The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01340

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text

AN INDBPENDM^ffl^^DAlLY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Lei the people know the truth and the country it safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
1 '
' -t
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1951

111 '
68 Missing As Three Aircraft Disappear
In US During Stormy End To Old Year
_______________________________------ --------:-------------------i----------------------------------------------- ___ ___ J
Churchill Sails
dfc Storms Abate
L O N D O N DecembM man.
31 ilii)Winston Churchill ano The Queen Mary sailed at noon
his "floating Number 10 Down-1 today. The Churchill-Truman
lng Street" sailed for the United j talks will not be able to start un-
States two days behind the ori-! til next week end, contrary to
ginal schedule for important the original plans to atar Frt-
conferences with President Tni*-
Russian Spy
Escapes Armed
From Death Cel)
da
AMIENS, France, Dec. 31 (UPJ
Self-confessed Russian soy
Leon Meurant made an armed)
escape from his prison death cell
today. Police immediately began
Investigating whether he was
aided by Communist agents.
Meurant, a 39-year-old bogus'
Belgian count, was awaiting
execution for the murder of a
> beautiful French noblewoman.
Countess Moa**'* Sauty de
Chaln, whose nearly n
It was found on the
Parts fctgfcway In IpttV ,
Meurant claimed that a "sm|n
Mongolian" was bidden m his
car trunk and strangled the wo-
man wlto had taken off her
clothes **oecause she was warm"
Provincial police and" the 8u-
rete Natlonale clamped a strict
news blackout on the bizarre
breakout by Meurant and his ac-
complice, and a strict watch was
set on the Franco-Belgian bor-
der, only 60 miles to' the North.
"^eae details were known how-
ever:
Meurant and Michel Courtln.
both condemned to death for
murder were manacled In ad-
joining sections of the death cell.
The guard, whose name was
undisclosed. wa ttoated to
watch on the other side of the
stoat bars. The three men al-
legedly started a game of cards
when Meurant produced the
revolver and hit the warden
while'bis accomplice sneaked
hit.bands through the grill and
stole the cell keys.
They then unchained them-
The 1951 Canal Zone license
plates will be good until mid-
night Wednesday it was an-
nounced today from the Civil
sel-es,' stripping "off the guard's Affairs Bureau,
uniform as they locked him In | The license offices will be
the cell and headed for the cen- open Wednesday during the us-
The world's fastest shipthe
Queen Marywith the most Im-
portant members of the British
government sat helplessly In port
at Southampton over the week
end owing to a missing link in a
chain.
To the layman, and Church- I
Ill's follow travelers, the mis-
hap seemed trivial. But it was
a very stubborn link in a very
important chainthe port an- i
chor chain.
* |
Meanwhile, In London, with
near record winds abating, and g
the Air Ministry and other me-iK
teorologists forecasting a "nor- I
mal" year-end weather, Britain "
and the continorJt started re-
counting the toll* .pi the worst
four-day Atlantic storm In the
past quarter century.
At least a down seagoing ships,
and freigHtera, including Hie A-
mirlcan Flying Enterprise, were
lost, wrecked or seriously #*m- I
I. Liners such as the Qtoan
ry were days lato, mad scom
coastal f lining ves'
\r beached on the
.coasts, often with a low
nasy nail complements,
lore, scores were Inju:
the "hnndred mile plus gale
which toppled chimneys, and by
flying debris. Coastal and
installations Were smashed on
the highway and railway's traf-
fic along the coasts was halted
by a washed-out right of way.
Inland, roofs of many small
houses and cottages were blown
off or damaged by gales which
made miles of highways impass-
able due to fallen trees, tele-
phone and electric light polea.
' (NEA Telephoto)
GOOD DEEM BY THE SHOVELFUL Under the supervision of firemen. Chicago Boy Scout
volunteers shovel the snow from around the cl ty's fire hydrants. The big city, which has had
473 inches of snow so far this season, is still digging out._____________________ '
Li red by
Your CZ Plates
Still Good Until
Wed. Midnight
Dignify Asked Snoy/y New Year's Eve
l^'Ye^MgyKes US Motfits
iff essage To RP
tralJaU office.
Several other guards were sub-
dued, another uniform stolen.
In a New Year's message to the
Republic, President Alcibiades
Arosemena today expressed hi*
disgust for the current campaign
of "Insults", and "the promotion
of hatred" among Panamanians.
Arosemena's message Included
an appeal for "decency and de-
corum" and warned that "votes"
not "Insults" will decide who wins
the next election.
The President admitted that
Panamanians are living moments
of "violent" political strife, but
added: "I do not believe that It
is too late or useless to make a
final appeal to the men and
women of good will who foresee
the tragedy of the country."
Asosemena made it cleir that
his plea was not motivated by
"interest or fear" as he express-
ed hone that Panama would
have "civilized and decent" elec-
tions next year.
The President ended his New
Year's message expressing best
that his fellow-citizens
uai hours: from 9 to 11:45 a.m.
and from 18:45 to 4:15 p.m. at
norm voim. the Aneon office In the Civil wishes 5,-^.
ndthe two men made their exit' Affairs Building and fromi 10 KtMr "happiest rnoments
through the central gate of thea.ro. to noon and from 1 to 51tonight in the peace or tneir
Amiens prison.
p.m. at Building 10, Cristobal, homes.
Air Force Favoritism Probers
Given Access To T ax Returns
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (If)
T UrO. Senate Preparedness
Subcommittee got a potent new
weapon at the weekend ac-
osas to Federal Income tax re-
turnsin Its drive to root out
fraud, waste, and' Inefficiency
in the defense program.
President Truman 'u'horlzed
the Internal Revenue Bt.
to supply the
headed by Sen. Lyndon B.
Johnson it requests.
The move was reminiscent of
i the authority given the Senate
I crime committee when it used
many files to put the finger
[ on racketeers, gamblers, and
mobsters.
It was possible the subcom-
. mlttee might make first use
t\ot Income tax files to public
hearings scheduled to start here
some time in January into
charges that officials at Wright-
Patterson airbase, Dayton, O.
gave contracts to favored firms
in return for gifts. Jobs or cash.
Counterattack
The Navy Patrol Building at
the Balboa-Panama "Limits"
seems an odd place to choose
for a burglary.
But 14-year-old Frank Adol-
hn Skceti waa charged in
alboa Magistrate's Court this
mrulas; with doing just that.
The Panamanian youth
who had a long criminal re-
cord -* alleged! entered she
Shore Petrel Building at l:M
a m. frith the intent U ease -
salt burglary.
Johnson has said the eases to
be covered involve corruption
and procurement irregularities
subcommittee The cases have been under in-
vestigation by the air force lt-
sdf.
"" > want to determine the
cwts to the government that
car i>e traced directly or. lndi-
rec ly to fraud and favoritism
and to find out whether the
Air Force has taken the neces-
sary steps to prevent these Ir-
regularities from recurring J'
Johnson said.
Subcommittee staff investl-
Stors have been looking into
e situation at the air force
base for some time.
A subcommittee spokesman
said one Air Force civilian buy-
er already had been indicted In
connection with the situation
Subcommittee sources indicat-
ed the group would concentrate
on Income tax files of indivi-
dualsthose who did the buy-
ing and procuring for the Air
Force.
The Investigators will not
seek to determine irregularities
In income tax returns, bat the
actas 1 source of outside Income.
The authority to examine the
Income tax files also was given
to the World War TJ Investigat-
ing- committee which President
Truman headed and which sent sm"ce" jg^f
him into the national spotlight.
CHICAGO. Dec. SI (UP) ,
An eastbound mass of cold and
snowy weather raised fears to-
day that slippery motoring
would bring a sharp upsurge
of traffic fatalities to end the
long New Year's holiday.
f
Already 118 persons have
died in fcafflc accidents since
0 p. m. Friday.
Anothe* 21 people lost their
Uves In fires, and 30 In mis-
cellaneous! accidents.
The fate of 68 persons miss-
ing aboard three planes which
disappeared In Pennsylvania,
Arizona and Texas Is still un-
known. Hoary rains and general
bad weather hampered the
searchersaseklng traces of the
missing craft.
Passengers aboard the stream-
liner "CitV of San Francisco,"
many of ----f-- .------
Hello, Another
United tates Representative
Gordon Can field. Republican of
New Jersey, arrived today on
the Crlatohal for a visit on the
Isthmus. .
He is ^accompanied by his
wife and sons, Carl M., 18, and
Allan R.,,'14.-
$2,800 Offered
For Murdering
British General
CAIRO, Dec. 31 (UP) E-
gyptlan extremists placed a
bounty of $2,800 on the head
of Lt. Gen. George
commander of the
troops in the Suez Canal Zone,
today.
The extremist weekly Algo-
mohour Al Mlsry offered the
bounty to any "partisan hero"
who would kill Erskine.
In a front-page bold-faced
advertisement, the newspaper
also offered $280 reward for the
murder of any British officer.
The British military authori-
ties today announced the sei-
zure of a "quantity of high ex-
plosives" lying in barges at the
Suez Bay at the Suez Canal's
entrance.
A British spokesman said that
the military had confiscated
the shipment to prevent it from
falling Into the hands of E-
gypMan guerillas.

the holiday, narrowly escaped
death Saturday night when the
speeding train sldeswlped a
railroad car on a siding near
Gault, 111.
Windows were ripped out
throughout the length of the
Chicago and Northwestern Rail-
road flier and more than a
dozen persons were eut by fly-
ing glass.
Doctors were called to re-
move glass fragments, but re-
ported none of the passengers
Was hurt seriously.
The traffic accident death|cut to a convenient
toll contrasted with an advance carrying away.
Cable Thieves Grow
Bolder, Try For Haul
llsisk ftssltsssss*ftbojr''
ItWi Mm rWij
Cable thieves are growing
bolder.
Despite coawlctlons and Jail
sentences, they seem to be clos-
ing in on Pacific Side com-
munities.
Up to now of the thiefts
have been from outlying areas.
. But late last week Canal
Zone Police reeelved a tip from
a passing motorist on the sus-
picious actions Jit some men In
the industrial and pier area of
Balboa in the vicinity of the
Electrical Field Office.
The men escaped but left be-
hind a number of short hanks
of lead-sheathed table, neatly
NEW YORK, Dec. 31 (UP) Sixty eight person
ware missing in aircraft crashes across the United States
on this last day of the New Year.
Searchers are bucking grim weather in trying to
solve the fate of three missing aircraft.
In the fog-bound mountains of northwest Pennsyl-
vania ground parties are waiting till the weather clears
for Civil Air Patrol planes to get off in an attempt to pin-
point a non-scheduled airline's Curtiss Commando, mis-
sing since Saturday between Pittsburgh and Buffalo with
Erskine!'33 passengers and seven crew members.
British I
In Arizona search planes are for some of the waiting 180 all
standing by to look for waiting spotters can get off the ground,
for the weather to clear suffl-| The hunt for the missing
clently for them to search for Commando extended from Mi-
chigan to Nova Scotia, but
Navy, Coast Guard and Civilian
rescue planes were unable to
participate because of bad wea-
ther and fog blankets.
Boats plied the Great Lakes
in a search for wreckage la
case the plane overshot Buffalo,
and i ground crews spread over
a wide area.
Reports of a low flying piano
and an apparent crash near
the northwest Pennsylvania
"ghost" lumbering town of Cla-
rlngton near here, shortly after
11 o'clock night sent most of
the searchers into that Isolated
area.
No word was received from
, ,. _., -.the plane after it took off from
.**. aSE?t!B maetlx)g, ,tor Pittsburgh at P, m. SKBT^-
b* 11 IssOBtjfawstyyof;the aw -
Army, Karl RT^Steforand "*-<*
Peter Beasley, Special Consul-
tant to the Assistant Secretary.
was scheduled at Balboa
Heights early this afternoon
with Bureau Directors and oth-

a C-47, with 23 persons aboard,
missing since lt began an in-
strument' approach to Williams
Field In a rainstorm.
And a Mustang fighter Is
missing somewhere over the
Arizona-Texas wastelands.
The group parties searching
for the Commando are being
held at strategic points in the
vast Alleghany national forest
till the fog clears sufficiently
size for
prediction of 350 by the Na-
tional Safety Council for a is t-
iod from 6 p. m. Friday to
midnight Tuesday.
Safety officials warned the
Meanwhile, In Balboa Magis-
trate's court this morning, cable
thief Onorato Pinto. 19-year-old
Panamanian, was jailed for 20
days after being *"- convicted of
toll could take a sharp spurt taking 25 feet of cable from an
If too many motorists try toJArmy area in Chiva Chiva trail
drive after a "wet" New Year's last Dec. 19. Tha cable was
Eve celebration. I valued at $12.32.
Top Canal Officials
To Heel Today
W ilh Visiting VIPs
The Commando was the samo
type which crashed at Eliza-
beth, N. J. two weeks ago to-
day, killing 56 persons.
The missing plane left Pltts-
wiui *""" w 4 The missing plane ieit Pitts-
er top officials of the Panam* burgh for a flight to Miami by
way of Buffalo.
Canal Company and Canal
Zone Government.
The Assistant Secretary and
Mrs. Bendetsen. Mr. Beasley.
and Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Ro-
binson, personal friends of Mr.
apd Mrs. Bendetsen, arrived
this morning on the Panama! area may can assume after
liner Cristobal. The party was I tonight that lt will take corn-
met at shlpslde by Governor plaining neghbors longer than
Newcomer, Lt. Gen. William H.j heretofore to summon the quiet-
Cops OuH (ocoli
Late roisterers In the Cocol!
H. Morris, Jr., and Lt. Col. Mar-
vin L. Jacobs. Military Assist-
ant to the Governor, and came
to the pacific side by railroad
motor car soon after the ship
docked.
Mr. Bendetsen Is Chairman of
the Board of Directors of the
Panama Canal Company and
the purpose of his visit Is to
attend a meeting of the Board
which is scheduled to open next
Monday.
---------------

Ins; hand of a policeman.
Canal Zone Police were mov-
ing out of the Cocoll sub-station
today.
Lanterns, ladders, -shades,
water coolers, spitoons flash-
lights and guns were being
moved Into Balboa District
Headquarters for storage.
All of which doesn't mean
that speeders can count on 'a,
cop-free stretch on Bruja Road.
The visitors will leave Friday
on the satne ship.
Canfleld is from Paterson,
New Jersey, nd Is a member
of the Appropriations Commit-
tee and has been in Congress
'Prosperous 1952' From Post Office
A New Years' gift in the form of upped postal rates
: for many kinds of mail matter will land, squarely on
Canal Zonians' palm fringed doorstep tonight.
The Increases In some domestic and special service
fees are authorized under Public Law No. ml. They are
to apply also throughout the United Slates;
US Ready To Warn Russia To Keep
Ransom Happy Satellites In Order
{
These rate changes will go Into effect tomorrow.
1) "Penny" postal cards will no longer be a penny,'
they will cost two cents.
i) The rate for private mailing or-post cards will go
from one to two cents.
31 Drop letters and other matter of the first class
mailed for local delivery will be two cents for each
ounce. The old rate was one cent.
4) The rate for business reply caros, whan returned
to permit holders, will be three cents instead of two
cents under the old rate.
5) First-class mall special dellve feat: Up to 2
pounds. 20 cents; over two pounds an* up to 10 pounds,
35 cents; over ten pounds, 35 cents.
6) Second, third, or fourth class-'special delivery
feos: Up to two pounds, 36 cents; over'two pounds and
up to ten pounds. 45 cents; and over ten pounds, 60
cents.
7) Increase* in foes for registered mail, will range
from five cents to M cent for different' valuations.
On articles on which the declared value Is more
than $26 a fee of not lees than 55 cents will be paid.
6 Postal ratos on third-class matter, return re-
cepta for domestic registered mall aid. return recelDts
for domestic numbered insured mail Also will be In-
creased.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (UP)
The United States Govern-
ment will bring pressure to bear
directly on Russia to stop Com-
munist satellite countries from
holding United States citizens
to ransom, according to diplo-
mat sources here today.
The sources said a stern
warning to Moscow to keep its
minions In check is considered
the most effective way to pre-
vent a repetition of Hungary's
treatment of the four United
States airmen.
The United States is also ex-
pected to ask the United Na-
tions to condemn Hungary for
violating "human rights" in the
seizure and trial of the air-
men.
The State Department also is
considering taking the case be-
fore the International Court of
Justice at The Hague. Nether-
lands, but no decision has been
made.
The government has little
hope of getting back the $120,-
000 In fines which the Hunga-
rian Communist government
collected after a Red military
court "convicted" the airmen of
illegal border violation.
But it hopes and expects a
condemnation of Hungary's
treatment of the men before the
"world bar of public opinion"
an action which would bring at
least moral pressure to bear on
the Hungarians to halt their
alleged violations of funda-
mental human rights.
The four filers landed In Hun-
gary Nov. after cosing their way
GOOD NEWS Mrs. John X. Swift. In her Glens Falls, NY,
home, registers real; Joy as she gets the official telephone
call from Washington advising her that her Air Force hus-
band had been cMeksed by the Hungarians. The four Im-
prisoned airmen were turned loose on payment of $120.000
In Unes by the U.S. government.
The State Department paid the
fines and the men were handed
over to United 8tates authori-
ties in Austria last Friday.
The fliers told a news con-
ference at the U. S. Air Force
base in Erdinr. Germany. Sst-
nrdav that they were well
treated bat subjected to con-
tinuoas questioning by Rus- i
sian and Hungarian officials
during their imprisonment.
Final decision on further re-
taliation against Hun gar v
awaits the return of Samuel
Klaus, State Department In-
telligence expert who flew to
Germanv to interview the fliers.
It was Indicated that portions
of their report which were with-
held from newsmen may form
the basis for future action.
Some or all of the filers them-
selves also may be brouaht hero
for further interrogation about
details of their 40-day captlvitv.
Capt. John Swift of Gle~s
Falls. N. Y., Is slated to flv to
Svracuse, N. Y to see his ailing
father.
preparel
will b*
on a flight from odtupied Ger-
many to Yugoslavia?
They were triad aad convicted
of Illegally crossing the border
and sentenced to $30.000 each
in lines or throe months in jail. I
Officials were not
to say whether he
brought back here for Question-
ing after he visits his father and
wife and gets his first look at
his 10-week old son. David.
Informants said, however,
that the I'nlted SUtes will
net stop with the sasvos It
has already take agalnt
smeary a ban a Ameri-
ca* travel in the Ctmminl't
cewntrr aad closing the atan-
(Ceatinned oa Page Cot 2)


r
MGE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAT, DECEMBER SI, 1M]
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNED aNB PueUSMro Y THE PANAMA AMERICAN PKII, INC.
POUNIID Y NELBON ROUNSIVILL IN ISIS
MAMMODIO ARIAS. tOITOR
37. H aTRtrt P O. BOX 134. PANAMA. Ft. OF P.
ttlepmone panama no. 2-0740 19 linio
caili Address fanamirican, Panama
Colon orrieti tt.170 Central avInui Between i*th ano 13th struts
PORIION FttRRtSINTATIVIS' JOSHUA B POWElT.fi. INC.
348 MADISON AVE NEW YORK. (171 N. V.
LOCAL SY MA.L
PER MONTH. IN ADVANCE __
FO SIX MONTHS. IN ADVANCE
FOR ONE YEAR. IN ADVANCE
I.70 t 2.80
80 13.00
18.80 24 OO
BROADWAY COLUMN
You'll find that most of them round
Would rather knock than boost.
You'll find the poisoned barbs come thick
The higher that yon roost.
But you can gather in this balm
And cherish it as such,
They rarely ever knock a fuy
Who doesn't matter much.
You'll find the Anvil Chorus roles
The bulk of any map.
You'll find that very few of them
Pass up a chance to rap.
But you can take this to your soul
And let it daily there,
They rarely ever pan a man
Who doesn't get somewhere.
Grantland Rice
Celebs About Town: Gloria Swanson obliging Inconsiderate
autograph-hunters on 44th Street as the temperature tumbles...
Marlene Dietrich, who Inherits Louella'g 9:15 Sunday night time
on ABC this Sabbath...David Nlven entranced before a Lexing-
ton bookshop window displaying his first novel...Billy Rose and
Joyce Mathews indifferent to the 3 a. m. gapers at The Texan...
Imogene Coca back from a Cuban holiday with a cocoa-tan...
Producer Leland Hayward and his star Henry Fonda. Both were
once wd to actress Margaret Sullavan.. .Navy Comdr. Richard
Aldrlch stifling the rumors by rushing to Gertrude (Mrs. Aldrlchi
Lawrence's ailing room...Jean Arthur, a spectator at "Fourpos-
ter," who may play It In Chicago.. .Tallulah Bankhead's accused
maidwho didn't wear her mink In court. The cardigan being
part of the court makeup.
Sallies In Our Alley: Bob Dunn was in a plane from the mid-
west as ft winged over the Empire State bldg.. .The husband In
the seat ahead craned his neck to look down at it, bat his wife
Jerked him back with this shove: "Stop gaping! All these people
will think we're hicks!".. .Tony Martin was ho-hummlng his
movie fame, a Photoplay editor reports. "One day," said Tony,
"vou-re making love to Grable, another dav to Turner, another
day to Darnell, then the next day you're a has-been". .."Yeah,"
gi; rjed a pal, "but look where you has-been!"
Memos of a Midnlghter: Greta Garbo turned down $25.000
for a 4-mlnute appearance on CBS teevy. Said she would do it
with no audience (or cameramen) gaping at her.. .M. Berle con-
lded thftt this is the last year with his current sponsor...
Gsorge Abbott's stunning rhumba partner at LaRue Is Marcy
Westcott, just unknotted from her Chicago millionaire.. .The
band biz is this bad: Veteran band chief Andy Kirk Is now sales-
manning real estate. ..Add Little Ironies: One of Tallulah's
Sreatest hits was In.a little thing named "Private Lives". ..Billy
lenny of the 4 Inkspots was acquitted by a Phllly jury last week,
The rap was rough. .Florence Hayes and Louis Jordan, the
maestro, merged without benefit of press-agency weeks ago...
Big Feud: Joe Laurie. Jr. (co-author of "Show Biz") was a part-
ner of "Senntor" Ed Ford on the "Can You Ton This?" program
for years. He deleted Ford from that best-seller!
Broadway Sideshow: A wealthy Texan named Blondy Turner
wa in New York recently...He telephoned Benny Blnion, the
prep, of The Horseshoe (the newest gaming place In Las Vegas),
to wish him good luck.. ."Howi the dice going?" he Inouired...
"Ok*?!" yelled the landlord.. ."Betcha $10,000 on the Field!" said
Our Hero in New York.. ."You got a bet!" obliged Mr. Blnion out
In '.'eras, as be put the phone up closeto hear the stickman
tefl the roll... "Nine!" he bellowed. "The Field!".. ."You win
Ten T'r Onm!" cheerfully informed Mr. Binion over the Long-
Diitinre. "Okay," chucked Blondy Turner In Manhattan. "See
you next week to collect It!".. .When Mr. Turner, the Sportsman,
arrived In Vegashe made straight for the dice table.. .And lost
$200.000.
Manhattan Murals: The little street corner violinist on 57th
warming his lingers over a csndle.. .James Melton, whose hobby
Is buvlng sntlnup autos (he has 150>. vainly hunting a taxi on
6*b Avenueloaded down with packages...The thrush namei
Dl:'l Douglas, whose tov Doberman wears costly earrings.. .The
so""-writers who gather nightly In the oddly-named bar at 49th
(The Snake Pit), testing tomorrow's hits...James Hill, the sou-
venir ss'esman at the Statue of Liberty. He was born there 28
years ago.
The Florida Special: Jane Powell'* first nirht club ap-
pearance (Copa ntv) is a smash...The applause is long and
lusty.. .This 5 foot (93 lbs.) doll-like movie star has a repertoire
e' 20 songs, all of then show-stoppas.. .Last night when the
hand-pounding got louder (after Jsne's 18th ditty). Broadway's
George Solotaire described her click in two words: "She's win-
ning". .Tony and Sally DeMarco and Larry Storch are the head-
liners at Ciro'*... Loo Holti took over at Martha Raye's fsr a
fortnightwhile she does her teevy stint In New York...Lou
Walters' Letln Quarter unveiled dancers Darvis & Julia. Their
Initial appearance in the V. S. Class. Bigtime. Up there with the
Ares .1,111 St. Cyr, the stripner who looks like the Esquire gels,
is The Beachcomber's bait.. .There are 65 Treasury Agents casing
the Tropical Park track.
THtt IS rOUt fOKUM THt MADIES OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Th Mail Boi Is an open te-rom lot readers ot The Panama Amar-
icen Lattsrs ara received sretttully and ara handled in a wholly cee-
fidentiel mannar. ,
It rou contribu, a Mttar don't ee impatient it t> doesn't appear the
aaat day. Lett en ara published in the arder received
Please try te keep iht letfsn limitad te ene peae tenfth.
Identity of letter writers is held in itrlcNst confidence.
Thii newspaper otsumea no responsibility for statements er epinlans
exercised in letfsn Item feeders.
_ THOSE AWFUL MEN AGAIN
Mail Box Editor,
Dear Sir:
The other day you carried a letter in the Mail
Box about the hangers-on at the Cinco de Playo
Plaza, who always menancingly descend upon you
requesting to watch your car when you go into the
area in an effort to do some shopping along Central
Avenue.
The letter obviously brought some action, be-
cause a few days later a news item appea-ed stat-
ing that the Panama Police had promised to take
action against these rough-looking "car watchers."
I don't know how much action the police took,
but I do know that the men are still there, still ap-
pearing out of nowhere to "guide" you into mile-
wide parking spaces and still scaring people with
their request to "watch your car."
The area is so wide open to the public view
that one alert policeman to patrol the square could
offer enough protection to motorists to make the
.presence of these seedy-looking car watchers un-
necessary.
Scared Motorist.
Food Problem
Bigger Than
Iron Cursain
By BRUCE BIOSSAT
The free world and the Com-
munist realm are battling on
many fronts.
Listening to utterances from
leaders on both sides, you would
almost inevitably conclude that
the Issues between them are deep
and basic.
To a very substantial degree
they are, but there are also
times when a man from Mars,
viewing the cold war struggle
with full objectivity, could not
help but feel that the two great
adversaries were grappling on
a superficial leve idealing
with symptoms rather than
causes.
A review of the world's popu-
lation statistics would be likely to
put a celestial visitor In such a
mood.
Several European nations are
groaning under the steadily
greater weight of Increased pop-
ulation.
Asiatic countries, particularly
India, continue to add to their
teeming millions.
Even the United States looks
ahead to a sharply hlgherliuman
total In the next two or three
decades.
If statesmen were complete
realists, the cold war would end
tomorrow and in its place
would begin a gigantic joint
effort of East and West to solve
this problem of over-popula-
tion. For the swelling statistics
are a matter of grave import.
They are a cause, not a symp-
tom. They bring in their train
a thousand other difficulties.
A few years ago a controversial
debate arose In the United States
over this Issue.
William Vogt of the Pan-A-
merican Union In Washington
dramatized the problem In a book
called "The Road to Survival." It
painted a gloomy picture of ris-
ing populations set against
dwindling food supplies and oth-
er resources.
Guardians of the great dream
of a relentless progress to high-
er economic levels were stung in-
to bitter reply.
The men of Vogt's view were
denounced as crazy alarmists
who failed to understand
world's potentialities.
They're There, All Right
v'

