The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01351

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text

"*BRANIFF




AN INDEPENDNTTg
KDAJLY NEWSPAPER
Paamna American
"tl tAe people knoic the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
SeagramWO,
^ CANADIAN WHISKY
^amm
* *../
Year* Ob
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952
nvt ciwi
Welcome
Pearson Reveals 'Pennsylvania' falmOUth Cheers
Truman-Lnurchill |CrewUnspotted. -j r| *
Conference Results By Rescue Fleet Intrepid Skipper
By DREW PEARSON
SEATTLB, Jan. 11 (UP) A
WASHINGTON. Jan. 11Here! Truman that the British do not fleet of rescue vasela was today
are the results of the first three: Intend to withdraw their recog-1 criss-crossing the last reported
meetings between Truman and | nltlon of Communist China position of the freighter Penn-
Churchlll and their staffs: even though they don't approve sylvanla, searching for some
1. Most Important decision j of Mao's government. Truman, trace of the 46 crewmen who
thus far agreed upon is that thei in turn, told Churchill that the' abandoned her In a north Pacific
U. 8. will supply Britain with onei U. S. does not approve of Chiang storm.
million tons of steel during 1952.1 Kai-shek's regime, but has no At least 12 long-range patrol
In return, England will divert I intention of withdrawing sup- j planes were ready to take off at
65,000 tons of tin to the U. S. i port from It at this time. In dawn today for the area 750
market. Details of other metal short, neither government likes miles northwest of Seattle where
exchanges aluminum, copper, the Chinese government It la the search la concentrated.
dealing with, but they both feel, Three ships are already on the
compelled to continue along pre- scene, and at least three others.
and nickelare atUl under con-
sideration.
2. Both Truman and Church-
ill have agreed to abandon the
feud over the British vs. the A-
merican high-speed automatic
including the Coast Ouard cut-
ter Klamath, were due there to-1
sent lines.
No Ticker Tape
Churchill Is so Intent on mak- ay
lng this visit a purely "business. An air and sea search yester-
rlfle. Since neither country is ln( affair," he turned down an offer ,jav covered a 7.000 square mile
a position actually to put either from New York's Mayor Impel- area without turning up any evl-
litteri to be the honored guest at, ence whatever of the four llfe-
a farrioua New York ticker-tape boats thought to be carrying the
HOTELS BURN IN ATLANTIC CITY
(NBA Telephoto)
A-thick pall of smoke blankets the ruins of the
Congress Hotel on Atlantic City's oceanfront as the resort city to swept by a,fireJ*j**
more than $2,000.000 damage. Two other hot els were burned to the ground and the flames
spread toihe fit. Charles Hotel in background.
-------
I u
1

UN Pilots
Bag 4 Migs
8TH ARMY HQ., Korea. Jan. 11
(UP) United Nations piiots,
outnumbered three to one. shot
down four Migs today, in five
gun into production, both coun-
tries have agreed to face up to
realities and rely on America's
war-tested Garant M-l.
3. Both leaders have agreed to
reaffirm their sponsorship of the
FALMOUTH, England, Jan. 11 (UP) Copt. Ku
Carlsen, whose valiant but futile two-week battle to sa<
his doomed ship Flying Enterprise won him world-wii
acclaim, stepped ashore here this morning and receivi
a hero's welcome.
Carlsen's elderly parents, representatives of the Uni
ed States, Britain and Denmark, and 3,000 seafaring B
tons cheered as the 37-year-old New Jersey skipp
landed.
At Carlsen's side to share the applause, as he h
shared the last half of the skipper's ordeal, was Kenne
Dancy, the young Scottish seaman who leaped aboard tl
Enterprise's sloping deck from the rescue tug Turm
just one week ago today.
parade up Broadway.
Confidential Papen
On his second day in Washing-
proposed Middle East defense j ton. the ever alert Winston
pact. This pact, a proposed ad- Churchill was walking through a
dltion to the North Atlantic pact,
would include France, Turkey,
the United States, and the United
British embasay corridor when
he passed a document-laden
, member of his staff. Stopping
Kingdom. Both Churchill and; the man. Churchill said:
Truman agreed to seek the addl- "Young man, do you think I
tional support of Egypt and oth- j should see any of those papers?"
er Arabic countries in the Near; "No, sir," replied the official.
East.. ', "These are intended for the f or-
4. To date, no decision has;elgn secretary."
been reached on the selection-of I Mr. Churchill proceeded down
a naval commander.to hsadLjiB., the-cosristor- tsn-paoss. .-,
Anglo-American i "One moment, jroung man. Do
I men from the stricken ship.
Ships and planea continued
(he search for the Pennsylva-
nia and the crewmembers who
abandoned the ship rn life-
boats late yesterday after a 14-
foot seam opened in the hull
and water shipped into the
forward holds. The lifetoats
were not radio-equipped.
The ship's agent in Portland
"No, sit," repiledthe official.|reieliaed a list of 46 crewmen on1
board. The Pennsylvania'a laat;
message Wednesday had said 45'
crewmen wen taking to four
lifeboats.
the combined _
forces m the Atlantic it Is, you think that there are any of! The Coast 0uard said it had
doubtful if any decision on this | those papers that I should noti ord on whether the skipper.
will be reached during these i see?"
conferences. (Copyright, 1952, by the Bell
5. Churchill has told President1 Syndicate, Inc.)
Capt. George P. Plover, Portland,
Ore., had remained aboard or left,
the ship with the other 45 crew-j
men. ,
A Coast Guard Mariner flying
down lour Migs loaay, in uve % > if f* Si A UOasi uuara anutuot ".;"*>
separate air battles which raged further south than any time pre- J \J I I UI J/3 "CfC l\UII Illfl/|,ast reported position of ^the
Boycott' By Cabbies Union
Refreshed by his first full
night's sleep since the worst
Atlantic storm in a quarter oi
a century cracked his ship's
plates Dec. 27. Carlaen wore a
dark blue suit and a borrowed
coat much too big for him.
He lost his own wardrobe
when the listing, leaking Flying
Enterprise finally sank in the
Engllah Channel at 4:12 p.m.
yesterday, mlnutea after he and
Dancy had dived into the sea
from its then-horizontal smoke-
stack.
The weather which robbed
Dancy and Carlsen of their
dream of riding the .Eiitemrisc
triurflpnantly Into FaJmouth
Harbor was still perverse.
Sleet swept the dock as Carl-
sen .stepped ashore from the tug
Turmoil the first time he had
been on land since Dec. 22 when
the Enterprise sailed from Ham-
burg on Its ill-fated voyage for
New York.
Carlsen was in tears s
obviously very moved as
stepped up to receive the w
come of Fslmouth's may
Thomas Morris.
Morris said: "We give
warmest and most respec
welcome to the commandet
the Flying Enterprise, whom
salute with honor."
Carlsen seemed choked \
emotion as he replied: "I v
to thank all those who ba<
! me. I knew you were all bei
| me. I Just can't find w
i enough to thank you."
Carlsen paid special tr(
, to Capt. Dan Parker and
crew of the Turmoil which \
ed him from the sea yeeter
and which had towed hln
within 50 miles of Falm<
before the steel towing c
snapped Tuesday night.
Dancy, wearing his unif
as mate of the Turmoil,
(Continued on Page 6, Colum
(NEA Telephoto)
1 MISSING AFTER FIRE A million-dollar fire razes
five-story office and apartment building in Westfield,
8., where eight persons were missing after the blaze that
threatened the town's business district.
ich Has Been Accomplished
Meeting Here Bendetsen
slant Secretary of the Ar-
irl R. Bendetsen today ex-
the* opinion that "much
6n accomplished" by hold-
le meeting of the Board of
tors of the Panama Canal
ly in the Canal Zone this
idetsen, who is Chairman of
ird, sailed with Mrs. Ben-
aboard the Panama line
on their return trip to
, the States. Also aboard were Mr.
jMrs. Matthew Robinson, who
iave spent the past two weeks
litre. Robinson Is a Special Con-
friends in the Republic of Pa.-
nama.
viously in the Korean war.
The United States Air Force's i
leading ace. Col. Francis S. Gab-
reskl, shot down one of the Com-
munist Jet fighters in a 35-mln-
ute dogfight this afternoon be-
tween 22 Sabres and 60 "very ag-
gressive'' Migs.
It was Gabreskl's 32nd plane
shot down, and his fourth Mlg.
7.800-ton vessel and that there
i waa "no sign of survivors or the
! vessel."
The Vancouver, B.C.. Depart-
I ment of Transport said the rad-
A total of 361 tourists, includ-1 lunch at, El Panam Hotel but %Xna^c&Ttol
lng North Carolina Governor some difficulty was expected in ff^aSSKFwiHE -
Kerr 3cott and Admiral R. O. getting all the passengers to the
Davis, commardant of the 5th
Naval district Norfolk. Va.. ar-
He scored 28 kills over Europe In rived at Cristobal this morning
World War II. aboard ir.e SB Ryndam of the
Apart from a couple of squad
encounters, there, was no more
than patrol activity along the
ground front today.
Temperatures are expected to
be down to near zero fahrenhelt
tomorrow.
Neither truce subcommittee,
considering supervision of an ar-
mistice and the exchange of pris-
oners of war, reported any pro-
gress today.
area but "found nothing.
The Japanese freighter Kima-
kawa Maru also found nothing.
The Pennsylvania, a Victory-
type ship which developed
hotel, because of a "boycott" de-
clared by the Panam Chauf-
feur's Union against El Panam.
The union declared the boycott
Holland-American Line.
A shore party from the Ryn- dependent tallai from picking,up | "Oioea spars "^""en that
dam boarded the President Por- passengers at the hotel wTncfi' S^dsare ale'force W?ttmoun-
ras at Catun shortly after the KaTa contract with Radio Taxi. wta^ are wte torce win m
which owns a fleet of vehicles <'
for passenger service.
pinimin- that tho hotel hnrs in- cracked hull several montns ago,
: radioed shortly before the aban-
shlp's L'rrival to transit the Ca-
nal to Pedro Miguel
The party was scheduled to
Family Quarters
'Frozen' To Aid
Cocoli Residents
"I have been deeply Impressed
with their goodwill which pre-j
vails here in this Isthmian com-
munitv and the desire of officials A temporary freeze on assign-
on both sides of the boundary ments to family quarters In Bal -
ilnes for a cooperative effort in; boa, Gamboa and Pedro Miguel
promoting the ideals of democra- will be in effect from Jan. 15
tic countries and good neigh- through Feb. 29 it was announc-
bors I ed today at Balboa Heights.
During this period, Canal Ca-
"I
sensus
feel that I express the oon- na,imploZeV*nhoii11wiiilnhiani1ry
is of the Board of Directors Quarters in C^jrai te p-
when I say that we are keenly ^&2L&tXS%^
Interested In the employes, their: "n Balboa, Gamboa ana re
nt to the Secretary and As- problems, and the welfare of "iJSKi
'
int Secretary of the Army
id attended the Board ses-
ae followlnc? statement con-
ning his visit to the Isthmus
[issued by Bendetsen shortly
re sailing:
fy visit to the Isthmus of
Employe families who live in
. tvoe 201 ouarters in Diablo
I hopeithatanothei-visit here Lhts may au transfer to
will not be long delayed." | JggJ quarters In Balboa during
the freeze period.
Assignments to bachelor quar-
ters will not be affected and will
be made in the usual manner.
The action is being taken to
provide sufficient housing for
the families in Cocoli, who must
move because of the transfer of
themselves and their families.
Students, Police
In Clash Again
The two menth old school
una has provided me with a strike was marked again today
-sought opportunity to gain!by clash-vs between students and
Fuerza y Luz Asks,
Consumers To Use
Less Electricity
Officials of the Panama Fuer-
za y Luz Co. appealed to re-
sidents of Panama Citv today
to turn off electric signs and
other equipment not entirely
necessary in an effort to con-
serve power following yester-
day's sudden breakdown of a
turbine in the company's plant
at 6an Francisco.
Areas on the outskirts of Pa-
nama City went lightless for
four hours last night, and will
continue without electric power
from to 10 p. m. every night
for a week, the company has
announced. ,
Radio stations with their
transmitters in the outskirts
also were affected by the four-
hour blackout. And two night
baseball games scheduled for
last night had to be postponed.
Nearly all power for Panama
and the outskirts is now being
supplied by the Panama City
power plant of the company.
Some current is being ob-
from the Canal Zone.
1 that town to the Navy, and the, talned from the Canal
lrst hand a better under-l*he po'lee in the vicinity of Liceo Canal employes who wish to Efforts are being made to have
ding of the operations of &n Profesional girls' high m0ve from type 301 houses in Panama Canal authorities supply
The boycott was declared fol-
lowing trie failure of representa-
The Pennaylvanla is owned by
the States Steamship Co.. which
lost another ship, the George
tlvVs ^^i the iAde^Tent uxl; Walton.1 November. Five crew-
drivers. Rado Taxi and of the men lost thslr Uves.
BALBOA TIDES
Saturday, Jan. 12
High Low
3:50 a.m. 10:15 a.m.
4:27 p.m. 10:32 p.m.
tourist aprendes here to reach an
agreement at a meeting held
yesterday in the office of Police
Chief Bolivar Vallarlno.
The tourists Off the Ryndam
also are rched-.iled to be enter-
tained at the hotel this after-
noon by the Conjunto Cajar be-
fore going on a tour of Old Pan-
am and other oclnts of interest.
Vasco Arosemena, manager of
Radio Taxi, ha- declared that he
will use r-rtvate automobiles andj V.D (TTD.
buses to transport the tourists NEW YORK Jan 11 (UP)
in vie* f the boycott declared There weie tears and cheers yes-
by the independent taxi drivers, iterday for Capt. Henrlk Kurt
The visitors will board a train Carlsen by the men, and the
In Balboa at 5 p.m. to go back to woman, who know him best
Cristobal The hip is scheduled The men who sailed with him
to sail at 1 a.m. tomorrow morn- 'auded h m^as they to d how they
protested that they did not want
(NEA'Newsmap
WHERE THE LINE BROKE This map charts the course o
the Flying Enterprise, with her captain. Henrik Kurt Carl
sen. from the point about 250 miles off the English coas
where the ship became disabled in a severe storm. The ves
sel was towed to within 45 miles of Falmouth. when th
towline snapped in another storm, and the Enterprise sanl
shortly after Carlsen dived off her.
Wife And Boss Weep For Joy
lng.
West Indian Dies
After Being Hit
By P.R.R. Train
Diablo.
West Germans Move
Nearer Schuman Plan
Panama Canal "as a water- school.
', the physical plant of Its __ ,
onels. and the men and wo- The pMice made several ar-
1 who form the organisation "f *nPn a >7P f students
lt onpiatlon started marching up Avenida
PI feel that much has been ac- S?.6.to**I2. *& ,tw0 "f^'.r"
nnlishnd in havino nur Rnarri waa reix-ited that ah those ar-
BlfflS5^^J^Se??r.t0iS Rte-*^ffi^VS!r,,Slirer BONN. Jan. 11 (UP) _
ne of operations. I MernV-Mle tne ^tuition con- West German Bundestag (
t has made possible a better ,:nTed much the same in PanS- er House) moved swiftly I
'the Canal administration and :r,,e g-ftools are functioning
per.-oi-.-el among members of >; h w lfT cent o( tneir teach-
Fo- d
"Aside from the business as-
:is of our mcc
rs in itt?nd:ince. but high
checis with the exception o
.ice. ;ng. the oc- r (ceo s d. PtofeflonM. and the sure 225-144. Only th
hp" o' o p-.ided us with 'Unlver^i v nre not functioning I Demociats Communists,
opporti ilty to hecr tettes ior lack of both students andhandful of Rightist
tinted with our many teacher,
The
Low-
todsy
towards giving final approval
to the Schuman Plan for pool-
ing West Europe's coal and steel
resources for the next 50 years.
The House approved the mea-
the P~iial
and a
of Rightist exti emisu
voted against the plan.
to leave him alone on the sink-
ing Flying Enterprise and how
he bellowed:
"Get off the ship! That's an
order.'
The man for whom he worked.
Hans Isbrandtsen had tears In
his eyes as three ship bells in hla office
tolled a traditional tribute to the
lost shin.
A West Indian section hand And in New Jersey, the woman
for the Panam Railroad was who preyed for him, Carlsen's
killed today when he was struck ailing wile cried for Joy and said
by a northbound PRR train on when ah? learned he waa safe:
Its way across the Isthmus. "1 can't believe it"
Edmund A. Fisher was hit at His cr;w members told their
10:20 this morning near the sta- story at Coast Guard hearing
tlon of Monte Lirio by the train, into the hip's disaster almost at
whose engineer was unaware of the hour Carls* was being for-
the accident. Iced to abandon the ship by
which he stood alone for almost
A tourist passenger, Dr. D. H. two weeks.
Brldger. on the southbound pas- Rlchaui Coasro 22. of Chicago
senger special a short whe af- told how the ship's hull had split
terwards discovered Fisher near; in a stom and everything looked
the tracks and treated him a- hopeless. But when Carlsen told
board the train until they reach- his crew to abandon ship, one
ed Gamboa. The injured man crewman protestingly exclaimed:
was transferred to an ambulance "We're abandoj'ng ship?"
and taken to Gorgas Hospital, Cosan said Carlsen replied:
immediately. "Yes. that's ap order-
Shortly after 1 p.m. today he "Skipper." said the Junior third
died in the emergency room of englne^i4. "I'll tav and I think I
O mm. According to a report, can get m., shortly after the watchman he had received a compound, to stay.'
made his rounds. (fracture of the lower left leg. j "The ssdpper replied, 'Get oil
more current to ease the load
on the Panama City plant.
During the enforced blackout
a special police radio patrol
detachment will cover the af-
fected areas in an effort to
avoid robberies and burglaries.
TNT Plant Blows Un
BELOIR. Quebec. Jan. 11 (UP)
Canadian Industiles Ltd.'s
TNT plant here was destroyed
by an explosion early thif
morning, but no injuries were
reported.
The blast occurred at 5.15 a.Gorgas
the sh^p: That's an order,'" Co-
saro sa.d. -
"The Junior *hlrd said: 'Are
you coming, skipper?'
"The sKlpper said: 'I'll make
my decision when you're safely
in the water.'"
Cosaro Jumped overboard and
climbed Into a life boat with his
shipmates.
"We rride a pass around the
Enterptise and we waved to the
skipper and shouted to him.
'Come on off.'" Cosaro said.
"But the skipper didn't say
anything, and he dldnt wave
back he Just stood there."
"He .- tood straight as a ramrod
on the r.razilv tilted deck."
Cosaro, asked If he had any
suggestion or criticism as a re-
sult of the disaster said he
thought they should design the
plant (mechanical works) so that
It would run when a ship Is list-
ing."
A fev; blocks from the Coast
Guard h arlng Capt Hans. Is-
brandts-n, owner ot the Enter-
prise, triod to talk with tears In
his eyes nd his chin trembling
as a bell tolled solemnly three
times in the traditional salute to
a sunken ship
"You Uve with your ship like
with vo>. r chllcren and when a
ship goes down It is like a loss
in the family." he said
"We say to him well done.
Carlsen.'
"When he la ready, we will have
another ?hip for him."
0"|i''-.r's of the line revealed
that in: Enterprise bad been
insured for a little more tl
$1,000.030 but that it would i
: $5,000.000 to replace her.
Before getting a new c(
mand. Carlaen will remain
England to take care of pr
minarv "natters connected v
insurance claims. Isbrandt
said.
Then he will return home
his family.
His wife, who had been rec
erlng from an illness, had bro
under th. strain of waiting i
prayln and hoping, and n
tives and friends got her to
into seclusion.
The n.latlves relayed the
port from the Uniterl Press t
Carlsen 'vas safe
"I'm very grateful" Mrs. C
sen said when she receiVei
message '.rom hei husband s
lng he waa "longing" for her i
that he vas "Okay"
"I have had ilmost no sle
she said "I would like him
know 'hat my heart and
'prayers io out to him."
. Her two children, she said, 1
not been told of their fath
.extreme dangei in the last
hours when new gales thr
huge waves over the ship.
A sp'ia-aman for Iabrands
Lines aid the Flving Enterp
carried 1200 Dags of Unit
States mall; 1.000 tons of
iron: 70.) to 800 tons of coffei
bags; ai, unknown number
German "Volk'-'vagon" autoi
biles anc "oth*r general cari
It had been loaded at Antw
Rotterdam, Bremen and Hi
burg.


