The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Creation Date:
January 4, 1952
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01344

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
*BRAN.FF
AN IW)gIltI^^ffes^lLY NBWSPAPBE
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

.
Scagram'sVO. i
I IVADIVV Minsk.
Now... 6 Years Old!
rWENTY-SEVENTH YEA*
PANAMA, R. P FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1MZ
FIVE CUNTS
US Wants No Part Of Peace Talk Shift

But UN Members Nibble At New Red Plan
l,V
.1

J V
I
(NEA Radio-Telephofc
CAPTAIN COURAGEOUS -r The storm-crippled freighter. Flying; Enterprise, Is listing at *
permanent angle of between 00 and 80 degrees as It rides out turbulent waters 300 miles
southwest of Ireland. The-skipper. Capt. Hen rile Kurt Carlsen, 37, to in his seventh lonely
day of trying to ride out the otsrm.
Capt. Carlsen Gets Company
To Share Epic Storm Saga
LONDON. Jan. 4 (UP).Capt.
Kurt Carlsen. 37. had company
aboard his stricken, storm-rock-
ed freighter Flying Enterprise
today for the first time In sevefa
As salvage operations were im-
perilled by another fog-laden
gale boiling" up around the
Freighter, the mate of the British
deep-sea tug Turmoil managed
to poll himself over the rail
onto the slanting deck of the
Flying Enterprise.
The Turmoil had already made
ye unsuccessful attempts to get
a line aboard the Flying Enter-
prise.
Carlsen, who has won the
British nicknames of "Captain
Stayput" and "Allalone Carlsen."
has communicated regularly
with the U. S. destroyer John w.
Weeks standing by, and report-
ed he was "in good health and
spirits" despite his lonely, peril-
ous vigil.
The ,711-ton Isbrandtsen Line
Freighter lay nearly capsized an
estimated 400 miles southeast
by west of Land's End, England,
where lashing waves cracked her
hull and filled one hatch with
water last Saturday.
The 50 crew members and pas-
sengers were transferred to other
ships and Carlsen has kept watch
alone on his helpless vessel.
The radar-equipped Turmoil,
one of the largest and fastest
tugs in the world, put out from
Falmouth, England, Wednesday
in a dramatic race to try to save
the Freighter
Capt. Frederick "Dapper Dan"
Parker. SO. known as a "man who
never gives up a ship," refused
to predict the outcome of his
mission.
One false move, one huge
wave or changing gusts of wind
might founder the Flying Enter-
prise, be said.
From the John W. Weeks,
standing a mile away from the
stricken vessel, came word that
Carlsen had his first cup of hot
coffee in six days yesterday.
After three attempts failed,
the Weeks' crew managed to put
a thin line across to the Flying
Enterprise and sent Carlsen cof-
fee, sandwiches, newspapers and
magazinea.
Lloyds of London issue* M lng more thai I ass.
advisory on the ship saying that
the vessel was cracked across
decks number three, the hold
Was full of water and the en
gjne room was taking on some
water.

The deck was awash to the
hatch on the port side, "but
chances are good that she will
stay afloat," the advisory said.
.It added that the ship was
llstkng at about 65 degrees.
A report from the Weeks said
Carlsen had been staying in a
cabin in the midship deckhouse
without lights or heat.
"He has been living more on
the bulkhead than on deck, since
his ship has 80 to 05 degree
in high guests of prevailing gato
winds and very heavy seas," the
report said.
The Weeks said that Carlsen.
"A radio ham," had set up a
battery powered radio with a
heavy antennae hanging out a
porthole on the port side of his
ship.
After the first attempts to de-
livery the food failed, Carlsen
radioed the Weeks:
"Suggest we wait until weather
abates. I don't need those items
&2&tiSZnEXL'*x
tag worse, beating am suffer-
this the Weeks message
commented: "There are a great
many members of the crew that
would have swum to the Enter-
prise to deliver him a single cup
of hot coffee.
"We are much more concern-
ed for his safety than he is. He
never expressed worry and is al-
ways optimistic about his cur-
rent situation."
Mossadegh Ban Two
World Bank Envoys
From Trip To Abadan
TEHERAN. Iran, Jan. 4 (UP).
Premier Mohammed Mos-
sadegh today barred two World
Bank representatives from in-
specting Iranian oil fields and
refineries pending satisfactory
clarification of provisions which
he found objectionable In the
Bank's eight-point plan for man-
aging the nationalised oil in-
dustry.
The Premier's letter to World
Bank vice President Robert
Garner rejected outright a num-
ber of provisions of Garner's
proposal and cast serious doubts
on the acceptability of several
others.
political circles here said the
fate of the World Bank's efforts
to solve the long-festering Anglo-
Iranian oil controversy was in
the balance In Garner's anti-
cipated reply. These sources des-
cribed the chances for agree-
ment as "extremely slender."
Observers here also believed It
was significant that Mossadegh
Voluntary
Tuesday;
Draftees' Here Report
Six Are Non-US Citizens
Induction next Tuesday of nine
young men who have offered;
their services voluntarily to local
Selective Service Boards will fill
the entire quota needed In the,
first call issued for local regis-
trants, Th Panam American. test (In English) and a physical
learned today. i examination, and to certify that
Of the nine, only three are A- they have no dependents,
merican citizens. Five are Pana- Two of the voluntary candl-
manlans; one Is a Colombian.] dates for induction are American
The non-United States citizens residents of the Republic of Pan-
are all bona fide residents of the ama. Asa practical matter, how-
ln ceremony will mark the end 1 had registered earlier with draft
of months of effort and patience.
All were required to have clear-
ances from the police of both
Panam and the Canal Zone.
They also had to pass a written
Canal Zone.
They have been iiermltted to
register for voluntary induction
ever, they were required to reg-
ister In the Canal Zone for se-
lective service, because the law
into the U. 8. Army under a required them to do so if they
' nlrue provision of the Selective so much as stepped over into the
Service Law. area of American Jurisdiction.
Besides the three nationalities: The six non-citizens had no
represented in the group of vol- obligation to register. In the con-
unteers called up by local boards, j tinental United States and ether
1 up by
there is also a broad mixture of
races and ancestry in the group.
All have been called to report
to the offices of Local Board No.
1 at 8:30 am. nrfxt Tuesday. From
then on, the Army takes charge,
but the men will not become
members of the armed services
until they have passed a physical
examination and other process-
ing tests.
After their Induction the
men will be sent to Fort Dix,
New Jersey, for training under
the V. 8. Army's policy of non-
segrecatlon.
For the nine:jroung men who
affairs in
induction
cerof the United
to aid in the defense of
demwraVy, Tuesday's swearing
Selective Service areas, aliens
must register and are subject to
call along with citizens.
All of the nine Inductees will
probably be sworn Into the Army
together, a fort Amador spokes-
men said.
But on the basis of registra-
tion it would seem that George
Austin Gale of Camp Bierd, who
boards in the States were in-
ducted on the Isthmus several
months ago.)
Gale was born In Silver City,
Canal Zone on June 20. 1927. He
is a Panamanian Negro and has
been employed as an office help-
er and clerk at the Mount Hope
Commissary.
The second Is Earl C. Swift, a
white American, son of Sergeant
Charles W. Hess of Fort Clayton.
He applied Sept. 77, 1951. Swift,
who was born March 10, 1932, is
'reported to have tried previously
to enlist.
Draft Board No. 1 on the Pa-
cific side is also certifying.
Arthur B. Gale, an American
Negro, born in New York City
on Dec 1, 1938. He to a photo-
grapher and cartoonist, employ-
ed In Panam City, and to also
a drummer In a band.
Ethelbert C. Harris, an Amer-
ican Negro, born In Seattle, Wash,
on May 19, 1929. He now does ad-
vertising and sign painting for a
firm in Panama City.
Rudolph R. Hogan. a Negra of
Panamanian citizenship, who
applied Sept. 20,1951, may be the was born In La Boca, Canal Zone
first Canal Zone registered in- on Oct. 31, 1928, and now lives
ductee. in up. Boca. He Is employed as a
(A group of young men who' (Continue oa Page S, Cot. 7)
Car Knocks Down
Boy on Frangipani ii.
A little Panamanian boy who
was knocked down by a car yes-
terday afternoon on Frangipani
Street in Ancon was in Gorgas
Hospital today suffering from
head lacerations. T
Harry Leon Lau. age S, was
walking along the sidewalk while
bis mother was shopping at the
commissary, and then he step-
ped down In front of a car driven
by Mrs. Edith H. Donaldson, an
Mrs" Donaldson picked him up *>?? officials were notified
and drove htm to Gorgas for ob-i by the Air Force and atoo sent
Vessel 'Progreso'
Makes Port Safely
With IS Passengers
The distressed vessel Pro-
greso with 18 passengers aboard
which yesterday was reported
sinking, has reached an uniden-
tified port safely, It was learn-
ed today.
The emergency message from
the Colon port authorities which-------
sent Ah* Force and Navy rescue read through Garner s involved
missions on a search of the. proposals and drafted his own
Nombre de Dios area off Viento reply within two hours.
The two World Bank repre-
sentatives, who had planned to
visit the huge Abadan refinery
today were barred from leaving
^Teheran.
'. Mossadegh, In his letter to
Garner, outlined his position and
then said:
If you accept these views
your representatives cap go and
Investigate locally. If not there
is no point in their going."
A government spokesman in-
formed the press 'that Garner's
letter of Dec. 28 was handed to
Mossadegh this morning. The
letter contained eight points
which Garner proposed to form
the basis tor future concrete
proposals the Bank planned to
make to Iran and Britain.
was
Frlo yesterday afternoon,
actually sent Wednesday.
The original message alleged
that the vessel was in distress
yesterday. Poor communication
between Colon and the coast
arses was blamed for the delay
in transmitting the Informa-
tion.
Yesterday, 25 minutes after
1st Air Rescue Squadron's Flight
"B" at Albrook was notified of
the condition of the Progreso,
an SB-17 was searching the
area with no success. The
Slane had been on a routine
raining mission about 50 milts
from Viento Fri and was di-
verted from its course by radio
message.
Navy officials were notified
servatlon. Hospital authorities
today say he is not on the seri-
ously 111 list.
Witnesses stated that Mrs.
Donaldson was travelling slowly.
Police reports Indicate that no
further Investigation will be
made.
The accident was adjudged due
to the careless pedestrian.
The injured child lives with
his parents In Panama,
aid in the form of a crash
boat Which was rushed down
the coast. Both rescue teams
were fullv equioped to pick up
any sungvors that they might
find.
The search was called off
yesterday at 3 p.m. when the
Colon port captain verified the
information that the ship had
reached a port safely, and that
all it passengers were safe.
Days of Quakes Keep
"ormosaris From Homes
TAIPEI. Jan. 4 (UP)Re-
sidents of Formosa's east coast
towns and villages huddled in
the open today under overcast
skies as the earthquakes which
began on New Tear's Day con-
tinued for the fourth straight
Chilean (raiser
Due Tomorrow
With 575 Aboard
A recent addition to the Chi-
lean Navy, the cruiser Capitn
Prat, to scheduled to arrive at
Cristobal tomorrow morning
and begin transit Immediately,
berthing at Pier 1, South, U. 8
Naval station. Rodman.
The man-of-war Is command-
ed by Captain Jorge Arios and
has a complement of 45 offi-
cers and a crew of 530. which
will be given shore leave and
liberty during their stay In Bal-
boa. The vessel, whose last port
was Havana, Cuba, will continue
its voyage Monday when it de-
parts for Talcahuano. Chile.
Formerly the United States
Navy's Nashville, the 10,000 ton
cruiser was recently taken over
by the. Chilean Navy In cere-
monies conducted in the United
SUtes.
Upon its arrival at Pier I,
Captain H. C. Fish, USN. Com-
manding Officer, U. S. Naval
Station, Rodman, accompanied
by the United States Air Force
Band, Will meet the Prat.
The bruiser will be welcomed
at Pedfo Miguel Locks by Cap-
tain H. W. Gordon, USN, As-
sistant Chief of Staff, repre-
senting Rear Admiral Albert M.
Bledsoe USN, Commandant 15th
Naval District.
Admiral and Mrs. Btedsoe
have issued invitations to a
dinner party in honor of the
visiting Chilean ship's captain
and their house guests, Mr. it
Mrs. W. H. Henszey of Los An-
Seles gt 7 p. m. tomorrow at
uartem "A," Naval Headquar-
ters reservation.
The Commandant, officers
and their ladies of the 15th
Naval District will hold a recep-,
tlon in honor of Captain Arios
and officers of the Prat Sunday
from 5:10 p. m. to 7:30 p. m. at
the Officer's Club, U. S. Naval
Station. Rodman.
All local Armed Forces Offi-
cers' Clubs have extended pri-
vileges to the visiting Chilean
officers, and the Chief Petty
Officers' Clubs of the 15th Naval
District reservation and U. 8.
Naval Station, Rodman and the
White Bats' Club. U. S. Naval
Station, Rodman have extended
Threaten Legal
Action Against Electoral Jury
^0
PARIS, Jon. 4 (UP) The United States said t
doy it gravely fears that the Soviet move to switch Ki-
rean armistice negotiations to the United Nations Se-
curity Council might delay or even torpedo the Panmun-
jom talks, *.
U.S. delegate to the United Nations, Benjamin V.
Cohen, served notice that the United States is decidedly
and unqualifiedly opposed to the whole Russian resolu-
tion.
He added that because of the boys it has fighting
in Korea, the U.S. is more eager tnan anyone to see a
swift armistice settlement, and it is gravely worried that
the Soviet maneuver would have just the opposite effect.
The surprise Russian proposal
unveiled yesterday calls for It
high leve! Security Council meet-
ing to attempt to ease the wor.Hl
tension starting with the Korean
armistice negotiations deadlock.
It also proposes the abolition
of the Acheson plan program for
streamlining veto free United
Nations collective security mach-
toery- /
Despite U.S. opposition, misj-
dle-of-the road support grew
here for the section of the Soviet
plan calling for high-level se-
curity Council talks on the cold
war in gneral.
Suppoit for mis section of trie
proposal came from the
Stalin Would
Leave Russia
To Meet West
PARIS, Jan. 4 (UP) A high
Iron Curtain source said here
today that Marshal Stalin would
be willing to leave Soviet Rus-soviet
sia for a top level
with Western leaders.
The source said Stalin's
choice for the site of such a
meeting would be Prague or
Berlin.
But the West is, not likely to
meeting Arab
from
tlons
American countries, probably i
eluding Guatemala and Uruguay.
The clx-natlon Arab bloc also
has decided to support lnterven-
bloe, and also reportedly
Ijrael. several Asian na-
and even scattered Latin
The Socialist Party, one, of
the four parties in the anti-
government coalition, threaten-
ed today to denounce the Na-
tional Electoral Jury before the
Court of Administrative Litiga-
tions on a charge of violating
election tows.
The Electoral Jury was sche-
duled to meet yesterday to dis-
cuss a Socialist Party reauest
for representation on the vote-
counting board.
However, the Jury failed to
meet when representatives of
the five-party National Patrio-
tic Coalition, which supports
the candidacy of Col. Jos A.
Remn, stayed away from the
meeting en masse.
Demetrio A. Porras, national
president of the Socialist Par-
ty, has protested that in addi-
tion to not holding the meet-
ing as prescribed by law "the
representatives of some parties
of the coalition" are making
demands that would delay re-
cognition of his party's repre-
sentative on the Electoral Jury.
In his protest Porras said his
Krty has 8,300 registered mem-
rs and claimed that the Coa-
lition was attempting to retain
its "precarious" control of the
Jury hy keeping his party out.
A total of 14 members now
represent ten parties on the
Electoral Jury. Seven represent
the five-party coalition support-
ing Remn, six are representa -
----------------------------------
Greek Quits Greek
As Tassoula's Love
Joins Historic Ruins
ATHENS. Jan. 4 (UP) The
sobbing heroine of a modern
"Trojan War" came home to
her family today for a scene
that would have done credit to
the ancient Greek tragedy.
Tassoula Petrako, fleeing from
the husband who abducted her
to a mountain cave In Crete In
August 1060, sought police pro-
tection and dashed into the
house of her Oreek deputy fa-
ther for a heroic reconciliation.
Her father had consistently
opposed the match. Tassoula
,._ of threw herself on her knees at
PJ^P" *** en d men0hls feet, kissed his hand and
Uves of the four-party Civil Al-
liance supporting Roberto F
Chiari for President and one Is
a member of Arnulfo Arias'
Partido Panamelsta.
If the Socialists get represen-
tation on the Electoral Jury It
may give the opposition parties
a majority since the Paname-
lsta Juror so far has always
sided with the opposition.
The opposition is represented
by the Liberal Nacional. Revo-
lucionarlo Independiente (PRI)
Frente Patritico and the So-
cialists.
The pro-Remn coalition is
formed by the Liberal Matade-
ro. Revolucionarlo Autntl:o
Nacional Revolucionarlo. Reno-
vador and Union Popular.
27 Women's Club
Leaders Arrive
From US Tonight
Twenty-seven leaders of the U.
S. General Federation of Wo-
men's Clubs are due to arrive at
Tocumen tonight on a short vi-
sit of Panama en route to sev-
eral Latin American countries on
a world cooperation tour.
The representatives of the
Federation have a full two-day
schedule for their stay on the
Isthmus.
Tomorrow morning at 9:30
they will visit the Morgan estate,
later they plan to go on a sight-
seeing tour. At noon the women
will visit the Presidencia of Pa-
nama where a reception Is being
given in their honor. At 5 p.m.
Mrs. John C. Wiley will honor
them at a tea given at the U.
S. Embassy residence at La Cres-
ta.
The clubwomen will leave early
Sunday for Bogota to continue
their goodwill tour which ends
Jan. .
the Prat.
In addition, the Balboa YMCA
has extended the use of its serv-
ices to the personnel of the vis-
iting cruiser.
BALBOA TIDES
Saturday, Jan. 5
HIGH M>W
lf:tl a m. 4:1 p. m.
lt:ll m. ** a as.
humbly begged his pardon.
Wtlh tears In his eyes, Petra-
ko Ohlorgi patted her on the
head soothingly.
Meanwhile, Tassoula's mother
fainted In an adjoining room
and her sister Electra wailed
loudly as armed police sur-
rounded the house.
The reason for the breakup
of the romance were not known.
Little League
Fence Builders
Call For Help
Members and friends ef the
Atlantic LKtle League are re-
quested to report to the Mar-
garita kail park tomorrow
morning it 1:11 to help pat up
a new park feat*.
The fenee has been con-
structed in tea-foot sections
and when ptaeii opright
stands four feet high. It ha*
keen painted aad Is ready for
erection.
The volunteer workers will
bolt these sections Ugether and
install the resfjewMee sections
in placo.
accept Communist Prague, for
HPp* of prestige, nor Berlin
because of 6*- association wttft
thilll-fated 194 Big Three
meeting at Potsdam.
Stalin Is apparently anxious
for high level talks at the ear-
liest opportunity, to obtain for
himself first han information
on the prospects for subsequent
East-West negotiations aimed
at a "global settlement" of the
cold war.
Contrary to Western Ideas,
the source said Stalin holds the
view that the way for such a
settlement should be paved by
discussions among top-level per-
sonalities with the greatest pos-
sible authority to state their
countries' terms.
Russia Is believed to feel a I pected tne Allied command wouid
settlement In the Far East will turn it down),
be easier than one In Europe. The Russian resolution also
It Is felt Russia will probably called on UJi. delegates per-
accept the present position of haps foreign ministers to ex-
Japan in the United States or-lamine a'l cold war problems to
bit in exchange for United:try to find some way of easing:
States recognition of Red China, world tsnsion.
The move, coming at a crucial
moment In Panmunjom where
truce negotiators were deadlock-
ed over methods of truce super
vision and exchanging prisoners,
caused widespread speculation in.
Western circles on the Soviet
motives.
8ome delegates thought the
Russians believed their propos>
al, even If It were doomed to do
tlon in the armistice if Russia,
will drop the proposal for th*
abolition of lOcBfeson pfifi
CoUecti.-e SexiffrW^PIanning
Committee.
VA. sources said the Soviet
plan would mean "turning the
clock back."
They said It was a long-cal-
culated move by the Russians
to get the armistice talks back
into the political arena and
that the United States would
have none of it
They stressed again the U.S.
Insistence that an armistice must
be negotiated by military men In
the field and not by politicians.
(In Korea, the Allied txuee
camp ave the Russian proposal
a cool reception, and it was ex-
Villages Cut Off,
93 Killed As Quake
Hits Turkish Town
ISTANBUL, Turkey, Jan. 4
(UP)Several villages remain-
ed cut off today as rescue teams .
dug through the wreckage of;feat, wojld stir small and mldb
an earthquake in Erzurum pro- die-nation support for new U.N.
bring
vlnce In which at least 93 per-
sons were reported killed. 200
Injured and 200 houses destroy-
ed.
The bitter cold hampered the
efforts of the rescue squads
that were digging through the
ruins.
peace efforts and thus
pressur on U.N negotiators in
the field to make more conces-
sions to the Communists.
Other observers felt the Soviet
maneuver meant a collapse of
chance for a quick Korean ar-
mistice.
(NEA Telephoto)
NO SIGN OF LIFE Only the tail section (circled Is visible
In this airview of the site where an Air Force C-47 crashed
on Lookout Mountain. 66 miles northeast of Phoenix, Ariz.
The plane carried 38 persons. Including 19 West Point cadet*
Who were returning to classes. All lost their liven.



