The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01352

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text

't^
"BRANIFF


AN INDHT5in)W^flj^^DlLT NEWSPAPE
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is gafe1' Abraham Lincoln.
SeagrunrsY
CANADIAN V;HI
DiMlhd. tfl W bo, i ltd to
TWBNT-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1952
FIVE CENTS
UN
For Week: 16 Planes
-
r
(NEA Telephoto)
OLD FRIENDS MEET Bernard Baruch (left) greets Win-
ston Churchill as the British Prime Minister arrives in New
York from Washington. In the center Is Churchill's son-in-
law Christopher Soames. Churchill will be entertained by
his friend of 35 years before returning; to England.
(NEA Telephoto)
STATE OF THE UNION President Truman reads hla an-
nual State of the Union message to Congress, with Vlce-
President Alben Barklev (left) and Speaker of the House
8am Rayburn behind him. The President warned-that "the
threat of world war is still very real."
(NEA Telephoto)
AMONG THE AUDIENCE Churchill (center) listens atten-
tively from the Presidential Box in the House gallery while
Truman .delivers his message. Flanking him are Mrs. Truman
________and Anthony Eden. British Foreign Secretary.______
Death Ends Coma After 9 Years
CINCINNATI, Ohio, Ian. 12 (UP)Death ended one
of the longest comas in medical history yesterday, and
doctora who studied the patient said he never seemed to
grow older during his nine years of insensibility.
Robert C. Steger 1, an Industrial engineer was
struck on the head by a neight-pound pulley which fell
from the ceiling of a Curtis-Wright plant at nearby
Lockland Feb. 4. 1943.
An operation failed to repair the injury to Steger's
brain and he remained in a coma until his death yes-
terday.
He was fed pre-dlgested food, but hit weight re-
mained normal, and he survived several illnesses. He
never seemed to age during his nine years at Bethesda
Hospital.
His medical care cost $116,608 of which $168.606 wit
paid by the Ohio Industrial Commission, mud the re-
mainder by the hospital
Coast Guard Steps Up Catholics Seek Re(| Antiaircraft
Search In Stormy Seas
SEATTLE, Jan. 12 (UP)The
Coast Guard said today there was
no doubt that the United States
freighter Pennsylvania has sunk
in a north Pacific storm.
The search for her 46 crew-
men Intensified as debris, most-
ly from her deck cargo, and in-
cluding a hatch cover, lumber
and other wreckage, was sighted
24 miles southeast of her last re-
ported position.
Lr. Car. F. H. Salmela said at
Coast Guard headquarters that
the prevailing winds and cur-
rents since the Pennsylvania was
last heard from 4:40 p.m. Wed-
nesday could have carried the
debris to the present position.
The Coast Guard cutter Kla-
math reported today that an air-
craft taking part in the search
of the grey and stormy waters
sighted an oil slick and olive-
colored drums in about the same
position as the rest of the debris
was sighted.
But there was no trace what-
ever of the four lifeboats in
which the crew of the stricken!
freighter is believed to have a-
bandoned ship after a two-word
radio message "leaving now" was
sent Wednesday. ,.. .
The discovery of the debris
pinpointed the search operation
today to an area 60 miles long
and 60 miles wide.
Six surface vessels, and 11
planes from the United States
Gout Guard and Navy, and the
Boy* Canadian. Air Force, cov-
ered the area.
Cwpt. J. W. McMunagle of the
Canadian weather ship Stone-
town, which is directing the
search, radioed this morning:
"StUl searchingnegative re-
The Pennsylvania's last posi-
tion was reported by Capt. G. P.
Plover, Portland; Ore., as about
School Subsidy
In Puerto Rico
By DREW PEARSON
Ex-Jap Minister
Invited By Soviet
To Economic Parley
OSAKA, Japan, Jan. 12 (UP)
Former Japanese Flnaace
Minister Ishibashl revealed to-
day he had been Invited by
Russia to atend the controver-
sial International economic con-
ference In Moscow this April
and said he would like to go
I "if the government has no ob-
jections".
Ishibashl, who was purged at
the end of World War II, la the
publisher of the magazine
Oriental Economist. He said he
saw no harm In going to the
meeting and said he would like
to see Red China on his way
back and talk with the business-
men.
In Tokyo, however, the Jap-
anese government was guard-
ed in its approach to the
nine Japanese leaders who re-
ceived invitations to the Red-
sponsored meeting.
A Foreign office spokesman
said that considerable thought
would to given to the question
of.Issuing p-ssports.
Ishibashl. speaking at a meet-
ing of the Osaka businessmen
said he believed Japan's trade
with Russia and Red China will
be Improved to some extent this
year. He said it would be "pro-
per to accept if Russia makes
friendly approachea."
"Japan belongs to a free
world" he said, "but there is no
need to regard Russia as an
enemy." /
! in four lifeboats. There was some
hope the weather would clear.
Capt. McMunagle reported:! .. _
"Weather conditions are slightly WASHINGTON, Jan. 12The
better this morning. Winds have heated quarrel now going on
dropped from 40 to 45 knots dur-1 between Catholics and Protes-
lng the night to 28 knots this tants in Puerto Rico over the
morning. Heavy seas and swell question of governmental aid to
still are running." parochial schools is being
Two U.S. Navy Neptune patrol watehed with some concern in
planes, a Coast Guard B-17 and other parts of Latin America
two Navy Coronados Joined the where in most of the countries,
search yesterday. i that Issue as -automatically
The Coast Guard said the settled thhrough the separation
four-engined Coronados had fuel 0f church and State,
capacities to stay over the search The U. S. Congress recently
area for 14 hours. 'approved the draft of a consti-
A Royal Canadian Air Force ,tutlon for puerto Rico, which
Lancaster bomber and a Coast ul ^ snbmitted to that ls-
Guard Mariner flying boat alsolands volerg Jan 21 0ne cl|iuse
J&o U.^Ah-^Force bombers ur ^documentm^eled on
:ri^Z^^iCi^eZ^ Prh.bU%bo"mm"U.ub:rdUles
cto^S^JSSti^J*^ form S re,l8loua insti-
^nVe^the^Stonetown.the1 Pto Rn Catholics have
Klamath, the Canadian tug Is- tfken strenuous object on to
land Sovereign, the American this article. However. It is sup-
freighter Cygnet III and the Ported by the Protestant
Japanese freighter Kamlkawa Churches Association, repre-
Maru criss-crossed the area.sentlng all the Island's Protes-
where the Pennsylvania last was tant denominations except Epis-
reported but said nothing of the copalians and Lutherans. Near-
crew or ship had been sighted, ly 40 per cent of Puerto Ricans
The Pennsylvania was aban- are Protestants,
doned when a 14-foot crack split i Although the Catholic major-
750 statute miles northwest of her hull on the port side. Water'Ry throughout Latin America
flooded the ship's forward holds runs close to 90 per cent, gov-
and forced her down by the bow. ernmental aid to parochial
The ship was bound for Yoko-|scnoola ^ permitted in only
ma from Seattle with a fn-fpur of the JOreppblics _--_&-
'" kentlriS, Chile,-Pefif fnfl CoWrS-
bla in all of whl:h Church and
State remain Joined.
Most of the other Latin-Ame-
rican nations went through ser-
ious and often bloody domestic
| struggles over this issue, half
a century or more ago. The re-
suit in nearly every case was
a constitution which establish-
ed a state-supported secular
education system, while con-
tinuing to guarantee freedom
of religious worship.
ABANDONED SHIP Capt.
George P. Plover was master of
the freighter, Pennsylvania,
which was abandoned during a
severe storm in the Pacific
Ocean, 465 miles northwest of
Vancouver Island. The crew of
45 took to lifeboats, but search
planes have been unable to lo-
cate them.
Seattle.
Stormy weather hampered the
air and sea search over the vast
Accounts For 13
8TH ARMY HQ., Korea, Jan. 12 (UP) The Unirtd
Nations Air Force in Korea this week suffered its heaviest
losses of the Korean war 16 planes.
In air battles for the seven days ending today Unit-
ed States Sabres shot down 12 Migs and lost three Sabres.
Red antiaircraft fire accounted for the remaining
13 United Nations losses four Shooting Stars, four
Mustangs, three Thunderjets, one Corsair and one In-
vader.
Red aircraft stayed out of range of United Nations
antiaircraft guns.
3 Jailed Boys
Threatening
Hunger Strike
US Studies Russia's New
Gambit On Atom Control
PARIS, Jan. 12 (UP)Russia
changed the United Nations
atomic bomb position today by
formally proposing that the ban
on the atomic bomb should go
Into effect only when a com-
plete control system Is fully In
operation.
Soviet Foreign Minister An-
drei A. Vlshinsky also told the
United Nations that Russia has
now dropped Its objection to
continuing Inspection of atomic
facilities, so long as the in-
spection did not Interfere in
the internal affairs of states
concerned.
This change in Soviet policy
which appeared far-reach-
ing at first glancewas an-
nounced by Vlshinsky at a
meeting of the main political
committee of the United Na-
tions. __
United States delegate Er-
nest A. Gross promptly told the
committee that the United
States certainly would not stt
up all night laughing' at the
new Soviet proposal.
Gross said the United States
would give the proposal careful
study to see if it constituted an
advance. If it did, he would
welcome It.
Vlshinsky made his new pro-
Army To Call Few
Reserve Officers
For 1952 Duty
posal at the end of a tar-rang-
ing two hour speech.
He proposed June 1, 1952, as
a time limit for the drafting
of treaties embodying his new
formula for banning the atom
bomb at the same time as a
continuing control system is
declared operative.
Vlshinsky built up to his sen-
sational climax by saying that
the long-time Soviet demand for
a ban on the atomic bomb had
failed to win UN adoption
mainly because of the -Western
objection that any ban would
be ineffective so long a control
system was not fully working.
He said today: "We want to
Simple Suggestion
To San Army Here
Over $1,000 a Year
A simple suggestion made by
an observant civilian employe of
the Fort Clayton motor pool will
save the USARCARIB an estlm-
_ ated $lJ)fi2 in the nine months
propose that our previous pro-that chKdreni of Army families
posils be re-worded as follows: go to school this yeai
^The United Nations Gener- Harold W Lowe a Panama-
al Assembly proclaims the un- D who resides at 90 15th St.
conditional prohibition of torn- West in Panam City, last Seo-
ul wMtmn. snd the establish- "mber :RW thrt the 13 ouses
!.W.e"P.ns..a"ft ,^.ern.Mi which pick up chool children of
ment of strict international
control over the enforcement of
this prohibition, having in mind
that the prohibition and
Fort Kchbe were being driven
needless additional miles every
day simply because the vehicles

inspection to see the atom ban
is being complied with.
Previously Russia had agreed
only to periodic Inspection,
meaning the i/*rry of Inspectors
into Russia only at previously
set intervals to examine pre-
viously determined sites.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 12 (UP)
Army Secretary Frank '
Pace Jr. said today that
than 1,000 Army reserve
cers will be called to active duty
as Individuals this year unless
the International situation wor-
sens materially.
Pace said the Army will con-
tinue its policy of not calling
Sunday Bullfight
Will Honor Army
Medical Officer
A traditional bullfight in the up involuntarily any more en-
Spanish :.tyle will be held tomor- luted reserves as individuals
rdw afternoon at 4 in the Maca-1 unless conditions become worse
rena in the San Francisco gard-l in a speech prepared for de-
en. I livery at the District of Co-
Two t">p performers. Eduardo iumbia reserve oflicers' train-
Ide Valencia of Spain and Jose-unK school. Pace said that by
Peace Is Shaky
On Boston Docks
B08TGN, Jan. 12 (UP. A
, ~lshaky peace- prevailed alon-r
'ff, | Boston's troubled waterfroil
" today.
Police were alerted to guard
Army officials who immediately
realized its merit and adooted a
new plan for the buses. The re-
sult: Lowe wlj) soon reseive a
check for $50 from the USAR-
CARIB Emploves" Sugg e s 11 o n
Committee, and the Army will
save at Vast $1.002 every school
year.
Three students serving sen-
tences In the Carcel Modelo -u
a result of recent clashes be-
tween students and the police,'
threatened today to go on a
hunger strike to obtain their
Immediate release.
Meanwhile, the Professor;.' As-
sociation and the teaching staff
of the Professional School for
girls have protested the arrest
by the police f students with-
in the school building.
Communist student leader \
Carlos del Cld, who has been
sentenced to serve 60 days, Car-
los Tovar and Bernardo Castillo,
who are serving. 40 days each;
in the carcei, have appealed!
their sentences and announced1
the beginning of their hunger
strike this morning.
Three more students are serv-'
lng sentences in Police head-
quarters after being found guilty
by Police Judge Agustn Ar-
gote of Insulting the police and
creating disturbances.
Ten more teenage students
arrested by the police during
two days of clashes were turn-
ed over to the Juvenile Court
for trial.
No new cases of violence In
connection with the school
strike were reported today.
Robert Halls1
Young Son Dies
In Hospital
The two-year-old son of in
American Army employe died
last night at Gorgas Hospital.
Pneumonia was believed to have
been the cause of death.
The child, Don Hall. Is the
son of Robert A. E. Hall who
Is administrative adviser to the
director of the Inter-American
Geodetic 8urvey.
The Halls live in Curundu
and have two other surviving
sons, aged four months and
four years.
In an effort to even up the
score Sabres tackled 50 Migs in
a brief battle over North Korea
today, but neither side scored
hits.
Another 60 Migs were spotted
out of reach beyond the /ala
River.
On the 145 mile ground front
In Korea a United Nations raid-
ing party today captured two
1.111 positions, one of them with-
out firing a shot.
At the Panmunjom armistice
talks today the Communist ne-
gotiators Informed the United
Nations team that the longer
ihe United Nrtlons l.i_i. oil
pro'iioiting the censtracl.oru. f>t
ahlelds in Korea during an ar-
mistice, _ihe longer the trute
talks will'drag out.
In Pusan the South Korean
Government announced that 5.-
520 North Koreans presently
held In United Nations prisoner
of war camps have sent a peti-
tion to the South Korean Gen-
cal Assembly stating they re-
fuse to be Included In any un-
conditional exchange agreement
for prisoners of war.
Panama's Gasoline
Prices Predicted
To Slay Unchanged
No immediate increase in the
price of gasoline used in Pana-
ma was predicted yesterday by
S. Scollary Moore, newly elec-
ted vice president and regio-
nal manager of Esso Standatd
OH.
-
Moore also believes that, uw-
less a global war comes. PC-
nama will suffer no gasoline
shortage during the current
year.
Esso has completed a merger
of all Its operations in six Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
countries with headquarters Th
Panama.
Moore believes that thta
move will facilitate the com-
pany's general operations In
this area and will contribute
enormously to the economlo
progress of Panama.
5 Czechs Condemned
For SiyR? For US
VIENNA. Jan. 12 (UP The
Prague radio said today that the
Czechoslovak court in Prague
sentenced five Czechs to death
Miami's Louis Sommer Nabbed For
$1.50 Robbery After 36 Years Free
against possible violence asjan(j three others to Ufe Imprls-,
AFL longshoremen prepared to, onment on charges of high trea-
cross the CIO picket line. son arKj espionage for the Unit-'
... i.led States. i
Dockworkers voted last mgnt, xhe radio said Jan Hosek. Em-(
to cross the picket Une and con- anuei Rendel. Jaroslav Dvorak,
tinue the alx-week old labor dis-, Josef LlsKa ancj petro rjlsek had
pute that has virtually closed the received death sentences.
Hilo of Colombia will fight four
wild bulls.
An American aficionado, Cap-
tain Alvn Shflk. of the Army
Medical Corps will be a special
guest or honor at the fights.
Captain Sholk. who is leaving
the Isthmus soon will be accom-
panied bv a party of friends.
BALBOA TIDFS
Sunday, Jan. IS
High Low
1:11 a.a. 16:56 a.m. 4. till performed it* peace-
5:64 a.m. 11:66 j.m.,time functions.
June 30 the Army will hive
expanded to about 1,000.000
men during the 24-month per-
iod since the outbreak of Ko-
rean hostilities.
He said that during ihis time
the Army has (1) Fought a
major campaign which Is still
In progress; 2 Supplied sev-
eral additional divisions to Eu-
rope; Si Carried out the great-
est combat rotation in history;
port to American cargo ships.
US Underwriters
Pay $612,500 On
Ship Insurance
NEW YORK. Ian. It (UP).
A check for $612.566 was
presented to the Isbrandl'en
company yesterday on behalf
f American underwriters who
had insured the hull of the
Flying Enterprise.
The check was given to
Isbrandtsen officials In a ce-
remony In the board room of
the American Hull Syndicate.
Frantlsek Kroe. Robert Sund-
erhauf and Frantlsek Dollnek
were sentenced to life imprison-
ment.
For Sale Cheap:
1 Pvthon Champ
LONDON. Jan. 12 (UP>.Lon-(
don pet shop owner. P. E. Child. [
was turning blue in the face,1
today when two men managed
to free him from the colls of!
his 15 ft. python, which was
wrapped round his neck.
"I think the time has cornel
for it to go." Child said after!
being freed. |
MIAMI, Fla., Jan. 12 (UPl
Friends who have watched fugi-
tive Louis Sommer live straight'
for 27 years sought to gain his
freedom today from a New York
State prison sentence for a
$1.50 pickpocket job.
Scores of businessmen and
fellow workers signed a petition
asking that the 58-year-old bar-
ber be released. A Miami house-
wife also pleaded by telephone
with an aide of Gov. Thomas
E. Dewey of New York.
Sommer was arrested and
fingerprinted on a pre-Chrlst-
mas drunk charge and New
York prison authorities recog-
nized him as the Louis Sommer
who escaped a prison road gang
at Auburn, V. Y., In 1916. He
moved to Miami eight years
later and started using the
name Sommer Instead of ".om-
mer.
"I've lived an honest Ufe for
36 years." Sommer said. "I be-
lieve I've paid my penalty for
that $1.50 robbery."
Many Mlamians agreed. The
operator of the barber shop at
Miami Beach where he has
worked for five years and the
manager of the hotel in which
the barber shop is located spon-
sored the petition.
Mrs. F. RusseU Floyd, who
said she never had seen Som-
mer before talking with him in
jail today, telephoned Newton
Buckner, Gov. Dewey's assist-
ant.
"This man has been at liberty
36 years and has lived an ex-
emplary Ufe In Miami." she told
Buckner. "He deserves his *ree-
dom."
Buckner asked that all In-
formation be forwarded to the
New York governor's office im-
mediately. Police In Miami were
notified earlier that New York
would attempt to extradite
Sommer so he could serve the
remaining two years of his five-
year sentence.
Police Chief Walter Headley
and Det. Capt. C. W. Potterton
said if all facts In the case are
true Sommer deserves a break.
Sommer has a wife, a 16-year-
old eon and a 15-year-old
daughter in Miami He has a 31-
year-old son by his first-wUt
who he said died In Bridgeport,
Conn.






