The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01358

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
t'BRANIFF
gaps.
Panama American
(DAILY NEWSPAPER
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe1* Abraham Lincoln.
If. ..
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f-SeagrauisYi

CANADIAN V/HISI
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DitOUd. fJwJbettlt to Cm* mVr Cmmi Gwnmtm saftnUm.
II Mil i *'^.^
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
FANAMA, K. P., FRIDAY, JANUARY IS, 1952
FIVE CENTS

Air Attacks In Red China Threatened
Taxing Of Retired
Local Raters
Checked By Army
(NEA elephoto)
AFTER FOUR DAYS ON SNOWBOUND TRAIN Closeup view from the air how* three
snowbound cars ot the streamliner City o Sa n Francisco as some of the passengers greet
rescue workers who reached the train after It had been marooned in the High Sierra since
Sunday. ._____________ i
Reds Charged With Plan
To Keep 50,000 POWs
PANMUNJON, Jan. 18 (UP).
The United Nations accused the
Communists at the truca talks
here today of trying to keep 50,-
000 impressed South Korean war
prisoners in the Red armies af-
ter the armistice.
United Nations negotiator Unl-
Communlst refusal to consider a
ban on military airfield construc-
tion in Korea during a truce.
But both subcommittees are to
meet again tomorrow.
There were nine infantry
[flashes along the 145-mile Ko-
rean front today.
ted States RawudMtmM*.------They^vere ineioly-o the west-
ern sector, not far'feom where
the trace talks are being held,
and on the east central front In
the vicinity of the PunchbowL
Libby said the Communists also
apparently Intend to retain twe-
finitely an undetermined num-
ber of civilian internees. '
Libby said that by contrast the
United Nations wul release all
116.000 Communist prisoners of,
war after a truce, and will give
them the choice of whether they
want to return home or stay in
Allied territory.
Libby bUsteringlv charged the
Communists with bad faith dur-
ing another "no progress" meet- rVu. .vw-.o "=-.-----
lne of the armistice subcommit-: this mcmlng in the Balboa Ma-
tee trying to arrange an ex- gtotrate's Court They were all
Four loiterers were sentenced
change of war prisoners.
The second truce subcommittee
remained deadlocked by the
Victor Belmejo, 21,
Faces 2nd Charge
Of Cable Theft
found in the vicinity of the UJS.
District Court at Ancon yester-
day.
Flix Ernesto Bolaos, 22, An-
tonio Casis. 26, and Ida Vasques,
all Panamanians were fined $10,
while Matilde Snchez, 17, who
failed ixj appear in court forfeit-
ed his $15 ball
Also heard were trespassing
charges against two Panamanians
who were picked up in the Tlvoll
Commissary. Josefa Castillo, 30,
In and Olays Jan. 20, were each
An alleged cable thief is ....
the Balboa Jail today facing a given a $10 fine.
charge of petty larceny with a
prior conviction. Bail was set
at $200.
Victor Manuel Belmejo, a 21-
year-old Panamanian, Is charg-
ed with stealing 52 feet of It-
gauge subterranean telephone
cable valued at $32.13 from the
Army Signal Corps at Fort Clay-
ton o i the afternoon of Jan. 17.
The ease is continued until
Jan. 22 at 1:30 p.m.
Belmejo previously served 20
days starting on Dec. 4 of last
year when he was convicted of
petty larceny. He had stolen 50
feet of lead-covered telephone
cable that amounted to $30.89.
The defendant also has a po-
lice record for marijuana of-
fenses.
For "borrowing" an Army school
bus that he normally drives
during his working day, John
Muelr, 28-year-old Panamanian,
was given a suspended sentence
and one vear probation. Muelr is
a driver for the U.S. Army, and
after waking hours drove the
bus toco Panam.
Peter Allen Rodemacher, 10,
was fine d $25 fi r reckless driving
on Bruja Road. He is an Amer-
ican.
And Er.iest Lightfoot. 20. an-
other American was fined $20 for
driving without a license.
For not having the proper
lights on the back of his truck.
Enrique Hermes Clifton, a 30-
year-old Vanamanian who works
for the Agricultural Commission
In David, was given a suspended
Reds' Human Train
Of Coolies Blasted
By French Planes
HANOI, Indochina. Jan. 18
(UP)French authorities today
charged that Communist rebels
have drafted a human supply
train of between 150,000 and
200,000 coolies to carry ammuni-
tion and supplies from Red Chi-
na to their Vletmlnh armies, re-
grouping around Hoa Blnh .
He aC^ow^thtfffcc to,
targeu forrrweeti piases pound-
ing them with flarataf npalm
bombs as they trudge over the
open plains of China.
French field headquarters said
Communist pressure around the
French-held fortress ot Hoa
Binh and Colonial Highway Six
had eased off while sporadic
clashes were reported from south
and central Vietnam.
A French military communique
said a Vletmtnh Communist reb-
el battalion last night attacked
the French post on the hub of
Quantrl Road in central Vietnam
but was beaten off. m
Twenty rebels were killed and
30 captured, Including ten offi-
cers.
The Caribbean Command to-
day was exchanging correspon-
dence with Washington In be-
i-.alf of retired local rate em-
ployes of the Armed Forces In
the Canal Zone who have been
declared subject to withholding
taxes.
Word to the effect that these
employes will have to pay 30 per
cent of their annuities In taxes
has just reached the Isthmus
and a Command spokesman this
morning revealed that informal
inquiries into the matter have
already been forwarded to the
Washington Civil Service Com-
mission.
The retired employes' fllea are
forwarded to Washington an
Army Finance Department offi-
cer revealed, and there the
Treasury Department makes out
checks and malls them to the
local retired employes.
The withholding taxes are de-
ducted according to the stand-
ard pay schedule.
According to section 143 (b),
the United 8tates Internal Re-
venue Code requires that a Fed-
eral Income Tax amounting to
30% be deducted from the an-
nuity being paid to retired gov-
ernment employes of the Armed
Forces who are not citizens of
the trustee? Otates.
Notices are being sent out by
the U. 8. Civil 8ervice Commis-
sion Retirement Division which
read as follows:
"Under Section 143 (b) of the
United States Internal Revenue
Code, Federal Income Tax
amounting to 30% must be de-
ducted from the annuity paid to
each person who is not a citizen
of the United States of America
and whose checks are mailed
anywhere outside the continental
limits of the United States ex-
cept to the Territory of Alkasa
or the Territory of Hawaii."
"If the amount of this check Is
less than what you have been
CZTaxpayers Urged
To Claim Refunds
Canal Zone taxpayers who sub-
scribed to the pending income
tax suit challenging the consti-
tutionality of application of the
tax to the Zone have been ad-
vised to file a claim for the tax-
es they paid In 1951.
The law firm of Collins Ac Mc-
Nevln, representing the plain-
tiffs, have advised their clients
to file their claim for taxes paid
In 1951 at the same time they
file their Income tax return for
1962.
. .The law firm explains that: ..
This action may not be nec-
essary to stop the running of
the statute of limitations,
which limit the time in which
claim* for refund can be made,
but It Is better to be on the sate
side."
The claim may be made on
President Is Guest
.. (D. m .., .-,., sentence and placed on one year
At Dig 1 ruin rilm probation. On a second charge Internal Revenue Form No. 843,
. ,. for falllug to appear In court on which can be obtained at the In-
Presldcnt of Panam Alelbia- time, hi was fined $10. ternal Revenue Of flee. Balboa, or
to Irnutmpnfl onri Vila i>ohln>t ,\_.. ..#!.. .# v.. u !
des Arosemena and his cabinet
Were guests this morning ot Lt.
Gen. W. H H. Morris at a show-
ing of tre film "Big Truth" at
Quarry Heights.
The movie is being shown In
Nicaragua Bars Export
Of Cotton To Czechs
4M ~w.> ..,u.n MANAGUA, Jan 18 (UP)^The
conjunction with the Canal Zone!Nlcaraguan government today
Crusade for Freedom campaign, i prohibited cotton producers from
End wi'l te used throughout the exporting raw cotton to Czech-
sthmus. according to a spokes- osiovakJa
man of tne Army beginning ear-
ly next month.
Death Is Punctual
TORONTO, Jan. IS (UP)__
John Virjint'i lifelong passion
for punctuality killed him.
The 68-year-old employe of
a moving firm had a perfect
record for getting to work on
time.
However he was delayed yes-
terday by a strike of local baa
and streetcar operators.
Unable te get a ride to work,
Vlnrint ran.
He collapsed and died en
The Czechs had offered to buy
the entire Nicaraguan cotton
ternal Revenue Office, Balboa, or
at the office of the law firm.
Collins 8c McNevin suggest that
in answer to the part: "The
claimant believes that this claim
should be allowed for the fol-
lowing reasons" the claimant
should Insert:
"I am one of more than 1,000
citizens who have joined In a
suit In the Canal Zone District
Court (Civil No. 3440) to have the
amendment of Sept. 23, 1950, to
Section 251 of the Revenue Act,
crop at a good price of $49 per declared unconstltuUonal. "~
ton F.OJt, but the government
consider.-, lt Improper to do busi-
ness with Soviet satellite coun-
tries.
KILLED BY OWN CAB
ROXBURY, Conn. (UP)Mrs.
Archibald Proctor, 65, parked her
automobile in the driveway of
her home to mall a letter. She
left the motor running. As she
walked toward the mailbox, the
car rolled down the
struck and killed her.
u~...--------------------------Copy
of our complaint has been serv-
ed on the Commissioner Of In-
ternal Revenue."
Meanwhile, In U. s. District
Court, attorneys for the U. 8. of-
ficials named as defendants in
the suit have been given an ad-
ditional two months In which to
BALBOA TIDES
Saturday, Jan. lt
High Lew
the driveway,;8:M a.m. 2:13 p..
S:ZI p.m. t;24 ..m.
file an answer to the bill of com-
plaint. .
The normal period for reply
had already been extended to
mid-January by agreement be-
tween plaintiff and defense at-
torneys.
Whalers, Mother""
Ship In Transit
Back To Norway
The "Anglo-Norse." mother
ship of a Norwegian whaling
fleet wa3 due to transit the Ca-
nal today northbound on Its way
to Norway
Seven whalers of the fleet re-
turned yesterday from the whal-
ing grounds and are also head-
ing for Norway. The eight ship
the KO.S-13 transited the Canal
Wednesday.
Fernle and Company are local
agents for the Ileet.
Ad vs. In Canada
Of Jane Russell
Ordered Toned'Up'
OTTAWA, Jan. 18 (UP).
Some of bosomy actress Jane
Russell's curves have been
covered from the sight of
Ottawa newspaper readers
at the request of self-ap-
pointed censors.
Action came after adver-
tisements for her new film
"HJa Hind of Woman" of-
fended some readers. The
advs. showed Jane bendlr-i
over Robert Mltchum and
gasing with a look of deep
affection Into his eyes.
Readers complained that
people might be less inter-
ested In the affectionate
look than the low-cut dress.
So the dress will now be
topped with dubbed-iu lace.
Churchill Stirs
Labor Critics
On China Hint
receiving, it is because income
tax as described above has been
withheld. Each of the annuity
checks you receive in the future
will be for the same amount as
this one. until further notice."
"All questions concerning Fed-
eral Income Tax are answered by
the Commissioner of Internal Re-
venue. Washington 25. D. C."
New Bill Allows
UP Deputies To Be
On Elections Jury
A bill which will allow candi-
dates to the National Assembly
to be members of the Electoral
Jury also, was approved In a
second and third reading last
night by the Assembly.
The rapid-fire passage cf the
bill was possible by holding the
secon dreading at 10:30 last night
and the third and final reading
at a session a few minutes af-
ter midnight.
At this final session the As-
sembly also gave passage in a
third reading to a bill which will
eliminate ail parties that fall to
pofiab-least 10,000 votes w the
next elections
Despite protestations that the
bill allowing Assembly candi-
dates to act also as electoral j ur-
ors would give rise to speculation
that the elections will not be
honest, the bill was approved In
the second reading last night by
vote of 29 to 5.
A breakdown of the vote show-
ed that 12 Deputies of the As-
sembly's majority bloc, eight of
the minority bloc and one Pana-
meftlsta Deputy voted for ap-
proval.
4-Master 'Pamir'
With German Cadets
Buffeted In Channel
LONDON, Jan. 18 (UP) A
gale-buffeted sailing ship carry-
ing 49 young German sea cadets
called for assistance in the Eng-
lish Channel today, but later de-
cided to carry on for Rio de Jan-
eiro.
The skipper of the four-mast-
ed barque Pamir radioed shortly
before 11 a.m. that the winds,
which had reached 60 m.p-h.,
were slackening, and he cancell-
ed his distress call.
Two British lifeboats had grop-
ed through % heavy snowstorm
to the side of the 47-year-old Pa-
mir after the Initial distress call.
Visibility was only 100 yards.
The 2,796-ton Pamir sent out
the distress call after she lost an
anchor while riding out the
storm about 30 miles southeast
of Margate.
The graceful old windjammer
is on a round-the-world train-
ing cruise, with a crew of 40 in
addition to the cadets.
Until three years ago she was
plying between Britain and Aus-
tralia and NeW Zealand under
the Mew Zealand flag, carrying
wheat and wool.
She was one of the last sailing
ships in the world In commercial
use.
Britain's Tiny Meat
Radon At New Low
LONDON. Jan. 18 (UP) .Brit-
ain's tiny meat ration is to be
cut from the present 14 cents
worth per person weekly to 12
cent* worth per person weekly.
Food Minister Owyllam Lloyd
George today announced the
cuts, effective Jan. 27.
The cut means that the me-
dlum-slaed lamb chop, or two
patties of hamburger, which
comprise a Briton's week's meat
ration will be even smaller.
But Lloyd George announced
the bacon ration would be In-
creased from three to four
ounces weekly.
He said the main reason for
the cut was that meat ship-
ments from Argentina had fallen
seriously behind schedule.
LONDON, Jan. 18 (UP) A
storm of criticism has arisen
here over what is Interpreted as
an intimation by Prime Minister
Winston Churchill In his Wash-
ington speech that Britain might
agree to aerial attacks on Red
China If the Korean truce is
broken.
Labor Party members are pre-
paring to bombard Churchill
with questions when Parliament
reconvenes Jan. 29.
They regard Churchill's re-
marks as a radical shift from the
Labor Government policy: "No
war with China."
Churchill promised to join lnj
a "prompt, resolute and effective
response" if the Reds broke an
armistice in Korea.
The Foreign Office here was
bombarded with questions as to
the meaning of Churchill's re-
marks.
An official spokesman re-
8lied cautiously: "The United
tates and Britain have heed
consulting other members of
the Uaited Nations on what to
do: 1) If these Is no truce, and
2) If a truce is broken."
Truce Trickery
To Bring Quick
UN Retaliation
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18 (UP) Communist China's
railroads, supply centers, power plants and other main-
land military targets face massive United Nations air at-
tacks if the Communists attempt any truce trickery in
Korea, according to informed sources here today.
The sources said the 16-nations which have troops
in Korea have reached general agreement to warn China
that any major violation of truce terms if and when
they are agreed upon will prompt quick retaliation be-
yond the Korean theater of operations.
Diplomatic and military offi-
cials here believe that the
chances are still better than
50-50 that an armistice will even-
tual^ be negotiated 'n Korea,
despite the Reds' stalling tac-
tics.
Looking ahead to the prob-
lem of enforcing ceasefire terms,
officials here are agreed that a
warning of swift punishment
should be placed before the
Communists at any time any
truce agreement is finally sign-
ter. eraanato. power plants, air-
fields and other installations in
Red China;
In Washington Churchill got ed^0^ndmU5rclts here said
an empnaM? an Ct tWt^^
The Truman Adnrlntotration,
cMCreassnea of both parties and
United 8tatea military men
quickly rebuffed the plea for; 2) fl -t Untted
"token forcea" which Churchill; a, bUktde wh0W! com-1 rived in the United States, dip-
made WtthOBt dvesjee^wwagt manders would be equipped with kunatlc informants said.
ffl**gj 5fci*2 to the "shooting orders" to halt Red
Joint session of Congress. shipping in Chinese coastal wa-
Dlplomatlc sources stressed te"- maior United Na-
Canal Zone, where British troops
could make these targets ex-
pensive for strategic bombers.
The United Nations decision
was tipped off by British Prime
Minister Winston ChurchUl ra
his address to Congress yester-
day and confirmed today by
other official sources.
In his speech to Congress,
Churchill said:
"We welcome your patienee-
in the armistice negotiatioM
and oar two countries are
agreed that If the truce we
seek Is only to be broken, our
response will be prompt, re-
solut* and effective."
The Idea ot giving the Redi
a stiff "truce break" warning
was originated by the United
States. It was Glscusaed with
I the other allies and support was
Nations'developed before Churchill ar-
The communique on the first
phase of the talks between Pre-
sident Truman and Churchill
hinted that the allied stnitegy
had been discussed. It said that
the two leaders "recognised..
United Nations strategy In the
event of a truce rupture by the I the overriding need to counter
Reds would not Include the i the Communist threat" In the
wholesale bombing of Chinese)Far East despite their differ-
ences on diplomatic recognition
of China.
are stationed under the 1936 An-
glo-Egyptian treaty.
In Paris, Egypt threatened to
appeal to the United Nations Se-, ttle... .
Stags* nenq rs-'Srxct',. ~r
&88S3!. o aasrsJSTAff ?.v Slate ol Emergency
nal Zone were heeded i stationed on Formosa.
In such event Egypt would also AlrstrategUts here refuse to. [WlafAri III FflWItf
invoke the Mutual Security pact say whether United Nations re- UVUalVU 111 L^Jpi
"r ttZ ..vn Arh nations, an UlUUon would include the, ,,.
bombardment of the Manrhur- lffj.B> Rare DaiflftaJI
ian airfields where 700 Red AIICF MlJ KdlQCU
Mlgs are now based.
The crack Red Jet fighters
of the seven Arab nations, an
Egyptian spokesman said.
J
French Assembly
Gives OK To Faure Japs Deny US Used
As New Premier
Pressure To Get
CAIRO, Jan. 18 (UP). A
state of emergency was declared
I throughout Egypt from dawn to-
day, following recent attacks on
bars and restaurants In Cairo
and Alexandria
Today is the Moslem sabbath,
ISBt/S Cl,,an RCC9n'Zed|rmddity^er^^
aSvtfygS^'Ag. TOKYO n 18 (UP The,-g use troubl- :
scmblv "esterdav and became Japanese Forelpn Office today! ine state or emergency aecia
&e7oun"st French"rentier in officially denied British sugges- tion followed a conference of
75 vean The vote was 401 to 101. tlon that the United States high Cairo police officials yes-
Faure is supported by all par-;pressured Japan into recogniz- terday.
ties in the Assembly except the;ing the Chiang Kai-shek's Na- They decided to take sWps
Communist bloc, which voted a- tionalist Chinese government on agamst raiders who told patrons
gainst h:m and the right-wing Formosi. rath*- than Mao Tse- vesterday: This is no time to
followers of Oeneral De Gaulle, tung's Kfd Chinese government be frequenting bars and restaur-
who abstained. 'on the mainland._______________' ants."
22-Hour Murder Trial Frees
One Man. Finds Other Guilty
One of Panama's most sen-
sational murder trials came to
an end today after almost 22
hours, when an eight-man Jury
returned a verdict of not-guilty l
for one defendant and a verdict
of guilty for another, who was1
tried in absentia.
Miguel Cayado, a Cuban, ac-,
cused of kidnapping and mur-
dering Bolivar Sucre, a collector
for a Panam grocery concern,!
on April 20, 1946, was acquitted
by the Jury after deliberating
for 40 minutes to end the trial
which began yesterday morning.
i and lasted all day yesterday and
I last night until 7:30 a.m. to-
day.
His co-defendant, Enrique Co-
rrales Domingues, who evaded
arrest by fleeing the country,
was acquitted of the kidnapping
charge but found guilty of mur-
dering Sucre.
A third man, Felix Oarcia
Moya, charged with being ar
accomplice, committed sulcldi
shortly after being captured bj
i the Secret Police in David fol-
BOLIVAR
...Still no trace
lowing Sucre's
appearance.
SUCRE...
after five years
mysterious dls-
Prosecutlng Attorney Jose M.
Vsquez Diaz had asked for con-
viction of the two men, despite
i the absence of a corpus delicti,
on a confession obtained from
Cayado.
Guillermo Mrquez, who de-
fended Cayado, produced testi-
mony, however, to prove that
the confession had been ob-
tained by "inhuman" torture
and argued that his client could
not be convicted for the murder
of Sucre when his body has nev-
er been found.
Anbal Ulueca. who defended
the absent Domingues. support-
ed Mrquez to his plea and
asked the Jury for an acquittal
claiming that the absence of
his client was not to be con-
strued as an attempt to thwart
Justice.
There is still some mystery
surrounding the disappearance
of Sucre, who was believed to
be in possession of a large
quantity of money when he
vanished, supposedly slain.




