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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01333
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01333
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Sunday supplement
        Supplement 1
        Supplement 2
        Supplement 3
        Supplement 4
        Supplement 5
        Supplement 6
        Supplement 7
        Supplement 8
        Supplement 9
        Supplement 10
        Supplement 11
        Supplement 12
Full Text
tsBRANIFF
fZTSUWAr
* \
.* *

Seagrams \;0. z
lew York
ONI-STOF
NON STO TO
Minmil
"Let the people know the truth and the country U $afe** Abraham Lincoln.
< \\\l>l\\ %t IIIMtl
Now.. 6 Years Old!
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAK
B. |, SUNDAY, DECEMBER U, 191
f
XO.
TEN CENT
UN Command Accuses Reds' Truce Team
Of Negotiating For Future War In Korea
Churchill
Stassen Agree
Not Brina War
By UNITED PBESS
I
Both British Prime Minister .
Winston Churchill and rormer pcome.
. 8. Presldentlal candidate Har- The British Prime Mtoister al-
old Stassen predicted today that so traed tfaat on his return
there would be no war In 1952. from his visit to Washington
it will be because of world pow-1 primary aim remains a settle-
ers beyond British control. But, ment of cold war issues through
in general r do not think war will | negotiation*, they polnte
to his' Christmas message to next month he will baje ajiat of es.
the British people Churchill said
out that Churchill has said such
discussions with the Soviets
must be based on western
strength rather than weakness-
he did not believe the world
would be embroiled In a third
world war during the coming
year.
He warned the British people,
however, that they should lend
.themselves to more austerity
next year If Britain Is to survive
as a nation.
Stassen, meanwhile, on bis ar-
ie parishioners of St. Mary's Mission may gain a Plenary- In-
iSSa^S^^fe^jS^B^ cent&Ve Papal Nuncio, and
wri iefu"n toSt, jHMtreclW the Rosary and witness a series of acenegSaAftpaBX set
"iSS^wSi be represented By the children In costume and the cMl-
-* shrine of Our Lady of Fajima.
newproposaiTio present to Par":: Churchill has long listed a
ltamnt/that will be found "dls-, face-to-face meeting with Stalto
tfteful" as one of hU pet projects. He
Churchill has abandoned his said before the 1960 British elec-
earller hopes for a Big Fourtlons that he favored least
meeting with Premier Josef Stal- one mor parley at the highest
in or a private meeting between level. .
himself and the Soviet leader!
authoritative sources said today. He made the same statement
Churchill won approval for before the recent general elec-
elther a Big Four or a private tlons. But he carefully added
conference with Stalin from the, then that the Korean war had
TOKYO, Dec. 22 (UP) The United Nations Com-
mand's official radio here today accused the Communist
truce negotiators in Korea of trying to negotiate for a
future war in Korea.
The broadcast aid that probably the Reds would
try to stall the- current truce conference beyond the 30-
day deadline for observance of the present front line as
a ceasefire line.
It went on: "Sooner or later the Communists must
choose between their demand to build airfields in Nortft
Korea or an armistice.
"This means a choice between ending the blood-
shed, or demanding unlimited right to build bomber bases
for renewed aggression against the Korean people.
"It is a choice between war and peace"
"The Communists are fool-
Stassen, meanwhile, on his ar- conference with Btaiin irom tne men in i";" ,7 ',"'
rival in New York from Europe French in conversations In Paris changed the political cllmaus.
predicted that there will be no last week. But informed sources. Both he and his Foreign Sec-
war with Russia during 1962, said Churchill himself has con-: retary, Anthony Eden, since have
mentioning "twp Important ob- eluded that the time Is not ripe, emphasised t^t strewn is es-
.ni.." nr irh negotiations sential before the west begins
promising to reveal
. . ; behind the iron curtain re
(ommendaflon *w sSf*"**
it clear
S^^^ftaSS VS^.JSUReTS^ the children, who later
i0Z"to&*mx*nts. <* contrlbuUons from Albrook included 34boxe. of
clothing 80Kso?food, 30 beds and mattresses and several boxes of assorted toys.
stacles.
Aftes
Thursday "the part I Intend to
play" In the next Presidential
elections the former Governor
of Minnesota said the two obsta-
cles were:
1. The need for an immediate
and extensive revolution In Pe~.
land, T&echoslovakia, Hungary
and the Ukraine, If the Commu-
nist* attack; and, *f
i 2* The certfjfatayof a devas-
for such negotiation*.
These sources said
sential before the west begins
Britain's basgaintog with the Kremlin.
Christmas Fades As Holiday
In Communist-Rulad Lands
Postal Clerk
Shoots Self
In Canal Zone
to
IE
rigm
^.t..tftag^sa
.. author- bow
itagM
Receive pny lw^aKr&s
1~ r L.VI.J t-Vs Irnn nvtoU Arta
background.
These reports
~ of wh*t""tiss"sje*psfiiSDant
the rising standard of Uv-
' In Rumania and Poland tH*
'winter trees" were not erected
ing no one in their efforts
negotiate for a future war
Korea.
"The theory that they are
attempting to gain the right
to build these airfields for t,
sole purpose of future aggri.
sion is up held by the fg_.
that they refuse to let any-
one inspect North Korea aftic
the armistice.
"They have rejected the Idea
of aerial observation.
J "They reject the Idea of ha-
----- ing inspection teams cover aft
Tnwnh t stallinss 36 Amer- oi Korea, though the united
fairs Building in the Canal Zone.:to boto these points,
shot himself through the tem- Can it be clearer wriatm
pie with a .3 caliber revolver CommaniaU are driving for a*
shortly aft* entering his office Panmunjom?
;ly
rly last flight.
It
"They are trying to gala
concessions tor themselves thaB
Medicai hefp"was immediately
pSiceeald Stalling, efcrved ^o i% tern accusg
the C^A&lrs Buidlng at 5:40,1 & g&^&de at the 5
"WinteVTree e n d gfffifewStVWoT-' lsh^s S3"8 K 22;
until after Christmas. The Polish' ^F&Jlffii^wi^re crican attitude, believing theft
press and radio talked about}*-*te*%*fv^J^: lor same reason the United
t clear P" *< radio talked about tra- ; ^"""u^riy employed: for same reason the Unite*
PopX 2^Jr*S2tiU& He"clcSeT lS?dffi S */* prl0Dg "
human custom of exchanging girw. th ^, d ,_, mmutes flghtmg.
human Ssto"1 e^^a5nr ^'i to^e^riV'ndTVmmmuteV flghtmg.
warmth and cheer o the season!Shows were presented .t_eWi- Iftter Mockus heard a shot. He|
the
Rescue hi biiYw
;-fv, rt ,hHf nt the M-ason Shows were presented ior cuu-
U Col Carl Davis McFerrln, warmth and #"f-P*2rfr\**~ throughout the country by
CWet of "ion WTlnfantry ^tmXcout^X^m'the atheist 'Friends of Children"
instractor. United "tat* Army j5^^SSESfrt 'ociety.
ttSe^^ffisS^JS^ XnHungery.melmporUtlonoi
U Parrack end M'Sgt. Alex A1-.E 25?1" wormaon * new xmas trees Is now forbidden and
vares, were awarded the Com- e/s gty. go- there wiU be no Christmas cards
mendattOD Ribbon with Metal JSn^^\tJu\^nnwn- -because of an officially pro-
PendanTfor their actions dur- viet Union Itself, where cwsnmu "paper shortage."
tox a reaeoe oeraekm In BoUvla nlsm launched a deesknuned ciwua v-v -
tog a res s onerasam m cnpajp, m the 193Cs to J?- T Bulgaria, where Chrtetmas
AccorBg to the citations re- inat* Christmas ? A mmUdu ^ been ceiebrated tradltlonaUy
celved bj mo three men, word celebration of New **** i' I on Jan. 7, the Communist govern-
was reeegred that a party had has been substituted tor Christ- ment ha8 announced that the
been atraOded bv a snow, storm mas and workert are give a noi: day wiu not ^ a hoUday as
in aft Andean pass and the Uni- iday on this day. JJta erto Last year's celebraUons "'"' '"j^yiBCW-en Street .Bai-
ted 8totos Aimy Mission was Christmas trees, as In Pg-Com- caused slowdowns and work ab-:n at mi a "
called upon to render assistance munlst days, there are near ew ws on gnCceedlnK days, gov'-'00"'
,a emment spokesmen said, so the
found Stallings sprawled In front
of an open safe.
The bullet bad entered the,
temple and out through the top
of his head.
Postal authorities said there
was no known shortage of funds
and nothing in the clerk's recent
Week or actions to indicate any
reason for the attempt on his
life.
Stallings. who worked for the
Bare Reports Indicate Gen. Dean
Accorded Red Equivalent Of V1P
US Asks Russia
To Help Free
Captive Flyers
f7ice"for"elght years, lived' WASHINGTON.Dec.22 (UP)
,"; day will not be a holiday as hlth- ^ hta ,f d tw0 small chll- : The United States today protect.
in aft Andean pass and the Uni-.idav on this day. Bupsad of ert0 l^ year.4 ceiebraUons *" ,uaw.. .....,. .v.. o-..rf ~t i~
ted 8Cttes Aimy Mission was Christmas trees, as In Jj^Corn- caused slowdowns and work ab- ?""
called Upon to render assistance munlst days, there are new New sences on succeeding days. gov-D
in sending a rescue party to the Year's trees"frequentlybearing ernment spokesmen said, so th
scene. Cawael McFerrln called a hammer and sickle de>%n.
for volunteers to join him on The Soviet Union haaieeposed
the mission and Sgts. Parrack its custom on the countries under
and Alvares -rere the two ac-lm control. Christmas it tuper-
cepted. They Joined other United Mded by Premier Stalin's birth-
States National and Bolivian day m December 31 cltisens In the rescue party. |j, 72 years old this year.)) Hun-
The rescue team fought its way _arlans ior example, last year
through the heavy snow and Jound plnk piaster busts of SUl-
managed to reach the stranded m ta we store windowB**nsteadi
imjup in me to save 13 ofjae;0f Christmas decorations. f CHESTKRTOWN. Md.. Dec. 22
17 members. The froten hoaies m the largely CathoHe country |,up,_The British-built twln-
of tte foor dcnd w*,re,.r*lir2lof Czechdklovakla. there wereuet Canberra bomber that set a
to La Pea. the capital city oi'Bo- ^ chrlitmM trees last year, but new Atlantic crosslhg record last
hria. _. .. .. thev were called "The OBslstraa*
The eltatti.n.- suted that the JV ntpbUc."tothetra-
irc men. without regard for.,,.,___,_____r. - hhm th
emment spokesmen said, so tne ^^ C ~L*A In
1052 observances will find work- j U|JU ^eOrCneO III
srs at their benches or In factor- ,.... ,
les and mills as on every other QU\ OtTICe Atter
working day.
Record-Setting
Jet Explodes
Theft Of Jewels
ed to Russia the arrest of four
American aviators by Hungary
and asked the Kremlin to use its
influence to have them set free.
The protest was presented la
Moscow by U.8. Charge d'Af-
faires Hugh S. Cummlngs.
Informed sources said Cum-
mlngs:
1) Discussed the case of th*
four American flyers whom Hun-
gary proposes to try on a charge
of espionage. ,_
2) Insisted that the U.S. take
epe_.-
^em about Dean have suggest-
ed they thought he was dead.
That curious fact, together
with the one that Dean's serial
number was one of five missing
in the entire list Allied war
prisoners In Red3Pgls caused
considerable speculation at the
Allied advance camp here.
Some quarters regarded It as
nut all official emphaslzt thati possiblebut by no meansi prob-
thS non^&SaSr world has fe-that his name could have
no way of knowing how the Reds been put on the list by the Com-
freaTW ^prisoners, ^because munlsts ^trading purge..
lv comfortably in Prison Camp
No. 8 at the North Korean capi-
tal of Pyongyang.
Th* reports Indicate that the
former commander of the TJ s.
24th Division Is being accorded
the Red equivalent of VIP-very
Important persontreatmei
mong the prisoners.
[February exploded on a test
tlight here yesterday, killing one
of Its two-men crew.
France Buys Comets
LONDON, Dec. 22 (UP)
The French national airline
... Air France today announced It
CHICAGO, Dec. 22 (UP)
About S.tee'persons were lock-
ed in a 31-sUry Loop office
building today after a KIM
Jewel theft set off a floor to a grave view of the arrest of the
floor search for the thief. four men in Hungary
With elevators halted and 3) Asked the Soviet Union to
Intercede with Hungarian aa-
thoritles for the release of th
nun i----
stairways gaaried, police comb-
lille the shut-
evidence to
Wllch said.
confirm his story,
Tms year in \jvecuvmtuvtua,to >~ yj m.<. .- ~
the m---ment has announced I Havllland Comet jet alrupers.
ed the beUdlng wh
ins milled about the lobby and
floors of the Plttsfleld building
for nearly M minutes.
A customer saw the theft In
a fifth floor shop and told the
saanager.
Two mep were picked up.
They denied any connection
with the theft, but were held
for euestionlng anyway.
flyers.
It Is understood that the U.S.
;also presented today its fourth
'protest in the case of the flvere
to the Hungarian government.
The new note, reportedly, a-
gain protested the arrest of thd
flyers and condemned harshly
the announced plan to bring
them to trial.
thev refuse to i>ennlt the Red
erse to visit their camps.
Cattp No. 6 was believed to be
one of the small "special" Red
prison campa..
Cardinal Spellman
Arrives Jn Tokyo
TOKYO, Dec 22 (UP >Fran-
cis Cardinal Spellman, arch-
bishop of Hew York, arrived
here today a route to Korea
to celebrate Christmas mass
for the Catholics with the tails
Only today one of
Red
The report said Dean removed
his general's Insignia and .took to j
the lulls after being cut off. He,
wandered for a month until
hunger and dysentery forced
him to go to a village to south-
west Korea and ask tor food. The
Communists picked him up there
but only later learned his Iden-
tity.
Tal I ul ah Smoked Reefers Ex-Maid
newsmen at Panmunjom gave a
Surported piece of new lnforma-
on about Dean. Alan Winning-
ton, correspondent for the Lon-
lon Dally Worker, said Dean was
captured Aug. 25, 1950, near Jin-
an, a village 30 miles south of
Taejon. Dean disappeared in the
fighting for Taejon late to July.
wlnnington said he received packages of clothing and
an "official Briefing'* from thefood wert distributed to over
Communists on Dean aboutr toe 360 newsboys yesterday after-
soutlT a^Vreloto^KeVln?: ^SS^S&ffc^
.togton id {, ^XuonNwaT handS'by
Newsmen's Wives
Distribute Clothing,^?
Food To Newsboys
vllle, tod-, ana tnat sne paua
cocaine delivered to the star's
room to a New York
Mrs7'Bvyleen cronln. 59. ex-
vaudeville dancer who served
Miss Banhkead In numerous
capacities, -was on the witness
stand for the second consecutive
day In hor trial on charges of
end others In her company who
were playing In summer stock
there In August, 1949.
The defense interrupted Mrs.
Cronln's testimony to put Blals-
dell on the stand. The prosecu-
tion objected frequently to We
testimony. .___
Morltt told the court he was
no trying to sully Miss Bank-
head's character, but said ho
wanted to show how Mrs. Cronln
spent her money "whether for
melons or marijuana: Coca-cola
or cocaine.*'
Blalsden said he saw PoBf*
5n acjmltted raising!Mi.7" arlen and^operated a get .Miss f^ 'jff\' gfike "ohnSonf 'partner* o
W. by th^cneck, ut tended that; Uves," and two other perse to downtown cabaret brought ccc- party LM^^ur8jn7-* and the summer theater enterprise,
; In' Tokyo, ben. Matthew . club president Mrs. Ce. ^the money to buy a "dreary and dark" W> ateto.Miss tn^S^L^I ^fi!- | He also said he saw Mr.^on-
e wUl hold services In front- Rldgway-s pbUc information of-, Catlta cajar Escala Mm. things for Wu Benkhead wh( home where they were .erved( fl room to th eHr th Th e creammg ^^i ^ leaye t get the ae-
Hne command posts, and at, fice? said newly published re*. Elvira Ferrer Gamboa and Mrs. the aid. Uved In ta expenaivel drinks and Ptrertos sgr metlme between Oct. % niao actr?a| ^ wl ^ ^ gtaM ^.tloa.
itn Army haadquartera, ports bout Dean were based on' Oraclela Oomea, and unusualmannet. "Then, they brought^ out svl-. mk tnd Mt^r j l. am v> v -^
ja>aaa".m.t JS3s&ffl: aafeftraa sal* TXS*'a'
mald^secre|Srtestifled yeeter-itlpn to buying s h tWs ea-eert; J^vHlrt "^ htmU.%tdVou nay for marijuana at
^imik&anXto^
i^Y^heeSwMWlHto' I^WhVn I .w what kind of started to say "Well, Betty, the
Mrs.'Cronln then identified a party it was I took Josle out' hajdre8??-t ht.ot* sCLeChadan;duidn n 1M' *^^.tWl^$AffSl G^eraFleSoS J^aSd
^eB&Si that MM. Bank-! lISi&imSSmAwJSu^; ZS&^X?&
head met a waiter in BvaosvUle cigarettes and that the proprle-\ Awlatont Dlt^tAttorney je
who^ "toW ,her there was a tor^fe^tound^flve mor. ^ J^^S^l^^S S
. She said that she and bar a- said, because she had no more the Judge New Eng-
ngford,
Bank!
i


P*0 TWO
-au.
- r.
------------
THt SUNDAY AMKRICAN
...\......_..
AMERICAN MOTHER SEES PLENTY WRONG WITH UNITED STATES BUT...
SUNDAY, DlCDOBIl,
She Preerred Ohio Suburb To British Mansio

MRS. JAMES N. GAPE is the wife of the Cuyahogo Falls, 0., valve salesman who
inherited $270,000 from an English cousinbut only on condition the Gapes
move to England and live on the old estate that had been in the family for 500
years. The Gapes' tentative rejection of their English inheritance in favor of a
-mfortoble suburban heme and an American upbringing for their children
touched off a wave of criticism from England criticism which inspired Mrs.
Gape to tell "Why I Choose America." ,
>.*
i BY MRS. JAMESON. GAPE '
CUYAHOGA FALLS, O., Dec. 22 (NEa- Lots of people gave the Gapes free
advice when ws were in a quandary over whether to move to England to qualify for
Cousin Sibyl's inheritance. .
.' Much of it woe good, much of it mercenary and some of it from sheer crack-
pots. ^
But it was a woman newspaper writer in the London Daily Express who really
set my blood boiling with her scathing comments that appeared under the head-
ing, 'So Mrs. Gape wouldn't live in Engl andat any price!"

"I DONTf WANT TO MOVE ANYWHERE:" Mrs. James N.
Gape sits in her living room at Cuyahoga Falls, U.S.A., with
daughter Grace. 5. The Gapes hare two other children, Da-
vid 8, and a four-month-old son. Their belief that condi-
tions In England "surely aren't food for raisins; children"
stirred up the bitterest of aU criticism over turning down

British estate.
v-
GAPE HOUSE IN ENGLAND: This home in St. Michael's
Manor at St. Albans la one of two country houses and three
farms included in the English Inheritance Mr. and Mrs.
James N. Gape tentatively rejected. "Thy have turned
down,", wrote a caustic critic in the London Daily Express,
"an old Elizabethan country house standing In private acres,
old furniture and good pictures, elegant china and rare
glass, a leisurely life aa a country squire and his lady and
a fortune to keep it going." Critic glossed ever the Gapes'
reasoning that British Inheritance taxes would make It
difficult to .tun such leisurely Uf.
Dog Tired Dave!
David was a busy fellow,
shopping never left him mellow I
Worn out weaiy tired and brava.
Why not read our Want Ads. Dave?



i /-'.',

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC



Due to the Christmas festivities our Plants will
remain closed on Dec. 25th.- To insure delivery,
orders for Beer and Canada Dry Products
should be placed in advance.


.

'


i )
-
OPEN ALL DAY TODAY SUNDAY

1


Cervecera Nacional, S. A.
(NATIONAL BREWERY, INC)
It set me burning at first, I
should saybecause, after my
original "lemme-scratch-her-
eyes-out"' reaction, the article
really set me to thinking.
I might explain that the clip-
ping was given me by a gracious
neighbor, who held it until sever-
al weeks after the "storm" a
storm that Included not only 6r
tough decision over the will, but
a set-to with measles, mumps and
the birth of our third baby.
The neighbor1 figured that the
English newspaperwoman's com-
ments would Just upset us more.
She was right.
"No, Mrs.. Gape," the British
lady wrote, America wouldn't be
my choice.
"Not for me a daughter who
is a specimen of that astonish-
ing phenomenon, American
womanhoodthe best dressed
and the most spoiled, the best
looking and worst educated,
the broadest smllers and the
worst cooks..."
Wowl ... spoiled ... worst ed-
ucated. ... I'll have her know I'm
a good cookand, what's more,
most of the young housewives I
know are, too.
The last paragraph was the
clincher, however.
It said: "But.they (that's the
Gapes) plumped in the end for
the country that believes abso-
lutely in creating something new
but perhaps has not learned
the pleasure of keeping alive
something old. *
Maybe she has something
there. Maybe here in America
we have failed to keep alive
that "something old." Maybe
that's why our papers have so
many stories about tax scan-
dals and other dishonesty in
fovernment, about gambling
Ixes of sports events, shocking
dope and sex stories involving
our youngsters.
Maybe it'a why public morals
have sunk so low, why the morale
of our country has sagged, why
Americans are confused and un-
happy in the midst of plenty.
We've moved so fast to get so
much that we've thrown over-
board our great traditions, dis-
honored our nation's founding
fathers.
Men like Washington, Jeffer-
son and Lincoln had so much
that was goodstill good today
but the school children hardly
encounter It, and by the time
they're grown the names are just
something out of history books.
I think we need in America,
more than anything else, a good
example. Something unassailable
and above reproach.
The English have It In their
Royal family. We don't have any-
thing like It.
As a result, we're groping
blindly for something, and we
can't tell for sure what It is.
The family here In America
Isn't what ft used to be. The
tendency is to let the children
take command, run things to
suit themselves. And where
could you find worse tyrants
than among undisciplined,
over-coddled kids?
They manage this better In
England, too I must admit.
It was a real experience for me
to see my two youngsters (there
are three now) react to our Aunt
Kitty when we went to England
early this year. Aunt Kitty is a
stately person, dignified, some-
what like Queen Mary.
David and Oracle were craay
about her. But, they were awed
by her, too. and treated her with
great respect. It was the sort of
respect Aunt Kitty was accus-
tomed to receive from English
children of their age.
To me, it pointed up the dif-
ference In training youngsters
get in a well-run, everythlng-
on schedule English household,
compared to the hurry-scurry,
hair-pulling, kids-in-command
rat-race that sometimes passes
for the American home.
Don't get me wrong, please. I'm
not running down this great
country of ours. It's the greatest
in the world, to be sure. And
GAPE HOUSE IN U.8.A.: Here's where the Gape. Uve to
Cuyahoga Falls, O. They turned down Ufe In England, com-
mented their critic In the London newspaper, "W'tavor of
id a lifetime work-
central heating, ft
-----ttt, a refrigerator,
1***^' "i?i,nta'l *' ""The two) and a television set"
rta*LSS0l?tloiv*',the **ut* *- *"hmd (which the Loa.
d^n 7nt%Xutn ? "mythlng so man WtlihnoirBles
spend a lifetime Working towards and dreaming about") li
still pending.
mentea their critic In the London newspaper,
everything that so many Americans spend a 1U
. f !Jfr "m>lU "*" house with oentrs
Job (wKh prospects) in American commerce, a
don't forget the Gapes chose it in
preference to sizeable fortune ln
England.
But, still, I think there are
things going on here that we
ought to worry about. Things we
should criticize frankly, and
things we should get up on our
hind legs and do something
about.
With all our social security, In-
surance against everything and
other pre-fftbricated securities, I
believe Americans are among the
most Insecure people on earth.
My grandmother had a woman
come ln and do her washing, and
stlU she worked 10 times as hard
as I do. Yet. I believe Grandmo-
ther and the washerwoman both
enjoyed mofe real security than
I and my automatic washer put
together.
Maybe the answer lies in a re-
turn to faith, more faith in our-
selves, more faith In God. Maybe
we'll find that example we need
la our churches.
But, not nearly enough of as
go to church. It's a real effort
to get a young family out of bed
on Sunday morning, get every-
body, sbined up and off to
churchbut, once you've doae
It, everybody feels a lot better
for It.
Maybe part of the answer liesl
in our schools. They've been ne-
glected far too long.
The British lady says "thel
American standard of education
is as far below ours as ours is be-
low the French."
Why should America's educa-1
tional system be below anybo-
dy's? If we're the richest, most I
fortunate people on earth then
we deserve the best schools, the I
best teachers, the best educated
people on earth.
All the good things, all the
comforts and conveniences
that America can give us, wont
amount to anything unless we
become mature, Integrated in-
dividuals, with (as the books
say) peace of mind and soul.
Now. don't, please, write mel
nasty letters and say. Mrs. Gape,]
if you don't Uke it here, why!
don't you go over to England and I
live?" I havent said I don't likel
it here. I do.
!
Mvamsim
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II)


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 151
fHE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE
pacific Society
Wlrt. C*rrotl L. J(tck*r
Bo, 17, &&os V.L BaLa 3521
six o'clock In the Balboa Dining;at 10:00 a.m. on Christmas Day
Room and from six o'clock on In at the club,
the Bella Vista Room.
Troop 37 had a part In the enter-
tainment: Mrs. J. F. Pree's PatrOl
headed by Dannlelle Horned gave
their Interpretation of the Nat-
ivity scene; Mrs. William Davis'
patrol, captained by
The regular Sunday buffet will
be held this afternoon, starting
at slx-thlrty, in the Bella Vista
Room of the Hotel El Panama.
MISS PATRICIA ELAINE FARLEY
FARLEY-VAN EVERA
ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
The engagement of Miss Patricia Elaine Farley, daughter
of Mrs. Malcolm F. Farley of St. Paul, Minnesota, and the
Ute Professor Farley, to Mr. Dwlght M. Van Evera^LV, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight M. Van Erera of Balboa, has been
The wedding will be a summer event to take place in St.
Paul, Minnesota.
Miss Farley is a graduate of
Hamllne University in St. Paul
and did graduate work at the
University of Minnesota. She
taught in the Hawaiian Islands
for one year and is now a mem-
ber of the faculty of the Balboa
High School.
Mr. Van Evera graduated from
the Balboa High School and at-
tended the Canal Zone Junior
College. He Is now stationed at
Albrook Air Force Base as a
member of the United States Air
Force.
I
| Mrs. Browne Honored
With Dinner at Union Club
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Gibson,
61 Curundu, entertained last eve-
ning with a dinner at the Union
Miss Barbara Jones
Home For Holidays
Miss Barbara L. Jones, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Jones,
arrived Thursday night by plane
from Miami, Florida. She is a
student at Florida State Univer-
sity in Tallahassee. "
Misa Wanda Hudson
Is Visitor Here
Miss Wanda Hudson, of Miami.
Florida, is the house-guest of
Miss Edith Beauchamp. of Bal-
boa, for the Christmas holidays.
Miss Hudson is a student at the
Miami-Jackson High' School in
Miami.
nlpg with a dinner at the Union ]
nt Kmutn Tennessee who ls'a'VuP
Mr. Snchez Entertains
For Daughter
Mr. Carlos Luis Snchez enter-
tained at seven: o'clock^ Friday
of ErwiniTennessee who is"a-
or on the' Isthmus.
The attending guests included
Mr. and Mrs. Victor F Goytia,
Mr. and Mrs. Enrique Abrahams,
Mr and Mrs. Francisco Fbrega,
Mr' and Mrs. Francisco Aued,
Mr' and Mrs. Adolfo Fbrega, Mr
and Mrs. Michael Todd. Mr. and
Mrs. A. 8. Barham, Miss Luz Ma-
ria Fbrega and Mr. John M.
Kennedy.
Mr. and Mr. McGlnnto
To Vacation in Costa Rica
Mr and Mrs. Edwirr Mahlon
McQlnnls left by plane yesterday
morning for Costa Rica, where
they wlfi enjoy a vacation of sev-
eral weeks.
_jebtng in tbftBtUa.i
f the HotelM"Pana
dinner given In honor of t_
birthday anniversary of Tils
daughter Daisy Elena Snchez.
Covers were laid for twenty.
Walker, gave a Santa Claus skit;
and Mrs. Gordon Balblrnles pat-
rol sang Christmas carols led by
Sandra Parsley.
Leader Mrs.G. Davis presented
the guests from the orphanage
and gave them gifts made for
them by the Brownies which
were spool dolls with candy canes
attached. Mrs. Simpson gave
them the gifts collected by her
respective troops.
Refreshments were served by
the Troop Committee, Mrs. K.
coombs, Mrs. J. Hewitt, Mrs. A.
Days and Mrs. D. R. Parsley.
Executive Board To Have
Christmas Meeting
The traditional Christmas
meeting and gift exchange of the.
Executive Board of the Balboa
Woman's Club will be held at the
home of the president, Mrs. Pat-
sy Ryan, at 548-D, Seaforthea
Street, Cocoll on December 26th
at 0:00 a.m.
Emblem Club To Meet
At El Rancho
The Balboa Emblem Club No.
49 will hold a Christmas party
on December 28th at seven o-
clock at El Rancho Garden. Re-
servations must be made o*10
the 27th and can be made by
calling Katherlne Trimble at
Balboa 1548 or Margaret Graham
at Balboa 2951.
Tivoll Hotel To Serve
Christmas Dinner
Reservations are now being ac-
cepted by the Hotel TlvoU for
Christmas dinners to be served
from twelve until two o'clock and
from six until eight o'clock.
Bridge Gamee Temporarily
Discontinued ,
The regular Monday evening
bridge tournament played in the
Card Room of the Hotel TWoll
has been temporarily disconti-
nued due to the Christmas and
New Year's holidays. They will be
resumed on January 8th.
Bingo Tonight
At Legion Club -. ...
Bingo will be played tonight at
the American Legion Club at
seven-thirty o'clock. All mem-
bers and their guests are invited
to attend.
New Year's Eve Party
At Legion Club
The American Legion Post No.
1 is planning a gala New Years
Eve celebration to be held at thei
Legion Club at Fort Amador on
December 31st. There will be no
charge for admission.
Hotel El Panam To Have1
Christmas Dinner
Reservations are being accept-
' fprthe Christmas dinner to
-Ja$* Dinners '*
Served from 12:00 noon through
lanrira Unlon Club To Ho,d
... ?ui,- Christmas Parties
The Union Club will hold iU
traditional Christmas party for
will go to send packages of food
to needy Immigrants of Israel
who are escaping from Commu-
nist-Infested areas.
The Channuka party, which
will feature a cake sale, card ta-
bles,' bingo games, white ele-
Hotel F.l Panam To Celebrate
New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve will be a bl]
10:00 p.m. December 31st In the1 arranged by members of each
patio. Dance music wUl be !unJg"55ffE&.A2"**
ting Panamani- Co^fe^^r- gu or
donations may be made by con-
tacting any of _the following
an and American dance bands.
Dinner will be served at 12:00
midnight and breakfast at 3:00
wuu.wu,., w. h., .. a.m. Reservations may be made\*2% "";t,s 7Panko Pana
the children of the club members by calling the hotel. Admission ffVJffii MrT M^WaiSFat
on Christmas Eve from price Is $2.00. P^namT VmM, "or ISfoA
six o'clock.
The club will give an eg-gnog
party for members and their fa-
milies on Christmas Dav from
twelve noon until two o'clock.
or
Stern, Panam 2-1962.
SIAMESE CHICKS THRIVE
Ladies of Jewish Communities
Plan Benefit Channuka Party
And Cake Sale
The ladies of the Jewish Com-
munities of Panam, Coln, and NORTH ATTLEBORO, Mass.
the Canal Zone are planning a (UP)81amese chicks are thrlv-
beneflt Channuka party andj Ing at Robert Peck's poultry farm
cake sale to be held Wednesday [here. The chicks, a combination
at the USO-JWB Armed Forces of Cross Barred Rock and New
Service Center on La Boca Road,1 Hampshire, are joined at the
Elks To Have
E-Nog Party
The annual egg-nog party giv-
en by the Benevolent and Pro-I Balboa from 7 to 11 p.m. |base of the neck. Peck says they
tUve Order of Elks will be held All the proceeds Of the party are "very healthy.'
kA. Splendid ^.ift
EMERSON'S
Model 587
$22.95
AC-DC Compact
PANAMUSICA.S.A.
127 Central Avenue