PAGE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, JANUARY I, 19R
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
WNtS 4ND PUILItNID TMI PANAMA AMBRICAN mil, INC.
rOUNOID *v NlkMN ROUNIIVILL IN 111!
HAHMODIO AMIAS. tOITO
7. H stkiit r> o Box 134. Panama, n. or ?>
Tiliphoni Panama No. 2-0740 '8 Lima I
CABLI ADORI** PANAMIKICAN. PANAMA
C4LON OFPICI. 11.17 CNT*Al AVINUI BITWIIN 12TM ANO IJTM TtT
pouiion RIPXISINTA1IVI4 jo*hua povvr.i. inc .
*4B MA0I40N AVI NIW VOK. (171 N. V
LOCAl TIIA.L
PtM MONTH. IN AOVAN_______________________f 1.70 t.BO
POP (IX MONTH*. IN AOVANC 80 13.00
PO ONI VIAK. IN AOVANCf.
IB SO
34 OO
THIS 18 YOU FORUM THE RtADIRS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Th* Mail Boa it opan rerum ret raaSar* of Th Panama Amar-
iron Latter* ara racaivad fjratcfully and ora hondlad in a wholly eon
fldrnliol manner.
If you contribua a lattar don't ba impahant it H doatn't appear lha
next day. Lattar* ora publuhad In the order racaivad.
Plaoie try to kaap th* latiera limitad to on* poge lartath.
Identify of lattar wrileri n held in rfrictatf cantidinea.
Thl* newspaper aiaumci na rcipomibility for rtatamanti or opinions
xpraned In lattar* from rndar*.
LET'S BE AFFABLE
Editor,
The Mall Box
Dear 81 r:
This letter U not intended to be Instrumental In the cor-
rection of any wrong, rather Its purpose Is merely to point out
and bring to the public's attention a most unpleasant experi-
ence of mine.
As a Canal Zone resident, I have naturally heard of the
many shortcomings of the clubhouse salesclerks, but since yes-
terday was the first time I was directly affected by the brazen
stupidity of one of them, I cannot resist the urge to put this
experience In print:
I had a very important letter to mail but, It being Saturday,
I couldn't get a stamp from the Balboa Post Office. 81nce the
Balboa Clubhouse was the nearest place where stamps could be
purchased, I went there. I approached the salesgirl and said.
'One six-cent stamp." She remained immobile and stared at
me with a look of blank stupidity on her face. I repeated the
order, feeling sure she hadn't heard.
Then she answered, "Can't you say 'please'?" feeling proud
Of the fact that she could find an excuse not to serve a color-
id person.
I was so overcome with a mixed feeling of anger and
genuine pity that all I could answer was. "What difference
would It make now?"
Of course, she served me, though not before I had waited
about five minutes.
I knew I could have reported her insolence and complete
disregard for the old adage, "The customer Is always right," to
the manager.
But why should I have denied this Intellectual midget her
brief moment of dubious triumph? Here was obviously an in-
corrigible Ignorance, therefore I just managed to contain mv
anger and walk out.
And there you have it another episode In Canal Zone Life
or It Shouldn't Happen to A Dog.
GTH.
Public Power
Competes With
Big Companies
BY PETER EDSON
ANOTHER GI LOSES PANCANAL QUARTERS
The Mall Box
Panama-American
Dear Sir:
On behalf of all the service personnel quartered In the Ca-
nal Zone, I wish to express our thanks for the Xmas greetings
we received from the Panama Canal housing office.
This "greeting" states that "the need to house new Canal
Company employes will require the cancellation of your present
provisional assignment to quarters on or before, but not later
than Jan. 31, 1982."
We were more than welcome to the "assignment" when
practically every apartment was vacant. I would like to see an
accurate accounting of the amount of rent collected from ser-
vice personnel In the last few years.
I'll admit the maintenance would be more In occupied than
In unoccupied quarters. The only maintenance we received in
the two years was one trip from the electrician to repair the
stove. I imagine this is about average.
Why not fill the vacancies, then give us at least 80 days to
move. i
I know this la asking very much, so I will pray for forgive-
ness.
G. I. Joe
"Low Man on the New Housing
Totem Pole."
WHAT HOPPENT
Dear Mall Box Editor.
Could you find out from the powers that be why the night
drop slot of the Canal library was removed?
This was a little added convenience for those of us who
can't make It during regular library hours, to return books that
ar: due.
Why was this extra service removed? All It required was
gathering up the books In the morning...
Puzzled Reader.
"I AM GOING TO CONTRIBUTE..."
"Breathes there a man with soul so dead who never to him-
self hath said"! this is mv community and I am going to con-
tribute something of myself to It.
Many Zonians have asked "What have the Civic Councils
evei accomplished"?
It Is true we have not satisfied the wishes of all who have
"tested their faith in us.
Recently we have lost many beautiful trees and engineering
has won over common sense to the extent that roads caved In.
hills slid down and sites were washed away: but never lose sight
of the fact that the Civic Councils have been very instrumental
lr having houses of masonry construction built.
Why not stop criticizing and help vour community by send-
ing us your name as a candidate for January elections.
Margaret Rennle
Box 485, Balboa. C.Z.
Telephone 2-2407
WASHINGTON(NEA) U. S.
electric power consumption for
the pre-Chrlstmas week was
reached a new all-time peak of
7,750,000 kilowatt hours. Total
for last year was over 432 bil-
lion kwh.
This is another record, and
there is every indication that
consumption will continue to
rise during 1952, 1953 and 1954.
But with the national de-
fense effort making un-
precedented demands for
more and more electric pow-
er for manufacturing alumi-
num, magnesium, atomic
energy and other defense
materials production, the
big question is: Will there
be enough, on time?
About three-fourth of today's
power is generated by private
utilities, or railways and in-
dustrial producers lor their own
use. The other fourth Is public
power. They are In a sense
competitive.
But a new and better rela-
tionship of public ppwer poli-
cy towards private power seems
to be in the making.
Oscar Chapman, Secretary of
the Interior, concedes that "the
private power industry la do-
ing a good Job of expansion to
meet defense needs. But If
private power companies d 1 d
even more expanding, it would
cut down on the need for more
public power."
Secretary Chapman has placed
James T. Fairman in the De-
fense Electric Power Adminis-
tration. Fairman is a vice pre-
sident of New York Edison, an
experienced utilities executive
acceptable to the power Indus
try. .
"The Defense Electric Power
Administration will not be used
to penalize private power ex-
pansion in any way, says Se-
cretary Chapman.
"Private power companies
will get top priority on mater-
ials for their expansion pro-
grams "
Biggest obstacle to con-
tinuing both private and
public power expansion to
meet defense needs is the
shortage of construction
materials steel, copper,
aluminum, nickel and other
alloys.
So great are these shortages
that George M. Qladsby, pre-
sident of Utah Power and Of
the Edison Electric Institute
Gosh, Don't We Hove Fun?
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PET?MC, 177
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AMoTherTaxH/kh.
THAT'LL iffrlOtf OFF
AloTOFIk
LOOSe JAQI
Ransom Reflections
By BOB RUARK



TO THE HOLDERS OF
SCKLUMBERGER OVERSEAS, S.A.

Serial Bonds First Series
payable on or before
April I, 1957
Notice of Redemption
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to th*
provision of th* Serial Bonds First Series of
8CHLUMBERCER OVERSEAS. S. A., payabl* on or
b*fore April 1, 1997, th* following numbered Bonds
hav* bean drawn by lot and will be redeemed en
April 1, 182:
Noa. MX2, MX7, MXI3, MX4I, MX52
each of the principal amount of $10,000.
On April 1, 1982 said bond* will become due and
payabl* at th* principal amount th*r*of, together
with accrued interest to April 1, 1982, upon present-
ation and surrender th*r*of at th* office of th* Com-
pany, 33 Central Avenue, Panam City,'Republic of
Panam. From and after April 1, 1952, interest on
said bonds will cease to accrue.
SCHLUMBERGER OVERSEAS, S. A.
By A. J. Stoll, Treasurer
NEW YORKYou may be happy today for the The Associated Press' Bill Oatla Is still stuck
families of the four American flien, and for the away in a black hole somewhere,
airmen themselves, who were ransomed loose It took the slnglehanded effort of a news-
from 'the Hungarian blackmailers for the com- paper chain to shake the State Department's
paratlvely plcayunlsh sum of $120,000, but y*u Angus Ward loose from his Red captors, while
can be very sad for and a bit ashamed of the the Department wiggled helplessly
greatest nation in the world. We have a government that will send us off
We went for the badger game for the old Into a "police action'.' in Korea overnight, with-
shakedown, and the snickers must be profuse in out the consent of the people, nnd we throw bli-
the barrooms of the curtained world. lions into foreign vacuums without active con-
We are smack back Jn the days of the Bar- sent of the people.
bary pirates, or so it seems, and a new and facile But the dignity of American forces and of Am-
pian for accruing American dollars has been sue- erlcan passports is watered down to a level of
cessfully launched. contempt on foreign sell, and we don't know
The snatch racket is on again, and big old, what to do.
powerful old, tough old Uncle Sam is helling Certainly, you cannot advocate a declaration
out the bribe money without a jueak. of war against Hungary as a protective measure
You can be heavily shamed of your own gov- to reestablish American prestige, but I will say
concedes that In 1958 there may eminent, which literally suffered its private that such a war, In defense of our nationals,
citizenry to dictate a course of official action, by would make as much or more sense than the war
Illegally forcing the State Department's hand. we started in Korea.
However generous or noble teh aim, the task of Its aim at least would be more definite than
liberating American fliers in Hungary was not the rat-bag operation we have espoused for the
the concern of Robert Vogeler or of American last 18 months on that dreary peninsula,
individuals, by direct subscription But it seems to me that certain drastic econo-
The law forbids negotiation between private mlc and diplomatic measures short of war might
citizens and foreign powersand even if it didn't, have been employed as a weapon against the
we supposedly have a government to act in be- persistent Insults at the hands of the puppet
half of each of usespecially when we run Into state of Hungary,
trouble abroad. As I recall, we felt deeply enough about the
The very size of the ransom demanded was an North African pirates to hand them a whipping,
insult, in that it comprised merely a traffic vlo- and the principle is the same today. We might at
latln- least have sent Hungary's envoys packing; we
The or-else penalty of three month Imprison- might at least have closed down any commercial
ment is another certain indication that the Am- dealings with the Hungarians
erlcan Air Forcers had committed no definite We have solved nothing at all by the whack-
act of espionage, but had merely flown "Illegal- lng bribe we paid for Vogeler'a releasenothing
ly" in the air. whatsoever by buying back our fliers at the cut-
But we have been bluffed and badgered by a rate price of $120.000.
tin-pot nation and shamed before the world. All we have done Is tool up for a thriving traf-
And, before the outraged citizens rigged up a fie In kidnaping for profit by bandit nations It
tarpaulin muster of cash, the American govern- has to stop somewhere, or we are back In the
ment shrugged its shoulders and muttered: slave-running era, with our folks providing the
"What can you do about It?" raw material.
We have allowed our planes to be shot dawn As Individuals It is not our responsibility to
be a 25 per cent reduction in
scheduled generating capacity
expansion, with a 50 per cent
cut in scheduled steam plant
expansion.
The Federal Power Commis-
sion, after surveying require-
ments for the next three years,
makes the flat statement:
"flkanj fs no place in the
country today where a load
of 200,000 kilowatts for an
additional four-pot-line alu-
minum reduction plant could
be placed before 1953, with-
out displacing other indus-
trial loads."
The way the situation shapes
up to EPC, total power capa-
city required a year from now
will be 85.8 million kilowatts.
with actual production capacity
of only 84.5 million kw. This
woull mean a shortage of 1.3
million kw. In spite of over 10
million kw. new capacity sche-
duled to be brought into- pro-
duction next year.
For 1953, however, the pic-
ture will be better with re-
quirements of 95 million kw.
and capacity of 9 .7 million kw.
For 1954 the situation will be
still better, with 101 million kw.
required and 105 million kw.
capacity.
This Is considered a minimum
safe reserve.
These figures include public
power expansion. Secretary
Chapman's efforts to aid the
private power industry are not
to be taken as meaning that
he will cut down on public pow-
er development, if materials are
available and Congress approv-
es.
by "friendly nations."
We have had our citizens snatched and drop-
ped into dungeons.
We had to pay heavy indemnities to buy Bob
Vogeler back.
kill the racket
It is the business of the men who are appoint-
ed by the people we elect.
Dont just stand there, fellow You can't ex-
pect the taxpayer to do It all.
Mnjoy th*
full flavour
of meat dishes
with ...
.. the sauet
with tk$
distinctive f*PtJ
Europe Breathes More Easily
By Stewart Alsop
WASHINGTON. There has been during the, The reminders were hardly necessary In view
past year a change In the*- whole atmosphere in of the Immense Soviet manpower superiority. But
Europe. these and other pronouncements do suggest that
This change, deep but difficult to define pre- the men in the Kremlin are beginning genuinely
clsely, Is one of the most lasting impressions left to respect the power of ;he West
by this reporter's recent trip abroad. Finally, of course, there Is Korea and the
The difference is essentially this. A year ago, simple fact that the failure of the aggression in
most European leaders believed that Soviet mill- Korea Is pot likely to Mcourage the Kremlin to
tary aggression in Europe mivht very well be attempt aggression elsewhere
Imminent. Now they no longer believe so.
To a considerable extent, this change Is a mat- For all these reasons, the fear of a Soviet ure-
ter more of instinct than of herd evidence. Last ventive attack, designed to nip Western rearma-
month. Winston Churchill warned that war might ment in the bud, is very much less alive today
come, but added "I do not think it will come." than it was a year ago. And the growing belief
Some time previously, Ip a talk with an lntl- that an attack is not Imminent has In turn in-
mate. Churchill drew the parallel between the flueneed the military planning of the Western
world situation today >.nd the situation after alliance.
Hitler had come to power He pointed out the This belief accounts In part for the so-called
obvious similarities, and laid tha.t from the mo- "Ottawa revolt."
ment Hitler came to power he had "felt in his At Ottawa, the Europeans strongly resisted
bones" that war was coming, NATO plans calling for well over 100 divisions by
But. he said, he did nnt "feel it In his benes" the end of 1964. It was finally agreed that W.
now. AT The change in atmosphere is not entirely, ot and France's Jean Monnet should re-examine
course, a matter of the feeling in the bones of the whole problem. Bui there was also a tacit
European leaden like CnurchiU. e*ment to scale down the whole effort some-
For one thing, for reasons already reported in what and to extend the time schedule.
this space, the Soviets ciinot now launch a sur- This agreement was reached because the Euro-
prise attack In Europe. To make ready an as- pean leadera and most American officials had
sault on the strengthened forces under General begun to come to the turne conclusion as Chur-
Dwight D. Elsenhower would require at least two chill. On the whole, they did not think war would
months of preparation. And there are no signs come,
that these preparation* ire berrg made. This guarded optimism In the West derives
Military Intelligence reports no slackening of directly, of course, from the growing strength of
the great Soviet rearmament effort whteh has the West. The stronger the West becomes the
been going on since the war. less likely a preventive a-.tack by the Soviets also
Yet the reported Soviet military dispositions becomes,
at least look defensive In nature, which was not
the case a year ago. Moreover, a subtle change Some scaling down of the Western defense ef-
ln recent Soviet propaganda and pronouncements fort may now be Justifiable ai:d necessary. Yet
points In the same direction. any real slackening will Invite a Soviet attack in
the period which lies not more than a year or
The tone of the October revolution speeches two aheadthe period when the Soviets have
this year, for example ?'as far mor* defensive built a really formidable stockpile of atomic wea-
than at any time since the war, full of remind- pons.
ers of the terrible fat* which has overtaken in- Moreover, as Churchill himself warned, war
vaders of Russia. remains at any time entirely possible.
Drew Pearson says: Eisenhower hot blunt conversation
with Churchill; Churchill noncommittal on troops for
European Army; Loyalty judge wos once chastised by
Senate colleagues.
WASHINGTON. It wasn't announced at the time, but pan.
era Elsenhower gave Winston Churchill some very Wunt talk^a
their recent luncheon in Paris
v. f^ieilhow he felt the time had come to speak frankly. He added that he
had always been a close friend of Britain in fact, had been
cri lclaed in the United States for being too friendly to the
firitiaSn.
Therefore he Indicated that, as a friend, ne was In a posi-
tion to speak frankly about Britain's failure to cooperate In
Europe.
Britain, he said, was not supporting the plan for European
unity, and, unless British unity was assured, he expressed th*
tear that European unity would be wrecked this winter
Unless Britain supported the European union, Elsenhower
argued the Scandinavian countries, Belgium and the Netherlands i
would not Join. '
Without Britain, Elsenhower said, the French, Italians, Dutch
and Belgians were feasiui that Germany would dominate West-
ern Europe. This was too great a risk for them to take.
Churchill did not Interrupt too many times while Elsenhower
was talking. He replied, however, that Britain did not consider
herself a part of the European continent, that her commitment*
were to the British Commonwealth, that she had never Intended '
to join the European army and the United States knew it.
BRITISH AID TO BE CUT
Britain Churchill argued, was already doing more than her
share for European defense than any other 2uropean country *
by her per capita output of munitions and troops
He suggested that the one way Britain would Join the Euro-
pean Army was if the United States would Join, too. ,
aJBenhower argued In reply that It was absolutely essential
within the .next few weeks for the British to Drove their honest
cooperation in the defense of Europe. Otherwise not only would
the other countries pull out, but economic aid to Britain pro- *
bably would be drastically cut by Congress.
Finally Churchill promised that Britain would provide planes
lor the European Army in addition to training pilots.
However, he refused to commit himself either on the Euro-
pean Army or on the Schuman plan., But he did say that he ap-
preciated Elsenhower's frankness and would consider all the
points Ike had brought up.
STEEL STRIKE
Reduced to cold arithmetic, her* Is pretty much what th*
threatened steel strike is all about:
United Steelworkers point to the fact that profits of the major
steel companies have soomed far beyond wages and the cost of
living.
In 194S, the profits of the nine major companies controlling
80 per cent of production were $151,800,000. That was an excellent
yearthe last year of the war.
But In the six years since then, stoel profits have gone up
240 per cent. This year they will be roughly $515,000,000.
Dividends paid to stockholders have also zoomed. VS. Steel's
dividends, for Instance, have shot up 168 per cent in the five
years since V-E day.
Meanwhile the cost of living has risen 44 S per cent In six.
years, while the average weekly wage C a steelworker has In-
creased 46.4 per cent.
In 1945 he got $52.44 for a 44-hour week; now he gets $76.77
for a 40-hour week.
The union now claims that a wage ircreaso should be taken
out of profits, not passed along to the public In Increased prices.
FOR THE RECORD
Keening the record straightJust to keep the record straight
as to who sits In Judgment on whom, the,Loyalty Review Board
chairman who passed on the loyalty of John Service Is probably
the only senator In 100 years who has been publicly chastised by
his own colleagues in an official resolution or. the Senate floor.
When Congress was writing the disastrous high-tariff Smoot-
Hawley Act during the Hoover Administration, Bingham, then
senator from Connecticut, allowed a lobby iat for the Connecticut
Manufacturers Association to sit in on secret tariff hearings.
while the public, which had to pay the h'gh tariff was barred.
For this Bingham was publicly censured by the Senate. It
caused his defeat in Connecticut, as the Smoot-HaWley Act later
contributed to the defeat of Herbert Hoover.
How Truman happened to pick Bingham for the loyalty post
has always been a mystery. Presumably re did not bother to look
up the record.
The straight record as to why Howard McGrath became at-
torney generalreal fact is that McGrath did not want the Job,
and Truman had to beg him to take it.
McGrath, a member of the senate from Rhode Island, was an
A-l senator and liked his Job. He didn't want to move.
However, he was also chairman of the Democratic National
Committee and Truman wanted his old friend, BUI Boyle, to take
over the Democratic Chairmanship.
So, to ease McGrath out and put Boyle in. Truman called la
both Senator McGrath and Attorney General Tom Clark.
To Clark he offered the Supreme court seat madt vacant by
the death of Frank Murphy: while to McGrath be offered the at-
torney generalship with the further offer of a place on the Su-
preme Court as soon as ailing Justice Stanley Reed retired.
"I know you've sold your property and made sacrifices to stay
on as attorney general," the President- told Clark, "but now I
want you to make a permanent sacrifice on the Supreme Court."
Clark was pleased hut flabbergasted.
To McGrath, Truman said he would only have to serve as
attorney general for three months. He Indicated that he had
Justice Reed's resignation virtually In bis pocket
McGrath finally agreed, has been waiting for that Supreme
Court vacancy ever since, meanwhile marking time In the Justice
Department, and Bill Boyle's appointment as national chairman
nas backfired more than almost any other Truman move.
Keeping the record straight en Umir CandleAfter the Pre-
sident fired Lamar Caudle he said he had been wise to Caudle
for some time and implied that he had planned to fire him.
Real fact is that Caudle was one of the few who stuck his
neck out for Truman in North Carolina In 1948 when almost
everyone thought 'vnmen was a dead duck. Caudle campaigned '
al' over the state, won Truman's thanks
Later, when McGrath became attorney general, his original
plan was to ease out Caudle, not for Inefficiency, but because he
wanted his own men in the Justice Department
The White House, however, let it be known that Caudle was
a friend. Later McGrath got to like Cauf.le. became his defender
even after the President reversed himself.
....Your Wife ?
Hew long did it take
you t* eeurt your wife?
It's the tame with advertising t
Yon caa't win customers with
ore ad .you've got to "call
on W* over a period of time.
ConsUtenl advtrthing in The Panama
American wins customers for you/
mmm+


