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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01301
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01301
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

-* BRANIFF

*
^2
TO
MIAMI
ONI WAT .\,
ROUND TRir.
$ 83.00
. 150 JO
AN PfPgnEKP^^HgS^DAlLT NEWSPAPI
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country U $afe" Abraham Linela.
i i ii ii
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAB
PANAMA, a. P., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 19S1
TEN CENTS
Three Gar Thieves Caug
Terms In
InCZ
Reds Agree With LJ.N.
Proposal In Principle
PANMUNJOM. Not. 21 (UP) troops hit the United Nation! Belfast, the Australian destroyer
United Nations and Communist lines under the coyer of a heayy Tobruk and the Netherlands de-
truce negotiators seemed close to artillery barrage. Istroyer Van Galen, accompanied
agreement today on the United! The United Nations artillery|by three rocket ships, bombard-
Nations proposal aimed at end- opened counterflre, and the bet-ed the town.
Air Chief Says
Korea Targets
!Not For A-Bomb
big the fighting
Christmas.
The Communists
(NBA Telephoto)
NEW PROPOSAL Ma]. Gen. Henry HOdes and Adm.: Ar-
lelgh Burke look over a map of the proposed truce demar-
cation line In Panmurtjjjfc.jfiprflg.,
in Korea by tie is continuing. United Nations air force pilots
Sea Furies and Fireflies from sighted no Migs today, but flew
. agreed in the Australian carrier Sydney hit 633 sorties against Red commun-
prlnclple to the United Nations i the north Korean port of Hung- Icatlons and In support of United
'truce plan, but came up with ajnam, while the British cruiser Nations Infantry.___________^^
counter-propoaal of their own.
The key clause in this counter-
proposal is that troops should
withdraw two kilometers from
each side of the ceasefire line, to
establish a demilitarized zone.
A United Nations spokesman
said the two truce teams would
be in virtual agreement If the
Communists would include this
sentence In their proposal!
"We agree that there will be no
withdrawal of troops till a full
armistice agreement Is signed."
The United Nations team, re-
quested and got an adjournment
till tomorrow to consider the Red
proposal.
In the ground fighting the
Chinese opened their fourth at-
tack In five days against a Unl-
Romania Says C-47 Violated
Border; US Fears Plane Shot
BELGRADE, Nov. 21 (UP) 'not Indicate whether his plane
Communist Romania today char-1 had been damaged or hit.
ged that a missing United States The plane took off from Ger-
Air Force C-47 violated Its front- many Monday morning. It last
lev, but Ignored a United States was heard from when the pilot
claim that both Romanian and radioed the Belgrade airport
Hungarian border guards fired tower,
on the plane. "Lost," his message said. "Ne
As 18 United States Air Force, Mea where I am."
search plattes hunted over Yugo-1 The American Embassy In Bel-
, slavia today for the C-47, the Bo-. grade said the plane reported it-
ted Nations hill position on the. manian toAlgnant outburst vas self over Belgrade when it actu-
westam ftnt. i taken as an. Indication that the ally was over Varaadia, about 26
Supported by tanks and self- plane may have one down be- miles south of th
J guna, up to 2*00 Red nutf the Iron Curtain, in Roma- border In north
c**------"-:------7 nian territory. ~* It was beli*r*J
Yugoslavia today gave the, the Drava River forthe Sava.
United States Air Force permls- "The plane was sighted bj Yu-
sin to extend their search oper- goslavs north of Vfrovltica and
ations, which earlier were limit- later near Bell Manastlr, where
ed to the northwest section of it was fired upon by Hungarian
Yugoslavia. border guards, according to re-
Thls extension presumably ports from the pilot," the embas-
nr I Aral Dalorr *'* let I'nited States lanes sy announcement said.
rl IVtdl KGICI search closer to the Yugoslav -
Hungarian frontier.
The missing plane carried a
WASHINGTON, Non. 21 (UP)
,Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg to-
day said there are no targets
In North Korea to warrant the
use of atomic bombs by United
Nations forces.
The U. S. Air Force Chief o
: Staff told a news conference
he could see no justificationfaor
using atomic bombs which pre
now stockpiled, where the Job
could be done with conven-
tional weapons.
Vandenberg who recently re-
turned from an inspection tour
i of the Korean battlefront. said
| It was impossible for U. S,
planes to gain "true" air supre-
macy there without bombing
Communist air bases In Man-
churia.
But he said any decision to
i do so Is "a policy decision which
must be taken bv the United
States and her United Nations
allies.
Three Panamanians caught stripping accessories off
stolen automobiles were found guilty this morning and
sentenced in the U.S. District Court at Ancon.
One, believed to be the ringleader of the trio, receiv-
ed five years in the penitentiary on one grand larceny
charge and a five-year suspended sentence on a second
count.
The others received sentences in the penitentiary of
three and three and a half years.
They were:
Delary Alberto Khan, 25,
considered the leader of the
gang because wheels and other
Earts of stolen cars were found
i his yard;
Juan Illueca. 24, who got the
3'j year term ;and
Luciano Luis Sanchez, who
received the lightest of the
three sentences.
Both Illueca and Sanchex also
Gov. To Push Raise
For Retired
Governor Francis K. New-
comer promised yesterday to
640 Men ol Naval
Task Unit Due Here
statement
received In addition to then
penitentiary terms five-year sus-
pended sentences on a second
charge .
The three pleaded guilty.
Kahn who got the stiffest of
the sentences, has a police rec-
ord in both the Canal Zone anc"
Panama for petty larceny.
The terms meted out were re-
commended by the government.
The trio were caught by Cm-
nal /one police en Oct. 25
stripping a car in Chive Chiva.
Another automobile, already
denuded, was nearby. Both ears
had been reported stolen in
Panama City the same evening.
Asst. District Attorney Rowland
K. Hazard pointed out thi:
morning that many automobile
parts found to be from stolen
cars were discovered in Kahn';
Korean atrocTtv'' yrd *d ll was K*hn'8 car tn,L
vctmfand chargea^V.?^" -' *> ** ^
Communist leaders presen 11 y A<>,'y. ""L-ggflg
~-n-i .n ~. u._ asked for a 2-year sentence fo.
his defendant. Illueca, on the
South Korea Backs
Hanley's Figures
On Red Atrocities
PUSAN, Korea. Nov. 21 (UP)
South Korea today backed up
8th Army Col. James Hanley's
are practicing still worse hor-
rors.*
first charge and for a five-year
suspended sentence on the
"It is believed the plane was
flying north of the Drava River
at this time, after getting off
the statement said.
as far as Jasa
was fired upon
The Romanian protest, filed' by Romanian border patrols."
The embassy report said it
was believed that when the pi-
^X .V^ff; to'it M bill crew of four, hd a cargo of sup-; course," the state
m^n-mio.0HnnL retir P" *>r " Unlted "tes mM "K flna"y fleW
I5l P.S.STrSnS to?sj rat em~ Islon ,n Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Tomic. where it
fd Panam Cmal ocalirateem-, ^ Romanian protest, filed' * ftomuiian hor
PyK nA^r^^rtment nd w"h *h United States legation
if the Defense Department and', ,.,,.? .,.,.,.* th.iiniti.ri
on Dec. 11.
A Naval Task Uir, uhd
mand of Commander C. C. Hah-
tigan, Jr., USN, composed of the
destroyers U68 Cushing 7971 and the USS Owen 536i will arrive Balboa at 7:00
a.m. tomorrow and berth at Pier
1. Naval 8tation Rodman until
November 24 when they will
transit North.
The ships are on their way to
Norfolk, Va. from Long Beach,
Calif.
These 2.050-ton destroyers, re-
cently reactivated at West Coast
ports, are 377 feet long and have
a complement of about 20 offi-
cers and 300 enlisted men each,
who, during their stay here will
be granted shore leave and lib-
erty.
released by the
rein prfsdfters'of wafr Wave been,Hen was not m
wantonly slain bv their captors, ach car.
,and that some 250,000 civilians! Woodrow De Castro, who re-
have been murdered "in deliber-presented the other two. asked
ate and cold-blooded mass kill-[the Judge to reduce the sentence
ings."
The
Sooth Korean figures
to a term "more commensurate
with helping the men." He said
were the same as those released that this was a time of "great so-
cial unrest in Panama, with an
upsurge of crime." He pointed
out that the defendants had
children to support.
On his own behalf. Sanchez
by Hanley, who Is chief of the
war crimes section of the Ith
Army.
The South Korean Government
statement stated
"The Communist leaders are pleaded for "mercy and leniency
risht now carrying on a cam- from the Judge so that after we
paign of murder never before ex-1 have learned our lesson we may
ampled In the history of civilized
RP High School
Students Clash;
(NBA Telephoto)
BROTHERLY LOVE Cpls. Dick (left) and Henry Needham
salute as stevedores load the body of their brother, Sgt. John
Needham, onto a train in Oakland. Calif. John was killed
in Korea. His brothers, who were both wounded in Korea,
are escorting the body home to Lansing, Mich.
, j j. v ii.. i plane violate the Romanian ritory.
This was revfaled today by the, frontter_ -At 4:30 p.m. he reported his
Ancon Chapter Nc 38oftheNa.( .^ hapiess C-47 apparently position In the neighborhood of
tional Association of Retired gtrayed Into one of the hottest Zagreb and at 5:15 pm., he re-
! Government emp'oyes following border spotg ln the worldthe I ported he was west of Zagreb
' pn interview hv three of the As-, neavUy guarded frontiers where, and headed for Udine, Italy."
sociation's members with the.tne Russian satellite states and The embassy said it was not
Governor. tne Communist but independent possible to establish definitely
Newcomer told the delegation; Yugoslavs have been involved in where the plane was when it was - j
- comprised of Luis A. Victor. countless incidents since Yugo- last heard, with the report that aCVfiFfll IfllllTCa
Samuel Stephens and Arthur, aiavla's Marshal Tito broke with, the pilot was lost. **,
Pyle that a bill approved re- lhe Kremlin. The U.8. legation In Budapest,
cently covering compensation tO| jbe plane disappeared Mon- Hungary, said the Foreign Min-
oldtlmers who worked on thelaay wr,lle en route from Erdlng iatry of that country reported it
Canal between 1904 and 1814 did1 (u.a. air base), Germany to Bel- knew nothing of the missing
not apply to local-rate employes, grade. I plane.
In answer to other questions | The United States Embassy In Air Force officers said the
put before the Governor by the Belgrade said it had learned the plane carried only enough fuel
delegation, Newcomer explained | missing plane had been fired up-, for eight hours. s
|that no special privileges can be on by border troops of the two! They said the pilot's reports
granted to retired local-rate em.! Soviet satellite nations after los-, that his plana was under fire was
j plpyes with regard to hospitaliza | lng its way to Belgrade. made to his home base at Erdlng
' tion and burial expenses under. An embassy official said the field, near Munich,
the current budget of the Pana-, pilot had- radioed that his plane His reports were confirmed lat-
in Canal Co.
Franchot Beats Barbara To The Punch;
Gets His Divorce Papers Filed First
was being "shot at." But he did er by Yugoslav frontier guards
who said they saw the Hungari-
ans and Romanians fire. *
It was not clear from either re-
port, however, whether anti-air-
craft guns were brought into ac-
tion or if the plane was subjected
to ground fire from small arms.
HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 2J. UP)
Actor Franchot Tone beat blonde
Barbara Payton to the legal
punch yesterday and filed suit to
end their 53-day marriage which
began and broke up with a fight.
Attorneys for the handsome
actor, who comes from a toney
Eastern family, scooted into)
court with his divorce complaint
even as the lawyer for the volup-
tuous movie starlet was prepar-
ing to file her own.
Love went out the window'
and Barbara out the doorin a.
furious quarrel Monday night in'
which tempers matched those of
seven weeks ago when Tone and
weightlifter Tom Neal fought a'
bloody love duel which sent Tone
to the hospital and Barbara to
his arms.
Tone, whose friends said he
had detectives shadowing his
wife, did not mention Neal In his
divorce complaint.
"Extreme mental cruelty,"
Tone charged.
"AH I want him to do is pay
some back bills," Barbara said. \
"No comment," said Neal.
The blow-up came Monday
night when the honeymoon end-,
ed in what Miss Payton's iriends
called a "terrible fight."
'Franchot was Jealous," they
said. "And Barbaja finally mov-!
ed out.''
She flounced out of their hill-
side love nest, Miss Payton's Bev-
erly Hills apartment into which
Tone had moved, screaming at
Tone to "Get out of my house
immediately" or she'd get an or-'
der to throw him out.
Tone stayed the night, told te-
lephone callers ne was the "baby
sitter" and finally stopped an-
swering the phone.
Tone headed for his lawyer!
with the dawn.
His one-page complaint was as
brief as the fist fight which sent
him, battered, to a plastic sur-1
geon. I
All he would say about their
brief married life was that he
suffered 'extreme mental cruel-
ty." .
Barbara said bitterly he would
have her own divonee complaint
ln court as aeon as "I ean pos-,
slbly make it And 1 donV want
money from him.'1 she said. "I'm
not even going to ask alimony.
All I want him to do Is pay up1
some back bills. This includes the
furnishings of my apartment."
"I'm going to confer later this
week with Tone's attorney re-
garding a settlement," Barbara's
Attorney Robert Feder said.
And that wouldn't be "very
much," he added. Merely "court
costs, attorneys* fees and obliga-
tions since they were married,
including furniture," he said.
"No alimony request at least
for the present." he added.
Miss Payton ndt only lost Tone
yesterday but her movie con-
tract. The office of independent
Koducer William Cagney said it
d not picked up her option.
She would not give details of
her marital feuding.
Feder said: "I can't even get all
the dope from her myself. I have
to have a lot more financial in-
formation relating to Tone be-
fore I can file Barbara's com-
plaint."
"But Tone hasnt won the first
round: yet." Feder said.
"We're planning to file a reg-
ular divorce actionand possibly
a cross complaint to his suit at
the same time."
Barbara spent Monday night
with a friend after her fight with
Tone. She said her divorce
grounds were the same as Tone's
"mental cruelty."
Tone added the adjective "ex-
treme."
"Mrs. Tone has Inflicted griev-
ous mental cruelty," he said.
"8he has destroyed the legiti-
mate alms of matrimony.
"There is no community prop-
erty... and there are no chil-
dren."
Tone's friends said that when!
the case comes to trial, the actor,
no doubt would present findings,
of a private eye fney said he hir-
ed to follow Barbara "right after!
the fight."
This was the pre-dawn brawl
on Barbara's lawn in which Neal j
gave Tone a broken nose, brain
concussion and fractured cheek
bone.
At that time Neal. who already;
was .planning to marry Barbara,
said H Barbara married Tqne he,,
Neal would "refuse to pay for
her wasserman test."
Two weeks later, Tom and
Miss Payton eloped to Cloquet.
Minn., where they were married
Sept. 28. J
The first real clash between
striking and non-striking high
school students occurred last
night during a mass meeting ln
Santa Ana Plaza.
Several students were in-
jurednone of them seriouslv
as a group of non-strikers at-
tempted to break up the meet-
ing held on the 15th day of a
student'strike to force the re-
signation of Minister of Educa-
tion Ruben D." Carles.
The- strikers claim that the
students who tried to break up
the meeting were "Remonlstas"
(supporters of the candidacy
of Former Police Chief Jose A.
Rattan).
CZ Milk Back Up
To 25-C Per Qt.
The price of milk ln Canal
commissaries will be restored to
25 cents a quart effective Dec.
1. It was announced today at
Balboa Heights.
The price was reduced to 22
cents in June 1850 when produc-
tion costs, were low and there
were surplus quantities of milk
because of forced reductions
among government agencies ln
the Canal Zone.
man.
"We welcome the suggestion
being made around the world
that the Communist leaders be
learn also to undo the harm and
wrong and shame we have
brought upon our families."
Kahn said he committed the
crime "in a desperate situation."
held for war crimes trial in con-and added, "my grandmother
nection with the atrocities they and daughter whom I support,
have committed against war pris- i need me."
oners and civilians. Judge Joseph J. Hancock tolt
"But It Is not enough to punish the three that they seemed to bt
them for the past. They are intelligent men. with more ad-
practicing still worse horrors vantages than the average per-
even today.
Millions of civilians in Corn-
sons who are charged with crime
in the court. He said "the Courl
munlst North Korea are being is always disposed to consider
systematically starved and froz-
en to death.
"All those who Joyously wel-
with much more leniency, a mar,
who has not had the advantage!
of a good home, parents and an
corned the liberating armies of! educa tion." and that although he
the United Nations a year ago i was very much impressed with
are marked for destruction. |the statements made by counsel.
"They are forced to give up all he didn't see how he could do
their food supplies as 'proof of anything to reduce the charges,
their renewed loyalty' to the
Communists.
"Warm clothing is taken from
them. They are left nothing
and the sooner they die the bet-
ter it pleases the bestial invad-
ers."
BALBOA TIDES
Thursday, Nov.22
High Lew
9:23 a.m. 3:37 a.m
19:03 p.m. 3:5R p.m.
Gun Waving Woman In Black
Whistles for Red Attacks
'NBA Telephoto)
UFE WITH KILLER Mrs.
Lillian Reese 17, told St. Louis,
Mo., police about life with her
10-year-old ex convict hus-
band. Samuel Police say he
confessed two murders. Mrs.
Reese said that after the first
killing hi he flourishes s run in front of
a mirror........
Freewheeler
GOSLAB, Germaay. Not 21
(UP) The police reported a
man and woman walked into
a motorcycle store and the
man a shad fee a trial ran en
the bike displayed in the store
window.
He said "J til leave my wife
here as security and he rode
off on the motorcycle and
never returned
The woman, whose Identity
waa withheld aaid she was not
his wife, bwt hid merely of-
fered t shew him the way to
the store.
TH ARMY HQ Korea, Nov. 2l
:UP) More f-ontline infantry-
men today described the pistol-
waving, whist< -blowing "woman
In black" who leads Red Chinese
assault troops ,
Men of the King's Shropshire
Light Infanfv a unit of the
British Comrr."nwealth Division,
told of seeing the woman in the
van of the afack Saturday.
They said she was dressed ln
k black Jacket and black trous-
ers, and had long black hair She
led the Chine-re troops attacking
the British infantrymen's posi-
tion.
Waving her pistdt'she would
'should a blase from time to time
of her whist..' One soldier said
the whistle seemed to be a signal
I for machlnegun fire.
Cap*. R. II Garnet! said:
I "There must be something to
' the reports. There were to*
mnt man? reasonable and
! reliable witnewe reporting her
: presence.
! "Of course there was a hell of
* lot of noise, smoke and soot,
and no chance to sit down and
take notes on It. or to have good
observation."
G a r n e 11 reported that the
woman's unit va.s heavily armed
with automatic weaponsa burp
gun or a marhlnegun for every
two men.
Sgt. Henry Ganon. who spent
Saturday nkht half-buried by
shell blasts on the hill the worn.
an's unit attacked, said he was
no more than 20 yards from her
.at one point.
Ganon said. "She stood there
blowing her whistle, which the
.Chinese Jumper to obey.
'She would clap her hands to
emphasise hti directions."
A corporal said there wat not
one woman n te Red forces
which hit the British-held hill,
hut two.
He said another woman, dress,
ed ln the uniform of the Red
Chinese Army, directed mortar
units ln suponrt of the Red at-
tack.
He said she was of medium
build, about 5 ft I Ins.. with bob-
bed haid, anc. "positively s wom-
en."


^^^"^I
VAOS TWO
* TB PANAMA AMMICAN AN INDPNDNT DAILY N^'PAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
9WKID MB ru.L'lHrp IV TNI PANAMA *MBRICAN "Ml
FOUND I* NILWN HOUNMVILL IN 1*11
HARMODIO ARIAS. tOITOK
97. H TttT P. O. BOX 1S4. PANAMA, R
TtLIPHONI PANAMA NO. 1-07 40 <9 LINK)
CLt AODRtaa RAMAM1RICAN. PANAMA
LON OMCt It.It* CINTKAL AVINUt ITWItN I *TM ANB
PBKIION iMillM'liill JOSHUA B. POWERS.
348 MACHN AVI. NIW YOUR. (IT) H. Y.
LOCAL
-I MONTH. IN APVANCt t I 70
'OK SIX MONTH! IN ABVANCt ...... SO
o ONI 'in. IN ABVAWSS <*
INC
OF P.
I 3th Struts
inc.
V MAIL
.se
IS oo
2 4 00
Tito Meets Press,
Gives Slivovich
And Spot Answers
BY PETER EDSON
Moybe He Just Doesn't Care for the Sport
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (NEA)
[Marshal Tito, Prime Minuter
I and boss of Yugoslavia, doesn't
[see the foreign and domestic
por respondents assigned to nil
Capital oftener than once every
oo .p.- ton.* ... .. .... a Tr. Pimrhi ARWr-'tworwthree months
hondled in holly on- Bl wheP .ne *J"' hoId a Pr,eM
' .conference, he introduces a few
'tricks that Washington corres-
pondents would like to see Pre-
set day. Lettan aro publukad in too arSar racaivad.
Plaaia try to kaaa tha lattart limitd to ana pogo lanfth.
Identify of lettar wrftan ia held in atrktaat cenfidanca.
This nawtaapar onumat no reiponnbility far ttaramaRti a. opinion!
axpratsed in lattars from raadara.
THIS IS rOW roUM THI HAD1M OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tha Mail Ion it
i'on. Lattart ora racaivad tratafully and ora
fidfntial mannar. -
If you contrwura a latter don't ha impatient if It dootn'l oppair rte
PIECE BY PIECE, LITTLE PIECES
Mail Box
Dear Sir:
i ht.e Just read W.H.B's letter, and while the letter that he
wrote of did not give me too much to think about, W.H.B's did.
I would like to take W.HJ3's letter piece by piece and chew
on it a little, at the same time throw in an observation or two
ot mine.
(1) Atout the C.Z.; according to W.H.B. we are paying only
for the rljht, power, and privilege to build and operate a Canal
here. u s taice this thing from the beginning. Teddy Roose-
velt sends a delegation down here to negotiate the right to build
a Canal, they meet with a delegation from the Panama Gov-
ernment, and this group says sure, "We give you the right,
ower, ana privilege to build a Canal for a certain sum a year."
hey all drink a tew Hi-balls, shake hands and go home.
Next Teddy sends his engineers down to start work. They
are met bv the Panama delegation which says to them like this
"L,ook aniin'i! You have only the right, power, and privilege
to build a Canal, what are you going to use for land?" Thus
acco.ding to W.H.B. we have not paid a nickel for the land, only
for the right, power, ana privilege.
Under tins interpretation 1 see no reason why Panama would
not be within her rights to say, the land in the C.Z. is part of
our national resources, therefore we will Nationalize the Canal
and claim the tolls.
Disregarding the fact that a previous administration allow-
ed a grant in perpetuity they would have plenty of prece-
dents, witness Iran and Egypt.
(2) It has been stated several times in the Mall Box that
the constitution does not apply to the C.Z. It is my belief that a decision of the C.Z. courts can be appealed to the federal
courts In the U.S., and these courts operate under the constitu-
tion.
(3) I object to W.H-8's sneering remark, "Self styled tax
payers." Listen Pal! when the internal revenue people take
J2S.0O at a crack out of my pay I don't call that being self
styled.
(4) W.H.B. says we should be glad to support the govern-
ment that we claim protection of, but then he says the consti-
tution does not apply to us. So where is the protection?
(5) He refers to the rights of free speech, and claims we
could not write to the Mail Box without it. May I remind him
the Mall Box is published in a foreign country outside the rule
of the C.Z. If he wants to find out how much freedom of
speech he has, let him publish a small paper critical of the ad-
ministration and hand it out for free on the C.Z. streets, and
see how far he gets whether his statements are true or not.
R. A. C.
sident Truman Install.
Right after the recent Zagreb
peace conference. Marshal Tito
managed to assemble some 200
American and European cor-
respondents in Belgrade.
Tito took advantage of the;
occasion to spread his particu-
lar brand of propoganda on the
record In a three-hour press
conference few of the corres-
pondents will ever forget
The correspondents were as-
sembled In the White Palace,
which is Tito's official residence
on the old royal pplsre grounds.
It's located on a hill overlook-
ing Belgrade, and It's protected
by what appears to be a strong
military garrison.
The old royal palace, last oc-
cupied by the boy-king. Peter
Is now closed up. Tito's official
residence is a smaller palace
formerly occupied by Prince
Paul, the former regent. Tito
actually lives in a smaller pa-
lace a half mile away.
To start his White Palace
press conference, Tito marched
into a big reception room where
the correspondents were as-
sembled.
He walked through the group
heeled by a big Oerr"-n police
As he strode, to the end
of the reception room, a eer-
vant presentee him with a
tray containing email glas-
ses of Yugoslav slivovich, or
plum brandy, chartreuse and
crerve de menthe. Mind you,
this was at 9:30 a. m.
Hugo Schemke
By BOB RUARK

