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PCANAL



**
HGE EIGHT


THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951
Puerto Rico Wins Amateur Baseball World Series
_^_^

ylm by
Ym JOE WILLIAMS
Ufiiek kicks: Yale's decisin to abandon spring football
practice (the other Ivies are all expected to follow) has this
to recommend it right off: It has the substance of action as
dist.nfuisiied from the vapory gases of idealistic double talk.
W e ye had a minimum of the former, a maximum of the latter.
w>, simply as a change of pace the decision commands atten-
tion and respect.
Counterpoint
Acclaimed As
Horse-Of-Year


-
*>
Venezuela 2nd, Cuba 3rd, Kulikowski, John Mac Advance
Dominican Republic 4th
AMATEUR BABSEBALL WORLD SERIES
(Championship Playoffs)
Teams Won Lost Pet.
Puerto Rico 3 0 1.000
Venezuela 2 1 .667
Cuba 1 2 .333
Dominican Republic 0 3 .000
In fFort Davis Invitational
*V, .
MIAMI. Nov. 19 (UP)An un-
known when shipped here last
j winter. C. V. Whitney's Counter-
College football baa been getting out of hand for some R?ln*was ejected yesterday as
lime now. Some 30 colleges have dropped it altogether. George- 'the "orse of the tYear ta the
town. University surrendered with $1,000,000 deficit. Apart from annual poll conducted by Trian-,1
the moral Issuesthe commercializing of students who suppos- ,:Paf* f"s' PUbUshers of; MEXICO CITY Nnv 1<1 _fITPi_Tru vnnno-
edly play for fun-ihe financial factor throws a lengthening * Racing Form. 1"l*ftu "" ^ov; ^T^*,'"1" y"11
hadow. Imagine a school losing $1,000,000 in football! Walter M Jeffords' Kiss Me' "uert0 KlCan team which said Confidently at the
iKZZi icuac,he?K pr.,est, 'gainsl eliminating sprms football. Kate, still another Hiaieah devei- beginning of the Amateur Baseball World Series
t seems to me they dI welcome the move. The more the sport opment. was named the best wA win {- wTin *<* Tvariu aeries,
Is reduced to reasonable levels the fewer the strains and ten- ; three-year-old filly | "e WIH Wln " wl" rescue the championship
Mods tho will sufier. If football is so complicated spring prac- At Hiaieah. Counterpoint was trophy tonight for doine iust that
jice imperative then uncomplicate it. There was a time when i known as "the fastest three-, ^ aumg jusi mat.
had excellent football ithout spring practice. Suppose foot- | year-old maiden in America" (a Francisco Diaz, a non-playinnlCuba Venezuela the Dominican
all becomes even more complicated, (which is the trend) : maiden, of course, being a horse; member of the team, stayed be?KWcTfd NSniSw
wouidnt we have college football in various phases the year- that has never won a race). hind to receive the trophy in ber Whatever it was, the'
At least, that was what
Trainer Sylvester Veitefa claim-
ed. Actually, as a juvenile, the
colt had been able to finish in
the money once in four starts,
and that was an unimpressive
second.
round?
i'-''
j eliminating spring football won't restore sanity overnight.
It' won't get to the root of the trouble bul it may help and
Iff, therefore, to be commended. We've had enough empty chat-
ter about this great sport which is played by pure amateurs
In the smaller school ano by semipioiesslonals. in the larger
universities (most of them). What we want now is realistic
action. This may be the first step in the right direction. If it
n't." try another. Anything's belter than what we've been get-
tingsanity codes, conference resolutions and pious academic
preachments, the integrity content in none being scarcely vis-
ible to the naked eye.
.
This has not been a winning season for the Vales. One of
my colleagues reads an uncomplimentary Inference into this.
The truth is the decision to jettison spring football was made
last Sept. 15. This preceded by some weeks the defeats by
*ro*n. Columbia, Cornel, and Dartmouth. The Vales just don't i 0t T^o other divisional cham- 3B3WBS
do thjngs that way. They may not always do things right tat piona, however, are expected to The narrow victor^
they seem to give it a good honest try. With their riches, tra- i see action at Hiaieah. The best thewav the Puerto
riitinn and alumni don -inwin kink Ih. V.lu If .,_ _lnJ.J .__________u .111.. -_. -.,______ "'c W*V t'"! ruc"(
half of the club in ceremonies at
Delta Park this evening.
The remainder of the team left
by air at 12:30 a.m. Central Stan-
dard Time today and was sched-
uled to arrive in San Juan at 6:45
a.m. local time where a large and
tout son of coint RS^^S^
Fleet, winner of the Belmont, a rousing welcome. ecnampions
^S%S^iSA2aSSt\ The perto Weans won the Se-
plre Gold Cup among others, ries championship last night with
amassed $250,555 in 15 starts this a dramatic 7-6 victory over a Cu-
ban nine that fought right down
to the last out of the last game of
the championship playoffs.
The Cubans, favored to win the
championship in the pre-tourney
ratings, had the bases loaded Venezuelan's
grounded out
Counterpoint will be raced this
winter at Santa Anita if he re-
covers from a recent injury, and
Kiss Me Kate has been turned
young-
sters pulled out of the slump to
take third place and clinch a
playoff berth In their final game
of the round robin tourney. Even
then they were still rated under-
dogs to the mighty Cubans and
Venezuelans who had finished
the tourney tied for first with
nine wins and one loss.
The Puerto Ricans had a sev-
en and three record. They had
Mike Kulikowski was forced to
to three extra holes before sub-
duing Jim Riley on the 21st yes-
terday in the most exciting
match of the first round in the
Fort Davis (Smoot-Hunnicutt)
Invitational Golf Tournament.
Mike and Jim wound up all tied
with 75's* at the end of 18. Kuli-
kowski finally won oat one-up.
Johnny MacMurray, however,
.turned in the best golf of the day
when he toured the tough Davis
layout in a brilliant three-under
ar 69 to whip V. A. Jankus, 5 and
Jankus' 73 was the next beat
score of the day.
In other championship flight
matches, George Riley turned
back Elmer Powell, 7 and , with
a 78, while Fres Trim, Sr. beat
out Roy Ilayden, one-up.
The complete results:
CHAMPIONSHIP FLGHT
George Riley defeated Elmer
Powell, 7 and 6.
Johnny MacMurray defeated V.
A. Jankus, 5 and 4.
Pres Trim, Sr. defeated Roy
Hayden, 1-up.
Mike Kulikowski defeated Jim
Riley, 1-up (21).
CONSOLATION
' A. Gagnon won from Jim Hln-
iry was typical of
#W?>!. ?.".alumni' doe? an>one thnk the Vales, If so minded, two-Tewlold'fmyT'Mai'ne'c^anM^thToug the wnojTtffiamSf*
1, or thereabouts, | Farms Rose Jet, will arrive next second place in the finals went
week end and Greentree's Tom to Venezuela, third to Cuba and
Fool the best two-year-oldcolt, fourth to the Dominican Repta-
te a liiely nominee for the $50.000 Uc. "Cuba gave us the toughest
Flamingo here.
\The winners" in the various
categories were:
Horse of the YearCounter-
point.
Two-year-oldTom Fool.
Two-year-old fillyRose Jet.
Three-year-oldCounterpoint.
Three-year-old fillyKiss Mel
Xate.
Handicap HorseHill Prince.
Handicap MareBed O'Roses.
SprinterSheilas Reward.
SteeplechaserOedipus.
beaten the Cubans once but lost I We by default,
to Venezuela. But the angry Bor-; J. Schlebler defeated Howard
leuas, stung by the taunts of the! Finnegan, 7 and 6.
Venezuelans, and aroused by the Harry Gardner defeated Jimmy
islanders said there were "dlrtyl Piala, 1-up.
baseball" tactics on the part of George Engelke defeated Sgt
their rivals, crushed the favored Kenna, 1-up.
FIRS1
17-1 in the first
ouH't field a team that would rank No.
year in and vear out? They have a quaint notion at New
Haven football Is meant to be fun for the students and the
alumni. If all schools had the same notion we'd have no foot-
ball problem and my friends, the coaches, who seem most dis-
turbed by this action, would have no headaches.
.
*As these lines are written there is small hope George
TreVor will live through the day. George was properly known
as the historian of the Ivy League He wrote with a knowing
mind and an eloquent pen. In his day on The Sun he com-
manded a large and loyal following. He spoke the language of
the towering elms and the cloistered halls. Indeed, these seem-
ed to'form the background of his adult world. A decent, gen-
tlefUrilifant man who gave so much and asked so little. It was
>' ytvUegjc' to know him, an honor to call him friend.
fight In the Series," Manager Pe-
pe Seda said as he grinned hap-
pily after the game.
But it was no tougher than
the dramatic comeback the
Puerto Ricans had to make
even to qualify for the cham-
pionship playoffs.
game of the plavoffs.
Saturday night, on a dia-
mond swept by chill winds, the
shivering Puerto Ricans shut-
out last year's champion Dom-
inican Republic team, 3-0.
Only the Cubans stood between
them and the championship. It
was a narrow victory last night,
symbolic of the way the Puerto
Ricans played the whole tourney,
winning when things looked
blackest.
The entire Puerto Rican squad
played alert ball last night. One
was shortstop Bill Flgueroa who
Meyer Spread Creates Holes,
Gives Better Blocking Angles
By HARRV GRAVSON
NEA Sports Editor
o

NEW YORK, Nov. 19 (NEA)
The spread is not new in foot-
ball, of course.
Baylor, for example, used one
In the.W28s. where the Meyer
Spread ts now snowballing.
Leo JoBMrt Meyer's version is
terrific, and if you can run just a
little, it makes a fine attack. .
"The Spread is a great passing
formation, but can be stopped if
that's the only threat."
Baylor, this fall, for instance,
made the mistake of suspecting
Omphroy Tennis
Tourney Play
Five Very Interesting Matches
PlayedEnthusiasm, Excitement
Rife Among Spectators
Dr. Manfredo Engel defeated
Dr. Rubn Puertas in the first
match of the Omphroy Tennis
Tourney yesterday morning at
the Olympic Tennis Court, 6-1,
6-1.
The second match, between
Benito Charrls of Banco de Co-
ln vs. Myron Fisher of General
Paints was won by Fisher, 6-4,
6-2.
The third match, between Cat-
When the round robin tourna- drove in the winning run and
ment started the confident Puer- made a terrific stop in the ninth
to Ricans surprised everyone by with the bases loaded to make
taking an early lead. Then they the final putout.
hit a mid-schedule slump, losing1 Another was pitcher Eugenio
three games. Sida said his young Encarnacin who took over in the
squadmost of them less than seventh with the score tied a
20 years of age and none over 25 "
had the Jitters from uncertain
ST FLIGHT
A. A. Zalkie defeated Jim Hov-
erson, 5 and 4.
J. Colombl defeated R. F. Alex-
ander, 1-up.
Percy Graham defeated Gil
Morland, 1-up (19).
Anbal Galludo defeated W. M.
Belvly, 5 and 4.
CONSOLATION
Don Henderson won from
Frank Day by default.
Harvey Beall and J. Clisbee
both, defaulted.
Sam Puller won from R. Super
by default.
Charley Wood shellacked L. L.
Koepke. 3-up.
SECOND FLIGHT
Don Mathleson defeated F. Liv-
ingston, 1-up.
Paul Richmond defeated Ed
MacVlttie, 4 and 3.
J. K. de.Braai defeated Ted
CONSOLATION
D. Clark won from Jesse Byrd
by default.
R. Brown defeated J. W. Mil-
Ian S and 3.
Ken Forrest won from Cllfr
Maduro by default.
Silvester Bubb won from Tom
Drohan by default.
FOURTH FLIGHT
B. Carter defeated D. Mann, 5
and 4.
Inamoratl defeated B. Balcer,
1-up.
George Carnright defeated K.
Prehn. 1-up.
C. Thompson defeated P. Trea-
nor, 7 and 6.
CONSOLATION
W. T. Johnson won from*J.
Flemmlng by default.
J. O. DesLondes and M. Ken-
worthy, no result posted.
Bob Hurdle defeated M. Med-
ellin, 4 and 3.
M. Chadwick defeated J. Cropp,
1-up.
FIFTH FLIGHT'
E. G. Huldqulst defeated J. Gil-
llllan, 4 and 3.
W. Sands defeated M. Zombo-
ry> 4 and 3.
8. Hlnkle defeated V. Reed, 3
and 2.
H. Hock defeated R. Tandy, 1-
up (21).
J. Ryan defeated R. Swearinr-
en, 3 and 2.
M. Towne defeated Jim Des-
Londes, 3 and 2.
CONSOLATION
W. Horick defeated J. Hend-
riclu, 6 and 4.
P. Moser won from M. Murrett
by default.
Ianarelll defeated R. Tudian,
1-up.
J. Hemann won from R. Chou-
ret by default.
NINTH FLIGHT
McCue defeated C. Lucas, 2-up,
L. Rutland defeated Mundkow-
ski 3 and 1.
J. Danly won from Pratt by de-
fault. v
J. Pescod defeated Parruaa, 8
and6.
CONSOLATION
R. Conover defeated C. Lucas.
1-up.
Parrusa and Mundkowskl, no
result posted.
F. Kraft advanced on a bye.
Lucas and Pratt, no result
posted.
Muluel Dividends
Juan Franco
CONSOLATION
r. Makowski won from W\
Beaver by default. i FIRST RACE
H. Hardy and D. Kimsey, no re- 1Mr. Espinosa $6.20, $2.80, $2.20.
suit posted. 12Mueco $2.40, $2.20.
John Wlggs defeated A. Pach- 3Pesadilla $2.40.
scheduling.
Many fans said It proved that
the Puerto Ricans just didn't nican Republic 13-8 for a win
have the staying power to stand I that gave Venezuela the runner-
up against such powerhouses as up spot in the standings
five-all and showed control that I Appelquist, 3 and 1.
pulled the club to victory. J. Hipson defeated R. Crum. 7
Earlier In the day the Vene-; and 6.
zuelans had downed the Doml- CONSOLATION
Joe Kenway and H. A. Bailey
. hat_TC's air arm was 1 5 g^olo^^rom^iCu!
series of them.strongest weapon,
however, and|
Texas Chris-;FOUR VARIATIONS
tlan's ve t e r a n
side, provided an upset. Motta, a
seeded player, was expected to
easily eliminate his opponent.
22 B.H.S. Boys To Receive
'51 Football Varsity Letter
Batch Meyer
een.
Run right, it's
thing different.
coach las been! Mever stunk with hi rimihu But in a gruelling match,"the fa-' This is the largest group ever
working with it wlnei andI spreads rleht alona TOrlt went down to deieat be- to leter .m footDa11 at thc Bul1"
Sra oTfo xfi Tuy wPhoadeveffiedasam-- fore the Atlantic side player, 7-5, %\^ more tnan ve ,.^ D^; O^ jd ^ ^^ ^ $Ml W BSffli B
Dr. J. B. Hampton whipped an- lettermen left In every position
other Colonlte, William Arthur, for next year except the tackle.
8-6, 6-1 In another exciting spot, and here all four of the
match. Py are seniors. It Is almost as
This exciting and entertaining
Sunday morning of tennis
Southern Cal-.away i[om thc Pitching game
ifornia's Jesse e always vses it as an inte-
Hlll called the' 8ral part of his offense, not just
Me ver Spread a threat when Fort Worth ^ be-
thl m o st for-1 hlnd or has t0 ? i0' distance,
mldable offense! thTi^ spr^tacular Horned Frogs
he had ever ,,w from anywh at any
tinic.
But Meyer has been around too,
long not to know that passing V
won't work consistently unless It Playea-
Is complimented
really some-
Naturally, the main idea is to
.Ti,e,wStuf1t At,hlelc Council''-*-r. Bob Peacher, Jim May,
i S8.1!08 High School announc- Dick Ostrea, Charlie Smith, Sam lean, 3 and 2
ed Friday the list of 22 boys who, liS. toou Morris. Managers'
will receive the varsity letter for,Bill Yerkes, Ray Tucker
football for the 1951 season. This
group Is headed by four boys who --------------------------------------
will be getting their third-year
award, three linesmen and one
back. Sam Maphis, All-League
fullback. Is the lone back, while
two other All selections, Clair
Godby, tackle, and Dick Dillman,
guard, are also In the select four.
Frank Bryan, veteran guard, Is
the fourth boy of this group.
both defaulted.
B. Boxwell defeated Col. Pum-
pellys 1-up.
Hlggenbotham won from Rog-
er Orvls by default.
F. Huldqulst defeated R. Rob-
inson, 1-up.
.......THIRD FLIGHT.....;.
B1U LeBrun defeated Vestal
Morris, 1-un (19).
B. Jorstad defeated R. Pugh, 3
and 2.
W. O'Shea defeated Pete Dun-
Fritz Humphreys defeated J.
Hammond, 1-up.
eco, 1-up.
A. Lpez defeated J. Storie, 0
and 5. _____
SIXTH FLIGHT
J, Davis defeated R. Gaylord, 3
and 2.
J. Loucks defeated R. L. John-
son. 5 and 4.
R. Stevens defeated E. C.
Stroop 3 and 1.
P, Whitney defeated J..J. Mc-
Carthy, 1-up.
CONSOLATION
E. H. Mitchell won from Banan
by default.
Albro defeated A. Lincoln, 1-
up.
E. Brooks and Dr. Clark, no re-
sult posted.
B. Roll defeated O .Bills, 1-up.
SEVENTH FLIGHT
E. Tanner defeated C. Maher; 6
and 4.
J. Katalinas defeated L. Park-
er, 3 and 2.
Harry Dockery defeated Bucky
Hall, 8 and 7.
J. Boykln defeated Dr. McKay,
4 and 3. c.i-.
CONSOLATION
H, Labacs defeated E. Break-
field, 1-up.
M. Smith defeated John Hedg-
es. 9 and 8.
V. Armstrong defeated J. Bow-
man, 6 and 6.
Newman defeated L. Kestley, 3
and 1. .
EIGHTH FLIGHT
E. Scarborough defeated J. T.
Smith, 2-up.
M. G. Greene defeated D. Tho-
mas, 1-up.
SECOND RACE
1Eclipse $4, $2.40.
2Resorte $2.40. C
First Doubles: (Mr. Espinosa-
EcUpse) $9.80.
THIRD RACE
1Diana $5.60, $2.20.
2Volador $2.20.
One-Two: (Diana-Volador (e))
$9.84.
FOURTH RACE
1Rina Roi $2.20, $3.20.
2Annie N. $2.20.
Quiniela: (Rina Rol-Anule N.)
FIFTH RACE
1Chacabuco $16.40, $2.20.
2Royal Coup (e) $2.20.
SIXTH RACE
1Pepai Cola $8, $3.30, $3,60. *
3Tropicana $8, $2.40.
3Rechupete $4Jfcin s i n,
:;(! SkVKNTHRACEr
1Riding Bast $5, $4.60, $2.80.
2-Notable $6.60, $3.40.
3Fair Chance $2.80.
Second Doubles: (Pepsi Cola-
Riding East) $31.68.
EIGHTH RACE
1Scotch Chum $11, $6.40, $S.6t,
3Walrua $3.60, $3.30.
3Apprise $3.40.
Suiniela: (Scotch Chum-Wal-
$17JM.
NINTH RACE
1Hit $)0, $6.30, $2.80.
3Goylto $4, $2.60.
3Hurlecano $3.
One-Two: (Hit Goylto (e)>;
$35. '
TENTH RACE
1Juan Hulncho $4.40, $2.60.
2Pregonero $2.80.
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL L0ERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Prize-Winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1706, Sunday, Novero^eF 18, 7*51'"'"
The whole ticket has 48 pieces divided in two series "A" A "," of 34 pieces
brought our schedule up to date.
The following matches will be
bad at the guard positions, too,,
as Joe Oliver, junior, will be the
only returning letterman to bol-
ster the middle of the line.
oread the" defense wide and to' 8rpunl "attack. S0?^.19^!0, i,-?- B- H"
Sake more potential holes There are four variation of Stroop vs Vctor Pascual
-And to give our men better the Meyer Spread, in which the' ,^sdfV^p^;. <-30 p.m.-La-
blocking angles," says Dutch ends are 15 yards from the k-: Motte va^roeslta Ou^l^
feioeWriai-hiS; arrspaufdfnVVs'aTn fSL
/le onn%Lman either In'orI Actually, the variations are|ra: 4:30-Webb Hearne vs. My-
eut, on each play. made by moving only one man,!rn f"- __ _Q. Mo '
5 -emendous factor Is wlde'T^'clolhe ^;dT.^SS $%.SZ&
"-Spread permits us to geti guard. 4:30-Lt. Luke vs. Roger Little, termen the football team elected
, celvers down field quickly Seasoned observers on'the Pa- Frlday 1 reserved for any BamejDick Dillman as the honorary
:iMt four, five on some cifie coast Just couldnt believe a that mav hav.e * ta postponed "
spread would go against South-! because of darkness or Inclement
four pats threat is always ern California, but when the weather.
The flank posts and the back-
field will be best taken care of by
the returning boys. Although Bill
Underwood, end, and Sam Ma-
Ehls, fullback, are both All-
eague, and will be mighty tough
to replace, there will be four ends
returning and a complete back-
field with one fullback left over.
Shortly after the Athletic


