The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01363

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
J4*BRANIFF
New York on* stop
non-stop to Miami
AN PTOBPBIiarin^fl
Panama


Let the people know the truth and the country i safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAK
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY IS, 1951
FIVE
CENTS
Increase
Rates
Egypt Asks Reds
Arms To Replace
British Weapons
(NBA Telephoto)
NATIONAL MONEY MATTER President Tru man uses a chart to explain a point In his new
budget to Director of the Budget Frederick J. Lawton (right). The Chief Executive present-
ed his fiscal 1953 budget to Congress Monday._________________________________________
Romanian Arrested
In rTunnel Murder'
Of US Navy
BERN. Switzerland, Jan. 23 announcement was the first m-
(UP) The Swiss Federal pol-
ice said today that they ar-
rested a man they believe is
connected with the mysterious
death a year ago of Capt. Eu-
gene S. Karpe, U. 8. Naval At-
tache assigned to Communist
Romania.
Karpe fell or was pushed from
the famed Orient Express as It
sped through a tunnel In Aus-
tria Feb. 23, 1950. His mutilated
body was found by a track
walker.
The Swiss police said "an al-
leged Romanian probably con-
Negro Doctor Finds
'No Room' Sign Al
Washington Hotel
The "no-rc:\n" sign at the
Washington Hotel "was Brought
out Monday and placed before a
Fellow at the Royal College of
Surgeons and his wife aa they
sought to ob'.ain over-night ac-
commodations at the American-
operated hotel
Dr. O. V. Harry, a Negro chief
dlcatlon that Karpe's death was f th ^ M u
still under Investigation and, lt, m tne IsIand of Jamalca
that the Inquiry had spread to,nere be fcM bem practicing
Switzerland. .since 193, enme to the Isthmus
r,IaIPewa^ a .c08eri1env ?' 11t week as a delegate to the
Robert Vogeler, the US. busi-,second *,cti0nal meeting of the
nessman who only two days be- American College of Surgeons
icer
CAIRO, Jan. 23 (UP). In-
formed United Nations sources in
Paris have reported that Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Viahtn-
sky Is 'returning to Moscow With
an Egyptian request to buy Rus-
sian arms, including tanks and
automatic weapons.
Egyptian Foreign Minister Sa-
las tl Din has reportedly asked
Vlshmsky for arms because
Egypt's usual sources of arma-
ments. Britain, has cut off sup-
plies, and Egypt la finding It In-
creasingly difficult to find arma-
ments elsewhere in the Western
world.
In the Suez Canal Zone town
of Ismallia today the Egyptian
authorities charged the British
authorities with cruelty and bru-
tality, and said they had as-
sumed virtual control of Ismailla
by sudden force.
Ismallia officials said no bread
was available In the town be-
: cause the British had seized the
bakeries, and that supolies of
meat, fish and vegetables were
running short.
In Cairo today Egyptiaa w-
llce reinforcement* forcibly
dranetf *ff S**1?*
RCTtrHmn *_> -**
blocked the entrance to- a
British bank for N inmates,
distributing boycott Britain
leaflets.
They resisted the efforts of tisfa
dozen Egyptian police officer,
Including two brigadiers and four
colonels, to get then to leave
peacefully.
In London it Is reported that
Ridgway's HQ
Says Moscow
Freezes Talks
TOKYO, Jan. 25 (UP) The
United Nations Command said
here tony that Russia has tem-
porarily .'rozt-n the Korean truce
negotiations till it can re-evalu-
ate the current world situation.
The Panmunjom armistice
Truman's Budget
Message Predicts
Changes By March
RP Schools Reopen
As 77-Day Strike
Halted By Truce
fore the Attache's death had
been convicted of espionage In
Communist Hungary and sen-
tenced to 15 years In prison.
held at the Panama Hotel Jan.
16 through 18.
While the three-day medical
conference was In session he re-
The 45-year-old Karpe had mained a guest at the "El Pana-
vlsited Vogeler's wife .and two, ma" with his wi'e-nurse who ac-
children in Vienna the night
before his death. Mrs. Vogeler
had called him ''one of Bob's
dearest friends."
He had boarded the Orient
nected with Karpe's death was, Express In Vienna for a trip to
arrested a short while ago."
They refused to give further
details, even as to whether the
man arrested was the same un-
identified Romanian that was
seized soon after Karpe's death
and released after questioning.
The Swiss police's surprise
Woman Who Gave
Long-Life Formula
Gives Up At 109
McCALLEN, Tex., Jan. 23.
(UP)Mrs. Trinidad Aguilar,
109. will be buried today.
Mrs. Aguilar, who died Mon-
day, once outlined this formula
for long life: "Meat is no good.
I have eaten tortillas, eggs,
bananas and milk. And I sleep
well. I say my prayers, go to bed
and sleep."
Paris en route home on leave.
Mystery
Maestro
Gregorio Ravic, billed as di-
rector of the Buenos Aires
Symphony Orchestra, is to con-
duct the Panama National
Symphony Orchestra In a eon-
cert at the University of Pa-
nama tonight.
The Buenos Aires Symphony
plays in the big Teatro Golon,
Bnenos Aires.
From the Buenos'Aires bu-
reau of United Press today
came this message:
"Both city-owned Teatro Co-
lon and private music circles
here hare never heard of Ra-
vic."
compan'sd him on the trip. 8ince
then the Oatun-born medico and
Mrs. Harry have been house-
guests of the surgeon's mother
and slstci-s at their home In Pue-
blo Nuevo.
They h*d "...-ncluded an Inspec-
tion too? of the Amador Guerre-
ro Hospiral at 7 pjn. when Dr.
Harry proposed to register at the
Carlton Hotel in Colon for over-
night leservations
However, another doctor sug-
gested the Washington Hotel
Instead and forthwith telephon-
ed to make -ht necessary reser-
vations. Dr Harry and his wife
immediately taxied from the
hospital to the hotel In the New
Cristobal area, reaching there
less than ten minutes after the
assurance was given that accom-
modations wire available.
When ne applied for the re-
servation, however. Dr.* Harry
was told: "sorry but the hotel Is
all filled up right now "
The 'it'.rgeon. who was educat-
ed at the National Institute, Ja-
maica's Calabar College, and
Edinburfsh University, returned
to Panam Monday night on the
late train with his wife.
Order Of Arrest
Out For Herbruger
An order for the arrest of Pa-
nameista presidential candi-
date Rodolfo Herbruger has
been issued, Second District
Court D. A. Darlo Sandoval an-
nounced today.
Sandoval said the order is in-
cluded in his findings in con-
nection with the attempt last
May to revoke the 1946 con-
stitution submitted- to Judge
Manuel Burgos.
Herbruger, who has been in
Washington since the overthrow
of the Arnulfo Arias adminis-
tration, of which he was a mem-
ber, announced following his no-
mination by the Panamelstas
that he will return to Panama
to lead the party's campaign.
Sound Sleeper
BROWNSVILLE, Tex., Jan. 23
(UP) Seventeen year old
Reyes Guzman of Mexico City
doesn't let anything bother him
when he wants to sleep.
The train passed over him
while he was napping between
the rails of the Missouri Paci-
fic Railroad. .
Police officers found only a
shredded red coat after the en-
gineer R. K. Gilmore halted the
train.
When the train backed up,
they found Gusmin between
the rails, still asleep.
Fear that all rentals and other rates for community
talksyhave new been stalemated, j^., 0 fhe _, Zflne wj|| bc uppe<| fcy March
this year increased today when the complete text of Pre-
King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia I A TJnUed Nations Command:.:,!--- Trumnn't ki.^na mo *--'-_______ ._
and Pakistan Foreign Minister broadcas* sai.^ "the war ordered "Jr" ,rumaB OUgtt message to Congress was reteir-
Hafflahn Shan are both working! by the Kremlin" was thrown Into (ed here.
The section of the President's appropriation request
dealing with the new Panam Canal Company said in
part:
"The Board of Directors has resolved to postpone
action on rates until necessary cost data are available
IT IS CONTEMPLATED, HOWEVER, THAT RATES (EX-
CEPT TOLLS) WILL BE INCREASED BY MARCH 1,1952
TO LEVELS WHICH WILL PLACE THE COMPANY ON
A SELF-SUSTAINING BASIS."
on mediation moves In the wor- the conference tents by the
sening Anglo-Egyptian dispute. Kremlin on tne supposition that
U. S. officials Investigating the united Nations* Command
Saturday's fatal shooting of Sis-
ter Anthony, an American nun,
during an Anglo-Egyptian gun
battle said yesterday It Is Impos-
sible Immediately to fix respon-
sibility for her death.
American Cohsul Lamar Mul-
llner, who made an on-the-spot
investigation of the Ismailla con-
vent area where Sister Anthony
was killed said "the origin of
the shot cannot be determined
definitely for the present since
no eye-witnesses to the actual
shooting were found."
would surrender there.
The ii'uadi-n.st, noting that the
Communists have rejected as In-
terference In North Korean af-
fairs tlu United Nations propos-
al for a 'an on all airfield cons-
truction In Kcrra during a truce,
said Nctih Korea had about as
much sovereignty as the city of
Moscow.
Meanwhile United Nations
Supreme Commander General
Matthew Ridgway told visiting
Filipino legislators that his for-
ces in Korea can repulse any
fresh Communist offensive.
Rldgwny said there was-no way
of knowing what the Commun-
jists want in the Panmunjom con-
ference, or what they intended
I to do.
On his recent visit to the
Isthmus, Chairman of the Board
Karl R. Bendetsen said he fore-
saw "no violent changes" In
the cost of community services
although he admitted there
were bound to be some adjust-
ments.
community services at the low-
est possible cost.
Apprehension has been rife In
the Zone community, however,
since the Canal Company is now
on a self-sustaining basis and
there Is fear that the books
1 only be balanced by lie
Alf Panama TJfty schools were
functioning today with 100-per-
cent attendance following yes-
terday's "truce" in the 77-dy
school strike.
The truce was called yester-
day following a meeting of the
Permanent Teacher's Commit-
tee and student leaders.
The reason for the strike
the ouster or resignation of
Education Minister Rubn D.
Carlesstill existed, but com-
munique issued by the group
claimed an "ideological" victo-
ry.
The communique said the
strike was called off "to save
those students that the Minis-
ter of Education cares little for."
Over the radio this morning
a spokesman for the teachers
said they had foiled a plan by
the Minister of Education to
keep thousands of students from
passing to a higher grade or
from graduating.
Earlier this week the Minis-
try of Education had announced
that the school term for second-
ary schools would end Jan. 31.
Teachers declared today, how-
ever, 'that they would like to be mailed to all employes of the
continue classes until they have Panama Canal Company-Canal
made up for the time they were Zone Government by Friday, ac-
At that time it was pointed raising of charges to employes.
out that the Canal tolls re-1 Mr. Truman's budget mess; ge
At Par.raunjom today the Unit- venue. had no bearing on the i pointed out that the recent .e-
ed Nations nee^latorsad^ttodif1 c<^ oi Peratln the organization of the Panam Ca-
United Nattoas planes had inad-1 CoJP"..y- ... .* nal *ctlvlty necessitated basic
Vlt^^uma^utt&''l3h^u the waierwav, "self chame* in fiscal structure and
area ^n^^nS^t^t ^^^*-^^ ^"'gr* "~*"j "" 'PP'~
camp at Kaeywg, ,#4 ,_ QOa. was (UM, Um rates for in- prlate corporation accounting
ceded We prcDaSility that UnlT Uv"f1 emploLM .2 the ZaM.Vtttm to provide cost data ne-
ed Nations fighter-bombers un- would not be affected pessary as a basis for determ.n-
Bendetsen added that every inr tolls and other rates.
It was then that the messrge
stated "It was contemplated
that rates (except tolls) will be
Soviet Hurls Spy
Charges al Fliers
Ransomed By US
intentionally attacked a Com-
munist truce delegation convoy f"ort would ** m>de t0 g__
on the Pyongyang road Jan. 18.
The Rfds showed a slightly
conciliatory mocd by agreeing, to
mark their prisoner of war camps
by day. but not by night.
They promised to provide maps
pinpointing of all 11 POW camps
in which they bold 11,559 war
prisoners, including. 3,198 United
States troops. PARIS, Jan 23 (UP) In a
Both stops* a re designed to pre-umted Nations session today
vent inadvertent United Nations;Russia charged that the four U.S.:
air attacks or these camps. filers that wcr- ransomed from'A* Cf I iiIsaV
Sabres shot down two Migs.Hungar- were spies sent by Gen-"* *** H*a
over noi-thweast Korea today. eral Elsenhower and that the
U. 8. admitted the espionage
charge t>y paying the $120.000
fine Imposed by the Communist!
court.
Soviet delegate Jacob A. Malik I
made the accusation in a heated1
main poi'tlcal committee debate. |
Russia insi8tr thafr the West I
admit fii'e Soviet satellites or It
Gross Earnings,
Tax Statements
Go In Mail Soon
increased by March of 1952 to
levels which will place the com-
pany on a self-sustaining basis."
Hoodlums Smash
Stained Glass
A piece of rubble the sise ot
a brictc was thrown through
the stained glass windows of
St. Luke's Cathedral in Ancon
last night by unknown hood-
lums, according to a statement
made bv Dean Raymond T.
Ferris today
Two quare feet of stained
on strike.
The
Judges' Bench
Coast Guardsman Nabbed AtGirlieShow
After Brief Flight On $46,000 Payroll
WEST PALM BEACH. Fla.,,don near Augusta, Oa.,. last
Jan. 23 (UP)City detectives I Jan. 3.
seized a Coast Guard warrant Officers recovered $25,197.23
officer at a girlie show here and in his pockets and in his car-
he admitted he was the dice-1 all In $1, $6, $10 and $20 bills
shooting paymaster wanted for prepared for the Coast Guard
slipping.away with about $46,000
in government money and a
red-haired waitress.
Two alert city detectives sneak-
ed up on 38-year-old Ernest
Leonard Whetzel, Jr., while he
was sipping a drink and Intent-
ly watching
Melody Follies Club last night.
They recogalzed him as the
six feet four Inch tall.. 240-
pound warrant officer who' looks
like a balding ex-pro football
tackle. He was sought by the
FBI on charges of embeullng
I Coast Guard funds while custo-
Idlan of the cash at Camp Gor-
payroll three weeks ago.
He told detectives Harry Con-
yers and William Fletcher that
gambling caused him to get so
deeply Into Coast Guard funds
that he "just decided to hell
with li" and absconded with a
payroi
dress
gray herringbone sports coat,
left Camp Gordon with a red-
haired waitress but told offi-
cers he dropped her three days
later in West Palm Beach on
his first trip here. The officer.
. leg show at the,new $30,000 payroll.
Whetsel, dressed la a new
he had not seen the waitress
since that time.
Whetzel, a veteran of 18 years
in the service Including 14 in
the Coast Guard, first told de-
tectives that he was Edward R.
Weaver, a Jewelry salesman of
Atlanta. But he confessed after
seeing his fingerprints matched
with those of the warrant offi-
cer sought.
"I was dissatisfied at Camp
Gordon and started gambling,"
he said. "I lost and got in so
deep I couldn't get out so I
Just decided to hen with It and
took the $30.000 payroll."
Whetselwho the FBI said
was a dice shooterreported he
took $50 from the Coast Guard
He said he knew Coast Guard
officers would audit the cash
and discover the missing funds,
so he vanished with the new
$30,000 payroll when It arrived.
He left Camp Gordon In a
rented car but abandoned that
In Augusta, Ga took a bus for.
Charlotte, N. C, and bought a
Bulck automobile for $1,575. He
and the waitress drove to West
Palm Beach.
Whetzel said he saw his de-
scription in the newspapers and
fled back to Charlotte. He came
here again last night and was
arrested a few hours later.
The tall Coast Quardsman
waived a preliminary hearing
and bond wss set at $10.000.
I've had It now," the mild
cording to an announcement at
Balboa Height*.
The Payroll Division will start
mailing t,he statements (Forms
W-2) tomorrow and they wlU all
be sent out by Friday.
They are being mailed to each
employe's postciflce address.
An original and one copy of
the statement will be received by
The embezzclment case against e*ch employe. Another copy of
Celso Rafael Madronero brought1* s??. J_ hi sent by the
before .he Balboa Magistrate's f-fy"" *lsk;n to the office of
Court tnls morning was contlnu- lTne. Internal Revenue Bureau In
ed until Friday afternoon on a J^_"__ Vg&t
motion cf the government. e oRlnal lata be forwarded
The 47-year-old Panamanian y f emplove_wlth the final tax
who worked as bartender and
cashier at the Chief Petty Of-
ficers' Club t Fort Amador al-
legedly embezzled $185.90 from
Statements of gross earnings SSBSL"1* Western-backed
nd withholding u for 1951 wUl g^fe ha, re(u8ed 8uch a
deal, and the US. delegate, Er-
nest A. Gross yesterday cited the
Hungarian ransom incident as a
prime extmpk of what motivates
Western opposition to the Redi
satellites.
will continue to use its veto to glass w.ndow erected in the
memory of those who lost their
lives in the construction of the
Panama Canal were completely
demolished.
The Dean said he "didn't
know anybody was mad at us
at the moment," and attribut-
ed the incident to the work of
hoodlums.
the club's funds. He Is in jail on
$r*M) bail.
. (m a vagrancy oharge this
mornin" a teen-age Panamanian
was sentenced to serve 20 days
in Jail. Enrique Antonio Becerra,
return; the copv Is to be retain-
ed by the emp'oye for his own
record.
Employes n?ed these forms
only to file final tax return for
1951, for which the deadline is
March 15
Japs To Resume
&.** not ia,lty to the|Full Relations
And fo' loitering In the Pacl- \i/:.L %/_.
flc Clubnouse Jonathan Mr Do- TV I in VOTICOn
nald Taylor 27-year-old Pana-
manian was given a suspended I TOKYO, Jan. 23 (UP) The
sentence and placed on one year Jgpanese covernment today an-
notation.
Spain-US Talks
May Set Pattern
WASHINGTON. Jan. 23 (UP)
Authoritative sources today
predicted that the pending |cio to Jaran
nounce'l that it would resume
full diplomatic relations with the
[Vatican and exchange envoys
when th> Jaranece Peace Treaty
goes Into effect.
The Forelrjr. Office statement
said the, Japan would send a
minister to the Vatican and that
the Holy See would send a Nun-
Amerlcan-Spanish military and
economic Ulks will chart Spain's
role In the Western European
defense setup.
The process of establishing
closer relations between Spain
and the West Is expected to be
. safe, lost that and then slipped' mannered officer said. "I'm not _
who has a wife and two chil- out $1,400. After losing that, he going to cause any more head- slow owing to political objections
dren in Charleston, S. C, said said he gambled away $15,000. aches." I In Western European countries.
Notes to thl effect were ex-
changed with the Vatican.
"balboa tides
Thursday, Jan. Z4
High Low
12:37 a.m. 7:17 aja.
1:23 p.m. 7:13 p.m.
KATHRTN GRATSON AND HOWARD KEEL of Hollywood
stars of the MOM film "8how Boat" which played In Pana-
ma City last week were stopover visitors at Tocumen Air-
port early today en route from Havana to Lima, Rio de
Janeiro. Buenos Aires and Santiago. Though their visit was
too brief for them to come into town. Miss Orayson anf
Keel graciously signed autographs and chatted with airport
employes and film fans who learned they were In the ter-
minal The stars are on a good will tour organized Jointly
by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Branlff Airlines.

'.' i ,.-


PAGE TWO
IB fAKAMA AMERICAN AN fMDEPtNDENT BAttT rTtWKPAl
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 88, 1MI
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
QWNID NO pu>lh(D Bv THI MANAMA AMBRICAN MIU. INC.
POUNOIB NILMN OUNtlVIH IN !<
HABMODIO AMIAS, irno.
, 87 H mill O BOX IS4. PAM.M. B. OF .
* TILIPMONI PANAMA NO. -O740 IB LINI)
CAiLl AOBMM PANAMBBICAN. PANAMA
Colon Orrict 11.17 Ccntbal Avinui itwiin Htm ano 13th staiit*
PomiON MPMMNTATtVB JOSHUA B. POWMS. INC
.MS MADISON AVI NIW YOrlK. 117) N. V.
i tOAt IT MAIL
ft* MONTH IN AOVANCI '' 't'on
3* IX MONTH*. IN ADVANC .'55 Ann
It 0N| VIA*. IN -*"- IB.BO wu
Walter Winchel
In New York
Election Year
Economizing
Is Foggy Affair
By PETER EDSON .
THE BROADWAY LIGHTS
Stage Door: "Venus Observed," due at the Century Theatre
" Ob Feb. 13, gives every indication of opening to nearly $500.(100 in
advances sales. This is the Laurence Olivier-directed opus star-
ring Rex Harrison and Lilli Palmer.. Jennifer Jones ill tour In
"Saint Joan" for the Theatre Guild. She Jilted a $250,000 cinema
deal to play her first starring role on the 0. 8. stage.. .Broadway
veterans recall that "Anthony and Cleopatra" was always a ticket
dudall the more reason to salute the Olivlers for making it a
--lilt now. They get $1,500 per week (over and above their regular
fees) just for living expenses.. .Judith Anderson's next showcase,
"Come of Age," which debuts today at City Center, snubbed the
Broadway brokerages. All tickets over the box-office counter...
French playwright Jean Anoullh has suffered three flops in New
York, although his dramas click big in London and Paris.. T. S.
Eliot's highbrow drama, "The Cocktail Party," is a hit In the
htcktowns. Will Rogers said: "You cannot judge intelligence by
geography."
In the Wings: Frisco, the most quoted of the wags, was at
Jlminv. Kelly's complaining about an editor rejecting a profile a-
bout his ca-eer.. .The editor, it appears, didn't think Frisco was
"lie big name he ifsed to be".. ."Howdaya like that!" he groan-
ed. "A guy named Mark Twain once wrote a whole book about a
kid named Tom Sawyer and who ever hearda him?"...An old-
timer summed up Judy Garland'.; record-breaking run at the
Palace Theatre: "Talentthe .oiher ol Broadway Success."
The First-Nights: r newest of the spine-quiverers, "The
Shrike," co-stars Juili, ,i Evelyn and Jos Ferrer. The critics greet-
ed the players with three cheers and the play with four shrieks.
Mr. Atkinson, over at the Times, reported: "It is likely to scare
the living daylights out of you." The show Is a macabre psycho-
logical study of a female dracula who attempts to torture her
husband into insanity.. .The oracles were not happy about meet-
ing "Fancy Meeting You Again" by George S. Kaufman and his
wife. Most regretted that the theme about reincarnation didn't
come to life. The Herald Trlb's Mr. Kerr dismissed it as "a pallid
comedy." Taking the hint, the show departed last night Eugene
O'Neill's "Desire I'nder the Elms," another of the many revivals
this season, brought posies to Carol Stone and Karl MalCen. Re-
viewer John McClain's salute: "Highly recommended".. The
week's departures summed up another $150,000 lost by "angels"
trying to make some easy money...In the last four months the
L'way wreckage numbered 19 flops.
The Cinemagicians: Several reviewers reported that "Room
for One More" is an entertaining family picnic with Cary Grant,
Betsy Drake and a crowd of moppets making themselves attrac-
tice. Especially remarkable being a four-year-old named George
WlMlc-w.. .'Tor Men Only" oilers a talc about fraternities that
takes rlace at Mediocre U. More blah-blah than rah-rah...
"Scandal Sheet" has Broderick Crawford playing the tough go-
get-em editor with cyclones in his head. You know what to ex-
pect... "Desert of Lost Men" presents the old hokum-pocus...
"The Light Touch" unreels a suspenseful meller with lovely Pier
Angel as the top tingle... It's a Big Country" shows what makes
Yankee Doodle a Dandy. A dozen stars salute the 48. Beautifully
played and kodak'd.
T.U; Iristocr&ts: The value of btariitst: II. Bcrle went on n
iioiiua;, and his tecvy program rating dived from No. 1 to No. (
I
'The Television Workshop" squeezed "Don Quixote" into a half
hour and strangled the life out of the classic.. .Bobby Barry, the
Homer on the Aldrlch Family, is a youngster headed for a bright^ g*^** Energy Committee
!uture.. .Garroway's early a. m. offering has the makings of a
f ood show. Zippy in spots plus many imaginative touches. It has
'9 improve.. .CBS's documentary, "The People Act," rates your
ears...There was plenty of funshine in Bert Lahr's fooling via
The Royal Showcase." His guesting again proved be should be
* Je host of a show.. ."It's in the Bag" is the Scrooge among the
. ingocasts. Winners get cans of soup..'.'My Friend Irma" looks
I *>d. Particularly Marie Wilson. Such antennas.
The Moviemakers: Walter Wanger, whose name was always
~'.ayed down in the billing of his filmsgets a heavy play in
i ime burgs featuring his "Aladdin." He had to have a tragedy
i become "important" to greedy exhibitors.. .The comedy hit of
'- .anee, "Jour De Fete," arrives next month. Borrah Mlnnevitch
ings it to the 55th Street Playhouse.. .The Samuel Goldwyn-
* olra Shearer decision to cancel things was mutual. He wanted
?r to do comedy routines and she wanted to keep her dignity
I id stick to pure ballet. Statements that she withdrew to expect
: baby were phonv. She signed with MGM. Shelley Winters'
st 3 film titles have 5 words in them. All got hit notices. Her
-test is "Phone Call from a Stranger." The others: "A Place in
i-ie Sun" and "He Ran All the Way."
j
i
The Press-Box: The President's doubts al-out a military man
i aklng a good President are partly correct. One former captain
: lied miserably. Capt. Truman... Gov. Talmadge is hardly any-
(ie to tell you the difference between black and white. He doesn't
i en know the difference between right and wrong .This L'nit,-
: Press dispatch was buried the other day: "Spain agrees to
! lit all exports of strategic materials to Russia and satellites."
' mi mean that this bulwark against communism" has been
- ing Business-As-Usual with Russia right along?...The Man-
ester Guardian (England) finally came around to it in these
>rds: "It is a strange thing that it was the fanatical hostility of
' ?. Bevlh and his foreign office advisers that produced Israel's
- dependence; their stupidity brought about the very thing thev
ared. The cynical paradox is appreciated in Israel and with
ry little bitterness. An independent Israel is as good a poten-
t U ally of Britain and the West as was the Israel within the
i -mmonwealth that Mr. Bevln refused to have". .'.Heah! heah!
The Intelligentsia: Major Clark's gunsight view of Korea In
' iek has an explosive Impact. This Is the blood and agony version
(..^casualty statistics. It should hit a complacency-drunk public
S : an ley shower...The dimpled dollv on Pageant's cover Is
flee Kelley. Makes the fifth time she's decorated it.. .Quick has
:. tnleal quip: Ike can prove he's a Republican. He hasn't been
t'eeted to anything in a decade.. .In the Feb. True Leo Durocher's
rMlner. "How We Won the Pennant," unveils why the Olanti
y the flag. Because, says Durocher, Dressen (the Dodgers
litf) removed Newcombe Just before Bobby Thomson came to
Efc. Laralne Day's book for Doubleday (she is Mrs. Durocher. In
at you were Just born) Is being prepared to break with the
enlng day at the Polo Grounds. The title: "Day with the
"tanta".. .Late in the Spring 81mon & Schuster will publish
^VUllam edited. Crowded with anecdotes, prophecies, political
- "tire and frank comments on his friends and foes.. .Two magi
'ive already elected Ike: Harper's and U. 8. News-World Report
selose what the General will or won't accomplish when he en-
ra the Dwight House._______________________________
EM 1$ TOO MUM TMI MABIR5 OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Z. Tfc* Mill Inlll apan tora* 'din ot Th Nuni Ami.
-> Latten mn ruti.ti trartrullv sod arc fcanalaa hi a wfcallv esa-
kteatial miaae*.
I eu canrnbutt tottei Ht'lkt ipnpeti.rrt il rt doatn'l apM" '?>
AMI ear LsrMn an awbluhia la Mm order near***
f PlMM rry re ra ktttn limit**' r* mi raft laafTh.
HiBtit B* Mt*r rifan >i htla in ricN* co-.ii6.ru
Till* K*ipaai (liman a* raiaoaitfcilir far rtartraarrti or aainjarx
STAMPS TO EXCHANGE
Drachten, Netherlands,
editor
tall Box
If* fir:
m In search of a philatelist
, ho should Ilka to receive Dutch
let stamps In exchange for Pa-
jina stamps. I hope you can
help me. for I onlv know your
address, which I found In the
New York Times. Please write
me In French. German or Eng-
Vh.
Thanking you very much In
inticipatlon
Yours sincerely,
L Mulder-Fljiman.
WASHINGTON (NBA)Most
people who try to read Presi-
dent Truman's new Economic
Report to Congress will get no
farther than the middle of
page eight. That's where it
says: "... even with the addi-
tional taxes I am recommend-
ing, there w 11 be a large defi-
cit this year and a larger one
next year."
At this poli t they will throw
the report In he waste baske'
and that will bo that. In an
election year, n* politician
wants to listen to U.V: r* high-
er taxes, and bigger deficits.
As if to anticipate what the
President would ask for, the
Council of State Chambers o
Commerce put out a significant
statement on the day before
the economic report was re-
leased .
This handout listed all the
things that had been done in
the first week of Congress to
prevent higher taxes and to
limit government spending.
Senator Taft announced
the Republican Policy Com-
mittee is opposed to further
tax increases. Senator George
of Georgia and Representa-
tive Doughton of North Ca-
rolina, both Democrats an'
chairmen of congressional
committees which handle
tax matters, announced thty
are opposed to higher taxes.
Rep. John Phillips of Cali-
fornia Introduced a bill to cut
national debt limit from $275
billion to $285 billion.
Rep. Fred Coudert of New
York Introduced a resolution te
limit fedegal expenditures to
$60 bllliorFand appropriations
to $71 billion in the flcesl year
beginning next July 1.
That's the economy gauze
over the picture.
But what's the real picture
underneath? The first bill that's
passed in the House of Repre-
sentatives is for a 10 per cent
increrse in pav for the Prmed
enrices. It will cost $832 mil-
lion a year.
Navy Secretary Dan Kimball
announces a plan to build one
new super aircraft carrier a
year for ten years. The Air
Force wants, and will probably
tet, authorization for more
than the presently planned 14?
Wl""S.
Prr lHent Truman l-timnter
th" si7c of the armed force?
will have to be increased above
three and a half million men
And 8en. Brlen MrMahon of
Fill 'Er Up, Please"

Thick Film
By BOB RUARK
Is still plugging for more mo-
ney for atomic artillery and
related activities.
Everybody loves national
defense, even in an. election
yer-. But every taxpayer
Win have the rioht to point
out that it Congress really
has Us mind on economiz-
ing this year, and prevent-
ing further tax rises, this
is a poor way tn ben in.
Th* President's Economic
report spels nut In lannvane
nnvont should be able to
understand just what the
condition of Uncle Sam's su-
gar bowl really is.
The President asked Congres*
for a $10 bUlion tax Increase
last 'ear. Conpress obliged with
a bill that will yield about $5
billion.
The President asked that cer-
tain tax loopholes be closed
and certain tax privileges be
eliminated. Nothing
about that, either.
The result is, according to
the President, that the gov-
ernment faces a deficit of $8
billion i for the fiscal year end-
ing ne*t June 30, and $18 bil-
llon for the year after that
All the Increases In expendi-
tures and the resulting increas-
ed deficit will be due to na-
tional defense.
The question it raises is
whether the deficit shall be
met by Increasing taxes, by
cutting back the program, or
by deficit financingborro..ing
the money to increase the na-
tional debt. It's aa simple as
that.
For those who can hurdle
this tax Issue barricade and get
beyond page eight in the Pre-
sident's economic message, there
Is some thoughtful reading.
The first section of their re-
port to the President by the
Council of Economic Advisers la
headed, "The Economic Strate-
gy ol the Defense Program."
This was prepared by Leon
Keyserling, John D. Clark and
Roy Blough.
It tries to set forth what the
government program la In the
present emergency. The aim la
to achieve national security.
The first step is said to
be fo define what arm are
needed, then to git them,
regardless of cost, end as
fast as possible.
This calls for a vast in-
crease in production. Along
with it, a strong civilian
economy must be maintain-
ed, capable of paying the
taxes to meet the bills.
Finally, the program calls
for dovetailing the Amer-
ican defense effort with
those of other free nations.
In oversimplified form, this
s the program for which the
Truman sdmlnirt-aMon 1* try-
ig to win public support and
hlch It is trying to sell Con-
gress.
NEW YORK. Aa an infrequent movie-goer,
I seldom see the big new shows until they
meander around to the corner palace of pop-
corn, and hence cannot give you the old ex-
pert eye.
But we clocked a couple lately, namely Mr.
DeMllle's clrcua epic, "The Oreatest Show on
Earth." and a simple little British thing called
"The Lavender Hill Mob."
Mr. DeMllle's excess took almost as long to
watch as It did to make, and was a mite wear-
ing, even on a pass. The English thing un-
Betty prepared for the part of the female filer
the high trape2 part by running full tilt
into DeMUle some years back, and knocking him
flat on his fanny In the Paramount eating
house.
"Excuse me, lover-boy," said Miss Hutton to
the great Cecil B, and continued on her busi-
ness, leaving a lasting impression behind her.
When she heard DeMllle was making a circus
picture, Betty attacked the genius frontally. She
bad a thousand bucks' worth of bouquet whip-
ped up picturing a three-ring circus with
spooled In a straight line and quit about the Miss Hutton's effigy swinging from the trapeze.
This gentle hint she dispatched to Mr. DeMUle.
"It was a very expensive hint," said Miss Hut-
ton, "but it got me the part I wanted and, be-
sides, it is deductible."
The average acting-type dame would have
mugged for the close-ups and let a competent
stand-In do the work, but this Is not the way
of my future fiancee.
Hutton spent six months learning how to kill
herself on a maintop trapeze. It takes three
years, generally, to build a competent filer
Hutton was sailing through the stratosphere
with something akin to confidence in half a
year. That's Betty up there in the eaves, not
Superman.
Miss Hutton painfully pickled her bleeding
white paws in brine to build up the necessary
callus and built a separate ache Into each mui-
rle and sinew of her body largely, I gather,
to win the grudging respect of a flock of tough
tutors.
She was scared half of death most of the time
in practice, signifying an unmaldenly Willing-
ness to bust her neck for her art.
Her ultimate success was celebrated by a re-
mark from her mother, who, as Hutton went
slithering up some 60 feet to do flip-flops from
one trapeze, to another, yelled In piercing pa-
rental tones: "Betty Thornburg, you come right
down from there I"
This paralleled the action of the two Hutton
tots, who watched mama half kill herself In
aerial gyrations and then inquired plaintively
as to the whereabouts of the band.
I am no DeMllle fan, but I guess I got to buy
"Greatest Show," after all. Anything with Hut-
ton plus elephant* in it has got to be a bar-
gain.
time the cigarette craving set in.
One was the antithesis of the other. After
the time-tried DeMUllan, which is to say Holly-
wood, formula, "The Greatest Show, etc." had
everything In It but Claudette" Colbert In a tub
of asses' milk, which was somehow, overlooked.
It had a romantic-physical conflict between
two aerlallsts, an unrequited torch between an
elephant trainer and an elephant rider, and a
battle 'twixt love and duty for a clrcua man-
ager.
And It had a stickup and a train wreck, and
some wild animals loose, and a mercy-killing
doctor hid out as a clown, and the Impact of
evil on good as exemplified by a crooked crap
jame In the cotton-candy concession.
It had a curdling accident from the high
trapezes, some fist fights, psychosomatic-Injury
a full-scale circus performance and all the fas-
cinating background of circus logistics.
The British thing was merely a gently sar-
donic treatment of how a timid bank employe
brought off the greatest gold-bullion robbery of
the age, with never a scene nor a lien of dia-
logue that did not contribute directly to the
limpid flow of humorous action.
As I watched the import I couldn't help but
think what a wonderful thing It might have
been if the entrancing details of circus Ufe had
been welded to a single, simple story line, In-
stead of staggering under a dozen sub-plots.
A better story, for Instance, than any contain-
ed in the DeMllle picture Is the true tale of
Miss Elizabeth Hutton's participation In the film.
was done i am convinced that Betty can do anything In
the world she wlshei, but In this she out-Hut-
oned herself.
Truman's Low
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
WASHINGTON. Sine* the worst moments of
the President's first Administration, there has
never been a time when Harry 8. Truman stood
so low with the leaders of his own party.
problem on a broad front.
The President had deelded there was a real
need for a thorough clean-out. H* had asked
Murphy to head the clean-Out commission. He
A Curious mood, at once paralyzed and sui- was of course Infuriated when Murphy first ac-
cldal, seems to have Infected most of the De- cepted, and then refused.
mocratlc chieftains.
On the one hand, they consider that the cor-
ruption Issue Is "destroying the party" the
most commonly used phrase.
Donald Dawson, Matt Connelly. John Steelman
and Harry Vaughan, to name the most lmpor-
Thls anger of the Prealdent's produced exaet-
y the right climate for aborting Truman's sec-
ond gesture In the direction of a elean-out
the project to remove Attorney General J. How-
ard McGrath. The President made up his mind
to take the big step. His mind was unmade
tant members of the White House Junta live by the usual argument that he was appeasing
bv Truman much as rhinoceros birds Uve by unfair critics.
picking the teeth of their sustaining rhinoceros
One can Imagine that the rhinoceros birds
must be strongly opposed to dentists for rhinos.
In the same fashion, the White House junta
seeks to Insulate the President; they paint for
And thus nothing serious is to be done about
this enormous problem of government corrup-
tion while the Congressional investigators lick
their lips, and prepare to go after the Alien
Property Office and other bureaus of the Jus-
Mm a falsely optimistic picture of the state of tice Department, the Alcohol Tax Unit, perhaps
_,____ j il___-_ u wa. .,~_- .14.. rtjl Ih ("Mvll Autatlnn 1]~.--i .__ __-_. A.
his affairs, and they play or his pugnacity and
irritability under criticism to stifle any impulse
he may feel to take corrective measures.
Their boldness is difficult to exaggerate. The
natrpnage dispenser, Dawson, freely used the
President's name, for example. In order to get
a fat Navv Job for the discharged R.F.C. di-
rector. WlUlam E. Wlllett, although the Presi-
dent had heard no whisper of this peculiar pro-
ject.
Equally, long after Stuart Symington had been
sent in to clean up the R.F.C.. the removal of
Dawson's wife from control of files, and of Daw-
son's creature. Don Smith, from the Personnel
Directorship, was long resisted. When 8mith
was at length fired, an important place was in-
stantly found for him In the Federal Security
Agency.
And meanwhUe Dawson and Company were
so successfully busy poisoning the President's
mind against Symington that the man chosen
to reform the RFC. actually had to go to the
Whit* House and protest h* had no' been "ln-
resti*atln too much."
It Is pretty dear, moreover, that thai* same
-ctica, with a prettv strong assist from Federal
'ud** Thomas J. Mumhy. w*re what stifled the
President's Impulse to tackle the corruption
the Civil Aviation Board, and several other or-
ganizations known for lax standards.
This complacency in the shadow of disaster
would be more understandable, if precisely these
same men were not needling the President to
run again.
He does not want to do so. Mrs. Truman
moat positively wanti him not to. Most of the
more eminent leaders of his party are convinced
he will make a great mistake If he Is again a
candidate.
But the key figures in the little voup he seei
every day at the morning conference speak of
not quitting under fire, recall how the President
confuted the prophets of gloom In 1948, and tear
down every other potential candidate. And this
is a kind of needling to whleh few men are
more vulnerable than the President.
It Is a tragic business, for the President's
honesty, courage and patriotism are too obvious
to need proof; yet his Isolation in the White
House frustrates his own good qualities.
The only hope appears to be that the bludg-
eoning of eventi will break down this isolation,
and cause Harry Truman to resume decisive
leadership.
(Copyright, 1952, New York Herald Tribune Inc.)
^NitY VftSMTON
MERRY-GO-
MIW MARIN
Drew Par$on says: U.N. will resist Communist attack
on Indochina; Public suggests names for "Truth Ship";
Slot machinas opon up again in Biloxi.
WASHINGTON. One of the. moa; important discussions
of the Churchill visit was the least publicized
It was to give Russia a firm warning of Allied unity to re-
sist Communist Invasion of French Indochina, also for United
Nations resistance in case of any full-jcale Communist attack.
Details of this decision were threshed out behind the closed
doors of the Pentagon by chairman of trie joint chiefs of staff
Oen. Omar Bradley, Gen. Alphonse Juln, inspector general of the
French armed forces, and British FleM Marshal 81r William
Joseph Slim, chief of the imperial generM staff
General Juln started- the discussion oy asking whether the
Korean truce could be tied to a truce m Indochina; in other
words, could we get the Chinese to agre- to cease hostUities In
both Korea and French Indochina durinc the seme truce nego-
tiations.
General Bradley flatly said no. It was fairly obvious that
the U.N. truce team in Korea Is having hard nough tim* gn-
tlng a truce there, without also having to work out peae* terms
for Indochina at the same tlm*.
General Juln then called upon the united States to bomb
China proper from the Philippines in cue of full-seal* com-
munlst attack on Indochina.
This also was rejected by General Bradley
He added, however, that If the truce talk broke down la
Korea, the United States would be ready to bomb the Chnete
mainland.
Bradley also said there would be no American objection to
tne French bombing South China with their own bombers based
on Indochina.
General Juln kept repeating that the United States did not
understand the problem in Indochina.
In the end, however, it Was agreed that In case of full-
scale attack on Indochina similar to that on Korea, the United
Nations would be called upon to resist i.i it has In Korea.
It was emphasized that the Commun<>t attack on Indochina
would have to be on an aU-out basis, not merely guerrilla fight-
ing
NOTEBritish Field Marshal Slim also reported that Chinan
Communists were quite capable of Invading Burma but there did
m t seem to be an Immediate threat.
Slim was asked whether he thought the Chinese would fight
on two fronts at once both In Korea and Indochina. He said
It was, his offhand opinion that they would".
CHURCHILL'S EVERY WHIM
Winston Churchill will never know how carefully Capitol of-
ficials mapped out hi* visit to Congress when he sat in th* gsl-
leiy And listened to th* President's State ot the Union messier
William "Flshbait" Miller, the House doorkeeper had hi* staff
chasing like mad to fulfill the Prime Minister's every anticipated
need.
Miller left nothing to chance. He even detoiled one aide to
the sole lob of directing the eminent vis-tor to a private men'i
room just off the floor of the House of Representatives.
This required a certain diplomacy and the employe who got
the assignment was somewhat at a loss as to how he should ask
a Prime Minister, particularly the famed Churchill, whether he
wanted to go to use the conveniences uf .he House.
When he finally summoned enough courage to make the In-
quiry, ChurchUl eyed the young man rather sternly and replied:
"No, thank you. I may be getting old, out not that old."
-TRUTH 8HIP"
The State Department has asked the public to help find %
good name for the new propaganda ship r-hieh will cruise around
Russia with a powerful transmitter, broadcasting the truth be-
hind the Iron Curtain.
The ship wlU operate in the North Sea and other waters ad-
jacent to Russia using one of the most powerful radio transmu-
tis In the world. The fact that It shifts its position every hour
wil! make it difficult for the Soviet to jam American truth mes-
sages. .
Here are some of the names submitted by the public for tha
new ship, and the authors:
"Curtain Breaker" Dr. C. F. Brindel. Anderson, Ind.; "The
Vi- ce of Fre-dom," Mrs. Corlnne Aui'n Ljs Angeles, Calif.;
"Voice of Democracy," Rev. G. H. Stahl, Suffolk, Va.- "Freedom
Calling," Mrs. Charles J. Nelson, New York City: "Spirit of Truth,"
Fex H. 8taden, Palm Beach, Fla.; "Voice of Peace," H. M.
Young, Massena, N. V.; "8pirit of Peace," Mrs. Rose Wernimoht,
Rochester, N. Y.; "Floating Freedom," David Hnuon, Colurabut,
Oa; "Herald of Truth," Mrs. Ingeborg Svulstad. New York City;
' Peacemaker," Axel Swanatrom, Rockford. Ul.; "Voice of Brother-
hood," Roy C Batea, Brooklyn, N.Y.
MISSISSIPPI GAMBLING
Last summer Senate investigators invaded Blloxl. Miss., and
turned the spotlight on wide-open. Illegal gambling that took 1$.
nd 19-year-old Keesler Field airmen 'o the cleaners on psyday
and even caused two young officers to commit ruidde.
Now that the heat Is off, however, th* slot machn** ana
gambling tables are back in business again.
This has been reported by Secretary of the Air Force Tom
Flnletter in an angry, private letter to Sen. Lester Hunt. Wyom-
ing Democrat, who headed the Blloxl Investigation
"Despite the combined effort of your subcommittee and of
this department, (gambling operational have been resumed in
the area of (Keeaier) base since the new sheriff of Harrison
Country took office." wrote Flnletter.
As a result, he promised swift action by th- Air Force.
"Since all efforts to have the responsible clvlUan official*
enforce the local antl-gambllng laws have been ineffective." h
declared "the only course open to us Is o pursue fcrcefuUy the
ro'icv of placing off limits in this area the casino portion of all
establishments where commercialized ambling appears.
"Where this is not practicable, the entire establishment will
be placed oft limits to shield the young men and women of th*
base."_______________ ___.
SIDE GLANCES
By Calbraith
"Will you phone and Ah tha dantJst to anawl my Appoint-
montf I've got a ooupk of oavltia* and I know had
Iftad'omr .