WHO'S SURE WHO'S RIGHT?
Cristobal, Canal Zone.
W.H.B.,
Co Mall Box,
The t a. a .n: American.
Dear L;r:
Wi are you so cocky, and so sure you are right and that
A >v*?ayei is wrong? 4
When our own Supreme Court can almost never reach a 9
to 0 decision, I. Just a layman, with a limited education, realize
that Justice is as the human mind, and finds any controversy
fair and Just. I realize that any law that will tax one U. S.
citizen and let another group of ci.i?en* not pay their share oi
taxation is not Justice. And W. H. B I have a suspicion that
you are one of them, or you would not have to hide under an
anonymity.
"lhe sum of $80,000,000 has been set aside for housing. Con-
tractors hire li. 8. citizens who do not have to pay any taxes
whatroever and they are competing against our own government
age :s for this work. Do you call that Justice?
ihe Constitution of th u. 8. of A. and the Bill of Rights
were founded on Justice. Our Legislative branch of the govern-
ment passed and enacted in law the N.R.A. In the early 1930s,
and our Supreme Court said, "No boys, you made a mistake.'
Ma: be. and I say "maybe," our Legislative branch made another
mis ;e in passing an unfair tax law for the Canal Zone.
lhat is my opinion and I see by the papera that there are
over 100 more beside me who think as I do. You as an Ameri-
can can have your opinion, and you can fight and holler your
head off for what you think is right. But don't write insulting
remarks about another American who also has the right to lav
what he thinks is right.
I lived in the District of Columbia, and for your informa-
tion you can buy property, build your own home, open a place
of business, shop in competitive stores, and you do not have to
Set out of your home when you reach the age of 82 years. There
i no comparison between the Canal Zone and the District of
Columbia with one exception, and that la that you cannot vote.
You go into legal terms about a "grant in Perpetuity, etc.,
what would be wrong or Illegal with leasing land on a "grant In
Perpetuity" to employes who do care to build their own homes
after spending most of their adult lives here? This could go on
and on, and I could find an opposite view to everything you say,
and maybe I would be more than half right at that.
Whenever the Canal Zone tax case reaches the Supreme
Court Calender, nine of the smartest, most honest and impartir
lawyers that can be found in the U. 8. will decide, and I woulo
be willing to make you a small wager that all nine will not de-
cide alike, even if they should decide taxation for the Canal
Zone is constitutional.
It will not be a nine to nothing decision so If you cannot
set nine of the best human brains that it is possible to fiad, to
think alike, how do you qualify yourself as Lord and Master of
about $5,000,000 of taxable money a year.
George Grace.
NIW YORK. Every time some iurly waiter
spills the soup onto the tablecloth and snarls
Tito took a glass of th e'Rentljr at a reauest tor the tork h forgot or the
randy, raised it and said T:water toe didn't bring; every time this obvious
'rink to the health of the nater P hla Jb oi service looks the other way
presa He downed It in a uin lor conducts a loud argument over whose station
Then the press took a 'shot1 lhe Uble belon * every t,me X ieel llke
>nd Tito led the waTlnLthH crownln" tnls "P-hungry Incompetent with the
conference room Tt h.H lull bua ** then mutter: "Whoa, lads, remem-
aDDearanc. oT .u hJ ber vour irlend Hu> Schemke."
room It wm wht i.JEI Then m*yhe ** uncommitted. Then the
white plaster blood pressure eases back to normal.
walled, with a china cabinet att
one end and high
croM the other end.
Tito is a chain smoker. He
smoked the end of one pack
and broke open another in
the course of the session,
smoking rapidly while
translations of questions and
answers were made from
Yugoslav to French and
English.
Once in a while, when the pressure of living
He uses a curved clnaret
bolder, wi'h an amb-r stem
ind stiver inlaid bowl, shap-
ed like a email pipe.
This mikes t h e ciiaret
tend vertically and keeps
the smoke above his eye
level.
At times Tito played with a
pair of horn-ririmed readln
"lasses, but he did not put them
on.
On his
window? | too fast in New York seems likely to blow the'
boiler, I amble downtown to Luchow's the old
Oerman restaurant that still dwells in the past.
It is a past of grace and quiet courtesy, the
past of Victor Herbert and the young Glsh girls.
I never know what,I am eating in Luchow's,
since I apeak no Oerman and Lake whit they
suggest that day.
I do not' go to Luchow's to eat. I go were to
stretch the nerves, and, perchance, to listen to
Hugo.
Hugo is a peculiar man for these times. He
li happy.
He has been a waiter at Luchow's since 1905.
He is pushing 73 now. He loves hit.work. He
likes people.
Hugo once was in love with a countess, and
he still has an eye tor the well-turned ankle.
Hugo was rich, once, too, when everybody was
rich during the '20s boom. He lost it, of course.
"But I never cared when I lost it," Hugo says.
"I never lived out of my station, so when I lost
it I didn't feel it. How can you lose what you
never really had?"
Hugo believes he will be reincarnated, and
. left wrist was a big
old wat-h, and on the rinSi *hen ne erae8 back to earth again he has one
Danish Butter.....71* lb.
Fresh Crisp Lettuce
From Cerro Punta

Green Onions Rhubarb
Strawberries
PAULS MARKET
finrr of his left hand as a
gold slnet ring. It W8s set with
* huee diamond which st in-
tervals caught the sunlight that
streamed in the window, send-
ing mvriad little lights dancing
across the ceiling.
Tito began the conference bv
i saying that h had no prepared
statement which was some-
thing of a surprise, since he
' has beer known to make
apeechel eight hours long.
But he was readv to answer
'resti'-na in all he answered
-"me 30 qi">a*'ons. p-,9 of n,,
-iswe's we-" ten mln-.-* lona;
~rr"tatln(T them lno Pr-'Un
"d French is what took the
'Tie.
Tito epeVcs French, as
well as German and Rus-
sian ad a fete other south-
ern European languages,
though ht tent so good on
his Ennlish. But whenever
the Trench translator di-'nt
suit him. Tito corrected the
translation.
On his own answers in Yu-
,.*H'V,*T,t0 *p?ke fluently snd
without consulting either hla
"otes or his aides. He knew all
the answers himself
Yugoslav Journalists in at-
ir-ndance spouted obviously
planted questions to give Tito
critics, inside and outside the
Iron curtain.
His whole purpose was to pre-
aeaire: He wants to be a waiter, all over again.
How, he says, could a man meet so many
.ondeiiul people otherwise? How, he layi,
could a man give so much pleasure to so many
people as by seeing they are well fed?
Hugo is a student of astrology, and he can
uote enhguer at you, or Goethe, and he
will casually refer to Ninon de L'Enclos in the
same breath with a personal reference to Anna
Held.
When he conducts you to a table you feel,
through the courtly sweep of his arm, that you
are a duke oelng led to table by the old family
serviior.
Yet there Is nothing servile in Hugo. I have
heard him say: "I am a man of Independent
means. Do not bother about a tip."
The meal that Hugo brings you is the meal
that Hugo himself would order that day, if he
were sitting at the table with a lovely lady,
just prior to a spin down the avenue with a
coach and four.
The way in which he brings it to you is in-
dicative of the fact that he has the entire day
to spend in seeing that you are made happy.
Hugo's gentle, white-haired countenance is
mildly sad when he. con templates the rush, the
fevered pace, of String today.
He is the merest touch impatient with an age
that dashes madly off in no particular direc-
tion.
He Is intolerant of his younger associates In
the waiting trade. "They are not gracious," he
sayi. "They are Just In a hurry, and crazy for
tipa. They take no pride in their craft.
"A waiter," be says, "is a special man. He
can make your day or spoil your day by the way
he serves you.
"When I go out to dine, myself, I do not wish
to have my evening ruined by some young fool
who is only in a hurry to collect his tip and
get off the job. A waiter has an obligation to
his guest. You do not see that often today."
Hugo says the trouble with us today is we
think too much, harass the brain too much.
"When you become too intellectual," he says,
"you lose Intelligence. Intelligence is inside the
man. Intellect is falsely acquired. One kills
the other." '
Hugo says he feels fine, at 72-plus, and that
he regrets no single instance of his life. He
does, however, hope some day to retire.
"I intend to retire," Hugo says. "Exactly one
week before I die."
Declaration Of Bankruptcy
By JOSEPH ALS0P
WASHINGTON. After a remarkable display
feebleness and folly, the State Department
i>as apparently decided to enter a declaration
of bankruptcy for Its Middle Eastern policy.
According to report, Assistant Secretary of
State George McGnee, who has been presiding
over this vital branch of our affairs, is about
to be transierred to the comparative safety ot
our Embassy to Turkey.
, The event Is comparable, or at any rate one
hopes it is comparable, to the declaration 01
Bankruptcy entered for the old Far Eastern pol-
icy in 194.
At that tim, W. Walton Butterworth was
shipped oil to tne embassy in Stockholm, and
che able and ham headed Dean Rusk replaced
aim at the head of the State Department's Far
Eastern division.
If a comparable Improvement can be made in
our Middle Eastern leadership, It la barely con-
ceivable that a full scale Middle e-astern disaster
can still be avoided.
This reporters partner Is now in the Middle
East, assessing the situation tnere on the spot,
it will not be competitive with his work, how-
ever, to note certain repeating errors which
INTER AMERICAN HIGHWAY
,.,Bli? .vm !fi <*** up to the 29th day of November
Wl. at the office of the Minister of Public Works, third
"U?I of..the National Paiaee In Panam City, for the
enatruetlon of a lection of the later American Highway
la the Province of Chlriqui.
Proposals received will be opened in the presence of all
persons interested promptly at ten o'clock In the mring
ef the above mentioned date.
Prospective bidder may obtain plans, specifications and
ether data pertinent to the projected work at the offices
of t'ie Inter American Highway. Via Espaa. No. 18, Pana*
City bv depositing the sum of one hundred dollars
Panam. October 24. i9oi.
NORBBRTO NAVARRO
Ministro de Obras Pblicas.
sent a picture that evervthlnV martted tne handling of the Far Eastern crisis,
in Yugoslavia was lust Hen* and n*v* now cropped up anew in the crisis in
-which of course it isn't, I "?. M!ale E*.t:.
1) The specialist groupings in the State De-
half of this waiter* Mm partment. lite the Middle RMtt.n and Far East-
around pink 'iwhud-flecwa'ali ern <"*"ln. until recently lo..ned separate
demi-tasses of feMk tSuS'&S! WltWn ** ltrMr **"*' oi to' Wontvx
On 4ucers"or nVti '^mltlf I T"*" th" specialists tended, as it were, to take i
Thes* kent tha rVI!if-f.U- out honorary citizenships In the regions of their could be arranged with the powerless Prime
durtailh. iSmS f'^iipeelaltles. Hard and vital American interest* Mintoter Ala; that a rational solution could be
thev aVsT^fnVmi iw L ,*," f beegme obscure to them. They grew indignant, worked out with th. irrational Prim. Mim.t.r
iSSman* S8*5? 5.'LPri?,? Chinese might be Indignant, about th. cor-
be vastly more dangerous than action.
Nothing was done while Cnina subsided into
Communism, because any effort to prevent tnls
catastrophe inevitably entailed grave risks.
Nothing ettecttve was done while the Iranian
crisis went from bad to worse, because there
was nothing to do that was easy and sure oi
results.
But in both cases, while the immediate risks
of eiiort ana action were saieiv avoided, the
inevitable ana lnunueiy greater price of inac-
tion haa to be paid in the end.
Just as the present grim lar Eastern situation
was the sure and mathematically predictable re-
sult of a flabby policy in China, so the present
hideous 'situation in Egypt was the certain out-
come of a flabby policy in Iran.
In bovh cases, the risks that must now be run
are immeasuraoly greater than tne risks that
would have been entailed by fore-handed, pre-
ventive action. In both cases, the chances of
saving something trom the ruins now are much
less man were the chances wnen the trouble
started.
3) By the same token. Judgments of Far and
Middle Eastern affairs of the future were con-
sistently warped by Mlcawbertam.
It was desired to avoid disagreeable and dan-
gerous decision. Therefore it was easier to pre-
dict, as Butterworth predicted, tnat It would be
five aecades betore the Chinese Communists
could organize China and begin to make their
orce felt beyond their frontiers.
And it was easier to assert, a* McGhee suc-
cessively asserted, that the Iranian oil problem
MERRY-GO- ROUND
y 0RIW PI ARSON
Truman rin i h,,v. _*T V * ^mnase mignt oe inaignani, aoout m cui-
lSuratTat th. u^LWli* *? ruPtlon oi " Cmng Ka.-shek regime; or they
But aftr fhrl. J,U.Wf worrled about lranUn Pu'le opinion as ia Iran-
har?n.W th ?.T* of tlto* laa Politician might worry,
narangue, the American corres- *- "-- "--'- ---'
pondenU Just got tired and
walked out
The v. fl embassy staff was
a little worried that it might
create ar. Incident.
But soon after, Tito himself
-ot tired and quit. He was driven
eff from the palace grounds ir
his CaoT'rc, followed by thref
car-ad* of bodyguard* in oper
In the Middle Eastern division, as managed
by McGhee, this tendency expressed itself in a
strange hankering to enter a Sort of Middle
Eastern popularity contest.
And thus when the Iranian oil crisis demand-
ed hard and disagreeable American action to
safeguard American and Western strategic eco-
nomic and political interests, ur interest* were
onhapplly subordinated to this wlll-o-th*-w>*p
jf popularity.
2) In the Middle East, as in the Far East.
the rule wa* ever recognized that iaaetlon can
worked out with the irrational Prime Minister
Mossadegh; that W. A ver ell H arriman would fix
everything (which came nearest to being cor-
rect; and finally that a deal could be made
with Mossadegh in the soothing climate ot
Washington.
Being fomyled on wlshfulness, all these Judg-
ments were Inevitably wrong.
4) In both cases, finally, great efforts have
been made to avoid responsibility for the bad
outcome, by loudly pointing to the follies o.
Chiang Kai-shek and the mistake* ot the Brit-
ish.
But in faet wise American action could ht'.
Sevented those follies and corrected those ml.
ke*. And since American Interests have su.
fered, the Mame i* here.
Drew Pearson says: Gen. Ike and Senator Duff clear up
misunderstanding; Marines raeover from food poison,
mg; Mafia smugglers harass immigration officials.
lMffW.i^I??TP,rW1?t aenerai taenhoa-er said to Senator
Duff after Ike let him down by saying he hadn't "heardtiS.
Senator Duff directly or Indlrecly til^ long time" is one offl
mt speculated questions in Washington W*
..m .vre/he debat ver what the Governor of South Carolina
said to the Governor of North Carolina ^ouna
fror2m,n,iJK5t wat Ike told the uburn-haired senator
irom Pennsylvania, briefly summarized was this- -""lar
at nnrm0 Menta and I didn't realize what was saying untlfit slipped
. J!,.5'0u.me letrleved his fumble at a subsequent press eonferenrah iWn'i
'nave8bSn %SS *>Jotion2o tto one" HoSSTfrteSd. who
r/ouTd react.17* 8 l0Dg.tney K*U,V* "** ^ow how i
CAPITAL NEWS CAPSULES
.-f'ffE. ?n SS effThirty senators left for home last
in % VSB? pa#ng P,tnlr bill *t the Senate dm^MoaV
?^i0PH0 W- n\tln-wlde Food Service, which runs thf nta
SrSth. to a ye.r.trylng * CUect "me torial blS for s
h..e't0r!.8 3u*1 don't Py easily. The list of senatorial dead-
ffi^if 0Ver to th Senate Rules Committee, but i|
is totter guarded than any secret regarding the atom bomb
* rS*" Ttp?lt how.eve/. that one senator is carried on the cuff
for $500; another, defeated in 1950, still hasn't paid hta bill!
.m,YnK,uky buelneat-The free enterprise system^-_.nd
small businessmen in particular-took it on the chin again wheh
the Justice Department's Antitrust Division was forced by CoS
S0sntaf?Cnny"PlnChln| t0 flfe P" Cent oi ite WW
This cut will tie the hands of the tnjst-bustera at a time when
the nation's largest corporations are becoming so fat with de.
^V.nnttro,Ctl!etwlthreaten to dr,Ve KaSfol smaUVul
ConSmXte^^
M^9lV^m*fil'Ur9?n*~7h0'h ew Vork'dock striken
^.rsomV^uWrtk'wT^ PenU0n P,na,r' " WOrrte"
They plan a new government organisation composed of long-
shoremen and stevedores, who will be regular Government CM
8.,.eV^mpi0y! ~ Uke Pitmen and thus not permitted to
strike The Pentagon believe, this will insure protectfon torMili-
tary suppUe* in the event if future labor trouble on the water-
front. ,
Unfounded rumor departmentMarine Corp families, alarm-
ed over rumors that a serious dysentery epidemic has heepltallz-
ed more than 1,200 Marines on maneuvers off the Atlantic Coast
should know the real facts: A mild form of food poisoning ln^
lected 208 Marines only. ^^ *~""a i-
.._ i?oweTe.r- a thousand of their buddies had to be quarantined
briefly until doctors oould diagnose the trouble. The quarantine
has now been lifted and all 208 of the sick Marines are back,
MAFIA SMUGGLING RING
It has been kept out of the newspapers, but immigration
agents have been ordered to round up "hundreds" of Sicilia a
desperadoes, believed smuggled into this country.
They have been aided and protected by the powerful alafia,
the secret underworld society that holds a mysterious control'
over the nation's top racketeers. '
The original tip to be on the lookout for these Sicilian ban-
dits came from the Army nearly two years ago.
Warned a secret Army report: "Many hundreds of members
of bandit gangs have been landed in the United States clandes-
tinely."
They have been "arriving at almost every port on the east
coast, somaggaes being taken-off In small boats before the ship
docked and at other times being taken oft by Members of the
crew who were also Sicilians."
Full tory Is told in a recent confidential report by C. H. Pen-
nlngton, Chief Immigration Investigator for New York. It reads:
"The bandits usually went to North Africa by fishing boats,
and there went aboard Sicilian boats, compelling the officers to
take them aboard as stowaways under the threat of what might
happen to their families In Sicily if they did not.
"The smuggling rings are operated like most any business
might be operated.
"The affairs of the organisation are usually directed by one
?erson' who in private business would be called the manager or
he president, under his direction, so-called salesmen look for
persons In the United State, who have relatives abroad, want
them brought Into the United States and have sufficient funds to
pay to have them brought in.
"These salesmen have contacts amongst the foreign-born who
will get them business."
"In addition, the organizations have persons In the countries
to pick up additional business, see that proper arrangements are
made and that the stowaway is placed aboard the vessel in ears
of tne proper persons."
Pennington's confidential report also takes a crack at legi-
timate businessmen "known to have obtained cheap labor (smug,
gled aliens) and at the same time retain their own air Of respect-
ability."
"A large (Newark, N. J.) road contractor," say Pennlngten,
"was obtaining this type of labor in large numbers
"A large-scale investigation was conducted that resulted In
the apprehension of about 90 aliens, most of whom had arrlvod
In the United States as stowaways."
The Sicilian bandits smuggled into this country are believed
to be serving as gunmen and runners for the Mafia.
1.
THE DIPLOMATIC CABLES
Russia has secretly promised Egypt complete political back'
lng, if Egypt will organize the Arab states into an all-out Cold
War against Britain. This proposal was made by the Polish min-
ister to Egypt, Jan Drahojowskl. to the secretary-general of the
Arab League, Assam Pasha.
Prime Minister Churchill Ignored tne advke of the American
embassy when he suggested another Big 4 meeting. The Ameri-
can embassy got Wind of Churchill's speech and tried to head it
olf, feeling that a Big 4 meeting would only put us in the hole
Churchill, however, went ahead with his speech exactly as he had
written it, while U. 8. Ambassador Glfford sizzled
The Egyptian press Is flooded with pictures showing alleged
Egyptian citizens behind barred wire In British concentration
comps. Truth Is that the pictures were taken ln^Malayaand
show Chinese Communists behind barbed wire, not Egyptian.
General Van Fleet has cabled Washington that tne Reds are
uslngoxen In some areas to haul guns and supplies to the front.
Van Fleet is convinced that transport will turn out to be the Com-
munists Achilles' heel, because Allied fliers are now destroying
7,0G0 Chinese trucks per month. If Allied planes can keep this up,
the Russians, who are supplying these trucks, will call it quit*.
(Copyright, 1951, By The Bell Syndicate, Inc.)
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT API
.IS
IIDAJOI
CATS FILL YOUR lSEEDS^
ii an i i ii




WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER II. Mn
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEFENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
VAGI
-....... ..........
Democrats WooSouthernRebels
WithHiiTruman WillNotRun
WASHINGTON, Nov. 21.(UP)Administra-
tion Democrats offered rebellious Southerners a
compromise Civil Rights platform yesterday in
hopes of luring- them back into the party before
the 1952 elections.
At the same time, Sen. A. S. Mike Monroney,
(D-Okla.) said it is his "guess" that President Tru-
man will not run for re-election. He was the third
Democratic senator in as many days to predict that
the President will no be a candidate.
The two development* ap-
peared linked. One Border state
Democrat, who asked not to be
Identified, said he doubted that
the Southerners would accept
the CMl Rights compromise If
Mr. Truman Is the party's can-
didate. Otherwise, there were
signs It might be acceptable.
Other political developments:
Mr. Truman denied anew that
he ever offered Oen. Dwlght
Elsenhower directly or Indi-
rectly the 1952 Democratic
Presidential nomination.
Sen. Frank Carlson (R-Kans.)
laid in Prance after a visit with
Eisenhower that he hopes the
situation in Europe will improve
to the point where the general
"will be available" for the Re-
publican nomination. Carlson
said he and Elsenhower talked
politics.
The national committee di-
recting Sen. Robert A. Taft's
bid foe the OOP nomination
opened Its drive for Wisconsin's

