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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01326
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01326
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Sunday supplement
        Supplement 1
        Supplement 2
        Supplement 3
        Supplement 4
        Supplement 5
        Supplement 6
        Supplement 7
        Supplement 8
        Supplement 9
        Supplement 10
        Supplement 11
        Supplement 12
Full Text


* BRANIFF
-j
SUNDA Y


NOW
DAILY SIHVICI
U.S.
-
I
Seagrams VO. :


r-SEVENTH TEAK
"Let the people know the truth and the country U $*fm" ? Abraham Lincoln.
i'ii


< V\\hlV\ UIIISK1
,
Now... 6 Years Old!
i

PANAMA. R. P., SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951
TEN CENTS


Income Tax Money Returned
To Help Run Canal Zone
J! 'Gold' Commissaries
lo On Cash Basis Jan. 1
I AJI U.S.-rate retail stos of andi yi reopen Thurulay. '^g^ fflflSJW-
Jw Commissary Division will be. uary 3. | From then untu April roch ex_.
llacedonacashbasl8wneniney| Nq materU1 chanf e jg to be changes may be made only at
leopen their doors after tne wewi made m the exigtlng system for'Balboa and Cristobal commlssa-
fear holiday. handling Commissary purchases riea and after April 80 commls- ,
Retail stores still using ine; ior thQse with Urmt#d purchase Sary coupons may be exchanged i!
fommlssary coupon book system Jt WM announced.; for cash only at the Finance Bu-
Lhlch will be converted to cash h a ortelnay adopted In! reau offlces at Baiboa Heights or
bles Include those in Balboa ^j W(h ,. the Issue Cristobal.
J/lablo He^U.Oamboa. Cristo- purchase cards has prov- ----------------------,--------
la) and MariartU. Cash ales; to both elfectlVe and slm-| .
|U1 also be instituted hi the lo- operation, according tojV_
fa^*%S??iSfi& co-muX Division office, Xmas Cavalcade
arV^n^o^: ^%&*SS ESSM TOfflOtTOW
ral retail sections which are ^ ha3 cards wUj be is- .*# IW1UWIIWW
^oSbt^TVS^a.-SiOwr Slaflon HOG
to all employes trading lnj
tore
ly b,
Dillon to aU Dredging Division
Issued monthly by the Payroll.
lolntly used.
I Because of complex contraband
|tnd control -problems, there is
|WP^af-W?r^ommlss^Veto ^%^7o^tho"bu* ^ ^J t*^ EE"
sales other than the one at 0meypafcronage there, while lo-: cade" will start rolling tomor-
amboa. cal-rate employe of other units row night at 7 over station HOG
Failure to adopt the cash plan ^. ^-tarnlsheS cash purchase with "A Christmas Carol," tea-
cards by the cashiers in the store turlng Alec Ouiness.
In amounts dependent on the'
limitations of their purchase pri-1 The Cavalcade, one of the
Government
To Control
RP Trust Co.
The government of Panama
will have direct control over all
. operations of the Panama Trust
I Co. bank when It reopens for
business, probably next week.
FALL CLEANING PLANS -
from the White House to ,
lng for his press conference,
Steelman. The President sal
to prevent federal emple-
Int
(NEATelephoto)
__dent Truman (right! walks
i old State Department bulld-
iccompanied by aide John R.
he Is planning quick action
n"*i having profitable outside
ets.

Ibera would necessitate consld:
treble alterations and it tia ex-
pected that the rigid regulations
governing commissary purchases
(111 prevent abuses of the pur-
as* privileges.
Cash sales were first adoptea
vilegea.
Commissary patrons who have
unused coupons when the change
isn saies wcic i.o. --"- unused coupons wnen tne cnangc
irlmentally In Ancon Com- ^ h ,,., effective may
ary last April. Since then;-? * ------__.
system has been installed in. .... .,._ vi?..
the system iu
"ainindu. CocoU, Pedro Miguel
nd Gaton Commissaries.
The cash sales, juan met **
widespread eustdnfer approvalMi
\ncon and has -proved entirely!
feasible from an operational
Standpoint. The customer re-
Donsetoeash sales ha been fa-1
vorable at other stores where the,
tem has been adopted, ac-
llng to Cnsruaiasary person-
It was announced several
nonths ago that cash sales
_#ould be adopted in all U.S.-
Irate stores as soon as the neces-
sary equipment was received and!
personnel could be trained. The
training of personnel for the fiyef
remaining- stores already Is In
progress and the necessary cash
registers and cash drawers have
been received and are ready for
installation. ,
| Approximately $96,800 In new
I Equipment was purchased by the
Commissary Division for the
change to the.cash sales plan-
lonly minorfalterations are plan-
ned In the stores before the
I change-over.
. The Commissary tores will be
closed both Tueaday and Wed-
nesday for the New Year holi-
day and the weekly dosing date
in January. All stores will be
opened on Mohday, December 31,
.many Christmas
j which will be aired from .
until Christmas, continues Tues-
day with the "Festival of. nine
Lessons and Carols."
The re* of the program ln-
irtea^The Orete*
Auto Designer Sees Car Of Future
ZsHs: More Efficient And Easier To Drive
A Congressional bill to give the Panam Canal Com-
pany the equivalent of the income tax total collected
from American employes of Federal agencies in the Canal
Zone is to be sponsored by Local 14, American Federa-
tion of Government Employes.
Local 14 President Rufus M. Lovelady said yesterday
his local will try to have such a bill, introduced when Con-
gress reconvenes in January.
Lovelady says there is precedent for such legisla-
tion in Guam. All federal taxes collected there are turn-
ed back to the United States authorities responsible for
governing and operating the island.
The move to have local tax cited as one more result of
This was agreed upon Friday collections said to amount reeulnng the Panama Canal
at a meeting of stockholders to S25.00O.0O0 annually -re- Company to foot the tire
and Ministry of the Treasury' turned to the Panama Canal bill for the Canal Zone
O^UeoSolls I Company, which pays the ex- On the second Item of the
The bank' which was closed penses of the Canal Zone Oov- legislative program lncreas-
slnce KCto'n>mt. U one of three ma- ed retirement benefits for an-
started an unusual run on bank jor items on the AFOE's 1952 nuitants - *d* pointed
depleting the cash on hand to legislative program out that many Federal em-
lmw than the amount sneclfled' The other two Items relate ployes who retired years ago
to Increased pensions for re- are having difficulty adjust-
tlred US government workers ing their pensions to inflated
already on the annuity rolls, prices,
and to the raising of the sal-
anc'"the manaM^r toeltoriaiI ary level at which true over- On the "true tlme-and-a-
Securitv BoarJon ?t asgoW- time is paid to classified gov-,half for overtime" Issue, it was
ernment workers. noted that the Income figure
All three Items were discuss- of $2980 above which classified
ed with Rep: Daniel A. Reed.'employes do not receive true
(R.-N.Y.) before his departuret time-and-a-half has not been
from the Isthmus Friday. < changed since 1945, though
Reed expressed himself as there have been three salary
by law will be run by a five-
man board, which will have the
Minister of the Tresaurer: the -
manager of the Banco Nacional; and to^the.1**?
to check
to see
the
how
ment representatives.
Reopening of the bank Is
awaiting approval of a bill au-
thorizing the government to ac-
cept a loan from the U. S. Ex-
port-Import Bank to enable the
HOM Panama 'tTpav of a taterertrffflu three"Tugges- increases In tnls period.
S^S. lv l2n_ J: ^_.pa._._. ti fnr initiation and nrom- The AFQE is not oddo
$1,000,000 loan to the Panama
Trust Co.
The bill has already been
-----* -----
By HARLEY J. EAL 'i You have
Vice PresMent, General lletoie', cars In the ucc i "." * ou uu bu-ohiv hu i
Corp, [wrong thev viere. Similar doubts oassed In a first reading and the
(Written lar NEA Sarrlcel were raised Sbour- pnah-buttmithe second reading la expected "
BTROIT Dec. 15 (NEA >- 1 de?w latches, fende/ extensions,to,16*6 place on Monday.
Our reasoning foe building the ti *___! ?,._
1938 car and new Le Sabre was! I Re CQilGI iLOne
very simple. The automobile |
tlons for legislation and prom- The AFOE Is not opposed in
lsed to look into the factors principle to the Civil Service
Involved. provision that employes above
As the ranking member of a certain grade should receive
e House Ways and Means leas proportionate overtime
Committee and the ranking pay. (The provision was put
Republican In Congress. Reed's in the regulations to remove
sponsorship of any measure, the temptation? some auper-
exerts a powerful influence on visors might feel to order over-
teglahrMou. I time unnecessarily.)
Commentators noted yester-| The AFOE does feel, how-
day that the transfer by the ever, that the level should be
US 'Treasury to the Panama raised to $5.300 per year salary.
Canal Company of a sum instead of having true-over-
equal to income taxes collect-, time stop at $2.980, as at pre-
.J in t-V. ranol 7nne VAlllH onnt
n on Thursday "The (^ m the United Elates todjay "starTllag*' hrno|ic1Bfll *!' imfllf wl^WCIOlI
__,.ra>v Angel." tarring Lorettacertainly the' pugUe response Is design are a conventional part e*--*^. P- IM
Song, on Friday; "The Oldest heyond anything we anticipated, of today's utomottBe. j.PWtHW I in
ristmas Story" and tha "8tory^th m,the United Stater and
of the Three Wise Men.'' nar- Europe,
rated by Charles Laughton and At Itsfarls and Antwerp show- very simpie. n utuaiuu
"The Little Match Girl" with mgs.Le Sabre attracted more in-,more than anythhiK else reflecte
Frank Luther on Saturday. Iterested spectators than any au- the contemporary feeling of Ame-
^. ... ? tomotlve display I've seen and rlcan people; t Utartritas our hnriowmit. ; vo{ce toward ^ying the tax ployes In the higher eategat*
The Cavalcade will come to \ tor the past 25 years I've madelt urge totkeep moving ahead, to Hes ^^'3^*^'g ?"-, because of Its discriminatory les draw less than half tun*
an end Sunday with a Nativity; my biurfnees to attend European have next year's modelas year, edatop Balboa Police^ftcm to ^au t working overtime In many
-*"'- The ueeet our experimenUl Le i:P"ao^?' ^t^ U who. * M alae, : instances, while their, subor-
Sabrelsoneof the way,i we keep pass, and mayoe^ghten^he Wow, J ^ ^ dinatej draw ^ &Q g ^
ahead of the public demand. |for ttg wto rwUte^oo heavi- ^ ^^ J-J tteady ri?e ,n dl.
'ra^zC indlSSff CUus^iS t ' ^^^1^^^'^Tne i
iporary feeling of Ame-, canal Zone and Santa Claus M.5Di.rUon. manv Zonlans now
uei It Ulustrates, our here to prove it......... ^~ ^.S ivfne ttfe tax
arranged that supervisory er
DENIES TAX CUQUEChas.
play entitled
"Emmanuel."
Runaway Logging
Train Kills One
On Steep Grade
LANSE. Michigan, Dec
15,
shows.
It has never been our Intention
to Imply that Le Sabre as such is
_t Le Sabre as such is ~~----------------7 T~ I !y of the joy and have to be led, 17.,^^,^ .-------X
"the car of the future." It Is a la-! Thinking ahead, plotting fu- )r through the portals to tell the' ^SaJS^lti and ether items LorifJOn OWneTS
boratory on wheels, and as such ture designs on tbfdrawlng officer how It happened. iSlhrJaSLedI rise to Su i T. X Lr>
Doraiorv on wiiccia, biiu o uw. ut^t u<. - - -
its value Is not In the car Itself board Is ndt enough. some Meas
but In what we will learn from It. ,that appear practicable on paper: canal Zone cops who fixed up
We know from experience that,are not practicable In metal, the station themselves, hope few
no matter how fantastic an idea Some Ideas that seem desirable ^ui have to "tell It. __'
hurtled backwards down a steep provement In future automotive ing. who has_a bag of ts an
and threatened rise In reats. Is s /%..#. f**-.-^
All of these, most employes rICKinQ UUt L-OTS
believe, are partly an out-1 .#.
growth of the "pay as you go"/\S rOQ LlffS
policy Inaugurated last July 1,!
which charges the Panama
a Canal Company with earning
i wno nas a ubk vl aubs * w -^""^^^-----_v ,. .-
E grade at "SSSTJF& mes SmulZTcZ 're^eV. tor ~f I We know for example thatbe- ; MJ^*fflai,for*JSS! 0SS^S&tS Corn^
lelP ofnheeffirnaTRevenue an hour las\ nlgh't tumbled j stance when r^^ i/?he%tates It has
SEES ifaSS-i^HeS 2S? kueedraone0nman^mS S'X pSSt&& ifft &V^^?^aSSR we w theo^-"^*- ^T^L^ *' ^
nffihVt hT w^ a'rnmbf r of !^o othe. J gjthe electrically actuated convert- have used them^in * B^^ui ^*nt^V^^wu ^ Uues. ^^ .
STepwted "c5o?e? of officials We top and door window.iwou Id ;as the result of. "fjgj^ XS Inthe work of Company announcement that |
taking part in tax shake- Witnesses said huge logs were be too expensive, require tooL^ul- we may be able to n^i
downs, or that he ever heard tossed from the ears Into the,ky machinery to be practical: for,lne use of them as they e*come '"W ,utlon.
n* an.k nllnuB olr rtllr mot ^htir If I xt.OCkparS available. % 6 1 t""~. _"
airilke matchstlcks
housing to a minimum was
London, Dec. is (UP)
Motorists here began today to
retrieve automobiles they a-
bandoned in thick fog two days
ago.
The "pea soup" fog which
blacked oat London for two
days began to lift, and the
weak sun could be seen.
Traffic and air services re-
turned to normal.
January, au sioree wiu oc oowm, or w "t " . i~~^ ..~ ~ ~i-v t - *------------\ Wir&hU caves ot Tne siauon. ^mu^ ^ _..^-.-~. ----------------------__________
ned on Mopday, December 31,________of such a clique._______air dike matchstlcks. __________stock cars._____________ available._____._^,--------__2----- _------------------~----------------------------j
John Foster Dulles: tommunity Punishing Pawer' To Stop Russia
By JOHN POSTER DULLES
(Distributed by NEA Service)
"Can we stop Russian imperialism?"
The answer is: of course we can.
We rust, in all honesty, admit that we are up
against one of the most complicated tasks the world
has ever kmown. First the Red Army. That is a
grave threat. But if we think only of that, we shall
find that Communism is surging from the under-
ground to seiap power, as has already happened in
nearly a score of countries. But if we think only
of the revolutionary threat of the ommunist Party,
we may find other and bigger Koreas, where the
weapon 1 open armed attack.
w _ilL rf..,wH wnrea laoan and Alaska? Must economice of the free nations whom Communism seeks to ex-
try to buUd enough military jgets In, there .will not be much country enough^7 !*_ ?Cito*thie coun- that most of them woeld be easl- plelt.
strength In each country tocheck.left worth liberating. But I am to hold off a full-scale Russian herej* "^" to boW ^ emptured by indirect, poUtteal
on the spot, any armed attack afraid they may be wrong about offensive? But how about the tries nongBKj Jh^ ^ fM- _nrM ^aW C
If we concentrate _
Burope there will be h .
In Asia which will make us re-
call Stalin* slogan that Asia Is
the road to victory over the
West." Bat we dare not concen-
trate on AaU. for Soviet strategy
can shift its! effort* to whatever
be the exposed areas.
Take the element 'of timing.
We cannot assume that the cli-
max of danger will be in 152 or
1BS4 or some other date that we
predetermine; for the Russian
despotism of today operates on a
flexible, long-range basis and
has. Itself, no yearly dates to
meet. <
tontine method* wHI
tarn back a threat of
.other 18?
such an offensive?
aggressien. The free world weald The area of freedom is already
have real strength nowhere and, perilously shrunken through the
haakraptey everywhere.. I capture by Russian imperialism
lot over one-third of the people
At various places around the and resources of the world
rtoty, of tueh scope and of such
' ed suspense. i
. Red Army U regularly,
/maintained at about three mll-
llon men. about 200 divisions, i
with ample numbers of planes, I
tanks and artillery. It Is poised
m a central area, with Interior!
lines. It could strike suddenly.:
with massive ^cwer. east, south)
or west at any chosen point along (
the 25,000-mile boundary which
runs from the Arctic, near Alas-1
ka, down by Japan, through East
Asia and South Asia, along the |
Middle East to Turkey, Greece,
Tugoslavla an.d then up along!
Western Burope and ScandrnavU
to near Its Arctic place of begin-
ning
How do we meet that? The
old-fashioned way' would be to
Vll Mic o/uv, muy wiucu abvob mi uu uisv uimy uc
which the Russian' rulers might how to get defense.
launch. That is the Instinctive j _--_. m! . i .tt-mt that weald In-
wlsh of people who want to be Let us see what local defense1 How about Scandinavia. West *;'"ucr^7oa#w'"Wr.
defended, not liberated. |would mean A major attack Germany, the Ixrwands .France, voive a. """j1/ te taftottw
could be launched against any Yugoslavia. Qreece. Turkey, the den '"'""J^VJJ-I .uagarde Soviet orbit as In Western Eu- more can be subtracted without
They are quite right to want one of 20 countries I could name. Arab states. Iran, Pakistan, in- ano' 5*"" d Weaken the rope. It Is possible to create use- endangering the happiness and
this, for if the Red Scourge once 'Must the free world have in that dla, Burma. Indo-Chma, soutn everywncre M {j mUItary Btienglh and every- security of the rest.
-------------------------------' "" 1 where there should be enough
strength to resist indirect aggres-1 Take South America. Presl-
Islon But to attempt generally dent Monroe said to Russia in
a policy of mllltarv containment IU23 that it would be dangeroua
along 25,008 miles, with the Rus- to our peace, safety and happi-
slans having both an Immense tiess If European despotism was
force and Interior lines, would. I extended to this hemisphere, and
suppose be Impractical as a mill- surely that Is no less true now
'tary matter; and surely It Is lm- than then. The same can now be
practcalas an economic matter, said of other areas whose cul-
Take next the threat of Indi- tures and religions differ from
rect aggression. In every coun- our own. but whose people con-
trv of the world the Soviet Com- tribute authentically and lndls-
munist Party has Its local af fll- pensably to a total world of free-
dates trying to magnify discon- dom. Even In economic terms
tent by means of political strikes, we are Interdependent.
sabotage and propaganda and,
i when the moment Is Judged op- i Take Africa. Its resources are
iportune they try to seise power a mainstay of Western Europe's
bv a political coup or launch a economy and Africa contains the
' / *. r ..I Wm^m. 4nK ^multl C\f
Debate on U.S. Foreign Policy May Revolve Around This Article
Here is a new American doctrine for world preserva-
tion from the horrors of an all-consuming war. It comes
from John Foster Dulles, architect of the Japanese peace
treaty and a leading Republican authority on foreign
policy. *
It would supplant the George F. Kennan policy of
containment against Rassia with a new doctrine, "Com-
munity Punishing Power." This, says Dulles, is the only
protection against imperialistic Communism which will
not bankrupt the world and throw it into the grosp of Red
aggression without a struggle.
The Dulles doctrine is important because the author
is likely to play an important role in U.S. foreign policy
whether the Republicans or Democrats win the 19S2 elec-
tion. This article is based on a recent speech made by
_______________________Dulles. It will be expanded in an article soon hr be pub-
v ^.w lhd in Foreign Affairs quarterly.
DULLES: 3Uhe a bonsehoider ^ n y^g EDITOR.
who toes* taoaeare.
.. TJNLES;* he has visible
strength in hat, awn hosse *
crril war.
only known rich deposits of
uranium which assure us. rather
When the danger is acute, than Russia, atomic supremacy,
there is usually an emergency ; We can go from area to area,
call for more United States econ- seeing how each part of the re-
omlc aid. There are some special malnlng free world Is vital to the
occasions when this 1* the right,rest. The Soviet policv of encirc-
answer I clement Is already so far advanc-
But the United States cannot, i that we shall have to find
by rants-in-aid. undertake per- more than a national, or hemls-
ai,anr**T to raise the living pheric or Atlantic defense.
standard ef the thousands of If we turn to the duration of
saiDJou throughout the world I (Continued on Page 6, Coraron 1
-j
dl
,-j
1

.
k



ruar, two
teu
te**

THE rrTKTOT AMERTCA
ni
S TlfJE COLD WAR SMOKES AND SIZZLES ROISD THE WORLD...
British Women Are Back Amid The Bullets
Sunday; dm*embcr 'tc,
- ,
Franco s Siberia
Has Bathing, Wine,
Sunshine. Gestapo
BY ALLYN BAVM
PALMA, Majorca Dec. 15
iNEA>Twelve hours by boat
from Spain Is one of Franco's
Blberias. It Is also the "golden 1^ beine'looled'and'sm^shed
Isle," the Ule o maana, the by an Egptian mob.
loveland of Frederick Chopin i she was renoused in a guard-
arid George Sand, and the Pre-|ed camp ur,der conditions much
lent day delight of European iess attractive than any she has
LONDON, Dec. 15 (BIS)-More than half of Britain's
troops are now serving abroad in 19 strategic areas, in-
cluding Geunany, Korea, Malaya and Suez.
In many cases their womenfolk are with them, shar-
ing the dangers and troubles as they did during the Ger-
man blitz.
In Britain, too, the threat of war is bearing directly
upon the womenfolk.
Here are reports of British women in three overseas
fighting zones, and with the civilian army ready to de-
fend the homeland while the Regular forces are attend-
ing to shooting wars round.the world.
SUEZ
Mrs. Peggy
husband Is a
Hansom,
Sergeant
whose
In the
Suez Canal Zone, saw her
tourists
Majorca lies In the Mediter-
ranean between France and
Spain; a 30-by-50-mlle
dlse of green mountains, rocky
cliffs and white beaches where
the sun shines all but 12 days
In the year.
It may soon rival Capri as
\n
MALAYA
international playground.
But few tourists know
that Majorca is an island
of exile to at least 500 form-
er poltica I prisoners, of
Franco. After long years in
jail, these men have been
tentenced to resettle in Ma-
jorta at the end of their
prison terms, never to re-
turn to their mainlanl
homes again.
Travel and communications
controls to and in Majorca are
rigidly enforced.
The island crawls with the
hted Guardia Civil and hun-
dreds of loyal Franco troops.
Despite close surveillance, op-
position to Franco exists, even
flourishes but is doomed to
failure because of Majorca's in-
sular position.
Criticism of Franco is
more outspoken here than
in any other place in Spain.
No one cheers the sloppy,
til-eq\ilpped Spanish troops
which parade through the
streets of Palma, Majorca's
capital. Spectators drift
away when the national
anthem is played.
Unlike the mainland, there
are no blatantly pro-Franco,
posters plastered over Palma's
walls. They would be ripped
down as soon as darkness fell.
Everyone gripes about the
radio: "Only bad records and
worse propaganda," they say.
Hardly anyone ever reads a
Spanish paper. They prefer the
mere expensive foreign papers
which arrive a week after orig-
inal publication.
So intense is the antl-Fa-
langlst feeling that Majorca's
inhabitants stubbornly call
treets for Franco war heroes
by their original name.
Franco's method of breaking
up opposition to his regime is
grimly efficient.
When an anti-Falangist fin-
ishes his prison term, he la
"exiled" to the provinces or
to the BilleaH: Islands of
MaJorea or Minorca as .far
away from hi original home
as possible.
One* there he must report
monthly to the police who have
his name on file. Any irregu-
larities and the exile la. return-
ed to prison.
Only in Majorca does this
method succeed completely. A
political exile here told me that
on the Spanish mainland many
ex-prisoners have managed to
return home and reorganize
their underground because of
the inefficiency and corruption
of Franco's government and po-
lice:
As more anti-Falangists and
political prisoners are shipped
to Palma and Majorca, travel
controls tighten.
All shipping to and from Ma-
jorca must go to Spanish port.
There is no maritime traffic
whatsoever with Bouthern
Franee or North Africa, the
nearest foreign ports. Naval
patrols enforce this blockade.
There are only three air
experienced before.
But she didn't sit down and be-
wail her fate: instead she volun-
para- teered for duty with a Military
Hospital to help ease staff short-
age caused by the walkout of
Egyptian workers.
She mans a switchboard. Her
17-year old daughter became a
yolunteer nursery teacher and
takes classes every day for the
children of other British wives.
The voluntary 'all hands to the
pump' scheme was started by La-
dy Robertson, wife of the Brit-
ain's Middle East Commander-
in-Chief.
women work at all sorts of es-
sential jobs teaching, nursing
and hospital cleaning during the
day, and then Rive a hand where
necessarv durinsr the evenlne.
The wife of Major General Witt
works as a pantry maid in a
hospital.
Troop welfare Is another part
of the work.
The wlvea of British planters
in Malaya are living under ever-
Increasing strata. They never
know when their Isolated homes
will be attacked by communist
terrorists.
Every week, the death roll
grows. Men, women and children
are being killed by ^anolis who
strike at any time of the day and
night and then vanish Into the
darkness or disappear Into the
Jungle.
Wives, waiting for their hus-
bands to return home, find them-
selves growing more and more! low rero (present temperature at
KOREA
BRITAIN
Two British women have Just
-rived in Korea to help bring a
"M of home comfort to the 20,-
000 British Commonwealth troops
in Korea.
They are 43-year-old Mrs. E-
mlly Prebble and Miss Pat Whit-
tall, 23. Both are members of the
active British Women's Volun-
tary Services.
Apart from nursing sisters,
they will be the first two Brit-
ish women welfare workers In
Korea.
They face a tough time during
the coming months: temperat- rlses mav ke,eP thrrn awflV from
res will drop many degrees be- home several nights each month.
With half Britain's armed
' ifces ' ead" serving overseas,
thousands of British wives,
mothers and sweethearts have
already been separated from
th?lr menfolk.
Now, with Winston Churchlll'.j
announcement of the re-forroa-
tion of the British Home Guard,
thousands more will see less of
their men.
Training will take up much of
the volunteers' leisure u-.id.e tei-
Long hours of duty, of stand-
ing by, patrolling and skirmish-
ing, have played havoc with re-
gular mealtimes and thrown a
great deal of extra work onto
the cooks.
tense with each passing minute
and if their men are half an
hour late, the strain is almost
unbearable.
The husbands of so many of
their friends have been killed
ambushed or picked off by snip-
ers that quite naturally, they
fear the worst every time their
own men are a little late.
Grname Greene summed
up when he said that the "
er's wife waits with the
of love for the sound of the
mobile motor, until he is safe
back In. the prison of wire. Th
night, the radio announces the
Pusan Is now 30 degrees below
They are equipped with long
winter woollies and quilted over-
coats, ear-flapped helmets and
large fur-lined boots. Comfort
before glamor is their motto.
Lady Reading, head of Wom-
en's Voluntary Services said that
their Job is to organize enter-
tainments and Interests for the
Commonwealth troops. Equally
Important, they will listen to any
soldier kho wants to talk, help
any one with a problem, look at
phothographs of the family or
girl-friend back home.
Both women will be paid only
So 41 wives have donned caps
and aprons and gone to work in
the kitchens. A soldier coming
off duty at any hour of the day
now finds a cookhouse open and
hot food ready.
Women with nursing experi-
ence are to replace nursing sis-
ters at Base Hospitals: the nurs-
ing slstera will be needed at ad-
vanced first aid posts.
The troops, facing difficult, ex-
acting times, are proud of their
women folk who, if not exactly
filling rifles and handing them
up. are doing their share, quiet-
ly and efficiently, facing the fu-
ture with no show of alarm.
flights weekly to foreign coun-
tries, two of which are on
Spanish commercial lines.
All three flights must arrive
and depart on Sunday when
Palma's airport is Jammed with
Falangist secret service agents
and Guardia Civil carefully
checking all passengers.
All other air travel during
the week must go through Bar-
celona on the Western coast of
Spain.
All telegrams and telephone
calls also must be routed
through Barcelona. This en-
tails fantastic delays.
A call to Paris from Palma
takes a minimum of 11 hours.
In any other country in Europe
contact can normally be estab-
lished within 30 minutes.
As "Siberia" go, how-
ever, Majorca could hardly
be more pleasant. Food,
rent and wines are cheap,
the scenery is magnificent
and the weather stunning.
But while delighted tourists
and visitors sunbathe and swim
in the clear blue Mediterra-
nean Sea, the exiled men of
Majorca dream only of when
they can get awayback to
the mainland and their homes
and to what liberty la left
them in Franco Spain.
murder of three more planters, (living and essential expenses.
The planter's wife lives in cage Their Jobs carry no salaries,
of wire with sandbags around | _.
the house to stop snipers' bul- ~ *
lets. ..
Her telephone ring every half
fourneighbors call each other |
at regulars Intervals to make
described how his hostess "but
sure telephone wires have not
been cut. If they fail to get a
reply, they notify the nearest
detachment of troops.
Often, patrols going out to In-
vestigate find only the bodies of
the family and burning houses
and storage sheds.
A visitor to one planter's home ;
described how his hostess puti
down her rifle and asked me
in."
One woman who was expecting
a baby was advised by her doctor
to go at once to the nearest
hospital 300 bandit-infested
miles rr"".
Her jand and friend es-
corted rifles on their knees.
Luck w: i with her she got
through. But at no period were
they safe from ambush.
These wives are carrying on,
determined to help their hus-
bands beat the Communist threat
to the well-being of the country.
Supplies of rubber and tin must
continue to come from Malaya.
Britain has 22,000 troops in
Malaya who together with 10,500
Gurkhas and 100,000 British-of-
ficered- Malayan police, wage
constant war against the Com-
munists.
But the country Itself, with its
swamps and dense Jungles, is on
the side of the terrorists. In small
bands they can carry out raids
and then split up and vanish in-
to the depths of the Jungle.
The men will be pal-1 nnlv a
few dollars a year towards cost
of wear and tear on civilian
clothes.
Wives will find their mending
and darning chores considerably
increased, uniforms will not be
Issued for a while: the expanding
Regular and Territorial Forces
need all available output.
But the Home Guards wives
will not grumble: they know that
their men aren't Just 'playing
soldiers.'.
Behind all the Jokes and wit-
ticisms, the good-natured grous-
ing, lies the knowledge that a
strong, determined Britain is a
major factor In preserving peace.
Norwegian Sailors
See World War II
Ghost Of Nazi
NEWCASTLE. Australia (UJ>.)
Crew members of the Norwe-
gian ship Templar claim the
ghost of a headless Nazi soldier
walks the decks at night.
They said the uniformed ghost
has been seen In the sick bay and
forecastle. It speaks to them in
the dead of night, the turns and
marches away.
Bo'sun Johansln said: "I heard
a German voice and then a head-
less soldier In a green German
uniform walked Into the sick bay
from the bathroom."
Johansln said the ghost was
that of one of the Germans who
died aboard the ship during the
war. The ship had been seized by
the Germans.
He Takes Gambler's
Chance, Breaks Even
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (U.P.)
Jesse Doyle, 33. was faced with
a dilemma In criminal court. He
took a gamble on a Jury's verdict
and broke even.
Doyle had been offered a
chance to plead guilty to theft of
$44 worth of whiskey and take
a two-year prison sentence.
He refused aud took hb
chances with a Jury. The two
years could be cut by the Jury to
one or could be increased to as
much as five years.
The jury gave him a two-year
sentence.
Marine Medic. Fixe.
Injuries At Source
By M/SGT. SPENCER GABTZ
Marine Corps Combat
Correspondent *