9!*"*':;
T^BMeP*^^*
.
s:
PEDNESDAT, JANTJARI 1M*
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE

Join
Democrat
Of Attorney General
GOP Pursuit
McGrath
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23. (UP) Republican
moves to investigate Attorney General J. Howard
McGrath received an important boost yesterday
from the second-ranking Democrat on the House
Judiciary Committee. -a .
Rep Francis E. Walter (D-Pa.) said he favors
GOP resolution calling for the investigation and
.redicted the judiciary group will approve it. He
aid there are "specific cases that should be looked
nto."
Sportscaster
The committee deferred action
m the proposal at closed session
resterday but one member said
t' will be the first order of busl-
ess at the next meeting.
Rep. Henneth B. KeaUng
(R., N. Y.) who introduced the
resolution, has accused the
justice department of "***-
ring- its feet" In prosecuting
tax frauds and certain other
criminal cases. He said he
would submit about six ex-
amples, some involving "P"-
tfcal figures" and "alleged
iderworld" operators.
collect the nation's taxes and
prosecute tax dodgers.
Mason also criticized the Pres-
ident for assigning McOrato to
clean up novemment corruption.
He said it was the same as se-
lecting "a known gambler to
clean up Rambling."
3) Pour Senators Introduced
a six-point "Clean Government
Act of l5t." it would' put the
entire tax-collecting system
from the commissioner down
under (Ml service.
Mr. Truman's plan would re-
place the 64 Presldentlally-ap:
VSSS. KS3-.-BE: Si SgsSS^iffS.
nkn Robert Ramspeck testified
>e]ore the House Executive Ex-
>edltures Committee In support
)t President Truman's plan to
eprganlae the Internal Revenue
bureau. _
i Secretary of Treasury John w.
&yder and Revenue Commis-
sioner John B. Dunlap gave si-
milar testimony to a Ways and
cans Subcommittee investigat-
ng tax scandals.
Other developments:
1) Sen. Richard M. Nixon ballf.) introduced a bill, to re-
mire the Treasury Department
o give Congress a full report on
iny tax settlements approved by
he Revenue Bureau. Sen. John
r. Williams (R.. DeD. who first
jrought the scandals to light,
:o-sponsored the bill.
Nixon said such reports would
..ake it Impossible for "crooked
:ax collectors to make secret set-
lement with delinquent taxpay-
rs and would "thus prevent such
x collection scandals as have
ocked the country m recent
onths." '
The hill would be retroactive
to require such reports for the
past fire years. Nixon said ibis
would "uncover any tax fixes
which have been engineered bv
the gangsters, racketeers and
dishonest fovernment employes
but which have not been dis-
closed."
3) Rep. M. Mason troduced a bill to abolish the bu-
reau entirely and replace it with
ll-man commission uncon-
ected with either the Justice
department or the Treasury De-
partment. The commission would
district commissioners under Ct
vil Service. Only the chief com-
missioner would remain a poli-
tical appointee.
The resolution sponsored by
Democratic Sens. A. 8. *****
Monroney (Okla.) Blalr Moody
(Mich.), John J. 8parkman
(Ala.) and George A. Smathers
(Pla.) also would provide man-
datory Jail terms and fines for 49 Newspaper
government workers convicted In executives
bribery cases. 61 Years between
It would make It unlawful for l2 and 20
< HORIZONTAL
' 1,4 Depicted
sportscaster
10 Seraglio
12 Click beetles
14 Males
15 Proofreader's
mark
17 Light touch
18 And (Latin)
19 Irregularly
notched
BO Father
21 Irish sea god
:23 Number
24 Allowance
for watte
26 Fewer
27 Pigpen
28 Half-em
29 Symbol for
indium
30 Auricle
32 Edible
rootstock
34 Cicatrlx
36 Exist
37 Japanese
outcast
38 Symbol for
samarium
39 Skins
44 He------on
television
45 Small child
47 Lariat
48 Explosive
sound
VERTICAL
1 Seesaws
2 Sea eagle
3 Ambary
4 Demigod
5 Rubber trees
6 Glut
7 That thing
8 Seine
9 Vine fruits
10 Pish
11 Frozen water
13 Bridges
16 Area measure
22 Withdraw
Anawer to Previous Puzile
ZMi-:~ 131 IMkiM
'Jir w-di ifjf-ji 11: 3W
1-:, \m leetsii H
['--, llliUel'--'^
wiai-:mi-*P3 r*-i
L-1Q iZJCSi='.-4H
^JACOSYON BRIPQt
By OSWALD JAfOBV
Written for NEA Service
26 Sediment
31 A Hot menU
32 Savor
33 Armed fleet
33 Grates
39 Goad
23 Bridge holding 40 "Emerald Isle'
29 Beginner 41 Girl
42 Size of shot
43Perehtd
46 Roman god of
underworld j
48 Footlike part!
50 Palm lily
S3 Babylonian
deity
[Not Only Potatoes,
But Grapes In Maine
GARDINER. Me., Jan. 33 (UP)
l-Herman Sahaglan was told em-
phatically that Maine's crisp cll-
foiate was not suitable for raising
Ijrapei. .
I He planted some anyhow two
Lears ago. He .says his vines pro-
liuced grapes suitable for Sau-
|erne, Chiantt, Zlnfandel. Bur-
.undy. Claret. Rhine and Cham-
laene wines.
I Now Sahaglan tells his crest-
fallen critics he Intends to build
\\ Rraoe-orushlng plant If he can
bet 30 tanners Interested In
growing grapes for wine.
"I figure Maine could get a
hi,000,090 to $6,000,000 industry
]n no time," he said.
ELECTRICIAN HAS IDEAS
DETROIT (UP) Herbert J.
iKlaes, an electrician at the Ford
Rouge plant, finds it pays off to
attention to other people's
anyone, including congressmen,
to Intervene m a tax case ex-
cept the taxpayer and his at-
torney or accountant._________
Lisbon Ambassador
Reported in Line
For Madrid Job
WASHINGTON. Jan. 23 (UP)
Lincoln MacVeagh, present
U. S. ambassador to Portugal,
has been selected by President
Truman to be the next Ameri-
can envoy to Spain, administra-
tion sources said today.
He will succeed Stanton Grlf-
fls whose Imminent retirement
was announced Monday. Grif-
fls, who is 65, requested a re-
turn to private life after 10
years of governmental service.
President TTuman said the re-
signation was accepted "on a
date to be established later."
MacVeagh, who is 61, will face
the job of persuading Gen.
Francisco Franco to permit
American use of Spanish air
and naval bases in return for
economic aid. Franco has not
put a price tag on the bases
yet, but reports from Madrid
indicate he would like U. S.
arms aid for his large but poor-
ly-equipped army.
Formal negotiations on the
terms are expected to get under
way in Madrid In the next
month or two.
MacVeagh first became a top
envoy In 1933 when he was ap-
Klntect minister to Greece. He
:cr served as minister to Ice-
land and to the Union of South
Africa
In 1S43 he was appointed U.
S. ambassador to the Yugoslav
government in exile with head-
quarters In Cairo. He took over
similar duties as ambassador to
the exiled Greek government,
also In Cairo, during the same
year.
When the Oreek government
returned to Athens In Oct. 31,
1044, MacVeagh went as U. S.
ambassador. He continued hi
that post until 1948 when he
was appointed ambassador to
Portugal.
MacVeagh is a native of Nar-
63 Stage
whispers
54 Onager
Canal Zone School Activities
NORTH
4.AKQJ4
? S3
? 10 2
*8763
WEST (D) EAST
AS Ata
K102 AQ7B
? A95 4>KJ8743
? AKQJ42 *9
SOUTH
A 107 532
VJ984
? Q
10 5 \
Neither side vul.
West North Eaat Seat*
1 14 2* 2N.T. (!)
Pass Pass Pass i
Opening lead* K
Massachusetts Tax Collector
On Trial For Taking Bribes
The hind shown today will
seem like sheer insanity to some
of my readers. Curiously enough,
those are the very readers who
are In need of he lesson taught
by the hand.
The average bridge player
thinks that the object of bidding
is to get to a contract that you
can mak':. The expert knows bet-
ter.
B08TON, Jan. 23 (UP) A
Federal Jury of 11 men and a
woman yesterday began deliber-
ating the case against Denis W.
Delaney first high tax offi-
cial to be tried in the wake of
the national Internal Revenue
scandals.
The Jury was placed under
guard while it tried to decide
whether the 55-year-old defen-
dant was guilty of wrong-doing
while collector of Internal re-
venue for Massachusetts.
He was charged with accept-
ing $7,500 in bribes and with
falsely certifying the payment
of $180,498 in Federal tax claims.
The highest penalty for con-
viction on the charges is 18
years' imprisonment and $37,-
500 In fines.
Delaney, who was fired last
July by President Truman, has
maintained his complete inno-
cence throughout the 12 days
of the trial in U. 8. District
Court.
Judge Charles E. Wyzanskl Jr.,
In an hour-long Instruction to
the jury, said It would have to
decide whether Delaney asked
for, accepted or received checks
totaling $7,500 "with the Intent
of being Influenced in connec-
tion with his official action or
his official decision."
The main Issue of the second
Indictment, the Judge said, was
whether Delaney knew certifi-
cates on $180,498 In taxes were
false when he signed them, If
he signed them personally.
The prosecution contended
Delaney accepted the money to
make things easier for persons
who were in difficulty with the
government over delinquent
taxes.
Delaney denied he ever gave
Friedman any tax information
about the "clients' and insisted
that he understood Friedman
was only selling insurance.
He said he went Into the in-
surance business with Friedman
because he wanted to build a
"little nest egg*' for his retire-
ment from federal service.
He was accused of sending
Daniel Friedman, a New York
financial consultant, to delin-
quent taxpayers with "sugges-
tions" on how to get out of
trouble. He then collected half!
the "fees" Friedman received, care"
it was charged. says.
Judge Wyzanskl, in his .ad-
dress to the Jury, told them
that Friedman was to be re-
garded as an "accomplice" and
that "when an accomplice tes-
tifies against a defendant you
are entitled to scrutinize with
what the accomplice
C.H.S. News
The true object of bidding is
to win as many points as pos-
sible wltl" good cards and to lose
as few points as possible with
bad caris. The question of who
plays the hand Is a side issue.
For example, take today's "in-
sane" hand. South was Richard
L. Frey. une of the all-time great
bridge player*. What's tnore. he
was playing as nard as he knew
how, since the hand took place
In a national championship tour-
nament.
Still, here was a player who bid
two no-'rump and didn't win a
single tiick What sort of serious
bid was that?
Actually, Frev expected to hear
further from the opponents. If
he got ooubled at two no-trump,
" he expected to make some other
"foolish" bids, winding up at
By Roy Wilson

If you were to walk around the
halls of Cristobal High School
these days you would see many a
student doing the school work
that he had so saved 'til the last
week of the semester. With only
three days left In the first sem-
ester many students who are be-
hind are practically pulling hairs
to complete their work.
the Tigers as they scored 13 and
10 points respectively.
Expensive Cigars
Set Patrolman
On The Scent
ALBANY, Ga.. Jan. 23 (UP)
Two Albany policemen took
quick Interest today when they
saw two shabbily dressed men
driving along In a dilapidated
truck and smoking, long ex-
pensive cigars.
Patrolman Bill Manley and
Sgt. W. A. Varnadore stopped
the car and found inside:
Feed sacks filled with clgar-
ets, cigars and candy, electric
coffee percolators, three auto-
matic pistols, a noi-tab'e sp-r
machine, a set of burglar tools,
costume jewelry, boxes 01 wne*
of rom ibngand..

Men's Slacks
. -1
-



three spades. No serious damage
could have been done to North at I watches, 'a dozen pair of men's j
a contract of three spades. doves, a paper sack holding $50
As it turned out. the opponents!I" chan8e and 8everal boxes oi
SrS^SPtStSS^^^l^^ Morton Burnett order-
The cast of the coming play gfeg fcTlSW BUS -d RBkAS
Corliss Archer" has been pick- IS-kin d,neight 1tricks union open charges mM tt u *,.
ed and rehearsal, have gotten SgulSSd^TlyTSTmSS. ffit*MUd where the merchan-
Sizes 32 to 42
a
uslness. Kikes has turned In ragansett Pier, R. I., and was a
early 400 suggestions and has steel company executive and
een paid, off for more than lOOi publisher before becoming an
[ them to the tone of $1,375. American diplomat.
The Juniors have Just com-
&leted their "works of art'' wrlt-
lg themes on poetry. A great
many good ones have been turn-
ed In, according to Miss Liter.
The Seniors have also been hard
at work typing their favorite
poems for their Anthologies. Tal-
madge Salter and Paul Whltlock
are only two of the seniors who
have been madly pounding away
at their typewriters In order to
finish7 theirs In time.
Frey didn't mind loslni
points with the cards held
partnership.
If West h
So much for the scholastic
side of the news! On Tuesday
night the Tigers Journeyed to
Balboa to play the Bulldog's in
basketball. Only in the Junior
Varsity game were the Tigers
successful as they walked off
with a 48-36 victory.
It was a good game as far as
Cristobal's offense went as Jim
Schiebler scored 18 points to lead
his teammates on to victory. In
winning this game It gives the
champlonahip to Cristobal for
the second consecutive year.
Credit should go to the players
of the Junior Varsity for bring-
ing home the championship a-
aln. A few of the team that won
or C.HJ9. are Les Rlnehart,
Johnnie Hatgl, Topper Dldler,
Bill Roberaon and Tagaropulos.
In the main game of the night
between the league-leading Bull-
dogs and Cristobal the Bulldogs
topped the Tigers 48-39. After
being outplayed for a little over
under way already.
Those playing the main parts
are Harriet Burke and Nancy Ka-
rlger as Corliss Archer, Karen
Stroop as MIMred.. Jeb Wllker-
son and Margaret Joudrey as Mr.
and Mrs. Archer. Others In the
play are Noel McGinn, Joanne
Recela, Nellie Holgerson, Allen
Simons, Louise Edmonson, Mey-
delle Gardner.
Last Friday night the S. A. put
on a dance for the whole school.j p^y EOt a good score even
The gala affair was held at the though not everybody bid the
"Boho Night Club" on Brazos |siam at clubs. Those who stopped
Road. The dance was a native at five cubs nevertheless won!
one and many dancers dressed I twelve tricks, fur a score of 420
In native clothing aind costumes, points, it will be remembered
Seen having a wrmderful time that Frey lost only 400 points,
dancing away to the orchestra and the difference of 20 points is
were John Fahnestock and Ardls
40o';dise came from,
y his
.p.* MOTTA'S w-.
ad gone on with his!
own bidding, h could have bid
and made a slam at clubs. Count-1
ing the vHlue of the game as 300
points 'as Is the rule In tourna-i
ment play), and not counting the
honors, West would have scored!
920 points for bidding and mak-
BBC six clubs.
Wllloughby, Bob Bailey and Nan-
cy Karlger, Jack Katallnas and
Leneve Dough.
ISTHMIAN DATA
vital In tournament play.
BIRTHS
PETERSON, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas of Diablo, a son. Jan. 15
at Gorgas Hospital.
SEALEY, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar
A. of Gamboa, a daughter Jan.
15 at Gorgas Hospital.
MOLINO. Mr. and Mrs. Este-
ban of Panama, a daughter, Jan.
15 at Gorgas Hospital.
OGLE, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne
of Panama, a daughter, Jan. 16
y\ORE 10 KEEP PACE
Lest To
Infarte*
Taxes and laBeUon have taken such a tell that your income must
h. double or better what It was in 1S40 for you to have the same
Miattve putxhaalng power you had then. The Newichart aboye.
K^^^SataTcVa the National Indurtrlal Conference Board.
JZ~ the it 1 Income needed by families at three different income
l^iTlWtbem^a^eaar buying power they hed In 1S40.
at Gorgas Hospital.
, ENGELKE, Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
StaSf Clifldogsputon last ert of Balboa a daughter, Jan.
half drive to overcome the Tig- 17 at Gorgas Hospital,
ers and go on to win by nine] ARCHIBALDO, Mr. and Mrs.
points Bob Bailey and Arnold 1 Fllmore of Red Tank, a son, Jan.
Manning played a good game for 117 at Gorgas Hospital.
MARCH
DIMES
JANUARY 15-31
UVENIA
All Steel Waterproof Automatic
Nationally advertised at $71.50 in the U.S.
0NLY5
48
-AT
The Juvenla Watch Agency, 580 Fifth Avenue,
New York, will honor the guarantee we give
with every Juvenla watch, _______
mercurio
Naxt te the Cenlrel Theatre
Stockholders of
Cerveceria Nacional S.A.
(NATIONAL BREWERY INC.)
We wish to remind you that the regular General
Assembly of Stockholders will be held in the main
office of the Company, North Avenue No. 77, Panam
City, on Monday, January 28th, 1952 at 7 p.m.
In accordance with the By-Laws of our Company
this meeting can not be held unless, one-half plus
one of the total number of stockholders are present
or represented by proxy, and at least one-half of the
capital stock is represented.
Stockholders who ar Unable to attend this
meeting SHOULD FORWARD THEIR PROXIES in due
time.
THE SECRETARY
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL ESSO-GAS CONSUMERS
e
As of Monday 21st the price of Esso-Gas is
$13.00 per cylinder of 100 lbs. delivered in
Panama City.
This rise in price is due to an increase in our
cost effected by our suppliers in the refinery.
ECONOGAS, S.4.




'


' I "tV*"' f- ;**> |
..

PAGE PODS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
I1M iKIIi.lMIK -.1 Kill 1 III IIUI.N KUROPE A.ND NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COAST (A Limited Number of P.wens*r Bartrwi
in I s.s. ss IOM.: I-

ro coi s.s. OMBIA. ECIADOR AND CHILE: Valofn** .............................. ......... January M 10


Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
PACIFIC-ARGENTINE-BRAZIL LINE
E TAIIOT,
ANNOUNCES
For the information of
Importers in the Republic of Panam and the
Canal Zone the expected arrival of
Cargo from Pacific Coast Ports on Board the
"PST SEAFARER"
AT BALBOA, JAN. 24, 1952
This vessel will accept cargo for the following ports:
CARTAGENA, CURACAO, PUERTO CABELLO
LA GUAIRA, TRINIDAD, RIO DE JANEIRO AND SANTOS
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY J, list
ro CRNTHA1 AMERICA WEST COAST USA
s.s. X..................................
February IS
PAMRNCn SHIP FROM NEW YORK TO PI VMOITII & I.K HAVRE:
lie De France........................... February II
I PASSENGER SERVICE Irom CARTAGENA in BUROPF
| | Colombie .............-.-----...................... February 24
Crtatokal: FRENCH LIN, P.O Box MIS Tel. 3-MJk 181
Panam: LINDO y MADURO. S A. Bo> IM8
Tcl Panam 1-ltSS -l-isi

i

MAERSK UNE
Accepting Passengers for
SAN FRANCISCO
by
m.s. "NICOUNE MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 26th
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel: Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
W. Andrews & Company
BALBOA
Phone J-1258
CRISTOBAL
Phone 3.21M
Shipping & AirLine News
"Atamfiunun" Arrives
Tomorrow In Balboa
The Dela-Rama Line ship
Agamemnon is scheduled to ar-
rive tomorrow night in Balboa
Irom the Far East. The British
cario liner is owned by Alfred
Holl. There are accomnidatlons
filled for 56 passengers.- The
Agamemnon will transit the Ca-
nal and remain In Cristobal one
lay F'mton and Company are
he local agents.
S. 9. Cristobal Advance
Passenger List
The Cristobal will leave the
Isthmus Friday with 48 passeng-
ers, according to the advance
passenger list from the Panama
Line offices and Balboa Heights.
Among those sailing will be
Waller R. Lindsay. Chief of the
Grounds Maintenance Division.
The complete advance pas-
senger list follows:
John J. Allgaier; Mr and Mrs.
H B. Almond; Mrs. Glenice I.
Brown: Mrs. Florence Carp:
Robert Carp; John Phillip Clar-
nrr; Miss Margaret P. Fessler;
Mr and Mrs. William Frecler:
and Mr. and Mrs. James M. I
Free and three children.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gar-,
(indue; Miss Birdie M. Gorsurh;
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Green: Miss
Dorothy Hass; Mrs. Leuore F. I
Uass; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hock; |
ltd"Mr. and Mrs. Zachtry Tay-
lor Jones.
Gerald J. Kellev: Lawrence
Kelly, Mr. and Mrs. J. W.
Kirchner: Kenneth Lander: Mrs.
ErmaLee; Mr. and Mrs. Walter
R. Lindsay; Mrs. Virginia Le-
venson; and Joseph Lynch.
Cpl. Raymond J. Peterson:
Miss LiallJan L. Pratt; Mrs. Ira
M. Price; Mr. and Mrs. Otis M.
Ramey; Kenneth G. Reynolds;
Walter Staltz; Mr. and Mrs. Ru-
ben N. Walters; Cpl. Lawson T.
Wertman; Agnes T. Wilkinson;
and Raymond G. Young.
SAA Officiab Plan
ecord Year In 1952
Heartened by completion of the
best year in history, traffic and
sales officials of Pan American
Wirld Airways' Latin American
Division laid plans for an even
(Continued on Page Seven)

f THE TIME:.-MACHINE \ D'YASUPPOSE IT WAS
JUST WENT DEAD... / BECAU6E OF THIS CORD
I CAN'T UNDER- /I FELL OVER AFTER I
STAND WHAT / LIT TH' FUSE TO TH'
WEN! WRONG / BLASTING POWDER?
DONALDSON LINE
S/S LISMORIA
Sailing About Jan. 31, 1952

For
LOS ANGELES
Excellent Accommodation Available
Apply
PAYNE & WARDLAW
BALBOA
Pacifir Terminal Bid*.
Phone 2/1258
CRISTOBAL
Masonic Temple Kid*.
Phone 3/2161
33,
//THE POWDERTl 1 AYEEKl IT'S
rNr- SF)]
BOOTS AND HER BUD DIES

LOOK!
BY EDGAR MARTIN $
MAERSK LINE
ACCEPTING PASSENGERS FOR
NEW YORK
by
m.s. "LEXA MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 25th
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781
Balboa: 1065
V*VL,YCrtT, "WW*WWf*uwowt'-tvfc*r-
CAPTAIN EASY
COWWAi 1
PCiVeRATB TO
PMODTHE CAR
CAV I* DRIOIWG,
REPORTS IT
TOLPM.
TRACING THE CONVERTIBLE
BY LESLIE TURNE!
CBRIS wELKEN. Planetecr
(I TIE FROM CLAIROBAR

BY KISS WINTERBOTHAM
T../V1V HOME lo CLAIROBAR,
PLANET OF PROXIAM CENTAURI
NEAREST NEI6MBOR OF THE
^UN.IAM THE PtSCOVERER
OF A NEW FORA1 OF COSMIC
ENERCV.
...WH/LE DUPLICATING THE ENEK&Y, MV CAPE
BECAME RADIOACTIVE. I PICKED UP AVIALOP
DEACTIVATING CHEMICAL*...'
VIC FLINT
A WAY OUT
PRISCILLA'S POP
DIDNT TAKE LONG
BY AL VERMI Kit r
BOGS BL'NM
SHORT CUT
HOW ABOUT 0ORRCRJN'
YR *HOVEL WHIN VBR
STOT IT, -XU BALAVy
BONNY .YOU'RE
wuweiNB >--------.
W f^TNC^/Ju,
L
1
THERE AIN'T NO BN*S
IN BOTH OP7 U* CeTTlN',
CNOCKRP OUT
*iHOVIJN' -&NOW.'
AND TO THINK I
LBT THAT ANgAT SO
RISWT RAW U6 ON
IT* WAY TO THE
TOCKYARD*!
ftfc^aCFSte
NSIDB HM> REFWSBWATEO PRJ*ON,
SPORT FINO AW1APONA
AABAT
m
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
with
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAY
By J. R. WILLIAMS
well / c*ie of tue Visrr-
IMG COfJeOVe 5TOM8LSD,
IMTOTHE VJfOte STALL.'
THIS 16 THE GKAkJD FiMlSH-
IKJ6 TOUCH THAT MAKES
.,^-THrXT giS WALKUS'S
***- ffcRTV A RiLUArtT
success/
OF-fHE|
LEFT-
OVERS
f ay*
HIS
NIBS'*, .


WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 23. 1951
f^acipfi Society
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
&, 17, &/L, U &IL. 35QI
*'
I Ul >
na i
:>ef
per
M
r
trela Smith, Bobby Jo Oglesby,
Diana Brovrti. Allana Lewis, Betty
Flatau. Jane Jennlson. Barbara
Mundt, Connie Glassbum, Sue
Kurdta. Edna Jenkins and Dawn
Crowell.
Jacqueline And Daniel Clark
Celebrate Birthdays Jointly
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Clark, of
Curundu, entertained on Mon-
day with a wiener roast and
movies for twenty five young
friends of their daughter. Jac-
quellne. who celebrated her first
birthday, and their son, Daniel,
who celebrated'his ninth birth-
day anniversary.
Those assisting at the party
were Mrs. Yolanda Diez, Mrs.
Jerry storey and Mrs. Fred Kol-
well.
MR AND MRS. CHARLES MONROE BOLES following their
redding ceremony performed by Chaplain W. W. Winter,
USN, in the 15th Naval District Chapel on Jan. 18. Mrs.
Boles Is the former Susan Constance Hutchlngs, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. B. V. Hutchlngs, of Balboa, and Mr. Charles
Monroe Boles, MN3. U8N, Is the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. C.
Boles, of Dallas, Texas.
PARTIES HONOR COL. RICHARD T. RIGHT
COMMANDER OF AIR RESCUE SERVICE
Colonel Richard T. Right, Commander of the L'S Air
Force's globally deployed Air Rescue Service, who arrived
Sunday for an official visit to the Isthmus, has been honor-
ed at several parties. He is the house guest of his brother
and sister-in-law, Major and Mrs. Henry H. Right.
Colonel Right wai honored
from seven to nine o'clock on
Monday evening in the Driftwood
Lounge *>f the Albrook Officers'
Club at an Informal cocktail
party given to Introduce to him
the Officers and their ladies of
the Air Rescue service Personnel
at Albrook Air Force Base.
Lt. Colonel George T. Prior.
the Commander of the First
Rescue Squadron, entertained
with an informal cocktail party
In honor of Colonel Klght in the
Driftwood Lounge of the Albrook
Officers' Club on Tuesday even-
ing from five to seven o'clock.
Among those attending were
Brigadier General Emil C. Kiel.
the Commanding General Carib-
bean Air Command and his
Staff.
Following the coktdil party on
Tuesday evening Squadron Ex-
ecutive Officer Major and Mrs.
Wllaon A. Miles entertained with
a small dinner party in their
Quarters at Albrook In honor of
Colonel Wight.
Marshall Perry Is Seven
Years Old
Master Sergeant and Mrs.
Albert M. Perry, of Fort Kobbe,
entertained young friends of
their son, Marshall, on the oc-
casion of his ninth birthday an-
niversary with a theatre party
after which the group return to
the Perry home for refreshments.
Attending the party were Lin-
da, Rick and Edward Perry,
brothers and sister of the ho-
noree. and Jerry Dewell, Babe
Storer, Jack Parry. Micky Mc-
Allister. Victor Bartolomei. Mike
Snyder. Susan McFadden, Sharon
Manderson. Bonnie Metcalf and
Alice Duncan.
General Morris To Return
From Lima
Lieutenant General William H.
H. Morris. Jr., the Commander-
ln-Chief of the Caribbean Com-
mand, la expected to return to-
day from Lima. Peru after an
absence of three days from the
Isthmus. General Morris was a-
companled on his trip by Lt.
Colonel Hugh Sawyer, and by his
aides, Major Warren H. Stutler
and Lt. Commander James K.
Wills.
Visitors Celebrate Fortieth
Wedding Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. George Miller,
of Bella Visto, honored his pa-
rent*. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Mil-
ler, of Brooklyn. New York, who
are visitors on the Isthmus, on
the occasion of their fortieth
wedding anniversary at a super
party held on Saturday evening
at nine o'clock at the Hotel El
Panam.
of the Diocesan Office. Mr. and
Mrs. E. C. Keeney. Mr. and
Mrs. E. J. Lucas, Mr. and Mrs.
Roger H. Greene, Mr. and Mrs.
W. C. Fritz. Mr. and Mrs, Rob-
ert Medlnger, Lt. and Mrs. Philip
C. Olsen, Mrs. George E. Mat-
Ithew, Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Alves. Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Cecil
Banan, Mr. and Mrs. C. F.
IHlnz, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Payne,
Mr. and Mrs. Jack G. Lennville,
Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Heltman,
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Fields, Jr.,.
'Dean and Mrs. Raymond T. Fer-1
rls Commander and Mrs. Ed
Fobte, Major and Mrs. William
!Peterson. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
F. Yost, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Mc-
Lavy, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Don-
aldson, Mrs. Thomas F. Macklb-
bon, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Wen-'
borne. Mr. and Mrs. W. O.
Rower. Mr. and Mrs, James
Hunter, Mr. and Mrs. C. W.
Chase, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. D. A.
Yerkers, Captain and Mrs. Harry
Bach, Mr. and Mrs. J. Palmer
Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Charles S.
Abernathy. Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Deo ton. Captian and Mrs. John
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Clymer, Mrs. Helen Shaw. Rev.
David B. Reed, Lt. Colonel and
Mrs. Lawrence Peterson, Mr.
and Mrs. W. O. Dunscombe, Mr.
and Mrs. T. G. Coleman. Mr.
and Mrs. Clarence Johnston and
Mr. and Mrs. William N. Taylor.
Luncheon Held By Fort Kobbe
Officers' Wives Club
The regular monthly luncheon
of the Fort Kobbe Officers' Wives
Club was held Thursday at the
Officers' Club, which was gaily
decorated with flags and guidons
of the 33rd Infantry and the
504th Field Artillery. The main
theme of the luncheon was the
second anniversary of the re-
activation of the 33rd Infantry.
Mrs. Robert Douglas, the wife
of the Commanding Officer of
the 33rd Infantry gave a brief
resume of the history of that
group.
TWO GALLANT FtCHTERS-This Is the 1952 March of Dimes
poster, featuring Larry Jim Gross, 6, who has battled polio since
he was 18 months old. Larry Jim is the son of Warrant Officer and
Mrs. Jim .Gross, now with the Air Force in Germany. The G.I.
figure in the poster was inspired by an actual combat photograph
made at TaejQti, Korea, in July, 1950. The poster, designed by
artist John Falter, will be used to spark the March of Dimes appeal
for funds, beginning Jan. 2.
Geographic Briefs
WASHINGTON. D. C. Jan. 23
The head of a Korean village
Is elected by secret ballot, with
one member of each household
casting one vote. He holds office
until he thinks lt wise to retire,
or until his constituents object
sufficiently to his administration.
Every other day for more than
two years, a specially fitted B-29
of the U. 8. Air Weather Ser-
vice has taken off from Alaska
for the North Pole. Wheeling
over the point which the world's
explorers struggled for centuries
to reach on foot, the plane makes
the 17-hour flight today merely
as a matter of routine, the Na-
tional Geographic Society says.
St. Jame's Palace, official
seat of the British court, stands
on the one-time site of a hos-
pital for 14 "maidens that were
leprous," mentioned In British
history of the year 1100.
USS Recovery Gets
New Commander
Navy Lt. Martin A. Kashworn
took over the command of the
USS Recovery from Lt. Robert J.
] Norman during a ceremony held
yesterday morning at U. S. Na-
val Station. Rodman.
Lt. Norman leaves the com-
mand of the salvage vessel to
report to Iowa State College.
iwhere he will take of instruction
in a Standard Naval science
, course.
Lt. Kashworn came to the Ca-
nal Zone from Washington r>.
I... wnere he served with the Mil-
itary 8ea Transportation Service.
I Couple Club Plans
Panamanian Dinner
At Next Meeting
A traditional Panamanian- din-
ner will be featured af the
monthly meeting of the Couple
'Club of Balboa Union Church
next Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.'In
the church dining hall.
i Preparations for the dinnkr are
being handled by Wesley #o<*n-
send. Mrs. Roy Graham Mrs.
Walter Oliver. Mrs. Max Sjhdch
and Mrs. C. A. VosburghJ .
Reservations at $1 per opiate
made be made through "Jovfn-
send. Balboa 1655, before naon
i next Thursday.
to come are asked to call Mrs. I their guests are Invited to at-
E. M. Browder. 2-1063; Mrs. B. ;tend.
A. Darden. 2-1671; Mrs. W. B. --------
Rogan, 2-1835; or Mrs. Robert Cotillion Class To Meet
Motion. 28-3-3376. Members who Th runda v
wish to Invise guests at $1.00 i The Cotillion class will meet
per person will please make re- informally Thursday evening at
servaUons with one of the above i seven o'clcok in the Washington
ladles before Friday, Feb. 1. Salon of the Hotel El Panama.
-------- Mrs. Sears will be guest teacher
Rummage Sale To Be for this Class.
Held Tomorrow ,
The League of Lutheran Wo- i Bingo Tonight At Pedro Miguel
men will hold a Rummage Sale i Bingo will be played tonight at
at the Salvation Army Hall atseven thirty o'clock at the Pe-
La Boca tomorrow morning at'dro Miguel Boat Club.
nine o'clock. --------
The world's highest waterfall
is Angels Falls In eastern Vene-
zuela, hemmed by jungle In a
canyon seen by a few men. the
National Geographic Society says.
Spurting from a cliff more than
half a mile high, water falls free
for 2,648 feet, then crashes on
for a total drop of 3.212 feet.
This Is 15 times higher than Nia-
gara Falls. By another yard-
stick: it Is more than twice the
height of the Empire State Build-
ing.
Monks were the timekeepers |
of the Middle Ages, and mo-
nastery bells told the time to
all living within their range. The
word clock really signifies bell,
and comes from the Old French
cloche, the German glocke, the
Medieval Latin clocca, and the
Old English clucge.
Winners Of Bridge
i Tournament Announced
The winners of the
Bridge
Monday
News Of John Hower, Jr.
Mr. John Hower, Jr. son of
Mr. and Mrs. John Hower, of [Tournament played on
Gamboa graduated with high'evening In the Card Room of the
honors when he received his B.,Hotel Tivoli were: 1st, Mr. and
8. degree from Syracuse Univ-'Mrs, W. Norris; 2nd Mrs. T.
ersity recently. He is a member A. 0rr and Mrs. C. R. Bowen;
. of 81gma PI Sigma, National 3r(j Mr. and Mrs H G Robin-
JalELK 5\to^rthu?iPhyslcs Honor Soclety and of ffi M?. 8 Mrs. E. Kohn:
rJ?J^Eraf nie "lessuo Mu EPsllon National Mathe- and 5th. Colonel and Mrs. N.
Koogan and Mrs Dale Jessup mattes Honor Fraternity. iEiton.
Guest at ending were all vi Mf H Jf duated tnm* _____
SfriEJS?ZS inrh.deS Mrs i81"08 Hih School with the, ExecUve Meeting Of
the isthmus and tacluded Mrs. clas8 of 1952- served in the Navy; Auxlllarv
T^ftatth0MSKl!erSwho wLat lUatln'1 nd uatel Unit No. 1 of the American
Llu^tof her daughteT-lnTaw *rom "",> Zone Junior Col- Legion Auxiliary will meet at se-
?.B^t?5,I.dS2n",tShttte kg1 .* Tr thiven thirty o'clock this evening
Mr. and Mrs. Hower, Jr.. the,at the Legion Home to hold an
former Joan Therrell of Curundu ,Executive meeting.
Heights, left for St. Louis, Mis-i --------------------------------------
souri, on January 19th, where he
.will enter Washington University [
to do Post Graduate work in
In the breeding season of wild
ducks, mallard drakes dogfight
In the air for a female's favor.
Among the dignified canvas-
backs, however, the competing
males stage a chest-to-chest
pushing contest on the water,
each swimming as hard as he
can move his webbed feet. When
one begins to slip backward, his
contest is lost, and he must turn
and dive before his opponent
seizes him by the back of the
neck.
Diamond shave been found in'
the glacial drift of the Great!
Lakes region, particularly In Wis-,
cousin They were apparently,
brought south by the glaciers,1
says the National Geographic 8o-|
clety. Thus, the region of the|
known glacier paths between the
Oreat Lakes and Hudson Bay Is'
indicated as a potentially rich
diamond field.
CHURCH WITHIN A CHURCH Built under the arches and
against a wall of the bomb-blasted Lutherkirche In the U. S. sector.
of Berlin, this new church offers a place of worship for a small
congregation. Lacking; funds to repair the larger building, the'
parish built the smaller, heatable one underneath the organ of the
original church. About 200 people visit the little church within a .
church every Sunday. (NEA-Acme photo by Staff Photographer
Werner Kreusch.)

Tower Club Holds Meeting
The Tower Club of the Ca-
thedral of St. Luke met at six
thirty o'clock on Monday even-
ing in the Bishop Morris Hall.
Documentary films of the mis-
sionary work being done Is Alaska
were shown during the meeting.
Special guests for the evening
Included Mrs. Dorothy Cutting,
of Mexico, Mr. Alan Shllin, of
Scarsdale, New York, and Mr.
Toge Fujhsla. of New York.
Members attending were Mr.
and Mrs. Fred DeV 8111, Rev.
John H. Townsend. Archdeacon
Mariners Transit Canal
Fourteen uniformed members
of Mariner Ship 17 armed with
picnic lunches met with their
Skipper. Mrs. Vada Pence, on
Saturday at Pier 18 to be the
guests of the Navy for the day.
They were taken bv launch to
West Bank where they boarded
a P. C. boat to transit the Ca-
nal The group was anchored In
Gatun Lake for three hours be-
fore transiting the Locks there
after which they proceeded to
Coco Solo and were returned to
Balboa by bus.
The attending Mariners in-
cluded Nancy Bateman. Nancy
Oswald, Rosemary Hollander, Pa-
Mrs. W. Chase; Mrs. Eutwhltje
who was also a guest of Mrs.
Chase; Mrs. Cullinan the guest
of Mrs. Glllesple; and Mrs. Hill
the mother of Mrs. Montgomery.
Mrs. W. Dodge who with her
husband Is leaving the Isthmus
In the near future for re-assign-
ment In the states was bid bon
voyage by the Club members.
The Club will sponsor an after-
noon of Bridge and Canasta on
Thursday at 1:15-p.m. at the
Club rooms.
It was announced that the first
Women's Stag Night will be held
on Monday, February 4th In the
Club rom at eight o'clock.
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panama No 58 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Tee Nails,
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments Massages,
Slenderlifng Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators, Per Information call: S-2217 Panam
:. M< jb.; t p.m.
Miss Mary Watson To
Campaign With Swim Party
Miss Mary Watson, leading
contender for the title of Car-
nival Queen of the Hotel El Pa-
nama, will be honored with a
swimming party at the Hotel on
Thursday evening at seven
o'clock. Music will be provided
by Luis Azcarraga and his orch-
estra.
Reservations May Be-Made
For Carnival Tea
The annual Carnival Tea of
the Canal College Club will bo
held on Saturday Feb. 2. from
four to six o'clock at the home
of Mrs. Lewis B. Moore. 207
Gorgas Road, Balboa Heights.
Members and guests are request-
ed to wear Carnival costume If
possible.
All members who are planning
WRONG PLACE TO LODGE
Geophysics.
American Legion Club
Sponsors Bingo
DETROIT, (UP). Jack Dob-
bins, cold and tired, found a
heated garage and went to sleep
to one of the cars inside. Dob-
Bingo will be played tomorrow; bins, had chosen the police gara-
evenln gat the American Legion ge as a lodging. Found guilty of
Club ai Fort Amador at seven I being intoxicated, he was given
thirty o'clock. Member and 30 days.
UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA
Spanish Courses for Beginners
Special Spanish classes for Americans will be held
every Saturday morning for a period of fifteen weeks start-
ing Saturday. January 26th, 1952. Intermediates: 8:45 a.m.
to 10 a.m. and Beginners 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Registra-
tion opened on Monday, January 21st. Registration fee;
Ten Balboas. Students eligible for college admission will
receive two hour credit upon completing course and passing
examinations. Registration fee will be refunded In case
a sufficient number of students fall to enroll.
Panam, January 22nd, 1952.
If you belong to the Armed Forces
or if yon have a steady job come to
our Store aad you can choose your
own terms to buy on credit.
We have the best Mahogany Furniture.
If yon don't know osr Club System
visit us and yon wttl be del'gbled.
8* Central Ave. TeL 2-2404
(Beauty
at its best...
BY PROFESSIONALS
OUO
' SPECIAI
*7%
WHY HAVE A HOME
PERMANENT ?
.. with Inadequate facilities,
no certain finished look, and
no guaranteewhen yon ean
have a professional one com-
plete for onl* S7.5t! It vill
last longer and look better i
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
These can be had
BALBOA
Salhw OiMmm Qiilalu
M*.ae!vonr 7.74KQ
Appointment *F^#
BEAUTY SHOP
Mrs. Bates Wleman. Mgr.
0*B : ... ,.
GALA CONCERT!!
National Symphony Orchestra
QUEST CONDUCTOR
GREGORIO RAVIC
Director of Buenos Aires Symphony Orchestra
So forceful Is the great Ori-
noco River In Venesuela that
where It flows through the so-
called Angostura constriction at
Ciudad Bolivar, the channel has
been scoured out over the cen-
turies to a depth of 262 feet be-
low sea level. Rushing between
banks only 800 yards apart, the
river has a mean depth of 335
feet, with fluctuations of as
much as 52 feet.
QUAKER OATS
Helps Children Grow
TOLLER and STRONGER!
I
SOLOIST:
.'
JUNE PRESTON
Renowned North American Soprano
Auditorium of the National University
WEDNESDAY, January 23rd 8:30 P.M.
Purchase your tickets at
MORRISONS NOVELTIES t LEWIS SERVICETel. 2-0441
FRENCH BAZAAR Tel. 2-3151
EL PANAMAFRENCH BAZAAR BRANCH Tel. 3-1*60
ADMISSION... $1.00

CRISP FRESH LETTUCE
i
Direct from CERRO PUNTA In Our Own
Refrigerated Truck.
RED CABBAGE
RHUBARB
CARROTS
SNOW CROP FROZEN FOODS
FRESH FROZEN OYSTERS
FILET OF HADDOCK
FILET OF CODFISH
PAUL'S MARKET
NEW Zf AL A NP PRODUCT
TO EAT!
i4 Boil 2 cup of water. Add
..in/mPtI !. When boilins id4
""Titftl C0tW"^BU P "I QuUer Otu.
ifAXlW**____-----^\ \ < '>k 5tirrio. for :' ,
Look! More Nourishment at Low Cost!
NIROY.............wit Qoaktr 0-tj cmUk,irwHt
STRENGTH...............wttfc Qeafcac Oat iilNaw
M STAMINA......with QMkor Oats Tafee* (Vltassi. I,)
M0# INJOYM1NT.. ...........wM that Aakdoes fseetf

Uta**
.