FEELING DULL?
ie to temporary sluggishness
i that dull feeling ... let
good-tasting Eno help
' ways: at badtlmt Eno
quickly helps neutralize excess
stomach/acid; eases that upset, full
faoliag./Botero broakfast Eno
work* a* a quick-acting, gentle lax-
ativo-
t. niaaaMT as a glass of spar-
kling, bubbly soda water!
2. ANTACID relieves sourness, fas
and heartburn promptly.
3. LAXATIVE relieves temporary
sluggishness quickly. (Take be-
fore breakfast when needed.)
Used by millions. Sparkling Eno is
also good for sick headache, acid
INDIGESTION, CONSTIPATION and
OVERINDULGENCE.
At all druggists-Get Eno today.
TAKE GOOD-TASTING
Froggies made 436 yards from
scrimmage, they were convinced.
It also enabled quarterback
McKown to set an individual rec-
ord for passing against Troy,
with 17 of 25 for 270. The sopho-
more's 340 total-offense yards
were the most ever recorded by
one athlete against the Trojans.
MAIN OFFENSIVE
Meyer warns other coaches
that the Spread must be em-
Sloyed as the main offensive svs-
m. not Just an adjunct to the
T. or something else, as some are
trying to use if.
He also adminlshes them that
the Spread takes a long time to
et everything perfected, as
locking assignments change
completely from play to play, de-
pending on the defense. A coach
cant put it in on Wednesday and
expect It to click on Saturday.
The Meyer Spread Is so simple
that It fools smart people, but,
like everything else In modern
football, there's vastly more to it
than the little X's and O's
coaches use in skull sessions. '
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
9 74 7,,,J0H
7382
1 9 7 4
la
$
i$l5UM
V
400.00
7
a
captain for the 1951 season. Dill-
man, diminutive guard, was a
true inspiration to his mates all
season long. He was the scrappi-
est player on the squad, and in
spite of his light weight (132
pounds) made more than his
share of tackles.
On two different occasions he
played opposite boys who out-
weighed him by more than 100
pounds, but this never seemed to
make much difference to Dick.
His playing and leadership was
always among the highest on the
squad, and he is richly deserving
of the honor his teammates be-
stowed on him.
Another award that was pres-
ented at this meeting was the
SprlngaU-Whittler award to the
hardest working player on the
squad. *Lee Myers, reserve ful-
lback, was given the award, and
will have his name engraved on
the beautiful trophy that rests
in the trophy case In Balboa
High.
Complete list of lettermen fol-
lows: EndsBUI Underwood. Bob
Dolan, Ted Norria, Francis Boyd.
Jim Jones. Ken Knight. Tackles
Clair Oodby, Jerry Fox, BUI Ril-
ey. Carl Meissner. GuardsDick
DUlman, (Capt.), Irwln Frank,
Frank Bryan, Joe Oliver. Center
Fred Cotton. BacksRay Nlca-
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5447 14444
S147 1444*
(247 144.44
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$547 144 44
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INT 14444 j
No.
4447
(147
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4747
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7(47
7147
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7347
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ata 144.40
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Ktaa PrtM 1444*
47
1141 144 44
47 144 44
47 144.44
447 144.M
547 . 144.44
47 144.N
47 41.M4.44
47 144.44
47 1444
Approximations Derived From Rrat Mrtic
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oa

38
n
t
414.44
744
41
484.44 1742
4*4 44 I 1743
4
414.44
44
4S
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741
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754
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751
712
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444 40 IS
'
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Appfuximatior Derived From Second rriie
12
7374

244 44
124 44
124 44
1312
75
7374
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244 44
124.44
124.44
2312 244.44
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12000
--------
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72M
77
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71M
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7201
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Approximations Derived From fhird Prize
(4 1444 274 1444 74 ( 1444
IMS IMS M4t M.M IH7 1M( M.M M.M IM 1471 M4 M.4
4J74
ll
171
14444
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Wi^wlnritaa numbers of vesterday Lotterv drawina were sold: 1st In Herrera Province; 2nd 3rd in Panam
The nine hundred whole tickets ending in 7 and not included In the above Mat win Forty-Eight Dollars (S4S) oa
The whole ticket has 48 pieces which comprise the two series "A" ant) "*/
CT.
WITNESSES:
Signed by: FRUPE ROMERO LOPK, Secretary of the Oovernor of the Province of Panam.
HUMBERTO PAREDES C, Representative of the Ministry of Treaaury.
Manuel Diaz;Cdula No. 47-47
Isidoro CastroCdula No. 33-2947
JOSE DOMIN SOTO
Notary Public, Panam
CESAR OROZCO
Secretary


MOV>AT, NOVEMBER 1, 1961
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGI
Sponso
## *** J#
I
___ ___ ^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ -^^---------------------------------------------
Sugar Bowl Rise To Defense Of Bowl Games--
i-----------------------*-------Hi"ft
Postseason Ban Would Put
Backers Out Of Business
By PRESTON IfcGRAW
United Press Sports Writer
NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 19.The sponsors of
the Sugar Bowl, which would be put out of business
if the National Collegiate Athletic Association out-
laws post-season football, rose to the defense of
Bowl games: last night
,-
The executive. eommltU*,.of
the Mld-Wlnter Sports Asso-
ciation which sponsors the
non-profit Sugar Bowl, issued
ft five-page statement charging
that the critics of post-season
centuated
Ninety-
FOOTBALL RESULTS
By UNITED PRESS
SOUTH
Miami 21, Florida 6
Tampa 14, FSU
Appalachian, It, New berry ft
KentuckylT; G. Washington 13
Georgia Tech 27, Alabama 7
Notre Dame 12, N6.'Carolina 7
Tenneasee 46, Mississippi SI
Georgia 46, Auburn 14
Maryland S3, No. dina State 9
Tulane 14, Vanderbllt 16
Stetson 7, Wof ford 7
William Mary 14, Duke 13
Louisville 14, Wash. & Lee 7
Clemson 34, Furman 14
Virginia Tech 20, Richmond 14
Sime
enef
and millions of funs.
pressure. ?****^yj-i mi hha ivm ,.iuvi>iuuh *-
five per cent of the teams par-, Virginia 88, South Carolinsvll
major e. Henry 39, Rn.:'Macon 7
" VMI 87, Citadel 21
Hen.rix 19, Mfllsaps 1
Murray SUte STrV.Kentucky a
Elmhurat IS, Rose Poly 6
In the four
games In the past
years were beaten or tied
regular play; an unbeaten
tlclpatlng
post-season
18
In
failed to recognize the record Is not now and never
UUpl.yVthTM rT bee" tTSsA orVbowi EEEZjOgS beiUSUt. 6
I invitation.'
Miss. Sou'rn 32, Lou/na Tech 7
Jackson (Miss.) IS, Paul Q'n 6
LSD 3, Mississippi SUte 6
W. Car. 14, CvrttrNewm'n.JS, .
Memphis SUte IS, Chattanooga C
EAST
Penn 7, Army 6
Navy 21, Columbia 7
Trinceton 27, Yale 0
The statement evidently was 9. "Only eight of the ftgprox-
provoked by the disclosure imately 450 members of tne
that the National Collegiate NCAA tan compete annually In
Athletic Association "will con- the four inafor post-season
sider at its January meeting a games. "Th* rsah of bowl games
proposal to outlaw post-season that developed five years ago
games as a part of the foot- has long since subsided,
ball "dvempnasis" carrrpalgn. w ..py8rs participating ln,r mwrn,
If the NCAA adopte the re- post-season games are not af-1 Harvard 34, Brown 21
solution It will put the Sugar fected scholastically. The per-1 Bucknell 33, Dala ware 6
Bowl out of buahiess and make lod of preparaUon for and play Cornell 21, Dartmouth 13
useless the 1x580,000 It has In bowl games Is during the Fordham 35, Temple 6
spent on Tulane SUdlum, Christmas-New Year holidays Boston Coll. 20, VUtanova 13
where the games are played when classrooms are closed." i Wesleyan 6, Trinity 3
everv year *,, 11. "Players are asked to de- Syracuse 9, Colgate 6
every year. RMlVeMi (by voto) if they wish to! Boston U. 30. WlchiU 6
The "facts" included: play in a post-season game Penn SUte IS, Bntfers 7
rT&sr as,R< "'" "^ Sss'IkEH1""
slm tsut B-sswa Mr >Tt Sss&HsSt4"
educational Institution, foot- and improve th. football rted- ^^tS^ttiSSTS
ball players,, or, he gam It- lunv Of Tulane University in ^lfT VMToutVt Tchrs 7
***" '' INew rl*-2* Throu".h thi* 2? RiSuh 2 Lifavette 6
. u ..-,.- Ilarged seating capacity (80.752 >Lehlsn n'kWjM** S. "From the date of their most o! the teamsi that have Scranton 12, WW-"^ 0
origin, the four major pow QftfM Tulane jk bonw to - ^S^^SlS'a''mtrU
have had official approval of guiar season contests in the ,. "g,
conferences governing colleg- past 10 years have benefltted {? "',\pYiZJhttn 13
late athletics in their locale." Through Increase In revenue D'eHk'"!J| * MansTIdi Tchrs. 13
3. The four major bowls through use of these te^-, S^ Grwr^Yu
have been approved by the Na- ties." K5X2i?tffiS" 14
tional Collegiate Athletic As- .' i *hnon Vallev 34. JunlnU
sociation and* are reguUted un-1 JS. V'More than one-half of, ^*t^MVnd M, Johns Hopkin, 6
der provisions set forth in thft this SI.350,000 Tulane BUd urn| **'Mh bT ,
NCAA constitution. Two NCAA'indebtedness has been retired||^gmore 19, HaverfOrd 7
of by the_ Sugar Bowl and the = h tta g -^t, 6
Professor Berra Dishes Out
What Just Comes Naturally
At American Baseball Academy
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________ -'