Big New Pipeline
Bring Here Oil
Soufheas!
BREMEN, Ga., Nov. 21 (UP)
Gov. Herman Talmadge will de-
dicate a second petroleum pipe-
Une linking Baton Rouge, La.,
with Charlotte. N.C., at a cere-
mony here Dec. 4, It was an-
nounced today.
The new $52,000,000 line paral-
lels, and more than doubles the
capacity of the present line
which links the Louisiana and
Texas refineries to six South-
eastern states.
Charles R. Younts, president of
the Plantation Pipe Line Co.,
which operates both lines, said
the new line Is geared to the ex-
pansion of the South and to na-
tional defense needs.
"With the opening of the new
line our delivery rate will rise
from th'e present run of 4,000,000
gallons of petroleum products
dally to 10,000,000 gallons early in
1852," he /aid.
"This rate can be increased
another 50 per cent to keep pace
with the South's future Industrial
growth by the addition of new
pump stations," he said.
The dedication will mark the watched, another Melrose pol-
10th anniversary of- the opening iceman stood before a window
of the original 1281 miles of in the home of Mr. and Mrs.
main an dlateral lines which now | Joseph P. Dawley and then
votes at the convention next
Jury. It announced appoint-
ment of Harvey V. Hlgley, for-
mer state GOP chairman, as
head of the "Bob Taft commit-
tee of Wisconsin."
Southern Democrats said the
compromise Civil Rights olan
was offered them by Sen. Clin-
ton P. Anderson (D-N.M.) of
the Democratic Senatorial cam-
paign committee.
They said he tried to persuade
them to accept a Civil Rights
plank drafted by the platform
committee at the 1948 Demo-
cratic convention.
That plank consisted of a
general statement on the con-
troversial Issue. It was rejected
on the convention floor In favor
of a stronger program offered
by Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey
(D-Mlnn.). Some Southern de-
legates bolted the convention as
a result.
The Humphrey plank put the
party on record In favor of a
Fair Employment Practices
Commission, a Federal antl-
lynchlng law, non-segregation
in the Armed Forces and aboli-
tion of poll taxes.
Sen. John J. Sparkman ID-
Ala.) said he thuoght the South-
erners at least would take it
only on condition that Mr. Tru-
man is not a candidate again.
Sparkman, who usually sup-
ports the Administration al-
though not on Civil Rights
said Monday he had a "hunch"
Mr. Truman will not run again.
The same sentiments were
voiced Sunday by Sen. Edwin C.
Johnson (D-Colo.).
Moonlight Court
Session Convicts
Peeping Cop
MALDEN, Mass., Nov. 21 (UP)
A Melrose policeman was con-
victed of being a Peeping Tom
today by a Judge who held a
special court session by moon-
light on a quiet residential
street.
Judge Lawrence G. Brooks
fined policeman Arthur J. Duf-
fy $20. Duffy appealed and was
freed in personal recognizance
pending superior court action.
Last night while Judge Brooks
connects the refining areas with
18 terminals in Mississippi, Ala-
bama, Georgia, South Carolina,
North Carolina and Tennessee.
The new line consists of 432
miles of 18-inch pipe and 275
miles of 14-lnch pipe running
parallel to the original line of
10-inch and 12-lnch pipe ter-
minating at Greensboro, N.C.
peeked Inside.
The Judge wanted to ascen-
tain whether a man could look
In the window and whether he
couldjbe identified from 30 feet
away. A young couple in a park-
ed automobile said they saw
Duffy peeping while he was on
duty.
BIRD IN THE HAND. Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei VI-
shlnsky, as a gesture of his country's peaceful intentions,
clutches a dove In his fist while speaking at the UN Oen-
eral Assembly in Paris. A French woman had handed the
un caged bird to Vishinsky as he entered the building.
JACOBV ON BRIDt
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
WIST (D)
AAJ1078
RQ
:A.
J65
NORTH
4.882
AJ10082
? KJS
A
A
BAR
4.3
974
? 10984
? 87432
SOUTH
? Q78S
? KQ108
Both sides vuL
Nttik b
IV Pan *N,T.
IN.T. Fus pas*
Wen
In
Pan
Pan
Opening lnd?J
of diamonds, and a natural
trump trick were enough to set
the contract two tricks. North
actually became annoyed and
dropped an additional trick, for
a loss of 800 points. The total
swing on this hand was there-
fore 1430 points. j j.

HURRY! Only a little time
left 'til Xmas!
Brooklyn was once known as
the city of churches and now
seems to be most famous for its
baseball team. It Is also raising
a large crop of young bridge ex-
perts, so maybe Brooklyn will
soon have another claim to fame.
Four of these young men,
barely out of their teens, made
up a team in the national cham-
pioshlps at Washington, together
with Mrs. Augusta Cantor, of
New York. In their very first
round they showed the quality of
their game by knocking out a
strong Cleveland team that has
several national championships
notched on Its belt.
The hand shown today played
an Important part in their vic-
tory. Mrs. Cantor made the key
decisions with the North cards
when she bid three no-trump
instead of rebiddlng her hearts.
It was unusual, of course, to
prefer a no-trump contract with
a hand that contained a strong
six-card major suit and a single-
ton. Mrs. Cantor's reason was
that East was bound to be short
In spades and might be able to
defeat a heart contract by ruf-
fing spades. She had three
spades in her own hand, counted
on South to have at least three
for his bid of two no-trump, and
counted on West to have at least
five for his opening bid. That left
two at most for East, with a very
strong chance that East had only
one.
The play at no-trump was very
simple. West led the jack of
spades, which rode around to de-
clares queen. Jerry Baraha. the
Brooklyn expert who was play-
ing the South hand, next dev-
eloped the diamonds and clubs,
and eventually fell back on the
hearts to make his game con-
tract. East couldn't gain the lead i
with the proverbial crowbar, so
declarer's king of spades was safe
against attack. Barsha made ten
tricks for a score of 830 points.
When the hand was played at
the other table, the Cleveland
team got to four hearts doubled
with the North-South cards. The
Cerner "H" and Darln Streets Tel. 2-2181 singleton spade was opened, and j
Aleo In Coln: Front St. in "Arena de Coln'' Bldg. Tel. 1212 East managed to ruff two spades
USE TOUR XMAS DOLLAR NOW I **ih M" **" fump*- The ace of!
________^__^________ spades, two spade ruffs, the ace
<.f"" **** *'**'*f re),eh fe the. heme.
9eftt+St*e*t*i*f.
jt
fki/ifip/ne Krtem fimirhn>e.
Lady's Groen.... $44.50
Man's Gruen $40.7
\
90 trulff accurate
...o truly curved
... Groen Curvex! No other
i watch is like it in the
world! Select your Gruen
I Curvex from our wide
assortment.
LAY IT AWAY TODAY.
Small deposit holds your
gift 'til Christmas.
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
1$7 CENTRAL AVE. 187
DONT FORGET TO USE
YOUR XMAS DOLLAR
Home Rule Working
In Many US Cities
CHICAGO, Nov. 24 (UP.)
Cities of six states this year
made progress in their peren-
nial battle for home rule, ac-
cording to the American Mu-
nicipal Association.
In Connecticut, the legis-
lature gave cities the right to
"make, amend, add to or re-
place" their charters. Propos-
ed amendments require a ma-
jority vote and 51 per cent of
the qualified voters must par-
ticipate.
The latter provision was re-
garded as a "Joker," because
none-voters In effect cast a
negative vote which could sty-
mie many cities.
In Rhode Island, votes a-
dopted overwhelmingly a home
rule amendment which permits
cities to draw up new home
rule charters. Such charters
will give to the cities all pow-
ers on loeal matters except
those denied them specifically
by state constitution, chiefly
concerning debts and taxes.
A honre rule bill for Georgia
offers municipalities their first
real opportunity for a large
measure of self-government In
strictly local affairs. The city
council or 30 per cent of the
eligible voters may petition for
a charter commission.
Tennessee's legislature en-
acted a call for a limited con-
stitutional convention to draft
amendments providing muni-
cipal home rule and a sys-
tem of optional municipal
charters.
Maryland enacted four city
charters permitting specified
cities to amend state-granted
municipal law. West Virginia
gave all Its municipalities the
taxation and financial powers
granted to home rule cities.
In Massachusetts, approval
Is anticipated on a dlluded
home rule bill. In Washington
however, a home rule bill was
rejected, although cities and
counties were given the right
to set their own office hours.
JOIN US FOR
ffianksgvngjDi*
m
enu
DBV MARTINI COCKTAIL:
Celery Green Onions Rartihe> olive
Frrsh Oyster Cocktail or Hawaiian Pmrapple
Oxtail
Filet of Corbiaa Saute Mcanlere
CHOICE OF WHITE or RED WTNE:
art Tom Turkey Base Drnalnt Glblat Gravy
Cranberry Satire
Candle* Sweet rotate Snow Cray Buttered Sajaaall
Hot Bella A Barter
Heart of Stales Lettuce A Sliced Tomato**
in* Island Or-ssini
CHOICE or DESSERTS:
Pumpkin PI* Lemon Sherbet Minced Moat PI*
Dutch Apple Pie
Dcasi Tasa*
S3 M PER PERSON
si &
cJ
*DUt U
mUinirtf
pi.
taiurti
For Reservation Please Call 2-1221 or 2-1226
USED BUICK SALE OF THE YEAR
Here you'll find the BUICK you've always wanted.
AT THE PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD to pvi *
1 * * ana* *


3P1
1948 SUPER 4-Door
new light green paint,
seat covers, new tires!
.
1949 SUPER 4-Doer DYNAFLOW
lastic seat cover
lack, new tires!
lastic seat covers, radio,
la
1949 SUPER 4-Door DYNAFLOW
plastic seat covers, white side alls,
radio, light blue.
1949 SUPER 4-Door
black, plastic seat coven,
white sidewalls.
1950 SUPER 4-Door
new dark blue, plastic
eat covers, radio, new tires!
1950 SPECIAL 4-Door
light gray, plastic seat
covers, new tires!
1949 ROADMASTER DYNAFLOW 4-Dr.
plastic seat covers, radio, new tires!
1948 SUPER 4-Door
black, eeat covers, good tire*.
1949 SUPER 2-Door SEDANETTE
new paint, DYNAFLOW,
radio, new tires!

1949 SUPER 4-Door DYNAFLOW
radio, teat coren, new tre!

1948 SUPER 4-Door

dark green, plastic seat covers,
radio, vent shades, new tire!
1949 ROADMASTER CONVERTIBLE
DYNAFLOW black, new top,
white sidewalls, radio,
red leather interior!

1946 SUPER 4-Door


new paint, green metallic,
white sidewalls, seat covers.
1949 SUPER CONVERTIBLE
cream, red leather, radio,
new tires, DYNAFLOW!
1949 SUPER CONVERTIBLE


maroon, new top, radio,
white sidewalk. DYNAFLOW,
leather Interior.
All are VERY LOW MILEAGE CARS and in EXCELLENT CONDITION! N\ f /y* _
COME IN... LOOK 'EM OVER... DRIVE THE ONE OF YOUR CHOICE '
AND YOU'LL SEE WHAT A BARGAIN IT IS!
SMOOT & PAREDES
Your BUICK & CHEVROLET Dealer


ON AUTOMOBILE ROW
PANAM
FOR
A BEWITCHING
SMILE
*fm^m^,^ . ^m m ^
PEPS0DENT
TOOTH PASTE
"" *"-" bs* a am
FOR
CAPTIVATING
BEAUTY








'
PAGE FOim

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21. 1951
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures 1
Shipping & AirLine News
TERRY-
ONE MAN'S MEAT...
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrives
S.S. Metapn ..................................No- 27
S.S. Inger Skou ...............................Nov. 30
S.S. C'hiriqui ..................................Dec. 2
-Handling Rcfriftratea' Chilled and Grnrrai Cano
Arrives
New York Service_____________________Cristobal
S.S. Tivives ...................................Nov. 24
S.S. Junior ....................................Nov. 27
A Steamer....................................Nov. 30
S.S. Cape Ann .................................Dec. 2
S.S. Heredia ...................................D*c- 4
I'lHfl'ENT SAILINGS KOM CRISTOBAL TQ WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA.
Cristbal to New Orleans via
lela. Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
S.S. (hirlqui ..........i....................... *
S.S. C'hiriqui.................................."** "
CRISTOBAL 2121
TELEPHONES:
PANAMA 2-2804
COLON 20
Missile
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted
missile
'! 0 Lasting
quality
11 Joker
13 City in niinois
3 Therefore
6 Wading bird
7 Indian coin
8 "Tar Heel
State" (ab.)
9 Obtain
11 It is made of
hard------
114 Make lace 12 Italian river
edging 15 And
17 Correlative of] 6 Bound
Answer to Previous Puxzle
3JEJL1HI3 mm annnMJi
warjcaceji^laa -)>w.i:
e?u:z: iair-i2ii-i" .cu 1, r
rji-jia.- Hi^BJiiEi^fcjuH
21ML1
U11I i:
1 I2JL4-; S-ritO; ^-m'^.U
a IIZIUSIM HU. .I -I ;-
PAA Instructors on West Coast
Study DC-6Bs
In preparation for servicing
the 18 new DC-6Bs it has on
order. Pan American" World
Airways has sent eight mem-
bers of its Latin American Di-
vision instructor staff to the
Douglas Aircraft Company fac-
tory in Santa Monica. Calif-
ornia, for a final checkout on
the planes.
On their return to Miami
early in December, the in-
structors specialists in vari-
ous fields of aircraft mainten-
jance will train the Pan
American crews who will ser-
vice the luxury Clippers.
a *
Prior to leaving for Calif-
ornia, the instructors spent, six
weeks "in school" in Miami.
1 with experts from the Douglas
factory as the "professors."
Having completed their class-
room course, they were sent
to California for first-hand
look-see at the PAA-ear-
marked planes as they roll a-
long the production line.
The group includes seven
MiamiansJoe Braswell, James
Alspaugh. George Emlg, Alphie
Hance. James Johansen, Har-
old Kelt and Charles Thomas
and Robert Spangler.
i-ano flights recently added an
extra section on weekends.
1 cainnlne- December 3, the
Constellation-type Clipper flights
will provide two more round -
trips a week between Panama
and the United States. The new
service also supplementswith
nonstop flightsthe twice-daily
flights between Panama and
Guatemala City. The Constella-
tions make their only stop en
route at the Guatemalan capital.
ACOB
CANASTA
FRECKLES AND BIS FRIENDS
WHO'D LOOK THERE?
BY MERRILL BLOSSER
either
II Interstices
20 Chinese
measure
21 Burden
23 Part of a face
25 Specks
128 Stepped
127 Pronoun
'28 Sun god of
Egypt
'29 Bone
30 Half an em
31 Throw
33 Eras
36 Poker stake
*7Try
3*------can be
Tpttt#nto
-----mcoII
I Ocean full.
45 Negative reply
46 Chance
48 Senile
49 Span*
10 It originated
in------
. 13 Gave
VERTICAL
1 Plead
2 Atop
3 German river
4 Hybrid animal
18 Taxes
19 Begs
22 Greatesl
24 Fruit
31 Caudal
appendage
12
34
35
40
41
42
Preposition
Anglo-Saxon
slave
Pack
Comfort
Social insects
Mud
43 Dash
44 Shoe part
47 Spigot
49 Passing fancy
51 Abraham's
home (Bib.>
52 That is (ab.)
faerfooiylteafe Classify
Panama's Position
As Air Hub Strengthened
By New Los Angeles Service
Panama's position as one of
the most important air junctions
in the worldand as a vital
gateway between the Americas
is brini; materially strengthened
by Pan American World Airways'
new Panama-Los Angeles serv-
ice.
Tocumen International Airport
1 already is he hub of Pan Ameri-
can system routes radiating in
I six directions and serving as ma-
ny different geographical areas.
Constellation-type Clippers, be-
ginning December 3, will link it
with still another vast areathe
United States Pacific Coast.
Other spokes in the wheel
are the route through Central
America to Mexico City and
Houston; the direct route to
New Orleans; the direct route
to Miami; the route across the
South American north coast
through Colombia and Vene-
zuela to Trinidad; the route to
Medellin, Colombia and the
route down the west coast of
South America to Buenos Aires.
Panama's growing importance
in PAA's world-wide system was
underscored three months ago
when It was designated as an op-
erating base and 18 captains and
first officers were stationed
there to serve as flight crews on
Clippers operating through Cen-
tral America and to Medellin.
Traffic records, too, show Pa-
nama's strides In the air trans-
port field. From one flight a
week in 1929, when PAA first
crossed the Caribbean to Pana-
ma, Clipper service has been
constantly stepped up to accom-
modate the increasing flow of
travel. This year, for example,
Pan American has expanded Its
economical tourist flights be-
tween Tocumen and Miami from
three to six flights weekly In
each direction.
The daily luxury El Interame-
BV OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
"Please tell me the correct
play in the following situation,"
requests a reader. "Both sides
needed 120 points for the initial
meld. Everybody began by throw-
ing sixes and fives and fours with
a few assorted high cards that
fortunately got by.
"Eventually the pack contain-
ed natural canastas of sixes and
fives together with some other
valuable oddments. At this stage
my right hand opponent melded
the following cards from his
hand: Joker-K-K-K Q-Q-2. Then
he discarded a four, which hap-!
pened to be quite safe.
"I drew from the stock and
then held: A-A K-K-K Q J-J 7-7 '
2-2. Assuming that everybody in
the game was a good player, what
WU my correct play?
"I actually melded A-A-2 K-K-.
K J-4-2 and discarded a seven.
If this is not the best play, would
you say that it is reasonable,
poor, or horrible?"
The correct playis to discard a
deuce, freezing the deck. To meld
and make an unsafe discard is
somewhat worse than horrible.
By the time the discard pile
contains two natural canastas
and other valuable cards, noth-
ing matters except getting the
pile, or at least making surej
that the opponents don't get it.'
It's better not to meld at all and
to let the opponents go out than |
to meld and lose a pack of that
size.
Let's suppose that the next
player has a seven and a wild
card or a pair of sevens. If he
picks up the pack with either of
these holdings, he will get two
natural canastas and an excellent
start towards two or three more
canastas. His side will probably
score at least two or three thou-
sand points and will surely win
the game. That's, the worst that
can happen if you meld and dis-
card a seven. What's more, it's
very likely to happen.
Now let's see what can happen
if you freeze the pack. You can
probably discard safely by throw-
ing kings and then whatever Is
safe by that time. Your partner
can surely discard safely to a
four-card hand. At worst, the
enemy will meld out and catch
you with your entire hand and
maybe a red three or two.
They will score sht or seven
hundred points and will catch
you with perhaps three or four
hundred. Your net loss will be
only about one thousand points.
Moreover, the game will probably
still be unfinished, and you will
have another chance to win it on
the next hand.
ALLEY OOP
NO NOISE AT ALL!
BY V. T. HAMLfN
CHRIS WELKEN. Planeteer
SPACE RIDERS
BY RL'SS WINTEBBOTHAM




WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, lflSl
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAI
racihc *2)ocietu

Bo. 17, &&~ VJL &&~ 352f
WELTZ-DCDZIN8KI MARRIAGE ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. F.mil A. Woltt. f Ralbo, announce the
marriage of their daaghter, Shirley Ann Welt, to Mr. Vin-
cent Ditdzinski, Warrant Officer Junior Grade, son of Mr.
and Mr*. Walter Dudslniki, of PitUharfh, PennsylTann.
which took place Tuesday at two thirty o'clock in the Port
Clayton Chapel with Chaplain John T. Hayes (Captain) of-
fieiatinr at the ceremony.
Mrs. Dudzinskl graduated from
(he Canal Zone Junior College
with the Class of 184. Mr. Dud-
zitiskl Is with the United State
Army.
The young couple will leave for
the United States on Friday to
make their home at Port Han-
cock, New Jersey.
Cocktail Party Held
Aboard Colombian Destroyer
The commanding; officers of
the visiting Colombian ships Cal-
das and Ciudad de Perelra. Cap-
tain de Corbeta Luis Riverla and
Captain de Frigata Aurelio Peri-
co and the commandant of the
Colombian Naval Academy in
Cartagena, Captain de Corbeta
Wenborne, Mr. and Mrs. Fred
8111. Mr. and Mrs. Edward J.
Lucas, Captain and Mr. John
B. Brown; Mr. and Mrs. Charles
P. Abernathy, Commander and
Mrs. Ed Poote, Master Sergeant
and Mr. Henry F. Yarbrough,
Dr. MfdMrs. E. B. Robinson,
Mr. and Mrs. A. Donaldson,
Captain and Mrs. M. C. Hill,
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Alves. the
Very Rev. Raymond T. Ferris
and Mrs. Ferris, Mrs. Margaret
W. Rennis. Major William H.
Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. W. C.
Dunscombe, Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert Medlnger, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Hlnz, Miss Claire Ogden,
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Chase and
Mr. and Mrs. J. Matthews.
Ing. Jaime Erato. A., entertain-
ed at cocktails Sunday night a- Hotel Panama to Carve
board the Colombian destroyer Thanksgiving Turkey at Tablea
-. . j... mi... tt c n--*l*. f map than iY WI
Caldas berthed at Pier 1, U.S.
Naval Station, Rodman, from 6
to 8 p.m.
The Colombian vessels are on
a midshipmen training cruise.
The ships departed Sunday night
at 13 p.m. and stood out for Mal-
pelo Island about 350 miles south
by southwest of Balboa.
Among the guests were the
United States Ambassador to Pa-
nama and Mrs. John C. Wiley,
the Charge d'Affaires of the Co-
lombian Embassy and Mrs. Leo-
poldo Borda Roldan and their
two daughters Helena and Jac-
quellna, Captain L. E. Coley.
Parties of more than six who
Bingo Tomorrow Night
at Legion Club
Bingo will be played tomorrow
night at even thirty o'clock to-
morrow night at the American
Legion Club at Fort Amador.
Prizes will be awarded.
Me Averted
In Blood Plasma .
Processing Plant
WASHINGTON. Nov. 21 (UP)
A strike which threatened to
cut off the Army's supply of
blood plasma was averted today
when the CIO Chemlnal Work-
ers and Sharp and Dohme. Inc.,
of Philadelphia reached agree-
ment on a contract.
Details of the agreement were
not announced. It was reached
after 16 hours of continuous
bargaining by the union and
management.
Representatives of the Defense
RUTH MILLETT Says
Mothers of teen-age daughters
frequently admit that their
daughters are so critical of them
they feel like failures.
They usually want to know
what they can do about it. The
answer Isnot too much, except
suffer through the daughter's
adolescense. But there Is a lot
the husband and father in the
family can do.
If he often compliments his
wife in front of his daughter, the
youngster is bound to be Impres-
sed.
If the reminder of all the
things the mother does for
the daughter comes from the
father. It sinks in. If It comes
from the mother it Is usual-
ly resented.
It doesn't hurt, either, for
the father of a teen-age girl
to say to her occasionally: "I
hope you'll be as good a cook
as your Mother some day"
or "I believe you're going to
be almost as pretty as your
Mother." Remarks like that
remind the teen-age girl who
is inclined to be critical of her
mother that the mother Is