PAGE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
WMIB AND U*UaHID V THI PANAMA AMERICAN "111 INC.
rOUNDIO NILION MOUNSIVKLL IN Kit
HAWMODIO ARIAS. rniTO
87 H STRICT P O BO 134 PANAMA OF P
TlLtRHONI PANAMA NO 2 0740 'S LINft)
CASLI ADOMU PANAKKRICAN. PANAMA
COLON Orrier 12 17 Cintrai Avinui etTwiiN I2tm ano ISth strict
rORIIHN RlRRfStNTAHVt -JOSHUA R POWflTS INC
349 MADISON Avi NI YORK. Il'i N V
LOCAl V M* I
Ft* MONTH IN ADVANCI __________ S 1 70 S 2 30
ROB SIX MONTH*. IN AOVANCI 0 00 13 00
FOR ONI YCAR. IN ADVANC ----------*S SO 24 ,>0
Labor News
And
Comment
i *.
The Modern Sisyphus
Walter Winche
In New York
PRESIDENTIAL TIMBER
Momentous political events are also 1 Hepse personal dramas
They have elements of tragedy and humor. There are plots and
counter-plots.. .The diverse factors surrounding White House as-
pirants are the stuff of history. And It Is always fascinating to
detect seemingly Insignificant quirks of fate thnt play vital roles
in malor events. History's tapestry is composed of many tangled
threads.
' Timing is a crucial factor In a presidfntlal contest. It can be
disastrous for a candidate to announce his intentions too late or
too soon. A veteran politico was once queried: "When is the right
time to'start a presidential campaign?'.. He grinned: The day
after a presidential election."
Numerous contender for the highest office are motivated by
loftiest patriotic impulses. Some are driven by rampant egomania
or lust for power. And there have been party hacks who secured
nominations due to the support of potent political machines.
Horace Oreely was a giant In politics as well as journalism.
It isn't generally known that he was one et the Republican Party's
founders.. .Greeley had no intention ct running for President
until foes accused him of that ambition. The accusation gave him
the idea.
He conducted a vigorous and Intelligent campaign But the
decision to run was the most tragic blunder of Greeley's notable
career. His health was shattered by the arduous campaigning,
and his spirit was broken by his defeat.. .Weary and discouraged
he died several weeks after the election.
Greeley's most important political act was a behind-the-
scenes maneuver prior to the 1880 elec.lon.. .A political leader
named William Seward and Greeley were hitter enemies. Seward's
nomination seemed assured until Greeley arrived at the conven-
tion and went into action. He pressured c.elegates Into changing
their minds. The result was they switched to another candidate
Abe Lincoln.
It Is traditional for leaders to publicly express reluctance to
seek the presidency until the decisive moment arrives. Some are
Sincere. But the purpose Is generally psychological: It Is an at-
tempt to convince voters that their candidacy was Inspired by
public support rather than personal ambition.
W. H. Tart was a reluctant candidate.. .He declared: "I should
like to occupy myself with something more attractive than a
Sresidential campaign or dodging office seekers In the White
ouse. There could hardly be a weaker candidate than I would
be. The horrors of a presidential campaign and the political
troubles that come to the successful car.riidate rob the office of
the slightest attraction for me."
P.S : Taft's ambitious family changed his mind.
When Charles Evans Huches was publicly discussed as a
Wh! e House possibility he firmly objected.
His determination against running wjs so strong that at one
time he threatened to sue a State for nominating him 1 But he
ranand was an also-ran.
iyt General Sherman's historic statement: ''I will not accept If
nominated, or serve If elected." is frequently \ned as a model of
absolut? election. Bv* the f"r.t is Shemitin had While House as-
pirations. He removed h'm-elf from the lace because his brother
was also a contender and the General refused to compete with
him.
Jar.
scarcely mentioned In that respect before the 1920 convention. He
entered the Ohio presidential primary solely for the purpose of
gaining prestige in his campaign for re-election to the Senate.
A deadlocked convention made Harding the dark horse candi-
date. The political bosses chose him as their standard-bearer for
this Incredible reason: They believed he looked like a President.
Among marathon-runners in presidential races was William
Jennings Bryan. He was a three-time loser. So was Henry Clay.
- who coined the classic: "I'd rather be right than President." That
statement was not Inspired by any lofty concepts It was pure
itnir grapes...A newspaperman once Informed Bryan he was
ippalled by the many polticos gripped by Presidential fever. "It's
a political sickness." he groaned.
Bryan cracked: "And what a flattering disease I"
The rreatest obstarle a candidate ever faced and surmounted
vse 'he shocker that rocked the nation before Orover Cleveland's
lection. His opponents disclosed he had fatherd an Illegitimate
:hlld. He admitted It and wondespite circulation of the Jingle:
"Ma, ma, Where's my Pa? Going to the White House, ha, ha, ha!"
That recalls the time Charley Mlchelson (FDR's genius) was
called In to help run a crmialgn In a nearby State...The De-
mocrats were worried about a new personality in the opposition.
He was going over very big as Election D3\ reared "He's got to
'ie shopped," Charley yelled. "Go out and dig something up on
him."
Two days before Election, a lieutenant dah<-d Into headouar-
'-ers and breathlessly reported: "We've pit it! We've got it! He's
}Of a mistress!"
"Good Heavens!" almost wept Mlchelson "Don't let that get,
around! It'll get him another 100,000 votes!"
1F It Is Important to remember that grooming a presidential
contender demands intensive organization and great financial
Huport. There Is no legislation limiting the amount a candidate
nay snend during a pre-conventlon camralgn Huge sums are
* "Xpended on such campaigns. Stassen's supporters spent over one
million dollars in an effort to secure his nomination In '48.
Even to his crew Capt. Hen-
rlk Kurt ^arisen Is a hero
sitting In their union hall on
wewiork's watefiront the uiiie.
aay, most oi tne sailors v. no
aivid mm b-ioot waves sau
.ne i'iyiiig ,n.ci-prise com,
aave ueen saveo.
i-ieparing themselves lor tlu
secre. coasi Uuaiu nia.inBs c.
tne saga v . news right if the lrom page
the crew s, te of their captan
es "a goou .nan," but insiste*
.iiat "tne 2U ours between UK
ii minutes ore 7 a. m. c.
i,.c. ''I and 20 a m. ) jc.
.J, anen the i., g Enie-..ise
.,iieu over on nt ., uiigm
nave been used aifierentiy.
i ins was a minority opinion
gainst the wond, but It wa:.
. uongly neid by Bos n Artnu.
janssei.s tneie In tne &LI-.
..ationai Maritime v> ion hah
"The Captain i.1,..., n&vi
callea for heip soo.er," t h t
oosn said, "wmn uie wind wat
not too bad."
Reilectlng the crew was the
union newspaper aione ainoi..
.ne millions ui printed page.
...nss tne globe.
It questioned Capt. Carlsen'.
..som ox heading to tne sc.
lor -j nours oe.oie a scries i
wiucKs aennuted enoufcn wr.
.o turn the vessel on ner po
-iuc." ,
"Historians will, for a
long time, recall the cour-
age of Capt. HenrtK Carl-
.., who it'i.im/itu on um.
uMfi lo the teiy last bui
Kite majoniy o] lnc crt'w
yaihciea in the Union Ufa*
.nuisaay morning had ai-
, cady reached a verdict
ihat the ship might hai.
oeen saved if the skipper
nad headed or the neatest
tort, Cobh, immediately af-
>cr discov^ing nis ptio/u,'
said tne tile, Naiic.ai Ma-
ritime Union newspaper*
we waltea a long oeioie a
. .cisin was made to call or
..imp, Bos'n Janssens said In
jpeanlng of the snipper they
want to sail with again, but
..nn wnoiii tiiey disagree with-
out losing me respect Wiiicn
ne tuti.u mail 6i
.o' ...i,-,.. .. ie
tcuceu po.t 1 we hau ueen on
our way when trouble strucs.
us. When sne racked we were
I nines irom land."
'Hieres a
, a.en the union and the sv.asii-
.u...iing AMtttkiuatcn line long
tAid UlitUuiu.iv., . ...ncil woulu MmaU its s.ilps any-
..nere, even into tne uilental
v.ar zone.
The crew said that Capt.
Carlsen wired the Isbrand-
tcn line "Ship's cracked,
wailing for orders." The
.ne's commanders say no
uch wire was dispatched.
..<{ they received was wora
-n Dec. 7 that the ship
.iad craclced with no re-
quest for advice.
And cracked Indeed It had.
-ic crew reveals that they
-iOke out spilng wires ano
lasned the snip from uow to
stern to easj me ten.. m as It
split right .round the oottom
.um sice to side.
They said mat when they
vent up to Sparks" (Radio
operator David Greene) to sn
messages, tney were told they
couldn't get through since
oparks' ordeis we.e to keep
the radio ciear for orders from
..cw York.
Ihey toid their union leaders,
Joe Curran ana Iiedley Stone,
and counsel, do.man h,. Cooper
mat tney alan t
i.hy the Capltaln
^P/MFlHiTJrn

Harry's Al'ey
By BOB RUARK
i
NEW YORKThe workings of the executive
nd are wonarous Indeed to the man who knows
ti.e sea na- .y wntt he sees In the papeu.
coiiia iiuvt so I suppose there is ome dark logic behind
Mr. Truman's nomination of Atty Gen. Howard
McGrath to clean 'up government corruption, as
per recent promise.
Tills is the classic case of sending the mouse
clash coming, be- to bell the cat, or of nominating the prisoner to
try the Judge.
It seems only yesterdayand it was. b'gosh
that Mr. Taiman was remaining glumly silent
when the boys were asking him if he was going
to kick McGrath out of office. The guess was goou
that Harry was either yolng to Invite him to
quit or bounce him with the boot.
It also seems only yesterday that Harry was
trying to hire Judge Tom Murphy, as chief while
wing in charge of governmental stable-sweeping,
with McGratn's Departinnt of Justice as one of
the likely stables.
Looked as if big Muipn was going to take It,
too, but something slipped and he reared, balked,
and backed up. This left Harry with nothing
much In the way of a Hercules to wield the mop.
But It Is a peculiar switch, In an election year,
for Harry to perform such a heedless, politically
dumb deed as appointing the head of a suspect
agency to play Snow Wmte alter wave on cresty
wave of scented scandal. Even a minor ward heel-
er, It seems to me, would have made a great show
of housecleaning In orcer to soothe the scream-
ers.
Our Mr. Truman has maintained a reputation
as a practical politician, with an ability to act
for the best general interests of his party at,
sometimes, the expense of the state.
The retention of McGrath, despite the pungent
odors in and around his department, strikes'more
as semi-senile loyalty than as gem-hard political
thinking.

f" ography has. an Important influence upon history. New
s have dominated presidential contests Candidate in 14
21 elections since the Civil War srrved ns New York gov-
Thls Is why: Only four men have been elected President
the past century without carrying New York.
Ohlo also has produced an abundance of Chief Executive
iMpiJnes. James Cox was nominated because his opponent was
aSatlve of that State Party strategists decided **Sjtge eould be nullified by choosing another Ohloan.
rllie next Presidential election is les^ than a year away but
rl political news Is already dominated bv much pro-and-connlng
jjjout possible White House aspirants. Th. chafes and counter-
wprges, attacks and promises wl II be intensified as convention
*}pil oears.When Stephen Douglas was seekln the presidency
ttjipvmmed up campaign strategy in a single pursent line: "Admit
nothing and require your opponents to prove everything."
jacic when me snip first split
and sprung water at 11 minutes
oefore 7 a. m. on Dec. 27.
Then they were 240 miles out
of Cobh, tne. Ine Flying fcn-
terprise at that moment was
uoing 70 revolutions, normally
iu or 11 knots an hour laoout
12 miles), and could nave oeen
jack to Cooh in a day.
Says the crew, we couldn't
nss the ocean with split plates.
I* we had turnea, the wlna
would have been at our bares
they added.
The men on the eight o'-
clock watc.i 13 hours later,
repo, tea that for four hours,
from eight to 12 o'clock on
the night of the 27th,
hours after tne first crack,
there was balmy, smooth
sailing.
'i hen they could have turned
As a casual onlooker at the ship of state, I am
beginning to wonder inure and more if Uncle .
understand Harry has not been overrated as a smart poll- each other with bladders
didn't turn tlclan. and underrated as a mere machine hack. Even so early in 1952, we bid fair to revive

about since 8tu Symington decided to quit the
RFC, and Clark Clifford gave ud the President's
pink ear for private Industry.
The last year or so has been crammed with
Presidential gaucheries, including the brusque
dismissal of Gen. MacAithur as he'd fire an of-
fice boy, the assorted set-tos with the press, the
stupid attempt at press control by government
censorship, the Intemperate personal letters and
the gratuitous row with the Mr.rlnes.
The budding open antl.athy to Ike Elsenhow-
er, now, instead of a smooth ignoring Job, when
it was practically an open secret that Ike might
have had the Democratic nomination with Har-
ry's approval, la not the performance o a slick
politician. -i
Harrys hurried departure from vacation In
Florida to look at "world affairs." but really to
check on who was stealing what In his own con-
cern, was not a very suave operation, either.
Harry's message to the Congress the other day
didn't tell me a great deal ovar 1951's spirited
speech; the ring of conviction had a downright
tinny sound.
His passionate declaration of intent to swamp
up his own galley sounds considerably like hol-
lering Into a rain barrel as or today, with his
bouncing boy McGrath now wearing the sheriff's
star and an expression line J. Edgar Hoover.
Possibly, It Is all part of a scheme to ride dif-
ferently into the elections, with McGrath wear-
ing a mink toga to go with his jousting lance a-
galnst the evil windmills, and the gallant Gen.
vaughan peering through the deep-freeze door
he wears in lieu of vizor.
Having given 'em hell In the last campaign,
maybe Harry reckons to slide Into this one on
belly laughs alone. I
I give up, myself. The whole procedure down
there In Truman's Alley teeim more like a skit
from Allen's Alley, with t:nphasls on the ancient
Senator Claghorn, and t will not surprise me a
whlt If the kitchen cabinet winds up whacking
What class he managed to accumulate has
largely left him; there ain't much around to brag
burlesque, lacking only the reappearance of
Henry Wallace to make it unanimous.
G. Farben
By Peter Edson

WASHINGTON-(NEA)-Wisconsin Sen. Alex-
ander Wiley's surprise bunnlng for the Depart-
ment of Justice Allen Property Office under
Harold I. Baynton Is now aimed at bigger game.
The original target was to take potshots at
Democratic administra: inn favorites who got big
fees as executives and lawyers for government-
held alien properties seized during tne war. This
is bound to be good clay pigeon shooting for the
Republicans, If it scores any hits.
But now Senator Wiley's field of fire is broad-
ening Into a complete analysis of the extent to
which I. G. Farben, tli3 big German chemical
f PM.W MAfHOM
J
Drew Peartoft Soys: Tax reform must begin at His top;
Publishing tax returns would help cure frauds; In-
fluence peddlers should be required to register as
lobbyists. x
WASHINGTON.Tueiday that part of the American people
which pays Income taxes in quarterly Installments, filed final tas
estimates for 1951plus payments.
Most people gripe at filing taxes, and this time their tripe
wlli be legitimate.
Never before has our tax collecting system become so steeped
in fraud and favoritism. If it continues, the United state* could
follow the road of France, Germany and Italy where unfair taxes
and crooked collections have given those countries a boost corn
the road toward Communism.
To put a road-block on that road In this country, this column-
1st herewith suggests five means of preventing fraud in the
future.
Here are the proposals:
Reform must begin at the topWhen the White House phone*
the Justice Department tax division regarding n further hearing
{or a Missouri tax case after Harry SchwLnmer, attorney for the
resident's close Kansas City friend Tom Evans of Crown Drug
Stores has been hired In the case, naturully Justice Department
lawyers take the eue.
w. iU ,e.ttA,fe1?ral P^ down below. So also does the be-
havior or white House cronies on other matters.
Roosevelt gave the cue on Influence-peddling and tax-fixing
at the start of his-Administration when he forced Democratic
national commltteemen Arthur Mullen of Nebraska, Bruce Kram-
er of Montana and Bob Jackson of New Hampshire off the De-
mocratic committee because they peddled Influence.
Truman, near the end of his AdmlniUration, still hasn't left
a clear-cut cue as yet.
HK "ENTERTAINMENT" RACKET
he easiest, quickest way to cure tax favoritism
is by publishing tax returns. Partial publicity was practiced dur-
ing the first years of the Roosevelt administration, and today
f uL tax returns are published In some states, notabl> Wisconsin.
But Congress, which is more responsible for tax favoritism
than its sanctimonious members will ever admit, overrode FDR
and put the quietus on any publicity regarding Incomes.
So solicitous Were congressmen for tne big taxpayer that they
made It a criminal oXfense to leak or publish any Income tax
data,
This has played Into the hands of a lot of people, especially
the Influence peddlers and those who deduct the expense of pri-
vate yachts, private airplanes and expensive parties at the Stork
Club or tha Mayflower.
This was how Larry KnoW, the tax-fixer, was able to take
Washington officials on his private plane.
It was also why the World Series games have become one of
the biggest tax deduction rackets In New York. The U. S. Tres-
suiy, not the public, paid for most of the box seats at the World
series, thanks to the present system of diductlng lush entertain-
ment expenses from taxes.
while some entertainment expenses are Justifiable, it should
be remembered that the stenographer or salesRirl can't deduct
the cost of taking the boss to the ball game or to dinner at the
Stork Club on the ground that she's helping to keep her job.
Her taxes-are taken out of her salary with her paycheck each
week, and she gets no allowance whatever for ntertalEment.
OVERWORKED OFFICIALS
More personnelThough the number of taxpayera has jump-
ed from 7,288.000 to 89,270,000 since the Democrats came In ltt
1933, the number of lawyers In the Justice Department's tax divi-
sion has not Increased proportionately, while the number of tax
agents and employes In the Treasury has fallen far below the
proportionate Increase in tax returns.
Thus, while the number; ortajipyets has increased by ten
tlmea In 20 years, the number o Revenue Bureau employes has
increased by only five .timesfrom 11,542 in 1931 to about 55,000
today. oa|*i
Meanwhile the Justice Department*? tax lawyers actually
were decreased by Congressional economy from 90 In 1948 to 87
in 1951 despite the fact that the tax division handled 1.608 cases
in 1948 and 3,100 cases In 1951.
The tax division was, formerly, under .toe.,ousted, Lamar
Caudle: and though Influence was sometimes responsible for
stymied cases, more often It was Just pla'n overwork.'"
Register influence peddlers.The public has the Idea that
all lobbyists In Washington are required to register. This Is wrong.
Lobbyists hired to influence Congress are required by law to
register. But the law does not apply to the really blg-tlme lob-
byists who pull wires before Government bureausaueh as the
Treasury and Justice Department to fix tax cases.
Congress, however, could change this overnight by including
them In the lobby registration law.
What Congress should do also is Include themselves In tils
law For the biggest tax Influence is sometimes wielded by Con-
gressmen on behalf of constituents who have contributed heavily
to their election.
JUDICIAL REVIEW
Review of fixed casesOnce a year all big tax cases com-
promised without going to court, should be reviewed by a group
of retired judges.
Under the Judicial Retirement Act retired Federal judges
whe draw pensions from the government are subject to recall
from time to time for special work. Most of them have distin-
guished careers and a detailed knowledge of government.
Such a panel of retired judges could be called back to duty
ence a year to pass on the big tax cases that have been fixed out
of court. Probably it would be inexpedient to review the smaller
cases.
However, the mere fact that such a tevlew board was func-
tioning would be sufficient to discourage unjustified compromises.
As of today, the public has no way of knowing how these
cases are handled, and what political wire-puller has put across
a deal. For under the secrecy act the Secretary of the Treasury
Is not required to tell,
Civil serviceTaking the tax collecting system out of polities
has already been proposed by President Truman and Is a wise
move.
It will need considerable pressure fnm honest taxpayers to
put this across with Congress, however, for Congress, despite It*
current tax-probe end despite protests of supreme sanctity, has
among Its members some of the worst Ux-ilxers of all.
More than anything else they want tax collectors to remain
beholden to them as under the present political system.
the American government's vesting of General
Aniline would be knocked out This would pre-
vent the Allen Property Office from ultimate sale
of General Aniline prop-rtles and their nearly
3000 extremely valuable putentc
All this makes a fascinating story of Interna-
tlonrl high finance. In the interests of world
trust busting, it should no doubt be thoroughly
investigated and the record spread on open books.
As a matter of fact Senator Wiley doesn't even
Kretend to know all the answers on this case,
lost of the preliminary investigation has been
carried on by the 8en:;'or's office staff under
SIDEGIANCES
By Galbraith
jut easily, instead of wait- trust. 8tl11 ls tied up with its former American smart young Julius Calm, while Wiley himself
It YOUR FORUM THI EADEKS OWN COLUMN
HE MAIL BOX
! fit* Mail Sea H an frum oi rtudtn et Th Panama Amtt-
(ntai leMm ara rtceirtd amrelull sna ara tund., in a whell ce-
KtVittiel inner.
it re* c.nt.pbut. a lefter den ke Imeoflent It M d.tm I aeaeai rtc
b 4er. letter ara avbliihed in the eider received
Meat* try te t the letter* limited to e eee length
leentity of letter writer* it MM la itriefit canfidtnee
Thra newtpaaer num.. no rweaairfcjlltv ** itetemcnti *i eelnlor
"ted la latter* Irani reader*.
LET'S ALL 'SHELL OUT' TOGETHER
BOX 44S
Balboa, Canal tone
5^
Pejuima American
Ptrgama City, Panama
To^those Interested in Conehology:
i_.. has been suggei'.ed that a conchla*.!:' rarlety be orerr
lax1' 'S2r no00* 1* studying and collecting mollusxi (shells)
Piense drop a postcard to Box 443. Balboa, with your namr
qjress. and phone number.
A group will be organized If there is sufficient interest.
A Fellow Concholof 1st.
i-:3 to change course in a gale,
niey knew there was pig iron
in the Number Two and Num-
ber four holds and that the
shifting boards (to hold the
cargo in place) might crack In
the gale, but they didn't com-
plain .
"When the crack came aft
of the Number Three hold across
the mam deck down to the
lira plate on each side," ac-
cording to Bos'n Janssens "we
looked her over finding three
more crocks on port and star
board on No. 3eighteen inches
longwe cemented the cracks
and lashed her lrom port to
starboard."
Then It was that they ex-
pected to turn about.
Finally, the captain told them
to jump. It was safe for them
although Seaman Jose A. 8
Marti was thrown back on -deck
three times by the waves be-
fore he could swim clear with
he passenger he was escortm?
or.-n the side.
Fe-rlessly, the captain was
lone. But the crew says hf
sfeculd have put back Into port
and the Flvln= Lnterprise would
still be afloat
subsidiaries.
They Include General Aniline and Film, Gen-
crrl Dyestuff and the Scherlng corporatons.
Assets of these three cjmpanles are worth a-
round 150 million dollar. Their U. 8. properties
were seized by the Allen Property Custodian in
1942 and the government, still holds them.
Reports recently received by Senator Wiley's
office indicate that General Aniline, through its
sales agent General Dve.stuff, l*as let contracts
for a number of foreign distributorships.
Key figures in these foreign sales agencies have
been Identified as former officials of the I. O.
Farben chemical trust.
This may be pure coincidence But it has led
Senator Wiley's staff to inquire Into the extent to
which the U. 8. government has broken up -the
German trust's hold ovci its forma American
subsidiaries.
At the start of the war Interhandel claims It
owned majority stock control of General Aniline
and its affiliated computes. General Aniline was
organized as an American corporation, however,
and its principal officers were Oermans who had
become naturalized American eltizens.
It ls the contention of the U S. government
that Interhandel was in reality a dummy cor-
poration which was In tUin owned by I. O. Far-
has been in Europe and Wisconsin
The 8enator. however, intends to introduce k
resolution calling for a Berate Judiciary commit-
tee probe of all Alien Property Office activities.
Senator Wiley Is ranking Republican on that
committee. Whether tlv Democratic majority
would allow him to run the show ls questionable.
If the investigation ur.covers anything more
than who has been riding on the alien property
"gravy train," as the Senate calls It, a big staff
of lawyers and expert accountants will have to
dig deep In corporation record caves for many
months. Jn an election year, thi public may not
be too Interested.
There ls one other factor which may explain
a lot. When the resolution to end the state of war
with Germany was before the U 8. Senate last
October, Senator Wiley proposed an amendment
It would have authorized the daughters of Er-
nest Harbach to bring lu.t against the U. 8. gov-
ernment for recovery uf .hares in General Dye-
stuff, which they formerly owned but later sold
to the Allen Property Office, through General
Aniline.
Ernest Harbach was ft'r many years president
of General Dyestuff and an I G. Farben man-
ager In the United Stales.
Senator Wiley declare his amendment was
merely a matter of service to enable a natlve-
The Swiss holding comjany. it ls Claimed, was born American citizen to establish his rights In
set up to conceal German ownership and so pre- court. But the Senate refused 10 pass the Wiley
vent seizure of I. O. Far! en properties in the V. amendment. Senator Wiley's Interest in inves-
S. under the alien property laws. tlgatlng the Alien Property Office began at that
If Swiss ownership can be proved in eourt, then
?"-r
t. a mo. v Mt a
eora. i*ti a |a artwai. my
"When the boy Is sway at school he writes on* In n whlljv
or phoapsthat's why you mise him eo much when ho t.
.