Inside Labor
By VICTOR RIESEL
To cover the fast-breaking labor events day
by day often called for a sense of humor as
well as a sense of rumor. Many stories didn't
the1 hit the press but they provided many a laugh
I as the headlines were being made inside labor:
The a'rgument still rages. It' For months the nation's top newsmen had
may fairly be said that it 4s not tried to pry loose from Phil Murray's lieutenants
settied Itne Wisest secret of all what the million
It may also be said that the steel workers would demand this year for on
economic optimists, for all the that hinged the nation's labor peace,
vigor of their convictions, have Finally, it was Phil Murray himself who liter-
not yet answered satisfactorily ally, and unwittingly, piped it to the world
fnd to a few fatigued reporters who gave up
he chase and wandered into a coffee shop to
wait for the CIO leader to come out of closely
guarded policy neetinfl in gat Atlantic Otjr ho-
ome of the critical questions in-
volved.
They contend, for Instance,
that Important scientific ad-
vances will enable man to re-
plenish exhausted soils and
thus actually increase his food
potential. But they seldom
bother to point out that many
of these advanees, If not all,
are vastly more expensive to
introduce and develop than
was the simple task of drawing
nourishment from originally
rich top soils. ... .
Again and again, this cost
problem tends to be Ignored by
the anti-gloom economic think-
ers.
Even more crucially, they usu-
ally gloss over the fact that
where technical advance are In-
tel.
As the reporters sipped their coffee they were
suddenly startled to hear Phil's voice broadcast
the much-sought-after confidential data over
the Muzak loud speaker. .
Somehow-, Murray's off-the-record speech to
his policy committee had been picked up by the
Muzak system, which had become hooked up to
the steel workers' conference hall, Instead of
the music recording room.
The speech resounded all over the hotel. Re-
porters scribbled.
One of Murray's aides raced for an engineer.
Another Jumped to the piano and pounded mad-
ly to drown out the, chief's voice.
But by the time the engineer cut the im-
airm re promptu, and unscheduled, broadcast, the secret
^S&^^SS^-was out-ll a vf nior the newsmen-
dards for the existing popula-
tion. .
Most commonly, they are used
to provide a broader base to sup-
port more people at absolute
minimum levels.
In other words, the population
rises as the food supply permits
Obviously this affords no relief
whatsoever.
Lately the United Nations and
other world agencies have been ion feud with the Oliver Corp. In Charles City,
giving considerable attention to
population problems.
But It would be heartening to
see the issue lifted from the
backwaters of obscure commit-
tees and thrust Into the lime-
light where it belongs.
Strangest demand of the year came from the
CIO Packinghouse Workers who asked, along
with wage Increases, for a 15 pound ham as a
Christmas and Easter bonus; free lunches or $1
a man; seats for all who can alt while working
and two hours paid travel time to cover an hour
before and an hour after getting to the plant.
Nice work If you can get it.
Sf
Beastly labor relations developed during a un-
"The Two Margaret*
I Know"
Meet Princess Margaret
and Margaret Truman,
as America's most cele-
brated party hos tea* tails
all, in Collier's!
ELSA MAXWELL
letkaOat* HOW ON Sill
Collier's
Iowa.
'Instead of showing up for work, some 1400
members of the left-wing United Electrical
Workers suddenly heard about a black panther
and went out to hunt him. They couldn't
find him for days.
All the while, the union leader insisted that
beating the bushes for the black beast was a
'public service." The chase ended when the un-
ion contract was signed.
The panther is expected back at the contract's
expiration.
a a
Nor was that the strangest strike reported
this year.
The oddest, by far, was provoked deep in
darkest Liberia on a rubber-plantation. There,
providing native style Muzak, was a drummer
boy beating a tom-tom. The natives worked In
time to the rhythm booming through the trees.
One day a native lad was promoted to over-
seer. To impress the boss he slipped the drum-
mer some local currency to pound a little fast-
er.
After a few hours, the workers discovered that
they were whipping themselves into a frenzy.
They walked out on strike.
Back to the bush want the new foreman. And
the drummer boy hit his old lelsurelv pace. It's
all In the labor-relations record of the Liberlan
Republic.
a a
The good old U.8.A. was not wanting in
strange strikes of its own:
A foreman's criticism of religion was resented
by CIO Bethelehem Steel workers. They struck.
And the matter was thrashed out at a joint
labor-management conference.
Of a less serious nature were the stoppages
at an airplane factory where the men quit be-
cause, the floor was to hard; the walkout by
New York mechanics because the garage was too
cold, and an aircraft strike for time out In the
early morning for eoffee and doughnuts.
But everybody lived happily ever after es-
pecially at the Mutual Life Insurance Co. whose
efficiency men saved the company $130,000
worth of work-hours by launching an Operation
Coffee Klatsch.
The company simply had waitresses bring hi
coffee and pastry every morning between 9:18
and 10:30. It takes 10 waitresses, pushing 10
specially built aluminum wagons, with two stur-
dy male assistants, but it saves hours of time
consumed by hundreds of employes heading for
the local beanerjr.
a a a
There were strange picket line goings-on, too.
At Douglas Aircraft's big plant, struck by the
CIO Auto Workers for weeks, the union supplied
baby sitteri, free haircut*, shoeshlnes, paid rents
and set up television sets In strike head-quarters
so no one would miss the World Series.
There was food for the kids hamburgers,
hot dogs, stew, chile and music from a donat-
ed Juke box.

Hair today; gone tomorrow: The AFL Hat-
ters' Union Is campaigning to get more men
wearing hats. In Its drive the union makes the
bald statement that exposure of the head to the
rays of the sun Induces loss of hair. The union
officers quote Harvard Medical School doctors to
that effect.
Not only that, says the union, but not having
a hat on to hade your eye from. the aim also
affects the v^Bon,
Suggested slogan: "Wear a hat from morn
to night; keep your hair and save your sight."
Neuroses are Red: The Communist Party this
year sent a questionnaire to Its members asking
If they, or members of their families, have ever
been mentally ill. Purpose was to weed out the
unstable comrades who might crack under stress.
In commenting on this, one labor paper re-
marked: "If the Communist Party expels all
those members from its ranks who are -mental-
ly unbalanced, the only ones left willlbe FBI
agents.'r
Semantics with a union label: When striking
teachers and custodial workers in the Berlitz
School of Languages struck some months ago
they carried picket signs in six languages, Eng-
lish. French, Spanish, German, Russian and
Italian.
In effect, the signs said, "This plaee is UN-
xair i x
a
Waiting for laughter. A Soviet diplomat met
a Swiss official at a reception.
Said the Red. "What's your position in the
Swiss government?". The Swiss replied, "I'm
Minuter of the Navy." The Russian chortled,
"That's funny. Switzerland has no Navy yet you
are Minister of the Navy."
"Well," squelched the astute Swiss, "It's not
nearly as funny as Russia having a Minister of
Justice."
a a
from India comes word of a Union of Princes
formed by th? deposed Oaekwar of Baroda to
"further former rulers." Sort of an Oriental Po-
litlcal Action Committee.
The CIO is really a mystery these days. A
whodunit novel, written by Bemlce Carey deals
with organizing activities by CIO In a mythical
California town.
Eight hundred auto workers in St. Catherines,
Ont., were laid off when a florist got an In-
junction against the plant where they worked,
charging that its fumes were killing his rare
orchids.
In Italy, during the filming of "Quo Vadis,"
Commie controlled theatrical unions performed
some creative bits of sabotage. When the di-
rector yelled "shoot" during a scene set In 20
B.C., several of the robed actors lifted their
arms and looked at their modern wrist-watches,
causing reshootlng at great loss of time and mo-
ney.
In another scene, a lion was to walk on be-
fore tne camera.
When the cue came. It was discovered that
the beast had "acciaentally" escaped and all of
the actors and technicians turned hunters, beat-
ing the country-side looking for Leo

Convicts in San Quentln are getting saws and
being taught how to use them. But don't ask
for the warden's dismissal. It is all part of a
rehabilitation course in meatcuttlng being spon-
sored by the AFL Butchers union.
Knives, saws and cleavers are standard equip-
ment in this unique, union-sponsored program
to teach the inmates a trade In preparation for
the day they are set free.
Coming In On A Wing And A Deer. Members
ot the AFL Air Line Pilots' Ass'n. knocked off a
couple of fast bucks in a weird experience at
Morristown. New Jersey.
Landing their DC-3 transport, at a local air-
port, they ran tato and killed two wild deer
which were loping across the runway.

Charged with Illegally obtaining unemploy-
Serrt benefits In Sunderland, England, where
ere is a rule against a man and his spouse
both working, William Mcoh had a unique de-
fense. Said he. "I didn't know my wife had a
lob."
He explained that although he and his wife
had been eating and living together, they
haven't spoken a word to each other for over a
year. How did he get the salt and pepper?
(Cory right 1951, Poet-Ball Syndicate, Inc.)
qUDAHY WSUfttiTOH)
MERRY-GO- RUHD
a
BMW MARION
aasaasBssaaasea
I
Drew Pearson says: A top-notch cttomey general could
stop government corruption; FDR occasionally "fixed"
a tax case; Tax-fixing is contagious in Truman Ad-
ministration.
(The following column in Drew Pearson's series on tax-
wire-pulling and government corruption deals with In- I
fluence Inside the Roosevelt Administration).
.v,,W,SH1NOT(r\N- It,hM frequently been possible, both la
Republican and Democratic Administra tic-ns, to escape {ax-fraud
prosecution If you are important enough and if you know the
right people.
Tne chief difference today Is that the Truman Administra-
tion has gone in for tax-fixing on a much broader and tewe*
scale. Even unimportant people pow can get, their taxes fixed
Several years ago, when Justice Tom Clark was attorney
general, he was informed by his U.S. attorney in Loe Aneles.
Charles H. Carr, that Charlie Chaplin, the famed comedian; had
a fealed income-tax Indictment hanging over his head ever Since
the Harding Administration. It had been kept secret and had
not been prosecuted.
Why the Republicans indicted, but failed to prosecute, U no
known.
Carr did not prosecute either, and later left the U.S. attor-
ney s office to become president of the Del Mar Racetrack, own-
ed in part by Joe Schenck, president of 20th Century-Fox.
Carr, while U.S. attorney, had been given the job of Inves-
tigating Schenck and certain other movie mogul/
And though Schenck eventually was convicted in New York,
Carr later wound up working for Schenck In Loi Angeles. The
other movie moguls were not prosecuted why, nobody knows.
It sometimes happens that cases ag.iinst men with Influence
lie dormant for years sometimes until the Statute of Limita-
tions expires.
For Instance, an FBI report on the bribe-taking of UB. Court
of Appeals Judge Martin T. Mantn, gathered dust in the Jus-
tice Department until forthright Frank Murphy became at-
torney general. He dusted off the files and sent Judge Mantn
to jail.
FDR'S RECORD
Incidentally, Joe Nunan, clerk to Judge Mantn, and later
Bob Hannegan's Commissioner of Internal Revenue, bobs up
from time to time In the background of the current Congres-
sional tax probe.
Frank Murphy's record in the Justice Department Illustrates
what President Truman could do If he appointed a courageous,
crusading attorney general such as Francis Blddle or Estes Ke-
fauver.
He would need no corruption committee or Judge Tom Mur-
phy If he made this one simple move.
A forthright attorney general makes all the difference when
It comes to corruption In government.
It also Illustrates what happened under FDR.
During the Roosevelt administration It was almost Impos-
sible to fix a tax case unless it was done right at the top in
the White House.
In the Truman Administration the opposite Is true. While
Mr. Truman himself would never fix a case, taxes are fixed all
over the place, and by all sorts of people.
But under Roosevelt, nobody could get by eagle-eyed Henry
Morgenthau or crusading Frank Murphy with a fix, except FDR.
Some of the most important cases Roosevelt took a hand In
involved boss Frank McHale, Democratic National Committee-
man from Indiana, Brown and Root, the Texas contractors who
backed Lyndon Johnson; and Andrew Jackson Hlggins, the
Louisiana, boat builder.
"2ND LOUISIANA PURCHASE"
There was also the "Second Louisiana Purchase" when
Erosecutlon of certain top polticos was stopped dead In its tracks
y a phone call from the White House.
This occurred In 1940, after graft exposures by the Washing-
ton Merry-Oo-Round caused attorney general Frank Murphy to
prosecute Louisiana's Oov. Dick Leche, Democratic National Com.
mitteeman Seymour Weiss, President of Louisiana State College
J. Monroe Smith, Abe Shushan and various others.
Murphy, who loved to prosecute like a hound dog likes to
chase rabbits, was in full chase and determined to draw blood,
when something happened.
I first heard about it from the foreman of a Orand Jury In
New Orleans who told how John Rogge, assistant attorney gen-
era! in charge of the Justice Department'? criminal division, waa
summoned from the Jury room by a phone call from Washing-
ton
The Jury was considering a hot oil conspiracy case between
Mayor Robert Maestri of New Orleans and the late Bill Hells,
otherwise known as the Golden Oreen, and a. partner of Prankle
Costello.
When he came back from that Washington phone call, Rogge
told the grand jury that their work was over.
Curious, I asked Frank Murphy what had happened.
He admitted that he had called Rogge and Instructed him to
drop the case.
He had done this regretfully, he said, on orders from the
White House.
The President needed the support of the Louisiana delega-
tion to be renomlnated In Chicago.
Thus was consummated the "Second Louisiana Purchase.''
THE OLD BOAT BUILDER
The Andrew Jackson Hlggins case took place at the height
of Roosevelt's 1944 campaign for re-elec'4on.
Andy was chairman of the Businessmen for Roosevelt com-
mittee, and was slated to make an Important speech in Phila-
delphia introducing FDR to a big campaign crowd just two weeks
before election.
But the night before the speech Hlggins got word that Mor-
Renthsu's men had found him tax delinquent to the tune of
about SI .000,000.
At this point Andrew Jackson Hlggins'became Just as bel-
llgerant as the man for whom he was named. He served an ulti-
matum that instead of introducing the President next day he
would come out publicly for Dewey.
For one whole night before the Philadelphia'speech, Howard
Hunter, an assistant to Harry Hopkins, had to sit up holding
Hlggins' hand.
Finally Henry Morgenthau was persuaded to call off his men,
Higv-lns made his SDeech, then retained Hugh Fulton, counsel to
the Truman Committee and close friend of the new viee-presl-
dent.
In the end Hlggins was not prosecuted. He paid his taxes in
Installments.
These case* went against the grain of such men as Mor-
genthau and honest Harold Ickes.
However, there were not many of them, and since only a
few people very close to the White House knew about them, tax-
fixing did not become contagious.
In other words, lesser people down the line did not try to
get in on the act as literally hundreds of people from cabinet
members down to collectors and U.S. attorneys have done in
the Truman Administration.
Eat, drink too much?
Here are the facts on pleasant
Eno relief for overindulgence
Overindulgenet usually causes eacess
stomach arias, sad. any times, bowel tlug-
aMaaaa. Em jfeasj Ml Helps neutral
Momsch sdds sad restore an sciaVaHtalina
balance in your gastric tract. AND it eats
as a mild laxative, gently stimulating the
aliminatory pin teasel of the jasmins. It
providas, in th intestine, the liquid asadas!
to soften sad rubricate the stubborn v_
matter, and in this way allows ganda, ease1
varuation of the bowel.
Nearly verrn, at soma rime ot a alna;
overindulges a drink er feed- Bat taste's
no need to sugar iinnstsssarily or "sweat it
out." Keep Ene handy (
relief. At ell druggist*.
TAKE GOOD-TASTING ENO
-T"


>

\
't
MONDAY, DECEMBER 81, ltil
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
Rev. Nida, Famous Religious
Linguist To Visit RP Soon
The Rev Eugene A. Nlda, Ph.!the American Bible Society in
D Secretary for Versions of i this area.
the American Bible Society, to-l Dr. Nlda is one of the fore,
nether with Mis Nlda will ar-,mosi linguists in the United
gether with Ms^ ^ gunda 8tatefc Familiar with the more
That evening he will preach in commonly poten *W**g
ih. Ralboa Union Church. Dr. Nidas acute ear catenes
Jan ma-ks the opening of the fine differences In the
ssschUKbS ,round ""ft'S.'S'ff&fflsrS
n Mondav nlsht Dr Nlda'ty, and received his doctorate
n d veteranreoreaentatlve of U and co-director of tne Sum-
D. P.. veteran representative 01 ^ In8titute of Linguistics now
located on the campus of the
Qacoiy on bridci
BY OSWALD JACOBY
V Written for NEA Service
- NOBTH (D) 14 *AQ ? AQ952 4X884
WEST EAST
7 4W1083
VQ10I48 VJ833
1 ? K1087 ? 6
> *10 8 *AQ97 SOUTH AK6842 VAX ? J4I 4WS1 Both sides vul.
North East Sooth West
!? Pan 1 Pass
1 2* Pass 2 N.T. Pass
IN.T. Pass Pass Pass
4, Opening leadV 4
What sort of temperament do
you have at the bridge table?
Do you take it for granted that
University of Oklahoma. In this
work, Nida Is engaged In tech-
!ing missionaries and mission -
jary candidates the fundamental
I principles of linguistic analysis
and the procedures ior trans-
lating the Bible into the vari-
ous languages of the world".
During. the winter Dr. Nida
dedicates himself to research
writing and checking manu-
scripts of new translations. This
work is done on the field when-
ever possible, for it Is the pur-
pose of the American Bible
Society to publish the Scriptur-
es In the form of the native
language which speaks most ef-
fectively to the reader's soul.
Dr. and Mrs. Nida will be
coming here from Guatemala
where at Panajachel on Lake
Atitlan they will spend the
early days of January In ,con-
sultatlon with missionary lin-
guists of five missions. These
linguists are working in seven
distinct dialect groups among
Indians in Guatemala.
While In Panama Dr. Nida
will make his headquarters at
the Bible House in Old Cristo-
bal. This is the center of the
work of his society in Central
America.
Nlda will consult with Mr.
and Mrs. Alclblades Iglesias
working among the San Bias
Indians. He will -also confer
with the Rev. Ephraim Al-
phonse of Bocas del Toro. These,
and others, are engaged in
sTitrwUrbreak^reTy-well"^ Jg "* *"
you and that finesses will work? of Jal naPanama t h e
and'alf Ze^efoSsfdef ^^!W" will* go* toYfiS S
where they will direct the work
of a committee of Professors in
theological seminaries in vari-
ous parts of Latin America who
are revising the Valera Ver-
sion of the Spanish Bible.
Men of this committee will
come from Mexico, Cuba, Co-
lombia. Venezuela, Argentina
and Chile. This will be the sec-
ond session of this committee
the first having been held In
San Jos, Costa Rica in the
months of January and Feb-
ruary 1951.
Dr. Nlda Is the author of a
number of books on translation,
"Linguistic Interludes," publsh-
ed by the Summer Institute of
Linguistics; "Morphology," from
the press of the University of
Michigan and "Bible Transla-
tion," published In 1947 by the
American Bible Society.
VERAR
At the risk of sounding like a
Boy Scout. I must point out that
the beat style at bridge is to hope
for the best but to be prepared
for the worst. With that in mind,
how would you play the hand
shown today?
When the hand actually came
along In a rubber bridge game at
the Mayfair Bridge club In New
York recently, declarer wa a
friendly optimistic sort of fellow.
This was not the hand for his
temperament.
He won the opening heart lead
with the king, finessed the queen
of diamonds, and then laid down
the ace of diamonds from the
dummy. East discarded a club,
and South saw that there was
very little future in diamonds.
After some thought, and per-
haps a twinge of regret, declarer
laid down the ace and queen of
spades from the dummy and re-N
turned to his hand with the ace
of hearts to cash the king of
spades. All would have been well
If spades had broken 3-3. but
this also failed. South couldn't
get another trick if he stood ort
his head, so the opponents cheer-
fully scored 200 points.
South could have made his
contract, of course, as you've
Srobably noticed. Do you see
ow?
Explosion Rocks
Ordnance Works;
1 Dead, 1 Injured
NEWPORT, Ind., Dec. 31
(UP) One workman was kil-
led and another critically in-
jured today when an explosion
shook the Wabash River Ord-
nance Works, part of which la
, leased by the U. 8. Atomic
South wins the first trick with' Energy Commission,
the king of hearts and success-1 Cause of the blast waa not
fully finesses the queen of dla- determined immediately, but
monds. Then he should cash the officials said It occured In a
ace and queen of spades. Next
he leads a low diamond from the
dummy and puts up the Jack
from his own hand.
If West takes the trick. South
regains the lead with the ace of
hearts (whether or not the de-
fenders take two clubs in the
meantime), cashes the king of
spades, and then finesses through
West's ten of diamonds to make
the rest of dummy's long suit.
South makes three spades, two
nltrator house on one of the
explosive manufacturing lines
at the works.
Lt. Col. Richard H; Peter,
Commanding Officer of the
Works, declined to say whether
the explosion occurred In
grounds leased to the ABC or
the part which Is operated by
the Liberty Gunpowder Co.
However, the designation of a
nltrator house appeared to lim-
it the blast to an area of con-
ventional explosive manufact-
hearts. and four diamonds.
If West refuses the Jack of dla- ure.
monds (to shut out dummy's-------------------------
suit). South lays down the king WORST FAMINE
of spades and gives East a spade One of history's worst famines
trick. South still has the ace of occurred in 1771). in Bengal India,
hearts as entry to his last spade, when a third of the population
He makes four spades, two i of 10.000.000 perished, according
hearts, and three dlailAds. I to the Encyclopedia Britannica.
RENT
All or part of 2300 sq. feet of air con-
ditioned, well lighted space suitable for
showrooms, offices, etc., with 2000 sq.
feet warehouse space adjoining, in central
location on Va Espaa. Ample parking
space.
I
Apply HASMO, S.A.
51 Via Espaa Tel. 3-3022
or
SMOOT b PAREDES
Tel. 2-0600
THEY'RE OFF AND RUNNING!Those are plastic nags, destined to spend their days galloping
around the outer fringes of a merry-go-round, spurred on by hard-riding juvenile cowpokes. Right
now, with the aid of an automatic conveyor, they're thundering off a DC-4 Cargoliner In Chicago.
They flew there in a herd of 260 from the factory in Cleveland, C where they were foaled.


