The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01334

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text

* BRANIFF
NEWSPAFWt
menean
SeagramsYO.
CANADIAN WHISKY
xo.
"Let the people know the truth and the country it $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
PANAMA, K. P.. MONDAY. DECEMBER 24, 1W1
nrt cBNTi
Christmas In Red Jail;
-

Truman Has No Plan To Free Them Today
------o------ \
NBW YORK Dee. 14 (BF). *- The Christmas spirit
prevailed across the United Nations throufh the week-
end, bringing cheer to many who had faced a dreary
hoUdy-
The United States Ah* Feree, Got. Thomas E. Dewey
of New York, a airline, a housewife who played Santa
Clan* and an elght-year-eM sheeshine boy were among
those who piUhed in to de what they could to brirhten
the holiday Mr lets fortnate persona.
The Christmas ipirit evon children and the showing of
tipped the scab of justice In'several movies.
SAFETY PSYCHOLOGYAbout the meat Important thing to a soldier In Ko
When the repsment arrives, the combat veteran can be "rotated" to*
That' the mart
Stef
logy behind the wording op.this traffic safety sign l>
Sgtv Robert D. Ferris tin sdyanced Air Force bate in K
------
Is his tenieee-
United Stales.
Jooketr#ver by .,
>
favor of leniency, as aome Yule-
tide offenders were forgiven or
given llgt jbunlshmenta.
Thomas F. Mannion, Jr., 52, a
convicted wife slayer; was par-
doned after serving 24 years in
i the New Hampshire state prison.
Father John Walsh, an Oak-
land, Calif v Roman Catholic
priest, refuse* -to testify against
Marvin Flt*ieral4, who. stole
$13.88 front a pqar boa. The
thief got a light sentence of
only 180 davs as a result.
hoenix. Aria, eight-
Arthur Fry spent bis
from shining shoos to
Rfeaeh 334
Since Friday
at the _
** home Ar-
hsve much of a
himself, beeawse
oreed mother Is a re-
lief.
The. Wh Air Force wound up
its lofcOOO "Operation Christ-
mas" with a party for 1,1 S3
shiny-eyed orphan at Pope
, Field, N. C. The airmen provided
CHICAGO; Dee. 24 (UP)Theipreaents for a total of 3.000
death toll from all kinds of ae-j children in 22 North Carolina
cldents since the four-day i orphanages.
Christmas holiday period began jn Rydal. Pa., a suburb of
Pope Blames
World's Woes
OrtBoth Sides
In Pontiac, Mich., Dale Palm.
30, a World War II Marine Corps
veteran, got ready for a Merry
Christmas, Just because people
liked him.
Palm was blinded In 1949
when a. tavern patron went
berserk and wounded Palm an*
nine other persons with a shot-
gun and then took his own Ufa.
Since then he has been un-
able to work at bis old factory
Job. His wife and two childje
have bad- to depend on con-
tributions, by friends for a- bv-
Tbings-wiU be brighter today,
*T Pata -Ajbjr tainy, witfit
"brand now, furnishetf 1|17,500
home.
Tied to the key and the deed
will be a simple message:
"Merry Christmas."
at 6 p.m. Friday stood at 334 per-
sons by this morning.
Icy streets and bitter cold fall-
Philadelphla. Mrs. Olive Ham-
mer, mother of six daughters,
-did her-.S-Sth annual stint at
ed to stem the rush home torj'Xady 8mnU Claus." With the
Christmas. .ild of contributions. Mrs. Ham-
for 240 of the dead while 44 died i toy, to mm chlIdren 8anta
in fires, and 50 perahd in mis- ,niiv fm-retx
cellaneous accident m**a-iiu
Lynden C. Of C.
Believes In Santa,
Missioners Don't
-Pope Pius XII bluntly told the
Western world today that it
must share with Communism
the bla-me "for the saddening
shadow of clouds which still
hand menacingly over the world
on the eve of another Christ-
mas ."
Simultaneously, in an annual
Christmas message broadcast to
the world in 24 languages, trib
Pope renewed his appeal lor
world disarmament.
The Pontiff offered both last
and West the good offtoes of
the Holy See to help bring
^boutr-lasttpg. peat*. 7
Btit h warned that disarma
ment 'alone would not bring
peace if the world continued to
Ignore the basic principles of
Christianity.
In unusually strong terms the
Pope castiga ted both East and
West for their incessant talk ed!
peace-while ignoring skeptical-
ly and .disdainfully what he
described as the basic cause
of world dissension the lack
of Christian principles.
______ m ______
WASHINGTON, Dec. 24 (UP) President Truman
said he does net plan re do anything today about the
four United States Air Force fliers convicted by a Hun-
garian military court yesterday of violating the Hunga-
rian border.
"What can you do?" the President said before board-
ing his plane, the Independence, to fly home to Inde-
pendence, Missouri, for Christmas.
The four fliers were each fined $30,000, or three
months imprisonment. They were the crew of a C-47 forc-
ed down in Hungary by Soviet fighters Nov. 19.
But State Deportment officials cut into their Christ-
mas holidays today to return here to decide whether to
pay what the $ 120,000 they consider a ransom price for
the four fliers, or let them spend Christmas in a Red jail.
The United States charge d'-
affaires conferred with Hunga-
rian authorities in Budapest to-
day, but declined to disclose
The. Hungarian military court
ordered the confiscation of the
lost .8. C-47 transport.
The official announcement of
VATICAN CITY Dec 24 (UP)' whether the United States will the trial said the four fliers were
pny. the fine or leave the airmen unable to give a "satisfactory ex-
"tAaiL_., ,j w L Planation" of why they carried
At Erdlnr Field, nearMunich, mapa & l0me parU of the 8oviet
Germany, the commanding of fh-1 Union and the people democra-
"T-u' ?!iftmir "P !? Blrm" cte- as well as parachutes "in
aald he had a plane ready to take auperfluou, numbers." a radl0
THIS 18 THE "UNITED 8TATET-ThU is head-on view of
the new superliner the "United States," now being outfitted-tor
vSEmASSFZ "***? in ""Port News. Va, Built .< cost of
704M.00O the vessel is said to be the largest and fastest passenger
Sip#2Xri bu^t tw a**- untr is 9*0 feet longiabout
. teemonger thn the Queen Elizabeth), with a beam ef lOm
feet and speedI In cess of 30 knots. She will be delivered to the
United States Lines in New York early neat summer.
. with the rush.
Sus and railroad terminals and
airports reported giant passenger
lists as last.-roinute holiday mak-
' er headed towards Christmas-
. time family reunions.
Travellers braved snowstorms
in .the West, showers
Southeast, and bitter cold in!
most sections of -the United
States.
One of the worst traffic tolls
was recorded in Arizona, where.
17 persons died in collisions to;
record the worst trsfflc casualty'
rate in the state's history. I
Dense fog closed airports for
11 hours. In the San Francisco
area, holding up homeward:
bound servicemen Just arrived
from the Par East.
Seven Air Force men return-
LYNDSN, Wash.. Deft 34 'UP)
Santa Claus came t Lynden
today despite
off for Budapest within 15 mln
utes to bring them back to thettj"
families for Christmas if he got
the order.
American officials were shock-
ed at the speed with which Com-
munist Hungary tried the four
fliers, and angered at the '^guil-
ty" verdict against them.'
The airasen were triad < en
rharres^ef violating the Hun-
The Pope described ma h y ar open to this country
world leaders as "poor, short-
sighted men whose field of vi-
sion does not go, beyond the
beyond the statistic of military
and economic potential.
"How can they form the
strenuous objec- 5iightMt ldea of 0ie worth uti
Thev live In Isolated Southern-'ons of 300 member sof the (imporUnce of reUgdous author-
monntain towns. Indian vlllaees;Ch:r'J'tiftn.1Riorm<1 rftufS.e?l'ty for the solution of the prob-
or crowded big city tenements. < who said his aDpearance w" *n lem ^ pejice?
The Christmas roiritjnvadedI''f^0'trym_.! "But others, and please Ood
sick rooms. In Portland !.^^^N.hT'hffi^flthey the majority, will see.
iux more or less awareness
of a" depart-
Ind.. 10-year-old John Paul < off against the Chamber of
Bger, paralysed bv polio more I Commerce which has sponsored
, t_. than two years aeo. lav m hi*1 ^ appearance of a depart-
e'bed waiting for the arrival of t atore SanU on Lynden s
a Marine Corps dress blue uni-
form.
Mayer Albert A. Abrotnson
wrote President Traman and
told him Jehn wanted a uni-
form fer Christmas and the
word was passed to Marin
officials 'in Washington. A. re-
elation uniform, tailored lest
fet John, is on its wsy to Pert-
land.
A Christmss tree glowed at
the bedside of Edward Mtcley.
streets for the last 20 years.
The mission society contended
the chamber was commercialis-
ing the Christmas spirit. It even
attacked the classic'New York
Sun editorial. "Yes, Virginia,
there is a Santa Claus."
ing home for Christmas with 14. in Boston, even though he
gifts for their, families para- can't see it Edward has been
chuted to safety When their, in a coma since he was struck
plane developed engine' trouble bv a railroad train 60 davs ago.
over central Michigan, but the.His classmates contributed pen-
pilot was killed.
The Chamber of Commerce,
through chairman Richard Al-
vers of the advertising commit-
tee, said there was nothing at
all commercial about Santa's
coming to Lynden.
"He Just stands around and
hands out crackerjactt to the
kids." Alvers said. '
The chamber's executive board
that denying the competence of
the religious authority of the
church in effective action for
peace has but made more
tragic the. condition of toe
troubled modern world."
transmitter and bundles of blan-
eU.
sasflaf-aryr
Which the Hnngarlan
sent saM earlier they weald be
charged with
An official announcement of
the trial said the Americans
"confessed." They flew across the
order in toyUkhVwftrt their na-
The Stale Departmeni denied
the charges and said the fliers
were lost when they were forced
down.
The court held that the lack of
such an explanation made it
"plausible" that the crew intend-
ed to drop those articles to "spies
and diversionlsts active in the
people's democracies."
The announcement said the
fp.uK.admitted they were in per-
; im rmspt contact WHh various ra-
dio stations, mainly the frank-
ifurt ststion. until they were
forced to land in Hungary.
It said they admitted they
knew they were ever Hungarian
territory, and were aware that
in that ease they should have
reported their presence by ra-
die and their intention ef land-
ing voluntarily at the first a-
vailable Hungarian airport.
The official announcement said
A number of retaliatory moves the four defendsnts acquiesced
'in the verdict.
It could apply further economic i
and diplomatic pressures, close \ They are Capt. John J. Swift of
Hungarian consulates in this Glens Falls. NY. capt. Dave H.
possibilities of the present hour, epuntry and cut off American Henderson of Saawnee, Okla,
travel in Hungaryor break off !Sgt. James A. Elam of Kings-
lLdiplomatic relations with the land. Ark., and Set. James A,
Russian satellite. Duff of Spokane. Wash.
Point-4 Men Who Launched Panam
Program Dead In Iran Plane Crash
TEHERAN. Iran, Dec. 34 (UP'
An Egyptian airliner crashed
into a mountainside and burned
near Teheran late Saturday, kill-
ing at least 19 persons including
US. Point-Pour Administrator
Newcomer Solutes
Canal Employes
The following holiday
greet-
nles and nickels to buv the tree fused to consider an anti-
and booed he mlaht be able to; Santa petition signed by 30ff
see It on Christmas Dav. cniIrShm A troubled Msrion, 111., family .* *a Selle, chairman of the
received assurance* of Christ-, mission society, said: "We asked
mas cheer from their friends i Lhe t chamber .not t sponsor
and neighbors (Santa Claux this vearbecause
The family of Mrs. Harrv we are convinced that this com-
ings have been extended by Gov- Watson lost everything it had' TAfP'1 *PPr?*ch robs the
ernor Newcomer to sll employes lWhep their rented four-room i Christmas spirit of its true
of the Panama Canal Company,house burned last 8undav. Her m**nlP,B- ,..,
and Canal Zone Government: i husband, a formef coal miner! Ue children are urged to
"As the year mi draws to > ^ jn a hospital with tuoercu-! Prav SanU. to believe that ha
.close, X wish to express my deep lewis Their four-vear-old son is exiaU "n<1 knows their actions
appreciation of the loyalland ef- crtmjled bv oollo
ffelent service perfornwd during ,,. townspeople heard about
the past 7> "tg J the Watson', plight and provid-
S5fe".(Htht?.5SriwS r22lT rent-free furnished anart-
r^no^l*^*?J2idPta2a'mM,t- eMh *nrt clothinv Mrs.
SW?K!& HL-SS* SJSl: WJtson was offered a Job.
The Christmas solrit of Cpt
Edd'e Rickenbacker. president > swerine a
of Eastern Air lines, made it! that her
and "to "their families my best;
wishes for a Merry Qruistmas
and a Happy New Year.
nd watches over them. That
is idolatrv and the t'me has
come to call a halt to It."
He deplore* th famed New
YorV .Sun editorial.
"The writer of the editorial
upheld the dea of Santa in an-
little girl who wrote
friends had derided
TELL OF RED PERSECUTIONWearing masks to oneeei their
identity, two Catholic priests recently arrived in New York from
Europe, tell reporter* how Stalin has made the Russian church a
Communist vehicle. Identifying themselves only as Fathers X and
Y, to protect friends and relatives still behind the Iron .Curtain,
the priests described the Soviet reign of terror against the clergy
Kussisn "priests," they said, are trained in M hours, and recite the
Lord's Prayer. "Our Esther who art to Moscow "
I also extend Season's Oreet- ?"{ <* L'^ Bo;%0tm* | Td ^^ **"*' ***
ft carrier t Bon Horn-1 ^ ,n(tlyWuaI ^ M fh.
brazen call to tell her tht
lngs to members of the Acotad
Forces, to representatives and
I
4
No Panam American Tomorrow
The Panam American will not be published tomorrow,
Dec. 25, but will resume publication en Wednesday, Dec. 16,
and will appear on Hew Xear'a Day.
employes of auxillar,agentle41o SSei .tate
the Canal Zape and to our K
friends and neighbors in the Re-
public of Panama.'1
'* -( '
Found With Heroin
me Richard to soend the holi-
days with their families In
The sailers arrived at Im
Angeles hsrbor after nine
month Aerean waters'and
were flewn direct to Newark.
N. J in a svscial plane pro-
vided by Rickenbacker
Gov. and Mrs Dewey played
and Mrs. Santa Claus in
NBW YORK, Dec. 24 w
Angel Roceo, 28. an airline pas'- Mr
senger caught With $250.000 Albany. N. Y. for 70 girl orphans
worth of pure heroin in a brown from St. Vincent's home. The
papar bag. is being held as a traditional gathering at the
courier for an International nar- executive mansion included Ice
cotice smuggling ring. cream, cake and gifts for the
there is a Santa Claus and al-
wa'-s will be.
"Right there he created the
idea of an idol and on ton of
it. he encourage* her to He
thst her l'Ule friends are pre-
varicators."
BALBOA TIDES
Tuesday, Dee. 15
HIGH LOW
11:11 a. SB. 1:4* .
12:49 p. m. 1:51 p. m.
SANTA CLAIS arrived at port Clayton and Coroial this
morning, directly from studying Fagtos beard In Oliver TwUt
unless this picture (or the beard i played him false. The kids
took a more favorable view of the unshaven Individual dad
In red than might have been taken by say, an eager counter-
intelligence operator as they watched him produce all man-
ner of seciet equipment and documents all around. Aiding him
were his cut-throat clowns (1 to r> PFC Paul Patela Cpl.
Tallie Wilson. PFC Walter Wylie, Cpl. Luther Jones and Sgt.
William Olbrys. On the sleigh with SanU is PFO George Guy-
ton
The red-robed ringleader then betook himself to the air.
and turned up over Albrook Field, displaying a firm grasp of
contemporary developments by keeping nis beard.well clear
of the rotor blades of his helicopter. There he went on to
play host to 700 kids to the Albrook theater.
/
if

Dr. Henry G. Bennett, his wife
and three other Americans.
The four-enguied MISR Airlines
plane was carrying Bennett and
his psrty from Baghdad. Iraq, to
Teheran and was circling Mah-
rabad Airport, three miles from
the city, when it smashed into
the mountainside and went up
in flames after rolling into a ra-
vine.
Killed in the same accident
were Benjamin Hardy. Point-4
Public Relations Officer and A.
C. Crllley. Bennett's special as-
sistant for administration.
In Panama today it was re-
called that Dr. Bennett and
Hardy visited here in early
[February' last year to launch
the Point 4 Program The par-
ty made an extensive tour of
the Interior.
Local economists and news-
men who talked with Bennett
were Impressed with his auth-
oritative grasp of agricultural
problems and sound plans for
developing backward areas.
Crttley. also was well known
here, where he once served as
Assistant Commercial Attach*
at the US Embassy.
Serpentine Driving
Ends In Conviction
WUd sig-zagging on and off
Oainard Highway near the Ci-
vil Affairs Building yesterday
afternoon tended the driver of
a Studebaker in Balboa Magis-
trate's Court this morning to
face a charge of driving while
intoxicated plus failure to re-
port an accident
Lino Coco. 31-year-old Pana-
manian, was convicted on both
counts. On the drunk driving
charge he received 1100 fine
plus a 15-day suspended sen-
tence; on the failure to report
count, he was fined $10.
. His drivers license was
.
-1


- ... I
PAGE TWO
..;. .. ,:i r-'-'trsm .. j. *i...m
. .

_*~ dp
THE PANAMA AMERICAN *, AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
__________LJ
MONDAY, DECEMBER M, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNtO NO PUSUSHID IY THt PANAMA AMERICAN PRMS. INC.
rouMOID NILfON KOUNilVELL in 1*11
MARMODIO ARIAS. IOITOR -
87 H Strut p o Sox 134. Panama, n or p
Tiliphoni Panama No 2 0740 cabli aooris panamhican. panama
| Colon ohici 11.170 Cintrai Avinui iitwiik 12th ano 13th Struts
PORIION RIPftieiNTATIVIS JOSHUA B. POWCRS.^INC ,
I- T MAIL
f HO
34A Mao "on Avl
I MONTH IN ADVANCl _______
FOR (IX MONTHS. IN ADVANCl .
FOR ONI VIA. IN OVNCI____
Ml YORK. 1171
LOCAL
__________ 1.70
__________ S.SO
____ S.SO
13.00
t4 00
Labor News
And Comment
By Victor Riese!
:
Christmas Eva is hate again,
' Occasion for Rietel'i old "yon."
As you recall, this is tha tima
I lor "Usloe Lobor" -l s rhyma.
"..',.., Post-Hall Syndicate, Inc.
'tit the nUfht before Christmas, and in every state.
Trade union officials again celebrate
They get palsy-walsy: Its "Hi, Joe," "Hi, Jack,"
And they laxgh as they gaily slap each other's back.
But this spirit of Christmas is merely intruding;
Tomorrow, alasj again, they'll be feuding.

In fine resolution in quick press release,
Both houses of labor talk blandly of "peace."
Bill Green and Phil Murray discuss labor's merging.
But neither will move at the other one's urging.
All hope of real unity quietly fades
As both outfits map out additional "raids."

The stockings were hung from the chimney at night,
When'some CIO unions got into a fight.
(In fairness to all, I must hasten to add,
This was all in a nightmare oh* anta Claus had.)
First leaders from Textile; then \ ers from Clothes;
And even Mike Quill "copped" a h..a from the hose
But the stockings, it seems, had a gun-metal heel,
So Phil Murray decided they should go to Steel.
A
As Santa snoozed on, in the AF of L
There was plenty of internal feuding as well.
The reindeer were claimed by the Butchers,, 'tis said,
So the Teamster, Dan TObin, Cried, "I claim the sled.".:
The Building Trades unions yelled, "That Isn't cricket; .
If we don't get chimneys, by Jlminy, we'll picket."
"Now there's no need io picket," said a leader astute, .
"For those TV antennaes will block Santa's route."

A Scotsman, whose talents are famed in pay-hiking,
May celebrate New Years in manner quite striking.
As midnight approaches and bells start to peal,
Phil Murray may darken the plants that make- steel.
But the strike should it come rest assured, will be
"token";
'Twill end very fast when the wage ceilings broken!

There's an absence of bluster, a silence that's queer.
From the beetle-browed boss of the coal-diggers here
It's so out of keeping, his foes and his friends
Are busy debating just what it porten*.' '"": ;**; '*'
He can calmly'sit back; he's in no special 'huffy.
,
THE MAIL BOX
CANAL ZONE COMMUNITY
CREST
(Sponsored by the General Com-
mittee of Civic Councils)
By EMMETT ZEMER, Gerieral
Chairman1948-49-19S0-51
The story of the Community
Chest In the United States is
quite widely known. Its purpose,
in the Canal Zone, as elsewhere,
is to call upon the members of
the community, In a voluntary
and cooperative effort, to pro-
vide the funds necessary for the
welfare, cultural, recreational,
and character-building organi-
zations which operate eleven
Canal Zone agencies.
During the recent war, when
the Community Chests of Amer-
ica idea first grew to Its present
nation-wide proportions and the
Red Feather was Introduced as
its emblem, hundreds of millions
of dollars were raised annually
to finance the gigantic struc-
tures which helped so much in
solving the many wartime prob-
lems. With the end of hostili-
ties, the USO structure was tak-
en down and the individual a- .
gencies went back to their peace-
time work. Such agencies as the
YMCA, the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board, the National Cath-
olic Community 'Service, and the
Salvation Army, continued Their
programs for personnel of the
Armed Forces and their depend-
ents. The extensive work done by
these organizations is well
known In the Canal Zone.
The first Canal Zone Commu-
nity Chest campaign was con-
ducted In 1947 under the gener-
al direction and sponsorship of
the Canal Zone Government and
Goevrnor J.C. Mehaffey, as Hon-
orary Chairman, and Mr. C. M.
Lupfer, as General Chairman,
but at the suggestion of Govern-
or Mehaffey the subsequent ef-
forts were managed and direct-
ed bv public-spirited local cit-
izens! The General Committee of
Civic Councils of the Canal Zone
was asked and assumed respon-
sibility for the Community Chest
campaigns during the last four
Let Nothing You Dismay
I
MERRY-GO-ROUND
Iff DRIW PEARSON
I
years. .
In former yers. It was
the
practice of the Individual organ-
izations, which operated within
the community' to conduct sep-
arate fund-raising campaigns.
Their appeals spread throuehout
the year tended to antagonize

No Angeles
By BOB RUARK
' -:

'/

John L. Lewis will move after Steel signs with Murray.

Successor to C pers the aging Btll Green,
Still heads AFL with a dignified mien. '*
But woe to the foe who attempts to Impinge -m .
This ex-Deacon's language will make Ms hair singe'
He still can fight back with a sharp verbal shaft
As he jealously guards every AFL craft.

He sits with top Communists comfy and cozy
Durante's chief rival, a lefty quite nosy
While calling us "fascists," this long-winded talker
Plots freely with Reds in the Hotel New Yorker.
Why do we send hoopsters from college to fait '
While Bridges, the perjurer's, still out on "Vail?

