The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01315

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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NBWSPAPM
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country Is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
SeagranrsYO.
g CANADIAN WHISKY
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TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1951
mrE cr.NT
........ '
Red Truce Team Suggests 5 Scandinavian,
__ t
Satellite Observers For Armistice
Suez Cops Told:
Shoot British
Cars at Border
Cabinet May
Take Steps
On RP Strike
CAIRO, Dec. 5 (UP)Egyptian rioters by firing- rifle volleyi over
police have been ordered to shoot their heads,
on sight any British vehicle try-
ing to enter the city of Suea, ac-,
cording to reports from the area.
The Egyptians have reportedly
refused British requests to enter
the town. Each Egyptian police-
man in the area has been issued "on strike today as an antl-Brlt-
wlth 300 rounds of ammunition., ish protest.
Latest official casualty figures' Fifteen Egyptians were report-
far this week's British-Egyptian ed killed and two British troop-
gun battles in the Suez Canal'era were wounded yesterday in
Zone are 43 Egyptians and 11 the second bloody clash in 24
Britons killed, and 87 Egyptians
All police leave has been
cancelled, and strategic points
and important buildings in
Cairo have extra police guards
mounted on them.
All the schools in Egypt went
staff photographer Walter Lea.)_______________
and three Britons wounded.
hours in the Suez Canal Zone.
A British column fought off
an attempted ambush by a band
of 40 Egyptian police and civil-
ians in the vicinity of Suez,
souther* entrance to the disput-
ed Suez Canal. Today's casualties
brought the 24-hour total of dead
to 50 British and Egyptians.
Britain, blaming the increas-
More than 1.006 rioting stu-
dents and workers clashed with
stave-wielding police in Cairo
streets today In an atmosphere
tense from two days of British-
Egyptian gun battles and riots.
In Alexandria 2,000 students
Sm *0 r k e r s demonstrated inglv frequent and savage clash-
rough the city, shouting antl- es on the failure of Egyptian po-
1 ans and: "Nhaa,;uce to maintain order was te-
*ur promises? Give ported- to have served an uM-
wantteveng o/" | matumwi ,0i$^ j|*a
the mu/aeotlon- *** "'"
iro also clashed with the Should Egyptian police Mil,
polio, and overturned, a Coca- Britain was said to have warned
Cola truck. [that her troops were ready to
Several policemen were report- take "all out action" to clean up
ed injured by stones hurled by chronic trouble spots,
the rioters. Police dispersed the United Press staff correspon-
dent Peter Webb reported from
the Canal Zone that the latest
battle between British troops
and Egyptians was fought on the
outskirts of Sues.
A column of Bren-gun carriers
of the Royal Sussex Regiment
was returning from a water fil-
tration plant when it was am-
bushed by the band of Egyptian
police and civilians, Webb said.
The battle was fought almost
sight of the scene of
President Alcibiades Aroseme-;
na reportedly moved today to
stop teachers from taking part
in political activities in the fu-
ture while the teacher's strike1
called yesterday went into effect
with partial success.
Most of thi teachers in Pana-'
rn City joined the strike move-
ment Dut some probably inde-
pendents showed up and,
taught classes this morning. One
school, the Repblica de Chile,
was functioning normally today
with all teachers present.
President Aresemena called an
urgent Camnet meeting this
morning to discuss certain meg-;
sures to end the student and!
teacher's strike called yesterday
by the Pennarent Teachers;
t.ommittee.
These measurer reportedly,
were drafted at an informal
Cabinet meet.? held at the Pre-!
s'.dent's home fast night.
Officially unconfirmed re-
ports say that these measures
include issuing decrees modify-
ing the Education Law to res-
trict teacher* from political
activity.
Early today the Minister of Edu.
cation made a personal check of,
all the school.- in the city and
held a mee tin-/ with.a group of
teachers from the National 1ns-
PANMUNJOM, Korea, Dec. 5 (UP) The Com.
munist truce negotiators today suggested two Commun-
ist and three non-Communist countries supply "neutral
observers" for the Korean armitice.
Red representatives told United Nations delegates
in an armistice subcommittee meeting that observers
from Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, and Communist
Poland and Czechoslovakia would be acceptable to them.
The Communists said that there would be "no boss"
of the inspection group "except the terms of the armis-
tice itself."
The naming by the Communists| *
of five nations acceptable tOi
them as "neutrals" was one of.
the few positive developments in I
a day of many United Nations;
questions, and few Communist
answers.
The Communists had suggest-!
ed that observers from neutral
states visit the "ports of entry"
behind both lines to see that nei-
ther side brought in fresh troops
or supplies during the armistice.
Until today however, the Reds
bad refused to name the coun-
tries they considered neutral,
and thereby eligible to supply
observers.
UN Jets Down 5
Migs In 10th
; Day Of Battle
Of-Hand
Artist Steals From
ChUd Met Vendor
where* they stood :in the st
A number or organized teach-
ers and profes-or., have express-
ed disagreement with the strike
movement, wnlch will affect a
total of 131,917 teachers and
students, but have declared that
they do not intend to break the
unity of the movement.
Threats of suspending indi-
vidual guarantees and revoking
i the Education Law a kind of
evil service for teachers volc-
ta jwterday in the Assembly is
LeHeved to have influenced some;
teachers against loinlng the
strike.
TOKYO. Dec. 5 (UP) United
Nations Jet fighters today knock-
There seemed .ome question another^ *** "* *****"'
t0 wbstterjhe^nitedjgao; Mx^ar. the 10th consecutive day
ing truly "neutral" in the Korean congrjQfcg^ ^ ^
minutes, equalling the longest Jet
The Communists still refuse to,**'1* n "?ord- ._.
clarify what they mean by "ports, Some 230 Migs were sigh tec
of entry"whether these would during the day, but not all were
include airports,and North Kc-brought to battle, .
i jiil unssjnri into Mao*)*-. The United ation* total or
rw- ^'Sl5r3rijU NerthKorean seaports: stroyed. SO preWBTy destroyed"
They also proved evasive on and 391 damaged.
other technical questions about
their keeping to the truce pro-
gram-
The Communist negotiators
Today's biggest fight time
whea 29 Sabres Jumped about
*ft Mies which were attacking
Thunderjets engaged en a rail-
blocked an immediate discussion | cutting mission.
of an exchange of war prisoners D gjr Force spokesman said
there were Indications that the
Migs have switched their tactics.
Instead of dogfighting with the
In Korea.
United Nations MaJ. Oen.
t\iks oo ON North Korean Mr"s stand guard as Communist staff tjficers, carrying
maoV head for the truce conference tent at Panmunjom for an afternoon session. Ground
HghUng hi been limited for the past week as hopes rose for a successful conclusion to
fighting ..
the armistice talks. (Navy Photo)
bered chance tickets. He offered
a check for payment after put-
ting the tickets in a small paper
bag.
Jose protested that he could
not receive a check and the Tronfnn Oil TfiriKS
youth obligingly returned the] reniun \Jl\ I UfllV
paper bag which supposedly had r* [i i C|#,.U*e
the tickets to the. boy and toldjUO Up 111 NOmeS
_ him to keep it while he tried TRENTON, Mich., Dec. 5 (UP)
The Commwrttar Chest drive t0 exchanfe the check in a About 11 huge gasoline and oil
has received its total con tribu- nearby bar. : refining tank, blew up or burn-
tions and directors report that f^,. a mtle whUe j05e de- ed, shooting spectacular sheets of
they are S3.W1 short of their $31,-1 elded t0 take the tickets out of fame hundreds of feet Into the
500 goal this year. 1 the bag, but all he found was air, and covering a ten-mile area
...a .>, onrfrtrmirp i 1. Collections that made up the R pjece or folded newspaper. with a heavy pall of black smoke.
MAN^. r>c. 5 (UP) -Morecloudofflneat The police believe that the No one was Injured In the
lan 500 persons perished.in the canlc dust waarer^rted in Duma contributions: thief mIk
me Volcano
Snuffs Out 500 Lives
Chest Drive Falls
Short By $3,801
A 12-year-old ticket vendor
was tricked out of $8 worth of within
lottery tickets early yesterday | Mondays clash in which 11 Brit-
evening by a young undentlfied lin troopers and 19 Egyptians
sleight-Of-hand exDert. it was were killed.
reported today to the Panama' violence flared yesterday as
Secret Police. Brigadier William Oreenacre,
The boy. Jose de la V. Vasquez. British commander of the sou-
told the police a youth about 181 thern Canal Zone, was reported
years old approached him while | serving the ultimatum on the
he stood selling tickets near the' Egyptian governor.
West Indian Bodega on Calido-1 British military sources said
nla and asked him for five Oreenacre "made clear to the
pieces of six different two-num-1 governor that the deplorable sit-
uation which developed was a di-
rect result erf the failure of
Egyptian police to maintain law
and order.'' ,
Archbishop Slepinac
Freed By Yugoslavs
ZAGREB. Yugoslavia. Dec. 5.
(UP)Archbishop Alois Stepl-
nac, 63. was released from Jail
today after serving five years
and two months of the 16 year
sentence imposed on him "for
offenses against the people and
state" of Yugoslavia.
He has returned to his birth-
place. Kraslc, not far from
Leopograva Jail where he has
been a prisoner,
High Vatican sources said Ste-
plnac's release was "a step In
the right direction, but not a
solution of this grave problem."
Howard M. Turner asked the'gtbrei they now stem to ^
Reds if they would agree to the c0ncentratln on golng after
appointment of a second suh- ^ u and Snootm 8tars
committee to consider the pris- gpr t bomber missions.
com
oner question.
The Communists replied that
their senior delegate. North Ko-
rean Lt. Oen. Nam II. had given
The Communist* are now be-
lieved to hsve fighters and
bombers capable of hitting the
any-
item no mstruction'on'tte mat"Unite* Nations positions
terfirst raised by the United where in Korea ___
Nations Mondav-and therefore.! Eve* port Installations at Pu-
could not give a definite answer.
The United Nations want to
arrange an exchange of prison-
ers as soon as possible due to
indications that nearly 60,000
United Nations war prisoners
mostly united States troops
nave already died in Communist
atrocities.
BALBOA TIDES
Thursday, Dec. 6
High Low
9:33 am.............J:36 p.m. shovelled leaflets overboard..
san are believed to be within
ranee Of Red bombers.
The Communist air force has
been moving its airstrips south-
ward, and is no longer based en-
tirely north of the Yalu River.
The United Nations front linea
are blacked out. and anti-aircraft
units are on a 24-hour alert.
Unidentified planes bombed
and strafed the United Nations
lines on the western front two
days ago.
There was a flurry at east cen-
tral front headquarters today
when six planes appeared and
violent eruptions of Mt. Htbokhi- gnete City, 106 miles from
bok on Camiguln Island, off Mln- |scene.
dlnao, yesterday, according to: The second eruption came at
latest reports from tte Wand- :46 p.m., Just as.rascne efforts
As the heat around the volcano. were organized. ,
subsides, search parties are find-! The government's
USARCARIB .......
U8 Rate-Employes ..
Local Rate Employes ..
15th Naval District ...
ngTSndrSa-of TloUmiTame ^department *%%**p0^^:Srtb"S SSmSd 1!
the ashes and boulders thrown that large numbers of SK,u 'All Other contributors
out by the angry mountain. Ibeen burled under a volcaaM Ia-j~. "
The verified death toll is now w. 'TotatContributions ... $27.698.66
189, out bodies found today have ;. Deaths bey saW. *f f _------------,------,--------
not vet bwan counted off c ally. 'due to falling rock, hurled miles, -
^The'eteuaUon of Mambaj.ojfrom the volcano's crater from Modem ScidlC*
principal town on Camiguln, is saphyxlation and from burning,
J*. Joaqun Canuto, chief of |fflS Hied LOVC,
tte-Red Cross disaster relief said
the town hall at Mambajao had
thief palmed the ticket swith: chain reaction blasts, and the re-
'a neat sleight-of-hand trick suiting fires at Socony Vacuum
$ 6.000.00 commonly used by a gang of! Oil Co. refining plant which is
9,295.98 young thieves and pickpockets; about 20 miles south of Detroit,
5,860.52! Who operate along Central Ave- near the Oroaae He Naval Sta-
l-,158.68,nue. tlon.
986.93 -------------------------------------------- ---------------------
265.95
4.
almost complete. Only a few sol-
diers and relief workers remain
S what Monday was a town of
,000.
The mountain blew up in two
eruptlens, almost lt hours a-
part.
The first, at 7 am. Tuesday
55| Bus Smashes Into Marching
Children; 23 Dead, 19 Hurt
been converted into an emergen
cy hospital for the injured
Two U.S. naval planes were
lent to the Red Cross today tor
darkened trie skies in the area erf service in flying doctors, nurses
northern Mindanao with a great medicines and blood plasma to
A further disaster was feared
Rumor of Letting Franco
Into UN Briinr Protest
as a result of disruption of water
and other essential services on
the island.
PARIB, Dec. 6 (UP).-The The Red Cross said the water
Spanish .Republican govern- supply of Manbajao. being used
ment-in-kjdle sent a letter to as a relief center, had been "pa- -
Luis Padila Nervo, president of [ralyzed** bv the eruption. Imme-
the United Nations General As-! dlate efforU were being made to
sembly's meeting here protest-'evacuate the injured to a more
lag the rumored admission of suitable location
General Francisco Franco's. The.volcano erupilon .Is the
Spanish government Into the hlrd^lolent upheaval of Hlbok-
world body. hittok hi a* many years.
Says French Poet
PARIS, Dee. 5 (UP)Modern
conveniences are rniaini leve
according re Pierre Greeelaude.
resident ef the Society af
French Poets.
"Not only does one no longer
know love as literature through
the centuries has described it.
bat ome no longer knows it at
all," Groeelande told an audi-
ence ef attentive lonely women.
Grosclaude bemoaned the
tact that levers no longer apeak
in poetle phrases, and Masaed
It en modern conveniences.
"Telephone and aulck mail
service have pat an end to love
letters and their once delicate
stylet?
CHATHAM, England, Dec. 5 ets, marching in formation from
(UPiDoctors in three hospitals their hesdquarters at the near-
were fighting today to save the by Melville Barracks to witness
i lives of badly injured youths, a boxing tournament of fellow
'survivors of yesterday's tragic students versus sea cadets.
i crash in which a lumbering red The bus was being driven by
1 double-decker, bus plowed Into a John William Oeorge Samson. 57
marching column of 52 boys be- who was to be presented a medal
;tween toe ages of 16 and 18 tomorrow for 28 years of safe
years driving. He has been with the
At least 23 were killed and a- bus company about 40 years,
bout 19 were injured. | Passengers said the bus was
The bus hurled the little bo- moving at "normal speed when
dies into the air on the dimly suddenly the driver slammed on
lit Pembroke Road. Many of the the brakesbut lt was too late,
victims were smeared along the The vehicle was travelling along
roadway in pools of blood, their a poorly lighted road, using only
crushed remains disfigured be- parking lights, which is custom-
yond recognition. arythroughput England.
Police report on the accident1 The morning casualty figures
which was the worst bus crash In remained 23 dead and 19 Injur-
the Island's historywas expect- ed. The bus was travelling down-
ed later hill with parking lights only *'
The youths were members of ward the Pembroke gate of
the Royal Marine Chatham cad- Naval Barracks.
to-
the
FLOODED TOWN The Chucunaque River floods the town of Yavlra as, it wends it way
around the town toward the sea. At the far right U tl- mout" of the C.n'co River empty-
ing its swirling flood waters into the Chi cun aque and directly onto the w"1"-1*,'.^,!!?
large plantain plantations were wiped out. tun** ro.w


eAGE TWO
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T* PANAMA AMERICAN e A* INDEPENDENT BAH* WEWSPAPEB
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1051

