The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01338

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
WW '
Panama
va
pkTLT VEWSPAFE*
*?* fne pcop/e know the truth an4 the country U safe*1 Abraham Lincoln.
eagram's
r~ CANADIAN WHIS]
DiirfsW. tgtmhtlk Oes mUer Cmm fommu mmtnlti
>.....
rWENTT-SEVENTH YBAH
PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, DECEMBER tt, 1951
US-Hungarian Relations Close To Break;^
Tip Decision
Freed
ers
$46 Million Budget
Readied For R P
A $46,000 000 budget probably lia always tardy because of the
(NBA Telephoto)
REDS. OUT OF ACTION Pfc. Bruce W. Hamil ton of Minneapolis stands guard with a hand-
ful oTbuddlea M North Korean and Chinese Red prisoners of war do some work on the
POW island ne" Puian called Koje-do Isle. The Prisoners file by. each picking up a atone
and placing.lt at the aide of the road to clean up after a landslide,
photo by Staff Photographer Hlaao Egosnl.) t-
(Exclusive
-Acme
UN Negotiators Offer Reds
Five Final' Concessions
PANMUfcjOMv Korea; Deci 29, iknowqrsla have bee* rp)_The Unltod Nafeons tjtoce onera j ^.
will be presented to the National
Assembly during the first week
of January, it was announced to-
day.
Treasury Minister Galileo Sous,
who, with Comptroller Henrique
de Obarrio, Is working day and
night preparing the budget said
the large sum will be asked to
cover an 18-month period In-
stead of a 12-month period as Is
customary.
The government intends to ask
the Assembly to change the
starting date of the fiscal year
from Jan. 1 to July 1 and a part
of the additional money request-
ed by the goverr^nent will be
used to cover expenditures from
Jan. 1 to June 30,.1952.
The new budget also will In-
clude a $5,000,000 appropriation
to pay all bills outstanding a-
galnst the government as of Dec.
31. 1951. ; .
The government lowes the So-
cial Security Bank an auto-
nomous 3tate institution some
$2,000.000 The\eet if the $5,000,-
000 is owed to private business.
This will
with
*UP)
negotiators here offered the
five "final" concessions today,
then warned the CommunM
that it was solely up to them to
decide whether there shall be
peace In Korea or more war.
The communists indicated they
mlsht decide to keep on fighting
unless the United Nations backed
down stlU further, but promised
full answer to the United Na-
tions concessions tomorrow.
United Nations truce negotia-
tor United States Maj. Gen.
Howard Turner submitted a new
United Nations truce program,;
which yielded to Communist
pressure on these points:
1) limited instead of unlimit-
ed troop rotation during the ar-
2)" Neutral instead of Joint Uni-
ted. Nations-Communist behlnd-
the-Unes truce observation
teams;
The Reds in turn aay 44,000 Red
prisoners are missing from the
United Nations list of prisoners
list on their roster of -war pris-
oners.
Soon-al yesterday's talk
(ended, the United Nations com-
mand issued a statistical analy-
Libby said the Reds gave grudg- sis of 725 American war prtson-
3) Two directing authorities ln-
ftead of one for the truce lnspec-
lona neutral organisation to
Investigate behind the front
fines- and a Joint United Nations-
Communist body to watch for
Violations along the ceasefire line
and buffer zone; __
4) Abandonment of United Na-
tions demands that the truce ob-
lervation teams be permitted to
My all over Korea to watch for
armistice violations;
5) Rehabilitation of certain
specified North Korean airfields of diseases,
for civilian V*;
Chinese Gen. Hsleh Fang lndl-
Kited today that this new United
stlons plan was still unaccept-
able to the Reds largely because
|t would ban Communist airfield
Estructlon during the truce.
he delayed his final answer
tomorrow.
There was also some progress
w the truce subcommittee dia-
A'sslng prisoners of war.
[f United Nations delegate United
States Rear Admiral BE. Ltbby
laid the Reds had finally agre.-1
lo exchange Information on miss-
Ine prisoners of war. ;
The Uplted Nations negotiators
eWlm the Reds have not account-
ed for 50,000 Untied Nations
troops, including 585 Aroerlaana,
License Plate
Deadline In RP
Extended 15 Days
The haavy rush fan the Pa-
nama Seeatte offloe has caus-
ed aa, extension ,1n the time
for metorHts to Set their MM
license plates.
The Pananas/ Municipal
Treasury annoeneed today'
that Panama motorists win
have until Jan. 15 to get their
new late*.
Vehicles licensed In Panaaa*
will have two platee this
year, oae in treat and the ,
ether hi **
tngly" acquiescence to exchange
information on the missing men.
They Qualified this acquies-
cence by aay ing that most of the
missing 6*,000 prisoners were
released at the front, where the
Reds had ho time to get their
names. .
United Nations planes yester-
day attacked 25 unmarked Com-
munist vehicles on the Pyong-
yang-Kaiong highway, the sup-
ply line of the Red truce team.
The United Nations notified
the Reds pa Dec. 18 that vehicles
lacking the plain markings of
truce convoys would be attacked.
Of the 25 ticked yesterday, six
were desUroydd and seven were
damaged.
Still another of the increasing
signs of grlnroeas In the stalled
negotiations was a Pelplng radio
hint that the Reds would break
off the talks rather than agree
to limit airfield reconstruction
in North Korea during an armis-
tice.
In the committee on war pris-
oners. Maj. OSn. Lee Sang Cho
told Llbby:
"We must remember that
Americans are hot accustomed to
this climate, and are susceptible
to local diseases so it wouldn't be
surprising K a large number died
' diseases.-
That was the only attempt the
Reds have so far made to explain
away the disappearance of the
50,000 men the United Nations
claim the Communists failed to
ers whose status was reported by
the communists Wednesday.
The Reds said 570 were killed
by UWted Nations attacks on the
way hack from the front, and 155
escaped er were released. None
of the latter ever reached the
United Nations lines.
---------------------------------
Radical Deputies
Lose Immunity,
Face B Charges
-----, Moor* beam
with pleasure displaying the
first muskrat he ever caught as
the ranging aoaso opened
along North Caroline's Due
coast The animal's pelt means
about $3 to the Collngton Island.
N.C.. youth. (MEA)
BUENOS AIRES, Dec. 20 (UP)
The Chamber of Deputies
voted DO to 0 today to deprive
putl
Santander, Mauricio Yarderola
and Miguel Angel Zavala of
their parliamentary Immunity
to face charges In the criminal
courts for participation in the
abortive revolt of Sept. 28.
Radical Deputies did not at-
tend the session.
The Chamber also accepted
the resignation of Reinardo
Pastor Sole. Demcrata Deputy,
who was originally charred but
was able to clear himself.
Driver And Owner
Of Overturned Jeep
Each Fined Ten $$
As an aftermath of an accident
Dec. 2 in which a Jeep turned
over on the K-2-H Road while
being driven by a young unli-
censed operator, two young Ame-
ricans paid $10 fines in Balboa
Magistrate's Court yesterday.
Patrick Byrne Hutchlngs. Jr.,
16, was fined for driving without
% license, while Edward Wighsm
Voss, 24, owner of the Jeep and a
oassenger at the time of the .ac-
cident, was fined for permitting
n unlicensed person to operate
a vehicle m the Canal Zone.
France's Downfall
In 1940 Bfomed
On Lack Of Vision
PARIS. Dee. 29 (UP) At a
tep-aeetai post-war investiga-
tion, the revert of which was
released today, Edward Dala-
dier said thai in 1 Prance
was better anted than Germa-
ny, and had a good haaoe to
win the war in IN*, bnt lack
ef vMoa in the Preach general
s(*ff brought disaster.
Dataller, who was Prance""
War Minister when Hitler
launched his May 1S4S offens-
ive throngh Holland and at'
riesn, said that at that thm
had MM tanks and
asas.
.will start *aly
sembly approves the
tionl request.
Soils said every year approval
of the budget by the Assembly
Near Hurricane
Lashes Britain;
8 Ships In Distress
LONDON, Dec. 29 (OP)
Near-hurricane w 1 n d ay>wtth
gusts of up to 100 mph, lashed
the coasts of Britain and- the
Continent today, and the air
was filled with calls for help
from ships in distress.
At least eleht shtps wese in
trouble on the third day Of a
storm which has caused heavy
three Radical deputies. Silvano ^ntad flood damage ashore.
The British Air Ministry
weather experts said It was the
worst December storm to
years.
The Queen Mary d
Southampton 71 hours
ter what Capt. Harry Cartridge
described as "the worst double
crossing of the Atlantic T have
experienced in 31 years.
Lizard Dies, $o
Inheritance Goes
To Second Love
DURBAN, Dec. 3* (W)
Tlmmy, the HzaYd. has did! so
his $560 Inheritance from his
late mistress will be. passed on
to the next beneficiary her
husband.
Tlmmy was one of seven pet
reptiles rare specknens of the
agamid family of lisards be-
longing at Mrs. Marlon Keilett
who died last July laving a be-
quest of $3.720 to mamtain them
in comfort.
But on the death of each
lisard $560 was to be deducted
from the total amount and paid
to her husband. Col. Keilett.
The other six lbsards are still
alive, in the care of local offi-
cials here.
250 Victims Of
Flash Fire In US
KANSAS CITY. Mo.. Dot. 29
(UP)More than 250 victims of
a flash fire which ravaged a
three-atory tenement house and
killed three persons here last
night moved in today to Uve
with friends, or took refuge with
the Red Cross.
Fifteen tenants were Injured
and six hospitalized.
The fire aooarently broke out
In a bathroom, but of Hotels
have not found how it started.
Damage is estimated at $tt,-
000.
Jan. 1 3tartlng date for the Re-
public's fiscal year
The new budget, Soils aid, in-
cludes 9 readjustment of all gov-
ernment salaries In conformity
with a salary readjustment bill
hlch the administration will
present to the Assembly for ap-
proval.
Hungarian Stowaway
Faces Three Weeks
At Cristobal Docks
A Hungarian stowaway Is ship-
bound In Cristobal today while a
Cuban stowaway is lodged In Bal-
Both men arrived in Canal
Zone waters as "non paying
guests" aboard the French
freighter Charles L. D. which
rammed the 6anar bank near
Gamboa Thursday night and
" late jester-
r-okl Hun-
being
LD. which
wfi probabiy have toTemoin in
Cristobal for three weekafor exr
tensive repairs which include ro-
handllng 300 tons of wheat Which
have to be removed from her No.
1 and No. 2 holds.
The Cuban stowaway,- Juan
Matter Morval, 25, is JeWd *
Balboa awaiting repatriation.
Cost of repairs and re-hand-
ling of cargo are estimated at
$60,000.
The Charles L.D. is under
charter to the British Ministry
of Food and is carrying 8400 tons
of wheat from Vancouver to the
United Kingdom. ^^^^^
Shady Lady
Mends Her Stays
Shady Lady came in from San
Francisco yesterday, but she
won't run at any Isthmian thea-
ter or even at Juan Franco race-
track.
Reason?
She's tied up at Balboa Yacht
Club for repairs .
The sleek 39-foot yachting
sloop Is New York bound under
command of Captain John Cap-
ponl, who heads a crew of four.
Shady Lady was Joined at her
Balboa moorings this morning by
one of her own kind, the 24-ton
yawl Fairweather. also stopping
for repaira
Captain Fred J. Allen and a
crew of three aboard the yacht
Fairweather are oSrt of San Die-
go, bound for Miami, with a stop
in Cuba en route.
Wirz Memorial
To Be Dedicated
Sunday, Jan. 6
Due to an Inaccuracy In mate-
rial given The Panama American
on the forthcoming dedication of
the Wirz Memorial in Balboa by
Rebekah Lodge No. 1, I.O.OF.,
the date of the ceremony was an-
nounced as Dec. 30.
The dedication ceremony is ac-
tually scheduled for next Sun-
day, Jan. 6.
Loan Contract
Signed In US
WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 (UP)
The Export-Import Bank and the
government of Panam today
signed the agreement under
which the bank grants $1.500.-
000 In credits to complete the fi-
nancing of the Hotel El Panam.
The bank approved the credit
last July 26. and today's signing
formalized it..'
Panama's ambassador Roberto
Heurtematte said the credits
would make possible the re-
opening of the Panam Trust
Company which has been closed
since last March.
Heurtematte added that after
certain Information required by
the bank has been received from
Panam, the bank will make the
credits available.
He said that at the same time
as the credit agreement was
signed, another agreement was
signed revising the contract
which the Export-Import Bank
had with the hotel.
Under the revised contract the
hotel will have 20 veara In which
to repay the credits. Instead of
10 years as previously.
,t wa> slti-
Panam,
behalf of the govorn-
Panam, and by Hau-
ident of
the Bxport-import
ment
thorne Airey,, vlce-presW
Heurtematte and Alrey also
signed the credit agreement.
\
WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 (UP) United States re-
lations with Hungary teetered near Breaking point today.
Whether there would be a final break apparently
depended on whether the Reds mistreated the four United
States fliers released from Hungary yesterday after be-
ing held for 40 days.
The fliers are being questioned on this today.
The tension between the two countries hit a new peak
shortly after the fliers were freed at the border between
Hungary and the Russian-occupied zone ef Austria.
Secretary of State Dean A-
cheson banned American travel
in the Moscow satellite end
closed Hungarian consulate*,
immediately* to Cleveland and/
New Yorkthe only two main-
tained in this country.
And lest Hungary get the Idea,
the United State* was knuc-
kling under by paying the $120,-
000 ransom, for the fliers Ache-
son said the "so-called fines*
were paid "because we vaiu*
the welfare of the individual
above all else."
The four Americans strayed
over Hungarian territory Nov.
19 while on a flight from Ger-
many to Yugoslavia.
They were forced, down by
Russian fighters at Soviet air
base in Hungary and two days
before Christmas were "con-
victed" of violating Hungary'
border.
They were "fined" $120,000.
The fliers were freed after
hitter diplomatic exchange In
Auto Tycoons
Meet To End
Work Cutbacks
POUR ONE Made of heady
stuff is the tongue-in-cheek hat
fay Svend, modeled here by e
Reriiitnne. The topper consist of
green satin champagne bottle,
gold liase trey and wine goblet
made of gold and satin lace.
Purely
Medicinal
ROME, Dec. 20 (UP) A 52-
year-old Rome woman, disturb-
ed by a persistent cough, decided
to take a whole bottle of cough
syrup.
She was admitted to hospital
today In a serious state of In-
toxication.
Doctors said it would take her
three days to shake off the ef-
fects of the alcoholic compound.
-"--*
New British Catapult
To Be Tested By Navy
LONDON. Doc. S9 (UP) A
new steam-driven catapult cap-
able of launching the latest and
heaviest naval planes will be
tested In United States waters
early n-xt month, the British
Admiraltv announced today.
Royal Navy Cdr C. C. Mitchell,
inventor of the catapult, said Us
possibilities are virtually unli-
mited.
Powe.-td by compressed steam,
it will permit the launching of
the newest and heaviest naval
lanes which cannot presently bo
andled b aircraft carriers
WASHINGTON, Dec. 2> (UP)
The United States automobile In-,
dustry and labor leaders, riled by
production cutbacks, today met
with Defense Mobtllxer Charles
E. Wilson to seek a cure for the
spreading unemployment in the,
Detroit area.
With another production cut-
back Just around the comer WilJ
son called the top-level confer-1
ence to see how layoffs might be,
stemmed by giving a greater
share ef defense contracts to the
motor
try are
mand for an end of cutbacks,;
Whieh have been hitting the in-
dustry every three months for
the past year.
An estimated 135,000 men have
already been thrown out of work
In Detroit as a result of Idled as-
sembly lines.
The demands of the industry
representatives are not likely toj
sway Wilson from his reported
decision that the auto industry's
material quotas, already slashed
to an equivalent of 930,000 cars
for the first quarter of 1952, will
have to be reduced again in the
April-June period.
Colombian Jailed
For Ancon Thefts
Pilfering of men's trousers.
"T" Shirts, a baseball glove and
other articles from three homes
In the Ouayacan Terrace area
of Ancon sent Lincho Hawkins
to jail yesterday for 30 days on
each of three separate counts.
The 36-year-old Colombian
was convicted of the three petit
larcenies upon complaints of
Donald Morton, Charles P. Hinz
and W. H. Edmundson, owners
of the property.
He was tried in Balboa Magis-
trate's Court after being turned
over to Canal Zone Police by
Panama Secret Police.
In another case, Luis Antonio
Camuas, R., was fined $10 for
failure to keep to the left while
passing a ear on Diablo Road.
equlppei with conventional
hydro-poeumatic catapults.
It may also radically affect
fleet maneuvers by allowing car-
riers to launch ihelr planes wlth-j
ont first leaving the line of bat-'
tst and coming into wind.
The Admiralty said prelimin-
ary testing of the new catapult
bad been highly satisfactory, and
added that the new device was
Mrely to be among the most Im-
partan*, development In naval
aviation stale* the war.
Propose Severe
Penalties Against
Govf. Corruption
WASHINGTON, Dec. 2 (UP)
Persons who corrupt government
officials, and the officials who
are corrupted should be punish-
ed equally, according to Senator
Blalr Moody.
The Michigan Democrat said
today that corruption penalties
should be made much tougher.
He said a "Glean Government
Bill" due to be introduced by
himself and Sen. Mike Moroney
would Impose mandatory tall
sentences for violation of public
trust, or for corrupting public of.
Bestia,
Recent congressional lnvesti-
;atlons have disclosed corrup-
lon or attempts to corrupt gov-
ernment officials.
Moody also said his proposal
would put all Internal Revenue
employes under Civil Service,
would prohibit congressmen Or
government officials from Inter-
ceding in tax cases, and would
take away the pension and re-
tirement rights of Federal em-
ployes convicted of violating
their public trust.
heson said the American
peqAle, many of whom offered
thlsr own money to Kelp "ran-
som" the mere, are "rightfully
indignant" that their service-
men should be subjected to
such treatment. But at the
same time, he said, they aro
relieved that the men are free.
Acheson's counter-attack lefi
diplomatic relations with Hun-
gary and the United States
hanging by a slender thread.
It was not Indicated whether
this government plans addition-
al penalties, but It was specul-
ated that some, probably eco-
nomic, might be forthcoming.
Acheson hinted at this whea
he said that any further state-
ment will be made only after
State Department officials talk
with the airmen. It was under-
stood they will be flown back
to this country for such con-
ferences.
The retaliatory action virtual-
ly wiped out concessions grant-
ed Hungary in return for thw
release of U. S. businessman.
Robert A. Vogeler from hie
Hungarian prison cell last A*
pril 28.
That agreement provided for
reopening of the Hungariaa
consulates and suthorlsed Am-
erican travel in Hungary.
The consulates bad been clos-
ed and travel cut off when
Vogeler was Imprisoned on
trumped-up spy charges.
The State Department an-
nounced the U. S., crackdown as
soon as word was flashed from
Vienna that the airmen were
safely out of Communist ter-
ritory.
After expressing indignation
over the incident. Acheson said
in a formal statement:
"Because we value the wel-
fare of the individual above all
else, we have paid the 'fines'.
But we bare not paid willing-
ly and we state clearly, In or*
der that there may be no mis-
understanding of our attltudo
in the future, that our patienoa
is not inexhausttblee."
Please Save
l
Christmas Cards ,
For Good Cause
B P. O. Elks 1414 wUI collect
eU Christmas Cards fee fer-
wardhag to the Cerebral Palsy
Foundation.
These cards are used fer ec-
cuBotienal therapy, to teach
the aafertaaates te ese their
hands again. The patients eat
ewt the designs and paste theaa
ea paper to form pltoras.
Arrangements are being
made to have receptacle ha
eoaveniea* placet to receive
them. The Cok Scoots la Cece-
II and Far Pan Radie Statton
will call frena henee to heneo
la their vicinities oa Friday,
Jan. ,4. '
Please save year eU cards
and torn them in, ae that they
may be asad for this worthy


...-.. ,;
f AGE TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

S7
INC.
OUHM6 T NILION IIOUNMVIU IN Itlf
MABMODIO AHIAa. tbiTor)
H BTWIIT P O BOX IS4. PANAMA. o F
TtltPHOM PANAM NO 2-074O IS Lin Hi
CABkl ADomt* PANAMIIIICAN, PANAMA
COLON OmCI< 12 17 CINTRAL AVINUI II1WIIN 1 llM AND ISTH JliriTI
fOMHN IMIIlNIlliM JOIHUA B POWERS. INC.
S4B MA0I4ON Avi Nlw York. ii*i n. V. ,
LOCAL It MAlk
PI MONTH. IN APVAMCt $ 1.70 2.80
re (IX MONTHS. IN ABVAHCI 80 13.00
re* ONI VIA*. IN AVANC IB.BO I4 40
THIS IS YOU "OHUM THt MADMl OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
The Mail Box tt an opon forum for reeden el Th Pname Amer-
iren Letters ere recervee gratefully aae er hentflee (a a wholly o-
fldrntial minnir.
If you conin out. leftei do a t bt imeetleni rl tt eesa't opptu th
next day Lttfirj ere publuhod la the order received.
Pleose try te keep the letter limttea to one pese leaata.
Identity letter writer, it hold la itrictoit confident*.
Thla eevtpepe' .num.. ae rtiponubilfrv fer atetameati ei opinion.
axprened in letters from reader*.
TEXAS "BUGLE" TELLS OF NEW LAW
TO KEEP WRECKS OFF ROADS
US Traffic. Dangers
Getting No less
As Density Soars
ntE PANAMA AMERICAN AN IHRPNDENT DAIXY NEWSPAPER
..... i i i i ii -.- ii, i jpj i, n i i ii i i tin i
Out of the Some Jug
Dear Mail Box:
San Antonio, Texas.
I just finished checking a week of mail deliveries
. and find quite a bunch of Xmas cards from the Canal
Zone and Panama and two called my attention to
the fact that I was not contributing often enough
to The Panama American.
Will try to do better in the future.
For the past two months I have had to make a
trip to the "Medico" every Saturday for an over-
haul of my irrigation system. Otherwise feeling
fine.
My friends also remembered that it was predict-
ed that two clean shirts were all I would need when
I left the Canal for the mountains of Chiriqui in
1914, and instead of two I find three this year.
So I suppose they are extending my lease.
Since the millionth mark of death by automo-
biles passed last week, there is a marked change
| for the worse. The last week surpasses them ail,
and of course Texas leads with 46 traffic deaths
; reported.
'.here is no excuse for this but pure careless-
Snes. The weather is clear and visibility good over
ths entire State, but that don't help reckless driv-
jin.
A new lav; goes into effect Jan. 1st that will
take about 2U percent of the worn-out wrecks off
| the road by a thorough inspection and a liability
i insviance of not less than $15,000.
'ihat may help some, as a closer system of li-
J cense inspection will cancel the licenses of some in-
! competents. But it can't stop them all.
We have had to take to the woods several times
*\ k? avo"f being hit by someone trying to-pasa at "90
t8 Nothing." -; w '
Tell you more when I make a trip out on the
road.
W. J. ("Fop'")



W/-7.

FRESH DATA ON INCOME TAX
Cristobal, C. Z.