'
PAGE TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, iftl
|
- THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNtn AND r>uLlMto > TM PANAMA AMRRICAN PRISa. INC.
roUNnm n NILSON OUN51VILL in its*
MAMMOOIO ARIAS, trim
B7 H STREI' P O Bo 134 Panama R ot P
Telephone Panama no 2 074O "9 Linii
Casli Ascpih PANAMIRICAN. Panama
Colon Office 12 17 Central Avinue itwhn 12th and !3tm Streets
PORBIQN RtPrKaiNTAIlvla JOSHUA P. POWEiJS INC
345 Madison Ave Nrv. vork
*! MONTH. IN ADVANCE
, POP IIX MONTH!. IN ADVANCE .
, POR ONI YEAR, IN ADVANCE_____
i N V
LOCAL V HA.L
S 1.70 2 SO
9 80 13 OO
18 SO 24 OO
Walter Winchell
In New York
Labor News
And
Comment
He Certainly Can't Get LostOr Can He?
By Victor Riesel
Shan about town
- Tony Bennett, the thrush, weds Patricia Anne Beech of Mans-
field, Ohio, early in Feb. Mabel. Wayne, whose songhits include
Jf Ramona" and "In a Little Spanish Town," and N. Campbell
would reconcile if their "set" would butt out Lt. J. Van Fleet
f r. (ion of the commander of UN forces in Korea) and Mrs. Van
ileet have the same problem.. .Peggy Joyce is in greai pain, with
daily medical at tent inn, at the Delmoniio. Mrs C. If. Palmer,
JJr., of the Soc. Reg. was the victim of New Year's Eve thieves.
Hetty loot from her E. 65th Street manse Despite their many
enials, Insiders insist Hope Hampton and Sinclair Robinson have
een secretly sealed a long time.. .Clark Cable and Virginia Grey,
his used-to-be, are beyond control again. Denise Darcel's latest
Jieart-thumper is ex-Vale star J. Fuchs, the world's champion
chnt- putter ..The buzz about Margaret Truman middle-a Ming it
'ftfter the elections persists. Marvin Coles? Walter Wanger
wants to plead guilty, offer no alibis and throw himself on the
court's mercy. Bitter and disillusioned.
1 The Artie Shaw-Doris Dowling idyll is in tatters. George Mil-
4er is new headman.. .Robert Taylor's favorite is French socialite
lali Duols.. Norma Shearer isn't happy about her daughter's Hol-
lywood pursuer, a movie producer tnnce tier years.. .John Buck-
master, the "St. Joan" leading man. ami soclalre Patricia Fabry
"Smith get their seclusion at Jimmy Kelt's in the Village.. .Pat
Easton, the Jill of "4 Jacks and a Jill," q Jietly married J. Derisc
of the act last week.. Handsome Belgian Ambassador Baton Ro-
ibert Silvercruys and Mildred Murphy (dgdtr. of the U. S. Ambas-
Isafef to Belgium) are enjoying the Capital together ..Shelley
Winters' merger plans with Vntorio Gassman apparently nave
wiTnered. Her current dating is with Jack Cuslungham, the ten-
!tilpro.. .Prince Alexis Romanoff (descendant of the Czari and
Baabra Moss tof the Blue Book) looks like
The Washington Wire: Tail's campaign fund received a heavy
'Sum from "Norcross Watson, 3rd," suspected as a pseudonym for
i an industrialist.. .Gen. Ridgway and South Korea chiefs have
been in a feud for months. The hushed tor* is about to erupt...
! The Sen. Ellender-Comm. McCloy scrap will be a dinger when it
reaches the Senate floor.. .There's a unit of about 151' men from
,'Army Air Force Intelligence studying Chinese at Yale...An up-
! coming hassle will involve Pan American Airways and Grace Lines
over control of their jointly operated Panagra Airline in So. Am-
' erica. Thurman Arnold, Paul Porter and Clark Clifford are only
tome legal giants retained for the showdown.. L. B. Mayer's re-
sidual rights deal with MGM (now being laundered) will make
! him $8,000,000 richer. Net!
Billy Rose and Joyce Mathews were i>. the Plaza's Oak Room
New Years Eve. At midnight they were i he only pair who didn't
kiss. Swapped grins...Wail Streeter J. R. Holohan (brother of
' Major Hoiohan. slain by subordinates i i Italy during the war)
win reuiairy any oay...LieiieCklvea working on the muiuer of
! Lothario Carlos Diaz are'scouring the ni-Hlei agencies. His little
biack book was packed with names oi m dels-aboui-lown.. .Ava
' and Frankie. learning that Nancy was in Giro's, took their patron-
age elsewhere. .The gal tossing love taps at Champ Kid Gaviln
U Lucinda Barna of Cleveland. ..Nancy Pearson taghtr of silent
screen star Louise Huff) married ad exe; F M Rugglc last week
- -Wall St. investment firms tell clients In buy airlines, chemicals,
utilities, machinery, oils and movies in b2 A New York muni-
! clpal judge is in trouble with the N. Y. btate Crime Commission
j.. .The Duke and Elsa are no longer pais ,
^
The Cables: Katherine Dunham fescart almost lugged All
; Kahn in Paris...Von Ribbentrop's widow' (one-of Germany's rlch-
' est women) will announce plans to wed a Prussian Count 20 years
'her jr...Grade Fields is said to be taking instructions for con-
version to fier fiance's faith...Mary Martin's son Larry (in the
ohorus of London's "So. Pacific") took iver an ailing specialty
dancer's role for a week and clicked with a wallop.. .Jennifer
Sevan, Princess Marj's Lady-in-Waiting, is quitting to be mar-
. rleo...Margaret-Rose's latest knight is Lord Carnegie, the Duchy
of Fyfe heir. He's a year older than Mag It's a girl for the 1.
I Nolans, TWA's Public Relations ace, at American Hosp Paris.
Squibb exec. Carleton H. Palmer tnd his second wife have
Reno'd. He will re-marry his former wife, the recent Mrs. Winth-
'. rop Bushnell...Charles Wrlghtsman, tha oillonaire, spent a mint
' tossing a New Year's Eve parly in Palm Beach (importing Lester
Llanln's crew from N. Y.) and couldn't attend. Pneumonia.. .Co-
'. .nic Herkle Styles and model Marilyn Hall are monopolizing the
>f Y. to L. A. phones...Rinehart. the publishers have found a
' ,enius among their shipping clerks. In his earlv 20s. he's writing
! lis third play and second novel.. .Bridegroom Georgi DeWitt is
fc ;etting a lawsuit as a wedding present because a friena wrecked
..Is car and injured others in a coast crash.. George Abbott's
new exciter is Lucille Gastn, who dazzles locals with her ermines
! .. .Top execs at 20th Century-Fox, who voluntarily accepted a pay
j ait in '51, got ft all back at Christmas.________________________
THIk IS TOUR FORUM THt MAPIRS OWN COLUMN
| THE MAIL BOA
Th Mail Boa an open rorum tei raoOcu ot Thu Panamo Amar-
'. lean Latter ara racalvaa' traltfully and ara handled in a wholly con
' HaWial marinar,
i If you contributa a inter don t ba impatient it it doom t appear tha
acii day. Letter art publnhed In tha ardar raeaivad.
Plaasa try "**P letter limitad to one paoo length.
Identity ot tetter writen n held in strictest confidence.
Thu newipoper atiumos ne reipaniibilrry tor itotamenti oi opinions
axarcitd in letters from readers.
A ------ O -
REPORT ON LOCAL-RATE RETIRFMENT
Luis A. Victor, president of Chapter No. 33 National Asso-
I station of Retired Civilian Employes, co-itribuies the following
, letter in response to a letter dealing w.th a number of local
problems, especially local-rate retirement:
J Washington. D.C.
j Dear Mr. Victor:
', Your letter of November 28. regarding your conference with
. Governor Newcomer on Canal Zone and Chapter matters af-
I feeting your chapter members is befoie me.
The matter of dispensaries, hospltaltzation and housing for
< '.he members of your chapter are of course, mutters pertaining
'.', ;ritirely to the Canal Zone Government, find the N.A R.C.E. Is
j powerless to take any authoritative aciiot on We are very much
J nterested to learn of your conference nd of the Governor's
, :omments and hope you will continue to keep us advised.
The legislation to give construction annuity for non-citizen
I workers who were on the Canal during he construction period
i as not re-introduced In Congress this year and as far as we
' :au learn, there are no prospects alon^, -his line on this legisla-
ba 'Ion.
As you were advised early In the your, Senator Langer did
re-introduce his bill to increase the cash relief benefits, but on
.earning from the Zone that the Governors Dili was much more
liberal and had the backing of organizations down there we have
ieen awaiting news that the bill was to n presented to Congress.
We have written twice to the Governor of 'hi Canal, offer- '
ins any assistance we can give on this matter but have not yet l
been requested to give any aid.
As this bill is the Governor's bill. ar.i. oertains to Canal Zone
matters, we cannot force the issue or take any initiative.
Now that the bill, as you advise. Is to leave the Defense De-
poitmem and go to the Budget Bureau, we presume lt Is being
tfil.vated and will soon be before Congn-.'s We are awaiting this
move with interest.
Your Chapter members who have civti service annuities will
benefit by annuity increase legislation if enacted in '52.
In regard to the construction legislation for non-citizens,
hafejyou contacted Gov, Maurice H. That her. Investment Build-
ing, Washington, D.C? He was a former Governor of the Canal
and has been and Is still working for Cniial Zorers. in his capa-
eltj ** practicing attorney. We suggest ycu write to him.
With kind regsrds to you Mr. Stephans and Mi Pyle and
nth beat wishes for your Chao I in
81ncercl} FRANK WILSON.
Supervisor of Chapters.
Many a palm will be shaken
next week on the warm sands
of Miami Beach and not for
coconuts. For votes.
Presidential votes in the 1952
campaign. Enough of ththn to
make or break a candidate in
any one of 100 strategic areas
across the \ 8-
Right nov heading into the
resort strip which runs up
neon-lit Col. is Av. are the
men who leao America's power-
nil AFL, whos 9,000 000 mem
bers make up i > biggest H c
iof potential voting ower in the
land.
Towards the end of January,
the 15 men who lead the
world's biggest coalition of lab-
or unions will sit across a con-
ference table in a closed room
David Dubinsky, Jlmmie Pe-
trillo, George Meany, George
Harrison, snow-haired Dan To-
bln, winged-collared diploma-
tic Matt Woll and all the rest.
And they will be pres-
sured by a bloc to remove
the now ailing SO-year- old
William Green from the
presidency and replace
him with a "dark horse"
who is an avowed Repub-
lican and who iclll undoub-
tedly endorse the Q.O.P.
nominee this fall as he did
Tom Dewey in 1948.
That "dark horse" In Chi-
.-ato's Building Service Union
chief, William McFetrldge, lead-
er of the labor men who back-
ed Dewey in the last surprise
election.
This Republican bloc Inside
the AFL Is a minority but lt
is powerful.
It probably won't succeed In
making "the old man," presi-
dent emeritus. But that hasn't
stopped the Republicans from
trying to round up support for
their m*n at the comlnt mid-
winter AFL Executive Council
session.
It can absolutely be reported
that su;h an historic drive is
under way to remove Green
who has held office so lonp
that, he is onlv the third AFL
president In Its 73-year career
It is a suretv that leader of
the group is the youneer Hut-
cheson (Maurice), now head of
the powerful Carpenters' Bro-
therhood. It is an absolute fact
that he and his colleagues have
talked this over with others
in thp AFL sanhedrln.
There is no doubt 'hat
there is powerful New Deal
opposition to this more cn-
sfrv'atve bloc inside labor
Most of the council, and
they are men who lead mil-
lions and can back their
nolitics with the political
fund they are raising, will
campaign for Mr. Truman
it he runs. Many of them
don't believe the President
will stand for re-election
however.
Second.in their political af-
'ections Is Tennessee's Sen. Ke-
fauver. coon-skin cap and all.
The New Dealers say that
the racket-buster wan's tn run.
Some of them know that the
crime prober spent hours at
his Waldorf-Astoria suite tele-
phone last week in long con-
versations with New York po-
litical leaders.
' Kefauver, no novice at ask-
ing lancing questions, was full
of queries.
How does New York feel
about the recent scandals? he
wanted to know. What do New
Yorkers think of Mr. Truman?
What appeal does the Kefauv-
er name still have? Would cer-i
tain political leaders sit down
with him when he returns to
New York within the next 15
days?
What he heard pleased him
What the others thought they
heard was that Kefauver was a
candidate for the presldrnlal
nomination whether or not Mr
Truman runs.
Through all this ran the
old New Deal refrain talk
of the new upsurging inde-
pendent tote and the know-
ledge that the same bloc
which was whooping it up
for Supreme Court Justice
Bill Douglas last time is
in Kefauver's corner today.
The Republican labor leaders
know this in a general, semi-
official fashion. And they're op-
posed to it all.
They're maneuvering for
greater influence inside the AFL
to push lt towards the Repub-
licans, or at least truly neutra-
lize Democratic influence in
their national headquarters.
Make no mistake about lt.
The anti-Qreen bloc is Repub-
lican all the way.
They may not be enthusiastic
about Gen. Eisenhower because
he's refused to commit himself
on labor policy, and he's "Army
brass,' as they put it.
They may actively dislike Ha-
rold Stassen.
They may like Sen. Taft only
as a man and oppose him on
the old Taft-Hartley tradition
(They are fond of Gov. War-
ren, but figure him for second
rlare on the ticket.)
But make no mistake! No
matter which of these men Is
nominated by the G.O.P. this
labor bloc will be In his corner
In the last months of the
campaign.
They'd like to have with them
the president of the AFL, lead-
er of 9.000,000 Americans -
and their families.
That's quite a batch of vote
and the Republl-an lab'
>aders will try to shake ther.
ut of the -u' hands 1.
Miami next week.
The Almost-Hummon
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORKWith a feeling composed more
of awe for ignorance than of violent outrage, I
recently reaa a long screed signed by Herman
Talmauge, Georgia's Uovrhor.
Tne gist was mat tcl.'vl;lon is undermining the
solid South by scheduling programs in which
Negroes and whites are shown together in atti-
tuues suggesting fricndsnlp rather than the Im-
minence of rope and fiery cross:.
Hummon, alstinguisheci son of distinguished
father, suggests that the South should boycott
the sponsors of non-segregated programs.
I Just knew this was cofnint, up when I saw
the equally, alstinguished censor of Memphis,
Tenn., chewing his figurative beard and rend-
ing his garments over the. impossibility Of In-
flicting censorship on TV at the soiree.
Gov. Talmadge, with un unerring instinct to
stamp out a threat to Southern solidarity, chose
the fact that the Mariners on Arthur Godfrey's
program, are composed of two white and two
Negro singers.
Horror of horrors, and heaven help us all, lit-
tle white children and ii tually danced together on Ken Murray's show.
On a Clifton Fadlman sh iw a white woman and
a Negro man literally talked together!
"In the present situation," Hummon-writes, "a
Southerner must even turn off the diai and miss
the good shows or else must stand there and take
these insults, sometime; writhing at the offen-
sive situations which ate thrust at him.
"Television,' said Hummon, "s Just about equi-
valent to visiting somebody In ills home."
I guess I been up North too long, and hence
am badly equipped to qualify for membership in
the Ku Kluxers, but I nad mostly forgotten that
we had Southerners like Herman Talmadge.
I have certainly been North too long to get in-
dignant over him, and the likes of him, who can
at best make you slightly ashamed of belonging
to the same race. By raco I mean human, if Her-
man qualifies for inclusion in It.
I suppose that the televised sight of little black
children playing with li'.tle white children may
wreck the digestion of a few people, yet, but the
wreckage scarcely seems Important any more.
If Gov. Talmadge's frrnds ^re writhing as a
result of what they see on TV I would guess that
tisenhower
By Joseph and
they are writhing more at the quality of the en-
tertainment than at the color of the entertain-
ers.
It is unfortunate that, the majoiity of the
countiy Is so out of step with Herman Talmadge
and the people who elected him that we cannot
sit through a steady diet of 'Uncle Tom's Ca-
bin," with emphasis on the Simon Legree-black-
snake whip scene, which would doubtless be ac-
ceptable to Talmadge's cultural code
But unfortunately tor these few remaining
troglodytes (troglodyte meaning savage who pre-
fers to dwell in caves i. so many people have got-
ten used to Joe Louis ai.d Jackie Robinson and
Lena Home and Marian Anderson and Louis
Armstrong and Dr. Rahn Bunche. n all their
mediums that f just don't see how we can re-
model television to fit Herman Talmadge's deli-
cate feelings.
Be assured that this coiumn Is not written in
anger, but merely in tlw mild amazement that
such savage stupidity still exists In any consider-
able proportion in any semi-enlightened com-
munity.
Poor old Herman's outburst is roughly com-
parable to stepping into the boss man's office
and finding an ape playing the typewriter. Ex-
cept you would expect the ape to make a little
more sense.
I am hot so distantly emoved from the land
of cotton that I fall to realize that the period of
.djustment between black and white is still In
progress, and that many a vear will pass before
t is satisfactorily solved.
There will, for some tine, bt Herman Talmadge
to match against the self serving firebrands who
mscrupulously endeavor to reshape a status quo
.n five minutes, to the gmerai detriment of both
-ides.
In the meantime, I suppose I must apologize,
-s a Southerner, for Gov Talmadge
We must bear, as in :hr cuse of subnormal
;hild, with the few remaning vestiges of an an-
cient and barbaric culture that still exists in
scattered clusters around the fund
It is no good to punish them. If you Ignore
them they will eventually go away and make
aces at each other.
H-eftuy mmm
MERRY 00- ROUND
________ 0RIW MARION
!
WASHINGTON. The backers of General of
the Army Dwlght D. Elsenhower have got their
man In the race but not, it must be added,
in quite the way they had hoped.
They wanted the General to become a fight-
ing candidate later on. Instead, they have got
an avowed, available and firmly Republican can-
didate now, but at the price of his aloofness
trom the dust and sweat of the pre-convention
struggle.
The story that ended witli Gen. Elsenhow-
er's Mo. oay statement Indicating tthe attitude
above-outlined, casts considerable light on the
status of his candidacy.
It begins at the time when his backers organ-
ized themselves under the chairmanship of Sen
Henry Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts, when they
toon discovered three unpleasant facts.
First, the rival organization of Sen. Robert A.
Taft, which Is certainly the largest, the most
powerful and the most plentifully financed pre-
convention organization ever seen in this coun-
try, had been doing a considerably more effec-
tive Job than was supposed.
Second, the professional Republican politicians
all over the countn hankered so strongly for
one of their own kind, symbolized by Sen. Taft,
that they were prepared to take considerable
risks In choosing the nominee.
Third, President Truman's progressive lqss of
strongth, owing to the corruption issue and
ether factors, was persuading the professional
Republican politicians that the risk of nominat-
ing 8en. Taft might not be so great after all.
Thus the prospective Postmasters and Col-
lectors of Internal Revenue were more and more
inclined to follow their fancy into the Taft
camp.
The Impact of these three facts In turn drove
the Elsenhower backers to alter their strategy.
They had Intended to refrain from forcing the
General's hand, but now thev were impelled to.
Thus, In mid-December, Sen. Lodge wrote the
General a letter asking him to announce his
andldacv at an early date.
In this atmosphere Sen. James Duff of Penn-
Ivania is known to have followed Sen. Lodge's
ter with an even stronger one. laying the
l^ole position before the General in the blunt-
est terms.
Announces
Stewart Alsop
If report Is correct, Ben. Duff on the one
hand assured the General that he could get
the nomination, but on the other hand warned
nim that there would be no draft and that the
General must become an avowed candidate.
Simultaneously, the Democratic scheme to
enter Gen. Elsenhower's name in the New
Hampshire primary, imposed a sort of time
deadline an the Eisenhowei men.
Senators Lodge and Duff therefore talked at
great length with the General on the trans-
Atlantic telephone. The outcome of these con-
versations was the Lodge statement on 8unday,
asserting the General's Republicanism and
availability, and inviting confirmation from the
JeneraTg headquarters.
Even then, however, it was still hoped that
Lhe General might ultimately go beyond con-
firming the Lodge statement, entering the cam-
oalgn in person.
He had said that he could do nothing until
after the Lisbon meeting of NATO leaders in
February, but he had not definitely stated that
he would take no personal part in the fight.
What was wanted was an Elsenhower address
to the American people on the pattern of the
ttreat Guildhall speech to the European allies
certainly the most stirring of postwar public
utterances which would satisfy the man in
the street's longing for inspiring and elevating
leadership. '
This, lt was felt, would start a surge which
would sweep 8en. Taft's Republican professional
friends clean loose from their moorings.
Gen. Elsenhower has not exactly foreclosed
the possibility of a great declaration of prin-
ciple on this pattern. It woul_ not be incon-
sistent for him to make one or more such
rpeeches. It Is an enormous gain for his back-
ers that his willingness to accept the nomina-
tion is now unequlvocallv on the record.
It Is also verv likely that the storm clouds
which are again gathering on the world horizon
will also stimulate an Elsenhow:r surge.
In short, the fight is on in earnest
Yet In honestv lt must be recorded that Gen.
Elsenhower's decision to remain aloof from the
L.reconventlon struggle Is a setback. Just as his
positive announcement of availability Is a gain.
(Copyright, 1MI, New York Herald Tribune Inc.)
Drew Pearson says: General Electrie's Charles Wilson
has showdown with Gen. Motors' Charles E. Wilson;
Tycoons battle over scarce copper, steel and alumi-
num; Detroit unemployment worries Washington.
WASHINGTON.What Moblllzer boss Charles E. Wilson, for-
mer head of General Electric, said behind closed doors to Charlea
E. Wilson, head of General Motors, wasn't meant to be published.
However, it was some of the bluntest talking ever heard in Wash-
ington.
Both are Horatio Alger products of American Industry, hav-
ing come up from the bottom to become production geniuses and
the heads of their giant industries.
However, Oeneral Electric'3 Charles E. Wilsrm now sits on tha
government side of the production problem, and last week bump-
ed heads with General Motors' Charles E. Wilson over how many
automobiles should be built .in 1952.
Wilson and other motor" moguls had come to Washington to
protest a drastic slash in production that would cut the 1052 out-
put of new cars in half after April. Gcn-.'.ral Motors' Wilson was
most vocal.
"The government has taken enough steel and copper from
the automobile Industry alone to fill all defense needs," he said,
charging that G.E.'s Wilson had discriminated against auto-
mobiles.
"We can easily prove that charge !s unfounded." shot back
moblllzer Wilson. "Nobody in his right, mind with any sense o
fairness would say that. Discrimination against the automobile
industry is the last thing we contemplate "
General Electrie's Wilson pointed out that construction, both
for defense and essential civilian needs, -vas eating up most of
the strategic materials.
"I wish some of us had a magic war.d." he sighed, "because
when you have too little, you wind up by not satlsfylnp practical-
ly anyone."
Automobile-man Wilson then quoted steel statistics to show
that the railroad and oil industry would be Increased one^thlrd
at the same time that the auto industry is to be cut one-third.
AUTO V8 MILITARY
Production chief Manly Flelschmann explained, however, that
the primary shortage was not steel, but c.pper and aluminum.
"I will not say that the way the automobile Industry had to
be handled was fair, Just essential," he added.
"We have been acting on the basis that automobiles are less
esjentlal than military or industrial expansion..'
Flelschmann pointed out that the automobile Industry had
received "far more fair treatment" than any comparable industry,
because a sudden automobile shutdown would hsve thrown thou-
sands out of work.
After the first angry outbursts, the two Wilsons cooled down,
and mobilizer Wilson cheerfully referred to his namesake as "the
good Wilson."
However, the mobilization boss grev exasperated at Mayor
Albert Cobo of Detroit, when he persisted In (toing into a lengthy
report on Detroit's fiscal problems.
Wilson tried politely to shut him up. then gave up and listen-
ed courteously.
However, united Auto Workers' boss Walter Reuther, after
squirming in his chair, broke in impatiently: "Don't you think
we had better get back to the issues?"
"What the Jiell do you want me to do?" snapped the mo-
bilizer, "insult the mayor?"
The red-faced mayor abruptly ended his speech, thus giving
Reuther a chance to complain that the automobile lnduitry was
opening new factories distant from the Detroit reservoir of work-
ers. He cited several examples, including a Chrysler tank-engine
plant In New Orleans.
GOV. WILLIAMS OBJF.CTS
Moblllzer Wilson explained that this was a World War II
plnnt, and added: "The taxpayers have a $100.000 investigation
in that plant."
He meant to say "Investment," and nastily corrected himself.
"There certainly would have been an Investigation if we
hadn't used that plant," he laughed.
Michigan's Gov. Mennen "Soapy" Wlfrs pointed out, how-
ever, that the automobile industry supposedly got steel and cop-
per priorities to relieve unemployment in Detroit, then used the
priorities In out-of-town plants, such as Chicago, New Orleans,
and Newark, Del.
Munitions Board chairman Jack Small shrugged that lt was
"up to the companies" where they produced their automobiles.
"Well, if you are going to put work in Detroit. I don't think
you ought to give us weasel words," blurted Williams.
"I am not a weasler," snapped Smoll. his face flushtd.
"It looks to me as if you were shot back the governor.
SEN. MOODY SCORES
The only other clash was between Michigan's Sen Blalr Moody
and Ford Motor Company's executive vice president, Ernest
Breech.
The Ford executive had prepared a press release, accusing
Moody of "playing politics" by criticizing the automobile Industry
for not utilizing its full activities for defense
"Brace yourself, Blalr," warned Breech, and he gave the clos-
ed-door meeting at preview of his attack on Moody.
Bristling, the Michigan senator replied: "Edgar Kaiser is
here. He tola me he could step up the production of C-119's (cargo
planes) four times by using tools that hu had available. Is that
right, Edgar?"
"It certainly is," admitted the Kaiser Frazer executive.
"As I understand it. Oeneral Motors is already making war
goods In the Oldsmoblle plant at Lansing, and Is operating three
shifts, but now plans to cut back to one shift. Is that right. Mr.
Wilson?" again demanded Moody, turning to the General Mo-
tors president
''That's right," agreed Wilson.
"Ernie, I think before you release tnat statement, you had
better go out and retract that part of lt" sugg'-sted Moody.
Breech picked up the telephone, ordeied his publicity men to
tone down tne press release.
COPPER BOTTLENECK
Studebaker's chairman Harold Vance also appealed to mo-
blllzer Wilson to lift the celling on auto production, give the In-
dustry as much steel as can be spared, then let the Industry use '
Its Ingenuity to stretch this Into as many new cars as.possible.
Wilson reiterated that the real bottleneck was the copper
shortage.
However. Vance charged that the m"ltary wore overstating
their requirements.
"I am almost sure agreed Wilson of General Motors, "that
a .ot of copper is going Into inventory. *
"The military gets its requirements from you. The basic
figures come from the Industry." broke in munitions chairman
Small.
Mobilizer Wilson finally agreed:
(1) To treat Detroit as an emergency area, and give pre*
ferred treatment to contracts that will help relieve Detroit's un-
employment;
(2) To set up a special task force to study auto production
and Industry unemployment.
Auto-union boss Walter Reuther offered to be "the prole
arlat window-dressing for this task force "
"You are the biggest business I know." quipped mobilize.
Wilson.
And the meeting broke up with a laugh
(Copyright. 1961. By The Bell Syndicate, inc.)
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FRIDAY. JANUARY 11. 15
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER _
PACK
Truman Gives Ike Green Light
To Quit NATO For US Politics
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 11.(UP)Presi-
dent Truman said yesterday he will not recall Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower from Europe, but will not
stand in the general's way if he wants to come home
and campaign for the Republican Presidential no-
mination.
I i While praising Eisenhower as a grand man,
Mr. Truman said he does not think' the country
would fare well under any Republican.
He promised to campaign for the Democratic
Presidential candidate t' is tall no matter who he
is.
The President declined again
at his weekly news conference
to say whether he will seek re-
-election.
* But he did say that his re-
fusal to have his name entered
In the Minnesota primary did
not preclude action on his part
and merely meant he was not
ready to disclose his Intentions.
Mr. Truman also said that he
definitely will make known his
political plans before a Repub-
lican candidate Is chosen.
There had been speculation ,.r------
that he might wait to see wheth-, was no use telling him.
[ i,er Elsenhower was the GOP| Mr. Truman called Harold E.
'^choice before deciding whether Stassen. another announced GOP
to run again. candidate, a wonderful man but
Mr. Truman said several times declined to estimate his poten-
that he will not relieve Elsen- tialltles as a Republican office
hower as supreme commander of! seeker,
the North Atlantic Pact forces I
unless Eisenhower requests it. Mindful of Mr. Truman s high
But he also said he will not praise of Elsenhower, a reporter
Reminded that he had aid
earlier he thought the situation
in- Europe would not interfere
with Elsenhower's intentions, Mr.
Truman said he still hoped the
situation would ease up by July
when the political conventions
are held.
The President said again that
he thought Sen. Robert A. Taf t
(R. O.) would be the easiest
Republican candidate to de-
feat. Asked why he thought so,
Mr. Truman said that If the
reporter did not know there
(NBA Telephoto)
ADMITS KIDNAPING Ricky HendHcksen.14, gets a warm
embrace (ett from his grandmother, Mrs. Thomas Flowers,
in Salt Lake City, Utah, after he was found chained to a
bed. He had been held prisoner for 10 weeks. John Be
.light) admitted to police that he kidnaped the boy. Billet
was picked up for robbing a bank and then told of the
kidnaping. ._______
stand in the general's way If
he wants to enter the political
field and be a target for mud,
rotten eggs and criticism. And
he said be would have no
hesitation opposing Eisenhow-
er if he should decide to bid
for reelection.
The President then went on to
' say that Elsenhower would have
to be relieved If he wins the Re-
publican nomination.
Elseohower-for-Presldent head-
quarters announced that Gov.
Frederick G. Payne of Maine has
/endorsed Elsenhower for the
I GOP nomination. Payne said
I Athat "America and the world
|i\V-eed 'Ike.'"
) Elsenhower supporters hinted
/ they were trying to line up other
i "big names" for their campaign.
Mr. Truman said he had it
In- writing from Eisenhower
that he would stey at his post
as supreme allied commander
in Europe as long aa necessary
or aa "long aa the President
thought he was needed."
asked If Mr. Truman thought
Elsenhower would make the best
President if a Democrat could
not be elected.
The President, who had been
In high good humor most of the
press conference, stopped smil-
ing and said he-had not said
that. He added slowly that he
did not think the country would
be good under any Republican.
Getting back to Elsenhower, a
reporter asked:
"How could you run against
a fellow you like so well?"
Mr. Truman, a veteran of the
political wars, said he could do
It easily and had done It before.
The President brushed aside
the suggestion of Sen. Paul H.
Douglas er be nominated for President by
both the Republicans and De-
mocrats with different vice pres-
idential running mates. Mr. Tru-
man said a one-party system Is
the road to Communist.
Balkan Alliance Seen
With Tito As Member
ATHENS. Jan. (UP).-The Mea
of a Yugoslav-Greek-T/.kUh de-
fense alliance, first broached
after Tito's break with the Co-
mlnform in 1848, has moved
from the realm, of possibility to
probability. .
Such an alliance would be a
major step toward Yugoslavia's
entry mto the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization.
With Yugoslavia in NATO, the
West would have an unbroken
chain of states allied against
holding the Dardanelles, the
Aegean, the eastern Mediter-
Ike-MacArfhur
Political Fight
Unlikely In N.H.
CONCORD, N.H.. Jan. 11 (UP)
The chances of a battle be-
tween the forces of Generals
Douglas MacArthur and Dwight
D. Elsenhower in the New Hamp-
shire presidential primary ap-
peared dwindling today.
While petitions to place Elsen-
hower's name on the Republican
ballot began circulating, two;
MacArthur supporters announc-j
ed they would run as unpledged |
delegates.
Atty. Wayne Crosby of HMs-
boro and Charles Holden of Han-!
over, both outspoken MacArthur
backers, announced they would
not attempt to have the name of!
the deposed Far East command-
er printed on the ballot for the
March 11 primary.
The 20-day period for propos-
ing presidential candidates yes-
terday and It appeared that Els-
enhower's name would be the
first, if not the only, one sub-
mitted.
It was uncertain whether two
other avowed candidates for the
GOP nomination would share
space on the ballot with Eisen-
hower.
But Harold E. Stassen an-
nounced he will confer today in
Boston with his New Hampshire
backers. The former Wisconsin
governor ran second to Thomas
E. Dewey In the New Hampshire
GOP balloting in 1048.
One of Sen, Robert A. Taft's
principal supporters, Atty. Wes-
ley Powell of Nashua, said he
would confer today with the Ohio
senator at Washington.
Gov. Earl Warren of Califor-
nia, only other avowed GOP can-
didate, has no strong organiza-
tion in New Hampshire and It
appeared his name would not ap-
pear on the ballot, except possib-
ly as a write-in.
The announcement of MacAr-
thur's supporters that they would
NEW RFC HEADHarry Mc-
donald has been named by
President Truman to succeed
Stuart Symington, who re-
signed, as head of the RFC.
McDonald was formerly chair-
man of the Securities and Ex-
change Commission.
ton today that both parties|
should nominate him.
"Barring a miracle," Douglas
said. "Elsenhower will be elected'
by an overwhelming vote If he Is.
nominated by the Republicans.
He said both parties should
nominate him with different vice
presidential candidates. '
MADURITO'S
1st. DIVIDEND SALE
1st. QUALITY FINEST
NYLON HOSE
59c.
PRESENTLY SOLD IN FINEST
STORES IN U.S.A. at____$1.50
SATURDAY 12TH FROM 2 to 5
P.M. ONLY
2 PAIRS TO EACH CUSTOMER
51-15
PAN AM A
COLON
ranean and the Balkans was run as unpledged delegates was
with an alliance which he called
an "An kara Athens Belgrade
Axis."
Tactically and strategically, all
military experts agree with
Tsaldarls. From a defensiva
viewpoint such an alliance would
eliminate the necessity for
guarding almost half of the 600-
odd mili Joint Greco-Turkish
frontier south of the satellites
interpreted as a move to avoid a
show-down in the,primaryfirst
In the nation this year.
If sent to the convention un-
pledged, the delegates could
throw their weight behind Taft,
If the general so requested, or
they could save their strength In
case MacArthur emerged as a
"dark horse" candidate.
Though Elsenhower In effect,
ruled himself off the Democrat-
chain of states allied again frontier south of the satellites, ruled himself off the Democrat-
Russian aggression stretchingt offensively It might secure the lc primary ballot in New Hamp-
H mmiW at Ipaxt. shir hv announcing his Dartv af-
President Given Little Hope
Of Higher Taxes Being OKd
WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 (UP)I announced today he will lntro-
Pesident Truman will ask Con- duce a Ml-lto reduce the legal
areas for another tax increase celling on the public debt from
despite warnings from his Con-1 its present $275,000,000,000 to
eressional leaders that It has lit-; $265,000.000,000
tie chance of approval, a source [
close to the Administration said He called It another attempt
today to "weave a web around the
At the same time, Chairman spenders" and predicted It will
james P Richards of the House win the support of all "economy-.
Foreign Affairs Committee pre- minded" legislators.
dieted the Administration's com- j
lng foreign aid request will be | He said It ties in with a bill by
"cut to the bone." I Rep. Frederic R. Coudert, Jr. (R., lwe j Greece aiW4 u. *, ,
The SoMth Carolina Democrat n.Y.) to put a celling on spend- have supported all developments
lng and appropriations to assure | ]eadlng toward better under-
a balanced budget In the 12 sUndln(fS.
months ending June 30, 1953.
from the Arctic to the Aegean.
Chances for such develop-
ments Improved with:
1) Increased American and
British pressure on both Athens
and Belgrade for a military
understanding.
2) Yugoslav Intimation, that
Tito might soon send a military
attache to Athens.
3) persistently circulated re-
ports of an impending' meeting
between Greece's premier Gen.
Nicholas Plastlras. and Tito.
The arrival of Sir Charles
Peake. new British ambassador
to Greece, emphasized Britain s
understanding of the mutual
problems affecting both Greece
and Yugoslavia.
Sir Charles served the previ-
ous six years as ambassador to
Belgrade and was regarded as
one of the prime mover In Ti-
to's break with the Comlnform.
John E. Peurlfoy and George
Allen respectively U. 8. ambas-
sadors to Greece and Yugoslavia,
have consistently urged Greco-
Yueoslav rapproachement, as
well as closer co-operation be-
tween Greece and Turkey and
Danube and would at least! shire by announcing his party af-
threaten the southern flank ot. filiation, Democratic Sen. Paul H.
any Ruslan drive west. 'Douglas of Illinois said in Bos-
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told a reporter It would be par-
ticularly hard to persuade Con-
gress to approve new economic
aid for financially-pressed Brit-
He said "hell will be raised" If
British Prime Minister Winston
hurehlll. who will address a
lint session of Congress Jan. 17,
;ks further U. 8. financial help
The Administration source did
jot say how much of a Ux hike I DETRorr, Jan. (UP).
tne fBMSSL w. Vwa tii m. ICeiger counter may soon be as
In his State of the Union mes- h a ^^ of ft lumber's
sage the Chief Executive said on
Geiger Counter Now
Used By Plumbers
much a
I.
'y that continued high taxes will
p needed and must be "shared
airly" among the people.
This led some members of Con-
gress to speculate that he will
eek correction of lnequittos" and
"loopholes" to raise some addi-
tional taxes without requesting a
general revenue boost.
Many Democrats have Joined
Republicans In opposing any Idea
r>f a general tax hike, at the
une "time calling for utmost ec-
lomy in government spending
.rhleve a balanced budget.
Sep. John Phillips (R., Cal.)
part of a plumber's
tools as the pipe wrench tre
Joke books say he usually for-
gets to bring.
Homer 8. Myers says he has
perfected an Instrument which
will detect leaks In a plumbing
system by use of radioactive
materials. He explained that he
lust puts the substance In a
drain, then follows It with his
Geiger counter to find out
where It starts leaking out.
"It saves both time and mo-
ney." Myers said.
Lv
FOR RENT
r
All or part of 2300 sq. feet of air con-
ditioned, well lighted space suitable for
showrooms, offices, etc., with 2000 oq.
feet warehouse space adjoining, in central
location on Va Espaa. Ample parking
space.
Apply HASMO, S.A.
51 Via Espaa Tel. 3-3022
or
SMOOT fir PAREDES
Tel. 2-0600
Although they have refrained
from public statements. Yugo-
slav representatives in Greece
recently have given Informed
quarters to understand that Ti-
to was seriously considering
sending a Yugoslav military at-
tache to Athens.
When normal diplomatic re-
lation between Greece and
Yugoslavia were renewed last
vear, the agreement called for
both nations to exchange mil-
itary attaches.
Greece took advantage of the
arrangement and soon sent -a
military representative to Bel-
grade A similar Yugoslav attache
had yet to arrive in Athens.
Meanwhile Tito has atoo re-
considered hi military views
about Greece. When the Yugo-
slav minister had his first press
conference in Athens last year,
he said Yugoslavia would expect
help from Greece In event of an
attack by Cominfonn states. He
refused to comment on whether
Greece could expect the same
aid from Yugoslavia.
Recently. Tito said he would
'assist Greece If she were at-
Stacked. .
Constantlne TsaWarU. leader
of the once powerful right wing
populis Party which was cut to
ribbons In last September's gen-
eral elections, first suggested a
Yugoslav-Greek-Turkish military
alliance.
Tsaldarls aid the only way of