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
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POMX RfP.HtNTATIVt JOSHUA WWI. INC
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< 1 7(1 t-l
M MONTH IN ADVANC-------------------------------------- ... | 00
rO I MONtN. IN AOVANCl--------------------------- ti Oo
POO ONI VIA*. IN AOVANCt------------------------1--------- *"
TM,$ IS TOU OBUM TMI MAOIM OWN COLUMN
T7e MAIL BOX
,M*",.?,,.7"".^,b.... M. *.-. -se- ,,M
,, dey Letter, or. publi.h.d IN the Older reee.vet.
Identity of letter riten .. heM etrieteet eentneiKe.
Th eewtpope. .-me. re,pe.bilitv U rf.t.moh oolmoo.
oercised in letters from reader!.
^ ------ o------
i
i MORE PRIVACY, PLEASE
The Editor.
8ir:The Ancon Dispensary want* to be a little more courteous
." IS fhou.d ^eP,ab" to be privately InterviewedJ, the doc-
tor, instead of been call in bv the dozen, which mean, you are
been place before the public, he ask you your troubles, you tell
him whats wrong and every one stares at you. __
At this day and age. this system embarrasses one. we the
Local Rate Employes hope that this will be adjusted, so one may
ieel as human, and not like hogs to -g^.^ CommuilUy.
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(0)
<>
(II
()
PETITION COVERING 17 POINTS
Canal Zone
(The author of this letter submitted it with the suggestion
'. that it be worked up in the form of a petition to:
Hon. Harry S. Truman. President of the United Btates
' Hon. Vice President Barkley
Judges of the Supreme Court
; Members of Congress
i US. Tax Court
J VS. Secretary of the Treasury
VS. Dept. of Justice
VS. Attorney Oeneral
: UJS. Internal Revenue Bureau
; QeBWemyrn:erican citizens residing in the Canal Z< Federal
employes, are justified in framing this petition as g*g*2**
the application of income tax. W* will prava by the toUowlng
that said taxation is unconstitutional and illegal That the law
passed in 1950 reads, "For Income Tax purposes, the Canal zone
I Is recognized as a U.S. possession," which la a false recognition,
; due to the facts herewith. .
, (1) Republic of Panama has sovereignty over the Canal
Zone and leases the 10 mile wide strip or land to tne
U.S. Government. ,
Why does the U.S. Government pay yearly to the Pana-
manian Government $250,000 gold for the lease if the
Canal Zone is a U.S. possession?
We as U.S. citizens are living and working in the Canal
Zone under a military governor.
We have no voice In electing this governor.
We are not allowed to own property in the Canal Zone.
We are not allowed to establish private business in the
We have no postal road service aa decreed by the Fed-
eral Constitution.
Canal Zone Commissaries are exempt from price con-
trol, not by law, but by edict. Whereas business enter-
prises In U.S. are subject to price control.
We as American citizens as non-employes, desiring to
visit the Canal Zone must enter through Panama first
by air with tourist card and photo, or have authority
Som tiie Executive Secretary, Panajpa Canal for a re-
tired ejnpfoyes to enter the Canal zone, and reside with
members bit their families -if travel by steamship or
' vice-Versa.
The Minimum Wage As Hour Act has never been appli-
ed to the Canal Zone; most laborers average approxim-
ately 60 cents per hour.
We have no voice or representation in Congress.
If the Canal Zone is a legal UB. possession, then all
income derived by all individual in the Canal Zone
should be subject to tax. The present law is most dis-
criminatory, as the law applies only to VS. citizens
drawing pay from U.S. Government agencies, while sev-
eral hundred U.S. citizens employed In, non-U.8. Gov-
ernment agencies do not pay tax. Nor do aliens, where-
as aliens in the U.S. are subject to tax.
If any VS. cltiaen in the Canal Zone has no visible
means of support they may be deported to the VS.
Canal Zone Postal Service will not honor VS. postage
stamps.
The Canal Zone has been decreed by Maritime law as
being a foreign port. American coastwise vessels moor-
ed to piers at either entrance of the Canal are subject
to Quarantine and Immigration, also Customs laws
upon arrival in U.S.
The Social Security Act has never been put into effect
to cover all American citizens working for others than
the U.S. Government.
A Canal Zone employe on return from visit to U.S. can-
not legally enter the Canal Zone with any liquor bought
in UB. Yet one can step across the Canal Zone bound-
ary into Panama and re-enter the Canal Zone legally
with any amount of liquor.
Further be it stated that we American citizens In the Canal
Zone object to discrimination, and illegal taxation based on the
fore-mentloned proof that the Canal Zone is not a VS. pos-
session. We are willing to share our obligations to our Govern-
ment, but we want it legal, and to have the same rights as citi-
tens and aliens in the U.S.. which at present are being denied
us. The application of Income tax In the Canal Zone has broken
down the morale of the workers here. The resignations that
are Indicative Is proof, besides being costly to the Government,
transportation, and training of new employes.
We are appealing to you for Justice.
Leg aliittc.
"
(10)
(12)
.(13)
(14)
(Id'
(it)
(17)
Army Outlook
Grows Rosier
In Germany
By PETER EDSON
HEIDELBERG. Germany (NEA)
Differences between the Amer-
ican military situation in Ger-
many today and one year ago are
marked.
On a visit to General Thomas
T. Handy's U.8. Army European
command headquarters here in
October, 1950, there was a gener-
al feeling that American forces
in Western Germany would be
considered expendable, in ease of
a surprise Russian attack from
the east.
Today there Is more of a feel-
ing that U.S. and Allied forces
in Western Europe ceuld hold
till reinforcementt tin be
brought In. The North Atlan-
tic Treaty forces under Gener-
al Eisenhower's cemmnd are
by no means superior to the
Russians. The Western forces
are woefully deficient in the
air. But they would not be
pushovers.
A year ago, there was some
loubt over what fate would be in
store for the 45,000 families and'
dependents of American officers
and top non-commissioned offi-
cers now living in Germany, in
case of a Russian attack.
Today there is a well-conceived
plan for their rapid evacuation
and escape to the French coast.
Co good is this plan considered,
in fact, that Fourth Division fa-
milies are now arriving and fa-
milies of the U.S. 43rd and 28th
Division officers will be brought
over.
A year ago, any such mass
movement of wives and children
was considered doubtful.
In the past year, American,
British and French forces have
b e Ch completely redeployed.
Their defense position is now
much stronger. Their alertness
and readiness to meet any sur-
prise attack has been increased.
U. S. ordnance, quartermaster
and engineer supply depots,
which a group of American cor-
respondents have been permitted
to Inspect, look impressive. They
have been built up tremendous-
ly In the past year.
General officers say they're
still not big enough. They never
are. It takes an enormous amount
of stuff to supply a modern war.
But, says General Handy,
"We're not hollering." He realizes
fully that Korea now comes first.
This la entirely different
from the prevailing Impression
Ken In the United States. In
t, the commanders in Ger-
many sometimes wonder what
all the excitement Is about
back home. There Is more- con-
fidence here than there. And
here they pat no reliance on
As the German occupational
duties of American forces have
been relieved, their field and
combat training have been in-
creased.
Scattered detachments in the
smaller towns have been concen-
trated In larger, tactical units.
Old German "kasernes" or ar-
my barracks still provide the
principal quarters for Allied
troops in Germany.
But field training areas have
also been taken over, and there
units live in tent cities.
Recent field maneuvers by A-
merlcan, British and French
forces over the whole Rhine area
would have been Impossible a
year ago. This time, forces work-
ed under joint commands.
Two of Maj. Gen. John E
Correct Info, Right From the Supply Department
-folftSCiW/4 LOT
OTCPSBACe
ATUSTfccR
Unwarlike Gestures
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. I cannot expert you on the
Korean War, first because I wasn't in it, and
second because it Isn't a war in any true sense
of war except, of course, to the people who
got killed in it. .
And even to it was more of a political traffic
accident.
I was only mixed up in one war, which was
considerably leas governed by ground rules.
I never hear of a war before, where the com-
mander gets fired for trying to win It. or a war
which runs back and forth and back again, like
a dog chasing iU tall.
.1 never hear of war which la fought part-
Ume, or where atrocity killings i,P/teq|ers are
debated Utfterms if timing of amiqUncalUint.
T Or a war which goes on in a I-wonT-ahoot-
you-if you-don't-shoot-me-flrst basis.
To consider the silliness of humankind you
have only to race backward over the conduct
of this "police action" in Korea, and you will
swear it never happened. It. has been played
from start to finish like a game of chest in a
madhouse.
The single tragedy is that the chessmen have
been kids, and tired old retreads, and weary
pros. But what it hat proved I will defy any
or blockade the ports because the Chinase won't
like it, even while the Chinese are killing your
people.
You can't do this, you can't do that.
You take this hill and lote it, and take it
again and lose it again. You cease fire here
and observe a perimeter there.
No war makes sense; this thing in Korea
hasn't even been a sensible guerrilla action.
Nobody yet has been able to tell me what we
are trying to prove.
rye read most of It. and all that comes out
is that we are in a light we dare not try to win;
in a valiant effort toward defeat. We have
^mj^cm^T.j^. man puylni
*rDVa$n. WiUoughby.. MacArthur's intelli-
gence boy, accuses a half-down writers and
three magazines of giving "aid and comfort to
the enemy," when the greatest giver of aid and
comfort to the enemy hat been the political
conduct of a war that isn't a war except people
get killed in it.
The most comforting aspect of the war, to the
enemy, has been our participation in It.
Wllloughby hollers about the press accounts
of the foul-upe in Korea, but Harry Truman
canned the old man, MacArthur, for a soldierly
'TexpMa?the good, and retired. Gen. Wll- eforTuTlmpir over the &tow**thm
loughby can call me a journalistic rag picker,
like he called the other fellers, but I do not see
how it is possible to look at the Korean mess
without heavy criticism of it* conduct. It has
been a sour operation from Its cocksure start.
Apart from affording the Russians a few
laughs and a chance to test their equipment.
very little has been accomplished past the
deaths of a great many nice young men who
Dahlqulsfs divisions and V Corps' had a very slight Interest In what South Ko-
headquarters worked with the jeans did to North Koreans.
British, and a French corps man-1 it u here that I mutt confess my Ignorance
euvered with the American fore- of global scheming, but I will bet my Ignorance
S^ of FELIX
Direct from FRANCE
tjuerlain f-^rfume
SHALIMAR f~ 11.75
FLEUR DE FEU () 11.75
LHEURE BLUE m-iM <~ 7.55
MITS0UK0 *- 7.55
Toilet Water ColofMt Lotk*.
FELIX B. MADURO. S A
es. The maneuvers showed plenty
of weaknesses.
Maneuvers never are realistic.
For instance, concealment wat
reported poor.
It was partially because troops
were prohibited from cutting off
branches bigger than an inch in
diameter, to use for camouflage.
This was to reduce damage pay-
ments to German farmers.
Air support of all ground
troops was also found to be far
from satisfactory.
But that Is ?#
ed on all VS. military operations,
whether in nutt* v. i ..
euvert in the United States.
Exeeilence of the French
units was perhaps the big ur-
K1M of tbls year't maneuvers.
tn. Manten fl. Egdy, com-
mander of the U. I. Seventh
Army, reported that French
units were net far behind A-
merlcans in one phase of the
maneuvers which called for ah
against that of the politicians who decided that
this wat it, this was the time to send somebody
else to do something vague in a futile fashion.
I think pack a bit: you can't bomb the bases
Seal of Approval under which this mock war
was being fought.
When and if the armistice, or whatever you
call it, is signed and sealed with the correct
blood I mean ink the Korawn conflict will
certainly have to go down in the books as the
All-Time Idiots' Delight.
We have spent live*. We have spent money.
We have managed to look pretty silly. (What
military effort we might have mustered seem-
ed Xo have been tquandertd for purpoeet 1 know
not of.
Like I said earlier, 1 can't expert it for you.
But I can ture be puzzled by it all, and may
find some outside agreement in the old gag that
If this Is war, it it one hell of a way to run a
railroad.
. '
Cure Of The Trouble
By JOSEPH ALS0P
cUeWuwWSHMTOHj
MERRY-GO-ROUND
|V OMW P1A>I4)M
WASHINGTONThere U no worte folly than
ormal prating when immoral behavior it the
eiult of compulsion.
And there Is vefy little doubt that American
politicians and American business men are in-
creasingly compelled towards the corruption
that increasingly marks their mutual dialing!.
The problem, then, it to remove the compul-
sion, which results from a vicious circle.
Politicians need larger and largad contribu-
tions to finance their campaigns.
The government which the politicians control
, .rows dally bigger, more mysterious and more
inPi;rvTnto!r e'tWrh Z,' ^important to the business men.
ed to pay money to the politicians, in campaign
n.hinni. ------iea to pay money 10 me poiiucuma, m ciwiutuBii
"If we don't nut our monev on 'contributions or otherwise, in order to facilitate
thAxS" w?mdUor Wft ^&^*^tl!r^\
lsh, moreover, to past lawk that merely limit'o
otherwise control the financing of political cam-*
Most large contributions art made Illegally,
under the table. la fact, there it no possible
remedy except the remedy briefly discussed in
the thirties public financing.
If campaigns were publicly financed on the
lush Ohio standard that has been proclaimed at
reasonable by Sen. Robert A. Taft, the cost
would be very great Indeed.
Moreover, there are many difficulties what
to do about new and minority parties, for ex-
ample, and whether to finance the primarlea
which replace elections in the South.
Yet both the federal Treasury and the Amer-
ican taxpayer would gain enormously in the
long run. if the Congress would crudely and
boldly cut the Gordian knots of this problem.
Drew Pearson says: U.S. scores diplomatic victory in Pa-
rig; Catholic bishops condemn McCarthyism; Ohioans
reient Taft-Bolton political monopoly.
WASHINGTON.The politicians are so busy knocking tha
State Department these days that when the State Department
does pull a diplomatic ten-strike it goes unnoticed.
The American disarmament proposal In Part, for instance
scored a tremendous victory, helped knock down Communist pro-
paganda that we were the world' leading warmongers.
Before this proposal was made, however, a hot, backstage
debate took place in the State Department.
Some advisers feared the Russians would pick up the disar-
mament plan and run away with it.
But members of the Russian section argued the opposite, said
tne Russians were sure to react the other way, and play Into our
hands.
That was exactly what Foreign Minister Vlshlnsky did He
shocked Western Europe by stating that he had stayed up all
night laughing at the West's disarmament pn poeal.
Since then. U. 8. Intelligence reports that vlshlnsky has re-
ef ived a scorching cable from the Politburo reprimanding him
Since Vlshlnsky has only recently got out of Stalin1! dog-
house, the chances are that shortly after he gets home he will
be fired.
CATHOLICS PAN MCCARTHYISM
Word from inside the Catholic hierarchy is that Bishop Em-
met M Walsh, Coadjudicator of Youngstown, Ohio, had a great
deal to do with that part of the Catholic Bishops' statement
aimed at Senator McCarthy.
Bishop Walsn, former bishop oi South Cain man of the legal department of the National Catholic Welfare
Conference and was appointed by President Truman as a mem-
ber of the Admiral Nlmlta commission to scrutinize loyalty and
totpected Communism in government.
Ex-Sen. John Danaher of Connecticut, a hading lay Catho-
lic, was also appointed a member of the Nlmliz committee, which
was killed because of opposition from Senators McCarthy and
McCarran.
Originally, McCarthy got his Communist-purge idea from a
Catholic professor at Georgetown University. Father Edmund
Walsh.
The senator had atked Father Walsh and Col. William A.
Roberts, prominent Washington attorney, how he could keep his
uame before the public.
McCarthy said that. In order to be re-elected in Wisconsin,
he would have to pick tome important issue and become a na-
tional figure.
Colonel Roberts tuggetted that, since Wisconsin it on the
Great Lakes, McCarthy campaign for the St Lawrence Seaway;
alto that he campaign for better social Security benefits.
Father Walsh advised that whoever campaigned on the Issue
of Communism In Government would become the most popular
figura in the country.
However, many of the Catholic hierarchy feel that McCarthy
wti not only late in accepting Fbther Walsh's advice, since the
campaign against Communism inside the government had been
started long before, but that he smeared far too many innocent
people.
Furthermore, the hierarchy never approved the quickie di-
vi rces McCarthy handed down for special friends when a judge
In Wisconsin.
These were some of the factors which Wrto the scathing
words d-ected at McCarthy in the bishops' statement unanimous-
ly adopted by the 132 bishops last week, which read:
"In their speech and In their actions, they (elected officials)
tie bound by the tame lawa of justice and charity which bind
individuals in every other sphere of human activity.
"Dishonesty, slander, detraction, and defamation of char-
acter are as truly transgressions of God's commandments when
resorted to by men in political Ufe as they are lor all other men."
MERRY-GO-ROUND
There are now 6,000 press agents on the government payroll
-and look at the press the government's getting'
Senator Welker of Idaho Is so tore at crime probes that he's
ordered hit ttaff not to speak to crime-butter Senator Kefauver.
Welker hat also blocked various moves of the D. C. crime probe.
It's hard to believe, but on Bntian-n>rpuan ssrfVimnt U over
the official Sues rat-catcher. Sore at the Brlth, this Egyptian
Eentleman has gone on strike. And ilnce. rats are a serious pro-
ltm capable of carrying bubonic plague, the British are worried.
Tip to Congressional Investigators: There may be an interest-
ing link between deputy Tax Commissioner Dan B<. llch and Henry
Orunawald, who tapped Howard Hughes' telephone wires for
Senator Brewster and Pan American Airway*. Orunewala\ who
handled tome tax catee, had a house near Bolicb's at Spring
Lake, N. J.
Lipe Henslee, the resigned Internal Revenue collector In
Nathvlile, hat reiuted to enter a government hospital for dope
addicts At first Henslee hid out from narcotics agents, finally
was warned that If he didnt turn up they'd lriur a warrant for
hit arrest. Henslee then wasted no time putting In an appear-
ance, was told he would be picked up If he were ever caught tak-
lug dope again. _^_
TWO OHIO FAMULUS
One undisclosed reason why some Taft Republicans are push-
Sg genial Congretaman George Bender to run for Governor of
Ido it compialnU from local leaders that two families, Tilt and
Bolton, are grabbing mora than their share of Ohio'i political
P lender la being urged by tuch rabid Taftlte a* Ben Tata and
Jive Ingalli to run against the senator's liberal brother. Charley.
However, mott GOP organisation leaden in Ohio are for
orother Charles.
Another family with a double-take on top political spot! is
the Boltont.
Oliver Bolton, son of -wealthy Congresswoman Frances P.
Bolton, fas announced for the GOP nomination for representa-
tive In another diatrict, the eleventh. ___
Mrs Bolton, Incidentally, has an excllent record In Congress,
sticks to her Job, doesn't waste time with social fol-de-rol.
Charley Taft, who has a distinguished record as a progres-
sive-both in Washington and Ohio, has always campaigned for
OOP candidates except during one election when he wat in the
State Department. .
Both this column and Ohio Oopeers were mistaken In re-
porting that Charley had once voted for Roosevelt.
He has always voted the Republican ticket.
All campaigns of the two national parties' no-
minees for national office ought to be federally
financed on a reasonable standard, and any
other financing ought to be forbidden.
Finally, it is also essential to tackle a third
problem which is at the very heart of the pre-
21 Central Avenue
6 Tivoli Avanua
on?" asks Handy, summlng-lt up. wji is the circle which must somehow be
The French officer corps was broken.
'f^L^^^&^Aulin-i ^e first and simplest measure .to be taken li
at complain and thty diant for the business men to stop treating the gov-
Tt ii th. mniotirm r th. ernment like a huge, terrifying, hostile power,
erir.r, Sir.?. nh hl & the vast majority of cases, the difficulties
"leneh wlft fight And tilt ag-l**' business men experience In dealing with pr0Diem which Is at the very heart or i pre-
kranee should answer^an*of theIth* lovemment result solely from the govern- ,tnt widespread corruption the problem of
iettJrtquentiyglased &u]rc ent cumbersomeness. and the business men's ufflng the government,
indfearii heardI fa ^a iSSSed t0t41 ignorance of government procedures. '
sta\ea v*uma Aji the irett jogjog of mfluenee traders The administrative officials of the American
I possess no real influence whatever; they Just government today handle problems Involving
There l na immediate nlaelne ^now enough about the government to make the millions and even billions of dollars with no
ai Aav reUance on Mrman te- iumberaortit machinery revolve with reasonable professional training, with no eeeufity of tenure,
armament-no felnV that the i-noothnese. i larles that would sake the Wettest
^t^oJ.^opeWhotiOleaj^tth-l ta Jcb &, butneM rotn themselves
i formed the
aahlngton, to
government at
furnlth unltt to a irOpeanjO m,nt *dy a plant lay-out er a sates tar-
Recruiting and training would ou'd mortal Wow, and much of the
ke time, but the hi? delay ptyehoels that mark! the business attitude to-
corporate vice-president faint dead away with
horror.
-.
SIDE GLANCES
By Calbroith
take .
would come from furnishing tup- wards government would be rapidly dispelled,
pitas. I Second, however, the tendency towards eor-
U. 8. generals must therefore i votion will ttill grow greater unites the basic
rely on what they have now, and roblem of campaign costs and eamoalgn eon-
the SO per cent or more buildup .butiort la directly tackled.
they expect in the eemsag yeei. Tftie U the real r**t of the evil. It U ehlld-
Inevltably. these administrators are the corn
between the upper millstone of the politleal
party needing contributions, ana the nether
millstone of the business men-contributors.
very kind of political pressure it brought on
them, to "see things the right way," to "kw ee-
operators," to "play the game."
And even if they are sternly honest, placing
the public interest first, they mutt always fhtot
of what they are to do when their term e< of-
fice expires.
(Copyright, 1S1, New Tort Herald TtifeaM toe.)
ejJtt&nA-
, m fntr tMNg ** come of thee* woweij'i tle^res