AT THE ATLAS GARDEN
On the evening of December the 31st there will be a minimum charge
of $3.50 per person for food and drinks. Noise-makers free.
Make your reservations now. Tel. 2-2423.
CARLOS BOZA & HIS ORCHESTRA
EVERY SUNDAY FROM Tlt30 A.M. TO 2 P.M.
Enjoy curb service around dance floor.

The world waits in eagerness ... for
the sound of the midnight bells which
will peal out the Old Year ... and
ring in the New.
With the blowing of horns, gay danc-
ing and mecry-making, and hilarious
celebration that always accompany the
birth of a New Year...there will also
be a note of solemnity, as we make
our resolutions for more worthwhile
future living, and our hearts arc filled
v-ithahopcthat the comingyear will be
happier than any we have known before.
It is a wonderful chance the New Year
offers us, to start afresh. Tomorrow,
it will deliver to everyone three hun-
dred and sixty-five gift packages of the
world's most precious clementTIME.
These will be ours to open, one a day,
and do with as we wish. We can throw
them away...or we can use them wisely,
and help make a better world for all.
The house of Sears, Roebuck and Com-
pany sincerely hopes that our Year of
Time, Nineteen Hundred and Forty-
Seven, A.D., will bestow, on all man-
kind, blessings in abundance and
wishes you all a PROSPEROUS AND
HAPPY NEW YEAR I
REPRESENTATIVES POR
Opposite Ancon Pott Office, Panam City
Ne. 1 Throll Arenne
O
EARS, ROEBUCK ANO CO*
7tM Tenth St.. Colon
Next U St. Joseph's School
>f


r-
PAGE FOUB
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
.MONDAY, DECEMBER SI, I
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
, TERRY-
ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great. White Fleet
Arrives
vgw Orleans Service___________________Cristobal
S.S. Iriona ....................................Jan. S
S.S. Fiador Knot ..............................Jan. 12
S.S. Chiriqui ..................................Jan. 15
S.S. Levers Bend ..............................Jan. 26
Handling Refrigerated (hilled and Genera Cargo
Arrives
New York Service ______________________Cristbal
S.S. tape Avinof ..............................Jan. 6
h.S. Comayagua ...............................Jan. 8
S.S. Quirigua ..................................Jan. 12
S.S. Cape Coil ................................Jan. 13
S.S. Heredia ...................................Jan. 15
i mill I M SAILINGS mo.M CRISTOBAL TO WEST COAST
CENTRA! AMERICA
Cristobal to New Orleans via Sails from
Tela, Honduras__________________________Cristobal
S.S. Chiriqui.....(Passenger Service Only).....Jan. 15
S.S. Chiriqui ..................................Jan. 29
CRISTOBAL 2121
TELEPHONES:
PANAMA 2-2804
COLON 20
Marsupial
Answer to Previous Puzzle
HORIZONTAL 5 Eras
1 Depicted 6 Canvas shelter
marsupial J Surety
7 It lives in a 8 Soviet river
____ Of the thing
10 Steal
11 Palm leaf
12 Marry
17 Symbol for
tellurium
19 Gaelic
FOR A QUICK TRIP OR A GRAND TOUR
let our expert travel department
SAVE YOU TIME AND TROUBLE
by preparing your next trip for
you at NO EXTRA COST!
-3 L St.
DeLesseps Park
V
OYD OTHERS. INC
Tel. 2-2098
Family Wanders Forlornly TATTLE-TALE FIGURES

While Work Awaits Them
-----o
. POTTSTOWN. Pa.. Dec 31
(UP A discouraged mother
and father and their two small
children are trudging along
some eastern Pennsylvania high-
way today unaware that they are
leaving behind the help they
walked 1.400 miles to find.
A home and, a Io'j on a farm
await the homeless "walking
Murphys" when authorities lo-
cate them.
The family also has promises
of financial help to tide them
over the misfortunes which have
plagued them since they lost all
their worldly possessions in the
Kansas floods last fall.
The plight of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Murphy and their chil-
dren, Jean. 4. and Robert 2, came
to liRht when a housewife at
nearby Trappe. Pa.. saw them
walking wearily along a high-
way yesterday.
The tall, thin father carried
the little boy. Jean walked by her
mother. Two battered suitcases
held all their belongings.
Mrs.J. Warren Poley. Jr.,
stopped to talk to the Murphys.
The destitute parents told her
they had walked from Topeka.
Kans. to Philadelphia, in the
hope of finding a home with
I Mrs. Murphy's mother. The trek
'took 44 days.
When their relatives were un-
;able to help them, the Murphys
decided to return to Kansas
'still walking.
i .Mrs. Polcy took them 'home
and gave them a belated Christ-
mas" turkey dinner. Then, She
said, the Murphys Insisted on
leaving, saying, they wanted a
"job and home" but didn't seek
charity.
The housewife reported their
visit to authorities, and a Potts-
town radio station broadcast a
story about the wanderers. Offers
began to come In from sympa-
thetic listeners.
Raymond P. Kulp, 38, a farmer
who lives in Pennsburg, prompt-
ly offered a job for the fattier
and four rooms of his eight-
room house as a home for the
Murphy family.
"We know the let-down, dis-
couraged feeling the family is
experiencing and we want to
help them," said Kulp. "Our barn
burned down last July and two
of our cows were killed. We know
how they feel."
IS Citrus fruit
14 Interstice
15 Seine
18 Abstract
beings
18 Wicked
10 Feminine
appellation
21 Impair
23 Decay
28 Deep holes
27 Child's bed
29 JUlian city
30 Compass point
31 Peer Gynt's
mother
32 Window glass
33 Trial
33 Passage in the
brain
38 Female saint
(b.)
37Brythonicgod
of these*
38 Lift
44 Self esteem
47 Papal cape
48 Wine vessel
51 Motive
S3 Barters
S3 Hit
58 Strong
vegetables
" VERTICAL
lWas victorious
2 Native metal
3 Entangle
4 Baron (ab.)
32 Heap 48 Obtain
20 Part of a circle 34 Golf device 48 Rowing
21 Feels loss 3B Appear implement
22 Endorse 40 Sea eagle 48 Bustle
24 Decorated 41 It goes (music) 49 Males
25 Tinsmith 43 Singing voice SO Onager
26 Irish fuel 3 Gull-like bird S3 Yes (Sp.)
28 Malt drink 44 Bitter vetch 34 Sloth
B6CASB I IVISHRP TO\AHP FOR A UTTLBr WHILfi, WWSAl I ARMS
SR A WOMAN ItfSTSMP 4. THR Y4NKS&6 CrUH, I F6LT AS. AMY OTH**]
L0~ A PISCIPUNSr- ROBOT, 1 WOMAN MV9T WHO HAS A MAH TO STAMP
lAIVCOLONRL.
FRECKLES AND BIS FRIENDS
It's Magic
BY MERRILL BLOSSER
TWENTY BUCKS.'\M)oW?
WHO SAYS A ROLUNO
Pife
jgsw/Fw

ALLEY OOP
How Santa Knows
BY T. T. IIA ML IN



A true story
with mony
happy endings!

i THE PANAMA AMELAN sold
2839 classified ads compared to
2253 classifieds in all othsr dailies
combined in the city!

\


586 MORE
* -
CIlRis WELKEN. Planeteer
THI5 IRTER5TELL4K MUtMK ~3
WORK* BV TBLEPATHV,lVtlA,
ANy STYLE HAIRCUT DBIRED
OV TME PERSON WUO OPER-
Off With the Wig
BE RL'SS WINTERBOTHAM
PIM.-iCILLA'S POP
Asks the Man Who Owns One
BE AL VERMEER
BOOTS AND HER BIDDIES
Unconvinced
BY EDGAR MARTIN
DOSW ,STOV
WORRY
HS.VP ,
M\r5 906'.
C* COOfetV ti&S MONfcV-VUNOfcO!
but tv\Nt' no c~wv.\~% awn
"t-Wfc VOPM V. V& '.HV CM**T Wt\S
iV.MX>.*rTOl KYL.IMKVY? v f\
V^, PRLTW O0G60NRJ.0 .------.
~fc U PR>v\w>.\.t Him'. I
VOHtWt
"O ? J
Mfci
CAPTAIN EASY
Open Up
BE LESLIE TURNER
JARY
INDIGNATION
GROWS WITH EACH
RILE THAT DRAW*
HIM NEARER.
JANET TOWS.
VIC FLINT
It's Rinda Complex
BE MICHAEL O'MALLEY
TRY TRANSflO^IN' ALL CA AWT"'
FRBQUENTLY POPULAR ^MABCLil
TO *E-, WHATEVER VttT /WB,
AND REVOCR DA PO0r~ r/ MEAN BXPRX--
JP' r-
DOMS3 ONt \ ^
RAVOR^AAR. I__
*xPorr~i
ABAM BXF
SHAODUPf
BOGS BUNNY

Got Anything Else?
SHKLP rTATRR, ^>/\f *&& $. 9
Ha "ir~.tr >^-
gSfiJ wt-
Hffi
J&vOfci
MAJOR BOOPLE OUT OCR WAV
I

K. WILLIAMS
gj.





MONDAY, DECEMBER SI, 1831
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
page mn

ft
\\

f^acific S^ocie
tlA *
Bo. 17, &&. V.L &&~ 352t
PRESIDENT AROSEMENA '
TO GIVE RECEPTION NEW YEAR'S DAY
His Excellency, the President of the Republic of Panama,
Don Alcibiades Arose mena will receive high officials of Pa-
nama and the Canal Zone, the Members of the Diplomatic
Corps and the Consular Corpa accredited to Panama on New
Year's Day at the Presidencia from 11 a.m. to IS noon.
at present visiting her son and
daughter-in-law. Mr. and Mrs.
Burn- Ralph H. Kirkpatrick of New
Representatives Leave
On "Panama"
The Honorable M. G.
side and Mrs. Burnslde, James I.Cristobal.
Dolliver and Mrs. DolUver and|
the Honorable Hubert B. Scud- Open House Honors
der and Mrs. Scudder sailed Fri-
day morning' aboard the 8.S.
Panama for New York, after a
visit of four days on the Isthmus.
New Jersey Congressman
And Family Arrive Here
The Honorable Gordon Can-
field and Mrs. Canfleld and
their two sons arrived today a-
board the 8.S. Cristobal from
New York for a visit on the
Isthmus.
Arriving; on the same ship
were Mr. Karl R. Bendetsen, the
Assistant Secretary of the Army
and the Chairman of the Board
Of the Panama Canal Company,:of Bangor, Maine, who arrived
accompanied by Mrs. BendetsenIrecently to spend the holidays on
Visitors
Ope nHouse was held on Thurs-
day evening by Mr. and 'Mrs.
Leslie Beauchamp at their home
in Balboa in honor of their
house guest. Miss Wanda Hud-
son. Miami. Florida and of Miss
Marlon Gagnon, of Bangor.
Maine, who is visiting her uncle
and aunt Mr. and Mrs. Prank
Violettc of Bella Vista.
Violettes Entertain
for House GnesU
In honor of their house guests,
Mrs. Marie Gagner and her
daughter. Miss Marion Gagnon.
and Mr. Peter Beasley, Special
Consultant to the Assistant Sec-
retary of the Army.
Sos'-C '"edding
To be Thursday
Invitation nave been issued
for the marriage of Miss Marura
Sosa, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Jose A. Sosa J., to Mr. Manuel
Jose Cucaln, Jr., son of Mr. and
Mrs: Manuel Jose Cucaln, to be
solemnized Thursday evening at
eight p.m. at Cristo Rey Church
in Vista del Mar.
Cbiarl-Arango Engagement
Announced
The announcement of the en-
gagement of Miss Dora Estela
Ohlari. daughter of Dr. and Mrs
Rodolfo E. Chlari. to Mr. Jose
Agustn 'Arango, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Bellsario Arango. was made
on Christmas eve at Dr. and
Mrs. Chiari's residence.
the Isthmus,Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Violette entertained twenty
guests on.a boat trip Thursday
to Taboga and the Otoque Is-
lands.
California Visitor
is 'aored
Mr. and Mrs. George Dilfer of
Las Cumbres, entertained fifty
guests at a cocktail supper party
given Friday evening at their
home In honor of Mr. Dilfer's
mother. M's. Flora Dilfer. of
Beverly Hills'. C-lifornia, v op'-
rivpd recently for a few weeks
visit.
Flatau. Bobby Jo Oglesby, Diana
Brown, Rosle Hollander, Greta
Navarro. Adele Meissner. Beth
Hatchett, Marilyn Abrue. Barba-
ra Mundt. Sue Curdts, Josie Dl-
Bella, Gloria Morton and Merlene
Jeppsen.
Installation of Fern Leaf
Chapter Officers on Saturday
The Installation of Officers for i
1952 of the Fern Leaf Chapter No.
4. Order of the Eastern Star will
be held Jan. 5. at 7:30 p.m. at the
Pedro Miguel Lodge Hall.
Those to be installed on this
occasion are Betty Crawfo* d as
Worthy Matron; John Muller as
Worthy Patron; Helen Myers as
Associate Matron; Harry Shan-
non as Associate Patron; Letitia
Schnake as Secretary; Marie
Curies as Treasurer; Melba Fox
as Conductress; Charlotte Dailey
as Associate Conductress; Betty
Muller as Chaplain; Betty Ma-
lone as Marshal; Georgia How-
ard as Organist; Ann Eckhoff as
Adah: Marjprie Bain as Ruth:
Etta Fay Terrell as Esther; Veta
Hatchett as Martha; Mary Kate
Underwood as Electa; Bernlce
Fullmore as Warder and Mavls
Compto nas Sentinel.
Morning Guild to Meet Friday
The Morning Guild of the Ca-
thedral of 8t. Luke, In Ancon,
will meet on Friday at 8:30 a.m.
at the home of Mrs. H. L. Bach
of 0821 Plank Street In Balboa.
'Happy New Year9 May Be
World's Oldest Greeting
Mr. Nolan Celebra t:s Birthday
Mr. Louis C. Nolan, the Econo-
mic Attache of the United 8tates
Embassy and Mrs. Nolan, were
ho'ts to a small group of friends
FrHav evening at their home on J Mrs. Alberto de Obarrlo.
Golf Heights at a party given in |
Mrs. Harry A. Comley of An-
con. entertained a group of
friends recentl" at a bridge lun-
cheon eiven at he home in hon-
or of Mrs. Flora DMfr, who Is a
visitor on the Isthmus.
'"is* Simmons
Hostess for Buffet Supper
Miss Rita Simmons was hostess
to a group of her friends on Fri-
day event-is; with a buffet stipier
*lven at the Golf Height's home
of her uncle and aunt. Mr. and
celebration of Mr. Nolan's birth-
day anniversary.
Buffet Smnner
Honors Isthmian Visitors
Mrs. William Gardner, of Los
Angeles. California, who is visit-
ing her son-in-law and daughter. |^in be held by the club on New
the United States Vice-Consul year's Day.
and Mrs. Anthony Starcevlc; and
Union Club
to HM Gala Ball
; A Gala New Year's Eve Pall
will be held by the Union Club
fo* members and their families.
The traditional Ewg-^o- party
for members aT"i their families
Colonel and Mrs. i Albert M.
Chlpman, of Matthew. Virginia,
who are visiting their son-in-
law and daughter. Mr. and Mrs.
Mi.ss Arlene MrSeown
Arrives for Visit
Miss Arlene McKeown of Haw-
thorne, New York, arrived today
Euiene C. McGrath, of El Coco on the Isthmus to visit her mo-
del Mar, were the honored gueststher, Mrs. Helen McKeown of
at a buffet supper given Friday Balboa and her brother, Tommy,
evening by the Attache to the
United States Embassy and Mrs
Robert J. Bryant at their home
atPaitilla.
Mn. Kirkpatrick
"At Home" to Friends
Mrs. Ralph Z. Kirkpatrick. of
Rochester. New York, was "at
home" to her friends yesterday
afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Geo.
E. Matthew on Balboa Heights.
Mrs. Kirkpatrick Is a former
resident of the Canal Zone and is
Mariners of Ship 17
Make Trip on "Se-horse"
The members of the Mariner
Ship No. 17 of Balboa, were the
Tuesta on Friday of Mr. B. M.
Parker of Cristobal, on a trip up
the Chagres River aboard his
craft, the "Seahorse."
The. group Included Miss Mary
Patton. the Girl Scout Director,
Mrs. Vada Pence, the Skipper
Mariner of Ship 17 and Pat
Smith. Nancy .Oswald, Judy
Brinkley, Allana Lewis, Betty
1952 brings you
new styles in furniture
all GUARANTEED
Yours-----$55.00 down
Always ask for a
GUARANTEED CERTIFICATE
to buy Mahogany furniture.
CASH CREDIT CLUB
The best Mahogany Native Furniture
wit1' a vear'n guarantee at best prices.
FURN1
:NTRALAVE.*t2JtE.ST. PHONES: 2-1830
& 2-1833
New Year's Eve Party
Tonight at Legion Club
American Legion Post No. 1,
will hold a gala New Year's Eve
celebration tonight at the Legion
Club at Fort Amador. Noisemak-
ers, streamers, confetti and fan- j
cv hat* will add to the gay time'
planned, One of the best dance ]
orchestras on the Isthmus will be,
on ham dto furnish music for the
affair. Admission is free.
Hotel El Panama to HoH
Celebration New Year' Eve
New Year's Eve will be cele-
barted In the patio of the Hotel
El Panama with festivities begin-
ning at 9:00 tonight and eontin-
utaa until dawn. Dance music
will be furnished by Carlos Ochoa
and his orchestra alternating
'vith Joseph Sudy and his orches-
tra The evening's entertain-
ment will Include a dinner at
twelve midnight, a floorshow at
1:00 a.m. and breakfast at 3:00
a.m. Admission price is $2.
SCIENCE BRIEFS
A midget version of the
sounding equipment used by
commercial fishing boats to
locate underwater fish soon
win be avllenle to pleasure
boat anglers. Like Its big bro-
ther, it sends high frequency
sound waves lrom the boat to
the bottom of the ocean. It re-
ceives and records the reflect-
ed sound waves.
Helicopters have come Into
ie in forestry to spot forest
fires.
Corrosion, including rusting
is being measured as it takes
place by a method that picks
up the minute electrical cur-
rents created by the chemical
reaction, enabling scientists to
measure and study the process.
A "pinch" of arsenic added
to lead alloys used to cover
underground cables carrying
electric power gives longer Ufe
and greater strength to the
alloy. It also permits r 'ier
electrical loada because 1 'ier
Dressure can be used for the
insulating oil within them.
Cooking utensils made en
tlrely of stainless steel tend to
become too hot In spots, so
heat must be kept low to pre-
vent burning food in top-of-
stove pans.
Good soil management means
the efficient production of qua-
lity crops along with continued
improvement In soil productiv-
ity.
A new spirit duplicator, de-
veloped by the Army for pro-
ducing multi-colored maps and
sketches In the field. Is hand
operated and able to print four
colors on paper 22 by 29 inches
in size. Alcohol Is the dampen-
ing medium to transfer the
image from master copy to
copy paper.
WASHINGTON, D. C. Dec 31.
"Happy Wew Year," said In
one way or another, is prob-
ably the world's oldest and
most universal holiday greet-
ing.
The coming of the new year
has been marked and celebrat-
ed since prehistoric time. It
has not always been January
1, however, and even now ma-
ny peoples celebrate some other
date as New Year's Day, ays
the National iSociety.
January 1, in fact, is an ar-
bitrary date set by the Romans
before Julius Caesar established
the calendar that Is the baaU
for the date used in most West-
ern countries. January l, In an-
cient Rome, marked the day
that consuls and other officials
took office, and until Caesar set
things straight It was some-
times Juggled considerably for
the political benefit of one of-
ficeholder or another.
An error In Caesar's calcu-
lation (36514 days), however,
allowed January l to creep a-
way from its original ^astrono-
mical place, and by 1582 when
Pope Gregory XIII instituted
the reformed Julian calendar in
use today, spring's first day
had gained 14 days on the stars.
Gregory in 1582 ordained that
October 4 be followed by Oc-
tober 15, thus adjusting the
calendar to A.D. 3255, the year
of the 'Church Council of NI-
cea.
The Gregorian correction of
the Julian calendar is close to
mathematical accuracy. It
makes allowance for the fact
that a year Is about 11 min-
utes less than 365' \ days long
by not only inserting leap years
such as 1952 every four
years, but also by omitting
"leap days" in the even cen-
tury years divisible by 400, such
as 1600. 2000, 2400, etc.
Practical as it is, the Gre-
gorian calendar gained slow
acceptance. The British Em-
pire, Including its American
colony, did not adopt it until
1752. Young George Washing-
ton had turned 2* on Febru-
ary 11, 1752, had to wait un-
til February 22, 1753 to at-
tain his majority.
Calendar reforms are fre-
quently proposed. The Grego-
rian calendar Is so widely used,
however, that even the Chinese,
who celebrate their next New
Year in February, have in re-
cent decades recognized Jan-
uary l for business and govern-
mental purposes.
The Jewish New Year in 1952
will begin at sunset September
19, and the Mohammedan year
starts Just 24 hours later. In
both cases the celebration is
largely religious.
A change of the Western
World's Gregorian New Year's
day would Involve considerable
difficulty. Race horses would
change their birthday, because
they always add a year on
January 1. Accounts and tax
collectors would have to reshuf-
fle their fiscal calculations;
schools would lose the con-
venient Christmas-New Year
vacation schedule, and greeting
card makers would have to re-
vise the plates saying "Merry
Christmas and Happy New
Year."
Celebrations probably would
remain the same regardless of
the day. New Year's Day Is
celebrated all over the world.
no matter whether It Is Jan-
uary 1, September 19 or the
vernal equinox. All religions
observe the start of a new year
with prayer and services.
RUTH MILLETT Says
tions and quit envying other.lty and that is something an
women. awful lot of women lack. So you'll
At least then you'll gain seren-lhave something rate right thera
News Item with, of course, a
Hollywood date line: "The most
beautiful woman in America is
not a single female but a com-
posite of 13 lovely ladies, the Na-
tional Portrait Photographers
Association has decided."
The story goes on to say that
this "most beautiful" woman is
a combination of one woman's
legs, another's smile another's
waistline and so forth.
Kind of silly, isn't It? But no
sillier than for a woman to take
the same unrealistic attitude
toward her, own looks, forever
wishing she had another wom-
an's figure or eyes or hair or
whatnot.
And yet there's a stronn ten-
dency in women to go around
comparing their looks with oth-
er women's and being unhappy
because they dont have this or
that asset.
No woman except the figment
of the combined Imaginations of
a bunch of photographers or a
press agent has perfect beauty.
And if such a being ever exist-
ed, who knows but that so much
perfection might be boring?
It's our flaws as much as our
perfections that give us indi-
viduality.
So stop worrying about that
feature that isn't just as you'd
Uke it to be.
You're you because you are
just as you are. You may not
have another woman's particular
appeal, but she doesn't have
yours, either.
Which Is all by way of say-
ing that the smart thing to do
is to make the most of your as-
sets, forget about your imperfec-
'

MADURITO'S
will remain closed during Jan. 2nd
and 3rd for inventory
PANAMA COLON

"- r*^._
ElDiablo
SIMMONS SPRINGS & MATTRESSES
ihe Store Where You Will Find the Largest Assortment
of Glass and Linoleum.
86 Central Avenue Telephone 2-2465
"Leaders in the furniture business since 1909"

m
3*>
Ei!
PANAMA'S WML
(Xt^uwClub
TO CELEBRATE OUR FIRST BIG ANNIVERSARY
WE'RE GOING TO PITCH A GREAT BIG
NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY
No Cover
No Minimum
No Admission Charge.
Plenty of Horn Noiae-Makera Paper Hats
Serpentine Favors
DANCING ENTERTAINMENT
No Reservations Necessary.
Drop in We'll do our bast to take cara of you.
VISIT OUR
, ZEBRA
N LOUNGE
KENNY ADAMS
at the piano
We'll be open till dawn
HETOQ D0WNC mana
% Oh*
^MauuU
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bldg.) Balboa
NOW... Years Old!
But No Increase
IN PRICE
You'll enjoy Seagram's V.O.
Canadian Whisky even more now
that it is 6 years old! Honoured
the world over, Seagram's V.O.
is the lightest, cleanest tasting
whisky you hsve ever enjoyed.
Try it. it's aged longer.
f/kwrtwtVMf VMM *y
COMPAA CYRNOS. J. A.
Seagram'sVO.
CANADIAN WHISKY
npbell's Vegetable Soup is a great family favorite. Into a
rich, invigorating beef stock go luscious tomatoes, green peas,
lima beans, crisp carrots, sweet golden corn, and many more
garden-fresh vegetables, each one contributing its own special,
tempting flavor. That's why Campbell's Vegetable Soup is so
deeply nourishing...grand eating for all the family at any meal...
BECAUSE IT IS

mea/ in iteelf

VEGETABLE SOUP

ONDENSED FOR GREATER VALUE lOOK FOR THE RED AND WHITE lABll
wm
m



'
PAGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
MODAT,~DECMBER Sl'lfsl
Proposed US Steel, Aluminum
Strikes Pose Serious Threat
SIDE OUNCES
LEWIS SERVICE
lie. 4 TtvoH Ave
H -SI1
KIOSK O DE LES8EP8
put* *> teats**
FOR SALE
Household
Two bicycles, shack obsorber. 26" I
I beys. I girls, excellent condi- .
tion. $25.00 eoch. 718-B. P'fldo .
Balboa. _____ I
see) he. eWaJuet
Writ* AkabeNre Amiimi
> 2011 Aeeee. C. Z.

