<%BANNER%>

PCANAL



PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Panama American
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01361
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01361
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
' BRAMFF
AN
lNDH*ElTOEN,5^x|f]g NOW

.DAILY NEWSPAPER
ONE STOf

SAO PAULO
"Let the people know the truth and the country is gafe" Abraham Lincoln.
'Seagram'sV
CANADIAN WHISK
-mwuAu ifo (4tS Oik*, '
Distilled, f t utd bottled to Cmmad ,ml CmaJim GtmimI n?*rwiti*i
rWENTi-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. F., MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 195J
FIVE CENTS
Truman Budget: $85,400,000,000
EL TORO looks to be building up a points .lead in this piece of infighting with Eduardo
de Valencia at "La Macarena" bullring, near the San Francisco Garden yesterday. But
Valencia got himself out of this spot without hurt, and went on to mate the kill_________
Local GFs Emergency Flight
To Mother May Save Her Life
ATLANTA, Jan. 12 -A 31- cts out of the hospital." Archer six months ago when he saw >.-.
11 PrQP* Archer SrW that his mother .tripes *.:!.,- ,_ Ji?^"^gS&STaJSZ
$ 7,815,800 Set
For CZ Expenses
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21 (UP) d expenditures during the next
An appropriation of $7,815.800 for nscal year:
the expenses of the Canal Zone1 Obligations reimbursable
Govt. Claims
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21 (UP)
to President Truman asked Con-
government has been requested the Treasury for the Governor's gress today for $53,800 for pay-
in the budget for the fiscal year salary and expenses, $18,000.
ending June 30, 1953, which Pres- Civil Administration, $655.000.
ldent Truman submitted to Con- Schools, $2,522,800; Police pro-
gress today. tectlon, $1,442,200: Fire protec-
The request compared with; tion, $481,000; Library, $77,300,
$11,595,000 appropriated for the; and Courts, $47,200.
which
ment to the Panam government
during the fiscal year starting
next July in settlement of claims
authorized by a joint claims con-
vention between the two coun-
tries signed Jan. 26. 1950.
Big Outlay Must'
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21 (UP) President Truman
urged Congress today to spend $85,400,000,000 in fiscal
year 1953 as "the heavy price" for peace.
He announced plans for doubling the nation's capa-
city to produce "fantastic" new atomic weapons.
The Chief Executive spelled out the third largest
current fiscal year, of which Highways and sewers. $371.000; I The convention was entered budaet ever submitted bv a Unirer! Srnr>: Pr<> $416,870 are estimaftd to be car- Hospitals. $3.612,300; and other! into torce on Oct. 11, 1950. after "t"H. [ *uom,rrea Y a unirea stare? president
ried over into the next fiscal year, Public Health services, $1,816,100. jt was ratified by both govern- "* D'ggesr two came during World War II in his
which would give a totl for FY, Proportion of employes' quar- ments. ; budaet messaac to Conarest
1953 of $8,232.ff70. ters" operations. $131,600. I Panamanian claims against the T V,0r
The appropriation request also Cash relief prior to Fiscal United Stales government which,
included $4,900,000 for construe-i Year 1951, $65,800.
tion and major equipment and I These tabulated estimated ex-
specified that the sum should re-
main available until expended.
A sum of $421,000 for this pur-
penditures totaled $11.239.500.
Obligations exempted from re-
imbursement to the Treasury
pose was requested In the budget are as follows:
for the current fiscal year. Administration of cus t o m s,
Tables accompanying the ap- immigration and contraband
propriatlon requests gave the c,,ntrol ana experiment gardens,
following breakdown of estlmat- ;;4 US District Court. $9,000.
Corozal Hospital and Palo Se-
co Leprosarium, $399,300.
Sanitation and garbage col-
lection in the Republic of Pana-
ma, $344,700; and corrosion tests
$102,200.
Civil Defense, $30,000, and civil
intelligence, $74,300.
Contributions to postal funda.
Mr. Truman said the bl? out- torv the President's program
SUM'S %&&nS& lav was necessary to build up the would add up to a deficit of some
ion a from* VIe ???%! ^military strength of the United '$14.400.000.000.
1906 and are known as the "Mal-
ambo Fire Claims.
US Defense Chiefs
Favor Jap Treaty;
Worry Over Kuriles
United States claims against
Panam which were covered by
the same convention stand at
siii:!.i.->(.. They included sniu.~
00 for losses suffered by sev-
eral United States citurns in
relations to lands known as the
"El Encanto Tract" and $3,156
for claims arising from injur-
ies suffered by soldiers of the
United States Army during dis-
turbances in Panam in 1945.
WASHINGTON Jan. 21 (UP)
The Joint Chiefs of Staff 70,000.
itification of the Stlmated expenses
are,group total $1,676300.
Rus-1 .__________________
sia's hoid on the Kurlle Islands,:
In this
Canal Zone to the side of his dy-
ing mother, si
toOojLlbaJL
"Dr!Behrens said that Mrs. Ar-! standing ^example' o a United! The general sense of the let-
ter r*jt new. its text was
made k'.town here today as the
I Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mcnT Fort Kobbe, was rushed nesses before.
^eVd^lam'thSh'is K8K: JS' SfEf s*m*-*m>r>
er, Mrs. C. S. Archer, 62. would
die of cancer. i
However, the son provided a
medicine with his presence that
the doctors couldn't match and
today her condition was describ-
ed as "fairly good."
When William first arrived at
her bedside, Mrs. Archer was too
42 Die As 6/ Survive Three
US Military Plane Crackups
tolor Defective
In Police Division
Stated and its free allies in the( Mr. Truman held out no hope
face of "grim evidence" that Rus- far an end to red ink spending
sla will not hesitate to use war before 1954.
to gain her ends.
He requested $51.200,000 to He renewed his request for $5,-
speed this country's military ,000.000.000 in new tax revenues,
buildup during the 12 months!but indicated that he does not
starting July 1, and another $10.-1expect to get them.
500.000.000 for allies of the Unl-: He says he has no plans to
ted States including $8,000.000,- send a special tax message to
000 In military aid and $2.500,-, Congress because his views are
000,000 in economic assistance. I already on record
Another $23.700.000.000 wasl
asked to finance normal govern- in terms of cash the President's
ment activities, to pay veterans' budget would commit the United
The appropriation requested of benefits, and to meet the ter- states to carry 85 per cent of the
Congress today would pay the est on the mounting national burden of rearming the West,
claims against che United States, debt. |
lnc budget also requested ap- Ev.rn with the estirated Fro- He requested a record 1 775-
piopnauon of *43U,uuO lor tne eral revenues of $71.000.000 000000.000 for the atomic prog.am,
customary annual payment to the largest in the nation's his- and disclosed plans to double this
the Panamanian government for program over the next five years
f-----tory
Lt. Oaddls Wall has been pro-
mittee cplled Bradley along with moted to Captain and has as-
' Secretary of State Dean Acheson sumed the position of Senior De-
and his top-level adviser, John tective in the Police Division at
the Panam Canal and $50,000 ^JL^-IU* Um.jle at an estimated overall cost of
for the Oorgas Memorial Labora- VlcUtUglbl rlCaUS |trom $5,000,000.806 to $6.000.000,-
For Tole Copper
Deposits Tuesday
The budget also included a re-
quest for $2,707,000 for payments
ot annuities to Panam Canal
construction employes and wid-
ows of the United States Light-
house Service. Tne budget did
not divide the amount between The quantity or
The President's program would
push the national debt to its le-
gal limit of $275.000.000.000 by
the end of the next fiscal year.
Eecause of the tremendous ex-
Panama's panslon of the American econ-
rhe twoerouos but sal that"la* newly discovered copper will be omy however, his program could
V*:"S.*!SyF'lSL"? >, V.LJT learned this week. * financed with 29 per cent of
June 30 there'were 3.031 Pana-1 learned this week.
Fo'SVr'"bulTes; to testify on the Cristobal; vacated by The~reUre": I m Canal annuitants compared!, Gpploglrt John R.Bogert of ^national_ tacme. wraps red
! ratification of '.he treaty.
o
,,. ;lsland and the Kurile Islands, and will serve as Substation Com-
CHIcAUO, Jan. 21 (UP) At.Port Angeles, while returning t 0. contcrm to the agree-,.,,ander at Ancon.
weak to speak and could only ,eMt ., pe'r8ons dled and 61 i rom the scene of the '
^.Jl^i,!^; were injured In three weekend crash
Watklns contended that Jan-.October. June 30 and 2,854 on June 30, ,t0.,Pla"8,. gq'Tit. T *m'
an's abandoning of its claim So sgt. Richard C, Nichols has! INK iS^.^.Iarv ,4,
the souti.ern.parA of Sakhalin Seen nromoted to Lieutenant! _--------------1^".---------". I preliminary surveys.
Bogcrt. a 28-year-old repre-
sentative of the world's largest
4.ments of Potsdam and Yalta un-
'der which Russia occupied those
Policeman Walter H. Alves was
promoted to sergeant.
All the promotions were effec-
tive Sunday.
Wall has served In the Police
One Die, 1 Injured
Over The We
In Silver City
Funds For Highway
*d JS^nS.S^^SiP ^hM America
One accident and one death
potentialities of Tole, where thej
metal has been discovered on'
the land of Egisto Antinori.
Less than three weeks ago,
Asked Of Congress
gcant said he talked to her today ..,, J ,r_lane crtumes into a i In Sacramento, an Invader isiands "
and he seemed "very much lm- motiatlinsie ft prisoners' bar-light bomber "Hooped down' onj He Wd:its the reservation spell-
proved.' racks, and the moonlit Northa prisoners barracas, killing sixed out t0 that effect.
"Hhp aid a visit from her only P*e,"lc- lt_ .I Thp'rrash Jeriirrpii minuteLi.BfaduMS ufW.i?..rif. niin?2i
nn was l\f what sh" wanted"1 Tnree others were feared fad .The crash occurred "lthat, wh. le the fe"^^/^! Division since 1940 He ha., beenlto SUver City residents occurred; Antinori sent the Kennecott a bill tommrhoriz^"'the rn3
SJr-JS.-aTt- K:J!S -aT^^^p^s^^^xh,or^^^^^ accordlng to; K-S=:S~
ment!Vf thSterritorial Use **_hf had considerable expert-,found dead In.her home. She with the Kennecott refers only, ^ billlSSSSSS Thursd
she'll probably live now.'
' Coast tragedies near Port A.. .
Mrs. Archer's doctor. Dr. R.,C. gf, and toJtocateMt near | crMh were uken tQ ^^
Behreiis, said the mther ad. 9U" Charlotte -., -.. w&sn wnere UM
been slipping ^t since he re- British Columma^ grlm their story of "death by siow ""later date
Sand t^" r'JZitt &tootuS^** &- \ ffii" m ley north. P.- W.^kins was r^rtedstudylng
been critical.
ence in the detective office at had been receiving treatment at to a "preliminary survey" ond|by"ReorVsntatve CharfesA
Cristobal. ,Colon Hospital for diabetes and is not a contract to mine the Bucklev of the s'ate of New York,
Nichols was employed at Oa- a stomach ulcer. property. also would authorize the send-
into Hecate Strait while at-
"Now, if everything gees fa- tempting an emergency landing
vorably," Behrens said, "she on a Queen Charlotte Island
should be able to leave the hoa- field. ""The*L>C-4 belonged to Trans'" Watki"' "aro"' dcated that he'ric side of the Isthmus. | wrists when he fell off the top mobile trip to Tole. He will be! The money f.ir the Interamer-
pital and go home." The seven described hf* .", Wor"d AlrllneT but was under will nropw that the US. set a i Alves was first employed In. rail of the grandstand to the! accompanied by Antinori who lean Highway would go to Pana-
others, including two civilian! world Amines, but^wa u^|*' P^ "%lr^snl*for|,tte i942 and has been on the ground about 20 feet below. came to Panama over the week-m. Costa Rica Guatemala. El
The Red Cross arranged for pilots and a stewardess, froze wnha0 we re o^rating tt on e OWn^ ana Grounding is- n*olfle side of the Isthmus Samuel Worrell, the baseball.end. Salvador Honduras and Nicara-
^^^^^^^^^^.T^)^^'Sl il8ndS 3 thSt the natlves.canthroughouthUemployment,
Isthmus Samuel Worrell, the baseball end.
.serv- fan, was In Colon Hospital to-1 Bogert said lt would take a-!gua.
that Mrs. Archer would probably, Three other men were feared
not Uve. The sergeant, who has dead in the crash of a B-17
been stationed in the Panam search and. rescue plane which
Canal Zone for two years, got an plunged into Tyler Peak, near
a plane Friday morning and ar---------T"nr. _" ~ ""
n Churchill s Parade
I'll be around when mother
UN Mej On Missing f&S****Starts
Persons Of Last WarA1 Hoon Tomorrow
were returning
gency leave.

Two cable tWeves, both Pan-
amanians, were, sentenced this
NEW YORK Jan 21 (UP) ' morning In the Balboa Magis-
ffarff {aiU lAwialf iBrttl8h i>rlme Minister Winston! tr%''* c."urt\,
JIOllj JdllJ JUTIvIJ Churchill staye.j indoors at the ne' Jose Domingo Martinez,
home of financier Bernard Ba- 25- was ilned a total of $50 and
GENEVA Jan 21 (UP) The ruch today to catch up on his received 30 days In Jail on two
UN commission on missing per- homework, but will come out to- pe'ty mrr-env counts of stealing
sons of World War II began morrov/ for a parade up Broad-lead cable from the Army1. At
meetlns here today without Rus- way to the City Hall. fdiffered times he stole 16 feet
sla which hua been accused of 1 Churchill said he would spend of cabla valued at $988, and 15
still holding more than 1,000,000 the day reading state papers that | 'eet o cable amounting to $8.28
orlsoner* have accumulated and greeting' irom tne Signal Corps at Coro-1
ifriendJ. Baruch salt' the vlsiU zal
In notes to the United States 1 would be ot "no political signi-' Jse -arate, 41, was found
and Australia the Soviet govern-: flcance." guilty of petty larceny and given
ment re fused to attend the meet- Churchill's U-oaflway parade 10 days In Jail He stole ten feet
inu and said Russia had repa- will take place around 12:30 p.m. or lead-covered copper cable
triated a.! German and Japan- His ten-car motorcade will Deamounting to $15 from the C-
ese war prisoner Its armies took Joined in Lower Manhattan by. nal s electrical division.
exceDl those held as war crtm- some 400 policemen and firemen,'. Also an tne courts calendar positions inside the cemetery.
inais an Air Force band and a mount-;,h'4 mo'ning were two traffic The British broke through the
servicemen nsjutemrem one dav deteimine how they me most ot the time as traffic day for further observation, but bout a week to decide on the The money would be spent be-
aming home on emer-1 want to or governed__________officer.________________________I his condition is satisfactory. copper value of the land. Itween July, 1953 and July, 1959.
US Nun Is Dead .British Officer Dying,
4 Guerrillas Killed In Bloody Ismailia
The
Judges' Bench
ISMAILIA. Jan. 21 (UP). AIassured United States ambas- on the steps of the convent, a
British officer was seri o u s 1 y sador Jefferson Caffery in Cairo
wcunded and four Egyptian that lt will make a full inves-
guerrlllas killed when renewed tlgation Into the death of Sister
fighting broke out today In this Anthony.
trouble town where a American
nun, Sister Anthony, was killed
Saturday.
The latest casualties came
during a British raid on a ce-
metery where the guerrillas
stored big quantities of ammu-
nition.
As the British threw a cordon
round the area the Egyptians
opened fire with Sten guns from
Both the United States embas-
sy in Cairo and the British mi-
litary headquarters in the Canal
Zone have already begun such
investigations.
Sister Anthony, 5*2. was shot
through the heart on the steps of
pistol bullet through her heart,
as British tanks raced through
the native quarter In response to
the Mother Superior's call for
help.
The British said Egyptian
terrorists lurking in the convent
garden killed her.
The Egyptians said the British
did it.
Two sisters in the convent said
day's gun battle and "that these I the gun tattle which brought
orders were obeyed was made | her death:
clear by the absence of bullet "She was good and kind, and
holes in any of the walls Inside she worked hard. She was a
the convent." |splendid woman. All after-
"She was murdered, and mur- roon the Falangists' (guerrillas)
kept coming Into the convent
grounds. The children were put
in the cellar.
dered by thugs." said Lt. Gen.
Sir George Ersklne. British com-
mander in the strike-ridden Suez
Canal Zone.
"Our native boy went out sev-
He insisted she gave her life eral times to ask them to go
in an attempt to protect Britishpway. Then five of them rush-
troops from the bomb-throwing ed through with bombs in their
'ed police escort. offender!
The U.8. Is oipected to reject After receiving the New York! For pawing a ear in a "no pass- ooo rounds of antiaircraft and
flatly Russia's claim, but the City's medal of honor from I ng' aiea an American. Anthony unk ammunition hidden In a
State Department had no im- Mayor Vincent I m p e 11111 e r i u' '-eggler*> 39 was fined $5
mediate inmnunt. [Churchill wlil give his farewell i and Alfred Tefi.o Scott 34-year-
cuerrilla defenses and found 2.- mercy
EllkA. Johnson. United States
he convent of the Sisters of that Egyptian thugs raced
Charity. | through the convent grounds af-
Bom Bridget Ann Timbers at'ter the nun was shot, shouting: Egyptians who forced their way, hands, the fuses burning.
Croton-on-Hudson. N. Y.. she "We got her. the bitch. The into the convent grounds "Sister Anthony ran out to
lived at Peekskill. N. Y.. before job Is done." sister Catherine said that al- stop them, shouting. 'No. no. you
setting out on her mission of; A British communique said though there were no witnesses,won't throw that.' But they
old Ecuacorean was fined $10
BALBOA TIDES
Nations participating in thej address tc the nation before ra-
meetln* include, the U.S.. Great dio mic-ophones and television
Britain. West Germany, Japan, cameras
Italy. AustralU Belgium, France! Churchill wil remain in the
and Holland. "ity as Uaruch? guest until his Tuesday Jan 12
The Soviets said the commis- departure for England on the Hi(..i Lo
slon was created under American Queen Mary probably early Wed-i 18:51 a.m. 5:17
pressure and therefore is illegal, nesday. ill22 p.m. -$$ am.
tomb.
In a diplomatic note publlsh-
consul at Port Said, hurried here
to Investigate. Gravely concern-
ed, he sought a full report for
ed today Britain demanded the U. 8. embassy In Cairo,
Egypt remove her auxiliary po-: which promised "appropriate ac-i "She was shot through the
lice forces from the Suez Canal tion" when the inquiry Is com- heart at point blank range by
witnesses heard the Egyptians
shout "shoot the woman down"
as she tried to stop them from
throwing bombs at British gun
positions from the convent
grounds.
Zone, and take action Imme- plete.
dialely to bring "lawless" Egypt- 81ster Anthony, revered for
ian police and civilians under i her five years of selfless service
control. I teaching Ismailia s British and
The Egyptian government has French children, was found lying
thugs who had viciously attack-
ed the convent," It said.
It added that strict orders had
been given to British troops not
to lire at the convent In Satur-
to the actual shooting, so far 1 pushed her aside and threw
as she knew, thugs had terroriz- their bombs,
ed the nuns with revolvers and "Then Sister Anthony phoned
tried to prevent them from tele- the British for help with the
phoning the British garrison for guerrillas outside screaming for
help.
She said they raced through
the convent grounds, shrilling
exultantly, while Sister Anthony
lav dying on the steps.
The calm, soft-voiced Mother
Superior of the convent told
someone to cut the telephone
lines.
"As we heard the tanks com-
ing. Sister Anthony began to
open the door., Then there was
a shot, and she was finished.
She died on the steps here. She
th story of Sister Anthony and was a very good sister."



