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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01308
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01308
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

KBRANIFF

AN INDEPENDENT^
QW VIA
MIAMI
HOUSTOX
Panama American
"Lei the people know the truth and the country i $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
Seagram's VO.
< v.WDIW UlllSkl
'
Now... 6 Years Old!
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951
FIVE CKNT8
Ground War Sloes To Standstill On Korea
Front Lines, But Air Fighting Continues
_____________ ------------------------------ -i. -A. -*- n i mu a
Teachers Verge
On Strike Call
Teachers all over the Repub-
lic of Panama, today were on
the verge of a possible general
strike wh'ch might go Into
effect on Friday as a result
of a wave of violence which has
attended the current high school
student strike.
At a meeting with teacher re-
presentatives from Santiago,
Chltr and Las Tablas yester-
day, the directors of the Pana-
ma Professors Association agreed
that'a "state of insecurity" ex-
isted as a result of the acts of
violence provoked by hoodlums
leading anti-strike students.
The association discussed a
proposal to go on a general I Avenue, followed the same pat-
strike Friday. Th's proposal was!tern of Monday afternoons dis-
being discussed today with the turbance along 4th of July Ave^
r i
Arms For Ike
Tanks For Turkey
Jeti For Canada
rer was urg-
VATO meefinrt in Rome
to~sp**tf trp'the prorlsion of men
and materials for the European
Army, there has alreaby been
evidence that much has already
been done to bolster Europe's
defense with American arms.
Above at Istanbul, Turkey,
American-made tanks, manned
by Turkish troops, parade past a
reviewing stand. Since 1948, Tur-
key has received about $700,000,-
000 In U. S, military aid to rein-
force her position as the keystone
of Near East defense against Red
aggression. At Norfolk, Va right,
U 8 8abre Jets are loaded on the
Royal Canadian aircraft carrier
Magnificent. Jets will be used
by Canadian pilots In England.
morning session of the Balboa
Magistrate's Court.
Ramiro Navarro, 10. and
Chandick Ruiz. 17, had no pre-
vious court record. Navarro had
an additional charge against
him of illegally having a black-
Jack in his possession.
At least one more clash be-
tween striking and non-striking
students was reported yester-
day. Anti-strike students were
attacked during a radio broad-
cast by a group of lads who
were not identified as students.
This attack, which took place
at a rad;o station located near
the Kodak building on Central
Teachers and Directors asso-
ciations.
A spokesman for the profes-
sors said. President Alcibiades
Arosemena promised them to re-
ply to their demand for a non-
pol'tlcal cabinet during a visit
to the Presidencia yesterday.
The President promised to
have a reply In writing by to-
morrow, the spokesman said.
But It a reply is not received
thi Association intends to con-
sider a concrete proposal to go
*m strtkje along with the atu-
sirup .un . ..- ties between students, also held
i$BKtB6Ftok j&r\ri*f-itffi8$n. SSSSk 'wlB be d-
T _^m. f ___ i_____i_~._a _^lti^J *_ \ *.., *-- V*nl#
Ua-BsueWAts who were involved
fiiMonday's rock battle between
students and charged with dis-
turbing the peace when they
were apprehended in the Canal
when students staged a rock
battle that endangered private
property.
Minister of Government and
Justice Miguel A. Orde, who
Sot a temporary "ceasefire"
uring Monday's rock battle, has
Issued Instructions to the police
to arrest anyone who directly
or Indirectly attempts to dis-
turb the peace or is caught in-
citing the students to violence.
Teachers of the Lleeo de Se-
oritas high school, which also
has been the scene of rock bat-
mltted to classes unless half
plus one of the student body
show up for classes.
This decision has already been
taken by teachers of other pub-
were apprenenaea in tne irsutu mnen uy itua uium huu-
Zone, today were placed on one lie high schools whose pupils
year probation each, during the are on strike.______
1
L
Piggy Banks Up For Killing
In Penny Trqde In Appeal
French Admiral Named
As NATO Commander
In W. Mediterranean
i
NATO HQ., Rbequencourt,
Trance, Nov. 28 (UP) General
Dwight Elsenhower today an-]
nounced the appointment of;
French Admiral Antoine Sala as,
NATO naval commander In the
western Mediterranean.
An Italian admiral will short-,
be announced to command
ie sea approaches to Italy.
But at the NATO meeting In
Rome today Winston Churchill's
British government again block-
ed agreement on the appoint-
ment of a United fa.es ad-|
nural to be NATO comnu.
in the North Atlantic.
The British also held out a-;
gain for the adoption of their
new .28 rifle as standard equip-;
ment for NATO forces.
Also in Some French For-
eign Minister Robert Schu-
mann confessed today that
Eisenhower's idea of a Eu-
ropean Army had again bog-
ged d.wn because of the in-
ability of European countries
Murray Wise Acts
As Charge; Wiley
Visiting Brazil
The American Ambassador
and Mrs. John C. Wiley de-
parted from Toeumen Interna-
tional Airport at I o'clock this
morning far Rio ie Janeiro for
a short vacation.
During Ambassador Wiley's
absence, Murray M. Wise, the
Counselor of the Embassy, will
act as Charge d'Affaires,
, to agree on political unifi-
cation.
He repeated that an European
Army. Including Germans, was
the only hope for avoiding an-
other war.
Holland. Belgium and Luxem-
bourg have put forward with a
resolution urging that the build-
ing of national defense forces
receive priority over contribu-
tions to the composite European
Army plan.
The rebellious "little pow-
ers" did not question the
eventual need for an Eu-
ropean Army.
Their objections were to put-
ti its development ahead of
thi creation and arming of
pu v national forces.
I intime more and more
mi" try men at the NATO con-
ference in Rome were becoming
convinced that Eisenhower would
resign his NATO command early
next year to return to the Un-
ited States to seek the Repub-
lican presidential nomination.
US Atlantic Coast
Shivers After Gale
NEW YORK. Nov. 28 (UP>
The entire Atlantic seaboard
north of Florida shivered today
In wintry weather.
An ocean gale, with winds of
up to 85 m.p.h., was the after-
Imath of a storm .which waa
! rolling north from New Eng-
land afier dumping up to 12
Inches of snow on parts of
'Maine.
Veep Barkley First
High US Official
To Visit Jap Ruler
TOKYO, Nov 21 fUP> Vice
President Albe.n W Barkley paid
an informal visit to Emperor
Hlrohito and spent what he call-
ed a "very profitable" 65 minutes
at the Imperial Palace.
Barkley Is the first Vice Pre-
sident of the U.8 and the high-
est American Government official
to ever meet with the Japanese
ruler.
Canal Zone residents are be-
ing asked to dig the pennies,
dimes and quarters out of their
piggy banks and to cooperate
with other measures being taken
to reJleve an acute shortage of
coins, on the Jsthmus. Pennies
and dimes are particularly
scarce.
T' place needed coins back
In circulation, residents are
asked to exchange the content
of piggy banks and other home j
sa/irigs containers for paper!
currency.
Canal Commissaries and Club-,'
houses are cooperating bv of-
fering small Items of merchan-
dise la lieu of odd penny
change.
Attendants at Canal gaso-
line stations have been asked
to stop the meter on even
numbered readings to elimin-
ate the need for odd penny
change.
The local coin shortage Is the|
re'"lt o several developments. |
>* Isthmus by passengers and
crews of Naval and merchant
ships.
Population increases on the
Isthmus and the world-wide
Inflationary trend have resulted
in Increased commercial trans-
action's of all kinds, and a
greater need for coins for
change.
Increases in odd pennv pric-
ing of merchandise, reflecting
Erice increases, have also con-
ributed to the shortage.
In view of the cota ahortage
in the United States, It is hoped
that the measures now being
taken on the Isthmus to al-
leviate the Weal shortage will
eliminate the need for adding
to the strain on the total supply
of coins.
The coin "shortage In the
United States, which was first
noticed after the outbreak of
the Korean War. has been at-
tributed to increases in prices
and retail sales, metal shortages
end other factors.
New Deadlock
Looms In Truce
Talks On Korea
PANMUNJOM, Nov. 28 (UP)
Communist negotiators today a-
galn rejected United Nations de-
mands for a post-armlstlce arms
freeze in Korea, and truce in-
sertion rights throughout the
country.
The Reds called once again for
the withdrawal of all foreign
troops.
Senior Communist negotiator
] North Korean Gen. Nam 11 dis-
i missed United Nations demands
as "Inappropriate and impracti-
cal" and asked for an immediate
oolltical conference to settle the
thorny problem of the removal
of foreign troops from Korea.
The conference, trying to agree
en complete armistice terms be-
fore the 30-day provisional
ceasefire line agreement expires,
appeared to be heading toward
another deadlock.
The Reds' five-point Armistice
proposal, which.pointedly makes
no mention of observer teams. Is:
1) That hostilities cease by
both regular and irregular forces
on ground, air and sea on the day
the armistice is signed:
3) Armed forces on both sides
withdraw from demilii%rjs*
tone w30tta^Bts* da**ft'*r the
signing; *
3> Tnat aU-armed forces with-
draw from the rear (positions
beyond the truce line and coast-
al islands within five days;
4) Armed forces do not enter
the demilitarized rone and do not
carrv out acts of armed force a-
gainst the demilitarised zone:
51 Each side will designate an
equal number of members to form
an Armistice Commission to be
jointly responsible for the con-
crete arrangements and the su-
pervision of the implementation
of the armistice agreement.
8TH ARMY HQ., Korea, Nov 28 UP) - United
Nations ground troops in Korea today virtually ended
their shooting war in Korea.
Front line infantrymen got an order not to fire en-
less fired on.
Infantry commanders of all corps were instructed
not to initiate any action against the Communists unless
the United Nations lines were threatened.
A frontline spokesman said:
"We are not going to provoke
or Incite any Incidents.
"If we are fired on we will fire
back, but only with counter-bat-
tery fire.
"We will not fire harrasslng or
interdictory fire missions so long
as the other side observes this no
aggression agreement
"I hope we will both be honor-
able about this thine"
The frontline soldiers were
CZ Firemen
Win Overtime
Back To 1942
The Attorney General of the
United States today approved
settlement of Canal Zone fire-
men's claims for overtime from
1942 to the present.
Word of the settlement of the
flremerpB.long-pending salt was
received this morning In a cabfce
from/King and King, Washington
attorneys. to-W. M.*rlce, pres-
ident of Fire Fighters -13. *
. Less than 100 local firemen and
some others no longer on the
Isthmus, will benefit from the
settlement of the nine-year-old
overtime lag.
Though similar in principle to
the police overtime claim settled
In 1950, the firemen's claim was
based on different regulations
and Interpretations applying to
their work status and conditions
Actual payment of the over-
time is not expected for many
months. Price said today.
Collins Reveals
Atomic Artillery
Almost Ready
EL PASO. Tex., Nov, 28 (UP>
Atomic artillery usable against
troops with as much accuracy
"as any other" artillery will be
ready in the United States "verv
soon" according to Artnv Chief
of Staff J. Lawton Collins In a
statement made here last night.
Methods of delivering atomic
missies have not yet been tested
Collins said, but they "can be
used oractlcally under certain
conditions."
Collins observed the firing of
guided missies yesterdav and
today he will Inspect anti-air-
craft units at nearbv Fort Bliss
He will then visit atomic testing
installations near Las Vegas,
Nevada.
New York Stands Still For 10 Minutes
In 1st Public-Action Air Raid Test
NEW YORK, Nov. 28 (UP)
The hurllngest city In the world
' stood still for ten minutes today
; starting at 10:30 this morning, in
New York's first "public partici-
pation'' air raid test.
The test was a drill for the day
when a sneak attack might
spread an atomic blast across the
From Wall Street to Coney Is-
land, from Ebbets Field to the
Bronx Zoo, the city looked as
nearly like a deserted village as
it Is possible for New York to
look.
Nearly everything stopped. An
estimated eight and a half mil-
lion New Yorkers, visitors and
commuters took part in the test,
and went to shelters.
Traffic froie as orders went
out to 332,Mt civil defense vol- i
nnteer wardens, to two-thirds I
of the 19,00t-man police force, I
snd to 11.toe uniformed snd
. MM auxiliary firemen to "im-
mobilise'all vehicular traffic" .
except the strictly emergency J
vehicles.
Wardens, whlte-helmeted, and
with, white armbands, Instructed
the cars tpj>ull to the curbs, and
drivers to proceed to one of the
804 public belters along with the
pedestrians.
All transportation, except those
subway trains actually running
underground, were ordered to
har with only a few exceptions.
Th wailing of sirens stilled the
Sulses of New York's complex
usiness and industrial life.
In the skyscraper office build-
ings and the vast industrial
plants, banks, stock exchanges.
?xecutives, white collar employes
and laborers walked to their ap-
pointed shelters. Wardens on
each floor of the big buildings
bossed the march to shelter areas
within the buildings, while the
wardens, police and firemen on
the streets waved to the curbs a
preponderance of 750.000 auto-
mobiles, Including thousands of
taxicabs with fares that were es-
timsted as running during the
hour of the test.
The big apartment hoases
had their owa wardens. Bnt
nobody would sver know whe-
ther I' housewives la the on*
and tv.o-story ones bad aban-
doned their kitchens and va-
cuum sweepers and went to the
basements, or merely peered
ont of windows to see wbat
everybody else was doing.
The alert was-a semi-surprise.
The city office of Civil Defense,
had not announced the exact day
or hourteut said that "a day"
test would come Wednesday or i
Thursday morning. A ten-minute i
drill staged as If enemy planes
In a surprise raid had Just been
sighting coming over Connectl-j
cut. or slipping In over Long Is-
landannounced It to New York-!
era by the screaming of 579 out-i
door sirens, plus those of police I
cars and the duplication of siren i
walls on millions of radio and
television sets.
Through the city's integrated
defense communication system,
every radio and televlalon station
In the city cut off their programs
i at the Instant of the "red" alert,!
and cut Into the municipal sta-
tion WEECY.
I The first thing that radio list-
given to understand that their
activity would be confined to
small scouting patrols unless the
Reds started something.
Last night and this morning
there was no contact with tho
Reds along the western front,
scene of the heaviest Hunting
recently.
Speculation at once started
among the frontline officers and
men that the Communist and
United Nations commanders had
agreed upon the no-aggression
policy.
However the air battle went on
today. Some 40 Migs and 28
United States Sabres fought a 20-
minute dogfight at 30.000 feet
over Sinanju, near the Yalu Riv-
er.
Three Migs and one Sabre wero
shot down.
$1 Robbery Count
Reduced; Taylor
Gets 15-Day Tern
A robbery charge against Ro-
dolph Herbert Taylor was dis-
missed yesterday afternoon in
the Balboa Magistrate's Court,
and a petty larceny charge was
substituted Instead. The 23-
year-old Panamanian was found
guilty and sentenced to 15 days
In Jail for petty larceny.
Taylor stole $1 in currency
from Federico Jaime Myers in
Ancon.
While Bartemlo Navarro. 23
who has faced the Balboa Mag-
istrate on five different counts,
recently yesterday drew another
115 davs for the theft of an elec-
tric Iron, bringing the total to
165 days in jail. He is a Pana-
manian.
Junior CofC Conference Opens
Tonight; Will Choose Queen
eners heard 30 seconds after the
siren, was the announcer's voice:
"This Is an official New York City
air raid alert drill. Take shelter
Leave your radio sets turned on.'
Television stations dropped a
slide over the screen, announc-
ing the drill, and carried on only
voice broadcasts.
Mayor Vincent Impellltterl,
and Civil Defense Director Arth-
ur Wallader watched the crowds
of traffic melt away hi the nor-
mally busy Times Square. One of
the most fidgety rooms In the
world, the huge four-story high
trading floor of the stock ex-
change was stilled for half an
hour.
The clang of the gong which
opens and closes the trading
signalled the alert for about
2.M0 Exchange members.
Clerks, and messengers who
trooped to shelters in the
building.
A million and a quarter public,
parochial, and private school
children filed from their class-
rooms to shelters in their pre-
viously rehearsed drills.
President Alcibiades Aroseme-
na Is scheduled to deliver the
opening address at the inaugura-
tion of the sixth annual confer-
ence of the Junior Chambers of
Commerce of Latin America to-
morrow morning at 9 o'clock.
The conference will get off to
an official start tonight with a
reception offered by the Pana-
ma Junior Chamber of Com-
merce in honor of the visiting
delegations.
Delegates from neighboring
countries began arriving yester-
day with their Coffee Queens,
who will vie for the honor of be-
ing crowned Coffee Queen of La-
tin America. The first queen to
arrive was Miss Cecilia Jimnez
Blanco of Costa Rica, who ar-
rived at Toeumen yesterday with
her court of honor.
A delegation of observers
from the I S. Junior Cham-
ber was expected today. Cana-
dian observers arrived yester-
day. All delegates and observ-
ers are staying at .Hotel El
Panam.
Up to now 11 countries have
officially signified their Inten-
tion to send delegations. They
are: Costa Rica. Cuba, El Salva-
dor. Nicaragua, Guatemala. Hon-
duras. Mexico. Argentina. Brazil.
Ecuador and Colombia. Replies
from other countries are expect-
ed today.
Highlights of the conference
will be the selection and corona-
tion of the Latin American Cof-
fee Queen Friday night at the
Central Theater and a dance to-
morrow night in the patio of El
Panam with each delegation
wearing the costumes typical of
their country.
Hildebrando A. Nicosia will
preside over the conference slong
with Virgilio de Len, president
of the Panam Juniors and Juan
A. Monterrey, president of the
National Association of Junior
Chamber of Commerce.
MISS CECILIA JIMENEZ
BLANCO of Costa Rica, who
arrived at Toeumen yester-
dav to enter the contest for
the Coffee Queen of Lats)
America.