FOR SALE: Set of
wide porch, duplex.
Apt. A. Gomboo.
Louvers for
House 130
FOR SALE
Miscellstneon
FOR SALE
Automobile*
FOR SALE:Man's su.t size 37 rt-j
guiar. $15.00. Mon's dress suit
sue 37 regular, $15.00. Tel. 2-
1630 Balboa.
Service Personnel and
Civilian Government Employes
r I N A N C I
your new or used car through
GOVIRNMINT EMPLOYES FINANCE
CO.
Fort Worth, Texos.
RESORTS
Williams Santa Clora Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frgida i res, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE:One West.rghouse 25
evele Ice Box, 9 cubic Ft. Good
rendition, ether household ortic'e:
Metiler 625-X Ancon Blvd. Tel AQUARISTS: Neon Tetra $2.80 pr
2-3116.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
shores Cervecera
/.ANTED: 100
Nocional stock. C. L. Pierce. Box FQR SALE:24-gal. Garbage Cons
182. Ancon. C. Z. Tel. 4-1/4. | wj(h covtrs meetng sanitary regu-
vVANTEC: Reward $10A fur-: 83 North Ave. (Phone 2-06101.
n :hed apartment for young
pie. Msdi-'Hv rr-iroved.
3222 or 85-2237.
Serving Government Employes ond
Service Personnel in the Canal Zone
I for 14 years. With our financing
your insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. coi eroga.
Glowlite. $2.00 pr. Chilodus Punc-iagKANGIMINTS f^N Bl MADi
talus Iheodstondersi $275 P' THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
Tlecostorrnis $1.00 eo. Plants. 5| DEALER
varieties. Feeding rings. ACUARIO;---------------------------------------------------------
TROPICAL. 11 Vio Espaa, oppos- '951 Packard. 4-door, radio, leather.
ite JUAN FRANCO STABLES I WSW. I'll take trade-in. prefer
Phone 3-4132.
Gramlkh's Sonto Cloro beach-
cottages. Electric lea ooxes. gos
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Phillip. Oceonsid cottages, Santo
Clara. Box 435 Balboa: Phono
Panamo 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
convertible. Good' price for Pan-
ama or Zone. No. 36 Franciscb
de la Ossa, Apartment 3, Ponama
cou-
Call 87-
Ictions. ALMACENES MARTINI,
Also 3 Martin Soso St. * 1424).
Help Wanted
VVANTED: Reliable, oil around
English and Span.sh speaking
maid. Week-end at beach. 8268
Empire Street. Bolboa.
ST b FOUND
'.OST OR STOLENA B. F. Goodrich _______
blue, girl's bcycle. $10.00 re- Triumph
w-rd. 3-2280.
FOR SALE:New Year's Eve, New
Year's Day Orchid Cartages avail-
able Meudrvs' Orchid Gardens.!
Cnstobcl 3-1033, doy-night de-!_
livery or moy be picked up At-iajn Mercury
lantic ond Pccific Sides. ^^
1*51 Ford Victoria (hard toa Ma
vertible1 rwa tana graea. Thii car
hast like new. Only 6000 miles,
drive it away. Oaly $725 dawn.
Your FORD DEALER. COLPAN
MOTORS INC.. an automobile
row Telephone 2-1033 2-1036
Paaanai.
FOR RENT
Houses
ALHAMRRA APARTMENTS. Soon
available chalet, five room duplex
with hot ond cold water, two
bathrooms, maid's room. Apply
immediately.
FOR RENT:Furnished concrete one
bedroom chalet, modern improve-
ment, in Arraijan. 8*-2 miles to
Ferry. Nome at entrance, John-
son.
It is actually cheaper
to buy a
P.r.l. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Besides Protection Against
Injury, they save many
limes their value in cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
6 peseeagar Coupe
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMRRA APARTMENTS
FOR SALE
Motorcycle*
leather uphelstery, Modern furnished unfurnished oport-
gaad (iros. Only 9000 miles. This monis. Maid service optional. Con-
car at a steel. Oaly $00 down.tact office 8061. IOth Street. New
and drive it away. Year FORD Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
DEALER, COLPAN MOTORS INC.,
en eutemeaile raw. Tel. 2-1033
2-1 OK. Pa
i.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Wfcer. 100.000 'eagle Meet
Presents
Motorcycle 650cc. lote
1951 model. Extras. $200 below
new mochme. Phone 2-1471 Bol- 1950 Stodabahar Ckaeaaien Sear-
boo, light Coupe Mack, gaad tiras, seat
cavers, a clean car. Oaly $465.
00 dawa aad drive it away. Yaari
FORD DEALIR. COLPAN MOTORS'
INC, aa autea.es.Jle raw. Tel. 2-
1033 2-1036 Panama.
FOR RENT
Rooms
US READY
(Continued fresal rage 1)
New
garian consulates in
York and Cleveland.
The consulate in New York
was mi, down Saturday.
Phones at the Celeveland con-
sulate went unanswered today,
but the Hungarian olliclais 1950 Ford Custom Tadar V-l light
were reported there packing, ,, $ww tires. This car la a
FOR SALE:Salvage 1937 Cor-!
bitt tank truck. Requires extensive
repairs. Will sell tor best offer.
The Texas Co. I Panama I Inc.
TeL 2-0620.
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, coa'
entirely renovated and wall fur-
nished. Rates reataaahla. Racha-;
lera only. Inquire at The Ame-
rican Club facing Do Leisep;
Park.
Todar, Mondar, Dec. SI
P.M.
3:30Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Sho w
4:30What's Your Favorite
the
and ready to be out by
midnight tonighi deadline.
The United States is con-
sidered almost certain to add
the case o the four filers to.
i is long list of evidence against.
Soviet satellites in Eastern Eu- FOR
with'
private bathroom and entrance I
Kitchen privilege. 43rd Street No.
13.
beauty. Only S485.00 own ad
it's years. Year FORD DIALER, --,,--
COLPAN MOTORS INC. a. a-
tomeba raw. Tat. 2-1013 2-
lOIt. Panama.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous-
6:00Happy the HunrbuRCia. rope accused of. violating the
Alfarof 8.A. "human rights" provisions in
8:15Evening Salon their peace treaties.
7:00Cavalcade of 1951 1UP1 There also have been strong
7:30Sports Review demands from Congressional
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan leaders for U. N. action.
SALE:1941 Plymouth Speool
DeLuxe Convertible, new top, new
tires. Tel. 3-3220.
two room suite
near Free Zone. Inquire Alham-
bra Aportments 8061-,. 10th Street
Telephone 1386. CoSJrt. *
8:00News and Commentary,
(VOA)
8:15Platter Parade "VOA)
8:45Labor World 1VOA1
9:00Story U.S.A. (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
1 VOA)
9:45 Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA 1
10:00The World at Your Win-
dow 'BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidniRhtSign Off
Tomorrow, Tuesday. Jan. 1
A 31.
6:00Sign On Alarm Clock from their relatives.
A chief V. S. complaint it
that the fliers were held In-
communicado without the
chance of talking to Am re-i-
on officials or of freely
choosing their own lawyers:
and that the United States
was not informed of their
captivity for two weeks.
In this connection, a State |
Department spokesman termed 1
"utter and complete nonsense"
a Hungarian charge today that
the U. 8. government knew the1
fliers had landed In Hungary,
but withheld the information
Sen. Paul H. Douglas
Lists Three Guards
Against Impropriety
LUX
VENETIAN
LINDS
Immediate
Delivery
Aluminum
Awnings
Different
Colors
$14.00
Industrias
Panamericanas
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29th Street
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Retel r> Pausa
Selling: Abattoir, Panam
Forest (preferred). Clay Pro*
duets, S. Fernando Clinic.
Tel. 3-471 3-1*80 *
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (UP)
Oovernment officials warn-
ed today that threatened walk-
outs in the steel, aluminum and
oil Industries pose a serious
threat to already-scarce sup-
plies of the vital metals next
year.
While voicing hope that the
contract disputes can be set-
tled without reaching the strike
stage, these officials said that
If walkouts do occur in any of
the three Industries, it will be
a 'serious threat" to the de-
fense effort.
They noted that even with
current relatively high metals
production It has been neces-
sary to order sharp cutbacks in'
most consume* durable goods
such as automobiles, refriger-
ators, ranges and TV sets.
The government will decide
Jan. 12 how much automobile
output will be cut this spring.
But officials already have said
the choice is between "autos
and ammunition" and the out-
come of the steel dispute could
have an important bearing on
their final decision.
Officials close to the situa-
tion hope a steel strike was
blocked when CIO president
Philip Murray agreed to hold
up a scheduled New Year's Day
walkout. A union convention
Jan. 3 is expected to support
Murray's action and let the dis-
pute go before the Wage Sta-
bilization Board.
While the Wage Board's re-
commendations would not be
binding, these officials believed
public opinion may force the
parties to agree on a settle-
ment. The union made 22 de-
mands, including an 18-1/2
cent-an-hour wage boost. In-
dustry wages now average a-
bout $2 an hour.
The aluminum workers al-
so members of Murray's union,
have threatened to strike a-
gainst Alcoa and Kaiser which
produce 50 percent of the na-
tion's aluminum. They were ex
pected to follow the pattern set
by the steel Industry.
In addition. 250,000 oil work-
ers in 17 unions have filed
blanket demands on 350 petro-
leum companies for a 25-cent
hourly wage increase.
Some 10,000 .
CIO oil workers recently broke: The special announcement
off talks with the Sinclair Re- j emphasized that the death toll
fining Co. and contracts with I represented "only about 6 per
other companies already have.cent of the POWs held by the
run out or will within the next United Nations Commands,''
few months. While none of the! and the- deaths resulted pri-
unions has threatened to strike, marily from the poor physical
this is labor's ultimate weapon, condition of the Red troops
By Calbraith
"When I invited them. I told them I was sure they couldn't
leave that pretty farm nestling in the snowbut hare
thay art!"

UN Reveals Number
Of Communist Dead
At Allied PW (amps
TOKYO, Dec. 31 (UP) The
United Nations command said
today that 6,600 Communist
prisoners have died in United
members of the'Nations Prisoner of War camps.
1949 Fore1 Tatar V-l dark Mae,
seat cavers, gaad tires. Oaly $395.
00 dawa. Your FORD DIALER,
COLPAN MOTORS INC.. ea eate-
moeile raw. Tal. 2-1033 2-
lOif. "aaasae.__________________
FOR SALE:Fordor 1942 Ford 1948; WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (UP)
eng.ne body upholstery good. Tires Sen. Paul H. Douglas lD-111.)
good duty po.d no_ spare. $400.-; recommended three steps today
to put an end to "Improprie-
ties" in the conduct of govern-
or
MODERN f URNITURE
cus ron'- BUU7T
Slipcover Reuphelstery
vtgrr ova SHOW-BOOM 1
astete Beeee
J r. a> l> Osu 77 (Aateaaobilf Raw)
free talantes tteksrp Delivery
TeL S-efXS K:te a.at. la 7:St a.sa.
Club
7:30Mornine Salon
8:15News (VOA 1
8:30Crazy Quilt
P.:Hawaiian Harmonies
9:00News
9:15"acred Heart Program
9:30 As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:".oPopular Music
1:00News
1:'5 Personality Parade
1:45Rhvthm and Reason
2:on_A Call Prom Les Paul
1:18Date fo- Danrine
2:?0SDirit of theVlklnes
2:'tBattle of the Bands
3:00AM Star Concert Hall
3: "VThe Little Show
3:30Music fo- Tvesday
4:00Panamuslca Story Time
4:15Promenade Concert
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Haopy the HumbugCia.
Alfaro. S.A.
8:15Evening Salon
7:00Ray's A Laugh
The official Communist or-
gan Szabad Neo cited a court
report which said the fliers ad-
mitted they maintained unin-
terrupted radio contact with
1 American officials In Frank-
kort, Germany, until their land-
ing.
The department spokesman
noted, however, that Capt. Dave
H. Henderson of Shawnee. Okla..
commander of the flight, said
at Erding Saturday that the
plane was lost and the men did
not know they were landing In
Hungary.
The question of taking up the
case In the World Court is more
complicated than seeking U. N.
action.
1947 eoatiac Farda. Si. dark -^.ment Off rials
tltaTIwarYou, fmd alrV ubcommittee wnicn investigat-
cvhVaIV&ES* ?Nr DEAL,R' d government ethical stand-1
COLPAN MOTORS INC a. ... ards gaid the ^ ^ great. T
in a ~ lv dlsturt*-d by recent Congres- R0*fK
1036. P.._____________ itonal disclosures. He said there nfnTasT
SiHSATIOMM. OFFER'
IH ti: 1& < f :.. i.. t s 1 s 1111!
" MDCOIil
slonal disclosures. He said thefe
Investigations have demonstra t-
V ll trie need for:
* 1) A code of ethical pro- SAVES 30% IRONING TIME
1947 Hadaaa Convertible Cues
bread aew goiat, brand new
T^.r.rt.V."'Snlv,O.l30'00:prletS *0Vem the COnduct
da!- U i2 of 80vemment business. Feder-
DlTtlR COLPAN MOORSSC I1 VS^"' VUtmg thB COde
-. .-T 22? MOrTPR* Jin; would S punished by dismissal
* i JS ""' 2-|0J,nd violators employed In pri-
4-losa, Panama. valp hnalnpvc n-nuiri inu thai
Groom, Best Man,
Atiendan! Knifed At
Cathedral Wedding
ASTI. Italy. Dec. 31
A wedding was abruptly car- sio.ooo a
Hungary is not a member of!ed **n the groom his best' ..Doug!
right to deal with government
agencies.
2 > Fixed limits on the total
amount that can be spent In
behalf of candidates and polit-
ical parties in election cam-
| paiens.
1 31 Annual public statements
showing the Income of members
of Congress and of Admlnis-
UP) 'tration officials earning over
year.
said the second and
Fits all <*.indard site h-onlnc boards.
Color fast. Stalnproof
Waterproof, keep- pad dry.
a No senrrh mark*, attractive looking
indefinitely.
Laboratory tested not to scorch at
fcOO degrees heat
Oaly S3.7S each Paataaid.
Send Money Order to
Dunmore Agency
Ertjteta Instituto Nacional
PANAM, K.P.
The vital airplane Industry,
which has suffered a number
et serious strikes this'year, now
has three disputes before the
Wage Board.
The latest was sent to the
when captured. "
The United Nations truce
delegation at Panmunjom has
charged that 77 per cent of all
the United Nations troops that
were known to have reached
panel Friday by President Tru-ithe North Korean prisoner-of-
man to prevent a walkout by war camps during the early
16,000 production workers at the part of the war, died In Com-
Boelng Airplane Co.. WichlU.1 mufiist hands.
Kan. The plant manufactures ..The death toll among the
let bombers. Allied prisoners for the entire
war is believed to be smaller,
The Board already la consi- but much greater than that
among the Communist prison-
ers.
dering disputes at a Wright
Corp. Plant in New Jersey and
three Douglas plants in Calif- A the deaths of Communist
ornia where walkouta had tied prisoners of war In the United
up production. 1 Nations Command hands, have
The Board also has defense fully reported to the In-
ternational Committee of the
Red Cross, In strict compliance
with the Geneva Convention of
1949,'' according" to a statement
from General Ridgway's head-
quarters.
disputes involving 13 brass
fabricating companies, 12 Borg-
Warner Auto Parta planta a-
cross the country, a California
Todd Shipbuilding Corp. and
the Hanford, Wash, atomic
energy plant.
The biggest dispute now in
the hands of government me-
diators, who try to bring about,
settlement without resort to the
Wae Board. Involves 1.600 car-
penters at the atomic energy-
plant at Psducah. Ky. thPt
dispute threatens to tie up all
operations at the plant.
The government also is con-
tinuing attempts to settle the
two-year-old dispute between Angela Gesualdl Was knock-
the railroads and more than 1*5 unconscious by a masher
1,000,000 rail workers. Preslden-
GLITTERING GOLD
Since the discovery of America,
more than 35.000 tons, or 17 bil-
lion dollars worth of gold has
been produced in the world. This
amount would make a solid gold
tower 20 feet In diameter and
140 feet high.
RP Will Probe
Recent Attacks
On 2 Newsmen
Minister of Government and
Justice Miguel A. Ordonez Or-
dered today a complete Investi-
gation of reports of an attack
yesterday on Ricardo A. Lince,
city editor of El Panama Am-
rica, by a former Panamanian
Consul in New York.
Lince Is the second Panama-
nian newspaperman to be at-
tacked recently because of
items published in newspapers
here.
I;
Two weeks ago, Gil Bias Te-
Ielra, columnist and editor of
> political page In the 'El
Pals," was attacked and beat-
en by a man who first offered
him a ride In a Jeep and later
turned on him with a gun. The
attacker claimed Tejelra's pa-
Et bad published an article
npooning bis "political" re-
lative. Tejeira spent several days
In the hospital.
Yesterday's attack on Lince
occurred at the Arraisona bar-
restaurant In Arraijan. As Lince
stepped Into the place on his
way back from the Interior, he
was attacked by Lucas Zarak.
Fists flying. Zarak shouted that
"La Hora" had "attacked his in-
terests."
(Reports indicated Zarak
thought Lince was still working
for La Hora, of which he was
editor for several months lass
year.)
The article to which Zarak
reportedly objected was one in
which La Hora last week re-
ported a fist fight at the U-
nlon Club. The tabloid mention-
ed no names but called it a
fight between "rabiblancos"
(whltetails) an uncompliment-
ary expression.
unconscious
who apparently
the court and could not bei"lan*nd third attendant were third proposals would provide
forced to abide bv its decision. *n'red .and paTnfully wounded:"deterrents to check improprle-
Diplomatie officials lndicat- 2 by .lrowd of men and te4'
ed that among the chief com-.*0"?' a,41th,ev.uwerc, entering The code, he said, would pro-
the the Aatl Cathedral toady, ivide "standards by which the
Police said the incident was uncertain could find their way "
a result of bitter hatred against I He said many of the govern-
32 Fascist officers during the ment officials guilty of un-
war- i ethical practices had blundered
this arta are believed respon-
sible.
! plaints likely to be involved in
i any World Court case would be
I the same "human rights" viola-
tions to be aired in the U. N.
failure to notify this govern-
ment for two weeks, and refusal
to let the filers talk to U. 8.
officials or choose their lawyers
?:rCT^,SRTS REVIEW The'official would not discuss
-on~irVw^VOA> SS Pss,blllty hat the United
I l&jShS On Your Mind ?'ates ml*nt aPDeal tne actual
(VOA? Hungarian "trial" verdict to the
8:45-Time for Business 'VOA) w gj* SgSL. id ,h.r. i.
9:008ymphonv Hall (VOA'
The groom. Angelo Bardlnl,
27 and two other, were pain-
fully slashed by attackers who
mobbed the group as they were
entering the Church.
VESESSSSaS* nie'e.t a PoaslMllty Hungarv was tech-; T* three man will be hos-
9:30-Commentators D igest,nlcly wUhm lt/rifhtl m try. pitalized for 15 days.
* j- C..TJ?. tsr,u -v,rf Tr, m" antl convicting the men for "'"e. 2<-vea'--nid Carla
9:4a-8ports World and Tune Of, horde, violation thnmh th.r. Carrettrt was nnt n,i..t-i
Dav 'VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Varietv Bandbox 'BBO
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:80Sign Off
VISION vs. TELESCOPE
A person with good sight can
see about a doten stars in the
bowl of the Big Dipper. Modern
photographic telescopes reveal1
150.000 stars In the same area.;
border violation, though there
has been no official statement
on this aspect of the case.
WEIGHT BT LOCATION
A man weighs more in Spitz-
be rgen than he does In Brazil.
Centrifugal force at the equator,
due to the turning of the earth,
makes objects weigh less thaa at
the polea
rer
ACCIDENT
NSURANCE

V
Ue lasers* Park
Tel.: 1 ?MI z-zegg
Carrettd was not molested.
Police are still investigatinu.
out no arrests were made yet
Bossy, Age 17, Sets
Longevity Record
RE-OPENS
JANUARY 1st., 1952
ear raasrestsaa. Tetefrai* et Writ.
HOTEL PANAM0NTE
aaaeie Chlrlaal
t ee ru Tratal Aieai
LONE ROCK. Wls., Dec. 31
'UP) -Old Jane," reputed to be
the oldest cow in the nation, has
reached an age equivalent to 170
years for a human.
The Holstcin cow. formally
registered as cold 8pring Jane'
Ormsby, celebrated her 24th
m birthday on the Brace Bros, farm
1 near here. She has lived 17 years
longer than the average cow's
life span of seven years.
Her once-shiny coat of black
and white is speckled with gray
but Old Jane still Joins the herd
in the pasture In summer. She
has produced more than 200.000
pounds of milk, which would
yield earnings of $4,000 to ifl.OOO.
and 17 calves.
CHAMPION BOXER
AT STUD
M-rtUlre'a ttadel MeSel
reases aag red lies tag
preasKleg east*.
Owner: Esther C da Velasquez.
Pet ssaaattal VI:. Porr. 42
Tel : -1S4S g-12
tlal emergency boards tackled
a union shop dispute Involving
non-operating employes as well
as a wage dispute with the
firemen. The conductors and
engineers also are in dispute
with the carriers and the
parties appear aa far from set-
tlement as they were two years
ago.
The government also is keep-
ing a weather eye on John L.
Lewis' United Mine Workers.
Lewis Is due to lead his union
in contract talks beginning a-
bout February but officials
were hopeful that If a strike
could be averted hi steel It
could also be blocked In coal.
Before Zarak could hurt Lineo
seriously, bystanders stepped In.
L'nce has announced he la
became exas- ready to settle accounts by any
Derated when she resisted his,means and under any circum-
attentlons. He disappeared. stances Zarak chooses.
FISHING BY REP'eOgU
The Chinese use the remora, or
uckmg fish, for catching turista.
A string is attached to the tall
f the fish and It is released In
he water. When It attaches it-
Bargain For Sale:
PRE-FABRICATED
ALUMINUM HOUSE
Living Diningroesn. three
Bedrooms. Kitchen and.Bath.
Fogy Cleeets.
PRICE: $3,950.
AGENCIAS LUMINA, S.A.
Tel. J-iaJJ
self to a turtle by means of the
suction cup on top of Its head,
the fisherman pulls both up.
Roma Movie Patrons
Make Their Own Fun
And Ignore Show
ROME. Dec. 31 'UP) It
was a day of frayed nerves at
the movies snd the show Ba-
taclan in Rome today with five
youths ending up in the hospi-
tal after arguments over seats,
and a pretty usherette was
knocked unconscious by a mash-
At the Slatlna Theater, where
the fast-moving Bataclan Is
claying, 20 year old Alberto
Fraschettl was thrown down the
stairs from the balcony by an
unidentified man after an ar-
gument over a vacant seat. He
suffered a possible skull frac-
ture.
And four other youths in two
motion picture houses were hos-
pltensed in a fight for seats.
> A 28-year-old movie usheret-
Y0UR8 FOR THE ASKING- you are a war veteran, the
chancas are the Army Quartermaster Depot in Philadelphia has a
medal for you. The Army has millions of them, toma dating back
to the Civil War, waiting to be claimed. They range from the
Congressional Medal of Honor to the Oood Conduct Ribben, and
it's coating Uncle Sam almost $11,000 a year lust to store thorn. If
you woo medals in any war and never claimed them, write to the
Adjutant General of the Army, or Adjutant General of the Air
Force. Washington, D. C. Hare. Rita Ricco. an employe at the Phila-
delphia depot, checks catalogue and cases of mariai^A-----,