itosn
On The Alleys...
By JOHNNY McCAIXUM
NBA SUM Correspondent
NEW YORK, Nov. 19 (NBA) BOB6LEDDLNG COSTXX. s'
it the Amerlcin Baseball Acad-| ..h-jLj
mm in New York's 212th A.A.A.! He also wa* a boba,
\rmory, Prof. Lawrence Peter parts, suffered his one
3erra was asked how he account- ah amateur boxer because of
:d for his rapid rise as the Yank- .
es'catcher. I Yogi won 14 of 15 matches.
"Bill Dickey," replied Yogi "I cut my mouth foolin around
:erra. "Bill learned me his expe- snow-sledding," he explained, "
iences.'* begged out of the bout, but thw
Professor Berra participated in couldn't find a replacement, so 1
ine sports, and his zest for them went in. I was so busy protyctin*
asn't wavered as a fn. | my bandaged lip that I forgot
Asked whftt position he played about my stomach,
n the hockey team, on The Hill '''' j. ,
n St. Louis, the first catcher "I asked for and got a retUMg*
ver to win the American match, stayed away from B*w
iniu mt ki< i ukc.aiaennr pnoiograpners at me las Angela uoiiseum nasxny oacaea twiy League's most-valuacile-player a- sledding, and flattened the maf
with their equipment as SUnford quarterback Gary JCerkorian was tackled and knocked out-of- wara" gald; "I skated." in the second round." '
kAiitif4i K\< ls\ntH*ki-n (TsklitVirnia tar*lrla D^h Vin Hnrain 71. IniuiHs *tnt InummqU /Nff A\ I I'll* .n
INTO THE PICTURESideline photographers a( the Los Angeles Coliseum hastily backed awaj
with their equipment as Stanford quarterback Gary JCerkorian was tackled and knocked o
bounds by Southern California tackle Bob Van Doren, 75, topside, and a teammate. (NEA)
HOMA KEGLERS MAINTAIN
LEAD IN MAJOR BOWLING
LEAGUE
The H. I. Horn, bowling team
fained one point in its lead over
he Max R. Stempel St Son five at
the Diablo Heights bowling lanes
by defeating the Angelini team
598, ..FTTE, winning the first
Same by a score of 907 to 874,
ropplng the second by 895 to 825,
but teklng the third by a score of
925 to 875, and plnfall by 2657 to
2644.
For the winners, Engelke with
197, 183 and 225 was high with
585, followed by Jamison with
bv defeating the Angelini team 585, roiiowed by Jamison witn
three games while the Stempel! 197, 188 and 170 for 555; Thomas
representetlves are members
aeh bowl committee."
.new NCAA regulations,
4. "The four major bowls governing post-sesson football,
have always' ;bgn handled by permit a deduction from post-
football offleiaW salM)!*: by' season 1 sjbwb irftpplpte to^ sssure
the confereOBftfi IronKiiWhlch tertment <-*f the outstanding
thft team*'Ha*W*drr>fV ~
or
have
ton
lIllWOIGD'TCMinPEUI -I r *w -v."-
,i Directly obligation of 8880,000."
IntflrWtl*, illF-major obwls
J?" Massachusetts 6, TufU 6
* Carnegie Tech 35, Westminster 6
West Chester 13, Drexel 6
Kings (Pa.) 27, Wllkes 1
i_> ."
'MIDWEST
intnrerny it mnaw ww
e had "conference srtpervl-
l" ' J t" "' -*'\
18 years,
the
14. "The Sugar Bowl, In ad-
dition to the post-season foot-
ball classic, conducts a mld-
re wttter calendar' of sports to
football fans of Arteflca. thru which are, tavlted collegiate
le sporori 6f thf four "major, basketbsW BWOWrlng teams,
bowls, have contributed more track and 'field, and tennis
than 810,000,000 'to partfefpftt- sUrs. Through these, events
ing schools.''' great Interest has been de-
^^ veloped in these college 'minor*
6. "All of the four, major sports."
bowls are civic, non-profit or-,. ..
ganlzations; collegiate In corf-' 18. **To further increase in-
cept and conduct;' ffee, of. .any terest and, participation in col-
talnt of professionalism." leglatevsj>)fpi. tnfc' Sugar Bowl
7. "The so-called, -pressure' annually produces a movie, in
for a winner is not the result color, of Its entire program for
of post-season football afames.; exhibition, free of' any charge...
It existed many vears before these movies provided whole-
the first bowl game was con- some entertainment for Ame-
celved. It is a vlUl 'part of'rlcan service personnel in
every AmericKn endeavor, be,World War n. The American
it 'educations!, athletics., pro--Rd Cross annu}Iy shows these
.fei'inr-or. buirrfessK '>|movles" ti hospitalized war
; I. '** Insurancemen dropped a game with 811. Norrls with 504, and
to an invigorated 7461st team. Allen with 502. For the losers,
The match between )the Homa McCarragher had 195. 184 and
boys and Angelini was not too 205 for 584, followed by Eady with
close at any point, with Joe File- 181, 189 and 196 for 566, Glelch-
bark having a field day With'man with 515, and Kelsey with
games of 179, 205 and 205 for a 507, while Nolan was unable to
total of 589. followed by Fron- hit 500.
helser with games of 215,189 and The standings of the teams in
160 for 564, Sartori with 535 In- the Major League after the play
eluding a game of 223, and Earl! were as follows:
Best with 530, while Payne made TEAMS Won Lost
491.
Michigan SUte 36, Indiana 26
Illinois 9, Ohio SUte
Northwestern 6. Michigan
Purdue 19, MinnesoU 13
Marquette 26, Detroit IS
avier 26, C4nclmisAi.r u
Northern Illinois 27, Omaha M
Belolt 20, Hope IS
Wisconsin 34, Iowa 7
Dayton S4, Marshall 13
New Hampshire 7, Kent SUte ft
Ohio Wesleyan 84, Wittenberg 0
Eastern Kentucky 27, Ohio V. IS
Miami (O.) 34, Wesfn Reserve 7
Dentson 14, Cas 7
Wooster 47, Oberlin 1
Cent'r St (O.) 19, W. Va. 6Ute
Bowling Green 20, Bradley 6
Wayne . 27, Mich. Normal IS
Monmouth 6, Knox 6
E. Illinois 46. James Millikin 6
Muskingum 48, Otterbeln 19
III. Wesl'y'n 14, WaahVtn (Mo.) 7
Cape Giaradeau 45, S'th a HI.
The Angelini team tried hard
but only Jenner with 170,186 and
205 for 581, and Andrews with
534, were able to hit over 500.
Walker. Bates and Klumpp with
498, 476 and 481, respectively,
were unable to help stem the tide
of defeat.
Homa won the first game by a Name
score of 861 to 826. the second by | Balcer
912 to 875 and the third 926 to Madeline
849, for a plnfall score of 2709 to Best
3550.
H. I. Homa Co....... 28 12
Max R. Stempel & Son. 23 17
Fuerza y Luz........ 22 18
7461st AU Signal...... 21 19-
Angelini............ 20 20
Local 595, NFFE...... 18 22
Boyd Bros., Inc....... 15 25
Almacenes Martins.... 13 27
The ten leading bowlers of the
I league are
Saylon
Marabella
Engelke
Filebark
Meanwhile, the Max R. Stem-
pel Insurance team was fighting
to keep up with the winning Ho-Thomas
ma team, but dropped '*'#-
Games
SO
SO
so
SO
30
30
SO

... .
$10,000.00 Stock of
1
JNOLEUMS
ust received1 All sise nigs anfl
vard oodv More than 199 dif.
ferent designa. Choose voun
today.
Mueblera El Diablo
The Store where you will find
the largest assortment of Glass
and Linoleums."
M Central An TeL 2-2465
"Leaders In the Furniture
Business since 1909."
game to the 7461st A.
fit bu only seven pins, with ft
score of 960 to 953.
In the second game, however,
the Stempeleers put on the big
game of the season with a score
of 1017 to 856. The 1017 game is
the high game of the season thus
far, and beats the 1014 set by the
Homa team two weeks ago by
three pms. The StempeTteam
came back In the third game with
another high game of Wttr*
over the Army unit, which scor-
ed 880.
In scoring the three games 95S.
Signal out-, McCarragher
Average
194- 1
186-25
185-28
185-17
185- 9
185- 8
181-24
\U
179-18 l
Where did the Squat Man ac- Berra, who has switched'fftot"
quire his distinctive nickname? denc< from st. Louis to Cllffaldft
"From the kids on the neigh- Park jj j sees t\\ the eollftgft
borhood Stag Athletic Club base- and professional football, tas>
ball team on The Hill," he jMkfttbftll and hockey games *a|
plained. "We went to a movie boxing and wrestling match* hft
! one afternoon, and there was one c4n fmd time for.
1 of those yogi characters in the
picture. Coming out of the Joint, professor Berra is so popular
lone of the kids looked at me,.at president Phil Rhauto's school
, sUrted laughing, and said: : y^t prospective outfteldftrs .
" -Hey, Berra walks Just like takilng his catching court*. -
that yogi in the movie. I^e been
Yogi ever since."
HOCKEY WAS WORKOUT
The faculty is having a tough
time splitting up the student
body, as Yogi Berra dtehfts out
what Just comes naturally. r
Thtt King (.11
Cough Mixtures comes
From Bliziardrjr
Cold Caad
u.t
BIGGESTElwood Grosecloie
t Wanchese proudly exhibits
the largest channel bass taken
with rod and reftl from North
Carolina's
Autumn. The
erman landed
with tackle
three-pound
The youngest of four sons,
Berra excelled at everything in
athletics in the center of St.
Louis' Itelian-American popula-
tion. H was the center fielder in
baseball, Softball and corkball,
guard in football and basketball;
1 halfback in soccer, goalie in ice'
, and roller hockey, weighed in at
1147 pounds in boxing.
"It was a full-time schedule,
, he explained. "I couldnt keep up
1 with both sports and studies, so
I quit school in the ninth gradft."| The Kmo ot all cough madldn**
Two winters ago, Berra caused Buckley's CANADIOL Murturj -
a minor uproar in the Yankee*' | has been used for year in ove 70%
front office when a newspaper,of Csnado's home. Fast wetking
picture turned up showing him'triple octing Buckley's Conadtel Ml*,
on skates scrimmaging with the.tura quickly loosens and raises phlegm
St. Louis Flyers' hockey tem. lodged In the tubes clear* air pfh>
Secretary Red Patterson, fear- moss soothe nuped row ttauas.
ful that the New York club's ae- on* or two sips end wont couohinj
compllshed handler of pitchers 'spasm c*os*s. You get rwuta f,
might be Injured by a high stick you tel th* effect ef Buckley's !
^. .nmthinff f*l(tnronh*rt him t.O .__.!..
or something, telegraphed him to
get off the ice.
tontly.
Compounded from rare CsnaaH
Pin* Bolum and ether mfhina h(*l
'( CANADfOt
Cap* uiaraaeau *a, o * ,in scoring me mice ''"~-
Westeni*7h46,Cent'rlMich.25; on ^.j 056, the Stempel team
Lincoln 4, Arkansas State 13 also set up the high team series
Wlll-m J*w*ll 58, Cenfl CMo.) 6 ^Ve season thus lar, which also
Illinois Normal 26, Navy Pier 1Z
Baldwin WftU.-John Carroll, ppd.
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma S5, Iowa SUte 6
Rice 28, Texas A. ft M. 13
Baylor 42. Wake Forest 0
SMU 41, Arkansas 7
T*xa*3,TCC21
Kansas 27, Oklahoma A. ft M. 21
Tnlsa 21, Texas Tech 14
N. Tex. SUte 62, rttsnoSUtt 0
Utah 27, Colorado A. ft M. Zl
Utah SUte 14, Denver 7
Colorado 86, Nebraska 14
Kansas State 14, Missouri 12
S'e.stMlssouri Tchrs. O, S. HL
Ark.A.ftM.S4,Col.ofOs.rksl4
Ky. 8tate 25, Bluefleld St. IS
New Mexico S4, Brig. Young
Mo. Valley 14, Southwest St. 7
knocked out the high series scor-
ed by the Homa team two weeks
aeo of 2850. The score of the
stempel team was 2926, Just 76
pins over the Homa record^
For Stempel, Bud Balcer was
high with games of 207 222 and
2l! for 639. followed closely by
BlSy Coffey with games of W,
9?i and 214 for 603; Marabella
with 202, 192. 192 for 586. Colston
with 181 213 and 160 for 554 and
Vfliher with 195, 169 and 180 for
XTwr the losers, Saylon was
high with 193 231 and169 for 593
fofiowed by Cooley with 220, 13J
and 194 for 546; Lawless with,200.
176 and 167 for 543. and Madeline
with 528.
The Boyd Bios, team scored Its
MlKw** flrit"foury-po?Ated 0 the season
larvla ChrirtU 13, Butler __ I L thp haDless last-place Mar-
1 over the hapless last-place Mar-
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N
NOW... Years Old!
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Youll enjoy Seagram's V.O.
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is the lightest, cleanest tasting
whisky you have ever enjoyed.
Try it .. it's aged l&Hgtr.
0**>vfW h hm*m* hr
COMPAA CYtNOS, S. A.
CANADIAN WHISKY
te'n P. Austin 14, Sam HoM-n JS,. by ecorei of 877. 864 and
Umar Tech 8, Sul Ross 27 I JJ, for'a series tota of 2707,
McMurray SS, New Mex. A.ftM. 14 ,,, the Martlnz gutatet w;
scoring 783, 790_and 879 for 2452
FAB WEST
Sanford S5, Oregon SUte 14
California 18, Oregon 6 ;
WashlngUnSti 47, Montana It
UCLA 8ft, WasWsgton 20
Col. Mine* 14. Col. College 6
Boise JC S5, Orang* Coast 19
WllUamette S3, Chle. State 7
W. SUU 28, Adams State 26
Whitman 29. BiitWjCelumbl* 6
HIGH SCHOOL
lea la 25, OfttUft*vlB*18
8arasoUS4, Arcadia 12
Plant City IS, Tamp. Plant 7
Williston IS. Branf*rd 7
SERVICE_____.
L'leune Mar'ns 81, Mrta1 HrYvy 7
N. Brifn Tehft. S7, C'nip Edw-dft IS
rort Meyer 40, F*rt Lee 19
G Lake.Navy ,Pense- Navy I
NEGRO
Florida A. ft M. 34, Southern 6
Ata'T ft M. 41, wrrilW 0
Wins. STm Tehrs. *, St. Pftftl
J. C. Smith 6, Shaw *
Tuskegee IS, AUen IS
Morris Brown 25, Benedict 0
Dela. SUU IS, St, Augustine *
Sewane* 41, Howard 0
Wilher'orce 19, W. Ylrg. SUte I)
FaywiVI Tchr. If, Elta. City 6
Lincoln 48, Arkansas SUU 13
Fisk IS, Morehouae 0
Miss. Industrial 14, Leland IS
Md State 40, Va. Union 6
Prairieview M, LangaUn 0
Alban v Tchrs. 48, FU. N.rmfti 8 j
Mile* (Ala.) 1, Rast 1
Morton wa high for the winners
with 200, 186 and 212 or 598 fol-
lowed by Schneider with 157, 186
and 212 for 555. Crecellus with
529, Melanson with 527 while
Dailey was unable to hit sou.
For the losers, only Owesne and
J. Damin were able to hit 500,
with the former hitting 547 and
5i3, while A. Damin.
Presho missed the
the latter
Burrell and
500 mark.
In the final match of the eve-
ning, the Fuer y Luj gashous-
ers took three points from Local
Imported
Canned Hams
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01299
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01299
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