* AQE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER S, 1951
I
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
WNtS AN un.l.Hl6 Ov TMt fVMA MICAM M" INC.
UNBIS Y NILtON OUVIIVILl IN IMI
HAftMOOlO AtrlAS. IDIT6
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FDIIl aitttltNTATlvta JOMUA HOWIHS. INC
349 MAOlON AVI N1W Yt)K. IIVI N Y.
LOCAL
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SU M9NTHI IN ADVANd
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14 90
GOP's 1952 Drive
To Control Senate
Faces Tough Going
BY BMOC BI0S8AT
Vhen Are You Gonna Start Your Collection, Chum?
Walter Winche
In New York
*VBrt8E S? -uop.- :^\^'^erw8hai
grumbled that C S. reviewers dislike What-Ho NQmMnkWWH
beastleh rot. American crttlea hare always >""* the g T'
the Rex Harrisons, Gertrude Lawrence * J* *"-J"
rame a tew If acting is your dish, vee will find eariar toTM
Browning Version film. A east of dattler, The Mnwiim of
Modern Art is giving a deserted reprise to mories atjarring Sarah
Bernhardt. Gamatinf was never grander. Another drama tnai
clicked In a Summer circuit temple was a Broadwa *>*- O'"0.,
sanr Wharf." which periled after a 41-hour m^**J*B
Senator Dlrksen, who will run
the Taft campaign in his home
state of Illinois, air will have
a big hand In directing the
Republicans' 195J drive to win
control of the Senate. It's not
an easy assignment.
Every two years one-third of
the Senate 32 seats nor-
ma!lv faces the voters.
Next year 38 seats are at
stake, sine* the unexplrtd term
of the late Senator Chapman
of Kentucky must also be filled.
But the accidental effect of
Senate election mechanics over
(he rears often gives one party
or the other a distinct advant-
aee In any particular test at
the polls. ,
1152. 19 seats now
orer
Mario, the Great."
But of those 14 Democratic
berths, six represent states In
One oi Wilson Miner's most quoted quips .vas bout a poker ,ne solid South whee an y
ame in which one pis ver tossed his loaded wallet on the table turn-over is highly unlikely.
T. Mlzner took off a shoe and. tossing KM &^ JS9*.
-11 it's leather you're betting. 1 call!" :fta lnthj *> Mitchum
film, "His Kind of Woman". Last Sabbath's; N Y Times gave a
rare to the Veep's fabulous )okfs.' which included the ageless
S55 about the inerate who when asked If he MM remembered
But what have you done
'v. all that was done to help him. barked: "But what
for me lately?".. Reminded us of a lot of people.
Hollywood reports that 'Til See To. IiIMJWl *
Daany Thomas stirrer. Is so good It will play the Music Hall here
around Yuletide.. John McClaln take over the drama spot at
the Journal-American Dec. IS when he return* from m.honey-
moon with "Mtyisle" Farr of the lorgnette division That girl
, rralkin* three white French poodles along Mh Avenue fa song-
stress CathT Mastlce. The fur on their backs to trimmed to> spell.
I -Longing for Ton." the title of her tatast BCArVl*t*r Jiatter.
, The lad In the romantic aging role of "Magic Melody, the TM-
dish operetta 'at the Public Theater downtown), fa J. Timothy
1 Barber an Irishman.. Teddv and PhylHa Rodrigue open at the
Waldorf tomorrow. Robert Weber, a comparatively onknown
thep. inherited the lead opposite Paulette Goddard In her next
I film, to be kodak'd in Spain.
Columbia Is rushing 'Death of a Salesman' Into the Victoria
Theater to be a candidate for the Movie Critic Awards Ton!
Arden's brother Jan is rated highly by June Par. Alleyltes He
opens soon at the Moeambo In Hollywood F. Hugh Herbert,
author of the hit. "The Moon Is Blue; and Cole Porter are col-
labbing on "Can Can." a new musical (onjtt COMtl) ^ next
season The Blue Angel cast Is one of its best. Klrkwood *vGood-
man. Trenet and a chirper named Annette Warren .William
Free, who produced a tv film I about narcotics* audit
This means that the GOP
must concentrate all its
eneraies on the remaining
eipht Democratic seats at
stake To o a in minimum
control of the Senate, they
must take three, since they
are now In a 46 to 50 min-
ority Five more, for a total
of 51. would be necessary
tor a ttiir working margin.
Dlrksen lists Connecticut. Ma-
rvland. Ml:higan. West Vl-inl*.
Kentuckv. New Mexico. Arizo-
na and Wvomine as the eight
fates from which he hopes
the GOP may win the three to
five posts they need.
Close scrutiny of the list re-
reals the sise of the Repub-
licans' problem.
In Wvnmln. Demoera!- Sen-
ator O'Mahonev has bn in
the saddle continuously since
1934.
New Mexico's Senator Chaver
besan his tenure in 1935.
Senators McFarland of Ari-
zona and Kilgore of West Vlr
cuur WSHNGTON
MERRY-GO-ROUND
ly D9.IW MaMON
.....
Bust-in Out All Over
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORKA sketchy survey of th* arts and
crafts of the last few years has finally eonvlnc-
without Interruption since 1941
THI> IS rOU f-OKUM THI MAOM OWN COLUMN
"the mail box
Furthermore, each of
these four states has a
nolitical history with a
strong Democratic tinge
That doesn't mean, of
rrmrse. that they rank with
the Solid South. At a mat-
'er of fact. Artiona, Neio
Mexico and Wyoming now
have Revublican governors.
Hut eapturinf, a Senate teat
in these four spots is pioin-
ly no cinch for the OOP.
America.
Our national emblem is a sweater, well stuff-
aSirSwgSwaBtf",mp""" --"'--- ?----*" a ""e'to'"""the "^ M
Ethel Merman waited at LaGuardia Airport for a plane bring-
ing a favorite friend the other noontime. Just a couple of hours
before curtain time at "Madam.- He's the Colorado mint we item-
ed about weeks ago The ballet thrown OTltJ!"tg B"n"
afier the Boston tryout sounds intnsting Depwted the plight of
a nude girl with a checkbook In a dept store Frances Hen.g-
han. bride of the writer, phoned a friend making a personal a
uear-c"e here. Frances told the theatre operator: "If shes on
age, please don't disturb her!" Teeyj Isn't the monster the
crepe-hangers would have job believe. It Is rerealed there re
mare movie theatres than In 1945. the pre-teeyv era.. The New
Yorker's opinion of "Quo Yadls'"an overtuffed sausage"
This did not strike ma as earth-shattering.
but then neither do the dally Storiesmostly
from Hollywoodwhich deal almost exclusively
with over-abundance beneath the neek.
I have seen lately, in a sneaky peek at mama's
ed with woman. The female chest has become ladles' magazine, pictorial essays devoted to the
! the standard by which everything from autos to
Safety precautions In the Air Force are Judged,
i 1 feel no hesitancy in attacking this subject,
, since all mystery nas been stripped from the
bosom by television, stage, Hollywood, the press,
advertising and economcls in reneral. One man
even has a successful syndicated column devoted
mostly to chest measurement*
He who studies television carefully enough
must wear slit goggles to escape snow blindness.
j I was talking not long ago/with Julie Harria,
an English actress, who professed some amaze-
! ment at American preoccupation 4rith the mm- ty-stfeanng rorhJc
Prospects are somewhat bright- mary fjnds.
er in the other four.
brassler-and-glrdle trade that made me gaap and
brought the roses to my cheeks
Lately the models have adopt-d a general aban-
don of stance that suggests strongly that an old-
fashioned orgy Is Just around the corner. '
I am reminded of old etchings on the crum-
bling walls of Pompeii.
Since the last war. when much overimpdrUnce
was placed oh the pin-up girl. It has atnee been
impossible to Identify the O. 1 with Afly opera-
tion unconnected with the ogle.
At a Jet air base recently I saw a ttodt ofjaft-
In England," she said, "acting is still done who never cays
holds
formerly
Tk Mail Bo li on ** lorum lor it. i Th Pamiffa Amar- Senator Vandenberg
lean LHen ort ractlvaa1 raMully and or* hondfad In wbally can- than 20 years.
fioWiol mjnnrr.
If you contribute I letter don't be impatient If It dojfn t Bptlt Hit
next day. Letters ort published in the order received.
Pltatt try to keep the letter* limited to ont page lentth.
Identity of letter writeri rl held In ttrlctttt confidence.
in MirhiiitrT senator Moodv with the face. Over here I am of the Impression the episode, playing a mute Jjne H
32. h.. Siliintmint the*! that the female profile has been freshly dU- It occurred at the time that this
merfy7 &SSTg S? - " the H. property of the^eri- w^tojoeu. a young filer's attenU,
nator Vandenberg for more, ar_____..._____. .... ,._ o-,,. _. *A>M*a ^rh. .nmmi.rniaiintinn of the h
Thi newipoptr aiiumti no rttaonnbllrty for itoteminti at opinion ponent.
, i cans.
I "I am only surprised that the Statue of Liberty
nrm1 rVaSLm v,.r. m,.st he nM not been replaced with a statue of Dagmar"
GOP chances here must oa We must not conclude hastlj that I am knock-
rated good, though Moody nas { fc ye pleaganl portion of he female facade.
the advantage which goes with hut ag an old legman cialm thBt too much
incumbency: he can make tneemphaslg on anything spoils 1U general long-
papers more easily than an op-term effectiveness.
aatartntd in lotttrt from rtadtn.
LET'S STICK TO THE POINT
Mr. George Graee,
Mall Box,
Sanama American. ,
ear Sir:
I was not aware that I have been cocky nor unduly sura of
myself. Now, tell me why it is necessary for you to resort to
name-calling and personalities in replying to my letter? Such
tactics are generally resorted to when the writer has nothing
better to say in discussing a subject under debate.
Now. let me make one thing clear to vou.
You are too suspicious when you insinuate that may be one
of those Americans who is not taxed. But it so happens that
i do pay income tax and my Income is not very large. la what
has been written 1 have said nothing about the Justice or In-
justice of what has been done. I have merely taken exceptions
to faet of statements of tact that have been made, and I have
elted extracts from documents that are the fundamental law of
the laud.
Most of those who read these letters will have a pretty good
idea of who WHB is. I am Warren H. Brown. 1 came to the
Zone In 1910 and have been here ever since. I came to work on
the Canal because I had an offer of a Job that was better than
anything I could get at home at the' time.
It has been my privilege to teach American History and
Government In several schools.
Ofte of the first things I was told on my arrival at
Gatun in 1910 was that we held the Zone on a 99-year
lease. I did not believe It, bat as I die not KNOW, I
waited tin I had a chance to read the treaty. There I
found that. In three different paragraphs, our rights
were la perpetuity.
I know enough about law to know that a lease Is a ter-
minable contract and that the lessor may regain possession of
the premises on the expiration of the lease.
The faet that there are persons here who do not pay taxes
nas no bearing on the matter under discussion. Some seemed
to think that paying our government income tax gave us some
source of special privilege, which, of course. It does not.
The Constitution and the Bill of Rights, which is a part of
the famous document are founded In justice, but that Is entire-
ly beside the point. Nothing was said about It.
The wisdom or fairness of the attitude of the government
of the Canal Zone in denying Americans o rent or buy land Is
not a part of the matter under discussion. However, If the Ca-
nal is held under lease how can the United States sell what be-
longs to Panama.
Now here la a little secret told me bv a man. one time pro-
minent among the labor organizations of the Zone. Organized
labor officials took the matter of renting land to retired em-
ployes up with the governor and made strong objections to doing
At one time sach leases were made, hut later discon-
tinued. I have bo comment to make on the wisdom er
unwisdom at eh an attitude.
However. I believe that the treaty of 1936 between the unit-
ed States and Panama has something to say that might affect
the situation.
Am I committing a sacrilege when I question the accuracy
of a statement made by another American? And something has
aeen said about the freedom Of speech.
I have question statements nads and pointed out the pos-
sibility that conclusions drawn from them might be wronk. I
do not expect martv to accept mv opinions. But facts taken
trom documenta are a different thing.
As to the Supreme Court Do vmi racaj] that that court
onsa ruled that If a stream of water could be made navigable
by the expenditure of monev and labor, it was a navigable
stream?
Of course, as Charles tvans Hughes said, the Constitution
means whatever the Supreme Court says It means.
Warren Herbert Brown.
Some years back we insinuated that a very
The Connecticut seat held by functional and pleasant sector of the ladies had
Senator Benton also has a Re- degenerated Into little more '.han costume jewel-
publican history. ry, and the Insinuation stand*.
The fresh point here is that while the bust U
It was lost when Senator! interesting it is not news, yet we treat It a*
Baldwin resigned in 1949, and such today.
dentn managed to squeeze by, I have a clipping here from the United Press
narrowly last year in a short- whose headline says: "It's he: gasp* that draw
term election. fpea to Dagmar' rival"the gist of which is
Maryland's recent Republican that the dame can knock ynur eye out with a
trend It put In a OOP gOv- special brand of exhalation
ernor and senator last year-
must inevitably give encour-
was a poor
attention on safety
reculations.
The commercialization of the buaaoom has
reached a peak, in the last couple of years, to
where It U broadly hinted that if you buy this
kind of car. ride this plane cr that train, eat
this sort of food or drink that kind of beverage,
you will not only become healthy wealthy and
wise, but will automatically develop a 38-inch
chest measurement.
This. 1 believe. U carrying .?. a little too far.
The female form la reasonable divine. In most
cases, and I would admire to keep it out of the
domain of a butcher-shop carcass
Grant a modicum of myftery maidens, and
remember that faith, not a D-cup move moun-
tains.
You might also reflect that allure is sometime'
based on urderplavlng a valued possession, ra-
ther than hiting the consume market over the
bead with an already obtioiu faet.
Truman And Vinson
By JOSEPH ALSOP
agement to Dlrksen and his
colleagues.
But Senator O'Conor, a
member of the Kefauver com-
mittee now winding up his first
term, may be hard to beat. ----- o -----
and7u1c,rte%it1orv^n!ver4tean WASHINGTON. What the President said to naming a new Secretary of State who eould
S ranked as law Remibii'art lne CWet Justice, what the Chief Justice said to possibly be suspected as a potential candidate.
Lnni Republican ^ Renten at their Tnankaglvlng dinner at In anort. whereas he was formerly willing to
Key West, Is unknown to this reporter.
Yet opinion is growing that President Truman
will not run again.
Chief Justice Vinson is the only other corn-
ground.
Kentucky, another border state,
is less promising.
It seldom elect a Republican
SS ,"ic!i..tnfu.!h AJSf monly mentioned Democratic candidate.
to
happened In the last decade
Chapman's seat will be tough
to capture
Beyond Question the Re-
publicans face an uphill
struggle to take the Senate
next year. The situation for
them is sd tight that some
political analysts are faying
it will reguire almost a
GOP landslide to turn over
enough seats for good con-
trol.
The cltisen who wants ef-
fective government must hope
that the 1952 victor at the polls
dots indeed get a suitable work-
ing margin.
A Republican presidential tri-
umph with the 8enate nar-
rowly held or In Democratic
hands would be a calamity In
these times.
A Democratic win by a slml-
.ar alender edge would be no
better.
IHEWSKIN CREAM
Sinn dtnundi dtuy eorrt
tita at roll ai ear*. Amttiat
tew Mruana Skin Creem
" rot taii important douM
itjr For duly r*tmt per-
fect nuke-up bavot protect
tttintt reughatit. ekap.
rt dry ikia to rtoh Untlin oil ttaka
a to tooth, ttttn nth oartawl tool-
Ik* toftamiat tctJatv Ojntly mt)llMas
Vital!II, en*.-white V Wily m
*ar attrtuaaMVlantnaSkin "
And it Is at least worth setting down the
Chief Justice's attitude towards this problem, as
he has conveyed it to some of the men closest
to him.
A number of months ago. In the first place,
he appeared willing, If not, exactly eager, to
make the Democratic race.
At that time. It can be rather positively stat-
ed, the President Indicated to his friend on the
high bench that Secretary of State Dean O.
Acheson would be retiring towards the end of
this year; that he wanted Vinson to succeed
Acheson: and that this transfer from the Court
to the 8tate Department would only be the pre-
lude to higher things.
No doubt the President gave no flat commit-
ment, yet the Chief Justice's intimates believe
he was led to expect the development above-
outlined.
And they believe further that because of bis
strong Democratic loyalty and special loyalty to
the President, the Chief Justice was preparing
to accept the new assignment with all its im-
plications for the future.
If any politics at all were discussed at the
Truman-Vinson meeting at Key West, it as of
course entirely possible that the purpose) was to
arrange the Chief Justice's transfer to the State
Department.
But this seems less likely now titan formerly,
for two reasons.
First, there Is no evidence wbeUevtr that
Secretary of state Acheson means to lay down
his office. And despite the dlffleoltles that fUB
result from having Secretary trtmiti at the
State Department durini an electlon-yetu Con-
gress the Presiden still seems trnman nver
to ask Acheson to retire.
Second, and more important. tM Cfciaf Jases*
himself has recently indicated tfeet ne no*
thinks it is too lato t mske any ajbtsatt at the
that the alreadv i vt oromem* of feretgn a**
i icy-making would be bcpelearay InflateQi tf
inherit Acheson s place, he Is now reluctant to
do to, although perhaps open to strong Presi-
dential persuasion.
As further complication the Chief Justice has
also indicated that he is most emphatically op-
posed to any member of the Court going
straight from the bench to party polities.
Por this there is, of course, the precedent set
by the late Chief Justice Hughes.
But Chief Justice Vinson thinks it a bad pre-
cedent, and believes firmly that some sort* of
disrobing room must be provided before a Jus-
tice can become a vote-seeker.
A spell at the State Department would be, of
course. Ideal for this purpose, being sufficiently
dignified to lustily a resignation from the court.
But if the SUte Department is not available
as a disrobing room, one wonders bow else the
Chief Justice can become a candidate on bis
terms.
for all these reasons, some people are gueslng
and It is puts guesswork that the Presi-
dent will shortly create a sort of assistant Pre-
sidency.
The future holds the secret of any agreement
that may have bam reached (or not reached;
at Key West.
Meanwhile, the fact that the President ap-
pears to think nuy poorly of any other poten-
tial heir except the Chief Justice also baa a
certain significance.
The Democratic party boasts a number of
other, men who might make good candidates
th State of Illinois alone has two, in Oov. Ad-
Mi Stevenson and Sen. Paul Douglas.
But they are either ruled out by practical po-
tttteal considerations like Sen. Richard Russell,
or past dUegrternenu er the persuasions of the
cronies have set Truman's mind against them,
a* m the ease of Sen. Douglas.
If Truman want* ne heir but Vinson, and the
fresUttn tt in fact determined net to be a
candidate again, then sewehow er ether he must
induce the Chief Justice ta aeeept the inherit-
is**.
In the last analysis, everything depends on
how you interpret the Preetont'i tmeonal tn-
ttWtiatM and ao rea cone back to pure guese-
Drew Pearson says: Eisenhower hedges in chat with Con-
gressmen; Acheson advised Truman to rebuff Auriol's
proposal; Army tanks have turret troubles.
WASHINGTON.Exuberant George Bender, the Ohio COn-
gresimai*. popped the question to General Eisenhower during a
two and one-half hour relaxed chat with the general In Paris
Binder, a rootin'-tootln' Taft supporter, looked Ike in the eye
and said with a grin: "General, is you or ain't you, and how?"
General Eisenhower's eyes twinkled but he made no direct
reply. Instead he emphasised to Bender and three other vlsltlnr
congressmen the great importance of his Job in Europe. It was
vital to the safety of mankind to rearm Europe, the general said
no matter what Individual sacrifices were involved. '
YOung Dick Boiling, the cln-cut Kansas city Democrat
suggested In half-humorous vein: "General, if you do run for
President, I am sure you will be much happier on the Democra,
tic ticket." "J
Elsenhower did not answer that one either, but Rep Leon
Gavin, Pennsylvania Republican, did, and in no uncertain terms.
"The Republican Party Is the only party of free enterprise"
he said loudly and firmly. "The Democrats are all Socialists ana
you would not get along with them."
At another point In the conversation. Congressman Bender
asked Ike:
"What about that Arthur Krock story in the New York Times
saying you and President Truman talked politics?"
This was the only time during the visit that the general
appeared upset or Irritated. "There was not a word of truth to
the story," he said Indignantly and with firmness. He added
that he could not understand why a reputable newsman would
fall for '!*ueh a phony."
NOTEFlying to Key West the other' day, President Truman
.at dOwn in the compartment of the PresldenUM lane where his
staff was working and point by polrtt went over hli luncheon con-
versation with General Elsenhower. Me repeated thkt at no time
had they dlseussed politics.
TWO PRESIDENTS
Here is the Inside story as to why Presldfnt Truman coldly
brushed aside French President Auriol's proposal for a new Biz
FOur meeting.
Mr. Truman flatly turned down Auriol's Idea after receiving
an urgent cable from Secretary of state Aeheton in paria, stat-
ing that President AuriOi had made the Big f cur proposal with-
ut the approval of French Foreign Minister Sehuman or of the
rench cabinet.
Furthermore, President Aurlol, according to Acheson's cable
had tersely refused to eliminate the Big FOur meeting idea from
his speech even though u. 8. Ambassador Jetsup pleaded with
him that the Russians would interpret It as n sign of weakneti
Acheson therefore advised the President to rebuff the entire pro-
posal, which was done.
DETECTIVE TANK TURRETS
Last month the Army refused to accep: a single medium
(M-47) tank from Its own Detroit arsenal.
The arsenal produced more than a hundred of the new tanks I
but the Army was so strict with its own arsenal that not a singl*
one passed inspection.
in each case the Army complained that the turrets on the
tanks failed to meet specifications.
Requirements for the tank demand that the tank cannon be
able to swing onto a target within six secondsand remain on
the target automatically while the tank continue! to move in
any direction.
While the rejected tanks could do this complex mechanical
Job, It took most of them nine or ten seconds instead of the re- [
cuired six.
Specialists from all over the country are now being called lnl
to try to perfect the tank's traversing gear to meet Army de- [
mand.v
Meanwhile, the Detroit arsenal will continue to turn out thai
faulty tanks on the practical theory that moolficatlons can be|
made later when the vital three-second problem is licked.
Meanwhile, the dispute over the three seconds will probabl;
be settled by a mock tank battle at Fort Knox.
NOTE-Our new light tank, the M-41, is having the same^
trouble with it turret mechanism.
**i t WASHINGTON PIPEUNE
f Price Boss Ttiike 1 ISklfe wul soon announce higher cUing j
r,^^m Newsmen have nicknamed Arval Ertkscj!. wan oT^jpSmeatj
pricing section, "meat head."
During the recent cold wave price enforcement boss Ed Mor-
can bought a thermometer. He found that the temperature in his
private office was down to 39 degrees. Remarked a friend: "That's
how some'senators feel about price controls.'
Latest A-bomb explosions near Las Vegas- will not cost the
uovernment so much money in broken windows. Last January the
government paid $17,000 for new plaster and broken glass. Now
(he damage will be less than S 10,000.
WORSE THAN BERLIN
American pilots have been running into worse flak over the
tiny Korean village of Slnaoju than they enountered over Ber-
lin during World War n.
Reason for the intense sntlalrcraft fire is that the Commun-
1st are trying to build three air strips near Sinaniu. If these are
completed, the Communists will move their Mlg-16 fighters across
the Yalu River for the-first time In the entlte Korean war ana |
thus be closer to the front.
In fact, this will put them In a position to hammer our front
Unes, whereas hitherto they have only fought defensively.
Or, in case of a truce and a freew on arms going into Korea,
the Communists would have their Air Force already Inside Korea.
Our planes are paying a terrific cost to keep these fields |
knocked Out. but so far the Mlgs still have to stay on the other
slue of the Yalu. ____
NO BARGAINING
Jovial, tough-skinned Mike DlSalle, the government's price
warden, has learned that you can't satisfy all manufacturers
even part of the time.
DiSaUe's aides were discussing price controls on stoves sad
ranges at a meeting with Industry spokesmen who kept demand-
ing that prices be fixed by the "historic markup" formula.
In other words, they wanted the traditional profit allowance
above present production eostr while OPS chiefs argued for pre-
Korean price levels. J
However, one stove msnufacturer was In no mood for bar-
* "Pre-Koresn!" he exploded "I'm tired cf all this gobble-
degook. What you government guys want is an antediluvian price
evel."
(Ceeyrifht, ISM, New *rk herald
tea.)
RENT
Hippy landlords sad
tenants get tofether
throofh our wint-ads
every issue. Tors to
the wsnt-ads. Check
them sow I
Every rsontb . every week . ***! **9~-
nt PANAMA ArHEWCAN esrries Mt WANT ADS
then sil ether deity Steers is Psaams csahtaB- I
m