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
MONDAY. JANUARY 21, 1951
'OlO*.
J
if* 0:4
o .
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
.ir NO P.r.l.HIO ' TMI PANAMA MHICON Fiaa. INC
i n. ..- > NILION MOUNtlVILL it Ktl
HARMODIO ARIA*. IOITO
7 M STt(l O BO* 134. PANAMA R
fLEinONf Panam NO 2 0740 '5 UNft >
CABLt ACORIIV PANAMinlCAN. PANAMA
IIMll I2.17t CNTRA, AVCNUC BftWf'N 12TH ANO
FO.-l.N fp-NTllvE JOSHUA POWCllS.
^4 -." Avf Nc*v vonK (17
O P
I31M S'I'tiTA
INC
;.. lit AOVANC
MONTHS IN ADVAMCC
VEA* '* AO.'ANCt"
MAN KMIlIM, THI. PAPERS
' 1 he American Conini2nd is In a bitter quarrel with Tokyo
over next year's military budget for Japan...Ironically, exactly
ten Ttar* aiter Bataan and Corregidor, the I". S. is insisting that
Japan apend at least 87% of the national revenue for its armed
farces, ami lit? Japs .it protesting; that this is too much!.. .The
"peaic-ioving" Japs for some time have taken legal refuge in the
con i;tuliim we ordered them to draftwhich forbids war...Of
ceur>e. everybody knows the score: We need Japan so badly as
an ally thai we've got to gamble on which way she'll point the
gunsin the end. History not only repeats. It often reverses
itself.
! Five very distinguished economists told the United Nations
tria', business booms from now on will be the rule, not the excep-
tion...At leasi 20 eminent economists saw the same thing just
before October 1929. The United Nations economists, though,
hv two hard decaties of history to back up their theory...They
do not say that the reason everybody is going to have work is
that business will be good. They say business will be good because
every government will have to establish full employment, as a
"firm objective of policy".. .In short, the Roosevelt experiment is
now respectable economics: Business doesn't make jobs, jobs
make business.
Attorney General Goldstein urges the N. Y. Legislature to
make dope pushing a crime punishable by life imprisonment af-
ter the third conviction... It seems to this reporter that the na-
ture of the crime depends upon the pushed and not the pusher.
The very first time a "pusher" Is eaught teaching a child how to
us-* narcotics, he ought to be pushed into the electric chair.. .If
murderers of a man's body deserve the death penalty, what is a
Just punishment for one who murders the soul of a child by mak-
ing it a drug addict?
. General de Lattre la dead In Paris.. The Iron Man of Indo
China put a spine of steel Into the French Far East army the day
he arrived. His 23-year-old son stepped up to greet him. and de
LatFre asked him where he was stationed. The boy. a fine officer,
said his battalion was in the firing, line. The General ordered
him to his post and reprimanded the officer who gave him
leave. But when the bo\ was killed a few weeks later, de Lattre
flew with the bodv back to France .The General never lost the
Will to win, but after that he lost the will to live.
; Visbinsky's Atom inspection plan is due for the Washington
waatebasket. Not only because it has the No. 61 joker in it, na-
tional domestic rights, but because St Red treaties have been
broken since 194li What Vishinsky is saying is: "I agree with
everything that you say, but I will fight to the death for my right
to disbelieve in you."
' Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas has refused any
Blase on the Democratic ticket of 1952though he would have
been on the winning 1944 ticket except for the Hannagan-Pauley
coup for Truman.. .Grace Tully tells the story of the two letters
by F.D.R. on his preferences, the first reading Douglas or Tru-
mfrij, and the second reading Truman or Douglas.. .Justice Dou-
glas2 decl'lcn is nerfectly understandable. Who wouldnt prefer
thr-gupreme Court ermine to the White House mink?
'. Jhe President has asked Congress to abolish the "grmchair
statutory officer" of 4 collectors of Internal Revenuea new
naru* for political plums. The message castigate the present sys-
tem- because, says the President, the Collectors, "must accom-
mbfste themselves to local political situations".. The only flaw,
tail*".!, is that the appointments are all made from Washington
. .JAtfter 'even years m office, that kind of a statement from the
President isn't a recommendation to Congress. It is an empty
aajofpgy to the nation's taxpayers.
K. Y. State has lifted the ban on parrots. This legalizes
pojli'clans for the Big Election Year.
' Inflation has hit the pocketbooks of the teachers of the na-
tion, hut not their salary envelope The million odd school-
teachers who teach the nation's 2'i million kids average about
S33 a month. In only two school districts in the entire nation do
school.' teachers average more than four thousand dollars a year
.. .His"home area continues its stranglehold o nthe No. 1 spot of
the nation's illiteracy by paying its teachers lowest, a guess you
would almost make from reading John E. Rankln's speeches.
THI: '5 T-QUR KHUM THE RtAOIBS CWW COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tht. Marl e ii an naan (rum lot raarfan ot Tha Panama Araar-
Iran lattcrs ara racaivaa* ratafunv ana1 ata KanaMta" m a whally Ma
tidaotial manner.
II you ceetrwura a latter an'r a irnaalunt i* aatn't appear the
esl day. Lattan an ublrahae' in Ike order received
Plaasa try to keep tka Ierren limita1 ta asa aaaa length
Identity of letter writers is MM in MricNtt cantiaanca.
Thii aewaeeser enanas ee reaaeniiaility lar itatamanti ar eamiaaa
axartutd in lattan tram raedera,
OPEN KOKIM ON DIABLO 2dl HOUSES
Mall Box Editor,
Panama American
Panama, R. de P.
Gentlemen:
Heartiest congratulations to the Canal management on the
recent solution to all their problems by merely doubling the
ren>. on Diablo bachelor quarters. That was Indeed a move of
master strategists. At one stroke we can single out a particular
Croup to show pointed discrimination, we can get rid of all those
Diablo bachelors i mostly teachers, nurses, firemen, policemen,
and mechanics) certainly not desirable people whom we need
- and at the same time we can empty all those three hundred
apartments so we can tear the houses down.
You see, students, the reaction will work out like this. The
bachelors and families in 201 houses will recognize the discrimi-
nation because all 201 houses in other towns are not being rais-
ed simultaneously. They will also realize that such increases
cannot be reasonably justified when a two bedroom family, du-
el of the same age In the same town rents for the same as
their new rental (looks like a thinly disguised school tax for
bachelors doesn't lt?i They also know expenses cannot lustily
ruch a raise, in Diablo especially, as there Is no amortization
of building expense on these particular houses for the Canal
simply upkeep. They will also see that the Canal doesn't want
them or doesn't care how much they are Inconvenienced and
hose by having to tear up their homes.
Another nice thing, we can open the door here for 100%
increases on all rents, but the reaction of the poor clucks who
aren't hit this time will be to settle back on the roost, sighing
gratefully that It was the other fellow tagged, so there won't be
much clamor raised, when we slip It to them gradually. That's
the reaction end of it.
Now, children, the finances will work out this way. Any
bacnelor stubborn enough to want to hang on will find the Ca-
nal can eveutually furnish slightly lousier quarters at a lower
price, and will feel foolish paying $35 per month for these un-
lurnlshed barracks and will move out, making room for the
100% plus 150% commercial renters, who will feel foolish paying
$13 for the same, and who wont move In, pe se.
Then, boys and girls, the houses will stand 95% vacant for
a time, and after a decent Interval we can say they are not fin-
aancially feasible and get to scrap them, goody!)
You see, children, these houses were built and paid for by
Special Engineers, and didn't cost the Canal anything. We want
the nice clean scrap to help finance one of our departments in
building something else, although we've got eighty million we
must spend on housing. So we can take these nice sites and
boondoggle around awhile and still come up with some new
bouses without going fantastically In the red. New rent $60.
Bee how simple solutions to weighty problems are?? of
course we will have to double everybody's rent pretty toon, but
don't, please, let on like you know.
Barry Missler.
Labor [News
And
Cotiiment
By Victor Riesel
Because the country S greatest
actress is as expert at reading
octwetn the lines as she is at
reading her lines, the movie
houses of this lana soon will be
snowing one of the llnest anti-
vommunlst 111ms produced
a picture callea 'My Son John,'
relating the Alger rilss story.
One day early In '51 while it
was sti'l In production on the
lot, the remaining band of Hol-
lywood Communists skillfully
got to Helen Hayes.
The stage's first lady was
under heavy strain. She hadn't
been in a film for a decade
She had been asked to take
the pan to give America a
line, intelligent and, of course,
absorbing antl-Communlst pic-
ture, skillfully portrayed by an
unimpeachable star Just as
she had helped us whip the en-
tertainment industry into a
furor years ago to get war re-
lief to Finland when Russia
invaded that frozen little land.
The Communists feared her
effectiveness and wanted the
film ruined.
So they got to her, whisper-
ed that the film was progress-
ing badly, that the early
"rushes" (views of scenes al-
ready shot) were "terrible." She
should pull out, they warned.
0/ course, this would have
butchered the film. But
she read between the "Par-
ty lines." She stayed. And
It's a great film- But what
of the conspirators for
what else can you call
them'! They tried to kill a
million dollar investment,
destroy a film career1, eva-
porate scores of technical
and talent jobs, so their
Soviet Fatherland would not
be hurt.
They will continue to work in
the fragmentary new Beverly
Hilsl undercover cells; linked to
the downtown Los Angeles Par-
ty, until they- too can take no
more, fin dno more studio work
and turn to the men and wo-
men they conspired to perse-
cutf and say. "We're sorry. We
should not have done It,"
What will- the anti-Commu-
nlsts do thenthe anti-Com-
munists whose private Uves
were shredded: yhose caraer
Who, Me?
By BOB RUARK

o .
NEW YORK. The President's speech about your sway, E>oc, we haven't accomplished the
preparedness In civil defense against atomic at- necessary steps to smltch of security against
tack, was real sound in general concept, until aggression and some sort of stability at home?,
you stubbed your toe and flopped over the mid- We mounted, moved and won a big war In
die portion. four years.
.It ls habit, you know, to chide the faceless We kept inflation to a minimum, by today's
i "little" man, which Is always you and me, with laughable standards, .while we were involved in
were knifed, whose daily -peace | negiect to do this and failure to do. that. a two-ocean conflict, with lend-lease to every-
was rent by professionally- This is known as the give-'em-hell technique, body we could hustle as an ally,
launched rumors o; moral and -4 ls not uncommon to Truman. The give- Then you guys tore down In six months the
political depravities few could
commit, even j a hobby?
Every at.i sement union
the Television Authority,
Actor.; Equity and all the
rtsi search, or at answer.
Who shaft'sit in 'judgment
on those who were vitriolic
Party-liners? Some of the
entertainment labor leaders
have been to Washington,
literally imploring the Dept.
of Justice and the House
iy. American Activities
Committee to give them
gtildanee, set up a board to
pass judgment 011 a man's
patriotism.
This question is stirring the
entire entertainment world to-
day.
They were listened to polite-
ly. But nothing doing.
Now these unions are seeking
lo set up an Independent trib-
unal, with perhaps some Federal
Judge, or a younger Barney Ba-
ruch who cat give time, lend
dignity and supreme honesty to
a board which will decide wheth-
er an actor was a willful Com-
munlst-fronter or just duped.
This agitation and gnashing
of teeth nas Intensified In the
em-hell technique is a sharp rebuke, and Is al- r.rmed might we have been trying to rebuild
ways employed as a mashed synonym for in- over a period of six years of your reign, and we
competence on high. still haven't got it rebuilt, although the taxes
Always we are banged across the brow with are tougher than ever,
"our" failure to prevent inflation,'and exhort- Who lowered tajees when we needed to keep
ed to go forth and sin no more. fronted with "our" Inability t 'produce more have been lowered? .
guns and tanks and ships and money. Who ordered the discontinuation of big ships
Always, but always, the danger of Immediate whose keels and already been laid? Who bought
destruction by "them," or "they," ls dusted off a program of guns and butter as well as arms
as a gimmick when The Man is preparing to and men?
shake down another shower of Jresh tax money Who has been horsing around with the uni-
te provide sewing machines for the suffering versal military training program for donkey's
Patagonlans. years? Who stuck us Into that Idiot's delight in
We Uve under a steady threat, a constant ac-. Korea?
cusatlon. The late FDR was a master at lm- Me, the unready citizen? Old Faceless Joe,
piled disaster, and invoked It often as a politic- the forgotten man?
al weapon. Have I been fixing tax cases and rigging deals
The present chief exec freely admits and Is with the RFC and surrounding the high offices
proud of the fact that he bulled his way into vith thieves and operators and Influence ped-
re-electlon op last-mtnute bluster. dlers? I would say no. I have fired remark-
So I was struck by Harry's phrase In the mid- ably few generals lately, or attempted to mix
die of a stout cataloguing of our laggardness in politics with the national well-being,
preparing for an A-bomb attack. The wildest dreamer could scarcely call this
"Regardless of the wishful talk to the con- comic tragedy In Washington a government for,
t:ary, you and I are now in a national emer- by and of the people, lately. There are too
gency as grave as any we have ever faced. We mt.ny people who have not had a hand In its
have not won the war against time. We have
no right to feel safe militarily or on the home
front..."
The boy lost my business right there. AU of
a sudden, as a faceless man, I say: "Whoa!
administration or a claw in its till.
We have suffered Instead a shouting spree of
Inept diagnosis and fumbling operation by a
bevy of barbers.
I do not hold with continually hitting the
citizen over the head In apology for govern-
mental shortcoming.
The current crew has been in long enough to
Easy!"
What ls the exact size of this national emer-
past few weeks over the case gency that you guys have been squawking about
of one Phil Loeb, who has play- 'the last six years, and why haven't we got a
ed "Jake" in the much beloved right, by now, to feel safe militarily and on the have It figured out by now. using the people's
"Goldbergs" radio and TV shows, heme front? money and the people's blood, without resting
Molly Berg owns, writes and Whose fault is it that In the last six years of the fault for failure on the people's bowed neck,
produces the showand plans
to put it on the air Feb. 4 with-
out Loeb. Reason for this, ac-
cording to the industry, ls that
Loeb's name appeared in "Red
Channels," a compilation of en-
tertainers and the left wing
fronts they Joined over the
years. This, Loeb's friends say, is
a blacklist, and therefore un-
fair.
Why is this a Blacklist? Have
we not all listed the political
affiliations of all sorts of groups
for years? Of course I
The question ls not whether
this ls a black or red list. The
question is why, when the New
Masses, a Communist policy-
making magazine, printed a let-
ter to President Roosevelt In
Defense of Communists why
was PhU Loeb a signer?
Were not the Communists at
that tune defending the Soviet-
Nazi pact? Were they not trying
to hinder our aid to the Allies
then being bombed by the
Wehrmacht?
Of course they were! Then
why did Loeb see fit to defend
them?
I have mentioned the fight
we had to get support for Fin-
nish relief In the entertainment
world. Our most bitter opponent
was something called the Thea-
tre Arts Committee (TAC). One
of Its executive board members
was Phil Loeb.
Who was among those who
defended these now Infamous
"Moscow Trials?" PhU Loeb!
That's aU on the record. In-
cluding membership on a com-
mittee to help re-elect that pro-
Communist political hack, Vito
Marcan tomo.
These, to me, were Indecen-
cies. Loeb ls one of thousands
who committed them. It la not
our problem to work out a way
for him to find work. Let him
undo the political harm he did.
That much he owes his country
now.
Latin American Health
By Petei Edson
WASHINGTON, (NEA).Not every U. S. for- By comparison, outside of Paris and a few
elgn aid program has to cost hundreds of rail- other places where the water ls checked by
lions of dollars. A lot of good can be done for U. 8. mUltary or other medical officers, It ls
a lot less. unsafe to drink a glass of tap water any place
This Is proved by the record of the nine-year- in Europe,
old Institute of Inter-American Affairs. In Colombia. 215 health centers have been
The XIAA Is a Uttle-known government cor- established throughout the country. The U. S.
poration recently given responslblUty for aU now operates only one of them, started seven
'Point Four" technical assistance to Latin- years ago In the capital of Bogota to train the
America It now operates In the State Depart- health workers for all the others,
ment, but under W. Averell Harriman's new Mu- In the five northern states of Colombia, ln-
tual Security Agency set-up. nablted by over two million people, an organized
The entire MSA program this yea. Is costing fight against malaria and yeUow fever is being
over six billions dollars. The economic assist- made.
anee share of this ls a billion and a half dol- It Involves spraying over 300,000 houses. Spray
tars. guns mounted on jeeps and in cutboard canoes
AH technical assistance programs for Latin- reach even the most remote habitations.
America this year get 18 million dollars. But Along the Pacific coast provinces of Colombia
for every dollar of American money spent, It Is and Ecuador, a similar attack is being made on
estimated the Latin American countries will yaws. People of this area are now being treat-
spend at least four dollars of their own more ed with penicillin for the third time.
as time goes on. "PenlcUHn and DDT are their own best sales-
What ls there to show for all this? Take the men," says Dr. Hyde. "When the people have
health program alone, which will cost six mU- seen what can be done by the first treatment
lion doUars. the rest ls easy."
Dr. Henry van Zlle Hyde, medical director of To the -Colombian health centers now come 70
U. 8. Public Health Service who ls now on loan to 90 per cent of the pregnant women for pre-
to the Institute of Inter-American Affairs as natal training. The babies are still delivered by
director of its health, welfare and housing ac- mid-wives. But after birth, back to the clinics
tlvltles. has just returned to Washington from they come for nutrition and health training.
a swing around South America. Here are some Before this service was available, one out of
of the specific examples he cites on what Point every three women died In chUd birth and half
Four aid has done. the chUdren died before they reached the age
In Santiago, Chile, the United States super- of five. Today workmen know that they will
vised installation of a sewage system in one have both a wife and a chUd alive after the
part of the city. Seeing how It worked, the stork arrives.
poor people ta another part of the city collect- And so the story goes. In 17 out of the 20
ed all the money they could, took It to the city Latin-American republics. Only Argentina, Cu-
aovernment and said ta effect, "We want one, ba and the Dominican Republic do not take part
too." They're getting It. ir. IIAA health activities. Nicaragua, Panama
In Venezuela, a program ls under way to pro- and Costa Rica dropped out during the war for
vide every town with more than 1000 Inhabitants lack of money, but they're back In now.
with a pure drinking water supply. It was start- .
ed with 120,000 U. 8. money, backed up by a mil- Against the three million dollars contributed
Mon dollars appropriated by the Venezuelan gov- by the . 8. last year, the 17 Latin-American
eminent. ..... - ..-..*- governments contributed 13 mllUon.
C1UDAH.Y VftSUINOTOH
MERRY-GO-ROTO
y DlfW PIAISON
I
Drew Pearson says: Churchill gets advice on U.S. of Euro-
pe; Truman-Churchill talks made no real progress
toward European unity; Churchill's war decisions left
us headaches in Greece and Chino.
WASHINGTON. It didn't leak to the presj, but at the Pre-
sident's first luncheon for Winston ChnrchUl, the 77-year-old
Prime Minister got some friendly advice from the only guest
older than he.
The adviser was 84-year-old Sen. Theodora Francis Green
of Rhode Island, who, despite his age. is even more active than
ChurchUl, and who during the luncheon g-:ntly tr.ld the PM. about
moves toward a United States of Europe made .it the Strasbourg
conference.
Green recently served as co-chalraon with Paul Spaak of
Belgium, over the consultative assembly <>l the CouncU of Euro-
pe, attended by 14 U.S. Senators ad Congressmen plus delegates
from all parts of Europe.
And the Rhode Island Senator was quite eloquent In describ-
ing the pleas for unity made by the delegates and their dis-
appointment over British opposition.
Most U.S. Congressmen attending the Strasbourg conference
came away determined that future American aid to Europe should
be tied to a proviso that Europe unite.
Even conservative Democrats Gene Cox ot Georgia and Ho-
ward Smith of Virginia made speeches praising European unity
and criticizing British aloofness.
Diplomatic Senator Green did no', bear down too hard on
tint during the President's lunch for Churchill, but tried to get
n!s point across by saying:
"Your delegate Robert Boothby did a.< well as he could with
the limited, material he had."
Churchill grunted.
"Good man Boothby," he said. Then with pride in his own
political party, he added: "He's a Conservative'
Senator Green's hint, however, had no effect upon the
Churchill-Truman conferences that followed. The Prime Min-
ister paid nothing more than Up-servire to European unity.
CHURCHILL'S BROKEN PIECES
During the Strasbourg conference. British delegate Boothby in
opposing a United States of Europe argued:
"The finest unity the world has ever seen was that between
Churchill and Roosevelt when they met .together to decide the
problems of the world."
To this Congressman Frazler Reams of Toledo. O.. took ex-
ception.
"I have had the greatest respect for both Mr Roosevelt and
Mr. ChurchUl," he told the Strasbourg assemMv. "but most of
Saltern Europe is littered with broken pieces of the policies they
eft behind."
TWO-MAN PARLEY
Diplomats who watched the venerable British statesman in
Washington couldn't escape the Impression that Churchill still
believes the problems of the world should be settled between two
men only.
Diplomats who watched Churchill In other conferences also
remembered, however, how obstructionist he could be when
Roosevelt would not yield, and how some of the decisions he in-
sisted upon completely upset the peace of the world.
Here are some of them.
Error In ChinaMeeting with Chiang Kai-shek and FDR in
one of their famed conferences (Cairo In 19431 Roosevelt felt the
urgent need of strengthening Chiang. Kis army had been fight-
ing the Japanese longer than any other. Already he faced de-
sertions to the Communists.
So FDR urged an Allied campaign over the Burma Road to
rescue China.
But Churchill was vigorously opposed. He would hear none
of it. Instead he wanted an Allied campaign to retake Britain's
old possessions Singapore and the Malays.
At this Chiang got. sore, threatened to pull out altogether,
and It took a lot of persuading by FDR to keeQjjiin Salfo.
To placate him FDR proposed that Britain,give,,up, Hong
Kong, make it an international port uncttr th; UN.
ChurchUl's reply: "I was not made Prime Minister to liquid-
ate the British Empire."
Chiang, returning empty-handed, faced increasing defec-
tions to the Communists.
Real fact Is that for Chiang. Cairo marked the beginning of
the end. Incidentally Hong Kong, still British, supplied the com-
munists with part of their gas and oil to oppos? us ta Korea.
Error In GreeceAt Casablanca, ChurchUl got from FDR a
promise that the Mediterranean was to be a British theatre, with
al! commands and political decisions clearing through British
hands.
This meant not only a British top commander for Allied for-
ces In Italy though most of the troop? were American but
it meant that not even a telegram could be sent In the Mediter-
ranean theatre without a British OK.
One result was gross mismanagement in Greece Churchill
backed the wrong leaders, got the count-y lnvo'ved ta clvU war,
eventually sent a telegram that shocked the world.
"Do not hesitate to act as If you were In s conquered city,*
ChurchlU wired the British commander n Athens. "You should
not hesitate to open fire on any armed male in the Greek ca-
pital who assails the authority of the British. Keep and domin-
ate Athens." ...
Eventually this policy failed. It failed so miserably that Lon-
don gave the United States peremptory notice It was turning
the future of Greece over to us.
Since then we have been running Greece at a cost of
about one billion dollars a year some of which could have been
saved If we had followed the old adage, "an ounce of prevention
is worth a pound of cure."
Iran And EgvptDiplomats also reca!l the manner In which
Churchill secured from Roosevelt fuU control of policy In Egypt,
Iran and the Middle East. _' ...-. L,
The result of that policy, partly spellid out In Egyptian riots
ann closed British consulates In Iran, is too fresh to need re-
petition here.
But the manner to which American wartime commanden
backed up British supremacy, may have been forgotten. Gen.
Benny Giles lecturing VS. newsmen who criticized British po-
licy in Cairo In 1943. said: "Gentlemen. I have noticed that you
have been writing political news. You are war correspondents,
and you will write nothing critical of British poUcy in the Mid-
dle East." .______
SIE GLANCES
By Galbra.th