Brownie Troop Holds
Christmas Party
Brownie Troop No. 37 held Its
Christmas party, Wednesday, In
the Cocoll Gymnasium. All par-
ents were Invited and special
guests were two girls from the
San Jos Orphanage In Panam,
Macenclana Castillero and Gloria
Yilll. TTiey were accompanied by
Sister Catalina Buitrago. Mr. H.
C. Simpson represented Troop 13
and 24 from Balboa and brought
the guests from the'orphanage.
Each of the three Patrols of


LA MODA AMERICANA
TO LAST MINUTE SHOPPERS . '.
THERE'S STILL TIME
TO FIND
every gift yon want for Her. .
rifht here . at very low prices
BLOUSES
silk, from 1.98
SKIRTS
from 3.95
Nylon HOSE
latest models
Housecoats
Silk seersucker
Ladies Sandals
from 3.75
NYLON
Half Slips Slips
Nighties Panties
LA MODA AMERICANA
702 Central Avenue Panam
'Wizard of Wappoo'
Balks Al Detective']
Magic Lie Detector
CHARLESTON, B.C., Dec. 22
(UP) Charleston county's
i slippery "Wizard of Wappoo"
'broke down and confessed to 15
suburban burglaries today rather
than submit to a He detector
test.
County police chief Julian T.
Williams said 19-year-old Walter
Deleston, a Negro golf club cad-
dy, admitted 15 of 17 reported
burglaries in the suburban Wap-
poo Heights section between Ju-
ly 23 and his capture Dec. 10.
Williams said the He detector
was brought from Columbia, but
when confronted with the ma-
chine, Deleston asked if he could
"confer with his attorney." After
a short consultation. Williams
said. Deleston confessed..
After the confession he took of- (
fleers on a tour of the scenes of
the robberies and demonstrated
the various means he used to gain
entry to the homes.
He said he usually took only
money but did steal some gloves
and a pistol holster from one vic-
tim's home.
HURRY!... HURRY!
Only two days left to do your
Xmas shopping at your
reliable Jewelry store
HAWAII
56 Central Are. 56
Choose
from .
gold and
silver
articles
from
$1.-
dgold
rings for
men and
women
from
$7.75
Swiss and American gold-
filled watches
from $15.
Cigarette cases and lighters
from $7.75
Today, Sunday, Open A Day
Use your Xmas Dollar!
TAHITI!

V FOR YOUR LAST MINUTE CONVENIENCE
* WE WILL BE OPEN ALL DAY
TODAY AND TOMORROW UNTIL 9 P.M.
THERE IS STILL TIME
TO USE YOUR XMAS DOLLAR!

^^.^ ou,nloe...
individual requirements
LODGE RINGS
Nl HIM M NEI
$ 15.- UP
SHOP IN AIR-CONDITIONED COMPORT
TAHITI
T H E
137 J E WE L R Y 9 T 0 R E
ntralOlvt. 137





''



tf

rxc.r Flint
.
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
/
Mushroom Stuffing Is Different


SUNDAY, DECEMBER tt, 1H\


'
w
omen s
WorU

Cranberry Parfait Is New Idea
ua ^ravote
CRANBEKRY-FILLED ORANGE basketa and watnrreee
drfor.ilr vour Christmas turkey.
help
L .a ior a new turkey stuf-| remaining 1/3 cup fat and klt-
t[na' Here is one you'll like:, ichen bouquet, if used. Rub this
'mixture all over the .outside of
Roast Turkey With Mushroom the turkey. Roast In slow oven
Stuffing: I (325 degrees F. i until joint moves
Eight to 10 pound broad- freely when end of leg is grasped
breasted turkey, dressed weight, flrmiy and aentlv twisted, about
I cup fat. 1 cup finely diced eel- 3 hours.
ery. 1 cup finely diced onion. 2"2 Meanwhile cook giblets and
iuarts cubed day-old bread. lVmake gravy. Serve turkey gar-
teaspoons salt. U teaspoon pep- nished with whole cranberry
per. "4 teaspoon marjoram, 2 3- sauce in orange cups and crisp
Ounce cans chopped bro 11 e d watercress.
mushrooms. 1 tablespoon kitchen For Christmas dessert on the
bouquet, if desired. lighter side, try this cranberry-
Have meat dealer prepare tur- apple pie, plus Cheddar cheese:
ley for roasting. Melt 2/3 cup of
the fat In a saucepan. Add cele- Cranberry-Apple Pie
ry and onion and let cook over.
oiod'-rate heat for 10 minutes. Four tart apples, 1U cups fresh :
(Birring occasionally. Meanwhile cranberries, pastry, 3, cup sugar.i
trim crusts from enough day-old '4 teaspoon cinnamon. >4 tea-i
while bread to make 2'2 quarts spoon salt. 2 tablespoons table!
when finely cubed. fat.
, Place bread in a large mixing pare, core and thinly slice the,
ftb4.r Sprinkle with salt, pepper apples. Wash and cut cranber-
Cffectit/e Catire
-ALaus Be Wett'3)reMeJ' % &a Jffai,
WUU
air
For your Christmas entertain-
ing, here are two delightful reci-
ples. The tutted mushrooms
can be served as hot canapes be-
fore dinner and the parfait la
light and delicate and as red as
holly.
h>
Staffed Broiled Mushroom
(Makes 4 servings)
Six-ounce can broiled mush-
room crowns, 3-ounce can deviled
ham, V\ teaspoon mustard, ft
teaspoon grated onion, ft tea-
spoon minced parsley.
Drain mushrooms, reserving
broth for other ase. Scoop out
stem ends of mushroom crowns
with sharp knife or melon bailer.
Finely chop stem ends. Combine
deviled ham, chopped mushroom
stems, mustard, onion and pars-
ley. Stuff mixture back Into
mushroom crowns.
Arrange in shallow pan to go
under broiler. Broil 4 Inches from
moderate heat in preheated
broiling compartment until thor-
oughly hot, about 5 minutes.
Serve as hot canape,'or to top
scrambled eggs on toast.
or 3 tablespoons sugar, ft tea-1
spoon alt. 3 tablespoons qulck-
copklng tapioca, ft teaspoon va-
nilla, 1 to 1ft cups cranberry
sauce or cranberry Jelly, ft cut
cream, whipped.
Beat egg white until foamy
throughout; add 2 tablespoon*
sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, and
continue beating with -fotary eg*
beater until mixture will stand la
soft peaks. Set aside. Mix egg yolk
with about ft cap of the milk in
saucepan. Add 2 or 3tablespoons
sugar, salt, tapioca and remain-
ing milk. Place over medium
heat. "'
Cranberry Parfait
(Makes 6-8 servings)
One egg white, 2 tablespoons
These California fashions, designed for resort wear, can play more
and marjoram. Drain and add.j-les In halves. Line a 9-inch pie1 than one role in a wardrobe. Three-piere ensemble (left) by Juli
Lynn Chariot is in wool jersey in shades of pink and rose, can be
worn afternoon or evening. Matador pants (center) from Addle
Masters are black rayon fringe on' bengaline topped by full-
contents of cans of mushrooms. \ plate with pastry. Place a laver
reserving broth. Add cooked ven-,0f apples in the bottom of the
etables and toss lightly to mix pie plate. Add" cranberries. Add
evenly with bread. remaining apples. Sprinkle with
Moisten as desired with the a mixture of the sugar, cinnamon
mushroom broth, saving the re- and salt. Dot with table fat.
maining broth for use in the gra-! cover with pastry that has
vy Stuff turkey with dressing, openings cut in the center to let
sleeved white rayon shirt. Cummerbund is electric pink saln.'
They're right both for lounging and for informal dinners at home.
Another afternoon-into-evening dress (right) is black-and-white
checked gingham. A Jeanette Alexander design. It has spen froatd
to show eyelet-ruffled underskirt.
BY GAILE DUGAS
Ni: \ Woman's Editor
lover elaborate fashions, for combines two shades of pink: le- pink for accent. This Is a loung-
clothes meant for single occa- mon blossom and patio rose, ing fashion that the hostess will
sions only or for clothes whose I For a strapless bodice, there's a
NEW YORK, Fasten vent opening with string steam escape. Seal edges. Bake and more, the dress that can be of time. This shirring appears again in
laced around poultry pins and in a hot oven (400 to 425 degrees worn afternoon into evening1 The average American woman'double bands on the soft full
truss legs In position. f. ) about 45 minutes or until the finds favor with American worn- likes fashions that dovetail neat- 'skirt. And it
Place turkey on rayjt,ln shallow apples are tender and crust Is en. And on the increase, too, Is a ly, that glide gracefully from one
roasting pan. Blend together the i golden brown. liking for informal lounging time of day to another.
____________ clothes that look well when a:
' hostess presides at her own small: An awareness of this changing
dinners. ,pace Is apparent In the current
For American women are busy collections of California design-
people. Few of them find them- ers. Juli Lynn Chariot of Los An-
dvea with time lo kill or evenjgeles. for one, does a neat and
time to spare. This means that timeless three-piece ensemble In
there's no place in the closet for light-weight wool jersey that
POR
SCRATCHES
LARGE 35c SMALL 20*
find equally becoming for wear
at her own dinner table.
When a woman has a favorite
dress, It's usually one in which
makes entirely t she looks pretty and feels right.
pink stole with rose-toned lining. Thus, it's likely to be uncompli-
The Spanish Influence is seen,ated. A Jeahnette Alexander
clearly in sUm and tapered mata-1 design for afternoon-lnto-even-
dor pants of black rayon fringe ing wear Is Just such a dress
on bengaline. They're worn with A black and white checked
a full-sleeved white shirt that gingham coat dress, it's split in
sports a brilliant jeUand-sequin' front from waist to hem to reveal
sugar, 1 egg yolk, 2 cups milk, 2 cream.
Cook until mixture comes to a
boil, stirring constantly this
takes 5 to 8 minutes. Pour small
amount of hot tapioca mixture
gradually on beaten egg white,
blending well. Then quickly add
the remaining mixture, stirring
constantly. (The hotter the ta-
pioca and the faster It is blend-
ed In. the thicker and fluffier the
pudding will be.) Add vanilla.
Cool, stirring once after 15 to 20
minutes. Chill. Serve the tapio-
ca cream and cranberry sauce
layered In parfait glasses. (Make
5 layer*, beginning with cranber-
ry sauce.) Top with the whipped
JJ% FOOD Nt ws I
\ W by tnou*(uu> / urifcZ (
' ^fc JJF n miifi iihutu if tay aiaejaataa, I
^B^^^ t-r ajB^hsl ssjMSMt 1
SINGING FOR JOY!
What a wonderful treat for your canary
to be fed on French"! Bird Seed! French's
ha everything he needs and likes to make
him hippy and keep him healthy. No
ordinary seed this I Every packet has i j
pure, tested ingredient! and a pedal Bird
Biscuit. This unique blend makes a per-
fectly balanced diet that keeps your pet
lookini beautiful aad singing hi* flecas
' lOQiS.
Each With Vbur Own
This stalwart snowman, stand-
ing poised before his drum of
dusting pov.ler, conceals a bot-
tle of cologne beneath his
sparkling white Jacket.
Initial
i

4qnBfurHmvJart
with white-star nil from
Kellogg'sVARIETYPACKAGE
PrlCt) Include, your script Initial!
Heavily putted, beautifully atyUsd ...
exclusive "Signature" is Old Company
Plata .made and guaranteed by the)
Wm Rogers Mfg. Co., Mariden, Conn.
So lovely, you'll want more! With tea-
apoona, you receive list of completa
pattern and price. Send for thia tun-
ning valueoffered by . .
Kellogg'avAjuarnr,beat pick 'n'chooaa
tun of all) 10 generou boxea, 7 real
cereal favorite. Grand anytime!
\&
giffiflaa
ffjp
HE!
ill!
X
O
A
K
f
Buiw, >m. iK wuamm. mmmm
Plaaeeaand ata......."gagaatare" pattern
>aaaaap with initial etrcteel. Wm each emit eat
ef 4 epaaaa, I doe t te-atar asad tree
KeOogg'e v**nvrr raccaob taiTesal ooen.
In a pose of elfin whimsy, this
red-felt Santa awaits the lucky
recipient who will claim the
cologne, purse perfume and lip-
stick forming body and arms.
..........
qn............
.ftATI.......
Koast L^hrittna
For best results, roast your tur-
key slowly. That is the exclusive
advice to this column from Ma-
bel Stegner. Bom in 8outh Da-
kota, now on a well-known home
economics consultant. Miss Steg-
ner has more practical hints for
roasting the Christmas turkey.
She thinks today's turkeys,
bred and grown under scientific
conditions, are much superior to
the big 18 to 20-pound birds she
remembers at home.
She believes in low tempera-
ture roasting. 300 degrees F. for
large turkeys, 325 degrees F. for,'
small ones, rather than the old-;
fashioned, high temperatures.
"Most people cook their tur-
kevs far too long,!'be insists.
"Two hours is plenty for small ,'
] turkeys and 3 hours for medium-
sized ones. Naturally the turkey
browns more slowly when roasted
at a low temperature, but I help
tt along with my own pet brown-
ing glaze made bv blending Va cup
softened fat with 1 tablespoon
kitchen bouquet.
"Sometimes I add a bit of herb
seasoning to it for an unusual
touch. I rub this mixture all over
the turkey before cooking. The
fat melts as the turkey cooks and
keeps the skin moist and soft."
poodle In this Addie Masters de-
sign. .
Satin cummerbund is electric
an eyelet-ruffled petticoat. Top Is
sleeveless and neckline Is widely
scooped-out.
omen
Wo
wu
HERE'S A FANCY DESSERT THAT'S EASY TO FIX! Takes only
about 5 short minutes to cook, serves five or six, and Is so
downright delicious you'll hever believe It could be so Inexpen-
sive I It's made with Jell-O Tapioca Pudding. We've come to
expect perfection every time we see this pudding in a recipe
every time we use it for a new dessert idea. It's always so rich,
ly flavored, it's truly delicious. And the texture of this pudding
is 8b creamy-smooth that when we combine it with whipped
cream as in this parfait, we never can tell where one leaves
off and the other beginsand that's oar idea of blissful eating.
Yours, too, we hope. Try this recipe tonight or save it for Sun-
day; but by all means try It soon. You have a delightful treat
In storel
LUSCIOUS MOCHA PARFAIT
/ package Jell-0 Chocolate Tapioca Pudding
Z cups milk
2 teaspoon Instant Maxwell House Coffee
or Instant Sanka Coffee
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon butter
Coffee Whipped Cream
Cook Jell-O Chocolate Tapioca Pudding with milk as directed J
on the package, adding instant coffee and sugar with the pud-' j
ding powder. Remove from heat -and add butter. Cool, stlrrlnjM
once after 15 to 20-minutes. Then chill. Serve In. parfait glasses,'*
alternating layers of pudding and Coffee Whipped Cream., 1
Makes 5 or 0 servings.
Coffee '/hipped Cream. Combine., In small bowl Vs up chilled
HOMEMADE FUDG.E Is the [ta without any fuss at all. Why\
cream of the candy "eropwhen 'not make some delicious Postum
it's good. But how many times Syrup and keep tt on hand?
have you turned it onto a plate *It's easy to prepare and dls-
Smiling in anticipation of her
mother's pleasure In her choice,
this little girl happily ties skin
sachet into perky package. Trio
of hand lotion, beside her. Is
next for wrapping.
Ht etfer atad eaty ia Ciaal Zee*
Child's fork-and-spoon in sil-
verplate make gift with some-
thing extra in way of small
plastic duck.that's a real toy.
A miniature spruce tree, trim-
med with after-dinner coffee
spoons in sterling-inlaid silver-
r'''~. makes unusual gift. "
By GAY PAULEY
NEW YORK, (UPj You think
your food!*111 As high....
Well, there's an Unusual dining
spot in New York where the tab
Is enough to make most of us
choke on the entree but the cus-
tomers are so blase about the cost
of eating they have a Joking mot-
to which is, "All you can consume
for $700."
A check like that would keep
I most of us from crashing the pri-
vate dining room of the Sports
Afield Club, a hangout for some
1,300 members, most of them
sportsmen.
If you once got in, however, you
could get a bowl of something
called "poor man's soup" for $1.
The members love wild game
and are willing to pay for it ...
up to $100, for instance, for
enough Mexican armadillo to
serve four.
An Australian kangaroo chop Is
$50, a porcupine luncheon runs
about $55, a muskrat blue plate
spetial goes for $62 and a cari-
bou steak is down on the menu
for $72.
The clubrooms are on the top
floor of a restaurant which caters
to the public and the works is run
by Nino Malnlnl, who learned
cooking first In his parents' res-
taurant in Milan, Italy, and then
m New York. Nino's restaurants
always have featured wild game
but It wasn't until the club came
to him asking for special dining
facilities that he went all out for
game cookery.
Nino's chef Is French born
Raymond Paret. whose hobby Is
wild-game preparation. He's
coming out soon with a book on
the subject.
It'll include methods for cook-
ing buffalo and bear steaks, a
couple of favorite dishes of the
club members. Incidentally, bear
steak, which Paret said "Is deli-
cious," costs a mere $7.50 per
serving. Buffalo Is $8 50.
The book also will Include Pa-
ret's method for scrambling os-
trich eggs and the chances are
you can fix them more cheaply at
home than you can have them
when dining out. The club charg-
es $35.
Paret scrambles them with truf-
fles, chives, fresh parsley and
heavy cream and serves them
with croutons and pate de fole
gras.
For any of you taking up wild-
game cookery, a tip from Ray I
mond. He said roost game is
strong In taste. It needs lots of!
marinating In wines and spices.
He also advocates a wine sauce,
with generous use- of garlic, tar-
ragon vinegar, truffles and
mushrooms, heavy cream hi some
cases, sour cream m otMers.
"The idea," said the chef, "la to
doctor game up a little.. other-
wise you can't stand the stuff.'*
only to find It still, runny? Or
perhaps you've boiled, it too
long and the delicate creaml-
solves In milk with a minimum
Of itirrlng, so even your little-
ones can fix their own drinks.
ness is gone? If you want to They'll get extra food- energy,
make sura of fudge that's tod, from the sugar, and Instant
smooth and luscious every time, Postum Itself Is a healthful
you ought to try Baker's 4.1n-l wheat cereal beverage. To make
Sweet Cocoa Mix. Just follow syrup, combine in a saucepan
the simple directions on the .1 cup Instant Postum, 1 Va cups
package, and watch the clock, water and lVz cups brown sU-
Easler than making tests you're gar, firmly packed. (You may
seldom sure of, and takes much usa granulated sugar Instead, It
less time. And oh, that Baker's
Chocolate flavor is the richest
ever! But fudge is only one-
fourth the story of Baker's 4-
ln-l. For chocolate drinks, hot
or cold, frostings and sauces,
you couldn't ask for a mix that
turns 'em out better and quick-
er. Get some today. You'll find
yourself concocting a regular
stream of chocolate goodies.
And who could object to that?
canned FRUIT ATOP YOUR it. But to gat cakes
BREAKFAST CEREAL Is a dish; beautiful and taste
you ought to try one of these you must use fine ingredients
mornings. You could dream up In making them. One of' the
you prefer). Place over low heat
And simmer until a smooth sy-
rup la formed. (About 3 min-
utes). Cool. Make 2V cups sy-
rup. For drinks, use 1 table-
spoon Postum Syrup to 1 cup,
milk.
ANY TIME IS CAKE-EATING
TIME with most folks. Just one
look at a tender, fluffy piece
and they're ready to drop ev.
exythlng to sit down and enjoy
that loolc
delicious.
many combinations, but sliced
peaches over Post's Grape-Nuts
Flakes gets our vote. Of course,
this tasty, ready.to-eat cereal
made of wheat and malted bar-
ley Is always good with fresh
Irults, or served plain with milk
or cream and sugar. But some-
how we're partial to the con-
trast between soft canned
peaches and delightful, extra-
crisp Grape-Nuts Flakes. Then
too, you get smoother sweeten.
Ing by mixing part of the can-
ned juice with the milk. Saves
sugar and adds to the even,
nut-like flavor of this nourish-
ing dish.
FLAVOR THE CHILDREN'S
MILK and you'll have no trouble
getting them to drink it. What's
more. If you can offer a choice
of several different flavors,
they'll consume their dally quo-
most Important of these, natur-
ally, is the cake flour, If you
want to be sure of soft, fine,
even texture when your baking
^merges from the oven, you
must use flour that has these
game qualities. Swans Down
Cake Flour, made of soft winter
wheat specially milled and sift-
ed through silk, Is your besl
assurance of perfect results.
And here's the perfect way to
trim your next cake to make it
even more tempting: bake a
Swans Down white cake (recipe
on the box) In a 9-lnch square
ran. Bake about 25 minutes at
75F. Cut 3-lnch squares, then
cut each of these diagonally in
half so you'll have 18 triangles.
Cover the top and sides of each
Jvlth your favorite frosting. This
Ought to satisfy everyonecake
and frosting lovers alike!
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANI AD*
.NUDA JOB
CAto-EULiYeVR NEEDS


TODAY, DlCmm M, 1951
i t i rti
tttaSip
THE SfNDAT AMERICAN
CeaSSBBW
\^rtlantic Society
&, 195, (*t** OeLpkmu Q*tun 378
MS. CEDENO HOSTESS EOK CBXISTMAS TEA
Mr, Arutin Ceden, wife of the GeTerner ef the ire-
Tlnee of Colea, m heetees for an elaborate Chrietsaes tea
slyer, at the Hotel Washinrton yesterdayafternoon.
The occasion aUo celebrated the birthday aninyersary
the hostess.
V. A. Garcia. A. E. Herrera, C.
Chuljalc, A. F. Magh, and J. P.
jaco me.
The friends who called during
the afternoon included: Mrs.
Henry F. Taylor. Mrs. L. L. Koe-
plte, Mrs Hollis Prelss, Mrs.
William Parsons, Mrs. L. L.
Jackson. Mrs. Raymond Klrwin.
Mrs. Frank L. Scott. Mrs. Frank
W. Scott, Mrs. Julio Salas, Mrs.
Harold Salas, Mrs. Ounther
Hirschfeld, Mrs. FritsHumphrey,
Mrs. Robert LetRh, Mrs. CUfford
Maduro, Mrs. Albert Motta. Mrs.
Charles Perrett, Sr., Mrs. Chas.
Perrett, Jr..Mrs. Harry Eno.Mrs
Marcelle Ortngoire, Mrs. Rul
Herrera, Mrs. Luis Eduardo Cas-
tillo. Mrs. Eduardo Castao. Mrs.
Enrico Burlando, Mrs. William
Adams, Mrs. Anthony Raymond,
Mrs. Enrique Pucci, Mrs. Juan
Puccl, Mrs. Felix Stansiola, Mrs.
Herbert oledano, Mrs. James
Whitely.Mrs. Juan Ventura.Mrs.
J. T. Butler. Jr., Mrs. James
Ford, Mrs. Humberto Leignadier,
Mrs. Ruben Arela. Mrs. Olmedo
Alfaro, Mrs. Hioollto Fernandes.
Mrs Julia Emilianl. Mrs. Jorge
Lefia Mrs. Jorge Patlflo Linares,
Mrs. Fabian Pinto, Mrs. Deme-
trio Rusodimus. Mrs. Dayga-
rner. Mrs. Manuel Castlllo^Mrs.
Emilio Palomeras. Mrs. S. Boner,
Mrs. Frank Zlemets, Mrs Harry
Castro, Mrs. Julio Domingues,
Mrs Walter Hunnlcutt, Mrs.
Daulton Mann, Mrs. James Fer-
nandei, Mrs. Ruben Catano.Mrs.
Jose Maria Gonzalez Mrs. Era
Forgnoni, Mrs. Blale M. Skill-
man. Mrs. ines Rosabal, Mrs Be-
ln Dommguea, Mrs. Julip Nino.
Mrs. Isaac Osorio, Mrs. Marcel
Belanger.Mrs. Alonzo Fernandez,
Mrs. Fred Workman, Mrs. Vi-
cente Lara. Jr.. Mrs. BCal-
ylno, Miases Blanca and Yolanda
Beyerhoudt, Carmen Calonje,
Thelma Herrera. Vllma Basso,
Rosarlo Lara. AdeUda Lopez and
Leila Leignadier.
Also present from Panama City
were: Mrs. Gustavo de Obaldia,
Mrs. Luis Carlos de la Guardia
and Mrs. Miguel Angel Ordonez.
Mrs. Emilio Rodriguez, Mrs. O.
Casas, Mrs. William Clark, Mrs.
E. J. Culllnan, Mrs. X. K. Hol-
ster, Mrs. R. Ramlrea. Mrs. P.
W. Rose, Mrs. Claud Douty and
Mrs. R. C. Wilson.
, Mrs. Rafael Ramires and Mrs.
Ctanley Lewis presided at the
coffee services and Mrs. Richard
Norton served the fruit cup.
Piano selections were played
by Corporal Miguel Venon of the
flOth Army Band during the cof-
fee hour and the ladles joined in
singing Christmas Carols
Thirty-five Christmas pa
were turned in for the children of
Young People to Sing Carols
The young people of the Cris-
tobal Union Church and of the
American Episcopal Church of
Our Saviour will meet at the Un-
ion Church at 0:00 p.m. Monday
to sing Carols at the Colon, Ama-
dor Guerrero and Coco Solo Na-
val Hospitals.
Christmas Eve Services
There will be a midnight serv-
ice at the Cristobal Union Church
at 11:30 p.m. Monday evening.
(Book (Bruft
the St. Vincent de Paul Orphan-
age. These, with money for fruits
for Christmas were taken to the
Orphanage In the afternoon.
Mrs. Orvllle T. Shaw was
chairman of this committee and
was assisted by Mrs. David Mc-
Cracken. Mrs. Vincent Oberg,
Mrs. Harry B. Gardner, and
Mrs. Raymond Patricio.
The Christmas Eve Service at
the Gatun Union church will
start at 11:00 p.m., and there will
bespeclaMnuslcbythecholr
CfllRFRfTLICH
JOtlEAUTIfUtCAIPtTS.
Christmas Branch
for United Fruit Family
Mr. William E. Adams, the
General Agent for the United
Fruit Company and Mrs. Adams
gave an elaborate Christmas
"Brunch" at their Brazos Heights
residence yesterday for the mem-
bers of the United Fruit Compa-
ny family.
Their guests were: from Pana-
ma City, Mr. and Mrs. V. Mais,
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Gorki. Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Aeree with Mr.
and Mrs. E. E.Moujmes. Mr. and
Mrs. O. Paredes, Mr. and Mrs.
A. F. Raymond, Mr. and Mrs.
.. J. Dldler.Mr. and Mrs. H. A.
Bailey. Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Pul-
ler and their house guest, Mr.
Oscar Wlberg, Mr. and Mrs. C.
E. Alberga, Mr. and Mrs. Her-
bedt Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. D. C.
Basso with Mrs. Florence Pauly,
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Letour-
neau. Mr. and Mrs. Alvln Heyde,
Miss Frances Moomaw, Mr. and
Mrs. Colin Lawson, Mr. and Mrs.
W. B. Mlddlemas. Mr. and Mrs.
M. S. Brzezinskl, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Macready, Miss Sarah Mac-
By United Press
New York's recent police graft
scandal would not have caused
much sensation In the old days
when it was really a lively city.
The story of the last 1O0 years
in the great city Is' one of sen-
sational growth and almost of a
sensational sobering up.
Lloyd Morris tells the cltys" his-
tory since the 1850s in Incredible
New York (Random House). It Is
a well told story, packed with In-
cident, filled with pictures.
Morris traces the city's growth
and the Ufe of its people from
the days of Dlcken's lectures,
Jenny Llnd, Adelina Pattl, the
Civil War draft, riots, when mobs
ruled the city, and the days
when the Tweed ring had in its
grip not only the police and the
city government but the courts
and even the state legislature...
Operation Overlord, the inva-
sion of Normandy, was one of the
best planned battles in the his-
tory of war. Even so. it had its
surprises. Among the more pleas-
ant ones for the Allies was the
unexpected effectiveness of
French saboteurs who, in con-
junction with the combined air
forces, crippled the enemy's
transportation. This Is one of the
events related in the official his-
tory of this great amphibious
operation. Cross Channel At- j
tack, written by Gordon A. Har-
rison from American. Allied and
German documents, and con-
taining photographs, maps, and
military directives. The book
forms part of the official record
of the U. S. Army In World War
II and Is Issued by the office'of
the chief of military history
through the superintendent of
documents, U. S. government
printing office...
Armour Incorporated