>t*BRANIFF
AN INDBPlOTl^^flJg^blLT NEWSPAPER
TO:
BALTIMORE
ONI WAY...... $142.$
ROUND TRIP.. 5268.85
ScagramsVOr
CANADIAN V/HISKVr Cf^
Let the people knou> the truth and the country is safe1* Abraham Lincoln. { ^^^^c^^c^fc,,,^.
Panama Amcrxcan
rWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR


PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1951
TIN CENTS
Egypt's Foreign Minister Terms Clashes
With British 'State Of War' As 13 Slain
I
rf
Taximan Wounded
In CZ Cop Chase
Fotos Snchez-Durand
OM.Y THE WALLS are left standing as a fire of an undetermined origin gutted the home
of William Love, 62, in San Francisco de la Caleta at 11 a.m. today. The damage is estimat-
ed between $6,000 and $10,000.
Fire Destroys
Willia
Home in Panama
i
TbOome at an Amenicen re-
rldent w San Fwncisco was al-
most totally destroyed by fir*
this morning.
William Love, 62. was sitting In
the patio of his part-concrete,
part-wooden home when he saw
large Quantities of smoke billow.
tag |ut through the windows.
His wife, tht maid and Carlos
Diaz, his little grandson, who
were in the h^use at the time
A taxi-driver who allegedly
tried to crowd an arresting of-
ficer's motorcycle off the Gavi-
ln Road yesterday afternoon,
was shot in the left shoulder af-
ter other attempts by the police-
man to stop his car failed.
Enrique Arosemena B., 24, Pan-
amanian, was in Oorgas Hospital
today, but was not considered in
serious condition.
Reds Promise
Quick Reply
On Korea Plan
lean Transportation Company
which operates solely within the.
Canal Zone on Navy contracts I --------
and Is owned jointly by several' TOKYO, Nov. 19 (UP) The
Americans and Panamanians. A Communist truce negotiators
spokesman said today that Aros-promised at Panmunjom today
emena had a good record with;to give their answer Wednesday
them, but had not been employed teethe Unitea Nations proposal
"too long." designed to end the Korean war
Police officials today recalled by Christmas.
that asimilar attempt to crowd The Red negotiators have al- parts of the European quarter of;
-o- r r
CAIRO. Nov. 19 (UP) Egypt's acting Foreign N
ister Ibraham Farog said here today that weekend eld
ed between Egyptians and British troops in Hie Suez <
nal amounted to a state of war threatening the peace)
the whole world. 1
Four Britons and 10 Egyptians have so far been t
ported killed in weekend fighting in the Canal Zon
town of Ismailia.
A British military communique said the fighting
started when a British military police jeep was held up,
by Egyptian police, then deliberately fired on without
provocation.
The British report said the I *
fighting quickly spread to other
1
\
hree bullets that Canal Zone! an arresting of'fleer "off" "the ready mdfcatcdtiey may acc^ IVl OV O it III
traffic officer Robert A. Engelkei street occurred in September of the proposal, but are believed to! police, "who appeared demoral-j
fired pierced the back of the taxi, last year. The chiva driver, Raf-lhave. referred it to highhieuth-' ised, fired Indiscriminately on all
British personnel and
including ambulances."
but the driver did not stop. Fin-' ael "Santo, "Panamanian",' whojorltes'i "before "giving*VdStalte,'British "personnel and vehicles, Pf\ljf\/ Holr\
ally, a fourth bullet hit him in, faced a charge similar to Aros-'answer.
the upper left shoulder and he! emena, was given one year In the! Meanwhile
pulled the car up, Just ten feet1 penitentiary.
inside the Canal Zone boundary
line between the south end of
Gaviln Road and the old incin-
erator area.
Arosemena faces a maximum
of ten years in the penitentiary,
a fine of not more than $5,000, or
both, on a charge of assault with
a deadly weapon (an automo-
bile with intent to commit great
bodlly injury.
This "morning the case was
continued until Wednesday af-
ternoon at 1:JO in the Balboa
Magistrate's Court, and ball of
$500 was set.
The incident occurred at 3:10
p.m. when the driver of the taxi
was stopped nitor the Limits, but
within the Canal Zone, and ac-
cording to a police report, was]
asked for his license. When he
Court records show the de-
fendant, Arosemena, was acquit-
ted In 1947 on a vagrancy charge,
but otherwise has no previous
record of convictions in the
Zone.
Disaster Control"
Dry Run5 Set
tomorrow
the Communist
radio at Pyongyang radio
broadcast a four-pflmt coun-
ter-proposal reportedly made
today by North Korean For-
eign Minister Pak Hon Young.
Pak's plan, which the raaio
reported had been cabled to the
president of the United Nations
General Assembly, demands the
withdrawal of al! foreign troops
from Korea, and the establish-
ment of a demilitarized zone four
kilometers wide. I
He further demanded that
fighting cease immediately, and
that war criminals 'responsible
for extending the Korean war"
be punished.
Thk United N'ationsfroposal L*
that fiie present flghtmg Un "
come the eaapajkre ifhiilu
ment 1 readied on all orwer
armistice details
he was under arrest.
It was then that Arosemena
tried to push the officer off the
street in the chase that landed
him In the hospital.
Police reports show that Eng-
, clke was compelled to fall back
were, not awe re that the house on the Balboa Road hU1
Egyptian civilians fought a- { rilm C#r/^
longside the police against the \*III III Jf lllG
British in what shaped up as the!
bloodiest clash of Egypt's cam-
paign tovdrive the British out of
the Suez Canal Zone.
Ismailia lies at the junction of
the canal and Its paralelllng
transport lines and the rail and
highway to Cairo.
Is the main cog in the phy-
sical setup controlling the canal.
A dispatch from Ismailia,
which did not pass through
Egyptian censorship, gave de-
tails of two gun battles.
A British family was reported
trapped in an
the town. Ope
eported lying \ wounded, Aflth
Lt. Gen. Sir George Ersklne,
_ LONDON, Nov. 19 (UP) The
united States soon may Join Brit-
ain la a united effort to pacify
the strife-torn Middle Bast a
move which would represent a
radical shift" in American poli-
cy, diplomatic sources here said
Up to ow, the United States
has insisted on the role of "neo-
toU mediator" m most MMdlt
tian shop in Eastern disputes.
soldier was
Britain now is
to per-
- on the" Iranian v
crisis as a prelude to a general
campaign to promote economic
commander of British troops ln|and social progress In the stra-
The Disaster Control Center (each nee nf"~w'r ni-unn?. "if
answered that he did not have a Joint service operation rwched withlrT 30 dav? '
one, policeman Engelke told him will hold a command post ex- In ground f^htlngUn!Ud Na- Bgypt, aid Egyptian police;"lostjteglc'nto7con'a^,area
erclse "on paper" at Ft. Ama- fens troops stuck north at dawnltheu" he0* and lired without!
dor tomorrow for high officials today above' ie San River'W r>o^b\e justification" last
of the Panama and United'
nts and, news- munist resistance.
The United Nations troops had
United gainst nght ,0 moderate Com-jn1Bhon,a *5ti1-*syJtaB ta the,the ape of UT^lcv have
States governments and, news-imunlst resistance. death of a British officer not yet decided Whether "to take
Peter Buckle, a British civilian tne Diunee ' Defcl. f th. 5.
of the British Armed Forces'^!T&.ZS&SL? &PI?*
The v.dr? iun k" ??*}, ^P3;thrown back three battalion-
because* ES* JK %Si^S? dafer sized Red counter-atUcks dur-,
" i strike the Canal Zone and ter- ,g the night, cut a Chinese bat-
declara-
alion encircled Saturday ap- ,?_,:? 8 their minds. p
iia ^."k U0,y Sh refused Si Gaviln Road, on the wrong side:
J.e*r the burning house untu!0f.the street.
Arturo Collazos, who went in toi
LITTLE CARLOS DIAZ, believed to be a grandson of Mr.
and Mrs. William Love, is hW up by his rescuer, Arturo Co-
llazos. The maid, whose name was not given, refused to
leave the burniiig home, until Collazos' found th* little boy.
As this is the first disaster-
***?! ?.ut- '?#.<" .tne "le boy| The policeman pursued him on S?*"1 demn"tration to be at-
nii., o- j i *^..._ ^,------.- w:uaeu
and led them both to safety.
Damage
believed
by officials from the
.nem Doin to safety. Gaviln Rnad His four nttpmnts _"ucu uy UI"-" ,,ura "lc
* to the house, which ^^uM^S^^al^MoK-: P,anama pvernment, the exer-
to have been insured, is I Lena's car failed if1? w111 te c9nductd hi Span-
estimated at between J6.OO0 and I After DAssirn? th lnit hnmp in: "" '
S10.000. The use of the blaze the area^andPwhUe b na torcedl Amonft thos* ,nylted to ltud
has not yet ben determined. | fig,*theiurb the leer fl5ed> techniques to be put in
. .^^1*"1 Jf the damage is several times into the rear of the1 5Per^tlon ta h,e, fvent. of,*
hlatned by some sources on the, uxl, but the car didn't stop, until faster are officials of the
lack of a fire station in the Out-1 the fourth bullet hit Arosemena various ministries in Panama
eared to hate slipped back tstrdght-
hrough the United Nations lines
to Red terrltorv.
United States B-26 light bomb-
ers, and United Nations fighter
bombers sighted more than 1,400
Communist supply trucks in
North Korea lest night, and des-
troyed more than 105 of them.
Analysis of camera gun films
showed two United States Sabres
vesterday destroyed four Migs on
a the ground and damaged three
the U. S. Embassy, the Pan-
ama Canal Company and Canal
ethers In a st/afing attack on a
new Communist airfield at Ulju,
Just south of the Yalu.
It was the first time in recent
;^lj'o* Pantm City. In the shoulder.
L. n,ear,!.s?l tiTS rt* to areasi A" the shots were fired within
like Bella vista. San Francisco, a distance of about 300 yards and Zone government and the months that United Nations
Vista Hermosa and Rio Abajo is, residents of the Gaviln area Army, Navy and Air Force. !Planes have found Red planes on
located In Eas, 20th Street, Gua-; commended the policeman for The Disaster Control Center the ground in Korea,
chapa. waiting until he had passed the Joint operation of the
Love is a retired Panam Ca- last house in the section before three US military services,
nal employe He was a boiler-1 firing.
mil... 1_ IK.. 11..1.J .-,.--: I .-?.
maker in the Mech > Divi-
sion from 1914 to 19 when he
retired.
Chilean Delegates
Walk Out Of UN
Meeting In Protest
PARIS, Nov. 19 (UP)-The
Chilean Delegation to | the
United Nations Assembly walk-
ed out of a meeting of 20 na-
tions of the Latin-American
bloc in protest over the pro-
cedure for the selection of a
Latin candidate for the Security
Council vacancy.
lL8en.?t.?r Jose. Maaa- heed o
the Chilean delegation say the
delegation walked out In de-
termined protest against
Police said that upon checking
their records they found there
was an outstanding warrant for
Arosemena for the violation of a
vehicle regulation and failure to
appear.
The taxi, a light blue '39 Ply-
mouth sedan, with a shattered
back window and three big bul-
let holes, is being held today by
the Balboa police.
It is the property of the Amer- jg* d ^
"himself
French Swindler
Panamanian Hunler CauaM In Panam
Accidentally Shoots By Secret Police
Himself In Chest
The dead British officer was _,, w,,.. _.,
found lying in one of the main *mfJ^n.ls *r^wto*pn chur"
streets after the fighting with all 1H himself leads the group
badges of rank stripped from his J*1** is urging the United States
uniform and his pistol, wallet, t abandon its "third party"
and papers missing. 8tand, the sources said.
A British military spokesman; ._ a
said the Egyptian police fired on me outstanding obstacle to
a patrol of the First Royal Lin- agreement on the Iranian situa-
cofnshlres. The patrol returned 't">n Is a difference over how
the fire in self defense and with-, Iran can be saved from Commu-
drew. he said. nism? -v
Interior Minister Fuad Slrag el, '
Din, reporting the same incident U.S. officials, guided by the
earlier, said the British troops reports of Ambassador Loy Hen-
started firing directly in front of derson, fear that the fall of Pre-
pollce headquarters and oonti- mier Mohammed Mossadegh
nued shooting around both the would open the door to a Red
foreign and native sections of Is-1coup d'etat in the oil-rich mid-
mailla for an hour. |dle eastern country, which lies
Sirag el Din said he had order-just south of Russia,
ed the Egyptian police forces in
the Canal Zone to take the "nee- The British, however believe
essary" action for self-defense,that Mossadegh is a dangerous
and protection Jit civilians a-:crackpot who sooner or later will
be "captured" by the Commun-
ists if he remains in office. They
gainst any attack.
In Ismailia today hundreds of
British famines received a Royal Mosslidtgh ta a ^^ pnT
Air Force order to move into the ^ the salvatlon of Iran_ m ,ry
believe that the overthrow of
An international dope smug- -
gler, swindler and forger was strongly defended garrison area.
captured today by the Panam1 The families are now living in Th th fc ^ .,
A Panamanian hunter who Secret Police as he returned to, what the Royal Air Force con- d h communism" lln7 has
was rescu. 1 from Chepillo Is-.'Panam from Ecuador. The *iders to be an indefensible area* ..pia^Sr bv^nportenTo?
Of the tOWn........'lh> nmlr tn rl.lit^l AF Drops Food
To Flood Victims
In North Italy
Panama when he shot capture ended a month-long vl-
accldentallv Saturday gil at the International Hotel in
afternoon was in critical condl- Panam City.
tion at Santo Tomas Hospital! Luclen A. Aqulnarena, 47. a
today. | French citizen, was one jump
ROME, Nov. 19 (UP) A VS.
an I Air Force amphibious plane
Gregorio Evlla was
in his cayuco on the Morte
numbo River when he laid his
shotgun down and it discharg-
ed. He was hit In the arm
shoulder and chest
Th present situation Is de-,[h.e P""!"1 ^i!^** in-
scribed as quiet but tense. ted statM "^o supporting him.
ram1?" ^cou^^XcLftll he British propose a joint An-
I ahead"of thTpoc Wer'they|W about 100 British tanks and 'J^*^ '^*
received a rttmTki for his orrput armored cars took part in the ueceni sianaaras or living.in a-
, 5"',a.r5?Ve?'!Pr_9.U ""st fi^htina while Rritish warshios! as where "the citisens' frustra-
huntlng received a request for his arrest i ?"rca o',3. n.,,,^ ,'" ,,,".
Morte! from police authorities In Mana- ^hUng. whll LBrilsh warships
gua, Nicaragua, last month.
He had left Managua for Pa-
nam, but by the time the re-
port reached here he had check-
moored in the Canal nearby fired' "on at their miserable life has
two shells, and Royal Air Force been turned into a campaign of
STILL DAZED, William Love and his wife are caught by an
alert photographer as they gazed at what was left of their
home after the fire was put out by firemen who had to come
all the Wav from Panajna City to San Francisco.
: unprecedented procedure which I cropped emergency food supplies Squadron was notified and they
is in reality a violation of all, today over the famine-threaten-1 rushed a crash boat to the Is-
mer Latin-American meet-led areas of northern Italy as new land which is off the coast near
The 3rd Crash Rescue Boatfd '" *"d ,out of the Interna-,
8 Die As Superfort's
Bombs Explode In Fire
lngs in which at least most of
the elemental rules of courtesy
were respected."
He said his country would
rains poured fresh torrents into
the already-maddened Po river.
The U.S. "mercy plane" con-
centrated
tional Hotel headed for Ecua-
dor.
The police waited, however. In
the hope that he would return.
He arrived _U8is morning from
TWINS FOOL VISITORS
TOKYO, Nov. 19 CUP)
" persons, including two
(Staves airmen, were killed yes-
terday In a series of bomb exclo-
ilcns after a Superfort swerved
and crashed oa takeoff from a
tut in Japan.
FAIRBANKS, Alaska Nov. 19
'UP) A motorist who enters
-Eight'Prison Air Force base through
United
the area of Tocumen airport.
themTnU^Klre^ere^y %&1ESV5
.in candldacv-'fort inZ&ft .S?hS.. fil.ff ^^T^^^^^^^^^^
Security Council seat
floor of the Assembly.
All the crew escaped
sight killed tad se eral r. -
'jured. werejj^i?htine tM
which brokt%eut following
crash.
Tie
n-
gate No. 1 ai.d leaves through
gate No. a usually does a double-
take when the young air police
sergeant checks his pats.
To the met-irfft It appears that!
the airman oi, duty at gate 1 is
there to meet him at gate 2
when he leave The cause of the'
|"O"1 ?*" U fijt; Elvin nd El-!
the den Chandler 2C vear-old Iden-
tical twins from Oaborne, Kens,
1st Shot Fired
In New A-Series
LAS VEGAS. Nov. 1* The first "shot" of a new ser-
le* of nuclear explosions de-
slned to test the effects of
atomic weapons en equipment
and animals was fired UU, at
the Prstsehman'* Flat prorlns
(rounds after a four-day delay
In* to adverse weather na-
ditlons.
on the Italian aircraft staged similar 'a. m. Sunday. A Panama pollcei aqi .arena s wanted hv the
missions over the>tieaguered'ambulance then transferred to Pars suret
city of Adria, Isolated by over-jfisnto Tomas Hospital.
flow waters from the river Ad lge .The crash boat team had e
on the north and the Po on the i medical officer aboard who ald-
"AnMHm.t-H inm # A^ri.".4*^ tne wounded man before he
An estimated 10 000 of Adria s wat taken to the hn*nai
normal population of 32.OO0 were tasen to tne hospital,
left behind when the rivers sur-
rounded the city and halted eva-
cuation attempts.
BALBOA TIDES
Tassday,
HIGH
7:41 ..
117 pja,
Not
ie
LOW
1:** *.m.
t-.m p.m.
Stickpin Saved
SPRINGFIELD. Mass^ Nev.
19 (DP)A thief iniaped off
Denis Kneeland's neektle as
he walked along the street
last night, bat missed getting
" *!5S diamond stickpin b*
about aa Inch.
and was being
sought by the British Scotland
Yard, the O-Mei of the U.S.
and the police of Asia, Europe
and Afrioa.
In N.caragu* he posed as an:
engineer and-was employed by]
the Nlcaramn government as!
an hydraulic engineer tor thei
Ministry of Development.
The Nlcaraguan Police learn-
ed about Aquinarena's record
from the French Legation in
Panam, but he had already left
there bound for the Isthmus. |
He hM -'?ped from tne French i
police IS times.