w
;r mix
THE PANAMA AMHUCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, .MVTIARY ?3, HOT
You Sell em When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
t.BWih BalV.L'I
etMMaUi Oh UUMtKP
MOKKI.-I.V
. t rtiri imi> 4
BOTICA CAJU/lOf
it Mt imiii
.., n _j .1,
-.AI.ON Dfe BM.IKZA AMERICANO
* Wat Un 9t
IHr. PANAMA AMERICAN
N. 7 "B" StreetFan be
. lili Central 1> Calta
$01*
*
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
I
FOR SALE
Household
fR SALE:Coldipot Ralr.gerotor
cod condition. Apply house No
915. Apt. "A" Li Boco Rood. Lo
loco. C. Z.______________
FOR SALE:25 cycle os^ng mo-
chan. S25, boby buggy $20. I.ned
bais.net with skirt and pad. SO.
Phene 2-28C4. 0779-J Will.om-
. sen Place. Balboa._______________
FOR }SArE^Btdroom set, 2 single
beds, vanity, chest ot drowers ond
wardrobe, good condition. Poitillo.
' cholet No. 3, across from Kodak
[ Biritding.____________________
iCfCSALE: Baby carriage with
mattress, light blue, three piece
ever stuffed livmgroom set. Ve-
enti.n blind sue 4 by 5. AllI In
exeallent condition. Phone 3--->'
, New Cristobal. House "72-A, 6th
ond Lemon street. _______
FOR SALE
Automobile
Service efonnH and
Clvilior jovemmeni tmoiove
I N A N C I
.uui new iM GOVIRNMIMT IMPLOYCS 'INANCI
00.
roo Wort*> lexov
Serving Sovernmer Employs ond
Service arsonne' m *>e Cenoi Zone
loi H /ear. Witt-, out financing
your Imurance automatically diluted
ro u. S. eoverooA
AMANGIMINTS CAN II MAOI
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
DIALER
raR SALE:Weete 1949 FORD?
rerker we have them, all ma-
eek. Credit, Trede-im. Sea us
tadar-
SMOOT PAREDES
Bukk-Chevralet Dealer
FOR SALE Mchcgony furniture m-
' eluding bar with stools; vanity
with mirror; corner settee with
hflir and coffee toble til gloss
topped; washing machine, 25 Cyl.;
. "set of eight venetion blinds end
' porch louvers, for Amador Rd
type cottage Coll Balboa 3003 ot
' 0924. Amador_Rd.. ftalboo. i
FOR~SALE:House 1545-A Mongo
Street. Bolboa; phone 2-2617. 3
chairs with cuih.ons. rug. 9 x 12.
4 rrodernistic ruis
FOR SALE:25 Cycle Westmghcuse
refrigerotcr. 7 cu. ft 3 1-2 veer
guarontee left. $150. 516-B. Co-|
coli.
WANTED
Miscpllanpn'i*
FOR SALE: 1938 8uick cooch
new tires, good mctor. a clean
cor. $175. Phone 83-5238 or
house 555-A. Curundu Heights..
FOR-SAT~Hudson~40_ $200.00
Leaving for Slates. Bargain. F.
Hiner, 2-042-O, E 3rd St., Cu-
rundu.
MISCELLANEOUS
De yen have a eWefclwa prettier?
Write Aleehelir. Awi.miii
.. 2031 AaM. C. Z.
FOR SALE
Miscelluneoiik
FOR SALE:Rodio transmitter 600
watts. Phone 1000 watts CW all
bonds. VFO bond switching, com-
plete antennos 10 meter beom
mast. Phone Bolboa 1234.
RESORTS
Foster's cottages completely furnish-
ed, one, two or three bedrooms,
liners, gas refrigerators, gas
ranges, dishes and kitchen ware.
Half a mile beyond Santa Clara
private rood to beach. For in-
formation visit or phone Dagmar
Tivoli Avenue No. 6, 2-0170
Panamo.
Shropnel's Houses on beach Santa
Claro, inexpensive. Phone Balboa
2820 or see caretoker.
FOR SALE:General Electric refri-
gerator 60 cycles, Underwood
typewriter, girl's bicycle, small
desk, gas stove, baby crib. Phone
916. Colon.
FOR SALEIdeal hunting cor, four
wheel drive command car S250.-
00. Will (O anywhere a 4 or 5
hundred dollar Jeep will yet carry
a decent load. House 1465-B
Holden street, Bolboa.
Moth.,i, JUMPING-JACK Children
shoes give young feet the right
start, from cradle to 4 years, sold
exclusively ot BABYLANDIA, No.
40. 44th Street, Bella Visto. Tel
3-1259.________________
FOR SALE: Piano-Accordion, 48
Bases, good condition. Phone 3759
house 2244. Calibre road, Balbco
FOR SALE:One membership shore
of slock m the Panamo Golf Club.
$75.00. House 1468-C, Bolboa
or call 2-4448.
FOR SALE:Bargain!1' Two odies
spring ond summer suits, one
brown, one pink and gray, size
14. House 1468-C, Bolboa, or coll
2-4448.
"OR SALE: 1949 Buick 4-door
Super Sedan, excellent condition
Call Cristobal 3-1350.
FOR SALE:1950 Oldsmobile. Go-
ing to highest bidder by January
27th. Leaving Isthmus. Tel. Co-
rozel 4188.
WANTED TO BUY cosh. olmo!t new
Chevrolet. 4 door sedan. 1949 or
1950. No. 20 Eost 39th streal
Apt. 6. Panamo.
DESIRES unfurnished chalet, two or
three bedroms or modem apart-
ment. Call phone 3-1617._______
WANTED:Passenger flying to cool
Costa Rica $30. round trip; or
Mexico. $140. round trip, on
LACSA. PAA affiliate. Coll Pan-
ama Dispatch Service. Tel. 2-
1655. opposite Ancon bus-stop.
FOR SALE:1950 British Humber
Hawk block four door sedan. First
class condition, new paint, battery.
$1,400. Also 1939 Chevrolet black
four door sedan, new differential,
battery, tires. $400. Coll Panama
2-0912.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
WANTED:Young Americon couple
desire tc board with elderly couple
in the Canal Zone. Phone 928-
2."5C4 between 4:30 and 6:30
Helo Wanted
WANTED:Good cook for couple
Must sleep in. Good salary. Apply
Panama Metals and Salvoge Co
6th St. Parque Lefevre.
WANTED-Coo!', housekeeper, sleep
in. 13 East 46th St. Apt. A
Position Offered
WANTED:Secretory, mole or fe-
male, able to take dictation in
English and Sponish. Call person-
ally of IMPA, S. A Calle 32 Este
between Central & Peru Need-
less to apply without experience
ond good references.
Gamboa Clubhouse
Now Operating
At New Location
The Gamboa Clubhouse ti now
In operation in its new location
in Building 65A immediately bo-
lo*/ the Oamboa Theater.
The library, Mutual Benefit
atasociation, dressmaking, shoe
and barber shops Are also locat-
ed on the ground floor under
tha theater.
The Clubhouse proper la fin-
ished with green tile floor and
modernized facilities for cooking
and erring food.
The luncheonette section will
feature hot sandwiches.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURE FOR SALE
For sale to the highest bidder Budd-
ing No. 906, Cristobal. Sealed bids
will be received in the office of the
Superintendent of Storehouses ot
Balboa until 10:30 A. M.. January
31 1952. when they will be open-
ed in public. Form of proposal with
full particulars may be secured in
the offices of Superintendent of.
Storehouses Bolboo, ond the Hous-
ng Manager ot Cristobal
FOR SALE: By competitive bid
Various items of fountain and
restaurant equipment. For further
information coll ot Novy Exchange
Office, building No. 24, Naval
Station, Rodman. Telephone
3339.
FOR SALE1939 Oldsmobile, $200.
In fair condition. Also two bicycles
one toble model Zenith radio with
45 RPM record ployer. Coll 2-
1335 or 5177, Morrison St..
Diablo Hgts.
FOR SALE:Baby carriage, strow.
two fiber mots, childs car seat.
Telephone 3-3575, ofter 6 p. m
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart-
ments. Meld service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:Boot. 19 ft. long. 6
ft. beam powered by V8, 60 HP
engine. With trailer, $450.00.
722-B. Cocoli.
FOR SALE:1951 Indion single mo-
torcycle, like new, In storage
Phone 3-4336.
LESSONS
Famed 'Vinegar' Bible
Back In Bank Vault
PORTLAND, Me. famous "Vinegar" Bible of Pre-
ble Chapel has gone back into,
storage in a bank vault after a1
brief display at the chapel's cen-.
tenary ceremonies.
The hand-tooled, leather-
bound volume is one of the few I
existing copies of the edition!
which received Its odd name from
a printer's mistake 234 years ago.
The printer. John Baskett of
Oxford. England, set un the word'
vinegar'' for vineyard in the
heading of the parable of the'
vineyard.
Cob Given Brushoff
In Grand Fashion
GREAT LAKES. 111., Jan. 23
(UP). A Navy recruit here re-
ceived a letter that Is a superb
example of feminine something
or other.
Here It Is:
"Hello Honey:
"I am engaged so don't write
any more. I am sending back
your ring. If you don't need It,
send It back to me. My new boy
friend eft n't afford one as of now.
By*.
"Nancy."
Leorn Fox-Trot, Waltz, Jitterbug,
Rumba, Samba, Tongo, Mambo.
Guoracho, Tamborito, Balboa
YMCA, Harnett Dunn.
Ski Clothes Models
In Short Supply
NEW YORK i UP i -There Is an
acute shortage of ski clothes
models.
"The average model agencies
have hundreds of girls but spe-
cialize in the sophisticated type,
whereas ski clothes need a typi-
cal outdoor looking girl," said
Fred Picard. noted ski clothes de-
signer. "This type can be found
much more readily on campuses
or in sports areas away from cos-
mopolitan cities.
A woman when skiing has good
natural color because of the out-
door activity. Therefore she can-
not have a made-up look or her
hair cannot look too set. She
must have the type of beauty
that comes with health, youth
and vitality.
"Another difficulty," Picard
said, "consists in the fact that
many ski pictures are action
shots, which show girls In a po-
sition of actually skiing. Most of
the time the model doesn't ski
and therefore has a hard time
adjusting to the looks of a ski-
er."
COMING SOON
f
(iimtOLET
7952
SMOOT b PAREDES
PANAMA
SMOOT & HUNNICUTT
COLON
Williams Santo Clora Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms Fngidaires, Rock-
gas ranges Balboa 2-3050.
Gromlich'i Santo Clara bench-
cottages Electric Ice ooxes. go:
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567
Phillips. Oceanside cottage. Sonta
Clara Box 43b. Balboa, Phono
Panamo 3-1877. Cristobal d-1673
Enjoy o vocation ot Hotel Pon Ame-
ricano, El Voile. Phone Panomo
2-1 I 12 for reservations.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT;Beoutiful chalet, fur-
nished, 2 bedrooms, terroce, maid's
room, residential section, Poitillo,
Seventeenth St.. 106 Coll Pan-
ama 3-0112.
FOR SALE:Comfortoble residence,
well situated, completely furnish-
ed. Ready for occupancy February
1st. Can be seen to 12 noon, Tel.
2-1456 for intormotion.
FOR RENT:Chalet in El Valle, 2
bedrooms. Telephone Panama 3-
3423 or 3-1183.
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR RENT:Three small bedrooms
apartment, unfurnished. Son Fran-
cisco de lo Caleta 4th of Avenue
No. 4.
FOR RENT:Unfurnished 1 bedroom
apartment, sea view, very cool. No.
2 Uruguay Street.
US Will Train Five
Panam Mechanics
Under Point 4 Plan
WASHINGTON. Jan. 23 (U8IS)
The United States will train
60 mechanics from Latin Amer-
ican under agreements between
ten Latin American countries and
the Technical Cooperation (Point
Four) Administration, the U. 8.
Department of State announced
today.
The students will be trained m
auto-diesel mechanics and weld-
ing at the Nashville Auto-Diesel
College, of Nashville. Tenn. Ten
of the selected trainees will come
from Mexico, ten from Colombia
and five each from Panama,
Honduras, Costa Rica. El Salva-
dor, Nicaragua, Ecuador. Cuba
and the Dominican Republic.
The cost will be $150.000 and will
be borne by the Point Pour Ad-
ministration as a part of its pro-
gram of education and training.
Classes are expected to begin
about the middle of March. The
first will consist of 20 mechanics.
Two similar classes will begin
studies ten days or two weeks
later.
Arrangements have been made
for the students to live in pri-
vate homes in Nashville to aid
them In their atudy of English
and to give them an Insight into
the manner In which an Amer-
ican family lives, plans also In-
clude employment each Saturday
In private garages and machine
shops to give the students prac-
tical experience. Side trips will
be conducted to Industrial cen-
ters to round out the training.
The expenses of these trips will
be paid either by the students'
home countries or by the student
himself out of his earnings dur-
ing the 42 weeks which consti-
tute the technical and practical
training.
Once they have completed their
training, the mechanics will re-
turn to their homes and will as-
sist In the local Instruction of
other mechanics without the ne-
cessity of their travelling to the
United States. There is an acute
shortage of skilled mechanics In
many of the Latin American
countries the Point Four Program
is helping to supply the need
through such projects as the one
annouricedtoda^^^^^^^
Registrar \\
La Salle Extensin
University of Chicago
P.O. 2053 Panam Tel. 2-3246
Care of
AGENCIAS CENTRALES
A. 8. BARHAM, JR.
REQISTRAR
^OMMtKCIAL (J
PROFESSIONAL
We have everythinjr
to keep vour Lawn
and Harden beautiful
durine the dry season
toot Wheelbarrow?
Hose insecticioes
Fencing Fertilizers
Sprayers Weedkillers
8prinklers Fungicides
GEO. F. fNOVEY, INC.
17 Central Ave. Tel. 3-014*
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
*22 E. 29th St.
Anti-Racetrack
Clergy Pray Hard,
Win First Round
MEMPHIS. Tenn., Jan. 23
(UP i Voters held a horse
racing election across the river
in Crltteidea County, Atk., yes-
tesday with the prayers of
Memphis preachers that they
will decide to keep the sport
and Its evils" out. of the area.
The clergymen felt they won
the first round Monday when
the Arkansas Racing Commis-
sion decided on the eve of the
referendum to revoke the fran-
chise for a proposed $2,500.000
Dixie Downs at West Memphis,
Ark.
But the outcome still might
hinge on the election and prea-'
chers of nine denominations
prayed In relays all night that
divine guidance will keep "gam-
bling... and all the other evils
that go with a race track" away
from Memphis.
An anti-race track league j
hustled a heavy turnout byj
telephoning and even providing
taxi service for as many as
possible of the 5,400 qualified
voters.
Supporters of the measure
meantime distributed circulars
describing benefits of the pro-
posed track, such as employ-1
ment of 1,200 workers, an an-i
nual $1,500.000 payroll and $2,-
750.000 new state tax revenue.
Attorney Olenn F. Walther
said Dixie Downs. Inc., will ap-
peal the commission's reversal
of the franchise if the voters!
decide In favor of racing but
he conceded that a decision a-
galnst it would end the mat-
ter.
The HX
The Best value In town
our furnltnre Is
RHT1IOI STKKKD
our Mattresses are
REBUILT
all woodwork rxprrlly
HI I 1MSIIKI)
We BuT-SeU-Barter
ll\ (Homrhold Exchange)
41 Aiiln Bow Tel. 3-M11
omen
m
WJ,
ANOTHER NUN FACES RED TRIAL-Slster Marie Raymond
cf the Order of St. Vincent de Paul, pictured with some of her
charges at the French Mission Orphanage in Peiping, China, faces
trial before a Chinese "People's Court." News of her arrest fol-
lowed reports that five Canadian nuns were convicted in Can'on
of "mistreating and murdering" Chinese orphans. This photo waa
received in France by Sister Marie's sister, also a nun.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Betel ri Paaaaia
Selling: Coca Cola and
Central Theatre.
Wants to buy: Brewery and
National Distiller.
Tel. 3-4719 3-1660
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM-BUILT
Slipcover Reupholstery
viarr oca show-boom i
alberta Berea
J. r. a i. cxm 77 'roe BMbaata Pickup Delirar?
Tai. S-40* I* ut to 1* am
FISHERMEN !
According* to the latest re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIO ONES with FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #39 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0363 3-4564
"A Fine Opportunity to
Learn From The Best"
Want to be the most attractive
couple on the floor? Then bring
your lvorlte partner to Harnett
Si Dunn NOW and Improve your
dancing together Modern ratee
use our Budret planfits pay-
ment lo paydays So come In
today and aave. Why mas the
Fun I
Balfeea YMCA 2-283t ar
Bex It* Balboa. Harnett and Dunn.
Bargain For Sale:
PREFABRICATED
ALUMINUM HOUSE
Living Dinlngroom, three
Bedrooms, Kitchen and Bath.
Four Closets.
PRICE: $3,950.
AGENCIAS LUMINA, S.A.
Tel. 1-1*33
By GAY PAL'LEY
NEW YORK, Jan. 23 (UP)Ci-
trus and dried fruits, perfect
makings for winter time desserts,
top the U. 8. Department of
Agriculture's list of plentiful
foods for the weeks ahead.
Prunes, much lower in price'
than last year, provide the;
flavoring for this meringue pie:
Ingredients
V/i cups cooked prunes; 1 cup
cooking liquid from prunes; 11
cup crushed pineapple; V* cupj
granulated sugar; 3 tablespoons,
cornstarch; U teaspoon salt; 3
:ggs; 1 baked 9-inch pastry shell;
6 tablespoons granulated sugar
for meringue.
Method
Cut prunes from pits Into pieces.
! Combine with cooking liquid and
. pineapple and heat. Blend sugar,
cornstarch and salt together!
thoroughly and stir into hot!
fruit. Cook and stir until mix-
ture bolls thoroughly and la j
clear. Beat egg yolks lightly and
stir a little of hot fruit Into egg
gOlka, Stir slowly Into remaining
fruit. Cook 3 to 4 minutes longer i
over very low heat. Remove and I
cool. Pour into baked pastry;
shell. Beat egg white until stiff;
and beat in sugar, tablespoon at
a time. Pile lightly over filling.,
Bake In moderately slow oven
(325 degrees) 15 to 20 minutes.
Cool thoroughly before cutting.
Serves 6 to 8.
You might try a new treatment
of an old favorite lemon pie.
i This one is without the mer-
ilngue.
Ingredients
1 cup seedless raisins; 2 eggs;:
1 cup granulated sugar; 1 table-;
; spoon flour; 1 teaspoon grated
lemon rind; 2 tablespoons lemon:
juice; > cup milk; 'a teaspoon|
salt; 2 tablespoons melted butter
lor margarine; >/j cup chopped'
walnuts; pastry for single 8-Inch
crust.
Method
Rinse and drain raisins. Beat
eggs and gradually beat In su-
gar. Blend in flour, lemon rind
and juice, milk, salt, butter, rals-
Ins and walnuts. Turn into!
i pastry-lined pie pan. Bake In
not oven (425 degrees) 10 min-|
| utes. Reduce teuperature to mo-1
derately hot (376) and bake 30
minutes or longer or, until set. '
Serves 5 or 9.
Plentiful raisins and cranber-
ries are combined In this tart|
| fruit pie. which requires less
work than most.
Ingredients
l '2 cups seedless raisins; 1 cup
cranberries; pastry for single 9-
lnch crust and lattice top; 34 cup'
granulated sugar; 1 tablespoon
cornstarch; '/a teaspoon salt; 1
cup table cream.
Method
Rinse raisins and cranberries
and drain. Combine and place in
pastry-lined pie pan. Blend su-
gar cornstarch, and salt thor-
oughly. Add cream and heat to
boiling, stirring constantly. Pour
over fruit. Top with pastry
strips. Bake in hot oven (450
degrees) 10 minutes, reduce heat
to moderate (350). and bake 30
minutes longer. Serves 6 to 8.
Chicken's Freak Break
Evades The Stew Pot
BniMINOHAM. Ala. (UP) A
smart little chick named Babe
never opened her mouth and liv-
ed a happier and longer Ufe than
her scornful brothers and sisters.
Babe saw much more of the
world than her noisy neighbors.
They never got out of their Clay,
Ala., chlckenyard.
Babe was born with her beak
crossed.
The Fred Martin family fed
her through an eyedropper and
made her a family pet. She ac-
companied the family to Cali-
fornia, where she strutted long
after her boisterous neighbors
had landed in the stew pot.
By BEN COOK
HOLLYWOOD (UP) Gordon
MacRae closed his New Year's
Eve radio show with a religious
song, and the persons responsible
are the service men the singer
entertained during a recent tour
of military hospitals.
MacRae returned from his
fifth annual tour to entertain
wounded soldiers with the con-
viction that the American GI Is
trading his love of hot jazz for
softer, more serious music and
that a religious poem Is likely to
take the place of a pin-up pic-
ture at the head of a service-
man's bed.
"Sure, the fellows still like
pretty girls, but I didn't see a
single pin-up during the tour,"
he said. "Instead there were reli-
gious poems, little sayings like,
God is Love,' or pictures of their
wives.
"I'm not the first one to notice
this change. Look at the firms
that manufacture calendars. In-
stead of scantily dressed girls,
many of them are putting reli-
gious pictures on their 1952 prod-
ucts.
"These kids who have fought a
war are far more serious than
the bebop-crazy youths I knew
not too many years ago. They
like soft music, light opera, mu-
sic with a thought behind It."
MacRae said a seaman at a
hospital near San Francisco ask-
ed him to sing "Golden Days"
from Romberg's "The 8tudent
Prince." Another requested "Myj
Hero" from "The Chocolate Sol-
dier."
"When I do these personal ap-
pearances, I usually sing and
play some bop songs on the pla-
ne, but the fellows this year yell-
ed. 'How about "Old Man River?''
How about "8ollloquy"?'
"One patient told me he wish-
ed our half-hour radio show was
a full hour because of the Vla-
Special Care Aids
Mental Treatment
STOCKTON, Calir. (UP)The
Stockton state hospital reports it
has completed a 'pilot study"' in
the treatment of mentally ill
which constitutes an Indictment
of present-day Institutional me-
thods.
Dr. E. F. Gallonl, directing psy-
chiatrist at the hospital, said the
experiment, started 17 months
ago, simply involved giving 200
Satients Intensive care and
reatment, while another similar
group received ordinary, routine
treatment.
Dr. Gallonl said intensive care
tripled the ralease rate, doubled
patients' days outside the hospi-
tal, doubled the permitted visits
of relatives, and doubled the)
number of patients able to work.
The amazing results were the)
product of close personal atten-
tion by doctors and attendants,
he added.
Owns Island, But
It's Under Water
EAST HAMPTON. Conn.. Jan.
23 (UP).J. Ho well Con kiln says
he's the only person In the world
who holds a deed to an under-
water Island.
He bought the island 40 years
ago from the state. It was really
an island in those days. Since
then the lake which surrounded
It was dammed up to make it
larger. The Island disappeared
under five feet of water.
"I see It once a year or so
when the water Is low," Conklln
said.__________________________
tor Herbert, Rudolph Frlml and
George Gershwin music on It.
"The men who have fought In
Korea also are leaning heavily
toward religious music. That's
why I wanted to close our New
Year's program on 'The Railroad
Hour' with Gounod's "The Le**!
Prayer.' '
r
ail for
Eno's
Its good for the liver!
A glass of sparkling ENO'S first thing in the morning ia good for the
liver. It dean the head in no tune. The wonderful effervescence is
rUanting and refreshing to a stale natty mouth. The non habit-
forming laxative action keepa the system regular. ENO'S ia pleasant
to take and in its action it ia gentle yet quickly effective. A real
family remedy. Keep your Fruit Salt' handy I
Eno's
Fruit Salt'
SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED
tar IBBIGSLA.B ACTION.
SICK HEA.DACHI, UVtaiSWMMa
ruOUBNEBS. HKABTBUBN. ex.
WatloaouUa/ar
Umimg frlut




WBDNESn AY. JANUARY ti, IMS
THE PANAMA AMEBICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SWIEB.
"Toddy Great Beauty Contest
At The Central Theatre
Chrif t For Youth
Plans 'Soul-Winning'
Ah Line News Rally At La Boca
Shipping &
(Continued From Pace 4)
SAVED BY SCRIPTURE-Ll. Richard P. Cassity of Charleston, W. Va., above. My* he owe his
Hie to the pocket Bible which he carried in a shirt pocket over his heart while fighting in Korea.
Inset shows where a Communist slug penetrated halfway through the small Bible Cassit/ was
wounded in the leg several months after the incident
These are the candidates entered In the Panam-Canal Zone,
;52 Beauty Contest which will be held today it the CENTRAL
Theatre: A group of Canal Zone girls seoritas Mary Watson,
Snnia Montavani and Maritia Obarrlo from "Hotel Panam" and
Fitlta Medina and Licky Arosemena from the Club Union Car-
nival Queens will participate.
K! HOLLYWOOD
By ERSKINE JOHNSON

HOLLYWOOD, (NEAV Its
my fiendish pleasure, since I
Jon't subscribe to the current
rhubarb that Hollywood stars are
Just like your next-door neigh-
bors and folksy as all get-out,
to mention that film royalty Is
eating from gold and silver
plates- _..
And I defy Dagmar. Sid Cae-
sar, iraogene Coca, Jackie Olea-
son, Sara Churchill. Howdy Doody
or any other upstart TV stars to
make that statement.
Yep. in spite of tar: hens and
salary cuts, movie biggies are
still munching off fancy platters
A famous silversmith named
Allan Adler, who's been design-
tag silver and gold knick-knacks
for celluloid kings and queens at
his Sunset Strip studio since 1939,
told me about this.
Adler knows every piece of ex-
pensive metal In the stars cup-
boards and his files are stuffed
with the contemporary stiver
flatware designs he's dreamed
up for Thespians such a* ?rp-
eorv Peck. Oreer Garson. Diana
Lynn. Maureen. O'SnUivan. Jerry
Lewis and Dean Martin. Katha-
rine Hepburn and Joan Craw-
Oiice he hammered out a $50,-
000 order of solid golc1 dinner
plates, water goblets and a tea
service for a male star.
When he sets his table-wow!
aald Adler. a blue-eyed younjs-
lsh'man "I can't reveal his name.
thoth He's afraid of belna bur-
glarized. Once some robbers
Eroke into his house but the
didn't take the gold stuff. Tney
figured It was brass.
except for monograms on their
krflves. forks. SP0 and | X*
(Greer Carson's hubby. Buddy
Fogleson. has his cattle brand on
the handles of his steak-knly I)
stars plav It pretty straight In
their table-setting.
It's when they get around to
'Win* silver and gold presents
thr-t the wacky note Is sounded.
A He' deSded that he'd master
the poker-faced technique of
facing star customers, when a
reducer ordered a gold-plated
Felephone encrusted with jewels
for a beauty who was still wait-
ing for her final decree. ,
"And I haven't cracked a smile:
si"";." said Adler. '
Fi also mentioned "gold-plated
po ties for babies a silver grater
for a screenwriter who loved
potato pancakes, and silver keys
to her apartment for a certain
blonde around town."
wdgar Bergen, the artisan re-
called, had htm make im a silver,
kev chain and cuff links for,
Charlev McCarthy. Gary Cooper
once ordered a silver clgaret box
that would hold exactly 20
cluarets. Greer Garson presents
friends' babies with silver por-
ringers and Alan Ladd. who's a >
horse fancier/persuaded Adler to,
turn out a slWer dresser set with
handles of carved horse heads. :
Grade Allen came to him one'
day with an idea for silver;
troughs for corn-on-the *ob |
Adler worked out some corn-
shaped vessels that make It pos-
sible for Oracle and he:- guests
to swish their corn around in i
melted butter instead of strug-
gling wKh blobs of the stuff on
k"-The other day," he related.'
"Oracle called us and she was
antic. Her maid and butler
had Just walked out on he- and
she wps glvlnu a dinner party
that night. -She wanted to know,
if we'd all come over and polish
her sliver. We did. too."
There's a big demand for sil-
ver pieces on which the signat-
ures of stars are engraved and
it's all that Adler can do to keep
up with the o.ders.
He's forever copying their
hand-writing scrawls on cuff
links, buttons, buckles and clgar-
et cases.
Katharine Hepburn. Margaret
Sullavan and Jtaraiy Gleason
like to drop Into his work-rooms
and hammer out .liver on and
anvil that's exactly like the one
Paul Revere used, and Adler,
commented thaf "Glea.on' very;
skilled Miss Sullavan's fairly
good at It and Miss Hepburn Just;
lort of plavs around."
He supplies studios with spe-
cial props In silver and gold when
a script calls for It. An Adler-
1 executed gold tankard was crush-
ed by Vic Mature for a scene In
, "Samson and Delilah."
It was made of lead so Vic
could crush it easily and look
. strong.
He still hasn't recovered,
though, from a job he did for
IOrson Welles. Orson brought him
a gold bracelet that Rita Hay-
! worth had given him a-.id asked
that It be soldered to his arm.
"He said,"' remembered Adler,
"that he wanted to wear the
Bracelet close to his skin for the
rest of his life. We wrapped his
! arm In asbestos to keep from
i burning him and soldered the
bracelet so that he could not re-
move it."
This happened before their di-
vorce and Adler doubts that Or-
Ijon Is still wearing the tra-le'
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Whtr. 100.000 People Ma*
Presents
Today, Wednesday, Jan. 23
P.M.
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15French in the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The Humbug Cla.
Alfaro. S.A.
8:15Evening Salon
7:00Paul Temple (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan!
8:00News and Commentary by
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Jam Session (VOA)
8:30The American Book
Shelf
8:45Commentator's Digest
(VOAt
9:00The Human Body (BBC)
9:30The Haunting Hour
(BBC)
10:00The BBC Playhouse
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off.
MAE IN CROCHET-A foot-
high figurine of buxom Mae
West, in her bast "Diamond Lil"
clothes, is one of the pieces in
the "Dress Through the Ages"
collection of Mrs Lilian Lunn.
Mrs. Lunn is now showing 150
such miniatures made of stitched
or crocheted velvet cord or
wool in London's Park Lane
Dr. Eno Elected
Chairman Of Colon
Stranger's Club
Dr. Harrv Eno was elected as
chairman of the Colon Strang-
er's Club at a meeting held Mon-
day night to suceed Walter Hun-
nlcut who presided over the club
for the last two years.
Others elected were: Albert
Motta, vice chairman: Oscar Be-
jarano, secretary-treasurer; and
David P Beere. Richard R.
Brown. Joseph E. Wright and
James Salterio, board-members.
The new chr.liman urged mem-
bers to cancel their indebtedness
o the club after a repor revealed
hal the cl.ib's financial condl-
ton Is poor.
The new secretary warned that
drastic measures will be taken
against delinquent members.
Magnolia Dancing
Club To Practice
!n La Boca Friday
Members of the Magnolia
Dancing Club will hold their reg-
ular practice session tomorrow
night at the La Boca Lateen In-
stead of the at Pacific Club-
house.-
An announcement said the
hange was made because the
lubhouse will be occupied that
night.
Thursday, Jan. 24
A.M.
6:00Sign OnAlarm Clock
Club
7:30 Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEWS
9:15SACRED HEART PRO-,
ORAM
9:30As I See It
:o:00NEW8
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEWS
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popuar Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN SCI-
ENCE
2:00Call for Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Panamuslca 8tory Time
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The HumbugCla.
Alfaro, S.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30~BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00News and commentary
(VOA I
8:15To be Announced
I 8:30To be announced
, 8:45To be Announced
i 9:00The Country House
(VOA i
1 9-30Moonlight Mood
: '0.00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
112:00Sign Off.
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BEC-British Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadiodifusin. Francalse
Tax Forum Tonight
At Junior College
This evening at 7:M at the
Canal Zone Junior College,
John Phillips, agent of the Bu-
reau of Internal Revenue, will
instruct taxpayers on how ta
-lake their Income tax return,
POLICE ROUT HORNETS
EL WOOD. Ind. (UP). The lo-
al police department has added
a new one to Its list of "odd"
cases. When Fred Barlow stepped
into his car. he found that
hornets had taken It over Po-
lice used a bug bomb to disperse
the Insects
better year In 1952 at a meet-
ing In Miami recently.
"The traffic potential, in both
passengers and cargo, is greater
than ever before." Porter Norris,
division traffic and sales man-
ager, told the 75 members of his
staff in attendance from 30 coun-
tries.
"Despite higher taxes and liv-
ing costs, there Is more money in
circulation than ever before." he
said. "United States production
and resources are proving that
our high standard of living can
be maintained while we re-arm
ourselves and our allies.
"People are prosperous, and
when thev are prosperous they
want to travel It Is Pan Amer-
ican's job to accommodate them,
not only with transportation, but
'with service, courtesy and hospi-
tality."
Norris said the world crisis was
bolstering travel, especially to
Europe.
"People -want to see the Old
World while there's still a
chance." ho said.
Other major incentives to tra-
vel this vear. he pointed out. are
the Euctiarlstic Congress in Bar-
celona the Olympic games In
Oslo and Helsinki and Inter-
national Rotary and Lions con-
ventions in Mexico City.
Muhlfeld also discussed PAA'S
trans-AUantic tourist service,
scheduled to begin May 1 When
combined with existing tourist
flights to and from Puerto Rico
and 8outh America and with
domestic coach service in the
United States, the new low-cost
trip to Europe via New York
should attract thousands of La-
tin Americans, he said.
He also predicted heavy travel
across the Pacific between Latin
America and the Orient, espe-
cially Japan.
Ernest L. Fobs. Latin Amer-
ican Division sales and ad-
vertising manager, told the
group that PAA System ad-
vertising matter folders,
posters and other material
LUX
Air-Conditioned
TCDAY ONUfjl
A "soul-winning" rally will be
held at the La Boca Salvation
Hall under the auspices of the
Panama Christ for Youth Fellow-
ship Saturday night at 7:30.
The rally will include choruses,
testimonials, gospel ;ongs and
srjeclal renditions bv the Christ
For Youth choral group. A ser-
1 mon will be delivered by one of
the young men of the group to
end the rally._________ _____
^-^
will be more closely tied in
with Latin America than ever
before to obtain maximum
benefits.
Oliver J. Studeman, Latin
American Division operations
manager, reported Improvement
in schedule performance during
1951. He attributed It largely to
the dally meeting of a committee
composed of traffic, maintenance
and operations representatives,
who discuss every flights delay
and plan remedial action.
Nut shells, corncobs, and dry
Ice are among strange materials
now used to put mirror-like fin-
ishes on metal and non-metal
machine parts at a fraction of
the cost of hand polishing.
YPSL To Re-Stage i
Biblical Drama
Next Friday Night
The Young People's Service.
League of the La Boca Christian*
Mission Church will re-stage the
biblical drama "Follow Thou Me-*
Friday night at 7:30.
t t
The play was first staged by
che League in :l>vember with*
great success. Tickets for FrlB
day's presentation may be.ob-
tained from members of the Ser-
vice League.
s%
BALBOA
OPENS SATURDAY!
MEET THE CHAMPFramed by assorted cuts of meat, James
Earry, senior at the University of Missouri, celebrates his winning
of the meat-judging contact at the international livestock show in
Chicago. Barry scored 932 out of a possible 1040 points, trimming
his nearest opponent, Robert Krelter of Iowa State College, by
three points.
ITS MOVltTIME ..
(P.
inama
Canal Clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
RALBO A
Air-Cnndltlnned
IS A *.:!
Fred ASTAIRE Mtar HUTTON
'LET'S DANCE" (Technicolor)
_____ Also Showing Thursday!_________
DIABLO HTS
:1S A 7:53
Richard DENNING Una FERRADAY
"FLAME OF STAMBOUL"
Thursday IN OLD CHICAGO"_____
cocoa
<:ll A S:1S
Don AMECHE Alice FAYE
"IN OLD CHICAGO"
Thursday "THE TOUGHER THFY COM:''
GAMBOA
a
MARGARITA
IS a S:M
Denni" MOI'CAN Patricia N'EAL
"RATON PASS"
Thursday "FRANCIS GorSTO_THE KACES"
Douglas KENNEDY Jean WILLES
"REVENUE AGENT"
Thursday "HEAVEN CAW WAIT"
MOST EXCITING MUSICAL
DRAM* OF THE YEAR I
MtCKCY SAltY V^aR1 N
MONEY"- FORREST
saw i-iiiE-iimtufiis
.. with
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
And Orchestra
TOMORROW!
OPENING
QMuMidi
STARTING
TOMORROW!
7he *M DANGER,
.it
... in the
Pirate
Port
of the
China
Seas!
SMUGGLEKS
ISLAND
cotonmv
TCHMCOlM
Starring
JEFF CHANDLER
EVELYN KEYES

PHILIP FRIEND
GREAT
AT 9:00 P.M.
GREAT
BEAUTY CONTEST TO ELECT MISS 1952
Also: RELEASE PICTURE from 1:00 p.m.
LUX THEATRE
Mickey
RDIIMY
Sally
r'OKKl si
The musical dra-
ms, of the dancer
and the drummer
on the glamorous
Avenue of night
clubs!

"THE
STRIP"
Was. Dtaurol
Bella Vista Latin Day!
3:00 4:25 5:55 T:f > MM
A Gav Argentine Comedyl
Juan Carlos Thorry. In '
"CONCIERTO de BASTN"^
Starling Tomorrow! r
ACTION! ROMANCE!
ADVENTURE!
Jeff Chandler Evelyn
Keyes. In
'SMUGGLER'S ISLAND"
In Technicolor 1
rSaSS, CECILIA THEATRE
An Exposition of Unscrupulous Lawy-enl
"ENTRE ABOGADOS TE VEAS"
with Carmen Monlejo Armando Calvo
'Also: See the immortal bullfighter again!
"LAS MEJORES CORRIDAS de MANOLETE*
TROPICAL
Steven MrNAU T Catara GSAY
in
"APACHE DRUMS"
ENCANTO THEATRE
~ Elsa Agulrre. In
"AMAR FUE SU
PECADO"
Mara Antonleta Pons, in
"LA REINA DEL
MAMBO"
TIVOLI THEATRE
BANK $100 0 BANX!
At S 00 pm
"EN CRNE VIVA"
- and
"IA BIEN PAGADA"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Femando Soler Nin
Sevilla, in
"SENSUALIDAD"
Chanto Granados, in
"INMACULADA"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Elsa Agulrre. In
"LA MUJER que YO AME"
- and -
-ARRABALERA"