.Jf
"1

mm


MONDAY. DECEMBER SI. 1K1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAI, Y NEWSPAPER
- FACE SEVR

4
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY BRSKINE JOHNSON
NBA SUM Corresponde
.in. u
lacles?" shrugged Sari. "The
burning of Rome U fine, but the
boys would rather see Av* Oard-
HOLLYWDOD (NEA) rar
be It from me to urge Greev Gar-
aon, Irsne Dunne and Claudetle
Colberi to drop their shoulder ner's bare back."
str.ips and hoist their skirts In' oOo
IroiV of the movie cameras Short Takes; Twenty-alx-year
But a couple of young, sucess-.old
ful- Dixie-born sislers who
split. Dan Dalley goes to Men-
nmger Clinic. Tom Neal slugs,
Franchot Tone, who weds Barba-
ra Payton and then spits on
newspaperwoman. Walter Wan-
ger shoots Jennings Lang.
Bob Hope's etmmenl. about
Jane Russell:
"That Jane. She's so great on a
set. She Just busts out laughing
at everything."
Atomic Plants May Produce
All Electricity They Need
machinery and light scores of, were about our theories being
lights In and around the unit, wrong."
But the power was only one The theories on which
the end produces. .original planning for the reac-
Sclenttsts in charge hap- tor began five years ago
py over results so far were have been proved correct so
ARCO. Ida., Dec. 31 (UB)
confident that their "haul
I yourself up by your own boot-
; straps" goal of producing more
_..-. ... ..\ fissionable material than they
BH.1 fo^two da8 thii montn consumed wrs in sight.
MUU. ma., uec. ji ium oui lur iwu uayo mia uiuinn consumed WfS in Sight
A picture of virtually self-j Dec. 20 and Dec. 22 an Harold V. Uchtenberger. pro-
sustained plans turning out fls- experimental breeder reactor at ject engmeer, was asked if this
sign glamorous glad rags for
Hollywood dolls whispered It to
me that there's not enough
blushing pink on the movie
screen these day U> lure the
male customers away from their
TV sets.
"Our stars are all covered up,
walled Sari Taffy, a petite brun-
et. "Why, the women on the
screen have more clothes on than
the women ki the audience."
"It's terrible, that'a what It is,"
chimed in her soft-spoken sister,
Ann. "There's Just nothing for
the boys to look at anymore."
The Taffy later alghed In
chora:
They weren't for anything that
waant nice and proper, they
drawled.
suces-old Charlie Chaplin silent "mo-ilywood night club flti c u f *!???!?" r
de-|vie have been sold to television...; league, entering Clro's with Judy, SSttSm by
Jane Wyman ha a new flame. Garland on his arm and a spec-
WVE
atto
local attorney Judd Downing... tator muttering:
weapons
last
make the
world's first atomic
Danny Kaye and Gene Kelly will
do a blackface routine in MOM's Judy."
musical veralon of "Huck Finn.", -----
Jimmy Ellison will do the title' A toll caddy telling Director
rvle in the "Buffalo Bill" TV (Gordon Douglas:
series "Use your head along
HOLLYWOOD. iNEAl
Foolish Thing remind
Hollywood in 1951:
These,
me. of
Someone's comment at a Hol-
ly weed fashion show:
"Don't let her figure fool you.
Nat "King" Cole's calypso war- She's only a bird In a girdled
hag: leaf*-"
far. Lichtenbergers' fears about
the electrical system were quite
proper.
"We quickly found we had a
few wires In backwards," he
laughed, "but once we got these
. straightened it went smoothly.
SidLuft champion of the Hoi- 8tonaDle material for vital ex-, the Atomic Energy CommU- might mean ^it self-sustained We were thoroughly thrilled
-..... of America's atomicJ sion's sagebrush-covered testing Ju ln remote areas andlthat our theories were right."
rogram was projected station here operated withoiet most uranmm supplies conn.- -------------------------
men who helped; commercial power supplies and | from near-isolated mines !
were possible. CLOSED ENTRANCE
"Not only possible, but prob-
able," he replied quickly. A bullet was found in an ivory
It was Lichtenberger who billiard ball which had no hole
switch,in its surface. The bullet had
_~. _.. .... shot into the tusk of an
anism, turned water into steam. duction. He admitted it was a elephant, and the ivory had clos-
The steam turned the; tur- iten8e moment. ed over the hole, leaving no
bines that made 100 Kilowatt ..We were U)0 b to be; trace of the bullet's entrance.
of electricity to power plant thr.ed immediately." he reca-! ----------- ,
____ ,,.____________ 'led- "We were more worried a-' Scientists are developing a
iiiasaBllB ___ bout some circuit breaker.,
other switches falling than
supplies and;
liquid letal as a- coolant.
...*. h it generator turn. In the process, the liquid
100,1 Existing works like that at | metal was heated ln an atomic
with
In
with
your other woods."
Hanford. Wash. which ln ef-
fect retine non-fissionable ra-
dioactive ores to extract com-
paratively rare fissionable ma-
terials require huge amounts of
electric power and cooling wat-
er.
pile to a
temperature that,
outside the I
when circulated ouisiae "-fopmini)/ turned the
pile in a heat exchange niech-|for the flrst electrlc power pro-,been
'^^^l^^nd^ht A plushy Hollywood hot dog
haS I atma* featuring "Menntager-
Her eyelash labe, her face la>"" or nervous, jittery ac-
paint.
:torsham with cracked nuts!
Km ja.t that they believed "The pad. are where the girl she jM ,_,., -tanllt,#- of sf
that producers eught to go back am fc _____ Patrick's Day:
It's Just two days after March
&&&&- .SJiJ&s waser -
Is themaelve." Newest Hollywoodeee for a
a .-_- .--nn-in,, ih movie star's home that has been
.ccuW'^droT&ara-^f_e.d *<* mcome taxes:
There were other little tricks
that paid off big ln the "SO',
too. .
Like a tar fastening her stock-
ing to her garter belt or getting-
her skirt blown way over her
head by a gut of wind.
storm the
Stanwyck' greying hair:
"Breath of spring mink."
A llen-to.
A young autograph hound, af-1
r_-.v. k', n-f_..in- .knnt ter getting Howard Duff's scrawl
^^.^t^! "efo"re hi. marriage to Ida Lupi-
Why men used to storm the "><"> omc *--"'.""""
theater doors to see Jean Harlow her yotog dau*ter not, cog
^52.**j ^fn."NntK^nr bachelor in Hollywood."
-..hirS' BriUsh newsman left.
wanna hear nursy ibluihtaf when he Mked Bette
ln black step-ins
Shearer undressing
all
to sleep,
mommy.
about
or Norma
behind a
screen while she talked to Clark
Gable," Ann said. "Nowadays a.
tar tart* taking off her clothes "
and the camera cuts away quick-
like."
"It's plain silly," aid Sari.
-Little thing like that help a
picture."
"They cheer the boy up,' from
Ann.
? JS.dJi .??heeinTomnalaces vaUo'book Margaret Truman!
SS^^^^^\&^)1U9m (Mri-charles
Well, one of her friend was an MacArthur).______
exhibitor and he hadit ***" | xj^t irma-like Urlet who was j
from him that salesmen **!bafflM by, a communique from
the Korean front. She could have.
Eve Arden' deduction
her wisecracking roles:
. ."I was a flop until I was flip."
The names of "Truman" and
"MacArthur" popping up toge-
ther on the Brown Derby reser-i
Davis for her recipe for lasting
wedlock. She snapped:
"Obviously, I'm no authority.
I'm on say fourth marriage."
sworn that a stalemate was a
movie queen's last discarded
husband.
, Those eye popping marquee
title*:
Two Weeks With Love" and
weren't dropping in the way they
used to.
"The fellow like to knock off
for a few hours if there's a movie
with a little sip to It," Sari said.
"It Inspires them. The word
gets around if Lana Turner is,
swishing around m a negligee;_ ... Hn,,
and sort of forgetting to keep, 1A^^d8d>*n%rBndied "
the lace together Only the,-jjg *?t$ _JJK5?. Great
let Lana do that in HoUy-Hi- w_ with Kirk Douglas."
anymore. Don n,,., observation that
Telephones began to jangle^at Holl ^ could ^ t few new
their Beverly Hills salon and the J particularly at the boxof-
Taffy sisters rushed away to as-, JJ^-~- ~ '
sure Zsa Zsa Oabor that her
evening gown was ready, and to
make an afternoon appointment
for. a fitting with Rhonda Flem-
"We think of men whea we de-
sign clothes for wesaen," Abb
tossed It to me. "Right now I'm
thinking of the expressions en
the faces of the men who see
Zsa Zsa in her evening gown."
"If we gave as little thought
to men as Hollywood does." Sari
added, "wed be out of business."
"That's right."
"You've got to think of the
HAVfl "
Could the Taffy. I wondered,
name any movie producers who
were giving male moviegoers
er a little peek-a-boo con'
lderation?
There Cecil B. de MUle,"
Sari said. "Watch the women to
his movie. Their skirt are al-
ways falling aside to reveal a
shapely leg. Or they're doing all
sort of wonderful, feminine
things. That' why hi pictures
make money."
"And then there's Howard
Hughes." exclaimed Ann.
"Of course." said Sari, rever-
ently.
Ann klghed:
"If only he could pat in movies
Eleanor Parker's theory about
her career:
"I dont believe In trying to
win Academy awards. I believe ln
working to give people good en-
tertainment."
That sign ln a Hollywood mov-
ing van offiee: __
"MOVERS ARE BETTER THAN
EVER."
Movietime. U.S.A.: Lana Tur-
ner falls through shower door.,
Lady Ashley and Clark Gable
Nearly one-half of the soil
beneath the surface of the So-
viet Union Is in a permanently
froaen state.
Tbis King of all
Cough Mixtures comes
From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
TROPICAL
TOMORROW
PRE RELEASE!
aSa*
A UNIVERSAL-MTEMMTIONAL PICTURE
LUX THEATRE
O (AirCondition! ill
NOW PLAYING! TUESDAY! WEDNESDAY!
Adventures 1 Love! Pre-Release Surprise Drama
Violence! Engagement! "VALENTINO" of the Year!
"LORNA DOONE" (Technicolor! "TALL TARGET"
(Technicolor!) His love and Times! with -
Richard Greene with Tony Dexter Dick Powell
Barbara Hale Eleanor Parker Paula Raymond
COMING NEXT THURSDAY!
or dried mixture of milk and ho-
wen.ey as a valuable food.
"BEST PICTURE OF THE
YEAR!"
THURSDAY
SIMULTANEOUSLY
1 i AT THE I
BELLA VISTA I
and
TROPICAL
_.- THEATRES I
CECILIA THEATRE
;
NOW PLAYING!
Two thrilling, new releases!
"HIGH LONESOME"
in Technicolor!
Plus: Monster, Primitive
Horror in
"TWO LOST WORLDS*
WEDNESDAY!
Two exceptional European
Hits...!
"SHOKSHINT"
The Academy Award Picture!
Plus: The Sexy Life of
"LUCRECIA BORGIA"
OPENING NFXT THURSDAY!
AT LAST ON THE SCREEN!
Native Son
THE DYNAMITE-
LOADED STORY
OF A NEGRO AND
A WHITE GIRL!
IPAN WflllACF
RICHARD WRIGHT
NICHOLAS JUY
NO* FOR 11 YEARS
ANYONE DARE TO FILM
IT...1
THE SAVAGE. TERRIFYING BEST-
SELLER EXPLODES ONTO THE
8C ~
Thi King ot all cough medicines
Buekltv'i CANADIOL Mixlur.
has been used for y tan in over 70%
9f Csnodp's homes. Fast working
whit he'iuU on his Cg" iUbVaVde *'P' Ktir^ Buckley sConodlelMix-
*'" '"' "uleklv loosens and raises phlegm
""They* had been offered jobs as! "**" *""* -'' *"
de&f on the movie lots, the ^JlJtT^XTrS^
.SE v^ereTB-ut Ke'y 3SR-y-fjj ffit g |
decided It would get them all ^ ?' ?^ of "lev '".-
frusUated and that they had
better stick to whipping up fan-
cy duds for the off-screen hours
of movie shebas.
"We made some sew gowns
for the 'Quo Vadls' premiere,"
Ann did.
"Spectacles, who needs spec-
ontry.
Compounded from rare Canodion
Pine Balsam and other soothing heel-
ing Ingredients Buckley's CANADIOL
Mixture is different from anything
cu ever tried de get a bottle of this
great Canodion cough medicine to-
day el any good drug store.
PRE-RELEASE
January 1st at the CENTRAL
A world of wonders in
One Ojrbat Roture
ITS MOVimME
m
anama
^ana (clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
4lr-Ci>nftltlonrr>
4 10 (:S S:3*
a ClarK (ABLE
"Across The Wide Missouri"
(Tiiesil> ) "KING SOLOMON'S MINES"
DIABLO HTS.
IS 1:113
COCOLI
IS 4i I:4S
GATUN
7:M
Eva ARDEN 'I. v ...(t Da SILVA
"THREE HUSBANDS"
(Tueseey) "AL JENNINGS OF OKLAHOMA"
Carole LANDIS Joseph CALLEIA
"THE SILK NOOSE"
(Tueaeay) "IP raONT"
(Tu4aT>
Claire TREVOR # Sal.'v FORREST
'Hard/ Fast And Beautiful*
MARGARITA
S:I5 A 7:SS
Mal ZETTERLIN a Robert BEATTY .,
"GIRL IN THE PAINTING"
CRISTOBAL
*:is a H-.n
Blng CROSBY Jane WYMAN
'HERE COMES THE GROOM'
(Tuesday) "Francis Go***j To The PUccV'
Portrayals
that make
t SO GREAT:
MARLON
BRANDO
as Stan. ..
mean, "^
coarse,
violent and
maqnifkenl!
"A
Streetcar
Named
Desire"
CENTRAL THEATRE
PRESENTS
TODAY
TWO ATTRACTIONS!
"GRAND PARADE"
From WALT DISNEY
in TECHNICOLOR.'
Also:
Notorious'
- with
INGRID BERGMAN
GARY GRANT
Walt Disney eouW bring H te
the screenl Fascinating
funny-folkl Strong edventuresl
Mad-cap merriment) Oay sonasl
Walt Disney's
Alice ,
WONDERLAND
lite sH -csrtoon MsiesJ WatvrJerfilsi
TUESDAY, Jan. 1st
Special PRE RELEASE
Of The Greatest
A world of
wonders in #
QnsGreat
Pkhukb
Walt Disney's
AUCE
wmm
dHOMYTECHNICOLOR
THURSDAY
WEEK-END!
lifts, Im
Storieiftm
PCSpVaV HfuIwS .
I
WOOCLLCOREY
IMCOONAU) CAREY
WMDIOND
ELLEN OREW-MHICC BENNin
BkLJWLL^JNWijjEVEtE
BELLA VISTA Two Releases!
Eric Portman Nadia Gray, ln
'THE SPIDKR AND THE KI.V
l:ie 4'SS S:I am.
Marjorie Main Percy Kilbride, In
"PA AND M.\ KETTLE BACK ON
THE FARM"
>:M 4:U S:3t p.m.
LUX THE
Hot blood and cold
eel to the story ot
two bom to love
but sworn to hate!
"LORNA
DOONE'
(In Technicolor i
e
Barbar. HALE
Richard GREENS
CENTRAL
Two attractions this week!
Car> Graat Ingrid Bergmaa
"NOTORIOUS"
- Also: -
GRAND PARADE"
In Technicolor from
WALT DISNEY!
CECILIA T HE ATRE
Only he saw the ehoat* that fired to kill!
"HIGH LONESOME" with John Barrymore Chill Wylls
Also: See the Earth Shake on Its Axis!...
"TWO LOST WORLDS"
TROPICAL THEATRE
"THE THREE MUSKETEERS"
with LANA TURNER GENE KELLY
____________(|i. Technicolor)_______M.G.M.'s
ENCANTO THEATRE
____ Ate-CenelUaaee
A~ COLOSSAL DOUBLE!
Ann Dvorak Douglas
Kennedy, in
"1 Wss An American Spy"
Wayne Morrl! Lola
Albright. In
SIERRA PASSAGE"___
TIVOLI THEATRE
Alan Ladd, In
"APPOINTMENT WITH
DANGER"
The M-irx Bros ln
DUCK SOUP"_____
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A SENSATIONAL DOUBLE
PROGRAM!
e
Richard Widmark Dana
Andrews, in
"THE FROGMEN"
Jeanne Crt.ni In
"Take Care of My Little
tart" in Technicolor!
VICTORIA THEATRE
Johnny Welssmuller, ln
"TARZAN end his MATE"
- and -
"TARZAN THE APEMAN"
TOMORROW!
PRERELEASE!
LUX THEATRE
and
CECILIA
SIMULTANEOUSLY!
mmrn
nimm
VES!
COIUM5IA PrCTUf ES
pfnf>
a. EDWARD SMALL
P'l.ieliii
tttrrmt
attstl GirttM Prirleta
QiSL^
SPECIAL
PRERELEASE
TUESDAY
JAN. 1st
A PICTURE THAT IS A FINE
BLENDING OF THE
ARTS ...
SPECTACULAR ...
LAVISH .. .
EXQUISITE ..
ENTRANCING ...
BRILLIANT .
THE TALES
OF HOFFMANN
(In Magnificent Technicolor)
With The Extraordinary Ballet Stars
MOIRA SHEARER
ULDMILLA TCHERINA




rAGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENf DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY. DECEMBER SI, 1*51
I