TAlil TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIL fUEWSPAPER

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
* VYNIB AND r>UL1r1BD BY THI PANAMA AMERICAN PRIII. INC.
FOUNDED NaTLSON ROUHIIVILL IN tZ9
HARMOBIO ARIAS. EDITO
7. H Street p. o. Box 134. Panama, P. op P.
Telephone Panau* no. 2-0740 .,,.. CABLE ADOftfft PAN AM ERIC AN. PANAMA
*,,Colon OfeicCi 12.17S Csntra. Avenue bctwefn 12th and isth streetb
FOREIGN PfRCBCNTAlWCB JOSHUA 8 ROWERS. INC
-. 343 Madison ave Nr.% vqwk i|7i n y.
IR MONTH IN *0'.ASCe _______
POR BIX MONTHS. tN AOVANCE
>EAR. iN OUNCC^,
VftR ONI
L0Ci M L
I.70 2.80
a no n.oo
Labor News
And
Comment
By Victor Itiesel
BROADWAY MIDMGHT
Celebs About Town: Princess Andree id? bawled out by a 5lh Ave. gendarme for jaywalking, i Havr
him beheaded. Princess) ..Bishop Ftilion J. Sheen and the
Michael O'Sheas (Virginia .Mayo) at a Malison soda fountain...
Ueurgia Gibbs. doing 5*th Street in vedow slax and mink...
Dorothy Sarnoff, a canary in "The Kinij and I." who wings to
Afovieiown 'shortly for her first emoting Nancy Valentine, the
ac.ress, confirming a 2-liner here month < ago- that India's top
hj\;ss were unhappy about her merger to Maharajah Cooch-Behar
and would try to sabotage it...Cab Calloway -ding Square. His
sew suit, an Oxford gray, is more Wall thin Basin Street.. .Odet-
te Mrrtil. the neu Bloody Mary in "South Pacific Her 20th mu-
sical.. .Lionel Hampton, rated the nation's top-grossing band,
vfho never uses popular chues. Only numbers composed by his
cfew... Fave Emerson finger-snapping pcisten? rumors that she
and Skitch, etc.
Sallies in Our Alley: Joe Bu.shkm mis about the Positively
Mad Producer, who was worried about the deadline for his pre-
miere... "Tomorrow is Monday," he screamed, "then comes Tues-
day and then we have Wednesday! A half a week already shot to
heiland we're nowhere ready!".. .Tallu!ah Bankheal's pet quote
aft'.-r her recent mud-sllnging ordeal: Envy yp!'s at Reputation:
You're an accident!' And Reputation wonders idly who is mak-
ing that funny squeaking noise away dovn at he bottom of the
IftJ
bhow Business Vignette: When Julie Harris tested for the
femme lead in "Zapetia" (opposite Marlon Brando) Elia Kazan
rushed the test to Mr. /.an tick ...shortly after. Mr. Z sent the
director a four-word memo: "Julie Harris. No Sex" ..So she lost
tbe role...In her current smash hit ("I Am A Camera") every
< ritir in town noted that her portrayal of a tart was the sexiest
performance of the year.
Altinos of a Midnighter: U S. Attorney Myle.: Lane 'prosecut-
ing costelioj starred in his own drama just as the trial started. '^}
Oju word that his mother had a stroe and may not last inc wee*
. i.Wait 11 you meet Sen. Kcfauvcrs 93-year-old pater on teevy
of wherever son Estes slumps. The old gent'; personality is a
great vote-winner, they report... Horace Dodge, who keeps a pri-
vate suite at Doctor's Hospital all year ro.ind, used it lor his big
New Year's Eve party...Her Intimates a:- scared silly over Mr.
Isabel McLane Maury's planned sizzler .tied "Me. My Life. My
Visions." Crowded with more inside stui: on the socially register-
ed (and royalty) than anything published in decades. ..The John
Oarradines parted again. She is Sonia So"el. "This is for good!"
.'.. Olga San Juan of "Paint Your Wa^on" and star Eamund
O'Brien reconciled.. Bobo Rockefeller's b^rristei (Hiram S. Gans
of Wall St. i is readying a demand for a heftv tilt in Winthrop
Rockefellers $'."00 monthly alimony.
Manhataan Murals: "Lady Macbeth," a raggedy old woman,
who stalks the lower 40s side streets every mi-idle ot the mgui
with a lighted candle seeking goodness knows what.. .The Duchess
ot Windsor's pooch, Disraeli, which has its own fnr blanket.. .The
Must Intriguing name for a publication firm. "Last Publications,"
c>n E. 39th. It publishes scientific tracts.. The pigeons which play
w.ith the Camel riggie signtaking turns diving through the
smo'Kt rings.
trt of Character:* Jimmy Mitchell a featured dancer in
TVT.-jn, was Interviewed 'over the air* t few days ago. He was
t|kcd il his specially was dangerous. "Yes." he said; "but so far
i knock wood) I've never liad an accident." The next perform-
ance he broke a toe and will be out of tne show for 3 weeks or
loiiger.. Lydia Clarke, who has a one-minute walk-on role in
"The Greatest Show on Earth." elevated to stardom in "Los Ala-
mjos "...Polly Bergen, who opens at the Paramount (on the 30th)
btcf use of her terrific success at the Maisonette? in the St. Regis
'her first New York appearance.. ."Mania." the 55-year-old news
vendor ion Lexington), who retires this week after 15 years. She
par 3 sons through college peddling papers
Far be it from me to invade
President Truman's p r iv a c y
more than need be. But there's
one telephone call he put
through Christmas Eve which
should have been switched on
a party line for millions
hear.
There are very few of
who weren't alfected by
I Those of us who weren't have
or the kids' new school rooms,
!or the roads beating the motors
lout of that '52 model, or the
proposed bridge which will
'smash that bottleneck that,
! keeps you tied up for hours,
j bumper to bumper, on those
sweltering Sunday mornings.
All this and the holocaust in
Korea were involved in that
phone conversation.
For that call was put through
to Phil Murray, a weary em-
battled labor leader at the cris-
is-moment in what will be
known as the steel war of the
winter of 1951-52.
It has been reported by
an erudite gentleman and
mediation expert named
Merlyn Pitzele that Mr.
Truman promised in effect,
Phil Murray that the CIO
Stcelworkers would get what
they wanted if they didn't
stri'ce.
Furthermore. Pitzele. who isj
of considerable repute In na-j
ilonal labor circles, quotes both
: Mr. Truman and the CIO
I chief.
-Since this would mean a se-
pact between two men
which gives the million Steel-
workers a pay Increase "pack-
age" of over $400,000,000 and
junks all rules by Vhich the
rest of us have been paid for
our dally stints under wartime
controls all without so much
as talking to a single steel
jompany executive there's
been considerable teeth grind-
ing bitterness in business
circles.
Until today, the White House
and Philip Murray have refused
to confirm or deny the almost
verbatim report of the holiday
conversation.
Today, by those who have en-
jtry to Mr. Truman's Inner of-
fice, I am told that this re-
Iport is "dishonest and without
substance."
And that all Mr.
jl On the Menu for '52
SATURDAY, JAffCARY M, 1951
^niy WtSUINOTON
MERRY-GO- ROUND
_r OMW MARSON
I
The Proffered Embrace
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
WASHINGTON. The real story of Winston
Churchill's American virit looks like being de-
pressingly simple.
The great British Prime Minister came to this
country to offer an embvace.
But when the caller talked In the door, he
found the temperature in tup parlor already
glacial, and the young lauies. sitting with extreme
primness on the extreme edga of the hardest
sofa. Under the circumstances, the embrace Is
Truman Ia" t0 U*"^? not to De >fred niter all.
inrrav tn nost-' Thls Pfhap tod frivolous image expresses an
ooned uie ^teel sinke ^n the'ilnmensely W cholc,! c'y ttK American policy
rm^-. in.t. Thw ?'I makers. But even before Churchill arrived. Pre-
country s interests. This Mr. ,d t Trunlan. secretary
i Broadway Table talk: The critics loved "Pal Joey" and noted
It* started a "new" kind of musical style"with an integrated
l)i)ok." etc. But didn't "Show Boat"?. .Jean Paul Sartre's new
play calls for 94 characters and II scenes. A cinch, eh?.. Svetlova,
premier ballerina of the Met Opera (only a few seasons ago), Is
running a school for tots on E. 88th. ..1 hat chap in the town's
only red dinner jacket is J. Aiden Talbot, Jr. Tbe Le Ruban Bleu
crowd envy his courage.. .The sinful gal set bave a new screen.
Dwelling in exclusive "for women only" establishments... Add
feads: Rudy Halley and Grover Whalen.. Katbryn Cravens,
author of "Pursuit of Gentlemen," enjoyed Dallas, except for its
burglars.. Juriv Garland's salary at the Palare last week was
29.000highest coin ever paid anyone in that theater's history.
Uncir Sara takes S5.006 weekly to erase in old deficit.
fftt IS YOU rOKUM THE MADlUS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tht Mail So n on oeon torum tot rodn ol Th* Panama Amer-
ican Letter! era rocoivsS fraternity ond art bandits in a wholly con-
tident.al msnnar.
It rou contribute o lettei don t be impotiont il it doesn't appear the
oxl day. Letters oro published in the order received.
Pleose try re keep tht letters limited to ene pete length.
Identify ot letter writers 11 held in strictit continence.
Thi newspaper assumes no responsibility let rtatementi or opinion
txprf-;ed in letters from readers.
CANAL MUST BEAT OLD MAN TEKMIT TO PUNCH
Editor Mail Box
The Panama American:
Dear Sir:
Your column is indebted to the newly formed Panama Canal
Company for the fact that the column Is constantly supplied with
topics of current Interest, pro and con about the Canal Zone
community. Without fail, they seem to hit on at least one topic
a month whicli stimulates the flow of letters to vour Mail Box
The latest one to hit the fan Is ttts raising of rent In the
wooden 12 family apartment building in Diablo The statement
Was issued by the spokesman of the Board of Directors of the
Panama, Canal Company that, "the 201 units In Diablo are con-
sidered; superfluous to the Canal's needs in the long range hous-
ing program, but are of such quality that they cannot be reason,
ably abandoned at this time. Meanwhile they must recover their
costs through rentals."
To think a little further along that line, it is obvious that all
12 family wooden dwellings and ALL 4 family wooden dwellings
are soon to be placed In the same "superfluous" category, and the
rents raised accordingly. The Panama Canal Company, with Its
newly announced program of non-maintenance on wooden bulld-
lags, must beat "old man termite" to the punch, by collecting
bough rent to write off the dwellings, if possible.
Anyone can see the handwriting on the well, when he con-
siders Bendetsen's comments on the general rnt increase. Mr.
Bendetsen was credited with a statement that indicated that no
decision has been made on a general increase- that Canal hous-
ing is not paying its way, but it is hop<-d that the deficit can be
met without a general Increase in rents.
It teems obvious that filling the 398 units of Diablo 12
family dwellings with double rent victims will not make up any
sizeable deficit In the Canal housing nroerram. so the next step
will be the doubling of rents In all 12 Mmlly nn'ts throughout
the Canal and a general increase In ren'.s In all other dwellings
ot the Canal.
Why doesn't the Canal see fit to do this a at once, rather
than keep people upset and uneasy aoout the future? Because
people forget easily and soon. If a general raise were approved
by this meeting of the Board of Directors, the people would be
ao upset that quite a few would resign and go home. The Board
does not want that, but still wants the rents raised, and by rais-
ing one type quarters in one locality, tho people not affected will
feel temporarily relieved, and In their subconscious minds be
preparing: themselves for their rent Increase that they know will
eventually come. In time, all houses will rent at higher levels,
ana almost everyone will still live and *vork under the flag of
the Panama Canal Company.At higher rents, higher commls-
aaiy prices, and higher coat of living.
So, the Mail Box can look forward to increased prosperity
M it represents the only moderate medium for the frustrated
Canal employe to unload his steam. The alternative Is a little
lore drasticresign and go back to the cod oil States.
uf three ninety six.
Murray agreed to do, of course.
However neither the fury
of the White House over
the telephone leak nor the
denial today by one of Mr.
Truman's colleagues hat
convinced the angered in-
dustrialists that such a pact
was not actually made.
Many of them feel they
might as well save their
hotel room tabs and leave
Washington instead of pre-
senting their case to the
special six man panel. This
is unfortunate, for the pa-
nel consists of a most ho-
nest group of men fully
aware that they are about
to set the new icage stand-
ards for the nation.
Now If you watch closely
you'll see how labor crises are
Dorn.
Murray's men, who tend the
liery furnaces which spew out
the weapons that make war
hell for the enemy, deserve a
raise. There Is no doubt that
the special panel will come
within a penny or so an hour
^Sr-^OTcr ebwloruly d-
Dean G. Ache-
son and their advisors-
cided not to grant the British leader wht he
mainly wanted, which was a strengthened part-
nership between America-and. Britain.
A conflict of world views was. involved.
In the world view of Winston Churchill, a
strong, intimate and organic partnership bet-
ween America and Britain is the only possible
core and center of the Western alliance.
He is known to believe that tbe two nations'
wartime partnership bad lately been allowed to
lapse In a most dangerous way. And although
was being satisfactorily handled by himself and
the British Ambassador, Sir Oliver Franks.
This general complacency about existing ar-
rangements has also been expressed In the claim
that Britain-and America "are partners already;"
In fact, however, the links that still survive
from the former Anglo-American intimacy today
conceal a frightening deterioration of Anglo-
American relations. At tne same time, Britain's
world power position is now decaying with fright-
ening speed.
If these processes continue unchecked, what
remains of the old Anglo-American collaboration
must at some point brea* down; and the Western
alliance will tbus lose its present substitute for
a backoone.
Meanwhile power vacuums will appear, In the
Middle East and other strategically vital regions,
where British power b now, so to speak, only
hanging on by the skin of its teeth.
American will be left to carry the entire bur-
den of Western leadershio. which is too great a
burden.
The power vacuums will be filledbut by So-
viet power. And ao the Western alliance will come
to ruin In the end.
On the other hand, these looming consequences
of 20 cents an hour).
The CIO will take It. There
will also be other benefits such
as a union shop for the entire
steel Industry, which it doesn't
have now.
Since all this will cost about
$400,000,000 a year more, the
steel companies, of course will
demand immediate price In-
creases. Some of them will be
granted.
But how much? That's the
crisis question.
The steel industry already
has an agreement from the Of-
fice of Price Stabilization for
a $3.50-a-ton price hike. This
Is to cover Increased costs un-
der the law up to the cur-
rent wage negotiations with
Mr. Murray's union.
The Industry will also want
four and five dollars a ton over
the $3.50 which It already has
In the bag.
Actually at this moment, It
can be reported that the White
House Is opposed to any further
price Increases.
Here's where the steel Indus-
try may get stubborn and use
the alleged telephone call quotes
as It sevldence that President
Truman favored steel labor
over steel business.
// the businessmen re-
fuse to go along with the
board's decision next Feb.
21, Murray will do that he
hopes to avoid cripple
V. S. steel production. He
couldn't help it. Hit men
would wildcat anyway if h*
didn't lead them out. This
is no guess. One of Murray's
second echelon aides pre-
dicted as much m Afea for*
last Saturday night.
Certainly neither labor nor
Industry leaders want a strike.
It now appears, however, that
only Mr. Truman's statesman-
ship can get us steel. Did he.
there were many other viial Issues to discuss, his can still be avoidedmoat narrowly avoidedby
pooling the power and influence and resources of
Britain and America, In the partnership Church-
Ill desires.
The price of forming mis partnership will be
considerable, no doubt. American aid must be
provided to find some relatively enduring solu-
tion of Britain's economic problem.
A truly Joint European policy, Involving im-
portant departures from 'he present British view
point, must somehow be hammered out. Other
thorny differences of view must somehow be
smoothed away.
But this price, which St-cretary Acheson seem-
ingly does not wish to pay. will reallv buy some-
thing.
In truth, It will buy survival, for America and
the British Commonwealth together and united
will constitute a commanding combination, that
will rally the weak, reassure the waverers and
deter the aggressors.
?1 i?.,.10 be hP*d, therefore, that Winston
Churchill's old magic hn. worked again, and that
this opportunity to give real strength and power
to the Western alliancewhich may well be the
last opportunitywill not be willfully lost.
main object in comlnc to this country was to
restore the Anglo-American partnership to full
working order.
Tbe Churchill world view was formerly shared
by many of the wisest American policy makers.
As recently as 1949, the brlllUnt Ambassador-
Designate' to Moscow, Oeorge Kennan, all but got
approval for a plan of the sort that would ap-
peal to. Churchill.
Bat the State Department of Dean O. Acheson
now fears that closer uartnershlp with Britain
will entail "sacrificing Europe."
This Acheson State Department remembers
with. resentment the foot-dragelng British ap-
f roach to the various projects of European union,
t shrinks from bruismg the feelings of the
French and other, lesser Allies, by forming spe-
cial links with Britain.
And it shrinks also from involvement in Bri-
of what Phil Murray expects, tain's liablitles outside Europe, such as the bitter
ior his million followers 'unpopularity of the Britirh In the Middle East.
about |S a week (or a packageI For these reasons, Acheson does not want what
Churchill wants. He Is ev. n reported to have said
that he could not see why the Prime Minister
bothered to come to America, since everything
Taftmen and Ikemen
By Peter Edson
WASHINGTON(NBA)A Taft-vs-Elsenhow- hower the GOP candidate are Senator
er battle at the Republican national contention Cabot Lodge, Jr., of Massachusetts and Senator
In Chicago Is now bein sized up as a show-down James H. Duff of Pennsylvania, both with known
on whether the Grano Old Party goes conser- sympathies for progressne Republicanism
vatlve or progressive. Senator Lodge was even a candidate in opposl-
Thls conclusion Is based not eo much on what tlon to Senator Taft tor chairmanship of the
Senator Taft has said or on what General Elsen- GOP policy committee in the Senate,
hower has said. It is based, rather, on the men Also prominent In tho Elsenhower-for-Prest-
behlnd each candidate. dent movement are Republican Senator Frank
Senator Taft would, of course be one of the Carlson and ex-Senator Harry Darby of Kansas,
first to assert that he Is teally a progressive. He Their voting records in the Senate were In the
doesn't like to have ti label cf "reactionary" mata In support of the Taft wing of the party
pinned on him. position.
As proof of Taft's Ubeia.'lsm, his recent appear- They support Elsenhower because Kansas Is
anee with Democratic Penator Harry Byrd of Eisenhower's home stale, traditionally Bull Moose
Virginia, on an American Medical Association In sentiment since the days of Teddy Roosevelt,
forum Is cited. On most question, Senator Taft's The Elsenhower backer who clinches the belief
position was considered to be to the left of Sen- that the General will be found In the camp of
the OOP progressives U Oov. Tom Dewey of New
It was Gov. Dewey, more than any other Re-
publican, who was accused by nls own party of
too much "me-too-Um." meaning that ne sup-
ported some Democratic programs for social
security and the bl-partUan foreign policy,
General Elsenhower can be securely ticketed
as favoring Internationalism as the American
foreign policy. He Is by no means an Isolationist.
He has even been the mokt Important Instrument
for carrying out the Truman-sponsored military
assistance fii Europe.
If General Elsenhower should become the Re-
publican nominee, Oov. Dewey. Senators Lodge,
ator Byrd's.
Also, It Is pointed oil that Senator Taft was
chairman of the Resolutions Committee that
drafted the GOP platforms of 3944 and 1948.
Even Oov. Earl Warren of California an avow-
ed progressive, has conceded these platforms
were decidedly liberal. Taft nevertheless has the
support of most Republican Old Guard poli-
ticians.
In trying to shake off the mantle of conser-
vatism thrown over th? shoulder? of their candi-
date, Taft supporters have asserted that it Is the
frofesslonal politicians-the candidates for pu-
llo officewho are backing Eisenhower ta the
hope that they can ride to victory on Eisen-
hower's coattaila.
Drew Pearson says: Sen. Bridges intervened in Baltimore
tax case; Churchill party disturbed by isolationism in
U.S.; Atomic artillery won't work miracles.
WASHINGTON. The manner In which some Senators have
puiled wires to secure tax fixes has come up recentlv ta connee.
tlon with Ser. Styles Bridges of New Hampshire who U fiSeaSff
Republican leader of the Senate, replacing the late Senator
wiicrry.
Certain GOP Senators who do not wish to be named, but wh
be,ieye nothing should mar Republican ability to pin the corrup-
tion label on the Truman Administration have dug into the tas
tiiony of Charles OUphant, hastily resigned counsel of the In-
ternal Revenue Bureau.
Oliphant testified Senator Bridges had approached him to fix
a big tax case m Baltimore Involving liquor-dealer Hyman Klein,
Bridges' Intervention with Oliphant on behalf of Klein ac-
cording to committee counsel DeWlnd, took place "sometime in
194.
GOP Senators have now dug up the Interesting fact that Sen-
ator Bridges made a speech on the 8enate floor on Sept. 29 1949.
urging a pay Increase for "good gold Charles Oliphant"
Bridges was then trying to get "good old Charlie" to take th
heat off Hyman Klein in a tax case totaling around $7.000,000.
So, apparently to curry favor with 'pood old Charlie." he pro-
posed raising his salary from $10,000 to $14,000. Thus the publii
would both pay more and collect less taxes.
NOTEOliphant.testified that Senator Bridges had approach-
ed him through mystery-man Henry Orunawald, a great friend of
both Bridges and Oliphant..
GROWING .S. ISOLATION
Most disturbing development In the U.8.A. to members of the
Churchill party has been the growth o isolationism in certain
sections.
British observers who see the United States during perlodlo
visits may have an advantage in diagnosis popular charges be-
tween those visits.
At any rate they compare public sentiment today to that Jus$
before Pearl Harbor when the United States also was torn be-
tween isolation and International participation.
This, Incidentally, appears to be borne out by the Washington
Merry-Go-Round poll of Republican candidates.
At the start of this poll, Taft chalked up his greatest strength
in the traditionally Isolationist Midwest; Eisenhower his great-
est strength In New England, the South and the Pacific Coast.
The poll, which Is still continuing, also continues to show Taft
strong in these areas.
In fact, the voting runs almost constant In regard to Taff
strength In the Midwest, Eisenhower strength in other areas.
You can vote In this poll by sending a postcard to your favor-
ite Republican candidate. Box 1962, Washington 13, DA.
REPUBLICAN RFC CHAIRMAN
Harry McDonald, to be the first Republican head of the Re-
construction Finance Corporation In 19 years of Democratic rule,
can be counted on to carry on the forthright policies of Stuart
Symington.
As head of the Securities and Exchange Commission, McDo-
nald vigorously advised GOP members of the RFC not to O.K. the
controversial Texmass loan, warned then that his SEC had not
given Texmass a clean bill ot health.
McDonald, who believes the public Is entitled to know all
the facts about big financial deals, used to run a Detroit dairy,
was supreme potentate of the Michigan Shrine, got to know Tru-
man because they are fellow shriners, and took a mild shine to
Rita Hayworth when she visited In Washington, He Is a bachelor,
ATOMIC ARTILLERY
Though President Truman has been opposed to exchanging
atomic Information with Britain, one so-called atomic secret,
wiich the Churchill party has been told. Is that our much-ballv-
hooed atomic artillery Is not going to work miracles on the bat-
tlefield.
This Is not exactly a secret, for the. American public will be
told the news later namely, that atomic artillery, While by no
means a dud, has been a military disappointment.
In other words, while a lot more nowerful and deadly than
ronventlooal artillery, the new atomic shells will not wipe out
armies overnight'. :
Most significant result of the recent Nevada blasts was that
animals staked behind near-by shelters easily survived atomic
artillery and baby A-bombs dropped from fighter planes.
This convinced U.8. observers that troops In trenches could
withstand ad atomic raid.
Thus, in rugged terrain, atomic artillery, would be no more
effective against troops than heavy artillery.
This means that the atomic bomb could not stop the Chines*
Communists in Korea.
By holing up In caves or lying low behind rocks and ridges,
they could take terrific atomic punishment.
Shell for shell, however, atomic artillery would pack 100
ti-nes the wallop of TNT, would sweep clean any military targets
sticking above ground.
The new A-Bombs also would he most effective In retarding
a Russian Invasion of Western Europe by bombing troop con-
centrations and transportation centers along the Invasion route.
Both superforts and fighter-bomber* are Already being, di-
verted from the Air Force's tactical and .-trategic commands for
a special atomic air arm called retardation command.
Atomic raiding along the Invasion route would be most ef-
fective against air bases.
One atomic bomb could wipe out an air base, flatten parked
planes, and level operations buildings.
NOTEOur most powerful atomic Dombs will probably be
used to blast factories and military bases. It has been computed
that one such bomb packs more explosive power than all the
ordinary bombs so far dropped In a year and a half of Korean
fighting.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
Stanton Grlffls Is retiring as Ambassador to Spain chiefly
because of ulcers. Also he has written a book which Casa Can-
Meld of Harper's Is crazy about. It's the Grlffls memoirs, begin-
ning with the days when he sold snaku nil at country fairs, but
m.t Including his feminine admirers at the US. Embassy In
Madrid.
Fanny Perkins, former Secretary of labor, now on the Civil
Service Commission, is given the credit or blame for get-
ting ex-Sen. Hiram Bingham of. Connecticut appointed chairman
of the Loyalty Board.
Bingham Is the only man In recent Senate history castigat-
ed by an official Senate resolution for letting a Connecticut
Manufacturers Association lobbyist sit ta on secret tariff hearings.
In spite of this, Senatoi Taft has gained the Duff, Carlson and the others who were "for Bsen-
reputation of being the spokesman for the con-
servatives.
He la the number one enemy of the New Deal
and Fair Deal Democrats. He Is opposed by near-
ly all union labor organization leaders. He has
the backing of most businessmen .
He has been critical of nearly all of tbe so-
called bl-partlsan foreign policies These are the
points that lead to the conclusion that If Sen-
bower before Chicago" vlll naturally be In a
position close to the throne where they would
bave the most influence
Of the other Republican candidates. Oov. War-
ren, as mentioned above U definitely a progres-
sive.
Oov. Harold Stassen of Minnesota used to be
considered a great light by the- liberal wing of
the GOP. Since his most recent nress conference
tor Taft is the Republican candidate, he would appearances In Washington ta which he dodged
or did he not promise t oojateer the party on a course decidedly to the right, more Issues than he tackled, It Is uncertain just
NOW you can
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PANAMA OISPATCH SERVICE
Trl. '-lo*
FanaaU
OMMlh.A.
eta
quickly in that phone call?
Leading the campaign to make General Elsen- what he stands for.
'*!
.,*'