jet fighters flew over Ismailia.
Garbo Flies To
Paris Incognito
And Not Alone
PARIS, Nev. 19 (IIP)Greta
Garbo, who traditionally likes
to be alone, flew here from
London today with British so-
ciety photographer Cecil Bea-
ton.
The Swedish-kern actress.
who doesn't like to talk to
newspapermen, would say al-
ly, "Please, I don't wish to
speak with anyone." Beaton,
who has often been seen with
Mise Garbo recently, didn't
sav anything.
The actress was ibted as
"Mies Marriet Brown" on the
pasenger manifest. Alrliae
officials tried to maintain the
fiction, bat occasionally one
sltpped an* called her "Miss
Garbo."
hate against western 'Imperial-
ists,' sources here said.
Woman In Black
i Led Red Troops
Against British
EASTERN FRONT, Korea. Nov.
19 (UPi A woman dressed in
1 black reportedly led a Chinese
battalion in an attack against
the Kings Shropshire Light In-
fantry Regiment, official source*
said today.
Unconfirmed reports which
were thoroughly probed said that
I "a woman was waving a pistol at
the head of Red forces as they
stormed the British-held posi-
tion."
Units defending the hill were
swept beck by an attack which
was described as particularly
fierce."


. nv't
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, NOVEMBER It, 1W1
.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNED NO PUBLISHED V THE. PANAMA AMERICAN 'III, INC.
rOUNOIO Bv NELSON ROUNSEVEL.L. IN IIJ5
MARMODIO AMIA*. IDirOR
37. H STBCCT R. O. Box 134. Panama. R. OF P.
Telephone Panama No. 2 0740 (5 Lined
Cable Adobes* PANAMERICAN. Panama
COLON OFriCE 12.179 CENTRAL AVENUE BETWEEN 12TH AND 13TH STBEETf
roBEISN REPRESENTATIVES JOSHUA 8. POWERS. INC.
34S MADISON Ave NEW YORK, 1171 N. Y.
. l*al MAIL
PBB MONTH. IN ADVANCE _______________________, 1 .70 S 2.SO
FOB FIX MONTHS. IN ."tfiurt 0.8O 1 3,0O
FOB ONI VEAB, IN ADVANCE__________^^^_w 18.50 24.OO
Walter Winche
In New York
Labor News
And
Comment
Bi Victor Riesel
i
BROADWAY FAREWELL
Since we must part, I think it might be idee
To hold ourselves above such petty rites,
As sending back the little rifts which spice
The memories of gladder days and nights.
Those little souvenirs of gayer times
The orchid pressed within your book of verse,
The Valentines, the trinkets, and the rhymes
That shiny cent I placed within your purse.
And vou may have the dreams... 1 will not care...
Yon built them with your own too-skillful knack,
(And you should keep the secrets lovers share)
But please, my dear, return the Cadillac:
For while I sorrow for a love that's fled
I feel it might be well to look ahead.
CHARLES J. HACKETT.
:
. ..Celebs About Town: General D. MacArthur and ex-Ambas-
sador to Britain Douglas midnight strolling ang Park Avenue
near the Waldorf... Joan Bennett letting her gray ones grow
in tor the first time. Looks Just grayt... Jennifer Jones run-
ning to the La Rue phone booth with a fistful of quarters for
Elizabeth Taylors long kisstance call to Cal... Nevada Smith
In green hair and a $25,000 mink in the Edison Green Room...
Lawerence Peter Berra, winner of The Most Valuable Player
award, getting the congrats of boot-blacks near 50th... The
. John Jacob Astors and their 2-year-young mage toy-shopping
I on 5th and 58th... J. Barrymore, Jr., tying his schoelace on
j the St. Pat steps... Ethel Merman, startling waiters by order-
uTlig~heT champagne "warm, very warm."
Sallies in Our Alley: Johnny Olsen overheard two critics
; discussing an actor they detest... "There's nothing I'd like
. better," said one, "than to be sending flowers to his funeral"...
' "What's the matter," Charles Addam's the other, you "getting
soft?"... 'Dennis James' slap: "The real miracle of television
. is that so many swelled heads can be squeezed Into a 10-inch
' screen."
Broadway Vignette: Coming from a very capable actress
this is most unusual... At a cocktail party the other sundown
producer George Prideaux handed Diana Lynn a copy of "Mis-
chief," the play to be offered in January... Diana eagerly
\ went to another room of the apartment to read it... She has
' ben seeking a role in a show for a long spell... An hour later
she handed him his script... "It reads fine," she said unhap-
pily, "and the part is terrific. But it kills me to admit it
' I am nowhere near good enough to play it."
Memos of a Midnighter: Judy Garland's collapse was no
1 surprise to Intimates. Medico friends warned that Judy "gave
; every indication" of being on the verge of it... The ticket de-
mand is lor "King and X," "Top Banana" twhich must build
! its balcony biz), "Guys and Dolls," "Madame" and "Fourpost-
er"... AOVA, the actors' union (in a confidential report),
. know that a greater number of performers quit show biz in
' 1951 than any year... Adele Chamberlain was quoted as tel-
I ling the Interviewer: "I think of marriage when I have time
between shows." She weds a Phllly mint next month, which
expiates the a,-karat she wears... The former Mrs. Geo Abbott
(MMrfJjfhclatf > la .saen with Ralph Nelson a lot. But The One
WM Kners prefers staying out of focus... Orrtn Lehman's
PoloflSBe hand-holder is Countess Klara de Corba. He used to
date Lady Mountbatten before switching to liona Massey. The
three gals Used to Be pals.
Times Square Sideshow: Last night's most quoted Silly
Story in Lindy's dealt with two comedians who argued over
J whose wife was uglier... Each claimed the honor... They
i made a wager and went to each other's home to decide it...
{ At the first comic's tepee Comic No. 2 admitted she was a
I beast but that he had seen better pans under ice-boxes, and
j so they proceeded to meet the other wife... At the second
home the comic called upstairs: "Come on down, honey!"...
To which she replied: "Shall I wear my masks?"... "Don't
I bother," her husband retorted. "I don't wann kiss you, I just
want you to scare someone!"
I ___Bigtown Smalltalk: It's a doll for the J. Horans at Woman's
: Hosp... Elizabeth Toomey and Jay Breen, both of UP, de-
-eided to stay free... The inactivity of the bookies is blamed
lor the big dive in many night spots... Soviet Ambassador
e**anyushktn will be star speaker here Thursday at a rally com-
fiiemoratlng the 34th ann'y of the USSR. Other gabbers will
be Paul Robeson and Dr. Corliss Lamont. The Nat'l Council of
American-Soviet Friendship sponsor It. This outfit is on the
V. 8. lists as a Communist group Gloria Swanson and ZaSu
Pitta, longtime Duddles, have foundered after all these years...
Broadway regulars report that the best lookers In town are
In the Gilded Cage chorus... A Warner's scout spotted Bar-
bara Laird, a James Madison High School senior, in Llndy s
Sunday night. Next stop: Screen test... William Fox, pioneer
film producer, is seriously ailing at Drs. Hops... The Eddie
(Leon and Eddie's >-Davises are wed 33 years tomorrow...
Photogs are worried about a new model-extortlonlst, who
threatens to make charges, etc.
Sounds in the Night: At Cafe Society: "Being in or out
f love is slmpl> the difference between walking on clouds
r under them"... At Cavanagh's "He's a social butterflea"...
At Cyrano's: "She's No. 11 in The Big 10 with me"... At The
Stork: "She loves 'em and leaves 'emwith scars"... At Stam-
per's: "Here rumps Dietrichwhat lovely kneelons!"
PITTSbURGH AM billion
dollar question Is about to be
answered in Washington.
When the answer comes, It
'will wind up a bitter year-old
feud behind the scenes of the
defense board which controls
the wages America earns dur-
ing these days of crisis.
That answer will unleash a
union drive which will add bil-
lions to the pocketbouks of the
people who work for a living
but not in actual cash.
When it comes, it mill be
in the Jorm of a decision
granting workers the right
to ask for health, hospitali-
zation, insurance, and other
welfare plans, in addition
to the full wage increases
allowed by the Wage Stabi-
lization Board. This means
that once the wage ceiling
is reached, the unions can
win billiom of dollars mor
for their people from their
employers in this indirect
fashion.
Here, in the heart of the
i coal industry, you get a dra-
matic graphic picture of what
this means in human feelings
in dollars and cents, and In
cost to just one Industry.
It's safe to estimate that
John Lewis' welfare plan will
cost the coal companies one
billion dollars in one. decade
Already some 721,000 coal dig-
gers, their wives and widows
their orphans and their crip-
pled, Including the 900 whose
backs were broken by the de-
vil accidents of the mine
falling slag and rock have
been helped In these first four
years by an outlay of $254,000,000.
Income from tne fund, which
started with a nickel union tax
on each coal ton torn out of
the earth and now Is up to 30
cents a ton, is well over $360,-
000,000.
Its should be pointed out, In
praise of John Lewis' aides
that less than two per cent of
this has been spent in these
years to administer the fund
a national record.
These millions have been
translated into survival for
0.000 widows, operations for
hundreds of miners' kids,
services of specialists who
never before got coal dust
on their feet, and costly
drugs to save lives which
would have whimpered out
in some miner's drafty
shack.
That's why, back-stage, many
a bank. Insurance company
hospitalization plan (now cov-
ering sotne 77,000,000 people)
and fine American Medical Asan
j backed up this drive for "health
and welfare."
When the decision comes
'down, in opposition to the in-
dustry representatives who say
that then- businesses In these
days of enormous taxes simply
cannot carry this burden, at
least 300 unions will automatic-
ally have their welfare plans
approved.
Here you come to a basic
reason for the predicted wage
board move.
These 300 companies have
for months, been seeking ap-
proval of their "fringe" demands
for health and welfare plans
above their wage Increase
drives.
If the board turned these
down, there would be strikes
in the very core of the defense
machine In the vitally need-
ed tool and die plants, in air-
craft factories, in the biggest
metal installations and even on
the atomic energy front.
The board is fully aware that
with a ceiling on wages, it has
to give the union leaders a
chance to go to the industrial-
ists and bargain for something.
'/ the union chiefs
couldn't bargain for more
money, or for better welfare
plans, the labor men could
The Battlefield EqualizerWe Hope
The Bettor Life
By BOB RUARK