UP Lists Big Stories Of 1951
JANUARY
23Charles G. Dawes. 85 died.
25Cuban ofr:engerp) ine and a
4United Nations forces aban- Navy trainer crashed over
doned Seoul. Kev West Pla.: 43 dead.
8In his Stale of the Union 26 William N. Oatls. A. P. bu-
messa^e. President Truman
asked swift steps toward war
basis; told Russia "we will
fight to keep freedom."
8United Nations forces quit
Wonju and Osan la Korea
conflict.
10Sinclair Lewis. 65. died.
15Use Koch sentenced to life
imprisonment at hard labor.
15President Truman submitted; 6Kuir Farouk married 17-
reau chief, jailed by Prague
government on charges of
hostile activities.
MAY
3Investigation of MacArthur
dismissal opened In Washing-
ton before two Senate com-
mittees.
a $7.500.000.000 crisis budget.
17Basketball fix" at Manhat- .
tan College revealed.
17Peiping rejected United Na-
tions proposal for cease-fire
in Korea.
?1Chinese Communists captur-
ed Inchon.
26Prices and wages frozen.
27Baron Carl Gustav Manner-
helm of Finland died.
77Atomic test blast carried out
AUGUST
1President Truman ordered
end of all tariff reductions
to the Soviet Union and
Communist-dominated areas.
3West Point ousted 90 cadets
for cheating In classroom.
5Gen. Ridgway suspended
truce talks after Red troop
violation hi demilitarized
area.
14_William Randolph Hearst,
88, died.
21U. S. Navy contracted "for
the first nuclear-powered
submarine."
23Communist delegates called
off the Korean truce par-
leys: accused U. N. planes of
raid on Kaesong area.
year-old Egyptian common-
er, Narriman Sadek.
6Twentv-three perished as B-
36 crashed on outskirts of Al-
buquerque.
6Earthquake rocked south- 30U. *. Navy plane set new
eastern El Salvador; approx-
imately 1.000 killed.
8Willie McGee. 37-year-old
Negro convicted of raping a
white woman, electrocuted
at Laurel, Miss,
at Air Force bombing and 14Navy reported 38 men dead
gunnery range near Las Ve- or missing after its seaplane
altitude mark (undisclosed),
passing 13.7 mile record.
SEPTEMBER
1Fishing boat Pelican, cap-
sized off Montauk Point,
Long Island: 45 perished.
gas.
10. N. political committee a- roal ship off Cape Henry,
dopted U. S. proposal naming Va.
Communist China an aggres- 18 Pennsylvania Railroad's Red
sor in Korea Arrow crashed into rear of
ilCharles F. Blalr, Jr.. set a halted train near Bryn Mawr,
record of 7 hours. 48 minutes Pa.. 8 killed. 123 Injured,
for the New York-to-London 19Great Britain warned Iran of
flight. "the most serious conse-
quences" if British oil pro-
FEBRUARY perties in Iran were confis-
cated without negotiations.
684 killed. 350 Injured in de- 21Supreme Court held that
rallment of a Pennsylvania1 state "f8ir trade" laws could
commuter train at Wood- not bind merchants two re-
bridge, N. J.. fused to sign no-prlce cut-
tinr agreements.
tender Valcour collided with I 4Louis Adamic. writer, found
dead by shot wound.
4First coast-to-coast televi-
sion program placed In oper-
ation.
5Maureen Connolly, 16, won
women's national tennis
championship youngest
champion in history of event.
6James W. Gerad. 84, died.
8Japan signed peace treaty
with 48 nations of the non-
Communist world.
12George C. Marshall retired as
secretary of defense; Robert
A. Lovett named to succeed
him.
14Ray Robinson knocked out 23_tj s Navv announced 45,000- 12Ray Robinson knocked out
Jake LaMotta in 13th round
for world middleweight title.
16Premier Josef Stalin decl-r-;
ed that war is not inevit" ;
"at least for the present." I t
held that the United Nations
"is becoming a weapon of
aggressive war" and "dooms 23American Broadcasting Com-
ltself to disintegration. p:iny merged with United
18Three City College basketball paramount Theaters In $25,-
players arrested in connec- 000.000 deal,
tion with "fixing" games at 27peiolng announced lncorpo-
Madison Square Garden. ration of Tibet into Com-
II'Jilted Nations troops capt-1 munlst China. 27-
'rod Chuchon. 28Joe Adonis sentenced to serve
ton battleship New Jersey I Randy Turpm in 10th round
and destroyer Brinkley Bass I to regain middleweight
were struck by shore batter-. championship,
ies at Sonsan. on Korean east i5_Twenty persons killed. 17 ln-
coast May 20; three Amer- jUred as stunting airplane
crashed Into crowd at FlagT
ler, Colo.
20Ford Frick elected commis-
sioner of baseball.
23King George VI of Great
Britain underwent operation
ican Navv men killed, nine
v;ouTided.
16T.venty-second amendment
to the Constitution went in-
to effect.
17Vladimir Clementis seized as
spy by Czechs.
MARCH
2An airliner crashed and
burned at Sioux City, Iowa;
15 of 25 persons aboard
killed.
5Dr. Alberto Galnza Paz. pub-
lisher of newspaper La Pren-
sa, charged with violating
Argentina's security law.
?Oscar Collazo found guilty
on four counts of having
slain a Blalr House guard In
an attemnt I to assassinate
President Truman.
7 "remier Gen. All Razmara of
Iran assassinated by religious
fanatic.
S Herbert Morrison named to
succeed British foreign secre-
from two to three years in
prison, fined $15,000 for hav-
ing broken gambling laws of
New Jersey.
28Macy's started nrlce-cutting
war in New York.
29Fannv Brice. 59. died.
30Lee Wallard set new record
for Indianapolis 500-mlle
Memorial Day automobile
race; drove 500 miles in 3
hours 57 minutes and 38.05
seconds; speed, 126.244 miles
an hour.
JUNE
2U. S. banned all travel to
Czechoslovakia by citizens of
this country.
3Pope Plus X beatified in St.
Peter's Basilia.
4Serge Koussevitzky, 76. died.
4The Supreme Court, by a 6-2
vote, upheld guilt of 11 top
U. S. Communists.
tary Ernest Bevln. who re-111United Nations troops occu-
slgned because of health.
9Dr. Gordon Seagrave freed
by Burmese Court after serv-
ing 7 months.
10- chbishop Josef Beran ban -
i aed from Prague and placed
rnder confinement.
12 enate crime committee'.?
pied Chorwon artd Kumhwa
and pushed forward toward
Kumsong.
12New York City's Superin-
tendent of Schools. William
Jansen. concede dthat 1,500
out of 300,000 high school
students are narcotic addicts,
first puellc hearing opened 15Thirty persons perished in
in New York City, carried i fire at the Hospice of Salnte
both by radio and television. | cunegonde in Montreal.
14United Nations troops re- 21Twenty-one Communist Par-
captured Seoul. ty leaders indicted in New
18Former President Grau San1 York City; four skip ball.
Martin of Cuba indicted on 23Largest liner ever built in
charges of frauds said to to- this country, the 51,500-ton
tal $40.000.000. United States, christened.
19 All three defendants In coun-! 23The Soviet Union called for
try's first atom spy trial talks to set a cease-fire In
Julius and Ethel Rosenberg! Korea.
and Morton Sobellconvict- 28Archbishop Josef Groesz of
ed of. war-time spying for So- Hungary convicted of trea-
for removal of part or all of
one lung.
Harry Gross sentenced In
New York to 12 years impris-
onment for bookmaking and
conspiracy.
28New York Yankees clinched
American League baseball
pennant.
OCTOBER
3N. Y. Giants defeated Dodg-
ers in 3-game playoff to win
the National League baseball
pennant.
3White House announced So-
viet's second atom blast in
two years.
3Lt. Gen. Hugh A. Drum, 72,
died.
6United Nations troops recap-
tured "Heartbreak Ridge"
for third time.
8Princess Elizabeth and Prince
Philip arrived In Canada on
the first royal visit since
1939
10The Yankees won the World
Series, defeating the Giants
4 games to 2.
13William A. Boyle. Jr., resign-
ed as chairman of tte De-
mocratic National Commit-
tee.
16Prime Minister Llaquat All
Khan of Pakistan assassinat-
ed by Moslem while talking
at public meeting.
20 Gen. Mark W. Clark nomin-
ated first U. S. ambassador
area.
British troops In Suez Canal
16Rioting Egyptians .battled
to the Vatican by President
Truman.
22White House disclosed "an-
other, atomic explosion," the
third inside the Soviet Union.
25Winston Churchill again be-
came prime minister of Great
Britain, succeeding Clement
Attlee.
31Princess Elizabeth and
Prince Philip arrived In
Washington and were wel-
comed by President Truman
NOVEMBER
5Leon Jouhaux, of France,
won 1951 Nobel Peace Prize.
9Twenty-five-day-old long-
shoremen's wildcat strike
ended.
12Juan D. Peron re-elected
president of Argentina for
new six-year-term.
12Union Pacific's streamliner
City of San Francisco crash-
ed into rear of its sister
streamliner City of Los An-
geles in snowstorm near Ev-
anston, Wyoming; 16 killed
one missing and more than
100 Injured.
13U. S. C-82 "Flying Boxcar"
crashed against peak of Mont
Dore in France; all 36 Amer-
ican service men killed.
14 United Nations command
charged that the Chinese
and North Korean Commun-
ists murdered an estimated
5,660 American war prison-
ers since war began.
16T. Lamar Caudle, assistant
attorney general, dismissed
by President Truman in tax
investigation.
19Salvatore T. Sollazo. "bribe
master" in college basketball
fixes, sentenced to from 8 to
16 years in prison.
19Argentine newspaper, La
Prensa, published again un-
der pro-Peron auspices.
25Two streamliners carrying
passengers between New
York and New Orleans crash-
ed head-on near Woodstock,
Alabama; 17 dead.
27Rudolf Slansky, Czechoslo-
vak deputy premier, arrested
on charges of spying "for the
enemy."
28A virtual cease-fire existed
In Korea, although Gen. Van
Fleet said no order to end
hostilities had been Issued.
29Senator Kenneth S. Wherry,
59, died.
DECEMBER
3Soviet news agency TABS
disclosed that U. 8. S. R.
planes forced a missing U. 8.
Air Force C-47 transport
plane to land in Hungary
two weeks ago; four-man
crew turned over to Hun-
garian authorittesT
3Edwin L. James, 61, man-
aging editor of New York
Times, died.
4Philippine volcano, Hibok
Hlbok on Camiguin Island,
erupted.
5Archbishop Aloysius Stepinac
of Zagreb granted condition-
al release.
6Harold Ross, editor of the
magazine New Yorker, died
at 59.
16Non-scheduled air liner
crashed in flames at Eliza-
beth. N. J.; all 56 aboard
killed.
Angry Industrialists Told Choice
Is Between Autos And Ammunition'
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31.(UP)The Govern-
ment told angry automobile industry officials at
the weekend the choice is between "autos and'am-
munition" and that passenger car production must
be cut further next spring.
The industry argued vehemently that the plan-
ned production cutbacks would cause unemployment
in the Detroit area to soar to about 250,000 persons
and would be a social, political, and economic crime.
Nevertheless, defense produc-
tion administrator Manly
Fleischman told an emergency
meeting of automobile industry
and union officials:
"The choice is between autos
and ammunitionlt is that sim-
ple."
Fleischman said he Is consid-
ering a cutback in new car pro-
duction to 800,000 units for the
April-through-June quarter next
year.
That would be a reduction
from the 930,000 cars scheduled
for the January-through-March
quarter.
Defense Moblllzer Charles E.
Wilson called the emergency
meeting.
The meeting, a turbulent af-
fair, was attended by virtually
all of the Industry's top offi-
cials, president Walter Reuther
of the CIO United Auto Workers
Union; Go v. G. Mennen Williams
of Michigan, and Michigan's two
senators. Homer Ferguson (R.)
and Blalr Moody (D.).
The Industry leaders charged
repeatedly that they were being
discriminated against." They
blamed the military in good part
for not scheduling their needs
correctly.
Reuther said he proposed
that the government permit
continued high production of
passenger cars until the anto
manufacturers have enough
defense work to take up the
unemployment slack.
Charles E. Wilson, president of.
General Motors, said the cutback!
proposal Is a "political, econom-
ic, and social crime" which would I
force the lay-off of another 125,-
000 auto workers.
About 125,000 auto workers!
now are idle in the Detroit area
because of past government-or-
dered cutbacks.
Fleischman and moblllzer Wil-
son, who Is no relation to the GM
chief, denied the discrimination
charges. They asserted the auto
companies actually were being
treated better than most other
consumer industries.
One reason for cracking down
on auto production, they said,
was because scarce materials are
needed for the defense expansion
program.
As for the auto Industry,
viet Russia.
APRIL
6In a letter to Rep. Joseph W.
Martin. Jr.. Gen. Douglas
MacArthur disclosed that
he favored using Chinese
Nationalists to open a sec-
on front to China.
6Julius Rosenberg and his
wife, Ethel, sentenced to
death in spy trial; Morton
Sobell got 30 years.
eIsraeli planes bombed Sy-
rian fortified positions as a
"retaliatory action."
son; sentenced to 15 years'
imprisonment.
30United Air Lines DC-6 crash-
ed In the Rocky Mountain
National Park; all 50 aboard
dead.
JULY
1Bob Feller pitched his third
not-hit game; set a modern
major league record.
4 William N.Oatls sentenced to
10 years imprisonment for
"espionage" in Czechoslova-
kia.
9Mickey Cohen, gambler, sen-
tenced to five years for In-
come tax evasion:
6David Greenglass. confessed
atomic spy. sentenced to 15 < io_Truce "talks opened In Kae-
ye- song.
6Oscar Collazo sentenced to io_Randy Turpln defeated Ray
death in attempted assassi-
nation of President Truman.
6Southwest Airways plane
crashed near Santa Barbara;
all 22 persons aboard killed.
7Twenty-one foreign minlst-
Robinson for the world's
middleweight championship.
12Race riots in Cicero, 111.,
brought out National Guard
to restore order.
14Arnold 8choenberg. compos-
ers of the American republics er, died at 76
signed security pact, pledg- 14Entire state
against Red
U
mg solidarity
acts.
-Gen. Douglas MacArthur re-
lieved of all his commands in
of Missouri
placed under state of emer-
gency as great Kansas flood
moved into the Missouri Riv-
the Far East by President 16-Leopold III of Belgium abdi-
Truman; Lt. Gen. Matthew, catert in favor of his son,
B. Ridgway appointed to sue-' Baudouin.
ed him. i 18-Joe Walcott knocked out Ez-
14Ernest Bevin, 70. died of a< iard Charles, world heavy-
,. S3&atUck- ... weight champion.
18British submarine Affray. 20Serge Rubinstein acquitted
missing since April 16, found, on all four counts of two in-
at bottom of English Chan-| dlctments charging mail
t. ne!L caredcrew l 75- ^ I fraud and violation of the
18 Arthur H. Vandenberg, 67,1 securities act
, dled- w ,. J20-King Abdullah of Jordan
19In speech before a Joint slain by an assassin in Jeru-
meetlng of Congress. Gen. salem.
MacArthur called our Asia 22Admiral Forrest P Sherman
policy "blind to reality"; said 54, died.
Joint chiefs shared views on 23Former Marshal Henri-Phil-
strategy. ippe petam. 95 died.
1Hungary announced early re-24Eight former Bradley TJniv-
lease of Robert A. Vogeler inl ersity basketball players ln-
exehange for the grantln? of volved in fixing games
"various Just Hungarian 25 Frank Costello. Joe Adonis
ciatos. _, ; and Frank Erickson indicted
BAneurin Bevan. British Labor for contempt of the United
leader, resigned. J States Senate.
WE WISH YOU A
f*Yn
*M*
w.^..^,
*
MH*MMtohi,
Fleischman said his present ten-
tative plan would give it 44 per
cent of the brass null products
it used in the six months before
Korea. That would permit pro-
duction of about 52 per cent of
the industry's pre-Korea output,
he said.
Ernest R. Breech, executive
vice president of Ford, said the
projected cutback amounted to
discrimination." He estimated
that unemployment would climb
to more than 200,000 If the gov-
ernment swings ahead with its
plans.
Both Ford and GMC suggest-
ed appointment of a special civ-
ilian committee by the President
tp determine essential material
requirements of the established
military program.
Both Wilson and Breech pro-
tested that the government Is
allot in scarce materials t*
durable goods Industries whlcn
are less essential to the econo-
my than the auto Industry.
Wilson said the proposed 800 -
000 auto cutback was not Justi-
fied as a steel conservation
measure because "there will soon
be a surplus of steel unless there
is a strike in the steel industry.
Wilson said that the auto in-
dustry should be given more than
16 000 000,000 worth of defense
contracts annually If the normal
production of cars is to be cut
down to that planned by the
mobilization officials.
"Certainly," he said, "if the In-
dustry Is to be discriminated a-
galnst by an unreasonable cut in
its regular business, lt should be
given at least enough defense
work to maintain Its normal en^
ployment." _.,
The argument advanced by GM
Chief Wilson was that there is
reason to believe the military has
made "exaggerated" demands for
copper, steel and other such
commodities, especially to view
of the slow rate at which these
materials "can be fabricated into
military products."
SCOTTISH SAVER
The first savings bank in Great
Britain was-founded in 1910 by
a Scottish minister, the Rev.
Henry Duncan, according to the
Encyclopedia Brltannica.
HEADS YOU DOReggie Quested, left, Jluddersneld Town Play.
ers" left halt takes a flyer to prevent Jack Evans,!Charlton Athletics*
inside right, from using his head during a soccer game at Chariton
The Valley Ground in London.' (NEA)
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT AD*
i*SL
aHO*
NUDAJOt
MB ^_
Kit* '
rm
5L
ms
kUSCOCMSI
INKD TOOLS

<*,
mm
.-/
'CAN FILL YOUR NEEDS!

to all Sports friends
and thanks for
everything to
our customers

BULL RGHT
in "LA MACARENA RING"
TOMORROW TUESDAY 1st
at 3:45 p.m.
(San Francisco Garden)
.may
1952
... NEXT YEAR
Pescadera Modelo
(Acroea from the Public Market)
MANUEL LOPEZ V., Owner.
Phone 2-0332
P.O. Box 1627
be a year of health
happineM and prosperity
for yon and yours.
Sincerely.
U. B. QLptt
UNIVERSAL SPORTS CORP.
ISTHMIAN riMLU KMMMMHTATTVM
' fXOUSIVI EXPOtT MANAGERS FO*i
a** ** om cmm
jrtfcf tmHU%*tU*#t, Vele***'
Ale* Iff-, CU*M* mm N e*r mmHn
ft V frt-
4 BULLS
Farewell to
the famous bullfighter.
MANOLO ORTEGA
and return of
ARMILLITA DE ESPAA
JOSE LI LL0 de COLOMBIA
new in this ring.
I
/
Ticket on tale at San FrancUco Garden.
Prices:
Shads: Box Ssoti $3.00 Gsnsral Admirreacs: $2.00
Sun: loxSsoti 2.00 Gsnctfll Admittance: 1.00
4
if I
V



MONDAY. DECEMBER SI. 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINE
r
h
-\
^rhlantic Society
Wr*. Witlon J.. Y\J.
Bo, 195, (dun D*Lpko*4 Qmlm 378
PANAMA HONORS COLONEL PTMPELLY
Colonel Jams Pumpelly, Commandant of the I'SARCARIB
School at Fort Guiles, was honored by the government of
Panama by being awarded the Order of Balboa at a cere-
mony in the Colon Municipal Council Hall, Saturday at 5:M
pjn.
The Minuter of Foreign RelatRir. Ignacio Molino, pre-
sentad the medal in appreciation o the honor-e'n work
promoting friendly relations between the two Republics.
Music for the occasion was fur-
nished by the Colon Bomberoa
Band/
No invitations had been issued
to the ceremony. However, a
and the meeting will be called to
order at 2:30 p.m.
This Is the first meeting for
the new president, Mrs. Benja-
* mm Brundage, and all members
UrgifTOup of officials took this are requested to attend and as-
opparfwlty to attend and ex: sist in making plans for 1952.
press their congratulations and
words of appreciation for Col.
Pumpeily's work while stationed to Resume Activities
on "the lattimos'. He la leaving
this month for Norfolk, Va.
Royal Palm Chanter O.E.S.
Installs Officers
Royal Palm. Chapter, No. 2, Or-
der of the Eastern Star. Installed
Its officers for 1962 at their meet-
Inn Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Cris-
tobal Masonic Temple.
Mr*. June H. May and Mr.
CarrH. Starke were the retiring
Worthy Matron and Patron with
Mrs. Aurelia D. Hadarlts and
Mr .'la-nest L. 81ocum assembled
the positions of honor.
The Installing officers were:
Mrff. May, Mrs. Mary B. Slocum,
P.W.M., Walter A. Freudlg-
mann, P.W.P., Mrs. Matilda
Neely, P.W.M., Chaplain; Mrs.
M: Wray. Marshal; Mrs.
Sreudigmann, P.W.M.,
larshal; Mrs. Marion
vlngton, P.W.M.. organist;
' Beatrice O. Fernandea,
.M., Warder and Victor H.
May, Jr.. P.W.P.. sentinel and
Mr. Henrietta Cheek, soloist.
The officers who were install-
ed 'with Mrs. Hadarlts and Mr.
Slocum were: Associate Matron.
Ml Mildred Neely; Associate
Patron, Earl C. Orr; Secretary,
Mrs. Ida May Cotton; Treasurer,
Mlaa Grace M. Williams; Con-
ductress. Mrs. Clara M. Cham-
bers; Associate Conductress. Mrs.
Wllhelmina Rudge; Chaplain,
Mrs. MaryL. Engelke; Marshal,
Mrs. Elizabeth Westervelt; Or-
ganist. Mrs. Ruth Perkins; Adah,
Mrs. Peggy A. Smith; Ruth, Mrs.
Marilyn M. Marsh; Esther. Mrs.,
Gladys A. Conley; Martha. Mrs,
Lorey M. Wray; Electa. Mrs.
Florence Denson; Warder. Mrs.
Dorothy Barsosky; S e.n t i nel,
William Jeffertes and Mrs. Clara
A. Barber, soloist.
An old-fashioned nosegay
theme was sed in the- decora-
tions with floral bouquets In em-
blematic colors used to mark thep
stations and center the bank of
Square Danoe Club
The Atlantic Side "Docey-Do-
ers" Square Dance Club will re-
sume their regular weekly meet-
ings at the Margarita Playshed
Thursday. Dancing will last from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. All Interested
residents are cordially invited to
attend. The small fee of 25 cents
covers the cost of the pianist.
Dr. and Mrs. Byrd
Hold Open House
Dr. and Mrs.. Jesse L. Byrd
held "open house" at their resi-
dence on Colon Beach yesterday
afternoon from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.
The buffet table was covered
with a handsome ecru Pointe
Venice cover and centered with
an arrangement of red carna-
tions and white calla lilies, flank-
ed by five-branched silver can-
delabros with tall red and green
tapers.
Appropriate Christmas decora-
tions with a Christmas card tree
were used In the home.
Virgil Lucky. The purpose of the
meeting was to elect a hew sec-
retary for the club, to replace
Mrs. Lucky, who would not be eli-
gible as her husband was pro-
moted recently to the rank of
lieutenant.
Mrs. Austl nTulip was elected
to fill the position.
Visitors from Balbo*
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Evans of
Balboa were the weekend guests
of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Genis of
Margarita.
Informal Cocktail Party
Miss Dorothy Henry and Miss
Thora Baubllts were co-hostesses
for a holiday cocktail party giv-
en at their quarters on Washing-
ton Drive last evening.
N.C.O. Wives Club
Elect Officer "
A special meeting of the N.C.O.
Wives Club of Fort Gulick was
held Friday at the home of Mrs.
Crack Streamliners
Delayed As Freight
Cars Jump Tracks
MONCK8 CORNER, S. C. Dec.
31 (UP)Thirty cars of a 61-car
freight train, jumped the tracks
lour miles north of here yester-
day, blocking the main line of
wo.. ana c*nW u.* i the Atlantic Coast Une ***}
ferns around the presiding ros- and delaying two crack stream-
trum liners indefinitely.
The retlrin* officers presented Raifroad officials said the cars
Mrs. May'Witrl a gift and'Mr .'hounded ctthe tracto at 2 am
,ed on his wife the past shorty ^^Xft-
'52 March ol Dimes
Gets Underway Here
Wednesday Morning
The annual "March of Dimes"
Program will be conducted by the
United States Army Caribbean
during the period beginning
Wednesday, Jan. 2 and continu-
ing through January 31 inclusive.
Fifty per cent of the tota lcol-
lected Is retained in the local
community and is administered
by a local committee. In the Ca-
nal Zone this money is used to
assist in payment for treatment
of local polio victims.
During last year's epidemic,
which was unusually severe the
local fund spent approximately
$8,500, some $5,000 of which went
to two dependent families of Ar-
my personnel, each of which in-
cluded several victims.
The other 50 per cent of the
money collected is used by Na-
tional Polio Foundation from its
headquarters in New York City.
This money Is used for research,
for maintenance of the sanitar-
ium at Warm Springs, Georgia,
and to assist in defraying ex-
penses of polio victims.
Total expenses of local funds
for other than direct cost of
treatment of polio have amount-
ed to less than (10, spent for
postage.
Means have been arranged for
aootlng voluntary contribu-
tions from both military and ci-
vilian personnel during the pe-
riod of the drive.
omen 6
Wc
Wort
matron's pin.
Mrs. Hadarlsts was also the re-
cipient of a gift from the officers
who will serve with her during
1952. M.1. i
Refreshments were served In
the banquet hall follow* the.
meeting from two long buffet ta- I
ty of them were scattered up and
down the tracks and road bed
some sliding down a nine-foot
embankment. Eleven of the de-
railed cars were loaded with fruit
No one was Injured In the mls-
eeting from two long buffet ta- b t nundreds were lnconve-
bles. Other tables held the gifts {J".^^.
lor the officers.
Visitors in Gstun
... Mr. and Mrs. Amon Krom. of
por! land. Oregon, arrived re-
cently for a visit with Mrs.
Kroin's sister and brother-in-law.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stewart of
Oatira.
Mr. Krom has retired as Gen-
eral Electric Installation Engin-
eer for Alaska. Oregon and Mon-
tana. From the Isthmus Mr. and
Mrs. Krom will sail for a
Hawaii.
Auxiliary Meeting In Gatun
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Gatun Union Church will hold
their first meeting for the year
Thursdav afternoon. Refresh-
ments will be served at 1:30 p.m.
Both the southbound Havana
Special and the northbound Pal-
metto Limited were forced to
stop short of their destinations
The Havana Special pulled up at
Florence, B.C., and the Palmetto
Limited was halted at Savannah,
Ga. .
Wrecking crews were sent im-
mediately to the scene, but rail-
road spokesmen said it would be
night" before the Une could be
. reopened to traffic. He said the
trip to Une might transfer the passen-
gers of the two trains by bus ana
turn each around In the direc-
tion from which it came.
The freight was northbound
out of Charleston, 47 miles to
the south. ACL officials said the
cause of the accident was not
immediately determined.
Death Penalty Asked
For Peacetime Spies
In United States
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (UP)
The House Un-American Activi-
ties Committee asked for the
death penalty for peacetime
spies.
The group proposed a Joint
Senate-House committee to stu-
dy espionage fend strengthen the
laws against It.
One suggestion would allow the
courts in espionage cases to ad-
mit evidence obtained by wire-
tapping, hidden microphones,
censorship and other methods
now Inadmissible.
"The laws of this country pro-
vide that a person who takes the
life of another may be given cap-
ital punishment," the committee
said. "Espionage, which has the
ultimate purpose of taking the
lives of many, should be consid-
ered no less an offense."
The death penalty now applies
only to wartime espionage.
"While this committee Is deep-
ly concerned with maintaining
the rights of the individual, it
feels that the provisions for the
admissibility of evidence In es-
pionage cases should be broad-
ened."
The committee Issued a report,
entitled "The Shameful Years
BY GAY PAULE Y
United Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK (UP) Five
hundred teen-agers who call
Dorothy Klock "teacher" have
never seen her In person but
they know her voice and her
smile.
Mrs. Klock, a widow. Is a tele-
vision schoolmarm, the first In
the nation so far as she can de-
termine. She's the only woman
teacher in New York's television
school, called: "The Living
Blackboard," carried on WPIX. j
She hopes, though, that soon
she will be Just one of many
video teachers.
"Education through television
certainly could stand expand-
ing," said Mrs. Klock, a veteran
teacher In the regular classroom.
"The Living Blackboard" Is
the latest program sponsored by
the city board of education to
bring the classroom Into the
homes of handicapped children.
Currently, the video school Is
limited to three 15-mlnute ses-
sions per week. They deal with
science, literature, social studies.
ter Mrs. Klock teaches.
"We call this class 'make It
your business', and aim it right
at advising handicapped young
i people what sort of jobs are open
for them," she said.
The classes are dramatized. For
Instance, to show the require-
ments and opportunities for the
handlcapped in a musical instru-
ment factory, the camera would
move right Into the factory.
The video school Is two months
old and Mrs. Klock said If the
mail It gets is any Indication, the
program is a bit.
"Some of the letters are from
the handicapped children," she
said, "but you'd be amazed how
many come in from parents and
other adults many of them al-
so handicapped."
"The grown-ups wanted more
of the same," she said. "There is
a lesson for television as a
whole."
"We can't compete with elabo-
rate commercial entertainment
shows," she said. "We Just don't
have that kind of money. What
we can't do with fancy produc-
tion, we try to make up for by
Interesting subject matter.
"The fact that adults come to
school with us when they could
escape with a flick of a button
convinces me that many televi-
sion fans want 'meat' as well as
whipped cream' on their enter-
tainment menu."
OFFICIAL LIS OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Prize-WinninK Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1712, Sunday, December 30, 1951
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided in two serles "A" Si "B" of 22 pieces each.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
5415
8876
7502
$ 44,000.00
$ 13,200.00
$ 6,600.00
No
Mil
US
21S
315
MIS
MIS
MIS
Mil
Mil
MIS
PrlM
I
13Z.M
1J2.M
132.
133.00
2.2M.M
1321
132.lt
112.H
132 It
11Z.N
Nee Mi MM Priiii No. Prlior INK Mee. Nat Print No. Mia. No* Prixai No*. Mm*
J* t t S S S
MIS 1*M MIS 132 It MIS 132.M MIS 132.M MIS 132.M M15 132.M 7(15 132.M MIS 132.M
HIS -132.M 2113 132.M 3I1S 132.M 41 132.M 5115 132.M SI 132.M 7115 132.M SI 132.M
1215 132.11 2215 132.M 3215 132.N 4215 132.M 5215 132.M 215 132.H 7215 I32.M S215 132.M
1115 1S2.M 2313 I3Z.M 3315 I32.M 4315 132.M 5315 132 It 4315 132.M 73 I32.N 83 132.M
MIS 2.2M.M MIS 2.2*0.00 MIS 2.2M.M MIS 2.2M.M 54 44.M0.M M 2.2MM 74 2.2M.M MIS 2.2M.M 1
IMS 132.M 2SIS 132*0 MI5 132.M 4515 132*0 5515 132.M MIS 132.M 7515 I32.H 515 132.M
MIS 132.M 2*15 132*0 M15 132.M M15 132.M K15 13200 M15 132.04 7*15 132.H MIS 132M
ITU 132M 2715 132.** 37IS 132.M 4715 132.M 5715 132 00 1715 132.M 7715 13LM 17 132.M I
1I1S 132.M MIS 132.M 3815 132.M M15 132.M MIS 132.M M IB.** It 132.M M I32.M 1
MIS I32.M MIS 132M 3913 132.M 4115 132.M M15 132.11 M 132.M 71 132.M MIS 132.M
No.
MU
1
MIS
S3
MU
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MIS
7
MU
MIS
I
132.SS
1J2M
ss.**
132.M
USftM
1M.M
132M
112.M
III.M
132.M
Approximations Derived From First Prize
mm' 54*7 4M.M 1 MM 4M.M 1 MM 1 44 M Ml* 44*.M 5411 i 440*0 444.M MI2 4M.M M13 44*.M 1 S i MM 44I.M M17 444.M M MIS 4M.MI M 4M.M| MM 4M.M 5421 4M.M 1 5422 1 44t.lt 5423 4M.MI54M 4M.M 4M.M
Approximations )erived From Second Prize
M7( SM7 IMS ZM.M llt.M llt.M 1S7C SMS M7I 4 if 2M.M 2M' 2M.M 3S7I ZM.M llt.M M71 lll.M M73 llt.M llt.M M72 llt.M M74 llt.M s 4S7S 22IM M75 1M.M M77 llt.M s 5176 22IM M7S llt.M 887 lll.M H7( MM SMI 2M.M llt.M llt.M 7S7I i 2M.M M74 t ZM.M
SM2 S8S3 llt.M llt.M MM SMS lll.M lll.M
Approximations Derived From Third Prize
MM 74S3 74M S 132 M M.M MM 1512 74M 74M 1 132.M M.M M.M 2M2 74*7 74M i 132.11 M.M H.M t 3MI 132.M 74M M.M 7SM H.M s 4512 132.M 7M1 M.M 7M3 M.M SM2 132.M 4M2 1 132.M MM 1 132.M MM 1 132.M
75M H.M 7M5 U.M 75M 7M7 H.M H.M 75M 75M M.M M.M 75 7511 M.M M.M
Prize-winning numbers of vesterday's Lottery drawing were sold: 1st and 3rd in Panam; 2nd in Chlriqui.
The nine hundred whole tickets ending in 5 and not included in the above list win Forty-Four Dollars ($44.) ea.
The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprise the two series "A" and "B."
Signed by: DR. LEOPOLDO MAZZOLA, Governor of the Province.
HUMBERTO PAREDES C, Representative of the Ministry of Treasury.
iviTurccec Emilia GuardiaCd. No. 28-1546.
Wl I NtMth. Luis F. Carrion Q Cd. No. 47.262
CARLOS CRISMATT
Notary Public, Panam
PABLO A. PINEL M.
Secretary
herfiotyVeds Qastfe&s


