
Paul C. Bender. awarded the
platoon a holiday Friday at the
Rio Mar beach, on the Panama
west coast, 65 miles from Fort
Kobbe. M-l's and squad tactics
were quickly nut aside as 40 men
set out for the resort In a bus
and two-and-a-half ton truck.
The men enjoyed a morn-
ing of both fresh water and
ocean bathing. At noon the in-
fantry went to work on a picnie
buffet lunch set up in a refresh-
ment stand on the beach. The
sandwiches, potato salad and
trimmings succumbed shortly.
After chow the energetic play-
ed softball while the others lan-
guished in the tropical sun.
The First Platoon of Charley
Company put on its winning
show at the Empire Rango Dec.
3 and the holiday proved a wel-
come break from Installation
guard, details and jungle war-
fare training. Platoon leaders
Sgt. Robert W Ross and Lt.
Charles N. Cook agreed. "It was
a grand day and the men de-
served It."
HAS WALK-IN FREEZER
FALLS CITY. Neb. (UP>. A
farmer had his own walk-In
freezer near here. He due a rave
into the side of a basement and
installed a refrigerating unit.
The freezer is big enough for
I him to carry in a quarter of beef.
THE ATLAS
GARDEN
IS NOW OFFERING
DAILY FROM 1 to 5 P.M.
Tom Collins.............0.25
Rum .............0.25
John' .............0.25
Ward "8" ',..............0.25
Frozen Daiquiri .........0.30
" Mint Julep ......0.35
" Orange Ade......0.20
Lime Ade ........0.20
Martini Cocktails........0.25
Manhattan Cocktails ....0.25
Rum it Coke............0.20
Atlas Special ............0.50
Wall of China...........0.75
Skull and Bones.........0.75
Planters Punch .........0.75
Scotch and Soda.........0.40
FROM OUR KITCHEN
"Fresh Sea Food
at all times"
Broiled Lobster .........1.75
" Shrimps ........L25
Shrimp Cocktails ........0.50
Lobster Cocktails ........0.50
Oyster Cocktails ........0.40
Ceviche Cocktails........0.40
Grilled Tenderloin Steak 1.75
Sirloin Steaks... 1.00
Rib Steak .......1.25
" Pork Chops.......1.35
Broiled Milk Fed Chicken 1.50
Arros con Polio..........1.75
SPECIAL TODAY
Patacn con Puerco......1.25
Chile con Came..........0.35
Curiosidades de Mono... 1.25
Tee, Coffee or a Glass of
Beer with the above meals
Curb Service at all hours
around Dance Floor.
Good enchanting music
NIGHTLY
THE 1952 FORD "CONSUL
BUILT IN ENGLAND
From Ford of Dagenham, England, sponsors of so many developments which have
been to the benefit of the motoring public at large, now comes the newest and
most significant development of all. With the introduction of their great new car,
the 'Consul' Ford has all the most desirable features of modern motoringcreating
a new 'Five-Star' class amona; cars.
Here is the definition of a 'Five-Star' Car:- "A 'Five-Star1 Car it a combination of
all those feature of design, performance and service which afford the maximum
pleasure and satisfaction to its users at the most economical cost."
SEE THEM ON DISPLAY AT
COLPAN MOTORS INC
Telephones Panam 2-1033 2-1036




page rovm


HE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAD1Y NEWSPAPER
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Wednesday,'January 3, 11
Shipping & Airline News
indefinitely and the crew sent
home on furlough.
Restrictions on fishing still ex-
ist, and some of the boats must
lav up to comply with the turn-
about plans to limit the quanti-
ty of tuna being brought in.
BOB HATCH will be Braniffs
new representative In Colon.
S. S. Ancon Advance
Passenger List
Edward D. McKlm, member of I
the Panam Canal Company.
Board of Directors, will leave the
Isthmus Friday on the Ancon.
accompanied by his wife and two
daughters, according to the ad-
vance passenger list from the
Panama Line offices at Balboa
Heights.
Sailing on the same ship will
be Miss Jessie M. Murdoch, who
was a nurse at Oorgas Hospital
during the construction days and
who has been visiting here since
early December.
A total of 83 passengers will
sail on the Ancon. The complete'
advance passenger list follows: !
Sgt. and Mrs. Walter L. Angle,1
Julio Arango and son, Mrs. Rei-:
Bob Hatch Assigned
As Sales Representative
For Braniff In Colon
Branlff International Airways'na Arango and daughter, Mrs.
has assigned Bob Hatch, senior
sales representative, to the air-
line's office at Colon.
Hatch a newcomer to Braniff s
Marie C. Berry, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert E. L. Brown, Cpl. George!
W. Burkart, Capt. Charles P.
Burns, Mr. and Mrs. Larry A. Cel-
expanding Panama staff, is a|Iucci and daughter. Michael
native Californian. who has Conn, Mr. and Mrs, John R. Cook,
worked for Braniff at the Hous- Dr. and Mrs. James H. Delaney,
ton Air Gateway, and later as a Miss Florence H. Edbrooke Mr
special sales representative at! and Mrs. Hyman Frankel, MrsJ
Braniffs base in Dallas. Texas.
He studied law at Santa Anna
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service Cristbal
S.S. Quirigua.............................___Febr. 3
S.S. Fiador Knot .............................Febr. 8
S.S. Chiriqui ...........................,:...:Febr. 18
S.S. Quirigua .................................Febr. 17
S.S. Levers Bend .............................Febr. 22
HandUnf Refrlftrated Chilled and General Cargo.
Arrives
New Vork Service_____________________Cristbal
S.S. Veragua .................................pebr. 2
S.S. Cibao ....................................Febr. 2
S.S. Cape Avinof .............................Febr. 3
S.S. San Jos .................................febr. 5
S.S. Jamaica .................................Febr. 9
S.S. Cape Cod >...............................Febr. 10
Weekl. Sailing* to New York. Loa Anules. San Francisco, Seattle
Occasional sillines to New Orleans and Mobile.
FREQUENT SAIUNGS FROM CRISTOBAL TO WEST COAS1
CENTRA1 AMERICA
Cristbal to New Orleans via c ., .
----------------------------------------- Sails from
Tela, Honduras_______________________Cristbal
S.S. Quirigua (Passenger Service Only).....Febr. 5
S.S. Chiriqui .................................Febr. 12
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
College. Santa Anna, Calif., and
later attended the University of
.Southern California.
Durliio world War II. his edu-
cation was interrupted, and he
ivas with the 8th Air Force In
England for 38 months. He Is
.the holder of the Distinguished
Flying Cross. Air Medal with five
Oak Leaf Clusters and the Pur-
ple Heart.
With Wars close. Hatch com-
pleted his law studies and later
attended the American Institute
for Foreign Affairs at Phoenix.
Arizona where he studied foreign
Mary G. Hammond. Paul 7. Hart-
man, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hirsch-I
man, Mr. and Mrs. Webber C.
Hosgland. and Mr. and Mrs. Za-
cbsry Tavlor.
Chris J. Karle, Floyd Kulp, Pvt.|
Frank Lascla, END3 Hohn H.I
Luellen, Mrs. Donald N. McKay, I
Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. McKim
and two daughters, Mr. and MrsJ
Charles E. Moore, Miss Jessie M.'
Murdoch, and Ernest P. Muzzlo.l
Cpl. Ralph G. Pendleton. Mr.
and Mrs. Leo Perper. Sgt. Robert1
P. Stewart, Mr. Marion M. Strik-
er. Mrs. Isabel de Striker. Mr.!
John Tone, and Arie T. Van Gel-1
der.
PFC Mark R. Warley. Lt. Corn-
trade and Spanish. He joined mander and Mrs. Maurice E.
Braniff shortly after his gradua-
tion from the Foreign Affairs
Institute.
i Hatch is a member of Delta
phi Epsilcn fraternity, and the
international Foreign Trade Fra-
ernlty. He is a hunting and
fishing- fan and an able tennis
player.
> His headquarters will be Bra-
Inlff's office in Colon, and he
tolll assume his new duties on
February St.
Wennermark and son. Mr. and
Mrs. Ray D. Wilson and two ehll-j
dren, Mr. and Mrs. Muriel Wln-
kleblack, Mrs. Irene M. Zwilllng,
and Sgt. John A. Zwilllng.
Four Destroyer Snil
For San Diego Today
Four United States Navy de-
stroyers, Lowry. Douglas, James
C. Owen, and the Laffey sailed
from Balboa today en route to
Ban Diego. The ships arrived
Sunday from Norfolk. There was
b crew of 300 men on each de-
stroyed
Tuna Clippers
In Balboa Docks
The tuna clippers Courageous,
Equator. Emma R. S., and Hor-
tensia Bertin are now at Balboa
docks. The Courageous and
Equator are to sail today, for the
high seas and fishing grounds.
The Emma R. S. has been un-
der repairs after having been ac-
cidentally flooded while on beach
at Taboga, and will proceed
through the Canal tomorrow for
drydocklng at Cristobal to re-
pair the keel and paint the bot-
tom.
The Hortensia Bertin is laid up
7t
,
M/S "PRESIDENTE
CAMPO SERRANO"
Sailing on or about
FEBRUARY 3rd, 1952.
Accepting deck passengers
for
CARTAGENA, Col.
Apply
C. Fernie & Co.
Cristbal
3-1772
Balboa
2-1657
C,E GLE TRANSATLANTl IQU
?ASI rKfcli.HIKH 8KB VICE. BETWEEN CUKOPE AMD NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COASTS (A Limited Number of Pawenger Berths)
hi EUROPE: S.S. Port En Bessin .....................,........... February S
ALLEY OOP
LET'S NOT TRY TOO HARD
Y V. T. RANN
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR AND CHILE:
S.S. Bernieres............................ ..........February 1
rO CENTRAL AMERICA WEST COAST t S.A.
S.S. -tX ...................,.................... February 15
PASSENGER SHIP FROM NEW YORK TO PLYMOUTH U HAV*E:
lie De Trance........................................ February IS
PASSENGER SERVICE from CARTAGENA lo EUROPP:
Colombit ......."............................-...I... February 24
Cristobal: FRENCH LINE. P.O Box 5*15 Tel. 1-Ult IS
Panama: LINDO Y MADURO. S A. Boa 1038
Tel Panama MM 1-lfifl
THAT EXPLOSION /YEH,DOC,)WBX,OkAV-1 YOU'RE CHECKING WE CAN /GLAD THATO ON HAPPENED \ SEE IT (ALL THERE RfcSHT HERE...ONE1 DIDNTJ WAS TO IT... 1 OF MY PROJECTS V ~*\ SO LQNGt THAT DIDN'T DO rlAW V^ _^ so good/ -jTTtnh Lflj MS0nl
A*tt jK Jam vim n
^41 llffWF^V
ROOTS AND HER BUDDIES
JINGLE JANGLE
BY EDGAR MARTIN )
DONALDSON LINE
S/S USMORIA
Sailing About Jan. 31, 1952
For
LOS ANGELES
Excellent Accommodation Available
Apply
PAYNE & WARDLAW
VW> .WOT MLMVftV
TH' WfO SO VfcAr^
USTtM VttOfcOOV
&M4 MrtVMV 1
CAPTAIN EAST
A DASH TO SONORA
BY LESLIE TURNEE
BALBOA
Pacific Terminal Bldg.
Phone 2/1258
CRISTOBAL
Masonic Temple Blag.
Phone 3/2161
WE WERE LUCKY TOTftlENPIP1. BUT FIRST
FIND YOUR CAR SO I I MUST SEND A WIRE...
UICKLY. YOU CAN VJU BE RIGHT BACK!
PILE CHARGES AGAINST
THE THIEF WOW, AND
GO OVER WITH US
TO RECOVER IT'
f HRIS WELREN. Planeteer
OUT OF CONTROL?
CUBI, ANO PS. SHOO B.OVHO IIP TNG TWO
PRISONER* L6T BEHIND IN THEIR
L ABIN OF THE PL VIN6 Td i MOL B...
BV BUSS WINTERBOTHAM
I *E THE EMEKOcaJty^
ROCfcET DROPPED OUT
OF THE +HIPWUEH WE I
opened r6 locks.
TUB INSTRUMENT
5MOM&OUK
COW&B /S ZI&-
ZAC rT^UOtlLP
NOT BE,
' SIXTY MJLES TO THE SONORA
COUNTY AT. GOTTA GET
THERE, ALONE, WHILE THEY
STILL HOLD THAT CONVERTIBLE!
Meanwhile -
VIC rLINT
THAT'S ALL FOR SPORT
BY MICHAEL O'MALLET
Pl'.lSCILLA'S POr
DRAMA IN THE RITCHEN
BY AX VERMEER
VJG8 BUNNY
JUST A VISITOR
THE'FlEON SPORT GOES DOWN UNDER THG
CHARTOE OP THE MADDENEC PULLS, ANT WVN
PUNTANI7 6KOWL ARRIV&...
V/* I WORK HERE,
SOMEffODV CHASE TL"*=C <------
5UU.S AWAY OK I'LL
i9TAZT SHOO-DMeV
INSPECTOR. I'LL
HANDL&THBAA/
rvouKB rtgwt;\ he was the
|PLJT. AOKI-VW-WJRDEKEK OF
EM7 FOR___/ HAMILTON
port y sense, that's
PEeCEJC./ WHY HB WA*
RUNAJIMC AWAV.
'aJ
HB RB.LasP'TO
KEEP HIS REST.
KANT. HBWAS
MLLBC7HWLF
wV STEAKS ON
THE HOOF. I'VE
flOTTJAWKEA
PHONE CALX,
OUR BOARDINC, HOUSE
with
t CAM /V\AKE\OKA>Y,
tit ON^ Y^L?'
THgT JUMPING J CAN
,THKTi,TIJF
NOW
sa
wn
rW6LL, HOOPLE, IN ALL THE VCARS
1'NlE Liv/ED HERE, THIS IS THe L,
f IRST TIME I'VE 5EEN O A A MCTLe.'- BUT IP YOU'RE?
C50ING IN POR CALISTHENICS,
I'D RATHER 6EE VfcTO
5yJim across -The
.KE WITH An)
AnWil UNDER
EACH

MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAY
By J. R WILLIAMS
EGAO.gAVTER / OJMe
, 6PCIWS, WHILE iCnydB.
GRUBBING AWAY AT
.HOUR. PR06AIC P0TATO66
> AND RADISHES, I'LL
Be L5ADIN6 OUR OWLS'
TOG-OF-WAR TEAIA
{ti 6LORIOS DEFENSE
OF ITS CHAMP-
IONSHIP oypf^ ^,
*o-
if
~\Zd