SATURDAY. JANUARY IB, 195
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
r*
I
'
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES
I
Union Churches
Where all Prawuiu cooperis with
Ball* la eaaentUls, liberty In aea-
easeeitlats and charH* In aU mine
CHE ATLANTIC SIDI
fi-isUiaei
The Rev fhllllo Havener fastc
Phona 3-1468. _____
10:45 WnrnhlD service and Church-Umt
6:00 Voung People's Heating
Gatun
auraerv
The Kev. J. William L Oraham pastoi
Phone 5-35 ^_ ___
9:00 a 30 Broadcast ot> HOR: HP si
and HON
6:46 Sunday School
11:00 Worship Service.
5:00 Christian Endeavor
Margarita
The Rev Henrv Ball Pastor
Phone 3-1488
1:30 Bible School
10:46 Worship service and Church-Urn
aursery.
30 Youth fellowship
' THE PAClFIt au
Balboa
The Rev. Alex.i.aai H Shaw Pagtqr
Balboa ltd at Sai Pablo St
Phone -I486Church Office -SJM
9:30 Church Mb** Free bus service
10:3 Wonhlp Service, Junior Church,
Primarv Story Knn Church-ume Wur
"s-00 Chi Rho-senioi HI rallowahip
AM Post Hi Fel'owshlp.
fagBsh**
All aervicea at the Gamboa Union
Church, corner rf Gaillard Highway
and* SUxrt Avenue. ..,,..
The Rev Raymond A Gray. Minister.
Phone 6-130.
:S0 Sunday School.
10:30 Morning Wnfblp.
rearo Miguel _, _
Rav Raymond *. Gray as Stated Pas-
toral Supply.
8:30 Sunday School
7:30 Vesper.
Churches of the man, reirhi in Mia C.nol Zone, and Hi* terminal
cifie of Panama ana1 Colon. Reeublic of P.aema. extend a welcome
I all timei to men and women of Hi* armed services, and to civilian
neighbors. Irlenas and ilrangart.
A* public service. Hi* The Pansmo Amer.can list* below, by
denominatiani, notices of hour of worship all*! other regular activities.
Listings are rotated Irons time to time. Denominations having
only **l* or two congregations are listed under "Othei Churches And
Services A special listing is included tor services at Army ports.
Ale Force basa* an*! Naval stations.
Ministers, church secretaries and chaplains ara asked to inform
the news desk by Wednesdey noon at the latas at any changas far
the earning Saturday's church poje.
Jewish

Catholic
Unitarian
IHs
UNITARIAN
SOCIETY
10:30 a.m
JWB Armed
Koreas Sarvle*
Cantar Library
Balboa. C.Z
Your invitation
to liberal
religion
baptist
NATIONL Armi ^UaWMk
Panama Baptist. Prayes f1? *?
a.m OlvineServlce, 9:30 a.m. Divina Sar-
vle* 7:15-pm. aud Servingol The Lords
Supper at both Service Sundav Schno
Boyo ttapilsu La Boca. C Uivint
Services 11:00 a.m and 7:30 pjn. Serving
the Lords Supper at both Service Sun-
dav School at *:00 ojn .,,_,..,.
New Hope. Chiva-Chiva. ex.. Ulvlm
Services 11:00 ro Sundav School I
"a*. at. N. avavra. Minister
Gan.uoa, L.Z. Divine service at 11 IX;
a.m. and 730 boa with Suoflav School
"'"*..*. a-*. m*m
Rio AO-jo- B.F mum Seno* '
8:60 o m
COCUl-l BAJTIS. CHURCH.
Building 311 Bruja Road
V? Y Pond Jt Pastor
Sunday school .............. J;**. <"
Preaching Barvta*......... "
Vrainlng Union ..............*JQ PJ
Pieachmg Service 7J* PJn
Brotherhood 7:00 pm. Mondays.
Prayer Meeting '> W*dn*sday
REDEMPTION BATIST CHURCH
26. "I" Street
iBwio* the National Instltuu)
Box 1442. Panama City.
Rev Jose Prado Clderes. Pastor
services; in sprnkh
Sunday Service
Sunday School ....... lO.-flO ajn.
Preaching Servtt. 730 p.m.
Werint .a.iv B't>'. SWdv 7:30 nm
m -ripnj
latayi HAPI1M UIl'etCH
naiboa Heights, CX
627 Ancos Boulevard
Orawei "B" Balboa Height
Phone Balboa 1727
Tear Church away free eosae
. wekoasr lusi a rrieealy'
a.m
a.m
om
o m
om
YHilase H Meeby Pastal
Sunday School ............. 3U
Morning Worship.......... 10:46
Baptist Tralnine Union .... 630
Evangel lit u Service...... 30
Prayer Meeting Wednesday 730
VVMS Bible Study
rhursdays....................... 01
Men's Brotherhood
(Last Monday In month i .. 13* c
ATLANTIC UAPT1S1 CHURCH
Bolivar Avenue at I2tb Siraet
Cristbal. C.Z
Rev Fred L Jone Pastas
(Listed below are the catholic Cburcoer
in the Canal Zone and Uiose in the ter-
minal cities of Panama and Colon whust
congregations are primarily English-
speaking Besides these, the Cathedral ir
Panama City, the Cathedral of the 1m-
naculate Conception in Colon, and num
erou* paru-h church* in both cities, wel-
come English speaking visitors, though
their congregation are orimartly Span
'Sh-apeaking.)
1 MARY'S
Balboa
Sunday Masaea S:5o. 6:00. 10.00. U .00.
12:00 am
Benediction: S:0U p.m
Holy Day Haas*: 5:56. 0:00. 11:10. 11:55
ajn.
Coniessions. Saturday 3:30, 6:00 p m
7:00. 8:00 p.m. Thursdays for first
Friday7.00, 6:00 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena-Monday at
7:00 p.m.
Rosary everv evening at 7:00
ACBKD HEART
An con
Sunday Masse*. 5:5a. 7 30. 6:30 a a
Holy Days: 5:5S. 7 30 am
Confessions. Saturday3:30, 6:00 pm
7:00. 0:00 p.m Thursday fot First
Friday -7:00. 6:00 p.m.
Sacred Heart DevotionFriday at 7:00
Dm
ST. ruttgA'g
Cocoli
Sunday Mass: 630 am
Holy Days: 6:00 am
CURUNDU CHAPEL
Curundu
Sunday Mass: 6 30 am
Holy Days: 6:46 a.m
Confeasions- 3 30. 6:00 p.m. Saturday*
Ab*LMP-rlON
Pedro Miguel
Sunday Mass: 6:30 am
Haly Days: 6:30 a.m.
Confeasions: Saturday7:16, 7:45 pm
Rosary: Monday, Wednesday and Satur-
day at 7:00 pm.
Catechism Classes: Sunday-1030. 11:30
ajn. ________
T. JOSCPR S
Paraiao
Sunday Mass: 740 a.m
Holy Days: 5:45 a.m.
Confeasions: Saturday3.30. 4:00 am
Rosary: Tusday7:00 pm
Catechism Class*' Sundav-10:30. 1130
m
'. VINCLNT1
Episcopal
ANCO.N, L.Z
rHt CATHEDRAL OP 1 LLKl
rhe Rt. Rev. R Heoer Gooden. Buhor.
The Very R*v Raymond T. Ferris. Deai
730 a.m Holv Communion
30 a.m Cathedral School
10:45Momlng Prayer and Sermon
I First Sunday of the month Holv Com
minion and Sermon.)
7:00 Dm.- Evening Prayer ana Serniui
CRISTOBAL. 6LP
CHURCH OP OCR SAVIOUR
3rd St n**r G. Navy
Rev. Milton A. Cookson. Pastor
Holy Communion 730 a in
Church School 6:30 *.m
Morning Prayer-Sermon 11:00 am.
(H.C first Sunday In the month, i
Young People' vesper Service 431
om.
Wednaaday. Holy Communion 8:30 o.m
Choir Rehearsal 730 a-m
A House of Prayer for all people
COCOLI
Church oi St Andrew
rhe Rev. David B Reed
Holy Communion <30 a.m
Sunday Schudi V30 a.m.
Public Worship 10:45 a m
tH.C. first Sunday in the month. |
Young People's Fellowship 4:00 pro
Choir rehearsal Wednesday evenini'
tt 6:30 p.m
Woman's Auxiliary 6nd and tth rhurs
lays at 730 p.m.
House of Prayer and Fellowship for all
oeopi*
COROZAL
i.ood Shepherd
rhe Vn A F Nightengale
8:00 a.m. Every Friday; Morning Pray-
Methodist
rita. MLTHOUUn CHUKCU
iBritinb C'onferenrr
Minister Wliiljm H. Armstrong
l.oo ajss. Morning Prayer no aeriaoi
8:00 p.m Sunday School
4:00 Man'* Meeilng
1:16 om Evening Pravei ano sermon
1K1.NIT* MATHOOlSl CHURCH
lib Street and Uelcnder Avenue
Kev Norman Pratt. Musiei
Colon. RJ>
Rav. Norman Pratt, Minister
Sunday Service at 9 30 a.m. ana i :ii
i.m_ Sunday School for all agas at 6
.;.
Monday 730 om Weekly Pr*v*i
Meeting
8BBNEZER MLTHOUIkl CHURCH
Slver City. CZ.
Sunday Service a.m and 6:15 pm
Sunday School foi all age at 8:30 pm
Tuesday 730 nm Pravei Meeting
^Y*ui lavHaUM Te Worship
Bible School........... t:45 a.m
Worship ................. iioo am
Training Union............ 630 pm
Worship .................. 730 pm
Praver Meatlna iThura.i .. 730 o m
Seventh Oay
Adventist
Sunday 11 00 an. Ftnt at Third W*d-
EVENTH-OAY
Weekly Services in all Churahes.
aa follows:
Saturday Sabbath School >30 am.
Di.-lne Worship 11*0 m. Youth's Meet-
ing 4:30 o.j.
sundavBible Lecture 7:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday rtible Studv and Prayer Ser-
vice 7:30 p.m.
Pacific *lae Panam A Balbe*
English hurcnaa H T Rankin. Dls-
Churches Cabo Vaee, Av*. J. aT. de
la Oass: Jamaica Society Hall; Chorrillo;
Rio Abajo- Pueblo Nuevo; Balboa Chapel
- 0S44 Gaviln Rd Balboa (Saturday
Meetings .mly).
Panera* Spanish Church i. R. Caa-
tanin. Pastor: Call* Darien.
Gamboa in. Frllol A. A. Grizzle.
Pastor.
AtlantU Side
English Churches B F Clarke. Dis-
trict Pssto-
Churehee Colon Cncllsh Third Street:
Cristobal English 1*6) St. A Bolfvar
Ave.: Crisfiba 1 Spanish 14th 8L A Bo-
Sunday Masses: HM, 8:30 in
Holy Days: 6:00. 8:30 a.m
Confeasions: Saturday3DO. 6:00. 7:00.
8:60 p.m.
Before Holy Days; 7 DO. 8:00
Roaarv very evening: 7DO pa*
ST JOHN BAPTIST Di. LA SALLE
Rio Absfo
Sunday Masses: 6:30. 8.30 aja. .
Benediction: 4:00 p.m.
Holy Day Masses: 6:45 am
Confessions: Saturday330. :S* p.m
Friday aft*r Mlrculou Medal No-
vena.
Miraculous Medal Novena Friday 7:00
Rosary: Monday and Wednesday7:00
p.m
ST. iwsnri
Sunday Masa: 7D0 a.m. Holy Day Mas
6:45 a.m.
Sacred Heart Devotions: Irlday 7 DO
Corr?**sions: Saturday-J'JO. 8:00. 7 DO
8:00 pjn. _. ^
Rosary *v*ry vaning exe*pt Tu*d*y *t
7:00 DBS. .
COCO SLITO PLAYSHED
Pastor. Rev Wn J Finn. CM
Sunday Mas* ............- Hg u
H41y Day Mam............ J jo
Sunday School ......: !:*J "-ra
Service Thursday night .. 7-46 om
Cnnf*sinn before Mas
CHURC'B O rHt Hill* rAAOLT
Margarita. CZ
Rev William J Finn CM
Mas..................... tU
MIRACULOUS MEDA1 CHURCH
New Cristobal. 4th G St
Pastor, Rev Vincent Ryan. CM
Sunday Masse. 7. 8 A 1030 am
Weekday Maav 630 am
SAL, 8:60 a.m
Holy Day M*nw* SD0 A 8:00 m
Confessions. Rosary, nightly 7:00 p.m
Sunday School after the 8 *.m Mas
Miraculous Medal Novena s*rvle* -
Mon 5:00 A 7:00 p.m
1st. Sat Devotion, every let S*t ftai
Mas
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH
Bolivar Highway. Gatun. CZ.
Pastor Rev Frand Lynch. CM
Sunday Mas*. 8DO a.m
Weekday Mas* Tbur 630 a.m
Sat 7:00 a.m
Holy Day Mas. 7 DO a.m
Miraculous Medal Novn* service -
Mon 7:15 p.nv
lst Friday. Confession Communion.
7:15 p.m.
Confession Sat 630 A,
ST. THOMAS' CHURCH
Gatun, Near Lock
Pastor. Rev Francis Lynch CM
Sunday Mass. :45 em
Wtekday M*me. Tue. A FU 630 am
Holy Day Mas*. SDO a.m.
Miraculous Medal Novan arvtc*
Frl 7:15 p.m. _
Coiifeslon Sat. 1:15 A 8:00 pm
1st Sst Devotion everv 1st 9*t after
HOLY FAMILY CHURCH
Margarita. C Z.
Pastor. Rev William J Finn. CM
Sunday Masses. 73" at 030 a.m
Holv Day Mass 6:00 am
Miraculous Meda' Noven service -
Mon. 7D0 p-ra _
Instructions fot sdulU Frl COO pm
Confession Sal 00 830 A 7:06 to
8D8 pm
BS. JOSIPH h CHURCH
Colon, lOtn Broadway
Pastor. Rev J Raymond Maohate_ C M
Assistant. Rev Robert Vlgnola. C M
Sunday Masses. 5:45 A 8D0 am
Weekday Mass. 5:45 am .
Holy Day Masses. 5:45 A 8:00 am
1st Frl Masses, 5:45 A 8DO am
Communion. 6*01 a m
Baptisms Sun.. 4DO pm
Miraculous Medal Noven* service
Wed at g:13 A 7:00 pm
Noven* of the acred Heart Frt 7 16
Conteauon hat. DO 5:00 om A
i::0 to 8:00 D*
Sunday School. 8:00 pm
Discussion Club Young man of Pars*
Sun 3DO pro
instructions tor adults seeking Know-
ledge of the C*tholsc Church. Mon *
Thurs at 7:15 pm
1st. Sat Devotion every 1st Sal after
T V-RCENTS CHURCH
Silver City. C.Z
Pastor Rev Raymond Lewis. CM
Sunday Masses. 1:45 A 8:00 PA
Weekday Mass 8:06 am
Holy Day Mas** 53* A 630 am
Sunday School URO aa*.
Miraculous Medal Nnven* service -
rue.. 7Du pjn
Baptisms Sun DO pan
Confemion Sat 338 6DO om 7DO
to 8:00 p.m.
Instruction tot adult* rue* A Frl
130 pjn.
1st Sat OevoUon every let S*t ft*i
Mam N
OUR LADY OP 34100 COUNSEL
Gamboa. C Z
Paator Rev Charla Jacoo*. CM
Sunday Masses 7:00 830 am
Weekday Masa*. 6:30 am
Holv Day Ma*** 5:45 A 630 ara
Miraculous Medal Novan* aer-rle* -
lues 7>M pm
Scored Heart Nnveaw service. Frl. I .-06
om
Confsaaiuiis Sat 7DO pm
let. Bat- DevotJoa. every 1st Set aftar
(HC ut Friday.i
GAMBOA
SL Simoa's Church
Rev. Aafosuo Oches B.
Padre Miguel 4-33*
Holy Communion .......... 10:30 am.
Sunday School............. 3.00 pan.
Youth Organizations 5:00 A 6:00 o m.
Evening Prayer A Blbbic
2nd A th Sunday ........... J:30 p.m.
Women's Auxiliary ........ 7:30 p.m
2nd and th Thursday
LA BOCA
si Petar' Churck
Rev Lemuel B Shirley. Priest
6 a.m. Holy Communion
7 a.m.Choral Eucharist and Sermon
10 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Church
School.
5 p.m.Holy Baptism
7:30 pm. Vespers and Sermon.
Communion Tuesday and Thursdays,
7 .m.. Wednesday and Fridays li;
Girls Friendly 6 and 7 pjn Monday. 6
n m Tuesday; Vesper nightly *t 7. ex-
cept Saturday Complin* 730 p.m.
MARGARITA
St. Margaret's Chapel.
Margarita Hospilal
Th* Rev. M. A. Cookson
Sunday School 0 ajn. Evening Prayer
f.D0o.m.
PALO SECO
Choren of The Haly Comforter
The Ven. A. F. Nightengale
Every Mondan 830 a.m Holy Com
m union.
PARASO
Rav. D. A Oaborne
6:00 ajn. Holy Communion 2nd Sunday
630 a.m Sunday School.
5:30 p.m Evening Pravar: 2nd and th
Sunday*.
Monday: f.DU p.m. YotflB Meeting
Wednesday: 630 o.m Girls' Friendh
Society.
RED TANK
Rev. D.A Osborne at Rev C A Cragweli
11:00 am Holy Communion and Set
non isi ano 3rd Sunday*
11 DO ajn Horning Praym no da-
r**: 2nd and th. Sundays
3:00 pjn Sunday School and Baptism
7:30 p.m Evening Praym and address
end. and th Sunday
rANAMA CITY
SI. PAUL'S CHURCH
A F Nightengale, tt U M.B.L
and rhe Rev Rlu Reglala Arweli
VeneraDle Archdeacon
d.OU ajn Holy Communion 0:00 am
7:00 o.m Evenson end Sermon
CHRIS! CHURCH BY-4rie-SEA
Colon. R. d* P.
(Opposite Hotel Washington)
Th* Rav Mainert J Peterson
STB Rector
SUNDAYS.
S s.m Holy Communion.
9 a.m. Choral Eucharist and Sermon
1030 am. Church School
738 o.m Solemn Ev*nrmg A Sermon
.VEUNkSUAYS
8 s.m Holy Communion.
/:30 pm Evensong end Sermon
30 o m Adult Confirmation Clas
rtlUKSDAYS
S o m Pravo Guild
RID A VS.
8 pjn Children Eucharist
7 30 om Choir Practice
SATURDAYS
I* a.m Children r- Confirmation Clas
7 .70 o.m Cnmnlm and Meditation
GATUN
> Church
St Oeergei Cb
Gatun. C.Z
Rev Snlomor N JacoD
:4& a m Church School
8:45 a.m. Morning Prayer
10:00 a.m Holv Eucharist and Sarmor
luertday
1.00 a.m Holy Communlor lAlso Holy
)- and Saints Day*.)
Wednesdays:
1:00 p in Evening Prayer
s-iKinm St Vincent's-Guild
i 'in o ni Choir Rehearsal
rhuradav
Church ol St Mary Th Virgin
Archdeacon Waldock Priest in Charge
Morning Pryfj ........ 6:45 am
Holy Eucharist and Sermon 7DO em
Church "School ......... 130 pm
Solemn Evensong ..... 6DO om
Woman' Auxiliary 2nd Monday*.
Order of St'Vlnc*n> Acolite Guild.
I'uesday*.
Vestrv Meeting 2m. rhursdays
Holy Commun'on. 7 am Thursday
Evensong 7 30 pm
Morning Prayer, tarn Friday. Choir
Rehearsal 8 pjn
RIO ABAJO
St Christopher's Church.
16 St.. Parque Lefcvre
Rev Antala Ornea S
Phone Pedro Migue' 6488
Holy Communlor...... 7:30 am
Sundav School ........ 1638
Baptism. 8 te ora Snd A th Sun-
"ive
_ enina PrayerBible Study 8 o m
1st snd 3rd Sunday*
Woman'* Auxiliary 2nd A th Sundav
i 00 p m
Holv Communion Wednesaava 7 em
Lutheran
attlHtEMER LUTHLMAN CHURCH
The Church el the Latbaran aar*
il 1 Banilh! Pastor
130 Balboa Roed. Balboa
Sunday School an< flote Clam a m
Worship service 10:15 am-, "Come rboc
with lis and We Will Do The* Good.
rrtendl welcome wait all vtsator Pot
luck suoaer second Sunday eaeh month
630 psn.. gam* nlgbt. fourth Sunday
730 p.m The Service Cantar, ooar Wed
enday through Sunday, extend a cai-
te all ouTltarv
Jewish Weitare Hoard. Biiig 762-A. La
Boca Road. Balboa C.Z Rabbi Nathan
Witkin director
Services on Friday /30 pan
(See also listings of Jawish seoviro
inder Posta Base and Sudona i
Congregation Kol Sheanio Israel. Ave-
nida Cuba and 361h Street. Bella Vista
Panam* City. Rabbi Harry A Herfeld
Service on Frldav. o.m
Posts. Bases
And Stations
PACIFIC Slut
r-r*lasia*i
r'ORT AMADOR
Sunday School ............
Morning Worship ...............
FORT CLAYTON
Sunday School. Bldg 164 ......
Morning Worship...............
FORT KOBBZ
Sunday School...................
Morning Worship ...............
12lh Station Hospital ...........
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Bible School ...................
Morning Worship...............
Youth Group...................
Servicemen's Hour..............
US. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Morning Worship.............
ProtesUnt Sunoay School ......
Corozal Chapel.................
6:15
1030
8:00
10:15
10:00
IID0
10:45
45
10:45
DO
7:00
10-45
1:25
83B
Catholic
i'ORT CLAYTON
Daily Mas*........... 730
Sunday Masses ......8:00. 8:00 A Z:45
I2TH STATION HOSPITAL
Sunday Mass.................. i
COHOZL CHAPEL
Sunday Mas................. 10:30
FORT KOBBI
Dally Mas*........ ............ 6:15
Sunday Masses 45, 7:45 and 11:45
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Sunday Mas* .................. *'-30
AUsROOR AIR FORCE BASF '
Dailv Masa ..................... 6:46
Sunday Mi'ssee ......... 7:45*11.45
Jewish
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Saturday....................... 8DU
FORT CLAYTON
Saturday ...................... 4:06
FORT KOBBE
Thursday ...... .. 7:00
IWB. Balboa. C.Z.
Frldav......................... 130
ATLANTIC SIDE
Protestant
FORT DAVIS
Protestant Worship Service...... 8DB
FORT GULICK
Sunday School.................. 8D8
Morning Worship............... 10:00
COCO SOLO NAVAL STATION
Sunday School ....... 8:38
ProtesUnt Worship Service ..... 11:19
Catholic
FOR1 DAVIS
Sunday Mass ................... 10:0t>
FORT GULICK
Sunday Mass ....... 6:00
COCO SOLO
Sunday Matt.................... 6:06
J*wlsb.
FORT GULICK
Tuesday ...................... 7Dli
Shipping &
Air Line News
Firot Post-War German
Sailing Vessel Leaves
For Radio de Janeiro
HAMBURG. Jan. 12 (UP)*
The four-masted bRrk Psmir.
! commanded by Cspt. Paul
; Grei&s, with a crew of 38 and
with 46 cadets aboard sailed
'yesterday on a training cruise i
for South America and Aus-
! tralla. Tens of thousands of |
! Hamburg citizens crowded the i
quay and all the vessels an-i
chored at Germany's biggest
seaport hooted their sirens in,
farewell.
Cardinal Joseph Frlngs gave
his blessings to the ship atidj
held a brief speech.
The ship Is Germany's first
post-war sailing vessel. Rio de.
Janeiro will be the first port1
of call.
She carries a load of cement.'
From Rio. the Pamir will carry;
Brazilian wood to Australia and'
is expected to return to Ger-
many in about nine months.
t'S Clubwomen
Visit South America
"Intercontinental Solidarity";
is the keynote of a trip now
being made via Panagra by 28
members of the General Fede-
ration of Women's Clubs around
South America, headed by their
president, Mrs. Hiram C. Hough-
ton.
This is the third such trip
made to different parts of the
world by members of this orga-
nization, which represents clubs
with thousands of members all
over the United States.
One of the purposes of their
"mission of cooperation" Is to
see the progress being made by^
South America women's clubs
in the countries they visit.
Plans have been made for con-
ferences with local women's
groups and inspections of dif-
ferent projects sponsored by
them.
Mrs. Houghton stated that
her organization attaches a
great deal of Importance to vi-
sits of this kind as a factor In
stimulating better International
relations through personal
meetings with clubwomen In
other countries.
Having visited in Panama, the
group will travel through Pa-
nama, Colombia. Ecuador. Pe-
ru, Chile and Argentina on Pa-
nagra before continuing up the
east coast of South America.
v JACOBY ON BRIPOt
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
WKST
*S42
V9843
? AKQ988
? None
NORTH (D)
4>AK73
/A7
4) J104
*>KJ87
EAST
S7
North
1N.T.
Pas*
Pass
AJ1098
a
? 7sa
4AQ1086
SOUTH
eQ6
VKQJ 10 6 5
? 5
e>5432
North-South vul.
East Sooth Writ
Pass 3 4 4>
Pas* 4 Pass
Pass
Opening lead* K
signalled with the eight and six
of clubs.
That was all the Information
that Zedtwltz had. He proceed-
ed to make his contract against
he best defense. Can you?
Declarer knew that West had
started with six diamonds and
four hearts. From East's club|
signal he deduced the rest of
the situation. Hence he could]
play the hand just as though
all the cards were exposed to
view.
Zedtwitz merely led out his;
last trump, discarding a second I
club from dummy. East still
couldn't afford to discard a
spade, since South would then
run four spade tricks. Henct
East had to discard the ten of
clubs.
Declarer then led a club*
allowing East to take the queen.
East returned a spade which
dummy won with the king.
Dummy returned the king of
clubs to East's ace.
East now returned anotlvrsT
spade, which South won with
the queen. And at this' point,
South's five and four of clubs'
were as good as gold.
Back in 1928, when the Na-
tional Open Paris Champion-
ship was staged for the first
time (before most people had,
ever heard of contract bridge),
Waldemar von Zedtwitz walked;
off with the national title. He,
repeated the feat In 1937.
One of the hands that Zedt-
witz played recently makes it
clear that he is at the top ot
his game. Tm willing to bet
dollars to doughnuts that most
of my readers won't find the
winning line of play even
though they can see all four1
hands.
West opened the king of dia-
monds and continued with the
queen, forcing Zedtwitz to ruff.'
Declarer then drew four rounds,
of trumps, discarding a dla-
mood and a club from dummy..
East also discarded a dia-
mond, but then had to find two
more discards on the third and
south trumps. He correctly de-
cided that he could not afford
to part with a spade, so he
Other Churches .
And Services
ARA'I LKNTSat
Apartment 1 Lux Building. 14th Street
Panama Monday; Lectures and Dis-
cussion* 8:00 0JH.
Choren ot Jesus Christ el Latter Oa>
Saints (Mormon) Balboa. C.Z
Sunday School 1:30 a.m.
Services 1030 a.m
At JWB Armed Forces Service Center
op La Bnc Rrutd
Kvening Service at 8 p.m. at place
of meeting announced at momlng ser-
vlce.
CHUetCH Of CtUCISl
06S1 Balboa Head. Balboa
W Harland Dllbeck. Evangelist
Telephone 2-3602
SUNDAV SERVICES
Bible Clases loi all ages 10:00 a m
Preaching and Communion 10:44 a.m
Preaching *nd Communlor .. 7:06 o m
MIDWEEK SERVICES
Bible Study ______ Wednesdsy 7MO p.m
Ladle' Bible Class Thursd 1:45 o.m
CBURCB Or CHRISTOld CrUtebsi
SUNDAYS:
We meet in the Americap Legion Man
id front of the Clubhouse
Morning Worship 10:45 s.m
Visitors welcome
Ladies Bible Study t Gatun
Phone Gatun 416 oi Ft Gullck SO*
Here's how I helped
clear up BLACKHEADS and'
'rW&L
^S
*v
(7. "(
r* a* ear. Clause wsth \ts f '
ildl aasdicated. emollient t-Vf- JLaaJ
C.iticur* Seap. then apply ~ /'* mildly aanaeptic Cuticura Osatment. That
orld-kaown combination I* usually *ar
pns.ngiy helpful Bay
both today at year
aruggiat'a.
CUTICURA
GENERAL
PAINT
(Pintura
General. S.A.)
Announces their
new telephone
number
2 -1891
GENERAL PAINT CORP.
(Pintura General, S.A.)
No. 30 "H" Street
Phones: 2-1891 2-1895
Mon as
offers
largest selection. ..
gj Panama Hats
Dolls ,
y Novelties
9 Pollera's Blouses
^ Straw Bags