i
Miss Carolyn R**k*
Engaged to Mr. T.B, Price
Mr. and Mrs. MerwinJ. Rock-
nounce thTenga?ementof their ready7Mr7"and Mre.T.Tiwa-
daughter. Carolyn A. R*weU
to Mr. Thomas Reynolds Price,
sonofMr. and Mrs. Malcolm
Price of Mount Carmel, Pa.
The wedding Is being nlanned
for Mav and will take place in
Rome.N.Y.
Miss Rockwell came to tne
Isthmus during the past year and
is employed as librarian at Fort
Gull. She graduated from Ge-
neseo State Teachers College
and received her Masters from
Syracuse University.
Mr. Price is also a recent ar-
rival on the Isthmus. He Is the
technician in charge of the Nay a j
Research Laboratory Tropfcf1
Exposure Station at Fort Sher-
jntiT He received his B.S in
Chemistry from Albright College
at Reading, Perm.
Kwearingens Hold Open House
MTand Mrs. C. T. Swearin-
sen and Mr. Richard Swearlngen.
of Oatun. held open house at
their quarters last evening.
The residence was beautifully
decorated for the Christmas holi-
days with evergreens, ribbon
streamers and bells.
The buffet table was covered
with an Army and Navy cloth and
had an arrangement of ever-
greens and taoers as a border a-
galnstthe wall.
The hostess and hosts-were as-
sisted bv Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Schwarte and Miss Bette FarreU.
Visitors Honored
With Cocktail Party
Lt. Commander and Mrs. J.
F Crider entertained with a
cocktail party at their quarters
on the Coco Solo Naval Station
last evening to honor a group of
visitors who are spending the
holidays with relatives on the
station.
The honorees were Mr. ana
Mrs. O. H. Seal of Baltimore,
Maryland, Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Schroeder bf Park Ridge, Illinois
and Mr. Fred G. Applequlst C;f,
Des Molnes, Iowa.
A large turkey encircled with .
evergreens and nohisettlas and!
flanked by small snowmen cen-!
tered the buffet table.
invited to meet the visitors
were: Commander and Mrs. W.
W. Berois, commander and Mrs.
Ben Clark. Commander and Mrs.
W D King, Lt. Commander
and Mrs. A. P. Anderson, Lt.
Commander* and Mrs. H. E.
Schmidt, Lt. Commander and
Mrs. W. W. Stevens, Lt. Com-
mander and Mrs. T. L. Applt-
qulst, Lt. Commander and Mrs.
V A- Schweitzer, Lt. and Mrs.
W. Hall. Lt. and Mrs. J. D,
Rives. Lt. and Mrs. J. C. Novafc
andLt. and Mrs. Roy Nielsen.
Fort Gnllck Ladles Club
m Christmas Coffee
The ragukl ape** | $
Gullck Ladles Club was held Fri- i
day at the Officers club and was
preceded by a morning coffee.
Mrs. David McCracken. presi-
dent, officiated at the meeting ,
and the hostesses were: Mrs. J.
c. Hlpson and Mrs. Antonio Que- j
sad a.
A snowman and candy canes |
centered the buffet table and m- ,
dividual Christmas tree place
mats with red tapers and green-
ery were used on the Individual
' tables. The places were marked
with snowmen place cards.
A door prize was given away
and the winner was Mrs. Lee
Montgomery. ,
Mrs c. Wumn. of Cleveland.'
Ohio was the guest of Mrs. Will-
iam Llndstrom. Also present
were the following new members:
nl, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Infuse,
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ender, Cap-
tain and Mrs. E. V. Rainier. Mr.
and Mrs. Alonzo Fernandez and
Mrs. Jack Coffey, Mr. and Mrs.
C. A. Gallardo. Mr. and Mrs. E.
Forsman, Mr. and Mrs. I. Levl,
Dr. and Mrs. Ruben Arela, Mr.
an dMrs. Alonzo Fernandez and
Misses R. Ehrman. C. Grlmaldo,
8. Jaen, c. Luque, S. Jan. C.
P. Lee, M. H. Japal and Vil ma
Basso. Also present were: Messrs
E. C. Berrio. E. A. Beliz, T. Si-
mons, A. Berrio, A. 8. DeCastro,
Come and Set our gorgeous collection
r
Venice and Murano *
Crystal Novelties *
Kalian Porcelain Vases
Italian Dolls Nylon
if Nylon Lingerie
Figurines
Table Centerpieces
Blouses
and many other Novelties!




*





ANOUNCES
THEIR NEW LOCATION ON
No. 5 MARTIN SOSA
(Next to Lechera Central)
New Telephone Numbers:
.

WUKLD'S BEST
100% guaranteed
Sold by
NAT. MNDEZ
15 "J" St.
(Across Ancon P.O.)
3-4885 3-4886 3-4887
Armour Incorporated
.
No. 5 Martin Sosa Street
forybody1fea Ask for your GIFT with each PURCHASE over $5.00
MADURITO'S
I. L. MADURO, Jr.
100 Central Avenue
OPEN UNTIL 9:30 P.M.
THE BIGGEST and
BEST CELEBRATIONS
WILL BE
AT. .-. ...

awm
where everyone is feint all-ont to make your .
holidays the most memerabl you've ever known!
A Klrkebj HUI
RESERVE YOUR TABLE NOW FOR CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S EVE!
MMMMMMMM
CHRISTMAS EV Monday. Dec. 24ih
Come with your Menus to see El Panam in its holiday dress and to renew old
friendship? in the Joyous spirit of the season I
CHRISTMAS DAY
partake of an old-fashioned
Christmas Dinner
in the air-ccnditloned
BALBOA ROOM
N 12 noon -6pm
in the
BELLA VISTA ROOM
p.m to 10 p.m
Children half price.
The turkry will be specially
carved nt any table as* t or
-
Modernize Your Home!
1 Panama's the placa for fun all through the week!
WELCOME THE NEW YEAR
At EL PANAMA'S GALA PARTY !
AH-your friends will bt b$r$ for ibt bigge:/, g*yesl party dn
su the 1sth pius. ..
FLOOR SHOW NOISEMAKERS FAVORS
TWO ORCHESTRAS FOR DANCING TILL DAWN!
Midmte supper ($3 ) or light rtU^bments
New Year's brenk'.ust jtom 4 *.m.
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS TODAY!
entrance deketa (St. ' penen)
must M cured at tha Hele
y Sunday night >'<> hold vtur
advance reservation
rabias helf
Until lt:O nm
New Year'
JOY A BETTER LIFE WITH
GENERAjU ELECTRIC
Special Christmas Offer
REFRIGERATORS
10' S 3V9.00
8' 304.50
6' 239.60
Radio Phonograph-Console
$ 280.00
'.
-




RADIOS
Special for the TROPICS
S 79.50 $ 30.00
Mixers toasters Irons Fans
The Queen of the Kitchen

$ 124.00
FOR A HAPPIER HOME. ..
VISIT

v
EL HOGAR MODERNO
104 Central Avenue
S

r



PAGE SIX
MU.
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
i " i
.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1J
as
You Sell em...
When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!


Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
No. 4 Tiv.lt Ave.
Panne -KSI
KIOSKO OE LESSEES
ruque d.
MORRISON'S
It*. 4 Fourth .( Jnir An
Paeae j-mi
BOTICA CARLTON
14.4W MsltaSaa AVO.
PbesM IM-C.lea.
SALON OC BELLEZA AMERICANO
Ne. H Wm 1Mb Strret
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
Ne. IT "H" Street Panama
N.. IZ.171 Central At.Col*.
w
12 words-
Minimum for
3c each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
=
FR SALE: Solid mahogany Bar
with 3 leather upholstred maho-
gany stools. Must be seen to op-
Sreciote. $22500. 306. Pedro Mi-
guel. Tel. 4-352.
FOR SALE:Refrigerator porcelain
inside ond out, excellent condi-
tion, 25 cycle. $100.00. 1525-B
Govilon road.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
"Lum Henry" repair refinish Rattan
Bamboo Furniture, free estimate,
pick up and punctual service. Dia-
gonal Hotel Roosevelt No. 22.
FOR SALE: Rattan semi-circular
couch, six strand, in very good
condition. Calle 51 No. 4.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:Boat 25 foot Cris Craft
95 HP Engine. See Sunday ot
Diablo Sea Scout Landing $1,000.
00. Coll Curundu "7194._________
120 Survivors
Of Gallant (Hosiers
Home From Korea
LONDON, Dec. 22 (BIS)The
urvivors of the gallant bat-
talion of the Gloucestershire Re-
giment, who fought In the fam-
ous "last stand' battle of the
Imjin In Korea last April, ar-
rived back In Britain today.
Of the original outfit which
landed in Korea In November
1950, only 120 officers and men
are returning.
The British Armv Is to learn
valuable lessons from these
urvivors. After a Christmas
leave the men of the Olosters
will help to teach troops at the
War Office School of Infantry
at Warminster, Wiltshire.
The Glosters leave behind
therh a record of one of the
finest single actions of the Ko-
rean war.
From April 22-25 they fought
oft repeated enemy attacks and
''kept open an escape route for
' n. Army Corps. Although com-
pltela- outnumebred and encir-
clL they took their stand on
a hill and beat back wave af-
ter wave of Chinese troops.
Two attempts were made to
relieve the battalion, one by the
.-10U Battalion of the Philppines
Combat team supported bv a
tank company of the TJ. 8. 15th
infantry, and another by the
Irltish 8th Hussars with 50-ton
Centurion tanks supported by
Infantry. Both failed.
Surrounded by over 20.000
enemy troops and without food
cr water, the gallant Olosters
fought on.
Every Inch of ground was cov-
.fred with enemy dead when
' finally, with ammunition run-
lung low, they split Into three
Croups with instructions to in-
filtrate back through enemy
positions.
About 200 younded, two med-
ical officers and the battalion
commander. Col. J. P. Carne
remained on the hill.
Service Personnel ond
Civilian Government Employes
P I N A N C I
your new or used car through
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYES FINANCE
CO.
Fort Worth, Texo.
Serving Government Employes and
Service Personnel in the Canal Zone
for 14 years. With our financing
your insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. coverage,
ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
DIALER
MISCELLANEOUS
hen* e VtakJae problem?
ftiH Alcobolk. AaenynHMU
20SI Ancn, C. Z.
Writs
1951 Ford Victoria (hard top con-
vertible) two tone freen. This car
just like new. Only 6000 miles,
drive it away. Only $725 down.
Year FORD DEALER. COLPAN
MOTORS INC., on automobile
row Telephone 2-1033 2-1036
Panam.
FOR SALE:Buying or selling on
outomobile? See Agencias Cosmos,
Automobile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-
4721, Panama.
1950 Mercury 6 passenger Coupe
dark green, leather upholstery,
good Hras. Only 9000 miles. Thii
car is a steal. Only $600 down
and drive it away. Your FORD
DEALER, COLPAN MOTORS INC.,
on automobile row. Tel. 2-1013
2-1 016, Pan.mi.
FERIAL:Often you something dif-
ferent In Christmas sifts. Beauti-
ful bateas tr.ys painted
in oil and by ancient Indian pre-
date. Also ties, handkerchiefs
scerfi. Chriitmos cards by na-
tional artists; drums, hot. Polleros
ote. In Avenida B beside the
parking let of tha French >
ear.
RESORTS
Williams Sonta Clara Beoch Cottages.
Two bedrooms Frlgidalras, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Gramlleh. Santo Clora beech-
cottages. Electric Ice ooxee, gas
stoves, moderate rate*. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:-
Must sell
Go tun.
-Electric range like new.
$175.00. House 233-B.
FOR SALE:Mosquito copper an
plastic mesh "Lumite," AL-
MACENES MARTINZ. 83 North
Avenue, phone 2-0610. Blanch:
3 Mortin Soso St., phone 3-1424.
Phillip*. Oceonsld. cottages. Sonto
Clero. Bou 4. Balboa Phoru
Panamo 3-1877, Cmtobol 1-1673
FOR RENT
Apartments
LOST b FOUND
ALHAMBP.A APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished opart-
ments. Meld service optional. Con-
tort office 8061. 10th Street. New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT
Rooms
It is actually cheaper
to bay a
P.l\l. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift
Besides Protection Against
injury, they save many
times their value In cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Are. Tel. 3-0149
LOST: House 551-A, Curundu
Hgts. Buff Cocker Spaniel, mole.
3-years old, answers to "Pancho."
Reword. Call 2-2888 between 7:-
00 and 4:00 or 273-5191 later.
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, to.1
ntir.lv renevtad end wall fur-
nished. Rate* reasonable. Bache-
lors only. Inquire at The Ame-
rican Club feeing Da Laeaapt
Pork.
DIAPHRAGMS:We have just re-
ceived fresh shipment for oil
makes of car Tropical Motors.
At* yen leaking far a sued car?
Something good at a fair price?
Came ta Autolandia No. 13, 4th
of July Avenue.
Best used cars for loss money.
FOR SALE:1951 Hillmon. Excel-
lent condition. Duty paid. Call
Panama 3-0095.
1950 Studebeher Champion Star-
light Coupe black, geeaVtiret, teat
covers, a clean car. Only $445.
00 down and drive it away. Your
FORD DEAL. COLPAN MOTORS
INC., on automobile row. Tel. 2-
1033 2-1036 Panama.
FOR SAUE:1949 Hudson 8 con-
vertible, excellent condition. Will
occept tradein and finance. Tele-
phone, office 3-3325; home 3-
2427.
1950 Ford Cuates T-der V-aTbjhr
gray SWW tiras. This car It o
beauty. Only $415.00 dawn and
it', your.. Your FORD DEALER,
COLPAN MOTORS INC, an au-
tomobile row. Tel. 2-1091 2-
1036. Panam.
Cyprus Again On Sentry Duty
Recalls Very Romantic Past
FOR SALE:1950 Pontioe "8" Ra-
dio and Tailor made soot covers.
Leaving for States $1,600.00.
Phone Rodman 3422 or see at
R17-A RousseaJ West Bank.
1949 Ford Tudor V-8 dark blue,
teat coven, good tiras. Only $295.
00 down. Your FORD DIALER,
COLPAN MOTORS INC.....uto-
mobile raw. TeL 2-1033 2-
1036, Panam.
FOR SALE'49 Renault. Duty poid.
Radio. Good condition, $625.00
Fort Clayton, 4173 or 6121.
1947 Pontiac Fordor Six dark blue,
goad tires, teat cavan, radio,
spotlight. Only $350 dawn and
take it away. Your FORD DEALER.
COLPAN MOTORS INC., an au-
toatebile row. TeL 2-1033 2-
1036, Panami.
FOR SALE1951 Ford "2 Door. Very
reasonable, will finance, will take
trade in. Phone Albrook 864239.
I94T Hudson Convertible Coupe
brand now paint, broad new tap,
brand new seat cavers, good tiras.
This car lea steal. Only $230.00
down and it's yours. Your FORD
DEALER. COLPAN MOTORS INC..
*n automobile row. Tel. 2-1 OSS
2-1036. Panam.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED TO BUY:Trailer suit-
able for 14' boat. Call 759 Coco
Solo.
Marie Wilson wears this
charming ensemble, designed
by Michael Woulfe. In RKO's
"A Olrl in Every Port." The bo-
dy of the dress Is of sheer navy
blue wool while the shirred bo-
dice Is of green and white pol-
ka-dot tie silk. The rim of the
cartwheel navy hat and the
loves are,of matching tie silk:.
(Best &/U
rt
WASHINGTON. D. C, Dec. 22
The Island of Cyprus Is again
on Mediterranean sentry duty as
British reinforcements are In-
creased In the Near East.
The island's sentinel role has
been well rehearsed. It has been
a crossroad of warring; armies
and an outpost of empires for
3,500 years, says the National
Geographic Society.
This strategic crown colony of
Great Britain. 140 miles long and
approximately the size of Puerto
Rico, lies only 230 miles north
of Port Said, northern gateway
to the Suez Canal. Cyprus reaches
to within 65 miles of Syria and
45 miles of the Turkish coast.
The majority of the 4*0,000
Cypriots today are descendant1!
of early Greek colonists. Turks,
Syrians, Armenians, and Eng-
lish compose the minority.
This legendary birthplace of
Aphrodite, goddess of Love, has
been ruled by the Greeks. Assy-
rians, Phoenicians, and Persians.
It was given by Anthony to Cleo-
patra, was visited by Paul and
Barnabas, and was seized by
Richard Coeur de Lion to avenge
an insult.
Cyprus, ruled bv the Turks for
about three centuries, has been
occupied by the British for the
past 73 years.
The storied island Is mention-
ed In the Bible and In the Iliad
and the Odyssey, in the midst of
modem military activity, fabul-
ous castles and ancient citadels
which may have Inspired the
setting for tales from Shake-
speare's "Othello" to Dlsnev's
"Snow White" still dominate the
scene.
In Bible times olive groves and
vineyard flourished. Today ex-
ports Include oranges, lemons,
rallsus. grain, cattle and pota-
toes. Silk and cotton contribute
to the natural wealth. A wool
industry Is in the making.
Ancient Cyprus produced much
of the copper that made the
Bronze Age possible. Copper min-
ing has been revived, and chorm-
lum ore, asbestos and gympsum
are Important minerals today.
Need for charcoal for copper
smelters caused destruction of
the once fine forests, but the is-
land still grows many beautiful
cedar trees.
In the stores of Nicosa, the
capital, Australian flour and Bra-
zilian coffee are now sold along-
side the aromatic herbs of the
East. New gates have been cut in
the ancient wall to cope with
modern traffic ranging from
donkeys to automobiles. Bastions
that once kept out the enemy
now serve as playgrounds.
Famagusta, on the east roast,
has Cyprus* best harbor. The Is-
land served as an important
British air base during world
War II Airlines new fly regular
schedules between Nicosa and
continental cities.
LUX
VENETIAN
BUNDS
Immediate
Delivery
Aluminum
Awnings
Different
Colors
$14.00
Industrias
Panamericanas
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29th Street
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
etel r< Paium*
Selling: Abattoir, Panami
Forest (preferred), Clay Pro-
ducts, 8. Fernando Clink.
Tel. 3-4719 3-1660
MODERN FURNITURE
cuaroM- BUILT
i Slipcover BeaTokQliJary
VISIT OU* SRW.ROOMI
Alberto Rene
4. P. de la Oeea 77 (Automobile Row)
Free Estimates Pickup Deriven
TeL J-428 IM eta. la 7:M p.m.

Research Shows
Blood Donors Need
High Protein Diet
LINCOLN. Neb. Dec. 23 (UP)
Dr. Ruth Leverton. director
of human nutrition research at
the University of Nebraska, said
she is 100 per cent for blood
donations to the Red Croas but
warned donors not to expect
their systems to replace the
blood overnight.
How fast you get your blood
back, she said, depends a great
deal upon what you eat. A high
protein diet, including more
than the usual amounts of
milk, meat, eggs, fish and
cheese, speeds the replacement
process, she said.
Dr. Leverton's -findings came
from a series of tests in which
146 co-ed blood donors co-
operated. Although the study
involved only young women, Dr.
Leverton said the results apply
in general to all blood donors.
Women donors, she pointed
out, usually make a greater
proportionate contrlb u t 1 o n
when they give a pint of blood
than men do. Blood makes up
about seven per cent of the
body's weight and therefore the
180-pound man makes a smal-
ler proportionate gift than the
115-pound woman.
Some of the girls ate care-
fully-controled foods, contain-
ing the usual amount of prote-
in, while others were given
between-meal snacks to boost
their protein Intake to 75
grams. A third group received
extra protein foods which in-
creased their prbtein Intake to
as high as 90 grama.
The blood of all the donors,
Dr. Leverton found, was rebuilt
fastest when their diets Includ-
ed between -75 and 90 grams
of protein daily. It was a 50
to 90 per cent boost in the
protein content of the usual
diet.
Conine Breed
HORIZONTAL 9 Bamboolike
1 Depleted breed grass
Answer to Previous Puxtt.
- "i", i
si, .
-'' '-:: I itiM
'm nu.Mt.ni i
of dog
10 Carbon In
boat-treated
stool
11 Pilfers
13 Penetrates
18 French river
17 Wort Point
student
19 Suffix
19 Rough lava
20 Lack
Ringlet
M Daybreak
11 Merganser
12 Ancient Irish
capital
14 Erects
15 Vapid
31 TMy
22 Sound quality
23 Surrender
24 Soviet river
27 Paltry
2IMusical
Instrument
32Mimicker
II
'J11> I I
i: 'ji
-it u
II I n:-K\'_,'v; fvs
(comb, form) MFromontory
26 Gaelic
37 Bridge
at mbar?
30 Quote
31 Ardor
34 Symbol for
radium
Hebrew letter
'Proposition
Uba>1i:
37 Woody plant
SIHostelriea
38 Nativa of
Latvia
40 arty Briton
41 On the
sheltered side
Ml us ; ;
'WCi r:
42 Wot as much
44 Boundary
(comb, form)
45 Tierra del
Fuego Indian
47 Moraine
(b.)
REPAIR Venetian Blinds.
MAKECornices es Curtains.
paintFurniture.
Work Guaranteed.
| TALLER CEDE0
#23 Per Aw. Tel. 3-1066
Japanese People Satisfied
With Occupation By U. S.
(Compiled by Publishers' Weekly)
Fiction
THE CAINE MUTINY
Herman Wouk.
THE CRUEL SEA
Nicholas Monsarrat.
MELVILLE GOODWIN, USA
John P. Marquand.
MOSES
Sholem Asch.
THE PRE8IDRNT8 LADY
Irving Stone.
Non-Fiction
THE SEA AROUND US
Rachel L. Carson.
KON-TIKI
Thor Heyerdhl.
DIZZY
Hesketh Pearson.
WASHINGTON CONFIDENTIAL
Jack Lait and Lee Mortimer.
IHE FORRESTAL DIARIES
Ed by Walter MUlla and E. 8
Duffleld. .
TOKYO. Dec. 22 (UP) The
vast majority of the Japanese
people are satisfied-with the re-
sults of the occupation, accord-
ing to the Influential Malnlchl
Shimbun.
There are some minor matters
which the Japanese as a nation
cannot understand and with
which they are not fully satisfied,
the newspaper said in an edit-
orial, but generally speaking,
"the occupation policy has prov-
sd a success."
Malnlchl said misgivings a-
mong "certain foreign circles"
that the Japanese will under-
mine what has been accomplish-
ed during the occupation years as
soon as their Independence is re-
gained "seem to have no
grounds."
Beyond Expectations
The editorial pointed out that
In addition to the fair play, gen-
erosity and good-will of the al-
lied powers, there were unexpect-
ed developments which con-
tributed greatly to the success of
occupation.
"The biggest of all such un-
expected developments was the
fact that the occupation policy
was entirely contrary to what
was generally anticipated by the
Japanese public," it said.
The second factor was Japan-
ese sentiment toward Russia.
"The Japanese as a whole could
face the Americans with a feel-
Inn which was something akin to
what a defeated athlete might
feel toward his victor," the edit-
orial said.
"The sentiment which govern-
ed the Japanese in regard to the
Soviet attack at the very close of
the war was not tha same."
Imprisonments Resented
Malnlchl sa'd the Japanese at-
titude toward the Russians, In before.
addition to old feelings about the
Russo-Japanese War. was devel-
oped by the Russian detention of
some 300,000 prisoners of war
and the occupation of the Kur-
iles Islands Japan held before
embarking on a course of ag-
gression.
"Such developments have
created a deep emotional stir a-
mong the Japanese." the editorial
continued.
The article said it was beside
the point to discuss whether It
was right for the Japanese to
entertain such sentiments to-
ward the Russians. It added:
"This is a state of affairs that
actually exists and it compares
sharply with the sentiment that
the Japanese cherish toward the
Americans and other nationals of
the allied powers."
It was this very sentiment,
Malnlchl concluded, which help-
ed to a large extent to make
the Japanese appreciate the Al-
lied occupation policy.
Check Puzzles Judy
But Not $10 Bill
KENOSHA, Wls.. Dec. 22 (UP)
Judy Kolar is only 11 years old
but she knows a good thing when
she sees it, even If she doesn't
recognize it .
Judy found a funny-looking
slip of paper with figures on it
and stuck it in her pocket. Hours
later she showed it to her moth-
er, who gasped. The paper was a
check for $5,489.
Police helped return the check
to the payee, who gave Judy a
310 bill. That suited her. because
she'd seen that kind of money
SAVES M% HKIMlftu . El
rita all itanarrt *Hse traataf beards.
Will last Indrfinllcly.
Only $3.75 each
2 for $7.25
Postpaid
Get one for yourself.
Give one as a Xmas Gift.
Limited Quantity. ORDER NOW
Send Money Order to
Dunmore Agency
Estafeta Instituto Nacional
Panam, R. P.
ffmt
w
PET HOSPITAL
Va Torra (S. francisco IU.I
aereas the ariose an tha rlihi.
O?. 1. V. Fernaneej D.. Veterinary
Mean: a.. llana. p.s*.
Phene <-WS Panam
P. O. San SIS Panam
P-ni
Machine Des Work
Of 120 Computers
CLEVELAND, O.'. Dec. 22 (UP)
The Olgltal Automatic Multi-
ple Pressure Recorder equals 120
girl computers over three week's
time.
At least that's the rough com-
parison of the work this machine
Can do at the Lewis flight pro-
pulsion laboratory here.
The machine measures the ef-
ficiency of aircraft engines in
terms of pressure.
Before It was devised, it took
120 computers about three weeks
to figure out the efficiency of an
engine based on pressure read-
ings from some 3,000 points.
Even with, the high protein
diet, however, it required weeks
for the donated blood to bo re-
placed completely.
Some of the girls were given
extra iron, copper or a B vit-
amin daily In capsule form
These additions helped, but
none approached the high
protein diet In effectiveness on
blood recovery.
"It takes a good many build-
ing materials," Dr. Leverton
explained, "to make blood.
Meat and milk contain many of
these building materials, while
a pill usually has Just one."
For the woman who wants to
make her contribution at the
blood bank. Dr. Leverton sug-
Sested this group f foods every
ay for a week before and a-
bout two months after the do-
nation: two servings of meat,
an egg, one quart of milk, and
a serving of cheese, in addition
to vegetables, fruit, butter or
Eiargarlne, bread and desserts
eederi to round out \he dally
menus.
The diet, she said, need not
be rigid. For example, a serv-
ing of fish can replace one
serving of meat; a half-cup of
custard can replace one glass
of milk, as can cream soup or
cocoa. Soy beans, navy beans
or lima beans, can be used In
place of cheese.
Kings, Shepherds
Pageant Planned
Al Balboa Church
The Balboa Union Church will
present its annual Christmas pa-
geant. "The Adoration-of the
Kings and the Shepherds," in the
church on Christmas Eve at 11
pm.
This is the familiar story of
the Birth, of Jesus in the manger
in Bethlehem, and the visit of
the shepherds and the three
kings as told in the New Testa-
ment.
The story Is told through the
carols which are sung during the
pageant as each scene is enacted
on the stage by the actors. Onoe
again we can recall the dramatic
arrival of The Messiah, and sing
our praise for his birth. There
will be caroling from the front
steps of the church starting at
10:15, followed by the pageant at
11 on Dec. 24 at the Balboa Un-
ion Church, characters in which
are:
MaryVirginia Townsind.
JosephRussell Nelson.
Manger AntelArlene Schmidt.
Other AngelsJennye Stevens,
Wilma Hidalgo, Sue Klrdts, Ca-
rol Adams, Sara Colllnge.
Shepherds Louis H a a e m a n.
Tommy Smith, Frank Towns-
end.
KingsM. Piper, J. Barned, R.
Worsley.
ReaderThe Rev. A. H. Shaw.
DirectorJ. 8. McNair.
Otows wan
OXest Indian
island
49 Lubricators
Portals
Appraises
VERTICAL
1 Doer (suffix)
2 Common swift
3 Pit
Numbers (sb.)
5 While
Indian
7 Metallic
element
Feminine
appellation
Foresters Work To Improve
Quality Of Christmas Trees
WASHINGTON, Dec. 22There To most Americans the Cfarlat-
Is no excuse this year for sad, mas tree Is a tradition that seems
bedraggled and motheaten as old as the era. Actually, the
Christmas trees in American first decorated trees were Intro-
homes. If shopping Is done care-; duced to the United States by
fully, the family Christmas tree homesick Germans about 1840.
in 9S1 can be greenr, fresher,
and more symmetrical than it
hes been at any time *lnce Yule
trees became big business.
The Agriculture Departments
U. S. Forest Service la working to
improve Christmas trees. This
rear special emphasis has been
placed on quality of\ the trees
shipped to market by farmers
and commercial growers, the Na-
tional Geographic Society re-
ports.
Federal foresters declare that
scientific Christmas tree mar-
keting is good conservation prac-
tice. Balsam firs, spruces, pines
and other conifers cut from farm
or commercial stands of timber
clear out the land for more
healthy growth of larger trees
sawlogs, pulpwood .or good
Christmas trees for future years.
There should bo as many
treeo on the market this year
*M there were in 15about 21
million, Or enough to supply
'Tu$doS"riH&ete.t>r cohrle,
that there will be only 28 million
homes with Chrbitmas trees.
Many families will sharpen the
ax and head for the woods to re-
turn with an evergreen suitable
for decoration.
The Forest Service says this is
all right if the cutter knows any-
" i the
One newly emigratei pastor
from Germany, Henry G.
Schwan, almost lost bis pulpit
In Cleveland in 1351 because
he set up a tree in his church.
Exhibition of a tree In a church
was branded as Idolatrous and
irreligious.
Use of the Christmas treel
sprang up in Germany in thai
Middle Ages. One legend hasl
Martin Luther a the father ot J
the Christmas tree Idea.
Historians agree that display
of a decorated tree was a prac-j
tice sanctioned by the church,
from earlier pagan worship
living things, particularly t
green trees that signified ete
fe.
I If I' "!>! _ I
Giant Shaker Tests'
Supersonic Craft
BUFFALO, N.Y.. Dec.;22 fUP)|
Actual physical vibration and,
oscillation experienced by a sul
Sersonic craft are being repro-l
uced at the Bell Aircraft Corp. I
by a mechanism resembling a]
giant cocktail shaker.
The "shaker" Is a 40-foot tow-
thing about trees and asks the er built of structural steel.
farmer or woodlot owner first| The tower can shake an object 1
But felling trees seen from the i from one to IS times a second
passing family automobile is not w>th each motion up to five feet
approved unless permission is ob-| in length. In technical terms It |
tained first and unless the loss means that aircraft parts and
ludae Makes Youth
Pay For Reform
FLINT. Mich., Dee. 22 (UP)
Judge Philip Elliott thinks he
may have a new system for set-
ting wayward youth straight.
in putting an 18-year-old boy
on probation, the judge stipulat-
ed that the parents should post
bond of $150, and that the boy
should then repay his parents In
$15 monthly installments.
When the bond Is repaid, the
boy continues to put the month-
ly sum In the kitty.
Just before Christmas, 1952, he
Eets the entire amount back it
e has stayed out of trouble If
he tumbles from grace, the mon-
ey goes to the county.
will not damage forest land.
The Christmas tree industry
grosses more than 50,000,000 an-
nually. It has provided added in-
come to farmers who cultivate
components weighing up to S.OOt
pounds can be submitted to vi- |
oration frequencies of from one
to II cycles per second.
The tower, the only one of Its
trees In their woodlots. It makes: kind In the country, simulates
up the entire business of some aircraft-or missile flight-path
tree farmers. vibrations and physical vibration
and oscillation experienced by
supersonic craft.
From results compiled by the
"shaker," Bell scientists hope to
reduce functional or structural
One Minnesota grower cuts
and ships some 1,400,000 trees a
year, most of them the tabletop
or baby size, 36 to 40 Inches high.
Many of these are dyed silver,
red or white, but natural green
(sometimes encouraged by a lit-
tle dye) remains the favorite.
fallare possibilities during high
speed and high altitude flight.
oidons
*