1-3.1
WHY MOTHER.*


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31. 1S5
fHF PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
pase rm
racific ^)ocietu
W*. CtJSCXJm
&. 17, & Zt &A~ 3571
ADMIRAL AND MRS. BLCDSOE
KM'tK'i'AIN VISITORS WITH DINNER
The Commandant of the Fifteenth Natal District, Rear
Admiral Albert M. Bledsoe, and Mrs. Bledsoe entertained
i .ili a dinner last evening at Quarters A, Fifteenth Naval
District Reservation, in honor of Rear Admiral Herbert La-
niunt rugh, Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery,
Navy Department, Washington, D. C, and Rear Admiral
Sherman R. Clark, Chief of the Inspection Team and Di-
rector of Shore Establishment Survey from the Chief of Na-
val Operations Office, Washington, D. C ____
Visitors Leave for Jamaica
Dr. and Mrs. Eugene de Sav-
ltscn lelt recently for Kings-
ton, Jamaica, after having been
the house gaeats for the past
several days of the Ambassador
Hospital where he had under-
gone an operation.
New Member Accepted
Ry. Cradle Roll Set
Mr. and Mrs. Louis (Cito)
o the United States to Pan- Towery, of Austin, Texas, an-
ama and Mrs.
Wiley;
John Cooper
Maria Enriqueta Gonsales
Revilla is Nine Years Old Today
i Dr. and Mrs. Antonio Gon-
j fcalez Revilla are to be hosts this
, klternoon at a "swlm-lunch-
.!on" party given In honor of
*ihe ninth birthday anniversary
,4f their daughter, Maria Enrl-
, ueta Gonzalez Revilla, and
leld pooUlde at the Hotel El
.Manama.
V1 The guests will Include Ma-
rias ti.oi.ner, Antonio, and her
Class mates from the Sacred
Heart School.
nounce the birth of an eight
will hold a "Bake Sale" on Fri-
day at 3:00 pjn. at the Civic
Center In Gamboa. Free coffee
will be served.
I.A.W.C. To Meet For Picnic
The Get Together of the
month for the members of the
Inter American women's Club
win be a picnic to be held on
February 12 at the summer
home In El Caney of Mrs. Jaime
de la Guardia.
Equipment for each person
planning to attend will Include
a picnic lunch and bathing
suit. The group will leave from
Club Headquarters at 00 a.m
La Boca Man Decorated In Korea
Bingo at American Legion Club
Bingo will be played tomor-
1 J- L0e?ionVcmnb^taWrt%m?dorCaa,^
7:30 p.m. Members and their
guests are Invited to attend.
uary, 28.
Mr. Towery la a graduate of
Balboa High School, attended
Junior College here and la now
a third year student at the
University of Texas. He Is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. John W.
Towery, of Ancon. His wife is
the former Delores Ann Gilbert
of Irving, Texas. Mrs. Towery
left the Isthmus Jan. 18, by
plane, for Austin, where she
will visit for a short time.
Mr. and Mrs. Orr
1 Celebrate Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Orr, of
Balboa, will entertain with a
barbecue supper at 5:30 p.m. at
their home given in celebration | classification.
of the fourth anniversary
their wedding.
Friends invited to attend in-
clude Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Mc-
Cauley, Mr. and Mrs. H. G.
Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Morton
Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. George
Daniels, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Blssell, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel
Klley and Mr. and Mrs. Marvin
Roth.
IAWC To Sponsor Dog Show
A dog show, under the aus-
pices of the Inter-American
Women's Club, will be held at
the Juan Franco Race Track
on Feb. 13 at 4:00 p.m. Entries
from both sides o fthe Isthmus
will be accepted regardless of
Equal attention
Arrangements have been made
with bus drivers to take play-
ers directly to the Club on re-
quest.
Cotillion Class To
Meet Thursday
The Cotillion Class will meet
informally on Thursday eve-
ning at 7:00 p.m. In the Wash-
ington Salon of the Hotel El
Panama.
Insects Threaten
California Nuts
i logy division said scientists bop*
I that many experiments now ir
| progress with sprays and grounc
! treatments and Importation ol
Jan so I possible parasites may bring re-
the flies;
Absent-Minded
Lift Operator
SALEM, Ore., Jan. 30 (UP). RIVERSIDE. Calif.,
The story Is going around Ore- (UP). Walnut husk files have1" "n the war on
gon's captol about an absent- built up one of their heaviest In-1 -..---J,.-,.- _,..,._,. .__
minded elevator operator In the festatlons this year since they in-i watchmaker starts latb
state's new office building in vaded southern California ' WALTHAM. Mass. (UP). A
Portland. She was busy, also con- quarter of a century ago, accord- "2-year-old Waltham watph-
fused. tag to University of California maker says life began for. him
As the account goes here, she Agricultural scientists. only two years ago. A self-mad
stopped on the fifth floor and Science as yet has been unable artist, he has turned out 40 olla
when a prospective passenger|to stop them from multiplying!marines, landscapes and por-
asked: "Going down or up?" she and damaging crops. traits after store hours wi
stepped from the elevator, look-| J. C. Ortega of the Riverside!his homemade easel and a set
ed at the light and replied: experimental station's entorno-1 of paints and brushes.
Bingo At Pedro Miguel Tonight
Bingo will be played at 7:30
p.m. at the Pedro Miguel Boat
Club.
Winners of Bridge Tournament
Announced
of I will be given pedigreed and m The winners of the Bridge
mongrel dogs, each in Its pro- Tournament played on Mon-
per class, and all will be eligible dav ven]nF ,lrU^i. il 18T
w equal honors. I of the Hotel Tlvoli were: 1st,
There will b ho fee to en- Mr 1' A. Orr and Mr Torres;
ter dogs as contestants in the 2nd- WaJor-and Mrs N. 0"n
show but registration must be day; 3rd, Mr. and Mrs; H. G.
made no later than Feb. 11 and
include the following informa-
tion: l, name of dog; 2, pedi-
gree, if any; and 3, name of
Mr. H. R Haskell
Honored On Birtday
Mr. Henry Bradley Haskell, of
Rodman, was the guest of hon-
or on Monday evening at a
dinner party given by Mrs Has-
kell at their home on the occa-
sion of his birthday anniver-
sary.
Those celebrating with Mr.
Haskell included Mr. and Mrs.
Wyn Garvn and their children,
Gloria and Erick. Mr. and Mrs.
Emll Gnehm. Mrs. Steadwell
Gnehm and her daughter, Joan.
Mr. Garvn showed movies he
had taken of the Perlas Islands,
Chile, and California.
owner. An admission fee of 50c.
for adults and 25c. for child-
ren will be charged.
Registrations may be made
at the IAWC Clubhouse or thru
one of the following directors
who are arranging the show:
Chairman, Mrs. Alberto de O-
barrlo, whose phone number Is
Panama 3-3580; Mrs. Arturo
Muller; Mrs. Lou Simpson or
Mrs. Harry D. Schelbla.
"Chez Eloise" Fashion Show
Tonight
The annual "Chez Eloise"
Fashion Show will be presented
tonight on the front lawn of
the Balboa High School with
Robinson: 4th, Mr. and Mrs. W
Norrls; 5th, Mr. C. E. Brooks
and Mrs. P. Hudson.
Prompt attendance at 7:00
p.m. Is requested of attending
players.
Balboa Woman's Bridge Group'
To Meet
The Bridge Group of the Bal-
boa Woman's Club will meet on
Thursday at 12:30 p.m. at the
Jewish Welfare Board in Bal-
boa.
Match-Box Size
Stove Fries Eggs
CHARLOTTE, N. C, Jan. 30
(UP).A local Inventor has ap-
plied for a patent on a stove no
HQS 93tTH END. AVN. GROUP, KOREA Sergeant Lance-
lot S. Lewis, above, La Boca, Canal Zone, was recently
awarded the Commendation Ribbon by Lt. Col. Charles S.
Allen, Seaside. Calif., Deputy Commander of the hard-work-
ing 930th Engineer Aviation Group In Korea.
Lewis, Chief Administration Clerk. 811th Engineer Avia-
tion Battalion, was cited by performance of duties as Ser-
geant Major In the Directorate of Installations, Headquarters
Fifth Air Force. The citation read In part, "He performed
his duties in an outstanding manner which displayed great
flexibility In handling tasks assigned him, many of which
were not In his field of specialization."
8gt. Lewis Is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edmond W. Lewis,
970-D Jamaica Prado, La Boca, Canal Zone.
t
BEST QUALITY
Sport Shirts % "T Shirts
Sport Jackets # Cabana Sets
A wonderful selection in the latest styles,
to wear for very casual occasion!
Panama MOTTS Co/on
Visitors Here from Wisconsin
Dr. and Mrs. Leon Nowak, uions." Master of Ceremonies
accompanied -by Mrs. Fredericks, for the occasion will be Sam
arrived last, week on the Isth-, Maphls.
mus for a visit with their son- --------
ln-law and daughter, Lt. and. Rabbi Wlikin Leaves
Mrs. George C. Wussow, of Fort For New Vork
Kobbe. Rabbi Nathan WitlOn, the
Dr. Nowak is the Fire Com- Field Representative of the
missloner of the City of MU-1 National Jewish Welfare Board,
waukee, Wisconsin as well as I Armed Services Division, Carlb-
an Honorary Member of the In- i bean Command and the Direc-
ternational Association of Fire | tor of the USO-JWB Armed
Fighters. i Forces Service Center In Bal-
Members of the Fire Depart- boa left Monday to attend a
50 girls from the school serving' bigger than a match boxjvhich
as models for their own "crea-
RUTH MILLETT Says
What's your guest rating with
your friends? '
You can probably get a fairly
good idea by asking yourself a
few questions.
When you receive an Invita-
tion do you accept lt with evi-
dent enthusiasm and pleasure,
rather than by some half-heart-'
ed answer like, "I think I can
come" or "If I can find a baby-
sitter, but you know what a chore
that Is" ?
Are you habitually prompt In
keeping engagements, rather
than having a reputation for al-
ways being late?
When a guest, do you feel the
same kid of responsibility for.
making a party go as you feel
when you are a hostess? I
Are you fairly good at small
<***
NEW ARRIVALS...
BRANCH
Beautiful MATERNITY DRESSES.. .from 6.95 up
RAYON AND COTTONS DRESSY COATS
SWIM SUITS . latest styles.
SUCKS . PEDAL PUSHERS.
Main Store:
62 Justo A rose mena Ave.
MAIN
RHODA
Branch Store: 8 Tivoli Ave.
Tel. 2-3121
ment have taken the three
visitors to various places of
Interest on the Isthmus during
their stay here.
Miss Jessie Murdoch
To SaU Friday
Miss Jessie Murdock, former
Isthmian resident who has been
visiting here for the past several
special conference In New York
of the Armed Services Division
of the National Jewish Welfare
Board. He plans to return to
the Isthmus in about three
weeks after a short visit to
Washington.
Art League To Meet
The regular meeting of the
months, crossed to the Atlantic j Canal Zone Art League will take
Side to be a guest at the Hotel
Washington until she sails on
Friday.
Hearnet To Lesve
Isthmus Saturday
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hearne, of
Birmingham. Alabama, who
have been visiting their fami-
lies on the Isthmus for the past
two months will leave on Sat-
urday by plane to return to
their home m the United
States.
place on Sunday at 3:00 p.m.
In the auditorium of the Jew-
ish Welfare Board Center In
Balboa.
Mr. Wright Kirk, the Cultural
Officer of the American Em-
bassy, will be the guest of the
organiatlon and will show two
colored art films from the Em-
bassy library.
A cordial Invitation Is ex-
tended to Interested persons.
Morning Guild to Meet Friday
The Morning Guild of the
Commander Halloran Cathedral of St. Luke will meet
Leaves Hospital at 0:30 a.m. to Friday. Coffee
Commander Edward Roose- will be served at the home of
velt Halloran, the Fifteenth Mrs. R. Heber Gooden In Ancon.
Naval District Public Informa- --------
tlon Officer, returned Monday I Bake Sale Friday In Gamboa
from the Fort Clayton Army' The Gamboa Woman's Club
boiling, talk, the kind of chatter that
coffee to heating baby's bottle, breaks the Ice In the rirstwj|
peter Gllchrist. secretary- minutes after you arrive at your
treasurer of Charlotte Chemical
Laboratories, claims his tiny
stove will heat a can of soup in
seven minutes, boll a cup of cof-
fee in eight and fry an egg In
three minutes.
The two-ounce midget, con-
structed of steel, will support a
0-pound weight and burns small
chemical pellets (hexa-metha
tetramine) which are odorless.
Gllchrist calls his Invention
the Charlab Pocket Stove and
says it costs about 50 cents. He
says several manufacturers are
negotiating for commercial pro-
duction of the gadget.
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panam No. 68 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails,
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments Massages,
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators. For Information call: 3-2217 Panam
; tLt ajn.; 28 p.m.
Fugitive Leaves
Polite Thank You
VTROQUA, Wls.. Jan. 30 (UP)
Alfred Stauf fer didnt want the
sheriff to take it personally.
So he wrote a polite note of
appreciation for Bernard Am-
merman'8 hospitality when he
broke out of the Vernon County
jail.
"If my own father had lived, I
would want him to be like you,"
the 22-year-old Los Angeles ma-
gazine salesman wrote. "And if
he had lived I might be a dif-
ferent type of fellow. If I am
caught, I will never be In trouble
again." _______
JUST CANT WIN
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (UP). Two
signs were on the tailgate of the
truck, says Weston Morgan. The
sign on the left read: "Crime
doesn't pay." The sign on the
right added: "Neither does truck-
ing."
hostess' house?
Are you an interested listener,
quick to respond to another's
comments and ready to laugh
appreciatively at another s hu-
mor?
Do you feel comfortably "at
home" in another's houserath-
er than feeling tense and ner-
vous? .
Do you really enjoy good con-
versation, eager to add your Ideas
and opinions to those of others,
not belligerently but with con-
viction?
Are you as careful of a hostess'
possessions as you would like
guests to be of your own?
When you take your leave do,
you know how to make your host
and hostess feel that lt has been
a real pleasure to be with them
and that you have enjoyed the
other guests as well?
When you decide it Is time to
leave do you have the courage
of your convictionso that you
can make your leave-taking brief
Instead of dragging it out?
The more "res'" answers you
can give to those questions the
better your guest rating with
your friends.
Notice of Meeting
To the Stockholders of
Hoteles Inleramericanos, S. A.
Panam City, Panam. January 18. IMS.
Yon are hereby notified that a Special Meeting of
the Stockholders of Hoteles Interamericanos, S. A., will be
held in the Saln Panamericano of the hotel El Panam
located at Panam City, RepubUc of Panam, at 4:00 p.m.
on the 31st day of January, 1952, fer the following pur-
poses:
1. To amend Article I of the Articles of
Incorporation:
2. To amend Article t ef the Articles of
Incorporation;
3. To amend Article 11 of the By-Laws;
4. To elect the Directors of the corporation;
5. To transact saeh other business aa may
properly come before the Meeting.
ROBERTO EISENMANN
President
{Beauty
at its best...
BY PROFESSIONALS
SPECIA' $750
WHY HAVE A HOME
PERMANENT?
...with Inadequate facilities,
no certain finished look, and
no guaranteewhen vou can
have a professional one rom-
siete for onlv 87.80? It will
last longer and took better1.
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
These cao be had
BALBOA
Soak on Mexunt, enjoy
cooling felief. It quickly
checks torment of minor
ikin irritation, chafe, itri-J
"ted feet, itchy toes. Its|
ipecial Arnylum base il
uper-soothing to ikin.
Quick!
Sure.1
MEXSANA
AMfOfCATtt
nmotm
PRE-INVENT0RY SALE
Ou. Turn Over Is Such, Our System Of Purchase* Is Such That Sales Are Not Too Common
In Our Store. But Come Inventory Time (Feb. 28th), We'd Just As Soon Inventory Dollars As
Merchandise. There Are Oodles Of Odds And Ends To Get Rid Of, At Prices___________
PANTS
Sizes 28 to 44
These Values
Justify Your
Stocking Up
for 12 Months.
VALUES
To
$7.50 2.25
To
14.50 -5.75
KHAKIS 2.95
SHORTS
For Swim
or Play
FIGURED A
SOLID COLORS
VALUES UP TO
$5.00
2.25

MS)
llalha. I >
Early!
Make your
Appointment
BEAUTY SHOP
Mrs. Bates Wieman. Mgr.
OpM H mm M :M

i
MEN'S SOCKS
WHITE ONLY, COTTON
6 pairs for $1.00
MEN'S SOCKS
6 Different Solid Color*
Mercerized Ribbed Lisle
4 Prs. for $1.90
Mens Bath Robes
SPUN RAYONS in
PAISLEY PATTERNS
CANDY STRIPES
FIGURED TERRY
CLOTHS.
lvalues Regularly Mark-
ed up to $19.75
All pooled in on let.
NOW... $10.75
MEN'S SOCKS
FANCIES PLAIDS
& STRIPES
Interwoven, Westmins-
ter, and other brands.
VALUES to 90c.
.
65<
FOR MEN and YOUTHS
KNITTED WOOL
BATHING SUITS
Sizes 26 to 34
$2.25
MEN'S SUITS
N0RTHC00L
Values up to $45
i. $19.75
Mens Bath Robes
COTTON PRINTS
A small lot, to
clean up...
(NOW only $4.75
COTTON
SEERSUCKER
ICOTTON CORDS
RAYONS
Values up to $35
... $13.75
MEN'S PAJAMAS
ICOTTON PRINTS $2.85
18" WHITE
COTTON
HANDKERCHIEFS
$1.35 per dozen
PARLAY SUITS
for email men
sizes 34, 35, 36
WERE $27
NOW $9.75
N0RTHC00L
SPORT-COAT
Sizes 34 to 46
A big value at
$25 . -
ONLY $16.75
Please: Our Sale
does NOT include
N0RTHC00L REPEL-0-TIZED Clothing
offoutdoirt
NfWZfALANPPROPuXT
SHIRTS
MANHATTAN
WHITE BROADCLOTH
$1.95
SHIRTS
$1.00/1.35 values 65c.
I/) $1.50/1.75 values SI.00
UJ $2.00/2.50 values SI.65
__ MANHATTAN, BOTANY
. HOLLYVOGUE, etc.
r" STANDARD BRANDS.
(/)

SPORT SHIRTS
VALUES $7lo$l95
NOW *fc
BODYGUARD Jockey Shorts
for men and youths
Sizes from 28 to 44
55*
MEN'S and YOUTHS
Knitted "T" Shirt
Athletic Sweat Shirts
VALUES UP TO $3.50
NOW.
$1.85
"GYM "Tmnb'fof Boys
of heavy
WHITE JEAN
55*
Boys Knitted T' Shirt
Sizes 6 to 18
$1.75 to $2.25 value
NOW. . $1.45
REGULATION AIR FORCE
BURTON'S IRISH POPLIN
BLUE
SHIRTS
16't to 17's J3VW
u mascota-Samuel Friedman Inc. -u mascota
OP P. ANCON POST OFFICE