1
t.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1951
TWE PANAMA AMWUCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PACE
Pills
Doctor's Trial
Highlight
ForKillingWealthy OldWoman
BRIDGEPORT, Conn., Dec. 5.(UP)Green
pain-killer pills, seen on the bedside table of wealthy
74-year-old Miss Agnes M. Ayres of Danbury be-
fore her death, became a focal point today in the
Superior Court trail of her personal physician, Dr.
Doaild F. Gibson, on a charge of manslaughter.
A Grand Jury indictment charged the dapper
Danbury doctor With causing her death by the
"reckless and grossly negligent administration of
drugs."
And a previous finding of the county coroner
said that Dr. Gibson hed left dangerous pills within
reach of his patient who had named him sole bene-
ficiary of her $100,000 estate.
The pilla cam* Into the testi-
mony during the opening day
brief hearing, which was ad-
journed after two and one-half
hours because of an Impending
lengthy crosSf-examinatlon. of
SUte police Ma]. Leo F. Carroll.
Carroll testified that Dr.
Gibson came to him after
learning that an autopsy had
been performed following Miss
Ayres' death July 28 1950.
"Have you been thinking
about the cause of death?"
Carroll said he asked the phy-
sician.
He laid Gibson replied:
"Yes. I was worried over the
green pills." and told him they
might have been responsible.
"He explained that this pain-
killer may cause a patient to
develop certain allergies" and
that one or two of these aller-
gies could be fatal.
The green pills first were
mentioned by a previous wit-
ness, Dr. Frank T. Genovese,
of Danbury, who admitted sign-
ing a death certificate for Miss
Ayres five hours before she
died.
He aid that he was called
In for consultation by Dr. Gib-
son about a month before Miss
Ayres died and that he found
her In a "very weak condition."
On the bedside table, he -said,
were green, black and white
piii
"I did not know for a fact
what the pills were for," he
s-d, "but was told by both
B 11 Ayres and Mrs. Gibson
(the doctor's mother)" that
the green ones were to relieve
pain, the black for a tonic
and the white ones for the
kidney*.
Chief defense counsel Davli
F. Goldstein indicated he would
consume considerable time, in
his^ross-examlnatlo of '
Miami Blasts Damage
Negro, Jewish Property
Dr. Gibson, smartly dressed
in a dark blue, pin-striped suit
and wearing a blue and red
polka dot tie, stood nervously
before the bench with his coun-
sel as he answered "not guilty"
to the charge.
He sat at the counsel table,
flgiting with a pencil and mak-
ing occasional notes through-
out the hearing. There were
few spectators.
Dr. Thomas G. Chiffell, for-
mer Yale pathologist who per-
ipsy, said it fall-
what
MIAMI, Fla., Dec. 5 (UP)
The governor ordered Nation-
al Guard troops to stand by
in readiness yesterday as theli
commanding general hurried-
ly started an investigation into
the dynamitinga. of Negro a-
partmente and Jewish synago-
gues.
Officers, aware of the tense
racial feeling and yielding to
angry protests from 'scores of
Jewish and Negro leaders, were
checking every known subver-
sive In South Florida and trac-
ing all sales of dynamite.
Sheriff Jack Henderson ask-
ed Gov. Fuller Warren to call
out the National Guard to pa-
trol the stricken areas.
But Warreh ordered the
troops to stand by and sent
Ma]. Gen. Mark W. Lance and
one of the governor's Investi-
gators to this resort city to de-
qulckly whether the
termine
formed the" autopsy, said it faU- National Guard la necessary,
ed to reveal what caused her SUte attorney General Rlch-
death. ard Ervln sent twe of his aides
The body already had been i to help local officials,
embalmed, and he said it wasl "There are very lnflammato-
"worthless" to have made airy conditions here with Negroes
microscopic examination of a| carrying guns," Henderson told
governor. "A little spark
few blood clots and a small
amount of blood which were
found.
the .
could set off a bad race riot."
Jewish organizations, led by
The body, he
"good condition" when he re-
ceived it.
State's attorney Lorln W. Wil-
lis called off the names of a
number of diseases and asked
Chiffell if any of them could
have caused her death. The
witness categorically replied
"no."
Dr. Genovese, who was not.
indicted but was reprimand-
ed by the state medical rx-
amining board for having
prematurely signed the death
certificate, said he was called
into consultation by Dr. Gib-
son who told him at their
first meeting "that he was
the beneficiary of Miss Ayres'
will."
He said he asked Miss Ayres
four times if she wanted to go
to a hospital, and she refused.
"The first time she said 'Don'
didn't want her to go," he testi-
fied.
He said he frequenUy urged
.Car-1 Dr. Gibson to hospitalize her,
or to hire private nurses, and
said, was In Miami Beach city souncilman
Burnett Roth,- requested the
Department of Justice to send
the FBI into the Investigation
on grounds of Interference
with religious freedom.
City and county officials,
ministers associations and Jew-
ish leaders held conferences all
over the city In hopes of com-
ing un with a.plan to prevent
another in the series of radial
and religious acts of terrorism.
Three explosions Sunday
were directed against Carver
Village, a new Negro apart
ment area near a long-estab-
lished white section, and the
Miami Hebrew school and con-
gregation.
Those dynamltings were the
third in Carver Village and the
fourth against a Jewish house
of worship In recent months.
Roth told a city meeting that
"kids did not bomb our syna-
gogues."
"Kids don't know German
phrases like these," he said,
showing pictures of defamatory
signs written in German on
Jewish churches.
Detectives were searching out
known subversives In the Mia-
mi area for questioning.
Sheriff Henderson said he
believed the persons who dy-
namited the Jewish synagogues
were either "amateurs or pro-
fessional agitators Imported for
that specific purpose... Com-
munists or some other groups."
He said the dynamiters of
Negro apartment build 1 n g s
were "professionals who knew
how to handle explosives to do
the most damage."
Chief of Police Walter E
Headley called In extra officers
and established 19 minute pa-
trols at the seven Jewish
churches in Miami.
Mayor Chelftle Senerchia.
who was elected only last week
quit his Nassau vacation to
Uke charge of the city Investi-
gation.
The mayor said he had re-
ceived one and his wife two
warnings in the last few days
to "get the Negroes out of I
Carver Village or they will be
blown up."
Resolutions will be Introduc-
ed In City Commission tomor-
row offering $5,000 reward for
Daughter Smothered
By Mother While Pop
Strangles Lover
DOMOSOLA, Itely, Dec. 5 (UP)
A mother was accused of smo-
thering her two-year-old daugh-
ter while her husband was slm-
ulUneously strangling her lover
in the same room.
The killings were brought to
light by the 11-year-old son ta-
lo, who tearfully reconstructed
the story for the police.
talo said his mother. Mrs. OI-
selda Patrlttl Castelletti and Ed-
uardo Pennesl had a rendezvous
m the Castelletti house while the
husband was out.
The boy said that he and his
two-year-old sister Hermes were
in the room when his mother put
out the lights.
Suddenly, the husband rushed
in and a fight started between
him and Pennessl.
2 Young Soldiers
Get Bool Training
With Girl's Shoe
GAFFNEY, S.C., Dec. 5 (UP)
Two youthful soldiers were for-
mally charged today with at-
tempting to ravish a pretty col-
lege student who fought them
off with a shoe.
Cherokee County Sheriff Jul-
ian B. Wright served warrants
charging assault with "intent to
ravish-' on the soldiers at Fort
Jackson where they were held by
military authorities.
They were identified as J. C.
Burnett. Jr., 23. and Charles Por-
ter. 22, both of Spartanburg.
The two were released by mlll-
Ury authorities into the custody
of Wright who returned them
here.
The warrants were issued by
Magistrate Francis McCraw here let them return to their dorml-
after the victim, a student at
Limestone College, told officers
how the soldiers attempted to
attack her during an auto ride
Sunday night.
The girl, described as "extreme-
ly beautiful," was treated for
bruises and scratches and war
streaked with blood which she
said was caused by beating one oi
the soldiers with her shoe.
She told officers she and an-
other student had dates with the
soldiers but the men refused to
"orles at curfew.
Instead, she said they were
irlven across the state line to
Wilson. N.C., where her com-
pnion got out of the car under
he pretense of calling the col-
lege but telephoned officers ln-
>tead.
The victim said the soldiers re-
,urned with her to South Caro
ma where one of them attempt-
ed to attack her In the back seat
3 the car.
MOTTA'S
Elementary School and is open
Monday through Friday from 7:
The child "suffocated, and the|j( to 11:45 and lorn 12:45 to
fight ended with Castelletti 4:15.
strangling Pennesl.
Police said that the husband
and wife have confessed.
Girl Scouts Change
Office Hours For
Atlantic District
The Atlantic District Girl
Scout Office, which Is located
in the former Margarita Hos-
pital Building, (the same build-
ing which houses the Toy Sale)
will be open December on the
following days for the conve-
nience of those people who
wish to purchase Girl Scout
Equipment for Christmas pre-
sents:
On Tuesday Mrs. Bieelow
will be on duty from 9:30 to
11:00.
On Wednesday Miss Pat-
ton will be on duty from 9:30
to 12:00 and 1:30 to 3:00.
On Saturday Mrs. Town-
shend will be on duty from 9:30
to 11:30.
to
Make Your Baby's Eyes Shine This
CHRISTMAS with a SILVER GIFT!
SII.VKRPI.ATKt>
BABY CUP
B/2.95
\
\
Coon. ..u..i O'ir huge M*ortm?nt
of Baby artlcl-s a. exceptionally
low prices.
EASY TFRMS
HAWAII JEWELRY
The Reliable Store
M Central Ave. M
Air Conditioned.------OPEN UNTIL 9:M P. M.

People are invited to come
mrormaU^oT-tTe emitir.;'" to either of the Girl Scout
and appropriating $10.000 to(filf3 '
hire extra emergency police.
see the Christina?
Balboa office is on
'the second floor of the Balboa


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that Gibson said that he had
been trying to do just that.
The day Miss Ayres died he
said he signed, her death certi-
ficate at 10:30 a.m., when he
found "the onset of death had
started," and beoaus he want-
ed to leave town for the day.
The suggestion, he said, came
from Dr. Gibson who told blm
he wanted the certificate ready
when an undertaker arrived
from New Haven.
Willis asked Genovese where
he had gone for the day.
"I went to the Belmont race
track In New York," he re-
plied.
He said he didn't know Miss
Ayres had died at 3:40 p.m.,
that day until be chanced to
meet Dr. Gibson some time
later at Danbury hospital.
A police Investigation start-
ed seen afterwards and he
said Gibson telephoned him
and asked if "anyone ha
been there te see yon."
He said police had railed
and he told them everything
they wanted te know.
"Well, I hope that covers
everything." he quoted Gib-
son as replying.
Gibson was In a jaunty mood
as he left the courthouse. He
said he was being "kept quite
busy" with his office practice.
"It's surprising," he said. "I
didn't think I'd have any prac-
tice."
Goldstein stopped the ques-
tioning by newsmen by grab-
bing him by the arm and lead-
ing him away.
Wilder Resigns PC
Post To Assume
Position With Army
FORT OULICK Dec. 5 Frank
Wilder, who until recently had
been an Instructor of Romance
languages in the Canal Zone Di-
vision of School, has accepted
an appointment as Civilian Ed-
ucational Advisor at the Army
Education Center. Fort Gulick.
On Friday he will officially
take over his new duties which
will Include educational advisory
work for service men and women
in this area as well as the organ-
isation and administration of
off-duty classes In any of the
many educational subjects offer-
ed by the Army.
Wilder son of Mr- and Mrs.
Leslie Wilder. Lakewood Manor,
Tampa. Florida. gradu a t e d
from Hillsborough High School In
his hometown In 1933. He then
attended the University of Flori-
da, graduating In 1938 with a Ba-
chelor of Arts degree.
In 1939 he received his Master
of Theology degree from the
Southern Theological Seminary
Continuing his education, he did
grsduste work tt the University
of Florida, the University of Pan-
ama, and the University of Louis-
ville.
Charch Preserves Rights
MUFORD. N.H. (UP) The
sidewalk In front of the Church
of Our Saviour is blocked off to
pedestrians for 34 hours every 10
years so it can be considered a
private way.
WE'LL put it up to you! There must be
plenty of good reasons why more people
buy Chevrolets than any other car.
Here are some things to'think about
There's the way Chevrolet looks. Nice
clean, curved lineslike cars in the high-price
field! Chevrolet's Body by Fisher sets the pace
among low-priced cars.
There's me way Chevrolet rides and han-
dles. The smoothness and big-car comfort of
SMOOT PAREDES
PANAMA
Unitized Knee-Action. Bigger brakes-biggest
in the fieldfor safer, surer stops. Finest no-
shift and standard driving at lowest cost with
Powerglide or Synchro-Mesh transmission.
There's the way Chevrolet saves. Chevro-
let is the lowest-priced line in the field and the
savings go on and on with low operating costs.
-There are plenty mere reasons why Chev-
rolet is America's favorite. Come in and let
us show them to you.
POWER%z
automatic transmission
Fine* no-ihift eririni at towtat coat.
Combination of Powerglide Automatic
Transmission and I05-h.p. Engine optional
on Da Luxe model at extra cost.

SMOOT HUNNICUT1
COLON


age rom
tUT. PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAn.T NEWBPAFb*
WEDNESDAY, Dl
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes- Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
*
Arrives
>ew Orleans Service _____________ Cristbal
S.S. Junior ....................................Dec. |
S.S. Piador Enot ..............................Dec. 15
S.S. Chiriani..................................Dec. W
ndllr.| aafrlftrateo' Chilled < Central Carga
Arrives
New York Service _________________Cristbal
S.S. Sixaola ...................................Dee. *
S.S. Cape ATinof ..............................Dec. 9
S.S. Limon ....................................Dec. \\
S.S. Cape Cod .................................Dec. 16
rRKQl f.M AU.1M.S HIIM l alSI'DHAL TO WIST COAST
CEMTKAL AMEBJCA.
Cristbal to New Orleans via Cristbal
lela. Honduras____________________Sails from
S.S. Chiriqui ..................................Dec. 1
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA Z-SM4 COLON U
Norwegian Cargo Liner Guy P. DeLongj and Pvt. Jere-
Arriving Here Saturday mlah Donovan.
The Trafalga. a Norwegian Honorable and Mrs. Ivor D.
cargo liner is due to arrive here Fenton; Pfc. Shirley E. Forres-
Saturday. The owner. P. Wll- ter; Sgt. Albert T. Gordon; Cpl.
helmson will be aboard the ship, Joseph B. Harmon; T-Sgt.
which is coming from New York i Leonard A. Hill; Honorable and
and is en route to the Far East. |Mrs. Benjamin F. James; Jacob
Wilhelmson is one of the biggest F. Krause; Mr. and Mrs. Louis
TERRY-
NIGHT SHIFT
ship-owners in the world. The
Trafalga carries a general cargo,
and is handled locally by Fenton
and Co.
C. Krldle; and Mrs. Mary M.
Kurlllo.
Sgt. and Mrs. William R La-
Perle and Step-Dtr.; Major and
Mrs. Earl R. Leaser and 2 chil-
dren; Mr. and Mrs. Louts D.
Leazenbee and 3 children; Mr.
Mrs. Robert Lessiak and 2
Cpl. Floyd R. Lester;
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
Ii That Good?
Army Dredge
Transits Canal
The A. MacKenzie. a 3.015-toniand
Army dredge, went through the'chlldren;
Canal yesterday bound for Gal-Sgt. and Mrs. Edward J. Mann;
vest on, Texas. The dredge camejjudge Joseph V. McKee; Sgt.
from San Francisco and the mas- James P. Mlschel; Mrs. Norman i
ter is Karl Hell. Moffat; Richard L. Moore; and;
Mr .and Mrs. Howard E. Munro.
C- Ellis Nash: Gotfred P. Nel-
on. Mrs. Kathleen I. Nelson;
Gilnockie pvt. Clifton B. Passman; Miss
to Genevleve F. Quinn; Miss Ther-
Yacht Ties lp
in Balboa
A 71-ton yacht the
,tled up in Balboa yesterday
get bunkers and for minor re- ese M. Quinn; Mr. and Mrs. Carl;
pairs* The yacht is headed forw. Reynolds and daughter; and
British Honduras from Los An-
geles. Richard Mason is the mas-
ter.
Pvt. Ivan H. Rhodes.
Comdr. and Mrs. Jack W.
Schwartz; Cpl. William J. Scott;
Miss Clara M. Scott; Miss Rober-
ta Scott; Mr. and Mrs. Henry H.
Shirk, and 2 children; and Mr.
land Mrs. Homer A. Sneckenber-
PACIFIC-ARGENTINE-BRAZIL LINE
fOfl a TAIIOT. INC.
ANNOUNCE
SlS "PGT TRADER"
ON BERTH AT
BALBOA
DECEMBER 8TH, 1951
Accepting Refrigerated & General Cargo
for
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRANCISCO
PORTLAND
Steamship Lines Announce
' 10 Per Cent Increased Rates
NEW YORK. Dec. 5 (DPI
Steamship lines, seeking toneu-'ger.
tralize the effects of port conges-1 Mrs. Eva M. Talboy; Robert V.
tion and increased operating1 w. Tiffany; Mr. and Mrs. Ar-
costs in the Caribbean area, have;thur M. Thompson and 2 chil-
announced a 10 freight rates to several IslandsjMae Ward; Mrs. Gay Whisnant;
of the Antilles and the Guias. |Mr. and Mrs. David E. Wright
land 4 children; Melville L. Booz;
At a shipping conference, it and Mrs. J. Austin,
was decided that as of March 1,
1952. the lOTr Increase will be ef-
fective on shipments to the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands,
Trinidad. Barbados and British
and French Netherlands Gula-
nas.
In addition, it was announced
that "because of costly delays to
vessels and subnormal working
conditions" at Bridgetown. Bar-
bados, a temporary surcharge of
15% will be assessed on cargo for-
warded to that port after Jan. 1.
A steamship conference Is also
studying the situation in other
ports of the Caribbean area
where congestion and higher op-
erating costs have been accented
m recent months.
BY MERRILL BI.OSSER
imVit W
ALLEY OOP
Jittery?
T. HAMLIN


SEATTLE
VANCOUVER
5tomac\\
* ?
W. Andrews & Company
BALBOA
Phon* 1-125*
CRISTBAL
Pkoao 3.21(1
fcwyboy Reads Classified
S.S. Panama Leaves Friday
United States Representatives
Benjamin F. James fcnd Ivor D.
Fenton are among the passen-
gers scheduled to leave the Isth-
mus Friday on the s.S. Panama,
according to the advance pas-
senger list iron! trie Panama Line
offices at Balboa Heights.
Also sailing on this ship will be
Austin J. Latimer, Chief Clerk
and Counsel of the Senate Post
I Office and Civil Service Com-
imlttee; and Judge Joseph V.
I McKee. a former President of the
'New York City Board of Alder-
:men.
A total of 92 passengers ar
tscheduled to sail on the Panama.
The complete advance passen-
ger list follows:
I N
Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Allen;
Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Bowen; Mrs.
Agripina Buon; Pvt. George J.
Carpenter; 8gt. Ralph J. Caru-|
|i: Malor and Mrs. Joseph J. F.
Clark and daughter; Sfc and Mrs. |
tin E. courtright and 2 chil-|
dren; Cpl. Claude R. Damewood;
Take soothing
repto-
Bfsmof
a fid feel good again?
nrroBisMOL is CMNTLM. It spreads
soothing, protective coating on ir-
ritated stomach and inteatin.l walla,
1. Hat* (fa mU aaato H, .?,
1. H.lp, r*mi IrnMj md
IttmaHam a/ f
* "'*< "*mtm mi unit H, ,i.m.,h
Ask your dragam for plcaaaat taxing
PetMo-rlitawi. for ftntia vat tax relief.
A Norwick I
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Independence
BY EDGAR MARTIN 1
SCXOWOWVrt.VOO V\V?
"SnYW\N>6 ftfeOti?
HOW VJUcV g\\- ,
SIWlO *A PLV|
" S0PV09X
OU.t5t lM
PnOCMbW TMt
OKHLV G\R\. \tH*K'|
VOOR.O WHO'S
CAPTAIN EAST
Ready for Action
BY LESLIE TURNER
CHRIS WELEEN, Planeteer
Whoom!
BY RL'SS WINTERBOTHAM
PRISlILLA 8 POP
That's Our Girl
BY AL VERMEER
ifsRANOMA,
rJ DON'T "VtXI
U THINK A
Buttle aim,
SHOULD
KE EP HfR
PROM
L^I ALWAYS SAY_
I PROMISED
MV3ELF
TO GO TO
THE MOVIES
WITH VOU
TODAY
XGS BUNNY
-6^
VIC FLINT
A rob for Vic?
BY MICHAEL O MALLEY
BY WTWe I PINH-WPMV NEXT CA*E
Dk book, vc, ru.r-/ mad scrreR
BC >BT iO \%01K J COM OOM,
WTCWA ON >A t-----'LOUIE. TWE TEA4-
NBXT CA*E. J UBV IN BAO *HAPE.
m
UT VIC DOaMMY aONOW WHaW
IN 4TOKB POR HIM.
...TO INVB*-f A LOT 1
TI6ATB *~)OW M
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futaom un-Jtwatll
QUOTE' J-' DO MB,
PORT, IF_,
>OU PULL TMATi
MAW MAW MAW/
I'LL EVEN WIRE
THB DCK WB
WEB TALKIN6
WrTM TONIaaWT
VIC FUNT. THAT* MOWl
FlOBNT I AM THatTj
I THB "

m:-wA
OOR BOARDING HOUSE
with
MAJOR BOOPLE OUT ODR WAX
By J. R. WILLIAMS
I
Big Deal
a
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br^h pB[a wx
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ACa-. r how mucm ^
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[CHAe$ m out
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AOVfC HBLPBR, CAM* MfO* TfcWlCAL
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fARTAMAfci *C^
>*