w**m^
miDAT. JANUARY II. IMt

.tire* PANAMA AMKBICAN AN 'INDEPENDENT DAliT NEWSPAPER
PAGE
-. -
Carlsen Rides Down Broadway;
1Don't Think I Deserve This9
Handy Device
Answer to Prevfoua Puzila
HORIZONTAL
M Depicted
iiMuurovnt
U Sewing
implements
14 Utopian
15 Anger
16Exung
IS Edge
19 Palm lily
10 Term o
endearment
12 Behold!
W Symbol for
ttrium
14 Suffix
3 Scottish
sheepfold
4 Hypothetic!
itructuril unit
5 Merriment
6 Olympian
goddess
7FonBtr
Russian ruler
8 Pastries
HMd(ab.)
10 Over (contr.)
U Bred
12 Masculine
appellation
IT Symbol for
Mknlum
I 2111 -iialfli J LdH
ixlliaaeaialaVUl-iW
Mis' C V
ugii**!
llaa '
II J'_'ill 'i SJi i
:< ; un u: :i <
26 Heavenly body20 Abandonad
28 Dissolve gtonn,
2 Greek portko
27 Mountain lake
29riufr
SO Very (Ex.),
39 Exclamation
of sorrow
40 Handle of
a sword
43 On top of
yiwim Zl Storm wvn twpw*
II Biblical weed M Writers' marks 43 Musical not*
Couple
13 Black Earth
etty
14 Anglo-Saxon
slave
SI Against
36 Drunkards
17 "Palmetto
I State" (ab.)
II Symbol for
thoron
Exclamation
41 Meddles
47 This device U
.' used-
home and
offices
46 Ignited
SI DUdam
81 Goddess of
infatuation
M Texan mission
M Undulates
it Hone
URespects
ftWICAL
1 Distinct part
JPersUn fairy
25 Motive
44 Peel
45 Goddess of
discord
46 Entranced
47 Entry in a
ledger.
48 Promontory
90 Paving
substance
92 Malt drink
94 Volume
96 Hebrew Utter
of it I tailed to bring my
hip into port."
Carlaen arrived In New York
by airplane after a flight from
-V
>
'
Notice of Meeting
Tolde Stockholders of
Hleles Inleramericanos, S. A.
Panam City, Panam, January 15, 1151.
Van are hereby notified that a Special Meeting of
the Stockholders of Hoteles Interaraericanos, S. A., will be
held In the Salan Panamericano of the hotel El Panama
located at Panam City, Republic of Panam, at 4:M p.m.
on the list day of Jannary, 1151, for the following for-

1. To amend Article I of the Articles of
Incorporation;
i. To amend Article I ef the Articles of
Incorporation;
I. To amend Article 11 of the By-Laws;
.4. To elect the Directors of the corporation;
S. To transact inch other business as may
- properly come before the Meeting.
ROBERTO EISENMANN
President
NEW YORK, Jan. 18. (UP) Capt. Henrik
Kurt Carlsen rode up the Highway of Heroes to-
day in a deluge of ticker-tape.
The little skipper of the sunken Flying Enter-
prise was showered with confetti, cheered by more
than 300,000 persons and praised with a "well done"
by the mayor of the nation's largest city.
But the durable Dane took the thunderous wel-
come as calmly as he did his 13-day, one-man bat-
tle against a North Atlantic storm. He still main-
tained that he was no hero.
-I will never forget one mo-| Captain Carlsen, seated on
ment of this day," the Danish- the tonneau of the open car,
born hero said, "but I don't waved his gold-braided cap and
think I deserve this. Just think smiled. While others shivered
in overcoats In a 40 degree
temperature'and a brisk wind.
Carlsen appeared to be comfort-
_ able in only a new captain's
Shannon. Ireland, that had been uniform. ___
delayed by mechanical trouble.! His wife. Agnes, and daugh-
He was given a few hours in,ters, 8onJa, 11, and Karen, 7.
which to see his wife and daugh- riding in the second car,
ters and catch up on his fought back tears when they
sleep and then the good ship heard the cheers. _____
Manhattan became his craft Ion Two thousand presons march-
tne day i ed In Carlaen's parade. There
After travelling from Brook-! were bands, mounted police and
lyn to the Battery on a Coast:an honor guard of 350 cadets
Guard cutter, he rode 12 blocks at the Merchant Marine Aca-
uo Broadway to City Hall In demy. The cadets, who some day
the same automobile that car- will be masters of merchant
ried Gen. Douglas MacArthur ships of their own, marched In
over the route of heroes nearly V formation in front of the
valiant skipper and stood at
attention during the City Hall
ceremonies.
The marchers reached City
Hall at about 12:30 p.m., and
Carlsen was greeted by city of-
ficials.
The platform on which he
was guest of honor was a re-
plica of the stern of his lost
ship. A smokestack on a City
Hall balcony belched bursts
of steam, and pennants hang-
ing from a mast spelled out
the messages "S.S. Hying En-
terprise. Well done," and
"Welcome home."
Mayor Vincent R. Impelllt-
terl awarded Carlsen the city's
, certificate for distinguished'
'and exceptional public service
and a gold medal of honor on
a bright red ribbon.
"New York city's street of
heroes has just acclaimed
Army Expects Big
Savings In Making
Vehicles In Future
Substantial savings in auto-
motive procurement are antl-l
clpated as the result of a pro- i
gram to simplify the producton ,
olf basic motor vehicles, the De-
partment of Army announced re- j
cently.
Estimates on the amount of
money to be saved by this cost
conscious move will not be re-
leased until completion of many
varied tests.
The project involves what the
Army calls its "primary wheeled
vehicles," which are trucks of
the one-quarter, three-quarter.:
two-and-one-half and fiveton
types.
Specially built models of these
have been stripped of fire ex-
tinguishers, certain brackets and
other features. In addition, they
have been constructed under re-
laxed specifications as to water- '
proofing and "radio suppression,"
the later pertaining to the de-jlng changes and substitutions of
gree of interference with which less expensive components.
radios can be operated In the
vehicles.
Various other cost conscious
This program was developed
from recommendations of a Mil-
itary Wheeler Vehicle Panel
which met at Fort Monroe, Vir-
and cost saving steps also have'ginia, last spring to determine
been taken, including engineer- what economies could be effect-
ed in production without Impair-
ing operational efficiency.
Modified versions of such ve-
hicles are currently undergoing
service experiments at Fort Knox,
Ky.. following a series of en-
gineering tests at the Aberdeen
Provlngs Grounds. Aberdeen. Md.
/ / lodern 11 Lasterpieces...
By CIA. Di LUDIO GONZALEZ IV., S..
Every piece is an original creation ..
designed to sell on sight to discriminat-
ing homeowners everywhere.
..
'

CIA. DULCIDIO GONZALEZ N., S.A.
h
Avenida Cuba and 28th Street Phone 3-3371
I
a year ago.
Cr
Jharles A. Lindbergh travel-
led the same route when he re-
turned from his trans-Atlantic
flight 25 years ago.
English Channel swimmer
Gertrude Ederle and avlatrlx
Amelia Earhart were among
others who have been cheered
In this skyscraper canyon.
But none was more modest
or unassuming that the five-
foot-tall Carlsen, whose cour-
age attracted the attention of
the entire world during his
stand against the sea.
"I'm completely overwhelm-
ed," he said in a soft Danish
accent "I've never seen one
of these things except In the
movies. It seems unreal and
It doesn't seem Ilka I quite fit
Into it."
The stay-put. skipper manag-
ed to-wave a Jaunty hand, how
Drive
the Aiial-Range'
'52 jtantiae
ed to wave a jaunty hand,now- heroes has Just acclaimed a
ever, at the crowds who cheered gallant sea captain, not because
him ali-mn IVio rnnte Th rrnwH v.- -v.**-. 4a mtntt ahAarrf Yi\e
him along the route. The crowds
from the Battery to City Hall,
Jammed from store fronts to
' police lines, cheered, clapped
and whistled.
Stenographers tried to break
through police lines to embrace
the hero skipper. And from the
skyscraper windows poured tick-
er tape, confetti and scraps of
shredded telephone books.
Boy Scout News
SECOND FLOOR
GRAND SPECIAL SALE
BEDROOM a, P .
STAINS NOW 5-75
Before 6.75
READING |QAA
LAMPS NOW lo-0
Before 19.50 ""
UVINGROOM *
lamps Now 1650
Before 18.50- ,*V ,w
BEDROOM ... ,
lamps NOW 0*5
Before-7.t5 '*WF V
PLASTIC
MATTRESS
COVERS IJftW A 7r
Before 5.50 HOW *'>
PLASTIC
33?' NOW 1-95
Before 2.50
NOTE: These articles are reduced for one day only.
Buy NOW
SECOND FLOOR 5* AVENIDA
he chose to stay aboard his
wounded ship, but because his
courage and indomitable spirit
have stirred the world," the
Mayor said.
"Our eight million New York-
ers, numerically almost twice
the' population of his native
Denmark, salute this modern
ship's master of stout heart be-
cause they, like all the world,
admire the traits of character
that saw him through his or-
deal." ? i
- Blonde Mrs. Carlsen fought
The annual meeting of the lo- back tears and daubed her eyes,
cal council of the International Sonja cried openly, but pretty
Boy Scouts of the Canal Zone mtle Karen appeared to be en-
will be held In the household arts joying herself,
room of La Boca high school this Carlsen, who sat throughout
Sunday morning, commencing at the ceremonies with his brows
11 o'clock. knitted, smiled broadly as the
All members are requested to medal was hung around his
attend as there are some impor- MC^ He n[ he was "over-
tant matters to be transacted. I whelmed and amazed at the re-
. -.t .ceptlon I've been given today."
Final plans for the annual c,risen said he would like
to share his day with the
passengers of the Flying En-
DOLLAR FOR'DOLLAR YOU CAS'T BEAT A FONTIACl ,
Take the wheelVOUJSelf.. for the Driving Thrill of your Ufejfi
camporee of the council govern-
ing the-IBSCZ were drafted at a
meeting of the council staff held
last Saturday.
The camporee will take place
in Santa Cruz Jan. 25 to 2*7 on the
site enclosed by the school, gym-
nasium and clubhouse.
Sunday 27th has been desig-
nated visitors' day, and the pub-
lic is invited to Inspect the camp.
Sunday morning, Jan. IS, found
22 scouts' and senior scouts, rep-
resenting seven troops on both
sides of the Isthmus, -participat-
ing in a hiking and mapping
course to complete the first class
requirements. '
Scout Executive Raymond
George administered the course,
with a teat following. He was
assisted by Romeo Q .Miller, D.C.,
Dudley Woodman, A.D.C., Dis-
trict Committee Chairman Ed-
ward Oreen, and Maurice Mc-
Lean, neighborhood commission-
er for Camp Coiner.
Edward Green of Camp Coiner
was reelected Atlantic District
chairman at the annual meeting
held in Silver City Thursday
night, Jan. 10. and Cyril Thomas
as vice chairman.
The Pacific District leaders
were also reelected when the
committee met in Paraso the
night of Jan. la. They are Hilton
D. Perkins and C. A. Cragwell,
chairman and vice chairman, re-
spectively.
A special committee of the lo-
cal council, IBSCZ, has been ap-
Klnted to select the boys and
ldert who will represent the
movement at the First Caribbean
jamboree to be held in Jamaica
March 5 to 17 this year.
Final selections were made at
the second meeting of the com-'
mittee Thursday night 17th. and
the names will be submitted at
the meeting of the local council
this Sunday.
Comprising the committee are
William Jump, president Ed-
ward Oreen and Hylton D. Perk-
ins, district committee chairmen;
j. A. Hassocks, scout commis-
sioner; Romeo O. Miller and
Pearl E. Ford, district commls-,
sloners; Hamilton H. Lvales,
council chairman on advance-
ment; Nathan S. Bryan, chair-
man committee on Jamboree
standards; Ellis Fawcett, chair-
man special committee on ways
and means, and the Scout Exec-
utive.
terprise, who unquestioningly
jumped into the sea when he
ordered them to.
He also paid tribute to the
vessels that stood by him dur-
ing the days in which he tried
to save his ship, and to the
crew of the tug Turmoil, which
tried futllely to tow the Enter-
prise to port.
"It was a marvelous piece
of seamanship that you cant
understand unless you've seen
It," he said.
We want you to be among the first driver In
America to personally experience a basic
advancement in motor car engineering-
new Dual-Range* performance.
Dual-Range performance means that Pontlac
has combined a powerful high-compression
engine, with GM's new Dual-Range Hydra-
Matic Drive* and a new high-performance,
economy axla to give you selective perform-
ance for any driving condition.
In the Traffic Range you have tremendous
acceleration and nap and go! At the touch
of a finger you can be In the Cruising Range,
riding so smoothly, economically and eltort-
leealy you almost feel you're coasting. Come
in and drive itfor sensational new proof
that dollar for dollar you can't beat a Pontiac!
Optional ml Ettrm Coil
TMK f0W CM \OV WAXT WMEK YOV WANT IT WaTSWaT Y0V WANT IT
lak-Caaipr*'*!** EhbIb* -
i \, u.|..nlr H.dr-Mllr^
0 w rro.< Axla

PANAMA
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY!
CIV A, S.A.
CADILLAC GMC PONTIAC
-

COLON


'
AGE FOB
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
_
FRIDAY, JANUARY IS, IMS
Cargo and FreightShips and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
"Shipping & AirLine News
TERRY
Knuiisen Line Inspector
Aboard "Anna Bakke''
Til. An (.. Bakke arrived at
midiiiv':'! l-i night Iron Chile
and ianrlcc! wo passengers ai
Cristobal. Oiif of ihcm. Herbert
Bats is the Inspector General or
the Knudwn Line. Local agents
lor the ship. f-'eiiton and Com-
pany revealed ilia*. Bals will
establish headquarters for the
Knudsrn Line In Cristobal He
has been on an inspection trip.
The Anna Bakke leaves today
for Antwerp and Scandinavian
ports.
"Barbara Hrovii '
An-vni:: Today
The Barbara Brovin Is sched-
uled to arrive todav in Balboa
from Esmeralda. Ecuador. The
Standard Fruit Company ship is
earning a cargo of bananas to
New' York.
Grace Line Ship
Arrives Today
The Santa Margarita arrives
In Cristobal today with the fol-
lowing prominent passengers:
Juan Jose Fernandez, secretary
of the Chilean Embassy In Lon-
don; Edward Henrlquez, of Colon
and Mrs. Henriquez: Ricardo
Sztyrle. military attache of the
Argentine Embassy In Bogota,
Colombia, accompanied by his
wife and son.
O'Reilly; Sgt. Catherine A. Otis;
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Parker;
Ira M. Price; Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Perper; Miss Therese M. Quinn;
and Miss Gene vie vp F. Quinn.
Pvt. Jack Rego: Mrs. Mildred
Rodriguez and son; SrI. Leonard
E Saladyga; Mrs. Mildred J.
Sauter: Dr. and Mrs. John E.
Scott and daughter; Mr and
Mrs. John J. Sparler; Mrs. Joyce
Sebastian; James R Sponagle:i
Mrs. Nora E. Sterritt; and
Walter Stolz.
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Vollmer;!
Walter Ward; John A Watson;!
Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph B. Weiler;
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weinstcin;
Mr. and Mrs. Howard L. Went-,
worth; and G. Raymond Young.
nWBw i$T
THE IEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
MAERSK LINE
Accepting Passengers for
SAN FRANCISCO
by
m.8. "NICOLINE MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 23rd
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC
Tel: Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
. SVTRA PBECAimOU* >** MIN6 TAKaW WITH
15 \TUB NSXT PLASMA MIRWBKT. ONLY ley PBOPL\llSUX WHIL I LOOK. AFTTX
~KNOW WBH IT |4 TO AIUUVB. IP AN ATTB-MPT IS iPINIII.
A1AP6, I'LL FRY 'M ALL UWTJL I BNP THB
GUILTY VBKMIN.
THIS IS VICTORIA TBMP4OT. XM CALLM6 TO TBU.
VO THAT VVB'LL HAVE TO CANCBL TH NBrT JO
I'M MCOMIQ PRI&HTBNW.
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
GOT HI SGOAT
BT MERRILL BLOS
/'BUT TMAf GOATS STORY MIGHT- ] Msu
Be cm the level.' its 7Better
happened BEFORE IM JZ^JS&r
S. S. Cristobal
Advance Passenger List
Ninety-nine passengers are
* scheduled to arrive on the Isth-'
' mus Monday on the Cristobal, |
according to the advance pas-
senger list from the Panama
Line offices at Balboa Heights.
Paul B. Andrews; Miss Rosa M.
, Arauz: John R. Barr; PR-Joseph
B. Bates; Mr. and Mrs. Lewis.
i F. Braden and twochidren; Mr.
and Mrs. Edwin B. Cain; Estus
E. Caldwell; Robert Carp; Mrs.
Florence Carp; Mr. and Mrs.
I Paul J. Coleman; Mr. and Mrs.
{ Seymour L. Cromwell .and Miss
Ann E. Cuneo.
Sg Walter DlMarla; Cpl. John
. F. Easterday. Jr.; Mr. and Mrs.
; Morris F Fidanque; Mr. and,
'Mrs. William Freder; Mr. and,
. Mrs. Hugh Fulton; Mr. and Mrs.
Garfinkfe Paul W. Gladfelter;
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Green: Sgt.1
Julia E. Grote; Sfc. and Mrs.
Joseph J. Hrelja and daughter;
and Mr. and Mrs. William J.
Jovce and 2 children.
! Sgt. and Mrs. Chester R.
< Kelly: Lawrence Kelly; Mr. and
'-Mrs. Aliene A. Kersch and 2
children: Mrs. J. W. Kirchner; I
"TOT? and Mrs. John J Kolenda;
Mr. and Mrs. Louis C. Kridle;
Kenneth Lander: Mrs. Annaber-,
ta Leap: Mrs. Erma Lee; Mrs.
Virginia Levenson; and Joseph F.
Lynch. ,
Dr. and Mrs. Leon J. Malock:
Mrs. Edna H. Mathels; James
B. fcrel: Mr. and Mrs. Carl T. I
Mosej: C. W. Moses; Maurice
A. Nichols; Mr. and Mrs. E. L.
SKI.NKS SNEAK IN
JAMESTOWN. R. I. 'UP' !
ThiS-tsland community of 1.700,
Is being invaded by a small!
army of skunks that come a-
cross the toll bridge from Saun-
derstown, paying only a scent. I
To! collectors say the smelly |
additions to the town's popula-1
tlon sneak over at night wheni
they can't be seen.
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGELES
MEXICO
-4* t
Wonderful vacations at the
year' lowest rates await
you in Mexico and the
U. S. A. And there's a new
low combined fare to Los
Angeles... $ 380.80 round
trip. Chicago is no more
than half a day away, via
Miami, with DC-6 service
all the way... Your choice
of 2 services to Miami: "El-
Inter Americano" and "H
Turista" flight!.
Set your Trartl Agtnl *r
woaio-
MOST IXFMNNC
(mum
PanAmercan
HiMiiu 4/XMiyy
Panama: L Sfratl No. 5,
Tal -070
CoW S*Ut BW, Tel. WJ
c .
. UV4-H-P
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Arrives
Cristbal
Great White Reel
New Orleans Service
-------------------------------------------------*TT-
S.S. Quirigua .................................Jan. Iff
S.S. Levers Bend .......>.......................Jan. 25
*S.S. (hiriqui....................... ..........Jan. 27
S.S. Quirigua .............................-----Febr. 5.
S.S. Fiador Knot........................ -----Febr.
'Handlinf Refriferated Chilled and Gtnrra< Care
Arrives
Cristbal
New York Service
S.S. Jamaica ..................................Jan. 19
S.S. Comayagua ..............................Jan. 22
S.S. Cape Ann ................................Jan. 2
S.S. Talamanca...............................Jan. 26
S.S. Morazn ..................................Jan. 26
S.S. Heredia ...................................Jan. 29
Wcckl) Sailing to New York I Anil*. San FmncUa, Sutil*
Occasional sailings lo New Orleans and Mobile.
KHHlllM SAILINGS non CKISTOBAL TO WEST COAST
CENTRA! AMERICA.
Bur THE WMOLE
THlNO WAS
UNCANNY out-
side Of IMF CANS
RATTLING IN MIS
-, TUMMY*/
AN'THIS GOAT
SAID HE QDUI.D
HELP us/ 7 hippo j
I "TELL* HE
WAS REALAS
LIFE! I could
EVEN SMELL AN
OLD INNER/
ON HIS.
BREATH.
Cristbal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
S.S. Quirigua ..................................Jan. 22
S.S. (hiriqui.....(Passenger Service Only).....Jan. 29
S.S. Quirigua .................................Febr. 5
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 28
MAERSK LINE
. ACCEPTING PASSENGERS FOR,.
NEW YORK
by
m.8. "LEXA MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 24th
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781 Balboa: 1065
TELLTALE TAIL
BT V. T. BAMLIN
ALLEY, I JUST V-*<. WHY, MY STARS.
CAN'T SEE ANY/ YCANT, \ THOSE LOOK ,
REASON FOR / EH?WELL, \ ALMOSTLIKE/ WHATCHA
OLD DINNY [ LEMME I TEETH / MEAN.AL-
ACTING UP \ 6HOVV A MARKS/ / MOST? THEY
THI6 WAY/
YOU.'
ARE TEETH
MARKS.'
-f^*
ROOTS AND HER BIDDIES
NO FOOLING
\ ?x wwtcuY f/nVi*'.
00V WAS VW3WS%YV
BWMMM AXr<>f\y '.
BT EDGAR MARTIN
W1
CAPTAIN EAST
t..
BAFFLED AGAIN
I
BT LESLIE TURNER
WELL. I MUST BE GOING
SUM. BUT I'D SURE LIKE
TO KMOW HOW COQUINA
M AM AGED TO CRO5 KJU
UP,'*| SPITE OF EVERY
PRSCAUTKHJ VOU-
fveryboy Heads Classified*
CHRIS WELKEN. Planeteer
THE COLD FACTS
BT KISS WINTERBOTHAM
PR! 1 ILIA'S POP
THE COLD FACTS '
BUT, MAJOR'. AFTER THAT SEARCH
AMO I CAM VMOW COULD HE P055IBLV HAVE-
rOKOW IT MORirTGOTTEN IT THRU CU*TOW$?!!
I MAY NAB M
DWKWUSOP
THtOTIPP! OP
COURSE, HELL
BE OW GUARD
AMO MM LOSE
MEtCfORE-
urn
-air*
HOlLMWl
UHCOLWI
fuHMEL I
VOUTELLMEI HLIKMCm\mk-SOXKil
15 HE'S DOME IT TIME AMD kiAPTATURN EA9T|
AGAIM, UNDER ALMOST THE /TOWARD THE 0WP
SAME COMDITION!^/SOOM, ANO LOSE
TRACKOTHECASeJ
T/-?-> W~L* L W\ *W ALW*MS NONO0
JZ^^*2wlkX>-Mn HE OH? it !
t-9
VIC FLJJTt
LOOK IN THE MEAT TRUCK
BT MICHAEL CMAJLLEI
BT AL VERMEER
' m .. u i >., ., m t^^.
CGS BUNN1
HE TOOK TOO MANY CUTS
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
with
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OCR WAT
Bj J. R WILLIAMS
JU#T l*\AG#, ^ I H-HOPE
PUG WC'Ke
TAPUAmNG / N-NOT
P0A _-^ LATe
9+X8KK ~\ FOK. The
coLurae/ ; co^^bncz-
l /V\Y 66TER ANNIE iS OOiNN wXTH
me FLU, SO I'M GOING TO
HELP HER A PEW DAYS/-
IF I COtAB 6f\C< AND PlND
MtX) CAISiNG CROCODILES iN^.
THE gATUTUB, OR PiGS- &?
KNiXKLES'ON THE PARLOR
FLCOfc?,YOU'LL BE 6ER\JED
A FAST ORD6R. OP
tft-waDOM.
EGAD, MARTHA.' VOU
/MAY DEPART \MITH
UTTER TRANQUILLITY.'>l
The manJor will Be <
conducted with the
dignity and
decorum op-
the british
Museuv..'
YOU KWOVJ
ME.'
O
./,
0
" fMARTHA,
fKNOW