.
NEW YORK.__The bookmakers have started set forth to find a man to handle my meagre
to sell automobiles for a living, and extreme action. Lqoked hard for two hours, and dug
caution is rife among the citizens. up nothing in the way of a wager.
Uncle Sam's tax seems not only to have drlV Horse paid sixty bucks, or some such, and
en the books out of business, but the election I hated-myself for a week,
of Rudy Halley, the man who hates crime, has The itch of a gambler to bet on Information,
added Insult to injury. with no takers, is the purest of all frustrations,
An actor fellow, I know, who likes to drop it seems to me.
a bob or two on the nags without the trouble The gambler himself, the poor sucker who is
of trekking to the track, is understandably bit- being protected by the current wave of honesty
ter. The tax on bookmaklng, he says, was ter-*" that sweeps the land, is the man who will fln-
ribie. t ally break down the new system of controlling
"But the election of this fellow Halley as chief illegal wagers,
of the Oity Council," he said, "is a direct slap There Is an old axiom among bookmakers to
at the gambling fellowship, of which I am a the effect that no bookie ever sought a sucker;
member. the sucker seeks the book.
"This bum Halley gets elected on an antl- As moth to flame, as migrant bird to light-
crime kick, so he is duty-bound for a little house pane, the chump eventually will discover
white to stay clean and,let the books stay clos- some means of allowing himself to be unloaded.
edC It is an affront to my persona* dignity a* In the meantime, the 'sight of a chronic horse
a constant sucker. player with no easy access to telephonic tempt-
"What happens?" the man asks. "I wish to atlon is a sad sight, for sure,
place a few on a couple of goats yesterday and Berelt of opportunity to jeopardize the rent
I cannot find the place to place the few. and imperil baby's shoes, he sweats and fidgets
"Old and trusted friends, when I call them and watches the clock, and dies a thousand
on the phone say, 'Who?' and hang up. No- horrled deaths when his horse rolls In wiWi no
body will even wish his mother a kind hello money on his ugly Roman nose,
on the telephone "* cannot sleep the other night, one addict
"I finally roust up one of my-more daring old tells me. "I got the sheets and I pick six win-
acquaintances, and he says he will come see ners! Six I pick! And when I grab the phone
me in person at the office. He will take my there Is nothing on the other and but a buzz,
bets, sure, but he will only take It in cash, buzz, buzz.
and" here the voice rose to an indignant "Six winners go hungry, because of lack of
scream "he will take them all at once. Even courage among a flock of schlemiels who used
the eighth race he wants the money down, and to kick your, door down to hustle custom. It is
this is before post time'" more than a man can stand.
If my friend Is any indication, the hardship "I am in the greatest streak of my betttog
produced by the head tax on illegal bookmakers life and I got no place to lay the dough wlth-
has fallen more on the horse . player than on out getting to be an accomplice before the
the horse layer. whatever. Yah, bring back O'Dwyer, so a man
The books can tear up their records and go can make a bet."
to work of sorts, but nothing Is so frustrated I am not a betting man, myself, having taken
as a hot horse bettor with no place to send the pledge before the heat came on, but I win
his package wager one thing: It .will not be the bookie who
I remember one time when New Orleans was finds the way to whip Uncle Sam's cute curtail-
having a sporadic stroke *of cleanliness, some- er of Illegal gambling. '
body mumbled the name of a sure thing out It will be the sucker himself,
on one of the coast tracks. A chump, given time on his hands, can 1-
I discovered ten bucks in my left shoe and ways dope out a way to beat himself._______|_
I
^DARY WSWNCTOH
I. U, tl 'OB
MERRY-GO-ROUND
r DREW PEAR
Pi
Arms For Yugoslavia
By Peter Edson
,-illJW..
THIS IS YOUR FORUM THE READERS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tna Mail loi r an pan forum far rooon of Th Panama Amer-
ican. Latter* ara receiv.d roufully ana ora homilaa m wholly con-
fieWiol mannar.
H reu contribute a lettar don't bt mnatient rf it doesn't eppear Hia
eat aey. Latan ara avolnhea1 in tha order received.
Picata try to keep tha lotton limitad to one pa at lanotfc.
Identity of tortor writan fi held in etrictatt confidence.
Thii nowoponor aeeumet no reepeniibility for ototement* er opinion*
expretted in letteri frotn reodert.
I joiny Biuouoj BHi fa' uepeej to) amo) nodo uo i xof now* HI
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia --(NBA) - Jufkey and Turkish instructors sent to the
not hold their people and ltary aid pact just signed by the United States U. 8. for spec allzing training. ranahlp
defense industry wo\ld ex- land Yugoslavia, under which Marshal Tito's Yugoslavia today has;no road systemcapable
anti-Soviet forces will get modern American of carrying heavy artillery, tanks or supply
WnT8iu^t1,^wUmuchPUs^urlty are the U. S., UAnd while American-made automobiles dash
Britain and Franc? buyinginJugoslavia? maoly about the streets of .drab, Slav Belgrade,
plode in hundreds of un-
controllable strikes which
still may occur in a rank-
ond-ftie effort
la^. ^L^L^^h^^Y^J^S^v supporting them as $100 million in loss of food export sales.
The board knows that Phil1 And_ tne Yugoslav economy supporting
"WELL BE HONORED"
-Me and mv pals are digging a
ditch
Tomorrow well stand and end
our hitch.
'The hole Is narrow and six foot
deep,
JoVell lay in the ground and start
the long sleep.
9ft) fought a good fight on Ko-
rean oil
She place the Commun 1 s t s
sought to despoil.
fe were surrounded by scream-
ing hordes
Of bestial bastards led by their
lords.
fcur arms were conventional, all
agree,
frank? and guns and TNT
the atom must be kept reserved
JCause Truman hasn't got the
nerve
To save us from a quick demise
And use the thing to save our
lives.
This fight Is Just an Incident
They say it's not the main event;
Good old Joe will see the light
When we all face eternal night.
So let's be smart and compromise
Be diplomatically wise,
Let's talk some more and be
damn fools
Keep the score and play by the
rules
Don't consider the sudden end
Thousands of planes end to end
Dropping eggs on Stalingrad,
Moscow. Minsk and Leningrad.
Let's be Christian, keep the
faith
We will earn a flowery wreath
We who fought and kept our head
Will be honored but very dead.
Miguel
Miirrnv r7r. 7 V" 111 mav be nrettv much of a hollow shell. as well as Internal suffering wnicn u. o. iooa
heU.rvT wage'mc^a^s 'and w BeforeThe "n^Sact wassigned in Belgrade, loans helped to relieve. This year's crops were
welfare Bg^ .W ^Marsha, Tu0 had j ^^^^^1^, ^aiue of the dinar is from an official rate of
WOrke"- HE wanted^ thele arms without any strings Tourists have a supplementary currency in
This was indicated by long UedVhem anTsalHe woud make'no con- putnUcs worth M. to& the doS They pay half
mmunlcation every te steel cessions to the Western powers to gain their *V^ <$*? Beigrade^who^ablde by
'BSfSUZSZ 17XS "SftX aid he will get wi.l have strings on ^^S^^,^^^
and legal counsel. Art Goldberg It. because the pact provides for an American worth 40 cents ap ec.bread the equlvalenl
Mr, Goldberg asked the stillilton.at. Belgrade that_will check^on the use W^lnf 2J|^^ffi ftTte^ftte
d*An.bsi, of this bid for a look I 'TheTis another side to this question, how- ^f^^^d^^iJSlvS^mt^-
aSSmS^&S v&^Sxjgsu ^WISBliu:
Mt^y^S'c^y^t^rL^TLT^ found that Turk had no There are rich farm area. Uk tow. copper,
"extra" benefits, Phil Murray's road system capable of carrying gasoline and 'ea^ bauxite timber Md other resources.
will blow It off wltt ammunition to the northern Turkish borders, The top men of,I vernment are aU young
[men
strike nobody wants.
That's why the answer to
l the M billion dollar question
is the most vital one on the
(Copyright ItSI. Post-Hall
Syndicate. Ine.)
to support mechanized forces. partisans, devoted to the Idea of making their
So the first requirement was to help the country a.rich ana powerful Communist state
Turks build a modern road system. But without plenty of-ouUlda technictel s-
Then it was found that the Turks had no slstance nd know-how. ttey face an almost lm-
mechanlcs capable of repairing motorized equip- possible task. It would be nq> Vfot to many
ment. So a training system and military schools on the spot observers in Belgrade If the eco-
had to be established, with American Instructors nomy collapsed, any day.
*
Drew Pearson say*: -Mrs. Tiuinon wants to go back t0 In-
dependence; Anaconda copper monopolizes ^Monta-
na press; Taft brothers wage political battle."
WASHINGTON. Mrs. Truman makes no bones about her
desire to turn the White House over to new tenants.
At a reception the other day;> the First Lay confided to
friend: ,H -. ..
"This Is a terrible life. We don't have any privacy at all.
If I want to go across the hall to see the President or Mar-
garet, I have to get dressed up,
"I can't Just slip a kimono on, for you never know who
you'll find In the hall. I'll be glad when we get back to In-
dependence and can Uve like human beings."
Mrs. Truman said she thought tht. govern ment should pro-
vide private living quarters away from the White House for
the*first family........,.,:[ .. H ... ,
She was referring, of course,' to the fact' that secret ser-
vice vigilance has been tightened since the attempt on the
President's life, so that guards are on every floor of Blah-
House.
MONTANA MONOPOLY
The more the Justice Department's anti-trust division
scrutinizes the NPA deal to put Anaconda copper into the al-
uminum business, the mote It looks like the most Ironic gift
to big business of the entire Truman Administration.
Government attorneys now find that Anaconda's powerful
Montana newspapers and Anaconda's close friend, Montana
Power and Light, bitterly opposed the Government power pro-
ject at Hungry Horsi, Montana.
Now, Anaconda has turned round, wants all of Montana's
share of the government power it fought. And the NPA plans
to fork it over.
Anaconda newspapers also criticized the Harvey Machine
Company's methods of lobbying for the aluminum-power con-
tract and RFC loan.
Now Anaconda has turned round and embraced the very
same Harvey Machine.
More alarming Justice Department attorneys find to be
the stranglehold which Anaconda will now have on the state
of Montana.
Already the giant copper company controls most of the
published news in that state. It owns the Butte' Daily Post,
the Montana Standard, published at Anaconda; the Billings
Gazette, the Livingston Enterprise, the Daily Mlsscrulian, the
Helena Independent Record, and' the Western News of Libby,
Mont.
And not having been able to acquire a paper at Great
Falls, It has now purchased radio station WFBB in Great Falls
subject to FCC approval.
MI'SKEGON TO MEXICO
In addition to its Montana operations, Anaconda owns or
controls plants and mines in Utah; East Chicago; Perth Am-
boy, N. J.; Buffalo, Ansonla, and WateVbury,' Conn.; Detroit;
Kenosha, Wls.; Anderson and Marion, Ind.; Pawtucket, R. I.,
Muskegon, Mich., Orange, Calif., Sycamore, 111., and Hastlngs-
on-Hudson, N. Y.
Most of these are operated.by Anaconda subsidiaries Am-
erican Brass or Anaconda Wire'and Cable.
It was the latter firm which was twice convicted during
the war for concealing fauUy wire sold to the Anfiy, Navy and
Air Force.
Anaconda also owns or controls Montana Hardware Co.,
Interstate Lumber Co., Tooele Valley Railway, Butte, Anaconda
and Pacific Railway. International Smelting and Refining Co.,
Chile Copper Co., Basic Magnesium, Inc., Butte Water Co.,
Chile Steamship Co., Chile .Exportation Co., Andes Copper Co.,
Potrerillos Railway Hn. Chile, Greene Cananea Consolidated
Copper Co.,-in Mexico.,- ,.,,, ,
Thesevare tltfrmtffeittons'.'.ot^tte thirOarteit copper
company Jn the worjd which the. Nfttlonal Production Ad-
ministration now wants tD/jiut into the aluminum business, al-
ready suffering from "monopoly control.' "..','. ,'
THE TWO TAFT BROTHERS
Taft forces are so sore at brother Charles' Taft for an-
nouncing for Governor of Ohio that they may put genial con-
gressman. George' Bender, a GOP stalwart, Into the Republican
primary in Ohio to run gainst brother Charles. .
There are several reasons for this row. over the younger
member of the Taft family.
Primarily, Bob Taft forces'are sore because two Tafts In
a political race cause confusion and make the public think
one family is out to dominate the state.
Second, brother Charles has not been regular. He was a
friend of Franklin Roosevelt, voted for him couple of times
and served under him in the Federal security Administration
and later in the State Department during the war.
Charles also bolted the regular Republicans In Cincinnati
where he has been a member of the city coucil and helped
elect a Democratic mayor, Albert Cash.
Finally brother Charles turned down Truman's,Invitation
to be ambassador to the Vatican, and because he was long
president of the Federal Council of Churches, a strong Pro-
testant organization, this tends to Une both Tafts up on the
protestant-aide in the now bitter controversy over an ambas-
sador to the Vatican.
Alreadv Catholic sentlrnent Is none too friendly to broth-
er Bob Taft as a result of protestant tactics during last year's
Senate race against Joe Ferguson.
That's why some Ohio GOP leaders, such as former state
chairman Ed Schorr and congressman Clarence Brown, are
considering Congressman Bender as a GOP candidate for gov-
ernor against another member of the Taft family.
MAILBAG
E. P. A., Brentwood. Calif. The Navy did not refuse to
cooperate in filming "The Calne Mutiny" because the mentally
unbalanced Navy officer was portrayed as an Annapolis man.
The Navy orotested, according to Its letter to Columbia
Pictures, that "the character delineation of the principals must
not be so over-simplified as to make It appear that the Navy
would tolerate for very long a vindictive and vicious officer
In command Dosltion or another unbalanced officer plotting
a-zainst him. In addition, it is stated unequivocally that the
Navy would not'offer cooperation of any kind, should the title
include the word 'mutiny.' As I mentioned to you... there has
never been a muthTv-in -the -Navy."
. WASHINGTON PIPELINE
General Elsenhower's name will definitely be filed In the
Republican New Hampshire prlmarv January 11 by young Re-
pubiiirans associated with Senator Tobey.
This will be significant, because In 1948 Ike asked that his
name be withdrawn from the New Hampshire ballot. If he
lets It stick this Ume, he will be running and as a Republican.
The Russians seem to be uslne Korea as a training ground.
Thev brought in a brand-new batch of pilots last week to fly
their Mte-15's over Korea. It was obvious to our pilots that
the new Reds were green at combat flying.
Onlv diplomat who got the VIP treatment t the Soviet
Emr>i>av oartv last week was Premier Mossadegh of Iran.
The Russians supoltod Mossadegh with a four-man escort
to run interference through the big crowd whleh cluster
three deep around the caviar.
(American guests at the Soviet Embassy shun Soviet cham-
nagpe which is sweet nd usually hot, but make bee-line for
the bowls of Caviar.)
(Copyright, 1981, By The Bell Syndicate* lac.)
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT ADS
CAN FILL YOUR TSEEVS!
Mhaaa,