"It's true I jumped bail, and for Mexico fled,
And changed by appearance from toe to my head.
But I meant no contempt to ifiecourts ,none at all
Just as sure as my true name's Gus (Dynamite) Hall.
The jailing of lovers of peace is your goal;
Why else make a mountrin now out of my mole?"
*
We've the sins of commissions, of cut-rate new cars,
Of five percent dealings in Washington bars;
Of pre-paid vacations, arranged with each drink;
Of freezers and parties and fabulous mink.
Corruption is digging democracy's grave; <
We're the land of the fee and the home of the knave.
NEW YORK. Ths spirit of Christmas hav- Their needs are more psyehologleal than actual,
charitable members of-the coin-!ing been variously translate hi terms of nearly at that age tome new frocks; not hand-me-
mnnitv who felt that they were, everything, including a psychiatric approach to downs for the girls, some athletic equipment for
being unreasonably assessed In Santa Claus and the fact that the bride of your the boys. Stuff like baseball gloves and skates and
order to finance even these bosom must be overjoyed with a new floor wax- stuff.
worthy undertakings. In assum- or, I still believe that the Immortal embezzler, So the four anonymous angels have been hus-
Ing the responsibility of the op- O. Henry, most nearly had it tabbed When he tllng around for the last few weeks doing a piece
ration of the Canal Zone Com- wroie a story called, "The Gifts of the Magi." of mild but charitable blackmail on their friends,
munlty Chest, the General Com- Most folks remember the story of Delia, who cut and sandbagging some wholesale prices from
mittee of Givie Councils felt mat. c.ff and sold her. treasured, lovely hair, in order
not only could It, attempt to t0 buy a watch chain for her husbamjS most-
raise funds necessary for the op- treasured possession, an heirloom watch. '
eration of the organizations ji^ ln tne meantime, had hocked the watch
which, ita members deemed wor- t0 buy a special set of fancy comb for the now
thy, sharing in funds forthe ele- nonexistent hair.
A watchless chain, perhaps, and cdmbs for
end peace hopes are
'Tis the night before Christmas
nil.
And Thanks to the Reds, there is littl-- food will.
But deep in the hearts of our people yov'll find
A faith in the goodness ot all of mankind-
Deep-rooted belief that the future will bring
The love and the peace which now we all sing
And it's this "secret weapon" not rockets nor tanks
Which rrsures we will conquer the Godless Red ranks
(Copyright 1951, Post-Hall Syndicate, Inc.)
Famous Landmark
Answer to Previous Puzzle
| HORIZONTAL
1,7 Depicted
famous
landmark
13 Thoroughfare
14 Merciful
15 Seine
3 Permit
4 Not (prefix)
5 Ponder
8 Close
7 Conjunction
8 Impolite
9 Part of "bo"
10 Poke
16 Dinner course Bloodlessnasa
iln'MMMiillael-'
HblMUmF: i 2 keMldM
ISWilEIW H'J'--! Its'
IJ .-> i
V.VISIM
18 Insect
12 Required
i i.'V.iii
SSBSSSSBOBeai
.-JIUaillll. -- IJ'-*!. ".
[JMIJEJI 4W WliWMUl 1
^BJMIdUlilW <]
nrib 19CorralsUveof ,7rrench arUdt j4 rrosen water 44 Parent
either
. 20 Calmer
' 33 Doctor (ab.)
33 RIB
33 Iroquolan
Indian
- 37 Spirit
23 Metal
39 Tellurium
I (symbol)
30 Half an em
' 31 Digraph
32 Near
' S3 Food regime
fl Brittle
: MLand mseture
I 39 Revise
; 40Cslut Julius
(a.)
41 Dry goods
merchants
47 Niton
(symbol)
41 cha
OAngry
eiMaa'i name
82 Region ot
Franc
. 54W1M ass
S Cases
Romances
VHsVnCAL
20 Chose
21 Frees
24 Trough
24 Leased
33 It Uto
commemorate
the-----wars
pendent
36 Bright
ornament
37 Essential oils
42 Cereal grain
43 War god of
Greece
a Famous
English school
46 Nevada city
49 Worm
51 Era
5S While
55 Average (ab.)
ven participating agencies
It should, be noted that all
funds raised hi the Canal Zone
Community Chests campaigns
remain and are spent in the
Canal Zone. The participating
agencies for most part receive
the greater part ot their budg-
etary needs from large nation-
al organizations in the Unit-
ed States and funds allocated
from the Canal Zotrt Commu-
nity Chest help them continue
full-scale operations. Contri-
butions to the Community
Chest are more than charita-
ble gifts since they pay for a
well-rounded civic Pn
avrliable not only to the chil-
dren of the Canal Zone but al-
an parents and other employes.
Therefore, the contribution
to the Community Chest is
more of an Investment, since,
through the various organisa-
tions which are assisted by the
Community Chest life in the
Canal Zone Is made more
pleasant and Its youth are af-
forded greater opportunities to
grow up in a typically Ameri-
can community such as ours
here on the Canal Zone.
At this time I would like to
quote two paragraphs from a let-
ter to Mr. Charles Peterson (de-
ceased), President of the Pedro
Mlruel Civic Council, from Gov-
ernor C. 8. Ridley, dated October
14 1937:
This idea originating with the
clothing and sports dealers.
And the press agent, who workiS for money and
who lives by space for his clients, has actually
gone to work on the deal for no- space and no
fee.
This I consider a modern miracle of the Yule.
I like at as an example of Christmas giving In
d
vanished locks may be frustrating, .but the spirit 'hat there Is no thought of
of giving; remained Intact despite lack of fune-. no real ne,oe|sHy tedoit.'The-'
We have been prone of recent years to for-
mulate the Christmas spirit according'to what is
practical, what we need, or else we give In a
sense of duty, without enthusiasm a joyless
giving followed by a dreary succession of bills.
Me, I need a new suit, but would rather have
an elephant gun, on the off-chance a rogue es-
capes from the circus next year.
All of which Is preamble to a kind of nice
Christmas story, New York style.
The cast is made up of a press agent, four ac-
tresses, and a lot of poor kids. And the odd thing
is that the press agent, who lives by getting peo-
ple's names mentioned in Broadway columns,
won't allow his name to be used.
. The actresses one of whom Is so down on
her luck that she Is studying typing ln the morn-
ings won't allow their names to be mentioned.
Arid budding actresses can use what press agents
call "a plug/'
There are 64 boys and 82 girls at the Children's
Center of the New York Welfare Department, loc-
ated at 1 East, 104th St.. here, and they range
from 12 to 16 years ln age.
They are at a rough age for charity, for the
younger kids more or less dominate the field.
pers
fort can scarcely afford the
let alone money.
It Is not a necessary thmg for the kida-. they
will be comfortably, if unmodlshly cladT and I
suppose Abe Lincoln never had a ball bat m his
life. There Is not even a plump for general con-
tribution here.
It's just nice. .
I think, that some young women who are still
battling the career business would stop to re-
member that a young girl might like a new and
possibly fancy frock for Christmas, Instead of
somebody's dreary idea of alms.
Or that some adolescent boy might be weary
of shoes and socks as a Christmas present and I
might like to brandish an Eddie Stanky-type
glove.
I am a suspicious fellow and New York, In the
press-agent-actress league, is full of angles, but
short on angels.
There do not seem to be any angles to this,
which is almost like discovering the milk of hum-
an kindness ln a shark.
I wish a happy Christmas to the four ano-
nymous angels, and to the press agent turned
Santa Claus, who have suddenly rebuilt my faith
ln Broadway.
Is Churchill A Bevanite?
By Stewart AI sop
.^unities theSv'eiTnv'olvM ForaA*rlcan; what has happened slnce"wn.0 eveh very great generals like Dwlght D. Elsen-
S&fsss \sst iS'astrMW*"' arwssss -- <>-
field fOr Mie5e LUUIlt.iv> -ww -, .. PhurKhlll ._. 1- v.,.. ill_____i_,u i .------ .. .
2 Exaggerate
before the crucial
onine and unifying the commu- J**?1."^iS oi ** ?lllirch"1 seema J hav! Churchill is undoubtedly aware, moreover, that
n?tv sDlrlt through a closer and adopted a good many of the views of his most the Bevanite charge that he would allow Xmer-
?reer social^ and cultural com- cUmgerous poltica antagonUt Aneurln Be van, lean strategy to dominate his government had
munltv intercourse. This would ****$* Left-wing, anti-American Social- had a damaging effect in the elections, and he
te brought about by means and t minority. is anxious to disprove this charge,
resources available within the InJ itw weeks since Churchill took power Churchill Is also unnaturally eager to improve
resuma ln_ moreover, the Brillan government has clashed "-
voting official\l"governmental jrongUy with the United States on many leer
ttl rminriV-fwoild be'nwt'helS ""reign Minuter Anthony Eden, for example,
h,e Crt hinPrlai to the people has supported White Russia for the United
Kmirfvffiffi&P^^ ?ations 8ecurlty ,CouncU' agamst reece- ""
nal Man example of this, there American canaiate.
rrTmr^ to mind he matter of as- The British have flatly refused to adopt the
Si-JTuatin* the relatively large American small arms standard for the NATO
number of new employes in the countries, and have refused equally flatly to
SS tmftura We must remember accept an American as NATO naval commander
Mutt the day of retirement of a in the Atlantic. And so on.
iativeiv-large number of our. But by far the most important issue concerns
oW-timers approaching. I feel the level ol armaments.
thot these men and women who Early this year, Aneurln Bevan resigned from
>.,,= toirpn such a oroud part in, the Labor Government, charging, among other
thP construction and develop-, things, that the planned level of British re-
mpnt of the Panam Canal are armament was dictated by American strategy
rfpaircius of maintaining and and would wreck the British economy.
SSilBtt on their spirit to the A few days ago, Winston Churchill rose in the
rnanv newcomers who will appear House of Commons to announce that the British
in their communities to take up rearmament effort would have to be sharply
the work If this Is to be done I reduced. In the course of the debate which lol-
knbw of no better way than by| lowed he remarked. "I am giving Mr. Bevan an
drawing these new people close- honorable mention ln dispatches for having...
lv Into an organized community happened to be right."
,{>. The remark was sarcastic. Even so, Churchill
"Three allied major interests announced the decision to cut back British re-
are always to be considered in armament almost at the very moment when El-
thp successful operation of the senhower was urging a sharply Increased effort but a fool.
Canal- 1) The predominant In- by all the NATO countries,
terest of our government which I in view of all this evidence, the casual ob-
bullt the Canal; 2) The.personal server in Britain might be excused for conclud-
mteresU of the employes who uig that Winston S. Churchill had suddenly be-
operate the Canal; and S) The come a Bevanite.
interest of shipping which uses Churchill has not, of course, become a Bevan-
the Canal and makes it neces- jte. There are all sorts of reasons for what hat
sary. The tact that the Canal i happened.
has won a world-wide reputation^ There is. for example, the character of
for being efficiently conductedi is.> Churchill himself. As this reporter wrote from
the result of the fundamental London on the eve of the British 41ectlona,
policy of giving well-balanced; Churchill (to quote one. of hie intmate*) wat
?nd constant consideration to willing to "accept the' role of Junior partner.
bis bargaining strength
Washington visit.
A few not-too-gentle reminders, like his re-
marks about the American bomber bases, might
serve to remind Washington that the Anglo-
American alliance is a two-way street.
Yet the essential, basic reason for what has
happened Is the desperate economic situation
of tne country over wnose affairs Churchill has
now again assumed direction.
The hard, bleak tacts of this situation have
forced Churchill to move a little way down the
Bevanite road. A nation faced with bankruptcy
cannot aflord to indulge in risky experiments
like the Schuman Plan or the European army.
The clear threat of economic ruin would force
any government to reduce its rearmament ef-
fort below the level of security.
The British are, Indeed, most dangerously
over-extended; with every day that passes, this
becomes plainer.
The immense British worldwide commitments
cannot Indefinitely be supported by the war-
wounded British economy.
It is on this simple fact that Aneurln Bevan
depends to force Britain always further down
the Bevanite road, always further from the
United States. And Aneurln Bevan It anything
1 rach of these thrae allied. Xac- but not too damn Junior."
-|j ? tors: It U in the -inter esfrot the, Churctrtll. unlike- Harry S. Truman or Clement
(Continued en Page THREE) Attlee, is accustomed to dealing with generis,*
In th elong run, there is only one other di-
rection ln which Britain can move. This la
toward a recasting of the whole basis of th*
Anglo-American alliance.
It is significant that some of those close to
Churchill are beginning to think seriously (al-
though tentatively, and even rather shyly) of
some such basic change. It is possible that we
may hear something about this when Winston
Churchill comes to Washington.
At any rate, if we want Britain aa an ally
arid Britain is the one wholly indispensable
ally we should ourselves begin to think most
seriously about Britain's changed position ln th
world, and its relationship to our own position.
(Copyright, 1951, New York Herald Tribune Inc.)
' 'in
Drew Pearson says: One honest official, a Woman, block
ed big tax-fraud deal in New York; While Caudle got
$5,000 airplane commission, Mrs. Florence Shientag
demanded prosecution of Caudle's friends' clients;
Tax defrauders almost got RFC $700,000 loan.
(This is another in Drew Pearson's series on hew to pull
wires and escape t>aying taxes.)
WASHINGTON. No story of how to use influence and es-
cape paying taxes would be complete without telling about the
honest public officials who have stuck out their necks to block
the corruption deals. '
One of the best Illustrations not only of an honest public of-
ficial but of how every conceivable wire was pulled to.save two
tax crooks is that of Jacob Friedas and Sam Aaron, second-hand
machinery dealers ln New York.
Though' the $5,060 commission to Lamar Caudle for the pur-
chase of an airplane made headlines, what the public doesn't
know about is how one woman, Mrs. Florence Shientag, assistant
U. S. attorney ln New York, almost slnglehtnded blocked the wire-
pullers.
In the end, she won out, tried the case herself and sent the
two tax defrauders to Jail.
T^he story, begins back in 1945 when Mrs. Shientag was prose-
cuting an alcohol tax fraud in Brooklyn and ran across the trail
of Larry Knohi. the gentleman who later paid Caudle the $9,000
airplane commission.
At that time, Knohl didn't have much more than the shirt
on his back, plus a criminal record dating back to 1989.
WAR PROFITEERS
It was hot until about four years later that Mrs. Shientag
ran across Larry Knohl's trail again, this time as a tax fixer for
two men, Frledus and Aaron, who had concealed $300,000 worth
of Income in their second-hand machinery business. Immediately
she smelled trouble.
Friedus and his father-in-law, Aaron, had three secret bank
accounts; and during the war years when other men of Friedus'
age were fighting for their country, they had piled up a fortun
selling machinery on the black market.
In all, they owed Uncle Sajn $319,000 in taxes for 1043-44, the .
two peak war years. '.' <
The two gentlemen, who didn't think they owed their coun-
try either military service or tax money, had prospered so ex-
ceedingly that they bought the Starrett-Lehigh building, organis-
ed the Starrett Television Company, and after hiring a Kansas
City friend, of Democratic Chairman Bill Boyle's, they were on
the-verge oi putting across- a $700,000 deal with the RFC.
Since they had reached all the way from New York to Kan-
sas City to Influence the RFC, they obviously knew how to pull
wires. So they proceeded to pull wires to keep themselves out of
Jail.
First they used Larry Knohl, the fixer.
Then Larry Knohl looked around for a way to Influence Lt>
mar caudle, the man ln charge of prdsecuting tax-fraud cases ln
the Justice Department. "*
Caudle was from North Carolina, a graduate of Wake Forest
College. So Knohl approached John Caffey, also a graduate of J
Wake Forest, N. C. Though Caffey was originally from South!
Carolina, he was practicing law at Greensboro, N. C, and a friend j
of Caudle's.
TWO NAIVE CAROLINIANS
Caffey was -asked by Knohl how much he wanted to handle
the Friedut-Aaron tax cases, and he replied that,he wanted a re-
'talnarnf i*X60-.-.. ujtw.t^ \,.
Tlfc fixers from New York almost fell ift of tbeir cnVttS,
Caffey seemed so naive that they weren't sure they had the matt
they wanted.
However, they explained that this was a big case and they
were prepared to pay more money up to $25,000.
Bo John Caffey, of North and South Carolina, friend of La-
mar Caudle, from North Carolina, went to work on the tax-fraud :
case involving two black-market machinery operators a long way]
from the Carolinas.
And you will still find Knohl and Caffey sharing joint officee '
at 1920 L Street. Washington, right across from the Hotel Statler.
During the period that intervened, caudle, the not too bright j
country boy from North Carolina, rode the private airplanes with
city slicker Knohl, palled around with his Carolina friend John
Caffey, got paid the $6,000 commission for an airplane that Knohl'
did not really want, while wires were being pulled in New York'
to block the prosecution of Friedus and Aaron.
Knohl did everything he could to pull wires and ingratiate
himself with those on high ln the Democratic Party. He even
bought ten tables at the big Democratic dinner ln New York In
1949 cost, $10.000.
And he was careful to buy them through Lamar Caudle, who
labored under the impression that all this attention was because
people just naturally liked him.
WRONG LADY JUDGE
This was where Mrs. Shientag got her back up.
The harder the wires were pulled to take the case out of her
hands, the more insistent she became that the case go to trial.
In this she got support from U. S. attorney Tom Murphy, now
Judge Murphy. Finally she had her way.
The trial opened Oct. 9, 1950. lasted six weeks before 8.
Judge Sam Kauffman. and ended with four and two-year jail
sentences for the tax chlselers.
Mrs. Shientag tried the case all by herself. Six high-powered
attorneys represented the defendants.
Irony was that although Mrs. Shientag has deserved a U. S.
judgeshlp for her long record in the U. 8. attorney's office. Mist
Frieda Hennock. of the FCC, was appointed Insteadonly to be
blocked by the Senate.
It will be interesting to see whether the White House now
belatedly recognizes Mrs. Shlentag's great Job of overcoming the
wire-pullers ln Washington.
NOTE 1. Just as Mrs. Shientag brought Friedus and Aaron
to trial they were negotiating with th* RFC for the purchase Of
the Alreon manufacturing company by their own Starrett TV
Company. The deal was being arranged by Knohl and Leo p.
Parker, a Kansas City attorney friend of Bill Boyle's.
The RFC directors, apparently Impressed by outside influence,
did not bother to get a Dun and Bradstreet rating on Starret TV,
and found out only by accident that the people to whom they ware)
making the sale were being tried for tax evasion.
NOTE i. Larry Knohl recently purchased the famous race
horse, "The Battler," from Ogden Phippa of Long Island at a cost
of $40.000.
Apparently Knohl has come a long way from the day in 1M
when Mrs. Shientag found he didn't nave much more than thej
shirt on his back, It looks like tax-fixing pays. .
(Copyright, 1951, By The Bell Syndicate. Inc.)
HEADACHE?
caused by acid indigestion or temporary sit
Get sparkling Eno ... foday.' Let it
relieve your sick headache two
ways: Eno quickly helps neutralise
excess stomach add.. and Eno
also acts as a speedy, gentle laxa-
tive when naededl
1. PUASANT- as a glass of spar-
kling, bubbly soda water)
"! LAXATIVI-relievea temporary
sluggishness quickly. (Take I
fore breakfast when needed.)
3. ANTACID-relieves sourness, 1
and heartburn promptly.
Used by millions. Effervescent Eno|
is also gopd for COsMTirATtC
DULLNESS, OVXaiNDULCIltCX
SOUR STOMACH.
At all druggists-Get Eno I
AKE GOOD-TASTING
v



MONDAY, DECEMBER M, 1MI
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM ntTOPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEE
PAOE
Tajuana Searches For Bodies Of 42
\Atfer Fire Sweeps Gay Christmas Party
TIAJUANA, Mexko, Dee. U . This tower Califoraia
town near the United State border was plumed into mourmn,
today ai grieving relatlTea searched for loved onei among the
42 charred victims of the worst re In Mexico history.
Authorities said most of the Christmas celebrantsi killed
when flames destroyed the eity'a, civic auditorium' early Sunday
during a ay Christmas party for orphans were honeyed to Be
women and children.
Hundreds of persons who
I gathered at the temporary
J mortuary searched vainly for
I their wives and children in the
1 lines of charred bodies.
Police said the fire apparent-
ly started shortly after mld-
[ night when a Chrhflmas tree
on the stage of the auditorium
I was knocked over in a scuffle
by two unidentified celebrants.
Newsman Salvador Urqulzo
I said:
"It didn't look like a serio
us fight and we all laufhed
and joked about it." Laugh-
ter became screams of horror
when lights on the tree ap-
parently short circuited and
the tree burst into flames.''
The fire "spread like a flash"
to drapes on the stage and
then swept through the audi-
torium sending more than 100
persons stampeding toward the
one exit that could be opened.
Doctors at Tlajuana's only
hospital said 52 persons were
trampled and burned seriously
In the crush and 80 others In-
jured.
Tiajuana police sent an em-
SIDE GLANCES
By Galbrairh
Broken Fire Hydrant
Drains Water From
La Cresta Mains
A broken flro hydrant in the
neighborhood of Kennelworth on
the Sabanas Road resulted in low
water pressure in the system
serving La Cresta Sunday after-
noon and earl7 night, it was an-
nounced today at the Municipal
Division office
La Cresta residents had little
cr no water yesterday.
The condition was remedied in
the late afternoon after the
heavy water loss was reported.
The broken hydrant is a part of
the Suburban Panam water sys-
tem but the heavy loss caused a
drain on water lines serving La
Cresta which are under contract
management of the Municipal
Division.
An emergency gasoline pump
was started &rer the'low pres-
sure was reported by La Cresta
realfe'irtr to'tl:e^rpt>r'ailthrjri;
ties.
A high-service water tank is
resanUy being constructed a,t
i Cresta and will be completed
In a few weeks. It will be served
through a check valve and will
be automatically filled at night
end supply additional water
pressure in the lines during the
peak hours of water usage.
At present a temporary gaso-
line pump is being employed to
supplement the. water pressure
in the Li Crests aria during Cer-
tain hours during the day time
when heavy vsage in the subur-
ban districts causes low pressures
in the city mains..
ergency call to San Diego, Cal-
if., lust across the California-
Mexico border. The California
State Forestry headquarters. at
La Mesa and the San Diego
Fire Department both sped
trucks to the scene.
At 1 pjn., nearly 13 hours
after it started, the fire was
reported under control, al-
though the auditorium still was
smouldering. The blaze was
confined to the auditorium and
several small dwellings sur-
rounding it in this border town,
a resort popular with south-
ern California residents.
Hundreds of persons gather-
ed outside the auditorium as
the sound of fire trucks broke
the night silence. The burning
area was blocked off by police
to prevent gricf-strlcken relat-
ives from hampering firemen as
they fought the blaze and
combed the area for more pos-
sible victims.
The three-story civic audito-
rium was left a hollow shell
but its walls remained stand-
ing. The structure is located a
half-dozen blocks from the
tourist area and Its many lux-
urious shops which exist chiefly
on American patronage.
The building Is constructed
around a patio and was one
of the show placet Of the bor-
der community.
Chanukah Parly
And Cake-Sale Set
Wednesday Evening
A benefit Chanukah party
and cake sale will he held
Wednesday ladies of all Jewish
communities of Panama and
the Canal, under the auspices
of the Council of Hebrew Com-
munities of Panama.
Proceeds of the party, to be
held at the USO-JWB, Balboa,
from 7 to 11 p.m. will be used
to send, food-packages to needy
Immigrants m Israel.
The policy of unlimited im-
migration In Israel has served
to. worsen the already difficult
kiod.,.siUiatlon. Abou ,900 Im-
migrants arrive in Israel dally,
the majority of them from
Communist-controlled countries.
' Local merchante have don-
ated door prises and objects
for a white elephant sale. Fresh
cake will be on sale and may
be purchased without paying
admission to the -party. Bingo
and playing cards and' tables
will be available.
Reservations and donations
may be made through any of
the following ladies: Mrs. S.
Kay. Balboa 6323: Mrs. Oerti
Stern, Panama 2-1963; Mrs. A.
Toussleh, Panama 3-0980, and
Mrs. L. Zelenka, Panama 3-0917.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
To give pur employes well deserved
holiday we will be closed
all day December 26.
TAHITI
TH* MWCIIV I.T 0 I
Ml* J&Mp nm... A
Mofe* I/** UHM
to oil our Friend
ondClientt
U MODA AMERICANA
102 Central Avenue Panam
"My tonsila are out, too! Remember the good old day*
whan we had Iota of vacation with tonsillitis?"
Stunning 6 DIAMOND
BRIDAL ENSEMBLE
Jacrtdilfy Price.
# eaff
$150.00
Everything about this glorious matched tot it wonder-
ful ... the fiery brilliance of the quality diamonds, the
exclusivo now styling of the exquisite 14K gold set-
tings and the exciting big savings you make at
this low, law price. Hurry in and see thii wonder
value for y our If I
NAT. MNDEZ
IS "J" St. (Aereas Ancn P.O.)
Today fcfjjgfe) day 1
.NUTS
A GOOD
BREAKFAST AT SEVEN
BETTEI? GRADES
AT ELEVEN.
I EAT
FRUIT, GRAPE-NUTS.
BUTTERED TOAST,
AND MILKT/w
mr*mn>tSAtajT*ic*TusiKABBuix rxjp keoukwwent
OoHsioos, nourishing GRAPE-
NUTS makes a hit with tas
whoU family! And GRAPK-
7 varieties
10 pacxeootl
NUTS Is only on* of th 7 dif-
ferent varieties of sinele-sarv-
ins packages in POST-TENS!
pos^rsjvs
The Mail Box
(Continued from Pate 2)
employes to uphold this fine rep-
utation of the Canal. In the con-
duct of the affairs of your coun-
cil, therefore, you would do well
to keep constantly before you
the same three Interests and en-
deavor to welch every question
which comes Before you in the
light of Its desirability and prac-
ticability with regard to each of
the several Interests concerned."
Paragraph to Mr. I. F. Mcll-
henny, President, The Pacific
Civic Council from Governor J.
C. Mehaffey, dated June 17,1948:
"It's my view that the Civic
Councils might well take a more
active interest In initiating ac-
tivities among the residents of
the Canal Zone in matters which
would tend toward the develop-
ment of a fuller manner of life.
There are many opportunities In
this field and one has only to re-
view the activities of the resi-
dents of the average American
community to form an estimate
of the interesting activities
which might be undertaken and
which have been almost com-
pletely neglected In this area.
What I have in mind is social
and cultural activities sponsored,
directed, and carried out by the
residents themselves. Here in the
Canal Zone the government lm-
8luges upon the lives of the res-
iente at many points taken in
the average community in the
States, and perhaps for this rea-
son we are much too prone to
expect the Canal Administra-
tion to replace Individual and
community enterprise in almost
very field.
-I shaU be greatly Interested
in the development of the Civ-
ic Councils in the broader
fields which I have ladleated
above, and your efforts WiU
have mv fuU support."
Paragraph from Governor F.
K. Newcomer, to me a President
of the General Committee Civic
Councils, dated July 24, I860:
"Inasmuch as the Canal zone
Community Councils seem to me
to be truly representative of
community enterprise to the
Canal Zone, and since their
sponaorshlp of the Coinmunto
Chest campaigns in the pest
years has been highly successful.
It would appear that here, once
agito a challenge to the rea
community spirit of the Canal,
Zone Civic Councils to MtUfy
the need for this truly Important
phase of community life.
The following is quoted from
the Nation's "Red Feather Cam-
P*Am,essage from Henry Ford II.
Chairman, Community Chests of
America.
EVERYBODY BENEFIT*:
"There Is one contributor for
nearly every family to areas cov-
ered oy Community Chests Stu-
dies Indicate that 40 out o^ev-
ery 100 families benefit.directly
from such organisations, as the
Boy and Girl Scouts, the Y.s,
the health organisations.
"Less directly, but Just as con-
cretely, everybody in a commu-
nity benefits when a homeless
child is given a home when boys
and girls find wholesome outlets
for their energies in youth cen-
ters, clubs and summer camps,
when community h e a 11 n is
guarded and toiproved, when
families are steadied and
strengthened.
"The whole community bene-
fits when citizens of all classes,
aces all religions uniteshoul-
der to shoulder, In the interests
of everybody's health, welfare
and happiness."
Everybody Benefits When Ev-
erybody G'ev!
Fox Company Make
Amphibious 'Assault'
On Ft. San Lorenzo
FORT DAVIS. C.avl-"Fo'
Co. Engr. Shore Bn. 370th EASR.
Fort Davis with "Charlie" Co.,,
Boat Bn. 370th EASR. Fort Sher-
man made Pct ^^U\nl" I
ings recently at Shlmmey Beach
Fort Sherman and a w"0*""*1'
from Chagres Beach using LCM ..
Speed Is the main lector In a
tactical landing. Aii soon as the
landing craft hit the beach and
the ramp drops down the men
hastily move out. running across
the beach to the ctoeeat cover and
CFrom this cover orconcealment
they administer covering rifle lire
for the crew served weapons ma-
chine guns, rocket launchero,
etc.. moving up from "
"Fox" Co. made a tactical land-,
Ins- at Chagres Beach near histo-
ric old Fort San Lorenoo Atfer
securing the beach they erected
bmeach markers, showing supply
dumps, food dumps, POL dumps,
ammunition dumps and so on for
the benefit of the latter elements
of our amphibious operation, i
Completing this problem with
an overnight bivouac nigh .they
concluded the exercise with an |
amphibious withdrawal hlfll
to the landing at Camp Blerd.
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKUS&
ATALANTA BRAND
, are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 -Coln
HOME DELIVERY
*
FELIX
TAKES PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
THE WINNERS OF HIS
7th ANNUAL CHRISTMAS GIFT RAFFLE
I
Id DDI7P 0A2A SrA- AIDA HA8ETH DE QUIZADO
IN rKlaVL s s If HI Avenida Per #79, Panam, R. de P.
164-Pc. Sel STERLING SILVER flatware
by INTERNATIONAL SILVER CO,