HOSPITAI.MAN STONE: When hell popped, he got fighting j2
SSi reollynewiniJRRAY^
5 ' ,. ^A an.............mnrnmu. _._ _...__ -.___... W
Malaya Is no place for women.
But these wives, many of whom
have lived In the country for
years, regard it as home and re-
fuse to leave their men to carry
on alone.
Truck Devised 'xo bave
Vital Defense Material
WESTON, W. Va. (U.P.) *A
Lewis County farmer has an idea '
that West Virginia's new tempo-
rary license plates have too
much sweetening in them.
The farmer reported to the
state motor vehicles department!
that one of his cows had eaten
his plates while his car was {lark-
ed overnight in a pasture.
The plates, first issued this
year under the state's new motor
vehicle cod, are made of card-
board.
J! wonderful modele to cnooae
from! Three 40", two 36", ind
one 20" wide unitsail made to
the highest standard by. the min-
uficturers of over 2,000,000 quil
ty home tpplitnces! No expense
b u been spe red to b ri nj you some
10
gal rang
tr your kitchen I
of the fine ranges on the market
today. Yet, because of new Murray
maii-pfoduction method perfect-
ed over the yean, you can buy
them at money-saving prices!
Come in and see four new Murray
Gas Range at once!
RANGE MODELS I
AS LOW AS
$40.00 DOWN
$10.00 MONTHLY
Jl. Beautifully designed
^ one-piece top no
burner-bowl or front-
edge seams to clean I
JL. Roberts haw predi ion
W thermostat!. Interval
timan built Into accu-
rate electric clocks I
JL Giant ovens, porcelain
enameled, rounded,
- easily -cleaned comen I
.JL. High, swing-out, smoke-
^ lass broiler) extra-
a rge I
WITH THE FIRST MARINE still kicking up the dirt arou:
DIVISION IN KOREA, Dec. 15 Stone's squad.
(NEA) "We were trying to get I He grabbed an M-l rifle, a
the wounded cared for when all started shooting. When that w
hell star'.ed to pop." said the empty he grabbed a carbine, th
mild-mannered medical corps- an automatic rifle,
man. "Something had to be done
about it, so we did it."
What Hospitalman Cletus H.
Stone, 23, of Columbia, Pa., did
when the Reds got his dander up
saved a squad of Marines from
annihilation and made a hero out
of a man who's technically a
non-combatant.
Stone was advancing with the
foremost squad during an attack
on a nenemy-held ridge on the
Korean front when men began
falling all around him from Red
bullets.
He was tending the wounded
when machine gun fire cut down
the squad leader...
As Stone tried to care for his
men, the enemy continued to fire
on the disabled little group.
From a knoll above him, a Red
soldier began lobbing hand gre-
nades at the Marines.
Fighting mad, Stone put down
Then, in a final burst of
geance. Stone charged the
machine gun nest with hand gre]
nades and a pistol and wiped
out.
With the opposition out of 1
way, the rest of the attack
Marine Infantry platoon
over the hill.
Stone, no longer a .fight
man, forgot about the grenac
fragment wounds In his face
hands from his brief role in i
bat.
He turned to the other wound
ed and went back to work -as
medical corpsman.
Stone has been answering tr
cries for "Corpsman!" with tl
First Marine Regiment in Kore|
since last May.
He Joined the Navy In 19451
has been In the medical corj
since Dec. 24,1048.
His platoon leader, 1st Lt. Jc
Bartos, former pro football plaj
er for the Washington Redskins'
his medical gear and grabbed a was a little lets modest the
grenade from a fallen Marine. He stone about what the corpsmai!
lieavad it. Then another, did when "all hell started to pop.l
'JTHrieoeridonc took card o the "It was something to see," said]
add soldier. Bartos. "really something mag]
But machine gun bullets were nlficent."
J_ Larga drawers glide on
w silent nylon rolln I
id or
nylon
JL. Model* with divided
grouped burn
Ranges can use any
typo gen supply!
JL Acid and stain resistant
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ww
)AT, DECEMBER IS, 19S1
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE
fef Aircraft Open Africa
Is Bastion Of West's Defense
(The strategic potentialities of
North and Eut Africa in the}
jveatern nations' defense system
surveyed In this dispatch by
r-rold Guard, who has just com-
pleted an S.eeo-mile round trip
by air from London to Uganda
i Equatorial Africa.)
0O0
By HAROLD GUARD
.LONDON. Dec. 15 (UJ.) A
hying trip to Africa from Brit-
am shows clearly that the devel-
opment of jet aircraft is brlng-
the "Dark Continent" into
3en. Dwight D. Eisenhower's
strategic command.
All along the 4,000-mile air
-oute from London to Entebbe,
eat of the Uganda government
In East Africa, air travelers can
lee a chain of airfields being a-
flapted for jet aircraft.
Areas which in former wars
*ere far-away bases are being
brought by the weight and speed
of modern weapons into the
Jouthern flank of European de-
fense stretching along the North
African coast, down through the
Unglo-Egyptian Sudan and
.reaching to Entebbe, which is on-
Jly half a mile north of the Equa-
n the tiny, war-scarred Medl-
Iterranean is land of Malta air
travelers, are. screened carefully
before leaving or entering Luqa
Airfield, which forms a perman-
ent base for Jet aircraft of Elsen-
Ihower's NATO command.
Across the Mediterranean at
El Adem, near Tobrulc on the
North African coast, the British
Royal Air Force flag flaps lazily
over an airfield, still ringed by
I land mines laid by Germans dur-
I lng the last war and re-designed
I In the past year to operate long-
[ range heavy Jet aircraft.
Prom bases such as El Adem,
lair men said their combat area
I could include Italy and most of
I Prance. From bases further east
along the North African coast,
I let aircraft could operate over
I Yugoslavia. Greece and Bulgaria
land reach even into the heart
of Soviet Russia.
Royal Air Force Jets already
have completed a survey of the
route from El Adem to Wadl Hal-
fa on the Sudan border with E-
gypt, through Wadl Sienda and
W. Va. Lawyer Starts Society
To Battle Communists In US
HUNTINGTON, W. Va., Dec. 15
(UP.) An anti-Communist or-
ffi K^X^sX an r^H-atefsTastfung8^8
on to Entebbe, which is the latest / Ri Haters has s Fh~
IVIES'1*"ln the 8tra" iKRffi^^.
"s^pingof the Anglo- Thomas E. WkMyB
Egyptian treaty and Britain's loss
of Palestine also have given the
North and East African air route
a new strategic significance.
During the last war, the areas
formed a westward extension of
the vital Suez Canal Zone, where-
as today they form an extension
to the east of Elsenhower's
southern flank ln the Mediter-
ranean area.
Entebbe, with its airfield de-
Foley, a Huntlngton attorney
and veteran of World War I, said
he organized the society to fight
back at "Communist traitors be-
cause he has been fed up with
and frightened by prospect of
Communism in this country for
30 years. M m
The society la designed to be
on the same patterns as the Com-
munist Party ln this country in
small closely knit groups coordi-
finieoDe, wun its airueia ae- ' *----- --_\." ^nrtv
signed to operate the heaviest Jet nated by a centralized body,
aircraft, could be a staging point The idea of SRH[haslongbeen
on a route linking Mauritius and a dream of Foley but the at
the Cocos Islands ln the Indian ,tomey said it was only in the last
Ocean with Singapore. Australia fewyears that he h.been able
lew ycaio i.nv .... ~ .- ...
to get others Interested m the
possibilities of such an organiza-
tion.
"I decided that Russia declar-
MHilary Resumes
Training War Dogs
WASHINGTON, D; C, Dec. 15
The Army Is resuming Its
formal training of dogs for mil-
itary use for the first time since
World War Et.
There are several differences,
however, between the wartime
"K-9" corps and the present pro-
Bram. This time the Army will
accept no donated dogs, and all
the animals purchased will be
German Shepherds.
In World War II the armed
aervices acquired more than 18,-
000 dogs of many breeds, the Na-
tional Geographic 8ociety says.
Some were lent, others were do-
nated by their owners. Only 10,452
of these saw service. Some ar-
rived at training centers too late.
Some Just couldn't stand the
military life.
Training of dogs m the new
program has been entrusted to
the Provost Marshal General, and
a special center to teach both
dogs and handlers has been set
up at Camp Carson, Colorado
The new cente* will supplement
the present limited use of army
dogs, a few of which, holdovers
from wartime training, are on
guard and patrol duty ln Korea.
The dogs will be trained pri-
marily for sentry duty, as were
the majority of canine recruits
in the 1941-45 war. In that con-
flict, however, dogs were also
employed for scout and messeng-
er work, as sledge dogs and for
mine detection.
The best military dogs are
"working dogs" ln the truest
sense. They are not hunters of
wild (tame and they are not pets.
The German Shepherd is one of
the most popular dogs In the
other working dogs, such as Dob-
erman Pinschers and Boxers,
have proved successful on mil-
itary duty. .
License Plates Tempt
Cow's Sweet Tooth
CHICAGO (UJ.)-A new Ply-
wood refrigeration truck that
could save an estimated two tons
of vital metale for defense pro-
duction has been put on the
market. .
The new truck is made by
pressed Steel Car Co., Chicago.
But the onlv steel used is ln the
wheel and! axle assembly and
door frames.
The body of the truck is form-
ad from layers of plywood
Strengthened with "specially for-
mulated" plastics, the company
aid._________________
'Reptile' Insurance
'Covers'Gary Cooper
HOLLYWOOD. Dec. 15. The
ipeclal '"reptile" Insurance which
covered Oarv Cooper during the
filming of ''Distant Drums" m
Florida will expire soon. Milton
Sperling, who produced the
Technicolor picture fer Warner
Bros, release. Insisted on the un-
lque Insurance for Cooper while
the star worked on location in
the alllfator and snake Infested
Jungles of the Florida Everglades.
MULES DUMB, TOO
OREEN8BURO, Pa. (UP.) A
lay-walking mule, as dumb at
some people, was struck by a car
as It wandered along a road near
here. The mule suffered a broken
leg and was dest'oyed. The car
attained t> damage.
and the Far East.
This route, already surveyed for
Jet operations, would be an alter-
native to that through Egypt,
Pakistan and India, which would "~^ "^SUZiTSZtmm more
be unworkable If a hostile power, ed war on the lWWtt"i!
was established in the Middle than 30 years ago and I have been
East. fighting the Bolshevik threat in
my limited way over that per-
iod," Foley said.
"It was only within the last
few years that my side began to
gain when some brave leaders
began kicking the Kremlin in the
teeth and responsible officials
began revealing the deadly truth
ln an alarming manner."
He said the danger of Commu-
nism has been dramatized until
the formerly indifferent citizen
can visualize now the "evil day
when lend-lease to Russia will
come back in the form of bombs
and germ warfare."
It will be too late to stamp out
Internal treason then, Foley said,
and it Is the object of the Society
of Red Haters to accomplish that
Job In the little time that re-
mains.
He said that because of the
profound change in the outlook
of his fellow Americans, he de-
cided that while the individual
is helpless, a million hard core
anti-Communists united for ac-
Capt<
In addition, military planners
see the North and East African
areas as a vast reserve area for
whole armies which could remain
safe from attack by an enemy
not possessing overwhelming na-
val and air superiority.
That's Different,
ain, SIR
PORT DEVENS, Mass. (UJfc)
First Lt. Edmund Burke no-
ticed M/Sgt. William J. Connor
studying a letter in front of post
headquarters.
"What's the matter sergeant?"
Burke asked.
"I've been called to active duty,
air." Connor replied.
"But you're already ln the Ar-
my, sergeant."
"Yes, sir. But now I'm being
called under my reserve commis-
sion, air."
"What's your reserve rank, ser-
geant?"
"Captain."
"Oh. Is that so, SHI?"
tlon could save this republic and
the civilized world.
Foley has received hundreds of
letters from all over the United
States and four foreign countries
asking how the writers could
help in the organization.
The main purpose of the so^
clety. Foley said, Is to educate
the public to recognize commun-
ist propaganda and rebel against
lt.
The society Is assembling mate-
rial based on official reports a-
bout Communist activity In Am-
erica anja Intends to conduct in-
vestigations to teach Americans
what Communism is and guide
them ln united action against lt.
Foley said state directors are
being chosen and organizational
plans and membership applica-
tions are at the printer's. The so-
ciety hopes to hold large rallies
in New York and Los Angeles
within the next few months.
Keith Newman, another Hunt-
lngton attorney. Is setting up a
panel of lawyers to assist in the
defense of persons who may be-
come victims of "red-concocted
intimidation suits."
9f$^'I DECEMBER
FRIGIDAIRE

ELECTRIC
Dehumidifier
Stops damage
from rust, mold,
mildew...
protects valuables
Com* ln. Find out hew to gat rid of
damaging effect of excess montura
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work shops. Just plug >n a Frigidalre
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M takes moisture from the air, con-
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ol electrically no chemicals, no
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demonstration.
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OPEN ALL PAY EVERY DAY INCLUDING SUNDAYS
Ample Parking 51 Via Espaa
Tel. 3-3193 for free transportation to our sale.
ALSO AT
SMOOT & PAREDES
ECONOGAS
B. Mth Street
RODELAG
5 de May*
SMOOT & HUNNICUT
COLON
Motorist In Hurry
Has Good Reason
ST. LOUIS (UP.) Anthony
Sadowski. a pipefitter, was fined
$80 after pleading guilty to the
following traffic violations:
Passing three stop signs, going
through an automatic signal,
careless driving and leaving the
scene of an accident after his car
hit another machine.
Sadowski had a ready explana-
tion for the police. He said he
was fleeing from the Irate hus-
band of a woman with whom he
had been drinking beer.
Name's Left Out,
He Sues Phone Co.
ST. LOUIS (UP.) When the
telephone company left Julius L.
Kern's name out of the new di-
rectory after also omitting it 10
months earlier, he filed suit for
$2,500 damages for "inconveni-
ence, humiliation and annoy-
ance."
Kern said he notified the com-
pany twice of the first omission
and it had no excuse the second
time.
"Anyway." his wife said, "we
never had any trouble gettln. the
hill. It always came right on
time."
'
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' / '" *

'


f ag* ror

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1|, lgl|
For Christmas Belles
BY ANNE I.ARSEN


V<
omen s
World I


H ~- 1;
Trim Your Own Tree And Eat It Too
BY GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Feed and Markets Editor
yjL (jfh %r iL Wan A Jmr Jif,--
or travel Vlllau de Au&t f\ia it
L^ione *jrt
This Christinas belle becomes queen of the ball with this bubble
I frown which {litters with king's ransom magnificence at penny-
bank cost. Self-stem Christmas tree ornaments and silver pipe
.cleaners are only materials needed for this reral hair' area
.'any women, feeling that the.er of your left hand. Continue
Christmas season calls for some- winding until there's enough
thing special in the way of per-"thickness for fluffy wings,
sonal adornment, arc disconrag- The body and the feelers of the
ed when a trek through the shops gossamer Insect are made of red
produces nothing more exciting ipipe cleaners, which are looped
than some colored pine cones under at the bottom to form llt-
or a fluster of holly berries. The tie hooks for securing thebutter-
arswer is to make your own. riles to vour slippers.
Patricia Eastei brook Roberts. a Juliet cap Is an accesory
well-known New York floral de- that's sure to create a stir of ad-
signer, offers these suggestions miration at teen-age holiday fes-
ter those who wish to add a spar- tivities. Pipe cleaners are again
kle both to their appearance and the heroes of the tale,
to party prattle. Green metallic and white che-
, i nllle ones are twined together to
A decided conversation piece is form a circle to fit the head and
a v-ubble crown which bestows re- to serve as cross bars from ear to
pality upon its wearer at pin mo- ear and from front to back. Little
ne'- cost. All that's needed to white straw flowers, tacked on
crete this gleaming magnific- around the circle and at the peak
."v- I; !>. handful of Christmas 0f the cap. give a translucent de-
tree balls the kind with self- i;Cacy l0 thc design. Aqua glitter.
sterns and a half-dozen pipe sprinkled onto their centers to
elerners which you've dropped a bit of
t.lue. adds a final touch of sea-
' pipe cleaners, which, sonai sparkle.
catch the eye with a tinsely lit- stra_. f.ow.rs are mefI avalo
Twi "tr^'hvo ? S& Wit'*5 CUS mSPS
plV ffKilveTiam t0AS 3tt? which hads &%& to <
t^o'nVm\Vt^
ffirSS?. !iiphi,?Sth5iiUlanl snow white flowers. The arrange- : Women, shopping for Christ- It comes in plaids of the Mac-
^^^!^2SfS^2Skrt. mentisMBl#tothtiwriitwithin* gifts for men, find the jobCleod, MacPhersoii and Gordon
if^-khiJ,Lmi hi', green chenille pipe cleaners. just as puzzling as do men,shop-,clans, and can be laundered in
ping for gifts for women. ,the washing machine.
GLEAMING CHRISTMAS TREE cake* add fe-Uve
___________ Chrlttaa dinner table, ^
to TMT
Here's the recipe for a beautl-1
fill Christmas tree In the form blanched or toasted whole al-
of a cake: monds In circle with a .red I
Holiday Cake
.One package instant white
cake mlx,.l egg yolk, unbeaten. Combine 2 unbeaten eg*
Me cup milk and 2/3 cup milk, whites. i>2 cups sugar, dash of |
3i cup chopped nut meats. 4 ma- salt. 1/3 cup water and 2 tea-
monds in circle with a
Christmas candy in center.
Seven-Minute FNettaf
Combine 2 nbeaten
candled cherries, spoons light corn syrup in too Of
double boiler. Beat with rotary
egg beater or electric beater a- |
bout 1 minute, or until thorough*
ly mixed.
raschino or
finely cut.
Turn cake mix into bowl. Add
egg yolk and 'i cup Vnilk. Blend,
then beat 2 minutes. Add 2/3 cup.
milk. Blend, then beat 1 minute
longer. (Beat cake vigorously by
hand or at a medium speed of
electric mixer). Stir in nut meats
and cherries.
Gifts like these show the man in your life that you've given thought
and rare to your Christmas shopping. Sport jacket (left) is in
hound's tooth .heck, the fabric Scottish cashmere and lamb's wool.
Young man's hat. which he picks out with gift certificate, has
(upper left center) telescope crown. Shaving cream (lower left
center) comes in glass ashtray; laic in boot that can hold cigarettes
BY GAILE 1)1 (AS
when powder is gone. Butane lighter (upper right center) gives two
thousand lights before it needs cartridge refill. Shirt (lower right
center) in all-viscose rayon tartan clan plaid comes clean in wash-
ing machine. Scottish cashmere jacket (right) with deep pockets
is worn over pure wool cashmere sportshirt In Glen I'rquhart plaid.
Wool sportshirt can be washed by hand. --*!
hem of a swishlnc formal, here's
another idea Involving pipe
i cleaners. They're o* red chenille
this time, paired with red metal-
lic thread -which Is available at
needlewbrk^countcrs.
To make a holiday-happy but-
terfly to n-.-eh upon each shoe,
vo'n hy loaning the metallic
t''5d in fi-v,j'-eJ7',.t fashion, a
round the thumb and little fins-.
Htrlofu! Hints
i
O.Uv'lj^ts on table linens re-
sulting from salad dressings and
butter respond to simple soap-
and-water laundering, provided'
you counteract the stains with a
little elbow grease. Rub well.
Chocolate and cocoa stains
wash.out successfully iri warn"!
soapsuds if treated before they
get dry. If it's not convenient to
give them prompt attention, try
rari'on tetrachlorlde after the
first laundering to get rid of any
lingering traces.
It's frequently a good idea to
launder new ironing board covers
before putting them Into use. j
Hot soapsuds wash away their
starch finish, which sometimes
causes the cover to scorch with
greater readiness than it other-
wise would. i
One temptation is to buy a man' Another shirt that's a good gift
a half dozen shirts just because1 possibility is a Qlen Urquhart'
he happens to need them. plaid in pure Wool ,cashmere
Another temptation is to come that's washable, but not in the
right out and ask the man what machine. This ene has to be done
he wants but this somehow, takes, by hand. .
the surprise element out of The sports coat that go over ,
Christmas morning. It scarcely these shirts might be in soft
seems worth the bother of wrap-' Scottish cashmere with deep
olng It up if he knows Just what (pockets for pipe. Another good
he's going to get. i choice is one made ot,-Scottish
Actually, It Is quite possible to (cash mere and lamb's pool in af
buy a man a gift that he'll like, .hand-tailored fount's tooth
tfeaf mil! onrnrfca him n*rl I i Vo ,.L-
ould
eJJiffereril, (L-xcitina
Jo ^recent Ufovur
ie
L^lotln
.
\A/ardrobe
Turn batter into two Christmas
tree layer cake pans, which have
been lined1 on bottoms with pa-
per, then greased. Bake in mo-
derate oven (375 degrees P.) 25
minutes.- or until done Remove ---------. ~. ...
from oven and cool on cake racks. [Add 1 teaspoon vanilla and beat
Prepare Seven-Minute Frosting 11' minute, or until thick enough
as directed below.
Cook over rapidly boiling wat-
er, beating constantly with rotary
er beater (or a high speed of
electric beatr) 7 minutes, o un-
til frosting will stand in stiff
peaks. (8tlr frosting up from bot-
tom and sides of pan occasional-
ly with rubber scraper, spatula,
or spoon).
Remove from boiling water,
Spread between layers and on
top and sides of cake. Sprinkle
top of cake with green tinted co-
conut and garnish with Christ-
mas stars: To make stars, place
to spread. To tint coconut, place
'/a teaspoon milk or water in
bowl, add a few drops of green
coloring and mix well. Then add
3/4 cup shredded coconut and
mix'lightly with a fork until co-
conut Is evenly tinted.
that will surprise him and at a
A Juliet cap of green metallic
and white chenille pipe clean-
ers twisted together, studded
with starry white straw flowers,
i* a gay touch for a teen-ager
dressed for holiday fun.
price that isn't staggering.
Most men use, or would like to
use, after-shave talc. When talc
comes packaged in a black boot
topped by a tan suede cuff,
you've a gift with originality. The
boot can hold pencils or cigaret-
tes when it's empty, making it
twice as useful.
The house that makes It also
Dackages a fine shaving soap In a
flat, horseshoe-shaped clear glass
container that's grooved ready
! for new-use as an ash tray.
For the man who travels a lot,!
there
p".
able squeeze bottles containing
shave lotion, talc, cologne, spray .-. ^
deodorant, brushless shave cream ( ) / l f
and halrdresslng. And there's plenty of room for a razor, tooth-
check.
Few women would he so brave
as to march Into a store and buy
a man a hat for Christmas. Even
fewer women know what a tele-
scope crown Is or how men's hat
sizes run.
The solution, then, lies in a hat
gift certificate that will allow a
man to cover his pate any way i
he pleases, from a homburg to a
snap brim, from conservative
brown to something snappy with '
a feather in the band. All you |
have to do Is hand it to him.
ere's a new travel kit in a wov- "7 fi 6 P
plaid that holds six unbreak- Jrifocal oLeniei
le smieeze bottles containing '
Mi
ippt
brush and other essentials. y~) i An c~j
A lighter Is always a good gift provide I lew ^Tocui
for a man. When it's a butane '
i lighter that boasts a disoposable
butane cartridge good for more
than 'wo thousand lights, it's a
Merry Christmas indeed. Two

FOOD NEWS
by /na*iC*A f%Kt&Z
A srsssly ntomm et iMhs| st.
DON'T SPEND CHRISTMAS IN THE KITCHEN! Plan menus
ahead, right down to the last detail. Choose recipes that are
simple, easy to follow. Prepare desserts and baked goods, in
advance. That way, you'll have a lot more free time during the
holidays! To help you.with this Christmas gay-but-easy plan,
we've designed a special new Candy-Cooky. It's truly delicious I
Easy to make, filled with chewy coconut, andbest of,allit's
chocolate-flavored! To do this recipe UH justice, be sure to1
use Baker's Breakfast Cocoa, for only, with this quality cocoa
can you get the rich flavor that's so important and the extra-
high percentage of cocoa butter which means more food value.
Keep a can on hand, you'll find yourself using It often and
enjoying it always. And do make these Candy-Cookiesthey'll
be a great new favorite, and a boon to your holiday lelusrel
CHRISTMAS CANDY-COOKIES
3 tbespohs Baker's Breakfast Cocoa -
2-3 cap sweetened condensed mflk
1-t teaspoon salt
1 Mi cups Baker's Southern Style CoQnut
teaspoon vanilla
t
m

-?j
m on very piece of
oiA/ruit>iv silverware)
Start your set v/'
4 TEASPOONS 0^75^
and white-star nd from
KELLOGG'S VARIETY PACK AG
* M m MriM MM
o beautiful.you'll want completa aervio
too! With epoone you gat rappee Ulue-
tratint complete earviee and price bet of
Hue lovely table leer It'a eicluairely
et y led Old Company Plate and guaranteed
by Wm. RogenMff Co.. Meridea, Conn
Senel aaaagr foe thie ntraordinary offer
tb:
KaaWft'e VASwrr ma At10 deliaoue
hoicee of eeven criep cereal a'oritaa
Enjoy em aaytimel
NEW YORK (NEA) For some trousers. They're striped In j
Combine all ingredients and mix well. Drop from teaspoon oa
greased baking sheet. Decorate with bright-cdlote candles.
years now, Gilbert Adrian haslbrown, gray and black while 1 Bake in moderate oven (350F.) 15 minutes. Makes 1 dozen.
The woman in her middle years been one of the best known de- skirt is browh. The stripes appear; vvANT A DIFFERENT FLAVOR TO PERK UP FAMILIAR
who disdains much-needed glas-(signers on the West Coast. again under the brief bolero-ef
ses because she feels they would [ As the enthusiastic sponsor of feet jacket top.
cartridges last the average smok-1 be aging is chasing youth down the shoulder pad he put padded
er a year and the lighter comes the wrong road. shoulders into his clothes even
in satin-finish chrome or in gold
or silver plate.
Getting back to this matter of
shirts, they're a fine Christmas
Actually, she adds years to her when other designers had passed j> i j />/
appearance when the squint lines 'hem by in favor of more na-,0"""' b/'*"J
tural lines.
n a SitiIg W/lPfl
conformist. And this means that
and forehead furrows that re-
sult from poor vision are allow-
giftwhen they're not run-of-the-jed to develop,
mill. No man ever has enough, Also, when she sees poorly, her n takes a wpman with true in-
just as no woman ever has en- movements arc apt to be groping! dlviduality. a real flair or strong
ough hats. and cautious the very opposite i character to wear his clothes, i
An authentic clan tartan pat- of the grace and self-confidence |. A. great many women do wear
Eyes Meet
FRUITS? If you're tired of the graininees of sugar on grape-
fruit or fruit cup, you can get smoother sweetening by pouring'
1 tablespoon of Log Cabin Syrup over each prepared grapefruit
half or each serving of fresh fruit cup a < few minutes before"'
serving. You'll get even flavoring throughout, for the syrup
will penetrate quickly. Sound good? It is good! The menfolk
in your family will especially appreciate this. It's subtle and
not too sugar-sweet. Log Cabin is a heavenly biend of pure
sugar and maple sugar syrups that adds a. rich maple flavor
to every dish. Needless to say. its effect on pancakes, waffles
and French toast will have everyone asking for more. Oet some
today.
tern in all-viscose rayon that's
completely washable makes the
Idenl gift shirt.
tnat characterize the youth she's U}*m eachjseason. thus providing!
striving so desperately to retain.
-CORN
JSLJOYA
\sm
RICE
SAJCI
UMTS. NTT a*.
waifm. ctswcncn
> <
CUfl m*TU m.
For the skin that doesn't like
heavy foundation
TH eo food ealy
a. Canal Dm
1
1
3
.wiwmiffli
When H'a Impartan le loe* your
levelieif o 1-Minuta Meik of
'ond'i Vanishing Creoei. Spread
o-enm laviehfy ever foee. except
eyes. The aeem'i "Keratolylic"
action diiiolvi off atwMrorri dtrt
ond dead skin flakes. After one
minute, rinut off. Right awoy'yovr
kin looks fresher rhrlllnaly soft
touch, perfec* for moke up.
A beer, greasclrss liase
Here's delicate flaltery for
thc skin that doesn't, like
that "made-up" look! A light,
greaseless foundation cream that
holds powder beautifully, give
a soft, naturil Bnish.'Beforo
powder, smooth on Pond
Vanishing Cream lightly. It
disappears instantljr.leaving'
only a sheer, protective GIm.
You'll love the smooth way
your powder goes os .'. the
way it cling for hours'
"Hond't I anukint
Lrtam aites uuh
a imooui,
HaUering
make-up, and
keeps my ikin
toft in any kind
of wenihrr,"
ays the Countess
Jean de Caramon.
KEEPING THE CHILDREN A-
ML'SED on rainy days often pre-
It happens often to almost' sen ts. problems. Rut one mother
the very best testimony to his
"TVVt7iireer"r"heoi'ni7"t Ulent I "^PP"" 01n * almost.-sents- problems. But one momer
If your eyes are beginning to u>^"'m Adrtan.. current t everyone suddenly, In a public we know has a novel solution.
'place, you find your glance is she gives each child a handful
locked with that of a perfect of toothpicks and a bowl of
stranger. Chances ar you react Post's Sugar Crisp. Creating
with embarrassment or with' "animals," "dolls." and "bridges"
downright hostility. !wlth these fluffy kernels of
Into-spring collection come two
suits that make fashion news. A
smoky pink called callrose is used
(left) for a collarless suit done
in rabbit's hair and wool
A short-sleeved jacket has
slotted self-detail in a Grecian
design on bodice, sleeves and
cheese
1 tableepoon cream
Dissolve Jell-O In hot water.
Add fruit Juice and "water and
lemon Juice. Chill until slightly
thickened. Then fold In fruit.
Turn into custard cups or In-
dividual molds. ChlU until firm.
Unmold on crisp salad greens.
Since the stranger's "stare" i puffed wheat keeps them busy
was probably no more conscious for hours. And if youthful appe- soften cream chedsevwlth the
than yours was. until thai mo- tites empty the dish as fast asjcream. Decorate Jell-O with the
ment of mutual awareness. It's a creative imagination does, well., cheese, using a cake decorator
hack Tt' .nd is Xd rth a rS blt unreasonable to scowl at him iwhat could be more tuty of .apr paper cone. Garnish with
and is paired witn a straight \ |f he,d lntruded deliberately better candy substitute than aladditional fruit cocktail, if de-
TvDical of the Adrian siemtiire uPn yur Privacy. wheat cereal with a honey and i sired. Makes 8 or fl servings.
ure I It's also ineffective to hurried- 'sugar coating? Your whole tarn-, ,--,.._-
lly will enjoy Posts 8ugar Crisp!KNOW-HOW IN PRELIMINARx
any time of day. With milk or i PREPARATION makei your
Is tailored wool town suit (right) "Sl
with short trousers. They're not !ly 2nl" ,yom; eyesyou rarely
noticeable at a standstill but do I?1*,*? n timeor to squeeze
become apparent when the wear- orthua weak *ria atbnavlR been
er is In motion.
A slim oversklrt is silt front and
back to permit a glimpse of these
fall a bit, admit It gracefully and
set about correcting the matter.
You owe it to yourself, from a
standnoini of health and safety,
as well as beauty.
A good choice for those in the
caught, so to speak, with your
sub-conscious showing.
There are two positive ap-
proaches to thta situation.
cream they're a wonderful
breakfast cereal, or eat 'em just
as they are for a sweet snack
or candy. Get a box today.
They're dellclousi
work easierespecially ironing.
For instance, when you sprlnkn
your clothes, use a bottle with
a perforated top. If yon done
have one df these, L whjjkj
broom or vegetable brush i
SS1 weie|PJhr.7n.l?r?*; A DELIOHJ* 2LAD FOR! serve. And be* sure the water la
t!t- t -iln *hen*er CHRISTMAS DINNER Is easy to i warm. This way the moisture
yiS >. make when you use Jell-O. wm penetrate more evenly an*
Thenyou wont have to worry | Ti,,,. Ie.UVe Christmas Bellsquickly. You can smooth out
about whether people are looking, can.i^ prepared ahead of time'any wrinkles wlht your hands
at your scriggly hair or mis- t0 ,dd a bright, sparkling note ( this point. Then fold and
mfili*hatw1 si]/***> nA*> will wnn heft!. ______ i.ui. -i.il /. i_ _l------------.***__" .. ... \mL
A good choice for those in the matched clothes: nor will you be to your table. Jell-O Is always Voll- the garments firmly t
40-dIus Eroup is the trifocal lens haunted by the dreadful certain- eas? to digest, and the light. I carefully without wrinkli
Chf.%eii;K?SUcJ?i.?I--:ty tha.La chani* *tan5e, caugl?t tangy strawberry flavor will beSm Sln. An dditlonat w
The Ideal Powder Base Pond's Vanishing Cream
vjL't
pany is featuring in well-de-, you with a jaw dropped lax or iri pleasant contrast to the heavy1
signed frames created with a .the act of nail-biting. foods which are so often predo-
womsn's vanity In mind. its unsureness on such matters mlnant at holiday time. ,
Trifocal lenses are constructed 'that can utterly dissolve your ln-
to do three Jobs for you. the Iherent poise.
makers claim. "The upper main < The second approach Is to take
portion of the lens provides dls- a less belligerent attitude when
tance sight; the center segment lyou discover you've locked eyes
eliminates the blur in the inter- |again. A friendly mile. ai> you
i mediate 18 to 40 Inch seeing ^one; .draw your glance away, can com-
and the lower segment serves for fmunlcate to your fellow sufferer
i reading, writing and other close! that you're feeling a bit silly, too,
I work." Is the way they describe but that you refuse io make an
them. Issue of such a minor matter.
again. An additional way
to speed Ironing Is the use of
Satina in your not'tarch solu-
tion. Women who use It say
CHRISTMAS BELL SALADS ea.erhetithsnnironTh. IK
Ination of sticking and puJUnf
1 package Strawberry Jell-O make, all the difference. You'
1 cup hot water finish faster an* fee* fese fa-
/ cup irv.it juice and water tlsrued
2 tablespoons lemon juice
f'2 cups drained canned Jruit
cocktail
1 package (3 ounces) cream
tlgued because your in will
glide smoothly over the clothe,
It's better for them, tooUs
danger of snag, tears, and
scorches.

- -^ .