Mail Box Editor,
Panama-American,
Panama, R. P.
Sir:
Add to the perer... ai income tax question the
following quote from Business Week, December
15, page 81 under "Taxes" relating to provisions in
the new Revenue Act of 1951 as affects business
men or employes:
"lilUjUi ning Money Abroad The Old Law:
An American working abroad could forget the
tax on his foreign earnings only if he could show
; (1) that he was a bona fide resident of a foreign
MCCUntry, and (2) that he had been such for an en-
tire tax year. If he became a bona fide resident on
Jan. 2. he was stuck for that year.
The New Law
Now his bona fide residence abroad is defined
like this': He must be outside the U.S. for 18 conse-
cu -ve months, physically present in a foreign coun-
try for at least 510 days, not necessarily consecutive.
Return to the U.S. on business, vacation, or hospital-
ization doesn't disqualify him from satisfying re-
sidence requirements so long as he meets the 18-
month and 510-day rules.
Also, the employe can get tax freedom on his
{foreign earnings for portions of years preceding or
I following a full year's residence abroad.
What It Does For You
Americans working for U.S. companies abroad
for the required time won't have to pay U.S. taxes
on their earnings. When it looks as if the employee's
on their earnings. When it looks as if the employe's
doesn't have to withhold income taxes from his pay."
Assuming that the Revenue Act of Congress
specifically provides as above quoted, and that those
;U.S. company employes working in the Canal Zorr
are still exempt from paying income taxes, it would
^appear that for one segment of citizens of the Unit-
led States the Canal Zone is deemed to be "a foreign
.country," while for another setthe government
I employeit is "United States territory."
If that doesn't support the allegations made
that rank discrimination exists in the application
I the income tax laws, I don't know what would.
By BRUCE BIOSSAT
On Sept. 13, 1899, one. H. F
Bliss stepped off a streetcar 1:
New York and was killed by ai
automobile.
On the morning of Dec. 22
1951, David Dawson of Danburj,
Tex., died In a hospital of Injur-
ies suffered in a traffic accident.
Bliss was the first traffic fat-
ality In American history, and
Dawson, as nearly as can be de-
termined, was the one millionth.
It took 52 years and little more
than three months to record the
first million fatalities of the Mo-
tor Age. But the National Safety
Council estimates that at pres-
ent rates the second million
would be reached In just 30 years.
Everyone will agree that one
million represents a heavy toil
of human life. Especially when
it is realized that these people
were struck down in the course
of peaceful pursuitsnot in
war.
It is a figure calculated to
shock. But will it shock? Will
it make a real dent on the
minds of the American motor-
ists who have already begun to
pile up the second million?
A study of accident trends
doesn't offer encouragement. Ob-
viously the number of mishaps Is
not dropping off. Numerical
probabilities are all the other
way.
The nation's population is still
soaring. And today there are al-
most 50 million vehicles on the
road^ roughly double the total at
the low point in World War II.
To accommodate the in-
creasing: millions of people and
added millions of cart, we have
a steadily lesa effective street
and highway system through-
out the country. This state-
ment holds In spite pf vast ex-
penditures for elaborate turn-
pikes and urban expressways.
The uncomfortable fact, long
understood by highway planners,
is that Improvement and expan-
sion of the road network simply
is not keeping pace with the
loads placed upon It.
Some of the fanciest thorough-
fares are outmoded almost before
they are open to traffic.
In many areas, state and local
highway departments can't even
keep the old roads In minimum
good repair. Consequently, the
system is breaking down pro-
gressively.
Hirhways are bearing burdens
out of all proportion to their cap-
acity.
Engineered according to now-
aptlqrated methods of design, all
too many are death trans under
today's conditions.
Jll Id-......-------------- "
1111*.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER tt, 1
2
MERWr-00-RWMD
. W HAIION
Raw Fish
By Petei fcdson
This is getting to be\jMetty
old story. But, unfortunately.
ly. so
stl(
Is the fact that nothing drastic Is
being done about it.
Is anybody in this country
taking a really long view of our
traffic problems? Is anybody
offering the bold, imaginative
solutions which alone might
get us out of this mess at some
point within the next couple of
decades?
Most of today's answers are
apparently arrived at with blink-
ers on.
Admittedly the sweeping solu-
tions called for will cost fantas-
tic sums. But if short-range sol-
utions are accepted instead. It
may be discovered In five or 10
years that the'smaller sums ex-
pendedsmall only by compari-
sonhave been largely wasted.
The likelihood Is they wUl
bring but temporary relief.
The traffic problem demands
the best thinking of some of our
top minds. Surely these are not
all engaged on defense matters.
Our statesmen had better put
a few of them on itand soon- -
or there won't be anything to de-
fend but a coast-to-coast traffic
snarl.
WASHINOTON- (NBA. -Speaking of holiday Trust territory. And that's too far for proper
leusung, tneres one little gruup o congressman inspection and administration
mat has nad ail tne raw iiah n wants tor quite The Japanese had their capital for the man-
a while. They Just got tack from a -2,000-ml|e date on fcublon, a little island near Truk. Un-
ulp around tne 0. to. Islands and the Iruat ter- der the Japs, Dublon wus a city of some 30.000
rltory in the Paclc. / people. But It was completely destroyed In the
It was a House Appropriations sub-committee war and is now overgrown with bush. To re-
^tfjsnseni^sss^jS^S buiid the capitai' ner **HR $ So
With hint were Keps. Ben Jensen of Iowa, Carl much money.
Anuersen of Minnesota i.nd George Schwabe of Next best bet seems to be Saipan, north of
UKianuma. Guam.
a 'ST,lnot0U,t to "V*10" much mon*y ">/? The Japs and the U. S. armed services after
2;JSrtav"f "PB,nd next J,ear'.,f* J"iS:Lt0 had big installations on Saipan during the
support these former Japanese mandated islands, war. ^^ .,
i nf U. b. High commissioner, former ben. Jpert
Tnomas of Utah wen* along, for his first inspec-
tion of the territory he governs. }~
There wasn't a great deal of entertainment on
the Mcdrath J linnet.
The Polynesian natives on the island are too
poor, for une thing. There was a platform ereci-
eQ and a crowd of about luOu InciUoing the major
cnieis and a lot of school children to sing wel-
Since then, without, adequate guards and care-
taaing, there has been plenty of vandalism and
lot more Just plain weathering and deteriora-
tion. Most of the buildings were temporary con-
struction, not made to withstand tropic climate.
If any new capital for the Trust territory is to
be created on Saipan, it will have to be done by
what has become known on the Islands as "boon-
docking." it means trying to make something
Drew Pearson $ayt: Cue for clean government it set at
top; Palace guard squelches Truman's good fiten-
tiont; Matt Connelly it not enthusiastic about a
genuine clean-up.
(This is another in Drew Pearson's series of columns 6a
?be cause of corruption in government and its cure.)
WASHINGTON.In ever
or Republican, the cue fc
top. Basically the fault
States.
This was true of Warren G. Harding, who, though personally
nne*t, spent B0 much tbne Paying Poker at the little green house
on K Street that the boys below and around him felt that they
could indulge their own personal pleasures, too. Result was on*
oi the worst eras of government graft.
This is also true, in a different way, of Harry Truman whet
not only honest personally, but had a eell-pupllcized record ia
tne senate for exposing inefficiency and corruption.
Though President Truman also goes in for occasional poktr
parties with stakes so high that 8peaker Sam Rayburn goes to
bed; and though the President also has occasional conference*
with I. W. Harper; the cue for Influence-peddUng Is set not by
him personally but by those around him.
It Is done in two ways:
1) By the fact that the White House staff accepts personal
favors such as deep freezes and free airplane Junkets in return
for highly valuable concessions made at the taxpayers' expense.
f' B? ^ iact tnat the men immediately around Truman
aon t get to the roots of corruption. They are not alert and null-
ttnt-5* w,ere_honest Harold Ickes and the men around Roosevelt.
This lack of militancy ia one reason why the President seems
to have fumbled the ball regarding the appointment of Judge
Tom Murphy to head a corruption clean-up. ^
THE PALACE GUARD
Truman began with every intention of a genuine clean-up
He seemed completely sincere about letting the chips fall where
they may.
u ^ tfaduaHy, almost imperceptibly, the palace guard has
shunted him around to the Idea that the press u exaggerating
the corruption issue in order to persecute one Harry Truman
To one recent visitor, the President ld reassuringly: "Cof-
3P %? if b.,d4* "' P*"1*"1 n(1 w'r lomg to clean it up.
The big trouble is the newspapers are all trying to outdo DreV
Peirson.
palaJguard1 *" ** fMuK f "t**lly **" ""P*1*
White House staff conferences never have been too inspir-
ing, but today they are worn.
Wilson Wyatt. the ex-mayor of LouUvill, when in charge of
Veteran's Housing, used to find his housing ideas sabotaged by
Harry Vaughan, who sat in a corner of the room during stgft
meetings, held his nose and pulled an Imaginary chain, when he
didn't like one of Wyatt's policies.
The President, watching Vaughan out of the corner of his
eye, took the cue. He turned down so many of Wyatt's ideal that
he resigned.
The incident Illustrates the power of the White House staff
on a President, especially one who is weak or changeable.
Today not many new ideas come up at staff meetings
Part of the time is monopolized by General Vaughan, who
takes pride in having a couple of new Jokes every day for the
amusement of his chief; while part of the time is spent telling
Mr. Truman about the unfairness of the press.
GOOD INTENTIONS

OSLO* LfcjW .^VL^V^ =.>* oi waT^va "and scV^ SSTSS
' for
BURGLARY
INSURANCE
SEP
V
t
OYD MOT HIM. WC
De irsseps Park
Tel.: t-tm t-MOt
Commissioner Thomas inude a little speech, say-
ing he'd be back again to stay longer and get
better acquainted.
There were a couple of parties thrown for the
congressmen on the U. 8. ulano of Guam, whicn
Is much more hlgnly civilized than the Trust
territory, mere were about SO guests at each of
these stag affairs, and enough food for 150In-
cluding tne raw fish.
But the party tnat realty stopped the congress-
men was an aifalr arranged in a native restau-
rant on Ponape, in ths eastern Carolines. The
name of the restaurant, by the way, was "An-
tolne's" like the New Orleans gourmets' paradise.
Only the menu at tha Ponape Antolne's was,
first, raw cray-flshtho big ciawiess lobster tail
varietythen two or three Kinds of crab, topped
off with raw tuna. It's served head, tall ano all,
smells considerably and is considered quite a
delicacy. But not to the congressmen.
Speaking seriously, they found other problems
in the Islands more serious than the diet, accord-
ing to staff members who went along.
For Instance, there's the matter of where to
locate the headquarters for governing the Trust
territory.
Commissioner Thomas nas been operating from
Honolulu since he took uver from the Navy for
the Department oi interior, on July 1.
But Hawaii is 3000 miles away from the three
million square mus of ocean which make up tha
have been cannibalized by somebody else who
got there first.
The Trust territory la divided into six districts
for local government, p.nd they're all to pretty
much the same fix.
There are about 50 Americans in each district;
as administrators. They went cut to the islands
most of them with familieson 18 months con-
tract, now one-third gone.
With temporary housing, uncertain electric
power supply furnished by. worn-out military
diesel portable light plants, thsy're having their
troubles. They need the electricity for their re-
frigeration systems, for fteeh food supplies come
in from Guam only once every two weeks.
If living conditions for these people cant be
Improved, it's going to be hard to keep good ad-
ministrative staffs for the 88 Islands, now In-
habited by some 52.000 natives
Primary schools have been started, health cli-
nics are open, native "eachers and nurses are
being trained and the missionaries are doing a
6ood Job as always. But the big problem is what
j do with the islands, economically.
Several proposals have been made to develop
the copra trade, start cattle ranches and pack-
ing plants, or revive the Japanese fishing trade
with fish canneries.
But not much can be done when the natives
can't see the sense of catching more fish than
they can eat today, and they like to eat that raw.
"Saber eg Poder"
'Knowledge is Power"
The Registrar of LA SALLE
EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
of CHICAGO______________
INVITES ENQUIRIES to
CONTACT HIM AT PANA.
MA CITY.
Tel. 2-3246 t a.m. to 6
p.m. 7 p.m. to t p.m. Resid-
ence No. 1 45th St., Panam.
Very truly yours,
Discriminee.
Christmas, Past & Present
By JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON. Somehow, for grown men
and women, the Christmas season is always a
time for nostalgia and happy recollection.
The cold, clear, early morning, with the farm
still sleeping all about the sharp sound of the
sleigh bell that was used to rouse the family
the vast, the almost orgiastic breakfast the
incredible delight of one's own ehairloed of pre-
sents the even vaster, the really shocking
family luncheon the somnolence, the Indiges-
tion all these things come back again, glided
with a supernal glory.
Yet how few of these grown men and women
who cherish the ghost of Christmas past, really
enjoy the present Christmas, with its expense.
Its bother, its tinsel that looks like tinsel to the
adult eye, it* dreadful blend of horrible eggnog
And dubious Jollity.
What makes the present Christmas bearable.
In truth, la Just the ghost of Christmas past.
Essentially, what we all hanker for Is the sim-
plicity, the ease, the absence of burdensome
responsibility which once marked American life,
at least for the more fortunate.
It was not so very long ago, after all, that the
Supreme Court sternly rejected the mare shad-
ow of an Income tax as an outrage against the
Constitution.
It was even nearer our own time, when the
"little band of willful men" carried America
back Into national isolation, and wire widely
admired as statesmen for their deed.
And It was only the other day, almost, when
cosy little national Issues farm W1U, power
bills, securities and exchange att*. and the like
were the chief preoccupations of Americans
who took their citizenship very seriously.
How pleasant it would be today, one thinks,
It one could only forget about the rest of this
ghastly world, and work up a fine passion of
indignation about the socialist tendencies of the
Securities and Exchange Commission.
Yet men wise in their time were doing pre-
cisely this, and as recently as 1938.
Now. instead of a dishonest broker who de-
frauds his clients of a few hundred thousand
Q?u"r,j we mus* worry about a Prime Minister
Mossadegh, an aged. Irrational and sly fanatic,
halfway around the world, who none the less
threatens to bring down the Middle last in
ruina, and thus expose the soft flanks of the
ffee world.
Or instead of the evil ways of utilities hold-
ing companies, or the desirability of a high-
er tariff on knit goods, we must now ponder
the apparently insoluble economic problems of
France, the British Commonwealth and half the
other nations of the West
Or Instead of the great Issue, whether to give
the Navy $300,000,000 or $400,000,000 of annual
appropriations, we must now dbate defense
outlays of fifty versus sixty billions, and hope
that our leaders have decided wisely in tne
matter of the weapons that may destroy the
world.
It Is a miserably uncomfortable transforma-
tion as. Indeed, U the transformation from
childhood to adulthood. Yet preelsely that is
this transformation-i real nature.
America has come of age. America has taken
her place among the great nations of the world.
Once or twice,-the President ha started his staff conference
pn what amounted to a sermon on clean government, repeated
his famous quotation to Democratic chairman Prank McKtoney,
"my friends have let me down. tokt how he never tolerated graft
when he was a countylndge ior Tom Pendertkst. and wound up
with a firm statement that he intended to throw out the crooks
Then when the conversation got round to specific ways of
cleaning up influence, someone adroitly shifted it to Mr. Tru-
man's pet targetthe press. This never falls to get his dander
up, and the President's original good intentions are forgotten.
Real fact is that Matt Connelly, most astute member of tha
White House staff, and friend of many of the big city Democra-
tic bosses, has not seemed too enthusiastic about A slam-bang
clean-up.
It was Connelly who first suggested Judge Murphy to head
the corruption investigation, but after Murphy insisted on a
forthright staff of his own choosing with plenty of power behind
it, the original ardor for a real house-cleaning seemed to cool
around the White House.
One interesting thing about the charming Matt Connelly is
that he has done some of the tame kind of wire-pulling that oth-
ers are being condemned for by congressional committees
Matt's special interest in more ways than one is certain big
airlines, ano it was he. perhaps more than anyone else, who
euchred the President Into reversing the Civil Aeronautics Board
and Its opposition to the Pan American and American Overseas
Airlines amalgamation.
BEAUTIFUL LOBBYIST
After Connelly helped these two airlines to combine, his
vivacious friend and vice president of American Airlines, Carlene
Roberts, hid her salary increased from $12,000 to $29.000.
The full Impact of these developments is not realized by the
President. And If he does read about them In ths newspapers, the
palace guard usually manages to discount them as more persecu-
tion by the press.
The President, for Instance, seems to have no realization that
when his personal physician, Brig. Gen Wallace Graham, is
publicly exposed for gambling on the commodity market and gets
promoted rather than reprimanded, the cue Is taken by lesser
men all down the line in government.
What those to the White House get r-.way with, argue those
down the line, others Can get away with.
The acceptance of free deep-freeaea by General Vaughan for
Mrs. Truman and members of the Cablnnt may not have seemed
important to the Prestdtnt. But these examples set at the very
top, have had Immediate repercussions down below
So does the effect of a municipal judgeship to the son .
liquor dealer who sends liquor to the White House, Milton I
heim.
So also does the effect of the free perfume which Joha
Maragon brought In for the wives of high officials. Matacn even
attempted to bribe the customs, and because he was a friend *f
tht White House, got away with it where other men would have
been prosecuted.
With these White House cues tacked on tht) pat
for all the world to see, it is not hard tc understand why saaer-
clnates follow suit. That is one Important way corrupts gets
started in government.
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANfftt!
AC*
IMNOIOOiS
CAN FILL VOUR NEtDS!
Hi.
_


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29. 1951
TUB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPEPENPINT DAILT NEWSPAPER
I"

i

ai
PAGE
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES
Union Churches
Where all rnumtmalM temtftnt* vrUh
allT la sssenllals, liberty In an-
aasenttal asa eharlty to all thlaga
I ATLANTIC SID1
Crta labal
Tha Be*. Phillip Havana. Pasto
10: Worhl service and Church-tUm
i:0a Young People Meeting
Data
"rhaTu. I. William L. Graham. Panto
loo1* 1o* Broadcast OB HOK; UP
uid HON.
:4S Sunday School.
11:00 Worihlp Sarvlca.
*:00 Christlsn Cndaavar
"tWIS Mr Sell. Pa**-
Phona 1-14M.
1^ W*rh?pJsrvlce and Churen-Um
"STreutb raltowahlp.
THE PAC1P1C SU
"mTsav. Alexander H. Shaw. Pastor
Balboa Rd. al San Hablo St.
Phone 2-14MChutch Olflca 2-S30
8:30 Church Sch.w. rree bus "ice
10:30 Worship f*r^^'uni".,i:.nu'
Primarv Story rloor Church-time Nfir
*V0 Ch Bho-enlor HI Pallowahlp
t-00 Poal HI fellowship.
All services at the Gamboa Union
ChurehT corn" ci GallUrd Highway
and Slbart Avenue.
Tha Rev. Raymond A. Gray. Minister.
Phone 6-130.
tM Sunday School.
,10 M Homing Wocnlp.
f rv .Raymond V Gray as SUted Pa.-
1:80 Sunday School
1M Veeoer.
Unitarian
THE
L'NITARIAII
soctmr
1030 a-m.
JWB Armad
Force Sarvlca
Cantar Library
Balboa. C.Z.
Your Invitation
to liberal
religion.

Baptist
NATION AL BAKl'la'l CiHIJaU-Ha
Panama Baptist. Prayer Meeting 5:30
a.m. Divine Sarvlca. td a.m. Divina Sar-
vlca 7:11 p-m. and Serving ol Tha Lord
Supper at both Service Sunday School
I '00 o.m
Boya Baptist, La Boca. C n.- Dlvln
Services 11:00 ajn. and 7 30. pjn. Serrn
the Lordi Supper at both Servica Sun
dv School t .100 om
New Hop*. Chiva-Chiva, CX, Divine
Service" 1140 a.m Sunday School at
1.00 pm
a. B..N. Brawn. tala
Oamuoa. a.m. and 7 30 o-m wllh Sunday School
At 1*0 o.m
Bay. A. W. Croee. pUnMea
Rio Atoija R.p7"SuBaay School al
COCUaJ BAPTIST CHURCH.
Building 111 Bruja Road
W Y Pond It Paatar
Sunday School
Preaching Service
l'rainjng Union
Preaching Service
a:ii am
10:44 am
JO p.m
7 JO p.m
Brotherhood 7:00 pm. Monday,
raver Meeting Tag Wadnaaday
BXDCMPTION BAT1ST CHURCH
BS. V Street
(Beside the National Institute!
Box 1*42 Panama City-
Ray. Jose Prndo Cldere. Pastor.
SERVICES IN SPANISH
Sunday Servicea
Sunday School.......'.-.. MM ***
Preaching ServU ........ 7JO p.m
Wednesday. Blhlc Study 7:30 pm
W- ^P1^
rtktsi BAPTUn CHUKCH
Balboa Heights. C.a
027 Ancoo Boulevard
Drawer "B" Balboa Height
Phone Balboa 1717
"Veui Church away fres neme
with welcome tint a friendly'
William H Baaby. Paata*
Sunday School ............. M am
Morning Worahlp
rUptlstTrali
inlns Union
10:45 am
:30 pm
Evangelistic Service....... MC om
rayer Meeting Wadnaaday 1:30 Dm
W.MS Bible Study
Thursdays ..........-............ Ham.
Mana Brotherhood
(Laat Monday In month) .. 1JU o-m
ATLANTIC BAPTIST CHURCH
Bolivar Avenue I 12th Street
Cristobal. C.Z.
Rev. Trad L Jone. Pastor
Methodist
rUa. MUHOUISI CHUBCM
I British Con(aranca>
Mlnlstar Wllilsm H. Armstrong
1:00 mm. Morning Praver and Seimor.
1:00 p.m. Sunday School
4:00 Mana Meeting.
7:15 o.m Evening Prayer and Sermon
TRINITY MKTIIODIST CHURCH
7tb Street and Melende? Avenue
Kev. Norman PraiL Mlmstei
Colon. R.P
Kev Norman Pratt. Minuta
Sunday Sarvlca at ;30 am and 1:15
.m Sunday School (or all age at I
.m_
Monday 7:10 OJB.. Weakly Pravai
aUENEZER MRHODIS1 CHURCH
Slvar City. CZ.
Sunday Sarvlca g am and :1S p.m
Sunday School (or all agaa al 8:30 pm
Tu*day 7:30 om Prayn Meeting
-Yea tarttanaa Ta Warship'
Bible School............... 1:45 am
Worship ................... 11 :W am
Training Union ............ 13 ar
Worship ..................7:30 pm
Prarar Meeting iThura.) ... 7:3 om
Seventh Day
Adventist
Pacific Sid
Cabo Verde. Panama City, lit I 1 A
Maynard, Pan.au City No 2 Jamaica
HHall lS.bO.th Sarvlca only):
us Lawes, Chorrillo. P A Henry:
alo. C. a Abrahams. Gamboa. A
A. Biixxle. and Soanlsh City Church. E-
duardo Rulloba
Atlantic Side
Colon rhird Street. Joseph Bryan: Cris-
tobal Engllah New Church E A. Crucfc-
snank. Cristobal Spanish Church B J
Sunday night ee-rtee at
Maxon. (Nc
orasaat i
Sabbath school each church Saturday
1:30 kg*. Divina warship 11 am Sunday
sight service al all church* exoapi
etnarwtM toCDtataal
ChurclMi at tha many taithi in tha Canal Zona, ana Hi* lermiaal
ctiei of Panama ana Calan. Republic af Panama, astead a waleama
al all tima* ta men anal woman af tha armaa aarvke*. and t* civilian
neighbors, Iriend ond Irongen.
Ai a public service, Hi* Tha Panama Amnrkaa lists halaw, by
dsneramatient, notic*t af hour ol wonhip and other regular activrlie.
Lining am roratad rram tima ta lime. Danswamartaas haying
only one or two cengregolion ara lilted undei "Other Church* And
Servica." A laaciol lilting i included far icrvke at Army pee.
Air Fore* basas and Naval Italians.
Ministers, church iscrelerlei ana* chaplains am akad t* inlerm
I he new d*k T Wadneidny noon at tha la la I at any chingei far
the coming Saturday's church page.
Catholic
(Lasted Dclow are the Catholic Church
,n the Canal Zone and those In tha tor-
minal cities of Panama and Colon whose
.-ongregation ara primarily English-
ipaaklng Besides these, the Cathedral In
Panama City, the Cathedral of the 1m
maclala Conception to Colon, and num
arou parish church* to both cities, wel-
come English speaking vUltors, though
their congregation are orlmariiy Span
ish-fpaaking.)
BT MARY'S
Balboa
Sunday Mauea: 5:55. :00. 10:00. 11:00.
12:00 a.m.
Benediction: 1:00 Bk
Holy Day Masaea: 5:55. 0:00. 11:10. UM
a.m.
Confessions: Saturday 3:30, S:00 pm
7:90, 1:00 p.m. Thursdays for Pint
Prlday7.00. 1:00 p.m.
Miraculous Medal NovenaMonday at
7:00 pm.
Roaary very evening at 7:00.
BACRBD HKABT
Aneon
Sunday Masses: 5:55, 7:30. OJO s.m
Holy Days: tM. 7 JO in
Confession: Saturday3JO, 1:00 pan.
7:00, 1:00 p.m. Thursday lor Plrsl
rr!day-7:00, 8:00 pan.
Sacred Heart DevotionPrlday at 7*0
n.m.
BT. TERESA'S
Cocoll
Sunday Mass: 1:30 am
Holy bays: IK am.
CURUNDU CHAPO.
Curundu
Sunday Mass: 1:30 e-m. ,
Holy Day: tM am.
Confelon: 3:30. 1:00 p.m Saturday.
ASSUMPTION
Pedro Miguel
Sunday Mast: 1:30 aja. .
Holy Day*: 1:30 a.m.
Confession: Saturday-7 JS, 7:4 p.m
Roaary: Monday, Wednesday and Satur.
day at 7:00 pm.
Catechism Classes: Sunday-llJO. 11:30
a.m. _.
st. joatPH
Parala*
Sunday Mam: 7:00 a.m.
Holy Days: 5:45 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday3:30.' 4:00 pm
Roaary: Tueaday7:00 p.m.
Catechism Classes: Sunday11J0, 11:30
ajatj
\ VINCENTTI
Panam
Sunday Masse*: 1:00. 8:30 s.m.
Holy Days: 1:00, 8 JO a.m.____
Con fee Ions: Saturday-3:00. 5:00. 7:00.
1:00 p.m. .
Before Holy Days: 7:00, IK.
Rosary every *vning: 1:00 pa
BT. JOHN BAPTIST DE LA BALLS
Rio Abajo
Sunday Mamas: 1:30. I-JO am
Benediction: 4:00 pm.
Holy Day Mssse.: 1:41 am
Confessions: Saturday-:**, 43 PJ. -
Prlday aftor Mh-aculoua Medal No-
vena.
Miraculous
p.m.
Rosary: Monday
PJn ST. TUBERS __
Sunday Mam: 7:00 am. H*e> Day Mam
*:45 am. _-l,
Sacred Heart Devotlona: Prlday 7*0
Confessions: Saturday1 JO.
Rossr'v every evening except Tueaday t
7:00 p.m.
coco souto riArmOao
Pastor. Rev Wm J Pton. CM
Sunday Mam .............. I m
Holy bay Mam............
Suhdar School .......... : ">
Service Thursday night .. 7:4 o m
CnnOasInn hefnre Ms
CHURCH OP TOE HOt.t PAMIL
MargarlU. C Z
Rev William J Plnn CM
......'*.* ..
Medal NovenaFriday 7 Ml
and Wednesday-7:00
74
MIRACULOUS MEDAL CHURCH
New Cristobal. 4th. G St.
Pastor. Rev Vincent Ryan. CM .
Sunday Masses. 7. I a 1030 oaa.
Weekdy Maaa. 130 am
Sat.. IK am____
Holy Day Msm. *30 am.
Confessions. Rosary. olghUy THw
Sunday School aftor tha 1 am. Mam
Miraculous Medal Novena ervlca -
Mon 5:00 TM pm
1st Sat Devotion. *vry tot Sat after
"MACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH
Bolivar Highway. Qatun., CX
Pastor. Rev Prand Lynch. CM
Sunday Mass. 8:00 am. .
Weekday Manses Thura 13* A
Sat. 730 a.m
Holy Day Mam, 7:00 m.
Miraculous Medal Novena service -
Mon 7:15 p.m.
1st Prlday. Confesa!cc Communion,
7:15 p.m.
Confession Sat 130 at 730 pm
^^ ST. THOMAS' CHURCH
Gatun. Near Lock*
Pastor. Rev. Prand Lynch- CM
Sunday Maaa, 1:41 am
Weekday Mssse* Turn. Prl *M a.m.
Holy Day Mam. 30 am.
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Prl. 7:11 pm. ____
Confaesfon Sat-, 1:15 A 1:00 pi
m
t aftar
lst Sat Devotion, every 1st
HOLY PAMTLI CHURCH
Pastor. Rev. WllUsm J Plnn. CM.
Sunday Ma
Day I
13 A 30 a.m.
Holy Day Maaa. 130 .m.
Mlraculou Medsl Novena service
Mon. 7 30 p.m.
Instructions for aduiu Frt 7:00 pm.
Confessions Sat 4:00. 130 130 to
8:00 D.Ql
T. JOSEPH'S CHURCH
Coln. 10tn. t Broadway '
Pastor. R*v. J- Raymond Maohate, CM
Asslsunt Rev Robert Vlgnola. C M
Sunday Maasaa. 5:45 A 0:00 am
Weekday Maaa. 1:41 am.
Holy Day Mame*. 1:41 A 031 am
1st Frl Masses. 5:45 A 130 am
Communion, 13t am.
Baptism Sun.. 430 p.m.
Mlraculou Medal Noven aervlcas
Wed. at 1:15 A 7:00 p.m.
Noven of the Sacred Heart Prl T3
pjn.
Contomlons Sal. 43. 30 pm A
7::0 to :00 p.m.
Sunday School, 13 p.m.
DUcusslorr Club Young men of Psrlsh
Sun. 331 p.m. ._, ^_
Instructions for adult seeking Snow-
ledge of the Catholic Church. Mon. A
Thurs. al 7:15 p.m.
1st Sat Devotion every 1st Sat aftor
ST VINCENT'S CHURCH
Sliver Cily. C.Z. ____
Pastor. Rev. Raymond Lewis, CM
Sunday Mian, 1:45 A 13 pm
Waakday Hans, 31 am
Holy Day llama. 130 A 130 am
Sunday School. 1131 am.
Miraculous Medal Novena service -
rue*.. 7:0 pm
ptlem Sutv. 30 pi
Confession. Sat li"
. 30. 130 pm 730
to 8*0 pm.
Instnietlon tot adulta. Turn 4V Prl..
790 pm.
tot Sat Davassmv every tot Sat aftw
OUR LADY OP GOOD COUNSEL
Gamboa. C.Z
P*to Rev Charles Jacob*. Cm
Sundey Maasaa. 730 A S3* am.
Weekday Mimes 3* am
Holy Day Mamas. 8:41 A *:M am
Mlraculou* Medal Novena service -
ruea 73 pm.
Sacred Heart Haven* arvtee. Prt '730
OJB
Confeaslons Sat 130 pa.
1st Sat Devotion, every tot let after
Episcopal
ANCON. CX.
THB CATHEDRAL OP B1 LUKE
Tha Rt. Rev. R. Heber Gooden. Bishop
Che Very Rav. Raymond T. Penis. Dear
7 30 a.m Holy Communion
(30 a.m. Cathedral School.
10:45Morning Prayer add Sermon.
(Pint Sunday of the month Holy Com
union and Sermon.) .
730 pm.Evening Pray a and Sermon
CRISTOBAL, BaT.
CHURCH OP OUB SAVIOUR
rd St. near G, Nsvy
Rev. Milton A. Cookson. Pastor
Holy Communion 730 ajn
Church School 1:30 s.m
Mnrnlna Prayer-Sermon 1130 am
(H.C flrat Sunday In the month I
Young People' Vesper Service 431
om
Wednesday. Holy Communion 1:30 p.m
Choir Rehearsal 7:80 san.
A House of Prayer (or all people
cocou
Church af SI. Aadrew
The Rev. David R. Reed
Holy Communion 13 a.m
Sunday School (30 a.m.
Public Worship 1045 am .
(H.C drat Sunday In the month I
Young People's Fellowship 430 pan
Choir rehearsal Wednesday venlru
it 1:30 p.m.
Women Auxiliary 2nd and 4th fours
day at 730 pan.
Hoi
lous* of Prayer and Fellowship tot all
cteople.
COBOZAL
Gead Shepherd
The V*n. A. P. Nlghumfal
8:00 am. Every Friday; Morning Pray-
"(ILC. tot Friday.)
GAMBOA
Bt Slmea's Church
Rev Aanwade Octtaa *.
Fedre Miguel 4-138
Holy Communion .......... 10:30 am.
Sunday School ............. 3.00 p.m.
Youth Organizations 5:00 A 1:00 pm.
Evening Prayer A Bibbl*
2nd A 4th Sunday ........... 1:30 p.m.
Women Auxiliary ........ 73 p.m
2nd and 4th Thursday.
^ LA BOCA
Bt Peter' Charcal
Rev Lemuel B Shirley. Priest
a.m -Holy Communion
7 aan.-Choral Eucharist and Sermon
1 amMorning Prayer and Church
School.
mHoto Baptism
Jewish
Jewish Welfare Board. Bids. 12-X, La
- Rabbi
C.Z
Nathan
Boca Road, Balboa.
Witkln director.
Service* on Friday. 130 piau
(See also listings of Jewish ehvice*
inder Post. Base* and StoUonal
Congregation Kol Sheartth Israel, Ave-
nida Cuba and Men Street Salto Vista
Panam City. Rabbi Harry A. Merfeld
Service on Friday. n m
Negro Official Goes To Florida
'To Stop The Reign Of Terror'
Posts, Bases
And Stations
PACIFIC eVIDR
Wtostaal
ORT AMADOR
Sunday School .................. :15
Morning Worship ............... 113
FORT CLAYTON
Sunday School, Bid 114 ...... 30
Wont'
ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 29. (UP) Walter
White, executive secretary of the NAACP, .arrived
here today to "see what cart be done to stop the reign
of terror" in central Florida where two Negroes
have been murdered and at least three others beaten
since last year.
White said he planned to attend the funeral of
Negro leader Harry T. Moore and "confer with
various state officials" about the blast planted under
Moore's bedroom at Mims Christmas night
He did not Indicate whether he
planned to see Gov. Fuller War-
ren who charged that the na-
tional Negro leader is attempting
"to inflame public opinion with
Morning Worship'";!;;";!;;;!: nan a serieiof absurd lies about me."
Ridgway Due For Sfep Down
When Jap Occupation Ends