mm newt
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAM NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2S, 1952
NBA Issues Ultimatum To Champs Walcott, Maxim, Gaviln
SOME FUN, EH KID?__It looks as if Rochester's Arnie Risen
cant contain'belly-shaking guffaws unwrapping himself from New
York's Connie Simmons at Madison Square Garden, as Ray Lumpp
eets popped in the eye with the ball. Other players are George
Kaftan 6. and Arne Johnson, 12. The Knickerbockers smothered
the Royals, 107-74. (NEA)
Service Sports
FORT KOBBE, C.Z.The big
bats of the 33rd Infantry failed
to boom Saturday but 13 base on
balls aided them in racking up a
8 to 0 win over West Bank Navy
team. The win was the sixth In as
many starts.
Mrquez won his third game
and second shutout In three
starts. He held West Bank to
three hits and struck out 18.
The Infantry collected only six
hits with right fielder Renfro
getting three.
In the second inning the In-
fantry opened the scoring. Lpez
went out short to first and then
Renfro slapped a triple to right.
Jones walked and Vega-Rivera
hit a slow roller down the third
base line. West Bank third sacker
Tutko, threw wide trying to cut
Renfro off at home and every-
body was safe. Toro filed to right
but pitcher Mrquez aided him-
self with a sharp single over sec-
ond, scoring Jones. Vega-Rivera
was out going to third to end the
inning.
West Bank threatened to score
in the fifth inning as Durchak
led off with a triple. Mrquez
then struck out Bush, threw No-
wack out at first and fanned
Briggs to end the threat.
Mrquez has pitched 27 innings
in which he has walked 7, struck
out 35 and given up 10 hits.
The llnescore:
33rd Inf. 021 102 0006 6 2
West Bank 000 000 0000 3 2
Wednesday at Fort Sherman
the 33rd Infantry will play the
370th Boat Battalion.
added freedom of action. (MEA)
Must Defend World Titles
Not Later Than March 15
WASHINGTON, Jan 23.(UP)The National
Boxing Association today emphasized that under its
rules Jersey Joe Walcott, the heavyweight cham-
pion; Light Heavyweight Champ Joey Maxim and
Welterweight Champion Kid Gaviln have until
March 15 to defend their world titles.
The N.B.A. said the deadline for the three
fighters was figured from the arbitrary date of
Sept. 15 "in order to be completely fair with the
six months rule." Hereafter, all NBA title defense
deadlines must come within six months after the
champion's last fight.
In the case of Gaviln, the title defense must
be against Charles Humezthe European champion.
The deadlines were set at the NBA's 1951 convention
at Chicago. >
TOUCH FOOTBALL
Touch football fans at Fort.
Kobbe watched the first tie game
of the season Thursday night as
Tank and Medical Companies j
battled to a 14 to 14 standoff.
Tank Company got off to a fast:
start and looked like they would
not be headed. Magee passed to1
ATLANTIC LITTLE LEAGUE | four-run sixth inning added in- curnow in the first period and
GETS UNDER WAY surance runs as Bateman held then to Carr for the extra point.
The Atlantic Little League the Sears sluggers to one run In Again in the second quarter the
opened the season of 1952 Mon- the third which was scored on a same combination worked to put
day, Jan. 14. The 60th Army walk and a two-base error on the Tank ahead at the half by a 14
Band, under the capable dlrec- following batter, to 0 count.
tion of Warrant Officer Emilio! McKeown started on the Tank kicked to Medical to open
Rodriguez, furnished the music mound for Sears with Mendoza the second half and Bennett ga-
for the grand opening ceremon- taking over in the fourth inning, thered it in to romp, with good
les. Mrs. Thomas M. O'Connor, Bud Curdts, Mendoza and Jas.: blocking, through the whole
sponsor of the Margarita All-1 Watson were the only batters to Tank team. Stlckhig to the
"" solve Bateman's offerings, each! ground King ran around the end
man collecting a single. Bruce for the extra point. Later in the,
Big League Ticket Admission
Increases Granted By Govt.
By ROBERT F. LOFTUS I Even with the order, however,
United Press Staff Correspondent there still will be wide range in
Ithe price of stadium seats
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23 The throughout the American and
government thawed its celling on National Leagues. With 'the in-
uaseball admission prices yester- creases granted yesterday,
clay and granted ticket Increases bleacher seats in various cities big league games are brought In-
ranging from 5 to 50 cents for, will cost from 60 cents to $1; to their home areas on television,
six major league teams andan 8: general admission tickets, $1.20 Some steps have recently been
ner cent hike for all minor league to $1.50; reserved seat $1.65 to: taken to ease the minor league
1950plus a flat 10 per cent to
reflect rising living costs.
Many minor league baseball
teams long have been victims of
poor attendance. Recently, they
have blamed it on the fact that
If you belong to the Armed Forces
or if you have a steady job come to
our Store and you can choose your
own terms to buy on credit.
We have the best Mahogany Furniture.
If you don't know our Club System
visit us and you wlU be deUghted.
Tel. 2-2404
dubs.
Major league teams that will
be allowed to raise their prices
Stars threw out the first pitch
as the season was officially open-
ed.
The game was highlighted
When the Margarita All Stars
came from behind in the latter
part of the fifth inning to score
six runs, taking the lead and
holding same to win the opener.
Bateman and Jules Dubois with
a single and a double apiece led
the winners at the plate.
Today the Elks and Firemen
will play and each team will be
looking for their first win of the m ... ----- .....
season. Lovelady is the likely' breath as the Medics came out]
9 to 7. Tommy Cunningham andl starter in the box for the Elksl0{ the huddle for the play. Ban-
Roy Perkins led the hit parade, with Randel going for the Fire- lesevich took the ball from cen-
each having two hits apiece. i men.
Score by innings: The box score:
under the Office of Price Sta-
bilization order, effective Jan.
29, are the two Chicago clubs,
the two Philadelphia teams,
the Cleveland Indians and the
Detroit Tigers. Other teams
must hold their 1951 ceiUngs.
$2.20, and box seats, $2 to $3.60.1 situation.
The government said the six
big league teams and the minor
leagues had not raised their
prices for several years and
have suffered increased costs
from higher player salaries,
traveling expenses and ball
park maintenance costs.
Only last week, the Salary Sta-
bilization Board overhauled its
Under the OPS order, the mi-
nor leagues were granted an 8
per cent increase in total ad-
mission revenues based on their
parks' seating capacities.
For example, if a team has a
5,000-seat stadium with tickets
now selling for an average of $1,
it will be permitted a $400 hike in
same period Baniesevich passed
to Delrie for the second score and
brought the score to 14-12 Tanks |
favor. iiujui.. .. r,.Pp.-.ri-ajmj-|
Every thing hinged on the. lnknded to bring admission' league teams pay out in salarien &StSmatSSSTiaS^
tra point try. Fans held theirI.-.
Thebvernmentsaid the o'rder|baseball policy i let inIoriK^fAL2L?HJL??fc
Powell's 110 0 5 07 I Lincoln Life AB R H PO A
Margarita 0 0 12 6 x9 I Durham, If..... 3
M. Sanders, C. French and J.; Dubois, V., 2b. .. 2
Hanna; L. Dialer and E. Cun-jBateman, p .. .. 4
nlngham. ; Dubois, J., 3b. ., 4
Engelke, W., cf .. 3
Little Motta's 4, Police Pals 0 Parker, rf...... 2
I. Wayne Wall, big righthander Million, c....... 3
i. of the Motta's. pitched brilliant- McGrlff, ss .. .. 2
ly striking out Jifteen of the Laatz, lb...... 3
".' eighteen batters to face him, and -------------------
allowed but one hit which came Totals........20 8 6 18 6
in the last inning. Barry Davl- Sears AB R H PO A
. son hurled creditable ball for the AiaSi rf...... 0 0000
Pals and his triple off Wall was Watson, Jn., rf .. 110 0 0
; the only extra base blow of the Watson,R., ss. .. 2 0 0 0 2
game Durfee, G., lb .. 3 0 0 7 0
Score by innings: Curdts, If...... 3 0 1*
.. Police Pals 0 0 0 0 0 00 aCapwell, 2b.. ..000
Motta's 0 0 3 1 Ox4 Watson,Jas.,3b.. 2 0 1
; B. Davison and E. Pabon; W. Mendoza, 2b-p .301
., Wall and C. Chase. Durfee, T., c .. .. 2 0 0
Police Pals 12, Margarita 8 Pearson, cf .. .. 1 0 0
1, The Police Pals defeated theiRigDy cf...... 10 0
Margarita All Stars 12 to 8 to go McK'wn, p-2b-3b 2 0 0
hito a tie with Margarita for sec- bSchwarzrock... 000
. ond place. The game was f eatur-' cCrawford.... 000
ed by the hitting of F. Leves. E.!
;. Pabon and D. Humphrey of the Totals
ter and fired quickly to Bennett
in the end zone and the game
stood at 14 to 14. Through the
0 final period both teams battled
1 fiercely and unsuccessfully to
1 score: .
I The league standings to date:
II Headquarters 5 0 0 98
1 TEAM W. L. T. Pts. Opp.
1 Service 3 2 0 88 62
0 Tank 2 2 1 90 75
0 Medical 1 3 1 67 .105
-Mortar 0 4 0 28 119
Army Sports
On The Alleys.
CLASSIC I.I AGUE BOWLING
Junior Say ion. who substituted
Y for Bud Balcrr last Friday night,
lead Sears to a four point win
2 ever the Jantzcn five. Say Ion,
* who had a 606 series, was given
X plenty cf help from Lu Lu Ze-
brock who hit 573. BUI Jamison
J was hi?h for the Jantzen team.
* he had a good 570. and also had
JJ high single game of the eveninf,
0 a 245. Juntan had help from
20 1 3 18
Owesne and Mcrton who had 559
Pate'and L. Dldier f Margarita -------- Score By Inning. jnTHn" *" 0rd6r
each having two hits. Llnc'n Life 10 3 0 0 48 6 2 nates 148
Score bv innings: Searg 0 0 1 0 0 01 3 6 Alerchn.an' 168
Margarita 3 0 0 0 3 2-8 aRan for Jas. Watson m 4th; ^Sn 138
Police 3 0 0 7 2 x_12 bBatted for Capwell in 6th; cKan'oweiEa ......217
C. Crawford, C. French, and E. for schwarzrock in 6th. Winning Morton .....149
Cunningham; Bailey and E. Pa- pitoherBateman. Losing Pitch-, "20
bn.
Little Motta's 6, Powell's 1
162
192
187
185
203
929
183
183
245
157
199
493
543
570
55
551
erMcKeown. Struckout by SEARS
Bateman 9, McKeown 6, Mendo-,Melanson ... 185 190
7a 2. Base on Balls of fBateman | Colston ......193 14*
967 2178
197
200
573
540
TneLittle Motto s took a com- 4, McKeown 5, Mendoza 1. Left|Zebr0ck ......173 191 209 573
sanding lead of the Atlantic Lit-1 on BasesLincoln Ufe 6. Sears 5.isaylon 194 231 181 *
tie League's first week of play,Rarned Runs-Lincoln life 2.(n'!. '
I, Saturday, defeating the Powell's
0 tol.
Gary Malloy of the Motta's al-
'.' lowed but three hits and his
pitching opponent Charlie
French also hurled creditably al-
lowing but five hits. The game
was featured by the hitting of
*. Hadarlts of the Motta's. Hanna
of the Powell's and Wayne Wall's
' tremendous home run blast over
' the Little League fence In cen-
terfleld.
Score by Innings:
Mottas 0 2 12 1 06
Powells 0 0 0 1 0 0
Earned RunsLincoln Life 2.lN0rrs
Two Base HitsBateman, J. Du-
bois. Three Base HitDurham.
Hits offMcKeown 3 In 3 1-3 in-
nings; Mendoza 3 in 2 2-3. Um-
piresLuzer and Priest. Time of
Game1:30. Attendance300.
Atlantic Side Chess
Tourney First Round
Over This Week
.116
606
192 184* 552
prices into line throughout the as much as they paid out In the
baseball world. All six of the highest year between 1946 and
teams had asked for the Increas-
es and presumably will put them
into effect at the start of the
new season.
The Philadelphia teams said,
they will raise their admissions
and the Tigers and Indians In-
dicated they will follow suit. The
White Sox said their board of di-
rectors will make a decision soon.
Officials of the Cubs said they
will decide this week.
921 951 971 2843
Second place PAA had a good
series, but ran Into a rejuvenat-
ed Nash team who proceeded to
take the:n three straight games.
Nash, who has vastly Improved
In the lpst few weeks, had a
splendil 2860 series Best rolled
602 to paced Nash, he had plenty
of help from Ma'ee and Madeline
who hit 592 and 588 respectively.
Substitu- Joe Fllebark led PAA
with 58.">: he was closely follow-
ed by Chris Hermann who hit 568.
With 19 players entered, first .f,
round play in the Atlantic Side ?" ...
G. Malloy and C. Chase; C. chess Tournament, sponsored by,Thomas"-------17S
tench and Hanna. | the ^ Cristobal_ Armed ^Services | jenn-r '.'.'.'.'.'. Ih7
Standing of teams:
TEAM Won Lost Pet. aused by the two youngest play-
Litilc Motta's.. .. 2
Margarita...... 1
Police........ 1
Powell's....... 0
YMCA was completed this week, i Eg ......gl
Two surprising upsets were Madeline'.'.'.!" 1*6
_ jv the two youngest play- 9J,
1000 rs in the tournament. TheronlPAA
.500 Lewis, aged 14, defeated M. Bes- Hermann 1 *'sel. eseded in the upper bracket,|o5oley '.'.'. Art
.500
.000
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
while John Hughes, aged 15, pueDark
overcame R. F. Alvarez, P.. ateo aiSchenlder
seeded player. Other results fol-.Engelke
Police..........2
Sears..........2
Lincoln Life .... 2
AFGE 14........1
Elks..........
Firemen........
low:
D. Gonzlez defeated B. Gold-,
berg.
1%
.182
.195
921
Here are the team standings
as of Friday. Januarv 18, 1952:
VFSTEKDAY'S RESULTS
Lincoln Life 8, Sears 1.
TODAY'S GAME (At Little
League Park, 4:3 p.m.)
Firemen vs. Elks
The Lincoln Life scored their
"eoond win yesterday defeating.
Sears 8 to 1 with Bruce Bateman
on the mound for the winners.
.limiting the Catalog Boys to
-three hits while striking out nine.!
The Insurance Bols got off to
.'a one-run lead in the first in-
nlng and Iced the game In the
Uurd by scoring three times. A
MM
.667
6671 jrcross defeated C. R. Asplasu.
.50*; T. L. Goldberg defeated A. M. SEARS
.60* Alvarado. p ..........
0M' Q. A. Orr defeated R. R. Funk. NAgH'...........
J. Evans defeated A. Garcia. : T NTF..........
Mario Ballard, last year's :JAWTZ,EN
i champion, has yet to play his
first match against Ernest Ruiz.
PAIRINGS FOR 2ND ROUND
(Winner's Bracket)
J. Gross vs. I. L. Goldberg.
D. Gonzlez vs. Theron Lewis.
G. A. Orr vs. J. Evans.
J. Hughes vs. Winner Ballard-
Ruiz match.
(Loser's Bracket)
M. Bessel vs. R. F. Alvarez P.
B. Ooldberg vs. C. R. Asplasu.
A. M. Alvarado vs. R. R. Funk.
A. Garcia vs. Loser Ballard-
Rulz match.
207
166
170
204
228
975
209
214
188
180
152
943
191
232
168
164
184
592
573
505
602
588
939 2860
166
176
201
182
188
568
545
585
544
535
Albrook, 33rd
Continue To Lead
Armed Forces Loop
The nice for first place in the
Panama Armed Forces Baseball
League remained unchanged af-
ter the dust of battle had clear-
ed away Saturday and the Al-
brook Fivers nr.H the 3rd Infan-
trymen both came up wRh their
sixth Struighc league victory. The
Flyers w*re. forces to go all out
In edging Atlantic Sector 6 to 5
and prowrve their victory string.
However the Infantrymen scor-
ed an'easy 6 to 0 shutout over
Westbauk.
Tnrei teams remain In a tie
for third place In the standings
with four wins and two defeats
In league play. Coco Solo. Special
Troops and *hc 45th Reconnais-
sance Battalion gained victories
Saturday to remain In the title
race. Coco Sole trounced Corozal
13 to 3 Special Troops scored
two runs in the eighth inning to
bre^k L deadlocked score and
win 9 to 7, while the 45th Bat-
talion defeated 370th Shore Bat-
talion 7 to 4.
In the ether two games played
Saturday Signal scored a 4 to 3
win over the 370th Boat Bat-
talion and the 504th FA Batta-
lion defeated the 764th AAA 3
to 1.
Wednesdays :chedule calls for
Special Troops to play host to
Coco So*o at Fort Amador. 764th
AAA entertaining the 45th Bat-
talion, tl\f 33d Infantry journeys
to the At'.ant.c side to face 370th
Boat, Albrool: tlays at Corozal,
Signal it home against Atlantic
Sector. Westbank coming to the
Pacific side to foce the 504th and I
the 903d at home against 370th
Shore.
HO. & SV. CO. FIRST ROUND
SOFTBALL CHAMPS
FORT DAVISThe 370th Engi-
neer Shore Battalion, Hq t Sv.
Co.'s softball team sparked by
fitcher Cpl. Len Wojtowicz, took
he first round of play in the reg-
imental softball league Saturday
by beating "A" Co. 16-8 for ten
straight wins and no losses.
Wednesday's game was the
highlight of the first round when
Hq. played "C" Co. for the cham-
pionship. The first inning ex-
ploded when Hq. took a six-run
lead, then "C" Co. tagged Woj-
towicz for five runs in tne fourth
inning.
any type
bleacher, box or general admis-
sion.
The order also authorizes an 8
per cent increase for tickets to
pre-season or other exhibition
games which are not played at
major league clubs' home parks.
Tills applies to "grapefruit
league" spring training games.
The customary differential for
admission to such special games
as the World Series and AlT-Star
Games will be continued.
Now... 6 Years Old!
913 2777
Won
52
40
32
28
Lost
24
98
44
48
PANAMA ARMED FORCES
BASEBALI LEAGUE
STANDINGS
Pet.
1.000
1.000
.667
.667
.667
.500
Team Won Lost
Albrook .......6 0
33d Infantry ___6 0
Coco Solo .......4 2
Special Troops .4 2
45th Bn.........4 2
370th Boat ......3 S
504th FA ........3 3
764th AAA _____3 3
903d AAA .......3 3
Signal..........2 4
Westbank ......2 4
Atlantic Teeter .. 1 5
370th Shore ... .1 6
Corozal ......0 6
S'.tardax's Resulto
Coco sv.lo13- Corozal 3
Signal -4, 3idth Boat3
504th3: 764' h1
Spect TrKips9: 903d1
45th? 3 roth Shore4
33d6. Westbank0
Albrou*:6: Atlantic Sector-
Hq. picked up two more In the
fifth, then In the seventh with
two men on "C" Co. was unable
to tally for a tie which would
have put the game into extra In-
nings. Final score was Hq. 8. "C"
Co. 6. .
A 23-inch trophy will be pre-
sented to the team with the play-
ers' names engraved ,on It.
Elks Score Easy
9-4 Victory Over
Philippine Rattan
Tuesday afternoon, the third
place Elks team carted off an
easy victory over Philippine Rat-
tan, scoring 9 runs on 9 hits and
5 bases on Balls. The Elks were
charged with two errors.
Philippine Rattan chalked up
only four runs on seven hits and
seven walks, committing four er-
rors.
Fritz Cheney was back on the
mound for the Elks and In spite
of a weak ankle, was the winning
pitcher. Cheney also tagged what
would have been a round tripper
in the fourth, but could only
make It to third where he was
granted a courtesy runner.
Howard Engelke was the los-
ing hurler.
The Elks scored three In the
first, two In the second, three In
the fourth and one In the sixth.
Philippine Rattan scored one
in the -Irtt and three In the
fourth. _.
Leading hitters for the Elks
were Larry Chance, Dom Rober-
to. Ray Evans and Charlie Rager
I wfth two each. Cheney's triple
500: accounted for the other nit off
[500 Howard Engelke.
333 For .Philippine Rattan Bob
333 Lawyer and Manager Marion
1671 Woodruff collected two safe hits
1671 each. Simon Jones, Bob Medln-
;ooo ger Hersh, and Dempeey with one
each were the only other Furni-
turemen to find Cheney's fast
throws. .. ..
Pete Rlley was behind the
Slate to give "Umptre-ln-Chief
ob Coffey a breather and a
chance to find out how the other
half sees them.
Tta1?feeYdTlwit Maw* tfce MMt to )foa.[
(
SETS ALL-TIME RECORD
31.05
IN 1951 MOBILGAS ECONOMY RUN!
MILES
PER
GALLON
Here is proof positive that the Nash Ram-
bler is the most economical full-size car on
the road ... official proof that you can go
farther on every gallon of gas in a Rambler.
For in America's blue-ribbon stock car
eventthe 1951 Mobilgas Economy Run
from Los Angeles to the Grand Canyon
the Rambler smashed all previous records
for the Run... did the 840.05 miles averag-
ing 31.05 miles per gallon! That's the thrifty
performance you've been looking for.
In setting this all-time record, the Ram
bier carried 4 passengers with driver .
averaging over 41 miles an hour over
deserts, mountains, in city and highway
driving... with snow, rain and head winds.
Yet never before had any car in this event
gone so far on so little gasoline.
Every Nash Airflyte entrantStates-
man, Ambassador and Ramblerwas a
trophy winner. Real evidence that Nash is
your best bet for* the years ahead!
M IWn l*f< DM. {***. IWI|W, U.S. A.
Vher
STATESMAN, 2*. 12 pm
CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
Phone 2.1790
(NASH AGENCY)
On* block from Tivoli Crossing


\vr
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY S3. 18M
TfflE PANAMA AMtMCAW AW ffTDirBKPEXT DAaY HlfTSPAFlK
rAGE
i--n-

Wednesday, jAtnjAK w. ---------------j,- !- ----------------- r-^r^ m m/ T /^W
Snead, Posse Favorites To Win Open
College Hoop Results
Monday MM
Indiana Iw ,,
Oklahoma 41. Mtoeourl 45
SKh. State 50. Wisconsin H
Ohio 8t.te 58, Minnesota W -
ftirthweaternJ. Mlehli 51
DePeul $4, Fort Sheridan (111.)
Adrian 71. Assumption 4
Hilladale l, Defiance (O.) (4
^ SOUTH
BsawressEU
M M, WMrtle (lad.)
Centenary 8, New Orleans Lay*-
Lineal* Mam. (Tana.) 84, D.
West Texae St. 0, Hardln-SIm-
_ ana 44 ______-------
Isthmian Sports
TNT acorad a sensational 35 to
34 win over Farmacia Chu last
night In the Pacific Clubhouse
auditorium before a record crowd
to become champion team of the
Ptelfle Boya1 Club Basketball
LCItui for 1M2. __
The encounter tu keenly con-
teited with the acore tied five
NM HlihUnd It, St Michael's
(MM) 48 _--------
FAR WEST
aereg&gara
Gamboa Regatta
Offers Several
Coveted Trophies
ttoM during "the "four ouartara,
and ftnee during an extra
play
PW,
..lying hi usually fin brand
o Mil. Rafael Bptaoaa nc
more prated hlmaelf the big gun
of the eireuit, slnkln gl5 point
to lift hi total to ill. seven
rolAt over Vincent Hall who ha
10 However, Hall la scheduled
to play In the league' final en-
gagement Friday evening. If he
can Icore eight or more point
he'll be acclaimed high point
winner of the season.
Stanley Hall's Pacific Girls
volleyball outfit gave another
fine demonstration to reach the
> bracket when they fought on
ifiost even terms with a strong
a-Star agfrifatlon represent-
ing the Paralao Playground Sat-
urday night to the Pacific Club-
hou audi^Hh^ wm
play neet to the PaRe glrU this
The Atlantic Cricket CouncU
lvarCRy F^e&una eornplet
plans for the inauguration of
,..e Atlantic side local-Rate
:rlckt League which If ehed-
uled for, Sunday, Jan. 21, at the
Jjount Hope Stadium.
The league heads have select-
ad Su** C.C., last year's cham-
ptens, and Excelsior C.C. for the
opening match.
All roads will lead to Gamboa
on the Che*rat Mturday where
the Free-Foi-All Outboard Motor
Cnamolonahip of the Uthmua
wlU be decided. This race will be
keenly contested and will pit the
big Johnson'a twenty-two horse-
power engines agalnat the Ugh
Mercury tena.
The boys will be racing for the
Agencia Lumina Cup donated by
Mr. Vizcaya. The wise money
seems to be on the Mercurys, and
Master Sergeant Colley of Al-
brook Air Force Base will be the
favorite. ,
The Gold Label Championship
for the big Class "D" Runabouts
will be run at 1:30 MB. for the
Dlers & Ullrich Prue, followed
closely by the Class "C" 10 horse-
g>wer boats competing for the
irveceria Nacional Trophy.
The Class "B" seven and one-
half horsepower racers will be
competing for the Duran Four
Rosas prtie at 3 p.m., and the
CUM ,rk" Midgets should cross
the starting Una at four o'clock
for the 8moot-Hunnlcutt-Na-
tlonal Distillers Trophies.
Club grounds are open to the
public and ample space will be
provided for the spectators.
The Gamboa Police, In addition
ROBERTO DE VICENO, the
Argentine slugger and one of
the top favorltea.
to patrolling the race course will
put out the fried fish dinner at
1 pjn. This promises to be a, busy
day for the Canal Zone's finest.
Prizes will be presented by Ca-
nal Zone belles at the Club dance
after the race.
Gamboa Swim Pool
To Be Closed For
Cleaning Friday
The Gamboa swimming pool
will be closed all day Friday,
Jan. 15, far cleaning, it waaian-
nounced today by the Physical
Education and Recreation
Branch.
The work will be done by the
Municipal Division force, and it
was expected that It will be
completed In time to have the
pool reopened on the regular
schedule the following day.
Successful Golfers
play
r ">1S
Now available once again at your Pro
Shop and Coif Clubs the world's most
successful golf Ball...
The DUNLOP "65"
in both English and American sizes.
$ 0.75 Per ball
7.50 per dozen
First Round Set
For Tomorrow PM
Seventy-five top notch golfers will swing into
action Thursday afternoon in quest of the 1952 Pa-
nama Open championship at the Panama Golf Club
with Slammin' Sammy (Chesterfield) Snead the
favorite to lead the pack when the final scores are
tabulated Sunday afternoon upon completion of the
72 holes.
Snead will play in a threesome
with Johnny MacMurray-the
defending champion and favor-
ite to win the amateur "aana
Gonzalo Saenz, the well known
amateur shot maker iram Col-
ombia. This trio is expected to
attract the greatest number of
galleryltes, and they ill hit the
fairways promptly at l:M Pm-
Roberto de Vlcenao rated as
the guy who can upset toin-na-
menf favorite Snead, wi be
playing with Charter MacMurray
and Miguel 8alas. They will tee
0iMornta{" starting times were
given the lesser lights of the
Clark, Thomas At Mount Ho_
Tonight; Bombers Widen Lea&
ANBAL MACARRN, the Pan-
am Club pro.
tournament, with all the "nwif
players In action in the arter-
nRaul Posse, the Argentine, ace
playing out of Colombia, fired his
second sub-par round in a row
DICKIE ARIAS, former Cabin-
et minuter, now a .vice-presi-
dential candidate, and one ol
Panama's leading amateurs.
CAPT. DAVE STARRETT, a U.
S. Air Forro pilot and Orte f
the best amateur in Pana. mi.
Contrasting Styles
To Make Sunday's
Bout Interesting
Sports........-v:xuauh..
The unorthodox boxing style
of Wilfredo Brown and the rip-
roaring two-fisted attack of chal-
lenger Louis Thompson should
make Sunday's title bout an en-
joyable and exciting contest at
the Panam Gym.
Despite the constant murmur-
ing of the fang that Brown is not
colorful, the record books show
him to be a consistent winner,
having lost only two of his local
fighta over a period of four years.
After viewing the films of the
Ray Robinson-Randolph Turpln
upset, local die-hards should be
convinced that good fighters can
also posses a unisue style. To-
day M per cent of the world's
boxers are either trying to be a
Dempsey or an Armstrong.
On the other hand the 81-year.
old sensational Louie, who is
{leasing to watch because of hi*
ine combination, has also been
consistent, having been victori-
ous in 17 af his 19 professional
outings.
Louie and his handlers pulled
second uu-u -j ti,m
yesterday when ,r* toured.the
panam course In jOSaate
two under regulation. Posse tied
for the runner-up spot last, year
and in 1950 wa ked of f with the
title. Today, he la hitting the ball
better than ever oetrc and he
can get off to a good start In.the
first round will be a hot con-
tender to repeat ble 1980 per-
OSckCWMt. from the United
States, Pablo Molina from Col-
ombia and Mike Kullkowski from
Fort Davis wUl start the parade
of stars to the first tee Thev art
slated for a 1:08 starting time,
and will be followed by Chica-
go's pro Phil Oreenwald Herb
Mitten of Balboa and Ral Ledes
from Colombia. i.,t
Chick Harbert-the longest
hitting pro in the United States
-will take his first swing at 1:M
P.m playing with Anbal Macar-
rn of Panam and Henry Rus-
sen, amateur champion of Flor-
ida who arrived last night.
Admission to the 18"F?.
rounds tomorrow, ^fe
day and Sunday will be one dol-
lar and tickets may be purchased
at tie entrance to the Panam
ChThe entry lift <-Unifies pro-
fessional) :
*'8*44-Qabriel Gallndo, Carlos
de la Guardia, Eraamo d la
shrank Morrlce. Rene Es-
n^VooH^tJeffSiaugh-
t1-o1^Eayrlfoerrans,DlCkDeh-
l^toyleo/Sck'enhauS. Tony
jankus, Chas. Inamoratl. .
9-a4-lMatt Shannon, Alberto
Arias. BUI Serin1**; g
9-SNorman Lewter. Al saa-
rlnen, Morris Muller.
9-40Preston Trim, Jr., Oo.
BtkT^5kl~H*U
U??nteevFeeaBeaudry Don|
pnnR^Preston Trim, Sr.__
Merchants, Brewers
To Clash Tonight
At Balboa Stadium
PACIFIC TvVOIGHT BASEBALL
(first Half Standings)
TEAMS- Won Lost Pet
Bslboa Brewer; .. J l S
Gibraltar Life Ins. I 1 JJ
Panam Merchants 1 J "
Balboa High Sch.. 0 4
10:18H. G. Roblnaon, Oen
Hochstedler, A. Gagnon. .
10'.2 Herb Busby. Joe Hoff-
man, John Olson.
10:34 Luther Fleming, Prc
Graham, Capt. H. W. Gordon.
10:42Roger Orvi*. Bob Arml-
tage, Jim Rldee. I.
10:60Charlie Wood, Thatcher
Cllsbee, Jim DisLondea.
P.M.
1:00John Wright, Sylvester
Bubb. Vlnce Lombrola.
1:08Pablo Molina, Buck
White, Mike Kullkowski.
1:16 'Phil Oreenwald, Herb
Mitten, 'Ral Ledes.
1: S3Sam Snead, Gonzalo
Saenz, Johnny MacMurray.
1:40Harvey Breaux, Jaime de
la Ouardia, Jaime Saenz.
1:48'Roberto de Vlcenzo,
Charles MacMurray, 'Miguel Sa-
las.
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
XEAM8 Won Lost Pet.
Bombers........14 I 36
Yankees........IS .
Bluebirds....... 9 12 M*
Brownies....... 16 .348
TONIGBT'S GAME
Mount Hope Stadium (7:30)
Brownlea (Clark 4-6) vs. Yankees
(Thomas 4-0).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Balboa Stadium: Bombers 5,
Bluebirds 2.
of the last place Brownies at
Mount Hops Stadium.
Clark la uaually rough when
performing before his hometown
fanshe halls from Silver City.
However, for the Yankees this is
another "must"' game.
Last night the Bombers cash-
ed In on another superb prteh-
The battling Yankees will be
going all out tonight to keep
within striking distance of the
leading Bombers. The Yanks will
send unbeaten righthander Dave
Thomas to the mound against
aajredlctablejefty Vlbert Clark
1:66'Anbal Macarrn, Hen-
ry Russell, 'Chick Harbert.
2:04 'Bud Hammond, Dave
Star re ti. 'Ral Posse.
3:00R. Billing, Anbal Galln-
do, Ray Golden.
Fight Manager,
Brother, Indicted
NEW YORK, Jan. 23 (UP)
Fight manager Tommy Ryan and
hla brother, Patsy Ebell. have
been Indicted on charges of third
degree assault by a New York
court.
Ryan and Patsy are charged
with attacking referee Ray Mil-
ler and match maker Al Welll
following a Madison Square Gar-
den bout on Jan. 11.
The New York Athletic Com-
mission last week removed Ryan's
license, fined him $8,000 and
barred him from all boxing clubs
In the state.
Big 10 Hoopsters
Among Country's
Top Basketballers
NEW YORK. Jan. 23 (UP) -
The Big 10 is well represented
among the top 10 basketball
teams In the latest United Press
coache poll.
The 86 coaches rate unbeaten
Illinois number one for the sixth
straight week. lowata fourth,
and Indiana holda down 10th
spot. The coaches considered
carnes played through Saturday
In their balloting.
Illinois polled 334 votes out of
a possible 360. Kansas holds sec-
ond piaea, and Kentucky, third.
Iowa Jumps from sixth place to
fourth. Washington dropped one
spot to fifth place. Kansas 8tate
moved from seventh place to
sixth. St. Louis is seventh. St.
Bon aventure and Duauesne each
sdvanced one spot. The Bonnles
rank eighth and the Dukes,
ninth. Indiana it 10th.
ing performance af Th
Smith and whipped the
place Bluebirds 5-2. Smith
ed up his fourth conseeutivjJBc-
tory In as many starts.
Smith scattered four base. M
while limiting the BJuebhsfEsa
only two runsone of the:
earned. The first run result.
an error by rrank Austin. 'PJta
Meolis, the loser, also mtm,jmm
distance while scattering asveyu
dozen hits. ^B
Fight Result*-
PHILADELPHIA
Champion Jimmy C
Now York, outpointed _
go, 138V4, LOS Angeles lit)
CHICAGOMosea Ward, 161*4,
Detroit, drew with George Sher-
man, 158, Chicago (8). 11'
NEW YORKWallace <*)
Smith, 138H, Cincinnati, .oat-
pointed Teddy (Red Top) Davta,
1S8V4, New York (8). ,____^
TRENTON, N J.Gene Takaeh,
132, Trenton, outpointed Pillear-
te Osario, 181H, Puerto Rica ().
RICHMOND, Va.B*sU Marte,
131H, Philadelphia, ewtpatatad
Gianni Uboldi, 188, Milan. Italy
(8).
WASHINGTONJunan
1TI4, Wsshlnarten. kaaekei
Art Henri. 180^4, New York
NEW OiaEANt^OtolpBiiDL.
1844, New Orleans, outpotn
Johnny Capitn, 1S6, New
leans (6i.
\\
BROTHER, you need


i
JACK WEIR
"Ye a cool head
and iron nerves
to be a champion
golf player-
im.)
TONIGHTS GAME
Brewers
Pete Corrlgan's Panam Mer-
chants will be seeking their^aec-
ond straight win tonight when
they faceche league leading B_
boa Brewera at the Baiooa
dlum at seven o'clock.
The Merchants broke Into the
the Brewers will give them aWfJ
game advantage over the Gibral-
tar Ineurancemen.
The last time these twe. teams
ond week, the Merchantmen have
improved and may be ready for
the Brewera tonight._________
lMl'a biggest boner when they
kicked aws the title -
peaed over-the-welght mateh.
Was R the unerthodoa atyle af
Brawn that baffled Louie?
Sunday's return bout alone eaa
answer this euestlon.
BUT
Anyone can drive a 1951
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I

BASEBALL ADMISSION PRICES GO UP
__________ _____________________________'___________________________i_______________________________________________:____:_____________________ <*te t)
Egypt Takes
lime To Cuss
Immoral Kiss
AN WPgPCrCLrtT^JliE^DAlLT NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Lei the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
CAIRO, Jan. 23 < UP '-One of
Egypt's most publicized kisses
since Cleopatra's time bounded
back into the courts today. The
questions to be decided are:
Did Kamal Saleh kiss his girl
in the railroad station in viola-
tion of the law?
Did he kiss the train window
while he was outside the train
and his girl was inside?
Is either kissing the girl in
public or kissing the window an
"immoral" act punishable by
law?
Kamal was taken to court on
a charge of kissing his girl. The
complainant wasa m ddle-aged ; Secretary of War Robert P.
man who said that kissing wasiPltterson and 27 others were
shameless. I crowded Into the small morgue
m h. mri viispdhere today as searchers looked
theaw"ndowld He w^acqululd re victims of yesterday
and the complaint was appealed
The Appeals Court ruled that
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Ex-War-Secretary Pattersons
BodyFound;28D
ELIZABETH, N. J.. Jan. 231 Two children and a woman were headed for Florida, crashed in Secretary for
IP) The bodies of former reported on the critically 111 list, the Elizabeth River Dec. 16 to 1947.


''I
kissing at railroad stations was
permissible if the participants!
were relatives.
Kamal admitted that the glrl|
was no relation, and he was
Kamal himself appealed this,
time because he says he didn't
kiss the girl, or even the window
because he is not tall enough to
reach it. __
Draft Board Head
Gets Three Years
For Taking Bribe
MEMPHIS, Tenn., Jan. 23.
(UP)Mark Heffernan, former
head of the largest draft board
in Tennessee, was sentenced to
three years In prison today for
accepting a $200 bribe to defer a
registrant.
Heffernan. 54-year-old liquor
dealer and leader In veterans
affairs, waived Indictment and
was sentenced by U. S. Judge
Marion 8. Boyd. He was arrested
last month by FBI agents as he
received money from Leslie V.
Thompson, father of a draft re-
gistrant.
afternoon's American Airlines
crash in the middle of the city.
Seven persons were injured.
Professor Says LA
Has Much To Offer
US in Literature
WASHINGTON, Jan, 23 (USIS)
A U. S. professor of English,
returned from a lecture tour In
Latin America, said today Latin
American writers have much to
contribute to the literature of
the United States.
"The reverse is also true we
have much to give the American
The Convalr, carrying 23 pas- killing all 56 aboard. One of
sengers and crew, including Pat- the Commando's engines had
terson, sliced off the top of an caught fire on takeoff from
apartment building and explod-1 Newark airport,
ed on a frame house in blind- The Convalr yesterday was
ing fog yesterday, killing all on' approaching Newark airport af-
board. : ter a flight from Buffalo.
The five occupants of the It missed a girls school by 50
flaming house, including three ft. seconds before it crashed.
children, "were burned to death Classes had been dismissed,
The crash was the worst- however, and the building was
almost empty.
Richard Mosher, former
chief counsel of the Senate
Crime Investigation Commit-
tee, identified Patterson's body
at the morgue by its shirt
size.
A dental chart had furnished
temporary identification of the
60-year-old lawyer, who served
in Mr. Truman's cabinet as
ever airline disaster in a me-
tropolitan area, and Eliza-
beth's second big crash in six
weeks.
A non-scheduled Commando,
Evangelist Finds
Washington Most
Sinful US City
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23 (UP)
Evangelist Billy Graham, af-
go<
ashl
Republics from a literary stand-; ter one week's crusading among
point," said Dr. John G. Varner. congressmen and government
Associate Professor of English at
the University of Texas. He re-
turned Sunday from a six-month
tour of Venezuela, Colombia,
Ecuador. Nicaragua, Honduras
workers, labels Washington as
the most sinful city he ever
visited.
But Graham said In an lnter-
and Guatemala."Dr. Varner is vtew t^y tnat nta evangelical
widely known as the co-tran-
slator, with his wife, of "The
Florida and the Inca," an ac-
count of Hernando de Soto's con-
quests on the North American
continent. The book was written
by Garcllaso de la Vega and pub-
lished In Portugal In 1605. The
translation Is bemg published in
England.
work here has barely begun.
"Washington needs spiritual
awakening more than any city
I have ever been to," Graham
told newsmen.
"I have only begun to see what
takes place heredrinking par-
ties, the way influence is bought,
disregard for morals In the
, realm of sex. It Is unbelievable.
Dr. Varner spoke at culturaliT Slm rum thBt the true story
centers, schools, universities and |of Washington's corruption is
museums on current U. S. trends not known
in literature and history and on'
outstanding U. S. literary figures.
He also offered appraisals of no-
vels In his country.
High School, CZJC
Teachers To Aid
Army Education
Teachers from Balboa's High
School and Junior College again
will aid the Army education pro-
gram in a new round of off-
duty courses at the Fort Clayton
Army Education Center, accord-
ing to an announcement by Cap-
tain A. M. George. 65th AAA
Group Education Officer.
Enrollment In the latest series
of group study classes will begin
on Jan. 28 and continue through
Feb. 8.
G. GRANT MASON, Jr., vice
JpresMent of the Spanish-lan-
#uage magazing "Vision," is
scheduled to arrive in Pana-
-Jna tomorrow for a short visit.
Accompanied by his wife, Mrs.
artha Ashley Mason, he
.plans to visit ten Latin Amer-
cean countries. Mason 1'-ed in
Jpanama for aboui 11 years
and Is one of the founders of
Pan American Airways.
The tour sponsored by the U.
S. Government's Exchange of
Persons Program, by which U. S.
leaders visit other countries, a'nd
leaders are brought from abroad
to tour the United States.
Austria ns Want
Prince's Castles
Confiscated
VDINNA, Jan. 23 (UP)Aus-
tria's Socialist Party today for-
mally proposed that all the pro-
perty owned by Prince Ernst
Starhemberg be confiscated and
turned over to the government.
The property 82 estates
valued at several million dollars
was recently ordered returned
to Starhemberg by the National
Court of administration.
The estates were seized from
Starhemberg by the Nazis after
the Ansehluss in 1938.
Army's Contest
For Cost Slogan
Has 2 Days To Co
Only two days remain in
which all military and civilian
personnel within the United
States Army Caribbean may en-
ter the cost consciousness slogan
contest.
The contest closes midnight
Jan. 25 and cash prizes amount-
ing to $90.00 will be awarded the
three best slogans.
Officials said that Increasing
Interest has been shown in the
contest during the past week by
the number of entries received.
Some of the slogans are short
some are long but all have a
chance to win cash awards. It
is felt that preparation of con-
test slogans by individuals of
the command should serve to
arouse a sense of responsibility
toward cost consciousness.
Churchill Leaves Sick Bed
___
To Board Liner For Homeland
JIFJf 2?RK'.?.an-t23 ,(.V.P)1 iorces to the Suez Canal Z01"5 city's Medal of Honor to Church-
British Prime Minister Winston aroused a storm of protest In' 111In bed
Churchill sick with a cold, sail- Washington, while being wel-! His Illness caused Gov and
ed from here aboard the Queen corned In London. | Mrs. Thomas E. Dewey to cancel
Ca7.at.l:.1..5am.todav'en route But on tne wnole Churchill is a trip from Albany to visit the
back to Britain to report to par- returning home well satisfied
llament on the results of his 17- with the results of his mission
day visit to the United States and He has re-established with
Canada, I Mr. Truman and with other
Parliament meets Jan. 29, one U.S. officials the personal con-
day after the Queen Mary is due, tact he feels so vital to Anglo-
ln Southampton. American understanding.
Churchill joined the liner Churchill spent the entire day .
hortly after 10 o'clock last night.'In bed yesterday with a slight! clenching his fist and shaking
British leader.
But Francis Cardinal Spellman
chatted for an hour with Church-
ill, although their originally
scheduled dinner engagement
was cancelled.
"He looks fine and he still has
that old spirit," the Cardinal said
after
bed
Iter getting up from his sick; fever, under his physician's ad-! for emphasis after leaving the
d to make the Journey home. I vice not to step outdoors until It1 apartment of Bernard Baruch
He had been hi bed two days, was time to board the Queen where Churchill had been stay-
fith a heavy cold and fever, and, Mary. I ing
With a heavy cold and fever, and Mary.
appeared slightly unsteady on his
feet.
He did not meet the press,
bnt later issued a statement
from his cabin expressing re-
gret that he was unable to do
SO, and sending his greetings to
the people of New York.
War from 1945
In Washington Mr. Truman
described Pattersons death as
a tremendous loss to him and
the nation.
A Civil Aeronautics Board in-
vestigator said the plane came
into Newark from the southeast,
heading for the runway, with
the celling 400 ft. and the visi-
bility one mile.
The Investigator said the
plane had been picked up, on
Vfewark airport's radar screen,
but veered off course several
times. It vanished from the
screen when It veered 900 ft
tq the right of Its course a few
seconds before It. crashed.
It took firemen almost three
hours to smother the flames
that damaged the eight-family
apartment building and destroy-
ed the frame house.
Mayor James Kirk of Eliza-
beth, enraged over the two re-
cent crashes and over the cons-
tant low-flying of other planes,
said the Newark airport must
be moved to a less densely po-
pulated area.
PC*
:. ; (NEATelephoto)
B-15 CRASHES Rescue workers carry out one of the Injured after an Air Force B-25
crashed into the main building of the corree tlonal and rehabilitation center which houses
prisoners of Mather Air Force Base, Sacramen to, Calif. Six persons were killed and 61 others
Injured.
The courses of Instruction are
offered primarily to military
personnel, who must appear in
person during normal duty hours
Annual BHS Fashion
Show Sel For Next
Wednesday Balboa
Storm Lashes
Stricken Vessel
Off Africa Coast
CASABLANCA, Jan. 23 (UP)
A violent storm threatened to
break up a U. 8. military cargo
ship stranded on rocks with 12
men aboard.
Other vessels raced for shelter
as the storm lashed Africa's
northwest coast for the second
straight day.
A French fishing smack sank
last night, but the four-man
crew swam to safety.
The 11,000-ton United States
cargo vessel the Newberry Vic-
tory en route from New York
piled into the rocks near the
harbor of Chisouse here yester-
day. The vessel was carrying
2,500-tons of military supplies
including 16 fighter planes lash-
ed to the decks for U. S. air-
bases in North Africa.
The crewmembers were be-
lieved to be in no Immediate
danger but the rescue vessels
were standing by.
Chez Elolse, Balboa High
School's annual fashion show,
will be presented on Wednesday.
Jan. 30. on the front lawn of the
Balboa High School building.
At exactly 8 p.m.. the Balboa
High School orchestra under the
direction of Victor Herr, Director
of Music, will open the program.
Master of ceremonies Sam!
te7nVofi^rHo^^Tdurtai;Maphto will welcome the public I _
the period from the 4th to ^|!?122SS5!^Ik*mSS? Ot ISthiTIUS PlCS
8th of Feb. enrollment will be Immediately after the lights w
accepted between 6:30 p.m. and be dimmed and the models will
8:30 p.m. for the convenience i begin to appear down the long
of troops unavailable during nor-|?la"n where they will exhibit
mal hoiiM theu" creations.
All kinds of dresses will be dem-
onstrated Favorites among
Longtime Resident
Courses being offered at the n
Education Center are: American the models this year are nylon
History. English I and II, Mathe- "'J"""1*?"! ^HES
matlcs I and II. General Science,
Typing, Spoken Spanish I and II
and Radio for Beginners.
No fee Is charged for these
courses of Instruction. Classes
are generally limited to 30 stud-
ents; therefore all enrollees are
urged to apply at their earliest
convenience.
Military dependents and civil-
fitted suits. Date dresses, school
dress and sun suits will form
rjart of the assorted collection of
dresses which will be modeled by
the BHS mannequins.
The girls taking Dart In the
show are In Miss Elolse Monroe's
ad venced classes.
The models will be: Ana Adler,
Cora Adler, Marlslta Arbalza,
James Chambers, 73. a long-
time resident on the Isthmus,
died early this morning at his
home in Panama City. He had
been suffering from heart
trouble for some time.
The funeral will leave the
family's residents In San Fran-
cisco at 4 p. m. today. Burial
will be in the Herrera cemetery.
He is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Pearl Chambers, 11 chil-
dren and several grandchildren.
EA Telephoto)
36 PERISH IN DC-4 CRASH Poking above the surface of
Hecate Strait, off Vancouver Island, B.C., is the wreckage of
the ill-fated MATS chartered airliner that crashed, killing
36 of the 43 persons aboard. The plane, carrying mostly mi-
litary men coming home from Korea, plunged into the ley
waters of the North Pacific as it attempted an emergency
landing at Sandsplt Field.
SURVIVORS Sgt. Charles H. Fields (left) and his brother,
Sgt. Richard P. Fields, who were among the seven survivors
congratulate themselves on their good fortune in the hospital
at McChord Air Force Base, Washington.
ian Army employes may apply by Edith Beauchamo. Margarita
telephone, for enrollment on a Chambonnet, Miriam Cornejo,
space-available basis. Phone 87- Josle Dl Bella. Bobble Dorris, Gav ;
2161 and ask for Mr. Clark.
Rotary Club Changes
Luncheon To Saturday
The Panama Rotarv Club Is
changing the date of its lunch-
eon this week In order that a
group of visiting Rotarians who
have a long record of 100% at-
tendance may continue to main-
tain this record. This group of
Rotarians are arriving from the
States on Saturday, Jan. 26, and
the Rotary luncheon for this
week will be held at the Hotel
"El Panam" at 12:15 p. m. on
Saturday Instead of the usual
time of Thursday.
The Rotarv Club Is Inviting
as guest speaker one of the visit-
ing professional golfers who will
be playing at the Panama Golf
Club.
Edwards. Eugenia Esrjeau, Pat
Foster, Freda Gfeller. Coila
Goodln. 8allle Gore. Pat Gott, |
Fresla Hager. Marian Harris,
Merlene Jeppsen. Betty La Bree,
Brunnv Lavergne Ann Magee,
Sonla Mantovani, Rosarlo More-
no, Mary Morley. Gloria Morton,
Mary Norgan.Pat Peacher. Grace
Plckenpaugh, Dora Ponevas, Elo-
sa Quintero, Evelyn Rlnaldo,
Idalla 8amudlo. Ligia 8anchez,
Sharon Slgfrld. Ofelia Suazo,
Rylvia Swift, Marllvn Toledano,
Edna Wantuck, and Vicky Yoh-
ros.
WANTED FULL MEASURE
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UP) The
diner ordered three ham sand-
wiches, but ate only one, says
Mrs. W. F. Wilson. The man
slipped the ham out of two sand-
wiches and put it into th' third
sandwich, which he ate.
He said they discussed "world
Churchill spent his time work-, affairs" and that Churchill "was
Ing on state papers relating to; very Interested In my recent trip
the momentous decisions he around most of the world "
reached on some of the biggest1 Churchill's visit, which began
issues of Western strategy with his arrival here last Jan. 5,
against Communist aggression, i ended with these agreements-
-Ty that the 77-year-old | 1) Use of American air bases in
Churchill can look forward to, British leader might catch pneu-, Britain "in an emergency" would
Mme criticism when he reports monia as he did twice while trav-1 be a matter of joint decision by
to Parliament. Many members; ellng during World War II. his' the two governments
5UTT?. g?ne 4to far lr? Physician, Lord Moran, had ad- 2) "Complete Identity of alms"
rrnr?tmi"^ftr^a," ,TCrt vlsf,d him t0 remaln mdoors the ta Mlddle East policy and "broad
United States policy in the Far entire day. harmony-on Far Eastern issues
TT1, _, ..... ... Churchill bowed to the doctor's 3) Need for streamllnlne the
& ?n dld not we,c(?Jne his counsel and. as a result, the big; North Atlantic Treaty Organlza-
tatementto Congress that If a ticker tape parade and official tlon. wrBiiaa
4) An American admiral to get
supreme command of NATO sea
forces, but Britain's home com-
mand to be enlarged.
5) An exchange of raw mate-
Korean truce was reached and! receptions at City Hall, which
tun broken "opr response will would have taken him Into win-
be prompt, resolute and effee- j try rain, were cancelled
flye." But in the United States Instead, Mayor Vincent R. Im-
that promise was well received. ; pe'lltterl and Orover A. Whalen
,_In contrast. Churchill's -
"mfiiSi EJE: chalrman ?f the mayor's recep- rials whereby Britain will get
#rinA .nrt ^,rw ..r,w *'' w" conIr"lit. arrn8f'' tn' steel ,nd the United States will
France and Turkey send token Informal presentation o the get aluminum and tin.
(NBA Telephoto)
CARDINAL RETURNS Francis Cardinal Spellman (second
from right i u greeted at Logan Airport, Boston, Mass. as he
returns from a 28,000-mile world tour. Among the welcomera
are Secretary of Labor Maurice Tobln (left) and Arc*Wnop
Richard Cushlng of Boston, who was dedicating the Airport s
" new chapei a the Cardinal's plane landed.
Travel
Before You Travel
To Any Place In The World
i
Buy A Travel
INSURANCE POLICY.
ON SALE AT ALL TRAVEL AGENCIES
OR AVIATION COMPANIES

AND AT MOTTA'S TOCUMEN STORE.
CIA. INTERNACIONAL DE SEGUROS, S.A.
P.O. BOX 1036
TELEPHONE 2-1641
PANAMA, R. P.
L E. G. de PAREDES
MANAGER
',-


Full Text

"*BRANIFF


i
AN INPgPENPl^^fjjfcs^P^T NEWSPAPK
Panama Amertcan
"Let the people know the truth and the country it safe** Abraham Lincoln.
SeagramsYO.
CANADIAN WHISKY
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P.. THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 195S
'i
FIVE CENT