SUNDAY. DECEMBER 1. 1851
THE rVOAT AMFRICA*
v* pacific ~25ocLetu

&. ,7, &&~ DJ. &&~ 3521
Anlonson, Mrs. M. J. Davis and
Mrs. A. T. Surkamp were wel-
comed Into the club. Introduced
to the club were Mrs. William
Fitzgerald, guest of Mrs Bach
and Mrs. Jesse Thomas and Mrs
Philip Smith, house guests of
Mrs. Bach's from Puerto Rico.
Mrs. Joseph Avans was the guest
of Mrs. Roger Powell and Mrs.
James Koenig was the guest of
Mrs. Reginald Weber.
An election of officers was held.
Mrs. Harry Newhall will replace
Mrs. Bach as president; Mrs.
Walter Eason will be vice-presi-
dent replacing Mrs. Wolcott
Parmly; Mrs. Terry Salt will suc-
ceed Mrs. Timothy Dyas as Sec-
retary and Mrs. Philip Allen will
follow Mrs. C. W. Hartley as
treasurer. Mrs.. James Reidy will
be the new assistant secretary m
place of Mrs. Roger Powell and
Mrs. Philip Beckner will succeed
Mrs. Claude Stewart as assistant
Treasurer.
Mrs. Robert Douglas presented
a gift of a silver cigarette box
from the club to Mrs. Bach In
appreciation for her work as
President for the past six months.
^Mtlanlic ^Docieti
Box 34, (alun Dif*pl<0H4 QmiiAm 216 r 463
THE DAVID t. MCILHENNT8
ENTERTAIN WITH BUFFET SUPPER
Mr. and Mrs. David C. Mcllhenny of Roosevelt Avenue,
New Cristobal, entertained with a pre-Christmas buffet sup-
per at their home last night. The decorations of the room
and the buffet table were appropriate to the Christmas sea-
son.
i
The invited guests included liamson and Mrs. Norvel Smith
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Peret, Jr.,! as new members to the Club.
Mr. and Mrs. Derek Langman, The visitors for the occasion
Mr. and Mrs. George Splotta. Mr. inciUded Mrs. William Heinecke.
FAUNDES-BLOOM NUPTIALS Miss Silka N. Faundes O.
of Panama was married last Sunday morning in Amarillo,
Texas, to Clayton Leroy Bloom in the Pierce Street Baptist
Church by the Rev. Earl W. Halchltt. After the wedding, a
reception was held at the home of the groom's parents. Mr.
and Mrs. Rex Bloom. They will spend their honeymoon in
Pennsylvania.
MISS JOANNE ELIZABETH FLYNN
FLYNN-FARLEY ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Germain Flynn of Balboa announce
the engagement of their daughter, Joanne Elizabeth Flynn,
to Charles Peter Farley, Jr., sen of Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Peter Farley, Sr., of Saint Louis, Missouri.
Miss Flynn is a graduate of the Canal Zone Junior Col-
lege and received her Bachelor of Science degree from Saint
Louis University in August of this year. Mr. Farley served
in the Corp of Engineers during World War II and received
his Bachelor of Science In Chemistry degree from Saint
Louis University in 1950. He is at present on a fellowship at
the University of Notre Dame doing doctoral atady in Or-
ganic Chemistry.
A late summer wedding is planned.
Rear Admiral and Mrs. Bledsoe des Pereira. Twenty lads will ce-
Entertain With Luncheon lebrate with young Octavio.
The commandant of the 15th
Mrs. McLavy to Join Husband
Mrs. John Robert McLavy. of
Balboa Heights, was among the
passengers Friday aboard the 8.S.
Cristobal en route to join Mr.
McLavy for a visit during the
holiday season with their son-in-
law and daughter. Dr. and Mrs.
John Wilson Clark, of Staten Is-
land, New York.
Jewish Welfare Board Center for ] seven until eleven o'clock at the
Ithe-last meeting of the year and |Guild workshop in Diablo. Re-;
the election of officers. Arrange- freshments and enterti
ments will be made of the pro-
and Mrs. Peter Sekarls, Mr. and
Mrs. Howard E. Clark, Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Wilson, Mr. and
Mrs. Gordon Denson, Mr. and
Mrs. Thomas Barnes. Mr. and,
Mrs. James L. Fernandez, Mr.|
and Mrs. Peter Foster of Balboa.
Also Miss Margaret Dagnal. Miss,
Margaret Mackenzie. Joe Bever-
houdt and Marco Fernndez.
Mr. and Mrs. James Darow
Hosts For Cocktail Party
Mr. and Mrs. James B. Darow
were Hosts last evening for a
cocktail party at their home,
Roosevelt Avenue. New Cristobal.
Christmas decorations were used
about the rooms and on the buf-
fet table in effective arrange-
ments.
Mrs. Wayne Cecil. Mrs. Louis
Kestley. Mrs. Charles Gunnerson.i
Mrs. Daniel D. Driscoll. Mrs.
Donald Blaine and Mrs. Paul Da-j
vis.
The new corps of officers
elected to serve the Club for tht
year 1952 includes Mrs. Walter
Skelstaitis, president; Mrs. Lloyd
Wise, vice-president and Mrs.
Frank Schulta, secretary-treas-
urer.
This year's officers with Mrs.
Jess, Mrs. Walter Bailey and Mrs.
Wuodrow Schmidt, were present-
ed with gifts from the Club
members In appreciation of their
work and interest in the affairs
of the club during their term of
office. Mrs. Henry Taylor made
the presentations.
The members who attended
Included with the hostesses, Mm.
Taylor and Mrs. Bennett, were
(Continued on Page SIX)
Mr. ar
grams for the coming year.
Christmas Party
for Theater Guild
The Theater-Guild will have a
Christmas party for members
and their guests on Friday from
nd Mrs. Van Siclen To
iresnmenis ana "*'"k, Spend Christmas in Jamaica
are being planned to provide a Tfte Superintendent of the At-
gala evening.
Bingo Tonight at Legion Club
lantlc Locks William L. Van Sic-
len, Jr. and Mrs. Van Siclen of
Gatun, will leave tomorrow by
plane for Kingston, Jamaica, to
Bingo will be played tonight at gpend the Christmas holidays
seven thirty o'clock at the Legion and a short vacation. Their
Club at Fort Amador, sponsored daughter,- Miss Lee Van Siclen.
Col. 7)
Curundu Girl Scouts
Celebrate Seventh Birthday
The Curundu Girl Scouts cele-
brated their seventh birthday an-
niversary Thursday afternoon
with aChrlstmasHiarty. Thepro-
i gram opened with an Investiture
i ceremony and skits were present-
ed by e.ach of the four patrols.
After the gifts were distributed
refreshments were served from a
: table centered with a birthday
cake. Mrs. D. F. Snyder, com-
mittee member, was in charge of
the decorations which followed
the Christmas motif.
Girls invested were Judy Cur-
tis, Betty Copenhaver, Georgia
Graham. Betty Hickman. Kathy
Kelesey, Elma Konoplnskl. Senla
Lagassle. Kathy Stressman and
Raleen Melandr.
Other members of the troop
an Art student at Richmond Pro-
I fessional Institute, Richmond,
. Virginia, will go by plane to join
parents For the Christmas
t&on.
and Mrs. Van Siclen plan
to return in January.
PANAMUSICA, S, A.
sjrx-*; -
L i
*
3v
.^Jk^x-
'f--
" "'Hi' '*
Proudly Presents
the Ingenious
EMERSON
CLOCK RADIO
Table Model
Radio. .
Built in Electric Clock Automatically Turns
on Radio and Appliances at Pre-Set Time.
$40.50
PANAMUSICA,S 127 Central Avenue
< LA MODA AMERICANA
Naval District, Rear Admiral and Colonel M. Gordon-Watson other members of the troop
Mrs. Albert M Bledsoe enter- to Leave Iatlbmas Florence Bauchman. Jeanet-
tained with a luncheon on Sat-i Colonel M. Gordon-Watson Eclinion sheila Snvder, Ma-
urday given in honor of the com- the British Military Attache in *^Z$Btitil?Stm. Ma-
manding officer of the U .61.8. Washington..who hasbeen the J Jnda Hosklns,
New Jersey. Captain Francis Mc- house guest of theMinister'|j^ce Hoskins. Mary Walters,
Corkle, USN and distinguished I Great Britain to Panama, Mr. J^-jL Luddv Nadlne Holbrook.
guests at quarters A, 15th Naval Brie Arthur Cleugh.. since Tues-|r^ia Luooy Naame^no^^^^
District Reservation.
SUtes Man-tag*
of Interest in Panama
"Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Neff
announce the marriage of then-
daughter. Gladys Evelyn, to Mr.
Betty Fortune. Janet Stockham,
Wife of Comptroller General
Entertains
Annie Hickman, Linda Morton,
Barbara Bishop, Eileen Kirehner.
The wife of the Comptroller Betsy Allen. Kay Monagan and
General of the Republic, Mrs.
. Henrique de OBarrro, entertained
Aaron Harry Hatch, Jr.. on Frl-lwith a luncheon for a group of
day the twenty third of Novem- her friends at the Union Club on
tter.'ajaeteen hundred, and fifty Thursday, ... ,. ..,,. v. -
one. at Hempstead. New York. ------
Mr. and Mrs .A. R. Hatch and i Fort Kobbe Officers
their son were residents of the | Wive* Club Meets
Canal Zone for a number of. Over seventy five members at- i p.T^asi.nel
years." tended the monthly business: Meeting.of Pedro Miguel
Frances Brandl.
Troop 28 Is under the leader-
ship of Mrs. John Hagborg and is
assisted by Mrs. Maggie Brandl,
Mrs. Roy Stockham and Mrs. P.
M. Holbrook. Mrs. M. t>. Morra -
gen, neighborhood chaiftnan, iris
also present.
i
102 Central Avenue, Panam
JUST UNPACKED
DRESSES m
Cocktail Formis Dressy. Also in Fine Cotton.
BAGS
HATS GLOVES
i
Woman's Club
The December meeting and
Christmas party of the Pedro Mi-
guel Woman's Club will be held
meeting and coffee of the Fort
Octavio Mndez III Kobbe Officers Wives Club on
to Celebrate Birthday Thursday at the Officers Club.
Master Octavio Mndez in will I Mrs. James Retdy and Mrs. Ben-.|;~ --------= SiSi#i
celebrate the occasion of his sixth! jamin Chase were co-hostesses; Monday evening at seven( rty
birthdav anniversary this after-with Mrs. Reginald Weber and,pclock in the parlors of the on-
noon with a "stag" party to be.Mrs. T. W. Mclntyre presiding|ion Church.,
given by his parents, Mr. and at the coffee table.
Mrs. Octavio Mndez G., at the
home of his paternal grandpar-
ents, Mr. arid Mrs. Octavio Men-
tor all occasions.
Rayon LINGERIE
Lace-Trimmed Half Slips
from .................... 1-75
Lace-Trimmed Slips, from 2.S5
Beautiful Panties, from'.... .75
Bras, from.......
Precious
Mrs. William Bach presented; Richard Tetley-Kardos
the new members and the guests,
Mrs. Curtis Grler, Mrs. Stanley


'omen
\rl Wo
f/ulon....
ove
DRIES IN A FLASH
NEEDS NO PRESSING
FEELS LUXURIOUS
pi r\\ ICCC Ldvely sheer, pjeated, fancy
DLV/UJCJ 'Selicate colors.
C^I/IDTC Permanently pleated, for afternoon
delicate colors.
rmanently pi
and evening.
oL inaeri
Nightgowns eGdorgeous pleat"
to Plav Monday
Under sponsorship of the In-
ter-American Women's Club,
Richard Tetley-Kardos. pianist,
.will appear tomorrow evening at
eight fifteen o'clock in a special
concert with the National Sym-
phony Orchestra of Panama In
the auditorium of the National
University.
Balboa High School
to Give Christmas Concert
The Balboa High School Musk
Department will present its an-
nual program of Chdistmas mu-
sic on Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. on
the front lawn of the Balboa
High School Building. The Direc-
tor of Music. Victor Herr. will be
in charge of the program.
Tower Club Meets Tomorrow
The Tower Club of the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke in Ancon. will
hold its regular monthly meeting
tomorrow evening at six thirty
o'clock in Bishop Morris Hall. A
Christmas pageant will be pre-
sented by the children of the Be-
lla Vista Home.
lace, rn latest colors
1, some with-
Klannaoc Beautiful styles,
INegiigeeS some pleated,others
with lace, latest colors.
^ed Jackets S^uuS
w colors to choose.
* Slips Panties
* Strapless Slips too!
HOSIERY. . SHEER. . SHEER!
OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9 P.M.
Remember our Christmas Raffle
$2,000.00 in Prizes
FELIX B. MADURO, S. A.
21 Central Avenue
o Tivoli Avenue
{

i
i
i
1
Captain and Mrs. Rainier
Hosts for Informal Party
Captain and Mrs. E. 8. Rain-
ier of Margarita, entertained last
evening with an informal cock-
tail party and buffet supper.
They were hosts for thirty
guests.
Fort Davis Ladies Club Have
Social and Business Meeting
Mrs. Harrv F. Taylor and Mrs.
William J. Bennett were hostess-
es for the monthly luncheon:
meeting of the Fort Davis Ladles
Club which met Thursday in the |
Fort Davis Officers Club.
Bridge games were played in
! the morning followed with lun-
' \ cheon and the meeting. The win-
Iners of the bridge games were
Mrs. James Jess who had high
score and Mrs. Milo Gardner who
j had second high. Mrs. Albert E.:
Hill won the door prize.
The Christmas motif was used
for the decorations. The lunch-
eon tables held Individual sliver
foil decorated trees. There was
an exchange of gifts by all who
attended the affair.
Preceding and during the lun-
cheon a program of Christmas;
music was presented by a group
of singers and a very talented
pianist, Pfc Donald Krueger, who
I' played several selections. He was
also the accompanist for the vo-,
calists. Corporal Lawrence Moul-
1 ton.'* Pfc Edward Campbell. Pfc
Salvador Luna. Pfc Akrysius Mc-
, Hugh. Pfc Louis DeVrlendt, Pfc
', William O'Shea, Pfc Joseph Gar-
cia and Pfc Rubn Castro. The
" entertainers were from 'D' Com-
pany. 370th Engineer Shore Bat-
talion, Fort Davis.
Mrs. James R. Jess, president,
l presided at the meeting and wel-
comed Mrs. James Quinn. Mrs.
Frederick Little, Mrs. John Far-
irell, Mrs. Charles Slater, Mrs.
Harold Curtis, Mrs. Thomas Wll-
Canal Zone Art League
to Meet Today
The Canal Zone Art League
will meet at 3:00 p.m. at the
oLooi ijour iSlil
for the holidays!
COLD WAVE
Special 7 50
Our rM nm W* ** rn-ai
tovely II Ihrith Xn . .
aa* awn? aMatla after!
APPOINTMENT /-IjZZ
Today! **
Ancon Beauty Shop
LOUISE HARTMAN, Manager
Old Ancon Theatre Bldg.
ARE YOU SAVED >
DO YOU KNOW what the Bible teaches about
your soul and its eternal destiny?
Have you obeyed the gospel?
Evangelist Frank B. Shepherd, formerly of England,
now of Sweetwater, Texas, is just back from a tour
of the continent, and will be in a series of Gospel
Meetings at the
BALBOA CHURCH OF CHRIST
7:0 p.m. Nightly, December 1 through Dec. M
Evangelist F. B. Shepherd
Following the meeting in Balboa Mr. Shepherd will
speak in a series of me?tings in Cristobal, announce-
ment of which will be made later.
You arc in> itcd.
Balboa Church J Christ 0851 Bolboo Road.
LISTEN
TO
SANTA'S
ADVICE:
Give this rich, gleaming
solid silver for the
most cherished
of all Xmas Gifts.
SUernatiorioi tofaf
Make her
Dream come true...
Start wilh a 6 pc.
place selling.
Only a small
down payment
does it!
Ms.- ywr ham nap-font **
the hunt olsttrtmf! Mat
your dHar buy mart...
met batuly, mora auMy,
moi Klual pian. Iff
vfflplt... tima
IiKwwIiomI SltiKnc'
let wr con.enti! aty-
aH ton help yon
start today. All pat<*"*
avKle by Tht Irtariutianal
Sitvar Cawawy i
B* U.S. A.
*8ee Uiesc lovely paneras in oar window display

' (svtioutdwt
NWZtALAMPf*R0PUCT
Shop NOW In air-conditioned comfort.
TAHITI
THE JfWflY MOM
1J7 AVOID THE RUSH USE YOUR XMAS DOLLAR NOWi
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE WE SHALL REMAIN"
OPEN UNTIL XMAS TILL 8 P.M. _______
Peggy Smitji of Balboa
Jt cfirilling (ift...*
from the JArtisl!
From today 'till Christina Eve from 3 to 4
p.m. I will do a portrait sketch FREE
for any child 8 to 18 months old!
DZIECZARSKI Studio
No. 27 46th Street, Apt. 18


PAGE SIX
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1151
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SKRVIC'l
No. 4 Tlvett Are.
Phone 1-tSSI
KIOSKO DE LESSEPS
Putn it I aape
MORRISON'S
No. 4 Pearth ( My An
Pnoae 2-SML
BOTICA CARLTON
lt.M* Meleaeea Ave.
Phone 15Col*.
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
No. M Won 1Mb Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No. 17 "H" StreetPanam
No. 12.17 Coolral AveCore*.
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
ac. eac
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:We.tinghouse Refriger-
ator. $125,00; Mahogany China
Closet. $25.00, Round Dining
Table, 6 chairs, $20.00; Coniole
Rodio and Record Player, records.
$60.00; lomps. odd tables, chairs,
miscellaneous household articles.
House 5516-A Hoins Street. Dia-
blo.
FOR SALE:6 venetion blinds for
12 fomily apartment. $15.00.
House 5255-1. Diablo Hgts.
FOR SALE:Fiesta ware 51 pieces
$28.00. Gold Bond Stemware,
$18.00 0305 Cable Heights.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
Service Personnel and
Civilian Government Employes
F I N A N C I
your new or used car through
GOVERNMENT IMPLOYS FINANCI
CO.
Fort Worth, Texas.
Serving Government Employes ond
Service Personnel in the Canal Zone
for 14 years. With our financing
your insurance automatically adjusted
to U. S. coverqo*.
ARRANGIMINT* CAN II MADE
THROUGH LOCAL AUTOMOBILE
DEALER
MISCELLANEOUS
Do you have oMftkfara problem?
Write Alcohellr. Aawiye*
Bo 2011 Anco*. C Z.
RESORTS
If your dress needs a buckle, cov-
ered buttons, buttonholes, large
eyelets, belt, hemstitching. Go to
to the Lux Building East 34tn St
Apt. 106. Efficient service.
FOR SALE:Large grass rug, 510.;
small bamboo chair, $10. coffee
table $10, end table $5. table
lomp $5, etc. 44th Street No. 22
Apt No. I, Tel. 3-0868.
FOR SALE:Buying or selling an
J^"| automobile? See Agencies Cosmos.
Automobile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-
4721, Ponemo.
FOR SALE:G. E. Radio and record
player. $75.00. Tel. 3134 Balboa.
7 54-A, Balboa Rd.
FOR SALE:25 cycle refrigerator
Frigidaire with 2 yeor guarantee,
$175.00. Call Mueblera Ideal,
Rio Aboio. Tel. 3-1216.
FOR SALE:New 5' x 61' Peruvion
Llama rug. Phone Curundu 7200.
House 2036-C.
FOR SALE:8 cu. ft Westmghouse
refrigerator. 60 'cycle, over 4-
year guarantee. Coco Solo. House
323-C.
Help Wanted
WANTED:English speaking moid
to do housework, cooking, laun-
dry. Live in. Apply Sunday Los|
Cumbres, end of 4th St. No. 413.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Special end-of year offer
Sanitary earthenware "Cloyco"
Toilet Bowl, ham $10.00.
Complete toilet in white and ce-
lan from $26.50.
Woinbaiint in white and calen
from $16.50.
Clay Product Ce.
Phillips. Oceanside cottage, Santa
Claro. Bom 435. Balboa. Phone
Panamo 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
Williams Santa Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedroom. Frlgldalra, Rock
go range. Balboa 2-3050.
Gromllch'i Sonto Cloro beoch-
cottages Electric Ice ooxes. gas
stove, moderate rote. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR SALE: 4-door Nosh Sedan, . y.. , __ T,', ,.n,60
new tires, excellent condition.
Phone Gotun 5-126.
FOR SALE:1951 Chevrolet Con-
vertible with Powerglide, radio
See Frank Alemn, Smoot b Pa-
redes. Tel. 2-0600, Panama.
FOR SALE:Fiat convertible Coupe
plus inventory of spare port
$495.00. Coll 86-3)90.
Americans Clothe
Chinese Refugees
HONG KONO (U.P-> Hund-
reds of refugees from Red China
will be kept warm this winter by
clothing and bedding donated by
American school children and
missions and agencies in the u-
nited States.
ARMY-NAVY b CIVILIAN
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYES. YOU
CAN SAVE MONEY. Receive fast
service. Take your car anywhere In
the world. Specify FEDERAL
SERVICES FINANCE CORPORATION
(Washington, D. C.) at your finance
company. Available through your
automobile dealer or direct from our
offices ot No. 29 Francisco De La
0sa I Automobile Row). For
information call Dan Pagento, No.
2-4555.
FOR SALE:Cheap transportation
1936 ply. Runs every doy $65.00.
2123-A, Curundu, phone 83-
4176.
FOR SALE:1931 Model A Ford 2
door sedan. Runs okoy. Tires ond
bottery good. Sealedbeom head-
lights. First $100 drives it away.
House 0253-8, Gamboa. Phone 6-
256.
Sealed bid, in triplicate, will be re-
ceived in the office of Engineer-
ing and Construction Director.
Panama Canal Company, Bolboa
Heights, until 10:00 a. m. Jan-
uary 28, 1952 and than opened
In public, for furnishing oil plant
tools, equipment, material, lobor
ond services and for performing
all work for construction of:
Project No. 1 Paraso Town-
site Extension
Project No. 2 Ancon Townsite
Extension
Pro(ect No. 3 Dioblo Heights
Townsite Extension
Project No. 4 Balboa Townsite
Extension
Project No. 5 Rough Grading
and Storm Sewer Drainage System at
Summit
Bid schedules, forms of proposals,
specifications, and full particulars
may be obtained from the office
of the Contract and Inspection Di-
vision, Room 336, Balboa Heights.
(Telephone 2-3739 or 2-2698J.
Specifications and drawings will be
issued on a deposit of $25.00 per
et for each Project or $100.00
for all. Deposit will be forfeited
if specifications and drawings are
not returned within 30 days after
opening of bids.
The shipment, comprising 1,028 FOR SALE:1950 Ford V-8. two
bales, was collected under the
auspices ot the National catholic
Welfare Committee and arrived
here aboard the Danish motor-
ship Lexa Maersk. It Is being
( distributed to Chinese children,
Indigent^, lepers and
door, radio, undercoated, occes
sories. Bolboa 2-3582 morning or
Panamo 2-0972 ofternoon.
who left their possessions behind
when they fled from the Com-
munists.
Refugee families moving on to
Formosa have been outfitted for
the winter journey and the re-
mainder of the shipment will be
distributed locally.
An rea baking far a used corf
Somethinf fooe at a (ait price?
refugees Came ta AuteUnela Na. 13, 4th
Missouri ranks 11th among the
itates In production of mules.
Deputy Makes Arrest
With Greatest Ease
DEADWOOD. 3-D. Dec. 15 (UP)
Deputy Sheriff Lloyd Schultr
was sitting In his office chat-
ting with a visitor.
As they talked, a police ra-
dio message came in from
Belle Pourche, 30 miles away
describing a man wanted for
lorgery.
Schultz didn't have to get out
of his chair to make the arrest.
The wanted man was his vi-
sitor, John Berschlde.
"It was the easiest arrest of
my career," Schultz said.
Old Testament Treasure
Exhibited In Chicago
CHICAGO (UP.) The Jar
that protected the oldest known
manuscript of the Book of Isaiah
for an estimated 2.000 years la on
exhibition at the University of
Chicago's oriental institute.
The container was one of the
Jars uncovered by two Arab shep-
herd In a cave south of Jericho
five years ago.
Their contents, known as the
"Dead Sea Scrolls." are kept at
the Syrian Orthodox Monastery
of St. Mark In Jerusalem.
Historians, and scientists be-
lieve the old testament manu-
scripts were cached in the Jer-
icho cave for safe-keeping before
the Roman occupation of Pales-
tine In 88 B.C.
The University of Chicago dat-
ed the scrolls with Its "atomic
calendar" as about 2.000 years
old, adding about 1.000 years to
the history of the Hebrew Bible
of July Avenue.
eat uiod car far laee money.
WANTED
'Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:International Horvester
Freeier, slightly used at bargain
prices. Ci. Alfaro S. A. Panama
No. 28 Peru Avenue. Ponamo
City. Tel. Panama 3-0301.
DO IT THE EASY
(ond ECONOMICAL WAY)
If you are too busy to write to
publishers, if you don't like to pay
higher-than-published prices, if you
don't wont to bother with buying
drafts or money orders ask us
to get the technical, professionol and
business books you need. We re-
lieve you of all the detail, tupply
fresh copies of latest editions ond
do it all ot a soving to you. Just
WANTEB:-1950 Cadilloc 61. 4:,i,t ."VlT",* ,nd !e" u5 whot v~
doors or Oldsmobile 98, 4 door. I.T'- And f/ 3d me0sure'
cash, duty free. Writ. Mr. R. H. [f T*Z SUkbscr'p,,0n ,040ny ""
gonne for business, profession or
home new or renewal.
Box 134 Panama,
WANTED:'47 f '48 Studebaker
4 door sedan, with radio, color
block, in good condition. Uphold-
er 286, Ancon.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
ALHAMMA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished opart-:
ments. Mild service optional. Con-1
oct office 8061. I Oth Street. New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT:Aportment in concrete
residence, consisting of living-
room, bedroom, patio, $45.00
monthly. Urboniocln LA PRA-
DERA, Sobonas,'. Tel. 3-2796 op-
posite SoitftW' Station, Porque
Lefty*.,9" 9
ll i | yilivt ii.il |V____________
it is actually cheaper
to buy a
P.r.l. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to tccept any other
as a Gift.
Besides Protection Against
Injury, they save many
times their value in cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
Atlantic Society...
(Continued From Pan FIVE
Mrs. John Wiggs. Mrs. Jarnea
Scarborough, Mrs. Eldon Mitch-
ell, Mrs. Margaret King, Mrs.
Frank Schultz, Mrs. Boylngton
K. Ogun. Mrs. George Kennedy,
Mrs. Mllo Gardner, Mrs. Harry
Green, Mrs. Benjamin Roll, Mrs.
Oustave Kamptner, Mrs. James
Bowman, Mrs. Henry. KnlpperJ,,
Mrs, Samuel Donnelly, Mrs. Wal-
ter Skelstaitls Mrs. George D.
Poole, Jr. and Mrs. Robert J.
Carroll.
Also Mrs. Floyd Wise. Mrs.
John Gllfilian, Mrs. Woodrow
Schmidt, Mrs. Jack Worthington,
Mrs. Pedro Mascaro, Mrs. Louis
Fournier, Mrs. Ovidio Prez, Mrs.
John Sofka, Mrs. John Donahue,
Mrs. Albert Plclrilli, Mrs. Clar-
ence Strike, Mrs. Kerdls Meeks,
Mrs. Truman Bennett, Mrs. Wil-
liam Eyler, Mrs. James Burgh,
Mrs. George Coughlln, Mrs. Jo-
seph Catania, Mrs. Harry Hart-
wig, Mrs. Albert Hill and Mrs.
Clair Wessell.
FORiri'rVEN>o.Purnished apartment;
rMr*|roMVUl diningroom, porch,
BtflfeomVl No. 12 Cub Avenue.
For'iiHfoVrnotion inquire 5h floor.
FOR RENT
Rooms
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, coo1
entirely renovate* and wall fur-
nished. Rate reasomkle. Bache-
lor, only. Inquire ot The Ame-
rican Club facing D.
Park.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery
Aluminum
Awnings
Different
Colors
$14.00
FOR 80OKS OR MAGA2INE5
call on
AGENCIAS STEER, S. A.
Telephone Panamo 2-1219
Moil Apartado 731 Ponema, R. P.
FOR SALE: Bicycle, man', good
condition. House 1479-A, Holden
St., Balboa.
BALDWIN PIANOS
La Caso Muoz (Colon> has ust w* hove ust received o shipment
received o large quantity of paint '' 'he beautiful new Acrosonic lald-
which is practically being given vl
away at the price of $2.50 per
gallon.
FOR SALE:Redio Phono Combino-
tion, 25 cycle. 1 1 tub* Console,
variable reluctance pick-up. 507-
C. Cocoli. Phone 4-139.
FOR SALE:Eastman 16 mm pack,
film movie camera, looks like new,
on excellent Christmas present ot
a bargain price. Phone 2-3303,
Balboa.
oienec.
L. F. Garcia, 34th Street
Opposite Lux Theotre. Telephone 3-
4947 3-0672. Panam.-
FOR SALE: Cor Heotor. Stewart
Warner South wind. Used ona
week, will fit any car. $40.00.
Phone 2-2108 1450-B, Owan
St. Balboa.
FOR SALE:Freezer 60 cycle. Never
used, 7.8 cubic feet. House 0788
Apt. K Balboa,
"Saber es Poder"
"Knowledge is Power"
The Registrar of LA SALLE
EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
of CHICAGO _____________
INVITES ENQUIRIES to
CONTACT HIM AT PANA.
JA CITY.
Tel. 2-3246 t a.m. to S
p.m. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Resid-
ence No 1 45th St., Panam.
FOR SALEPedigreed Dog. Son Fco.
Vio Beluario Porras. No. 46.
FOR SALE:Roggedy Anns ond An-
dys. Telephone 3255. House 1516
B. Blalboo. Hinkle.
You won't cotch Santa's helpers
napping;
They've PANAMA GUIDEBOOK for
their mapping.
IF YOU DON'T SEE PANAMA
GUIDEBOOK, ask for it.
If your book or news deoler Is out
of it, he will get more for you.
FERIALOft.,, y.u (emethina dif-
ferent in Chriifmoi gift. Beauti-
ful batea tray painted
M ail and by ancient India* bro-
ten. All. tie,, handkerchiefs,
(carft, Christina cerd by n-
tienal erfittt; dram, hat. Pallaras,
etc. In A.mld. S. batida* the
parking lot of the French le
leer.
FOR SALE:Emerald Ring with two
boquette diamond in plotinum
setting. $225.00. Phone Panoma
3-2351 evenings.
We offer you any kind and size of
lumber, Imported or native, nail
and screws of any description.
Lowest prices. ALMACENES MAR-
TINZ, S. A. North Ave. Tel. 2-
0610 Martin Soso Street Tel. 3-
FOR SALE:Mo*quifo copper and
plosfle mesh "Lumlte," AL-
MACENES MARTINZ. 83 North
Avenue, phone 2-0610. Ptonch-
3 Mortin Sosa St.. phone 3-1424.
RE-OPENS
JANUARY 1st., 1952
Far rce.rvati.in Telegraph ae Wrlle
HOTEL PANAM0NTE
Boqu.tr. Chlrlqul
r tee your Travel Afeat
SPECIAL FLGHT TO MIAMI
Letjvlno December lg. Returning
December 21. $50.00 on* woy.
Contact PANAMA DISPATCH SER-
JOHN FOSTER
DULLES:
(Continued from Page 1)
our dedication, we see that the
Soviet imperialism of today has
set aside "nn entire historical,
era'for the struggle. Stalin has;
taught his followers: "The object
of this strategy Is to gain time In
order later to assume the offens-
ive."
Take first the matter of de-
fense against Red Army aggres-
sion Obviously the Ideal Is a lim-
itation of all armament so that,
in the words of the joint British
French, United totM-Moppsai
now before" the TTnited Nations
Assembly, each nation's arma-
ment will be "adequate for de-
fense but not for aggression "
The hopes and prayers of all of
us should go with that proposal.
But we cannot be blind to the
stupendous difficulties in the
way of achieving the wished for
goal. Therefore, we should have
a practical policy of defense for
use if this United Nations pro-
posal should fall.
There Is such an alternative.
Let the free nations combine to
create a striking force of great
power and then rely more and
more upon the deterrent of that
punishing power, and less and
less upon a series of many local
area defenses.
That means having, at what-
ever are the convenient places,
the capacity to hit Russia'* In-
terior lines of communication
with such disruptive power that
its highly centralized despotic
police state will fall apart.
Russian militarists will not in-
vite that by sending the Red
Armies to capture other peoples'
lands. It must, of course, also be
made clear that that punishing
power will never itself be an
offensive threat or strike except
in retaliation for open, unprovok-
ed aggression. That philosophy
of reliance on the deterrent of
striking power was. Indeed, basic
to the North Atlantic Treaty, as
Senator Vandenberg eloquently
expounded in the Senate debate.
Community punishing power Is
what every civilized community
relies on for the security of Its
residents. We do not post armed
guards, for 24 hours a day. in
every home and stpre. No com-
munity.could afford that.
Today each of the free nations
exposed to Red Army attack is
like a householder who feels in-
secure unless he has. within his
own home, enough visible
strength to resist possible rob-
bery. That Is the kind of protec-
tion upon which nations have
been in the habit of relying, be-
cause the society of nations has
been primitive and unorganized.
But the very magnitude of the
Soviet threat now forces us to
develop a modern type of protec-
tion.
The probability is, Indeed, that
for the last five yean we have
actually had that kind of pro-
tection, without fully realizing it.
During this time, so far as local
resistance was concerned,
Industrias
Panamericanas
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29th Street
Duplicate Bridge Games
At Margarita Clubhouse
The weekly duplicate bridge
fames will be played tonight at
he Margarita Clubhouse at 7:30.
The winners of last week's games
North-South, Mrs. L. E. Cot-
trell and B. Talens, first place;
Mrs. Oarland Orr and John M.|
Pahnestock, second and Mrs. A.
P. Doyle and Sydney Passalague,!
third. East-WestMrs. Henry i
Hartwlg and Mrs, Oust a V
Kamptner, first; Mrs. Walter """
Skelstaitls and Mrs. James 8car-; wAnmNrvrnu n n r. ta
borough, second and Mrs. Joseph The tr fl I?mv u it fit.
ratnnla. nnrt Mm ftenro* n Tne U- 8- Army tS USlng Ideas
Ratania ana mis. uet u. Hevolnnorf k moH^.,, i
MAL L. DODSON, leader cablespllcer In the Electrical Divi-
sion Field Office at Balboa, has received a $10 Empfaye Sug-
Ssstion Award. The^ward was presented by J, Hartley
mlth, Acting Electrical Engineer. Dodson suggested mark-
ing house numbers on certain diagrams to save time In find-
ing the transformer houses which are on a feeder line that
Is in trouble.
Army Borrows Features Of Tepees,
Mongol Tents In New Korea Shelter
developed by the American In-
All persons interested' in play- {"". ** M.on.?! and the EI
! .r. inulta r att.nrf klmos in its effort to provide
troop* sufficient shelter against
severe Korean winter weather.
More than 30,000 five-man
shape and dome top. actually la
anchored, or driven toward the
ground by wind. The conical
shape of the tepee serves the
same purpose.
The hex tent 1* also designed
for windy areas. It la peaked
at the top, like the tepee.,Bnt
hex tents" have been shipped it resembles the yurt in its
greater circumference in rela-
tion to height.
A compact gasoline stove Is a
decidedly better method of heat-
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
flotrl Ft Faaaina
Selling: Brewery, Panam
Cement, Clay Products and
Fuerza y Lu (preferred).
Tel. 3-4719 3-1660
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUILT
Slipcover Renpholstery
VISIT OCR S1IOW-KOOM'
' Alberta Here*
4. r. de la Ona 77 (Autom.bllr Kor)
tree KetlaMte* Pickup DeUvet*
TeL 1-4*21 8:M a.m. to 7:*# em
lng are invited to attend.
Arrivals Aboard the
S.S. Ancon Monday
Mr and Mrs. Worden E. French
of France Field and their sons,t0 Korea and more on the way.
Charles, Worden Earl and Lewis The tent is six-sided, with a lin-
who have been vacationing with lng and a special gasoline stove,
relatives In Vermont, will arrive It Is designed to keep troops
tomorrow aboard the 8.8. Ancon warm when the temperature is as lng than the open fires of the
from New York. They were away low as 68 below zero. Mongols and Indians, and -the
six weeks. The hex tent Is shaped some- side vent for stove fumes is con-
., w7T r. what ,,ke *n lndlan teDee-II In- slderably more efficient than the
Mr. and Mrs. George D. Poole, corporates features of utility | smoke holes of primitive tents
8r., will be among the passen- and comfort found not only in'The Indians had an arrangement
itlng reiawves in Hcne-;the National Geographic Society,
nectady, New York and Phoeb- gog, the tepee and the yurt
us, Virginia.
Mrs. Edna Hale of Washing-
ton, D.C. will be the guest of her
children, Mr. and Mrs. Irl R.
Danders. Jr. and Mrs. Hugh Hale
of Margarita, and Mr. andw Mrs.
are built to withstand strong
winds. The yurt, with Its round
Geese Knocked Out
of Margarita, and Mr. andw Mrs. IV, k A _a,_| D__.
P. A. Hale, Jr., of Pedro Miguel. By MetO! KOOl
smoke.
The hex tent has a ground
cloth to keep out cold winds and
seal in warm air. The Mongols
use rugs for the same purpose.
The Indians stuffed dried grasses
and sometimes buffalo hides a-
round the bottom edges of their
tepees.
The Armv describes as an "out-
standing feature" of the hex
tent an inner lining which pro-
vides insulation and prevents
frost from falling on inhabitants.
Mr. and Mrs. Otho Hanson- EAST GULF, W. Va. (UP i __
Seal of Baltimore, Maryland will A flock of Canada geese made an
arrive to spend the Christmas unhappy landing on a sheet met-
holidays with their son-in-law al roof while they were flying at
and daughter, Commander and night over a coal mining camp Many Eskimo Igloos have an-
2?'*iW- T ^T^ ot the Nava,near here. ,lmal skin linings that to the
Station, Coco Solo. Six of the floundering honkers same thing. They provide an air
r e ,,"."... ',1.... 'were Injured, one so badlv thatispace for insulation and they
gg ft*.?*!!?*'* ygff..... he was cared for by state conser-1 prevent drip on the occuoants.
HThVc^tTas*mot.f,ws0sed S22RaS^feS-52 Sf ^ ^ ^^ *"' ^ "n
REPAIRVenetian Blinds.
MAKECornices it Curtains.
PAINTFurniture.
Work Guaranteed.
I TALLER CEDEfiO
#23 Per Ave. Tel. 3-1066
me ynreniaa muni was uncu im.r...ri _ i.u- ta;n A~. lB
elaborately in the decorations of 1"oeratea on a ltKe tw days lat-
1 the rooms and the side tables at| u. ............. _*i_ . .u
the Coco Solo Officers Club for' Th* cs"*a.1.?l "ter8^d
the meeting and luncheon of the &apparently mistook the
Coco Solo Wes Club of which | oodllghted roof for a pond.
Mrs. T. L. Applequlst and Mrs. ~r t- ;------------.
W. D. King were the hostesses.! Pnrifir Snnotv
Mrs. W. W. Bemls, president,! r UV,,M*' JUtlciy. .
was in charge of the business! 'Continued From Pace FIVE)
meeting which included the elec-.
tion of new officers. She wel-
comed (he new members, Mrs. L.
G. Boston, Mrs. C. W. Olbbs, Mrs.
SeHSATI0HAt0FHR'\
tit tWaiiaG itn I COUCH DCSISTA!
IfiOHlaC BOflR0CO.lt-
other use. They keeD the snow of -
the igloo from melting too ra-
pidly on the Inside.
In construction, however, the
army tent and the shelters of the
Indians and the Mongols differ
widely. The hex tent is like the
familiar army pyramidal tent,
suspended from a center pole and
held in shape by staked guv lines,
by the American Legion'. Cash Its material is cotton twill,
prises will be awarded winners, i The tepee was covered with
buffalo hides, sewn together and
W. E. Thompson and Mrs. E. W.ls**e Christmas Cards i stretched over a framework of
Bcott. ifor Afflicted Children I poles angling in from the cir-
The cook book, prepared for The Benevolent and Protective cumference and tied together
publication by the Officers Wives1 Order of Elks in Balboa requests'near the top to form a cone.
Club of the Coco Solo Naval Sta-jthat all used Christmas cards be The yurt is built up from a
tion, 1961, la just off the press saved and turned over to them folding, latticelike framework
SAVFS 1*r IRONING TIME!
Pint all sUndarJ five Ironing boardf.
Only $3.75 each
2 fOf $7.25 Postpaid
Get one for yourself.
Give one as a Xmas Gift.
Limited Quantity. ORDER NOW.
Send Money Order to
Dunmore Agency
Estafeta InsVtuto Nacional
Panam, R. P.
m&
'y#$i
and the first copies were distri-
buted at the club. The book in-
cludes recipes given by many la-
es who have left the Station
r scattered parts of the world.
Much credit must be given to
Mrs. Thomas Greenwood of
France Field who was instru-
mental in preparing and respon-
sible for its publication.
The officers elected for the en-
suing year are Mrs. Roy Nielsen,
president; Mrs.' J.F. Barlow, vice-
president; Mrs. Michael Leahy,
secretary; Mrs. Davis Henderson,
treasurer. The Board members at
large elected are Mrs. T. L. Kp-
plequlst and Mrs. C. L. Lucas.
after Christmas to be sent to the that forms the walls, while the
United Cerebral Palsy Association i top is made of wooden wands
for the use of children so afflict- bent in ward and attached to a
ed. hoop at the center. Over this
framework is placed wool felt,
Regular Buffet
at Hotel El Panama
The regular Sunday Buffet
will be served today in the Bella
Vista room beginning at she thir-
ty o'clock. Music by Joseph Sudy
and his orchestra will provide
musical entertainment.
held in place by lashings.
Happy XXXmas
Balboa Junior High to Present
Christmas Program
The Balboa Junior High School
will present Its annual Christmas
music program at seven thirty
o'clock on Tuesday evening in the
Balboa upper gymnasium. Wal-
lace Woodruff will direct the
performance. Larry Siegel and
Chris Hearon will be the vocal
soloists.
PET HOSPITAL
42 Via Porrai (8. francisco ltd ,
_ aerte the bridge on the right
Dr. J V. PeraBd I). Veterinary
Henri: ( a.m. II noon 3 p.m. I o a
Phone MI29 Panama
P.O. Bo SI5 Panam
could have picked up their two
most coveted prises, Germany
and Japan: Something held then
back.
incredible destruction. Thus, the
free world has, I believe, been
getting the security of deterrent
striking power.
So long as the Red Armies re-
main Internationally unlimited,
uninspected and uncontrolled
and at the service of a group that
proclaim* Its goal of world con-
quest, there is need to develop,
consciously, dependence on pun-
ishing power as the means of
community defense against di-
they rect aggression
Viet.. No. 7, 4th of Jury Avenue. The most reasonable explana-
oppotlt* Aneoo Bui Stop. Telephone'tion 1* that the rulers of Russia
Ponoma 2-1655. iknew that If they Indulged In this
FrtR cA|c;~ ... open asgresilon in any area of
.5 * W- Caterpilior,vital concern to the -United!persuading the Russian
by
It 1* the only method which
meets the test Of being efficacious
throughout the entire 25,000-mile
line of possible Russian attack.
It is the only method of doing
so at a cost which can be sustain-
ed oevr the years. As such It Is
more eloquent than any words In
leaders
treaty we that they have come to the end
DtMtJ 0*"*rbtof unit. Completely states or which
overhoi.erl 1000 ft. wolk-in-Cool- were bound to defend, their sour- of the road of aggression and
.r w.th- <>ep freeze comportment. Ices and means of power in Rus- should accept limitation of arm-
87-7140. ,ia would have been visited with ament.
Gatun Civic Council to
Sponsor Christmas Parties
The Gatun Civic Council will
sponsor several entertainments
for the residents of Gatun and
their friends during the Christ-
mas vacation.
The first of the series will be a
children's party at the gym. De- Mr. Jack G. Craft
cember 22, starting at 6:30 p.n| Visiting Arey Family
for children from infancy to and
including the sixth grade stu-
dents. There will be entertain-
ment provided and refreshments
will be served.
The second party for the teen-
agers will be in the nature of a
dance at the gym to be held
Thursday night, December 27, at
8 o'clock. Refreshments will be
served.
Entertainment for everybody
and all ages will be provided
Wednesday, December So, when
the Civic Council will sponsor a
motion picture show at 8:00'p.m.
In Gatun Clubhouse Theater. At
this time also the winner of the
outdoor house decoration prize
will be announced and the prize
presented. The Judges will meet
Christmas night at 7:30 to make
their decision for the best dec-
orated house.
Burial Of Mrs. Burke
To Be Held Monday
At Corozal Cemetery
The burial of the late Mrs.
Noami Charles Burke, 99, who
died last Thursday night, has
been transferred from the Jar-
din de Paz to the Corozal Ceme-
tery on Monday al 12:30 p. m.
Mrs. Burke Is survived by five
daughters. Francela, Pearl, Te-
resa, Maria and almona; three
sons, John Simon and Armando,
and 15 grandchildren.
Wr. Jack G. Craft of Ander-
son, South Carolina, will arrive
today to visit through Christmas
with his daughter and her hus-
band, United States Embassy
Public Affairs Officer William G.
Arey, Jr.. and their two sons at
thei-homein Paitilla.
BRISTOL, Tenn., Dec. 15-
(UP) Douglas Slagle, 39, ar-
rested on a drunkenness
charge, pleaded for mercy In
city court here today en the
(round* that he had "spent the
ast five Christmases in Jail."
The judge tempered justice
with the holiday spirit and
sentenced Slagle to a term
ending on Christmas Eve.
Fair EnougTl
WATER VALLEY. Miss. (UP)
.Sign on a gas derrick: "Unne-
cessary Profanity Prohibited."
Teeth Go Begging
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (U.P.)Chic-
ago and Southern Air Lines lost-
and-found department reported
six sets of unclaimed false teeth.
Sunday Crossword Puzzle No. 403Ralease Oct. 14
Herewith find solution to Sunday Crossword Puz-
zle, No. 403, published today.
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DMnMM* > Kin reauroj roateat