1\ /RIDAT. JANUARY 4, 1*51 ___.
IHB PANAMA'AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAl,Y NEWSPAPER
Truman Writes Steel Workers
'Please Drop Strike Threats9
Rodent
Answer to Previous Puzzle
I 1
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted
rodent o
i South
America
eitsitiin------
of its burrow
like a prairie
dog
11 Exp unger
13 Offer
3 Rodent
4 Pronoun
5 Withered
6 Pedal
extremities
7 Symbol for
radon
8 Harem room
9 Pen point
10 Malayan
pewter coin
I-II2I'%EJIJ1WW.SJ.-4>J 2IM
isiMi;i=j
li11A
MUlMttl-KrJrJW' IUT El IB glAlnr
I le [Al lAlelRlYl
14 Burmese woodi2 Knock
, sprit
15 Hindu queen
17 Striped cloth
of Arabia
18 Satiated
20 African fly
13 Golf device
23 Speaker
24 Spanish city
25 Strikes
27 Number (pi.)
16 New line (ab.) 37 Goddess of
18 Withdraws
19 Gateway
20 Venetian
painter
^22 Negative word21 Heavy
discord
38 Narrow Inlet
39 Ancestor of
Pharaohs
41 Narrow fillet
42 Calf s bleat
43 Social insect
44 Babylonian
deity
48 Weight of
India
47 Oriental porgj
48 Exist
25 Sword handle
28 Horse's gait
28 Passage in the
brain,
29 Chest rattle
30 Ocean
; movement
i 31 Solar disk
32 Icelandic myth
33 Bows slightly
34 Seine
> 35 Blood money
36 Notched
42 Shakespearean
queen
45 Lariat
46 Station (ab.)
49 Genus of
' climbing ferns
51 Seem
53 Volume of
mapa'
54 Weird
j VERTICAL
1 Stranger
(comb, form)
2 Age
hammer
40 Indonesian ol 50 Parent
Mindanao 52 Hebrew letter
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Jan. 4.(UP)Presi-
dent Truman made his second personal appeal to
the United Steel Workers (CIO) yesterday to drop
a threatened industry-wide strike, and 3,000 union
members responded to the request with applause.
The President's appeal was made in a letter to
Philip Murray, president of the CIO and the Steel
Workers Union.
Murray read the letter, which started '.'Dear
Phil," to union members meeting here to decide
whether to go through with the threat.
Atlantic Camera
Club Elects New
Officers Monday
The Atlantic Camera Club of
Cristobal will hold its annual
meeting for the election of of-
ficers on Monday at 7:30 p.m.
Since the club's usual meeting
place is no longer available, thla
meeting: will be held in the rooms |
of the Atlantic Art League In
the old Margarita Hospital
building.
Because manv lmpqrtant items
of business will be discussed, no
program of entertainment has
been planned. Only members
may vote for officers, but
prospective members may attend
and present their suggestions for
future club activities.
"TTTmiT
PAGE
Canal Announces
14 New Employes;
9 Joined Locally
Five new employes from the
United States and nine who were
employed locally joined the ta-
nal organization during the last
half of December, according to
information from the Personnel
Bureau.
New personnel from the States,
their positions and birthplaces
are:
Mrs. Pauline G- Streetman,
nurse at Gorgas Hospital, Lake-
land, Florida;
Billy O. Manzy, recreation su-
Mrs. Pfizer and Misses"Joan and!06*801- !* th Schools Division,
Beryl Pfizer; Mrs. McKlm and I Marlon, Illinois;
John P. Sterritt, stevedore
foreman In the Terminals Divi-
sion at Cristobal, Brooklyn New
York;
Donald A Hause. bollermaker
in the Industrial Bureau at Cris-
tobal, Hagerstown, Maryland;
and
Vern H. Chrlstoph, surveying
and cartographic engineer In the
Dredging Division at Gamboa.
Erie, Pennsylvania.
Personnel employed locally,
the positions and units in which
they work are:
Health BureauMrs. Dorothy
L. Topley, clerk-typist at Gorgas
Hospital.
Police Division Jack D. Pal-
'Shipping &
Air Line News
(Continued from Page FOUR)
pear-old-son, Mark, and Mrs.
Srivner is accompanying Con-
gressman Scrlvner.
Members of the Panama Ca-
lal Company Board of Directors
arriving on the Ancon Include
i nfl. R. Pfizer, Vice President and
I {(Director. Major General Julian
L. Schley, U. 8. A., ret., former
1 Governor of The Panama Canal;
Bernard F. Burdlck, chief of the.
|| Canal's Washington Office; and*
Edward McKlm.
Others In the party include
their two daughters. 13 and 1
'years old; Mrs. Schley; and Mrs.
'Burdlck.
Also arriving on the Ancon
will be Carl J. Browne, Assistant
Building Engineer.
A total of 104 passengers will
arrive on the Ancon. The com-
|m advance passenger list fol-
lows: '
/ iiss Ivymae Baker; William J.
Barrett; Melville L. Booz; John
M. Bradford; Roy Broadhurst;
%At. and Mrs. Carl J. Browne
and two children; Mr. and Mrs.
B. F. Burdlck; Mr. and Mrs.
Tames 8. F. Carter; and Hyman
Cohen.
Mrs. Eileen DlGiorgio; Joseph
DIGiorglo; James c. Drawbaugh;
tfr. and Mrs., Harvey L. En-
iminger; Miss Louise Feemster;
The Honorable and Mrs. Foster
Furcolo and son and Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Gasso.
Miss Dorothy Hass; Mrs. Le-
'ore Hass; Mr. and Mrs. John
r. Hern and 2 children; T-8gt.
Leonard A. Hill; Mr. and Mrs.
..William T. Hoffman; James C.
The letter, dated Dec. 31, ask-
ed that strike threats be drop-
ped "in the national Interest."
'Applause which greeted the
reading of the message Indicated
that convention delegates prob-
ably will go along with the idea.
The union's executive board al-
ready has voted unanimously to
, recommend holding off strike ac-
tion, at least while the union's
1 case is before the Wage Stabili-
zation Board. The convention
fff luSSScStbJA *"* "H for New Year's
Murray said the Industry has
said it needs price increases to
offset any wage Increases, but
government price officials say It
rates little, If any.
Wages paid by the U. S. Steel
Corp. have risen 56.8 per cent
since 1945, Murray said, while its
profits before taxes have soared
551 per cent and profits after
taxes, 209 per cent.
Mr. Truman's letter praised the'
wage package and other conces-
sions.
Day.
"I am sure the American peo-
Wa gagged to the ^reatesVad most stay on the Job." the President
damnable and most vicious con. *
spiracy ever perpetrated against
the American people."
"The record shows clearly that
they haven't bargained, but have'
maliciously engaged in collu-
sion,1' Murray told the cheering!
convention delegates.
He said the steel companies
have formed It "great conspira-;
cy" against steel workers and
"against the country."________
FRESH
CRISP LETTUCE
Just arrived from
The Volcn.
SPECIAL for SATURDAY
First Cut
Boneless Rib Roast
Eye of the Round
Boneless Sirloin
for Steaks or Roasting
Sirloin Tip
PAUL'S
MARKET
cJo stress you figure-flattering
ROSE MARIE REID
SWIM SUIT EVENT
at Motta's
The prettiest suits under water or under
the sun '52's most enticing fabrics
and styles just waiting to cut an
eye-compelling figure on you!
Also Reversible
BEACH ROBES
to fit everybody.
PANAMA COLON

SECOND FLOOR
mer policeman at Balboa: and
Paul E. MacMillan. policeman at j tax on the gross receipts
Cristobal. their, operations plus the
Engineering Division Azacl it costs to get the Initial
Governor Orders
Florida Sheriffs
To Chase Gamblers
TALLAHASSEE, Fla., Jan. 4'
(UP)- Gov. Fuller Warren to- .
day directed all Florida sheriffs
and constables to use the Fede- I
ral government's records on I
gamblers to enforce the state's
anti-gambling laws.
"You are requested to obtain
from the Collector of Internal
Revenue at Jacksonville all
available Information about
gamblers and make full legal
use of It In enforcing the laws
against gambling," Warren said
In an order to the state's sher-
ifls and constables.
Warren apparently referred to
information gathered by the
Internal Revenue Bureau in ad-
ministering the new Federal act
taxing gamblers.
Internal Revenue officials
have names and addresses of all
persons who have applied for or
received the Federal gambling
tax stamps, which are required
under the new law.
The tax law Is believed to
have curtailed gamblers' oper-
ations by bringing them out In
the open.
Names of persons applying
for the tax stamps have been
printed Widely and broadcast
throughout the state. |
Registered gamblers are re-
quired under the law to pay a
of
$50
J. Benavides, and Tomas F. No- stamp,
riega, engineering draftsmen at
Diablo Heights;
Finance Bureau Mrs. Grace
L. Lloyd and Mrs. Janet M Har-
ness, clerk-typists.
Marine Bureau Adrien M.
tax
Hughes; Mrs. Ana M. Jackson; Bouche. Jr.. signalman. Flamen-
Mrs. Wathleen M. Jones and co Island.
son; and Miss Shirley J. Jorgen-
en.
Chester Killlan; Mrs. Vera E.
Kirk; Mrs. Anona Kirk Ian d and
'wo children; Mrs. Pauline Klap-
Kin; Mrs. Anna M. Kovach; T-
Sgt. John A. Kruszon, Jr. Mr.
id Mrs. Daumant Kusma;
|' Francia J. Leonard; Mr. and Mrs.
ED. McKlm and two children;
I At. and Mrs. John F. McLavy;
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Martin;
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Muller;
and Mrs. and Mrs. James 8.
(Hunden.
Ootfred Nelson; Mrs. Kath-
en I. Nelson; Joseph E. Noo-
an; Mrs. Delia J. Noonan; Dr.
llfford A- Pease, Jr.; Mrs. Cllf-
.jrd A. Peace, Jr.; Miss Florence
,.%. Peterson; Mr. and Mrs. W.
. Pfizer and 2 children; and
(r. and Mrs. Glenn w.
Postal, Customs and Immigra-
tion Division Claude W. Pur-
vis, postal clerk at Balboa
Heights.
mond.-
Mrs. 8ylvia J. Scandrett and
son, John Schmid; The Honor-
able and Mrs. Erret P. Scrlvner;
Mr. and Mrs. Jose Sert; Mr. and
Mrs. Ed Sleracki; John W.
Smith; Mr.,i"jtnd Mrs, Max
Smurlofsky; Miss Bern Ire Smur-
lofsky; Mrs. and Mrs. James M.
Snell; WOJG Chester D. Snyder;
Mr. and Mrs. H. Doyle Snyder;
Charles W. Stevens; Kenneth A.
Thompson; Mr. and Mrs. Emil
A. Trefzger; and 8FC and Mrs.
Robert J. Updike.
Cpl. Rubin Wagner; Mrs. Pau-
line L. Wise and son; and Mr.
Red- and Mrs. Leonard Wolford.
Episcopalians List
Epiphany Activities
Al Cristbal Church
Beautiful
Wm. Rogers
Silverware Sets
CLUB or' CREDIT
as low as
litlMM
<,,.. i
i i Hill1 i
p#W+
500 Weekly
Radio Center
7110
Bolivar
40
Coln
The Feast of Lights depleting
the spread of Christian truth
will be celebrated on Epiphany
Day. Sunday, at the Episcopal
Church of Our Saviour, New
Cristobal.
At 7:30 a.m. Holy Communion
will be celebrated, and at 11
Gounod's setting of the commun-
ion service will be sung by the
senior choir under the direction
of Mrs. George N. Engelke with
Mrs. R. de Boyrie, organist.
Rev. Milton A. Cookson will
use as his sermon, "A Guide
Through Darkness Into Light."
At 6:30 p.m. the traditional
candlelight Service of the "Feast
of Lights" portraying the spread
of the light of the Gospel down
through the ages will be offer-
ed in worship.
The pageant opens with the
lighting of the Christ candle,
the Nativity tableau follows
then the Calling of the 12
Apostles, the election of Mat-
thias, the conversion of St. Paul,
the early Saints and Mission-
aries, the coming of the Church
to Panama and up to the pre-
sent day Church.
The Youth Fellowships of the
[Church are sponsoring this mis-
sionary celebration under the
direction of Mrs. C. D. Cheek
with the assistance of the choirs
and the men of the parish.
John M. Fahnestock will be'
the Reader. Rt. Rev: R. Heber
Oooden, 8. T. D. will give the j
Epiphany Address and take part!
in the service.
The muscle which works the
wings of a bird is heavier than
all other muscles of the bird's
body put together.
i.
SHAVEN i a
WF ARF UNPACK!!
A
WE ARE UNPACKING
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Air Foam pillows...........
Beautiful bedspreads, from
Metal St board bed trays ...
Traverse rods ..............
New stock of bedroom table
lamps .............. from
Wooden ilvlngroom lamps
(blonde finish) ... .from
Aluminum chef foil ___roll
Blue Magic salt St pepper
sets ......................
Artificial paper flowers from
Europe ............. from
Sterling silver brush b comb
sets ...................... 19.95
Bath room nampers .. from 10.50
Bath room metal towel bars 1.15
Glass shelf with towel bar 3.25
Round glav, Si metal shelves 4.50
Czech jslovaklan Crystal
Special week 20% discount!
Princess Plstica place
mats.......... from .45 ,
Plastic Hopalong Casidy
plac*> mats..........60
Open-stock on kitchen
Knives ........ from .35
Plastic wading pools .. 10.50
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\\



rAGF FOTTB
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY. JANUARY 4. 1951
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes- Arrivals and Departures
TERRY
"ALWAYS INTERRUPTIONS-
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Greal White Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service _________________Cristbal
S.S. Iriona ....................................Jan. *
S.S. Fiador Knot ..............................Jan- '2
S.S. Chiriqui ..................................Jan. 's
S.S. Levers Bend ..............................Jan. 26
'Handling Refrigerated ( hilled and Genera Cargo
Arrives
New York Service_____________________Cristbal
S.S. Cape Avlnof ..............................Jan. 6
S.S. Comavagua ...............................Jan. 8
S.S. Veragua ..................................Jan. 12
S.S. Cape Cod .................................Jan. 13
S.S. Heredia ...................................Jan. 15
FREQUENT SAILINGS r'ROM CRISTOBAL TO VEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
Cristbal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui.....(Passenger Service Only).....Jan. 15
S.S. Chiriqui ................................. Jan. 29
CRISTOBAL 2121
TELEPHONES:
PANAMA 2-2804
COLON 20
BARBER LINES
Accepting Pascc _ora for
LOS ANGELES
by
m.8. "TAMESIS"
SAILING JANUARY 6tr>.
(Every room with private bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel: Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
Shipping & Air Line News
>AI l Kl II.HI IK SERVICE BETWEEN
EUROPE AND NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COASTS
(A Limited Number of Paatenger Bertha)
TO EUROPE:
S.S. Rouen............................................ January T
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR AND CHILE:
S.S. Port En Benin .................................. January 5
TO CENTRAL AMERICA WEST COAST U.S.A.
S3. Chill ............................____-j_-......... January 10
? ROM NEW YORK TO PLYMOUTH LE HAVRE
II. De Prance.....................................January 12
PASSENGER SERVICE from CARTAGENA to EUROPF:
Colorable ___........................... .......... January 1 a
tn.Ci.bal: rREM'll LINE-, P.O Bux Mia lei MM1I UN
Panama- LINDO MADURO. 8 A. Boa 103
T.I Panama MU t-IStl
Latin American Shipping
Expansion
Hits Post-War High
ships to pay heavy charges while
lying at anchor waiting to dock;
discriminatory taxes, extra port
q
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
MERCENARY MORTON
BT MERRILL BLOSSER
'Is ROe-iw STPPPiMer \Will. I fiarTO* ATA J^e-
'OUTONMCT 7A LETTER, JoMIATATiMB/
WASHINGTON. Jan. 4 (UP) fees, special currency" require -
Latin American countries are'merits or unusual charges on
close to completing 300 percent | maintenance items such as rope,
postwar expansion of their mer-lfuel. and so on.
chant fleets and are now in a
position to cut heavily Into the
ocean cargo business of other
nations, according to the Na-
tional Federation of American
Shipping.
According to figures compiled
bv the Federation, 11 Latin
American nations have acquired
This discrimination la causing
great concern to United 8tates
shipping lines and the Federa-
tion Is studying what might be
done to meet It.
It is understood that U. S.
government officials are also
considering this problem.
One shipping expert aid that
or started building a total of 9,- there was enough ocean cargo
771,200 tons of ocean shipping business presently for ships of
as contrasted with only 2,358.000 all nations which operate sub-
; tons in their possession before stantial fleets, but that much of
World War II.
They said of this total that 8.-
this carrying is of an emergency
nature, such as economic aid for
729.000 tons were already in Europe or the transfer of mil-
operation In the last half of 1951 itarv equipment under the free
and 1.042.200 tons were under nations' defense buildup,
construction. ""* He added that in normal times
'there's likely to be severe com-
Thls greatly expanded tonnage petition for the usual hauling
has come at a time when sev-; business.
eral of the shipping nations oil ______
Europe have also Increased their | increased Freight Rates
merchant fleets, compared to.To Be Effective March 3
pre-war and outstripped the1 new YORK. Jan. 4 (UP).
United States In a fast new type steamship conferences covering
of cargo vessels.
Among these are Britain.
|France. Norway. Sweden and the
[Netherlands.
A Federation official said that
Latin American and European
the east coast of Colombia and
the west coast of South America
have announced a general In-
crease in freight rates effective
March 3.
The conferences decided the
iHATS JUST If.' NO SENSE ,
WASTIM6- 1DUR.OR6A.reiFT/
f. >T. OffY,
-I
ALLEY OOP
CANT MAKE IT
BY V. T. HAMLLN
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

THE ODDS
BY EDGAR MARTIN
W
//
MAERSK LINE
Accepting Passengers for
SAN FRANCISCO
by
m.s. "PETER MAERSK"
SAILING JANUARY 7th.
(Every room with private bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel: Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
countries are In a position to of- increases were necessary because
fer stiff competition to United 0f the "heavily Increased costs"
States vessels in normal times, 0 operation,
and that this country will need Trie announcement did not
to give serious consideration to specify the percentage of the in -
Improving Its numbers of fast crease which will vary from pro-
efficient vessels. duct to product.
I It is predicted that the next1______
session of Congress, opening 4 canaL Company *,.-,_-,
Jan. 8 will study this problem. Directors Due Monday' *r"
The large expansion of Latin Aboard S.8. "Ancon"
1 American shipping is a direct jrour members of the Board of
outgrowth of the wartime short- Directors of the Panama Canal
' age when those countries some- company are expected to arrive
times had difficulty in moving 1 Monday morning on the Pana-
their products overseas to mark-: ma nner Ancon to attend the
ets or obtaining space for im- Board meeting which opens that
ported supplies they needed, ac-, dayi according to the advance
cording to experts. passenger list received at Balboa
Some of the Latin American Heights,
countries resolved then to obtain
more ships so that they would
not be In such a position again.
The Federation official said a
number of them have resorted to
discrimination against foreign
vessels in an effort to increase
their own merchant shipping.
This discrimination has in-
cluded such devices as berthing
preferences in ports for their
own vessels, thus causing foreign
Arriving on the same ship are
James C. Hughes, Secretary of
the Canal Company, and United
States Representatives Foster
Furcole of Massachusetts and Er-
ret P. Scrlbner. of Kansas. Both
Representatives are members of
the Appropriations Committee.
Congressman Furcole Is accom-
panied by his wife and their 11-
(Continued on Page THREE)
CHK* WEI,KEN Planeteer
TRIGGER HAPPY
BY RDSS WINTERBOTHAM
The three eartmmen,chri* welkin,
ROCKY -STARK, ANO OR. Eft>po,'&rotrr
TO &EIZE CONTROL OF A*R.7& FLYIH&
j ----- f ONE OF TU&5E TACE
PIRATES HA* -SPOTTEd
THE LEFT
MICHAEL
JsVUHE, VC NOW
TAX TWI* TVPS
WRITER KEYBOARD..!
|"Uaa\ CRIBS WANTED TO WRITE HELP' IN COOS. O HI
1 MOVED M P1N&ER* ONE KEY TO THE UPT... Jgp.1.1
? ?aaQDHaauri
c ? a h a ? ? h a a h u
nQHflanaHHijea
ANO WROTE " WHICH HB X-EO OUT. THERE
NOW LET'fr TAKE ,' THBV
ANOTHER LOOK | AREi AOIBR
AT THO*fi OTHER
WORD* I'VE BEEN
PUZZLING OVER.
UAJUKKWE
XWBRWECU
By J..R. WILLIAJ-
Ir* <&t^\,s. :Z??
41


FRIDAY JANUARY 4, 1952
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NBWSPAFBB
pacific ^ocie
-
PAGE
it
&. 17, B.L* D.L &IU. 3571
1