30 Years of Soviet Espionage In
the united States," which was a
70-page rehash of previously dis-
closed Russian spy cases.
The booklet did reveal, how-
ever, that the committee still is
investigating an unidentified
former Justice Department at-
torn ev whom It accused of hand-
ing FBI information to a Red
spy ring in 1937 and 1938.
The report said the attorney
was a contact for the spy ring
headed by Oaik Badalovlch Ova-
klmlan. arrested for espionage in
1941 but allowed to return to
Russia.
The committee said the attor-
ney was suspended June 17,1941,
and allowed to resign Oct. 31,
1941. He later was employed by
the Office of Price Administra-
tion, the report said.
The committee labeled this the
"third Instance'' Involving the
Justice Department.
It listed Judith Copln and Al-
ger Hiss as the other two.
A Justice Department spokes-
man said Hiss worked in the soli-
citor-general's office from Aug.
15, 1935, to Aug. 31, 1936.
Since we're not crystol oozers, we conncrf tall
whot the future hold for you or for ourselves.
But, basing our thoughts on the post, we con
soe nothing but happiness and prosperity for
the fine people of this community. You or*
deserving of oil the good things of life and
it A our hope *hot next yeor, ond the futuro
years, will bring you much good.
US 4 AMIBAS DEL PUEBLO
LA BIZKAYNA EL BATURRO
Mercado BIZKAYNA Mercado BATURRO
Miqtik'i
mikmA!
"Tfie nw front appearance
will delight you! So simple,
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CEREAI in POOT-TBN8 10
packages give the entire family
it* favorite choioa of cereal at
breakfast! Try some todayl
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-Post-TNS
m* HIERCURY
YOUB FIRST l-OOK wiD tell TOU
that the 1951 Mercury is a car
brimming over with eye-filling fea-
tures: new styling, new interior,
new trim.
Your first drite will tell you that
here is an automobile with every-
thing: honeyed smoothness, family
comfort, safety, and economy. And
remember, the 1951 Mercury is spe-
cially engineered to fit your local
driving condition?.
And the 1951 Mercury offers a
double choice for "the drive of your
life"-thrifty Tooch-O-Matic Over-
drive (optional at extra cost) and
the silent-ease synchronised stand-
ard transmission.
Get the complete story today from
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New rear wlndow-oW 1000
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CAPTIVATING
BEAUTY
TOOTH PASTE



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAT, DECEMBER SI, 1M1
r\GETEW _........ ._.............................- i
New Year's Day Bowl Teams At Full Strength
Several Squads In Final
Light Workouts This PM
By UNITED PRESS
The entries in this years New years' Day bowl ames are
"'"And most of the squads apparently will be at full strength
for the annual grid extravasanzas.
Georgia Tech and Baylor look the day off yesterday and
will run through final light drills today before squaring-off in
the Orange Bowl at Miami. Baylor is at full strength and
Tech's only doubtful starter is offensive tackle Hal .Miller.
Kentuckv recovering from a siege of the flu worked -
out this afternoon. The Wildcats' Cotton Bowl opposition
T-C-U has onlv one more lifiht workout scheduled. The
Frogs are at full strength for the Dallas. Texas, game.
Both Tennessee and Maryland are ready to move into tne
Sugar Bowl at New Orleans. A rash of injuries apparently have
responded to treatment and both teams will be going full-speed.
Stanford and Illinois will run through loosening-up drills to.
day for the Rose Bowl classic at Pasadena, California. Both
teams have some injuries and both coaches are tinging the
A full-scale grudge battle is shaping up in the Gator Bowl
at Jacksonville, Florida, where Clemson plays Miami. Last year,
Miami and Clemson played in the Orange Bowl and Clemson
won 15-14 in the last seconds on three 15-yard penalties and a
Miami will move to Jacksonville today and will hold a final
drill. Clemson arrived Friday.
The weather outlook for the Southern bowl games couldn't
be better. Teams worked-out yesterday in temperatures ranging
as high 80 degrees. And the mild conditions are to continue
through New Years. But a drizzling rain fell steadily in Cali-
fornia and the prediction is for rain at the Rose Bowl.
Races Tomorrow
1st Race "F-l" Natives 7 Fgs.'3Royal Coup)
Purse: $275.00Pool Closes 12:45,4Main Road)
First Race of the Doubles
1VUlarreal M. Hurley 115
2Caaveral E. Sllvera 105
3Bijagual C. Ruiz 120
4Mona Lisa O. Bravo 112
5Diez de Mayo F. Rose 115
(5Torcaza J. Rodriguez 114
7Romntico A. Mena 115
I 5Galante II
16Tomebamba
7Dictador
K Flores 128
O. Bravo 110
O. Chaola 105
J. Contr'r'a 108
V. Castillo 110
Bombers, Browns Clash
At Colon Stadium Today
2nd Race "F-2" Natives6 i Fgs
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
Silver City Sports
Silver City Baseball Playground
League
The Silver City Playground
League, which is sponsored by
the Physical Education and Re-
creation Branch, of the Division
of Schools, entertained the local
fans with the first came of the
second half of the league at the
Silver City Playground. Mayor
Brownie met Almcndares with
the latter winning by a 8-6 score
on Thursday.
Mavor Brownie held Almenda-
res hitless and scoreless for four
straight Innings while scoring
six runs on four hits. The fifth
Inning was decisive for Almen-
dares when they collected seven
hits and eight runs off the Mayor
Brownie mound throwers.
1Eclipse
2Hercules
3Campesino
4Rio Mar
5El Mono
6Tap Girl
B. Agulrre 113
C. Ruiz 114
B. Pulido 120
R. Vsquez 113
8th Race "I-l" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Cobrador C. Ruiz 116
2Frutal V. Castillo 114
3Costina H. Alzamora 112
4Charles S. J. Phillips 109
5Miss Matty O. Chants 112
6Beach Sun E. Guerra 109
7Zevelania M. Arosemena 106
8Astoria C. BovU 115
J. Baeza, Jr. 108x 9th Race "G" Imported6V4 Fgs.
V. Castillo 120 | Purse: $450.00 .Pool Closes 5:15
._____ One-Two
3rd Race "H" ImportedIK Fgs., l_Rlnty BAgu!Fre. H?
Purse: $100.00 Pool Closes 1:45 2Breeze Bound B. P
One-Two
1Vampiresa M. Guerrero 112
2Miss Fairfax B. Aguirre 113
3Delhi B. Pulido 112
4Trafalgar E. Corcho 109x
5-Hlt J- Avila 120
6Silver Fox H. Alzamora 114
4th Race "H" Imported44 Fgs.i 3Bartolo
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 2:20!4Balota
3Scotch Chum A. Mena 106
4-Bendigo K. Flores 110
5Picn J. Oontreras 112
10th Race "l-t" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:40
11Lacnico
'2Dora's Time)
Batteries for Almcndares and
Mayor Brownie respectively were
Gordon. Small-Franklin. Small
and Montez. Bartley-Smith, De-
Sousa.
Standings of the first half:
TEAM Won Lost Pet.
Mavor Brownie. ..3 0 1.000
Almendares.....1 2 .333
Red Sox........1 2 .333
St. Louis......0 3 .000
FAR BETWEEN
EAST LANSING. Mich. (NEA)
Michigan State's 1951 un-
beaten football season marked
the first time since 1913 the
Spartans finished the campaign
with an unblemished record.
Quiniela
1-Lituana J. Phillips 114
2-Batt. Cloud B. Aguirre 114
3Montmartre G. Graell 120
4Levadura O. Bravo 20
5Supersticiosa M. Guerre. 112
6Marlscallto Jos Rodgz. 113
5th Race "D" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes 2:55
l_Mimo E. Gugnot 13
2-Newminster O Bravo 112
3_Welsh Loch R Vasquez 20
4-Roadmastcr O. Chains 106
5-The B. Road M. Hurley 112
fith Race "F" Imported1 Mile
Purse: S500.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
l_Cyc. Malone B. Aguirre 114
5Vermont
C. Ruiz 112
A. Mena 114
F. Rose 114
A. Bazn 114
E. Sllvera 120
2Piragua
3Curaca
4Alabarda
5Rocky
6Pblico
7Hurlecano
V Castillo 112
A. Mena 118
Jos Rodgz. 110
C. Lino 112
.C. Ruiz 120
O. Bravo 112
7th Race "Open" Import-7 Fgs
Purse: S2.000.08 (added) Pool
Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
"NEW YEAR'S CLASSIC
1-Chacabuco M. Art'men 106
2 Gris B. Af ulrre 11J
Georgia Tech Cops
Carolina Invitational
Basketball Tourney
CHARLOTTE,'N.C.. Dec. 31
(UP) Georgia Tech left no
doubt about the ownership of the
Carolina Invitational Basketball
Tournament crown in Charlotte,
N.C., Saturday night when it beat
Davidson 78 to 60.
Davidson managed to hold the
Yellow jackets for only seven
minutes of the first period when
the score was tied 15 to 15. But
Pete Silas, who paced the Tech-
sters for 17 points In the game,
flipped In a push shot to give
Georgia Tech a lead it never lost
during the rest of the game.
Tech went Into the second per-
iod riding on a slim 19 to 16 lead,
but before the second quarter
was over there was no doubt a-
bout the outcome. The Jackets
widened the score to 43 to 27 at
half time, and held up the 62. to
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
The Standings
TEAM Won Lost Pet
Yankees........ 3 .756
Bombers........7 3 .766
Bluebirds.......6 -500
Brownies.......1 0S3
TODAY'S GAME
Coln Stadium (4 p.m.)
Brownies (Burke 0-4) ?*. Bomb-
ers (Johnson 2-1).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT
Balboa Stadium
Yankees 7, Bluebirds 5.
The Bombers are scheduled to
play the last place Brownies this
afternoon at the Colon Stadium
The game will get under way at
4 p.m. with Ernest Burke of the
Brownies opposing Connie John-
son of the Bombers
Burke will be seeking Ms ""'
victory of the season and will al-
so be tryis- to PWM*5ftJ8!
less Brow.-N.; from establishing
a new league record for conse-
cutive defeats. A Brownie loss
will give them an even dozen
straight setbacks to wipe out the
previous record of eleven In a
row held Jointly by the Brownies
and the Yankees
Last night at the Balboa Sta-
dium the Yanks Increased their
league lead over the second place
Bombers to a full game by virtue
of their 7-5 win over the Blue-^
birds in a good game
In the ninth Inning of the
game umpire-ln-chlef Leonard
45-polnt margin to testify to
their superiority.
The cagers of Coach Don Hyd-
er entered the tournament not
expecting to do better than
clinch third place. But the blis-
tering 79 to 62 victory over Au-
burn Saturday afternoon set the
pace for the point-happy Geor-
gia team.
Only Joe Dudley, a sophomore
center, showed the class It would
have taken to clip Georgia Tech.
He flipped in 16 points and was
the only Wildcat eager who hit
with consistency.
In the consolation game play-
ed earlier, South Carolina dis-
posed of pre-tournament favor-
ite Auburn 70 to 67. Duane Mor-
risonthe South Carolina for-
wardset a tournament high of
27 points for a single contest.
W. Roberts was knocked uncon-
scious when hit on the head by a
foul tip off the bat of Eddie FUo.
Roberts was examined on the
field by several doctors. After
regaining consciousness, he was
taken to Gorgas Hospital for ob-
servation.
Albrook Blue Jays Whip J. C.
To Cop Basketball Tournament
Easi Nips West
15-14 In Grid
Shrine Game
SAN FRANCISCO, Dee. 31
(UP)A spirited Eastern ele-
ven churned through the mud
to win the 27th annual East-
West Shrine Bowl Game, 15-14,
at San Francisco Saturday
night. The passing and run-
ning of Dick Kazmaier and Al
Darow and a 32-yard field goal
by Vic Janowict of Ohio State
sank the favored Western
team.
Janowici's field goal In the
first quarter put the East a-
head, 3-6. He missed two con-
version attempts as the teams
scored two touchdowns each in
the ensuing periods, and his
field goal proved the differ-
ence.
The East outplayed the West,
especially during the first half
when they threatened to turn
the game into a rout. Kazma-
ier, a Princeton AU-Amerlcan,
and Darow of Michigan State
alternated in passing to eaeh
other to roll up most of the
Eastern yardage.
The West was unable to
make a first down during the
first quarter and didn't threat-
en during the half. But some
great running by Frank Git-
ford of Southern California
and Glen Lippman of Texas A.
and M. made it closer in the
third and fourth periods. Lipp-
man scored on a 52-yard gal-
lop in the last four minutes.
Albrook Blue Jays did it this
time. Playing a rather listless
game, they managed to take
the measure of a well drilled
and hard playing Junior Col-
lege team 42 to 38, and there-
by won, the Second Annual
Canal Zone Junior College In-
vitational Basketball Tourna-
ment. In the preliminary game
the Cristobal High team took
home of the third place trophy
by virtue of their win over the
Balboa squad, 37-32.
The biggest crowd of the
tournament was on hand wit-
ness two very well played
games. Albrook was at full
strength for the first time in
the tournament, and they need-
ed It all to subdue to Collegians.
The Blue Jays seemed to lack
the spark they had shown In
their two previous wins during
the tournament, and worked
Just hard enough to keep a
small advantage throughout
the game.
J. C. took a short lived lead
to start things off, but after
about 2 minutes of play the
Servicemen took over and were
never headed after that. At the
end of the first quarter they
held a slim 8-9 lead, and by
the end of the half had added
another point to make It 17
to 19. Don Lee was the big gun
for the Champs with 14 points,
and he scored 11 of these In
the first half.
By the end of the third
quarter Albrook had a 30-35
head start, and from here on
In the they seemed content to
let the Green Wave try and
catch them. This they almost
did, as they got to within 1
point of the Blue Jays before
Don Lee pushed In a 2 pointed
to give them another 3 point
advantage. For almost three
minutes In the four quarter
the score stood at 36-37, with
neither team able to cash in
on the several scoring oppor-
tunities they had.
Score stood at 30-36 for a
short period of time, then Sal
Scalafanl added a charity toss
to make It 40. Seconds later
j.C.'s Manuel Roy pushed to a
bucket, only to have BUI Sharp
duplicate it for Albrook. Thla
was the way things stood aa
the final buzzer went off.
The preliminary game be-
tween the two high schools was
a well played ball game on tho
part of both teams. Balboa took
a lead In the first part of the
game and was able to hold on
to It until the 4th quarter when
Arnold Manning tied It up with,
a free throw at 30 point each.
As the fourth quarter wore on
the Cristobal lads played heads
up ball, and stopped the Bull-i
dogs from scoring 5 different I
times, and three of these five
Intercepted passes that even-1
tually resulted in scores for;
them. Balboa was only able to1
score 2 points In the fourth
quarter, while the Tigers added
8 to their score. Bob Bailey, was
the high man for Cristobal with
10 points, and Gene Rlchter was
high for Balboa with 15 points.
Immediately after the end of
the second game. Dean Roger
C. Hackett presented the tro-
6hies to the winning teams. Al-
rook too the attractive Pana-
ma Tours Trophy home with
the Championship, Junior Col-
lege got the second place tro-
phy and Cristobal got the con-:
solation award.
Juan Franco Tip
By "CLOCKER"
1Mona Lisa Romntico
2Campesino Eclipso
3Miss Fairfax Delhi
4Levadura Montmartre
5Newmlniter The Bath Road
Hurlecano Cyclone Malone
7Main Road () Grists
8 Frutal Miss Matty
9 Rinty Breeze Bound
10Lacnico Dora's Time ()
"GAS" LIGHT
A candle light "goes out" when
you blow it. because you blow a-
way the gases which feed the
flame. In lighting a candle, tho
match must be held to the wick
long enough for the wax to begin
to melt and from gases.
I


:>*-!

t&OptUCK^l
fuUoHUck.HoPPy^V0"
/ lew year L,lc


''/

:ew uear classic
7th Race Importeds (Open) 7 Fgs.
Purse: $2,000.00 (Added) Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
1. CHACABUCO.....M. Arosemena (1) 106
2. GRISU...............B. Aguirre (2) 113
3. (ROYAL COUP......... K. Flores (3) 128
4. (MAIN ROAD..........0. Bravo (5) 110
5. GALANTE II.........0. Chanis (4) 105
6. TOMEBAMBA......J. Contreras (6) 108
7. DICTADOR........... V. Castillo (7) 110

rfl
M
rr\


MONDAY, DECEMBER SI, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
r i i ii -i -----
ft.
Untried Frosh, Sophs Key Men In Big Ten As Kalafat Upsets Kentucky
TIGER TAKES TRQPHY-^Dick Kasmaier wears a wide grin
alter being awarded the Heisngan Memorial Trophy at New York'i
Downtown Athletic Club. A national poll of more than 1200 sports
(writer and broadcasters picked the Princeton atar as the out-
standing college football player in America. (NEA)
There are lovely and lively carda at hand conveying the
season's greetings from such as Tommy Lyman, last of the
moaning-low pappas; Bob Edge, a sports broadcaster who has
something more than an edge over some of his colleagues when
It comes to honest reporting; Fred Capossela, the turf narrat.
or, who calls claiming races with a,Bryan Field inflection and
stakes events more like Noel Coward; Ted Blair, Yale optimist
adn author of the best seller "You Can't Win 'Em All."

Big Jim Farley, who will, remember 1951 with abysmal
shame because he got mixed up In the first names of two
sport* columnists In writing to them from Rome: Will Harridge,
whose smoothly run American League refleects his unusual
executive ability; Frank Hogan, the hard-hitting DA., who has
turned out more basketball players than Holman, Bee and Rupp
combined. (Leave us not mention where he turned them). Dick
Andrade III, whose horses seldom do as well as third; Fred
Corcoran, who manages Ted Williams, Babe Dldrlkson and Otto
Graham and, to quote the late Jack White, "what a parlay."
f
J. O. Taylor Spink, obviously a man of letters. Boy Campa-
nula, Inc., and staff in a holiday salute from Harlem, which
includes everything but the price list on their wines and liquors.
The Atlantic City Racing Assn. pleased as punch that relations
between the owners and the press box have been so cordial.
Without stint or equivocation, the McGregor Golf Co., forwards
"all good wishes for the New Year." And the North Essex Buick
Co., inc.. Is thankful "for your friendship and good will through.
out the past year."

Ruby Goldstein whose high talents as a referes do not
include infallibility. (Aside to WJ.D. Manhattan: On the con-
trary, I rate body punches high. I may not be able to Judge
a fight any better, or as well as Goldstein, but there have been
times when the young man was out of lien, and I definitely
think he was In the Cartler-Gavilan bout. Maybe Gaviln wasn't
leading "comfortably" going into the 10th. but he certainly
didn't need a knockout to win. And for youf information, I had
something more than a rooting interest in Cartler going for
sue that night)

Steve Hannagan, who made a million by crossing Miami
sunshine with typewrter moonshne. Charley Dressen and the
mssus (see cut) beaming as f Bob Thomson's homer was some
crude person's idea of a practical Joke; Harry MendelL who
arranged the Joe Louis "retirement," and Abe Green, the com.
missioner, who gave it his official blesJsng. (Wonder of the
whole story of that one has ever been told?) Joe Walsh, the
movie genius, who discovered a new heroic profile, practically
another Barrymore, in the current film short, "Channel Swim-
mer." Don't tell me you didn't recognise the Old Colonel. Jack
Lavelle, a football humorist who doesn't use Joe Miller as his
blocking back.

Valerie and Ben Hogan, golf's Juliet and Romeo; Patty Berg,
whose golfing skills don't get the full critical recognition they
warrant. A really fine .little player. Larry Gardner, who tells
so many amusing stories about Babe Ruth as a Red Sox rookie,
and who is serving his last year as Vermont's director of ath-
letics; Jean and Tom Yawkey, whr may or may not have am-
using stories to tell about Ted WUims. Hazel and George Weiss,
who are much too nice to telL-^imislng stories about what hap-
pens to the Red Sox when >tiey face the Yankees. Ed Barrow,
the stalwart old campaigner, who put all his stories, amusing
and otherwise, in an absorbing book this year, "My 50 Years in
Baseball."