SUNDAY, DECEMBER II, 1951
i i. in r..... .....
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE SEVEN
Warner Bros. Film On Moonlight Bay'
Stars Doris Day. MacR ae At Balboa
No Complaints From Paul Douglas
BRIAN YOUNG
LILLI MARLENE has been captured by the Nazis and is be-
ing held for use in their propaganda operations, in this scene
from the romantic drama which bear the tltje of the war-
time song which Inspired It. Lisa Daniely, In the title role,
is co-starred with Hugh McDermott in "Lllll Marlene," Mon-
arch Production at the Central Theater which is distributed
by RKO Radio. The picture was directed by Arthur Crabtree.
With popular song stars Doris
Day and Gordon MacRae in the
leading roles, Warner Bros, has
put on film another of Its popu-1
lar musical comedy stories In
hthe new Technicolor film. "On
Moonlight Bay," which opens at
Balboa Theater today.
Set against a background of
collegiate Indiana Just before
World War L "On Moonlight Bay"
is a whimsical and youthful co-
medy with plenty of nostalgic
singing, dancing and laughs to
please the most avid fan of light
motion picture fare.
Doris Day, has been brought
back, together with MacRae, to
follow two previous n popular
smash hits. "The West Point
Story" and "Tea For Two." In
this, she la a pretty but torn-boy
type gal who Is more interested
In baseballuntil college student
Gordon MacRae turns up. To-
gether the two fashion a number
of song and dance melodies, and
love comes along. Father, how-
ever, leans toward Jack Smith,
who came from radio popularity
for this role, as a son-in-law who
has a good job.
On Graduation Day, MacRae
Is revealed as heading for war,
and Pop relents to allow the lov-
ers to wed and have a honey-
moon before Gordon ships out.
Drama Vies With Romance At Central
As 4Lili Marlene' Unfolds On Screen
Paul Douglas Is a friendly, i years old, and played Shy lock in
The production values of on irtown.to earth feUow wltn B re. a urammar school produotion of
Action, packed with romance
^accented with comedy and tense
with drama, vitalizes Monarch
Productions' "Lllll Marlene,"
starring Lisa Daniely and Hugh
McDermott.
With many scenes set In Hw
blazing heat of North Africa, the
film takes the audience also to
war-torn Berlin, post-war Lon-
don, and gay but little-known
nitrht .spots of Cairo.
Lovely screen newcomer Lisa
Daniely makes her debut in the
title role as a "lrl who was the
I sweetheart of the famed Eighth
I Army Desert Rats, and whose
| song that hard-f Uchtlmr machine ,
took Into battle with It.
Inspired bv the popular war
song which Elves it Its title, "Lllll
Marlene" is the strange drama of
a girl who was said to have work-
ed for both sides during the pasj
war but who was. in reality, a
courageous patriot, loyal to the
man she loved despite the fact
that she believed him married to
another woman.
William J. Gell produced and
Arthur Crabtree directed the film
distributed by RKO Radio. Prom-
inent parts are played by Rich-
ard Murdoch. Leslie Dwyer and
!Estelle Brodv. the latter re-enact-;
ling her acclaimed cheracterlza-i
tion of the mademoiselle In "Ma-
I demoiselle from Armrntipre."
|The orlglnali story Is by Leslie
Wood.
ir: HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKlNE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
Moonlight Bay" are said to rank fre8hln(f outi0ok. He talks freely
I with the best musical*the.Bur- and mterestlngly on a wide va-
bank. Calif., studio has present- rlt of subJects and doesn.t
ed In years. Six numbers, moat LmAtW.
of them familiar favorites, In- c
You, Too, Can Dance, Toot,
Fight Way To Film Stardom
HOLLYWOOD. Dec. 15 Want
to become a Hollywood actor?
First star as a dancer, singer, co-
clude, in addition to the title
1 song "I'm Forever Blowing Bub-
I bes." "Till We Meet Again" and
"Tell Me." The new number,
| written especially for the film
and already up with the nation's ti
; top tunes, is "Love Ya." Roy Del sometnln different. What's
i ----- Ruth directed, while LeRoy Prinz, tt compialn about?"
such nroductlons as "Show Boat" h?ndled the4 d?,"ce numbe"' a11 He first became interested
sucn proauotions as enow oat : witn an eye to the warm and me-
and "Lovely to Look At. lodlc atmosphere of the day.
June Haver, signed by 20th wnen lonff crta on he glrU iur
"Why should I?" he asks. "I've
never had it so good. Good wife,
good home, good climate, good
pay and a good kind of ex-
citement and satisfaction in new
roles that always seem to bring
On The Records
"The Merchant of Venice." He'
continued to appear in high
school productions and. upon
graduation, haunted repertory
theatres, where he Jjad both !
major and minor roles i.i innu-
merable productions^3WhfflC^r' EW YORK. Dec. 15 (U.P.)imot'on pictures,
found himself unaWeotoUmd ajazz collectors who go prowling! Alan Young is his name,
orofesslonal acting joboSWavi- ar0und used record stores trying! Being a television star doesi
tated to radio announcing. The j to find, out-of-print discs of;i
result was a successful and lu
HOLLYWOOD 'NEA Be- cessful play." Judy says. Billie
hind the Screen: The video tubes!was great for me. but I like to
will crack and the micro-wave think that I'm a versatile actress
relay will sputter, but a blg-tlme who can play a variety of roles."
| TV star confessed today that he'd
like to do less television and more
The fan-ma? scribblers have
been instructed that they can
ask Fernando Lamas every ques-
tion but the $64 one: "Are you in
the sad-faced 'love with Lana Turner?"... Bet-
median, boxer, saxophone play-1 Century-Fox as a singer and w,ny -em the college lads, bicy-
- dancer, was ma I chance at cleg buUt tor tw0 teleles and
er, pianist or anyone else who
performs publicly.
Man; of today's top personal-
ities got their chance In movie-
land because of some specialized
talent in another medium.
The stars of 20th Century-
Foxs' Technicolor musical "Gol-
den Girl," for Instance, were all
above-average In other field be-
straight acting In her first pic-i_traw
ture, "Home in Indiana," and Is 0Dera
now co-starring with another
former stage dancer, Dan Dal-
ley. in "The Girl Next Door."
Marilyn Monroe, featured in
"Love Nest" and "Let's Make It
Legal." became an Outstanding
photographers' model before the
fore producers "tapped them on studios eyed her for films.;
the shoulder. Mltzl Gaynor was Joanne Dru also posed for stilt
a ballerina in such operettas as pictures until Hollywood realized
"Song of Norway" and "Naughty!she would be Just as attractive!
Marietta"; Dale Robertson was a|ln action. Her portrayal in "Mr.
successful professional boxer, I Belvedere Rings the Bell" won
and Dennis Day's prowess as a;her the lead in "Return of the'
singer and comedian was widely Texan" opposite Dale Robertson,
recognized. Paul Douglas skipped from
playing professional football to1
Buddy Baer, who has an lm-sportcasting before his debut on
boaters were
operating equipment.
1 The
standard
story of "On Moonlight
Bay" was taken from Booth
Tarklngton's famous Penrod ser-
ies read by thousands.
acting when he was thirteen wanted most.
portant role In MGM's "Quo Va-
dla," Is the brother of former
heavyweight champ Max Baer,
By BEN COOK
HOLLYWOOD (U.P.I Horace
Broadway in "Born Yesterday."
Now he's a Hollywood regular. Qreeley originated that old saw
Walter Jack Palance. former' about going west, young man.
BALBOA
TUESDAY
"| DECEMBER 18
(RitJi J 1 CURTAIN 8:00 P. M.
TETLEY CARDOS
and was a ring headiiner In his pugilist, was brought to Holly-!oene Nelson did not pay any at-
own right. Oscar Levant, now wood by 20th Century-Fox for tention to Greeley's advice.
appearing in "The I Don't Care|"The Halls of Montezuma" and He went east. On the third
Girl" with Mltzi Gaynor. parlay- /'Panic In the streets." and now ^p ne ended up as a movie star,
ed his piano plavlng Into pnrt|shuttles between the movie cap- Nelson's round-about method
playing. Rudy Valley rode to film Ital and Broadway. oi becoming a screen star start-
fame on a combination of croon- other stars who first twinkled ed wheTli t8 a youngster from
ing and saxophone tooting. In other skies before brightening santa Monica. Calif., he went to
Leslie Caron. who stars with,films are Bing Crosby. Martin,New York witn Sonja Henle's
Gene Kelly In "An American ln.and Lewis, Red Skelton, Robert 8kaUng txouple. Stardom did not
Paris." was a Parlsianne dancer Merrill, Alan Young. Dinah beckon after this first trek to
when Gene spotted her. Now she .Shore and Frank Sinatra. Hol-;New yorJl bUt tne Army did.
is getting an all-out bulld-iip at
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Marge
and Gower Champion, at the
same studio, have leapt from
lywood Insiders predict that when Trip j0; 2 occurred after World
Golden Girl" is released Mltzl ,War jj xhjg tjme aene was fea-
Gaynor will Join this select clr-,tured ln ..jt Happens On Ice" at
cle, one of the youngest ever to
nightclub dancing to top spots In do so. She Isn't 21 yet.
Beauty And The Feast




the Center Theater in New York.
He returned to Hollywood under
contract to 80th Century-Fox
studios. There he was given sev-
eral small parts, including one in
which he was June Haver's danc-
ing partner. The energetic Nelson
needed more action, and he ask-
ed for his release.
In New York Again
Then Nelson Joined a group Of
young actors and actresses in
producing their own show. "Lend
An Ear," at a Hollywood theater.
After four months the show mov-
ed on to New York, where Nelson
was acclaimed as a bright, new
dancing sensation.
That trip east. No. 3. was the
charm. Warner Bros, signed Nel-
son to a contract and gave him
one of the leading roles In "The
Daughter of Boale O'Gredv "
Sow. a couo'e o* vear and six
ures 1W he Is runkert a
star rnd 1 listen " the exhibit-
or ry?)>* as one of the ton new-
comer.
Current'v >>p ' mpHn the cnl-
n- m"lcal. "he'- Wo^k'"-* wr
Wfi" T*ronh rnnpp w'h Vlr-
ilni *v "i1 Po""''* Re"""!
oroof of tn th's Hwt *"r
voi'M-be movie Hww It bou Id
be, "Head east. "O""" man."
JANE RUSSELL, who carved a permanent niche for herself
as top Hollywood star, prepares to do another good carving
Job on this Christmas turkey. Miss Russell, currently ap-
pearing In Howard Hughes' "His Kind of Woman." will soon
be seen In RKO's "The La Vegas Story."
"--*-* Film P~h
Mow fVimetitors
HOTTYWoor> "><* is fKw-
who o>'" rarer*1" fl"',-v,e-' "lv.
no Tw1'rv eSfW, n*l- 'i "AhO"t
Fce." Warner Pros.* folor mini-
I. pre now competitors at Las
Vpwps. WPWd''
MaeWo \i fllllnrr q. Inwini pn-
vpvnt In the Western W-wn 1 t*n'r* p nt"M club
-.tint at I he Hotel Flm'ngo.
Faltering Philip
ruiaet
Philip' tffe Is filled wttb
Well-worn step and rug be Use
Repairs would tan* his home like new
r A. Classifieds, tat the right clue!
^
c*eve Cvhran Is
New Godfather
fpp Pochrp" cut short an
'--"' -"tlnn and flew back
to Hollywood to be p on*'-**------
1 ph-utenlna of little Marllvn
Darcv Hinton, whose father. Ed-
ward Hlnton. worked with the
star In Warner Pros." "The Lion
And The Horse," recently com-
pleted outdoor color drama.
l-inivtPlandazTbN^ Hutton is introducing Para-
ajcratlve career in this field ai.d.!,st should lift their ears out of of "The Alan Young Show." "' njunt dance 6llreetor Charles
at the same time, a stepping- the dust ion? enough to listen to more important when your name O Curran around town as my
in I stone into the acting career he a new m-G-M album. "Dixie- |te up there on movie-theater next husband.
lonrt vnvorites" nlaved bymarquees^ too. -----------
Preacher Rollo gad his Five! "I'm doing a TV show every; Inside reason for Jean Slm-
saints All eight numbers from week now. After I've built an mons'.lump-for-Joy act about her
"Tteer Rae" to "High Society" audience following. I'll do tele-1new RKO contract: She will he
reaK are among the Dixie favo?-.vision only pnce a month so I'll oaId in Uncle Sam's crinkly
fto.1 are rilsnlaved with as have more time for movies." :green. Until now. Jean's salary
m!?rhsku as ever shewn by Alan completed a Paramount has been frozen in sterling in
E of the New OrleansTeats film. "Aaron Slick From Punkln'England.
"PhHstmas In The Air" (Capi- Creek." before the start of the -----------
tl Presents the choral group, winter TV season and now he's Sylvia Gable. I hear, is prepar-
The. Voices of Walter Schumann, working in "Androcles and the ed to wait until gangrene sets in
Er. rnllecUon of 11 -lew and old 'Lion." with "Sad Sack" slated for before she gives Clark a divorce.
Yuletide numbers (filming in the spring. She's ateli.g over the urpr.se
Arthur Godfrey sings and plays
the ukulele with abandon on the
new Columbia album "Hawaiian '
Blossoms." which also features lumbia. Just uttered a big no to
the singing of Haleloki Kahauo-
move that X-ed Clark's name off
Judv Hollidav, who's winding \ the MGM payroll and frustrated
up "The Marrying Kind" at Co- her plan to attach his salary.
lopua.
George Copeland plays an-
interesting and pleasant M-
O-M album of "Spanish Piano
Music" which explores some of
the little known in America
music of six Spanish compos-
ers.
Dinah Shore, who never re-
cords a bad disc, has an especial-
ly Rood one with the torchy "End
of a Love Affair" backed by "Get-
ting to Know You" tor)... Dennis Day sings about
the best he's ever sung with
"Never" from his new film mus-
ilcal "The Golden Girl' (RCA
Victor)... .
joe (Fingers) Carr, whose pia-
no playing Is all WOM COTM
ask for. now comes forth with
some lower-than-bass singing for
a pair of comedy sides that are*
sure to be played over and over
aeain on every Juke o0*- Ce-
cilia" and "Snuggle Bug (Cap-
itol) June Christy does a nice
'lob singing "Daddy" with Stan
Kenton's Orchestra (Capitol)....
Camarata has a pair of DgJJ-
i tiful Instrumental numbers, i ne
Grasshopper" and "Little Jump-
ing Jack" (Decca)... Jack Has-
kell sings well on the K*lrnar-
Ruhy-Hammersteln "A Kiss to
Build a Dream On" (Coral)...
Tex Beneke's Band has a pret- ,
tv good side with "Tennessee
Central" (M-G-M... Composer-
conductor Johnnv Oreen debuts
Jon M-G-M records with a couple
of his own tunes "Hello. My Lover.
| Goodbye" and "Easy Come. Easy
"Ouy Mitchell sings "I Can't;
I'Helo It" and "There's Always
iRoom at Our House" (Columbia).
Erroll Garner's latest piano
! numbers are "It's the Talk of
the Town" and "Robblns* Nest ,
' (Columbia)... ,.
David C Whitney.
the offer of a rsdlo series based; Broadway Producer Lee Sabrn-
on her Billie Dawn character in son's whooping offer to Groucho
"Born Yesterday." Marx to re-team with Chico and
----------- iHarpo for a musical stage ver-
"I have no intention of doing slon of Molieres "The Doctor in
BiUie Dawn and Her Electric Spite of Himself was flatly
Rifle' or 'Billie Dawn In the Balk- nixed. The boys vow they'll never
ans' Just to capitalize on a sue-work together again.
When Michael Crtlz was ask-
en- his honest oolnlo 8*^"' an-
other dl-ectnr. h said: "If I*oM
vou the truth I'd be a hypocrite.
oOo
There's a writer |n town whose
rgent told him he coulr) exnert
a big boost In salary. "I don t
w-nt more monev." he yell-d.
Mv wife doesn't rie<-rve to be
married to a rich hu-band!"
_oOo
Dan Dailey riueht two starlets |
in enrnest discourse. Snid the
first: "I bear Bettv ano js-k are
back together aTan." "Yeah,
.drooled the other. "T tuess ts
Hist one of those Hollvwood dlv- ;
orces that didn't pan out!"
Hnn IVfore ^^"oht
With Chlmnev Down
HOLLYWOOD Dec. 15 The
first big rainfall of the year in
Hollywood caueht Don DeFore
by surprise. Rain poured Into his :
csnvon home through openings;
where DeFore Is In the process,
of constructing a new rh'mney.
The actor dashed off the set of
Warner Bros.' "She's Working:
Her Way Through College" and
headed fot home to cover the,
opening with a tarpaulin Don
managed to avoid serious damage i
to his furnishings.
LUX THE7 R
:' ~w-
'AT 1:30 P. M
(*cronal Presentation
of the Baritone
Mario FARRAR
'i Tbmponied at the
piano by Prof
Hans Janowitx
U.* If.e Screen
A beaut I-i' musical picture!
"MEET MF AFTER THE
SHOW"
(! I'-i-hincoUu 1
CENTRAL
Alan LAl> Phillys C A I. VERT
in -
"APPOINTMENT
WITH DANGER"
CECILIA
ASOTHSB OOt-HI t
M-G M great
RELEASE I
-Battltground''
Also
Van John*.. In
"GO FOR nROKE"
Ethel Birr- mm. Maurice Evan*, in
"KIND LADY"__________
Afraid of Love and Marriage!
The first picture that dares to -.iscuss the v'tal problem that
ruins thousands il youri couples lives .. I
"A MODERN MARRIAGE"
A PICTURE FOR ADUL'.S'
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air ( nnrtiiionrd
TWO rU'HNICOLORS!
Van Heflin Yvonne
Oi Carlo. In
"TOMAHAWK**
Audle .Vi.urnhjr Marguerite
Chrpman. In
"KANSjAS RAIDERS" .
r//OL/ THEATRE
SPANISH DOUBLE PHOC.RAMI
risa Ac'''" Jorge Mlatral
- in -
"AMAR III SU PECADO"
GulliTTlna Grin, en
BURLADA'
CAPITOLIO THATU
A Great Double Program
In Technicolor!
Jama Maim Ava Gardner
in -
FANDURA AND THE
FLYING DUTCHMAN"
Esther William, in
PAGAN _10Vr^SONC.^_
VICTORIA THEATRE
' "TAltZAN AND THE
SLAV* GIRL"
"TAR/ANTS MAGIC
FOUNTAIN"







CROSS-FIGURES It's A Trick ITS A JIGSA W WORLD In Proportion CAN YOU TOP IT?
P)R an exhibition of "Sleight-
of-Hand," fold a sheet of pa-
per Into nine squares. Write your
name In the middle one. Now
carefully tear the square* apart,
and, without folding them, drop
them into a hat.
Invite someone to shake the
hat and to blindfold you. Then
you reach into the hat, and with-
out any difficulty, pick out the
piece of paper on which your
name la written.
How la It done? Every square
of paper, with the exception of
tne middle one which bears your
name, has at least one smooth
edge. The middle square has four
uneven edges.
Puzzling Moves
.
D
3
D
? [
AN artist says the proper pro-
portions for a girl are: The
waist la twice the diameter of
the neck, the neck la twice round
the wrist, once and a half.around
the wrist la once around the
ankle.
Then If a girl'a waist measure
la 24 Inches, what is her ankle
measure ?
-ooqaai auiu t| 1J :iO|i|os
Missing Figures
FtOal the figures that are
given, deduce which digits are
represented by the < X's in this
problem in multiplication.
XIX
sxt
By Jessie R. Smith
ACROSS
I. 1 have six half-brothers, four half-sisters, two
full sisters. How many children In the family?
8. How many letters in Tennessee's capital?
4. Foic little ourcaucrats, then came a drive
Aimed at economy, and then there were .
8. Seven hours of minutes.
7. "Among men, In seven shaves dally."
8. A red silk star on a postman's sleeve Indicates
that he naa been how many years in the service?
9. The boss: "Okay, you can have the day off to
celebrate your silver wedding, but 1 hope that I am
not going to have to put up with this every
years."
II. Whale feathers.
12. Washington's rating in peace, in war, and In
the hearts of his countrymen.
14. Parla claims to be how many thousand years
old?
15. For how many months of the year are oysters
supposed to be In season ?
16. "Spirit of ."
DOWTS
1. Number of horns on a unicorn.
2. The letter "f must always be Inches long
because it Is one-fourth of a foot!
8. Meek me at , l"U treat you to torne,
And when I leave you at the door, it wilt not
be after
i. if Instead of fretting you balance up your take,
you'll find moat times you're getting a break.
8. Legal age in most states.
7. The answer to ray prayer:
yon are the only on earth with whom I want
- be
You are the only in life that means so much
me.
10. At this sge, one has lived 11 years, 'ti said.
18. If every golf ball you shot went straight
enough snd far enough, what would be your acore
for 18 holes?
16. About 1, 7. 20. or 90 per cent of the juice fed
into the average electric light bulb is used to make
light?
17. " alim allck aycaraore saplinga."
ii !i
ftCl 'ISfll T1II "K osuo* "tos r.i
II :U*mT 11I '111 * II 'III-tl '011 fla
,J, .,i -Ur-i V-? S-t tt-l :"~v :**
cD
>qt| Mata xsx 8X2 X X X 5
1X8X80 iqinoo 00441 OAf OUO ) OMl )Ut|* OOJW lui as tuo muj :jj*tuv
1 z 3
"'-"