Morning
FORT KOBBE
orship
1:15
11th Station Hoepltel ........... 10:41
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASK
Bible School................... 1:45
v,oXGrorhp.:::::::!:;:::;: S
Servicemen's Hour.............. 7:00
US. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Morning Worship ............... I:45
Protestant Sunday School ...... :
Corcoal Chapel................. 30
Cata* Be
FORT CLAYTON
DaUy Man .................... T30
Sunday lima......CM. coo 1:45
12TH STATION HOSPITAL
Sundsy Mam................... 1:46
COROZAL CHAPEL
Sunday Mam ................... 1030
FORT KOBBE
Dally Mam...........,.......... :1
Sunday Masse *'43, 7:45 and. 11:4
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Sunday Mam ................... 30
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASK
Daily Mam..................... 130
Sunday Maswm..........73 1:45
Jswtah
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASK
Saturday....................
PORT CLAYTON
Saturday
FORT KOI
...mm
Thursday ......
IWB, Balboa. C.Z.
Friday.........
Vet.
13
130
ATLANTIC SIDR
Protsstsal
FORT DAVIS
Proteetant Worship Sarvtc*...... 3
FORT tiUUCK
Sunday School.................. *3t
Morning Worship ............... 10:00
JOCO SOLO NAVAl STATION
Sunday School ............... 30
Protestant Worship Servic* ..... 11:1
in
pm. Vesper and
Communion
and Thursdays.
a.m
7 am, Wednesday and Friday m.;
Giril friendly 1 and 7 pm Monday. 4
p.m. Tuesday; Vesper* nightly at 7. ex-
cept Saturday Compline
MAROARITA
73.V
Margsret's Chapel.
Hosplul
The Rev. M A. Cookson
St
Margarita He
Sunday School am Evening Prayei
130pm. _____
PALO ECO
Chafen al The Bato Cornier!**
The Ven. A. F. Nightengale
ivery Mondap 1:30 am Holy Com
11 union.
- PARASO
Rev. D. A. Osborn*
:00 m Holy Communion 2nd Sundsy
:30 am Sunday School.
130 p.m Evening Prayer: tod and *tb
Sundays.
Monday. 130 p.m. Youth Meeting,
Wednesday: (30 pm Girls' Friendly
Society.
RED TANK
Rev. D.A. Osborn* Rev C.A Cragweli
1130 a.m. Holy Communior and Ser
non 1st. and 3rd Sunday.
11:0* am. Morning Prayei and sdd
ram: tad and *th Sunday.
S3.pm Sunday School ana Baptism
730 p.m. Evening Prayer and address
id and 4th Sundays.
PANAMA OTl
T. PAUL'S CHURCH
A P. Nlghtangale. an Mil
and Tbf R*v RIU Reginald Atwel)
Venerable Archdeacon
30 am. Holy Ccmmunlon :O0 am
73 o-m Evensong and Sermon
CHRIST CtrUBCK BY-THE-SEA
Coln. R d* P.
(Opposite Hotel Washington)
The Rev Malnert J PaTersc
STB. Rector
SONDA YS:
s.m Holy Communion
am. Choral Eucharist and Sermon
10:30 a.m. Church School.
73 om Solemn Evemon A Sermon
WEDNESDAYS.
g a.m Holy Communion.
730 pm Evensong and Sermon.
130 om Adult Conlirmstlon Clss
mURSDAYS
1 p.m. Prayer Guild
FRIDAYS:
p.m Children's Eucharist
730 nm. Choir Prsctlea
SATURDAYS: _
10 s m Children Confirmation Claa
73* pm Combllne and MadiUtlon
GATUN
SL Geerge Chatch
Gatun, C.Z.
Rev Solomon N Jacob
*:41 a.m Church School.
C41 am Morning Prayer.
10:00 a.m Holv Eucharist and Sermon
Tuesdays:
130 am Holy Communion (Asm Holy
Days and Saints Days.)
Wednesdays i
1:00 p.m Evening Prayer
g on om St. Vincent' Guild
13 D.m Choir Rehearsal
Ttnrrsday*' \
Chare* el St Mary The Vlrgto _
Archdeacon WaWock, Priest In Charge
Morning Pray* ........... g:41am
Holy Eucharist and Sermon 7:00 am
Church School .:........... 13* p.m.
Solemn Evensong ......... :*Oom
Woman Auxiliary, tad Mondays.
Order ol St Vincent Acolite Guild,
ruesdsy.
Vestry Meeting tac, Thursdays.
Holy Communion. 1 a.m. Thursday,
evensong 7:3* pm. _. .
Morning Prayer. m Friday. Choir
Rehear.!." I pm
RIO ABAJO
SL Christopher1 Chareh.
I St., Pareae Lafevre
Rev. Aaieal* Oehea S.
Pheae Padre Mlgaal (
Holy Communion ...
Sunday School .....
B*ptiens. I to 1 pm
^Evmln* PrayerBible Study pm.
lat and Ird Sundays ^ ..
Woman Auxiliary tod 4th Sunday
73 am
Holv Communion Wednesoaya. T am
.. Iwia
'tod"* 4th Sun-
Lutheran
EDEEMKB LUTHKBAN CHURCH
Th* Church *l the Lathers H**a*
II. T. Bernthal. Paster
tM Balboa Road. Belko*
Sunday School and Bible ftom am
Worship eervtce 10:11 sm-, "Came Then
wSttTU and W. Will Do 'Thee Oood.-^A
(rlandlv welcome await all vlaatar Pot-
tuck auDcar second Sunday each month
(3* pm. game night, fourth Sunday
13 .m The Same* Center, open Wed
FORT DAVIS
Sunday Mam
FORT OULICK
Sunday Maw
COCO SOLO
Sunday Mam .
Catballc
.................
.........
10:00
S3
:00
FORT GULICK
Tuesday ....................... T30
Other Churches
And Services
Apsrtmant lLux Bulmng" th Street
PanamA Monday: Lecture and Dis-
cussions 138 pm.
Chareh 4 Jeaaa Christ *t Latter Day
Saints (Merman) Baleea. C.Z
Sunday School 130 s.m.
Service 10:30 am.
At JWB Armed Porce Strvlce Cantor
IP L* Bncs Rnad
Evening Service at I p.m. at place
o meeting announced at morning ser-
vice.
CHURCH OP CHRIST
0*51 Balboa Road. Balboa
W. Harland Dllbeck. Evangellsl
Telephone 2-3*02
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:00 am
10:4 am
73* om
___WKKK SERVICES
Bible Study ...... Wednesday 130 pm
Ladle' Bible Clam Thursday 1:41 pm
Bible Claaat tor all ages .
Preaching. nd Communion .
Preaching nd Communion
CHURCH OP CHRISTOld Cristobal
SUNDAYS:
We meet in th* American Legion Hal
in (rent of the Clubhouse
Morning Worship 10:41 am
Visitor welcome >
Ladto Bible Study atfett*.
Phone Gatun 41* or Pt Guile MS
:
113
1:4
T3*
73
CURUNIIl) PROTESTANT
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Chaplain William H Blab
Sunday School ................
Morning Worship...............
Young People' Sarvtc* .........
Evening Worship...............
Pry*rM**tlng Thursdsy .......
Choir Praetle*, Wednesday t
73 am and Saturday *3B am
OLD CATHOUC CHURCH
L Raakael The Arekaagel
13th St Wast No I
Holy Buchari.'t Sunday at 130 am
Tueaday. W*dn*sd*y and rhursdav
Sacrament ol Unction (Healing Ser
ce) Ftrst Sunday ad each month a'
730 pm
TOKYO, Dec. 29 (UP) Gun.
Matthew B. Ridgway will step
down as top United States ol-
ilcial in Japan and take a po-
sition second in Importance to
the U. 8. ambassador when
the Japanese peace treaty Is
effort to gtop bombings in Mia-j iully ratified early next year,
White had accused the Florida
governor of defying "world opin-
ion by failing to act vigorously
to suppress lawlessness in his
state."
A survey showed that Moore, a
state official of the NAACP. was
the second Negro murdered in
recent month near here, where
a series of cross burnings have
been held.
Melvln Womack, 27, a Grovel
worker, was taken from his home |
In Oakland by four white men
last March 31. He was found
beaten and shot to death. No
arrests were made and the mo-
tive was not known. /
Last Feb. 6 Luther Coleman, a
Negro Janitor at the Winter Gar-
den elementary school, was beat-
en in downtown Winter Garden
by several white men and in No-
vember, 1950, Jimmy Woodards,
a shoe shine boy in his late teens,
was shot five times but recovered.
And during Easter of 1950,
William Vincent, a 50-year-old
Negro, was seen in a car with
three white men and later was
found with a fractured skull. Ail
the victims of "beatings left the
area. .
Womack's murder and the
three beatings occurred in Or-
ange County. Moore's murder
last Tuesday night occurred in
adjoining Brevard County.
The widely publicised Grove-
land rape' case and the shooting
of two Negro defendants last
month also occurred in adjoining
Lake County.
More than a dozen crosses were
burned here last Oct. 23 but
Sheriff Dave Starr called it a
"political stunt" by Florida's Ku
Klux Klan leader, Bill Hendrlx of
Tallahassee;, who also is a candi'
date for governor. Other cross
burnings have occurred almost
weekly.
Attorney General J. Howard
McOrath said every facility of
the FBI is being used to investi-
gate Moored assassination and
also the bombings in Miami.
Governor Warren has posted
up to $6,000 In rewards and Other
groups a total of more than $11-
000 for information leading to the
conviction of the terrorists.
White's organ 1 z a t i o n, the
NAACP. announced a $5.000 re-
ward.
Warren called White a "paid
professional agitator." He said
White's "hysterical ravings" that
the governor did not act "vigor-
ously" cannot "alter the facts."
"I personally investigated the
first bombing at Carver (Negro)
Village In Miami, and one of my
Investigators was assigned to
work with federal, county and cl-
ml," the governor said.
"In less than 24 hours after the
recent trouble Jn Lake County, I
had personally conferred
officials and citizens of
County and had assigned an In-
vestigator to the case.
"On my orders, the Florida Na-
tional Guard quelled a near-riot
In Lake County in 1949."
it was learned today.
According to "present think-
ing," high diplomatic sources
with'"id, the U.S. State Department
Lake representative will rank higher
than the commander of U. S.
troops which will remain In
Japan as "security" rather than
occupation forces under the
new Japanese-American mutual
defense treaty.
In addition to losing his No. anese as equals.
1 post, Ridgway will move out
of his present residence the
States maintains possibly
third or fourth in size in ths
world.
U.S. State Department of-
ficials are concerned about the
availability of office ipace for
their expanding corps.
At present the chief Stats
Department official, minister
William J. Sebald. and some of
his staff, are crowded together
in the Mitsui main bank build-
ing in downtown Tokyo.
Despite the pinch on of fir
space, sources here said that in
the "new era" of American-
Japanese relations. State De-
partment representative her
always will deal with the J*p*.
The State Department will
American Embassy which;lease or buy whatever reslden-
has housed the occupation chief itlal or office quarters it needs,
since the end of World War II. The Japanese will not be.re- l
The chancellery of the old quired to furnish quarters as I
American Embassy here will be they had to do for occupation
too small to house all the per- forces.
sonnei stationed here as a part
of the post-occupation diplo-
matic mission
Authoritative sources said the
embassy in Tokyo will have ap-
proximately 250 American and composer, wrote his firit musical
an equal number of Japanese work when he was 15 and his last
"white collar" employes, making when he was 85, according to ths
-it one of the largest the United Encyclopedia Britarmica.
Long Life of (jamposing
Guiseppe Verdi, famed Italian.
"Streetcar,
ty law enforcement officers in an tress.
MAKES COMEBACK Re-
member Madge Kennedy? After
28 years in retirement, Madge,
queen of the boudoir farce in
silent movies. Is appearing in
another movie. She has her first
talking role in the picture, "The
Marrying Kind."
'Streetcar' Wins
Film Critics Vote
As Year's Best
HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 29 (UP)
"A Streetcar Named Desire"
won the New York film critics'
vote as the best movie of the
year and "Miracle In Milan"
was their choice as the top
foreign fUm of 1951.
"Streetcar" was filmed by
Warner Brothers and won by
one vote on the sixth ballot
over "The River," an Indepen-
dent movie made in India by
McDowney.
Arthur Kennedy was voted
the best actor of the year for
his role In Universal-Interna-
tional's "Bright Victory,'.' edg-
ing Marlon Brando, Vivien
Leigh, Brando's co-star in
was voted best ac-
Do II the Easy (and Economical) Way
If you are too busy to write to publishers, li you don't
like to pay higher-than-publlshed prices, if you don't
want to bother with buying draft or money orders .
ask us to get the technical, professional and business
books you need.
We relieve you of all the detail, guppiy fresh copies of
latest editions and do it all at a saving to you. Just
lift the phone and tell us what you want
And, for good measure, we'll take your subscription to
any magazine for business profession or home new
or renewal.
Telephone
Panama
2-1219
FOR BOOKS OR MAGAZINES
call on
Mall
AGENCIAS STEER, S. A. APnVnl. r.v.

-*?
CECILIA THEATRE Opening Next Thursday, Jan. 3
Not
Suitable
For
Children
Bishop
Ballberh Christian Chareh
Panam R.P.
Bl Bev T. Ja-naa, D. D
officiating.
Morning devotion at ........
Holy Communion a. .........
Fellowship WorsruD at ......
Suatday School at............
Divine Service at ...........
Sermon at ..................
Holy Communion at .........
Mooeay Roll cr'l and pray.
er meeUng a .........
Weelneeday IvangellsUe Ser-
vice at ...................
Fridays, Lltsny. Fasting, and
Sermon from.............
:*0 a.m.
:0 a.m
UM a.m
1:00 pa.
7:S p.m
:*> p m
30 p.m
1M p.m
1J0 p.m
MM om.
Christian Scientist
CHRISTIAN SClKNCk CHURCHICS
first ffnT*-* ol Christ. Scientist Anco,
MO Ancon Boulevard
Sunday noo. Wedneadav I* a
Sunday School Jt am
Khret Chare of Christ, Scleatlai. Crtteee>
11th Street A Bolivar Highway
Sunday 11.00 am Wednesday 7-JO e.aa
Sunday School :S0 a
Christian Science Society. Qaaahae
Civic Canter Building
M am. Flnst ATlra Wed
Sunday 11
7:10 p.m.
Sundav
1 10:11
Salvation Army
i City. Calle t da seen
_ at li am and 7 JO paa. (Mai
w WUaen); Sunday School si S pm.
La Beea: Services et II sm and 1
om. Sunday School at 1:3 pm
Red Tank: Service at 7 J pa Sundav
Icheol at 1.-00 om.
at........ II am 7Jp-m
Colon. 14th Street
Sundav School at.......... I
Colon. Ird Street
> Ice al ...... 11 a.. 1 o-m
Silver Ctty
Bet In at ................. 7J p.m
Sunday School at...........J pm
DO YOU KNOW?
WHAT THE BIBLE TEACHES ABOUT YOUR
SOUL AND ITS ETERNAL DESTINY?
CRISTOBAL CHURCH OF CHRIST
7: OS p.m. Night I v, December 27 through January I.
I
FOR RENT
All or part of 2300 sq. feet of air con-
ditioned, well lighted space suitable for
showrooms, offices, etc., with 2000 sq.
feet warehouse space adjoining, in central
location on Va Espaa. Ample parking
space.
Apply HASMO, S.A.
51 Via Espaa Tel. 3-3022
or
SMOOT & PAREDES
Tel. 2-0600
THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by the State
Pays 2% Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
W makB loans with guaranttss on first mortagoa ,
or other ecurities.
CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
25c. 50c. $1.00 and $5.00
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety dapoiit boxe. for jtwslry and
document, in 4 different sizes.
BrangeUst r. B. Shepherd
Hove you obeyed the gospel?
Evangelist Frank B. Shepherd, formerly of England,
now of Sweetwater, Texas, is just bad; from a out
of the continent, and will be in a series of Gospel
Meetings at the
Cristobal Church of Christ American Legion Building
You are invited.
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
ltff Central Ave. st
earner ef "1" Street.
G. R. De R0UX
Manager.
COLON BRANCH:
rrent St. st cerner
of 7th St
CARLOS M0UYNES V.
Sab-Manager.
HOURS:
rrom S:M t\Jkv U U:M
SATURDAYS: fren S:H am
te U:M -.a.