.l-^Wl'WQH r*
T"^e ft. vrni
SAi
tm PANAMA /IMFRCM .AN INDEFENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
________
o Pin
racific J^ocietu '
Bo* 17, BatU 0.1 &&~ 3SQI
CONGRESSMAN AND MRS. REED
TO ENTERTAIN AT HOTEL TIVOI.I
The Honorable Daniel A. Reed and Mrs. Reed, who are
visitors to the Isthmus and guests at the Hotel Ttvoli during
their stay here, will entertain tomorrow evening at seven o -
clock in the Pern Room with a dinner for the Governor of
the Panama Canal, Brigadier General and Mrs. Francis K.
Newcomer, the Lt. Governor of the Panama Canal, Colonel
and Mrs. Herbert D. Vogel, and the Military Assistant to the
Governor, Lt. Colonel and Mrs. M. L. Jacobs.
Venezuelan Ambassador
Returns to Panama
Mr. Enrique Castro Gomez, the
Ambassador of Venezuela to Pa-
nama, returned to the Isthmus
recently by plane from a short
trip to Caracas.
I_,ewell Entertainments
for,Mrs. Fierro
Mrs. Ignacio Fierro, the former
Yolanda Bleta. who is leaving
soon for Spain, after a visit to
Panama, has been the guest of
honor at several recent social
functions given in farewell to her.
Mrs. Adolfo Arlas. Jr.. was the
hostess for a buffet luncheon glv
en at her home; Miss Doris Arias
enterttained with a luncheon at
her-residence and Mrs. Flerro's
brother and sister-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. Fernando Eleta, were
hosts at a dinner given at the
Union Club.
Miss Patricia Kenealy
To be Honored at Shower
Miss Patricia Kenealy, who
plans to leave the Isthmus on
Saturday, for the home of her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. James N.
Kenealy. of Los Angeles, Califor-
nia, where she will spend the in-
tervening time until her mar-
riage, to Sergeant Nicholas C.
Stelllngworf on December 27 In
Los Angeles, will be the geust of
honor at a personal shower this
evening to be given by Mias Delo-
res Sutsman at her home.
Guests will include Mrs. Alice
Sulsman, Miss Eileen Suisman,
Mrs. Pat Lenneville, Mrs. Mary
Joyce, Mrs. Lll Wills, Mrs. Tom-
my Lou Horter, Mrs. Carmen
Masot. Mrs. Betty Boyer, Miss
Lillian Zupanclc. Miss Mary Sul-
livan, Mrs. Patty Baker, Mrs.
Mildred Morrill, Mrs. Beverly
Paonessa, Miss Nannette Lynch,
Miss Joyce Sebastian, Mrs. Bar-
bara Schmltt, Miss Oeraldlne
Mellon, Miss Mary Boylngton,
Miss Laraine Terry. Miss Ginger
Coffy, Mrs. Eleanor Husum. Mrs.
Marguerite Flynn, Misa JoAnn
FlynnandMrs. Ellen Crabb.
Misa Patrela Hattler and the
host will be Master Charles Hum-
mer.
The class will meet In the
Washington Salon of the Hotel
El Panama at 7:00 p.m.
dlally invited to attend this
meeting.
been a patient in the Gorgas
Hospital for the past twelve days.
Rotary Club to Hold
Luncheon Meeting Tomorrow
The Panama Rotary Club will
meet for their regular luncheon
meeting at 12:15 p.m. tomorrow
at the Hotel El Panama with the
chief of Field Party. Health and
Sanitation Division, Dr. James
G. Townsend. of Inter-American
Affalrds, as the guest speaker.
A Christmas party, sponsored
by the Rotary Club, has been
planned for members and friends
at the Panama Golf Club on Sat-
urday evening, December 22.
Malones Move to Ancon
Former Pedro Miguel residents.
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Malone and
family have moved to Ancon
where Mr. Malone is an employe
of the ME. Division.
Vacationers Return to Isthmus
Captain and Mrs. Clifford
Payne of Bella Vista, returned by
plane from a vacation of several
weeks In Mexico.
Mrs. C. S. Hollander
Returns Home
Mrs. Charles S. Hollander, of
Balboa, returned to her home
yesterday afternoon after having
Mrs. A. N. Beauchamp and her
sister. Miss Lucille Hearn are at
home again after a vacation
spent in Mississippi with their
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M.
Hearn.
Single Performance of Messiah
To be Given the Twelfth
The community and College
chorus presentation of Handel's
"Messiah" will be given at 8:00
p.m. in the library of the Balboa
High School, with Music Supervi-
sor Nell V. Branstetter conduct-
ing.
Admission will be free.
Music Group to
Meet with Mrs. Webb
The Music Group of the Canal
Zone College Club will meet at
7:30 p.m. on Monday. December
10, at the home of the chairman,
Mrs. W. A. Webb. 790-C Taver-
nilla Street, Balboa.
The program, on the topic
'NStringed Instruments and Their
Music," will be presented by Miss
Dorothy Moody.
All members and prospective
members of the group are cor-
Corinne Feeney
is Chairman of Book Display
Corlnne Feeney has been ap-
pointed, the chairman of the
book display to be included In
the Christmas Bazaar to be given
by the National League of Amer-
ican Pen Women tomorrow from
4:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. in the
Little Gallery of the Hotel Ti-
voll. The public is cordially in-
vited to attend. ,
All items on display will be ap-
Eroprlate for Christmas gift glv-
ik and the nfest expensive Item
will not exceed $25.
Mrs. Pat Morgan will give a
demonstration of ways to make
Christmas table decorations at
5:00 p.m.
Hospitality Committee to Meet
The Hospitality Committee of
the Inter-American Women's
Club, will meet on Friday at ten
o'clock at the club headquarters.
Winners ef Bridge Tournament
Announced
The winners of the bridge tour-
nament, which is played every
Monday In the Card Room of the
Hotel Tlvoll at 7:00 p.m., were:
1st Dr. and Mrs. D. G. Stroup;
2nd. Mr. and Mrs. W. Kennedy;
3rd,-Mrs. J. E. Davis and Mrs. L.
D Boney; 4th. Mr. and Mrs. E.
Kohn; 5th, a two way tie between
Dr. R. L. Stewart and Mrs. E.
Brown and Mr. and Mrs. H. G.
Robinson.
Bridge Group
to Meet Thursday
The Bridge Group of the Bal-
boa Women's Club will meet
Thursday at 12:30 p.m. at the
Jewish Welfare Board Center In
Balboa.
Cotillion Class Patrons
Announced
The Patrons for Thursday's
formal Cotillion Class ase Mr.
and Mrs. Brack Hattler and Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Hummer. The
hostess for the evening will be
'_, I flake it

n (bmerson
tristonas !
3-Way Portable.
Super Sensitive for
Greater Reception In
" Outlying Areas.
ONLX
45.90
MANY OTHER LOW-PRICED MODELS.
fANAMU$iCA.$.A>
1*7" Central Avenue
Elks Request Used
Christmas Cards Be Saved
The Benevolent and Protective
Order of Elks in Balboa, have re-
quested that the general public
save their Christmas cards to be
given to the United Cerebral Pal-
sy Association. The cards may be
turned over to the Elks who hope
to benefit children afflicted with
palsy.
Bingo Tonight
at Pedro Miguel Boat Club
Bingo will be played tonight
and each succeeding Wednesday
night at the Pedro Miguel Boat
Club at seven thirty o'clcjck. Two
door prizes will be awarded.
Balboa Emblem Club to Meet
The Balboa Emblem Club No.
48, will hold its regular meeting
on Friday at 7:30 p.m. in the
Balboa Lodge Hall. Election of
officers will be held.
Cocoli Girl Scouts
to Hold "Bake Sale"
Girl Scout Troop 10 of Cocoli
will hold a "bake sale" on Sat-
urday morning from ten until
twelve o'clock downstairs In the
Navy Exchange Building at the
Rodman Naval Station.
This sale will be held to spon-
sor an overnight trip to the At-
lantic side, during the Christmas
holidays, for the entire troop
which Is working on a Travel
Badge.
Baked goods should be brought
Daily Reading
THE WAY OUT OF THE DARK
John 1,1-17
The element of faith is very
extensive in every human activ-
ity and relationship. To trust
things and people is as impor-
tant, and as natural as breath-
ing. And yet everyone has had
the.experience at some time of
being let down. Not that there
was anything wrong with his
faith, but he had chosen the
wrong object on which to place
his faith. Religious faith is no
different in kind from other
faith. Here too, like In all else, it
makes all the. difference In the
world If the object Is worthy. If
one's faith is in Jesus Christ, and
if one depends on Him, as though
his well-being now and forever
were Inseparably bound with
Him, He will not be let down.
The object of the Bible read-
ing of today Is to show that
Christ Is the Eternal One who
entered our own world for our
benefit.
to the Naval Exchange Building
between nine thirty and ten o'-
clock or, If unable to bring them,
call Mrs. Davis at 4-225.
There will be a special Girl
Scout meeting on Friday after-
noon at three o'clock at the
home of their leader, Mrs. DavU.
Junior Gun Club Members
Hold Target Match
A target match was held by the
Cocoli Gun Club at Its range be-
(Continued on Page SIX)
[Beauty
it its best...
BY PROFESSIONALS
($/O*
SPECIAL
$759
WHY HAVE A HOME
.PERMANENT^?
...with inadequate facilities,
no certain finished look, and
no guaranteewhen you can
have a professional one com-
nlete for only $7.5! It wttl
last longer..and look better]
These can be had
MONDAY thro THURSDAY
Absent 2-2959
BALBOA
BEAITY SHOP
Mrs. Bates Wieman, Mgr.
Opto l:M ,.m to CM p.m.
Salto OabhaaM. apnain
mttrm&rmigrmw -njp ***r-m*w~wi*rmiwmtr sbj^ust ^jw ^apr ^sjr ^_r ^_r ~^m ^
S YOU MUST GET READY FOR
CHRISTMAS EV TIME
WE SELL ONLY FIRST QUALITY MERCHANDISE
If you belong to the Armed Forces or if yon have a steady job
come to our store and yon may choose your own credit terms.
EASY WASHERS
SPECIAL DISCPUNT FOR
FREE ENTRY
WE HAVE RECEIVED
$10,0O0.0O's WORTH OF
BEAUTIFUL LINOLEUM
FROM PABCO
ElDiaiu

SIMMONS SPRINGS b MATTRESSES
Open evenings until 9:00 p.m. until Christmas.
The Store Where You Will Find the Largest Assortment of Glass and Linoleum.
86 CENTRAL AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-2465
"Leaders in the Furniture business since 1909"
PAULS MARKET
and
DELICATESSEN
Our store will be closed ALL DAY
SATURDAY 8th of DECEMBER
MOTHER'S DAY
WEEKEND SPECIALS
Fresh Danish Batter ......... 67c. Lb.
Danish Swiss Cheese.......... 86c. Lb.
Danish Tilsit Cheese.......... 62c. Lb.
Danish Port de Salut ....".'...... 62c. Lb.
THURSDAY A FRIDAY
Fresh Lettuce from the VOLCAN
***' >.. t -
'Shop early to avoid last minuta ruth
OPEN ALL DAY FRIDAY
Sale 01 Christmas
Seals Goes Well
In The Canal Zone
The sale of Christmas seals,
sold each year to raise funds to
fight tuberculosis. Is going well
in the Canal Zone .according to
information from Mrs. H. J. Mil-
lion, chairman of the annual sale.
The seal sale is conducted un-
der the direction of a newly ap-
pointed Board ol Trustees of the
Canal Zone Tuberculosis Associa-
tion, named this year by Oov-[
ernor Newcomer.
The sale is being handled in
Canal communities by the Wom-
en's Clubs at Balboa, Cristobal,
Pedro Miguel and Gamboa.
Seals are also being sold by the
American Girl Scouts on both
sides of the Isthmus, and, for the
first time by the International
Girl Scouts at Cristobal and by
Rainbow Girls on the Atlantic
side.
The seals are also available
from Mrs. G. B. Baldwin at Gor-
gas Hospital and. Miss Margaret
Wiggins in the Finance Bureau
at the Administration Building
at Balboa Heights.
Chairman of the seal sales
handled by the Women's Clubs I
are:
Cristobal Woman's ClubMrs.
A. G. Turner, General Chairman;
Mrs. William L. Brooks, Marga-
rita; Mrs. Freida Boydston, Ga-(
ton; and Mrs. H. E. Pihlgren,
Cristobal.
Balboa Woman's ClubMrs. L. D.
Boney, General Chairman; Mrs.
Joe Bourgeois, Curundu; Mrs. C.
R. Taht. Diablo Heights, and Mrs.
H. B. Yard Cocoli.
Pedro Miguel Woman's Club
Mrs. T. J. Ebdon, Jr., Chairman.
Gamboa Woman's Club Mrs.
Norma Wemmer, Chairman.
The new Board of Trustees of
the Canal Zone Tuberculosis As-1
soclatlon, appointed this year by
Governor Newcomer, are: Major
General George W. Rice, Health
Director. Chairman of the Board; I
Mrs. H. J. Million, Director of the
Christmas seal sale; E. C. Lom-
bard, Executive Secretary; Dr. W.
F. Ossenfort, Chief of the Divi-;
sion of Preventive Medicine and
Quarantine; and F. G.Dunsmodr,
Executive Assistant to the Gov-'
ernor.
& CLOTHES
^WASHER
~ with DISHWASHING
ATTACHMENT!
Available in
25 or 60 Cycle
WASHING
RINSING
DRYING
... in ONE porce-
lain tub your
hands never touch
the water I
Panam
Friee
C.Z.
Price
295>
283
COMPAA ALFARO, S.A.
No. 28 Peru Avenue Panama Gty
Helps You Overcome
FALSE TEETH
Looseness and Worry
No longer bt annoyed or feel tn-at-
eaxe because of loose, wobbly false teeth.
FASTEETH. an Improved alkaline (non-
acid I power, sprinkled on vour platas
holds them firmer so they feel more
comfortable. Soothing and cooling to
gums made sore by excessive acid mouth.
Avoid embarrassment caused by loose
plates. Get FASTSXTH today at any drug
tor*.
NEW XMW PRODUCT
Never neglect
a cut!
The tiniest injury can become in-
fected. Never take a chancel
USE
BAND-AID'
ADHESIVE BANDAJES
Mcomnnhd by
any oitwr brand.
They come to you iterikhelp keep
out dirt and germ*. Mercarachroaw
or tyrc-thri-cin pad.
Have tome atwayt near at hand.
JOrVtMOH 4-OrVeieOH
!..
PRE XMAS
REFRIGERATORS
49930
Before.... 449.50
37930
.50
.50
.00
60 cycles
ELECTRIC RANGES
Before.....299.50
now 249

AUTOMATIC
WASHING MACHINES
Before.... 429.50
now 299*
60 cycles
Ample Parking 51 Va Espaa
Tel. 3-3193 for Free Transportation to Oar Sale.
OPEN ALL DAY EVERY DAY INCLUDING SUNDAYS
ALSO AT
SMOOT & PAREDES
RODELAG ECONOGAS
5 de Mayo 34 E. Street
SMOOT & HUNNICUT
COLON




'-^T pss^p
.'* X
THE PANAMA AMERICA* AN DEPENT DAT! Y NEWSPAPER
.-
Kb
EDNESDAT. DECEMBER 5," lfl
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
i.EHIS SHEVIC1
Ms 4 Tt\ AM
KIOSKO Ot LESSEPS
*arjju* 4*
, OR SALE
Household
MORRISON'S
Ne. 4 hulk I Jal At*
him J-IM1
BOTICA l A ELTON
e.aw Metaaeei At*.
Phon ZSS -Colen
SALON OB BELLEZA AMERICANO
. (S Wan Hi Mml
1MB PANAMA AMERICAN
a. IT -IT' treateaaaaaa
Na. 12.17 Central A -Cole
12 words
ininvim lor
Jc. each additional
word.
FOR SALE:' Dixie" gas stoves ot
ridiculously low prices. See thfir
at Hosrro S. A.. No. 51 Vio Es-
pao, Panamo. Don't mus this op-
portunity
FOR SALE
Automobile
MISCELLANEOUS
IOK SALI:-CMMim'l tele and
chain. tuae-metel frame. Sturdy
ana practical. Orear taken lei
Xmai Dalivery. Phone 2-3708.
House 0954. Amador Reea.
FCR SALEChna closet. 3 pieces
Dovenport set. mahogcny bed &
spring. House 937 Apt. B. La Bo-
cc C. Z
FOR SALE: Venet ion
tobal 3-2320.
blinds. Cris-
For tha buving oi sellinf ot your,
outomobile consult: Agencias Cos-
mos. S. A.. Automobit Row No. BAIL
29. Telephone 2-4721, Panama
door
un-
May
C
0* ? a eViakina arafclam?
Writ* Alcekelin ajmilWI
Sal 2011 Am**), C. 2.
RESORTS
FOR SALE:Morris Minor. 2
sedon, green. 3.000 milas,
dercooted. pnce $1,125.00.
be seen at house 1550 Apt.
BONDS:Boil and Guorontee
Compony S. A., No. 78 "B" Avt.
Tel. 2-307H. Box 1352; Colon
Agency. Cantrol Avenu 12167.
Tal. 63*.
Gramlich'i Sonto Cloro beoch-
cottagts Electric Ice ooxes. gos
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Gaviln Rd., Bolboa. ofter 6 p. m
FOR SALE:Your Chrysler and Ply-
mouth Dealer offers for Christmoi
season the following used car:
Chrysler Convertible 1951 fully
equipped, 4,000 miles, $2.850;
Chrysler sedan 1950, fully equip-
ped, $2,400; Chrysler Sedan 1948
$1290; De Soto Sedon, 1948. $1
195; Plymouth 1949. $1.400.
Agencios Pan-Americanas. S. A.
front El Rancho Garden, Tel. 2-0825
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALEGuatemalan couch plos-
tic covered, excellent condition
reasoncble. Phone Balboa 2-2490
.---------------------------------------------------, BARGAINS! BARGAINS!
FOR SALE: Bamboo divcn w.t. IN USD CARS
cuch.ons covers. $40.00 .House pR|CES AN0 TERMS TO FIT
796-A. Tavernilla. Balboa. Phone ANy poCKtTiOOK
2-3163.__________________I SMOOT tV HUNNICUTT, S. A.
SALE -Complete set of Pon-! TIL. COLON, R. P.
Conal tvoe metal furnitureXOLON (00 16th t> Iroonway
S0R
ama Conal type
for apartment, in 12 family bui d- "0R SALE:1950 V-8 Ford 6-pos-
ing. Kelvinator refngerotor, Lol
P.
spot refr.gerotor 25 cycle, numer-
OJS other pieces of household fur-
n t;Te, Venetian blind louvers
Cooking utensils table ware. Car
be purchased' week days after 4
m. Saturday & Sunday. B-iild- R
0S39 Acacia Place Apts. J &
K. Phone 2-2653 2-2582
Balboa.
=C?. SALE:Bureau Street
mirror. $10.00. Tavernilla
807-C. Bolboo.
FOR SALE:Kerorene Servel,
$150.00. 1451-A, Balboa,
Cruces St. _____
FOR SALE:3-pc overstuffed living-
senger Club Coupe, rodio, original
owner, con be financed, $1,450.
807-X, Apt. A, Tavernillo, or
phone Balboo 3582.
SALE:1950 Renault, 4-Door
Sedan, seat covers, excellent con-
dition, ot gcod price. Phone Pan-
ama 2-1644.
FOR SALE: Electric water heater
with automatic temperature con-
trol. One yeor guarantee, capacity
and prices:
6 gallons. 110 volts. $47.00.
25 gallon. 220 volts, $56.00.
12 gallon. 110 volts, $57.00.
25 gallon* 220 volts. $59.50.
Moke use of this opportunity.
HASMO. S. A. (The home of Fri-
gidoire) No. 51 Via Esparto. Panama
WE SELL:600 Pre-fabricated Ve-
netian Blinds at cost price, cream
color:
22". 24", 26" wide by 48" long
$4.80 ed.
28". 30" 32" wide by 60" long
$7.80 M.
34", 36". 38" wide by 60" long
$9.00 eo.
Telephone 2-0756, Panama.
R. A. COVVES Y CIA.
First Street by Union Club
Willioms Santo Clore Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidoire*, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
CASINO SANTA CLARA
Cobins, food, swimming. No reserva-
tions necessary. Choice lots for sal*.
Phillips. Oceanside cottages. Santo
Claro. Box 435 Balboa. Phon*
Panamo 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
HOTELPANAMERI CAO in cool El
Valle. Room $2.00 doily per per-
son. Meols o la Carte. Reserva-
tions. Telephone Panama 2-1112
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:Beautiful and comfort-
able residence with all modern
conveniences. Responsible person
Milla 15, Transisthmian Highway.
FOR RENT:Chalet on Expositior
Grounds, next to British Legation.
All modern conveniences. Inquire
Juan Chopsour, 6th. St. No. 10.
Phone 2-2419.
with F0R SALE:1951 Buick Super Ri-
Street
9 ft
Los
room set, cocktail table, end tables,
refrigerator 25-cycles. Simmonr
couch. Boby crib, youths bed
Phone 916. Colon.
FOPTSALE:One 9 cu. ft. Westing-
house refrigerator with 2 year
guarcntee. 25 Cycles. One General
Electric washing machine, 25 Cv'
good condition. 5337-D. Davis St
Diablo, any time.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
.WANTED TO BUY:Day bed with
mottress ond two grass mat rugs
Phone Bolboa 2-2490.
veria, 7.800 miles, with radio,
sect covers W-SW tires, wate al-
cohol injector, cor and accessories
like new. can be seen at Cristo-
bal Police' Station between 3:00
p. m. II :00 p. m. All this
week.
BARGAINS! BARGAINS!
IN USED CARS
PRICES AND TEEMS TO FIT
ANY POCKETBOOK
SMOOT & HUNNICUTT. S. A,
TEL. COLON. R. P.
COLON 100 16th b Breoaway
FOR SALE:1947 Mercury convert'
ible $990.00 undercooted, Co-
lumbia rear end, very good rodio,
upholstery, body, paint, 0422-B,
renado Street, Ancon. Telephone
2793, between 5-7 p. m.
TIRES AND TUBES: New; 11.00 x
22; 12 ply; for trucks; bargain
prices. F. Icozo & Company, 79
B Avenue.
FOR SALE:Beautiful potted plonts.
Low prices, 5th street. No. 7026
Colon.
FOR SALE: Frigidoire $165, GE
woshing machine, $95. pair 12 in
electric fans, $15, or $10 each
all items 25 cycle, excellent con-
dition. Frigidoire and washing ma-
chine late models, one ownrr.
Many beautiful potted plants, all
sires, varieties. Phone 2-3265
Frank Wilder.
Returning to Stotes must sell new
Baldwin "Acrosonic" spinet piono
in beautiful mahogany $200
under list price. Phone Cocoli 596.
FOR SALE: Miter table and sow
$25.00. Breast drill $4.50. Liqui-
dizer $10.00. Air compressor $25.
00. 361 France Field 37-88-722.
FOR RENT:To responsible person.
Furnished house. 3 bedrooms, liv-
ingroom, diningroom, office, three
porches and garoge, Tel. 3-3143
Ponomo.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT:Beautifully furnished 2
bedroom aportment. Son Martin
St. (50 St. I Bella Vista. Coll Pon-|
ama 3-4405 from 6 p. m. to 8
p. m. House No 30,
FOR RENT:Furnished aportment.
Mexico Avenue and East 42nd St.
Telephone 3-0140, Ponomo.
It is actually cheaper
to buy a
P.T.I.
SAFETY
BLADE
SAW
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Besides Protection Against
Injury, they save many
times their value in cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Are. Tel. 3-1141
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery
Aluminum
Awnings
Different
Colors
$14.00
Industrias
Panamericanas
22
Tel. 3-1713
E. 29th Street
FOR SALE:Hydraulic Jock, twr
large gas tanks, grease gun, 60
cycle motors, 1-4 1; 2; horse-
power, 25 cycle motors, 1-4 &
3 horsepower, sheet of 3-4" ply-
wood. 1445-A Owen St. Balboa
2-3630.
WANTED: TO BUY OR TRADE
Used kerosene refrigerator, about
7 foot. Hove 7 ft. Frigidaire, 60
cycle. Write Box 535, Fort Ama-
dor, for quick deol.
FOR SALE:1942 Packard Clipper.
Good tires. Engine recently over-
hauled. $350.00. Call Albrook
21 10. before 3:30 p. m.
WANTED TO RENT:Relicble North FOR SALE:1942 Buick Sedan with
American family wonti 3 bed-
room, unfurnished cha'et. Tele-i
phone 3-3923.__________
WANTED" TO BUY:Coat for lody
Size 16. coll 2-5121. Panama.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motora
WANTED:Screened cottage, com-
pletely furnished preferred, for
occupancy January first. Coll Pcn-
omo Coco-Colo OMt. Co. Tel. 2-
0750.___________________________
OST & FOUND
LOST:At Quarantine Station Nov-
ember 19th, Spayed female white
cot 2 years old with tiger mark-
ing* ond tiger marked toil wear-
ing red leather harness. Answers
to name KI-KI. Twenty dollars re-
ward for return of this cat. Do-
nold C Koan, 812 'i Empire
St.. Balboa. C. Z. P. O. Box 1650.
LOST:On National Highway Mon-
day, between Puerto Vidal and
Panama, one canvas bag contain-
in*] clothes and bedding Reward.
Reese, Tel. Balboo 3323, Box
214, Diablo. C. Z.
LOST:Sunday in vicinity of Far
Fon swomp, one black ond ton
hunting hound. 8 months old.
Nome: Tern. Tel. 13-6212. Re-
' ward.