4
'' .'
1


5
-
Nc
jow in fairly common usage. SNAFU first gained
currency as a word Ui the military services dur-
ing World War II. Its letters initialed the words:
"Situation Normal, All Fouled Up."
Similarly, SUSFU signified "Situation Unchanged;
What's Wrong Here?
YOU can Improve your game
solving posers like this one.
White moving up the board, is
to move flrst and win In four
moves against any defense of
Black. Note that Black has a
king on No. 29.
Can you make White win?
< i. nal a pn ft-
M :-( a :- M Vl-lt 8 '-It-st .
UrtZ oib Si-OE MHIM llS
Wits Tester
HOW many fives,' tens and
twenty-fives make 82.80 if
there are equal numbers of all
coins? Can you answer correctly
within a minute.
'uouooiaiouop qooo
10 U|oo ua Kit uu :aa||a]Os
kterm desdlbed a particular situ-
is became quite hopelessly snarled,
utting out and putting together
'the various letter pieces shown
form the live-letter word tbdt signi-
J-plus" situation: And can you give
the five words they abbreviate?
dn pomoj usan ojv otuiqx foiann TuruVA
uaul oqi uuoj o vpvts g ubj tioamSM qj. oo|ia|og
THEY'RE UNDER COVER
POSSIBLY the poet didn't realize it, but the name
of a Biblical city and of two animals appear In
the following lines. They can be found by Joining
two or more consecutive words or parts of words.
Try to locate them.
From the desert t come to thee,
On a stallion shod with fire.
And .the winds are left behind.
By the speed o/ my desire.
Under the window I stand,
And the nudntgut hears my cry.
.(If you want to read the rest of the poem, it's the
Bedouin Song, by Bayard Taylor.)
(Mull qiMl JO ta|quUUQ pa vug
jo pn) o*a :un pjtqil paia :roun puooon non 'lts|*8
Magic For You This h Out Of Gear
*' inV U1S.T nut a n>\v rtxniliir rirrnlnr pout lr
Kiddle Anagram
THE answer to each riddle below must contain as
many letters as there are numbered blanks. A
recurring number will always stand for the same
letter. However, the same letter may be represented
by different numbers in different wordf. Transfer
the letters when found, to the numbered spaces
below and-a legal term will appear. What is It?
Answers
11 1* 8 21
Biddies
Most efficient la-
bor-saving device.
What is it that you
don't want, but if
you had it you
wouldn't sell It for.
a million dollars'.'
A man who is able
to convince both
the rich and the
poor that he can
protect them from
each other .......
An eavesdropper..
What 1 the differ-
ence between gross
and net Income? 12 18 8 6 20 21
Transferring these letters to the corresponding
numbered blanks below will give you a legal term
which means that the husband Is a rotten bridge
player.
16 IS 18 4 1 8 IS 3
12 10 18 19 14 2 9 17 IS 8
7 9 16 9 16 6
1 2 S 4 A
7 8
9 10 II 12 IS 14 16 16 17 18 19 20 21
'llliqurtuiiioai uappiu *aui r*s*i iqj, "
T~"OR a surprising bit of magic,
r take a piece of red, white, or
blue ribbon, one inch wide and
two feet long, and two pieces of
ribbon of some other color, each
ne and one-fourth inches wide
and 25 Inches long. The two rib-
bons of the same color are sewed
together at their extreme edges
to form a flat tube which is left
open at each end. The single
piece of ribbon Is placed in the
tube and one end is left even
with the end of the ribbons form-
ing the tube. Sew across that end
and fasten the inserted ribbon at
that point and your trick is
ready
To perform, take hold of the
loose end of the inserted ribbon.
As you do su. bold the ribbon in
your right hand so the lingers
conceal the tube from which the
single ribbon now hangs down
The back of your hand is turned
toward the audience and only the
single ribbon of one color is seen
Now stroke the ribbon from
top to bottom several times with
your free hand, causing the color
to change. You accomplish this
by taking the crumpled tube be-
tween the thumb and forefinger
and pulling it down over the sin-
gle ribbon.
A T THE TOP
RIDDLE: To what person must
men of all persuasions always
take off their bats?
no ii iniiu uojoq oqj. 14Jm
JOE just put a new regular circular gear In the'
machine that broke down On the gear the 7th
tooth la directly opposite the 23 tooth. So bow many
teeth has the gear? You're supposed to work thi*
out without s diagram. :qw M M ^ ,, TC
-odao ti si -*u* si nmoaoo i tuo nuiu*a*i q->i qi wojomuj
U inoddo ! uo aoul ' ouaodrio ii Mu uum imijaiog
i A-Mazing Problem
REUBEN S. DeLONG designed s new mase thai
may drive you dizzy trying to penetrate it
without getting lost and 'having to retrace part of
your route.
Start at the arrow pointing Inward below and see
if you can arrive back at the other portal, also Indi-
cated by an arrow, without running into dead-enda
THE term "dummy" In a bridge
game usually is literally ap-
plicable only to a male player ,
The female whose partner gets
the bid often is the most loqua-
cious member of the foursome.
Grand slams are made without
playing a card, charges are
EVER thought you could make up better cross-
words than you find In most puzzle corners?
Here's a means or testing your
wits in that direction. You're pre-
sented with a diagram and two
clues. I across Is to be filled in
with a word meaning protection.
I down la to be a word meaning
a member of a band or orchestra.
The diagram Is to be completed
with other words vertically and
horizontally, the object being to
attain the highest point total you
can. Letters will have the follow-
ing values:
1C-J2 M 8 V-4
R 11 U 7 S-3
D 10 L 6 A2
1-9 N 5 C-l
You may use letters not in the
above table, but they have no
point value. Only words to be
found in a recognized English
dictionary permiasable. No proper
names or abbreviations.
You are invited to beat our
puzzle-master's overall .total of
344. His 1 horizontal and 1 verti-
cal to which clues are given
above, totaled 54 and 67 points,
respectively.
When you've done .your besi
compare your results with those
of our puzzle-master, given be-
low, but don't peek prematurely
and spoil your pride of achieve-
ment.
Incidentally, you may count a
letter each time it is used In a
word In either direction.
joiioa op not no.
-oil pa 'utii
am ujuiuinjp nqlu 01 i/i ur.oc!
tU'ftl ppilllUl (OAWP Oil t0J3V
Pum a.jiavui-revnd .-no *>MI1*I*S
Settling A Bet'
AT AN Army recreation hall.
A and B deposits five dollars
apiece with Sergeant C. the
stake-holder, with the under-
standing that the one who won
the first three games of table-
tennis was to have the entire $10
Corporal A won the first two
games and B the next one snd
then they had to quit playing be-
cause of "taps." 8o A ami B de-
cided to divide the 810 In accord-
ance with the number of games
each had won, A taking two-
thirds. $6.67. snd B the other one-
third. 6/1.33.
But Sergeant C. ruled tfce figur-
ing of A snd B Incorrect He said
A waa entitled to three-fourths
of the money. $7 50. and B the re-
maining one-fourth. $2.50. And
e finally convinced the two cor-
porals that his calculations were
correct. How did the Sergeant C
figure It out? os jo
'ft J> nii i>u on Jo nu -joqioSoi
o***i mm OMi ooqi Jl*u ui paimuo
im v JOj*ioqi pao 'jjvio oqi o* oto*
aoja to na fiiitniuoao ouo iin pairu
D lOVoZop 'jivq-ooo ui ponjiuo oaoo
Aiu Pino o -iiui oJMkM oqi Suiaoi
'lutmt itq) ii ao pan*? oooo poo uiv
ui pom 'uo> ma v ,'poowai n oit
ojiioo out oi poimao uuoa Aim pihom
mi unos ism mii an pea v n omraS
MUqj jo liuut M|) 01 " o) nit oqi joi
to* inMiMorio iouiSuo oqj :j**v
trumped up and no trick Is missed
In the machine-gun aaatter of the
feminine tongue.
Such conduct would be ruinous
to a man's game, but Garrulous
Gertie can pay no attention to
the cards she lays down and picks
up, or to what score she puts
down, and yet manages to come
out ahead In the end. If mistakes
have to be made, they can Just as
will be made in one's favor.
Here la a picture of one ot
those exasperating bridge games
with the unsllent partners. Can
you detect the ten anachronisms
or errors intentionally made by
the artist. f)il IUQi iujoi Jioud
n io ooo uia iq ao iAjiit uoi*
pa* muoi su ittiuod ota pao xpoa
oo rau joAnd mm oui io mo umouo
Mi oai jo ..nn-iom. <"> lu'uipjo
iou op U4U10A4 ouod omi ui ii >-.n pa* pira poua oqi ai 4*m Viui oqi
ju* osnno oqj iqSU)* o 101 ooj>i*p
O toa UJIUM 'MDOP 00*0110 #a| u| pjio
o jn pooioai Piodn < lopuoio mm pu* loop oqi uo
qliu ooi n qon loop oqj i4O*0av
THIS HAS A KICK
THE something that's In the
' autumn air reminds us of an
old riddle: Who can be most suc-
cessful when he's kicking ? Know
the answer? ,,,, ,
ouqi tutJoo* 1* uodxo JO Joioad poof
o ,ou ii 'u. Just Picture A Nursery Verse V&mti^
^fT ~~ I ^ jF\J\i\*mJ%0l\Af y UUIIUCI VERTICAL 42-Prom what did Ell' fall and 52Chills snd fever.
\ !*3\ o HO *^\ I I ^W s**^ TA * 0*> 1 A t ^k s7*4 !**. 1"E*r^m v. run. no n
42 tf -38
*?* uV Vl '32
HV
I 2b .3
48- .5 #30
6 25 .21 2H 28
23
15
22
lb
21
( P
3- IH 18 .20
EmmjxCMtKka.m
IS
caDuiary builder
QUIZ CROSSWORD
AUK and ----- went up the hill . ." complete verse, men complete
pieture by drawing s continuous line from dot to dot consecutively.
By Eugene SAe/Ter
HORIZONTAL
1What book ol the New Testa-
ment deals with the ministry
of the Apostles?
5What is the 33rd Dook of the
Old Testament?
10"A wise son msketh s
father" 14Learning.
15Positive pole
16Frog
17-Den.
18"The ----- of s labouring man
is sweet, whether he eat little
or much' 19The birds
20Browned ovei fire.
22 Whst it the tenth month ol
the Jewish year? lEsth 2:16>
24Mail
25"For he hath broken the gates
of brass, and cut the ----- of
Iron in sunder" Pa 107:16)
w-ol
nnnc%nprjni-^nnnp]
ODD l%k"]UErciTJiTIR'ri'i:i
KnEf-inrroki^rjciifJCiiTi
ccjutnii^pr f rr ;nrrn
pnrrrrv^r'r-i -nm-:m
nncn^CFir.or'SRiinE
'v.vrx-.r. vr.izrwi;
num tip r pr-kiri"
rrcrj^riFTCE^GiicB
rinrir^.FJFEcriF^rrrs!
rccK^mcEBr^nnF.n
LKUSSWOKU ILZI.fc 8UL(JT1U>
26Who was Asron'f second son?
(Ex 6:26)
2W-Male deer.
31-Mscsw
34Whst evil spirit did the Jews
accuse Jesus of having? i John
8*46)
35Plant ol Illy family
36 "Whose hope shall be cut off,
and whose trust shall be s
spider's -----" (Job 8:14)
37Pertsimng to the ear
38"But aow is Christ from
the dead, and become the first-
fruits of them that slept" (I
Cor 15:20) .
40Cslrulate
41-The ----- that is In the land
of Assyria" (Isa 7:16)
42Communion.
43Deserve
44Ensign 45Dueling swords.
47Mental concepts.
48College cheers.
46"Te shall away for your
iniquities, and mourn one to-
ward another" (Ezek 24:23)
51"The children of " (Ezra
2:42)
54 Horizontal top pieces of door-
ways
57Aqulver
58Turkish decree.
60One of the animals whose
meat was proscribed for the
Israelites (Lev 11:30'
62What ls-the eighth book of the
Old Testament?
63One engaged id business ol
moving possessions.
64"Be not overcome of . but
overcome ----- witb good"
' Rom 12:211
65 Virulent epidemic.
06Commence.
7Steeps flax.
Copyrlfkt. l*ol. Hlot FVotorro Sr.olr.U
VERTICAL
1"Except ye repent, ye shall
----- likewise oerisb" Luke
13:3)
2Whst garment ot many colors
did Joseph's father make him?
(Gen 37 3i
3Group of three.
4Angelic
5Derrick poles
6Entrances to a culvert.
7 Young woman student edu-
cated along witb male (col-
ln, i
8Citrus drink.
?Figure with seven sides and
seven angles.
10Snatches
11-Wssh
12The dill.
13 "Thou shall breek them with
s rod of iron: fhou shslt
them in pieces like a potter
vessel" iPs 2:9>
21''Pleasant word are at an
honeycomb, sweet to the .
and health to the bones" (Pr
16:24)
23Gaelic
25 Large bundle.
26Sun-dried brick
27A border city in the fifth lot
of the Levitical apportion-
ment (Josh 19:25)
28Clinging vines
30 "O----- and see that the Lord
is good: blessed it the man
that trusteth in him' (Pa 84:8
31"Ye ar as graves which ap-
peal not and the men thai
walk over them are not
of them i Luke 11:44)
32Networks
33Countenances
$8What peoples ere smitten in
the battle of the kings at Ash
teroth' Gen 145)
39Frozen desserts
40"I know that my ----- liveth.
and that he shsll stand at the
latter day upon the earth"
(Job 19:25)
lac
42From what did Ell fall and
break hi neck when he beard
the ark had been captured?
(I Sam 4:18)
43Fragrant herb
46 Arachnid
43Whst pillai of the temple war
named Jachin? (1 Ki 7:21)
50 Lifeless
51Whst Instrument did Dsvid
play? (1 Sam. 16:23)
52Chills and lever.
53Small children.
54Molten rock
55 "Better is a dinner of herbs
where is than a stalled
ox and hatred therewith" (Pr
15:17)
56Gash
59"The name of the wicked shall
-----" (Pr 10:7)
61Street railways


j
^n










M-rt





mmmmmmmmmm
..................i
ews o
.........'
in
"53 i

mm:... ::.. -..............:..:.............. ??_______1______.".....:.............m-..:_________,?,-......-...L..:..*____.......AM
RUBBERNECKING just like any other tourists on their first trip to New York are those Jap-
anese-business men touting the United States to inspect manufacturing plant methods.
SCHOOL DAYS are not far off for these Students who look at a model of the new West
Berlin,tree university which will be constructed through a Ford Foundation grant.
MUSHROOMS and lovely Graziella Fornaresi seem to have
little in common but still she is the "Mushroom Queen" of RECEIVING the first honorary membership in the Institute for the Crippled and Disabled
Alba, Italy, a region known (until now) for mushrooms. in New York is songstress Kay Armen (second from left) at a meeting of the group.
HUNTERS.in Wyoming no longer need to shoot at state road
sigas,ft get in some added target practice. Free targets
offered by the state, such as this one shown by Robin Bowen
of Cheyenne, are placed about 300 feet from the highways.
WATERS of the Gulf of Mex-
ico along the beach at the
Casa Marina hotel in Key
West, Fia:, inspired Leo De
Bray*s "Casa Marina Wave."
CHILE'S STEEL TOUGHENS FREE NATIONS
Miner awaits signal before throwing switch to sot off blast
AT A TIME when the free
nations of the world are
striving to build up their
steel industries to meet de-
fense needs, Chile is moving
to the front as a "big gun'
in' the 'arsenal of democ-
racy." A narrow, ribbon-like
country of some 286.396
square miles, Chile is help-
ing out its bigger South
American neighbors, as well
as the United States with
vitally needed shipments of
iron ore and steel. A new
steel plant, Compaa de
Acero del Pacific, located at
Huachipalo, the "Pittsburgh"
of Chile, is producing steel
at the rate of 180,000 tons a
year and still expanding.
Iron to feed the mills comes
from Chile's famous'El Tofo
mine, a mountain of high
grade iron ore set in the vast
mineral frontier of northern
Chile. Operations are sched-
uled to begin shortly at a
new iron ore deposit at Ra-
meral, near El Tofo. It is
believed to hold a 30-year
supply of high grade ore.
Many allied industries are
expected to develop-around
Huachipato soon. Chile's in-
dustries not only give steady
work to her people, but
hold out hope to other na-
tions through her steel.

'"-' 1
^.
m
.*;-. :.
Electrical contact sots off the blast to looson the iron oro.
Oro is token to South America's second largest steel mill at Huachipato, near Concepcin. Workers tap a blast furnace to start a flow Of liquid metal.
King Features Syndicate




FACE TEN
SEC Rejects
TUB SUNDAY AMERICAN
____
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1MI
To Ban Football Bowl Games
nockouts Defeat Panama
jArniy Boxers In Pto. Rico
the ten-count
r
By PRESTON MeGRAW
.. i First round knockouts In the; fighting before
final two bouts of the evening, wax completed,
gare the USARFANT boxing Private Frank McLaughlin of
fearn the USARCARIB title, five; Panam found Private Angel Fl-
Wins to three, over the Panam, gueroa a rugged stumbling block
team In Sixto Escobar Stadium, on his path to defend his 1950
San Juan. Puerto Rico last All-Army featherweight title but
Thursday evening. i managed to gain a split decision! eastern Conference summarily
The two teams were tied with verdict from the judges to retain! rejected one proposal to abolish
three titles each after the firstjhis USARCARIB title and the! football bowl
1st Proposal
Voted Down;
2nd Doomed
NEW ORLEAN8, Dec. 15 (UP)
-The 12 members of the 8outh-
On The Alleys...
(I HINDI! BOWLING
The fourteenth week finds An-
feHnl ascending to top place by
aklng four points from the luck-
leas American Club. Into second
spot dropped Acme Paints, who
could only take two points from
Budwelser, even though they
rolled a new high game of 896:
VFW Jumped out of the cellar
spot to attain sixth place by
trounclngCanada Dry for three
points. The sodamen had only
Murdock
Hicks. .
Henry .
Allen. .
Lane . .
Handicap.
CANADA DRY
185 112
112 138
134 134
168 '148
1S1 152
124 124
143 440
117 387
134 402
158 474
185 408
124 372
Gaviln In Line
For Turpin Bout
NEW YORK. Dec. 15 (UP>
Drawings For 2nd Annual Jr.
College Hoop Tourney Released
Bob Mower, director of the sec- place Is being taken in the most
Totals
Moss
Hannberg
874 808 8412523
tnree titles eacn alter tne nrst,nu usakuakih title ana tne football bowl games yesterday i r "'""": ,' muu iua oniyimnnoerg
8lx bouts but then the two quick1 right to enter the All-Army tour- and passed on to another whlchli?ur wle" ** this week.! Mashburn
to re-
knockouts turned the tide andI nament this May and defend his they'also were expected
gave try team championship to crown. | ject.
the Puerto Rican group. Briga-| Flgueroa was unimpressed' When they have finished with
Her General Robert M. Bath with the advance publicity given' the second, proposal the dlscus-
Urst, Commanding General, U. S.1 McLaughlin and forced the slon of banning bowl games in
trrny Forces Antilles, presented champ to go all out in order to the SEC as a mean* of sports de-
le team and Individual trophies gain the vote of the Judges. The'emphasis will be complete for
i the winners following the fin- Panam area youth showed whyi another year.
al bout. I he was champion as he remain-1
Private Luis Tapia. 182-pound ed unruffled and codlly went a-
Antilles champion, climaxed the' bout the business of holding on-
evening and clinched the title to the crown.
tOr his team with a stunning I Pe Laureano Berrios, Panam
nockout of defeating titlehold-! area,'and Pvt. Miguel Gotay, An-
er Sergeant Ramn Rosarlo, whoi tilles winner, opened the evening
outweighed the winner by 13 in thrilling fashion as they pum-
pounda, after only 37 seconds of melled each other all over the
the first round. ring for three rounds seeking the
; Rosarlo, who has won the US- flyweight crown. Berrios was a-
ARCARIB title for the past two warded the victory in a split de-
pears, never got started as Tapia'cisin of the Judges. Both lads
The aeadllne has passed for
submitting proposals to amend
the constitution of the SEC
and. only by constitutional a-
mendment can bowls be abol-
ished. SEC Secretary-Treasur-
er N. W. Dougherty said the
E residents of conference mem-
er Schools might like the sec-
ond proposal better.
Hannberg aided Moss In taking i Wltelg .
the last game from Canada DryiRizzo. .
with a 163 game. Carta Vieja Handicap.
took a firmer grip on fourth!
place by beating Balboa Beer for I Totals .
four points and are only four
points behind the top team.
Dude (Ringer) Borgia finally
came through with a 211 game
for Acme Paints to help them Mtl Torian
their high game and was ablyjKelsey
assisted by Stan Casten who
rolled a 519 series.
VFW POST 3828
. 122 127 173 422
118 139 183 420
185 142 141 448
128 136 117 381
145 114 137 396
162 162 162 486
Welterweight Champion Kid Ga-,ond annual Junior College Bas-'part by Verrion Bryant.
840 820 8932553
Norrls
ot in a hard right to the head'fought furiously and knockdowns never got beyond a second" he
the fight opened and then | and stunning blows were ire- said. '
followed up before Rosario could quent during the final two
ie,*2v!r *"l connected again1 rounds but Berrios carried his' The presidents of the member
a?*5^2i?** biMt hls hea7'- sli*nt ^vantage throughout. ,schoolsPwent to work onZ
er opponent to the canvas forj The Antilles team qulculy even-! nroDosal rleht after r>r Fr.d
uiCa?nK R0sarl. a"emPted to ed the count with Pvt. Antonio Mitchell, president of the SEC
Ise at the count of seven but, Quintana taking the title In the, had warned them that unless'
TEN PINS
McCarragher........ 169
Colston............ 158
Coffey............ 157
Kelsey............ 154
Lane............... 154
McConnell.....*... 153
152
161
150
148
CARTA VIEJA
Mynarcik. 130 179 137 446
. 128 179 148 435
. 154 149 142 445
. 154 154 191 499
McCarr'gher 154 151 195 500
Handicap. 99 99 99 297
Totals
619 911 9122642
..
"rr .1- I
Ail wir;
,nhX0v Ver 'if00. stVnned and'!n* flint wh'cn 8aw llttle actlon W*' wouW^^ cor?ecUd tor!"ud4wei8fr. '- '
Hovan .. UnsuufiU
Lavallee:i.'it ..!-u .
Allen.......|f.. .
Cain,
TEA'.*
25 17 85
Carta Vieja.
Hnb.e".'Lvln,t u 3 ow'.v realized, by either man.
that the powerful punch had McLaughlin put the Panam Dr'Mitchell who U the nres- Canada Dry 20
tnded thf.evenlng/i actl-mea. | team back in the lead with his dent of MlMlsTiPDl Stato Col- VFW !
Corporal Wilvert 8ar :cls had victory but once again the An-
ssured the Antilles teem of at! tilles lighters came back to even
sast a tie for the team title in
Mississippi State Col-
lege, did not go so far, however,
as to urge his colleagues to abl-
as matter* in
should restrain
& a,tr ne minute and 26 out and tne Panam tltleholder
seconds of the first canto. Tate, was unable to come out for the
naa gone down for the count of third round as the referee call-
5 a ir onlv iortv seconds, ed the tight to a halt.
K.nH.wV an? 8amuels bore ln' Possibly the most debated, _
Si ?h.Sta,W,r 5*Ve the' Shtof the evening was the wel-, adjustments, of putting things in"
recover A vlSSn. niihance t0 Tl;w5*llLtlt,e, bout in w"^! balance where there has been
the bov dron^w ^ cr0? 8gt- Clot,,de Colon 8ntlao w" imbalance. But I don't think you
was SuK Tate and he given a split decision over SgtJ cannot afford to make some be-
Amer. Club.
Balboa Beer
1
17
18
22
24
tt
25
Total
fins
35261
35439
35155
35407
35396
34746
34956
34498
BALBOA BEER
Stanley. .
Smith. .
Schoch .
Carpenter
Cain. . .
Handicap.
Totals .
104
129
136
136
125
151
137
142
120
131
134
151
vlln today was In lfne for a
middleweight challenger's battle
with Randy Turpin of England
In March because of his hurri-
cane finish Friday night aa he
stopped Walter Cartler ln the
tenth round at Madison Square
Garden.
His terrific finish In the last
scheduled round against the
heavier New Yorker apparently
saved the dusky Gaviln from
defeat for he was behind ln the
official scoring before he achiev-
ed his technical knockout at 1:31
of the tenth session.
Referee Ruby Goldstein stop-
ped the bout as Cartler tried to
rise from the canvas where a
right to the chin sprawled him
sideways. Cartlerwith blood
seeping from his nose, mouth,
and left browhad taken such a
battering he was befuddled and
helpless before he went down for
ketball Tournament has just re-j The Working Boys will be
leased the drawings for the big headed by Edgar McArthur and
event slated to get started on De-
cember 26th. There will be two
games every night, from the 26th
through the 29th. First game
will have such players as Bill
Carlln, and Ed Capalbo.
The second half of this open-
ing night will find the Cristobal
each evening will start at 6:45| Athletic Club and the team from
and the second game of the dou-i Albrook matching shot* and
bleneader at R:15. | passes. Along with the CHS ent-
The two games scheduled torS^St toaran STLfeSS
two ff Si ^jtou^mJTSftt U sn\aliewo
ttoVurnlmntb^e%rs^%oenntst|der *..*" Penlng. night
games will be among the best of
the tournament.
On December 27. Balboa High
and Powells will tangle ln the
opener, while Junior College and
15th Naval District will make up
the final opening round game.
144
151 42:
140 396...
\lf *IthYTone knockdownof"thiTbout
Shortly before the knockdown,
m~ 4M| Ca^VrTad TrTed'to"walk Vw"^ glrff iS^oTSSSS. "jg
781 .15 844-2440| fe^oEffi? Z^^gfiS^^rgfttS. "<"
ANGELINI
varsity teams
which they
themselves.
"I dont believe it Is a ques-
tlon of cleaning up," he said. "It
debated, is rather a question of making
McConnell .
Studebaker.
Woner . .
Balutls . .
Colston. .
Handicap. .
169
198
134
173
137
121
153
112
153
102
195
121
186 508
116 426
135 422
124 399
Local Rate
Playground News
RED TANK-PARAISO
Las Tranquilas, Las Estrellas.
and Los Corsarios are tied for
first place ln the Girls' Volley-
ball League.
Canal Zone Amateur Baseball
League will meet with managers
Monday 17th, 7 p.m., at Paraiso
Gymnasium.
Both Paraso and Red Tank
tack.
Gavlln's next fightln which
he will defend his welter title
against Bobby Dykeswill be
held ln Miami Beach. Florida if

will pit the defending tourney
champs, Cristobal High against
the Working Boys.
CHS has Its entire Interschol-
astic League Champion team
from last season back with one
exception. This is Dick Sullivan, Th. fn.,r .
who graduated last year, and his ^T^oT^o^^Uty,
with Powells and the Navy prob-
ably rating the edge.
Powells, Canal Zone casaba
fans will recall, won the Atlan-
tic side basketball league cham-
pionship this past summer. How-
ever, some of their best boys
were high schoolers, and will
therefore not be. playing With
them In this tournament.
the Florida authorities will per-
mit a Negro to box a white man.
The International Boxing
Clubs Promoter Al Welll expects
to hear by Tuesday whether a
154__496 baseball teams _worked out last
121 363
Totals
932 836 8462614
h was unable to rise
and resume Lorenso Baca. Santiago, fighting'ginning on these adjustments.
i Unless you make some ad-
justment, they will be made for
you."
13
374
Totals
Lavallee
Casten
Corn .
Yarbro
Borgls
Totals
Here's a timely "tip," Fido
I Smart merchants are sending their
: CHRISTMAS SALES MESSAGES
I via RADIO STATION HOG!
The first proposal to abolish
howls was No. 1 on the agenda
of yesterday's executive meet-
ing. It would hte restricted
the football season of member
schools to not mere than 19
weeks from the date ef the
first game.
. And the proposal specified:
" In no ease shall this period car-
Iry the season beyond the second,.,
Saturday in December. No mem-,Handicap,
ber of the conference Shall en-
gage ln a bowl game either at
the close of its regular season or
at any time thereafter."
The second anti-bowl propos-
, al. like the first submitted by
C. M. Sarratt of Vanderbilt Uni-
versity, said:
"There shall be no training,
assembling of candidates or Issu-
ing of football equipment to
freyhmen. regular upperclass-
men, or transfer students prior
to the first day In September,
nor after the close of the foot-
ball season in December. This
will eliminate spring" practice or
organized practice at any time
exceot -that held during the
3tated period."
AMERICAN CLUB
Vale.....Ill 149 147 407
Hellwlg. 117 123
Prltchard 90 108
Relchert 132 187
Coffey ... 148 147
Handicap. 132 132
NativesM Fgs.
Sunday oh the Paraso diamond.! I?*'**'.
They will be working out again Torse: 1275.00Pool Closes 12:45
... A'_ ___t_ .uL Fir.t- Rana f 1. m nnuhl.r
oh December 18th.
_oOo
CUAGRES
Sunday, December 9th, mark-
125 313'ed the opening of the Chagres
116 385Cricket League. The two teams
158_ 43 ] battling were, J. Glttens XI win-
132__ 396,ning with a score of 60 and S.
Klrton XI losing with 49 runs.
First Race of the Doubles
1Sin Fin A. Vasquez lllx
2Vlllarreal J. Avila 119
3xito Jos Rodriguez 118
>>...>>>/>>>'>
730 796 82223481M. Heinz, top-scorer for'Glttens
4Hercules
5Strike Two
6Opex
7Mona Lisa
8Carbonero
9Brochaclto
10Fulmin
C. Ruiz 112
G. Grael 117
F. Rose 112
J. Bravo 118
G. Ramos llOx
A. Vergara 109x
B. Pulido 120
ACME PAINTS
163
152
109
123
107
146
154
168
160
157
211
146
140 457
199 519
106 375
124 404
140 458
team had 50 runs, while C. Smith, *nd """ Nahre,r l Mi,'
was top scorer for Klrton and1 Fur*.:_t.7^0# ~ ???'CJ0,?.1:15
ended with 30 runs.
oOo
SANTA CRUZ
Second Race of the Doubles
1Filigrana
2Bagalefio
3Volador
4Bijagual
5Pregonero
J. Phillips 120
J. Bravo 115
A. Vsquez 109x
V. Castillo 110
O. Grael 120
Hovan .
Steuwe. .
Bryan .
Stahl. .
Walker ,
Handicap.
Totals .
The Intramural Leagues for
146 438the Elementary and Junior High' '.Mt.j in-
_______________I consist of four teams each. Cap- LR*?."'BSffefi ffA
800 (996) 855-2651! tains for the Elementary teams' *****: 8375.69 Pool Closes 1:45
I_____ ar Alfred Jones, Mervln Grant, ,. One-7,w0-, .,,. ,,
BUDWEISER Inharlu Pivl.r anrf Tom* Allen I V. t-EStlllO
. 154 153 147
SAVE!!$9oo
A MERRY CHRISTMAS
SPECIAL OFFER
A NEW
RCA VICTOR
45 RPM "VICTROLA"
60
Cycles
144
148
109
146
114
159
115
120
139
114
815 800 8712486
Another proposed amend-
ment rejected would have com-
pelled "each conference mem-
ber to play every other eonfer-
ince member in at least tw.
ootball games every four
year*."
*{oyal
J/etherlands
Sieamship
Company
K
N
S
M
TO
EUROPE:
HERA ........
WILLEM8TAD
BREDA ......
...........Dee. 22
........Dee. 24
...........Jan. 12
Juan Franco
Muluel Dividends
FIRST RACE
1Don Joaqun $9. $4.40, $2.40.
2Eclipse $5. $3.
3Cosa Linda $2.80.
8ECOND RACE
1Tap Girl $3.40, $2.60, $2.20.
2Cacique $2.60, $2.20.
3Tulra $2.60.
First Doubles: (Don Joaquin-
Tap Girl) $13.66.
THIRD RACE
Charles Baxter and James Allen.
454' Captains for the Jr. High teams
160 463! are Clarence Small, Sidney Rl-j
150__ 413 chards. Orlando Scott and Cleo-
144- 373 philus Williams.
158_ 44iI Four Girls' Softball teams are,
114 342 slated to begin operations as ... _
________Isoon as their organization to'S&iHI
complete.
An Open Air Christmas Con-j
cert will be presented on ahe
23rd at 2 p.m. This concert is
sponsored by the Santa Cruz
School and the Centro Isthmian1
Band of Gamboa under the di-
rection of Maestro Joseph. The
School Glee Club, directed by
Miss Blandlna Waterman, will
also be featured on this pro-
gram.
2El Mago C. Ruiz 115
3Br'ze Bound B. Moreno 108
4Bendigo A. Phillips 115
5Bosforo C. Iglesias 109
6Choice Brand J. Bravo 115
60
Cycles
AND
45 RPM RECORD ALBUM
VALUED AT 29.00
ALL FOR
$ 20.oo
ONLY 5.00 DOWN 5.00 MONTHLY
The member presidents also
voted to: hold the SEC Basket-
ball Tournament in the armory
l&HSSf?^ Ky-F.eb.J2?wand l-B*ron $5.40. $2.20.
and March 1. and hold the con- jas de Oro $2.20.
ference tennis tournament at
Tulane, the swimming meet at
Kentucky and the golf tourna-
ment at Georgia.
"F-" Natives4H Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 2:26
Quiniela
1Domino
2Romntico
3Miranda
4Rio Mar
5El Indio
6Recodo
P. Ordez 120
F.Rose 109
H. Reyes 104x
R. Ycaza 102x
J. Bravo 115
J. Phillips 106
7110
Bolivar
WHILE THEY LAST
RADIO CENTER
Tal.
40
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------i---------------------------
P.S. An deal gift for children.
7Diez de Mayo E. Silvers 105
8Taponazo C. Kam 117x
9Campesino Jos Rodgz. 109
5th Race "A" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $1,096.00Pool Closes 2:55
1Royal Coup J. Bravo 126
2Rath. Light J. PhUlips 105
3Chacabuco E. Sllvera 103
4Gris J. Baeza, Jr. 106x
TO THE CARIBBEAN:
MERA ................... n-, ..
WJLLEMSTAD ...... IW 2
rei>*................::::::::::::Xn:fi
TO COLOMBIA and ECUADOR:
LANGLEECLYDE ...................n^..
BAARN
TO PERU and CHILE:
LANGLEECI.TDE ..
HERA ILIA .........
BAARN .............
17
Jan. 11
.........Dec. 17
.........Dec 27
........Jan. 11
1." CRIS1UHAL, 3-1216. 3-111* 3-1113
(Passenger And Freight)
"K.N.SJM
Freigb
BMJVD BROS. PANAMA CITT Ml
(Passengers Only
BUM AGEFCIEA BALBOA: 2-371*
(Freight)
under the colors of the Antilles
team, was awarded the decision
but a large number of the fans
seemed to disagree as the boos
rained down on the ring follow-
ing the announcement. There
was plenty of action throughout
the fight as both lads stood to
to toe and hammered at each
other with telling effectiveness.
Baca received two bad cuts on
the face and blood ran freely but
he continued to hold his own a-
gainst Santiago down to the fin-
al bell The victory pot the An-
tilles team ln front for the first
time.
Cpi. Arthur Collins used his
educated left hand to capture
the middleweight title with a
unanimous decision over Pvt.
Francisco Pellot to pull the Pap-
am team Into, a tie once more.
The fans viewed a remarkable
display of boxing ability as Col-
lins stayed at long range and
kept his left flicking to the face
of his opponent continually. Pel-
lot tried to bore In but could not
coe with:the fancy style Of the
mora experienced Collins.
With the two team* tied at
three titles each the stage was
set for the stunning finish which
left the fans in shocked surprise
at the speed with which the fin-
al two bouts ended.
BETTER BUSINESS
NEW YORK (NEA) Calu-
met Farm's racing earnings in
1932 were $1150. Since then the
stable has won more than $10,-
iOOO.ooo.
One-Two: (Baron-As de Oro)
$7-26.
FOURTH RACE
1Alabarda $4.40, $2.80, $2.20.
2Interlude $3.20, $2.40.
3Sans Soucl $2.80.
Quiniela: (Alabarda Inter-
lude) 15.49.
FIFTH RACE
1Tomebamba $3.40, $2.20;
2Paragon $3.40.
SIXTH RACE
1Atason $7.20, ,$3.60, $3.60.
2Marsellesa $4JO, $3.
3Terry J. $3.60.
SEVENTH RACE
1Hurlecano $4.80. $340, $2.40.
2Doa Bielda 3AthOS $2.80.
Second Doubles: (Atason-Hur-
lecano) $11.
EIGHTH RACE
1Prestigio $13.20, $5.80, $4.40.
2Lujoso $10.80, $5.
3Scotch Chum $6.80.
Quiniela: (Prestigio Lujos.)
MS.4*. _ta
NINTH RACE
lLituana $4, $3.40, $2.40.
2Fanglo $14.80, $5.60.
3Astoria $4.60.
One-Two: (Lituana Fang i.)
8346M
TENTH RACE
1Mimo $630, $6.3k
2Th Bath Road $9.80.
Juan Franco Tips
By CLOCKER
LA BOCA
A meeting of managers of the
Pacific Divisional Softball League
will be held at the La Boca Play-
5round, at 5:30 pm. on Wednes-
ay.
In addition to the managers of
the Commissary, Housing, Army,
Navy, Building Division and Post
Office, managers of new teams
are invited.
The La Boca Minor Softball
League meets at the La Boca
Playground, Wednesday, Dec. 19',
at i p.m.
oOo
Managers of teams of the La ,,
Boca Girls' Softball League are -SjfSMM^^^TS
scheduled to meet at the La Bo- rm2*fi" ~ (fil nSSSlel
ca Playground, Tuesday, at 5:30
pjn.
6th Race '1-2' Imported4W Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Flambaro) B. Moreno 120
2In Time) J. Avila 120
3Gale Force Q. Duarte 117x
4Flamenco E. Campbell llLx
G. Grael 120
J. Bravo 120
G. Snchez 112
C. Iglesias 114
F.Rose 115
O. Chanls 120
5Hortensia
6Walrus
7Islero
8Picn
9Armeno
10Pincel
Whlppers CC, La Boca, CC,
Gamboa CC, dovelly CC. Red
Tank CC and Sporters are point-
ing towards a successful Pacific
side cricket season.
At present 110 girls have en-
1Pblico
2Mllros
3Roadmaster
4Rose Hip
5Notable
6Mosqueton
7Keyhaven
8P. Star
C. Ruiz 110
B. Pulido 114
O. Chanls 120
J. Phillips 112
J.Bravo 120
R. Vsquez 120
V. Ortega 113
1 THE MOST INVITING
I WINDOWS ON THE ISTHMUS!
This is how one of our customers
enthusiastically described our
Christmas windows!
J YOU TOO WILL ENJOY LOOKING AT
' ALL THE BEAUTIFUL NEW ARTICLES
NOW ON DISPLAY, PRODUCT OF
THE FINEST ARTISTS AND SKILLED
CRAFTSMEN OF EUROPE!
J. Contreras 112
roHed-for the OlrTs^ntramural ?^S-Cc.TJ,^
1Mona Lisa.
2Baga Una
3Choice Brand
4El Indio
5Royal Coup
6Flasabar. (e)
7Keyhaven
8Baduln.
R. Alligator
16Slxaolm
Vlllarreal
Filigrana
B. Bound
Campe* in.
Gris
Walrus
Notable
Softball League. These high
school girls are eager to compete
for the Intramural Champion-
ship. The Jr. High girls are also
looking forward to a splendid
softball season. The little Ele-
mentary boys and girls will be
vetting into action soon.
SILVER CITT
Quiniela
1Nehulnco J. Contreras 112
2Vampires*
3Beduino
4Apprise)
5 Apretador)
6Caribe
7Fright
8Trafalgar
A. Phillips 120
B. Pulido 114
A. Vasquez 103x
J. Bravo 120
O. Chanls 115
V. Ortega 117
V. Cas tin o 120
JKS5 swaga w. srsi=rssa ra
One-Two
1Rocky C. Lino 115
2Pampero II I. Sllvera 100
ember 19th. Six teams will vie
for supremacy.
In the girls' department eight
teams will participate In the Se-
nior Softball League. Nine teams
will comprise the Jr. High Soft-
ball League.
The Elementary Boys' Intra-
mural Baseball League got un-
der way on Monday 10. Eight
teams are engaged in this loop. mh aace "B" Natives 1 MUe
The Dodgers edged the Braves pUrse: $356.M Pool Closes 5:46
II
3S. Domino
4Revlal
sFun
6Coragglo)
7Rondlnella)
8R. Alligator
B. Moreno 116
R. Vsquez 114
J. Bravo 120
A. Basan 114
J. Cont'raa 112
O. Chanls 114
in a scbre of 5-4
On December 22nd. the annual
Fright' Christmas Treat for children will
Rondlnella (e) he held at the Mount Hope Sta-
Manoletc dlum at S p.m.
1Lollto E. Sllvera 106
2Casablanca Jos Rodgz. 110
3Slxaola G. Sanchez 116
4Elona F Rose no
5Manolete J. Phillips 120
i
AND IF YOU HAVE TIME TO SPARE,
DO COME IN AND LET US SHOW YU
ALL THE NEW QUALITY GIFTS WE
HAVE JUST UNPACKED FOR THE 1951
CHRISTMAS SEASON!
THE FRENCH BAZAAR
"TiV Most Talked-About Gift Store
onthehthmus!"
Juan Palomeras
COLON
COLON
I
}
I