'^^p^wH^B
.
page focb


THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAJXY NEWSPAPER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 89, 1M1

IN HOLLYWOOD

BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
HOLLYWOOD, (NEA) Laugh-
time, U.S.A.: Douglas Fair-
banks. Jr., told this story to Bette
Davis and Gary Merrill while they
were co-starring In his new film,
."Another Man's Poison."
During World War .n. Fair-
banks was commanding a small
naval craft in the Adriatic and
running supplies to General Ti-
to, who was then engaged in lib-
erating Yugoslavia Irom the Na-
Word eventually reached Fair-
banks that Tito wanted to ex-
press his thanks in person, so the
actor and eight fellow-officers
went aboard the partisan chief's
own vessel and stood stiffly at
attention as befits men who are
about to receive a military
award.
The ceremony was formal and
each man. as he shook hands
with Tito, was given a metallic
Object. Back on their own craft,
Fairbanks and his officers ex-
amined their awards.
Each one had been given a can
of Yugoslavian anchovies.
.Blonde Peggy Castle tells about
the time she was under contract
to UI and wanted the role of a
Mexican girl In the Audle Mur-
hv picture, "The Cimmaron
Id."
Peggy arranged to be photo-
graphed In a black wig and sent
the prints to the producer. A
week passed and she telephoned
.the producer's secretary to ask if
the picture had helped.
, "Yes, indeedy." said the secre-
tary. "My boss sent them out to
all the agents in Hollywood with
a note saying he was searching
lor an actress who looks exactly
tyke you!"
"?' -Stella by StarUght," one of the
'.-Hit Parade songs of not too long
tf- was featured first In the
movie, "The Uninvited." It was
written by Victor Young, who
liad a hard time getting it into
-the picture over the objections of
-eharles Brackett. the Paramount
.producer.
-" Brackett thought the song was
awful but finally approved Its use
'in the film, saying:
"If that song is a hit I'll eat
The record."
Seven months later Brackett
potted Young in Lucey's restau-
rant, walked up to him and said:
"I just bought two records and
I'm having them for lunch."
Lisa Ferradav witnessed a re-
hearsal of -Milton Berle's TV,
how In New York and turning to
1 disc jockev Kal Rosa, asked why
the comedian tvas knocking him-
self out.
"Milton feels Insecure." Ross
snipped, "His contract has only
y 29 and a half years to go."
Mrs. Eleanor Perreau is still
gasping. Her 10-year-old daugh-
ter. Gigi, hits tardom in TJT
The Lady Pays Off." Her son,
Peter, Is In "Quo Vadls." Her
; youngest daughter. Janine. lias a
big part in Gloria Swanson's
"Three For Bedroom C" Even
the Perreau family dog. Taffy,
was given a role In Weekend With
Father."' i
But one day recently, the door-
bell rang and a man Introduced
himself.
"My name Is Arch Oboler," he
aid." and I'd like to rent your
house for a movie I'm making.
' It happened on MGM's "Lovely
'to Look At" set.
and Director Mervyn LeRoy call-
ea ior silence.
The entire crew stood rooted to
the floor, but LeRoy still looked
perturbed.
"There's someone writing on
paper at the far end of the sound
stage," the director barked.
"When-1 say silence, I mean si-
lence."
After the First Drama Quar-
tette finished Its one-night stand
at Carnegie Hall In "Don Juan in
Hell," Agnes Moorehead, wl|o
doesn't sing,'made fellow-actor
Charles Laughton, who doesn't
play, sit down at the piano to ac-
company her In a song. Then she
explained:
"Now I can say in my autobi-
ography, 'Sang at Carnegie Hall,
October, 1951."'
A Hollywood agent brought an
actor with an overdeveloped
chest to see a producer about a
life-guard role.
"Look at him," beamed the
agent, "a regular Marlon Bran-
do."
"You mean," said the producer
looking the chestlness over, "a
regular Dagmarlon Brando."
Michael Curtis, the director,
arrived at the studio for work
and complained to a friend that
he was suffering from insomnia.
"But don't worry about me," he
added, hastily, "I'm not losing:
any sleep over it."
Glenn Ford's first Independent
movie in '52 will be "Hill of the
Hawk," a yarn about the fight for
control of California. Linda Dar-
nell will co-star.
HOLLYWOOD(NEA)Exclu-
sively Yours: "The Judy Garland
Story," a film biography starting
with the days when Judy was
singing as one of the Gumm Sis-
ters, may be Louis B. Mayer's
first move away from MGM. The
veteran producer has been dis-
cussing the Idea with Judy,' who
Is ready, willing and able to star
In the picture.

The grapevine bins la that
Fred Astalre f Inally has agreed to
let MGM make his Ufe story and
that Donald O'Connor will play
Fred.
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes'*
was the bait that lured Betty
G rabie back to Fox after an
eight-month suspension. The
studio slipped her the news that
another doll would get the part
if she ddln't call off her beef.
Betty came running.

Maria Montez's sisters are an-
gry over the handling of the
star's personal effects by the
Jean Pierre Aumont family.
Keepsake Items, they claim, are
being sold.
Mae West's walls that she
won't play a mother role in a
movie for Arthur Lubln haven't
ended his efforts to sell her on
the Idea. "I still think I can talk
her into It," the 'director says.
Mae, meanwhile, Is trying to
sell Lubin on the ides, that she
has for a comeback film.

Sir Alexander Kor.da will film
a movie titled, "Who Is Sylvia?"
Nope, not a biography of Mrs.
Clark Gable.. .The Bob Topping-
June Home Idyll is over...Ruth
Roman wont talk on the subject
of the exclusion of her hubby's
name from the New York Social
Register. It's a taboo topic on the
Warner lot, too...Pattl Page's
agreed to lose 10 pound before
taking a Warner film test.

All gag references to the West
Point cadets who were dismissed
for cribbing have been dropped
from the script of UI's "Francis
Goes to West Point." Direct or-
ders from West Point.
. Rome-returnee Shelley Win-
ters gives this picture of Ingrld
Bergman on the set of Roberto
Rosselllni's new movie:
"She sits quietly on the side-
lines like a little Italian wife and
speaks only on cue from Rober-
to."

All the majo studios are bid-
ding for "Earthquake Lake," pro-
duced by the men who made
"Beaver Valley." It's a combina-
tion nature film and dramatic
story, photographed in a Ten-
nessee primitive area.

John Huston predicts an Oscar
for "Humphrey Bogart's work in
"African Queen." Bogie, mean-
while, is writing a magazine
story titled,. ''John Huston, Man
or Monster?"

Yvonne de Carlo is the latest
film star to have her eyes open-
ed by a TV appearance. Playing
another "Belle of the Brawl" sa-
loon entertainer in UI's "The
Scarlet Angel," Yvonne enthus-
ed about her video appearance on
the Donald O'Connor show:
"Everybody I meet says. 'I saw
you On TV.T It' fantastic. I'm
getting into tt,*.
The Greta Garbo-Cecll Beaton
romance Is the third flare-up of
the old flame. But now a London
newspaper quotes Beaton as once
having said:
"She (Gorbo) would be a try-
ing companion, continuously
sighing and full of tragic regrets;
she is superstitious, suspicious
and does not know the meaning
of friendship. She's incapable of
love!"

UI's out to turn Mona Freeman
into a cheesecake Item. She'll be
tagged "The New Girl"...Popu-
larity note: There was a 94 per
cent press turnout for Dinah
Shore's TV debut. Frank Sinatra
got a mere 14 per cent.
Ethel Barrymore denies that
she's made arrangements to nave
her memoirs published posthu-
mously. She's still working on
the book and says that she will
turn It over to a publisher tne
minute it is completed.
The flood of religious movies
continues. Now Warners Is ready
to film "The Miracle of Pertm-
Press agents at Fox are gulp-
ing. They asked Hlldegarde Neff.
Europe's No. 1 dramatic actress,
to pose for cheesecake shots.
Garbo-llke Hlldegarde was in a
bathing suit before you could say
Betsy fon Furstenburg.
Paul Muni, facing the cameras
for the first time In many years
in "A Bottle of Milk" In Rome, is
telling pals he'll return to Holly-
wood to resume his career. He s
finally licked his fear complex
about remembering lines.
SHOUTS SAVE DAY
DETROIT (UP) Two thugs
lifted Russell Ellber's wallet con-
taining $1 but were frightened
away by his shouts before they
eot to the $J00 In his side pocket
and the $2,500 ring on his finger,
Eilber told police.
FRECBXES AND HIS PRUNOS
V\*U_. MY WOHRS I AND MINE
ARECMER. ftt./ / HAVE JUST
ALL THE WDS
ARE BACK WHET
COOL RODS/
Does I Work?
BY MERRILL BLOSStt
AND.
WHOLE
POTATOeS
HILDA'SJ*PTA
MAYBE TWISLL.
SHOW Me WHERE,
T&W6ITUP/ *
UTNtoaT
SaoccfI
jes for. I
yH
ALLEY OOP
Check]
BY V. T. HAMLIN
j Red Skelton and Kathryn Gray-
.son were doing a difficult scene
The Chase National Bank
or th. City of New York
.
Total resources over $5,174,000,000.00
PANAMA BRANCH
COLON BRANCH
General Banking
DAVID BRANCH
CRISTOBAL BRANCH
BALBOA BRANCH
'
We Specialize in Financing Imports and Export
*
I
*\
CHRIS WELKEN. Planeteer
Meet
BT BUSS WINTERBOTHAM
WE'LL HAVE TO TAKE THE HAIR
OFf ONE OF TME* \CTH*Ht* AND
PITT IT ON YOUK MEAD TO COMPLETE ,
HAVE YWN[y WE'LL NEVE *>*> PA** M A BAR
mop **t*t> mrr meice* the
TON+OfilAL. ARTI*T OF ICTW*!Y
I .......
CAPTAIN EASY
Taking Off
BY LESLIE TTJRNEB
VIC FLINT
So Long, Sarge
M TUB FR*R" *STHE BEST *-^
PLACE, eWOWLIB,] MAPWRTTW.
AnwBun Lexpert* in
THI* NOT WA* TOWN U*R-
WfciTTBN BV I ANTlrfTr
HAMlU'ON>CRIBt?J WA* Ml*
JOHN
A O M C I A.V INSPECTOR, THERE* K NUTTV UTTLB CHARACTER | OWN MERC, WHO *A\* He l> A A BOOK ON *ECRET tJm ODE* POR \OU *HALL JJiUfc TO**.HIM OUT?^ ^MV9 JL
^T


MAJOR HOOPLR OUT OB WAT
BT MICHAEL OTOALLCl
i dont etU uke i
re BUT HE K*AID,*R-
*V* ROR M3U 6EANT,
TO O ON UP I, Y3U
TO THE HOAM- (SHOULD
CIPE BUREAU j HAVE
MORE
| TRU*T IN VER
FELLA MAN/
By J. B, WILLIAMS
WREATH? OPERATION ?
UM-HAK7 lDE-PLimUS
)


SATURDAY, DECEMBER t, 151
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
page mri
\
pacific ^ocietij

&. 17, &IU D BJU 3521
tall pprty given at their home In
Bella Vista.
daughter-in-law; Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph H. Klrkpatrlck of New
Cristobal.
MR. AND MRS. JAMES LEROY LUNDY.
HORXKR-LNDY NUPTIALS
In an Impressive wedding ceremony held December
twenty seventh at eight o'clock in the Fit -.: lib Naval Dis-
trict Chapel, Miss Joan Horter, daughter of Mrs. Frances
Horier, of Balboa, and tlr. Mil on Horter. of New Orleans,
became the bride o Mr. James Leroy LnnSy, son of Mr. and
Mrs. William E. Lrndy, of Balboa.......
Chaplain William W. Winter officiated at the candlelight
ceremony.
Guests attending the luncheon
included Mrs. Stella Price, Mrs.
George Matthew. Mrs. Karl Cur-
tis, Mrs. Nina Plckett and Mrs.
Ralph H. Klrkpatrlck.
The senior Mrs. Klrkpatrlck
was the over night guest of Mrs.
Nina Plckett at the Hotel Tlvoll
on Friday night.
Lt. Oarvyn Monmblow
Leaves for Texas
Lt: Oarvyn H. Moumblow left
this morning by plane, from To-
cumen Airport for Houston, Tex-
as en route to Reese Air Force
Base in Lubbock, Texas, where he
will begin the second six months
f his flight training. He com-
pletes his first six months of
training, in Moultrle, Georgia.
Lt. Moumblow has been visit-
ing his parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Frrn*ls J. Moumblow of Gatun
and his brother, Keith Moum-
tln," for the Christmas holiday
season.
Serreani Fred Campbell, Jr.
is Visitor on Isthmus
Sergeant Fred E. Campbell,
Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred E.
Campbell, of Balboa, arrived on
the Isthmus on December 2 from
Fort Bennlng. Georgia, where he
was with the 78th Engineers. He
plans to leave Panama on Jan-1
uary seventh to report In Seat-1
tie, Washington on the eleventh
for his orders which will send
him to Korea under the Far
Eastern Command.
Townsends Entertain
With Open House
Dr. and Mrs. James G. Town-
send held Open House for their
friends on Christmas night at
their home on Golf Heights.
Mrs. Arias
Hostess for Dinner
Mrs. Francisco Arias P.. was
the hostess at a family dinner,
given Christmas dav for a group
of her friends, at her home on
the Sabanas.
Miss Carol Sublett
Is Visitor from Virginia
Miss Carol Sublett of Norfolk.
Virginia, arrived Sunday on the
Isthmus and Is the house guest
of her btothex-in-law and sister,
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ralston
Ross of Balboa. Mr. Ross Is the
Director of the American Nation-
al, Red Cross. ,
In honor of Miss Sublett. a
cocktail party was given from
five to eight o'clock on Thursday
by Mr. and Mrs. Ross at their
home.
Naw Officers Wives Club
Holds Cocktail Party
The Navy Officers Wives Club
of the Fifteenth Naval District
held a cocktail party on Thurs-
-------,,. ^y everiing from five to seven
V/eddine vows were exchanged CanalZone Junior College,*wherei o'clock at the Fort Kobbe Offi-
ce "ore the altar whlC was de- ;he was a member of Phi Theta leers Club. The club was appro-
Mr. and Mrs. Ross were hosts
for a Christmas Day dinner at
their home Tuesday and had as
their guests Miss Sublett. the
Honorable and Mrs. Jamea I.
Dolliver and their sons, Robert
and Arthur and Mrs. Abdlel J.
Arias.
Air Rescue Squadron
Helps Out Waterless
Group of Scouts
The 1st Air Rescue Squadron
came to the assistance of a
group of Boy Scouts yesterday
when they ran short of water
after an overnight camping trip
to Cerro Galera Mountain near
Fort Kobbe.
Two-scoutmasters and nine
boy scouts were picked up by
helicopter and returned to Fort
Kobbe. The mission took five
trips by the helicopter, flown
by Capt. H. J. Basham with Sgt.
R. H. Polllch as crew chief.
The party of 11 left Thurs-
day for an overnight trip and
were sighted by Capt. Frank
Sutor and Lt. Andrew Baird.
flying over-the area In an L-S.
The scouts signaled the officers
that everything was okay and
they returned to the airstrip at
Fort Kobbe.
Next morning Lt. Baird again
flew over the area and the
group signaled him that they
short of water and had grown
tired dud to the strenuous trip
through high grass and dif-
ficult terrain.
Lt. Baird
Kobbe and
m*/ftlantic -2)c
oae
h
Box 195, (Jutum DiLpLon (]*!** 378
C. P. O. WIVES CLUB
ENTERTAINS WITH DINNER
The C. P. O. Wives Club of the Coco Solo Naval Sta-
tion entertained with a dinner party at the Stranger* Club
Thursday evening for the husbands of the members and to
honor the departing ajid incoming officers of the organiza-
tion.
The group was seated at a large U-shaped table center-
ed with tropical flowers and red tapers.
During the evening the retiring;ln-law, Captain and Mrs. John
president, Mrs. Ralph Hill was Hlpson of Fort Gullck.
presented a gold evening bag by Mrs. Wlss plans to stay on the
the ladles In appreciation of her Isthmus until February and dur-
work during the past year. Mrs. ing that time they plan trips to
J. F. Ure, the retiring vlce-pres-Costa Rica and other points of
ldent made the presentation. The 'interest,
other retiring officers were: sec-
retary, Mrs. F. N. Johnston,Holiday Cocktail Party
treasurer; Mrs. CM. Lowe and Lt. Colonel and Mrs. Robert
the following committee chair- c. Stump of Fort Gullck, had a
men: working committee, Mrs. I holiday cocktail party at their
A. M. Pachance an dco-chalr-jquarters at Ft. Gullck last even-
man, Mrs. J. F. Ure; publicity, ing from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.
Year holidays with relatives at
Gorgona.
Captain and Mrs. Robins
Entertain with Cocktail Party
Captain Harvey E. Robins, U.
S.N., and Mrs. Robins were
hosts at a cocktail party recent-
ly at their quarters on the head-
quarters reservation.
Colleen Louise Golden
is Recent Arrival
Lt. and Mrs. Charles L. Gold-
en announce the birth of a
daughter, Colleen Louise Golden,
on December 17 at the Fort
Clayton Army Hospital.
Lt. Golden Is attached to head-
quarters.
returned to Fort
------------ phoned the Alr-sea
Rescue Squadron and gave them
the location of the scouts. The
Squadron sent out the helicop-
ter and gave the scouts a thrlfl-
ii'T climax to their camping
trip by hovering over them and
picking them up to fly back to
Fort Kobbe.
OUT AGAIN, IN AGAIN
SYRACUSE, N. Y. (UP)Pa
trolman Charles Heath, enjoying
his first day out after a three-
week confinement In a hospital
had to be returned for treatment
when he was Injured In an auto-
mobile accident.
orlatelv decorated for the Chriat-
nas season.
The chairman. Mrs. Robert W.
corated with white lilies and Kappa. She also attended the
flanked pn either side bv floor i University of Minnesota. Mr.
candelabra holding tall cathedral Lundy Is a graduate of the Bal-
ra-irtles boa High School and of the Ca- *? ~-r;--; r- v. ~er
"rae organist. Mrs. Abble dejnal Zone Junior College where.JJJJa-fed blUJ Ter-
Umrzz, played "Salud 'Amour",he was a member of the jy Swemey. Mrs. i. *
and Schubert's "Ave Maria" dur- Theta Kappa. He Is now a stu- -Mrs-Robert Stade-^M. C. M.
Ing[the ceremony and tradition- dent at Northwestern University j Morris and Mrs, wma.
al wedding marched for the pro-iwherehe is affiliated with Lamb- Klin.
cerlonal and recessional. \ da Chi Alpha and PI Tau Sigma Mr. {^g^Sta IaUll0T
Giver. In marrlpge by her bro- Fraternities. n fa-
ther, Mr. Milton Horter. Jr.. the.
br'^e wore a ballerina length """ t Supper Honors
gown of white satin with a don-i Wedding Party
bl- ivcrsklrt of tulle and fitted Following the wedding rshears-
satin bolero Jacket with longial at the Chapel on Wedn^doy
sleeves ending in points over the j evening. Mr. and Mrs. William
hands. Her fingertip length veil e. Lundy entertained with a buf-
of illusion was fastened to a sa- fet supper at their'home in Bal-
tin cap and het bouquet was of boa for the young couple and
white orchids andftar Jasmine. their wedding party.
The maid of honor, Miss Bar- Guests Included Mr. Frances
bara Fritz, wore a gown of red I Horter, Chaplain and Mrs. W. W.
tulle over red taffeta, studded!winter, Mr. and Mr. Mil'
ivtuuuii------~~------~i ~: ,
v^fo'rhtaestonesjind her head- Hor.yer.Dr. andMrsgH. W. Mlt- With BMBwnny
' teh, Jr.."Mr. and Mr?: Lawrence-;
Jones. Mr. and Mrs. William Mc-
Dougal, Mlfs Barbara Frita and
Mr. Richard Elton.
dress was V meteftrrnr red" gros-
grrMn bow tiara with a short veil.
H t-ouquet was of varl-cplored
'The best man was Mr. Richard
E n and ushers were Mr. Law-1 Rear Admiral and Mrs. Bledsoe
f -s Jones and Mr. William P. to Have House Guests
y --uigall. The commandant of the Flf-
rsceotion for one hundred, teenth Naval District, Rear Ad-
fifty guests, was held on the miral Albert M. Bledsoe and Mrr
tr ace of the Army-Navy Club Bledsoe will have as their hous'
1l', wort Amador Immediately fol-ieUests. arriving Monday. Mr. an-'
owing the ceremony. Assisting -.ir8. yy. H. Henszer of Los Ange
in hospitalities were Mr WH -m i3S. California.
Horter. Jr. and Mrs. H. W. Mlt- Mr. Henszer is oresldent of the
ten Jr. who presided at the, -*efiners Marketing Company of
punch bowl and coffee service tos Angeles. He served as a Na-
Mr. and Mrs. Charles F
Kline with their children. Les-
lie, Jeffrey and Kenneth, are
spending the week-end at their
cottage at Coronado Beach.
Noveys Entertain Christmas Day
A family dinner was held on
Christmas Day by Mr. and Mrs.
George Novey at their home in
Bella Vista:
Tates Enteraln
Mi. and-Mrs. J.'D. JTate, of
Balboa, entertained with a fami-
ly breakfast party on Christmas
morning at their home. Covers
were laid for twenty four.
and Miss Elaine Lombard, who
wr.s in charge of the Bride's
val Reserve In World Wars I and
*T. During World War II he
commanded naval bases at Pana-
r. and Mrs. Martini
Hn-'s for Oifn House
t 0,.i, Martinz, of
Golf Heights, held "Open House"
- < Christmas Day.
lH three o'clock, for
their friends.
;-| P-rty Given
Christmas Eve _
Dr. and Mrs. Jaime de la Guar-
dia were hosts to a group of their
friends at a Christmas eve cock-
-* ;, commanaeu iiuvai ura -
i the receiving line were the ma city, Florida and Plymouth,
br'-ie and bridegroom, Mr. and
Mrs. WllUam Lundy. Mrs. Fran-
ces Horter and Msls Fritz.
"re. Horter, the bride's mo-
thr:x wore a gown of champagne
lacs over matching taffeta with
a matching bancock hat with
ri-*fled veiling. Her corsage was
of red rose buds.
ft, Lundy, the bridegroom's
mo'her, was gowned in turquoise
blue lace with a hat of navy blue
straw with a crushed veil and
other navy blue accessories. Her
corsage was of red rose buds.
Mrs. Lundy, the bridegroom's
mother, was gowned In tourqouise
blue lace with a hat of navy blue
straw with a crushed veil and
other navy blue accessories. Her
corsage was of white gardenias.
The young couple sailed yes-
terday aboard the S.8. Panama
for New York and will be at
home at aid Apt. E-l. Maple Ave-
nue. Evangtown, Illinois. The
bride wore a Unen >ult of dark
green with black accessories for
traveling.
The bride is a graduate of the
Balboa High School and of the
England.
Mrs. R. Z. Klrkpatrlck
Honorer! at Luncheon
Mrs. Stella Bradney of Gam-
boa, entertained Thursdsv with a
luncheon at the Hotel Tlvoll in
honor o former Canal Zone re-
sident. Mrs. R. Z. Klrkpatrlck
now of Rochester, New York, who
Is presently visiting her son and
POTATOES
For the Table and for Seed.
English and continental pota-
toas available for immediate
delivery in any quantity you
need. Fruits also available.
Writ* to:
PERCY DALTON
(London)
LTD.
*>-5i BnsMlaM St.
, B.l Enftaa*.
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IMrum: Impcrdalt,
Tilx. Txjndon.
Tilephonw: BlshoptgaU SMl/ltM.
BRANCHES In LIVERPOOL:
"fwey DaKaa. Lta. (Uvaaaael)
Enltrprli* Home
Ma. t, It aaa 12 Ratal ara Gaideaa,
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Talpgrams: impardalt.
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Tdapbam: Liverpool Ctntral TSM.
Sff Asm Impart Textile ana Machinery
Let us Rive you a new
lease on beauty this sea-
son with a complete re-
styling nermanent wave.
See oar Experts Now.
ARMED SERVICE
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bldg.) Balboa
Mr. and Mrs. Haskell
Ret rn from Vacation to Interior
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Haskell of
Rodman, returned Thur s d a y
night from a short vacation
spent at the Hotel Nacional in
David. They made short tripe to
El Volcan and to Boquete and
spent one night at the guest
house of the Chlriqui Land Com-
pany In Puerto Armuelles.
Wlrs Memorial Opens
One Week from Tomorrow
Sunday, Jan. 6 has been chos-
en by the Rebekah Lodge No. 1,
I OOF. as the date for dedica-
tion and formal opening for the
new Wirz Memorial Lodge Hall
on La Boca Road.
Mrs. Woodrow P. Cary; tele-
phone, Mrs. S. C. Dills.
The Incoming officers who were
honored were: president. Mrs. J.
B. Berube; vice-president, Mrs.
B. E. Johnston; secretary, Mrs.
Donald Brlggs; treasurer, Mrs. K.
E. Sterner.
The members and their hus-
bands who were present were:
Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Bernlcki,
Mr. and Mrs. L. N. Beckstead,
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Berube, Mr.
and Mrs. J. D. Boyer. Jr.. Mr.
and Mrs. Donald R. Briggs. Mr.
and Mrs. W. P. Cary, Mr. and
Mrs. S. C. Dills, Mr. and Mrs.
B. E. Duncan, Mr. and Mrs. P.
R. Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. S. O.
Cranberry. Mr. and Mrs. O.
Orassl, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W.
Hill. Mr. and Mrs. C R. Hirsch-
er. Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Holston.
Mr. and Mrs. George J. Hyfan-
tis, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Johnson,
Mr. and Mrs. S. N. Johnston.
Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Johnston,
Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Jones. Mr.
and Mrs. Felix Karplnskl, Mr.
and Mrs. C. M. Lowe. Mr. and
Mrs. D. L. Lowe. Mr. and Mrs.
C. A. Lowrey. Mr. and Mrs. T.
M. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Neal
Ownry, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Pa-
chance, Mr. and Mrs. A. G.
Prien. Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Red-
mond, Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Ro-
der, Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Schaf-
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Maedl with
their house guests, Mrs. Maedl's.
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Conrad
Peterson of St. Peter, Minnesota,
are visiting Interior towns.
Mr. Peterson was professor of
history at St. Adolphus College
for over forty years and is now
in charge of the archives of the
school.
Visitor from Chattanooga
Mrs. S. J. McCallle arrived be-
fore Christmas to be the guest of
her daughter and son-in-law.
Captain and Mrs. Robert L. Ware
of the Coco Solo Naval Hospital.
Miss Joretad Wins Music Honor
Miss Judith Jorstad. daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Jorstad
of New Cristobal, who Is a stu-
dent at the University of Michi-
gan at Ann Arbor, has been in- j
vited to join the National Hon-
orary Music Sorority, Sigma Al-
pha Iota.
Miss Jorstad soent the Christ-
mas holidays with her uncle and
aunt Mr. and Mrs. Paul O.
8cholz of Bav City, Michigan.
Voting for Carnival Queen
Tonight
There will be a dance and the
second counting of votes for
queen of the Carnival de Centen-
ario of Colon tonight at the Mon-
aco Garden.
At the last counting Miss Nan-
cy Sasso was In lead for the title.
Concert to be Presented
at Cristobal Union Chureh
The following concert will be
oresented Sundav at 7:30 p.m.
at the Cristobal Union Church by
*he choir with several guests so-
loists.
The vocal folotta will be Mr.
Jamie Carruth. ba nnd Misses
Rita Howard and Nellie Holger-
son. sopranos.
The choral selections will be:
"Praise My Soul, the King of
Heaven" bv Galbralth: "Bring a
Torch. Jeannette. Isabella" an
Old French Carol; "Good News
From Heaven" arranged by
Tknch: "Jesus Lie* In the Cra-
dle" by Hemried: "Beautiful Sa-
viour" arranged b" Christiansen:
"Silent Nieht" arraned bv Wil-
son; and Halleluiah!" bv Handl.
Fnecipl numbers will Include a
French Line Employee
Entertained
Mr. and Mrs. Marcelle Oriri-
golre entertained the employes
of the French Line and the mem-
bers of their families on Christ-
mas Day.
Mr. Gringolre is manager of
the Line and the French Consul
at Colon.
Mrs. Candle Returns
to Delaware
Mrs. Watson Caudle, who has
been stopping at the Hotel Wash-
ington, sailed Friday to return to
her home in Wilmington, Dela-
ware.
Mrs. Caudle accompanied her
daughter. Miss Betty Ruth Pep-
per to the Isthmus for her mar-
riage to Mr. Wlllard T. Oarrett,
Jr.. on Thursday at the American
Episcopal Church of Our Saviour.
violin solo "Adoration" hv Bor-
ter.Mr .and Mrs. W. C. Shank,|0WSjtVi rendered bv Mrs. Victoria
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Singletary.iHourijrar, Tommy Jordan, barl-
Mr. and Mrs. K. E. Sterner, Mr; tonei wm 8me q Holv Night.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30th
at
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
11:45 a.m."A SURE FOUNDATION FOR '52."
Special Choir Number.
7:JS p.m."8PUHTUAL PRIORITKS FOR THE NEW
YEAR."
' ..a* ,-
Trumpet Solo Vocal Numbers.
Speaker: Pastor W. H. BeebyRadio Service-HOXO-760 Kc.
EVERYONR WELCOME
We Preach Christ Crucified Risen Coming Agate.
and Mrs. F. T. Sustee, Mr. and
Mrs. J. F. Ure, Mr. and Mrs. W.
W Utterback. Mr. and Mrs. J.
K. ViieandMr. and Mrs. C. W.
Wright, Jr.
Informal at Home
for Visitors -
Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Thomas
had an Informal "at home"
Thursday evening to give friends
and neighbors an opportunity to
meet Mrs. O. G. Thomas, Jr.,
and to welcome Lt. Thomas,
who are spending some time with
his paren.
Mrs. Mise Visiting
at Fort Gullck
Mrs. Charlotte D. Wlss arrived
by plane Thursday from her
home in Morristown. Pa., for a
visit with her daughter and son-
CERVEZA
slop worrying...
start llnling!
Don't worry about that
first gray strand! Let it be a
"blessing in disguise"
signal to you to take action
and do something about ob-
taining lovelier, natural
looking new haircolor! So
relax and let Roux take
overt For Roux Oil Sham
poo Tint treatments conceal
every visible strand of dull
or gray hair, gire sparkling
highlights and lustre, adds
subtle, natural-looking color
that changes your worry to
delight! '
ROUX OIL
SHAMPOO TINT
COLORS CONDITIONS
CLEANSES
Caution: use only as directed
on label
OteliUartat ta ha Biffi at f
aae the Caaal Seat
JULIO vos
No. I "A" Street
Telephone S-S97I Panama I
TJJgg^
Vista de! Mar
#5 East 39th St.
Professor Leo Cardona, pianist,
will play a groun of his original
Christmas compositions.
Mr. O. E. Jorstad Is the choir
director and Mrs. C. J. Genis Is
the organist.
Visitors at Ceee Solo
Mr. and Mrs. Edison Marshall
of Augusta. Georgia, arrived yes-
terday for a visit with their
daughter an dson-ln-law, Lt:
Commander and Mrs. L.B.Jen-
nings of the Coco Solo Naval
Station.
Square Danre
New Year's Eve
The Star In A Circle Square
Dance Clubs from both sides of
the Isthmus are sponsoring a New
Year's Eve dance and buffet sup-
per at the Margarita Clubhouse.
Dancing will start at 8:00 and
the affair Is open to the general
public. The tickets are $1.50 per
person.
Visiting In the Interior
Mr. and Mrs. carl ton Hallett
of Gatun with Judith and Char-
lene Boyce are spending the New
$0C*