SUNDAY. DECEMBER 2S, 1951
i ii i i i
THE STJNDAI AMERICAN
PACE SEVEN
Here Comes Groom' Is Ace Crosby
Bonanza Showing At Balboa Theater
In "Here Comes The Groom."
which Is now playing at the Bal-
boa Theater, Paramount has pro-
vided Blng Crosby with a big,
bountiful comedy that dispenses
top-notch entertainment with a
rare and generous abandon.
There's a star-studded cast, a
score of bright tunes and a hilar-
ious story served up In a buoyant,
spontaneous show that win af-
ford you two of the happiest
hours ydu"v ever known In the
theater.
Here la Crosby at his very best,
and he romps through his role
with all the easy assurance and
simple charm that have made
him America's most likeable film
performer. Co-romping with Der
single are Jane Wyman, Alexis
Smith, Franchot Tone and James
Barton. In addition, the film
marks the American screen de-
but of Anna Maria Albergbettl,
a fifteen-year-old soprano with a
truly magnificent voice-
The,story, which famed pro-
ducer-director Frank Capra has
guided with an unerring tense of
comedy, pick up reporter Crosby
as he brings home a ready-made
family of two French orphans to
bride-to-be Wyman. But this fie-
ry miss has tired of waiting for
the far-wandering reporter, and
la now about to merge with a
young man from the plushy end
of town.
In cahoots with his editor and
the girl's fisherman father, Blng
seta out to lasso his bride before
the knoj, Is tied. Stratagems, sere-
nades and crafty appeals avail
him nothing until he maneuvers
a beautiful blueblood Into the
fourth corner of a romantic rec-
tangle. Then the marital mix-up
soars to a hilarious climax In-
volving irate Immigration offi-
cials, a bogus G-man an da score
of Incredibly funny characters.
All of this wonderful make-be-
lieve is enthuelrctlcally perform-
ed by a cast that knows Its way
around a eomedy script. Two ve-
. .. u.ix youngsters, Jacky
_:::jel and Beverly Washburn,
~!ve hcart-warmlng performanc-
r- -s tv, imported moppets and
Miss Alberghetti's singing is a
.e bet to leave a lump In your
throat.
As the bride wavering between
two grooms, Jane Wyman is pert
and peppery, while Alexis Smith
and Franchot Tone extract the
maximum laughter from their
' of anguished aristocrats
caught In a marrying muddle. As
(W uing, when you've said that
his performance is the greatest
he's aver given, you've told the
story.
Ace melody men Jay Livingston
and Ray Evans have provided the
Oroanmg One with several pow-
erful rounds of musical ammuni-
tion, and Johnny Mercer and
Hoagy Carmichael have contrib-
uted their infectious "In the Cool,
Cool. Cool of the Evening" to the
score.
Notorious Teams Grant Ingrid Bergman
In Espionage Romance At Central Theater
Cary Grant and Ingrid Berg-
man, co-starring as American se-
cret-service operatives battling
je German post-war under-
ground in Brazil, bring the Im-
pact of their oustanding talents
and popularity to Alfred Hitch-
cock's production of "Notorious"
for RXO1 Radio, which bids for
top honors in suspense and ro-
manee at the Central Theater
Thursday.
Miss Bergman has the role of
Alicia, a loyal American girl who,
as the daughter of a convicted
traitor, Is especially well fitted
to handle a delicate Job of pen-
etrating an enemy group for the
government. Grant is cast as
Devlin, her immediate superior,
who finds love for her complic-
ating his assignment as an in-
vestigator in the secret service.
The task given to the pair, they
learn on arriving in Rio, Is to dis-
cover what certain wealthy Ger-
man settlers are up to. One of the
leaders. Sebastian, Is a iormer
admirer of Alicia, and he soon
gets around to proposing mar-
riagea move that Devlin views
with mixed feeling. Soon after
the wedding, Alicia and Devlin
learn the secret; the German
have found a huge deposit of ur-
anium ore in the Brasilia in-
terior and are evidently plan-
, ning to make atomic bombs,
Oolncldently Sebastian finds
that his bride is an American spy.
sad this leads her into deadly
Suct/of her Ufe, a hanSedJvlth the JftngthlessJto-
tensity foe which Hitchcock, is
ROMANCE AMID COUNTER PLOTS Gary Grant and In-
grid Bergman, desperately in love, are discovered by Claude
Rains, her husband and commander of secret enemy forces
In South America, during a critical Interlude in RKO Radio's
exciting "Notorious." Alfred Hitchcock produced and.directed
the suspenseful romance co-starring Grant and Miss
Bergman and featuring Rains.
lng the film. With its colorful
Rio settings, tense plot and note-
worthy east, "Notorious" offers a
distinctive vehicle for Grant and
Miss Bergman, who recently won
high acclaim in Suspicion and
The Bells of St. Mary's respec-
tively.
. fanQtt. a(_, v*tij '
Cary Orant and Miss Bergman
have unusually powerful roles in
"Notorious." Claude Rains heads
the featured cast as the wily Se-
bastian, with the notad Austrian
actress. Mme. LeopoMine> Kon-
sUntin, playing his raft*
mother. Such other favoritas as
Louis Calhern, Moroni Olsen,
Walk/ Brown and Ivan Trlesault
n prominent parts. .
Ben Hecht wrote the original
story and screenplay, with Hitch-
aock both directing and produc-
Flynn Disrupts
School Classes
HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 22 The
excitement of seeing Knol Btonn
upset the deportment of 250 high
school girls In San Fernando
Valley,
Plynn was recently on location
at San Fernando Mission for
"Mara Maru," Warner Bros.' ad-
venture drama in which he stars
with Ruth Roman.
During the lunch hour the
girls descended on the location
site to get a glimpse of the ro-
mantk star.
Many of the girl, overran
their lunch hours and their class
room chaster so disrupted study
periods that they were kept after
Virginia Mayo
Keeps Pepped Up
Heels Over Head
Virginia Mayo has a secret
for keeping her vitality and
'"when she start te get weary
daring shootinr on her current
ttchnkolor maslcaL "She's
rerktag Her Way Through
College? at Warner Vrto^jh*
disappears Into her 'reeshtg
reom and stand a her head.
Mis Mayo Own resumes
filming a fresh as the pfover-
Slal daisy.
Nevei* Say Never
Phyllis Thaxtar, who ha re-
ceived some tempting stage of-
fers this fail, had to turn down
another, "Never Say Never."
which Robert Sinclair Is direct-
ing on Broadway. Phyllis Want
finish her Warner Bro.'
the Technicolor musical
Working Bar Way Through Col-
lege," in tune to begin rehearsals.
ATE DOCTOR AT LAST
MANNSVILLl. N. T. (UP)
Dr. M. N. Marguelles. Inmate of
German concentration camp
luring World War II, is the first
-esldent physician this village;
is had in almost six years, f
rgullea U a native of Poland.,
Panama \>nal (clubhouses ~~
SHOWING TODAYI
DIABLO HEIGHTS
2-3 C:1S |:li
Bob HOPE
Luclile BALL
"FANCY PANTS"
Monday
HOI SE ON
>PH
TKLEGRAPHHU^
COCOLI
IM 1:15 t:l(
Audi MURPHY
Bill MAULDIN
Red Badge of Couragi
"""'""^'"r"
NG"
OeC MKUH .ftjftggt ffiSE&,
BALBOA
Air-Conditioned
2:00 4:10 6:20 8:30
HERE COMES THE GREATEST
PACKAGE OF ENTERTAINMENT
EVER FILMED!
Bins
ALfiXiS
rss
SMITH
JAMES-
TONE BARTON. '
fotOspas
HERE COMES
7HEGR
>5
V*
gin nlrodtces lbs new
SStfMSHtatMl
AWflWrAarBitti
\#
Ml 0KRr OITN W*M AmmiA Aiaewem
fflyfrmw

fZ i U in A Claudatla COLBERT MacDonaM CAREY
:. "LET'S MAKE IT LEGAr
GATUN
14 T:a
"^TmidBMtiP
ANDREWS
MAtGAHITA
SIS III! t:M
mm tract
Diana LYNN
People Afointt O'HaroJ
)BAL
m
Atr-Cod Wa
1:M II -
Darl DAY
r.mIon MacRAE
"On Moonlight Bay"
'Goliath9 Greeted By David
On Arrival At London Field
A Streetcar Named Desire' In Pre-Release
Showing Tuesday At Bella Vista, Tropical
A RECENT arrival at London Tirport, on the B.O.A.C.
Monarch service from New York, was ft. 6 ins. Walter
Talun, who plays the part of the giant Goliath In the 20th
Century Fox film "David and Bathsheba."
"Goliath," who is making a six-week personal appear-
ance tour o the British Isles, stepped from the Stratocruiser
in the costume which he wears in the film. He was greeted
by a London air scout appropriately named David who,
In accordance with the Biblical story, produced a sling with
which to menace the giant.
Walter Talun, originally a wrestler known as "The Polish
Angel," has a 46 inch chest, 42 inch waist, 22 Inch neck, and
an 84 inch reach. He weighs 23 stone.
On hi arrival at London Airport traditional English
weather persuaded "Goliath" of the value of an umbrella.
It did not however, prevent him from greeting B.O.A.C. re-
ceptionist Pamela Blake with great enthusiasm.
"David and Bathshaba" will open here on Christmas Day
at the Lux Theater, which has been closed since Monday
installing new air-conditioning equipment

-r
Now... A New Service

Direct from Panama to
LOS ANGELES
n
via Guatemala
ft sisses I ft lutry if fesiMfiNN-tve,
fcri ratltal, Haiwtiale jewiiy
Now, tar the first time, you can fly directly
tros* Panama to Gua I mala and then non-
Step to Loo Angelad. And alao, for the first
time r A A of fart apactoua Cona t alia t ion -typo
dippers in this aros, traveling this now
reate In too fa* teat flying time e.ec offered,
with no change of plane along the war.
From Los Angele* there are convenient connec-
ting flights to San Franca* and other West
Coast cities, pas PAA servios to Hawaii, te
Australia and the Orient.
This new service twice weekly, once again dero-
onstratm PAA'a pioneering spirit; the same
impetus that made PAA first to link the Aateri*
ees by air, first across the Pacific and first
around the entire wo* W.
k

*"
CSBiP-r-
THtttH* $3*0
COMItMtt ^aTi*
FAR*
See
your Travel
Agent or
&W AMffICt/S/
W.rW Meal Ipmii,J AWto.
aan. L Sheet Na. S. Tt I-M70
.f.W,AA.I*
Celeo. Sele* lio*.. Tal. 10*7
. XsVeni*
"A Stretcar Named Desire," the
extraordinary play that won the
Pulltier Prise and the New York
Drama Critics' Award in the
course of its broadway run, has
been made into a motion picture
and will be seen in a pre-release
showing on Dec. 25 at the Bella
Vista and Tropical Theaters sim-
ultaneously.
Starring Vivien Leigh, who
created the lead role In London,
and Marlon Brando, star of the
New York version, the picture
boasts the entire prize-winning
New York cut.
In addition, Ella Kazan, the
talented Broadway and Holly-
wood director who staged the or-
iginal, directed this plcturlzatlon
of the famed Tennessee Williams
work. An Ella Kazan production,
the film was produced by Charles
K. Feldman for Warner Bros, dis-
tribution. Jack L. Warner per-
nally directed the Warner Bros,
participation.
Unusual Story
Thus it Is that the forthcom-
ing film will have all the ele-
ments of the great Broadway at-
traction. The gifted Tennessee
Williams penned a touching, yet
powerful work to "A Streetcar
Named Desire."
The story of a southern "gen-
tlewoman" whose Ufe takes a
downward direction as the family
estate falls off to nothing. It tells
how she flees her home town to
come and live with her sister In
New Orleans.
The sister, a normal young
woman who has thrown off the
dreamy memories of the past, is
married to a muscular young
man, who though beneath her
former station perhaps, (jives her
happiness, nonetheless.
But Blanche, attempting to
hold onto her unreal earlier days,
provokes her brother-in-law into
searching: out and revealing her
more immediate past, leading to
the climax.
On The Records
NEW YORK ( J.) "Dang-
er," a nhw M-G-M album, feat-
ures the jazz guitarist Tony Mot-
tola on seven of the themes he
has composed for plays on the
television thriller show of the
same name. The music on re-
cords does the same job It does
on television of creating an at-
mosphere of suspense.
Walter Gross has recorded
some good piano music In anoth-
er InM-O-M's "Keyboard Kings"
series. The eight tunes, all com-,
posed by Vincent Youmans, In-
clude "Orchids in the Moonlight,"
"Through the Years." 'More
Than You Know," "Tea For Two,"
"Without a Song," "I know That
You Know," "Sometimes I'm
Happy" and "Time on My
Hands.".
Harry Horlick's Orchestra has
recorded an album of "American
Waltzes" for MGM. The dreamy-
type instrumental music includes
eight popular waltzes as "Let Me
Call You Sweetheart," "Missouri
Waltz," "Beautiful Ohio" and
"When I Grow Too Old to
Dream."
New Singles:
One of the best of the many
recent recordings of "Char-
maine" is that by Ralph Flan-
agan's. Orchestra featuring vocal
bv Harry Prime (RCA Victor)..
Blng Crosby does his usual
smooth singing job with Tommy
Dorsev's Orchestra on Rodgers
and Hart's "The Girl Friend"
(Decca)...
Blllv Eckstine and George
Shearing combine very success-,
fully on "Taking a Chance on
Love" and "You're Driving Me
Crazy!" (M-O-M)... Eckstine al-
so has another new pair of voc-
als in "Strange Interlude" and
"jalousie" (M-G-M)...
Joe "Fingers" Carr's latest pia-
no instrumentis are the peppy
"Ragtime Melody" and "Snow
Deer Rag" (Capitol)... Teresa
Teresa Brewer may have a hit
with "Stag Sing Sing" (Coral)...
Champ Butler, whose singing Is
zooming him to the top of the
heap, has a good one in "Oooh!
Look a There. Ain't She Pretty?"
(Columbia...
Perry Como's latest pair of
waxlngs are "Here's to My Lady"
and "If Wishes Were Kisses"
(RCA)... Jerry Lewis has a na-
tural with "I Love Girls" (Cap-
itol).
David C. Whitney.
Songwriter's Widow
Given Unique Part
In Musical Film
HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 52Grace
Kaha. widow of Gus Kahn, will
be seen briefly in Warner Bros.'
musical, "I'll See You In My
Dreams," the story of the famous
songwriter.
Mrs. Kahn has a unique part
of' applauding herself In a se-
quence. For the picture she plavs
a guest at a banquet given In
horror of Grace and Gus Kahn,
portrayed by Doris Day and Dan-
ny Thomas. When Doris finishes
singing the camera centers on
the real Mrs. Kahn applauding
Doris.
Seminle Suite
Director Raoul Walsh used an
actual Seminle Indian village,
deep in Florida's Everglades, for
several Important sequences in
"Distant Drums," Milton Sperling
production in Technicolor for
Warner Bras, release, starring
Oary Cooper.
(Vivien Leigh) fire a tragic background and ar-
rives at her sister's Cat n New Orleans. Here she meets up
with Kowataki (Marlon Brando), her sister's husband, who
suspects her story nnd believes she has swindled her sister.
This is a scene from a "Streetcar Named Desire," which
opens in a pre-release presentation at the Bella Vista and
Tropical Theaters.
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS SALE
Model III F with F2 lens and case
Reduced to $199.50

PORRAS
Plaza 5 de Mayo
PANAMA

.


I
Help the Postman Save Some Steps
JIAVE you ever wondered what
Christmas celebrations were
like over a hundred years ago?
Here we have Illustrated a Yule-
tide party of the 1800's, and for
an insight on activities, let us
examine the notes of a young
Virginia schoolmaster:
". . When the candles were
lighted, we all repaired Into the
dancing room; first each couple
danced a minuet; then all Joined
in as before in the country dances
(the stately minuet, the quad-
rille, the Virginia Reel, and
number of "country dances" were
the favorites), these continued
until half after seven, when at
the proposal of several we played
Button to get pawns for redemp-
tion; here I could join them, and
indeed it was carried on with
sprlghtllness and decency; In the
course of redeeming my pawns 1
had several kisses of the ladies!
Half after eight we were runs; In
to supper. The room looked lumi-
nous and splendid: four very
large candles burning on the ta-
ble where we supped; three others
In different parts of the room; a
gay sociable assembly. . So
soon as we rose from* the supper,
the company formed into a semi-
circlet round the fire for convers-
ing and more games.... We were
all dismissed by ten, and retired
to our rooms."
WhatsWrongWitbThisPicture?\ "Yule-Tied" Cross-Figure That Tests You
By Jessie R. Smith
ACROSS
1. During Christmas
week people rush
give each other pres-
ents and often the
race results In a tie!
3. Number of times
letter "i" occurs in
name of a scarlet
Christmas flower.
4. Tear preceding the
year following next
year.
8. Number of drinks
a Scotsman buys.
9. Popular mystic
number.
10. First man mentioned in any book
is Chap -.
11. Tree lighting tip: Use an bulb
string for each foot of tree.
12. "Jingle Bells" suggests what date?
14. A person with faces is called a
double-dealer.
15. Add 4 to the number of days in 1962
when January and February are gone.
DOWN
1. Merry Christmas and Neto Year*
Ice cream, candy and nut you!
2. What occurs twice in 220 years but
not once in 300 years?
4. Number of Bibli-
cal Commandments.
5. If one Xmas can-
dle can be made from
melting 8 candle stubs,
how many candles can
be made, and used,
from 64 stubs ?
C One more than
55 5/5.
7. How many errors
In this quotation?
With a little old driver,
so happy and quick,
I knew in a minuta it
mutt be 8t. Nick.
10. How many candy
sticks would you want
to make a model of a cube?
11. Fifty-eight reversed.
12. Blue ribbon place.
18. Rebus: The first letter is a drink;
the second is doable U; the third is nothing.
14. Xmas shopping deadline.
15. A holiday party consists of 2 grand-
parents, 4 fathers, 2 granddaughters, 2
daughters, 2 sisters, 2 sons, 2 pairs of
brothers. What is the fewest number of
people there?
... fi ki tn ntt :sfit
El-ill tL :m :#s :ot* :z :wi
(u*oa> --si :f_t :eai-i :t-rt u-oi n-t
ns son* ise Its1 (mojo*) :b*||OS
PSTMAN PARKER'S feet are killing him and he
still hasn't mads his rounds. Needless to say,
he'd like to deliver the mall he has and make pick-
ups from the boxes on his route Just as quickly as
he can, and with a minimum of Walking.
The stops he must males are arranged rather
Irregularly, with lanes leading from one to another
as you can see in the drawing above. His routs
begins at number 1 and ends at 21.
What Is the shortest routs he can follow, calling
at each stop without retracing any steps?
._ OO-flOMU PB1 nWlUM -XllIMM ,>UPI
A|J1 'DM]* -BinUUV 'UMWIS1 TK.'BMIIS 'IMAM 'Aft*
nwiMia Mae -mu 'mot "jeSt as 'mii 'om oo-^anuo ui
-oiio; n ai mrasira n nuu wuw mraw :iir8
Fun With Cryptaritbms
COLVE this divisin problem replacing the "X's"
*-* with numbers. The third product added to either
the first or second product will equal 6 times the
divisor. Par is 2 minutes. Solution (1) is given
below.
Whatsit Quiz
yVTHAT-SIT that can be put in
" everyone's right hand that
la Impossible for him to take out
and put in his left hand?
... 'east ui m .jiv
What'sit that we give to an-
other that we should always
keep?
__ pjom mo : J**iav
What'sit that keeps the moon
In peace?
femq u ssjasav
See Here, Scrooge
X X X X 5
X X )
X X X X X 0
X X
X X
X X
Troublesome Tree
SANTA'S visit, of course, is one
of the most exciting moments
of Christmas, and there's little
wonder our artist friend, Emms
McKean, was carried away by
the spirit of the occasion. She's
purposely made 20 mistakes in
this drawing so that you may
test your skill in finding them.
See If you can locate at least 16-
-unpid jo ao) i jq "01 :aip|oq joj uowsod Sou u| nop
"61 :j*dd|[l uo pui tltlft | uo uv
It* HI :>!>" uo luo uiw p|S n
'loo iih-juu <(uo inm uiS 9| rjsjjtp
OPJIVCl t.|JlJ JO 'Ml C,| 'pi.iTTlnluj AC4)
-area 1.111) '! :tia ooi jus luu>aii o,['
jo pti oo xi P*l" qSnoiu imovjo looq
uoi .nuts 'gi '-'oid Suau ui mrui
'II 'tpivuj iou op iSm tiuvd .iu*s '01
:uMt:p iii-idiuoj iou uu* ij*i a.wiuvB
S :do t.wjus o >ik) 8 -u.op opwdn
lunpoi* uo i :Su|st|u) uaqaina imot
'9 *MO*|d SaoxH u| jMiuinu y :hdo|0
no pasq ao AIUO ft *Jp|Oq AOqv |p
-an e iiaoidpiuaai jo tip* ao j ipioq ip
-avo 7. 'fjoopino aovidwa 1 :u Candle Poser
"TTHE Doakes' Christmas center-
* piece contained two candles,
one an inch longer than the other.
Mrs. Doakes lit the longer at
4:30 and the other at 6:00. At
8:30 they were both the same
length. The first burned out at
10:30 and the second at 10 o'clock.
How long were the candles be-
fore she lit them?
"qa| 6
iif)o aqi :auu|Smo uoi Mqoui wg
Aq wnm n put, -au| i ajnq Ol Jnoq
jroq-ftO" tJinboj pinoM puoMi ftqi }iu| ot
'unoa a pva ft ai puaom jih u.miu rv
tuna iuii *ui 'unoa 9 ai wuH unofj
.'-i pao i ui lajna p .<,... qi n aoaui
n ftuinq ii.ii t|i lot'Ol I Ot:i> uneq
r. o| -tjnoa joj mm.,, aqi p,.B tin.>u
ioi tajno ipuko my qj, jMay
Twisters To a "T"
~THREE tired tinkers tried to tie
I ten tree-toads to tin tub.
Tiny Tommy Tinker tearfully
tried twenty time to teach two
team of terrible teals to tap two
tapir twice.
a-zi
RI^OjraPj^HtJBlt DBHE
WbicbWay'sWhkh?
AS Santa started from Lowville
for a village 10 miles away,
he came to a crossroads and
found that the signpost had been
pulled down and lay In the middle
of the road. Yet. from the sign-
post he determined which was the
proper way to go. How ?
c^ mj
Ju|o qi Aq pjiv.iipui Utm tpMU q.i|q*
lll O) tioa aa. m tuni ill irima. uiojj
uoiioaaip Jin ai imuiod aniiu inn mi
xodoSi* qi jo ou9 .ui mm luiioddna
mi pu toloa pvu >q uoiq. uiojj Un
II* WJ) JO ftuiwil ftqi Mm f| :JUfUV/
Brain Squeezer
PVE automobiles were parked
bumper to bumper. How many
bumpers were actually touching?
Answer in one minute.
-ttwpnoi na mita :*/
E
r
<5
AT first glance it appears this Christmas tree is
drawn In one continuous line, but the more you
look at the drawing, the more you'll have your
doubts.
Is it or isn't it? Trace out the lines and see.
K. P. Shell Game
SHELLING peas for Xmas din-
ner in the Army messhall,
three K.P.s decided to arrange a
kind of competition. They divided
all the peas they had into four
equal piles.
Brown took fifteen minutes to
do his pUe. Smith did It in half
the time Brown took, and Wil-
liams did it in the time it would
have taken Brown and Smith
working together on the same
pile. Then they all worked to-
gether on the fourth pile.
How long did it take them to
shell all the peas?
tiinuiui Jiaq-ioo poi
oMi iii lunoora 10U.M in Jo ?inu|iu a*
at niiuu)ju-xi> op pjr.oo <*m o 'taiooai
-JB-MJOi "ujainiM PU* 'uiuijD-ni op
Pioaj qiiais 'Jinaiiu ao ui iimoan wi jo
qioMUB-ftuo op pnrao 0MO18 :j->Mtov
Xmas Riddles
\Y/HT *re lollipops like race
W horaes?
o qi mtqi on pox jftpnq >qx jjmit
What Is It that everyone, no
matter how careful, overlooks at
Christmas?
- too tin : 1**1*1
X 0
X X
1 If you still remember how to extract the square
root of a number, this should be easy:
X 4 X
) X X X X X I
X
XX) XXX
XXX
XX) X X X X
X X X X
Trick for a Holiday Party
HTAKE eight bottles of the same size, suspend a
* broomstick between the backs of two chairs, and
tie the bottles to the stick so they will hang loosely
and not too close together.
Place a different quantity of water In each bottle.
Tune" the bottles by adding more water for low
notes; decrease the liquid for high notes. Now a
tune can be played by tapping the bottles with a
ruler. With a Uttle practice, anyone can acquire
the knack of topping out simple rhythms.
Vy/HlLE it took a great deal of
** doing by the Ghosts of
Christmases Past, Present and
To Come to put Dickens' immor-
tal Scrooge In the right frame of
mind, our artist has made it pos-
sible for us to make the old gent
see things whatever way we wish
instantaneously!
We simply slit his ears at the
points marked by arrows. Insert
the panel (below the drawing)
containing his eyes, and by mov-
ing the strip about slightly, we
make him wink, go to sleep, give
a sly glance, etc.
Try it>it's fun.
CHRISTMAS QUIZ-CROSSWORD
SEH^SEBH^EEBEH
CKuttawuBD rt'zzi.E u,i im\
By Eugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL
1Book of the New Testament
7What wilderness t h r o u g n .
which the Israelites journeyed
lay between Elim and Sinai? '
(Ex. 16:1
10S o 1 e m d affirmation of the
truth of one's words.
14What there's not much of
after Xmas dinner.
ISImplement for digging and
scraping
16Malaysian vessel.
17Neuter pronoun.
18Scottish explorer.
IBValued highly.
21-Salt
23-Cure
25"He shall be great, and shall
be called the-----of the High-
est" (Luke 1:321
26Uniform.
28Steeps flax.
30To dish out the Christmas
goodies.
34Brother of Sheba (IChr. 1:9)
-Ifi-Blast
38What servant of King Saul
killed priests by his com-
mand? (1 Sam. 22:18)
39The human race.
41Narrow inlets.
43Entreat
44GIobes.
48Vehicle operators.
50Land-measure.
51 greens are a Xmas sym-
bol. *
53 What high priest said to Han-
nah. "Go in peace"? M Sam
54Dish-like metal instrument
sounded by besting.
56What mount was to be cursed
by the Israelites when thev
reached the Isnd over Jordan'
58To rap.
62Show clemency.
64Eucharlstic wine vessels.
66Feminine name.
67"----- Maria'"
69Shield.
71Accomplished.
72Book of the Old Testament
76Steal from.
78Pronoun that's part of "Merry
Christmas."
79 Military assistant
80Petition.
81-Effaces.
83Woody plant twigs.
84S-shaped worm.
85W hat Ammonite encamped
against Jabesh-gilead was
asked by the men of Jabeab
for a covenant? (1 Sam. 11:1)
VERTICAL
1-Ufted.
2Group of eight
3Mountain (abbr.)
4^Light breeze.
5Builder of the Ark.
6Scoff.
7Place of refuge.
8Bombycid moths.
9Seines.
10Dec 23 is the day gifts are
11Upper limb.
12-Pedal digit
13Possessed
20Goddess of dawn.
22Guided. ,
24Bronze money.
27Entitle.
28"He whistled and shouted and
called them by -----."
31Long, loose outer garment
32Change direction.
33 Incites.
35Nostril
37Unusual
Sioff |.bri?d,r iCt l0rm*U0n-
44 Droops.
45Support.
4 Biblical city (2 Kl. 11:13)
47"I gave Egypt for thy ransom,
Ethiopia and ----- for thee
(Isa. 43:3)
49Climbing plant
52 What place in the wilderness
did the children of Israel leave
to go to Succoth? (Num. 33:8)
55Places of Interment
57Loiter.
59 Aged.
60 Regions.
41From what place did Moses
send messengers to the king
of Edom asking permission to
3-Twm,hhtrou*h h" couatryT
ot=GTe 70-RaiL
72Equivalence.
73City in Brazil.
74 Peculiar.
75Public vehicle.
77Exclamation Scrooge may once
' have used.
82Symbol for samarium.
Why Santas a Stylish Stout