Military Moves
Planned As Truce
Talks Fizzle Out
TOKYO, Jan. 24 (DP) The
Korean truce outlook has be-
come so dismal that United
states officials and Allied repre-
sentatives In Washington are re-
portedly considering what mili-
tary moves to make If the Pan-
munjom negotiations break down
entirely. .
United States officiate have not
abandoned all hope that an ar-
mistice might eventually be sign-
ed at Panmunjom. But they are
frankly pessimistic about, .v,...._..._-.-- _.
chances for breaking the present were marked the ^a"" fr a0Uf
deadlock over exchanging prlson.| but on of MttU JO*" of
-----
rla hit the United Nations ground
forces. .
If the Panmunjom talks break
down, but the Reds still hold
their fire, a military stalemate
may follow.
If the United Nations attack
first they would be left open to
Red charges of "aggression.'
These charges would find sup-
port in Asian countriea.
At the Panmunjom conference
today Red staff officers gave UN
representatives maps on which
era of war.
There is a growipg feeling that
the prisoners of war stalemate
Involves basic differences be-
tween Communist and democra-
tic principles which cannot read-
ily be compromised by either side.
United Nations strategy will
probably hinge on what the
Reds da.
If they launch a major of-
fensive the United Nations will
fight back with a counter-of-
fensive.
This counter-offensive would
be limited to Korea unless Com-
munist plane based in Manchu-
* *
Ariiulfistas Tie Up
Traffic On Avenue
A group of some 160 placard- leader, Former President Arnulfo
bearing members of the Partido Arias,
Panameista today blocked both The Panamelstas sat and lay
vehicular and pedestrian traffic down across the avenue and on
nn Central Avenue, opposite the sidewalks holding alpt Ula-
santa An Plaza, for one hour cards demanding the release
while they protested over the Arias, who has been in Jail since
continued encarcelatlon of their his overthrow tost May 10.____
------------------------------- Policemen on duty in tne area.
One-Handed Bandit
Dies After Gunfight
South Of Jurez
PASSIVE RESISTANCE A
lone panamefllsta reclines on
the pavement of Central Ave.
(top) while other demonstra-
tors and curious spectators
mill around blocking traffic.
Earlier (bottom) about 150 Pa-
namefiiStas, carrying placards,
sat and toy down in the streets
during a demonstration de-
manding the release of Former
President Arnulfo Arias from
prison.
JUAREZ,
(UP) A
Mexico, Jan. 24
one-handed bank
tried unsuccessfully to clear the
street but only managed to get
some of the demonstrators to
stand up matead of sitting or
lying in the street.
A slight drizzle which started
to fall made them decide to con-
tinue the demonstration with a
parade along the avenue.
They were just two Jumps
ahead of a group of mounted
(UP) wic-iuiu m..~ ahead of a group oi muunvcu
robber died early this morning, ^y^men who arrived on the
the second victim of a brief but sabers bared, to take up
action-packed gun battle in -o,,.!.-. m tne area around the
Tunisian Troops
Cry 'Help' As Arabs
Dynamite Outpost
TUNIS, Jan. 24 (UP)Besieged
French militiamen called for aid
from airplanes and tanks today
Shen a huge mob of Arabs
unched a dynamite attack on
the French outpost at Kelibla. a
little town on the extreme end of
the Cape Bon pennlnsular. 70
miles east of Tunis.
action-packed gun
Mexican cotton fields between
the police and a gang that was
hunted in a $175,000 bank rob-
bery
i Leopoldo Rey, a 27-year-old
ex-convict died of Head wound.
His brother, Alfonso Rey was
cut down, by police bullets and
died in a iarmhouae where the
band of six men with a woman
and a five-year-old boy sought
refuge about six mile south of
Juarez. ".
The two that remained' large were identified merely as
Kav and Jimmy.
It was thought that they were
headed for Los Angeles or San
Francisco. They had 342,600
pesos and $38,158 in their pos-
session.
Two others of the gang sur-
rendered.
i
Sex Appeal Said
To Bar Italians
From British Mines
LIVERPOOL. Jan. 24 (UP).
_ A Oenserv.tlve member ef
parliament, Victor Ralkes. aald
todav that British miners ob-
jected te> bringing In It "Hans
to work their undermanned pits
because the Latins have "cer-
tain sex appeal to miners' wive
and daughters."
Raike suggested that any
recruited Italian miners should
work certain pit exclusively,
so they would be segregated
from the normal life of the
English mining villages.
position in the area around tne
plaza.
Aged'Pauper'Given
Belter Burial Alter
Fortune Is Found
There was no Immediate indi-
cation a to whether the tanks
and planes had actually gone
into action.
. ready the eighth day of
nationwide rioting In Tunis has
claimed four new casualties. At
least 83 have been killed and 200
wounded in the eight days.
The French Resident-General
m Tunis, Count Jean Hautel-
NEW YORK, Jan. 24 (UP) clocque went to see the Bey of
Authorities today withdrew en-Tuns at his palace here to try
ough from an aged recluse' to find a way to resume negoUa-
$500,000 estate to move his body | tlons to end the current blood-
from a pauper's grave to a more sned.
Americans
Details
Of Train Death Case
BERNE Switzerland, Jan. 24
(UPL The Swiss police and U.
S. Legation officials today re-
fused to reveal further details
concerning the arrest of an al-
leged Romanian in connection
with the mysterious death two
years ago of a U. 8. Naval At-
tache assigned to Romania.
The arrest, which took place
some time ago" was announced
yesterday by federal police chief
Dr. Walter Balslger.
The U. S. Legation here later
denied reports that the U. 8.
authorities had demanded extra-
dition of the arrested man.
The official Investigation or
the death of Capt. Eugene Karpe
who fell or was pushed from a
speeding train in Austria on
Feb. 28. 1950 had been closed for
some tim.
Karpe's death is listed as ac-
cidental on the official records
of the United States Navy-
Britain To Refuse
Egypt Mediation
Unless Terror Slops
De Hautelclocqne was report-
edly ready to make Important
concessions to the rioting Na-
tionalists in return for the
Bey's Intercession in a bid to
calm the country.
At the top of the likely con-
dignified plot on Long Island.
The King's County public ad-
ministrator authorized re-burial
ye-'srday after a fortune accu-
mulated by Harry Chapn 8m 1th.
84. "'s found in a safety deposit
vat'lt in a Brooklyn warehouse.
L r.iith died Oct. 24 in a hospl- the top o tne uxeiy con-
tal in Brooklyn. HI frail body|cesslons ls the release of Tablb
was buried in a pauper's grave in,,,^^ leader of the Neo Des-
after it had lain unclaimed m thejtour (New independence) party,
morgue for about 12 days. whose arrest bv the French au-
The wealth 8mith accumulat- Ueg ,Mt fhursday parked
ed waa discovered after f'tondSj rlotmg>
and neighbors began: wondering MAt the United Nation In Pa-
w_h*i.hap?*ne,toni^im,r^ who ra. Mexico's LuU Padilla ervo,
shabbily dressed old man who { th GeneraJ j.
JEM i5CS3iwS5SS s>8X'5ES5r
vault. Court permission was gW- gUon at the United 1
en to open the safety deposit
vault where he found stacks of
stocks and bonds from all sec-
tions of the United States show-
ing cash deposits totalling $275,- HIGH
000. 1:1 .
He left no will '4.U m.
war camps in North Korea.
The Reds said close to the de-
vena camp a river had recently
changed its course, so the map
has to be redrawn. They prom-
ised this map as soon as possible.
The United Nations team has
been asking for the location of
POW camps in North Korea since
the Reds reported 20 prisoners,
bellevedly ail South Koreans,
were killed when a United Na-
tions plane bombed the hospital
of a POW camp aear ,4Pyong-
atBut the Reds ref used to give
a simple promise not to build
North Korean airfields during
"55 the tato* remained dead-
locked for theHnth straight day.
In fighting', on the western
front tank-supported United Na-
tions forces battled the Commu-
nists at close quarters in a snow-
storm for possession of a bill.
United Nations tanks poured
concentrated fire Into Commu-
nist bunkers along a seven-mile
segment of the central front be-
tween Kumsong and the Pukhan
The' tanks fired at least 1,600
rounds, damaging; 0 Red bunk-
The Reds replied with only 34
rounds, but that was sufficient
to damage five Qnlted Nations
tanks. .
Three of these were brought
back by tank-recovery teams,
while the other two plodded back
to the base under their own pow-
er.
Philippine Troops
Launch All Out
Attack On Huks
MANILA, Jan. 24 (UP) Thou-
sands of Philippine troops,
spearheaded by Korean combat
veterans, Jumped off at dawn
today to attack a major con-
centration of Communist Huk
rebels five mUes southwest of
the United States Force's Clark
Field.
Virtually the %ntire Phllip-
iNEA Radio-Telephoto)
NEEDLEWORK A Chinese
POW k masked to prevent re-
prisals ngainrt his family) dis-
plays an anti-Communist slo-
gan ta*tooei on his arm. At
least 3000 Red prisoners on
Koje Island. S juth Korea, have
similar statement printed on
their skin, aid 12,000 have
signed petition? begging Allied
officials not tc ship them back
to Red China.
House
Condemns Move
As Discriminatory
WASHINGTON, Jon. 24 (UP) A House Foreign
Affairs Subcommittee which recently visited South A-
merico took the position today that it hod been "most un-
wise" to increase the tuition rates for Canal Zone Schools.
In a report describing its visit to the Isthmus the
committee observed that the proximity of the Canal Zone
to Panam provides a unique opportunity to inculcate'
Panamanian children with American principles and
methods.
Even more important, the subcommittee went on re-
cord to say, "It is desirable to extend the benefits of
American education to all American children in the Ca-
nal Zone and Panam on an equal basis."
The report said: lit impress upon these and
"In view of large United States j redound to our advantage.*
expenditures .being made In The subcommittee was headed
many foreign countries for the by Congressman James P. Rich
Price Of Gas,
tip
Reliable sources today re-
vealed that the price of Canal
Zone gas and elgarets will he
upped two cents in the very
ear future.
Gas new costs 17 cents a ral-
ln and elgarets are 13 eents
a pack in the Zone.
An official spokesman for the
Panama Canal said today that
the new tariffs are in the "pro-
cess of preparation," and as
soon ai they are completed,
copies will be made available
to the
education of nations of those
countries it is difficult to ration-
alize this apparent discrimina-
tion in the matter f Canal Zone
tuition rates."
In condemning as unwise the
increased tuition in Canal Zone
schools which made it difficult
report aid:
Many of them will be th
future leaders of their country.
Indoctrination with American
concepts will undoubtedly leave
ards, South Carolina Democrat.
In describing its visit to the
Isthmus the report said the Re-
public of Panama "presented
some sharp contrasts with other
countries visited.
"The economy of Panama is
unique in Latin America in that
^preg^^mmercW.
"This is the direct result ei
Panama's location as regards
much of the world's ocean-borne
commeree."
The report added that the ef-
fect of this economic pattern i
"directly related to the political
scene in Panama." It continued:
"Since 1845, particularly. Pa-
nama has bad a series of weak
governments.
"There has been little or no
consciousness of need for econ-
omic reform.
"Those seeking hlh public of-
fice too frequently have used
demagogic appeals and Ignored
US Movie Truck
'Bombed'In Genoa
ROME, Jan. 34 (UP)Officials
of the U. S. Mutual Security A-
gency said that one of their fleet
of movie trucks had been dam-
aged by an incendiary bomb
Monday at Vado Ligura, a small
"Communist stronghold" near
Genoa.
A spokesman said that the
damage was estimated at about
$100. The truck had been parked
in the square overnight and
there were no casualties.
Midwesf freeze
Claims 16 Lives;
Two Still Missing
CHICAGO, Jan. 24 (UP)Res.
cue parties today are seeking two >iijti -Kr -
persons missing in the chest- the basic problems of the coun-
high drifts and numbing cold try. Lack of progress has been
which have already claimed at' attributed to the United States
least IS lives in the freezing and its policies.
Midwest.
Drifts have given up the bo-
dies of six in South Dakota, sev-
Communlsts and leftwlng sym-
pathizers have not been slew to
in Minnesota and one in I capitalize upon the disturbed in-
North Dakota. The freeze ex-iternal political scene ta
tended far south a the Gulf ma.
The truck Is one of a fleet of
24 that tour Italy showing edu-
.. n. ,,. of-Pines Air Force upported the catlonal and other films depict-
LONDOH, Jan 24 (UP) or'| _?- big United States aid.
flclal sources said here today 22:
that Britain would not agree tO|
mediation piani in the Anglo-
Egyptian dispui" being put into,
action ail Egypt calls a halt to
terrorism ih the Suez Canal Zone.
Medlaf on proposals from King
Ibn Baud of Saudi Arabia are re-1
girtedly en route here from the
rltlah enbiEsy In Jedda |
Pakistan Foreign Minuter 8tt|
Zaffrultoh Khan l.also_report-| BOWLINQ
dipped

"They have promoted and fo-
mented anti-Americanism in- a
number of fields, including the
National University."
States' temperature
sharply.
Meanwhile a new storm in Cal-
ifornia brought more rain and
snow in the High Sierras. The
storm came after a two-day dry
spell which brought relief from KIpno Revolt Fails
last week's disastrous snows and; PiepUl IXCTUH i uiis
"hh winds on the Chicago' NEW Pf"lWan. lake front forced waves into city, The Nepalese ?3S5 he,?*,
streets today that a 24-hour revolt in
Ranchers in South Dakota the tiny buffer state of Negei
were snowbound for days, and'has been smashed, and all but
got out Into the fields today to 100 of the rebels captured,
find many cattle dead. Nepal Is a Himalayan state
Some ranchers reported heavy sandwiched between India ana
losses Communist-dominated Tibet.

Cops Pick Up Jeer lous Vet For Mailing
Bomb To Wife's Forgotten Old Flame
ed to have put forward some of-
QREEN O., Jan. knowing the coed, Sarah Jane door, he was shot through the authorities *aPj*N5
(VpP- r^glaTJames Mc-.Dulmage ef Oberiln, O.. for shoulder with a revolver Denver to face charges
ed to nave punorwaru a.= w- _. (r,p) j^gias James Mc-Duimage or uoerun, u., ior.snouiaer wuu "-"" ,jr.,;~r HvrraiirTth
fer of tnedlaticn Jew a. "haunted man" the past,three months and they had a1 The second attempt came on sending explosives through the
MeanwnUe at Ismallla. Inthe way, a "< nldto^to- romance, but he had forgotten Jan. 10 when a "fr ghtened-to- mails.
ruiMi:< ii Crav a haunted man tne past, mree munwu ma uiey nu ic oi" ^rr. ,\ .."
..wlto at ismallla. In the !wa3^* ame out of hiding to- romance, but he had forgotten Jan. 10 when a "fr ghtened-to- mails.
lu qua! Zone, a battery of W. ame ow or^nw ^ i ^ death". Mc^ayrweivedajjack-; | ^
faced on
Jen. Sir Georg
mand oust.
"
}5l^^^^i^^\1,^^ "" kt Rankln TO|S?Whlef^eSl^PSi'. ^.rtelnly relaxed and re-
'in-medtote call" a^ .ve|B -total stranger" to him and! would be from the FBI. He .had lie ved/' McCray said as he re-
BALBOA TIDES
TODAY'S TIDIS
LOW
10:07
10:30 p. i
The
Judges' Bench
For loiteri'g in Building 1551
In Oavlton Ro.id a 20-year-old
Panamanian, Pogelio Cedefto,
was sent';nce.1 to ten days in Jail
during the morning session of
the Balboa Magistrate's Court.
a?s w McS tSS* wooed' mlTa? '=55BEf hardTwhen i be-en; ^picious of tbe^letter. I turned tc.hi,i jot.for the first
a girl who later merrled the | told that Sarah Jane, was the which wm sign^Jby^^ppyje M;'t: ks. Ma]
veteran I wlle of the veteran, did he re-
Donald Robert Rankln, 27. of member her
Richmond, In., who served | Coller aald Rankln "must
"brilliantly" in World War II have found out about the re~
and Korea, was accused of manee and it preyed en
shooting McCray and later mall-, bis mind."
ing him a bomb out of bitter Sometime hi November, ac-
Jealousy over his wife's past. I cording to Coller, the local tele-
"Jealousy must have been the: phone office got a long distance
motive.' Prosecutor Floyd CoUer call "from somewhere out west
Hawthorne," superintendent of now I can get a good nights
the FBI office In Cheyenne, sleep without trembling Ive
Wyo. When the package came, been scared to death of she
he turned It over to Prosecutor unknown since Dec. S.'
Coller McCray added that he
Both McCray and Celser es- ] couldn't "Imagine whs had It
caped possible death or in- in for me ... It was
said here.
McCray could scarcely re-
member the girl whose husband
asking the address of Jim Mc-
Cray."
The operator informed the
Jury when the package, filled
with IS sticks of dynamite,
failed to explode because the
fuses were battered loose hi
the malls.
Rankln was traced through a
The operator inrormea tne nanxin was iraccu uiruugu uwm .. i. *-..
caller there was no listing for fingerprint on the package and Indicated she d stand by
being haunted."
He described Sarah Jane as
"really a lovely girl. She came
from a fine family."
McCray's wife had no com-
ment on the events but it was
her
^B^,a^?lS^le^iound allegedly tried Vhf him. rto McCray" and gave" the told Dunbar an "ahnost unbe-1 husband.
.nt^twXaree For driv- Jilty on iwc.ccarge. *""'" maw,.., *i ii-i. R.ni,in ; MrRae "
ing without an operator's license,
he was fined $10 And for fall-
ing to Ooey a traffic signal he
paid an iddltlonal $5.
And an American, William Be-
lisario loyd. 3? was found not
guilty of a waffle violation.
McCn^. *r77Wwta'RankinV McRae." postal inspector declined to' "We intend to start going
arrest in Denver yesterday by On Dec. 8. a man appeared make public. i back te church he said. We
fedwal authorities a charge at John McRae's hou. and, "Were satisfied the motive couldn't while this ntaiowa,
of sendlns dynamite through asked If he was "Jim McCray, was jealousy." Coller said, "and fear was over our head.
thesis. a7num%t """ caller said. John McRae direct- we want him back to fate two Rankln was arraigned and
"McCray is a straightforward ed the man to the Jim McCray's charges of attempted murder ; held in lieu of $20.000 bono m
guy," Coller said, "He admitted house, as McCray answered the However, I'm sure the federal Denver county JaU.
'



SCORES SOAR FOR OPEN' STARTERS
Shannon, Smith
Lead With 37s
AN INDEPENDENT^
^P
wm>.
DAILY NEWSPAPER
The scores zoomed upward this
morning as the early starters In
the field of 75 got the Panama
Open- Golf Tournament under
way at the Panam Golf Club.
While most of the topflighters
were not scheduled to tee off un-
til the afternoon the ever-pres-
ent hopefuls of the also-ran
class went out to do their best.
As the scores were turned In, it
became increasingly apparent
that their best, at least today,
was none too good.
Venerable Matt Shannon, best
o the morning field before he
went out. proved his standing as
ha came in with a nine-hole
round of 37. This score was
equalled by Jack Smith but bet-
tered by ho one as most of the
entries went way over par.
The scores:
FIRST EIGHTEEN
G Gallndo. 83; C. de la Guar-
dia, 82; Erasmo de la Guardia,
83- Nene Arias, 84; Ernesto de la
Guardia, Jr.. 85; G. Engelke, 83.
FIRST NINE
F Morrice, 41; R. Estrlpeaut,
46- J. Kenway, 45; B. Hurdle, 48;
J. Slaughter, 50; H. Beall, 40; E.
Gerrans, 43; R. Dehllnger, 40; R.
M Arias, 40; R. Glickenhaus, 40.
C Inamorati. 50; M. Shannon,
37; A. Arias. 47; W. Schmitt, 40;
N Lewter. 42; A. Saarlnen, 40; M.
Muller. 38, P. Trim Jr., 42; P.
Trim. Sr.. 42; G. Riley, 39; J.
Smith. 37.
W "Eason. 43; Lee Hamilton,
43- George Fears, 45; S. Beaudry,
45 D. Hutchins. 51: B. Boxwell,,
46 fc Harley, 44; M. Mahoney,:
^HUBoblnson, 47; G. Hochsted-
ler 4; A Gagnon, 52; J. Hoff-
maA; J- ofsen.45. R. Orvls,!
48; D. Bean, 41; J. Ridge, 47; P.
Graham, 39; W. Gordon, 43.
Next Tuesday Is
Election Day For
Pacific Civic Council
Next Tuesday will be election I
dav tor trie Pacific Civic Council.
That day all eligible voters
from Balboa. Ancon, and Diablo
districts mav vote at the three
commissaries In those towns. An,
eligible voter is any resident over;
21 years of a-^e In the three dis-
on ballot inp wiil take place
durin- the usual commissary
hours between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30
Pm- .,_ '
Every eligible voter of these
three towns is expected to cast
his ballot for the representatives
of his town. When voting, he
should request the teller to give
him a ballot for the town of
which ho Is a resident. j
By casting his ballot the resi-
dent will show the administra-
tion that he is behind his Paci-
fic Civic Council in Its endeavors
to make *ne Cana! Zone a better i
piece In whi"h to live.
A list of the present nominees I
will be published in the very
r.ear future.
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
rWENTY-SF.VENTH YEAR
PANAMA. R. P.. THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Kefauver s Hat In Democratic
Ring For Presidential Choice
By JOHN I. CUTTER
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24 (UP)
Sen. Estes Kefauver formally
announc -d his candidacy, for the
Democratic Presidential nomina-
tion todav and said he is in the
race "to the finish" regardless of
whethc.' President Truman runs
again.
He sail he v.ants only the top
spot and wi'l not settle for the
vice presidential nomination or
any other office.
The Tenness-e Democrat, for-
mer chairman of the Senate
Crime Comm.ttee said world
peace is the "paramount Issue"
but that ne also is concerned over
the political influence of organ-
ized crime and corruption.
Keafauver made his long-ex-
pected announcement to a jam-
packed news conference which
capped a rash of political pro-
nouncements during the day.
Amonr; them:
Democratic national commlt-
teman John Nr.ngle of Missouri
said after a talk with Mr. Tru-
man he has "no doubt" the Pre-
sident will svek re-election.
Paul E. Fitspntrick. New York
State Democratic Chairman,
said after a tallr with the Pre-
sident he "hopes" Mr. Truman
Evicted Panamanian
Reports $3,725
Missing From Trunk
The loss of $3.725 he had hid-
den In the bottom of a trunk
was reported today by John
McGovern de Freitas, a Panama
City refrigeration mechanic.
De Freitas said the money
he had been saving for five
years to get married on was
left In the locked trunk when
he was put out of his home In
San Francisco following a fore-
closure on a mortgage.
When his personal belongings
were returned to him, de Frei-
tas said the trunk was unlocked
and the money was missing.
De Freitas has filed charges
In the First Circuit Court.
1 will run again and believes
"the call of duty" will influence
his decision.
Price Stabilize Michael V. Dl-
Salle anr.oun.ej he will be a can-
didate for the Democratic U. 8.
Senate nomination In Ohio, seek-
ing the seat now held by Repub-
' lican Sen John W Brlcker.
It also was disclosed today that
Mr. Truman had a private poli-
tical talk at his Blair House re-
sidence 'ast nlpht with Gov.
Adlai E. Ste\enson of Illinois.
Stevenson has been mentioned
as Mr. frump n s likely choice as
successor if the President doesn't
run aga'n.
The Tennessee Senator said
i he decided to get Into the race,
without wailing to learn Presi-
dent Truman's intentions, be-
cause he feels the voters are
i entitled to (he "widest choice
possible.''
He said there is a need for
"new blood" in both the Demo-
cratic and Republican parties. He
I expressed confidence that if he
I wins the nomination he can beat
any candidate the Republicans
have to vttu
Kefauver said he told Mr. Tra-
jinan In advance he was going to
get into 'he race. He declined to
say how the President reacted.
Kefauver suid that If Mr. Tru-
man does decide to run again
and wins the nomination "I will
support him and urge my friends
to do so.'
It is generally assumed that
Mr. Truman can get the no-
mination at the Democratic
National Convention at Chica-
go in Julv if he wants it.
Kefauvr premised that, if elec-
ted, hi? administration would
give "close attention and much
emphasis to the battle against
'corrupti.m." He said the Federal
Government must provide lead-
ership for states and commun-
ities in eliminating criminal in-
fluence. ,
On che politically explosive
Issue of civil rights, Kefauver
said that as a southerner he feels
great progre has been made In
recent years and much more can
be done on a voluntary, educa-
tional oasis
He said h> opposes a compul-
sory Fair Employment Practices
Commission.
SPOTLIGHT REVELS The USO Camp Show revue, which arrived at Albrook Air Force
Base this morning to entertain troops on the Isthmus. Left to right: Lt. Col. R. M. Walters,
CAlrC D/CS Personnel; Tommy Trent, puppetteer; Evelyn Hamilton, accordionist; Lt. Leo-
nard W. Halley, project officer; Paul LePaul, comedy card act; Virginia Seller, singer; Doro-
thy Wenzel, mistress of ceremonies; Clyde Parks, dancer; JacJ Powell, educated dram sticks;
Lt. CoL J. M. Martin, Albrook base executive; Richard Conway, dancer and Bill Roberts, In-
strumentalist. This afternoon the troupe played at Army field positions on the Pacific side.
Tonight they will play two shows at Albrook Air Force Base, Hangar 3, at 6:30 and 8:00 p.m.
(Official USAF Photo)
Army Must Tell Why Crosses
Replaced At Hawaii Cemetery
Gaskin, Welsh
Address Women
Ed Welsh, International re-
presentative of the CIO, and
Ed Gaskin, president of CIO
Local 900, last night addressed
a, meeting of the Local 900 wo-
ma's auxiliary in the La Boca
Bfflbhouse.
Jhe meeting elected Mrs. Le-
muel B. Shirley chairman of the
'Stpresident. and Miss Lurllne
Johnson secretary.
Time' Magazine's
John Boyle Is
Isthmian Visitor
John Boyle of the foreign
news staff of "Time" Magazine
Is making a brief visit to the
Isthmus during a tour of South
and Central America.
He arrived at Tocumen yes-
terday from Bogot, and will
leave tomorrow morning for
Costa Rica. He plans to stop In
Guatemala and Mxico before
returning to New York.
Boyle is a guest at Hotel El
Panam.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24 (UP)
Military officials were order-
ed today to explain to Congress
next Wednesday why white
crosses were removed from the
graves of 13,000 war dead in
Hawaii's National Memorial Ce-
metery.
The summons was Issued by
a House Public Lands Commit-
tee which is considering a bill
by Rep. Edith Nourse Rogers
(R-Mass.) to force the Army
to restore the crosses on graves
on the "Hill of Sacrifice" at
Punchbowl Crater overlooking
Honolulu.
The crosses were removed last
September, evoking a storm of
criticism from Congressmen, re-
ligious leaders and veterans
groups. The Army said they
would be replaced by flat stone
markers which are cheaper and
easier to maintain. .
When one veterans' group
protested that the markers
would make the rock-rimmed
cemetery "look like a vacant
lot," the Army noted that flat
markers are used in national
cemeteries in this country, in-
cluding Arlington Memorial Ce-
metery.
The Public Lands Subcom-
mittee Is an arm of the House
Interior Committee which has
jurisdiction over national ceme-
teries.
The committee said lt still
has not received a report on
the Issue which it requested
from the Defense Department.
The military witnesses presum-
ably will be asked about this
as well as about the crosses
themselves.
President Truman has saW he
approves the way the Army is
handling the controversy about
the crosses. He said the service
is treating all war dead exactly
alike and voiced confidence
that the controversy will be
resolved to the satisfaction of
all concerned.
But Mrs. Rogers and other
members of Congress refused to
be pacified. She said recently
that she will give the Army
one more chance to restore the
crosses and then demand that
Congress take direct action.
Chairman John E. Rankln
(D-Mlss.), of the House Veter-
ana Committee has promised to
back her In the effort. He said
he will fight to the "last ditch"
to keep the Army from "oblit-
erating the crosses over the
graves of those dead."
Mrs. Rogers, Rankln and Rep.
George H. Falln (D-Md.) In-
troduced resolutions last year
to force the Army to restore
the crosses but Congress ad-
journed while the resolutions
were In committee.
Rep. John R. Murdock 'D-
Ariz.), chairman of the Interior
Committee, said he does not
know enough about the Issue
to predict what the group will
do. But Rankln said he will
lead an effort to force the mea-
sure to the House floor If the
committee doesn't act.
Mrs. Rogers said she is sure
Congress will approve her re-
solution If lt reaches the House
and Senate floors.
Drunk Driving
Case Held Over
No plea was entered yesterday
by Mrs. Katherine Lucille Krae-
mer who was booked on a drunk
driving charge in the Balboa
Magistrate's Court.
The 43-year-old American post-
ed the $100 bail and asked that
the case be continued to 1:30
p.m. next Monday in order to
give her time to secure counsel.
Mrs. Krnemcr was charged with
drunk Jriviwr on Bruja Road be-
tween Cocoll and the Mlraflores
Bridge on Jan. 18.
Officials Seek
Removal Of
Newark Airport
(NEA Radlo-Telephoto)
KILLED IN EGYPT Sister
Anthony, bra Bridget Ann
Timbeas in Croton-on-Hudson,
N.Y., was the first American
slain in tlie current Anglo-
Egyptian struggle over the
Sues Canal. Sister Anthony was
shot through the heart on the
steps o the Convent of the
Sisters of Charity, in Ismailla.
'Miss Z Of 1952' Contest
ELIZABETH, NJ., Jan. 24
(UP) Angry city and state of-
ficials demanded today that
Newark ilrport be moved or shut
down as the result of Tuesday's
flaming airliner crash In tie
heart of Elizabeth.
Twemy-eigrrt persons were
killed, live of them residents.
| making a total of 84 persons who
1 have died in Iwr airliner crashes
I in this city in the last five weeks.
Planes tnklnfj off or landing at
nearby Newark airport fly over
Ellzabetn.
Federal, state and local offi-
cials Joined American Airlines
executives In an Investigation of
the Convalr ctash, which occur-
red at (.bout 3:43 p.m. The plane
smashed a brick apartment
building, splintered a frame du-
plex and set the wreckage afire.
Three of the dead residents
were small children.
Amon? the 23 dead passengers
and crewmen aboard the plane
was former Secretary of War Ro-
bert P. Patterson. It was an-
nounced in Washington that he
will be buriea in Arlington Na-
tional Cemetery, probably Friday.
Police and firemen probed the
mass of boards, bricks and twist-
ed airplane parts for other pos-
sible victims of the disaster.
The charred bodies of 28 per-
sons had been taken to the Eliza-
beth morgue. Twenty-three had
been identified, including 19 per-
sons who died on the plane, the
three cnildren and a woman re-
sident. Five bodies were not iden-
tified immediately.
Air and electronics experts be-
pan an investigation of the
crash, which came with explo-
sive suddenness as the twin-en-
gine plane was being guided to-
ward a landing through fog and
rain by the conventional Instru-
ment landing system, at the
same time oelng monitored by
ground rontrcl radar. The plane
was trying to land at Newark af-
ter a flight from Buffalo.
'*
Ann Gorman, right, last night was chosen Miss Canal Zone of 1952 in a bathing beouty contest held
t the Central Theater in Panam City. Miss Gorman was presented with a beautiful trophy after winning
out over a bevy of beauties, the lineup of which is shown above. The photographer forgot to take down
their names (and telephone numbers) but we thought you'd like to take a look anyhow. Nice job these
judges have, eh?

THE FLIGHT ENGINEER
IS A PILOT TOO
Yes. there are three pilots aboard your BranifF DC-6,
three pairs of hands, three pairs of eyes, three alert
brains to guide the great airliner through the sky.
First, the captain. He has flown more than a mil-
lion miles.
Second, the co-pilot, first officer of the airplane. He
too has thousands of hours of flying experience.
Third, the flight engineer. His job is to keep a con-
stant check on all instruments and gauges aloft. He's
the watchman and he too is a licensed airline pilot.
P^'v BranifF Bives vou tni* extr insurance of a
"third pilot" on every flightanother reason why expe-
rienced travelers choose BranifF for dependable service.
For informition and
rwtrvitlon tee your travel gent oe
ctH your Brants* representativa.
Avenido TWO #11.
Telephone 24729
Hotel El Panam
Via Espaa, 111
Telephone 3-4726
or 3-1660 Ext. 130
Celan Ticket Office Telephone 779


'
' ', *
THURSDAY, JANUARY 84, IMS
.?HE PANAMA AJIEIIICAN AS INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEK
PAOE SETHI
^^/ftlantic ^ociel

Bo* 195, (turn OtLpkom (J*fm 378
date. "I'd like to get a look at
thia guy." said Pat.
Replied Mavourneen: "Daddy,
maybe be'd like to take a good
look at you."
MR AND MR9. LILLY
INTRODUCED AT COCKTAIL PASTY
Mr. J. E. Noonan, manager of Norton, Lilly and O. In
Cristobal and Mrs. Noonan entertained with a cocktail party
at their Brazos Heights residence Tuesday evening in honor
of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Lilly of San Francisco.
Mr. Lilly Is an associate member of the ilrm of Norton
Lilly and Co., in charge of the Pacific Coast operations of
the prominent shipping concern. ...,
Mr. and Mrs. Lilly hare been stopping at the Hotel El
Panama and droe to the Atlantic side Tuesday evening.
They overnighted at the Hotel Washington and enjoyed
sight-seeing tour of the Gold Coast Wednesday, before re-
turning to Panama City.
One year pendants were given
Sharon Tully. Louise Allgaler,
and Lillian Hlrons.
Three members of the troop
celebrated their birthday an-
niversaries. The horio-eo3 were:
Ursula Alexaltis. Sharon T 'lv
and Sol Diaz. A large beautlfullv
| decorated cake In the Brownie
i colors of brown and gold, was
I cut for the occasion. It was made
I by the father of one of the girls,
[Mrs. J. H. Payne.
Mrs. Seaman was assisted by
|Mrs. George Tully and Mrs. E.
Rebekab Lndge Holds their Brazos Heights Club Satur- f McClelland, the assistant
Annual Installation I day evening. leaders and Mrs. Walter John-
The Cristobal Rebekah Lodge.! During the evening the votes stn nd M" John Pettier, the
No. 2. held their annual open will be counted for the young ico immee members,
installation of officers Tuesday ladies who are running for Elk's Several parents and friends
evening at the Cristobal Masonic Carnival Queen. ,*e" W present with the girls
Temple. Mrs. Prank Estes was All friends are Invited to at-,01 lM Troop,
the retiring Noble Grand and tend, The admission fee Is fifty
Mrs. Percy Lawrance assumed:cents per person,
the duties of this office. I '
For the occasion the lodge hall Captain and Mrs. Borden
was decorated with white trel- Returning to New York
Uses covered with red bougain- Captain and Mrs. Howard Bor-
vllla. A small white fence with den, with their daughters. Alice
the gateway leading to the rost-1 and Pamela are leaving Febru-
rum was entwined with fern and I ary 1$ for New York Captain
carnations and tall baskets of Borden Is being detached from:
the flowers marked the stations, the service and Is returning; to
Installing the new corps of of- his former position. He has been
fleers were: The Special Deputy, stationed on the Isthmus for the
Miss Grave N. Williams, P. N. G.; ,Daat seven months with
IN
HOLLYWOOD
' Bob Preston, mixing New York
, TV work with movies, is In town
, for "The Bride Comes to Yellow
Sky." About his rumored shaky
1 marriage, he said:
"We've been separated onlv by
3.0M miles while I was in New
York."
-
Bob says that N. Y. television
erecutlves are convinced now
that TV Is moving west to Holly-
wood and on film.
"Live shows." he told me, "are
just too limited and the boys
know it. They all asked me to
mention their names In Holly-
wood."
MGM vetoed a $12.000 Las
Vegas night-club engagement for
Jane Powell with the curt word-
age: "We don't want you hang-
ing around saloons."
Cristobal Elks Hold | Navy Wives Plan
Pre-Carnival Dance March Of Dimes
Next Saturday Night 'Fashion Parade
, An informal pre-Camlval dance
will be held at the Cristobal Elks
| Club. Brazos Heights. Saturday
night, during which the votes
cast In the Elks Carnival queen
contest will be counted.
A general admission fee of fifty
cents will be collected at the
door.
Miss. Joann Recela Is leading
over the other contestants by a
slim margin, others in the con-
test are Elaine O'Hayer. Lor-
raine Hennlng. Mnry Ann Bras-
sel. Nancy Karlger. Patricia Rod-
d. Carol O'Hayer and Anna
Fisher.
Cristobal Elks plan to repre-
sented In Colon's centenary Car-
nival celebration with a ojueen
and four maids of honor and to
tPke active part In the festi-
vities.
! HOLLYWOOD. (NEA). Ex-
clusively Yours: Lana Turner Is
flashing the green light that will
the make her the ex-Mrs. Bob Top-
the Deputy Marshal. Mrs. Doro-1536th Fire Fighters at Fort Gu- ping. The divorce action will be
thea Churchill; Deputy Warden, lick. filed in January before she leaves
Mrs. Christine Poole. P. N. G.:| -------- for a vacation In Europe.
Deputy Secretary, Mrs. Lucille Visitors See Fort San Lorenzo .--------
Smith. P N. O. of Balboa; Deputv Mr. and Mrs. Horace Smith
Treasurer. Mrs. Ella Brown, P. arranged a picnic at Fort San Another sequel to "Father of
N. G.; Deputy Chaplain. Mrs. Lorenzo, last evening, for their,the Bride" is in the works at
Fay Wray has her eyes on a
movie comeback. Her last film
was in '42.
Mona Freeman says she spot-
ted a billboard In Ta Juana,
Mexico, reading: "The beer that
made Milwaukee Jealous."
Marl Aldon's comment on an
altar sprint with director Tay
Garnett:
"It's no comment, but with a
question mark."
Rubbing sapphires and em-
eralds on the eyelids had the
power of making tb* eyes bright,
according to an old superstition.
TEETH NOT NEEDED
SPOKANE Wash. (UP). A
Dawn shop reported a man hock-
ed his teeth for the duration of
a meat strike In Spokane.
The current trend In male and
female attire r-ill be on disDlav
at a March of Dimes Fashion
: Show to be sponsored by the,
Navy Officer- Wives Club at the:
Ft. Amador Army-Navv Club on
Feb. I.
The dresses and suits that will
,be worn during the show will
be furnished bv Felix Maduro
| and the American Bazaar. All
proceeds will be donated to the
11952 March of Dimes drive.
Women's daytime sporU wear,
beach toss and late afternoon
.aowns will be featured In addi-
tion to men's Haspel suits, with
emphasis on tropical evening
wear.
Music bv the ABC Trio and
other entertainment also Is
listed.
HE WAS ROBBED
LEWISTON. Ida. (UP)Sheriff
Clarence Kyle found his black- .
jack when he sorted through a I
pile of stolen articles cached un- I
der a haystack.
ITS MOVICTIfcF. ..
Panama (^anai (clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
Air-Onndlttoncd
Fred ASTAIRE a) lenv HUTTON
'LET'S DANCE" (technicolor)
Frldjy "ALONG THF GREAT DIVIDE"
/"if AUin UTC Do" AMKCHE Alice FAVE
77s a ."i "IN OLD CHICAGO" (Repeat)
m Friday "AIK CADET"
C C\ C f"i I I Preston FOSTER Wayne MOHRIS
C Tuhim "THE TOUGHFR THEY COME"
a) FrldyJ BRAVE BILLS"
PtUKL MIQiUtL Pau| DOUGLAS Janet LEIGH
ua 8 2. "ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD"
i*
GAMBOA
7 rBS
Dorald O C>NNOF lper LAURIE
'Francis Goes To The Races"
_______Saludar "BR \VF BULLS"_____
GAT UN
(Friday)
nine CROSBY inne WYMAN
"HERE COMES THE GROOM'
MARGARITA
SlIS .20
Don AMhCHE One TIERNEY
"HEAVEN CAN WAIT"
Friday "RATON PASS''______
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Coadltlnned
c.l.'. S:X*
Bwl LANCASTER
"Jim Thorpe All American"
Friday APPOINTMENT WITH DAGGER"
JOIN THE MARCH OF DIMES TODAY!
Jessie Albright, p. N. G.; Deputy houseguests. Mrs. Smith's pa-
Inslde Gaurdaln, Mr. Harold i rents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert A.
Chambers, P. O.; and guest or-;Huffman and their friends. Mr.
janlst, Mr. A. A. Albright. and Mrs. D. I. McCrate of Co-
The officers that were lnstal-,iumbus Orove. Ohio.
led were: Noble Grand. Mrs.' The other guests were: Miss
Maude Lawrance; vice-grand, sallie McLimans. and Mr and
Mrs. Lorey Wray: secretary. Mrs. Mrs. Paul Stewart.
Elizabeth O'Rourke; P. N. O.;! --------
Treasurer, Mrs. Helen Stern; Recent Visitor
Chaplain. Mrs. Andrea Nessler; Mrs. Edgar T. White, nee Do-
MGM, with rumors that Join I
Bennett's role will be eliminated
from the script. A line of dialog
will explain that she's op "vaca-
! tIon."
It will still be titled. "The Jazz
Singer," but Danny Thomas. In
the Al Jolson role for the
Warners' re-make, will play an
entertainer more like himself
Warden. Mrs. Edna Furr; Con- rls McKee, has been the house-.than a jazz singer. The original
ductor, Mrs. Virginia Cralg; R. guest o her sister. Mrs Thomas'plot was about a father wanting
S. N. O ; Mrs. Clara Chambers, M. Herring, of Old Cristobal for I his son to follow in his footsteps
P. N. G.; L. S. N. G.. Mrs. the past two weeks. She arrived as a great singer, but Danny
Violet Deaklns. P. N. G.: R. S. at Tocumen In December for a told me:
V. G., Mrs. Betty Marshal, P. holiday visit with her pirents.
N. G.; L. S. V.G., Mrs. Elizabeth Mr, and Mrs. W. S. McKee. of "We don't want to expose the
Williams: Inside Guardian. Mrs. Pedro Miguel. She has now re- public to my uncultured voice so
Phyllis Turner; Outside Guard-'turned to Pedro Miguel to com- I'll Just be an entertainer."
Ian, Mr. Otto Simmons, and Diete her visit before leaving for I --------
Musician Miss Grace Williams, her home in Louisiana early In' Dorothy Lamour, the Iron Jaw
P. N. G.
February.
girl of the circus In "The Great-1
est 8how on Earth." Is blushing.
Her highly publicized scenes
dangling by her teeth from the
Following the Installation Mrs. St. Mary's Alumnae
Lawrence presented Mrs. Estes i Association Notice
the past noble grand Jewel, and The 8t. Mary's Alumnae As- end of a rope were left on the
a gift of Italian pottery from soclatlon will hold a meeting and jcuttingroom floor.
her officers. Mra. Lawrance was i election of officers. Sunday, Jan.: -*-----
presented a gavel by Miss Wll-!27at4:00 p.m. In the Parish Hall Academy Awards brass hats
fiams from the recipient's hus- of the Church. !reconsidered their original nlx-
band _____ i Ing of televising the Oscar festl-
Mrs Dorothea Churchill had Brownies Have Investiture i vltles in March but again came
the honor of receiving her .Ceremony up with an "Inadvisable'reason
twenty-five year jewel from the Brownie Troop 32 held an in- for the video blackout. Several big
Special Deputy. vestiture ceremonv Tuesday at industry leaders are howling mad,
Following the Installation re- the home of their leader Mrs. about the whole thing,
freshments were served in tho Harrv Seaman of Cristobal. Mrs. The Broadway hit. Paint
banquet hall which was decked Stanley Hamilton, president of Your Wagon, by Alan Lerner
with purple bougain villa. The the Girl Scout Council presented'" whL n..rf. ,.h vtpf.nnhlrithf -alrl their Bias. The three,for MGM with a $200,000 price,
grpsd TpenTd tr^nglF*iro^glrisVho Were invested- te:'tuPenciled in for the leads arei
their friends at this time. |8ol Diez. Laura Strongman. Lin- Spencer Tracy. Kathryn Grayson
Sixty-five members and friends da Shumate. and Fernando Lamas,
attended the meeting. Flag bearers for the ceremony. Mj
--------- >J which was held on the lawn of Variety reports from Cincinnati
Elk's Carnival Dance !the Seaman residence, were that if and when Sen Robert
The Elks will hold another In I Vickie Fettler and Pamela Taft moves into the White House,
a series of Carnival dances at Johnston. I Louis B. Mayer will move Into

the cabinet job of Secretary of,
Commerce.