IwFPNESDAY, NOVEMBER tt. 151
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPETENPENT PAfrT NEWgEAPEK
PAGE
_______________ _________________L ^^^^MaMaHMaMHannnnnMBBlBBliBHSBPBnnMI-----------
One-Time TaxFraud Prober Got
FreePlane Trips^Swank Hotels
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28.-(UP)-T. Lamar
.Claude said yesterday he received two free plane
trips to Florida in 1947 from a North Carolina busi-
nessman under income tax investigation and that
general counsel Charles Oliphant of the Internal
Revenue Bureau went on one.
The ousted assistant Attorney General said
other "guests" included a former assistant to the
late President Roosevelt.
He said the junkets included a stay at a swank
>alm Beach apartment hotel, paid for by another
businessman, and fishing from a boat called the
Naughty Lady.
n,,t ranrile scion of an old|llgence unit (of the Internal
fng\S.Xy WhKneadWof committee* counsel Adrian W.
Cat'
Of
s Best Friend Is Society
American Feline Society
By RICHARD KLEINER
NBA SUff Correspondent
Red China Extortion
Victims In US Agree
To Hold Up Payments
bharlote, . C, was under in-
fcestigatlon for alleged
iraud at the time.
He
kbout 11
pircussed It with Oliphant.
As the big, drawling
Southerner testified for the
second day before House
tax investigators, the Inter-
nal Revenue Bureau disclos-
ed plans to fire or suspend
a number of employes In
field offices today in ajresn
crackdown lttX
dais.
Dewlnd asked.
"No sir.- Caudle replied. "La-'
he found outter I learned that the agents l
admitted he louna ^ h|m
it later and Dewlnd explained that cases
are "Jacketed" at the close of
a preliminary Inquiry and be-
fore a formal Investigation Is
opened. It seta up a file of re-
cords on the case.
I jHe said the allegation of
fraud were dropped but that
liens were filed on Whltehead's
property.
He did not know the exact
HAPPILY DREAMING cat lite thla is happy dream of Robert
L. Kendell, American Feline Society president For the aort f
cat that makes him unhappily excited, sea the photo below.
toocate odd requests, likei a pair
. .j tn .v amount of the alleged tax de-
A spokesman refused to say but Mld he had heard
.here the axe will fall. He de ^ ran from ^m
'lined comment on reports it v %2mm.
raid affect employes In offt-ea,10 *-iuu.uw
hot previously linked witn ine, The 0U8te offlclai recalled
kandals. ,.,. r_mmi,J under questioning that White-
Internal l^venue Com head telephoned him upon dls-
sloner John B. Dunlappromlsea,cover, ne (Whltehead) Wa?
ait week to move soon " "Jjunder Investigation and Feder-
hCaltfornia situation wnerc,^ g wefe >bout to atUch
Collector James G. Stnytn anoj against his business.
tight others in his office were, . Upended ^ ^ptember. ana ou hantr ked rewind.
he newly-publlclzed iw*n -J Just declare I don't re-
ls in the Detroit tax ofiwe. | b Mr rjcwlnd," Caudle
It also was believed dtKlpllnrlled
ry action will Involve the NeW| He ^ ^^ however, that
rork office where even em he 8Ugge8t that Whltehead
.loves have been suspenoeo ^ ollpnant and added ne
ending Investigation. |mlght have cfiUtd the Tax Bu-
Two of the uPen lornia employes have been nr0| Caudle M,d he has not geen
ind Jndlcted since. ""?"..whltehead In some time.
Ported that Smyth and lour mt ---------------------,-----------
'he others will be fired and'
liquor Store Break
Neis Robbers
I Bullets, 10 Years
it *
TSATFNBY, S.'C.-Haw.-a*-'***).
_Jpwo North Carolina men were
He msrateffheWulfnot nave sentenced to 10 years eatih In
ken the plane trips if lie """the State penitentiary today
__ iirhitBVipad was under ... .. ,,,,,, hh, f
he other two relnstatea.
^Caudle was less explosive yes-
rday than during his first ap-
iearance Monday. .
He sat for the most part
pawled In the witness chair
S. head tilted * drawl
thrust forward, Ws drawl
hick revrter* cqjjK .harfl,y
rder'tand "Jim *J .JSft-i,.,- -JFwo North Carolina men were
. msifeeethe. Ji0*"^,11^ -
for the"attempted robbery of ft
NEW YORK (NBA) -- Ro-
bert Lothar Kendell, the best
; friend any cat ever had, Ji a man
who believes in letting nature
take its course.
As president of the American
Feline Society, he directs the
bustling cat-adopUon service the
organization ponsors. Farmers
and ranchers sometimes write In
with the idea of getting 40 or
50 cats at once. But Kendell op-
! poses such mass adoptions.
"I tell them," he says, "to take
a couple. Just two. Cats will have
four or five litters a year. There's
a man in New Jersey, adopted a
pair in 1939. He'l gotten 209 des-
pendan U. He's very happy."
The adoption service U only
one phase of the Society1! work,
but it li one that li very close
to Kendell's heart. He's a short,
stocky man with a plug of to-
bacco in his mouth and a sad ex-
Dression In hU eyei when he
talks about the nation's homeless
cats. ... '
"People think It's funny
when they tee pictures or hear
jokes about a cat In a garbage
pail." he says, emotionally.
"But the cat Is just plain hun-
gry. I'd like to see.any human
without any food for a while, and
see who thinks that's funny.
"The cata I get excited about
are the ones I hear howling at
night. Many's the night I've got-
ten up at 2 a.m.. and gotten
something out of the Icebox and
thrown it overboard. The poor
creatures.
"I've seon-'eome of these ao-
calied humane societies, take
thing but an exact duplicate
Kendell has spent months trying
mown Whltehead was
n-estimation. ....\Blacksburg liquor store.
Caudle said they began witn, Jud(te wlulam H ortmball of
me in the spring of 1947 while Cnarieston sentenced Harry
he was still in the Justice De-whlte 37, of Concord and Will
hprtment's criminal division. | piess. 34. of Charlotte in gen-
f On that trip, he said, he wasieral sessions court,
[accompanied * *of%ibc The two pleaded guilty to the
, f.Vl f^n t the Justice De- attempted robbery of the Hoyle
information at tne JU8H^rlvat(,!Allen,Liquor store Oct. 15.
partment and now a pri a Allen, who Uves across the
Vsultant in W""nOTt\anUil street from the atore, shot
itiorney I. T. Cohen or AUW"*', Wnite m the ieg and back with
J . ._ -__ in the'a .30 calibre carbine rifle dur-
The 8e^nd..t;lp,ac,nmo1 Shant log the robbery attempt. White
,mmer Caudle *^i,jwu brought^from a hospital to
Tre-of rrSneleiis cats. At night,
rendering truck comes in and
pick up the cats they've gassed
that day. They shovel the poor
'dead things Into the truck. By
1 the shovel full. It's pitiful."
I So Kendell makes a big effort
to put across the Society's slogan
"Adopt a Cat." Every day's mail
brings offers of kittens, and
other requests for a cat or kitten.
He tries to match them up.
Most people who want a cat
1 are trying to replace one that
Idled, and often will accept no-
of chocolate tigers or a cat wl
sit toes. He's found them, too,
oOo
He never sees the cats he
finds homes for. It's all done'
through his file system, which
he keeps religiously.
Every letter and callwhether
It's regarding adoption, or asking
a cat question, or making a con-
tributionis carefully filed some-
where In his cluttered, one-room
office.
If someone offers cats for a-
doptlon. Kendell carefully finds
out all the factodescription, sex
age, housebroken or not, and
I health. He says there are two
simple tests to determine If a cat
is healthy.
"You look in a cat's eyes and
smell Its breath. If Its eyes are
bright and sparkling, and its
breath 1 sweet, the cat is
healthy."
One thing annoys Kendell.
And that's people who want a
eat, but won't take one unless
It's marked attractively.
"Jf a cat has cock-eyed mark-
ings not symmetrical people
Just won't take It. But It's Just
'as good a cat; and it will be a
good mouser and a fine pet."
Cats, Kendell says, will adjust
rapidly to a hew envlroment.
especially if they haven't been
spayed or neutered. If they have
been altered, they sometimes
become set in their way!. In new
surroundings, thoy. become
frightened and hide under fur-
niture. Kendell usually sends a-
t
SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Nov.
28 (UP) gome 40 victims of a
Chinese Communist extortion |
racket were under a solemn
pledge today not to send any
more money to ransom their
klnfolk threatened with impri-
sonment, torture and death.
At an emotional meeting held
here Sunday night, rank and
file victima of Red blackmail
voted to cut off the flow of mo-
ney to the Pelping government
although it undoubtedly meant
the end of their hopes to keep
their relatives in China alive.
The meeting was an out-
growth of recent publicity given
to the Communlst'i method of
acquiring valuable foreign ex-
change by threatening the lives
of the mainland Chinese who
have relatives abroad.
Meanwhile it was learned that
the executive council of the
powerful "six companies" which
virtually run the affairs of San
Francisco's populated "China-
town" has scheduled a meeting
soon to discuss the problem.
A spokesman said that they
realized that in sending money
to the Communists they were
helping the Reda entrench their
power.
Almost all of them sobbed,
said the man who called the,
meeting. Lee Dal Ming, editor,
of the newspaper Chinese World
of San Francisco, 'It was the
most heart-rending gathering I
have ever attended."
He said a strong protest will
be sent dlrtctly to the Red lead-
er, Mao Tae Tung, to Governor
Yeh Chlen Ying of the Kwang-
tung Province, and to the Over-
seas Affairs Bureau of the Can-
ton provincial government.
PREVIEW FOR XMAS
NOT SMALL LONG
OKLAHOMA CITY (UF.) %
Delores Jane Nitzel, who won the aF
title of Oklahoma City's smallest m
baby when she 'weighed in at
Wesley Hospital here at one
pound, 11 ounces, didn't stay
small long. Her mother Mrs.
Henry A. Nitzel, reported she
weighed 22 pounds at six months.
I

ef& irri
THEft Atf f O A i. OF^THi
OUTSTANDING M O D t L t IN
SOLID MAHOGANY'
CONSULT US ON A~M V T H I N S
Li^e C H I N t S I U G -
9 ATTAN I A M A* f -.O a A***
. Wppme 1MhiHjk**rf*K
Remember to join us at our Anniversary Party
on December 2, 12 o'clock noon at our store
CORNER "H" AND DARIEN STREET TEL. 2-2181
fverfooiy V&h> Classified
THIS IS A BIG OPPORTUNITY
To make your home Cheerier for your family
and more inviting for your friends!!
a
long some choice catnip to make
these neurotic cats feel at home.
He figures the society placei
about 800 cata a year, and the
number Is going up. Running the
society and hli advertising busi-
ness at the same time often takes
Kendell 18 hours a day, but he
loves It.
"It's coat me a fortune In
dollars and heartbreak," he says,
"but It's worth it to help these
poor homeless cats."
.
I*
&-, along at his %2 be sentonced.
f /-iot her member of the parwj In passing sentence, Grlmball
Lr- James M. Barnes. '"!Id: "It looks like nobody is
l*c mlnlstratlve assistant to w. ith theM twQ around.
, env-Ufttwho cSSte-lS was ** with these two around.
|SinffTm.laHe S.MTwo Panamanians
h? firm handled tax cases.; .
Still another member of the JQ Study ClVll
[second party may have been
Harrv Holt, Caudle said. He
Pnfled HH as the U. S Dls-
Jrlct Attorney at Richmond, Va.
'at the time.
The ouited tax prosecutor
Lho begged off from an af-
Aeronautics In US
Francisco Sanchez and Car-
los Contreras, both of Rio Aba-
Jo, Panama City, left Saturday
afternoon from Tocumen Air-
tprnoon session because of p I port aboard an Bcuadorean
"snlitting headache." said both Area Airlines plane for Miami,
o'artles stayed at the exclusive en route to Washington, D. C.
poyal Poinclana apartments at for instruction and
Iralm Beach.
He said they were the guest.-
at Louis H. Pullock, retired
shoe merchant of Ashevllle, N
C No details of Pollock's role
, host were brought out.
\' Caudle testified that afi
me guests on both trips
pa*d their "incidental ex-
penses" other them the
Tlazie trips and the apart-
ment bills. He did not say
who took part in the fish-
ing trip aboard the Naugh-
ty Lady, or who owned the
vessel.
*bla jrou know that a fraud
homkless CATS like this one, sniffing a rubber^mouse.make
Kendell work overtime to put acroaa "Adopt A Cat slogan.
Use our easy terms and buy
the set that you want, paying
ONLY
10$
0
down
Most mea call o spade o spode
anril they thimble over cu ia
the dark. (hhovt*a*.
under the U. S. Department of
Commerce Civil Aeronautics
Administration.
Sanchez and Contreras have
been awarded Group C Tralh-
lng Grants In the Foreign Na-
tionals Training Program by
which the U. 8. Government
pays maintenance and training
expenses, other than transpor-
tation costs from the student's
home to the port of entry in
the States, and from the port
of exit back to the student's
home.
Charles Howell of the Pan-
ama Dispatch Service Agen-
cies awarded the trainees free
transportation to Miami on the
Xcuadorean Area Airlines.
Sanchez will spend a period
of approximately 8 months In
study and observation of the
installation and maintenance
of air navigation facilities and
radio aids, after reporting to
Washington, D. C, while Con-
treras will spend approximately
five months of study and ob-
servation of the maintenance
of aeronautical communica-
tions, teletype and related
equipment.
Both trainees will return to
Tocumen upon the completion
of their Instruction.
Landing Gear Jams,
B-36 Crew of 16
Parachute Safely
FORT WORTH. Tex.. Nov. M
iUP) Stx'een soldiers, the
crew of a B-8 superbomber
which had a jammed landing
gear, parachuted to safety Here
last night shortly before the
pilot, the co-pllot and the engU
neer landed the big .ten-motor-
td plane easily despite a bllnd-
CCapt. Clarence F. Horton pilot-
ed the plane with his two com-
panions to the landing strip of
the Carswell Air Base and land-
ed in an almost routine manner.
Air Force officials ordered the!
crew to paiaehute from the.
5lane, which droned around Fort:
forth for hour to use up gas
for a possible craah landhjg, be-
rauae they feared that the big
$5.500,000 plane would be des-
troyed if a fcrced landing waa
i nfeceas&rY
The plane rode around In great
circles after the pilot waa un-
rble to get the left wheel down
ind remained air ft not only to
use up gas l"t also to try to
.ower the lammed gear with
I two emergency manual methods
while fire trucks, ambulances
and other emergency equipment
stood by.
Iran To Sell Oil
To Eastern Bloc
Premier Announces
T1HERAN, Nov. U (UP)De-
puty Premier Hassetn Fateml
announced today that Iran would
start aeUlng oil to an "eastern
bloc" as soon as the necessary
formalities were completed.
He told a press conference that
irn viewed the oil sales as an
economic, not political matter
and did not care about political
views of political customers.
Cristobal-Colon
Rotary Meeting
Tomorrow At Noon
The Crbtobal-Celon Rotary
Club will hold its weekly
lancheon tomorrow at 11 neon
at the Strangers Clab.
BETTER ALL-AROUND
PHILADELPHIA. (NRA>
Leo Reordan. Philadelphia sports
writer, has seen Princeton's Dlck-
Kaamaler, California's Johnny
Olatewaki and William and
Mary's Dick Lewis this Fall, says
the latter's pin-point punting
makes him a greater triple threat
and you will have
the best mahogany
furniture.
LA GARANTA
FURNITURE STORE
"I" STREET No. 4, DIAGONAL NATIONAL BANK TEL. 2-1752
FOR
A BEWITCHING
SMILE
PEPS0DENT
FOR
CAPTIVATING
BEAUTY

TOOTH PASTE



- r aoe roce
THR PANAMA AMERICAN AN INOBPBNDENT 5AM ltEWSPAEBR
Wednesday, rovnim
,u

1
K
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes- Arrivals and Departures
TERRY-
WHAT? NO DOWNCAST EYES?
Shipping & AirLine News
AS1 rKMUHTKK SEBVIVA BETWKEN
RUMIPI AM OATH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COAST
fA Llmilfd Knmbff of Passenger Berth")
ro EUROPt
SS Argentan ....................................... December >
MS WlnrlDeg ..................................... December 7
To COLOMBIA.*BCCADOR. PERU CHILE:
S S Cher bmirg ........................
... December 5
TO CCNTRAL AMERITA Wt COAST II S A
M S. Wyoming ...... ......
December 2.1
tlllM NK lORk TO PLYMOITM 1.1! RAVfel
lie D. France ................................... R^ZS" ,-
i ik. ........................................ December 17
1 rmobal FRENCH LIME. P.O Box Sf.15 M. 3-Mi a iKlk
Panama: LINDO MADl'EO. S A Bo inn
TW. Panam 1-1SS3 1-1M1
PAA officials described the Ar-
rangement is an eexAmple of the
cooperation between the worm
airlines In exchanging engineer-
ing tad technical imowledge tor
the general advancement ot air
transportation.
ACOBi
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOB Y
Tltlr fo NBA Service
Bird of Prty
HORIZONTAL
predictors
23 ReUtives
I Depicted bird
5 It has long,
pointed
10 Small finches
12 Senseless
persons
14 Golf term
15 Girl's name
17 Impatient
exclamation
I IS Atop
TO Struggle
51 Troop (ab.)
ttCityinNvadaj,,^
24 Particle
Ireland
27 It is a bird
of------
28 From (prefix)
29 Knight's title
30 Playing card
21 Preposition
32 Above
33 Otherwise
26 Repose
27 Actual
21 Physician
(ab.)
29 Bombards
45 Psyche part
46 Japanese
outcast
48 Air sprite
49 Drink made
with malt
1 80 Push back
52 Wander
54 Remove
55 Hair fillet
TBRTICAL
1 Sharper
2 Anger
; S Palm lily
4 Within (comb.
form)
9 Deep red color
* Roman date
7 Nickel
(symbol)
8 Obtained
Speak
haltingly
10 Shop
11 Misdeed
13 Wander
16 Near
19 Musical
entertainments
Answer to Previous Puzzle
tV.ii:irdBaeiC!W>y-3' 4
WuirJaJWilamMldaL^tJ
[:u - ciJ d.jfj.,* ' *: . IL-'SI
tie
3D
[dl^l-
i \z 'rjMrjuTirs!t*'Tidi5i
?LrJUL-JIia | UUUJ1 JifflU
<'.r-n-igfgta.'as-
25 Bird
30 Prevented
32 Command
34 Went by
steamer
35 Senior
40 Story
41 Railroad (ab.)
42 Point a
weapon
43 Charges
44 Dash
47 Mimic
40 Fuss
51 Hebrew deity
S3 Negative reply
Death Aboard Ship
MenestheuS" Reported
Dr. V. J. White, ship's sur-
geon aboarc tile Menestheus died
,in his cabin when they were two
davs out of Lot Angeles. Dr.
While, a Brltllher. had been
i with the ship as surgeon for four
jvears. He was found by the sec-
ond engineer And was buried at j
sea.
The British ship was coming
from the Far East. One of the1
passengers aboard was travelling i
on a Red Chinese passport, how-
: ever he wa listed as having been
born in Panama. Fen ton and CO. I
are the local agents.
British Motor-ship "I wu dealt a natural canasta
Makes Maiden Vovage of sixes," relates a corrtapondent.
Throurh the Canal "Both sides needed ISO points for
The Port Townsvllle which ar- the initial meld. With the sixes I
rived from London yesterday.'hd a pair of Unfa, A flair of
made her maiden voyage .eight* and a lone ace (after my
through the Canal. Carrying 12 draw from the stock pile.)
passengers, the British motorship
Is headed for Australia. She cAr- "I had to make the very firat
irles a general cargo. discard of the hand, And I
* ____ thought about it quite a bit. i
Wheat Cargo Fumiga ted finally discarded the ace. I knew
Aboard ship this was dangerous, But reckoned
The Green Mountain State" that the next player still had to
'which was carrying a cargo of 'have a pair of aces and the count
wheat underwent a special gas;to profit from my discard.
fumigation yesterday before! "The next player did have the
transiting the Canal bound for perfect handand the heavens
Antwerp. Custom officias report-1 fell on me!
ed that this fumigation was done | .., ,
to get rid of the rice bug (ephls-1 "What would An expert do In
tla ) The ship was coming from this situation*"
Vancouver .1 An expert would discard the
______ ace, hoping for the best. Just as
Stowaway Remains imy correspondent did. ThAt dla-
on "Champoeg" |card may turn out badly, but it
A 19-year-old stowaway was|is the wisest choice. Moreover, it
\
li/ojt 11 >^ 3 IrW i
7 > ^S
found aboard the Panamanian
Steamship Co. ship Champoeg
that was headed for Aruba. from
Chile. The boy. German Fajardo
I was being: held aboard ship until
it reaches its destination. Esso
Shipping; Co. are the local a-
I Rents. _____
PAA to Observe
British Jet Operations
Two technical observers from
Pan American World Airways are
would not disturb me greatly if
the next player picked up my dis-
card immediately. That's not at
ail disastrous.
What is the normal future of
this hand? You keep discarding
whatever you draw until you get
a third king or a third eight.
Then you are only one draw a-
way from a concealed out. That's
one possibility.
Maybe you will draw a wild
flvine to London for a prellmin- card before you get a third kin*
- ot a third eight. Then you have
to guess whether to throw a king.
or an eight. But you're still on-
ly one draw away from a con-,
cealed out.
ary survey of the engineering,
flight and maintenance know-
how of Comet jet airliner opera-
tion .
The two observers. Capt. Scott
Fower. superintendent of opera-
, tlons engineering and George W.
Taylor, maintenance manager of
Pan American's Atlantic Divi-
sion, will study Comet'operatiOns
out of the London airport.
Perhaps your partner will make
the Initial meld while you're
waiting. Then you will quickly,
meld your natural canasta Of]
sixes and thus signal him that i
The arrangement for the Pan i you are practically out. He may
American technicians to study be able to meld kings or eights,
the Jet, airliner project parallels i perhaps both, to help you.
the arrangement whereby a team I One of these should happen
of British Overseas Airways Cor-1fairly quickly.' Tne wont that
poratlon observers came to the can happen Is that one of the
united States in 1941 to study 'opponents may meld out before
Pan, American's over-ocean fly-. your side can meld. That's still
.&"OTaSBKS**
*o DV&COUMP* '.
inghoat operations.
COMFORT
IN ACTION
Sorter/ Safer!
MODESS
(jorUuon -flolwMOH
DON'T NEGLECT LITTLE WHS
THI THING TO Uil IS
UNGUENTINE
Ma ken-way maoturet can
So who! toothing, onfttaptic
UNGUCNTINE w da to>
ttUIYt PAIN
'I8HI INHCTION
'OMOII HIALINS
not a disaster. It may cost you
six or seven hundred points
perhaps a thousand. Unpleasant,
but not overwhelming.
The way to get yourself mas-
sacred is to begin breaking up
such a hand. You start by sav-
ing the ace and throwing a king
or an eight. In a few rounds you
have an assortment of odd cards
and no play at all for a concealed
out. If your partner then falls to
meld, you go right to the clean-
ers. The opponents meld and
meld and meldand you just sit
there and take it. That sort of
hand may cost you several thou-
sand pointsand that IS a dis-
aster.
Wrlttl
_____MA*fc. AMNYMtf&b 40*1 to
v*itv\ 'iv\: i----------
OMAN
ttl
OWAV 1 \\\. YOW*YT SAX
A&OUt 'tM'.rWW. AU.,
WVM o\Cj V* OVO a O*
cowttfe .te* *m*t t*
--------. OtTW*A' Walk
1wi ar mu navwc attimtit w. aw
I '
( APTAIN tAY
Rienle Shows U Hand
BY LESLIE TDENI
mR-rtch, w r if Mf -iSim. \
KeWTtRYlMei \cONCSRal. AMD IT HAP)
TO TUX ****& MOTHtMB TO PO vMfM
WtTH MR. WATT* m ACClKNTAL pgArM'
OH THE CRUhSe.
vMATKMPO'
CHRIS WELKEN, Planeteer
Not Men From Mars
BY RlSS WINTERBOTHAM
JILLA'S POP
Not Genuine
BY AL VERMEER
i Aovtoe
WUTOtttP
YOUR AssuW
OR VOVlt WflCC MC TO COWtM I HP
COWCM. THE TRUTH! THAT I HiARP
Ti* 0iMtRf t with vatwm.tnbm
A OHOr... AMP RU*HBP VP OH ORClC
h6 TUB* HURLBP W* GUM OVER-
^"RRPr
YIC PUNT
A Last Mrwawge
BY MICHAEL O'MALLilj
zstat
on coun9% rr* a *hjjdsi
NOT. WUatT QD SOU
THINK IT VwX* OOMNA Vt,
A NEW NOVR4,* MAW MAW .
HAW/
OCR BOABDUIG sWDIE
MAJOR aOOfLE OUT OCR WAY
y J. R. WILL1A
01 is !! NNV
,
Oa Toast
...But *hc aip i'hap
TO HPCVS A MOT LUNCH/
**> gRTTsr cram/
i ^VT GONNA GST
IN PU7CH \MTH
fSTUNIA /
'HUT A
VvlNOTB/
i aorr an
*sa...
A1
*., m.ntaetf
we -rHOMT oticut
A SO VAPULO Bet
feeWAkt'EMoirr