PANAMA
COLON
CURUNDU PXOTtSlA.VI
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Chanlaln William H Blali
Sunday School ...............
Morning Worship...............
Young People' Service ........
Evening Worship ............
Prayer Meeting Thursday .. ....
Choir Practice. Wednesday *t
7:00 o.m and Saturdav 9:S0 am
8:6
11:60
5:45
740
7*1
OLD CArHOLIl fill Kt'H
SI Rapbsel The Archangel
13th St West No 1
Holy Eucharist: Sundav at i JO a.m
Tuesdsvs Wednesday snd rhuradav
-JO a.m
Sacrament ol Unction (Healing Ser-
vice) First Sundav of each month a'
7:30 o m
Mount Halibet' Christian
Panama R P
B\ Hev T. janes. D D
officiating
Morning devotlor a ......
Holy Communion a. ........
Fellowship WorshjD at .....
Sunday School *t ...........
Olvlne Service a' ...........
Sermon *t..................
Holy Communion l .......
Mondays Roll cr*l and pray-
er meeting a .......
Wednesdays Evancelistlc Ser-
vice* a I .........
Friday. Litany. Fasting, and
Sermon from
Church
Bishop
6 uu am
6:30 a ra
11:00 am.
3 00 pm
7:30 om.
6:30 p in.
6:30 om.
/:30 o.m
i: 30 em
I 00 DJn
Christian Scientist
CHKISriA.N-sCll.Mr CHUKCHLh
Irsl Church ol Christ Scientist Anco-
580 Ancn Boulevard
Sunoay 11.80. Wednesday 8:01 ojs
Sundav School 8:30 a.m
rtrat C'barcb of Cblist, aaeausl, UtaaBBga
13tb Street A Bolivar Highway
Sunday 11:00 a.m Wednesdav r-ge ojb
Sunday School 6-80 am
Christian Science So. in. Uaasbe
Civic Center Building
Sunday 11J0 a to Flri 4 Thlro Weo
iairl*y 740 rat
Sundav Se/ ml 10:1
iQue
CASI miK.IIIKK SKRVICh HtTVtliN CUBOPE AM) NORTH AND SOUTH PAC It It COASTS A Limited Number of Passenger Berth)
TO EUROPS,: M.S. Washington ..................................... January 19
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR AND CHILE: January 24 .

It CENTRAL AMERICA WEST COAST U 8.A. S.S. X- ....................................... January 25
FROM NEW TOBK TO PLYMOUTH 4V Ut BAVRt Libert* ............................................. January 23
PASSENGER SERVICE fren CARTAGENA le EUROPE-Colorable.......................................... January 14
Crtstebai. HCEf.CH LINE P.O Mea 6*1 r*l 6-2476 at 181*
Partas**: LINDO Y MADURO 8 A Bes MM
Tel Panama t-168.1 1-I68I
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrive
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui ..................................Jaa. 1J
S.S. Quirigua .................................Jan. 28)
8.S. Levers Bend .............................Jan. 25
S.S. Chiriqui ............ .....................Jan. 27
Handling Refrigerated Chilled aad Geaera Cargo
New York Service
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Verafua .........
S.S. Cape Cod ........
S.S. Heredia ..........
S.S. Jamaica .........
S.S. Cape Cumberland
S.S. Comayagua .....
..............Jan. It
.........Jan. IS
..............Jan. IS
..............Jan. It
..............Jan. 283
..............Jan. 22
Weekly Sailings to New York Los Angeles, San Francisco, Sea I lie
Occasional sailings to New Orleans and stabile
FREQUENT SAILINGS FROM CRISTOBAL TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA.
Cristbal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui.....(Passenger Service Only).....Jan. 15
S.S. Chiriqui..................................JB- ',
CRISTOBAL 2121
TELEPHONES:
PANAMA 2-2M4
COLON 2t



Salvation Army
Panama City, call* ia a **"fi:
Services et II em and I JO o-m I Mai
>r Wilsoni, Sunday Schoo' at 3 pm
La Boca: Service at 11 am and 7-ja
a.m. Sunday School at JjJO p-m
Bed Tank: Service al 7 30 om Sundav
ichnoi at'3:60 o.m
Service* at...... II am 4k i JO ojb
colon nth Street
Sundav School al .. Si ojo
Colon. 3rd Streei
Service- *t II am 4> ') OJO
Suva at
Service et................. :21 "2I
Sunday School at......-.. 8J0 om
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1MI
Royal Mails Lines Lid.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SAMANCO'' ................................"" i,5th
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO"....................Jan. 31st
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA,
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUA.
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO"..................March 1st
Nsie: The m.v. "REINA DEL PACIFICO" will not call
at Kingston on the March voyage.___________
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "LAOUNA" ..................................ran',,1.?t5
M.V. "SALAVERRY"".............................Jn- 22nd
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
MB. "DUIVENDVK" ....................'.........Jn Mh
M.V. "LOCH GARTH" ............................Jn- 22nd
TO UK/CONTINENT
M.V. "PARDO'
.Jan. 25th
Accepting passenaers in First. CaWn and Thlra Class
Superior accommodation available for Dassenaers
All sailings subject to change without notice.
PACIFIC STEAM NAV. CO.. Cristobal. Tel. I KM IM6
FOBO COMPANY Inc.. Panam Tel S-llM/l: Balboa MM

' i
6
Call for
"Black & White
Asking for Black A White" shows your
knowledge of good whisky.
Every drop of this special Scotch whisky t
distilled in Scotland: it ha* a flavour and
character all it own.
Distilled and Bottled in Scotland
BLACK&WHITE
-

SCOTCH WHISKY

m
Scoca WTUskr Dt.tla.ei
limas aWdianan 6 Co. last.
a
a H.M. Km Geerge VL
IAH6I IUCH1N1N S eai7B.6UI6PW, 8COTLAMI
Distributors: AGENCIAS W. H. D0EL, S.A.
NS. 14 Central Ave. TL X-VIU


.

I^BHBPy^^^^

.
fuf rovm
THE PANAMA AMERICAN _" AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSfAPER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1958

It! HOLLYWOOD
By ERSKINE JOHNSON
"But I miesa ;he tide's lurnhiR
HOLLYWOOD. (NEA>. Guys f01. vuuns actors." he grinned
and Dolls: If Italian movies are -xhey're all geltliiR big lovr
good enough lor Ingrid Bergman, ;scenfs Maybe the public wants
they're fine and dandv lor Ma-|us young.''
rilyn Bufen, too. j Remember Catherine McLeod.
Marilyn's the Misj America of v.no ,vas launched as a breath-
SIDE GLANCES
By Galbrairh
1946 Who hit stardom in Rome
two years later and she isn't
dreaming of trading it for an-
other go at Hollywood lhcker
glory.
"I'm afraid 10 take the chance.
coniessed the Detroit born
beautv. who'd back on native soil
on stork business. "Too many
actresses start off great guns
and fi?zle out in Hollywood, i
was under contract at MGM and
nothing happened. Nothing!"
Here are some ot Marilyns
iu.-t-back-home comment:
lngrid Bergman and Roberto
Rosselinl: "My friends are al-
uav.i writing to me in Rome and
asKing about them. I don't know
whether they're happy. But I do
know that they work together
beautifully.' -..._
Shellev Winters and \ittono
Gassman: "Is it really a ro-
mance? People in Rome will be
surprised."
American lood prices: "Wow!
How can people afford to eat?
There will be no changing of
Wlliam Ching's name even if
movie producers do get him con-
tused with Charlie Chan's No. 1
son Cbing. a blond southerner
ol English parentage, (he got the
name from the English village
of Chingford near London.) is
retting the star treatment at
Republic In "Bal Tabarin" after
starring on Broatlwav in Alle-
gro."
-It's the roles, not the name,
that make a star," is Ching's
philosophy about his Chinese-|
sounding moniker. Republcs!
boss. Heroert Yates, agrees with
him and they'll stick to Ching
and "see what happens.
Ching was at Universal betoie
Rodgers and Hammerstem hired
him for "Allegro." "1 was in an,
Abbott ana Costello mov.e. ne
said. "and I got hit with every-:
thing except Lou."
I ain't a-tangling with Maria
H: it Hollywood's new cowgirl. I
..aria hits the measuring stick
at the five-foot ten-inch mark,
rides a nag in the John Wayne
manner, shoots with a Dead-Eye
Dick aim and says that any-
thing a man can do on the.
creen. I can. too."
She's been an opera singer, an
Earl CarroH showgirl, a defense
plant worker, and started a-gal-
foping Into the sunset in "Border
Outlaws" and "Cattle Queen.'
Now she's streaking across the
plains in "Outlaw Women" and
says of her cactus-studded ca-
reer:
"1 I lip fellows, but 1 dont
shoot em. I use my head instead
Of a gun. Audiences love it."
Maria's comment on Carolina
- Cotton, another western queen:
"Ah. she's strictly a yodeler. I
-can l'ck her." .....
' ie a good squint at your
mailman, folks. There may be a
new Clark Gable or Tyrone
-Power groaning under that mail
.'pouch.
Tri'm still gulping, but Rock
fa'idson. UI's. new wonder boy.
Was pounding the pavements as
a letter carrier three years ago. ,
Now. Instead of delivering mail.j
he's delivering male zip as Yvon-
ne de Carlo's co-star in "The
Scarlet Angel.''
Rock's under the quartcr-cen-
turr mark In age and Is plumb
vrnrlsed that he's being allow-
ed to eru'h important movie i
fttieba* In his arm?. '
less, voung thing by Director
Frank Borzage in 1946o
Catherine's name disappeared
from the movie marquees when
she bolted to New York, married
actor Don Keefer and shrugged
her shoulders at flicker offers.
Now she's back on the old. fa-
miliar sound stages as Robert
Clarke's co-star in "Sword of Ve-
nus." but she's saying that live
television is love No. 1.
"It's :iol frantic any more,"
Catherine whispered. "Everybody
knows his business by this time.
It's wonderful for an actress.
Now we have designers, makeup
people and even hairdressers.
"One of these days, they'll buy
some hair dryers and then tele-
vision will be heaven."
She turned down a chance to
do "The Egg and I" as a TV
serial"Thai's Not for Our Girl"
to be scot-free for moviemak-
ing and the stage.
And she's right proud of hav-
ing grown out of girl-next-door
roles.
"After all. let's face it. I'm
older." Catherine grinned.
TERRY-
DONE WITH MIRRORS?
Description of a dumb actor:
"He's ambidextrous. He can
use either head."
"That* hankies from Ralph raally mut be lovt, mother-
he's the only boy friend who didn't run out on me before
Christmas!"
Girls Exposing Too
Much. Survey Says
DETROIT, Jan. (UP'.White,
collar workers are wearing fewer
itnd fewer clothes "almosi to the
extreme oi shocKlng exposure,'
a lashion survey reports.
Working girls "uncier-dress,"
tiie American Women's Institute
said. 8mall town girls under-1
dress even more than their big-
tlty sisters, the report added.
"They wear of -s h o u 1 d e r
blouses, deep-cut necklines,
skirts with long slits and trans-'
parent blouses and thin sweaters
almost to the extreme of shock-
ing exposure." the organization'
said.
The men weren't overlooked.
"The chief fault of men Is
that they clutter every pocket
with miscellaneous objects from
paper notes to screw drivers,"!
the group reported.
It rated Boston's women the
beat dressed in the nation, fol-j
loved by Washington. Kansas
City, Atlanta and Detroit. Rated
lowest in the survey was Chi-,
cago, mhere the girls wear "too!
many sweaters, too few hats and j
many, go without handbags."
New York, Loe Angeles, Miami I
end Philadelphia rated barely
above Chicago in the best-
dressed survey.
In the nation as a whole, the
survey revealed that "less than
five per cent .of the males wean
garters" and only three per cent
wear gloves with an overcoat.
The. investigators apparently
were rellefed to note, howefer.
that 95 per cent of the men re-
port for work with ties on.
It said 79 per cent of the wo-
men wear hats to the office.'
while only 63 per cent of thej
men do so. Sixty-one per cent'
of the women were found to
work without stockinbs in the
summer.
THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by the State
Hays 2% Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
We make loans with guarantees on first mortages
or other securities.
CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
25c. 50c. $1.00 and $5.00
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety deposit boxes, for. jewelry and
documents, in 4 different sizes.
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
10 Central Ave. t
corner of "I" Street.
COLN BRANCH^'
Front St. at corner
ef 7th St.
(i. R. De ROUX CARLOS MOUYNES V.
Manager. Sab-Manager.
BOORS:
From 8:0 a.m. to 1Z:30 p.m
SATURDAYS: from : m to IZ:S0 p.m.
TH U.P.'i BAKU BVWt/ TdUfiK SOW* TH*0U6h1
6WAfc MV SLOOP COl'LPtfT.,

FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
BEATS BOOKS
BY MERRILL BLOS8RR
DO66ONE I'M DUE
AT THE CRUMPET HUT
AND I CANT FIND .
MYCRY5TALBAU./
Don't Tense.cwum
MAKE WITH We
PALM REMPMe>
Why NOT? rru. ^
PILL IN DLL I LO-.
CATE "WE CRYSTAL/
MOWS lib THINK OF
WITH ALL.THH
THE" YEARS I'VE
F&LM S WA5TID
OEATNMA RADtN6-
r ALLEY OOF
IT MAY BE A BIG JOB
BY V. T. HAMLIN
Everybody feas Qassifieis
. >
CAPTAIN EASY
JITTERY JANE
BY LESLIE TURNER
CHINS IVELKLN Planeteci
ALLEY STYLE
BX RCSS WINTEKBOTHAM
VIC FLINT
COMFANY OUTSIDE
BY MICHAEL 0*8111X11
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
With
MAJOR HOOFLE OUT OUR WAX
By J. R. WILLIAMS
HAVSVOU
TAtfEN A
LEASE OH
me tub ?j
BYTME
Time we
"GET IN. \
the water]
will Be- 4
just RishtJ
\fOd A. |
PENGUIN.7
FAW.'WHY MUST A MOB
for a eveev time x
PERFORM l#f ABLUTIONS
AND DO A BIT OF CON-
STeocTive thinking ?
a Plague op
GRASS-





ATUftDAT. JANUARY It. IMS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE PTVI
pacific S^ocietu
I
Illri. Carroll O. J\1h*l
&, n, &tL. 3U &m 352t
RECEPTION HONORS ISTHMIAN VISITORS
The President of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs,
Mr. BJenneth R. lverson, of Washington, D. C. and his As-
sistant. Mr. Lee Ross who is the Director of Information of
the Institute of Inter-American Affairs In Washington, D. C,
ace visitors to the Isthmus and were honored at a reception
for one hundred guests given in the Balboa Dining Room of
the Hotel El Panama from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Friday by
the members of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs in
Panama.
-f
Vacationers Return To Panama
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Brown re-
turned recently from the Uni-
ted States where they have
spent a vacation of several
weeks.
News of Former Chinese
Minister to Panama
The Chinese Minister to Pa-
The visitors were accompanied t*d S**1**-
through the Canal this morn-
ing by launch by a small group
Mr. and Mrs. Sergio Betan-
court returned Wednesday by
plane to their home in Golf
Heights from a vacation of sev-
eral months spent In the Uni-
Diablo-Gaillard CZ Employes Will
Cut-Through Road Get w_2 statement
Closed To Traffic
A cut-through road between EMngl bOOII
Diablo Road and Galllard High-
way, near the Balboa lubricant statements of grow earnings
warehouse, has been closed to and withholding tax for 1951
through traffic, It was announc- will be distributed to all Pana-
ed Friday afternoon at Balboa ma Canal Company-Canal Zone
Height*. Oovemment employes about'
The "short road to not a P^.^^gJ? *". pely"a corsa
of the public road system. <"'" -
Signs have been posted no-'
^yitlantic S^ociet
i
iSot 195, L/alun Jilephon* (yatu
378
BON VOYAGE TEA HONORS MRS. PL'MPELLY
ton has been touring Europe, the
Scandinavian countries and vis-
iting In England before sailing
on the Stella Polaris for Jamai-
ca, where he Joined Mr. and Mrs.
William A. Van Slclen. Jr.. of Ga-
tun. who were spending the
The hostesses gave Mrs. Pum- William Hanly, Mr. and Mrs. Gil- 9onte*inas holldayS near King-
illy a corsage f orchids for the bert Sol'as. Mr. and Mrs. Eric *"**
Mrs. Myron Smith, Mrs. Clayton Moore, and Mrs. Hal-
land Hankie were co-hostesses for a tea at the Fort Gnlick
Officers Club Thursday afternoon, as a farewell to Mrs.
James Pumpelly, who is leaving on the 19th with Colonel
Pumpelly for duty at Norfolk, Virginia.
Th. .tat..nS hSu W-2) occasion, and the ladles of the Thelemark. Mr. J. D Beverhoudt. o_Work, su
rne statements Forms w < iio._ r,_iW .___..,._.j u...~.. r-,-mo., n,,i.<>t tutorir 10-norefrs om
; >,.. ~=..u "- ar|1 .. ,,_ nr-n-riiri hv the USAR Carib School presented her> Misses Carmen Ducruet. Marttza, M ,. Goodbv,
tlfying motorists that this short pavrn7nivil?onPaXwlll sent a doubIe sllver vegetable dish, as Tagaropulos. Maria Tagaropulos. MrTh^1"
trir. T. nnt a thrmiBh ronri A Pay" Division ard Will be sent _.,,, .'.. vilmii Roinh The ma Herrera. lne
strip is not a through road. A
barrier has been erected near
the lubricant warehouse. Ac-
r out as soon a **^*fe'toBh4m, The buffet table was centered Irene Leone, and Teresa Brian.
T!lp..-m_e.nb!I xu JSSSPES with a floral arrangement of,
The Chinese Minister to Pa- mg by launcn by a sinaii group ft r nance Tonlrht the lubricant warenouse. Ac- _.n Vf.iVi on th* nihtert has wltn a noral arrangement 01
nama. Dr. Cheng Chen-Yu, who 01 District Grant Lo&ge Of ncers. %he Balboa Hl7h School R cess as far as the warehouse ffiJJSS-^*-"Jgti5n!wroU painted daisies, flanked by green
te,ssST5W&VRBBVBSgznw&fc%fite\vsur*,rom ^S^SS-MiH'**8EuZZ-m. ~ _. _.....
goodbye to Mr. and Mrs. H. A,
Bailey at an Informal gathering
1 in the office Friday afternoon at
3 o'clock,
was due Mr. William E. Adams, the
Nationalist Government there.
A new minister is expected Former Resident Is
to be appointed to replace Dr. Visitor Here
Cheng Chen-Yu.
thirty
Upper Gym.
Metilers Sail For States
UNIA Group presses
Thanks For Donations
To Last Charity Drive
misunderstanding concer n in g AUo resent were. Mr, Rafael gitane from Jamaica. Capt. Fen-
the necessity for having these Ramlrez Mrs Harry Gardner,
forms at some earlier date t Mrs Josepn Kataiinas. Mrs. By-
i was explained that Canal em- ron Ki Mrs Henry LaBacZi
(Continued on Page SIX)
IAWC Cooking Class
Meets For Luncheon
Mrs. Marguerite Brown and on the Istnmus and
Mrs. Martha Anderson enter- house guests of Mrs.
Elreth's
home In the United States
individuals who gave contrlbu-
cent Oberg, Mrs. Raymond Patri-
cio, Mrs. Antonio Quesada. Mrs.
Orvllle Shaw. Mrs. Jos Torres.
Mrs. William Coleman, Mrs. John
tainedlhe-CooiUnClass of the mother Mrs. M. Oiler, of Em- ST^ Tnf. TdTe"^*?.*"' 2-Week Salvation Army
Inter-American Woman's Club pire Street in Balboa. P^e ShJ b^esl meetfng 'Vnds6 collected during the Revival Ends Tonight
with a luncheon given on Wed- of tne Canal Zone Branch of drive were augmented by the
nesday at Mrs. Browns home Mrs. A. *. Harria ^ Natlonal j^g^ of Ame:- Division and used to purchase
lean Pen Woman will be held items for distribution to the Army corps will wind up two Mrs'WHUam Hawkins. Mrs.:
!"; Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the Little inmates of the Matas Her- week* of dally revival meetings Sffil ^ n Mrs Gerardo
the!,,.,,.. ,u. iw.i _..-. a.-i tonight with an '-open-air "/"?'" *JL_ virell Luckv.
home Mrs. A. J. Harris
at Fort Clayton. To Visit In Chile
The attending guests lnclud- Mrs. A. J. Harris of Curundu
ed Mrs.^ Angle Smith Mrs. Jo to leaving tonight via the:, nf y,-. .., T|vo
Therrell, Mrs. Angela F. de Uetherlands SS Une for Chile,'GaUery or "" Hotel Tlvo11"
Guardia, Mrs. Mabel Comley, where she will Join Captain:
Mrs. Panchita de Ponce Roas, Harris for the duration of his
Mrs. Helen R. Adler, Mrs. Luz temporary assignment there,
de Mndez P., Jennie Stephens, Their son, Pfc. Richard Har-
1. a.i..un Prehle. Mrs. Lowell Parker. Mrs.
The Panama City itton wunerson. Mrs. Joseph Do-
Legion Auxiliary Board
To Meet
Unit No. 1 American Legion several pieces of clothing.
nandez Asylum tonight with '0P*n:~' Snchez, and Mrs. Virgil Lucky.
A committee led by president bombardment" between 8 ana ____._
Mrs. V. Lashley visited the in- 7:15 p. m. surprise Bridge Party
stltution on Dec. 30 and distri- The bombardment will be led c Hmentg M. Thomas
buted 101 packages of food and by the Youth for Christ Feuow- Mfs Q Q Thomas. Jr., who
Mrs. Dora A. de Arias. Mrs. rto of the Marine Corps, who AlXJ;~ ^Ul hold an Rxecutlv
Louise Eaton, Mrs. Teresa D. has been spending his pre-em- jtaSmeJunsfott JanMB at 1
de Burrel, Mrs. Diana Bright, barkation *** >**
ship.
.
p.m at the Legion Home.
leave on the Isth-
Mrs. Rosita de Hernandez, Mrs. mus, will leave by plane to-
Anita M. Weltmer. Mrs. Am- morrow for California, where he
paro de Brostella, Mrs. Natalia: will report to hto unit scned-
A. de Rivera. Mrs. Ruth Town- uled for early shipment to the -_-_ Ni_ht
send and Mrs. Jeannette Mo Japan-Korea Theater. The regufar Monda
Bridge Tournament
bridge
tournament will be played Jan.
14th at 7 p.m. In the Card
Room of the Hotel Tlvoll. All
Klbbon.
Amador Officers' Wives
The next meeting of the IAWC Club Meets For Luncheon
Cooking Class will be held on Mrs T A Graham and Mrs 1
Jan. 27 in Panama at the home H L Undt we co-hosteswi! lnt5e*d. br,id5e. pla.ers arS'
of one of the members. : Wednesday to "members of The" g* *$* to^ment'on!
T^T". ; Fort Amador Officers' Wives: 0onp1l* ]"_,
Panama Canal Dental club at a luncheon held at the Mondav nlnt
Ashociation To Meet Army-Navy Club.
Members of the Panama Ca-1 Mrs. Alex A. Dobak was the
nal Dental Association and Af-> guest of Mrs. C. Plckett.
Iiliated Members have been re- j New members present includ-;
minded by Dr. Earle Gerrans of ed Mrs. J. Stadnick. and Mrs.
the Dental meeting to be held! William M Smith,
on Tuesday at 7 p.m., the Fon' The high sere in Bridge was
Clayton Hospital. A part of the won by Mrs. Thomas A. Enloe:
program will consist of the 2nd high by Mrs. C. A. Schrad-
showing of dental films. r and low scores by Mrs. R.
. ------1 -O. Fleet.
Masonic Grand Master
And Wife Entertained The door prize was awarded
Dr. Thomas Sherrard Rov.toMrs. John R. Uldrlck.
Grand Master of Masons in The high light of the lun-
Massachusetts. and Mrs. Roy cheon was a dance revue pre -
with Mr. Herbert H. Javnes, sen ted by young pupils of Mrs.
Marshal of the Grand Lodge' James L. Jarnagin, of Albrook
of Massachussetts, and Mrs. | A. F. B.
Jaynes arrived by plane early ->
Wednesday morning and are Vtoitor Returns To Arisona
guests at the Hotel Tlvoll. Mrs. Jack Mercer, the former
An official reception was held Hilda Vallarlno, daughter of Dr.
at seven forty five o'clock Wed- and Mrs. J. J. Vallarlno. left
nesday evening, at tn-acoMtoh yesterday to return-to her home
Rite Temple In Balboa by the In Phoenix, Arise*.
District Grand Lodge of thei -------
Canal Zone and was attended Guests At Hotel El Panama
by Past and Present Masters The President of the Garden;
and Wardens of the several State Association, Mr. E. Mori
lodges. and Mrs. Mori are recent ar-
A special meeting of Army, rivals on the Isthmus from
Darlen and Chagres Lodges was their home in Camelen. New
held at 8 p.m. Thursday at the Jersey, and are at guests at
Scottish Rite Temple in Balboa the Hotel El Panama.
at which time the Grand Mas- --------
ter witnessed the Exemplifies- Mr. Valdes Honored
tion of the Entered Apprentice On Birthday
Degree. Mr. Hector Valdes, Jr., was
Also on Thursday Mrs. Roy the guest of honor of the mem-
and Mrs. Jaynes were the guests bers of the staff of the Secret
of honor at a dinner given bv Police on Tuesday evening even-
the wives of members of the lng at a party given in cele-
Army, Darlen and Chagres bratlon of hto birthday anniver-
Lodges on the terrace of the sary.
Bella Vista Room of the Ho- --------
tel El Panama at 7 p.m. Re- World Club Elects Officers
presenting the Army Lodge The following officers were
we Mrs. W Gerhart, Mrs. recently elected by members of
Paul Jamesson and Mrs. Mc- the World Club; President. Miss
Donald: the Chagres Lodge Mabel Snelder; Vice-President,
ladles were Mrs. C. E. Priest, Mr. George W. Bates; Treas-
Mrs. T. McGulnness and Mrs. urer, Mr. Cecil Smith; Record-
F. Chollar; and the wives of lng Secretary. H. Jonas; Cor-
Darlen Lodge members were responding Secretary, Miss Car-
Mrs. C. Sorrell, Mrs. B. Wil- men Berguido; Parliamentarian,
Hams, and Mrs. E. Filer. Mrs. Cora Oliver; Historian. Mrs.
On Friday at 8 p.m. the Ca- Lilla Freeman and Hostess, Mrs.
nal Zone and Isthmian Lodges George W. Zates.
were hosts to the visiting lead- The World Club met Friday
er at a Fellow Craft meeting evening to discuss the visit of
thatw as held in the Ancon Winston Churchill to the Unl-
Masonlc Temple. ted States.
Make an
appointment
now, for one
of our
personalized
short cuts.
They're
young, casual
anoV.3wodir-
fully easy
to care for.
SEE OUR EXPERTS
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bldg.) Balboa
PANAMASMWJTa^fMjrfcmziw)
"-'Onumieaii Ctub
Takes great pleasure in announcing
the limited engagement of
M MARTIN'S ORCHESTRA
for your dancing pleasure
PLAYING NIGHTLY (except Monday"
IN THE POPULAR BAMBOO ROOM
VI8IT PANAMA'S POPULAR LATE SPOT
THE ZEBRA LOUNGE
Solando to mix your Kenny Adams at the piano
favorite drinks playing vour requests
WE SERVE THE BEST LUNCH IN TOWN
dally from 11 a.m. to S p.m
Quick Strvice------75c.------Generous Portions
consisting of a home made soup
Sntrre c-our choice) Salad Vegetables
Drink
We feature choice
STEAKS
CHOPS
CHICKEN
(any style)
SEA FOOD
Native dishes
HCL TOU 0QWN manage
stop worrying...
start linling!
Don't worry .about that
first gray strand! Lei it be a
"blessing in disguise"
signal to you to take action
and do something about ob-
taining lovelier, natural,
looking new hkircolor! So
relax and let Roux rake
over' For Roux Oil Sham-
poo Tint treatments conceal
every visible strand of dull
or gray hair, give sparkling
highlighrs and lustre, adds
subrle. wawal-lookmg color
that changes your worry to
delighr*
ROUX OIL
SHAMPOO TINT
COLORS CONDITIONS
CLEANSES
Caurion: use only as directed
on label.
iMMrltxiKK in UN IMaakttc tawi
M thr Canal taa*
JULIO VOS
No. I "A" Street
Telephone 2-2*71 Panam
COME AND HEAR
REV. VAN EARL HUGHES
Missionary to Costa Rica
SUNDAY, JANUARY 12,
COCOLI BAPTIST CHURCH
7:30 P.M.
of the
as
Despedida for Eric Ducruet
AiVinformal buffet supper was
eiven Wednesday evening by tne
Misses Blanca and Yolanda Be- (
verhoudt.and Jos Beverhoudt as
a -despedida" for Eric Ducruet
who left by plane yesterday for
an extended visit in Florida.
The other guests were: Mr.
and Mrs. Luis* Ducruet. Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Aubln. Mr. and Mrs.
jMtflMtat*iaaaa^^
Know your Bible and you'll come to know your Lord
SUNDAY. January 13th
Zrirst SapUil Canuten

HEIGHTS. CZ.
"LOVE SO AMAZING'* < Isa. 43 44)
"OTHER GOSPELS" (Oal. 1:6-10)
Second in Series on Oalatlans)
Special Music at Both Services.
Pastor W. H. Beebyspeaking. Radio ServiceHOXO760 Kc
come
We preach Christ
ryon*
Crucified Risen Comine, Again
<<< -
Let's go
I
to
I
with Lieut. Thomas, is visiting
Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Thomas. Sr.
of Gatun. was surprised with a
bridge party given Frldav eve-
ning by Mrs Semon Theriot and
Mrs! Leslie Croft at the Theriot
residence in Qatun.
The other guests were: Mrs G.
O. Thomas. 8r., Mrs. Walter
Skelstaitis. Mrs. George Poole,
Sr., Mrs. George Poole. Jr., Mrs.
T r Gibson, Mrs. F. W. Mills-
paugh. Mrs. Allen Flinn, Mrs R.
B Ward. Mrs. William Nessler,
Mrs Fred Schwartz. Mrs. Law-
rence Chambers, Mrs. Sallie
Foote Allen. Mrs. J. A. Cunning-
ham, Mrs. C. T. Swearingen and
Mrs. Jack Pearson. J
Mrs. Thomas received a guest
; prize of a crystal bowl from the
hostesses.
Isthmian Nurses Meet
At Elks Club
The Isthmian Nurses Associa-
tion met Wednesday evening for
dinner and a business meeting
at the Brazos Heights Elks Club
Miss Ann StrlcMer presided
and Introduced the retiring pres-
ident, Miss Winifred Seeley. who
installed the following officers-
president. Mrs. Arthur SprtngaH.
vice-president. Mrs. Edith Don-
aldson; 2nd vice-president. Miss
Catherine Kackefcn; secretary,
: Miss Elizabeth Marsh; treasurer,
Mr. Waldron Eldrldge.
I The members of the Board for-
the past year will serve during
1,The next meeting will1 be held'
' the first Wednesday in February
at the Wers Memorial Building j
in Balboa.
Farewell Cocktail Party
Mr and Mrs. Laurence Breece,
of Balboa, gave a cocktail party
at their residence on La foca
Road last evenlnR as a farewell
to Colonel and Mrs. James Pum-
nellv of Fort Gullck.
^The Atlantic side guesU were.
Mr and Mrs. Humberto Letena-,
dler, Lieut. Col. and Mrs. K. K.
rKolster, Major and Mrs^ Bvron.
King Major and Mrs. Joseph Ka-
" ffias. M^jor and Mrs. Roy Hay-
den Major Jerry McCarth>. cap
: tain and Mrs. John Hlpson, Mrs.
Charlotte Wlss, Lieut and Mrs.
William Coleman, Lieut, and Mrs
Victor Marques Dr. and M
Wayne Glider. Mr. and Mrs_ Mai
eel Grlngolre. and Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Hunnlcutt.
Fort Davis Woman's Club
"The^monthly meeting of
:5S KffWS^mcWers
SL with MM. James Thompson
and Mrs. Joseph Catania as host-
Jim for the morning of bridge
and the luncheon which follow-
edprizes for cards went to Mm
William Evler, and Mrs. Henry
Hartwfc. The door prize was won
%BFt&JEB& Presid-
ed at the business meeting, and
fnVoduced Mrs. Calvin Ellis as a
Oscar Barfleld Mra^ JaggJ
tens and Mrs. *g!*2SG5
The following committee chair
men were IntWdueed^HcapKM-
ity, Mrs. James Bowman Reser
vatlon. Mrs. Harry Green, Week-
ly Bridge. Mrs. James Berfn.
PubUrltv. Mrs. George Poole Jr.
and Sunday School. Mrs. John
Wiggs.
OfrCancno
PANAMA'S FINEST NIGHTSPOT
for

C^ochtall
a1
tnina
2>,
ancina
LUX THEATRE
BE LLAV 1ST A
\:M. 3:11. S:*S. 7:*. -_
The moat
enchanting and
lmasinativ*
picture of the
Century I
'THE TALES OF
HOFFMAN"
IN TOCHNICOLOR!
CECILIA THEATRE
Wast moat thrilling, adventure!
SANTA ft." "n Technicolor)
with R.indolph Scott Janla Carter
Also The lickrt tax-dodftn(
.ackets ever pulled 1
REVENl'E AGENT"
with Dnuglaa Kennedy Jean Willaa
TROPICAL
AaWOTT aad ( OSTF.I.I.O. In
"COMING ROUND
THE MOUNTAIN"
________wil K1BBV GWANT
BNCANTO^THEATRE
Gene Evans Steve
Brodie. In
"STEEL HELMET"
John Wayne, In
"Long Vcyoge Home"
TIVOLI THEATRE
Farley Granger Ruth
Roman in
"Stranrrrs On A Train"
v -' n'-- in
THE GREAT DIVIDE"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BOMBA The Jungle
Boy. in
"The Lion Hunters"

Reed Hadley. in
"Modern Marriage"
with Robert Clark____
VICTORIA THEATRE
~"4.TOM MAN vs.
SITEKMAV
. Also- -
TWO PICTURES!.
.