really quite a woman. Else
why would her husband be so
proud of her?
So here Is a tip for fathers!
of teen-age daughters: If
you've noticed that your i
daughter Is pretty critical of:
her mother and Inclined to
take all her work and sacrif-
ices for granted. It Is time for
you to step into the picture.
Not as a high-handed father I
who is determined to force bis
daughter to treat her mother
with more respect.
But as a loyal and admir-
ing backer for your wife. Show
your admiration and respect
for your wife, and aee if your
daughter doesn't come to have
more respect and admiration
for her.
This is a situation where
your wife can't do much, but
you can do a lot.
BECRONS TO GRAVE
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (U.P.)
Jimmy Monroe, 4, suffered a
compound fracture of the leg. He
pulled a tombstone over on him-
self.
LISA DANIELY, charming
newcomer to the screen, who is
reported to offer in "Lilll Mar-
lene" an outstanding perform-
ance as the girl about whom
the song was written. Hugh
McDermott appears opposite
Miss Danlely In this monarch
film production for RKO west-
ern hemisphere release.
Parties of more inan six wno; Dtment an(J the redera,
gather at Hotel El Panama for M^,u service also took
their old fashioned Thanks-! t i
giving dinner will see their *
turkey carved at their own ta-
ble. Half-prices have been an-
nounced for children under 12
year of age.
Dinner will be served all day
at El Panama. From 12 noon
until 7 p.m. the festive meal
will be served In the Balboa
Room, and from 7 p.m. until
closing time In the Bella Vista
Room. An orchestra wlU play
for dancing in the Bella Vista
room.
Some 2,000 workers are ex-
pected to ratify the agreement
at a meeting In the Phlladel-
Dhla plant tonight. The strike
had been scheduled to start at
midnight.
Sharp and Dohme processes
about a third of the Army's sup-
ply of blood plasma. The threat-
ened strike had caused the Ar-
my to halt blood collections at
11 Eastern military installa-
tions.
Prior to settlement, the three-
man panel of Federal mediators
U8N Chief of Staff. 15th Naval
District, representing the Com-1 Jr. andMrs. jonnaon
mandant. Rear Admiral Albert, to Entertain for House Guests ha(, ^m^ the union and com
M Bledsoe, USN. Captain H. C.i Mr. and1MB. F. R-Ji.h"?01n' pany that the government
Fish USN. commanding officer, lof Raboa Heights will entertain wou}d not p^^ a strlke. x^y
.....natation. Rodman and Mrs. on Friday In heFern Room of Mld lhe dlSpUtewould be sent
commanding officer. Mar- the Hotel Tlyoli with a recepUonto president Truman if an
;--------,.- ^-ii t Tn,. to be given in honor of tneir tgreement was not reached.
house guests. Mr. and Mrs. Mag-1 jtnal issue In the contract
nus Sommer, of Caracas. Vene- diSpUte involved union demands
zuela and former residents of I for a union shop. Previously,
Panama who arrived on the the union and company had
fcNaval
jp^K loll, W^ ^^ m ^ -w -
Une Barracks Colonel H. J. Tur-
'ton and Mrs. Turton. Captain
r, *nd Mrs. C. O. Ollsson, USN and
other officers of the Naval Sta-
tion and Headquarters 15th Na-
1 val District.
Isthmus by plane Sunday from
the United States en route to
South America.
Commander and Mb. Halloran
Entertain at Army-Navy Club
Commander and Mrs. Hdward Mr. and Ma. Coreo
RooseVelt Halloran. U.S. Navy.
entertained Sunday night after
the cocktail party aboard the Co-
lombian destroyer Caldas, "with a
dinner at the Army-Navy Club,
Fort Amador, honoring the Com-
mandant of the Colombian Na-
val Academy at Cartagena, Cap-
agreed on a 4.4-cent hourly wage
Increase, plus other benefits.
Picture Window Proves
RetunT from Wedding Trip To Be Hazard For Birds
Mr and Mrs. Jose Coreo,
whose marriage took place here' BELLEVILLE. 111. (UP 11 -
recently have returned from,The Armln Oantners Installed
their wedding trip to Costa Rica.! a large picture window in their
and are now at home to thelri home to get a full view of
friends In Bella Vista.
Lester* Return from States
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lester,
of Balboa, returned Monday on
the S.S. Cristobal from New
York. Thay attended the wed-
ding of their son, Mr.
tain de Corbet Ihg. Jaime Era-
ao.A.
r
Former Reaidenta are Viaiting
un i fioiu Costa Riea
Mt. and Mrs. Maurice Gabriel, ding o their son. Mr- cngJJ" The" other three, crippled by
fomeVraaldents Of PafcAma, are Lester and Miss Hilda Htoz, ^ ^puA.
placid Lake St. Clalr.
The window has proven to
be a traffic hazard for birds.
Recent casualties Included a
covey of eight quail. Five of
the birds were "killed when
'* we."" they flew against the window.
CnarieS *>.. ?>, thw. <-rlnnlri h
cSSCind while on thejF. Hlnz. of Ancon^Jhfch w
managed
to
UMU HOtel mtrs!tSylcmh^2.
Panama.
Dinner and Shower
Honors Engaged Couple
On Sunday, at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Henry T.. Lelsy .of Pe-
dro Miguel. Mrs. Xelsy and Mrs.
C Roland Jones entertained with
a dinner and a klUhen shower
givn in. honor of Miss Jean Kles-
wetter and her fiance. Sergeant
Edward Maim, whose marriage
will take place on December 6.
Those entertained with the
honor guests were Mr. and Mrs.
Emeat M. Kleswetter, Mr. and
Mrs. William Lundy, Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Jones, Mrs. James
W. Barrett, Mr. Edna McClaln.
Mr. Edwin Y. Wuley. Mr. Ro-
land Jones, Mr. Henry Luce and
Mr. Ralph Luce.
Tower Club Holds Meeting
The regular monthly meeting
of the Tower Club of the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke was held Mon-
day evening at six thirty o'clock
ir Bishop M&rrls Hall. Those at-
tending Included: Mr. and Mrs.
E L". Payne. Mr. and Mrs. Da-
vid Yerkes. Mr. andMrs. J. Pal-
mer Smith, Mr- and Mrs. Roy
Reeae. Mr. Barbara Bach. Mr*.
J. R. McLavy, Mr. and Mrs. W.
O. Fritz, Rev. and Mr. J. H.
Shaffter, Mr. Edwin L- Luce. Mr
and Mr. C. M. Banan, Colonel
and Mrs. Virgil P. haw. Mr.
and Mr. Roger H. Greene. Mr.
and Mrs. W. G, Rowe. Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley F. Yost, Mr. and
Mrs. John Ryan, Mrs. Rose
Montgomery, Mr. and Mr. ]
Mr. O.
Visitors on Isthmus
are Guests at Hotel El Panama
Mr. and Mrs. K. Gudmond-
son of Englewood, California,
arrived On the Isthmus Monday
evening by plane and during
their visit here are guest at the
Hotel El Panama.
Mr. Arthur Mojo of New York i
City 1 also a guest at the Hotel
El Panama. ______
Winner* of Bridge
Tournament Announced
The winners of the bridge tour-
nament, which Is played every
week in the Card Room of the
Hotel Tlvoll at 7:00 pm., were:
1st; Mr. Tom Orr and Mr. R.
Torres: 2nd, Mr. and Mrs. W.
Kennedy: 3rd, Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Brady; 4th, Mr. and Mrs. W.
Norrls; 5th. Mr. P. Cranahaw
and Mr. F. Morril.
Ramadan Grotto
Dance to be December 7
The Hamadan Grotto "Fancy
Shirt Dance." previously an-,
nounced to take place Friday
evening, will take place on De-
cember 7 at the Pacific Sallfish
Club at Fort Amador.
Plav Reading Group
to Meet Monday JL
The Plav Reading Group of
the Canal Zone College Club will
meet at 7:30 p.m. on Monday at
the home of Mrs. R. C. Ser-
.. ireant of 122 Ridge Road. Balboa
N. Taylor^" Archdeacon John Heights. Mrs. Henry A. Starrett
Townsend, Mr. and Mr. Earl <3. will have charge of the program,
V#**V Ur ftnrt *- TaI>m UI.U .111 Ua V,mrm*3 M* t ri mull-
MayWMr'.and
a*ay.
The birds apparently are
blinded by the reflection of
the big window.
Mrs. John which will be hased on the mul-
HEAD FIRST...
for Beauty!
SPECIAL
*7&
WHY HAVE A HOME
PERMANENT ?
... with inadequate facilities,
no certain finished look, and
no guaranteewhen you can
hare a professional one com.
ulete for only $7.50! It uill
last longer..and look better'
These can be had
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
Make your
Appointment
Early!
BALBOA
BEAUTY SHOP
' Mrs. Bates Wieman, Mgr.
OU t:M ami* IN p.m
BalkM CkMmh. aattatn
2-2959
cal comedy South Pacific.
>>*>>>>
ANNUAL COMMUNITY
THANKSGIVING SERVICE
THURSDAY 18 :M A.M.
(Hoot Church)
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Height, C.Z.
anksgiving Hymns Presidential Proclamation
Rev. Alexander Shaw Speaker.
SPECIAL MUSIC
Mala Quartet Baptist Choir
BroadcastStation HOXO7M Kc.
EVERYONE INVITED TO ATTEND
<*<(*<('<<<<
PARTIES AND MORE PARTIES
ARE APPROACHINO 1
You will find NOW the BIGGEST
SELECTION of the most gorgeous
cocktail and evening dresses at
34th Street Lux Building
Tel. 3-0W7
1
NEWZt/UAWPROPUCT
from GERMANY
from CANADA
from AMERICA
from ENGLAND
SEE OUR PRICES BEFORE !
THE LARGEST
ASSORTMENT
IN TOWN!
LA PARISIN
113 CENTRAL AVENUE
* ----------
mW*dL2xa
Special Representative of
$
ViUieuK/tf
HUJ
will be in our store daily from
TOMORROW through NOVEMBER 28th,
for consultation on skin care
and beauty problems.
PLEASE PHONE FOR APPOINTMENT!
I
Panama Store
MOTTA'S
Only new
ODO-RO-NO
CREAM
gives you all
these
advantage!
I Scop penpiradoo Ataolncdy hanulon
quickly, fely. all fabrics.
1Banishes odour nsttntly.
_ta protectoo la*, for -* doe. p. ~or
on, to tbf dayt. atty or harde-s-i
4Does dm rrioue oonnal the jar at ordinary deo-
h mf it daily. doc nu often do.
Millioni / fw*W ***** *
-
AND THIS IS OUR WAY OF THANKING YOU
DEAR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS

--


COME TO THE PARTY WE'RE THROWING
IN YOUR HONOR

TIME: 12 o'clock noon
DATE: Sunday Dec. X 1951
place: Wi/w'tie Mt*fo*rfitf*j
OBJECT: To help us celebrate our Anniversary
with Buffet-Lunch and Drinks
ffli/ipp/M? TtafafitM/twpe
CORNER "H" and DARIEN STREET-TEL 2-2181
ALSO IN COLON: FRONT STREET IN "ARENA DE COLON" BUILDING TEL. 1212


earr '^

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INMTBNMNT DAILY MBWATAPMl
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 1MJ
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one o! our Agents or our Offices
iKHIS SERVICE
Ne. 4 TlvaH At*
ehea* z-rui
MOSMi Of. LESSEPS
Parur d !.enri
r>e
MORRISON'S
Me. 4 Paatlh at Jal Arc
Phent I-S44I
BOTICA CARLTON
11.13 Melendr Ave.
Phont r.; I'nlm

SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
fa. U KM 1Mb Strrat

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
Ne. 17 "II" StreetFtaaata
Ne. 12.171 Ceatral Aw.Celta.
12 words
Minimum for
3c. each additional
word.
' ti \i<.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS
Automobile*

RESORTS
FOR SALE:Bamboo livmgrcom set For the buying oi selling
automobile consult: Agendas Cos
mes. S. A.. Automobie Row No. BAIL BONDS:Bail
29. Telephone 2-4721, Panama.!
B.200.00. 4 bamboo chairs $10.
00 each, I Easy washing machine
I 60 cycles S50.00. House 23 apart-
, meat 4. 50 jtteet.----------------------- NOTICI TO FORD OWNImT
FOR SALE:All household furniture
! electric *n<, leaving. Must sell. WHO 1941 1942 Fere 4 Deer
house H20-D Balboa. Telephone ^
1251. Call alter 6 p. m. "^
Newer Mtee cera.
Oe tea have e errnkme ereateea Houses ON IIACH Santo Clara
I Write Akeaelica AaaayaMt Phone SHRA'NfL Balboa 2120
Of your i,, ,011 a.,,.. C j. or m corataker ther,.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE: 8 cubic feet, porcelain
Fngidaire, $100.00, La Boca 902-,
, C. La Boco Roed. 2-1942.
Gee* Meat Offeree
C I V A, $. A.
Your Cadillac Pentiec Deeler
FOR SALE:Complete set Venetier
Blinds for flats type house. Col.
- house 1412-C. Las Cruces. Bol- occ ..._. T1 loc. T;
boo or phone Balboa 1675. TUBES: New;
nd Guarantee GramJich's . Santo Claro beach-
Company S. A No. 78 "B" Ave. I cofteges. Electric Ico boxes, gat
Tel. 2-3078. Box 1352; Colon1 stoves, moderate rote. Phone 6-
Agency. Central Avenue 12167,' 441 or 4-3f}7
Tel. 63V. | ---------------------------------------
" ,,.,.,.,--,----------~-------:--------- I CASINO SANTA CLARA
DULCINA Fancy Grapefruit. Rich Cabins, food, swimrfiina. No reserva-
in flavor. Rich in Vitomins. $1.- > n.,-...... ruu. i~.. A*, .i. I
00 per doren. "DULCINA"
Choice Highland Juice Oranges
Delicious flavor. $2.25 per hun-
dred, $1.25 for 50, delivered.
Productos Nacionales, telephone 2-
0028, Penoma.
FOR SALE:Frigidaire, radio, desk
breokfast set, Venetian blinds. Misc.
household goods. 1461-D, Holden
FOR SALE:1941 Studebaker Corn-
il .00 x,
22; 12 ply; for trucks; borgain
prices. F Icoza & Compony, 79
B Avenue.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
tions necessary. Choice lots for sale.
Phillies. Oceaniide cottages. Santo
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. Crlstobol 3-1673
Williams Santa Clare Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidaires. Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
Street. Balboa. C. Z. Call 2-1403
FOR SALE:25 cycle Generol Elec-
tric 9 cu. ft. refrigerator, Bolboo.
Phone 373-A. Ft. Kobbe.
FOR~SALE: Gas ronge $50.00.
Good condition. 51 Street, Rosa
Morina. Apt. 5.
mender. Sedan, excellent condi-,
tion. House 5360 Davis St. Dioblo.
FOR SALE:Leica $146.25, Bolex
three lenses $350. "Porros," Pla-
za 5 de Meyo. Panama.
HOTEL PANAMERICANO in cool El:
Voile. Room $2.00 per day, meals
A La Carte. Special Thanksgiv-j
ing Dinner $1.25. Reservation]
phone Panama 2-1112.
Heights. Balboa 2918.
2 SPECIAL SALES 2
'II MERCURY CONVERTIBLE
Ceuee with radie, leather,
ever-
FOR SALE:Eureko electric portoble
range oven with Thermostat con-
trol and two burners, cooking
utensils, complete $25.00. Excel-
lent for small apartment. Also
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR SALE:Beautifully hand carved'^j,,, 6rt#B, Umt aaw!.. $2,100 _J
ALNAMBRA APARTMENTS
electric" roaster 90^3' Seventh' St" ***rn ^""hed. unfurnished apart-
,-_,__ ments. M*id service optional. Con-
Colen.
Chinese wardrobe. 3 sections wth
mirror. La Corbollinesa. No, 224
Lux Building. Telephone 3-1136
Ponami.
FOR
WANTED
Miscellaneous
se'e. one water cooler. To' be told
"as-is" on closed bids. Con be
seen of Fort Clayton Officers'
Club 8:00 o. m. 4:00 p
m.
WANTED: Clean soft rogs. Job
Dept Panamo American.
doilv Thursday 22 26 Nov-
ember 1951.
LESSONS
Help Wonted
WANTED:Good cook to sleep in
Bring references. Good salarv. Cu-
ba Ave. No. II, "Nestle" build-,
ing, entrance 28 street.
OST & FOUND
REWARD to person who finds lady's
black pocketbook with keys end
papers belonging to Benita H. de
Tosen. Telephone 2-0496, Pon-
ami,
'SI OLOSMOBILI "it"
2-Deer Sedan with radio, lacellcnt
ceaeetiea.... $2,200.
Heve te be atea to
be eaerecietee
C I V A, S. A.
Yeur Cadillac Peafiec Dealer
- ----------------------------------------------Treot yourself to a ballroom dance
FOR SALE1941 Pontiac Coupe; course for Xmos. Balboa Y. Hor-
1941 Buick Sedanette. $375.00; I nert & Dunn.
1940 G.M.C. Panel $225.00. Air-
duty paid. Agencio Ponamotores
"Q" St. No. 27.
FOR .
smooth running car 1 hove a K342.
Cadillac, block, 4-door sedan, 6
new tires, radio. Any demonstra-
tion. Wiil sell to highest bidder.
Seen at 8052-D, Margarita.
____________?oct office 8061. 10th' Street, New
SALE:__One electrc floor butvCnstobol. telophono 1386- Colon.
fer. one cash register, one field.coo dcI.it.
..,. ___....... ...i V.-l____i.i;FOR RENT: Modern unfurnished
oportment In city's most exclusive
residential section, two bedrooms
porch, spacious kitchen, laundry
room, garage, hot water througout
wafer heater furnished. Call Pon-
amo 2-0103 during office hours.
It is actually cheaper
to buy a
P.T.I. SAFETY SAW
BLADE
than to accept any other
as a Gift.
Besides Protection Against
Injury, they save many
times their value in cost
o SHARPENING and
POWER alone.
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Are. Tel. 3-1140
Diplomats Speculate Russians
May Reject Kennan As Envoy
toD experta on Russia, la be-
ing considered as next US am-
bassador to Moscow, has caus-
ed speculation In diplomatic
circles here that Kennan might
not be acceptable to the Soviet
leadera.
He Is a principal author of
the United states' policy of
containment of Communlam.
Appointment of an Ambas-
sador always la preceded by a
note to the country Involved
terest criticism leveled by the
Soviet Unin in the war of
words.
Under the pen name of "Mr.
X." Kennan also first describ-
ed to the public America's for-
eign policy aimed at contain-
ment of Russian expansion.
Mr. Truman yesterday con-
firmed reports that he has dis-
cussed the appointment of
Kennan with Secretary of
State Dean Acheson. But he
vice at the end of his term at
Princeton's' institute of Ad-
vanced Studies In April, said
!"* have de*P and personal
Interest in Russia."
Kennan is considered an
extremely thoughtful atan
and an excellent writer.
Department official taid his
written reparta prob ably
weuld be a great help hi for-
utore
Russian po-
Z.wi_. -# juvwvea otaie uean Acneaon. But he Hey.
tlfiSS'mSK0**1 i tne no- ,a,d nothln definite has been If named to
SJ5A K* WietSr^^gy -* th appointment so would be the fir
iar- I man to represent the United
-
Position Offered
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. J-1713
23 r astfa st.
mutating fui
Hey.
the post, he
turned down aTM'^aTOtRfc----------m "" I ^ * non-military
SovietfeUUi5a %! Ja PM8,dent ,e,t no doubtJste^tlnXTtntRua.u.1 Since
ect'Snan ^ht "*" ^owever- ffif Kennan U a World War II United States
IfWed to th. rf ..trong possibility for the high-; ambassadors have been Klrlc
46-vear oa K^nn* JS& th* ^PP"** Moscow post. ^and U. Qen. Walter Bedell
ceed Adm Atan n * "5" Kennn would make lood! Smith since AprU 1946.
lnParUatUched to th^n?t.H 'Ti>^^r'. Mr Trum,n Mld Although he authorized the
At Princeton Univers lty,:definite "go easy" policy for
where he Is teaching, Kennan United States military forces
indicated he would accept the when they approach Soviet
appointment if It is offered by borders.
ed Nations.
State Department
said that Kirk, who la known
sources
FOR RENT: Furnished oportment!
for couple without children,
screened, government inspected.
Tel. 3-3404.
FOR RENT
Rooms
SALE:If you want a clean WANTED:Young lady for cashier innut availabbi iuu
.u ------1------- i u.____i&ii .h cr.;,,i .-.i, A...4 m.,i"vvl" **" Mew, ate
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Retel ft Paaaata
Wants to buy stocks of:
Brewery
And has for sale stocks of:
Central Theater
TELS.: 1-47 IS 3-1 Stt
FOR SALE
Real Estate
end secretariol work. Must speak
English ond Spanish fluently and i
type correctly. Peferobly experien-'
ced and with references. Distribu-'
dora Elctrico, S. A. Ancn Ave
corner H Street.
Ousted Tax Collector
Will Come To Trial
rida.
Local Merchants
T3*eTnbured
At YMCA Dance
A dance tributing local mer-
chants will be given for service-1
men at the Cristobal Armed!
Services YMCA on Saturday.
The name of the dance will be -
"Mad About Adds'- and will fea- FOR SALE. .
ture unusual stunts and enter- let in Grinea Tewe, Lai Cumeret Judge.
Uinment. Members of the Girls; 1.099 M with 31 mts. fronting'
service Organization will be hos- highway. Price $1.80 M*. Coll Judge Charles E. Wyzanski
teases to the guest servicemen. Wofff & Co, Ponomo 2-2388. !Jr- also denied a defense motion
jfor Indefinite continuance of
l the case which will come up
| for trial Dec. 3.
However, the Judge did grant
a motion to allow defense at-
torneys to examine tax records
bearing on the case.
Deianeys attorney, C. Keefe
FOR SALE:Chalet three bedrooms.
800 MS lend, situated in 19 and
P street. Porque Lefevre, behind
Mueblerio Ideal, Tel, 3-1216, BOSTON, Nov. 21 (UP)-Denls
COME TO FLORIDA. If interested w- Delaney. ousted Internal Re-
in homes, forms, stores or income'venue collector for Massachus-
property. write H. Kleefkens, 3617:5tt8> today lost his motion to
South Cole Mowbry, Tampa, Flo-'?*ve th? Indictments charging
him with accepting bribes and
-----------------------------signing false tax lien certifl-
the beet, high anf level cates dismissed by a Federal
entirely renertd and well Far-
nhaed. Ratee reeseaable. aeche-
Ion ear*. Ineuin at The Ama-
ricen Club facina De
Park.
Radio Programs
Your Community Storion
HOG-840
Where 100.000 Peeale Meat
Presents
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM -BUILT
Sllpeerer Beophohitery
VISIT OOI SHOW-BOOM!
Alberto Btraa
J. P. delaOaia.il (AataaBeeOelew)
ftoe Estimate Ptekaa) Delivery
Tel - -IMulilMim
Stanford History
Student To Make
Surrey In Americas
to have asked to be relieved
of his Moscow post, probably
will be named first U. S. Am-
bassador to post-war Western
Germany In April.
In the German post, Kirk
would relieve U.S. High Com-
missioner John J. McCloy, who
also Is known to want to re-
turn to this country. McCloy
is reported to have turned
down an offer to be first Unit-
ed States ambassador to West-
ern Germany.
Kennan, new en leave,
long has been one of the
State Departments top spe-
cialists en Russian affairs.
Re speaks Russian fluently
Jf* *!?"* *TftraI years in
the United States embassy in
Moscow at a career diplomat.
As chief of the State Depart-
SIDE GLANCES
By Galbra.rh
Escaped Lifer Pardoned
By Georgia Parole Board
Today, Wednesday, N#v. Jl
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15French in the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00The Jack Smith
(VOA)
6:1&Evening Salon
7:00Paul Temple (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON 8P0RT8
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
Hurley, had contended that the: 2:55~Here Comea Louis Jordan
.former collector's constitutional1 :<-News and Commentary by ,
rded him to the parole board r'8ht? we,re vlol*ted by a con-, -.,. ^S^lfjf* lV^' Japanese control, he
hearings, left with him eresslonal committee which in, M*-!*"1*?u,es}}oaa ,(VA' ner will visit Brazil
effect already had "tried him :*5Arts and Letters (VOA) Argentina Bolivia i
Newton fought through five "nd found him guilty. "" '
Pacific campaigns in World
w"' pusuner wno escapea 14 r"'. campaigns in World -----------____________
years ago and went to Birmin-War II under the name of Hat- U/-...-1 Ai*":-*.
gham. Ala., to become a re-ify Henderson, which he adont-l" Q''Oni VJT lICeT
citizen
ATLANTA, Nov. 21 .UPi
Toe Georgia Pardons and Par-
oles Board today freed Law-
rence Oeborn Newton, a life-
term prisoner who escaped 14
years ago and went to Birmin- " lar-
gh*m. Ala., to become a re-jry Henderson, which he adopt-
5Kable ctzen and Paciic eu w.hen he fled t0 AUbamaip--,*,U. ki^J
hter. shortly after hU conviction. TrOmOtlOnS Made
Newton was convicted of the When arrested last month Under NeW P TOO TO 111
sensational Charlie Daughtry Newton said he had saved ud wSiii
mrder In Screven County, Ga.,; $16,000 with which he lntsnd-
lni!l- v. 2 A buy B iarm 'or hi wire
When hia long years as a and two children.
iusdtlve ended with hU recap-'
tur last month Newton claim-1 Newton's case was unloue
Innocence, saying he hadiWlih the parole board in that
STANFORD, Calif. Nov. 21
lUSIS) A Stanford Univer-
sity, graduate student will vis-
it 11 Latin American countries
in the next eight months to
survey communities of Okin-
awans living there.
The U. S. army granted
funds for the survey to James
L Tlgner, Jr. The information
he gathers will form the basis
for a doctoral thesis in history,
and will also be used to as-
sists In the U. 8. adminlstra-
Bh tlon of Okinawa, the Pacific
IW Island battleground of World
War Two.
A university spoke s m a n
pointed out that more than
30.000 Okinawans live in Brazil
alone. Most Okinawans came
to Latin America after 1920,
when the island was under
Japanese control, he said. Tig-
and also' tics;
Presidential Flight
Mb Rough Political
Weather In Capital
WASHINGTON, Not. 21 (UP)
President Truman interrupt-
ed his Florida vacation to de-
liver a political speech before
the National Women's Demo-
cratic Club last night and
>romptly became enmeshed in
he subject.
Mr. Truman flew here from
Key West in the big four-en-
flned government plane, the
Independence. After delivering
his speech and spending the
night at Blalr House, he plan-
ned to return to Florida, and
take Mrs. Truman with him.
The President's plane had not
even landed here when Rep.
Fred E. Busbey (R-Hl.) attack-
ed Mrs. Truman's use of the
XMutghtry case.
After giving
him a special
rhlf. the "board announced
that Newton had recelv-
commutation of
today
d a special
sentence.
'Wewton is entirely free as
far as we are concerned," said
board member Charles Pan-
nelL "We released him on spe-
cial present service commuta-
tion on grounds that the evid-
ent presented in his trial
was not enough to convict
him."
The overjoyed Newton, who
i been held in the Fulton
Recent insrade promotions of
Warrant Officers of USARCARIB
have affected Warrant Officers,
Floyd Bowen, Walter F. Hopkins
Kerdls E. IfOukS, Harry L. Phil-
lips. Walter C. Pool, William M.
Smith, Douglas E. Carter. Tol-
land O. Uvesay, Leander K. Tho-
-**e.vwrff~"H "" cae*, "jas, Joseph Fllipski. Charles B.
an~.ry Sr Prisoner does not Onj, Wesley L Johnson, and
the board insert J. Sackrtt. It is anticipated
. oj"'e; He mu ".....* uaiuie Doara m that
iramed In the mysterious ;ne wa allowed to appear be-
the four
fore them each .
times It considered his
of
person.
Pannell said the board was
ati,fied" that Newton ^d
not commit the murder for
that similar ptimotlon lists will
be released every week, for ap-
proximately the next six weeks.
Army personnel may new make
ior applications \:z Warrant Officer
i sentenced but appointments under a new pro-
gram to be announced within a
said the board was not corr-"
pletely "enlightened" on the
tvWt, *Ie 1?* actually sure
that Newton did not have some
connection with the crime he
Wuety; (Atlanta r-j.'ir pending thing .bout V ttStT Set
his Birmingham home after! Mrs. Rebecca Ralney an-m
a-___ sons that he "usl doesn't trust
anyone enough to confide in
few days.
The following Military Occupa-
tional Specialties are open for
- ar---------aw " eaaa ^Kl" A**B
ppllclants: Unit Administrator,
123; Militar/ Personnel Officer.
2200; Administrative Assistant,
2800; Quartermaster Supply Of-
cer, 4419; Ammunition Supply
Officer, 4514: Automotive Main-
tenance Officer. 4805: Engineer
realtime laaalia, a
teaaaaty. (l)kaUa
taaaMfLCbanaaea't
art. buy a jar now
'ANA ":
M A SONIT E
TEMPERED
PRESDWOOD
Distrfbatcd by
VnJLANUEVA T TEJEIRA
CIA. LTDA.
Tat t 0144 #Z I*at Hth St.
Beekeeper Ig Caught
With Hi Pants Down
MURPHT8BOR0, 111. (U P)
Ray Baker's 75 pounds of ho-
ney from a bee hive at his
home was substantial reward
for being stung seven times,
but the bussers never should
have gotten up his pants legs.
Neighbor women gathered
with pots and pans for some
of the honey as bees covered; 7 45-jam w
BWhen 'h^blea'^V1" Z Z^oWSS.VOA
SSI-' afdhdronrid'hu.,,'e Te, *^^"-oa VOA,
we. and dropped his pants.j i;00-Meet Beanor Roosevelt
9:00The Jo
(VOA)
9:15Radio Forum (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOAJ
9:45Sports and Tund of Day
(VOA)
10:00The BBC Playhouse (BBC)
10:30Foreign Policy Address by
Pres. Truman (VOA)
11:00The Owls Nest
Midnight Sign Off.
Thursday, Ner. 22
AM.
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
:15-*aW7V0A)
8:30Craiy Quilt
8:45Jerry Bears Presents
9:00NEWS
9:15SACTOD HEART PRO-
GRAM
9:30As I 800 It
10:00NEWS
I0:05-Off the Record
11:00NEWS
ll:05-Off the Record (Contd.)
11:80Meet the Band
NoonNEW8
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN SCI-
ENCE
2:00Call for Let Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:80Music for ThuMday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's four Favorite
6:00 PANAMUSICA flTORV-
TTMC
6:15Evening Salon
7:00-Make Believe
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON
REVIEW
Chile, Co-
plane for the trip.
He demanded that the Demo-
cratic National Committee pay
for the journey since the Presi-
dent was making a purely pol-
itical speech.
Busbey estimated the cost of
the round-trip flight at $2,280.
Candy Orange Slices
Make Good Mouse Bait
ST. LOUIS (UJ.) For
three weeks Ben Ohm, super-
intendent of the new St. Louis
County courthouse, waged a
war on mice with traps baited
with meat and cheese. He
caught about 10 mice.
Then Ohm changed his tac-
he wanted a more en-
TThr one is my moat artistic pinupehe'e got a wonder^
ft profile, all the way d**,!*- ~
Stafford Show iombia. Cuba, Ecuador, Guate-
mala, Mxico, Panam and Pe-
ru.
Tlgner served five years as
a pilot and air combat Intel-
ligence officer with the U. S.
Air Force. He recently visited
Japan to confer with U. S. of-
ficials who administer affairs
in Okinawa. .
Thanksgiving Day
Service Tomorrow
Night At Cocoli
Archdeacon Town send, in
charge of St. Andrew's Church,
cocoli, assisted by William Bald-
win, lay reader, will hold a serv-
ice of Thanksgiving at 7:80 p.m.
tomorrow.
The) special guest preacher for
the occasion will be Chaplain
Ahremdt of Ft. Kobbe. This
service will be held at night by
special request.
Sunday Services listed
By St. James, Red Tank
Holy communion will bo giv-
en at 11 a.m. next Sunday at
St. Jame*' Church, Red Tank,
followed by a service at 3 pjn.
conducted by the) Rev. D. A.
Osborne
Sunday School will be held
at 8 pm. and evening prayer
at 7:80 p.m.
tlclng bait. He decided on can-
dy orange slices to bait his
traps. The count at the end
of another three weeks was
100 mice caught.
"If the orange slices hold
out, I'll get 'em all," he said.
WANTED: PATRIOT. Economic Stabilizer Erie Johnston,
whose resignation effective Dec. 1 was announced by Presi-
dent Truman, appealed for an outstanding American to "put
aside personal Inconvenience" and take over his job. He
made hie appeal at a press conference.
Ballroom
SPORTS
(VOA)
9:80Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:43aborts Tune of Day and
News (VOAr
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:18 .Mniipal Interlude
10:30Take It Prom Hart (BBC)
11:00The Owls Nest
12:00Sign Off.
Exptaaatleat af SymbeAs
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadlodiffusion Francalse
THE AMERICAN CLI
Tivoli Avenue and DeLesteps Park
Will Celebrate Thuraday From Two P.M. With An
OLD-FASHIONED THANKSGIVING DINNER
------------ 2.5 0 ------------
OM Fashioned Chicken and Noodle Soup
Consomm au Sherry
Papaya Balls in Win* Sauce
ROAST VERMONT TURKEY
Oyster Dressing Gib let Oravy
Sliced Virginia Ham
Whipped Potatoes
Asparagus Spears
CHEFS SALAD
Pumpkin Pic Pcaeh Melba Diplomat Pudding
Caffcc Tea
CREME DE MENTHE
Children half prioc MUSIC
Visit the town's moat popular rendczvoua
THE ZEBRA ROOM
Charlie Bourne at the piano, playing your favorito tunee.
Hector Downe, your hoct.
Candied Yame
Petit Pole