AT THE ATLAS GARDEN
Just Unpticked
EVENING DRESSES
and
BALLERINA with SHOES to match

A GIFT fOR YOU
THE SCOn SPOON
Mode of Durable Plastic
in Beautiful Colors
On the evening of December the 31st there wiM be a minimum charge
of $3.50 per person for food and drinks. Noise-makers free.
Make, your reservations now. Tel. 2-2423.
_____-
CARLOS BOZA & HIS ORCHESTRA
EVERY SUNDAY FROM 11:30 A.M. TO 2 P.M.
Enjoy curb service around dance floor.
NO EXTRA COSTI Ask for the
large Scott's Emulsion package
containing a beautiful tablespoon.
Obtainable in six attractive colors.
Then give your family this scien-
tific, vitamin-rich food-tonic every
lay, u many doctors recommend.
You'll soon have a stronger and
healthier family.
^eSCOTTS EMULSI0
HtGM Energy food tonic
MAKE THIS
NEW YEAR'S EVE
THE GAYEST,
GRANDEST
PARTY EVER!...

MAKE IT AN "EL PANAMA" PARTY!
One for the books! Join the gang at 10 p.m. In The Patio to enjoy
the sparkling special floor show, the magic tunes for dancing by our TWO
ORCHBSTRAS. the Nolsemakers. favors and the fun galore you'll have at
El Panama's gala goings-on!
LIGHT RKFRB8HMENTS LIQUOR AVAILABLE BY THE BOTTLE
Midnight sapper RESERVE YOUR TABLE TODAY
.

Advance reaervaUoRi will be bald until
under evening U Uckeu ara not picked
up by thai time
#.
, Tablee will be held until U30 pa.
Haw Year's eve.
BB
(WWW
/
7


I
f AGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPET
SATURDAY, DECEMBER t, 1951
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
N. 4 Th.It At*
Pkae I-MI
KIOSEO DE LESSEES
rar,.. de l.emee
MORRISON'S
Mb. tWDl of M *T*
r... -jmi
BOTICA CABLTON
1MM Melee Sea At*.
Pkeae HS-CeUa.
SALON DE BELLERA AMERICANO
Wo. tV Weee IJtt 9ciet
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
m*. n urn ga
He. 12.1-1 Ceatral Are -!*
12 words
.Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
MISCELLANEOUS
Furmturt to till.'
Call
HX"
Hiusehald Exchange
No. 41 Fronnsco de la Ossa, Ave.
Tel 3-49H. Ponomi.
Oe) |H he. nmkm, ..ekle..?
wnt* AininSw tmmmmm
n rut am, c z.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Service Personnel and
Civilian Government Employei
F I N A N C I
your new or used car through
RESORTS
HOTEL PAN-AMERICANO in cool
El Voile. Rooms $2.00 per per-
son per. doy. Meals a la carte.
Special New Year's Dinner $1.25.
Reservations. Tel. Pon. 2-1 I 12,
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
VB.NMINT LMPLOVnp,NANCI>M^0CTQmM, g^ W
ssiAg -w^^w^ =- wit** ass Bsu Js^ag-casi.{5?,
Call 83-6234 or come to .vi-r- Hermes, both in good condition. s#rv,c Personnel in the CanbJ Zone Williomi Santo Clora Beoch Cottoqes.
_Curundu1______________________: Phone 83-5186. _____ I'or 14 year. With our financing | Two bedrooms. Fri0idalres. Rock-1
FOR SALE:-Mahogany table $20.- FOR SALE:Man's suit tin 37 re-P"" ,ntu,ron1e1- ou*>inaBtoally Adjusted
CO. Other furniture. 21^7-A East $15 00 Mans dr. u L 'O U. S. covevagee,
7th Street. Curundu. Phone Cu- f*r'37V*. Man.,r, r,A*tANOaMBNT$ CAN 81 MAOI
au 5177. ______________l_JM0_BoS_ 2-)THEOGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
Two "bicycles, shock absorber, 26" |FOR SAL:Beeoiyrest bo~
1 beys 1 girls, excellent condi-'
t,en. $25.00 each. 718-B, Prado
Bolboo. _____
ond mattress $40 each. Al-
brook 5287.
_/H 1951 Packard. 4-door, rodio. leotfTer.
FOR SALE:Living, bedroom
Hollicraffer rodio. dining
FOR SALE: Aquarium
mH Tel. 83-5141.
and fish.
lamps, r-iouicra>rer tuu.v. "_"|la-_ t
table oil kitchen items including'i*fS< tfuck, good tronsportotion.
2 complete sets dishes. 2 sets Cheap. Also some steel furniture
silver club aluminum pots, pop up Reams, 758-8 Borneby St. Bal-
toaster, electric broiler. 2041-D boo.
East 3rd St. Curundu. Phone Cu-
rundu 7141.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
Vandergrifl Quits
VA Post To Accept
WSW. 1'ir take trooV-fn. prefer
convertible. Good price for Pon-
oma or Zone. No. 36 Froncisco
de la Ossa, Apartment 3, Panama.
Gromlichi Sonto Cloro beach-
cottages. Electric lea boxes, am
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
1951 Feed Victoria (bard tea cea-
veitraie) tw. mm .ai Tata car
iwit Eke new. Only 000 miles,
drire away. Only $725 down.
Year FORD OEALIR. COLEAN
MOTORS INC.. aa aatoasakira
raw Teleskeiie 2-1031 2-IOJB
Paaeeie.
FOR RENT
Houses
ALHAM1RA APARTMENTS. Soon
available chalet, five room duplex
with hot and cold water, two
bothrooms, maid's room. Apply
immediately.
It is actually cheaper
to boy a
P.r.l. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Beside Protection Against
iinJun\wthey save manv
times their value in cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-8140
RadioPrograms
Your Community SroNofl
HOG-840
Where 100.000 Peaele Meet
Presents
i.m. s*Urd*y~^-
J:lMg*ftBJ Bad Concert
3.30McLean's Program
3-J5-Musical interlude
4:00-Music ior Saturday
i 2tS2Jour Favorite
8.00Guest Star
8:15Masterworks from Prance
S.i^-American Polk songs
<&, Muslc HaU
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:0Newsreel U.S.A. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45-Battle Report
9:00Radio University (VOA)
!:Hlamp club (VOA
9.30 Radio Amateur Program
9:45sports and Tune of Day
10:00 HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00-.The Owl's Nest
100a.m.Sign Off
WANTED:Responsible North-Ame- huajaajui _.L U_.>a_
riean fom.iy desires 3 or 4 bad- IlllUillllCC JOB FlClC
-
roem house.
Panam.
Telephone 3-0733,1
Charles R. Vandergrift, Canal
FOR SALE:1939. 8-cyl. Pockord
Sedan. Good condition. Radio and
overdrive. A pood family car.
Priced to sell. Universal Service
Inc., Calle Jernimo de la Ossa
Phone 2-2624 2-3057.
FOR RENT:Furnished concrete one
bedroom cholet, modern improve-
ment, in Arraijan. 8 \'t miles to
Ferry. Name at entrance, John-
son.
FOR RENT
A pa rmenla
w.,ITCn T#\ BCWT-1 bedtcom Zone representative of the Vet- i ten u*~-~ T .
.-tmni Administration for tUtl' j2M27 V2_*__ ^Modern furnisr-ed.upfumished oport-
ALHAMBRA APARTMINTS
dark flraea, leather
pLn. PAD IT R",onol":nounced that he is resigning ^J6*.**! f<.I W** oWca 8061. 10th Street, n
---------------hia governments post to go into e-' "V1 > *eo dewa Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
s Cervecera, the insurance hunineu hi. m.1 "" *iva it .w.r. y.ur FORD ------------------------------_,
_____r_---------------------------.------,----------.- iv,,.,uiiu inai io go invo L Z* Z IZZZ
\VANTED-100 shores Cervecera, the insurance business His re- *' *"' fOtlB
Nocional stock. C. L. Pierce. Box fiignation is effective Jan. 1. MALBS, COLPAN MOTORS INC.
82. Ancon. C. Z. Tel. 4-174. Vandergrift has assured de- *#* "" Tel. 2-1032
,----=r--------. tin__a tur- P-rtment commanders of the 2-103*;, Paaeaii.
WANTED: Reward $10A '- American Legion and V
nished oportment for young ecu- Forei BHWSU
pie. M^colly opproved. Co.. 87-^ Jgfigtfg J
3222 or 85-2237.
Help Wonted
I partrnent" _commaaders""of the: 2-I03B. Peaeti.
ie'verteri W S*1-^-1*" Hudson Commo-
has an-! o" 4"door 5,don' rodi0- h*5,r-
nounced no intentions to close
the Canal Zone VA office in
Diablo Heights. However, the:
new seot covers, good tires, ex-
cellent condition. $800. Ft. Clay-
ton. Qtrs. 510-B. Phone 5127.
WANTED: Reliable, oil around
English ond Spanish speaking
maid. Weal:-end at beach
cmpire Street. Belboo.
J Street No. 4. Panama.
Monday afternoon visit to the a .... JSjZI Z -.^ --..
American Legion Building In LaELT? S"L*Sr
Cristobal will be discontinued SZh !tt..a!L' It? iT'L
During his terminal leave *% jj. T*** "' **
from VA. unless new lnatruc- *!' *3 *** ,_____'
"mola 10,u are received from Wash- "*** ** > -.
ington. Vandergrift will devote 1941 Ford Tudor sedon. radio, good
FOR RENT:Comfortable oportmentj
15 St. No. 32. San Froncisco de
lo Coleto entrance.
FOR RENT:Comfortoble oportment.
two bedrooms, dining room, both-
rOOin, Oorage. Perejil 2nd Street;
No. 11. Same house, upstairs or;
Phone 3-0354.
LUX
VENETIAN
HLINDS
Immediate
Delivery
Aluminum
A wnings
Different
Colors
$14.00
Industrias
Panamericanas
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29th Street
8268
FOR RENT:J-One bedroom unfur-
nished modern apartment. Gar-
age. 168 Via Belisario Porras.
cV-2 M, A Pnnoma LfiS8" O th* lay to VA aC-
L I-
tivities.
Mrs. Eileen Lambert, VA
socr'tary for the past two years,
will be in charge of the office
in Vandergrift's absence.
Cristobal since August 1927, will
leave Canal service at the end
of December.
At the time of his retire-
ment, he will have completed
31 years, seven months and 16
days service with the Canal or-
La Boca Church
School Pupils Co
On picnic Tuesday Quarantine Officer
Pupils of St. Peters Church1 li f-J-aXLaJ l -:---'
School. La Boca, will go on an AI LmIHiImI LSciVSi
outing to Chorrera on New! ^owaai hvurvj
Church School pupils will be CdHdl DeCllllbCr 30
furnished transportation and,
refreshments free, but other. Dr pwilin Hnrw i, v...
v&sss&j m ,ot thelr &%siJSffi& a
Buses chartered for the trip
are scheduled to leave the
church at 8 a. m. and Chorrera
On the return at 5 p. m.
Watcbnight Service
The traditional Watchnlght -
service will be held at St. ye. tntlon
ters Church Monday night, be- t&JP*J&L2H*B* May
linnlnR 11 p. m. ?*1 "20- *" ****** "'t oer-
lod of temporarv dutv at Colon
Parishioners are urged by U SjXSai was tranaierred to the
Rav. Lemuel B. Shirley to at-'!***" *"}<* where he
teiV this last service for the if <^* conUnuosulv since
r tnat home. He came to the Isth-
mus from Brooklvn. where he
ihprf been in private practice.
Horwitz served his intrnshln
at Westchester Countv Hospital
iin East View. New York, and
took residency training at St
Michael's Hosoital In Newark.
New Jersey, and served for a
The Cocoli branch of th. Pa- ^^X^Ylr^r^^1'
ama Canal Library wUl go sat.^aJtJSLPJ S&4 ,. .
of Cocoli tn the Navy.
The Library will be open
Monday afternoon.
Books which have been bor-
tires, good shape. $3O.o". 417
Porto Bello St.
150 Sradaaaker Cbaatalaa Ster-
liih Ce-p. black, feed tira, sea
covert, a cleea car. Only $465.
00 dewa end drive it away. Tear
BORD DEALER, COLPAN MOTORS
INC., ea automobile raw. Tel. 2
1033 2-1036 Paaeeea.
FOR SALE:1950 Chevrolet sedan
white walls. 0766-D Williamson
Place.
current year.
Cocoli Branch
Library Suspends
Operation Monday
30 Perd Custom Tuder V-B light
ray SWW tires. This car is a
kaauty. Only $485.00 dewa and
ite year*. Year FORD DBALBR,
COLPAN MOTORS INC. ea eu
teaseaile raw. Tel. 2-1033 2
1036. Paaeese.
FOR RENT:Two bedroom oport-
ment. maid's room, "D" Street,
Cangrejo, near Hotel Panama.
Tel. 2-0313 3-0460. Panomo.
FOR RENT
Rooms
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel n P.n.ml
Selling: Abattoir. Panam
Forest (preferred). Clay Pro-
ducts, S. Fernando Clinic.
Tel. S-4719 3-1660
BOOMS AVAILABLE Light, caal
entirely eeaeveted aad well fur-
aiihed. Ratee reasonable. Bache-
lera only. Inquire at The Ame-
rican Club teciag Da Leueat
Park.
.:
FOR RENT:Furnished room with
privte bathroom ond entrance.
Kitchen privilege. 43rd Street N
MODERN FURNITURE
cuaroM built
Slipcover Renpbolstery
viarr ova SHOW-BOOM!
Alberto Herea
tl *U "'i* T JAeteeaeMle In)
t3* Sea*1" .-T** J1 ,?Uv^
Tel. S-US :ae am I. 1:M p m
Sunday, Dae. 30
A.1H.
S:00Sign on Musical inter-
lude
8:15Newsreel U.S.A. (VOA)
8:30Hymns of All Churches
9:00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OP
THE AIR
9:15Good Neighbors
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00In the Tempo of Jass
10:30Your American Music
11:00National Lottery (Smoot
and Paredes)
11:15The Sacred Heart Pro-
gram
11:30Meet the Band
12:00Invitation to Leamlor
(VOA) *
P.M.
12:30Salt LakeTabernacla
Choir
1:00The Jo Stafford Show
1:15 American Chorales
1:30Rev. Albert Steer
2:00Opera and Bymphony
Hour ,
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Heritage of Britain
6:30Donald Voorheet*
7:00Opera Concert
7:30Story of the Christian
Church
7:45Radio Varieties U.S.A.
8:00Sports Roundup and News
(VOA)
: 15Report from C o n a r e u
(VOA)
8:30Show Time
8:45The Letter Box
9:00United Nations Revlgw
(VOA)
9:30The Bing Crosby Show
(VOA) ,
10:0u_*riUah Concert Hall
11:00Sign Oif '
Explanation ef Symbols
VOAVoice ot America
BBCBritish Broadcastlng
Corp.
RDF Radiodifusin Francaise
UNITED IN MARRIAGE last night at the Albrook base chap-
el was T/Sgt. T. c Garner, of Oklahoma City, Okla., assign-
ed to Albrook s 570 Maintenance Supply Squadron and
Miss Lucille Haas, of Gramercy, La., a member of the nurs-
ing staff at Oorgas hospital. Chaplain (Major) V. H. War-
ner read the marriage ceremony. Best man was M/Sgt.
Marvin Gartner and the maid of honor was Miss Shirley
Pyie who will be married tonight at Albrook to Lieut. P. C.
Marine, USAF, now stationed at Wright Patterson Air Force
Base, Ohio.
(Official USAF Photo)
FOR SALE:1951 Chevrolet pow-
der-elide. $750.00 down, will take
trade. See Frank Alemn, Smoot
& Paredes.
1949 Perd Tuder V-B *.rk blue,
teat cavare, feed tires. Only $395.
00 dewa. Year FORD DEALER
COLPAN MOTORS INC.. aa aura-
ekile raw. Tel. 2-1033 2-
1036. Peeeat.
FOR RENT: Spocious room to
honorable gentleman. Private en-
trance. No. 5 oportment, 4 Dar-
ien Street. Telephone 2-3189
Panama.
SiMSATWHAL OFfCRl
nmc Ntn s:jc RCSISTM!
-.CUf(
FOR RENT
Misrelianeon
OPFICB: Modern two room suite
near Free Zone. Inquire Alham-
bra Apartments 8061. 10th Street
Telephone 1386, Colon..
TO'ved frhm *he Cnonli T ihrorv v. cnere w" Ull-tlm*
Sivta tr5!r|CN0lK.Ll!I 2hV8lC.ian I ?Utv SI th. P.lo
Local Shriners
Plan To Welcome
New Year At Party
Potentate Henry E. pik n-
.....- ^. *w ...Arabic Order of The Nobles of
Sft ** 2-IOBI 2-; The Mystic Shrine will ron oS
!QS. Paaeau. I the carpet on New Year. v.
naturallved United states clt- 7937ltudebak.r ^ .^ ^ .,0r "Mobles and their ladvs
nat ?dth* e-.liftr.rat Ueute- fron^.t^*'S7^;r,w,.fh^.lnJhta area
nant in the Medical Corps from1
April 1918 to June 1919 at Camp
Dlx. New .Tersey.
Before there was a full-time
^^T-1941 'V** Speciot
DeLuxe Convertible, new top. new
tires. Tel. 3-3220.
1947 Paatiae Bardar Si. dark brae.
feed tires, >. cavare, radie.
spetlieht. Our, $350 dawa aad
take it away. Tea FORD DEALiR
COLPAN MOTORS INC. .^
transportation. 2041 -0
Phone 83-7141.
SAVES 30% IRONING TIME I
T\tm all standard size Ironlns boards.
Color 3St. SUInproof -
e Waterproof, keep- pad dry.
J*o senrrh osarka. attraetlve looklne
Laboratory tested not to scorch at
600 degree, hear.
Only 13.75 e.rh Peetpald.
Send Money Order to
Duiimore Agency
ErUfel Inelllulo Nacional
PANAMA, a. P.
ntay be returned to the main
library at the Civil Affairs
Building In Ancon either by
mail or in person.