Value $1,000.00

ln DDI7P CfiC. Mi" MARY Elizabeth morris,
llll miXE s a a a JOJl Calle 50 #10, Panam, R. de P.
103-Pc. Set ROSENTHAL Bavarian China dinner aet j
Value $350.00
3rd PRIZE.....3726 LTIT^'
1 LIONEL DIESEL Engine Freight train complete
r -_
1 Handmade VENETIAN LACE Or Tablecloth & 12 Napkina
Value $250.00
APPROXIMATIONS OF THE FIRST PRIZE. 9030
Merchandise prise of $5.00 each
atti
at
eats-
em
era
em
ten
ess
NN
tesi
M32
ess
em
ess
ese
Htl
ess
et
sese
sese
ese
ma,
etse
7*se
A. J. Areffi, Box 214, Aneen, CX
Francisco Motes, CaMe IS No. 17. Panam, K. da P.
Estalla da Chiari, Avenida Per No. 79, Panam, R. de P.
Utabol Guardia, Via Tip.., Panama,'R. d. P.'
Felieia Chan, Calle 44 No. 23, Panama, R. da P.
R. Guisado Jr., Are aid Per No. 7. Panam, R. de P.
R. Guisado Jr., Avenida Peri No. 79, Panama, R. de P.
Difna de Rodriguez, Panam, R. de P.
Reda Botero (Familia Quelouejeui. Panam, R. de P.
(apt. Flak Rodman, CX
Cast. Fish Redman, CX
Alicia Irante Rada (RlaHa), Panam, R. de P..
Capt. J. E. Casselberry, Albrook, C.Z.
Capt. J. E. Casselberry, Albrook, CX
Jorge Alemn, Panam, R de P.
R. Guisado Jr., Avenida Pert No. 79, Panama, R- de P.
Berta de Alemn, Callo Colombia No. 11, Panam, R. da P.
Y. V. a> Linde, Panam, R. de P.
; i
L. B. Cramer, National City Bank, Panam, R. da P.
A. Borehard Ato. J. O. Duque No. IJ, La Cresta, Panam, R. de P.
Pilda P. de Arias.
C. Rodger, e/o A. Jury, Colea, R. de P.
Cecilia O. Chiari, Panam. R. d. P.
C de-Cha^ Pana*. R. dwF,,-i ^, ..; .%,^.:
Isabel Daniels, Box 24, Atoen: C.Z.
Loa S. de Mantea, Panam, R. de P.

rv
Sese Juan A. Vrela Calle 3 No. 17, Panam, R. de P.





APPROXIMATIONS OF THE SECOND PRIZE.
r
5831
SS4S
SMS
SM4
M4S
SM7
Bit
l4
5SS2
SMS
SM4
5SM
sese
5857
SSSS
MS
5M4
85!
MSI
3851
4M1
MM
7M1
SMI
Ml
G. Saint Male, Panam, R. de P.
Victor de Molestin, Panama, R. de P.
Alvaro Bernal, Panam, R. da P.
R. Goiaado Jr., Panam, R. to P.
Jacinta Aguilera -.- ....
Alta de Guisado .
Ana de Estripeaut, Avenida Chile, Panam, R. te ,P.
Carbone
Margaret I. Harvey, Box S3, Corando, C.K
L. Hoting, Box MM, Balboa, CX
Mrs. A. J. Areffi, Box 214, Ancn. CX
Carmen J. de Icaza, Avenida Pero No. 52, Panam, R. de P.
Ella Alfaro
G. MeUon, Box M2, Diablo, C.Z.
Luisa de Wendehakc, Cangrejo. Panam, R. te P.
Lupe Alfar, Panam, R. d P.
Celia, de Caldern, Panam, R. Me P.
Susana Icaaa, Calle 4a. No. M, Panam, R. de P.
Geo. Tommies Hotel Tiveli, Ancn, CX
Malvina Galindo Panam, R. de P.
Mara Hyde, Balboa, CX
. ...
Ethel Myers, Box O, Ancn, CX
Marilyn Toledano, Calle M Na M.
G. Brld, Ave. Norte Ne. 12.
Molida de GamboUi.




APPROXIMATIONS OF THE THIRD PRIZE.....3726
3717
3718
371
3724
3721
3722
3723
374
3725
S727
S7M
372
S7M
3731
3732
37SS
3734
3735
7M
17M
27M
47M
5726
SIM
71M
S7M
m

Merchandise prize of $5.00 each
Erria I. Rodrigues, Calle A No. 4, Panam: R. de P.
Mercedes de Chen, Calle M No. 44. Panama, R. de P.
Mercedes do Chen, Calle M No. M, Panam, R. de P.
Mercedes do Chen, Calle M No. 4a, Panam, R. de P.
Mercedes de Chen, Calle M Ne. M, Panam, R. de P.
Cecilia O. da Chiari, Calle 4 Kate Ne. 21, Panam, R. de P.
Emma te aseth, Avenida Par No. 3, Panam, R. de P.*
Mercedes de Chen, Calle M No. 46, Panam, R. de P.
Mercedes de Chen, Calle 5 No. 46, Panam, R. to P.
Eteivina de Salasar, Calle 3a. No. 27. Baa Feo., Panam, R. de P.
Stanford Clement, Panam, R. de P.
Stanford Clement, Panam, R. de P.
Z. Correa, Calle la. No. M, Vista Hermosa, Panam, R. de P.
Berta Ch. do Healy, Panam, R. te P.
Elbert Basse, Panam, R. de P. i. ; .
Sydney C. Lmdo, Box 1124, Balboa, CX
Sydney C. Lindo, Box 1124. Balboa, CX
R. 8. Cotton, Lebanon, Now Hampshire.
Luisa de Anudo, Panam, R. de P.
Ana Ma. de Conzanl. Calle 6a. No. 8, Altos Golf, Panam. R. de P.
Com. R. W. Carter, V. S. Naval Station.
*
Norita D. do Tejeira, Calle 43 No. 37,
G. Mellon, Box *62, Diablo Hts., CX
Lovic G. Skootman, Balboa, C.Z.
Mrs. G. Cardse, Panam. R. do P.
Dorothy Melndez, Panam, R. de P.
Clotilde Isaza, Avenida a., San Peo.,
Panam, R. de P.
Panam, R. to P.
FELIX B. MADURO. S. A.
21 Centra! Aetant
TivorJ A
.<


PAGE FOUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 19511


IN HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD(NEA)Shel-
ley Winters, who was Miss Eager
Beaver about her career before
he went to Europe, now wants
out of her long term contract at
TJI and agents are huddling on a
non exclusive two picture a-
year deal.
"I made six pictures in 1951,"
Shelley wailed H to mc, "and If
I don't get an Oscar for quality I
hould get one for quantity."
"I want to do TV and stage,
plays. I don't have to knock my-1
elf out anymore. The big chase,
for security is what grinds peo-
ple in Hollywood."

Hedy Lamar can start blush-1
teg a(ain. The skeleton in her
closetthe controversial "Ecsta-
sy," has been sold for showings
n television. It's the film In
which she did a nude bathing
scene.

The movie slated for Tom Neal
and Barbara Payton on producer
Ed Levins slate concerns a Ma-
rine who returns home to flnd
that his wife hasn't been faith-1
ful. There's no part in it for
Franchot Tone. Hollywood would
rather not admit it, but Barba-
ra's last film. "Bride of the Gor-
illa," is racking up staggering
box-office grosses.

Turnan Bey, who owns 22 first-
run movie houses in Vienna, is
now angeling half a dozen inde-
pendent film ventures In Europe
he's that loaded with money.
There's a no-limit clause re-
Sarding movies in Ginger Rogers'
1.000,000 TV contract. She can
make as many as she likes, not
being limited to three a year as
first reported out of New York.

Montgomery Cllft is now hold-
ing down the nuts-to-Hollywood
corner all by himself. Marlon
Brando, who still won't admit it,
has signed a contract to do nine
count 'emmovies for Fox.

Definition of a Hollywood cock-
tall party. Where they cut up
sandwiches in little pieces and do
i likewise to their friends.
e a
The needle on William Bish-
op's career meter is nudging the
word "Jackpot" and when the
bells start ringing there will be a
lot of red faces at Columbia stu-
dio. Bill's been freelancing his
way to stardom for the last year
after three years of work-horse
duty at Columbia, where he was
featured in 25 films.
Now he's set for "Decision," a
prize fight story in the "Cham-
pion" class.
"I got my biggest chance as
the guy Paulctte Goddard mar-
ried in 'Anna Lucasta.'" Bill tells
it, "but the picture laid a great
big egg. After that I was dead at
Columbia."
SIDE GLANCES
Calbraith
It's very hush-hush, but mimic
Arthur Blake is doing his im-
pression of Eleanor Roosevelt in
Pox's "Diplomatic Courier."
A football pool poster at Mo-
tion Picture Center reads:
Pick your favorite team. Win
$50 and be a producer. Have your
own private office and secretary.
See your name in lights-."

Mrs. Cora Lane, mother of the
Lane SistersRosemary. Priscilla
and Lolais seriously ill at her
Hollywood home. Priscilla flew In
from her home near Boston to be
at her'bedside.
.
Hattie MacDaniel's doctors
have cut bedside visits of her ,
friends down to three minutes.
And they are unable to promise
a speedy return of the ailing ac-
tress to her "Beulah" show.
*
' "-.v-dway producer Leland
Hayward's dangling a play at Ty
Power, who may grab it. Ty's ne-
Otiating a new contract that will
put him in the one-a-year class:
at Fox.

Overheard:
"Honey, we're as inseparable as
Bar-ra Payton and her mink
eoai."

Peter Lorre's European medics
are advising him against return-
Inr to Hollywood. You'd be sur-
prised at the names of Hollywood
friends who have helped p*y Lor*
re's doctor hills in Switzerland.
--.
The jinx sign is still floating
over Jean Hersholt's movie ca-
reer. "Load" the episode he made
with Ann Harding fo rMGM's "It's
a Big Country," has been scis-
sored from the final footage of
the picture. Inside word Is that
it was one of Hersholt's finest
performances.
Lois Andrews nixed an offer to
star in an Italian-made film and
will return to Hollywood and
daughter. Jerrilyn. In time for
Santa Claus. She was left high
and dry in Europe when Orson
Welles called off his plans to film
"Othello" with Lois as his co-
ttar.
20 Miners Dead.
(0 Others Trapped
In Illinois Colliery
WEST FRANKFORT, 111., Dec.
24 (UP)__Twenty miners were
frAind dead t H'ay and about 60
ethers were trapped and believ-
er dead in the explosion-torn
and gas-fill.-d depths of the
world's largest soft coal mine.
Earl Snarr, general superin-
tendent of the Chicago, Wilm-
ington and Franklin Coal Co.,
said the margled bodies of the
20 men were found at the 535-!
foot level of the New Orient
mine.
Five bodies v/pre carried to the
surface by rescue crews and vo-
lunteer minerr, carrying safety
lights and the.r own oxygen.
Snarr said there was little
likelihood thtt the men that are
still missing in the huge mine
were alive. Snarr made a per-
sonal inspection of the wrecked
shaft.
He said the bodies were found
badly mangledevidence of the
force of the explopion. He said
none of them nseel the emergen-
cy facilities, Indicating that the
trapped men did not have time
to bolster the crumbling tunnel.
Rescue crews moved cautious-
iv through the wet, dust-filled
reaches of the mine. Snarr said
S good deal of the gas which
caused the explosion was still
present.
TERRY-
GRANDSTAND PLAY
SFKAK' CARRION/ x oav^
VORPS THAT TH6 YANKS* PLANS'*
r6Wt SB CTSABMBP YBT, Ut HA*
LWOT POWN Hl OPPOHBHTAUD TH,
WBKA PLANS...VVWV*

FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
You Did?
BY MERRILL BLOSSER
*****
com. ii y nca *.:. me.
"Rtmtmbar ma, Dad? I'm George, your oldest *or __J
Special Christmas Sale
Model IMF with F2 lens and case
Reduced to $199.50
lbe\
WINNER. OF TUS
S/LFSTY SLOGAN CONTCST
/S ABOUT *3 BE
ANNOUNCED/
Think it
WAS OKAY
FOR.VDU
TBE THE
ONLY _
Judge?
ySURE.'vWATS
Thewff?
. BESIDES.
/WASN'T THF
WHOLE
CONTEST
MY IDEA f
tK
ALLEY OOP
\&S
*SPARF TH5 HOT ROD
AND SPOIL THE
LILY BUSINESS-
Santa? Saucers?
BY Y. T. HAMLIN

PORRAS

Plaza 5 de Mayo
PANAMA
ROOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Bargain Hoys
BY EDGAR MARTIN
H.60YOWonr\v\ .voo'w. a
TrfiCtTW OM&.WM' \ a\nt.
VetfKYvMb' "WH NOWfc
if.
YO ft. OR.V4 CCK *S\kS\
Y
VJiC-O!
VNOrAfc XWfc
OnCrfc C*> W.
YOS tWMRV
CtNv% '
TOO MOCA'. WS.
NO HELP NEEDED
LITTLE FALLS, N. Y. (UP)
Police and firemen hurried to
the banks of the Mohawk River
upon receiving a report that a
man was calling for help. They
found Mike Kusmuk shouting to
his pet ducks to come in out of
the water.
Samuel Smug!
Samuel Smug is smart, 'tis tras.
If 70a were he. ron would be too!
Sam can always find good buys.
Hb secret Is to advert lie!
L'H'-'S WELKEN. Planeteer
It's Universal
BY RI1SS WINTERBOTHAM
i I A'S POP
The Sure Thing
BY AI. VERMEER
THAT'S NONSENSE,
PRISCILLA! MOW
,DO YOU KNOW
ANYONE WOULD
WANT A PRESENT
LIKE
THAT?/i
&*
CAPTAIN EASY
Only One Easy
BY LESLIE TURNE1
YES. THERE
MUST 86 TWO
CAPTAIM EASY.
FELLAS. KWTli_
MATEL.Y. I'M MOT
THE OWE JAWET
TULLS MARRIED
THftTCETTLfSm
THAT* "WAT SHE
CALLED HIM IN
THIS INTERVIEW
TODAY!
SHE ADOS THAT
ITJ AM ILL-PAID
rWESSIOM.BUT
LUCKILY SHE'* ABLE'
TO HEtP YOU OUT
KATW*TOTT-
OH. SHE DID, DID
SHE! WeLLGET THIS
STRAIGHT-IVf **.
MET THAT DIIIY OAMt
MOO YOU CAM 0U0TE
MBl y---------V
C'HAON.
EASV.WE
aOTTAflC
PACKi,
YIC FLINT
An Idea From Louie
BY MICHAEL O'MALLEY
[A FEW
HOURS
LAT6R...
?4
VER LOOKIN' I RE-
MORE CHEER-1 LAXED
PUL TONIGHT PROM
VC WHERE J THE
VA BBBM?r-' SCRIBE
CASE, AND
'TOOK LIBBY
LANS TO
DINNER,
Loue.
,->-..
''..it or '. -
tiNNW
Drop In and Shop
f WHAT \ 1 A CLTE ? WATCH WHERE VCR SOtN' ^_y RBTUNl. t"j
!T
f^y--^ r>Jr f
^M OI.'R BOARDING HOUSE
with
MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OCR WAV
By J. B. WUXIAMt
>.