/



sHbAt, dkmbkb m, imi
TpE SUNDAY AMERICAN

AGE
Veeck Chief Cook In Deals' On Fire
(Reprinted from
"THE -SPORTING NEWS"
oOo
Bill Make* four Proposals
' to Cleveland, But Receives
Only Yawns tor Trouble
OOo
COLUMBUS, O. While no
deals of any Importance were an-
nounced before the close of the
minor league convention here
last week, there were plenty of
reporta, Involving virtually every
club In the major leagues and
many of the top names m the
game.
BUI Veeck, owner of the
Browns, for Instance, was prob-
ably the most active of the maj-
or league moguls attempting to
stir up business.
An example of how Veeck oper-
ated was revealed In his attempt
to "talk, business" with the In-
dians.
Veeck's original offer to the
'Indians was Catcher Matt Batts
I for Pitchers Sani Jones, Bob
Chakales and Jose Santiago.
When Manager Al Lopez said
he wasn't overwhelmed by Veeck's
"generous1' offer, the Browns'
prexy said, "How about Les Moss
at the same terms?" Again the
hlKh-pltehed laugh of Incredul-
ity.
by
JOE WIU.IAMS
As a yoang reporter with dreams I was more interested in
the sports writers who visited the home town in the spring
than the players with the big league clubs.
This particular spring was in 1911, a Sunday, and the
Chicago Cubs, champ.ons of the National League, headed by
Frank Chance, "The Peerless Leader," Were the visitorsChance
, and all the wonderful players I had read about:
Three Fingered Brown (I-got to meet him and sure enough
a finger was missing from his pitching hand), Joe Tinker, John-
*' ny Ever (The Human Crab), Ed Reulbach, Arthur Hofman, who
was known as "Circus Solly" because of his acrobatics In center
field, and Johnny Ming, the slender backstop.
It was of Kllng that Hughey FuUerton (whose son ably car-
ries on the family Journalistic tradition these days for the AP)
had written in a magazine article the previous winter: "He
introduced brains to the art of catching.,f ... '
Hughy himself had Introduced a mathematical formula to
expertlng by which he picked winners, had achieved spectacular
resulta and was therefore a man of distinction In press box
circles at the time. As he talked to my editor, the brilliant Tom
- Scarborough, dur ng the game that afternoon, I hung onto his
; every word. Presently he made an assertion that shocked me...
and no doubt angered me.
For at that time nobody could say anything disparaging
about Joe Jackson and hope to hold my respect . not even
a writer who had a by line In a great Chclago newspaper, cov-
ered the World Series each year, and knew the editor of the
Saturday Evening Post' well enough to call htm by his first
oame.
^
COULDN'T BEAD OR WRITE
Mr. Fullerton had/written Jackson off as a big-league bust.
That afternoon . and there was a sickening, shattering fl-
- nallty in his words, "A man who can't read or write simply
can't expect to meet the requirements of big-league baseball as
. It Is played today," Mr. Fulletton Insisted.
Jackson had gone up from our league to Join Cleveland the
: fall before and this was to be the first season as a regular.
- I don't know when I ever had such a wonderful summer. I had
" been taken off space rates and made a member of the staff at
a severe reduction in pay, a sacrifice which seemed both pro-
' per and tr.fling In view -of the professional recognition and
rewards . which included a police badge and free rides on
the trolley cars. But that wasn't 11: Joe Jackson was tearing
the American League apart. Even the great Ty Cobb had to
' pull back and take his dust. It looked as if he waa going to
hit .400, a figure Cobb hadn't even threatened.
Well, Jackson went on to hit .408 his first year up, but it
' wasn't good enough, for Cobb, reacting marvelously to the lash
of pressureone of the tilings that made him a superlative
filayerdrove himself to .420 to win the batting title for the
ifth consecutive time. But Jackson had proved he could play
in the big leagues despite his lack of book learning and this
was gratifying and reassuring, for if he had made Hughey*
gloomy prediction stand up I would have had to devise an
entirely new yardstick for big league success. To my youthful
eyes the 0 foot 3 inch, black haired, 180-pound left-hander could
. do everything. It hadn't occurred to me that h's lack of formal
' education might prove to be a handicap and yet It probably did.
s
MADE COBB EVEN GREATER
I You wouldn't find It In the figures. In his first three years
with Cleveland, Jackson hit .408, .395 and .373. Only Cobb
'. could keip ahead of him with any consistency. I actually be-
lleve Jackson made Cobb a greater hitter than he might have
", been otherwise by keeping the pressure on him.
.'Phat's the way Cobb liked it. Jackson didn't. He wasn't
much of a competitor. I don't mean to say he lacked conven-
tional courage. I never saw him pull away from a pitch In bis
life . : and they threw at him plenty, for he was one of the
most remarkable hitters baseball ever saw and he was just as
i liable to knock the ball into the stands as not.
Jackson was actually conscious of his educational ahortcom.
ings and as he got around more and found himself In the com-
.pany of people who had been more fortunatemeetings he
couldn't always avoidhe began to feel sorry for himself; he
'yielded to elf p\ty and a persecution fever that weren't to help
-him either as a player or as a man.
You had to know Jackson real Well to sense the torture
he felt because of his Ignorance. He never wore these things
on his sleeve. I traveled with him the last two years he was with
..the Cleveland club. I presume to say I knew him real well.
I don't believe it was greed or a Black heart which brought him
shame in the 1919 World Series. Sometimes sick men do inex-
plicable things. I'll compose another piece on my old boyhood
.Idol later.
Cta Dbtflm
H.M. Kb* & VI
.Cerdo* a Ce i A

ordon's
Stands SupteHiA
Veeck made another stab,
"What about Tommy Byrne
(southpaw pitcher) for Jones and
Santiago?"
"Byrne has trouble with con-
trol," replied Lopes, "even when
he works regularly and with us
he wouldn't work regularly."
''You could make an outfield-
er out of him," suggested Veeck.
"He's a good hitter."
"No, thanks," retorted the
Tribe delegation. "Give us Moss
and a good outfielder and we'll
consider giving up two or three
rookie pitchers."
Veeck mentioned Cliff Mapes
or Jim Delslng. Both were shrug-
ged off quickly. "A good outfield-
er," repeated General Manager
Hank Greenberg.
There was also a lot of conver-
sation among other officials, but
when it was all boiled down it
turned out to be Just a lot of
talk.
Following are some of the deals
which were discussedor dream-
ed up by Imaginative scribes
at the convention.
Stan Muslal of the Cardinals
for Outfielders Carl Furlllo and
Duke Snider of Brooklyn plus
$160.000. with the Redblrds turn-
ing Furlllo ever to the Giants for
Stanky.
Pitcher Ned Garver of the
Brown for Outfielders Hank
Bauer and Jackie Jensen. Sec-
ond Baseman Gerry Coleman and
an unnamed pitcher of the Yan-
kees. The Yankees are said to
have turned down this offer.
Pitcher Warren Spahn of the
Braves for Shortstop Granny
Hammer and Pitcher Bubba
Church of the Phillies. The Phil-
lies were reported to be demand-
ing Inflelder Slbby Sls^l In the
deal.
Pitcher Howie Fox of the Reds
for Inflelder Rocky Bridges. Out-
fielder Cal Abrahams and Catch-
er Steve Lembo of the Dodgers.
The Dodgers reportedly were
holding out for the Inclusion of
Catcher Joe Rossi, drafted by the
Reds from Portland, in the deal.
The Reds ai a Cubs_ reported-
ly were Interested in Bobby Mor-
gan of the Dodgers, with Pitcher
Bob Rush of Chicago as a possi-
ble figure in. the deal.
First Baseman Ferris Fain of
the A's for First Baseman Joe
Collins, plus four unnamed play-
ers of the Yankees.
Inflelder Johnny Pesky or In-
flelder Vern Stephens of the
Red Sox for Hoot Evers and
Shortstop Johnny Llpon of the
Tigers. The Tigers also were, re-
ported Interested in First Base-
man Walt Dropo.
First Baseman Gil Hodges and
Shortstop Bobby Morgan of the
Dodgers for Outfielders Del En-
nis and Dick Slsler and First
Baseman Eddie Waitkus and the
choice of Pitchers Bubba Church
or Russ Meyer, with the Dodgers
then sending Ennls and Pitcher
Ralph Branca to the Reds for
Pitcher Herman Wehmeier and
Outfielder Johnny Wyrostek. The
Phils reportedly sought to in-
clude Catcher Andy Semlnlclt in
the deal Instead of Ennls.
Pitcher Morris Martin of the
A's for Outfielder Jim Busby, In-
flelder Mel Hoderleln and Pitch-
er Howard Judson of the White
Sox.
First Baseman Eddie Robinson
of the White Sox for Pitcher Tom
Morgan. Outfielder Hank Bauer
and First Baseman Joe Collins of
the Yankees.
First Baseman Eddie Robinson
of the White Sox for First Base-
man Dick Kryhoskl and an un-
named player of the Tigers.
First Baseman Ferris Fain of
the A's for First Baseman Jtoe
Collins, Inflelder Billy Martin,
and Outfielders Bob Cerv and
Jackie Jensen of the Yankees.
Pitcher Kenny Raffensbergr
of the Reds for Catcher Sal Yvars
and Inflelder Bill Rlgney of the
Giants.
First Baseman Earl Torgeson of
the Braves for Third Baseman
Rnnsom Jackson of the Cubs.
Players' AM Body
Reports Need Of
Additional Revenue
'Reprinted
"THE SPORTING
from
NEWS")
Minnie Off The Field Likes
Action Films, Sports Stories
(Reprinted from
"THE SPORTING NEWS")
OOo
Minnie's full name is Saturni-
no Oreste Minoso... But he pre-
fers Oreste.. .or Minnie, his fav-
orite nickname.. .He is 29 years
of age. He was born in Perico Ma-
tanzas Province, Cuba, November
29, 1922.. .His winter home, is
there, too, "at 9 Avenue, between
Eleventh and Twelth streets. Co-
lumbia, Havana, Cuba.":..He's
five feet. 11 inches tall, weighs
178 pounds, appears stocky, bull-
shouldered and heavy-calfed. He
bats and throws rlghthanded and
he's the first of his family to In-
dicate any athletic adaptability.
Personal preferences Movies,
action; clothes, sharp; food, sea-
food; reading matter, sport sto-
ries. He also like to ride horse-
back.
His movie hero: Gary Cooper,
and.his favorite singer, the Ar-
gentine singer, Carlos Gardel...
He's unassuming, pleasant and is
forever seeking to Improve his
mind.
That's one part of Minoso...
There's anotnerthe on-fleld
Minoso.. .He's a hustler from the
word "go.".. .He's a play-maker,
a know-how boy and the know-
how seems to be inherent, not ac-
quired. Of baseball. Minoso says:
"It means everything In life to
me."
He's of Negro-Spanish descent.
Parents born In Cuba. Hair black.
Eyes black... Attended high
school in Havana, where he got
his baseball start... Didn't par-
ticipate In other athletics at high
school... Father is a sugar cane
grower... Played his first pro-
fesional game In 1940 with the
Marianao club of the Cuban
League, and was promptly
brought to the States by Al Pom-
pez, owner-manager of the New
York Cubans In the now-defunct
Negro National League... He hit
.298 with the Cubans that sea-
son. .Spent his time alternating
between the two clubsMaria-
nao In the winter and the Cu-
bans in the summeruntil about
the tag end of the 1948 season,
when BUI Veeck signed him for
the Cleveland organization and
sent him to Dayton, where he hit
.925 in 11 games...Says he owes
COLUMBUS, O. Members of
the Association of Professional
Ball Players of America, the
players' aid organization, con-
sidered problems of diminishing
Income and increased financial
obligations at a meeting here,
December 5. presided over by
President Eddie Sawyer, man-
ager of the Phillies.
Commissioner Ford Frick sent
assurances that he was in their
corner and would do everything
he could to help in their work
in caring for the old and indigent
players.
Treasurer Hollls Thurston serv-
ed as secretary In the absence of
Win Clark. It was announced that
Win, who had been In a hospital
since July 5 for the second am-
putation of a leg, was to be re-
leased on December 7 and would
carry on the work as In the past.
A financial statement for the
fiscal year, ending October 31,
showed a surplus of $29,865.94.
Receipts for the year. Including
membership dues, of $40.157,
$30,000 from the majors and com-
missioner's office and $2,500 from
a Pacific Coast League benefit
game totaled $73,384.54. Assist-
ance to the .npedy amounted to
$48.903.80 and.. tptftii. expenses
were $75.250.34.......nail/.
----------......... n(ii3
George Sisler U,$. A.
Commissioner For
NBC For 14th Year
(Reprinted from
"THE SPORTING NEWS")
oOo
ST. LOUIS, Mo. George H.
Slsler, one of the game's all-time
greats and former manager of
the St. Louis Browns, will serve
as United States commissioner of
the National Baseball Congress
in 1952 for the fourteenth con-
secutive year. This was made
known following a Joint confer-
ence here between N.B.C. Global
Commissioner J. G. Taylor Splnk,
publisher of The Sporting News,
St. Louis, and President Ray Du-
mont. Wichita. ^
will continue his duties
Those Offers For Hodges, Et Al?
Dodgers Were Merely Curious
-(Reprinted from
"THE SPORTING NEWS")
oOo
NO INTENTION OF SWAPPING
STARS, JUST WANTED TO
LEARN THEIR VALUATION
By JOE KING
BROOKLYN, N. Y. President
Walter O'Malley was serene and
unruffled as he held the fort
alone m the Brooklyn front of-
fice while the rest of the Dodger
brass panted for pulmotors in the
hot air at Columbus.
"I Just phoned Gil Hodges," O'-
Malley offered, "to assure him he
could forget those trade stories
about him out of Columbus. I
told Gil we had no Intention of
trading him."
The prexy rounded up to the
main topic in the agenda. "But
you wanted to know about our
salaries, and whether we expect
trouble signing our team," he
opened.
There was gossip that the
Dodgers were not aware they had
lost the pennant, and that half
the club eyed a $50.000 fee.
"I really do not expect any dif-
ficulty," O'Malley stated. "The
players know exactly what khid
of year we had. and what kind
they had. We will get along fine
on that reasonable basis.
"Jackie Robinson was In the
other day." O'Malley related. "He
told me: 'I sort of had to talk up
out there on the Coast, but don't
[Jet that bother you. I guess I
talked about your manager be-
fore I should have, too.'"
Robinson had said in Los An-
geles he would demand a $50.-
000 salary, and also revealed that
Chuck Dressen had been given a
vote of confidence by Buzz Bava-
sl, vice-president, and CMallev.
Jackie Wants to Be First In Fold
The prexy resumed: "When
Robinson left he said: 'Don't
worry about me; you will find I
will be the first player you sign
up.' I came back at him: 'Don't
be too sure of that, because Roy
Campanella was in last week and
claimed he had a habit of being
the first man to sign.'"
The keeper of the home front
summed up his salary situation:
"It will be no trouble at all. We
had a great opportunity last year
to straighten out a few salaries,
and we wound up with the high-
est payroll in Dodgers history.
This year we will not let a few
dollars here or there stand In the
way of a satisfied ball club. But
a 'Say It ain't so' approach, and
we said it wasn't so.
"We are telling the fans we did
not, and do not,- have any
thought of trading Hodges. The
story got so big I felt I should
call Gil and reassure him. He
thanked me, because he said he
got to the point where he felt a
deal was already under way."
O'Malley paused and then stat-
ed deliberately, for emphasis:
"Let me stress this. There is no-
thing even remotely In the wind
so far as trading off a front-line
Dodger player Is concerned.
"We have been very constant
in our thought that our team
which has come so close two
years running 1* still good en-
ough to win in the third year.
We have no disposition to trade
a top-line Dodger."
O'Malley explained he had been
In touch frequently with Bavasl
at Columbus, and attempted to
outline what had been done
there, to give rise to the usual
flood of trade stories.
Asked Only About First-Stringers
"Out there," he began, "a num-
ber of clubs came to Bavasi and
asked whether they could have
Reese, Furlllo, Campanella,
Hodges and so on. They never
Inquired about a Joe Doakes, on-
ly about our best men. We would
naturally be curious to find out
how they value these regulars of
ours, but Bavasl never heard an
offer.
"That Is far different from the
story that we are offering
Hodges. We are not offering any-
thing in front-line strength. But
when Bavasi is asked by the
writers whether he would trade
a regularunder any circum-
stancesthe answer clearly is,
'Yes.' That Is an automatic an-
swer. No player Is beyond prteo.
if some club offered as what
seemed an overlay in value for
a regular, we would surely be
tempted. But we are not offering;
regulars, and we firmly believe
our team can win."
It was rugged passing out from
215 Montague street into th
wintry wind, because there in his
office O'Malley had diffused th*
warmth of southern skieswith
his picture of a happy, content-
ed club which had the pennant
already in view.
Building
Contractors
WE HAVE Surplus and
Second Hand Construction
Materials for Sale
as follows:
Wooden Doors, Windows,
Frames with Brass Mosquito
Wire Mesh, Frames for Door,
Steel Windows, Glass Block,
Plain Roofing Asbestos, Sanit-
ary Ware, Ornamental Grilles
and Steel Rolling Doors.
APPLY TO
VILLANUEVA Y TEJEKA
CIA. LTDA.
Warehouse located at Locera
Road. Tel. 3-S4U
Staler ..
In certifying eligibility of play-
ers and teams into the elgh- J do not know of any clubhouse
teenth annual natonal tourna- lawyer or.Bolshevik on our team
ment in Wichita, starting August
15.
*
The winner of the annual na-
tional tournament In Wichita,
starting in 1953, will represent
the United States m the inter-
national tourney' for non-profes-
sional champions, which for the
first year (1953) has been assign-
ed to Ebbets Field In Brooklyn,
starting October 10. A.B. Chand-
ler is president of the newly
formed International Baseball
Congress, which will sponsor the
annual world's tournament.
who would not be reasonable."
O'Malley chuckled, and return-
ed to his thought. "We had a
hectic time around here when
that Hodges story came out of
Columbus. Fans called us, and
thsy were worried fan. They had
s: i as11
i m i in \
Holmes & Edwards 52-Pc.
service for 8 persons.
Chest included.
' X GIFT any woman
will be proud of for
a Life-Time I:
A lovely chest
of $ilver. ,
Come and see our
silver articles, sur-
prislngly low pric-
ed. Don't forget to
claim your Christ-,
mas Dollar today.
Air Conditioned! '
EASY TERMS.
HAWAII JEWELRY
The Reliable Jewelry Store
M CENTRAL AVE. M
OPEN UNTIL 0 PH.
.
most in baseball to Pompes for
giving him a chance to make good
in the United States.
Having been in a couple of bat-
ting slumps, Minnie says, "The
toughest thing in baseball Is to
shake a bad hitting slump."
I The Perfect Piano for
fyllUfc Family...
rOT iHUM ... thai .Mra~ie*cial lock ih. ha. alwoi
wanted th* family'* la veril, room 10 bar*.., and
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ant hewn ol relaxation in her par
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y
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It the evening otter chool
Sting the enttre family I* ,
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in the Finest Hand-Cut and Hand-Engraved Full Lead Crystal,
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THE FRENCH BAZAAR
"The Most Talked-About Gift Store on the Isthmus r
Juan Palomeras
COLON COLON
.



GAVILN MAY MEET RANDY TURPIN

. tZSUNDAY
Jtmericatt
"Let the people know the truth and the country is gafe** Abraham Lincoln.
tPag l)
riVENTT-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951
TEN CENTS
Top Jet Fighter Ace Explains
i
i
i*.