NOTICE
THE COLON CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE
ANNOUNCES
y to all member
that election for new board of Directors
will take place
Tomorrow Friday, Jan. 25th.
General meeting will be held at the
Strangers Club
where vote will be counted.
Kirk Douglas stepped On a
plane in New York into the arms
of Betty Threatt, who worked
with him in "The Big Sky." At 7
a.m. yet.
Pat O'Brien's off on another
supper club tour. Pat's telHng
about his- 17-year-old Mavour-
neen getting ready for a blind
IT'S NEW!
a PLASTIC ENAMEL
for every use
Brush it or Spray it
on Metal, Wood or Plaster
For your car, refrigerator,
kitchen or bath, walls, cab-
inet, kid's toys, etc., etc.
Brilliant Gloss
Plastic Smooth Finish
* Startling New Colors
* Dries In Minutas
For Sale in Panam
ft all P.C. Commissaries
and Army Post Exchanges.
TROPICAL
TODAY
THE APACHES ARE
OVER THE BORDER ..
hum by of the Old Wm.t!
L"
X
TODAY!
Shows:
2:41 4:29 8:44 9:00
The story of how a boy
b-at the wicket!... And
how a girl made him a
man'..
-&&1!83b"1.
Saturdays
Hero
iohniau Donna REtO
.inSxtwy BUckiMT AieuMer Knoi
I:**** Of MUM.!.!, MV0 MUM
CECILIA TODAY
DOUBLE PROGRAM! \
Another exciting adventure of
the Belvedere you have al-
ways enjoyec"! ..
The shock by shocking
story of "The House"!
Murder, sin. violence and
shame live In It!...
i MM PAIKEI Artier SHIELDS
mi.
Belvedere ik
the Bell
BASEHART CORTESA LUNOKAN
H0USE0N
TELEGRAPH HILL
a*.

TODAY
Shows: 3:00 4:15 5:35
7:15 9:00 p.m.
GOLD SMUGGLER and ADVENTURESS
in the Pirate Port of the China Seas!
T
1
I
Wfl
ISLAND
Ley
s
DM

m
\
nil*
JEFF CHANDLER EVELYN KEYES

r
CENTRAL THEATRE
TODAY WEEK END RELEASE! TODAY
&*2S%SZ,(
On the ko' Caribe...the most feared
of th- plunderers ,is the
"lot -blooded adventure i
i .called FabianJ
">*.

*&&'
Ha Uvari at t* f.v#M .. wWi
II Hta fury and turbuUnc*
t iti# Monpiy ssMVJnii mssm i

A KPUtUC ntMNTATION
" I.......-wnifcuii.
ON THE NEWSREEL VIEW OF THE FLYING ENTERPRISE!
,n
CENTRAL
12:.iV MS, 4-41. :4t. K:37 p m.
FRROI KI Y\\ la
"ADVENTURES OF
CAPTAIN FABIAN"
with Mkhele Prelle
SCOURGE
OF THE
SEVEN
LUX THEATRE
How one boy
b*t thr rack-
et... and bow
a girl made
him a man!
John Donna
DKREK REED
- In
"SATURDAY'S HERO"
A Story VTeyvtr Told B*fotel
BE LLA V 1ST A
.1:00, 4 IV S:U. 7:15, ) l p.m.
Action, ronvnee and adventures
'n the "Irate Poet of the
I'M:n Seat!
[SMUGGLER'S
$
.ISLAND.
T&Mieaw -
tmnBfgmin ErHYH KEYES J
t unsae-> uwtusAimtu- .nv .
DO V BLE
PROGRAM'
CECILIA
DOUBLE
PROGRAM'
Another adventure of Mr Belvedere ..!
MR. BELVEDERE RINGS THE BELL"
fllflnn Webb J ..un. Dru
Also* The passions arid pe)p|f> OI 'The House'
"HOUSE ON run i:\ni HILL"
Km hard aVueliait Hlluam LuwUgan
TROPICAL
Slevrn M-SALIY Celeea .AY
In
"APACHE DRUMS"
ENCANTO THEATRE
"At 9 p.rr. 11 WAHOO!
S115.ee r Prises!
Humphrey Bogart. in
THE ENFORCER"
KISS TOMORROW
GOODBYE"
wit*: JMTiesQagney____
TIVOLI THEATRE
At 8 30 p.m.
Presir-tatlon of
"TRIO ATLAS"
and VARIETY!
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BANK NIOHT!
Mee.tttl to th. Public!
Constance Moore, in
' K \l! I CARROLL
VANITIES"
- Also: -
-SINGING GUNS"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Douglas Fairbanks. In
"STATE SECRET"
-SON OF NEW MEXICO"




~^w

tAcr six
DAILY NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, INS
When You Tell em thru PA. Classifieds!
You Sell em...
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
H.KW1S HtfRVlG
*
auSKO OI> tSSSSPS
WB
IrfKH"
FOR SALE
Household
MOftBUMlMt
_.. ouita a Ml "
f I-M41
BOTICA CAttLTON
2! SM.'~
FOR SALE
Autotuoliile
SALON Ot HELLSZA AMERICANO
. H Ml IS
THt PANAMA AMERICAN
" itn taw BBajpi
MISCELLANEOUS
OR SALE.Coldspot ">_'
good condit.en. Apply heuse No
Ol Art. "A" La Boca Roed. Le
Apt.
Sore. C. Z.
Serv* _rsonnel and
Civilian _Bvefrirnenf tmplove
MNANCI
vow new oi uMB oar through
0
(H aave
Write
l.> 2011
-riakbie. greblaiej
ma-
mad
toR SALE25 cycl. washing
chin S25. bobv buggy<$-0.
bossmete with skirt and pod. *>>-
Pj,one 2-2604. 0779-J W.ll.om-
---------OVIRMMIMT IMPUOYISHNANCIi
00.
fart Wort*, teno.
Servir. Sovemmeni Employ
Service "ersonne1 if> ha Canal
loi !4 /ear. With Our financing
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous.
Williams bonto Clora Baoch Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigldalras, Rock-
gos ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
FOR SALE:Radio tronjmittar 600
-nd | watts. Phon 1000 watts CW II
bonds. VF0 band switching, eorri-
plt ontennos 10 matar beam
Gromlich's Sonto Cloro beoch-
cotteges. Electric lea coxes, gos
stoves. derate rotas. Phon 6-
441 or 4-561.
Street.
chairs with cuthions, rug.
4 modernistic rugs.
bR'sL -House fSAS-A Mt aM-TOty ggff ***** _______ ____ Bolb0 1
olboa; phone 2-26T. 3LyMUaltaMijBra CAM
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILI
OIALIR
__5 Cycle Mg
$150. 516-B. Co-
refrlgerator.
guarantee left,
coli.
MAp|iF0R SALE: Piono-Accordion, 48
Buses, good condition. Phona 3759,
house 2244. Calibre road, Balboa
R SALEGeneral Electric refriger-, -__
; otor 8 ft. Perfect working condi-
tion.
50th
Give-owoy pnce.
Street. Momo.
No. II
FOR SALE;Hudson 40. $200.00
Leaving for Stotes. Bargain. F.
Hiner, 2-042-ft E 3rd St., Cu-
rundu.
FOR~"~SALE: 1949 Bu.ck 4-dcor
Super Sedan, excellent condition
Coll Cristobal 3-1350.
FOR SALE:Rodio Victrolo
RCA. Apex woshing mod
portable sewn, machine.
model woshing machine '
cleoner. records. Phone Colon 299,F0R
J. _____.
Console,FOR SALE:1950 Oldsrr.cbile. Go-
ing to highest bidder by January
table' 27,n- Leaving Isthmus. Tel. Co-
.,.,,_, rozel 4188.
-OR SALE:10" table saw 'Home-
model, $20.00. Large baby s crib,
$20.00. Stroller $4.0C; High cho.r.
$8.00. Hojse 604, Cocoh. Phone
Ctlboa 1970.___________________|
:OR SALE:Bedroom set. 2 single.
beds, vonity. chest of drowers]
ond wordrobe. Good condition.'
Poitilla. chalet No. 3. across frOm:
Kodok Building. ____
SALE:1950 British Humber
Hawk block four door sedon. First
doss condition, new paint, battery
$1,400. Also 1939 Chevrolet black
four door sedon, new differential
battery, tires. $400, Coll Panama
2-0912._________________________
FOR SALE:Or trade: 1951 Ford.
4 door, rodio. blue. $1.700. Coll
273-3296; 273-4112, evenings.
FOR SALE: By compatltiva bid:
Various items of fountain and
restaurant equipment. For further
information coll ot Navy Exchonge
Office, building No. 24, Naval
Station, Rodmon. Telephone
3339._________________________
FOR SALE1939 Oldsmobile. $200.
In fair condition. Also two bicycles
one table model Zenith radio with
45 RPM record ployer. Coll 2-
1335 or 5177, Morrison St
Diablo Hgts.
FOR SALE;Baby carriage, straw
two fiber mots, childs cor seat.
Telephone 3-3575, ofter 6 p. m.
RESORTS
Shrapnel's Houses on beach Santa
Clara, inexpensive. Phona Balboa
2820 or see caretaker.
Pkilliai. Oceomkl cottage. Sonto
Clare. Sox 435. Balboa. Phono
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
Enjoy a vocation at Hotel Pan Ame-
ricano, El Valle. Phono Panamo
2-1112 for reservations.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:Beautiful chalet, fur-
nished, 2 bedrooms, terrace, maid's
room, residential section, Poitilla,
Seventeenth St., 106 Coll Pan-
onTo 3-0112.
FOR RENT:Comfortable residence
well situated, completely furnish-
ed. Reody for occuponcy February
1st. Con be seen to 12 noon. Tal.
2-1456 for information.
FOR SALE:One beautiful Pollero,
white linen, embroidered with red.
One complete montuno suit. House
No. 1468-C or coll Balboa 2-
4448.
Help Wanted
SALE:1949 Chevrolet, four
doon. in good condition, cheap
Tel. 2-4624.
WANTEDCook, housekeeper, must
sleep in. 18 East 46th St. Apt. A
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE:Child's tricycle, wogon
wheel six 16 inches, $9.00. House
1419-C, Blboo. ___________
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR RENT:Chalet in
bedreoms. Telephone
3423 or 3-1183.
El Valle, 2
Ponomo 3-
FOR SALE
Motorcvcle
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFIftS STRUCTURl POR SAL
Far sal to the highest bidder Build-
g No. 906. Cristobal. Sealed bids
FOR SALE:1951 Indian single mo-jwl|| _e received in th offie of thej
torcycl. like new, in storage j Superintendent of Storehouses ot;
FOR SALE:Boot, 19 ft. long. 6
ft. beom powered by V8. 60 HP
engine. With treller, $450.00
722-B, Cocoli.
FOR RENT:Cottage "Mi Petate"
in Santa Clara Beoch. Three bed-
rooms, living and dining rooms
bath, kitchen ond pantry. Com-
pletely furnished, gas stove, elec-
tric refrigerotor, independent moid
quarters ond both, three side
porches, well kept towns. Three
months ot $150.00 per month
four months ot $125.00 monthly.
Call Ponama 3-0339.
Phone 3-4336
Loyal Pride Lodge
Schedules Picnic
To f acora Feb. 22
Balboo until 10;30 A. M., Jonuory
.31 1952. when they will be open-
led in public. Form of proposal with
I full porticulars may be secured in
the offices of Superintendent of
Storehouses Balboa, and th Hous-
iing Menagr ot Cristobal.________
5 Posts Here Begin
Observing National
V.F.W. Week Today
RededicatUnrto Am_c*n prin-
ciples through public mvlce is
tp be the theme developed in the
Canal Zone five Posts of Veter-
ans of Foreign wars, located on
the Isthmus, during National
VFW Week. January 24-31.
FOR RENT:Centrolly locoted re-
sidence. Three main bedrooms, two
main baths, hot ond cold water
installation, kitchen, pantry, lorge
refrigerator and deep-freezer, liv-
ing ond dining rooms, maid quor-
ters with bath, oil completely fur-
nished. Garcge and cor Ford, gar-
den chairs, children playground,
swings, etc. For four months, $200
00 monthly. 39 St. No. 28. call
Ponama 3-0339.
FOR ^ALE >Chalet: living-dining-
. A picnic to Pacora will be! roam. 3 bdroms. 2 bothrooms.
sponsored on Feb. 22 by the! garage, hot woter and all other
Loyal"Prlde No. 92. IOOF. It was' conveniences. Best rsldntiol dis-
announced today. triet of Cristobal, one block from
- Plans have been made to pro- beach. Coll Ponoma 2-2642 or
tide' dancing and opportunities Writa> Apartado 3085. Ponomi.
for outdoor sports and swim- cais __/_._ h~,.. <_,.. rim ..
mlng. The services of the Tro- FO* SALE.-One house Sonta ciara, D _rtment commander Eglm-
Pical Boys orchestra have been: **~^J?Z^ ton declared today that the or-
obtalned __Sll_____*iw__?f-r___ it'ganlzatlon of more than 1.200,000
Comfortable buses, the Lodge, *_. "WgJPr"T'i .man In 10.000 local units Is stag-
said, will leave from "N" Street iphon Bag 1536._________ ^ Nttional VFW Week as a
from 8 to 11 a.m. on the morning special public demonstration of
of the picnic. j CnnAnrrpA Tfilir Of 'Veterans In Action for a Strong-
| V-O lOUCr I OUr Wr Amerlcan Homefront."
Egllnton said that the special
week Is designed to make clear
to everyone that "the men who
have fought overseas still are
conducted tour of the Canal campaigning for the Welfare of
Zone Experiment Gardens at this nation, their communities
Summit will be held from 9 to and for America's disabled veter-
11 a.m. Saturd&y. ans and their dependents."
a "fci-irf Arlvlxnrv Team from! At tn-* thve. a guide from the.
the ff ire of Industrial Reli-; Gardens will evplaln to visitors I National VFW week Is a ra-
ttonl Navv Department Wash- the lnle>stl"g and unusualPhlc Illustration of what local
to-tan D^ C: arrlSd thelltti Plnts th^t ave growr there. members plan to accomplish
In addition io the usual at- during 1952 for Improvement of
commutiltv recreational, educa-
tional, health and safety facll-
FOR RENT
Apartment
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
Navy Industrial
Relations Team
Vials At 15th ND
CZ Gardens Set
For Saturday AM
FOR RENT:Three small bedrooms
apartment, unfurnished. San Fran-
cisco de la Caleta 4th Avenue.
No. 4.
&?_,unc^^^ the cannon
_??? thi nhYnrm ni nmh- bal1 tree'- which are now In
l-lSti. faJ"wa -nrnitt bl00m- -'10be' and COffee PlantS
_*r__rf fr\ ir\'TS/lHa re" and otll"r unusulJ varieties, the
f__Sd L.- industrial re- ,th_ee |_8C.W. __d the Uve fer _e
m^^i.iJ?t_ i.___-nc,. r Ian *'llch ha^e interested vls-
The Field Team Is composedof ,tors for sonle 0m_ are stm
C2'.".r-^.9r, EwLoeser-, As,.m. there, personnel at the Experl-
Chlet OIR. Marvin J. Ottllie. ment 0ardeR say.
Employment Division: Ray A.,
itles. It also emphasizes the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars sponsor-
ship of patriotic and human-
itarian actjvttles.
Commander Eglinton quoted a
letter from the VFW Command-
CrosBy- Training Division: E. W.' tour's* eV''ot^atflrWF*^* HUton- de?Crlbl^g
Sombrar. Wag% and Classlf lea- S^ ? gg g *SgS& i National VFW Week as "
tlon_pivislon: A. Turnbull. 8a-]pubuc interest tlve aorjroach
tetv Divisions; and John 8. Bur----------------------------
on and C A Silver of the Area j BjJboa ^^ gj^
"a post
tlve approach toward solving
some of the pressing problems
of the day." Continuing. Hilton
I and Classification Office. I DaUDOa -.reail UHlOIl said: "The men who have fought
First on the team's schedule! u n T1 j foreign enemies of democracy
was a conference with Rear Ad- I O meet Ull I hlirSdaV are now combating new threats
mlral Albert M. Bledsoe. Com-; ____-_i r.r.Hit:t0 our American way ol life at
ES3SS- rn^nin^The^em 3S wfSTd SB Sffl h0me abr0ad'
Va0re/wfth*C.ypUinr menfheads and top civilian shop ponant items on the agenda.__
ftnd -office supervisors. A Dls-
trlctifide conference will be held fleer. Captain L L. Koepke. and
_.t Rodman Friday. ;tour the Naval Station and the
Saftjrdav thev will visit the Naval Hospital.
Jiaval Station. Coco Solo to con- The team will depart for Pa-
fer Jlth the Commanding Of- i tuxent River. Maryland Monday.
Lambert Scheets,
Former Isthmian,
Dies In Lafayette
News of the death on Jan. 22
In Lafayete, Ind.. of Lambert
Gregory Scheets, who was Chief
of Section in the Panama Canal
Record Bureau at the time of his
retirement hi August 1937 has
just been received on the Isth-
mus. He was 70 years old and
had not been well for several
weeks.
Scheets Is survived by his wife,
in Lafayette, and by one son,
James O. DesLondes of Balboa.
DesLondes left Wednesday night
by plane for Lafayette. Survivors
also include two grandsons on
the Isthmus.
During his residence in the Ca-
nal Zone. Scheets was active in
the local Elks Lodge, havina been
treasurer of Lodge No. 1414. for
ten years. He was also active In
the Y. M. C. A. during construc-
tion days, working for the Y. M.
C. A. after regular office hours.
Registration Opens
Today For CZJC
Extension Classes
Do II the Easy (and Economical) Way
ft you are too Pus to wr.ie to ouolisliers it you don't
_lt_e to pay higher-rnan-c uDllshen prices if vou don't
want to bother with buying drafts or money orders
a_sk us to get 'he technical orofesslo.ial ara business
pooks vou need
4Te relieve vou of ah the cetai supp.t fresh copies of
latest editions ana ao it ail at a savin, to you Just
lift the phone and tell us what you want.
land, for gooa measure, we'll take your subscription to
any magazine for businea. profession o hume new
pr renewal
FOR BOOKS OR MAGAZINES
Celeabane cg|| M Hail
TftSf AGENCIAS STEER. S. A. __2*_5.
B
Ml
Registration for seeond sem-
ester Canal Zone Junior College
Extension Division classes will be
held from 8:SO to 8:30 this even-
ing in the Canal Zone Junior
College building and in Cristobal
High School.
Classes will begin on Monday.
Feb. 4. but only those classes for
which at least 10 students re-
gister and pay tuition this even-
ing. All others will be cancelled.
On the Pacific Side courses are
offered In -secretarial subjects',
accounting. English, public
. speaking, dramatics, sewing,
Spanish. French. English for
Spanish-speaking students, high
school and college mathematics,
mttalworklng. woodworking, and
engineer 1 n g, machine, sheet-
metal, and architectural draw-
ing for credit, while special one-
hour-per-week no-credlt courses
in art appreciation, personal fin-
ances, and the history of Pana-
ma also will be given.
I On the Atlantic Side courses in
'shorthand, typewriting, mathe-
matics, and Spanish are being
.offered.
12 wof(U
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
-_
COMMERCIAL fir
PROFESSIONAL
We hare everythinjt
to keep your Lawn
and Garden beautiful
durinjr. the dry season
rOOlf
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrows
lnsecuciaes
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel.3-0146
Witness Says Californi an Lawyers
Formed Communist Party legal Cell'
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
#22 E. 29th St.
The HX
WE BUY
WE SELL
WE BARTER
The very best ALWAYS In
reconditioned FURNITURE.
HX (Household Exchange)
41 Automobile Row
Tel. Panam 3-4911
PANAMA BROKERS, INC
Hoiri f) Panama
Selling: Coca Cola and
Central Theatre.
Wants to buy: Brewery and
National Distiller,
TeL 3-4719 5-1880
MODERN FURNITURE
cus row BUILT
Slipcover Beupholsterj
viarr oua show-roonm
iberio Barca
J. P. oe la Om 77 (AaleawBHe llw
free t-tiauu* ekup <_?!
TeL I-M2S SiM a.at. to 7:e .m.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 24 (UP)
David Aaron, a former gov-
ernment employe, told House in-
vestigators yesterday that he and
32 other Southern California
lawyers belonged to a Commun-
ist Party "legal cell" in Los An-
geles from 1948 to 1948.
Aarop said he joined the party
In 1948 after a two or three-
month stint with the National
Labor Relations Board.
His contact with persons en-
gaged in labor disputes, he said,
caused him to decide "there
must be something wrong with i
the economic system when all.
these things were happening."
Aaron, who lives at Fullerton,
Calif, told the House Un-Amer-
ican Activities Committee that
he and the others he named were
all members of the communist
Party."
He identified them as:
John McTernan, Charles J.
Katz Ben Margolls. Milton Tyre,
Victor Kaplan. A. Marberg and
Martha Yerkes. Albert and
Thelma Herzlg. Frank and Jean
Pestaa. John Porter. Jack Ten-
ner and Robert Katz. __,__.
Also J. Allen Frankel. William i
Esterman, Jane Orodzins. Se\ia
Baohells, Sam Houston Allen. I
'William M. Samuels, Esther |
Shandler. Leon Turret. Nancy
Reeves, Aubrey Finn, George Alt-
man, Pauline fejsteln, Matt Rich-1
man, Fred M. Snider. Seymour
Mandel. Fred H. Steinmetz.
Richard N. Rykoff and William
O. Israel. ,
Herjlg and his wife and Israel
and Yerkes attended the com-
mittee hearing and followed the
testimony closely. They said
they, too, have broken away
from the party and will appear
as "friendly" witnesses."
Aaron told the committee that
one communist objective in Los
Angeles was to seize control of
the local lawyers guild. He said
it was "hoped that the guild
could be made the instrument
and spokesman for the Commun-
ist Party."
He said that Robert Sllber-
stein, secretary of the National
Lawyers Guild, once spoke to a
"very secret meeting" of club
leaders and discussed the group's
function as a Communist orga-
nization .
He said he was "certain" SJlber-
steln would not have been at;
the meeting unless the leaders;
believed he was a Communist
The cell decided that he should J
run for election as secretary of:
the Los Angeles guild, he said.
as part of the scheme. He said
he won the election but was "too;
busy making my living" to de-,
vote very much time to the
Party's objectives.
Aaron recalled that several at-
tempts were made to make over
the guild but 1 "antl-Commun- "cell" he joined was known aa
1st'* group always voted the Com-
munists down.
Aaron said: "I realize now that
what I have done was just plain
wrong." He said that since mov-
ing to Fullerton in 1948 he has
married and broke all connec-
tions with the Communist Party.
Aaron testified that the Red
the "Engels club" and was limit-
ed to lawyers.
He testified that Leo Gallagh-
er, a member of the law firm of
Katz. Gallagher and Margolls,
asked him to join the party but
he could not say whether Gal-
lagher was a communist.
GETS TOE-HOLD ON COMFORT Cold (act don't both
Alberta Speicher, employe of the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Com-
pany in Akron. Onto. She's ahown ttstinj out a new rubber foot- '
warmer which builds up hejat within itself upon application of
electric currant The material has long been used in ice protection
of propellers and wing edge_ Capable of being plugged into any '
outlet. It is particularly adaptable in buildings with cold, dr ally j
floors and can be used outdoors in press boxes, sentry boxes, on
football fields beneath the players' bench* or wherever immobility
tend to chili the feet
Dog Tired Dave!
David was a buy fellow,
shopping never left him mellow 1
Worn out, weaiy. tired and brava.
Why not rend oor Want Ada. Oavat
FISHERMEN I
According to the latest re-
porta fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIG ONES with FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #39 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0383 3-4564
BB> a Fine
Opportunity
to Learn
From
The Best"
Want to be
the most at-
tractive
couple on the
floor? Then
bring your favorite partner to
Hartnett 4c Dunn NOW and
improve your dancing togeth-
er. Modern rates use our
Budget plan fits payments
to paydays. So come in today
and save. Why miss the fun!
Ilnlho YMCA 2-2S3t or
1 Bax 10* Balboa Harnell and Dunn.
a-
DYING DRY CLEANING
GENERAL LAUNDRY
TROPICAL CLEANERS
Plant: #830 Via Espaa. Tel.
3-0871. Branch: 24th St. &
Central Ave. Tel. 2-1348
BLACKSMITH WANTED
The American gentleman
who fixed the hoofs of the
horse named Daiquiri owned
by Mr. Oscar Ghltls, please
communicate with Mr. Mir,
calling telephone 2-3436, dur-
ing office hours. Thanks.
_j INSTANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(fortified with Vitamin D)
for
DRINKING
for
COOKING
for
WHIPPING
Farm Fresh
Flavor!
On Sale in
p. t. Co Commissaries.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TR 18 Trvoli Aw. fn. -20M
WOW!
USED CARS
The Best Buys in Town at C0LPAN CAR MART
REDUCED PRICES
Formerly NOW
1947 PONTIAC............* 990.00 $ 890.00
4-Door Sedan
1947 NASH................ 850.00 775.00
Coupe
1947 BUICK............... 1075.00 990.00
Roadmaster 4-Door Sedan
(Standard transmission)
1941 PONTIAC............ 350.00 290.00
Commander 4-Door
1949 NASH................ 1100.00 990.00
4-Door Sedan
1948 CHEVROLET........... 1000.00 900.00
4-Door Sedan
1948 FORD................ 990.00 890.00
2-Door Sedan
1947 FORD................ 890.00 790.00
2-Door Sedan
1949 CHEVROLET........... 1250.00 1180.00
2-Door
1949 MERCURY............ 1450.00 1350.00
6-Pass. Coupe
1949 MERCURY............. 1490.00 1390.00
4-Door Sedan __,
1949 FORD................ 1250.00 1180.00
Custom V8 Fordor Sedan
1949 FORD................ 1200.00 1120.00
Deluxe Tudor 8
1949 PLYMOUTH........... 1200.00 1180.00
4-Door Sedan
1949 OLDSMOBILE.......... 1390.00 1280.00
Deluxe 4-Door Sedan
1949 HUDSON............. 1125.00 990.00
Super Six Sedan Tudor
1950 FORD.........----------- 1500.00 1390.00
-2-Door Sedan Overdrive
You May Pay More But You Cannot Buy Better Than At
COLPAN MOTORS INC
Yuur Friendly Ford Dealer
Telephone: Panama 2-1033 2-1036

A f _r n-i


ws^pw^p

THURSDAY, JANUARY U. 1MI
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Greal White Fleet
sw Orleans Service__________
Arrive
Cristbal
S.8. Levers Bend ..............................'
S.S. Chlrlqui...........................t....." "
8.S. Qulrlfua .................................H& \
S.8. Piador Knet .............................*ebr- "
BuSUm BoMsantel MM n* Gtmtn- Cart
Jew York Service
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Cape Ann ................................{" H
S.S. Talamanca...............................*"" *?
S.S. Morasn ................................." g
S.S. Heredia ..................-.................,an-
Weekl, Wltap l*w Te*k. L Af.l. ,PM*> '
Occ.rion.1 mUIbo t New Orlej.ni nd Mobil..
rUQUKNT SAILINGS KIOM CBISTOBAL K WEST COAST
CKNTBAL AMEBICA
fistbal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Sails from
Cristobal
S.S. Chlriqui.....(Passenger Serrlce Only).. ..Jan. 29
S.S. Qulrlgua.................................Febr- 5
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL Z121 PANAMA t-2884 COLON 20
FRUIT EXPRESS LINE
Accepting Passengers For
LONDON DIRECT (13 days)
By m/s "PACIFIC EXPRESS"
SAILING ON OR ABOUT JANUARY 30th, 1952
All rooms with private bath.
FOR PASSAGE
Apply *

C. FERNIE & CO.
Cristbal, C.Z.
3-1771
Balboa, C.Z.
2-1857
Where in the world do you want to go!
TO THE STATES? SOUTH AMERICA? EUROPE?
Wherever you want to go come In and let our expert travel
department arrange your trip exactly as you want itat
absolutely no extra cost to you. Take advantage o our
years ot experience In the travel business.
#J "L" St.
DeLesseps
Park
OT0 BROTHER* INC
Tel.
2-2001
2-200*
PACIFIC-ARGENTINE-BRAZIL UNE
POPI 4 TAltOT, INC.
ANNOUNCES
Importers in the Republic of Panam and"the
Canal Zone ths expected arrival of
Cargo from Pacific Coast Ports on Board ths

MAERSK LINE
ACCEPTINQ PASSENGERS FOR
NEW YORK
by
m.8. "LEXA MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 25th
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781
Balboa: 1065
Shipping & Airline News
"Ryndeham" Due Here
With 300 Passengers
The Holland-American
will make it possible for many
travelers in the modest Income,
Line two-week vacation bracket to
passenger ship Ryndeham Is ex- take advantage ot these travel
pected in Cristobal Saturday, bargains and enjoy a South
morning with 300 passengers! American vacation next year.
aboard Out of Norfolk. Va. on The Panagra route along the
a 14-day Caribbean cruise, the
ship will leave Panama the next
morning. Panama Tours has ar-
ranged to take the passengers on
a sight-seeing trip of the Paci-
fic side aU day Saturday.
Fresh Fruits, Vegetables
Arrive Tonight From L. A.
The P. and T. Seafarer which
Is due to arrive at 11 p.m. to-
night is carrying 1400 tons of
cargo from-Los Angeles, Includ-
ing fresh fruits and vegetables
for the Canal Zone. The Pope
and Talbot Line ship Is headed
for South America and will leave
Saturday.
Braniff Officials Return
William Taylor, manager of
Braniff Airways has returned
from Dallas. Texas where he was
attending a meeting of all the
Managers and sales managers of
the airline company. He was ac-
companied by Pedro Diaz, the
district sales manager.
Surprise Support Given Truman
House CleaningPlanByProbers
_____ n -------_____________
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.(UP) House in-
vestigators who dug into the Internal Revenue
Bureau scandals threw their support to President
Truman's reorganization plan in a surprise move
yesterday.
The group warned, however, that the shakeup
will not furnish all the "housecleaning" needed in
the tax-collecting agency. Rep. Cecil R. King (D-Cal)
chairman of the tax fraud hunters, said it was only
the "first step." N
King and Rep. Carl T. Curtis
(R., Neb.), a member of his House
Ways and Means Subcommittee,
testified in favor of the plan be-
fore the House Executive Expen-
ditures Committee.
The committee will give Mr.
Truman's proeram its first test.
Rep. Clare E. Hoffman Mich.), too Republican member,
said he would not oppose it
Much of the opposition that
first developed In the House ao-
oeared to be melting but Senate
hostility might not soften. Sen-
ators have more to lose In the
e way of patronage if tax officials
AmerieT&E. vil JSSSSUBSS
New Tanker Is Launched
And Overturns In Naples
NAPLES. Jan. 24 (UP).A new
480-ton tanker overturned yes-
terday Just after being launched
at the shipyard, and some 50 per-
sons, Including wives and chil-
dren of the workmen were
thrown Into the harbor.
First reports said all aboard
the ship, which had Just been
launched with the traditional
bottle of champagne, were res-
cued. Two persons were reported
slightly Injured.
The vessel was christened
Pleri Riego Oamblni. and finish
ed up lying half submedged at a
90 degree angle at the end of the
launching ramp at nearby San
Giovanni. Firemen swarmed
aboard to search for possible vic-
tims in the hold.
For ths information of
P&T SEAFARER"
AT BALBOA, JAN. 24, 1952
TWs vssssl will accept cargo for the following ports:
CARTAGENA, CURACAO, PUERTO CABELLO
LA GUAIRA, TRINIDAD, RIO DE JANEIRO,AND SANTOS
* i i a a a *
i., az-
ur. Andrews Company
. S. Air Travelers
Offered New Low Rates
In line with its efforts to en-
courage mass air travel to South
America, Panagra (Pan Amer-
ican-Grace Airways) will intro-
duce the "lowest air transporta-
tion fares ever offered United
States travelers to that contin-
ent.
The new low-cost summer ex-
cursion fares which Panagra. in
conjunction with Pan American
World Airways, expects to put
into effect this year from May
to October will save 50 per cent,
Instead of the usual 10 per cent,
on the return portion of the pre-
sent tourist fare round-trip tick-
et between New York and Buenos
Aires.
This Is equivalent to a saving
of $313 under the present round-
trip first class fare
Offered on a 30-day limit ex-
cursion plan, these fares will re-
duce a complete around South
America trip originating and
ending in New York 1879. A
round-trip between Miami and
Buenos Aires will cost as little
"a special 17-day round-trip
ticket from Miami to Lima will
be only $300. while the; 30-day
round-trip fare from Miami to
Santiago, Chile, wll be only
$546. AH flights will be made
with Panagra's four-engine
Douglas equipment.
Panagra officials feel that
these summer excursion fares
west of South .
Panama, Colombia. Ecuador, Pe-
ru, Bolivia, Brazil. Chile avd Ar-
gentina.
Economically the tourist move-
ment will mean an influx of
many dollars in these dollar -
scarce countries and quite nat-
urally, will have a healthy effect
on trade and commerce in this
hemisphere.
American travelers will get
great values for their money be-
cause of the favorable exchange
rates. Anticipating the growing
trend to travel to South Amer-
ica, most of these countries have
eliminated visa requirements for
United States tourists.
Colombia, Ecuador. Venezuela,
Bolivia. Chile and Argentina no
longer require visas for American
pleasure travelers.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Whir, 100.000 People Meet
Presents
Today, Thursday, Jan. 24
P.M.
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00 Panamuslca Story Time
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The HumbugCla.
Alfaro. S.A.
8:15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News and
Features (Voice of
America)
9:00The Country House (BBC)
9:30Moonlight Mood
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
13:00Sign Off
rather than Dolltical appointees
The President wants to replace
th" nation's 84 Internal Revenue
collectors with up to 25 district
collectors, all under Civil Ser-
vice. Either house could kill the
with >o unfavorable vote. Other-
wise it becomes effective auto-
matically March 14.
It was disclosed yesterday
that the eovernment has filed
a $974.78 tax lien against for-
mer assistant attorney general
T. Lamar Caudle and his wife.
Caudlr. who was fired by Pres-
ident Truman for outside acti-
vities, headed the Justice De-
partment's tax fraud division.
He figured prominently in the
tax scandal inquiry.
Some of the congressmen who
criticized Mr. Truman's olan to
reshuffle the Revenue Bureau
also complained that the Justice
Department had been lax in pro-
secuting tax fraud cases.
It HDpeared. however, that
many House members will be re-
luctant in an election year to vote
aealnst any measure bearing a
"reform" label.
Curtis, who once ooenly op-
posed the plan, said he has de-
cided to supoort It although it
la not "the ultimate basis reform
we ouPTit to have."
Curtis had introduced his own
bill to divorce the Revenue Bu-
reau from the Treasury Depart-
ment.
Hoffman sponsored the reso-
lution to veto the President's
olan. Yesterday he said he in-
troduced it only because he
wanted to force hearings on its
merits. The exoendltures com-
mittee will meet todav to take
action on it and the House will
act next week.
Israel Adds Marble
To Its Export List
WASHINGTON, D. C. Jan. 24
The young state of Israel Is
taking another step In Its vigor-
ous drive for self sufficiency by
exporting marble from quarries
unused for almost 2,000 years.
The first major shipment of
Israeli marble, three tons for use
in a new Brooklyn synagogue,
arrived recently In New York In
the Israeli flag freighter "Hen-
rietta Szold."
Building stone thus is added
to the nation's already import-
ant exports, which include citrus
fruits and cut and polished dia-
monds, says the National Geo-
graphic Society.
In addition, plans are under |
way to revive the once-flourish-1 Most modern authorities, be-
ing trade In potash extracted Heve, however, that the "marble"
from the waters of the Dead Sea. used in the temple was actually
Intensive oil exploration Is being a glistening, soft white lime-
conducted In areas which geolo- stone, quarried near the Damas-
gists consider exceptionally pro- cus gate of Jerusalem, rather
mlslng. Israel already has a mo- than the metamorphosed, crys-
dern oil refinery at Haifa. talline limestone that is marble
MARCH
DIMES
JANUARY 15 31
Marble played an Important
part In building construction in
Biblical times, but it is not be-
lieved to have been exported in
any quantity.
by today's standards.
ENGINES NEED FUEL
GRAND LEDGE, Mich. (UP)
The big Chesapeake and Ohio
Solomon's' temple contained diesel train stopped suddenly,
stone described as marble. King | Puzzled crew members checked
David, gathering the material for for more than an hour, f
his son Solomon to use in the
temple, said In the First Book of
Chronicles that he had obtained
"marble stones in abundance."
MikeDiSalleAimsToBe
Senator (D.) From Ohio
they discovered the trouble.
Someone back In the Grand Ra-
pids roundhouse had forgotten to
fill the fuel tanks.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24 (UP)
Price Stabilizer Michael V. Dl-
Salle brushed aside the objec-
tions of his wife and President
Truman vesterday and announc-
ed he will run for the Senate
seat held by Republican John W.
Brlcker of Ohio.
The colorful ex-mayor of To-
ing their telephone chat, he re-
plied:
"She said about the same thing
the President said."
He admitted she didn't want
him to get In the race but agrepd
to go along with whatever he
decided.
DiSalle said Defense Mobilizer
ledo dld not make up his mind Charles E. Wilson asked him to
to seek the Democratic nomina-
tion in the May 6 Ohio priory
until after he had talked foY 35
minutes with Mr. Truman and
chatted rJy long distance tele-
phone with his wife.
He admitted that Mr. Truman
wanted him to stav in the Ad-
ministration and that Mrs. Di-
Salle wanted him to stay out of
the political race. ,,,,,_
But five minutes after talking
with his wife, he imolshlv told
a snecial news conference: .
-Well. I'm going to do it.
DiSalle will have opposition m
the primary, notably from[Henry
Busch of Cleveland, a, Western
Reserve University professor.
Brlcker is assured of re-nomina-
tlon by the Republicans.
Brlcker said he had hoped that
stav on the Job. But he added
with a grin: "He told me he'd
come out to Ohio and stump for
me."
BALBOA
Phene MW
CRISTOBAL
Phone MM
MAERSK LINE
Accepting Passengers for
SAN FRANCISCO
by
m.8. "NICOLINE MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 26th
(Every room-with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel: Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
2000 modern rooms
bothradioMuzak
spotless comfort
TAFT
tsotbtt! NEW YORK
M TIMES SIME IT MM BIT
Kim .mu i..iiiiiiiiii

Friday, Jan. 25
A.M.
8:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:48Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30 As I See It
10:00 News and Off the Record
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
PJH.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News '
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA>
2:16Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45 Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club (VOA)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The HumbugCla.
Alfaro, S.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Barchester Tower (BBC)
(VOA)
7:30Sports Review
7:45^Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00 News, Commentary
(Voice of America)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA) /
9:00Short Story Theatre
(VOA)
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade of America
10:30Adventures of PC 49
(BBC)
11:00 The Owl's Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Of
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting Corp.
RDFRadlodlffuslon Francaise
The U. S. Patent Office func-
tions by authority of an act of
Congress, as stipulated by the
Constitution.
Symposium Planned
By Pueblo Nuevo
Islamic Mission
The Islamic Mission at Pueblo
Nuevo will stage a symposium
Sunday at their new hall begin-
ning at 10 a.m.
The symposium will revolve
around the seven Articles of
Faith in Islam. (1) Allah. (2)
Angels .(3) Books from God. (4)
Messengers from God. (5) The
norter would be'Hereafter. (6T Measurement of
nonSWbT^" 2S2? 22^ (7> ReSUrrCCtl0n
the Issues will be clear cut and
the results decisive." He added
that "Mr. DiSalle seems to meet
those requirements."
DiSalle made an unsuccessful
bid for the Democratic senatorial
nomination in 1950. He wasi de-
feated by Ohio state auditor
Joseph Ferguson, who was
soundly beaten In the fall elec-
tion by Sen. Robert A. Taft (R.J
O.). Busch claims Ferguson's sup-
port in this year's primary.
DiSalle said his decision was a
"very tough" one to make.
But as usual he appeared at
ease and in the same gay. witty
mod that was characterized his
stay here In-one of the most try-
ing Jobs in the capital.
Asked what the "issues" will
be in the primary, he replied:
"Well, I guess the biggest issue
win be who can get the most
votes."
He agreed that "corruption
will be an issue, "but I don t
think anyone will take the af-
firmative side."
DiSalle said "It might be some
time" before a successor is named
to his price Job but that he will
not necessarily stay until then.
DiSalle said Mr. Truman ask-
ed him to stay In the govern-
ment but said he would not inter-
fere with his personal plans.
His wife's attitude was some-
what like Mr. Truman's. DiSalle
said.
Asked what she told him dur-
after Death.
TAGAROPULOS
INDUSTRIES. S.A.
Phones:
1002 1003
r404i feo Boya Ave
Coln R P
. FRESH MILK
. FRESH BUTTER
RICH ICE CREAM
everything
Inspected by the
Health Department
HOME DELIVERY
V
Icmova
uias the latest
novelties


.

...
GENERAL
PAINT
(Pintura
General, S.A.)
Announces their
new telephone
number
2-1891; also 2-1895
GENERAL PAINT CORP.
(Pintora General. S.A.)
No. 38 "H" Street
Phones: 2-1W1 S-1M5
SKIRTS
Gabardine, Taffeta, Cotton
BLOUSES
Esquisite embroidery
NYLON HOSE
with semi-precious stones,
lovely embroidery too!
NYLON PANTIES
all color-
Icmova
115 Central Avenue
IJoul JLook SO
feel
so won
Jbovelu'
derfuL'

Wearing Dresses with the FINEST
MATERIALS from Zig-Zag.
Printed Sk
Pure Irish Linen
"Dan River" Chambray
Plaid and embroidered
ZIG-ZAG
Tel. 2-3418
Headquarters of VOGUE nd McCALL PATTERNS


SSV
P*;f rom
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
'
THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 15J
Bv OSWALD JAfOBY
Written for NBA SerTice
NORTH >
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*AK
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* .1 2
V AK9
4 10864
* 108 5 2
North
1*
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SOCTH
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742
? K J 3
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North-South vul.
Kaat Soth
Pass 2C)
Pa5S 3 NT.
Pass
Weat
Pass
Pass
Opening leadV 3
All of the best townament
players look for chances to talk
'. their opponents out of what is
rightfully theirs, and sometimes
the results are more weird than
. wonderful.
Memory takes me back ten
years to the national touma-
;ment that was interrupted by
'Pearl Harbor. I remember one
hand in which both sides got
. ;busy with swindling tactics.
South decided he could play
; 'the hand at no-trump if he
could stave off a heart open-
ing lead. His bid of two hearts,
i iwu an attempted swindle, lead-
'ing;._to the expected contract
of three no-trump.
West, who had a very good
""Hose, smelt something fishy,
about the bidding and there-
fore opened the three of hearts
in spite of Souths heart bid..
Declarer played the ten of
hearts from dummy, and East!
woo. with the king.
Peter Leventriff, who held
East cards, made the rather
natural return of the jack of
spaces, and South put up the
act'-of spades to win the trick.,
West, who was Sam Rossant.;
tried his hand at swindling by'
dropping the queen of spades
on this trick.
-This plav made it appear that
East had led the jack of spades
from a holding of J-10-2. De-
cQJrer therefore went over to
rivinmv with a club to lead a
Feoond round of spades frnr
dummy. When Lcventrltt na-
turajly played the deuce of
ies. Sov'h finessed the
ossant won with the ten o!
spades and led another heart.
Declarer looked anxiously at i
tbe dummy's Q-6 of hearts and
decided that his only chance
to recover was to put up the
queen of hearts and win the
trick with it.
This was a sad mistake, at
Hi i turned out. Leventritt won
with the ace of hearts and re-,
turned the nine, whereupon
Rossant overtook with the jack]
of hearts and cashed the eight
of hearts for the fifth defen-
sive trick.
OLYMPICS' BIG FOUR
New York Only four
athletes have won lour medals
in the same Olympic Games:
America's A. E. Kraenrlein and
Jesse Owens, Finland's Paavo
Nurmi and the Netherlands'
Mrs. Fannie Blankers-Koen.
Stonecutter Carres
His Ancient Art On
NEWPORT. R. I.. Jan. 24 (UP)
John Howard Benson has
carved a reputation as one of the
world's foremost chlselers.
I The lean bearded Yankee with
the hands of a olacksmith is
considered one of the world's
'master stonecutters by people
who k/iow his ancient craft.
Architects, typographers, col-
lectors, artists all who value
'the art of hand-toewn stone let-
tering and desig* have beaten
a path to his little shop sub-
merged just off Newport's mahi
stem.
! Using the techniques and tools
of the ancient Egyptians who en-
graved their history on stone. I
Benson carries on a tradition o
American stonecu 11 i n a that
reached its height in Newport
in pre-Revolutionary days.
A wooden mallet, home-forged
steel tools and a hand-painted
design arc all he needs to turn
out stone inscriptions that bring
as much as $7.000. All his work
is done in the 246-year-old shep
where he learned hts art. The
'shop was established In 1705.
Food Fish
HORIZONTAL
1,5Depicted fish'
9 Singer
,11 Ventured
9 Footwear 12 It is used
10 Augmented ,,[?r~- ,
12Exhaust 14Not (prefix)
13 Old-womanish 'fl Unusual
At Last!
Ike flavor
of fit* coffee
f. u$icofm
Youmutsrt9
BECAUSE IT 15
100% PUKE COFFEE
%. MAGiC
COUVtNiBHCB
NOPOT-NO GROUNDS
ftEAW IN AN INSTANT
3. THRIFTY, TOO.'
USE* S SAY-'MOUE CUPS
THAN A POUNO OF GROUND
comii AHV 1HWI IS
NO WASTE
i# it aouMM. if 1 or r *( ooop!
mar. pur*
COFFEE
15 Fish
17 Bone
18 At that place
20 Sun god of
Egypt
21 Greek mount
23 State
25 Portal
26 Created
27 Exists
28 Plural (ab.)
29 Measure
30 Hebrew deity
31 Unhampered
33 Network
36 Ogle
37 Looked at
38 Providing
39 Hailed
45 Mixed type
46 Number
48 Victim of
leprosy
49 Caress
50 Pay
52 Active
54 Moistens
55 Fabulous herb
VERTICAL
1 Marsh
2 Behold!
3 Western state
4 Domestic lave
5 Windstorm
t Notion
7 Lim 8 Limb
18 Small
primates
19 Meddled
22 Evening party
24 It is found in
the Mississippi i0 Landed
____ 41 Permits
31 Pass quickly
32 Relate
34 Wigwam
Answer to Previous Puxzle
Mi ii-]ii::'iiMig2!c:
Ml lUUIllMHUiil-iUH
lSlMiaa*W^I;Ji Iki lUQU
f.-jti^amiiiWF-ji i**aido
iitdl i I I ,- .r jr 1
I 112
r r-KJlzl
r i z m\zHAmkir-mmu&
IJWIiiiWUr 1 aatl ,: lUJFJ
UMHWid! ifcajMrJEJ
The council
jnstant
Foster Homes Urged
For Younger Waifs
CLEVELAND. O.,'Jan. 24 (UP
I Pre-school children are better
i off In foster homes than they are
in institutions if they do not
have their own homes, according' ""
to the children's council of the
Welfare Federation here.
urged
Stockholders of
Cervecera Nacional S.A.
(NATIONAL BREWERY INC.)
:
We wish to remind you (hat the regular General
Assembly of Stockholders will be held in the main
office of the Company, North Avenue No. 77, Panam
City, on Monday, January 28th. 1952 at 7 p.m.
In accordance with the By-Laws of our Company
this meeting can not be held unless, one-half plus
one of the total number of stockholders are present
or represented by proxy, and at least one-half of the
capital stock is represented.
Stockholders who are unable to attend this
meeting SHOULD FORWARD THEIR PROXIES in due
time.