'
MONDAY, DECEMBER 14,18
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER

PAGE
pacific S^ocCetu
Tf
Bm IXBJU 3&m.332l
AMBASSADOR AND MRS. WILEY
TO HOLD. "OPEN HOUSE" TONIGHT
The Ambassador of the United States to Panama and
Mr. John Cooper Wiley wiU hold "Open House" at eight o'-
clock tonight at the Embassy Residence on La Cresta for the
members of the Embassy staff and their wives.
Ambasador to Colombia
Here for Christmas
Mr. Carlos Lopez Fabrega, the
Ambassador of Panama to Co-
lombia, arrived on the Isthmus
from Bogota on Thursday and
will spend the Christmas holidays
with relatives here.
Mrs. Gardner Honored
at Buffet Supper
Mrs. William Gardner of Los
Angeles, California, arrived on
Tuesday to visit her aon-ln-law
and daughter, the United States
Vice-Consul in Panama and Mrs.
Anthony Starcevic, who enter-
tained a group of friends at a
buffet supper on Friday evening
at their residence In Bella Vista
in honor of her arrival.
Mrs. Gardner will spend the
Christmas holidays on the Isth-
mus;
Hollanders Hosts
for Dinner Friday
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hollan-
der of Balboa, were hosts at a
dinner party on Friday evening
.which honored Captain and Mr.
Paul Barenberg, of Fort Kobbe,
andLt. and Mrs. Arthur Koggan
of Balboa, who are newcomers to
the Isthmus.
Bangor, Maine. Mrs. Gagnon
and Mrs. Violette are sisters.
McGraths Have Christmas
Holiday House-Guests
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene C. Mc-
Grath of El Coco del Mar. have
as their house guests for the
Christmas holiday season Mrs.
McGrath's parents, Colonel and
Mrs. Albert Chlpman of Mathews.
Virginia, who arrived Thursday
night by plane.
Colonel, arid Mrs. Chlpman
were honor guests at a barbecue
supper given by their son-in-law
and daughter at their residence
for a group of their friends on
Friday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Byrnoo
to Hold "Open House"
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Byrne, of
Bella Vista, wijl entertain Christ-
mas Dav at their home with an
"Open House" for their friends to
begin at 1:00 p.m. ;
Cocktail Buffet Honors
Mies T'nkle and Fiance
Miss Suzanne Unkle and Lt.
Arthur Burke, whose marriage
will be solemnized December 28,
were compUJnented Saturday
evening by Mr. and Mrs. J. Mi-
chael Byrne, of Curundu, who en-
tertained In their honor with a-,
cocktail buffet fe* fifty guests.
Mtrs. Osterbew of, Nw* Jersey
Arrives On Isthmus
Mrs. Alice Osterberg of Bast
Orange New Jersey, arrived to-
day on the S.8. Panama from
New York to visit her son and
daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs.
Eric R. Osterberg, of Balboa
Heights.
Dr. and Mrs. Osterberg and
family will entertain several
friends tonight at a Christmas
dinner. Those Invited include
Mrs. Alice Osterberg, Mrs. John
Herrick and her daughter. Miss
Anne Herrick, Mr. Thor Fors-
lund and Mr. and Mrs. A.E.B.
Rlmmlngton of Bella Vista.
Violettes of Bella Vista
Have Holiday House Guests
Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Vio-
lette of Bella Vista, have as their
house guests for the Christmas
holidays. Mrs. Marie Gagnon and
daughter, Miss Marie Gagnon of
Scurlocks Give Cocktail Party
Mr .and Mrs. Frank Scurlock,
of Bella Vista, entertained at
their home with a cocktail party
Saturday evening for a gTOup or
their friends.
Lunettas Return
From States Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. J. Charles Lun-
etta of Balbao with their daugh-
ter, Andrea, have returned re-
cently from an extended visit to
the United States and Canada.
They were the guests of their
brother and sister-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. D. Charles Lunetta in
Qulncy, Masachusetts and of Dr.
an dMrs. Maurice A. Lesser in
Boston during a tour of the New
England states.
Following a stay at the Cha-
teau Frontenac In Quebec they
were guests of their cousins, Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley Van Allen
Coeyman In Montclalr New Jer-
sey. The Lunettas also spent
some time at their own home In
New Jersey.
Dick Turbvfil to Sing
December 27th
The regular December concert
of the Jewish Welfare Board USO
will-present Dick Turbyfll, tenor,
in concert, with Hans Janowltz
at the piano. Mr. Turbyfll Is a!
Senior and a teaching fellow in
voice at the University of Texas,
where he has appeared as the'
leading man in the college opera
productions and in professional
puroductlons with the Austin
Symphony Society. He has also,
done regular solo work with a
church choir as well as singing in
many public concerts.
The local concert will be given
on December 27 and will be open
to all music lovers of the Isth-
mus.
_ JACOBY ON BRIDGE
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
Colonel and Mrs. Davenport
Entertain
Colonel and Mrs. M. C. Da-
venport were.hosts to a group of
their friends at a cocktail supper
given at their Herrick Heights re-
sidence on Friday evening.
Mr. Carl Posey
to Arrive Christmas Day
Mr. Carl A. Posey, son of Mrs.
Earl A. Schilling, of Balboa, will
arrive on Christmas Day, by
plane at the Tocumen Airport,
which he helped to build and will
spend the Christmas holidays as
the house guest of Dr. and Mrs.
Schilling-
Mr. Posey Is Consultant Engin-
eer for the Civil Aeronautics Ad-
ministration in Quito, Ecuador.
Mist Andrea Lunett*
is Ten Years Old
Miss Andrea Katherlne Lunet-
ta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.' J.
C. Lunetta of Balboa, celebrated
her tenth birthday anniversary
recently and had as her luncheon
guest, Miss Carolyn Gaye Ma-
ple, grand-daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. N.E, Newport, of Balboa.
Students Honored
at Christmas Party
- A group of students of the Ca-
nal Zone Junior College were
honored on Friday evening by
Mt, rwLMrs. On Moore Bssjag.
of Balboa, with^'buWet supper
preceding the College Christmas
Dance at the American Legion
[Club at Fort Amador.
The guests included Miss
Elaine Kelly. Miss Ellen Cllne,
JMlssPeg McCubbln.Miss Glorela
Rosas, Miss Stela Campagna,
Miss Peggy Mayhew, Miss Shirley
Karst. Miss Nancy Sasso, Miss
Catherine Concasure. Miss Cora
Arm Gomez, Miss Pat Kelly, Mr.
Allen Townsend, Mr. Alexander
McKeown, Mr. Jack Pearson, Mr.
Richard Hoplak, Mrs Edward
Castao. Mr. Lewis Trembley, Mr.
Bob Slever, Mr. Bill Weisene. Mr.
Jack Alexaltls, Mr. Abdlel Flynn,
Mr. Nick Stokes, Mr. Charles
Harrison, Mr. Jimmy Thompson,
Mr. Frank Robinson. Dean and
Mrs. Roger C. Hackett, Mr. and
Mrs. Subert Turbyfll, Mr. and
Mrs. James Lyons. Mr. J. Stuart
McNalr and Mr. Dick Turbyfll.
Flower Project
Completes By Camera Crub
The collection of a group of co-
lor slides on tropical flowers of
Panama was the project under-
taken by the color slide group of
the Diablo Camera Club for the
year of 1961. A premiere, show-
ing of the set of color slides en-
titled "Flowers of Latitude Nine-
was enjoyed Saturday by mem-
bers and guests of the club at the
club's building on Diablo Heights.
Special Service Tonight At
Church Of Our Saviour
The Festival Choral Com-
munion Service tonight at the
Church of Our Saviour, New
Cristobal, at 11 fsa. will sing
an arrangement from "8. Cecl-i
lia's Communion" by Charles
Gounod. Mrs. R. de Boyrie, Or-,
ganist and Mrs. George N. En-,
gelke Choir Director and the.
Senior Choir with Mrs. D. Emo-
gene Cookson, Mb. G. N. En-
gelke, Mr. Garland Orr, and'
Corp. Theodore E. Mar HI as
soloists will lead the congrega-
tion.
The Processional Hymn: 'O
Come, All Ye Faithfull," Adeste
Fideles*, the Carol, "Angels,
from the Realms of Glory," Re-
gent. Square; Gradual "Rosa
Mystlca," Praetorlus: "O Little
Town of Bthlehem," St. Louis;
"Silent Night," Holy Night; and
the Recessional Hymn: "Hark!
the Herald Angels Sing." Men-
delssohn will be the Christmas
muslc as part of the Festival
Celebration.
The Offertory: "Christians,
Awake, and GreeWthe Happy
Morn," by Maunder will be
sung. -
The Rev. M. A. Cookson, pas-
tor, will extend Christmas
Greetings to the congregation
with the message "New Lite,
and New Hope."
NOBTH t
4.742
76
? J10S
? Q85
WEST BAST
4.Q83 4.J1095
VK1094 Q5
43 4VQ98
*J9i- 1074
SOUTH (D)
AAKI
VAJ82
? AK72
*AK
Both sides vul.
Soma West North East
SN.T. Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead? 4
The Perfect Gift..
For Christmas .
Birthdays .
or for that
"Special Occasion"
a beautiful box of
PCRUGIRSI
Caadles ongis Chocolates !
We With to
Express Our
Beit Wishti for
SK
TO OUR CLIENT
ows
PANAMA
BSSSSBHBB
COLON
(HRISTM4?
Balboa
Beauty Shop
Mrs. Bates Wieman, Mgr.
Oeea :M a.ar ta :H p.m.
Balfcoa C!ahaawt, nsaUln.
Ninety-nine players out of a
hundred would go wrong with
the South cards in the hand
shown today. Half of those nine-
ty-nine South players would be
rescued by a mistake on East's
part. (That makes forty-four and
a half bridge players, to be sure.
The half bridge player has been
my partner hundreds of times.)
When West opens the four of
diamonds, the ninety nine
Souths play the ten of diamonds
from dummy. Half of them are
saved when East covers with the
queen. South can now win with
the king, cash the ace and king
of clubs, and get to dummy with
the jack of diamonds to win a
trick with the queen of clubs.
Half of those poor South play-
ers find themselves in trouble
when East plays the six of dia-
monds on dummy's ten. Dummy
is in the lead at this time but
will never be in the lead again.
It Is impossible to cash the queen
of clubs because the ace and king
are still in the South hand. With-
out the queen of clubs there are
only eight tricks.
One South out of a hundred
makes the sure-fire play at the
first trick. He plays the low dia-
mond from dummy, leaving both
the jack and the ten there for
later use. East plays the six of
diamonds if he is a mind reader,
but South wins with the king no
matter what East does. The im-
portant point is to leave both the
jack an dthe ten in the dummy.
with two small diamonds in the
South hand.
Having won the first trick with
the king of diamonds. South gets
the ace and king of clubs out of
the way. Now he can lead a low
diamond to dummy's ten. Either
the ten or the Jack of diamonds
is bound to win a triek. anowlng
dummy to cash the queen of
clubs. By this line of. play, nine
tricks are as cold as ice.
Murphy Reluctant To Head
Truman s 'Cleanup Squad
Charming is this short dinner
dress worn by Jane. Wyman
who heads an all-star cast in
Wald-Krasna's "The Blue Veil,"
which RKO Radio is distribut-
ing. Designed by Sophie of Saks
Fifth Ave., the ballerina-length
frock is of black souffle over a
flesh colored slip banded in
black Chant illy lace.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 24 (UP) i
Sen. Edwin C. Johnson to-
day opposed the appointment
o any "member of the court"
ab an investigator of govern- j
ment ."wrong-doers" and urged
Congress to continue its job of,
turning up Federal corruption.:
-The Colorado Democrat made
the statement as Federal Judge
Thomas E. Murphy of New
York was reported increasingly |
reluctant to head President
Truman's special "cleanup!
squad." Murphy earlier had
been reported ready to accept!
the post.
It was said that among thej
reasons for Murphy's change of i
mind were protests from col-
leagues in the Federal judiciary!
and failure to get the men he
wanted to help him.
In an apparent reference to
Murphy, Johnson said that in-1
vestlgation of corruption in
government "is not a proper
function lor members of the,
courts or hand-picked men out-
side the government."
"Whoever the President ap-
points will be accused by his
political enemies of 'white-
wash' regardless of the objec-
tivity of the investigation,"
Johnson added.
He said Congress "is the
proper Investigating authority
in government" and noted that
the 1946 Congressional Reorga-
nization Act set up special
Senate and House committees
on expenditures in the execut-
ive branch. He said these are
the groups which should con-
duct any inquiry.
Johnson emphasized, how-
ever, that he has "nothing but
praise" for the House Ways and
Means Subcommittee which has
been investigating tax scandals.
The Subcommittee has reces-
sed its work for the Christmas
holidays but will re-open its
inquiry Jan. 17 at San Fran-
cisco. It also will take up again
the case of Henry W. Grune-
wald. 'mysterious Washington
"investigators and public rela-
tions counselor."
The investigators believe they
have laid the groundwork for
possible contempt action a-
gainst Grunewald, whose name
has been linked with an alleged
$500,000 tax shakedown attempt

against ex-Capone lawyer A-
brabam Teitelbaum.
Grunewald's attorney,- Wil-
liam P. Maloney, said in Bridge-
hampton, N. Y., that his client
refused to answer questions as
"A protest against the- thor-
oughly unlawful procedures fol-
lowed" by the Subcommittee.
He said Grunewald's action was
"not dictated by a desire to
conceal facts."
Asserting that Grunewald
will "answer fully all questions"
posed by a Grand Jury, Ma-
loney said:
"In declining to answer be-
fore the committee his sole de-
sire is to bring home to all
citizens the danger inherent to
them in such proceedings; and
he intends, if necessary, to test
the legality of such proceedings
in the courts."
THE DAY I
LE1UIY
Got your spectacles?
Then enjoy some good
laughs training them
on this comic feature:
b lot. Hud
'ON ULE
Colliers

IMPORTANT NOTICE

To give our employes well deserved
holiday we will be closed
all day December 26.
CORNER "H" and DARIEN STREET ------ TEL. 1.2181
Also in COLON: Front St. in Arena de Cotn Bldg. Tel. 1212

' r-'
-- -
.. -. --
Ancon Beauty Shop
LOUISE HARTMAN, Manager
Old Ancon Theatre Bldg.'
MERRY CHRISTMAS
and
HAPPY NEW YEAR
to all my friends
"SALIH"& "CHARLIE"
We are now at our new address
No. 119 CENTRAL AVE.
BAZAAR HINDUSTAN
PERFUME LINEN JEWELRY
SAINT LOUIS
f )4./ -(///( i
THE FINEST CRYSTAL MADE
^-^ All Patterns In Open Stock
X J Easy Terms Available
Special Christmas Dinner
WILL BE SERVED ALL DAY CHRISTMAS DAY
AT THE
i
16 Tivoli Ave.
American Club
Where Tivoli Avenue Meets DeLesseps Park
MENU
Fruit Cocktail
Chicken and Rice Soup
BAKED CORBINA Egg Sauce
ROAST YOUNG VERMONT TURKEY
Oyster Dressing
"


I WAS FLATTERED
Young people, for all their new
ideas, do appreciate old-fash-
ioned goodness in a meal. I had
my two small grandchildren for
dinner the other day and, as a
treat, served them chicken soup.
"Say. Grandma," said Jean,
"this Is a delicious soup. I hope
someday I'll cook aa wen aa yon
do."
Flattered as I was, I answered,
"It's really quite simple, Jena.
This is Campbell's Chicken
Soup ... so delicious, aa you
say, becauee Campbell' make
lt with fluffy rice, oft* o deep
chicken flavor, aalhplenty of
real chicken, alow-farmorod to
a rich golden broth."
Just then, little Billy, who
hadn't stopped eating all this
time, spoke up. "More please,
Grandma."
3T SYLVANIA
#1 Via Espaa
Tel. 3-0383
Giblet Gravy Cranberry Sauce
Candied rams or Whipped Potatoes Asparagus Spears
Chilled States Lettuce
Russian Dressing


or
GRILLED FILET MIGNON
French Fried Potatoes Asparagus Spears
Chilled States Lettuce
Russian Dressing
CHOICE OF ONE:
Brandied Fruit Cake Ice Crtam
Cup Custard Pumpkin Pis
Mines Pie
.
CREME DE MENTHE, Frapped
2.50

Special Children's Plate.....1.25

Remember Our Big Cola New Years Eve Party
NO COVER- NO MINIMMUM -NO ADMISSION
We Want You to Help Celebrate Our First Anniversary *
HORNS NOISE MAKERS SERPENTINE
PAPER HATS FAVORS
Drop in Any Time We'll Be Open Till Daylight
HECTOR DOWNE Your Host
.1




PAGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, MSI
You Sell em.. When You Tell em thru PA Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWI SERVICE
Ne. 4 Tlvul! Ave
15f MS81
rUOSKl> Oh LESSEES
Parque d> Ia
Pun.m
MORRISON'S
No. 4 r Pheae Z-M4L
BOTICA < ARI.TON
lt.Ht BMeedea At*.
Pheae ZSS-CaleB.
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
N.. u Wat 1Mb Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
no it "H- treat WmSj
No. 12.17 Ceatral A.C.I4.
0*
\ 12 words
Minimum for
k. each additional
word.
Customs Officer
Paul Dignam, Jr.
Dies Suddenly
Richard Paul Dignam, Jr well
Officer In Cria-
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE: Ration semi-circular
couch, six strand, in very good
condition. Calle 51 No. 4.
FOR SALE
cord player, automatic changer, 10
and 12 inch. "8 FiPHM, in mohogo-
ny case, excellent condition, $25.
Coll 87-4219, Ft. Clayton.
FOR SALE
Boat & Motors
FOR SALE
Automobiles
Service Personnel and
Civilian Government Employe
FINANCE
your new or used cor through
25 cycle Admiral re- GOVIRNMINT EMPLOYES FINANCE
CO.
Fort Worth, Texas.
Serving Government Employe* and
Service Personnel in the Canal Zone
for 14 years. With our financing |
your insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. coverage.
ARRANGEMENTS CAN RE MADE
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
DEALER

COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
TAnil-TALE FIGURES
FQR SALE:Boot 25 foot Cris Craft
95 HP Engine. See Sunday at
Diablo Seo Scout Londing $1.000.
.00. Call Curundu 7194.
PERSONALS
A Merry Xmas
and
A Hoppy New Year
Harnelt
Dunn
1951 Fere* Victerie (herd top con-
vertible I two tan* (teen. Thii cer
jwtt like new. Only 6000 mllci,
Vive it away. Only $725 down.
Year FORD DEALER, COLFAN
MOTORS INC.. an aetataobile
raw Telephene 2-1033 2-1036
Panama.

A true story
with many
happy endings!




.

It is actually cheaper
to buy a
P.I\I. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Besidea Protection Against
Injury, they save many
limes their value In cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Centra] Ave. Tel. 3-814
known Customs
tobal for many years, died early
lust night at Coln Hospital only
a lew hours after admission to
the hospital. He was 98 years old.
Although he had been ailing u>
health because of a bronchial
condition for several months,
Mrs. Dignam had worked during
the past week He became ill at
his home yesterday afternoon
and was taken to the hospital
where he died at 7:86 o'clock.-
A native of Pittsburgh, Penn-
sylvania, Mr. Dignam lived most
of his life In the Canal Zone. His
father, the late R. P. Dignam, Sr.,
was employed '.s a buyer in the
Commissary Division.
Mr. Dignam came to the Isth-
New Envoy Predicts Miner Found In Good
Turkey WHI Join
Wesi Against Reds
WASHINGTON, Dec 34 (DP)
George C. McOhee, new Ame-
rican Ambassador to Turkey,
predicted today that Turkey
will Join fully In anti-Commun-
ist defense plans and strategy
despite Russia's perhaps vio-
lent objections.
Preparing to depart for his
post in Ankara, McGhee lauded
Turkey's determination to Join
the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization and to participate In
the proposed Middle East Com-
mand.
McGhee said in an interview
that he sees no indication the
strategic country astride the
Dardanelles Straits and border-
FOR SALE:Buying or sailing on
automobile? See Agencias Cosmos,
Automobile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-
4721, Panama.
4
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED TO BUY :_Troller suit-
ob'e for 14' boat. Coll 759 Coco
Solo.
1950 Mercury 6 pasunfler Coupe
derh flraan, leather upholster,
good tires. Only 9000 mile. Thii
car is a steal. Only $600 down
ina drive it away. Year FORD
DEALER. COLFAN MOTORS INC..
en automobile raw. Tel. 2-1033
2-1036. Panama.
WANTED: Well furnished cool
TOOm with independent bathroom.
preferable in Bella Vista, for Ame-I-JT *"'I '*""""
T ., r ii i .cw eet unc cam tor la money,
neon gentleman Call 2-4611.____________________
FOR SALE:1951
Are you looking tor a used cer?
Something good at a fair price?
Came to Autolandie Na. 13, 4th
of July Avenue.
WANTEDFounteen inch or larger
bondsow. See Capt. Mclntosh im-
mediately oboard, motor vessel Lu-
cy, Pier 7, Balboa.
Radio Programs
Yout Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 People Meet
Presents
Today, Monday. Dec. 24
P.M.
4:30Music for Monday
1:00Music Without Words
: 15David Rose Show
:30What's Your Favorite
;00Happy the Humbug Cia.
Alfaro. S.A.
?: 15Evening Salon
:00"A (BBC) Xmas Carol"
1:30Sports Review
:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00 News and Commentary,
(VOAl
4:15Platter Parade (VOA)
8:45Labor World (VOA)
8:00Story UJ3.A. (VOA)
8:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports Tune of Dav and
News(VOAi
1Q:00La Boca Hi School Glee
Club
18:30The World at Your Win-
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off
Hillmon. Excel-
lent condition. Duty paid. Call
Panama 3-0Q95.
I9S0 Stadebeker Champion Star-
light Coupe black, food tire, seat
caver, a clean car. Only $465.
00 dawn one drive it away. Your
FORD DEALER. COLFAN MOTORS
INC.. en automobile raw. Tel. 2-
1033 2-1-036 Panama.
hOR SALE:Salvage __ J93-7 Cor-
bitt tank truck. Refluir**' extensive
repairs. Will led for*best offer.
The Texas Co. (Panama) Inc.
Tel. 2-0620.
Last month THE PANAMA AMERICAN old
2839 classified ada compared to
2253 classifieds in all other dailies
combined in the city!