(tu
-Lhntrtf

9*i*M4
SUNDAY
SPECIAL LUNCHEON
Fru" Cocktail II Ranche .r
Spaniah Mackerel ea aacakache
Mulllajatiwny Soup
Consomme Madrilea
Spaahetli BieUlaaew aa Caa-
-* ..................... IN
Waele Pried B..v C.rklaa
Tartar, taaca ............ 1 i
Potonalae Potaseee Saur Beeta
Orean talad
Hot Rolla Sattar
Marenaue Glace
rotte Tea
COCKTAILS
---------
E\ery Sunday }>
11 a.m. to 2 mi. *#*
Seco Leoer Colony. Dr. Horwitz
servad there for a number of
years as visitine; physician,
workinp at the Leoer Colony
durinit the morninas and at the
albo* Quarantine Station in
the afternoons.
Dr. Horwitz will leave the
momita January 11 on the Pa-
nama Tine. He has not decided
where he will make his future
home.
Cn^Lb!nTJ.S ,invltttoM have;
-----------:iTi Mhi?Ue . s mili Caape %hn^U **? we|come with or
faea. kaaad a^ tap. S,* Invitation. The ce-
aa aareee, ejaad tieZ. ini ?f? ""a be*'n t 8 pJT.,
? O^ "0o!?onmln?vernUnUe D tato *
1947
brand new
bread aew
niALBB. colpan MOTOM ^!DM,el'Uk dinner, door
MlePltSZ* 2',M,iS' A-i' Cn,et
will share
and two
Abou Saad
xmu^nHZSSZTttn* with hundreTof iff
'rlt.nn'r!n*^ *earn8 th^ trt-
'" deer sedjea, radia, seat
cavers, eacelleaf t.r.i lew mile-
an. aaly $1300. Ci.., $. A
Peeriee aad C.d.ll.r dealer..
EAST TO TRAIL
. LOWELL. Mass. fUPA aol-
fr who lost a tlrt in a hit-run ..
eaUlalen was tracked down by TumPh
police who followed the mark
mad> on the road bv the rim of
the bar wheel on his car.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle*
Motorcycle 650cc. lote
951 model. Extras. $200 below
new machine. Phone 2-1971 Bal.
bes.
RE-OPENS
JANUARY 1st., 1952
er reeemite*. Tel^raek aj Write
HOTEL PANAMONTE
eaaete CkIrlo at
*e ee yea. Travel A(aaM
dltional red fezes
ha^rinaItZ0n< .Pollce wU1 ^ on
hand to control traffic ate
aupervise parking in ^e Ancn
Playground. It win not be ne-
aSrSF.s? bl0Ck S B1"
y4*s year' ta iormerl
hI?le.uI)lrector' Te" Butler,
boasted that even if the No-
bles arrived on camels the boyj
thS/eaSr He adaed- however,
t v, 'h,M a ln Shrinedom*
southern most oasis camels are
"g?,,/. but then again
anything can happen when
riera meet." Secretary
Sff6 Z3iman *<> that
".-hi?' ""'a' ^ OWWl ^
purchase new feses without any
discount. "It isn't that I want
to seU them, but that I war
to see them," be eaj^exT
CHAMPION BOXER
AT STUD
M-rlialrc'a Madel Medel
Faaseaa deep red law tap
producing bexer.
Owner: Eatker O de Taliaeuez.
Fe! Maapetal VI.. Porra. 42
TeJ.: 2-1Z44 3-38
THIEVES GET E ITCH EN BINE
Bargain For Sale:
PREFABRICATED
ALUMINUM HOUSE
Livlnf DMfatf room, three
edjreewew. Kitchen and Bath.
Petir ClaaaU.
PRICE: $3,950.
AGENCIAS LUMINA, S.A.
Tai. i-ian
RIGHT FORMULA
Lt. Potros Is New
COOfUSSAMC-12
Lt. Marcel Patras. Jr., USN.I
relieved Lt. Stanley C. Orr.'
UNS, as Commandint Officer of
the ACM-12 at change of com-
mand ceremonies held Thurs-
day morning at the Naval Sta-
tion, Hodman.
Lt. Orr has been assigned
new duties at Headquarters
Fifteenth Naval District.
Prior to assuming command
of the ACM-12. Lt. Patras was
executive Officer of the vessel.
A native of Parwell, Michigan.
Patras enllsed ln the Navy on
June 17. 1938. He served here
in the Canal Zone In 1940-43
as an enlisted man at the Net
Depot, Coco Solo.
During the war he served a-
board the minesweeper YMS-
297, on which he won his com-
mission, and as Executive Of-
ficer of the LST-528, both In
the Pacific.
Previous to reporting aboard
the ACM-12. he was atatloned
at the Naval Ordnance Plant,
Indianapolis, Ind.
Lt. H. M. Yelton, USN. has
MRS. ELSIE E. TAtES",'orrMfbTo.BCan*l''a6i*; decrttiry to
Brigadier General Emll C. Kiel, commanding general of Car-
ibbean Air Command, was awarded this week a superior ac-
complishment pay increase for outstanding performance in
her secretarial duties. The increase was accompanied by a
letter of authorization and appreciation from General Kiel
which was presented to Mrs. Yates ln a brief ceremony in
the General s office at Albrook Air Force Base.
Mrs. Yates received her superior accomplishment award
for parformance of duty far beyond the standards required
of a satisfactory employe. In addition to normal secretarial
duties performed in a superior manner, Mrs. Yates, said th*
recommendation, has shown superior tact and understanding
in handling matters relating to military and diplomatic pro-
tocol. Also, continued the recommendation, she has demon-
strated keen Insight to staff doctrines.- functions and coor-
dination.
Mrs. Yates, whose home la in Boston. Massachusetts, Is
an Air Force employe of ten years standing. She has been
associated with* the commanding general's office at CAlrC
since March, I960, serving under General Kiel and his prede-
cessor. Brigadier General R. Beam.
New Books
books at the Library follows:
Social sciences The army
officer's guide, Harklns; Coun-
seling any psychology, Blum;
and New ways to better meet-
..Z"r.h of Pane?" by James lings, Strauss.
Ridden, is one of the new books
placed in circulation during the
past week by the Panama Ca-
nal Library.
The book details the trip
taken by the author and Nevil
Shute in a small, private plane
on a trio from England to Aus-
tralia via India, Burma, Slam.
Automobiles Auto repair
kinks, Toboldt.
Fine Arts Cezanne, Leclere.
Travel Flight of fancy, Rld-
dell.
Fiction The grass harp.
Capote- By-line for murder,
Garve; The end of the affair,
Greene: Barabbas, Lagerkvlst;
Ball, Malaya and the butch
1 "-"" J-mi Indies and back to England The way some people die Macr
taken over the duties of Eke-:across the Middle and Near Donald; The blessing; Mltford
cutlve Officer of the s
a.
TROPICAL
TUESDAY
PRE-RELEASE!
4uEKAt ; ,u" Thieves
i5?tu"v ,eave th kitchen STATE COLLEGE. Pa--(NEA)
uik when they looted John en- Bob Hlgglns. former Peon
1 w new h2U8e TheJ' took the itato coach, had the Ntttany
,,' ii ?. r P'umblng ready Uona up. among the nation's top
for installation. ;i0 grid toama from 1B39 to 1m
SSs!

East.
The
complete list of
The conformist, iyforav7a"and
new'Ue down ln darkness, styron.
CECILIA THEATU Opening Next Thursdoy, Jan. 3
v^lisV
[
% pays
Not
Suitable
For
Children
and oo-rtaMnd
[DOROTHY SHAY
the Psrfc tour** HjHbifl /tj
* mm* NTUMTWIAI nCTUK
Seagrams
vo.
^CANADIAN WHISKVj
Now. ..6
kYears Old!
Swiraiffi


SATURDAY. OFCEMBFR *, 1K1
UTO PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPBNDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAOK SFYEN
.
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures ftJsOtf Hjf HST Returns In Good Humor
jMBL&utm From Christmas In Missouri
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
[
Wild Sheep
BOUEONTAI.
1 Depicted wild
Mew Orleans Service
Arrives
Cristobal
S.S. Chiriqui...............
S.S. Inter 8kon ............
8.8. Fiador Knot ..........
Dec. M
......L
........../ 1*
H.-dlInt BafrltaraKd Chill** and G*a Cart*
New York Service
S.S. Cape Abb ...
S.S. Junior .......
S.S. Cape Avinaf .
Arrives
Cristobal
.........
.......
.....
Dec. M
Jan, 1
Ja.
FREQUENT IAU.1.NC. FROM CBMTOSAl fO WHT COAST
CENTRA1 AMERICA
istohal to New Orleans via
Sails f ron
reto, Honduras_____________________Cristos*!
S.I. chiriqui ..............._;". __;;.....{"* ,}
S.S. Chiriqui.....(Passenger 8rvlce Only).....Jaa. 1
CRISTOBAL 1121
TELEPHONES:
PAN ABU t-SSM
COLON M
7 it has spirally
horns
II Spoiled
HOpetMd
II Oriental coin
KKXCUM
II bitted
II Providing
M Church
dignitary
n Note el ecalt
SI Bare
M Horned
ruminant
Dtih
MLeer
M Ptych part
lOPronoua
II Sub aS
M Net (preAx)
II Prank
Row
M Raw
aSCaBKNti
4 Area MAture
41 Light shoot
47 Till tal. (ab.)
41 Plaything
O German river
SI Hawaiian
wreath
U liter ef oklc
I Shaketpeareaa
Mag.
Unoccupied
7 Island republic
I Distinct part
I Highway (ab.)
10 Solemn
promite
11 Shiny paint
llwlah
niUinium
(symbol)
20 Hanging
ornamenU
II Deaceadants
of Emu
M
Anewer to Previous Puizle
U. : U.I3I1 .iHHMmwn
r_iyo_r_?lMl>lkWIll--
UIB". I-' ''-'' J'K liMB-l
'_n. '; i. ju r-ro
H'.'aaaaaa
IB 21
mumib:
U'v j.arj
, X-_-_-_---_ '
: '.' i ,-:r
ur-Jk. :-.'_': ill'J ai
t'A-:uwaMiBis!'-'"
21 Woeaan 44 Colla, degree
advittr (ab.)
31 Speaker 45 It ii from------
34 Word of honor 41 Fatting season
M Natural tats Assent
37 Withitand 51 Sheltered side
41 Poker stake SI Near
411Uqulr USlseolshot
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BY ROAL CHARTER ISM
Royal Milis Laws Ltd.
FAST FREWHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA _
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA,
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUftA.
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
hf.V, "REINA DEL PACIFICO"......... .......March 1st
The m.v. "REINA DEL PACIFIC" will not call at Kingston
on the March Voyage.
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "CUECO" ...................................Ptc.aoth
TO UK/CONTINENT
S.S. "DIEMERDYX" ..... .......;:................Dec- Mta
Accepting passenger* in Pint. Cabin and Third Class
Superior accommodation available tor passengers
AU aailiBge tabject to change withe neiiee. ,
PACIFIC STEAM NAP. CO., Cristbal. Tel. ISM 1M
FOR!'COMPANY IBC. Pana- Tel. S-1SI7/.US: Balboa 1IM
14 Buries
saw
' TERtlOAL
1 Poisonous gas
IRegrstful
3 Scare
4 Article
rr r-rx n r-jr rn rr- r
M V
f
m

-

t*

k -i
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written fee NBA Serriee
NORTB II
V.
? J
? KQJ1074I
WEST (D) BAST
4)1 AK74
? Q7| VAJ10II3
? AK7643 Qlll
? IS I
SOVTR
AAQJ10S2
None
? III
? AI
Both sides vul.
Nerih Bast Seaih
Pass IP U
? ?
Double Pqss Past Pass
Opening lead ? K
West
Pau
IP
WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 (UP)
President Truman flew back
to Washington yesterday from
a Christmas visit to his Inde-
pendence, Mo., home and im-
mediately plunged into a top-
level budget conference with
defense and foreign aid of-
ficials.
The President's personal
plane, the Independence, land-
ed at Washington National
airport. He was in smiling good
humor as he was greeted by
Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son and several members of the
White House ataff.
Asked If he had a good
Christmas during his five-day
visit to Missouri, the President
replied:
Electric Gear, Methane Gas,
Blamed For 119-Death Blast
1
Shipping & AirLine News
1st Ship ef I'nited Fruits
Cvolee Sestea Dae Tomorrow
With IS Passengers
The United Fruit Company
will inaugurate its 1952 winter
cruise season ahead of time by
bringing 13 cruise passenger
in addition to local and transit
travelers by the S. 8. Chiri-
qui from Hew Orleans tomor-
row.
Early in January it will start
Its weekly cruise sailings out
of New York with an estimated
100 cruise passengers arriving
every Sunday morning to re-
main in port until Sunday
afternoon.
Between the bi-weekly New
Orleans-to-Cristobal service and
the weekly New York-Cristobal
service the Unlted's Big Four
ships are expected to average
a minimum ef 00 tourists
monthly from now until April.
Tourist booking are reported-
ly very good for the coming
winter cruise season, the Com-
pany assures, and both service
have Itineraries so arranged as
to give travelers nearly two
days in port here for shopping
fast freighter service between
nisok abb north anb booth pacific coasts
(A Limitad Number nt Pawcntr Berth>
_______------,---- '.
ro tutors:
9.a. Houan .......................................... January 7
TO COLOMBIA. SCUABOB ANB CBBLB:
S. Parti Bain .................................January S
It CENTRAL AMERICA B WBBT COAST U S.A.
S.S. Chill ........................................_ January is
raoM nkw vork to plimouth b lb bavbb
lit D Franca .....................................Jaautry it
rASSBNGM- SCBVICE tnaa CABTAGENA EDROrg:
Cdoml-ia .................................... January U
CrBMBal BKMCB UNA, M> 7w -4f "
>in.m. UNDO V MADCBO. B A. |gg ISM
Tat. Pajuunt S.ISSS t-lStl
and sightseeing on both sides
of the isthmus.
1 The ships starting the New
, YorS winter cruise service to
the Isthmus include the Quirl-
'gua. Jamaica and Talamanca.
They will arrive at Cristobal ev-
ry Saturday at 7 a.m. and leave
Sunday afternoon.
Th Wew Orleans ships will
remain In port even longer, ar-
riving Sunday morning early.
Siring passengers ample time
> shop and see the Atlantic
81de and offering a trans-Isth-
mian excursion on Monday. A
special train will leave ship-
side at 1:00 a.m. Monday, re-
turning to Colon in the after-
noon.
The Stranges Club in Colon
has extended the club's wel-
come to all passengers arriving
thl8 weekend from New Orleans
to Join in the New Year's fes-
tivities
In view of the presence of
' tourists in port on Sunday pro-
minent Colon merchants are
i planning to open their stores
every Sunday to enable the vis-
itors to shop there as well as
in Panama City.
NOW IS
THE IEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
Dangerous Gas
Carbon monoxide gas cannot be
smelted, and that makes it very
dangerous. It ts formed as a re-
sult of Incomplete combustion.
When carbon burns, one atom
normally unites with two atoms
of oxygen to form carbon dioxide,
which is not poisonous. If there
| is insufficient oxygen, only one
atom unites with a carbon at^m
and the result is carbon monox-
ide.
"Fine. It couldn't have been
nicer."
His good humor was in mark-
ed contrast to the wasplshness
that marked his departure from
| Monday morning.
He told reporters at an im-
A little learning Is a dangerous Promptu press conference at
thing in bridge as to anything __ _?* that >uld not
else. The other day I saw a cou-.P1,01* hem, anything this
pie of good players butcher a *-___* 0l\ nls Plan* create a
fense in a way that simply would commission to clean up cor-
not occur to average players. |ra*jf ln the * played the queen. His motiviwa's _imo8t "nmediately for a White
iery slmDle\nd very correct. He "* >* *_** ^Jhffi
KS^W..t to continue the dB-^l; _2fS. td?..
i ley-
Any average West would un-. officials on the budget -un-
derstand what was expected of forence list Included Defense
him. He would lead a second mobilizer Charles E. Wilson,
round of diamonds, forcing dum- Mutual Security director W. Av-
my to ruff. After that, declarer errell Harriman, Defense 8e-
could huff and he could puff, but cretarv Robert A. Lovett, Army
he couldn't capture East's king of Secretary Frank Pace, Air Se-
trumps. He would be unable to Cretry Thomas K. Flnletter,
take two trump finesses with on- wavy Secretary Dan Klmball.
ly one trump ln the dummy. Budget Director Frederick Law-
ton, and the Joint Chiefs of'
However, West was no average Staff,
defender. He had heard about the Lovett has said before that
"suit preference" signal, and he military experts have drafted a1
was one of those players who like tentative 143.000,000,000 defense
i to work a good thing to death, (budget. This would represent a'
West said to himself: "My cut of more than 114,000.000.000
partner is trying to indicate under the current fiscal year,
i which suit to shift to. A high But Lovett emphasised that
diamond means the higher side the figure .was not a "celling"
{suit (hearts i, while a low a la-.but rather a starting point for
mond means the lower side suit;the military planners. All' In-,
(clubs)." idications are. however, that the
detente budget at least will be
So West shifted to a heart, and! below this year% total.
South proceeded to wrap up the Budget officials have estimat-
slam and th rubber. South ruff- ed the government's overall
ed the heart, got to dummy with budget next year will not ex-
a club .-nd led the eight of ceed MS.000.000. The 1852 bud-
spades from dummy. The eight get of 170,000,000,000 repreaent-
lof spades rode aroun dsuccess- ed a peacetime record,
fully, and dummy continued with' Observera said the President's
the three of spades. South won good humor may have ben
the second trump finetee with prompted by the fact that two
the queen, drew the last trump'pressing problems were solved
with the ace, and then ran the during hi five-day holiday
clubs to discard hi losing dia- the release of four United
monds. *' State filers from a Hungarian
prison, and the postponement
The difference between the of a threatened steel strike,
sensible defense and West's: But the President still faced
brainstorm was 1530 p o 1 nts.'scores of conferences ln prepa-
What's more, this sort of thing is ration for the opening of Cori-
belng done all over the country ere Jan 8 including the
the name of the higher skill, drafting of his "State of the
'Union' message.
There Is a place for the suit Late next week he also_be-
preferenee signal When you lead ginsa aeries of Important
a card for your partner to ruff, meetings here with Britlsn
you can lead high to show that Prime Minuter Winston Chur-
lyour entry Is hV the high side chUl on cold war strategy and
suit; or you lead low to how that other mutual problema of the
your entry Is in the low aide suit. Anglo-American allies
I There are even one or two other __
ways to use suit preference, but
don't dream of using it on simple
ifollow-sult play. In that situa-
tion, a high card should mean
WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 (UPi!
The government said yester-
day that the West Frankfort,
111., coal mine disaster which
killed 119 miners last week
"most likely" was caused by
electrical equipment operating;
in air containing explosive gas.
The probable cause was given |
in a preliminary report by ins-
pectors of the Federal Bureau
of Mines after a two-day check
of Orient No. 2 mine of the
Chicago, Wilmington Frank-i
ltn Coal Co.
Secretary of the Interior Os-
car L. Chapman, in releasing
th report, warned that "the;
source of the explosion has not
yet been determined."
The blast which occurred a
week ago, ripped Into the
depths of the Orient mine and
caused the worst mining death
toll in 42 years in Illinois.
The report said "a large a-'
mount of' electrical equipment,
capable ef igniting the gas. was!
ln operation ln air returning
from the entrance to abandon-
ed work-out ateas that are,
known to contain explosive'
gas."
It said, however, that "the'
possibility of smoking" as a!
cause "cannot be entirely dis-
regarded" because matches were
found duirng rescue operations.;
The report pointed out that!
the investigation still Is in-!
complete and "therefore it I
necessary at this time to pre-
sent what seems to be the
most likely causa, based on the
evidence now at hand."
Chapman said the final re-
port will not be completed un- i
til analytical tests of air and
dust taken from the mine have
been completed.
The preliminary report said
that large accumulations of I
coal dust, which spreads ex-,
Elusions, were present In the:
last area.
It also said this dust had
not been coated with sufficient
frotective rock dust to prevent
he spread of the explosion.
Investigators said they be-
lieve the disaster was caused by
the ignition of methane gas,1
which raised and ignited clouds j
of coal dust
"It is further believed," the:
report said, that the ignition!
was of electrical origin because
of the operation of electrical
equipment ln the area. Blast-
ing was not going on in the
explosion area at the time of
the disaster.
ITie report abo said that a
large number of the 111 miners
killed were victims of the ex-
plosion and of fire. The rest,
ft said, died of carbon monoxide
poisoning.
;..!
FLESH AND BLOOU -J
bars Bernard wears a symbolic;
"bottle" that goes with the title*
"Miss Blood Plasma," which -h
won for sparking the campaign!
for blood donations at the Grarxj|
Trunk railroad offices in Chicago^
**_
be
F
Literary Satire
- IT' ajOVIETII...
(Panama Canal Clubhouses
J^? Shoving Tonight!
B A I B fi A Cl-"' GABLB
5.. \i ".J "Acrow The Wide MiMotin
IN 4:M :W
a-st .a
Ah Showing Sunday!
DIABLO HTS.
t:IS :U
ClauAatU COLBERT a Min-Donild CABSV
'TET'SMAKE IT UGAl"
(Saatfat) "If rBOBT"
r r\ r r\ t l s*1** scott a.i-. jebgbns
C ?. ? "SUOWFOOT" (Technicolor)
(aaar) "on mooniigrt bay
"'''' '
DavU WAVNE Tim EWELL
"UP FRONT"
la_a.tr> THfc PRINCE WHO WAS A THIEF-
pfDRC MIGUEL
t A AS m ft A Bicliard BASBBART q VMmUna CORTESA
* -HOUSE ON TlllGRAPH HILL"
(aday) "THE RED KAPOK Of COl'BAGE"
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGILIS
MIXKO
Wonderful vacations at the
year' lowest rates await
you a Mexico and the
I. S. A. And there's a new
low combined fare to Loa
Angeles. $380 80 round
trip- Cbicigo i no mora
than -half a day away, via
Miami, with DC-6 service
all the way... Your choice
of 2 service to Miami: "El
Inter Americano" and "El
Turista" flight*.
** yqar Trurtl Afrnl at
1:11
GAT UN
t aa
Stewart QKANGBB Waltar PIDGBON
"SOLDIfli THMiF
(-IJ) "tAMtr PAKTB-
MAKGAKHA
it a f.n
M
Richard WIDMARK a Dana ANDREW
"THE FROGMEN"
(Mnttfar) "LIT" MAKP IT I-MIAL"
cmroBAL
:1S B I.M
'Htt'EcSiis-T'BiStCOM'
Alaa thawin Sunday I
R*/V A MMWAN
1 .tasmo--
: l Start Ne. 9.
Tel t-SI
Celt*. SIm *-, TL tf 7
GtlLvjdM
PRE-RELEASE
JANUARY lit.
I The Mcst Enchanting,
Lavish and Imaginative
Picture of the Century. |
THE TALES
OF HOFFMANN
With The ManreloBs
BaUerlBB
MOIRA SHEARER.
LUDMILLATCHERINA
DON'T FAIL TO SIR ITI
Cervantes' "Don Quixote." re-
___"tha*__ilPasm_r __rtaer garded as one of the greatest sa-
whfi? *low,Ucard8 should mean. tire, m t rtura. telji
Don't lead the suit again unless theme the ridicule of the extra-
you have a very good reason of vagant heroism of ImlghU in
your own." contemporary literature.
BAUOA
TODAY 2:30 4:30 6:30 1:30
mi mTECHNICOLOR ap w*i ipktacui
kyw in tin Sq! Hundfwls in tin cast!
A fortuM tt bring it to you!


i**
-K-V
m
mm
''''a_ti-|
m
mum
mw
onday!
Only ha a th chla that (red to kill!
"HIGH LONESOME'" iln Technicolor i
with John Bar-yBore Chill Wylla
Alao: Sa* th* Earth Stw-a i IU Aalal...
"TWO L>ST WORLDS"
TROPICAL THEATRE
JOHNNY 8HEFFIELD e ANN TODD. ln
"THE LION HUNTERS"
ENCANTO THEATRE
____ AW-Caadll
A~COLOSSAL DOUBLE!
a
Ann Dvorak Doufl
Kapnady. in
"I Waa Aa Aatericaa Spy"
Wayna Harria Lola
Ala.ight. in
SIERRA PASSAGE"
TIVOLI THSATRE
Alan Ladd. ln_____
APPOINTMENT WITH
D.NGEB"
Ttoc Mrx Btoft to
"Did SOTJP"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A SENSATIONAL" DOUBLE
PROORAM!
a
Richard Widmark Dana
Andrcva. tat
-THE FBOGMBN"
Jeann* Craln. In
"Take Care ef My Little
Girl" In Technicolor!
VICTORIA THEATRE
Two New Chapter of
"SVPEBMAN V.
ATOMIC MAN"
AUo. TWO PICTURES'^