ftMiAf. C*TT.' 1. &
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE PIT*

pacific Z^Ocie
ti

AMBASSADOR AND MRS WILEY TO
JIONOR GENERAL AND MRS. KIEL
The Ambassador of the United States to Panam and
Mrs. John Cooper Wiley will entertain with a dinner to be*
riren Tuesday ermine, January 22, at the Embassy Re-
sidence on La Cresta in honor of the Commanding Gen-
eral, Caribbean Air Command, Brieadier General and Mrs.
Emil C. Kiel.
Covers will be laid for twenty fear.
Fifteenth Naval District, held a i President presided. Chairman
luncheon-meetintr on Tuesday atfor the luncheon was Mrs. R.
the Quarry Heights Officers'IH. Buckley assisted by Mrs. L.
. New members of the Club1 Jones, Mrs. V. P Oordoi
group who witnessed the first
counting; of the votes for Queen.
Votes will be counted Sunday
evening during the regular buf-
fet in the patio to determine
which young lady is in the lead
for Queen at that time.
YMCA To Present Puppet Show
The Balboa YMCA will pre-
General And Mrs. Howie Company and Mrs. Bernard Bur-
Entertain i dick: sailed today for tJew York
Brigadier Oen. Robert Howie,'aboard the 8. 8. Panama after |ent a puppet how this evening
the Chief of Staff of Caribbean a visit of-two weeks to the Isth- at 7:S0 v*. Uit au.tmo1rlurn t0 "
Command, and Mrs. Howze were mus during which time they were
hosts Tuesday evening to a group guests at the Hotel Tivoll and
of their friends at a cocktail
Sarty held at their home on
uarry Heights.
of
General And Mrs. Cranston
Arrive For Visit
The Lieutenant Governor
the Panama Canal and Mrs.
Herbert D. Vogel have as their
housstruests Mrs. Vogel's broth-
er-in-law and sister. Brigadier
General and Mrs. Joseph A.
Cranston who arrived yesterday
from New York for a visit to the
Isthmus.
Consul And Mrs. Hermann
For Cocktail Party
The First Secretary of the Le-
gation and British Consul in Pa-
nama and Mrs. Alexander H. B.
Hermann were hosts to a group Christmas holidays in San Jose.
Of their friends Wednesday even-,costa Rica,
in* at a'cocktail party held at
Hotel Washington.
produced by a professional group.
Tickets to the entertainment
may be bought at the door.
Watereolor Exhibit Open
Through Saturday
The exhibition of watercolors
recently returned from
tended visit in Europe.
an ex-
Club. New member of tne Club' Jones, Mrs. V. F. Oordonler,
were introduced and welcomedlMrs. W. McCarthy and Mrs. T.
by Mrs. J. E. Haines. They were K. Wright.
The fia raisin* reremonv h> d Mra H. A. Drumm. Mrs. E. B. --------
uifi^Ktti.?HDUfl *>l*.JiW. J- O- TUUs- M "Springtime For Henry
PaSama was attended bvalarge'C. A. Drzewieckl, Mrs. T. F. Try-Outs To Be Held
SESft^Sn^'&S t Gruble and Mrs. j. Baakln. Try-outs for the comedy.
| "Springtime For Henry" to be i and his family at their home in
Mrs. W. P. Allbrlght. Direc- directed by Rufus Smith will belPaltllla.
tor of the Fashion Show to be'held at the Guild Workshop In
given on Friday. February 1, at Diablo on Tuesday and Wednes-
the Army-Navy Club from 5:30.day evenings at 7:30.
to 7:30 p.m., for the benefit of I
the Infantile Paralysis Fund. Those interested in any phase,
announced that Navy. Army and of Theatre work are urged toj
Air Force wives have have been'attend whether they wish to act
selected to serve as models. Miss or to work backstage.
Dorrlta Borrel, the Hotel El Pa-1
Mis* Mary Alice Arey
Arrives For Visit
Miss Mary Alice Arey of Shelby,
North Carolina, has arrived for
a visit with her brothers, United |
States Embassy Public Affairs
Officer William G. Aeey. Jr..
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panama No. 58 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments. Mas
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths. Male and female
operators. For information call: 3-2217 Panana..
812 a.m.: 28 p.m.

Former Resident Arrives
For Visit
Mrs. Donald Grefe, of Buenos
Aires. Argentine, arrived Sunday W 'J"Ue SS"^?,,^"10"? d.fc
by plane to visit in Panama for Payed In the Gallery of the
a week as the houseguest of Mrs. ** WtMsaw.lOMll Center will
Allen Lowrle of Bella Vista. Mrs. remain through Saturday. The
Oallery Is open to the public
from a.m. In the morning until
ten at night.
American Legion To
Sponsor Stag Smoker
American Legion Unit No. 1
nama's beautiful Life Guard, will Rotan Club Meets At
lead the parade of fashions. An Hotel El Panama
admission charge of fifty cents, The Panama Rotary Club met
will be payable at the door. i yesterday for its regular lunch
|eon meeting at the Hotel El Pa-
in the absence of the President, nama. Guest speaker was Mr.
Mrs. O. M. Fisher the Vice- Juan M. Berrocal who has but
Grefe is a former resident of
Panama and Colon.

Vacationers Return
From California
Dr. and Mrs. Juan J. Diaz re-
turned Tuesday bv plane from
Los Angeles. California from a *U>:.*?_* !*?_Sm.?,ke.r,*J?
holiday visit with relatives there.
Also returning by plane yes-
terday was Mrs. Diaz' sister. Mrs.
Laura Boyd who spent the
heir home on Golf Heights.
Visitor Returns To State*
Accompanied by her sister. Mrs.
Mildred Ramirez Duque, Miss.,.
Anita Ramirez Duque, the First wnen they arrive on Tuesday.
Secretary of the Panamanian y plane from Miami, for a visit
Embassy In Washington, D. C. to the Isthmus and will have
Mr. and Mrs. Beeson To
Have Visitors
Mr. and Mrs. L. Beeson, of
Golf Heights, will be hosts to
Mr. and Mrs. James Vincent
left Tuesday for the United
States, by plane, after a visit of
several weeks in Panama.
Alemans Entertain With
Barbecue Supper
The Honorable Deputy and
Mrs. Alfredo Alemn, Jr., enter-
tained Tuesday evening at their
home In El Coco del Mar for a
group of their t friends with a
barbecue supper.
them as their houseguest during
their stay here. Mr. and Mrs.
Vincent are former residents of
Panama.
Tea And Shower Honors
Mrs. Carl Axel-Janson
Mrs. Carl Axel-Janson was the
guest of honor at a tea and show-
er given Wednesday afternoon
by co-hostesses Mrs. JohnT. Fo- M,s obarrio In Lead For
(tarty, Mrs. Andrew M. Wright carnival Queen
evening from seven till eleven
o'clock at the Club at Fort Ama-
dor. Tickets may be purchased
at the door for 83.00. Dinner will
be served,, followed by appro-
priate entertainment and re-
freshments.
Art Exhibit At YMCA
Opens Tonight
A cordial Invitation Is extend-
ed to residents of the Canal
Zone, and Panama to visit the
exhibition of oil paintings to be
on display in the Basement Oal-
lery of the Balboa YMCA from
this evening through Sunday
evening.
The exhibit will be open on
Saturday and Sunday between
the hours of 3:00 and 5:00 p.m.
and 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.
Mrs. Herrick And Daughters
Leave For States
Mrs. John Herrick and her __
daughters. Jane and Ani. left W^kX**!*
Wednesday by plane, for Mobile. !"""* EF^ S2L.
Alabama, to meet Cantata Her- S&J&rf tSS"?*.
rick who recently returned to
the United States after eighteen
months in Korea. Mrs. Herrick
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
A. E. B. Rimming ton. of Bella
Vista.
and Mrs. Louis Martlnz at the
Marttaz home on Golf Heights.
Miss Marltza de Obarrio Is In
Legion
Auxiliary will hold a dance on
January 25 at 8:00 p.m. to raise
funds for contribution to the
March of Dimes. Music will be
furnished by the 71st Army Orch-
estra. Tickets may be obtained
from members or bought at the
door for $1.00 eaeh.
Navy Officers' Wives Club
first, place for Carnival Queen j* gfflSWS
of the Hotel El Panama with
Visitors Sail On, S. S. Panam Miss Mary Watson in second
The Chief of the Washington! 0lice and Miss Sonla Mantovani
Office of the Panama Caal m third place.
TRY your LUCK
ON OUR
I
CLUB
SYSTEM
(jet your number TODAY
and you'll have NEW
furniture next Christmas!
SIMMON'S Folding Couches .............
Mahogany Easy Chairs..................
2 Burner Gas Stoves.................____ F* A
Children's High Chairs .................. .jU C.
Flatware place setting for 6.............. aar w ^
Play Pens...............................
SIMMON'S Springs......................
ii i
SIMMON'S Innersprinj Mattresses.......
SIMMON'S Baby Cribs..................
Babybeauty Mattresses for Cribs .........
2 Burner Kerosene Stoves................ |> A A
Mahogany Bookshelvea .................. K IIII
Mahogany Living-room suites ........... U* ltVv
Woolen Rugs ............................
Metal Garden sets.....................
Dining Tables...........................
Dining-room suites 4 chairs, Upholstered.
Mahogany Youth Beds :................. _
Metal Chaise-lounges ................... D f *)P*
Mahogany Dressers, 22" mirror........... |i A~%
Mahogany Child's Chllforobes........... mMm ***
Mahogany Desks, latest style ............
Mahogany China Cabmets...............
Mahogany Credenza Buffetslatest style f% A A A
Mahogany Chest of Drawers ............. K /III!
Mahogany Beds with Spring t Mattress. ** "Vw
Mahogany Kitchen Cabinets...........
PFAFFSewing Machines.......... *v a Mia
Double Size Wardrobes latest style .'.'.'. K / ?K
Mahogany Chlfforobes.................. D# >
Living-room Sets...... %*** a
simmonsDupiex-couches'.:::::::::;::: R 9 fill
SOOallon Water Heaters................. O* J.UU
^__________________ ________________________________
S&2&' a&Uah Bicycles...........,.......... B/ 1.50
HERMES BABY Typewriters 175
SIMMON'S Studio-couches ...................... 00
4 Burner Gas Stoves ... !'*",......**" ,50
ASTRAL Refrigerators ........................... 400
Bamboo Sets ... ........................... 122
EA8Y Washing Machines :::::.'................... s'25
Dining-room Sets "Spanish Renalsac:*'tyle '.','.'.' 650
7 Piece Dining-room Sets .. ..^T.. .. 00
7 piece Bedrooms Sets ... 7 2S
8 cu. ft NORGE Refrigerators'i.'.Y,'.'.'.'.'.'.'.V.'.'.'.'.'.'.. 9.50
^^ERIR
The Navy, Officers' Wives Club,
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Whom 100.000 Poslo Moot
^Pre&ents
Today, Friday. Jan. II.
F-JN.
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Happy The HumbugCia.
Alfaro. S.A.
6:15Request Salon
7:00Barchester Tower (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary-
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
9:00Short Story Theatre
(VOA)
9:30London Studio Concert
(BBC)
10:00Cavalcade oi America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of P. C. 49
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Off
NEW ife
BRASSIERES
'

NYLON LINGERIE
Famous Makes
PANTIES SLIPS
'
SKIRTS BLOUSES
* All Colon Lovely Styles
Exquisite COSTUME JEWELRY
EARRINGS PINS NECKLACES

BHBaEflsWHnB
Ave., Central Calle 21 K. No. 1 Tata.! S-18M j t-18
Saturday, Jan. 1
A.M.
6:00Sign On Alam Clock
Club'
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Dead Ned
8:45Musical Interlude
9:00NEWS
9:15Women's World (VOA)
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:06Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00NEWS
FJW.
12:05New Tune Time
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1: ISPersonality Parade
1:45Tour de France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
5:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Band Concert
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude.
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Ouest Star
6:15Master works from France
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00 Gay Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00Voice of America.
9:00HOO Hit Parade
9:30VOA Hit Parade
(VOA'
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30Having a Wonderful
Crime (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Off
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
DFRadlodlifualon Francalse
vn
anova
115 CENTRAL AVENUE
Look For Established Products Of Quality
FRED HASLAM & COMPANY, INC. (Est. 184S)
Surgical Instruments
THE BIRTCHER CORPORATION
Electrosurgical Unit MODEL 2000
BLENDTOME Portable Unit
HYFRECATOR Set
THE PELTON-CRANE Co.
Sterilizers Autoclave
Examining Operating Lamps
Air Compressors
CORP. PICKER INTER-AMERICANA
Medical, Dental and Industrial X Rays
"SANBORN" Metabulator
"SANBORN" Electrocardiograph
"RAYTHEON" Diathermy Units
Accessories
Service

1

..

CHRISTY SURGICAL SALES
Surgical Blades and Handlers
WELLCH-ALLYN
Ophthalmoscopes
Protoscopes
Transilluminators
Otoscopes
Laryngoscopes
Retinoscopes
LA CASA DEL MEDICO
No. 6 "I" Street
Pad ros Building
Tel. 2 3302
P.O. Box 1689
Serving The Medical Profession Since 1932
LARGE SELECTION OF
Zrrtnch Crystal
SAIN1 lOlilS
tMI MMIST CttlTSl

S"\ All Patterns In Open Stock
f J Easy Terms Available
16 Tivoli Ave.
:
soy* ELSIE the BORDEN cow j
FROM among the world's finest, most sanitary dairies 2
comes KLIM milk. Processed and packed when it is farm-
fresh, it keeps fresh in the specially packed tin until ready
for use. KLIM is pure, safe, dependable milk, as fine as
money can buy, as fine as only 30 years of expe-
rience can make it. Your family deserves the bene-
fits of KLIM.
6
AdtsM
KLIM IS PURE, SAFE MILK
Jfr s*
KLIM keeps without refrigeration
KLIM quality Is always uniform
KLIM is oxcolleat for growing children
KLIM odds nourishment to cooked dishes
KLIM is recommended far infant feeding
I KLIM is safe in the specially packed Mr
{JjKLIM Is produced under strictest control
KLIM MILK
MUST in MIFIIINCI THE WORLD OVII