*



i '
586 MORE



MISCELLANEOUS
Oe you kav. a drinkma ptihlimf
Writ. Alcak.lici >tllii|Hl1
Be 2081 A.caa C. Z.
1950 Ford Custom Tudor V-8 light
gray SWW tira. Thii car it
heouty. Only $485.00 down and
it'i year. Year FORD DEALER,
COLPAN MOTORS INC.. an au-
tomobile row. Tal. 2-1033 2-
1036, Panama.
FOR SALE:1950 Pontioc "8" Ra-
dio and Tailor made seot covers.
Leaving for States $1,600.00.
Phone Rodman 3422 or sea at
R17-A Rousseou West Bank.
1949 Ford Tuder V-8 dark blue,
eat cover, goad tire. Oaly $895.
00 down. Yeur FORD DEALER,
COLPAN MOTORS INC., on auto-
mobile row. Tal. 2-1033 __ 2-
1036. Panam.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:24-gol. Garbage Can
with covers meeting sanitary regu-
83 North Ave. (Phone 2-0610).
lotions. ALMACENES MARTINZ,
Also 3 Mortin Soso St. (Phone 3-
1424).
RESORTS
Gromlich's Sonto Clore beach-
rnriasjas. Electric Is ooxe, as
tovas, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-57.
mus when he was IB years old. ling Russia will be "deterred
He was first employed December from pursuing her present po-
1. 1934, as a c.'erk In the Marine hcies and objectives" in the
ES*!*? ,*? raM!S2Bd .to. S ace o Sovlet Protests.
LUX
VENETIAN
RLINDS
Immediate
Delivery
Aluminum
Awnings
Different
Colors
$14.00
Industrias
Panamericanas
22
Tel. 8-1713
E. 29th Street
Phillip.. Oceonside cottages, Santo
Claro. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponoma 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
Williams Santa Clara Beoch Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidalres. Rock-
Oas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
FOR RENT
Apartments
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Betel PI Panama
Selling: Abattoir, Panam
Forest (preferred). Clay Pto-
deets, S. Fernando Clinic.
TeL 8-4719 3-1880
Cristobal Customs Office in April
1036 and has been continuously
employed there since. He has
served as guard, boarding officer,
inspector and Deputy Shipping
Commissioner.
In addition to his duties with
the Canal organization, Mr. Dig-
ram was well known on the At-
lantic side for his interest in
[sports and fraternal work. He
was a prominent member and of-
ficer of the Knights of Columbus
and was one of the principal or-
ganizers this year of the "Pony"
baseball league on the Atlantic
side.
He Is survived by his wife, Mrs.
Elizabeth J. Dignam, and em-
ploye In the Commissary Divi-
sion; three daughters. Kathryn.
who is In school in Youngstown,
Ohio, Virginia and Mary Frances;
his mother, Mrs. Edmonla Dig-
nam, an employe of the Navy at
Coco Solo Hospital; two brothers,
Joseph, Cristobal Customs Offi-
cer, and John, r-n employe In the
Grounds Maintenance Division;
and two slstors, Mrs. Rosemary
Reardon and Mrs M.S. Brezez-
lnskl, both of Cristobal.
His brother Joseph is presently
on leave of absence an dwas tak-
ing a round trip to the States as
a crew member of a tanker which
la presently In drydock In Brook-
lyn. Both he and Miss Kathryn
Dignam have been notified of the
e'rath.
Funeral arrknt/ements had not
been completad this morning
Condition 48 Hours
After Gas Explosion
WEST FRANKFORT, III., Dee,
24 (UP) Cecil Sanders. 44, one
of the miners entombed for 48
hours to the blast shattered
depths of the New Orient mine,
as found alivo today and in a
"miraculously good condition."
Sanders was found deep in the
recesses of the mine by rescue
workers who had removed 104
bodies from the world's largest
shaft coal mino, tocked by a coal
gas explosion Friday night. He
has been hospitalized.
The mine's physician said
Sanders reported that el ght
other miners are alive in the vi-
cinity of the wrecked mine where
he was found.
He said Sanders was found a
few feet from where the bodies
of his fellow miners were dis-
covered,
Nes of Sandf rs' removal came
as company officials feared the
final death toll would run to 120.
(His rescue may cause a down-
ward revisions of toll figures.
He predicted that Turkey will
continue to follow her present
"resolute attitude" toward So-
viet pressures.
McOhee has been Assistant
Secretary of State for Nearchildren. His assignment
EMtera South Asian and Afri-Turkey win include direction
can Affairs He wUl leave New of American military and co-
22Le*yvP^2P S 3 accom-'nomic aid programs in that
panled by his wife and fivecotmtry.
NOW... Years Old!
... But No Increase
IN PRICE
Alarm Clock
"Tomrorow, Tuesday, Dec. 25
A.M.
i:008ign On
Club
t:30Morning Salon
|: 15News (VOA)
i:30Crazy Quilt
1:45Hawaiian Harmonies
FOR SALE'49 Renault. Duty paid.
Radio. Good condition, $625.00.
Fort Cloyton. 4173 or 6121.
1947 Pontioc Fardar Sis dark hlue,
good tire, eat cavar, radio.
potliaht. Only $350 down and
take it away. Year FORD DEALER,
COLFAN MOTORS INC., on au-
tomobile raw. Tal. 2-1033 2-
1036, Penoma.
FOR SALE1951 Ford 2 Door. Very
reasonoble, will finance, will take
trode in. Phone Albrook 864239.
FOR RENT
Rooms
AQUARISTS:
Ju received Urge .ertm.nt Ira'-
pica. fi.h. Ac-aria Trapica., ..Via ^^St^^^T!^.
tapan.. Worte Juan Franca table.. **. Maid service optional. Con-
Tet. 3.4132._____________roc offiet 806, )0|n j^, N#w
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
11-Year-Old Tips
Pan Of Boiling
Milk Over On Self
Christmas will be an anxious
day in the Ro Abajo home of
Vemon Smith whose 11-year-old
son, Gilberto is in Oorgas Hos-
pital suffering from burns of the
face, neck and chest.
Gilberto reached onto a stove
and tipped over a pan of boiling
milk while visiting In the Para-
so quarters of Edgar Simmons.
Gorgas alerted an emergency
staff to give the child blood
plasma. t
ROOMS AVAILABU LieW. cee!
arlrety renevatae) and rail Far.
"b*ee\ Rare reenaaela. Bache-
lor eaty. In.uire at The Aste-
''" Club facing Da
Park.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM-BUILT
Slipcover Renphotstery
VISIT OU SHOW-BOOMI
aiaerta Here.
rf*0'"^_(AMi.l>B. Be.)
fr*r?8pfefe,2
REPAIRVenetian Blinds.
MAKEcornices Curtains.
PAINTFurniture.
Work Guaranteed.
TALLER CEDEffO
#23 Per Ave. TeL 3-1068
j: 00News
1:15Sacred Heart Program
1:30As I See It
: 00News
18:05Off the Record
lfc: 00News
11:05Off the Record
11:30Meet the Band
1: 00News
1|:05Luncheon Music
1$: 30Popular Music
1:00News
|: 15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
:00A Call From Lea Paul
:15Date for Dancing
$: 30Spirit of the Vikings
1:45Battle of the Bands
J:00All 8tar Concert Hall
: 16The Little Show
3:30Music for Tuesday
1:00Panamusica Story Time
1:15Promenade Concert
4:30What's Your Favorite
1:00Happy the HumbugCia.
Alfaro, S.A.
:15Evening Salon
:00Mr. Pickwick's Xmas and
The Happy Prince ____
t:30PABST SPORTS REVHtW
1:45Jam Session
1:00NEWS (VOA)
|: 15Peace on Earth (VOA)
!:45_Tlme for Business (VOA)
:00My Favorite Xmas Songs
(VOA)
1:30Commentator* Digest
(VOA)
1:458porU World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
18:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Variety Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Otf
1947 Hudson Convertible Coupe
brand new paint, brand new tap,
brand new eat cover, food tires.
Thii car it a steal. Only $230.00
down and it' yours. Your FORD
DEALER, COLPAN MOTORS INC..
an automobile row. Tel. 2-1033
2-1036. Fanemi.
Salvation Army
Acknowledges
Several Donations
The Salvation Army today ack-
nowledged donations to its
Christmas cheer appeal and an-
nounced that distribution of
packages to the poor will take
place this afternoon, startlne at
3 o'clock.
The list of donations Include:
National Brewery. $20: US. Am-
bassador John C. Wiley, $10; Miss
D. Rodney, 15; National City
Bank, $25; Sylvester Callehdar,
84; Albert, $2; Miss E. Spence,
31; Leslie Thomas, 85; Junta Fe-
menina, one case of milk.
James DeFrees
Dies In Gorgas
James DeFrees, 68. American,
a resident of Cresta Hermosa on
the Boyd-Roosevelt highway
died at 11:30 p. m. last night at
Gorgas Hospital. He had been
a patient at the hospital since
December 3.
He Is survived by his wife, and
a son, James R. 8. DeFrees.
who Is employed in the Munici-
pal Division on the Atlantic
side, both of whom are residents
of Cresta Hermosa.
Funeral services will be an-
nounced later.
RE-OPENS
JANUARY 1st, 1952
e narrvadaaa Tctrfreph er Write
HOTEL PANAM0NTE
aate. Charlan!
ereee year Travel Asea
FOR BRONCHITIS
COUGHS, COins
It's Triple Strength
Loosens Things Up
It' differentIt's taster In action
It's compounded on superior, medical
foct finding never before heard of
in thi country.
Juckley's ConocDoi Mixturo (tripla
strength) la the nut of thi omoi-
big cough and cold prescription that
"acts like o flash" yet h) so pure and
tree from harmful drug ihot a child
con toko It..end atop coughing.
On little tip and the Ordinary
cough is gone o few dote and
that tough old hong on cough h
heard no more It's really won-
derful to watch how speedily bod
lingering colds ore put out of bust-
Tests of Tin Cans
Gathers Important
Data At Corozal
Imposing signs marked "Poi-
son Injurious to Humans"
warn curious persons away
from an area o the Army's
Quartermaster Food Service
Section at Corozal General De-
pot where an important series
of tests on tin cans and tin-
ned foods are in progress.
PteHBg .ptJndpif with the
question of coating cans to pro-
tect the metal from rust and
corrosion the experiment in-
rolves both pre-coating and
pro-coating. Covering the in-
side of cans with a substance
is known as pre-coating; coat-
22 *,?,' ou%lde ** Protec-
tive film after the can is pack-
ed and sealed Is known as pro-
coating. "
JriJiu Corozal Perimenta!
stockpile are cans covered with
*!' *nown types of protective
coatl"8f. plus some with none
at all. The cans are filled var-
UU which exactly simulate the
roods canned for overseas shlp-
mentwJth Army and civilian
enterprises.
J5PSJ* the te warn per-
sons who might consider eop-
Kf ,ewJ;an" ** fre* *<**
inat the goods are not fit for
human consumption
Bimilar experiments are be-
ing conducted simultaneously
?*. t*> location in ralr-
vrSJ' A"?U:. "O to the dry.
torrid heat of the dessert at
El Centro. California.
The ultimate goal of the ex-
Right owoy thot ttghtneu loosen
up..the bronchial nossoge doer..
you're on your roes ogpin. .happy and
breathing easier. Get o bottle of
Buckley'i Conodlol Mixture today.
, SAW S% SMNptU m
rNs all .U-4..' ibrb l| bsaraa.
Only $3.75 each
2 for $7.25 Postpaid
Get ene for yesvtelf.
Gire one as a Xmas Gift.
Limited Quantity. OBDEB NOW.
Send Money Order to
Dunmore Agency
Estafeta Institute Nacional
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Wit hoof Worry Or Care
18 Try ell Ave. Pan -2M
Allies, Reds Swop
POW Moil; Dean
Sends 1st Letter
FANMUNJOM. Iteres. Dec. 24
(07) Allied and Communist
negotiators aareed today to the
periment it to detemtoe which tafeaste o mall Jw>yn pri
pro-coating la best for a partss- stsBSv H war sUJcf teWlr fan-
ctly when each type of pro-
The resulting knowledce trtn
be invaluable in Uve^ent^
Another world-wide war *
ixn.taWlth "^ rart-
111 and the CUBBJIIISBaistl 4e-
**d Us. fine cm -- let-
ter (ron Mal, Oen, WflUam T.
DW' _
A suainiBueierii ewonhsp
on the t%4m*t ot tor pri-
soners screed that the ex>
i listn inifstw
Pojfhumouj Award
Given Te Soldier
Win Sacrificed Life
WASHINGTON, Dec. M (UP)
The Army announced today
that the Medal of Honor has
been awarded posthumously to
Sgt. Charles R. Long, Kansas
City Mo., who sacrificed his life
by calling for a mortar bar-
rage on his own observation
post when surrounded by ene-
my troops in Korea.
Long, 27, was a member ot
the 38th Infantry Regiment ot
the 2hd Infantry Division.
According to the accompany-
ing citation, he "exacted a
heavy toll of enemy casualties
and enabled his company to
withdraw, reorganize counter-
attack and regain" a key
strongpoint near Noensong, Ko-
rea, last February.
Long is survived by his wi-
Idow, Mrs. Evelyn H. Long, and
two stepchildren, Patricia Mar-
lene Tipton and Sondra Nadine
Tipton, Olenwood, Kansas City,
and, bis mother Mrs. Lois D.
Long, Arlington, Kansas City.
A veteran of World War II,
long was a member of the or-
ganized Reserve Corps and was
called Into active duty three
mnths after the outbreak of
fighting in Korea.
Capt. Richard E. Lively,
Chattanooga, Tenn., said Long
was a forward post observer
when the third battalion was
attacked by several thousand
enemy troops.
"When the unit was ordered
to fall back, Sgt. Long, serving
as forward observer for the
mortar platoon of the Heavy
Weapons company, deliberate-
ly, and in the face of almost
certain death or capture by the
enemy, remained at his observ-
er post In order to continue
directing the fire of his mortar
platoons while the rifle troops
were withdrawing." Lively said.
"All alone, and with the ene-
my almost on top of htm, be
steadfastly and calmly relayed
his observations and directed
fire over his radio while hold-
ing the attacking enemy from
his own position by firtng his
carbine and hurling handgren-
adas at then."
"Sat. Long deliberately sacrif-
iced his own safety in order
to destroy the enemy and per-
mu his unit to escape possible
annihilation." Lively saicf^As a
nsult of his heroic end selfless
devotion to duty, Sgt. Long Is
reported killed m action."
You'll enjoy Seagram's V.O.
Canadian Whisky even more now
that it is 6 years old! Honoured
the world over, Seagram's V.O.
is the lightest, cleanest tasting'
vshisky you have ever enjoyed.
Try it '...it's aged Imgtri
n*wMihfmmmhrt
COMPAA CYRNOS, 8. A.
CANADIAN WHIKY
Of course
-
you
better
WITH
EVERSHARP
*.--..
r
3 Couqht Digging
Coble Charged
With Larceny
Acting on a Up that some-
thing odd was afoot on the
K-e-B Itoad near Cocoll. Canal
Zone police approached and
caught three men digging up
. Camilo Caizales, 88. Victo-
riano Tejada, 18, and Domingo
Mreenas, 28. all Panamanians.
were la Balboa Magistrate's
Court this morning with at-
fcrmpted Vend larceny of 147
feet of armored .easts valued at
The case was eonnnued until
Thursday and bail set at 8208
lm each defendant.
V the etfl sets ef
EVIttHAB .. aad
euteamilc pandit ,
Se practical, atodem aad
beevHteil
The EVERSHARP combines beauty with
perfection! No other pen, for instance, has
Magic Feedto prevent flooding or leak-
ing ... for instant, smoother writing!
And. that's not all... EVERSHARP
points are not hidden under a "hood'*,
because they are all hand-wrought in 14
Karat gold extrs-large designed ex-
clusively to fit your writing... The
Breather Tube gives you the largest ink
capacity ever... and the Flip-Fill Ac-
tion is dm fastest, safest, surest way to
fill your pen!
7JJWj
l:\ i;itsII \/{/>
AND YOU GIVE THE FINEST
DUtrlbaters:
PANAMA
a CASA LUIS
o BAZAR PRANCES
a BAZAR ESPAROL
LA PARISIN
e OFFICE SERVICE
e CARA ZALDO
COLON
a ALMACN 8URANT
o ALMACN COLUMBIA
DAVID
e AXMAOtna ROMERO


\

MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
" ATSATUNTHLF
rASI tKHI.HII K SKKVII ? Bk.TWI.fcM
UMOFR AMD NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COAST
(A Limited Number of Pn-WMf Bertha'__________
.'() eUBOPtl
SJS. Pont Audemer..................................December 28
3.S. Rouen ....................v................... January 10
To COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PERU CHILE:
SB. Bayeux........................................December it
S3. Dieppe ....................................... December 2
O CENTRAL AMERICA A WEST COAST t.I.A
M.S. Wyoming .................................. December 25
'HUM NEW YORK TO PLYMOUTH LA HAVRE
He De Prance........................ December M A Jinmry 1?
rASSENCKR SERVICE from CARTAGENA te EUROPE: ,
* Colorable .,.................................. <------ January
CftoWbal: rRKNCH LINE, P.O. Mes Ml Tel. J-247* 111
Panama! UNDO T MADURO. S A Bes IK
Tel Panun* 3-1*83 J-1M1
Shipping & AirLine News
Captain Denies More
Stowaway* Aboard
NEW YORK, Dec. 24 (UP)
The captain ol a British "myste-
ry ship" from which Federal A-
gents removed a
to make a "full investigation. "
He said he might make a state-
ment later.
Three plane loads of "miracle"
. small quanti- drugs are being flown by Pan
ty" of morphine and three of 14 American World Airways from the"lesAt"obJe"ct"ionabieof the v-
alleged stowaways said today .Miami to Panama in what is be- Tloug hoaK ruleg m reurn for
Canasta players? Or should I
Join a bridge club and save a dis-
position that is rapidly going to
the dogs?"
This is a very difficult problem.
There are official rules for Can-
asta, but people are entitled to
make up their own rules if they
wish to do so. House rules don't
have to be good, logical or wise.
They Just have to please the
players.
When the players can't agree
on which rules to follow, you have
a problem In human relations
rather than a problem in card
games. I would suggest a certain
amount of horse trading. Accept
Flying Corporals
Envy Of Others
At 65th AAA Group
craft guns which are silently fol-
lowing the target plane across the
sky.
The planes. L-5's and I.-19's.
are flown by personnel of the 2nd
Light Aviation Section stationed
at Fort Kobbe.
that -a cook's statement that he
feared for his life was "all non-
sense."
OFFICE MACHINES REPAIRED
We repair all makes of typewriters and
adding machines.
V
OYHJWTMWS.IItC
Ave. Tivoli No. 16 Tel. 2-2010
lleved to be the biggest Interna-
tional air shipment of Its kind
on record.
The shipment consists of 41,000
"It's piffle," said Capt. Henry pounds of anti-biotlcsterramy-
Purvis of the freighter Canford icin, penicillin and dihydrostrep-
which docked here yesterday af-|tomycln.
Sec^th^c8cikragmCes^hmtgsn" Shipper is the Charle, Pflser
Purvis denied there were 11 Company of New York, which Is
stowawavs still aboard the ship, sending the drugs to Its new Lain
He satTthere"were only three American branch, Laboratorios
"Whit'slid unusual about Pfizer, recently established In the
stow?ways?^he askeT foreign trade zone at colon. Pan-
When the Canford docked at!
Charleston last week, federal a-
gents said they took the mor-
phine off the ship, along with the
three stowaways. Purvis denied
there were any narcotics aboard.
The ship's agents were required
to post a $2,000 bond for the
three stowaways before the Can-
ford was permitted to leave. Au-
thorities saltl there were a total
of 14 stowaways, who boarded
the ship in Guatemala.
Purvis said he talked this
mvmlng to the ship's cook. Alex
Harris, and that Harris denied
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
I've just received a plaintive
letter from a Midwestern reader.
"What is your opinion," he asks,
he told authorities in Charleston "0f people who insist on loading
scrapping the worst of them. Or,
perhaps, play one game of offi-
cial Canasta In excehange for
one game of hot-rod Canasta.
Another solution is to try Sam-
ba. People don't seem to invent
as many rules for Samba as they
do for Canasta.
If you do decide to Join a bridge
club, maybe you can find three
kindred souls who would like to
play some honest-to-goodness
Canasta once in a while. It may
be the best way to save your
sanity and your disposition.
1951 1952
"MERRY XMAS"
and
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
To our Friends & Clients
AGENCIAS CENTRALES
Beauty Shop "A B C"
Coln A Panam
that he expected to have his
throat cut on the voyage to New
.York.
The cook has quit, however, and
is returning to his home at Sid-
ney. Cape Breton. Canada, Purvis
said. The Canford will have a
new cook when it leaves next
i week for Port Au Prince, Haiti,
the Captain said.
Purvis would not comment on
reports that an unidentified
! crewman tried to commit suicide
by slashing his thoat. He would
'not say anything, either, about
I other crew members who said
| last night that they were anx-
ious to "sign off."
"We'd rather be paid up now
i and then over and out (quit),"
>one of the men said.
the game with house rules?
"Rhubarb number one is on,
playing for the hand and not fon
the game. They keep a regular
game score but also have a sep-
arate side bet on each hand.
This style of play puts all the
emphasis on winning the hand,
and it spoils your concentration
on what is best for the game
score of 5000 points.
"Rhubarb number two deals
with this nonsense of making two
canastas before you are allowed
to meld out Heaven help you if
the opponents get control of the
discard pile. You never get two
canastas and the opponents have
a field day.
"This Is the same gang that
won't allow me to put a deuce on
The crew complained about the a completed natural canasta
i food, lack of recreational facili-lwhen a play like that will enable
ties and "too severe" discipline!me to start the next hand with a
I by the captain. meld of 90 points instead of 120
Purvis said he was disgusted points,
"with this botherment." "Should I exercise patience
A. W. ivers. agent here for the and keep trying to convert this
ship, went aboard this morning'gang into honest-to-goodness
tot %JL>
Christsas
To Our Friends
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bide,) Balboa
Two Fort Clayton corporals are The target planes fly missions
the envy of the other artillery-1 "gularly as part of the training
men of the 65th Antiaircraft Ar-!f Group personnel and to test,
tlllery Group for the reason that the guns and antiaircraft elec-
they receive $50 more each pay- tronic equipment so essential to
day than other Army corporals, the defense of the Panama Ca-i
nal.
The two men. Corporals Wayne i
Keith and George Markham of|
Headquarters and Headquarters,
Battery, 03d Antiaircraft Artil-
lery Battalion, received the ex-
tra money as flight pay because! #/\
they are airborne radio operators
who ride in "tracking mission"
planes relaying orders from
ground control to the pilots of
the "friendly enemy" planes.
These two soldiers, trained In
the VSARCARIB School at Fort j:
Gullck, spend an average of six
hours in the air each month in
the uncomfortable position of be-
ing on the cross hairs of manyi
of the 65th Group giant antlair-
Horst mm* is tke kind o jock
M lock. MU
NOW. 'EAR THISKatherino
Hartman of Butler, Fa., a re-!
ceptionist in the Washington of-
flee of Sen. James Duff (R., Pa.),|
likes "Ike." She likes him so
much that she had earring* mad*
of her "Ike-for-Prerident" but-
tons. Her boss is one of the lead-
ing boosters of the draft-Eiseo-
bower movement.
t\OIiID?IY
(/ Vtay this Holiday Season
hring you much harness, health, and good fortune*
THE NATIONAL CITY BANK

OF NEW YORK
First in World Wide Banking
ISTHMIAN BRANCHES
BALBOA PANAMA CRISTOBAL
iswr
it'
a ..
|as/i (

i

-

ft i -




.
1
*.

Of'.;
1

a
,
SEASON'S GREETINGS










'&*&'

ay the [Peace of Christmas surround you
e (foyousness of Christmas inspire you
e Spirit of Christmas abide with you always!


.




We thank you warmly for your cooperation

d wish uou all a
an

you
very

e%
appy
Christmas Jxnd flew L/ear!

'


,
'

NATIONAL LOTTERY of BENEFICENCE



aflatt


'

W"" "".un
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
antic
tu
Sc
ocie
U

nu mu Jh yu
I&I 195, (jatttn DJipLoiu (Jalu* 378
cote, held a party for their par-'
ents Friday at the School.
The nursery who decorated
with the manger scene and had ,
a throne for Santa Claus, who'
visited the group at this time.
Christmas Carols were sung by
for May be Viewed by AllMtlc Siders |hejA'ldren and they gave.their
A contest for the best ChrUt-l Rarfns a/lft of an Sprint of
BETA SIGMA PHI HAS CHRISTMAS SUPPER PARTY
The Beta Chapter of Beta Si(ma Phi Sorority met Fri-
day evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold S. Hudtins
in Gatun for a supper party and social, evening, to which
the husbands and friends of the members were invited.
Games were played and there Decorations at Coco Solo
were grab bags of presents
the men and ladies.
The members and their guests mas decorations has been on at,"1"' '',:;?.',,, ,,___.
present were: Mr and Mrs Con- Coco Solo Naval Station, between I .* g* g.gggg.*****&
fad Maner Mr. and Mrs. W. H the different departments. Friday a11 of the fathers were present.
Huffman. Mr. and Mrs. David evening. Colonel Robert F. Alex-|rh P.....H1. h. n.,
cofcv, Mr and Mr;. Charles ander and Captain Walter D Christmas Fest Hie, |n Gatun
Judge. Mr. and Mrs. Max Welch. Beaver, both of Fort Sherman.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Berger. Mr. served as Judges of the exhibits.
nnd Mrs. Howard Henning. Miss The Supply Department won
Ann Wichner. Miss Carolyn first prize, Fasron 105 was second
Rockwell. Mr. and Mrs Hugh and the Security Department
Malonev and Mr. Thomas Rey- placed third.
nolds Price. Honorable mention went to the
------- Ordnance. Medical and Dental
Anniversary Eff-NOfg Party and Transportation Sections.
Lt. and'Mrs. G L Wallace The award was a cut-out of a
celebrated their fifth wedding Christmas tree, bearing a bronze
anniversary with an egg-nogg,plaque, which is to be awarded
party at their quarters on the'annually,
coco Solo Naval Station yester-1 These exhibits may be viewed
day afternoon by Civilian residents of the At-
Friends called lo extend their lantic Side Monday and Tuesday
congratulations from 3:00 to 6:00 evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
p.m. |The station will be open to guests
Mr and Mrs Harris I*' "" "!____ the Gatun Clubhouse Wednesday, Explorer's Club Christmas Party
Leave for Tennessee Mr. and Mrs. Kaplan December 26 at 6:30 p.m. There Explorer's Post No 6, of New
Mi and Mrs Howard Harris Return to Isthmus wU1 be community singing fol- Cristobal held a Christmas Par-
Of Gatun. left bv plane during the Mr. and Mrs. David Kaplan lowed by the singing of The ty on December 22 at 7:00 p.m.
weekend lo spend the holidays returned Monday to the Isthmus Gr.ee"1G,ra,ss of Wyomin|L1, w at the 8cout Shjfck.
With their son and daughter-in- from New York. Thev are occu- ^Christmas dance will be An evening of dancing, follow-
La Boca Glee Club
To Sing Carols Over
Station HOG Tonight
The 35-volce La Boca Junior
High School Olee Olub will be
heard in a program of Christ-1
mas carols over station HOG
tonight from 10 to 10:30 p.m
The group, directed by Mau-
rice H. Heywood. will sing a
number of French. German and
British carols. Hugh Adams,
brilliant boy pianist, will ac-
company the singers.
MONDAY, DECEMBER U, an
LITTLE LIZ
We Represent ALL Airlines
80 LET 6 ARRANGE YOUR NEXT TRIP
BY THE MOST DIRECT ROUTE.
It's just barely possible that
Hi* reason some wives art nogs is
.because they art married ro
mules. e*u
EL *********
listen
*>S "L" St.
DeLeueps Park
V
Ttl.
2.2S0*
by friends from Mr. John Mont-
The Gatun Civic Council with gomery. who was formerly ctn-
Mrs. Robert Thomas as chair- ployed in the Inspector's Bureau
I man. entertained the children of residing at Margarita and Is now
the town with a party at the a student at the University of
playshed Saturday evening. San- Washington, at Klrkland Wash-
ta had a toy for each child In his ington.
sack tagged for each individual. Of interest to friends Is the fact
Light refreshments were served that "Nana," Mrs. Montgomery
and "a short program was pre-Is at present visiting her family
sented. tn Israel. They took refuge In
-------- that country from Communist
Three prize? will be awarded china in 1949. Mrs. Montgomery
for the best decorations on the lis having her first visit In many
grounds or exteriors of the resl- years with her mother, who Is
dences in Gatun. The Judging very ill.
will take place at 7:30 p.m. Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery are
Christmas night. residing at Box 301, Route 4
The prizes will be awarded at Kirkland, Wash.
a movie for the town residents at
CENTRAL THEATRE
PRESENTS
THURSDAY Weekend Release
TUESDAY DECEMBER 25th
SPECIAL PRE RELEASE
A Christmas dance will
law. Mr. .-tl Mrs Robert Harris Dying quarters 327-C at Coco So- E*M at the_Gatun Playshed on ed by refreshments, was enjoyed
of Nashville, Tenn.
lo.
Thursday. December 27 for the by the Explorers and their guests.
Junior and Senior High School SfeJBSBJM|tSt> I .-
I.A.W.C. Carries Duplicate Games students of the town and their The Eroup WM chaperoned by
Christmas to Pina Children The weeklv duplicate bridge dates i the Post Advisor and Mrs. R. E.
Mrs. L. L. Koepke. president games were held last Monday at! Music win be rurnishedI by an nox nnd the assistant advisor,
of the Colon Unit of the Inter- the Margarita Clubhouse. They Army band and.lhere will be light Mr. John Vaucher.
American Woman's Club accom- will be discontinued until janu- rerresn'nentsserved. --------
panied bv Mrs. Julia Emiliani. arv 7, because of the holidays. Christmas Eve Services
Mrs. Adrian Lollar and Mrs Sid- The winners of last week's C.orporai Ai6rint Midnieht services will be held
ney Passallague made a trip to games were: North and South, >'siting Parents at the Atlantic Side Churches.
Pina Thursday atternoon with Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Cottrell; 2nd. CorporalBrian Albright arrived Gatun Union Church will hold
the gifts for the children of the Mrs. Garland Orr with Mr. John by plane Saturday to spend the a service at 11:00 p.m.
town which had been prepared Fahnestock; 3rd. Colonel H. A.,Christmas holidays withihis par- Cristobal Union Church's serv-
by the club members. Greene and Herbert Delgado. |ent Mr and Mrs. Arthur Al- jCe will start at 11:30 p.m. .
East and West. 1st, Sergeant bright of Gatun. The American Episcopal Church
The children with their school and Mrs Edward Dickinson: 2nd, Corporal Albright is stationed of Our Saviour will hold a festi-
teachers lined the main street of Mrs. Henry Hartwig and Mrs. at Camp Edwards. Mass. val choral communion at 11:00
the town to welcome the ladies. Harrv Green: 3rd, Mrs. Walter p.m.
The gifts were presented at anlskeistaitis and Mrs. James Scar- Announcement of Interest
informal ceremony i:i the school borough.
at which Mrs. Koepke was pre-'
eentrd a bouquet of flowers and Nursery School
coconut Juice was served. lE'.'tertaias Parents
The kindness of the ladies was I The thirty-eight children of the
returned with gifts of sugar cane Coco Solo Nursery School, under
and tropical fruits.
the direction of Mrs. L. J. Oil- *?. Bell is pastor of the Marga-
Rev. and Mrs. Henry L. Bell. Services will also be held at the
of Margarita, announce the birth;Episcopal church on Christmas
of their second child, a son. on|Dav with Holv Communion and
Thursday. December 20, at Gor- Meditation at 10:00 a.m.On Wed-
gas Hospital. Inesday. December 26, Holv Com-
The baby is to be a."Junior.",raunion will be celebrated at
rita Union Church.
A
ITS MOVIBTDIF
anana
Canal Clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
News of Mr. and Mrs.
Montgomery
A letter was recently received world.
8:30 a.m.
Also on Wednesday The Chil-
dren's Christmas Service will be
held at 6:30 p.m. with a pa-
geant "Christmas Around the
TWO ATTRACTIONS
Notorious
SHE Isarnsd a
lot of things
you never
find in
school
books!
Also
"GRAND PARADE"
from WALT DISNEY
BALBOA
Air-C>nH,i(onp'
1:11 H:29 H:3i
niABLO Hft.
1:11 X:M
Bing CROSBY e Jn WYMAN
"HERE COMES THE GROOM"
TweeeM TBANCI8 GO! S TOTHE HACES"
Richard BASEHART f V'e'enUn CORTESA
"House On Telegraph Hill"
Tuerfiy "HARP, FAST AND BgAUTPrUL"
f f\ C C\ I I Mai ZETTERLING e Robert BEATTY ..
iTis *" "GIRL IN THE PAINTING"


.....