'ornarrow J
BUSINESS MAN'S
LUNCH .75
Tomato Juice Cocktail
or Oiblet Soup with Noodles
Ham Hoch
Parsley Potatoes
Early June Pom
Hot Rolls it Butter
Oreen Salad
Vanilla lea Cream
Coffee Tea Beer
' Je*n aa fee Cocktail
/rom 4 to I p.m.
MANHATTANS
MARTINIS
DAIQUIRIS
nmTlZlKS 'On The Mouse-
ra'd.o. For information oppiy Bol-
boa Bowling Center, alter 3:0C
p. m.
BARGAINS! BARGAINS!
IN USED CARS
PRICES AND TkkMS TO FIT
ANY POCKETBOOK
SMOOT ft- HUNNICUTT. S. A.
TEL. COLON. R. P.
COLON 800 16th 6- Broadway
rCDR SALERED M. G. convertible
1951, used two- months. Under
coated, i 1.400. 1523-F, Ba.boa
RETURNING to States will sell 95C
Buick 4 Or. Special, with oil ac-
cessories. Phone: Cocoli 596.
OR SALE:'51 Horley Davidson
motorcycle 74 0. H. V. Painted
red. with all accessories of chrome.
Bike about 4 months old. Inquire
ot Cristobal Police Station, Cris-
tbal, C. Z.
FOR SALE:Johnson Outboard Mo-
tor 10 H. P. New model. Boot &
Trailer, $360. House 152-B, Tel.
6-246.
OR SALE: 17 foot inboord 4
cylinder Lerol engine (magneto)
iust reconditioned. Cristobal Yocht
Club, name: "U-Liar." Phone 5-
169.
NOTICE:Automobile Dealers ond
Salesmen. For your convenience
and better service to your clients
Financing for Government employ-
es can now be done ot No. 29
Feo. de la Ossa (Automo'jlle low)
see Don Pogenta. Tel. 2-4555.
BARGAINS! BARGAINS!
IN USED CARS
PRICES AND TERMS TO FIT
ANY POCKETBOOK
SMOOT r> HUNNICUTT. S. A.
TEL. COLON. R. P.
COLON 100 16th & Ireeaw.y
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE iChalet three bedrooms.
800 M* land, situated In 13 and
R street. Parque Lefevre, behind
Muablerio Ideal. Tel. 3-121$.
FOR SALE:Five-acre fruit farm,
twenty six miles from town. Year
round river. $3,500.00. Term*
available. Telephone Etilboa 1772
FOR SALE: Excellent investment,
chalet located Exposition Grounds.
S200.C0 net income, monthly with
a seven years' contract, guaranteed
nnt. Insurance and water will be
poid by tenant. For further de-
tails phon* 3-2269, from 4:00 tc
7.00 p. m.
%M4 (C
(Bill f UITLIH
JMIEiWTIfULCAIPtTS.
Helo Wanted
WANTED: Good cook and laun-
dress. Bring references. Good sa-
laries. Avenida Cubo No. II.
"Nestle" Building, entrance 28trj
Street.
WANTED:Efficient maid for gen-
eral housework, most speak Eng-
lish and sleep In. Engel 44th St
No. 37, apartment J, Sousa Build-
ing.
WANTED:Maid for full-time gen-
eral house work. Reference* re-
quired. Apply 604-V Cascados Rd.
Ancon.
Position Offered
NEEDED:Teochers for First Grades
ond High School for boy* tc
teach in SAN VICENTE DE PAUL
school which opens in David In
Moy 1952 under the direction of
the Vicention Fathers. Applica
tions from lody school-teacher?
will be considered. Writ to Rev
John J. Cusack. C. M. c/o Hotel
Nacional. David.
RP Couple Remarries
1 Year After Divorce
A young couple who were di-
vorced on Nov. 30. 1950 celebra-
ted the anniversary of their di-
vorce Saturday morning by get-
ting married.
Mildred Ellington and George
Standford were united in holy
wedlock at 9 a m. Saturday in
the MethodLst church of Pana-
ma City during a simple ceremo-
ny performed by the Rev. Will-
iam H. Armstrong.
The remarriage date also was
birthday annlversarv for the
bride, who was 39 years old Sat-
urday. Her husband is the same
Sf*a
FOR RENT:Aportment in best re-
sidential neighborhood. Modern
construction. Well planned ventila-
tion. Porch, diningroom, living-
room, two bedrooms with cedar
.' lined closets, battiroorn, kitchen
laundry room, garage, storage
room. Woter heater furnished. En-
tire apartment screened. City gas
line connections. On bus route tc
and from town. For further In-
formation coll Panama 2-1554.
FOR RENT
Rooms
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, coo1
entirely renovated and wall fut-
niihed. Rate* reasonable. Bache-
lors only. 'Inquire at Tha Ame-
rican Club facing Da Lessee*
Perk.
ISTHMIAN DATA
Births
McPARLANE. Mr. arid Mrs.
Roy of Silver City, a son, Nov. 28
at Colon Hospital.
PRECIADO. Mr. and Mrs.
Marcos A. of Colon, a daughter,
Nov. 28 at Colon Hospital.
SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil of
Panama, a son. Nov. 29 at Gor-
ges Hospital.
GOMEZ. Mr. and Mrs. Jose F.
of Colon, a daughter, Nov. 29 at
Colon Hospital.
LEE, Mr. and Mrs. Seymour of
Pueblo Nuevo, a son, Dec. 1 at
Gorgas Hospital.
TATT, Mr. and Mrs. Claude R.
of Red Tank, a son. Dec. 1 at
Gorgas Hospital.
Marriage Licenses
SZCZUXOW6KI. Myron James
of Ancon. formerly of Alpena.
Mich., to ZUPANCIC, Lillian Jane
of Diablo Heights, formerly of
Pueblo, Colo.
TOUSSAINT. Alfred Vincent of
La Boca to FELIX. Bethelia Ver-
onica of La Boca.
MATTHEWS. John Will of CU-
rundu. formerly of Scottsboro,
Ala., to RODEN, Dorothy White
of Curundu. formerly of Scotts-
boro, Ala.
ROJAS, Jose Bernardo of Ft.
Kbbe "to SANABRIA, Petra Ro-
man of Puerto Rico.
Cristobal-Colon
Rotary Meeting
At Noon Tomorrow
The Cristobal-Colon Rotary
Club will hold its weekly lun-
cheon meeting at the Strangers
Club tomorrow at 12 noon.
Primrose Society Holds
Special Meeting Tonight
The Primrose Benevolent So-
ciety will hold a special meeting
tonight to hear a series of re-
commendations agreed upon by
the board of management last
Friday.
Other matters of Importance
also will be discussed.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel ri Panam
Often slocks fnr aala: San Fernando
Clinic, Panama Insurance, Central
rtiratre, and Abattoir. Want! to buy
Stocks: Panam Omen I and Faena
jr Lb* (coaamm).
TILS.: 1-471 S-1SM
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUn.T -
' Slipcover Reupholstery
VISIT OLB SHOW-llOOal!
Alberto Here
J r. d> li Ossa 77 (AaJomoblieRow
free Kitbaaraft Plckvp a Delivery
Tel. J-4S28 S:M a.m. lo l. p.m.
Last Half of Nov.
Seos 28 Now Faces
In Canal Company
Twenty-eight new employes
joined the Canal organization
during the last half of Novem-
ber. Eleven came from the Uni-
ted States and 17 were employed
locally.
The new States employes,
their positions and birthplaces,
are:
Schools Division Miss Ruby
L. Cryer, physical education
teacher at Balboa, Saratoga,
Texas.
Health Bureau Richard L.
Wright, X-ray technician at
Gorgas Hospital; Miss Marlon D.
Smith, staff nurse.at Colon Hos-
pital; and Dr. Robert A. Gale,
veterinarian. Balboa.
Three new medical officers al-
so were assigned to the Canal by
the Army in the last half of No-
vember They were colonel Rob-
art P. Hughes and captain Will-:
lam A. Meriwether, assigned to
Gorgas Hospital, and Major Tho-
mas B. Hauschlld, assigned to
Corozal Hospital.
Locks Division Nell A. Do-
herty, lock operator, wlreman, at |
Pedro Miguel. Beverly, Massachu- j
setts; Ernest C. Van Horn, lock
operator, wlreman, at Miraflores,
Dayton, Ohio; and Alfred H.
Rodgers, lock operator, machin-
ist, at Gatun, Florissant. Missou-
ri.
Electrical Division Donald C.
Kaan, wlreman at Balboa, Say-
ville. New York.
Aids to Navigation Division
Arley A. Hill, radio mechanic at
Balboa, Sil vis. Illinois.
Industrial Bureau Joseph A.
Greenwood. Inside machinist,
Warring ton, England.
Clubhouse Division Fisher
M. Oltenburg. motion picture
projectionist at Balboa.
New Personnel employed lo-
cally are:
Engineering Division Gilber-
to Guardia, civil engineer; Julio
B. Mora and Ascanlo A. Watson,
engineering draftsmen.
Division of Storehouses John
J. Medllng storekeeper at Cris-
tobal; and Wilfred M. White,
guard at Balboa.
Police Division Tom P. Ba-
cllleri, Richard A. Whalen and
Chester E. Van Orden, policemen
at Balboa and Kenneth L. Mc-
Graw. probationary policeman at
Cristobal.
Dredging Division Daniel R.
Klotz, apprentice machinist.
Finance Bureau Mill Julia I.
Musical Instrument
Answer to Prmviout
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted
musical
instrument
10 Pear-shaped
gem
11 Vat
IS Verify
14 Measure of
weight ,
17 Pronoun
llCores
20Xltt
21 Greek letter
23 Owl's cry
3 Smoking
device
Antler
5 Spanish town
6 Granular snow
7 Roman road
Not of
Guldo's scale
Encountered
11 It is a bartono
'A.l IWWJI I lnl' i It
usy viaka-uri-uiiH
UiTaMam a. .,r_v,
^"B^BaaTeBaBaMal
r-vi'-i > | !>_"-> ,-,- .,., ..,, <-},
12 Employed
15 Musical
instrument
16 Seine*
IS Mine entrance U *"b^l
28 War god ot
Greece
27 Reserve
Corps (ab.) '
28Us
21 Exclamation
of atisfaction
30 Sodium
(symbol)
31 Portend
33 Icelandic
legend
M Stale
37 Brother of
Jacob (Bib.)
38 Direction (ab.)
39 Withered
45 Written form
of Mister
48 Arid
48 Polynesian
4 Western
democracy
(ab.)
50 Public votes
S3 Ability to fed
VERTICAL
1 Recede
2 Abraham's
home (Bib.)
players
19 Indians
22 Harangue
24 Mountain 42 French
nymphs novelist
31 It is used in s 43 Great Lake
IT" **Heaven (var.)
Above 47 Assent '
34 Barriers 49 Utility J
35 Emanation 51 French arUda
40 Prayer ending 52 Tar Heel ,
41 Treaty State-(ab.) i
Army Secretary's
Consultant On Way
Here For Parleys
Peter Beasley, Special Con-
sultant to the Assistant Sec-
retary of the Army, la sched-
uled to arrive Thursday by air
for conferences with Canal of-
ficials. It is not known how
long he will remain on the
Isthmus.
Diablo Heights.
Terminate Division Reed B.
Mcllvame, stevedore foreman at
Cristobal.
Aids to Navigation Division
Fred E. Whlpple, foreman at
Gatun.
Postal, Customs and Immigra-
tion Division Joseph T. Kos-
Pomeroy, card punch operator at lowskl. postal clerk at Gamboa.
Ferry Service Will
Be Halted For 3
Hours On Thursday
Thatcher Ferry service will
be suspended about three hours
from 9 p.m. midnight. Thurs-
day, during repairs to the east
ramp. i
The last trip will be at
p.m. from the East to the West
side on Thursday.
Service will be resumed lm-
diately after repairs are com-
pleted.
Traffic will use
Bridge during the
of ferry service.
Mlraflorea
suspension
>)>)>))))))>>)>>>>>>) > M )>>>>> J >>>>> > > >. .. > >. 7. A > > ...'..'.. > >..'.. ... > A.. *
Pacific Society...
(Continued From Pace FIVE)
hind the Cocoli Police Station re-
cently on the fourth anniversary
of Its founding.
Two classes shot for prizes, age
groups nine to twelve and thir-
teen to sixteen. A silver cup
donated to the club by Castano's
Hobby Shop, Brockton, Massa-
chusetts, was presented to the
winner In each class while me-
dals were given the boys who
came in 2nd and 3rd places.
Several Thursday evenings later
the club members and their
parents met at the Cocoli Club
house for a turkey dinner after
which prizes were awarded the
winners by the Instructors of the
Juniors, Mr. G. M. Sylvester.
Those receiving prizes included:
James Hale of Rodman, 1st
prize. Silver Cup, 13 to 16 Class.
Charles Michael of Ft. Kobbe,
1st prize, Silver cup, 9 to 12 Class.
Richard Hale of Rodman. 2nd
prize, Gold medal, 13 to 16 Class.
Jack Jenkins of Rousseau. 2nd
prize. Gold medal, 9 to 12 Class.
Roger Griffith of Diablo. 3rd
prize, Silver medal. 9 to 12 Class.
The runners-up in the 9 to 12
Class, Donald Bruce and Robert
Laatz of Balboa, were given
bronze lapel button!.
Tee, at El Panama
to Honor Mrs. Tauber
A welcome home tea for Mrs.
Dona Tauber who returned from
the States is being given at 3
p.m. today at El Panama by
Mrs. Inga Renert. Mrs. Tauber
is staying with her daughter,
Mrs, Z. Blum berg in Curundu.
GREETINGS
NOW/
Rains Wash Out Junta
Fair; Girls To Try
Again Saturday Night
Heavy rains early Saturday
evening caused the partial sus-
pension of the fund-raising fair
sponsored by the Junta Femeni-
na de Beneficencia, but another
fair has been agreed on for this
Saturday night.
The locale of the fair will be
the Children's Playground at
Parque Lefevre. It Is scheduled
to start at 6 p.m. with games for
children followed bv dancing and
other attractions for adults be-
ginning at 8p.m.
The Junta la trying to raise
enough funds to give a big
Christmas party for children at
"La Casita" nurserv in Chorrillo
and to distribute a large number
of food packages to needy fami-
lies on Christmas Eve.
We've a gala array of gay and
distinctive cards waiting for
your selection. Humorous
cards, religious cards, senti-
ment! cards filled with
your good wishes exactly the
way you want to, express them..
Come make your selections,
today.
LEWIS SERVICE, INC
4 Tirol! Avenue
MORRISON'S NOVELTIES
l Fourth of July Avenue
Both storei opposite the Ancon Poet Office
and open, noon and until a.ai.
[f<<4<4<<<-<<<<' (<-<<<:
* 5. <*'*<<*<*<.<.* < < *


; WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8. 151
THE. PANAMA AMERICA AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE 8EYEN
Metan tic ^>ocietu
#.#t nuJi~rf |CPX HeM at 6ullck;
&,34. Qalun D.LpLns Qalun 716 or 463 [ Qgp| Jfl |fe M
MRS. W. E. THOMPSON GUEST
OP HONOR AT COFFEE PARTY
Mr*. W. E. Thompson, a recent arrival on the Naval Sta-
tion at Coco Solo, wai ntrociiceH to a group of ladle on the
Station at a coffee party jiven by Mra. J. W. Schwartr ye-
terday mornlnf at the Naval Officers Club, Coco Solo.
tereated In the activities of thla' &*.;_-----
group are invited to attend the JOfllOlTOW nOll MO
meetings.
"T^r^Aeo* win *-**< -rive at the best
| Guliek. Fort Davis, Fort Sher-
man, and Coco Solo. The aec -
j 1 ion of the disaster control
I Joint Army-Navy-Air Force staff
Included Fire Fighting, UtU-
! itles. Rescue and Engineering
Supplies: Bomb Disposal and
Ordnance, Police, Transporta-
tion, Refugee Care and Feed-
ing. Supplies, Food and Cloth-
ing, Communication, and Me-
dical.
A critique of the exercise will
be held at Atlantic Sector
Headquarters, Thursday start-
ing at 10 a.m.
terd, morning at the Naval Officer. Club, Coco Solo. pr&dV the Regular monthly metRodi to us. in lessening
Mrs. Thompson arrived 8atur-| loons and multi-colored stream- meetmg of the Woman's Auxili- Physical damage and human
day, Decembe rfirst, accompa- ers of crepe paper. w _, ary o Oatun Union Church, ^Ju^ In the event of disaster,
nied by her husband. Command- The guests included Madeline Thursday, at 12:80 o'clock. There J held at Fort aunen yes-
er W. E. Thompson and their two Oarrett. Donna Humphrey, Mar- wlll ^ ^ exchange of gifts the t?"y morning by the Army-
sons from Charleston, South Ca-, garita and Maria Butcher. Julie cost of whichls not to exceed one 'j* *>"-*' /or.ce VS^ .
rollna. Commander Thompson! Lewis. Rosita Almengor, Margar-, doUar A11 members and friends trol Sub-Center (Atlantic).
,111 a,iA/taAl Pnmmanriap .1 XV at. flnmlla OTlrf Orflciela ReStrP-. # *V. ^.irk r urAlpnm aiyA
The CPX lasted from 9 to 11
. m. and was directed by Sec-
tor C. O., Colonel Henry F.
Taylor, director of the Sub-
Mimui. ,.*... .... <-. Center. Present at the exercise
ington The adult guests included Mrs. Christmas Holidays as an observer was Lt. Col-
Thc 'guests Included Mrs. L.yle Roger Hamor.Mra. John W. Dwy- Mr. and Mrs. Hal Flnleson of 0nel John P. Mlal. Director, Dl-
I. Koepke Mrs. Charles C. Yan-: er, Mr. and Mrs. John Forrest Cartago. Costa Rica, arrived here Mter Control Center, Fort Ama-
quell, Mrs' Robert L. Ware, Mrs and son, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. during the week: end for a visit dor#
Theodore I. Applequlst, Mrs, P. L. Butcher. Br, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. with members of their fanuWon
Balay, Mrs. WVW.Bemla, Mrs. A. \ Murray, Mr. and Mrs. M. B.Alex- both sides of the Isthmus. They Taking part in the exercise
P Bollens, Mrs. I. J. Ducote, Mrs. ander, Captain and Mrs. Harry are at present the house guests were aj, dlsa8ter control staffs
George J. Ellis, Mrs. William Hall, Hurst, Mr. and Mra. Ross Aid-, of their son and daughter-in-law ^ ^ Atlantic Side; viz., Fort
Mrs. Eugene U Hamon, Mrs. D. rich, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Greene, Mr. and Mrs. John Flnlesno and ---------------------------------
Henderson, Mrs. W. N. Horlck, and Mr. and Mra. Henry E. Lewis, family in Curundu.
Mrs. J. J. Humes, Mrs, L. B. Jen-
Mrs. inompson arnvea oaiur- won ana miuu-u meeting 01 me w uwu- *",*, ,' ,r-""" f-f riiat#r
day, Decembe rfirst, accompa- ers of crepe paper. '. u ary of Oatun Union Church, Injury In the event of OMMMr,
nied by her husband. Command- The guests Included Madeline Thursday, at 12:30 o'clock. There *' held at Fort OuacK yes-
erW.E. Thompson and their two Oarrett. Donna Humphrey, Mar- wlll ^ j, exchange of gifts the terday morning by the Armj-
sons from Charleston, South Ca-, garita and Maria Butcher. Julie cost oI whlchls not to exceed one ''avy-Air Force Disaster con-
rollna. Commander Thompson! Lewis. Rosita Almengor, Margar- doHar, All members and friends trol
will succeed Commander J. W.let Gomlla and Graciela Restre- of tne crnirch are welcome, and
Schwarts as Public Works Offl- do. Also Luke Palumbo, Andy an invitaUon Is extended to all Tl
cer at the Naval Station, Coco Bleakley. Allen Roblnette, Jackie newcomers to attend. ia.m.
Solo. Commander and Mrs. and Bobby Aldrlch, John Bur- -------- itor
Schwartz will sail Friday for gess, George Hurst and Elmer,
their new duty In Seattle, Wash-1 Hamor. ._, _. Visitors. Arrive _Fpr
nongs, Mrs. Wlllard D. King and American Episcopal Church to
Mra. F. A. Kraft. Observe Universal Bible Sunday
Also Mrs. Michael Leahy, Mrs. Universal Bible Sunday will I
Experiment Garden
Change of Residence
Mr and Mrs. O. Jorstad U/on f-'HoVP XmOS
and son. Jon. who formerlv re- 1
Also Mrs. Michael Leahy, Mrs. Universal Bible Sunday win oe ancj <,, jon wn0 formerly re- ." 'wt* --
Mark A. Loy, Mrs. Frank Moore, observed at the American Epls- sided 0n Third Street, New Cris- "VrWiflie Tkic YPrtf
Mrs. Roy Nielsen, Mrs. William D.: copal Church of Our Saviour,,t0Dai are now residing in Mar- iiWMIIS I III I cut
Ronayne. Mrs. I. M. Rowell, Mrs. I Third Street New Cristobal, 8un- %aLlitSi, in. the quarters vacated; v.,^m. ,,,,. .r
w r Qonric mtr o^h.rt Snhaf-1 Amv npcfmhfr fl. ,Z.... r. n it-mana The Christmas wreaths ar
iiuiioj iiir, ma. 4. **v*., --* *- -,--
W. E. Sands, Mrs. Robert Schaef- day, December 9.
ler, Mrs. Vance A. Schweitzer,, ,. ? th. 11 nvinrk
Url p t am Mrs. k. l. amitn. Mrs. n. >v. .., h )h. ,m.
The Christmas wreaths and
centerpieces sold by the Canal
Mr "hT 'i Kuesis at ine ij uuw _,w., ., ajffll,,B'. rin Zone Experiment Gardens dur-
Thomas MnT enrv^Thornton; morning service will be the, em-Tic^for woman s Club past holiday seasons. wUl
Colonel and Mrs. James W.I I was not sold
PumpeUy of Fort Oullck were gtM ^te Tbgjtg
SenceMS^WT^f^
"r WMWrangen by*Mrs Pum-^ Clv Theater met Monday night
peUy ceieK The blxthdav.ln the C it. Room at 1
anniversary of her husband, tun om
There were sixteen guests invited' election
Tn the"Community Room at Oa- Chapter DonGteS
anniversary of he? huVbancf. tun Clubhouse, lor the. annual
An adequate and satisfactory
1 supply 01 the manufactured
wreaths *rrt centerpieces, from
the United States is again
available In the stores and It1
I is felt that the manufacture
of wreaths by the Garden Is
' no longer Justified.
)house lor the annual ._ /- 1
of officers and Boardi$5 Tn Leoer Colony
tn'hMrTrVtetoa!^ -K^i "*-v j
to help celebratejhe occasion. gerye for the (nsulng 1M2 ^^ ^ ^ Leorosarium
Coln Matron Celebrate I were Mrs. Robert T. Thomas, h acknowledged with gratl- in the Welfare and Recreation
mrthdaV Annlvomry president; Jerry Schear, vice- t th ^.fio,, Qf $5 from Fund of the Leprosarium roirr
Birtnaajr Annivrry_ __%i_ __ 1; ,d _t Mr8 Carl w, Reyn. ,lM"e '"'""_.. ,"._..,.. _.hlrh .ntertalnment and lit
irthdaV Annlvenary president; Jerry ecnear, vrce- t d tne dollBtlon of $5 from Fund of the Leprosarium iroin
_ Mrs Ysalc OsoKf Coln.ce- president; Mrs. Carl ^,, f^"-. ihe Chagres River No. 6*Amer- which entertainment and gifts
leoratedher birthdav annlversa- olds secretary; Mrs. WiUiam N. u lon Alucllhiry at Gam- are furnished for the patients
ry with a bufet luncheon andNessler. assistantretary; M. boa> according to superintendent
aSSSSericiS MOndaV at m\VwEBOttufr e mon^ h" Placed'Ezra Hurwit.
StThnegguesUUlncluded Mrs. David'. $$fi^fiS ?V
C. Sasso, Mrs._ Abraham Saaso.: riot. Mrs.Lee Karlger. Mrs. A
QMo^jj&u
' -
THimDA
|r~
The hlr'O!'
a-2-fun town!
** TECHNICOLOR
dm mw-nnujs iHinE5frar#
UrTcS^Umm Taac Cunningham. Carl W.' Reynolds.
SaJsoM^ rII HerreTa. Mrs. Mrs. Ralph Malcolm and Cur s
Oscar Van deTDys, Mrs. Manuel! George. Raymond Ralph presi-
Castiilo Mrs"loTd Alberga, Mrs.' dent of the Gatun Civic Council
Percva AJbergaJ Mrs. Jaiqueta an honorary member of the;
So^n18^.fe Ll^eSB0Te- regular meeting of th.
Jain J Mrs Benito Pabn, Mrs. eroup U held on the fcond
ffiKCJ^Oa,
ui Mrs: snero Melndez.i n.m. In the Community Roomta
Mr?* Enilque CoPtees? Mrs. Joa! Oatun Clubhouse. AU perK,nln-
Mara Gonzlez, Mr. Robert Von'
Tress; Mrs. Arglmlro Guardia,
Mrs. James Salterior. Mrs. Gusta-:
vo Valverde, Mrs. Enrique Jara-
millo, Mrs. Lprria Lyons. Mrs. Ol-
medo Afaro>Mrs. Mareel Belan-
ger. Mrs. Neil Hatgl, Mrs. Julio
Vial. Mis. Enrique Tories and
Also Mrs'Peter Inder, Mrs Al-
exis Vila, Mrs. Mtt ftnto. Mrs.
Fabin Pinto. Mrs. Carlos Moral-
es, Mrs. OeW Mercler Mrs
Herbert Toledano, Mrs. Robert
Hull Mrs. Agustn Cedeno. Mrs.
Joseph Watson, Mrs. Hiplito
Fernandez. Mrs. Lenidas Sanch-
ez Mrs. Joaouin Franco, Mrs.
Jofge Legula. Mrs. Manuel Ric-
ardo, Mrs. Juan Ventura, Mrs.
Thomas J. Butler, Jr.. Mrs. James
B Ford, Mrs. Robert Richardson,
Mrs Julio Nino. Mrs. Ernesto Ni-
no Mrs. Humberto Lelgnadler,
Mrs. Julio Lelgnadler, Mrs. Enri-
oue Belando, Mr. Julio Salas,
Mrs.Gunther Hershfeld, Mrs Al- ,
bert Motta, Mrs. Gulseppe Ipae.1
Mrs. James W. Kane, Mr. Her-
beltK. Peterson, Mrs. Anbal Ga-
lindo. Mrs. Ernesto Estenoz, Mrs.
Antonio Alberola. Mrs. W. H. Go-, ,
ebertus. Mrs. Maximo Walker, '
Mrs. Robert Leigh and Miss Enri-
queta Secull.
Buffet Supper and Party
Honors Paul Orvls'
The fourteenth birthday anni-
vrsarv of Paul Orvl was cele-
brated with a buffet supper and
party given by his parents. Mr.
and Mrs. Eugene E. Orvls at their
home in Margarita. Sunday eve-
n The birthday cake decorated
and suitably inscribed was en-
circled with novelty Christmas
candles. The lower floor of the
home, where the party was held,
was decorated with marry bal-.
FAKIR URBANO
THE MOST SURPRISING MAN IN THE WORLD
HE HAS HOURS ; 120 WITHOUT EATING
AN EVENT THAT NO ONE HAS EVER DEFIED
IN EXHIBITION AT THE
VICTORIA THEATRE
Today Popular Wednesday for Every One To Go
20c. Admission 20c. Admission 20c.
TOMORROW AT THE
CENTRAL
KIRK
VIRGINIA
% VIRGINIA
DOUGLASMAYO
JOHN WALTtK
8 Tivoli Ave. Tel. 2-3121
NEW ARRIVALS...
Cottons......995
RHODA
62 Justo Arosemena Ave. Tel. 3-1477
EVENING and COCKTAIL
DRESSES
SHOES
Patent Leather... Suede Too!
GrOA40AROW/
_ AT THE _
LUX THEATRE
He put the world on a HOT
SPOT! Me-.t the man who
wanted to possess the World
and the girl that woke him
up!
MB OffMTWN Xi
nuaaa mowi rmm *^^^
14
ON
CUMMINS
greeneJ
CroAiowtow.'
_ AT THE I
CECILIA
The struggles to get to the
top of Gol! Champion
Bfc>' HOOAN
"FOLLOW THE SUN"
Glenn FORD Anne BAXTER
-. Also:
"THE FROGMEN"
Uncle Sam's Under Water
Cvmmindos!
RH H.AltD WIDMARK
DANA ANDREWS
MERCURIO
Next to th Central Thwir
Inn S m. to I p.m.
SENSATIONAL
DECEMBER
[Panama C^anal (clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
Air-ConflUMe*
815 ft S:ll
David WAYNE Tom tWELL
"UP FRONT
Also Showing Thursday
Motion Pleturo C-malled:
BALBOA WJOH SCHOOL promt*
"LIFE OF THE PARTY" cm.
DIABLO HTS.
COCOLI
CIS ft 7:5
'io* WARN Jimmy HANLEY
"THE BLUE LAMP"
Thuntoy HIT PA BAD:"
GAMBOA
7:N
^Sfif TA "TH^N^ECTOrTciENERAL''
1:1 ft 8:1
Tkuraaay "PTOm ISLAND
CRISTOBAL
Alr-roTMlltlannt
<:15 ft :!
Roban STACK Joy PAE
'Bullfighter and The Lady"
nan**? "GlBl. OF THB TEAB"
Bob HOPE I lid BALL
'Fancy Pants" (Technicolor)
A!jo Showing TW.ridav!
Automatic
WASHING MACHINES
60 cycles
Before ... 429.50
now 299-
ELECTRIC RANGES
Before ... 299.50
now 249
.00

BELLA VISTA fc*^
1:M *M S* T:S
A Wondrrf.ii Comedy.-!
Zaily MOBKNO Angal MAOAftA
in
"COSAS DE MUJER"
LUX THEATRE


"JOHNSON B HEROES OF HE
42nd Ref .jrembatjreaan!
CENTRAL
BENEFIT SHOW OF
THE EMPLOYES!

John Wayne Henry
Fonda, In
"FORT APACHE"
- Also:
A Select Stage Show!
CECILIA THEATRE
A modm itudy o mod-rn married life!
BOLD' DARINiJI SENSATIONAL! TBUB!
TKST TUBE MABJES"
Alto: A Sonsatlonal s.-iwv.ific Shortl
"STORY OF UIRTH"
AIIILTS ONLY!
.. -^ajga
TROPICAL-
It'i Th R*il Korean Story ...I
Bobert HLTION Bt.vc BRODIF
- In
"THE STEEL HELMET"
j0*nr-:*-
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air ( o.iilUnrJ
A Groa I Oouolt ProgMml
Prank Lov"Joy Dorothy
Hait. In
"I WAS A COMMUNIST
FOR THE FBI."
Kirk Dour;i Jane Wyman
CLASS MENAGERIE'
B".
TIVOLI THEATRE
BANK DT IIM.M
Tn at S CO and on pm.
Alan The* Plcturoal
"UOCKS Or NEW YOBK"
"THB 8TAUP STBSAK-
"BXONDIKK PVBV
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
two" new CHAPTEBSOP
PIRATES OF THE
HIGH SEAS"
with Bua Chap-er- 4 and S
Alao Johnny Waiaaaiullar. In
"THB LOST TRIBE'
flu Ai.jthfT AcUon PicturI
VICTORIA THEATRE^
FAKIR URBANO
Nailed From H.ada ad Peetl
Alao. Trc Pictures!
"ALASKA"
GANGSTER-
REFRIGERATORS
0 cycles
49930
Before 449.50
37950
399
now 349
315
50
50
ALSO

Dehumidiliers Electric Ironers
OPE1S ALL DAY EVERY DAY
INCLUDING SUNDAYS
Ampie Parking 51 Via Espaa
Tel. 3-3193 for free transpotration to our sale.
ALSO AT
SMOOT & PAREDES
RODELAG ECONOGAS
5 de Mayo 34 E.. Street
SMOOT & HUNNICUT
COLON



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
_ _____________f___________________ .WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, II