r.
i
SIX
'-
THE PANAMA AMEB'CAN AN INDEPENDENT D^T''r^SPATEt'
FRIDAY, JANUARY II, ItM
You Sell em .. When You Tell em thru PA. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
it*lb acKVlC
HUKK|3.\
^r
SKU (Ml I mUttl
* '
BOTH 'A CAsULTUfi
lilt
SAM DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
. u wt im fMreet
IHK PANAMA AMERICAN
M. st B" item iissssjl
H: HII Central An.Calta
International Girl
Seoul Leaders To Be
Invested Tomorrow
12 words
Minimum lor
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Houscliulll
FOR SALE
Automobile
MISCELLANEOUS
...io
-Practicolly new
L. refrigerator,
Pinico aoio. II 25
pieces
Servic eronnel and
.ivlliap jovimmini Employ
s n a n c r
our im ueeM oar rhrougn
GOVIRNMEMT SMLOY!S FINANCE
CO.
fcer worth I
serving Sovemmem Employes ond I
FOR %M-
PillO. &.
ii.g machine
c>cle* Ventiion almas.
I ben boo. i sira I rug>. Singer sew-
ing machine. kie^tr;lux. tobies
'I dressers. 1 ehittoniers, 1 chairs
I kitchen table, b lamp'., dishes
kitchen uteosils. House '5'4-E I Service ersonnei ir. lie Ceno' Zone
Gaviln R taiboo. Tel 2-3450 'l(1, ; a, ^eor. vVitt out financing
WE IARTER vour insurance automatically idiusled
to u. S. coverage.
The HX is open ai lost 'ARRANGEMENTS CAM II MADE
HX means Hcu:ehold txehenge ... THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
... a ajervice to you m finding DEALER
fornitura to |U.I >our need-, Sf*fJ|2 SALE:-Sport car for the whole,..
,.ur eecketbo.k. I f m G 1 1-4 litre four seat FOR SALE:
For years we have seen the need
jf one centro.zed exchange deolmg
in tine reco.iditioned turnituie.
De yett have e eVmkmn realem?
Write Alc.holici AaeMveeee
B. 2031 Aneen. C Z.
Wt IUY WE SELL
AMATEUR RADIOMEN Experi-
menters. Must dispose of my sur-
plus iunk accumulated over sev-
eral years. Rather wide assortment
new and slightly used vacuum
tubes, transmitting and receiving
types. A few components. Will sell
ond give away ell day Saturday.
603-A Ancon Blvd. Tel. Balboa
2304 after duty hours.
RESORTS
Enjcy a vacotion at Hotel Pon Ame-
ricano, El Voile. Phone Panama
2-1 I 12 for reservations.
Gramlich'i Santa Clara beach-
cottages. Electric tee ooxet, go*
stoves, moderate rates. Phone 6-
441 o 4-567.
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
Phillies. Oceoru.de colleges, Santa
Clero. Bo* 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal i- 1673
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous*
Today., we oflec the be:t avoiloblr
lugs, chairs, tables, etc. pqr
tourer. New point, top. other ex-,
tras. Fast roomy and aistmclive
Ports available. Deems.quortres 35j
Albrook, phone 86-3108
wh.ch we heve expertly and skillfully
i*newed in ojr o*n workshop.
ni
0 ycu have used turmture
Eu want to sell
II us for en approval.
fi ycu ore loo'.mg lor
that extra cha.r or lable oi
eut.itung a complete hOu^e or
btadi cottege teme to
the HX I Household Exihaneel
41 Autonnbile Row Tel. 3-4911
WE IUY Wl SELL WE IARTER
POFi sALt: 25 cycle eqj.pment
includinf Westmghouse, 9 cu. ft
refrigerator, oscillating tan. kitch-
en timer and wall clock. Assorted
household ellecls including Sim-1
mons Coveno couch ond uphols-
tered Chan, dishes. Posts, pans
Cleaning gear. Telephone Balboc
23u4 aiter working hours.
fCR SALE Quartern's.er lurm-
leaves
SALE: Oldsmobile Hollyday
One well made pipe-
framed garage, can be seen at
Instrument repair shop building, 9
in Balboa. Contact O. F. Hender-
son. Phone 2-2593 or Box 23
Balboo. C Z.
Williams banta Clare Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidaires, Rock-
gos ranges. Belboe 2-3050.
We have everything
to keep vour Lawn
ind Garden beautiful
luring the dry season
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:-Cholet in El Valle, two
bedrooms. Telephone Miller 3-
3423.
Coupe. S50. Hydramatic. $2.300 rOR
00. Tel. 3-0126. till 5:30 p. m
FOR SALE1949 Chevrolet 4 doors
Tel. 2-4624.
FOR SALE1948 Plymouth 4 doors
good condition. Tel. 2-4624.
SALE: Small
upright piano
upholstered wing choir, carnage.;
stroller, electric boiler, large scoot-'
er. small scooter, tricycle, roast-
ing pons, enamel baby bathtub.
Riviero Aportments. Melendez and!
3rd. St. Apt. 8. Colon.
FOR RENT:To responsible person
furnished residence, livingroom,
dmingroom, office, three bedrooms,
garage, porches. Tel. 3-3143,
Ponam.
Will se
bakei
lomatic
3400.
my equity in 1951. Stuae-!FOR SALETwo horses with saddles
Commander Four Coor Au- bridle, suitable for children. Phone!
Transmission. Call Navy 670. 9088, I Oth St. Colon.
FOR SALE: -
new tires.
- 1938 Buick
good motor.
coach.
clean
Help Wanted
car. $175. Phone 83-5238 or
house 555-A.
olter 4:30.
Curundu Heights
OR SALE:1939 Chevrolet Sedon
Very good motor end tires, $200
CO. Coll Curundu 7208.
WANTED:Good cook for cop
Must sleep in. Good salary. Apply
Ponoma Metals and Salvage Co
6th St. Porque Lefevre.
WANTED:English speoking maid
to live in. Cook, one meal, care
for 2 children age 3 and 8, con
leave during day hours, between
10:00 and 4 p. m. Call at house
5083-A Diablo, behind Diablo
Clubhouse. Bring references.
OR SALE:Buick coach 38. new
tires, excellent transportation.
'.-.200.CO. Federico Boyd No. I,
Tel. 3-1316.
ture. Ook dining lable, 2 leaves IT*,-~' .---------~z----------- -
Metal table 42" x 42". Metal lib-." SALE:1949 Hudson Comma- WANTED:Moid to cook and do
rory table. Dresser with mirror
metal. Dresser no mirror, oak. Ply
'42 motor torch down tor in-
spectf^i. Tel. 2746. _
OR SALE^-9 steel venenan "blinds.F0? SALE: 1950 Cadillac Sport
dore Six 4 door sedan, rodio,
excellent tires. Excellent mechomc-
al condition. Call Balboa 1806
61 1 -A, Ancon Blvd.
61 x 50; electric Lux Vocuum
', Cleaner end 2j cycle fan. All very
reasonoble. I'el. 2-2585 or call
et bOO Api. C. Tavemilla St., Bal-
boa. _______^_
FOR SALE.Various items, house-
I hold furniture. Calle Mariano Aro-
semeno, apartment 292, Ppnama.
general housework. Apply Soturdoy
or Sunday, house 5850, Dioblo
Heights.
P. SALE: 2 bedroom concrete
cottage ot Sea Cliff Acres IB*,
lindo BeacM near Santo Claro
All tile floors, bath and roof and
car port also furnished including
8 ft. Servel retngerotor end au-
tomatic Tappan Gos stove. Sacri-
fice for $3,400.00 with tern
See Anderson on Tract or' Box
2616 Cristobal.
ool
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrow.
insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
*7 Central Ae. Tel. 3-14t
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
* Betel r> P.nim
8elllng: Coca Cola and
Central Theatre.
Wants to buy: Brewery and
National Distiller.
Tel. 3-4719 3-1060
FOR RENT:Furnished 2 bedroom
cholet with garage for 3 months
from February 1st. No. 15, 48
St. Tel. 3-3443.
FOR RENT
Apartments
Coupe Might green) 61 series.
New seot covers, white wall tires.
De Luxe occessories. Convention-:
ol transmission. $3,125.00. Over-
all, 5330-A. Davis Street, Dioblo
Saturday ond Sunday.
WANTED:Nursemoid for two boy;
2 and 4 yeors old. Good educa-
tion and references necessary. Te-
lephone 3-0595 mornings only
from 8 to 10.
ALHAMIRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished oport-
menti. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
MODERN FURNITURE
cfsroM Hi'in
Slipcover Beupbolstery
VISIT OUB SHOW-BOOM'
Alberto Aerea
irliUOin.lt (Antonio bile How I
ftee Matates Pleka 4k rjellverj
Tei. a-eaa l:N i.n. ti 1* pm
Miss Gladys Oomlen completes
the first phase of training ses-
sions for International Girl Scout
leaders today with a program
and investiture ceremony for
new leaders at the Study Hall
of the La Boca Occupational
High School, commencing at 5
p.m. j
Leaders to be Invested are: f
Alicia Downs, Ethlyn Davis, Do-
rothy Powell, and Jeanette Mo-
rant of La Boca: Mrs. A. Gar-
n'ett. Mrs. N. Blades. Mrs. E.
Joshua, Mrs. Lena South. Misses
Evelyn Wilson. Miriam Walker,
and Bemlce Alder of Paraso:
Mrs. Hilda Butcher, Mrs. First
lne Townsend. Mis-- Celina
Leach, Daisy Cumnw-.gs. Violet
Cummings. Eutrene Woods. Me-
lida Watler. Dorothy Joseph, Ma-
I rion Holness, Gloria Holnesg. and
Verna Mitchell of Gamboa. There
also will be new leaders from the
Atlantic side.
Troop committee members for
two Pacific side communities
are: Mrs. Thomas Sawyers Mrs.
Robert Grant and Maurice Hey-
wood of Paraso; Mrs. Robert
Millet. Mrs. George Joseph, and
Mr. A. L. B. Morgan of Gam-
boa. Troop Committees for the
other communities will be pro-
perly organized shortly.
Executive board members also
will be presented to representa-
tives of the various communities
tomorrow. They are: Miss Eneida i
Hamlett. Miss Egla Gooden. Mrs. I
Ena C. Ellis, Mrs. Lillian Mairs.
Mrs. Lurlene Johnson, Mrs. !-
Gladvs Grant, Miss Emily Butch- j
er Mrs. Wilhelmlna Rayslde, '
Mrs. Louise Walker, and Mrs. V.j
Bap tiste.
Specially invited guests include I
ICOl. Richardson Selee. Dr. Law- j
;rence Johnson, Mrs. Francis
Newcomer, Miss Mary Patton.: b. Gllbreth. Jr., author of
:Mrs. John Dovel, Mrs. Will' "Cheaper by the Dozen" and' FARMINGTON, Conn. (UP).
Pence, Mrs. Horace Weltmer,, "Belles on Their Toes," is one of This town claims to have the
Mrs. Everett Klmmell, Mr. Ray- the new books placed in circula- nation's first traveling traffic
mond George, and Mrs Karl; tlon during the past week by the '< llht.
^, ,.- ~___ (NBA Telephoto)
IN THE DRINK An airliner In flight passes over the
wreckage of a Northeast Airlines plane, which crashed into
New York s East River with 38 persons aboard. All passen-
gers and crew were rescued after the ship overshot La-
______________Ousrdia Field's landing strip.
New Books
"I'm a Lucky Guy," by Frank
Traveling Traffic
Light Makes School
Bus Much Safer
FOR RENT:For three months 3
bedrooms apartment completely
furnished to responsible party on-
ly. Apply 106 Vio Espaa acros;
police booth. Apartment 5.
fOR SALE:Radio
>1CJ.C0; rug.
ho combination.
$10.00; dressing
J' tcb.'c, ..d.CO; 2 enctables, 1 cof-
% fee leb.e. jiJ.CC; waffle iron, $5.
* LO. 2,..--I. Luiundu, Tel. 5166
tCH SALE:Coldspot Refrigerator,
J too i condit.cn. Apply house No.
'>ij, Apt. "A' La Boco Rood, Li
I^-JLi :__
JFC SALE: Maple ccuch, good
'condition, $10, Bolfcoo 2863.'
House 5E6-B. D.ablo.
Position Offered
Impo.iant Ameiican Ccmpcny, with
0..,CSS in tne Coon t-ree Zone
requ res the services ot a bilin-
gui secretary capable of takinj
rcp.d dictation in bo:h Spanish
na English. Good salary, five
day week. Submit application with
cor.-.pvete details and reierences It
P. _0. Box 1115. Cc!on, Panama
POSITION 'OFFEREDi-^bffice mon-
oger, muit speak English and
- Spanish understand and develop
ggreeive sales promotions. Write
giving previous experience ond
qualificat.ons for personal ap-
pointment and interview. P. Trad-
ing Corp. C/O The Panama Amer-
lean. Box 134, Panama, R. P.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
WANTEC: Cook ond general
housework for family of four.
References necessary. Telephone
3-4619, mornings only, from 9
toll (Not Sunday).
FOR SALE:Lot in Parque Lefevre
700 Meters. Mariono Aroieme-
n No. 22 room No. I, Harris.
FOR SALE:A grand opportunity.
For $2.000 you can buy eight ond
a half hectares of land ImeosuredJ
with frontage on the "Calzada
Largo" rood, sides SCO metei
length above Rio Chilibrillo. Tele-
phone 3-0171, Panama. Mr. Al-
vorado.
FOR SALE
FOR RENT: Very nice furnished
apartment, 2 bedrooms, living
diningroom, gorage for 4 months
$175.00 per month. Cook moid
included. Coll 3-3543, from I to
3.
WANTED
Miscellaneous)
WANTED:Amencon Couple. De-
sires to rent furnished apartment
or house in vicinity Bella Vista,
for approximately 2 months. Tel
Ponama 3-1660 room 522.
DYING DRY CLEANING
GENERAL LAUNDRY
TROPICAL CLEANERS
Plant: #830 Va Espaa. Tel.
3-0871. Branch: 24th St. &
Central Ave. Tel. 2-1348
FOR RENT: fumiehed oportment
2 bedrooms to responsible person
without children. For 6 months
Inquire No. 60, Apt. I, Mexico
Avenue. .
FOR RENT
Rooms
i-ericon couple desires to rent two."*** AVAILAStt Light, ceol
or three room apartment. Mrs. I ?*_''!* teaeveted end well fur-
Bomber, Hotel Tivoli, telephone
Balboo 211 1.
I'dut-. & Motor*
"OR
VVANTED: Spanish-English steno-
typist. Write g.ving references, P.
O. Box 722, Ponama.
International
Beauty Show
Planned In NY
An international beauty show
U being arranged for this spring
s* one of the createst fashion
centers of the world. New York
SALE: 32 ft. cabm cruiser
Philippine mohegony Excellent ccn-
dition thoughcut. Sleeps six. Run-
ning water. Gos cooking. 2 large
mechanical fish b-xes. one rre-
d.um in galley. M-7 Chrysler Mr
rme mctor w tii reduction. Ful:
equ-pped. Outriggers, Ready to go
Lots of extra pon T2.7C0. N'
quibbling. Also used fishing equip-
ment. Phone 83-6257.
5 CZJC Students
Initiated Into
Delta Psi Omega
-J"". students of the Canal
_ n? J.unAor Coege were for-
DickTurbyfiM
Now Treasurer Of
1usic Fraternity
AUSTIN. Texas. Jan. 18 (TJ8IS1
Dick TurbyfiU. University of
vtu student from Balboa, Ca-
-.1 Zone, has been elected treas-
-er of Phi Mu Alpha-Slnfonla.
rof essional and honorary music
.retcrnltv.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs
Subert TurbyfiU. Turfybill is an
Instructor in English and Dra-
matics at the Canal Zone Junior
College and Is also Acting Dean
of Men.
niihed. Rat r.oionjbl.. Bache-
lor. ,nly. Uauir, Tl* A_
ricea Clue focin, De
erk.
FOR RfNT:Furnished room with
privte bothroom and entrence.
Kitchen privilege. 43rd Street No.
;r0R RENTNicely furnished rooms.
Government inspected. No. 21. 4th
of July Ave. opposite Roosevelt
Apt. 3.
.OR RENT:Large room, furnish-
ed or unfurnished, for one or
two bachelors. Near Ancon Post
Office. For information call Bal-
boa 2708.
FISHERMEN !
According to the latest re-
ports fish of every kind and
size are moving into our wa-
ters. Be sure to CATCH THE
BIG ONES with FIRESTONE
lures and other equipment.
We carry a complete line AT
THE LOWEST PRICES IN
PANAMA. Visit your
FIRESTONE STORE
;-t #3 National Avenue
(Automobile Row) *
Telephones: 2-0363 3-4584
Harris. School principals and Panam Canal Library.
ministers representing various I
denominations also have been! The book takes the author, in
Invited.
A school bus driver, Clement
Beauchemln. rigged up the sig-
nal device for the safety of his
Religious Council
Issues Final Report
On Xmas Basket Fund
i ersatz racoon coat and porkple! passengers.
hat, through campus capers at! The traffic light flashes green
I the University of Michigan, re-when the bus is in motion yellow
1 porting for the college paper, and when slowing down and red when
later, ior a New York daily In;stopped.
the depths of the depression, and
then, a hitch In the Navy, and
service as an admiral's aide.
The complet list of new books
at the Library follows :
At the January 1 f the um^ AmeflciTtem tSS^Ku
I $?S!%&3. Person"!1 With the RFC, Jone*
Washington, Freeman; The Sec-
ond World War, Churchill.
FICTION: Party Going, Green,
pseud.; The Utmost Island. My-
ers; The Many Loves of Dobie
Gillis. Shulman; Murder by the
Book*, stour; Southern Territo-
ry, Tallant.
B ?aoaw'an to raise 81 000 to Memoirs; Hoover; The Master Eleven F4a"ys,"ibse"n:'
ecnrisJnas bMkets$ t'o SOOi Por"er' ^cker,; George .Myatery er .-pense.
Suspect Forgers
Believed Key Men
In Interstate Ring
TAMPA, Fla., Jan. 18 (UP>
The sheriff's office held two
men today who are wanted in
Indianapolis on charges of be-
ing key men in a large inter-
* SheriffgHugh Culbreath Iden- tribuUons pacFthe baskets and
Sve Christmas baskets to 500
rnilies. However, through the
\ generosity of churches, employes
! of Panam Canal Divisions, bus-
iness firms and Individuals the
sum of $1.881.48 was collected.
This made it possible to help
over 650 families and enlarge the
baskets of food to Include items
totaling $2.50.
The Atlantic Religious Work-
ers Council is made up of minis-
ters and religious workers from
Atlantic side churches. The min-
isters of the Colon and Gatun
Churches made a statement ex-
pressing the appreciation and
fratltude felt by the families In
heir churches who received par-
eels,
A vote of appreciation to Rev.
Peterson. McClelland, and all
others who helped to seek con-
NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders
of "Panam American Press, Inc." will be hold at
the offices of the Company, No. 57, H Street, Panam
City, Republic of Panama, at 2 p.m. on Monday, Jan-
uary 21, 1952.

THE PRESIDENT
Union Church
Council Elects
New Officers
Timothy D. Ladd was elected
ernity in dramatics, on Wednes I three-year-old sister of Harold, Fnairman of the Cristobal Un-
'lon Church Council for 1952 at
the January meeting held Mon-
day.
Other officers elected were:
BABY ZIPPED UP
BELOIT, Wls. (UP) The ex-
jnally Initiated Into Delta Psl Pr"**on "button your Up" is a
Omega, national honorary frat- "tUe t00 old-fashioned for the
Peck, Jr. She pul a zipper In her
four-month-old brother's mouth.
It took a doctor to remove it from
his throat. *
LEGAL NOTICE
JiP1*.11.1.?1 the colle8e building.
.t&M? vhe students were made
X"f b/ Wvrlf, ln thC theat
done last school year and th
school year.
fAstnrfuss
api ssKsas bpr^^^
*<- nkni.,.i.>.j5.__ re sophomore or spe- -
JACK A. MEASITY.
Plaintiff.
- vs. -
ADAUNC S MTAST.tY,
Defendant.
SUMMONS
Caae No 32. Civil
Civil Docket IS
_ _. ACTION rOR DIVORCE
To the above-named defendant:
You are hereby rcttitlrec* to appear and
answer the complaint filed In the above-
entitled action within ninety days after
the date o first publ'eation.
In ease of your failure to so appear
and answer, judgment will be taken a-
alnet yo-j by default for the relief de-
.manded in -he complaint.
Membership in Delta Psl Om-' wr? the Honorable Joseph J. Han-
ega is strirtly an "earned" bail* Sm^TClS?1^' ?"V Court
-every college student!whoS U&TS? "' C'M' Zon'' S
C T. MeCeeaalek, Jr.
tor. whowha. completed plan. ^\SS^ffmSSSSt
This year the beauty show will1 prlsented hvStnnfre ?ny ,Was
leature the American Look MSSFSmlaS J&Pl Nlccolson,
*hlon-hair, hat. and clothes SLdmanaierFSi/SSSJABS1
fishions,accessoriesall coor-iinT5n TSf..' d rrank Rob-
dtnated to give the American pic-! r'sK rSf' ,assf-
ture of beauty. Beauty editors SDon*nr il T. byfU1' f?culty
Ot world famous fashion maga- ?^n r.. nrar^.,rep;e?e^ts the
fines and newspapers will attend KadV th#1 e&SS*S 0mSt^-
& see the forecast of style, ere- Sfff* h* 2,!tr^n?r?,a?alon-
Sted by the hands of skilled Eu- *, Lni rtrTli[byfi.H' hon-
ropean and North and South A-'ciS, T%L% ^ ,*}nr~
menean artists. Sia&,raC,ed the pled|[e
me re uno
Panam
ex-
tifled them as Robert Chastain. 1 >!**?** tne.m-*i.
30. and Clyde Isenhour, 31, whoi m addition to the Individuals,
were picked up last night with and organizations MHCvdyN-
two female companions. A ported Aanks were expressed to
search was underway for a: the following persons and groups
third member of the gang whom I who generousy gave toward the
deputies refused to identify. cKTtriaF w^roaii United
tives they came here because I fj0"'.un,iJ.-.Ba,^and,^P1mrA:
they.'Wd Florida" and insist-1 ^g^Jfgg^ggJBi
yice-ch.lrm.n:E:F\"aMcClel|tl0onHcbar^
ed they had not passed any
bogus checks.
But where they were living,
police found a bundle of checks
of 20 different companies, an
elaborate printing press, and
check-protecting equipment.
Chastain and Isenhour waiv-
ed extradition and were being
held for the arrival of Indiana-
polis authorities.
The two women, Identified as
Bertha Woodhall, 44, and Vera
May Crawford, 21, were being
detained on an open lnvestlga-
C. F.
Police traced
telephone
Order of Eastern Star, Standard
Fruit and S. S. Company, Marine
Division, Cristobal File Depart-
ment. Jamet B. Dorow. and em-
Eloyes of National City Bank,
oyal Emmanuel Lodge Oddfel-
lows, Mrs. Beresford, Immigra-
tion Division, Court Brock. Or-
der of Foresters, Jasmine'Tem-
ple, Elks, Mr. McKenzle, All-
Amerlcan Cables, Dr. R. R. Greg-
ory, Miss Lillian Smith. Henn-
quez & Cla., Tagaropolos, and
Dr. Paul Dowell.
White Rote Dancing
The Council i. made up of
elders, deacons, deaconesses,
trustees and certain church of-
ficers elected at a congregation
meeting in December. Including-
the required work ln at least
three fields of theater activity
and e--is a better-than-averge
Srao .n a class in dramatics re-
ceives an invitation to Join. To -i; -. -.....> ,
date, a'most one-fourth of the 7L"ES52SR un,,"on ^ erred utm Mrs. Ivy Hogan French .
250-odd students who have tak- ofu.h. ^rVbu 'ST? STneocT ^h^rnin*1 t8unday Mtab-
en part in college dramatics here f"^ KteTBweS SSrSl\ ThSalTSSS* ** n the
have become members. ffiin23ET?i f~". S^fi-^S"*- .**4lH2. ..,1?. accompanied by
(leal) CUrk
W B>, Lela t Harrlmi
T. AdaUn. 8. ***** ""*
The foreitnln. eummona is served upon
you >y publication pntiuant to the ordir
Mrs. S. M. Hamilton Mrs. N
B. Davlson. Mrs. A. T. Holger-
son, Mrs. C. D. Robinson, H
W. Casslbry, L. R. Palumbo c
D. Dameron. B. R. Ooodhead.
H. M. Barnes. Jr.,B. C Robin-
son, T. H. Zuldema, Mrs. G. E
Lust, H. C Anderson, L. j'
Benthall. A. C Howard, and W
G. Monroe.
Mrs. Ivy French
Leaves For U.S.
left
After the initiation" pfetWRfcS.W^ff^S-iSIl? MMNaTcSeOi an(r ataS
' the fratern
followed by a short 1KL
,.i. ""-- ,r-----7"*T" H'nmw na uji i-iron in uw orrice of the Clerk ltn
session on the fraternity songs w 9 at, SmS court "? .
'as held, followed bv a short t.Di -l,a o Ba,bM on December 31. M"-"Tench will Join her hus-
t-'ness ir ;tf- tod) M SSV-i L ME c t Mrr.r.i j -""' -y- Prench' who left
era social affairs still on the ,#*| OeT"*' "
"finif for members of the VLnanV '' E Harri.
Xraternlty. "~^Jr oepuiy cierk
ior the U. 8. some months ago
She is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs Leonard French of La
Boca.
land: secretary, Mrs.
Say=%r?,t.rr^V">rup|> ySB Club Meet Tenjgbi
HainuiK ,, r. one dlly aiter *jje our m0ved. ^^
?ut !:uih^,tle^ learned Uea: The White Rose Dancing and
hour had bought a new car and: Sportmg Club wm hoW ft s?t.
checked all financei companiesl Jg meBetln(r ^.ght at the
A used car dealer, who sold Parftlso clubhouse to discuss
Isenhour the car spotted him; ..matterg of Tltal importance,"
The meeting will start at
and Bertha last night at a Tam-
pa drive-in theater. Police
rushed ln and arrested the cou-
ple who gave their Tampa ad-
dress where Chastain and Vera
were later arrested.
The sheriff's office would re-
lease no information on the
third member of the gang,'
pending his arrest.
William Brown Diet;
Funeral Tomorrow
William A. Brown, 70, died in
Santo Toms Hospital last night
after ailing for some time.
Relatives announced today
that funeral services will be con-
ducted tomorrow at 3:30 p.m. in
the Sojourners Lodge Hall. Bu-
rial is scheduled for 4 p.m. st
the Herrera Cemetery.
Brown is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Jane Brown; two sons, Pat-
na and Merantfo; three daugh-
ters, Frances, Wilhel and Carmen
and several grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
MARCH
DIMES
JANUARY 1 '. 31
A-l CONDITION
1947 POHTUC "6"..........$1050
4 door sedan New paint & good tires.
1940 PONTIAC "6".........$1250
4 door sedan with Hydramatic.
1949 PONTIAC "6"

$1550
Sedan coupe with Hydramatic, Radio
and Seat Covers.
1949 CADILLAC "62" .......$2500
4 door sedan with Hydramatic. Radio,
Seat Covers and Whitewall Tires.
1950 MORRIS MINOR ..'......$900
Convertible Coups.
ALSO:... Litter Model Pooliscs. Fords, Chevrolet^
Plymouths, Studebakers and Chryslers.
BETTER SEE 0LR CARS BEFORE YOU BUY!
CIV A, S.A.
Cadillac GMC Pontiac
Tel. 2-0870