WEDNESDAt, NOVEMBER Jl, I51

tm PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SETEH
^Mtlantic ^Docieti
&, 195, QmUm Dttfkmu (*lm* 37b
MISS JIDI1H ANNE SMITE
WEDS KENNETH CARL KROGH
In a candle liiht ceremony at the Balboa Heights Bap-
tist Church last evenin, Miss Judith Anne Smith, daa|htr
of Mr. and Mr. David S. Smith of Mararlta. pliihted her
troth to Mr. Kenneth Carl Krof h, of Diablo, tan of Mr. Har-
vey U. Krofh and the latf Mr. Krogh of Blalr, Nebraska.
The Reverend William, H. Boeby performed the doable
ring ceremonv at aeren o'olock, in the presence of relatives
and friends from both aides of the Isthmus.
Ifs A Grape Life
employed as a supervisor of In-
dustrial Arts with the Division
Candles were used In the
church windows and on the
chancel and two even-branched, i School,
standing: candelabras, with baa-[ ....." ...
keta of lilies flanked the altar. **" **d Mrs. William Dlxon
Large fern arrangement* on pe- Honored with Reception
destals formed a background for1 Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hadartts
the central basket of lilies. Little nrl Mr. and Mrs. Chester Shaw
lanterns with clusters of garde-' Harrold. Jr., of Balboa, give
nias and net bows marked the | reception In the parlors of the
pews Jasmine was used to en-' Cristobal Union Church Monday
twine the chancel rail and give evening to honor their brother,
softness to the window arrange- Mr. William Dlxdn and his re-
menti. cent bride.
Mrs. Howard Jones played a Palms, ferns and blue aga-
prelude of nuptial music and the I panthus were used to decorate
traditional wedding marches.;the church parlor. An all white
She also accompanied Mr. Webb floral arrangement of Mies of
Hearne who sang "Because," "O the Nile, orchids and baby a
Promise Me." "Through the breath In a green bowl, flanked
Years." and "I Love Thee." by white tapers in green holders.
The bride entered upon the centered the buffet table.
arm of her father, by whom she! Mrs.P. P. H4nna and Mrs. Roy
was given in marriage. She was Perkins had charge of the guest
lovely in her wedding gown of book and Mrs. Harvey Smith and
white frosted organdy over slip- Mrs. R. T. Conley presided at
Ser satin. The dress was strapless the refreshment table. Mrs. B.
ut she wore a fitted Jacket of D. Humphrey and a group of
the same material which but-Rainbow girls assisted with the
toned down the front, had long'serving. The young ladles were:
fitted pointed sleeves and a Pe-'Mlss Katherlne Argo. Miss Pat
terpan collar. The full, gather-'Rudge. Miss Pat Howard, Miss
ed skirt was floor length. A seed Marian Joudrey. Miss Gwendolyn
pearl tiara held in place the fin- Kariger. Miss Nancy Karlger.
ger-tlp veil of illusion, which was Miss Hazel Griffith of Balboa
edged with lace. She wore a and Miss Dorothy Rowley,
wrist watch, the gift of the Mrs. Hugh Cassibry entertaln-
groom and a strand of pearls, ed with a number of piano selec-
The bridal bouquet was a shower tlons during the evening,
bouquet of white rosos, entered The honoree wore a white or-
with a white orchid. .chid corsage and Mrs. Cassibry
Mia Marlemma Smith, sister; and the ladles and girls who as-
of the bride, was maid of honor, slsted also wore corsages.
Her dress was of Nile grefn em- Over seventy friends called
broidery organdy, over matching during the evening to welcome
taffeta. The aleeveles dress had Mr. and Mrs. Dixon. Pacific
a short organdy, over matching Side guests were: Mr. and Mrs.
taffeta. The sleeveless dress had.B. I. Everson. Mr. and Mrs. R.
ashortbolero Jacket and a floor. ]W. Orlffith and Mr. and Mrs.
length, full, gathered skirt. She Donald E. Bruce.
used silver accessories and wore' ---------
a bandeau of flowers in her hair, Canal Zone Police
to match the old-fashioned nose-' Give Retirement Party
gay which she carried. Detective Captain Samuel Roe
Miss Dottle Cotton, coulnof the and Detective Carmelo Cont.'
bride and Miss Zoe Ann Karst who are retiring from the Canal,
Were the bride's maid. They Zone Police Force, were honored
wore matching dresses of pink! with a party given by the Police
Swiss organdy over matching, Saturday evening at the Police
taffeta. They were fashioned Park on Brazos Road
with off-the shoulder necklines,' A steak dinner was served at a
finished with a standing collar., large U-shaped table, centered
jvhleh formed a suggestion of a with tropical flow.ers. Printed
ileevea. They wore all ver acces- menu8. cottmemoratlng the af-
aories and Ju&rrsfi, velvet sa.ttie'fair, with places far signatures
gave contrast to" their dresaea. were given eachgueat.
Their flowera were also old-faah- After-dinner speeches were<
loned pastel bouquets and thoy made by Major George Herman,
wore hair arrangements of pink of Balboa. Chief of Police. Major
horsehair and flowers. Pastor Ramos, chief of ColonPo-
Mlss Georgia Smith, vounpw lice and Judge E.I.P. Tatelman.
slater of the bride, waa the flow- Sergeant Leonard Heltzke. mas-
ergirl. He rorchid organdy dress ter of ceremonies on behalf of
was mad over matching taifa. the Canal Zone Police presented
ta. The waist and skirt werejcaptain Roe an electric shave-
tucked. The waiat had a quare > mgster and presented Mr. Conte
neckline and cap sleeve'. She an.engraved wrist watch. The
carried a pink satin roa basket BUboa Detective Office gave
filled with flower petal. Her!each of the honorees a Ronson,
headdress matched the bride's lighter.
maids. Officials attending the dinner
Mr. Marshal Rinker served a were Judge J. J. Ramirez, and
beat man and the groomsmen |District Attorney Clemente Ba-
were Mr. Charles Smith, brotherrrera*f Colon. Assistant District
of the bride and her cousin. Fred Attorney. R K. Hazard, Police
Cotton. Iiupector, Carlos.Bieberach. Po-
A reception was held In thejjee Inspect or. Rodger Griffith;
parlors ofthe church Immediate-jCaptolnJ- M. Fahnestoek; Co-
]y following the ceremony. Mr. mandante, de Bomberoa, Luis
and Mr. Smith received withiEUjcruet: Captain Rafael Alva.
the members of the wedding 'Detective Captain Macon Tur-
cers were discussed. The pro-
gram for the year was decided.
The program consisted of a se-
ries of records by Mendelssohn.
The members present were:
Mrs. William Clute.Mrs. Pindley
Meehan. Mrs. Andrew Whit lock
Mrs. Cheek and Mrs. George
Engelke.
Rainbow Meeting Cancelled
The Rainbow meeting will not
be held thia Thursday because of
the Thanksgiving holiday. It will
be held on Thursday. December
13.
American Legion Auxiliary
Thanksgiving Radio Program
The American Legion Auxilia-
ry will present a radio program
at 6:30 p.m. Thanksgiving Day.
The guest speaker will be Rear
Admiral A. M. Bledsoe.Mr. Vic-
tor Young of Gatun, will be pre-
sented as the "Person of the
Month.
The program Is being arranged |
by Mrs. Louise Griffon. Depart-
ment Radio Chairman and Mrs.
Edith McGinn, Unit Radio Chalr-
;man. Those participating in-;
elude: Misa Yolanda Diez, Miss
Pat Howard, Miss Rita Howard,
Elliott Reid, John Barr, Robert
Granberry and John Wllkeraon.
Thanksgiving Services
The Cristobal Union Church
and the Church of Our Saviour
will hold a Joint Thanksgiving
service at the Cristobal Union
Church at 10:00 a.m.. in which
all Protestants are Invited to
participate.
THERE'S SOMETHING in that West Coast sunshine that
makes things grow bigger and better. But those outslzed
apples and grapes aren't any sweeter than lovely Jeane
Cochran. the peach who has a plum role In RKO's "The
Half Breed." which co-stars Robert Young, Jani Carter and
Jack Buetel.
IN HOLLYWOOD
.'
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
,r " i
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Be- It to me that she's still ga-ga
Rev Milton A Cookaon will hind the Screen: It's open set- about sound stages, cameras and
deliver the sermon entitled, "Lift- son In Hollywood on the stars of; movie razzle-dazzle,
ine Up Grateful Hearts. Senator Kefauver's crime hear-1 "I can understand people say-
Rev Philip Havener will lead lngs and the "any resemblance is ing that I've lost interest," hus-
the worship aervlce. The choir, atrictly coincidental" worda up ky-volced Ann said. "I've said no
under the direction of Mr. O. E. there on the screen may have to i to so many movies offered to me.
Tontad and accompanied by Mrs., be printed in underlined capital But the rumor's not true I
C J Genis will sing "We Thank letters. ;wouldnt be happy at air unless
Thee" bv Bornscheln. First It was Claire Trevor's I could make pictures.
The morning offering will go. hard-as-nalls southern babe with' "I'm not knocking a good dra-
towards providing Christmas' gangster bov friends In Repub-'ma f one can be found, but im
baskets for the unemployed In lie's "Hoodlum Empire." And now doing the comedy stuff that I
Colon it blonde, wimsome Carolyn like to do. We're in for a laugh
--------- Jones (watch this doll zoom to time. People want to laugh."
Holv Communion will be held stardom) telling a crlme-investi-
at the Church of Our Saviour at.gating committee In Paramount Brace youraelves. brothers and
8:30 a.m. At thia time the recent -This Is Dynamite": sistersHollywood's coming out
confirmation class will partake -Where do I get mv money?'with ralnbow-hued curls for mo-
, of their first corporate commun- From fellas, of course. How much | vie queens.
Ion In a body. I did I have when I left Florida?
--------- f don't remember. Maybe $12,0e, Whirls of red. green and lav-
The Gatun Union Church will'maybe S20.M0. Money is for enderwill be worn by movietown
have a apeclal aervlce at lfetQ amnelliig." doll when the sun goes down.
,a.m. Thanksgiving morning.1 In the same film Ed Begley according to hair-stylist Jack
with the pastor Rev. J.W.L.!piay8 an underworld czar with Saason, and blondes like Betty
Graham offlclathag^There will nervoug nanda whlle fumbling.Grable and Lana Turner wont
be special wa-Whj tnVtwlr. over racket-buster Edmond O'- think anything of partially tint-
Brien's questions. I asked Pro- ing their bangs and waves chart-
ducer Irving Asher If there would! '*" * match their nails,
be any closeups of Begley's fid- ""'a all done with powders
eetv dlalts iSasson told me. "You only tint
* i one or two curia aa an accent for
Aaher looked aa startled as a your hair. You rlnae it out the
to honor Squadron VP-45 which i movie exhibitor caught in front s,^ mght."
has recently returned to the of a TV set during a Movletlme,
First 'Marriage
By Movie' Studio
Opened In Munich
MUNICH, Nov. 21 (UP)
The first 'marriage by movie
studio in the world ha Just
ooened In this Bavarian capit-
al.
At least It is the first one,
according to its writer, direct-
or cameraman and producer,
bachelor Werner Hampe.
Herr Hampe charges 60
marks tor a four-minute pro-
duction. He then shows the re-
sults to other lonely hopefuls
of the opposite sex.
The fee also Includes private
showings of all possible mar-
riage mates in his film library
called "Ethos Studio" the
name Hampe has given his
new enterprise.
If a woman client sees a man
she likes among the samples,
Hampe then showa him her
movie along with a few others,
Just so he won't feel he Is be-
ing "sold a bill of goods."
And if he picks out the gal
who liked his picture, Hampe
hands out the addresses and
they are on their own. He
plans to open branches In Bra-
zil and In New York.
WelcomeJBome Dance
at Coco
A Welcome Home dinner dance
will be given at the Coco Solo
Naval Officers Club thia evening
Diosa Costello tosses her der-
riere.
"I've been at RKO, MGM.
everyplace in this town. They
wouldn't let me do anything but
beat drums and wear big hats."
First video idea for Lucille and
Desl was for them to play them-
selves but the pair nixed it quick-
ly in favor of a modest-income
Mr. and Mrs. format.
"What problems," walled Desl,
"do we have? We drive a big car,
we have a big house, a maid, a
swimming pool, everything. We
start talking about our problems
as Desl and Lucille and the pub-
lic would wonder what we were
squawking about."