s
at the United States to Panama
and Mr. John Cooper Wiley.
Visiting Clubwomen
To Arrive Tonight
The President of the General
Federation of Women's Clubs,
Mrs. Hiram Houghton. and the
40 members of the Federated
Women's Clubs, by whom abe Is
accompanied, are expected to ar-
rive this evening at 10:30 p.m.
by plane.
Eden Entertain With
Cocktail Buffet
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Eder, who
are guests at the Hotel El Pa-
nama, entertained last evening,
on the south terrace of the Ho-
tel, with a cocktail buffet for
a large group of their friends.
Visitors Leave On
S.S. Cristobal
Among the passengers sailing
for New York this morning
aboard the 8J8. Cristobal were
the Honorable and Mrs. Gordon
Canfleld and their two sons and
the Honorable And Mrs. Leroy
Johnson who have been visitors
on the Isthmus for several days.
LIEUTENANT AND MRS. THOMA8 C. MARINE
MARINE-PYLE WEDDING
SOLEMNIZED AT ALBROOK CHAPEL
;
' On Saturday, Dec. 29, at 6:30 p.m. In the Albrook Air
Force Base Chapel, the marriage of Miss Shirley Dell Pyle,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Pyle, of Brasil, Okla-
homa, to Lieutenant Thomas C. Marine, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas J. Marine, of Panama City, was solemnised with
Chaplain V. H. Warner officiating at the ceremony.
The chancel and altar were decorated with large vases
of white calla lilies.
The organist played appropriate nuptial music during
the ceremony as well as the traditional wedding marches
for the processional and recessional.
The bride wore a wedding
gown of white Glpiur lace and
nylon made with sweetheart
neckline, fitted lace bodice with
a stole effect of pleated nylon,
and bouffant, ballerina length
nylon skirt. Her fingertip length
veil of illusion was of nylon net
and was attached to her lace cap
with white carnations. A corsage
of white carnations worn at her
waist and slippers of white satin
completed her ensemble.
A sister of the bridegroom,
Mrs. William James Bright, Jr.,
was the matron of honor and
wore a gown of aquamarine crepe
McCormack-Sartin Wedding
Takes Place in Mexico
Mrs. Amy Vincent Sartaln and
Mr. Cornelius Sinclair McCor-
mack have announced their
marriage on Dec. 13 In Cuerna-
vaca, Mexico.
The couple spent a wedding
trip in Mexico. Guatemala, and
Costa Rica and after Feb. 1 will
be at home at 82-A. New Cristo-
bal, Canal Zone.
Mrs. McCormack has been em-
ployed by Gorgas Hospital, and
was for several years Society
Editor for The Panama Amer-
ican. She has lived on the Pacl-
and a corsage of pink rose buds, fie Side for many years.
The best man was Mr. William
James Bright, Jr. '
Immediately following the ce-
remony a weddl
Mr. McCormack is employed
Kith the Marine Bureau of the
anama Canal. During World
wedding supper was i War II he was an officer in the
served to members of he I*-[submarine service of the U.S.
dlate family in the Pern Room Navy and saw duty in the South
of the Hotel Tivoll after which Pacific. After the war he was
transferred to the Isthmus and
served a tour of duty at the U.S.
Naval Station, Rodman* Canal
Zone.
the youn* couple left for a short
wedding trip to the Atlantic
Side.
Lieutenant Marine returned to
the United States yesterday by
plane to report to Wright-Pat- Mra, Gilford Pinchot
terson Air Force Base in Day- Arrived On Isthmus
ton, Ohio. The new Mrs. Marine, Mrs. Glfford Pinchot, the
wUl leave the Isthmus February; widow of the former Governor
2 for Dayton where they will of Pennsylvania, arrived last
make their future home. |night by plane for a visit to the
The bride. whtjJs a member of isthmus. During her stay she
the nursing stafrof the Gorgas!will be the houseguest of the
Hospital, is a graduate of the St.. Ambassador of the United States
Louis City Hospital Nursing to Panama and Mrs. John
School and was a Lieutenant in cooper Wiley,
the Army Nurses Corps during
Visitors Here Prom New York
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Miller, of
Brooklyn, New York, arrived
Monday aboard the S.S. Cristo-
bal to spend the winter months
as the house guests of their son
and daughter-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. George Miller, of Bella Vis-
ta.
C. 2. CoUege Club To
Hold Tea At J. W. B.
The Canal Zone College Club
will hold a tea and business
meeting at the J. W. B.-U. S. O.
on Monday. January 7, at 3:45
p.m.
The program will be presented
by the "Know The Canal Zone"
Group. Mrs. I. F. Mcllhenny
will talk on the recent re-orga-
nlzation of the Canal organiza-
tion.
, ___, (NBA Telephoto)
IN KOREA Infantrymen of the U.S. 45th Division, an
Oklahoma National Guard outfit, disembark from troopship
on their way to the front. The first National Guard unit
of Its size to be sent to Korea, the 45th was shifted from
Japan to the battle lines and has been in contact with the
enemy for three weeks.
Jimmy Tribble Celebrates
Birthday
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Tribble,
of Curundu, entertained at their
home in honor of the birthday
anniversary of their son, Jimmy,
with a party for him and all of
his young friends.
Anita Webster To Play
Sunday
The talented young Panama-
nian pianist, Miss Anita Webster,
will >.ve a concert Sunday at
10:00 a.m. at the Rex Theatre
in Colon.
Tea Honors Returning
Residents
Miss Clotilde Vejas and Miss
Josefa Gonzalez who returned
recently from New York where
they have been studying, will be
the guests of honor at 4 p.m. to-
morrow at a tea to be given by
Mrs. C. R. Vosburgh in the Fern
Room of the Hotel Tivoll.
World War II
The, bridegroom attended the
Canal Zone schools and is a
gradute of the Canal Zone Junior
Taylors To Leave Por
Guatemala
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Chatfield
Taylor, of Washington, D. C, will
College. During the last war Lt. leave today by plane for Guate-
Marine accomplished 25 missions mala. During their stay on the
over Germany for which he was | Isthmus they have been the
decorated. 'houseguests of the Ambassador
1952 BRINGS YOU
NEW STYLES IN FURNITURE
all GUARANTEED!
Directly
from Havana,
Cuba.
All Star Circle Holds
i.i.nt hrim
The All Star Circle met Wed-
nesday at 1 p.m. for a covered
dish no-host luncheon and busi-
ness meeting which was held at
the Scottish Rite Temple In Bal-
boa. Following the business
meeting the group played canas-
ta and bingo.
Those attending included Mrs.
Ella Brown. Mrs. Edith Eppley,
Mrs. Celia Currle, Mrs. Edith
Henshaw. Mrs. Catherine Sellen,
Mrs. Florence Yard, Mrs. Edith
Voss, Mrs. Dorothy Allen, Mrs.
Grace Brundage, Mrs, Maude
Cllnchard. Mrs. Rena Harvey,
Mrs. Harriet Powell, Mrs. Ruth
Straus and Mrs. Elizabeth Zlrk-
man.
Mrs. Maude Parke attended as
a visitor.
High-Ranking Pallbearers
Attend Litvinov Funeral
MOSCOW, Jan. 4 (UP).Rus-
sia gave a state funeral yester-
day to Maxim Litvinov. one of
its most famous diplomats who
in the decade before the World
War II was a familiar figure in
the council chambers of Khe
West.
The "old Bolshevik and pro-
minent diplomat," as a half-col-
umn obituary in Pravda describ-
ed him, died Monday. Severe
illness had forced him into semi-
retirement for the last few years.
The Foreign Ministry an-
nounced the death of Litvinov,
75, in a black bordered state-
ment in Pravda. It expressed the
profound sorrow, of the govern-
ment he served so long.
Lltvinov's body lay In state
on a flower-bedecked catafalque
yesterday morning In the con-
ference hall of the Foreign Min-
istry. Four uniformed officers of
the Foreign Ministry made up
a guard of honor.
Three deputy Foreign Min-
isters, Andrei Gromyko. Valery
Zorin and Fedor Gusev, served
as the principal pallbearers.
They carried the coffin to a
flag-draped hearse.
The pallbearers and honor
guards wore black brassards. A
military band played funeral
dirges to the slow beat of muf-
fled drums.
Lltvinov's widow, the British-
born Ivy Low, his son and
daughter, and other relatives
were in the funeral cortege.
Litvinov was burled In the ce-
metery of the former "new
maiden" convent after brief ce-
remonies.
ROWING CONTESTS
The Yale-Harvard rowing con-
tests were begun in 1852 by six-
oar crews without coxswains, in
a three-mile course on Lake Win-
nepesaukee, N. H., with Harvard
winning.
By GAY PAULEY
NEW YORK, Dec. 26 (UP)
Modern women are Just as eager
as last century's cooks to ex-
change recipes but now they do
Jt on a trans-continental basis
Instead of over the back fence.
A milling company says that
fact is brought out by its cook-'
lng contests, held annually at
New York's Waldorf-Astoria Ho-'
ML
"We have been astonished at
the number of women who send
in recipes for our grand national
bake-off," said Mrs. Ruth Andre,
director of the Plllsbury home
service center.
"Since last year's contest end-
ed, we have had 2,500,000 re-
quests for our book of prize-win-
ning recipes. It's the same as the
old custom of exchanging recipes
with your neighbors, only on a
larger scale."
The baking contest sur-
prised eTeryone, including the
hotel executives, when it wu
staged the first time.
It seemed a slightly unsophis-
ticated affair for a Park Avenue
hotel and the stoves were moved
Into the carpeted main ballroom
past some skeptical faces.
One whiff of the appealing
odors drifting Into the corridors
when the finalista started bak-
ing their specialties brought the
skeptics around. Soon they were
filing into the gallery to watch.
Now, there are no eyebrows
raised when the ballroom be-
comes a kitchen for a day.
There are never any signs of
temperament among the contes-
tants either," Mrs. Andre said.
"They act quite at home In the
huge ballroom."
Only one thing has the com-
pany puzzled.
That is, why so many finalists
hail from Wisconsin.
"We've had 15 prize winners
from Wisconsin," Mrs. Andre
said. "Maybe it's because the
famUles are larger there than
the average of the country, or
because it's a dairy state with
plenty of milk and butter."
New York, the largest city, has
never produced a prize winner.
"Maybe," Mrs. Andre suggest-
ed, "the city kitchens are too
small to inspire much baking. At I
least, women from the smaller
towns walk off with all the cook-
ing honors."
The 1951 contest will be held
this month.
F
L
O
R
E
C
I
T
A
Available at your favorite store I B
Made in New Zealand E
Distributed by the Swift, Co.,
Panama.
*
Preview of
Spring igju
oLovely [Prints
FROM 9-W
<
Cool COTTONS and
Pure Silk DRESSES
in delightful styles
and colors!
AT BOTH OUR STORES
FELIX B. MADURO, S.A.
21 Central Ave.
6 Tivoli Ava.
SCH DLL'S SERVICES
Panama No. 58 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails,
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments. Massages,
Slenderizing Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators. For information call: 3-2117 Panam.
812 a.m.: 26 p.m.
Gills! Women! Who Suffer Distress Of
TEMAL WEAKNESS
with Its nervous
cranky feelings..
Do female functional monthly dis-
turbances make you feel nervous,
fidgety, cranky, so tired and
'dragged out'at such limes? Then
do toy Lydi EL Plnkham's Vege-
O$&&0fcMNg.
table Compound to relieve such
symptoms. It's foment for helping
girls and women in this wayl
Taken regularly Plnkhunto
Compound helps build up resist-
ance against such distress. Jus*
see If you, too, don't remarkably
benefit. Also a great stomachic
tonic Worth trrtngt
OITABLI
OMPOUNO
*sacKsaggacatttiaeiacaoa^
"To Know Your Lord, You Must Know Your Bible."
%/lnnounctng a Hew ermon cbervtce
STUDIES IN THE BOOK OF
alatlans
Every Sunday Evening7:30 p.m.
This Sunday"The Christian's Magna Charta." Gal. 1:1-4.
Morning Worship10.45 a.m. "Conversion and Character."
Special Music at Both Services
first [Baptist Church
BALBOA HEIGHTS. C.Z.
SpeakerPastor W. H. Beeby Radio ServiceBOXO7M Ke.
We Preach Christ Crucified Risen Coming Again.
i

mmtmMuuumHmuummu
<<<<<<<<<<<
Orchid Chapter O .E. S.
Installs New Officers
The Installation of Officers
for 1952 for the Orchid Chapter
No. 1. Order of the Eastern Star,
was held on Saturday evening at
7:30 p.m. at the Scottish Rite
Temple In Balboa with the re-
tiring Worthy Matron, Alice Bld-
strup: retiring Worthy Patron,
Paul Jamesson: Marshal for 1951.
Louise Bisssel: and Assisting
Marshal. Jane Payne, serving as
LARGE SELECTION OF
French Cnjilal
Ok
Yours $75.00
down
Fine native mahogany
BEDROOM SET with a
year's guaranteed certificate.
CASH CREDIT
CLUB
By SET or PIECES
SmuRESTORE
NTRALAVE.*t21tEST. PHONES: 2-1830
* 2-1833
REX Beauty Salon
takes pride In announcing
their new expert
ANA
Specialized in
Permanents Cold Wave
Facial Massage Tints
Halrstyling
Call for appointment
Z-334, Panam
REX
BEAUTY. SALON
N.. 5 4th of July Atmh
* All Patterns In Open Stock
* Easy Terms Available
16 Tivoli Ave
COLOSSAL
GIGANTIC
ENORMOUS
Marvella Pearls
stiver Pin ...
Vanity Cases ..
Coco Jewelry ...
Before NOW
.25.00 7.M
.. 2 95 .*
...2.00 I.ZS
.12 50 4.M
Before .NOW
"Coty" Perfum ..
"Rety Montecarlo" .
"Friendship Garden"
"Kuss-Kuss" ......
"Yardley" Shampoo
.12 SO 4.4*
.8 90 !
..ISO .7
..2.7S .JX
. JO .*
BOOKS (3591 lbs.)
Before up to $6.50
NOW .25 e Before NOW
St. Silver Ronson Light.
r ...................3000 IS.M
Leather Billfolds ......1 25 .1
Leather Cigarette Casea 1 00 .1
Klrsten" Pipes ......8 50 2.8
"Dr. G.-ibow'- pipea ...1.75 .M
Metal Rim Sunflasaaa 5 25 US
Before NOW
"Old fplce" Talcum ... .1.50 .71
"Yardlev" Aftenhive L. J no l II
" Yard lev" Sha vln Bowl 1 25 M
SHEAFFER PENS
and PENCILS
Now Lee* Than "ICq/
In The U.S.A. J% less
Before NOW
Pipe Stand* Beauties 11 00
Book EndsLovely ..1.1 JO
Pictur* Frames .....l so
Butterf'.y Wing Pictures 4 75
Ash Trays Onyx 25
roto Scrap Albums .75
Glass Wax tin*......7S
s.ts
s.ss
1.14
IS
MS
.24
.44
FROM CHINA
TOYS
Before NOW
Plastic furniture ......2 50 .7
Basehs.il Seta ........4 25 J.ie.
Mechanical Train .....1.(5 .49
Doll Hrusea ..........2.50 .T
Holster Sets 4..........1.50 Lie,
Sewing Sets /...........75 .*)
T.otto .ames ............75 .St*
Binen Games ...........75 5.a
Checke- Game* ........1 SO JS
Before NOW I
Canasta Tr*yt ........1 25
Crucifixes .............5 50
Reynolds" Pen* .....15.50
Ballpoint Pan*..........JO
Table lighten .........1.50
1
IS
OUR STORE
WILL BE
OPEN
from
8:30 a.m. 9 p.m.
Before NOW
Laquer Tea Seta ___25.00 14.M
Laquer Jewelry Boxes 5.75 1.SS
Bronze Flower Vases ...230 M
Porcellaln Buddhas.....6.5(1 IN
Pnrcellaln Figures ___4.50 l.SS
Cloisonne Vase* .....19 95 *.M
SIROCCO WOOD
WAY BELOW COST
Before NOW
Mexican Flower Pots .. SO Jg
Crechoslovaklan Crystal
Vases ...............3.M IS
Eaton Stationery ......175 .4*
S. Silver Tableware MM IMS

Please pome early, will yen.-
We must reduce oar Stock...
Our loss is your PROFIT.
FORMERLY
"MORRISON'S'
LEWIS SERVICE
CORNER "J" STREET & 4TH OF JULY AVE Opposite Ancon P.O.
SORRY: No Credit Sales No Return or Exchange



r*G* six
THE PANAM AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
rti-*mm
-----------------------.
FRIDAY, JANUARY* 4", 9*SI
;
i
You Sell cm...
leave yow Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
UCW18 SiMtYlCI
to. Tin At*
Vme i-TMl
KIOSKli Df. LBS8BPS
MORRISON'S
hew ?-'!
K. r*a(th at J' *
Kiirin JARLTON
te tes Mtjeajaap at.
Pkl S-Cale
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
He. M W 13th Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No n "" Stre*lPanaaaa
V. 11, lit Central \t# <"ol*m
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
Candidates Hotting Up Their Bidding
In Race For Presidential Nomination

FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobile
MISCELLANEOUS! RESORTS
*OR SALE: Lown mower, $10
youth dresser $15. cleon mattres?
and pillo*. $10. Otfice teephone
_2-2525. ____
FOR SALE:3 Fes. Custom Built
overstuffed livingroom furniture.
$375.00. Complete set of Ralln
tattles $125.00. 5"1-S, Curundu
Heights, 7-9 p. m._________________
COR SALE:Gtntrol Electric refn-
gerator, 60 cycles, guaranteed
Simmons doy couch. 4-pc. living-
room set. baby crib, youth's bed
Shane 916, Co:on._______________
OR SALE':1951 Coldspot 9 cu I
(t. with large Freeier Chest. 60]
Cyl. 1951 Kenmore Automatic)
Goi Range, built in griddle. 2 boy's |
snowsuits, perfect condition, size
'4 end 6 1-2. 60 Cyl. Clipper
Clock. See at M90-D, Bolboo
DoKrroan St.
FOR SALE:Beoutyrest box springI
and mattress $40 each. Al-
brook 5287________________________|
Help Wonted
WANTEDMld for generol house-
work. Must speak English ond hove
food references. Apply house
1580-1, Balboa, oftar 4:30 p. m
WANTED
Miscellaneous
Service Personnel ond
Civilian Government Employes
MNANCI
your new or used cor through
SOVIRNMINT EMRLOYIS FINANCI
CO.
Fort Worth, Texos.
Serving Government Employes ond
Service Personnel in the Canal Zone
lor 14 years. With our financing
your insurance automatically aoiusted
to U. S. covrag*.
ARRAN6EMINT$ CAM IE MAD!
THR0U8H LOCAL AUTOMOBILI
_____________MALM
FOR SALE:Buying or selling on
automobile? See Agendas Cosmos
Automobile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-
4721, Penomo.
FOR SALE: Hillman 51. Excellent
condition, leaving lor States. Tel.
Panama 2-0694; 3-0095, even-
ings.
FOR SALE:1950 4-docr Chevrolet
Sedon. 0766-D. Williamson Place
between 4 and 6 p. m.
FOR SALE:1951 Chevrolet Con-
vertible. Powerglide, radio. Con be
financed. Will take trode See
Frank Alemn at Smoot tr Pare-
des. Tel. 2-0600.
FOR SALE:Chevrolet Tudor Sedan
excellent condition 1939, cheap
Rhone 916. Coln.
WANTED: Modern two bedroom
house in good residential area
Coll 3-3795 or" 2-2842 2-
2542, Panomo.
WANTED:Furniture for livingroom
diningroom. bedroom, kitchen. CaK
Caldwell Hotel, Tivoli, room 268
Position Offered
FOR SALE Nash Ambossodor 1949
fou door sedan, excellent condition.
Leaving Isthmus. Financing ovoil-
able. Tel. 2-2757 Bolboo.
i an have e drtaUng reblen?
Writ. Alt.heliM AjMaeeaeeje
Sea 20SI Aareeo. C. 2.
Sealed bids, in triplicate, will be re-
ceived in the office of Engineer-
ing and Construction Director,
Panama Conal Compony, Balboa
Heights, until 10:00 a. m. Feb-
ruary 18, 1952 and then opened
in public, for furnishing all plant
tools, equipment, motenals, lobor
ond services ond for performing
all work for construction of:
Project A Margarita Townsite Ex-
tension
Pnject BConstruction of Quorters
at Gatun
Project CGrading ond Site Prepo-
ration for Future Townsite Ex-
tension ot Margarita
Project DGrading and Site Prepa-
ration, Access Rood ond Access
Utilities for Future Townsite
Extension ot Crdeno*
Project EConstruction of Two Con-
crete Tanks, Appurtenonces and
Service Rood at Summit
Bid schedules, forms of proposals,
specifications, ond full particulars
moy be obtained from the office
of the Contract and Inspection
Division. Room 336. Bolboo Hots..
iTelephonet 2-3739 or 2-2698.
Specifications and drawings will
be issued on o deposit of $25.00
per set for eoch Project or $100.
00 for all. Deposit will be forfeited
if specifications ond drowings ore
not returned within 30 days ofler
opening of bids.
Williams Santa Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidaires, Rock-]
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
Gromlich't Santo Clora beach-
cottages. Electric ice ooxes. got
stoves, moderte ratas. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567. Jl
Phillips. Ocaonside cottages. Sonto
Clara. Box 435 Balboo. Phone
Porvomo 3-1877. Criitobol 3-1673 I
HOTEL PAN AMERICANO in cool
El Voile. Reservation. Telephone
Panama 2-1112.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR RENT
Houses
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS. Soon
avoilable chalet, five room duplex
with hot and cold water, two
bathrooms, maid's room. Apply
immediately. Tel. 1386, .Colon.
FOR RENT
Apartments
It s actually cheaper
to buy a
P.r.l. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Beside. Protection Against
Injury, thev save many
times their value in cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
CEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Are. Tel. 3-0146
\ ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
Met office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cnsiobci. telephone 1386 Colon.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel F Taare*
Selling: Abattoir, Panam
Forest (preferred), Clay Pro-
ducts, S. Fernando Clinic.
Tel. 3-4719 3-1660
FOR SALE:Chevrolet Sedon 1951
De Luxe, radio, seat covers. Power
Glide, excellent condition, $1,785.
Jock Rocker. 713-A, Prado, Bol-
boo. Tel. 7-2874.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM-BUILT
Slipcover Reupholstery
VISIT OUH SROW-BOOMI
Albene Herea
1. t. la la Oeea n < Automobile Row)
Free Eallmatef rirkup A Deliver;
Tel. S-4S2S H:N a.m. le 7:M *..
WANTED: Experienced ond full
-time. Beautician. Apply Diablo
1 Heights. Clubhouse Beouty Shop.
leTsons
TEENAGERS only. Special Ballroom
f Dance. Course 12 Privte Lessons
. for $25. Balboa YMCA, Harnett
:, Dunn.
FOR SALE: 1948 Packard four
door sedon. excellent condition
new WSW tires, radio; will toke
older car in trade. 860-Q Morgan
Ave. 5-7 P. M.
FOR SALE:Radio transmitter poir
813s Phone-CW, all bands. Phone
Balboa 1234.
Pacific Society...
'Caftinifl Fro Pate FIVE
'Installing Officers for the. oc-
casion.
! The new officers included
Worthy Matron. Ella Lombrola;
worthy Patron. Nolan Blssell:
Associate Matron. Martha Relf;
Associate Patron, Maurice Tee-
winkle; Secretary. Elsa Bailey:
Treasurer, Lillian Ryan: Conduc-
tress. Mary Orr; Associate Con-
ductress. Louise Sorrell: Cha-
plain. Claire Ogden; Marshal,
Charlotte Herman; Organist.
Louise Swafford; Adah. Leah
Greene; Ruth, Geraldlne W.
Magnuson; Esther. Elolse Brown;
Martha, Louise Blssell; Electa.
Evelyn Yarbrou g h : Warder.
Ruth Daniels; Sentinel. Paul
perry > Soloist. Marv Nussbaum:
- and Trustees. Marybelle Hiclts
and Paul Jameison.
FOR SALE:Almost new 1951 MG
with extras, must sell. 860-X.
Morgan Ave. 5-7 p. m.
FOR SALE: Hydromotie Codillac
"Fleefwood," 1949. perfect con-
dition: Duty paid, block four door
sedan, non-punctur W/S tires ond
tubes, radio, red silk seat cov-
ers. Can be financed. $2,500.00
House 2179-C. Telephone 7126
Curundu, C. 2.
FOR SALE:Piano, mangle iron, 25
cycle. 425, Porto Bello St., An-
cn.
FOR SALE:Hoover sweeper with
attachments, Kenmore electric
ironer. 25 cycle, Tropical ond
Gold Fish. House 771-A, Bolboo
or phone 2-2581.
FOR SALEChoice luquete Novel
Oranges, $2.25 for 50. delivered
Productos Nacionales. S. A. Tele-
phone 2-0028. Panamo.
FOR RENT:Small one room fur-i
nished apartment. All modern con-1
veniences. 43rd Street No. 13.
FOR RENT2 bedrooms, livingroom.,
diningroom, garage. Justo Aro-
semena No. 97. Edificio Agromon-'
te. '
FOR'RENT:Apartment, unfurnish-
ed; one bedroom sitting-dining-
room, bathroom, kitchen, No. 91
44th street, Bella Visto. See Dc,
Castro No. 24 "B" Avenue. Te-|
lephone 2-1616, Panoma.
.OR RENT
Rooms
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, cool
entirely renovated and wall fur-i SAVES 30% IRONING TIME
nished. Rates reasonable. Bache-
lora only. Inquire at The Ame-
rican Club facing Da Leiieei
Perk.
SfMSATIOMAl 0FFR!
Iht CMAiihC itn S:DCH fliSlSli"!
PQNtUG BOai-OCOVEK
FOR SALE:Ford Panel 47. Perfect
condition. Foe quick sale $550-
00. Con be inspected. Tel. 2-
2772, Panam.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
; .Coffee Te Honor Mrs. Houihten
Mrs. Hiram Houghton. the
president of the General Fede-
- ration of Women's Clubs, and
40 members of the Federated
women's Club will be the guests
of honr at a coffee to be given
Jointly by the members of the
Federated Women's Clubs of the
Isthmus on tomorrow morning
at the Morgan estate at Mlra-
flores.
The oof fee has been arranged
by the presidents of the Fede-
rated Clubs who are Mrs. R. W.
Rubelli of Cristobal: Mrs. Pat
Ryan of Balboa; Mrs. R. C.
Meissner.of Pedro Miguel and
Mrs. J. H. Pennington of Gam-
baa, who Is also the Chairman
an charge of refreshment* for
the affair.
- Coffee will be served at 9:30
B.m. followed at 10:00 a.m. by
,4\ tour of the garriens conducted
- by Mr*. Morgan.
: Vesper Circle Meete At
War* Reme
The Vesper Circle of the Gam-
boa Union Church held their
first meeting of the new year
em Wednesday at the home of
their chairman. Mrs. W. H.
Ward, who was assisted by Mrs.
R. X. Soyster.
Prior to the social hour at-
tention was given to important
business, relative to the formu-
lation of policies for the comng
?year.
Members and friends present
were Mrs. F. J. Ryan. Mrs. Nor-
-nan K. Anderson, Mrs. L. P.
Morrison, Mr. R. K. Soyster,
| virs. John J. Huff. Mrs. M. S.
I Herring: Miss Amanda Huddle-
f st5n. Mr. F. 8. Pierce. Mrs. B.
I A Herring, Mrs. James C.
I MecArlav, Mrs. Harry Egolf. Mrs.
/. ^ 1 F. Boyd. Mrs. A. R.
Sprier, Mrs. O. G. Felps. Mrs.
&. (.jo Waluridge. Mrs. O. E.
:. Mrs. P. W. Henderson.
J* A. Oray and the hostess.
Mrs W. H. Ward. t
|FOR SALE-.Pick-up Ford 37, goodj
I condition. See it from 9-12 o
I m. 14th West Street No. 52.
JFOR SALE:Plymouth 48. like new.!
4 door. Chevrolet 4 door, duty
poid. Phone 2-4624.
Negro's Widow
Dies From Injuries;
Killers Still Free
SANFORD, Fla., Jan. 4 tUP)
\ The widow of Harry T. Moore,
Florida Negro leader killed In
a bombing of his home at Mlms,
I Fla., died yesterday of injuries
received in the same explosion.
The victim, the second of the
] terrorist violence Christmas
night, was Harriet Moore, 49, a
school teacher at Lake Park,
,Fla.
Mrs. Moore died at Fernald
Laughton Memorial Hospital
I from a blood clot, according to
(Dr. George Starke. He said she
never rallied from a relapse
Wednesday. Her only statement
(before she died, Starke repott-
ed, was: "Don't give me any
more medicine."
The FBI. state and county
officers still are seeking the
terrorists who set a terrific ex-
plosive almost under the
Moore's bed Dec. 25. The blast
tore out one side of the Moore.v
modest home set in a small
orange grove near Minis.
Moore, a state official of the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
died en route to the hospital
here. His wife was never given
better than a 50-50 chance of
living.
Moore was buried in a coun-
try cemetery near Mlms Jan. 1.
Nearly 600 persons attended
the funeral during which Moore
was praised as a "martyr of the
fight for a world free from dic-
tatorship.'.'
Officers investigating the case
so far have not announced any
progress In their search for the
killers.
Attorney General J. Howard
McGrath ordered the FBI to use
every facility at Its disposal in
the investigation.
The NAACP offered a $5,000
reward. Gov. Fuller Warren of
Florida $3.000 and the Brevard
County commission $500 in re-
wards for information leading
to the bombers.
Governor Warren and the
state conference of the NAACP
termed the bombing a "coward-
ly assassination."
FOR SALE: Cabin cruiser 19 ft
long with model "A" Marine En-
gine. Trailer 50 H. P. Call 3-
2104 Panama. 2:00 p. m. tc
5:00 p. m.
FOR RENT:In Bella Vista, beauti-
fully furnished lorge bedroom
kitchen privileges. Mexico Avenue
No. 69, neor 43rd St. Phone 3-
0553.
FOR RENTRoom for single person
furnirhed or unfurnished, cool,
comfortoble, neor Ancon Post Of-
i ce. For inlormalion coll 2-2708.
Pitt all ?nndard size Ironln* boards.
Color tut. Stainproot
Waterproof, keep pad rjrt'i .
No sc.irrh mark.-, attractive looking
indefinitely.
Laboratory lested not to scorch at
600 deoreea heal
Only S3.7S each Postpal*'.
Send Money Order to
Dunmore Agency
Eatuteta Instituto Nacional
PANAMA. R.P.
FOR SALE:21 foot sailboat. 2 sets
sails, 5 HP outboard, in good con-
dition. Licensed plus misc. equip-
ment for boat. Box 377 Apt. 507-
A. Cocoli.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
OFFICE:Modern two room suite
neor Free Zone. Inquire Alhom-
bra Apartments 8061. 10th Street
Telephone 1386. Colon.
"Murder In The JC"
Ready For 2 Shows
Wed. and Thursday
Since 18 college actors will ap-
pear In the production of "Mur-
der In the Junior College" at
Balboa on Wednesday. Jan. 9 and
at Cristobal Thursday, Jan. 10. a
wide range of experience on the
stage is represented. Most of the
players have appeared in shows
before, but at least half of them
are new to the college theater
work.
Peggy McCubbin, Betty Flum-
ach. and Gerl Snodgrass are cast
in the roles of three interlopers,
who turn out to be what they
claim. But that Is not at all un-
usual in "Murder in the Junior
College," which bases its great-
est interest on the fact that It is
novel.
With Charles Becktell as the
soda fountain boy and Solly
Toussleh as the property boy of
the play, the murder-mystery-
comedy booked for the double
performances at both ends of the
Panam- Canal, offers theater-
goers of the Isthmus a different
sort of stage production.
The 18 actors who appear In
the play will also fill the posi-
tions required for the staging
and producing work of the show.
No seats will be reserved and no
advance sale of tickets will be
made. Tickets will be on sale at
the door on Wednesday night at
50 cents each for the one per-
formance in Balboa, at the Little
Theater building on Carr Street.
B0STICH STAPLERS
the best I
5.000 Staples95c.
V
MYDftftOTHEkS. IMC
#1$ Tivoli Ave,
Tel. Z-2tl
Navy Cuts Clothing
And Footwear Prices
The Navy reduced the prices
of enlisted men's clothing and
footwear about 20 per cent on
Jan. 1.
Reduced prices of materials
recently purchased and an in-
dicated future downward market
trend in textiles and footwear
made the price reduction pos-
sible, the Navy Bureau of Sup-
plies and Accounts announced.
The 20 per cent reduction Is
the first readjustment In the
price of Navy clothing, sold
through official "small stores,"
since their prices were raised
last March 1.
Under the Navy's stock fund
pricing policy, funds from cash
sales and clothing issues are ex-
pected to replenish the Navy's
stock of clothing or basic fab-
rics. Price rises in March re-
flected increased costs in basic
fabrics and other uniform items
since the last purchase of major
quantities of this material In
1945.
The Navy said that represen-
tative price reductions which be-
came effective Jan. 1 Includes
blue dress Jumpers, down to
$12.50 from $16.50; blue undress
jumpers, down to $7.10 from
$11.65; overcoats down to $32
from $39.65; low-cut black shoes,
down to $6.50 from $8.50; blue
trousers, down to $12.20 from $15
and cotton undershirts, down to
45 cents from 60 cents.
The Navy's wool conservation
program has brought savings
through a new crew's blanket.
The new blanket Is made of
equal parts of cotton and wool,
resulting In reduction in price
from $20 to $12.50.
As further reductions hi pro-
duction costs are effected, they
will be passed on to Navy per-
sonnel.
Royal Doric Club
To Meet Wednesday
The Royal Doric Club will hold
i special meeting next Wednes-
day night at 7:30, it was an-
nounced today.
The announcement said the
meeting will be held a: t'i. reg-
ular clubroom and summons
have been issued to members.
CHAMPION BOXER
At STUD
Mrltalre's Model Model
Fames dee* red fawn lop
predaetot eexer.
Owner: Esther G de Velasquez.
Pet Hospital Vi Porras 2
Tel.: I-1M4 3-312
WASHINGTON. Jan. 4 IUP)
Harold E. Stassen threw a di-
rect challenge at Sen. Robert
A. Taft for the Republican
Presidential nomination today
by announcing plans to enter
the Ohio, Pennsylvania and
Minnesota primaries.
Taft said he welcomed the
move but predicted that Stas-
sen will be "wasting his time
and money."
The Oh loan said the action
merely will force him to set up
the formal organization in his
home state for which his sup-
porters have been clamoring.
Simultaneously, Sen. Esi.es
Kefauver (D-Tcnn.i said he will
decide about Feb. l whether he
will be a candidate for the De-
mocratic Presidential nomina-
tion regardless of whether Pre-
sident Truman decides to run.
Underscoring the stop-Taft
complexion of his strategy,
Stassen said he still has not
decided whether to enter GOP
state primaries which will fea-
ture the names of Gen. Dwight
D. Eisenhower and Gov. Earl
Warren of California.
The former Minnesota gover-
nor said at a news conference,
however, that he will decide
within about two weeks on the
New Hampshire race March 11.
It Is the first primary in the
nation and is expected to pro-
vide the key to Elsenhower's
intentions.
Obviously referring to reports
that he eventually may throw
his support to Elsenhower, Stas-
sen said submission ot the gen-
eral's name In the New Hamp-
shire race will not necessarily
rule him out.
He added that his decision
also will depend on whether any
other candidate presumably
Taft enters the state race.
Kefauver, original chairman
of the Senate Crime Commit-
tee, said at a news conference
that his political plans will not
be Influenced one way or an-
other by the President's still
unannounced intentions.
He said he will make his de-
cision on the basis of "my gen-
eral appraisal of my support
and what my strength is."
Kefauver Is the only Demo-
crat so far who has been bold
enough to let his friends launch
an open bid for the Democratic
nomination without waiting for
Mr. Truman to declare himself.
He has authorized boosters in
California to take the first step
toward entering his namd in
that state's June 3 primary. He
said he has told them to hold
no on the final slep, however,
"until I have made my final
decision."
Kefanver had said earlier
that he would welcome a
heart-to-heart talk with the
President on Democratic stra-
tegy this year but indicated
he would not seek the meet-
ing. He may wait quite a
while. Mr. Truman has shown
no enthusiasm for the Kefau-
ver eandidaey.
Stassen, now president of the
University of Pennsylvania, was
not ready to say whether he
will enter the primaries In War-
ren's home state of California
or Wisconsin and Nebraska
which he won in 1948. But he
said his name will be entered
in other primaries.
SIDE GLANCES
By Calbraith
"Why can't I read the letters Sis sets from her soldrflf,
friends? I like war stories!"
Final New Year's
Death Toll Shows
593 Persons Dead
CHICAGO, Jan. 4 (UP). An
outbreak of fatal airplane
crashes boosted accld e n t a 1
deatlis over the long New Year's
holiday to 593, a final survey
showed today.
Widely scattered air crashes
accounted for 65 deaths. Twenty-
six died in the crash of a C-46
non-scheduled airliner in New
York state, and 28 Including
19 West Point cadets perished
when a military C-47 hit a
mountain in Arizona.
A final United Press tabula-
tion showed this breakdown of
accidental deaths from 6 p.m.
Friday to midnight last night:
Traffic ..........,......348
Plane ................... 5
Fire,.....................2
Miscellaneous ...........122
The traffic toll fell two short
of the National safety Council's
advance prediction of 350. It was
a marked drop from fatalities
over the four-day Christmas
holiday when a record 555 per-
ished on the highways.
Linguist Is Guest
Speaker Tomorrow
At Union Church
WARNING:
Clothes that are In our establish-
ment* *or more than SO days wUl
be disposed ot
"TROPICAL CLEANERS"
riant Via Essana No. SM Tel. 3-S71
Breach :4th St Eut Central Ave.
Tel. 2-I34
Rev. .Eugene A. Nida, PhD*
u secretary for versions of the A-
New York led the States witn merican Bible Society will be the
a total of 61 deaths, Including | guest speaker at the Balboa Un-
26 In the C-46 crash and 19 In fon church Sunday evening at
traffic. California had a total of
51. including 35 in traffic.
Rubber Industry's
1951 Sales Record
Hit Ail-Time High
A new all-time sales record
was established by the rubber
Industry In 1951. a record which
may be surpassed during 1952 as
new manufacturing equipment Is
put into production to meet the
combined civilian and military w^i-"^om W42 to* StV*
requirements of the nation, ac- lfih ^,* sirvrit^Palestine and
cording to Harvey 8. Firestone, I ??wduty ^ EgyI>t'P*
VOLUNTARY
'DRAFTEES'
(Continued from Page I)
clerk In the Chase National
Bank's Balboa Branch.
Kenneth L. R. Crooks, who was
born in Coln on June 30. 1926.
He Is one of the oldest of those
called for Induction, and the on-
ly one with previous military ser-
vice. Crooks also is a Panama-
nian Negro. Since 1947 he has
worked for the Commissary Div-
ision in Balboa Drtag v^il*
War II, he served with the uric-
Newsman Takes
Sleeping Pills;
Worried Financially
MIAMI, Fla., Jan. 4 (UP)
Fred C. Fletcher. 65, one of the
first newspaper fishing editors,
was found dead In his small ho-
tel room here early today with a
: suicide note on a table.
Police said he had taken an
overdose of sleeping tablets.
Mrs. Hazel E. Knox, a nurse
and Fletcher's niece who had
taken care of him for more than
a year until three weeks ago, told
oolice Fletcher had been ill and
had been drinking heavily be-
cause he was despondent over
financial matters.
Fletcher, a native of Denver,
began his newspaper career more
than 40 years ago. He worked on
the old New York World and re-
tired several years ago from the
New York Dally News. ,
He was a good friend and fish-
ing companion of the late Babe
Ruth and Lou Gehrlg.
He ran the fishing tournament
sponsored by Col. Jacob Ruppert
until Ruppert's death.
One lnh of rain means more
than 100 tons to an acre.
Muscles of the lobster are in-
ide Its skeleton, which is out
side its body.
Jr.. Chairman of the Firestone I*fe.J.
Tire and Rubber Company.
During the year, the rubber
crisis came to an end as natural
rubber production reached an
all-time high and synthetic rub-
ber output attained the highest
rate in history.
Rubber industry operations
through the ye>r were conduct-
ed under strict national emer-
gency restrictions In order to
Conserve available supplies of
rubber. The recent relaxation of
controls on the use of rubber in
the manufacture of tires and
other products now permits the
rubber Industry to produce a
wider range of products to sa-
tisfy consumer requirements.
The year 1952 may lead to re-
moval of some of the remaining
Goverment controls on use and
manufacture of rubber providing
the supply of plantation and
synthetic rubber continues to In-
crease and providing conditions
in the Far East do not become
more critical.
In 1952. there will be on the
road three million more auto-
mobiles two or more years old
than there were in 1951. Many
of these vehicles will need new
tires this year for the first time.
This Increased requirement for
replacement tires will more than
offset any anticipated decrrnse
In requirements for tires for
new automobiles.
Hour glasses were used by
eartar New England ministers
for timing their sermons, and
sometimes the sand was run
through four times.
In the circus, a zebra is
known as a "convict."
. George Austin Gale,
Draft Board No. 2 on the Atlan-
tic side has certified the follow-
ing for Induction:
f^ISSJSLSSSkm^who Ninety-eigm per earn m
. rSrT5? Cotn^on March 27,; total weight of a tin can is steel.
the with the other two per cent o*
tag the coating of pure tin.
7:30. Dr. Nida, one of the fore-
most linguists In the United
States, Is visiting in Central A-
merica for consultation with
missionary Bible translators con-
cerning various translations of
the New Testament into native
Indian languages.
His appearance at the Balboa
Union Church will mark the be-
ginning of the observance of U-
niversal Week of Prayer. Other
services during the week will be
held on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday evenings at 7:30.
Rev. Raymond Gray, pastor of
the Union Church at Gamboa,
will lead the service on Tuesday
night. Rev. Louis Fiske, superin-
tendent of the Methodist Mission
In Panam will be the leader on
Wednesday evening and Rev. Al-
exander H. Shaw, pastor of the
Balboa Union Church will be in
charge of the last service In the
series on Thursday night.
Ninety-eight per cent of the
"As much soda as will He upon
a shilling." was called for in an
old-time English recipe for "par-
Meet America's
mis simptico
1926, and is the oldest of
group. He Is an ex-Navy employe
and lives in Silver City with his
P8Betuel Angel Prez, a Colom-
bian who was born in the Re- _
public of Panam April 10. 1928. kins." or crisp cookies.
Since 1949 he has been a civilian i
employe of the Army at Ft. Gu-
llcki where he is a lathe machin-
ist assigned to armament repair.
He lives at Camp Blerd
Carlos Alfonso Gordon, the
youngest of the group, born in
the Republic of Panama on Sept.
22. 1933. a Panamanian Negro
H is a carpentry student at the
occupational High School in Sil-
ver City and lives at Coco 8ollto
with hfi parents. His father Is In
^Besides the nine Draft Board
No. 2 Is supplying one additional
man, a Canal Zone resident who
rew up on the Isthmus but reg-
utered in Miami, Florida, for the
drift. He UT Paul William Kram-
er Jr., white American, who lives
in' Cristobal.
U.S. Envoy
Christisn Ravndal
In Uruguay, this friendly
U.S. statesman mat its
equally friendly people,
and helped rout the Reds!
Learn the whole thrilling
story:
la H Jaa. St* NOW ON SMI
Collier^