TO ALL CANAL ZONE RESIDENTS
We are making a very attractive offer in our off the floor deliveries io all residents of the Canal Zone.
Please call at our offices on Calle Estudiante and Jernimo de la Ossa St., at your earliest convenience.
.
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type.hock .brber^thV.?V0,ut,0-'y new
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PAN-AMERICAN AGENCIES
CALLE- ESTUDIANTE AND JERNIMO DE LA OSSA STREET
)



V

j PAGE POUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY. JANUARY 11. 15
; Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes- Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
TERRY-
MYSTERY
QWSON 66T* CH*UK> \ 1 LRHV* TW* THANPOTT nOPUt ALON,
FOB THIS! 4WVON6 COULO V JOWtf. TUB/ WEWT FOOLMP. I PONT
S. S. Santa Barbara
Arritinc Monday
The Grace Line's shin Saiun
Barbara that is due in Cristobal
. Mondar has the follow! v pro-
minent passcngeis aboard, Doug-
! las Morgan, a memb.-r of trie
staff ol the U. 8. Embassy In
Santiago. Chile accompanied by
his wife, and Sisters Rose June
' and Peter Claver. teacher., o the
Vlllamaria Academy at Santiago.
I chile The ship is bound for New
York ironi Valparaiso
! BOA( Expects Big Yea-
Before he left the U. K. ate
: las; month cm a tour o Central
and South Africa Su Miles
! Thomas. Chairman ol b.u.a.v,..
""The year 1952 shows every
Inrospect ol being a high y nn-
portant year in British civil avia-
: tion B.O.A.C. will be introducing
the first civil pure jet airliner
I and will also inaugurate tourist
! rate fares on the North Atlantic
" and possibly on other routes.
i -I am taking this early op-
'portunity of going to Johannes-
: burg and to Central Africa to
ilnalizc the commercial ar range-
; merits for our first scheduled
'Comet service.
-Early in 1952 we shall start
.'regular' route ?.millarlzatlon
; 'flights and expect to take de-
'livery of enough Comets to en-
; ble us to begin regular pas-
jsenger carrying services by about
.' ^Naturally, the commercial
[aspects of this most Important
[ 'development have to be geared
' in with our partners on the
' 'Sprrnfebok route. South African
! l*ay. and the situation in
' 's-.->pt has a particular impact on
! 'this matter.
. "The much improved financial
; results of the corporation we
, i have made profits during the
1 .last eight months on our opera-
[ tlons as disnct from deficits
1 amounting to several millions of
! pounds for the corresponding
periods of previous years now
! put -us In a- position to study
fare structures that will appeal
[to a still wider section of the
.public and we are progressing
[towards the day when air travel
i becomes the accepted means of
[international movement."
I Former Health Officer
"Due For Visit
. Major General M. C Stayer,
,Ret.. who was Chief Health
! Ofiic?r for the Panama Canal
trom 1939 to 1944. is scheduled to
! -arrive on the Isthmus-Monday
Ion the S. S Panama for a short
' 'visit, according to the advance
passenger list from the Panama
Line offices at Balboa Heights.
The complete advance pas-
!gener list follows:
Mr. and Mrs H. B. Almond;
:Barkis M. Arkell ;Mr. and Mrs.
ArthurG. Baggot; Mr and Mrs.
Floyd H. Baldwin; Mr. and Mrs.
,Wm. J. Baldwin and son; Mr.
and Mrs. Charles P. Barton;
!Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Carpen-
ter: Mr. and Mrs. Archur C.
Cherry; Mr. and Mrs. John J.
'Cofcnard; Dr and Mrs. Chas J.
Cooriey; and Dr. and Mrs. En-
nls H. Corley.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. De-
Raps and daughter; Mrs. E. T.
[Drake; Mrs. Maria Ehrman;
Henry Ehrman; Rev. John H.
'Engstrom; Orville L. Evans; Mrs.
Loretta Geddes; Mrs. Jessie
Gettle; Dr. Robert J. Gortl;
I/Sat. and Mrs Harvey N.
lourley: Joseph F. Green ;and
.Irs. Rosemary Gros and child;
Eu-ene E. Hamlin. Jr.: Frank
''.'Hlrt: Mr. and Mrs. H. W.
Hock: Robert C. Robert C.
Hurdle; Mr. and Mrs. Zarhary
Taylor Jones; Miss Shirley J.
Jorgenscn: and the Rev. Ber-
nard A. Kerrigan.
Sgt. Walter Labiek; Cpl. Win.
G. LaFleur: Cpl Jos. M.
Lambrdcht: Mr. and Mrs. James
J. Latlmer and daughter: Mr.
and Mrs. W. H. Lee: Mr and
Mrs Earle Lew: Mrs Bert L.
"Lewis: Mr and Mrs John W.
Lev: and Mr and Mrs Elton E.
Lowe.
Dr. and Mrs. Win. F. Me-
Garvey: Mr. and Mrs. John G.
McCoy and daughter: Mr. and
i Mrs. Archie Manikas and son;
Miss Gertrude M. Milloy: Mr.
and Mrs. Howard E. Munro;
[Mrs. Teresa M. O'Donnell; Cpl.
'Parvln G. Peters: and Mrs.
.Beatrice M. Peterson and daugh-
ter:
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Reighard:
'Kenneth G. Reynolds; Mr. and
|Mrs. Chester Robertson; Dr. and
I Mrs. Monroe A. Rosenbloom;
|Mrs. Rose M. Rouleau; Mrs.
I Ethel K. Schaier and 2 children:
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Schus-
ter and son: Mr. and Mrs. Jose
Sert; Joseoh F Shea; Mr and
Mrs. J. Homer Sherman: and
Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Shirk
and 2 children.
Mr. and Mrs. Homer A.
Pneckenberger: Mrs. Ethel J.
Staats: Ma.i. Gen. and Mrs. M.
C Stayer: Dr, and Mrs. R. A.
Stiefel: Mr. and Mrs. S. Sune- I
taro; and Miss Regina Thomas- I
on;
Mr. and Mrs. Walramo Von
Scoeler: Mrs. Gabriella Passa-
montl de Von Schoeler: Mrs.
Betty Lou Vranesic: Mr. and
Mrs. Ruben M. Walters: Mr. and
Mrs. John H. Ward: and Dr.
and Mrs. Stuart Yntema.
(RSR FRSTLIH
JO BEAUTIFUL CARPETS.
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted
animal
9 Hindu queen
10 Siouan Indians
12 Fish part
13 Idolize
4 Grant
5 Minute skin
opening
6 Passage in the
brain
7 Negative reply
8 Lampreys
t Streams
15 African worm a Smudges
17 Hail!
18 Hinder
19 Slight taste
20 Symbol for
tellurium
21 French article
22 Sea eagles
25 Disorder
27 Observe
12 Destiny
14 Overtime (ab.) 31 It
iBMBlil^
-.? -r i-2i.li sr-ir.- -t;2 'jrj
id[l'JI2llli.i'ttl L.UFJ
shoot
Imported ^
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKVS&
ATALANTA BRAJSD
. are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
16 Mimics
23 Approach
24 Fur-bearing
aquatic
mammal
25 Song (comb,
form)
28 Diminutive of 2u Type of cheese 40 Fury
Edward
28 Rough lava P 1 k
30 Varnish
ingredient
32 Nobleman
34 Persian
tentmaker
36 Average (ab.)
37 Symbol for
sodium
SI Short-napped
fabric
40 Speedster
45 Blackbird of
cuckoo family
46 Nothing
47 Greek market
place
48 Against
49 It is a-----
rodent
51 Insert
S3 Introducer
VERTICAL
1 Window glass
2 Preposition
3 Peruse
its quills
voluntarily
32 Merit
33 Profit
35 Precipitation
39 Blow with
open hand
41 Eras
42 Symbol for
cobalt
43 Ireland
44 Rave
45 Maple ganus
50 Railroad (ab.)
52 Symbol for
selenium
BOOTS AND RER BIDDIES
A WARNING
'1W1
BY EDGAR MARTIN
tAj\ .ORV |I fcWfc \.\V:
own o^cfccA Lsmuxtcutft'J
TO OMMMRtU
V OOto'T -Vfc
IMMMft, Iv-VA-W.
voo mno|a\n-\ v
s mw-|w oa*
&OT \i> T* SAfYt ,\ GOT
ow W,
CHRIS WELKEN. Planeteer
HANDY THING TO KNOW
BV RU8S WINTERBOTHAM
i ,|F'.*rAy OUTBIDS
TUB MENTALEXI4
DIDN'T TELL VOV
EVEEVTMIN<5>,A1R.7.,
LIKE JUDCMAYK!
PRISCILLA'S por
TRUE TO HER WORD
CAPTAIN EASY
^THE
CAR 19
PACKED
FOR THE
TRIP WITH
JANE...
AT THE STATION
BT LESLIE TURNE!
VIC rLINT
LEAVING US, SPORT?
BV MICHAEL OMALLEI
V A I. VER MEEK
TELL ME, PRISCILLA! DID
OU MAKE A NEW YEAR':
RESOLUTION?,/-**
Ainn's
uf

m* i
CM'
FsUCW A C300
FVDESERVES
l-*\~CANDYU
A C3OO0 <3RL?
RESERVES SOME
CANDY!!
C2/ZD&
AND WHAT
WAS YOUR
RESOLUTION
! Bl ON BUNM
YOU LOSE, BUD
wwv wh >OU
IN &UCM A
WURirV TO
LEAVE IM*PEC
TOR
MOVE TWROUSW
CHANNEL*.
TWEYRE TOO
FOR
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
with
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAT
By J. ffc WILLIAMS
JUT A WORD, MX) UNKEMPT
OAFS/ TMI6 NEW YeAR.
" t MlSW TlWETO MEND
VOUR COAIKE, 8U*M T(?tS&
MANMERS.'HEREAFTER,
[ COAT6 /W THE TABLE,
NECKTIES, CLEAN
' ^HA^BS.ANDLET'
PA6S TMiNfiS AND
MOT LUNGS AT
THESDlBLES
Like WOLVES'
FIRST TIME THAT
BEPS HAP A FOOT
OITM FLOOR FOR
TVJO VEAR6.' NOW
THAT VOLTRE GO\Kf
TO WORK ON TH*
STUFF, VOULl- HAVE
TD BE MAKINJ' IT UP
UNPERNEATH, TOO,
ID KEEP IT LEVEL,
\HOKTT "OJT
NOT OKI MORe LIFe.'
1 SLESP IN A BEDROLL
ALL FALL ON HILLSIPES.
ROCKS. LUMPS AN' MUMPS.
AND I'M IN MkSHTy tSOOO
SHAPE FER THAT BED
THIS WINTER/



FR1U1T. JANUARY 11, 195i
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE P1TB
W
^acific S^ocie