WEBNESTM' voVFWtw - "51
run *vfim MriN'U Jv rvp'PFrTOFVT p*y newmmpe*
page mn
pacific Society
&. 7, &&* J-/ BJLm 3521
LT. GOVERNOR AND MRS. ?OOJH. ,
10 ENTERTAIN VI8ITING CONGRESSMEN
The Lt GoTernor of the Panama Canal and Mm. Her-
3?Sm sss.'s.'MaSE
for a new tear of duty at Fort Knee. Kentucky.
Brazilian Minister and Wife
Give Reception
The Minister of Brazil to Pa-
nama and Mrs. Jose Emilio Ri-
beiro were hosts at a reception
Riven Monday evenln gat the Le-
gation. -
Mr. Gillen leaves
for VeneaueU
The Executive Assistant to the
United States Postmaster Gen-
eral Mr. John J. Qillen, left yes-
terday for Caracas. Venezuela, on
the neat lap o this tour of Latin
America. During his stay on the
Isthmus Mr. Gillen was a guest
at the Hotel El Panama.
SUtes Wedding
of Interest Locally _,.,,
"Mr. and Mrs. Harry Powell
Tassell announce the marriage 01
their daughter. Margaret WUhel-
mina. to Haran OwiewiJ,
Staff Sergeant. United States
Marine Corps on Saturday. No-
vember the seventeenth, nine-
teen hundred and fifty one, at
the First Church m Weymouth,
Weymouth Heights, Massachu-
W At home after December 15 at
Camp I* Jeune. North Carolina."
Miss Tassel was a former resi-
dent of Diablo Heights.
boa Dining Room of the Hotel El
Panama. The attending guests
Included Mrs. Gilberto Arias,
Mrs. Roberto Novey, Mrs. Adol-
fo Arias. Miss Tania Plza, Miss
Cecilia Heurtematte. Mrs. Gui-
llermo de St. Malo and Mrs. Va-
nessa Elsenmann.
Union Club
Gives Ebb Nog Party
An E-ig-Nog Party was given
by the Union Club today, from
twelve noon until three o'clock,
for members and their families
to celebrate the Anniversary of
the Independence of Panama
from Spain.
Guests at Hotel El Panama
Mr. and Mrs. J. Herman, Jr.,
of Los Angeles, California, arriv-
ed on the Isthmus Monday, by
plane. During their stay they are
guests at the Hotel El Panama.
. Mr. Thomas L. Kemey. of
Trenton, New Jersey, arrived here
Monday and U a guest at the Ho-
tel El Panama.
Mrs. KUbey and Daughter
Return from Vacation
Mrs. C. W. KUbey of Balboa,
acompanied by her small daugh-
ter, Christina, returned to the
Isthmus Monday, on the S.S.
Ancon, from a vacation of two
months spent with Mrs, KUbey s
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Jackson .of Saint Joseph. Missou-
ri and with friends and other
relatives of Kansas City. Mlssou-
r land Saint Joseph.
Balboa Emblem Club to Meet
The Balboa Emblem Club No.
49 will hold its next regular meet-
ing on Friday. December 7 at
7:30 p.m.. In the Balboa Lodge
Hall.
A/omen
WoJ,
f
Alemans Host for Dinner
The Honorable Deputy and
Mrs. Alfredo Alemn, Jr., were
hosts to a group of their mend
on Friday evening when tney en
tefUlned with a dlpner at then-
residence at Coco del Mar.
Tea to be Held
at Children* Home ______
The Bella Vista Children
Home No. 11 on 46th Stree wUl
be the scene of a tea and open
house" on Wednesday December
fifth from 2:00 p.m. to 5.00 p_m
Mrs Francis K. Newcomer, wife
of the Governor of the Panama
Canal, is Chairman of theCom-
mittee in charge of the anair.
Engineer Oftteer Wive. Club
^fSa^H. Hewitt will be
heltes Friday at herhpgjrt
will be served.
i
to EntarUtay: ^ _, t0 th|
Lt. Colonel and Mrs. Marvin L.
Jacobs wfll entertain Friday eve-
ning at their home in Balboa
with a cocktail buffet for thirty
Quests to be .erved at six thirty
o'clock.
Mr! Fierro Entertain With
Luncheon at Hotel El Panama
Mrs Ignacio Fierro was^the
ho:tess on Monday at a ncheon
and,card party held in the Bai^
RUTH MILLETT Says
By GAY PAULET
United Pres SUf f Correspondent
NEW YORK (UP.) Janet
Collin was born to dance but it
took years of Hard work to put
her In the. unique spot she holds
in the entertainment world to-
day.
She is the first Negro ballerina
to star vrtth the Metropolitan
Opera. 8he makes her debut with
the Metropolitan when it opens
the fall season with "Aida" Nov.
13. She also is the first featured
Negro ballerina in the United
State*. The two most noted wo-
men dancer of her race. Kathe-
rine Dunham and Pearl Primus,
have specialized in primitive- and
modern dance.
Janet, a slender and attractive
girl, said "I must have been born
to be a ballerina. I kept going
to school and working harder and
narder at it. though nobody in
the family encouraged me.
The ballerina, a native of the
Pacific coast, said her parents
thought she was too frail for all
the hours of practice that go into
- making a ballet dancer. Tney
wanted he rto study art. so she.
^JatoJoUedhot_axt and dancinr
Members are requested to at-
tend this important meeting.
Eectlon of officers will be held.
Cotillion Claa Patrons
Announced .
The patrons for Thursday s in-
formal CotiUlon Class are Mr.
and Mrs. W. B, Rogan and Mr.
E F Rigbv. The hostess for the
evening wiil be Miss EUen Rogan
with Master Lee Rlgby serving as
The class will meet at 5:30 p.m.
for a swimming (*^
tel El Panama. Cotillion Class
wlU be held at 7:00 p.m. m the
Washington Salon.
Evening Guild to
The Evening Guild of the Ca-
thedral of St. Luke will n>eet Fri-
day at 7:30 p.m. at the home of
Mrs. Arthur DoneU'on 215-A
Darien Street, In the Fishbowl
The Very Rev. Raymond T.
Ferris, Dean of the Cathedral
will be the guest speaker at the
meeting and his topic will be
Social justice."

^Atlantic Society
nu wtL Jm ru
Bo, 195, QaU* D.LpUs g*t~ 378
BON VOYAGE PARTY ___
AND SHOWER FOR MRS. BOWEN
Mr. James E. Bowen, Jr., who Is calling on December
7th for Washington, D.O, was the nest H .MMt J*
dessert card party and handkerchief shower given Monday
afternoon by Mrs. Henry F. Taylor and Mr. Maurice Webb,
at the Taylor residence at Fort Davis.
Mrs. David McCracken won
the high scoring prize and the
traveling prize.
The other ladies playing were:
Mrs. Robert F. Alexander, Mrs.
E. H. Mltchel and her mother,
Mrs. Margaret King. Mrs. Will-
iam J. Bennett, Mrs. John Wlggs,
Mrs. James Scarborough, Mrs.
Fred Steiner, Mrs. Clayton
Moore, Mrs. A. A. Zilkie, Jr.,
Mrs. Henry Hartwlg, Mrs. Geo.
C. Poole, Jr.. Mrs. Walter Skeis-
taitis, Mrs. B. K. Ogan and Mrs.
James Jess.
E=S^k^ asjraxwsr
TUNNEL'S WASH DAYHow would you like to waah 0500 tile
bathroom^ aU STonce? That's what wahing the 780,000-squaxe-
f eet of the tile lining in the new Brooklyn-Battery tunnel In New
York amounts to. But tbi 'special tank truck makes snort work
of it The longest vehicular tunnel in the U. S. gets Ms walls
washed every two weeks, Its celling every six. The truck does the
complete job in two night, using 40,000 gallons of water ana
7000 pf cleaning soluUgn.
Crocker-Ledford Wedding
Plans Announced
Sergeant and Mrs. Edward A.
Scherer of Fort Gullck, an-
nounce the approaching mar-
riage of their daughter, Dorothy
Amelia Crocker, to Corporal Bill
Franklin Ledford, of Fort Kobbe,
'son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Led-
ford of Copper Hill, Tenn.
The weddmg will take place
Sunday. December 2 at 5:00 p.m.
in the Fort Gullck Chapel.
Invitations have been Issued to
the weddlnc; end reception which
will be held at the N.C.O. Club.
The bodice and long, pointed
sleeve were of Chantllly lace.
The satin kirt extended to form
a long train, which was bordered
with matching lace. A coroonet
of roses and lilies of the valley
held In place the veil of Uluslon.
Her flower were a bouquet of
white roses.
lustrated with colored slides, of i
the trip through Europe made by ^_ t
Misses Bea and Ann Imswiller. IJ^^^^MothODOT.
During the long business meet- the bride was m&id of nonor^
s&sr^&ss* rus? &TtobaKag
and Mr. E. C. Stevens thanked
the group for their cooperation
with the tea given recenty for the
with pink appliques. Her pink
headdress was styled to match
the bride's. She wore pink mitt
ard Sullivan would have charge
of the nursery for the next three
months.
Plans were made for the
Christmas party to be held De-
cember 12 at 8:00 p.m. at the -
home of Mrs. Chester Lindgren, O""
House 52 3% St.. New Cristobal.
AU members of the Auxiliary are
Invited to attend.
The bridesmaids. Misses Mar-
garita Chen, Muelng Lee and
Amuy Tarn, wore matching whit
ballerina dresses trimmed with
blue appliques. Their accessories
matched the maid of honors, in
They carried blue horten-
5^y^5^^
Bingo at Legion Club
Tomorrow Night tnrrn-
Bingo wUl be played tomorrow
night at seven thirty o'clock at
the American Legion Club at Ft.
Amador. Prize will be awarded.
Winners of Bridge Tournament
Announced
The winners of the bridge tour-
nament, which is played every
Monday in the Card Room of the
Hotel Tlvoli at 7:00 p.m., were.
1st Mr. TomOrr and Mr. R. To-
rres; 2nd, Mr. and Mrs. HO.-
Robinson; W.^ath'l?T
and Mr. Sanchez; 4th, Mrs r.
Cranshaw and Colonel N. Elton;
and 5th. Mr. and Mrs. W. Ken-
nedy.
FOR ALL WITH
Recent Arrivals
H.B.M. Consul and Mrs. Ray-
mond Kirwln arrived Monday on
the S.S. Ancon and are at home
"t the British Consulate in Co-
lon.
Mr. and Mrs. Klrwin have
spent the Dast eight months vis-
iting in England and traveling
on the Continent.
QUAKER OATS
f Ascha
fithLe
in*
You're a wonderful cook and
having 15 or 20 guests to a buffet
supper is fun Instead of a head-
ache. Yet every time Clara comes
out in a new frock he whipped
pp herself or Barbara starts talk-
ing about her Job you begin to
feel downright stupid.
Wei that's a common fault of
housewives. They are much too
hard on themselves.
They aren't content to dp a few
thing exceptionally well, most
things reasonably wei, ana w
admit that some things Just
aren't their dish.
They figure they've got to
shine at everything. To look as
carefully groomed as Mrs. A. to
cook as well as Mr. B. To en-
tertain as effortlessly a Mrs. C.
To have as weU-mannered cru-
dren as Mrs. D. To sew as pro-
fessional as Mrs. Eand so on.
And all the whUe Mrs. A, B. C.
. D and E are envying each other's
talents. They feel frustrated be-
,-, iuse in this ability or that they
pa, short of a friend who excels
fvJ. That sort of envy and low-rat-
tn gof self isn't Just a waste of
good time. If downright de-
" struetlve.
Bo tot's cut lt out. Let each of
ns decide where we shine and be
content with that bit of excel-
lence. For the other Job, lets
just do them reasonably well.
And when lt comes to something
we can't seem to do even passa-
bly, we might as weU admit it Is
clear out of our Une.
Men specialize at their Jobs. A
naperhanger doesnt mind ad-
mitting he doesn't know any-
thing about plumbing.
Women cant specialize to tnat
extent, if their career is home-
making. But they can take pride
in the thing they ARE special-
ists In Instead of frustrating
themselves by the feeling that
they ought to be able to win a
specialist's rating on any number
of }obs.
tan gavB her and lfSeodu
modem dance and an opportun-
ity to appear in his production
of the "Rite of Spring" at the
Hollywood Bowl. She studied a-
daglo dancing for a while and
then went on tour. She appeared
hi Hall Johnson' "Run Little
Chlllun" and played the west
coast with Katherlne Dunham.
As the Negro dancer became
more adept at her art, the limit-
ations also became more ap-
parent. There weren't enough
ballets in which a girl with olive-
brown skin could be cast in the
eaSald Janet, "I decided If I
were going to be a ballerina,
Td have to do it as a soloist.,
not part of a company. New
York seemed the next stop for
me."
She sold a painting to pay her
railroad fare East and after win-
ning the audition series of the-1
YMHA In New York, he was hir-
ed by the American School of
Ballet to teach modern dance.
Cole Porter heard about the
young dancer and hired her for
hi Broadway musical comedy,
-Out of This World." The notices
by the critics helped land her a
lob with the Metropolitan.
She still paints and also sketch-
es her own costume design.
She beat the New York hous-
ing shortage by a stroke of luck.
A doctor friend of her aunts
wanted someone to occupy the
suite of rooms adjoining his of-
fices. Janet moved In.
"It's convenient and comfort-
able," she said. "Dancers often
get sprains and bruises. I always
have a doctor and all the lini-
ments handy."
Group of ~
hoa vfomen's Club will meet
Thursday at 12:30 p.m. at the
Jewish Welfare Board Center in
Balbao.
Daily Reading
Getting Up Nights
If roll auffar troa OattTaa: Us
NlrhU. Backach, Lc Plnilx>
of Visow. NarvouinMS or wtak-
mb you should halp roar Prottat*
Clan Imnwdlataly with ROQENA.
Tula wondar nadlolna makaa
yea (aal troansar, atronptr aad
l!p without Inturruptfon. Oat
ROO EN A from your chamlat
mtlaSaatiaw Swanuitaa.
THE WAY OUT OF THE DARK
PSALMS 46
Some people are shy of others,
giving social life an element of
painfulness. though at the same
time they may enjoy it. It is
doubtful that there is anyone
who does not experience some
pangs in those lucid moments
when he faces himself with all
his favorite make-believe masks
laid aside. And when it comes to
the knowledge of God and com-
munion with Him, we are truly
awed and frustrated. The sense
of God's transcendent majesty is
in evidence everywhere through-
out the Scriptures. It is also the
key-note in the Ufe of the church
in aU ages. _A
But the Psalms have served
well the Impulse of reverent neo-
ole to express their praise to God.
Therefore the Psalms are deeply
embedded m the liturgies of the
church. All the Psalms have been
set to meter at some time, some
with frequency and in jnany
languages for congregational
sintrlng. Today we have anotner
one of the cherished Psalm for
our reading.
NEW Zf ALAND PR0PUCT
HEAD FIRST..
for Beauty!
SPECIAl

WHY HAVE A HOME
PERMANENT ?
... with Inadequate faculties,
no certain finished look, and
no guaranteewhen yon can
have a professional one com-
nlete for onrv $7.5! It tci/1
tost longer, and look bsttsr'
These can be had
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
Make yenr ft ^QPA
Appointment Z-ZTJjf
Barry!
BALBOA
BEAUTY SHOP
Mrs. Bates Wleman, Mir.
Osa tM ia -
' aalhaa Oaaaaaaa aaataba.
THE MOST EFFECTIVE
DEODORANT
You'v ever usmdl
ONLY NEW ODO-RO-NO CREAM
~i VES YOU ALL THESE ADVANTAGES!
1Stop perspirationquickly, safely.
XBanishes odour instantly.
3Its protection lam for out tbrtt days.
4Never irritates normal skinuse it daily.
Absolutely harmless to all fabrica
New, exclusive formulanever dries up
or cakes in the jar as ordinary deodorants
Often do.
Millions of uttfM
I mi I---- 1"
ODO-
CREAM
Mr. and Mrs. Irl Sanders. 8r..
of Gatun, returned Monday from
a visit with their daughter and
son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. M. A.
r^atourneau in Georgia and with
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Sanders in
Dlxon, Tenn. They also visited
former residents of Gatun in
Georgia including Mr. and Mrs.
W. C. Webber and Mr. James
Pate.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wood of
Gatun, were among Monday's ar-
rivals. They visited m the south-
ern and mid-western states
Thev also stopped with a former
neighbor, Mr. and Mrs. W. C-
Gavin in Waynesboro. Miss.
They were the dinner guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hotz upon
arrival.
The following officer were
elected: president, Mrs. E. F.
McCleUand, vice-president. Mrs.
Roscoe Haming; Secretary, Mrs.
G. E. Lust; Treasurer, Mrs. Al-
ton Jones. The members of the
nominating committee were:
Mrs. Timothy Ladd. Mrs. Rich-
ard SuUlvan and Mrs. J. W.
Umkemann. A Hostess Commit-
tee was also selected. The mem-
bers are: Mrs. L. C. Palumbo,
Mrs. R. K. Hanna. Mrs. John
Nolan. It was announced that
Mrs. M. T. Webster has moved
to Gatun and farewell was said
to Mrs. Wesley Herr who is leav-
ing Friday for the States.
Co-hostess with Mrs. Maedl
was Mrs. Alton Jones.
Miss Lee Weds Mr. Chen
Before a flower decked altar in
the Immaculate Conce p 11 o n
Church in Colon, Miss Amalia
Cristina Lee. daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Antonio Lee and Mr.
Yee Sing Chen, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Joaqun Chen, exchanged
their nuptial vows at a double
ring ceremony Sunday, Novem-
ber 25, at 5:00 o'clock. The Rev.
Father Diaz officiated at the ce-
remony which was witnessed by
a large gathering of friends and
relatives from both sides of the
Isthmus.
Regal Ulies and lighted tapers
were used to grace the altar. Mrs.
Angela Castillo organist, played
the traditional wedding marches
and accompanied Mrs. Ligia
Pretto, soloist.
The flower girls were Beatrla
Fong and Margarita Lee and the
train bearers were Mirtha Choy
and Claudina Lee. They wore
ballerina length dresses of white
tuUe with pink accessories.
Felix Lee. brother of the bride
was the ringbearer.
Mr. Andres Chen served as
best man for his brother. The
ushers were Messrs William-
Chen. Domingo Chen, RogeUo
Fong and Jimmy Leon.
A Chinese banquet was held at
the 8trangers Club for six hun-
dred guests following the cere-
mony.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee and Mr. and
Mrs. Chen, the parents of the
bride and groom received with
the members of the wedding
Party- .. .
The mother of the bride chose
for the occasion a floor length-
crepe gown with gold accessories,
and wore an orchid corsage.
The mother of the groom wore
a bue evening gown with white
accessories and an orchid cor-
sage.
The mother of the groom wore
a blue evening gown with white
accessories and an orchid cor-
ese -. ,^j^
The bride and groom eft later
In the evening for the Pacific
Side where they enplaned for
Costa Rica. The bride's going a-
way costume was an aqua tailor-
ed suit, with which she used
white accessories.
Quaker Oafs helps children grow taller and
stronger ; and because it helps to build
pep and endurance it's ideal for active
grown-ups, too. Quaker Oats gives every-
body super nourishment-and at such LOW .
COST. Buy it nowl
MORI RIASONS THAN IV1R TO BUY QUAKIR OATS
MINERALS...........Isftr-t--ae--lw*
PROTIINS.....WirwW*;.-WieeJBscle
CARBOHYDRATES.......far e-anj en- *
VITAMINS. .He I. hW MM fee. h* *%**+*
MX,
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Owen, of
Margarita, returned Monday
trom a visit in the south and
midwest, spending part of their
time at their former home, Ham-
mond, La. ...
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Da-,
bek, the former Miss Joan Reed, j
arrived Thanksgiving Day for a
visit with Mrs. Dabek's parents,!
Mr .and Mrs. J. M. Reed In
Margarita. Mr. Dabek wiU play
baseball this season in the Pan-
ama League.
Sorority Meeting
The Beta Chapter of Beta Sig-
ma Phi held its resular meeting
at the home of Mrs. Charles
Judge in Margarita.
The business meeting was fol-
lowed by pledge training. Plans
were discussed for a Christmas
party.
The members present were:
Mrs. Edith Hermlng, Miss Mary
Teanne Wlesen. Mrs. Betty Lou
Hudgins. Mrs. Jean Coffey, Miss
Ann Wichner and Mrs. Bea
Whyte who was attending her
last meetin" with the chanter as
she leaves for the SUtes tomor-
row. ^
Evenir,r Circle Meeting _
The Evening Circle of the Cris-
tobal Union Church held Its re-
gular meeting at the home or
Mrs. C. F. Maedl. of New Crls-
Mrs. Thompson, who Is visiting
on the Isthmus from Costa Rica,
gave the devotions. The program
was an Interesting account, II-,
Mr. Marshal Called to States
Mrs B. D. Marshal of Gatun
left by plane during the week-
The'brideT who was given ln!nd forOhlo. SUfwas called
marriage by her father, was love-1 home because of the Ulness oi
ly in her gown of pearl satin, 'her father.

m
i WaMa
J>tnUn
Special representative of
(?
VU*ei*to'is
Wonful
will be in our COLON store THURSDAY,
FRIDAY and SATURDAY of this week.
Avail yourself of her experienced advice
on problema of skin care and make-up.
Make your appointment for Complimentary
Skin Analysis.

MOTTA'S

' Tit rfM-Wonf wiffcwwl a rf.BBr
Bs*BBBBSwSSBBSBBBBBBBBBSSW*ka~
21 JEWEL
Automatic Watches
By
LAMONT
At Prices You Can Afford!
^a/afii/ttEch
SwBJIV 1-WOPIMaTBBB
I


THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DA1LT NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER M, 1951
f AGE SIX
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Office
MORRISON'S
No. Fourth ot Jn ft
Pho.r 2-9M1
Hi) IK a l.ARLTON
lO.iil Molantei a,v*
Phone I5.V-Colea
SALON OE BELLEZA AMERICANO
No. S Weal lilb Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No SJ "H" SlrooiTunum*
No 12.179 CenUal A%* .TWf
12 words
.Minimum lor
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:Now used retngerotors
In p.rfect condition. Reosonoble
prices or.d terms. Compon,. Alfo-
ro. S. A., No. 28 Peru Ave. Pan-
omj City. Ponomi._____________
FOR SALE:3 piece mahogany liv
ng.oom,set $80.00. Mata|wy
d.ninaroom set $170.00. 5647-1
Mogoon St.. Dloblo. between 5:0C
ond 6:00 p. m.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
MISCELLANEOUS! RESORTS
u.
,.n hem o eWedriM ajaMesa? ffcSBa*. Oceonslde cottages. Sonto
FOR SALE:Seven suit coses, vari-
ous sires, excellent condition,
SI 00.00 for lot or will sell M*
porotely. Phone 3-4088^Ponami.
FOR SALE:Washing mochine, re-
frigerator, water heater, good con-
dition. 43rd Street No. 41-A.
downstairs, ofter 5 P- <"
For the buving Oi selling of your
automobile consult: Agencias Cos-
mos, S. A.. Automobie Row No.
29. Telephone 2-4721. Ponomi.
Writ* Alcoholic) AlMf
oi 2011 Ancon. C..Z.
For Better
USED CARS
Smoot 4V Parodts
Your BUICK e> CHIVROLIT Deeler
FejMeHl
FOR SALE
Miscelluneons
FOR SALE: 1951 Dodge Coupe I _
"Coronet Diplomatic" two tone !pQR SALE
white side well tires. 3,500 miles
For information apply "Inversio-
nes Generales, S. A." Jos Fran-
cisco de la Osso Avenue No. 38
FOR SALE:2 door Frigidaire. 2s
cycle $75.00. Night febles. Lora
mirror. Miscellaneous items. <-
Balboa 2820. House 150 one way
street to Quarry Heights. ___
FOR SALE:1947 Ford Panel. Very
good condition, $575.00. only. Call
2-2772. Panama.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
For Batter
USED CARS
Smoot 6- Paredes
Yeur BUICK CHEVROLET Dealer
Panam.
WANTED: Clean soft rogs. Job
Dept. Panamo American.____
<
New
CHEVROLETS
ana
BUICKS
Only a few left!
Smoot Parades
Panam.
Far Better
USED CARS
Smoot & Paradas
Y.ur BUICK 6> CHEVROLET Dealer
Panam._________
-AKC eagistared bond
Clara Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Panama 3-1877. Cristobal i-1673
Gromlich's Sonto Cloro beoch-
cottaoes Electric lea coxes, gas
stoves, moderate rotev Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
HOTEL PANAMERICANO in cool El
Valle. Rootn $2.00 doily per per-
son. Meals a la Carte. Reserva-
tions. Telephone Panama 2-1112
William Santa Clara Baach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frlgldalres, Roek-
gos ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
CASINO SANTA CLARA
Cocker pup. Qtrs. 53-B, Albrook cQt,.ns. ,ood' swimming. No reservo-
6223.
LOBELL'S
Fashion ond Gift Catalog now on
sale ot all newstonds. We will handle
your orders for you at no extra cost
AGENCIAS STEER, S. A. Aportodc
731, Telephone Panamo 2-1219.
CHEVROLETS
and
BUICKS
Only a few loft!
Smoot 4> Paradee
Panam.
FOR-SALE:1950 Da Luxe Chev-
rolet 2 door. 7,000 miles, under-
cooted, duty paid. Excellent care
Coll Panamo 3-3748. ofter six.
TIRES AND TUBES: New; 11.00 x
22; 12 ply; for trucks; bargain
prices. F Icoza & Company, 7
B Avenue.
FOR SALE:Austin Sedan. 4 door
5 new tires. Perfect condition. 35
miles per gallon. Pure leather up-
holstery. Duty paid. $57500. Pe-
dro Miguel Barber Shop. 8 a. m
6 p. m.
tions necessary. Choice lots tor sola
FOR RENT
Apartments
New
CHEVROLETS
and
BUICKS
Only a few left!
Smoot 6- Parades
Panam.
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Cgton.
FOR SALE: Lionel master trans,
former, never used, "60 cycle
$25.00. 1490-D. Dohrman St.
SAVE
$245.00
LEICA
LENS 1.5
INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY
(adjoining International Hotel!
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
It is actually cheaper
to buy a
P.T.I. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Besides Protection Against
Injury, they save many
times their value In cost
of SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0148
FOR RENT: Urea aade three
bedroom oportment witfc twej
main bathrooms, diningroom, liv-{
ingraoma, diningroom. livingrooir |
prvote porch far nodrcom. ser-
vants ream wth bat, aereec
not water. Venetian blind, lacker
room under house all com-
pletely screened, also laundry ream.
Bast retieentiel eeetian. Rant $150.
00. Phone Panama 2-0027 or
3-0763.
Help Wonted
FOR SALE
Real Estate
LESSONS
Nelly and Jaime Ingram, piano
teachers. Give private lessons. Call
3-3083. appointment.
MAID WANTED:A well trained
maid and housekeeper to live in
full time. Must be able te take
full chorge of 2 little girls, ages
4-6 when required. Must hove
references. Write Box 2036 An-
cn, C. Z.
FOR SALE:Chalet three bedroom
800 M* land, situated In 13 and
R sfreet. Porque Lefevre, behind
Mueblera Ideal. Tel. 3-1216.
Be popular, leorn Ballroom Doncinc
from popular instructors. Balboc
YMCA or Box 106, Belboo. Hornett
& Dunn.
ISTHMIAN DATA
Births
FOR SALE OR RENT: Beautiful
corner lot, one block from Central
Avenue, between Jose Vollorino
and "N" Streets. 1485 Mtrs. Tel
2-1081.
Nev
CHEVROLETS
and
BUICKS
Only fa left!
Smoot 6- Parada.
Panam.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Imuedlate
Delivery.
Ttl. 8-1713
22 E 29th 8L
A WELCOME WAGON Is the latest Innovation on Albrook Air Force Base. Sponsored by the
NCtVvTiveT Clubf group? o committee call on new Albrook arrivals greeting Ihem.with a
^ft of home made pastry and a cordial welco me to the base. The committee briefs each
new arrtva. h? Information about Albrook, its activities. ^to**h}f^r$*ms '
cilitles Loans of household goods are also m ade to new arrivals until their own effects ar-
rive on the base. Last week the welcome committee greeted twenty ^Ajjjl*^^
dents.
Britain Joins US,
France In Agreeing
To Talk Disarmament
2nd Annual Caribbean Parley
Set For Florida University
FOR RENT:Two room. aportment
unfurnished, apply Via Esparto 106
across police booth, apartment 5
Position Offered
RAINFORD. Mr. and Mrs.
COME TO FLORIDA. If interested
in homes, forms, store or income
property, write H. Kleefkens, 3617
South Dole Mawbry, Tampo, Flo-
rida.
nninrunu. mi. ai*j *..,.*.-----------,---------------------------------------
Gladstone E of Colon, a daugh- \ FOR SALE, the bait, hiah and level
9 v. ii -* nr.l/N Un.n(tal I.. i _:- ?-..._ I .. ^ *
ter Nov. 21. at Colon Hospital
GRANT. Mr. and Mrs. Emilio
f Colon, a son. Nov. 22 at Colon
Hosoltal.
ST. JOHN.Mr and Mrs. Chas.
of Ft. Davis, a son, Nov. 22 at
Colon Hospital.
FERNANDEZ. Mr. and Mrs
lot a G'ineo Town, Lai Cumbres.
1089 M2 with 31 mts, fronting
highway. Price $1.80 M. Colt
Wolff & Co.. Panoma 2-2388.
UNITED NATIONS
NEEDS
BILINGUAL SECRETARY
ENGLISH-SPANISH STENOGRAPH*
FLUENT ENGLISH
2-3 weeks
' PANAMA CITY
Apply: Jane LaHerty,
Lobby: Hotel International
Thursday 2 4 a. m.
Far Batter
USED CARS
Smoot 6- Paradas
Year BUICK b CHEVROLET Deeler
Pana asi.
GAINESVILLE, Fia.. Nov. 28 panel participants will Include:
(USIS)Five key speakers, 15 PUBLIC HEALTH: A Area
PARIS Nov. 28 (UP) Bxl-1 panel .participants and scores Parro, technical advisor to the
tain today JoMied the Unlted'0l offtbtal delegates from the Venezuelan Census Bureau and
States and France in agreeing toUnjte(j states and many Latin former director of the Peruvian
private United Nntlons disarma- tuertean countries are slated to Census; Fred L. Soper, director
ment talks with Russia, leaving atten(1 tne second annual Con- of the Pan American Sanitary
enly the Kremlin to be heard ference on the Caribbean to Bureau, and Mark D. Ho'fis, s-
irom officially 'De heid December 6 B at slstantf surgeon-general of the
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei university of Florida. United States.
Vishlnsky said today: "Wait onel *h lnternati0nal LANGUAGES. LITERATEE
or two days, and it will all be ,, nt onthose good neigh-AND EDUCATION: A Torres
cl Htiah PMi..li*r of state Sel-jbors" whose1 nations comprise Rioseco professor of Spanish
taid^rdM told the Unitedithe Caribbean area, the Con- University o California. Doris
S^Hnn^oenrral AsTembirserence will feature sessions on Stone of Costa Rica, and Har-
ITmc^Umil^t^lt^ topics as Public health; ^^"^ JJ:
tha Hi Th-oe Western powers anguages, literature and edu- LAND UTnjZATiON. Ra-
acceot in principa the Pakistan- cation; land utilization; trade fael Pico, cha rman of the
Syria-Iraql proposal for Big Four transportation, and communlca- 'planning, urbanizing and ton-
talks but he added that such tions, and hemispheric rela- tag boar Puerto Rico; Ross E.
talks would hive to be subjected tions. Moore, assistant director office
to a definite time limit. Represented will be experta of foreign agricultural relatons,
He also said the Big Tnree!fr0m many fields, and among U. 8. Department of Agricul-
would have something to say on the top speakers W4U be Rwc-lure, and James G. Maddox, as-
the exact worriin? of the assign-'for rcent to be given such a Big Fourerno 0I Puerto Rico and fomer.ternational Association for Eco-
subcommittee. : Chancellor of the University of nomlc and Social Development.
The three small powers have Puerto K,co wn0 ^ nfjw pro.
proposed that the Big Four meet.fessor of ponncai science and Anf transportation
under the chairmanship J]director of the program of edu-
preslder^ of ;e General AMem-|cUon d researcn ln plan.
Ely. Mexico's V'iS0K] til im' "'"8 l " University of Chi-
to seek ways of breaking the^im-, j y
passe between'he East and west, ^ leading addresses williWythe, director, American Re-
blueprints for the reduction 01 o{ lcg Dlvlsl0n Department of,
*^Z&*$2*^'*^ State Department. John Commerce, and William L.
TA^,ffiritwrouble^waiTthatP- Harrison of the National Schurz. professor of area stud-
^w^.^^u^SSA^Ai^m. Frank K. Bell, vice ies and international relations
2m?wlUTbui^ioVSt^SKtUBlllWt of Akoa Steamship American Institute for Foreign
tti^ Co., and William O. Mauch, vice Trade. J"____
He said- "They should get to-!president of the Institute of HEMISPHERE RELATITNS:
pether Drivately to explore and I Inter-American Affairs, Educa- Alberto Lleras, secretary-gen-
eliminate thf-se semanUc dlffl-'Uonal Divisions. eral, Pan American Union: W.
culties instead of playing to the I The School of Inter-Amerl-,H. Callcott, professor of history,
ealleries of the world in tones oflcan 8tudles of the University .University of. South Carolina
1 sustained anfecr." lof Florida which is sponsoring,and C. H. Hkring prpfessor of
aa. |< *. I----------------------------if.khe conclave announced that,,history. Harvard University. ^
Radio Programs^,!*, OffpyfapgcUNCEs? BvGaibroitr,
Attempted Rape
LIN
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel r Paaaas
Offers stocks for sale: Coca
Cola Clay Products Fuerza
y Lus (common) Forestal
Products. *
Wants to buy stock of Brew-
ery" nxi.: \-*m J-ia
MODERN FURNITURE
cus ron built
Slipcover Reupbolstery
VISIT Oil SHOW-BOOM!
AJbeite ttera.
J r delaOaea-n (Aolomoklle Row)
Free Ksthaalaf Ptrkup A Delivery
Tel. 3-4MS : a-sn. u tsa tea.
TRADE. TR *.NSPORTATION.
AND COMMUIICATIONS:
Francisco Aguiire, Pan-Ameri-
can Division, American Road
Builders Association; George
I
!
FOR RENT:One bedroom apart-
ment, with kitchan. both, cedar
closet, back porch orSd livingroom
diningroom combination. Rent B.
55.00. Phone Panama 3-0763 or
2-0027.
FOR RENT
Rooms
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 Peeelo Mae*
Presents
Estwick To Be Buried
FEKNANUEZ.. Mr. ana mrs. 1
Aniceto of Gamboa, a daughter, I- M York' Memorial
Nov. 25 at Gorgas Hospital. | ,n " , HlCOIUridl
a Service Here Sunday
Of Ancon. a ion, Nov. 25 at Gor-
gas Hospital.
MORENO. Mr. and Mrs. Jose
Of Gamboa, a daughter, Nov. 25
at Gorgas Hospital.
Arrangements to bring the bo-
dv of David G. Estwick back to
Panama from New York were
McNALLY. Mr. and Mrs. Leon suspended this week owing to the
Of Colon, a daughter. Nov. 24 at
Colon Hospital.
KONOPINSKI. Mr. and Mrs
Elmer J. of Curundu Heights, a
pon. Nov. 24 at Gorgas Hospital
BOWEN, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred
Of La Boca, a dau^ter, Nov. 23
t Gorgas Hospital.
MUI.LER. Mr. and Mrs. Will- morning
lam of Balboa, a son, Nov. 24 at
Corsas Hospital.
BUDIL. Mr. and Mrs. Gilberto
Of Gamboa, a son. Nov. 22 at
Gorgas Hospital.
high cost of transportation for
the body.
Estwick. 43. died on Nov. 22,
one week after he left here for
further training in refrieeration
in the US He was scheduled to
be buried in New York this
Jilo Abaje. son, Nov. 22 at Gor-
gas Hospital.
Marriage Licenses
His wife. Mrs. Pearl Estwick,
and her three daughters here,
have arranged for a memorial
service to be held at the Bethel
BLAKE. Mr. and Mn. Allan of Mission Church in Red Tank
HICKMAN. Truitt G. of Cu-
rundu Heights, formerly of Ft. >
Worth, Texas, to GO* IOHTLY
Wary La Verne of Ft. Worth
Texas.
KROGH. Kenneh Carl of Dia-
blo Heights, formerly of Blair
Nebraska to SMITH, Judith Anne
Of Margarita.
DUDZIN3KI, Vincent Richard
Of Ft. Clayton, formerly of!
Elttsburgh. Pa., to WELTZ, Shir-
y Arm of Diablo Heights.
McCLURE. Kendal B. Jr. of Ft
Kobbe, formerly of Corpus Chrls-
U, Texas, to FITZGERALD, Mary
Frances of Diablo Heights.
STICKEL, Clarence Lee of Ft.
Clayton, formerly of Springfield,
Ohio to SANTAMARU. Margari-
ta of Panama.
DORVILLE. Norris L. of Gam-
boa to HOLDER. Edith of Gam-
boa.
Sunday at 3 p.m.
Estwick. a Barbadian, was ac-
tive among tradesmen here as a
free lance refrigeration service-
man.
T Q&ncko
Deaths
BRERETON. Katherlne, 63 of
Obispo Land Lease. Nov. 25 at
Gorgas Hospital.
REIVER, Emlle, 72. of Colon.
Nov 23 at Gorgas Hos Ital.
GORDON, William J. 57. Of
Fan ".ma, Nov. 23 at Gorgas Hos-
Itai.
am orrau
tci
J
LUNCH -
Florida Art Exhibit
In February Invites
Entries From Panam
A representative cross-section
of creative arts in America to-
day will result from the unique
Florida International Art Ex-
hibition for professional art-
ists, teachers and amateurs, to
be held in February 1952, at
the Florida Southern College.
Lakeland. Florida. The college
Is inviting entries from Pan-
ama.
There will be no rejections
all work submitted will be ex-
hibited. However, there will be
an Awards Jury with a distin-
guished panel of thirty artista
representing all styles and
schools of art, hich will award
prizes totaling over $5,000ot
which $1,800 is in cash. Addi-
tional cash awards are to be
announced. All media may be
submitted.
Florida 8outhem College is
giving $1,000 in cash awards to
teachers, professional and ama-
teur artists, as well as one full
and a one-half art scholarship,
with a value of over $1.400.
The exhibition will be hung
on the walls of one of seven
bulldinKS designed by Frank
Lloyd Wright, the new $350.000
Industrial Arts Hall.
Exhibitors will welcome this
opportunity to show their
work in this new "Art Center
of the South."
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, eoo
aatirary rcnovoted ana' well tar-
nished. Rates reasonable. Bache-
lors only. Inooire at Tfca Aane-
rican Club facing Da Lessepr
Park.
FOR RENT:Furnished small bun-
galow, on Sobonas moin rood.
Very reasonable nice home for
on American bachelor only. Box
57, Ancon. C. Z.
FOR RENT:Furn shed room, 4tr-
Of Jury No. 49.
Bethel Mission
Presents Drama
Tomorrow Night
Today. Wedneaday, Nov. 28
PJM.
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music for Wednesday
4:15French m the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00The Jack 8mlth Show
(VOA)
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Paul Temple (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7-45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and commentary by
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Twenty Questions (VOA)
8:45 Arts and Letters (VOA)
9 00The Jo Stafford Show
(VOA) /ro>>v
9:15Radio Forum fVOAt
Of Gamboa Girl
Upon a complaint brought to
the Canal Zone police by the
godmother of a 14-year-old Pa-
namanian girl, Tefilo Vergara
was charged in the Balboa
Magistrate's court this morning
with assault with attempt to
commit rape.
Vergara. a 24-year-old Pana-
manian, was allegedly found In
the home of the complainant
in Gamboa, locked in a room
with the young girl.
Bail has been set at $500 and
the case was continued Friday
afternoon at 1:30.
Policeman Prduces
Fool-Proof Pistol
9' 30Commentator's Digest
9-45Sports and Tune of Day
, (VOA) .
10:00-The BBC Playhouse
(BBC)
A drama entitled ''The Good klO: 30Foreign Policy Address By
Pres. Truman Samaritan" will be portrayed
Friday night by the Salem Mis- li:00The Owl' Meat
sion Church of Coln at the Be-
thel Mission Church, Red Tank.
MidnightSign Off.
Thurselay. Me. 2
The drama portrays the Bible j
story of the man on the road to a. ooAlarm Clock Club
Jericho who fell among thieves 7-30Mornlng 8alon
and was shown mercy by a good
Samaritan.
Admission to- the church will
t:15-MKW8 (VOA)
g:30Craay Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presenta
LOS ANGELES (U.P.)-Trage-
dies involving a loaded pistol in
the hands of children mav be a
thing of the past, according to
a Los Angeles policeman-inven-
tor. Tex Bjorklund.
Biorklund has invented a tie-
vice which locks the trigger of a
pistol and prevents cocking the
weapon. It U ln two pieces one
of which fits into one side of
the trigger guard with a cog
which locks the trigger. The oth-
er piece is placed on the opposite
side and locked in with a key
Disclosure of Bjorklund s in-
vention followed a tragedy here
tn which a child discharged his
father's pistol, killing his young-
er brother and seriously wound-
ing his mother.
Cream of Tomato Soup or
Headcheese a la Vinagretta
Swedish eUMehaar
Maihed Potatoes
Mixed Vegetables
Hot Rolls It Butter
Salad Dessert
Coffee Tea Beer
Join as lor Cocktails
from 4 to 8 pjn
MANHATTANS
Admission w tne cnurcn wui :nn_nrw(i
be free but the audience will be J:?SZsjLcRBD HEART PRO-
asked for voluntary donations to-, 9-1*^!'E
ward a new church building j ?rflL, rt
110:00 BJEWB
In addition to the drama a pr^^0:%r2XLe Recrd
gram of songs and instrumental J:0""*.?. r,0.{aa iContd)
renditions will be offered. The U:05-O the Record (conio.)
program includes a saxophone111 :N>-Mgct "* S"0
solo by Miss V. Noad. pieces byiMoonMEWS
the Salvation Army Band and fJM,
songs by tile choirs of the two U;et^Lunhan M0
churches.
CZ International Girl
Scouts Actively Scllint
martinis
daiquiris
25 c.
APffi iZERi, "On The House'
kTWUlaJV il.H'V.i; tTVIfJII
Those desiring further Infor- mation about the exhibition. *** Km AianiK SM*
entry blanks, or rules for the
exhibitors, should write to Miss
Donna M.s toddard, Director
of Art Department, 925 East
Lexington Street. Lakeland,
Florida. Entry blanks must be
mailed back before December
31, 1951 and the entries them-
selves should be received by
January 15, 1952.
Paintings should not exceeei
36 by 40 Inches including the
frame, and It is advisable to
send the paintings unframed
because U. 8. Customs Regula-
tions provide the duty-free ad-
m'-'on of ordinal works of
art, but not of the frames.
"How much longsr doss thla dlst of yourt last? My frtonda
are telling me I look terrible:"
The International Girl Scouts
of the Canal Zone are selling
Christmas seals, to help In tne
fight against tuberculosis, for the
first time this year, according to
reports submitted by Mrs. A. O.
Turner. Atlantic side chairman
of the Girl Scout wganlzation.
The gtrla are directed In their
activities by Mrs. V. asssptatt Sil-
ver City chairman and Mis. L M.
Dawson. chairman of the inter-
national Girl Scouts in Gata,
irnaTrt^Ta^a
12:10 Popuar Music
1:00MEWS ^_
l:li_PersonaIlty Parade
I;ajaL_EXC^iaSIOMS W SCI-
ENCE >
;raj_Cll for Lea Paul
2:I5-D*ta for P***?,^
2 J4-AfUrnoon Melodies
ttS^stU* Of *****
tM^UtuU lor Thursday
4 osCMaaUc Wtttaoot Words
4:ae>-Wlit*B &*52i*
ffcSST .**om
Some Hone Winners
Just Don't Care Much
LOUISVILLE, Ky- 'UP
Some people who go to the races
bet and win. never bother to pick
up their earnings.
Churchill Downs reported that
It has been holdings for more
than two years $16380S9 in un-
claimed parl-mutuel winning
Durlne the soring 'ctnB.n2*?t
in 1149 $12.414.60 worth of tickets
were left at the tsevefc.__________
(VOA)
SPORTS
-a
:46Jam Session (VOA)
9:00Meet Eleanor Roosevelt
(VOA) ...
9 -30Commentator's Digest
VOA) ^
4V-Sports Tune of Day and
Ntws (VOA)
lOOt-BXTTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical interlnde
10.30-Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The Owls Nest
12:00Sign Off.
Esstanatioa ! fJysabsb
VOA-Voke of Anierlea
BBC^Brttish Broadcasting
r-<>nf*menns:;'5 : , ***** VB A .BOT-Bl^lfiusloirPrancalss
..auswedto tbe trotter, aide, while brushing Sunnybrook, (NEAJ
Aeir community.