i..ir".
e^,. iMi maganta..

"Now ha wnta to quit the piano and study for % l"*ra>>





MONDAY, JANUARY 11. 1958
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPOt
PAOI
Pacific Society
fL 17, &&~ V.l &&~ 35QI
AMBASSADOR AND ME8. ORTIZ DE ZEVAIAOS
TC ENTERTAIN
Th. Ambassador of Peru to Panama, and the Dean of
Relations and Mr. Ignacio Molino, Jr. ,___
i
Commander And Of Doer Of
"louique" Entertained
Commander Mario Espinosa
and the Officers of the ChUean
frigate. "Iqulque" who are visit-
lne the Isthmus, were honored
Saturday evenln* at the Chilean
Embassy by the Ambassador of
Chile to Panama and Mrs Ma-
nuel Hidalgo Plaza who enter-
tained for them with a cocktail
party.
Dinner Party To Honor
Visitors Tonight ttMmm
Captain and Mrs. Matthias
Manley, visitors to the Isthmus
will be honored this evening at
eight o'clcok at th Union Club
with a no-host dinner given for
them by a group of their friends-
General And Mrs. Cranston
Honored At Reception
Brigadier General and Mrs
Joseph Cranston, who arrived
from New York Thursday for a
Visit to the Isthmus, were honor-
ed with a reception given Friday
evening by Mrs. Cranston*
brother-in-law and sister tne
Lieutenant Governor of the Pa-
nama Canal and Mrs. Herbert D
Vogel, at their home on Balboa
Heights.
General And Mrs. Kiel
Return From Honduras .
Brigadier General Emil C. Kiel.
the Commanding General, Ca-
ribbean Air Command, and Mrs.
Kiel returned Friday by plane
from a visit to Tegucigalpa, Hon-
duras.
Chrlstiancy Plckett of Albrook
Air Force Base.
Colonel And Mrs. ReUy
Honored At Dinner
Colonel and Mrs. Leo F. Kelly,
of Fort Clayton, were the guests
of honor recently at a dinner
nartv elven by Colonel and Mrs.
ghriaUanc? Plckett at their
quarter on Albrook Air Force
B Also present at the dinner were
Miss Aline Flores house guest of
the Plcketts. Colonel and Mrs_
Leland Hewitt and Colonel and
Mrs. Morley.
Bridge Tournament Tonight
At Hotel Tirol!
The regular weekly bridge
tournament will be held this
evening at seven o'clock in the
Card Room of the Hotel Tivoll.
Any interested bridge .player la
Invited to attend.
Miraflores Observatory
Open Two Nights A Week
The Miraflores Observatory
will be open to the public on
Sunday and Friday nights from
7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Tower Club Meets Tonight
The' Tower Club of the Ca-
thedral of 8t. Luke will meet at
six thirty.o'clock this evento* In
Bishop Morris Hall. Document-. --"
ary films of the missionary, work The person ta^ pleased
RUTH MILIETT Says
No one ever forgets Martha.
Those who know her only briefly
remember her and further-
more they have the feeling that
they really kndw her better
than they do.
Wherever she goes she makes
friends quickly and easily. She
Is never a stranger for long in
any place.
How does she make others
remember her? It Is simple
actually. She remembers them.
But it doesn't stop with that.
After a first meeting she is
always quick to let a person
know she remembers him. And
If there Is the slightest hesita-
tion In the other's manner, she
identifies herself and recalls the
first meeting.
From then on it is simple
to have
being done In Alas* will
shown during the meeting.
be I been remembered, gratified that
he has made an Impression on
such a friendly and charming
woman. And Martha is not a
vague face or a vague name
In that person's mind. She has
Latin America Breathed Easier
WlwnStu. Symington Quit RFC
uy 1
ard- (
Legion Auxiliary To Hold
Executive Meeting
rortnlghU, Bridge Club ^
The members of the Fort^ghtly unit o Mven thlrty|bered.
Bridge Club * We*0nmSed*yf | dock at the Legion Club to hold
^rlAT^T hm an Executive Meeting.
The members attending lnclud-
eMd KviSSr? huT B&& Local 900 Reports
SSS?R5&E On Recent Talks
and Mrs. E. W. Schnake.
Mrs. Murphy Honored With
Dinner _
Mrs. Loula M. Murphy, of Co-
rundu was the guest of honor
at a dinner given last evening
bv Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Hol-
lander at their home in Balboa
Mrs. Ward Arrives For
Visit With Son
Mrs. Roscoe C. Ward accom-
oanle dby Mrs. Lincoln C. Con-
neSy arrived this morning
aboard the S. S. Ancon for a
visit of several days to be spent
witn Dr. John Cook War II of
Bella Vista, who Is Mrs. Ward's
son.
Captain And Mrs. Manly
A?apta?"and - J^gg
Manlv of Santa Barbara Cali-
fornia arrived yesterday aboard
the "Stella Polaris" for a slurt
visit to the Isthmus before con-
tinuing their Caribbean cruise.
Mrs. Pinehot Leaves
For States _, ... .. .
Mrs Glfford Pinehot." the wi-
dow of the form-r Governor of
Pennsylvania, left yesterdav for
the United Spates after a vlsi
Batchelor-Setslons
Engagement Announced
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis A. Bat- trie J' ~T,th.TVhmus
chelor, of Druid Hill Park Drive, of several weeks on the nnm
Baltimore, Maryland, announce Us the taw g** J ^
the engagement and approaching|hassartor of th* W" *
marriageiof their daughter. Mary pimmi and Mrs. John ooopet
Bortle Batchelor. to Walter War- j wUey. _____,
ren Sessions, Civilian employe of
Martha has probably never
stopped to think about any of
this. She just happens to be a
friendly person who. likes peo-
ple, is always interested in
meeting new persons, and there-
fore doesnt easily forget them.
But the woman who .realises
that she doesn't make friends
easily and doesn't make much
With USARCARIB
4 .#o~r, of an Impression on those she
A formal report of conferen-; te CMuany could take
ces held between Local 900, | lMgon from Martha.
GCEOC-CIO. and Army author- Dmn expect otners ^ M.
Itiee here will be given tomor- member you xmim you remem-
row night to D. S. Army. Navy ^ them %n M ^tm know
and * and Air Force employes who
attend the meeting at the Paci-
fic Clubhouse.
Never hesitate to be the first
to recall a previous meeting,
even if It means Identifying
.. . even if It means wentiry
At the meeting, which Is sche-1 your8t to someone with
duled to start at 7:30, recent poorer memory. Arid dont 1
By DREW PEARSON
WASHINTON.Though Stuart Symington is
one of the most efficient officials in Washington, a
good part of Latin America sighted with relief when
he submitted hi resignation as head of the Recon-
struction Finance Corporation.
The reason was Symington's tough price policy
in buying tin from Bolivia.
Though Bolivia was the only nation which sells
tin, the basic policy laid down by Symington set a
pattern which, was of vital concern to other Latin
American governments.
What happened In the case of > were not renewed. Between June
tin was that when its' foreign | and September of this year, total
purchases were turned over to imports dwindled by two-thirds,
the RFC, Symington promptly I from an average 9,000 tons to
instituted a campaign to drive3,000 a month. .
down the world price from $1.80' While Symington's policy was
a pound to $1.03. His technique,aimed chiefly at the hi"'ihand-
was devasiatingly simple: Stop ed tactics of the British-Dutch
buying. tin eertel In the Malays, Bolivia's
It worked. In less than two j economy was thrown for a ter-
months after the TJ. 8. had
suspended purchases, the Inter-
national quotation on tin drop-
ped the required 77 cents.
But when Symington authoris-
ed limited importation again, the
price soon crept back up to $1.20
pe rpound.
By holding RFC purchase to a
minimum which was Insufficient, so, beginning in October. Boli-
to replenish rapidly decreasing] vian producers stopped shlp-
U. 8. stockpiles, Symington kept, ments.
it from going above that figure.' That was when neighboring
Contracts with foreign produc-Latin republics began to take
ers particularly Bolivian serious note of the tin crisis.
They had thought that a set-
tlement would be reached before
It was too late, but by, then it
then It had become evident that
Symington would not modify his
policy under any circumstances.
Coffee growers In Mexico,
Brasil, Colombia and Guate-
mala; Cuban sugar planters,
ChUean nitrate and copper-
mine operators, all began to
realise that what had hanpen-
ed to Bolivian tin mieht well
happen to their products if
the V. S. decided to make its
single-agency purchase policy
general for foreign imports.
As reports of Increasing Hard-
ships borne by the Bolivian peo- }
pie reached the sister republics, J
press and semiofficial comment
i has grown more bitter.
Even Oswaldo Aranha of Bra- j
zll, long a close friend of-*he'
|U. 8.. offered this blunt private.,
appraisal:
| "It Is almost Inconceivable
that President Truman, who
I must be aware of the resentment
created by apparent U> 8. indif-
(Continued on ?age SIX)
"ntl poorer memory. Arid dont for-
President Tru-1 t the Mre>t way of seeing to
president P lip that others remember you is by
remembering them.
talks between
man and CIO ,
Murray, which averted the im-
pending U. 8. steel strike, will
be discussed.
During the meeting commit-
tees to assist in establishing a
Federal credit union for Arm-
ed Forces employes will be ap-
pointed.
Speakers at the meeting will
Include Ed Welsh and Edward
Oaskln.
rifle loss.
Tin normally accounts for 12
per cent of that mountainous,
landlocked country's exports.
Due to 'topographical and
transport difficulties, produc-
tion costs are high. The metal
cannot be sold profitably at
the same price as Asiatic tin;
Give
"Wotch-Motes
HERCULES LUGGAGE MFG.
Show Room21 J. F. de la Ossa.
Tel. 2-1969
GENERAL
PAINT
(Pintura
General, S.A.)
Announces their
new telephone
number
2.0*1; also 2-1895
GENERAL PAINT CORP. I;
(Pintura General. S.A.)
No. M -II" Street
Phones: 2-1WL 2-1895
the Army. Curundu.
The wedding will take place on
February 8 on the Canal Zone.
Mr. and Mts. Corver
Visitors Entertain g* "*"
Mr and Mrs. H*>rry I
Lsrscn who are v1i1p-
Isthmus were ho-ts a
lveti at the Ho*l El
on Thursday evening.
Gambling debts first
made lrre-overhle by law -
the rei"n of England's
Charles II.
were
rinir
King
I.
">. th*
- dinner?
Panama
Return From Europe
vefhavdarvSedJohnanthAe lZ'- jVHtors From Pennsylvania
ETopeTd ^^^Vrtne i ^SjSS^ff&
home in Lima, Peru. During .ed Thursday at.her hometorn
their stay m Panama they are coco del Mar with *-TeH"rtI
the house guests of Mr. and Mrs. i canasta party with IW.ftn
William L. Lewis, of Diablo, McGrath as co-hostess for the
Heights. _. occasion
Mr Corver is the Inspector of
the Royal Netherlands Steamship
Company in Lima.
Miss Flores Returns To Quito
Miss Alina Flores, of Quito,
Ecuador left Friday by plane to .
return to her home after a visit | Panama
General And Mrs. Stayer
Sail For New York
Major General and Mrs Mor-
rison C. Stayer, of Carlisle.
Pennsylvania, sailed for New
York on Friday aboard the 8. 5.
after a short visit on
of several days on the Isthmus] the Isthmus jW.JftWbit me
during which time she was the U.hev were guests at the Hotel El
house guest of Colonel and Mrs. 'Panama.
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panam No 58 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Caltouse*!Ingrown Too Nato
Arch Supports.- REDUCING Treatments Manages
Sleiideris&gMaehlnes. Turkish Baths Male aniIMMk
operators. For Information call: $-2217 Panama
812 ajn.; 28 pjn.
If you belong to the Armed Forces
or if you have a steady job come to
oar Store and you can choose your
own terms to buy on credit.
We have the best Mahogany Furniture.
If yen dont know our Club System
visit us and you will be delighted.
86 Central Ave. TeL 2-2404
NOW...Years Old!

But No Increase
IN PRICE
You'll enjoy Seagram's V.O.
Canadian Whisky even more now
thai it is 6years old! Honoured
the world over, Seagram's V.O.
is die lightest, cleanest tasting
whisky you have ever enjoyed.
Try it.. it's aged longer.
PtosWWs.* fcy,
COMPAA CYBNOS, $. A.
eag-ram'$V0.
CANADIAN WHISKY
GALA CONCERT!!
National Symphony Orchestra
GUEST CONDUCTOR
GREGORIO RAVIC
Director of Buenos Aires Symphony Orchestra
SOLOIST:
JUNE PRESTON
Renowned North American Soprano
Auditorium of the National University
WEDNESDAY, January 23rd 8:30 P.M.
Reserve your tickets at MORRISON'S NOVELTIES
and LEWIS SERVICETel. 2-0441 FRENCH
BAZAARTel. 2-3151 EL PANAMAFRENCH
BAZAAR BRANCHTel. 3-1660.
ADMISSION... $1.00

IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL ESSO-GAS CONSUMERS
As of today Monday 21st the price of Esso-Gas
will be $13.00 per cylinder of 100 lbs. delivered
in Panama City.