FRIDAY JANUARY 4. 1952
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
^^Mtlantic S^ociL
Wrs. WiLn X. %A
Bo, 195, (jalu* VJipLont (Jatum 378
MR. ft MRS. WILLAKT GARRETT, JR.
Pfc. and Mr. Willard T. Garrett, Jr. following- their
wedding on December 27th at the American Episcopal
Church of Oar Saviour, in Cristobal.
Mrs. Garrett was the former Miss Betty Ruth Pepper,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Watson Caudle of Wilmington.
Delaware. Mr. Garrett is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. T.
Garrett, Sr. of the same city.
Mrs. Caudle and her daughter arrived on the Isthmus by
plane a few days before the ceremony and were guests at
the Hotel Washington.
Mr. and Mrs. Garrett are residing at Coco Slito.
and Sarah Elizabeth were among
the passengers sailing today on.
the "Cristobal."
Mrs. Whltely and her children
have been visiting her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. J. 3. Butler, Sr.
of Colon for the past six months, I
while Mr. Whltely has been tra-
veling for W. R. Grace and Co.
in South America. He was on
the Isthmus to spend the Christ-
mas holidays with his family.
Mrs. Smith Receives Degree
Mrs. Elizabeth Hubbard Smith,
who is well-known on the At-
lantic Side fir her work with
the Cristobal Little Theatre and
other community activities, re-
ceived her degree from the Pal-
mer School of Chiropractic early
this mon|.h.
Dr. Smith was formerly a
member of the nursing staff of
the Colon Hospital. She left the
Isthmus two years ago with her
husband. Captain George H.
Smith, who retired as a pilot
with the Panama Canal, and
their sons, Bobby, George and
Billy._______________________
Boy Seoul News
Arrangements are being made I
with radio stations on the At-
lantic and Pacific sides for a 15-
mlnute program once per week
in behalf of the International
Boy Scouts of the Canal Zone.
The object of the programs
will be to keep the public
abreast with the activities of the
movement and focus attention
at this particular time on the
coming jamboree In Jamaica
between March 15 and 17.
Filmfown
Shoptalk
(NEA Telephoto>
COLD FEET A woman guerrilla prisoner of war with
frostbitten feet Is carried pickaback by another Red POW
Into the South Korean Capitol Division stockade. The Re-
public of Korea has just reported that 7000 Communist
guerrillas have been killed or captured In the mountains of
southwest Korea in the past four weeks.
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY KRSKINF JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD, (NEA)- GUYS
AND DOLLS: It's enough to
A training course for leaders j scare Father Time himself, but
is scheduled to start at La Bocaidanged if Jackie Coogan the
By BEN COOK
HOLLYWOOD (UPi Freder-
ick Valencourt looks like" a mil-
lionaire.
That fact pays him a hand-
some wage and it makeihim one
of the champion Hollywood par-
ty-goers of all time.
During the past six years he
has been a prominent guest at
more than 500 big parties, a
claim that even such social lions
as Peter Lawford, Cesar Romero.
Gregson Bautzer and George
Jessel would have a hard time
matching.
Happily married though he is.
Valencourt never has taken his
wife to any of these shindigs. In-
stead he sips cocktails, dances
and chats with such glamorous
"dates" as Joan Crawford, Linda
Darnell, Rita Hayworth and Ann
Blvth.
He admits having downed as
many as 75 drinks at a single
Sarty but says It never has made
im tipsy. He never leaves until
the last dog is hung, but he al-
ways gets to bed by midnight.
He owns more formal clothes
than street clothes, and although
he never Is seen twice with the
.same woman his name never gets
mentioned in the society gossip
columns.
This, of course, Is because he
is a dress extra in the movies,
"It must be my year-round
tan and white, wavy hair," Val-
encourt opined after a pleasant
afternoon of dancing with Jan
Sterling for a scene in "Hear No
to keep the home fires burning! Evil" at Universal-International
between film roles. studios.
His last movie part, he walled. [ Gets $23.33 a Day
was In "Starlift" as an unseen "I'm strictly the party type.
Mrs. Oakley Honored
With Morning Coffee
Mrs. Jack Oakley, who Is leav-
i this Sunday morning from 8 to same Jackie Coogan who was laugh better. "They hired me to. The studios pay me $23.33 per
11. This course will be conduct- the big-eyed moppet with Charlie \ do my Army Sad Sack character; day to look like a guy who has
ed every succeeding Sunday | Chaplin in "The Kid" isn't for an auditorium full of G. I.'s millions.
morning until the seven classes i playing a 50-year-old western at Travis Air base. But the ca- "J'Yf wo,rn out 14 tuxedos Since
of two hours each have been | character in Producer Ron Or-1 meras never saw me. They just 1M* hutlve never beentociros
completed. |mond's "Outlaw Woman." photographed the guys laughing, fi|),eM0^fm uLa"L?L; e
day evening at the residence "of
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel MacReady.
of Brazos Heights, to
------ Next thing you know Margaret
The Atlantic District Commit- O'Brien will be playing Grand-
extend tee w,u convene at the regular ma Moses.
famous Sonja Henie parties.
"I'm Hollywood's number one
stuffed shirt and I hope I stay
S* J* *?_8S!** Betty; th"it belts one of the jobs I used
at me. It was a dirty trick, but
I needed the dough.
lng January 22, Was the guest their congratulations to Mr.. M^f P*ce-?" "IdJr-Jan-' Unrecognisable with a Turner
of honor at a morning coffee;MacReady on his birthday n-j..^1/ftepSLlflp Dis. walrus mustache and his ml OeorglSSi D^lSSa said to 5ave-,
given by Mrs: Roy D. Wllker- | nlversary. | ^ % Pacifk D^ 37-year-old Jackie ta.tbitTj^wISt cSSSfwhen "I hauled coal in Chicago."
son at her Fort Gulick residence. I
Wednesday. Samuel Donnelly Has
Mrs. Wil'kerson recently resign- Fifth Birthday Party
ed her position as superintend- Lieutenant and Mrs. S. A. Dem-
ent of the Fort Gulick Sunday nelly, entertained with a party
School. She took this opportun-,at the Fort Davis Officers Club I <*** on Saturday night I2th.
lty to honor Mrs. Oakley, who In honor of their son Samuel on
has been teaching In the school, his fifth birthday anniversary,
and also entertain the other A circus theme was used with |
members of the teaching staff, a large cake encircled with
The coffee table was centered animal crackers carrying out
with an arrangement of hand- the, motif. Ping lemonade and
kerchief corsages which were other appropriate refreshments
given the teachers In apprecla J were served. Favors of snappers
tlon of their work
suMrlBtciidfint.
with their
The honoree received a hand-
some cutwork and embroidered
and fancy hats were given the
young guests, ,
The children who attended
cTntonTaWe"cloTh frm'h7co- were: Rldiard Patty and Bar-
workers bara Gllllsan. Jackie and Julie
i Wise, Leonard Coughlln, Richard
Among those present were: Carroll. Lorraine Farrell, Jeff,
Mrs. James Hemann, Mrs. M. D. and Bruce Wlggs, Kate Poole,
Mundkowsky. Mrs. Howard Bor-' Richard Green. Claudia Knlpper,
den, Mrs. Ray Towne. Mrs. John Bobby Schultz, Marsha Kennedy,
Byrd, Mrs. Carroll Thompson,
Mrs. Owen Tolbert, Mrs. Ous
ZUkle. Mrs. William Marvel.
Mrs. Roy Smith, and Mrs. David
McCracken, who Is joining the
group as a teacher In the near
future.
Captain Robert Noll, who
also teaches In the Sunday
School also participated.
Captain and Mrs. Oakley have
been on the Isthmus for over
three years. They have been or-
dered to Camp Cook. California.
I Mmday 14lli at Paraso turning a new career page as a an ^my enlisted man In Korea
school. ?*!*? ct"-nd is saying told reporters that Bety and DIITU Mil I FH W
The Commissioners Staff will!*""* "** wanted to do it for a Lana were too old to give cheese- aWlli MILLO i idyS
hold a meeting at Gamboa 7>n* time, but until you haye cake lovers in the Army a thrill.' _____
^.ihrnd(fint,0Uth^nnr "He couWn't nave. m"t It."'I "Watch out for Dixie" Is the
something different, the pro- protested young-than spring- tilu 0f an article in the Wo-
FCas! Sdlnl y Jackie tossed 'lnie "IK 2S. ?"*W W*J?t'd Home Companion for
LJJJffBSSL ff5S?ifSE? :*? y that Betty and Lana have November which turns out to
and
again. But ne insists mat "" "uirls
wouldn't do any good to shuck' m. red-topped beauty is still, From what
the Jackie part of his tag even blushlng over the stralght-up rflclTthe Souhem girl's parti?
and'down gowns she had to wear cuiar attributes are two. First.
as a belle of the twenties in;^ never really becomes lost in
d h art- "*?* .Anyl!fdy Seen *"* |a biK cU7 but creates '**
ySSSS S?W. .mm.Vhw i Sn-t and hewed: Iground for herself wherever she
maced. "Its something I cant '<-j was emb~~
jacoby on moot
rairaa^xtfs if^&VSSrnS W^ssss^istss^
lSn tart it JS* at pictUrM f ^LEf* alon ,n tne busl"
if he becomes Hollywood's new
Walter Huston.
"They'd -till call me Jackie no
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
drop."
Mr. and Mrs. Lawson Return
from Interior
Mr. and Mrs. Colin Lawson. of
Brazos Heights, with Miss Ann
William and Patricia and Col-
Jlmmie Berp,h. Tlmmy Qulnn.,
Pamela. Brooks and Lynn Roll,
Lynn Stories, Susie Eyler. De-
borah Bowman, Lynn and Janice
Ellis.
The hostess was assisted by
Mrs. John Gillisan. Mrs. George
W. Kennedy and Mrs. John H.
Wlggs.
Mr. and Mrs. White Return
from Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Harold White,
of Brazls Heights, arrived ves-:
terday from a visit with relatives |
In Atlanta, Georgia.
Mr. Dorgan Leaving for
Vacation
Mr. Frank Dorgan, of Gatun.
leen Lawson, have returned sailed on the "Cristobal" today
from spending the weekend and to spend two months with rela-
New Year's holidays at the Har- Uves in Philadelphia and New
rlngton Cottage at Sea Cliff i Jersey.
Acres.
Mr. MacReady Celebrates
Birthday
Friends called during Wednes- with their daughters, Julia Marie
17
WIST
4.S642
62
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NORTH (D)
AAK9SI
104
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? AK7B2
BAST
AQJ 107
VAfl
? Q
?J9543
Norl
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4V
SOUTH
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VKQJM7
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*
East-West vul.
Bait Swrth Wo*
Put 1
Pass 2W
Pats 3W
Pats Past
Pan
Patt
Past
Past
Opening lead? K
began
dent and gaunt. I don't care if
I never see a low-cut gown
again."
Producers Anthony Velller and
Donald Hyde mumbled "Not the
!type" when Andrea knocked on
I their door to prove her I'm-a-
nice-glrl point. Then she read
| for them and they changed their
minds.
There'll be no more "Ba-ba-
ba-bumble, Be-e-e-be-be-Bees"
: from Roscoe Ates, the screen's
famous stuttering comedian.
now that he's the idol of the
There's usually more than one Juvenile set as TV's "Uncle Ros-
way to make a bridge hand. Just'coe."
as there's usually more than one I "The kids would mimic me. the
way to kill a cat. In today's mothers would raise caln and
embarrassed. I felt ln-ig0es. To quote from the article:
decent. They tried to bind me up|.-xhey (Southern girls) have a
atSSEefflP <*" Nelson-^oesn't want BAltatl&VS
a Hl2nnh!. iit gt,H !Le,,le Caron and Qene .Kelly chaperoned rather than alone.
2&SL t ,rh'. **n^;i howling at him for saying it. but; They gather people around them
~J JZtZt n Mirarte'ne.'s 5t? I"',1?" t"* ""' and are part of a group. They
woman scientist in Miracle, minute-lonj{ ballet, cycle theyinave roots"
From Mara. 'started In "An American In Pa-j Her other ctstanding char-
"I was a haughty, regal, ruth- ,rte eteristie in that she has a
'ThdidrfnVm?nk^eome "* couldn't hold a musical; %, tase on courtesy.
with diamonds.and mink. People 'dance number that long." howled To ote again: a Southern
began to think that I was an- the Warner mimble-footed star. fn take, linger to sar some-
"It's too much to ask of a
dancer. Besides, it's like good
candy. You can get too much of
it.
"Maybe you can do a 17-min-
Mr. and Mrs. Whltely ,
R Mrrnand MrsN JohnTk Whltelv and."harp defense robbed- de-| then""i'wouldn't have an audl-
y clarer of the simple play for his ence," Ates theorized about
contract, but he was clever I ditching, after 21 years, his co-
enough to find a satisfactory medy trademark and emerging
substitute.
THE NEWEST
RCA VICTOR
West opened the king of dla-
as a new straight-talking char-
acter. "
Ates, who stuttered until he
thing. That is because she uses
extra words. She says, 'Would
you mind,' and 'If you please'
and Thank yon.'"
You might be able to argue the
ute ballet once or twice. But the polntof whether those two q.ual-
third time, people are going to lties are peCUijarly Southern or
grab their hats and leave the not
theater." But you can't deny they are
I asked Gene why there was quauUefl that help a girl away
a shortage of leaping, tapping. {rom home make a _0 0l ner in-
sliding male dancing stars In dependence.
Hollywood. The Nelson reply:: How aDOut lt you Voung and
"That's tough to answer. May-iambitloua career girls? Are you
be It's because Hollywood cx-,puttm(f down roots and making
pects so much or a male dancer a plgiCt for yourseif socially In
he has to be able to sing, dance the cUv of y0Ur choice? Are you
and act. taking the trouble to create a
home background?
And are you smoothing the
THROWS ITS POLLEN
The laurel blossom Is set with!
ten springs, each of which acts way for youraeli as well as for
as a slinK In throwing pollen at others by bringing as much gra-
vlsltlng Insects, so it Is carried to clouaness and charm and good
other flowers.
mml'^;nd"7eaYia"15ewsitui-lwasT8. cured himself and then About 500 classes of product
when hU_ partner dropped went b K tS?t-J jj^^mj^ ^ ^ touaands, ofh girls who^have
. .. ..._-% j v.. *u- -i i^Hcru icome to the big city to make a
manners to your business life as
you possibly can?
If you are, there isn't much
chance you'll be lost among the
COMPLETE WORLD COVERAGE
AVAILABLE ON
EASY CLUB OR CREDIT PLAN
'OR ONLY $10.00 MONTHLY
USE YOUR OLD RADIO AS
DOWN PAYMENT
7110
Bolivar
RADIO CENTER
40
Coln
the queen. West thoughtfully
shifted to a trump, the best de-
fence. East naturally took the
ace of trumps and led a second
round of trumps, thus "killing
dummy's ruffing power.
The contract would haye been;
easy against any other defense.
South was sure of five trumps
In his own hand and four top'
cards in the dummy. If he could
ruff a diamond with dummy's
ten, the tenth trick would su-
rely develop. If East over-ruffed,
the South hand would win six
trump tricks: If East failed to
over-ruff, dummy's trump would
win a trick.
Declarer won the second round
o ftrumps with dummy's ten,
cashed the top spades, and ruf-
fed a spade. Next he drew the
last trump with the king of!
hearts and entered dummy with,
a club to lead another low spade.
East played the queen of spades,
and South calmly discarded a
diamond.
Now dummy's nine of spades
was high as declarer's much-
needed tenth trick. What's more.
East had to lead a club (he had!
nothing but clubs left) to dum-
my's ace, thus enabling dummy
to gain the lead.
median,
to become
switched to
star co-1 shapes.
television duced by
the steel Industry.
career for themselves.

IT'S MOVICTTMr ..
Cana/ Clubhouses
Showing Tonight! ^r""""HBi
Stephen McNALLY Gall RUSSELL
"AIR CADET"
(S.lur>) "ANr.ELS IM THE OUTFIELO"
Tony CURTIS Plrtr LAURIE .
"The Prince Who Was A Thief"
.Silurdav) "RED RADGE Or COURAGE"
Eve ARDEN Howard DaSILVA
"THREE HUSBANDS"
(Saturday) "The Priace Wka Wai A Thief"
or nor kAirilfi Dorii DAY e l-a, u VS On Moonliqhr Bay" Technicolor
anatna
BALBOA
\ir-Ci>ndlllnrr<
4'M CM *:
OIABLO HTS
:15 7:55
COCOLI
1:15 A t:M
GAMBOA
1:11
(Saturday I "HARRIET CRAIG"
Eva ARDEN M.-.vti Da SILVA
"THREE HUSBANDS"
(Salardar)
Urge Spare Refrigerator
EVAN8VILLE. Ind., (UP).A!
camoaign to develop the "two J
refrigerator household" and
make it as familiar as the two-
car garage Is advocated for 1952'
by W. Paul Jones, president of
Servel, Inc.
Claudette COLBERT a> MaeDonald CAREY
"LET'S MAKE IT GAL"
(Satarday) HOL'RE ON TELEGRAPH HILL"
Randolph SCOTT A.VM JXRGENS
"SUGARFOOT" (Technicolor)
(Saturday) "FANCY PANTS"
Dennli MOI'CAN PMricia NEAL
"RATON PASS"
(Saturday) "ACBOSS THE WIDE MISSOURI"
GATUN
IM

MARGARITA
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OWSrOBAL
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IBALBOA
Srart$ TOMORROW!
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Paul Douglas^Ianet Leigh
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BIG SALE
PRE-INVENTORY
Starting Tomorrow Saturday, January 5th.
For 5 days only.
Thousands, of yards of materials at reduced prices.
DON'T MISS IT!
GATENO'S
"The House of Fashion for Beautiful Brides"
104 Central Avenue 104
J^u^^L^ue
Starriaf .. "Two Fl.gi Waal",
a MM* Cantury Fax PredaaMaaj
V-8 Has Lively Havor i^
1/Vholesome Goodness I
no *sinci/eju/ce can match f\
In V-8 there are 8 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetables-not just
one. That"s why V-8 has lively flavor
and wholesome goodness no single
juice can match. Each juice adds its
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A, B, Ccalcium and iron. Your
family will love V-8. Serve it often.
vary |Um VI i, deliciaos alead efi
Tanatea Celery Beett Corren Penley
lettuce Watercreu Spinach
Mode by the tnehen ef Cemebell'i Savpi. VI li
trademark ewned by Cempbell leva Company.
CENTRAL
Saawa: 1:11 1:11 S:*7 7 3 :Se p m.
WENDELL CORKY MrDONALD CARET
WARD BOND. In
'THE GREAT MISSOURI RAID"
BELLA VISTA TROPICAL
Show: 1:1* 4:3.1 6:15 Show: 1:4 4:5 25
9:2* p.m. M p m.
SIMULTANEOUSLY e
AM the tire of the Pulitzei Prize and critic
Award Play. Itri'tifht to the Screen in one of
Hollywood'' Rare Great Movies'
Vivit.'.' Leigh- Marlon Brando
In
"A STREETCAR
NAMED DESIRE"
LUX THEATRE
Here Come* the MlfWiest Muiical of the
Mississippi... I
"SHOW BOAT"
IN TECHNICOLOR!
Kith Ava r.ABDNE* Haward REEL
_________ Kathr.vn OSAYSON___________
CECILIA THEATRE
RICHARD WRIGHTs Savare. Terrifying Best
Seller Exolooe Onto The Screen r
"NATIVE SON"
The Love of a White and a Negro! .. Not For
11 Years Did Anyone Dare Bring It
to the Screen ..!_______________
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air-C'endllioned
TE P S I C O LA
STAGE SHOW!
At S -20 p.m.
Also' Gale Storm, in
"FOREVER YOURS"
Leo Goreey. in
"JINX MONEY"_____
TIVOLI THEATRE
Bank SlM.ee Bank
At 5 and 9 p.m Also:
"GUADALCANAL"
and -RAWaUDE"____
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Frank Lovely, In
"I WAS COMMUNIST
FOR THE F.B.I."
- Also: -
Garv cooper, in
"DALLAS
VICTOJUA THEATRE
David Brian. In
"ABRIFNDOSE PASO
- and -
"CARRETERA 3ei"