"I'm a new face. John Beal
grinned on the "My Six Convicts"
set. "I've been forgotten and re-
discovered."
Snowed under by an avalanche
of B pictures several years ago,
Beal left Hollywood for Broad-
way. Now he's back on the sound;
stages that he first saw when he
arrived In movietown in 1933 to
play In "Another Language" with |
Helen Hayes.
And in the plum role of the
prison psychologist in Stanleyi
Kramer's new picture, too.
But he's not sure about stay-!
ine around Hollywood.
"It all depends on work." said |
Beal. "I klnda go where I can get
a job."
Bate.
The Albrook ABC Trio will fur-
nish muaic for the evening. Din-
ner will be aerved at 8:00 p.m.
U. S. A., rally and whispered:
"We don't dare." Y Y

I
Ifra new career shake for Desl
Arnaz as co-star with wlfey
Lucille Ball In TV's "I Love Lucy."
I'm playing a real fellow at
'The day that Hollywood puts
and dancing'wUHMtuntU 12:00'VOU In pictures for your pretty last,- crowed" Co han -born Deai.
Dra face i over. The curly hair, the|it's the most wonderful thing in
All officer of the Armed Fore- blue eyes and the teeth all go In
a are cordlallv Invited to attend, time. You have to be an actor."
Tony Curtis, hottest of Holly-
wood's movie males, talking on
the "Hear No Evil" set.
the world. I'm so tired of trying
to be funny with maracas while
Basket Of Groceries,
. D It waa tne bum in Tony'a eyea
LiqilOr AmOIlff I riZeS and the sweep of his blark hair
At Grand JFB Fair
Comihg TOMORROW!
TO THE *" '
LUX THEATRE
AND
CECILIA THEATRE
SIMULTANEOUS RELEASE!
party. Mra. 8mlth choae for her
daughter's wedding a floor length
dresa of orchid crepe, with silver
accessories. She wore a dark or-
chid coraage tied with silver.
The four-tiered wedding cke
waa encircled with gardenias
net; Lt. Oaddls Wall. Mr Wal-
ler. Hunnlcutt, Captain Sam
Brown. Mr. Thomas Bougan and
Mr. Wallace Bain.
Seventy-eight friends and
guest were also present.
The committee In charge of
and topped with a bride and the arrangements were: Messrs
groom. An arrangement of white Leonard Heltzke, D. A. Waddell,
rosea, gardenlaa and plumoaua Robert Taht. Charlea Green, Al-
fem centered the buffet table. clde Hauaer, Gayle Fortner. Oeo.
Assisting with the reception Tully. S. S. Blackburn and
were: Mra. Edgar Plummer, who Frank Qulnn.
had charge of the brlde'a book.| ---------
Mr. Elmer Stevens, who served > Dinner Honors
the ck and an aunt of the Sergeant and Mrs. Whyte
bride, Mra. Arthur T. Cotton! Sergeant and Mra. Millard
who presided at the punch bowl: Mundkowsky and Sergeant and
that started him on the stardom I
ladder, but he's out to make I
moviegoer holier about his act-
A big basket Of groceries and ing.
a basket of assorted liquors "When people go to see me be-
will be among the prizes of- cause they think I'm a good act-
iered at Junta Femlnlna de.or, then 1*11 be happv." vowed!
Beneficencia bgnefit fair in i Janet Leigh's hubby. "This is the'
Parque Lefevre a week from .compliment I'm waiting for.
next Saturday. "I believe I'm developing as an
The Junta which took over actor. I think I've helped all
the administration of "La Ca- young actors in this respect,
sita" nursery 'recently, haa! "Producera say, 'Hey. if this
planned the fair to augment, young punk from New York can
their funds for the dlstribu-' help carry a picture, maybe other
tion of Christmas packages to;young punks can do It"*
the needy during the Yuletide.
The fair will include games,
'; n >olaa." a f lining well,
dancing and early entertain-
ment for children.
with Mra. Jerome F. Evans.
Mr. and Mrs. Krogh over-
nighted at the Hotel El Panama
Mrs. Ernest Beck entertained
with a farewell party at the Beck
reldence Sunday evening for,
and left the next morning for a sergeant and Mrs. Jerry Whyte.
honeymoon trip to Costa Rica, who leave by plane on the 29th
They will return Sunday and! for re-assignment,
make their home at quarters!
Place, Diablo
1423 Hecker
eights.
The bride is a graduate of the
Balboa High School and attend-
ed the Balboa Junior College.
She I employed by the Electrical teasea.
Division at Balboa Heights. Mrs. C J Genis presided at
Mr. Krogh is a graduate of the the business meeting during
Unlveraity of Nebraska and la which plana for election of offi-
Mondav Mualcale
The Mondav Musicale met at
the home of Mrs. Alvin Rankln In
Margarita with Mrs. Earl Orr
and Mra. O. E. Joratad aa hoa-
ff>,
an ama
(^anal {clubhouses
Showing Tonight!
R A I Dili iehr WIDMARK D*n ANDREWS
JLXo? 'THE FROGMEN"
"**'"---------------AUQ Conunuou, Sho, Too.or.o. '
DIABLO HTS.
*:U 1:15
Ann Sheridan ho-hum about1
her movie career^
The accusing finger has been
pointed at Ann, but ahe slipped
TODAY ONLY!
SPECIAL RELEASE!
LUX THE ATRE
Air-Conditioned
That wonderful guy
(former star of
"South Pacific")
asks her..
COCOLI
1:11 7:M
"SUNSET IN THE WEST"
a -numr Ul CRIME"
ThrM7 Q LONQ AT THE FAIR"
Jmh SIMMONS Dirk BELGRADE
"SO LONG AT THE FAIR"
Ml 1 HK'KOK
GAMBOA
taM
Larry PARKS a Barbara HALE
"EMERGENCY WEDDING'
Taaiaaar "Wo CRANPE"
MARGARITA
1:15 a*
All Star Heviiellt
"HOLLYWOOD CANTEEN*
ThurMl.r "TBAH, y api,, ^qqq
Joel McCRtA Wanrta HNDR1X
rOKTHRAI Jo*> McCRkA a Wanrta HENDRIX
u%mm "SADDLE TRAMP" (Technicolor)
IS I in
Alao Showing Thursday I
Now, with the new, improved
Modest, you can enjoy greater com-
fort than you ever dreamed was
possi blecomferr-in-meiion.
For the new Mode it to luxury-
tonto truly comfortablethai I
out of 10 women in a recant teat re-
portad so chafing with Modus.
And there's a trifk safety ahieM
for extra-long protection.
Discover new freedom with
SOrTf, SAFlt
MODESS
THURSDAY AT THE
CENTRAL
The hottest
combination
that ever hit
the screen!'
' l ...'. I SONS
_-.J
'?&&
This darling from
Dixie replies...
'$>
The Loves of
Pandora
IN FLAMING
_ CCxOt or
TECHNICOLOR!
/
and it's ,J
hilarious hit from the
play that rocked Broadway!
M-G-M'a
hiUntus cumedy milk mutt
EZIO PINZA
W;t lili M hear him tint!
JANET LEIGH
wit
MILLARD MITCHELL
GALE ROBBIfiS
mmmmmmm
H**III presents
the swsctocular romane I
JAMESMAS0N
AvaGardker
iWmaWlJie
TkScLmim
TECHNICOLOR
I6EL PATRICK*. SHEILA SIM
HAROLD WARRENDER
MARIO CABR

fe:
>ac/
tevit
b i9!6. Role ireaud th warU'i fin
waterproof watch, the uniquelr successful
Rule* Ovster. Today, twenty-two jrears
later, the Oyster's reputadoo remains
unrivalled. This 1* because the Oyster
case la-made permanently waterproof by .
metallic surface upon another. Moreover,
both men's and ladies' modela art ex-
tremely handsome in appearance, and ara
available either In stainless alee1 or la
solid gold. No wonder they are treararedl
by well over a million men and
MK I l(J*UC fWB..III{F -IICI^IIIUI VJ '\\it *V *""* Wa .llllll.^ll IITIL
the patented self-sraJinf action of one a in every part of the globe.
ROLEX
(HI u IAI I 1 CERTIFIED
WRIST-CHRONOMETER
a/afa/tlich
WIUVY rNEADOUAR
G&U
STARTING
TOMORROW!
Story of the (foot
atMap
it-
riESTii fi.Il. jtfi im in mil uui urn ALEX INCH.
PANAMA CITY
WaW THEATRES
Present
LUX THEATRE
GIRLS! Got a wolf on your door-step?
Take a leaaoo from Janet!
STRICTLY DISHONORABLE
with
Exria PINEA
Janet LEIGH
A CENTRAL T Bella Vista Latin Day
s ALAN LADD H E VH, 4:25. VSC, 7:2i. 9 M p.m
K A WITTY COMEDY!
F Dorothy LAMOUR E Ollnda Bozar Fco. Alvarez A!da Albertl. In
0 In N "MARIDOS MODERNOS"
R "WILD T esasBBB aaaaaa aaaa -
HARVEST" R STARTING TOMORROW 1
Y 0 U R with Robert Preston A N C E Van Heflin Yvonne de Cerlo. in "TOMAHAWK"
LOTTERY AT In Trchnicolor!
CECILIA THEATRE
Found a secret '.pon and gave their
own lives that our country might know'
Alan Baxter Oortrude Michale. In
"PRISONER OF JAPAN"
Also: Barton McLane. tai
"MEN OF ST. QUINTN"____
TROPICAL
"KEY LARGO"
with HCMPtntEY BOCART EDWARD G ROBINSON
and LAUREN BACALL
TIVOLI THEATRE
BANK NIGHT SIN Free
At 5 and S p.m.
U' "STRANGE BARGAIN"
Harold Lloyd, In
"MAD WEDNESDAY" .
fNCANTO THEATRE
Sensational Double Program!
Gary Cooper Ruth Roman, in
"DUILAI"
Also S'eve Cochrane
Virsinia Grev. in
________"HIGHWAY "Sl"________
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Last three Chapter!
"MASKED MARVEL"
. also: .
"WYOMING TRAIL"
and
"Madonna ft The Desert"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Alan Ladd Veronica Lake
In -
"SAIGON"
Also' Jean Parker. In
"COAST GUARD"


rAoe eight
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER SI, IMf
CCNY Admits Hoops ters Got In On Forged Notes
by
JOE WILLIAMS
Some of the best amateurs in football are to be found in the
professional came. Among the owners, that is. Next to trying to
make 16 the hard way, running a pro team Is still the toughest
Way known to break even. Not many manage to do it.
Even the Giants won't this year. And they are one of the best.
if the owners expected they would move into a golden Untopla
when they ended their long, costly player war they know better
cow. They have a sounder competitive setup, better personnel
"all around and pre.umably more economical operation, yet it is
still touch and go with most.
Certainly thev present football at its best and they have
name playera In abundance, adding annually, as they do. the
cream of the college crop. Now that they are running a tight lit-
tle monopoly, offering sparkling merchandise and charging rea-
sonable prices, why don't they need armored trucks to carry the
swag away? There are several reasons.
One is the short season. Another is the hazardous weather. A
third is the schedule. There is nothing the owners can do about
the first two. For economic reasons thy seem to prefer not to do
anything about the third. For examole: The O'ants do not meet
Asm Angeles or San Francisco at all Two fine -i tractive clubs, too.
Operating expenses have skyrocketed. This is true of all busi-
ness, of $ourse. But the gap between growth ol Interest and cost-
eo promote in pro footbail widens instead 91 narrows. In most
"rases, anyway George Marshall vas talking about this with our
Joe King the other night. The fiscal comparisons the Washington
owner made were startline.
HOW COSTS HAVE GONE I'P
Marshall went back to '38 when he had e team in Boston
headed by Cliff Battles. That year his operating expenses on a
"fam- basis was $3502.29.
For the entire season it was only $42,000. nils included every-
thing. Plavers. coaches, trainers, business mam.gei and publicity.
Know what it will cost him to operate this year? Minimum
1300.000
Yet Marshall is one of the few owners who has a going con-
cern Puts on a colorful show. Gets a good price. Has conditioned
his clientele to season ticket buying. And S.immy Baugh ap-
parently is still box office. Even so. Marshall s take-home check
isn't opulent.
Singularly, the cut-throat war which left the field strewn
with bankrupt sponsors and cost something like $10,000,000. by
iar the costliest box-office battle in the history of all sports,
hasn't hurt the players at all. It anything inyrolls are higher
than ever, though there is no longer competitive bidding for ta-
lent. Reason: All the teams are loaded with crack players. Every
team must start from scratch with a potential winner. This can't
ie done with cheap players.
During the war between the old league and the Invaders
which called themselves the All-America Contirence there were
18 clubs (peak) as against 12 now Geographically the league ex-
pends from the Atlantic to the Pacific But in two keys cities it
doubles up. New York has two teams, so has Chicago. This works
out fine in pro baseball: It isn't working oat too good in pro
football
GREAT BATTLE IN PROSPECT
The Cards, with the great Chicago Bears as box-office op-
position, have seldom drawn sellouts. They'll lose a hatful again
this year. Same with the Yankees in our town Radioman Ted
Siiilth who manages Kate Collins 'I've got something twisted
Here) likes to boast about how much money he loses. He'll have
mother boastful year.
Sooner or later both the Caras and the Yankees will have to
?eld. Or move elsewhere. Pro football has Ions made the mistake
Of thinking In terms of pro baseball. One Item Is sufficient to
nrove howfatuous such thinking is. One washout game can prac-
tically ruin a pro season at the box office. Pro baseball with a
154-game schedule can play a double-header nfld maybe get more
out of It than if the single game had been plajed
But If football Is your dish the pros serve It best.
Races
Tomorrow
1st Race "F-2" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Mona Lisa C. Iglesias 114
2La Negra F. Avila 115
3Cosa Linda G.Cruz 112
4Hercules A. Vergara 113x
5Carbonero J. Baeza, Jr. 113x
6Tap Girl A. Mena 118
7Con Valor II J. Avila 120
2nd Race "F-2" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1Fonseca C. Iglesias 112
2
3
4Little Lulu G. Snchez 114
5Villarreal C. Bovil 116
'Working Boys' Tackle Tigers
At Mt. Hope Stadium Tonight
Tennessee, Kentucky Tilt
Offers Three Big Prizes
By UNITED PRESS
-----o
The working Boys (Black
Knights i are scheduled to tackle
the Cristobal High School Tigers
tonight (7 pjn.) at Mount Hope
Stadium in their final football
game of the season.
The Working Boys, who have
won only against Junior College
this year, hope to snap their los-
ing streak against the high
school team.
This game will be the final prep
3rd Race "F-2'" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
Three big prizes will be at'eastern Conference champion-
El Mono J. Baeza, Jr. lllx stake Saturday when Tennessee ship. If Tennessee wins and lf'forthe Tigers before they engage
Romntico E.Campbell lllx meets Kentucky at Lexington,; Georgia Tech is upset by Georgia th K West H1 h 8ch00l Con.
Ky. on December 1st, Tennessee will nM Dc at M^ Hope_
To begin with, this will be an (take the title. Tne Cristobal Tigers will be in
inter-Bowl game. . something i Prize three will be national rat- {or r0UKh evening due to the
rare, even in these days of Bowling. Unbeaten Tennessee this ,oss oI two regUlar backs Tal-
games in every back yard. week stands number one in the d g^,. and lMllt Rlne.
Tennessee has already accept-1 nation. . Kentucky which low I h*irtr The Tigers offense will be
ed an invitation to the Sugar three early season games, is rat-. _"_ Arnold Manning All-
Bowl at New Orleans. Kentucky d 11th in the latest United Press Isthmian quarterback and Rob-
yesterday agreed to play on Jan-poll. A Kentucky victory could; t Qrace right halfback, who
uary 1st in the Cotton Bowl, at scramble the standings. a(Je the All-Zone team.
Dallas. One of those two Bowl Only one other Southern team Rooert Baney Bm Roberson and
rates ui the top 20 in the latest Bennett are a trio of
P011- fraEh2SS& & hw i ckwho will do plenty of ball
accepted an Orange Bowl bid,' carrvmB
stands in seventh place nation- U^, forward wall, will be
ally this week.
Investigation Underway
To Try To Fix The Blame
By STAN OPOT0WSKY ,
United Press Sports Writer
... .NEW YORK, Nov. 21.City College of Ne*
York admitted yesterday that at least two basket-
ball stars convicted for bribery were admitted to
the school on the basis of fraudulent records.
1El Indio
2Recodo
3Conde A
4Brochaclto
5Campesino
6Resorte
J. Avila 120
G. Cruz 120
de Paredes 112x
A. Vergara HOx
H. Pltti 117x
E. Julin 112
4th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Atasn
2Gay Ariel
3Blumaha
4Islero
5Tartufo
6Nantago
7rabe II
8Celaje II
9Yorgo
10Flamenco
G. Cruz 115
A. Mena US
O. Chanis 115
G. Snchez 115
J. Ruiz 115
M. Guerrero 115
G. Grael 115
E. Guerra 115
K. Flores 115
E. Julin 115
games will lose prestige on Sat-
urday, unless there's a tie.
Prize number two in the Sat-
urday game may be the South-
5th Race "1-1" Imported1 Mile
Purse: S375.00 Pool Closes 2:55;
1Baby Betty M. Hurley 120
2Hit J. Samaniego 115
3Mon Etoile C. Chavez 105x
4Rechupete A. Vergara 112x
5Batt. Cloud V. Ortega 116
6Armeno E. Ortega 108x
6th Race "1-1" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $375.08. Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Donbles
1Betn
2Troplcana
3Bartolo
4Walrus
5Pincel
6Picn
7Nehulnco
V. Ortega 115
E. Alfaro U5x
G. Grael 115
B. Pulido 115
V. Castillo 114
C. Chavez 105x
E. Julin 109
7th Race"H" Imported61; Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Rose Hip V. Ortega 114
2Silver Fox A. Enrique 107x
3Rinty J. Baeza, Jr. 103x
4Pepsi Cola K. Flores 115
5Belfarset R. Ycaza 107x
6Vermont E. Sllvera 110
8th Race "E" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $550.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
"Thanksgiving Day Handicap''
1Vampiresa M. Guerrero 110
2Soberana II) A. Bazn 110
3Mimo K. Flores 114
4The Dauber B. Moreno 115
5Revial
6Alto Alegre
7Pampero II
8Mingo
9Key Haven
10Pia
B. Pulido 112
J. Avila 116
V. Castillo 112
G. Snchez 110
V. Ortega 112
E. Alfaro 110X
9th Race "t-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Athos
2Caonazo
3Cobrador )
4Goyitoi
5In Time
6Interlude
7Hurlecano
8Zevelania
9Poleckas
10Jepperln
L. Pea lllx
A. ngulo 112x
M Hurley 120
A. Coronado 114x
R. Reliman 120
B. Pulido 120
V. Ortega 114
D. D'Andrea 120
G. Snchez 115
J. Baeza, Jr. 117x
Now... Years
10th Race 'H' Imported6' Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Lujoso O. Chanis 114
2Br. Bound B. Moreno 111
3Cantaclaro O Iglesias 109
4Miss Fairfax B. Pulido 116
5Scotch Chum A. Mena 115
Pacific Side
Little League
Holds 2nd Tryouts
Pacific Side Little League of-
ficials today announced that
the second tryouts for the com-
ing season will be held Satur-
day (Not. 24) at the Diablo
Heights ball park beginning at
9 a.m.
The tryouts will be exclusive-
ly for boys eleven and 12 years
old, including boys who played
last year but who will not reach
their 13th birthday ON or BE-
fore Aug. 1.
The league officials hope
that there will be complete at-
tendance. A total of 63 boys
turned out last Saturday at the
tryouts for nine and ten-year-
olds.
Along The Fairways
P.W.G.A. Monthly Tournament
Nov. 17 at Brazos Brooks:
Low grossGrace Dehlinger
87.
Low Net
1Cleo Galyon, 73.
2Grace Morris, 78.
3Sylva Carpenter, 78.
4Edith Mathieson, 78.
5Violet Ossenfort, 80.
6Emille Grant. 81.
7Charlie Mae Heffelfinger,
81.
8Ellen Kenna, 82.
9Marianne Taylor, 85.
10Gladys Bailey, 85.
11Ruth Daniels. 86.
12Jane Huldqulst. 89.
13Siddv Hlpson. 89.
14Bea Tyrell, 90.
15Adamary Anderson, 91.
Putts: Tie Grace Dehlinger
and Bea Tyrell, 29 each.
Capt. Paul Whltlock, All-Zone
The University of Tennessee 'gJe Center? Franc^co Wong" yerha~blundVhlch~wuld
President. C. E. Brehm.-struck A.|^ takIe Joe Katalln- Indicate who falsified the rec-
back Monday night at charges * a euard Robert Blakely, a ords. The situation is complicat-
that the school has over-empha- !
sized athletics.
The chargesmade by Judge Judge Strelt said the same as
Saul Strelt Monday when he true in Cohen's case, except the
sentenced five ex-players to Jail) difference is 10 points instead of
were first denied by CCNY only five..
Coach Nat Holman. President Wright also pointed
But yesterday the college pres-! out, "We have already withdrawn
ident admitted the fraudulent our team from competition which
records were discovered six weeks; is not administered by education-
ago, and that an investigation is! al authorities." He referred to
trying to fix the blame.
The records involved Herb
Cohen and Al Roth, two of nine
players who received suspend-
ed sentences. Their high school
averages were too low to qual-
ify them for City College, the
judge said, but somehow the
averages were npped in the
college registrar's office.
CCNY President Harry Wright
said yesterday, "No evidence as
his action last spring when he
ordered the team no longer to
play in commercial arenas such
as Madison Square Garden, but
instead to confine play to camp,
us gymnasiums.
Sports Briefs
By UNITED PRESS
_. ,_ .,__ . top condition, tne Tigers snouia
The charge came in New York' P B, Kn h^ ed
from Judge Saul Strelt, who sent-
f^JZ*&Sff'i&&!r Tickets will be sold at the Mt.
jail for bribery. The judge ln-Hn_ ., tartine a id-
Tennessee among other;5?R'!.!.a:f,ta-r.lnf a.J.pVm; -S.
cluded .
schools in his blast at what he
called the "big business" of col-
lege athletics.
Tennessee President Brehm
says the university has done no-
thing outside the rules laid down
by the Southeastern Conference.
Brehm says the Tennessee ath-
letic department is self-support-
FOOTBALL
Only one major berth remains
tackle and Hughes and Anderson ed because there are about 50 open in the New Year's Day foot-
at ends With the linesmen all in. persons in the recording offices ball Bowl games. That's in the
top condition the Tigers should | who had access to the filesr" Orange Bowl where Georgia Tech
Wright said the school is also is looking for an opponent: Ken-
* tucky has accepted a bid to Play
the winner of the Southwest Con-
ference in the Cotton Bowl...'
probing the judge's charges that
coaches lured players to the
campus with the promise of
mission" will be 75 cents'lor ad-! work-free jobs and "winked at''
lid contributes.. valuable ^ Bfcsajm, g
ults, 25 cents for students with- courses of study,
out S. A. cards and grade school
children free.
Probable starting lineups:
CRISTOBAL
Anderson, LE; Blakely, LT;
Katalinas, LG; Bryant, C; Whit-
lock, RG; Wong, BT; Hughes,
Manning, QB; Bailey, LB;
Maryland and Tennessee are
booked in the Sugar Bowl.. .and
..Stanford will play the Big Ten
"Assistant Coach harold Sand. wlnner m tne & Boml *
property to the university.
Schroeder, Seixas
Reach Semi-Finals
In Aussie Tourney
SYDNEY, Australia, Nov. 21
(UP)American Davis Cuppers
Ted Schroeder and Vic 8eixas
have reached the semi-finals of
the New South Wales Tennis
Tournament in Sydney, Austra-:
lia.
However, Wimbledon Cham-1
pion Dick Savitt of Orange, Newi
Jersey, has been eliminated.
BLACK KNIGHTS
(mentioned by the judge) ap-
peared before the investigating
committee and answered in de-
tail the charges made against
him," Wright said. "He denied
that he made offers to players
which violated any rules of in-
tercollegiate athletics.. .employ-
Carlin, LE; Sherry. LT; Tur-!"lenl J!^_1*L!*&
er, C; Fraser, RG; Thorny, .idents
mrasSTiSBWK a-*basU"other rtu-
Malla, RT; Herring, RE; Anger-
muller, QB; Thompson, LH; De-
LaMater, RH; Mullen, FB.
Charlie Mac
Loses 2 and 1
Charlie MacMurray of Panam
went down 2 and 1 in his match
Young Mervin Rose of Austra- for the Guatemalan Open golf
lia, who beat Savitt twice last, championship yesterday as Hel-,
year, came from behind twice toadlo Polo, tournament favorlte.j^ntknow how a judge could say
CCNY Registrar Robert L.
Taylor said he discovered the
doctored records of Cohen and
Roth six weeks ago and report-
ed them to Wright. Wright
said he in turn gave them to
the court authorities.
"There was 'foul play some-
where between when we receiv-
ed the correct transcripts from
the college and when this office
certified the boys for admission."
Taylor said. "I have no Idea who
the culprit might be."
Coach Holman. when first told
oif of Judge Strelt's charge, said,
1 That's completely untrue.
win 3-6, 6-1. 2-6, 7-5, 6-4. I added the title to his medalist
Frank Sedgman of Australia, I honors,
who won the U.8. National Sin- Polo, playing on his home
gles Tournament this y ear, course, was a little too much for
such a thing
Today Judge Streit indicated
he thinks the colleges will have
to do more than Investigate
rounded out the semi-finals with MacMurray in the final analysis ^SSSSSL J/1^]1 &2L&3&
Juan Franco Tips
By CLOCKER
1Tap Girl
2Fonseca
3Recodo
4Blumaha
5Rechupete
6Walrus
7Rose Hip
8Key Haven
9Cobrador (e)
10Lujoso
Hercules
Little Lnlu
El Indio
Islero
Battling Cloud
Nehuinco
Pepsi Cola
Pampero II
In Time
Miss Fairfax
ONE BESTKey Haven.
a 6-1, 6-1,6-4 win over Sven Dav- although Charlie put up a stiff
idsson of Sweden. Schroeder will I battle right to the 35th hole,
play Rose and Seixas meets Sedg-
man in tomorrow's semi-finals.
Gatun Pool To Be
Closed Tomorrow
The Gatun Swimming Pool
will be closed all day Thursday,
Nov. 22, due to the Thanksgiv-
ing Day holiday. It will be
opened again on Friday, Nov.
23, as scheduled.
Curb Backache
Vigour, Nerroaanea* or weaJc.
you hould help your Promt
nd Immediately with ROaENJL
Tlfia rwlthROOENA.
If,...*?1"1*' "dlolno male**
ROOBXA from your ehm' -
*tifaction suaraattos.
Speaking of the irregularities
he discovered in a four-months
Lefty O'DoBl's baseball All-
Stars left Tokyo for home 'Mon-
day night after winning 13, tying
two and losing one game on their
tour of Japan. The final game of
the trip was a 5-5 tie with the
Japanese Champion Yomluri Gi-
ants. The game was called be*
caase of darkness.
,
In a Philadelphia fight Mon-
day night, rising welterweight
Johnny Saxton of New York
punched his way to an easy ten-
round decision over Charley Sal*
as of Phoenix.
Sessions aimed at caring the
ilia of intercollegiate athletics are
due to be wound ap today in
Washington and Chicago.
Ten university presidents have
been holding hearings in Wash-
ington. They will report to she!
American Education Association
on ethical lapse* in coUoge sports.
And hi Chicago, the NCAA'
council Is to complete a two-day
study of members' response to
the council's 12-point de-empha-
sis program. The council says 7f
per cent of the members favor
the plan.
leges change their present meth-
ods."
He said Roth ranked 638th in
his 816-man high school grad-
uating class with an average of
71.43, not good enough for ad-
mission to City College. But the
college records now show his
high school average as 75.5,
which is good enough.
the-Year."
The Northern California Foot-
The Guatemalan Inter-club ??<. *SStnj5rS?*.52 ball Writers Association has
Murray, the present Isthmian
Open king.
Johnny, who was* unable to
take part in the Guatemalan
Open, left Panam today.
Fight Results
NEWARK, N.J.. Nov. 21 (UP)
Chico Vejar, 148%, of Stamford,
Conn., won on a technical knock-
out over Jimmy Gee Dee, 151. of
Plainfield, N.J. in the third round
of a scheduled eight-round bout
last night.
Vejar battered Gee Dee for two
rounds and floored him with a
hard right to the body in the
third. Referee Paul Chavalier
halted the fight.
Do FALSE TEETH
Rock, Slid* or Slip?
rASTEETB. an improved powder to bt
iprtakled on upper or lower plate*, held*
false teeth more (irmly in place Do ml
slide, dip or rock. No summy. looey,
pajiy taato or feeling. FASTTITH 1*
Ikallne (non-acid) Doe* not sour. Checks
pUte odor" (denture breath). Get FAS.
TEETH at any drug tor*.
Baseball immortal Ty Cobb Is
free on his own recognizance on
charges of violating the Califor-
nia game and fish code.
Cadet Dick Shea of Army has
won the IC4A Individual cross-
country championship for the
third straight time. .
Pretty Mrs. Mae Collins has ap-
plied for permission to be a sec-
ond and trainer for her husband,
featherweight boxer Tommy Col-
lins. The Massachusetts Boxing
Commission says it may grant
her requestwith restrictions.
Tommy's bride of two weeks
wont be allowed to enter dress-
ing rooms and cant go into the
ring between rounds.
RACES TOMORROW
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd 6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
our patrons we are non
operating both at the
"COPACABANA" and
'SAVOY."
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
7th Race "H" Importeds 6Y2 Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
I
1. ROSE HIP............... V. Ortega 114
2. SILVER FOX.............A. Enrique 107x
3. RINTY.................J. Baeza Jr. 103x
4. PEPSICOLA...............K. Flores 115
5. BELFARSET............. . R. Yeaxa 207*
6. VERMONT...............E. Silvera 110
8th Race "E" Importeds 7 Fgs.
Purse: $550.00 Pool Closes: 4:40 p.m.
QUINIELA
'THANKSGIVING DAY HANDICAP"
J. VAMPIRESA............M. Guerrero 110
2. (SOBERANA H..............A. Bazn 110
3. (MIMO...................K.. Flores 114
4. THE DAVBER............B. Moreno 115
5. REVIAL..................B. Pulido 112
6. ALTO ALEGRE............./. Avila 116
7. PAMPERO U.............V. Castillo 112
8. MINGO.................G. Snchez 110
9. KEYHAVEN.............. V. Ortega 112
10. PIA ..... ...............E. Alfaro llOx
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK
10th Race "H" Importeds 6l/2 Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes: 5i40 p.m.
2. LUJOSO.................O.Chanu 114
2. BREEZE BOUND..........B. Moreno 111
3. CANTACLARO....... ____C. Iglesias 109
4. MISS FAIRFAX............B. Pulido 116
5. SCOTCH CHUM.........____A. Mena 115