...

> <*
Beginning of
a long-life
friendship....
r
In times like these the longer life of
Ford Products really payo off!
WHEN YOU BUY A FORD (car or truck),
Mercury, or Lincoln, you know you have
bought yourself many years of care-free driv-
ing. For it has always been the policy of the
Ford Motor Company to build more into their
cars than just style, safety, comfort, and per-
formance.This extra feature Which Ford stresses
so stronglyand which is doubly important
todayis longer yean of trouble-free life for all
Ford products.
And those people who own Ford products
know that Ford-planned dealer service keeps
these long years of trouble-free driving in their
cars. Because Ford Dealers know Ford products
so well, only they can give the fine service that
matches the quality of the vehicles they sell.
A I
Ford Automobiles and Trucks Mercury Lincoln
I
4
FOR
A BEWITCHING
SMILE
PEPSDENT
TOOTH PASTE
POR
CAPTIVATING
BEAUTY
mmm
- *-*>
.^__


MONDAY. DECEMBER 24, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE IKE

Top-Ranking Philippine Red
Is Bespectacled Physician
MANILA (U.P.) -, The top-
ranking communist rebel In the
Phllllpplnes now Is 34-year-old
bespectacled Dr. Jesus Lay*, ac-
cording to the army.
The reward ior his capture
dead or alive has been raised
trom 100,000 pesos ($50,000) to
130.000 pesos $85,000).
Luis Taruc. the moat colorful
symbol of the Huk rebellion. Is
now considered No. 2 Red leader
by the army and the prize of his
head remains at 100,000 pesos.
The army has not revealed the
reason that led It to consider La
v as the No. 1 man In the Huk-
bong Mapagpalaya ng Bayan
(People's Liberation Army) that
has been trying to overthrow the
government since 1945.
However, an army source
claimed that the brief "surrend-
er" of Taruc in 1948, when Pre-
sident Elpidio Quirino proclaim-
ed an amnesty for the rebels,
"had something to do" with La-
va's rise to the topmost rank in
the Huk hierachy.
Although Lava, a medical doc-
tor. Is one of the founders of the
Huk movement, he has consis-
tently remained In the back-
ground and Taruc undoubtedly
Is the best-known Huk leader.
A civilian source said It was
possible the army raised the prize
on Lava's head for psychological
reasons. This source said the ar-
my aparently hopea to stir Jeal-
ousies In the Huk high command
(Book <&n
| by acknowledging Lava, rather
: than Taruc, as the most Import-
ant dissident leader.
Lava was graduated from the
college of medicine of the Uni-
versity of the Philippines in 1936
He was an honor student, and
soon was among the promising
young practitioners in Manila.
His wife and children still Uve
in Manila, unmolested by the au-
thorities.
Lava had extremely radical
ideas even during his university
days, according to a former class-
mate. In Lava's opinion, the
'classmate said, "violence is un-
fortunate but unfortunately ne-
cessary" in securing Communist
ends.
\ The Japanese occupation I1941-
451 gave young Lava his chance
to follow his leftist leanings. He
'boned up" on Communist theory
and laid down the Darty line to
the recruits of the Huk army In
Central Luzon. The Huks started
out as an anti-Japanese army.
Whether or not Lava is the No.
l Red leader, there seems to be
no doubt that he is the top the-
oretician In the Philippine Com-
munist movement. ,
[' In 1946, after the liberation.
Lava was elected to congress
: from his district In Bularan pro-
1 vlnce as a candidate of the leftist
"Democratic Alliance." Taruc at
the same time was elected con-
gressman from' his district in
."ampanga, also as an "Alliance"
standard bearer.
By Caite* Prsta
The story of adventure at sea
is endless and a great part of it,
insofar as this country is con-
cerned, has been provided by the
American whaling vessel. Thar
9e Blows is a collection of sto-
ries of adventure, disaster, hero-
Ism, murder and mutiny aboard
whaler by Chester s Howland
(Wilfred Punk). Howland is a
New Bedford mam. the son of
a New Bedford sailing ship mas-
ter, and is well qualified for his
Job. His stories, some told-in the
first person by the participants.
Include the historic mutiny on
the whaler Junior off Australia,
100 years ago. and a story of the
only woman known to have ship-
ped on an American whaler as a
member of the crew...
Bop May Be 'Music On Brain/
Scientist Says Of Fanatics
Charles Dickens wrote his mas-
terpieces under considerable
pressure as serials Or for month-
ly publication. Hence there was
no time for careful revision and
editing that would have elimin-
ated the considerable padding
and digression that leisurely 19th
century readers didn't mind. In
these days of short-cuts and
speed-up. a streamlined Dickens
is welcome, provided nothing es-
sential Is left out. That Is what
I Mary Louise Aswell has accom-
: pllshert in The Dickens Digest, a
compression of David Copper-
: field. Oliver Twist. Martin Chuz-
i '.lewlt and the Pickwick Papers
into one volume (Gross'et A Dun-
lap). AH the- well-loved charact-
ers and scenes have been pre*-
served in Dicken's own magic
words but fewer of them...
CHRISTMAS MAT BRING SANTA CLAS, but It also brings
such eye-catching leg art lovlies as Coleen Miller, who plays
In RKO's "The Las Vegas Story," In which Jane Russell,
Victor Mature and Vincent Price are co-starred.
BOP MAY SET HOLD and be1
LONDON, Dec (UP) You
really can have bop music on the |
brain, a British scientist con-
tends.
Dr. Grey Walter, famous for his
research at the Burden Neurolo-
gical Institute, believes there Is
an "Interesting" connection be-
tween the minute brain waves of
bop fanatics and the music they;
rave.
In average hot music fans, the
connection Is quite loose. In those
Sople in which the rhythm of
e music synchronizes with the
rhythm of the brain, there may
be a physical effect such as an
overwhelming desire to move
their bodies in time to the mu-
sic.
Dr. Walter declined in an In-
terview to say whether the com-
pulsion of this rhythm might be
responsible for the widespread
smoking of reefers (marijuana)
In bop clubs in Britain. His re-
search has given rise to specula-
tion, however, that narcotics may
help the brain to pick up the
rhythm of the music with more
intensity.
Dr. Walter said he found that
closing the eyes changes the rhy-
thm rate of the brain and may
explain #hy jazz fanatics often
close their eyes as if in ecstasy as
they listen to the music.
"There Is an intriguing relation
between the rhythm of the mu-
sic, the rhythm of the dance or
the way bop fans move to it, and
the brain waves." said Dr. Wal-
ter, who was born In Kansas City,
Mo. f
"Does that mean?" he was ask-
ed, "that people whose brains
pulsate in time1 to classical music
say Beethoven and Mozart
are more Intelligent than those
who like bop?" -
"Not necessarily," said Dr. Wal-:
The Satuday Book (Macmll-
lan) Is an annual delight, a
splendidly edited, printed and il-
lustrated miscellany of fiction,
reminiscence, pictures and artl-
cies on unusual subjects. It is one
of those rare miscellanies which
may be dipped into at random
with confidence that anything in
it may be read with pleasure.
i
tor, who handles the Idiom of
Dopular music like an authority.
"You can be hep and smart or
hep and stupid. I think a better
indication of intelligence from:
love of music would be the range
of taste. Intelligent people pro-!
bably like god bop as they like
good music of all kinds.
"They don't swoon over Stan
Kenton any more than they,
swoon over Vivaldi or Scarlatti."
Dr. Walter is noted for his stu-1
dy of brain waves- and his con-;
structlon Of two robot tortoises
which travel around his house,,
avoiding objects and backing up
to the electric light socket to re-
plenish themselves with power i
when their batteries run down.
ft MW-
While II of u, eotch ur
breath after very busy
Christmas Sestee, lev tit
eareael this ene sincere
theuahr heve e huge,
happy Holiday, won't you?
.
AUTOS 0MPHR0Y, S. A.
Phoee 2-0810 -. Panam
Ave. Justo Arosemena k 26 East St,
SINGER SEWING MACHINE COMPANY

97 Central Ave. Tel. 2-1565 Panam 7085 Bolvar Ave. Tel 148 Coln
*
.

Jrleasan Cmsom. to oeW


You moy "be sure we extend our Greetings of
the Christmas Season in all sincerity. We
thoroughly enjoy this occasion of renewing
friendly associations
Our thanks for your, patronage during the
post year. Moy the New Year bring fulfillment
of your every desire, os well as Health, Happi-
ness and Prosperity




'







w,

ITH candles gleanif everywhere
we know it's time to send a
M
*% A 'v
Brewery, Inc.
appy
(greeting

of Merry Christmas Cheer
... AND
Here's our Very Best Wishes
for the
flew LJeai




-


UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
COLOMBIA ir COSTA RICA CUBA REPBLICA DOMINICANA ECUADOR EL SALVADOR
GUATEMALA HONDURAS JAMAICA. B.W.I. NICARAGUA .* PANAMA PANAMA CANAL ZONE

^-~


tnew
THE PANAMA AMERICAN A* INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

Santa Claus To 11,000,000
Does It Through Xmas Clubs
NEW YORK. Dec (UPi Ed-
ward Dorset hardly looks the
^Santa Claus type. He's too tall
and rangy. He doesn't wear a
whoa husband became ill and the
couple had to move to the warm,
dry climate of the southwest.
They didn't have enough capital
beard. He Isn't plump In the to start a dIr business but the
right places. club money was enough to un-
Yet In a way. Dorset Is Santa Iderwrlte a small project sta-
Claus to nearly 11,000.000 people, tlonery with desert scenes palnt-
Because of him and the organl- ed at the top. and for sale to
atlon he heads. It will be a much tourists.
merrier Christmas, financially Dorset said one widow, living
speiklng. on the east coast, used club mo-
Dorset, from Richmond. Va.. lsney to buy one fishing boat, and
president of Christmas Club, a now operates a fleet of vessels,
corporation responsible for the Club savings are used to fin-
system whereby vou can save a- anee babies, for donations to the
head for the holiday drain on church, to pay for new homes, or
your finances. to meet income tax payments.
Maybe you're a club member.
If so, through your bank each
week for the last year, you've
been setting aside a dollar, two.
.or even $5 for your Christmas
fund. Between now and Dec. 25,
the bank will be sending you a
check for the total saved.
RUTH MILLETT Says
Started In 1910
- The idea of putting money a-
side for the one big day of giving
After the guests arrive he Is a
charming host. But any wife will
tell you that a man feels abso-
lutely no responsibility for a par-
ty before the guests arrive.
Half an hour before the first
guest arrives, you will find the
was started in 1910 m Carlisle ^ h d one Qf;
Pa by Herbert. F. Rawll. then a lh followln thlngs:
salesman.
As Dorset tells it, Rawl! walked Taking a quick nap to get In
! Into a bank one day to find the shape for the evening. That
banker poring over a confusion means he probably won't be at
of papers. The banker explained the door to greet the first guests
It was a group of small deposita I and that Mama will only make it
by customers saving just for by the skin of her teeth. That's
' Christmas. because, of course, she has to re-
Rawll looked at the banker's;make the bed In the room she'
messy desk and decided he could i had foolishly figured was all
work out a.less confused system ready for company.
of handling small deposits. So the Racing across town to buy the
.club was born. Now the corpora- wine he was reminded only three ;
.tion supplies the materials and]times to buy on his way home j
^ promotion needed to start and (from the office,
operate clubs in local banks, and | Ripping through the book-1
also has a sales force touring the .shelves to find a book he's prom-
NEW YORK (UJ.) John I.
H. Baur's "Revolution and Tra-
dition In Modern American Art"
Is a successful attempt to "de-
fine and trace the development
of the chiei movements in our
painting and sculpture during
the last fifty years." The author,
I who Is curator of painting and
sculpture at the Brooklyn Mu-
seum, has avoided taking partis-
an positions, for he thinks we
are still too close to the artists
discussed. His book is an excellent
laymen's guide book through the
bewildering diversity of modern
American art. (Harvard Univer-
sity Press).
MERRY
CHRISTMAS
to all our
friends.
-a-
MONDAY, DECEMBER M, INT
"r
DOROTHY McGUIRE, screen mother to Jerrilyn Flannery
and Erik Neilsen in Samuel Ooldwyn'g "I Want You," goes
further In her duties than the script provides. The young-
sters were constant visitors to her dressing room where she
kept them enchanted with her Mother Goose recitations.
American Square Dance Is Rage
As Britain Apes Royal Example
nation to sell more banks on the
idea
This vear. Dorset said, pay-
ments total $952,000.000 distribu-
ted to 10.875 000 members. The
average per member is $87.50.
Used In Many Ways
ised to lend Joe or yanking ev-1 LONDON, Dec. 2 'UP>
The craze started officially
or
erythlng out of his closet to find i The American square dance is when Princess Elizabeth and
sweeping Britain today as jit-'the Duke of Edinburgh ducked
terbugging and the ^antics- of for an oyster in Ottawa In one
of their Canadian tour's gayest
something he hasn't worn
thought of wearing in a year.
Snitching canapes from the
perfectly arranged tray the wife
hoped would win oohs and ahs hall. trans-Atlantic cowboys in
Dorset said the unusual thingj from the feminine guests. ten-gallon hats, .boots and
about club savings was the way, Down at the corner getting the, frontier pants can be heard
the jazz age did before it.
In any Saturady night dance
evenings.
Photographs of Elizabeth in
a "peasant", skirt swinging on
Thomas B. Heps' "Abstract
Painting" Is' a storehouse of
partisan opinions. (Vicking).
The Paris school is declared
dead. A group of young New York
abstractionists is said to have
taken its place. America, on the
other hand, is presented as par-
ticularly hostile to Its artists.
The truth is that Paris is very
i much alive. So are Italy, Switzer-
land. England and South Africa.
Far from being hostile to mod-
ern art. New York pays the high-
est prices in the world for its
products. The exhibitions of the
artists sponsored by Hess are re-
viewed favorably by leading crit-
ics. Their pictures are reproduc-
ed in such leading magazines as
Life and Vogue.
Top dealers peddle their
paintings often for fabulous
. prices.
They are not yet recognized
abroad, where painters have to
suffer the inevitable comparison
with the giants of the Paris
school.
I The value of such a partisan
Ibook lies in its homeopathic in-
fluence. It provokes artists, crit-
ics and the enllghted public into
'rethinking the artistic problems
of our time.
Paul MocsanyL
HERCULES LUGGAGE MFG.
No. tt Art. Jos Feo. de la Osa*
(Next to Buiek Agency) Tel. S-Mt,
people used them.
It is not so much for Christmas
spending as for other things, he
said. Only 38 per cent goes for
hair-cut he has been needing for
a week.
Starting a rough house game
with the kids in the middle of
holiday gifts. Some of it is used, the living room,
for regular bills, some for educa-1 Telling the lady of the house
tion of the youngsters, and a big, he needs a business letter that is
chunk36 per cent goes back probably put away with all the
Into some form of savings. other things quickly shoved Into
Many a member has used the drawers to make the house look
avlngs to help start a business. Ispic and span. None of the ad-
Dorset heard of one
caUing thTsteps in a-wSSStiH ',*&?&
western drawl as Britons wear-1P cau*ht. the PU.bc fancy.
western drawl as Britons wear
Ing gingham and blue jeans
pound, stomp and twirl in dosi-
dos and allemand lefts.
Fiddlers saw out tunes such
as "Little Brown Jug" and 'The
Arkansas Traveler" to the
rhythm of clapping hands.
es ever tells
woman vice to would-be serene hostess-1 maintain her
woman how to
calm and poise
through this kind of last minute,
frantic search.
That's about as much help as
any wife gets from even the most
charming and affable of hosts.
A woman will work two days' to
get ready to be a hostess. A man
assumes the role at the split sec-
ond when the first guests ring
the door bell.
Promotor
alize.
were quick to caplt-
Now dance hall signs say:
"genu-ine American square
dancing ton I to! Yippee! Leave
your spurs and pistols to home."
Checked shirts and gingham
dresses have become as much
as a uniform as tuxedos used
to be for more stately dancing.
Men like the exercise which
square dancing entails said the
girls point out there are no
wallflowers on such occasions,
in contrast to the usual wom-
an-heavy British social func-
tion.
Like .most trans-Atlantic Im-
ports, square dancing It -not!
being swallowed whole by ev-
eryone, however.
Scottish opinion claims that
the square dance is only a cor-
ruption of ancient Scottish
dances which are till going
strong.
The Scots claim there Is lit-
tle In square dancing that is
not found in their traditional
reels and quadrillesthe direct
ancestors of the square dance.
In Scotland, they don't need
anyone to call for them. They
know all the steps already.
The square dance is here to
stayfor a while, anyway.
Institutions in close touch With public lift, that
lowly grow to greatness through the years,
acquire definite individualities. They become so
much a part of the daily life about them that
their corporate lives are frequently personified
and endowed with human traite. .Vary often,
they themselves, rather than the men and wo-
man who may be guiding them for the mo-
ment, are praised or oenaured at individuals.
In the thoughts of their friends they are very
real, very helpful citizens # their communities
and of the world.
That is how, we
bank. To us it
proper that the
75th anniversary
her* of the staff
Merry Chrtsfcna*
of the Chase feel about our
seems altogether fitting and
Chase National Bank, in its
year, should speak for mem
in wishing friends like you a
a Happy New Year.
v
The Chase National Bank
of the City of New York
PANAMA -COLON DAVID BALBOA CRISTOBAL


Or TO ALL
At the carols of Christmas seasons
rim out the Joyous Tidies,
*e bring you
r good wishes
for e kmppy ChrUtmts Season,
THE SAVINGS BANK
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
109 Central Are. at
corner of "I" Street.
G. R. De ROUX
Manager
COLON BRANCH:
Front St. at corner
of 7th St.
CARLOS MOUYNES V.
Sab-Manager.
HOLES
From gee mm. te 12:3* p.m.
SATURDAYS: from S:M a.m. te 12:** p.m.
1 .
1,11 I I I
! .. ; u ,i\


mmmmsmmmmsmmmtmrnt
' ?':
.u


.

i&tntvtt6
We want to publicly thank tile hun-
dreds of employes- of the Post Of-
fices and Freight Stations for' their
splendid cooperation in the distribu-
tion of the merchandise shipped by
Sears, Roebuck and Company.
We hope, that each and every one of
them together with their families will
enjoy very Merry Yuletide Holidays.
CMtKTMAS i. ~ ,# tfc-e *,
eceeeiesw #hea ear ritetJftJrfs rent
free* Hie mete material tfceeas ef life
te Mm aeMer, meee fceaesiiel mm
. te ear fceved ease end frisad* .

THf SfNtfT ef Christ** I* temel
d a? i. flretffyisM te lusew mot we
cea find peece end i
erring the birth ef
. /

rstsetmst te ah- j
the Ktoe ef KismsJ
Geo f. Novel, |nc
No. 279 Central Avenue
Tel. 34)140
MPMIlHImTtVH POR
O-
*^*^**m^mT^aT^r mW^^W'W %Ve
. ITMSkfc.'.
*mea,liieSH Ilia




MONT,Y, TPCPMBint l5t
---------*
TOT PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPffgNDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
Sports Shorties
By UNITED PRESS
BOWI. TENNIS
The top-seeded stars are get-
ting ready for action in the Or-
ange and Sugar Bowl Tennis
Tourneys.
Tim Coas o Washington is rat-}
ed beat in the Orange Bowl jun-,
lor championships which open
Wednesday. In the Junior girls
division, the honor spot goes to
Toby Oreenburg of Chicago.
And in the Sugar Bowl Tour-
ney, Qardnar Mulloy of Coral
Gables, Florida, is the top-seed-
ed star. Mulloy is the eighth-
ranked singles player In the
United States.
BOWLS ,
Most of the football bowl
squads are home for the holi-
days. But Its practice as usual
for the University of Miami.
Coach Andy OusUfson has
scheduled a long scrimmage for
! his Golden Hurricane this morn-
jing. Miami is getting ready for
I Clemson in the Gator Bowl.
And In California, Coach Jess
'Neely has scheduled a wo"5"1
today for his Shrine Bowl West-
ern squad. Fullback Ollle Mat-
son of San Francisco nd half-
back Johnny Bright of Drake
were outstanding during a long
Western scrimmage yesterday
Coach Chuck Taylor will dis-
miss his Stanford squad until
after Christmas.
The Indians then will move to
Southern California to resume
33rd Infantry Baseball
FORT KOBBE, C.Z.With the anees determining the starting
regular season only two weeks, squad.
away and practice games airea- At first base Captain George
dy being played, the 33rd Infant-! Whlthey, and Private First Class
ry baseball team Is beginning to Miguel Ruiz-Hernndes, both
look like a solid contender for' lefthanded hitters, art about
! the top spot In the Inter-Service equal. Private Leonard Nowickl
i Loop i Is the under-study to Torra at
Strength In the pitching de- second while Private First Claa*
partment and depth In reserve Jos* Gautler-Boyer at third and
make the squad a great Improve-1 Private Glenn Trhlln at short-
ment over last year's team. stop, are furnishing good ra
The team manager. Chief War- serve strength for the Infield.
I rant Officer James H. Crowder' Of six outfielder, Lieut. An-
ean count on at least four start- drew Balrd, Private First CUM
ing pitchers, with two others Sergio Rivera-Martinez and Prl
working In relief. In the field vate First Class Alex Renfr,o,
only three players can count on have a slight edge toward a
being on the starting team In' starting berth due to fine show-
the opening game. All other posl- lngs In pre-seaaon game*. Pitch-
tlons are still hotly contested by er Lpez, a power hitter, will M
two or more men. I sure to be in the outfield when
Labeled as the standout pitch- he Is not pitching. Three other
er on the strength of past per-> gardeners who are still very
formances, Is Private First Class much In contention are Corporal
Carlos Lpez-Torres, a lefthand- Gordon Dabrasky. Private First
er. Lpez, who was Just recentlyj Class Alfaro Cedefto-Coln (also
15 drafted, 1 the property of the a pitcher, and 8ergeant Flrt
R9, Detroit Tigers and pitched last] Class Maurice Belisle.
i ^ lyear wtih Gadsen, Alabama In,
.- wrDF ftNLV KANSA&Dr. Phog Allen expresses the Joy that would be his if the mir- the Class "B" Alabama-Georgia Private First_ClassJorge Toro-
,F SAS*f Clvde LoVellette roulSbecome a member of his Kansas squad. The six-foot eight-and- League. Private Manuel Mrquez,
rored image of Clyde LoveuencJ*"" ^ int_ (NEA) righthander, is another man
)f Clyde Lovelletie coma oecome a raemwi v -M-.. ------
a-haif inch Jayhawk sets a record every time he core a point. (NBA)
HEAD WORKA mud-smeared Arsenal player, left,. use his; practice'forlhe'Rose Bowl and
head to repel an equally heady offensive thrust by a Manchester fiHnnM
United rival in a British soccer match at London. Manchester, Halfback Bill Rogers of Fres-
uptet Arsenal, 3-1. (NBA)