1


aW



*'
Copjriskt. imi. kUas lostera* flyaSMate. U.
12*3
\V7HJBN Thomas Nast pictured
W gsnta as the stout. Jolly old
gent shown shove, ha set the car-
toon pattern we know today. In-
cidentally, two of Naat's best
-f/ACet,
known cartoon symbols will be In
prominent display In 1863. Do
you know what they are?
-4asaoa onuaewa m
n lmeMls yih)M* qj, iiii(

t.




ti&j';itei:.&>
'ti!ij)tti'"[
______- -, -.....,......:i=.....mm,,--------*---------,-,.,,, ------' r '------


:".<.....y.- .. it-.%*,...-____,- ......r,...;

COW'S head and a pair of
bejewelled hands lend the
decorative touches to these
shoes from collection of Paris
HIGITtHA!RS thfcfe days nee too high, to suit one-year-old Jimmy Hudart who tries to tell shoe designer Laure. Top
Johnny Halbleib, 4, how he broke his arm. The two youngsters met in a Pittsburgh hospital, shot is in gray patent leath-
er and other, an evening
King Features Syndicate shoe, is mauve crepe de chine.
'.
OREGON'S Mt. Hood pro-
vides the backdrop for the
latest western movie star-
ring Jimmy Stewart. A
wagon train and a herd of
cattle wind aip the snow and
ice field at 8,000-foot level
to reach the Oregon trail
and Columbia river country.
Company's spending several
months on location for the
action sequences of the film.
FOR A WARIER CHRISTMAS
("HRISTMAS comes jurf once a year, but what about the day after? Will it also be merry?
' It will if you remember to pick up loose wrapping paper and stray toys; hang orna-
ments out of reach of children and warn them to ride carefully n new bikes and sleds.
T*y Wt *n landing may rwult in a fumble downstairs and a one-way trip tha hospital. Curieu .mall fry shouldn't b. abl. to reach the tret lights.
DOG'S LIFE is not for S/Sgt. Snooks, who prefers her role as mascot of Sheppard Air Ffjfce
Base, Tex. Snooks, getting a few words of advice from S/Sgt. Cecil Smith of Holjywbod,
Cal., got her fourth stripe as a "litter supervisor" on arrival of a fourth litter of pups.
SHAPE OF AIRCRAFT to come is this Avro 707A Delta high-speed research plane winginc
through air over London. Plane has air intakes at wing roots and Dei-went jet engine
IOVE ISN'T BLIND in case of Mae Kumashiro, 26. a blind Japanese-American girl who will
marry Maury Carlton, 33. whom she first met years ago in Detroit. A chance meeting in
Los Angeles revived the romance. The couple are shown at a candy stand run by Mae


TUT SNDAT AMERICAN
...--------------------------------------
SUNDAY, DECEMBER O,'ill!
High School Federation To Fight Organized Baseball's Raids
Fear Majors
Plan To Sign
Boys In Class
By BILL EGGERT
NEA Special Correspondent
Army Athletes
Here To Get
Olympic Chance
Races
1st Race "E" Natives 7 Fge.
Purse: $275.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Bagaleo O. Cruz 117
2Raymond F. Rose 120
3Little Lulu G. Snchez 113
4-Luck Ahead J. Phillips 108
5Taponazo C. Iglesias 112
8Volador Jos Rodrguez 112
7BIJagual A. Coronado HOx
INDIANAPOLIS, Dec. 22 (NEAi! Members of the United States
" Branch Rickey hasn't heard Army who have outstanding
the last o the protests over his abilities in any of the events to,p ,0Ofl Po_ .K ,.t5
attempts to wrap organized base-' be held In the 1952 Olympics "Mfi oftheDouhV,
ball with more leeway to raid Helsinki, Finland, will be given ^Qoidfn Faith V rteea 114
high schools for talent the opportunity to train and at-1 i?.0lan
Etseball men will tell you that tend the Olympic tryouts for that
Rickev, now vice-president and cent.
general manager of the Pirates, However, it was pointed out by
is the smartest man in the game, the Special Service Office, Fort
Bri when he spearheaded or- Amador, that the Individual:
ganized
hi
Interview and sign "prospective
baseball talent, he brought upon him from his duties to partlci-
himself some stormv opposition.1 pate.
L. V. Phillips. Indianas high The only team to be sent from!
school athletic commissioner who USARCARIB. according to pres-,
has sat In sessions with Rickey ent plans, will be the winners of
and other big league executives, the boxing tournament held in
declared- San Juan earlier this month.
2nd Race "D- Natives I Mile
2Tin Tan J. Contreras 118
3Pesadilla V. Rodriguez 108x
4Arqulmedes A. Vsquez 105x
5Pregonero G. Graell 112
8Mueco E. Julin 110
anized baseball to move Into, must have exceptional qualifies- ,d R ,.n,. N,, ...
igh schools beginning in 1953 to tions in his specialty before the ^fgg, ^ Po'?c,~ fffl
iterview and sign prospective Army will be allowed to release rurse- * rooi Closes 1.45
One-Two
1Orgullosa O. Chanls 107
2Apolo Jos Rodriguez 110
3As de Oro
4Capitana II
5Maravilla
6La India
A. Mena 116
H. Reyes 100x
G. Ramos 104x
B. Pulido 110
These champions will be sent to ... _,, N.H., _.
will be
the All-Army tournament In May ll" ""5-, Poo, F M
and the winners there will be r
eligible to compete in the Olym-
pic tryouts.
The United States Olympic
Committee has announced that
; It will inform the Department
: of the Army of any national
i champions now on active duty:
that they desire to have com-j
.^Anyone interested should con- 2"S & *Mfe4M ?f*
? tact the Chief, Special Services, ,;,;
Fort Amador, Canal Zone, *"'
Quiniela
1White Fleet R. Ycaza 105x:
2Casablanca Jos Rodgz. 108
3Elona F. Rose 116
4Grito y Plata H. Reyes 104x
5Juan Huincho E. Silvera 104
6Manolete J, Phillips 120
7Lolito J. Bravo 110
BASKETBALL TWINSThe Kourany twins, Oscar left and
Edgar, right, no Edgar left and Oscar right, no now wait a
minute, maybe it was right the first time. At any rate, the op-
ponents can't tell them apart either, so what's the difference.
These two boys play for the Balboa Bulldogs, and will be count-
ed on by Coach Al Bleifuss for plenty of work in the Invitation-
al Basketball Tournament which gets under way the day after
Christmas.
Coach's Son
Is Sentenced
To End Zone
STATE COLLEGE, Pa., Dec. 22
(NEA) RlpEngle's 17-year-old
son, Chip, appears destined to
match his father's Penn State
football teams perform hereaf-
ter from an Inconspicuous seat
In the end zone.
He was ordered from his 50-
yard berth mid-way through the
losing struggle against Pitt when
his mother protested his conti-
nued belaboring of the opposition
as well as the officials.
In the end zone, she reasons,
he can do all the shouting he
pleases and nobody will hear him
or, more important, nobody will
know him.
His father, informed of the
banishment, moaned:
"Shucks, all he's trying to do Is
help his poor old father win a
football game.''
Canal
further information.
for
Branch Rieker Car! Enktn*
Juan Franco
"High schools are most anxious;
to cooperate with the major|Jall,aA| T\\\m\AiAr
leagues, but In order to do it we PIUlUCl L/IVIuCllUj
need the cooperation of organized,1 ""'" """
baseball.'' --------
Organized baseball's five-year1 s-irbt narp
agreement with the National "*.*" ,.
Federation of High School Ath-. "E' !*??,f ff*gttn'
Sctic Associations expires Dec. 31. fcaSHUSfJa* *
: During the agreement, organ-1 3-vllla"eFa'2 20
Ized baseball has not talked sal-'
Jary with high school boys or
signed any until the first day af-
ter .ie lad graduated.
1Domino $8, $3.60, $2.80.
2Campesino $4.80, $2.80.
3Tap Girl $3.20.
First Doubles: (El Mao Dom-
Last June, tne NFHSAA and in0> :,%IRD RACE
.00Pool Closes 2:55
E. Julin 113
2Rath. Light J. Phillips 105
3Chacabuco M. Arosem. 97
4Royal Coup J. Bravo 126
6th Race '1-1' Imported6 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Rinty A. Mena 120
2 Costina E. Silvera 107
3Bosforo E. Julin 110
4Hurlecano J. Bravo 118
5Incomparable A. Vsq. 108x
6Cantaclaro J. Avila 120
7Pincel o. Chanls 115
Leo Hands Brat's Brogan's
To Davey To Try On For Size
organized baseball started work
on r. new five-year plan whereby" -"c0" fi* "& *2"0
high schools agreed to allow 22S5* SVP* *2J0,
da) $20.20.
(Picon-Dona Elei
FOURTH RACE
1Romntico $7.20, $3, $2.80.
2Eclipse $3, $2.80.
3Cosa Linda $5.40.
Quiniela: (Romntico-Eclipse)
9.40.
FIFTH RACE
cm to lo interview boys and sign! ^J^S $2,8,
then Piter they had met all of
Jthei athletic egllibility require-
mer -.
Rickey, however, was after a
"serious modification." He has
led professional baseball into go-
ing along with the high schools
lor one year of a tentative agree-
ment. Then in 1953. organized
baseball might be able to move ,
Into high schools, Interview and! l~Mlir0u, $522x$3'
kign boys. 2Notable $2.60.
. SIXTH RACE
Tha Is a direct violation o! -anit tlA0PJ\n
NFKJAA and Amateur Athletic'*-?0 Tjmen *3-40' $2 2CL
Union rules. 3Astoria $2.80.
""go schools feel baseball ..... --i- ^
hBsnt played fair." Phillips savs. SEVENTH RACE
fit -anted us to promote the 1Beach Sun $14.40, $8.60, $5.
gem and surveys will show that 2Ifpacu*4-2?,3,
mu"-- the five-year agreement 3Blumaha $4.80.
hi?'--school baseball has pros- Second Doubles: (Folanito-
perr Beach Sun) $63.
"II baseball puts Mr. Rickey's EI^HTH RACE
rule Into operation, it would be i~iui?0 *4-4,0' 3-20- *3-
my -jess that high schools would 2Battling Cloud $13.80, $7.40.
t.ire-ten with the 'no-contract'. 3~IL!v?d.u *lM;
rule and ban high-school boys . from major-league t r y o u t Cloud) S33.40.
*" "ev once asked Phillips if NINTH RACE
b : all ever committed one ov- 1Zevelania $6.40, $3.40, $2.40.
It r ct prior to the agreement 2Goyito $2.60. $2.40.
He t =ked the wrong man. 3Terry J. $2.60.
.Phillips recalled that Carl Ers- One-Two: (Zevelanla-Goyito)
kin;, the Dodgers' right-hander *17-0-
from Anderson, Ind., was ap- TENTH RACE
Broached and asked to take in a 1Fangio $2.80. $2.20.
tvyout camp at Muncle during. 2Caonazo $3.
the school year. ~---------------------:-------------------
*thr,i!?^2h?i Pl}lllips', Dar] "> abiding by Rickey's 1953
with the school principal and plans
Erskine's parents stopped the The one-year agreement Is
E&2K2 rememberto and looked upon as a major-league
prk.Wnil ,eeIer th8t wU> Sh0W JUSthOW
hn i ?Ppare,ll'nomilcl1 high-school opposition
I?J5 JV mno,rit3Lmove in or- there will be.
.tam t?*5t With the blgl Ud t0 tnla POtot- hiph schools
idgnn' tZ2 ?.C1n? COmProm1- have been clean of Big league
ereement JfnrUtVe o-**"'inroad* with all of its8money-
agreement before loosening up persuasion.
(Reprinted from "The Sporting he replied. "You know what he
Newt.") j did for me in his two years with
1 us and you know what he did for
Kid Williams In line for first shot the other clubs he played for
at keystone; Lippy glad to get the Dodgers and the Braves. He's
Lanier, "My kind of pitcher." I been with three different clubs
NEW YORK, N.Y.Eddie Stan-1 in the last five years and they
ky and his vast intangibles werej all won pennants. That's some-
gone from the Giants after a su- thing you can't overlook."
perlatlve two-year stretch and' Nooody around the Giant of-
Leo Durocher was standing in flee was overlooking it. They all
the foyer of the Qlarft office, Just knew what a tremendous lift
before heading back to his home; Stanky had given the club, and
In California after the rigorous what a tremendous part he had
Second Race of the Doubles and mentally hectic winter meet-1 played In the Giants' drive to the
lsupersticiosa IE Alfaro 117x ings. Durocher was-talklng abouti pennant over a two-year span.
the kid from Texas who must fill "He's the guy who did it for
the shoes of the little guy who jus," said. Horace Stoneham
7th Race "G" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $450.00 Pool Closes4:05
Eight Years In
Minors Developing
Footwork, Stanky
(Reprinted from "The Sporting
News.*')
ST. LOUIS. Mo.Eddie Stanky
has an explanation for the fact
that he needed eight minor,
league seasons to reach the maj-
ors with the Chicago Cubs in
1943.
"It took me that long to mas-
ter the footwork at second base,
and to think," the Polish-Ger-
man Pennsylvanlan explained. "I
was a better soccer player than
baseball player In high school.
You'd think I would have had
good footwork."
J. C. HOOP NEWCOMERFred Aleguas, pictured above, will be
a newcomer for the Junior College basketball team this year.
Aleguas, according to his coach, will make the local fans open
their eyes with his ability on the hardwood. The j. C. rooters
will be counting heavily on this boy in the forthcoming J. C.
Basketball Tournament, starting on Dec. 26 at the Balboa Gym.
2Piragua i
3Vampiresa)
4(Prestigio
5(Trafalgar
6Fright
7Caribe
8j-Nehulnco
9The Chef
A. Phillips 120
G. Cruz 112
C. Ruiz 112
M. Hurley 114
J. Phillips 111
O. Chanls 109
E. Julin 114
K. Flores 110
8th Race "1-2" Imported 7 Fg*.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Gale Force) G. Snchez 115
2Rechupete) A. Php 120
3 Frutal
4Delhi
5La Chata
6Cobrador
7In Time i
8Flambaro
9Vermont
10Bartolo
E. Alfaro ll3x
B. Pulido 120
C. Ruiz 115
M. Hurley 120
J. Avila 118
B. Moreno 120
V. Arauz 120
F. Rose 118
9th Race '1-1' Imported61 j Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Atasn G. Snchez 115
2El Mago C. Ruiz 111
3Miss Fairfax V. Ortega 120
4Lituana J. Phillips 112
5Silver Fox A. Mena 114
6 Bendigo K. Flores 118
10th Race "F" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $500.00 Pool Closes 5:4*
1Lln'yHead J. Contreras 112
2Newmlnster J. Bravo 112
3Beduino) B. Pulido 112
4Alto Alegre G. Snchez 118
5The B. Road J. Phillips 120
Juan Frrr~> Tip
By CLOCKER
now Is getting the managerial! bluntly after Leo had left. "I
shot he's always had his heart' wasn't kidding when I said we
set upon. The kid from Texas, of j could have done better with two
course, is Davey Williams. other clubs if we'd wanted to
"Hell get the first shot," Leo] deal for him.Just as a player. But
said, "and I don't see any reason we weren't going to stand In Ed-
why he can't make it. You know.j die's waynot after what he'd
he did a great Job for me when done for us."
he was playing regularly after!
we brought him up from Minnea-! There is no question that the
polls. i chance Stanky Is getting to be a
"Boot forget it wasn't because; big league manager was the on-
of any lapse of his that I took|ly reason the Giants let him get
him out of the lineup the day we away. "He'd have been our sec-
started our winning streak. It' ond baseman next spring but for
just was that the club was stag-! that," said Stoneham.
gering. We'd lost four straight! But now it's Williams and Leo
Is confident that .the slim, boy-
ish-looking 24-year-old from
Dallas wont fail him. Horace
Stoneham agreed.
1Little Lulu
2Mueco
3As de Oro
4Lolito
5 Royal Coup
6Pincel
7Prestigio (e)
8In Time (e)
9Lituana
10^Newminster
Volador
Golden Faith
Orgullosa
Elona
Gris
Hurlecano
Trafalgar (e)
Rechupete (e)
Miss Fairfax
Beduino (e)
and we were 13 games out, and I
had to do something. The way
my ball club was set up there
weren't many changes to make.
So I decided to put Stanky back
in there to see if he could light a
fire. You know the rest of the
story and that's why Davey spent
the rest of the season on the
bench save for a few times In the
late innings when I gave Eddie
a rest after we had locked up the
game."
Leo paused to shake hands
with Vice-Presldent Chub Feen-
ey, who had come out to say
good-bye to him. "The big point,
though." Leo added. >"& that
Dave did a great job when he was
in there. He fielded well, made
some plays that > lot of second
basemen wouldn't make, and he
was hitting right Around 300
when I took him out of there. He
looks like a great kid to me."
"Anybody'd Mis Eddie"
A guy asked Leo if he'd miss
"Who wouldn't miss Stanky?"
good years at Oakland and Min-
neapolis.
Before leaving, Durocher said
he was glad to have Max Lanier
on his side. "I've always had a
lot of respect for him. He's my
kind of pitcher and he always
could beat Brooklyn. He was the
guy we wanted and he'll be a lot
or neip.
.The Giants added another
pitcher to their roster" Decembe?
iliiH*? thev traded utility in-1
fielder Jack Lohrke to the Phll-i
lies for Jake Schmltt, a lefty who|
mnr- W4nd l08t 14 at B^H
more last season. Arob, Murray.
ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
TO EUROPE:
BREDA ........... ................Jn.
N
S
M
TO THE CARIBBEAN:
WILLEMSTAD .....................Dec. 24
BREDA ........ ...............Jbj,. u
TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:
HERS1XIA .........................De,.
BAARN.............................,BII.ii
'''" '? ii li i l i i i |i
"Kid Can De Everything"
"Youve got to remember one
thing," the Giant president add-
ed. "That's the way Williams Im-
proved from one year to the
next. When he played at Min-
neapolis in 1950. he had a couple
of weaknesses. He couldn't make
the double play, for one thing.
But last year, when he left there
to Join us during the All-star
interlude, he could do every-
thing,"
Williams isn't the only young
keystone prospect who'll be car-
ortirig under Leo's eye at Phoen-
ix. There'll be Ron Samford, a
kid from Williams' own home
town of Dallas, who had a whale
of a year at Sioux City. Chick
Genovese, his manager, thinks
he's ready right now. Then there
is Bobby Hofman, back after two
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Esparta .........
S.S. Chlriqui ............;.......
S.S. Inger Skou ..........
S.S. Fiador Knot ...........
..........Dec. 24
..........Dec. 30
..........Dec. 29
.........Jan. 12

liaf a*frifml4 ChllM < G*ana ( .
New York Service
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. San Jese ..................
S.S. Capa Ann ..................
8.8. Junior ..........'..........
8.8. Cap* Avtaef ...............
racQusNT aaiUNGB rutm caisroaAL tc
1 cnmuL /unaica
Cristobal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
......Dee. zs
......Dee. 30
......Ian. 1
......Jan. <
WOT COAST
Sails from
Cristbal
S.8. Chiriami ......................;
S.S. Chiriaai.....(Passenger Service Only)!
.Jan. 1
Jan. IS
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL mi PANAMA 2- 2004 _
COLON 20
Armourclad
PICNIC HAMS
Shenandoah Valley
Eviscerated TURKEYS
and
BREAST of CHICKEN
LEGS of CHICKEN
Snow Crop
FROZEN CHICKENS
Just Arrived
CAMEMBERT CHEESE
Fresh Crisp Lettuce
from the Volcan

a beautiful CHRYSLER
or
at

PAULS
MARKET
Our Store will be open
ALL DAY
Monday 24th of Dec.
/ PLYMOUTH
an econmica
Choose your color
name your model!
AGENCIAS PAN-AMERICANAS, S. A.
Your CHRYSLER & PLYMOUTH Dealen
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Nylon Socks........................................ i qq
JAYSON Shirts..................................... 45Q
JAYSON Pajamas..................................w 5 95
PA NAB A N A Tropical Sport. Coats......... ^........ 17.50
GALUENI Ties.................................... 4M
BORSALINO Hats............. ..................... 9 50
Fine SWANK Jewelry ,............. ........ from 350
Fine Colognes.................................from 2.5D
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Tl C*ah*l in, urf Calta
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PANAMA II 71
total II Panam
COLON Omm.II. a. E. SUHaa
S A




T^AT DECEMBER t, MSI
TB tfffift) A T AMERICAN
wyi.JMro.HB %,................^ |----------------- -------------------- ~ -----------------------------1-------------., ----------------
Second Annual Jr. College Basketball Tourney To Be Wide Open Affair
r-

56-Game Hit Streak Tops
Joe's Many Achievements
' THt SPORTING NEWS")

m NSW YORK. W. Y. With his
"retirement on December 11, Joe
' DiMeglio, who veas 17 on Novem-
ber, 35 doted one of the most
remarcable baseball playing
careers In the history of ton
game.
Joe plaed with four conseco-
tive walla's championship"clubs
"hli fire* iour years 1988
through 1MB. No other player
can make that statement.
The 1911 World's Series saw
DlMaagto play his lltty-flrst
classic game, a record. He pas-
sedfrrnkle Frisch lh the sixth
"an after they had bean tied
Hat 80.
In his 13 years of major league
baseball (time out for service in
1M-44-45). DIMagglo was pick-
ed for every All-Star oame. He
dia not play In 1948 or 1951 be-
cause of Injuries. \
m his IS years, DIMagglo play-
ed on ten pennant winners and
nine world's championship clubs.

His greatest record was set in
1941 when he hit safely to 08
consecutive sames from May 15
through July 18, after which he
was stopped by Jim Baeby and
Al Smith.

DIM**rio was named the
American League's most valua-
ble player in 193, 1941 and
1947. In 1948. when he lea the
American League In BBIs at
155, and played all the way
down the stretch despite crip-
pling injuries, the portacast-
ers' association picked him as
the player" of the year.
*
DiManio has. hit more home
runs (Sil In regular season play
plus eight in the World's Series
and one In the All-Star Oame)
than any other player who was
active this year.

He led the A. Is. fen RBIs also
In 1941 (125) and twice was the
league's home run king with 48
in 1937 and 39 in 1948. He won
I two battin* crowns, wlfh an av-
erage of .381 in 1939 and .352 in
1940.

He is the only player who
has ever hit three home runs
Into the left field stands at
Griffith Stadium In a slncle
bau game (September 19.1959).