"- f SIX
/HE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER
Wednesday, January m. iS
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru PA. Classifieds I
Ltavt your Ad with one of our Agents or our
Offices
I ,.KH1 *a*VlCi
tiue.AU Oh UMSBM
MORRISON'S
h*- r**m ft
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALEComplete livingroom set,
cor.boo. S35. metal d.nette
table four chairs $15 metal chest
of drcv-ers ond n.flht t.ble $17-
Poir bide table? S3. all
BOTICA UAJkXTOM
FOR SALE
Automobile
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
No ft wi UK* tat
l'Hfc PANAMA AMERICAN
Wo. t "TWihi raeaaeE
.. ant CeerMI Ae,Celea.
MISCELLANEOUS
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
Servtoa ersonnel ond
Clvtllon Government Employee
PINANCI
your new or ueao eor through
p.r-iOOVMNMIMT IMFIOYES PINANCI
tm lit. tmm.
10. Cell ofter six.________
For"SALT S tube Zenith
model radio, excellent condition. |4 ^^ wh ^ finoncing
25 cycles House M01-B, l-r,lvour niuronce automatically adjusted
-- r,'1' Servlnp. Sovemmor* Employ ond
lble Service Personnel in the Csnoi Zone
St.. Balboa
to U. S. coviroge.
gM"-4,T;------p^nnerotor 60 cycles.1 ARRANGIMINTS CAN II MAOI
FC,^ 5A 7 tvoewnte Simmons: THP.OU6H LOCAL AUTOMOIILI
Underwood typewriter, j OIALIB
Oe yea have e rtekftit treble*?
Writ. Alceftolio Aieireaaeiai
tee 2091 Anee C. Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: fl/ competitive bid
Various items of fountain and
restaurant equipment. For further
information coll at Navy Exchonge
Office, building No. 24, Naval
Station, Rodmon. Telephone
3339.
double bed complete, baby crib.
Phone 91 e. Colon_____________WANT TO BUY or sell an automo-
6'.'. bile? See Agendas Cosmos, ou-
2-2490
p. m.
roTsL Venetian ^^
folSALER.iboo0 2ed2490S after "6| to-,b,f." row'"29. telephone 2-
4721. Panami. Open all doy on
.., jc, Saturdays,
blinds. Set----------------------
Will exchange 60 cycle Admiral au-
tomatic record changer for any 25
cycle automatic record changer or
will sell outright. House 1487-A
Dohrman St., Bolboa.
RESORTS
Enjoy a vacotion of Hotel Pon Ame-
ricano. El Voile. Phone Panamo
2-1112 for reservations.
Williams Santo Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms Frigldoires. Rock-
got ranges. Balboa 2-3050. '
HOUSES ON BEACH Santa Clara
and m ceel Cerro Campana
mountain. Phone Shropnel 2820
or see Coretaker.
Gramlich' Sonto Cloro beoch-
cotteoe Electric Ice poxes, got
stoves, moderate rote*. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Fiesta Wore, stucio
small rugs, ship's clock Most rea-
sonable prices. '574-E. Govilon,
sora
Rd Balboa
HelpWonted
\vXNtFd- Maid. Euopean pre-
lerred care for 2 children, house-
work """'' o(rnces reauire
62, 1950
4 door sedan, 2 tone, radio, hy-
dramatic. conditioner, 11.000
miles. Trade $3.100. Coll Scott.
Ponamo 2-0600.
Phillip*. Oceoruide cottage. Sonto
Claro. Box 435. Balboa Phone
Ponamo 3-1877. Cristbal 3-1673
_oiV.Mt.iC I AL (J
PROFESSIONAL
We have everythlnjt
to keep vour Lawn
ind Harden beautiful
lurini! the dry season
'OOlf
Hose
Fencing;
Sprayers
Sprinklers
vvneeibarrnwf
insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
FCR SALE:1949 4-door Chevro-
let 4-door sedan. Good condition
See Vincent. U. S. Embassy.
FOR SALE:Buick two door 38 newj _
FOR SALENew Home Sewing Ma-
chine 25 or 60 cycle, long bob-
bin 5135 Remington Sporter Rifle
with target and hunting sights in
good condition. House 5607-0, i
Diablo Hgts.
FOR SALE:Baby carrioge. Kiddy .
Koop. basinette, misc. baby equip-
ment. Very reasonable. Hours 4-
6. Brazos Hgts. 9-A. Phone Cris->
tobal 3-2388.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:For 3 months. Com-
pletely furnished 3 bedroom house
with swimming pool. Golf Heights.
Call Ponoma 3-3069 or 3-3341.
FOR RENT
Apartments
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Call at
Balboa
m
cook. References required ~ ,ronsDOr.; F0R SALE:3 pairs drapes 2 l-2l *",*M"* ml2EkZm*
! ,467-A. Dohrman Street, t.re* tnd ootte y. g vvith-^rn furnished uotu^she^ oport-
, between .0 and II . * *_,, J * j ,, wal.J^kM^ ~\ff^JB?tfStfSZ
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
#22 E. 29th 8t.
BALLET REHEARSAL The Colon chapter of the Gladys Heurtematte School of Ballet is
shown rehearsing for a recital to be given Feb. 1-2 In the Colon Inter-American Women
Club building.
* *
Heurtematte Dancers Giving
2 Recitals At AWC, Colon
Wanted
Miftrrli*ii*i
FCR SALE1942 Buick Sedan, per-j
feet condition. Recently over-,
hauled, rodo, plastic upholstery.
Baiboa Bowling Center. 3 p. m.
11 p. m. Tel. 2-3387
trade 25 cycle_______---------------------------------------------
cu. ft. porceloin.FCR SALE:1947 Ford Station Wa-
automatic wash-| gon.
nhn. 7 I*** 0,fl* 806, ,0,b S,r,e,< N,W
1766 Telephone 2-jOWobalt tf*htm 1386 Colon.
Mcchanicolly A-l. House:
41 -), G:tun, phone 5-505.
WANTED: Will
Westinohcuse 9
refr:g0tcr and
ing machine, both in good con-
d.ticn for 60 cycle refrigerator
nd WKhinej machine. Call Balboo
2-3373;; _____ ________
WANTED:Used Chevrolet Pick- _
up. 1-2 ton. Cash. Box 775 An-1 FCR SALE:Vincent Block Shadow
con, C Z.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE
Motorcycle
W/NTED: Passenger flying to cool
Costa Rica S30. round trip; or
Mexico. SI 40. round trip, on
LACSA. PAA affiliate. Coll Pon-
oma Dispatch Service. Tel. 2-
1655. oppos.te Ancon bus-stop.
1.000 C.C. twin and Ariel Red
Hunter 500 ce. ingle. Both ex-
cellent condition, 2,000 miles.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURES FOR SALE
For sale to the highest bidder Build-
ing No. 195. Cristobal, and Build-
ing No. 453, Ancon (Ancon Theo-
tre Building). Sealed bids will be
received in the office of the Su-
perintendent of Storehouses at Bal-
boa until 10:30 A. M., February 8,
FOR RENT: Beautiful, furnished
apartment. Suitable for two mar-
ried couples, screened. Government
inspected. No. 19, 45th Street,
Belle Vista.
..,.,, ,. r w_ii.._:_. a.1 1952, when they will be opened in
Will finance. Coll Mcllvaine, Bel-, r .,
.. ic-io 1440 b Owen St PUD'IC- Form of proposol with full
FOR RENT:Modern two bedroom
oportment In newly constructed
building on 51st. Street No. 42.
For further information coll Mn-
dez & Zubieta. Telephone:
3035.
FOR RENT
Rooms
boa 3518 or
Balboa.
LESSONS
WANTED; Light weight Panga.;
obout 14 ft. Moil description ond UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA. SPAN-
price to Box 16, Bolboo, C. Z.
anted Position
p'ev-r i:hes to place competent
rrr d for general housework, Crit-
tc'-cl 3-2388.
particulars may be secured in the
offices of Superintendent of Store-
houses, Blnlboa. and the Housing
Managers at Cristobal and Balboa
Height.
ISH COURSES FOR FOREIGNERS. AttentMn Cele*:For sale houses
Special Beginner' Ciaste f o r
American will be held every So-
turdoy for o period of 15 weeks
from 10 to 11:30 A. M. Classes
start thi Saturday. Februory 2nd.
Registrotiort fee: 10 Balboas.
Farhions For Sports, VFW Stresses
Afternoon, Evening Red Menace to US
Booked For Showing \&^ 'as a national organization have i
Style tips on new fashions for been striving to arouse the
boLh men and women will be American people to the dangers!
featured at the Navy Wives Fash- of communism, said Hank R.
lonShow scheduled for 5:30 p.m. chenevert, the Canal Zone De-
Fridav at the Army and Navy Dartment Judge Advocate at an
Club. Ft. Amador interview held at Post No. 100.
The March of Dimes wili be- Cristobal, last night.
nefjt from the 50-cents admis-
tion charge. Chenevert declared that the
Xrtswear for morning, ana VFW at s Nati0nal Encamp-
irou? models for late after- t ,926 acceptcd a na.
noon will be followed by gala
dress for evening wear.
The evening dreases will be
modeled by a lovely group of
Navy wives.
Creations offered by Felix Ma-
duro will feature the women's
fashion display: while Haspel
ults will be shown by the Amer-
iCTheBaBC Trio la donating its * <"" results of ft**;
talents fSr the mualcal ^\^t"?J?3Fn*% S2
of the program, Thto group of &^LSOS^SSLPL'3R
No. 2010, 2012. 2014 exception-
ally well situated oh 3rd street
between Btolboa and Bolivar Aves,
with large frontage on all 3 im-
portant thoroughfares. For infor-
mation: Victor M. Ossa. Tel. Co-
lon 210 L or Wolff & Co. Tel
Ponoma 2-2388.
FOR RENT:Furnished room with
private bathroom. Independent en
trance. Kitchen privilege. Bfcllo
Vista No. 13. 43rd Street.
FOR RENT: Well located room
with independent sanitary service
Ond entrance. Corner 38th St. &
Chile Avenue No. 6.
FOR RENT:Completely furnished
2 bedroom house, for 3 months
beginning February lt. Price
$150.00. No. 15. 48th Street.
tional policy, a mandate to
combat Communism which
even then was a menace to
America.
Because all VFW members
have served in the US Armed
Foces in foreign lands during
actual war, they not only have
mualcans promises perfection in
the!/ performance.
The commentary for the style
pageant will be given by Mrs.
C. Is*. Holcombe who will be re-
lieve dat intermission time by a
elected group of entertainers.
The Navy Wives Club cordially
invites everyone to share this
evening of fun for 50 cents, the
proceeds of which will go to the
March of Dimes.
COLD CASH. AND WHY
NTW HAVEN. Conn. .
Burglars took a cool $495 from
safe at Marzullo's Pastry Shop.
The,safe was rolled into a walk-
In refrigerator where it was rip-
ped open.
foreign countries forces to exist
under enslaved state condi-
tions.
"It is only within the past
decade that Americans as a
whole have awakened to the
true menace of Soviet Russia
and to the Communist ideolo-
gy which Russia uses to weak-
en national loyalties, thereby
weakening governments, and
inevitably making whole coun-
tries easy for conquest," he said.
"The purpose of National
VFW Week Is to demonstrate
how war veterana are in action
for a stronger American home-
front," declared Chenevert. "A
Do II Hie Euy (and Economical) Way
' If ;ou are too busv to write to publishers If you don't
like to pay higher-ihan-tublishea prlcr-s. it vou don't
want to bother With buying drafts or money ordera
sk u* to get the technical, professional and business
aooki vou need
fffe relieve vou of all the detail supp.t fresh copies of
.test editions and ao It all a* a in to you. Just
lift the phone and tell us What vou want.
And. for good measure, we'll UK vour subscription to
njr magazine for busines profession or home ntw
* renewal.
(NEA Telephoto)
WILL FORM NEW CABINET
Aly Maher Pasha I above), an
Independent and a one-tune
Premier of Egypt, has been
called on to form a new gov-
ernment. This announcement
came after King Farouk's sud-
den dismissal of the cabinet of
Premier Mustapha El Nanas
Pasha, who issued a declara-
tion of marshal law to cope
with the recent outbreak of
mob terrorism.
The HX
WE BUY
WE SELL
WE BARTER
The very best ALWAYS in
reconditioned FURNITURE.
HX (Household Exchange)
41 Automobile Row
Tel. Panam 3-4911
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Hotel El Panami
Selling:
Cemento Panam 4c
National Distillers.
* Tel. 8-471 3-1880
The b 1 a d y s Heurtematte
School of Ballet will make its
first Atlantic Side appearance
Friday night in a dance recital
to be given at 7:30 p. m. at
the Inter-American Women's
Club Building, 5th Street and
Melendez Avenue, in Colon.
A second program will be
given on Saturday evening at
the same hour.
Mrs. Nltzia Cucaln de Mar-
tin has instructed the young
ballerinas, and Miss Anita Neff
is secretary of the school.
An elaborate and varied pro-
gram will Include the follow-
ing numbers:
PROGRAM
IMelodle, from Jules Reynard,
orchestra under direction Claire
Jorstaid.
INTERMISSION
IIMinuet Galante, F. F. Zam-1
echik, orchestra under direction-
of Claire Jorstad.
Minuet, Paderewski, Esther
Miller.
10. Minuet, Luigi Boccherlnl,
Karen Coate, Esther Miller,
Gloria Toledano, Andrea
Greblen, Frances Holmelin.
Rosa Castillo, Tanla Salas,
Leila Leon.
11. Piano Solo. Rondo Capric-
closo, Meldelssohn, Maritza
Tagaropulos.
12. The Little Swans, from "The
Swan Lake," Tschaikowsky,
Vilma Cecilia Garcia, Sofia
Ramirez, Myrna Quiones,
Camila Lpez.
13. Vals in C Sharp, Chopin,
Erda Mlchaela Kuhrlg.
14. Mazurca, Chopin, Vilma Ce-
cilia Garcia, Camila Lpez.
15. Vals Brllliante, Chopin,
Norma Ibaez, Erda Kuh-!
rig, Nllda Charris. Lucille
Hughes, Gertrud Serko, T-
mara Leon, Vilma Cecilia
Garcia, Camila Lpez. Sofa
Ramrez, Myrna Quiones.
Orchestra Members: Jos Bal-1
quin. Martha Graham, Barbara!
Thrift, Maria Rudge, Neffln Chi-I
trit, Nellie Holgerson, Robertl
Grandberry, Marie Anne Hannt-]
gan, Maritza Tagaropuloa.
MODERN FURNITURE
cus roiu JILT
Slipcover Renpbolstery
viarr ou* sbow-boomi
Alberta Bete
j r.dtHOHa-17 CAoteaaobUa lew)
free latlmate Pickup A Delivery
TL S-4KS I* im. lo 7:M i.b.
2.
Company C 45th Reconnaissance
Battalion Wins Leadership Test
/
Jarabe Tapato. Gertrud
Serko.
Butterflies, Vals. Hlnda Bil
StohVesTedsisan n0PeteMene| Capt. Archie H. Daus, com-
Joan Walker, Patricia Mack.'manding officer of "C" Company,
lrlppbeae
Panama
2-121
FOR BOOKS OR MAGAZINES
call oa
Mail
AGENCIAS STEER, S. A. rVn'^ivr.
good wartime slogan to awak-
en and arouse the peoples to
combat the foreign enemies of
democracy."
"The Veterans of Foreign
Wars is an organization whose
members are very practical;
they are the fighting men of
America, young and old. re-
presenting all walks of life, all
racial origins, colors and creeds,
believing in Americanism and
all that word Implies with di-
rect action toward extending
the many opportunities which
our form of government pro-
vides for all citizens."
Greece, Turkey
Get NATO Nod
From US Senate
WASHINGTON. Jan. 30 (UP)
The Senate voted without dissent
yesterday to admit Greece and
Turkey to the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization and thus
extend the defenses of the west-
ern world to the remote Turko-
Russlan border in Asia Minor.
United States approval is con-
sidered the key move in admit-
ting new members to the orga-
nization, although all signatory
powers must act on the request
for membership. '
Senate approval was by voice
vote with only six Senators on
the floor when the ballot was
taken.
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee earlier this month
unanimously recommended ap-
proval of a protocol, or agree-
ment, to let the two countries
into the defense organization.
Chairman Tom Connally (D.,
Tex.) told the nearly empty
chamber he was "highly grati-
fied" by ratification of the pro-
tocol.
He said Greece and Turkey oc-
cupy a highly strategic position
In the Mediterranean and have
resisted Communist aggression
In that area.
The Turks are a nation of
brave men and good soldiers, he
said, while the Greeks with
American aid drove out Commun-
ist Invaders. -_
Connally said approval of the
Srotocol will "be of value to the
orth Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion, and give strength, prestige
and power to the resistance of
Greece and Turkey."
None of the regular Republican
leadership was in the Senate, and
Sen. Harry P. Cain (R.. Wash.)
said he regretted the absence of
so many members.
I He called the ratification a
: "simple colossal blow about to
'be Struck hi the name of further
alms and ambitions of collective
security."
Cain paid tribute "to the con-
tributions being made right now
by our friends in Greece and
Turkey to the war in Korea."
LITTLE ANGELS SAY HELLO
YORK. Neb. (UP). The glass
--closing the nursery at the
"t'k General hospital had spe-
-1 greetings pasted on it dur-
Jhristmas from us Little Angels.'
FISHERMEN !
According to the latest re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIG ONES With FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE _ST0RE
at'#39 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0363 3-4564
45th Reconnaissance Battalion.
was presented with the Armored
Leadership test trophy last Sa-
turday at Ft. Clayton for his
company, which took top honors
in the Armored Leadership fund
competition.
The Armored Leadership Fund
competition between platoons of
opanisn r-cBoaiii/ "''" the 45th Reconnaissance Bat-
garteranas, Rosa Castillo, ta]ion wa8 completed Dec. 41 with
Esther Miller, Andrea Ore- ^ gecond platoon of "C" Com-
pany winning the $500 cash
award authorized.
1st Lt. Woodson Bercaw. pla-
toon leader, and key Individuals
of the platoon received engraved
watches at a mounted review
held at Fort Kobbe on Dec. 22.
while other members of the pla-
toon received engraved identifi-
cation bracelets stating that
Tita Tigert.
Hawaiian, Leila Leon.
Russian Dance, Gertrud
Serko, soloist.
Chinese Dance? The Merry
Mandarin, Poldlnl, Dina Vi-
la, Laurlta Toledano, Diane
Delsz, Judith von Tress,
Emilia Quesada.
Spanish Peasant Dance. La-
blen.
7. Mazurka. Saint 8aens, Vil-
ma Cecilia Garcia.
8. Piano Solo, Albenlz, Yolan-
da Delsz.
9. Paso Doble, Cielo Andaluz.
R. Gascon. Norma Ibaez.
Canalete
INSTANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(fortified with Vitamin O)
for
DRINKING
for
COOKING
for
WHIPPING
Farm Fresh
Flavor:
On Sale in
P. C. Co- Commissaries.
DYING DRY CLEANING
GENERAL LAUNDRY
TROPICAL CLEANERS
Plant: #880 Va Espaa. Tel.
3-0871. Branch: 24th 8t. Jt
Central Ave. Tel. 2-1348
(NEA Telephoto)
MOTHER ARRESTED Mrs.
Jada Z. Kader, charged with
the slaying of her 3-year-old
daughter, puffs on a clgaret
after she was taken Into cus-
tody by Portland, Ore., police.
The 21-year-old mother is ac-
cused of dumping her child's
body in a drainage pit.
Company Platoon leader Lt.
Bercaw; 1st Platoon "B" Com-i
pany, 1st Lt. P. A. Callahanj
2nd Platoon "B" Company. 1st
Lt. Harold A. Sackman; and 2n4
Platoon A. company, 1st Lt. E.
Reeg.
The four platoons underwer
a final 24-hour test under tt
supervision of Pacific 8ect
Headquarters officials. The fir
test began with an lnspectic
at noon, then the men were ser
out on a mission. As probler
presented themselves during the!
test, umpires Issued new orders,]
and the platoons were requiredj
to make decisions as to the bes
method to meet these problemaj
in the light of the new orders.
The test problem ended in aj
firing phase, with each platoonl
being required to carry out a]
firing mission using Uve i
cation Draceiets siawus in mm* ui"wi * -----
they were members of a winning munition In all weapons. The
platoon of the Armored Leader-
ship fund.
In preparing for the platoon
competition. Battalion Head-
quarters set up a series of tests
to be conducted under field con-
ditions, as a result four platoons
were selected for final competi-
tion.
They were 2nd Platoon of "C"
firing problem was conducte
against simulated enemy posi-
tions representing a strong point,"
with targets so designed that thel
number of hits and effectiveness!
of fire could be computed.
The problems, both Battalion!
and Pacific Sector, were designed!
to test the leadership abilities of ]
platoon leaders and noncoms.
FOR YOUR HEALTH
CONSULT:
Dr. B. L. STONE
Chiropractor
STONE CLINIC
7th St. tt Juato Arosemena
Ave. Coln Tel. 457
Cast For Next
Theater Guild
Play Anonunced
The cast for "Springtime for
Henry." which will be the Thea-
ter Guild's next production, has
been /inounced by the director,;
Lollle Maduro, to Include the fol-1
lowing: Henry Dewlip, Rufus
Smith; John Jelilwell. Leonard
Worcester; Julia Jelilwell, Helen
Wright; and Miss Smith. Marie
Jones. With the exception of
Rufus Smith, all the actors are
newcomers to the Theater Guild.
Researsals are already in pro- HERCULES LU00A0E MF0.
-ress with the production slated
for presentation for the first
week in March at the Diablo
Theater.
1948 PACKARD............1250.00
Sedan Leather Upholstery. New
Tires. A beautiful car and a bargain!
1951 FORD.......... .....150.00
Sedan Leather Upholstery.
This car la like new.
1950 5TUDEBAKER........ 1450.00
Sedan Radio, Overdrive,
Lots of Bxtras.
1949 CHEVROLET...........50.00
sedan Low Mileage.
A real clean car.
Show Room28 J. F. de la Ossa,
Tel. 2-1088
1949 HUDSON..............1250.00
Sedan Plastic Seat Covers.
New Paint Good Tires.
SMOOT & PAREDES
Your BUICK & CHEVROLET Dealer
On Automobile Row Panami