'
eagi six
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
M
aa-i---:
SATURDAY, JANUARY IS, 1*51
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru PA. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
tftVlS SKRV1C
>'.' Tiv.ill Air
ftlOSKo III I I SM.h
Psreur d> Lssset*
>ioKKi>ON"S
So 4 Fourth si Jab *?
hi.n -1MI T
BOIH. AKLTO.N
IM Melender Ai.
Pnone HS-Cels
SALON UK Hr.l 1 EZA AMERICAN!)
So U WmI I2tb Sirrt
l UK PANAMA AMERICAN
So S7 "H" StreetPanam
No 12.17 Central AveColea
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
Eisenhower Supporters File
In New Hampshire Primary
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE (MISCELLANEOUS
Automobile?
FOR SALE:9 cu. It. Coldspot 25
cycle' porcelain in ond, out, $100
00. Coll 84-3133.
Service Personnel ond
Civilian Government Employe
FINANCE
WIST BANK LADIIS. Expert beauty
service is conveniently ovoiloble in
the Genell Bliss Cocoll Club-
bous e Beauty, Shop,
through Saturday.
RESORTS
Tuesday
Phillip* Octonside cottage*. Sonto
Claro Box 435 Bilboo. Phona
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal d- 1673
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE:West.nghouse rcr.ger- y{HJf nfw Qi use{J cQr ,hrough
oor -9. cu. feet. 5I85.UU. c GOVMNMINT EMPLOYES FINANCI
>eors old. Qtrs. .8-C. Coco Soli- CQ
to. onytime.____________________ Fort Worth, lexos.
FCR SALE- Dc Luxe Serv! Gas Serving Government Employes ond.
Refrigerator. Gos Stove. Liv.ng- Service Personnel in the Canal Zonel
room Set. Dmmgroom Set. Silverjfo 14 yeor. With our financing !
City Heights 6' 51. apartment C 'your insurance automatically adjusted
POft SALELivinaroom set moho- t U. S. coverooe.
cany with spnng cush.ons. Window ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE
* csLns agnd sl,p covers. 2- \ THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
0e you have a sVinkifla roklam?
Write Alcoholic Assnymsus
Be* 2031 Aac*. C 2.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
4442.
DEALER
HOTEL PANAMERICANO In cool El
Valle. Reservation, telephone 2-
1112, Panama.
Williams Santo Clora Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms Frigldalras, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
Gromlich's Sonto Cloro beach-,
cottages Electric ice boxes, go:
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
FOR SALE; Several gas water-
heoters some in good condition.
Cheap. All America Cables ond H0TEL PAN-AMERICANO in cool
Radio. Inc.. Balboa. Canal Zone.
FOrTsALE- Smoir'upr.ght piano":FOR SALE:-Buying or selling an,Bids will be received in the office
auto/nobile? See Agendas Cosmos
Automobile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-
4721. Panama.
upholstered wing chair, pedal sew-
ing machine, playpen, high-choir
crib, carriage, baby stroller, ene-
msl wash basm. mixmaster. top
of even boter. large electric broil-
er, 'woffle iron, grill, roasting pan
Underwood typewriter, large scoot-
er."smoll scooter, tricycle. uice-O- F0* ?ALE:_-_ Cadillac Senes 61
mot. small metal dry food closet
Aprjly Riviera Apts. Melendez &
?:'. St. Colon, apartment 8.
FOR SALE:1940 Buick 2-door se-
dan, good running condition. 48-
A. 4th St.. Coco Slito.
FC.* SALE: Leaving for Stotes
Household effects including twe
refrigerators, new Victor Console
edito, fans, clerks, all 25 cycles
4ib-6 p.' m.. daily, cottoge 0314
Gable Heights, opposite Jardin Mi-
r- lores. ______________
FCV. SALE:60~Cycle Westinghouse
8. ft. efrigerator in guarantee.
De Luxe gas range. Excellent con-
dition. Miscellaneous' household
articles. .Coll 3-1252. evenings.
Help Wanted
black 1950 iStpt.) 4-door >edan
$3,225.00. Phone 88-786.
FOR SALE:1948 Chrysler "New
Yorker" Sedan, 5 new tires, per-
fect mechanicol condition. Bargain
Inquire "da. General de Seguror
S. A.," Plaza Herrera. Panamo.
Wf sTED:Nursemaid to take care
lf baby. Must sleep in. Inquire
5Cth-,5t No. 5. Apt,. 5.
WANTED:Good experienced, cook
svith recommendation. Must sleep
|r>. Good salary. Tel. 3-0405. Pon-
3m.
: WANTED
5 Miscellaneous
WANT-D:Terrece furniture, sec-
nd hand, in good condition. Tel
FOR SALE:1951 Codge "Coronel
Diplomatic" two tone, WSW tires
3.500 miles. Inquire "Inversione?
Generales S. A." No. 38, Jose
Francisco de la Ossa Avenue, Pan-
amo.
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF YOUR
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYE STATUS
ARMY NAVY and CIVILIAN EM-
POYES. YOU HAVE MONEY by
using the FEDERAL SERVICES FIN-
ANCE CORP (Washington D. C.)
facilities -available to you locally,
SEE US BEFORE you finance your
next new or used cor.
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE our
office is located at No. 29 on auto-
mobile Row or call Dan Pagento ot
Panama 2-4555.
of the Generol Manager, Commis-
sary Division, Mount Hope, Co-
ral Zone, until 3:00 p. m., Jan-
uary 22, 1952, when they will'
be opened in public, for oil or
part of a 25,000 pound lot of
poultry freed, consisting of brear/
flour with added inedible tank-
age. Inspection ond particular:
may be obtained ot the Commis-
sary Division Cold Storage office
Mount Hope, Canal Zone.
El. Valle. Reservations. Telephone
Panamo 2-1112.
FOR RENT
Houses

FOR SALE1950 Packard, refriger-
ator, toaster, rugs, tables, tricycle
miscellaneous. 1446-D, Owen, FOR RENT: 3 bedroom chalet
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom concrete
cotage at Sea Cliff Acres I Be-
linda Beach; near Sonta Clara
All tile floors, bath and roof and
cgr port olso furnished ncludinp
8 ft. Servel refrigerotor ond ou-
tomotic Tappan Gas stove. Sacri-
fice for $3.400.00 with terms.
See Anderson on Tract or Box
2616 Cristobol.
We have everything
to keep your Lawn
and Garden beautiful
during the dry season.
Tools
Hose
, Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrows
Insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
PAMEMA BROKERS. INC.
Bote' F' Panam
Selling: Abattoir. Panama
Forest (preferred). Clay Pro-
ducts. S. Fernando Clinic.
Tel. 3-4719 3-1660
Balboa 2-3715.
FOR SALE:Complete hobby shop
Power tools, all separate motors
25 cycle, hand tools, extra mo-
tors ond miscellaneous articles
395-C. Cocoli. Phone 2-1953.
FOR SALEOne Caterpillar Trader
D-7. Good condition. Los Andes
Quarry Tronsisthmian Rood.
FOR SALE:Collie pup, 41 St. No
13, Tel. 3-0384.
FOR SALE:1950 Chevrolet 4-door
sedan. House 0766-D. Williom-
son Place.
I
-0405 Aniomi.
"-Position Offered
FOR SALE:Practically new, Ford
1951 Radio and Chevrolet 1948
radio and ports. Goroge "Cuba"
in front of Ameglio Iceplant No
8. Juan B. Sosa St.
Spert:s15-nglish speaking young girl
4th knowledge of bookkeeping
bid stenography to assist in of-
' |e. Telephone Alhambra Apart-
nts 1386. Colon.
i
.red Position
D^RT Spanish-English Secretary-
Steno. Experienced Executive and
Correspondent. Excellent record
A hite Ponamonion. Give full par-
ti ulars solary ond position open
Write to E. S. Box 134. Panama
;
LCf~n"
r& FOUND
Balboa commissary vici-
tlty, woven shopping bag with
irious /identifying
Jard to finder, col
-t
papers. Re-
2-2729, Bal-
Corelcss Jamaican
Foreman Injured
By US Navy Pickup
Wesley Beckles. Jamaican
foreman for the Maintenance
Division living ai 322 Chilibre
a Injured yesterday on the
rigrjt knee whe,n he was struck
by a Navy pickup truck operated
by, 'Thomas Kolonsky. Navy
civilian guard supervisor.
FOR SALE:1939 Packard 8 radio
Good condition, see it Saturday
and Sunday. Gamboa. House 167
B. Phone 6-249, J. Morris.
FOR SALE1940 Oldsmobile. $185
00. Can be seen across from Ga-
tun Post Office.
FOR SALE:M. G. Sport Roadster.
1951 5,000 miles. Perfect
condition. Telephone 2-1800 un-
til 5 p. m. House 0590 Mindi St.
Ancon. 2-3627, evenings.
FOR SALE:I 1-4 litre MG spe-
cial 4-seat tourer model. Newly
laquered Alfa red, new block top
hprns, built-in hydraulic jocks, i
f. s.. back-seat cover. Only MG
of this type on the Isthmus. Stand-
ard RPAG engine. Deams. Quarter;
35. Albrook. Phone 86-3108.
FOR SALE: 195f~Ford~Victoria.
two tone green, radio, overdrive
undercooted. See ot Curundu
2038, phone 83-7194 Saturday
ofternoon and Sunday.
maid's room, garage. No. 76 Jus-
to Arosemeno Avenue, between
38th and 39th Streets. Phone Pan-
omq 3-3305.
FOR RENT

Apartments

Mothers, JUMPING-JACK Children
shoes give young feet the right ....f
start, from crodle to 4 yeors. sold h^K *!';
exclusively at BABYLANDIA. No
40. 44th Street, Bella Visto. Tel
3-1259.
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobol. telephone 1386 Colon.
cOR SALEElectric ironer, 25 cycle
Modern apartment
two bedrooms. Ilvingroom, kitchen
etc.. $100. House No. 2, 41 St.
corner of Cuba Avenue. Apply
Quijano, 8th Street No. 15. Pon-
ama.
565. Deep sea fishing tackle, $25.iCrib doit c ~1
One table, $4. Phone 2-3021 F0R Furnished or unfur-
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUILT
Slipcover Reupbolstery
VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto Here*
""I' Osss 77 (AatsoMblls Row)
Free Estimate Pickup A Dslhrsn
Tel *-4KS K:ae m lo 1:M Dm
House 434-A,
Ancon.
Frangipani street*
nished apartment, 2 bedrooms ond
garage. Carrasquilla 642, Son
Francisco. Tel. 3-4418.
FOR SALE:Man's gray top coat
sii* 44, worn one month $25. Car
heater $10. 104-X. Gamboa.
FOR SALE
Boat* & Motors
FOR RENT: Apartment. Living-
diningroom. bedroom, kitchen, ser-
vice, $40.00. First, street in front
San Fernando Hospital 'Corros-
quilla). 4th house left hond No
390-A.
FOR SALE16 ft. Boot Sea-Mite
20 H. P. Marine Engine 4 Cycle
excellent condition. Con be seen
at Cristobal Yacht Club or phone
John Allgoier, Cristobal 3-2486
FOR SALE:25 foot Cris-Craft. ex-
cellent condition, new 95 HP
motor. Demonstration Sunday from
noon to 6 p. m. ot Balboa Yacht
Club pier. See No. 530 "Amber"
or call 446 Colon daily.
FOR RENT
Room
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, cos'
eerirelv raaovarao ana well fur-
niihed. Rates reosenable. lacha-
lera ealy Inquire at The Ame-
rican Club feeing Oe Lessees
Park.
FOR SALE:Pockord 1941 Sedan
new tires, good transportation
first $100 tokes it. Phone 2-2786
Lux Novelties No. II. J. Street
FOR SALE: 1950. Rocket "88"
Oldsmobile. Coll owner Navy 3231
MUST SELL Ford Panel. Very gooc"
condition, $550 only. "B" Ave.
No. 83 or phone 2-2772, .Pan-
ama.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR RENT:Furnished room with
meals. Telephone 3-3921, No.
34. 45th Street, Panami.
Precious
MEMORIES
Preserved Forever!
Baby's first shoes preserved forever
In solid metal bronze make a match-
leu .if! Ttus smart miniature oval
plinto f'sms'snd baby shoe combi-
narlo style 628 M0 85. Larger bast
with iwo- shoes, *tyle 29 sT-iJS,
Other styles from $3.75
WRITE FOR DETAILS I
DUNMORE AGENCY
Estafeta Instituto Nacional
Panam R.P
DYING DRY CLEANING
GENERAL LAUNDRY
TROPICAL CLEANERS
Plant: #830 Via Espaa. Tel.
3-0871. Branch: 24th St. it
Central Ave. Tel. 2-1346
CONCORD, N. H., Jan. 12 (UPI
Led by Gov. Sherman Adams,
six supporters of Gen. Dwlght
D. Eisenhower yesterday filed
as candidates for the 1962 Re-
publican national convention.
Two others, one a Democrat
and one a backer of Gen. Doug-
las Mai-Arthur, also entered the
March 11 primary race first
test of strength for Presidential
hopefuls this year.
Supporters of Sen. Robert A.
Taft (R., O.) and former Min-
nesota Gov. Harold E. Stassen
shied away from the first-day
filing.
There was no sign of support
for California's. Gov. Earl War-
ren, he only other avowed can-
didate for the Republican Pres-
idential nomination.
All of the Eisenhower backers
filed as "favorable" to the gen-
eral a position which does
not require specific permission
from the proposed candidate.
In addition to choosing dele-
gates to the conventions, New
Hampshire voters may express
a preference for a Presidential
candidate.
Gov. Adams was expected to
file a petition next Tuesday
which would place Elsenhower's
name on the ballot for that
purpose.
Under New Hampshire law
the general would have to give
Commercial Traffic
Through Pan Canal
Highest Since 1939
Commercial traffic through
the Panama Canal during the
past your was the highest since i
1939, according to statisties from
the Management Division.
During the year that ended
Dec. 31, a total of 5,868 ocean!
going vessels of 300 net tons ori
more transited the Canal, the
highest since the 1939 calendar;
year when there were 5.928
transits. Transits in the 1950
calendar year totaled 5,852.
Transits during December to-
taled 550, the highest since
1939 when 553 ocean-going com-
mercial vessels went through the
Canal. There were 452 transits,
by large commercial vessels in'
December 1950.
Tolls for the past calendar
year amounted to $24,651.886.26.
excluding credits o $1,404.031.66
for the period from July 1 to
Dec. 31. for the passage of Gov-.
ernment vessels which transited
the Canal free before the estab- j
lishment of be new Pauamaj
Canal-Company the first of July.)
Tolls for 1950 totaled $25 124,-
102.96.
During the month of Decem-
ber, tolls totaled $2 592,438.12,
including a credit for Govern-
ment vessels of $245,844.38. Total
tolls for December 1950 amount-
ed to $1,885,813.24.
his explicit permission within i in which Stassen wounfi up iec-
10 days after the petition was'ond to Thomas E. Dewey.
filed. The period for proposing stassen was believed, how-
a candidate ends Jan. 30.'ever, to have lost some of hia
Would-be delegates may file nn-i 1948 strength to Elsenhower and
. '. 9-. iSo the prospect was for a battle
A last-minute communication' between the Ohio Senator and
from Sen. Taft was believed to the general
have advised his supporters to
postpone temporarily their fil-
ing.
Louis C. Wyman of Man-
chester appeared at the sec-
The candidates "favorable" to
Eisenhower were Gov. Adams;
former U. S. Rep. roster
Stearns; Harold Young of Pitts-
field, chairman of the state
retary of state's office and said Eisenhower movement- Robert
he was about to file as a Taft P. Burroughs, former GOP
delegate. But he left after re- national commltteeman- former
celvlng a telephone call. |Gov. Robert O. Blood of Con-
It was reported that Taft cord and Harry p. Smart of
advised against a show of Ossipee.
strength utnll after a two-day | First man to file was Dart-
New Hampshire visit by two of mouth College Prof. Emeritus
his field captains John D. M. Charles A. Holden of Hanover,
Hamilton, former chairman ofian avowed MacArthur support-
the Republican National Com-!er though he sought to run un-
mittee, and John B. Holllster, pledged.
the Senator's law partner. I The first Democrat to file was
Hamilton and Holllster will Frank Sullivan, a Manchester
start a survey of Taft's .strength labor leader who wUl run un-
on Monday.
The plans to Stassen likewise
were uncertain until after he
confers tomorrow in Boston
with John W. Gulder, Little-
ton attorney who managed the
1948 New Hampshire campaign
pledged.
New Hampshire RepuWlcaru
will send .14 delegates to the
National convention July 7.
The Democrats will end fa
delegates with 8 votes to their
July 21 convention.

Bull Fight
iu "LA MACARENA RUNG"
'

SUNDAY 13 at 4 p.m.
(San Francisco Garden)
y,
Atlantic Society...
'Continued Prom Pner PIVE>
FOR SALE:Two lots in Santa Cla- __
ro opposite residence of Ernesto ?P-beilaif 0i the ^ff. presented
Maduro. For information write
Box 204, Ancon. Canal Zone.
Coraas Surgeons
To Give Lectures
At MDs Meeting
OPPORTUNITY:
Acquire beautiful 1.700 M* lot at
only B.I.50 per M*. Los Cumbres
Arrange for inspection
RIAL ESTATE CENTER
Tel. 3-4512 Sundoy 3-2969
FOR SALE2500 M* of the choicest
property in Las Cumbres. Over-
looking "Gringo Town." Call Pan-
ama 3-1107.
FOR ALE: 1949 Pockord. Four-
Door Sedan. Duty paid. Excellent
condition. New tires. Phone Bal-
. boo 3103.
The accident occurred at 12:55 xD -.,-------;----------------
p.m. about 100 yards north of F Ford 4I new mo,or
paint, tires. Best offer. One oak
dinette. 4 choirs, toble. buffet &
mirror. 78-D, Coco Slito.
the'Pedro Miguel Gun range on
Galllard Highway.
Beckles is reported to have
attempted to crass the road and !
to,have stepped in front of the!
pickup which was going north.'.
He* was taken to Gorgas Hospital. PRIVATE LESSONS:English. Spon-
The cause of the accident was sh. French. German, from 9 o. m
credited to his carelessness. till 2 p. m. Box 1475.
LESSONS
FOR SALE:Ideal country home
concrete, city conveniences, fruit-
ed, fenced land. Owner leaving
Moke offer. Phone 1283-J. Co-
lon.
FOR SALE
rtfotorcvcle*
FOR SALE:Ariel single, 500 c.c.
2.000 miles. Mc llvoine 1440-B
Owen 5t. Bolboa'or 2-3518.' $500
cosh.
1;.??1 % ?, wrlst ,wat?n and! A lecture on "the operative
g -, "e,van alligator bag.i repair of harelip" bv Dr. E. C
i.J*J*9eyshavebeenapopu-jLowry of Gorgas Hospital, will
rSrw tiast couple They sail be one of the features of a Isth-
22528 '...? ^"S f.or an ** mlan Canal Zone Medical As-
tended stay in the States. sociation meeting Tuesday at
BtffiTEfVS'ff*1*1 InsUation of officers for
rrutnhni .7mM v o n 1952 w,u ^ he'd ** the
Hernfth/L^hnifL?0;i2'K0!': Tuesday meeting which will
der of the Rainbow for Girls, held take place at the Gorgas Me-
morial Laboratory.
Other features on the pro-
gram will be a surgical treat-
ment case report on subclavjan
an election of officers at their
meeting at the Cristobal Mason-
ic Temple Thursday evening.
Miss 8afah Rowley, Wortv Ad-
viser, presided at the meeting mei ase "2"*" "' suociayan
The folWiK of fleers were elept aneurysm and motion picture
^Worthy Adviser Hal rl HL" c,olor ot ^ ^malectomy
flth; Worthy Associate Advisor bv } members of the surgical
Ardis Wllloughb-y; Charity. Mar-i|sectlon oi a<*M Hospital
t ha Grahamo Hope, Mildred Mar-
quard; Faith, Nancy Kariger;
Recorder, Nellie Holgerson, and
Treasurer, Louise Edmondsen.
The officers and members of
the Rainbow Board will be in-
stalled January 24 at an open
Installation. FORT DAVIS Headquarters,
j764th AAA Gun Battalion, Fort,
Following the election, a mis-'Davis, today announced the nro-
Army Ups Grades
Of Four Soldiers
Registrar |
La Salle Extension
University of Chicago
P.O. 2053 Panam Tel. 2-3246
Care of
AGENCIAS CENTRALES
A. S. BARHAM. JR.
REGISTRAR
BULLS

In honor of
Dr. ALVIN SHOLK,
M.D., U.S. Army,
who will preside
the fight
#*uBMar2 aii".fs*.-
"Eduardo
de Valencia"
FIRE
For
INSURANCE
SEE
V
OYDMOTHMf.mc
De Lessens Park
Tel: 2-7008 MM