Brazilian Referee Called Them
All Right18 Fouls Against Utah
By BARRY GRAESON
NEA Sport Editor
' MEXICO' CITY, Dec. 24 (NBA) I la, Veracrua, and Hidalgo, has
Puerto Rlcan baseball bug; stops scheduled In another 15 cl-
make the Brooklyn faithful look; ties before returning to the Unlt-
and sound like a calm and ln-ied 8tates the latter part of Jan-
troverted breed. uary. He takes the show on the
You should see the Venezuelan road, hauls a three-man staff to
at the horse and bicycle races, | remote villages to lecture and
" ball park, soccer or track and demonstrate.
. field.
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
The Standings
TEAMS Won Lot Pet
Bombers........5 .71*
, Yankees........ ]
Stanford's oppositionIllinois Bluebirds.......4 ?*}
got busman's holiday yester- Brownie.......1 -lu
The llllni squad watched
UIIUIO,
Halfback Bill Rogers of Fres-
no was a standout during Stan-
ford brlela yesterday.
d-utui^id rutis ruoir UUUO tlUlgC IWIU*
_.l Mrquez, Prez and Private Hctor Crea-
a righthander, Is another man po-Nleves will probably share
who Is sure to start on the the catching chores. Crespo
mound for the "Infantrymen." caught a fine game against Al-
Corporal Max Carpenter, who brook last week,
pitched last year and Private Sergeant First Class Joseph
First Class Jerry Shepard fill the Hardy is the official scorer for
other starting berths. Both are the team. Lt. Baird is the assls-
righthanders and have looked tant manager, and 8FC Belisl
good so far in practice. is the coach.
The three fielders who are sure Manager Crowder has had
of starting assignments are all quite a lot of experience in base-
in fielders. They are Lieut. Rees ball both as ajSayer (21st Divi-
Jones, shortstop; Corporal Artu- slon team in '26 and "30 and pro
ro Vega-Rlvlera, third base; and ball In 1935Mn North Carolina),
Corporal Jos Torres-Melndez and as an umpire (In the North-
at second base. Torres was the ern State League) In Michigan.
, shortstop on last year's team. Two pre-season games are
This afternoon the Cervecera i nal Zone had Its first taste of Lieut. Jones did not play last scheduled for the 26th and 27th
Bluebirds are scheduled to meet:pro baseball this season as the year but was the regular short- of December. The first is w4th
the 8pur Cola Brownies In the Carta Vieja Yankees handed the stop m 1Mfl ,the 504th FA Battalion and the
Coln Stadium opener. The game Spur Cola Brownies their eighth: .i of jhe 0ther positions are1 second against Amador. Both are
Colon Baseball Opener Slated
Todays Yanks Blank Urowns
______ mm ... r. *-.< naaiitf .! *t-,. O n*ln ***, am thai fill
LAST NIGHTS RESULT
(Balboa Stadium).
Yankees 5, Brownie 9.
of the Sodamen on the pitch-
er's mound.
Last night, with Panama Ca-
nal Zone Governor and Mrs. F.
K. Newcomer on hand, the Ca
??"Dm tiram^racta oTon-l TODAY'S GAME Coln "Stadium opener. The game Spur Cola Brownies i eir eignin AU of the other posltions are! second against
\WSS5S Mineles /coln SUdium-4 P.m.) to slated to get under way at 4,straight defeat of the season 5-0 twn rtPffD wlth future perform- ~*h,.im M K-
California soil Baturday.
. John Lawther, teaching bas-
' ketball In Mexico, tells you that
players, coaches and spectators
are undisciplined, become so ex-
cited they cannot control them-
selves.
But Vadal Peterson says the
- JWrswaaaKS re-;L<* 'si
Most surprising to Lawther
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Most of the top-ranking col-
lege basketball teams have held
their ratingsbut some had close
calls Saturday night.
Washington squeezed P* *
stubborn Minnesota team 55-51.
Indiana got past Kansas State
80-75 in an overtime, and Kan-
Minor League Owner Threatens
To Take Baseball Draft To Court
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sport Editor
sas won Its seventh straight oyer pgj.
Southern Cal 76-55. In other top .^j
games, St. Louis University, p
--.downed Army 85-50 and t. th j selective draft 411s,
was women not Infrequently per- Johns Deat Vanderbllt 69-54.
forming as well as the men. This; ______
PORTSMOUTH, Va., Dec. 84 the better ones away for a com-
1 If the major league paratlve pittance."
suspect that they have
they're nuts.
"They shoot better and han-
dle the ball more skillfully, but,
or as strong as the men of the
top level," he explains.
Mexican basketball, largely
ispeaklng, Is still in the primitive
stage. Court in many cities and
towns are few, frequently have
either roof nor wooden floor.
Only early risers see some
teams work. Suoh Is the interest
that teams practice before 6 a.m.
because that Is the only time
Innocence personified comparea
to the Brazilians.
Peterson's Utah varsity played
10 pre-season games in the land
with all the coffee a couple of
years ago, saw really Inflamma-
ble customers. /
"They're the nicest, most hos-
pitable people you ever sawbe-
b^^aV CoacWte: 2 Tin acc to*? *S
BASEBALL NOT ONLY A
MONOPOLY4T'S A
MONARCHY
Lawrence doesn't mean to
forming as well as the men. This.______ ^ Ji~.T 01wh the Pacific
the professor attributes to their! DALLAS-Llttle Ben Hogan has The gg^ved the Pacific
heavy work making them big and ^ naned to the Texas MgclffiA under which,
atIong- Hair of Fame. The Fort W P Francisc0'g Paul Fagan and condemn all major league clubs, to get Kropf
golfer Is the secondITexas figure, san k ball plav- "A majority of them are OK."| oville alt
ter fielding support and more
opportune hitting behind him,
bested southpaw Vlbert Clark.
Neville was touched for ten hits
but kept them well scattered and
got brilliant defensive help. .
The Yankees tied the Panam
League's doubleplay record for a
single team in one game by turn-
ing in four twin killings.
The Brownies registered the
season's first triple play in the
seventh Inning.
The play came when, with For-
rest Jacobs on second and John-
ny Kropf on first, Dale Lynch
lined to Humbert Arthurs at
third. Arthurs relayed to second
to nip Jacobs and second base-
man Hall threw to first in time
n
figure. -
tiogari is a iu-^ ,S1SEiT
of the National Open golf title.
. aided his own cause
ne explains, "but among them with a two-run homer in the
i men consent. to a vicious minority, composed, sixth Inning. Ziggy Jazlnskt was;
i But In at least one thumping of five or six, with power enough | the leading hitter with three for
The award was voted by the minority viewpoint, Frank D. created through ownership and;four.
Texal Sportswrlters Association. LaWrence. continues to demand i working agreements-by lnflu-
Hannfa a three-time winner th repeai 0f the draft rule In ence, persuasion and, yes, intl-
~----------,. mu "grety Lawrence, a banker,mldatlonto accomplish any-
here for 27 years has made a thing they want."
hobby of the ownership of feel Lawrence says that baseball Is
Sports Briefs
By UNITED PRESS
Portsmouth club of the Class^
Piedmont League.
Lawrence's talk in executive
session at the meeting of
rds, recaiis i^uncn *..-. -- sessiuii v... -------j. --
work
earlv game played hard by Sao ^P-^ecaaM^ J: ^id^n^ ruhgfi Black,
We were a few points ahead all athletic work has to be done favor b' '
"We were a. lew puuius tmeau **v***>v- "*^ ***" *** ***; <
at the half." explains the square- in the evenings. The clinic. at
rigged Peterson, "when I took Acaputoo^began at 6, ran u
my boys to the dressing room. I
heard a lot of noise outaWe.
GOVERNMENTS CONTRIBUTE
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Peterson's assistant and the
Redskins' publicity man came
running down the passage way,
hit the door simultaneously. ,
"They're beating up the ref-
erees!'' they shouted.
"Who is?'' asked Peterson.
"The crowd!" came the pant-
leterson went outside. A big
fat official just stood there, did-
nt say a thing. But the other
referee, a little fellow, wobbled
up to Peterson, and In a squeaky
'""Mr.^Pete. they beat hell out
of me, but I no quit.
"I call them."
He did. He called 18 fouls in
the second halfall against
South and Central American
overnmnt agencies contribute
Lnancial assistance to the deve-
lopment and expansion of ath-
letics by furnishing transporta-
tion to visiting teams, inviting
coaches for clinics and consulta-
tion. \'
Lawther, who coaches at Penn-
Slvanla State college for year,
t months ago accepted an in-
vitation to teach Mexicans has-1
ketball. with emphasis on the
youth of the land.'
MEXICAN WOMEN PERFORM
AS WELL A8 THE MEN
Lawther hit the large popula-
tion centersMexico City, Pub-
after 10:30. Many states in the
Commission.
rence unc Mv.- *
ject with the new president or nlng,
the National League.
"The way a vicious minority oi
big league clubs has acted in the
past, and the way they are still
not only a monopoly of the worst
kind, but a monarchy, with the
vicious and powerful major,
league minority as ruthless as
any dictator you might name.
After making his blazing
speech in Columbus, Frank D.
Lawrence turn d right around
and drafted eight players a
record.
If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.
Besides, it's the only game run-
Jit eJmityUfttms
I ami a toppij 7W- \\&tii
YOUR RELIABLE JEWELEI
TAHITI
Bankruptcy is the process by
which a man ours his money in
his hip pocket and lets the credi-
tors roke his coat. **
T H I J
1*7 n
W
I R Y
ral
iron
cAvt. .VT
7*&Srrf-\**mXb4**&-^^
Fullback OlMe Mataon of San
southern section have only out- Francisco UiBveraity has woniactmRi shows me conclusively
door courts, and the daytime the "Pop" Warner award -onei or that there will be no relief un^
beat is almost unbearable. | the top football honors on tne less Washington intervenes, he
A ball going out-of-bounds at Pacific Coast. Matspn was nam-
Taxco more often than not costs ed as the Most Valuable senior
$18, which to what its worth. Player on the Coast in voting by
The only court is on th side f a, 400 sports writers and broad-
mountain, the ball Is lost In the casters.
barranca hundreds of feet below. _.
Kids lurk in the bushes and glee-! Mrs. Ogden Phippsowner of
fully make off with the casaba the steeplechase champion Oed- L.^ ardella who won a de-
much as youngsters do with ipus-was the top winner among uarmy u ^ m-
baseballs fouled out of American steeplechase owners in 1951 ^lon0"1 '".t -et relief other-
parks. Oedipus provided most of the tie teuows can1 gey
Basketball-all sporU for that earnings with victories to:w**\^j^lffi
matter-have morV bounce in Broad Hollow, the Brook and^the the case to.the^Pdera ^r tstM
South and Central America than'O r a n d National Steeplechase
the Mexican jumping bean. Handicaps.
RESERVE CLAUSE NOT
NEARLY AS UNFAIR AS
DRAFT
Lawrence doesn't want to ape
*
Pirates Give
Army Nucleus
Of Good Club
PITTSBURGH, Dec. 24 (NEA)
The Pirates already have giv-
en, and are about to give, the
nucleus of a pretty fair baseball
club to the Army.
pitchers Bill Macdonald and
Vernon Law and Shortstop Dan-
ny O'Connell are in uniform
Outfielder Frank Thomas Is a-
waitlng call. There will be plen-
ty more from th recruits now
on the roster. i.
The Buccaneers could be roughl(
cu" omers in 1952 with Macdon- .
ajd. Law. O'Connell and Thomas I
c/o
M' Gur
c/nenas
AND
e
ustomers
A/era I tierra Jit
erra
,mas
AND
Prosperous
Tlesv year
191*19 '*- mm* OAKtIH &T9IIT TU. 9-9191
tin i toiBt.iif trun i .imt i tin' intuit m. mi
in Washington will be glad to
hear from some of us who haven t
yet testified," he says.
"Too much was said In Wash-
ington about the reserve clause
(which chains an athlete to one;
club). The reserve clause Is not,
nearly as iniquitous as the draft
rule." I
, "I amreadv to go all the way,
Lawrence told the minor league
people In Columbus. "I have suf-
fered so have many of you.
"I believe we can not only get
relief in the future, but collect
damages on account of violation
iof the anti-trust laws by major
league clubs within our organi-
aation.
"Talk about the reserve clause
being a violation of the anti-
trust law. Why. that's a joke
compared to the draft."
PORTSMOUTH COULDNT GET
S5M* FOR BRECHEEN
Lawrence hadn't forgotten the
meeting in St. Peterburg a year
ago, when he lost four players
for (Cfregate of $12.000. when he
should have sold them for at
least $50,000. Three are on major
[league rosters, the other with a
Triple A Club, owned by a big
league outfit.
Lawrence savs that the excuse
for the draft, "for the purpose of
enabling players to advance," Is
nothing but a sham.
"I had ft major league pitcher
rjitchlna for Portsmouth," he re-
calls. "He won 21 games. Natur-
llv. 1 tried to sell him. I wanted
10,000..I couldn't even get $5000
tor him, try as hard as I did. The
oltcher' name was Harry
"recheen. He was drafted by the
"ardlnals by way of their Class
\ club. Thev got one of the best i
for practically nothing.
"The major leagues are a gen-
erous lot. They give us all th,
birds we can catch, and then take
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAl LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Prize-Winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1711, Sunday, December 23, 1951
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two series "A" to "B" of 22 pieces each.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
9030
5851
3726

$ 44,000.00
$ 13,200.00
$ 6,600.00
N PrlMi ttlt** No Priva Nk PtIm|Nm Frlu* No Prl No Mm Nos Prln f No Prta MM Prln 1
> MM 2.2MN lM I MOM 2*30 2.2M.M 3M 1,2M M MM t 2.200 00 MM 2.2M.M MM 2.2MM 7030 2.20I.M MM I.2M.M MM M.Mt.M
I1M 132.M 11M 113.M 21M 132 00 31M 132.40 41M 132 M SIM 132.M 4134 132 M 71M 132.M SIM 132.M J13 IJ1.V
KM 13Z.M 12M I32M MM 132.M 3231 133.M 42M 13240 S2M IM.M MM 13200 7231 IMM MM 1M.M MM 132.M
an m.M in D2M 23M 132.M 333 1M.M 43M 132.M S3M 132 M 43M 132.M T3M 132 00 MM I32.M MM 132.M
MM 1M.M MM 132.M 24M 132M 14M 132.M MM 132.M S4M 132.M MM 132.M 7M IM.M MM 131 M MM 132.M
SM 132M ISM 132.M 2SM I32M 3530 132.M 4SM 132.M .-.530 132 M ISM IMM 7S34 1S2.M SSM 132M KM IMM
MS ltt.M 1439 132.M 2SM 132.M MM 132 M 4434 132.40 I MM 132.M MM 132.M 74M 132.M MM 132 M MM 132 M
n 13S.M 173 132M 273(1 I32.M 3734 132M 47M 13200 57M 132.M 4730 132.M 7734 IM.M STM 132.M 97M 1M.M
woo, 133.M ISM 132.M 283* 132.M 3SM 132.M MM 132 M MM 132.M MM 133.M 7SM 132.M MM 132.M MM IMM 132.M
1 MM m.M ISM 132 M 2M 132 M MM 122.M i 4SM 132 M S9M 13X.M I MM 132 M 7SM 132.M SSM 132 M MM
w Approximations Derived From First Prize
I -,, Ut.M M23 1 440.M MM i 4M.M 1 M3T 4M.M i MM 4M.M M32 4M.M MM t M.M MM 4 MM M.M MM I M.M
1 ^ 4M.M MM 440.M M2S 4M.M MM 4M.M (31 444 M I M33 MM M3S M.M M37 MM M.M 1
Approximations )erived From Second 1 'rize
MSI IS4J XMM I M.M m SM4 1 SMM llt.M MS. MM i 2MM 3M1 IM.M | 4 [ 48S1 2M.M I MSI IM.M 7H1 'smS- I IM.M llt.M MSI S IM.M HIM MSI 2M.M
114 M MM I MM SSM 114M MM 1II.M SM7 MM llt.M
* MM llt.M SS4S lltM SM7 11.M SSM 114.M 5SS2 114M MM llt.M MM llt.M MM llt.M MM llt.M
Appr oximations Derived Fit mi ITiird f rize
72t Tit 1 1M.M ftMt 17M I71S 1 132.M MM 2724 mi 4 | 133.M MM i 4TM 131.M Tin MM > STM 1J2.M STM MM 4 47M 132.M rm 1 1J2M ITM t 1S2M 724 > IMM
STM MM 37M MM 3732 M.M MM MM
STll M.M 372 M.M STtt MM 3TM MM 3727 M.M 3TM MM 3731 M.M 3733 H.M 3735 MM
Prtoe-winning number of yesterday's Lottery drwtn were sold: first, second and third In Panam.
The nine hundred whole ticket ending in and not Included In the abore list win Forty-roar Dollar ($44.) ea.
The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprise the two series "A" and "B."
Signed by: DR. LEOPOLDO MAZZOLA, Governor of the Province.
HUMBERTO PARKDBS C, Representative of the Ministry of Treasury-
u/iTucccBiv. Abraham CruzCdula No. 47-281S "
WITNFSSES: Beraldo ZapatelroCdula No. 50-198
CARLOS CRISMATT
Notary Public, Panam
PABLO A. PINEL U.
Secretary
Hi



PI
PAGE TWELTE
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AJ INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

i-
MONDAT, DECEMBER U, MS,
NCAA To Consider Amendments At
Televising. Broadcasting I*1*1 &*ko
To Be Among M&in Issues Mtt,uel ***
By UNITED PRESS
The policy-making council of the National Collegiate Ath-
letic Association has drawn up several amendments to be con-
sidered at the NCAA convention next month.
Many amendments concern the lone-debated and touchy
Question of televising- sports eients.
Still another proposed amendment would set up a member-
ship committee to consider and investigate complaints against
member schools for failure t omaintain academic or athletic
standards. The membership committee would have power to start
its own investigations and recommend action to the association.
Under another amendment, an ethics committee would be
established to act as a watch dog over actions detrimental to
the NCAA.
The council also drafted amendments dealing with the def-
inition of amateurism, financial aid, academic standards and pro-
cedure, for expulsion.
Four separate amendments have been suggested to govern
out-of-season practice. Two of them would restrict a sport to its
season and limit off season football and basketball workouts to 30.
The Southwest Conference has offered an amendment setting a
20-day limit on both football and basketball off-season workouts.
The Pacific Cuast Conference suggested an amendment banning
all off-season practice sessions.
The full NCAA will take up these and other Items of business
In the four day convention at Cincinnati starting January 9th.
FIRST RACE
1 Little Lulu $4. S3. $2.20.
2Taponazo $3.60, $2.80.
j 3Volador $3.
SECOND RACE
! 1Pregonero $15.40, $5, $2.20.
I 2Golden Faith $2.80, $2.20.
3Tin Tan $2.20.
First Doubles: (Little Lulu-
Fregonero) $82.60.
WURI) RACE
11As de Oro $2.40, $2.20. $2.20.
, 2La India $220. $2.20.
| 3Orgullos $2.20.
One-Two: (As de Oro-La In-
dia) $11.60.
FOURTH RACE
11Lolito $3.40. $2.40, $220.
2Grito y Plate $4.40, $2.80.
3-Eloina $2.40.
V Quiniela: (Lolito-Grito y Pla-
ta) $19.80.
New Year's Bowl
Program One Of
Host Well Matched
By UNITED PRESS
One of the most evenly-match-
FIFTH RACE
1-Chacabuco $12.80, $4.40.
2Royal Coup $2.60.
SIXTH RACE
1Hurlecano $6.60. $2.00. $2.20
i 2Pincel $2.40 $2.20.
' classic pits Baylor against Geor- 3Incomparable $3.20.
I gia Tech while Kentucky meets SEVENTH RACE
Texas Christian in Dallas. 11Prestigio (el $5, $2.60, $2.20.
Clemsoh and Illinois will carry 2Fright $3.20, $2.20.
unbeaten and untied bowl rec- 3Nehulnco $2.60
orcU Into their games. Clemson Second Doubles: (Hurlecano-
has three major bowl victories. Prestigio) $14.4$.
including wins In the Cotton,i
Gator and Orange Bowls.
Local Rate
Playground
LA BOCA
Charlotte flooding, girl athlete
from La Boca Is home again after
winning decisively the events she
participated in at the III Bollva-
rlan Games at Caracas, Vene-
zuela.
La Boca community Is going
out for Track ft Field events
since the success achieved by
Charlotte Goodlng. coached by
Aston Parchment, Physical Di-
rector. Her accomplishments are
so Influencing that the famous
Club Mercurio will be made up
in the coming year of all new
talent.
\A Werru Critma toad
lerru ^Hntma.
our reade
er.
JHESPORT8 STAFF,
*
College Basketball
Results
y UNITED PRESS
The! EIGHTH RACE
Illlnl have made Just one bowl 1Flambaro visit before. That was six years 2Delhi $6. $2.40. ($2.20. Jmder PJ* of Manhattan players, though the Jaspers' Andy Mc-
ago when they trounced UCLA, 3Frutal $7.40. Gowan, 37, and Junie Kellogg, 48, do their best to check him. Man-
ed bowl game programs in years: 45_14 ln the Rose Bowj Quiniela: (Flambaro Delhi) "tanupett the favored Horned Frogs. 65-52, at Madison Square
Is forecast for New Years Day., Tennessee has three wins and $12.40. _^~ \ Garden. (NBA)/- -
New York odds-makers rate: one losa m ^j competition, and' NlgTH RACE ___________ "
two of the fly emajor games on| Maryland has one win and one 11Bendigo $9.80, $4.80, $4.20.
a take-your-pick basis. None oij tle, Miami has played ln the Or- 2Lituana $5.40, $5.20. CUnnfc UmrB||
the other three figure tn wind up ange Bowl five times winning 3Silver Fox $4.80. JllUUlb I liSCH
with more than a one-touchdown twice ui losing three. Georgia One-Two: (Bendigo Lituana)
difference. I Tech has a 3-1 record in post-
Tennesseethe number one season play and Kentucky has a
team in the final United Press |.j record. Baylor will be mak- .
board of coaches ratingsrates, ing its first appearance in a ma-i2Llnney Head $4.40.
the biggest advantage with tne jor bowl.
experts. The Vols are rated sev- ---------------------------------
en points better than unbeaten
Maryland ln the Sugar Bowl. HALL-OF FAMERS
Illinois is a six-point favorite w
to take Stanford in the Rose LOS ANGELES
$44.60.
TENTH RACE
1Newmlnster $5.20, 13.20.
Sports Shorties
End Frank Simon of Nebraska
will miss the East-West Shrine
Bowlwhlle Miami is the choice ftour of the National Football E2L3ff" -TTanFraiSEn
(by three point* > to down Clem- League's all-time great? John- tnto toturtffv because oil brok
son in the Gator Bowl at Jack- ny Blood. Wilbur Henry. Arnold en t^ Simon K "second
Mind Reader
Out of Bear Den Chan9es Mind
wu vi vcai ven NEW YoftK Dc_ 24 (NEA) _
DANBURY,Wis.,Dec.24(NEA) M*"f.r "H"? SS*** ,53?
- John Bradshaw, Jr.. deer fff%J5 r,*ade/- Predicted
hunting with a 30-30 rifle, ac- N.-ton! U.'d wln the 1951
cidentally found himself ln the %"0,na'Leaiue pennant.
middle of a bear den here. fo?uJp* h. fl ^er.vlews
lior ia. He says the Giants.
Then 17-year-old hunter OradJtW*Ji8? K5ta wl." fl*ht
five shots. Result: Three dead !S ulorthJ!'kIy" winning.
lKr. k second and St. Louis
Baseball for the eleven, twelve,
and thirteen year old boys will
start on December 27th. These
youngsters will clash for out-
standing places in their league.
106 boys are preparing to play.
The Elem. girls are anticipat-
ing the opening of their Soft-
ball League with as much gusto
as are the Elem. Boys. '
Approximately 60 Jr. High girls
have enrolled for the Softball
League. While the High School
girls have already selected four
captains who have planned sev-
eral novelties for their League.
They have decided to ask the
teachers to sponsor a plaque
which will be a motivation for
more cooperation and better
team spirit. Each captain is look-
ing forward to stiff competition
from the other teams and is
working vigorously towards bat-
tling for first place.
(Saturday Night)
St. John's (Bkn.) 08, Vanderbltt
NYU IS, Oklahoma 85
Fordham 60, Temple 42
St. Josephs (Fbila.) 71, Buek-
nell C7
Seton HaU 70, Scranton 45
Brooklyni Poly 82, Union (NY) 60
Pitt 3, William Mary 42
uquetne 71, Geneva 48
VUlanova 60, lona (NY) 57
Fort Dlx 64, CCNY 81
St. Francis (Bkn.) 66, Adelphi M
Brandis 67, St. Michael's (ft.) 50
Rider 54, Yeshiva 51
Columbia 74, New Yerk AC 56
Miami (O.) 86, Marshall 59
Akron 94. Wash. Lee 88
MIDWEST
Notre Dame S3, Pennsylvania 78
Kansas 76, Southern Cal 55
Indiana SO, Kansas State 75
Illinois 70, Depaul $1
Michigan 58, Colorado 55
Washington 55, Minnesota 51
Marauette 51, Wisconsin 47
Bradley 79, North Carolina 84
Drake 8, Iowa State 57
St. Louis 85, Armv 50
Wabaah 80, Butler 58
bears.
"5yule-____.., w, _. m g??.*^.. Bulldog Turner member of the West squad to be Young Bradshaw. who is out of
belayed0 Rs* Orange "bow! BsM^aSiBliSi^S^^ *&" ^ the
and the Cotton Bowl. The Miami Fame.
hole. .
"""""laSSS"'^SfSL^ffjn^lajifiii ho^ettb'JtWJwSlS scared until tine rtooUna: wax'/li
'because of a back Injury. what he thought was a mall'over," he said. noounK wa* "
third.
SANTA CRUZ
Mr. Loney from Silver City
will replace Mr. French for a
couple of days starting Decem-
ber 24th.
Four girls teams from the San-
ta Cruz Jr. High have entered
the Intramural Softball League.
The Adult Baseball team has
displayed poor Interest in organ-
ization. Mr. French said, how-
ever, that despite this fact there
will be a team representing San-
ta Cruz, even If it is necessary
to use the Jr. High Boys.
PARASO
Las Tranquilas defeated Las
Estrellas easily with a score of
15-2; 15-0; 15-4. These volleyball
teams have a couple of games
to play before deciding the win-
ner.
Toledo 59 Eastern Kentucky I
BOIoit 95. Centenary 60
Carroll 78, Hanover 7S
Waah. (St. Louis) 47, Fresno St.
Carlcton 61. Lake Forest 55
Lawrence Tech 63, Colorado Ik
Albion 82, Detroit Tech 54
%SftS' *v^ <*
E*(MKe,w,,)* Wta~
Mankato 97, Huron (SD) SI
Buffalo 63, Western Reserve SO
Illinois Wesleyan 78, Quincy 71
Illinois State Normal 70, LaCroi.
se 58
Wittenberg 73, Mt Union 84
Xavier (O.) 73, Ball State 59
Oklahoma City 56, Central Mo. 49
SOUTH
Cornell (8, Talane 48
X** ybetaL M *>* '
Rlee 64. Tenneosee 9
Miami 79, Nebraska 69
Clemson 79, Pelseer Mills 8
West Va Teeh 93, High Point If
__, SOUTHWEST
Tulsa 66, Arkansas 42
Houston 74, Detroit 71
Murray (Ky.) 73, Baylor 55
m FAR WEST
Utah 81, Ohio State 48
57
Little Leaguers from Paraso
number 45 to 50. The boys are
very interested in their practices
which sarted on Monday. Red
Tank has an enrollment of SO
boys.
Loe Angeles Loyola
Washington State 92, Montana
State 49
UCLA 60 Denver 51
Peoperdlne 78. Wichita If
California 65. Oregon State If
Idaho State SS, College of Idaho
Colo. Mines 64, Fttaeimmons Ar-
my Hospital 49
Brigham Young 66, Santa Clara
61
San Bernardino SI, Dixie (Utah)