-
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 36. 1952
THE rANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAOE SMEW
^sftlantic S^ociett
nu Mi- J *W
Bo, 195, (atu* ViLpltmu Q*l*
378
MRS. WINKLEBLACK HONORED
WITH AFTERNOON COPFEE
Mr. P. N. Curry, of the Coco Solo Naval Station, was
hostess for an afternoon coffee Riten at her residence Mor-
day, to honor her mother, Mrs. Muriel Winkleblack who s
her houseguest. .
Tropical flowers were used to decorate the buffet lane
and residence.
The friends who called durlng|vltles ^S^aBS^0^"'^^
the afternoon were: Mrs. Roy at Home Valley. Washington, last RuQff Mrg Francls wljcavaze,
Nlelson. Mrs. Frank Kraft Mrs.summer. ^rMhm.n and Mrs. Claudio iglesias.
Fred Wroble Mrs. John Danly.l Songs,games and refreshments -------f"
Mrs. Morse Rowell. Mrs H. J.!concluded the program Heurtemalte Ballet Recital
Thornton, Mrs. Paul Balay Mrs. The other girls present wen. The ,,s of the Heurtematte
Chester L. Lucas. Mrs. Phoebe |Lynn Coffin, Maria Iglesia Judy iBaUet School ,n Colon wl be
Kelly. Mrs Gary McKay. Mrs. Hackenson. Verna Hlldebrand. e t d ,n a recUai Friday and
W L. Hall. Mrs. M. L. Leahy. Charlene Graves. Sarah Barfleld. v
Mrs. John Peace. Mrs. Fred Linda Cunningham, Shirley
Roepke, Mrs. David Henderson,Keepers, Judy Malcolm, Nancy
Mrs. W E Sands. Mrs. A. E.!Grimes. Barbara Thrift and Kay
IP. HOLLYWOOD
By ERSKINE JOHNSON
Mrs. W E. Davey, Mrs. Les-
leigh Davis. Mrs. Bernard Frost,
Mrs. Roscoe Halning. Mrs. Mary
Halsten. Mrs. R. K. Hanna, Mrs.
Philip Havener. Mrs. Anton Hol-
gerson. Mrs. Alton Jones, Mrs. T.
D. Ladd. Mrs J. W. Llmkemann,
Mrs. G. E. Lust. Mrs. Carl F.
Maedl. Mrs. L. C. Palumbo. Mrs.
Clemmer. Mrs. E. J. Ducote,
Mrs. R. K. Glffon and Mrs. G.
J. Ellis.
Saturday evenings at the Inter-!
American Woman's Club Build-!
ing. The recital will start at 7:30,
p.m. and the price of admission
is 60c. Tickets may be obtained
Kunkle.
Mrs. Leslie Anderson, assist- at the building or at the door.
ant Brownie Leader, assisted!
Mr and Mw. Winkleblack ar-:Mrs. Mauldm. The following,
rived on January 10 by plane mothers were in charge of re-
from their home "in Charleston, 1 freshments or the parent of one
Illinois for a visit with their of the children flytng-up: Mrs.
daughter and son-in-law. Lieut. Thomas Gibson, Mrs. Tracey
(jg) and Mrs. P. N. Curry. They (White. Mrs. C. G. Boyes. Mrs.
will sail Friday on the "Ancon" Emmett Argo, Mrs. Martin Saw-
or New York, en route to their yare, Mrs. Paul A. Kunkel. and
home Mrs- Clifford Asbury.
Invitations Issued to
Beokham-Herring Wedding
Invitations are being isued to
the wedding of Miss Shirley An-
ne Beckham. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. E. T. Harper-of New Cris-
tobal, to Mr. John Joseph Her-
ring, of Pedro Miguel, son of Mr.
and Mrs. George J. Herring of
Tampa. Florida.
The ceremony will take place
in the Pedro Miguel Union
Church at 8:00 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 18. A reception will be held
in the Church parlors following
the wedding.
Combined Troops Hold Fly-Up
Brownie Troop 35 and Olrl
Scout Troop 30. of Gatun. held
a fly-up at the Trefoil House
Monday evening, under the di-
rection of Mrs. Ralph Malcolm.
Girl Scout Leader and Mrs. Sam
Mauldln. Brownie Leader.
The program opening with a
flag ceremony, after which the
girls formed two circles. At this
time Mrs. Mauldln presented the
Brownies, who were "flying up"
into scouting, with their wings.
The girls who broke the Brownie
Circle to join the Scouts were:
Nancy Gibson, Virginia Mauldln,
Claire White and Charlene Boyes
Mrs. Malcolm received the
girls into Scouting. They gave
their laws, made their promise
and received the Girl Scout pins,
In an Impressive candle-light ce-
remony, at the conclusion of
which the girls sang "When Ere
You Make A Promise."
One-year pendants were pre-
sented the Brownies by Mrs.
Mauldln. The recipients were:
Andra Lee Nash, Marilyn Defen-
baugh. Pamela Theriot, Kathie
Asbury, Barbara Reynolds. Vir-
ginia Mauldln. Claire White.
Juditv Grav. Elizabeth McLaren,
Judith Hallett. Beverly George,
Pomona Anderson. Nancy Gibson
and Charlene Boyes.
Mrs. Malcolm presented the
following awards: Marjorle But-
cher. 2nd class badge: Wendy
Cotton camp craft badge; Diane
Hannlgan. cyclist badge: Grace
Argo, Bird and Camp Craft
badges; Rachel Radel, swimming
and camp craft badges; Rosalie
Fiadel. badges for music, bird,
camo and swimming.
Miss Catherine Argo gave An
interesting account of her acti-
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds
Return from Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Reynolds
' and daughter, Barbara of Gatun
returned Monday from a vaca-
tion spent with Mrs. Reynolds'
> parents In Glorida.
Mrs. Chase Complimented
With Party
Mrs. Carmen Chase, of San
Jose. Costa Rica, who is visiting
I her sister and brother-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. William O'Hayer, of Co-
ico Solo, was complimented with
a canasta party given Monday
1 evening by Mrs. David Kaplan at
jher residence on the Station.
The other iguests included:
Mrs. O'Hayer. Mrs. Fred Bell,
Mrs. George Carlson, Mrs. C. E
'Ogilvte. Mrs Isaac Levy, and
Mrs, E. W. Bell.
Prizes were won by Mrs
O'Hayer Mrs. Chase. Mrs Fred
Bell and Mrs. E. W. Bell.
Whar. 100.000 Copla
Presents
Mrs. Gregory Address
; Evening Circle
Mrs. R. R. Gregory, who is
leaving the Isthmus In the early
soring, addressed the Evening
Circle at their meetin? Monday
i at the home of Mrs. Julius G
ILusky in New Cristobal. Mrs.
Gregory told of her thirty years
;on the Isthmus and the many
; factors which enter into the
. distribution of Bibles in this part
,of the world.
Mrs. Roscoe Halnine eave the
rievotionals. She red a poem bv
, Appreciation of beautv which
surrounds us, and used this'as
her theme.
It was announced that their
will be a Parish covered dish
simper at the church on Feb. 12.
nil members of the Parish and
: their families are invited to come
and bring a dish.
February 19th is the World Day
of Praver and the Cristobal Un-
ion Church will be host for a
.combined service with the
Church of Our Saviour.
Buffet refreshments were serv-
. ed at the conclusion of the busi-
ness. Mrs. E. F. McClelland,
co-hostess, presided at the cof-
ifee service and Mrs. Alton Jones
served cocoa.
The members present were:
Mrs. L. J. Benthall, Mrs C.
Custer. Mrs. Carlton Dameron,
Today, Wednesday. Jan. 30
PJB.
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:16French tn the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The Humbug Cla.
Alfaro. S.A.
6:15 Evening Salon
7:00Paul Temple (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louia Jordan
8:00News and Commentary by
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Jam Session (VOAi
8:30The American Book
Shelf
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA'
9:00The Human Body (BBC)
9:30The Haunting Hour
(BBC i
10:00The BBC Playhouse
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
! MidnightSign Off.
8CI-
rrs MOVKTIMF
Wan ama Lana/ Clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
*.u.Cnn ;la S3
DM01O HTS.
1:15 A *:M
Ava GARDNER Jim MASON
"ANDORA Jk THF. ri VING DUTCHMAN"
(TVc-hnlc.-ilor)
Also S v>winf__Thursdjy_l__________
Sric PORTMAN a Ndla ORAY
'THE SPIDER AND THE FLY"
Thuraday "ARSENIC AND OLD LACE"
COCOLI
1:11 S:M
,. t ii
Carv GRANT a Prkcllla LANE
'ARSENIC AND OLD LACE'
_ Ttjuraday YUKON MANHUNT"
GAMBOA
?M>
SteDben McNALLY a Gail RUSSELL
"AIR CADET'
Hilled... "KING SOLOMON'S MINKS
MARGARITA
:1a I:.'.ft
Presin FOSTER a Wavna MORRIS
'THE TOUGHFK THEY COME'
Thuraday IN OLT CHICAGO"______
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Cenrfltlaned
:IS S:M
Fr*d ASTA1RE a lat'y HUTTON
'LET'S DANCE'" (Technicolor)
Also Showing Thursday!
STARTING
OMORROW t.
They met under fire and their love flamed a hot _
Grenade Hero in muddy boots and the Diu-eye WAC who
had him walking on velvet...! '
THE MOST BEAUTIFUL LOVE STORY EVER TOLD I
NANCY
FRANK
^W ILL. AM k NANCY FRANK W
Holden Olson Iovejoy
Thursday. Jan 31
A.M.
6:00Sign OnAlarm Clock
Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:18NEWS (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEWS
9:15SACRED HEART PRO-
GRAM
9:30As I See It
10:00NEW8
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record iContd.)
11:30Meet the Band
' NoonNEW8
. P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popuar Music
1:00NEW8
1:15Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN
ENCE
2:00 Call for Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamusica Story Time
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The HumbugCia.
Alfaro. S.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00News and Commentary
(VOA)
8:15Arts and Letters (VOA)
8:30Radio University (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:30Take It from Here (BBC)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15 Musical Interlude
10:30Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off.
Explanation of Symbols
I VOAVoice of America
| BBCBritish Broadcastlng
Corp.
RDFRadiodlffusion Francalse
15th Naval Marine
Executive Officer
Now Full Colonel
I,t. Col. Theodore M. Sheffield,
riBMC. executive officer of the
Marine Barracks. 15th Naval;
District, has recentlv been pro-
moted to the rank of Colonel.
Col. Sheffield, who spent five
years as an enlisted Marine from
1925 to 1930. attended the Univ-
ersity of Toledo, Toledo. Ohio,
and was commissioned a second:
lieutenant In the Marine Corps,
Reserve in 1937.
Spending ten vears as a retail,
dmeelst In Toledo Sheffield wav
callad to active dutv on Nov. 8.'
1940. Durinr the war he served!
as Co*""ending Officer. Real- I
mental Weapons Company 2nd
Marines, on Wallls Island, Sa-
moa..
He later participated In the
Marshall I<<->nds Offensive from
Jan to April 1944.
~F'-HFS INNMINK COAT
Vr-'PHI8. Tenn. (UP) Leo
". W>^zburger snM he observed
ie 1-test In fern*!-" fashion*
x *"n wearing a mink coat
while Xlshlni.
HOLLYWOOD. (NEAV Hol-
lywood on TV: Groucho Marx
tells me that offers have been
pouring in, but he won't be team-
ing up with madcap brothers
Harpo and Chico for a TV co-
medy series designed to revive
the zany Marx antics.
The mad-eyed, sharp-tongued
Groucho will roll along with
You Bet Your Life" and an oc-
casional movie role because this
gives me all the work that I want
"We made 15 movies together
and that's enough," Groucho
savs. 'You can only get increas-
ingly stale. We realised that and
struck out for ourselves. Maybe
I should say we struck out."
Charges of hacking contestants
to little pieces on his NBC-TV
quiz show sends the Marx eye-
browns higher than they went
when a shapely blonde passed in
his days as a stage wolf.
Protested Groucho:
"I don't insult people. I just
get off a few truths. Hardly any-
body in radio or TV speaks the
truth. Fred Allen is one of the
few who does."
No wonder Hollywood's gulp-
ing. More people see Dean Mar-
tin and Jerry Lewis for free on
their TV shows than people who
pav to see their movies.
their average TV audience is
28.960,000 people. The average
movie plays to around 20.ooo.ono.
The same goes for the Lucille
Ball-Desi Arnaz show, "I Love
Lucy." Lucille states:
"More people see my TV show
every week than saw me in a
movie In two years. What's more,
I can play a different role every
week and I have control over the
roles I play."
Movies on TV are big-
business dept: The DuMont net-
work wrote a $1,800.000 check
for the lease of 26 old movies for
three showings each in 20 cities
First in a series of TV films
based on Mary Roberts Rine-
harfs famous "Tish" stories goes
before the cameras m Hollywood
this spring. Zazu Pitts win star.
. . Barring total war. a TV set
manufacturer predicts 95 per
cent of U. 8. homes should have
TV within 10 years.
Movie stars leaping Into TV:
Gale Robbins in "Pan American
Show Time." video musical co-,
medies. . George Brent and,
Nigel Bruce in the Raffles stories.
. Dan Duryea In "The Affairs j
of China Smith." He plays a pri-
vate eye on film. . Melvyn
Douglas hits the air Friday in'
another filmed series, "Holly-
wood Affair." The show is being,
sold on a city-by-city basis. .. .,
Allan Jones and his actress wife,
Irene Hervey. In a Mr. and Mrs.
show.to be produced by veteran
movie maker Harry Joe Brown.
. Gene Autrv and his radio
sponsor are plottln* a Uve TV,
version of his "Melodv Ranch '
He's already on the TV channels
in a western film series. .
Meet Dick Jones, the only ex-
movie moppet to go streaking
across the plains!
He's the television sagebrush
star of "The Range Rider" series
these days, but as Dickie Jones
he was wept over bv misty-eyed
movie queens, played Cary Grant.
Fredrlc March and Ty Power as
children, and "didn't grow up
to look like any of 'em."
Teleform: Fred Allen: "There's
a big difference between radio
and television. In radio you
write what people can Imagine-,
For television you write only
what somebody can build."
Maureen O'Hara, admitting
she's a TV holdout: "People
won't pay to see me at theaters
when they rn. e me free at
home. I'm sticking with Holly-
wood until I can't get a movie
Job. Then I'll do TV."
It's being kept qv>t. but TV
Is the big reason for the recent
merger of Universal Inter-
national studio with Decca Rec-
ords. To avoid squawks from
theater owners, Decca's 55 distri-
buting centers will hahde TV
films produced at the studio.
The video giant: There are now
15,000.000 TV setsone'for every
three familiesin the U. S. New
York tops the nation with 2.630,-
000 sets Los Angeles is second
with 1.045.000 and Chicago third
with 1,020,000.
$756 Weekly Lures Plumbers
On Atomic Bui I din g Contract
LOS ANGELES. Jan. 30 (UP) In c:n:clllng a contract for con one week he received a check for-
A construction company won the struciion of buildings at an ato- $641.18 because of overtime work/
I first round yesterday in its fight mic test site near Las Vegas, Black contended before two
'with the government over can- Nev., in view of the rival firm's special masters hearing the case
icellation of an atomic building high pay, the McNeil Company that McNeil was seeking to try.
!contract with its claim that a claimed. the dispute "before the press" by
rival firm allegedly lured plum- Two special mat.srs hearing giving out information on the al-
| bers awav with pay as high as j the case denied the goverr rent's leged high payments to work-
'$756 a week. dismissal motion. They ordered ers to reporters without it being'
Federal attorney Sterling F. both sides to continue presenting introduced as testimony.
Black moved for dismissal of the their testimony. The government attorney.
McNeil Contracting Company's! The McNeil Company accused charged McNeil had a "very]
the Haddock Engineers. Lt.,
operating on a cost-plus basis
at the atomic test site, of pay-
ing at least one plumber $756
a week through over-time and
Three Retinna doubir-,imr
iiiivv r\ viii my Bruce W. McNeil, head of the
[,... f a.aa.1 f.;.. flrm- W hU 517.000 contract
From Canal Service z&vS& MS ?
As of Jan. 31
claim based on the fabulous
wages.
The government acted unjustly
Gold In those vaults: Veteran
movie producer Hal Roach esti-
mates the TV rights for old films
will yield $25.000.000 for each
major studio unlaodlng Hi film
library.
could not finish the job within
Only three employes will retire the tf0**125 days, beginning
from Canal service at the end of M^u .ij
Donald O'Connor, after work-
ing on TV with Harpo Marr: "It
was just like working with Fran-
cis, the mule. Except Francis
talks."
January.
The retiring employes, their
positions and periods of service
!are:
Julius H. Bornefeld. Lock,
I Operator, Machinist, at Atlantic
Locks, 31 years, six months and
22 davs
weak" case and sought to bolster '
Ht through the newspapers.
Black said that the govern-
ment was "not trying to-perse-
cute McNeil by terminating his
contract. It was trying to speed
up the atomic weapons program."
He contended that if McNeil
had worked his men on Satur-
days and Sundays his workers
serted him for the rival firm. i would not have left for the rival
As a result, he contended, he firm.
In contending it could not
meet the rates paid by the
Haddock engineers, the McNeil
firm cited the case of plumber
M. H. Stewart who received
$721 for a single week's work,
plus $35 for board and room.
It contended Stewart received
40 hours pay on the basis of
for working Monday;
pav for Tuesday. 18
that in one
three-month period, caroenters
were lured away by Haddock
so quickly that he had to hire,
a total of 119 men to keep 23
on the Job.
The McNeil Company also cited overtime
the case of one of its cement j 12 hours
rr r u,nHrw wtrh foremen. W. L. Reddick. who re- hours for Wednesday. 24 hours
m.irer in' tha TnrtvKUikl SS eelvd about $200 a week from: for Thursday. 32 hours for Fri-
rtCrtetobal M^uiffimmiSa'theid but auit and went to work day. 48 hours for Saturday and
at crisiooai. jo years, six montns . T. Hor_.ri fnrio, k_ fr snnHav
Quickie TV film producer an-
swering the telephone:
"Hold the line a minute while
I finish this picture."
TOMORROW!
OPENING
SIMULTANEOUSLY
AT THE .....
LUX THEATRE
' AND
CECILIA
, THEATRE
ALSO OPENING AT THE
CARIBE THEATRE
(COLON)
BALBOA
OPENS SATURDAY!
A GREAT PLAY
BECOMES A GREAT
and 24-'2 days: and
W. H. Nellis. Leader Lock
Operator Wireman. Atlantic
Locks, 27 years, seven months
and 28 days.
Bomefeld was first employed
: as machinist in the Atlantic Di-
'vislon February 4. 1910. He was
born in Austin, Texas, and was
employed as machinist on rail-
roads in Mexico and Ecuador
for three years before coming to
the Isthmus. He left Canal ser-
vice in 1913 and worked as mach-
inist In Guatemala. Argentina
j and various parts of the United
States until 1923. when he was
reemployed as machinist in the
Mechanical Division. He worked
in the Locks Division from time
to time until April 1929. when he |
became locomotive towing oper-
ate rat Atlantic Locks. He was
named lock operator, machinist,:
in July 1948.
Mr. and Mrs. Bomefeld plan
to leave February 9 by air to go
to Houston, Texas, where they
will make their home.
Henderson, a native of Randa-
lia Iowa, has continuous Canal
.service from July 7. 1915, when
he was first employed as Instru-
ment repairman In the Mechan-
ical Division. He had been a
Jeweler, watch repairer and
, machinist in Iowa. North Dakota,
Washington. Tennessee and Flo-
i rida for about nine years before
j Iolnlng the Canal organization.
He served for several months In
11916 as machinist and In Jan.
i 1917 was named Instrument
maker. He was designated
watchmaker in June 1928 and
remained In that position
throughout the rest of his Canal
service.
Mr. and Mrs. Henderson plan
to remain on the Isthmus for the
i present. .
Nellis was born at Faulkton,
south Dakota. He studied elec-
trical engineering for three years
at Oklahoma Agricultural and
' Mechanical College and was em-
ployed aa electrical operator in
' Chicago for about two years be-
fore coming to the Isthmus. He
was employed April L 1914 as a
wireman m the Erection Divi-
sion and also served in the Elec-
trical and Fortifications Division,
until July J917, when he was
transferred to the Locks Division.
He served as towing locomotive
operator until 1922. when he be-
came general lock operator. In
April 1925. he was made tunnel
operator. The following year, he
left Canal service to return to
the United States. He was re-
employed in June 1937 as towing
locomotive operator. He became
tunnel operator In January 1946'
and was named leader lock oper-
ator wireman January 6.
Mr. and Mrs Nellis plan to
leave February 3 by ship for Ca-
lifornia, where they will make
their future home.
for the rival firm .It charged for i32 hours for Sunday.
MOTION PICTURE
With These Unfor-
gettable People!
Tomorrow
Thursday!
CENTRAL
Tomorrow
Release!
NOW AT POPULAR PRICES
^a|M^a^ Stanlay Kmnm'i Product**, of
WVmno