PANAMA



FRIDAY. JAM ARY 1, 1*St
fHK PANAMA AWKRCW AN INDEPENDENT I)MI Y NEWSPAPER
TAE sinn
^^Mtlantic S^ocieti
So, 195, (J*l*m D,!,PLoH. (JmIu 378
I.A.W.C. HONORS DEPARTING MEMBERS
The Colon Unit of the Inter-American Woman's Club
honored Mrs. James Pumpelly and Mrs. Thomas Greenwood
with a luncheon at the Coro Solo Officers Club Wednesday.
Both of the honorees aie Iravinr. in the near future ,.h
their husbands, who have been ordered to nosts in .he
SUtes.
Mrs. Koepke, president of the McHan and Mrs. Dorotuy Han-
Club, presented Mrs. Pumpelly a'ner were co-.-"^e'-:-.s for the
silver fish, symbollic of Panama, meeting of the oatun Star Club,
and Rave Mrs. Greenwood a sou- which was held at the home of
venir spoon of the country. Mrs. Orvisln the DeLesseps Area i
The group was seated at a Tuesday evening,
luncheon table centered with Cards were played durlntt the
zinnias and ferns and the ml- evening and Mrs. John Fahne-
nlature flags of the 21 American stock won the high scoring
Republics. Seated at the head bridge prise. The winners at ea-
table were: Mrs. Pumpelly, Mrs. nasta were: Mrs. L. L. Barfield,
Greenwood, Mrs. Koepke. Mrs. Mrs. Whitman Oarrett, Mrs.
Ounther Hirschfeld. Mrs. Hum- William Badders. and Mrs. Ben-
berto Lelgnadler. Mrs. Stanley 'amin Brundage.
Hamilton. Mrs. Julia Emilia and The door prise was won by.
Mrs. Samuel Puller. ..Irs. Charles Lesser.
The other members who parti- The diner members present
cipated in the party were: Mrs. were: Mrs. Starford Churchill.
Fred Bell. Mrs. O. T. Shaw. Mrs. Mrs. William Hughes. Mrs. Marie
David Kaplan. Mrs. Vicente La- Gorman. Mrs. Richard Pennlng-
ra. 8r., Mrs. T. J. Butler, Jr., con. Mrs. O. K. Worley. Mrs. J
Mrs. T. J. Butler Sr..Mrs. De- w. ,L- Graham, Mrs. Kerdis
mitrio Rusodimos. Mrs. H. K. Meek, Mrs. Fred WUloughby.
Taylor, Mrs. Byron King. Mrs, Mrs. Garland On. Mrs. George
M D. Smith. Mrs. Vincent poole, Sr.. Mrs". George Poole.
Oberg. Mrs. George Carlson, Jr.. Mrs. Curtis George, Mrs
Mrs. Victor Marques Mrs. An- Fred Newhard. Mrs. Leon Egolf
tonlo Quesada. Mr. John C. and one visitor, Miss Grace Wll-
Hlpson. Mrs. Charlotte Wise, llama;
Mrs. D. O. Coffev. Mrs. J. A. --------
Katallnas. Mrs. Willard D King, visitor In Gatun
Mrs. H. J. Thornton. Mrs. John Mrs. Howard Munroe of An-
La Hew. Mr. T. L. Balay, Mrs. cons was a visitor in Gatun yes-
Mary Unzicker, Mrs. T. L. Ap- terday. She spent the day with!
plcquist Mrs. Julia Lelgnadler. Mrs. A. A. Albright and Mrs. '
Mrs. Charles Whitaker. Mrs. Fred Newhard. Mrs. Munroe re-
Herbert Toledano. Mrs. Frank L.' turned from spending the Christ-
Scott, Mrs. Raul Herrera. Mrs. !mas holidays in New Jersey with.
Lydia Drumberg. Mrs. Maria her mother. She was joined by[
Aubert, Mrs. Hiplito Fernandez, her son and daughter who are
and Mrs. Enrique Burlando. to college;n the States.
Auxiliary Has Morning Coffee
The Woman's Auxiliary of the;
Gatun Union Church held a
morning coffee and business
meeting at the Church, Thirrs-j
day. to inaugurate the business;
for the year.
Mrs. Benjamin Brundage, pres-
ident, presided at the meeting.
It was decided to change the
meeting hour to 9:00 a.m. from
2:80 p.m. on the first Thursdav
of the month. The Auxiliary will
work in groups again this year
with a contributing group for,
working members and two work-
ing units under the leadership
of Mrs. Joseph Irving and Mrs. '
Fred Newhard.
Thirty members attended the
meeting and seven ladles join-,
ed the Auxiliary. They were:
Mrs. M. T. Webster. Mrs. Ross
Aldrldge, Mrs. Alfred Gloss. Mrs.l
India Parker. Mrs. J. L. King.
Mrs. T. W. Pels and Mrs. Wal-j
lace Thrift.
The officers of the Auxiliary
were hostesses for the meeting.
They were: Mrs Brundage. Mrs
Raymond Ralph. Mrs. Ralph
Graham and Mrs. Richard Pen-
nlngton.
Formal CatHUon In Dmee
The Washington Cotillion Club
will hold its formal dance Sa-
turday, Jan. 19, In the ballroom
of the Hotel Washington.
Music will be furnished by the
Royal Sultan's orchestra, and
dancing will start at 8:00 p.m.
All members are urged to at-
tend.
Angelo Jaspes Band To Play
At El Panama For 13 Weeks
Loretta Marcum Celebrates
Birthday Anniversary
Loretta Marcum. daughter of.
Mr. and .Mrs. George Marcum j
of Gatun,'celebrated her fourth
birthday anniversary with aj
Darty at the home of her parents
Tuesday.
A circus theme was carried out
wtth a. green and white color
scheme.
The guests were: Linda Brund-
age. Claire and Billv White. A.
J. and Norlne Metsger. Marilvn
Roth. Susan 8wver. Edna Mae
Forsythe and Edith Stelbrltz.
*s
Sat.
0
Dance Planned at Gatun
Clubhouse
The Gatun Civic Council is
soonsorlni* a dance to be given
it the clubhouse Monday, start-
ing flt 8:00 The orchestra from;
the S 8. "8teini Polaris" will,
'urhish the music and promises
x most enjovxble evening for all
lovers of good mi'Sie.
The admission chsree Is a "ol-
lar Der person. The dance will be
Inform! and Is open to the gen-
eritl public.
Roval Palm Blrtbdav Meetlnr
Roval pplm Chanter No J Or-
der of the Eastern Star, will hold
Its 3th Anniversary meeting
Monday.
This is a special meeting A
dinner will be served at 8:30
p.m.. preceding the business
meeting. '
Mrs. William Hadarlts. Worthy,
Matron, will open the meeting,
the past matrons and patrons
will fill the chairs for the ini-
tiation.
-*V
' **
-..
NOW you can
FLY to MIAMI
via COSTA RICA and CUBA
for only $83. ONE WAY
(SI50.75 Round Trip)
Enjoy all-davtime flying,
Make your TRAVEL DOLLARS
take you FARTHER!
VIA
3 Flights Weekly
from Toeumen
7:45 a.m. Tuts. Thurs Sat.
PAA
Affiliate
To COSTA RICA
$30.00 round trip
Special Flights to MEXICO
$80.00 One Way $140.00 Round Trip
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
Tel n.-,5
Panama
rippm!*. Aneo
"ki Stop


Your $$$ Go Farther
m
n
-
-
1
at Panama's 0!SE STGi- *
4
Shopping Center
SPECIALS
;
Saturday b Monday
CORBINA
whole
.21 *

BRISKET i
uHK
Mrs. Kerr Honored At
Afternoon Ceffee
Mrs. Olga Kerr. who is moving
from Fort Gulick to Fort Clay-
ton, was honored with an after-
noon coffee given at the home of
Mrs. Mike Kinnick. chairman of
the HosDitallty committee of the
N. C. O. Wives Club. Wednes-
day. Co-hstesses with Mrs. Kin-
nick were: Mrs. Joe Gormley and
Mrs. Clarence Harvey.
Mrs. Pauline Marsh, the pres-
ident of the Club, presented Mrs.
Kerr and embroidered table eloth
and napkins as a gift from the
organization.
The members who attended the
party were: Mrs. M. D. Mund-
kowsky, Mrs. Roy Smith. Mrs.
Robert Mossman. Mrs. Charles
Bresch, Mrs. John Cousin. Mrs.
Neville Hart. Mrs. Francis Bre-
mer, Mrs. Harry Copare. Mrs.
Maurice Towne, Mrs. William
Bell, and two guests. Mrs. Sa-
muel Bvrd and Mrs. Lucius,
Kitchen. i
1
P W. G. A. Monthly Tournament
The Panama Women's Golf
Association will hold its monthly
tournament aU the Fort Davis
Club tomorrow. Luncheon will
be served at the Officers Club
and there will be an election of
officers.
Entries mav be made bv call-
ing Mrs. Pauline Marsh. 3788490
>STHMI/N DATA
Miss MART WATSON, beautiful candidate for Oueen of
hotel El Panama's Carnival. Miss Wa! '-on was a close sec-
ond in the first vote count which took place in the patio
of El Panam on Sunday night. Th? second vote count
will be on Sunday night when In a carnival atmosphere
Angelo Jaspe's orchestra will play for dancing. Other
candidates for Queen are Miss Mav it; a De Obarrlo, and
Miss Sonia Mantov&ni.
Bon Voyage Dinner Party
Captain and Mrs. Robert 3.
Noll entertained with a dinner,
party at their Fort Gulick quart- ,
ers Monday evening to honor
Colontl ad"*rs Cannes Pttrn-
pelly iwho are leaving for Nor-
folk. Virginia.
Dining with the honorees were:
Major and Mrs. Byron King,
Captain and Mrs, John C. Hip-
on and Mrs. Charlotte Wlss. |
Gatun Star Club Meeting
Mrs. Roger Orvls. Mrs. Porter
If you belong to the Armed Forces
or if you have a steady job come to
our Store and you can choose your
own. terms to buy on credit.
'e have the best Mahogany Furniture.
If yon don't know ear Club System
visit us and you will be del'ghted.
86 Central Ave. Tel. 2-2404
BALBOA
Sfarts
SATURDAY!
BIRTHS
CEDEfJO. Mr. and Mrs. Bo-
livar of Panama, a daughter, Jan.
7 at Gorgas Hospital.
FAMlOLrETTI, Mr. and Mrs.
Angel of Panama a daughter,
Tan. 7 at Gorgas Hospital.
BGLINTON. Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert of Curundu. a son. Jan. 7 at
Gomas Hospital.
PALMA. Mr. and Mrs. Retu-
Ua of Panama, a daughter, a
daughter. Jan. 8 at Gorgas Hos-
pital
WALLACE. Mr. and Mrs. Her-
bert H. of Rio Abajo, a son, Jan,
10 at Gorgas Hospital.
PALMES. Mr. and Mrs. Dar-
rell A. of Panama, a son. Jan.
11 at Gorgas Hospital.
Angelo .aspe's popular dance
orchestra will play at El Panam
Sunday night and every Sunday
night for 13 weeks, as well as for
the four dav* of Carnival.
Sunday night. Jan. 20 will see
,the Second Vote Count in the
election vf the Oueen of Hotel El
Panama's Carnival. The three
lovely candidates are Miss Ma-
ri tza De Obarrlo. Miss Mary Wat-
son, and Miss Sonla Mantovanl.
|to MARTINEZ. Andrea of Pana-
>ma.
SABIS, Joseph Richard of Pa-
nama to KING. Kelurah or Pa-
inama.
DEATHS
BUCKVAN. Rudolph, 5 of C0-
lon. Jan. 8 at Gorgas Hospital.
HALL, Don, 2, of Curundu. Jan,
11 at Gorgas Hospital.
CASTILLO. Fulvla, 8. of Pa-
'nama, Jan. 13 at Gorgas Hos-
pital.
CLARKE. Estella of Panama,
Jan. 13 at Gorgas Hospital,
MARRIAGE LICENSES
VELASQUEZ. Sixto of Ft. Kob-
be. to SANCHEZ, Lucia of Pa-
nama.
TOPPIN. Samuel Douglas of
Gamboa, to HAWKINS. Elisa Ce-
cilia Contreras- of Gamboa.
HOPKINS. John Arthur of Co-
co Solo to GARRISON, Ada
Evelyn of Ft. Clayton.
TRIANO. Anthonv Joseph, Jr.
of Ft. Clayton to VELASQUEZ.
Teresa Margarita.
VASQUEZ, Santos of Panama
Friend* of the candidates are
working nard. piling up votes in
the enthusiastic contest.
Every cent paid for food or
beverage at El Panam is worth
one vof*
The seorita who is elected
Queen, a companion, and the
runner-up will receive a com-
plimentary trip to Costa Rica,
Havana, and Miami stay-
ing at the Hotel Europa in San
Jos, the Hotel Nacional in
Havana, and in Miami at the
Kenllwortb.
The last two hotels are part of
the Klrkiby hotel chain, of which
El Panam is also a member.
The First Vote Count Festival
last Sunday nlftht was well at-
tended by an enthusiastic crowd
which entered into the Carnival
spirit, dancing tamboritos and
other typical dances.
Vergar&'s Carnival Band was
an added attraction, giving an
authentic Carnival touch to the
fiesta.
Vergara's Band will also play
for the Carnival at II Panam.


_- <._J :
Fred MacMURRAY
0 Dorothy McGUIRE
Howard KEEL F 'r^Li' Wti' ml y W m
in bbbuS r % 1 hi
a rib tickling atatafl flaW.
'CALLOWAY WENT THATAWAY' You'll be calling your best friend "PODNER" afu. this one..!

Added: Color Cartoon "Jerry and the Goldfish" Selected Short NEWS of THE NATION!
Support:
THE "MARCH OF D
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TOINIGHT
SPECIAL
LATE SHOW
10:30 P. M.
linWis;,
yh/iu
WML
TheBiy
kShat
FLYING LEATHERNECKS
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SI MULTAN F. o US RELEASE!
THX MOST FORBIDDFN or WOLRD'S GREAT
LOVE STORIES ..I
"DAVID AND BATHSHEBA"
(In Technicolor)
GREGORY PECK
SUSAN HAYWARb
A dr!m thut will 1W orev*r
bi the Heart of Mankind... I
e
LUX: I.4S 4:J' :T >:3 P">-
CECILIA: :. 4:3. :4S. :
J 4-2S 4:4* :SS
A PWWUL. HUMAN EXCIT
DCO AND INSPIRING STORV
i

IRENL MANNING
A WAKNE* BROS. HIT
WCHAID SVSaKi STANtfY i
rRAVrS- PETERS -RIDGE
We/come Basketballtrs!
CfcaatB u the bt picture ever
made in Enilandl
ANNA NEAGI.E
TREVOR HOWARD
In
TROPICAL
Ruth ROMAN Steven COCHRAN
Tomorrow Is Another Day"
A RELEASE!
NCANTO THEATRE
A GOOD DOUBLE
PROGRAM!
AND
STAGE SHOW!
TIVOLI THEATRE
BANK HMD FREE:
At 5 and p.m AIo'
"REDHEAD AND THE
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AUo: "HITLERS GANG".
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Jane Wyman Van
.Johnson, in
"THREE OUYS NAMED
MIKE"

Speacar Tracy. In
"FATHER'S UTTLE
DIVIDEND"
with Joan Rennelt ^___
VICTORIA THEATRE
3 Picture* 1
"Docks nf New Orleans"
"GUN RUNNER"
"DANCE NIGHT"
IT'S MOVIbTIME .
Panama L^anal (clubhouses
Shoving Tonight!
-
Alan LADO PhyMi* CALVERT
"Appointment With Danger"
(Satard "CAI.LAWAY WENT THATAWAY"
'Dennis MOPCAN Patricia NEAL
"RATON PASS"
(Saturday) HERE COMES THE GROOM"
Edward G ROBINSON t Petty CUMMINS
"OPERATION X"
____________(Satarday) "RATON PASS"
OEDRC MIGUEL Clark GABLE .Johr HODLAK
is a sis Across The Wide Missouri
a (Saturday! "Prancli Of To The Races"
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(Saturday) "HARRIET t RAH."
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JOIN THE MARCH OF DIMES
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CHERRY MUFFINS j
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OPEN DAILY
9 a.m. to I p.m.
3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Closed Sundays.
RAISIN BREAD
./5
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/f TtrSH...
Ym minimum-
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BOO BLINDS, TABLE MATS *n FABRICS *** TABLE LAMPS lo.matih..-,
every itemj itar // itself-
Open a budget account today
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t. I A
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34th A Via Etparla
Open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Every Dy
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WHERE THE BEST
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- 9
15th fc Belisario Porra*
SAN FRANCISCO *'<*


f AGE EIGHT
-ft
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILX NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY. JANUARY II, ltd
T
Posse First To Arrive For Panam Open Tourney
Little
League
Races First 18 Holes Thursday; 'Carib* Series Contest Opens
Tomorrow Wednesday Is^linic Day Soon; Bombers Take Over 1st
Lost Pet.
0 1.000
1.000
.500
"PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
- Team won
Police.........2
Sears.........1
Lincoln Life.....1
Firemen........0
AGE14.......
Elks 1414........
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
' Police 2. Lincoln Life 0.
TODAY'S GAME
Firemen vs. Sears.
(At Little League Park. 4.15 p.m.)
.000
000
.000
Lanky Owen Sutherland, ace of
the Poiice team, pitched a no-
hit. no-run panir over the Lin-
coln Life team yesterday at Pa-
cific Little League Park.
Sutherland faced only twenty
batters over the six inning route
setting ten men down via the
strikeout route and walking
three. Of the three batters who
reached base, on got as far as
third base and one other reach-
ed second base,
Bruce Bateman was on the
mound for Lincoln Life and he
also sent ten batters down swing-
ing but gave up eight bases on
balls. Bruce got in a hole in the
very first Inning by hitting Vic-
tor Coln and then walking Am-
marati and P. Corrigan but he
bore down, and pitching brilli-
antly, got Sutherland on strikes
for the first out. Coln tried to
score on a passed ball and was
cut down at the plate. Million to
Bateman. Crook then went down
swinging for the third out.
The Police scored their first
run In the second inning on a
-wlk to Barnes leading off. Priest
struck out but Klelhofer walked
sending Barnes to second from
where he scored on Colon's hit. j
The second run was scored In
the third with Crook singling
after two were down and going to
second when the Lincoln Life
center fielder let the ball get
awav. Barnes then singled with
Crook stopping at third from
where he scored on a passed ball.
The Police had runners on In
trie last three Innings of play but
each time Bateman bore down
and prevented further scoring.
In tne meantime, Sutherland
was setting down the Lincoln
Lifers in the best pitching duel
of the young 1952 season.
Today at 4:30 p.m. the Fire-
men arid Sears meet to close the
first week of play in the Pacific
Little League. This, game could
also wind up in a pitcher's duel
with Gabe Mendoza, the probable
pitcher for Sears, and Herb
Schneider, the Firemen ace. the
likely starters for the Smokies.
1st Race "D" Natives 6! j Fgs.
Purse: $300.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Volador E. Sllvera 104
2- Arquimedes A. Vsquez 109x
3Domino V. Ortega 114
4Annie N. B Moreno 115
5Golden Faith V. Arauz 116
6Mueco E. Julin 115
7El Mao J. Bravo 111
8Villarreal C. Chong 104x
2nd Race "G" Natives 2 Firs.
Purse: $250.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
The box score:
POLICE
Coln, 2b.....
Ammirati, 3b. .
Peterson, 3b..
Corrigan, P., rf .
Scott, rf.......
Sutherland, p.
Crook, cf......
Barnes, c......
Priest, lb......
Kielhofer. ss.. ..
Corrigan, E., If ..
LINCOLN LIFE
Engelke. J., If ..
Parker, rf.....
Bateman. p ..
DuBois, J., 3b. ..
Million, c......
Durham, ss ..
Engelke. W., cf ..
Laatz. lb......
DuBois, V., 2b .
1 -Piropo
2La Mucura
3Apolo
4Huascazo
5Don Jaime
E. Dario 106
E. Julin 113
E. Sllvera 108
B. Aguirre 115
V. Ortega 112
Raul Posse, the'dapper-dan golfer who finished
in a tie with. Florida's Gene Kunes for top money
among the pros, in last year's Panama Open golf
tournament, is slated to arrive at Tocumen tonight
in quest of the 1952 title over the Panama fairways.
This year's event will start Panam Opens and has yet to
Thursday, with 18-hole rounds finish below the runner-up spot,
slated for Thursday, Friday, 8at-1 He copped the title in 1950, andj
urday and Sunday. Offlcially, the In 1948, '49, and '51 tied for sec-.
golf clinic Wednesday afternoon ond place,
at 4:30 will open the annual ev-
Last year he set a record with
a total of 16 birdies for the 72
holes.
\B R H PO A
3 0 13 1
1 O O 0 0
2 0 10 0
10 0 0 0
10 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 3
3 12 0 0
1 1 1 10 1
10 0 5 0
1 O 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
3rd Race "E" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Torcaza J. Rodriguez 114
C. Chong 112x
ent which has attracted some of
the greatest name stars from
the United States and Latin
America.
Posse will be the first arrival of ,, fU K"1 u;*wUr ?h 'nrnf>-
an invading contingent of stars though he has been the proies-
Ihat will include Sammy Snead, siona at the .: Colomwa,
Chick Harbert, Buck White. Hen- Country Club since |M5. rJurtng
rv Russell. Clayton Haefner.Rob- his tenure at the C
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
TEA'M Won Lost Pet.
Bombers........12 7 .632
Yankees........13 8 .619
Bluebirds....... I 11 421
Brownies....... 7 14 .333
TOMORROW'S GAME
Balboa Stadium (7:30 p.m.)
Bombers vs. Brownies.
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Balboa Stadium Bombers 1,
Bluebirds 0.
Mt. Hope Stadium Brownies
4, Yankees 3.
Posse hails from Argentina al-
erto De Vlcenzo, Kunes and many
manv more.
2El Indio
3Recodo
4Bijagual
5La Loba
6Bagaleo
7Wlnsaba
A. Enrique 109x
V. Castillo 112
C. Uno 120
E. Dario 120 '
C. Ruiz 112 '
AB R H PO A
3 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 2 4
0 0 10
0 O 10 3
0 0 0 0
2 0 0 10
2 0 0 4 0
10 0 0 0
4th Race "F-2" Natives 7 Fes.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Opex
2Cacique
3El Mono
4Tocopilla
5La Negra
6Golden Girl
J. Bravo 120
H. Reyes 112x
J. Baeza, Jr. 117
O. Grcil 116
A. Vsquez 114x
F. Rose 110
Score By Innings
Lincoln Life 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~0 0 3
Police 0 110 0 0-2 5 0
Winning PitcherSutherland.
Losing PitcherBateman. Base
on Balls offSutherland 3, Bate-
man 8. Struckout bySutherland
10, Bateman 10. Hit by Pitchby
Bateman (Coln. Kielhofen.
Wild PitchesSutherland, Bate-
man. Passed BallsBarnes, Mil-
lion 5. Left on BasesPolice 7.
Lincoln L ife 2. Earned RunsPo-
lice 1. Umpires Luzer and P.
Corrigan. ScorerF. Reilly. Time
og Game1:18.
7Sincero J. Samanlego 120
8Bfalo J. Rodriguez 113
9Tapsy E. Julin 110
5th Race "B" Imported 7 Ffs.
Purse: S750.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Mllros J. Bravo 112
2Rathlin Light H. Reyes 117x
3Galante II O. Chanis 105
4Welsh Loch V. Castillo 110
If you belong to the Armed Forces
or if you have a steady job come to
our Store and you can choose your
own terms to buy on credit.
e have the best Mahogany Furniture.
If you don't know our Club System
v'v.t us and you will be delighted.
86 Ccn.ral Ave. Tel. 2-2404
Glh Race "F" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $500.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1__Petit Pois B. Aguirre 115
2Picon A. Vsquez 110
3Hurlecano J. Bravo 116
4Cradle Song G. Prescott 112
5Pblico V. Castillo 114
6Alto Alegre A. Valdivia 120
7Rose Hip F. Rose 120
8Vampiresa M. G'errero 112
9Supersticiosa) O. Bravo 112
10Linney Head J. Contras 120
7th Race "H'' Imported 1 Mile
Purse: $400.00-- Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Nijlnsky O. Cruz 110
2Trafalgar V. Castillo 117
3Danescourt H. Reyes 105x
4Sans Soucl J. Cont'ras 108
5Pincel V. Ortega 114
Meet Scotland's (
Favourite Son
Born 820
still going strong
JOHNNIE WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
The fashionable drink everywhere
JOHN ALKEB SUNS LTD, Sc.,c. Wkk, D-Ulkn. K1UURNOCX
8th Race T-l' Importedt'A Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Cobrador A. Enrique 107x
2Delhi O. Bravo 120
3Flambaro B. Moreno 120
4Troplcana R. Vsquez 112
5Flamenco H. Reyes 106x
6Astoria E. Dario 107
7Miss Matty B. Aguirre 116
8Tupac J. Baeza. Jr. 109
9Jepperin C. Ruiz 112
9th Race 1-V Imported4' i Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Gale Force G. Duarte 117*
2La Chata A. Valdivia 114
3Antecede C. Ruiz 120
4Costina B. Aguirre 116
5Bartolo i F. Rose 112
8Dora's Time i C. Chong 112x
7Sandalia R. Vsquez 112
8Islero G. Snchez 114
9Vermont E. Sllvera 118
Add to that list such local stal-
warts as Johnny and Charley
MacMurray. George RUey, Joe
Brbaro, Anbal Macarrn, Bud-
dy Hammond, Herb Mitten, Dave
Starrett, Charley Wood, Mike
Kulikowskl. and a great number
of others and what you have Is
the strongest field in the history
of the event. Veteran mashie
swingers in Panam cannot re-
call a tournament that will fea-
ture the caliber of players of the
1952 Panam Open.
Zonians are reminded of the
fact that if they are at the Pan-
fm club at 1 p.m. on each of
he four days they will be able to
see the cream of the crop In ac-
tion as none of the headline stars
will start their rounds before
that time.
Posse is no newcomer to Pan-
am fairways.
He has played in the last four
3Novelera
4Damascus
J. Perada 112x
B. Aguirre 115
10th Race 1-2 Imported4 Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Tartufo J. Avila 120
2rabe II A. Vsquez 112x
11th Race 'E' Imported11. Miles
Purse: $550.00.
1Roadmaster L. Bravo 120 |
2Mosqueton C. Ruiz 115
3Nehuinco J. Contreras 107 i
4Sun Cheer C. Chavez 107x
5Alabarda G. Prescott 110 I
6Cyc. Malone B. Aguirre 116 |
ilia icuuit ***- w~----------. --
has been defeated not more than
ten times In tournament Play
three of the defeats coming in
the Panam event.
The 35-year-old member or a,
well-known golfing family will,
stay at the Hotel El Panam a-1
long with the other players who,
will be arriving early next week;
to play in the event .
Ral is the brother of the.
I world-famed Martin Posse who
was runner-up for the Bruism
Open title about four years ago.;
In a recent match in Colombia,!
Ral put the skids under his
brother.
First prize for the pros in the,
! tournament will be a cool $1.000.
Second prize will be worth $500,
1th additional prizes amount->
ing to $300. $200, $100 awaiting
the play-for-pay boys.
The low 15 amateurs will re-,
celve beautiful silverware for
their efforts.
SportsJhorties
ATLANTA, Jan. 18 (UP) At-
lanta sports columnist Ed Dan-
forth says the Government Hoot-
ed away more than $52,000 a
year by recalling Ted Williams
to Marine duty.
Williams, the Boston Red Sox
batting star, has been drawing
$89.000 a year. And Danforth
figures the case this way:
FirstWith Williams In the
Marines, the Government loses
the $47,000 he would have paid
as income tax.
SecondAs a Marine captain,
the Government will have to
give Slugging Ted another $7,200.
Out of that will come about
$900 In taxes...net loss to Un-
cle Sam, Just under $52,500.
Fastlich Teen-Age
League Openers Set
For Tomorrow P.M.
The Fastllchrsponsored Pony
Baseball League will get under
way at 1:30 p.m. at the Balboa
Stadium when the Conejos meet
the Palomas in the opening game
of the doubleheader.
Pumas will tackle the Ocelots
In the nightcap.
The 71st Army Band, under the
direction of WO Thomas E. Gold-
er, will be on hand to furnish the
music during intermissions and;
for the traditional flag raising
ceremony.
All five teams of the loop will
be in the parade to the flag pole
In centerfleld of the Balboa Sta-
dium.-The sponsor, Adalbert,
Fastlich, wUl toss the first ball, i
The Bombers last night edged
the Bluebirds 1-0 at the Balboa
Stadium while the last place
Brownies were eking out a 4-3
triumph over the Yankees at Mt.
Hooe. As a result, there Is a sig-
nificant change in the Panam
Pro League championship stand-
ings today.
The Bombers took over first
place on percentage points al-
though tjed for first on the basis
of games won and lost.
The classy veteran Theollc
Smith set a new league record
for consecutive scoreless Innings
pitched by adding nine to his
previous skein of 16. Smith, un-
scored upon In local play, wiped
out the record of 23 set by Eddie
Neville earlier this season.
Pete Nicolls matched Smith for
the first five innings but gave up
a run In the sixth when Pepe Os-
orio singled, moved to second on
Frank Austin's sacrifice and rode
home on Archie Brathwalte's sin-
gle to right. That was the ball
game.
After the sixth, Nicolis again
held the opposition in check but
the damage was already done.
Pete gave up seven scattered hits
and struck out five. However,
Smith was even betterstriking
out six and allowing only three
measly singles, two of them to!
Rocky Tedesco.
Over at Mount Hope, moody,
Vibert Clark was In good form
for eight and one-third Innings
and held the Yankees to six hits,
while his mates got eleven but i
was hard pressed to squeeze out'
a 4-3 victory.
Pat Patrick opposed Clark for
eight Innings and gave up ten"
hits and all the Brownie runs.
Clark blanked the Yanks un-
til the sixth when the Rummies
tallied once. The other two Yan-
kee runs came in a ninth Inning
uprising.
Zlggy Jazinski tripled home
Jim Cronin who had slnftled
with one out In the ninth, then
scored on Steve Karas' double,
after two were out but Clem
Koshorek rolled out to short to
end the game.
Plans for the holding of a
"Caribbean Series Contest"
were drawn up Wednesday aft-
ernoon at the office of the Ca-
ribbean Confederation at the
Panam National Stadium dur-
ing a special press conference.
The contest will be based on
guessing the correct answers of
questions about the probable
leaders In several departments in
the Panam Pro League at the
end of the season's play.
The winners would be awarded
free tickets to the Caribbean Se-
ries which gets under way at the
Panam Stadium Feb. 19 between
the champion teams of the pro
leagues in Cuba, Puerto Rico,
Venezuela and Panam.
The 15 tickets to be offered as
prizes have a total value of $150.
The contest will consist of four
questions:
1Name the order in which
you predict the teams will fin-
ish.
2Name the league's leading
pitcher.
3 Name the player who wlB
bat In the most runs.
4Name the batting champion.
The point distribution will be
ten for question No. 1, 20 for No.
2, 30 for question three and 40
for No. 4.
Entries must be mailed to the
Caribbean Confederation, Box
197, Panam, R. P.
Juan Franco Tip
By CLOCKER
1Annie N.
2Huascazo
3Wlnsaba
4Sincero
JMllros
Domino
Don Jaime
La Loba
Opex
Welsh Loch
6Supersticiosa (e) Hurlecano
7Trafalgar Sans Soucl
8Flambaro Miss 'Matty
9La Chata Vermont
10Novelera Damascus
11Cyclone Malone Nehninee
oOofy far
Complete Assortment of
DOG SUPPLIES
t
Of
1* Tivnll Ave. Tel. t-ZWt