Tickets on Sale at
San Francisco Garden
PRICES:
SHADE:
Box Seats ........$3.00
General Admittance. 2.00
SUN:
Box Seats ........$2.00
General Admittance. 1.00
"JoseMllo
de Colombia''
HEREDITARY?
Un-m fci* science li,,,
new hep* rer cancer cure/
At last, new tests show that
certa in types of cancer bey
the laws of heredity! Read all
bout this promising new dis-
covery in our war on mankind's
most dread disease.
I" *s Jan. Ill NOW ON SALI
Comer*
Price: 15c.
cellaheous surprise shower was
?iven for Mrs. Robert Wllford,
ormerly Mlsy Carol Harvey.
Barbecue Supper. Party
Mr. and Mrs. H. S. White, of
Brazos Heights, gave a barbecue
supper party, on their lawn last
evening to honor Mr. and Mrs.
Harold A. Bailey.
The other guests were: Mr. and
Mrs. W. E. Adams, Mr. and Mrs.
Anthony F. Raymond. Mr. and
Mrs. H. H. Lewis. Miss Frances
Moomaw and James C. Roberts. I
Arnold Riley Dies,
Funeral Tomorrow
Arnold Riley, 70, retired Pa-
nama Canal employe, dledv in
Santo Tomas Hospital after a
brief Illness and will be burled
tomorrow in the Jardin de Paz
Cemetery.
Funeral services for Riley, a
Barberlian. will de held tomor-
i, row afternoon at 3 In the chapl
of the hospital. He is survived
by his wife Mrs. Alberta Riley
and two daughters, Beulah and
Beatrice Riley.
motion In grade of four soldiers.
Those promoted were: Monte;
B. Green to Master Sergeant;
Roberto Ayala Colon to Sergeant
First Class; and Teodoro Burgos
and Douglas E. Murphy to Ser-
geant.
(Jtdft
*JtV
THE WH0LI
OIL! 0VEI
CENTRAL THEATRE
TODAY!
JOHN HOWARD DAVIS
ROEERT NEWTON, in
"OLIVER TWIST"
of the
world's most
cherished
story comes
brilliantly
to life.
WEDNESDAY 16TH
PRE RELEASE!'
FIRST TIME AT
POPULAR PRICES
U
THURSDAY!
WEEK END RELEASE!
SKY-SHATTERING STORT
OF MARINE AIR-DEVILS!
M s.t
CUUsKUM
OSE'FERRER
ACADEMY AWARD
W INIilK because
ft* was the tbr musketrt
in on*... and on*
/over in a million I
tirano
H0WAPD H4il.hi
MALA POWERS:
asMltaMHMkk
JOHN WAYNF
ROBERT RYAN ',
FLYING 'I
LEATHERNECKS
jay c. menu
WIlllAM HAItMMM


SATURDAY. JANUARY It, IMS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE

Manager Slugs Referee Following T.K.O. Verdict
"r*v
This
Is Little League
LEAGUE SPIRIT vs. TEAM
SPIRIT
The Little League Program Is
a neighborhood project. Herein
lies its true worth and value.
The smallest unit is a four-team
league organized and operated
by a neighborhood group with-
in a community. Everything
possible should be done
velop and maintain a
pint.
The league should be the pri-
mary interest. Team spirit will
generate of its own accord be-
cause of competition on the
playing field. The interests of
the league are far more Impor-
tant than those of its member
teams. A member can (with-
out endangering his team's
standing) work for the league's
success and thus be a credit to
his neighborhood and hence to
his community.
SUNDAY BASEBALL
NIGHT BASEBALL
- It is strongly recommended
that all Little League games,
whether regular or exhibition,
be played only on weekdays and
before sundown, preferably at
principia of Little League Base-
princlpl eof Little League Base-
ball since Its founding.
USE OP LITTLE LEAGUE
NAME
No one shall be allowed to
use the name of Little League
or operate under this name un-
less "sanctioned" by National
Headquarters of Little League
Baseball, Inc., Williamsport,
Pennsylvania.
and we ask your cooperation in
seine that they are carried
out in your local community
activities.
From time to time, new situa-
tions pertaining to individual
localities and Individual condi-
tions present themselves. Re-
cently two of these clrcums-
to de- tances came to us for decision
league and we have, therefore, elected
to define our rulings on these
so that, should similar situa-
tions arise in your community,
you will have our "policy" rul-
ings on these phases.
MULTIPLE MANAGEMENT
The crux of Little League suc-
cess Is wrapped In several Im-
portant factors:
(a) Manpower.
(b) Playing Fields.
(c> Adequate opportunity for
all eligible boys to play regard-
less of race or creed.
With this in mind, the follow-
ing policy on league manage-
ment was adopted: Multiple
Cristobal High
Whips JC 34-21

Cristobal High bounced right
Into the middle of the turbulent
Canal Zone Interscholastic Bas-
ketball League race last night
when they defeated the Junior
College quintet 34 to 21. Arnold
Manning proved to be the spark
that finally fired the Tigers and
allowed them to pull away In the
fourth quarter in what until then
had been a nip and tuck game.
With the score standing at


Emergency Meeting Slated
Bv 'Box9 Commission Today
Games Scheduled For Balboa*
Colon Today; Yanks Triumph
Management shall be permitted with a 12 to 13 count. The Tigers
that is, several leagues un-
der the same top management;
Provided, each league has its
own individual management
made up of the men who ac-
tually operate these
leagues:
NEW YORK, Jan. 12.(UP)Before today's
emergency commission meeting opened, Chairman
Robert K. Christenberry of the New York Boxing
Commission threatened to "bar for life" manager
Tommy Ryan for his rowdy actions after last night's
fight at Madison Square Garden.
Ryan slugged referee Ray Miller after Miller
awarded Ernie Durando a technical victory over
i-2o"for CHS as trie fourthquar.! A van's middleweight, Rocky Castellani, in 2:04 of
&^h!f wd^a^wa^boui the seventh round. Later, matchmaker Al Weil of
' the International Boxing Club was slugged in Cas-
tellan i's dressing room when Ryan was present.
Weill claimed he was attacked so quickly by
four men "he could not see who they were." He was
knocked down and kicked in the ribs. His right
cheek was bruised and his glasses broken.
Christenberry suspended Ryan indefinitely and
ordered Castellanas purse held up pending today's
meeting. The irate chairman said he wold revoke
Ryan's manager's license for life and consider ad-
vice from the Commission's attorney about having
Ryan arrested for assault on Miller.
all there was to it. He was aided
by buckets from his teammates
Sklppy Anderson and Roy Wil-
son, but for the most part It was
Manning who fired up his ball
club and brought them on to a
victory.
It was a low scoring contest
until things opened up a bit In
the fourth, as the first quarter
score found Cristobal with a one-
point, 7-8 lead. In the second
Juarter neither team was able to
o much scoring, and half time
found the Tigers still in the lead
pulled away a bit as the second
naif began to move on, as they
began to open up with an occa-
sional fast break.
By virtue of their win last
several: night, the Tigers paved the way
for the big showdown battle
Provided, also, that the fran-: Tuesday night at the Balboa
chise holders for the several Gym when they tangle with the
The policies defined In the
preceding paragraphs are, for
the most part, the ones that
will come up for discussion and
decision in the everyday man-
agement and operation of local
Little Leagues.
We believe we have clear!
interpreted our thinking on
these for the guidance of local
Leagues are able to furnish ade-
quate manpower;
That they can provide playing
fields;
That adequate opportunities
are given all boys of eligible age
who wish to play;
That the franchise holders
have programs of constant ex-
pansion within the limits of
population.
The Board of Director; re-
serves the right to withdraw
or cancel such franchises if,
its judgment, the obfectlves of
Little League, as set forth in
the preceding paragraphs, are
league leading Balboa Bulldogs.
In the only league game played
date, between the Tigers and the
Bujldogs, the Balboa lads won a
spine tingling overtime contest,
44-42. Earlier in the year, CHS
had defeated the Bulldogs hand-
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Yankees........12 S .7M
Bombers........ I 1 MS
Blnebirds....... I 7 .513
Brownies....... 4 13 .135
College Hoop Results
TODAYS GAMES
Coln Stadium (4:3* p.m.)
Bluebirds (Nirolis t-J) vs Brown-
ies (Clark 3-4).
TONIGHTS GAME
Balboa Stadium (7:34) Bomb -
ers (Smith 1-4) vs Yankees (Ne-
ville 3-2).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Alt. HopeYanks 11, Bombers C
(Thursda* Night)
EAST
6. St.
t. Ntrbsft
Local Rate Baseball League
Planning On Better Season
By VICTOR M. CAREW
O
Uy.
Balboa sits on top right now,
Officials of the Canal Zone
Amateur Baseball League have
ers from their roster, in the per-
sons of Stanley Arthurs, Spur
Cola hurler, and Joseph Best,
property of the same club, but
currently on an inactive status.
Last season's La Boca Olbral-
leagues as the questions arise'not being observed.

by
JOE WILLIAMS
expressed great optimism on the
outcome of the new season
but the Tigers have some defln- scheduled to begin tomorrow
lte Ideas about this, and will be when Silver City Powells, last
out to even the standings all up season's champions, will square tar Life Insurance will change
it two wins and a loss for each,0ff against the powerful Colonel Uta name now that the club is
ln I school by end of game time nextiRemonteam from La Boca at the) backed by Jos A. Remn, for-
Tuesday night. Isthmian basket-, Mt. Hope Park, at 9:30 jn. mer National Police Chief of Pan-
ball fans are urged to get there ( The presentation of trophies i ama. This club has managed to
early for good seats at the game, ^d other prizes to last season's keep all of Its better players to-
between the two high schools t leading clubs and Individual
Tuesday night at the Balboa players will form a part f the
snappy inaugural ceremony that
has been arranged.
EN ROUTE TO CINCINNATIPutting ene Httle word after
another and whatever became of your New Year's resolutions?
The Yankees may deal with the Detroit Tigers for Even or Wertt,
outfielders. They've decided the Red Sox are going to keep Ted
Williams. Obviously Tom Fool will be the winter book favorite
to win the Derby, provided the shadowy publishers Issue one.
Here's the low-down on top baseball pay. Until official figures
were introduced at Washington hearings !tst fall. It was popular-
ly believed Ted Williams led with $125,000 and DIMaggio (J.) fol-
lowed with an even $100,000. The official figures revealed major-
loague salaries ranged from $5000 to $90,000; technically the
figures are correct. Actually DIMaggio received $100,000 but he
collected (for income tax purposes) in two checks. $90,000 salary,
$10.000 expenses. Williams' base pay Is approximately $90,000 plus
bonus based on attendance. My information is that this total take
went over $100,000 only once under (tus arrangement. In any
case, he has never had a contract calling for $125,000, or any-
where close to It.
* *
Mr. Churchill says America never ceases to amase him. May-
be what he has in mind Is how we can jettison met. like Mac-
Arthur and DIMaggio and still hope to survive. Washington tailors
are working on a new model for influence peddiers who have Fair
Deal officials in their hip pockets. Every year is leap year for
pedestrians. Pal Joey has finally decided to enter the Olympics,
and just wait until he learns he can't bring along his own re-
ferees, storekeepers and rule makers. Mayor Impelllttcri has bis
critics bat nobody can say he isn't the best press agent Sugar
Ray Robinson ever had. The valor of that young fellow firm-
ing to bring his ship to port across the sea makes you hesitate a
little longer about giving up your stock in the human raee.
* *
Lou Little, Columbia mentor, is on the train, headed for the
Coach-of-the-Year dinner and football tkecut've sessions. "Looks
like we did all right In the Chlantl Bov/1, eh.' be greeted two
ports writers. Along with six other neutral coaches Little exam-
ined films of Princeton and Tennessee .ames and picked Dick
Kazmaler over Hank Lauricella as the year's best all-around back.
After which Kazmaler made the panel !.ok good by starring in
the East-West game while Lauricella v/as topped cold ln Sugar
Bowl, being held to one yard net gain from scrimmage. Why the
Chiantl Bowl? It was held ln Leone's whv ceUar.
* '
"Whatever became of Torch) Peden?' The old six-day bike
racer takes pen in hand and duly informs me he's located in West
Pitlston, Pa, promoting stoek car races. Has three youngsters
Carol, 5 months, Alice 33 months and Bill lr., SH years) and doing
aU right. Still interested in bikes... "I'm also associated with Al
Scbelstraete who runs a portable bike track in Ontario. His re-
cent nine-day meet (three hours a day, six-day bike style) was
a big success. Don't be surprised if the old sport makes a smash-
ing comeback.' Comment: Why not? Vaudeville, the square dance
and the sanese bunt came back last year and didnt I read where
college boys had started eating gold fish again?
Gym. The two Junior varsity
teams will tangle in a prelimin-
ary game starting at 6:45, with
the big battle to follow.
Atlantic Pony
League Underway
The Atlantic Pony League
opened at Margarita on Jan. 7,
with Buick beating the C. P. O.
Chiefs, 10 to 3. The game was
featured by a home run over the
center field fence by Mickey Ma-
tos of Buick.
The second game of the young
season was won by Margarita
over the Shkmrocks, 8 to 5. This
game had a total of four homers,
two by Gonzlez and one each by
Hodges and Custer.
The schedule for the week of
Jan. 15-19 is as follows:
TuesdayShamrocks vs. C.P.O.
4:30 p.m., at Margarita.
Thursday Margarita vs.
Buick, 4:30 p.m., at Margarita.
SaturdayBuick vs. C.P.O.,
200 p.m., at Coco Slito! Marga-
rita vs. Shamrocks, 2:00 p.m., at
Margarita.
Game of Jan. 9:
SHAMROCKS AB
Palumbo, 3b........ 3
Newhard, b........ J
Pabn, rf..........
Silver City Powells are defin-
itely not expected to retain their
title this season because of the
gether and although they finish-
ed in the runner-up slot behind
Powells, they were the pre-sea-
son favorites among baseball ob-
servers.
Silver City Sports
GIRLS INTRAMURAL
SOFTBALL LEAGUE
'
Robinette, lb.
Orvis, cf......
Custer, p......
Favorite, c ..
Wetzel, If........
Rodriguez, E ss.
2
2
3
2
1
2
AB
R
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
It doesn t build muscle but throwing 'he rascals out is a good
exercise in moral lndlgation. Overheard "He can't take It with
him and if he could it would melt." Han* Qreenberg says he likes
to get the Yankees' goat but Cleveland fns would probably be
rauSn more '"'erested ln their jcalp. West Point only 150 years
old? It must be longer than that since Dorias threw that fa-
mous pass to Rockne. It might be easier to effect a truce if the Olsen, 2b
Koreans wouldn't have to go back to the miseries of peace. De- Cox, cf..
partment; of'fascinating Intelligence: The best arc-light hitter ln
baseball In 51 was Dark. Naturally our Olympic gal divers will
be expected to feature the plunging neckline.
Four other bribe takerp en Kentucky basketball teams of re-
cent seasons are known by the D. A.'s office but Vefuse to co-
MARGARITA
Rankln, If..........
Dougan, 2b.......... J
Prez, 2b.......... 3
Wllllford, as........ 3
George, cf..........
Hodges, p........... '
Oonsalez, rf........ $
Albright, lb........ 2
Tobln, c.......... *
Smith, E.. Sb .. 2
Shamrocks 5 0 0 0 0 5
Margarita 4 01 2 2 x8
Home Runs GonsAlez 2. Hodg-
es. Custer. Two Base HitTobln.
Stolen BasesPalumbo, Pabn,
Robinette, Rankin, Willlford 3,
George. Struckout byCuster 6,
Hodges 4. Winning Pitcher-
Hodges. Losing PitcherCuster.
UmpiresHughes and Curtis.
Game of Jan. 7
C.P.O. CHIEFS
Hamilton, lb, p..
McJennett, rf.. ..
Ramsey, ss
The bluest surprise of last
, year was the third place finish of
absence of two outstanding play- Cervecera Nacional from Paral-1
so. When this club submitted its
application for entry to the
league, it was at first rejected
because the general feeling
among the members of the Board
was that this club was too weak
for its rivals. It was, however, re-
luctantly admitted and went on
to embarrass those league offi-
cials who had earlier opposed ac-
ceptance of its entry application.
Red Tank Spur Cola and Ale-
mn, Jr., of Santa Cruz both fail-
ed to Uve up to expectations, and
along with Chagres occupied the |
second division of the league last
season. However, considerable
Colon, captained by Amelia: improvement Is expected of these
Herbert, collected, 12 runs on 10, ciubs as managerial changes
hits against Cocle, captained by have been made and this is ex-
State 42
Williams 35, Cbamplain 43
Brackport State $7, U4iea College
SS
St. Anselm's 73, Grenier (NH)
AFB44
Bethany (W.Va ) at Westminis-
ter, postponed.
-------- SOUTH
Baseball fans on both sides of fjj. Wesleyan 73, Georgetown
the Isthmus will have an oppor- (Ky.) $1
tunity to see baseball today as Jacksonville (Ala.) 5$, Snead JC
the Pro League has games sched- S8
uled for both the Coln Stadium Livingston State SI, Craig Field
and the Balboa Stadium. This: (Ala.) 47
Middle Tenn. 54, Birmingham- I
Platteville (WIs.) S3,
M
Chicago Loyola 6$, St. John's St. Porcopius 43, Nerthwestesm
(Bkn.i $4 College $
Dak* 74, NYU 72 East. IU. 97, Central Michigan ST
Seton Hall 80. Creighton 44 Wooster M, Koyea 58
Penn State 1, Syracuse 57 | Ohio Northern $1, Otterbeia 14)
Binghampton Tech 51, Oneonta1
SOUTHWEST
Ha rdin- Simmons 12, Texas West*
em M
SW Toxas $1, McMurry 44
FAR WIST
San Francisco 51, La. A. Loyola 44
Eastern Montana 93, Alberta 74
i. A. State 49, Santa Barbara 41.
Fight Results
afternoon the Bluebirds and
Brownies will tangle at the Coln
Stadium while tonight the
Bombers and Yankees will have
a return engagementat the Bal-
boa Park.
Last night the Yankees out-
slugged the Bombers for an 11-6
decision. The Yanks blasted out
18 safeties against ten for the
losers.
Jim Cronln led the free hitting
parade with two homers, a dou-
ble and a single. Cronln tied the
league record for most homers ln
a single game, also the most ex-
tra base hits and total bases11.
Another league record was tied
When the two teams completed
six doubleplaysthree each.
The Yankees also set two new
records when they got five extra
base hits ln a single inning for 13
total bases. This was the fourth
inning when the Yankees got
Sou. it
No. Georgia 64, Piedmont 61
Louisiana Coll. 62, La. Tech 69
Halliburton Cmtrs. $3, Cameron
Aggies 58
SE Louisiana 59. Centenary 48
Lincoln Mom. (Tenn.) 4$, Austin -
Peay 44
Morgan State 63. Howard 59
East. Ky S(, Tennessee Tech 64
Kentucky State 57, Lincoln (Mo.)
59
Maryland 55, Georgetown (DC)
West. Maryland 68, Ml St. Mary's
Virginia 89, Virginia State 69
Roanoke 77, Virginia Tech 74
Wake Forest 55, NC 53 (overtime)
Marshall 75, More head (Ky.) 89
Union (Ky.) 92, Centre 79
Bridgewater 86, Alumni 85
'MIDWEST
Hamline 58, St. Olaf 4 9
(Thursday Night)
CEDAR RAPIDS, la.
Flanagan, 128, St. Paul, knocked
out Eddie MIRoa. 128, Omaha, 4.
NEW BEDFORD. Mas.Fred-
dy Holmstead, 131. Springfield,
Mas outpointed Manuel Batis-
ta. 131, NCW Bedford. 8.
NEW YORK (SaaayaMe Gar-
den)Ralph (Tiger) Jones, 154,
Yenkers, N.Y. and Bobby Uev*.
1451, New York, drew, 8.
PHILADELPHIAGeorge Bea-
ton, 154, Philadelphia, outpoint-
ed HoUy Miau, 15'... Washing-
ton. 8.
SPOKANE, Wssh. Bobby
Weeds, 128. Spokane, stopped
Marlin Edwards, 128, Seattle, 8.
four runs that practically sewed Gustavos Adoiphas (Minn.) 52,
The opening of the Girls' In-
tramural Softball League, direct-
ed by the Physical Education 8c
Recreation Branch of the Divi-
sion of Schools, went off with a
bang. Gwendolyn Layne threw
the first ball.
up the game.
Manager Al Kubskl and Scoot-
er Koshorek also had a happy
night at the plate. Kubskl got
four for five while Koshorek gar-
nered three safeties ln four trips
to the plate. For the losers Peps
Osorlo was the leading hitter
with three for five.
Dave Thomas, who got relief
help from Marlon Frtcano, was
the winning pitcher. Connie
Johnson was the loser. Thomas
now has a S-0record while John-
son has dropped five decisions
against only two wins.
Augsburg 59
Marvville (ND) 7$, Dickinson
(ND) 74
Northern (ND) Tchrs. 83, Sioux
Falls 59
BaU State 63, EransviUe 59
Huntington 65, Trl-State 64
Indiana State 71, DePauw 58
Earlhasa 83, Manchester 62
Wheaton 74, Carthage 49 m
III. State Normal 89, Mich. Nor-
mal 64
Lesas 88, Upper Iowa 52
West. III. 58, So. Illinois 89
Pena 82, Hiram 58
Ashland 88, Bluff ton 6$
TAGAROPULOS
INDUSTRIES, &A.
PS, PhM
4%|$JglO02 100J
4041 Feo. Boya Ave.
Coln R. P
o FRESH MILK
o FRESH 101719)
o RICH ICE CREAM
everything
taspeerai by the
ealtb Deparreaeat
HOME DELIVERY ,
Gloria Brown, with 9 runs on 7
hits. Outstanding players were
Ruby Davey and Barbara Mel-
bourne of Coln and Gloria
Brown and Angelina Coote of Co-
de. ____
The Herrera vs. Darin game,
piloted by Sylvia Evering and
Daisy Davis respectively, was
won by the latter-named team.
Outstanding players were Daisy
Davis and Jean Hall.
ELEMENTARY INTRAMURAL
BASEBALL
The Browns-Yankee tussle was I
won by the Browns, captained by'
Edward Haynes who also slugged
| homer ln the second inning. |
Outstanding player was Jerry Es-
calona.
Batteries were Haynes and
Ashby of the Browns and Clarke
and Cogglns of Yankees.
pected to cause quite a few,
changes in player personnel.