:
MOt EIGITF
THE PANAMA AMERH AN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY. NEWEPAH
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, IS
Skip Alexander Named Most Courageous Athlefc
Golfer Suffered Severe
Injuries In Plane Crash
PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 30 (UP).Golfer Stewart "8klp" Alex-
ander has been named the Most Courageous Athlete of 1951 by
the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association. __
Alexander crawled from a plane crash with broken bones
nnd severe burns in September of 1950. One year later, he beat
John Panton of England to win the Ryder Cup match at Plne-
hurst North Carolina. Alexander's eight and seven victory was
the biggest margin compiled by an VS. player.
The 33-year-old Durham, North Carolina, golf pro was the
Muy survivor of a civil air patrol plane which crashed near
Fvansville, Indiana, en route from Kansas City to Louisville,
Kentucky. He suffered a broken ankle, and third degree burns
o! the hands, arms, legs and face. He has undergone 17 opera-
tions since the injury.___________________________________
Pro League Games Today At
Baseball Team Game, But Club
With Name Players Gets Money
By HARRY GRATSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK. Jan. 30 (NEA)
The Pirates drew 1,800,000 paid
admissions in 1948, when they
made Billy Meyer something of
a Miracle Man by finishing
fourth.
The Pittsburgh Nationals drop-
ped to sixth and 1,600,000 paid in
49. continued to tumble in '50,
when 1.200.000 coughed up to see
them run dead last. Attendance
at Forbes Field slumped to 984.-
000 for a seventh-place wlndup
last season, but over-all the fig-
ures are remarkable for the per-
formance. .
"Almost entirely due to Ralph
Klner," says Manager Meyer.
When the Buccaneers were
hopelessly beaten, the fans
wouldn't think of walking out if
Klner, the home-run king had
another time at bat.
"Baseball Is strictly a team
game, of course," says the veter-'
an Mever. "but the clubs with
name players get the crowds and
the more Important money.
"Look at the difference be-
tween the Yankees and Giants In
New York.
"The Giants may have caught
on now, for they also created
names In their fine stretch run,1
play-off and World Series-
Thomson, Irvln, Dark, Mueller
and the three big pitchers. But
for years It has been the Yan-
kees with Joe DIMagglo, Rizzuto,
Berra, McDougald, Bauer, Wood-
ling, Mantle and the pitchers.
DODGERS WERE LEAGUE'S
BISGHTEST ATTRACTION
There was the same difference
between the Red Sox and Braves
In Boston, where the National
League side had no one with the
bucks-office magnetism of Wil-
liams. Stephens, Goodman, Pes-
ky. Dom DIMagglo, Doerr and
some more.
The Indians' biggest talking
Joint Is their pitchersFeller,
emon, Wynn and last season,
Garcia.
The Dodgers were the bright-
est attraction all around the
league with Jackie Robinson,
Hodges, Furillo, Reese, Campa-
nella and Snider.
The Phillies outstripped the
Athletics as a Shlbe Park seller
with the arrival of the Whiz Kids
Simmons, Roberts. Hamner,
Jones. Ashburn and Ennls.
"Neither the Cardinals nor Pi-
rates were going anvwhere last
season." points out Billy Meyer,
"but when the Red Birds return-
ed home after a bad road trip to
play us we'd have more than 20,-
000 at night. The Browns, on the
other hand, with all of Bill
Veeck's fireworks, free refresh-
ments, midgets and whatnot,
would be extremelv fortunate to
play to 6000. The Cards, you see,
still had Muslal, Slaughter and
Ralph Klner
Jackie Robinson.'.
Schoendlenst, and we had Klner
with a bat in his hands."
CUBS HAD TO DO SOMETHING.
SO OUT WENT FRISCH
Names tell the story of the up-
swing of the White Sox, too. Chi-
co Carrasquel quickly became the
darling of the south side. Eddie
Robinson was obtained, and
along came little Nellie Fox and
his big chaw of tobacco. The cus-
tomers started yelling "Go! Go!
Go!" to fleet Jim Busby, and
Mlnny Mioso rounded out the
troupe. The Cubs had to do
something, so out went Frank
Frlsch.
If you had to put a finger on
what hurt the Tigers most last
trip It would have to be young
Art jioutteman's stretch In the
Army.
The name does the business
In any sport or line.
MacPhail Buys
Bowie Racetrack
BOWIE, Md., Jan. 30 (UP)
The man who introduced night
baseball in the major leagues
says there will be no after-
dark racing at the Bowie race
track he bought yesterday.
Larry MacPhail heads a syn-
dicate which bought the Mary-
land track for an estimated
$2,006,000.
Says MacPhail: "I'm dead
set against night racing. I
know It would draw bat I'm
still against it for a thousand
reasons. You'll remember that
even though I introduced maj-
or leagne night baseball I also
led the opposition against too
much after-dark play."
MacPhail, who resigned as
New York Yankee president in
1947 to raise thoroughbreds on
his Maryland farm, says he will
ask for more than the 83 rac-
ing days now alloted Bowie.
The red-haired syndicate head
also says he will Improve the
Bowie plant and increase
parses.
Coming Soon
Something New Sensational!
THE WILLYS
PASSENGER CAR
A product of many years of research.
SOON ON DISPLAY