^___. __.-_-..--_._-__.
> ---- .IB mi 'i


'i ',; '

fAGE EIGHT
.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
/
AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1051
Bowl-Bound Grid Coaches Divided Into Two Camps
Vols' Neyland, TC's Meyer
Fall In Optimistic Group
By UNITED PRESS
The coaches of the bowl-bound teams are divided into two
camps today the optimists and the pessimists.
Dutch Meyer of Texas Christian and Bob Neyland of Ten-
nessee are two who are optimsitic.
Neyland sent the Vols through two workouts today in pre-
paration for the New Year's Day game with Maryland. The
Tennessee coach appeared confident and not even the threat of
rain seemed'to bother him.
"The weather would slow our attack of course," said Ney-
land, "but Maryland would be bothered Just as much."
Maryland Coach Jim Tatum has been fretting about the
weather ever since he started getting the Terps ready for the
Sugar Bowl Classic. Before the tea mmoved to its Bilozi, Mis-
sissippi, training site. Tatum was forced to hold indoor workouts
on the school's campus because of rain and snow.
Meyer sent Texas Christian through Its last hard scrimmage
before the Cotton Bowl game against Kentucky. After the work-
out, Meyer was pleased.
"I'm convinced we're going to play a fine game against Ken-
tucky," h esaid. "The players are showing plenty of enthusiasm
and seem to nave the spring back in their legs."
At Houston, Kentucky Coach Paul Bryant was anything but
optimistic.
"We haven't been able to get in the shape we would like
to," says Bryant. The coach adds that his team is in good
physical condition, but he is disappointed in their endurance.
The Baylor Bears' schedule was thrown off balance yester-
day. The Bears, who meet Georgia Tech in the Orange Bowl,
were scheduled to leave Waco, Texas, by plane yesterday morn-
ing. However, their flight was delayed about one hour.
College
Basketball
(Thursday Night)
BIG 7 TOURNEY
Kansas State 87, Nebraska 67
Missouri 49, Iowa State 42
DIXIE CLASSIC
No. Carolina 49, So. California 45
Cornell 58, Wake Forest 51
N.C. SUte 71, Navy 51
Columbia 66, Duke 58
Brookline Tourney
At Brazos Brook
Heavy Hitting
Bluebirds
W. Holder, cf
Tedesco. ss. .
Parrls, 3b .
aRoberts, rf .
AB R
3 0
The first round of the popular Roberts, rf
Brookline Tournament which Is Ganss, c .
sponsored every year by Casul- Barbee, lb. .
lQ'a of Coln has been completed Erathwaite. 2b.
and there were several upsets; Miller. If. .
but the pre-tournament favorites Alonso, p .
comprising the team of Kenway Salinas, p .
and Huldquist remained In the Stempel, p
running by trouncing Reed and
Harrington by a 5 and 4 score. Totals.....20
HPO
1 S
0 10
0 2
SOUTHWEST TOURNEY
Vanderbilt 60, Baylor 53
Tex. Christian 69. Rice 57
MIDWEST TOURNEY
Wayne (Mich.) 59, St. Thomas
(Minn ) 55
Indiana St. 69, S. E. Louisiana 55
ALL-COLLEGE TOURNEY
Tulsa 62, Alabama 52
Oklahoma City 52, Tulane 49
Idaho 58, Wyoming 46
Okla. A&M 53, San Francisco 41
GATOR BOWL TOURNEY
Florida 73, Clemson 62
Georgia 79, Florida SUte 50
STEEL BOWL TOURNEY
Fenn SUte 62, Michigan 60
Pitt 73, Virginia 49
HOFSTRA TOURNEY
Queens (N.Y.) 67, Williams 48
Wagner 65. Cortlaad 54
Trinity (Conn.) 66, St. Lawrence
50
Alfred 42, Hofstra 41
SUNSHINE TOURNEY
SW Oklahoma 65, Abilene Chris-
tian 63
r Central Okla. 58, Howard Payne
0 56
n ENID TOURNEY
n Regis 67, Washburn 61
n East Central Okla. 52, Phillips
X Univ. 48
,, Fort Hays (Kan.) 76, Arkansas
Y Tech 59
{ Neb. Tchrs. 85, East Texas Bap-
Bowler Grooves His Swing Like
Golfer, Has Pitcher's Control
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
MANUEL CUERVO, happy first-prize winner of the Lavasol contest, receives his $500 check
from Mr. de la Ossa, manager of the Compaa Panamea de Aceites, S.A. Ernesto Koref
general manager of the firm, and Mrs. Usa Pick of Propaganda, 8.A., who represented the
company during the contest, also appear in the picture.
tist 69
1 5 24 12 3
HPO
2 2
The Zilkle-Livingston combin- ---------
ation used their large handicap
to good advantage when they de- Yankees AB R
feated last year's winners of this Koshorek, ss. 4
tourney, Scheibeler-Orv.'s by 2- Jacobs, 2b. 4
up. However, the biggest upset of Kropf, cf 2
the day was caused by the Ital-! Lynch, If ... 4
Ian team of Piala and Raymond i Cronln, rf 4
when they set back the highly! Kubski, lb ... 2
favored team of Mathleson and! Jazlnski, 3b 4
Carnwrlght. I Dabek, c .... 4
Here is how they line up for Patrick p .4
the second round which has tO|
be completed not later than Totals.....32
Sunday evening, Dec. 30.
Kullkowski-A r ms t r o n g vs.
Byrd-Clark.
Day-Brown vs. Hoverson-Ray- Bluebirds 000 000 0101
h_aonf Yankees 003 100 OOx-
Zilkie-Livlngston vs. Galindo-
4 8 27 13 0
Score By Innings
OTHER GAMES
St. John's (Bkn.) 66, UUh 57
NYU 103, Ariiona 76
Iowa 69, California 64
Wisconsin 82, Oregon 77
Tampa 84, Penn 83 .
Yale 70, Miami (Fia.) 68
Duquesne 83, CCNY 51
Bradley 61, Marquette 52
Denver 65, SanU Clara 59
Dayton 76, Hamline 56
John Carroll 59, Case 57
OiAdelphl 89, Bates 58
01 Seattle 87, Pepperdine 79
0i8t Bonaventure 68, Lawrence
0 Tech 46
01 Rochester 76, Colby 71
Buffalo 65, Connecticut 58
Chicago Loyola 98, Kansas Wes-
leyan 59
DeDaul 88, Mornlngside 54
Milllkin 73, So. Illinois 61
Glenville 66, Concord (W.Va.) 56
Montana SUte 84, Eastern Wash.
81
Yankees Take One Game Lead;
Bombers, Browns Tilt Tonight
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
The SUndings
TEAM Won Lost Pc4.
Yankees........8 3 .727
Bombers........6 3 .667
Bluebirds.......6 5 .545
Brownies.......1 10 .091
TONIGHT'S GAME
(Panam Stadium 7:30)
Bombers (Robinson 0-1) vs.
Brownies (Burke 0-4).
TOMORROW NIGHT'S GAME
(Balboa Stadium7:30)
Yankees (Thomas 2-0) vs.
Bluebirds (Nicolis 3-1).
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT
(Mount Hope Stadium)
Yankees 4, Bluebirds X
NEW YORK, Dec. 29 (NEAT
Buddy Bomar is writing and Il-
lustrating an instructive bowling
series for NEA Service, and Chic-
ago's transplanted Texan has at
least 16 million readers In this
country alone.
Bowling Is by
far the greatest
p article ant
sport. No fewer
than 6500 estab-
lishments w lth
55,000 alleys in
the United
States are certi-
fied by the A-
merlcan Bowl-
ing Congress.
Men, women and
children bowl in
practically every
nation In the.
world. Members Buddjr ""*
of the armed forces gave the
game tremendous impetus a-
broad, bringing
with them.
Bomar was the national
match-game champion in 1044.
he stresses, advising that the
fohr-step, which is how he gets
to the foul line, helps timing, the
secret of success in all games.
AN ATHLETE IS BEST DOING
WHAT COMES NATURALLY
After showing them the correct
way, Bomar, like all Grade A In-
structors, puts pupils on their
own. The main Idea is to knock
down tenpins, and teacher does-
n't care how they do it. An ath-
lete is best doing what comes
naturally.
Bomar tried various methods
until he found the pattern that
suited him. He doesn't recom-
mend spot or pin bowling, tells
the constituents to try both, and
see which brings the richer har-
vest.
"But the thumb comes out of
the ball first," he insists. "The
tn.l Hon.1 I0**** Impart stuff with a 11ft-
installatloiM mg motion as the ball is
over the foul line.
sent
"Do not twist your wrist. That
Bomar and Ned Day are the only maT^tZim^^^^n
two men twice designated Bowl- *%Tsttekouteir?*ar SS.
er-of-the-Year, the former's be- 5e ffiSffiSL*JSF 322*'
l5^VrS^T^^^^7^%^
The last place Brownies will be; Lefty Pat Patrick scattered olvthee men who have held
individual, doubles and team.
He has rolled 54 perfect games
tag '45 and '47. Bomar -
holder of the national aouoies ,tn Wtn >M~Vi^h+~K.
match-game championship in '"SenuV *
and the past year. He captained)IunammentaU-
fresh
ships of '47-48-49. He is one of
I trimming the third place Blue-
birds, 4-1, before a sell-out crowd! the team which won the nation-i t,,,, ,.
Hope Stadium. -ui~ ~# <7 ? __ _# start.
fort to break their ten-game los- to a single run while his mates
ing streak when they tackle the! slugged out five extra-base hits
second place Bombers at ~the,_two triples by Ray Dabek and
Panam Stadium. Humberto doubles by Forresti Jacobs Clem
- Koshorek and Manager A Kub-
Roblnson will oppose the Browns
Ernest Burke on the mound.
Both boys are non-winners thus
far.
Last night the Yankees took a
firmer grip on first place by
St-oop. aRan for Thome In 7th. Runs Montana 70, Consaga 56
Melslnger-Prler vs. Maduro-1 Batted InKoshorek, Jacobs.i S. Fran. SUte 73, Camp Pendle-
Mc :and. | Dabek, W. Holder. Two Base Hits, ton Marines 63
r uncan-Allen vs. Ken way- _j acobs, Koshorek, Kubski i Ricks 43, Carbon (UUh) 36
H '-nilst. Three Base HitsDabek 2, Hold-Chaffey JC 67, Dixie (UUh) 58
. 'a-Raymond vs. Wood-Pa-ier sto'en BasesJacobs, Jazin- .--------------------------------------
cr-o.
;Vittie-Hardy vs. Engelke-
Jc .ad.
rthy-Forrest vs. Koepke-
Cl wick.
I.?ht Results
Sports Shorties
NEW YORK, Dec. 29 (UP)
ski. Earned RunsYankees 3,.
Bluebirds 1. Left on BasesYan-'
kees 8, Bluebirds 4. Passed Ball
Dabek. Bases on Balls offAlon-|
so 2, Patrick 3, Salinas 2. Struck-!
out byAlonso 2. Patrick 5. Hits
and Runs offAlonso 6 and 4 in!
5 Innings; Salinas 2 and 0 In Former Champion Jack Dempsey
2 1-3 (left two on In 8th); Stem-;wm open his Novice Heavyweight
pel 0 and 0 in 2-3. Doubleplays i-Tournament in Toledo on next
Jacobs, Koshorek, Kubski; Jazin- March fo'irth.
ski, Jacobs, Kubski. Losing Pitch-1 u was m Toledo that Dempsey
erAlonso (1-1). Winning Pitch-!won nls heavyweight title in 1919
erPatrick (11). Umpires by knocking out Jess Wlllard in
1 Francis; three roands.
All the heavyweights in the
tournament will be amateurs.
CECILIA THEATRE Opening Next Thursday, Jan. 3
(THURSDAY NIGHT)
MILWAUKEE Johnny Brat-
ton, 148, Chicago, outpointed Li-
Yio Minelli, 150' i, Italy, 10.
MINNEAPOLISDel Flanagan, _
140, St. Paul, stopped Hermie'Roberts, Watson and
Frcsman, 135, Bangor, Me., 9. |Tlme of Game2:00.
. imim.TON. Del. George]
Ts'ldaris, 185, Greece, knocked' Newark, N.J., outpointed Sal Bel- They'll lose that standing when
out Clarence (Buck) Jones, 216, loise, IBS',, New York, 8. ithey climb through the ropes in
B;;" i more, 1. PORTLAND. Me.Eddie Zas-the Dempsey Tournament.
NEW YORK (Sunnyside Gar-ltre, 173, Winnipeg, outpointed ---------
den)Roosevelt Laboafd, 175%, Charlie Babcock, 180, Bangor, 10. Manager Tommy Holmes of the
iBoston Braves says he may quit
as an active player.
"My future Is going to depend
on how the team does rather
than my playing," says Holmes.
"I think I will devote more time
to the kids."
Last season, Holmes quit the
outfield and used himself as an
occasional pinch hitter after he
took over the club from Billy
Southworth.
Tommy is high on the rookie
crop the Braves will look over
next spring.
"We'll go along with these
kids," says Holmes. "We're build-
ing for the future."
Holmes says the Braves will
make a deal if It strengthens the
club. "But," adds Tommy, "we
just can t clean bouse."
Not
Suitable
For
Children
J. C. Albrook To Vie
For Hoop Title Tonight
It will be Albrook and Junior I Alegues dropped In a field goal
College in the finals of the J. C. to put his team out in front, 34-
Basketball Tournament tonight 32.
at the Balboa Gym. These two I Shortly after that Aleguas was
teams won their games by the
narrowest of margins last night.
J. C. defeated the Balboa High
five in the nightcap In a thrill-
er-diller on a tost second, and I
mean last-second, free toss by
George McArthur. Score of this
game was 34-35. In the first
game of the evening, the Fly
Boys from Albrook took the
measure of last year's champs,
Cristobal High School, 47-45
If last night's games are any
indication of what tonight's bat-
tles will be like the basketball
fans of the Isthmus are in for
some real thrills. Both games
were close. The first contest, be-
tween Cristobal High and Al-
brook was nip and tuck all the
way, with never more than five
points separating the two at any
Albrook had a slim 25-20 half-
time advantage, but the High
Schoolers came right back and
early In the fourth quarter had
pushed themselves to what look-
ed like a safe margin with a 38-
43 cushion. After whittling off
the lead by a basket and free
toss, Sal 8clafanUied It all up at
45 each after Skippy Anderson
picked up an additional two
points for the Cristobalites. With
59 seconds to go, Don Lee pushed
a one-hander In from the corner,
and that gave the Blue Jays the
margin of victory. Sclafani and
Bill Sharp made some miracu-
lous saves in the final few sec-
onds to preserve the
This was one of the
games of the tournament thus
far, and gives the fans a good
idea of what to expect when the
injured and had to leave the
game, and college fans had
sinking hearts as they saw their
star being helped off the floor.
Ray Davidson scored on a free
toss, and seconds later Rlchter
tied up the game at 34-all with
skito push over three runs In
the third and another in the
fourth to ice the game.
Dabek opened the Yankee
third with a triple. Koshorek
fushed him home with a single,
acobs doubled past first base
down the right field line to score
Koshorek. Jacobs also scored
when Qulncy Barbee tossed the
relay to the plate Into the dirt
past catcher Bobby Ganss.
The final Yankee run came in
To^^J?Wilnfii?nm^S.Zl!gF leM' 'w he has" to come up with
Jazlnski singled and Dabek belt- a gtrike 12 consecutive times.
has a high three-game series of
855, based on 277-300-278.
like so many athletic stars,
Bomar obUlned a flying start.
He began when he was 13, and in
the 22 years since has bowled
more than 25,000 games.
BOWLER ROLLING 300 IS
UNDER TERRIFIC PRESSURE
Bowlers tell you that a bowler
fashioning a 300 game Is under
the pressure put on a baseball
pitcher turning in a no-hit, no-
runner. He really has to be fault-
ed his second triple of the eve-
e only Bluebird tally was the
ninS-
Thi
Professor Bomar points out
that bowling is very similar to
golf, in that superior keglers, like
0' .fg* to re.Uef P .chr | accomplished golfers.
wkmSV-SSS^ T& *yfibeJ5t0 thelr 8wln*8 trough long"prac-
Holder s triple to right field Jim! tice at doing the right things. '
Cronln had tried to make a shoe-
string catch of Holder's drive but
the ball got past him and rolled
to the fence.
All the Yankee runs were scor-
ed off starter Andrs Alonso. Sa-
linas pitched the sixth, seventh
"WVi I.r2Lthr0w; Bat w" !t and eihth innings for the Blue-
F-I-B Agent Fred Wilt has ac-
cepted an invitation to run In
the one-mile event of the Phil-,,
adelphia Inquirer Indoor Track Green Wave *** m If*
Meet on January 18th. Defend-1 tanE,S tonight. Lee was high
man for Albrook with 17 points,
and Roy Wilson did the honors
for the second time in the tour-
ing Champion Don Gehrmann of
Wisconsin already has accepted
an Invitation...
nament with 14 points for CHS.
The Cnlcago White Sox have Juntor_iCoI,lee **?._* "? *&
signed right-hander Luis Aloma. tV*S&*^E,*3}'' ^ft
He is the sixth White Sox play-!0 *e BH8 OTtm to a rather
er to sign. Aloma won six and "r5ne contest JD th'.fl?*b*
lost none last year and also bat- PoH- cor1. *..points to Bal:
ed .350,.,
boa's 11, and In the second half
it was Just about reversed as the
Middleweight Champion Ray SiW2? K0TtA l2 *n<1 Biga
Robinson savs he will arriv ,,8cnooi 23.
San Franclscu' on o7 before Jan- ^^M^1^ *.2
of Hawaii on^lanuary S&^T ^\^^^^\
Dapper Jimmy Demaret t eted crowd down "^
Ojal, clinforX hasVnTered thi f. "IcArthur stepped up and
Los Angeles doll^T^irnanient "^ -t^ed m *** wmnte
which starts January fourth The
winner will pick up a check for
four-thousand -dollars.
KINER CHECKED
Elnt. After that Balboa never
d a chance to even take a shot
before time ran out.
College buUt up their halftone
lead of 23-11 to 48-11 before the
Bulldogs could get things start-
ed. Then with Sam Maphls and
DISTRIBUTORS CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
Cincinnati nih vi Qene Rlchtr hitting shots, they
his six seasons with PltUburgh, lutes left In u,2L? I
malned that way until fYeddy fense weaknesses
until McArthur got his chance,
and he came through like a real
champion to score the winning
point of the game.
Jerry Walsh was high man for
the victors with 10 points, while
Gene Rlchter was high for Bal-
boa with 15 points.
In tonight's game the two high
schools will play the preliminary
game starting at 8:45 to deter-
mine third place in the tourna-
ment. The feature game of the
night will pit the Albrook team
and the College In the game to
determine the Tournament
Champion. -
Right after the final game tro-
phies will be presented to the top
three teams, with the Panam
Tours trophy going to the win-
ners. Basketball fans are re-
minded to come early and get a
good seat for the finals of the
tournament tonight.
Vols, Maryland In
Final Workouts For
Sugar Bowl Game
BILOXI, Mississippi, Dec 29
(UP)Maryland Coach Jim Ta-
tum and Tennessee Coach Bob
Neyland exchanged compliments
from their Sugar Bowl training
camps today.
At Blloxl, Mississippi. Tatum
announced"We can't match
their depth and power... but
well use speed and deception
and we think we can win."
At Baton Rouge. Louisiana,
Neyland bad this reply"We're
gomg to work on a little new
stuff ourselves.''
With both teams beginning
final workouts for their Mew
Year's Day engagement, Tatum
says his piit-T formation is the
nest runnlnr attack system In
football
General Neyland has an ans-
wer to tint, too He says"We've
already played five teams which
ase the tpUt-T this year." He
didn't bother to add that Ten-
nessee Is unbeaten and untied.
Both coaches agree on. other
matters, though each says bis
tea Is facing Its toughest game
of the year. Both aleo say their
boys need a lot of practice. Each
team will work twice daily
through tomorrow.
Key lend taya Tennessee Is
working especially on pass de-
birds and was relieved by Cookie
tempel in the ninth.
And Just as with a baseball
pitcher, control Is more lmpor
tant than excessive speed.
Bomar takes the clientele
through the stance, steps, dellv
ery, follow through, discusses
Harry Matthews
Gets Ultimatum
For Maxim Bout
NEW YORK, Dec. 20 (UP)
The International Boxing Club
has Issued a "sign or else" ulti-
matum to light heavyweight
Harry Matthews for a title bout
with Joey Maxim.
D3C match-maker Al Welll
says he spoke to Matthews man-
ager, Jack Hurley, by telephone
and told Hurley that unless he
signs to fight Maxim by Satur-
day he may not get the bout at
all. WeiM says he told Hurley
Middleweight Champion Ray Ro-
binson probably would get the
fight unless Hurley meets the
deadline.
The I-B-C wants to put on the
Maxim-Matthews fight at Madi-
son Square Garden- on February
22nd, Wclll says he boosted the
IBC's offer to Matthews from
15 percent of the net receipts to
spot and pin bowling, spares and,20 percent. Welll says Maxim al-
sums upllke a Philadelphia bar-lready has agreed to terms and
rioter. The three-step approach!would get 40 percent of the re-
deflnltely is going the hard way.'ceipts.
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^gggl


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1M1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE NWR
-

Tearless9 Ffaley Comes Up With 1952 Sports Predictions

by
JOE wlH.IAMS
A euuil digest of the grand Jury's f'ndlngs In the death of
Geerge flores might give th. Impression the young welterweight
wm not a prlse-rlng ylctim alter all bat a gangster trophy on
In a ride or In target practice.
The preaentment bears down heavily on tne low moral tone
of the personnel commonly auoolated w!th the manly art, and
urges the commUilon to "appoint 10 Investigators to assist In re-
movlng th criminal element from boilng.'r
Any move to drive the rascal out, of course stands reason-
ably good Chance to earn commendation but in this particular
instance there had been not the slightest hint of hoodlumlsm.
Public indignation stemmed from what appeared to be gross ne-
gligence and official malfeasance.
The grand Jury doea not ssem to have gone into these infer-
ences beyond recommending medical safeguards most of which
had already been Instituted. No investigation no matter how
thorough or ingenious, la going to bring Plores back but an expo-
ltlon of neglect and Improper procedures. If they exlated, might
eerve to guard against repetition and tnus perform a worth-
Shlle purpoee. The grand Jury wrote finis to the Mores caee with
le simple atatement that It found "no violation of criminal law."
It would have been interesting to hear In detail from the two
doctor who certified the youngster's physical fitness after two
successive knockouts In less than SO days Dr. Vincent Nardlello
testified at the public hearing that Flores death was due to the
violence with which his head hit the canvas, not the knockout
Sunch. Simply as a contribution to medlcil history It would have
een Interesting to know how the doctor arrived at this conclu-
sion, but more Importantly, Just what made him so positive?
THE BOARD WAS IGNORED
Two other ring deaths had preceded the Plores' tragedy and
Oot. Tom Dewey nad appointed a nine-man medical advisory
board to work with the boxing commission to help minimise in-
juries. This was in October, IMS. The ooard was virtually Ignor-
ed until Plores' death In 1981. By that time most of the doctor
had resignad in dlgut. -^ ,___.. .
One of the few who remained was Dr. Charle Muzzlcato who,
{'owing florea' death, was quoted a saying; "I see no reason
sr complaint. The board Is operating efficiently."
Actually there wa very little left of the board by then and
since the commission had consistently 1-. uted Its recommenda-
tions Dr. Musslcato'i defense and his insistence that efficiency
prevailed were a bit puzzling, it would have been interesting to
near further from him, for the doctor eemed to be saying that
in spite of three ring deaths in 10 months, everything was all
tight.
Did the grand Jury hear from Llppy 3reitbart. who managed
Floras? Llppy Is a prldeful fellow. No one suffers more in defeat
than this sterling sportsman. Plores was half dying as he sat in
his corner after the knockout that nigh: vet Llppy gave him hell
for not keeping his guard up.
"What do you expect?" he roared. "You get hit with a sucker
punch. A Sucker punch I tell you."
The day Plore died Llppy told newsmen:
"I lose a great fighter. He was a natural. He was definitely
golnf.to be a topnotcher."
Actually Klorea was a crude, awkward mediocrity, a -club
fighter," who had to wind up punchy and maybe knocked dead,
as he did. If I was on the grand Jury it seems to me I'd want
to hear from a guy like Llppy. I'd want to know how he qualified
to become a manager, what tests he had to past, what conditions
he had to meet. .___
THERE'S BEEN LITTLE DIRT
It is popular, to blame boxing ills on the shady characters
who infest if and no doubt tSai's v bul It would be mistake towop there As we have seen right
here in our towh neglect and departmental conflict can produce
an Impossible situationa situation which for a while had the
game hanging on the ropes.
I happen to know there are certain characters In boxing who
are notorious, racket,guja- aiLlf.the commission must-build its
own police force (the lOlnvesUgators) to get rid of them, maybe
the extra taxes It's going to cost us will be worth it. The grand
Jury said "at least 10."
I cant remember when boxing didn't have a bad name, when
sinister people weren't supposed to be manipulating the cham-
pions backstage. It may be worse today than ever. And vet it
Seems to me we've had a surprisingly l.ng run of good fights
around here and they all seemed on the an and up to me.
Itf In keeping with the sports grubby background that It has
never tried to police Itself. Racing has Its own FBI So does base-
ball. Ned Irish could have saved his basketball mint if he had
spent a few bucks on roving flat feet. Now boxing's apparently
going to have a constabulary forced on it. Officer, he went that
a-way!
. i
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Dodgers, Hart
And Marciano
To Be Champs
By OSCAR PRALEY
NEW YORK, Dec. 20 (UP)
Using a fiahbowl full of eggnog
as a crystal ball, Fearless Fraley
peeks into the future today and
comes up with these sports pre-
dictions for 1052.
BOXING
Rocky Marciano will win the
heavyweight championship by
knocking out Eaaard Charles af-
ter he recaptures the title from
Joe Walcott. Harry Matthews will
cop the light heavyweight crown
after an unsuccessful bid for the
heavyweight derby; Ray Robin-
son will continue to rule the
mlddleweights; Gil Turner will
become welterweight king; Jim-
my Carter will provide a durable
lightweight champ and Sandy
Saddler will remain boss of the
featherweights.
BASEBALL
The chastised Dodgers will
hornswoggle some pitching help
and beat out the Giants and
Cardinals in a tight race for the
National League championship.
Cleveland, New York and
Boston will wage a ding-dong
dandy right to the wire, with
the Indians emerging triumph-
ant. Cleveland will win the
World Series, four game to
two.
Bob Lemon of the Indians will
bounce back, after his first poor
season, to become the American
League's most valuable player
and Roy Campanella will win it
In the National League. Jim
Rivera of the Browns will be the
rooki of the year.
HORSE RACING
It's a chalk eater's year at
Churchill Downs as Tom Fool,
the winter book favorite, wins
the Kentucky Derby. Counter-
point, 1951 Horse-of-the-Year,
will be bigger and better at four
as the handicap champion. Once
again an apprentice, 17-year-old
Al Wldmar, will become the Jock-
ey champion.
TENNIS
Doris Hart will interrupt young
Maureen Connolly's march to
greatness by finally winning the
National Amateur tennis crown
after hitting the Wimbledon
Jackpot.
Dick Savitt also will finally
live up to his promise by
sweeping men's amateur laur-
elsbecause Prank Sedgman,
undoubtedly the current best,
will turn professional.
GOLF
The ame bearded coterie will
hold forth on the fairways, with
the big booty sliced up by the
Hogans, Sneads, Mangrume, Mid-
dlecoffs, Ferrlers Burkes, et al.
Bantam Ben will awe the golf
world by winning the Open a
third straight year and Slam-
mln' Sam will take the rugged
PGA again.
SKIING
The slalom races will continue
to be run down-hill.
FOOTBALL
Tennessee, Stanford, Georgia
Tech and Miami will open the
year with bowl victories. Notre
Dame will rebound to the top
next fall. Minnesota and Okla-
homa also will loom large. In pro
football, Sammy Baugh will fin-
ally retire and the Cleveland
Browns will bounce back to lead
the pack. __.
BASKETBALL
If Illinois, Kentucky and
Kansaswith Kentucky emerg-
* 0D ^HE OLYMPICS
Athletes of the free nations
will chase Russia's secret agents
back behind the Iron Curtain.
Bring on 19B8I _
Army To Decide
Newcombe's 'Ball
Future In Few Days
NEW YORK. Dec. 39 (UP).
The baseball future of right-
hander Don Newcombe will be
decided within a few days
Officials at First Army Head-
quarter* In New York says the
adjutant general and the sur-
5eon general In Washington will
eclde Mvirtly whether the Brook
lyn pitcher will be Inducted Into
the Arm-;. This news comes from
Colonel ttuart Smith, surgeon of
the First Army at Fort Jay
"I'm M>rry there Is nothing I
can tell you here." says Colonel
Smith. Newcombe was at Fort
Jay for special screening by Army
physician for three day and
their finding were not reveal-
ed."
Edmund Qrundy, who 1 chair-
man of Newcombe' draft board
in Ellaaof th. New Jersey, says he
too 1 m the dark. Qrundy say
the report from Fort Jay stated
"Newcombe's physical status
still is undetermined."
The additional examinations
for Newicmbe were to decide Just
how serious Is ths kidney ail-
ment which led to his discharge
from the Navy during world war
two.
Newcombe's wife says she is on
the anxious seat. ^
We certainly would like to
9nd out ourselves," says Mrs.
Sweoraoe. "but we haven't heard
a thlngj_______________
INITIAL INVESTMENT
. Lexington, Ky. (NEA)Horse
sales enjoyed a big year in 1951.
A weanling sold for 125.SO0. a
yearling for $00,000, a broodmare
for $72,000.
FUN FOR ALLHead Lineman Doug Young dives Into a tussle between Bill Ezinicki of the Boston
Bruins and the Chicago Black Hawk1 Beb GuldoUn in an attempt to tear the pair apart. Chicago won
the National Hockey League battle, 4-3, but here's on* Hawk who came out on the short end. (NBA)
Louisiana State Soph Breaks
Spivey Record, Ties Another
In His First Six College Games
By EDWIN POPE
NEA Special Correspondent
BATON ROUGE. La., Dec. 29
(NBA) Basketball's sophomore
sensation Is a local boy made
good: Louisiana State's Bob Pet-
tit. six feet nine inches tall and
still no goon.
In hlsflrst six games, the 205-
pound 19-year-old broke one rec-
ord and tied another held by
Kentucky's fabulous BUI Spivey.
And who in college is beating
a 25.6-polnt average?
Robert Lee Pettlt, Jr., majors
in Insurance and real estate, and
Harry Rabenhorst, LSU's coach,
calls him the best young piece of
property in the game.
17
Kentucky Highest
Scoring Quintet
In Basketball
NEW JTORK, Dee. 2 (UP)
Latest N-C-A-A figures show
that Kentucky is the highest
scoring team in major basket-
ball circles.
The Wildcats, rated second
best in the United Press coach's
balloting, have averaged 85 and
eight-teiith points hi games
played through last Saturday.
Syracuse Is the second highest
scoring <\ub with an M-peint-slx
average. Third-place auk has
averaged 84 and one-half points
a game.
Penn State has shown the
tighest defense. The Nlttany
Lions nave held opponents to 44
With Pettlt, BRHS won
straight. Bob came down with
the mumps, missed nine games.
Baton Rouge lost all nine.
Lots of the kid's proclivities
must be genetic for his six-foot
four-inch father was a football
and baseball star at Westminster
College in Denver, Colo.
Apropos of something, the Iron
Man's pop Is a hardware dealer.
Bob Pettlt himself Is a Dixie-
that he Isn't playing the sweet- f1116 Oklahoma A*1 ere 8ec"
est tune on twine of any sopho-'ond best with a 44-pOint-seven
more in America. average.
Turpin's Win Over Robinson
Was Year's Biggest Upset
V OSCAR FKAL7
NEW YORK, Dee. 29 (UP)
Look back over your shoulder
today and you'll see that sports, ting him to ribbons.
had many big moments in 1951
and here are some of the best
and worst.
Biggest upset When Randy
Turpln dethroned Sugar Ray
Robinson as middleweight
champion.
Greatest comeback Jersey
Joe walcott winning the world
heavyweight title at SI, or is it
41?
Most thrilling moment
Bobby Thornton's peitnant-
wtnning home run and Ben
Hogan's birdie en th final
hole to toin the National
Open after being five strokes
back of Bobby Locke with IS
holes to play.
Saddest moment Joe Louis
flat on the canvas after being
kayoed by young Rocky Mar-
claon.
Funniest momentWhen Bill
veeck's midget strode to the
plate as leadoff man against
Detroit.
Goat of the year Ralph
Branca, whose two home run
pitches to Bobby Thomson lost
two National League playoff
games.
Disappointment of the year
Those Dodgers, who blew a lift
game lead to lose the flag they
had virtually wrapped up.
Biggest surprise The Ch-
ants, a they never gave up
and wrote baseball history
with the greatest comeback
in the annals of the game.
Best loserTed Collins, whose
New York Yank pro grid team
dropped $90,000, but who an-
nounced hell be back at the
same old stand in 1952.
Blackest incident The col-
legiate basketball scandal.
Rookie of the yearKansas
Charley Burr who, at 17, be-
came the seventh Jockey in rac-
ing history to pilot 300 win-
ners.
Most courageous performance
-By Irish Bob Murphy as he
kept boring hi against Joey
Maxim even though the light
heavyweight champion was cut-
Best bet to attain greatness
Maureen Connolly, who at
1$, equalled Helen Wills
Moody* feat of winning th*
national tennis title.
Most tragic eventThe West
Point cribbing scandal which
put a black mark on the rec-
ord of nearly loo fine beys.
Most startling moment-*
When young Mickey Mantle
dropped to the outfield turf
during the World Series ss If
shot through the head and lap
there motionless as 70,000 pus-
sled fans held their collective
breath.
Most disgraceful incident-
Oklahoma A. k M:s deliberate
slugging of Drake's Johnny
Bright.
Most changed personality
Leo (The Silent) Duroeher.
8addest farewellSeeing JOe
DlMdggiO call it quit*.
POUR LETTBRMAM
Atlante, Ga. (NEA)John Ry-
der, Qeergai tech's new baskst-
baii coach, won letters la four
portsbasketball, baseball.
track and cross-countryas an
undergraduate.