THE SECRETARY
CAPTAIN EAST
TUT, TUT, JANE!
BT LESLIE TURNEB
rums WELKEN. Planeteer
HOW TO VANISH
Rl'SS WINTERBOTHAM
SHE OFTBM POKE OF VOU A* SO..1
SO GALLANT AMD DARING.. A COM-
BINATION THRBs- MUSKETEERS
AMP ROIU HOOP! A SORT OP
POOR GIRL'S KNIGHT iw
MS ARMOR
VIC FLINT
RIGHT BEHIND TOD
MICHAEL O'MAU.KV
OUR BOARDINO HOUSE
with
MAJOR BOOPI.E OUT OUR WAX
By J. R WILLIAMS
THE WRECK THAT PARTY OF *3lK9]
/MADE OF THIS MOOSE, X OOOHT>
TO AUTOGRAPH YOUR DOME
WITH A CANDELABRA /-OUT
OlJ THE FLOOR WITH YOUR
BUKllC>lS -*~ V0ONE SOT THREE J
DAY" WORK ClSAKllKlG UP/
AMO DONTTRY A >K)EA<
MLE65 YOO WAkJT
GlX MOWTH* IK GAZEJ
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AW WORD,
MRTHA/T.
MEAWT TO
ftoLlSH UPTW
MAiOOR LI
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SHlP OH
INSPECTION
-you
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TOO SOOtif
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TODAY
WOULD
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GTRIM6/

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FALL IW
....,... -J 1QRN THIRTV YgARftTOO SOQM ^.^./u>



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1952
IB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE mw
pacific ^>ocie
tl
& 17, &L. 3U B*tU 352/
AMBASSADOR AND MRS WILEY
ARE HOSTS FOR DINNER
The Ambassador ol the United States to Panama and
Mrs. John Cooper Wiley entertained Tuesday evenin, at the
Embassy Residence on La Cresta with a dinner % Wen in
hSSST*of Brigadier General Emll C. Kiel the Commanding
General Caribbean Air Command, and Mrs. Kiel. Co?ers
were laid for twenty.
Visitors Are House Guests
Of Ambassador and Mrs. Wiley
Mr. Mario Santo Domingo, Jr.,
and Mr. Miguel Correa who ar-
rived Wednesday from Barran-
qullla, Colombia, for a visit to
vne Isthmus are the house-
guests of the Ambassador of the
United States to Panama and
Mrs; John Cooper Wiley during
their stay here.
SIDECLANCFS
By Calbraith
Ambassador and Mrs. Orth de
Zevallos Entertain with Dinner
The Ambassador of Peru to
Panama and Dean of the Diplo-
matic Corps and Mrs. Emilio
Ortiz de Zevallos entertained
Monday evening at the Embassy
on La Cresta with a dinner
given In honor of the Minister
of Foreign Relations and Mrs.
Ignacio Molino, Jr.
The attending guests included
Mr. Jernimo Almillategul, the
Minister of Agriculture and
Commerce: the Ambassador of
Argentina to Panama and Mrs.
Julio A. Lopez Munlz; the Min-
ister of France to Panama and
Mrs. Ouy Menant; the Ambas-
sador of Spain to Panama and
the Countess de Rabago; the
Minister o Brasil to Panama
and Mrs. Joao Emilio Ribeiro;
the Minister of El Salvador to
Panama and Mrs. Joaqun Val-
des; the Counselor of the Unit-
ed States Embassy and Mrs.
Murray M. Wise; the President
of the Diplomatic Committee of
the Chamber of Deputies of
Pera and Mrs. Enrique Miro'
Quesada; the Comptroller Gen-
eral of the Republic of Pan-|
ma and Mrs. Henrique de Obar-1
rlo; the Secretary of the Peru-
vian Embassy and Mrs. Jose
Alvarado Sanchez; the Secre-
tary of the Spanish Embassy,
Mr. Po de los Casares; Mr.
and Mrs. Adolfo Arias. Jr., Mr.
and Mrs. Ricardo Arlas E., Miss
Ramona Lefevre and Miss Glo-
rela Calvo.
of the Chief of the Mission for
the Army In Bogota, Colombia,
who is a visitor to the Isthmus
was the guest of, honor at a
dinner given on Monday eve-
ning by Colonel and Mrs. Chrls-
Uancy Plckett at their quarters
at Albrook Air Force Base. Ma-
jor and Mrs. Noble Holladay
were also guests on this occas-
ion.
Tea Honors Isthmian Visitors
Mrs. Lenora Hass and her
daughter Miss Dorothy Hass who
are returning soon to their
home In Washington, D. C. after
a visit with Mrs. Hass' son-in-
law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
Ernesto Jan Guardia, of Pan-
ama, were honored with a tea
given Monday, by Mrs. Nicholas
Norman at the residence of her
son-in-law and daughter, Mr.
and Mrs. Arturo Miller of Bella
Vista.
Mrs. Ernesto Jan Guardia
and Mrs. Camilo Quelquejeu
presided at the tea table.
General Exhibition Of
Paintings At TivoU
A new general exhibition of
oil and water color paintings
by a group of artist members
of the National League of Ame-
rican Pen Women Is now on
display in the Little Galelry of
the Hotel TivoU.
Play Reading Group
To Meet Monday
The Play-Reading Group of
the Canal Zone College Club
will meet Monday evening, Jan-
uary 28, at seven thirty o'clock,
at the home of Mrs. George O.
Lee. 794-A Tavernllla Street,
talooa.
The program will be based
on the comedy "Bell, Book, and
Candle" by John van Druton.
Members of the College Club
and their guests are invited to
attend this meeting.
Mr. and Mrs. Beeson
Have Visitors from Miami
Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Bee-
son, of Golf Heights, have as
their guests former residents
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Vincent
who arrived Tuesday by plane
fro mMiaml. Florida.
Reception To Be Held Friday
At Brazilian Legation
The Minister of Brazil to
Panama and Mrs. Joao Emilio
Ribeiro have issued Invitations
to a reception to be given on
Friday evening, Jan. 25, from
six to eight o'clock at the Lega-
tion.
Mrs. Stuart Vincent
Honored At Dinner
Mrs. Stuart Vincent, the wife
Writer's Group of Pen Women
Hold Monthly Dinner
The Writers Group of the
Canal Zone Branch of the Na-
tional League of American Pen
Women met for their monthly
dinner meeting on Tuesday eve-
ning in the Fern Room of the
Hotel TivoU with Mrs. Roy E.
Graham and Mrs. Abbie de Lin-
ares serving as co-hostesses.
Honored on this occasion was
Mrs. Roy E. Graham (Gladys
Graham), author of the newly
published "Panama Guide
Book," who Is the first writer-
member to have a complete
book published since the Group
was organized two years ago.
Those attending the dinner
Included Miss Sue Core. Mfs.
Lewis B. Moore, Mrs. Francis
Feeney, Mrs. William Bailey,
Mrs. Ernest Reimer, Mr WUllam
N. Taylor, Mrs. David J. "'srkun,
Mrs, Cornelius S Mc -rmack,
Mrs. Mabel Shaffer and visitor
Mrs. Frank Bruce Lamb.
JUS f UNPACKED .
First Cotton Dresses



of the year
from $9.95
also a new line of
Summer Shoes
new styles
High heels Ballerina Flatties
No. 5 39th Street Vista del Mar

,*
Beta Sigma Phi
Soro.uy Meeting
Alpha Chapter of Beta Sigma
Phi sorority met at their So.or-
ity house tor a cultural and so-
cial evening at 7:30 January 22.
The meeting was called to or-
uer uy auwelte Lynch with all
present reciting the opening
ritual in unison. Roll was callea
ana the minutes of the last
meeting were read by Louise
iileiiuubtsen, followed by a
short business meeting.
The program, "The Art of
Dress" was presented by tfau-
ette Lynch who started the
group participation discussion
with an informal talk on "Dress
of tne Sixteenth Century" with
each girl taking a diuerent per-
iod, carrying tne tneme through
the present day dress.
Late supper^are served by
the nosi-esses, Margie Ka.hga-
ber and Pat Lenevilie. OUier
memoers present were Patty
Baser, Barbara Curies, Ava
Howell, Marian Kariger, Doro-
thy Taylor, Lorraine Terry,
ftb'gy Vvertz. Be tie rarrel ana
Genie Williams.
The next meeting of the
group will be hela at the Soiur-
k.v Uouse on February 12, at
7:30 p.m. Program for the eve-
ning will be "oeslgn for Living"
witn group participation to oe
led by Charlotte cagley. Host-
MHI ior the an air will be Do-
rotny Taylor and Ava Howell.
March of Dimes
To tftildilt irom Dance
Unit No. l American Legion
Auxiliary will hola a dance on
January 25 at 8:00 p.m. to raise
funds for contribution to the
March of Dimes. Music will be
furnished by the 71st Anny Or-
chestra. Ticnets may be obtain-
ed from members or bought at
the door for $1.00 per person.
"The Russians must have you mechanics and your repair
charges in mind whan they call America a capitalistic
crtrv!
Atlantic Camera
Club Sees Color
Slides Of Orchids
Harry Dunn. Importer, grower
and photographer of orchids, was
guest speaker Honday evening
at Atlantic Camera Club.
A large group of members of
both the Atlantic Camera Club
and their guests from the Orchid
Society, enjoyed the beautiful
collection of Kodachrome slides
exhibited by Dunn.
Special emphasis was pl~";d
on orchids which are native to
Panama, but many beautiful
orchids from other Central
American countries were includ-
ed.
Members of the Orchid Society
were probably conversant with
much of the Information cover-
ed by Dunn's talk, but others
were surprised to learn that al-
though the average layman con-
siders orchids purely tropical
flowers, they are found In every
country In the world, from pole
to pole and from sea level to
altitudes of ten thousand feet.
The next regular meetln" of
the Atlantic Camera Club will be
held on Feb. 4 ft the Armed
Forces Y .M. C. A.. Colon.
A. cheer fc
11 Lara vi/atson
winner of the SECOND VOTE COUNT
for Carnival Queen of
BE
u

mim
MAR1TZA DE OBARRIO
2nd. place
WHO WILL BE THE CARNIVAL QUEEN ?
Don't miss our last festival ... All your friends !
will be there backing their favorite candidate ...',
SUNDAY, JANUARY 27 ... 8 P. M. ;
... LAST VOTE COUNT. FESTIVAL
Don't miss it And don't miss
ANGELO JASPE & HIS ORCHESTRA OF THE TEAR! !
i
. HOG, "Your Community Station,"
will broadcast the events of this last
VOTE COUNT FESTIVAL
from 10 to 10:30 p.m.
Entrance to the Last Festival $1.00
0 t
Those attending the SUNDAY EVENING BUFFET'
will receive a FREE TICKET to the last vote counting.
. REMEMBER
. Every cent paid at the hotel for food or beverage
Is worth ONE VOTE FOR YOUR CANDIDATE I 1
: ;;
0Wm
'"^'.Vv''v.v.v.-
SONIA MANTOVANI
3rd. place
A Kirkeby Hotel
C^r
Platter Fans... You'll Welcome Oui
......
For as little as $ |oO o. D0 Weekly
You can be the proua owner of the latest 'hite'....
or what aver type of music you enjoy most!
Ca. Cyrnos Cyrnos Gift Shop
No- hiSkJte d* ta Ma N- ItoM Ave.
(TlTOH Crossing) (Across from Ancon Playshedl
\J\jant garden-fresh,
flavor-fu/J green peas?
V. F. W. Bingo Tonight
Bingo will be played tonight
at the V. F. W. Home on Curun-
du Road at seven forty five
i'clock. Prizes will be awarded}
to winners.
Prominent Visitors
At Hotel El Panama
Mr. Harry P. Lilly who is the
associate partner of the ship-
ping firm of Norton, Lilly and
Co., and Mrs. Lilly are visitors
on the Isthmus until Sunday
on a combined business and
pleasure trip. They are guests
at the Hotel El Panama during
their stay here.
CRISP FRESH LETTUCE
Direct from CERRO PUNTA In Our Own
Refrigerated Truck.
RED CABBAGE
RHUBARB
CARROTS
Mr. Sam Snead, Mr. Chick
Harbert, Mr. Buck White, Mr.
Harry Greenwald and'Mr. Jim-
my Vincent, who are golf pro-
fessionals from various parts of
the United States arrived Mon-
day evening by Pan American
World Airways for a Visit to the
Isthmus where they will be
guests at the Hotel El Panama.
They will participate In the
Panama Open Golf Tourna-
ment.
Police Ball To Be March 14
The Balboa Branch of the
Canal Zone Police Association
will hold its annual police ball
on Friday, March 14, at the Ho-
tel El Panama. Tickets are
available from any Canal Zone
policeman or at the police sta-
tions. Reservations may be
made by calling Balboa. 1377.
SNOW CROP FROZEN FOODS
FRESH FROZEN OYSTERS
FILET OF HADDOCK
FILET OF CODFISH
-
.
PAUL'S MARKET
Reserve Officers To Meet
January 31
The Reserve Officers' Asso-
ciation, the Navy Pacific Chap-
ter, will meet on Thursday,
January 31 at 8:00 p.m. at the
Officers' Club, rfaval Station,
Rodman.
The recently drafted Consti-
tution of the Chapter will be
presented for adoption by the
newly elected officers and all
members are requested to at-
tend for this reason.
Reserve officers who apply
for membership before the
opening of business may parti-
cipate as members in this meet-
ing.
CHAIN SNARES CHILD
KOUTS, In. (UP).Four-year-
old Elisabeth Werner was injur-
ed by a chain attached to a trac-
tor when It wrapped around her
and squeesed her. Elizabeth was
holding the end of the chata
and her .father. Elmer Werner,
was driving the tractor In the
barnyard of the home.
Shaded, ready to pop
Into bailing wafer.
ATLAS GARDEN DRIVE-IN
CURB SERVICE
AROUND DANCE FLOOR.
See Dancing
Listen to Music
hjoy Fresh Sea Food.
Shrimp Cocktail....SO
Cevlche..........Me
Lobster Dinner___2.M
Fried Chicken ...1J#
ATLAS GARDEN
tdb
L
face powder
gram by gram
': '. selecting each shade either to match your complexion
right before your eyes into the one
and only oneface powder
to do the most for
your beauty..

RHODA
MAIN STORE
(2 Jaste Arosemena Ave.
Tel. 3-1477
BRANCH STORE
g TivoU Ave.
Tel. 2-3121
CHICKEN:.: SOUP!
You'll taste at once the tempting flavor of fine
chicken in every golden-gleaming spoonful,
and you'll know why Campbell's Chicken Soup
is such a universal favorite! Plump, full-
breasted chickens make a rich, glistening broth.
Fine white rice fluffy light makes every
delicious spoonful extra satisfying, extra nour-
ishing. And you're sure to enjoy the. tender
pieces of chicken so generously added! Serve it
soon for just as surely as you like chicken,
you'll like Campbell's Chicken Soup!
.
"-^-"T-"-'"-".....'" "'VH'I ,"""'
?y
eONDNSEO FOR GREATER VALUE LOOK POR THE REO AND-WHITE LABEl
..: ieflHs^s^sVia^sVeHHsVHsaBVBaBl
fl^^F*
*&&**
WfW


PAGE TWO
Tim PANAMA AMERICAN *. AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
i'.*


WN(B AMD Puill.MIO ST TUB PANAMA AMKRICAN NUI. INC
rouNOto NBLSON MOUNSCVILL IN III*
HARMODIO ARIAS. IOITO*
B7 H linn O BOX 134. ANM *. Of P
TlLIFMONI NM NO 2 0740
C*ILI ODItll PANAMRICAN. PANAMA
COI.ON QMiei la.l' CINTHAI AUINUI ITWIIN 1TH ANO 13TH SlAIIH
Pouiion RiPniaiNTAiivii JOSHUA m POWErt. INC
34B MADHON Avi Ni* yoak. 1171 N Y.
LOCAL ? j
I* MOUTH IN AOVANC1 --------------------------------- '* 'lioO
fon (IX MOUTH. IN AOVANCI---------------------------JAW I OO
PS ONI IN AOVANCI-------------------------------
Labor News
And
Gotnmetit
By Victor Riesel
V. MAN ABOUT TOWN
The President of Mexico's son. M. Alemn, Jr.. rendezvousing
1th Elizabeth Taylor, has coasters wondering about all those
S Merger reports with M. Wilding.. Mrs. Clark Gable has up d her
ttlement price to a million.. The Doris Duke-Philip Reed dates
Cave resumedconfusing the experts.. Mickey Rooney's monthly
-H timony checks to his ex-wives total 83.500... Mr*. Constance
i Winant, widow of the U. S. Ambassador, may wed a wealthy Texan
when she returns from abroad.. Former screen star Bessie Love
lit reported on the verge of middle-alsliug in Italy with an artist
8 Prince All Khan was "taken" for $10.000 by card sharps en
m. route to Buenos Aires.. Greta Garbo's escort to the Havana-Ma-
*- Lrid was a Merchant Marine skipper.. .Lady Judith Montagu,
5? cousin of W. Churchill, and rich Raymunri Murphy have the ring
w _Gene Tierney's divorce confirmation paves the way for groom
" Olee Cassini and starlet Barbara Freking.
The Overseas Press Club hasn't quit, "JltlniZ for newspaper-
man Bill Oatls' release from a Red jail. T.cir.bers keep bombing
the While House and Dept. of State...Ham Fisher Is Irked over
published legends about town that he plins marriage With any-
one but Barbara Harbin. She's the onewhen and if.. Rita Hay-
worth's latest hand-patter Is Cy Howaiu .Na'icy Andrews, the
No 1 Fifth Ave. headliner. and her mat bavj decided to be pals
instead of married. .Peter Lawford and J'-an McDonald of Movie-
town are experimenting again.. .The E. HurVEths he's the textile
mogul, have parted...J. Paris wishes CeiPste Holm would listen
to reason...Harvey Stone is out of the L is A:ie.:les hosp. greatly
improved...The Horace Dodge-Gregg 3herwod idyll is idle
Tribal interference.. .The line will nam? a ship after heroic Capt.
Carlsen.
^
I
v-
I
The White House hopes to yank Gen. Vaughan out of the
campaign target area. Prob'ly with an assignment abroad in the
Spring.. "Fancy Meeting Yon Again," which fell before the fir-
ing squad, made 69 backers poorer.. .Joyce. Mathcws whose tresses
were toned to a light brown at Madeleine's, confided to staffers
there that she was going to Nassau sonn "on a very important
vacation" Mailman Muntz' ex-wife Diane Garret pines for Ro-
bert Taylor...Hl Block of "What's My Line?" to pretty Joan Hudson...The Byron Robyn-Elise McCully be-
trcthal was announced this week, but not the we-iding date, which
is April 19 at St. Ignatius.. Mexico City's latest feud: Dalton
Tiumbo and Hugo Butler, who were ejected from a cafe after
slugging it out Georgia Gov. Talmadge'* outbursts were Inspir-
ed by his hopes to be the Dixiecrats* first Pres.
Gracie Fields' wedding bells ring Fib. 6 Jimmy Rltz is try-
ing hard with June Lee.. Parisians are ravi: k over Marcel Cer-
dsn's nephew as a future ring star...Jack Benny, who never
phyed the Salcon Circuit, is getting fabulous offers to try it...
The Colony eyebrows tilted when Countess Dorothy dl Frasso dat-
ed author Ludwlg Bcmelmans.. .The Frcil Glmb< Is confirmed our
recent tip. Wed only 2 years ago. they will divide quietly. She Is
Ruth Newton, sister of the Denver mar'or... Robert R. Young,
chairman of the board at C. & O.. is prominently mentioned for
the same spot at N. Y. Central.. .Col. R. R McCcmlck. the news-
fiaper publisher, planning retirement lr. a few months? Thats
he 4*h Estatp buzz...D. Garroway has a now heart-throblem.
Model Nancy Berg from his native Chicago. Rosemary Clooney
grs-cefully stepped aside.
Veronica Lake's despondency is the reason she missed her
teevy appearance. Chums have been arcing her to reconcile with
her husband. Phyllis Kir* replaced Tier n "Hollywood Screen
Test" .Karen Lewis, recently in "So. Pacific," got her melting in
las Vegas from J. Gordon of here. She Is now the bride of a
Robbins Mills exec...The Carmen Cava';aro (In that divorce
?ot) are not unwinding. He's starring there.. Van Lewis of
exas. who sighed over Jill Warburg during the holidays, keeps
long-distancing her at college. He's the chap who wears a S10.000
bill in his tie claspwith a window so vou can see it... The
George Brandts are imaging. She was ictress F'len Fenwick
State Senator F. Moritt's mother never saw him In court until the
last day of the Tallulah case, when His Ilonor cited him for con-
tempt.. Lovelv Bess Cashenberry. former El Morocco hatchick,
owns several slivers of Broadway shows._______________________

THIS IS TOUR FORUM THt READERS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Thi Mail Bo M an op" torum tot trodsn ot Tro Panamo Amar-
kan Ittttf ar..reiYid fro (fully and ara handltd in a wholly fMcri.sl manmr.
It iom contribu, a krttar don't bi impatient it it doein't oppeii Mil
al day. Litter ara publnhid in thi ordir received
PImm try to ktp thi lattan limited to on* page length
Identity ol letter writer, i held In itricf.it confidence.
Thi newipaper aiiumi no ruponibilify tor totement or opinion
xpnitid in letteri from rtodtrs.
o
FIGHTING MAD BACHELOR
Diablo Heights, Canal Zone
Mail Box Editor
Panama American
Panama, R. P.
Dear Sir:
The bachelors of Diablo do not want to move or to pay
double rent. We highly regent the discriminatory and arbitrary
cisin of the Panama Canal Company Board of Directors In
proving a 100% rental Increase on the group of 201 buildings
In Diablo Heights.
It was said that "this plan was adopted In lieu of a general
Increase for Government Employes other than those of the Pa-
nama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government." That
1 certainly a twisted thought! Why shouldn't the Panama Ca-
nal take care of their own employes first? tand at a normal
and fair rental rate).
It was also said that "this was agreed upon at a conference
held late In November by representatives of the Canal Company
and other agencies represented in the canal Zone subject to
final approval of the Board of Directors."
"Why do other agencies have anything to say about the
rental rates of our quarters? Can't the Panama Canal Company
control their own housing, or did they recommend this increase
tor one particular group of their own employes?
The fact that this 100% Increase was unde.- consideration
wu. denied by certain officials, who said they knew nothing
about It. (Possibly those who recommended it). This Is a good
example of the double-talk rampant since the formation of the
Panama Canal Company.
We obtain from the newspapers (not through any official
notification) the startling information that we may apply for
assignments elsewhere. A call to the housing office soon alter
this story In the paper gives us the Information that there were
no vacant 301 quarters In Ancon or Balboa. (The only type as-
signed to bachelors).
Other Panama Canal Employes should not be lulled Into a
falie sense of security, just because this latest "rental robbery"
does not apply to them. Their morale will probably take an-
other nose-dive within six months when their rental rates are
also boosted. This is Just the beginning of things to come!!
We like Diablo and are very indignant at this Increases.
Wh> shoula the Army get this choice location of Panama Canal
201 Houses? This Is really what Is happening when bachelors
are being forced out in order that the Panama Canal can col-
lect double rent from the Army.
Most of us have spent a considerable amount of time and
money in having our apartments painted and fixed up. Most
of ua would not want to move even If we were entitled to any
other type of apartments such as a one-bedroom, four apart-
ment house. It Is said that bachelors may be assigned apart-
ments In "family" type 201 buildings. This was been tried out
before and was highly unsatisfactory to both.
If it can be proved that a higher rental is really necessary
for these "lovely" barracks, then the rent for all type 201 build-
ing on the Isthmus should be Increased. The percent of In-
crease would be a much smaller amount.
"Fighting Mad-
Dead men may tell rro tales.
But If they are seafarers,
frozen to death In lce-sheathed
clothing, frozen as they aban-
don cracked ships In 50-foot
waves or* are turned l-om life-
boats floating futllely un-
seen and unheard because their
emergency wireless has long
since been torn out lor econo-
my reasons their unl-i rill
,pil these tales. And loudly
right across the inn .
While the world watched a
heroic captain reiusing i ,
his ship die alone on the At-
lantic waves, 46 sailors, six
thousand miles away, died alone
when their ship, the 8. 8. Penn-
sylvania, went down In the
waters south of Alaska.
Storms come in cycles, the
seamen tell me, and the S. S.
Pennsylvania was caught up in
one, atop mountainous seas.
The men took to four life-
boats in winds up to 50 miles
an hour on one of the Pacific's
roughest spots.
This captain got off with his
men, after reporting that his
7,800-ton Victory ship was tak-
ing water through a 14-foot
ciack in the hull. She was down
by the head and out of con-
trol.
"Leatino note," the radio
sparked out. Then silence.
For there were no emer-
gency sending sets in the
lifeboats. If there had been,
the seafarers might have
been alive today per-
haps not taking a ticker
tape greeting, but ready to
ship out. BUI Steinberg's
crusading CIO American Ra-
dio Assn., which cleaned
all subversives out of the
ship radio shacks the lefties
once infested, charges that
the "short-sightedness of
government agencies which
permitted the lines to strip
the life boats of radio
transmitters" is responsible.
This wasn't always so.
During the past war, the
Navy ordered transmitters into
all lifeboats. Hundreds of lives
were saved by the crackling
sounds from those little elec-
tric gimmicks.
But when peace broke out,
the Navy didn't enforce its
rule. Since there are no laws
to compel the use of transmit-
ters, many lines Juat ripped
them out to save the tab on
upkeep, replacement and test-
ing.
When Korea put peace on the
shelf, the rush to get out new
ships killed off the transmit-
ters' entirely.
There Just wasn't time to
equip all new 'lifeboats. The
electrical gadgets and wiring
were needed elsewhere al-
though there is a modern,
hush-hush little transmitter be-
ing developed now which will
actually be sufficiently buoyant
to hold a man up in ordinary
seas.
Such transmitters could have
summoned help for the 46 from
a vessel standing by Just 81
miles away. The rescue vessel
veered and headed for the lo-
cation of the original S.OS.
But by that time 50-foot waves
and 50-mile winds had moved
the lifeboats some distance.
There's great bitterness in
seafarers' halls today. The
radio union reports that
messaoes have been pouring
into its headquarters like
water into the S. S. Penn-
sylvania's cracked bottom.
Protests from all over the
world demand a swift safe-
ty drive for there, but
for the grace of God, would
have gone Capt. Kurt Carl-
sen and his crew, too.
Seafaring union chiefs are
planning to demand that. e*ch
new contract call for the Instal-
lation of transmitters in the
lifeboats.
The CIO's American Radio
Assn. will this week dispatch
letters to every Conwsman.
as well as to the Federal Com-
munications Commission and
the Coast Guard, demanding
this safety device. It will be-
come a political issue.
Capt. Carlsen has dramatized
the entire question of safety at
sea. The seafarers point out
that a ship, like a human be-
ing, wears as it gets old.
Just 10 weeks ago, the AFL
Seafarers International Union
lost seven men on the 8 S
Southern City, an L.S.T. con-
verted to cargo carrying.
It split up off Hatteras as
I ..was runnlnS to the West
ndies Just broke in two.
Too late the Coast Guard
ruled that the company was
at fault for not riveting a bel-
ly band 'metal strip) right
around It. That's something the
CIOs National Maritime Union
will investigate and beat the
drums for in Washington.
All these ships are weld-
ed vessels. They just don't
have the flexibility to give
a little in heavy weather.
They crack right under a
sailor's feet. They're too
rigid they have a stiff-
ness which doesn't ertst in
riveted ships, even the old
ones. And the NMV may
demand the end of the
"quickie-welded" ships even
in wartime.
Many brave souls may be
:leep in the deep but the
afarers take a dim view of
.he old lyric.

THURSDAY JANUARY l, 5I
Thar She Blows7


By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK.More in poverty than in hunger,
the lady who looks after the larder at our house
prepared a surprise for the master the other
evening: whale steak. More In hungei than In
confidence, the master aie some. Hmmm.
The best thing about whale tenderloin is that
it sells for 88 cents a pound, and the pound con-
tains no bone, no fat, no ristle.
The average Norwegian fin whale will relin-
quish about tnree tons of tenderloin sometimes
us much as four.
This puts the whale considerably outside the
steer class as a ylelder :n clear meat, but I am
afraid the whale will never completely replace
the cow unless they start trans using a little
Eskimo into our bloodltm-s.
They say that whale steak dees not taste fishy.
To me it tastes fishynot very fishy, but as tlshy
as a mallard duck that nas forgotten its table
manenrs, as fishy as a fish that has conceivably
been finished oft on wheat.
Served with lots of onions, 1 suppose whale's
fishy taint Is mild enough to surrender to the
stronger oniony aroma i.rd enduring taste.
Whale steak looks great, though It chars on
top like a good sirloin ($1 38 a pound, bone and
fat and gristle Inclusive) and is pink but faintly
coarse Inside.
It is not so tender as you wi-uld Imagine, but
a lot more succulent than som of the economy
cuts we've had around here In the past few years.
The dogs thought it was line.
I expect that the wha'.e, as steady provender.
might prove more acceptable as a meat course If
you did not move into f&t fray with foreknow-
ledge of what you were about to receive.
I ate a dish compose-1 mo?tlv of sheep's eyes
one time, in Morocco, ana did not suffer acutely
until later, when somebody tipped me to the
nature of the specialty
At one time or another I heve sampled both
goat and horse, and found them swallowable 1
not palate-tickling, and I have reason to believe
that an old Swahlii cook once palmed off a zebra
chop on me when eatln'-nvat was low in the
kitchen tent.
It was pretty fat but riot bad if you were
hungry enough.
And they said that during the war In France
a fair fricassee could be (and v/as) composed of
cat. The thought strikes unpleasantly every time
I eat in a French restaurant, because you know
how the French can gusty up an old bone with
sauces.
But we must not cavil at our lot today. The
blessings of government have placed red meat
beyond the reach of all cave oil millionaires and
friends of Harry Truman, and a man is lucky to
find a slab of whale on his table.
The Eskimos and the Scandinavians hajfre
thrived on it for years and seem Inordinately
healthy. Whale cutlets are fine for slimming too,
which should make them readily acceptable to
all women, everywhere. Dames will eat anything.
Including rope salad dusted with Paris green, If
they suspect It will pare a pound off the posterior.
I have come to accept cheerfully anything that
is placed before me the can chew it and it ain't eggplant
Between the high cost of old-fashioned gro-
ceries and the recurrent reducing fads the even-
ing meal is a constant surprise.
One week It's nothing but pig from feet to
flight deck, and the nex. week it's grass and cot-
tage cheese, according !o the latest in dietary
theory and store-window speclsls
In my momentary tranqulllty I now consider
the whale as man's best friend, for does he not
five us sperm oil, corset stays fertilizer, per-
ume from ambergris, anrt. finally, hamburger?
I will continue to eat him so long as he sticks
around the buck mark per pound with only one
brief complaint.
I do wish that Mama would continue to an-
nounce dinner with "Come and get itl" or "Soup's
On!" Instead of "Thar 8he Blows!"
Old Boys
By Ptter Edso
.
WASHINGTON(NBA)There were lot of
people In Prime Minister Winston Churchill's
audience when he spoke to Congress who pro-
bably looked at him and listened to him and
thought: *
"If Winnie can still get by at 77 so can I."
But there were others on the floor of the House
and in the gallery who came away from that
third appearance of Churchill before Congress
with the feeling, "He's still one of the world's
greatest statesmen, If rot the greatest, but he's
not what he used to be."
It was Churchill's first speech-making appear-
ance before television, so the TV audience had
no basis for comparison -vlth past performances.
Radio audiences may have ceoed the situation
accurately. This was a pood speech. But it didn't
lift them out of their se:its cheering.
Consideration of old age among politicians is
not necessarily disrespectful. It is a fact of life.
Not present in the House o Representatives
chamber when Churchill made his speech, but
watching the proceedings Dv television in his
office was President Harry 8. Truman.
He will be 68 years old on May 8 That's nine
years younger than Mr. Churchill
If Mr. Truman could next November and serve out another full four
year term, he would be only 72 in 10M, or five
years younger than Churchli: is today.
"If Winnie can still get by at 77 so can I."
Mr. Truman may have thought that as he lis-
tened to the speech. B'n Intimates of the Presi-
dent say that a different lint of thought has
sometimes been running thrrugh his mind.
The Trumans are a long-lived breed. If Harry
8. Truman were to resign from the Presidency.
he would have every expectancy cf another 15 or
20 years of life.
If he continues in public office, attempting to
bear all the burdens certain to be heaped on his
shoulders and desk in ti.e next four years,'he
might die before the term was out Is the game
worth that price? ,
Seated on the rostrum behlna Prime Minister
Churchill as he spoke were Vlee President Alben
W. Berkley, who will be 75 nex November, and
Speaker of the House 8am Ray burn of Texas, a
mere boy of 70.
Friends of the Vice President report that, her
-
of late, he has become an authority on the lives
of elder statesmen.
He can cite all the facts about Georges Cle-
menceau, who was World War I premier of
France at 77 and lived to be 88. Or of Field Mar-
shal Paul Von Hlndenburg. who was President
of Germany right up to r.ls death In 1934, at age
87.
All this interest of trie Vice President's in
feople who are not only 17 but three score and
7 comes naturally.
For there are those among the Democratic
helrarchy who think that Berkley should step
aside to let some younger man tun for his office.
With this Idea. Mr. Berkley has shown no sym-
pathy thus far.
"If Winnie can get by at 77, why can't I?"
Facing Churchill in his audience were a num-
ber of venerable Senators ana Representatives
who may have had thjs 3ame thought. There was,
for Instance, Sen. Theodore Francis Oreen of
Rhode Island. He will be 85 in October
Senator Green was all over Europe last year,
and every place he went v.e made a good Impres-
sion. He attended every briefing, and In between
official business sessions he went to air the art
museums, Instead of canuslng sround the way
some Junketeers do.
He was indeed a credit to nil country in spite
of bis years.
But before Churchill was also Sen. Kenneth
McKellar, of Tennessee, who will be 83 years old
on Jan. 29, though he kteps his birthday out of
his official biography in the Congressional Re-
cord.
He hobbled Into the session en a cane, and has
been noticeably even more enfeebled since his
return to Washington this year. H Is up for re-
election this November and there is a chance he
will not be baek.
Sen. Walter F. George it Georgia will be 74 on
Jan. 20. Sen. Tom Connaily of Texas is 75, and
so is Sen. Cari Hayden of Arizona Sen. James E.
Murray of Montana is 76
On the House side, there was Adolph Sabath of
Illinois.who Is 86 Robert L Doughton of North
Carolina is 80. Robert Croiser oi Ohio is 78. Daniel
A. Reed of New York is 77 Aud others.
"If Churchill can get by at 77. why can't I?f
ClLlsHY iwwftarwiwiii
MERRY- GO- ROUND
t OMW MAliaet
Drew Pearson says: Lie-detectors used at Pentagon; A,
F. of L holds strategy meeting to back Governor War-
ren for White House; Universal Military Training
won t be passed this year. I
ma WASH^QTON. Gracious Secretary of Defense Bob Lovetl i
did not have an easy time at the first closed-door meeting of
the Senate Armed Services Committee for the year 1092. He
struck a virtual buss-saw of senatorial questtons
"This committee should find out Just why we had to par
the Hungarian government a ransom for our filers?" opened ui
Efex'K1 Wayne Mors.evth.e reon RP"bean. "wVXhJI
caU both the Secretaries of Defense and state "* i
"I agree''supported chairman Dick Ruseil of Georgia "II
Oisapproved the payment of the ransom, too, Mr. Secretary Wi
would like to hear the reasons." *' "'
Secretary Lovett asked that' his remarks be off-the-record, |
However, he actually said nothing more than had already been
In the newspapers. '
Senator Morse then turned to another subject
"If what I have heard Is true, it Is fantastic," he said "i am
told that when a civilian applies for a key job in the Defensa
Department, a personnel officer tells him: 'Your security clear-
ance would be hurried along if you would volunteer for a poly*
"That's a lie detector explained the Oregon Senator, slam-
JJ'IfLv.1* h.and on tne Uble- "and there's nothing voluntary about i
it. Either that man takes the test, or he is conspicuously marked |
n"He L06" ta* a emldark room, where the operator, a dra-
matic looking person who acts like he's playing a Sherlock Rol
mes mystery, straps the machine on him, breathing suspicions
M.W'.whC0mK a,!on5 wa? ilnce tne BU1 oi Wte.^itonned
Morse. "Why, the lie detector is not eren admissible In some
c2art*. because it's too capricious and too much depends on the|
,,. SSf 8.hwW8 how iar. we>ve 5?ne- u UMil ta Heft one of I
tne basic rights of American Justice was the presumption of ln-b
nocence. But in the Pentagon, you are resumed guilty unless
this high priest and his machine decide otherwise* I
t '\ toP' am f*mlllr with this case," commented Senator Rus I
sell soberly, ''and I believe the Senator from Oregon la right. This
Secretary Lovett had little comeback.
"I agree if that is the way applications are handled," he said.
**A JK2I?.lsed check wlth *"tent secretary Anna Rosenberg
OTBDefense Secretary Lovett promptly went baek to the
pentagon building and ordered all use of lie tests by the Army.
Navy, or Air Force discarded. w^7'1
TWO'S A CROWD
When Eisenhower's announcement for President was festur-1
ed on the Camel Caravan TV show, theie were some backstage
fireworks which the television audience missed
It did not know, for instance, that fK)P sen Henry Cabot
Lodge of Massachusetts, Ike's campaign manager, almost walk-
ed out.
Lodge had not been told that he was to appear with Demo-.
cratlc Congressman Wayne Hays of Ohio, who is promoting Sen.
Estes Kefauver for President. He had been given to understand
that only Eisenhower was to be dlaeussed. not a rival Democra-
tic candidate. **
"I should have been consulted about this.' remonstrated the
tall New England Senator. "I don't think the Elsenhower an-
nouncement should be mixed up with th Kefauver activity "
But turning to Congressman Hays, the Senator assured him:
"I have nothing personal against you, Congressman. You're
a nice fellow. It's ufflortnnate -that th.Vwl'^^pBen."
"Nuts. Senator!" growled Hays, who was having trouble con-
trolling his own temper. "How do you know Im a nice' fellow
when you haven't even met me before tonightV
After that the show went on.
LABOR EYES THE CANDIDATES
, A. F. of L. leaders held an important confidential meeting
af president BUI Green's suite at the Hamilton Hotel the other
day to map labor's political strategy for and against the Presi-
dential candidates.
Among the key labor leaders present were George Harrison
of the railway clerks. David Beck of the teamsters, Al Hayes of
the machinists, and George Meany, A, F. of L. secretary.
Beck, the rough-and-tumble West Const teamsters' boss and
a strong partisan of Oov. Earl Warren of California, dominated
the OOP discussions.
His plan Is to string along with General Elsenhower as 8
means of stopping Senator Taft and throwing the convention
Into a steamy deadlock.
At that point, Beck would talk turkey I o the Republican king-
makers somewhat in this vein: "The A F of L. can win the
election by its strength in key states. We are tired of Truman,
but we won't buy anyone you have to sell. We wi'l buy Earl War-
ren, however."
This preference for Warren ties in with a revealing poll of
150 AFL, CIO, ahd Railway Brotherhood presidents.
By a 74 per cent vote, they picked the Oovernor of Califor-
nia, compared to 14 per cent for Eisenhower. 0 per cent for all
others, and 3 per cent no opinion.
A. F. of L. leaders who happened to be Democrats agreed that
President Truman's stock with labor is low. but differed on whe-
ther! could be stopped.
They favor backing Sen. Estes Kefauver la the preconven-
tlon maneuvering, with a switch to Sen. Paui Douglas of Illinois
at the last moment.
Tills tactic is not nailed down and depends on how Kefauver
stands on key Issues. Many A. F. of L. leaders feel that after
they know more about his views they ml?ht stick with him
This liking for Douglas and Kefauver follows the same poll
of labor leaders on the Democratic candidate which gave Douglas
47 per cent, Kefauver 19, and smaller percent ires for Ike, Chief
Justice Fred Vinson, Oov. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois and Jus-
tice William O. Douglas.
Eguallv significant are the private Indications that certain
CIO and Railway Brotherhood leaders will sit on the sidelines
until after they see who is picked at the conventions.
Walter Reuther. the dynamic auto workers' president, ean-
didlv told Democrat friends in Washington: "You cant count us
in the bag. We are going to look over both platforms and both
nominees. As it stands today, "we are not for anyone, and we're
nol happy with Truman." .
This was pretty much the same line taken by the paeemak-
!ng Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen in talking to Beeretsry
of Labor Mauriee Topln.
The BRT. which put up the first cash to get President Tru-
man's 1948 campaign started, is open *c conversion depend-
ing on who each side nominates.
UNIVERSAL MILITARY TRAINING
IT AR Y
.^aWTi
It's a safe bet that Congrea'Wn not legislate a Universal
Military Training program for 18-year-olds during the presen
session. Probably a "standby" law for future emergencies will be
enacted but that's all. .m
The proposed UMT bill now befori Congress would provide
for 18 months of service, Including six months of basic training,
for all 18Vi-year-old youth In peacetime after the present Se-
lective Service Law has expired.
Thus, the UMT program could not bt initiated in the fore-
seeable future, since the nresent selective service or draft law
will not be allowed to expire during the Korean war or during
any threatening crises thereafter.
At a closed-door session of the House Armed Services Com-
mittee last week. Chairman Carl Vinson of aeorgja tried to put
over a Pentr^on-approved compromise whereby UMT would be
launched on trial basis with an initial force of 60.000 volunteers.
However, the Georgia Congressman pulled In his ears and
abandoned the scheme when he couldn't get a single solid bart-
er among his Democratic and Reoubllcan col.eagues.
Congressmen James Patterson (Conn.). Arthur Wlnstead
(Miss.), Walter Norblad (Ore.). Clyde IVyle of California, and
others pointed out that it would be impractical and Costly to
have a token UMT and the draft program operating simultane-
ously. Thev also argued there wouldn't be enough seasoned of-
ficers to train UMT volunteers unless they were recalled from
combat.
foryfeody&aJ* eiassrfaV