After mlsslne 65 games In 1949
because of a heel injury DIMag-
glo starteoVhis "season" by lash-
ing Boston pitching for four
home rune and a ingle, driving
In ninft runs, in a three-gaThe
sweep t' Fenway Park.. Many
consider that performance the
; greatest of his career.
He Joined the 2,000-hlt club
June 20, 1950. in Cleveland. On I
July 99 this year he drove in five
runs against the Chlsox at the
Stadium. The second pf these
wasItBI Ho. 1,500 for the Yan-
kee Clipper. ^
He was selected on The Sport-
Inn Hews'. All-Star Major League
team eight times in 1937-18-
39-'40-'ll-'4a-'47f*48, topping the
EM in 1917 and '41. In addition,
e was named the Major League
Player of the Year by the Base-
ball Bible in 1939.
a>
DIMagglo/collected 296 hits
in his first season in the maj-
ors, 1936. during which he al o
tied major and A. L. records
with six eatra bases on lone
hits in an inning and eight to-
tal bases in one frame by
clouting two homers in the
fifth inning of a game, Jane
*.
Joe clouted three homers in a
game three times during his
major careerJune 13,1937. May
28, 194*7 and September 10, 1950
and twice hit for the cycle-
July 9.1937, and May 20,1948. He
equalled modern major and A. L.
marks for most three-base hits
in a name (3), August 27. 1938.
All 8 Teams
Appear To Be
Evenly-Matched
Infield, Catching Put Lou
On Double Shift As Worrier
(Reprinted
"THE SPORTING
freis
NEWS")
After having seen all the Pac-
ific side teams that are entered
in the second annual Junior Col-
lege Basketball Tournament In
action during the past week, this,.
writer feels very safe In stating, tain least the finest opportunity
that this promises to produce Wtain Slugger Ted Williams
some of the best basketball tobej" moves temporarily at
seen in the Panam area. least, the finest opportunity
The three Atlantic side teams the Red Sox had to solve the
Late Nose-Dive In '51 Emphasised
Weaknesses; Boudreau Espec-
ially Concerned Over Keystone

By BOB AJEMIAN
BOSTON, Man. Lou Bou-
dieau's emphatic decision to re-
are known to be very strong, so
amounts to an eight-team field,
any one of which has the stuff
to cop the championship trophy.
Cristobal High SchooL having
staggering situation which con-
fronted them at the end of last
season and still confronts
them.
The Sox wound up the year
played three and won three so losing 12 of their last 13 games,
far this season rates as the top They were an unsound ball Club,
team in the tournament. The old1 They had not one dependable
saying that the Champ Is'still catcher. Les Moss. Buddy Rosar
Champ until someone proves and Aaron RoWnson all hover-
otherwise, la good right here. ed arcmnd the .200 mark. Walt
Coach Paul Moser has one of the Dropo had'stumbled to nothing
smoothest working, round ballat ffr8t base Bm Goodman could
* *
:
quintets these eyes have seen in
the tropics.
Don't get the Idea, however,
that this is going to be one nice
big pushover for the Tigers. Far
from it. In their ppening night
game they come face to face with
potentially the strongest team In
The tournament. This team that
FISH OATOJES BWThis
84 H-pound channel bass was
landed with rod and reel off
Nags Head. N.C., but not by
six-year-old Jan Oneto, who can
hardly reach the whopper's
mouth. (MEA1_
For People of Fine
Ttute... the Finest
LIQUORS
Whiskey
Cognac
Gin
Champagne
Rom
Table Wine
White Wine
Red Wine
Creams
CANDIES
Italian Nougats
Chocolate* with Liaaer
Assorted Chocolates
Italian Marrn Glacis
Chocolatas in- Italian
Ceramic Figurines
CANNED GOODS
Pats de Pole Gras
Antipasto
Olives
French Sardines
French Mustard
Champignon
TOBACCOS
tacrista
. e Menterray
fe?%Mo
Oolonna
not fill the gap left by Bobby
Doerr at second base. At short-
stop,- Johnny Pesky was not
charging balls and making the
double play. Boudreau, himself,
could not cover ground. At third
base, Rookie Fred Hatfield was
a fielding wizard who batted on-
might well knock off the Tlger.;lyJ72. t was a p^nfle d then.
is the Working Boys team of Ed-.Today, "is still a poor Infield.
gaf McArthur. Boasting such And with Uie best piece of
basketeers as Noel and Bob Olb- trading bait if al baseball -
Williams now listed as an un-
touchable by Boudreau, the pro-
Nlarhos is scrappy, aggressive
and capable, but doesn't seem the
full-time answer to Red Sox
backstop woes. Behind him. Bou-
dreau still has Robinson, an ag-
ing veteran. Third man Is Rookie
Sammy White, who played Class
A ball most of last season.
The Red Sox, in other words,
still possess the same ills which
handicapped them last season.
And mainstays like Williams,
Dom DlMaggio, Ellis Kinder.
Pesky and Stephens are ell sm-
other year older.
Sox Shorts: Many baseball men
insist the Red Sox landed a prize
draft choice in Hal Bevan, Hol-
lywood second baseman. Tad Mc-
Orew, chief Hose scout, recom-
mended the selection of the six-
foot, 21-year-old infielder who
was with New Orleans last sea-
son. "I've read a lot of stories a-
bout who'll play in the Red Sox
Infield nekt year and I've seen
no mention of Vevan in any of
them." said McOrew. "I think the
kid has a chance to be' the Sox'
first or third baseman." McOrew
said he first signed Bevan when
scouting for Pittsburgh. "I would
not say he's ready for a second
base or shortstop Job in the maj-
ors," said McOrew, "but I do
think he can fill the bill defen-
sively at first or third."
son, McArthur, Ed Capelbo, and
many other Isthmian basketball
Clipper's Record Clippings
(Reprinted from
."THE SPORTING NEWS")

American League batting
champion 1939 (.381) and J940
(.852).
American League leader in runs
batted in 1941 (125) and 1948
(155).
American League leader In
home runs 1937 (48) and 1948
(39).
Tied with 16 others by making
200 or more hits In his first full
season in the majors: 206 hits In
138 names in 1936.
Most consecutive games batted
safely in one season (a record for
both leagues): 56 games, May 15
to. July 16, 1941.
Tied with 11 others for most
extra bases on long hits In one
inning (two home runs): June 24,
1936.
Tied with 12 others for most
total bases in one inning (same
as above).
Tied with nine others for most
triples In one game: Three on
August 27, 1938.
Tied with 11 others for most
home runs in one toning. Two,
June 24 1936.
Hit three home runs In one
game on three occasions: June
13, 1937, May 23, 1948, and Sept-
ember 10, 1950.
Had a fielding mark of .9968
for 139 games in 19S7.
Won the most valuable play-
er award for the American
League (The 8porting News) in
1939 and 1941 and of the Base-
ball Writers' Association of Am-
erica in 1939, 1941 and 1947.
Tied with George Herman Ruth
for playing in most World's Series
10.
Holds record for playing most
times1 a World's Series with
winning clnb9;
Holds record for most games
played in total World's Series51.
Holds record 'for most. Series
games with one club51.
Holds' record of most times at
bat in total Series199,
Tied with 12 others for most
times at baj In one nlne-innlng
Series game: 6, on October 6,
1936.
Tied record held by numerous
players of most times at bat in
one inning in World's Series: 2,
on October 6, -1936.
Tied with five others for most
base hits in one Inning of a
World's Series game: 2, October
6. 1936.
Made one or more base hits to
each game of a World's Series in
1939.
DIMagglo hit home runs In the
following World's Series: 1937,
1938, 1939. 1947, 1949. 1950 and
1951.
Holds the record of most
chances accepted as an outfield-
er In a five-game Worlds Ser-
ies: 20, in 1942.
Holds reoord for most putouts
by an outfielder In five-gam
World's Series: 20. in 1943.
Tied for record with five other
for most putouts by an outfield-
er in one toning of a World'
Series game: 3 on October 2,1984),
and October 7,19S7.
Perfectly Satisfied,
Ed Tells Old Bo
(Reprinted from "The Sporting;
News.")
ST. LOUIS, MoMinute af-
ter Fred Salgh and Eddie Stanky
came to terms to the Cardinals'
offices at Sportsman's Park, De-
cember 11, the phone rang while
the club owner and his new Red-
bird manager were talking to re-
porters. The caller was Charle
(Chub) Feeney, New York Giant
vice-president who wanted a
word with Stanky.
The Brat chuckled at Feeney'
greeting and replied, "You may
Beat us a few games, Chubby, hut
we'll win the rest."
Stanky became serious then.
"I'm 100 per cent satisfied,'' he
answered the next question, "an*
I appreciate the chance you gave
me. .
"We'll be after one another
next summer," were the ex-Ol-
ant's parting words to a former
employer.
Ereals, all this gang needs to do
) go right into the finals is to
hit the stride they are capable
of.
Another tremendous bunch of
pass and shoot artists are the
Blue Jays from Albrook. Headed
by the former All-American, Sal
Sclafanl, and with three All-
State players from Pennsylvania,
this team will be tough to knock
off.
In addition to these teams, the
ball clubs from Balboa High, Ju-
nior College, 15th Naval District,
Powells, and Cristobal Athletic
Association, Just cant be dis-
counted. Having seen all these
teams but the latter two to ac-
tion, it is obvious that they all
have the boys to get Into the fin-
als if the breaks go their way.
Tickets for this gala basket-
ball tournament can be purchas-
ed at the Balboa Gym, J.C. Of-
fice, or at the door the nights of
the games. 50 cents for all games
up to the finals which Is 75 cents,
is what it will cost you.
CUN CLUB
NOTES-*- -
ii
Cristobal Riflemen Defeats
Cristobal ROTC
The Cristobal Qun Club rifle
team put together their highest
team score of the year to defeat
the Cristobal ROTC team 1065,
719 to a match fired Friday i
ternoon on the Cristobal High
School range. This put them .
the win column lor the first time
and left the ROTC boys still
struggling for their first victory.
Bill Blngham and Noel Gibson
paced the winners with scores of
277 and 176 respectively. Dale
Cockle's 222 was high for the loS-
ers.
It Bhould be pointed out that
the ROTC teams compete to the
Isthmian Gallery League under
some disadvantage as regards
the standing position. The league
operates under the NRA rules
which allow the left arm to be
supported against- the side,
whereas the ROTC boys are han-
dicapped by their requirement to
use the military standing with
the left arm free from the body.
The scores:
CRISTOBAL
Prone Sit Stand Ttl
B. Blngham 100 93 84 277
Noel OlSson 99 97 80 276
Roy Perkins 97 88 73 258
F. Anderson 92 95 7 J54
Team Total 10
CRISTOBAL ROTC .
Prone SI' Stand Ttl.
Dale Cockle 92 83 47 222
D. Ooodhead 85 97 37 189
Wm. Stevens 70 71 37 178
Dick Blwell 89 44 17 130
Team Total
719
LIQUOR DEALERS SINCE 1890
Box SMI
PANAMA
Telephones:
9-OSM 2.0SM
Cristobal Jfs. Take Crucial
Match to Retain Rifle Lead
In one of the closest and best
high scoring rifle matches ever
fired to the Isthmian Gallery
League, the Cristobal Junior Ri-
fle Club team defeated the Ai-
brook-Curundu Gun Club team
nTh?eci?of 1132 fired by the
juniors equalled the league reo-
ord for four-man teams which
was made by Albrook-Curundu
last year. The scores fired by
both sides were high foi-ttl
vear, and it is a tribute to the
ouallty of the shooters on these
teams that under the pressure of
a crucial match they were both
able to lift their scores to this
Among the individuals, there
were five scores fired over 280, in
fact the average among the eight,
scoring shooters was almost 283.
The outstanding performance of
the night belonged to Jim Schel-
peler, who knowing that he had
to come up with at least 287 for
his team to win, was able to rack
up a 289 to pace the Juniors. Leo
Constanttoe fired a 287 for the
Juniors while M-Sgt. Bill Merri-
man equalled this for Albrook-
Curundu.
This match was fired at Cris-
tobal High School and these
teams will meet again In the sec-
spects of Improving that infield I
have dimmed to the vanishing
point. Williams Is the only Red
Sox player who could bring re-
placements heavy enough to re-
shape the Boston club.
Boudreau acutely recognises
his dilemma around second base
for 1962.'At a recent press con-
ference, he shook his head say-
ing:
"I'd like to get strength at sec-
ond base and shortstop, especial-
ly the former. If Ven Stephens'
leg responds, I think he'll be able
to handle shortstop. But second
base worries me."
Right now. the plans call for
Pesky, a shortstop and third
baseman the last 12 years, to at-
tempt a shot at second in spring
training. The 32-year-old veter-
an Infielder who finished the
year with a snappy .313 average,
is In favor of the idea. He thinks
the position will add some time
to his playing career.
Also, Goodman, who does not
have a strong arm, will take an-
other shot at the Job.
Boudreau Is plenty worried a-
bout the position, and rightfully
so. However, he still may yield to
offers for Williams which would
Include a second baseman, for
example Gerry Coleman of the
Yankees, it the proposition is too
good to turn down.
The point is, thought, the Red
Sox still are as weak around the
middle of the diamond as they
were the end of last season when
they nosedived.

Mainstays All Another Year Older
Boudreau is hoping Dropo will
make a comeback at first base.
Maybe he will, maybe he won't.
Hatfield may blossom Into an av-
erage hitter or he may continue
to sputter along, below .200.
Behind the bat, the Sox have
added Gua Nlarhos, a slim, brit-
tle receiver who cannot plug the
catching hole by himself. He bat-
ted only .256 last season for the
White Sox.
"Nlarhos is my first-string
catcher," stated Boudroau.
Johnson Changes
Hfs Mind About
Top Ball Player
ST. LOUIS, Dec. 22 (NBA)
Billy Johnson, who spent most of
his career with the Yankees, has
changed his mind about the
greatest player he ever saw.
"When I was with New York,"
the Cardinals' third baseman
says, "I thought Joe DIMagglo
was the greatest active player.
"But that was before I had
seen Stan Muslal."
ond half of the season In a Paci-
fic aid match. Friday night's
scores:
CRISTOBAL JUNIORS
Prong git Stand Ttl.
J. Schelbfler 98 99 92 280
L. Constanttoe 97 98 92
Ray Pinto 100 92 86
John Hatgi 100 98 80
Team Totals
287
278
278
1132
ALBROOK-CDRUNM
Prone Sit Stand Ttl.
B. Merriman 100 98 89 287
BUI Jeffrey 100 94 88 282
Earl Mitchell 99 91 90 281
Ed Coe 96 99 82 279
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ARMY ATHLETES VIE FOR OLYMPICS
*
Rail Pay Rises
Living Costs
lit New High
WASHINGTON, Dec. 22 (UP)
Tile government reported today
kt living costs hit another rec-
! high. Nov. 15. giving 1,200,000
road workers a 4-cent hourly
wage Increase and paving the
way for millions of other em-
ployes to seek raises.
ith new and old consumer
ce Indices for Nov. 15 hit a rec-
peak. the Bureau of Labor
Is tics said.
ie new Index reached 188.6
per cent of the 1935-39 period
which represents 100.
Sharply higher prices for fresh
fruits and Vegetables and heavier
7&
SUNDAy

(Page l*f
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
rWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY, DECEMBER S3, 1951
TEN CENTS

Silent Dutchman Grunewald Clams
On $500,000 Shakedown Probers
WASHINGTON, Dec. 22 (UP) | threatened him by telephone in) Grunewald then picked up met Grunewald, but assumed
ti^r,ft^,,ror^'!!Lar,aiJc,',aoV.Henry W. (The Silent Dutch-, a guttural voice and German i the statement and read it- him- he had a guttural voice and
";*"!!"i.. o=n*.V*l man) Grunewald refused at a I accent. self, giving subcommittee mem- German accent because ha was
I've never spoken to Tel-bers and newsmen their first nicknamed 'The Dutchman."
on utomobiles. gasoline, cigar- hearing vester-!
ettes. and beer were chiefly re- f** House MflUWW
aponsible for the rise.
day to answer questions aboutitelbaum, by phone or other- first opportunity to hear his
The rail rmnloves' increase ian alleged $500,000 tax shake-|wise." he said. "I don't know voice.
effective Jan 1 is the result of down Plot- and was threatened I the son of a bee. If he's good| Kean said he would describe
wage contract geared to Hv- promptly with contempt pro- -
Ing costs. The rise in the price isec"tlon- .
index aUo pushes up the gov- The mysterious man-about-
ernment's wage ceiling. |the-capital broke his studied
While the wage ceiling technl-! silence only to give his age (59 >
cally still Is 10 per cent above'and to accuse the investigating
Jan. 1.1950. levels, the Wage Sta- subcommittee of trampling on
bilization Board has laid down a his constitutional rights,
policy of permitting workers to I Acting chairman Eugene J.
bargain for further raises to re-iKeogh (D-N.Y.i warned him
fleci increases in living costs that he was laying himself
since last Jan. 15.
The rail workers are among
some 3,000,000 union workers
who have escalator clauses in
their contracts providing auto-
matic increases each time the
open to contempt action unless
he claimed possible self-in-
crlmlnatlon as his reason for
refusing to testify.
But Grunewald declined to
make- such a claim. He Just kept
index rises. Eventually, they [repeating that his attorney
Will switch to the new index [had advised him not to say
which includes such items as anything,
television sets and baby foods. ,, ., ,._,__
Both indices have been climb- *>* inallrdlsmlssed Giune-
lng steadily since February. 1950.,waId-* lh,opde[s to reappear
Including the latest boost, the on Feb.13. He told reporters the
rail employes will have received
Charles OUphant, resigned
chief counsel of the Internal
Revenue Bureau, testified that
enough to pick up the check for Grunewald's voice as "guttur- Grunewald obtained confldent-
Al Capone, he's good enough.." al" but "I would not say he has ial information from him about
a total increase of 11 cents an
hour under their escalator agree-
ment since April t-
full seven-member subcommit-
tee will meet In the nterin to
decide about contempt action.
Rep. Robert W. Kean (R-N-
The other 2,000.000 workers J> said he will strongly urge
covered by Such agreements are that Grunewald be cited. Con-
not scheduled for adjustments vlition on contempt of Con-
thls month.
The index showed an average
increase of one per cent for re-
tail food prices between Oct. IS,
and Nov. 15, including a 9.6 per
" cent rise in prices of fresh
fraits and vegetables such as
cabbage, green beans, lettuce,
carrots, potatoes and onions.
Dairy products, beverages, cer-
eals and bakery products rose
slightly. A slight decline was not-
ed for beans, poultry and fish.
gress charges -carries a penalty)
of one year in prison for each
question spurned.
The subcommittee wants
to find out what, if any-
thing, Grunewald knows
about an alleged attempt
to extort 1500,000 from ex-
Capone attorney Abraham
Teitelbaum of Chicago with
threats of tast troubles.
At this point, his attorney.
William P. Maloney, of New
York, cut him off abruptly by
saying "that's enough, that's
enough."
Maloney, who has chaperoned
Grunewald through all his re-
cent contacts with newsmen,
stirred up a noisy row when
he tried to play a similar role
in the hearing.
The attorney tried repeatedly
to head off questioning of his
client by reading aloud a state-
ment asserting that Grunewald
had been .depicted as "an In-
fluence peddler, a generally un-
savory character, a fixer and
a party to criminal attempt to
extort money" all on the basis
of "the rankest kind of h**r
say testimony."
Maloney engaged in a
shouting match with Keogh,
who ruld the statement
out of order. Ttie congress-
man finally silenced the at-
torney by threatening to
have him thrown bodily out
of the hearing room.
say
a German accent."
Keogh said it was "a husky
voice" but agreed that It bore
no detectable strains of Ger-
man accent.
The subcommittee had
been trying for about two
weeks to question Qrune-
wald about Teitelbaum's
story that three men tried
to shake him down for
$500,000 by claiming they
could send him to jail On
tax fraud charges.
Teitelbaum identified two of
the alleged extortionists aa
Frank Nathan and Bert K.
Naster.
He said he never saw the
third man, but that he spoke
iver the telephone in a gut-
tural voice wRh a German
accent.
T. Lamar Caudle, ousted as-
Teitelbaum's tax situation, and
later urged him not to disclose
the fact to House investigators.
After almost an hour of this
futile, procedure, the subcom-
mittee excused Orunewald and
went into executive session,
presumably to consider its next
step.
Traditional Xmas
Caroling Listed
Al Ancon Cathedral
Fired Diplomat
Challenges Ruling
Of Loyalty Board
WASHINGTON, Dec. 22 (UP)
Career diplomat John Stew-
art Service charged yesterday
that President Truman's loy-
alty review board acted illeg-
ally in finding "reasonable
doubt" of his loyalty and de-~
manded that.it reverse its rul-
Servlce, veteran Par Eastern
expert, was fired by the State
Department Dec. 13 after the
review board reversed rulings
of the department's own loy-
alty board which had cleared
him of all charges.
Service was a prime target
of Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy
(R-Wis.) who accused him of
being pro-Communist.
The review board based its
findings of reasonable doubt of
Service's loyalty on the fact
that in 1945 he gave informa-
tion he gathered in China to
Philip c. Jalfe, editor of the
now defunct Amerasia maga-
zine.
It said Service knew Jaffe
was "a very doubtful character,
extremely left-wing."
In terming the board's, ac-
tion illegal, Service said the
body has authority only to re-
view cases of employes whose
dismissal has been recommend-
ed by departmental loyalty
boards. He said It has no pow-
er to overturn favorable rul-
ings by departmental boards.
Service's petition noted that
he had been cleared at least
six times by the State De-
partment's loyalty board.
Service freely admitted glv-
MAJ. GEN; LESTER 1. WHTTLOCK. center, foreground, Com-
manding General. U. S. Army Caribbean, Inspected all the.
Aimy Posts on the Atlantic Side on Thursday. When he-
had Inspected Fort Sherman he rode a crash boat from
there to Pier 9. Cristobal. At his left In the picture above
Is Colonel Robert F. Alexander, Commanding Officer, 370th
Engineer Amphibious Support Regiment. (Official U. 8. Army
Photo by Pfc. Edward O. Marino)
The traditional
caroling from the
Porch will be presented, by me E
choir of the Cathedral of 8t.i:He said this may have shown
Luke for the benefit of the L "|ck of discretion" and "bad
M*Jtm? ''*Uaie' 01U"1 fr """ene* In Polnclana Plaza on Tudwnent" but raised no ques-
KhafrnVS S& *"* **- -
Teitelbaum's story, he immedia-
tely surmised that the third
man might be Grunewald.
Caudle said he had never
GM Hops In For Price Hikes
On All Passemger Models
Although he mas unwilling!
to discuss the case under oathGeneral Motors Corp., asked the
Residential rents increased an before the subcommittee, Grune-!8vernm average of one-half of one per wald told reporters outside the'feUln.s" P* ,'ncrease *""
cent. hearing room that he was not!ln,B from * ,* $103.29 on
Apparel prices dropped six-,the so-far-unldentified "thirdIa1'"ve makes of its automobiles
tenths of one per cent. man-' whom Teitelbaum says;Chevrolet, Pontiac. Oldsmo-
blle, Buick and Cadillac and
its suburban passenger car.
Officials said the requested
hikes would boost retail prices
25 to 35 per cent above the
wholesale dollars and cents In-
creases or possibly as much
as $31.44 to $139.44. The in-
creases would apply to all mo-
dels.
The company asked the 'Of-
fice of Price Stabilization for
wholesale boosts of $00.54 on
Its best selling Chevrolet: $78
19 on Its best selling Pontiac;
| $94.18 on its best selling Olds-
mobile; $67.65 on its best sell-
ing Buick; $103.29 on its best
selling Cadillac and $24.44 on
Its best selling suburban mo-
del.
General Motors was the sec-
ond of the "Big Three" auto
manufacturers to apply for
price increases under the so-
called Capehart amendment to
the price controls law.
The amendment lets manu-
facturers' celling prices reflect
nearly all cost increases through
July 26.
Ford asked Wednesday for
wholesale Increases of 4.37 per
cent on its Mercury, 5.39 per
cent on the Ford line and 8.33
per cent on Its Lincoln model.
Chrysler, the other member
of the automotive Big Three is
expected to apply for an in-
crease soon.
Three smaller auto manufac-
turers Hudson, Studebaker
and Kaiser-Frazeralso applied
for wholesale boosts Wednesday.
Hudson and Studebaker r-' -
WASHINGTON, Dec. 22 (UP) ed for Increases ranging from
4.89 to 8.67 per cent and Kai-
ser-Frazer from 24.33 to 28.48
per cent.
The wholesale percentage In-
creases sought by General Mo-
tors range from 1.7 per cent on
tty suburban to 6.01 pr cent
on the Ofdsmobile.
On the other cars, the per-
centage. Increases asked were
5.14 per cent on Chevrolet, 5.36
on Pontiac, 4.48 on Buick and
4.41 on Cadillac.
The increases must be re-
viewed and approved by OPS
before they can be put into
effect.
Only a few weeks ago. the
agency authorized auto manu-
facturers to apply for their
third round of price hikes this
year.
opens the Christmas celebra-
tion at the Cathedral at 11 p.m.
Funeral Services
For Sidney Simmons
Scheduled for Today
Funeral services will be neld
Crowds of people annually
gather in cars and on foot to
hear the Christmas carols
sung.
At 11:30 p.m. Christmas Eve
the Choir will proceed into the
Cathedral and lead the con-
gregation in a quarter hour of
carol singing before. the cele-
bration of Holy Communion at
11:45 p.m.
This year the Choir of Christ
C h u re h-by-the-Se, colon
Beach will present a sacred
concert in the Cathedral on St.
Stephen's Day, December 26 at
7:30 p.m. The offering to be
received at the end of the
concert will be used to buy
equipment for Christ Church
Academy.
There will be celebration of
Holy Communion on all the
holy days during Chrlstmastlde
at 8:30 a.m. in All Soul's Cha-
pel at the Cathedral.
Santa To Make
Pre-Appearajlce
At Fort Amattor
A hard riding /taessenger
from Banta Land ha Just ar-
rived at Fort Amador on the
speediest reindeer in the Far
North. .>>_.-
The messenger brings word
that Santa Claus will be at the
Army-Navy Club, Fort Amador
tonight from 6 to 6:45 to see
all of the children who are
there for the Sunday Buffet
Dinner with their parents.
As a preview of his regalar
visit on Christmas Eve Santa
will have candy, for the chil-
dren.
Santa invites all club mem-
bers to come out to the Buf-
fet and bring their children to
see him.
BLOOD GIVEN FREELY L/ _!_ w e.'ll
Moscow, ida. (UP) u King S VOICe Still
students ... .
thn53SIWeak For Rad,
their blood iriKnctt rwi jo hto\
donor record for Korea. The BtS* ^gToeorge VI win
iffit? 1taCtttireaMd1.t" '"* mftke ^Is annuaT^ChrWmS
ta^J^ three days .broadcast this year by record-
h~2ELS* U f mry-n*. according to a Bucking-
three students. ham pange announcement.
NOT TOO OLD TO WORK I
NEWBURGH, N.Y. (UPJNil* The decision-was made on
Magnuson, 82, has just complet- his doctor's advice,
ed his own house, doing all -Ufe!
work himself. The house con-1 His voice lias not regained
slsts of a bedroom, kitchen and its normal strength since his
a place to store his truck. lung operation,
Of course
Department Of Agriculture
Is Another Probe Prospect
MONTPELIBR,' Vt., Dec. 22
(UP) A full-scale Investiga-
tion of reports of corruption in
the Department of Agriculture
is being weighed by the Senate
----------.Agriculture Committee, Sen.'said ha
mis afternoon at 3 for Sidney Qeorge D. Alken (R-Vt.) disclos- compared with the potato price
81 mm o n s who died Frldav > her vesterdav. support program because "pota-
Alken said the preliminary
staff investigation had covered
at least these subjects:
1) The losr.es of the peanut
price support program which he
d recrlved little publicity
8 ""l0' who died Frldajnea here yesterday
nigm in the Santo Toms ,Ho- The ranking minority member
Pital of cerebral hemorrhage, cf the committee said an lnves-
Burlal will be at Mount Hope tlgation would be launched if a,
___ (NEATelephoto)
MIXED EMOTIONS Pfc. William Sasser and his wife.
Agnes, 2?, of Atlanta. Ga., consider the problem presented
When the Communist POW list carried the name of Pvt.
Walter Dlxo. Mrs. Sasser's first husband who was presumed
dead. After being notified that Dlxon was killed In action.
She collected $10,000 GI insurance and remarried. Now she
. says. "I don't know what to do."
Cemetery.
Simmons suffered an atUck
while attended a ball game at
the National Stadium with his
brother, Archibald, Thursday
night. He had come over tnat
day from Coln, where he lives
with his family.
In addition to his brother
Archibald, he is survived by ols
wife Mrs. Eva Simmons; h
parents; two daughters Mrs.
feari DePass and- Doiore?
Sweetie" Simmons and an
other brother Claudio "Chino"
Simmons. .
report expected next month from
the committee's staff verified
rumors of favoritism, unethical
conduct and illegal activities in
the department
"Well go ai high as necessary
in the department if we decide
o full investigation In warrant-
ed," Alken said.
He said there was a "proba-
bility" that Illegal acts had been
made by Agrieu't1
officials hd emp
ed:
"You can be"-
lelng illegal.*
pfrtment
, bit add-
hout
toes Is a Republican crop and
peanuts is a Democratic crop."
2) Illegal acceptance of money
by Agriculture Department em-
ployes from etneerns affected by
department rlleles.
3) The alleged speculation In
cil o government-cont r o 11 e d
lands by officials of a'Missouri
bank on information said to have
been supplied by staff members
r>; the department's farm credit
administration.
4) The laaslrtf of government-
owned buildings in the Midwest,
largely In Missouri by Democrats
who then allegedly rented the
structures at large profits to the
department's Commodity Credit
Corporation for grain storage.
US Homes Promised Streamline Treatment
BY ROBERT F. LOFTl S

' WASHINGTON. Dec. 22'(TJW_
A new alliance between builders
and furniture makers promises to
revolutionize the home building
Industry in 1952, one of the coun-
try's top housing experts said to-
day.
With competition stiffened by
the completion of more than 1,-
080.000 new homes this year,
builders throughout the country
are reported using multi-purpose,
specially-designed modern fur-
niture to lure the customers in.
Chief advocate of the scheme
is James Lang, executive editor
of "The Practical Builder." a na-
tionally circulated publication
which is a trade "bible" for most
of the United States' 100.000
builders.
Lang predicted that home'
builders, who expect to put up
about 850.000 new houses in "1952
' if materials and rprtgage money
hold out, will find the selling in-
creasingly tough unless they
come up with some new gim-
micks.
Lang said 1951 marked the end
of the "shelter building" era for
I the housing Industry.
A large part of this year's eon-
! structlon, he asserted, was sim-
ply four-walls-and-a-roof hous-
ing designed to. meet the urgent
need for low-cost homes.
In 1952. he said.'prospective
home buyers, particularly In the
upper-middle Income brackets,
are going to do more shopping
and insist on better housing for
their money.
Lang is stumping the country
trying to sell his idea to the,
builders.
He predicted that the major'
new trends, In 1952 housing will
Include: i
The use of tailor-made, mod-
\ ern furniture designed for the
compact housing now being built. I
Furniture makers for years
have been turning out ultra-,
modern chairs, tables and sofas,
but without taking a good look
at their customers' homes to find
out how they tit into today's,
houses.
Lang proposes that builders,
call hi the furniture men when;
they start on a housing project1
and outfit at least one demon-
stration unit from top to bottom
with furnishings designed for
that home.
The result would be a sort of
mass-production interior decor-1
atlng service of the kind that,
only high-income families here-
tofore could afford.
Among other things, the fur-,
niture men are now making ad-
justable tables that can be rais-
ed or lowered, expanded or con-
tracted, and made to serve a
half-dozen functional purpose*.
Another new development is a
square or rectangular coffee ta-
ble that can be taken apart to
make four television or party
chairs.
Built-in television nooks, and
beds with bookcases fitted in
place of headboards also are on
the list of housing extras ready
for 1952. AH of the "tailor-made*'
furniture is lowslung. open stys
equipment designed to create ex-
tra room, and give the illusion of
still more. In the small modern
home.
Since chromium, nickel and
stainless steel have gone to war,
the furniture makers have re-
verted to wood for their 1952
rroduets.
One novelty is a "dust-color-
ed" wood designed to save the
housewife a lot of extra furni-
ture polishing and dusting.
Lang said builders next year
also are going to have to pack
home electrical appliances Into
their new homes, including ex-
haust fans in the basements, re-
creation rooms and halls as a
form of low-cost air condition-
ing.
New tricks to ease the house-
wife's kitchen Chores are on,the
1952 list.
Some builders are splitting the
cooking range into sections, with
the broiler, oven, and hot plate
in separate locations picked for
their convenience.
Indirect and recess lighting
will replace wall and celling fix-
ture* in the 1982 house, with
floor lamps as a supplement for
reading. _______^_
Lang also predicted that build-
ers will put more functional fea-
tures into their new homes next
year, such as a single-unit sash
containing a regular window,
storm window and screen.
in summertime, the screen fits
in its normal position outside the
window.
In winter. It can be slid up Into
the wall and the storm window
slides down.
. Lang plans to launch his "mod-
ernizing" campaign next month
at the annual convention of the
National Association of Borne
Builders by demonstrating two
Identical home*, one equipped
with specially-designed furnish-
ings and the other fitted out with
the full-sized furniture most
homes now use. _. __


We polled the three younger persons in this Christmas
Cover Shot as to who was the genial gent in the under-
brush. Bernard Shaw got no votes. Wouldn't it sleigh
you:
(Turn to rate
. 7ZeSUNDAY
American
Supplement
PANAMA; R T., SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3J. 1M1
* '
' V.