This rise in price is due to an increase in our
cost effected by our suppliers in the refinery.
- -

.
-

ECONOGAS, S.A
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFI($NCE
Complete Priie-Winnin* Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1715, Sunday, January 20, 1952
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two serles "A" A "B" of 22 pieces each.
First Prize 2 8 60
Second Prize 8 6 8 3
Third Prize. 59 8 5
SIM
US*
3J4*
1 MM MM
I3I.H 4IM
US.M Mt
132 M 4Mt
133.M MM
1SZJS.UM
Itt.M MM
132.M 2.1M M M
1JI.M MM
$ 44,000.00
$ 13,200.00
$ 6,600.00
t
13.M
132.M
132.M
13I.M
ISX.M
ih.m
131.M
l.M
2.3M.M
1RM
SIM
52M
S3M
MM
S5M
SM*
STM
SSM
SM*
IKrtr*- |N
I
132 M MM
132.M tlM
132*0 2M
132. M
132.M IMS
132.0* urn
132 M MM
132 M TM
2.2M.M MM
132.M MS
132.M
US.M
132.M
132.M
1S2M
132.M
U2.M
132.M
2.2MM
132.M
7***
TIM
72M
nm
7S*
7SM
7M*
7TM
TM*
7M*
|rlr. | Na*
132.M I MM
132.M SIM
132 0* I S2M
132.M SM*
turn 8M
KM SSM
132M MM
132 M STM
2.2M.M MM
132 M I MM
Pttf I
I
132.M
I32.M
I32.M
n.M
132. M
132.
I32.M MM
132.M STM
2.2M.M MM
MM
MM
:.M 5M
>
132M
IBM
132.M
I32.M
132 M
132.M
132.M
132. M
2.2MM
132M
Apfrorimatioiw Derived From Flrel *r1zc
MM TSS*
MM tl
2M2
an
4M.M 2M4
4M.M 2MS
U.M 2MT
2MS
2M*
4M.M
A 8ijaJu^liv4si, EXAMPLE
of what this wonderful
polish will do for your shoes
KIWI
WAX SHOE POLISH
if In Black. Ox blood an*! tlvs shsdMof Brown.
A Kiwi shin* lists longer becsuM the polish
Is nud only from the Bnest wsxm and dyes.
JOSEPH GROSSMAN, S. A.
118 Central Avenue Pansm. R. P._____
Approximations Derived From Second Priie
i
ZMM
11*
lie*
SMS
SMS
usm mm aw i* *****
II M MSI
1U.M MM
llt.M MM
11*.M MM
llt.M
11* M
MSS SMM
SMI M*M
MSS USM
Awrormatioo? Derived From fhird rVize
132.MI TM5
MM SMS
MM MM
M MSS 1J1M SMS tm
132.
MM SMI
MM MM
MM SMS
SSM MM
W
_
r^-wtnnlna numbers of rasterd.,'. totterv drawtn. were sold: 1st and 2nd prise. In ****** In Col6n.
Th. .Ism hsusared whM. tlekrt. ms*Us, 1. assd M mel eded In th. above tUt win '"*-* "^ (M4-> m'
The whole ticket ha 44 pieces which comprise the two series "A" and "B."
Signed by: ALBKRTO ALEMN, Governor of the Province of Panam.
HUMBERTO PAREDES C Representative of the Mtaistrv of Treaaury
WiTNCCccc. Martin Marin-Ced. No. iMgf
WITNEdSts: Jumn E. oonsles Ced. No. 28-659
JOSE GUILLERMO BATALLA
Notary Public, Panam
PABLO A. PINEL M
Secretary
T
J"


(


PAGF For*
r'HF PANAM*. AMERICAN AN INniPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, JANUARY 81. 195
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes- Arrivals and Departures
TERRY-
STORM WARNING
MAERSK LINE barber-wilhelmsen line
Accepting Passengers for
SAN FRANCISCO
by
m.8. "NICOLINE MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 26th
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel: Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
Accepting Passengers for
NEW YORK
By
m.8. "TALLEYRAND"
SAILING JANUARY 23rd
(All rooms with private bath) f
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
FRECKLES AND HIS PRIENDS!
H KM FOftMMN DM POWIglUTY, MM )
TBMfmfT. U9TBM CLOitLY AMD POLUJW l~.
INSTRUCTION*... TWSRB WILL K 4OUB0N6
ACTIN 4 PUTV ORSfCW AT YUM IMMRg
HOSPITAL toniout, yts? .
i!
K

OKAY, COACH!
BT MERRn.L BLOSSEB
Yaks, Cannibal Spiders Are
Earth's Highest Inhabitants
WASHINGTON. D. C. Jan-
Four miles high and more, the
earth's lof.iest permanent in-
habitants are small black spid-
ers that eat each other to stay
alive.
These are the champions tn
life's grimmest battle for sur-
vival. Thev struggle against thin
air and bitter cold, against
snow. ice. and barren rock, on
the storm-swept slopes of the
world's highesi mountains.
Altitude chokes off human
settlement and then vegetation,
before animals give up their
struggle, the National Geogra-
phic Society says.
' What are the world's highest
land animals? Scientists who
have returned from attempting
to climb 29.002-foot Mount
Everest tell of tinv caniibalistlc
spiders hooping from ice cre-
vices and rock niches at 22.000
to 23.000 feet. There the atmos-
pheric pressure is less than half
that at sea level, and all plant
life stops 4.000 feet below.
No one knows what makes the
great splayed footprints in the
now which several Everest ex-
Beditions have seen hlah above
ie treellne. Tibetan porters and
the Sherpa tribesmen of the
Himalayas ascribe them to the
feared "M etch kangmi"
translated bv British moun-
taineers as 'Abominable Snow-
men." a 30-year-old Everest
legend.
Whatever the fact or fancy of
such unknown mountain crea-
tures, animals do exist near or
above the line of permanent
snow in the mighty Hlmalavas.
These Include the ghostly
-low leopard, the Asiatic
mountain goats ibex, mark-
hor, serow and tahr and
the bharal. wild sheep with
heavy, down-curving horns.
" There are Himalayan red
3>ears "Ursus arctus) which
hibernate through the winters:
wild shaggy yaks in the most
Inaccessible reaches of the
'.mountains: marmots. Tibetan
hares, and burrowing pikas that
"resemble small furry guinea
-pigs; reaccoonlike pandas and
-even slender, long-legged mon-
lievs known as langurs.
- Even higher, zoologists have
lound bees, moths, grasshoppers,
and butterflies. Birds exist on
dead grasses blown among the
rocks and lichens growing on
tone. *
In the Andes ranges of South
America live the lamoids. a
branch of the camel family
which includes the llamas, al-
pacas, guanacos and vicunas.
The thinner the air the better,
they seem to like it.
Rocky Mountain bighorn |
sheep come down fro their
loftv crags only when forced by
heavy winter snowdrifts, on the
other side of the world the
slopes of snowcapped moun-
tains in the Belgian Congo are
the home of the last remaining
mountain gorillas.
, Not alone on mountainsides
do animals battle snow and
cold. Polar bears live on Arctic
i ice floes, preying on seals, fish
and birds. Penguins and seals
: greet visitors to Antarctica's:
Little America.
In the barren lands of the,
Canadian sub-Arctic, at the site
of the huge Chubb Crater In
northern Quebec, members of a]
, National Geographic Society-1
Royal Ontario Museum exped-
tion this summer found Arctic
: foxes, fish and numerous birds
existing amid eerie silence.
i
Workers Resist Efforts
To Muffle Rackets
MILWAUKEE, (UP).Workers
in noisy places could avoid
boilermakers' deafness" but,
! they resist the use of devices to;
protect their hearing, according
to an industrial nurse.
Irma Schroeder told a meeting
of the Milwaukee Hearing So-
ciety that earplugs, earmuf fs and
valves have been developed to
i shut out damaging high fre-
quency and Intensive noises and
still admit conversational tones.
However, she said, workers are
as slow to use those devices as
| they were to wear safety goggles
and safety shoes when thev were
developed.
CURDLING COLD
Coldest wave that ever hit the
' United,States invaded the north-
ern Rocky Mountain region in
, February. 1933. It hung up the
: all-dime low-temperature record
I for the country when it curdled
the mercury of a thermometer in
Yellowstone national park at 68
degrees below zero Fahrenheit. I
NOW IS
THE BEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
by
DECK SCRUBBER-'Dutch"
Bandholz, above, is a card spe-
cialist in Las Vegas, Nev His
specialty is cleaning the hun-
dreds of decks of playing cards
usd by a gambling house there.
To clean the deck, "Dutch" uses
his own secret formula, with
which he's seen polishing off a
five-card straight.
IP WE
COULD
L?MCEaTE
right
goat
Snap into
it, champ/
WE PLAY
KINGSTON
TOMORROW-
REMJMBER
ALLET OOP
TROUBLE COMING UP
BT T. T. HAMT.IH
A ton of coal Is required to
trod'ic" the power to make a ton
of teel.
MARCH
DIMES
JANUARY 15-31
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGELES
MEXICO
Wonderful vacations at the
year's lowest rates await
you in Mexico and the
U. S. A. And there's a new
low combined fare to Loa
Angeles. $380.80 round
trip. Chicago is no more
than half a day away, via
Miami, with DC-6 service
all the way... Your choice
of 2 services to Miami: "El
Inter Americano" and "El
Turista" flights.
Sre your Trurtl Aytnl or
WOMB'S
IXMIIINCID
AlillNI
PanAmRca\
Hoh/o AUtlVAYS
Pmmim: L Strtrt No. 5,
T.I 14670
Colon: SUi Bid,., T.I. 1097
XE-43-5I-P
THERE, THAT'5 WHAT'S
LAYIN1 READY TO BITE
ACHUNKOUTAOtl
DINNY EVERY TIME
WE TRY TO TIME-
MACHINE HIM BACK
TO MOO.
.
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
ABSOLUTELY SORE
BT EDGAR
"\WWt Va>*& *0
cwt otra.\ut'. VMA<&\K>K\SO^'.
1 VMOto
NAOO ,
MA'AM I
CAPTAIN EAST
FOLLOWER FOLLOWED
BE LESLIE TURNER
CH"V WE1.REN. Planeteer
HERE SHE IS AGAIN
...IT HAD A FLORIDA LICENSE....
PROBABLY RETURNING HOME FROM
MEXICO. BUT I DUWWO WHICH ROUTE
TOVU& TAKEM TO REACH THE
HIGHWAY AROUND THE QUIT
BV RUSS WINTERBOTHAM
EMPTT CAGE.
BE MICHAEL O'MALLEE




MONDAY, .UNTAR* 51, IMS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

-
.ALntk Society*"*
nu niiiion j.. fu
So, 195, (Jalun DLpliOHi (j*lu*
3 78
LOTTERY PARTY HONORS
COMMANDER AND MRS. JONES
Comnund and Mr. Z. T Jones, r.Whj{ni D-
ere ruest. at a lottery party Riven by their Ms.and
hMte Captain and Mm. William Paraoiu el Colon Beach
TMt Twenty friend, showered" the guests with tickets, and
enjoyed the hospitality ef the Parsons. (______
Following the business meet-
I Mr. Martin Sawyer Invited the
, group to a showing of orchid
slides to be held at the Cristobal
Y. M. C. A.
Also present at the meeting
were: Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Croft,
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas fels. Vke
Dare. Mr. and Mrs. E. E. On;-,
Sergeant and Mrs. Allen Lloyd,
Mrs. P. A. Lawrance, Mrs.
Colonel and Mr. Fumpelly 1 ollowlng the Businessmeet- - 'R^ g^int".^ Mrs I
Sail for the States Ln!5SL TSSLffwS* orchid * Schuberg, Lieutenant and
Colonel and Mrs. James Pum- door prizes wUaeworchid M R H" B sergeant
pelly and family sailed Saturday E^J^^Sg^oi* a"d Mrs. D. O'Connor. Mr and
to the "Goethals" for Charles- Wor^Wbrook, Mrs. D. rycon- mg ^ ^^
toffk*. C.. from where theyjnor.and M""*^*- Small, Henry Lawrence,
will drive to their
at Norfolk. Va.
- '.37'Mfi RBwvr IP- L. Hooper, Henry Lawrance,
l?'T& wa l8a%Tcollection H^J. Small, tggm $.
Before the r departure Chris- the member .as we 11l as the me c be he,d
tint Pumpellv celebrated her hosts> ""f"0"L*50. den- at * Block House In CVatun
fourth birthday anniversary with studied by the group, a oem Tnursd February 7 at 7:00
a party at the Hotel Washington.: onstraUon J'rmr^'as p. m.
At this time she had the op- W given by Mr. Thomas Fels lnterested persons are cor-
ffiSJU ^ ^^^Sf^ST^ d.a.ly invited^ojoin the group.
HwSW" SJP^flHFaf*?1: r^S OunUe.te.B^e.o
guests were me guesis oi <>.>.. -...- --- ,.
Pumpelly for refreshments In the Sergeant >*>' J- Kelly
fountain room of the Hotel. and_Bryan McNamee._-----------i
All bridge entuslasts are cor-'
Twenty-six friends dined with
the Pumpellys at a dinner given
by Major and Mrs. Byron King
at their Fort Gullck residence,
Thursday evening. I
The visitors from the Pacific |
Side Included the Ambassador of;
Costa Rica to Panama and Mrs.
Alfonso Guzman, the Minister of I
Guatemala and Mrs. Oscar Be-
nltes Bone, the Charge d Af-
faires of Nicaragua. Mr. Jose,
Sandino, of Panama and Mr and
Mrs. Laurence Breece of Balboa.
Mrs. Solimn Complimented
With Shower
Mrs. Alpha Kenyon was
hostess for a shower given at her
Cristobal residence to honor Mrs.
Frank Kollman.
The gifts were presented on
a table centered with a plastic
tree trimmed with baby toys.
A color scheme of pink and
blue was carried out on the buf-
fet table. Pink carnations cir-
cled a large cake decorated in
the pastel colors and topped witn
a miniature cradle.
The guests were: Mrs. L. D.
Simons, mother of the honoree,
Mrs. Frank Truman. Mrs. H. C.
Shonebarger, Mrs. William Knox,
Mrs. 8am Roe. Mrs. David Haw-
thorne, Mrs. Harold Fernandez,
Charles Robinson. Mrs.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
WK.-t 100.000 Psopl. Mm*
Presents
Today. Monday, Jan. 21
P.M.
3:30Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Sho w
^anWhat's Your Favorite
. 4:00Happy the Humbug Cia.
Al farol S.A.
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Calling All Forces
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary.
8:15Halls of Ivy (VOAi
8:45Commentator's Digest

9:00The Man In Black
(BBC)
dlallv invited to Join the weekly
bridge games at the Margarita
Clubhouse: Duplicate bridge is
played on Monday evenings.
Winners of last week's games
i were: North and South: Mr. and
|Mrs. L. E. Cottrell. 2nd. Miss
I Jeanne Doble and Harry Fried-
;land: 3rd. Julius Loeb and W. E.;
:Gibson. ... ..
East and West: Mrs. Walter
Skeistaitis with Mrs. James Scar-
borough; 2nd. Mrs. Porter Me-
!han with Mrs. Sam Rowley: 3rd.
Mrs. J. A. Cunningham with
!Mrs .Harry Green.
ANOTHER FREEDOM TRAIN Czechoslovakian engineman
Yaroslav Konvalinka, who made international headline by piloting
a trainload of his countrymen through the "Iron Curtain" to free-
dom, is seen inspecting the cb of an electric locomotive In New
York. Explaining the controls is engineer Lewi I. Newman, left,
of Roselle, N. J. Konvalinka was brought to this country as an em-
ploye of a toy train company.
ir* HOLLYWOOD
By ERSKINE JOHNSON
Beverlv George Celebrates
Ninth Birthday
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis George,
of Gatun .gave a party at their
HOOLYWOOD, (NEA)On the truly loves people. There's none
Record: Groucho Marx, answer- of the fear and cringing away
ing the wlll-you-marry-again from people that Judy went
question: through at one time. When Judv
"I contemplate remaining in gives of herself, there's some of
'JLEEr.tetnrrittv the bachelor condition perman- her blood on the film."
residence ,m,.^at a;ur*y ently, but this Is subject to re- --------
afternoon for their daugnier. Be- visiDn 1 nave no romantlc In- Katy Jurado, the Mexican flre-
verly. to celebrate jr mrim, ffee ke ba 0D. the maIe sex:
birthday anniversary. Follow big K 8hearer." One mans een Ollywood een-
refreshments the children at-, -------- goU me on radJO Re My ,Katy
tended the matinee Pamn '. Patrice Wymore, on gossip vou like mans?' Theese ees beeg
The young nests were. amu- aboul a rirt wlth Erroi Fjynn: eenso|t to me. Anybody can look
na Anderson. Elizabetn Mearen. "I'm almost afraid to pick up on me and see I lore mans.
Helen Marie G>oi ge. Ana.a ^ee the papers It.s beta M 1(mg glnce should l0Te woman? What ees
people have said that we were thees?"
separated or on the verge of di- --------
vorce. I imagine it will start up' Marie Windsor, on the subject
again soon. This time, though, .of romance:
I'll know how to cope with it." i 'Right now I'm at liberty. I'm
----- not between pictures, but I'm be-
Robert Taylor, on Hie antl- tween heart Interests."
Nash, Pamela Therlot and Ma-
rilyn Defenbough.
Rebekah Lodge
Installation Tomorrow
iDDOi Cristobal Rebekah Lodge No.
9:30Symphony Hall (VOA> wm hoid an open installation of
10:00The World at Your Win- the 1952 officers tomorrow even-
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
Albert Ruoff. Mrs Rubent Rob- MidnightSign Off
ertson Mrs. I. M. Smith. Mrs.
Robert Berger, and Mrs. Leo
Goulet of Panama City.
Tomorrow, Tuesday. Jan. 22
A.M.
6:00Sign On Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Mornlnc Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Gtazxftuil'
8:43Hawaiian Harmonies
Mr. and Mrs. Corvel
Visiting In Diablo
Mr, andv.Mjtfi. Jontan, A i?or"
vel, formerWdenfrof New Cru-
tobal. haVfewurned to the Hth- .,^-^
mus fron seven months vaca- 9:00News'
tlon spent In Europe. They are. 9:1SSacred-Heart Program
en route to Lima, Peru, where 9:30As I See It
Mr Corvel will be stationed as 1 io:00News
Inspector for the Royal Nether-; 10:05Off the Record
land S. ."Oo.^They are theiuM-^News
houseguests of Mrs. Corvel's sis- n:05Off the Record
ter and brother-in-law. Mrs. and 11;30Meet the Band
Mrs. William L. Lewis, of Dia-
blo.
hH*
the 1952 officers tomorrow.even- HoUywood attitude of the British
in gat 8:00 p.m.. at the Cristo- preM. AIftn Nixon ulklnR of hls
bal Masonic Tempie. ..0ur actors donY Keep their movie career:
Mrs. Frank fstes is wie re- mouths snut xi you g0 abroad -Dis-assoctating myself from
tiring Noble Grand ndwtnm- w,th the baslc ,dea lhat you beinR Marle wHson's husband
stall Mrs Percy Lawrance 01 u- must not Xqq]/. down your noge at helped mv career more than any.
tun m this office. ,,,;other people or talk about their thing else. Not that I wanted
All friends of the .orant??"on,politics, food and studios, you 11 Marie to divorce me.
are cordially Invited to attend. |g a rlght .,But men marry w0men stars
"I go on the basis that I'm a and something goes wrong. You
guest in another country and,fall Into their shadow."
keep mv mouth shut. I'ye never Director Bud Boetticher. about
had any big trouble in Europe." Scott Brady: "Scott's going to
-------- be a great star. Aside from his
Marilyn Monroe, on cheese-; ability, there's something fey
cake photography: .about him. It's what Barrymore
sk me if It's distaste-1 had.
Fat*from It. Why, I. "We went to a sneak of our pic-
Mrs. O'Connor Visiting
Relatives
Mrs. Morgan P. O'Connor, the
former Miss Carlotta de Obaldia,
arrived by plane yesterday from
Washington, D. C. for a visit
with her f amily In Colon. She Is
the houseguest of her sister and
brother-in-law. Mr. and Mrs.
Luis Eduardo Castillo and will
also be visiting her other sister
and brother-in-law. Mr. and Mrs.
Agustn Cedeo.
Mr. Bigelow Return for Visit
Mr. Henry Bigelow, St.. who
Is well-known on the Atlantic
Side, arrived Saturday by plane
from his home In St. Petersburg, ,.-,*..... *~
Florida, for a visit with his son: 8:00NEWS (VOA) and
and daughter-in-law, Mr. and] Features
Mrs Henry Bigelow, Jr., of Coco 9:00Musical Americana
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
2:00A Call From Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Spirit of the Vikings
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Panamusioa Story Time
4:15Promenade Concert
4:30What's Your Favorite
-6:00Happy the HumbugCia
Alfaro. S.A.
8:15Evening Salon
7:00Rav's A Laugh (BBC)
7:30PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:45Jam Session