(
'\>*<-


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMMUl 81, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
Big Prizes Ride On Outcome Of This Week's Football Games
:
Gun Club Notes
o
mutes &&$
In the first officlal target com-
gitltlon held at the Crlstooal
un Club's range In some years,
the Balboa Gun Club team Sun-
day won the CZSA center fire
pistol match, with a score of 2040.
Although never able to close In
on Balboa, the Cristobal team
celebrated firing on their home
range by coming home in second
place with 1806. ' ,
The competition for third place
was the closest, as the Marine
Barracks team from Rodman
aqueewd In ahead of the Balboa
second team for the awards, 1781
to 1748
In winning, Balboa placed
three shooters among the top five
to elnch the win. Major Dan
Crumpacker was wH out to iron
for the gold medal with 529.
Teammate 8. Todhunter Todd,
firing a long barreled relic ne
unearthed from that 200-pound
ditty bag he carries, came up
with a 519 for second. He just did
nip Paul Stewart of Cristobal,
whose 518 was good for third
place.
Archie Turner of Balboa turn-'
ed up In fourth place with 511,
and these were the only shooters
to score 500 or better. Lt. John;
Counselman of the Rodman Ma-
rine Barracks Just missed lt with
496 to take fifth place. '
The match was well attended
My an enthusiastic bunch of
shooters! and lt Is evident that
they enjoyed traveling across the
Isthmus. Roy Perkins of the Cris-
tobal Qun Club served as Range
Officer and did an excellent lob,
the match going off In good time
with no delays and no complaints.
.This was, the last official CZSA
match Of the year, as most com-
petitive shootlhg now moves in-
doors for the* Gallery season.
However, the Balboa Oun Club Is
holding their individual pistol
championship for members only
during the month of December,
with generous merchandise
prises, some to be given on the
Lewis system to give all shooters
an equal chance to take home an
award.
The next CZSA match will be
the big on*, scheduled for the
middle of January. This will be
the registered big bore shoot, to
be held over the DCM course,
cores of competitors entered In
this match will be official and
will be entered In the NRA rec-
ords in Washington. Ammunition
has been supplied by the Director
of Civilian Marksmanship, and
will be available for all compet-
itors. Entries will be limited to 40
shooters, and It Is advisable to
enter in advance as post entries
will be charged extra. Entry fees
will be announced after the next
CZSA meeting, to be held the
29th of this month.
Several Bowl
Bids Rewlain
Not Clinched
The detailed scores at Cristobal were as follows:
BALBOA
No. 1
Dan Crumpacker
S. Todd
Archie Turner
Jake Bernsen
NATI, MATCH
8. T. B. T.
78 94 83 258
77 93 78 248
84 85 88 255
08 78 74 220
CAMP PERRY Grand
8.. T. B. T. Total
96 06 84 276
07 82 92 271
89 86 81 256 .
98 82 86 261
TEAM TOTAL
529
519
511
481
2040
CRISTOBAL
No. 1
Paul Stewart
Floyd RoblnSbn
John Eelther
HI Cronan
g. T. B. T.
7S 86 88 347
73 86 58 217
59 82 80 201
61 74 54 189
s. r. B. T.
94 87 90 271
88 84 89 261
88 60 66 209
92 59 60 211
TEAM TOTAL
........."
MABWE8 (BQDMAN, %
J. Counselman 85 90 77 252
HowardTurton 76 79 70 225
C. P. Haynes 78 81 76 230
I R Newton... 71 68 62 202
:'^AM:*0TAL....:........
BALBOA No. 8
8. T.
92 73
77 81
73 71
71 81

......
B. T.
79 244
46 204
S199
205
Ne. 1
V. Underwood
. V Bilairtw .
Mike Wolchlck
B Budd
8. T. B. T.
72 74 81 327
41 73 56 171
8. T.
80 79
87 81
89 78
83 66
B. T.
80 339
74 343
80 247
53 301
Total
518
478
410
400
. 1806
Total
496
429
429
407
. 1761
Total
466
449
458
372
TEAM TOTAL ..........
MARINES (CRISTOBAL)
No. 1
E. L. Hamon
L. H. Pratt
ft. Montorano 32 59 33 123
J. T. Denham 38 54 86 118
.................... 1745
T.
75 67 68 198
39 72 69 180
. T.
88 73
78 70
T.
228
216
76 40 37 168
58 30 38 116
Total
426
396
376
334
TEAM TOTAL ................................... 1M2
AXBBOOB-CTJBDNDU
No. 1
Bill Jeffrey
Bob Oorder
Oeo. Neubauer
Jim Coman
8.
76
61
29
6
t. B. T.
87 77 339
86 68 316
30 30 69
6 10 30
TEAM TOTAL
INDIVIDUALS
8. T. B. T.
88 83 79 349
81 83 76 320
43 7 14 63
9 30 6 85
Total
488
435
132
65
13
No. 1
M R. Boggs
me weu
J. Schwarts
Duerr
O. . Tueker
H. Henderson
S. Therlot
H. Hlnton
J. X- Hopkins
8.
76
75
80
57
50
35
33
6
13
T. B.
83 74
85 71
83 63 304
80 88 302
68 57 184
35 64 134
S3 40
7 36
0 10
If
96
49
31
T. B. T.
84 77 354
83 83 78 346
93 01 76 360
88 83 78 360
83 S3 64 108
78 56 50 184
88 IS 30 HI
44 41 41 136
0 10 10 30
Total
487
876
463
453
382
306
207
175
61
LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC
AS SOON AS YOU CAN
IMTBMNf AwHg4tg fall strength- kills
millions of gwaas on threat surface. It
attack! the germs associated with coldi
befere they attack you ... keep* them
from leaning serious tremble. Take the
sensible precaution against cold compli-
eations-gargie with LBTIRINI And
atptic, full strength!
M TUTS OVW A 12-YIAI PlilOO, DAILY USStl
Of UfTIRINI ANTMIPTK HAD 'IvYBB COLDS!
NEW YORK, Nov. 31 (UP)
Big prizes are riding on the out-
come of this week's football
games.
Several bowi bids still are
open, and only two major confer-
ence titles have been clinched.
This Saturdaythe last big foot-
ball weekend of the seasonwill
go a long way toward deciding
such Issues.
Stanford already has clinched
the Pacific Coast Conference
crown. The Indians meet Cal-
ifornia Saturday, but even a loss
cannot keep them out of the
Pose Bowl. Utah, of the Skyline
Conference, U the other team
vlth the league title already In
the trophy room
Princeton ui the Ivy League
and Oklahoma In the Big Seven
are assured of at least a tie for
league titles Princeton can
clinch the Ivy League with a win
,c\er Dartmouth The Sooners
can take the Big Seven by beat-
ing Nebraska.
Georgia Teen needs one more
victory to wrap up the South-
eastern Confeience and Tulsa
must win its lust game on Dec-
ember eighth against Detroit to
get the Missouri Valley title.
Both Maryland and V-M-I
have a chance for Southern Con-
lerence honors Each has won
four and lost none In league play
and each has one conference
game left. Maryland meets West
Virginia this Saturday, V-M-I
takes on V1 rg 1 n 1 a Tech on
Thanksgiving.
The Southwest Conference race
Is wide open. Three games
|Texas Christian. Rice and Bay-
lorstill are in the running. I-
'C-U and Rice are the current
leaders with three wins and one
loss in league play. Baylor has
won two, lost one and tied one.
T-C-U and Rice tangle Saturday,
p.lvlng Baylor a chance to gain
ground when it goes against
Southern Methodist which has
won only onb conference game
; If Rice beats T-C-U, and Baylor
wins this week and then beats
Rice the following Saturday, the
Bears would win the title and
the Cotton Bowl bid that usual-
ly goes with It
The Eastern representative in
the Rose Bow may be decided
this week when Illinoisthe Big
10 leadermeets Northwestern.
The mini have won four and
tied one in conference play. Ohio
State marred Illinois' perfect re-
cord last week by holding the
Illlni to a scoreless tie-
Assistant Couch Ernie Godfrey
of the Buckeye says the phono-
graph recorr which inspired
Ohio State to hold Illinois score-
less will stay in the team's dress-
ing room. '
Godfrey played the university
fight song and recordings of the
late Knute Rockne's pep talks to
get the Buckeyes "up" for the
Illinois game. The coach says the
ohonograph v-111 be In use this
week as State prepares for Mi-
chigan.
State's head coach Woody
Hayeshas denied rumors that
star back Vic Janowlcz Is un-
popular with his teammates.
Hayes said "Janowlcz still Is
an All-Amerlcan and the most
popular boy on the squad." It's
been reported the team wasn't
blocking for the 1950 All-America
and Helsman Trophy winner.
On The Alleys

PLEASANT PROBLE*nV-Now that George Ratterman. center, has Jumped back to the National from
the Canadian Provincial League, Coach Jimmy Phelan of the New York Yanks scratches his head over
which passing quarterback to use. The other one is Bob Celeri. (NEA)
Bowl Bids Stimulate Dixie's
Growing Grid 'Powerhouses
By BILL FERGUSON
United Pres Sports Writer
inree touchd-jv/n? to give the un-
beaten Volunteers their eighth
straight win.
ATLANTA, Nov. 21 It's a Mississippi gave the highly-
Iwugh presctiptlon to fill, but a touted Vols quite a battle for the
stimulating bowl bid seems to be first half, trailing 19-14 at the
just what the doctor ordered for intermission, but after that Gen.
Dixie's growi.-.g grid powers. Robert Neyland's single wing
New Year's Invitations are do- was unstopablc.
lng wonaers lor Georgia Xecnl Kentucky's Wildcats, who lost
and Tennessee and Just the three straight, at the beginning
thought of a bid is lifting Ken-'of the season, racked their sixth
lucky to greater heights. (straight victory with quarter-
Georgia Tec'.i, with_an Invita- Babe Parilll passing his way to a
Leaders Falter in Classic Bowling Nash won the first game by a
League as Nash and Jantzen Win score of 907 to 862; the second ay
The league-eladlng Sears and 952 to 887 and the third by 013 to
second place PAA Flyers took 848, for a pintail total of 3771 to
three and four-point beatings in 2597.
the Classic Bowling League last Standings of the teams after
Friday night at the Diablo the play-were:
Heights alleys when Nash took TEAMS Won teat
the Flyers for four and the last-iBears........... 36
place Jantzen team snapped the PAA Flyers........ 30 30
winning streak of the Sears team
by taking three point*.
Nash-Willys......
Jantzen.......... 17
The leading bowler* in
Classic League after the
piy
.ATsr
In the Sears-Jantzen meet, in-
dividual high scoring took the were:
exciting end. For the Jantzen NAMES
team, lead-off man Presho snap-\ Balcer......
ped off games of 229,194 and 184 Morton............. ISO
for 608, followed by Kelly Mara-! Madeline............ lit
bella with 210, 159 and 190 for Best................ 186
559; Bill Jamison with 480; Ow- Jenner.............. 188
esne with 221,168 and 191 for 580,1 Presho.............. 188
with anchorman Bill Morton in
fine form with 218, 180 and 225
for a splendid 633.
For Sears, Ted Melanson had a
poor night with 430, with Colston
following with 515; Zebrock with
518; Wilber Norrls with 540. and
Bud Balcer coming through with
fine games of 310, 383 and 187 for
a total of 630, Just three pins be-
hind his opposing anchorman
Morton.
The scores for last Friday eve-
ning were:
Melanson.
Colston .
Zebrock. .
Norria. .
Balcer. .
Totals. .
SEAB8
144 158
157
181
. 200
.210
190
156
170
238
128430
188 515
171 518
161
187
902 025 8069688
Presho .
Marabella
ilon to the c.ange Bowl safely
.towed away, rolled a good Ala-
bama team 7-7 Saturday and
Tennessee celebrated being ask-
ed to the Sugar Bowl by trounc-
ing Mississippi, 46-21.
Rumor has It that Kentucky is
In line for the Cotton Bowl and
the Wildcats made the talk
stronger by mauling Oeo. Wash-
ington, 47-18. In a warm-up for
i ext week's battle with Tennes-
see. Undefatcd Maryland, the
Southern Conference's represen-
tative to the Sugar Bowl this
year, also got tough and Jarred
Worth Carolina State 53-0.
Elsewhere In the Southeastern
Conference the bowl talk was
nil, but Tulane and Georgia
found something to get fired up
about. Georgia opened up a ter-
i.ew national record.
The quarterback All-America
candidate passed for three
touchdowns to run his collegiate
career total to 50 scores and a
new mark. The Wildcats also
came up with a deadly running
attack that could spell trouble
for Tennessee this coming Sat-
urday.
Georgia also found a pummel-
Santa Cruz Sports
students from the Local Rate
Schools spent a wonderful day
at the Santa Cruz playground
last Saturday during the Inter-
School Table Tennis Tournament
Du"rn,raill.mnd S^^|Pg-* ft the Physical Edu-
VanderbUt, 14-10. for Its first cationand Recreation, Branch.
8ALAMI AND PENNIES
McKEESPORT, Pa. (U.P.)
A burglar stole 830 worth of sa-
lami and 200 pennies from the
Tassone market When police
tried to pick up John laenberg
he started throwing pennies at
them from the window.
loop victory.
* Louisiana State scored a field
toal In the fiist period against
Mississippi State and then hung
on the rest of the way for a rug-
ged, 3-0, victory over the Ma-
il ons and Flcida went down be-
fore non-conforence rival Miami,
21-6.
Georgia Tech's Engineers, who
l.ave won elgnt p.ames and tied
one in nine tries, pulled within
one game of the conference title
by dumping Alabama.
C. .arterback Darrell Crawford
again led the Orange-Bowl-
bound Jackets by passing for
three touchdowns. Tech now on-
ly needs a victory over Georgia
on Dec. 1st to win their first
Southeastern crown since 1044.
Tennessee -llc'n't need Its star,
tailback Hank Lauricella. His
sub, Herky Payne, accounted for
Stomach
-
Take southing
npto-
Bf'smoi
end feel good again!
nm-MttMOi ii sntu U tama*
a sooddag, protective coating oo ir-
ritated ttoauch aad iniMtina] walla,
1. Hl+t $m mm ato) fe *,
i. Wat turn fmmtwmmu W
Km* fita
> Mat MNM mm MMfc Mv MM*
nu'- *M H""" aula*
ol. M (Milt rw m r*4M
Vi
ice
from 3 to 7 p.r.:.
EVERY DAY
The Boston Bar
lng ground game to combine with
quarterback Zeke BratkowskTs
passing as the Bulldogs routed
Auburn, and this could also spell
trouble for unbeaten Tech.
All LSU needed was freshman!
Cliff String i ield, who gave the
Tigers enough offense to top Mis-1
slsslppl State with a 10-yard field
goal, and Tulane came up with a
thrilling touchdown In the final
period to surprise Vanderbilt.
Miami built up Its chances of
receiving a bid to Jacksonville's
Gator Bowl by generally humb-
ling Florida In every department.
Southeastern Conference
Standings
By UNITED PRESS
(Conference Games)
Jantzen ployed through in the
first game with a total of 1027 oJJJSJ^
Sears' 902; Sears took the second i owesne
by a score of 929 to 859, but Jant-
zen again came back to take the
third by a score of 072 to 806.
Jantzen bowled a total of 2858 to
Sears' 2633.
Team W. L. T. Pet.
Ga. Tech. 6 0 0 1.000
Tennessee 3 0 0 1.000
Kentucky 3 2 0 .600
LSU .... 3 2 1 .600
Mlsslssl'pl 3 2 1 .600
Auburn .380 .500
Vandrbllt 3 4 0 .429
Georgia 2 3 0 .400
Al'bama .240 .333
Miss. St'te 2 4 0 .333
Florida .14 0 .200
Tulane. 1 4 0 .200
Team-
Tennessee 8
Oa. Tech. 8
Kentucky 7
Auburn .
LSU ....
Mlsslssl'pl
Georgia .
Vancfrbllt
Mis. State
Al'bama .
Over 40 boys and girls took ac-
tiva part in the day's activities.
Henry Clark and Eugenia Lemon
representing La Boca won the
mixed doubles, for the Jr. High
Boys, Lloyd Griffith did a splen-
did Job as representatives of La
Boca winning four while losing
none.
Eugenia Lemon won four and
lost none to take the honors for
La Boca In the Junior High sec- Florida
tlon for girls. This gives La Boca Tulane.
credit for winning the Junior
High Tournament.
Santa Crux walked away with
the Elementary Tournament
with the following representa-
tives: Claudette Palmer 5-0;
Linda Griffith 5-0: Hasel Joseph
5-0; Marvin Grant 4-1; Alfred
Jones 5-0; and Oscar Townsend
5-0.
VOLLEYBALL
All roads will lead to Santa
Cruz Gymnasium Sunday, (Nov.
25) at 9:00 a.m. for the women's
Volleyball Tournament. Miss Hol-
ness, assistant director. La Boca
Playground has a strong all star
team ready for the occasslon.
The Bermuda Devils are work-
ing hard trying to get in shape
for the affair The Santa Crus
girls are hoping to defend them-
selves.
The Ohagrei girls hope to dis-
play their best combinations.
Miss Stewart, playground assist-
ant at Silver City, has such play-
ers as Dolores Worrell, Caroline
Cox, Constance Warner, Joyce
(All Games)
W. L. T. Pet.
1.000
1.000
.700
.621
.621
.621
.555
.555
.500
.445
.445
.379
P. OP.
127 35!
87 34
102 40;
56 51
132 123
94 1391
120 132
67 39
70 103
16 58
58 65
37 100
P. OP.
310 61
106 63
336 86
178 153
69 93
205 150
170 136
161 154
76 78
217 151
144 110
82 151
The loss of three points did not
affect the league standing for
first place, however, as the sec-
cnd-place PAA Flyers stood on
the losing end of four points
when the Nash team ran rough-
shod over them for three games.
Best was high for the evening
(not a pun!) with splendid games
of 238. 224 and 178 for a total Of
640, followed by Thomas who had
a poor night of 498; Jenner came
through with 530; Saylon with
524, and Madeline wound up with
168, 206 and 205 for 579.
On the PAA side of the fence,
Wilber led off with 524, followed
by Schneider and Cooley, both of
whom had bad nights with 480
and 497 respectively; Hermann
had 523 and Engelke came up
with a bright 573.
Morton
Totals.
JANTEEN
. 229 194
. 210
. 149
.221
. 219
159
140
168
189
184- 808
180888
183 480
191 680
335 883
.1027 859 9733868
Best.
Thomas.
Jenner .
Saylon .
Madeline
Totals. .
NASH-WILLYS
238
161
193
147
168
324
168
167
187
206
178 640
188 488
170 630
907 953 9133TU
Wilber
Schneider
Cooley .
Hermann .
Engelke. .
Totals. .
PAA FLYERS
169
168
152
206
176
182
165
187
159
194
162524
147480
188487
158 633
303 6T8
862 887 848350T
CBL boys and San Carlos Snort-
ers. The CBL boys eked out the
veredlct 52 to 51.
Top men of the fray were M.
Gonzalez with 12 points and A.
Lambert with 11 for the winners
while Victor- Acosta sank 15
points for the losers.
The TNT team Is lined up with
the CBL squad for Friday's en-
gagement, which get* underway
precisely at 7 o'clock.
Playground Sports
A display of basketball tech-
niques featured the inauguration
of the Pacific Boys' Club cage
league Friday night in the Pacific
Clubhouse auditorium. The
opening event of the circuit, be-
tween Farmacia Chu and TNT
Brothers, and resulted in a 42 to
39 victory for Farmacia Chu.
TNT managed to steal the
show in the first-half but at the
end of the fourth quarter found
both qulntests tied at 37. This
caused an extra period of five
minutes play which ended with
both squads adding two points.
Another 3-mlnute period also
followed, and it was at this point
that the medicine men were able
to squeeze out the win.
The winners attack was spear-
headed by V. Suarez, who played
all over the floor while scoring
Mitt * SAI
HEPTICA
17 points. Harold Kerr. who also
Warner, Sylvia Oybs and Aet-i played a fine game, topped his
hla Dudley, etc. In top form to'teammates with 14 markers.
assure Silver City the honor of
twinning the first of this kind of
tournament.
The circuit's second encounter
took place Monday night in the
same auditorium between the
HO ONE UK
COUIDHAVEA
BACKACHE
ASBAOASMIM
.auan
IT MAYBE VOUft KIDNEYS
-WHY NOT TRY THOSE
DODO'S KIDNEY PILLS
^YOUR BROTHER STOKE Of?
ILL G|T SOME VOW
DODD'S KIDNEY PILLS/
OUR MOST POPULAR
REMEDY.
THEY SHOULD HELP,
YOUR BACKACHE
0ODDSARE
CERTAINLY
EASY TO
.TAKt-ANDl
FEEL SOME
.BETTER
ALREADY
fes
Nit lot IACKACHE Spoil Your Pteaura
N.T- fkK hint h.rk. It b mmJtj * tnl If
rwr kdtyt uttmitl mim uU iwj Ih. tflrt|. dwi
mi Am ?" < Mi's Kinr P9U to mtor* taw
ml bmHv M,. DU: Umtj
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tortol BiiiMto ai ton a Ha mi to
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uttw 4 m *. mr m
NOW AREN'T YOU LAO YOU
TOOK MY ADVICE?
YOU KNOW I AM |
MARY-BACKACHE
ALL ONE AND
I FEEL 1ETTER
EVERY WAY
Always keep gentle
SAL tHEPATIC
-the lexttivt that suits
your convenience in
your medicine chest.
Don't feel sluggish and
miserable. Don't let
headaches spoil your day
SAL HEPTICA bring,
you gentle, speedy relief,
usually within en hour.
Anucid SAL HEPTICA
sweetens sour stomach.
t
;\
m sis