Review
Th

ISTHMIAN
LAST-MINUTE CHRISTMAS lists Still held the top
spot in the local news this week as youngsters plan-
ned to celebrate an Xmas, and Santas with reindeer
appeared on Army posts and throughout Isthmian
communities.
The usual bright star shone down from Ancon Hill,
and the Miraflores Bridge rafter bedecked with
multi-colored bulbs twinkled at night like a giant
tree.
Unusually heavy Christmas mail tc the Cana; Zone
kept postal clerks hopping and more was expected
over the weekend to swell Zontan's mail boxes.
Many obliging Panam storekeepers with the
' blessings of the law were keeping open all day Sun-
day for tardy shoppers who forgot last minute items
on their lists.
Meanwhile Local 14 of the American Federation of
Government Employes was already planning how to
make next Christmas merrier by proposing a kick-
back of Zone income tax revenue to the tune of
$5.000,000.
to the Pa
;ti Co
this



:>>>>>>>>>> LAA.
THE FURRt FIGUR on the front page
was to be teen for 12 days in the past
couple of weeks in the Ancon toy-sale de-
partment. During 12 days he toas quizzed
by 325 youngsters and one 2S-year-otd lady.
Nothing' in the researches of this per-
ceptive throng (including a keen question
as to whether the sandwich and coke eft
under the tree last Christmas was proper-
ly appreciated) in any way substantiates
the story that the mystery of Santa's early
disappearance from the Ancon toy depart-
ment is an open and shut case.
Opening and shutting the locks, that is,
during normal Santa Claus hours, denies
Stanley Sowa, in explaining that the row
& Sowason the front page include (1 to r.)
Donald 4, Jimmy 14 months and Stanley
Jr. S.
This is hot an exhaustive list.
<<<<<<<<<
<<<<<<<<<<<<'.
WORLDWIDE
If returned to the Panam Canal Company u*
money would be used to help defray the cost of schools,
police and fire protection, the health and housing pro-
grams, and the commissaries.
Canal officials were being consulted this week by
CIO spokesmen in order to get action on a 23-cent-an-
hour wage Increase for local raters, as well as an
adjustment for within-grade steps. A program consist-
ing of 15 points was presented to the Governor.
The town of Cocoli was preparing to sing "Here
Comes The Navy" when the New Year rolls around.
Large-scale moves are in store for Canal em-
ployes who live there now, as well as for retired
people who will be transplanted- to Gamboa.
Perhaps a too attractively-filled Ancon mailbox re-
sulted in a 16-year-old Panamanian being charged
with mail theft after he allegedly pried open two
mall-box doors and rifled the contents Ellas Brown,
who is in Jail on $250 bail, was bound over to US
District Court.
Peace again prevailed In the ranks of the five- -
party National Patriotic Coalition.
Jernimo Almllltegul, Renovador (Reform) As-
semblyman from Cocl. became the new Minister of
Agriculture, Commerce and Industry Friday to fulfill
the months-old longing of the Renovadores for a
Cabinet post.
Almiuategui's appointment was result of an
ultimatum handed to President Alrlbiadea Arose-
mena and Col. Jos A. Remon, whose Presiden-
tial aspirations have been formally endorsed by
all the other parties of the coalition with the
exception of the Renovador Party, which will hold
Its twice-postponed convention to launch Remon
on the party's ticket on Ian. 5.
To make room for a Renovador in the Cabinet, Jos
M Vrela resigned the Ministry and accepted the ap-
pointment as manager of the Social Security Bank.
Violence broke out anew this we-.-k, but It quickly
subsided because the police appa-ently decided to
u.ke a more determiner, stand
The offices of the Partido Nacional Revolucionario
were stoned by an unidentified group Thursday, fol-
lowing irascible Health Minister Juan de Arco Galin-
tio's application of the "dialectic of fists" against news
pnotoghapher Alfonso Gmez Santos
(.alindo punched Gomes Santos and tried to
wrest his camera way after the .photographer
took his picture during a session of the National
Assembly. He later apologised to the legislators
for the disturbance, but claimed that the picture
Santos took was intended to be used to smear
him.
Nearly all of the important Panam news came out
o* the National Assembly this week.
Panamanian legislators gave their approval to a
loan contract for $1,500,000 to finish the financing of-
El Panam Hotel and reopen the doors of the Pana"
ma Trust Co. Bank which has been closed since last
March.
The loan will enable the hotel to pay off a $1,000,-
000 debt to the bank after the government of Pana-
m signs the loan contract with the US. Export-Im-
port Bank and additional contracts with Hoteles In-
teramericanos, 8.A., owners Jf the hotel and with the
bank itself.
A move to get former President Amulfo Arias out
of jail by Christmas Day slowed when the committee
assigned by the Assembly to discuss the bill, failed to
submit its signed report within 72 hours.
One commltteeman had signed the report but the
others had gone off without signing :o attend to "per.
sonal" matters in theii home provinces.
Estimates arc that the amnesty Mil. which report-
edly has the approval of the Assembly's majority
bloc, will not get /inai passage until early in January.
Striking students ana teachers were still out on
strike W(!e thvi.' cjc as betnt; Sivju-'ted- n the
National As^Oii.'y .mi Jne r.:t:re lipiibHt. But ir-.di-
catfohs>nro cm ;iij wt.^^iiJ uuid oe owes M he
populace pr'cpafc.1 w .elrtrste he Cliiisiwnm.'.'ll-
days-
JsM
fAUE TWO
THE REDS WERE looking under the bed again.
For what Santa brought?
Nothing so seasonal. Same old trouble. Spies.
It was not a little sad that the latest victims of the
Red spy bug should be four uniformed members of
the United States Air Force, named by Hungary as
due for a near-spy trial shortly. However, it was all
in the game-according to the ground rules presently
practiced.
The four fliers most certainly did cross into Hun-
garian territory when they were trying Nov. 19 to
reach Belgrade from Munich, and finished up forced
down by Russian fighters near Budapest.
And undoubtedly they did have in their C-47 good
maps of Hungary and Rumania and countries adjacent
to their course.
However, on the score of carrying maps of Hungary
and Rumania, the fout United States fliers ought to
have a good defense. If the Incriminating maps had
been any good, they would not have lost themselves
into Hungary..
Conversely, If the crew's mapreadlng and navigation
was so wobbly they could not tell one country from
another, they would not have been entrusted with a
secret spy dropping mission.
Which, incidentally, brings up the thought that
however unfortunate the crew's position made be
right now, they were not especially clever to lose
themselves in the first place.
However that's rather a matter between them and
their squadron navigation officer, rather than between
them and the Hungarian government.
A big burst of anger was spreading over the United
States yesterday and today about the Hungarian
handling of the four fliers.
Anger or no, It would seem that Hungary, which
Americans have tended to value at about 9>/2 cents
to the dollar In the Cold War, rather has the
United States across a barrel.
Relations between the two countries have been so
near severed there is hardly much left the US can
do to hurt Hungary.
Severing diplomatic relations, for Instance, would
merely mean that the striped-pants diplomats laugh-
ed oft by FDR as cookie pushers would have to return
to push home grown cookies.
Unless the demands of abrupt travelling cuts them
down to the bare seven cocktail parties per diem over
the Christmas season, even to cookie pushers wouldn't
find the placidity of their lives interrupted near a*
much as has the C-47 crew.
But one thing the Administration dare not do. in
election year, is let harm befall the American fliers.
There are plenty of things, such as the national
relic, St. Stephens crown, that Hungary can demand
from the windfall of ransomable bodies the C-47
brought Hungary.
Hungary has no doubt learned as much about the
refinements of international ransom deals as has the
US from the bargaining for the release of US busi-
nessman Robert Vogeler.
And 9'.4 cent Hungary is one again, due apparently to
some rough map-reading, again in a position to name
her price to the proud United States.
The spirit of seasonal goodwill and gifting was in-
deed prominent in the United States, but somewhat
backdated
Most of it was backdated to the time the givers
found the Government breathing down their necks
for tax frauds or defaults.
The recipients, on the other hand, predated the oc-
casion to the times before their firing and 'or resigna-
tion from Government service.
It was pretty well proved, by the week's end. that
the politically appointed gentry who have been hand-
ling millions of the taxpayers' dollars are scarcely of
the probity that a good bank would insist on In a
man who handled mere thousands.
Such lack of moral strength In high places was no
advertisement in the eyes of the rest of the world for
the American way of life.
No glare of publicity on the proposed hpuseclean-
ing will quell the thought that the house should never
have got dirty in the first place.
The United States has something of a simon-pure
Idealist's role to play on the world stage today.
The chiselling tax collectors strung across the land
are no help to Africa's front men in the United Na-
tions, and or other world stages.
Vlshlnsky. for one, is far too smart to miss the
chance of pointing the finger of scorn.
One bright spot in the sordid deal: Career civil ser-
vice men lnvc been proved as near free of taint as
fluid ir isonacly be hoped.
Las'.ly. the writer of these rambling roundups each
wo<:k 1u.i)j liroiuundlv that no one ever takes hlra
set! tion.. .'13 readers may have a less scandalously de-
plorable Christmas than they all sn merrily merit.
uiiui. A < nle^
Week :
SPORTS
THE UNITED STATES Lawn Tennis Association!
named young Maureen Connolly as the outstand
women's amateur player In 1991.
The 17-year old miss from San Diego captured the!
hearts of tennis fans last summer by winning the Na-
tional Singles title at Forest Hills. Miss Connolly won
the erown Dy beating Doris Hart of Coral Gables, Flo-
rida, In the semi-finals and then downing Shirley Fry
of Akron in the title round. That was enough to boost
her from 10th place in last year's ianklngs to the top
pot this year.
Miss Hart was runner-up for the second straight
year while Miss Fry was ranked third. Nancy Chaffee
Klner of Ventura, California. Is rated fourth, follow-
ed by Pat Canning Todd of La Jolla.
Rounding out the top 10 are Beverly Baker Flelta of \
Santa Monica, Dorothy Head of Alameda, Betty Rosen-
quest Pratt of the British West Indies, Magda Rurac
of Los Angeles and Baba Madden Lewis of Newton-,
vllle, Massachusetts.
The only million-dollar winner of racing ,,
"Citation" was named handicap champion of j
19S1 in the 16th annual poll of the "Turf and
Sport Digest" magazine.
The 145 sports editors, turf writers and radio
announcers gave Citation 239 points. "Hill Prince,"
voted the handicap champion by The Racing Perm
and Thoroughbred Racing Association, ran far
behind with 157 points.
The Turf and Sport Digest poll picked "Coun-
terpoint" as the Honc-of-the-year and best throe-
year-old, "Tom Fool" as the leading juvenile celt
and "Rose Jefas the champion two-year-old filly.
Official National Football League figures show that
the Los Angeles Rams led in total offense, passing and
points scored in 1951.
The Rams, who play Cleveland lor thex league title
today in Los Angeles, gamed flve-thousand-508 yards
In 12 games. That breaks their own record of flve-
thousand-420 yards set last year. Los Angeles gained
three-thousand-296 yards on the pas?lng of Bob Wat-
erfleld and Norm Van Brocklln. They scored 392 points
56 more than Detroit.
The New York Giants had the best defense against
rushing and intercepting passes. The Giants allowed
an average of two-point-three yards per rush. De-
troit's three-point-three average was second best. The
Giants intercepted 41 passes or eight more than San
Francisco. Philadelphia had the best pass defense.
Only 41-point-five- pe-cent of th; opponents passes
were completed.
The Cleveland Indians decided to take a chance on
a young outfielder who sometimes resembles Babe
Ruth but at others looks like the Ail-America out' at
the plate.
Cleveland bought 27-year-old Dlno Restelli from
the Washington Senators. Restelli (oes to the Indians
for the $10,000 waiver price.
In 1949, Restelli caused quite a sWr among Major
League fans. Brought up from the Pacific Coast Lea-
gue by the Pittsburgh Pirates, ResteJJi hit seven hom-
ers in the first 14 games. He eventually slumped and
alternated between the Pacific Coast League and the
Pirates. Pittsburgh sold Restelli to Washington at the
end of last season.
It may be difficult to believe, but official National
League figures released show that a 20 year-old rookie
pitcher had more stuff on the ball than the Mages.
Roes and Jahsens. . _
He's Chet Nichols, a skinny southpaw with the Bos-
ton Braves.
Nichols has an earned run average of two-polnt-8S I
to lead in that department. He's ths first rookie to win '
the earned run average title since .Tim Turner did it;
for the Braves back in 1937.
Sal Maglle of the New York Giants was runnerup
to Nichols with a two-point-93 average. Warren Spahn
of the Braves was third with two-polnt-98.
Even though he was a 20-game winner, Murry Dick-
son of Pittsburgh gave up the most runs, the most
hits and the most earned runs. Three pitchers Ken
Raffensberger and Willie Ramsdell of the Cincinnati
reds and Paul Mlnner of the Chicago Cubs 4- had the
dubious honor of losing the most ganes. Bach lost 17.
Manager Charley Di'essen has formally signed to
lead Brooklyn again in 1952 and left salary terms up
to.the Dodger front office.''
Dressen, who saw a 13 game lead disappear and
lost the pennant to the New York Giants in the final
layoff game1, mailed the contract to the Dodgers with
he salary lino left blank. Dressen received $35,000
for las season ana is expected to get the same in 1952.
On November fifth, Brooklyn President Walter O*
Malley announced Dressen would return next season.
OTvIafley was asked if Dressen would want a raise. 'I
dont think." said the Dodger president, "we'll have
any trouble from Chai ley on thai count."
Dressen's note with the signed contract read "I
am leaving the terms ertlrely up to you. I am extreme-
ly happy to be back at the helm of the best ball club
in our league."
It will be Dressen's second year rs Brooklyn Man-
ager He was a Dodger coach under Leo Durocher, and
a New York Yankee coach in 1947 and '48.
The gelding "Pronto Don" has been named "Har-
ness Horse-of-the-year" in a poll of 101 sports writers,
radio and television sprrtscasters and magaaine writ-
erOfflclals of the "Trotting Hall-of-Fame" in Goshen.
New York conducted the poll.
Pronto Don won 16 oi his 24 star's in 1951 and broke
three world records at three different tracks. The
Haves Fair Acre Stable trotter rta?"earned $170.000.
making him leading money wtnneTW a time.
' ii .i i ti'
ciTNTUY. DECEMBER 23. 1951


S State Department iways Butt
Of Critics Since Jefferson's Day
By MART CIIANNING STOKES
WASHINGTON, Dec. 22 (UP) qualnted with the Defense De-
Lambasting; the state Depart-
ment is an American tradition.
Ever since Thomas Jefferson
was sworn In as the first secret-
ary of state, the department has
been under fire. Alexander Ham-
ilton and other Federalist started
denouncing; Jeffetson In 1789 and
criticism has cropped up inter-
mittently ever since.' Today Har-
old E. Stassen. Douglas MacAr-
thur, and Joseph R. McCarthy
are amone; those carrying on the
attack.
State Department officers,
long hardened by criticism, aay
their department la attacked
more often than any other exe-
cutive-agency of the government.
They stress several reasons for
public mistrust.
They explain that the contro-
versial nature of foreign policy
makes them doubly liable to at-
tack. The department is the tar-
get for the blasts of both isola-
tionists and Interventionists.
"On the one hand there Is still
a good residue of isolationism In
the country today," one state De-
partment officer said. "On the
other. Americans dissatisfied
with our role of leading the non-
Communist world take it out on
the State Department."
The average American always
has distrusted diplomats. Like
the symbol of the Wall Street
banker, the symbol of the diplo-
mat In his striped pants and
Homburg hat breeds antagonism.
Many people mistrust the depart-
ment because they think it oper-
ates mysteriously.
"This is because the State De-
partment deals with ideas rather
than material things," and of-
ficial said.
He pointed out that average
cltlsens can inspect easily many
of the operations of other depart-
ments. Most Americans buy post-
age stamps and fill out income
tax returns. Service men and
their families are thoroughly de-
partment. Fanners receive as-
sistance from Agriculture De-
partment county agents through-
out the country. Business men
work with the Departments of
Commerce. Interior, and Labor.
The American people find no
physical guide posts to show what
is going on the in the State De-
partment, the officer said, "and
they often suspect that Intangi-
ble things will affect them un-
pleasantly."
Like the President, the secret-
ary of state holds down a lonely
Job. Politicians throughout Am-
erican history have taken ad-
vantage of the secretary's lone-
ly position. The House In 1810
called for a report on charges
against Secretary of State Robert
Smith, accused of sending his
private shipbuilding company's
bills to the treasury for payment.
Although Smith was exonerated,
he resigned a year later to be
replaced by James Monroe.
A House committee Investigat-
ed Secretary of State James O.
Blaine In 1881 on charges that
he put pressure on the govern-
ment to Intervene in Interna-
tional business deals with which
he was connected. After six
months of study the charges were
iroved false.
Frank Kellog, secretary during
the Coolldge administration, suf-
fered because the department
failed to satisfy all of the people
all of the time.
Currently, 8en. Joseph Ri Mc-
Carthy, (R-Wis.), Oen. MacAr-
thur, and Stassen are denounc-
ing the State Department. When
McCarthy claimed he had a list
of Communists in the State De-
partment, publicity mushroomed.
MacArthur's criticism of the
State Department's Far Eastern
policy led to one of the most
Intense Congressional Investi-
gations in American history. Lat-
er the spotlight turned to Stas-
sen when he charged that the de-
partment sought to withdraw all
aid to Chiang Kai-shek.
MONARCH
M FAMILY FAVORIU FOR
ALMOST WO YARS
. Monarch finer foods
re today the stand-
ard of quality all over
the world. They are pre-
pared in the most modern
'manner... but retain all the real
old-fashioned flavor. Five generations
have proved Monarch finer foods... the
BEST by TEST. There are over 500
Monarch finer foods. Ask for them in your
grocery store. If your dealer does not
stock Monarch finer foods, inquire of:
MONARCH
World's Largttf Family of her Food
Distributor* in the Republic:
COLON Tagaropolos, S. A. Tel. 1000
PANAMACia. Panamericana de Orange Crash
HOME DELIVERY Tel. 3-3219
Ptvntier Sunday Cross- Word Puzzle
IShelter
SLawn
covering
10Place of
confusion
15Uttered
19Raccoon
80Projecting
Mlient In
fort
81Tropical
plant
22Place of
Napoleon's
first exile
23Spoils
24Power of
imitation
26Make
secure
27Warehouse
29-^"Charged
a'.om
ftICSBSJf
82-
83-
- e
re Of
..ass
85 Jcltic
language
36''umble
39Very long
;>eriod
41 ."oncise
43- i.sertlon
47 ndcr
'*
.-.wary
lottlcd
streak in
wood
62- --onstlt.
iiL'nt
63- Not astir
4
51-
OBHONTAX.
64Click
beetle
57Shrubby
plant
59Comfort
60Title of
baronet
61Merganser
62June-bug
64Cheat
Bound
66Stannum
67Inveigle
69Mocker
72Sign
74Encircle
76Fabulous
bird
77Dandy
79Silk waste
60Pointed or
antithetical
saying
83Pertaining
to an acid
from oil of
turpentine
86Prick
89rate
90Liliaceous
plant
92Malayan
gibbon
93Unpolished
99And not
96Face of
indicator
98Lounge
100Having
feet
102Now
103Landed
property
105Fragment
107Rust
106Spiny-
finned Ash
110Sandpiper
111Object
113Textile
fabric
115Property
116Instead
116Opposed
to verae
120Fine
ravellngs
122Without a
large unit
of rural
adminis-
tration
126Lump of
moist clay,
(ceramics)
127Capable of
feeling
131Old
132Hurtful
135Settlement
in
Greenland
136Simple
137Hollow
intersec-
tion of
crossing
vaults
138Enhance
139Certain
140Match
141Barracks
142Wading
bird
143Ebb and
flow
1Ironwood
of Pegu
2A blessing
3Source
4Dauntless
5Com piala
(slang)
6 Sucking-
fish
7Entrance
8Posed for
a portrait
9Mollusk
10Obstruc-
tion to
sight
11Trouble
12Lure
13Freedom
of access
14Stratum
15Judgment
16Regiment
in Turkish
army
17Heron-
like bird
18Valley
25Vessel
28Level
31Continent
where
, tigers
are found
33Defeat
34God of
love
36An
amorphous
substance
37North
American
thrush
38Perturb
unduly
40Rodent .
42Cauterise
44State of
cold
dignity
45A dye
46River In
England
48Muffin
50Short
talk
supporting
one flower
only
52Criminal
55Induced
56Twig of
woody
plant
58Breach
61Sawfish
63Umpire
65Toothed;
irregular
68Equip
70Plant
disesse
71Defraud
73Small
bird
75Decorative
paving
slab
78Publish
without
authoriza-
tion
80Shrub
81Balance
82Low
84Blow
85Intersect
87Scandi-
navian
88 Address
91River of
Germany
94Emblem o
morning
97Sweet-
scented
plant
99Flaccid
101Brave
103Swiftest
104Take
effect
106Machine
routing
on shaft
109Declaim
violently
111Barren
land
112Prowl
114Gratify
117Marsh-
plant
119One
kiloliter
121Creek
122Fill up
drill hole
123S curve
124 Lived
125Portico
127Rouse
128Pocket-
case
129Herb
130You
133Tear
134- Irritate by
scolding
Arertcc Urn ! HtSMlSI 17 !I|S DKttUMst W Ms* hsw SfdHrt.
Answer to he f and elsewhere to the Sonda? American)
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1951
.....


Italian Beauties
Now Covered Up
ANTICOLI CORRADO, Italy
(UP.) The world-famous mod-
iste of this tiny village perched
on a 1,500 toot hill are refusing
to pose in the nude for Italian
and foreign painters on "moral
grounds," the 70-year-old Italian
painter Antonio Guarino reports
sadly.
Antlcoll Corrado is 45 miles
west of Rome and has a popula-
tion of 1,500 people. Had it not
been (or the striking beauty of
its girls and their classic figures
nobody In the world would hare
known that It existed.
Ouarino is working here with
other Italian painters. He said
the local parish priest was re-
sponsible for the new code that
Swift) Amm* Soppiarat
the beauties of Antlcoll Corrado
no longer expose their curves.
About a hundred years ago a
group of Italian and foreign
painters joyfully discovered dur-
Inga trip to the little village that
the girls of Anticoll Corrado had
perfect bodies."
Since then any painter who
wanted to paint a lovely nude
went to Anticoll.
Boss Gets Gold Tray
Gives Pay Hike In Turn
BROCKTON, MASS. (UP.)
The employes of Barbour Welting
Co. arranged a surprise for their
boss, Perley A. Barbour, on his
50th wedding anniversary but
received a bigger surprise them-
selves.
The employes bought a gold
tray as a gift to. Mr. and Mrs.
Barbour and arranged an 1m-
proptu reception for the presen-
tation.
Barbour then announced that
he was celebrating his golden
wedding by granting a five per
cent wage Increase to everyone
who worked for him.
PAGB THREE


THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNtD AND iilihid v TM PANAMA AMUtlCAN f mr
B7' "tEeu. paS3S%ta- *
Colon Orric-, ,217, <;,., av'SKTSSIS th and ISth (.m
34B MADISON AVf. (it* VOIIIC. (I7> N. V.
A MONTH. IN APVAN^. g1**. /VS
FOA SIX MONTH*. IN ADVANC. 1 ', 5"52
ron QN ,..,, ,w AOTANCt ~ ,' * J
POETS'CORNER
Huffed and Puffed
INVIOLATE
(From Kansas Magaiine)
He had never known ... how
could he know
That her heart owned no master
Save its own slow measure
or little tritles lert rrom long ago
Held not lightly as a beach holds
its bright
Sea treasures.
But Jealousy. Inside some inner
door,
Nor heard the wild surf or bis love
come brea kins;
Against the barriers or heart and
mind___
Long long ago upon a moon-
white road
The key to that inner door was
lost___
The key that none, not even she
could rind.
Alma RobisoB Higbee
GRAND CANTON
(From Spirit)
Time runs vertical and the dis-
tance sags
With the burden of blue to the
lar horizon
And light explodes from a shat-
tered prism
And nothing matters by the inch
or mile
From the Painted Desert to the
Grand Wash Clifrs.
The Colorado with a shining kriss
Gouges the sandstone, quartz and
gneiss
And earth counts yesterdays in
layer on layer
Along the wind-washed corridor.
The eye reads down on the rusty
gaugei
In layers or limestone streaked
with iron.
The shadow of the man who sits
on the brink
Reaches the bottom where the
hour is prime
Then moves with the moments,
millenniums and all
Toward tracks of the monster in'
the lava beds.
The shadow of the plane that is
passing over
Touches the river seldom as the
sun.
The echoes from the mesa of the
bursting atom
nv"n in the thunder of the ca-
taract
Roaring since the pterodactyl
poised webbed wings
Against warm spirals of the
morning air
That crept with the mist on the
canyon walls.
The -ones grow liquid In the rip-
o>s of light
Arr How down the sunset in a
rrinbow flume
Anci the truth and the myth are
dancing on the rim
And the canyon's rim is the end
o" the world.
ATOMIC WAX
(From The Scientific Monthly)
When it is over and the cities lie
With shattered beams across the
deadly groove*.
When the last bombs have fallen
rrom the sky.
And nothing lives below since
nothing moves,
Surely some scheme of life must
rise somewhere
To gauge the elements and lift a
crust
That may build up a dream of
touch and air
Love quickening in the straight
and crumpled dust.
For I cannot believe that love
will fade-
Give up the fight that is as old as
rain.
Beyond the Geiger counters we
have made.
Something will struggle and be
born again.
And there will be a peace beyond
all wars
Under the curious language of
new stars. -
Daniel Ssaythe
A. M. Sullivan
THE INLAND SEA
(From Canadian Poetry
Magazine)
Here and near as the hands of
the sea
where the sea holds the land
till the climbing dark and all time
are dying,
where the walls are down, and
the sand
is a building-ground for the flair
of a poet or lover, or the boy
high-flying,
and the dunes of the hearts are
free.
Is the country we know. Wholly
days and night
are trapped in the sea's green
hair
and this half-darkness here Is
half our light.
Fair and far from the prayers of
the blind
and their wiles who'd have you
sleep
safe and sound in the boisterous
shires of land
and surf, is the country we keep
reclaimed in the bay of the mind,
where the smooth white gulls rise
over the sand
and. the nodding heads of the
blind.
Walk firmly that shore, whatever
the wise ones
devise for your footsteps, and
find in yourself the unknown,
the only horizons.
Howard Sergeant
Pearsons Merry Go-Round
Herewith And solution to Sunday Crossword Pus-
Tie, No. 404, published today.
oaan arauas a&niHi Runs
asMw mhiqbi anaiso sieh
smku ii-iiji'.' iimiu :;nri"
HBinrtJHMEii UK? ri'::.aiillRa
yiaaaa ata:! dimws u^aau
aKani S3!d asa uaHoas
oaas iasn^L UBaa acaa
eir Bian m :wsa nu
sshh fsaansaa rasidiaf
, afleas asa mwa rziwna
asnaar-Tii nasa-joa hiihih
anaa ibis saanna la^a
a^Ma [sjoi. iian aaEMaa
Salsa E-acsa aaa asaaa
laws aaEaa ins
nwMiaHw :]gjo ea:iiimu
asas saanTaaona Una's
aaaa aaanta agnaa assa
aaaa auaaa -ihhh .uisa
DREW PEARSON SAYS: CABINET PRESS CON-
FERENCES VANISH FROM WASHINGTON;
MRS. HUGO BLACK'S EXAMPLE SHOULD
HAVE BEEN FOLLOWED BY THE MINK
COAT ENTHUSIASTS; SEN. DUFF CANT
DELIVER PENNSYLVANIA DELEGATES TO
EISENHOWER.
WASHINGTON. Newsmen raised cain about
President Truman's secrecy order on classitied
documents But they havent let out a peep on a
possibly greater inf rlngemente of the press the
almost complete abandonment of press confer-
ences by the Truman Administration.
Today, the only two men who hold regular press
conferences are the President himself and se-
cretary of State Acheson.
Tnman's press conferences have been cut from
two a week under Roosevelt to one a week; while
Acheson's conferences have been cut from five
a week under Henry L. Stlmson to one a week.
This cut. however, is not as bad aa the total
blackout on press conferences by other cabinet
members.
Howard McGrath. for Instance, has not held
one single press conference during his entire re-
gime as attorney general. Regardless of the furor
that has raged around bis head, McGrath has not
submitted himself to press questioning as in
the days of Homer Cummings, Frank Murphy,
Robert Jackson, Francis Blddle, and other at-
torneys general.
Secretary of the Interior Chapman almost nev-
er sees the press, though the man he trained un-
der, Harold Ickes. stood up against the barrage
of newspaper examination once or twice a week.
The record of other cabinet members is similar.
For years it has been a Washington tradition
that the British system of asking questions of
the government on the floor of Parliament was
replaced by the give and take of Washington
press conferences. Today that system has almost
vanished.
A GREAT LADY
A great lady died in Washington the other day.
She was Josephine Black, wife of Supreme
COurt Justice Hugo Black; and the example of
her lire. If followed by others, would have saved
many a heartache and headache to those who
have put mink coats ahead of government ethics.
Mrs. Black came to Washington 25 years ago in
an automobile loaded down with household goods
and two small boys.
She and her husband, then the new Senator
from Alabama, had driven up from Birmingham,
and Hugo had told her on the way that Senators'
salaries were small, that they must live within
their Senate Income.
He had given tip a $0.000 law practice in Bir-
mingham a lot of money at that time and
site had given up a retinue of servants.
The Senate in those days was far more a rich
man's club than it Is today.
And Mrs. Black was thrown among such gracio-
us and wealthy ladies as Mrs. David Reed, wife or
the millionaire senator from Pennsylvania, Mrs.
Jpso Metcalf. wife of another millionaire from
Rliod.- Island, and Mrs. Warren Barbour of New
Jersey.
Most senators' wives had staffs of servants and
all the clothes they could buy. So they coudn't
mderstand how Mrs Black managed to raise two
FIaL
taut kmttum inajpnem
small boys and later a daughter on a senator*,
salary.
But she did. The Blacks never cut corners, never
profited from friendly favors, and Josephine,
somehow or other, stayed within her budget.
Sometimes she teased her husband about the
rigor* of keeping an expense account, and last
summer Justice Black, in an unwise moment of
masculine superiority, announced that he would
keep the accounts and show how easy it was. How
he regretted that.
I don't believe that Josephine Black ever had
a mink coat. But she had a lot of other wonder*
ful qualifies, that money couldn't buy.
She had a sparkle and vivacity that made her
seem so young.
Obviously she enjoyed life. Yet she knew how
to enjoy it without the splash and fol-de-rol of
material things which seem so necessary to some
of the newcomers in government today.
NO DANCING BEAR BREWSTER
Maine's redoubtable Sen. Owen Brewster almost
turned handsprings to keep from being star per
former at Joe McCarthy's testimonial dinner In
Wisconsin.
McCarthy didn't know It. but Brewster tele-
phoned the Senate Foreign Relations Commute
to ask if there was any official trip going abroad
early in December that he might John.
Told there was not, the Maine senator seemed
quite disappointed.
Later, however, something turned up that gave
him an excuse to go to Europe.
Inside reason for his reluctance to show up as)
a dancing bear lo the McCarthy circus was the
danger of hurting his re-election chances In
Maine next year.
PENNSYLVANIA POLITICS
Though Pennsylvania's ex-governor, now Sen.
Jim Duff. Is Elsenhower's chief Republican sup*
Cter, it looks like Pennsylvania's powerful de
_ itlon to the GOP convention next year would
not be definitely in Elsenhower's camp.
Gov. John 8. Fine, the man Duff put in power,
and Sen. Ed Martin of Pennsylvania have agreed
privately to plump for an unlnstructed delegation
to the Chicago convention.
This decision is also a blow to Senator Taf
whose managers in Pennsylvania, ex-natlo
chairman John D. M. Hamilton and natl
committeeman Mason Owlett, had considered thf
conservative Senator Martin In their corner.
However. Martin, although personally agreeing
with Taf t in the Senate, says this does not meas
he would support him at the convention. MartinV
only comment on General Elsenhower was that b*.
didnt think Ike waft a candidate.
Governor Fine, who parted comrny with the
man who elected him shortly arter Duff put hire
m the governor's chair has kept his views to him
self.
But privately. Fine and Martin mt-nd to drlv
a tough bargain. They want a cahln-r nost or thl
equivalent In return for Penn-ylr-'i "s 70 dele-
gates.
Senator Duff and Rep. Hugh Scot; ir.. the tv.
Eisenhower missionaries in Pcnti" lvanla. ail
steadily plugging awav, but a p-'"-'e poll d)
slightly lees than half the Ren-' -i:vn count*.
>hairmen shows a five-to-one ede<- r Tart ovel
Eisenhower. '
StX "ivA j. vmu^Iui....... _J, 19f|