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FILES


THURSDAY, JANUARY M. Its*
THE PANAMA AMIEICAN AD INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE OTNI
ii
P.C.L. To Poll Team Owners On Admission Prices Increase.
Little
League
ARMED FORCES
l the last itrlke I Barbler.
Before a large audience, which' Barbler carried WestBank's
Included top officers of the Ca- mound the full six Innings with
ribbean Command, West Bank Kobbe's Crowderjjotag for four!
and Fort Kobbe Little Leaguers, and a half and Martinez taking
slammed their way through a1 the anchor.
hArtought slx-lnnlng batfle to The game was called^ because
tie the score at fl-6 for the open-
ing game of the 1963 Armed
Fortes Little League season
of darkness, to be finished at a
future date. It ended with West
Bank tallying 7 hita, 6 runs, and
Fortes Little League season aana wuying < n "Q
which was played at the Cocoll erroriiss against.kobbes4hits,
home diamond of the West Bank rune and errors.
nine Monday afternoon. I
prtor to game time and while nwwsraT firfmfn a to n
top-ranking Army, Navy and Air ^"8 DEFEAT FIREMEN 9 TO 0
Foree officers of the Panama
afea looked on, the two teams
paraded around the newly pre-
pared Cocoll diamond, which was
made possible through the efforts
of personnel attached to the U.S.
Naval Station, Rodman. Setting
off the ceremony in proper style,
the Air Force Band, directed by
Chief Warrant Officer E. A. Die-
ter, sounded off in rendition of a
series of lively tunes which kept
the crowd tapping their toes,
both before the game began, and
during the betweenTlnnlng pe-
riods.
Among the military officials in
attendance at the battle between
the two teams, which are com-
posed of the children of person-
nel attached to the S. Naval
Station, Rodman and Fort Kobbe
respectively, were: Rear Admiral
Albert M. Bledsoe, USN. Com-
mandant Fifteenth Naval Dis-
trict; Major General L. J. Whit-
lock, USA, Commanding General,
. S. Army Caribbean; Brigadier
General R. L. Howze, USA, Chief
of Staff, Caribbean Command;
Colonel P. D. Coates, USAF, Base
Commander, Albrook Air Force
Bas; Captain H. C. Fish, USN,
Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval
Station, Rodman; Colonel R. H.
Douglas, USA, Commanding Of-
ficer, 33rd Infantry
IN PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
THE STANDINGS
TEAM Won
Police..........
Sears..........2
Lincoln Life......I
AFGEM........1
Elk...........1
Firemen........I
Lost Pet.
1.000
.667
.667
.560
.333
.0*0
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Elks 9, Firemen I.
TODAY'S GAME (4:31 p.m.)
Police vs. Sears.
The Elks Little Leaguers mov-
ed into the win column yester-
day, scoring a 9 to 0 win over the i
Firemen. Terry Corrigan, a sur-i
?irise starter for the Lodge Bro-
hers, set the 8mokies down with |
only two hits, and struck out!
eight batters. Llnfors, with a
single In the aecond, and Webb,
with a double In the sixth, were
the only Firemen to connect
safely.
The Elks Iced the game in the
third inning scoring five runs on
five hits and added four more
runs In the fourth to finish the
scoring for the game.
Jlmmle Lovelady led his team
GYMNAST C< -h Gene!
Wettitone considers :sn Cron-
Stedt, Finnish orphl i and 19-
year-old Penn State freshman,
a major prospect for champion-
hip hor"r <"n *s high and
,.j:_..c1 jars. (NEA)
Chisox Already
Have 27 Players
Under Contract
CHICAGO, Jan. 24 (UP) The
Chicago White 8ox said yesterday
that shortstop WUlie Miranda
and third baseman Hctor Ro-
driguez were among the four who
signed their 1052 contracts,
Yanks Sign 2 Key Players;
A's Buy A.A.A. Farm Club
The Pacific Coast Baseball League will poll club owners to
see whether they want to take advantage of Tuesday's rating by
the Office of Price Stabilisation.
The O-P-S gave Minor League clubs permission to boost
ticket prices eight-per-cent. Pacific Coast League President
Clarence Rowland says some teams may "feel forced" to take
advantage of the new ceiling.
Says Rowland "Ticket prices didn't even come up at our
recent meeting, but I ant polling the teams to see what they
want to do. Some of our teams are faced with terrifically In-
creased COitS."
------OOO-----
The World Champion New York Yankees have signed two
key players.
They are Catcher Larry Berra and second-year Inflelder Gil
Mc Dougald. Berra, voted the Most-Valuable-Player In the
American League last season, signed for what the Yankees call
"a sizable boost" over the 30-thousand-dollars he earned to 1961.
The chunky catcher batted .294 and hit 27 home rana.
Me Dougald tod the Yankees in hitting with a .306 average
while playing third base and second base. The 1951 American
League Rookie-of-the-Year signed for about 12-thousand-dollara.
The Philadelphia A's now own their first Triple-A farm club
in 25-years. The A's have bought the Ottawa club In the In-
ternational League and say they will operate in that Canadian
City. Arthur Ehlers, who to director of the A's farm system,
*eys "We have been convinced by the league this can be a
very successful venture. We have needed a top Minor League
farm club for yars to develop young players.
Ehlers says the purchase of Ottawa from the New York
Giants includes about one dosen players but not all of them will
be kept.
"We have a number of our own Minor League playera," says
Ehlers, "and the International League also will help us."
at bat and afield collecting three
v Reehnent h"s ,n four ^P wlth tw0 hita
?kiPrvJSSndS Fort Kob-1 ghig for doubles and started the
5Td Sf Snr dT Glisson\ only doubleplay of the game by
han f^UvS omcer'US Na-' taking a grounder, touching first
E5 tifln Rodman base and doubling a runner at
*%&& th. narade the 1952 econd with a good throw to Ry-1
Followtog the parade the law corrigan helped his
SV?SlS^*SftotoSf^W ton collecting two hits
TEreSsra^SSSs p"ch,t "3r* """*
Of the game up at bat and the
Ul LUC game "K """"-----C
first to get on base after being
hit by a wild pitch JW Weil
Bank'a mbundsman, George Bar-
bler. Two strikeouts followed,
miter which Wilfred Martinez,
Kobbe's fireball first baseman,
was hit by another wild ball.
West Bank's catcher, Timmy
Days, tried to nail Martinez as, ..
the latter took off for second but, f^0"- f
his wild throw only made mat- fchoch, c...... |
Mrs worse. West Bank's short-Llnfors. ss. .....
The box score:
FIREMEN AB R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Baker, rf...... 0
Huddleston, rf .. 2
Klntner, cf .. .. 0
Wallace, 3b .. ..
Webb, 3b-c .... 3
flPO
0 0
ters worse. West Bank's short-, ""ors. ....
stop immediately followed this by Smith if ..... 1 0
atop unmeaiateiy iviwwm "> -'.,, i
an error to put both Douglas and McNa.ll.
Martinez across the plate Bar* Handel p.
bier then found the mark, andl C
retired the side by striking out
Vincent Vasil. .
West Bank, after a bad start,
tried to make a mark their first
time at the plate. Frankie Dinoto
1
2
0
Terry, 2b...... 1
Totals.
ELKS
10 0 2 16 7
SSTtn. lop of ^=i^: Desires 2b.
Lovelady, lb..
Ryter, ss ...
Trimble, c.
AB
4
4
Lewis, cf...... I
Morton, 3b. .. ..
Corrigan, T, p .. I
Dube, If. .. .... i
Corrigan, L., rf .. a
Totals........28 0 6 18 5
HPO A
1
6
1
9
1
0
0
0
0
hard double. One walk followed
end the Naval Station team then
Went down in fast order.
Top of the second saw Kobbe
tr-ing to add more runs to their
fast start. With one on and one
out. Jerry Conwell smashed a low
flying ball, meant for deep in tne
outfield, but West Bank's second
aacker. Tommy Bush, snagged it
and relayed the ball to first base-
mart Brent Borup for a beautiful
doubleplay. ..
West Bank opened up all its
guns during the second inning to
claim five runs on the score;
^ariradvaBnUced oneTs^o \ Losmg"Pcner-Randei:"struck-
?0f which was dAven in by Ken out by-Corrlgan 8, Randel 4
Score By Innings
Firemen
Elks
0 0 0 0 0
00540
0-0
x9
Winning PitcherT. Corrigan.
Longeway's single. Michael Daw-
eon followed with another single
and came across the JHajtjMtag
Dlnoto's walk. Two outs followed,
but Days drove In one while tw-
in* to make first. Rolando Sal-
va Wast Bank's hard hitter, _
opened up with a long three-bag-, Seorsr-Rellly.
set towards the right field fence -
which brought In two more men
before the side was retired.
Neither team scored In the
third. Kobbe got one walk In four
tries while West Bank got a sin-
gle in that inning.
Martinez opened the fourth
with a single that started Kobbe
on Its landslide of five runs for
the inning. Hector New found
the way to first. Vasil, New. Dou-
glas in error) end Conwell, all found
e ticket to home plate by a wild
pitch, a walk and an error on
the part of West Bank's catcher,
DWest Bank, trailing by two
tuns, made last work of the four
men pitted against them bv Kob-
be In the top of the fifth, and
turned in Che bottom of that
inning to a the game at 8-.
Skive: who already had a triple
to his credit banged out a dou-
ble and was followed with a sin-
cle by pitcher Barbler An error
'a, the part of Kobbe's catcher,
Conwell, put Salva over
Robert Crowder, who held
Kobbe's mound from the begin-
ning, was relieved at this point
bv jiartlnea who walked Bush.
Sd Barbler stole home to th* up
thiT score. Martines struck out.
Collto'e fly ball towards the
mound. He ended the inning and
Sow damage, by fennlng West'
Bank's new right fielder Taylor.
West BAnk's Borup advanced
to second In the bottom of the
sixth but was left stranded when1
Bases on Balls offCorrigan 6.
Randel 1. Two Base Hits-Love-
lady 2, Webb. Doubleplaya
Loveledy, Ryter. Left on Bases-
Elks 8, Firemen 6. Umpires
Neville and Engelke. Time of
Oame 1:27. Attendance 100.
leaving only eleven to be sign-
ed to the roster. I
The others were pitchers Al
and Hector "Skinny" Brown. Ml-;
renda came to the club In an off,
seaso deal with the Washington
Senators after hitting .246 for
Chattanooga in 80 games. He Is
rated an exceptional fielder.
Rodriguez was the rookle-of-
the-yeer with Montreal in the
International League and hit .302
in his first year of organized
baseball, scoring 105 runs, driv-
ing in 95 and leading the league
in stolen bases with 26. He ran
second to the voting for most-
valuable-player and was elected
All-Star third baseman.
Pac Div. Softball
League Opener Set
For February 3rd
Ten teams are enrolled In the
Pacific Divisional Softball League
which is scheduled to get under
way Feb. 5 at the La Boca Ball
Park.
The final league meeting be-
fore the opener will be held at
the La Boca Playground, Mon-
day, Jan. 28. Registration fees
must be paid at the meeting to
R. Matthews, secretary-treasurer
of the loop.
The following teams, with their
managers, have enrolled in the
Working Men's League: Army
Quartermaster. Manuel Tulloch;
Post Office, Chino Dies; Navy-
Supply, Claudio Wilson; Central
Labor Office, Alfred Bowen;
Electrical Division, Joe Brath-
waite: Building Division, Albert
Nlcholls; Kobbe Sales Store, p.
Bynoe; Navy-Ordnance, Fernan-
do Donalds; Army 8ales Store,
Charles Allison; and Commissary
Division.
Alka-Seltzer
for UPSET STOMACH
*&-**
For ever 20 years people have relied on
pleasant-tasting Alka-Seltser for prompt,
frntlm relief from the sourness of Upset
Add Stomach. rVontpr-beceuee sparkling
esterveecence helps Alka- Sel tier go to
work right away. Genr/e because Alke-
Seltter contains no laxstiv, and can be
taken mnytim. Get Alka-Seltzer today,
and keep it handy tJwaytl
fmm iJetotr toiat gOg*
lit It to* rw tn
Alka-Seltzer

They had old Primo Cerner in the Garden ring the other
night making with the hideous grimace in his retread role as
wrestler end I wondered If his memories carried him back to
the night of Jan. 24 in 1930 when he made his debut there as
a prise fighter.
And I wondered, too, If he gave any thought to the curious
rwhavlor of the American sports fan; how he likes to be taken
for patsy; how quickly he's moved to fury when' the truth hits
Mm in the kisser and how quickly the fury subsides; how eager-
ly he Joins reform crusades and how inconstant his support;
how really indifferent he Is to being saved.
There was sublime Irony in the return of old Satchel Feet
#hen a new boxing commission Is applying disinfectant and a
grand Jury is taking character tests. You think the prize ring
i? immoral now? You should have been around in Camera's
day It was unbelievable. The bootleg mob was In almost com-
plete control.
You couldn't come In here unless you cut the mob In on
your fighter. If the mob wanted your fighter to do a Johnny
Weismueller you agreed, or else. Camera was mob controlled
and his entire career, leading ultimately to the heavyweight
championship, was mob manipulated.
Owney Madden, then the East's public enemy No. 1, bank
rolled the fantastic Camera argosy. Madden and his vicious
iiei.chmen filled a front-row section the night the preposterous
freak was unveiled for American suckers. One Big Boy Peter-
sen had been picked to go Into the tank for him; he went early,
In the first round.
A Monster in Trunks
Camera was 6 feet 6 and weighed 260. He came into the
ring wearing a beret, a vivid green gown and bright yellow shoes
which accentuated the size of his immense feet. He wore a
moronic, fixed smile that revealed uneven, pointed teeth, and
ropey varicose veins coiled about hie legs. A caricature of a
raor.ster.
Everybody on Broadway knew It was to be an aquatic act,
yet the Garden was packed. Curiosity could have accounted for
much of the response, for lurid reports of the Giants' exploits
had preceded him. But the Incredible fraud was extended from
coast to coast with one hum after another taking the plunge
and sucker Interest mounting.
This was the mob's most memorable and flagrant operation,
as well as Its most artistic. But It was only a part of an ex-
tensive program. Not before or since has the fight racket been
30 wicked and corrupt. Fixed fights are rare today. They were
common then. The racket element hasn't yet been completely
eradicated, probably never will be, the ring being what It is, but
in those days It was all racket, or mostly so.
I have Just finished reading Sid Feder's absorbing and
frightening book, 'Murder, Inc.," and In It he touches on the
underworld activities of two sterling sportsmen who have long
been Identified with the manly art of self defense, Champ Segal
and Frankie Carbo, both of whom have managed world cham-
pions.
Along with others, these two gentlemen were Indicted in
connection with a mob murder in Los Angeles, a murder direct-
id by Buggay 81egel, who was later rubbed out.by gengster guns
% he sat on a divan In the lavish Hollywood home of the de-
mure Virginia Hill of fascinating Kefauver TV memory.
The D. A.'g Book on Carbo
Both of these gentlemen are still active. Several months
hack Segal had a punch absorber named Freddie Beshore In
Mf ainst Joe Louis. Despite his record It Is evident Segal Is still
acceptable in prominent fight circles. As far back as 1923 the
la* was questioning him on a homicide charge. Carbo, Feder's
true life horror storv reveals, had a tough time beating the L. A.
muider rap. Twice he was identified from the witness chair as
a participant. The Jury deliberated 68 hours but could not reach
a verdict. Feder asserts a retrial was blocked by Mayor Bill O'-
Dwver's refusal to release a key prosecution witness. In any
case. Carbo owes his liberty to a hung Jury.
Sensing that Intrusion is unmannerly, I hesitate to discuss
Caroo at length inasmuch as he appears to be the personal
lournalistlc property of Daniel Parker. Carbo is out of Seattle
and at one time controlled the middleweight championship, and
In recent years has operated as an undercover manager, which
means he stUl has fighters but others front for him.
The D. A.'s office has a book on Carbo as long as your arm
It spans more than 20 veers of lawlessness and murder is a fre-
auent charge. In 1928 he was sentenced from two to four years
to a homicide case, the courts' lone decision over him. It took
$40,000 ball to spring him in 1936, a murder rap which he later
beat
How a ferocious bum of this type can repeatedly thwart the
law mystifies the public. How. with his background, he can con-
tinue to do business In the prize ring, even deviously. Is beyond
belief and understanding. The underground is too informed and
articulate for promoters and matchmakers not to know.
/
Samuel Smug!
sasaaei lisios SMfi tto toe
U ? wet be weM be tee)
tosn can arwav fto* we* ewye.
flts eeeret Is to edeertteei
Reduction In Distant Recruiting Will
Check Criticism, Bryant's Sane View
By PAT HARMON
NEA Special Correspondent
CINCINNATI, Jan. 24 (NEA)
If the men who run college sports
are eager to cut down on recruit-
ing, they received a strong send-
off In Paul Bryant's announce-
ment.
The Kentucky coach announc-
ed he would recruit no more
players from out of his state.
At first glance this appears a
drastic cut which may reduce
Kentucky to a second-rate pow-
er. The last figures of the Na-
tional High School Federation
show Kentucky has fewer high
schools playing 11-man football
than any of Its adjoining states.
In 1946 Kentucky had 77 high-
school teams. Indiana had 113,
Tennessee 187, West Virginia 218,
Illinois 316, Ohio 370, Pennsyl-
vania 405.
Bear Bryant said Kentucky
would have the same number of
football scholarships as formerly,
but would limit out-of-state
grants to five boys a year.
If freshmen continue to be eli-
gible, Kentucky could have 20
out-of-state players on Its squad
and meet this rule. There would
be five seniors, five Juniors, five
sophs, etc.
"Any out of state student
wishing a football scholarship at
Kentucky must apply for It,"
Bryant said.
"If I hear any of our alumni or
friends are recruiting an out-of-
state man, I'll refuse to play
him."
If Kentucky Is able to obtain
out-of-state students of the cali-
ber of Vito Parilli, Rochester, Pa.;
Bob Fry, Cincinnati; Gene Don-
aldson, East Chicago, Ind.; Steve
Meillnger, Bethlehem, Pa., and
Doug Moseley, Luverne, Ala., all
members of the 1951 team, the
Wildcats wUl be potent.
Bryant said any commitments
the school has made already to
future students will be honored.
"But there are no loopholes in
the decision," he said.
Bryant said he had been con-
sidering the move a long tune.
"You can't pick up a paper
Babe ParUU PiU, Bryant
without reading where some-
thing's wrong with football.
"In the past we have spent a
lot of time trying to recruitr"
This marks a great change in
Bryant's policy since he embark-
ed on his first head-coaching Job
at Maryland in 1946..
His far-flung search for talent
won him the title of "Dixie's No.
1 Grldnapper" in One slick mag-
azine.
Bryant, it seems, had ree
a number of players at hi
Flight School who still had 1
blllty. and had drilled then
sonally before moving
Maryland.
That was nothing unusual in
1946, when nearly every college
was bidding recklessly for Joot-
"1 think a reduction in distant ball talent.
recruiting will stop a lot of thls.i But it will be rememberee "It win give our staff more to 1952, Bear Bryant set sinew
time to coach the boys we get. record for reversing the flfjp.
Silver City Sports
ELEMENTARY BOYS BASEBALL
The Giants nosed the Cleve-
land Indians at a score of 7-6. to
move tato second place. After
scoring six runs in the first half
of the first frame, firing Cross-
dale the confidence ne needed on
the mound, the Indians chalked
up three In the second stanza
and three in the fourth to even
the score. _
The White Sox swamped the
Yankees to the tune of 12 to 3. E.
Haynes tripled, A. Ashby homer-
ed and captain Ricardo doubled.
Junior High Girls' Soft hill
The Los Santos combined Ele-
mentary team met Bocas in the
scheduled Junior High Girls
softball game and scored their
second win to retain the lead in
the Intramural League. Cynthia
Turner hit two homers, one in
the third and one In the sixth
stanzas to give Los Santos the
lead.
Bocas met David and edged
them at the score of 14 to 13. It
was a thriller all the way until
Caroline Cox made a triple to
cinch the game.
Senior High Glrb' Softball
Cuba trounced Venezuela ten
to four in a scheduled Senior
High Girls' softball game. Cuba
drew first blood, chalking one in
the initial frame. Venezuela re-
taliated with one In the second.
Both teams rallied in the third
and fourth Innings, but Cuba
tallied six more in the fifth and
three in the sixth, to make the
score 10-4. .
Honduras beat Nicaragua 5 to
0. Honduras scored three In the
first frame and Nicaragua fought
desperately to even the score. E.
Franklin held them hltless to
finish the game 5-0.
Junior High Beys' Baseball
The Tigers met the Bombers
and whitewashed them 10 to 0.
Irving De Sousa started and the
first pitched ball was a homer.
Christopher Robinson also hit a
triple. Two walks and another
triple caused his removal for E.
Montez who finished the inning
In fine style. A five-run lead for
the Tigers gave the Bombers the
titters and Robinson held them
for a no-hit no-run win.
TRACK
On the cinder path, coach Har-
old Scott Is busy looking for a
new find for the coming Track
and Field Meet (Interschool)
which is slated for March 7, at
the Mt. Hope Stadium.
In the High Sehooy boys de-
partment, De Sousa, Panton.
Ogllvle, Stewart and "Fish Gill
McLeod are going at fever pace.
In the Junior High squad, Ra-
mn Alaton, William Vernon,
"Cane Dump" Barton and
Flash" Orazzette are burning up
the cinders. .- '
In the girls department Sylvia
Webster, Daisy Ersktae and Glo-
ria Greene are determined to give
a good account of themselves.
FINDER NOT
DOWAGIAC. Mich. (UP)John
L Coates advertised in the loeal
paper for a $20 bill he'd lost
and got it back. The finder. Mrs.
Dorothy Thurman, refused a re-1
ward.
NOW you can
FLY to MIAMI

via COSTA RICA and CUBA
for only $83. ONE WAY
($150.75 Round Trip)>
Enjoy all-daytime flying,
Make your TRAVEL DOLLARS
take you FARTHER!
VTA

s#H
3 Flights Weekly
from Tocumen
7:45 a.m. Tues. Thurs. Sat.
To COSTA RICA
$30.00 round trip
Special Flights to MEXICO
S80.00 One Way $140.00 Round Trip
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
1* HM
CM.atf-
Stop
See The BULLFIGHTS
at
LA
MACARENA
RING

MANOLO ORTEGA
4:30 p* SUNDAY Jan. 27*
JOSELILLO
Farewell Performance
of the distinguished
"matadores"
Manolo Ortega
and
"JoseMlo -
de Colombia"
FOUR
(4)
BULLS
will be fought
and killed.
We are pleased to announce that we have obtained
the bulls from El Rosario Ranch in Antn,
famous for its fifhtinf bulls.





rsar. no
i r
*m PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DADLE NEWSPAPER
ISDAT, JANUARY 24, 1*52
Field Of 75 Tees Off In Isthmian Open
tended yesterday's Golf Clinic to
tee how the real topflighters hit
golf ball.
M5gp '
An international field of 75 golfers was off and
swinging today at the beautiful Panama Golf Club
in the first round of the 72-hole Panama Open golf
tournament.
They will be back in action tomorrow for the
second 18 holes and will battle it out for the title
when the final two rounds are played Saturday and
Sunday.
Well over 400 1395 paid) at- strating how the average duffer
looks making a 150-yard slice or
a 30-yard blooper.
Sncad also went through his
famous slow-motion swing while
Haro.rt described the fine points
of it and then all the pros took
turns in hitting shots the way
they should be hit.
White used the short Irons,
Greenwald the middle distance
irons and Snead blasted away
with his favorite No. 1 iron.
Miguel Salas hit the tricky No.
4 wood and Roberto de Vicenso
and Harbert, himself, electri-
fied the crowd with a booming
demonstration of long woods,
de Vicenzo using the brassie
from the practice tee and car-
rying to the No. 3 green while
Harbert, with the driver,
smashed the ball out of sight.
Following the Clinic the spec-
tators enjoyed a free cocktail
party at the club and by thlsi
morning everyone was set to en-'
Joy the best Open Panam has.
ever staged,
At this writing, with first
round scores not yet in, Slammln'i
Sam was still the favorite to win
; although he has had trouble with
the course in practice rounds.
He had a 74 Tuesday and a 73
yesteiday, most of his trouble
! coming on the greens where he
was missing putts from less than
Bulldogs, Tigers
In Hoop Finale
Tomorrow Night
Powells Take Over Atlantic
Twi-^oop Lead; Carty Hurls
No-Hitter Over Pabst Nine
Snead drives m long one with a No. 1 Iron as the crowd looks on at the Golf Clinic.
JIMMY VINCENT, honorary
chairman of the tournament
committee. A former pro at
Panam, he is no longer a
tournament competitor.
Chick Harbert was master of
Two Games Slated For Panam
Tonight: Clark Edges Neville
Merchants Whip Brewers 4-2;
Pacific Loop Race Deadlocked
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE f
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Bombers........14 8 .636'
Yankees........II 10 .5651
Bluebirds....... 9 12 .429
Brownies....... 9 15 .375
TONIGHT'S GAMES
Panam Stadium (Pint Game
three f Yesterdav "he three- 6:30)Brownies (Burke 3-5) vs.
smsya^iss.s! & s **<- ssssr3 ars -* sags ^-"iSisra'SS^ t a
(First Half Standing!) I Coffey followed with a single.
TEA'M Won Lost Pet. Francis laid down a nice bunt to
Omento of the game (grip, g' d has not been playing Yankees (Thomas 4-0).
stance, swing etc. I Sam Snead, Mead, nas noi DMn LAST NiGHT'S RESULTS
Phil Greenwald and Buck White t^ieaTe many who befeve Rob-! Mt. Hope Stadium-Brownies 2,
could both see and hear. | ^&&vS%-SS:>. Two games^rTscheduled to-
,. t ~ ment oredlctlons and walk off night at the Panam Olympic
rdu/nd told how NOTtlf i> ft with tl?e$l.000 rst prize money.; Stadium as local pro baseball
cedure and told now NOT to do It been Dlavlne in swings back to the large Panama
a Snead, Greenwald and White Jg**Zsteady, and De VI-: field The games will feature the
did a bit of clowning in demon- ^am,enr?,j^a^y-aa g|ht nightcap clash between the
mashle swinger on any course.'league leading Bombers and the
Brewers........3 1
Gibraltar Life Ins. 3 1
Pan'm Merchants 2 2
Balboa High Sen.. 0 4
.750 sacrifice the runner*. Ridge
.750 grounded out while Bill Hele
.500 walked to fill the bases. Henry
.000
TEA'M
Pabst.........2
C.H.S.........1
This Friday night the Balboa
Bulldogs will invade the Cristo-
bal Gymnasium when they play
the Cristobal Tigers, starting at Powells........'4
6:45.
This will be the last game be-
tween the two high school teams,
this season. In- the two previous
meetings, the Balboa cagers
came out on the winning side, so
the Blue and Gold from Cristobal
have yet to beat the Bulldogs in
league play. Much depends on
the victor of this contest, since
either club can win the cham-
pionship, or a tie for the league
crown, if they win this game.
Both teams will be playing and
shooting their best. Balboa will
ATLANTIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE' ery at short, and advanced to)
.+ J fecopd while Hugh Hale was be-
Won Lost Pet. lng thrown out at first. JaramUU
.667 watched a third strike go by.
.500 Swearingen grounded one down
.250 to second base, and when McCul.
lough threw the ball away from
first, Hooper came all the way
around to score.
TUESDAY NIGHT'S RESUTS
Powells 2, Pabst 1.
THURSDAY NIGHT'S GAME
C.H.S. vs. Pabst.
Shaky defense by his Inflelders
deprived George Carty of a shut-
out victory, but the top Powells
hurler nevertheless inscribed his
name In the Atlantic Twilight
League Hall of Fame when he
. turned In a no-hitter to defeat
be on the rebound after losing a the league eladine Pabst, by a a
close game to the Junior College
last week. The fact that they
have been In the top position
since the season started means
that It will take some ball play-
ing to knock the leaders out of
the select spot.
Minus the services of their star
scorer, Eugene Rlchter, the Bal-
boa hoopsters will have to de-
pend on their strong reserve
strength. With Herring, Ray-
bourne, and Donahue, the red
and white still has plenty of
height and scoring power under
the boards. In the backcourt will
be the Kouranys with Maphis
and Ostrea controlling the for-
ward positions.
to 1 count. The win put Powells
in first place, one full game a-
head of Pabst.
Carty was practically untouch-
able as he easily went through
the Pabst lineup, In a game that
took only one hour and twenty
minutes for seven complete In-
nings. Carty struck out five bat-
ters and walked five. Only five
Pabst batters were able to hit the
ball beyond the Infield, all five
flying out to the outer gardens.
All scoring In the contest was
unearned, with Noel Gibson,
Pabst hurler, neatly scattering
four hits, striking out four bat-
ters, and allowing nary a walk.
But he too was a victim of poor
defensive work, with two errors
Atlantic Midget
League To Open
Saturday A.M.
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
(At Balboa Stadium)
Panam Merchants (Old Timers)
4, Balboa Brewers 2.
SUNDAY'S DOUBLEHEADER
SSt57.fi kn^wSe WoMhei ^fiame^be between <&&* *- Kffi>|tW0 walkS and a bia^
Panam Merchants vs. Gibraltar
Life; Balboa Brewers vs. Balboa
scored one of their two tallies in!
tough Panam course (he has the now dangerous Brownies and
played here for five consecutive' the third place Bluebirds. Ernest
years). The tricky little putts Burke <3-S) of the Brownies is *"
that the newcomers miss give slated to Wg jg Holder ^ T| from pan_
Posse little or no difficulty be- (0-11of the Bluebirds in tne Merchants came through
cause he is familiar with the P nd Bame wU1 brlne 0ut laat nl8ht at the Balboa Stadium...... ,
Sheens. .... ._.._ M.P^f^f.Bf^*i"5ri,g.2: as they handed the league lead- ed minutes later on a run-down
ig_
biers will be Bailey and Manning,
Phillips worked McGee for a free n N runntng frorn the
Kf *t***%U&SS'J&sS ESwMd Positions and Wilson,
the game. At thU point Mueller Ad^d B t wU, ^
2 CSE2?d struckout ** M handling the center, and guard
man, Hearn. nnjitlons
The Merchants pushed across *~, t_T Dreiiminarv Bame the
another run in the next frame on bJC and Sstobai fv/ will
play for the third time, with the
and advanced to third when Her-
ring grounded out. Neckar scor-
terday'Henry Russell, Florida's
Tlle_HS" conducted amateur <*p. toJ the
by the Physical Education and
Recreation Section on the At-
. Ian tic side will get under way
this Saturday moraine on the
Margarita diamond. The Mar-
garita Mules and the Margarita
Mustangs v.-ill meet two teams
from the Cristobal Playground
starting at 9:tO a.m.
Tivc teams are entered in the
leaguetwo representing Cristo-
bal, two representing Margarita,
anc! one representing Gatun. The
Gaum team will not play a loop
..game until Feb. 2. These teams
course for the
carded a 75.
Thompson Having
Sparring Partner
Difficulty Also
Johnny MacMurray, the de- the two league's leading hurlers
fendin champion, had a 73 ves------Alberto Osorio of the Bombers
tPrrtav' Henrv Russell. Florida's '6-D and Dave Thomas (4-0) of
the Yankees.
A Yank victory will place them
only a half-game out of first
place, while a Bomber triumph
will give the league leaders a
commanding two and one-half
game bulge.
Last night at the Mount Hope
Stadium, the Brownies again
handed the Yankees a heart-
breaking setbackthis time 2-1.
Vibert Clark and Eddie Neville
hooked up in a red-hot mound
duel with Clark emerging victo-
rious.
Clark allowed nine hits, but
they were well scattered and on-
ly In the ninth was he scored
a sprinkling of eleven-year-olds
who are carried as substitutes on
the various Little League teams.
Unless Louis Thompson takes a
ffie^Tten-vearoS b^va with rest ,rom the COMta"t p0undin* upon and m Serl0U? tr0uble-
^;"?.!;n:ie^ Reinaldo Greenald's two-run
to complete his conditioning for: double gave the Brownies all
his most important fight by road! their runs.
working, shadow boxing, and! A perfect throw to the plate by
In addition to the five tpams sWPP'rt*- j Granvllle Gladstone In the ninth
mentioned above Cristobal and R'Por,s irom Louie's cwnP "H cut off the tylng; run and 8aved
Sarita each have a team that KuPerto Brown' a loc*' t"e ame for clark"
Xprised o'fto. %SA l55 **' '?I*?"* H -------------------------------------"
most inexperienced players on ". h" missed last three
thP rncfpr tk= t= t= -fill *Sff*S training sessions.
the rosters. These two teams will
also play on Saturday mornings
beginning Feb. 2.
Louie is little alarmed at Ru-1
perto's actions, remarking that1
he merely turned on the heat
'^The Physical Education and B*"*ly.
Recreation Section has organized
this league for the express pur-
"I was soundly booed and ridi-
Atlantic
Pony League
pose of providing an opportunity gjgj or handing my title to
for those boys who are not one! }v",f,r*'l0."" on a ***%&}
of the twelve boys in uniform om ter- sa,(l rnompson.
the Little League teams, to play f m> PPonent, and taking Buick..
on an organized ball club and toi to "> durinF ml I"* OM..
learn and improve their skill in. ,8lon8; J\* continued; ^ Margarita
^he fundamentals of the nation-
al sport.
STANDING OF TEAMS
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
There are 95 boys claying on
the seven teams In the league.
All of the 05 boys will get a good
deal of experience in baseball un-
der actual game conditions.
'I intend to get in tip top shape Shamrocks......
even if I have to acquire the ser-1 ____
vices of Finnegan or Plummer.l Game of Jan. 22:
And speaking of Plummer, this MARGARITA
1.1
.4*0
.400
.250
AB R
ing Balboa Brewers a 4-2 set-
back to put the race in a dead-
lock for first place In the league
standings.
Webb Hearn, striking out ten
Brewers, turned in a fine job of
hurling as he matched Chris Mu-
eller pitch for pitch after the
latter had replaced William Mc-
Gee In the top half of the first
inning when he ran into trou-
ble.
The Old Timers were first to
score when they took advantage
reminds me that he is my March [ Rankin, cf........ 2
contender." i George, cf........ 1
. [Prez, If.......... S
Herbert Brown, Louie's condi- Long, If.......... 0
! tioner, says he is breathing.easier willuord, ss........ 2
Parents of the boys playing are these days, thanks to Louie's co- Hodges, rf-p........ 4
urged to be at the Margarita dia-'operation. Qonzles.......... 2
moncl Saturday morning to^n- "You know, these promising xobln, c.......... 2
courage their youngsters. The youngters have to suffer a de- Albright, lb.,
general public is also invited to f feat during their meteoric rise In Dougan, 2b
oOme out and watch the boys
take their first steps in baseball.
The P. E. c R. Branch encour-
ages your child.
This King of all
Cough Mixtures comes
From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
The King ot all cough medicine
Buckley's CANADIOL Mixture
hos been used tor veors m over 70%
of Cnado'i homes. Fast *orking'
triple octing Buckley's Canadiol Mix-
ture quickly loosens and raises phlegm
lodged In the tubes clears air pis-
sages soothes rasped ro* tissues.
one or two sips and worst coughing
spasm ceoses. You get results fast
You feel the effect of Buckley's ins-
tantly
Compounded trom rare Canodior
Wne Bolsam and othe' soothing heal-
ing ingredients Buckley's CANADIOt
Mixture is different from anything
yau ever tried do get a bottle of this
great Canodian cough medicine to
doy ot any good drug store.
Little Galileo High
Graduates Large
Athletic Names
order to set them in the right g. Smith, 3b..
frame of mind," said Brown.
C.P.O. AB R
Maugher, If........ 4 1
B. Newhard, 3b...... 3 2
Gibson, c......... 1 1
Crawford, p........ 3 0
Hart, 2b.......... 2 1
Hamilton, lb........ 2 0
Ramsey, ss......... 0 1
C. Rodriguez, If...... 1 1
SAN FRANCI8CO, Jan. 24i Cunningham, rf...... 2 0
(NEA> Galileo High, one of 8an I McJennett, rf....... 0 1
Francisco's smallest preparatory! Seore By Innings
institutions, believes it has grad-i Margarita 0 2 112 17
uated more bis-tlme athletes C.P.O. 0 10 0 3 48
than any similar school in the: Home RunsAlbright 2, New-
country, j hard. Struck out byGonzAles 2,
Among Galileo's alumni are Hodges 4, Crawford 6. Winning
Hank Lulsetti; Grover Klemmer,1 PitcherCrawford. Losing Pitch-
former world 880-yard record-' erHodges. Umpires Waldron
holder; Lawson Little; Joe and
Dom DLMangio; Rod Franz, Cali-
fornia's All-America guard: and
Dr. Bobby Brown of the Yankees.
and Curtis.
PLENTY OF WEATHER
EAST HAMPTON, Conn. (UP)
, Mrs. Sarah O'Connell says New
lEnglanders don't have to go to
'the South Seas for Xjrrlcane
UP IN THE AIR Milan's1
goalie, Frank Buffoni, leaps high
in the air to nab an attempted
scorinn not during a soccer
MM with Lati of Rome,
lied football in Italy, the
sport has no tackling or touch-
downs. Milan and Lazio battled
to a 1-1 tie. (NKA)
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT API
TOO MICH TO HANDLE
LOUISVILLE. Ky. (UP!.
Transportation of a 1.400-pound I weather or out west for tornados,
safe proved too much for bur-She's seen both right here. The
glars here. They got the safe out 88-year-old woman has seen
of a window of a motor companv three hurricanes, one tornado,
but when they tried to make off two floods and several blizzards,
with It in an automobile the car, including the famous bllzsard of
bogged down on a mud road. 88.
scorea one oi WWJW <-aies m, 645p.m. 8o get your tickets ear-
the bottom half of the second1 as: *,"{& oesf interscholastic
Al Neckar walked, stole *nMlXaTl the season. Tickets will
be on sale at the door: Adults 50
cents and children without S.A.
cards 25 cents.
Firemen Defeat CAA
1C-5 For Seventh
Successive Victory
In the Pacific Softball League
yesterday Don Bowen's Firemen's
on the base path when pitcher
Hearn caught him taking too big
a lead at third. Neckar beat the
throw to the plate for the Brew-
ers' first run.
The ball game was iced in the
top of the fifth when the Old
Timers pushed across two mark-
ers on hits and an error.
The Brewers tried in vain as
they scored their last run on two
hits. Neckar singled and scored
when Herring hit a three-base I insurance team marked up their
knock deep to right center. I seventh consecutive win with no
The only batter to collect more losses.
Cristobal, fresh from a victoryjby thirdn baseman Jack Pescod
on Monday night, over Junior accounting for all the Powells
College, will be out to turn the ""* -. ....
tide. After playing a much lm- ^^"OTh^tn^nfthf^lrS't
proved brand of ball, the Tigers &3*iPJ*&m will try to keep on the winning I party led off.with a ground tall
side. Leading the Cristobal drib- oAjJ ^ J^gjgg
ty stopped at second base. Harry
Dockery followed with another
grounder down to third baseman
Pescod. Pescod fielded the ball
cleanly, but again tossed far over
Louis Hooper's head at first, and
Carty came across with the first
tally.
Dockery stopped at second and
after two were down, Hlghley
drove a single Into left field,
moving Dockery across the plate
with what proved to be the win-
ning run of the game. After the
damage had been done, the Pabst
team settled down to playing
brilliant ball, allowing only three
more men to reach first base,
Muloy doing so In the fourth
frame with a long two-base blow
to left, Carty with a one base
blow in the fifth, and Dorn Tho-
mas who led off the sixth with a
single.
Pabst's only serious threat
came in the lower fourth when
they pushed over their lone un-
earned tally. Louis Hooper was
given a life on an error by Dock-
Dunning was hit by a pitched
ball, putting the lead run on base
but Gibson's best was a fly bait
to center to retire the side with
their only serious threat of tho
game. After that frame, only ons
other Pabst batter was able to
reach second base, Bobby Baiter
doing it in the fifth frame after
walking, then tagging up on
foul fly far behind first base.
Pabst va. C.H.S. Tonight
The Pabst nine will be out to
regain lost ground tonight, when
they take on the C.H.8. team at
7 o'clock. Pabst and Powells both
have the same amount of losses
In that all-Important column, so
Bucky Hall will be using every
trick In the books to leave thoso
two losses stand, and gain a half
game on the idle Powells aggre-
gation. C.H.8. is still very much
in the battle for the first half
title, but cannot afford to do
much more losing. Logical starter
for Pabst will probably be George
Egolf, a good righthander, who
has not toed the mound thus far
this season. He will be faced by
Blades of CHS.
j Cristobal yearlings still unde-
SSiMt^LHKLHS W*. it. game will start at
The box score:
POWELLS
Carty, p .
Dockery, ss .
Thomas, lb .
Muloy, c .
Hlghley, 3b .
Watson, rf .
McCullough, 2b
Chappel, If. .
Englebright, cf
Troutman, cf .
AB
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
2
HPO
1 1
Totals.....27 2 4 21 T 4
than two hits In last night's tilt
was Neckar who collected two
blngles in two trips to the plate.
The box score:
Both teams
pitchers.
introduced new
FABST
Pescod, 3b.
Hall, If. .
Salter, If .
Welch .
Egolf, sa .
Hooper, lb
Hale, cf.....3
Jaramlllo, rf. 2
Swearingen, e 2
Dunning. 2b .'. 2
Gibson, p 3
. 2
. 0
. 1
. 3
3
HPO A
0 0 1
1
1
0
0
11
2
0
5
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0

3
3
Totals.....23 1 0 21 8 3
Seore By Innings
Powells 2 0 0 0 0 0 0t I
Pabst 0 0 0 10 0 01 |
Merchant!
De la Pea, cf
Coffey, ss .
Francis, 2b. .
Ridge, If. .
Hele, rf. .
Phillips, 3b. .
Hearn, p -.'. .
Rlley, lb .
Thompson, c.
AB
2
4
2
4
3
2
3
3
3
HPO
1 1
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
Totals.....20 4 6 21 5
Brewers AB
Scott, 3b ... 4
Carlln, lb ... 4
Cox, ss.....3
Gibson, cf 3
Neckar, c. 2
Herring, If. 3
McGlade, rf-2b 3
Quintero, 2b
aPatterson. .
Larrinaga, rf
McGee, p .
Mueller, p .
Brown started for CAA, tossing
E, only two innings, but was respon-
0| slble for eight runs on eight hits.
0 Ted Jordan took over the mound
1 duty for the Aero club In the
0 third and gave up only two runs
0 on four hits and one base on
1 balls.
0 Oangle pitched the first five
X Innings for the Inaurancemen, al-
0 lowing five runs on nine hits and
~ two walks.
. J In the fifth inning CAA start-.
0 A ^ ed wnat looked as If It may be a
2 rally by scoring two runs on four
2 safe connections off Gangle.
2 Manager Bowen began to get
X worried and sent his ace pitcher,
1 Lew Hilzlnger, to the mound to
2 start the sixth. Hllzinger, In two
2 innings, faced seven batters and
2 allowed no hits, no runs and got,
21 the third strike by four of the
21 seven CAA boys.
2 Leading batters for Firemen's
u Insurance were Bobo McArthur
~ with three for three. Bevel and
o zi i i Scheldegg chalked up two each.
Angermuller, Dunn, Hllson, Per-
ry and Gangle added one each.
For CAA, Baker got three for
four and Malene two for four.
Silva, Polomakl,. Hutchlns and
Totals.....28
Score By Innings
Merchants 110 0 2 0 04
Brewers 0 10 0 0 1 02
Runs Batted InPhillips, Her-
ring. Earned Runs-Merchants 2,, oj
Brewers, 1 Left oni Bases-Mer- J()rdan collected one eacn off
chants 7, Brewers 6. Three Base _ltl.h-,. rjanole
Hit-Herring Sacrifice HI t_j Pg$ O-g- ^ hlt iour
^&ffSSx f^a^Necklr *lff .** ** Wancemer,
3 Quintero Larrinaga 2. Balk-I ^",^ Insurance-10 runs,
""Ant S^KE Ila h,t' J walk' 2 erI ,: CAA
McGee 3
and Runs offMcGee 1 and 1 in
2-2 Inning; Mueller 4 and 3 lnj
81-3. ErrorsMerchants 2!
(Francis, Phillips); Brewers 3!
(Neckar, Herring 2). Losing
PitcherMcGee. UmpiresMa- j
io-t and MohL Time of Game
1:55.
F, in Raspon Balls off 12 nita- l wftlk' 2 err0r8' CAA_!
ft Mue^rS^He^l^Hlte; runs, 9 hits, 3 walks, 3 errors.
Playground Sports
Hickman Is Asked
AboutTelevision,
Then Eli Football
NEW HAVEN,, Conn., Jan. 24.
iNEAi Herman Hickman says
he Is asked as much about his! will practice Thursday afternoon
GATUN
The eight, nine and ten-year-
old boys who could not make the
Little League will be given an op-
Eortunlty to learn and develop
iseball playing skills in the
league conducted by the Physical
Education St Recreation Branch.
Practice at Gatun will be held on
Monday and Tuesday afternoons
at 3 o'clock. The league games
will be played each Saturday
morning.
The Gatun Girls Softball team
CAN FILL YOUR NEEDS
television activities as his Yale
football team.
"After ithe kind of season we
had last fall. I kind of prefer It
that way," the round mentor
grins. .
"Some folks are saying I called
off spring practice to have more
time for TV.
"But we never did practice on
Sunday nights, and that's the
only time I ever give to that bus-
iness."
at 3:30. Your softball tournament
is scheduled for Feb. 16.
Adults Interested In swimming
Instruction report to the Gatun
Pool Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday mornings at 10 o'clock.
Children's Swim Classes: Be-
ginners l:00j)jn. and 3:00 p.m.
Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-
day. Intermediate and Swimmers
classes are held at 3:00 pjn.
Wednesday and Friday.

Successful Golfers
swaou
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