*
ACE OF ACES MaJ. George
A. Davis. Jr., o. Lubbock. Tex.,
emerges from the cockpit of
his F-86 Sabre jet in Korea af-
ter downing two Communist
MIO-15 fighters. Davis, who
got two more MIGs in a vast
all-jet dogfight, now has 12
planes to his credit. He is the
- world's'leading jet ace.
Pope To Resume
Christmas Eve
Mass Tradition
it All
A KOREAN FIGHTER FIELD,
Dec. 15 lUP)Maj. George A.
Davis Jr., the world's leading
jet ace, leaned back in a brief-
ing-room chair today and told
how It's done:
"Just get In there and mix it
up with the other guys," he
said.
Then, with a bow to Maj. Gen.
Israel Putnam's historic advice
lo his colonial troops at Bunker
Hill. Davis added:
"And don't shoot until you
see the flames from their tall-
pipes."
Knocking off Mlg-15s Is as
simple as that, the lanky, 31-
year-old Texan said.
He should know.
Just Get In There
He shot down four of the
flashy Mlgs In one day's combat
over North Korea Thursday.
He .has nine Red jets to his
credit In 13 missions. And his
total kill. Including conven-
tional, propeller-driven Com-
munist aircraft Is 12 in Mr days.
"The secret of mv battle suc-
cess?" Davis lauched. "Why, sir,
there are no special combat
tricks or tactics.
"You Just get in there ami
mix It up with the other guys.
"I try to get within 1,000 feet
before I fire. If you're farther
off you just damage 'em.
- "If you're In there close, you
really get 'em.
The jet ace, whose wife and in his face or the Red pilot balls
two children live in Lubbock, out."
Tex., credited "experience" with! "A businessman who knows
contributing' largely to his aerial his business," was the way his
commanding officer described
victories.
"I've had pretty good luck, I him.
and I've had a lot of gunnery
experience," he said. "The whole
secret, I think, is ruing in
there... at'.tim \" cM."
kwill' ill you
Davis, a slight, thin-faced man
with black hair sprinkled with
gray was self-conscious about
all the attention.
Davis became an ace in World
War II with seven Japanese
^planes to his eredlt.
He started flying combat in
Korea only six weeks ago. In
the Alt. Force. | addition to his 12 kills, he is
avis, we call credited with one Mlg probablv
him," one follow filer said ad- destroyed, two damaged and
miringly, "Just give him one one Russian-built medium
burst and they either blow up bomber probably shot down.
as one Of
Train Blown Up
In Suez CZ;
4 Tommies Die
CAIRO, Dec. 15 The
Egyptian Minister of Interior
announced tonight that four
soldiers were killed and an un-
determined number Injured in
the derailment of a military
train outside of Suez early to-
day.
The note said the derailment
was caused by a mine placed
on the tracks by two unknown
persons.
British authorities, who had
previously reported the derail-
ment, aid they believed the
perpetrators of the act were
Egyptian saboteurs.
U. S. Ambassador Jefferson
Caffery declared this afternoon
after another visit to the Min-
ister of interior, that the U. S.
was trying to find a solution to
the Anglo-Egyptian conflict.
It was Caffery's fourth visit
to Minister Ibrahim Farag.
United Press Correspondent
Peter Webb reported from the
British general army headquar-
ters in the Suez Canal Zone that
British troops at El Fayld fired
on a group of Egyptians who
were attempting to attack ar-
tillery emplacements with
stones at the headquarters of
Gen. Sir Brian Robertson, Brit-
ish Middle East commander.
Yanks Trying To Date Queen
VATICAN CITY. Dec. 15 (UP)
High Vatican sources said to-j NORMAN, Okla.. Dec. 15 iUP> Man. with headquarters In New[120 talents of gold and otherfof temple and other architec-
day that Pope Plus XII has de- -^-An expedition to excavate the York. 'items, and the Bible adds: I ture.
Cided to recite the first of three tomb of the Queen of Sheba | Officials of the foundation' "King 8olomon gave unto the' "Some of the work will be very
Queen of Sheba all her desire, delicate," he added, "and they'll
whatsoever she asked, beside use such tools as garden tro-
traditional Christmas Eve masses leaves. New York soon in hopes; confirmed that the expedition
hi the Mathilda Chapel of the of making the greatest archeao-, u scheduled to leave New York
Apostolic Palace.
weapons and possibly forms of
writing may be found.
"Archeaologically," he said,
"the queen Is relatively late.
Some'archeaologlsts point out
; logical discovery since the be- but declined to discuss the pro- that which Solomon gave her of wels, paint brushes and teasing. that no evidence has been un-
| Jeweled mummy of King Tut was ject in detail.
The Pope wi,l recite the Mass unearthed, a University of Okla-
Sn the presence of the entire di- homa scientist said today,
plomatic corp.'i accredited to-the;
Holy See. thus resuming a tra-^ The expedition. Dr. Robert
dltion interrunted at the out- Bell disclosed, hopes to confirm
break of Wor'.d War n. i Biblical reports on the wise and
i wealthy queen who lived some
The mass will be broadcast 900 years before Christ,
over Radio Vatican with a spe-l
clal program beginninglng 11:45 It might also turn up gold,
Christmas Eve. jewels and other long-hidden
. treasures.
The Pope win later recite two Bell said the expedition will
ether masses In private. They be sponsored by the American
Will not be broadcast. (Foundation for the Study of
r^utoes yd ieodJ
...peeouiG/
Bell, however, said one of his I In
I his royal bounty."
needles
. another version of the 'attached r
outstanding students, Ralf An- atpry, not the Bible's the queen Bell said, anthropologists could about her come from the Bible
drews of Pauls Valley. kla. al-! wag so favorably impressed ^identify the queen's tomb by and Arabian, folklore.
i_. (NEA Telephoto)
MORE JETS FOR THE AIR FORCE The Air Force's call
for an Increase in Jet plane output gets results at the
Northrop Aircraft plant in Ontario, Calif. A line of Scorpion
F-89 all-weather Interceptors waits for final testing. The
planes, with a crew of two, carry six 20 mm. cannons and
operate in excess of 40,000 feet altitude.
Arosemena And Wiley To Be
Guests Of Honor At Concert
a small stick with an earthed in the past regarding I Panama at the National Unlver-
needle [the queen's reign. Most stories sity auditorium.
The concert will be presented
President of the Republic and!he had become a musical instltu-
Mrs. Alclblades Arosemena, Unl-IUon before he reached twenty.
td States Ambassador to Pana-'More laurels were added with two
ma and Mrs. John C. Wiley, Bri- solo spots with the Los Angeles
gadier General William H. H. Philharmonic Orchestra and a
Morris, Jr.. and Mr*. Morris areHollywood Bowl' performance
expected to be honor guests at | which drew praise from Southern
8:16 p.m. Monday, when thelCalifornia critics such as "The
young American pianist, Richard young pianist' rarely beautif al
Tetley-Kardps, appears in a spe-1singing tone, his musical phrase-
clal Joint concert with the Na-ology and his taste made an ar-
tional Symphony Orchestra of resting Impression. He was per-
sistently encored." (Los Angeles
ready is/ In New York awaiting;
departure with the expedition
about Dec. 14.
the point
is hand-
wrought in gofd!
"The discovery of the Queen
of Sheba's tomb," Bell said,
"would be comparable in Im-
portance to the finding in
1922 of the tomb of Tutank-
hamenKing Tut. It would be
one of the greatest archeao-
loglcal discoveries of all times.
"The site has been known for
some time, but only recently the
foundation received permission
from King Iman Ahmed of Ye- excited the
men to enter the forbidden land
for research and exploratory
purposes."
with Solomon she became one
of his 700 wives and gave birth
to a son claimed to, be the
founder of an Abyssinian dy- '
nasty.
The tomb of King Tut yielded
a vast treasure of golden vases,
carvings and jeweled apparel.
It was found in a room hewn
from solid rock beneath the
tomb of Rameses VI near Thebes
OB the upper Nile River.
Tut was one of the last pha-
roahs of Egypt, and the splen-
dot of his ancient burial vault
world.
the way In which her tomb is
expected to stand out above the
other royalty.
He said tools, Implements,
Army Switches
Wild Irishman Spurns E99 Policy
$263,000 Silk Purse, Astonishingly
Extols; Sow's Ear
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 15 (UP)-
Bt DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON, Dec. 15 Sen.
Times), And. "He has the gift of
beguiling his hearers." (Lo* An-
under the direction of Professor i geles Examiner.)
Walter Myers.
Sponsored by the Inter-Amerl-1 Richard Tetley-Kardos began
can Women's Club, the concert | his more extensive travels as ac-
wlll benefit the IAWC Scholar- companlst to some of the most
ship Fund and all- tickets have
been priced at one dollar to en-
able a large audience to hear the
famous singers of the genera-
tion; among them, Lotte Leh-
man, Lily Pons, Gladys Swarth-
Of cours you write better with
Kversharp I It's the only pen with
* point which, like a jewel, it
band-wrought in 14 kt. gold...
And the breather tube insures
largest ink capacity ever ...
y. the positive flip-fill action is
the fastest, surest, safest
way to fill it ...the magic
(sed prevents flooding
and writes more words
ore smoothly 1
Evtnharp i thi
yew which people of
dittmction exhibit
tita prid and uti
Bell said archeaologlsts be-
lieve the ancient city of
Mareb. from where the queen
set forth on her fabulous ad-
venture to the court of Solo-
mon, is buried beneath the
sand of the southwest Arabian
desert, about 200 miles from
the Red Sea.
"I'm sure thev wouldn't be
startled, If thev found it," Bell
added. "They (foundation
scientists! are quite ODtlmlstlc."
The expedition will include
American and European scien-
tists and scholars. Thev will
travel down the Suez Canal and
th wed Sea.
Bell said the group had locat-
ed ruins of the mysterious cap-
ital citv of Mareb In Arabia sev-
eral months ago, but received
permission only recentlv from
the King of Yemen in old Ara-
bia to die there.
The Bible tells of how the
Queen of Sheba traveled to see
Solomon "with a very great
train, with camels that bore
spires, and verv much gold and
precious stones."
She presented the king with
The excavating
may require as much
*"?, "grout"-111 use native f ^^^ M * **** \^8J. Joiner. Lorenzo. Tex.,
labor to help In excava ting the! The man with the brogue was'PUDUSner-
site. retired engineer Paul Donovan. Joiner claims he Is a firsthand
He said the usual procedure is The 71-year-old Donovan went authority on this subject, being a
to court here to try to _prevent wa rvet, and has some ripe ideas
claimed visiting pianist. Arrange-
ments have been made so that no
tickets will be available at the
door of the auditorium tomorrow
night and all who desire to at-
tend must secure tickets prior to
the performance at IAWC Head-
ch as five not before he had taken a couple Army's Dowdered eees a la Texas It ??.' u ?
of Dotshots at the Enellsh iryJ p t^??*J_a.Texas 8haw's on Tivoll Avenue. I. L.
to scrape awv the earth with
shovels until they strike ruins
Ihunderjels Gel
Another Mlg;
Chinese Hit Turks
the late Mis. George Bernard of his own on eggs, as follows:
Shaw's money from being used
to teach the Irish manners.
Mrs. Shaw bequeathed $263.-
000 to "smooth the rough edges
off the Irish."
She named an English bank as
trustee of the fund. The fact
"Your disclosure that the Ar-
my continue to nub the Agri-
culture Department's powdered
esgs has left tens ef thousands
ef veterans in a state of slack-
)awed amasement," Joiner in-
ormed Johnson.
' "It had never occurred to most
that a Los Angeler court had no' -"' " "" eighteen Tetlev-Kardos was car-
jurlsdlctlon mad no difference of us that eggs could be powder-.?e*n,^ed^ of Slt^ con-
ed in such a manner as to cause 52* scneauie or iruriy con
to Donovan.
Korea nee He wa incensed at the whole the Army to refuse them.
15 (UP,-United States jet lde*- He ^l the judge that "a "Upon written requat and at
fighters shot down another Mie *an* of the characters that,your committee's own risk I Will
X Worth Korea today and han ar0und London" was try-'send you a powdered egg sample
damas^d lx ln t0 "P"80 mv anc estor s'whlch most nearly confarms to
A flight of 24 Thunderiets around" the Army powdered egg as we
was lumoed bv MIm m toe' can>t Itand ,or that-" he World War n vets remember it.
American^lane's ^plSe^t'*"- ""? ^^ &&
fire bombing mission against! Donovan said that mavbe some'*5I,e4u?n,^5f..w*,-Zg
joint performance of the Nation- out. He later became assisting
al Symphony and the wMely-ac-! artist with Grace Moore. Next
came a thirty-week engagement
on Bing Crosby's Kraft Music
Hall, which introduced him to a
nation-wide radio audience,
which has heard him repeatedly
since, most recently on the RCA-
Victor show, and 'Tlano Play-
house." .
A mow from Southern Cali-
fornia to New YYork extended
his activities to nation-wide con-
cert tours, performances with
the Minneapolis Symphony Or-
chestra in the St. Paul "Pops'*
series, the Columbus Philhar-
monic, the Duluth Philharmon-
ic, the Jersey City Philharmonic,
and three performances with the
Buffalo Symphony in one sea-
son.
In the spring of 1850 he com-
fleted his fifth engagement at
he Radio City Music Hall In New
York when, under the baton of
Alexander Smallen, he has play-
ed 580 performances of the Liszt.
Rachmaninoff, Gershwin and
Warsaw concerti, before an ag-
gregate audience of nearly a mil-
lion and a half persons.
Madura's on Central Avenue, and
the French Bazaar in the Hotel
El Panam.
Richard Tetley-Kardos, young
veteran of the keyboard, began
his musical career at the age of
even. At eight, he was writing
melodies, and at eleven he gave
his first concert. His first song,
which is still selling today, vjas
published when the young /u-
alclan had reached the advanced
age of thirteen. When he was
certs a year. These auspicious
beginnings were made on the pi-
anist's native West Coast, where
upplie: and rolling stok at of'KSSeSSa*8 liv^wiTI^'to ^nd^ur eSSK?
thThrTrndehr^teo^
one Mig | damaged five. I g^^Aish^woujd dJ^
"This egg was chosen frejn .'.
Mig and damaged five.
Later 43 Sabres fought 50 better to spend the money"
Mlgs at about 30.000 ft. over corn and raise themselves some
EVERSHARP
AND YOU GIVE
THE FINEST
PANAMA
CASA LUIS
BAZAR FRANCES
BAZAR ESPAOL
. LA PARISIN
OFFICE SERVICE
e CASA ZALDO
Dutrlbulors:
COLON
ALMACN SURANY
ALMACN COLUMBIA
DAVID
- ALMACENES ROMERO
Neoro Doctors
In Arkansas Join
Against Segregation
CAMDEN. Ark.. Dec. 15 (UP)
Arkansas' Negro doctors, den-
tists and pharmacists announc-
ed today that thev will finance
a campaign to end racial segre-
gation In the state's school sys-
tem and expressed hope It will
spread Into a southwlde drive
to break down all race barriers.
The Southwest Medical-Den-
tal and Pharmaceutical Associa-
tion adopted a resolution pledg-
ing complete financial support
to Pine Bluff attornev Haaold
Flowers In his two Federal Court
suits seeking an end to educa-
tional segregation.
The organization offered
| similar aid to any others desir-
ing to combat segregation.
Dr. o. U. Jamison of Texar-
kana. Ark Dresldent of the as-
sociation, said the group Is hope-
ful that Its campaign will spread
Into three other member states
Texas. Oklahoma and Louis-
ianaand oerhaps mushroom
into a Southwide movement.
"The association wants to be
placed On record as opposing
segregation as a moral wrong."
he said. "It is the duty of u
all to pledge ourselves to rlght-
lnc this wrong.
"I want the people ef the
South to understand that we
bear no malice, that u we want
i dignity of Justice,"
Slnanju, and damaged one.
One Sabre also was damag-
ed, hut reached base safely.
The biggest Chinese attack
since the two week old "ease
fire" threw
against the
hogs so thev would have some
bacon for breakfast Instead of a
tin can of washed out tea."
Said Donovan- "The British
are a grand people, but I'm
a full battalion :afraid their-polished fingernail
Turkish brigade's' philosophy Is taking them down
ritionB south of Pyonggang
the old iron Triangle.
An outpost was overrun and
communications with the main
United Nations defense line cut
before the Turks rallied and
sent the Chinese back to their
own lines.
the drain."
BALBOA TIDES
TODAY-
HIGH
5:25 a. an.
5:5 p. m.
TIDES
LOW
11:41 a. m.
11:58 p. m.
$10,000 Diamond Pin Lost
For A Week In Miami Sands
MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Dec. 15
(UP)A $10,000 diamond pin
lost by heiress Brenda Frazler
Kelly while night clubbing here
beach chair forward in the sand.
Kennedy said Brneda must
have dropped it while strolling
on the moonlit beach near the
litter of 12 because of Its ran*
cal. liquid sound- when shake
slightly. .- -*
"It was then ripened andar a 1-.
warm Texas son fr 67 day,
boiled in sheep dip for 24 hears,
dehydrated in a eetton barr-
burner, smoked in a earheB.
black plant, crushed nnder th*
hooves of a locoed brone id
carried in the toe of a cowbsy' '
beet for six months.
"The resulting, product haa/aj
the tang of the Army powde
egg that haunts mv memory.
"It also kills roaches and water
bugs on contact.
"Tell me. sirhas Agriculture
got something worae?"
Steel Producers
Warned Against
Raising Prices
WASHINGTON Dec. 15 (UP)
Economic Stabilizer Roger L.
Futnam said todav he has warn-
up in the beach .and today by He said thatspofon the beach I drimf l nemMit,0Cer. ? nrtet.*
a Michigan tourist and her was raked several times in p
daughter. search of th platinum pin.
Mrs. Kelly, the No. 1 glamor ] which ha'd a two carat diamond
girl when she made her debut in the center surrounded by five
lrr 1938. was visiting a Miami < largt triangular diamonds and
five baguettes.
last Saturday night was kicked hotel Saturday night,
ich sand toda
tourist and
1938. was visiting a
Beach couple and wore the pin
to the Park Avenue Restaurant
and to MacFadden-Deauvllle's
Dixie Room Saturday night.
She missed the pin after re-
turning to the couple's hmoe.
She notified her insurance!
company. J. A. Kennedy, man-
ager of the Macken Adjustment
cover any wag* Increase grant-
ed the CIO United Steelworker.
Hearn Playi Hele
Id Omphroy TennU
Final This Morning
Kennedy said apparently Mrs.
Jacobson saw an advertisement
on the lost pin b) the newspa-
pers. He said she was paid a Bill Hele and Webb Hearn
"substantial reward" for find-meet at the Olympic tennis
Ing It. court 8 o'clock this morning
Mrs. Kelly, who returned to'in the finals of the Omphroy
Service, said Mrs. A. E. Jacob-1 New York after losing the pin. tennis tourney,
son and her young daughter of! said it was a gift from her hus-1 Hele reached
Flint. Mich., kicked up the- band, John Sunms (Shipwreck1 beating Julio
mining pin when they moved a ijelly. 4-8, 8-2, 8-2.
KAYSER
NYLONS
*
are the fiMt because they^CT
You may be short, medium or tall-it make no diereaee!
Kayser's Proportioned Hosiery give a smooth,
flattering.fit And Kivw'i patented "Strait-On"beel cradle
your heel for comfort and guarantee straighter seems.
A variety of fashionable shades, too 1
Kays.:.?
i the final by
Plnilla H H a e 1 1 1 t
1 o v <
1 I N I I I I
.


',...

THE CANAL ZONE SAYS THANKS
TO REPRESENTATIVE REED
WITH A PANAMA HAT
Amanean
Supplement
r A NAM A B. r SUNDAY. DECEMMB IS, 1S1
(Sets sUry >
t)


-: Review Of The Week
ISTHMIAN
WORLD-WIDE
SPORTS
THE I8THMUS WAS quietly proud, thla week, of two
local heroes, Sergeant 1st Class Paul L. Davidson and
Private 1st Class Emiliano Lpez Postrana, who leaped
into the turbulent waters of Gatun spillway and
brought out an Injured airman alive,
Inter-service rivalry forgotten at least on the
personal level the Air Force man. Tech. Sgt.
Henry hrben is recovering In toco Solo Naval
Hospital, and thanking his stars the two Army
men happened to be stationed nearby when the
weapons carrier in which he was a passenger
crashed through Gatun spillway bridge and tum-
bled into the water.
Erben Jumped clear of the falling vehicle, but was
about to be swept over the edge of the apron when the
soldiers pulled him out after a locai rate worker had
tossed a liferlng Into the onrushing water.
Both Davidson and Lpez Postrana have been re-
commended for the soldiers Medal o:> their command-
ie,.0ulcer,?oth are oi Ba'tery <; 903rd AAA (AW)
Battalion, U8ARCARIB
.Te drVer, ,.he weaPns carritr, Pfc. Adrian Olte
oi New York City, was killed in the crash. He and
Erben wereattached to Flight M, 1st Rescue Squadron
Albrook AFB.
Morale received a sharp slap with the announcement
me canal will keep household maintenance work and
painting to an absolute minimum as an economy
move, Tne Canal Company also askc:, bids for a group
oi contracts Involving r.ew construction in Ancon, Dla-
fi ani'Par*lso lne ilrt big group of contracts of
the 1952 year.
All was not well this week in the camp o( the
live-party coalition backing former Police Chief,
Col Jose A. Remn C\, to be the next President
I Panama.
Directors ot the Renovador (Reform) Party who had
been biding their time waiting for promises by Re-
m,on and President Alciblades Aro.semena to be ful-
filled, finally decided they would wa!t no longer. They
handed a virtual ultimatum to Remen and Aroseme-
na. i nc eldest son of Francisco Arias Paredes, found-
er of the party, already has been officially launched
PL im Iour Parties of the coalition PRA,
Liberal Matadero, Unin Popular aad PNR but the
Renovadores want the Cabinet pt they had been
promised before they would do anything about hold-
ing a convention to launch the Colonel officially.
The ultimatum brought a flurry of action from Re-
ViWl the members of the PRA. A meeting was
tailed. Many formulas were suggested, reviewed and
(iiscarded Finally they hit upon a feasible plan: Min-
ister of Agriculture Jos M. Vrela would resign and
accept appointment as manager of the Social Security
Tnl& seemed all right to the Renovadores, but they
were going to await fulfillment of this new promise be-
lore they heid their convention The same day a spokes-
man announced that the Renovadores would again
PftP"ne their convention, which should have been
hold first in early November and later on Dec. 15.
inc new date was announced as Jan 5.
The PRA. meanwhile, was being equally cagy PRA
dacctors said Vrela will not reslgi; ntil the Nation-
al Assembly approves an "organic social security bill."
While the nation was regretting the death of Guil-
k:mo Van der Hans, crack Paltllla pilot. Mrs. Colom-
bia Rendon Fernndez, a passenger who was aboard
the plane when it crashed during a take-off, clamor-
en from her hospital bed, where she Is being treated
lor burns, for the $3.000 she said she was carrying
in her luggage. ,
Mrs. Fernndez claimed that the money didn't go
v<: in smoke when the plane crashed and burned par-
t.lly. But indignant Paitilla ground employes and
ground crews claim that rubble In the plane indicat-
ec I hat the money was consumed in the flames.
Panam City and Coln began really to look
like Christmas, Panam style, this week as 23,-
48S depositors withdrew their Christmas savings
In in the Panam Savings Rank and started their
Xmas shopping in high gear.
Bank figures showed that a .record 677,484 was sav-
ed this year. This figure was $69,709 or approximately
t'n per cent more than last year and much greater
than preceding years. This wa-, regarded as encourag-
ing In view of the sort of depression that Panama Is
undergoing.
The "fickle finger of fate" did not fail to put in
Its appearance this week.
6-3-1-0 were the four numbers of the second prize
of the National Lottery last week Sunday. It unex-
pectedly made Mrs. Florencia Rlvas $300 richer. But
it made Mrs. Vlrg;nia Maria Gumn argry. drove her
to file suit for posseslon of the ticket, which she had
been buying for over a year.
Mrs. Celia Garzn, a ticket vendor, used to sell the
ticket to Mrs. Guzman. She would k ;ep It and collect
later, even when Mrs Guzman did not show up be-
fore Sunday to claim the ticket This week she Intend-
ed to do the same, but fate steppe! in. When Mrs' Ri-
vas came to get her number, 9510, the ticket vendor
absent-mindedly gave her Mrs Guzman's number in-
stead. Mrs. Rlvas did not discover It until she got
home, but she decided she would keep It "because it
was the same number of the grave ot a dead relative."
Now Mrs. Guzman feels that the ticket Is hers
by virtue of her regular purchase of the ticket for
over a year. The matter Is left to the court to decide.
- o -----
Student disorders, the reported resurgence of
the Liberal "Pie de Guerra" (war footing) group
and undercover Communist activity rounded out
, the news this week.
Striking Panam City students staged rock battles
FROM KOREA, WHERE It Is getting hard to re-
member which started first the war or the truce
talks the scene of briskest action ast week shifted
to Washington.
Probably there we no more scalps than usual being
scuffed in the dust of that unhygenic arena, but there
seemed an Increase in the worth, if not the number,
of pelts being flayed off.
Many of them seemed quality mink, rather' than
the expendable human skin which commonly lies
thick about the capital.
Mr. Ther on La mar Caudle (who may have made
himself a more durable income by batting around the
cantinas against the probability of the existence of
so fantastic a name) used to be chief tax prosecutor
In the Justice Department.
In this capacity he mixed business with pleasure
by confining his social relaxation, so far as evid-
ence before a House soubcommittee has revealed,
exclusively to those whom he knew daring busi-
ness hours as suspected tax evader*.
Unfortunately for the much-put-upon T. Lmar C.
not everyone is so fully seized as he of the shining
social merit, the'' gay Insouciant charm, of the, tax
dodger.
Specially out of key with their genial.worth is that
larger community group that appears to dwell, In the
Siberia of Theron L. C.'s social orbit the simpletons
who paid their taxes as and when -Jue albeit with a
pained squawk.
However, facing this multitude of slow thinkers
shortly is another tiresome chore attending on citizen-
ship of the United States.
It Is chore of voting for a President', some Senators
and so forth, to make sure the tax demands keep
coming.
Enter, prancing, Harry 8. Truman. Exit Caudle from
the government payroll, limping.
Mr. Truman may be slowlsh to grumble when big
firms start cutting each other's throat, in efforts to
make a faster and thicker buck than the next firm.
After all, U.S. Steel's Been Fairies*, and General
Motors' Alfred P. Sloan, only have one vote, apiece.
As there aren't all that many Fairless's and Sloan's,
Mr. Truman Is content to shrug It off as often as not
if they get mad about what's happening to their
money.
Conversely, the voting register Is crammed full
of guys who run hamburger carts, and dig ditches,
and drive trucks, and sit behind the same desk
day after day hoping to make a decent living.
These guys pay their taxes like honest- men, but
with the reflection that the dough they give to the
^Government could help them pay off some of the
mortgage on the home, or maybe give the kids a bet-
ter education. ,;
They regard It as a sacred trust that the Govern-
ment should make at least equally worthy use of
their money.
They do not regard the high wVc*-of,the finagling
Caudle, nor any other of the Justice tt"pftrtment's and
Internal Revenue Bureau's broken w^ds. ja^an ade-
quate discharge of this sacred trust. I v|jnM9
Mr. Truman, whose lob depends or.'the n'Srle|i' men's
votes, and not on Caudle's, hopped swiftly hack to
Washington last week to deputize for hl$ good friends
the Voters In their clear desire to kick ,tile chiselling
smartles in the.pants
[X-
At this writing-, within a year of the election Mr.
Truman's leg is about poised at the top of the back-
swing.
Only in the air was action much mere than per-
functory. Thursday United States Sabre* jumped a
bunch of Migs that were apparently admiring the
scenery, .or thinking of lottery numbers, or doing
anything but keep looking around for trouble..
The Sabres knocked down five dozing Migs In the
first pass, went on for a total of 13 for the day.
t
But United Nations ground- commander In Korea.
United States Gen. James A. Van Fleet, warned that
if the Reds choose to fight an air war with all the
power at their command in Manchuria, things will
be rugged indeed for the United Nation* army.
The Sabres' advantage In the doeflghtlng box score,
as presented by enthusiastic United Nations report-
ers, tended to obscure the fact that (here are more
Migs waiting in Manchuria than thrre are Sabre* in
South Korea, or are likely to be there for a while.
They also obscured the fact thnl the United Na-
tions were pretty steadily losing planes to Communist
ground fire.
during the week and the Pie de Guerra Is said to
have entered the conflict between strikers and non-
strikers, by giving their support to 'he latter.
The Ministry of Government ana Justice, however,
moved to get the uniformed police who have been
remaining neutral while the students battled each
other and the Secret Police to intervene in student
clashes and to arrest anyone found carrying arms
during the different demonstrations for and against
the government.
The Ministry also announced that an under-
cover Communist movement, led by the Partido
del Pueblo, against the Chiriqui l.-ind Co. in Puer-
to Armuelles, had been brought to their knowledge
quite accidentally. -
An instruction sheet whlcn someone left lying care-
lessly was discovered by an official It revealed that
Panamanian Reds are really gunning for the Chlrl-
qu Land Co.
, WE TWQ
.t-fc
iWi* kme,KM ^wff1
PANAMA'S ATHLETES AT the III Bollvarlan Game*
being held at Caraca*, Venezuela, are more than hold-
ing their own although greatly outnumbered by the
Venezuelan, Peruvian and Colombian sports contin-
gents.
Panana wound a first In women's track and
field with three first* although represented by
only four athlete*. Carleta Gooden wen the fin-
al* of the 5 and 1M meter dashes in record times. I
Her teammate* Adelina Bernard, Dotare* Wor-
rell and Esther Stewart aided Panam to add
the 4 x 1H meter relay for women.
In men's track and field, Panam was third' behind
Per and Venezuela with five firsts. Per and Vene-
zuela were tied with seven firsts such.
Sam LaBeach in the 400 meters dash, Frank Prince
in the 800 and 1,500 meters and Faustino Lpez in
the 5,000 meters run were individual winners. The
fifth victory was scored In the 4 x 400 meter* run
(approximately one .mile) by the team formed by
Frank Prince, Marco* Wilson. Clayton Clarke and Sam
LaBeach.
Cuba's Charolito Esplrltuano. 146'-.. knocked out
Coln'* Young Flnnegan, 1434. in 1:1* of the fifth
round of a scheduled ten-round main bout.
Flnnegan was leading on points wneh the end came.
A hard right followed by a solidly placed one-two to
the chin dropped Flnnegan for an eight-count. The
ref stopped the bout after Flnnegan visited the canvas
two more times. ,
Teddy (Red Top) Davi*. 131. spoiled the U.S.A.
debut Of Panama Featherweight Champion Fe-
derico Hummer. 1H'S, by scoring a unanimous
decision ever the elongated Hummer in the eight-
round main event at St. Nicholas Arena Monday
night in New York.
It's the dawn of a new day for Eddie Stanky and
Joe DIMaggio.
For Stanky If* the tart of a two-year grind to re- )
build a shaky St. Louis Cardinal oaseball club. For <
DIMaggio, It's good-bye to the game he starred in for
13 seasons and probably a new^ob as- television com-
mentator. <
Stanky, the ex-New York Olant second baseman,
make* only one promise he'll Liep the Cardinal*
on their toes.
"They're all grown men," says Stanky. "and should
hustle. I'm sure most of them will, but there might
be a few who have to be reminded:"
Stanky signed a two-year contract as Cardinal
manager Tuesday night at an estim ifed $35-thousand
a season. Most baseball observers believe the scrappy
Stanley is the man to get the Catdlnals back to the
days of the Gas-House Gangs.
Stanky says every player on the squad will have
to fight for his Job, but he is glad to have the veter-
an outfielder Enes Slaughter, around. Slaughter plays
the slam-bang, all-out ball Stanky typifies. The 34-
year-old Stanky say* he definitely will play next sea-
son even though it means trying to replace the man
he calls the best second baseman in the league. Red
Schoendlenst has been the regular St Louis second
baseman for several year*.
In return for Stanky, the Giants got southpaw
Max Lanier and outfielder Chuck Diering. Lanier
ha* said he may qifit baseball rather than leave
hi* restaurant business in St. Petersburg, Florida ]
where the Cardinals train. The Giant* train at
Phoenix, Ariiona.
VIce-President Charles Feeney of the Giant* say*
the Stanky deal stands even though Lanier quits base-
ball. "It's our problem to get Lanier to sign," saya j
Feeney.
DiMaggio probably will replace Dizzy Dean aa j
television commentator for the Yankee home games. I
Dean will, handle the St. Louis Browns television next 1
season. DiMaggio speaks slowly and distinctly and la I
considered a natural for radio or television. Yankee j
co-owner Dan Topping agrees.
"Joe definitely will remain with us in some capa- I
city," says Topping. We have talked about him do- I
lng television for us."
DiMaggio says he wants no part or becoming a man. I
ager, coach or scout. "But," adds Joe. "I think I could ]
do all right describing games over the air." .
Manager Casey Stengel also is doing some planning ]
now that- Joe is gone Stengel say- his 1951 rookie !
Mickey Mantle will get first shot at Joe's spot in cen- I
tcrfleld. Casey also has a few trades In mind but isn't I
very optimistic about them.
He has talked to the Boston Red Sox about out- ]
fielders Ted Williams and Dom DiMaggio.
"I don't think the Red Sox would let Williams
go," says Casey, "and we're pot going to break up
this club just to get one player. I Just lost my big
buy, and I'm going to be darned careful about who
else I give up. One thing for sure," adds Stengel.
"If we do get WilHams be won't be playing in Df-
maggio's center field spot." '
.Nineteen-year-old Mantle was his usual shy, but I
confident self upon hearing he is expected to fill DI- I
Magglo's shoes. Mickey, who Jumped from Class "C* j
ball to the Majors in 1951, was in Commerce, Okla- I
homa, with his parents when he heard the news.
"I sure hate to see old Joe leaving the game," said I
Mantle. "It won't be the same without him around. I
As for me, I'll never begin to fill DlMa^glo's shoes but I
I'll sure gWe it my best." 1
Mantle has been classified 4F by the draft board 1
because ot a bone disease which causes his lower left I
leg to swell. Mickey says the leg feels good, but It I
still swells a little when I use It a lot "
----- o ------
Elsewhere In baseball, American League Umpire Cal I
Hubbard is recuperating In a St. Louis hospital after I
a hunting accident. A shot-gun pellet hit Hubbard in 1
the eye during a hunting trip Tuesday.
The hospital refuses -comment on H ubbard's condl- I
tlon but friends cay the umplie hm a "50-i0 or bet- J
ter chance" of saving the 3lght ot that.
. The Cleveland Indians have lost taeir ninth player I
to the Army the most by any Major League club. 1
The latest to go is catcher rial Naiagcn who played- I
ed with San Diego last season I
* ^^ I
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951


U.S.. Propaganda Goes
Over Big In Yugoslavia
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia. Dec.
15 (UP) Ask anyone In Bel-
grade how to find the United
States Information Center and
he will tell you "Follow the street
past the Hotel Majestic until you
see a big crowd. That will be it."
Day and night the USIC win-
dows, on a busy corner near the
center of town, attract sidewalk-
blocking interest. An average of
over 40,000 persons a month go
on inside to look at the down-
stairs library and reading room.
Another 30,000 monthly use the
Zagreb branch.
The USIC and Yugoslavia have
come a long way since the days
in 1946 when secret police were
stationed outside to interrogate
and sometimes arrest those who
walked in.
For a few weeks the service was
completely closed down. Then an
arrangement was worked out for
a quiet and limited re-openlng.
The popular magazine distribut-
ed by what was then USIS was
forbidden.
Even since the end of 1946
there has been a gradual in-
crease in USIC activities, he big
upsurge began in the summer of
1949. coincident with the lto re-
gime's first hesitant steps toward
economic collaboration with the
west.
Today Yugoslavs move freely
and unhampered about the
crowded premises, many return-
ing again and again. They re-
quest "Voice of America" pro-
grams on open postcards and
carry on a lively correspondence
with the library on every con-
ceivable question connected with
America.
In early 1949 the USIC staff
counted an average of 20,000 vis-
itors per month. In August. 1949,
there were 34,000. In September
41,000 and in March. 1950, a peak
of 45,500. A monthly average of
over 40.00 has continued ever
since.
The visitors concentrate most-
ly on the downstairs exhibit
room., which has been denuded
of all furniture to make room for
.the crowds. The library and re-
ference rooms are heavily used
also.
About 8.000 volumes are in the
library, all but a few reference
works available for loan. The
USIC staff reports remarkably
good returns on the books, even
the hundreds which are loaned
by mall all over Yugoslavia. Most
In demand are scientific and
technical works.
Numerous other activities also
go on at the U8IC. Belgrade ra-
dio gets regular loans of records,
both classical and modern dance
music, and frequently commen-
taries to accompany the pro-
grams. Some 150 to 200 documen-
tary films, renewed with new
subjects every few months, are in
constant use.
One movie record of a recent
air show in Washington, D.C., is
being shown daily to visitors at
an exhibition celebrating the
tenth anniversary of Yugoslavia's
guerrilla war, which had to do
without planes through most of
its course.
Communists Back
Nazis In Berlin
BERLIN, Dec. 15 (U.P.)
Almost 15.000 hard-boiled Nazis
have formed about 30 fascist un-
derground groups in West Berlin
with financial support from Com-
munist Soviet zone sources, a'
West German government agent
reported.
The investigators, who has ex-
amined illegal Nazi activities in
the three western sectors of the
city, said the East German com-
munists sponsor neo-Nazis so as
to have handy a group poised
"for possible unrest."
All programs of the loosely-
linked organizations, according
to invetlgations, have the follow-
ing aims in common:
Revival of the old Nazi ideol-
ogies, rejection of the democratic
system and spreading of anti-
Semitic feeling.
The government agent describ-
ed the iUegal NSDAP (Nazi Par-
ty), with a membership of 8.000
former Nazis, as the biggest of
the groups.
Another underground organ-
ization was formed by 150 former
members of Adolf Hitler's black
corps.
Other Nazi groups holding
their secret meetings In west Ber-
lin homes and hide-outs are, ac-
cording to the agent's findings:
A 60-man organization com-
posed of former Nazi storm troop-
ers; a 300-man "people's action"
with a strong anti-Semitic policy
under Richard Bode, editor of the
anti-Jewish Nazi sheet Der Stuer-
mer; a "national youth league":
and an Illegal trade union.
HAPPY LANDING * '
i miii, q
BUTTE, Mont. (U.P.) feter*'h
an pilots had proof here recently
that a small training plane can
be landed on a "postage stg**fi
Dirk Duykers escaped with
or Injuries when he landed
the roof of the Butte aero sale:
hangar. After a faulty take-off,
he landed In the middle of the
80-100 foot roof.
II ' I I^^^SM I ^^.^^SS^pSSWS^ I ^ I
Premier Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle
&
7
27
53
5t
76
84
8
m
14
ISO
54
7?
IIS
90
*7
1/6
33
O
12
I/O
97
I05
20
24
41
61
US
134
135
55
13
7
2
117
35
7/.
73
80
106
2*
I
i
24
m
30
1/8
21
56
62
107
10
25
50
7a
S3
ts
IOI
127
132
136
57
8t
128
n
3/
SI
74
91
112
in
13
82
we
120
14
m
44
Me
US
%
WL
32
58
i
Z'l
15
22
52
97
103
121
33
14
*S
83
0
121
17
45
44
84
122
IB
S
123
KSgH
JOHN2!
GLOCOAT
JSrnoo**
MkS
m."""
Make floors shine
the easy way
with the wonder
polish that's now
water-repellent!
Your tile, wood or linoleum floors get a beauti-
ful, protective shine in minutes, with self-
polishing Glo-Coat. And now you can wipe
away water or spilled things, yet your floors
koep their shine! Johnson's Glo-Coat is now
positively water-repellent!. Save time and
effort. Make your housework easier. Get Glo-
Coat Save money, toobuy larger sizes.
JOHNSON'S GLO-COA1
_ _________JHntrt baton:
For sale at all
P. C. Commissaries
TROPIDURA ;
1Insect
8Freer from
mixture
10Electrical
unit
18Pretense
ISPot
20Childish
21Eat away
22Araceoua
plant
23Whir!
24 Black and
. Mu
25Jet black
26West
Indian
shrub
'Reflect
Row
Make
complicated
,83Wandering
Indian
- dancer
34Assembler
37Footed
vaae
38rOf a crown
42Like a fuel
43Syrup from
sugar
47Footless
animal
48Rutaceou
tree
60Unearthly
62Set of
workers^
HORIZONTAL.
63Printing-
term
65Circum-
ference
57Substance
68Depart
59Aaaam
insect
60Heat to
excess
62Black
variety
of hard
rubber
65Weight of
India
66Palpable
68Young
salmon
66Hangings
71Jot
72More
prepared
76To-do
76Eight.
pointed
cross
80 Small
branch
81Mishap
86Before
87Cotton
fabric
89An alarm
90Roman
house god
91Store up
93Tatter
94 Agitate
96Ingrained
dirt
98Scent
99Wooden
peg-
101Engender
103Elysium
104Handler
106Civet
108 Service at
close of
meal
110Thus (L.)
IllModerates
113Woo
114Explode
with
sudden
report
118Face
value
119Pressmen
124Enduring
metal
125Cheek
bone
127Bravery
129Gait
130Term in
mathe-
matics
131Babble
IS?Flower
133-Capital of
Peru
134Notice
135Waif
136Hold back
137Discover
1A larva
2Oil shielded
side
3Snow
vehicle
4Formal
retraction
5Of the roof
of the
mouth
6One
7Copious
flow
8Biblical
Judge
9Fragrant
10Pure metal-
lic iron
11Brazilian
bird
12Rambler
13Arabian .
seaport
14Set of
artificial
teeth
15Salt of
stannic
add
16Depend
17Seed coat
18Burrowing
animal
28Harden
sails
30Wing
32 Land
measure
35On left side
VERTICAL,
36Blemish
38Writer*
mark
39Musical
work
40A hard
resin
41 Licit
43Shrinking
44Desist
45Purple
seaweed
46Hard
mineral
49Niggard
51Go swiftly
54Muscle
having
three heads
56Rasher
58Foremost
61Very fat
63Place of
confine-
ment on
ship
64Mark
67Channel
68 Sliding-
boU
70Group of
seals
73What-not
74Lift
76Purposed
77Mall
78Let
79 Fallacy
82Dogma
83Ignore
84MenUoner
85River in
England
88Rook's cry
89More
reliable
92Acclima-
tize!
95Seen
97Readjust
99Absconds
100Eel
102Wisher
106Stannum
107Town in
Belgium
109Source of
light
111Of a ussue
112Cleft
114A plate
115Iroquois
116inflection
117A small
pastry
120Roar of
surf
121Goddess at
discora
122Play
boister-
ously
123Remain
126Luzon
savage
128English
- rural
festival
ATtrast tl-r >r lull: 73 IimDl.intmtcd by Kins FWMns Syndic!.
Answer to be found elsewhere in the Sunday American)
Farmer Devises Way
To Protect Birds
HOWARD, S.D. Dec. 15 John
Ho&s has devised a method for
protecting pheasants and other
wild birds while harvesting his
farm crops.
He has his black Labrador
hunting dog flush the birds
from In front of the mower
He also places several pickup
guards on the sickle bar. The
guards jut out several inches
ahead of the. blade and arouse
the birds.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,1961
Travel Made Diffiealt
WEYMOUTH, Mass. (UP)
When an airliner made an emer-
gency landing here, the 16 pas-
sengers were loaded into a bus
for a trip to the nearest commer-
cial airport. The bus broke down
and they were transferred to
taxicabs. One of the taxlcnbs
then developed a flat tire but all
finally completed the trip.
SwNlay Amman SiH.W6nt
All He's Asked To Do
Is Fish Folks Out
NEWPORT, Ky. (UP) Rob-
ert Payne has the kind of job a
lot of people dream about.
Payne Is paid for doing noth-
ing more than sitting in a boat
under a bridge eight hours a day.
The reason is this: The Oreen i
Line traction system's span a-
cross the Licking River is being
resurfaced and it's Payne's job to
fish any workmen out of the riv-
er who might fall off the bridge.
39-Inch Auto Horns
Are Not 'Adequate*
ALBANY, N.Y. Dec. 15 (UP)
William R. Costantlno, 18. learn-
ed to his sorrow that the two 39-
inch horns on his automobile
were not "adequate."
Arrested when the horns
"caused a terrific blast" that
frightened pedestrians, Con-
They Grow Old In
West But Stay Tough
BROADUS. Mont. Dec. 15 -UP)
They are still wild and wooly in
Montana, at any age.
A writer tried to interview
92-year-old Charles Thex while
the oldster was working n a
nearby field. He was brushed
off with:
Tm too busy to talk. I have
to get this haying done."
Thex first came to Montara
with a Texas trail herd In '.877.
stantlno was given a suspended
sentence in police court for not
having an "adequate horn or
suitable signal device on his
automobile."
The horns cost him $204. the
youth walled when the court or-
dered him to produce "satis-
factory evidence" they had been
removed from his car.
I
PAGE THREL