Haig
Scotch Whisky
i-.

No finer Whisky
goes into any


bottle
HULlAtf
%i-*-sV
.

RACES SATURDAY and SUNDAY
-------------------------------- _______ __________
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd-6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenieuce of
our patrons we are non
opera ting both at the
"COPACABANA" and
"SAVOY/'

SATURDAY'S STELLAR RACE
ucut ^PxoHCo 'Race 7i QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK
5th Race "B" Importeds 7 Fgs.
Purse: $750.00 Pool Closes: 2:35 p.m.
1. MUROS...............J.Bravo 112
2. RATHLIN LIGHT......H.Reyes U7x
3. GALANTE II.........O. Chanis 105
4. WELSH LOCH........V. Castillo 110

SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
5th Rece "A" Importeds 7 Fgs.
Purse: $1,000.00 Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m.
2. KEYHAVEN........ J. Contreras 106
2. GRISU...........M. Arosemena 99
3. CHACABUCO........A.Enrique 103x
4. ROYAL COUP.........J. Bravo 124
5. DICTADOR............O.Bravo 112
7th Race "D" Importeds 7 Fgs.
Purse: $600.00 Pool Doses: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
1. NOTABLE.............O.Bravo 112
2. AVENUE ROAD.........F.Rose t20
3. CORAGGIO........J.Contrera* 120
4. VISIR................B.Aguirre 117
5. BEDUINO............E.Svera 112



PfWVj^^H
flpP
FltlDAT, JANUARY It, 1051
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
National Football League Clubs Make Annual Draft Selection
Los Angeles Rams Come Up
With Special 'Bonus' Pick
NEW YORK, Jan. 18.(UP)The 12 National
Football League club dipped into the annual grab
bag yesterday and the Los Angeles Rams came up
with the prize package.
Bay. The Philadelphia Eagles
Wilfredo Brown
Trains Earnestly
For Title Defense
Wilfredo Brown la taking his
title defense eerap seriously. This
can be easily judged from the
manner In which The Thin
Man" baa been handling his
sparmates.
Working with more pep and
Bay. -rne rnuaueium w> confidence slnee the return ol
drafted half back Johnny Bright hii tr,,n TomB- -Bolo" Royal,
of Drake. Other first round arart; Brown has been a revelation dur-
oi uraae. man i" '""'"..'i*"". Brown bas been a rewisum i
choices were Maryland fullback; ln. hJi gparr|ng sessions.
Ed Modselewskl by Pittsburgh, Boi0 .de It elear that in
passing star Larirlebell of Bay- d t0 keep np these ter.
_. or-
terrifk
The Rams won the special "bo-
nus'' pick at the draft meeting
in New York and promptly put
the tinier on quarterback BUI
Watte, the ace passer from Van-
derbllt. Seven teams were eligible
for a "bonus pick" before the
drafting of 30 players by each
the i| clubs.
The other clubs eligible were
Oreen Bay, the Chicago Cardi-
nala. Cleveland Browns, Ban|Frank 9^d o Southern Call- wlu ^ added next week.
Francisco, Pittsburgh and the fornla by the Giants and Mien- .,Ka gt another fight." says
New York Yanks. The other igan Stale end Bob Carey by Los Bo, but t want the urf to be
in the pink for this one...the
reason...I will have no alibis if
teams-New York alants, Wash- Angeles.
lngton,Philadelphia,Detroit and ,.,. ^ reason...I wu
Chicago Bears-drew bonus play- Cleveland tot two Pjy gg m, boy losea."
ers in previous years and had to the first round. Detroit traded Its, *___'__--------.--------------------
stand by this time. I opening pick to Cleveland and
After the Rams selected Wade, the Browns drafted Tennessee ft km an RlflClS
the regular draft started. The,halfback Bert Rechichar. elev- 1)1111111011 l\8Jl*
Yanks, with the poorest record land then drafted[Boston M- y .,
last, season, got first pick and se-1 verslty quarterback Harry Agga- I gam IA HAI Q
lectd guar Les Rlchter fromnls. ILWeJIII IV leve we
the University of California. The A aa .-l.il___
*s#avs&Mta -Th4F0wn Motorbikes
Bt5nigffiS Babe Parilll of\^^^^^^ JW *,*TSor?K
Rafted by Green I^Wft B\ ffiKS SMS f^^J
foid was drafted by the Bears'around-rlders and rubberneck-
and Oklahoma tackle Jim Wea- ers.
T
Albrook, 33rd Remain Unbeaten
In Panama Armed Forces League
Philippine Rallan
Defeats CAA 12-11
In the Pacific Softball Lea-
gue, the Philippine Rlttan team
won Its second victory Wednes-
day at the Ancon field, defeat-
ing CAA 12 to 11.
In Che first inning Philippine
Rattan marked up two singles
but a fly to left field and a
double play when Medlnger
lined a grounder to third baee-
man Malene, who tagged Bob
Lawyer out at third then threw
to first before Medlnger arriv-
ed, kept Philippine Rattan
scoreless.
FLYING HIGHTom Jacobs, Boulder, Colo., and John Caldwell,
Putney, Vt.. stage a tandem Jump as they zoom down Baldy
Mountain at Sun Valley. They are among the eight members of
the American cross-country and classic combined akiing teams
training at the famed Idaho resort for the 1952 Winter Olympic
Games, hard by Oslo, Norway, Feb. 14-25. (NEA)
therall went to Philadelphia.
in and veto the player draft.
Army Sports
TOUCH FOOTBALL
FORT KOBBE, O Z .-Head-
quarters Company won its Ilitn
game in the Special Units Touch
oreiess. 'Football League Tuesday night
CAA came up in their half a8 they squeezed by a stubborn
of the first and scored five runs service Company team 13-0.
hita, a walk and an -n^ garrj was fought hard all
the way with both teams stay-
ing. In mid-field' most of the
tin. Twis* HeadJUirters con-
iitcttd wttK long ppkes to score.
fMBrfMers WVpany, usual-
ly effective with short passes
over center, found the Service
defense too tight as they battled
to a scoreless tie at the end of
the first quarter.
on- four
error.
Philippine Rattan, in t
of the second, chalked up
runs on five hits, one bl
balls, two1 errors and two/
pitches by Jordan.
CAA failed to score again un-
til the fifth inning when they
went ahead 10 to 8 (Philippine
Rattan having scored one In the
first of the fifth on a four-
bagger to right center by Era-
ser with none on) on five hits
and two errors.
The Bamboo boys came
with four runa In the top .
the seventh to again take the
lead 13 to 10, on four solid hits, one
Next is the lessons It teaches
the manufacturers of the ma-
The uro clubs now have two chines.
things to worry about. First, will M o t o r c y ele manufacturers
the drafted players want to en- nearly all have their own racing,
erthe play-for-pay ranks Sec-teams, riding racing machines
ondly ill the mlllUry draft step incorporating the firms latest
brainwaves. _
These brainwaves get pretty
much sorted out in the battering
of flatout competitions.
The ones that come good are
then Incorporated into the stock
machines produced by the com-;
panies.
The racing machines are, in
fact, a highly mobile laboratory.
An adaptation of the same
idea is coming through In Pan-
ama's motorbike fraternity.
All the BSA's, Triumphs, Har-
leys and the Vincent which the
lads have been racing here so
far are production line stock
models, designed as much for
rambles along the country roads
and touring as for speed Work.
But, With the experience of. two
road races and one track meeting'
behind them, the riders of Pan-
am and the Canal Zone are full
of little wheezes for hotting up
their machines on raceday.
So it is that such dust-shovers
as Dan Klota (Triumph )r. Dick
one a round tripper by Bob
Lawyer who rapped a long fly
to right center. Center fielder
Hobart was playing toward left
center expecting Lawyer to pull
in that direction instead Ho-
bart had to make a long tun
to right center, managed to
touch the ball, but failed to
hang on to it.
The Aero team, in an effort
int Aero team, m on cuuu sparKea uy such sianaouis as
to catch up In the last of the | Roper, Une backer, Dussault, left
seventh, scored one run. Catch- half, and Ferbert, right end.
In the second quarter Quar- a
terback McCrane passed 85 Burns (Triumph), Artie Sherry
yards to hit Trout in the end (bsa) and a few others will be
aone for the first score. The pass au0ard the same bikes at next
play for the extra point was un- aunday morning's Juan Franco
-tccessful. meet, but expect to be conveyed
In the third period Hqs. pulled ar0und the oval markedly more
ie of the beat plays of the rapidly than they were Jan. 5.
fame. McCrane took the ball They propose, In fact, that the
rom the "T" and lateraled to results list next Sunday should
Trout who started to run and look gulte distinct from that ol
then passed to end Hunt who Jan. 6. .
was wide open 45 yards down More prominent mention ol
field. McCrane passed to Conroy Flotz, Burns and Sherry la their
for the extra point. intentions.
The defensive team for Head-
quarters Company has been
scored on one time in five games.
Sparked by such standouts as
they provide a tight defense
against air and ground attack.
The next game in the league
la Jan. 17 between Tank and
Medical Companies.
er Ed Jones, having been given
a free pass by Bngelke, stole
second. Catcher Sutherland
threw toward -second but the
ball evaded the second base-
man and went into center field..
Jones came all the way to make a j__.L|.. D \i/ f* A
the acore 12 to 11. The suceeed- MOmMy r. VY.Vj.A.
lng two batters popped out to
end the game.
May started for Philippine
Rattan, allowed nine runs on
nine hits, two walks in four
and 1-8 Innings.
Two U.S.A. Cities
Claim Basketball
First Played There
By UNITED PRESS
Tournament To Be
Held At Ft. Davis
COLON. Jan. 17PWGA mem-
three strikeouts.
Jordan went the distance for
CAA and was responsible for 12
runs on 14 hits and one free
pass.
Bob Lawyer, playing third
base for Philippine Rattan, was
the heavy man with the bat
getting four hltt for five tries.
Malene, Baker and Ed Jones
led hitting for CAA with two
each.
A basketball feud Is brewing
between Herkimer, New York,
and Springfield. Massachusetts.
Each city claims It's the birth-
place of the game. Basketball
historian Frank Basloe of Herk-
imer says the_ first game was
played In his city on Feb. 7,1801.
Ed Hlckok, secretary of the
jprlngfleld Basketball Hall of
Tame committee, says his Mas-
Irr-oi rn r.achusetts city put on the first
la vis Golf Club at eight-thirty game In December of 1801.
tomorrow. i "That February date Basloe
Slnee elections were not held quotes," says Hlckox couW be
at the December meeting, they one year off. The game couldn t
- '.iave been talked about before
jecember of 1801."
Hlckox says the National Bas-
eball Coaches Association has
ade plans and bought land in
ana i-s inmna. COLON. Jan. 17PWGA mem-
Howard Engelke relieved May erfi rtari the new year off with >
in the fifth giving up two bang by being present when
runs on two hltt, one alk and tee-off time comee at the Fort si
*Vim ftti>tlrfviit.a *. .,_ r*_ta .-.i-,. -. .1.1.1 4vi_- ~
Will fee held during the luncheon
at the Fort Davis Officers Clnb
which will follow directly after
the tournament
Call your reservations to Paul-
ine 'Marsh at Part Gullek M4M;
or to Mike Etlkewakl at Fort
Davis 81110.
Bulldogs, Tigers
To Tangle Again
Tonight At Balboa
Balboa High and the Junior
College will match baskets and
Sasses tonight at the Balboa
ynvln the second league game
of the season between the two
teams.
The High Schoolers won the
first one by two points, and this!
contest should be Just as close
and hotly contested as the pre-
vious ones. Also In this one there
Is a whale of a lot more at stake
for both teams. There'wlll be a
preliminary game between the
BHS Junior Varsity and the.
Harbor Defense team starting!
at 6:45. The Varsity game wlu
follow Immediately.
The Bulldogs stand a good
chance of going Into a com-
fortable lead In the League
standings by virtue Of a victory,
and the resulting detest would
all but eliminate the Oreen
Wave from any hope of the
title. Reverse the situation, how-
ever, and you find that the en-
tire League would be a wide
open affair. Balboa would still
be on top, but only by the skin
of their teeth, with Cristobal
breathing down their necks,
and J. C. not far off the pace.
Fans can be assured that
Coach Bob Mower will have his
boys fired up to the hilt in order
to upset the high riding Bull-
dogs. The Bulldogs are still un-
defeated In League play, and
will have to play one of their
top games of the season to re-
tain their undefeated record.
Gone from the Bulldog bench
tonight will be the man who has
brought them this far, Coach Al
Blelfuas. He was forced to return
to the States very suddenly and
Coach Paul Dreska will stand in
his shoes for the remainder of
the season. Dreska has been
handling the Bulldog Junior
Varsity this year.
Doors to the Gym will open at
6 p. m., and there are plenty of
good seats available for the fans,
so here is another opportunity
for the hoop enthusiast of the
Isthmus to witness another
bang Up game, with a pre-
liminary encounter thrown In
for good measure.
Offer To Buy Grid
New York Yankees
Flatly Turned Down
NEW YORK, Jan. 18 (UP
Commissioner Bert Beil of the
National Football League reveals
that a promoter In Dallas, Tex.
tried to buy the New York Yanks
but was turned down.
Bell identifies the prospective
buyer as "Mister X,' 'adding that
he isn't Dallas hotel operator
Glenn McCarthy or radio exec-
utive Gordon McLendon, the
head of the Liberty Broadcasting
Company. Both have been men-
tioned as prospective buyers of a
pro fooiball club.
Says Bell: "Owner Ted Collins
flatly refused the proposition to
buy the Yanks. That ended It.
The proposal was submitted to
me and I turned It over to On-
line. He decided to do nothing
about lt.M
Bell also' says the Baltimore
franchise will be Inactive again
next season. Tte league president
says owners of the franchise
failed to meet certain obligations
by last Oct. 1.
65th Sports Chief
To Leave Isthmus
This Saturday
1st Lieutenant Alder P. Bettl
Welfare, Athletic and Re-
creation Officer for the 65th
Antiaircraft Artillery Group,
Fort Clayton departs the
USARCARIB on Jan. 10. He will
attend the Light Aviation School
at San Marcus, Texas.
A versatile baseball player,
the lieutenant has sparked
Group and Battalion teams
since his arrival in the Canal
Zone In October, 1048. His abil-
ity to play any positions from
catcher to right fielder has
made him a valuable captain
for the ball teams of the sports
minded 66th Group.
Lt. Bettl spent six of his eleven
service years with the Air Force
where, as an enlisted man, he
won many decorations in the
South Pacific during World War
II Including the Distinguished
Flying Cross, the Bronze Star
and the Air Medal with Cluster.
Also Public Information Offi-
cer for the Group. Lt. Bettl has
been the managing editor of the
Group's weekly mimeograph
newspaper, The Voice Of The
Ocelot.
The Albrook Flyers and the
33a infantrymen continued their
unbeaten ways Wednesday af-
ternoon as both teams chalked
up their fifth straight victory
In the first round of play In the
Panama Armed Forces Baseball
League. The Flyers edged out an
I Improving signal nine 7 to 6
I while the 33d had an easy time
of it, romping to a 16 to 1 vic-
tory over Corozal. It was Coro-
aal's fifth straight defeat.
With these two teams stand-
ing out in early season play, the
question the fans are asking
each other is "Will the 33d be
able to break the monopoly
which the Fivers have held on
the league title for the past two
years?" Comparative scores in-
dicate that the 33d might be
the stronger of the two teams
but the Flyers have proven their
olllty to come through when
the pressure Is on by rallvlng
in the late Innings when It look*
ed as If their string might have
run out. The two teams do not
face each other until February 2.
While the battle for the top
position has turned Into a two
team affair, the fight for third
place Is wide open with six
teams tied for that spot after
five games have been played.
All six teams have complied a
record of three wins and two
defeats. The change in playing
form of several of the teams
has kept the fans In doubt a-
bout this battle for third plaee
in the standings.
The 370th Boat Battalion
and the 003d AAA, after drop-
ping their first two games, have
come back strong to chalk up
three straight wins while the
764th AAA and the 45th Recon-
naissance Battalion have drop-
ned two in a row after captur-
ing three straight wins to start
the season.
The 370th Boat gained Its
third win In a row bv overpow-
ering the 45th Battalion 10 to 0
while the 003d continued its
winnings ways with a 10 to 5
conquest of Westbank. Special
Troops handed the 764th its
second straight setback as the
Frt Amador nine pounded out
Davidson Advances
To Semifinals Of
Jr. Tennis Tourney
In an excellent and hard
fought match In which both
players show their best quali-
ties, Raymond Davidson defeat-
ed Saverlo Melfl by the score of
6-3, 6-1.
In the first set Melfl took the
first two games of the set,
forcing Davidson to play his
best.
From this point on, Davidson
\ took the offensive, putting in
I play all bis technique to take
the first set by a score of 6-3.
In the second set, Davidson
| played a fast and beautiful
game, forcing Melfl to make
continuous mistakes, which cost
him the set and match.
Davidson showed once more
the form which has made him
as one of the top seeded players
of this tournament.
a 20 to 6 victory, highlighted
by Lloyd "Red" Thomas' third
home run Of the season.
The victory moved special
Troops into the group tledolof
third place. Coco solo- also
moved into the group with*.13
to 7 win over the 370 wore
Battalion. It was the Shore Bat-
talion's fourth straight set-bejelc
after winning its opener. In the
remaining contest Wednesday
the 504th FA Battalion defeated
Atlantic Sector 9 to 2.
PANAMA ARMED FORCE*
BASEBALL LEAGUE
STANDINGS
Team
Albrook
33d infantry
Coco Solo 3
Special Troop 3
46th Reeon. Bn. 3
370th Boat Bn. 8
764th AAA
903d AAA
Wstbank
504th FA Bn.
Atlantic sector
Signal
370th Shore Bn. 1
Coroial 0
T F
PENICILIN CURE
Hlaleah. Fla,(NEA)Dr. E
N. Southard, Hlaleah veterin-
arian, say penlellin does not
hurt hofees.
Wednesday's Resolta
Albrook 7, Signal 6
33d Inf. 16, Coroial 1
Special Troops 80, 784th
370th Boat 10, 41th 0
504th 0, Atlantic Sector
oosth io, westbank i '
Coco Solo 13, 370th Shore
.000
-
"DITTO"
THE DUPLICATOR THAT DOES NOT USE INK
PRINT* O 4 COLORS
COMPLETE STOCK OF ACCESSORIES ON HAND
ASK FOR A DEMONSTRATION I
V
Ate. Tivoil No. II
TeL t-teie