Japan's New Film
Termed Big Lift
To Industry There
TOKYO, Jan. foremost motion picture direc-
tor thinks the National Board
of Review award to "Rasho-
mon" as the best foreign film:
of 1951 may revolutionize Jap-1
anese movie making.
Akira Kurosama. 41. who di-
rected the picture, said he hoped
the current showing of "Raaho-
mon" at Wew York's Little Car-
negie Theater would start a
"dollar making'' trend that
would raise the quality of Jap-
anese films.
"Rasho-moo" is the first Jap-
anese movie to be shown in a
New York theatre in 15 years.!
It won the grand prix at the
1951 international film festival!
in Venice.
"Japanese producers have the
same problems as American pro-,
ducers." Kurosama said, it's'
a constant battle between try-1
ing to make artistically good
movies and making money.
Japanese studios need dollars
for new equipment. The Japan-
ese government needs dollars.
"II a Japanese production is
good enough by western stand-'
ards to earn dollars well, we'
will trv to make more movies
like it."
Kurosawa, who was singled
out by the National Review-
Board as the year's best foreign
director, admitted "Rasho-mon"
was no box office smash until
it won the Venice award. Then
it was re-issued.
Daiei Studios, which produced
it. is an offshoot of the defunct
Hikuatsu Studios, which used to
specialize in old-style blood and
thunder Samurai movies, the
equivalent of American west-
erns.
"Rasno-mon's" claim to dis-
tinction comes from its original
treatment of a murder and ra-
vishment as told by four peo-
ple the murdered man. his
wife, the murderer and a wit-
ness.
Kurosawa, who speaks no
English, attends all the foreign
movies he can get to see but for
for enjoyment, he said, not in-
struction,
"American movies are far a-
head of Japanese movies when
it comes to technique." he said.
"If we tried to copy your tech-
nique we could only turn out
pale copies of American movies.
In fact, that is what many Jap-
anese movies are. If we intend
to be first rate we must develop
a 'school' of our own."
r.FF I'M FREE"-HldinK a ^-string costume'in one hand,
I mil CSV blonde Hollywood strip artist, hugs her attorney. Jerry
Gcsfer a Her her acquittal on charges of 'decent exposure A
hS of 0 women and two men took only 78 mnute. to deride Ulls
bubble bath, performed in a Hollywood night club, was not too
naughty A few hours later she was hack in Ciro's doing her d.nce.
with her act held over for another week.
IT'S MOV1CT1ME...
Panama L,anal (^/ubnouses
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
*ir-rniHlonm
< 15 :5
Fred MacMURRAV Dorolhy McGUIRE
"Collaway Went Tharaway"
_________(Tund)) "U HOCKS"
DIABLO HTS.
:IS A :1S
1
Mel FERRER MIROSLAVA
"BRAVE BULLS"
(Tuesday) "THf. TOUGHER THEY COME"
f O r f\ I I Richard DENNING LtM FERRADAY
C Fh ? "FLAME OF STAMBOUL"
g (Tuesday) FRANCIS GOES TO THE SACES"
GA TUN
tm
Dennis MOI*':AN Pntrlcla NFAL
"RATON PASS"
______________Tuesday >______________
MARGARITA
lili a 7:SS
*
Michael REDGRAVF Jean KENT
"THE BROWNING VERSION'
_________(Tuesday) "OPERATION X"______
II
CRISTOBAL
Atr-Condltloned
: S:S
Mltzl GAYNOR o Dale ROBERTSON
"GOLDEN GIRL"
(Tuesday) "THUNDER ON THE HIU."
. JAcoparow tMem^.^^.".yJ>wayT
By OSWALD JACOB?
Written for NEA Service
Slito.
(VOA)
9:30Pride and Prejudice
(BBC)
NOKTH 4 4>42 AQ7 ? 10 5 3 2 ? Q743
WIST EAST.
AAQ8S K10SS3
K63 J842
? 874 IN
d>10S *s SOUTH (D) 4>J' Ml AKQ 4>AKJ9S3 North-South vul.
South West North East
1* Pass 2 Pass
3* Piss 3 V Pa
5* Pan Pas* Pass Opening lead* 0
\Besl cSellen

JOIN THE MARCH OF DIMES
iget' wonderful letters from the ture, 'Bronco Buster.' Two little
Iboys in Korea. They're so ap- girls rushed up and said. 'Will
preclatlve. One of them Just vou lve us your autograph. Mr.
wrote me, 'Don't bother with Brady?'
bathing suits and shorts. Just sit "Scott said. 'I'll give you more
down wearing a sweater and a than that. I'll give you the shirt
skirt. But lift the skirt a little.'" off my back.' He took off his
Robert Mitchum, about his.shirt, ripped it into two pieces,
favorite co-star. Jane Russell::autographed each part and gave
!"We want to keep working to- half the shirt to each girl,
gether, but we don't see whyi "I was embarrassed as heck,
they can't give us something to but I have a great respect for
,say. Something important. an actor who has this wonderful
"Jane's an American lnstitu- quality."
ticm, 8he has a great deal more i --------
to offer than has been used by Marilyn Bufferd. former Miss
Hollywood. And she's so much' America, on becoming a star in
wiser than her critics, believe Italy:
me." "I'm a star, but the Italian
Dubllc has never heard my voice.
how its always dubbed in later by
and an Italian actress. Very few
Enelish stars speak their own
Orchid Society Meeting
The Gold Coast Orchid Society 10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
held its bi-monthly meeting 10:15Musical Interlude
Thursday evening at the home 10:30Variety Bandbox (BBC
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lutroj 11:00The Owl's Nest
ofOatun. l12:00-SlgnOff
Lili Palmer, revealing
she memorizes lines for V
movies:
"I learn my script while I'm dialogue in Italian movies. Mag-
,under the dryer in the beauty nani and Ingrld Bergman are ex-
parlor. I think the heat bakes ceptions."
_____ Ethel Waters, on her zooming
Director Chuck Walters, on career:
m,<^a___.a .v j. uia Judv Garland's hit at the Pa- "I left Hollywood In 1948 like
The hand shown today was bid >* r w o ^ ^^ ^ -^ ^ me |f was
and payed by two Canadian ex-i'a^-jj people love starvation. Now I'm coming in
pern in our 1949 national cham- j ve ,:. ,1. ,;, .!. ShP like a. Han *
pionship, and it has stayed in my; J"dy nQ for the first time she like a lion.
Today is WflJES
I'M FULL OF ENERGY
ALL CAV BECAUSE
I EAT A
&ALAWCED,n
BREAKFAST//2
I RECOMMEND fT ID MV
(CUSTOMERS-FRUIT.POSTS T0A5TIES
CORN FLAKED
BUTTERED
TOAST
)
AMD
. MILK.'e
PROVIDES FR04A 4. TOVi OF Afc/fcRA&E ONLY FOOD MEEDS
TENS! Your wholo family will
onjoy these ingle-aarving
package* at Very braakfastl
fast's Tovatlos Cora lakos is
only on* of the 7 varieties of
delicious cersals in POST-
7 verieliet-
10 poekag"!
Post-TFNS
'Post-TENS

mind because of the very neat
bidding point involved.
At most tables South decided
to risk a contract of three no-,
trump. North usually raised
clubs, and South then took the
plunge in the hope that the op-
ponents would open the wrong
suit or that even their opening
" [lead would not give them more'
I i Whenever three no-trump was
tried, it went down. A spade
opening was pretty automatic
tioni euner side of the table, i
and It always provided five im-
mediate tricks to set the three
no-trump contract.
At one table. Miami Roncarelll,
of Montreal, held the South hand
and decided to try for game by,
making the invitational bid of
three clubs. John Wiser, also of.
! Montreal, responded with three
hearts to show the location of
his side strength.
. This was a highly informative '
bid not only for what it said '
but also for what it failed to say.
Wiser promised heart strength
with his bid. but he also denied
spade strength. If he had held .
strength in two suits, he would
have gone to three no-trump in-
stead of three hearts.
Miss Roncarelll saw the hand-
writing on the wall. Her partner
said he had no spade strength;
uid she had none in her own
hand. A no-trump contract was
;learly a bad gamble. Hence she
bid the game In clubs instead.
The defenders might have tak-
en two spade tricks, but West
made the somewhat understand-
able opening of a trump. Now
declarer could draw trumps, cash
the top damonds and enter dum-
my with a trump to discard a
jade on the established ten of
;iamonds. Later on, the Miceess
of the heart finesse gve de-
clarer twelve tricks for a well-
Jearned top '
CENTRAL
TODAY
SKY SHATTERING STORY
NE AIR EVILS!
THURSDAY
WEEK END RELEASE!
SCOURGE
OF THE
SEVEN
"WS? MIICHIS
JOHN WAYNE \
ROBERT RYAN J
LEATHERNECKS
TfHWCOU>t<.
"f
M
DON TAYIO
JANII CAMH
MY C. HIPS
WILLIAM HAMiGAN
paja---------
ts^^
m

**,*** *
+ +***
(Compiled bv Publishers
Weekly)
Fiction
THE CAINE MUTTNY
Herman Wouk.
MELVILLE GOODWIN. USA
John P. Marquand.
THE CRUEL SEA
Nicholas Monsarrat
MOSES
Sholem Asch.
THE WANDERER
Mika Walter!.
THE PRESIDENT'S LADY
Irving Stone.
Non-Fiction
THE NEW YORKER TWEN-
TY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY
ALBUM
THE SEA AROUND US
Rachel L. Carson.
CLOSING THE RING
Winston S. Churchill
THE FORRE8TAL DIARIES
Ed. by Water Millis and E.
S. Duffield.
A MAN CALLED PETER
Catherine Marshall .
FREE START
In the 1860's. wastage from
wells and leakage from tanks and
barges covered Oil Creek, in
Pennsylvania, with floating oil.
People stood along the banks
with buckets, skimmed the oil off
the top of the water, poured it
Into barrels and sold it. thus get-
ting a start in the oil business.
QdL^jJM
STARTING
THURSDAY
GOLD SMUGGLER and
[AOVENTURI
. 111 the *
Cl
Smugglers
ISLAND
JEFF EVELYN
CHANDLER KEYES^
PHILIP FRIEND %



'*'



-
rAcr six
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILX NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, JANUARY M,
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru PA. Classifieds!

Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
L*W1 StatVlC
.lOKKIMIIV
roan* a imo
?-oI
SALON UK Bfcll KZA
4a im Watt IHfc atr-o
AMERICANO
4jsn; i iausei*
FOR SALE
Household
rtUlH A .4JU.IUN
teat Mmm
lllfc PANAMA
Urn. -i'-' '" Ml
a IS. ITS Central
AMER1UAN
r.iua
.
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
Wl IUY WI MLL Wl IARTIR
Th HX is open ot lost I !
HX mons Household Exchonge . .
... servic to you in finding
furniture to suit your needs mite
y.ur cketbMk.
For yeors we n4V seen ,he need
of one centralized exchange dealing
in fine reconditioned furniture.
TocUy.. we offer the best available
rugs, choirs, tobies, etc.
which we hove expertly and skillfully
renewed m our own workshop.
If you hove used furniture
you want to sell
Cdll us for on appraisal.
If you ore looking for
that extra chiir or table or
outf.ttmg o complete house or
beach cottage come to
the HX Houieh.U ExCh.Rje)
41 Automibile Row Tel. J-491I
wi uy wi sm w?..!A"ta
FCR SALE:Hond mode salid cy-
press desk, designed for stamp
collector. With swivel chair, $50
00. Phone Bolbo 3763._________
FOR SALE:Various items, house-
hold furniture. Mariano Aroseme-
na St. No. 29, apartment 13
Panamo. _____
FOR SALE
Automobile
Same* 'ersonnei ano
CMttor jovamwm fcmpiov
* l N A N C I
/out oec oor ttvuugr
GOVIIlNMfNT IMPlOYIS r-INANCI
CO
-Oft Voftrt lesto*.
Servinv Sewemmtrm Employ and
Servir, JriOnn W "ht CnO' OO*
io. .4 tmOtt. rVitf 3Ui finonc.no,
you insurance automatically ediusted
'o U S coveroo*-
ARRANQIMINTS CAN BE MAOI
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOIILE
DEALfR
FOR SALE;For best offer by Jan-
uary 23. Frazer 1947, 4 door se-
dan, not junk. New tires and ra-
dio. Make your own pr.ee A1 ,0-
oc, 15th ond Melendei. Con.
FOR SALE- 1948 Buick Sedanette OPPORTUNITY: Wonderful
MISCELLANEOUS
0. ,.u have tkmmm* MlM>
writ AitiinUti mmtmm
.. zoii >, c. i.
FOR SALE
Miscellunieonf
FOR SALE:-"Formal!' A" tractor
almost new. Poid -$1,985, selling
dt $1,000. Telephone Curundu
6227.
RESORTS
W.tfU.1 Oceomida conaoes.
Clara Bob 435 Balboa.
Ponomo J.I877. Cristobol 4
1679
Foster's cottoges leaaeMsli furnish-
ed, one, two or three) bedrooms,
liners, gas ref rigerotors, gas
ranges, dishes and kitchen war.
Holt a mil beyond Santa Clara
privet road'to boch. For in-
formation visit or phon Dogmar
Tivoli Avnu No. 6, 2-0170
Ponomo.
:C3 SALE:9 eu./ft.
frigerator, 2? cycle.
25 cycle. 1938 P .
blinds. Tel. 2-1921.
B. Cocoli.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
Coldspot re- Williomt Sorwu Clara Boh Cottoges.
":ctric fon I Two bedroom Frlgldorr, Rock-
. 2 wooden | go '"* T * M0SO--
"O"" 548- GromllerV Sonto Clora boorh-
eottagn CWcrrk tc cones, got
stove nlrot raSaa. Phon 6
441 or 4->67
'?'->-.,---------
WANTED
Miscellaneonp
in perfect condition. Easy tinoncing
Call Panama 3-2513.
FOR SALT-1930 Chevrolet Sdon
New point job, good condition
ReoMJnoble price. 800-C Tavernillo
Tel. 2-2585, Balboa.
LESSONS
Leorn Fox-Trot, Waltz, Jitterbug.
Rumba, Somba, Tango, Mombo
Guaracho, Tamborito. !l a I b o a
YMCA. Hornett Dunn
1700
M2 high lot panoramic view. Price
$1.50 per M*. payment facilities
Los Cumbrs. Real Estate Canter
Tel. 3-451?. Panama.
FOR RNTOr lease: Finco Browns-
ville, twenty minutes from Frry
Coll from 3 to 5.
FOR RENT:Completely famished 2
bedroom house, for 3 months be
ginning February 1st. Price $150.-
00. No. 15, 48 Street.
Our vaudeville Industry was
born In Boston. Mass., when B.
F. Keith opened his "Oaelty Mu-
seum" in a vacant storeroom in
1883.
WANTED TO RENT:Unfurnished
Cholet by American couple long
residents of Panama. One
child
California's Cold Wave
Moves Across Midwest
Telephone Ponomo 2-3072 nights O
and Sunday or Balboa 6327, week-, NEW yORK- Jan 21 (UP)I The temperature plunged to
days. _______________| Rain and snow chased by a 23 below zero at Bismarck, N.D.,
bitter cold wave moved east a-
crosi the nation Sunday in the
wake of devastating West Coast
WANTED:Passenger flying to cool
Costa Rica $30. round trip; or
Mexico, $140, round trip, on.
LACSA. PAA affiliate. Coll Pan-: Storm.s.
' ama Dispatch Service. Tel. 2-1 **'
1655. opposite Ancon bus-stop.
rain hit San Francisco
land northern California. Gala
winds and snow lashed the bat-
tered Sierras and other Inland
mountains.
Tt Sun Valley, Ida., a hand-
picked party o veteran skiers
tolled up Mt Baldy in a snow-
storm to search for two men
believed buried under a snow-
slide.
Ski Instructor Victor Ootts-
ohalk, who had been with the
missing men, was pulled out of
the mass of snow but died
shortly afterward.
FOR
' House
+*<
.*
FOR RENT
Anftrtmrnt*)
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished oport-
merits. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobol. telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT: Very nic furnished
apartment, 2 bedrooms, living
dininflroom. gorag for 4 months
$175T00 par month. Cook maid
included. Coll 3*3543. from 1 tc
3.
-wMMtKUAL b
PROFESSIONAL
We have everytliins
to t>eeo voar Lawn
ind Harden beaotrfui
Jnrine the dry season
WANTED:2 or 3 bdroom chalet
er Apt. unfurnished. Pref. Bella
Vista or vicinity. Responsible fa-
mily. Tel. 3-2212.______________
WANTED TO BUY:S^ond hand
Air Extractor 35", n perfect con-
'dition. Cosmtr!a Imperial 27-A
Central Ave.
Wonted Position
' European, University graduate, ac-
cepts ony position, except wet-
nur:e. Ponami, Box 1327.
Hpln WnntPfi Into Canada.
neip vvunicu __ But lts frlnge brought raln
WANTED:Good cook for couple j to Northeastern states and light
Mu;t sleep In. Good solory. Apply snow to the Great Lakes re-
F-pnamo Metals and Salvage Co 81. -
6th St. Parque Lefevre. Behind the storm, B^fBrt-.
r__:------:--------------------------Imoving cold wave Invaded the!
WANTED:Good cook. Must wash, n0rthern plains and was ex
20 below at Fargo, N. D., and
21 below at Bemldjl, Minn. It
was three below at Mason City,
la., and Chicago had a low of
'21 above.
CalUbrnians, mean while,
cleaned up the debris and mud
left by the series of storms
that claimed at teast 15 Uves
and caused uncounted millions
of dollars In property damage.
But Southern California farm-
ers rejoiced at the prospect of
bumper crops as ft result of the
heavy rainfall.
Water experts said the bene-
fits from the rains may far
outweigh the damage. Drought-
FOR RENT: Beoutiful fumlshd
opartmant with Frlgldaie,- all
screened, for couple or 2 bache-
lors. Via Espaa last house be-
for Juan Franco. No children.
FOR RENT
Rooma
ROOMS AVAILABU Li.kt. Ml
eBtkery rerravarM ana* well far-
rtlMd. Bstes roma!, lache-
rora Mr hie.rr at TV
rkM Chsb f.ci., D
Nek,
U. S. forecasters said the P"**3J^IS?lrL222**2*
1 stocked with abundant snow
for the spring runoff.
The storms also provided an
under-fire test for Civil Defense
organizations that plunged into
relief work at some points. .
Officials praised Civil Defen.
I volunteers in the Elan Fernando
clothes, clean for
to Call '"C" No.
jo"
" COt,9re";leorCgTaSt 8nd ^^ "* tor^'^to X^^fSod
tor pools to
evacuations.
Le^al Notice
This New Amazing
C| /I United States District Court For Th
o:,r h Mixture Lomes District of The caNi zM
, From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
Compounded tram rare Conodiar
Pine Balsam. Menthol. Glycerin. Irish
Moss ond othei splendicl ingredients
Buckley's Conodlol Mixture Is differ-
ent mor effective taster In
act en Get o bottle todav toke
e reaspoontul. let it He on voui tongue
rnomnt then swallow slowlv
fee its oowertui effective ectior
spreoa through throov heaa r> 0
bronchiot tubes Couqhinj, posrr
ceases foi right away It start* tc
loosen uo hick choking ohlegrr one
opan up clogged bronchial tubes
Now vou'll know whv ovei 30 mil-
libn bnttles M Bucl'v's hov ber
solr in cold, wintry Canada.
Your own druggist has this ro'
Cennrli- discovery.
TBr:
Balboo DivMdn
MATTER OF THE ESTATE
IN
or
Eitwird Mi.-h.cl Fo!y
DrcMflod
No tOJS. Prob!
NOTICE OF TIMF SKT F'K PROVING
WILL AND HEARING APPLICATION
ion LETTERS
NOTICE I- hti'liy flvam that a potl-
ln for lltr probato af tne will ot
EUword Michael Folry, dacoand: and
for the htenance of lettori of admi-
n>tratlon with the will annexed to tho
Public Administrator of lha Canal Zone
wat filed in this Court on January
C 1(5!. and that February 7,' 1*52.
at o'ek-ck a. mt. in the Courtroom
of this Court at 'Ancoa. Canal Zdno.
MJ ba(n set for tho hoarine of aid
peti'ion, when and where any person
interested may eppear and contoat tha
same, and show cause. If any. why aald
ild not be fronted.
Ancon. Canal Zone, this
IS;:.
C. T. McCORMICK, Jr.
i- --. of Court
petition
Dated
January
sh.
*.
SEAL)
Sr Lola
lie .jly
C. Harrison
Clerk of Court
Sub. Moon To Dim
Twice During 1952
WASHINGTON, D C. Jan. 21-
l"our eclipses will be visible
somewhere on earth In the year
1952, two of the sun and two of
the. moon.
Only one. a partial, blackout of
the moon on the nlrht of Feb.
10-11, will be eenerallv seen In
the continental United States the
National Geographic Society
says.
Another, a solar eclipse on Aug.
30, will barelv grase Florida's
southern tip.. Its extreme north-
ern 'edge of visibility will give
dark-glassed onlookers In Key
West a momentary view of a
"dented" sun. as the moon just
touches Its edge m passing.
Along a curving track In South
America, from Una, Peru, to the
Urugvav coast, the sun will be
gink d out briefly on that day.
cert for a blazing annulus or
ring.
Hlehllght of the year for the
world's astronomers will be a
total eclipse of the sun on Feb.
25, visible along a 9.000-mile an
across Africa and Asia.
Khartoum m the Anglo-Bgypt-
lan Sudan, near the mldnolnt
of the path of totality, will be
site of separate
Tht grim work of clearing
the wreckage and moving Into
slit-covered homes was aided
by clear skies in Southern Cali-
fornia.
No series consequences were
reported from the freah ram
and snow in Northern Califor-
nia.
LATIN AMERICA
BREATHED EaASIER
(Continued from Page THREE)
ference toward economic prob-
lems in Latin America since the
last war. should permit an en-
tire nation to be brought to thel.the site of senarate eclipse
brink of ruin like this. Can we studies soonsored bv the National
nexer expect true understanding Geogrsphlc Soclety.-the U. S
and real helo?"
And the title of an editorial on
the subject In a leading Chilean
newspaper summed up the at-
titude of many- a Latin Americ3n
with these words: "Who says dol-
lar diplomacy is dead?"
COMING SOON
!
h
MIEYKOLET
1952