MONAT, NOVEMBER 19, 1951
-------------'-------------------------
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
paob mn
i- -i
Ex-Congressmen Gain Money
Influencing Former Colleagues
Airman of November
Is Corporal of 1st
Air Rescue Squadron
0-------
WASHINGTON, Nov. 19. (UP) At least
seven former members of congress, including five
Democrats, are registered lobbyists seeking to in-
fluence their former colleagues on euch subjects as
trade and taxes, radar and rubber, bowling and bil-
liards.
The final Congressional record for the last ses-
sion lists as lobbyists such prominent names as
former Senate Democratic Leader Scott W. Lucas:
ex-Senators Sheridan Downey, John A. Danaher
and Joseph H. Ball; and former Reps. Fred A.
Hartley, Fritz G. Lanhara and Carter Manasco.
Others, such as former Senate
Democratic whip Francis 3-
Myers of Pennsylvania, were
not registered as lobbyists In
their own names but testified
on behalf of various Interests.
Myers joined In the successful
effort to loosen consumer credit
controls.
8everal prominent ex-govern-
ment officials also cropped up month period from the Western
as lobbyists In the list for the Medical Corp.. of hlcago and
months of July. August and Sep-
and a merchant marine meas-
ure.
-
Danaher. who served as a De-
mocrat from Connection, said
he received 11.875 each from
the Firestone Tire and Rubber
Co., and the B. F. Goodrich Co.
Hartlev reported that he re-
ceived $5,000 during the three-
Hfc---------------
Copy** Cos.
tember, Including Robert N.
Denham. former general coun-
sel of the National Labor Rela-
tion* Board. .
The ex-legislators had an
advantage over their execu-
tive branch brethren in that
thev could go on the House
and Senate noon and even
in the private cloakrooms
reserved for Congressmen.
This la because all former
members of Congress are en-
titled, under oresent rules, to
.keep the "privilege of the floor"
aa long as they live.
The Senate Labor Subcom-
mittee on Government Ethics,
headed hv Sen. Paul H. Dou-
g-las (D-lll.), nrged last month
that "former members of Con-
gress workin* at lobbyists
should be denied the privilege
of the floor."
"The evidence suggests."
subcommittee said, "that
bylsts who are not ex-senators
or ex-congressmen have a suf-
ficiently developed sense of the
spent about $350.
Lanham, a Texas Democrat.!
received a quarterly total of i
$1.000 from the American Fal'-|
Trade Council. Inc.; $1,500 from'
the National Patent Council.
Inc.; $2.500 from the State Tax
Asn. Houston. Tex.; and $900
from the Trinity Improvement
Assn.. of Fort Worth, Tex.
Manasco. an Alabama De-
mocrat, said he received $R00
during the quarter from Na-1
tional Business Publications
Inc., and spent about $200.
Manasco also reported a quar-
terly receipt total'of $2,600
and expenditures of more than
$200 on behalf of the National
Coal Association.
Downey (D-Cal.) reported re-
the! celpts of $9.000 and expenditures
fob- of about $5.800 during the quar-
ter as a repretentattye of the
Harbor Commissioners of Long
Beach, Cal., In the controversy
HORIZONTAL
1,7 Depicted
part of riding
equipment
10 Grave
11 Underworld
15 Playing card
14 Boredom
16 United
17 Greek litter
18 Primped
20 Suffix
II Gaelic
23Unbleiched
28 Stagger
28 Counterfeit
27 Capuchin
monkey
MMixsjitjrDS
29 "Tar Heel
State" (ab.)
30 Little demon
32 Type slat
34 Oceans
36 So be itl
37 Redact
38 In the same
placa (ab.)
39 Horses' homes
45 Direction (ab.)
48 Regret
48 Perfect
49 Goddess of
infatuation
50 Small finch
52 Served
54 Sorry
55 Browned
VERTICAL
1 Fastens
2ExUt
2 Two (prefix)
4 Performer
I .'
5 Crescent
6 Domestic slave
7 College degree
(ab.)
8Stir
9 Clanes
lOSoundor
mentally
II Hurry
12 Blood '
component
IS Not (prefix)
18 Large birds
19 Scorn*
S Sitting
Pealed
81 Colored
Answer to Previous Puzzle
iw-4Tiin:i:'ipimi:iiiiit-i
1 J>lfl'.'i-li'-lMI'-''
S1I1 Wai Lu S!l 'ad
[-4,21 rjQis '.Vl.J -: 1
raacoLLA
MM
REC
..i i Old
i tu:-J2i
:i rut
t i t
I 4l i.-lllin|r3ir.VII 2M -1
32 It usually is
used in r
$3 Impregnates
35 Hone
4 Metal
41 To (prefix)
42 Belabor
43 Molten rock
44 Dash
47 Age
49 Malt beveragt
51 Psyche part
53 It is used
the west
niceties of fair play that they over the tldelands.
would prefer that no registered ------- #
lobby bis be permitted on the Qg|f;Q Pj| Omega
n^S:~ArA^ Initiates Two '
Tabor fllnf. was listed as a
lobbyist on labor relations and
"general industrial /regulatory
legislation" for the Continental
Banking Co.. New York. He said
they paid him $2,575.76 during
the three-month Jjuly-Beptem-
ber period.
Lucas Joined Myers this year
In helping to loosen the credit
controls they had championed
through the Senate last year.
Lucas testified before con-
gressional committees In behalii underway since that
of easier Installment terms for the formal initiation.
auto purchases as a representa-
Uve of the American Finance
Conference.
In the latest lobbyist list he
also I* registered as a repre-
sentative of insurance inter-
ests, bowling and billiard Con-
cerns, manufacturera of trail-
ers snd a radie and radar
outfit.
All his listings were reported! "Grand
At Junior College
Formal Initiation exercises
were held Thursday by Delta
Psl Omega, national dramatic
fraternity, for Anne Howze and
Frank Robinson at the Canal
Zone Junior College. The two
school leaders In dramatic work
were pledged to the national
group the middle of October,
and preparations have been
time for
Miss Annie Nlcolson, cast di-
rector, was In charge of the
formal exercises, assisted by
Mrs. Subert Turbyflll, honorary
I member of the group. Subert
I Turbyflll, of the Canal Zone
Junior Collefe faculty, is spon-
sor of Delta Psl Omega, and
I the representative of the
Cast" for the Panama
Canal.
The initiation marks the be-
ginning of the tenth year for
the local' east of the national
group. Of the 180 chapters of
the-oiational fraternity, the Io-
bv Lucas and Thomas, the law
firm of which he Is a member.
The law firm listed reeelots
for the three months of $1.250
from etch of the accounts ex-
cent the bowling-billiard combi-
nation, which showed no**.' eal college group Is number 138.
The total lobbying income listed
was $5,000.
Ball, a Minnesota Republican,
is registered in his capacity as
Vice-president of the Assocla-
tnon of American Ship Owners.
He listed quarterly receipts at
$1.250 with expenditures of
$95.46. He said he has been in-
In addition .to Its work in
drama, Delta Psl Omega con-
ducts an active social calen-
dar for the year.
Following the Initiation, plans
were discussed for the Christ-
mas formal dinner, tradltlon-
terestd in the recent tax bill .ally presented here.
SPEBSQSA Execs
Meet With Program
Committee Tonight
The executive committee o
the Society for the Preservation
and Encouragement of Barber-
shop Quartet Singing in Ameri-
ca, Inc., will meet tonight with
the program committee at the
offices of Don McNevln in Dia-
blo Heights.
Besides the members of these
committees, chorus director, Joe
Flynn and musical director. Vic
Herr, also will be present.

A Special Communication
OF
CHAGRES LODGE A. F. & A. H.
will be opened at Scottish Rite Temple
TUESDAY, November 20, 1951, at 4:00 P.M.
For the purpose of conducting Funeral Services
over the remains of our late Brother
Lawrence L. Adams
Of Sheridan Lodge No. 8, Sheridan, Wyoming.
Services will be held at Ancon Masonic Temple
at 4:30 p.m.
Master Masons and Friends Invited.

ALBERT H. EVANS
Secretary
RALPH E. HARVEY
Worshipful Master
Airman of the Month for No-
vember at Albrook Air Force
Base, chosen by the Character
Guidance Council, is Corporal
Richard A. Johnson of Detroit,
Michigan.
Johnson is assigned to Flight
B. 1st Rescue Squadron and Is the
fourth man to be chosen from
that organization since Airman
of the Month was established
last February.
The 21-year-old airman se-
lected over all other entrants for
his efficiency, attention to duty,
character and overall military
bearing, entered the Air Force in
September of 1951. He is a grad-
uate of Saint Francis do Sales
High School, Detroit and attend-
ed the University of Detroit for
two years before entering the
service.
Corporal Johnson is married to
the former Miss Patricia Smith
of Detroit. He resides with his
wife at Gamboa.
In keeping with the custom.
Johnson will be awarded a trip to
one of the South American
countries and will receive a hun-
dred dollar expense check. He
has chosen Lima, Peru for his
trip via military aircraft on a
flight available basis.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Whir. 100.000 PMpb Meet
Presents
Today, Monday, Nov. 19
CIA. DLC1DIO GONZALEZ N., S. A.
WHY OUR PRODUCT SELLS THE MOST?
THIS CHART SHOWS YOU WHY THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR OUR CEMENT FLOOR TILE
POINTS OF COMPARISON Terra no Marble Rubber, Linoleum Asphalt, Cork Cement Floor Tile
Is the product fireproof V V ns
Are 'Its installation materials fireproof? V V ns
Is its snrfaee finish imihune to the mar from a burning cigarette? V V ns
I* It colorfaat? v V V ? ns
Is it unaffected by alcohol, gasoline, kerosene or ink? ? ns
Is its surface waterproof? V V t ns
Is it free Ire upkeep cost of waxing, polishing, varnishing oi painting? f V r ns
Is its Installation unaffeeted by severs or continued damuuess? V V "8
Is its installation unaffectr*-bv severe r continued dryneas? V V t ns
Is It easy to lean? Is it easy te keep clean? T ? T ns
V ? ns
Is its installation vermin-proof? V V ns
Does It have color balance? ? T T ns
Oees it have lew maintenance costs? V y ns
THE ONLT MATERIAL WITH A rKRCT RATING ON ALL TESTS
1H%
Caraant floor til* 1 abwluttly flraproof.
Tht tart and anrtrar* on thli chart ara raaulta oi an impartial aurvay. They
va corcluaiva avldancc that OUR COUNT VtOOfl TILE la ~
Taelni material tkaf baa no equal or nraeffla maml|H
the one aur-
In your am tntartata. rludy bala chart and convince youraelf that OUR
CEMXNT FLOOR TUX as It la mamifactui ed todar hai become a baaic
building materiala etandard by which all Imlta'lona and all aubatltute
ara Judge*. There la No Substitute for OUR CBKN1 FLOOR TILE.
ON EQUAL PERFORMANCE RATING, OUR PRODUCT HAS THE LOWEST INITIAL COST
P.M. -
3:30Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose8how
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00British Masterpieces
(BBC)
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Kellog's Program
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00 News and Commentary,
(VOA)
8:15Platter Parade (VOA)
8:45Labor World (VOA)
9:00Story UJS.A. (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00The World At Your Win-
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off
Tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov. 20
A.M.
6:00Sign On Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Hawaiian Harmonies
9:00News
9:15Sacred Heart Program
9:30Asi See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
2:00A Call From Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Spirit of the Vikings
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Radio Univeralty
4:15Promenade Concert
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00PANA MUSIC A STORY
TIME
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Ray's A Laugh (BBC)
7:30PABST 8PORT8 REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00NEWS (VOA)
8:15What's On Your Mind
(VOA)
8:45Time for Business (VOA)
9:00Symphony Hall
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA) ,
9:45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Variety Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00-8lfn Oil---------

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WE TAKE GREAT PLEASURE
announcing that
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Corner of "J" Street & 4th of July Avenue
will be operated from now on by
LEWIS SERVICE, he.
.'
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Your continued patronage will be greatly
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the lowest prices and shall be known for
its courtesy.
i




DO YOUR X-MAS
NOW



P^F-
page four
I

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
i'' v.
fi #.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19, INI
Cargo and FreightShips and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & Airline News
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
.New Orleans Service
Arrives
Cristbal
*8.S. Metapan ...................................Nov. 27
S.S. Inrer Skou .................................Nov. SO
SS. (hirioill ................................ Dee. 2
Mni4lini Rafrif trata*1 rhilled and Dorm Cario
Arrives
New York Service______________________Cristobal
S.S. Tivives .................................' Nov. 24
S.S. Junior .....................................Nov. 27
S.S. Cape Ann ..................................Dec. 2
mcoiTKT SAILINGS mOM CRISTOBAL TO WEST COAST
CFVTRAI AMERICA.
Cristobal to New Orleans via Sails from
Tela, Honduras_____________________ Cristobal
8.S. t'hiriaui ___(Passenger Service Only) .. Nov. It
8.8. Chirlen i ................................ Dc- *
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL *M1 PANAMA 2-28M COLON 20
Grace Line Ship
Transiting Today
Aboard the S.S. Santa Luisa
which is arriving today from
Baltimore, bound for South
America, are the follwoing pro-
minent passengers: Charles C.
Atkins, trafile ^manager o the
Central Railroad, of Peru, Dr.
Michael KorvalenVo, a professor
of astronomy, formerly of Prlnce-
town University. Dr. Orlando Or-
landini. who has been conduct-
ing research at the Hospital for
Sick Children in Toronto, Cana-
da and Enrique Valenzuela, a
Director for the Chile Nitrate
Corp.
NOW IS
THE BEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
LET US GET YOU
THERE IN A HURRY
By irranrint yoar completa trip
by the most efficient ronte possible
Accredited
Travel
Agents
amaWTHlM.lttC.
De Lesseps Park
Tel. 2-2008, 2-2009
Members
UTA
ASTA
Try the small but mighty want
ad
It's the wondtr selling aid
Gets results so fast, so cheaply
When you want to sell or trade!
You'll agree P.A. Classifieds are
SUPER, too, for buying, selling,
renting, trading, hiring or what-
ever your need is I
San Bias Islands Trips
Planned for December
The The Colon Chamber of
Commerce announces that com-
bined plane and launch trips to
the San Bias Islands will be a-
vallable during December for
group reservations. Individual re-
servations are $15, but the spe-
cial group rate is $11 a person.
The program consists of board-
ing a 26-passenger DC-3 at To-
cumen on the Saturday morning
of the trip, for a 25-mlle flight to
the San Bias Archipelago. A
launch waits for the group at
Mandinga Point for a 30-mile
tour along the shore of three or
four of the islands, returning to
I the airport at about 5:30 p.m.
:the same day.
Fred Busch, who can be con-
tacted at Cristobal 1901. advises
sight-seers to bring a picnic
lunch, raincoat, bathing suit,
silver coins for trading purposes
and old clothes. Soft drinks will
be available there.
Swirling Waters
Of Po River Break
Through Banks
MILAN. Nov. 17 (UP) Half
of the 40,000 Inhabitants of the
city of Rovigo were evacuated
here by dawn todav as the swlrl-
ling waters of the Po river broke
I through enforced banks on the
city's outskirts.
At 1000 hbprs today 35 Inches
of muddy-water had covered the
city'4 streets and roads hamper |
ing evacuation of the remaining
'citliens to Padua Verona and
even as far as Bolgna.
Firemen, troopers and volun-i
teers worked throughout the:
night.
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGELES
MEXICO
Wonderful vacations at the
year's lowest rates await
you in Mexico and the
U. S. A. And there's a new
low combined fare to Lo?
Angeles. $380.80 round
trip. Chicago is no more
than half a day away, via
Miami, with DC-6 service
all the way..'. Your choice
of 2 services to Miami: "El-
Inter Americano" and "El
Turista" flights.
Set yoiir Trurel Agent *
wooio-
MOST MPtBMNC
Pa/vAmerican
Womim 4toimm*
Panama: L Strtat No. 5,
Tel. 14670
Colo: Sala. Md, Tal. 1097
TERRY
SAFETY FIRST
PMak....v *"" : -- -1
WHAT* y^COtOfiBt. iCK^SLjSL
-ABcarrf 7 ysu&*w* with,ammuniti~' '
BOOTS AND BEK BUDDIES
Another Way
BY EDGAR MARTIN
OH* BOARDJNO HOUSE
ToOTCH/f^AV-
INO OFF A
Pearo es fJcrr
ALL rT'6 CfJACKeD
UP TO 6e.'-~*
THE KlH
Peels OFF
TOO.'
with
. MAJOR BOOPLE OCT OUR WAY
By J. R. WILLIAMS
DRAT Marthas
STU0SOR>4NeS
I SHE'S AS IMPERIOUS
AS CATHERINE THE
, 0KEAT .'-*- WHEr4
1 SHE GBT5 THACT
W0LWDED PANTHER
GLIrT Iti HER BWe,
ALU OF STAllf*6
SECRET POLICE
COOLDtfT Wlr4 Af4
[ARGUMENT
FROrA
HER/
UM? WOfJDER
IF SHE SUS-
PECTED THE
BEARD WAS
MY INSURAMCE
ASAIMST
BEIKlG HIRED
FOR SOME
MEMIAL
JOB/
OH,THI6rS
ALL RUSHT-
FWE- IN '
FACT, BEST/
fjUST GO
Riorr
AHEAD'
WITH HIM--
WCLLPICK
IT UP.'