i
'J
**

litre Carroll O. -Kochr
80. 17, &/L 3.L &tL* 3521
GENERAL AND MRS. WHITLOCK
TO ENTERTAIN VISITING OFFICERS
The Commanding General, United States Arm)', Carib-
bean, Major General and Mrs. Lester J. Whittock will enter-
tain at cocktails in their Quarters on Jan. 15.
Among: their guests will be Brigadier General John A.
Elmore and ten other visiting Officers from the Department
of the Army.
Tuesday from the United States
by plane for a visit of a few
weeks on the Isthmus where
they are guests at the Hotel El
Panama.
British Minister To
Vacation In Boquete
The Minister of Great Britain
to Panama, Mr. Brie Arthur
Cleugh. will leave Saturday for
a short vacation to be spent in
Boquete at the home of Mr. Carl
Axel Janson. the Consul General
of Sweden in Panama.
Countess De Rabago To
Entertain
The Countess dc Rabago. thi
wife of the Ambassador of Spain
to Panama, will entertain a
group of her friends On Saturday
at the Residence with a luncheon
and Canasta. Among those in-
vited to attend are Mrs. John
C. Wiley. Mrs. Murray M. Wise,
Mrs. Francis K. Newcomer, Mrs.
Herbert D. Vogel, Mrs. H. L.
Donovan, Mrs Elisa Heurtemat-
te. Mrs. Adolfo Arlas and Mrs.
Carmen Arias.
Prominent Passengers
Sail Today On Ancon
Mx. Karl R. Bendetsen. As-
sistant Secretary of the Army
and Chairman of the Board of
Directors of the Panama Canal
comapnv and Mrs. Bendetsen;
The' Honorable Foster Furcolo
and Mrs. Furcolo and son; the
Honorable Errett P. Scrivner and
Mrs. Scrivner; and Mr. Mat-
thew Robinson. Special Con-
sultant to the Assistant Secretary
of the Army and Mrs. Robinson
sailed today for New York aboard
the S. S. Ancon.
"Miss Nora Isabel Schlomlng
and Joseph Lynwood Cummings
were married Friday morning,
Dec. 29, in an Informal cere-
mony at the home of the bride-
groom's sister, Mrs. Dale R.
Shockley, of Albuquerque. New
Mexico.
'The Reverend Ira J. Bailes of
the Monte Vista Christian
Church officiated.
"The bride Is the daughter of
retired USN Captain and Mfs.
Hans. M. Schlomlng. Mr. Cum-
mings is the son of the late Mr.
and Mrs. J. A. Cummings of
Enid. Oklahoma.
'The bride, given in marriage
by her father, was attended by
her sister, Miss Beatiice C.
Schlomlng, as maid-of -honor.
Dale R. 8hockley was best man
for his brother-in-law.
"A small reception for mem-
bers of the couple's Immediate
family and close friends was held
following the ceremony.
"The couple will be at home
early in January at 2929 North
Adams. Albuquerque. New Mex-
ico."
Rotary Club Holds
Weekly Meeting
The Panama Rotary Club held I
Its weekly luncheon meeting!
yesterday at the Hotel El Pa-
nuns. The topic of Rotaryi
Education was delivered In Span- '
Ish by Mr. Carlos Icaza and in
English by Mr. Dave Robles, both
of whom are Rotarians.
Mrs. Davis Resigns
As Brownie Leader
At a Neighborhood Leaders'
Committee meeting held Tues-l
day at the home of the Chair-
man Mrs. Edwin H. Eaton, the1
resignation of Mrs. G. Davis as
Leader of Brownie Troop No. 37 ,
was submitted and accepted A
vote of thanks was given Mrs. |
Davis for her work with the
troop.
Other important matters were
discussed and It was decided that
the troop will meet In the future
at the Naval Station Chapel.
Those attending the meeting
included Mrs. C Balbirnie. Mrs.
W Davis. Mrs. A. Days, Mrs. S.
Fields. Mrs. G. Berglund. Mrs. !
J. Hewitt and Mrs. V. Stevens.
Senators To Survey DPs Offered Chance
Defense Housing To Build Homes
WASHINGTON. Jan. 11 (UP) MERIDEN. Conn. Jo-
Senate Banking Committee mem- seph Grillo, a florist, wants to
bers will survey housing at help displaced persons feel at
three vital Southern defense home, so he's offering them a
centers, it was announced today, chance to build their own.
They are the atomic energy
projects at Aiken. S. C. and Pa-
ducah. Ky.. and the navy yards
at Hampton Roads, Va.
The committee also scheduled
a hearing in February on reports
;of a "tight" mortgage situation
for housing in California, the
Southwest and the South.
A staff study was asked by the
'committee of financing of de-
' fense housing projects at Pine
Bluff. Benton-Bauxlte and Oam-
den. Ark.
I
Grillo promises to give 20
acres to any group of DPs who
will build a co-operative hous-
ing project. He pointed out that
many newcomers are skilled ar-
tisans who should welcome such
an opportunity.
Explaining that he can't for-
get the devastation he saw
while in Europe during World
War II, Grillo said. "I feel that
displaced persons should be giv-
en an opportunity to begin their
new life with dignity."
Itahmian Visitor Entertained
With Dinner
Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Hol-
lander entertained last evening
at their home in Balboa for
Professor J. E. MausteUer. Pro-
fessor of Forestry at M'fhigan
State College who arrived on the
Isthmus Monday and will leave
today for Medellln. Colombia to
establish a school of Forestry
there under the Point Four Pro-
gram.
Mrs. Kirkpatrick Sails
For States
Mrs. R. Z. Kirkpatrick, of
Rochester, New York, who has
been visiting her son and daugh-
ter-in-la*. Mr. and Mrs. R. H.
Kirkpatrick. of New Cristobal,
and friends on the Pacific Side
during tne-Holiday season sailed
today aboard the S. S. Ancon
to return to her home.
Mr. And Mrs. Breece To
Entertain This Evening
Mr. and Mrs. Laurence B.
Breece will entertain at six
thirty o'clock this evening at
their home In Balboa with cock-
tails and a buffet supper to be
given in honor of the Command-
ant of USARCARIB School and
Mrs. James W. Pumpelly who
Iwlll sail for New York on Jan.
19 en route to Norfolk, Virginia
where they will reside while Col-
onel Pumpelly attends classes at
the Armed Forces Staff College.
Mr. Matthew To Vacation
In California
Mr. G. E. Matthew, Chief
Hydrographer, plans to leave the
Isthmus Saturday by plane for a
month's vacation to be spent in
various parts of California.
Beesona Return From Miami
Mr. and Mrs. Carles L. Bee-
son returned Wednesday to their
home on Golf Heights from a va-
cation spent In Coral Gables.
Florida, during the Christmas
Holidays.
Woman's Auxiliary To
Hold Board Meeting
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Balboa Union Church will hold
a Board Meeting at the home
of the President. Mrs. Frank
Sulc. of 5754-B Diablo Heights,
on Tuesday, at 9 p.m.
THIS LITTLE LAMB WENT TO MARKET-WilUam Sergeant,
age 4, and hii brother, Robert. 2. are happy to be reunited with
their pet Iamb. "Molly," after the animal was rescued by their dad
from a Des Molnes, la., packing house Police are searching for
the "lamb-snatcher" who kidnaped "Molly" and sold her to a Des
Moines packer for $13.
Legion Auxiliary To
Meet January 23
Unit No. 1 American Legion
Auxiliary will hold and Executive
Board Meeting on Jan. 23 at 7:30
p.m. at the American Legion
Home.
Mr. ana Mrs. L. B. Moore
Are Honts
kn- and Mrs. -L. B. Moore, pi
Ancon, were "At Home" to their
friends last evening from five
thirty.to eight, o'clock. Special
guests fpr the occasion were Mr.
and Mrs. Gordon Ashe. of Call.
Colombia and the members/of
the Board of Directors of the Pa-
nama' Canal and their families.
rmmings-SclilominE
Marriage Announced Here
Word has been received on the
Isthmus of the marriage of Miss
Nora Isabel Schlomlng. former
Canal Zone resident, and Mr.
Joseph L. Cummings, of Albu-
querque. New Mexico. An Albu-
querque dally said:
Tea Honors Former
Resident Visitors
A tea. given to honor their
mother Mrs. J. W. Hearn. of
Meridan. Mississippi, and their
aunt, Mrs. J. M. Hearn, of Bir-
mingham, Alabama, former Isth-
; miar* residents who returned m-
Icentiy to visit their families on
the Canal Zone, was given by
Mrs. A. N. Beauchampand Miss
.Lucille Hearn on Wednesday at
1 the Army-Navy Club at Fort
Amador.
Presiding in turn at the tea
and coffee services were Mrs. J.
'j. Byrne. Mrs. R. A. Getman,
!Mrs. E. L. Payne. Mrs. E. M.
Browder. Jr., Mrs. F. M. Irwln,
iMrs. F. R. Johnson, Miss Bea-
trice Simonis and Mrs. J. H.
iTyreli.
Carnival Flag To Be
Raised At Union Club
When the counting of the votes
for the Carnival Queen takes
i place on Saturday evening at the
Union Club the Carnival Flag
will be raised. .
A fashion show by Felix B.
Baduro, Rhoda, Casa Motta and
Modas Marcela will be a feature
of the evening.
___^_
Mr. and Mrs. Hart Return
To California
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hart, who
have been guests at the HoEeTEl,
Panama for the past several
days, lelt Tuesday by plane fon
their home in Los Angeles, Ca-
lifornia.
COME AND HEAR
REV. VAN EARL HUGHES
Missionary to Costa Rica
SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 1952
COCOLI BAPTIST CHURCH
10:45 A.M.
7:30 P.M.
Mrs. Ehreth And Sons
Visiting Hero
Mrs. Orella Ehreth and her
I sons, of Tacoma, Washington,
arrived on the Isthmus recently
and will visit -rnlth relatives* in
Panama for several months.
*****
fa"
If you belong to the Armed Forces
or if you have a steady job come to
our Store and you can choose your
own terms to buy on credit.
n have the best Mahogany Furniture.
If you don't know our Club System
ns and you will be delighted.
86 Central Ave. Tel. 2-2404
Visitors At Hotel El Panama
Mr. and Mrs. A. Shllln and j
their baby daughter arrived
BIG PRE-INVENTORY
SALE
Time to add color and charm
to your rooms with our new
ALL-WOOL RUGS
at COST PRICES
i
We're clearing out our RUG DEPART-
MENT. and in order to do it fast
we're putting the cost price tag on each
RUG.
Cash Credit Club
^BlERlfl
Before her wedding day
the most important day in
her lifemake sure your
daughter knows how essen-
tial douching with such an
effective product as Zonite
nften i to feminine cleanli-
ness, health and lasting
happiness in marriage.
Weak, homemade mixture i
Mich as salt and water can
!\ot and do not give the
great germicidal and de-
orforo/n action of Zonite.
Yet Zo.mte is tp SAFE
even lo the most delicate tis-
*u'*. In fact, no other type
of liquid antiseptic-germi-
cide for the douche of all
those tested is so powerful
yet so sake.
Its revolutionary principle
discovered by a famous
.Surgeon and Chemist/<>
nite helps guard against
infection by killing imme-
diately all germs on contact.
I -c as directed as often as
necessary; however, make a
regular habit of using it two
or three times a week with
perfect safety! All drug-
store*.
SCHO-LL'S SERVICES
Panam No 68 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments. Corns, Callouses. Ingrown Toe Nails.
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments. Massages,
Slenderizing Machines, Turkish Baths. Male and female
operators.. For information call: 3-2217 Panama.
812 a.m.: 26 p.m.
AVE.CENTRALyCALLE 21E..I*TEIS..2-1830
_________________________________Y 2-1853 |
om'te
ANTISEPTIC
AmetMg
ttatte-
LARGE SELECTION OF
French L. rusia I
TNI f INItt CIYSTAI MAOI
All Patterns In Open Stock
* Easy Terms Available
foryfeodyRsaJs ClassiiWi
PAUL J. KIENER
OFFERS
U. S. LAMB ARMOUR
LEGS OF LAMB...........1.29 lb.
LAMB LOIN CHOPS........1.49 lb.
LAMB RIB CHOPS.........1.19 lb.
LAMB BREAST for stewing. .50 II).
Genuine Imported PECORINO CHEESE
RICOTTA MOZZARELLA
New Low Prices for
Genuine ITALIAN OLIVE OIL
VEAL SAUSAGE FOR ROASTING
Readv to Eat
BROILED CHICKEN
PAUL'S MARKET
Panama's Only Air-Condltloned Sanitary Market
PANAMA'SNEWESTadFMST JttNMmiH)
*. Omtnieaa CWb
Takes great pleasure In announcing
the limited engagement of
AL MARTIN'S ORCHESTRA
for your danctaa? pleasare V*-.:
PLAYING NIGHTLY (except Monday)
IN THE POPULAR BAMBOO ROOM
VISIT PANAMA'S POPULAR LATE SPOT
THE ZEBRA LOUNGE
Rolando to mix your Kenny Adams at the piano
favorite drinks playing your requests
WE SERVE THE BEST LUNCH IN TOWN
dally from II a.m. to 3 p.m.
Quick Service------75c.------Generous Portions
consisting of home made soup
Entree (your choice) Salad Vegetables Drink
We feature choice
STEAKS
CHOPS
CHICKEN
(any style)
SEA FOOD
Native dishes
HEiTOR DOME manager
JOINT PAINS
Sudden stabs
or crippling stiffness
When Kidney* grow sluggishneed
to iing up you Orgin co fed danger
iignii jirrt and muscle pain re one
>f their They ma* mean thai youi
Kidneys are tailing to do then proper 10b.
which is to tiiiri harmful impurities away
rom the system
O Witt's Pill are specially prepared to
nelp restore your kidneys to then normal
ictivity By Chai tonii aed ntiseptii
-ft eci on sluggish Kidneys they tackle one
of the common causes of joint pains The
impurities which have given ns to roui
suffering are cleared oat of tne system, and
in gross leas as s natural consequence
We nave received letters 'rom Jl osei
the world written o grateful people who
base turned to Oe Witt's fills and round
Blessed relief They may oe rust what
you need Why not try them tor your
trouble' Goto youi chemist and obtain s
supply ot this tried tod trusted medicine
0e Witt v Pills
at Wo) s*C >*> >
CsaVtICA
LUMBAGO
BACKACHE
IOIN1 PAIN)
RHEUMATIC
PAINS
OUR fiUAMNTEl
L> Witt s Pilis are
made undei strictly
hygienic conditions
and each of the
ingredients used
conform Co the
most rigid tan
daids of parity
DE WITT'S PILLS
for Kidney and Bladder Troubles
DONT MISS
A MINUTE
OF THE FUN!
Attend all
the festivities
of the
Pre-CARNIVAL
Season!
Be sure to
VOTE for your
favonte
(anataate
cJor slueen
of the
11 tost ibxctttng
(arm val fever !:
(arm val
al
- '- .\
Tiotel
QC
F
natna
(Feb. 23-26)
Three Lovely
candidates await
your decision!
* Simia Mantovahi
* Maritza de (Huirrio
* Mary Walton
Guests at
our bountiful
Sunday Buffet
at 6:30 p.m.
in the PATIO
will receive
A FREE TICKET
to the
First Vote Count
for queen
to be held at 8 p.f&
Sunday in the P;rtio
(Entrance otherwise, SI.*))
4
Music for laming
at the buffet '
and vote count
bv
"
ANGELO JASPB'S
Super-Orchestra
Every cent spent for
food and drink at
El Panama until the
final vote count can
serve as one vote for
your FAVORITE
CANDIDATE.
A Rirkebv Hotel




PAGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1951
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
Se 4 Tl\oil Ai.
Phe-ae 3-t!il
KlOSKu l>t. LE8SEPS
rar..e de (.easea*
rnal
MOKRIXI.VS
Ke. 4 Fnerih Jm\j At.
rh.a 1-M41
BOTHA i;arlton
lt.N* Melenae An.
Phon* 33 -tela-
SALON DE BELLRZA AMERICANO
Ne. K West 111 Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
Ne i; "H" StreethNM
Ne. 12.17. Ceatral Ae C.I*
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
Politicians Squawk As Tturnan
GivesCleanupJob ToMcGrath
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobile
MISCELLANEOUS
RESORTS
De .* bare a VMhtot arefclaeaf Goiter's cottooes completely furnish-
FOR SALEMFHIGIRATOR. Norge.
25 cycle ond WASHING MA-
CMINI. G. I. 25 cycle in excel-
lent condiiior. 2 nnersprmg mot-|
tresses, choirs end other house-
Service Personnel and
Civilian Government Employes
F I N A N C I
your new or used car through
ing for States Tel.
2757. 816-D Empire
Balboa
Si
2-
hold articles RCA RADIO. Leov- GOVIRNMINT IMFL0YIS FINANCl
CO.
Fort Worth, Texas.
Government Employe and
Writ, Alcetielir. Aaaaa
. 2031 Awe.. C. Z.
FOR SALE
Miscelluneoiu
FOR SALE:
1948 Phi.co-Trop.c *"""
ber
cycles
console radio- phono. 60
like new Westnghouse
ator 9 ft 60 cvdes, excellent
condition. House 10-B. Margarita
St. New Cristobal. _______
Service Personnel in the Canal Zone
for 14 yeors. With our financing
FOR SALE;
heaters some
Cheap. All America
Several gas water-
in good condition.
Cables and
ed, one, two or three bedrooms
liners, gas refrigerators, gas
ranges, dishes ond kitchen, wore.
Holf a mile beyond Santa Clara
private rood to beach. For in-!
formation visit or phone Dogmor
Tivoli Avenue No. 6, 2-0170
Panamo.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Radio, Inc., Balboo, Canol Zone.
Inner l0' '* yeors. With our financing'-------------------------------------------
your insuronce automatically adiusted^ B'dsf *"< be 'eived '" he office
Mrittiae. Ocaonside cottages, Santa
Clara. Box 435 Balboa.- Phon*
Panama 3-1877. Cristobal i> 1673
FOR SALE:9 cu. ft. Coldspot 25
cvcle porcelain m ond out, $100.
00. Call 84-3H3.
FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
ator 9 cu. feet. $185.00. twc
years old. Qtrs. 78-D. Coco Soli-
to. anytime. _____
FOR ~~SALE: De Luxe Servel Gos
Refrigerator. Gos Sto\e. Living-
room Set. Dinuigroom Set. Silver
' City Heights 6131. apartment C
Help Wanted
to U. S. coverage.
AWtANGIMINTS CAM H MADI
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOIILt
_____________DIAUR_____________
FOR SALEBuying or selling anj
automobile? See Agencios Cosmos i
Automobile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-
4721, Ponoma.
of the General Manager. Commit- Wllllami Sonta Clara Beach Cottages.
sory Division, Mount Hope, Ca-i T* bedrooms Frigidaires, Rock-
nal Zone, until 3:00 p. m., Jan- 0 ranges
1952
Balboa 2-3050.
nary
when they
ill
Or
Gramlich's
Santo Clara beach-
cottioes Electric lea eoxw, go;
stoves, moderate 'rota*. Phone 6-
44 1 or 4-567.
FOR SALE:1940 Buick 2-door se-
don, good running condition. 48-
A, 4th St., Coco Soiito.
WANTED:Nursemaid to take caro;FOR SALE: Codillac Senes
" o ooby. Must sleep in. Inquire black 1950 iSept.) 4-door sedon
- 50th St. No. 5. Apt. 5. I $3.225.00. Phone 88-786.
OR SALE:Plymouth Coupe, mode'|
1940. good condition. Can bei
seen ot 827-B. Empire Street. Bal-
boa. C. Z. Call Corozal 2160.]
from 8 to 4 p. m. Sgt. P. Turner I
61!FOR SALE:S.lvertone 3
cord ployer. New.
be opened in public, for all
part of a 25,000 pound lot of!
poultry freed, consisting of bread
flour with added inedible tonk-
oge. Inspection ond particular? I HOTEL PAN-AMERICANO
moy be obtained at the Commis-
sary Division Cold Storage office
Mount Hope, Canol Zone.
f-OR SALE:Complete hobby shop
Power tools, oil separate motors
25 cycle, hand tools, extra mo-
tors ond miscellaneous articles
395-C. Cocoli. Phone 2-1953.
We have everything
to keep your Lawn
and Garden beautiful
during the dry season.
Tools
Hose
Fencing
Sprayers
Sprinklers
Wheelbarrows
Insecticides
Fertilizers
Weedkillers
Fungicides
GEO. F. INOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-9140
in cool
El Voile. Reservations.* Telephone
Panama 2-1112.
FOR RENT
Houses
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel F1 Piena
Selling: Abattoir. Panam
Forest (preferred). Clay Pro-
ducts. S. Fernando Clinic.
Tel. 3-4719 3-1660
speed re-
S30.00. House
FOR RENT:-Two bedroom Chalet
in El Valle near Hotel PanAmer-
icano. Phone Balboa 3763, or
Panama 3-3423.
07-B. Pedro Miguel, C. Z. Phone pQR RENT:Modern chalet in the
WANTED:Good experienced,
with recommendation. Must
in. Good salary. Tel. 3-0405. Pan-
ama.
.
WANTED
; Miscellaneous
cook!
sleep IFOR SALE: 1941 Tudor Lincoln'
Continental Radio, new leother-
ette, upholstery. House 2013-B or
phone Curundu 6159.
FOR-SALEZ948 Chrysler "Now Fl
Yorker" Sadan, 5 new tires, per-
4-506.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
WANTED:Terrace furniture, sec-1
ond hand, m good condition. Tel
3-0405 Panama._______
WILL *UY: Small sofe: Duronl
Phone 2-2226, Panama._________
WANTED:_Possenger flying, to coo"|
Costa Rica $30. round trip; or
MexifO. SI 40. round trip, on,
LACSA. PAA affiliate Coll Pon-
orro Dispatch Service. Tel. 2-
1655, opposite Ancon bus-stop.
Position Offered^
feet mechanical condition. Bargain
Inquire "Go. General de Seguros
S A." Plazo Herrera, Panamo.
FOR SALE:1951 Dodge "Coronet
Diplomatic" two tone, WSW tires
3 500 miles. Inquire "Inversiones
Generales S. A." No. 38, Jose
Francisco de la Ossa Avenue, Pen-
me.
:OR SALE:Cheap 1946 Chevrolet
four door sedan, perfect condi-
tion. Phone Panama 2-0816.
FOR SALE:Equity in '5l Ford Vic-
toria. Will accept older car in
trade Cocoli Police Station.
Spanish-English peaking young girli
with knowledge of bookkeep.ngj TAKI AOVANTAG Of YOUR
and stenography lo o.sist m of- GOVERNMINT IMPLOYI STATUS
Site, Telephone Alnombro Aport-|ARMY ^vy mm4 CIVILIAN IM-
rrtanes 1386, Colon. _______IPOYIS. YOU HAVI MONIY by
~ using the FIOIRAL SIRVICIS FIN-
ANCl CORP (Wothington D. C.)
foe ill ties available to you locally.
SEC US BIFORI you finance your
next new or used cor.
FOR YOUR CONVINIINCI our
'anted Position
XPERT Spomsh-Eng.'ish Secretary-
Steno. Experienced Executive and
Correspondent. Excellent record
Wh.te Ponomonian. Give full par-
ticulars saiary ond position open
Write to E. S Box 134. Panomo
SALE16 ft. Boot Sea-Mite
20 H. P. Morine Engine 4 Cycle,
excellent condition. Can be seer
at Cristobal Yacht Club or phone
John Allgaier, Cristobal 3-2486
FOR SALE
Real Estate
best section of Bello Vista: 3
bedroom, livingroom. diningroom
kitchen, maid's room, 2 bath-
rooms, goroge and all desired
comfort. $140.00. Telephone 2-
2260, Panamo.
MODERN FURNITURE
custom Bini.i
Slirx orrt Reupholstery
VISIT ill R SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto Herat
J r.diliOw-l? (AnlomuMIe Kaw|
free Eatteaates Pick** Deliver?
Tal. I-4I2S !:M a.m. lo 7-.ee am
FOR SALE:Lot in Parque Lefevre
700 Meters. Mariano Aroseme-I
ne No. 22 room No. 1, Harris.
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom concrete
cotage at Seo Cliff Acres (Be-
linda Beach; near Santa Clara
All tile floors, bath and roof and
cor port also furnished including
8 ft. Servel refrigerator and au-
tomatic Tappon Gas stove. Sacri-1
fice for $3.400.00 with terms i
See Anderson on Tract or Box
2616 Cristobal.
FOR SALELaundry (Launderette).
See at Galvez Building, 32nd St.
locol 14 from 4-6 p. m.
FOR RENT
Apartment
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
LC C C ^ fcj aj Modern furnished-unfurnished oport-
L J jUll J Iments. Maid service optionol. Con-
----------------------------------------i fact office 8061. 10th Street. New
dance now for Carnival'Cristobol. telephone 1386 Colon.
Learn to
time. Balbo
Dunn.
now
YMCA,
Harnett ond
New Books
FOR RENT: Modern apartment
two bedrooms, livingroom, kitchen
etc., $100. House No. 2, 41 St.
corner of Cuba Avenue. Apply
Quijano, 8th Street No. 15, Pan-
amo.
"Schnoatola, the Story of Jim-
office is located "at o" 29 on" auto- i Durante," written by Gene
mobile Row or call Don Pagento otlF.ow,er. ta one oi the new books
Ponoma 2-4555. i placed In circulation during the ROOMS AVAILABLE Lie**, cool
FOR RENT
Rooms
4263
:OR SALE1950 Packard.
ator, tooster, rug. table
miscellaneous 446-D,
Balboa 2-2715.
FOR SALE:1939 Pockord 8 radio
Good condition, see it Saturday
and Sunday. Gamboa. House 167
B. Phone 6-249. J. Morris.
Acheson Again Urges
Soviets To Return
Lend Lease Vessels
WASHINGTON.Jan.il (USISi
.Jne United States urges the
Sowet Union to return the 670
vessels still due this nation un-
dec the wartime lend Lease
Agreement or agree to .submit
ths> matter to the International
cojit ot Justice.
Hi a note transmitted to So-
*iej AmoaUaAcior Alexander 8.
Panyushkin. U. S. Secretary of
State Dean Acheson noted that
thC Soviet government had re-
jected the 8. proposal that
trvCquestlon of a settlement be
submitted to arbitration and re-
Tte*ed earlier U. S. demands for
return of the hips.
XJie lengthy negotiations be-
tween the two countries have
correemed only those lend lease
vessels of peacetime usefulness,
which were held by the Soviet
Unjpn at the end of the war.
Sueh equipment was part of
about $11,000,000 worth of goods
aenl to the Soviet Union during
thexwar by the U. 8.
The U. 8 government esti-
mated the value of this t\pe of
goods held bv the Soviet Union
at-the end of the war at about
1^600,000.000 but later offered to
acoep* approximately $800.000,-
000 at settlement. Last August
thr Soviet Union offered $300,-
OOfCpOO to settle the account. The
United Sutes rejected the offer
aa inadequate.
*i* Soviet Union, so far. has
returned only 47 vessels, the last
f-^vhich were two icebreakers
tht were turned over to the "" Telegraf. He told West Barita
past week by the Panama Canal
FOR SALE:1950 Chevrolet 4-doorJTJbrary.
sedan House 0766-D. Williom-j
. sonJW____________________I Besides being the story of one
"OR SALE:1949 Chevrolet. 4 door,r tne most widely known and,
Plymouth 48. 4 door, like new I beloved figures in the entertaln-
Tel. 2-4624. ment world. "Schnozzola" is also
OR SALEs-n"
lent condition.
7 a. m. till 3:30
V30 till 10 p. m.
5 SALE:Practically new, Ford
1951 Radio and Chevrolet 1948
radio and ports. Gorage "Cubo"
in front of Ameglio Iceplont No
8. Juan B Sosa St
entirely ranevatce net wall tur
nisheje). Ratee reasonable. Bche-
le only. Ineuirt at Tba Ama-
rUaii Clue facing Oa Lessee
ark.
- =r ;a recreation of the Broadway of
Oldsmobi e Excel- Drohlbltlon hi-jinks and hi-Jaok-
ings. fabulous show people and
legend-making happenings.
The complete list of new books
at the library follows:
OR RENT:Furnished room with
meals. Telephone 3-3921, No.
34, 45th Street. Panama.
CARLSEN
RECEIVES
over-
Prrrious
M EM CRIES
Preserven Forever!
Baby's first hoes preserved forever
In sol.it metal bronze make a match-
less gift Th.s .smart miniature oval
photo f'jmr and baby shoe combi-
nation style 628 S10.SS. Larger base
Wilb two shoes ,ty|e Sit SM.tS.
Other style* from JS 75
WRITE FOR DTAII.S!
DUNMORE AGENCY
EatafeU Inetltato Nacional
Panama. R P.
Bargain For Sale:
PRE-FABRICATED
ALUMINUM HOUSE
Living Diningroom, three
Bedrooms. Kitchen and Bath.
Four Closets.
PRICE: $3,950.
AGENCIAS LUMINA, S.A.
Tel. 3-1033
Social Science Panama
'Honomie and commercial condl- (Continued from Page t)
tions in Panama. Greenwav; ,
Gatewav to citizenship, u. sJth crowd he was too
'eiriqe. immigration Jc Naturalization1 whelmed to say much.
tncvcie service: A foreign policv for' Carteen, Dancy, Parser, and!
Owen. Americans. Taft Yo-r Income Cindr. Leslie J. O'Brien Jr. of!
tax, Laaaer: and God and man '* United btates destru>cr Wil-
at Yale, Buckley. 'ai(1 Kf,i,n which remainca a-
FOR SALE1940 Oldsmobile. $185
00. Can be seen across from Ga-
tun Post Office.
FOR SALEM. G. Sport Roadster
951 5.000 miles. Perfect
condition. Telephone 2-1800 un-
_til5p m. 2-3627. evenings.
German Complains
US Dalles Use
80% of Newsprint
BERLIN, Jan 11 (up) /
West Berlin newspaper publish-
er. Amo Scholz, complained to-
day tnat German newspapers
were unable to help democrcy
become. more popular in Ger-
many because American news-
papers bought up more than 80
per cent 3f the jeorld's newsprint
supply.
Scholi publishes the West Ber.
Unated Sutes late last year.
Far
AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE
ICE
V
reporters and City parliament
deputies discus-ing better report-
ing of public affairs, hit and
other German papers could print
more n?ws if they could buy
(newsprint
He laid that "popularizing de-
muci i y is a tough Job if you
cannot print sufficient news to
inform vour readers on their
government."
Drawing Drawing, painting
c sculpture from models. Glllen.
Travel. Biography and History
Strange lands and friendly
people, Douglas; Dizzy; the life
At personality of Benjamin Dis-
raeli, Pearson; Schnozzola; the
story of Jimmy Durante, Fowler;
A man called Peter. Marshall:
and the making of modern Hol-
land, Barnouw.
Fiction Mr. Johnson. Cary;
longslde the Enterprise during
the last stages of the epic, weie
all given bouquets.
Asked what he is going to do
now Carlsen quickly replied:
"Sleep."
As Carlsen spoke school-
children crowded along the
edge of the nearby docks
burst into cheers which echo-
ed through the narrow streets
of this old seaport.
Approximately 7,000 persons
massed In the town square to
pay a second tribute to Carlsen
SMhS?M& P. .EH* Dancy. Carlsen received a
SSfafttSe.-1^?!^ iiSSiS: tWUflS ovation as he stepped
TS fi?: ^ t,D "i'P1.8 forward for the second time.
!L y,hlr klrKl DUk The reSCUe 0i CarlWn nd
5?.!5. Mt*r ... ,!Dncy was the climax of the
Pnma Canal Periodical drama-packed struggle to save
K. wTi, QalaP** Yacht I the Enterprise. The ship was 35
' miles south southeast of Lizard's
Head, in some of the roughest
I waters off England's"*shores.
Its flying bridge dipped far
. into the water and 25 foot
{waves made it Impossible to at-
tach a new towllne to replace
Club. Vtckers.
Carnival Queen
Vote Count Set
For 'El Panama'
Boston's Swains
Warned To Watch
'Firebug' Sweaters
B08TON, Jan.. 11 (UP). "Ex-
plosive" sweaters have been dis-
covered here and State police
have warned young women as
well as men against buying any
such garments from door-to-door
salesmen.
Manuel B. Bello. 37. said he
bought four for $20 from a ped-
dler and tested two of them be-
cause he remembered reading
about inflammable sweaters in
California.
When they burned quickly,
Mello turned the other sweat-
ers over to State police and tests
were made by state chemists
who reported the material con-
sisted of a rayon fabric with a
trick rayon nap,
The nap te what causes the
material to ignite readily. Both
nap and fabric are Inflammable.
and a lifeboat sent out from
the kizard's Head lifeboat sta-
tion.
Carlsen and Dancy pulled
themselves up \from the radio
cabin along ropes they had rig-
ged earlier.
The ship was slowly rolling
over in the water. The two
men climbed to the top of the
superstructure and onto the
stack.
They waited until the funnel
was almost horizontal with the
sea.
Dancy Jumped first. He was
caught by a huge swell and
The
whose
West Berlin publisher,
paper comes out with a
the one which snapped early
Thursday. Gale winds up to SO
An open-air festival to be held miles an hour whipped the sea
in the patio of the hotel El Pa- i into a fury,
nama Sundav evening, will in-' Carlsen's decision to abandon
augrate the first count of votes'ahlp became known when the
tor Carnival queen for 1952. : Keith, told him a Royal Wavy
helicopter was on the way.
In the absence of a nationally Carlsen agreed to climb to the .
sponsored carnival thi year, the highest point of the ship with swept back from the ship,
hotel is sponsoring the event Dancy to enable the helicopterI Carlsen took one last look at
which will begin Sunday with .to lift them off. (the Flying Enterprise. Then he
the raising of the 1052 Carnival But howling winds and rain plunged Into the sea.
"** frustrated that rescue plan. Thel The Turmoil picked up Carl-
helicopter, which took off from sen first, then Dancy.
Three candidates have been the Culdrose naval air station Then Capt. Dan Parker of the
named by various local groups to: lurched so perilously that the Turmoil turned his squat ship
lend luster to the proceedings pilot was forced to turn back, toward port and aped at its full
which will Include three vote! The Keith radioed Carlsen 10 knots away from the sinking
vounts. to end In a free trip to that the helicopter could not Enterprise.
Costa Tilci. Cube and Miami for I make it. Then the Keith's skip-1 The tug Dextrous stood by
daily avrrage of six pages, as-the queen-elect fnd her runner- per said:
'the doomed Enterprise aa she
De I sepa Park
Tel.: t-MM 1-2W*
*erled that the entire press of up. The candlcites are Miss I'lfs up to us to" take you off wallowed hull-up "for an hour
Fiance re-elved the same amount Mary Watson and Miss Marltza now."
r>f new-print n. month as used De Obarrio of Panama Citv and The
and then plunged to the bot-
----- destroyer closed in. So torn. Only an untidy patch of
ally by one of 'he big New York Mitu Son* : umoyanl of Ancon. did the tugs Turmoil and Dex- bobbing debris remained to
t(|r newspaper ~ ~ ". Vc Z. j trous and the French tug Abielle mark her grave.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 (UP)
President Truman yesterday
placed the Administration's
' promised clean-up of government
corruption In the hands of At-
torney General, J. Howard Mc-
Grath, whose own department
figured in the tax scandal ln-
' vestigatlon.
The President at his weekly
news conference squelched ru-
mors that McGrath soon would
resign or be kicked out of of-
fice.
He said he has dropped all
plans for a special clcan-up com-
mission and that the attorney,
general will handle the Job in-;
stead.
Mr. Truman's announcement
brought angry protests from Re-
Eublican congressmen who had i
een demanding that McGrath!
be fired.
Rep. Patrick J. Hillings. Cal.i called the action a "white-:
wash" of the Justice Department.
"How can McOrath Investigate
himself?" he asked.
Other Republicans said the de-
cision indicates the President is
not "sincere" In his promise to
weed out wrong-doing. They de-
manded anew that McGrath quit
and that Congress investlgRte
i his department.
Mr. Truman did not explain
why the Idea of a special antl-
| couuption commission was dis-
carded.
He had previously offered the
Job to Federal Judge Thomas F.
Murphy of New York, who first
' accepted it and then changed his.
! mind.
The President was asked about'
i a report that Dr. Daniel A. Pol-
I ing, unsuccessful Republican
| candidate for mayor of Phila-
delphia, will figure in the clean-1
up. He said only that Poling Is,
one of his frequent consultants.
Mr. Truman promised in his
State of the Union message Wed-
nesday that corrupt government
officials will be "weeded out" and
"punished."
He had already proposed a
wholesale reorganization of the;
i Internal Revenue Bureau with
the view of protecting the na-'
' tions tax-collecting agency from
"Influence peddlers."
Congressmen who protested
the assignment of McGarth as
clean-up director, included Re-
publican members of the House
Ways and Means Subcommittee
which has looked Into widespread
i tax scandals.
Rep. John W. Byrnes (D, WU.)
[ said there has been nothing "to
'change my mind that McGrath
should be removed. This seems to
'signify a lack of determination
i on the President's part to do the
I job that 1$ so necsaary to be
done." '
Rep. Claude I Bakewell (R.,
Mo.) suggested that "If the Pres-
ident is sincere In his claim that
he Intends to clean up the gov-
ernment, he had better start at
the top and clean out J. Howard
McGrath." _______^^
Local 900 To Air
Reasons For Banning
Parley At Meeting j
Discussion on Gov. Francis K. I
Newcomer's reply to Local 900,
GCEOC-CIO. on part-time em-
ployment for local-rate employes
wili be one of the main topics of'
a meeting to be held next Tues-
day at the Pacific Clubhouse.
The reason for the union's re-
fusal to attend a conference with
members of the board of direc-
tors of the Panama Canal Co.
also will be aired at the meeting,
which is scheduled to get under-
way at 7:30.
On Monday stewards and col-
lectors of the Local's Balboa
chapter will meet at a regular!
Stewards Council In the La Boca1
Clubhouse to discuss a plan of
action for the next few weeks.
It Is understood that a quiz
contest for stewards and collec-1
tors, with prizes ranging from i
$2 to $5. will be proposed at the
meeting. After the meeting a
party will be held in Local's of-
fice.
Palestine Body
Flayed As Unfair
To Arab World
PARIS. Jan. 11 (UP) The
Palestine Conciliation Commis-
sion came under heavy fire as
the United Nation General As-
sembly's ad hoc political com-
mittee went Into its fifth day of
discussion on Palestine.
Arab representatives and Pa-
kistan attacked the Commission's
report cs unfair to the Arab
world and as an attempt to side-
track the Important problem of
the Arab refugees' future.
Tala' Yakub Al Ohosaaln of
I Yemen crargeri that Britain had
left Palestine In utter chaos and
anarchy, and that she held "the
first responsibility for the sltua-,
tion prevailing due to her policy!
of ignoring the repeated crimes
committed by Zionist terrorists
during tne British Mandate."
He said that 'he Palestine Con-
ciliation Commt!rlon had sought
a "tricky outlet" to Justify the
negligence In carrying out Its
duties in fields of internation-
alization of Jerusalem's repatria-
tion of refugees and territorial
settlement.
Ohossaln added that the Mid-
dle East peoples felt that the
spirit which actlvlated the Se-
curity Council'*, decision on Ko-
rea should have been shown In
efforts to carry out the General
Assembly's resolution on Pales-
tine. ...... i
THE POWERS STEP OUT-This mi*hv have oeen a shot cut
freight out of one of Tyrone Power's swashbuckling movie roles,
but it's not It's merely Tyrone and his wife. Linda Christian,
decked out for New York's Knickerbocker Ball at the Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel. All proceeds of the glamorous event went to aid
Korean war wounded.
WELL POTTEDPaul S. Gable hammers away at finishing
touchas on world's Urgeat cast steel cinder pot. fabricated by U. S.
??''.ior n*w wo^k, Morrlsville. N. J. The 10 K -foot deep pot.J
I2tt feet across the mouth, will handle 42,800 pounds of hot slag I
Irish Start Grim
Recovery Task
For DC-3 Victims
CARNARVON. Wales, Jan. 11
(UP)Rescue workers started
today the grim task of recover-
ing the bodies of 23 persons
who died last night when an
Aer Lirjgus i Irish Air Lines)
DC-3 crashed in the Welsh
mountains in a storm, killing
all on board.
It was the worst crash in
the airline's history. The plane
was bound from London to
Dublin.
Cristobal, Ancon
Optical Sections
To Take Cash Only
The optical sections at the An-
con and Cristobal Commissaries
will accept only cash for pay-
ment starting Tuesday. Jan. 15,
It was announced Thursday at
Balboa Heights.
libe sections have been ac-
cepting either cash or coupons
In payment for eyeglasses.
CHIMNEY PURLOINED
LYNN. Mass., (UP). Harry
Wilson reported the theft of a
chimney from the roof of an
unoccupied house he owns.
WILL'S SON AS WILLOld-time movie fans might say, "Why.
that's a picture of Will Rogers aa a young fellow." But actually,
it's a picture of Will Rogers, Jr., as of the famed cowboy-
humorist, who will portray hia father in a Hollywood movie, "The
. ___^r=r_-^WiU_Rogers Story"
t
Samuel Smug!
Samuel Snag is smart, 'tie trae.
If yea ware he, yaa would be toe!
Sam can always Had good baya,
Ule secret U to adverta*! Jg*
S-