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I
mm\s
I
S*fg
-VA*A>
r<*
FINEST
BOURBON
WHISKEY

NATIONAL
DISTILLERS, S. A.
Trans'Isttimian Highway

AJU




TENNESSEE,

"

r.-gy.-.v-........_


BIG ONE
BOX
HONG KONG, Not. 21 (UP)
Thr Communists' requisition
of tnmber has created a coffin
shortage in Swatow, and peo-
ple are reported to be making
coffins out of packing cases.
The Reds' executions of alleged
"cmnter-revelntionariea" has
reportedly aggravated the sit-
; nation.
|M Officials
Here To Study
Tourist Potentials
To encourage U S. tourist travel
tu Panam, team of top offi-
cials from Braniff Airways ar-
rived at Tocumeri this morning
on. board Braniff's flight 605.
Fourteen traffic and sales exe-
cutives of the airline will spend
two days in Panam in prepara-
tion for the Company's new win-
ter campaign to publicize and
sell Panam as a vacation spot
for air travelers from the United
States.
Headed by ftex Brack. General
Traffic and' Sile? Manager -for
the airline, the group are man-
agers of Brai>;ff offices in the
largest cities on the airline's do-
mestic routes.
In addition to helping develop
tourist travel between the U. S.
and Panam, 'he men will call
on business firms which have
trade with North America out-
lets.
"Some of the chief barriers in;
the development of smooth in-
ternational commerce have been
distance, time, and communica-
tion,'' Brack said
"We feel that the obligation
of the air transport industry is
not only to break' down these j
physical barriers, but it Is also
our duty to encourage interna-
tional commerce by lending all
possible form: of aid to busi- >
neasmen at both ends of the
line."
Braniff has already solved the
time and distance problem forj
U.S. Latin American travelers by
continuing to Increase Its inter-
national service. The airline now
has daily flights between Latin
America and the U.S.
Brack said: "If we can talk to1
businessmen in Panam, we can
better understand their trans-
porta turn problems and so im-
prove our own service to meet
their needs."
' "This trip is being made pri- '
atarily to further acquaint onr
Mies managers with the won-
derful opportunities for TJ. S.
tourists in Panam.
"We want our district repre-.
tentative* to I as well inform-1
ed on the ma; y attractions
whieh Panarra has to offer as
our employes In Panam. Bra-
niff feels that Its employes must
personally visit in Latin Amer-
ican before they can plan trips
for our passengers. We intend
to visit Colon's Free Zone. Tabo-
ga Island, the ruins of Old Pana-
m and the f>mous Panam Ca-
nal locks.
"Our compsny has already
launched an extensive adverts- ;
lng campaign In United States
newspapers featuring travel to;
Panama for th" next six months.
. "In addition to our advertising
program, re are furnishing
newspaper editors with pictures
and stories about Panam City,'
Coln and points of interest here,
distributing *fi over the United States, and
BOnsorlng lec.ure programs on
Oftin America to various club
pjroups."
Chilean Navy Buys
USS 'Nashville'
PHILADELPHIA. Nov. 21.
(UP)The Chilean Navy today
took possession here of the fam-
ed World War II light cruiser
TJ8S Nashville.
The Nashville was renamed
the Captain Prat in honor of
Chile's greatest naval hero.
The Nashville was bought bv
Chile along with the USS
Brooklyn, which is now the
Callean navy cruiser O'Hig-
tuu.
'' J"......I .' ".....
II.....
AN INDEPENDEN^
DAJLY N1W8PAPW

>
'Let the people knou the truth end the country safe" ' Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER M, 1951
..... I l"l' I !.....'
TEN CENTS
Able
About To Be Fi
urgeon
OTTAWA.-Ont.. Nov. 21
The Royal Canadian Navy
yesterday shelved a press re-
lease praising an American
surgeon lieutenant for skillful
battlefront operations on Ko-
rean war casualties and an-
nounced Instead that he will be
discharged for fraudulently pos-
ing as a doctor.
Navy officials said they have
established definitely that Fer-
dinand Waldo Demara. Jr. 29,
Lawrence, Mass., entered the
Canadian service as a surgeon
in March. 1950, with the cre-
dentials of a Dr. Joseph Cyr,
Grand Falls. N. B.
Dr. Cyr said at Grand Falls
yesterday that he never knew
Demara by his rignt name but
that he used to be his close
friend.
He said he knew him as "Dr
^__.^^^
Nationalists Warn
Red Chinese Have
5 Million Men Ready
TAIPEH, Formosa, Nov. 21
(UPj Nationalist China warn-
ed today that the Chinese Com-
munists have V0O0.OO0 under
srms and 10,100 000 more in re-
serve, ready to go Into action "on
pny front."
The Nationalist Minister of
Defense, Gen. Kuo Chi Chao, in
a special report to the govern-
ment, said that according to in-
formation compiled by the Na
tlonallst Chinese Intelligence
service, the Chinese Reds are
apldly increasing their air force
personnel.
He added that the Reds now
have, 1.000 combat planes and
said "If Russia continues to sup-
ply them with planes at this
rate, the number will be tripled
by the middle of next year."
Kuo said the Red Navy main-
tains 200 warships with a dis-
placement of 70.000 tons, but he
observed that only 30 of them
are in active srv!ce. The rest of
them are usea as transports. He
explained that this fleet is suf-
ficient to mow four or five com-
plete armies
He said their are 80.000 Rus-
sians in charpe of missions in
China Some 30 000 of .them are
occupied in military and politic-
al affairs. The rest are technici-
ans, mechanics and military spe-
cialists.
Kuo warned also that the Reds
have made great progress in the
construction of transcontinental
:ailroads from north to south
and from east to west, all of
which are connected with Rus-
sian rail lines in the north and
the west.
Cecil Hannan," a member of a: has not heard from him for i gery, and nothing has occurred
ralioinii nrrl> Mti'U kaatliaiinfi >K>-r.^ **.*. ^ 4nni/1ant cithnu trt Dnonl
; religious order with headquar-' three years,
ters four miles from Grand! He said that as far as he
Falls. | knew, his son's only medical
Cyr said "Hannan" visited; esprtense was aa an order-
him often, but added: j b at the Massachusetts Eye
"I was suspicious of his claim a Ear Infirmary in Boston.
to be a doctor on several oc- The elder Demara, 93, said
casions. For one thing, he never' that his son quit Lawrence Cen-
would talk shop with me and, tral Catholic High School when
always changed the subject. On he was 15 and left home to en-
one occasion when he accom- ter the Cistercian Monastery
panied me on a confinement he at Cumberland. R. 1. A year
made me suspicious by saying later he returned home.
it was his first experience on; "But from then on, my wife
such a case." ' and I were like outsiders," he
Cyr said he dismissed his > said. "We Just didn't aeem
suspicions because Demara was to exist in his world. He was
"a very charming fellow." still determined to enter rellgl-
"Hannan" and Cyr's papers ous life."
then dlssappeared at about the Ferdinand, Jr.,
same time.
to Incident either to Royal
Canadian Navy authorities or to
authorities of other forces serv-
ing in Korea that he did not
possess the competence of a
fully-qualified, medical man,"
an officer said.
THE GROUP OF HIGH-RANKING PANAMANIAN officials that attended the Disaster Con-
trol Center program yesterday morning at Ft. Amador are shown as they gathered after the
demonstration. Members of Panama ministries, embassies, and government officials were
Introduced for the first time to the civil defen ae set-up In the Canal Zone. A Joint Panama-
Canal Zone venture Is anticipated In the futu re.
US A-Bomb Bases
In England To Stay,
Churchill Promises
The alleged imposter was
brought back from Korea,
where he bad extracted a
bullet lodged within a quarter
inch of a soldier's heart, col-
lapsed a patient's lang
performed various leg
putations.
LONDON, Nov. SI (UP) _
Prime Minister Winston Chur-
w .X? "je'chill today tOld left-wing laborite
United BtaWl Army in 1941, af- Emrys Hughes In Commons that
ter spending time at religious Britain will continue to have U.S.
retreats. Later, he joined the rtomic bomb plane bases In this
Navy, and after the war taught country as long as they are need-
philosophy at St. Martin's Col- d for world reace and security
lege, Lacey, Wash., the father Hughes previously this week
and said. He also spent some time was critical of U.8. policy in the
am- at Purdue University. I Korean armistice negotiations
The elder Demara said he | Hughes asked Churchill dur-
250 lb. Siren Admits Bilking
10 Near-Husbands of $17,000
The Navy announced after a may to go Canada to offer help ing a formal question period "if
closed hearing at Esquimau. B. to his son. be will not take steps to termln-
C, that the highest praise fori Canadian Navy offieals said ate the arrangement whereby
Demara's medical skill, even they had not yet learned all the U.S. atom bombers are based In
though he was not a trained details of Demara's background England in view of the dangers
surgeon. I but that they had ascertained of retaliatory bombing to the
Immigration authorities also'that he "has served in the people living In the crowded
were investigating to. determine1 United States Navy on medical cities of Britain."
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., NOV. 21
; (UP) Postal inspectors today
checked the story of a fat. mld-
dle-aged siren that she had tak-
en 10 matrimony-minded males
for $17,000 in mail-order roman-
ces.
Mrs. Mary E. Eubanks, 53. 250
pounds and five-feet-seven, was
charged with using the malls to
defraud and was released on $1,-
000 ball whieh she posted in
whether Demara entered Can- duties." -
ada illegally.
Demara is being held on the'
Canadian Navy's hospital ship
Naden at Esqulmalt.
"No. No. Never." he said,'
when asked if a reporter could'
see him.
He replied, "No statement," |
when pressed for comment.
"I'm going to
he added.
Canadian Navy officials said
that they had been so im-
rested with Demara's work
n Korea as Surgeon-Li.
Joseph Cyr that they had
prepared a press release
prais ing him. This, they said,
has been shelved.
The navy avoided condemn-of world peace and security.
write a book.", ing Demara, however. i There were loud cheera from
All the medical authorities othre members.
Churchill replied that the La-
bor government Itself had made
'the atom bomo bases in Britain
available to America for the
Common defer.se of British and
other North Atlantic countries.
Churchill suid "this arrange-
ment will continue as long as it
is needed in the general interests
BillfoM Snafcher
Hissed Wallet, Gel
Two Year Sentence
cash with a U.S. Commissioner;
8he was charged specifically
with defrauding Martin Rosen-
baum of Lexington, Ky., last
May. Postal Inspector P. jr. Ro-
senberger said Rosenbaum sent
her the money in Moses Lake,
Wash., to use for fare to Ken-
tucky to marry- him.
Mrs. Eubanks also "confessed
to everything" written a note-
book which listed 10 men she had
defrauded. Commissioner T. V.
Caahen said. The notebook was
found on her person and proved
to contain her handwriting, he
said.
Inspectors said that the hea-
vyset Mrs. Eubanks apparently
had used a picture taken in her
youths for Romance magazine
,.! advertisements that lured elder -
For "attempting to commit ^ymen into her mail-order trap.
In Lawrence, Demara's father. I in the United Nations forces in Hughes couutered, "but when
a part-time movie projectionist,' the Far East with whom De-. this arrangement was entered
said he was "certain" that the mara came in contact have Jf'to were you not highly critical
allegedly phony suregon was | testified as to the extent of his because of the dangers it meant
his prodical son. although he knowledge of medicine and sur- to the civilian population of this
country? Art you prepared to!
sacrifice the civilian population
of this country to American stra-
tegy?"
Churchill replied, "when this
arrangement was made we on
the then opposition side of the
| House supported the government
in the matter We share with
them havir.g regard to the
difference becween government
and opposition -a large measure
of the responsibility for this ex-,
tremely important and formid-
able act.
u
PCC Lists Special
Turkey Day"
The Panama Golf Club will
ksrve a special Thanksgiving
Bay menu tomorrow.
It will be turkey and all the
tfmnting- from noon until
aiartnf time.
There will also be an orches-
tra for dancing in the evening.
Two New Medical
Officers Join
Conal This Week
Two new medical officers
started service with the Canal
organization this week.
Col. Robert P. Hughes will
serve as Chief of the Ortho-
pedics Section at Gorgas Hos-
pital, replacing Col. Alfred A.
Grebe, who left the Isthmus Oct.
21 for reassignment at Fort
Hood.
Ma]. Tomas B. Hauschlld will
serve at Corozal Hospital.
Hughes, a native of Okolona.
Arkansas, arrived Saturday ac-
companied by his wife, son and
two daughters. Maj. Hauschlld
also arrived Saturday with his
wife and two daughters.
___ (NBA Telephoto)
smoky TRAP. Smoke billows from the top floor of the
four-story Normal Hotel in Chicago as firemen race up lad-
ders to battle the blaze. Three died In the fire and nine
were Injured, some after Ifftplng from the flaming building.
Retiring Canal Zone
Detectives Honored
At Police Parly
CRISTOBAL, Nov. tl. Two
Canal Zone Police detectives
were honoted on their retire-
ment at a' party given at the
Police Park on Brazos Road
last Saturday night.
Capt. Samuel Roe and de-
tective Carmelo Cont, who
have retired from the force,
were presented with Ronson
lighters by the Balboa Detec-
tive Office, and on behalf of
the Canal Zone Police Roe was
given an engraved electric raz-
or and Conte an engraved
wrist watch. The presentation
was made by Sgt. Len Heltzke,
who acted as master of cere-
monies.
The party was attended by
all high ranking zone police
officers who were not on duty,
Colon Chief of Police Pastor
Ramoa with Judge E. I. P. Ta-
telman as the leading guest of
honor. Other Panama and Ca-
nal Zone officials also attend-
ed the party.
grand larceny" Joseph Nathan
Williams was sentenced to two
years in the penitentiary during
this morning's session of the UJJ.
District Court at Ancon.
Williams, a 27-year-old Pana-
manian, tried to snatch some
money from the billfold belong-
ing to William Coffy, An Ameri-
can Panama Canal employe who
had boarded a bus In Pedro Mi-
guel. .
Coffy testified this morning
that ha had reached for his wal-
let near Red Tank and was ex-
tracting a bill to pay his fare,
when the defendant snatched
some of. the money and disap-
peared out of the bus and in back
of the Red Tank clubhouse.
The incident occurred Nov. 6.
Williams, who was previously
convicted of grand larceny and
given a six-month sentence, was
represented today in court by
Public Defender William J. Sher-
idan. Seven government witness-
es were heard.
Also on the court's calendar
this morning was the case of Au-
gustln Martinez, a 25-year-old
San Bias Indian, who received a
six-month suspended sentence
for a second offense of possessing
marijuana. He was also placed
on probation for a period of two
year.
AFCE Lodge 14
Holds Monthly
Meeting Tonight
The regular monthly meeting
of Lodge No. 14 of the American
Federation of Government Em-
ployes will be held tonight at
7:30 at the Balboa Clubhouse.
On the agenda for discussion
tonight are pay increase bills,
an analysis of the new leave
legislation which becomes ef-
fective January 6. 1952. and the |
nomination of officers for 1MX
Through the medium of corres-
pondence clubs, the woman told
Inspectors, she had met and
married four of her victims. The
federal agents said investigation
showed she had married at least
two of them and the record of
her divorces, if any, was vague.
In one instance, Mrs. Eubanks
said, she defrauded a prospective
husband of $4.000.
The woman waived indictment
proceedings in Kentucky with a
request that the case be trans-
f erred to Federal Court here. She j
was understood to be in Miami
today, having given the Commls-!
sioner an address in that city
where she could be reached.
The arrest climaxed a long in-
vestigation by postal inspector E.:
Tinson of Lexington who had'
been assigned to the case.
Local Rale Rolls
On CZ One Half
Of Wartime Peak
Local-rate employment in the
Panam Canal Company-Canal
Zone Government organization,
which at the present time em-
ploys about two-thirds of the lo-
cal-rate personnel working in the
Canal Zone, was lower during the
month of October than it has
been at any time since 1939. Em-
ployment in that organization
reached its peak about the mid-
dle of 1942, when the local-rate
force almost reached 30.000. In
September, the local-rate force
slightly exceeded 14,000.
Similar information for other
Government agencies was not
available but it is known that
they likewise have had a largo
decrease in force from the peak
period. It is estimated that fof
the Zone as a whole local-rate
employment now Is approxim-
ately one-half of what it was at
its wartime peak.
During the past year, the
Company-Oovernment local-rate
force has continued gradually to
decline, although the forces of
other Government agencies have
Increased slightly due to reactiv-
ation of some of the defense ac-
tivities. The present force of this
group for all Government agen-
cies and contractors in the Zone
Is approximately 21,000.
The Comapny quarters build-
ing program, most of which will
be performed by contractors, is
expected to provide temporary
employment for possibly 1,000 or
2,000 local-rate workers. Aside
from this, present indications are
that local-rate employment has
reached a general plateau or lev-
eltng-off.
There are an estimated 12,000
to 15,000 local-rate workers elig-
ible under present rules to seek
Zone employment.
B am 1 LJ J^Sy W aa v si am_r^ IV .ja atibas i
l>"?' ^neM Tflt-

____ (NEA Telephoto)
WINTER WONDERLAND There's nothing worth singing
about for these two motorists, who have to shovel their car
out after it was trapped by a. 13-inch snowfall in Cleveland,
O. High winds caused heavy drifts in the area, and traffic
was slowed to a crawl.
THE FIRST THANKSGIVING
famine boon gariteras' oil mhmmt, ami orad
f to b* mo4t in tow i nttr clothing That fall
aa abuitdant harvest wot reaped.
William Bradford wet
elected tht first Governor
Of Plymouth Colony Tkt
lift! republic was happy
aod flourishing.
rostrated by Walt Scott
3V* "!*"'." * * *>"*. Plw ** Miar. aNies, held o great
eort of Theaksgirmg, which lotted three doys. It was America'!
"it Thankiginug Day
P" 'W' T sV KTJft IgJ
ccsm. towATtaadiafrri
hoar.*** .
with Thaokifiviin rhoic
i r riQTIfM ks*fw ffcOt, Wfffc
t *y * *** telsjif Mtti*