ALL
DRINKS
sold
t
H
price
from 3 to 7 p.m.
EVERY DAY
The Boston Bar
THE CHASE
NATIONAL BANK
OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
STATEMENT OF CONDITION, DECEMBER 31. 1951
AB
.. 1
. 1
. 0
B. Newhard, 3b...... *
Cooper If..........
'. 1
Cunningham, c......
Lewis, cf..........
Gibson............
Maugher, p........
Rodrigues, 2b........ 0
operate. Wouldn't it be nice If Mr. Runp their garrulous coach,
persuaded them to aid Justice? He alwavy. claimed tt have such
t.*E5ntf.1 Intw"est in the young men he recruited snd exploited.
Bill Strelt, ye oulde Auburn footballer and Olympic badge wear-
er, has been named president of the Southern Cement Co., in
Birmingham There is no truth in the teport Mr. Strelt peddles
his produet to be used between the ears of A.A.C. officials. Bobby
Jones is preparing a book for PGA on golf teachers and teach-
ing. Supposed to be the last word. In my ease the last word
tram the teacher has always been: "That'll be five dollars, please."
Allen Kaufman, Cornell '46, U urging nls alma mater to Insti-
tute a basketball league limited to players no teller than 5 feet
10 Inches..."Considering that the average American male Is 5
feet 9. this would leave better than baif the student bodies to
draw from. For press purposes the teams could be snapplly de-
signated, '6 and 10*8.' As matters stand now basketball more
than any other varsity sport, is restricted to a handful of gene-
tic fortunatea."
BUICK
Sasso. 2b........
Hannlgan, as........
Croft, c............
Matos, cf......
Bazin, p........
Lamls, lb..........
Hartz, If .... .,.....
Smith, D 9b.......
Mercier, rl. .. .... ..
C. P. O. 8 0 0
Buick 5 2 3
Home RunMatos. Two Base
HitsMcJennett, Cooper, LamlS
Stolen BasesHamilton, McJen-
nett, Gibson, Hannlgan. Lamls.
Struckout byBasan 6, Hamilton
2. Winning PitcherBazin. Los-
ing PitcherMaugher. Umpires
Badders and Hughes.
RESOURCES
Cash and Due from Banks .
U. S. Government Obligations .
State and Municipal Securities .
Other Securities.....
Mortgages.......
....... $1,527,019,824.03
....... 1,183,476,912.03
....... 306,241,404.39
....... 277,305,439.32
....... 56,101,004.00
Loans................. 2,161,951,614.89
Accrued Interest Receivable .
Customers' Acceptance Liability
Banking Houses.....
Other Assets......
10,361,315.94
46,310, 28,391,406.99
10,023,288.15
"$57607,182,845.47
LIABILITIES
Deposits................$5,149,631,444.15
Foreign Fundo Borrowed...........
Dividend Payabl- February 1, 1952.......
ReservesTaxes and Expenses.........
Other Liabilities.............
Acceptances Outstanding..........
Less: In Portfolio............
Capital Funds:
700,787.86
2,960,000.00
29,796,367.75
16,081,128.17
52,286,435.90
5,4*6,302.28
Capital Stock .
U.MOOOU Shtrat-JIS Par)
Surplus ....
Undivided Profits .
... $111,000,000.00
. 189,000,000.00
. 61,182,983.92

DISTRIBUTORS. v4A. OYKlNvAJ, St At
.
'
361,182,983.92
$5,607,182,845.47
United States Gavanunant nd thai acuriU earriad tt SSSt.lS7.meo wart pladfad to
tacur* sufeUe and treat amo*it? and for attar euraaaor motead ar oarmittad a law








J
A
NY FIGHT MANAGER CAUSES RUCKUS
f-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------?------------------------------------------"------------------------------------, __ .-----------------------------_________,_____ "Let the people know the truth and the country is safe'* Abraham Lincoln.
nVENTI-SEVENTH IEAR
PANAMA, R, P., SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1962
Plan Proposed
Here To Curb
Prostitution
Drastic measures to. curb pros-
titution nd to .'ut down the in-!
cldence of venereal disease in
Panama were recommended to-
day by the Panamanian Aca-
demy ul Medicine and Surgery.
The recommendations were
made, the AcacVmy said, after a
prolonged study o.' prostitution,
abortion and sterilization pro-
blems in the Republic of Pana-
ma.
Police, sanllary and education-,
al measures were suggested byj
the Academy, whose secretary
general !r, Dr. Rolando Chanis for' .___... ., ...
the solution of these problems. ine|i*^J,hurdll eta people 8^ave **
Amon the .sanitary measures! FALMOUTH. Jan. 12 (UP) welcome to Carlsen.
the academy recommended strict;c?Pl: Kurt Carlsen swore an From the moment he stepped
observance of the rules of. affadavlf here today that the ashore at 10:05 am. until a
i
MV NWSPAPIW
FIVE CENTS
Carlsen Tells Lloyds
Of Enterprise Act
Loss
God
hygiene in established road-1loss of hls Flying Enterprise
houses and the establishment ofiwa* "an act of God" for which
prophylactic clinics all over the'nether he nor his company
city to offer .'ree day and night, cou'd be held responsible,
service. | After a consultation with of-
The academy also recom- ficials of Lloyds insurance
mended ree medical treatment! underwriter, and the London
for all persons afflicted with' agents for the Isbrandtsen Line,
venereal disease and an intensl-j Carlsen performed his final
ficatlon of the search of such duty in connection with the
cases. gallant ship that sank Thurs-
An education campaign against day despite Carlsen's 13-day
prostitution, both from a moral battle to save her.
and economic point of view, alsO| The document will be used
was recommenced by the group.
This campaign, they said, should
be Rinv.iri at Increasing public
reaction to this illicit trade.
Chase Bank Report
Of Total Resources
Shows Big Gains
in a legal hearing into the loss
of the Enterprise, and in de-
ciding about the payment of
Insurance on the ship and car-
go, whose combined value has
been estimated at $5,000,000.
Carlsen is expected to travel
to London by train tomorrow,
and then to fly to the United
States to join his wife and chil-
dren.
Scarcely a dry eye or a dry
cup could be found In this llt-
tle Cornish port yesterday as
Deposits, loans and total re-
sources of the Chase National
Bank on Dec. 31, 1951. registered
substantial gains over the fig-
urea of Sept. 30 and those of the
1950 year-end.
Total loans outstanding on
Dec. 31, 1951, amounted to $2,-
101,951,615 (anew all-time high),
compared with $1,953,537,210 on
Sept. 30, 1951 and $1,815,387,721
on Dec. 31 a year ago. WASHINGTON, Jan. 12 (USIS)
Total resources of the bank on Guatemala became the tenth
Dec. 31, 1951 were $5,607.182,845'American Republic to accede to
compared with $5,174,410,239 on the Inte.-American Convention
Sept 30, 1951 and $5,283 011.7591 on the Fights of the Author in
on Dec. 31, 1950. Deposits were Literary, Scientific and Artistic
Guatemala Is 10th
To Ratify Copyright
Convention In U.S.
toast was raised in late after-
noon in the town hall, Carlsen
was given a reception that left
him haggard and weak-voiced
at the end.
The skipper, who is Just a
shade over five feet tall, was
emotional girls pecked his cheek* until he
flushed crimson.
Finally, exhausted, he made
his apologies and headed lor
his bunk and his first good
night's sleep ashore in the 22
days since he sailed from Ham-
burg on his fateful voyage-
On the door of' his room in
the local inn he hung out a
"Do not disturb" sign that not
whacked on the back until he1 even an admiral would disobey.
wlnced The hysterical celebration left
Children shredded a bouquet this seafaring town almost as
of red and white flowers some- limp as the skipper himself,
one thrust into his hands. And I And his modesty and candor
$5.149,631,444 compared with $4-
747,J93,JSg and $4,971,424,027 on
the respective dates.
Cash and money due from oth-
er banks on Dec. 31, 1951 was $1,-
Works on Thursday.
At a brief ceremony at the Pan
American Union, Dr. Alfredo
Chocano. Counselor and Charge
d'Affalrcs of the Guatemalan
8H&& COnpa.ren loi1, $1-;Fmbassy here, deposited his
378.828,483 on Sept. 30, 1951 and country's instrument of ratifica-
$1,499,884,121 a year ago. Invest-!tion of the convention
ments in United States Govern-, Slgned here jn 1946 the C)n_
ment securities amounted to $1,- vention provides for uniform and
H&12&2 com2aV&on$1'" broader copyri the American Republics. It comes
into force for each country as
that country completes the pro-
cess of ratification. Previously,
Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecua-
199.967,856 and $1,477,758,049 re-
spectively.
The capital of the bank, $111,-
000.000 and its surplus $189,000,-
000. were unchanged. Undivided
profits on Dec. 31. 1951 were Wl.-ldOt, Hcndu7as."'Mexlco~"Ntaara-
182,984^compared with $59,198,- gua, Pa:*guay and the Domini-
225 on Sept. 30, 1951 and $53,007,-
007 on Dec. 31. 1950.
Net earnings and profits for
the year 1951 were $21.496,000 or
$2.91 per share, including profits
on securities of three cents per
share, compared with net earn-
ings and profits for the same pe-
riod in 1950 amounting to $20,-
939,000 or $2.83 per share, includ-
ing profits on securities of 33
cents per share.
Reserves for Federal and State
taxes for the year 1951 were $25.-
can Republic had done so.
Dr. Chocano termea the con-
vention "nighlv satisfactory" and
noted that Guatemala had been
one of its strongest champions
since the inception of discussions
aimed at perfecting copyright
protection and procedures in the
Americas.
Copyr!?ht exoerts of the West,
ern Hemisphere will convene
here Monday for a five-day dis-
cussion of means of harmoniz-
ing the Inter-American Conven-
931,000 (or $3.45 per share) whichjtlon with the proposed Univerl
may be compared with $14.890.- sal Copyright Convention which
000 (or $2.01 per share) for the .was proposed In Paris last sum-
same period in 1950. represent- raer by .the United Nations Edu-
tag an increase of $10,841,000 (or cation. Scientific and Cultural
y .per cent). Organisation.
only added to the admiration
built In the hearts of Falmouth
by his lonely, two-weeks fight
to save his crippled ship.
As Carlsen took his well-earn-
ed rest, the story of his exploits
was told and retold in the
"fish'n chips" shacks along the
wharves and in the pubs along
Falmouth's still crowded streets.
"A brave lad, he is," they said.
"Aye, a proper man and true."
And they recalled how he had
turned his back on offers to ca-
pitalize on his heroism-
The men of Falmouth knew
what he meant when he said
CIO To Meet
Deputy Of PC
'Board Chairman
Local-rate union officials win
have an opportunity of meeting
with a personal representative of
the Chairman of the beard of
directors of the Panam Canal
Company Karl Bendetsen early
next week, to discuss their prob-
lems. 4
In a letter addressed to presi-
dent E. A. Gatkln of Local 900,
Government and Civil Employes'
Organizaron CIO, Bendetsen
made hi3 personal representative
Peter Beasley "available for a
conference witr. you."
Local 900 considers this offer
"extremely significant and is
deeply grateful for the oppor-
tunity to be afforded us to pre-
sent as a -abpr union the case of
local rate workers."
Bendelsen's offer was an out-
growth cf a misunderstanding
between the Board and local
union representatives. An oppor-
tunity to air their grievances
Wednesday was turned down by
Local 900 officials when their In-
ternational CIO representative
Ed K. Welsh was refused ad-
hls only desire was to return |miWance on the ground that only
to the sea. And they drank his government employes could act
health and wished him better
rBr[V. ,-, ,, (NEA Radlo-Telephoto)
2H5S* ^F Z..tn Dwlht a Elsenhower (left) accom-
panled by his Chief of Staff, Lt. Gen. Alfred Gruenther
leaves SHAPE headquarters at Rocquencourt. France after
HI* f nouncement that gave Ike's GOP supporters the green
light to go ahead with their campaign to run him for
-*'
President.
-WttaaV
NEW YORK. Jan. 12 (UP)
Henrik Kurt Carlsen, captain, of-
the lost freighter Flying Enter-
prise, will receive a rousing he-
ro's ticker-tape welcome when he
returns to New York City, Mayor
Vincent Impellitteri announced
yesterday.
The hero of the sinking of the
Enterprise will be guest of honor
at a City Hall reception and will
be showered with ticker tape and
shredded telephone books in a
arade up lower Broadway, New
ork's "8treet of Heroes," Im-
pellitteri said.
GroVer A. Whalen, the city's
official greeter, will work out de-
tails of the 'celebration, the first
official hero's welcome since the
ovation given Gen., Douglas Mac-
Arthur when he returned from
Japan last April.
y*&rt/Lets>ui&l
onion's
Catholic University
Opens Essay Contest
On Latin America
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12 (USIS)
The Institute of Ibero-Amer-
ican Studies of the Catholic
University of America announc-
ed its second annual prize essay
contest on Latin America on
Thursday.
A prize of $100, donated by
Rev. Dr. James A. Magner, Pro-
curator of the University, is of-
fered for the best essay or pa-
per submitted by a student in a
Catholic college or university
in the United States. The sub-
ject of the contest is "The Ca-
tholic Contribution to Social
Welfare in Latin America."
The winner of the contest will
be announced by the Catholic
University next May.
I
turned attention to the British
seaman, Dancy, who Jumped
aboard from the tug Turmil to
share his vain struggle to save
the Enterprise, and to Capt:
Dan Parker, the 'Turmoil's skip-
per.
Those brave men got their
plaudits too. But there was no
question that the 37-year-old
Kurt Carlsen was the man of
the hour.
And he put the answer that
won over his admirers com-
pletely when he was asked what
he intends to do now.
"Why, I'll keep on going to
sea," he said.
Full Participation
In Disaster Control
Stressed By Army
"Each cttlaen may benefit or
suffer from his neighbor's pre-
paredness or lack of it.'* With
that statement Major General
Lester J. Whltlock, Commanding
General, United States Army Ca-
ribbean, brought home the prin-
cipal reason why he feels that lt
is necessary for 100 per cent par-
ticipation by military depend-
ents In the Canal Zone in the Di-
saster Control program. General
Whitlock's statement was made
during an address before the Di-
saster Control zone commanders
and Disaster Control Center
staff at a conference Thursday
morning at Fort Amador. The
meeting was held to begin an
all-out drive to complete the
program.
General Whitlock praised the
work already being done in the
Canal Zone but urged the group
to continue their work in bring-
ing the participation to a higher
percentage.
In expressing the need for an
all-out campaign at the present
time, the General stated that
"the present stage is critical. An
extensile publicity and promo-
tional campaign has been In ef-
fect for some time. While the
iron is Still hot. we can strike
the final blow and achieve our
Soal. Should we relax our efforts,
owever, and allow interest to
cool off, in a short time all the
people we have trained would be
lost by attrition. The entire pro-
gram would have to be re-insti-
tuted from scratch, and the task
would become doubly difficult at
a later stage.
However, by achieving full par-
tlcipatlon now, we can establish
Now I can tell my children what' nartlclpatlan by all as an ac-
a hero their father is." levita custom in the Panam
SSr*" xi'And Karen, 7- knew, areasomething that everyone is
nothing of their father's plight expected to do and does. Once all
until after he had been rescued, zones are up to this standard,
Wont they be proud?" the the problem of replacement
luck in the future.
His welcome here may not
have been as perilous, but it
certainly was as gruelling for a
man of the sea, as the 13 days
he spent aboard the cracked
and listing Enterprise before
she surrendered to. the gale-
lashed seas Thursday, seconds
after he had leaped from, her
half-submerged funnel.
Seven thousand personshalf
the population of Falmouth
braved driving sleet and rain
to greet Carlsen and local hero
Kenneth Dancy.
egal.nn5ndlngM,hU Sartn" **5 ^Vtw^oasMn
interviews, Carlsen ^ Beasley would be arranged.
as spokesmen for the local rat-
ers.
The three man committee
Wednesday walked out of the
meeting maintaining that the
Union his the light to choose its
own representatives.
Bendetsen' letter, sent on the
eve or his departure, said that
he was 'particularly interested
in obtaining the facts... you have
in your possession which might
be of constructive benefit In this
connection."
A CIO spoke-man today said
he did not know the exact date
Two Atlantic Side Girls
Enlist In Navy On CZ
M-'fc-. .-, (NEA Radlo-Telephoto)
THE SEA TRIUMPHS The crippled Flying Enterprise list-
ed at 80 degrees shortly before it began to sink about 30
miles from Falmouth, England.
.
New York Plans Ticker-Tape
Welcome On Crlsers Return
o_____:
. '
Whalen's plans depended upon
word from Carlsen as to when
he is coming home. -
.Impellitteri announced the
welcome at the suggestion of
Capt. Clayton McLaughlin, oper-
ations manager of the Isbrandt-
sen Line, owners of the Enter-
prise.
"If this city is looking for a
real hero, they're certainly got
one in Captain Carlsen," Mc-
Laughlin said. "If anybody was
ever entitled to a hero's welcome,
it's Captain Carlsen."
The 37-year-old skipper, who
leaped Into the sea just as his
storm ravaged ship was about to
sink, also will get a hero's wel-
come in Woodbridge. NJ., where
his wife and two daughters are
waiting for him.
"This is the answer to my pray-
ers,'' cried Mrs. Carlsen when
her husband reached England.
Silver City Youth
Serving In Korea
Is Staff Sergeant
S/Sgt. Claude B. Davto, the
son of Mr. and Mrs: D. Davis of
Sliver City Heights, Is now
stationed in Korea with the 35th
Fighter Intereepter Squadron,
according to word reaching his
parents.
Davis' promotion to Staff Ser-
geant was followed the same
week by his being moved up
from Payroll and Personnel Clerk
to Chief Clerk of the squadron,
his parents reported. >
Two young American girls from
the Atlantic Side may soon be
donning WAVE uniforms if their
enlistment in the VS. Navy here
is accepted in Washington.
The future female tars are Do-
rothy Rowley and Beverly Ma-
dison.
Both gals are 18 years old, and
recent Cristobal High School
graduates. They went down to-
gether Wednesday to Headquart-
ers, 15th Naval District at Fort
Amador and enlisted Just be-
cause "we're Interested in the
Navy."
After completing mile-long
forms, and physicals, their en-
listments will have to be okayed
from Washington, and according
to the recruiting officer, should
take about a month. They'll leave
for Baihbridge, Maryland and
"boot camp" training, if the
answer Is yes. ,
"I only hope I'm accepted"
young Miss Rowley told The Pan-
ano American reporter today.
"I cant expalln it very well, but
it's all tied up with helping my
country. That's the reason I
want to get in."
The oldest In a family of three,
Dorothy is the daughter of Cap-
tain and Mrs. Sam Rowley. Her
father has been a tug-boat Cap-
tain for the Canal 15 years.
Her companion in the venture
Beverly Madison lives with hei
sister and brother-in-law Sgt
Charles Bresch at Fort Gulick.
Her brother who is hi the Navy
"told mt all about it" and ap-
parently the revelations mad
her want to Join too. He's in San '
Diego.
Meanwhile both girls are
spending their time waiting and
"gettin- prepared" by outfitting
themselves with winter clothes
to wear on the trip up.
"Of course once we're in we
won't hive to worry abou.t
clothes," philosophized one of th'
young ladies.
Lake Patrol Seeks >
Missing Farmer f
The Gatun Lake Patrol was
searching today for the body of
a Panamanian farmer whose
cayuco was found capsized yes-
terday morning in the Arenosa
section of the Trinidad River.
A police report said that Vic-
toriano Ortega, the missing man,
was last seen leaving a saloon
In a drunken- condition, early!
Thursday morning.
If the body la found, and the
circumstances are as indicated *
by the police report, the body |
will be turned over to relatives)
for burial In Arenosa.



mother asked.
McLaughlin said Isbrandtsen
Sanned "to get Carlsen back
ime as quick as we can. The
quicker the better is how I feel
about it."
Carlsen must remain in Eng-
land, however, until he furnish-
es Lloyds of London with the in-
formation it needs to settle Is-
brandtsen's claim for the Enter-
prise.
Hans isbrandtsen, owner of the
lll-fated ship, said he will buy a
new vessel for $5.000.000 and give
it the name of the Plying Enter-
prise A spokesman said later it
was too soon to say whether
Carlsen would be put In com-
mand of the new'ship.
training'will be relatively sim-
ple, since new arrivals will read-
ily participate when they realise
that everyone also is trained and
has done his share.
General Whltlock pointed out
that the Panam Canal would
make a worthwhile atomic tar-
get, and since there U no positive
guarantee against preventing
such an attack, the subject of
minimising lt* effeet should
properly receive high priority in
the Panam area.
Following the talk by General
Whitlock, Lt. Col. John P. Mlal.
director of the Disaster Control
Center, reviewed the work com-
pleted and discussed plans for
future training and organisation
of Disaster Control teams.

i

.:
"You mean White Horse!"
Every horse is not a thoroughbred and every whisky
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things of life, taste the rich and mellow flavour of your
White Horse whisky, rtom where else could it come but
Scotlandthe home of Scotch whisky, where Nature
and man have combined to'produce' the drink of drinks.
White Horse is a permanent member of the best social
and sporting clubs, t welcome guest at every party, a
dweller in every discriminating home. It should 'be
your first choice in whisky. Ask for it by name.
> lJ
'
f
WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky
A pit ature t remtmber a joy to see again
S*U Di,*b**, COMPAA CYJtNOS S^i. COLON & PANAMA.



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