SMOOT b PAREDES
PANAMA
SMOOT b HUNMCUTT
COLON
Navy and Air Force.
The partial ecllDse of the
moon Feb.. 10-11 will be visible
o-enerally In Asia, the western In-
dian Ocean, Europe. Africa, the
Arctic reelpns, across the At-
lantic to North and South Amer-
ica. It will not be seen in the
extreme western and northwest-
ernparts of the united 8tates.
i On Aug. 5. the earth's shadow
{Will again cover part of the
rroon. Out of slsrht In the United
States, this eclipse will sweep
from the western Pacific across
Australia and southern Asia,
eastern Europe and Africa to the
eastern half of South America.
Bethel Mission
ins Annual
Gospel Services
Beginning todav the Bethel
Mission Cbrrch wi,l start its an- ,
nual gospel services.
These services will be held at|
three different locations. The:
first series, which begins today!
and end on Friday, will be held
as Parque Lefevre, No. 40 Fifth
and First 8ts.
The second series will be held
In Red Tank; from to 8 and the
third and last will begin on Feb.
11 at the Paraso Gymnasium.
Bach night there will be one
service of choruses and goaOel
songs, the reading of the Bible
and a *osnel message from dif-
ferent elders.
Begi
fftOlf
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheat oar*"W'
insecnciaes
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
79 Central Ave. Tel. 3-1149
LUX
ENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
TeL 3-niS
#22 E. 29th St
US Tax Bureau Cleanup Plai
Spends Weekend Under Fire
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hate, f Panama
Selling: Coca Cola and
Central Theatre.
Wants to buy: Brewery and
National Distiller.
Tel. 3-4719 1-1060
MODERN FURNITURE
cus rt>M UILI
Slipcover Reupholsterj
ran ova show-eoomi
i g. a la (Maa TJ < AasaaaoWla SVa-1
at tallaawll rVfcaa, os DaM.arj
Tas. *- M aUSV. to : ..
FISHERMEN !
According to the latest re-
porta fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. B sure to ,CATCH THE
BIG ONES With FIRESTONE
lurea and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
at #99 National Avenue
(Automobile Row)
Telephones: 2-0393 3-4584
Bargain For Sale:
PREFABRICATED
ALUMINUM HOUSE
Living Dining room, three
Bedrooms. Kitchen and Bath.
rear Closets.
PRICE: $3,950.
AOENClAS LUMINA. S.A.
Tel. 3-1933
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21 (UP)
Rep. Carl T. Curta iR. Neb.)
urged Congress yesterday to di-
vorce the Internal Revenue Bu-
reau from the treasury depart-
ment and make It an Independ-
ent agency which would be "free
from the political bosses."
Simultaneously, Rep. Kenneth
B. Keating (R.. N. T.) challeng-
ed Attorney General i. Howard
McOrath to Insure a proposed
Congressional Investigation of
the Justice Department by giv-
ing the plan his support.
Keating told McGrath In a
telegram he feels the attorney
general should "welcome" a
chance to have a "fair and
thorough airing of the many
charges levelled at you and your
associates." He assured McGrath
that any such Inquiry would be
conducted fairly.
Curtis, a member of the House
tax scandal investigating sub-
commltte, said he will Introduce
a bill today to make the Internal
Aevenue Bureau an Independent
agency. He said the tax collet-
lng system "needs major surgery,
not an aspirin."
He said President Truman's
reorganization piap which now is
pending before Congress falls
short because it would not wipe
out "political favoritism, impro-
prieties, laxness or corruption."
"So long as the Internal re-
venue Is a part of the Treasury
Department." he said, "the final
decisions and tax collecting
policies will be made In a polit-
ical atmosphere."
He said his plan would protect
the buerau against boaslsm "re-
gardless of party."
Mr. Truman's proposal would
replace the present 64 tax col-
lectors with up to 25 regional
collectors, all under Civil Service.
Only the Internal Revenue
Commissioner would be appoint-
ed by the chief executive.
Curtis said his bill will call
for a three-man Internal Re-
venue Commission with each
member serving nine years and
receiving $25,000 a year, the same
as associate justices of the Su-
preme Court. He aald the long
terms would leave them free of
political control.
The commissioners would be
named by the President but
could not be removed by him. the
Congressman said. Tne com-
missioners would appoint the
chief counsel of the Internal
Revenue Commission and ap-
pointment now In the hands of
the Secretary of the' Treasury.
McOrath has been picked by
President Truman to head the
government's own cleanup cam-
paign a move loudly criticized
by Republicans who had been
blasting airar at the Justice De-
partment's role In the tax scan-
dals Investigation.
The Republicans contend that
no "self Investigation" by an ex-
ecutive department can restore
public confidence In the govern-
ment.
The appointment prompted
Keating, a member of the House
judiciary committee, to renew
his fiRh't for appointment of a
special seven-member subcom-
mittee to Investigate all aspects
of the Justice Department's
operations.
He has been assured that the
committee will consider the pro-
posal next Tuesday.
Girl Scouts WHI
Celebrate Joint
Anniversaries Soon
LUXURY AND BEAUTY are combined in the 1952 Buick
Special four-door sedan to make It the acknowledged style
leader In the low-priced class. New for 1952 are the sweep-
spear and rocker panel moldings, a redesigned front end In
the distinctive Buick styling and rear fender ornaments that
enhance the beauty of the long, flowing fenders. High
lustre stainless steel wheel covers lend a distinguishing ef-
fect to the overall appearance of the Special. It is mount-
ed on a 121 Vs Inch wheelbaae and is powered with Buick's
famed F-263 engine which develops 128 horsepower with
Dynaflow. The Special for 1952 also boasts new and bigger
front wheel brakes for greater safety. The new Bulcks are
due on the Isthmus next month.
THE FIRST PURCHASE made by the Panama Canal In the
Colon Free Zone shows Carlos Taft, a Laboratorios Pfizer
warehouseman, (right) delivering two cartons of Terromycln
to an employe of Gorgas Hospital. Panama Customs In-
spector Garcia (center) supervises the delivery of the duty
free merchandise.
__
CRACIE TO WED Oracle
Fields, famed British music hall
star well known to millions of
Americans, announced she will
marry Romanian architect Abra-
ham Boris Altorevich on the Isle
of Ctprl late in January. The
54-year-old comedienne is the
widow of the late Monty Banks,
movie director.
Plans for celebrating the 40th
Anniversary of the Girl Scouts
of the USA and the 28th An-
niversary of the Girl Scouts of
Scouting on the Isthmus will be
discussed at the Annual Meet-
ing of the Girl Scout Council on
Wednesday at the NCO Club. Co-
'rozal. Also planned will be made
!at this time for the entertaining
of the retiring President of the
Girl Scouts of the USA who will
stop here on Feb. 22 and 23 on
her way through the Canal on a
World Crulee.
Mrs. Paul R. Lucaa, Vice
i President protem of the Girl
Scout Council and chairman of
the Council Meeting committee,
announced the agenda for the
annual meting this morning.
Members will register at 9:00
and look over displays of troop
projects made during 1951.
t Presiding at the meeting which
will follow will be Mrs. 8tanley
Hamilton, will present the new
constitution and bl-laws for the
approval of the group. The
Camp Report will be made by
Mrs. M. D. Monagan of Curun-
du; The Troop Organization Re-
port will be made by Mrs. R-
Ruper of Gamboa; Mrs. F. K.
Newcomer of Balboa will read
the International Friendship Re-
port. The International Girl
Scout Report and the Program
Report will be presented by Mrs.
John Dovel of New Cristobal. In
the absence of Chairmen. Miss
Mary L. Patton. Executive Di-
rector, will report on Training,
Publicity and the Staff and Of-
fice Committees.
Miss Gladys Gormen, traveling
trainer in Latin America for the
World Association of Girl Guides
and Girl Scouts, will speak on
Scouting In Latin America.
Lunch will be served abou
twelve o'clock.
At the afternoon session the
Council will elect new officers
and Board Members for 1952.
The leafy wastes of many veg-
etables can be converted Into
high quality feed for farm anl-
mals by a drying process.
Alb rook Chaplains
Announce Cultural
Attractions Series
The Chaplain's Division at
Headquarters Caribbean Air
Command, Albrook Air Force
Base, announces a series of cul-
tural attractions which will take
place during the next few months
at the Albrook base chapel.
Known a sthe "Chaplain's Cul-
tural Series," the program are
designed to stimulate Interest In
fine arts among the personnel
of Albrook.
First in the series which will,
take place at the base chapel
next Sunday, at 5 p.m. Is an or- {
gan concert of sacred and secu-
lar music by Opl. Tommy John-
son, chapel organist. Johnson's
repetoire will include lighter
compositions of Johan Sebastian
Bach, familiar compositions of
the Romantic School and a group
of compositions of Marcel Dupre
and Charles-Marie Wldor, con-
temporary French organists.
In addition to the organ con-
cert. Chaplain Verne H. Warner,
Albrook base chaplain, has an-
nounced a tentative schedule
aaaassaasi
Dan's Dilemma !
Dan's pockets bad no silver
lining.
For some money he was pininrl
Then a P. A Want Ad hi
sigbted.
Got a Job .now he's delighted!
alumnae Chorus, under the di-
rection of Miss Emily Butcher,
on Feb. 24 and a violin concert
by Lt. Russell D. Archibald on
which" will" Include the La Boca March 30.
Breed of Dog
D
HORIZONTAL
1,0 Depicted dog,
the West
Highland
13 Pauses
14 Interstices
15 Shade tree
18 Palatable
1 Type of boat
19 Neaps (ab.)
to Relieves
Jl Station (ab.)
22 Symbol for
selenium
23 East Indias
(ab.)
24 Roman god of 28 Killer whale
underworld 31 Public
3 Doctrines
4 Size of shot
3 Essential being
Bugle call
7Iroquolan
Indian
8 Brilliant
color
9 Universal
language
10 Alimenta
11 Oriental '
12 Keep
17 Rough lava
25 Nested boxes
20 Haiti
27 Chickens
Answer to Previous Puzzle
aiiLJiMMi-: is>iLiiairi =*
Ch;.Mt>..HGl tSWlrltsJUM
JWWsilII:s!U'BHM. Ul-J'-J
i^i:.-..i.'-',sssi-'it;r-r>i-:i
LdlgUI < SBSSSMaaaaai,: _\ss, |
f-JIIUI;.! ffluHL=.Fd
isJ|
i si ;;'_'ir ; ic: r-3'.i
/-JKkiawioii-iwLi '.'iiT.;
l laalaJ::1 ':lr-JMiiaU1-i'2:
27 Antler
29 Symbol for
niton
30 Sea eagle
31 Blood money
32 North Carolina!
33 Mince
34 Membranous
pouch
34 Laughter
sound
37 Part o "be"
39 Limb
41 Stage parts
46 Chemical
sufflx
47 Follower
autopian
49 Metal
50 Colonize*
52 Rectify
54Expungem
55 Minute skin
openings
VEBTICAL
1 Song birds
2 '
document
S3 Two-wheled
carriage
35 This------
breed
originated In
Scotland
38 Repairs
40 Diminutive of
Margaret
41 Vex (coll.)
42 German rivet
43 Not as much
44 Babylonian
deity
45 Blow, with
open hind
48 Roman road
51 One key only
(ab.)
81 Volume



y...

MONDAY, JANVART 1, 1862
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT PAIL NEWSPAPER
M<
Top US Golf Pros Arrive Tonight; DeVicenzo Here
Harbert. Heafner, White
Snead. Others^ Due At 9
Slammin' Sammy (Chesterfield) Snead, Chick
Harbert, Buck White and Clayton Heafner-four
well known names in the world of golf-will arrive
tonight at Tocumen airport at 9 p.m.
The topfltaht profesilcmalB wUl appearances the tayout will be
MmpUeVW Panama Op ready by fta* ^ sHr, wUi
1 ** *SU* nud. t5J5
White,
Star In Motorbike Races