FRIDAY, JANUARY 1. IMS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
L*
-Atlantic S^ocieli

### W*. Wm JL VIA
Bo, 195, (alum V^L/lmt Q-l 378
DESPEDIDA FOR MR. AND MRS. BAILEY
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Baijry. of Brazos Heights, were hon-
ored with a despedida cocktail party given by Mr. and Mrs.
Gilbert Morland at their quarters in the Fenton Building.
The affair wai given Thursday evening to honor the
popular couple who are taking a nine months' vacation,
leaving for California during the weekend. Seventy-five
friends called during the evening.
i
IN HOLLYWOOD
By ERSRINE JOHNSON
o
TONI
Famous Italian Hairstvlinr
All eligible ladies are cordially i ..gKTNF 10HN8ON
invited to join the Club. Ke ^ggfW^flA). _
iMsUnn arp held everv second !,_,_. .u- e....n- nmthi v
meetings are held every second
Tuesday of the month.
Visitors in Port
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ford,
of Norfolk, Virginia, arrived In
Cristobal today on a Holland
steamer for a day in port They
Mr. and Mrs. Van Stolen Morning Coffee in Gatun
Return irom Jamaica Mrs. Frederick Willoughby was ----
Mr. and Mis. William A. Vau hostess for the first meeting of tneir snort wwu
Stolen, Jr.. o Gatun returned by her sewing group since the holi-
plane. Tuesday evening, tfom day season.
Christmas vacation spent at The ladles leclded to ir;et
Constant Sprmg, near Kingston every two weeks hulead of every
Jamaica, mey were joined oy week.
their daughter. Miss Lee Van isi- Those attending were: Mrs. H.
cien wno ilew down irom Rich- p. paddock, Mr3. Wayne Hatting,
inond, Virginia, wnere sue is a Mrs. T. W. Fels. Mrs. E. A. Cox,
college student. She also spent Mrs. Ralph Graham. Mrs. Sam
some time in Nassau e.i ruuie Mauldin. Mrs Carl Nix and Mrs.
to Jamaica. Wallace Thrift.
pirate movies, swashbucklers and
Be- science-fiction wares from other
hind the Screen: Ouch! What studios.
western movies on the TV chan- ---------
neis have done to Hollywood's Italian actor Vittorio Gassman's
super-westerns. quotes about Shelley Winters af-
Llterary agents are suddenly lerhellew from Rome to Holly-
finding it tough to peddle horse wood to spend six days with her,
opera scripts at the major can go down as the understate-
i studios and the word's out that ment of the year,
were the guests of Mr. and Mrs." mllljon_donar buckskin dra- Gassman told Rome reporters
5 Croft, of Gatun. du t m(( wU1 be exUnct by the end when he returned:
--------- There is nothing but mutual
Straws in the wind: Absence of sincere sympathy between me
shoot->m-up dramas on Para- and Miss Winters."
mount's 1952 production list. His Italian wife, from whom
concentration on sea stories and he's separated, ls'the reason, of
big Umber epics by Nat Holt and course, for his delicate wordage
Pine and Thomas, and a rash of Shelley, not so delicate about it
_____----------------------_------------al) gajsshp-u fiy to Rome to visit
JACOBY ON BRIDGI
tyflit t*'f"
ASK FOR
Rebekah Club Elects Officers pre-Carnival Dance at
The Cristobal Reoekah Club Monaco Garden
met Thursday evening at the The third counting of votes
home of Mrs. Robert 'i nomas in for Queen of the Carnival de
Gatun, witn Mrs. Margaret centenario In Colon will be held
SchubeiR and Mrs. A. J. Cun- Saturday evening at the Monaco,
iimgnam as co-nostesses. Dancing will start at 8:00 p.m.
The admission fee will be a dollar
Mrs. Percy Lawrence, retiring f0r men and no charge for the
Bv OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
president, presided at the elec-
tion of oiiicers. The new officers
are: Mrs. Lorey Wray, president.
Mrs. Nan Pihigren; vice-pres-
ident; and Mrs. E. E. Stem. Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
young ladies.
Elks Danee Tonight
Votes for the Elks Queen for
'he coming Carnival Season, will
> counted tonight at the Elks
Club. All candidates, their fam-
ilies and friends ate cordially
The dark horse was won by ,
Mrs. EUuoetn vv'aliams. Tne mvited to attend the dance.
prizes for games went to Mrs. ---------
Dorothy Tneriot, Mrs. Beity rpo wives Club Meeting
O'Rourne, and Miss Grace WH- The memberof the C.
Hams.
The other members present
were: Mrs. Olive Halloran, Mrs.
Violet Deaklns.Mrs. Freda Boyd-
stsom. Mrs. Emma Estes and
Mrs. Phyllis Turner.
O.
Wives Club held their regular
reeling Tuesday afternoon at
fie C P. O. Club with Mis. :
Jean Johnston presiding in the
absence of the president, Mrs. J.
B Berube. ...
Mrs. Millie Smithers and Mrs.
NORTH M
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Opening- lead? K
Eleanor Roosevelt
Says Soviet Should
Study Democracy
him.
Doctors are worried again
about Fred MacMurray's wife.
Another relapse after signs of
recovery .. Richard Rober, star
of "The Well," is heading for
Boston to resume his shattered
romance with textile heiress Cyn-
thia Pierce.
PARIS. Jan.- 11 (U8IS).- Mrs.
Franklin D. Roosevelt says the
Soviet Union should learn to
understand the democratic form
of government and stop expect-
ing it to collapse.
I "They had better learn to -
understand it." the acting head Jan.et- *"%
of the U. S. Delegation to the lv|f;
II finally made up its mind
about Tony Curtis' true love. Pi-
per Laurie will co-sUr with him
in "My True Love." Peggy Do*
was first announced for the role,
ihen Tony's wife, Janet Leigh,
wasn't the
"What is-meant by control of a.
U HoSes for the afternoon ; fine, but you.always know what
United Nations General As-
sembly said this week before the
Assembly's Social Committee,
'because It is very strong, since
it comes from the people them-
selves people whose souls can-
;not be bought.
"It b a total lack of under-
standing on the part of the
government and people of the
I'SSKs which has made them
believe that a democratic
country rould not control its
economy through action by the
people."
Mrs. Roosevelt was among sev-
eral delegates who answered So
Hollywoodites returning from
Rome report that Lia de Leo,
the movie siren who linked her-
self with Bob Taylor, Is In the
doghouse with Italian movie-
makers because of her front-
page statements about Bob. No-
jobs since "Quo Vadis."
Spechlized in
Permanents Hairstyling
Cuts Tints
CALL for appointment
2-3346 Panam
REX BEAUTY SALON
No. 5 Ith of July Avenue
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
While 100.000 People Moot
Presents
The boys were debating who
made more moneya rare art
collector or a rare diamond col-
lectorwhen Alan Wilson Inter-
rupted with: "A rare tax col-
lector."
; children's Home by Mrs. Do- __ ^^ ^ {o_ example. CmWlU."he"Eg %f. School teacher."
othy Lowe.-------------------------3outn lost control of the play, plains why the Soviet Union re- caufleld'i impersonations
It wasn't his fault, however. Juat fuses to repatriate children c/TXlah Bankneai Katie Hep -
keep your eye on East and see taken from Greece during the Sand Gtawr Rogers had tne
KSA! E M.MS7 K2f**SS aftLK ^VrndwalLnRresoun8ding on her
tish Rite Temple m Balooa for
Mr. Thomas S. Roy, D. D.. Most
Worshipful Grand Master of Ma-
sons in Massachusetts and the
Grand Master, the Right Wor-
shipful Herbert H. Jayne.
The Masons attending from
the Gold Coast were: Messr
Worden French, Master
Journers. Lodge Curtis
Master of Slbert Lodge.
Bigelow. Jr.. J. W. Nelson. C.
F. Delaney, William Badders,
Frelerlck Wllloughby, Starlord
Churchill. Robert N. Ruley Leon
Egoli and Wf C. 8mlth.
Winnino Photos
'T:By Servicemen now ----S.'%,'".,, __ ^nfeases-si
On Display In Zone
the six. South next led the eight
if hearts toward dummy's king
hoping to land In dummy for the!
Economy note: The Paramount
studio cafe has switched from
linen to paper napkins.
"The average Soviet citizen
probably loves children as
much as we do." the British
delegate said, "but this has
never been raised to the level
nnUwal ^.,wen n dtaSuv'M he took the ace of hearts f ,,ernment policy.
raphy Contest went on W. EajJt could return ft dlamond, but; ___ soviet Union
Mrs. Kirkpalriek Complimented ,>day l"f,^%^tSVlavton Fort'South would discard instead Of against men's right to choose ------ g.-,
with Dinner ForAAmD,r.S^yuarrv;rufing. West would take the sec- their own country because they httby ole* Cawini.
Mrs. R. Z. Kirkpatrick a lor- Kobbe Corozal and uarry!ond defensive trick with the ace Cannot admit to themselves that ________ __Z7T____. Domar-
mer Isthmian nurse, who Is visit- Heights. of diamonds and return a spade. people want to flee from their Shudders dept. Fa
lng her son and daughter-ln- This contest, opened wj.per nnimv would wm with the ,o-ealled workers' Daradlse."
law In Cristobal, was compli- sonnel of all branches of_U: 8
Friday, Jan 11
P.M.
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15VOA Stamp Club
4:30 What's Your Favorite
6:00Happv The HumbugCla.
Aliare 8.A.
6:15Request Salon
7:00Barchester Tower (BBC
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00 NEW8 and Commentary
Raymond Swing (VOA;
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Commentator's Digest
9:00To be Announced
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures ol P. "
(BBC)
11:00The Owls Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Off
Gene Tierney, down In Argen-
tina for "The Way of a Gau-
ariruesch0'" is f>"to of rumors about a rift with
Alam Clock
o^aeworke"r."'paradse.'" ISTir^T^SffiS^'^
Mrs.Roosevelt began btr.ffr ft ^."BB,
Dummy would win with the
n,rti A ace of spades to lead a club. Mrs. Roosevelt began nanra- ii-f. ~\\ _T____i_ fan
mented ltha tamil*- dmner Aimed Fprcet, was Imukura d. *J,d wke the queen and marlts by ^^^ out that since }gX_f*J3 io ^mrt any
party given last evening by Mr three years ago to imulate in d ruff tnirri { UnJ naj bfen magazine wr ters to orna any
andM?s. Carroll Kocher of Bal- terest in Photography as an off lace^o^cun ^ ^^ th n Wndg of ,t. wok*on his wl e UttlrJ
boa at the Hotel Washington. duty eattonaliu:Uvtty lor, co ^_ thM defensive' tackB *n the UN refugee lflWwjS%&Sffi'SSiR
The other-guesU were Mr. and service men and women. t ick. but the rest would be particularly the United Nations'!- J^S^S^tlon^nAN
Mrs. Ralph H. Kirkpatrick with i Prlze-w nnlng p^ugrnanPsh tig.: South'^ I refusal to force persons to re-, morte tei tatlvely tttled An AT
Patricia and Mike Kocher. remain at these Army post Ub won the MCondt m to death Jn cow- fair in TrinUad tont a remake
---------. S'l" oUontVv,8 Vht'hlti will be' trick with the king of hearts, de-. lrlel the Soviets dominate of Gilda. but it s definitely
Mr. Stevens Guest at 20 to 29 the exhibits willl be c,ubg /meMe,' The ,ree countries of the world GUdish entertainer
Hotel Washington shown at the libraries at Fort f cluh(J and f. nQ Qne snould be The picit line An' etrta,n"
Mr. C. W. Stevens, of New Davis Fort Oulick and the Ar-.can o ^ ^^ country in aTrnidad nigh club and her
Jersey, vice-president of themy Hospitalla.Fort Clayton j~ h Qnce m0re East of origin against hU will... There loyer (Glen Ford- become m-
Rust-Craft Greeting Card Com-! "Rest Period.' a rmotograph of M. m He refu8ed to;ls n0 detef,ate around his table volved in a spy ring.
uany. is a guest at the Hotel,a sailor snoozmg in the bow |er-rutf except those of the Soviet Na- __ _------- ,-
Washington. Mrs.Stevens arrived,a ships anchor, was Judged |ov makes the **, of 'Si who wiU not feel the Unl-1 A dog breeder around town is
Monday on the Ancon and that the llrst pr^e w toner I; will [._n South makes the ted Nations must give Its full introducing a fern, le co 1.lieh ose
day left with Mr and Mrs. L be shown with 11 other. P^" contract,East returns a diamond, !streneth to the effort to secure -puppies were sired by Lassie as
W Mcllvaine for a trip to El v.inning photographs all sub- com g^ dlscards. West takes ;his basic freedom.
Valle and other Interior towns, r.iitted by members of tne u o|th ace of diamonds and returns.
Thursday Mr Stevens and Mr Armed Forces. d Dummy wins and re-
R. E. Hopkins, of Diablo, tran- Additional units of the *'"" fur^s the%even of hearts, and:
sltted the Canal. Though he has nlng photographs went on dk-, l take only the ace 0f;
resided on the Isthmus for the,play at the same tine in Army "J^an
past 45 years, this was Mr. Hop-libraries throughout the world. ^ E t re{u8ed to over-
kins' first transit, by boat. He After being shown at Army'to- nlff declarer returned the seven
had walked through, during the staUaUon. to the moth of Jan
Lassies Ex-Woof."
HEADACHE?
kins' first transit;, oy ooac ne,i' ,\:r'^,CA,r^ ruff. declarer returned tne seven ; m sssmoi -n ----------
had walked through during the stallations In the month of Jan, of hpart. tr0m the dummy This .. ,. ..
consuueuon of the Big Ditch.- exhibit of the photographs win JJX onent for which East cauud by acid indigestion or temporary sluggtshnes.
--------- _.. J3,0 arranged for the general pub- had been waiting. He stepped up, ,-w.u.
Mr. and Mrs. Metsler Overnight "- "3I--- ..j-./t-*!. "' -"""
1 llc '- c i *#.. f with the ace of hearts and put; Got sparkling Eno ... today! Lot it
The Special Services office of b retumir.g a spade. nii_ your ck headache fwo
,v the USARCARIBha' announceo ,aum3wydeclayrer couldn't get out wuy.: EnyQ quickIy heip.neun.lii.
i- 'hat plans are being made to A..mmv exceot bv ruffing a \_Z___ ^-~_->, _riri .nd Eno
at Washington
Mr. and Mis. HariT.' Metzler ..
were guests at the Hotel Wash- 'hat plans, are being
lneton last evening, before sail- show the pictures In the Canal
ing todav to make their home in Zone and Panama communities
the States. I during the month of Feb.
of dummy except by ruffing a..,
spade or a diamond. This brought, ^ speedy, gente laxa-
him down to one trump. whUe needed!
Fast till had two trumps. South nve wne" "**"*"
Then discovered that hehad lost I. ^aASANT- as a glass of spar-
**ltSis**icsciuea|feCSiv^^ of the hand No matter, kUng, bubbly soda water.
------------------------------ i M'how he wriggled and squirmed 2. IAXATIVI-relieves temporary
Z he could wl" only nine tricks.
the V-M tri-o-matic
YOUR H0 M[ I N I [RI A N M[M PI l U [ i
USE OUR
EASY PAYMENT PLAN
sluggishness quickly. (Take be
fore breakfast when needod.)
3. ANTACID relieves sourness, gar
and heartburn promptly.
Used by millions. Effervescent Enc
is also good for constipatiok.
DULLNESS. OVERINDULGENCE and
SOUR STOMACH.
At all druggistsGet Eno today.
BALBOA1
STARTS
TOMORROW!
TAKE GOOD-TASTING ENO
ITS MOVJCTIMK ..
Canat C^luonouses
SrtowMf Tonight.'
711
Bolivar
you should have
this V-M tri-o-matic 955!
your home entertainment picture just isn't
complete, without facilities for playing
your favorite recorded music and the tri-o-
matic 955 fits the picture perfectly! Equipped
with a six-foot plug-in cord and o four-fool
phono-cord, the tri-o-matic 955 plays through
the amplifying system of any T-V set or radia
Completely automatic for all record- ill sues,
ail speeds and shuts off automati-
cally after last record has played!
RADIO CENTER m
40
OPEN UNTIL 9 P.M.
'-a*3Cs3CT3Ce]s3^^
Audi* MURPHY Brhn DONLEVY
"KANSAS RAIDERS"
(SatarOs?) "OOLDKN GIRL"
XT**..-1 EXTRA I
HIGHLIGHTS OF THL BOWL (AMES!
MLO HTS. ***
15 A S:l*
O_____
: ocoli
:I5 S:SS
Cionn rORD Viv.r LINDFORS
THE FLYING MISSILE"
(SstarOaj) -ON MOOWI.UiHT BAV
Dan ANDRr.WS CaiU BELINDA
"SEALED CARGO"
(Salara) "FLYINr. MISSILE1
bins CROSBY o >" WYMAN
___, llir,,r, Bins tBOSBV e "" w-^
F0K -*$UEL "HERE COMES THE GROOM"
,IS (SaMra-ay) HTRANtiERS ON A TRArN''
GAMBOA
is
______o
GATUN
I :H
O
rajHorea*!
Dan ANDREWS CarU BALENDA
"SEALED CARGO"
Auale MURPHY o Bi'i MAULDIN
RED BADGE OF COURAGE'
(Safraayl THRrF "LSBANDS'
I.-njr CURTIS o Pica* LAL'RII
Saturday, Jan. 12
A.M.
6:00Sign On
Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30 Dead Ned
8:45Musical Interlude
9:00NEWS
9:i5_women's World (VOAi
9:30~Aa I 8ee It
10:00NIWS
10:05 O the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Ol the Record (Contd.l
11:30Meet the Band
12:00 NEWS
P.M.
12:06New Tune Time
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Tour de France iRDF>
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date lor Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00 American Band Concert
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30What"s Your Favorite
6:00Guest 8tar
6:15Masterworks from France
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00 Gay Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45jam Session
8:00Voice of America
9:00To be Announced
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00a.m.Sign Off
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
DFRadiodiffusion Francaise
SAILOR GETS SERVICE
JACKSONVILLE, Fla \ gunners mate first class.
Cl ristopher J. Kyrus of Chicago,
was served breakfast in bed by
his executive officer after he
had won a fund-raising contest
to help needy children on
Christmas.
. nt~ a BIT a n tumia a) ruti L-numa
M*sGoAf "The Prince Who Was A Thief"
iv.....it., i "IT* rmiVT '
CRISTOBAL
Alr-TaMIIlM**'
IS S IS
(Saturday) "UP ntOXT"
Stephen McNALI.Y Gail RUSSCtX
"AIR CADET"
(S.luidaj) "AhUELS IN THE OLTtlELD
LAST DAYS
OF OUR TERRIFIC
RF ORGANIZATION
SALE
HUNDREDS OF ITEMS REDUCED
MERCHANDISE PRACTICALLY CIVEN AWAY
MORRISON'S
LEWIS SERVICE
Corner "J" Street and 4th ol July Ave. Opposite Ancon P.O.
A- .:.. ^



PAGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
-
FRIDAY, JANTART 11, IMS
Mays, Coleman, Merriman To Report For Service
This
Is Little League
Races I Smith Hurls Against Yankees
Tomorrow fon ignt. panama Games Off
POLICIES
In 3 spirit of helpfulness, we
ask that the lollo^iiv: policies
be mad? a part of the Little
League Program in local com-
munities These policies are
based upon years o thinking
and working In the program ot
Baseball lot Boys.
AWARDS
Leagues would be wise to pro-
ceed carefully In the matter of
prizes and awards at the end of
ach season. Awards ba-sed upon
the cold facts of tne League
core Book euch as leading hit-
her, leading pitcher, most home
tuns, etc., are easy to determine
and may. if the league desires,
be given. However, awards not
substantiated by actual records
iten lead to disappointments
and hard feelings. Such awards
should be discouraged. We ieel
that the league program itself
Is a tremendous award' to each
boy participating.
| In some communities tire
practice 01 awarding special
prizes, such as roller skates,
bicycles, fielders' gloves or even
ice-cream sodas, lor home runs,
doubles or strike-outs by the
pitcher, was adopted and proved
to be extremely detrimental to
Little League. It was found
that some players were more
Interested In winning P. milk
shake than in winning the ball
game.
For this reason, the Board of
Directors has taken a definite
stand discouraging the award-
ing of any pri?es other than
trophies or medals. Only the
awards mentioned in the first
paragraph are acceptable.
We wish to point out thai
every league should check the
State or Local Amateur Athletic
Association regarding prizes.
Some states are very strict and
you may endanger the bovs'
amateur standing if you don't
check.
EXHIBITION GAMES
Exhibition games should be
limited to one such game for
each regular league team mot
an Ail-Star Tcann during one
playing season. The All-Star
team should not play exhibi-
tion games.
, Participation In exhibition
games will be limited to teams
which are located within a 50-
niiie radius of each other. Rea-
sons: Too many exhibition
games could lead lo physical or
,'flnanclal exploitation of the
"players. Also exhibition games
could become more important
,^han regularly scheduled league
contests. The Board of Direc-
tors reserves the right to with-
draw' or cancel a league's fran-
chise if it is established that
exhibition games have been
'played to an extent or under
such conditions as to be detri-
mental to Little League Base-
-ball itself.
FIELD DECORUM
Manners and poise or. the
field should be on a high level
'.at all times. Only uniformed
players, managers and umpires
should be within the confines
of the playing field prior to and
'during a game. Except io; the
batter, the player "on deck''
;and coaehers at first and third
bases, all players should be on
^their bench or in their dugouts.
! A manager should not leave
his bench or dugout, except to
confer with one of his players,
or with an umpire when the
| question is a matter of rule. He
should nut smoke on the bench,
Jin the dugout or on the field.
'Riding'' the opposing team or
Individual players and umpire
baiting have no place in Little
League Baseball
Umpires should be dressed a-
like. They should approach tin Ir
mob in a manner as profession-
al as possible. They should con-
fer with the managers during
the game only on matters of
business and should ignore the
fans. They should not smoke
during the game. The goal, on
the part of everyone, should be
"action above reproach.''
tat Race -F-2" Natives6!- Fgs.
Purse: S275.O0Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Brochacito H. Alzamora 110
J -Embustero J. Phillips 110
3 La Prensa A. Bazan 118
4As de Oro L. Pea 115x
.">- Carbonero J. Baeza. Jr. 110
6La Negra B. Pulido 112
7Sincero C. Bovil 112
8Strike Two A. Enrique 107x
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Yankees.. .. .. .. 11 5 .688
Bombers.. .. .. .571
Bluebirds .. .. .. 8 7 .533
Brownies. .. .. .. 4 13 .235
Sam Snead No Newcomer To Panama
Fairways; Seeks Open Title Soon
BIRMINGHAM, Alabama, Jan. 11 (UP). The New York
Giants' center fielder Willie Mays has been erdered to re-
port to his Fairfield, Alabama, draft board for a new examina-
tion on Jan. 16.
The young Negro baseball player the National League a
Riokie-of-the-Year in 1851 failed his draft aptitude test last
October. ,
Eight Teams Ready
For (Z Elementary
Swim Championship
Balboa Pool will be the scene,
nd 9:."!(l a.m. this Saturday will
be the time of the annual con-
test.
The following elementary
school teams will participate in
the 22 events:
GAMBOA: (harlene Moreno.
Rill Miller, Theresa Dunn, J.
Crawford. E. Bleakely. Judy
Felps. Douglas McLean, Veronica
llolmer, James Pedersen, John
Morris. Janice 'Malone, Jon Snod-
grass. Jack Dunn, Rolando Win-
berg, Don Ryter, Lynette Hen-
dersanor and Sandra Morenc.v.
GATL'N: Bob Williams. George
Cotton. Bill Thrift, Mike Bar-
field. Mike La Croin. Leroy Wer-
line, Eddy Marshall. Harry Keep-
ers, George Slaughter. Ernest
Steibritz, Edwardo Bird, Helen
George, Pamela Theriot. Ramo-
na Anderson, Nancy Gibson, Clair
White. Rosalie Radel, Grace Ar-
go, Wendy Cotton, and Linda
Cunningham.
PEDRO MIGUEL: Ella Mae
Hess. Caroline Zirkman. Janet
Mulligan. Beverly Phillips, Bar-
bara Roger. Kathy Kircluner,
Sandra Dunning. Deanne Hoon-
ke. Anthony Kirkpatrick. Tom
Fbson. Bobby Norton and Bur-
ns Rogers.
CRISTOBAL: Sammy Katz,
Carol Seamon. Tivila Walsh,
Jackie Walsh, Keith Kulig. Diane
Gondhead, Francisco Katz, Mari-
Ivn Smith, Russell Favorite, Nor-
ma Ramirez. Mary Washbough,
and Jean Seamon.
ANCON: Tommy Bright. Bob-
by Maroney, Jeanette Merriwith-
er, Michael Bettsak. 'Mary Smith,
Dirk Goodin. Auristela Schmidt,
Dick Duran, Eva Tritikova. Maria
Vrela, Alcides Linares, and Ben
Morton.
DIABLO: William Mohl. Ralph
Shuey, James Gib-ton. Barbara
Bishop, Donald Terry. Joan
Dimpfl. Edward Stoddart, Linda
Hoskins. Sue Taylor, Alberto
Sehevalm, and Ed Shuey.
MARGARITA: Carlo Flennik-
en, Wayne Bath. Edward Cun-
ningham, Samuel Rowley, John
Bennett, Irl Sanders, Margarita
Ins'lke. and Dale Clark.
BALBOA: Leslie Henning. Bev-
erly Smith, Karen Clark, Doro-
thy Miller. Sandra McKay. Bill
Hamma, Jimmie Ford, Robert
Maxon, Bobby Barnes. John
Barr, Naomi I.etvin, Kay Flow-
ers. Dick Henning and Lee Hen-
ning.
2nd Race "B' Natives 6'2 Fgs.
Purse: S350.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1 Mr. Espinosa B. Pulido 110
2Pregonero O. Graell 109
3Lolito J. Bravo 112
4 -Taponazo C. Kam 103x
5Mandinga E. Sil vera 111
3rd Race "G" Natives 4'/i Fgs.
Purse: S250.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1 -Componedor M. Arose. 100
2Panchita E. Silvera 110
3Apolo D. D Andrea 114
4Piropo E. Dario 100
5Chispeado T. Medrano 108
6-Libertino C. Iglesias 112
7La Mucura E. Julin 108
1th Race "D" Natives 4'i Fgs.
Purse: S300.V0 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1 Arquimedes H. Reyes HOx
2 Golden Faith V. Arauz 120
3Domino P. Ordonez 120
4Mueco E. Julin 113
5Villarreal E. Silvera 107
fiLittle Lulu G. Snchez 120
7Romntico C. Chong lOlx
5th Race "C" Imported 7 Fgs.
Turse: S656.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Newminster C. Iglesias 110
2Pampero II T. Medrano 110
3Welsh Loch B. Pulido 112
4Beduino E. Silvera 100
6th Race "H" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Paris A. Phillips 120
2Trafalgar C. Ruiz 115
3Interlude J. Samaniego 115
4Miss Fairfax B. Agulrre 118
5Hit O. Bravo 120
6Danescourt B. Pulido 114
7Pincel
8Delhi
9Mr. Foot
V. Ortega 111
R. Ycaza lOlx
J. Bravo 120
7th Race '1-2' Imported%Yt Fgs.
Purse: S375.06 Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Doa Eleida V. Castillo 118
2 -Walrus R. Vsqaez 120
3Costina E. Dario 112
4Zevelania D DAndrea 120
5V. a Terre C. Iglesias 112
TONIGHT'S GAME (7:38)
Mt. Hope Stadium: Bombers
(Smith 3-1) vs. Yankees (Frica-
no 3-1).
LAST NIGHT'S GAMES
Panama Stadium: Bombers vs.
Brownies and Yankees vs. Blue-
birds (postponed because of lack
of electric power).
TOMORROW'S GAMES
Balboa Stadium (7:38 p.m.)
Bombers vs. Yankees.
Coln Stadium (4 p.m.)
Brownies vs. Bluebirds.
The classy veteran Negro A-
meriean League righthander
Theollc Smith is scheduled to
start for the second place Bomb-
ers tonight against the league
leading Yankees at the Mount
Hope Stadium. Marion Fricano!
will opDose Smith on the mound.
The breakdown of the Paltllla
Electric Plant caused the Pana-
m League to postpone last
night's doubleheader at the Pan-
am Stadium and to switch to-
morrow night's scheduled Yan-
kee-Bomber game to the Balboa
Stadium. Tomorrow's scheduled
afternoon game in coln will al-j
so be played.
The league expects games to
be resumed at the Panam Sta-!
dium by next Tuesday.
Meanwhile, it has also been
announced that the Caribbean;
Confederation office, situated
under the Panam National Sta-
dium, will remain open during
the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 12:30'
pm and 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. for
the attending of all matters per-'
tainlng to the Caribbean Series
late next month.
All the games of the series will
start at 6 p.m. There will be two
games each day for six consecu-
tive days.
Admission prices will be $5 for
box seats, $2.50 for reserved seats
and $1.50 general admission
Tickets for the entire series
will go for $25 box seats, reserved.
seats $10 and general admission
Reserved and general admis-
sion seats tickets for all games
of the series may be obtained on
the Installment basiswith a
slight extra charge.
8th Race "1-1" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1 Cobrador
2El Mago i
3Lcnico
4-D.D.T.
5Miss Matty
C. Rui 116
V. Castillo 114
E. Corcho 112x
O. Chanls 113
B Agulrre 114
6Miss Cristina Y. Ortega 120
r- Mariscalito A. Phillips 120
8Baby Rol F. Rase 120
9Tupac J. Baeza. Jr. 115
10Bosforo E. Julin 110
Juan Frenro Tips
Bv CLOCKFR
1La Prensa La Negra
2Lolito Pregonero
3Apolo Componedor
tLittle Lulu Villarreal
jWelsh Loch Newminster
6Mr. Foot Miss Fairfax
7Zevelania Walrus
8-'Miss Cristina Miss Mattv
9Tropieana < Hortensia
10Supersticiosa In Time
9th Race 'I-2* Imported6'; Fgs.
Parse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Charles S. J. Phillips 112
2Hortensia
3Tropieana
4Goyito
VBeach Sun
B. Aguirre 115
B. Pulido 115
C. Ruiz 111
E. A. Diaz I17x
Cth Race "G" Imported1 Mile
"arse: $450.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Rocky C. Lino 112
2Scotch Chum B. Aguirre 112
3Supersticiosa O. Bravo 112
4In Time J. Bravo 110
Tournament Slated
Atlantic Side Chess
To Start Monday
The Atlantic Side Chess Tour-
nament will be conducted by
the Cristobal Armed Services
YMCA starting January 14th..
All Chess players on the Atlan-
tic Side in the Canal Zone or;
Panama are invited to partlcl-,
pate. Entry blanks can be se-i
cured at the information desk,
of the YMCA.
The tournament director will'
be Mr. Weeks, present holder
ot the Isthmian Chess Champ-
irmshlD. Mr. Weeks announces
that the tournament will be run
on the popular Swiss System
which permits all to take part.;
Suitable prizes will be award-
ed to the champion and run-
ner-up.
The Cristobal Armed Services
YMCA hopes to conduct a tour-
nament to determine th? Isth-
mian Championship after com-1
pletlon of the Atlantic Side
Tournament.
Slammin' Sammy Snead Is no
newcomer to the Canal Zone.
That isto the oldtimers.
The 1951 Professional Golf As-
sociation champion who will be.
competing in the Panam Open
tournament at the Panama Golf;
Club Jan. 24 through 27 played;
the Panam course in November
1941_a few short weeks before
Pearl Harbor. And there are
many here who remember the;
day he Joined Jimmy Vincent,1
Al Escalante and Jimmy Demar-,
et in an exhibition round.
It was a typical rainy season
day. The course was soaked, the;
greens dripping and the specta-
tors and players drenched. I
But Snead was the same old
Snead. He shot a sub-par 70
and it was the first time he had
ever seen the course.
Snead, Vincent, Buck White,:
Clayton Heafner. Chick Harbert
and Henry Russell are slated to
Baseball, Softball
Between La Boca,
Silver City Today
Students of Sliver City and
La Boca High Schools will com-!
pete in softball and baseball
games to inaugurate inter-
scholastlc tournament series on
Friday, January 11. 1952. The
series originally scheduled for
nine games will be limited to
three games due to the dis-
qualification of the La Boca
junior College which failed to
produce a team for the series. I
The La Boca Lassies are eager-
ly awaiting the event, hoping
to make up for last years' show-
ing.
The bovs. however, won two
games and lost one to be;
crowned champs of the 195C-51
school year. Physical Director,
Ashton Parchment, faces the :
coming series with the quiet,
confidence of his numerous:
years of experience.
The Silver Cltv High School j
nine will probably swat at the
curves of "Ferdy" Alder or the
"drops" of Colon Colona. This
vear's team will also carry "re-
liever" Edgar Quillette. Other
players on the La Boca souad
will include. Griffith. Gittens.
Weeks. Roberts, etc.
This powerpacked lienup will
more llkelv than not hit at the
cannonbflll deliveries of Silver
Cltv's Ditcher Smith. Smith
singlehandedlv defeated La Boca
last vear when he limited the
entire team to a single infield
hit In the third game of the
series. Silver City won It. 2-0.
The girls will use Burke,
Joseph. Campbell and others.
Games are scheduled to be^ln
at 6:20 with the girls Dlaying
the first game. The bovs' game
will be played directly after
the girls are finished. The series
will continue on Friday. Jan-
unry 18 at Mt. Hope. Two earner
are also offered on this bill.
Moderate charges of 10 cents
and 20 cents will be collected
to help defrav costs of lights.
Everybody else will be there:
will you?......I hope so.
arrive here Tuesday, Jan. 22. to
get in a few practice rounds be-
fore they start playing for keeps.
Also due to arrive around the
same time are Roberto de Vlcen-
zo. Ral Posse and a host of oth-
er Latin American professionals
and amateurs.
Panam Is exceptionally fortu-
nate in attracting a player such
as Snead for the tournament.
Were It not for complete co-
operation from the local repre-
sentative of Chesterfield cigar-
ettesCarlos Eletaand the fact
that Snead Is not competing in
any of the winter tournaments
in the United States, it Ls doubt-
ful if arrangements could have
been made for his appearance.
Jimmy Vincentfor many
years the outstanding profes-
sional In this areamade the
contact with Snead in Florida
and Eleta and Chesterfield cig-
arettes and the Open committee
of the Panam Golf Club took
over from there.
The 37-year-old slugger from
Hot Springs, Virginia, has been
playing professional golf since
1934. and his list of tournament
victories covers one and one-half
pages of small type In the PGA
annual publication.
But his most recent 1951 con-
quests Include:
Captain and high point win-
ner on the United States Ryder
Cup team. Sixth ranking money
winner. The PGA championship.
Winner of the Miami Open and
the LaGorce pro-amateur tour-
nament. Runner-up in the Miami
Beach Open and the $20,000 Pabst
Blue Ribbon event.
Snead Is building a home in
Coral Gables, Florida, and an-
nounced last month that he
would not be competing in any
of the pro tournaments until
March. That means that he will
miss the Bing Crosby Open-
something he has not done in
many years as he ls a personal
friend and playing partner of
the famous crooner.
But he will not miss the Pan-
am Openwhere it will be
Snead against the field."
DOTS AND DASHES
Entry lists will be posted In lo-
cal goif clubs this week for the
convenince of club members who
want to play in the Open ..
Starting times will be arranged
for the local players so that they
may play and be finished In time
to watch the topflight profes-
sionals and amateurs. A golf
clinic will be held Wednesday,
Jan. 23, at 4:30 p.m. with Har-
bert acting as Master of Cere-
monies.. More about that later
but keep the date open as there
will be a cocktail party after the
clinic...Get your ticket (a buck
apiece i on the Pontiac being raf-
fled by the Tournament Commit-
tee to help defray expnses
Army Special Service Is making
arrangements for transportation
to and from the Panam club
for Army personnel.. .Don't be
afraid to play In the Open Just
because you will be competing
against the best...The commit-
tee wants a big fieldand a big
gallery.. The new golf rules will
apply to the Openwhich means
stymies WILL NOT be played
and when you hook a shot out of
bounds it will cost you stroke and
distance. .So keep your head
down, left arm straight and playj
in the Open. '
Two other Major League names were added to the Marineo
service list late yesterday afternoon.
A Marine Corps announcement oat of San Francisco reveal-
ed that inflelder Jerry Coleman of the World Champion New
York Yanks and outfielder Lloyd Merriman of the Cincinnati
Reds also have been called. Like Williams, they'll report for
physicals on April 2nd and, if accepted, will go Into uniform a
menth later.
Coleman, a reserve captain In the Marines, won Rookle-of-
the-Year honors with the Yanks in 1950. Last year Coleman
played only against lefthanded pitching: and batted .Ml. That
weak batting average was the source of a quip to newsmen to-
day.
Asked if he had any physical disabilities which may keep
him out of service, Coleman said, "Weak eyes. Look at my bat-
ting average." Actually, Coleman was a very valuable cor In
Casey Stengel's two-platoon machine. He played seeond, snort
and third baae and hit well in the clutch.
Coleman, who is married, the father of one daughter and.
soon to be a father again probably in May, says ho will re-
port for spring training. In New York. Yankee general manager
George Weiss said Coleman would be difficult to replace. ""But."
says Weiss, "if the Marines need him that la his first call of
duty."
Merriman. the Cincinnati outfielder called op yesterday, bat-
fed .243 for the Reds last year. Merriman never did quite Uve
up to the S25.000 bonus the Reds paid for his signature. Bat
he always has been a speedy, good fielder with a strong throw,
inr arm.
College Hoop Results
(Wednesday Night)
EAST
Pitts 7, Syracuse 49
Colgate 60, Cornell 34
Columbia 68, Harvard 51
Yale 64. Brown 59
Holy Cross 74, Trinity (Conn.) 50
Penn 79, Delaware 54
Gettysburg 86, Bucknell 79
Junlata 86. Dickinson (Fa.) M
Lebanon Valley 84, Susquehanna
44
Maine 72, Bates 69
Lycoming 75, Wilkes (Pa.) 5<
Penn Military 52, Swarthmore 51
Urslnus 76, Haverford 59
Vilianova 79, Creighton 61
Army 78, Puerto Rico 65
Lock Haven 81, Bloomsburg 68
Lafayette 67, Muhlenberg 57
St. Josephs (Pa.) 61, Elisabeth-
town 44
Rocheste 71. Allegheny 68
Geneva 72. Carnegie Tech 68
Providence 84, Ft. Devens 62
Scranton 83. Moravian 58
West Chester 84, Wash. (Md.) 70
Boston Coll. 83. Rhode Island 5
Wesleyan 70, Tufts 49
Colby 70, Bowdoin 57
Wagner 81. Pratt 44
Vermont 70, Cnlon (NY) 50
Arnold 84. Brooklyn Poly 77
Frank.-Mar. St. Albright 80
Stonehill SS, New Bedford Tea-
tile 35
Rutgers 88. Lehigh 76
Kings Point 65. Hofstra 58
Stevens Tech 75, Cathedral (NY)
62
I'psala 47, Newark Rutgers 44
Montclair 61. Bloomsfield 41
Bridgeport 85. Fairfield 66
Davls-Elklns 65, Alderson-Broad-
dus 60
West Liberty 97, West Va. Wes-
leyan 74
Rutgers So. Jersey 87, Trenton
Trhrs. 76
NY Aggies 73, NY State Tech 58
SOUTH
Mississippi 77, Miss. State 62
Georgia Tech 56, Auburn 54 *
Miami (Fla.) 106, Florida South-
ern 43
Wm. Mary 75, Hampden-Syd-
ney 69
Navy 77, Catholic Univ. 39
High Point 84, Gullford U
l.enoir Rhyne 96, Catawba 71
Spring Hill 52, New Orleans Loy-
ola 44
Appalachian 81, Elon 68
McCrary 69, East Carolina 60
Western Carolina 190, Piedmont
(Ga.) 62!
Johns Hopkins 83, Towson (Md.)
64.
'MIDWEST
Bowling Green 54, Toledo 53
Oklahoma City 53, Wichita 46
Youngslown 69, Steubenrille 4f
Louisville 77, Xavier (Ohio) 7
Kent State 70, Akron 53
Defiance 94, Cedarvllle 6*
Dayton 101, Ohio Univ. 71
Denison 83, Marietta 69
Ohio Wesleyan 85, ( a pit r I 68
Wittenberg 77, Heidelberg 63
Kentucky Wesleyan 84, Oakland
City 3
Klrksville (Mo.) 68, Parsons 47
Northern (ND) 62, Ellend.-.le Nor-
mal 61
Oshkosh 63, Milwaukee Tthrs. 57
Dickinson ND) 63, Valley City
(ND) 55
Dana 59, Grand View (la.) 49
Dekalb (Dl.) 62, Whitewater 59
Great Lakes 92. Perey Jones
(Mich.) Hosp. 56
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas State 67, Hendrix 40
Southern State 81. Ouach'.ta 53
FAR WEST
Eastern Montana 73, Alberta 60
St. Mary's (Cal.) 50, San Jos
State 49
Seattle 84. Western Wash. 70
Central Wash. 79, St. Martins
(Wash.) 63.
If you belong io the Armed Forces
or if you have a steady job come to
our Store and you can choose your
own terms to buy on credit.
We have the beat Mahogany Furniture.
If you don't know oar Club System
visit us and you wffl be delighted.
86 Central Ave. Tel. 2-1404
fie
RACES SATURDAY and SUNDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd-6th. 7th RACES
O N E T WO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
our patrons we are now
opera tine both at the
"COPACABANA" and
"SAVOY/'
'HftsVipV>Vvc"w
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
MM *?1CUlCQ 1R CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK
SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
5th Race
Pur^e: $650.00
"C" Importeds
7 Fgs.
Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m.
SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
1. NEWMINSTER............C. Iglesias 110
2. PAMPERO II............T. Medrano 110
3. WELSH LOCH.............B. Pulido 112
4. HEDIISO................E. Silvera 100
5th Race "B" Importeds 6V2 Fgs.
Purse: $750.00 Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m.
/. RATHLIN LIGHT...........H. Reyes 117x
2. PARAGON.................J. Bravo 115
3. KEYH4VEN.............. V. Ortega 119
4. MILROS.................C. Iglesias 110
8th Race "E" Importeds 1 Mile
Purse: $550.00 Pool doses: 4:40 p.m.
QUINIELA
J. ROADMASTER.............J. Bravo 120
2. CYCLONE MALONE.......B. Aguirre 114
3. ROSE HIP...............J. Phillips 108
4. SUN CHEER...........J. Samaniego 115
5. 4LTO ALEGRE...........G. Sanche* 110
6. IINNFY HEAD............O. Chani 106
7. /VEH/'VCO..............., E. Julin 112
8. NOTABLE................O. Bravo