p.m;k eight

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
.FRIDAY. JANI'ARY 4, 1151
Senior Bowl Game Ends Football Season Tomorrow
Races
Tomorrow
1st Race "D" Natives 6'i Fgs.
Purse: S300.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
]Mr. Espinosa J. Contreras 112
i 2Golden Faith V. Arauz 119
3Casablanca G. Alfaro 120
4Juan Huincho V. Castillo 120
5White Fleet J. Rodriguez 120
2nd Race "(i" Natives 2 Fgs.
Purse: S250.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1Capitana II H. Pitti 103x
2Orgullosa O. Chanls 111
3Apolo Jos Rodrguez 112
4Chispeado T. Medrano 112
5Libertino C. Iglesias 112
3rd Race "E" Natives, 44 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Mueco
2Volador
3Pesadilla
4Domino
5El Mao
E. Julin 120
J. Rodrguez 115
J. Phillips 116
E. SUvera 104
B. Pulido 112
6Romntico Jos Rodrg'z 112
HORSIN' AROUNDSam Davis attempts to show Drafting
Board how he used to move rival tacklers out of the way when
he was a star lineman at University of Miami. Davis is now ,
trainer at Hialeah Park. (NEA)
^ ---------------
Armed Forces Leagues Opening
Featured By Slugfests, Duels
4th Race "F-2" Natives44 Fgs.
Purse: $2*5.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Brochacito Jos Rodrg'z 115
2Cacique E. Julin 115 !
3Fulmine B. Pulido 115 1
4La Negra A. Vasquez 112x
5Strike Two A. Enrique 112x
6Embustero J. Phillips 115
7Golden Girl F. Rose 115
North Team Battles South
In Play-For-Pay Contest
MOBILE, Alabama, Jan. 4.(UP)North and
South squads are preparing to put a belated end to
the 1951 college football season with the biggest of-
fensive explosion of them all in the Senior Bowl
Game in Mobile, Alabama.
The game tomorrow will be a combination
rround and aerial assault bv the North eainst the
South's awesome passers Babe Pan Hi and Bill Wade.
Co-Coaches Friti Heisler and Wilbur Eubanks have
taken over the North squad from Paul Brown who
had to leave for the Coast Pro-Bowl game. The
weather in Mobile was warm and muggy today, but
is expected to turn cooler by Saturday.
The Senior Bowl Game was won by the South
in its only two'previous playings. The players will
get cash for their game $500 each for the win-
ners and $400 each for the losers. The players also
will cease to be amateurs after the game. None of
those who are selected will be eligible for further
participation in collegiate sports.
5th Race "C" Imported6',i Fgs.
Purse: $650.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Coraggio J. Contreras 111
2Pampero II A. Enrique 104x
3Welsh Loch O. Bravo 112
4 Milros B. Pulido 117
Speedboat Races
At Gamboa Yacht
Club January 26
Pitching duels and slugfests
mailed the opening day of the
1952 Panam Armed Forces
Ba;\ ball League Wednesday af-
ternoon with all 14 members of
the league seeing action in near
perfect baseball weather.
Major General Lester J. Whit-
locl". Commanding General Unit-
ed States Army Caribbean, offi-
cially opened th Am"dor by tossing the first pitch
at the Special Troops-Corozal
game. After the formalities had
been completed, action started
on seven diamonds throughout
the Fanam area and the 1952
season was under way.
Fans who had been anxious to
tee what their teams would per-
form like under league pressure
came away with mixed feelings
as their teams either came
through with an opening day
victory or went down to stirring
defeat.
Albrook Air Force Base, the
league champions for the past
two seasons, made it plain that
they were not going to step out,
gracefully If any other team
hoped to dethrone them. The
Airmen gained a 4-1 decision in
starting their campaign to re-
tain the title. The victory was
falned over the 903d AAA before
he home fans at Albrook. The!
370th Shore Battalion also put
on an impressive opening day
performance by trouncing the
Atlantic Sector nine 19 to 3.
Special Troops put on a pow-
erful display at the plate with
three home runs in pounding!
out a 13-8 win over Corozal on!
the Fort Amador diamond. Sev-;
en runs in the second Inning;
paved the way for the victory
and Corozal fought back but.
could never close the gap and the'
Special Troops batters continued
to add to their score.
The 370th Boat Battalion drop-i
;jed a heart-breaker to the 764th
AAA by a 2-1 count although the
AAA batters could account for
only one hit. In other games
West Bank gained a 3-1 edge over
Coco Solo, the 33d Infantry slip-
ped past the 504th FA Battalion
5 to 3 and the 45th Reconnais-
sance Battalion defeated Signal
8-2.
Seven more games are on tap
for the fans this Saturday after-
noon with all contests scheduled
to Ket under way at 2:30. The
rchcciule shows Coco Solo trying
to get in the win column against
the 370th Boat Battalion at Co-
co Solo, the 764th AAA playing
it Corozal, Signal entertaining
Special Troops on the Albrook
Air Force Base diamond, the 45th
Bn. journevlng to Fort Kobbe to
face the 504th FA Bn.. 903d AAA
facing the 33d Infantry at Fort
Clayton, Albrook traveling across
the Isthmus to oppose the 370th
Shore Battalion and West Bank
playing the Atlantic Sector on
the West Bank field.
The standings:
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Albrook........1 0 1.000
Special Troops.. ..1 0 1.000
West Bank......1 0 1.000
33d Infantry .... 1 0 1.000
45th Battalion. ..1 0 1.000
370th Shore Bn .. 1 0 1.000
764th AAA......1 0 1.000
Atlantic Sector. ..0 1 .000
Coco Solo......0 1 ,CO0
Corozal........0 1 .000
Signal........0 1 .000
370th Boat Bn.. .. 0 1 .000
504th FA Bn .... 0 1 .000
903d AAA......0 1 .COO
Wednesday's Results
West Bank 3. Coco Solo 1.
370th Shore Bn 19, Atl. Sec. 3.
Albrook 4, 903d 1.
33d Infantrv 5. 504th 3.
45th Bn 2, Signal 2.
Special Troops 13. Corozal 8.
764th 2, 370th Boat Bn 1.
fith Race "G" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: S450.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Hechizo G. Snchez 118
2Rocky C. Lino 120
3Vampiresa O. Bravo 112
4Scotch Chum J. Cont'ras 110
5Breeze Bound E. Daro 105
6Rinty B. Pulido 112
Speedboat races will be held
at the Gamboa Yacht Club
starting; at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 26. Entries will close Jan.
19.
No entry fee will be charged.
Many prises will be offered
participants.
There will also be sailboat
and rowboat races over the
one-mile surveyed course.
7th Race "F'' Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $500.00 Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Hurlecano C. Iglesias 114
2Petit Pois A. Bazn 115
3Alabarda F. Rose 112
4Curaca B. Pulido 112
5Piragua) M. Guerrero 108
6Paris) A. Phillips 115
8th Jtace "1-1" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Atasn G. Cruz 120
2Espartano G. Graell 120
3--Sans Souci J. Cont'ras 113
4Bosforo E. Julin 116
5Rechupete B. Pulido 114
6Cobrador V. Castillo 116
9th Race "H" Imported6'/: Fgs.
Purse: $100.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Pincel 'O. Chant 117
2Danescourt J. Contreras 120
3Silver Fox G. Snchez 109
4Hit C. Ruiz 120
5Supersticiosa O. Bravo 110
6Lituana J. Phillips 108
7Delhi E. Silvera 108
10th Race "D" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: S600.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1_Newmlnster C. Iglesias 114
2Roadmaster O. Chanls 110
3Rondinella J. Contreras 120
4Visir B. Aguirre 115
11th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00
1Arabe II E. Julin 110
2D. Salomn H. Alzamora 110
3Tupac J. Baeza, Jr. 117x
4Mayordomo C. Iglesias 120 i
5Jepperin C. Ruiz 115 I
SWIFT ON DRIFTS Lean-
ing against a sharp turn on
Dollar Mountain, Sun Valley,
Ida., Katy Rodolf speeds on
skis. The Hayden, Colo., miss
is the United States' women's
downhill and slalom champion.
She is picked to place high in
the Winter Olympics, at Oslo,
Norway, Feb. 14-25. (NEA)
Pacific Twilight
Baseball League
The Old-Timers team of the
Pacific Twilight League will
hold a practice game tomorrow
at 9 am at ihr Balboa Stadi-
um. All members of the team
are requested to attend this
workout.
Inter-Service
Baseball League
FORT KOBBE The Inter-
Service Baseball League got un-
der way at Fort Kobbe Wednes-
day with the 33d Infantry beat-
ing the 504th Field Artillery by
a 5 to 3 count.
Mrquez, winning pitcher scat-
tered five hits over the route giv-
ing up only one earned run. The
Infantry collected eight hits off
loser Feliciano.
The 504th scored one run In
the fourth and added two more
in the sixth on two hits and an
error to lead 3 to 0. In the 33d's
half of the seventh a walk and
two hits scored one run and af-
ter two were out with two men
on base Infantry right fielder
Renfro slammed a home run to
right field.
In the eighth the 33d added
one more run on an error by
pitcher Rodriguez.
The line score:
504th 000 102 0003 5
33d 000 000 41x5 8 1
Carrasquel Signs
- For $20,000
CHICAGO, Jan.4 (UP)Chi-
co Carrasquel, the Chicago
White Sox' brilliant shortstop,
has signed his 1952 contract for
a reported $20,000 next season.
The White Sox announced
that they have received the
signed contract by mall from
Carrasquel's home in Caracas,
Venezuela.
Carrasquel said last Satur-
day in Venezuela that he had
signed for $20,008.
Great Britain has more than
150 houses said to be haunt-i I.
More than 400,000,000 pairs
of shoes are produced annually
In the United States.
Main Event Motorbike Winner
To Do Plenty Racing Sunday
The winner of the main motor-
cycle race at Juan Franco Sun-
day morning is going to have
done quite a bit of racing before
he collects the honor.
The final will be his third race
of the day, by which time he and
his machine should know plenty
about the inside track at Juan
Franco.
The program starting at 9:30
a.m. has already drawn entries
from many Of the best riders and
fastest motorbikes In Panam
I and the Canal Zone.
There will be four elimination
races (two heats, a semifinal and
one consolation race) before the
six starters for the 10-lap (about
six miles) final are selected.
For the benefit of competitors,
they will follow the basic inter-
national rules and practices for
motorcycle racing on flat dirt
tracks.
Long tested in Europe, Brit-
ain, the United States and Aus-
tralia, they will be enforced by
the authorities controlling Sun-
day's racing.
W BRAKESUnder no condi-
tions are brakes to be used on
racing on dirt surfaces. If possi-
ble, the whole brake assembly
should be removed. Brake levers
and rods must be removed.
Yanks, Brownies Play
At Mount Hope Tonight
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
The Standings
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Yankees........11 3 .716
Bombers........ 7 S .513
Bluebirds....... 6 1 Ml
Brownies....... X 12 .2*0
TONIGHT'S GAME
Mt. Hope Stadium (7:30 P.m.)
Yankees (Patrick (1-1) vs.
Brownies (Clark (S-4).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Brownies 6, Bluebirds 5 (ten
innings); Yankees 7, Bombers 3.
The league leading Yankees
will try to Increase their margin
tonight at the Mount Hope Sta-
dium when they play the last-
place Brownies.
The game is expected to be a
duel of lefties Vibert Clark of
the Brownies against Pat Pat-
rick of the Yankees.
A Yankee victory will stretch
2) PROPSAll side stands, jif-1 the league leaders' lead to three
fy stands, rear stands, and props! and one-half games over the
must be removed from the ma-1 second-place Bombers. A setback
chine.
3) EXHAUST PIPESIf in
such cases that an exhaust pipe
must protrude on the left side of
the machine, the pipe must be
parallel or above the level of the
rear axel. The pipe or pipes on
the right side can be at any lev-
el. In no case will the exhaust
pipes face Into the ground as to
cause an exceaslve amount of
dust to be thrown on the rider
following. ______
) BREAKABLE OBJECTSNo
breakable objects such as head-
lights, spotlights, tail lights, mir-
rors, etc., can be attached to the
machine. The only exception to
this rule Is the use of a tacko-
meter or speedometer.
5) CRASH GUARDSUnder
no circumstances will rider use
crash guards.
6) NUMBER PLATESEach
rider will be required to furnish
will leave the Yankees two and
one-half games ahead.
Last night the Brownies came
from behind as they wiped out a
Mexican Authorities
Investigate Shooting
Of Hiram Bithorn
MEXICO CITY. Jan. 4 (UP)
Mexican authorities are holding
one of their police officers in
the mystery killing of a former
Major League pitcher.
The victim was HI Bithorn, a
former pitcher with the Chicago
Cubs.
The officer being heldJuan
Canosays he shot Bithorn in
self defense. Officer Cano says
. he picked up Bithorn for trying
and to have on his machine at|t0 ^ an automobile in the
the time of the ace, two number sman cotton center of El Mante
pla-tes. One will be attached to
the front of the machine and the
other will be attached to the
right side of the machine. It Is I pound Bithorn started
advisable that the number plate nlm ^y, a suitcase.
be square in shape and that the | Bithorn's sister has told re-
numbers be as close to 10 Inches iattves in Mexico City that she
without ownership credentials.
According to the officer, a
rather small man, the 200-
hltting
In height as possible.
7) STEEL SHOESIt Is dvis-
considers the accidental shoot-
ing "very suspicious." And she
able that all riders make them-!Vislted E3 Mante to investigate,
selves a steel shoe to fit over | Mexlcan officials promise a
their left boot The steel shoe incomplete hearlng on the cage.
a great help in' controlling the
machine around curves. I
8) GOGGLESAll riders must,
have and must wear goggles dur-
ing the time he Is actually rac-
ing. It is advisable that the lens-
es of the goggles be made of a
plastic substance as to prevent
eye lnlury in case of breakage.
9) CLOTHINGIt is advisable
that each rider wear as heavy
clothing as possible in order to
prevent cuts, bruises, and dirt
burns. Leather jackets or com-
petition sweaters should be worn
on the upper part of the body.
In cases where riders do not have I
leather britches, two pairs of
pants should be worn. If possi-
ble, some type of protective e-
quipment should be worn on the I
head such as a crash helmet or
football helmet. To prevent in-
Jury to the hands, gloves should
be worn during the race. Gloves
not only act as a protective mea-
sure but also help the rider to
obtain a more firm grip on the
handlebars.
5-0 deficit to gain a hard earned
6-5 triumph in ten Innings in tht
first game of a doubleblll at the
Panam Stadium.
Humberto Robinson, tha
starter, was chased from tha
mound In a five-run first inning.
However, Ernest Burke cama
through with nine scoreless re-
lief Innings to gain credit for his
first win of the season.
In the second game the Yan-
kees hit opportunely to wallop
the Bombers 7-3 as Marion Frl-
cano got his third victory while
Alberto Osorlo tasted defeat for
the first time, this season. .
Playground Sports
GATUN
"Learn to Swim" classes are
being held at the Gatun Swim-
ming Pool on Wednesday, Thurs-
day and Friday afternoons at 1
o'clock and 2 o'clock. The Inter-
mediate and Swimmer groups
will report at 3 o'clock Wednes-
day and Friday afternoons. The
American Red Cross Swimming
tests will be given to each group:
Beginner, Intermediate and
Swimmer. There is no charge for
these classes.
The Gatun Elementary School
swimming team will practice at
3:00 p.m. Jan. 3, 4, \ 10 and 11
for the swim meet to be held Jan.
12.
Information concerning chil-
dren's classes and adult classes
can be secured by calling H. M.
Woods, teacher. Physical Educa-
tion Phone 5-133.
Juan Franco Tips
By "CLOCKER"
1Juan Huincho
2Orgullosa
3Pesadilla
4Strike Two
5Welsh Loch
Vampiresa
7Alabarda
8Cobrador
9Supersticiosa
10Visir
11Jepperin
Mr. Espines
Apolo
Domino
Fulmine
Milroa
Hechizo
Hurlecano
Rechupete
Pincel
Newmlnster
Tpa
Meet Scotland's
Favourite Son
JOHNNIE
WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
sokm iiii mi coins srsONC
The fashionable drink everywhere
John W.lk.t a Son. Ltd., Scotch Whiikr Diniltn, Kilnnrnocfc
RACES SATURDAY and SUNDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd 6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
our patrons we are non
operating hoth at the
"COPACABANA" and
"SAVOY."
SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
5th Race "C" Importeds 6V2 Fgs.
Purse: $650.00 Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m.
1. CORAGGIO..........J. Contreras III
2. PAMPERO II.........A.Enrique I04x
3. WELSH LOCH...........O. Bravo 112
4. MILROS................B. Pulido 117
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK

SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES

5th Race "B" Importeds 7 Fgs.
Purse: $750.00 Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m.
1. KEYHAVEJS............V.Ortega 110
2. RATHLIN LIGHT......B. Aguirre 120
3. GALANTE II............O. Chanis 107
4. PARAGON............J. Contreras 113
7th Race "A" Importeds 1 Mile
Pure: $1,000.00 Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE Of DOUBLES
1. DICTADOR.............O. Bravo 112
2. CHACABVCO.........T. Medrano 104

4. MAIN ROAD...........C. Iglesias 107
3. TOMEBAMBA........J. Contreras 115
5. GRISV..................E.Daro 105
41
i

4\
A


'
fRIDAY JANUARY 4, 1951
THB FANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAO.Y NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINE
*
Ohio State And Michigan Prove The Team Isn't The Thing Altogether
They Averaged
73,393 With
Nothing Much
Television Wrestling Making
Judo Experts Of Weaker Sex
BY HARRY GRAYRON
NEA Sport* Editor
BY LEW BYRER
NEA Special Correspondent
COLUMBUS, O., Jan. 4 (NEA)
Devotees of win at any price,
bring-'em In whatever they cost,
have argued that you must have
a winner In college football to
draw big crowds, fill big stadia,
NEW YORK, Jan. 4 (NEA) the ring, where Antonlno Rocca
Mildred BurTce was grounded lor was kicking Gene Stanlee around. a.-.. ,thlH nrr-.
almost four months by a fright- The man was seated between two "BBML*K^-"iSKfifta
ful automobile accident in Call- peaches he was escorting, and, .J. SSthta failJhh s7mB
fornU. who stirred up more excitement ?"?*?",""'A" wlth 49S'7'7
The long-time "women's world than the exhibition. He practic- "^htoirf J?22mii with a
wrestling champion's stepson,' ally was frapped when Rocca n,M=hjaLlnw. !!c"d wlth 45B-'
Srfm' k,"aefflt1WSS!SS PUt the **" to Mr' ^^Ohlo'sVtewoK'lost three,
ate/part ^hls* o'dTwll There are now more than 200 Michigan won five, lost
u a cast for another month.
But durable Miss Burke Is back
In training.
women permitted to pull and tug
In 42 of the 48 states.
They even have their own
"Her wonderful muscles are ciar, the aforementioned Billy .
itarting to ripple as well aa ever," | Wolfe, originally from Wheat-iine
four. _
Neither won a championship
nor was either in the running for
Big Ten title In the final
if the season which pitted
Billy Wolfe, fier husband-man- land, Mo., but now operating out ^menV<: "f?t thTwiftrSS
age?, writes Ned Brown, editor of! of Al Haft's town, Columbus, O.l^e Bucks aga^st the Wildcats
'. ,.-., w,..i Billy the Kid built a big bul-|n L'Etfflatfaa
ness for himself In a htehlv-n. Nov' 2* before 95.000.
SdmeryXl andVaffithe' None of the tearn. which won
champion. championships nearly equaled
Nothing escapes his searching tnose figures-
w.i..B wia jiio ocsiuiiug So you don>t have to have
eye.
N.W.A. Official Wrestling.
"Outside of minor cuts and
bruises, the total extent of her
injuries was five broken ribs."
Sometime back I read where a
demure grandmother of 70 plus
Rrofessed to disdain wrestling on
levlsion which kept her up un-
til after midnight. She said she
watched it only because she
couldnt sleep if abe retired too
early.
One night a burglar, entered toik I footra
grandma', chamber through TORTOU roWBMX
wtodow, and made the faUl mis- rters Company,g undefeated
take of tripping .ver a footstool J unscored on team continued
Granny coolW twisted one o m hlgn_nanded way of desl-
e hoodlum's legs aroundla bed- opponents on Dec. 24 by
Army Snorts
team which wins all its games to
draw big crowds.
the hoodlum's leg. _
post and shouted lustily for help.
When police congratulated her,
ahe said, airily, "Shucks, It was
nothing at all. I Just took hlrn
with a step-over toehold.
MORE THAN 75 PER CENT
ARE WOMEN FANS
Only a few days ago in Holly-
wood a hood grabbed Denise Dar-
cel's bag. Miss Darcel blandly
fastened a stranglehold on the
lng with opponents on Dec. 24 Dy
shellacking Tank fompany, 35
to 0.
Hqs. kicked off to Tank but
took over on downs four plays
later. They then moved for a TD
on four plays, climaxed by a pass
from McCrane to Watson. Mc-
Crane passed to Hunt for the
PT.
After kicking off to Tank de-
fensive center Fox moved down-
Cristbal, Balboa
In Inlerscholaslic
Cage Opener Tonight
FROM CUM TO KIDSPhil CavarttU, manager of that Chi-
cago Cubs, helps his daughter, Cheryl Jean, onto on of the iron
Steeds of the merry-go-round at ths Children's Amusement Park
._ he operates in Dallas, Tex., during the off season. (NBA)
field and trapped the Tank ball
few plays later quar-
carrier behind his goal for a iHqs.
bad man. had him as limp as a "'"" "c
bloke belted squarely by R^i terbac'kMcCrarie passed to Trout
for another score and Hqs. ended
MaTflwnf) when the cops came.
The culprit didn't know the bux-
om blonde movie dish was a rass-
Un' vldiot, you see.
Hammerlocks, half and full
the first quarter with a 15 to 0
lead.
In the second quarter the Tank
defense settled down and both
Les Horvath Dik Kaimaler
On The Alleys...
It's my hunch that there's an-
CURUNDU MEN'S OPEN
BOWLING LEAGUE
(January 2)
The first bowling night of the
new year closed the gap between
first position and fourth position
by four points.
Acme Paints could onl ysalvage
recruiU^^ TVfd "
have glgantio men with estab- f writable tie for first place by
Ushed high-chool reputations.
Hovan
Steuwe ,
Bryan .
Stahl. .
Walker .
Handicap.
Totals. .
BUDWEISER
. 148 137 137 433
167 136 143 436
.119 143 187 446
. 131 148 143 411
145 148 131-424
113 113 113- 33S
803 834 8522470
Judo expert?.:
KAZMAIER TOO SMALL
T.
And he gals use-punishing
ho!ds, as they are known in the
Kite- .. .. nth n. thp in'the final period Tanks de-
More than 75 per cent of the aparfand Headquar-
285t,<-ie 5?tS^ stmttd by te swePt through for three
J^*;i\^.u Ir. i^meiAnS | touchdowns. The first came on
the channels, are women. na: intercentien bv defensive
^'^^V^l%Te^^ S^^*ent over
dent. They demana oiooa am ,___tUm nawM xi^rranp
bones.
NOTHING ESCAPES WOLFE'S
SEARCHING EYE
tck Kazmaler, for Instance,
might have had trouble getting
a real tryout had the Princeton
The first blood in the second; All-Everything reported for foot-
half came when Fox, who played I ball at a Big Ten school. He look-
great defensive game, again ed too small for the rugged play
In the Western Conference.
Of course, Les Horvath, Tippy
Dye, Pete Stinchcomb and even
the Immortal Chic Hrley were
little fellows, too.
But the professionals have gi-
gantic men with established rep-
utations. Even the mastodons on
taking three points from the Murdck
fighting Vets. The Carta Vleja'nenry '
five knocked off Budwelser for; Alien ', '
three points to tie for third posi- Lane
tion. The American Club topped Handicap
is to
Canada Dry for three point
emaln In sixth place.
Colston, anchor man on
the
CANADA DRY
Hicks. ... 162 118 110 3S0
106 159 149- 414
134 134 134- 402
154 125 164 443
166 156 171 492
119 119 119 357
COLON, Jan. 3 Tonight the
Cristbal High 8chool quintet
will demonstrate their basket-
ball ability once more when
they play host to the Balboa
High School Bulldogs.
The game is the opener of
the season and promkes to In-
sure the crews of views of smart
ball handling and fast action
which is so typical when the
two high schools get together in
competitive sports.
Cristbal High, the defending
champions, will be led by the
well-known Arnold Manning-
Roy Wilson scoring combina-
tion, names that spell trouble
for any Cristbal competition.
Balboa High School Is not to
be underestimated in their cap-
acity at basketball, for they
have some mighty clever mani-
pulators on the floor and ara
mighty determined to make up
for the place they lost in the
late J.C. Basketball Tourney.
So make sure that your sche-
dule is open tonight to see these
two teams get together. Both!
Xids, varsity and Junior var-
, will go against each other.!
Be at the Cristbal Gym at 6:30
p.m. when these two teams go
into action.
Admission fee Is only 76 cents, l
a small price for large size en-
tertainment.
rOR.^LTLTJ1 ft?PTed Williams' flawless follow-through at bat
SJSm^,by his ,8W'n on the o course at Coral Gables, Fla The
Rea box slugger is the top name in baseball trade reports. (NEA)1
Totals.
841 810 847-2498
Angellnl team, rolled a 528 series
while McCarragher tossed a 201 vale. .7 "ui
AMERICAN CLUB
game for the Carta Vieja five.
Hellwlg.
Pritchard.
Relchert
from the 10-yard line. McCrane
passed to end Watson for anoth- an average Big Ten team would
er score. seem puny compared to the av-
In the closing minutes of the
game the offensive team retired
erage National League pro out-
fit.
.._ from the field and the defensive Yet Ohio State and Michigan
man tried Played the averaged 73,393 fans for 12 home
,.JJ? ?2Jk^hnok hornteId' Working out of a single wing games.
rtJ?*rnnf^rV nffiou tethe Sparks completed passes to end No pro team averaged two-
3uS 5t snlnsVn?! lSside Owens and back Roper to wore thirds as many,
murder that.wi sU more pomts. Baseball operators learned
Score bv periods: I something during war-time op-
Headquarters 15 0 2 1835 eratlons. Many outstanding stars
TEN PINS
1McCarragher........167 coffey
2- Colston............160 HanaieaV
J-CoMey............158
'Lane..............156
Bembenek..........166
0Kelsey............164
7--Lavallee............151
8McConnell..........161
9Hovan..............151
idAllen..............151
119
146
133
163
434
180
150
161
145
164
134
166 439
141 410
124- 431
135 393
185 512
134 402
Totals. .. 829 884 8742587
Yale Wallops
Puerto Rico U.
Hoopsters 96-46
NEWHAVEN, Jan. 4 (UP)
The University of Puerto Rico's
"Gallitos" who are currently
touring the United States lost
their third straight game to
Yale University's "Bulldogs"
96-46.
The Gallitos, coached by for-
mer Long Island University
Elayer Victor Perez, had lost
wo previous games to Connec-
ticut University and City Col-
lege of New York.
The Gallitos, trailing 33-3 at
Atlantic Twilight League
Opener Scheduled Sunday
The Atlantic Twilight League'that
is looking to 1952 with optimism
as they prepare to
bar
open the
new baseball season this Sun-
day afternoon. The usual ac-
companying pomp and ceremo-
ny will be held with the tradi-
tional throwing out of the first
ball by a Caanl Zone official.
The official announcement re-
Sardlng the person selected to
o the honor has not yet been
made. As soon ss the selection
Is made It will appea ron these
sports pages.
should follow between
these two teams. The Powells
team has added much strength
to their roster having acquired
the services of Vince Ridge, a
dependable infielder, good pitch-
er and hard hitter. Vince was
a member of last year's Marga-
rita team, which outfit has been
disbanded this year.
72 Pabst team is going along
with the same team that ter-
rorized Powells last year, and
made the going tough every
,lnch of the way, and Hall 1
As is the tradition with the!confident that his charges will
A* ball League, the opening game and when you improve on sec-
be between the two top ond place, there is only on
nines of the past season. This
the end of the first period, year the championship Powells
found the range and closed the
gap to 33-19 but the Ells led
43-21 at halftlme.
Captain Raul Feliciano of
Puerto Rico was the game's
highest scorer with 19 points.
Yale, sparked by Johnny Weber
other position that you can land
in.
with 17 points and Bob Harding
with 16, entered the final quar-
ter leading 67-38.
team, strongly reinforced for
the coming season, will take on
Bucky Hall's "Pabst" outfit. The forthcomln
year carried the:lng gai
tun" and came tain...
within a razor's edge of copping | Atlantic Side will give the Gold
Coast fans more than their
share of thrills as they battle to
take the place of the Inactiva
Canal Zone Loop.
More pre-season data will be
lng prior to the open-
contenders last year carried the:lng game, but one thing Is cer-
nner of "Oatun" and came!tain... The Twl-Loop on the
the bacon.
This year's opener should be
an indication of the dog-fight
College
Basketball
By UNITED PRESS
EAS
T
Arizona State
Wssh.-Jeff. 81,
(Tenue) 16
delphi 11, Williams 65
ifayette 58, Scranton 57
Buffalo 68, Colby 48
St. Francis (Bkn.) 69, Bait. Loy-
ola 60
Yale .96, Puerto Rico Uplv. 46
Fairfleld 48, St. Peter's (NJ.) 45
Bates at Wagner, canceled.
SOUTH
Eoke 62, Penn 52
Duisiana State 77, New Orleans
Loyola 80 ,A
Fordham 62, NX. State 59
Tennessee 59, East Tenn. 53
McCrary 68, Davidson 63
Hants 71, Elon 63
area. 76, Bellarmine (By.) 58
MIDWEST
Michigan State 66, Notre Dame 52
St. Louis 64, Houston 57
Detroit 63, Marquette 61
Butler 73, Evansville 68
Bowling Green 78, Dartmouth 68
67, St.
ANGELINI
McConnell 141 141
Lavallee
Casten .
Corn .
Yarbro .
Borgia .
Handicap.
ACME PAINTS
138
170
156
131
138
138
148
164
121
121
146
138
129- 415
159 493
118 395
121 363
171 446
138- 414
Tank Co.
0 0
0 0
Woner .
Balutls .
Bembenek
were in service. The player-pool tcTolsj;on
barrel was being scraped at the
low-rung level. Caliber of play
was definitely below pre-war
standards.
In a hard fought game Friday
Headquarters Company remain-
ed undefeated in the Special
Units Football League by down-
ing a stubborn Heavy Mortar FEW NOTICED DIFFERENCE
Company team. 19 to 6.
The Headquarters offensive got
off to a fast start, scoring two
touchdowns In the first period.
The first came on a pass from there,
quarterback McCrane to half-
baek Watson. McCrane then
passed to end Wlthey for the PAT
.The second score came on an-
But crowds continued good.
Few noticed much difference.
Handicap.
175
121
161
193
116
15S
140
170
166
116
123 3841
}2j- g. Stanley.
116 348 gmith. .
831 838 836252C
BALBOA BEER
Totals.
907 892 8*92648
Moss
Hannberg
Witzig. .
Mashburn
VFW POST 3822
. 133 139 168
The competitive angle was still RJw>;
The fans were thrilled.
I believe footfall fans would
still he thrilled by good eompe-
Handicap.
128
157
105
140
164
106
119
148
116
164
433
120 354
163 439
144 397,
133 389
164 493
Cain.
Carpenter
Handicap.
Totals. .
186
130
126
170
130
148
128
157
153
139
105
148
127 441
137 424
160 439
108417
159 394
148 444
890 836 8392559
Totals.
829 792 8822503
M*
other pass this time to halfback, tltive college football played by
Trout. i bona fide students instead of the
McCrane again passed to Trout | ballyhooed recruited stars,
in the second period for Head* Crowds'might drop off a bit,
quarters last score. sure. But I wouldn't personally
Mynarcik.
Norria, Ted.
Torian .
Kelsey .
McCarr'gher
on the| Handicap.
After the half Mortar Com- mind a bit of a let-up
pany stopped each threat and pressure for tickets which has g88 M2583
accomplished what other teams accompanied nearly every Ohio;Totals. 8C8 bob wb-m
in the league could not when state game of late.
they scored on the Hqs. defen- of course, one, university D ...__! ")Q*.L
slve team. The telling blow was couldnt accomplish this result rOriUQai 7111
alone It's opponents would have
Junior College Plays
Quarry Heights 5
173 180 144- 477 TOIMITOW Al M\til
V \V, \lt~ r~The c"*12on,unlor col,ee
ilJ iI isi 4??lwU1 Pla? ,ta econd of four extra
.? :5i ?, scheduled games tomorrow In the
l2 !i 2i_ Hi Balboa Gym at 7 p.m. against the
98 a; Quarry eights Special Services
team.
CARTA VIEJA