Christmas Classic ?
VI
7th Race Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
Natives OPEN 1 Mile
Purse: $5,000.00 (added)
..-(BLACK SAMBO.. .V.. J; Coniferas 110
2.-(TULLY SABA......... V. Castillo 113
3.GOLDEN TIP.........J. Rodriguez 118
4.-SIXAOLA...........,. C. Snchez 108
5.-HORTENSIA.............. Flores 121
6.-MARSELLESA........... V. Ortega 121
7.-BABY ROI.............. B. Pulido 113
CHRISTMAS PRIZES FOR HOLDERS
OF LUCKY PROGRAMS
CLUBHOUSE:
Gentlemen..................... $100.00
La GRANDSTAND:
1st. Prize................... .. 75.00
2nd. Prize..................... 50.00
FIELD POOL:
AM. r FIZe ....... ....... ....... 30.00
2nd. Prize................. .. 25.00



-
- *
MONDAY. DECEMBER 24. 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
r*GF. TBBHHH
*
m t ti
e Coaches Defend Platoons And Spring Practice
Penn, Cornell
Chiefs Favor
Over-Emphasis
By NEA Sendee
BRE 8M0TJudy Feher, lj-year-old Milwaukee miss, displays
.the first deer she ever shot, bagged while hunting in Florence
County. WU., with her father, who fired first and missed. The little
lady brought the animal down with her third shot, complained later
o a or arm from the rifle's shock. (NBA)
by
JOE WILLIAMS
What with one thing and several others, there has been con-
siderable firing on the sports front, and as a consequence my desk
is not at impeccably tidy as It should be. There are evidences of
, nelest. Dust has gathered over vitally important Items.
The proposed chess match; far Instance, between Donald Jac-
Sbs. a Maryland industrialist and California robot with an electric
ram for which the claim Is made It can outthlnk any human mind.
I seem to have'no information on the match beyond the fact
that It was proposed. For all I know it may have been held while I
sVaa listening to tror-eterling educators .emphasize de-emphasls In
football. A cursory check has yielded no enlightenment.
This is how it was when I last looked. The Computer Research
j Corp. of Torrance, Calif., started talking big about its newest
..electronic wonder boy. Could even play chess. And what's more
rwould always win." ^
Mr. Jacobs, who breeds his own electronic "robots in the rolling
Maryland hills, and is also familiar with sacrificial pawns and com-
plex gambits, scoffed:
* "I'll bet $1000 the thing can't beat me and I'm a very ordinary
jchess player.-'
Mr. Jacobs imposed two stipulations. The robot was not to be
touched by human hand and no signals or information fed Into it
^during the match.
'
CHESS AND SNOB APPEAL
Here my notes end. Whether the match was held and, If so,
.how it came out I must check further to learn. I remember wonder-
ing Idly at the time whether the bookies (they were still around
then) would make Mr. Jacobs or the robot the favorite and what
the price would be.
On second thought, the bookies probably never went for chess
In a professional way. At least one never heard of a point spread in
connection with the National Open championship which is the out-
standing chesn tournament of the year, amateurs and professionals
alike being eligible.
The bookies like to know all about the games they play with
and it is unlikely many of them have ever been equipped to debate
the Danish gambit versus the Caro-Kann opening, in which event
they would have had very little on the author of this piece.
But this phase is immaterial and irrelevant. Perhaps because I
am too dull to play chess (the young heir, aged 14, going on IS, leads
me gently id the TV set now when l suggest a match) J find myself
faulting the pastime for its intellectual pretensions.
There is evidence of what I perceive to be snob appeal in the
build-up the California scientists gave their electric rain. They
stated it "could even play chess." As if that were the v. .-me chal-
lenge, the ultimate In mental power.
Chess bugs aren't totally different from their counterparts in
other sports. They have a patron saint. One Paul Charles Morphy.
He's Bob Jones, Bill Tilden, Jack Dempsey, Man O" War, wrapped
PITTSBURGH, Dec. 34 (NEA)
What football needs for its
ills are less doctors, George
Munger and Qeorg* James a-
The Ivy League coaches ex-
pressed their opinions at the an-
nual banquet of the Joycee Mon-
lng Quarterback Club at Pitts-
burgh's Roosevelt Hotel.
Cornell happens to be about;
the only Ivy League school which
hasn't adopted a hands-off at-
titude toward Pennsylvania in
football.
Perhaps it's because they see
things pretty much the same.
At least their head coaches do.
Perm's Munger and Cornell's I
Lefty James agree that two of,
the ltems.under heavy fire the
platoon system and Spring prac-
tice are good for the game.
The scholarly Cornell coach,
who followed his most bitter riv-
al to the rostrum, in effect ad-
ded an ament to each of Mun-
ger's ideas.
A STEP BACKWARD
"In fact," James conceded.
"George almost took my speech |
right out of my mouth. Criticism
of things like 8prlng practice
and the platoon system are out
of line, in my opinion.
"It almost appears to me some-
times that the people who do so
are trying to cover up the Ills
that should be fixed by criticiz-
ing these two things.
"Abolishing either would be a
step backward."*
George Munger said he was in
favor of over-emphasis, if neces-
sary of the good things in foot-
ball, intead o de-emphasls
"Too mueh de-emphasis win
kill the wlU to win," he said
"That would be the worst thing
that could happen."
CristobaTHigh
Out To Repeat
In JC Tourney
WELL-ROUNDED___Dick Groat has been called by competent observers the best college baseball
layer theV have ever seen. ShorUtop Groat led Duke to the Southern Conference baseball cham-
SKirTlUtEi^on, was largely instrumental in making the Blue Dev.I. the runner-ups ,n basket-
ball The 31-year-old, six-foot, 183-pound senior from SwUsvale, Pa., batted .388 to be an All-
America. He set a new national seasonal scoring record in.basketball..Ml points. (NEA)
Decision No Surprise To Brother Dom;
He's Glad Joe Quit For His Own Sake
(Reprinted from "The Sporting
News.")
agates and eventually went nuts.
BRAINS ARE OVERRATED
It may be that brains are overrated, anyway. Joe Jackson, as
has been recorded, got along sensationally as a big-league ballplayer
despite the fact he couldn't read or write. Walter Hagen once said:
"No golfer with a bright, active mind is ever going to win the
National Open."
Reminded he had won the great championship twice, he readily
admitted the charge.
"Just goes to prove what I said.''
i A sports world populated by robots might tend to stencil same-
ness and there'd be few Dizzy Deans or Jimmy Demarets or even
Gorgeous Georves, but there'd be certain compensations. It wouldn't
be necessary to doctor classroom transcripts to get robots into City
College or William and Mary, and West Point wouldn't have to
worry about another cribbing affair. Thus, the essential football
problems would take care of themselves.
Of course, it might be expecting altogether too much to get a
robot bright enough to replace Charley Dressen in the coach s box
back Of third base to steal signals and scream runs home and pick
pitchers like Branca to face fitters like Thomson but don't be too
Jure Selence is wonderful. Look what it's done for dish-washing.
BOSTON, Mass.Dom DiMag-
glo, now the last of the big
league DIMagglos, was not sur-
prised on learning of brother
Joe's decision to retire as a play-
er. The Red Box outfielder re-
ceived the news happily.
"I'm glad Joe quit fot his own
sake," said Dom. "It was too
tough for him physically. He
never complained, but he was
handicapped. His muscles would-
n't respond. Joe made the right
decision.'"
The Boston center fielder was
not startled by the development
even though Joe had not told
him of his plans.
"Joe didn't play too much in
Japan," Dom said. "And when he
did, it was an effort for him. I
predicted he would quit and
stuck to it whenever they asked
me in Japan, which was every
day."
Dom feels his brother's legs did
not give out on him first, as so
often happens to athletes.
"Injuries caught up with Joe,"
he said. "I think it was his back
and shoulder and neck, maybe,
that bothered him most.
"Joe always used to hold both
hands on the bat on his follow-
through," said Dom. "but all last
season, he was letting go with
his right hand. It was very ob-
vious to me. He lust couldn't hold
the bat correctly."
Ever over-shadowed by his
famed brother, Dom always
wanted to make good on his own.
He reached that goal but, at the
same time, never lost his admira-
tion for his older brother.
"Joe was one of the greatest of
all-time," said Dom. "I don't
' know when he was best. He al-
ways looked great to me."
Joe was tendered the grandest
ovation of his career on the fin-
al day of the 1948 season when a
Fenway Park.crowd excited by
the Red Sox tying for the pen-
nant, still took time to award the
Yankee Clipper a tremendous,
standing outburst as he left the
field for a substitute.
"You must have felt like killing
me," Joe said to Dom that night.
"No," replied Domtnlck, "I felt
like cheering, too.'' Boh AJemain.
Arizona Wins
And Rings Bell
TUCSON. Ariz., Dec. 34 (NEA)
Every time an Arizona sports
team defeats an out-of-state
school, It is heralded by the loud
tones of the bell taken off the
USS Arizona, the battleship
sunk at Pearl Harbor.
The bell hangs In the tower
of the new mllllon-dollsr Stu-
dent Union Memorial Building.
150,000 Americans Fence, Which
Is Playing Chess With Swords
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
CARACAS, Venezuela, Dec. 24
'(NBA)Yov have to come to
South America, at least this ob-
server did. to grasp the Impor-
tance of fencing, the oldest of
sports.
sense of dlstanc*. technique ana
endurance.
As the science progressed, the
foil, a light weapon, was deve-
loped, at firs' for training. The
[Mm being to develop accuracy.
More than 1500 turned out for the target was limited to the
the matches in connection with
the Third Boilvarlan Games in
Caracas, whlcii Is remarkable to
a fellow accustomed to seeing
the gladiators thrust and party
In comparative privacy at home.
Tracy Jaeckel of New York,
who supervised the show here,
tells of the ancient sport's
growth In the United States and
South America, wonders why
more is not written about It on
the sports pages Jaeckel, foreign
recretary of the Fencers' League
c f America, was Princeton's In-
tercollegiate champion of the
dueling sword in the mld-20s,
nnlshed third in the Olympic
Games of 1932. competed again
chest and abdomen, above the
groin line.
The foil was kept as one of the
three basic weapons, and with
the limited target men and wo-
men have developed carriage and
Dosture for a great many years.
The foil is won with the best five
out of nine touches A match is
now limited to 10 minutes. There
it no time limit when the score
l* four all, and skilled workmen
have dueled for more than ah
hour, and with no time out for
tea. :
The Fencers' League of Am-
erica wisely changed all French
and Italian terms into English,
ro the epee once more becomes
just plain dueling sword.
in-38.
Sales of equipment show thati
150,000 Americans now fence in EPEE CAPABLE OF INFLICTING
seme form. More than 1000 New A SERIOUS WOUND
(York high school boys and per-
haps as many In Chicago now
thrchmra^rr Players Gain Right To Liaison Man
prove otherwise is applicable to mmmJ
the strong Cristobal High 8chool
basketball team. Coach Paul
Moser'a lads took the First J. C.
Tournament last year, and will
be out to repeat that again this
Tournament festivities get un-
der way on the night of Decem-
Attached To Commissioner's Office
(Reprinted from "The Sporting
News.")
- o
NEW YORKFor the first time
her 28th at the Balboa Gym, with major league players have won
?he same Cristobal team opening the^ight to have ftJWHIlgMl
things ki a game against the attached direct to the eommls-
Workhig Boys This game will sloner's office.
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT AD)
.
CUN FUJLJQLR SEEDS!
begin at 8:45 and will be follow-
ed by wha tcould well be the best
aame of the Tournament when
the Cristobal-Athletic Associa-
tion five tangle with the Albrook
Blue Jays. .
Mosers has all but one of his
boys back from the title team of
last year. Not only did the Tigers
win this Tournament, they also
went on to the win thfe Scholas-
tic League .and then moiit Of
these same boys played for the
Powell's team that won the At-
lantic Side Basketball League
last summer. The miss ng boy
from the 1*50 team is Dick Sul-
livan, play maker extraordinary.
The lob of filling Sullivan's
place has fallen on the ahouWera
of two boys. Vernon Bryant and)
Talmadge Baiter are the two
that will have no produce f
Tigers are to continue their win-
ning ways this year. The re-
mainder of the starting line up
will have Arnold Manning. Bob
Bailey Roy Wilson, and Sklppy
Anderson. .,
Manning. BaUey and Ander-
son will do the prunt of the scor-
ing for the Blue and OoUm
it Is rare day Indeed that these
hovs can't ring up the points,
banning and allev are both
two year letterman, and aisc
both 'gained AUXnt.rahola.tlr
League honor, last **-BZ
on. only a sophomore lettered
> a freshmen, and is the top
scorer for the Tigers .
The Cristobal boys work, on the
double pivot, with efoot 3 Roy
Wilson and Anderson handling
the pivot spott. Both boys score
heavily on tip Ins and rebound
shots. They also make It pos-
sible for the Tigers to control the
back boards to a large extent.
Boxing, Racing
And Track Could
Use Kangaroos
SYDNEY. Australia, Dee. 14
(NBA) A full-grown kangaroo
stands taller than a man, weigh*
00 pounds.
His huge hind legs, with steel-
spring power, sends him sailing
over a 10-foot fence, or in a fight
can beat off a doten docs.
The kangaroo's favorite sport
is boxing. His flve-flngered hands
are very much like a man's, and
In the most advanced step In
the five years the players have
as for big-theater television or.
some other enterprise of that na-
ture in which the players may1
share in receipts."
Hatton was on a hunting trip
near Beaumont. Tex., when he
received a wire from Klner, who
fence, so colleges get prospects
with basic training. At least four
or five years is required to de-
\elop an accomplished fencer.
Argentina alone in South Am-
erica has more than 60 clubs and
r.wre fencers than France. At the
Pan-American Games In Buenos
Aires In February each perform-
once played to 200 or more. Out-
ride of the Argentine, the prln-
clDal handicap throughout South
This is a tactical weapon, and
while some saber men may argue
differently. It is the main event.
11 is plavlng chess with swords.
The dueling sword Is a trian-
gular blade with three sharp
tolnts capable of inflicting a
serious wound In this year's
ChamplonshiDt. Denmark's world
chamolon killed the captain of
the Finnish team, a thrust bet-
ween the ribs under the arm.
puncturing the heart. Command-
ant Harro Oliva of Mexico killed
America is the lack of capable a Frenchman In the Olympia
Instructors and the money with
which to pay them:
MODERN FENCERS WOULD
BEAT LEGENDARY MASTERS
Modern fenctw weapons evolv-
ed from the older.
Men who have devoted years
to fencing tell yon. and it la rea-
sonable to assmheTtne technique
has so Improved that any good
Games of '28.
The target Is the entire body,
rrom the toe to the toe of the
maskanywhere and electrical-
ly fudged down to one twenty-
fifth of a second Should both
lnnd within one twentv-flfth of
a second, both are credited wlthi
hits. Three out of five decides.
Naturally, a much heavier uni-
form is used than in the foil:
The saber la a cutting as well
modern fencer would beat any of as a thrusting weapon. The tat-
the legendary masters, including get is above the groin line, ln-
Alexander Dumas' rollicking
three musketeers.
The basic weapons are the foil,
dueling sword and saber.
The secret of all games Is tim-
ing, and this 1 especilly true of
fencing. The fencer must have a
ciudlng the arms and head. The
caber is the easiest of the three
weapons for the layman to
watch. The Hungarians are the
best saber fencers, with the
Czechs and Poles not far behin*.
Touchel
had a voice in the conduct of the
game, owners at the major league
meeting agreed to the estaonsn- mm. ......... u.. ...& w.m
ment of a full-time go-between Grady he wes still on his honey-
for the athletes and the game's moon and also wanted to remain
_..__ - was at his home in Alhambra,
Calif., asking him to fill in for
him. The' home run king told
governing office.
Fred Hutchlnson. Detroit Tig-
er pitcher and the American
League player representative,
and Grady Hatton of the Cin-
cinnati Reds, representing the
National League players in trie
absence of Ralph Klner. won the
concession.
Tnl* is the most advanced
and progressive step In ourrt-
lations with the club owners,
iutchlnson said.
"We will establish an office in
onnectlon with the commlsslon-
,r's and appoint a full-time man
'"represent us. This office will
e thi centralized clearing house
or all player problems which
irise."
Hutchlnson pointed out the
^layers' liaison man would not
ake over as a spokesman for the
thletea, however.
The representatives whom tot
layers themselves elect wl" atUJ
nake all the pre.enttions to U
club owners and be our official
spokesmen." Hutchlnson said.
"Our liaison man wUl, how-
ever, contact each of the Indivi-
dual clubs regularly. In that way
we will be able to handle more
rapidly problems which arise
"Through our own office we 11
be able to keep the players bet-
ter informed of the current sit-
uation and what Is being done
on particular Issues."
Hutchlnson said that the ap-
pointment of the ll*iaorx.
probably would be made at the
lime of the 1952 All-Star Game
"We want to have a chance to
receive applications and heck
on men with the qualiflcat ons
for the position," the Tiger Hurl-
TA former player or a man who
has held an admlnlstrattvI posi-
tion to baseball most likely will
be ehoeen.
Hutchlnson U*2$H}
mans salary and the grating
expenses of the office would be
on the Coast to keep an eye on
the construction of his new
home.
Tommy Devine.
TOP WOKCharlie Burr st-
lects his equipment at Florida's
Tropical Park as the leading
American jockey of 1951. The
17-year-old Arkansas City,
Kan., lad was the phenomenon
of the New England racing
season. (NEA)
A -SHINING9 EXAMPLE
of what this wonderful
polish will do for your shoes
KIWI
u
are very mucn uae a mans, ana expenses of tne onice wviuu
he uses them exactly the way a pald initially by a direct assess-
boy uses his Wheft firs learning' ment on aCh big >e*Re p|a*er.
to put up his dukes. He's been i "It is possible," he added, tnat
docked at dose to 50 miles an later on the money might comei
hour. through outside payments sucn
WAX SHOE POLISH
if la Mack. Oxblood and five shades of Brown.
A Kiwi shine lasts longer became the polish
Is mads only from the finest waxaj and dyes.
JOSEPH GROSSMAN, S. A.
118 Central Avenue Panama. R. P.
Pescadera MODELO
(Across from the Public Market)
MtrsBelLoper V.
Phone 2-0332
Owner
P.O. Box 1627
1




iM i .....
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i'i'iWiiiiiiii-;

: '^^^.^ >>i:? dMlf 's;*;
upes
NEW LIFE is ahead for two Korean war brides as their soldier husbands and Infants greet
them in Fairfleld, Cal. They arc (from left) Sgt. Don Keller, wife Chung Lee, 23, Donald,
Jr., 20 months; Sgt. Jim Evans, wife Chuke, and their 10-month-old daughter, Mary Ann.
WAITING FOR her next screen assignment, starlet Susan HHIHBBHHHHBHBBI
Cabot takes some-time out to relax on a California seashore, "TAKE A LTTLE off the top," says Sleepy, the pony, as he drops in at the Stock Yards Inn
X*m reatore Syndicate barbershop for a once over lightly. Charles Suhs cut's S4eepy's mane while Marion DeFauw
______________g'V" him a manicure. Sleepy is featured In horse show at Chicago Livestock Exposition.
AAARKS
YtSPJSS?5J5? T Am?r. cas most i"ustrious fame. The nation's second oldest university was transferred in 1716 to New
cb^SZiSSm^ni^^i^r'-^ Prtrfhy *nd law~is Haven- P*et ite, because the town dutbia other communities land
cSSlut JZ^ ?h- 22 *? *Utrn *? to 701 Whe" 10 and mon*y- Tw0 *"" later Elihu e. a reli* merchant living in London,
an pTandTne cSSaTl ^n W^V* ^T' RusseUJn Bradford *>nterWne bales of goods to help the*oUege nd the trustees, m gratitude
corridor" tacudiS N^ thrU*h ** named thc *"tuu* Yal liege. Today, on its 2Mth birthday, Yale h^
^u^^^^^X^I^LSr^ Tf adK U?h4Pr^etnt 8Tn,int0 mftSsive Univer8ity ^ a 1'W- PUS- V *denu *
author John HerS idTth vm2 tfSFJftE R0^l^ TaftJ V1* of U* ** And, in the field of education itself, the record
John He.se> and the Vagabond Lover, Rudy Vallee of W/ujJenpoo/ shows that 41 colleges have chosen Yale graduates as their Rest prudent
HIDE THIS picture from any youngsters who believe there is only one Santa'Claus. The
Kris Knngles are getting instructions before going out on the job on New York streets.
r.

-
y
foHfnmn!!,^^fartrWeStAb,U^y.En8Iand emtains a "0-foot-long white horse cut in the turf
to commemorate K.ng Alfreds victory over the invading Danes hack in the ninth century;
AROUM -WORLD_______
tour M^ & m if A
IN 21 DAYS-------------
1^ vi'w of whof Yfl" "'""'* ">?h'rf '" "ndergroduot., bacUn ffc. y-, }7*. The *H frfr Hb^TTTS?S3
MIDGET AUTO getting a tuneup from John Byczynski, 8. at a Washington motor show
is supposed to reach 15 miles an hour but unless he gets the Austin. Jr., started, his sister,
Jessica, 9, may have to try her hands at it. A washing machine engine powers midget car.
ii
Tare*-* riersen gateway many of Yale*. fvtur. I.od.r*. Dormitori., flank the CMtav. of Yl. Divinity uH* With Matavaad CKa,
-*. >
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Mofar rrfhUW


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