Majors' Steal Show At Minor League Meeting!
Bavasi Denies Dodgers
Top Players 'On Block'
By United Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio, Dec. 5.The Major Leagues
stole the show yesterday at the Minor League base-
bull meetings in Columbus, Ohio. While Class 'B'
clubs were drafting 70 players, Major Leaguers
made the news. One item comes from Buzz Bavasi,
general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Bavasi
denies reports that the Dodgers will trade first-
line players. Bavasi says Brooklyn intends to keep
its regulars.
i'd MAJORS STEALSports .J "I've got enough men to rebuild
T.ie Dodger general manager] my club. I spent more
says he .spent two hours
jOmphroy Tennis
Tournament Play
I spent more money
with'than that for Just two or three
Harry Willis play Achilles Petit to
Standstill; Game calleddark-
ness.
Yesterday afternoon the
Omphroy Tennis Tournament
Charolito, Finnegan Getting
Ready For 3rd Clash Sunday
Young Finnegan and Charolito
Espirituano are putting on the
finishing touches to their train-
presented one of the most fan-jing program for their third local
tastlc games of the season when! clash. The first two matches were
Achilles Petit faced Harry Willis'held at the Colon Arena, this
to decide the right to play Roger | timeSunday nightthey will
Little in the last quarter-finals meet at the Panama Gym overa
match .scheduled ten-round route.
After nip and tuck rallies, Wil- The ,int iim,e nese. 2! '
11s won the first set at 6-1 and Charolito knocked out Finnegan
started off the second set by in the second round, m the re:
leading Petit 3-0 and it appeared
as though the end was just a-
round the corner but Petit forced
Willis Into many errors In that
most crucial game to break the
monotony.
Petit followed with three serv-
ice placements to take the fol-
turn match, Finnegan flattened
the visitor In the first round. So
they're all even thus far.
Charolito, welterweight cham-
pion of Cuba, packs a murderous
wallop in both mitts but doesn't
seem to be able to take a punch
too well. Finnegan, on the other
hand, hasn't been rated a kayo
Philadelphia Phil President Bob'players last summer, and none lowing game to make It 4-2,
Carpenter Monday night but no- of them came through very well."i dropped the following game on artist for some time but toe seems
thin? was settled. One of the most highly regard-! some keen volley-placements, to be regaining the punch wai
Carpenter wanted some of my ed players drafted Is Roy Price, a from Wiliis and some errors on once placed him at the very top
top guvs." says Bavasi. but he southpaw grabbed by Corpus, his part, but In an exciting ser- of the local heap.
didn't want to give us anything Chrlsti. Price struck out 344 bat-lies of shots Petit took the fol-| These two classy 147-pouiiders
much in return. We v anted Del ter.s with Havana last year while lowing four games to win the set will be out to demons
das has drawn up an excellent
supporting program. There will
be the usual semifinal and two
preliminaries. .
The unbeaten Pedro Tesis of
Colon will meet Vicente Worrell
of Panam in the six-round 126-
pound semifinal. This will be the
stiffest teat up to now for Tesis
who has reeled off five straight
impressive victories.
Alfonso Perkinson returns from
Yanks, Bombers Open Tonight;
Ed Neville vs. Connie Johnson
The second game of the 1851-
'52 Panam Pro League season
gets under way at 7:30 tonight
with the Carta Vieja Yankees
scheduled to meet the Chester-
field Bombers at the National
Stadium.
Eddie Neville, a chunky south-
paw who tantalizes the opposi-
tion with slow breaking stuff and
Santiago of Chlriqui In a 126-
pound preliminary at a four-
round distance.
Baby Patrol and Cisco Kid will
swap punches in the 126-pound
four-round opening contest.
Sports Shorties
By UNITED PRESS
Ennis because we could use him winning 17 ames.
Behind the scenes at Colum-
bus, General Manager Bill Mul-
ligan of Portland in the Pacific
Coast League says Clay Hop-
per has been named manager
for 1952. He replaces Bill
Sweeney who resigned after the
1951 season. Hopper is a vet-
at 6-4 amidst thunderous ap-
plause.
After a rest period of five min-
as a wide open affair. The bet-
eran of the Brooklyn farm sys- mutual agreement, to start the
tern. j third set all over this afternoon
Jack Burns Is the new manager, at 5 o'clock. .
of Albany, a Boston Red Soxj The winner of this final set
ir;
B
utes, Petit started off by taking ting is even money,
the first four games to lead at Matchmaker "Goyo" Castane-
4-0, then dropped the following
two games. x
It got so dark that it was de-
cided to postpone the match by
In another deal, but Carpenter
belked."
Bavasi says he is beginning to
feel like Casey Stengel, the New
Yor'< Yankee manager.
"Casey says why break up a
winning combination,'' recalls
Bavasi. "Even though we did-
n't win the pennant like the
Yankees did. I still know for
sure we could finish first or
second next year with what we
have got."
Gettln back to the draft...
Portsmouth. Virginia, of the c!ub at Scranton the
Piedmont League drafted eight of seasons.
the 70 players selected. Despite Carl Kubbell. farm director for, the contestants. JjJJgL 2~2itV HRSSS 1,
that. Portsmouth President the New York Giants, says he ex- Reminders are voiced for all o., e j ?w p ^^
Frank Lawrence still is against pects to name the new Mlnnea-! players remaining In the tour-,s"va .ra8necl. M. SfftSPJ!
the draft law. i polis manager in a day or two. nament that foot-faults will be lien they each broke 93x100 in
"I still think we ought to throw Tommy Heath quit to manage called against each player In the th* combination skeet and trap
the thing in the Atlantic Ocean.". San Francisco in the Pacific semi-finals and finals and every shoot to tie for high score.
says Lawrence, 'but as long as Coast League. effort should be used by them fi>\ In the last stages both the
we have the rule I guess It is all 'restrain jumping on the first ball; shooters were so hot In the
right to ta-.e advantage of it." Within a few days the baseball service, or moving when in the shoot-off that they had to fin-
COLUMBUS. O. The minor
day who is the better manonce, league draft opened steady Wed-
and for all. The boat shapes up nesday with a strong undertone
GUN CLUB
NOTES
Two squads of shooters braved
farm club in the Eastern League, wil Iplay Roger Little tomorrow the rX "duck" weather to
Burns managed Boston's farm afternoon at 4 o'clock as It Is St "S .J^e Colonel Rice
last three qujte probable this match will go Tarouh?ai&1t at toe Cristobal
........ J t? three sets due to the caliber o JS%SS. tZL22*
Thirty-eight players were world may learn the plans of New
drafted from Clnss "C" leagues
for $1,000 each. Another 32 mov-
ed up from Class "D' leagues at
$800 each.
Lawrence figures he had a good
day even though he hasn't seep
any of the eight players he
drafted.
'Tor $6,400," says Lawrence,
York Yankee outfielder Joe Di-
Maggio. Yankee co-owners Del
Webb and Dan Topping and Dl-
Magglo will leave Phoenix today
by plane
Fl
for New York. The
act of serving or touching the
service line or moving into the
courts while serving.
It is anticipated that the semi-
finals will be played Sunday
morning, with Bill Hele facing
meeting scheduled for Thursday juno plnllla and Webb Hearn
Or Fridayls expected to decide facing the winner of the Willis-
whether DIMagglo will retire or
continue playing.
THE BEST IS WELL
WORTH WAITING FOR!
Shortly we will present
our new collection of
Quality CHRISTMAS
GUTS!
Look for our
announcement
very soon
n this paper!
THE FRENCH BAZAAR
"The Most Talked-About Gift Store
on the Isthmus!'*
Juan Palomeras
COLON COLON
s
lildll IH1IUI1.U1IU.II!
Petit-Little fracas.
Margarita Sports
lsh by flipping a coin to de-
termine the winner of the
sterling silver creamed and
pitcher set given by the Cris-
tobal Gun Club for this spe-
cial occasion. "Lucky" Eddie
walked away with the trophy
when the ''head" he had se-
lected turned right side up.
The 50 bird skeet event was
shot first with Eddie breaking
46 and Captain Silva 48. But
Eddie turned the tables when
he came through the trap
event with 47x50 while Captain
Silva dropped 5 birds for a
total of 45x50 tying each other
In a knot.
Others making high scores
in the handicap trap event were
Spencer and Marie
Four Teams to Compete for 2nd
Half Volleyball Championship
Due to the advent of the base-
ball season and the large number
of games already postponed In
the second half of the Margarita; _
Volleyball League, it has been de- Hgg
elded to play an elimination Westover both with 47x50. Joe
tournament for the champion- ** brke *M Harold
ship of the second half Wednes- *odf" started out with 25
day night straight In the first string but
I Of the six teams In the league,! wound up with the loss of 4
!only four will compete In the birds In the second for a total
tournament. Cristobal, the flrst of 46x50. Lee Carr turned In
; half champions, will forfeit their a very good score of 46x50.
chances In the second half so: And this Is history until sun-
that team members may attend day morning, Dec. 0th, when
the welcoming banquet tobe glv-1 "Charlie" Dlsharoon will open
en for the Key west football the Gamboa Gun Club for a
team that night at the Strangers gala Xmas turkey shoot. All
Club. The faculty team will not shooters, young and old; male
be able to put a team on the and female; skilled and un-
court that night for the same skilled come and "git" fa*
reason. lone buck a 15 pound Xmas
Margarita, 764th AAA. Fasron turkey if you are lucky.
105, and the Shore Battalion will1 Targets used will be similar
be on hand Wednesday evening to those you shot at during the
at 6:30 to draw opponents and
get under way. The final game of
the half between the two win-
ners will be played the same
night.
The public is invited to attend
these games which should be
hotly contested throughout.
The charity fight between Mid-
dleweight Champion Ray Robln-
; son and Bobo Olson at San Fran-
| cisco on December 20 has been
postponed Indefinitely. A spokes-
man for Promoter William Kyne
says Robinson Injured his sacro-
iliac while training In New York.
Thanksgiving turkey shoots.
Don't forget the trap gun be-
cause there will also be some
trpshootlng. Come early be-
fore the rain starts!
of trading.
The draft officially opens the
week-long minor league conven-
tion at Columbus, Ohio. The A-
merican Association, the Inter-
national League and the Coast
League get first crack at base-
ball hopefuls.
From there it works down
through the various loops with
the Class "B" and "C" Leagues
getting a shot at the leavings.
Major league owners and man-
agers are on hand with trading
In mind. Brooklyn Is openly af-
ter one of Cincinnati's pitchers
preferably Swell Blackwell.
The Dodgers Indicate they might
trade either outfielder Carl Fu-
rillo or Duke Snider.
CHICAGOA group of educa-
tors says time is running out in
correcting Intercollegiate athlet-
ic evils.
. A subcommittee of the North
Central Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools thinks the
problem must be solved Jointly
by colleges and high schools. The
committee is meeting in Chica-
go.
A spokesman says abuses
threaten to affect unfavorably
the entire educational and ath-
letic program of secondary
schools and colleges.
The committee recommends
that athletics be taken under
complete control by those re-
sponsible for the overall educa-
tional programs.
Federico Plummer
Rated 4th In World
According to the latest issue
o the "Ring Magaslne" (Jan-
uary edition), Panama's classy
Featherweight Champ Federi-
co Plummer is now rated fourth
in the world In the 126-pound
class behind Champion Sandy
Saddle!.
Listed ahead of Plummer are
Willie Pep, Ray Famechon and
Roy Ankara. Following Plum-
mer are Ernesto Formenti (5),
Ronnie Clayton (6), Percy Bas-
sett (7), Lauro Salas (8), Teddy
"Red Top" Davis (9) and Luis
de Santiago (16).
Federico is scheduled to
make his first start in the UjB.
next Monday against Davis at
the St Nicholas Arena in the
main bout at a limit of eight
rounds.
ing, will start for the Yankees on
the mound against the Bomb-
ers' right-handed fireball ace
Connie Johnson.
The Yankees go into this new
season as favorites again but this
time they have the added advan-
tage of being managed by Al
Kubskl, who reeled off six conse-
cutive championships In the Ca-
nal Zone League. Kubskl, natur-
ally, will be out to stretch his
Isthmian winning streak.
The Yanks, however, must play
up to expectations in order to
hold their own against the other
three clubs which are vastly Im-
proved over last year's squads.
Alberto (Mamavlla) Osorlo and
Dave Thomas will be ready for
relief duty In case Johnson or
Neville, respectively, need help.
The lineup:
YANKEES
Jassanski, ss
Jacobs, 2b
Kropf, cf
Lynch, If
Cronin, rf
Kubskl, 3b
Dabek, c
Chataham, lb
Neville, p
NOW-j^

ALL
DRINKS
sold
at
Yz
price
from 3 to 7 p.m.
EVERY DAY
The Boston Bar
Old!
Faltering Philip!
PhUip s Hie I Oiled with bruises.
Tell-worn steps and rags he ases
Repairs woeld leave his home like nev
r A. Classifieds, lust the right clue!
neo mrninf
yellow keep wk,e m
now, you aeed to use our?
little .
It's gonna be easy, Dancer
TO FILL THAT CHRISTMAS LIST
with gifts that really suit!
Alert PANAMA MERCHANTS are using
Radio Station HOG
to tell shoppers about their
sparkling selection of gifts!
BOMBERS
Osorlo, cf
Austin, ss
Tumlnelli, 3b
Brathwalte, If .
Napier, c
Montelro. rf
Prescott, 2b
Williams, lb
Johnson, p
'Voice of America'
Warns AAU Against
Red Olympic Tricks
DAYTONA BEACH. Fla.. Dec. 5
(UP)A "Voice of America"
spokesman warned the Amateur
Athletic Union Saturday to be-
ware of Russian tricks in the
1952 Olympic Games.
Speaking to the AAU's conven-
tion, Richard B. Walsh said Sov-
iet athletes feel they have to win
all the time because "the super-
iority of 8tallnlst, socialistic ath-
letics over capitalism athletics
must be continually demonstrat-
ed."
He pointed out these classic in-
cidents:
When an opposing team made
an objectionable goal during a
Central Asia League soccer game,
the Soviet coach blandly an-
nounced the ball would have to
go through the.-joal posts twice
to count.
In a tour of China by a Rus-
sian basketball team, the Sov-
iets brought their own referee
and he changed the rules as the
game progressed to make sure
the right team won.
In Hungary, the fans walked
out of the arena when the Rus-
sian-appointed referee counted
so slowly that the fallen Soviet
boxer was able to rest, then re-
gain his feet.
Sports Briefs
FASTER, RASTER!Navy's Johnny Raster (number 49) spurts
'Sst the 10-yard line In a record-smashing 101-yard dash to a
ouchdown In the clash with Army in Philadelphia. After pilfer-
ing an Army pass to the end zone. Raster roared across the field
In the first quarter. Navy sank Army, 42-7. (NEA Telephone
ji (ft ti wu %itf
Witt nofL
or
By UMTED PRESS
The Southern Association has
followed the American Associa-
tion in reducing Its player limit.
Southern clubs will be allowed
to carry only 20 menInstead of
22 for the first 30 days.
After the 30 days, the player
limit will be the same as before
19 players. The American Asso-
ciation cut limits Monday from
24to2L
In another action, former
Baseball Commissioner Albert B.
Chandler was named the new
head of the International Base-
ball Congress. The D3C will hold
Its first international tourna-
ment for non-pro teams next
ear. The tourney probably will
held In Brooklyn.
Iff
Reports from St. Petersburg,
Florida Indicate that former Bos-
ton Braves' President Bob Qulnn
Is slightly improved following
five days of critical Illness at a
local hospital. The 81-year-old
Qulnn entered the hospital last
week.
The repeated failure of the
Boston Red Sox to win the pen-
nant has cost them a long-time
fan. Calvin Hubbard, of Merld-
en, Connecticut, says he has been
a Red Sox rooter all his life, but
is switching to the Yankees be-
causeas he put it"I'm tired of
waiting for Boston to win again."
Hubbard is 100 years old.
/ PLYMOUTH
an econmica
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name your model!
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OP LISTERINf ANTIttPTK HAD FfWtt COiDSI


ygPWMDAT, DECEMBER 5, 18S1
m PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

rr- T-- ii
PAOININB
Boston College Win Over Holy Cross Rated Vpset-Of-Year'
W.&M.Over
Wake Forest
Second Best
By STEVE SNIDER
United Press Sport Writer
JACK KATALINAS, S'10" 165 Poondi, Senior.A brother to Joe.
Jack haa been used as a defensive lineman. Many times the
Katallnas brothers' have been on Cristobal's forward wall, work-
ing side by side, and stopping the opponents running attack cold.
Jack can play at any position on the defensive line, which gives
the Tigers a great boost by having a versatile man up front. Tack
Is one of the fattest players on the team, and with his exceptional
speed has caught many backs for a loss. When Cristobal goes
on the defense against the "Concha" of Key West, Jack Katallnas
will be one ofthe Blue and Gold's hard charginR linemen, that
'he Red and White will have to stop.
Key West High School Players
Arrive At Tocumen This P. M.
he
o
SH,
is set for the wel-
of the visiting firemen
_jy West, Florida, who are
dv to. land today at 4:00 p.m.
atTocumen Airport.
ast minute arrangements for
tr. great cavalcade of sports
tht will take place on the At-
latlc Side this weekend, are
capleted, and in the three
wilts the Tigers have had no
rre and select their basket-
squad that will face the
lating Key West aggregation,
Cch Paul "Mo" Moser has
sen working earnestly round-
In his squad Into top play-
e condition for their game
ttlnst the runners-up of the
Ute of Florida Basketball
rumament.
Coach Moser, a newcomer on
e Isthmus, did wonders in his
- st year at Cristobal as head
sketball coach. The Tigers,
der Moser, won the 1951 title
defeated, and made It their
trth title in five years.
rhlS year's hoop squad is not
Ite as deep in reserves ns the
- im f fast season,- since
ach Moser has. los the ser-
ies of his Way-maker, Dick
lllvan, his two towering re-
und men, John Algler (S'-4"i
d Bill Blackburn ('-3"), and
dependable guard In Carl
himons; thru graduation.
Trying to make the best of
e situation, the Tigers can
11 count on holdovers from
st year's championship team,
id Moser will probably have
winning combine on the floor
' fore the season Is over.
From last year's squad, Coach
oser has on hand five players
which four are in the start-
g line-up. Coach Moser will
lld his attack around these
ur Arnold Manning, Sklppy
iderson, Bob Bailey and Roy
ilaon. To replace the play-
aker's spot on the floor, Coach
poser will give the nod to Ver-
on Bryant, who was moved up
rom the Junior Varsity ranks.
The Tigers have on the re-
erves Oil Smith, a holdover
rom last year's quintet, with
ilenty of basketball experience,
harlng the duties with Bryant
nd Smith will be rangy Tal-
adge Baiter, who like Bryant,
ihowed great basketball abtll'v
ihlle they were teammates on
he Tigers Junior Varsity.
The rest of the team will be
illed up by a group of green-
loms who have made the grade
lump from J. V.
' hi -i r ;
it is only fitting to mention
that of the eleven men on the
Tigers Varsity basketball team,
eight are also on the football
squad.
Cristobal wUl find their op-
ponents are not going to be a
"push-over" since reports from
Coach Beckman of the Key
West Conchs have indicated
that.his squad has suffered no
great loss, and with the new
additions to the team, Beckman
indicated that they were a
greatly Improved ball club all
around.
The red and white Conchs
will have on the first five one
of their outstanding athletes in
Ken Bazo, who Is also Captain
of the football team and holds
down the center position in the
basketball squad. Ken plays
center on the football team.
Ed Beckman, however, is
banking heavily on his all,
rangy, g'-l" star performer. Bob
Cooper, In combination with
Exldo Vidal, a shrewd ball
handler and playmaker. ThlsJ
combine will give the visitors a
great one-two punch.
in order to take care of the
expected capacity crowd, Cris-
tobal's high school officials
have secured the Coco Solo Na-
val Station Gymnasium which
has adequate seating capacity.
LOS ANGELES"It's Detroit
next,' chorus the Los Angeles
Rams.
The Rams took first place in
the National Pro Football Con-
ference Sunday by trouncing the
Chicago Bears 42-17. The Rams
play second-place Detroit next
week at Los Angeles.
A victory would virtually as-
sure the Rams of their third
straight divisional title.
And the Rams apparently are
pretty confident they can handle
the Detroit club.
NEW YORK Upset of the
year? The big one on football's
final frantic Saturday fills the
bill best: Boston College 19, Holy
Cross 14.
Six times beaten and a hope-
less underdog, Boston College
knocked over the hottest offen-
sive team In the nation with a
desperation assault in the final
seconds. Favored by 21 points,
Holy Cross is believed to be the
heaviest favorite that failed In
61.
William and Mary pulled a
surprise nearly aa great on
Wake Forest, winning by 7 to
after the oddsmakers had
Wake Forest favored by 20.
There were plenty of shockers
along the Une as the season un-
wound, but for the most part the
underdogs that came through
were conceded at least some
hope.
Two touchdown underdogs
proved to be plenty dangerous.
Notre Dame, believed to be en
route to the heights after a bad
y*ar, was favored by two touch-
downs over Southern Methodist
and lost 27 to 20. That was quite
an upset at the time. It has paled
a bit since then.
Columbia was favored by 14
and lost to Army, Pennsylva-
nia wat favored by 14 and lest
to William and Mary, Georgia
Tech was favored by 14 and
was tied by Duke, Alabama fig-
ured to beat Louisiana State
by 14 and lest
Every time Arkansas played it
was the upset of the year as far
as we're concerned. The Razor-
backs showed their absolute
worst form reversal when Santa
Clara, a 14 point underdog, up-
set 'em the week after Arkansas
mowed down favored Texas. Or
maybe It was the time we pick-
ed 'em to down Southern Metho-
dist and they lost, 47 to 7.
Did >ou know Princeton scored
an upset this year? They wound
up the East's top team for the
second straight year but early in
the campaign the Tigers rated an
underdog by six points against
Pennsylvania. Princeton won It,
13 to 7.
Here's one that had the odds-
makers in a tiny: Georgia and
Maryland. This one was rated
even but Maryland won It, 4S
to 7. Indiana palled a major re1-
versal on favored Ohio State,
not just upsetting the Buck-
eyes bat the manner in which
the Hoosiers won: 32 to 10 or
insult to injury.
Northwestern was getting
votes in the top 10 with Its 4-0
record when it ran into Wiscon-
sin and the Badgers won, 41 to 0.
California was the top team
when Southern California mess-
ed 'em up, 21 to 14.
Stanford, Illinois. Texas Cris-
tian and Georgia Tech might re-
gard their entire season as an
upset of sorts. None figured in
advance to storm into a post-
season bowl but they'll all be
there on New Year's Day.
Kulikowski Defeats Geo. Riley
To Cop Ft. Davis Invitational

i i Ifif n ar.'Aat i. awjj.." i. JmtZ
KEY WBST ENDBob Cooper, Key West Conchs' star right end
and ace pass receiver. CHjS. halves will have their hands full
trying to stop this elongated, fl'l" pass snatcher. Bob doubles
t-s a forward on the basketball team.
TCU Grid Players Earn Play Session
By UNITED PRESS
The Cotton Bowl-bound Texas'
Christian team has earned some
fun and relaxation by winning
the topsy-turvy Southwest Con-
ference title.
Coach Dutch Meyer says the
team will rest this week and will
hold only "play session" on three
days next week.
"We're Just going to have some
fun those three days," says Mey-
er. "Probably play a little touch
football, but mostly it will be Just
fooling around like a bunch of
kids on a vacant lot. Those kids
need some relaxation. They've
come a long way with the pres-
sure mounting each week."
Meyer says hard work for the
Cotton Bowl game with Kentucky
will start December 17.
The final NCAA figures show
quarterbacks Bob Helmerdlnger
of Northern Illinois State and
Andy MacDonald of Central Mi-
chigan led small college stars In
total passing and offense again
this year.
Helmerdlnger gained 1,775
yards rushing and passing. Mac-
Donald completed 114 passes In
183 tries for a .823 percentage.
Turning to pro football, Detroit
halfback Bob Hoernschemeyer Is
said to be Improving after suf-
fering a head Injury In Satur-
day's game with San Francisco.
A spokesman at Grace Hospital Hi II ill i klCnTAII
in Detroit says X-rays would be PANAMA ."WfllAN
taken yesterday to determine If
Hoernschemeyer suffered a frac-
tured skull.
FORT DAVIS, C.Z.Mike Ku-
likowski defeated George Rlley,
1-up, in 18 holes for the Cham-
pionship Flight of the Fort Davis
Invitational.
The day was marred by a con-
stant all-day rainfall but Kuli-
kowski and Riley played good
golf nevertheless. Mike had nine
straight pars on the first nine
and was 2-up at the halfway
point. Rlley fought back stub-
bornly In the back nine and re-
duced Mike's lead to all-even at
the 17th, whereupon Mike came
through with a birdie 4 to win,
1-up.
The professionals, Buddy Ham-
mond, Joe Brbaro, and Anbal
Macarrn had- tough going over
the rain-soaked course for the
professional special prize. At the
halfway point, Hammond led the
pros with one over par 78. Joe
Brbaro and Macarrn came in
tied with 76's. Barbaro's downfall
was the second hole which he
4-putted for a big 7. The final 18
holes of the special match for
pros will be next Sunday, Decem-
ber 9, with tee-off time at 10:00
am.
At 2:00 p.m., Sunday, December
9, Mr. Walter Hunnlcutt will pre-
sent trophies to all Flight win-
ners, Flight runners-up and Con-
solation winners. All winners are
requested to be present. The Golf
Club is serving free refreshments
to all club members and tourna-
ment participants during the
presentation ceremony.
The results of all flights are as
follows:
Championship Flight
Mike Kulikowski defeated Geo.
Rlley, 1-up.
Consolation
H. Gardner defeated J. Schieb-
ler, 1-up (21 holes).
First Flight
A. Oallndo defeated A. A. Zil-
kie, 4 and 3.
Consolation
Don Henderson defeated Char-
lie Wood, 1-up.
Second Flight
P. Richmond defeated J. Hip-
son, 1-up.
Consolation
B. Boxwell defeated Higgenbo-
tham, l-up (19 holes).
Third Flight
Bill Lebrun defeated W. O'-
Shea, 2 and 1.
Consolation
Ken Forrest defeated R. Brown,
3 and 2.
Fourth Flight
B. Carter defeated C.I. Thomp-
son, 2-up.
Consolation
W.T. Johnson defeated B. Hur-
dle, 1-up.
Fifth Flight
W. Sands defeated Sandy Hin-
kle, 2 and 1.
Consolation
A. Lpez defeated Makowski, S
and 2.
Sixth Flight
P. Whitney defeated J. Savia.
2 and 1.
Consolation
Albro defeated Brooks, 2 and L
Seventh Flight
E Tanner defeated H. Dock-
ery, 3 and 1.
Consolation
H. Labacz defeated R. An*
strong, 4 and 8.
Eighth Flight
3. Ryan defeated M. Greene, T
and 8.
Consolation
W. Horick defeated J. Hemann,
5 and 4.
Ninth Flight
B. McCue defeated J. Peseed,
1-up.
Consolation
J. Mundkowiki defeated R,
Kraft. 3 and 2.
American Davis Cuppers Ted
Schroeder and Tony Trabert
have reached the quarter finals
of the Victorian Doubles Tour-
nament in Australia. Schroeder
and Trabert beat Ken Rosewall
and Lewis Hoad of Australia m
straight sets. However, Vic Selx-
as and Dick Savltt were elimin-
ated by Aussie veterans Adrian
Qulst and OeotT Brown.
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McCALL'S Patterns
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PS.