ALL
DRINKS
sold
at
Yl
pnie
from 3 to 7 p.m.
EVERY DAY
The Boston Bar
DISTANCE MAN Bob Pettlt
hooks with either hand front
any distance. (NEA)
"I have never been fooled so
completely,'' says Rabenhorst,
who has been coaching 27 years.
"We knew from watching Pettlt
make prep All-America at Baton
Rouge High that he had amazing
possibilities. But we felt sure
that It would take him at least
the usual season of orientation to
hit his stride."
BOUNCES BACK WITH 49
In bis first college game, Pet-
tit, tipping, hooking with either
hand from any distance, hitting
with a long overhead shot,
plunked in 23 points. Bob got 17
against Rice, 31 against Birming-
ham-Southern. 22 against Ala-
bama. Ironically, he reached his
19th birthday with his "worst"
nightonly IS points against
Mississippi State.
An evening later, he redeemed
himself with vigor, smashed to
<0 points against Mississippi, tar-
in Splvey's single-game South-
eastern Conference scoring rec-
ord and banking 19 of 29 field
goals to bust the Lexington lu-
minary's mark of 11 goals in one
game.
On his next trip, against un-
beaten Texas, the lanky lad sunk
30 points, plenty to lest until
the Tigers resume post-holiday
play, Jan. 2.
Rabenhorst had to Journey no
farther than a couple of miles to
wateh Pettlt develop. In bis
senior year at Baton Rouge High,
his phenomenal protege scored
501 point in 23 game.

\-V~-

su

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC


Due to the New Year festivities our Plants
wHI remain closed on Jan. 1st- To Insure
delivery, orders for Beer and Canada Dry
Products should be placed In advance.
.
OPEN ALL DAY SUNDAY, DEC 30th

Cervecera Nacional S. A.
(NATIONAL BREWERY, INC)

>


JC, ALBROOK IN BASKETBALL

lf*t s>
AN INDEIT5TTOE^^^|||^^ILT NIWSPAP1
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1S51
FIVE CENTS
195Vs Dizzy Divorces
Fishhooks, Horses and Popsicles
Lead A Parade Of Cold, Cold Love
By RICHARD KLEINER
NEA Staff Correspondent
Money matters must be dis-
cussed frankly In a working mar.
rlage. Mrs. Sarah Daly of Jersey
While you're reading this, put a City asked her husband for mon-
nlce. dreamy record on the phon-
ograph. "Hearts and Flowers"
Would do nicely. This Is a story
\y to buy groceries. He frankly
shoved a 50-cent piece down her
about love. Love that has gone a ed.
throat. And so they were dlvorc-
Ilttle sour, perhaps, but love just
the same for 1951's parade of
dizzy divorces.
It takes real, deep, passionate
love to make a man sprinkle
fishhooks in his wife's bed.
That's what happened to Mrs.
Stanley H. Langdon of Sydney,
Australia. She got her divorce.
So did Joseph L. DeLemere of
Detroit. He told a tender story of
his wife's fondness for horses.
He finally told her, "It's either
Eie or the horses.'' She put on her
at and headed for the track.
A touching story was unfolded
In a Brazil, Ind., court by Mrs.
Geneva Mae Pollom. Everything
was Idyllic, until her husband
told the grocer not to let her
charge any more popsicles.

Romance la its purest form
hn opened to Mrs. Anne Swlck of
Pittsburgh. She won a divorce
because her husband wanted to
tsttoo her and put her in a cir-
cus.
A tale of true love came from
the lips of Paul Joanethis, a res-
taurant operator of Miami, Fla.
He filed suit for divorce saying
his wife wouldn't coo's for him.
.-'___-lyhen he was hungry, she gently
remrtea; Go to your own
Greasy Spoon."
The wisdom of Solomon came
down to the husband of Mrs. Le-
la LMepenbrock of St. Louis.
When she threatened to leave
him, he said there was only one
fair way to divide their belong-
ings. 80 he took up his saw and;
cut a
In Parts, France, M. Claude got
a divorce. There was Just one
little thing that disturbed him
about his wife. She liked to run
around without any clothes on.
*
The "better or worse" aspects
to marriage ruined the wedded
bliss of Mrs. Elaine L. House of
Detroit. Things were tough, so
House obtained a loan. He told
the loan company he needed to
pay for Mrs. House's funeral.
Only she wasn't dead.
Every once in a while, anybody
likes a little quiet around the
house. But Laughlin Hayes of
Detroit overdid It, said Mrs.
Gladys Haye. He didn't say a
word to her for 223 days. They
went their separate ways.
And there were the romantic
events that happened to Mrs.
Ethel Sue Kaye of Miami. Her
husband, a disc-Jockey; told the
world about their marriage.
Mostly he criticized her cooking
and laughed at their "so-called
honeymoon." Ethel sued.
all the furniture in half.
Cristobal Union
It's the Uttle things that make -,. _
* marriage. In Los Angeles, Mrs.1 ChUTCn "r6SGIatS
ene Neally said her husband, T?,." '"a
ew about the little things. He ChrKtmaC Crtllf **rf
cursed her, struck her. threw|*"nr,'ima5 V-OnCeiX
mashed potatoes at her, tossed 1 .-..c.^ -. ,,, ,
chicken pies at the celling and1 concert of Christmas mu$lc
Bien sawed off the handfes of J f P_re,sftented ffi^S even"
her croquet mallets. nSL2L.7, y h0 0
Tender love words caused the Cristobal Union Church,
end of the marriage of Thomas
Anderson of Los Angeles. The
Words were, "You fool." Not only
Sid Mrs. Anderson utter them,
ut she taught their parrot to
say the same thing.
In Wisconsin, a dairy state,
Mrs. Agnes Wllklns of Madison
won a divorce because her hus-
band wanted her to use oleomar-
garine Instead of butter. The
fudge said that was cruel and
Inhuman.

A marriage is based on mutual
understanding. That was, appar-
ently, lacking in the union of
John and Betty Dlmlck of Los
Angeles. She bought a new tail-
ored suit, and John dunked her
in the bathtub. She was wearing
the suit at the time.
Maid Convicted
Of Stealing
From Tallulah
NEW YORK, Dec. 39 (UP)
Mrs. Evyleen Cronln, former
maid for Tallulah Bankhead,
was convicted yesterday of
stealing $4,284.60 from- the
actress by raising her checks.
A Jury of 12 men found the
white-haired former burlesque
dancer guilty of three counts of
grand larceny and forgery. She
could be sentenced to 2'/2 to S
years Imprisonment on each
count.
Mrs. Cronln, 59, stood so-
lemnly before the Jury as its
foreman, Maurice Nlzen, read
the verdict. The Jury had de-
liberated almost five hours.
Mrs. Cronln was accused dur-1
lng the 13-day trial of raising
the amounts on 28 weekly ex-
pense checks signed by the fiery
actress between Oct. 8,1948 and
April 11, 1950.
The Jury weighed the case
from 11:35 a. m. until 4:20 p. m.
Mrs. Cronln sobbed frequent-
ly during the trial while des-
cribing her relationship with
Miss Bankhead but she was un-
emotional when she heard her
fate.
(NEA Telephoto)
.now-weary Chicago, Dick Riegre tries to
DREAMING OF A NON-WHITE NEW YEAR
dig his car from under a new fall of snow tharba7k"ewlhe"c"y"8UThe"3tv^Btrr
After the verdict was read,
General Sessions Judge Harold
Stevens ordered Mrs. Cronin's
Attorney, Fred O. Morltt, to
show cause on Jan. 24 why he
should not be cited for con-
tempt of court. Stevens had
warned Morltt during the first
week of the trial that he would
cite him.
In addition to the choir, pro-
fessor Leo Cardona of the Pa-
nama National Conservatory
will be heard In a group of
piano selections.
Other soloists will include
Mrs. Victoria Hourlgan, violin-
ist; Jamie Carruth, bass; Rita1
Howard, soprano and Kellie
Holderson, alto.
Patents Boomed
An average of 451 patents
weekly were granted by the VS
Patent Office during 1948, as
compared with 385 In 1947 and
430 In 194.
New Yorkers Held As Peddlers
In $2 Million Stolen Bond Ring
NEW YORK. Dec. 29 (UP) _|ti s. Government bonds
The FBI announced yesterday,New York to Havana
Ethe arrest of three New York The FBI said the bonds u
in as members of an Inter- eluded of $100,000 denomination
f^ J5~dJ?!D.*a *M tw? of $lA whSh "ere
from
In-
disposed of more than $2,000.000
worth of stolen securities In the
last three years.
ftoko tTom a roessenger of the
first Boston Corp., of New
York, last Nov. 21.
tfter an Investigation lasting JmttXajgfrJt
[TSltoKd it'han' EnV?1 Mld *I0-M bonds at the'STnco fj!
LJnThth .1^ T5e,\ u?wa!41 m "** Monteflore. walt-
R52L K? 8tolerfbonds lnJth tog outside the bank, also was
PJ*1***! ^?** and d,H>osed of arrested, the FBI said
them to Cuba, Canada and pos- Monteflore. a broker In the
%.0the.L2untrif,4w !wa" Street district Returned to
Five members of the group,New York after bis release bv
Were arrested In New Jersey (Cuban police **
KwX ? charges of selling! Arrested yesterday by rBl
stolen bonds In Canada. agents, he said
Others were said by the FBI 1 the European
was related to
Tie. "-**,*=*" 'mv year ui Monieilore. He Wa* rrlsaaerl
after selling bonds stolen from In $10,000 ball on a and *Tr
the Bank of America in Los ceny charge g "*
Aron. who said he is an hn-
Balboa T Resumes
Educational (lasses
With Two New Ones
A varied schedule of educa-
tional classes will be offered
for military and civilian per-
sonnel of the Pacific Side at
the Balboa YMCA starting Jan.
1, Merle L. Piper announced to-
day.
Some of these classes, which
enable many to Improve their
education during their spare
time, will be new ones for be-
ginners, while others are the
continuation of courses given
during the past year.
Two new beginners' Spanish
classes will start on Jan. 7. The
morning class will meet at 9
a. m. on Mondays and Thurs-
days and the evening class at
5 p. m. on Mondays and Wed-
nesdays at 5 p. m.
Intermediate Spanish will be
taught on Mondays and Thurs-
days at 10 a. m. and on Mondays
and Wednesdays at 6 p. m.
These classes are planned for
those who alreadv have some
knowledge of Spanish.
A class for advanced Spanish
will be taught at 7 p. m. on
Mondays and Wednesdays. AH
Spanish classes are to begin Jan.
7 under the direction of Mrs
Maria del Pilar Vega, who has
taught at the YMCA for the
past two years.
A new daytime class In oil
painting is scheduled to start
on Fridav morning, Jan. 4 at
9 a. m. This class is in response
to a large number of requests
and will be taught bv Mrs. Bet-
ty Bentz, Mrs. Bentz, will also
continue her evening class from
7 to 9 p. m. each Monday even-
ing starting Jan. 7. Registration
will be limited in these classes.
All necessary supplies are made
available to members of the
classes.
Labor Plans To Make Barbados
'New Zealand Of Caribbean'
BRIDGETOWN, Dec. 29
Barbados is now to follow the
pattern of New Zealand and
Sweden, Labor Party leader
Grantley Adams said after his
party's 16-L election victory
over the Conservative Party.
"With the majority we now
have we confidently expect that
we will make Barbados the New
Zealand or the Sweden of the
Caribbean area.
"We are going to redistribute
wealth by a system of taxation
making it Impossible for any-
body to be extremely rich or ex-
tremely poor.
"We hope to establish cooper-
ative societies and cooperative
organizations that will enable
us to follow the path those two
countries have followed. With
the big majority we have, we
are bound to get the necessary
legislation passed."
Conservative circles In Bar-
bados, stunned by the success
of the Labor Party at the polls,
have already called for the for-
mation of a strong opposition
party to replace their Electors'
Association.
Labor's choice of four mem-
bers to sit on the Executive
Committee has fallen on party
leader G. H. Adams. Dr. H. G.
Cummins, M. E. Cox, and F. L.
Waleott
The newly appointed Attorney
General, Campbell Wylle, a New
Zealander, has been named by
the Governor to the Legislative
Council
Automotive Hint
A front wheel should spin free-
ly after a bearing adjustment,
with a small degree of side play.
The bearing will be ruined com-
pletely by binding.
MUST BE THE SUN
MIAMI, Fla. (NEA) Horses
which ran or trained at Hialeah
last Winter won 41 per cent of
252 stake races east of the Mis-
sissippi daring 1951.
Six Employes Leave Canal
Organization At Years End
18 Graduates Get
First Aid Diplomas
At NAS, Coco Solo
Lt. Col. R. l. Norton, USA,
Deputy Commander of the Dis-
aster Control Sub Center at
Fort Gullck, presented diplomas
to 18 graduates of the Ameri-
can Red Cross Standard First
Air Course at exercises held re-
cently at the U. a Naval Sta-
tion, Coco Solo.
The course consisted of 34
hours of instruction in first aid
including the care of Injuries
resulting from atomic disasters.
The following persons received
their diplomas and First Aid
Cards:
Mrs. E. J. Andrews, Mrs. W.
L. Hall, Mrs. W. E. Barber.
Thurman H. Jones, Mrs. D. B.
Bruce, Mrs. M. L. Leahy. Mrs.
F. E. Capps. Val E. McAllster,
Mrs. B. W. Clark, Mrs. K. N.
Mountain, Mrs. R. Crum, Mrs.
Tom Parrish, Mrs. C. O. Der-
rick, Robert E. Rumens, Louis
A. Downs, Mrs. H. E. Schre-
ckengast, Mrs. W. F. Gachs
and Mrs. G. L. Wallace.
The course was conducted at
Coco Slito by H. E. Schre-
ckingast, HM3, USN, and at Co-
co Solo by J. W. Kinlaw, HM3,
USN.
Lt. Comm. I. M. Rowell. U. S.
Navy, Deputy Zone Commander
for Disaster Control at Coco
Solo and Lt. W. L. Hall. MC,
USN, Coco Solo Zone Surgeon
assisted at the ceremony. These
graduates will be given assign-
ments In the volunteer Disaster
Control Teams.
R2)L5^K.L_BSlht"eyM D* ***** on swarm around
^f^TJ? h!.C0ooi,* Creadon Park, Miami. Fla. The wily,
StSSS** ** ***** ** srws of the park, but they like
civilization well enough to turn up at the cookhouse three times
a day for handouts.
------------
Six employes of the Canal
organization will retire at the
end of December.
The retiring employes, Uelr
posltlons, and periods of ser-
vice, are:
Mrs. Mary G. Hammond, Ta-
bulating Machine Operator in
the Finance Bureau, 14 years,
seven months and 11 days.
Dr. Philip Horwitz, Quaran-
tine Officer at Cristobal, 21
years, seven months and 16-
days.
Mrs. Edna M. Judson, Claims
Examiner in the Finance Bur-
eau. 20 years, seven moths and
21 days.

Edward Sheidt, agent fci
eheu-ge of the New York FBI of-
fice, revelead that bonds stolen
to New York. Connecticut and
(low Jersey had been smuggled
to Cuba.
Arrested yesterday were Jac-
Qoes A. Monteflore; 45; Jean
Aron. 83. and John Drydso
Windsor, 51.
They were charged with tak-
ing 1130,000 worth of stolen
porter of metals and electrical
25*5 was released to $10.000
S5SJ JL cnajKe of counter-
JrSSkS". rei acu8d h,m
of dealing in counterfeit Bel-
gian bonds.
Assistant u 8. attorney Mar-
tin Klein said Windsor was re-
STt!* ti00 ba" *" he
had been cooperating with the
government In "
Classes in English for Soan-
lsh-speaking students will be
suspended at the end of Decem-
ber but plans are being made
to again offer them starting a-
bout the Feb. L
During the school vacation
rerlod In Panama, a daytime
class in English is planned. Mrs.
Abble de Linares and Prof. Ra-
mon Barbero are teachers of
the English classes.
Also offered at the YMCA are
classes in tap and ballet danc-
ing for children with Mrs. Do-
rothv Chase as teacher.
Instructors Harnett and Dunn
will offer instruction to adults
In ball room, samba, and rhum-
ba. They also have a class for
highschool age voting people on
Saturday mornings.
Registration for YMCA classes
ivernment in its invectivan.. "=->" or xmca cissses
A hearing for u toff^a. SL^JSf "^e Information
set for Jan. 25.
was 1 Desk. For further Information
icall Balboa 2759 or 28J9.
1
Jacob F. Krause, Junior Con-
trol House Operator at Atlantic
Locks. 31 years, nine months
and ten days.
Mrs. Dell aG. Pllkerton, Nurse
Supervisor at Corozal Hospital,
35 years, seven months and six
days.
John F. Stops, Head Steve-
dore Foreman In the Terminals
Division at Cristobal, 11 years.
11 months and la days.
Mrs. Hammond, a native of
Stonlngton, Connecticut, has
been a tabulating machine 0-
perator since 8ept. 1917. She
came to the Isthmus In Dec.
190$, and was first employed by
the Csnal organization March
24, 1914 as a coupon dark at
Empire. She left the serviee
the following July and was re-
employed in 1937 as operative
in the Accounting Division. Mrs,
Hammond plans to leave Feb.
1 on the Panama Une and will
Uve In Ramsey, New Jersey.
Mrs. Judson, ho was bom
in Roxbury, Massachusetts,
came to the Isthmus in Feb.
1919 from Boston, where she
had been employed for about
five years as bookkeeper. She
was first employed by the Can-
al March 1920. as clerk In
the Municipal Divisin at Pedro
Miguel. She left Canal service
in June 1928 and was reemplojr-
ed in Aug. 1993 as clerk-typist
In the Special Engineering Di-
vision. She became accounting
clerk in the Accounting Divi-
sion in July 1945 and was nam-
ed claims examiner In Sept-
ember I960. She sailed Friday
on the & 8. Panama to go to
Boston.
Mr. Krause was born In
Meshamlny, Pennsylvania and
worked In Philadelphia about
ten years before coming to the
Isthmus. He was. first employed
by the Canal May 8, 1918 as
a battery repairman in the
Electrical Division. He left Can-
al service In July 1920 and was
reemployed about two years
later as repairman in the Com-
misary Division. In April 1923,
he was transferred to the Locks
Division as locomotive towing
operator. He was named Junior
control house operator In Jan.
1945. He left early In December
to Join his family in Pitman,
New Jersey.
Mrs. Pllkerton wju born In
Flint Hill, Virginia. She was
employed at St. Elizabeth's Hos-
pital in Washington, D. c. for
about three years before com-
ing to the Isthmus. She was
employed as nurse at Corozal
Hospital May 25. 1916 and was
promoted to the position of
stewardess In February 1918.
She served as nurse from Aug.
1933 to Aug. 1901 when she was
named nurse supervisor. 1
Mr. Stops was born in Fair-
mont, West Virginia. He was
employed in Brooklyn for a-
bout /lve years and played pro-
fessional baseball for about four
years before coming to the
Isthmus, He was first employed
in the Canal organisation Jan.
16. 1940 as foreman In the Re-
serving and Forwarding Agen-
cy. He was named head steve-
dore foreman In Jan. 1951.
Mr. and Mrs. Stops plan to
leave Jan. 28 on the Panama
Line and will live in New York
City.
<

Be sure they are White Horse"
There is no whisky like Scotch Whisky and no finer Scoteri
than White Hone. It is distilled amidst the highlands of
its native Scotland; aged, matured and watched over with
unceasing care by men who have the inherited instinct of
generations to guide them. At the club, at home, wherever
you may be, you show wisdom by ordering Scotch whisky
... and prove youg experience by asking for White Hone
by name.
WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky
A pleasure to renumber 4 Joy to st ogam
S* Dlrtritmm,: COMPAJ&A CYMftOS^. COLON + PANAMA.
I
L.
**c
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