""awl
Labor News

And Comment
By Victor Riesel
ON IWI KATf ^^^ :,
iron Curtained Cneehs are up a. tree this Christmas
Mt happily not our in the USA. -
Because of mnakjMe in this column, the Czechs, who are
the real munitions merchants for the Sorlet armies, bare lost
muttons of desperately needed American dollars which tbey suck-
ed from u in the- ale Of cleverly camouflaged religiou. and
decorative Christmas tree objects.
So K was that mlUM?". of tinseled trees had, in the past, been
covered with gayly colored bulbs, icicles tars and balls from
which the country of origin had been skillfully removed.
Btfc'.atktbe last Toy. Show, at which orders were placed for Qua
holiday season, the nation's big department Stores told their ma
nufacturers and importers that they rejected Caech Mods, desplti
the high profit which could be made on the stuff turned out in!
the land of the Skoda munitions plants.
So for the first time in rears, the Caech merchants have
been exposed and cut off from ghoullshly exploiting our holiday
season. v

It's now- quite possible that your singing of- Auld Lang Syne,
at the stroke of midnight Mew Tear's Eve, may be interrupted
by a news flash revealing that oar guargantuan steel industry
has been paralysed by pickets.
Philip Murray, speaking quietly, and not to make any public
liiiprrwrinn. has told some national CIO Tice presidents that he
will trMw unless he.gets a package increase for his million fol-
lowers costing, the companies about 20 cents more an hour.
A usual, behind the scenes. Murray's lieutenants hare been
bargaining with Bethlehem Steel so he can come up with an a-
greentent to force U.S. Steel into line. -
So far this is certain, the million steel workers, now with-
out a paid holiday, win have six when the smoke clears and
probably three weeks vacation tor thousands of the older workers.
But Mr Truman must come through with a price increase of
at least H to $7 per ton of steel or the companies and the
steel union will sit it out for weeks, war or po war, regardless of
what government board the White House appoints.

Labor circles hear that:
There's a new Intense investigation of Owen Lattlmore be-
hind the scenes.
i Mr. Truman will appoint Clark Clifford Attorney General if
Howard McGrath quits.
Sen. Mike Monroney of, Oklahoma says that the president
wont run tor re-election and that the strongest of the dark horses
is House Speaker 8am Rayburn.
Supreme Court Justice- Vlnson doesn't want the nomination.

The gambling syndicates get an average.of two dollars .man
from the country's 14,000,000 factory workers each week, according
to one of the nation's best informed crime investigators.
All of which highlights the sharp attack on the crime syn-
dicates last week by the CIO Auto Union, led by Walter Reuther.
It warned its one thousand local unions it would not fight
for-any member fired from a Job for helping organised rackets
and gambling.
That goes far the shop stewards who disgrace their union
by acting as bookies for the toughest crime syndicates of all the
Detroit and Chicago mobs..
However, Mr. Reuther's colleagues, meeting in special session
last week, made it clear that this did not apply to "benefit raf-
fles, church or civic group-sponsored bingo or to friendly games
of chance among friends" Just to the rackets which hand out
a cut to union members and officials. Poker you can play, boys.
a
Since narcotics smuggling is an even more lush racket than
the huge gambling take, the AFL Sailors Union of the Pacific has
decided to cut the west coast oft from the dope runners over the
Hawaiian-San Francisco route. It is now amending its constitu-
tion to read:
"Any member of the S.U.P. who is found guilty of using or
being in the traffic of narcotics be Immediately brought up before
a Trial Committee of the Sailors Union. If found guilty of being
a user of narcotics or as a carrier or seller of narcotics, that he
be immediately expelled "
This would drive the man off the seas. *
a
A new electrical torture Is being used on Argentine labor lead-
ers by that man Peron. His goons truss up the railroad labor of-
ficials who called the recent walkout, and burn them with hot
wire shocks.
Hundreds of other labor chiefs are being Imprisoned and. at
night, rushed from jail to jail so their lawyers cant use what
laws are left to start the Latin equivalent of habeas corpus pro-
ceedings. It doesn't take a mustache to make another Hitler.
a a
Informed Democrats have told labor men that Charles Wilson
and many other war production officials will quit in March so
they don't get caught up in the presidential campaign. By then
the war machine will be pulsating along despite the exodus.
At least 500 men and women are on the list of Detroit Com-
munist activists now in the hands of House Un-American Activities
Committee investigators.
a a
The Tax Division (if you'll excuse the expression) has ruled
that the cost of bomb shelters for workers inside a plant Is not
deductible as a current business expense unless you can con-
vince the bureau that It is totally useless until a Red A-Bomb
falls,
If you use It as a storage bin in the meantime, brother, you
pay for It yourself.
Technical!) you capitalize and depreciate It, like any machine
over the years
(Copyright 1951. Post-Hall Syndicates, Inc.)
WalterWinchelllnNewYork
Faltering Philip!
i
fhilip' life is filled with
WeH-wern step ad rags be ases
Repair* would leav* his home like new
P A Classifieds, fast Hie rtrht ehae!
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 196J
MAN REAVING THE PATERS
The President and then hi the Administration
have taken a hoM stand ha favar eg honesty...
Tbey are issuing ilatotnanto attaching grafters in
the govern Men t and pioaaiy reclaiming that eer-
raptiest "mast be eliminated frent public office"
.. .Tbat't what nay are saying nowafter the
awtabng headlines burned off their taita.
But the record revala that it was Mr. Traman
who called the faMsailgaifsn of the B, P. C. "as-
inine"... Later he was forced to reorganize the
agency and f ire its directors .. Mr. President then
hailed1 William Boyle's integrity even after
Boyle's peculiar operations were exposed by a
Sonata Committee.
The President has lalaratod Gen. Vanghan's
deep groom and infMenee-peddUngand he re-
mit anything was wrong at the Dope.
Revenue (sosno Administration people
the probe) nntil the flaming facts
lag himself as much as the night they bombed
Warsaw, Rotterdam and London .. The calendar
weald seem to indicate that It is the Christmas
season, hat no dewbt many of them are eelehrat-
ing the happy anniversary of the Battle of the
Holge and the Malsaody Massaere just seven years
ago- ^^^^
The rastlirt laugh on Capitol Hill is currently
enjoyed by Senator Margaret Smith... Some time
ago the lady Senator was deprived of an Import-
ant committee post by Senator Taft's behind-
the-scene string-pulling... Of course, you know
that a Senate committee is now probing Mr.
Taft's 1860 campaign expenditures. The revela-
tions make him squirm.
The head of this committee is Senator Margaret
Smith.
have to got hatter. Price can't
and peUticians can't got much
On his retara to Washington' from Key West.
the President told the papers that his return was
not dictated by any emergency... That's the trou-
ble with this Administration. A six-alarm fire Is
out of control -but the President doesn't think
it's any more dangerous than a hotfoot.
i. Breaks Parker of PhiladeIphia left $z5,eo In
hi will "for an appraisal of the influence FDR
had an the nation"... It was his parting shot at
hat Framd eat... FDR tiH ha great influence on
the American people because they had even
greater influence on him... Boeanse of him the
American people remember apples on trees in-
stead of an street earners... And as for the be-
anos* of SSS.eee. Mr. Parker wouldn't have been
able to leave it if FDR hadn't reopened Mr. Park-
er bank.
FJ. S. Attorney-General McGrath informed a
graduating class of F.B.I, officers that their Jobs
are "saered trusts" and he added: "When a law
enforcement of fleer misapplies the as* of his of -
floe or sir firm an act of aaalfeasaam, be breaks
down the structure of our society which we have
spent twenty centuries in building" .. Isn't that
a Banger, Mr. President?
Seme editorialist* continue hammering away
at the Idea that PDR played sucker for Stalin.
They would have you believe Roosevelt, was not
aware of the peril that Communism represents
and sold out to the Reds at Yalta.
They never mention that FDR warned the na-
tion: "The Soviet Union, as everyone knows who
has the courage to face facts, is a dictatorship as
absolute as any dictatorship in the world."
FDR said that on Feb. 11th, 1940.
A woman by the name of Evyleen- Cronln is on
trial in criminal Court, allegedly for stealing
some $4,000... But you'd never know it to read
the headlines. The State's principal witness. Tal-
lulah Bankhead. apparently is being tried by de-
fense counsel, instead .. The indictment charges
forgery and embezzlement by Mrs. Cronln and
she la either guilty or not guilty. The connection
between Tallulah's private life and her maid's in-
dictment for forgery has yet to be explained to
this reporter. Everybody knows Tallulah raises
hell, but this is the first time It has been seriously
urged that that gives anybody a defense for al-
ledgedly raising her checks.
West Germany, according to High Commissioner
McCloy, is enjoying its greatest boom in years...
The beinles are on the most terrific spending
spree staee before the war and everyone hi enjoy-
Senator Tobey has asked the Brooklyn Grand
Jury to excuse him from testifying in the investi-
gation of the mysterious death of Abe Relea. The
gentleman from New Hampshire explained that
be had "no facts or actual evidence to give" and
that his remarks during the television hearings
here last March were "based upon supposition"...
However, the Senator can find some documenta-
tion In the court records of very strange doings
in the room of the dead man, and some very un-
usual messages that the deceased sent out any
time the Senator wants to look... A free transla-
tion of what Sen. Tobey has to say Is this: "I ad-
mit I was talking through my hat last March, but
in my television bamming it would have destroyed
the effect of the act if I said so"... The Senator's
inability to produce Is a tremendous disappoint-
ment to the public and an awful fadeout tor
the top billed act of 1951 television.
Peter Edson In Washington
NBA Staff Correspondent
BARCELONA(NEA>Spain U still the tour-
ist's best bet in Europe. With the official ex-
change rate at just under 40 pesetas to the U. 8.
dollar, and tbe black market rate much better,
money will go far.
A big double room and bath at the Ritz here
costs 94.40 a night. Best rooms in Madrid, with
linen sheets, are $8 and $10. Rates at the official
government inns are from $1 to $2 a night.
Second-clam hotels without the conveniences
are leas.
Food in Barcelona Is higher than other parts of
Spain, but the average table dhole luncheon or
dinner, with three courses and dessert, is $1.15.
Theater tickets are $1, but bull fights get up
to $30.
A big filet niignon In Toledo was 75 cents. Five
pesetas12 & centsis an average tip and will
get you service with a smile.
For those who can take it. Mediterranean sea-
food offers some rare adventures in eating. You
start with French fried minnows, tails, heads,
black eyes and all.
You go from there to baby clams about the size
of your finger nail.
Baby octopus in the soup or snails in the rice
are the next step. Then eels.
When you can eat octopus cooked In Its own
inkthen you're a real Spaniard.
PROBLEM IN PORTUGAL
LISBONDifficulties of trying to bring Euro-
pean armaments up to modern standards are best
illustrated In Portugal, where next North Atlantic
Treaty Organization meeting will be held.
If Portuguese armed forces were mechanised
and modernized. Portugal would have" to double
its present military budget, just to maintain the
equipment
And this would, of course, assume that the U-
nited States furnished all the modern jet planes,
tanks and guns needed.
Portugal couldn't afford to pay for themmuch
less make them hi her own limited Industrial
plants.
STILL NO CHANGE
MADRIDSpanish government o El Caudillo
Francisco Franco Is still doggedly, determinedly
fascist m character.
This was strikingly shown after a recent Span-
ish government order temporarily expelling a New
York Times correspondent.
Sunday kmentn SupfNOReat
When the order canceling the expulsion was Is-
sued, some U. S. newspapers praised the action.
It was Interpreted as a sign that Franco was at
last seeing the wisdom ot greater freedom of ex-
pression and less censorship.
Spanish government press officers, immediately
protested. 4
The Franco administration was not becoming
more liberal, they said. And they didn't want cre-
d id "for being considered liberal when they weren't.
WE'RE STILL FRIENDS
PARISDr. Philip Jessup. doing a job here as
U. S. representative to the United Nations Gen-
eral Assembly meeting, had a unique experience
after the Senate refused to confirm his appoint-
ment.
Republican Sen. H. Alexander Smith of New
Jersey, whose vote against Jessup had resulted In
a 3-to-2 Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee
adverse recommendation, called Jessup to his of-
fice.
Smith and Jessup had long been friends.
Smith's vote had therefore come as a surprise.
The senator said he hoped bis vote would make
no difference in their friendship.
He said his reason for the vote was a belie* that
Jessup had lost the confidence of the country.
Jessup accepted President Truman's recess ap-
pointment, and came to Paris regardless.
VERY LITTLE OPPOSITION
MADRIDQuestion of Franco overthrow Is no
longer considered a remote possibility.
Maximum opposition to Franco is considered
not more than 10 per cent of the people, and most
of {he opposition leaders arc hi France or Mexico.
Alter 15 years ot Franco rule, opposition has
been pretty well dissipated.
The country Is still heavily policed, with 50.000
Guardia Civil, in their green uniforms and black
Ktent-leather bats turned up at the back, pa-
illing every road day and night, keeping an eye
on every truck and Its cargo.
There Is no opposition press in Spain. In recent
months a little criticism of village officials haa
been allowed to creep Into print. There was also
some open criticism of candidates tn recent mu-
nicipal elections.
Everything else is still under tight censorship.
PAGE FIVE



i The problem faced by the 65th
Antiaircraft Artillery Group, Ft.
Clayton, was how to Integrate in-
to the Group the hundreds of
American soldiers arriving from
Puerto Rico. How to get them
(trained m Artillery; how to teach
English to those whose mastery
of the language was poor; and
how to instill into these new sol-
diers the spirit of the Army of
the United Btates.
The solution was in the crea-
tion of two training detachments,
one on either side of the Isthmus
of Panama, which were staffed
with non commissioned and
commissioned officer* who-were
"old hands at the game." These
men, working with the raw mate-
rial represented by these fledg-
ling soldiers, are turning out first
class fighters and technicians to
fill the ranks of the expanding
Armed Forces.
During the six month training
cycle, the new soldier learn ma-
ny things. The Education Cen-
ters at Forts Gulick and Clayton
have them for two months dur-
ing which time the men are
taught basic English. This lan-
guage training Is followed by a
concentrated period of four
months when the neophytes stu-
dy such subjects as baste artille-
ry, drilling, aircraft indentiflca-
tlon, signal communicat ions,
censorship, map reading. Individ-
ual weapons and equipment, mil-
itary Justice and antlrlrcraft
technique.
Concurrent with this technical
program are .periods devoted to
Individual welfare and morale,
conducted by local Chaplains and
responsible officers.
Couple this well rounded train-
ing program with good Army
"chow" and Innumerable oppor-
tunities for wholesome relaxation
provided on and off the Post by
service dubs and service organi-
zations and the result Is all-a-
round good soldiers, 4 minis
style 1
"Police Call" is a dally chore which keeps the training area clear. Here a cheerful group of
"automatic lawn-mowers" pause for a picture.
"Ready, HEX ercixe" says the training ser geant and the boys "sweat out" a period of
I calisthenics on the parade ground.
Private Jose Antonio Peres gets a private English lesson
from Mrs. Rosemary Ruis in the Fort Clayton Education
Center while Wilfredo Arrarado, left, and Francisco Serrano
Alvares look on.
These three men demonstrate that tt's nat all work in the
Training Detachment as they utilise the Day Room facilities
for study and relaxation. Left to right are Private Roberto
Nieves, Private FJnrt Class Jose G. Rurgos and -Private
Gonzaler-Maniro.
Chow time----and they all go to it.
B/eryboJy RsaJs Classified*
The detachment troops pasa i5th Antiaircraft Artillery Headquarters on their way back from
the theater where they have seen training fU nu which help them to become accustom*d to
their new life In the Army.
PAUb; SIX
Hw|ddws uffuiMNy Apin$
!
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, MW



* -*,f---
-rr*--------T. f.
Teen-Age Ambassadors
(Pictures and text
by Ralph E. Skinner)
SUNDAY AMERICAN readers
may remember lovely Esther
Lemm whose pictures Illustrated
the recent story on the magic of
thepoUera.
Will, that pollera and Esther
have aroused considerable inter-
est throughout, the United States
-*nd Hawaii lit conjunction with
an article Esther wrote entitled,
Hw We lire In Panama.
Thus tar, more than 1450 let-,
ters have come to this 15-year-
old girl, "each seeking an ex-
change of letters and more Infor-
mation on the pollera, on sanco-
cho or oo Panama, in general.
As a student at the Pan Amer-
ican institute,; Esther will start
her school vacation shortly. Dur-
iag that time she plans to nswer
Most of her letters. And to send
autographed pictures of herself
attired In her pollera to the
more than 60 writers who asked
for them. Her. parents, Mr. and
Mrs- Rodolfo Lemm, will help her
with this big Job.
1.. i IIIJL..W .' '
Shown at her home is Miss Lemm, whose article HOW WE LIVE IN PANAMA together with
pictures of her brought in a flood of letters. Some of the letters are shown In the picture
above. Miss Lemm plans to answer all the letters during her school vacation and thus brlnr
goodwill between the young people of Panama and the United States.
With this picture printed In a magaslne In the United
States, Miss Esther Lemm, aroused so much interest she re-
ceived some 1490 letters from people who wish to exchange
letters with her and learn more about Panama. Miss Lemm,
who is 15, is the daughter of 8r. and Sra. Rodolfo Lemm, of
Vista Hermosa. She is a student at the Instituto Pan-
American*.
She has been overwhelmed
with the friendly spirit which
prompted the sending to her of
so many letters. Esther's story
was published In a 'scholastic
magazine which circulates among
American schools everywhere
and so It is from these young peo-
ple that her letters are coming.
She's Panama's youngest good-
will ambassador.
Another receiver of heavy malls
Is Paul Smith of Balboa Heights,
j Canal Zone. He wrote for the
same magazine, a piece on How
We Live In The Canal Zone. A-
!montr the Illustrations for the
1 article was the one reproduced
here of Paul makinc a table to
fit one of his mother's hand-
painted bateas.
In his Dad's carpenter shop un-
der the house. Paul designs and
makes these tables to order for
purchasers of the bateas produc-
ed by his mother. He Is the tall
young man who achieved consid-
erable publicity try winning a lo-
cal rifle shoot with a "possible";
that Is, getting a bullseye with
every shot. Paul plays the guitar,
sings, is an honor student at Bal-
boa High and Is active in a doz-
en different extra-curricular ac-
tivities. Besides that he likes to
go hunting.
Somewhat to Paul's dismay,
most of his 1200 plus letters are
from young ladles! He wishes
more boys would write. And
there was an additional angle to
Paul's voluminous correspond-
ence. In his article he mentioned
his two sisters Carmen and Mar-
torie and younger brother, Raloh.
Now these three have also receiv-
ed letters from prospective pen'
i pals. With four Smith children
getting fan mail, the family mall
box has bulging sides these days.
And the letters are still pouring
in!
Because of his strenuous sche-
dule In school and out, Paul isn't
sure how many letters he is going
to answer. He is the son of J.
Bartley Smith, P. C.'s Electrical
Engineer and Mrs. Mercedes Ale-
gre Smith, who is well-known in
her own right as a teacher, paint-
er and daughter of a well-known
Panama City family.
Certainly the articles by these
two young people as published
throughout the United States
have raised student Interest m
the Isthmus of Panama to a new
high level.
i
Paul Smith shew* a batea he has Just finished lacquering
and for which he is baiMing a stand to match. He la in
his father's workshop in the basement of their Canal Zone
house. Paul's mother painted the batea.
Amid the flood of letters which has mounted to over liOt, Paul Smith thinks about the
power of publicity. American students are eag er to learn more the Canal Zone and the Isth-
mus of Panama, Paul learned from these letters.
For the Bes t in Fotos & Features
...Ifs The Sunday American
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1951
Suaday AatfKMi SuppJoRcit
PAGE SEVEN
i



i
^5
flationa tottery drawing to 11/5 every SUNDAY MORNING
Ka

Your Community Station
HOG-840k
r-l'lf nil .g
/'
,V
MI>H PRINCE VALIANT HANGS UP THE 'SINGtNG
SWORD' ANO HIS BATTERED ARMOR ANO SETTLES
DOWN WITH HIS W*NDING FAMILY. NEVER HAS
H6 KNOWN SUCH COMPLETE HAPPINESS.
THEN, UP FROM THE GOAST, COMES ARF.
NO LONGER IS HE THE CLUMSY BOY PLAY-
ING AT BEING A KNIGHT-HERO, BUT A
ICON YOUNG LAO OP GREAT ABILITY.
V\JTH HIM COMES GAHARiS, SIR GAWAWS
BROTHER.
LONG HOURS THE/ SPEND WITH KING AGUAR UNTIL
AT LAST THE/ ARRIVE AT AN AGREEMENT FOR PEACEFUL
TRADE BETWEEN THULE ANO ORKNEK PEACE ANO
PROSPERITy, IT IS HOPED, WILL BRING AN ENO TO
RAIDING AND PIRACY.
MR OUT AT SEA THE SHIP OF SIEUR DU LUC SAILS
THE NEW TRADE ROUTE TO THULE. HIS PRETTY
DAUGHTER HAS HER LADY COMPANION READ OVER
ANO OVER THE LETTERS ARE HAD SENT HER ANO
AT EACH READING HER HEART BEATS FASTER.
THE SEAFARERS OF THULE PIRATE EACH
OTHER WITH THE SAME ENTHUSIASM AS
THEy RAID THE COASTS OF THE WORLD.
CAN THEIR TURBULENT SPIRIT BE QUELLED
BY TH^ GREATER PROFITS OF TRADE?
^"Kr^aHMIMi 7 ,'ir-u-iI
THE ANSWER IS SURGING HOMEWARD
FROM A PLUNDERING RAID. BOLTAR,
THE SEA KING, LOOKS ACROSS THE JAM-
LACED WAVES AND SEES A VICTIM

-
.....AND THE FIRST VESSEL IN PEACEFUL
TRADE FALLS TO THE HAROY NORTHMEN.
next *eac- Gathering Storm CM.
' :--. '-
PAGE EIGHT
SuDMy Ancnuti vpptctotot
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, t]



4
flafna (ottcni drawing to 11/5 every SUNDAY MORNING
Your Community Station
HOG-840. k*.
..,..;.....'.<-..'.. ;
rjnm, is INK





I
r
j^3^
^por r\
n
eview
The latest news from the world of sports!
7:30 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station
HOQ-840k
PAGE TEN
VmUj AaencM Swppmctt
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1951


Warn
flatonJfottem drawing to fc/5 eery SUNDAY MORNING
V'our Community Station
HOG-840

Kcs.


PAGE ELEVEN


^P
IM
-T'|f
flationJ tottem drawing to 1W5 every SUNDAY MORNING
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Kcs.
S*3
I
-a
IDONPT \MYSTARS,OOOLA,OF
KNOW.ZEL.^COURSE HE IS/
IF ALLEY 15 \THE BOYS
SUCH ASOOD) SIMPLY
INFLUENCE / ADORE
FOR YOUR A HIM/
BOYS.
1' SLING SHOTf ITAIN'TSO ^ AfTA BOYS! JWELL.I dnNO AS It)
SHOOTIN', (TOUGH I )THERE'S /SAY T$T, BOYS/THERE'S .
. v THINKYOU V CAN'T ( NUTHIN / MORElD HANOUNG A
Sa CAN DO IT?? CHEW IT/ 1 TO IT.' /SUNG THANHAULIN' BACK
feV. rfifc^ JV ^ ON Ttf STRETCHERS... *

/
Y
jNS
trf^L
..AN' LIKE ANY OTHER
WEAPON.THEYRE DAf*
GEROUS .TOO...WHY, I
MIND A DAY BACK IN
MY BOYHOOD WHEN A
COUPLE KIDS I
KNEW...
V-
BECAUSEjMYU'L
PRINCE, AS LONG
AS YOU'VE GOT ME,
YOU DON'T HAFTA
THINK.
YOUCALL
>well,iTjoined ^thai-toy
uww^seeyou ( you7pja slin6-
'guyshave \ hah// fs shot?
joined me
in th'sung
shot league.,
THIS'LL \NOW0DtNf} YEH.-GETBACKOUTOF
HOLD ER.AYOU FIXINVH' WAY,BOY.-WE DON'T
NOW LEre)TOSHOOT> WANT ANYBODY.
LOAD *ER ) THAT_ AGETTtN HURT/
UP/ A THING;
Kg
**&***
HAUL ER BACK JUST
AWEE BIT MORE,
GUZ...CMON, NOW-
EASY DOES IT....
-^^S>^
OOMLIWI. -......VICttHC
11-18

i .... i
I. V
Sunday A*eri SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1951