Allison Danzig and Peter Brandwein, coeditors of "The
Greatest Sports Stories from The New York Times." An im-
portant and fascinating contribution to sports literature. And
to students o journalism, a rewarding study of under.the-gun
reporting, accounts of epic sports events composed within min-
utes after they took place. There are some pieces in this massive
book (MO pages) which are especially recommended to E. B.
White, who felt It necessary to explain, by way of apology, he
had only a half dosen hours or so to turn out the Harold Ross
obituary, a routine procedure the city side takes in stride ev-
ery day in the week

The Fred Aliens (with the brilliant comic looking unbeliev-
ably alive). Chick Meehan, Eddie Dyer (who appears to have
r; baseball for good, Andy Kerr, Midget Smith, Clem McCar-
, Burris Jenk.na Jr., (and Just how many names does the dis.
tlngulshed cartoonist manage to work Into his amazing Christ-
mas cartoon?) Frank Stevens, Clarence Rowland, Eddie Bagan,
who must be so much happier now that he's free of the prize
ring and Its headaches. TrumanTruman Gibson of IBC, that
Isto all these nice people, to those I've missed, Indeed, to each
and every one, Including Acme Nut & Bolt Co., (freight depart-
ment), thanks for your thoughtful greetings and the same
to you.
"DITTO"
THE DUPLICATOR THAT DOES NOT USE INK
PRINTS IN 4 COLORS
COMPLETE STpCK OF ACCESSORIES ON HAND
ASK FOR A C-"-0*'STnAnON!
V
MYDikv THUS. INC
Ave. Ttvetl No. It
TL 2-2016
Wisconsin Ace
Compared To
An All-America
BY E. C. JAMIESON
NEA Special Correspondent
COLUMBUS, O, Dec. 11 (NEA)
New faces may hold the key
to the Big 10 basketball cham-'
plonship.
Most of the teams will rely to
a areat extent on freshmen or
sophomores untested In collegiate
ranks.
Minnesota's spark Is Ed Kala-
fat. The six-foot-six soph cen-
ter, who weighs 244 pounds,
racked up 30 points In the Goph-
er's upset victory over top-rank-
ed Kentucky-
Ohio State may have the prize
newcomer In Bill Ebert, six-foot-
five sophomore center who is ex-
ceptionally talented. He performs
with the coolness of a veteran.
Then there's Paul Morrow, six-
foot-seven sophomore center at
Wisconsin Morrow already Is be-
ing compared with Don Rehfeldt.
the Badgers' All-America center
of a few years ago.
MEAD MICHIGAN'S MAN
Michigan's brightest newcom-',
er appears to be Milt Mead, a
six-foot-four sophomore forward.
Indiana has Don Schlundt, six-
font -nine freshman center.
On Northwestern's squad of 13
are six sophomores and four
freshmen. The best of the new
crop may be freshman forward
Frank Ehmanti and sophomore
forward Don Blaha.
Before the season i very old,
sophomores Johnny Kerr and
Max Hooper may have earned
starting positions with Illinois,
the defending champion.
Iowa's top newcomers are Bill
Stenger and Ken Tuckles. from
Davenport's state high cham-
pions of 1950, and freshman Mc-
Klnley Davis.
Top Challenger Moore Is Denied
Chance, Even Boxing For Dollar
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK. Dec. 31 (NEAi
In these days of upside-down
match-making, when a fighter
gets kicked upstairs for losing.
Archie Moore hasn't a China-
man's chance.
Moore for five years has been
the number one challenger for
the llght-heavywelght champion-
ship. Yet the closest be has come
to a crack at the crown was
a match with Bob 8atterfleld two
years ago in Toledo, where he
knocked out the then second-
ranking aspirant in the third Abe j QleeDe the New Jersey
round. boxing commissioner and peren-
Moore. a 34-year-old St Louis nlal nead of ^ Natlonal Boxing
Negro operating out of Toledo Association, had Lesn e v 1 c h
and San Diego Is the champion matched ^^ Maxlm for tM
of Australia and South America ,!,. championship, and
His best weight is 173 or 174 tbt work a|?amst Moore went on
pounds, but he concedes as much fr0m there
as 92 pounds and flattens heavy- ^^ te runm^ out on Archie
weights. Moore, but not nearly fast en-
He has beaten every toughie 0 h ^ 8ult the ught-heavy-
he could get in fee same to- N33n, ge'Ring the more im-
closure with the exception of Ez- oartlEt money
zard Charles. p
He has scored 69 knockouts <"'
250,000 To Play
Little League
Baseball In '52
WILLIAMSPORT, Pa., Dee. 31
(NEA) Like Topsy, Little
League Baseball Just grows and
grows.
Commissioner Carl Stots esti-
mates that more than 2000
leagues will operate next season.
This will include 250.000 boys,
between the ages of eight and
12.
Last Summer, 778 leagues held
franchises in 38 states, as well
as Canada. Alaska, Hawaii, Cu-
ba, Canal Zone and Puerto Rico.
There were 80,000 youngster
playing In the program in 1851.
In 1950. 306 leagues operated.
SMALLEST CAGES
EAST LANSING. Mien. (NBA)
Michigan State's flve-foOt
five-inch sophomore guard. *le-
key Ayala, a Brooklyn product,
is the smallest eager playing at
a major school.
Ernest Hall, sophomore for-
ward, looms as Purdue's best
scoring threat. Another soph. Ted
Server, is a real ball hawk and
may crash the starting lineup
oefre mid-season.
At Michigan State, isx-foot-
four DeNeai Hartman and six-
foot-slx Hugh MacMaster are
dueling for the center position
with the former having the in-
side track. Both are sophomores.
Because of the lifting of the
rule against freshmen, there is an
over-abundance of new men in
the Western Conference.
And the caliber of the new-
comers seems to be far above
average.
Juan Franco
Muluel Dividends
FIRST RACE
1Villarreal $7.40. $2.60. $2.40.
2El Mono $3.80, $2.80.
3Opex $2.80.
8ECOND RACE
1Dies de Mayo $5.40, $3.
2Cosa Linda $4.60.
Pirst Doubles: (VUlarresl-Dle
de Mayo) $15.40.
THIRD RACE
1Tulra $6. $3.20.
2Carbonero $4.40.
One-Two: (Tulra-Carbonero)
$84.66.
FOURTH RACE
1Sixaola $7.60. $3.40, $2.40.
2Mandinga $3.60, $2.60.
3Pregonero $2.60.
Quiniela: (Sixaola-Mandlnga)
112.86.______
FIFTH RACE
1Keyhaven $3.80, $2.40.
2Mllros $2.40.
SIXTH RACE
1Di Time $7.60, $5, $2.60.
2Rechupete $6, $3.20.
3Frutal $2.20.
SEVENTH RACE
1Hurlecano $7.40, $4.0, $4.20.
2 Hechizo $3.80, $4.20.
3Picon $2.60.
Second Doubles: (In Time-
Burlecano) $25.8$.
EIGHTH RACE
1Delhi $4.60, $2.80, $2.40.
2Cobrador $2.80. $2.40.
3Armeno $3.60.
Quiniela: (Delhi Cobrador)
$8.46.
NINTH RACE
1The Bath Rd $11, $5.80, $3.60.
2Alto Alegre (e) $7.60, $7.80.
3Beduino (e) $7.80.......t.
One-Two: (The Bath Road-
Alto Alegre) $87.40.
TENTH RACE
l_Wlnsaba $5.60. $2.80.
2 Campesino $2.20.
Bran by Is After
White's Record
BOULDER. Colo.. Dee. SI
(NEA) Whlxzer White Is the
only man In Colorado's 80 year's
of athletics to win nine varsity
letters.
Thirteen years after the All-
America back graduated, Don
Branby threatens to equal the
record. Last year as a sopho-
more, the Glen wood, Minn., star
won letters In football, basket-
ball and baseball. The 195-pound
)IG SHOTSWisconsin's Paul Morrow, inset, to compared with
tea Rehfeldt, the Badgers' All-America of a few years age. Oh j
Stele's BUI Ebert performs with the eeolness of a veteran. (NEA)
College Basketball
Results
By UNITED FRESS
end has twice been named on
the Big Seven's All-Conference j ir,a>w+*aT" Delaware 44
SATURDAY
DIXIE CLASSIC
(Championship)
No. Carolina St. 51, Cornell 49
No. Carolina 81, Columbia 60
So. California 87, Duke 69
8UGAR BOWL
Kansas 75, Missouri 65 (Cham-
pionship)
Kansas St. 84, Oklahoma 69
Stanford 75, Colorado 69
Iowa State 75, Nebraska 68
BOSTON INVITATION
(Championship)
Holy Cross 78, Boston College 59
Bucknell 75, Arizona (Temps)
State 67
HOOSIER CLASSIC
Notre Dame 64, Purdue 50
Indiana 87, Butler 71
GATOR BOWL
Clemson 85, Georgia 68
Florida 61, Florida State 51
S.W. CONFERENCE TOUBNEY
(Championship)
Tex. Chris. 65, Texas A.&M. 35
Arkansas 58, Baylor 44
Rice 52, Southern Methodist 47
Texas 85, Vanderbilt 49
ALL-COLLEGE TOUBNEY
(Championship)
Oklahoma City 52, Tulsa 1
Tulane 73, Alabama 87
Wyoming 84, San Francisco 48
Oklahoma A.&M. 52, Idaho 42
CAROLINA INVITATION
(Championship) f
Georgia Tech 78, Davidson 60
South Carolina 70, Auburn 67
Georgia Tech 79, Auburn 62
Davidson 87, So. Carolina 63
HOFSTRA TOURNEY
(Championship)
Wagner 51, Alfred 48
Hofssra 58, Cortland 43
MIDWEST TOURNEY
(Championship)
Wayne (Det.) 89, Ottawa (Kan.)
Indiana State 79, Indiana Cen-
tral 59
KNOX TOURNEY
(Championship)
Monmouth 73, Cornell (la.) 88
Knox Bgy.Augustana 47
ENID TOURNEY
(Championship)
Regis 3, Ft. Hayes Tehrs. (Kan.)
East Central (Okhv) 88, Peru
(Neb.) 67
Arkansas Tech 88, Washburn
(Kan.) 52
East Texas Baptist 51, Phillips
Univ. 48
SUNSHINE TOURNEY
(Championship)
8'west (Ohla.) State 84, Central
State 2
Panhandle A.AM. 45, East New
Mexico 38
Southeast (Okla.) St. 76, Howard
Payne 41
Abilene Christian 58, Col. Col-
lege 58
SUN CARNIVAL
N.Texas St. 77, Texas'Western 58
N. Mexico A.&'M. 12, W. Texas St.
JAYCEE TOURNEY
Ricks (Idaho) 80, Compton (Cal.)
57
Cs-'on (Utah) 55, Weber (Utah)
Dixie (Utah) 55, Mesa (Cole.) 52
SPARTAN CLASSIC
Michigan State $2, Princeton 48
Minnin 75, Dartmouth 62
OTHER GAMES
EAST
St. John's (Bkn.) 82, Dayton 88
Louisville 67, Manhattan 88
Utah 58, St. Joseph's (PHA) 42
St. Bostaventure 73, Western
Kentucky 88
Canislus 89, Ariiona 78
St. Francis (Bkn.) 87, Illiaois
Wesleysa 41
Bowling Green 82, Hamline 68
Xavier (O.) 77, Cincinnati 70
Toledo 76, Wash. A Lee 59
Colby 78/ Baldwin-Wallace 76
Duquesne 79, Yoangstown 42
Marshall 89, Wittenberg 61
Akron 87, Oblo Wesleyan 75
Superior (Wls.) 72, St. Cloudy
(Minn.) 84
Eau Claire (Wls.) 72, Ripon 64
Beloit 111, Kan. Wesleyan 63
Coe 88, Loras 62
So. Dakota St. 73, Grinnell 59
Detroit 88, John Carroll 89
Western Michigan 74, Northern
Illinois 68
Wheaton 87, St. Ambrose (la.) 82
Western III. 14. Ifthern ill. 68
Minnesota Duluth 81, No. Dak-
ota State 54
SOUTH
Penn 89, Miami 84
Stetson 64, Yale 52
Northwestern La. 71, Northeast-
ern La. 49
Taylor (Ind.) 74, Southwestern
La 85
Presbyterian 62, Fort Jackson 44
Enka 87, East Tennessee 74
FAR WEST
Washington 83, Northwestern 60
Santa Clara 8$, Utah State 62
Wash. Satte 62, Ohio State 54
Memphis St. 86, Whltwerth 55
Vanport 65, So. Oregon 82
Colorado A.&M. 87, Lewis A Clark
79
San Diego State M, Seattle 49
Oregon 58, St. Mary's (Cal.) 58
Fresno State 88, Chico State 54
Montana St. 88, Eastern Wish. 59
Eastern Montana 17, Northern
Wyoming 57
121 starts throughout 16 years.
"Moore is a highly-satisfactory
performer,'' says Al Welll, the In- ]
ternatlonal Boxing Club's New
York matchmaker. "He walks
right in keeps the other fellow
busy all the while. He Is an ex-
cellent boxer, a two-fisted
pouncher and a master ring gen-
eral.
Why hasn't he boxed Harry
Matthews. Irish Bob Murphy or
Joey Maxim? Why didn't he box
Gus Lesnevlch when he was on
top? He was and is too good,
that's why."
A PRIZE FIGHTER HAS TO
BELONG TO THE GUILD
Jersey Joe Walcott acquired
the heavyweight championship
in his fifth shot, two against Joe
Louis. When he finally gets a-
round to it, the Great Father of
Camden will defend the crown
against Charles in their fourth
meeting. Charles outgalloped
Maxim for the fifth time in San
Francisco the other night.
There Is additional unmistak-
able evidence In these times of
the One Big Happy Monopoly
that a prize fighter has to be-
long to the guild. Murphy get-
ting the titular engagement with
Maxim in place of Matthews, and
the latter being sentenced to the
outlying precincts, for examples.
Moore's name popped up in
the course of the negotiations
for the Maxim-Matthews match,
but was laughed off as usual
with, "He wouldn't draw."
Moore offered to box either
Maxim or Matthews for $1, and
when Ray Robinson stuck his
nose into it, the veteran of the
run-around said he would take
on the middleweight monarch
Just for the exercise.
HERE'S A CHANCE FOR AN
ALL-OUT BENEFIT
If Sugar Ray Robinson wants
to make one of his charitable
gestures against someone other
than a rank sucker, here's his
rand opportunity, with the en-
Ire gate going to the cause.
Moore was the ranking chal-
lenger when Lesnevlch lost the
leadership to Freddie Mills in
London in July, 1948.
But Moore couldn't as much
as get himself arrested even with
the "foreign flavor. Joining those
Wllliamette 57, Central Wssh. 47 disregarding the fellow who had
team.
A week after the 1991 grid cam-
paign ended, Branby was nailing
own a regular guard post on
i-. r-,,ff gage gquad. He plays
third bass on the baseball team
.ie is an outstanding candidate
for the ski team.
Brooklyn Poly 184, Bates 72
Siena 51, Lafayette IS
Rochester 78, Colgate 61
Washington A Jefferson 68, City
College of New York 58
Connecticut 88, Puerto Rieo 52
Buffalo Tchrs. 76, Alliance 88
MIDWEST
UCLA 87, Bradley 68
Montana 83, Gonsaga 84
FRIDAY NIGHT
DIXIE CLASSIC
So. California 86, Navy 84
Cornell 66, Columbia 84
N. C. State 58, No. Carolina 51
Duke 79, Wake Forest 74
8UGAR BOWL
Kentucky 84, Brig. Young N
St Louis 73, Villanova 69
BIG SEVEN
Missouri 61, Oklahoma 49
Kansas 98, Kansas State 88
Stanford 162, Iowa State 102
Colorado 68, Nebraska 63
STEEL BOWL
Michigan 66, Virginia 52
Penn SUte 55, Butler 51
HOOSIER CLASSIC
Indiana 87, Notre Dame M
Purdue 55, Butler 51
BOSTON INVITATION
Boston College 88, Bur knell 84
Holy Cross 78, Ariiona (Tempe)
State 65
ALL-COLLEGE TOURNEY .
Wyoming 61, Alabama 53
San Francisco 65, Tulane 81
TsJsa 77, Idaho 75
Oklahoma CRy 46, Oklahoma Ag-
gies 3*
GATOR BOWL
Clemson 62, Florida State M
Florida 82, Georgia 47
CAROLINA INVITATION
Auburn 66, Davides* 59
Se. Carolina 78, Georgia Teeb 62
SOUTHWEST TOURNEY
earned the right the hard way,
A.AM. 28
Central Okla. 55, Eastern New
Mexico 48
Howard Payne 64, Colorado Col-
lege 58
S'east Okla. 69, Abilene Christian
88
OTHER GAMES
Michigan State 51, Dartmouth 42
Minnesota 63 Princeton 51
Washington State 11, Northwest-
ern 64
Siena 13, UCLA 81
Iowa 88, Oregon 12
California 68, Wisconsin 49
Ysle 88, Tampa 82
Washington 78, Ohio State 43
DePaul 84, St. Ambrose 82
Lafayette 73, New York AC 71
lona 167, Bates 77
Gosaga 69, Montana 62
Portland 52, Oregon State 43
Memphis State 89, Whitworth 86
Montana State 85, Eastern Wash.
82
Cornell (la.) 76, Knox 67
Luther (la.) 59, Loras 54
Augustana (SD) 55, Grinnell 52
Iowa Tchrs. 72, Coe 49
MaeAlester 5, Ripon 41
St. Cloud (Minn.) 76, Minn. Du-
luth 88
Superior (Wls.) 68, N. Dak St. 86
Southern III. 75, Austin (Tex.) 54
Hannlbal-LaGrange (Mo.) 68, Il-
linois College 41
Pepperdine 84, Seattle 53
Case 84, Ohio Wesleyan 56
Texas Christian 61, Vanderbilt 49 Monmouth 75, Augustana (DJ.)
Texas A. M. 52, Texas 51
So. Methodist 54, Arkansas 46
Rice 16, Baylor 64
MIDWEST TOURNEY
Ottawa (Kan.) 62, Indiana Cen-
tbal 61
Baker (Kan.) 48, Southwestern
(Kan.) 42 _
N.Y. State Tech 63, Jersey CRy
JC 54
San Diego State 16, Whtttter 65
Wayne (Mich.) 61, Indiana State Pacific Lutheran 49, Wllliamette
U
HOFSTRA TOURNEY
lofstra 86, Williams 58
Alfred $8, Queens (NY) 25
Wagner 66, Trinity (Conn.) 62
Cortland 52, St Lawrence 51
ENID TOURNEY
Regis 19, Peru (Neb.) 84
East Texas Baptist 81, Washburn
Phillips Univ. 67, Arkansas Tech
88
Fort Hays (Kan.) 82, East Cen-
tral Okla. 81
SUNSHINE TOURNEY
8'west Okla. 51, Panhandle Okla.
M
Vanport 85, Southern Oregon 50
San Diego Mar. Bee. 68, San Ft.
Utah Branch Aggies 71, Ricks 63
Chaffey (Cal.) JC 88, Compton 65
Weber 61, Dixie (Utah) 48
Carbon (Utah) 88, Mesa 54
FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL
Jsx Jackson 44, Tallahassee 21
HiUsboroagh 51, JesaK 48
Miami High 49, Tampa Jefferson
|g
St Joseph's (JMe) 41, Jackson-
ville Be h. 34
Veniee-Nokomis 28, Sarasota 24.
NOW VIA MIAMI
or Houston
For your convenience, Braniff now often;
two routes to the United States. Via Mi-
ami, only one-stop to New York (non-stop
Panama to Miami). YMK-choice of quick
connections to any city irrjjje eastern half
of the U. & or Canada. Via Houston, you
fly direct to the heart of North America
with the best connections to California and
the West Coast.
For information and
eall your travel agent
office.
rvanosav
or Branitf
City Ticket Office
Ave. Throb, 18 Tel. 2-2129
El Panam Hotel Via Espafta 11'
Tel. 3-4728 or 3-16M.
exteeudou 1M
Tecasaea Airport
Colon Ticket Offtos
Calle 16 No. 1SJ1S
Tel Celen Tit
----'-
at**.


h

O'
,NI THING *v*ryon* uttorod ogroom.nt on in 1*51 wo root doiro for poaeo. Apparently
all Mm hooting in varlout action of tho Ml* roprotanlod attempt to d*dd* II a lingl*
method of achieving It. Whil* true negotiator expended word, troop I* Karoo expended thair
livot with UN catuollle topping 100,000. In leer way, the hooting an*) blood-letting wonl
en alto In Ih* Middle Eat, In Burma, in Malaya and oth*r placo. A If thli woron'l onovgh, Mr.
MiHIonth died in U. S. traffic. Howovor, madicin* and othor Kience did mak* cantributiom to lir*.

CLIMAX of his dramatic return to the U. S. following sudden
ouster as supreme commander in the Far East by President
Truman came for Gen. Douglas i MacArthur when he ad-
dressed a joint session of Congress. He followed up with
series of speeches attacking administration policy n Orient.
I
I
I
CREATEST SHOW of this or any year was furnished by a
cast of the amateur but exceedingly able thetpians who day
after day enthralled the greatest television audience in his-
tory. Principals included Senator Estes Kefauver and his
Senate crime investigating committee, a variety of big and
little officials and a motley array of big and little racketeers.
ATOMIC RACE hurtled n between the U. S. and U. S. S. R.
at the most rapid rate yet. America, determined to keep the
upper hand, blasted the sands of Frenchman's Flat in Nevada
for Weeks with tests of new A-bombs and smaller atomic
weapons. For first time, troops participated in some tests.
HAPPY INTERLUDE for President Truman among the tribulations of his office was the state
visit by Princess Elizabeth, heir apparent to the British throne, and spouse, Prince Philip,
While her father, King George VI, was recuperating from a serious illness, the prince and
princess toured across Canada and hack, looping below the border to visit Washington and
place scores of thousands of thronging Americans under the spell of their charm as well.
v3
NATO ANO SHAf! began to take form of en and planes and
guns instead of a mere collection of initials as Gen. Dwight
D. Eisenhower went about the task of discouraging Russia
about an attack on the west He assembled a polyglot staff
at his sprawling new headquarters, went into the field (right,
above) to look over his expanding forces on maneuvers.
SIX YEARS of socialist experiments by the Labor government wound up in defeat in Great
Britain at the hands of Winston Churchill's Conservatives. Restored to his old Job as prime
minister, the 77-year-old wartime leader set out to see if he could put Britain back on its
economic feet and thwart the forces threatening disintegration of the. empire. The world
and the Laboriteawatched for. results, which Wight bear heavily on democracy's truggle.
KANSAS AND MISSOURI bore brunt of year's greatest ram-
page by nature in U. S. when Kaw and Missouri rivers raged
over their banks. Half a million people were forced out of
their homes, damage soared into the hundreds of millions.
AROUSED BY PROBES of a variety of scandals in his admin-
istration in the pre-election year. President Truman discarded
William M. Boyle (left) at Democratic national chairman and
replaced him with Indiana banker Frank McKianey (right).
I
AS THE YEAR neared an end, a non-scheduled airliner ashed
at Elizabeth, N. J., carrying its crew of four and 52 holiday-
bound passengers to their deaths in the flaming wreckage.
Ship had been airborne only seven minutes out of Newark.
"MR. REPUBLICAN," Ohio's
Senator Robert A- Taft,
started early, vigorously to be
named Mr. President in '52
while everyone wondered
whether Gen. Dwight Eisen-
hower would seek GOP nod.
JAPAN rejoined the family of
tVitions in San Francist
#ftcr Secretary o Stale Dr.,
dkeheson led defeat of Sovi<
MtempU to scuttle treaty
, ''
NEW CRISIS was presented to the western world when the Middle East yanked mtghti
the whiskers of the weakened British lion. Iran evicted the British from th Important oil
lields there. Egypt, watching, tried to follow suit by seizing the Suez canal.and the Sudan,
but the lion had taken enough. British military reinforcements poured into the area and pre-
pared to stay. U. S. State depai tment worked to keep Moslem world from Soviet embrace.
COMMUTER RON of the Pennsylvania railroad's Broker came
to an abrupt, traglc end when it plunged down an embank-
ment along a temporary stretch of thick, carrying 84 persons
to grinding death at Woodbiidge. N. f in year's worst wrack.
WHITE FLAG of truce (right) must have soti record for
number of appearances m any war. UN and Communist
delegates carried on a weary war of words for Itikii weeks
and months while the war of fire and steel continued to take
its bloody toll. New UN Supreme Commander Gen. Matthew
Ridgway divided his time between solemnly awaiting (left)
truce reports from hi* delegates and directing battle strategy^


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