HwM
TONESDAY, NOVEMBER , 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SETEH
Railroaders Object To Arbitrators,
fa!k Out Of Wage Dispute Hearing
IN HOLLYWOOD
Y ERSKINE JOHNSON
NBA SUll Correspondent
" 'T lui
talked out yesterday on oMn-( walked. m_ statement.
Iig hearings of a Presidents 11 In an openm^ attorney
Imergency board trying to set- Hetes f "^ *, member of
I tne union's two-year wage Arw,rf J^e? formal pro-
fispute with the railroads, the ooaro. a unB" d gr0.
Ihree board members "* ^^ond iernlir. he said,
[barged that it Is tryingto A W wmr'0 ,everal
fecSo^S STafi? wMCtoi2K^f* another. Brotherhood
Bv BEN COOK
HOLLYWOOD-(NBA)-Elu-1 i"atdon-t want to werk that
slvely Yours: v.r
concerned" ^IS^i,! ..hit *-Th took a' bounce back to a movie career, career that a lot of fans are go-
HelM aid the union Hi h*i-" he te"LMid there's a I Ing to be astonished to discover
availablefor "consultation" bul look at me and said, ,n*l Prlnted reports that Bill Ben- tht he's a funny man.
wl not return to the hearing, tragic laee. and I got slue* *"|dlx walked out of a Movietime I The one-time amateur boxer is
wats, asa 3^pftaustsisaras: sks^sss
,. railroad said "we proposeij",*"""," :tK.',n.i.w|me: . ,.._._
[Panama Canal Clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
BALBOA
Air-Condltloned
:1S S:te
Bob HOPE lilcl BALL
'Fancy Pants" (Technicolor)
______aim showinf Tuaagead
DIABLO HT5.
SIS 7:U
Paul HKNHKID a Jack OAKIS
"Last of The Buccaneers
(TtchnlTtor'
Thnf^Ay^TYOirr_iaLAND
Johnnv W1ISSMULLER Ann SAVAGE
"PYGMY ISLAND"
WlfTr TF U"PKCTOK IIKe-
r- " b n i "obrt pxmton cJSr i*1*. .
& A MB V A The c,utujowner," (Ttcnn/co/or)
Tnyffr "THE CrW AT_CAJWIt COCOLI
ill ':*
* -
Jeanne Crain at 20th Century* I
mnnat a HsrrlSbura Pa., cnurcn. "" "" -J ........- jrainu- i/iaui >! wui ^=mj
strike of four of the natas sent board, inum em ...__. .,..
iiiOriPITl Constance WNITT rue. CABOT
M5Gi? "WILD BILL HICKOK RIDES'
2 taitiai-tp 'f H M rA"
hajor railroads for Nov. 8. But
Jhe walkout was postponed for
It least 80 days when President
San Diego attorney George employes. ^ ^^ ^ HejM
ChCythrd board member and said ^ftUSU g
fruman named a board - * JK olr'Northwestern settlement of carrier-proposed
lelay which is not affected by Mughtrty or on, ^ cnang on individual
^For tLse reason. Hela railroad,
said, "the employes cannot he
"I've lived In too many Joints, surprUe t0 Brady.
for that. The true story is that| ,, alwavs been a comedian,
the, arrangements were fouled up d ,T M,d a
and when I arrived In New Yoik aen.ran _. the top of m
lesterday's action.
1 Brotherhood attorney Harold
Heiss said the union 'can-
lot believe that the appoint-
ment of thi board is a sincere
:ffart to settle this dispute.
Heiss then picked up hU pa-
much, generally at the top of my
voice but nobody ever seemed to
be listening."
I was told there wasn't anything
for me to do,"
The rules change, he aid,
said, euipivj r-""--t .: The rules changes, ne a"[^r i KrtehtlT*"r'You're Barry Sullivan.
Heve that, the apnointmant^oi , ,ne ..ch)fjf roaJWockln the J^1**,0" rveouT voice any.-
vJouUi "touch where. You always talk that way
this board la a slneere effort
to settle this dispute. *'
the members of this board
path idwardsettlement
He aid they would
the pocbrtbaok, the hopping
bags ^"and result in dwloca-
on of the home life of a aub-
stantlal number of employes.
press Interviews.
"The last time I was there I
talked to the press so much that
I wound up with larynglU. I
called the hotel switchboard girl,
trained my vocal chords and
whispered: 'Can you understand
me?'" . *y ny^/ecreTan'where his pencil ihU comedy role were shown in
Of couri." said the girl JJ>.^ffidw^ur ear" she the studio projection room. Dar-
rrv Sullivan.:was. ii.^oem y^ 8napped'TVl F. Zanuck the boss man of
"^C the executive, "I'm a buay man.;a5th Century -Fox, slippedla v-
Which ear?" en-year contract under Brady s
wnicn ear/ f # # rj^ Zanuck ^ ^ slgngture t0
Pint cameraman abeat Maur- an Mreement calling for art(lat
that Nina Foch 0>Hara: -Her face is her fer- one picture a year, in addition to
ftfl become Mrs V^'"and be" tune." Second cameraman: the two a year Brady muit make
CRISTOBAL
Alr-rondlll.innl
ichrd WIDMARK Dan ANDREWS
"THE FROGMEN"
AIM abawini TnurwUyl
I
in your pictures."
The bet are on that Nina Foch
te ^jgWh2^ft,S 5vIradybaaUIia5^ra^**w rdy think eomedy .
mn more than 50 cenw _kl __.,__ ,___,i,, u><, ,-;-.< nn *:"''._"___juIZ .
MU There's a buzz that t le ringj ^'^ZaZSlSg *-
houc over Wbat tney receiv ^ ,. Laurie's engagement.finger E-T, that thev both depend
J ^0el,M.farr'?nhaMTV vMstoof1!^^ Charlea MmontUI. alJI ff?AS He said:
h^amoSerU"TVB^Mrs"i Publicity man in New York. ?Take any single comedy line
^rnhcr" Kulkovlch. working on(Wnai oo you nave
CENTRAL
TODAY
WEEK BND RELIA8E
Shews:
1:M. 2:40. 4:47, :M, :!
TODAY
$4.18 ovar 1950. Data from U. 8. Treawrr Deo.rtm.nt.
In his opening statement for
the railroad. Neltaert aid trie
' railroads proposed rulea chang-
es to achieve a 40-hour week.
He added, however, that the
union ba bean resisting ef-
! forts "to eliminate ieatherbed-
dlng, unreasonable, unearned
and special allowances, and
pay for time not worked and
services not performed."
Chairman Dougherty aid he
does not know whether the-
hearings will continue beyond
the carriers' opening statement
which Is expected to be com-
pleted today. .
I (law wwmm m hp wm
he told me. "I told 'em I would
have to give up movie. Look, I
Defense Spending Ourtrips
Unites States9 Tax Take
uiifiHivnTON Nov 28 (UP)iW. Snyder may have to aak
hat size would exert it'-tro- rent 1
nendous lnftlonary pressure,
resident Truman is expectea
arfltlY ON lK1P BV OSWALD JACOBY
Written lex NBA Serviee
due In Uarch. Snyder eMtaat-
ed recentry-t^nh^l^lfcW
will conUno^to-elhnb 4a abO\W
ji $7,800,000,04 by next June 30
hrd time 4neee- *""' ^he're nag ^^ n0 afflgUl
' But"8 Congressional ; leaders! Treasury^estimate y.t of the
lve will be to finance the coat- $80,000,000,000.
y rearmament program thru
tond.sales and other forms of
Government borrowing, which
will end the public debt soar-
the debt now stands at *25g.-
104.158,199.
If It continues to rUe at the
ate which appears likely, Sec
etary

i
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aet atk
Pass 1*
Pw SN.T.
107(3 I
"Bomber" Kulkovich. working on-j-; -^^ordage that faUs flat
? 1!iXSS^m^S?^mSP^*^^ ,iming and
- i. __ !... mim nnlneaal T_
Stra
ona
ALFREO HITCHCXK'S
pie-hurt or the super-colossal I-
can't-stand-it?"

Note from Alan Wilson: "Just
read where Ava Gardner lost
seven pounds. Does this means
she's gotten rid of Sinatra?
The Treasury, on the other
hand, ha* calculated that the,
Svernment will take In about
J.500,000.000 during fiscal 1953
under present tax laws.
That would leave a deficit
of more than 11.500,000,000 to
be added to the $,5o0,000,o00
Narta
If
!?
4N.T.
Pass
Opeaiac le.4 ?*
West
Fats
N.T. Double
A COCKTAIL DRESS, worn by
Janis carter, star of Howard
iiugnee' Technicolor film, "Fly-
ing Leathernecks." an Bdmund
Oralnger production for RKO
Radio. Designed by Ernest
Newman of Beverly Hills, dress
Is imported French lace trim-
med with matching beads, In
shades from French nude at
fitted bodice to rich copper at
the hem.
'ol thrTreasury' John p VxpVcted In ftocal 1952.
' ormer Admiral Counters
itory Of A-Plant Loafing
Sometime It is very easy to, RICHMOND.Va. (UP'Appar-,
find the moral in a bridge hand, ently city fathers here arer,it;too
Virtue is rewarded or crime is i sure that the horse-and-buggy
punished, and everybody can; daysi won't return. The city-wan-
feel satisfied. But I'm having a, oil okayed moving ahorse-water-
terrible time finding the moral,ing fountain from a busy dow
of the han dshown today. town Intersection but stipulated
North's bid of tour no-trumptht It be relocated a few blocks,
was intended as part ot thai away.
Backwood convention. South was
humor, someone who wasn't
stamped as a comic." h said.
'We weren't sure about Brady
until we made a test, and then
there was never any doubt.''
Cukor has an explanation for
' the fact that Holly wood does not
I develop many new comedians. He
Tyrone- Power asked for a re-; say| there are few young men
write on 'Diplomatic Courier arovnd with a sense of humor.
and some of the important actors i "^vtTy0ne seems to take him-
ln the flicker are screaming... \s^i qulte seriously." he said. "It
George. Raft has found another! be wlth good reason, for
film to substitute for 'The Hood- hft^ are MllQUS times."
lum Empire," the picture he bolt- Bradv says he had no trouble
ed. He'll star in "Loan Shark Ior, dtveiopmg a sense of humor. It
Producer Ed Levin. ^ I wft8 pounded Into him.
Recommended listening: Capl-j
tol's 'Hark! The Years!,"narrat-I
ed by Fredrlc March, the best of
the volces-out-of-the-past al-:
bums.

Will Russell Nype join Ether
Merman In Hollywood now that
Fox has purchased "Call Me Ma-
dame"? Nype was Imported to
MOM for Young Man In a Hur-
ry," then replaced by Olenn Ford
and shipped back to New York.
"I don't think his film career is
WMbed up." Producer William,
Wright ot MG'M tew me. "He was,
miscast. The role was a demand-1
ing oneone of the biggest parts |
Pvi ever seen. It was Josf too
much for a Broadway Juvenile.

Denlse Darcel on rumors that1
. she may remarry Peter Crosby:
"Oh, no. no, no! I haven t even
seen him since the divorce."
Could the French star ever
marry again and "le down?
"Maybee," she winked, I could
settle down and go a little beet
and take my husband along,
maybee.."
Trai
FHOM
WARNER
BROS.
jMMMro
LUX
TODAY!
A SPECIAL PROGRAM!
to
to
to
WASHINGTON. Nov, 28 (UPt | ment MietU
La special Investigator told a does not have
Souse-Senate committee today -he matter
hat recruiting arrangements
with the AFL have cut hiring
posts at the Savannah River
itomlc energy plant "very
nuch" but also have caused
adverse crltlclam." '
This report was made by Carl
fc Cotter, a Charlotte, N. C,
construction engineer, to Sen
supposed to bid five clubs
show no ace; five diamonds,
.show one ace; five hearts,
that the.union;show two aces; and o on.
a monopoly In North's idea was quite reason-
making recosa- of the hand shown today.
me'nfaFlons for employment... in live diamond whether or not
and that It assumes no obliga- south had an ace even though no
PRERELEASE
p. TODAY!
-- at the -
TROPICAL
tion whatever to emplov per
sons recommended to the Job,
by the union,"
Maybank made the report
Subllc as the committee met
ehind closed doors with offi-
cials of the Atomic Energy Com-
gssrr ass: -**. =.. -*. r-
Ehairman of the Joint Con
iresslonal "watchdog" comralt-
ee on defense production.
Cotter said the project "is In
japahle and experienced hand"
ind that work so far has been
'very commendable."
Maybank had asked Cotter, a
[retired Nvv rear admiral, to
niake a special Investigation as
i result of published charges
of S S raSTat the big ^o*S**j. - con-
project in the Augusta, Ga.-
Aiken, S. C, area.
The House Labor Committee
ilso has been investigating the
project. It heji hearings recent-
y at Augusta.
said about 17,800 em- operations somewhat In ad-
nloves'are working at the site, vanee of projected schedule.
.,.,. .h,,u 9\ Labor "Work stoppages
Be said ^employmenl; should
reach a oe9k of 52,000 by Oc-
tober, 1952.
The ranort said the prime
contractor for tt plant, E. I
pupont De Nemours, "does not]
maintain recruiting offices In manda "that an hour's work be
gress In the defense program.
Cotter reported that:
"It can be concluded that the
protect Is In capable and ex-
perienced hands, that the In-
terests ot the government are
being constantly given para-
mount consideration and that a
very commendable job thus far
has been don. by the prime
contractor and associates on
atructlon phases,"
Other highlight of Cotter's
report:
1) Progress Grading and
drainage "according to sched-
ule" and "concrete-placement
2) _
have been negligible." One
walkout by electricians was set-
tled the next day.
3) Loafing Adequate check
on time work. The company de-
yarlous cities.- a custoi
cedure on projects of
nltude."
Cotter sold the AFL
larv pro
mag-
is
performed for each hour' nay
41 Safety Accident record
.lower than average for almllar
used protects.
bj management as a recruiting
organization and makes recom-
mendations for filling man-
power requirements."
He said "management con-
Isiders that a reault ot thl
arrangement,, recruiting costs
re very much lower than they
would be otherwise."
There have been charges that
this arrangement violates the pirateo ror xne man* ana *vu.- o-. "---"-; -rc~ Bnrt" There
K-clo ns ofi^O^more^U ^ed^which,.^ ^/i^gi^
would probably be set If South
were aceless. H. wanted to be in
a slam If South had more than
one ace.
The trouble is that North's bid
ot four no-trump is not necessar-
ily a Backwood bid. Some experts
would say it Is, and others would
say it Is merely a raise in no-
trump. Since North and South
had not discussed this situation,
It was probably foolish for North
to bid tour no-trump. Foolish-
ness should be.punished.
South was well aware that the
bid of four no-trump might be
conventional. South wa also a-
ware of the fact that he held
only one ace. A prudent player
would bid five diamond with a
partner whose meaning was not
clear. South was greedy nd
therefore bid six no-trump. Greed
should be punished, too.
West began the punishment by
doubling six no-trump. Then he
led the ace of clubs. His plan was
to follow it up with the ace of
hearts, but he became greedy
when he saw the dummy. There
was lot of time to take the ace
ot hearts, he thought, o he led
another club in the hope that a
really big set might develop.
When West led the lack of
clubs at the second trick. South
won In his own hand, discarding
a heart from dummy. He next
cashed his remaining good club,
discarding another heart from
the North hand. Then he ran
all of the diamonds, saving three
spades in his own hand; whe
dummy saved two hearts and a
8PPo"r West had to aavo the ace
ot hearts and therefore had to
part with a spade. Thereupon
81 Waste -r "It appears evi-
dent that management Is cost
conscious" and Is trying to hold
costs down.
6> Sscurjrr Security men
"evidently well trained, tnor-
ough and polite."
71 Cat$1,260.000 being spent
eaeh week for labor. A total of
8856,000,000 has been appro-
r ,r-u!rSnd'K: &?&*%**$:
(th Taft-Hartlev labor law.
But Cotter said that 'manage- June 30, 1962.
idas suffer in a case like this.
TODAY
PANAMA CITY
THEATRES
Present
LUX T H f ATRB ==
Prisoner In her own homr for almost on* jrrl
The roort driinatic piir!e in Ule nnli
o crime.
"KIND LADY"
witk Ethel Berrvmore
AIM: M Minute with your fvorlUi Stan!
"THE M-G-M STORY"
CENTRAL
Shaw: l:M- 24*.
4 47. S:S4. :! >.
Farley Granger,
Ruth Roman, In
"STRANGERS
ON A TRAIN"
LOTTERY AT
BELLA VISTA
LATIN DAY!
'Skew; 1:30 lit IM
7:H H pJB.
CANTINFLAS
The jjre.it Mexican co-
median in his best pic-
ture! .
"E 7 HACHOS"
CECILIA THEATRE
Tropical romance lindan1 the moon of
the Smith Sea* . !
"PAGAN LOVE SONG"
Un Tehmcolorl>
Ethr WILLIAMS Hew*** HtML
StanMi
TROPICAL
"I WAS AN AMERICAN SPY"
- with --
ANN DVORAK and GENE EVANS
ETHCL
BARRYMORE EVANS
rwkwt Sim* rm Is s
ret HeHywoe*- fila------s
-i AHMIA Urn
LANSBURY III
Plus:
SPECIAL ATTRACTION:
"THE M-G-M STORY"
60 Minutes with your favorite
starsPreTiew ot 25 outstand-
ing forth coining pictures. In-
cluding first scenes of "Quo
Vadls." ^___
STARS! GLITTER!
SPECTACLE!
Tomorrow!
WHEN WORLDS COLUOK"
ENCANTO THiATRE
Al? CMdlttoaeS
~Tom Ncal Margo, In
"BEHIND THE
RISING SUN"
Also:
George Raft, In
"Dangerous rrefeaalan^
CAPITOLIO THIATRE
Three flrrt Chapter of new
Thrilling Serial!
"PIRATES of HIGH SEAS"
lU-Kjolpf Scott, in
"WALKING HILLS"
Chi'I SUrreti. In
"ROBIN HOOD OF THE
RANGE"
TIVOLI THEATRE VICTORIA THEATRE
ank Niriirn siee.ee "re
At lrl-1* p.m.
"Breaktkrnurti" with David Brian
Stc < Cocbrane. In
INSIDE THE WALLS OF
Johnny Weissmuller, In
"SWAMP EIRE"
John Payne. In
"El_P_ASO^__
Dog Tired Dave
David was a aasy feUew.
Marine never left hiss eaeUaw!
Wara eat. weai., tired aad -ra*.
Way not read o.r Waal Ads Dave?


PAGE EIGHT

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 11
White Sox, Browns Swing Eight-Player Exchange]
AID TO THE ENEMYThe Cleveland club obtained the services
of Bob (Sugar) Cain in a front-office, off-season job. of selling sea-
son tickets, and the Detroit pitcher gets inrtructions from President
Ellis Ryan. Cain is in the odd position of working for the outfit
which did most to knock the Tigers out of the first division. The
left-hander was given the post so he could be near his fiancee, Judy
Stevens, whom he will marry Dec I.. (NBA)
Nation's College
Grid Standings
BIG SEVEN CONFERENCE
League AU Games
W L W L T fW OPI
6 0 7 2 0 280 91
5 1 7 3 0 289 229
2 7 2 0 275 180
4 4 4 1 212 216
4 1 7 1 73 228'
4 2 7 0 141 251,
Okla.
Colorado 5
Kansas 3
Iowa State 2
Nebraska 1
Missouri 1
SKYLINE CONFERENCE
Utah
Wyoming 5
Denver 4
Colo. A&M 3
Brig. Yo'ng 2
Utah St. 2
Montaa 1
New Mex. 1
Leagne
W L W L
1
1
3
3
3
3
4
4
AU Games
T PF OP!
0 236 247
220 82'
283 138
242 157,
214 184,
148 1591
108 266|
194 249
Clemson Accepts Gator Bowl
Invitation Against S.C. Denial
SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE
League All Games
W L W
5
7
5
7
3
5
4
TCU
Eaylor
Rice
Texas
SMU
Arkansas
Tex. A&M 0
L
4
1
4
2
5
5
3
T PF OP
0 186 161
1 197 101
0 136 110
0 161 107
1 162 131
0 177 162
2 191
158
SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE
League All Games
W L W L
0
Ga. Tech
Tennessee
L. S. U.
Mississippi
Kentucky
Auburn
Vanderbilt
Georgia
Florida
Miss. State 2
Alabama 2
Tulane
9
9
6
5
7
5
6
5
5
4
5
4
T PF OP
1 230 70
0 338 61
1 114 98
1 205 150
0 294 114
0 173 187
0 174 160
0 170 136
0 172 131:
0 75 78
0 232 181'
0 130 158'
(NEA Telephoto)
VICTORY SHOWER Jubilant Illinois football players hold coach Ray Elliott under a show-
er to celebrate their winning the Big Ten championship and the Rose Bowl trip' by beating
Northwestern, 3-0, at Evanston, 111.
SOUTHERN CONFERENCE
League All Games
By ED COINS
United 1 ress Sports Writer
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Nov. 28
Clemson College agreed yester-
day to play Mk.iiii in the Gator
Bowl, becoming the sfrond mem-
ber to rebull the Southern Con-
ference on its anti-bowl stand
and assuring a December show-
down in that loop on the burn-
In-: de-emphasis issue.
Clemson accepted the Jack-
sonville invitation even though,
the conference denied it permis-
sion to particioate. In that re-
spect the South Carolina college
went even farther than Maryland'
did in accepting the Sugar Bowl
bid. Maryland didn't r.sk the con-
ference for permission.
Southern Conference Com-
missioner Wallace Wade com-
mented that Clemson may
have violated a conference by-
law requiring members to have j
loop permission to play in a
post-season bowl.
Clemson thus would be thei
first member to violate the by-
law, adopted several years ago.!
Maryland is expected to apply I
formally for permission to play}
Tennessee at New Orleans Jan. 1
when the copference directors
meet at Richmond Dec. 14.
Wade said he "couldn't even|
gunss" what the conference ac-i
tion would be on Clemson's deci-1
sion but under the by-laws it
could mean expulsion from the
loop.
In advising Gator Bowl offi-
cials here of Its acceptance,
Clemson acknowledge that It was
making the Jan. 1 date although
the Southern Conference had re-
fused to sanction it.
After deciding at a meeting
of the athletic council, which
included Clemson President Dr.
R. F. Poole, to accept the invi-
tation, the college "asked the
Southern Conference officially
' in the usual way for its ap-
proval," said Faculty Athletic
Chairman Dr. Lee Milford in a
statement later yesterday at
Clemson, S.C.
"But the Southern Conference
did not approve our request," Mil-
ford said. "This Is the first time
In the history of the Southern
Conference that a member insti-
tution has been denied this priv-
ilege."
The council then again studied
the "various issues that have
brought about the unusual denial
of the Southern Conference of
members participating in a bowl
game on New Year's Day," Mil-
lord said.
"President Poole has consulted
every member of the college
trustees and upon our recom-
mendation they have given their
hearty approval of our accepting
a bowl bid," he added.
But Milford said the accept-
ance of the bid without the cus-
tomary approval "is not Intend-
ed in any way to be a defiance of
the action of the Southern Con-
ference,"
Southern Conference directors
adopted an anti-aowl policy at a
meeting just as the current foot-
ball season began and agreed to
ratify it as a conference rule at
the December meeting in Rich-
mond.
It was believed Clemson, as
well as Maryland, might make a
new bid for official sanction to
po through with the Jan. 1 dates
liut both appeared determined to
play with or without It. If re-
fused, they might walk out of the
conference or be expelled, de-
priving the loop of two of its
strongest members.
When Maryland agreed to
flay at New Orleans, Coach
im Tatum remarked that the
school was violating "a regu-
lation that is not in existence"
since permission had never
been denied a member to play
in a bowl.
This year's de-emphasis pro-
gram sprang up after a scandal
at William and Mary led to the
resignation of the school's pres-
ident as well as the football
coach, Rube McCray. Clemson
was the olv school to vote
against the subsequent anti-bowl
stand. Maryland and Washing-
ton & Lee abstained.
The ciemson-Miaml game will
be a rematch of last New Year's
Orange Bowl opponents. Clemson
won that one 15 to 14. This sea-
son the Carolina Tigers won sev-
en and lost only to College of Pa-
cific and South Carolina. They
completed their season by wal-
loping Auburn 34 to 0.
Miami has won six and lost two
but still has Nebraska and Pitts-
burgh to play.
W
Maryland 5
Va. Mill.
Wm.&M'ry
Wash&Lee
Clemson
Duke
Wake For.
So. Car.
Geo. Wash
West Va.
No. Car.
Citadel
Furman
N. Car. 8t.
Davidson .
U. of Rich.
Va. Tech
L
0
3
3
4
2
4
4
4
5
5
8
6
6
7
8
8
8
220
188
83
157
142
T PF OP
0 353 62
0 227 162
O 172
0 281
0 193
1 201
0 200
0 175 135
1 109 206
0 225 190
0 120 224
183 209
182 179
141 203
91 248
100 245
87 299
Hair, Smith Unanimous Choices
On U.P. Ail-So. Carolina Team
COLUMBIA, S.C, Nov. 28 (UP) i day, with the Tigers' great pass- are honorary co-captains by ylr-
South Carolina and Clemson i ng duo the only unanimous cue of being named on all the
each grabbed four spots on the choices. ;bal'ots cast by the sports editors!
United Press All-South Carolina Tailback Billy Hair and his -nd directors of the United Press
football team announced Tues-iohief target, end Glenn Smith,, newspapers and radio stations.
Red Sox Deny Williams
For DiMaggio Swap Set
By UNITED PRESS
NEW YORK, Nov. 28.The Chicago Whiti
Sox and St Louis Browns have swung an eighl
player deal.
The White Sox shipped first
baseman Gordon- Goldsberry,
outfielder Jim Rivera, catcher
Gus Niarhos, right-hander Dick
Llttlefleld and reserve lnflelder
Joe DiMaestri to the Browns. In
return, the White Sox got catch-
er Sherm Lollar, right-hander Al
Wldmar and shortstop Tommy
Upton.
Chicago General Manager
Frank Lane says Lollar will give
the White Sox more strength be-
hind the plate and at bat.
"Injuries to our catching staff,"
says Lane, "forced us to over-
work Niarhos and Phil Masi. -Our
combined catching staff drove in
45 runs in 155 games. Lollar drove
in 44 in 97 games."
S^.; Briefs
By UNITED PRESS
BIG TEN CONFERENCE
(Final)
League
W L W I.
0 8
Illinois
Purdue 4
Wisconsin 5
Ohio State 2
N'west'm 2
Minnesota 1
Indiana 1
Iowa
All Games
T PF OP
7 170 76
0 152 152
Princeton
Columbia 5
Penna'. 3
Cornel! 3
Dartmouth 2
Brown 1
Harvard 1
Yale 0
IVY LEAGUE
(Final)
League
W L W
196 53
109 104
102 124
162 258
118 191
161 232
DES MOINESThe Drave Uni-
versity athletic council met yes-
terday to consider the Johnny
Bright case.
Bright, the nation's all-time
leading ground gainer, suffered
a broken Jaw in the Drake-Okla-
homa A. and M. game. Drake
charges Bright was slugged In-
tentionally by Aggie tackle Wll-
banks Smith. The Missouri Val-
ley Conferenceto which both
schools belongsays it will not
take action in the matter.
next season. The Lumberjacks
are in the C)as s"D" Wisconsin
State Baseball League.
o
1
l
3
4
3
4
5
All Gams
T PF OP
0 310 82
149 103
121 117
207 139
121 152
110 208
143 266
126 131
DETROITThe Detroit Tigers
have bought two more farm
clubs.
Directors of the Buffalo base-
ball club yesterday ratified the
sale of their International
League franchise to the Tigers.
And the Tigers will take over
the Wasau, Wisconsin Lumber-
Jacks "lock, stock and barrel"
ULSA
Drake
MISSOURI VALLEY
CONFERENCE
League All Games
W L W L
Sports Shorties
By UNITED PRESS
The sentencing of three for-
mer Bradley basketball players
accused of "fixing" games has
been postponed until December
7. Gene Melchlorre, Bill Mann
and George Chiankis were to
have been sentenced yesterday,
but Judge Saul Strelt postponed
it to await probation reports on
the trio.
Okla. A&M 3
Houston 2
Detroit 2
Wichita 2
Bradley 0
7
7
3
4
4
2
4
T PF OP
0 304 106
0 187 107
0 162 210
0 201 193
0 115 229
0 74 200
G 192 139
. Minor League Baseball Presi-
dent George Trautman says he
has received $500 for the fund he
is raising for one-time Olympic
hero Jim Thorpe. The 63-year-
old Thorpe is almost penniless.
BORDER CONFERENCE
League All Games
W L W
5
6
6
5
3
2
1
Tex. Tech 4
Hard.-Slm. 4
ASC T'pe 4
Arizona 4
Tex. West. 3
W. Tex: St. 1
N Mex AM 1
ASC F'st'f 0
L
4
4
3
5
7
7
9
7
T PF OP
0 248 134
1J7 155
308 176
214 249
152 241
131 249
115 337
76 211
PACIFIC COAST CONFERENCE
League All Games
A committee of the North Cen-
tral Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools will meet in
Chicago this Saturday. It will
discuss ways to enforce what it
calls the "high standards" In
college athletics.
Stanford
U. C. LA.
California
So. Cal.
Wash. St.
Ore. 8tate
Wash'ton
Oregon
Idaho____.
W
9
5
8
7
7
4
3
2
2
T PF OP
0 222 141
1 188 120
0 307 166
0 229 176
0 280 187
0 204 180
1 283 218
0 130 317
0 109 182
$10,000.00 Stock of
LINOLEUMS
just received' All tee rags and
yard goods. More than 100 dif.
ferent designs. Choose yours
today.
Mueblera El Diablo
The Store where yon will find
the largest assortment of'Glass
and Linoleums."
M Central Avc Tel. 2-2465
"Leaders In the Furniture
Business since 1909."
Open 'till 9 p.m. during
December.
Don't Neglect Slipping
FALSE TEETH
Do UIm teeth drop, lip or wobble
when you talk. eat. laugh or neeie?
Don't be annoyed and embarraaaed by
uch handicap! rASTEFTH, an alkalis*
(non-acid) powder to iprinkle on your
Dlatea. keepa fata teeth more firmly
t. Give confident feeling of aecurlty
hd added comfort. No gummy, gooey,
paity taat* or feeling. Get FASTTKTH
today at any drug atora.