;l
Mg



1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
nr.ri- ANO -UW .....in ay THI PANAMA AMERICAN PE, INC.
FOUNDED II NILION OUNHVtLL IN IIS
HARMODIO ARIAS. EOITOH
57. H STREET P. O. BOX 134. PANAMA. R. OF P.
Telephone Panama No 2 07o ts Lines)
cable aodres pan american. panama
Colon Ctfiqe 12 170 Central Avenue etween 12th ano 13th Sireet
foreign representative* joshua b powers, inc.
349 Madison Ave new York, local sy mail
PER MONTH. IN AnvANf-p % 'f.TO S 2.BO
FOR blX MONTHS. IN ADVANCE_________________9 80 13 OO
FOR ONE YtAR. IN AOVANCC__________________ I* SO 24 OO
POETS' CORNER
BESIDE /"DEATHBED
(From The Hopkins Review)
Her spirit hiding among skin and
bones
In willine,ness and wariness waits
death
Like hares that peer from corners
of their peas.
Lured by a curiosity, yet loath.
Her eyes meet bed. chair, face,
but do not focus.
As if these objects, heretofore
shade.
Have caught up with their sha-
dows. Thinks that wake us
Upon her eyelids heap a heavy
load.
As straws pierce rock, our words
reach where she lies.
Heedless of our cheerfulness or
condolecence.
Uncaring how our chatter ebbs or
flows.
She catches the first syllable of
silence.
So true the craftsman, memory,
in lying,
She will be less a stranger dead
than dying.
Vassar Miller.
LOST SEASON
(From Kansas Macacina)
Summer is over.
We are finished with long, lasy.
quiet days.
The wine of autumn fills an eag-
er cup.
But I am sad.
I am not ready to see leaves fall.
To know the frost and all that It
portends.
Summer is too short; there are
birds I have not heard,
And gardens somewhere that I
have not seen.
A blue haze covers the distant
views. September wind is
chill.
But we must drink this wine of
autumn,
To gird ourselves for winter and
Its cold.
Summer is over...
The work I should have done lies
with my other dreams.
And I am sad. For though sum-
mer comes again,
I may be old, and satisfied and
winter-bound.
Helen Lindsey
LOON CALL
(From The Christian Science
Monitor)
Quiet
Is shattered now
As far across the lake
A loon calls down dark corridors
Of night.
L. D.
WHEN GOD A BABE DID
CHOOSE TO BE
(From Spirit)
When God a babe did choose to
be.
The stars with wonder shook
For never had such Majesty
Assumed so mild a look.
Then, angels blossomed in the
skies
As bright as daffodils.
And shepherds shielded dazzled
eye
That midnight In the hills.
When God a babe did choose to
be.
All power from heaven came
down
To show us erring men how we
Might wear a thorny crown,
Might choose a crosswith no
retreat
That truth should still live on
And rise with nail-holes in her
feet
To walk across the dawn.
Margery Mansfield
MONARCH
Irtt FAMILY fAVORIU FOR
ALMOST 100 YARS
Monarch finer foods
are today the stand-
ard of quality all over
the world. They are pre-
pared in the most modern
manner... but retain all the real
old-fashioned flavor. Five generations
have proved Monarch finer foods... the
BEST by TEST. There are over 500
Monarch finer foods. Ask for them in your
grocery store. If your dealer does not
stock Monarch finer foods, inquire of:
:.~j

' -
I
MONARCH
World's Largest Family of Finer Food
Distributors in the Republic:
OLON rajjaropulos. S. A. Tel. 1060
NAM.ACm. Panamericana de Orange Crash
HOME DELIVERY Tal. 3-3219
YOUR SPEED AT A GLANCEThis oversize peedometer, developed by frame safety specialists /
in Seattle. Wash., and at Washington State College, may soon appear en police cars throughout the'?
country. The 31-inch half-moon speedometer registers exact speed in lights, and motorists are invited J
to check their own speedometers by it. Here, Washington State Prof. Homer J. Dana, left, and CaptJI
R. W. Zottman, traille chief of Seattle police, developers of the idea, look over the finished product,'!
Pearson's Merry Go-Round
DREW PEARSON SAYS: Canada withholds alum-
inum from l'-S.; Penny postcard bows out Jan.
1; Two youne men solve copper shortage.
WASHINGTON.Its a poor example of the
good-neighbor policy, but Canada is deliberately
withholding precious aluminum from the United
States.
This has already pinched the aluminum supply
for home construction and other civilian uses.
But far more serious the Air Force is not get-
ting ail the aluminum it needs to build jet fignt-
ers.
Furthermore, part of the aluminum Canada is
withholding from us was financed by United
States RFC loans during World War II.
What Canada has done is divert aluminum
from the American to the British market.
It won't be admitted, but the real reason for
this diversion is to force this country to swap
steel lor aluminum.
For example, Canadian aluminum shipments to
the United States dropped from 4,800,0u0 pounds
per month last March and April to a meager
b,300,000 pounds per month todaya decrease of
Uj per cent. I flaw i
In the same period, Canadia.n",h.|puv*iits to
Britain have shot up from 31,MumO-*W)ftads to
39,70..\000 pounds per monthan Increase of 88
per cent. As proof that this Is a cold-blwdediJKtMeeze-
play, Canada has doubled its aluminum ship-
ments to Australia, Brazil, Uruguay and even Ar-
gentina at the same time it strangled, the alum-
mum How to tnia country.
In fact, the United States is the only major
market that received less Canadian I metal tuis
year than last.
As a result, the United States is the only North
Atlantic Pact country that has been forced to
clamp civilian controls on aluminum.
CANADA WINS
Meanwhile, the Canadian squeeze has accom-
plisncd its purpose and forced the United States
to swap American steel for British aluminum.
Hard up for steel but overllowing with alumin-
um, Britain has agreed to divert 22,000,000
pounds of aluminum to American purchasers dur-
ing the next five months.
in return, Britain will oe allocated 25,000 tons
of fabricated American steel, 45,000 tons of steel
ingots and another 28.500 tons of iron and steel
scrap from the American zone of Germany.
Tne joker in this deal is that the United States
must return the aluminum after its own plants
are expanded to make up the shortage, though
Britain is allowed to keep the steel with no
strings attached.
Another ironic fact is that Britain's contribu-
tion of 22,000,000 pounds of aluminum won't come
from Britain at all, but It will be shipped directly
to us from Canada.
In other words, this is the same aluminum that
normally would have been shipped to the U.S.
market anyway, but was withheld In order to
force this country to kick In precious steel.
ICKES PREDICTED IT
But here is the final Ironic pay-off.
During the recent war Jesse Jones, then czar
of the RFC. advanced $68,503,000 without interest
to the Aluminum-Company of Canada (affiliated
with the Aluminum Company of America) to
build the Shipshaw aluminum plant on the Sa-
guenay River.
Jones also extended another $34,240,000 at 3 per
cent interest, gave the Canadian plant an order
for all its aluminum, and provided that If the
order was canceled before 1945. It would not be
necessary for Canada to pay back the (68.580,000.
Harold Ickea, then Secretory of the Interior,
vigorously protested.
He argued that t.he USA. could not control
fc] FfiTJB
HUM'
aiascft4si ^ttppictncft!
Canadian aluminum, and that equipping a Can
adian power project with vital turbines, would
set back American power projectsShasta Dam,
Colorado-Big Thompson, parts of Grand Coulee,
others. x
However, Jesse Jones had his way. Now Canada,
withholding aluminum from us, is fulfilling
Ickcs' prediction.
END OF PENNY POSTCARD
There will be some nostalgic sighs at the Post
Office Department when the latest casualty ol
Inflation, the penny postcard, bows out Jan. l.
For about 89 years, during which helicopters
have replaced horses and which have seen a 500-
lold increase in the cost of government, Uncle
Sam has been toting the popular, green-stamped
postcard to all parts of the countryeven to our
irocps overseasfor one penny.
Government subsidies helped, of course, but it
is .still a tribute to American rugged Individual
ism that the penny postal could survive so long.
The postal was first issued in 1872 during the
administration of President U. S. Grant.
Later, in 1898, the same one-cent postage was
authorized, the more elaborate picture card on
which you place your own stamp.
One reason Congress boosted the postcard to
two cents after Jan. l was because big business
has been exploiting the penny postal for adver-
tising purposes.
Actually only about 10 per cent of the 4,000,-
000,000 cards sold yearly to post offices are now
used for personal correspondence.
To foil the advertisers. Congress further pro-
vided a 10 per cent surcharge for postcards pur
chased in bulk lots of over 49.
But the Post Office Department doesn't think
the new price will seriously affect sales. Even for
two cents, the government postcard Is still far
and away the best mail bargain anywhere in the
world.
NOTEMail a postcard today to the Pearson
poll of Republican candidates for President. Mali
it to Box 1942, Washington 13, D.C.. and state the
GOP candidate of your preference for 1952.
IKE WOULDN'T BE CONVERTED
An off-the-record crack by George Allen, one-
time White House jester, is proving good cam-
paign ammunition for Elsenhower boosters who
want to prove Ike is a Republican.
Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., of Massachusetts,
leader of the "I Want Ike" forces, and former
Sen. Harry Darby of Kansas are repeating re-
marks Allen made before the National Industrial
Conference board at the 8ea View Ciub near At-
lantic City.
I know General Eisenhower is a Republican,'*
quipped Allen, "because. Lord knows, I've tried
hard enough to convert him to be a Democrat. I
didn't have a bit of luck.''
SOLVING COPPER SHORTAGE
One of the most strategic metals In the world
today is copper. All sorts of defense projects are
retarded because of it.
However, when a couple of young men called
nn defense mobilizers in Washington with a new
invention by which the government could save
millions of pounds of copper, all they got was
advice and the run-around.
The new invention is a bimetal combination of
copper and steel, whereby a steel sheet can be
perfectly lined with copper, thus savlnrr, tremen-
dous amounts of copper, yet at the same time
gl\ Ing steel corrosion resistance.
During ^orld War II. a group of civilian scien-
tists organised a board In Washington to sort
out new Inventions and use them for the Army
and Navy. Today, this board has been replaced
with run-arounders.
However, fed uo v ith the government. William
Ulmer. one of the inventors. Is setting private
buriness interested in Cleveland this week.
sy^DAY. DECEMBER i. W51
1


iBMMnm
Labor News
And Comment
By Victor Riese!
HEARD ON THIS BEAT: '
It's been }ast about as easy to obtain passports as mink coats
In Washington over the past few years.
Easy even for the 50 Communist labor leaders who were wined,
dined and airlifted throughout Russia, then briefed and. unfortu-
nately, returned to the U.S. for a aeries of pro-Soviet propaganda
rallies, the moat recent of which have been.held in New York and
Chicago.
Now it can oe revealed that the State Department passport
division will be investigated by the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee
before Christmas, to discover Just who has been simplifying mat-
ters for those American labor agents who want to' slip in and out
of the "workers' paradise." Among these have been the most active
U.S. Stalinists.

The nation's massive steel mills will be silenced by a short
steel strike, predicts Father Charles Owen Rice, an intimate of
many of the top CIO leaders. Phil Murray's union now has $9,400,-
000 in reserve for any strategy it chooses.
Of all the candidates for the Republican and Democratic nom-
inations only Oov. Thomas E. Dewey and University of Pennsylva-
nia president Harold stassen do not have powerful labor leaders in
their corners.
Tennessee AFL chiefs have been whooping it up for their
Senator Estes Kefauver.
Walter Winchell I n New York
NEW YORK EXPLORER
The most colossal jewel in the Western Hemis-
pherethe topas mounted in the Museum of
Natural History. Weighs 596 lbs. (1.J80.-000 kar-
ats) ... The site where Stephen Foster dwelled on
the Bowery. Now a flop house beanery called
The Horse Market. (15 Bowery)... The most ex-
pensive parcel of property In the world: The
Northwest corner of 42nd and 5th. Realtors value
it around $20,000 per ft... The hospital without
a bed. The National Hospital at 61 Irving Place...
The six block area from 42nd to 48th on Broad-
waybrighter than before the war. There are
364.933 light bulbs and approximately 52 miles of
neon tubing... The Camel cigarette sign smoker
(on Broadway) who blows 9 ft. smoke rings...
The town's most unsual house of worshipSt.
Ann's Church (for mutes) on 10th Street. The
chapel is flooded with light so worshippers can
read the pastor's sign language sermon... Grand
Central Station, which thinks of everything. Even
has its own morgue... Radio city's fleet of elev-
ator operators. More than 400 for 215 lifts.
Why Oar Town is the world's leading amuse-
ment center: It has over 700 theaters and movie
temples... Sprawling Bellevue Hospital. Its 2ft
buildings spread across a dozen square blocks...
The Public Library which preserves (on micro-
film) every edition of a major New York news-
paper published in the past 150 years... Even the
futters of Park Avenue are snobbish. Busses and
tucks cannot use this thoroughfare. Strictly for
non-commercial traffic... The Waldorf-Astoria
which has a staff of over 2000... The Roxy The-
ater's huge lobby which can accommodate half as
many people as the theater itself... The unique
subway station at 190th St. Carved out of the
side of a cliff... One-third of the Empire Stale
bldg (largest in ihe world) is devoted to its 67
elevators... The largest chandelier of allIn the
Center Theater. A mere six tons.
One of the strangest sights in town: On 2nd
Avenue along the lower East Side. On the same
block (between 1st and 2nd Streets) are a saloon,
a funeral parlor, a .gravestone place and to top
it oila sign on the 2nd Avenue Theatre mar-
quee announcing its Yiddish musical comedy,
fc ilua. J?f STfiUa ^EME^^'A^ ;;??nt.Wor^- ^^.* O* *** >% between
Tennessee lads waltzed up to any whodlisten and talked up for ?bke a swank Vnch restaurant but isn't, it's a
Broadway is considered this Important: A
Stockholm (Sweden) newspaper. The Aftonbiad-
et, assigned a Broadway columnist to cover the
Bistro Beat. His name is Karl-Otto Westin. 8ports
a monocle, too... Manhattan's most baroque, ro-
coco and ornate edifice: The 10 story apartment.
house on the 58th and 7th Avenue corner. Every
inch is decorated with a design... The largest
barber shop in the city. The "Terminal" in Grand
Central depot. 54 chairs... The restaurant on 58th
6th and 7th called "The Stut-n-Tut."
the crime buster's nomination atop the Democratic ticket.
First actual public political praise for Gen. Ike from a labor
union came from the AFL Chemical Workers last week.
West Coast AFL chiefs passed word on to their Eastern col-
leagues that there was growing support for California's Gov: Earl
Warren, especially after his recent speech praising health Insur-
ance.
There is no longer any doubt that Sen. Robert A. Taft has
influential labor support in the AFL Building Trades, frequently
described as the foundation of the American Federation of Labor.
And. of course. President Truman will have the support of the
CIO which, in all industrial states, will form joint local campaign
committees with the Fair Deal AFL leaders.

Social Note:You may be wondering where the most promin-
ent Communists are spending their seasons for the next few years.
Alger Hiss, Communist labor Chief John Williamson and Polit-
buro member Carl Winter are in the Lewlsburg Penitentiary.
Ex-Party boss Eugene Dennis and ex-Daily Worker editor John
Gates (once one of the toughest, aluggingest Commissars in the
Spanish Communist army) spend their time in the Atlanta pen.
At the most modern of tails Is the furrier and Industrial expert
for the Party, Irving Potash.
Negro leader Ben Davis Is at Terre Haute, reportedly working In
the woolen mill there. ._,.,,
Easiest of the lot is the brainiest of the Party chiefs, Jack
Stachel. He's at the Danbury prison.
Big Party boss Gus Hall Is behind bars in New York, awaiting
sentence after his escape dash to Mexico.
Despite the splash of the Kefauver hearings and despite the
refusal of the biggest mob chiefs of all-the Guziks, the Accardos,
the Adonises and scores like themto answer questions, there have
only been two convictions for contempt throughout ^he country.
All is normal on the crime front.
To avoid what might be a bloody civil war inside labor between
the AFL and CIO, many of the regional leaders are orgmlttar
peace committees to work together down below, even H "tWe'r
chiefs feud In Washington.
First of these reasoning groups has been set up behind
scenes in New York. There five AFL men are meeting with five
ClO'ers, seeking an impartial chairman. '"""1':"
Then, at the first sign of a labor war, the 11-man cormnrwee
will meet and try to straighten things out before men are straight-
ened out on the sidewalks. --,-,. . .
Meanwhile first of the feuds expected to break out will find
the AFL Machinists, seeking to oust Mike Quills Transport Workers
from the airplane sheds, fleet services and stores of American
F Next big conflict win hit the atomic energy fields. Here the
AFL has announced that it plans to take over all nuclear weapon
Installations yet to be built.
The AFL has virtually driven the CIO from the Atomic Energy
Commission's plants. ^
mirs by the State Department It Is not unlikely that the
AFL and CIO will send missions to Spain if Gen. Franco eases
his restrictions on union activity there.
With tension mounting in Europe, and the Pentagon hearing
that the Soviets may move in the Balkans, our own government is
eager for American labor to get closer to TMo and Franco.
Tito's unions may yet be admitted to the International Con-
federation of Free Trade Unions.

Unmitigated Gall Dept.: The Soviets actually approached the
(Catholic) International Federation of Christian Trade Unions,
which met In Vienna last week, and urged them to Join the Com-
munist World Labor network. The Stalinist emissaries were thrown
out.

Te avo'd being.embarrassed by having to crack down on crit-
ical strikes, the White House has had Its defense agencies set up
an intelligence unit, to seek out trouble spots and try to smoothe
them before there's talk of t walkout In some vital defense plant
Headed by manpower boss, Arthur S. Fleming, this unit meets
once a week. If it senses trouble, It whips word to War Moblliaer
Charles Wilson, and he rushes it tn President Truman, who gets his
labor friends on the win.
home for dogs in the fashionable E. 70s... The
Stage Hand Cafe which isn't in the Theater Dis-
trict. It. is on 39th Street in the heart of the gar-
ment center. Named after a race-horse who
"laughed his way home" a few years ago. This
Stage Hand nag married a steed called Nadja.
Its sen, which runs First or Last, is named Run-
yon Fund.
Australian slang for "steaks and chops"... The
Police Department's 185 lady-cops. About a third
are college grads. Many are former models, wait-
resses, etc... The local law which nobody obeys:
That a night club must be light enough to read
a newspaper.
The Battery, the best place to view the river
traffic. Named after a British fort once located
there... Ornate pre-Civil War homes along
Church Street. Tall white columns and iron bal-
conies embellish each facade... The lighthouse
tower atop Seaman's Institute. A memorial to the
ill-fated S. 8. Titanic... New York (the five Bor-
oughs- -m its present form) is only 52 years old...
Tha glass mosaic surmounting the 6th Avenue
entrance to the RCA edifice. It Is made of one
million different glass slivers... Button Place and
Its charming nook:
Levers who hire hanson cabs for whirls around
the park probably wonder why the top-halted
drivefs wears a cap In their identification pho-
tos. Police regulations require caps because they
do not hide tne features... After midnight along
midtown Lexington Avenue you see more female
newsboys than males. All motherly types, whose
men run the stand by daylight... Bible House on
Park Avenue at 57th. j3ells nothing but the Scrip-
tures in every language and shipped to every part
of the world... The oddest gym you'll find any-
where is the one at 42nd and 8th. Circus folk,
carnival people and aged wrasslers train there.
Not unusual to see 70 year old women limbering
up or doing their daily workouts... The survey-
A tree-lined cobbled road,
iof th rf,t-?8~,8t SS?K !* .as ,nldeaways ors snafu-wbich set up the tiniest hunk of real
h 4t wr^"S ^lnals.w West estate at the corner of 7th Avenue * Christo-
pnrneri h S "" both on "* Jsame Pner SL ll ls 308 ^uare ebes. The tax Is $3
per annum.
corner!
Peter Edson In Washington
J- NLA Stall Correspondent
i Kb
town^bout who .will make' up'his cabinet tfMV ^An'aTh^eTworl.
man
reta
bad and thinks he has a chance for It.
Godfrey Is in the naval reserve and has* a lot of
contacts m that service. He is also a good friend
of General tte and visited him in Europe recently.
What's more, Godfrey has taken a sudden in-
terest in politics.
High officers In the Navy who tell the story
say that at least Godfrey would bring some hu-
mor to the rather dull Pentagon.
AN KXFERT COOK
One of the town's more eligible bachelors. Col.
Frank X. Dorn, awaiting confirmation as a briga-
dier general and one of the Pentagon's outstand-
ing authorities on China, has Just written himself
a cook book called "Eat and Enjoy It."
He's actually one of the best amateur cooks In
town and his book includes recipes from countries
all over the world where he has served In the
Army.
It even contains a few Russian dishes which he
boosts. ----------blgBest
It Is estimated that 400,000 square feet of space
is needed off the convetlon floor for all of TV's
special needs.
The Stadium didn't have this much extra room.
Movie studios will be set up to film special fea-
tures for distribution to local television stations.
Much of the convention proceedings will be
filmed for later TV showing, which requires la e
processing labs.
And the maintenance and operating crews
needed for television broadcasts are hue
WHO'S EXCITED
An investigation of the release of the story
about the Air Force's guided missile called the
Matador, which got President Truman so upset
has cleared the Glenn L. Martui Company of
having had anything to do with leaking tte story.
Apparently there was some Pentagon confusion
^B.KSfi S^^J^^^^^SiS
Faltering Philip
i
Philip's life m ruled with braises
WeU-wertj steps as* rags he ases '
Repairs tiill MM* his home like ae
f, A Classifieds, tact the right duel
WILL BE MORE STATIONARY
Although the new American Legion National
Commander Donald R. Wilson ls said to be one of
the best public speakers to ever head the Legion,
he is going to cut down on the amount of travel-
ing and speaking which recent commanders have
done.
Probably his biggest worry ls declining Legion
membership.
It has fallen from a post-war high or 3.300.000
to the current officially announced figure of
2.700,000, which is considered exaggerated because
of the method of reporting-membership figures
by individual posts.
This membership decline, among other things
is causing the Legion major budget problems
had nothing to do with it.
In their part of the whole thing, the Air Force
spokesman admits, the Martin people carefully
ooserved every regulation governing the hand-
ling and relea .e or classified inlonnation.
Till-:YXI. GE'i BY
According to Angelo Tozzl, a small manufac-
aurer of metal parts from Bayonne, N.J., who
has been In Dusuiess since before World War 1,
Washington doesn i need all the congressional
committees and government agencies which have
been created to help small businesses get in on
the defense effort.
He came to town to explain that he didn't
think that big business was trying to hog all
defense orders and that It was easy to get sub-
<&?
Wilson hopes to do some economising of the contracts f.-*m big firms and to do business with
Legions functions, as well as try to find some thiin.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951
way to spark membership.
Lack of funds Is the biggest reason whv the
Legion gave up its Tide of Toys program for Euro-
pean kids. Last year it cost the national organisa-
tion $130.000.
TV ENTERS THE PICTURE
Biggest reason why the Republican and Demo-
cratic conventions were switched In Chicago from
the Stadium, where they have been held before, to
the International Amphitheater at the stockyards
was to give more room for better television cover-
age of the events.
SoRdey Ameriten Supplement
He explains:
"Big business needs us small fellows just as
much as we need them and wants us to stay In
business to make use ol our special know-how.
We can do things they can't do and they know it.
"I've always gotten plenty of contracts without
help of five percenters or committees.
"All you have to do Is prove that you can do
the job you say you can.'
While he was saying this the Pentagon reveal
ed that small businesses were getting 75 per cent
of all government defense orders
PAGE RVK


He Gets A Thank You And A Panama Hat
(Text and pictures by
Ralph K. Skinner)
The reception tendered Repre-
sentative and Mrs. Daniel A.
Reed. (Dunkirk. K.Y.) by the
American Federation of Govern-
ment Employes at the Fern Room
of the Tivoll was a joyous occa-
sion.
There was plenty to eat and
drink and lots of nice people to
talk to. In addition to the guests
of honor.
Congressman Reed Is probably
the most popular legislator to
visit the Isthmus in years. He Is
vividly in the thoughts of Isth-
mian Americans as the man who
spearheaded elimination of the
retroactive income tax in the
House. Yes. lots of Canal Zoners
are buying Christmas gifts this
year that wouldn't have been
> '? If there had been 1950
taxes to pay.
But there's more than just his
id to the Canal Zone to this
stalwart of 72 years.
He's what you'd call a "swell
Joe."
He meets people with genuine
enthusiasm, shakes hands as
though it were a pleasure Instead
of a social duty and speaks hon-
estly and from the heart.
Mrs. Reed is the same.
They remained affable through-
out the reception, and appeared
really pleased with their gifts.
Reed wasn't going to open his
carefully wrapped box with every
one watching, but he got a little
outside help and found himself
with a handsome Panama hat.
Mrs. Reed
point purse.
received a petit
Now about the nice
we mentioned above.
people
AFGE Lodge No. 14 really
gave every croup in the Canal
Zone a chance to send Its re-
presentatives to meet and
thank the Congressman.
Some folks came from labor
unions and organizations, others
from womens' clubs, some from
the civic councils, more from
veterans' groups and I suppose
every fraternal outfit on the
Isthmus had at least one member
there.
Anyway, after the people who
attended had all met the Con-
gressman and Mrs. Reed, being
introduced by either Loveladv or
Chase, the gentleman from
Washington must have realized
that every strata of social and
employe organizations had come
together this once to do him
honor.
The folks at that party, felt
really grateful to Reed and he
was made to feel it.
Governor and Mrs. F. K. New-
comer. Lt. Gov. and Mrs. Her-
bert D. Vogel, Executive Secreta-
ry and Mrs. E. C. Lombard,
Executive Assistant to the Gover-
nor and Mrs. F. G. Dunsmoor
and Personnel Director and Mrs.
E A. Doolan were among the
olficials at the reception.
President of the American Fed-
eration of Government Employes,
Local 14, is Lovelady. National
Vice-Presldent of the AFGE is
Chase. They represented the un-
ion at this reception.
In charge of the arrangements
for the reception was H. D. Ray-
mond assisted by John De Grum-
r.-.ond. Also assisting were Mrs.
Rosalie Demers, Miss Bertha
F enslev. Mrs. Lada Hanklns.and
Earle Trout.
Reer1 h.-rt this photographer
". iov tr.der." Not with words,
but with pictures! Yes pictures
o' 15 foot hieh snow banks a-
lcn~ the roads back home in
Dunkirk.
No nla"e for a Canal Zoner.
And If Representative Reed
v ara his crlft hat home, he's go-
4i-' to attract some attention!
The Governor and Lieutenant Governor and their wives attended the reception. Shown here with
the guest of honor and officers of the lodge, they are, left to right, H. J. Chase, Rufas M. Lovelady, the
Congressman, Newcomer and Vogel.

1 .Mb. M>
Mrs. Reed, second from left, was surrounded hy enthusiastic Canal Zone ladies all eve-j.
Sundy Amerite* Supple*!
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,1951


Making gore that those in back could see and hear, Lovelady
mounted an informal rostrum for his presentation of gifts
to the Reeds.
Crric Council chiefs applaud the food legislati re work of Reed in eliminating the retroactive
income tax. Left to right, Raymond Ralph, Gaton; Charles A. Garcia, Pacific Council: Ed
White, Cristobal-Margarita; Reed, W. H. Ward, Gamboa and T. H. Hoenke, Pedro Miguel.
The tang of the salt sea was brought by representatives of
the Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association. Left to right,
George Fitzgerald, Vice Pros., Guy Lord, President; and Ed
Broun, District Deputy.
If the guests didn't remember the name of the host, they could get a quick reminder by
peeking at the wall where a banner set them straight That's Mrs. Lovelady in the center
facing camera.
"How about a bite to eat?" suggests Chairman of the Party
Raymond. With the aid of a mirror at the left we get two
lokos at Dare at the same time.
Veterans' organisations paid tribute U Reed, headed by, left. Department Commander of
the V. F. W, E. J. Egllnton and, right, Pat Ry an, who represented American Legion Depart-
ment Commander Majar Leon Carringtea.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951
,ni|ddn$ wnuMn-y Atp*f
PAGE SEVEN


ljfJL^9A 1J ^1 .J ? Phone Panam 2-3066
------------------ ^s------------ and ask for your favorite recording?

4:30 to 6 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station /"/ Q G ~ 8 4 0 ^CS
$$JMJWS = MY UFE OF ADVENTURE BE-
GAN WHEN MY SIRE, PR/MCE VALIANT,
RETURNED FROM HfS LONG QUEST ANO
DISCOVERED THAT I HAD BECOME A MAN-
ALMOST. I DEC/OED TO BE HAS TRUSTED
COMPANION ANO WE WOULD GO QUEST-
ING TOGETHER."
'WHTLE HE WAS AMSPECTTNG THE HORSES
I TR/ED TO PICK ONE OUT FOR MYSELF,
BUT THEy WERE ALL SO TERRIBLY BIG! "
NEXT WE HAD 70 GO TO THE RIVER 70
SEE /F THE SALMON WERE RUNN/NG
yET THIS WAS THE F/RST TTME I HAD
BEEN OUTSIDE THE CASTLE GROUNDS. *
~1
Uff*
Z&k-.^M
"/ STOPPED TO BATTLE
A HORDE OF DANES
W/TH GOLDEN
HELMETS, AND A
SLEW HUNDREDS' A
4F^hl
WHEN I REACHED THE RIVER My SH/ELD SUPPED
OFF My ARM AND I HAD TO CLIMB DOWN THE
CLIFF TO GET IT. My TVfTHER WAS NOWHERE IN
SIGHT.
BUT SOME PEOPLE ACROSS
THERiyER WERE AWFUUy
EXCITED. I COULD NOT
HEAR WHAT THEy WERE
SHOUTING, FOR THE
RIVER ROARS ANGRy
HERE. "
/
& I STARTED HOME, BUT THE WAy WAS VERT LONG
' AND STRANGE. THE CASTZE WAS NOT WHERE I
t*" LEFT IT, BUT I COULD HEAR PEOPLE CAUING My
NAME IN THE DISTANCE. "
*7 WAS HUNGRY AND MET A BEAST
THAT LOOKED HUNGRY TOO I CLOSE
AT HAND I COULD HEAR MY SIRE
SHOUTING AND THE THUNDER OF
HOOfiS."
"" 1 . * mum Mm
"*i ".*.-. tu 1
'THEN A SPEAR HURTLED BY ANO THE
BEAST FEU. MY Sim?, THE PRINCE, HELD
ME VERY 7TGHT AS WE GALLOPED HOME'
. *-
w
"SOON I WAS SAFE IN MOMMIES
ARMS WHERE NO HAfiM CAN EVER
TOUCH ME. IN A STRANGE, TIGHT
L/TTLE VO/CE SHE SAID TO MY fATHER:
'SOON ENOUGH HE WILL H4VE THE
LOOIC OF EAGLES AND THEN YOU WILL
TAKE HIM OUT INTO THE WORLD AND
7E4CH HIM MAN'S WAYS. UNTIL THEN
HE AS M/ME7"
____________mxr week- The Irtttfl-
PAGE EIGHT


< i
SwmUv AaertCMt Supplement
*
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6. 1951
.
m


'Wliaft Wour
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avonie r
and ask for your favorite recording!
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%t
JjUJU^Y; DKCE^^pR 16. W^L

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*
...WITH THK HEAVY CARGO
LOAP/ I THINK THW FREE-
LOAPING RIPE OF YOURC
JU6T ABOUT OVER, PEW?/
DON'T KNOW G WHAT VOU CAN F DO, PE0R1*, BUT...CCOTTY I ANP I ARE., j BAILING OUT/ / r ' BUT WHAT OF FLOTTANPJET... ZEY7WENO tar CHUTES.'K
fcfe
Mn
POUBLE ROUGH,
M'SIEU/ TAKE OFF
VOUg CHUTEC/i
ANP COOP RIPPANCE/
WE PONT NEEP THE CHUTES,
ANYWAY/ THAT WAS THE
WEETEST TRICK, JOCKO...
NOW SWITCH ON THE
ENGINE/
' PAGE TEN
CmnIm Aaenuui Supptaaort
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,1951


aport f\evew The latest news from the world of sports!
7:30 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station HOG 840 *<*
SyNJUft PE^EMBER 1$, 1951
SumUv Anerk^n Sopptaftent
PAfl^JEJLEVp


Soport rs
f>
eview
7:30 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station
The latest news from the world of sports!
HOG-840 k
r.vGE TWELVE
Swidav Aaemaa Supplenettt
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1961