Yankees, Bluebirds At Colon
Today; League Race Tied Up
;olI tournament starting Thurs
,y at the Panam Oolf Club,
_.id are arriving on Pan Amer-
ican Airways Flight 335 irom Ml-
I ami, Fla. They will be accompa-
nied by Jimmy Vincent, well-
I known former local golf pro, who
has been appointed Honorary i
Tournament Chairman. Also
I slated to arrive at the ame- time,
I is another U. S. proHarry j
I Greenwald from the Shore Acres
Golf and Country Club Just out-
side of Chicago. Oreenwald v
Md Wednesday, and will parti-
cipate In the Golf Clinic Wed-
nesday afternoon at 4:J0. me
Gelf Clinic is a standard fea-
ture of Stateside tournaments.
Chick Harbert will be the Mas- :
ter of Ceremonies and coir
fans are urged to be on hand
to watch the pre* display their
bar of tricks. , ..
Tickets for the raffle of the
Pontiac automobile are on sale
PANAMA PBO LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost'Pet.
Bombers........IS 8 .619
Yankees........13 .8
Bluebirds....... S U .421
Brownies....... 8 15 .348
TODAY'S GAME
College Hoop Results
(Saturday Night)
St. John's (BkB.) 54, St. Francis
(Bkn) 88
Fordham 74, Army 78
High Point 66, Western Car. 85
Forman 78, The Citadel 58
Wofford 77, Erskine 58
Randolph-'Macon 66, Catholic U.
85
Coln Stadium (4 p.m.)Blue- st BonavenUre 17, Cincinnati 58 Lynchbur 80, Gallaudet 64
George Stewart
Loses His All
In Dorm Fire
CSC MEN'S DORM RAZED
BY FIRE
jirds (Stem
SEWS tsaeseaem
brin'the"dass"y Fled~when the at the Panama_Oolf Club^atjme
swinging starts Thursday.
Henry Russell, amateur cham- the
plon of Florida, will also.be a-
board tonight's plane. They will
stay at El Panama.
Roberto De Vicenzo arrived
Sunday night from Argentina,
and Ral Possethe first arrival
-reached the Isthmus Saturday
night. It was also learned today
!that Pablo Molina, another Latin
pro who has competed in past
opens, ft tjgBfr gaS: iearthc Clubhouse.
5,
I 3-8) vs. Yankees CorneU g>, rrineecton 51
Holy Cress 78, Tufts 47
Villanova 86, No. Car. State 71
Lawrence Teeh 73, St. Joseph's
| (Pha.) 87
s today wUl send{j SfS&SStli 5
turn
rica no 3-2).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Balboa StadiumBrewnies
lumbers 3.
;he tournament expenses Get
vour ticket early, because If your Marion Fricano to the mound at NiMar, 77, John Carroll 68
number should play before tne,the Coion stadium against the w A yi,.^ 37, Waynesburg 57
raffle date, you receive a batch Bluebirds' Cookie Stempel as c _,*. A st, Lawrence 33
of lottery tickets gratis. they try to regain the Panama N h CmroHna 7, Temple 85
Immediately following Wed-
nesday's Clinic there will be a
free cocktail party in the Club-
house.
Tickets for any of the tourna-
nent dates or the Clinic are on
I ment.
and Greenwald
to
Pro League lead all alone. i'"salle 95, Mohkmberg~77
A Yankee triumph will place ^\X" JefPson 2, Geneva SO
the Kubskl-men a half-game on j ^th (WVa) 74 mu U
top of the heap. Right now the: j,,^,/,,, ai, Hamilton 58
Yankees and Bombers are dead-,, 6g s{ pter,, (NJ) 53
locked in first place with the bany SUte 78, Plarftsburgh 1
same number of games won and LeblM 74 Gettysburg 82
the starting
lineup serves to make the Open, A\QnQ JnG pOirV/OVS
an even better tournament than' rnivi 15* "__ '
anticipated.
Last week at the Fort Amador I
Golf Club, Bea Tyrrell and Ole-
I ana Harrington tied for first In
I the "Throw-out Tournament' lor
ladles.
Sunday saw several of the
favorites to cop the title In ac-
tion at Panam. Raul Powe
runner-up to Johnny MacMur-
lost.
The lowly Brownies last night
knocked off the then learue lead-
ins Bombers, 5-3, In a thriller as
they overcame a 3
win out at the Balboa Stadium.
Ernest Burke, the winninr
ray last yearfired a two an*
der par 78. At one time during
the round, Posse was five
strokes under par and eased p
coming In, bogeyrng the last
couple of holes.
MacMurray shot a lofty 7o,
four over par. Buddy Hammond,
the pro at Fort Amador, was even
par. He had
Lafayette S3, Wiikes (Pa.) 89
Bowdoln 49, Maine 48
:*& SL*I N7En1*1,,eertaf 'Newark
Cpsala 71, Montclalr 84
pitcher, scattered ten hits In a X^eeSs (N) 71, Yeshiva 48
SufiS*'!!^ Centra, State (0.) .l.Wtlkingt.nI fSEktaaT OikfiBHK
Lambuth (Tenn.) 98, Southwest-
em (Tenn.) 48
MIDWEST
Iowa 78, Minnesota 59
Wisconsin 74, Northwestern 58
Indiana 88, Purdue "7
Bradley 65, Detroit 59
Dayton 91, Chicago Loyola 71
Michigan 50, Michigan State 38
Kansas State 76, Iowa State 58
Missouri 44, Colorado 41
Ohio Univ. 71. Toledo 88
Kent SUte 67, Wittenberg 55
Miami (O.) 70, Bowling Green 56
Wooster 92, Hiram 45
Valparaiso 63, Marquette 80
Drake 49, Creighton 48
Tuba 46, Oklahoma City 43
Bliss 66, Rio Grande 58
Baldwin-Wallace 69, Case 58
Denison 61, Kenyon 87
Oberlin 71, Otterbein 53
James Mlllikin 51, Wash. (St..I..)
49
Oakland City 90. McKendree 75
Concordia (St. L.) 63. Shurtleff
58
59
In the second flight ...ie
holes), Marian Mallory v -irst^
Bobby Quton second .10 Bob
Klncald third.
This week a special 36-hole
'Selection Tournament" will
route-going performance,
nie Johnson, the loser, wa
to the showers In the eighth with, n ts", Hobart 78
two men on. Joe TumlneUI came ^J^" ja Lycoming 57 | Wayne (Neb.) 62. Doane 61
on and gave up the deciding basejMCoJt Guard Academy 47 Peru (Neb.) 60. Chadron 58
blow-a double by '* enlata^safuehanna 41 Midland 78, York 63
Charles to right. Albright 73, Bucknell 56 Concordia (Neb.) 92, Nebraska
The Brownies added another ], Valley 83. Scranton 62 Central 37
a
Large Crowd Witnesses:
Seven Thrilling Races ~
Champion Choppy White, accompanied closely
by his champion British-built Vincent, kept his km
torbike racing crown yesterday morning: at Joan
Franco.
But his symbolic sombrero of So. Hidalgo hopes to get hlmaeli
- sovereignty was soiled by dust a less reluctant Harley for rae-
WILBERFORCE, O., Jan. 21 flung upon it by BSA charioteers tog.
(Speclal)-A 3:45 am. blaze, Jan.' Eddie Armlstead and Jerry Fox. Dan Klota, a day-long sufferer
16, routed 52 men from Furtheri Balboa High School's Armis- from engine trouble, rode one-
Hall dormitory at Central State tead beat White once, when the handed almost all the way in tne
College. Some received injuries as 1 bait was a presentation from: final, soothing his spluttering
they lumped pajama-clad from carnival queen contestant Mary: steed with the spare mitt,
windows, and others Incurred In- Watson. I Though thus proving himself a
juries fighting the terrific blaze! white later beat Armlstead dogged fellow, he .wowa.BSj8
that Imperiled a teachers' dorm-, twice, and collected the final 10-. proved himself a wiser fellow u
itory. Trails End. and two four-lap event, but did not thereby,hed quit,
family apartment buildings. | edge Eddie out of those moments
Occupants of the one-story Wifh Mary.
pre-fabricated H-shaped dorml-j All records established Jan. 6
tory that was once an NYA build-, 0n the one-kilometer Juan Fran-
i lng lost all of their personal be-|co training track were broken
longings. Some students who. yesterday.
work evenings to help pay their
tuition returned In the morning i New records and old are:
to find they had no place to go. 0NE LAP: Eddie Armlstead not to be thanked Is the ewera
Building Housed Star Athletes )BSA 500c.c): 40.2 sees, (about entrusted with waving tne cneca-
Nine varsity basketball players 58 mph>. There was no previous; ered winner's flag. ....
were housed in Further Hail, and record. T*113 functionary, for .reason*
three received minor injuries, four LAPS: Armlstead, 2mln. he may_ have deemed worthy, ao-
Robert "Pappy' Smith, BHBJHSU sees, (about 51.5 mph). No
ton, O., suffered a broken toe. previous record over this dls-
and is expected to be out of play' tance.
the rest of the season; WUllam six LAPS: Choppy White
Games, Flndlay, O.. suffered a (Vincent lOOOc.c), 4 mins. 8.8
shoulder injury which is thought secs (about 54 mph). Previous
to be a sprain or dislocation ra-( recordWhite (Vincent) 4:19.
ther than a fracture, and Dallas
No one would have thanked
him for doggedness If he had lost
his one-handed control and fall-
en as White and Fox, actually a
complete lap ahead, were tussling
flatout In his wobbly backwash.
But leading the list of those
run in the ninth of Tnmlnelll to
assure themselves of victory.
g&^.te&'t^SH* Eloy Snchez (ops
Tyr~ was lam-' of 18 holes win be playetL.During tlUJ JOIIUIIOA VVMJ
Jr. Tennis Tourney
holes will be played.
gSsxwasss' asrsr wws ai
Playing his best game, Eloy
Snchez defeated Raymond Dav-
Arnold 93, HlDyer 6
Rider 58, Brandis 56
Fairleigh Dickinson 78, King's
(Pa.) 51 ,^__4
Pateraen Tchrs. 95, Trenton
Tchrs. 90
Merrlmaek 120, Portland JC 104
Williams 58, Westeyan 29
Glenville (WVa) 87, Shepherd 78
West Va. Tech 84, Bekley (WVa)
54
new trlTOc* to front ol thaj putts.
17th green caught more than,
their share of balls that would Jan
normally have-rollee> ente he will
green. iw*
t cffiMimt niimhpr of alrls the final point of the game was ware SUte 69
Qrpf intarested in the, ne-Kft played. In the first set Snchez- Salen, (WVa) 82, Morris Harvey
host clu* hM hU crew worktog m 69 ^ v
hard to put the course In fine "Ight, a Ringer i"^m that Dvld7wnwaa playing Buffalo Tchrs. 71, Ashland 81
?,lm hy -fam-wiav. fad from aU b held tor them too. ^pe up important points PAR WEST
which later gave him the set. | Washington 64, Oregon 39
In the second set, Davidson California 54, UCLA 51
played beautiful tennis, placing 1 Southern Cal 75, Stanford 64
balls and palytog the net like a Brig ham Young 68, Colorado A. ft
veteran. This was too much forj m. 47
Sanche, who lost the et by a Idaho 74, Oregon State 50
Hastings 38, Nebraska Wesleyan
35
I Illinois Wesleyan 89, Wheaton 73
Illinois Normal 65, Eureka (111.)
59
De Paul 80, Beloit 57
Chase 88, Cedarvule 83
East. Illinois 100, N. Illinois 68
Concordia 88, Northwestern 58
St. Frocoplns 73, Wisconsin Tech! jjj studenta.
sented himself from the scene as
White and Fox ended their
tough 10-lap final.
Seeing no checkered flag, they
both kept racing.
Fox's motor stopped on this ex.
tra needless lap, and the gallant
TEN LAPS: White, 7 mins. 1.8 challenger, running to his heavy
1 secs. (about 53.2 mph). Previous racing Bfar, Pushed his machine
record-White, 7:13.6. I to the Itolsh line trying to get
Besides Illustrating that rec-1 there before the third and fourth
ords are strictly expendable, yes-1 place men. still behind him. He
terday's racing brought out that: thought the race was sUU on.
1) With riders of equivalent! On reaching the line Fox li-
ability, the lOOOc.c. thoroughbred lapsed from his effort, or maybe
Vincent has the edge on the 500- the flag stewards lack of "me
c.c. stock model BSA's. But the This lapse aside, those to
Origin oiBiu. unnwwn MA> can s^etm,,., nip home charge of the meeting were right
College officials are PnosUnj, ahead of the Vincent with near, on top of their Job
an investigation and checking brllllance, considering how far A clear, explicit broadcast in
with students to determine the t f ^ j weight they are1 Spanish and English by Po de
George Stewart, National
Stogies Tennis Champion, of
Panam, and Ronald Charity,
National Junior Doubles
Champion escaped unharmed,
bnt lost all of their personal
belongings.
Origin Of Blase Unknown
origin of the fire. In the mean-
time they are busy providing
housing on the college grounds
and in the vicinity for the dla-
West Liberty E. Central 78, Central (OkhO 59 ^ gag.:___
Phillips 38. Oklahoma Baptist 37 TfiArC hrPPn WfiVG
Howard 53 St. Benedicts (Kas.) 59, Plttt- MljCllr WWII ffOf*
Brewers Take 1-Gaine Lead
In Pacific Twilight League
PACIFIC TWILIGHT BASEBALL
LEAGUE STANDINGS
lopsided 6-0 score.
The decisive third set found
Snchez playing an offensive as
well as defensive game, with
Davidson playing to the back Colo. Mines 82, Mex. CKy YMCA
court, occasionally going to the gg
net to make some Important
Score By Innings
Gibraltar Life 000 000 00
Balboa Brewers 010 003 x4
tfam Won Lost Pet. Runs Batted In-^Glbson, Neck-, points.
R.Th, Rrewen 3 0 1.000, ar, Patterson. Earned Runs-; ^he match went on with the
rMtosTtwLlf a lao I 1 .6671 Brewers 1. Left on BasesQlbral- 8ame intensity until the player; stun 63. Dixie (Utah) 37
P.nm Mwchants 1 2 433 tar 4, Brewers 2. Sacrifice Hits- u dlt up to 5-5. From this point
*SrEE*XE?9 3 .OOg: Conover, Scott. CarUn. Stolen the wag only one man ta
Balboa mgn acn. a o ^ BasesDedeaux, Sullivan, Cox, ^4 court> Snchez, who was
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS Neckar 2, Passed BallsConover cheered by all of his admirers,
ES(T!?ofsudu).. .. 2. StruckoutBbv-Oibson^ Hinz ^^t on to COp the ret ana
PitcherHlnz The last get ended unexpected-
Balboa Brewers 4, Gibraltar 2. Base on
Life 0; Panam Merchants 3,' Hlnz
Balboa High School 1.
TONIGHT'S GAME
(Balboa Stadium 7:00)
Balboa High School vs. Gibral-
tar Ufe.
Regis 66, Colando State 63
Carbon 53, Branch Aggies (Utah)
46
'333' tar ^Brewers 2. Sacrifice Hits: t!e'dlt"up "to"5-5."From this point Northwest Nazarene 47, Col. of
Idaho 36 ..1
WlUlamette 103, Lewis 8c Clark 62;
Pacific 76, Linfleld 68
Central Wash. 73, Eastern Wash.'
59
San Francisco 56, San Jose St. 54
(WVa) 80, Dela- burg 41 ,
Wm. Jewell 65, Culver-Stockton
Emporla State 60, Kansas Wes-
leyan 57 ..
Northeastern (Okla.) 60, South-
western (Okla.) 59
Heidelberg 64, Mount Union 58
Steubenvflle 52, Alliance 45
Youngstown 92. Marietta 78
Knox 72, Coe 67
St. John's (Minn.) S3, Duluth
Branch 71
Carleton 75, Grinnell 52
Augsburg 62 ,St. 'Mary's (Minn.)
Dickinson (N.D.) 88, Bismarck
(N.D.) 60
St. Thomas 76, Concordia 62
Man ka to 78, Wlnona
No. Dakota
49
Utah 57, Utah State 45
Wyoming 71, Montana 51
Montana St. 72, Western Colo. 56
Denver 72,New Mexico 58
(1-1). Winning "PitcherGibson y~ vidson,"who throughput
Quintero,
Carito; Cox,
UmpiresPratt, Majors,
Time of Game1:25.
the
(1-6). Doubleplays
Quintero, Carito. Mr/t&, made a double fault to
match had been
SECOND GAME
Merchants AB R H PO A
Balboa HighAB
Only a handful of loyal fans
were on hand to witness Noel
Gibson, making his first appear-1 De a Pefta.
anee as a pitcher for the Brew- Williams, 2b .
ers beat the Insurancemen's 1 Hele, lb .
Charlie Htoa, 4-0, to a pitcher's Coffey, ss
duel Francis, iwo
Trie game took only one hourHearn, rf .
and twenty-five minutes to com-! Medtoger, p .
niete P"!"'08 iD
The second game, another fast Thompson, S., c 3
contest, took one hour and forty- Rlley, lb. \
iive minutes. Frey Rayboume 1 Ridge, If. ... 8
lost a heartbreaker to Bob Med-I
i"ger as the "Old Timers" (Pan-1 Totals.....34
ama Merchants 1 came from be-
hind to tie the ball game and
forge ahead to win, 3-1.
Fans were treated to some fine
ball playing. A grand total of five
doubleplays were completed, all
of them in opportune moments
which could have meant the ball
gaThe Brewers, behind the three
hit Job by Gibson, took a firm
hold of first place to the Twi-
light Loop standings.
In the nightcap the Panam
Merchants Old Timers broke Into
Pe win column as they nosed out
trie Balboa High School nine, 3-1,
bv coming from behind.
The box scores:
FIRST GAME
AB R H PO A
3 0 0 0 0
0 16
12 0 0
0 110
17 0 1
0 10 0
14 0 0
0 2 0 0
0 0 2 0
placing his
_Je fault to
Mom- end the game and surrender to
Snchezthe new Junior Tennis
Champion.
l
1
3
2
2
0
1
1
4
6
0
Juan Franco
Muluel Dividends
3 5 21 7 2
Halman, 2b
Rowley, If. .
Flynn, c .
Carito, R., lb .
Maygcf . .
Henderson, rf .
Napoleon, rf-cf
Maldonado, u .
Arias, 3b. .v. .
Ostrea, 3b. .
Rayboume, p .
aJones.....
HPO
1 2
0
4
10
1
Totals
Gibraltar
presho, 2b. .
Dedeaux, ss .
Jones, cf. .
HUzinger. 3b.
gulllvan, lb .
KeUeher. If .
DcLaMater, rf
Conover. c . 1 9
wins, n.....2 0
... .28 1 21 "
Score By Innings
Pm. Merchants 000 012 0-3
Balboa High 010 000 0-1
aGrounded out for Rayboume
K la 7th. Runs Batted InFrancis
0 2, Thompson, Rayboume. Earned
Hlmvp.
Totals
.81 0 3 11 8 t
Brewers
scott, 3b .
Carito, W, lb
Cox, ss. . .
Gibson, p .
Neckar, c. .
Patterson, rf.
Herring, if. .
McOlade, cf
AB
. 2
. 8
. 2
:5
. 2
2
2
HPO A
0 2
6
1
0
6
1
1
2
nnfiO'
nsMerc'riantsT, Balboa High
1 Left on BasesMerchants 0,
Balboa High 8. Three Base Hit-
Francis. Stolen Bases Phillips,
Flynn, Carita, Napoleon. Struck-
out byRayboume 3. Medtoger 4.
Base on Balls off-Raybourne 5.
Medtoger 3. Losing : Pitcher
FIRST RACE
1-Dalida P. $5. 82.80. 8X80.
2White Fleet 33.80, $2.80.
3Manolete S3.
SECOND RACE
1Proton $3X0, 82.60. $2.20.
2Dies de Mkyo $3, $220.
3Sin Fin $2.20.
First Doubles: (Dallda P.-Pro-
ton) $1.40.
U, THIRD RACE
.0 1Ventre a Terre $7. $3. $2.60.
0 2Paques $2.60, $2.40.
0i 3incomparable $7.
One-Two: (Ventre a Terre-Pa-
,UO) ^FOURTH RACE
1Bronx $6.30, $3X0. $3.
2-Gay Ariel $0.80. $5.60.
S-^Apology $2.80.
Quiniela: (Bronx-Gay Ariel)
FIFTH RACE
1Keyhaven $4.80, $3.60.
3Orlsu $5.60.
SIXTH RACE
1Gaywood $6.40, $4.20, $2.40.
2Miss Fairfax $5, $3.
3Mingo $2.40.
SEVENTH RACE
1Visir $4, $2.40.
2Notable $2.40.
Second Doubles: (Gaywood-Vl-
sir) $11.88.
EIGHTH BUCE
1Caonazo $8.40, $450, $3.80.
In Return Hoop Till
Today Al Cristbal
Tonight, at 6:45, the Cristobal
Blue and Gold' will play the
Green Wave from Junior College,
at the Cristobal Gymnasium.
This game has been moved to
Monday night, Instead of Tues-
day, as had been previously
scheduled.
This will be the second encoun-
ter between these two ball clubs.
The first game was played to
los Casares, owner of the winning
Vincent, kept the crowds up to
the minute on what was going
fighting.
2) Seven riders are not enough
to sustain a full amateur motor-i on. .__J,.. -
cycle racing program. Ksfitoel Bact re ^S^JgSSSrL
trouble is bound to eliminaTTa yet with reasonable lenience to
few. and there should be others: riders who wanted a minute ta
available to fill out the fields. tighten one more KtlMtlM
Some of the motorcyclists rid-1 back wheel.falloffjoraome uch.
ing prettily about In the center Efficiently keeping ajnWtag;
of the field yesterday would have onlookers from among^toe^speod-
helped more by doing their rid-
ing to the Taces.
Had Fox not hit out-of-the-
box form to the final, when he
tog spokes was the Panama Na-
tional Police detachment wider
Capt. A. Hassan.
To mark his good work, and
became chief BSA torchbearer- that of Jgfc Mg.^* jg^SJSg1
vice Armistead-the race would' commission controlUrujthemeet-
have been no culmination to the' tag yesterday presented Hassan
program, but a walkover for a handsome tropny.
White. Resulte:
Next Juan Franco motorbike! __ -------
meeting, probably a fortnight O 'y_!l**l&tf.THBS
hence, there may be Sad[SS^^SS^SS
in'these Panam and Canal1 py White (Vincent lOOOc-cJ 4J
Zone motorbike owners who have: sees., 2; Jerry Fax (BSA sOOcc-
h.'-" no racing experience yet can 41.5 sees., 3, dk *u . 11
1; Balboa, and the Tigers won a i po^d the polvo In company with umph 650c.c.) tl* 5SS* S
tttranmCSD hard fought game by a score of ^st-drubbeis equally inexperl- Hidalgo 80, Augustana |BJI.) wj^h ggj teamJ startlng enced cc) ft.2 sees.. 5; Dave Moulton
.Iiriuai Mnnrhf.d (Minn* 48 otttt* on b^J^tbew teams xney can thereby accumulate (BSA SOOc.c.) sees 8,.Dan
wS3a?tiS!FL Msmttk* have yet to play their best gameisome Mcin knowhow before be- Klotz (Triumph 500c.c.) had en-
Lllendaie Normal S3, maryvuie ,.m\ in nrinkfaH nth th current.
Oregon Education 73, Vanport 62
Oregon Tech 74, Eastern Ore. 53
SOUTH
Kentucky 5. Tennessee 56
Tulane 82, Georgia 49
Mississippi 7S, Auburn 58
Western Ky. t, Eastern Ky. 63
FWHda 84, VandartUt 7
Alabama 93, Florence (Ala.) St.
Louisville 83, Morehead (Ky.) 63
Wm. k Mary 86, Richmond 70
South CareUna 71, VPI 88
Gaargte Tchrs. 95, Florida St. 75
American Univ. 54, Baltimore 49
Quantico Marines 76, Wash. &
Lee 88
AppaUchUn 83, Catawba 73
Mercer 59, Florida Southern 53
Ky. Wesleyan 162, Murray (Ky.)
181
Berea 71, Union (Ky.) 69
Georgetown (Ky.) 64, Transylva-
nia 81
Tenn State 66, Kentucky SUte 54
East Tenn: 71, Emory 8c Henry 61
some racing itnownow Deiore De- awuimiuuii. .*~ST" ti-i7h
of the season. ing sprinkled with the current glne trouble and did not tlnlah
-Jt aartenltural1 Junlor CoUege lost their Initial sUrs- dust. | his lap.
Mornlngde72,N.D.A "ijtort to the high riding Balboa; choppy White, though he was'
team, by a close score of 35-33. beaten once and was passed a few TROPHY .RACE four Japs,
Playing a very aggressive style of llmes> emerged with his crown barrier positions according w
ball, the Green Wave will give ntUng even more becomingly. | time trial placlngs):
either High School a close and, Jan- 6 ne atayed In front Just1 Armlstead, 2 mln. 53^ sees...,, i
well played game. From all pre-iaD0Ut gji the way, all the time.. White, 2:53.2.
vious games Junior College has yesterday he showed himself a'Burns, 3:00.2.
Dakota (SD) Wesleyan 80, Yank
ton 63
Soo Tech 82, Northern Michigan
88
Kalasnasoa 95, Alma 96
Detroit Teeh 87, Olivet 60
Hope 84, Hlllsdale IS
Southern III. 87. Mich. Normal
41
Albion tl, Adrian 39
Western Illinois 46, Central Mich.
45
not been bitting from the floor champion who can also ride with Fox. 3:00.5.......
so the Collegemen, with several idust f j^ -
Anderson 85, Indiana Tech 56 i"XiAr''rfTh_robriundh
Indiana Central W, Tri-State 'dolnAaUf %e. cSteae If he
Jackson (Mich.) JC 70, Concor- scoring tor the College. J
2
.%... 3
.....4
face and other ma-j First Heat (six lapa): White,
exhibition games under theirchmes Ught around him, and 4:10.8, 1; Armistea. 4.12.8. x,
belts, will be ready to explode to- who can stay steady under pres- Fox, 4:20, 3: IOlga *.m, *.
night against the Blue and Gold. su | Moulton, Klotz and Burns were
Leading the J.C. dribblers will
be All McKeown, who has been
dlatt
Taylor 88, Huntington 72
Marshall 78, Evansville 72
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 68, Ball State
68
Manchester 77, Franklin 74
Wartbarg 64, Westmar 51
Momtogaide 72, North Dakota
State 89
St. Norbert's (WU.) 58, Lores 55
Simpson (la.) 75, Dubuque 67
Luther (la.) 82, Buena Vista 47
Iowa Tchrs. 7$, St. Ambrose 57
Raybourne (0-8). Winning Pitch- 2Walrus $5X0, $3.20
erMedlnger (1-1). Doubleplays -
Thompson, Coffey; Arias. Car-
ita; Medtoger, Hele. Umpires
New and Levy. Time of Game
1:40.
POISONOUS TOMATOES
3=-Mlas Cristina $3.
Quiniela: (Caonazo Walrus)
$33.80.
NINTH RACE
1-Hechlao $3.0, $2.20.
2-Marlscallto $2.20.
One-Two: (Hechlso (a)
callto) $5.80.
TENTH RACE
1Fulmine $3X0. $2.40.
UntU late to the 19th century.
0 many Americans refused to eat. 2Hercules $3X0.
^totemib 2 118 8 1 tomatoes because they thought ELEVENTH RACE
Quintero, zo ,_* _*__________ were po^nou, according to 1-Rlna Rol 8XJ0, $2X0.
1 the Encyclopedia Brltannlca. 12Pregonero $2.60.
Totals
.21 4 4 21 9
MaryviUe (Tenn.) 67, Mllligan 62
Southeastern La. 58, SprlnghiU
88
Xavier (N.Olns.) 74, Fort Valley
(Ga.) 85
N. Orleans Loyola 73, Northwest-
ern La. 58
Lincoln Mem. (Tenn.) 55, Austin
l*eay 50 m _.
Untan (Tenn.) 78, David Ups-
eeaab 62 ..
Middle Tean. 57, Tenn. Tech 56
Miss. Southern 80, Louisiana Col.
Paiy Lamber (Tenn.S 72, Tuscul-
um 48
Virginia MlUtary 76, Norfolk Na-
?a' '*
Elen 77, Lenolr Rhyne 66
can manage to play a full game,
without getting fouled out, his
presence will be felt. Teaming
up with McKeown will be Fred-
dy Aleguas, who as yet to play
his best ball game, and McAr-
thur, Welsh and Roe round out
the starting five.
The Tigers will try to return
to the win column this week at
the expense of the Junior Col-
lege. But many changes have to
take place for Cristobal High,
regain their wta-
Armlstead was unlucky to have I eliminated by motor trouble.
i let the final go by. But It Is not i Second Heat (six laps) .W,
tely he bawled out his chief!4:08.8, 1; Armlstead. 4:133, 3,
In order to .
Cornell Mission House (Wls.) 63, Milton and Gold always ahve speed to
68 I the first half, and then gradual-
Stevens Point (Wls.) 74, Stout 62 ly lose their speed, MOM, and
Milwaukee State 56, Platteville game to the second half. If the
to
llkelv
mechanic for his motor trouble. Fox, 4:16.3, 3. Kioto, Hidalgo and
Chief mech's name Is Armlstead. | Moulton were eliminated by mo-
tor trouble. j
Consolation ttac*: Moulton
finished alone. Klote completed
the course slowly, still with en-
gine trouble.
FINAL (10 laps);
White,7:01.6.................. J
Fox, 7:10..................... J
the Isthmus a couple of times Moulton, 7:16........."'
every working day, and seems to. Klotz again completed th*
resent being thrashed around course slowly, again with motog
Juan Franco on Its day of rest.' trouble.
Armlstead, Sr.
Crowd pleaser Bill Hidalgo also
had a bad day with the motor of
his big Harley-Davldson, the only
non-British machine to yester-
day's entries, and never managed
to get up a full head of steam.
The Harley hauls him across
(Wls.) 50
Whitewater St. (Wls.) 68, Osh-
kosh State 44______
SOUTHWEST
Rice 48, Arkansas 46
Daniel Baker 64. Texas Lutheran and so far this season,
61 have played remarkable
big boys under the board can
act the Job done, then the Tig-
ers will be a hard team to stop.
Co-captains. Bailey and Man-
ning will control the back court,
both
ball.
Arkansas Teeh 85, Henderson Si. Along with these forwards will
45
Austin 64, Texas A. it I. 56
Arkansas CoUege 84, Beebe 51
Eastern N. Max. 4, N. Mexico
Western 48
New Mexico A. Western 36
BOTTLE FEEDING AT ITS BEST
There's ao need to "eery over
boak-fccdk* if mkk it mei-
titd with Robsasoa's Pstset'
Bsrky. Baby will than digest
it ss easily sad sleep
contentedly after
every sted.
*fJke. cote' milk right for bmb
be Anderson, Wilson and Bryant,
to compose the starting five.
In the preliminary game, the
Cristobal J.V.'s will play the Ft
Gullck service team. This game
will start at 6:43 p.m. and
should be a close contest with
the Cristobal Young One's being
undefeated.
Tickets will be sold at door.
Adults 60c.. Children without
S.A. cards 25 cents.
TEAR FOR COMETS
Fourteen comets wore spotted
during 1948. This Is as large a
number as ever has been found,
and only the third time on record
when more than a doaen were
spotted In a stogie year.
latin was the language of
diplomats until the middle of the
17th century, at which time It
was superseded by French.
$ 1545.00
Rare MG 1% litre 4 seat family tourer.
Exceptionally clean, carefully used. New
paint and top. Deems, quarters 35, Al-
brook. 863108.
If yon belong to the Armed Forces
or if yon have a steady job cone to
oar Store and you can choose your
own terms to buy on credit.
We have the best Mahogany Furniture.
if yea don't knew ear Clab System
visit as and yea will be dettgntad.
Q^/^J^ElDiablq
86 Central Ave. Tel. 2-24I4