CIA. CYRN0S, S.A.
Willys Agency
PANAMA
Phone: 2-1790 One block from Tivoli Crossing
Balboa High Beats
J.C. To Move Into
School Hoop Lead
Balboa Bulldogs fought their
way Into the lead In the Inter-
scholastlc Basketball League last
night as they defeated the Ju-
nior College five 38-33.
This ends the regular season
for the BHS team, and assures
them of no less than a tie for the
title. Cristobal and J. C. have a
game this week (Friday) at Cris-
tobal, and a win for the Tigers
will give them a tie for the hon.
ors with the Bulldogs.
It goes without saying that
should the Oreen Wave upset the
Atlantic aide entry, they would
then toss the trophy Into the laps
of the Bulldogs.
The game started out as If
there were going to be some
mighty fine basketball played,
but with both teams using zone
defenses throughout the major-
ity of the contest, It soon devel-
oped into a passing contest.
Balboa took a two-point lead
on the very first try with Sam
Maphls doing the honors, and
from that point on they were
never beaded. In fact, shortly
after Maphls' two-pointer, All
McKeown made a free throw, and
that was the closest the Oreen
Wave was able to get all night.
First quarter score was 11-7,
halftlme it was 24-17. third quar-
ter found it at 27-30, and then;
BHS pulled it out of the fire to
coast In with the victory.
Edgar Kourany was the big
gun for the Bulldogs, as he not
only was high point ma nwlth 14 i
to his credit, but he also did the
damage that spelled defeat for
College in the final stanza.
With only three points between
the two teams as the fourth pe-
riod got under way, Edgar made
two quick field goals, and short-1
ly thereafter added a charity toss
and another field goal. This was
the breaking point for J.C., and
from then on BHS Just stalled
out the clock.
Jerry Welsh was high man for
the loser with 11 points, and All
McKeown was right on his tall
with 10 markers.
In the preliminary game (If
that Is what it should be called)!
the Ail-Star Intramural team
defeated the BHS J.V. 43-42. This
game probably set the cause of j
basketball back at least a dozen |
years, and aside from plenty of
exercise for the two teams, not
much else can or should be said
about It.
Silver City Scores
Win Over Chagres
By HERBERT MOI8E
Coming from behind with the
aid of extra base hits, the cham-i
oion Silver City Powells of the
Canal Zone Amateur League out-
'asted the Chagres Agewood 16
to 13 at Chagres.
Silver City Jumped off to an
early lead and seemed on the way
to an easy victory only to have,
their neighboring rivals come;
within range and forge paat
them with a run In the first, two
in the third and nine In the I
fourth. At this point Chagres led
12 to 9. During these uprisings,
Percv Ramsev, the starting hurl-
er, Ersklne, If ill and Jonesthe
ultimate winnerparaded to and
from the Silver City mound.
Powells scored two In the fifth
to move within one run of the
leaders only to have Chagres
move up with one in the bottom
of the Inning.
Both teams settled down until
Silver City tallied three more on
a base clearing triple by Buggy
King in the eighth, then George
Dawklns' homer (his second of
the game) deep to left, with two
on added the insurance runs.
Silver City's 19 hits were dis-
tributed In every Inning with
more than one In each inning
except the fifth, sixth and sev-
enth when Carew pitched good
ball only to blow up In the last
tw of r ames. Scantlebury started
for Chagres but lasted only two
innings and gave up la favor of
Small who fared no better as he
also lasted two Innings.
The win was the second in as
many games for Sliver City while
the loss was Chagres' second in
as many outings.
The linescore:
Sliver City 322 220 03216
Chagres 102 910 0001
Caribbean Series
Admission For
Bleachers $1.50
It was announced today that
the admission price for the
bleacher stands will be 91.56
per game for the Caribbean Se-
ries, instead of the ene dollar
per game price announced In
The Panama American yester-
day. ________
COLONEL IS LIEUTENANT
CHATE ATR BASE. HI. (UP
Mr base clerks listed him In
>.i: records as Lt. Col. Ray.|
They searched the files for his
tl-st name. Finally thev learn-
ed that Ray was only a Iieuten-'
ant ard that his first nr-'-ne w?s
Colonel. His title nowLt. Col-
onel Bay. '
Motorbike Racing Slated For
Colon This Sunday Afternoon
NEW HAVEN, Conn. They say If the home town goes for
vou you are alright. George Weiss must be aU right. This is
the home town of the Yankees' general manager and the na-
tives gave him a banquet and a gold medal In recognition 01
his achievements In the baseball world.
"The food he'll keep" observed a dour baseball writer who
had come down from New York for the affair, "and medal, he 11
probably try to trade for a first baseman."
Another stray from the metropolitan press box, no more
overcome by the sentiment of the occasion than his companion,
commented: i
"They're honoring blm because he left Yale and New Haven
so quick."
While Weiss, who is generally accepted as the master mind
behind the Yankees' long run of success, beginning with the
30's, left Yale for Columbia's School of Journalism after one
year, he remained a townle, as they say around here, for a long
.time. ....
This Is where, as a boy promoter, he started a career that
was to lead by way of Baltimore and Newark to the 8tadlum
and a success In building, selling and trading that was eventual-
ly to surpass even that of Branch Rickey, founder of baseball a
farm system. _:_ .._. u_
Weiss never played baseball, save perhaps in high school, out
he demonstrated early rare organizational and promotional ta-
lent, plus business acumen. He made money out of a semi-pro
team which featured guest stars such as Babe Ruth, Ty Cobo
and Walter Johnson. He inherited a grocery store from his dad,
sold It and bought a franchise In the now defunct Eastern
League. Built his own plant, demurely called lt Weiss Park and
developed players that yielded some $300,000.
Get Me Some Pennant
By 1929 he had taken over the Baltimore club hvthe Inter-
nutlonal and three years later Jake Ruppert, watching Rickey
and the St. Louis Cardinals win pennant after pennant without
investing a quarter In purchase money, while Yankee deals for
nlgh-prlced minor leaguers fizzled, sent for Weiss.
"Get me some young players and some pennants, the
wealthy brewer ordered.
Though the credit went to others, and In some instances de-
servedly so, Weiss, mild-mannered, pleaaant, unfailingly courte-
ous, physically built like a beach ball, set up the first Yankee
farm In "32 and proceeded promptly to fulfill Ruppert s modest
Out of the rich soil tilled by Weiss and his scouts, who oper-
ated coast to coast, came a seemingly unending flow of blue
ribbon products, the Joe Gordons, Charley Kellers, Spud Chand-
lers, Phil Rizzutos, Red Rolfe. Hank Borowys, Vic Hachs, Yogi
Berras and pn and on up to the present day Oil McDougalds.
an operation representing literally millions In player values. And
trus doesn't take Into consideration a great number of rejects
and near misses who were sold to other clubs or used to staff
various Yankee affiliates.
Since 1932 the Yankees have won 12 pennants. From /36
through "39 they won four In a row. Another period, '41, 42, 43,
they made lt three straight. Last fall they made it three hand-
running again, and as the records show, there's no law which
says they must stop there. Over this stretch of years, certainly
until the fantastic bonus frenzy became a vogue, the Yankees,
excepting the hand-to-mouth clubs, spent less on bought players
tiioi any other club In the big time.
A Paradise for Managers
Ruth went. The Yanks still won. Oehrig died. The Yankees
atlli rolled. Now DIMagglo Is through.
"What will happen to us now?" an anxious, ardent Yankee
fan was asking In Leone's the other night, a charming member
of the squealing set.
An eavesdropping sports columnist made bold to answer.
"Nothing lady, as long as they still have George Weiss."
For the most part the Yankees have alwstys had excellent
managers. Joe McCarthy was the beat. But In the Yankee, or
Weiss scheme, the manager Isn't too Important. They won for
McCarthy, Bucky Harris and Casey Stengel In quick succession.
It's an upset when they don't win. Harris was equipped with
championship material In '48. When he failed he was fired.
Stengel, who couldn't get out of the first division In Brook-
rro and Boston, and even had tall enders In the bushes, has
won three fast ones In the Stadium. Only Stengel and close
sideline observers realize how much Weiss, by deals at critical
periods, frequently Involving undistinguished players but cap-
able of valiant help In spots, contributed to the manager's suc-
cess. But that's another story.
So Oeorgle-Porgie. as his gracious missus calls him. much
to the gentleman's visit and understandable revulsion, had al-
ready proved his mettle before the local advertising boys gave
lita that gold one last night (move over Berle) to put him in
the same company with such able citizens as Howard Palmer,
railroad tycoon; William Lyons Phelp, literary notable; Wilbur
L. Cross, four-term Connecticut governor; Charles Kullman,
opera star, and Charles Seymour, president emeritus of Yale,
past medalists.________ t
College Hoop Results
(Monday Night)
EAST
Pittsburgh 62, Notre Dame 55
Duque.ne (3, Villanova 61
Boston Coll. 75. FairfleM (Conn.)
86
Manhattan 79, Lemeyne (N.Y.) 71
West Chester Tchrs SO, Kutstown
Tehrs 56
Potomac State 75, Salem 67
David and Elklns 71, Bethany 56
MIDWEST
Illinois 64, Purdue 61
Iowa State 78, Nebraska 72
Oklahoma City 61, Drake 47
Wilberforce Univ. 76, Cedarville
68
North Central (111.) 65, Fort She-
ridan 55
Northern III. State 57, Chicago
Tehrs 16
Monmouth (III.) 76, Iowa Wes-
leyan 67
St. Norbert 82, LaCrosse State 81
Omaha Univ. 81, Neb. Wesleyan
36
Toledo 71, John Carroll 57
Kirksville (Mo.) 54, Cape Glrar-
dean 37
Emooria (Kas) 74, Friends (Kas)
63
Wichita 91, Southwestern (Kas.)
68
Principia (HI.) S3. Rota Poly 61
South Dakota U. 69, Aogutana
(S.D.) 66
St. Cloud (Minn.) Tchrs 75, Stout
73
SOUTH
"iicky 88, Vanderbilt 51
Carolina 7, Georgia Tech
m
Motorbike racing Is taking It-
self to Coln Sunday.
Interested In speed In most
forms, the racers are to help
speed the success of Colon's cen-
tenary Queen carnival with an
afternoon race meeting at the
Colon Stadium. .
The 406-meter aval cinder
track demands different racing
technique to the big one-kilome-
ter clay track at Joan Franco, or
the Juan Dias road racing cir-
cuit.
So new champions may be
found.
However, the Jnan Franco-
style champions wUl be out In
force to try their inck round the
Celen track. _.-'
The program starts at 8:86 in
the evening.
Saturday, by way of dramming
up interest In (a) carnival
queens, and (b) motorbike rac-
ing, the Coln queen carnival
contestants will board a conver-
tible in Panama, and the motor-
bike racers will Une up behind
on their machines, and the whole
array will proceed in orderly
splendor across the Isthmus to
Coln, starting at 12:36 p.m.
More motorcyclists will join
the parade In Coln.
So. Carolina Fifth
Annual AOA Clinic
Slated For August
COLUMBIA, B.C., Jan. 30 (DP)
A master of the single-wing
and two highly regarded T-for-
matlon coaches were signed up
today to direct the football phase
of the fifth annual South Caro-
Una Athletic Officials Association
Clinic here Aug. 10-15.
And m addition.to Charlie
Caldwell of Princeton, Jess Neelv
of Rice and Rex Enrlght of South
Carolina on football, the clinic
will have Hank Iba, the famed
"control" expert of Oklahoma A.
and M. to direct the basketball
end.
Caldwell has guided his Prince,
ton single wing Tigers to two
consecutive unbeaten season
and Ivy League champlonslups
and was the nation's "Coach-of
the-Year" In 1960.
Neely will be returning to the
state where he coached at Clem-
son for a number of years before
moving to Rice. His 1939 Clemson
squad went to the Cotton Bowl
and defeated Boston College. 6-3.
Enrlght has been head coach
and athletic director at South
Carolina since. 1938 and Is the
dean of Southern Conference
coaches In point of service.
', . -------.
THE MOB SPIRIT
HAVERHLL, Mass. (UP).
Spectators cheered as they
watched firemen smash windows
while fighting a blase on Mala
street. One fireman who tried to
force open a window was roundly
booed but the boos turned to
cheers as he gave up and smash-
ed the glass. "____________
Mt. Hope
Yanks Edge Bluebirds 2-1
In Ten Thrill-Packed Innings
PANAMA PROFESSIONAL LEAGUE
Teams Won Lost
BOMBERS .........-............. 16 t
YANKEES ....................... W 11
BLUEBIRDS....................I 16 15
BROWNIES...................... 16 16
Pet.
.646
.577
.466
.385
TONIGHT'S GAMES
Mt. Hope Stadium (7:36)
Bombers (Osorio 7-1) vs. Brownies (Clarke 5-5)
Panama Stadium (7:36)
Yankees (Neville 9-3) vs. Bluebirds (Barbee 6-6)
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT
Panama Stadium: Yankees 2, Bluebirds 1 (ten innings)
The Panam Pro League of-
fers baseball fans a game on
both sides of the Isthmus to-
night. At the Panam Stadium
the second place Yankees will
tackle the Bluebirds again. At
Mt. Hope, the league leading
Bombers take on the last place
Brownies.
These games are the ones that
wer called off at the Panam
Stadium Jan. 10 when the Pal-
tllla electric plant broke down.
Eddie Neville and Quincy Bar-
bee, who will be making his first
start this season, are the sched-
uled hurlers at the Panam Sta-
dium. At Mt. Hope lt will be Al-
berto Osorio against madcap VI-
bert Clark. ,
Last night the Yankees over-
came a 1-0 deficit in the lower
tenth Inning to stage a drama-
tic comeback and pulled the
name from the fire to score a
terming 2-1 victory.
Up to the upper tenth, the
game had been a scoreless pitch,
ing duel between Marion Frtca-
no of the Yankees and Andres
Alonso of the Bluebirds.
Hard-hitting Eddie Filo, the I
Bluebirds' left fielder, broke the
ice In the upper tenth when he
blasted his fourth homer of the
season over the rlghtfleld fence.
However, In the Yankee tenth
Eddie Neville hit for Fricano and
doubld to the right field wall.
Clem Koshorek rolled out but Ne-I
ville moved to third. Forrest Ja-I
cobs followed with a triple tol
center for the tying run. The!
next two menZiggy Jazlnski
and Jim Croninwere purposely I
walked to fill the bases. Manager I
AI Kubskl then hit what aproar-1
ed to be a doubleplay ball but I
Wllberto Holder, at short, threw!
wild to Alonso Brathwalte at|
second while the winning rur
crossed the plate.
Pan Liquido Edges Firemen
10-9 To Tie For Pacific
Softball League Leadership
staff) _
San Diego Ntl Tg Ct (4, phoenix
College 56
Vanport 83, Estn Oregon Edu 71
Camp Roberts (Cal.) 81, San
Francisco State 75.
Tennessee It, Georgia 68
Western Kentucky 82, Tampa 77
Furman 66, VMI 76
Clark 82, Benedict (7
Louisiana College 62, Spring Rill
61
Appalachian 68, Atlantic Chris-
Virginia St 96, Bluefield (W.Va.)
SUte 61 ".
Roanoke Oat 68, Wash. College
(Md.) 58
Elon 88, Western Carolina 76
Wofford 64, College of Charleston
59
North Georgia 6, Newberry 61
Arkansas' Tech 86, Southern St.
46
Kentucky Wesleyan 92, George-
town 71
Morehead 78, Tennessee Tech 66
Tusculum (Tenn.) 69, Bluefield
(W.Va.) St
SOUTHWEST
Texas 43, Oklahoma 89
St. Edwards 62, Lamas Teeh
(Tex.) 48
Southwest Texas 74, Sam Hous-
ton 4 __
Midwestern 58, Stephen F. Austin
57 ......
Hendrix 67, Oaaehlta 68 ___
W. Texas St. 66, Texas Western
68
PAR WsWT
Seattle 85. WWtwarthtt
Phillip. Oiler. 96, Regis (Denver)
51
Arisona 67, Arizona St (flag-
US. KEDS
LITTLE LEAGUE
BASEBALL
SHOES
Approved by
Little League
Baseball Inc.
at
Mxuvt
Sporting Goods Store
In a hard fought, up and down
game at Ancon Tuesday, the sec-
ond place Pan Liauldo nine de-
feated the first place Firemen's
Insurance team to tie up the
first place spot by a score of 10
to 9. Both teams have now won
seven and lost two.
The Liquid Bread boys scored
one in the top of the first on a
single by Stanley and a double
by Tarf linger.
Jennings Turner, the first man
up for the Insurancemen smash-
ed a homer to deep right center
to tie up the game.
In the second, Pan Liquido
scored one run on a single by
Muller and a triple by catcher
Murphy, who was out at home
when he tried to stretch it to a
four-bagger.
Don Bowen's Insurance boys
came back in the bottom of the
third to again deadlock the
garner with one run on a ingle
by Turner an error and a single
by Lew Hilzlnger and Pescod.
Neither team scored In the
fourth, but Pan Liquido came up
with three runs in their half of
the fifth on a single by Harry
Foster, a walk for Larry Jones
and a long round-tripper by
player-maViager George Stanley,
to give the beer "boys a 5 to 2
lead.
The Insurance team went down
in order in the bottom of the
fifth.
Pan Liquido chalked up a 6 to
2 lead in the top of the sixth.
getting one run on a single by
Lane, a passed ball, and a douJ
ble by Bill Muller.
By this time the Firemen had
to knuckle down to the buslnei
at hand and garnered five rur
to take the lead again, 7-6, on t.\
error, a single and three bas
on balls. Lee relieved Muller f
the mound duty in the sixth wll
one out. Lee walked Angermil
ler. Hilzlnger rapped a doubll
Pescod was safe on a fielders^
choice (Angermuller being tag-1
ged out at homethird to catch. 1
er). Scheldegg's fly to center end-
ed the Inning with Firemen's In- j
surance in the lead again.
Pan Liquido, Intent on hold-1
lng their own, came up with fourl
runs In the top of the seventh on I
a single, a walk, a single and a I
home run by Leo Presho to gol
ahead 10 to 7.
In the bottom of the seventh,I
the Insurance team was unable!
to score bu two runs on a double I
by player-manager Don Bowen.l
two errors, and a single by Stock.!
Totals:
Pan Liquido10 runs, 12 hits,
3 walks and 6 errors.
Firemen's Insurance9 runs, 91
hits, 3 walks and 0 errors.
Leading Hitters: Pan Liquido |
Muller with 2 for 3, Foster,
Stanley, Tarfllnger and Presho |
with 2 for 4, Lane and Murphy
with one each. Firemen's Insur-
anceTurner and Hilzlnger with
2 for 4, Pescod, Scheldegg, Bow-
en, Dunn and Stock with one
each.
Winning pitcher was Lee, tho
loser Hilzlnger.
CtafJUtiflm *v