Albrook-Curundu Rifle
Team Beats Balboa ROTC
The Albrook-Curundu smallbore rifle team completed the
first half of the Isthmian Gallery League season last night with
a victory over the Balboa ROTC In a r-yular league match. Al-
brook-Curundu was defeated onee In the first round, and finish-
ed the half In second place
The score of the match fired on the Albrook range was Al-
brook-Curundu 1113. Balboa ROTC 1013 Earl F Mitchell, Army
civilian, a veteran shooter who has been a mainstay of the Al-
brook-Curundu team from its inception fired high acor of 286
for the winners. BUI Jaffray with Ml wu second David Hoopes
of the Balboa ROTC (an alumnus of th* Albrook-Curundu Junior
team of two years ago) fired top score of 877 for the losers.
^prlnglleld to ereet a HaU of
Fame. Basloe says Hall of Fame
committees throughout the
country have raised the money
but are waiting a final decision
on where to buUd. Basic* says he
can back up his claim with sev-
eral persons who saw tht first
game and with documentary evi-
dence. Hlckox eays he also has
evidence.
The case reste. ______
FORCE OF HABIT
State College, Pa. (NEA)
BUI Jeffrey, In his 26th season
its Penn State soccer coach, has
lost only 21 out of 190 starts.
Albreek-Curande
Earl MlUhell.....
Bin Jaffry.....
Bill Merrlman
Ed Cos...........
SCORES
Prone
55
Sit
I
OS
M
Stand
OS
84
84
80
Team Total
Balboa ROTC
David Moopes.....
Gerald Herleksen
Vicente Esguerra
Francis Roddy
Team Total
Total
281
280
176
1188
1018
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKVSA
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Colon
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PROS DRAFT TOP COLLEGE GRIDDERS
Briggs Death
Great Loss
For Baseball
MIAMI, BEACH. Fla.. Jan. 18
(UP) Walte- O. Briggs, Sr., 74.
who rose irom a $20 a month
freight cleric to the hobby-own-
ership of the Detroit Tigers base-
ball club, died yesterday at his
Winter beach home.
The wealthy owner of the
Briggs M.uiufacturing Co. one
of the iaigest parts supplier com-
antes hi the automobile lndus-
ry was stricken with a kid-
ney ailment Sunday. He seemed
to recover Monday enough for
his weekday automobile ride but
became 111 again.
His ron, Wa.ter O. (Spike)
Briggs. Ji flew here from De-
mm^.
AN INDBPEI,-Dg^<|lfes|DlLY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Lei the people know the truth and the country i$ tafe** Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1952
FIVE CENTS
Defense Chiefs Hope To Start
UMT In Fall With Volunteers
WASHINGTON Jan 18 (UP). to 18 months active duty after
Defense officials said today finishing their training- They
troit and was at his bedside when (tna, __ congress willing the; also would be paid $75 a month
he died, along with his widow.armed services will start univ-: during training the same as
and the Most Rev. Allen J. Bab-ersal mnitary training this fall recruits In active service -
cock, auxiliary bishop of Detroit wlth 60,000 "volunteer 18-year-
who adivunister-M rites ,d ho would be ut on active
His body will be own by priv- ft six-months training,
ate plane to Detroit today for a u rc,of-n solemn requiem mass at Blessed I l0^fa^Sa7/Sary
Cathed, 11 a M^eU^nd^lstant^Sec^^^
the House Armed Services Corn-
Monday. The Most Rev. Babcock
will conduct the funeral rites.
Bascuul! men agreed unanim-
ously tnat Brings' death Is a
great lo.-:s to the eame. Red Rolfe.
manage.- of the Detroit Tigers,
called toil death a "staggering
blow to tasebail"
'Baseball mav well have lost
Its last owner with the viewpoint
of the ian." Rolfe said. "His
generosiiy to his players and to
his offtcs associates was bound-
less."
Briggs starting as a $20 a
month clerk pioneered the cons-
truction f automobile bodies and
parts spiead his factories and
{iroducts to nearly all parts of
he worid
But hr was best known as
Bresident of the Detroit Tigers.
bought a half interest in
the American League club in
1921 un obtained sole control
in 1935. He showed his view-
point for the fan by lavishing
money on Bnrgs Stadium in
Detroit to make it perhaps the
most beautiful park in the Ma-
ior Leagues and in once giving
is
eheel
ond baseman.
Charley Gehringer, general
manager of the Tigers who also
played for the club, said Briggs
told him he could do anything "I
wanted if I thought It would help
the club'
"He wai the Tigers' most loyal
Ian." Gehringer added.
John Oulnn, general manager
Of the Boston Braves; Bob Car-
rn-ral manager a blank
to purchase a good sec-
?inter, ov/ner o! the Philadelphia
nils; Powell Crosley. president
of the C1 n c 1 n n ati Reds, and
other agreed that his passing
will be felt in baseball.
Brlgg3 was born at Ypsllanti,
Mich., Fib. 27, 1877 He advanced
irom frelRht clerk to yard fore-
man before quitting to work for
a cement company. He later Join-
ed the B. F. Everitt Company as
?Ice president and then got con-
trol of t-ie company and changed
Its nam-i to Brings Manufactur-
ing Co.
In 1920 he started annual vis-
Its to Miami Beach, where he
helped to found the exclusive In-
dian Creek Country Club because
of his second sports love golf.
For the last several years he of-
ten Tolled his wheel chair out to
thftlSth green to watch golfers
finishing their round.
mittee their plans to launch the
nation's first UMT program In
3eDtember or October.
They said they would start by
'aklng 5,000 volunteers a month
for the first year and then put
the program on a compulsory
basis until some 800,000 men a
vear are being Inducted for six
months training. After their
training, the "umtees" would be
placed In the reserves for 7-Vi
years.
But Lovett said the first 60,000
trainees would be called for 18
months active service as soon
as they finished their training.
They first would be placed In the
reserves only as a matter of
form.
The Defense, Secretary of-
fered two proposals which are
certain to be opposed by the
House Committee.
In fact, his entire plan Is si-
milar to one advanced by Com-
mittee Chairman Carl Vinson
(D.. Ga.) and rejected informally
by other members.
Lovett suggested that Con-
gress keep the draft law on the
books "two or three vears" after
UMT is started. Committee
members have proposed a ban
on further drafting for Im-
mediate active service after the
first 12 months of UMT.
The committee also has indi-
cated it will oppose calling train-
ees to active duty Immediately
after she months training. They
want to put all trainees In the
reserves and keep a tight rein on
the President's power to call
them to active service.
Under the Defense Depart-
ment's plan, the 60,000 volunteer
trainees would agree In advance
stead of the $30 proposed for
"umtees" once the program Is In
full swing.
The first year's "volunteers"
would come from 18-year-old
youths who knew they faced
induction calls under the draft
law any way.
Lovett and Mrs. Rosenberg
said that present armed service
bases in 12 states would be con-
verted partly as training sites
under the UMT program.
Mrs. Rosenberg said that after
the initial 12-month period,
monthlv calls would tart for
non-volunteers.
The defense chiefs told the I
committee that if Congress re-!
jects their plan, they wul accept I
any reasonable substitute that I
provides for an early tart of
UMT.
(NEA Telephoto)
RIVER RESCUER Joseph Amlco, of Mount Vernon, N.Y,
talks to the press after he and two others rescued 25 per-
sons from the East River In New York. Those saved were
among the 36 passengers of an airliner picked up after the
plane crashed into the river. Amlco fished the victims out
from his crash boat, then transferred them to a tug.
Anti-Pern
News Editor
Dying In Jail
Da-
By DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18 -
vld MKiel Torino, editor-pub-
lisher o the padlocked anti-Pe-
rc-n newspaper, "El Intransigen-
te," in Salta, Argentina, Is near
death in a jail cell where he has
been held for seven months with-
out trial by direct order of the
dictator whom he defied.
All Torino's property and bank
deposits have been confiscated,
while both his lawyer and his
personal physician have been im-
prisoned lor trying to get him
free on habeas corpus and on the
plea of needing adequate medi-
cal attention.
Torino was removed to a Salta
hospital tor an intestinal oper-
ation last November, but sent
back to 1?il three days later. His
incision nas not healed properly
and he is In a state of collapse.
Even the prison doctor is allow-
ed to visit him only twice a week.
Meanrhlle, Peron recently told
a Junket'ng group of U.S. Con-
gressmen that "no limitations
are plactd on freedom of the
press in Argentina." Not one of
his hearers called him a liar.
PC Observatory
Tb Open 2 N^Ms
Weekly To Public
Miraf'.ores Observatory will
be open to the public from 7
to "9 p.m Sunday and Friday
Bights starting Sunday, It was
announced yesterday at Bal-
boa Heights.
'Earl 6. Dally, of the Elec-
trical Division will be at the
Observatory on Sunday nights
and Clarence True, of the En-
rineerlng Division, will be
there on Frldav nights.
Arrangements may also be
made for groups to visit the
Observatory on other nights by
contacting either Daily or True.
Spanish Classes
For Americans Set
Al RP University
The Panama University will
offer special classes In begin-
ners and intermediate Spanish,
designed specially for American
students, beginning Saturday,
Jan. 26, it was officially an-
nounced yesterday.
The classes will be .conducted
every Saturday morning from
8:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and stud-
ents who complete the course
and pass the examination will be
entitled to receive credit for
same, it was further stated.
Classes will be in charge of a
Panamanian professor who has
a Bachelor of Arts degree with
a major In romance languages
from an accredited U. 8. univ-
ersity m addition to other univ-
ersity degrees.
It is also likely that should a
sufficient number of students de-
sire it some tours to the Interior
of Panama may be organized to
give pupils the opportunty to
know the Republic and to prac-
tice their Spanish in places
where no English Is spoken.
Registration fee for the entire
course will be $10.
Registrations Set Next Week
For LSU's Program On C.Z.
Registration for the spring se- Jan. 24, enrollees may register In
mester of the expanded Loulsl-
ana State University Caribbean
Lathi American
Women Students
Aided By Altrusa
CHICAGO. Jan. 18 (USI8) -
Funds for supplementary
grants-ln-ald to Latin Ameri-
can women studying In the
United States and Canada have
been replenished by a drive Just
concluded by Altrusa Interna-
(NEA Telephoto)
RAINY SEASON Dwellings In Concord, Calif., are surrounded by water from rising creeks,
as heavy rains continued to fall In the San Francisco area. The violent storm which hit
Concord caused the occupants of 600 homes to prepare to evacuate to higher ground.
* # *
Soggy California Hit By New
Torrent; Families Flee Hills
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 18 (UP)
The newest of the current ser-
ies of storms was sweeping down
the Pacific coast today as Cali-
fornians started to clear the
wreckage caused by the worst
winter in 82 years.
San Franciscans enjoyed a
short glimpse of the sun yester-
day, but in Los Angeles and
Program In the Canal Zone area
will be conducted next week, Jan.
21 through 24.
Although designed primarily to
provide college educational ad-
vantages to members of the
Armed Forces in the Caribbean
Command, the LSU program is
also open to U. S. citizens who
are employes of the Panam Ca-
nal Company or the Canal Zone
Government.
An expanded curriculum plan-
ned for this semester will In-
clude classes in eight college-
level fieldsfour more than were i
offered last semester. Classes will; p_| |amM Pnmnpllv
begin Feb. 4 at military Installa- M* James rumpeiiy
tions throughout the Canal
Zone. All classes will be conduct-
ed In the evenings.
Dr. Claude E. Shaver and W.
E. Highsmlth, two of the pro-
tional. association of member-
me Examining and Computing ship clubs founded In 1817 for
classroom, building 3, Fort Am- service to executive and profes-
ador, or at the Headquarters sional women.
Building, Quarry Heights. | Eacn October Altrusa, which
Panam Canal employes may initiated the program of grants|tures for eight days, reported.
Chinese Required
To Attend Showings
Of Anli-US Films
HONG KONG. Jan. 18 (U8IS)
A collection of anti-American
newsreels filmed by the Com-
munist regime is breaking box
office records throughout China
because the theaters are ordered
to show it and the people are
required to see it.
The manager of a Canton
Theater visiting here gave this
explanaton of the record theater
attendance today in a Voice of
America interview, adding that
it takes a clever person in Chi-
na to escape seeing the films.
The theater manager asked
that he not be further identified
as he planned to return to Can-
ton.
The newsreels, reputedly film-
ed in Korea, are hailed by Com-
munist propaganda as China's
most popular movie.
The Canton theater operator
said all schools, business firms,
factories, government offices
and professional groups are re-
quired to see the newsreels.
There is a street organization
for every street in every city,
village and hamlet in Commun-
ist China and each organization
must sell tickets for it, he add-
Canton's 19 leading theaters
were ordered to show the pic
Southern California a new and
unexpected rainstorm of almost
cloudburst proportions dumped
nearly an inch of rain on areas
already flooded.
Families were evacuating
homes in the hills above Holly-
wood as a mud bank moved
down the slopes.
A Marine Corps training plane,
caught in the downpour, crashed
eight miles off Laguna Beach
and both occupants are feared
dead.
Meanwhile eastern California
and Nevada continued to dig out
of record snows.
But all transcontinental rail-
roads and highways over the
Sierras remained closed. High-
way officials said it would be at
least two days before they could
be opened.
Southern Pacific work crewt
battled to free the $3,000.000
streamliner City of San Fran-
cisco from snw and ice near
Emigrant Gap.
Ranchers near the California
state line and in western Neva-
da have fears for the oafety of
30,000 head of livestock, which
might not be able to reach their
food through the snow.
Lt. Cot. Schuelke 7"
Will Be New Army PIO
The new Information Officef
for the U S. Array Caribbean was
due to rrive today from the
United States.
He is Lt. Col E. R. Schuelke
who will assume his new duties
at Ft. Amador on Monday.
register for classes at the mill-;m 1945, has a nation-wide cam-
tary post most convenient to najen for swelling the coffers
them on the day enrollments are of jheir international project
to be accepted. I which club officers report be-
College courses offered this se-comeg increasingly popular,
mester will Include English,; The rec|pients who have
Spanish, mathematics, history, I ^ benefited from Altrusa's
speech economics accounting frMlte.|n-ald since 1945 came
and chemistry. The last three 5 Panama Ururuav. Costa ,, n
are new to the curriculum white ggj "%%&?Tr.entina, Offered By Noted
the speech course will be differ-! l.Zi. r-k. o.^Luh iwl,6,*y
ent.
When the managers objected to
the length of the run author-
ities assured them that their
theaters would be full, and they
were, he said.
Free Piano Recital
Gets French Medal
COLON, Jen
Bolivia, Cuba, Guatemala,, _.
Chile, Mexico and Colombia. Chilean PiaiUSt
ante ySTlA"faJf'tato Chilean pianist Armando Pa-
Sh^hra, frtendahta? with wo? laclos *' 8lve a irce concert In
Sff^^iSSS^coun: bh?M unlver8lty M0 y
tries who come to the UnitedPK**L2g ., to honor the
COLON, j en 18 James Pumpelly, outgoing com-!Jgg zurces F^rty-two 'w^ing of Panam Qty. Anyone who
_,<., o Ko nciDfiotn otner sources. _*o"y *fi" wo !a,iBhi> Ut cama u invited
enrollments during the four days School, was presented with the |2Sfi2"livi w'inien! Pala3io 1 topping over here
next week. Hours For registration French Medal of Honor this I ^un.eA haiL.b.et? "cip.?P;! on his way from Colombia to. a
will be 9 a.m. to 12 noon; 1:30
to 5 p.m.; and 6:30 to 8 p.m. each
gram's Instructors, wUl supervise .mandan; of the USARCARIB ""'" ,%" To Latin American
" ttttt rMe%SeSfteHonorh this XttThii. JSn S^
l&f. ttlte i of these grants-ln-ald since
mThe,no8reSenta..os was made en .ffiTSShlfffl
day. Ithe Atlantic Side by the Consul been 5ve",to '," tJ8"
On Monday registrations will 0f France in Coln. Marcel Grin-: Tr\0J^^ratinnf ^h
be accepted at the Army Educa-1 noire, and honored Col. Pumpelly ate students In vocations that
tlon Center at Hangar 3, Fort for his sendees during World War; ran*e rom (
Kobbe, and at the Airmen's Club, n, when he commanded a reg- c
Albrook Air Force Base. On'ment under the late French Gen-
Tuesday the men will be at the Ural Jacques Leclerc.
Army Education Center, building | Recently, Co! Pumpelly was
ONE DAT FOR ALL
ELBERFIELD, Ind. (UP)
GIRLS! WOMEN! TRY THIS IF YOU'RE
NERVOUS, CRAN KY, TIREP-OUT
y
"* Fort "ray tonT 'SV following also" honored "by the Republic of Oct. 10 is an Important date in
ay enrollments will be accepted;Panam, which decorated him the life of 68-year-old John
V the Atlantic side, at the Army with the Order of Vasco Nunez: Snyder. It's his birthday. It's
cation Centers at Fort Sher- de Balboi. also the birthday of three of
n and Fort Gullck. On the Col. ai.d Mr*. Pumpelly are his grandchildren, all of whom
U registration day, Thursday, leaving lonrrmw for Norfolk, Va. were born Just one year anart. como-si-im by
three- concert engagement in
Managua
His Monday nieht program will
be:
I
the Fantasy in D Minor ............ Morart
Chaconne In D Minor .... Bach Busoni
II
Araboqu ................... Schumann
Rondo Ciprtccioao.........Mndlohn
Polonnalw..................... Chopin
Waltz in A Ma]or ............. Chopm
Nocturn In B Minor ............ Chopin
Scherzo In at Bajor............. Chopin
HI
MNBBf
(NBA Telephoto)
MINE BLAST IN NOVA SCOTIA -^ Rescue workers carry the
body of a miner through the snow in Stejlarton. Nova Sco-
tia, after lt was taken from the blasted McGregor coal mine.
Mine officials said 19 miners were killed In the explosion.
ParviMMit rl ctwr*
On 'CERTAIN DAYS'
- or The Month 1
Do female functional monthly dte-
frbano maks you feel nervous,
fidgety, cranky,bo tired and 'drag-
ged out'-at such times? Then do
Wj Lydla E. Plnkham's Vegetable
ofyk.(?htMal
Compound to relieve such symp-
toms. It's faMoui for this purpose I
Taken regularlyPlnkham's
Compound helps build up resist-
ance against such distress. And
that's the kind of product yoa
should buy. Thousands have
ported benefltl Worth tryta#.
IOITABLI
COMPOUND
Sultry Samia, Tummy Twirling In US,
F Spurns Idea Of Torso Tussle With Lili
creamy, tasty pvingsi
Thrifty and easy fo moka, tool
MIAMI BEACH, Jan. 18 'UP) "Miss St. Cyr Is very famous." i month. Samia said her mother bout from the attitude Mrs.
- Sultry Samia Garael, happy Samia said. "I would like to see died when she was eight years King adopted when her son
art she has a "mama'' again,1 her bubble-bath act before I old. [started his torrid international
V-8 Has lively Bavor as
Wholesome Goodness
no *sing/e juice can match!
twirled her tummy in her fam--comment... I want to know
ous Egyptian harem dance last what I'm talking about.'
night and pooh-poohed the idea
of a battle of the torsos with
Lili St. Cyr.
Miss Gamal exhibited her
"artistic hip movements" and
'ier oscillating navel at the
LIU, lamenting the poor re-
romance with Miss Gamal in a
I'm now going to have a Paris night club last summer, j
mama again and I'm very hap-1 "They tell me Sambowhat's ^
ception of an act that won py," she said, smiling at her. her name? Oh. Samia," Mrs
Latin Quarter for the first time to compete with Samla's "real
to an American audience and Oriental art."
to her husband, playboy 8hep-| 8amla began her convolutions
her court fame and fortune at husband. "I'm going to tele-
Clro's to Hollywood, promised phone her today and ask her
to throw in more nudity, bumps to visit us here. If she can't
and grinds at the Beachcomber! we will go to see her as soon
King laughed, "111 call her Sam-
bo... they tell me Sambo is
really a lovely girl from a very,
very nice family... Shepperd
brought some pictures of her
home... I think she has the
men in Houston. Tex., "If you1, prettiest tegs and feet I ever
perd King of Houston, Tex. But ] "so happy" that her mother-in-: talk to 8hepperd, tell him I'm saw."
she refused to get embroiled law had changed her mind and not mad at Samia and I hope "She's absolutely 100 per cent
s I finish my contract.-
Mrs. Bonnie King told news-
Just **) milk, cook 5 minutos.

\ to an argument over the "art", welcomed her and Shepperd he's going to be happy and I
of her dance as compared to home for the first time since hope their marriage will last."
that of Miss St. Cyr*. 'their marriage in Egypt last1 This was a complete turna-
correct about the pretty legs,"
King said. "Take it from me,
I know."
In V-8 then are 8 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetablesnot just
one. That's why V-8 has lively flavor
and wholesome goodness no tinjlt
juice can match. Each juica adds its
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A, B, C calcium and iron. Your
family will love V-8. Serve it often.
v.ry gam V-S h Sildssi t .f.
Calary Camta
SM* by <*> Mkm 4 CavpWH'i Smp*. V-S h a
VMMMfl Iwnii wy VvSMntflMIl ewVp fcsspBsPSjW""



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