PGA
Ruling Regarded
Personal Triumph
For Joe Louis
AGAINST NEGROES
SAN niEOO. Jan. 21 (UP*
The Professional Golfers Asso-
ciation has lowered Its long-
standing ban against Negro golf-
er. ...
PGA President. Horion Smith
announced tod that six of the
seven members of the tourna-
ment committee have approved
the admittance of Negroes to
POA tournaments. The seventh
member could not be contacted
The ruling Is a personal
triumph for forme' heavyweight
champion Joe Louis, who said
last week that the battle against
the racial ban was the biggest
fight of his lift.
At that time Louis was seek-
ing permission to play in the 10-
AN INDl5PETTONT^rtlKvgAnL'T NEWSPAPER
PanamaMerican
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
60 mph, 2 ft Apart
rw ENTY-SEVENTH Vr'
PANAMA, R. P. MONDAY. JANUARY 81, 15*
FIVE CENTS
Horseburger War May Be On;
AFL Butchers Union Bombed
CHICAGO. Jan. 21
(UP) A of the AFL Amalgamated Meat six-cent Hourly wage boost from] guard after he said heifeared re-
rdavat the Cutters and Bv'chers Union. I major pikers, while others haveiprisals fiom racket operators. _
The "Past dirt little damage to been holding out for greater be-' -------* -*. wen. r-
AFL
Seven slate inspectors were Or-
tS^4K^!SMS bomb exploded yeste.
because he was amateur But ggg%0^ ^^th^i^to^^ '7,7 3 ~t 7 ed after Wray^ dismissalI for re-
Negio profesional Bill Bplller Butcne .. "BK.1.* mitbreakof windows of ar. adjacent apart- State tnd federal agents have fusing lo give information or
was no', admitted. '^J^Kt}tmuUmAMKT"bmv- mintho use driving about 50'estimated that 2 000.000 pounds take lie detector tesU in the ln-
The dr-ve to kill the PGA ban.vloencertti.a>-Tni* iSSoB artollS street No in- of hoscmeat have been sold U- vestlgation One of the inspectors
XS mom" ntum'as the San burger- scandal in Illinois.
$P&Htt woAuld An alleged r a c k e t. t> IHegal '
legally.
The revelation
has beer, charged with accepting
has c a u s e da $150 bribe to "go easy" on meat
last nltrht,8pi lie saw ne*oukv .. '-^,,eat already nas Deputy chief of police John hamburger saleslUslumptaire*- inspections,
sue the PGA If a B*2?3. tod to. ii Gran.'. Jury investiga-.Walsh said he would Investigate.taurants and^made Ullnota citte-
tion briwv ch-r?es and the fir- the possibility that the explo- ens warv I the meat they buy.
statement was not
forthcoming.
Smith drafted
would allow Nero participation,
and secured ne necessary en-
dorsement of tournament com-
mittee >rc mbsrr
Smith stresses that the pro-
pv-i which Is in effect, an ,
added clause In PGA bylaws i
Is effective immediately. Smith
says he hones some Negroes will
he allowed to play in the up-
coming Phoenix and Tucson |
Onen tourney
The POA he?d says the com-
mittee will endorse a half dozen
amateur snd professional Negro-
es for Hi.'. Phoenix match. Names
of the players will be handed the
PGA bv a five-man Negro steer-
In committee.
. The drastic revision of the PGA
bv laws .-till ienves Negro golfers
with obstacles to hurdle. They,
must ne specifically invited by
the tournev sponsor and endors- ;
ed by the POA tournament com- j
nvttce. !
In aiJition. they will be li-
mited by tournament quotas on
non-touring nrofesslonals. Smith
savs that 1* the time comes when
a Negro Ir a recular tournament
player, h-. may be accorded a dif-
ferent status.
The stterine committee which
w'tl handle the lists of Negro
plavers Is headed by Ted Rhodes
of Nashville, and Includes Louis,
Sptller. Howard Wheeler of Phi-
ladelphia and F.ural Clark of Los
Angeles.
GHOST TOWN NOW
clause which lne of ;be slate food director and slon stsmmed from the widening
seven aides.
Charle.; Wray. state superin-
h o r s c n e a t investigation and i tendent. ..>f food and dairies, was
'< would question union leaders
bomb apparently fashioned when they return from out-of-
of blar:< powder exploded at the,town trips
northsidi headquarters building
811ver City, one of the mast
Elcturesque of the ghost towns In
dsho. once was the center of the
nation's second-ranking silver-
producing area.
Walsh believed that union of-
ficials, or members, may have
supplied information about the
adulteration of hamburger and
other beef products with horse-
I meat.
Howcvr. Walsh did not dls-
' count the possibility that the
i blast may have resulted from
ousted bv Gov. Adlai Stevenson
after he gave an unsigned state-
ment ti, the r.:torney-general's
office tr.it he vas offered bribes
up to $.V)00 to -vlnk at horsemeat
sales.
As a result, a warrant was fil-
ed against Joseph Siciliano,
small ini-at packer in McHenry
County, accusing him of Offering
the bribes.
Former Zonian
Dies In U.S.
Armin A Klammer. 33, a for-
mer Panam Canal employe, died
last Dec 21. In a highway acci-
dent in Minneapolis, Minn., ac-
cording o word reaching his
*,wife's relatives here over the
weekend.
Klammer was married to Lucl
Garrudo and had no children at
81clllr.no. who has surrender-1 the tlmf of h|$ departure from
ed to authorities, and three
!union isrutes in the meat pack-.others also were charged with
ilng industry. conspiracy to make illegal sales.
AFL members have accepted a I Wray was placed under police
Army, State At Odds
On Big Jap Buildings
the Isthmus in January 1944.
A na'tWe of Nora. Mirm., he was
first employed on the Isthmus
by the Department Engineers
and in March 1940 went to work
for the Panam Canal In the
Motor Transportation Division.
Champion
Challenged
..Champion Choppy White
(Vincent) bore leads Jerry
Fox (BSA) by about half a
length as they emerge from a
curre and head off down the
straight at 60 mph or better at
Joan France motorbike race
meeting yesterday morning.
Fox, on a machine about half
as powerful as White's, rod
the race of his life to push the
champion all the way.
At right Eddie Armistead,
Balboa High School student,
receives from beauty queen
contestant Mary Watson the
cup he won by beating White
?er a four-lap sprint. But
Whit* woa three races later in
the program. On the left of
the photo Is Pi de los Casares,
owner of the Vincent whleh
White rides lueld commentator
at the meetings, and all-
round driving spirit of motor-
cycling's rise to popularity on
the Isthmus.
*
* .?
TOKYO. Jan. 21 (UP).Gen.
Matthew B. Rldgway's head-
quarters will undertake to Con-
vince a mission from Washington
this week that after the peace
connected with working out the
final details of an agreement for
U.S. bases in and around Jap-
an.
State Department offlcials here
treaty is ratified U. 8. forces in i were said to oppose the retention
FOR LITTLE SQUIRTS-Dor-
sey Connors, a household hints
and gimmicks expert on Chicago
TV, shows how to use (he
"grapefruit glasses," equipped
with tiny windshield wipers. A
simple"push of the plunger and
In Japan, the diner in arres-, the Wodes wipe way every
COOKS TO EAT
taurant often cooks his own food
In an iron skillet set on his tab'e,
according to the Encyclopedia
Britannira.
trace of wild grapefruit juice.
-'-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Albrook's 1st Air Rescue
To Be Doubled In Strength
'By August, the strength of 1st for Washington, remarked that
Rescue Squadron down here the extremely well qualified men
will he doubled," Col. Richard T. doing rescue work down here ..e'hclicopter in saving lives, be-
Klsht announced today.
of any "conspicuous" buildings In
Tokyo or other Japanese cities
which have been identified, pro-
minently with the occupation, i
The officials were said to feel'
that In the interest of Japanese-
American relations the Aineri-
can forces should withdraw from
the cities and set up headquar-
ters in rural areas. In effect the
Slate Department position was
said to be this:
"The mutual defense pact
makes Japan and the United
States allies. UjS. forces will be
in Japan as guests of the Jap-
anese to help guarantee the se-
curity of the Japanese nation.
Therefore there should be a
break with the past, and noth-
ing should be done to indicate
that the occupation still is go-
ing on."
Reports have circulated that
the Army would move to former
military camps outside of Tokyo,
and the Air Force and Navy
would leave the capital, partly
to eliminate possible charges I
that the U.S. forces were in-1
iluencing the Japanese govern-
ment.
Details of the Army's position
were not known. Army officials
here have refused to say any-
,i -u *-_ ~^. vJ thing on the subject publicly or
;^e7nlhebUeffTctiveauseot;'g"^ """- '" Information.
Jarran should lceep the better
Japanese buildings they now oc-
cupy, reliable sources said today.
State Department officials here
will oppose that military stand.
Informants said, arguing that It
would damage generally good
Japanese sentiment toward the
United States.
The U. 8. forces will stay In
Japan after the treaty ratifica-
tion under a new American-
Japanese mutual defense pact.
The Washington mission will
be headed by Dean Dush, Far
Eastern consultant to Secretary
of State Dean Acheson. Its main
task here will be to reconcile the
differences between the military
and diplomatic points of view.
That will be part of the Job
. i

TO EUROPE
sense their need to help Indlvi-: sides copping the Distinguished
Col. Kight, the commander of duals outside of the military or-| Flying Cross In 1942 for a special
the Air Force's world-wide Airi ganlzation." and observed that a flight from Washington to Java
Another Hollywood
e Air forces worra-wiae Ain gamzauun. ana uuaervea uk a: uigm. nuui noouuisMiii u .- a | ||
tfeseue Service. Is in Albrook to-: great percentage of missions per-' when the Pacific flight lines had. ffAIIJIfi ArriVAC HiHP
day on an official three-day visit.'formed are for other than mill- been cut a month after PearlHWM|!w MlllfVJ IIVlV
^-Thursday On Tour
day
of F
Harbor.
The youthful commander
worked his way up since he
irivate, to
"The reactivation here of Flight tarv personnel.
"X" of 1st Air Rescue Squadron.1 The late Wendell Wilkie on his
which was previously based in 28,400 mile round the world
Miami, will double the local tour, for which Klght was se-; listed in 1933. From a p:
strength. lected as pilot, dedicated his his promotion to colonel and USO Camp Shows will present
book, "One World," to Kight and head of Air Rescue Service. another series of Hollywood star
This would mean an Increase his crew. In summing up his work In the,entertainment 'hows, beginning
In airmen strength for Albrook of i The Air Rescue chief received Air Rescue field Kight st/d: "ItThursday. for service personnel
142 airmen and 26 officers who the first Kossler Award for out- is really a mission that ir/plres." oThe Isthmus when a new
wlH be coming from the States
' --' '.^ ^^ "35ik- ~*6 '^^m Mi
soon.
The reactivation will also bring
four SA-16's, the new Drum-
mond-built Amphibian "Alba-
tross" planes to the new flight,
as well as an additional four for
Flight "B."
Kight said that the two flights
Will "be prepared to meet any f u-
ture emergencies" that might oc-
cur.
The 38-year-old commander
who piloted Wendell Wilkie on
bis famous trip around the
world, and has beeh command-
er oi Air Rescue Service since
1946. explained that the equip-
ment and men will start com-
ing to Albrook by the end oi the
month.
The visiting chief was "very
grieved" to hear about the B-17
mercy bomber that crashed yes-
terday on Tyler Peak during a
blinding snowstorm He only1
learned about the accident on his
arrival here.
There have been very few loss-
es in the Rescue Service, accord-
ing to the young commander.
Over a two-year period Air
Rescue Service has been able
to evacuate 3,501 military men
from Korea, and performed
ver Z.SCO missions since the
beginning of the Korean war.
Their world-wide missions, not
counting Korea ran to 2,50*
Separate rescues In the last
year.
.Kight, who leaves Wednesday
F -
\ DANGE*'-

m
COL. RICHARD T. KIGHT, left, commander of the US Air
Forces globally deployed Air Rescue Service, soon after his
arrival at Albrook AFB yesterday, aboard the new type 8A-
18 amphibious Grumman Albatross in which he flew from
T.r&hington. All rescue squadrons are to be equipped with
->- Bet amphibians as soon as they become available. Col.
...iiht was welcomed at Albrook by Lt. Col. George T. Prior.
::nd from left, commanding officer of the 1st Air Rescue
Squadron, Lt. Col. C. H. Smith, and Lt. Col. James L. Jar-
nagln. commanding officer of Flight "B," which performs
the many rescue missions originating at Albrook.
troupe of entertainers arrive at
Albrook Air Force Base.
The troupe will Include Doro-
thy Menrel as master of cere-
monies- Jack Powell and his
educated drum-ticks; Paul Le-
Paul. comedy card man; Bill Ro-
berts, lnrtrumentallst; Tommy
Trent, puorjeteer Virginia Seller,
vocalist; Richard Conway and
Clyde Parks comedy dancing
team and Evelyn Hamilton, ac-
cordlanlt.
Members of Army field Dosl-
tlons on the Pnciflc side will see
the shew Thursday afternoon.
That evening two shows will be
held at Albrook Air Force Base,
Hanear 3. at 6:?0 and 8:30 p.m.
Friday mornln? the troupe will
depart for the Atlantic side for
a 10:30 a.m. performance at Fort
i Davis and a 3 pm. show at Fort
Sherman. In the evening Navy
'personn'l at Coco Solo Naval
station will be entertained at
6:30 and 8 p.m
Saturdnv at 10 8.m the troupe
will entertain at Fort Amador
and In the afternoon will tour
Fort Clayton horpital. Two shows
are scheduled for Saturday even-
ing, one at 6:30 at Rodmin Naval
1 Station and another at 9 p.m. at
Fort Kcbbe
8undpy afternoon will be de-
voted to a return en Army Field positions on the Pa-
cific side and on Monday the.
troupe wf leav Albrook for Ra-!
mey AFB Puerto Rice to perform I
for troors In the Antilles area, i
A holiday abroad is no longer
a luxury. Not only is your
money worth more in Europe,
but you can also save on your
trip with KLM's new low Air
Tourist fares.
Starting MAY 1st,
KLIft offers yon this choke
1. SUPERB DE LUXE SERVICE including
these features... delicious full-course
meals, cocktails and liqueurs, sleeper
accommodations on the Southern
route, choice of routes, reduced fares
off season, five flights a week from
the Caribbean,
2. NEW LOW FARE AIR TOURIST SERVICE
via Northern Route. Enjoy important
savings on one way and return fares.
Weekly flights by giant DC-6 air-
planes. Meals available at moderate:
prices.