ALL
DRINKS
sold
at
Vz
price
from 3 to 7 p.m.
EVERY DAY
The Boston Bar
Annual Army-Navy
Grid Game To Be
Broadcast Saturday
Football fans will find exciting
material Dec. l, when the annual
Army-Navy football game will be
broadcast from Los Angeles, Cal.
Locally, the Army-Navy Club
at Fort Amador will receive the
game broadcast, and post results
on a specially prepared football
scoring board. Members of the
club, their ladles, and guests, are
cordially invited to watch the
game results at the Army-Navy
Club.
Live airing from the stadium
will be made at 2:00 p.m. (local
time), Deo. 1, over stations KRCA,
6.06Megs; KRCA, 931 Megs.;
KCBR, 15.31 Megs., and KCBR,
11.81 Megs. Shortwave reception
should be best on KCBR at 15.31
Megs., as the beam will be direct-
ed toward Latin America. A local
radio station Intends to carry the
rive broadcast at 2:00 p.m. (local
time).
A re-broadcast of the game will
take place at 10:05 p.m. (local
time) over stations KWID, 9.57
Megs.; KCBR, 6.17 Megs., and
KCBR at 11.81 Megs., Saturday
evening.
Final airing of the game will be
at 4:05 a.m., Sunday, Dec. 2, over
stations KCBR, 6.04 and 9.70;
KWID. 9.57 and 11.86; and KGEI,
9.67 Megs.
CHICAGOElection of officers
will highlight the second day of
the Professional Golf Associa-
tion's annual convention at Chi-
cago.
\ Yestefflajr the POJA heard a
proposal that international golf
matches similar to the Ryder Cup
contests be played between U.S.
and Canadia npros. Ken Murray,
Canadian PGA president, sug-
gested the event.
INDIANAPOLI8Lee Wallard
may drive in next year's India-
napolis motor speedway race.
Wallard was critically burned in
a race at Reading, Pennsylvania,
four days after winning this
year's "500." He has undergone 31
skin graftings with more to go.
But he says he'll be back in the
500 "if all my hands and legs are
here."
SAN FRANCISCO Former
Minneapolis Manager Tommy
Heath will draw his 1952 pay
check from the San Francisco
Seals.
The Seals signed the 38-year-
old former major league catcher
yesterday. In his three years at
Minneapolis, Heath won one
American Association .pennant i
in 1950and finished fourth in
1949 and fifth last season.
ROSE BOWL
Illinois and StanfordRose
Bowl opponentsare rounding
up scouting reports on each oth-
er.
Illlnl Coach Ray Eliot has ask-
ed Big Ten Commissioner- Tug
Wilson for the dope on Stanford.
Earlier in the season, Wilson as-
signed Michigan to look over the
Indians for the conference.
And Chuck Taylor of Stanford
says he's had scouts on Illinois
and Wisconsin for the past two
weeks.
South Carolina halfback
Steve VVadiak, the Southern
conference's all-time rushing
champion, Furman sophomore
Russell Sutton and Clemson
tackle Bob Batton all missed
unanimity by one vote.
The fourth Clemson represen-
tative is guard Dan Dlmucci and
South Carolina's quartet is
rounded out with end Bob
(Mooso Kahle, tackle Don Ear-
ley and center Larry Smith.
Furman grabbed a second spot
with Calvin Hartness holding
down a guard post and the lltn
position went to Wofford tailback
Jack Beeler.
The .closest battle In the vot-
ing was at tackle where Earley
nosed out Bud Neely of Presby-
terian. Smith's closest competit-
or for the pivot post was team-
mate Harry Jabbusch.
Hair edged teammate Smith
and Wadla kin the voting for
Player of the Year and also
skimmed by The Cadillac for
Back of the Year. Hartness
grabbed Lineman-of-the-Y ear
honors in voting that was divid-
ed among eight linemen.
Eight of the first team picks
are seniors, Earley and Hair
juniors, and Sutton is the
"baby" of the bunch aa a 19-
year-old sophomore. The two
"granddaddles" of the team
are Wadiak and Patton. Each
is 24.
The line averages a hefty 203
pounds with Patton topping
things at 220 and Glenn Smith
the light man at 180. The back-
fleld tips the scales at a trim
average 179.5 and the overall
team average is 193.6.
In balloting for Coach-of-the-
Year, Phil Dickens, perennial
winner at Wofford, edged Frank
Howard of Clemson by a single
point. Only other coach receiv-
ing a vote was Qulnn Decker of
The Citadel.
The Boston Red Sox are busy
denying another report con-
cerning their stormy outfield-
er, Ted Williams.
A Boston newspaper(The
Evening American)quote an
unidentified American League
owner as saying Williams will go
to the New York Yankees in re-
turn for Joe DiMaggio and three
other players. The story says the
Red Sox got permission to talk
with DiMaggio and quotes the
Yankee Clipper as saying: "I'd be
glad being in BostonIf I decide
to play."
Red Sox General Manager Joe
Cronin says there is nothing to
the report.
"We were not approached by
the Yankees," says Cronin. "We
never talked with DiMaggio. We
are not negotiating any such
deal."
According to this report, Bos-
ton would give up Williams for
DiMaggio, second baseman Ger.
Coleman, catcher Charlie Silver
and either Jackie Jensen,""
Bauer or Billy Martin.
In the Pacific Coast League
Lefty O'Doul baa taken over
manager at San Diego.
Salary for the one-year eor
tract was not disclosed but it
believed to be around $25.000.
O'Doul, who managed Sal
Francisco for 17 years before bel
lng dismissed a few weeks ago]
will accompany San Diego Presl
ldent Bill Starr to the mine1
league meetings. They open
Columbus Monday.
"Lefty hasnt lost any of hi
baseball savvy," says Starr. "Il
fact, I think he gets smarter ev|
ery .year."
Former St. Louis Cardlnall
manager Marty Marion says he I
has cut Job offers down to two.l
The veteran shortstop eltherl
will Join the Boston Braves orl
remain in St. Louie with the|
Browns.
Apparently there is little ,
choose between the two offers,
The Braves or the Browns woul
pay Marlon about- $15,000 t
coach or $25,000 as a player
coach.
It's reported Marlon told tr
Braves he would accept only
he could be a "regular" playej
The lanky shortstop told Bostr"
General Manager John Qulr
he'd sign for a year if back ai
knee ailments Improved enoug
for him to play regularly. Marie
says he doesn't want to become |
bench warmer.
Thompson To Workout In Colon]
Tomorrow; Brown Gets Boost
KANSAS CITYA revolt may
be brewing In the New York
Yankee farm system. Baseball
writers and fans of the Kansas
City Blues have asked for a meet-
ing with Yankee brass within the
next two weeks.
The move came out of a meet-
ing in Kansas City yesterday.
Discussion became heated over
Yankee tactics in shuttling ball-
players in and out of Kansas
'city.
V.O.
OS*****""
Now-T*ar?
[Wwrsj
la * I
*sa>jt=xM31
Old!
Ep^lHDf OI^Hirit*l*H
nmrUTttthW
Stlf-fiRdiig vrist.Mlck
(Ves, the Omega Automate thinks
for you. h winds itself with each
arm rnovernent and stores up a
running reserve of 36 hours. 17
jewels non magnetic and sheck-
proof, it is far more accurate than
ordinary watches because the
mainsprinc; tension is constant.
Swiss Jewelry Store
Chas. Perret
General Agent
Coln, R. P.
All TRI WOStO flUStl OMlta
Panam Lightweight Cham-
pion Louis Thompson will travel
to Coln tomorrow for a workout
at the Colin Arena in order to
allow Atlantic side fans to form
their own opinions of his present
condition for the scheduled San-
Champ Wilfredo Brown.
Brown worked out at the Are-
na yesterday afternoon and was
so impressive that his stock was
Immediately boosted In the At-
lantic eity. He gained many vet-
eran backers and the odds
against him went down a few
points. *
Those who are expecting the
former champ to upset his
Eounger rival are basing their
opes on Brown's punching pow-
er and greater experience. The
Calldonia lad is a winner of 22 of
his 24 pro bouts.
The present tltleholder, how-
ever, will be gunning for his 18th
consecutive professional con-
quest. Thompson looks better
each time out and Is sure to give
a good account of himself, win
or lose.
Hard-hitting Leonel Peralta
will get another chance to re-
gain tome of his lost prestige
when he meets David Martines in
a 135-pound six-rounder. This
boat is listed as the semifinal.
The Black Bill-Leslie Thorns]
son 124-pound six-round
cial" la, however, creating
rL^ahTSiU and Thompson
In the midst or winning I"
g idols in
rosno*;
and fast becamlng Id
preliminary Between R
Ampudia and Joey Armstron
Along The Fairway
The tournament chairman
the Summit Hills Golf Club
nounced today that the quallf j|
lng date for the Club Best Ba
tournament, which started
Summit last Saturday and Su
day. has been extended to
dude Saturday and Sunday, L~,
1 and 2, because of the inabllltj
of many members to qualify la
week end.
AU members are urged to get I
Dartner and enter this tourna
ment. The combinad handicap
of the partners must be betwe
20 and 40. If you haven't anyonj
you care to play with put you
name up on the bulletin boai
and the tournament chalrma
will find you a partner. Full han\
dicap is allowed and anyone ca
win]
WIDE-AWAKE PANAMA MERCHANTS
are using RADIO STATION HOG
to tell CHRITMAS SHOPPERS
about what's new . and where!
Start your yule shopping today
and you can snooze peacefully like Santa
'neath your Christmas tree . .
with no last minute gift woes!


M
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951
TBE PANAMA AMERICAN - AN JNDFENOEN* DAILT NEWWAFtt
-#iSHWi
T '
,j_l^**_a.
* IE 1 l It
Barring Upset, Tennessee Sure To Grab Top Spot In Nation
Michigan State Takes 2nd
In United Press Grid Poll
By LEO H. PETERSEN
united Prert Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Nov. 28.Barring an upset de-
feat or poor showing against Vanderbilt in its final
game Saturday, Tennessee will be acclaimed .as the
nation's No. 1 college football team in 1651.
add BARRING UPSETSport* | place from their rating Ut
The 35 outstanding coaches, week,
who make up the United Press, Maryland was third wHh 226
rating board made that clear .points followed by nilnola with
Tuesday when they gave the uft- 117, Princeton with
CONQA LINEThe Chica
ovar the fiera in San
Chicago Cardinal went down eld in chorm-lina style dancing to a 17-11 victory
Prancfico. fullback John Panelll led Quarterback Jim Powera, center, and Jim
Catn. (NEA)
McKown Selected As Top Back
Alone; With Lauricella, Pappa
*-T______ '. ... .'_.L. _____i'__w..i. nut,. il>.l non ctoi- orlnnllM Till
defeated Vols of Coach Robert
Neyland a total of 384 out of a
possible 350 points. It waa the
strongest showing made by any
team in the ratings thi aeaaon.
Thev gave Tennessee 86 first
laee votes, five Second, two
bird, one fourth and one fifth
one of the few timea thia aaa-
aon that a single team ha* ap-
reared on every eoaeh A ballot.
oints are scored on the basis
of in por a first place votes,
nine for a second and so on
do-'n to one for a 10th.
Michigan State remained In
second place, getting six 1
place votes and a total of SMftn parenthesis):
_ 192, Oeorgla
Tech with 178, WUodruin with
184, and Stanfor dwith 113. Bay-
lor held ninth placesame spot
as last weekwith 79 points.
Maryland, Illinois and Prince-
ton each received one first place
vot.
Oklahoma, 12th laat week,
moved Into 11th place while Cal-
ifornia, 18th s
vanced to 12th .
victory Over Stan
Of the teams li. .
have completed their season ex- >
cept Tennessee. Georgia Tech, Aflamir PfillV
Baylor and Texas Christian, nuoiltlv r VIIJ
The ratings (flrt place vote
the numbers of hi
_j). The all-eonquer-
(NEA)
By STEVE SNIDER
Cnltd Prcas Sports Writer
NEW YORK. Nov. 28. All-
Amerlca football memo:
Danny Ray McKown of Texas
Christian came out of nowhere
to collegiate football's 1951 pa-
rade of stars, from third string
quarterback to key man in the
dizzy southwest Conference race.
That'* "Ding Dong Danny
from Duma, Tex.," top man in
this corner' top four backs of
the week with halfbacks Hank
Laurlcella of Tennessee and
Johnny Pappa of California and
fullback Bllf Tate of Illinois as
his rideklck*.
McKown saved the aeaaon
tar Dutch Meyer and Texas
Christian by fyiing in for other
iniured quartekback stars and
now the Horned Fregs need on-
ly a victory over Southern Me-
8odi*t next week to sweep into
b Cotton B*wl against It*i-
ttfcky.
In hi latest effort, McKown
iltched one touchdown pass and
handoffs from quarterback Billy
Mais as the Bear'banged over
Stanford, 20 to 7, twice crossing
the goal line with touchdowns
that led to Stanford's first defeat
of the year.
Lauricella, consistently bril-
liant, pass e dofrho V E8E8B
liant, passed for one touchdown
and set up another as Tennessee
dumped Kentucky and Tate. with
187 yards to. his rushing credit,
was a vital-force In the 8 to 0
Ilmols victory over Northwestern
for a berth in the Rose Bowl.
Quarterbacks with three
touchdown passes to their
credit were Johnny Scarbath
of Maryland against West Vir-
finia, Harry Agganls of Boston
f. against Syracuse, Lamar Me-
dian of Arkansas against Tul-
Isa, Dick Lalla of Colgate a-
galnst Rutgers, Bob Burkhart
of Washington State and Sam
Mitchell of Washington against
of Washington against each
other.
Other standout quarterbacks
points.
There were two change* in the
top 10 from last week. Stanford,
third a week ago, dropped to
gainst Penn State; crippled Bilk eighth place as ft rtnfl ot_ its
Wade of Vanderbilt whose pal- MMtA^^or?&?^"22r1
both TD'S -|^gate,to1?tl?'!tor,1lS
6lace after being beaten by,
CLA.
League News
gainst Memphis State and John
ny Coatta of Wisconsin with a
touchdown pass, a touchdown
run, a field goal and three extra
points against Minnesota.
Among the halfbacks figuring
Importantly were Steve Wadiak
of South Carolina, Billy Pate of
Virginia. Paul Cameron of UCLA.
Max Schmallng of Purdue and
Billy Hair of Ciemson.
Full back Alan Ameche of
Wisconsin scored a pair and
rushed 184 yards against Min-
nesota and Ed Modaeelwskl
Of Maryland, operating against
West Virginia, out-rushed his
foe for the sixth time this sea-
son.
Linemen mentioned promi-
nently: EndsBob Carey, Mich-
igan State; Karl Kluckhohn, Col-
gate; Hal Faverty, Wisconsin;
Vince Kaseta, Tennessee: Ed
Barker, Washington State. Tack-
lesPug Perman, Tennessee;
TEAM Point
1. Tennessee (28)...... 334
2. Michigan State (8) .. 308
3. Maryland (1)...... 8
4. Illinois (1)........ 217
5. Princeton (1)...... 101
0. Georgia Tech...... Ill
7. Wisconsin........ 1M
8. Stanford.......... HI
, 9. Baylor............ 71
wa?Texa7cS^^
not receive a single vote a week tM^MiJf^UJa^tbW^Ti^ Recreational Asso
ago.
With Stanford dropping five
f laces, Maryland, Illinois,
rinceton. Georgia Tech ana
Wisconsin each moved up one
The newly formed Pony League
for the Atlantic Side 1* in need
of a sponsor for the fourth team
of the league. There are three
teams already with sponsors.
The League as it stands now
l composed of the Bulok. the
C. P. O. Club of Coco Solo, and
as asms? wrss gg. saas
orea once nimseu m n >
etw*v over Rice for the lead In
title: tacO.'*?**?._______ ,