St&tuts Sufft&mi A




wedwesdat, rnmm*Y n, mt
Df, PANAMA AMttlCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
page mm
Gatica Challenges Sampson To Return ^Rubber Match9 Soon
a HITE POWDERDan ell Robinson, left, and Jack Reddish sprayed snow hitting into turn* on Baldy
auntain, Sun Valley, Ida., where the Salt Lake lads and thiir United States teammates underwent
preliminary training (or tht Winter Olympics, hard by Oslo, Norway, Feb. 14-28. (NEA)
Jim Hearn Chose Baseball Over Golf,
But Latter Keeps Him In Pitching Shape
Panamanian
Kayoed Jose
SaturdayPM.
By United Press
BUENOS AIRES, Jan.
30_Panamanian Former
Lightweight Champ Cla-
rence (Young)' Samp-
son today was challeng-
ed by Argentine Champ
Jose M. Gatica who is an-
xious to avenge a knock-
out by Sampson in the
sixth round last Satur-
day.
Sampson had original-
ly been knocked out by
Gatica Nov. 24.
Gatica said, "Sampson
looked like easy chow to
me. I was badly mistaken.
He is shrewd fighter,
jle pretends dismay, only
to cut lose with an as-
onishing hard-hitting of-
-sive soon afterwards."
By EDWIN POPE
NEA Special Correspondent
Fastlich League
i Jim wound up with 11 victories rison WIckel ran out of pitchers,
in 1950. He led the National sent Hearn to the hill. He had a
League with a 2.49 ERA and tied 11-12 record, but a 3.24 ERA. He
ATLANTA, Jan. 80 (NEA)Jim for the lead In shutouts. went off to service and In 1940,
Hearn, in a decision both strate-l They still were not sure about his first post-war season, won
gle and algnlfleant, chose base- the high-cheeked Cracker. So In four, lost five with Columbus of
ball over golf, so now he pars his first full season with the, the American Association,
away to heart's desire. Olants, he copped 17, lost only I Thence to 8t. Louis, and no
There's logic In the paradox/nine, finished with a 3.81 ERA in! small difficulty. Hearn got pre- Palomas......t
The New York Olants' right-> the monumental march from be- cloui little work under Eddie! ocelots ......1
hander, a pitching hero of the hind. Dyer, picked up pitching tricks
1951 stretch drive and playoffs, which he feels "hurt my natural
loves baseball, likes golf. ESTABLISHED HIMSELF throwing motion."
When the rangy, 205-pound. j He shed them under Leo and
Atlantan was waived from the' Having established himself lookit 'lm now.
Bt. Louis Cardinals Into the Oi-! baseball wise after a relatively
ants and the biggest break of his, dreary three maiden major
27 years, manager Leo Durocher' league seasons at St. Louis, Hearn
put It to him straight. golfs away now In the middle 70s,
"Jim, I understand vou take a will try again for the ball-play-,
lot of time with golf. That's okay. ers' golf title In Florida this
But I want to know right now Spring.
whether you prefer baseball or; He was runner-up to teammate
golf. Half a man cannot succeed! Al Dark last year.
In anything that I know."' | Hearn has no trouble main-
"Leo said it in a kidding way," tabling pitching weight of 205
STANDINGS
TEAM Won Lest Pet.
Conejos........f t 1.M0
1 .W7
1 .5*0
2 .333
3 .00
League Leaders
Clash In Twi
League Tonight
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL
LEAGUE (1st Half Standings)
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Balboa Brewers ..4 1 .800
Gibraltar Life Ins. 4 1 .80
Pan'm Merchants 2 4 .233
Balboa HI School.. 1 5 .IN
TONIGHTS GAME
(At Balboa Stadium 7:00)
Balboa Brewers (Gibson 1-1) vs.
Gibraltar Life Ins. (Love 2-0)
Army Sports
Hearn remembers, taking time during the off-season. He likes to
from practice-putting at pine-; think that golf Is the reason,
lined North Fulton golf course I His rise to full-karat blgtlme
here. from the mediocrity of a total of
"But I could, tell there was 21 victories and 16 losses with
some seriousness in it. I told him the Cardinals In 1947-48-40 Is
I was. fond of golf but attached! happy denouement to a career
no significance to it other than! that never was orthodox.
as a pleasant hobby." Hearn was a third baseman at
And since The Lip was never'Georgia Tech, quit after two and
particularly antagonistic toward I a half years of industrial man-
a friendly hacking session, there agement study to go to colum-
was not much the boss could say bus In the South Atlantic League,
to that, One day in 1942, Manager Har-
BASEBALL
FORT KOBBE. C.Z. Led by
big Max Carpenter on the hill
and at bat the 33rd Infantry ex-
perienced
swamping
little trouble In
Atlantic Sector 11-0,
Macaws........1
Pumas......, .. C
Saturday at the Fort Kobbe dla- Hotz, c
The Fastlich League's second
place yesterday went to the Pa-
lomas as Louis Charles allowed
only one hit to the Macaws push-
ing them Into fourth place. The
score eight runs for the Palomas
and four for the Macaws.
Tomorrow afternoon the lead-
ing Conejos will take on the Oce-
lote at the Diablo Oval at 4:30.
The box score of yesterday's
tilt follows:
PALOMAS.. .. AB.R. HPO. A
Hatchett, If .... S 0 2 1 0
Brandon, cf .. .. 1 1 0 0
The winners play host to the
Bacote, 3b...... 1
Zambado, 2b.. .. 8
Lopes, rf...... 1
Angstadt, ss .. .. 1
Winklosky, D., lb 2
Charles, p...... 1
Totals........14 8 4 12 1
Uttle
Leag
MACAWS
Mead. R., 2b..
Morris, K 3b.
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
TEAM
Sean..........8
Police..........8
AFGE 14........t
Lincoln Ufa.. .... 2
Elks 1414.. .. .. i
Firemen ......1
Won Lost Pet.
1 .750
1 .750
2 .509
2 .501
2 .500
2 .250
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Police 5, Elks 8.
TODAY'S GAME
APGE vs. Sears.
The Police went into a tie for
first place yesterday at Little
League Park by downing the Elks
B to 3- Owen Sutherland, pitch-
ing and slugging ace for the Cop-
pers, practically won the game
slnglehanded.
tag for a triple for the only extra
base hit off Sutherland.
The box score:
FLKS AIIHPOA
DesLondes, 2b .. 2 1 0 4 0
Klrkland, lb.. .. 2 1 1 1
Ryter. ss...... 3 1 1 1
Trimble, c..... 8 0 1 S
Lovelady, p .. .. 3 0 1 0
Halvosa, 3b .... 3 0 0 2
Lewis. J Cf.. .. 3 0 2 0
Hele, If........ 3 0 0 0
Thompson, t. .. 3 0 0 0
mond In the interservlce baseball
league.
The long lean righthander
twirled tight three-hit ball,
struck out eight, belted two sin-
?:les and a double in four trips to
he plate, and scored twice to
pace the once-beaten 33rd to Its
seventh win.
AB
3
764th AAA at 2:30 p.m. today and | Morr". *:,3D- \
travel to undefeated Albrook' Salas, Pablo, ss-p 2
Saturday for what may prove the Norton, lb..... 3
decisive game of the 8ARCAR- Olud, c.. .. .. .. 2
IB season. Mead, B rf ..
Cody If.....
Starting Atlantic Sector pitch- Boughner, cf..
e,r Bernard Stewart, got himself Elienmann. p.
into serious trouble In the sec-Bruhn, lb-sa..
ond Inning when he walked ,
Olenn Trhlln after Jorge Toro i Totals .. .._,I*
and Miguel Ruiz singled and Ser-
gio Rivera drew a walk to fill the
bases. When Jos Torres singled
home Rivera Elwood Stafford
HPO
0 2
0 8
The Balboa Brewers will be at
full strength to battle the deter-
mined Gibraltar Life Insurance
aggregation tonight in what will
probably turn out to be the best
game of the young season. The
game Is scheduled to get under
way at seven o'clock at the Bal-
boa Stadium.
The first time these two teams
met, both clubs had won two and
lost none. The Brewers came out
victorious as Noel Gibson, mak-
ing his first appearance as a
pitcher, shut out the Insurance-
men 4-0 for the first whitewash
job of the season. This gave the
Brewers a temporary one-game
margin.
The Insurancemen were tied
with the Brewers for first place
again when the Panam Mer-
chants Old Timers won their
first game at the expense of the
Brewers by a 4-2 score.
Tonight manager Bill "Casey'
Carlln, of the Brewers, will give
Gibson his second mound assign-
ment while player-manager Dave
Kelleher will call on Jack Love.
Love has had plenty of rest1
since his last game, but Gibson
has been patrolling the center
field pastures when not needed
on the mound because of his
needed power at the plate.
A sour note about baseball on
the Canal Zone is noted by the
MEN OF MAGICRay Sonnenberg. left, fits well in St. Louis' fast-break strategy, lends the Sugar
Bowl champions height on the boards. Capt. Leland Norria, center, roly-poly senior guard is Day-
ton's steadying influence. Six-foot eight-inch Doug McClary adds to defending Pacific Coast Con-
ference champion Washington's strong attack. (NEA)
poor attendance at the Twilight]
League games (the same thing is
happening to the Pony League) |
and was the cause of the Canal
Zone Pro Loop's folding.
So far the brand of ball of the!
Twilight circuit has not been so
disastrous that fans should stay
away.
There is a great deal of work
involved for the league officials.
These men must enjoy and carej
for the game in order to go to
such great extremes to offer
baseball for your enjoyment and
entertainment. It is discouraging
the way fans have not supported
the game. In a couple of years
baseball will probably be a for-
gotten game on the Canal Zone.;
POLICE KEEP BLOTTER CLEAN'
PONTOTOC, Miss. (UP). City
police dldnt make a single ar-
rest here during a One month
period, the first time in 30 years.
BIG SALE
Befse 2.50 NOW 1.85/yd.
56" for suits .... 36" in colors for dresses crease-resistine .... 1.50 0.85/yd.
2.25 1.45 1.75/yd. 1.20/yd.
CASA FNIX
155 Central Ave. Phone 2-2790

Widest Choice of Routes
Greatest experience,
Most enjoyable travel
pa a offers you all three