M


mm-WT^




FRIDAY. JANUARY 11. 1952
'
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE Num
-----------------.------------ ,................... _. ------..... ....... ..... ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pan-Canal Bowling Association City Tournament Scheduled For Feb. 3
i-*

U.S. Senator Promotes Soccer
And Baseball In Both Americas
WASHINGTON, January 10
(U8I8) U. S. Senator Edwin
C. Johnson, Democrat of Colora-
do, ha* embarked on a program
to encourage the playing of
baaeball In Latin America and
soccer In the united States. Al-
ready, baseball Is played In
many of the other republics of
the Hemisphere and soccer Is
played as a minor sport In the
United States, but I 8enator
Johnson would develop major
competition In both sports be-
tween the two areas.
Johnson has sent three dozen
baseball bats and twelve major-
league baseballs to Santiago,
Chile, by air as an emergency
move In his campaign. They are
in answer to a letter from
James B. Noland, a young staff
officer In the U. 8. Embassy
In Santiago. Noland, a personal
friend of Senator Johnson had
written that he had been play-
ing basketball with some Chi-
lean youths and wanted to
teach them to play baseball. For
this purpose, Noland asked the
Senator for some used baseball
equipment.
In response, the Senator
bought new equipment out of his
own pocket and sent It to Chile.
He will later send a number of
baseball gloves.
"I believe my friend Noland la
on the right path to interna-
tional good will," Johnson said.
"Here is no finer way, I think,
than sports to build up a good
neighbor policy between na-
tions."
The Senator has long been
Interested in sports. During his
school days he played football,
baseball and basketball and ran
on the track team. He now
serves without salary as Presi-
dent of the Western Professional
Baseball League, one of the U.
S. minor leagues, comprised of
eight teams.
Special Troops Suffer 1st
Loss In Armed Forces Loop
Panama Armed Forces Baseball
League Standings
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Albrook........3 0 1.000
33d Infantry .... 3 0 1.000
45th Battalion.. ..3 0 1.000
764th AAA......3 0 1.000
Special Troops.. ..2 1 67
West Bank......2 1 .667
Atlantic Sector. ..1 2 333
Coco Solo......1 2 .333
370th Boat......1 2 -333
370th Shore.....1 2 .333
90Jd AAA"......1 2 .333
Cdrozal........0 3 .000
Signal........0 3 000
604th FA......0 3 .000
WEDNESDAY'S BESULTS
764th 6, Coco Solo 5.
370th Boat 10, Special Troops 0.
48th Bn. 8, Coroaal 4.
33d Infantry-11, Signal .
Albrook 21, 604th 11.
903d 7, Atlantic Sector.6.
West Bank 7, 370th Shore 3.
Special Troops dropped from
the list of undefeated teams in
the Panam Armed Forces Base-
ball League Wednesday after-
Soon to leave only four all-vic-
arious nines after the first three
contests for all teams. Albrook,
Entries Being On The Alleys...
Received For **** a* bo* ^ g ggtSff
^. I I X v In the Major League Tuesday ers just had a bad night. Allen,
lliahln ImirnPV "Ight the second place Max R. of Canada Dry. wp^hir'--" '-
1/laUIU lUUIIICy stempel keglars were able to er of the game with a 194 indivl-
take three points from the league dual and 509 aggregate.
-------- leading H. I. Homa team and Carta Vieja took Angellnl to
ffntriea are now helm* rnreiverf thereby cut their lead to only the cleaners (or shall we say Dls-
for the 1952 ClTv Tournament four potato. Bud Balcer was high tillers?) 4-0 and joined the gang
of the Pancanal Rowling Asso- for the Stempel forces while Sar-, crowding the top slot. Kelsey of
a 1024 game, high for the night gregate was tops for the niatch.
and went on to take three from Colston of Angellnl was nigh
the 7461st Signal. Bill Malee led scorer for his side. (In-ldF"'-"".
the Federation with the night's I hear that one of the players In
sanctioned by the American ^h aeries of 632 including one the game Uto be the reo,
Bowing Congress la open to all "'*" "? 24fl No,an also had a a very speclal presentation next
bowlers affiliated with the: 5Lmseerlers "r Signal, Saylon was week.) No names-no pack drill.
Congress. The tournament n- >* M *d Madellne also Further details next week,
eludes competition in the 'had a w series. 1 Budwelser beat V. F. W. Post
and two man team-events and ,L power Boys of Fuerj* y i 3822 by 3-1. This was the closest
also an Individual competition _, ^ ufe M Engelke roll-1 game of the evening. Budwelser
The championships will be d 817 and Nrrls 602 to take lost the first game by 21 pins,
determined on the basis of th DOlnts from the Martinz won the second by 17 and just
"scratch scores" In each of the t( ^urj, man for the losers managed to clinch the third for
was Jack Owesne. Dointe and pins by the narrow
in the final match of the eve- margin of 10 pins Final resuli-
ning the Boyd Bros, put on a "udwelser 2476, V.IVW. Post 2470.
strong finish to take the final
game and total pins, thereby
breaking even with Angellnl. An-
drews was high for Angellnl and
Morton was tops for Boyd Bros
Standing of the League
TEAM Won Lost
1-H. I. Homa......46 19
2Max Stempel......41
Pabst Scores Second Victory
In Atlantic Twilight League
.indines of Atlantic Twi. Loop
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Fabst........2 0 1.000
C. H. S.........0 1
rowell'i........o i
.000
.000
Uie Diablo Heights Alleys dur-
ing the week starting Feb. 3,
1952.
This tournament which Is
sanctioned by the American
The Pabst "Blue Ribbon" nine,
the team that battered Powell's
o a 10 to 3 defeat in the open-
ing game last Sunday, made It
two In a row Tuesday night, but
-hey had to come from behind
o pull the game out of the fire
in the bottom half of the sixth
frame, and defeat Cristobal High
School 8 to 6.
Behind stellar three-hit pitch-
ing of Tommy Hughes, the high
rhool lads seemed to be masters
to be icing the game inthe up- Hale, Gibson and Swearlngen,
per sixth, pushing two more e-ch of whom got a pair of bin-
markers across the plate, on a gles. For the losing CHS nine
pair of walks, and a single by I alley and Hughes each had two
Manning and double by Bob1 to lead their team's hit sfllack.
Bailey; and when they moved in-1 Jim Coffey went six frames for
to the lower sixth the lads led 6 the winners, and was credited
to 2. I with the victory,* giving way for
a pinchhitter In the fateful low-
After the first two batters had er sixth,
paraded to the plate for Pabst in! The box scores:
Rinehart, 2b .
Bailey. 3b .
i Hughes, p .
Grace, rf .
iSasso, If.
Elks, 'Firemen's'
Chalk Up Victories
In Pacific Softball
Tuesday afternoon, with Frite
Cheney again on the mound af-
ter recovering from a sprained
ankle, the Elks got their first
win of the season by a score of
7 to 5 over Philippine Rattan.
Philippine Rattan introduced
a new pitcher, Ray Simons, who
did wen considering that It was
his initial start with opposing
batters' likes and dislikes being
unknown to him. Simons allow-
ed 7 runs on 11 hits. 4 walks
and struck out 2 Elks.
Ace pitcher Cheney went the
distance for the Elks giving up
6 runs on 6 hits, 8 bases on
balls, 3 strikeouts and hitting
one Bamboo boy with a pitched
ball.
Big stickers for the Elks were:
Soyster with 3 hits for 4 tries,
Chance with 2 for 3, and Pete
Hale with i for 3, one a grand
slam homer In the first.
The Philippine Rattan team
salvaged S runs off 6 hits and
8 walks, scoring four in the
4th and one in the 5th. The
six hits were scattered no
player chalking up more than
one each.
Don Bowen's Firemen's Insur-
aneemen scored an easy victory
over CAA Wednesday afternoon.
CAA strong-arm boys failed to
connect with Lew Hilzlnger's
Slferings Hllzlnger held the
ero men bitless until the last
of the sixth when center fielder
Malene rapped a sharp ground-
er toward 3rd where the ball
deflected off 8tock's glove into
the hands of shortstop Ronnie
Angermuller who decided he nad
no play at the Initial sack and
held the ball.
' Jordan hurled for CAA allow-
big a total of 11 runs on 10
Bits, 5 walks and struck out 3.
Hllzlnger gave up 1 run on 1
hit and 5 walks, striking out.6
batters.
Scheldegf garnered 2 hits for
3 trips at bat. Pescod walked 3
times and then sent a long
four-bagger to center for one
official time at the plate.
Dmplre-ln-chlef Bob Coffey
is continuing his excellent offi-
ciating at the plate calling the
infield fly rule and interference
against players where warrant-
ed.
Team Standings:
Team W L Pet.
Firemen's Ins. 3 0 1000
Pan Liquido i 0 1000
Elks 1 2 .333
Philippine Rattan l 3 .250
CAA 0 3 000
Note: Two games tied Elks
vs CAA tied 10-10 on Dec. ?8.
1951: Pan Liquido vs. Firemen's
Ins. tied 6-6 on Dee. 11, 1911.
the 33d Infantry, the 45th Re-
connaissance Battalion and the
764th AAA kept their records
clean with their third straight
victory to remain atop the league
standings.
The Special Troops nine from
Fort Amador suffered a humili-
ating 10-0 defeat at the hands of
the 370th Boat Battalion for their
first loss of the campaign. Spe-
cial Troops started the season
displaying power at the plate In
the first game and then coming
up with spectacular fielding to
win their second contest. How-
ever, Wednesday they were un-
able to connect from the plate
and they committed numerous
errors afield to hand the Boat-
men the victory.
Albrook and the 504th FA Bat-
talion engaged In a slugfest
which stayed close for the first
several innings before the Flyers'
power asserted its authority and
they went on to win by a 21 to 11
count for-their third consecu-
tive win on the read to their
third i league iltle. The Flyers
pounded the ball hard in the last
two innings to lengthen their
lead and ended up with a sub-
stantial margin.
The 33d Infantry had no trou-
ble remaining In the unbeaten
class as they pounded out an
easy 11-0 win over Signal. How-
ever, the 764th AAA had to bat-
tle all the way before downing
Coco Solo 6 to 5 and hold on to
their tie for the top spot. The
45th Battalion came up with its
third straight victory by defeat-
ing Coroza! 8-2.
The 903d emerged from the
cellar position with Its first win
of the campaign by coming put
on top of a 7-5 contest with the
Atlantic Sector. In the remain-
ing contest played Wednesday
afternoon the west Bank nine
defeated the 370th Shore Batta-
lion 7-3.
The teams will go back into
action tomorrow afternoon with
Atlantic Sector entertaining Co-
co Solo, Albrook playing host to
West Bank. 370th Shore Batta-
lion journeying to Fort Kobbe to
face the 33d Infantry, the 45th
Battalion and 903d AAA tangling
at Fort Clayton, Speclal Troops
engaging the 504th Battalion at
Fort Amador, 764th entertaining
Signal and 370th Boat host to
Corozal.
Fight Results
above events and also an All
Events Champion will be crown-
ed.
Trophys are to be awarded to
the champions: that for the all
events has been donated by Mr.
Glasgall of Universal Sports,
Inc.. the others bv the Pancanal
Bowling Association. Thev are
now on display at the Diablo
Heights merchandise counter.
Distribution of prize monies
in the various competitions is on
a handicap basis whereby each
howler receives two-thirds of
the differnece between his high-
est current average and 20 in
addition to his scratch score for
each game.
The 1951 Champions are all
expected to be back to defend
their crowns. Leo Presho is the
defending All Events Champ
and paired with Bud Balcer will
be defending the Doubles title
as well. The Tops of the Cos-
moplltan Mixed League wll also
be back, but with a different
line-up. Wllber Norris Is the
defending- Singles Champ, but
doesn't expect to get another
726 score this year.
tournament
35
33
32
26
25
19
29
31
32
38
39
45
3Angellnl
47461st Signal
5Fuerza y Luz
6N.F.F.E. .. .
7Boyd Bros. .
8 Martinz.....
Leading Bowlers
1Balcer..........198-36
2Engelke..........}?S"?5'--------
3Madeline........185-45. Canada Dry .
4-Saylon .. .. .. ... 185-28' Americ'n Club 25
sZwalee ........185-12; Balboa Beer 22
6-Best .......... 1S6- 4 VFW Post 3822 21
7-Fllebark..........WfcJ
8Marabella........182-37
9Morton..........JgO-16
10Andrews.........180- 7
TEN PINS
1McCarragher........166
2Coffey............160
3-Colston............160
4Lane..............156
5Kelsey............155
6Allen............152
7Hovan............151
8 Lavallee............150
9 McConnell..........150
108teuwe............149
Team standings and scores:
Total
W.
29
31
29
31
28
the last of the sixth, It seemed; CHS
that CHS was well on their way Manning, as
to victory. Hooper and Welch
were strikeout victims to open
that frame. Then Buckeye Swea-
rlngen singled to right and Hugh
es lost all appearances of con-
trol when he walked four con- Smith, cf.
of the situation for the first fivelsecutive batters. .pinchhlttersSalter, T., c .
frames of the scheduled seven. Jaramillo and Dunning, then. Anderson, lb.
during that period Hughes struck | Pescod and Egolf. -------
out eight Pabst hitters, while hlsi Hale singled to left, and Noel [ PABST AB
counterpart, Jim Coffey, was Gibson unloaded a triple lntoi Pescod, 2b-p-3b
hurling five-hit ball for Pabst, right field. Gibson was cut down Egolf, ss .
and whiffing only four CHS bal-, at home trying to stretch his hit Hale, cf
AB
3
4
3
3
4
4
4
2
2
ters.
CHS had drawn first blood In
the top of the fourth, when
Tommy Hughes blasted a Coffey
pitch far Into right field, the ball
bouncing over the fence for a
Into a home run.
when the clouds
Pabst had dented
times In the sixth, making the
count 8 to 6. Noel Gibson, winner
of last Sunday's game, hurled the
Nevertheless,!Gibson, lb-p
had cleared,'Hooper. 3b-lb
the plate six Welch, If
TEAM
Acme Paints
Carta Vieja.
Angellnl .
Budwelser
L.
25
23
25
23
26
29
32
33
Pts.
41
41
41
40
36
34
29
26
Pins
45741
45525
45276
45239
45638
45238
44597
44506
Filebark,
Sartorl .
Plerobon
Payne
H I. HOMA
195
186
161
211
Entries for the
i close on January 27th and should
; be turned In to the tournsment -
committee which is composed of Best....."
8gt. Elliot of Albrook Field. Joe i "2J
Filebark. Herb Cooley, BUI Tots
Malee. C. E. Schecker. Ted Wll-
ber or Wllber Norris, the toruna-
I ment manager.
168
202
167
181
169
165 528
Vale. .
Prltchard.
Hellwlg. .
Relchert .
Coffey
196 584 Handicap.
215 545
178 570 Totals
150 613
AMERICAN CLUB
151 181
97 98
133 152
160 159
164 240
133 138
116- 448
138 383
160 445
116 434
158 562
133 399
UN CLUB
NOTES
Wllber .
Marabella
Coffey .
Colston.'.
Balcer .
Totals .
887 9042740
vs.
MAX R. STEMPEL
838 063 820-2621
198
223
154
178
216
195
169
157
177
201
179- 572
169 561
176- 487
184 539
174- 591
969 899 8822760
A. Damin
Presho .
Burrell .
J, Damin
(Tuesday Night)
TAMPA-Bobby Dykes 149, Mi-
ami, stopped Jee Lassiter, 156.
WLWnita 6.U. 163.
Donors, Pa., outpointed Tony
Maselarelli, 164, New Vork, 16.
WHITE PLAINS, N*-Sal Bel-
loise, 177. New York, stopped An-
gel Martines, 18114, Newark. NJ.,
NEWARK, N.J.Jimmy Walk-
er, lffl, Plalftfleld, NJ-, tpolnt-
ed Archie McBridge. 18. Tren-
ton, NJ- 12. .
SACRAMENTO, Cal.Baby U-
roy, 137. Oakland. Cal, knecked
out Don Rogers, MM, Portland,
SANESE, Cal.Jimmy Sava-
la. 135, San Francisco, and Sam-
my Flgueroa. 186. Los Angeles,
drew, 16.
Stephens
Thomas.
Jamison
Norris .
Engelke.
Totals .
Saylon
Hudak .
8hattock .
Cooley .
Madeline .
Totals
RAILET TAKES WARM UP
HOOT AS MANY TOP
SHOOTERS FALTER
, In the 30-06 warm-up compe- -
iltlon held at the Far Fan 200- Owesne .
vard range on Sunday, M-Sgt.l .
Bailey of the Balboa Gun Club Totals .
hung un a score of 190 out of 195
on the first relay, and no one else
, reached It throughout the five-
hour competition, although some
came close.
Al Joyce of the same club scor-
, ed 189, while Thamalls of the
1 Marines out-counted Breckon of
i Balboa on rapid fire to take third
i place, both having scores of 188.
, None of these top shooters could
be considered an upset, because
all of them shoot constantly in
the top brackets, and they are
all capable of going home with
the gold medal at any time.
However, many of those who
would also be included In the list
of favorites fell by the wayside,
and their chances of taking the
big registered match scheduled
for next Sunday, Jan. 13, must be
considered to have decreased ac-
cordingly.
Plans for the registered match
in the meantime are progressing
satisfactorily and the entry list
is Increasing daily to the extent
that it looks as if the full per-
missible field of 40 shooters will
be on the firing Une. Forty shoot-
ers took part in Sunday's match,
and several late arrivals were
unfortunately turned away.
There will be shooters present
from the Marines, the Cristobal
Gun Club, the 7461st Signal, the
Balboa Gun Club, the Albrook-
Curundu Oun Club, and there Morton
have been many individual en-|Dailey .
tries. The match should be close Dunaway
and interesting to competitors as Melanson
well as highly interesting to Schneider
watch.
Last Sunday's scores follow:
Slow Rapid Total
Railey.......58 132 190
MARTINZ
. 189 156
. 170
. 150
. 138
. 202
205
120
193
177
180 525
169- 544
171- 441
184 515
200- 579
849 851 9042604
vs.
FUERZA Y LUZ
153
176
172
209
190
170 509
169 484
146 485
169 602
201- 617
186
139
167
224
226
942 900 8552697
746LST SIGNAL
218
191
184
185
180
224
180
183
188
232
177- 619
139 510
151 518
178 551
190 602
Schoch. .
Carpenter
Smith. .
Cain. .
Stanley. .
Handicap.
Totals .
BALBOA BEER
116 116 116 348
122 122 122 366
132 140 130 402
144 154 128 428
121 128 120 369
148 148 148- 444
783 808 7642355
zround rule double. Bob race \'me. allowing two watt*
Followed with a single to right- but^tting out of the inning
center, and when the ball went '' "sn[ts were Shared bv
through Hugh Hale In center
field, Grace tried to go all the
way and was cut down at home.
After Sasso had grounded out,:"
Gil Smith was given a life on|
Hooper's error, and Talmadgei
Salter and Sklppy Anderson
loaded the sacks, drawing free
passes. Bucky Hall, Pabst man-
ager, catching, tried to pick An-!
derson off first, the ball going
wild, and Smith scoring from1
third. Manning again loaded the!
sacks with a base on balls, but'
Les Rinehart went down swing-1
lng to retire the side. '
Pabst came back fighting In
their half of the fourth to snot
the score at two-all on a single 1
by Gibson, a pair of stolen bases,
an error by Bob Bailey, with a
base on balls to Welch thrown In.
Singles by Bailey and Hughes,
an error by Hooper, and a double
Into left field by Gil Smith push-
ed two more runners across in1
the CHS half of the fifth frame.;
and led 4-2 going into the sixth.
And that is where the roof fell in. I
First of all the CHS lads seemed
rf-c
Sw'rlngen.
Hall, c.....
Jaramillo, rf .
Coffey, p .
"Dunning, 2b.
Walked for Hall in 6th.
Walked for Coffey in 6th.
HPO
0
2
0
0-
0
0
1
10
5
HPO
0 2
fc#w^*wwv*^rx^v#wvw%^>^w^%*wx#
Meet Scotland's
Favourite Son
JOHNNIE
WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
0*N ISJO STIU GOING ITIONC
The fashionable drink everywhere
JOHN WALKER A SONS LTD- Swuk Whliky Dbtiltoi, KOMARNOCX
Miu-dock
Hicks. .
Allen. .
Lane .
(Henry) .
Handicap.
Totals .
CANADA DRY
129
125
165
157
134
119
135
130
150
172
134
119
157- 421
127- 382
194 509
147 476
134 402
119 357
829 840 8782547
La valise
Casten .
Corn .
Yarbro. .
Borgia .
Handicap.
Totale .
ACME PAINTS
138
127
139
121
134
136
123
135
144
121'
141
136
145 406
144- 426
167 450
121 363
140 415
136 408
795 820 8532468
. 958 1007
LOCAr5957NFFE
8352800
Nolan. 229
Malee 213
Kelsey m
Eady .... 200
McCarr'gher 210
204
173
157
151
172
170 603
246 632
188- 517
166- 517
171 553
CARTA VIEJA
Mynarclk 136 128 141- 405
Nottu, Ted 189
Torlan ... 125
Kelsey 174
McCarr'gher 194
Handicap. 98
Totals .
139
132
141
138
98
170- 427
187- 503
140- 472
8 294
916 776 8782570
Totals 1024 857 941-2822
Jenner .
Walker .
Klumpp
Bates .
Andrews
Totals .
ANGELINI
. 198 168
. 155
. 137
. 203
. 161
166
216
171
202
147- 513
157- 478
142- 495
160 534
214- 6T
McConnell
Bembenek
Woner .
Balutls .
Colston. .
Handicap.
Totals .
ANGELINI
156
173
152
157
149
105
136
102
125
127
158
105
121- 412
116- 391
136- 413
121 405
154- 461
105 315
892 752 7532397
. 854 923 8202197
vs.
BOYD BROS.
222 158 180- 560
136 178 197- 511
160 199 197- 556
143 174 216- 533
191 156 162- 508
Hovan
Steuwe. .
Bryan .
Stahl. .
Walker .
Handicap.
Totals .
BUDWEISER
153
157
126
95
158
114
131
121
132
150
155
114
157- 441
162 446
155- 413
158 403
118- 431
114- 342
803 809 8642476
2U Bar
Complete Assortment of
DOO SUPPLIES
at
fi
Joyce........ 55
Thamalls..... 84
Breckon...... 86
Bole......... 63
Wells........ S3"
Lucas........ 93
Yanagawa .. ..52
Gorder .. .... 53
Briason...... 93
Merriman .. ..93
Todd........ 93
Demlng...... 52
Foster....... 93
Jackson...... 94
Jaffray...... 94
Albrltton..... 90
Perkins...... 91
M. Mlllard .... 48
Monroe .i .. ..90
Ryan........ 61
Fraaer....... 91
McCaaland .. .. 49
Mlllard...... 82
Vangsnesi .... 44
Schrunk...... 49
Ferry......,.. 93
Henry........ 49
O'Connell..... 4
Budd........ 99
Kennedy..... 48
Counselman. .. 90
McNeill...... 46
Hudglns...... 43
Combs....... 35
Husum...... 39
134
134
132
132
132
132
131
131
131
130
130
129
128
127
130
129
131
128
126
124
126
122
139
123
118
120
119
113
119
112
116
!!?
103
189
188
188
187
ill
184
184
184
184
183
182
Totals
852 864 9522668
CURUNDU MEN'S OPEN
BOWLING LEAGUE
Coffey Bowls 240 in Second Game
Wednesday night at the Cu-
rundu Restaurant alleys the
joint leaders. Acme Paint and
Angellnl, were both beaten 4-0 by
Canada Dry and Carta Vieja HP
spectlvely. Carta Vieja now Join
with them in the stellaroetttoa
with 41 points each with Bud-
welser close behind with *0
points. The race is so close that
182 ; only five points separate the first
83 flvey teams. The American Club
blanked the Balboa Brewers 4-0.
Highlights of this gmt tm col-
fey's 240 for the Clubmen to
make his aggregate for^the.night
562 Cam had the highest line
and aggregate for the Brewers
CanaSa Dry beat Acme Paints
4-0 and helped tangle the fight
for first place more than_evtr.
181
180
180
179
178
177
178
174
174
173
171
171
169
168
168
167
162
162
161
162
142
U riVOM Ave, fel. 2-IM7
*I*OA GUN CLUB
TO HOLD ANNUAL MEETING --
Prealdtnt Tom McNeill has an-served after thi meeting.
Moss .
Hannberg
Wltslg .
Mashburn
Riso. .
Handicap.
Totals .
VFW POST 3822
151
119
128
120
143
163
130
132
138
120
in
114 396
135 386
143- 409
120 360
129- 431
163- 489
824 792 8542470
nounced that the Balboa Oun
Clubs annual meeting will be
held at the Knights of Columbus
Building in Balboa this enlna
at 7 30. Business to be presented
to the whole membership in-
cludes election of officers for the
coming year, possibility of rais-
ing the club dues in accordance
with increased expenses, finan-
cial report, and many other
items of vital interest to all
members.
There will be refreshments
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
of all types for
your office
Typewriters
Adding Machine:
Calculators
Bookkeeping
Machines
Steel Desks
Office Chairs
Safes
Ditto Duplicators
Filing Cabinets
Kardex
Cash Registers
V
MTBNrtTttfM
#14 Treeli Ave. Tel. t-2010
PHILIPPINE BAMBOO FURNITURE
THE MOST COMFORTABLE FOR THE TROPICS!
Select today your bamboo from the largest assortment
and stock in Panam at "El Diablo."
If yon belong to the Armed Forces or If yon have a steady Job
come to our store and yon may choose your own credit terms.