and aet up a third score In a 20
to 20 tie with Notre Dame; Bob
., qeaawtak oiPittsburgh who pas-
'ambled with wd one and(et up the other a-
*.!*'
Evans, Pennsylvania.
Guards Herb Zimmerman,
Texas Christian; Ted Daffer,
Tennessefo Joe Schmidt, Pitts-
burgh; Jo-Paluml, Virgin}.
Matson, Don Klosterman
End Season With New Records
;
NEW YORK, Nov. 28. (U.P.)
The men who keep up the N-
C-A-A record* are busy revising
more than half a dozen entries
concerning San Francisco's Ollle
Matson and Don Klosterman of
Matson carried the ball 31
time M the DOns beat Loyola
20-2 Sunday to boost his season's
mark to a record-setting 245. The
San francisco fullback gained
112 yards, enough to help him
set a now collegiate average of
174 yards gained per game In A
season. ,
Klostarman wound up his col-
legiate career by setting records
for the most passes attempted In
three seasons. 729, the most com-
pleted, 388, and the most laterr
cepted In three years. 44 The Lo-
yola bOCk also set one vear re-
cords by attempting 315 passes
and completing 158.
The 1951 season produced few-
Emporia. Kansas; Bloomsburg.
Pennsylvania Teachers; Law-
rence, Wisconsin; Trenton. New
Jersey Teachers and St. Michael's j
of Vermont.
Tennessee registered its ninth Bowl
in a row by beating Kentucky, 8 Is al
CentersChuck Boerio IHsttois;
Clin KniW; Purdue; Donn Moo-
maw. UCLA; Dave Hlckock,
Prlncton,
Sports Shorties
By United Press
The line-up for the Little Rose
ame at Pasadena on Dee.
set. Pasadena Junior Col-
lege has been named to meet
Tyler, Texas J-C. Both teams are
unbeaten.
28-nothlng in a game that drew
compliments from Kentucky
Coach Paul Bryant.
"In my opinion," says Bryant,
"that is the best team and great-
est squad "General Bob Neyland
has Droduced at Tennessee. It's
hardly a disgrace to lose to a
team like that."
Bryant savs he Is not sure how
his cotton Bowl-bound Wildcats
wUl react to the Tennessee loss.
"Naturally, thev're nrettv low est shown by various bowl com-
now.'i, says Bryant. "Whether we j mittees in our fine football
can get them back up for the team," say Hlldreth. "but we
have decided not to prolong our
The unbeaten Bucknell Unlver-
stly team will not play In any
bowl. The President of the Penn-
sylvania school Dr. Horace Hll-
drethsays all bids to play in
oost season games have been
turned down.
"We appreciate all the Inter-
Omphroy Tennis
Tournament Play
bowl game remains to be seen."
Bryant and the Wildcats are
waiting until this week -re.ee
who they will face In the bowl
regular season."
Another Pennsylvania school-
Lafayette Collegewill be look-
iUC VJX acaa*jn i/iwuuv,-u *. i WllU HH5J !> ,* ais w*. i**4
er unbeaten and untied teams game at Dallas. The winner of juhi; .,,..,.. ~~ .
than last year In 1950. 20 teams the Southwest Conference tradl-ing for a new football coach.
wound up with perfect records.
This year, 16 ha,ve completed
fsrfect seasons and a 17th
ennessee *- can do it by beat-
ing Vanderbilt this Saturday.
The 16 who finished with per-
fect mark* arf Maryland. Buck-
nell, Princeton, Ban Francisco,
Michigan State. Northern Illinois
that race is going right down to
the wire.
tionally is the host team, but I Head Coach Maurice "Clipper"
Smith says he has asked college
officials not to renew his con-
tract when it expires this year.
Smith says he has no Immediate
Texas Christian Is the current .
leader and can clinch the title plans for the future.
by beating or tying Southern; --------
Methodist. However, if S-M-U KICKER
beats Texas Christian and If I Unbeaten Maryland rolled over
UMPIRE BOXER Bobby
Thomson gets plenty of atten-
tion from his dog as he prsc-
tices a few chip shots in the
backyard of his Statin Island
home. The New York third
baseman, whose three-run
ninth-inning home run won
the play-off with the Dodgers
and the National League pen-
nant for the Giants, is still be-
ing swamped by congratula-
tory mail from fan. (NEA)
rornia, ze: Texas, i; uoij .ran, i
10; .C.L.A., 7; San Francisco, 5; elation.
Michigan, Purdue, and Virginia, It 1 hoped that a sponsor wlU
2 each; Kentucky and Southern be found soon for the fourth
California. 1 eaeh. team so that final plans can be
made, uniforms made, and the
bat and baila ordered, and a,
schedule drawn up.
Any one wishing to sponsor a
team or desiring to contribute'
towards the league In any way|
whether it be in cash or talent
Due to inclemency of weather ^^'ffi1 'SrS&trf
it ws not possible for the match f'TuL.?. P *ml 0I
scheduled for yesterday evening, ineieaiue. nrrw.
to be played, between Dr. Man- The League Ia for thepurpose
^rioFneel vs Stanton Brown. ' providing baseball for those
carnes for today: '* League and not yet ready for
B7 30am.-DT7ManfredoEngel;the High School team or the
v*. Stanton Brown. |Twllight League
8-51 a m Howard Bpauldlng All games will be played at the
vs. Croeslln Guardia. :Margarita baseball park.-
9:00 a.m.Cyril Oldfield v.. All candidates are asked to be.
Victor Pascual. at the Margarita ball field on
3:00 p.m.Roger Little v. Lt. gaturady, Dec. 1st for practice.!
Luke. I All players eligible are aaked to
4:00 p.m.Bill Hele vs. Lui bt there at 8:30 a.m.
Verna*L ,- Any one interested Is alao wel-
Tomorrow come to come out and give us
4:S0 p.m.Stt. T. R. Branam a hMW.
v. Dr. J. B. HamDton.
srnpton
Sunday, 1>ee. 2
7:30 a.m.Webb Hearn
v-
state. Western Maryland. South,Rice beats Baylor and Texss West Virginia 54-7 last Saturday.'
Dakot Mines, Illinois Wesleyin beats the Texas AggiesThe race j but the West Virginians received
andSuaouehanna. others Include Icoud end in a three-way tie be- some consolation. The Warner j
Valpar2*o, Indiana; college of tween T-C-U, Rice and Texas. IFoimdation of Philadelphia says
winner oldfleld-Pascual
8:80 a.m.Dr. C. W. Omphroy,
Jr. vs. Harry Willis.
9:80 a.mflgt. Branam-Hamp-
ton vs. Hele-Vernaccl.
10:30 a.m.Delvalle va. winner
Little-Luke.
Auditing Wins
Prince George
'Cap At Bowie
BOWIE, Maryland, Nov. 28
(UP.) A On of "Count Fleet"
carried on hi ire's winning tra-
dition Saturday in the 10-thous-
and dollar Prince George Handi-
cap at Bowl*.
Owner W. Ewihg'* "Auditing"
closed smartly to win the Mary-
land feature by a head over fav-
orite, "Inseparable." "Oil Capitol"
ran third a head behind In-
separable.
West Virginia earned a 45-45 tie Jockey Bobby Mitchell held the
under its scoring system for brown colt In second place early
sportsmanship. The Foundation hi the mile and one 16th test.
says Maryland excelled in alert-Auditing made hi bid neartng
ness and natural ability, but West the stretch, but went wide and
Virginia gained the tie on it* lot ground a* Inieparable took
th* turn In close. Auditing re-
gained lost ground at the head
of the tretch. then caught the
leader In the last few yards.
Auditing made the distance In
one minute. 47 and two-fifths
second* over a fast track. The
winner paid H-W, four-80 and
three-*.
CHICAGO (NEA) Ben
Hog an, 1951'a Oolfer-of-the-Year,
averaged 70 trokes In winning
three of four tournament*.
HIGH MANThe missus, Lucille, smiled and the children at
plauded at the Yankees' Gil McDoueald leaped for-joy at hi!
Belleville, N.J., home upon learning that he had been namea
American League's Rookie-of-the-Year. The youngster are, left;
right, Ted, 1; Gil, Jr., 2, and Christine, 3. (NEA).-
courage and will to compete.
tteo
nip1
5 fc W .a-A
LOOK YOUR
BEST
OOO"
U.i
\teti
.tfci tread *"u,-
*V)TOS>-
Johnny Bratton,
KM Gaviln Clash
In Non-Title Bout
CHICAGO, Nev. 28 (UP)
Johnny Bratton, once a cham-
pion himself, aim* for a victory
over welterweight tltleholder
Kl Gaviln tenight so he can
return to the contender's ranks.
Bratton, who won the NBA
147-pound title from Charlie
Fusari in snareh. lost it te Gav-
iln In May. The Cuban then
was accorded world recogni-
tion.
In that beat, Gaviln broke
Bratton's Jaw for the third
time In his career. But Bratton
figures his Jaw will hold up
ten'ght In the non-title fight.
IT'S HARA-CAREY
SOUTH BEND. Ind. (NEA)
The Fighting Irish don't care
if they ever see or hear of Bob
Carey again. In three games a-
gainst NOtre Dame, the Michigan
State end scored two touchdowns,
booted eight extra point and a
field goal for 28 pouts.
\
>
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~1
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'
CLEMSON DEFIES S.C. BOWL RULING
(Page )
AN INDEPEND
Panama American
"Let the people knotc the truth and the country it safe" Abraham Lincoln.
r\VENTY-SFVENTH VEAR
Bigger West Point Scandals Foreseen
As Gibbers Are Denied Readmission
Minister-Pilot
Killed After
Mid-Air Crash
OCALA. Pla.. Nov. 28 'UP>-
An Eastern Airlines DC-3 With]
20 persons aboard and a small
Civil Air Patrol plane collided
In the air yesterday, killing
the minister-pilot of the small
plane.
The big Eastern plane carry-
ing 17 passengers and three
crewmen on its local flight'
from Atlanta to St. Petersburg,;
landed safely at the Ocala air-
port shortly after the collision. |
None of the passengers and
crewmen was hurt.
The Rev. John Macy. pastor.
of the Methodisi Church at:
Anthony, Fla.. plunged to his WASHINGTON. Nov. 28 were notified the appointees
death In a thicklv wooded area The Armv announced yester- would not be considered for re-
wlth the CAP L-4 training day that none of the 90 West appointment under the circum-,
plane. Point cadets dismissed for crib- stances,
. "I saw "the small plane a bing in examinations last Aug-1 Under the law, all the dls-
fleeting second before the Im- ust will be considered for reap-,missed cadets technically were
Sict." EAL Pilot Capt. J. E. pointment to the military acade- eligible for renomination pro-
IshoD of Atlanta said. my. vided they were accepted by the
"We hit with a light lar or, The announcement came af- Point's academic board,
bump, about the same feeling'ter three Congressmen who had An Army spokesman said,
you would have from hitting renominated dismissed cadets however, that "the t
a bird." he added.
"I didn't see the plane after
the Impact. I circled the area
for about 15 minutes trying to
find the other plane."
Apparently Bishop was the
only one to see the actual im-
pact or know that the wings
of the two ships bumped
' Two youths, J. W. Dees, 14.
and Woodrow Bozeman. 18. said
they saw the planes collide at
about 700 feet. They said the,
big passenger plane came up
from behind the Cub.
"I saw the Cub start to fall
with part of the wing gone,"
Bozeman said.
.' It was the third air colil-
lon involving an Eastern Air-
lines plane in the last 28
months.
Fifty-five persons were killed
On Nov. 1, 1949, when a P-38
fighter plane collided with an
Eastern Airlines DC-4 over Na-
tional Airport In Washington.
D. C. The fighter was piloted
by a Bolivian air force officer,]
who survived.
On' July 30. 1949. a DC-3
-Eastern passenger plane and a
Navy Hellcat fighter collided
six miles north of McGulre ait;
force base. Ft. Dix. N. J. kill-
ing 16 persons.
The airliner, a wing sheared;
off. chashed with 15 persons
aboard and burned. The pilot
of the Hellcat was killed when
his parachute failed to open. I
ILT NEWSPAPCT
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951
FIVE CENTS
of those dismissed were mem-
bers of the Army football squad,
that backed up 25 victories
! against only one loss and one
tie in three seasons. Most since
I have enrolled In other colleges
Passengers Safe
When NY Central
Train Jumps Track
ALBANY, N.V Nov. 28
Seven cars of the New York Cen-
tal's ten-cai Cleveland to New
York passenger train. "The East-,
erner." jumper" the tracks near
Stuyvesant W'.y today, but the
railroad reported no one killed
Oj seriously 1-iiured
board has never accepted a
cadet for reappointment who
was dismissed for violating
the honor code." He said the
board is standing by that
tradition.
Dismissed cadets were reno- and universities,
minated to the academy by I In September, Secretary of
Reps. John W. McCormack, Jr.,'Army Frank C. Pace Jr., said
iD-Mass.i. Glenn R. Davis (R-|that the 90 cadets could be re-
Wis.) and Cliff Clevenger (R- appointed and readmitted if the
O.t. | Institution's academic board
Davis' office said the Wiscon-: approved,
sin Republican renominated! By yesterday ruling, however,
former cadet Ronald Clough of, the academic board will not
Waukesha. Wis., a senior honor pass on the cadets Individually,
student, at the "boy's request" | The ruling barring them from
and probably will not press the readmission was announced af-1
MATE TROUBLE Complications have come
here they are pictured. At the right Yerke Is
six-year-old daughter Sharon, after six years
The complication on the left Is Mrs. Reuben D
Yerke married her three or four yean ago, an
Into the life of David Yerke of Detroit, and
being reunited with his wife Douglas and his
spent so says Yerke, in an amnesia blackout.
avid Dry, 31, of New Orleans, who claims that
1 wants him back right now. Mrs. Dry be-
lleves all about Douglas' and Sharon, and npth lng about Yerke's amnesia.
case.
Clough. now
Notre Dame, Is
a student at
said to have
ter the Army received such a
recommendation from the board.
The academic board,, which
helped tutor some of the foot- ruled against readmission of any
ball players involved in the cadet found in violation of the
scandal. honor code, is composed of the
The names of those renomin- superintendent, the comman-
ated by McCormack and eleven- dant of cadets and 13 faculty
ger were not disclosed. 'members.
Informed of the Army's ml- I
int. Robert Dam, counsel for
the committee on justice for
the New York Criminal and
Civil Courts Bar Association,
predicted revelations soon in-
vnlvinr the West Point scan-
dal will "be moro shocking
than what has been disclosed
to date."
Daru, who headed an unoffl-
Pope Discusses
Recent Statement
On Childbirth
Churchill's Home Guard
Epithets Flying In UK
Plan Sets
Parliament
LONDON, Nov. 28 (UP) Thei Sidney Silvermak an antl- Conservative member Rri*
home this morning after sittini
through a marathon 20 hour 29
minutes session. .
During the marathon an anti-
United States member was sus-
pended, the Government surviv-
ed a division by a 13-vote major-
ity, and one member suggested
another go to a barber and get
his throat cut. (
The uproariousand decidedly
undignifiedsession ended only
CASTEL C.ANDOLFO. Italy
cial committee that investigated,Nov. 28 (UP) Pope Pius XII
the dismissals, said it is "un- today issued t clarification of his', three hours 40 minutes before
derstandable" that the cadets :ecent speech on marital duties, members were scheduled to troop
will not be accepted for read-,birth control, and the import- back to begin this afterhoon'-
mlsslon "in view of the lncon-janee of the child "before, during session.
suspended from ^he Commons Shin well, former Labor Defense
for five days for challenging ai Minister: "You should go to the
ruinfth f.nPHea.^er- Jbarber and have your throat
Epithets filled the sacrosanct'cut." ,
chamber as the session dragged! Clarke later withdrew his re-
out into the longest sitting so far mark,
of the present parliament.
"If you spat In the Socialists'! The Conservatives were shov-
faces they would say it was lng through Winston Churchill's
rain," yelled Conservative memi, bill to establish a 100,000-raan
ber Charles Taylor. "There are;Home Guard to fill the gap caus-
some of them you could not in-
sult."
SOLDIER'S FAREWELL SHAPE Commander Gen. Dwlght
D. Eisenhower says goodbye to Britain's Princess Margaret
Rose, after her visit to his headquarters at Roquencourt,
France. The royal visitor was 35 minutes late for her tea
date when her car got lost on the trip from Paris. (Photo
by KF1-"Verne Staff Photographer Max Winter.)
slstencies at the Academy,
while the present superinten-
dent remains.'
Daru charged that MaJ. Gen.
Frederick Irving, academy head,
called the 90 cadets "basically
honorable men" on Aug. 7.
"On Aug. 23, the same gen-
eral said these men are con-
spirators and not deserving of
readmission." Re said.
Daru said he knew the com-
mittee of graduates of West
Point consisting of more than
tiki persons, had discovered
information of '* shocking
nature which will be present-
ed soon publicly.
snd after blrtn" / The government managed tol
The Pontiff took the occasion! shove through the first part ofj
i.t an audience granted to mem-. its bill recreating the Home
bers of the National Congress of Guard, over the bitter protests of
the Family Front, to reply to the the Socialist opposition,
world's reaction to his 9,000 word i
Al
obstetricians The text
2 Egyptians Shot
By RAF Patrols ^
Along Suez Canal
ISMAILIA, Nov. 28 (IV)
New Approach To Retirement Pay vs. HCL
Annuity Expert Tells of Plan to Ease Fixed Income Problems------
By R. McAllister lloyu
Fresiaent, 'leacners Insurance
U Annuity Assn.
tWrliten ior ixa service)

NEW YORK, Nov. 28 (NEA).
A new approach to providing, in
tne years ol retirement, an in-'
come wnicn will renect possiDle.
changes in the cost oi living, is
now being considered by the
oonege world.
' Alreaay screened and approv-
eu oy outstanding investment
anu Insurance authorities as;
Veil as Dy college aamunstia-
tors. Uie pian is oeing cncuiat-1
a in outune as a matter ot in- h
loiuiation amonR the "o.uOU pol-;
Jcj noldeis in tne 6uu institutions
ge.ved by "i'IAa.
oaaicaiiy, Uie proposal is to
supplement tne conventional re-
tirement annuity, which is paia
in a lixec number ol dollars,
wun a variable anuuitv in teima
ol a fixed number of units
whose cash value will tiuciuatt
yom year to year.
As tnese units will represen,
pa. ucipaupn in investment in
sons who are dependent on
annuity income in their
years of retirement.
We therefore expect that the
results of our plan, when it is
EDITOR'S NOTE: Among
the hardest hit by inflation
are those with fixed in-
comes particularly retired
people. Now an organization
which specializes in the re-
tirement problems of college
teachers has come up with
a new idea which may have
important implications in
all retirement and pension
plans. It's described hv R.
McAllister Lloyd (right),
who has been president of
Teachers Insurance and An-
nuity Association since 1945
and chairman of the board
since 1947. Previously, he
had been in the banking
business since graduation
from Harvard University in
1919.
of the
speech, which Vatican sources
described as a "clarification"
was released today.
The Pope'* original discourse
had been Interpreted in many
circles as implying that if there
were a choi-e between saving _
the life of the mother or her Two Egyptian saboteurs were
I child, even th^ufh it were still shot dead today by RAF patrols
I in the mother's womb, the child: near hare, as violence flared
He said he believes a Con-has the right to live. again in the Sues Canal Zone
gressional Investigation will be The Pontiff said that.it had I The Egyptians were slain
inevitable after the graduate been the "constant teaching of while attempting to cut a ml-
commlttee speaks out. the Church, a thesis which was.ntary cable between Abusselr
At the time of dismissal, the'one of the essential foundations, (and Ismailia ner the main
Academy said that all but two r.ot only of con-ugal morality ; Cairo-Ismallia road.
but of social morality in general,)
namely, that *ny direct attempt i Patrols which opened fire
on an Innocent human life as a immediately, reported a third
means to an end in this case,Egyptian was believed killed
the end of" Mvtng another life and ^the, W0Unded. Thev be-
"* unlawful lleved the Injured man Jump-
. j ..* c.-.., .-j < into the nearby sweet wa-
In^SSffiffichiSfTkJlSi ** re
that the life of a child must be
. preferred to that of the- mother."
clv""iBut the Pope emphasized that
01 '"on purpose we have always us-
ed the expression 'direet attempt
on the Ufe of an Innocent per-
son' for direct killing."
I&E Head To Attend
College Conference
On Service Training
fMaj. Frank. Tourtejtattg,, Jn-
for^heUi
Mi ftd EdueiOMuoUfcwM'
US Army CarflWKh", will
leave tomorrow morning for St.
Petersburg. Florida to attend a
convention of the Southern As-
sociation of Colleges and Sec-
ondary Schools.
The conference begins Dec. 2
and will last four days. Tourtel-
lotte will speak on the topic of
"College Training for Service-
men and Women" which will be
a summary of the development
of the Louisiana
ed by the wholesale dispatch of
Britain's army to Germany, the
Middle East and the Far East.

Labor members considered the
bill "alarmist" and said they saw
no reason to rush it through.
They asked caustically what
use the Home.Guard would be
" The flmjirFatbrS said the
Home Crowd would be cnio'ly a
protection against paratroop in-
vasion. ,
Fasl Firing Follows
RaHman's Testimony
sity program in this area.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28 (UP)
Paul J. Neff was fired as
president of the Missouri Paci-
fic Railroad by his superior to-
day as he stepped from the
witness stand at an Interstate
State Unlver-jCommerce Commission hearing.
Col.iT. C. Davis, board chair-
l.lT.
His first stop will be at Baton man of the railroad, asked for
Rouge where he will meet sev- and received Neff's immediate
eral LSU officials who will ac- resignation because of "the
company him to the convention.
The LSU extension courses
which the Army inagurated last
September have been very
favorably received by service-
men in the Canal Zone.
nature of his testimony."
Davis charged that Neff's
testimony was "detrimental to
the credit of the Missouri Paci-
fic Railroad, hence harmful to
all the bond and stockholders."
'lorces were given farms;
tans with no private means
support were sent 'over the hill"
to the poor-house.
Then veterans were among the
first to be gifen pensions at
public expense. On the civilian
front there has been the exten-
sion of Federal and state old
age and social security programs
to cover practically all citizens.

At the same time there has
oeen a broad and significant de-
velopment of privately financed
ietirement programs; and in
this field the educational world
pioneered and still maintains
leadership, thanks largely to the
generous concern of the late,-
Andrew Carnegie in the plight!afternoon session of the Bal-
Eastman Bound Over
To District Court
Probable cause was found yes-
terday afternoon in the case
of Charles Robert Eastman.who
was charged with assault with
a deadly weapon during the
of college professors in the twi-
light of their careers.
boa Magistrate's Court, and the
case was bound over to the U
S. District Court.
Eastman, a 22-year-okl Pan-
amanian allegedly stabbed Lo-
put In force, will be watched by
-----~-j~ ---~-: those responsible for retirement
common stocks, they can be ex-. m h segments of our,
peced to Produce extia dolar, soc We expec *lnat lhe plan
to those yeas when tie cost o ^ be avaUable l0 the e
living is high and moie dollars worW by mid.1952.
re consequently "ded to Tne plan will operate through
i separate corporation known as
maintain a given
living.
7 We do
not
Thus the conventional fix-
ed uollar annuity based on
income from such debt obli-
gations as bonds and mort-
gages will continue to be the
backbone of all retirement
plans offered by TIAA to
the educational world.
Although some colleges had
formalized pension promises to,,
their faculties, the first country-!well 8keete In Paraso Nov. 17
wide arrangement among the]The defendant is In Jail on $200
orivate colleges was the free Iball, and was represented In
pension system initiated by the court yesterday by attorney Da-
Carnegie Foundation for the vid A. Leon.
HnVHCtemf= oi Tehtai. en-' Eastman is sata to be a mem-
dowed in 1905. hM of the notorltmi 8orrow
Thu .,..t_ .. Osng of Panama and Red Tank
in 1-Vm ?hwasuPPlnentea, His previous convictions, ae-
Teachers Insurance**^Annult 1iCOT-Bt to court records' ,n'
Association as a mean fnr ?lu f TmoT stocks iund -"" with-TIAA. This the educational world. funding and oneraUn.Retire ,n 1M8 for ,TDe- A8?lllt1. VJK
^ ^'t^ l^^nM^ M*'^^^^^ toyM ^^ **? vanable annu"y should mentplanT foT?fi?* l* AV"y ""V? ',*?. ^.S'hi
rises ana laiis in airecc reiauon ^ common slocKS- provide, lrom an investment number of educational in.HtV, hi 1.49 was dismissed, and he
toetobu.T?n"lrften^^ havlnK *Vfo oi common -" mow 'KindhelaSe, """" *" ntenred to 80 day. in
Phai ha! actuTuv naopeneu lio,naL T1A^ retlrement plans dollars when they are needed in ( iwumes. JaU pm, ,, fl f battery
?ver the vears iince S n- *"' have l*lf opUon oi. ****- meei n1 increased living costs Whereas protective coverage ""tead. In March 1951 he was
the relationship
parallel to help
tlrement to
Vhich comes w
Of living presses
dollar income
u .nTrtrientiO 1.n,ves>-lnK "P to a maximum of ment, when and where cc
,_Lon in r VCT cent oI lhe total annual ating institutions elect to
h .in retr*ment plan contributions advantage of this unloue i
maximum of ment, when and where cooper- the cost of living has rendered:tenf* for nother battery.
total annual itinn r>,il.,K... .1__,. i_ ..... Li. err .1. ~ "aS rCnUerCO ,__ u___- _. ,...<
takej the benefits Inadequate. It is to
Also bound over yesterday
ease the Dinch UVh l u ",', ""'" ""'w oi uiis unique meth-mis new aspect of the retire- ,a"emooi
hS^a rising ct on bena" ot each ParUci- od of givInK the beneficiaries of; ment problem that TLM[pro- mnn!ell
against a fixeo. "ift- lnstltllMn. , ..Jl ff"" D ",a ,lect a"d :?? to bring the variable an- *I Pen.
The new plan has been
devised to meet this prob-
lem in the educational world
1 in which T"AA operates ea-
flu^tTelv. But the me
problem is faced by all per-
the retire >fUrnoon was the case of Em-
nnlelle Cassldolne. a 36-year-
Penamanlan who is charged
tht nuity as a partial^solution.'" |wlth burglary. He is in Jail on
11300 ball.
It will be introduced only to i --------------^~-------~"
S&t In,t,r.ther,C0^e ^ Tn tf,r those reachng-the-age '^SSSS^g"^
'eJ,me"t ^Q.ultles Tund mVess of retirement Is a subject that cation prove to te eff^V.^E..
These institutions will remain continuing participation 1
oerfectlv free to come into the,growth of the American econo-
new plan or to stay" out of it. my.
But no institution will be per-1 The evolution of public con-
and until it has in force a TI v makes
prove to be effective, re- \
for fascfisfttng study. In tlrement
retirement plan providing a -ts earlv and ..more primitive, groups mav^SlJ edant
loaste layer of protection. Horma, veteraniTiaf the armed I their sotcM srtoattns
,,_.
other i High
tt to;Vl a.m.
,J;14 ,mx.
Thursday, Nov. 99
Lew
9:49 a jr.
19:99
/,af3d*P*
TO
ORDER FROM SEARS
FOR
CHRISTMAS
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
All orders desired for Christmas should be
placed In these last three days.
/
REPRf fENTATlVf f PO
O
Opposite Ancn -Post Office
No. 10 Tivoli Avenue
PANAMA
EARS, ROEBUCK ANO <0
Tenth A Melendez
COLON