12 13
4 1
Score By Innings
Palomas 5 0 12-8 4 1
Macaws 0 3 1 04 1 1
Runs Batted InHatchett,
Earned
came on the hill for Atlantic Angstadt, Winklosky.
Sector but couldn't stem the tunsPalomas 5, Macaws 2. hen
0'33rd's 15-hlt attack.
i on BasesPalomas 8, Macaws 7.
Rees Jones, Carlos Lopes, Tor- Stolen BasesBrandon, Hotz,
res and Toro hit safely twice and Qlud 2. B. Mead 2, Cody. Hit by
a triple by Rivera was the big. Pitcher-by Bruhn <*&*{
blow of the game. Right fielder Passed Bafls-Olud 2. Wild Pitch
Alex Renfro contributed the out- Charles. Struckout by Bruhn 2,
standing defensive play in the! Charles 7. Base on Balls off-
Totals ........25 3 0 IS 3
- _{ the foul line and threw a perfect
POLICE AB R
Coln. 2b...... 3 2
Robertson, 3b. .. 1 0
Ammlrati, 3b. .. 1 1
Corrigan, E., If .. 3 0
Sutherland, p. .. 3 1
Crook, cf...... 3 0
Barnes, c. .. .. 3 0
Klelhofer, ss.. .. 3 1
Roe, rf........ 0 O
HPO
2 1
Owen collected his second
home run of the season with a
mate aboard In the fourth ta-j Scott, R., rf .... 2
ning that provided the winning. Priest, lb...... 3
margin. On the mound Suther- --------------------
land allowed six hits and three Totals........25 5 8 18 2
walks while striking out 13 bat- Score By Innings
ters. Jlmmle Lovelady went all, Elks 10 0 0 2 03 6 3
the way on the mound for the Police 110 3 0 x5 8 2
Elks giving up eight hits and Winning PitcherSutherland.
strike to put out Rademas Diaz,
Atlantic Sector catcher, who had
singled and taken his turn at
first.
Ltaescore:
Atlantic rector 000 000 0000
33rd Infantry 132 201 llx11
Carpenter and Toro; Stewart,
Stafford and Dies.
GOLF
FORT KOBBEWith local golf
Charles 9, Eisenmann 4, Bruhn
10. ErrorsCharles, Norton. Los-
ing PitcherBruhn (0-2). Win-
ning PitcherCharles (2-1).Um-
piresNeville and Klernan. Time
of Game - 1:45.
Gamboa Regatta
Jimmy Ramsey from Cristobal
ran away with top honors at
Gamboa on Saturday winning
he Class "C" 22 horsepower race
four bases on balls.
Mike Crook and Klelhofer led
the winners at the plate with
Losing PitcherLovelady. Struck
out bySutherland 12. Lovelady
8. Bases on Balls offSuther-
.land 3, Lovelady 4. Three Base
eaeh man collecting two hits In I HitRvter. Home RunSuther-
three trips. Johnny Lewis with land. UmpiresLuser and Dall-
two for three led the losers at ey. ScorerMead. Time of Game
bat with Donny Ryter connect-11:15.
third annual golf tournament
Tuesday at the Fort Amador
links.
Defending champion Sergeant p *{! f^m Albrook to
Dale Beam ?s included among al- JSkSSSiSZ & &."
most 25 entrants who will com-
pete in the qualifying rounds
Tuesday and Wednesday. Fol-
lowing qualifying play flights
will be established with trophies
for winners and runners-up In
each flight.
Match play begins Friday with
the semi-finals Saturday and the
finals Wednesday, Feb. 5.
The tournament will determine
the Regimental golf team for the
USARCARIB tourney in March.
captain Walter T. EMon si the
Offleer-ln-Charge.
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT ADt
Now... 6 Years Old!
. CAN FILL YOUR NEEDS
for anyone who cares to see it.
Ramsey was driving Bill McCul-
lough's "C Sharp, and it was
aharn Saturday..
took
theamboa"'Cup in the Class "C
10 horsepower classic followed
closely by the Egger boys from
Cristobal and Patterson of Al-
brook.
Oeo. Egger took the Class "A'
trophy, with 8gt. Minner and
Lanny Ounn following In that
order.
Townsend took the Midget
Class race with Minner and
Ounn taking second and third
respectively.
Lloyd Kent driving Fred Hatch-
ett's Baby Jumbo u took second
honors in the free-for-all and
Class "C."
The Cristobal Sea Scouts with
Capt. Johnson as skipper won
the sailing trophy followed close-
ly by the Gamboa Sea Scouts
entry captained by Bobby Dala-
ey.
The crowd was treated to plen-
ty of thrills, the biggest was
when Winkle toured the course
with his engine on fire and ev-
eryone knew it but him, and
when he found out, the boat and
Winkle soon parted company.
The prompt action of the Crash
Boat crews saved the boat and
engine.
The officiating of Mr. Hatchett
and Mr. Holmes was above re-
proaeh.
The Oamboa course on the
Chegres River is a natural for the
spectators as well as the racers.
Now York
IfcWxico
Paris
Miami
Hem
Rio
Aires
.- i*' ssMlssSae, you
travel in swift comfort when
eiu"iyPAA."Sptclally-trained
ght attendant! anticipate
your
Wfcalfca Wt Hafet lunch
ob a ihorter flight or a full-
course dinner, Clipper meali
are always an "event."
Whether your first Clipper flight takes only an
hour or carries you completely around the world
you will notice immediately the many little
touches of thoughtfulness and hospitality which
have won so loyal a following among interna-
tional travelers. At the ticket counter and air-
port, tooyou will be impressed with the same
eagerness to please.
For nearly a quarter of a century. Pan American
has been studying and learning etch last detail
which can add to a passenger's comfort and en-
joyment. From this vast backlog of experience
have come today's standards of training which
assure you a pleasanter, more memorable trip
in every way.
TO USA. EUROPE SOUTH AMERICA
MEXICO WEST INDUS a CENTRAL AMERICA
AFRICA AUSTRALIA and the FAR IAST
You can "fly PAA" almost anywhere to any of
83 countries and colonies. You will be amazed et
the wide choice of routes, destinations and costs.
For reservations, see your Travel Agent or
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Panama: L Street Mo. 5, Tel. 1-0670 Colon: Sales feildins, Tel. 1097
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PACIFIC TWI LEAD AT
TONITE
(Page I)
AFL Believes
Rearmament
Will Pinch Soon
AN IKPgTl^>.^^f|re>|SAILT NKWSPAPBB
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is aafe" Abraham Lincoln.
Red HeldPOW'sRe-Wed Wife
Gets 2nd Marriage Annulled
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
'Silent Dutchman Features
In Noisy Washinaton Probe
MIAMI BEACH Fla., Jan. 30
(UP) Tne executive council o
the American Federation of La-
bor warned yesterday that the
"toollng-up period" has passed
and civilians can soon expect to
feel "the real pinch" of rearma-
ment.
To make this "real pinch" as
painless is possible, the 15 AFL
chiefs called lo- the formation
of a special c'vlllan board to the
armed forces needs and alloca-
tions.
. "It would be the height of j WASmNGTON Jan 30 (UP) Subcommittee looking Into tax
folly to assvr e the most econ- I aSSETu.vestigators voted scandals trie J twice to query
omlc use of critical materials, t chan-.-s against Henry Grunewad about an alleged
i?.? itfflK? rSv irGr^nlwald'and8^ attorney $500,000 Ux "sh,kedown" but the
!^ArVvfe^uTeof (cri- yesterday after the "Silent questions met stony sUence.
te tSSriS^aa If we had Dutchman" gain refused to
In ,Vn,?mited -'mddIv of them" answer q'-.estiuns and the attor-
t" Toncif^cfflln ahepTe'- ^Jejaeted for talking too
P"rTh2St?ouncU'estimated that The contempt citations were
the military end atomic energy, recommended at the climax of
nroaram? In Uio second quarter an uproaiious session which saw
of thU yea? wh! consume more attorney William Power Maloney
than na'f of the nation's sup-!escorted from the room by a Ca-
nnes of wch critical materials as;pitol policeman while shouting
aluminum, stainless steel and at toe up of hi; voice,
brass mill copper. | The House Ways and Means
This "expansion of the defense
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952
FIVE CENTS
sector of toe economy." the coun-
cil said, "will be accompanied by
reductions in civilian output."
The council deplored "a ten-
d e n c v in programming and
procurement bv the military
services to 'reach for the moon,'
often disregarding the limited
supply of critical materials and
the imperative need that they
be used most economically."
The iivlitary's request for
enough materials to construct
permanent housing equal to more
than one-fourth of the total na-
t i o n a 1 housing goal for 1952
"seems far out of line," the coun-
cil said.
No Trace Found
Of Absent Swede
As of early this afternoon the
mystery of the missing Gosta
Vldegaard remains unsolved.
Vldegaard. a wealthv Swedish
shipping owner, disappeared
from his room at El Panama Ho-
tel early last Friday leaving only
a note, which his business as-
sociate found under the door
saying that Vldegaard was "go-
ing for a walk."
Both Canal Zone and Panama
In
Sen.
police have been hunting for
,hlm ever since, as every available
rasponee to a letter from 1 clue was being Investigated.
Hubert II M m p h r e y (D-
Minn.), (he AFL chieftans said I 1 uonrn Pn'tApmiC
the problem of Communist-do-'nTIlienZCI Epidemic
mlnated unions should be dealt
with by the unions themselves,
since it "cannot be well handled
through legislation."
Amendment To U.S.
Constitution Urged
By HI. Legion Post
Hits Arkansas
LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas.
Jan. 30 (UP) An influenza
epidemic has struck hundreds
of children here, and forced
the closing of the public
schools.
An estimated 2,455 of the
city's 15.560 public school chil-
dren are sick.
Grunewald, Washington
"mystery man," and a key fi-
gure in ihe tax fraud investi-
gation, was as mutely defiant
as he was at his first sub-
committee appearance Dec. 21,
when lie declined to tell more
than his name and age.
Yesterday's stormy hearing was
accompanied by two other de-
velopments in the far-reaching
inquiry into Internal Revenue
irregularities:
1) The House Judiciary com-
mittee voted to conduct a "non-
political" Investigation of Attor-
ney General J. Howard McGrath
and his handling of the Justice
Department. Some top officials
in the department have been in-
volved in the tax fraud hearings.
2) Rep. Thomas F. O'Brien (D-
111), a member of the tax sub-
committee charged that Repub-
lican Gov William 8. Beardsley
received 'preferential t e r a t -
ment" on ni" Income tax case.
O'Brien also criticized the sub-
committee for falling to take up
the case. .- '
Grunewald was called to tes-
tify concerning a story Chicago
attorney Abraham Teltelbaum
told the subcommittee Dec. 4.
Teitelbaum. who once repre-
sented Scarface Al Capone,
said two men who claimed to
have government "Influence"
threatened him with a Jail
term if he didn't hand them
$500,00 to ft* his tax troubles.
ington
Teltelbaum said an anonymous
telephone caller with a deep gut-
tural voice also advised him to
pay up. Ousted assistant attor-
ney general T. La mar Caudle
said he tnougnt the voice might
have been Grunewald's.
Subcommittee chairman Cecil
R. King :D-Cul.) said he would
ask the full committee to act Im-
mediately on the contempt cita-
tions for Grunewald and Malo-
ney. He said he did not know of
any precedent for citing a law-
yer representing a Congression-
al witness but though the action
fully Justified.
King engaged in a furious
exchange with Maloney after
the chairman demanded direct
answers from Grunewald and
the attorney objected. He fin-
ally ordered the attorney oust-
ed from the room.
Each time subeommitee mem-
bers tried to question Grune-
wald, the witness started read-
ing from a preoared statement.
He nevtir finished it. King re-
cessed the meeting and ordered
Grunewald to return later
without Maloney
During the next go-round toe
attomevlcss witness sat with his
arms folded and his mouth shut.
After readme a one-sentence
statement that "the committee
has deprived ine of the right to
counsel of my own choosing" he
said nothing.
Subcommittee members final-
ly tired of the monologue and
dismissed the witness until
March 1.
Grunewald has been subpoena-
ed to arpear before a Grand
Jury investigating the Teitel-
baum case Feb. 4.
Thatcher Ferry
To Close For 9
A proposed amendment to the
United States Constitution which
would make void any treaties or.
International agreements to the LJ_.,__ Tamamaw
extent toat they interfere with nOUTS I OmOrrOW
guaranteed American
lights .
citizens by the Constitution is
being urged D.v Post No. 2 of the
American Legion in Peora, 111.
The Post has adopted a reso-
lution which pointed out that the
civil right of the citizens of the
United States may be nullified
by treaties or convenants or ex-
traordinary agreements under
Thatcher Ferry will be out of
operation from 8 p.m. Thursday
night to 5 a.m. Friday morning,
while the ferry ramps are re-
paired .
The last trip of the ferry on
Thursday night will be from the
east side of the Canal at 8. The
first trip on Friday morning will
the United Nations, the North he from the east Ide at 5 a m.
Atlantic Treaty, and many others--------------
apparently binding on the Unit-'
ed Stat&s but entered into by the
President of Secretary of State
on their own authority without
the eonsent of the Senate.
The Post called upon the Gen-
eral Assembly cf the State of Il-
linois to ratif? an amendment to
th United States Constitution
which would protect the cons-
titutional rights of American
clUaens.
B-36 Crashes
In Snowbank; But
12 Aboard Escape
SPOKANE, Jan. 30 (UP) A
$5,000,000 B-36 heavy bomber
crashed and burned when it hit
a snowbank short of the runway
while landing at Falrchlld Field
near here last night.
The nine-man crew and three
representatives of Consolidated-
Vultee, makers of the B-36, es-
caped.
BALBOA TIDES
Thursday, Jan. 31
Hiih Low
7:r-> a.m. 12:48 p.m.
t:r'[ ~ttn. 1:07 a.m.
Massachusetts Tax Collector
Gets 2 Years For Bribe Taking
__
B08TON, Jan. 30 (UP) De-
nis W. Delaney was sentenced to
two year*' imprisonment yester-
day by u Federal Judge who said
he undermined the taxpayers'
faith in tae government by tak-
ing bribes while serving as Col-
lector of Internal Revenue for
Massachusetts.
The G5 -year-old Delaney also
was fined a total of $10,500 which
included $7,500 for taking an
equal amount In bribes.
The ertra t3,000 fine was for
signing filse tax certificates, an
offense which brought him an
additional but suspended six-
month sentence.
Judge Charles E. Wyzanskl, Jr.
also disqualified Delaney, as re-
quired by law in the case of a
convicted bribe-taker, from ever
holding "any position of honor,
trust or profit" under the UJ3.
government.
The Judge, who could have Im-
posed up to 18 years' Imprison-
ment and fines totaling $37,500,
permitted Delaney to remain free
in continued bail of $2,500 while
the defendant's attorney takes
the case to the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals.
Delaney was the first of three
Indicted former collectors to
stand trial, but Judge Wyzanskl
said thi current nationwide tax
American Woman
appeals Conviction
On Traffic Charge
An American woman, Mrs. Ka-
tberine L. Kraemer, 43, was
found guilty, fined $100 and
sentenced to 30 days in Jail yes-
terday m the Balboa Magistrate's
Court.
The execution of the Jail sen-
tence was suspended however on
toe condition that the defend-
ant Is not guilty of either reck-
less or drunk driving for one
year.
A notice of her appeal of the
conviction was entered yesterday
by Mrs. Kraemer's counsel, at-
torney VI. J. Sheridan.
The defendant was involved in
an automobile accident on Bru-
(a Road on January 18 in which
ler car collided with another ve-
hicle and caused it to turn over
completely. Heavy damage was
Incurred to both cars, but neith-
er of the drivers was badly hurt.
Taft Declares He'll Fight Eisenhower
In March 11 New Hampshire Primaries
WASHINGTON, Jan. 30 (UP)
Sen. Robert Taft agreed to-
day to enfer the New Hamp-
shire Republican p r 1 m a r y
against Gen. Dwight Eisenhow-
er and Harold Stassen, despite
what Taft called "factors which
are apparently unfavorable" to
him.
The March 11 New Hamp-
sire election will be the first
1952 primary vote In the L'hit-
ed States. Taft's action ensures
a three-way popularity contest
there.
So far New Hampshire offers
the only showdown contest in
sight between Taft and Eisen-
hower, who are regarded as
chief contenders for the Re-
publican presidential nomina-
tion.
Taft stated: "The political
machine of the present late
administration is openly pledg-
ed to Gen. Elsenhower in New
Hampshire. *
If flM it o knockout, die it
ore re lamC ring experience.
(NEA Telephoto)
CAMP.*'GNING Sen Robert Taft of Ohio, asphant for the
Repufciic?n Frcldentlal nomination, enters a car outside his
Washington o nice, en route to Union Station to entrain for
Florida. The prospective nominee will make a series of
speeches in toe southern state.
Labor Office
Clerk Missing
Since Yesterday
A 29-year-old Honduran em-
ployed as a clerk in the Cen-
tral Labor Office was reported
missing today. He is believed
to be suffering from a mental
ailment brought about by a
frustrated love affair.
Canal Zone police were
searching for Lester O. Clarke
of Rio Abajo who was describ-
ed as being 5 ft. 8 inches tall
and weighing about 140 pounds.
He was last seen yesterday af-
ternoon at work.
scandals did not influence his
decision to send the defendant
to prison despite the latter's
emotional plea for mercy.
The tddge said, however, that
Delaney had violated his oath of
office and thus deserved impris-
onment because his offense "af-
fected the confidence of the
people in the integrity of the
government."
Bribe-taking by a public offi-
cial, the Judge said, is as serious
as any offens except treason or
a crime of violence.
Delaney, who rose from ditch-
digger "-n a Federal relief project
to become Massachusetts WPA
administrator and then Collector
of Internal Revenue in 1944, told
reporters he will "look for a Job"
while his attorney appeals the
conviction.
Though the government con-
tended he and his wife had some
$28,000 in assets when he was
fired last summer. Delaney told
the Judge he has lived partly on
the charity of friends since he
was ousted from office by Presi-
dent Truman.
The defense has conteded that
Delaney'r: dismissal and prose-
cution represented "persecution"
and an attempt "to get him" on
the part of "somebody In Wash-
ington."
In a voice breaking with emo-
tion Deleney himself told the
Judge:
"Ddrinf! my seven years as Col-
lector of Internal Revenue I have
never done anything with cri-
minal intent I request that you
be as merciful as possible."
Delaney sal'' he felt "innocent
of any wrongdoing" despite the
verdict of the Federal court Jury
which convicted him of taking
bribes'from New York financial
consultant Daniel Friedman to
influente throe tax cases in his
office and of falsely certifying
the payment of $180,498 in three
other tax casi*
The government did not ac-
cuse him of receiving anything
for signing the false certificates.
'Leap Year Leap1
At YMCA Planned
For Saturday
To the toeme of the 'Leap
Year Leap." gals and guys are
in for a hllarlour, evening on
Saturday. Balboa YMCA.
A men's prize for the longest
"leaner" and the fastest "Jeeper"
prize for the girl were announc-
ed. Descriptions of "Jeepers" and
"leapers," will be given at the
dance. .
Music for this gala affair will
be furnished by the orchestra
from toe 71st Army Band.
Dancing will be from 8 to 11
p.m.
Being a leap year celebration
a large turn out of girls report-
edly are prepared to exercise
their charms on the bashful or
more experienced.
8pecial Intermission entertain-
ment will add to the evening's
hilarity.
Wives of servicemen are wel-
come but husbands will have to
secure guest passes m advance
at the "Y" Information desk.
Young women who are not
regular members of the OSO
Hostess group must secure a
guest pass In advance In order
to attend.
ATLANTA, Jan. 30 (UP)A
sympathetic Judge declared Mrs.
Agnes Dixon Sasser's second
marriage null and void yester-
day, freeing the 21-year-old
blonde to await her "Enoch Ar-
den" first husband's return
from a Communist prison.
Superior Court Judge I. An-
drews awarded the annulment
to the young woman who had
been inadvertently caught up
In a wartime triangle that made
her twice a bride and once a
widow" in the space of eight
months.
Embittered by her experience
and the publicity that had
hounded her since her first
husbands name showed up on
the Communist Korean prisoner
of war list in December, Mrs.
Sasser now Mrs. Walter Dix-
on hastily left the court.
"I hate you all," she cried at
reporters as she left with her
attorney, T. Blake Jackson. "I
have nothing at all to say to
you."
At Ft. McPherson, Ga., where
he had worked with his wife in
the machine records depart-
ment, toe man who lost her
Pfc. William Sasser said:
"No comment, no pictures, no
nothing."
Like Mrs. Sasser, he had
avoided publicity and even his
former friends since the first
shock of their situation wore
off. In December, when the
name of Pvt. Wajter Dixon on
toe Communist POW list Indi-
cated that the man reported
killed in action might be alive,
Sasser said he would let his
wife work out her own deci-
sion.
Both had waited for confir-
mation that Dixon was alive.
It came In a letter from Dix-
on to his wife passed through
the 'Iron Curtain at the truce
negotiations.
But the Defense Department
remained skeptical until the
FBI decided the letter matched
handwriting in other letters
written by Dixon.
But Mrs. Sasser, she revealed
in court yesterday, had known
in her heart that the letter she
got Jan. 2 was authentic.
"He mentioned in his letter
the names of relatives, such as
Joe and Woody. Whom only he
would know about," she told
Judge Andrews.
It said that "at toe time the prisoner of war list burned out
second
marriage
ull
and
was
Is now null and void.
Mrs. Dixon, or Sasser, how-
ever, had "entered Into a pur-
ported marriage with Sasser
conscientiously believing her
first husband to be dead."
Mrs. Sasser had been mar-
ried to Dixon on April 6, 1051,
only five days before he was
sent overseas, ultimately to
Korea. She was notified seven
months ago that he had been
wounded in action and died the
following day. Dlxon's com-
manding officer wrote her that
his death had been verified by
eyewitnesses.
Last September, she became
Sasser's secret bride. They re-
vealed their marriage in De-
cember, Just before they start-
ed off to LaGrange, N. O, to
visit Sasser's family.
But as they prepared for the
entered of the newspaper page at them,
and The name and the serial num-
ber matched that of the "dead"
husband.
From that moment on the
Basse had no peaee and the
mental agony that they went
through in working out their
future is still a secret that they
SreWr to keep locked In their
i
learts.
Ironically, Pvt. Dixon probab-
ly does not know that he is an
"Enoch Arden" who turned up
alive after his wife remarried.
And that gives the old legend
a reverse twist because the fic-
tional Enoch, a "lost" seaman,
found about his wife's remar-
riage without her knowing that
he was alive. Then he went
away without letting her know.
The dilemma was solved by
the wife this time, but neither
she nor any one else can guess
when the story will end
trip toe agate type from the.with Dlxon's homecoming.
Fastest to RIO DE JANEIRO
and SAO PAULO
.
Yon will enjoy the ultimate in air travel when
.-you fly Braniff to Brazil.
As you soar non-stop from Lima to Sao Paulo
and on to Rio you'll see South America's most
spectacular scenery And as you relax aboard
the luxurious DC-6 El Conquistador you'll enjoy
cabin service beyond compareplus the confi-
dence of flying; with- million mile captains. It's
the perfect combination for a perfect trip.
Judge Andrews had opened
the annulment hearings by say-
ing he was "Inclined to disbe-
lieve, or believe Just the op-
posite, of what the Communists
said" in publishing Dlxon's
name on the prisoner list.
But then he read the Defense
Department telegram to Mrs.
Sasser advising her of the FBI
comparison test and that Dixon
had been taken off the killed
In action list and put on the
prisoner list.
The Judge then went into
conference with Mrs. Sasser
and Jackson and emerged a few
moments later to Issue a decla-
ratory Judgment.
MRS. EUGA A. CAMPBELL,
National President of The
American Legion Auxiliary,
who is dne to arrive on the
Isthmus tonight for a four-day
visit. She was unopposed for
office at the time of her elec-
tion to head the group com-
posed of nearly a million wo-
men.
Mrs. Campbell has headed
many important activities of
the Legion Auxiliary and was
given the task of organising
the "Girls' State" on a national
basis and developing it ta'->
"Girls' Nation." .
Disaster Control
Exercise For
Reserve Officers
The Disaster Control Center of
USARCARIB at Fort Amador last
night conducted a Command
Post Exercise for Organized Re-
serve Officers in the Panama
Area.
The CPX was opened by DCC
Director Lieutenant Colonel John
P. Mial, who explained the
functions of USARCARIB Dis-
aster Control Center.
Seventy Six O. R. C. Officers
were present, representing the
Army, Navy, and Force. Lt. Cmdr.
Tom Stone, U8N, and Major
Arlle G. Watkinson USAF con-
ducted toe exercise.
For Information and
retcrvarton* aae your travel agent 1
call your Braniff representative.
Avenido Tivoli #18
Telephone 2-072V
Hotel B Panamo.
Via Eipaa. Ill
Telephone 3-4726
or 3 1660 EkI 130
Colon Ttekot CHfke'Tetephoae 77