PHILIPPINE BAMBOO FURNITURE
THE MOST COMFORTABLE FOR THE TROPICS!
Select today your bamboo from the largest assortment
and stock in Panama at "El Diablo"
If you belong to the Armed Forcoa or T you have a steady job
com to our store and you may choose your own credit terms.
Iowa Tchrs.
(Minn.) 56
Hamline 67, Drake 46
Pittsbarg (Kan.) 79, Maryville
(Mo.) 61
Youngstown 88, Akron 71
Kent State 72, John Carroll 17
College Emporia 68, Rockhurst 57
Wayne (Neb.) 77, Sioux Falls
(8.D.) M i
SOUTHWEST
Texas Christian 58, So. Method-
ist 48
Taylor (Ind.) 68, MsMurry 59
HardlK Simmon 7, Texas Wes-
leyan 52
FAR WET
Oregon 55, San Fraaelsso 49
s, Mary's (Cal.) 54, Santa Clara
5
delivered on a pass from Dan-
ford to Strange.
Here are the league standings
to date:
W. L. Pts.
Headquarters Co. 4 0 77
Service Company 2 1 60
Tank Company 1 2 44
Medical Company 0 2 12
Mortar Company 0 2 6
s
to go along. m .
But that has been done in some
quarters, like the Ivy League.
I believe It could be done else-
where without materially hurt-
10 i ine the game.
81 It might help.
45
65 I iros play it could get it by at-
Nation To Enter
Winter Olympics
?
this Service team had little trou-
ble defeating the college In a
scrimmage game it looks as If it
will have its hands full on Sat-
urday night.
The Juntar College team, run.
nerup in the recent Invitational
Tournament, Is determined to
show that thev have Improved,
since the last time thev played
The next game will be held on i tending pro games.
Thomas Tuesday night between the two I think there are enough folks
wlnless teams, Mortar and Med- who like bona fide college foot-
leal Companies. | ball to support that brand.
FEELING DULL?
...due to temporary sluggishness
I"1 .thfH?hlnivmJr Win 9aanr Heights and will be out!
TheRwho want football aath. f'P^j? *h,eJT '$^S makl to ven thes?f-
__-i i* iw .f i4 v. -?_ ter Games i / i ieoruary. ma Quarry Heights
ing the number of nations one -
morethan at any previous Win-
ter Olympics.
In Oarmlsch Partenklrchen,
1936, and Saint Morltz, 1948,
twenty-eight nations participat-
ed. The deadline for entries was
at 2300 GMT, Dec 31.
A -cable from the Portuguese
Olympic Committee was sent
from Lisbon before that time, so
the entry was accepted despite
arrival In Oslo late on the night
of Jan. 1st.
Relieve that dull feeling ... let
sparkling, good-tastiag Eae kel
you two wmyt: At bedtlase Eno
quickly help neutralise excesa
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feeling. Befar breskfsst Eno
works si s quick-acting, gentle lax-
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2. ANTACID relieves sourness, gs
end heartburn promptly.
1. LAXATIVE relieves temporary
sluggishness quickly. (Take be-
fore breakfast when needed.)
Used by millions. Sparkling Eno is
also good for sick headache, acid
indigestion, constipation and
OVERINDULOENCE.
At all drugghts-Get Eno today.
TAKI GOOD-TASTING
Imported
Canned Hams
PER
DREWS
KRAKVS 4t
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Colon
HOME DELIVER V
recently de-1
fealed the Pacific side Working
Boys by 21 points, this team Is
led by sueh outstanding players
as Andrade, Pendleton and Fitz-
maurlce.
Tickets for this game will only)
be 25 cents for adults and 15
cents for students presenting S.A.;
cards. Remember the game will
start at 7 p.m.
jboa Bar
">f
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We also have the
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>


SENIOR
US GRID FINALE
(Page I
AN INDI

^
DAILY NEWSPAPMt
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country i safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTI-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., rRIDAT, JANUARY 4, 195
FIVE CENTS
Revenue Head Says
Is Over;
Widow Admits
1945 Murder
Called Suicide
Truman Mum On McGrath Firing
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4 (UP)
- Interno i in vault Commission-
er Jonn Dun:ap saia ioaay tne
tax scandal purge o high-rank-
ing ofllcials is over as iar as he
knows, but added that action still
Is pending against several minor
employes
At the same time, President
Truman challenged the forecast
of some Congressional leaaers
that his plans lor a house-clean-
ing reorganization of the Re-
venue Eureau v.ill meet stlif op-
position
he als>' confirmed at his week- j
ly news conference that he tried i
In vain to get Federal Juage Tho-
mas J. Murphy of New *ork to|
head a federal clean-up commis-1
sion. Mr Truman said Murphy [
at first accepted the Job Dut:
changed his mind after return-,
lng to N< w York.
Murphy's turn-down had been'
widely reported, but the Presi-|
dent refused to discuss other:
persistent reports that Attorney
General J Howard McGrath is
on the way out. He said he can't,
spend all his time answering
rumors.
In predicting that top Revenue
Bureau officials are safe in their
jobs for the time being, Dunlap|
made clear that he will act
promptly If anv new irregularl-]
ties occur.
The President was obviously
touchy t:>day when the subject i
of Mcratn was Introduced.
Some members of McGrath'sj
justice Department have figured
ID the investigation of wide-
spread tax scandals.
Mr. Truman was asked about
a report that McGrath had told
him in writing of a desire to
leave the government. He said it
seemed to him announcements
of this type should come from
the President.
He aald there have been so
many rumors he can't keep up
with them. Asked if further
questions about McGrath were
barred, the President said they
were.
Mr. Truman also said he really
did not care to answer questions
on the Murphy appointment but
would make some comment. He
then told of the Judge's on-and-
off attitude toward the anti-cor-
luptlon commission Job.
In reply to another question,
Mr. Truman said spiritedly that
he, the President, had laid down
the conditions for the job and did not think much of t predic-
tion by Chairman Robert L.
Doughton of the tax-writing
Wouse Ways and Means Commit-
tee on the chances for approval
of the Revenue Bureau changes.
Doughton told a reporter he
"doubts" the plan will be accept-
that Murphy had imposed none.
Mr. Truman declined to say if
he is still thinking about a subs-
titute for Murphy, but did say
that was something on his agen-
da.
The Chief Executive said he
(NKATelephoto)
TAX BUREAU CLEAN-UP President Truman (left) and
Secretary of the Treasury John Snyder look over a chart
showing proposed changes In the Internal Revenue Bureau.
The President ordered a sweeping reorganization of the Bu-
reau, which figured prominently in recent scandals. One
change would abolish the offices of the 64 Internal revenue
collectors.
Talmadge Vows
Industrial War9
On New England
ATLANTA. Jan. 4 (UP).Gov.
Herman Talmadge declared "In-
dustrial war" on New England
today and gave his blessings to
a move to scrap the controversial
re-registration provisions of his
1949 voting act.
Talmadge replied to a blast at
the south by Rhode Island Gov.
Dennis J. Roberts for luring New
England industry. Talmadge said
Georgia would continue to wel-
come new Industry which seeks
to develop the state and its re-
sources, not exploit them.
Talmadge teed off on Robert's
blast at the south by snapping:
"If he wants war, we'll be glad
to give him war."
Roberts said Dixie was raiding
New England of its industry and
Confederate Veteran, 104,
Buried Quietly Under US Flag
LINCOLN, Ala., Jan. 4 (UP)
Col. P. R. Crump, 104, was buried
under the United States flag he
once fought against and only
seven Confederate veterans and
a lone home guard were left in
all the land.
"Mr. Rlggs," as Crump was
known, died quietly at his rural
home Monday night almost as
the year 1951 ended. He had lived
there since be came back from
Appomatix, Va., where he saw
Robert E. Lee surrender to U. S.
Grant.
William A. Lundy, about 100
Laurel Hill, Fla.
Lundy was too young to fight
in the war but Is listed on Florida
pension rolls as a Civil War
home guard.
US, Britain May
Confer With France
About Indo-China
Ironically, this town bears the WAHHTVrrr_ T
name of the President who was I p^ASflINGTON. Jan. 4 (UP)
Crump's enemy during the OM1 [figf* Jr "" an and Prime
War Minister Winston Churchill may
War.
Crump, who celebrated his
104th birthday last week, was the
agree to urgent Big Three' mili-
tary talki with France over the
last Alabama Confederate veter-! {""easing Chinese Communist
an of the thousands who went to ;nfeat Jo Indo-China, diplomat
war in the 1860's from this state, forecast today.
war
The handful of Confederate
survivors elsewhere are:
William J. Bush, 105, Fitzger-
ald, Ga.
John Sailing, 105, Slant, Va.
Arnold Murray, 104, Orange-
burg, 8. C.
W. D. Townsend, 105, Olla. La.
Thomas E. Ross, 102, Los An-
geles, Cal.
Walter W. Williams, 108,
declared the plants lured away Franklin, Tex.
would flourish better in New Thomas E. Riddle, 103, Austin,
England in the long run. Tex.
ed by Congress Mr. Truman said
he believes it will be approved.
He pointed out it had been
under consideration since the
Hoover report on goyernment
reorganisation, which was before
the Wavs and Means subcommit-
tee started turning up tax scan-
dals.
Mr. Truman said there had
been both Republican and De-
mocratic opposition In Congress
but he hopes the plan will be
acceptable He said some mem-
bers of Congress want to keep
revenue collectors as political
appointees and had raised a fuss
when some of 'hem were fired.
The President acknowledged
that mon tax workers fired re-
cently were under Civil Service
but said the top ones were poli-
tical appointees
There were rumblings o op-
position in both Houses today as
the Senate was promised a
chance to vote m the tax reform.
Sen. Richard B. Russell (D-
Oaj, a member of the 'Senate's
tax-nan illng finance committee,
thought Congress will "go slow"
on the President's proposal to
reorganize the Internal Revenue
Bureau.
In any case, Chairman John
L. McClellan (D-Ark.) said the
Senate Executive Expenditures
Committee will hold immediate
hearings on the plan when the
President sends it to Congress
later this monta.
56 Panam Seamen
Will Fly To VS.
Fifty-six Panamanian seamen
win fly to the United States,
probably next week, to fill va-
cancies aboard U. S. ships. It was
announced today by Cecil R. Jo-
sephs, director of the Panam
Merchant Seamen's Pool in Co-
lon.
Josephs said the pool had re-
ceived a letter this week from W.
O. Allen, chief of the division of
operations, National Shipping
Authority, in Washington offer-
ing Jobs to 56 Panamanian sea-
men.
Josephs said he did not know
what grade of seamen were
NEWPORT, Ky., Jan. 4 (UP)
Police said today that Mrs.
Betty Lee Stldham had confess-
ed killing an amorous carpen-
ter in her kitchen on V-E Day
because he told her he hoped
the Germans would kill her of-
ficer-husband.
Detectives brought the 40-
year-old widow back from Jef-
fersonvllle, Ind-, for more ques-
tioning on why she voluntarily
confessed to murder in the 1945
death which had been listed as
a suicide.
Mrs. Stldham-admitted to of-
ficers yesterday that she stab-
bed Fred Fehler when he made
repeated advances and he told
her he hoped her husband
would be killed.
"This has been on my mind
all these years and I just had
to get It out of my system,"
she told detectives who wanted
to know why she waited more
than six years.
"I haven't been able to sleep
nights. I started for Newport
one day about two months ago
but I changed my mind. I
couldn't go through with It."
Mrs. Stldham told Sgt. Jack
Thiem here she killed Fehler, a
carpenter who had been repair-
ing her apartment, with a but-
cher knife in self defense May
8, 1945. The death was ruled' a
suicide after Mrs. Stldham's
eight-year-old daughter, Mari-
lyn, corroborated the story.
"He made repeated advances
and I had warned him to stay
away," Thiem said Mrs. Stld-
ham told him. "Then the news
of the end of the European war
was flashed on the radio. I told
him that pretty soon my hus-
band would be home.
"Fehler said: 'Well, 1 hope the
Germans blow up all of Luxem-
burg and your husband, too.'
That made me mad. There was
a butcher knife on the kitchen
table. I guess I must have
grabbed the knife. He kept
coming at me. He wouldn't stop
although I warned him and
kept backing away from him."
The story Mrs. Stldham gave
the-coroner was that Fehler
grabbed the knife when he
thought her husband would
soon be home from the war,
went Into the bathroom and
killed himself. Stldham died
last year in Walter Reed Hos-
pital at Washington from a
war-time ailment.
CLOTHING FOB; CAFTUR1 CHf AmartcanViefoners at a camp In North Korea^tand
in rule to receive an Issue of cotfon-na Esstfoto, a Communist Chinese source.
.1
US Gypsy
In Ch
es Wild
In Jail
Three-Fourths Of
Point-4 Experts
In Latin America
WASHINGTON Jan. 4 (U8IS)
At least three-fourths of U. S.
Technicians In the point four
program are working In the
Latin American Republics.
This is revealed by the most
recent report of the technical
wanted but he expected to re-lC0OP*,a,tI10,n administration,
celve definite word from the whlch administers the U. S. pro-
Shipping Authority by Monday.
The papers of 70 men, who
have been screened by a U. 8.
Coast Guard representative in
Fort DeLesseps, have been reval-
idated and the 58 men wanted
will have to be chosen from -
mong these, Josephs stated.
The pool has 580 seamen in
Colon and approximately 300 in
Panama,
gram of technical cooperation
with other countries. The report
shows there were a total of 477
technicians participating in the
program abroad as of the end of
October. N
Of this number. 376 were
working in Latin America, while
the remainder were engaged in
projects in the near east, Africa
and Asia.
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Jan. 4
(UP) Local law took over to-
day after the tribal law of Jack-
sonville's gypsy population broke
down in a free-for-all riot over
whs should be "king." '
Starting with violent cursing
and the attle of foreign tongues,
the battled bo.!ed among some
40 costumed gypsies and several
bystanders In a whole block of
the downtown district tielng up
traffic for about 15 minutes yes-
terday afternoon.
One of nine policemen who
quelled the riot was sent to a
hospital for treatment of kicks
and scratches. Ten gypsies were
hauled off to Jail from the brawl
and nine more were rounded up
later from seven fortune-telling
shops. .
Actty judge fined, four o*>tbe, "The v/hole thing seems to
nomads 10 each on charges of have came about over in-law
vagrancy today and dismissed
charges aaainst six others. Nine
Other cases, including those of
two men who claim to be "kings,"
will be disposed of later.
Police weren't exactly certain
what caused the melee.
:
5,500 Meat Plant
Workers Strike
In Chicago Yards
CHICAGO. Jan. 4 (UP)More
than 5,500 CIO Packinghouse
Workers at the Armour and
Company meat plant here ex-
pected to stay off their Jobs to-
day in a half-day "demonstra-
tion "against the company's
wage Increase offer.
A union spokesman said
workers would duplicate the
half-day demonstration staged
yesterday bv 1,500 employes in
the hog killing and cutting de-
partments.
At the same time Ralph Hel-
steln, president of the CIO
United Packinghouse Workers'
Union expected to reject the
Armour offer of a six-cent hour-
ly wage hike.
Soviet Press Opens
New Blast On U.S.
Policies In Japan
An AFL Amalgamated Meat
Cutters' Union accepted the six-
cent offer Wednesday on behalf
of 10.000 members employed in[
the 13 Armour plants.
MOSCOW, Jan. 4 (UP)
The Soviet press today scath-
ingly attacked American policy
in Japan, contrasting asserted
U. S. efforts to meJU^fAPan.
military cats-paw in the Orient
with Premier Joseph Stalin's
New Year's message of "Deep
sympathy" for 'Japan's efforts
to achieve "Independence."
Pravda and other Russian
newspapers carried three, col-
umns of world-wide reaction to
the Stalin message and Trud
and the Literary Gazette fea-
tured bitter attacks on U S.
policy and on State Department
adviser John Foster Dulles.
Trud, in a half-pace article,
charged that Dulles, on his
most recent trip to Japan or-
dered the Japanese government
to "introduce Fascism at once"
and step up its rearmament
program.
trouble and one tribal
lng to oust another
Capt. W. B. Keene.
lng to oust another?' said Police
John Nicholas Miller. 44, was
reported to have arrived recent-
ly from Battle Creek, Michigan
in a big CadUluR to lay claim to
the ruling rights of black-eyed
Steve Nichols, 58. Both were
picked up on charges of attempt-
ing to incite riot, fighting, re-
sisting; arrest, drunkenness and
disturbing the peace. (
The gypsy dynasty In Jackson-
ville consists of a string of for-
tune-telling shops, instead of a
camp, apparently run for the
most part by members of the
same family.
"They xU aeem to be In pretty
financial shape," Keen*
The newspaper said Washing-
ton had demanded the imme-
diate formation of 10 Japanese
army divisions and the reorga-
nization of the present police
reserve corps and Its incorpora-
tion into the Army.
The United States, according
to the paper, has promised to
supply tanks, artillery and air-
craft for the new Japanese ar-
imy.
Knives flashed and garbage
cans sailed through the air as
the gypsy men and women, clad
In colorful costumes and Jewelry,
clawed and grappled with each
other.
"It looked like a tong war."
said a tobacco shop owner in the
block.
Gastronomic Workers'
Havana Strike Ends
HAVANA fan. 4 (UP)The
24-hour sltdown strike called by
the National Federation of Gas-
tronomic Workers employed in
restaurants, bars and hotel din-
ing rooms will end today but
the Federation warned that if
the management and Cuban
government fail to7 settle the de-
mands for a 30 per cent wage
increase promised last June,
then an Indefinite general
strike will be called January S.
_ (NEA Telephoto)
HERO AIDS INVESTIGATION George Albert, (right), hero
of the crash of a non-scheduled C-46 in 8alamanca, N.Y., is
Questioned by Inspectors of the Civil Aeronautics Board In
Pittsburgh. Investigating the crash are Richard C. Hughes
(left) and Arthur Caperton. Albert, one of 14 survivors,
walked through snow to get rescuer*.
.. .f,,0"^ sutes currently Is
unwilling to say exactly what it
would do if the Chinese Reds
sent 'volunteers" into the three
associated states of Indo-Chlna
or formally attack the southeast
Asia nation. But the precedent
ror armed intervention by the
United Nations was set 18
months ago when North Korea
Invaded South Korea.
The Fiench government has
been pressing for Big Three mi-
litary :aiks on Indo-Chlna for
some time Confirmed Intellig-
ence reports of new Red activi-
ties In tire area however, have
made the situation even more
ominous.
In addition, a Korean truce
would free dlnese troops for a
possible invasion of Southeast
Asia.
The United States is known to
have prepared a "position paper"
on Indo-China which will be
taken up when top-level global
talks between Mr Truman and
the British Prime Minister open
here Saturday.
United States concern over the
problem of Southeast Asia was
reflected today when American
officials replied to a statement
by Soviet Foreign Minister An-
drei Vlihlnsky in Paris that the
United 8tates Is plotting a Ko-
rea-style war In routhern China.
That part of China borders Thai-
land, Burma and Indo-Chlna.
In answer, state Department
Spokesman Mirhael J. McDer-
mott said Vlshinsky's comment
was "another example of the
usual Soviet tactics of attempt-
'"* j coyer up the aggressive
designs of international Com-
munism by charging others with
misconduct,"

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