We else have the n.. ueautlful MAHOGANT FURNITURE In town.
SIMMONS Inner-Sprint; Mattresses.
EASY WASHERS in both 25 and 60 cycles.
ElDIAILD
The Store Where Ton WIU Find the Largest Assortment of Glass and Linoleum.
86 CENTRAL AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-2465
"Leaders in the Furniture business since 1909"
)
1


:
^HPP^^^WP^^i

MARINES CALL OTHER BIG LEAGUERS
(Pare II
France's Top
Fighting Man
Dies At 61
AN INDlT^I-^^^ffifeS^DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people knotv the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952
I
PARIS, Jan. 11 Gen.
Jean Dp Lattre Dc Tassigny,
France's No. 1 lighting man and
high commissioner for Commun-
Jean De Lattre De Tassigny, 61,
tot-harried Indo-Chlna died to-
day after undergoing two opera-
tions.
Capt. Jean Badre, chief Ca-
tholic chaplain of the French Ar-
my, hurried yesterday to the sub-
urban clinic where De Latter lay
to administer last rites.
An official spokesman said De WASHINGTON, Jan. 11 (UP) branches apply for dollars for handling charges and the
Lattre was suffering from ure- A writer in an oflicial United profit remittances the exchange tructure of prevailing freight
mla. Sources close to the five States government publication control authorities in the for-! rates," he wrote.
specialists In almost constant at- expressed the opinion today elgn countries are more likely i "Under present conditions,
tendance for two weeks said the that the new Colon Free Zone to give approval since these'firms dealing in goods having
ailment was far more serious. I can be of substantial benefit branches would be a source of small bulk and high unit value.
Twice in the past two weeks, in- to the Republic ol Panama. dollar Income. I such as pharmaceuticals, are
formant* said, the general al- The article, entitled "Pana- "United States companies'not seriously affected, but bulky
most died. ma The Colon Free Zone," having European branches may j goods having a low unit value
His wife rarely left the pri- appeared as the leading article also find that an operation in present a different problem.
vate clinic in suburban Neuilly, hi the current issue of "Foreign the Free Zone will afford great- "For example, it now costs
after the general entered It Dec. Commerce Weekly" which is er flexibility In supplying the' approximately $275 to ship an
18. fresh from a flight from his published by the Commerce De- Latin American market in times: automobile from New York to
Saigon headquarters. | partment. A picture of the Free of material shortages, since It Buenaventura, Colombia. It costs
More than anv other one man, Zone's administration building would be possible at times to $200 to ship the same automo-
De Lattre was credited with in-was n the front cover of the supply the market by means! bile from New York to Colon,
fusing fresh life into France's magazine, and a map of the of shipments from its European and $200 more to ship it from
Army after the war. He held free Zone by A. Rubio accom- branches to Colon." Colon to Buenaventura. The lo-
more decorations than any other panted the article. But Mrquez said there are cal shipping conference has the
active French officer 48.
FIVE CENTS
Army Vehicles
Badly Damaged
In Czl. Accident
Two Army vehicles collided
RP's $ Exchange For Foreign Business
Said Major Asset For Colon Free Zone
"The question of municipal
taxation of foreign firms has
been raised recently.
Owing to a constitutional
change effected during the re-
cent shift in government, one
municipality does not recognize
exemptions from municipal tax-
ation granted to one United
States firm by the national gov-
ernment during the previous
administration.
"This firm Is not operating
under laws applicable to the
Free Zone, and is not a trading
concern. Most of the companies
. already established under Free
The article was written by some disadvantages and unre-; problem under study at pre- Zone laws apparently believe
department's Office of Interna-
tional Trade.
"The free zone can be of sub-
stantial benefit to the Republic
of Panama," Mrquez wrote.
"The economy of the country
would naturally be stimulated
early this mornln* on Oalltord | {*** *5&F%5n ZSSta ."Eh1
Hioftmav T,par rjatn 9 nf rnrfwnl Ilncrease 'oca' commercial actl-
KK!Lnfr,.rt l2ffr vltV anv attract more ships to
f!& .~5 Phonal in- (he area since the sale of Qods
juries suffered. .and services to ships represents
. ?vh K.Armiii?ah.ii2 a" important source of Income
a 2-'/2-ton truck were badly lto tne country
damaged In the accident, ac-, "The Republic will also receive
cording to a report issued by the lncome ^ th f
Provost Marshal's Office at Fort pald to Panamanian emp$es
"ii .' i ~ i ^ ,r ot contracting firms, from ren-
The drivers. Cpl. Dewey Kea- tal of the Fr*e Zone' d and
ton whose track TO strucK: by ,aellltles. and from goods and
the sedan which Pvt. Santiago otner services sold to contract-
Rodriguez was driving, were; both mg flrrns and their employes.
properly licensed and on official ..As the scale of operations of
:J\ .. 4i ,. foreign firms functioning in the
A further investigation is be- j^e Zone increases, local com-
mercial activities and service
Industries should increase con-
siderably. New Panamanian in-
dustries, such as the manufac-
ture of parts or containers,
might also be expected to re-
sult.
"The Canal Zone has long
been an important factor in the
Gregory T. Mrquez of the Ame- solved questions to be consider-
rican Republics Division of the ed.
"One of the major handicaps
to extensive development at
present is the high level of
sent, and 'nformed sources arel that the matter will be settled
hopeful that a revision can be In a manner that will not pre-
affected which will permit the Judlce operations in the Free
PHILADELPHIA archbishop INSTALLED The Most Rev. John Francis O'Hara fal-
right) listens to the opening of ceremonies installing him as Archbishop of the Roman Ca-
tholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia. At left foreground, the Rt. Rev. Magr. Francis J Furey
reads the Apostolic Decree. Seated at extreme left is the Most Rev. Amleto Q. CicoznaaL
Apostolic Delegate to the U. S.
economical shipping of bulkier
goods.
lng conducted bv the Army.
Newscaster Zappi
Out On $100 Bail
Faces $500 Fine
Political radio commentator economy of the Republic.
talo Zappi. prominent member
of one of the opposition parties
who was jailed Wednesday for
spreading a false rumor concern-
ing the formation of government
Junta to rule the Republic, was
released yesterday on $100 ball.
Acting Governor Leopoldo
Mazzola said today that Zappl's
"The location of the Repub-
lic with relation to the Canal
is a definite asset to the
country, and it is generally
felt that the operation of a
foreign-trade rone adjacent
to the Canal will enable Pan-
ama to take better advantage
of this asset.
"Panamanian officials also
announcer's license had been
suspended while the investigation feel that the establishment of
of the case is going on. the Free Zone might be one
If Zappi is found guilty he is step In the long-range program
subject to a fine ranging from. of solving the unemployment,
$1 to $500 and permanent sus- | problem which has grown out
pension of his license to speak of the decrease in wartime ac-
tivities in the Canal Zone.
"In the final analysis, the1
primary requisite lor the suc-
cess of a foreign-trade zone in
Panama is the substantial in-
vestment of private funds, and
the government of Panama will
have to endeavor continually to
make that investment attrac-
tive.
"The Colon Free Zone is a
over the radio in Panama.
Former Reliaious
Director At YMCA
Dies In California
Word has been received by
friends on the Isthmus of the,.
death of Dr. John T Gobey on functioning entity, and its fu-
Dec. 31 in Monterrey ?1 whereiture development most certain-
he was Instructor of Russian lni'y w111 ^ watched with interest
Die V.H Army School of Lan- throughout the world."
Ruages Mrquez wrote that propen-
Dr. Gobey was director of the ents of the Free Zone believe
religious education program at: it may offer advantages arising
the Balboa YMCA from 1939 to from current materials short-
Zone.
"These unresolved Issues are
of particular moment to the
type of Free Zone operations
which would require a heavy
investment In the zone, such
as that Involved in manufactur-
ing operations. Against these
disadvantages, interested com-
panies would desire to consider
the advantages derived from
tax benefits, favorable location
in relation to shipping routes,
proximity to market, possibili-
ties for deep-water harbor de-
velopment near the zone, and
the fact that all transactions
are in dollars."
Herbrugcr In US Announces
Acceptance Of Nomination
------o ------
J947
- He Is survived bv his wife, Mrs.
John T. Gobey.
PIGEON COMES HOME
" "PALL RIVER. Mass. (UP). '
The thief who stole one of Jo-;
reph Martin's prize oigeons fail-I
ed to reckon with one detail. It i
was a horning pigeon. The I
pigeon was bad: In Martin's]
coop within two days. I
ages and exchange restrictions.!
"As an illustration of the
latter point." he wrote, "It is
suggested that I'nited States
companies maintaining bran-
enea in blocked currency coun-
tries may find that their pro-
fit remittance problems mav
be alleviated by having the
Colon branch buy from their |
foreign branch and pay them
off in dollars.
"Consequently, when these'
ARE YOU DISCOURAGED^
bacMM yon suffer distress from
Ke complaints
which makes you NERVOUS,
HIGH-STRUNG on such days?
Af yarn trobii by distress o female functions*
monthly disturbances whk-h make, you suffer irosa
P"*. O nervous, cranky, restless, weak--at
och MsMSf Then do try Lydia E. Pinkhjart. Veaa>
table Compound to relieve such symptom*I
ha recant medical test kt proved remarkably
helpful so ramea troubled this way. Why salt
you |et smart and try it roursaJT*
Ptnfchssn1 Compound is what Doe esfl a
terina sedative. It has a granel soothing effect cat
~ ~ afwommn'm most importmntorjana.
stresralarly Pinkham'iCompc*indhssaa
bud up resistance against such dsskraas.
It's also a great M"-"ihir teasel
MOT!: Or vo<. may prWsc LYDU M.
PINK HAM S TAiUTS Mi ocM*. Ires,
A BRONZE STAR MEDAL was presented yesterday to Mrs.
Adam M. Romero, widow of Eergeant 1st Class Romero, by
Major General Lester J. Whitlock, Commanding General
USARCARIB, at a full military review held at Ft. Amador.
Mrs. Romero, who resides at No. 10 Jernimo de la Ossa
Street In Panama City, was accompanied at the ceremony
by Camilo Levy Salcedo, Chief of Protocol of the Panama
Foreign Office, and by her brother Joel Farrugia Terez and
her son, Carlos Calizto Terez. Yesterday's ceremony and re-
view marked the first time such an award had been pre-
iented to a widow in the Panama area.
The Bronze Star was awarded to honor SFC Romero for
action during the campaign near Kujang-dong, Korea, on
Nov. 26. 1950. The sergeant, who had re-enlisted in 1949
after having retired from the military service with 20 years
of duty in 1945, went to Korea with the 2d Infantry Divi-
sion shortly after the outbreak of hostilities.
SFC Romero was in command of a tank supporting a
rifle company, which was being forced to withdraw due to
overwhelming enemy pressure. To cover the withdrawal and
give the infantry troops time to set up new defensive posi-
tions, the sergeant exposed himself without regard to his
personal safety in order to direct the fire of his crew mem-
bers in the tank. Engaging the enemy in a heavy firelight
SFC Romero's crew inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy
and were able to delay the advance until the infantry was
able to prepare a defense against the attack. While direct-
ing the fire from an exposed position, SFC Romero was kill-
ed by hostile fire.
Army Fixes Price
On 31 Lale Model
Cars Up For Sale
Pans for a sale of used Army
passenger cars have been an-
nounced by Captain W. J. Mc-
Conaghy. Army Property Dis-
posal Officer for the Corozal
General Depot. USARCARIB.
A total of 31 late-model auto-
mobiles and one Jeep will be sold
at Corozal Jan. 22. The vehicles
will be displayed at the parking
lot across from the Army Bakery
at corozal from 7:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. on.Jan. 21 and from 7:30
a.m. to 8 p.m on the day of the
sale.
Sale of the cars Is restricted
to personnel and organizations
normally authorized to purchase
from the Army retail Salvage
Sales Store. Captain McConaghy
announced.
Prices on the vehicles have al-
ready been established, and there
will be no competitive bidding.
Prices will range from $300 to
$500. it was announced.
In cases where more than one
person desires to purchase the
same vehicle a system of draw-
ings will be conducted. Each
prospective buyer will list his
name, address and telephone
number and at the end of the
WASHINGTON. Jan. 11 (UP)
Rodolfo Herbruger, former
Panamanian Ambassador to the
United States, today announced
his acceptance of his nomination
for the presidency of Panama by
the Partido Panamelsta m Pa-
nama City.
Herbruger told the press he
will leave shortly for Panama to
direct his campaign, but he has
not yet chosen the date for his
departure.
(Tbe arrest of Herbruger on
his return to Panama was re-
garded as possible in Panama
today by political observers.
Herbruger |ef* bere last May
shortly after the rail of the
Arnulfo Arias administration.
In which be served as Minister
of the Treasury).
Herbruger outlined a six-point
platform and declared:
"I have not yet set the date
to return to Panam, but I ex-
pect to return soon. If I am re-
ceived in a climate of liberties,
everything will be fine.
"But if when I go there ob-
stacles are erected against my
campaign or I even am put In
jail, as certain politicians there
were quoted yesterday as saying
might be done, then it would be
up to the authorities of Panama
to respond to the conscience of
the people of Panama and off
all the Americas and allow the
expression of the wishes of the
Panamanian people in free elec-
tions.'*
Herbruger said his nomination
came as a surprise to him but he
said he had "a very%good chance
to be elected."
He commented that there a
large number of voters in Pana-
ma who are not affiliated with
any political party and he hoped
he could obtain their votes.
Army's Skepticism
Upsets Re-Wed Wife
Who Was 'Widow'
ATLANTA, Jan. U (UP) The
Army's skepticism that Mrs. Ag-
nes Dixon Sasser's first husband
has survived as a Communist
prisoner of war added another
perplexing twist to a modern En-
och Arden story today.
The distraught woman's attor-
ney said Mrs. Sasser Is willing to
turn over to Army officials a let-
ter from Pvt. Walter Dixon,
which led her to petition yester-
day for annulment of her later
marriage to PFC William 8. Sas-
ser.
"Of course, positive proof that
the letter is genuine is also nee-
Dr. Henry Bennett
Buried In Oklahoma
STILLWATER. Oklahoma, Jan.
11 (UP) Leaders in education,
government and religion gather-
ed here yesterday for the funeral
of Dr. Henry Bennett, head of
the U. S. Point Four Program,
who died In a plane crash In
Iran last month.
Dr. Bennett was burled with
his wife, who was killed, in the
same crash, al>:ng with several
of the Point Four chief's aides.
The rites were conducted at
the Oklahoma Agricultural and
Mechanical College, which the
65-year-nld Dr. Bennett headed
for S3 years.
In Washington, a number of
Congressmen also paid tribute to
the Point Four administrator.
Brass Considers
Indo China Threat
WASHINGTON. Jan. 11 (UP)
Top British French and Unit-
ed States military officers held
secret discussion here today on
what their countries' should do
if the Chinese Communists In-
vade Southeast Asia.
The
Judges' Bench
Minor traffic offenders were
the order of the day yesterday
in the Balboa Magistrate's
Court.
For passing another car in a
no-passing area a 19-year-old
American, George Christopher
Swearingen, was fined $10.
Two minor traffic violations
by Clarence Raymond Choate,
30, American, and Oscar Geo'ge
Smith, 32, Panamanian, netted
the courts $15 each.
And for trespassing in the
commissary, Raquel del Castillo,
a 35-year-old Colombian and
Ida Polo, a 22-year-old Pana-,
manan, were each fined $10.
A speeding charge brought
against Florentino Guzman, 27
Panamanian resulted in a $7.50
fine.
The only case heard t'la
morning was that of Carlos
Caldwell Hylton who was found
driving without a license. The
23-year-old Panamanian was
fined $8..
Well Matured Woes
Brew In Milwaukee
MILWAUKEE, Wls., Jan. 11.
(UP) Julius Bonikowsky, 90,
today won a divorce suit from "Sis
wife, who had accused him of
having relations "with another
woman."
After Jndgment was given in
his favor Bonikowsky was order-
ed by the Judge to turn over to
his wife $250 all the money he
possessed
However, Bonikowsky said the
order did not bother him because
his wife, Julia "is much younijer
than I." Julia Is 84 years old.
Bonikowsky denied having re-
lations expressed the bjlief that he "will
remain single for a while."
He won the suit on a charge
that his wife had abandoned
home.
day a drawing will be held and "S^m^t"nrn^V,onD.wlth.r "]e
the car will be sold to the per- Ky^Vtal^iacSon
son whose name is drawn. v2'L, .& Sii,A
nal 7one which to charitable ln act,?P last May 18' M his wlfe
'&SS.xWtSS.*SJ^l!^r was notified originally. A spokes-
educational, scientific or bene-
ficial to public welfare in nature
is eligible to purchase one of the
vehicles.
The automobiles cannot be im-
ported into the United 8tates
without approval of the Depart-
ment of Commerce, or Into the
Republic of Panama without ne-
cessary clearance and such as
payment of duty as Is required.
originally. A spokes
man said the Army wants Mrs.
Sasser to send the letter to the
Adjutant General's office for a
check of the handwriting.
"His death is well substantiat-
ed by two eye-witness reports,"
the Army spokesman said, but
he said the Army is still investi-
gating.
The woman, who remarried
four months ago thinking her-
self a widow, was shocked to find
The cars must be purchased, Dixon's name on the recently-
for personal use and not for re- published Communist prisoner of
sale. Also, the U.S. Army does war list.
not guarantee the condition of Then she received the pur-
the vehicle. I ported letter from him on Jan. 2.
Egyptian Belly Dancer In US Has Word
For Women They Use Too Much Soap
NEW YORK. Jan. 11 (UP) During their stay they bought night club tour. Including spots
i Egyptian belly dancer Samia Ga. her a $6,000 mink coat and went in Miami and New York,
mal saui today American women on a tour of strip tease spots to' Although she admits she Is a
bathe too often. Samla could compare notes with bit "hlppv Samia was ln a rage
The/ use too much soap," said American dancers. because a gossip columnist des-
the sinuous siren from the land 'crlbed hei as "chubby."
As a girl who knows some-! "I'm r.ot," she declared. "I
of the sighing cands.
every
thing about such performances, weight I pounds, and where I
Samia si-'.d she was disappointed come from. If a glr
rl shows her
^Udia C. Pinkham's VEGETABLE COMPOUND^
The curvaceous entertainer
who tnchante.! such interna-
tional notables as the Duke of
Windsor. Rita Hayworth and
Egypt's King Farouk said she to
willing to give her "blue book"
mother-in-law a chance to snub
her.
"I'm willing to bet the best
five year? of my life that It does
Samia made sure that none of .not happen." Samla declared,
her bone would "show" during I Despite the objections of ler
her visit here Three afternoons j husband Samia stubbornly an-
in a row, her lunch has consisted < nouncr! that she would make a
of a plate of three hot dogs on I side trip to Houston, where she
buns, with mustard and relish, hopes to win over the wealthy
Tills Amciran delicacy is as I matron who threatened to dis-
to New what she meant Her version of good as anything I ever ate In;inherit her son when he married
i the dance will be displayed oa a Cairo,' she sfj i the danc r.
"I take a bath twice
week, and the other days 1. with the American bump and,bones she'll be lonely all her life."
sponge s/self with Olive oil. grind routines she saw.
"It wo.ild be better if Amer- "They nap and Jerk to much,"
lean glrn shlned a little. They .she said. "The body dance should
look like parchment sometimes.",be like pulling taffy, all silk and
i Samla and her husband, Texas no bump; "
playboy aheppard W. (Abdullah)
King in. wound up their whirl- Samia declined to demonstrate
wind, t^ree-day visit
York today.
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V'8 Has lively-Ravor as
1/Vholesome Goodness
no *snc[/'ju/ce an match!;
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