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STOW] PANAMA
orsM turn. pjl till Christmas;



1
RING' RATES PLUMMER 4TH FEATHE
<*age >
HappyChristmas
BecomesOfficial
Labor Dispute
WASHINGTON. Dec 5 'UP)
The National Labor Relations
Board said yesterday that it re-
lieves in the Christmas spirit
but not at the expense of col-
lective bargaining.
A three-man board majority
ruled that an employer who
sharply slashed the size of his
Christmas bonuses after 12 years
must bargain with a union that
wants the bonuses restored to
the old level.
The firm contended it was
under no obligation to bargain.
The NLRB majority ruled that
year-end bonuses had become
an "integral part of the wage'
structure" of the Niles-Be-
mont-Pond Co. of Hartford,
Conn., machine tool manufac-
turers.
Ordering the firm to bargain
with local 405 of the United
Auto Workers tCIO. the board
caid:
"The Christmas spirit, as we.
conceive it. does not stop short
of the bargaining table, fpr
bargaining in good faith is in
itself a continuing effort to
achieve good will..."
Board member A. Murdock
led a dissent, however, and
cited Charles Dickens for sup-
port in his contention that "a
genuine Christmas gift has no
place on the bargaining table."
Murdock said the majority
opinion, signed bv members
John M. Houston, James J. Rey-
nolds Jr., and Paul L. Stvles.
was "destructive of the Christ-
mas spirit" which makes "a
selfish world" better.
"Even grudging, callous char-
acters have been transformed
and moved to participate in the
giving of the season. (8ee
Dickens, a Christmas Carol, Mr.
Scrooge,v' Murdock said.
To this the-majoritv replied:
Although we. no less than
our dissenting colleaeue. believe
in the Christmas spirit, we agree
with the trial examiner's find-
ing" tht bonuww "in this case"
are subiect to bargaining.
The decisions backed up an
earlier ruling by examiner lyd-
ney Lindler.
In its fight over a regal inter-
pretation of the holldav spirit.
the maiorlty denied Murdoeks'
contention that the ruling
meant an emoloyer "must ob-
tain permission to make -a
Christmas elft to his employes."
Thev said that according to
the "realities of the industrial
world," a regular year-end
bonuseven though it conveys
the Christmas spirit of gift giv-
ingactuallv Is deferred com-
pensation for services perform-
ed.
After paying various types of
Christmas bonuses since 1938,
the Hartford company last year
drastically cut down the size of
the 1B50 check.
, Where It usually had given
one week's pav. it offered each
employes $1 for each year of
continuous service with a mini-
mum of $5.
AN DIDXPEND
NEWSPAPB
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Al Capones Attorney Tells
Of$500,0001ax Shakedo wn
Boy kin Denies
To Sfop Tax
He Attempted
Prosecutions
WASHINGTON. Dec. 5 UP>
The late Al Capones attorney
testified yesterday that he be-
gan having income tax troubles'
when he balked at a $500.000
-shakedown" by two Miami men
put anybody in trouble If you | published a report
could make half a million dol-
result of his persistent efforts
to free him on a writ of
habeas corpus. The attorney lars?"
said he represented Ralph | "If I had had a revolver in
Capone in a tax case. my hand," Teitelbaum said, "I'd
Teltelbaum testified after have killed him."
who "claimed to havVtop Wash- Peyton Ford, former deputy At- Shortly after this conversa-
mrton tax officials In their,torney General, told the sub- tion, he said. Nastor renewed
-vest Docket" committee he cut off Caudle the demand for a pay-off.
The Chicago attornev Abra- from an Alabama tax fraud "He wanted $175.000 down and
haSfttSSm aSd teemen case because he believed Caudle in 72 hours to wanted WM.OOOT
involved In the attempted was leaking "too much lnfor- the attorney said. I told him
shakedown in Florida last April mation" to a congressman. he was crazy.
shakedown in Florida last April
were Frank Nathan, former Ford did not name
Pittsburgh promoter, and Bert greman.
Nastor, partners in a Hollywood
Fla.. electrical business.
He testified that after twice
rejecting their proposal, he
was told by an anonymous
telephone caller to take their
advice because the pair had
T. I.mar Candle, ousted Jus-
tice Department official, and
Charles Oliphant, chief coun-
sel of the Internal Revente
Bureau, "in their vest pocket."
Teitelbaum said he told the
men "to go to hell." and shortly
the con-
It was testified Monday, how-
ever, that Rep. Frank W. Boy-
kin (D-Ala.) tried to block pro-
secution of the case and repeat-
edly telephoned Caudle about
lit.
The defendants subsequently
'pleaded guilty and two of them
went to Jail.
Teitelbaum said Nathan's
son-in-law. Les Sales, called
on him in Miami and told him
Nathan was a blackmailer."
He abo aid Sales told him
that he had been present
when Nathan met Candle in
the Mayflower Hotel in Wash-
ington.
last month
that Caudle and Larson were
associated with Nathan In oil
speculation.
Larson subsequently acknow-
ledged that he had a small hold-
ing in an oil firm, but said he
was unaware that Nathan also
was a stockholder.
Teitelbaum testified that he
met Nathan In Miami Beach,
Fla., through a mutual ac-
quaintance, J. Kenneth Edlln.
He told the committee he as-
sumed Edlln told Nathan about
his tax troubles.
"Nathan told me Caudle was
a frequent guest in his home."
Teitelbaum said. "But teat
didn't mean anything to me. I
didn't know him from a bale of
hay. He was trying to impress
me, but I cut him short."
Ford told the committee that
Caudle, former head of tee
Justice Department's tax dlvl-
after that "I started having re- bo't last Anrll 20 his
percussions in my Income ^ ^Ts^rlXLcMcU
"He said Nathan and Caudle
Teitelbaum testified that his' mentioned my name and that
tax troubles Involved defl- .Caudle called Charles Oliphant sion, was under "great pressure"
ctencies for 1943-1947 on tile telephone and told him n the so-called Rlpps-Mltchell
He said that shortly after a!to press my case," Teitelbaum'tax case in Mobile, Ala., home
conversation with Nathan on testified. i city of Boykin.
0, his case was He said Sales told him Caudle i \"
Chicago to the and Nathan agreed that Caudle! He testified that he did not
Washington offi:e of Rlley should press tee case against lack confidence in Caudle, but
hi^n%HeM.al0r"cZ,.ln Campbell, chief of the Internal Teitelbaum. ; feared that he was being "to-
him there was a clique in Reve"nue Bureau's penl dlvi- After that, Nathan would ap- dlscret" in conversations with
Washington which was look- s,on proach Teltelbaum to have his the congressman,
lng around the country to see Hg appeared beiore Campbell, tax troubles taken care of, ac-1 He said the defendants in the
who are soft touches on income he Ml(f ^ got the impression cording to the attorney. I case were getting information
tax. a;ialr*/.. ...____. ... CamDbell was not too Interest-: "All this is what Sales told which could come only from
you about the conversation in "leaks."
W a s h 1 n g ton?" subcommittee "He wasn't succumbing to the
counsel Dewind asked. I pressure," Ford said. "I just be-
"Yes. Sir," Teitelbaum replied, i Heved he was giving a congress-
MOBILE, Ala., Dec. S (UP)
Rep. Frank W. Boykin id-Ala.)
denied yesterday that he ever
attempted to discourage a tax
fraud prosecution but said he
had telephoned Justice Depart-
ment officials at the Insistence
of the wife of a defendant in a
tax case.
Boykin said teat he called
Justice Department attorney
John Mitchell once, but had
never met him. and that he
"alwyas" called former assistant
Attorney General T. Lamar
Caudle to satisfy Mrs. Joe Mit-
chell.
Mrs. Mitchell's husband was
later convicted and imprisoned
and she committed suicide.
Boykin said that John Mit-
chell's "statements and infer-
ences" to the House Subcom-
mittee Investigating tax scan-
dals, as he read them in tee
newspapers, "are absolutely not
correct."
Witnesses before tee subcom-
mittee have pictured Boykin as
calling the Justice Department
repeatedly about the so-called
Mitchell-Rlpps tax case in Mo-
bile.
Mitchell testified that Caudle
once accepted an Invitation for
Mitchell to visit Boykin but
Mitchell didn't go.
"I at no time invited John
Mitchell to be my 'guest" at Mo-
bile or anywhere else." Boykin
said. "I nevermet him and
never talked to Kim over the
telephone but one time.
"That conversation was to
Washington at tee insistence of
Mrs. Joe Mitchell (wife of one of
the defendants in the Rlpps-
Mltchell case and no relation to
John Mitchell) who was then
6resent and insisted that I call
1m," Boykin added.
"I' told him about Mrs. Mit-
chell being there and her ner-
vous state and concern and that
iqi
Oliphant, Joseph D. Nunan
Jr., and George J. Schoeneman.
former collectors of internal re-
venue, and Jess Larson, of the
; General Services Administra-
tion. "Mrttsf
"Was Mr. Caudle's name men-
tioned?" asked subcommittee
counsel Adrian W. Dewind.
"Yes," Teltelbaum answered.
'Nathan exhibited an'oil con-
tract on which the names of
Larson, Caudle and Nathan ap-
peared."
He said Nathan identified
himself as a "partner" of Caudle
and Larson.
Both officials have acknow-
ledged that they held small
holdings In an oil firm in which
Nathan also had an interest,
but denied there was anything
, wrong in this.
1 Larson, who said previously
that he didn't even know
Nathan was in on the oil deal,
immediately asked to be heard
by the Investigators.
He labelled the testimony
"widespread disperal of malici-
ous and unfounded falsehoods."
Teitelbaum told reporters
he represented both the late
Al Capone and his brother.
Ralph. He said "Scarface" Al
was released from prison three
years and 25 days early as a
ed in what he had to say.
"The first time I realised
that some skullduggery had
been done by Nathan and Bert
Nastor was when I realized I
wasn't getting a fair deal en
my income tax," Teitelbaum
testified.
He said he flew to Florida the
next day. confronted Nathan
and demanded:
"Why did you pat me in
trouble?"
The witness quoted Nathan
as saying: "Well, wouldn't you
Teitelbaum testified
Nathan and
their nceptsltlon to
He sale
that
made
April.
said be knew he was
antier investigation foe alleged
tax a eft st so, sits fee the years
1MS-47, addta- that he an-
dsrstaea tgjpe kmd see
seat te tie Bfiee Depart- I
aaeat abeart twe weeks ago.
The St. Louis Post-Dlspatcn
mfcn too much information."
He testified that he order-
ed Jesttse Department attor-
ney John UttiihiH, who was
secating the case, and Perry
Faantahi, U. s. Altesae ha
MtMIe, e br-paas Caadle and
res* dtreetty to
saM Caadle tasante
told him he couldn't
with Mitchell.
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Wttiom of HtufM wnsn mtt
.she came from one of the best
! families and was concerned over
| the effect the prosecution was
going to have on her mother
and father and children, in-
cluding her daughter, who was
an honor student at the Uni-
versity of Alabama and was
very much worried.
"I did not tell John H. Mit-
chell that it would'be a grave
miscarriage of justice to press
tax fraud charges nor did I In
any way attempt to prevent his
prosecuting that or any other
case where he thought there
was guilt.
"Mrs. Joe Mitchell was In rfy
office on many occasions and
was in a highly nervous condi-
tion and threatening to jump
out the window and insisting
that J call Caudle, which I al-
ways did to satisfy her.
"However, as stated in my
former statement, I never asked
Caudle or anyone else not to
oroserute if they were gutltv but
| If they were not guilty I would
appreciate any asslstlnce In not
further embarrassing them, but
if h? thought they were guilty
they should be given the works,"
Boykin added.
"Caudle always told me he
was going to send the defen-
dants to prison If he had the
evidence to do it
"I cannot believe teat Caudle
told John H. Mitchell that I
took any contributions for the
Democratic Party from the Joe
Mitchells or the Rlpps or any-
one else. Caudle never discussed
or mentioned any contributions
tome.
"Ipsofar as I know, no con-
tributions were made. Certainly
none were made directly or in-
directly through me or at my
suggestion.
r'l In no way tried to bring
about any fix of tee case and
did not seek to find out what
Nastor Denies
Shakedown Story
HOLLYWOOD. Fla., Dec. 6-
(UP)Bert Nastor today denied
being Involved in any "income
tax" deals with Graham Teltel-
baum, a former Al Capone at-
torney who testified before a
House Ways and Means Sub-
committee investigating tax
scandals. .
Nastor laid: "I only know1
Nathan 'casually..-.f-don't even
know where he is now."
"And I've only met Teltel-
baum twice in my life. He's an
attorney who trys to inject him-
self Into everyone's business...
He wanted to know if I knew a
lawyer who might help him...
I wouldn't have anything to do
with him."
Teitelbaum testified that Na-
than was a partner in Nestor's
Imperial Electric Co. here.
Nastor said Nathan had no
Interest "whatsoever" in the
jfirm, although Nathan had tried
| to buy in at one time.
Nastor said the testimony In
Washington teat he demanded
$175,000 from Teltelbaum and
another 1925,000 within 72 houra
"were ridiculous and stupid."
He said he had never met the
"clique In Washington" men
tloned by Teitelbaum.
"I don't know anything abou
his charges," Nastor added.
evidence if any the governmerp
! planned to present to the Gran
Jury.
"I did suggest to Mrs. Joe Ml.
chell that they get the be}
lawyer they could to handle tb
case.
"I further understand th
they have settled their ta
liabilities with the government'
Boykin said he did not inters
to go to Washington to apper
in the tax scandal hearings b
cause he considered tee Rlpp
Mitchell case a desd issue.
Atlantic Siders Should
Know This Man!


COLON
Travel Agen'V
,/",.
THE RETURNING PANAMA NEWSPAPER MEN are greeted at Tocumen by PAA's Elton
Todd. From left, Gabriel Lewis Galindo (El Pals), Daniel Jacinto Fuentes (La Nacin. Rob-
ert Lawler (The Panama American, Luis Noli (Star 4t Herald), Jose A Cajar (El Panama
America). Arquimedes Fernandez (La Hora), Todd, and Harmodio Arias Jr. (El Panama
America).

urdays, continue at 8:30 a.m.
and terminate in Panama at 1
ip.m.-
In command of the Clipper
Pacifico on its maiden south-
bound flight was Capt David G.
Desmond. Pan American's sector
chief pilot at Panama and Miami.
with Capts. Benjamin F. Jones
and Edwin C. Perry alternating
at the controls on the long flight.
Capt. Jones is 13th on the senior-
ity list of PAA's 1,300 pilots, while
Captain Perry ranks 17th.
Panamanian newsmen aboard
the inaugural flight were Manuel
ngulo, managing editor of La
Estrella de Panama: Harmodio
Arias, Jr., director of El Panam
Amrica; Jose Cajar. president of
the Panama News papermen's
ISyndicate; Arquimedes Fernan-
dez, director of La Hora; Daniel
Jacinto Fuentes, associate editor
of La Nacin; Robert Lawler.
(United Press correspondent and
editor of The Panama American:
Gabriel Lewis Galindo. assistant
editor of El Pals, and Luis Noll.
Associated Press- correspondent
and staff writer for the s_tar and
Herald.
The giaut Constellation-type coast Of South America and with
Clipper Pacifico landed at Tpcu- Pan American-Grace Airways' El
men International Airport yes- Interamericano service down the |
terday completing the inaugural west coast of South America,
southbound flight o vet Pan| The new service also provides
American World Airways' Los the first nonstop flights between
Angeles Guatemala Panama Panama and Guatemala City, re-
route and closing the last gap in duclng the time between these
the company's round-the-world,two points to three and a naif
service. .hours.
Aboard the sleek, triple-tailed' The flight from Los Angeles by
aircraft were eight of Panama's'the Clipper Pacifico marks the
leading press executives, who debut of the speedy, 49-passen-
were completing a round-trip: ger Constellation-type Clippers
flight over the new 3,112-mile in regular service in Panama and
route and a five-day pre-inau-,Central America,
gural press visit In Los Angeles.! The inaugural nortnbound
The new route gives Panama flight over the new route leaves
Its first direct, one-carrier air Tocumen tomorrow. .
link with the populous United Two round-trips weekly are
States Pacific Coast, cutting ma-' scheduled as foUows (local
ny hours from the best previous times):
service offered between the two Northbound flights leave Pan-
ama at 10 a.m. Sundays and
Thursdays, arrive at Guatemala
I'.V/r.'
t'Sini '"

swstcSE
AweHe
areas.
Panama now becomes an even _
more Important Junction for pas- City at 12:20 p.m., depart at J
angers flying between the U.S. ipm. and arrive in Los Angeles at
Pacific Coast and all parts of 7:30 p.m. ,
""'th America. Through pasten-1 Southbound flights leave Los
-r r~-ke connc-"loa. here Andeles at 9 p.m. Mondays and
with Pan American's long -tab- F. idavs. arr.\ e in Guatemala City
"-"tu routes across tea north at 7:20 a.m. Tuesdays and Sat-
owner of the
"COLON TIAVEL AGENCY*'
Free* taW fJtfc St.
Arena ee Cole* iuilmg
- It watt known lo American oi we*
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planning mot vocation trip to the
States or Souwi America. Hh agency
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by moklog year bwvel orraasje
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Mr. Caitido, an Bvmorired
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MAMrTS flights to he United
Stolet orta 10 OOUHI AeWOnCkaV
____
Braniff
A.RW,
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OaTaTsTJaTsl
an
mm


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