MONDAY. NOVEMBER if, 15I
JE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT H*.ILY NEWSPAPER
PACE PITE
racific S^ocietu

&, 17, &tU V.L &tU 3521

GOVERNOR'S WIFE HONORED ON BIRTHDAY
Mrs. Francis K. Newcomer, the wife of the Governor of
the Panama, Canal, -as honored, on the occasion of her
blrthflay anniversary, with a surprise card party liven by
the Health Director of the Panama Canal, Major General
George W. Rice and Mrs. Rice, at their residence on Balboa
Helfhts Friday evening;. ?__
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hollander
Entertain with Buffet Dinner
Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Bol'
lander entertained with a buffet
dinner given Saturday evening
at their residence In Balboa for
a group Of their friends.
The table, from which the food
wa sserved, was covered with an
ecru point venlce lace cloth and
centered with sterling silver can-
delabra with cream color tap-
ers.
ton, Josle DIBella and Jacqule
McCoy.
Initiates present were Merlene
Jeppsen, Adele Melssner, Beth
Hatchett. Marilyn Abreu. Bobby
Oglesby, Allana Lewis, Pat Smith.
Betty Flatan, Greta Navarro and
Diana Brown.
N.CO. Wives Club
Meets for Monthly Social
The N.CO. Wives Club of Fort
Kobbe met Thursday evening in
their club-room for their regular
monthly social. The Social chair-
man, Mrs, James Niebch, was
the hostess for the occasion.
The winners for bingo, played
Pacific Scout Awards To Be
Presented Tonighf In Balboa
Mfsp Hewtematte Hostess
(orTear d Card Party
Miss Cecilia Heurtematte was
hostess to a group of her friends
at a tea and card party given
Friday afternoon.at her resi-
dence In Bella Vista. The honor
guest for the occasion was Mrs.
Oscar Fierro, of Buenos Aires,
who arrived recently to visit her, during the evening were, Mrs.
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Jaime de|wu"am La Pearl. Mrs. Pastor
la Guardia. Santiago. Mrs. Carl Barnett. Mrs.
______- Alberto Bartolomel and Mrs.
The guests included Rabbi and port Kobbe N.CO. Wives Club John Rerner.
Mrs. Nathan Wltkln, Judge and Meets for Coffee A buffet supper was served to
Mrs. Edward Altman, Mr. and The Fort Kobbe N.C.Q. Wives the twenty eight attending mem-
Mrs. W. H. Esslmger. Mr. and club met on Wednesday morning|bers.
Mrs. O. C Myers, Mr. and Mrs. m their clubroom for a coffee1
Arthur Donaldson, Mrs. C. E. given in honor of seven new Girl Scouts
Hall. Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Lier- members and one departing *,s" Summit Gardens
man, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Van member Mrs. Peter Zanls who' The "Rambler"patrol of Troop
Wagner, Mrs. Cotton, Mrs. Fredwas -iven a tablecloth as a fare-:?; of Curundu, enjoyed a field
Frank, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Mir-!weii gin from the assembled trip to Summit Gardens on 8at-
rop, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Craw-;rouD. lurday. The purpose of the out-
ford, Mr. and Mrs. C E. Ko- ling was to observe and gather
cher Mrs. L. M. Murphy, Mr.' The new members welcomed by .ideas to formulate plans for work
and Mrs N E. Wise, Mr. and i Mrs. Elbert Wright included Mrs. ion Nature Badges.
Mrs M. Attard Mr. and Mrs. E. Ernest Rosa, Mrs. Miguel Zara- Members- of this patrol are
Zelnick Mrs. ETfle McGlade and voza. Mrs. Charles Hartman,:Betsy Allen, Barbara Bishop,
Mrs F J Brady Mrs. James Watson. Mrs. Will-:Frances Brand). Judy Curtis,
-------- lam La Pearl, Mrs. Carl Barnett Elaine Greene. Annie Hlckman,
Rabbi Nathan Wltkln 'and Mrs. Truman Weeks.
Leaves on 8eml-Annual Trip
Awards will be presented at the
Pacific District Court of Honor it
was announced by Charles F.
Ebner Jr., District Advancement
Chairman, Boy Scouts of Ameri-
ca. The Court of Honor will be
held tonight at 7:30 on the third
floor of the Balboa Elementary
School.
The top award to be made will
be the Eagle Scout Award to be
presented to Richard H. Smith
of Troop 16, Fort Kobbe. This a-
ward will be presented by Will R.
Price, Council President.
Edward Scott of Troop 3. Bal-
boa and Royal Markillie of Troop
17, Fort Clayton, will receive the
Life Scout Award. The Life
8cout Award is the last award
before a boy becomes an Eagle
Scout.
The Star Scout Award will be
and Dormn Fulton of Troop 3.
Balboa; and'Robert Roche of
Troop 4, Diablo.
Scouts from Troop 7, Curundu,
who will receive merit badges are
Victor Walters, Victor Carter.
Walter Collins and Albert
Schwalm; and also William
Campbell of Troop 10 Gamboa.
Robert Wheeler of Troop 13,
Cocoll; and Richard Rlchter of
Troop 15, Albrook will receive
merit badges also, as will Rlch-
^Mtlantic *2)ocieti
nu nuL J~ tur-
&, 195, C*U* DMpkon, Q'mtmm 3
NEEDLEWORK GUILD TEA
HELD AT STRANGERS CLUB
' > *
Colonel James PumpeSly, Com-
: mandant of the school, made a
i farewell speech to the cadeta_q
a response was given by Cadet
Armando V. Jiron. ..
Other guests included the'con
sular representatives fiam the
students' countries with Seor
Mrs. Stanley Hamilton, presl-iwere Col. Henry F. Taylor. com-ijMe Sandlno Arellano, lstsecrei
dent, opened the meeting by|mandlng officer Atlantic Sector; tary of the Nicaraguan Embassy!
thanking the officers and mem-'Lt. Col. M. E. Webb, Executive1 The members of the gradual*
bers of the Board for their assls- Of fleer with Mrs. Webb and hig class were: Cadets German
tance in arranging the tea. She Miss Jo-Ann Webb; Captain E. Bello, Enrique Bermudez. Cemf
also listed the charities which!w. Scarborough, Adjutant; Cap- A. Briceno. Humberto Corralea;
The annual tea given by the Colon Unit of the Needle-
work Guild was held Saturday afternoon at 4:60 p.m. at the
Strangers Club. The donations of new wearing apparel were
displayed on long tables, and will be distributed, at a later
date to charitable organization.
ard Magune. Francis Roddy and the, Gulld ta assisting. Mrs. HI-.tain Archie B. Davidson, Head-Enrique Garcia Carlos, Arm3
pollto Fernandez served as mas-quarters Detachment Command- Gonzalez. Ramiro Gonzalez. Solo j
ter of ceremonies and had charge e rand Mrs. Davidson: captain imon Ibarra, Jose A. Jimenez, Ar-
Rlchard Smith, all of Troop 16.
Fort Kobbe; and Royal Markillie
of Troop 17, Fort Clayton.
Five-Year Veteran Scouter Cer-
tificates will be presented to
of the bi-lingual announcements.
Tribute was paid Mrs. Jesse L.
W. G. Roberts, Assistant Oper- mando V. Jiron, Alfredo-JuareX
ating and training staff officer Luis M. Larius. Gonzalo Marti*
Byrd, who founded the Colon ann Mrs. Roberts; Mr. and Mrs. nez, Silvio
Mayorga Frank
Russell M. Jones, Elmer B ste-|Gulld,ln 1939- A few appropriate Paul W. Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. lOrozco. Daniel Ortega Jorge A
vens, Charles F. Ebner Jr. How-remar-s were made hy the hon-, Robert Thomas; Mr. and Mrs. Pabon. Carlos Pereira, Jaime ana
ard E. Munro and Rabbi Nathan ,0Te* an,d she waf presented with,R. R. Aguirre, Sergeant and Gastn Quintana, Adolfo SolUL
Wltkln who have all completed'*."?1 centerpiece donated by Mrs. Donald W. Huck, Mr. and Efraim Santamara. Raul E. To
presented to 8couts Raymond W.| five years of service In the Canal' 'he Margarita Florist.
Foland of Troop 3, Balboa. Rob- Zone Council.
ert Wheeler of Troop 13. Cocoll
and Richard Magune of Troop:
16. Fort Kobbe.
David Forman of Troop 3, Bal-
boa wli lrecelve his First Class
Award.
Second class Awards will be
presented to Grant Jeaklns,'
Troop 3, Balboa: James Selby, JACOBY ON BRIDGE
Harold Mccarrick. Paul Glass-1 ww' vr* ""TTg.
burn, Robert Roche and Marcy
Carpenter all of Troop 4. Diablo
Heights; Albert Schwalm of I
Troop 7, Curundu: Jerome Hille-
jg5"f
BE OSWALD JACOBY
Written for VF s-frr
Mrs. Glynn W. Williams and Tres, Jose Nicholas Valle, Pablo
Mrs. Hamilton introduced her Miss Betty Ann Williams, Sgt. Zamora. Rene L. Zelaya and Ed-
officers who were: Mrs. Julio Sa- Robert C Robb, Mr. and Mrs. gardo J. Zeledon.
las, 1st vice-president; Mrs. Raul William Warden, Miss Wanda' --------
Herrera, 2nd vice president; Mrs.Ann Johnson. Sergeant and Mrs Birthday Dinner Party
Isaac Osorlo. 3rd vice president; clarence G. Vice, 8gt. William ' Mr. George Egolf was honored
Mrs. Agustn Cedefto. treasurer; |v. Cunliffe and aunt, Mrs. Cun-'on his birthday anniversary wit
Mrs. Adele Joly. Spanish secre-;iiffe. Miss Surgeon, Corporal W. a dinner party Saturday evening
tary and Mrs. Fabian Pinto;iR. Hovestadt, Corporal Foster G. given at the home of Mr and
English secretary Smlthson, Corporal M a r I o n Mrs. Caleb Clement in Gatuo. by
Mrs. Olmeda Alfaro and Mrs. I shook. Corporal Robert White, his sister and his parents Mr.
Isaac Osorio were in chrge of a corporal Peter Wesner and Pic. and Mrs. Leon Egolf
Associate Scouts Mrs. Roy
Rabbi Nathan Wltkln, Field ..Arrival of Master Charles Ross
Director of the Jewish Welfare;Jones is Announced
Board center in Balboa and Arm-| Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Jones
ed Services Director tor the Ca-'of Curundu. announce the ar- stockham
ribbean Command, densrted to- rival of their baby son, CharlesBrand! were in charge,
day by Militan- Air Transport Ross at Panama Hospital on Oc- -_
for Guantanmo Bay, Cuba. U)ber 21. Concert Given hy
P erto Rico and Trinidad. Mr. Jones Is employed with the Panama Conservatory Professors
This tour Is Ra^bl Witkin's re- Armv Transportation Division as I A concert of chamber music
eular seml-annral trip to con- in Engineer and Is the son of the, was given yesterday afternoon
drct services pnd nerform other 'ate Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Jones'for patients of Fort Clayton Hos-
relleious rites for the men of the of New Bedford. Massachusetts, pltal, by three Conservatory pro-
Jewish faith and their denen-!Hls wife Is the daughter of Mr. ifessors who were; Hens Jano-
dents stationed at these mllitaryland Mrs. Ross HolloweU of Bal- witz, pianist; Teodoro Tlrelli,
installations. Rabbi Wltkln ex- boa.
Eileen Kirchner. Kav Monagan, '"P %^r'e\ome "_*-
Linda Morton a-ri Janet StcVk- bra"do' T"? VForS amador;
and Richard Richter of Troop 15.
Linda Morton and Janet Stock
ham.
Albrook.
Merit Badges will be presented
e to Scouts John Stevens. John
Maggie _,niHt Jame Scott, Thomas Hale. L. W. Hearne
pects to be away for about two
weeks.
During his absence Mrs. Na-
than Wltkln will be in cha rue of
activities at the Jewish Welfare
Board-USO Armed Forces Service
Center.
Dr. Stanley Blber. of Gorgas
violinist And Eduardo Charpen-
tier, flutist. The concert was ar-
ranged by the Jewish Welfare
Board-USO.
Marinen of Ship 17 Entertain
initiates at Santa Clara
The Mariners of Ship 17, of|
Balboa, entertained with an all i Meeting of Cardenas club
dav beach party at Santa Clara Cancelled
on Saturdy from 7:00 .m. tilll The regular monthly supper
7:00 p.m. The home of Mr Roy.meeting of the Cardenas River
services at the Center In Balboa
during Rabbi Witkin's abrence
Oarden Club has been called for
this month. The next meeting
of the club wil lbe held on Tues-
day, December 11 at the residence
Hosoital, will conduct religious'DWelle. retired swimming coach.
was the headquarters for the
daV during their stay. The group
enjoyed horseback riding, swim-
Miss Tania Pisa mlng. baseball and card games, of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Morgan
Complimented by McGraths A picnic lunch was served bv the at Miraflores.
Mis Tania- Plea of New York, rlr-* at noon -
ACOBXon
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOBS
Written for NEA Service
In my last column I discussed
the advisability of melding early |!
from your hand if. you need only
50 points when the opponents
need 120 points for the initial
meld. I don't recommend an
early meld on every type of hand
even In this favorable situation.
For example, suppose you
hold: '
Joker A Q-Q 10-10-10 7-7 6-5-2
You have Just drawn; and you
must decide whether or not
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Opening load A
raffle, the prizes for which were c. Barnett.
donated by the generous mer-
chants of Colon.
The winners and donors were:
Mrs. Julio Salas who won a pair
of earrings and ring donated by
Castillo's; Mrs. Isaac Osorio, who
Graduation Dance
for Nicaraguan Cadets
A dance was given at the Fort Mrs.
Gulick Officers Club ThursdayiClment. Mr.
evening for the Nicaraguan Ca-'Hall. Dick Egolf of Balboa, *.
received a silver and glass fruit dets who were receiving their di-|ard Aycock Miss Barbara" EkoI
The other guests were' *Mi*
George Egolf, Mr. and Mrs. Har*
ry Egolf of Gamboa, Mr. and
Mrs. W. D. Williams, Mr: and
W. L. Brooks, Mrs.
and Mrs. Will!
Ric
bowl from Motta's; Mrs. David
Serko, who won a porcelain pow-
der box from Surany's; Mrs.
Manuel Joly, who received a fig-
urine irom Pohoomull's; Mrs.
Katherine and Billy Egolf
Mary and Orrin Clemen:'
plomas the next day at the com-
pletion of a.six-month course at
the USAR Carib School.
The dance was given by the Seven-Year-Old Celebrates
commandant, the staff and fa-1 Mr. and Mrs. Ramoh Vale of
Parker Hanna. who won a plas-cuity of the school. Also present Fort Gulick, arranged a party at
dc handbag from the National were cadets from Ecuador and their residence. Friday, to hon-
Mattress Factory; Mrs. F. Arts, who received Toby jug from the;can countries with younR ladies,seventh birthdav anniversary.
law and shtct, Dr.
"Wnat is your opinion of the
bidding of this hand?" asks a
correspondent. "West opened the
ace of clubs .and East eventually
got a trump trick, so the slam
was set.
"Would you say that Nprth or
tdjithat South' Was guilty over- presentec
1 sang, "Because." "La VI en Rose,
l" and "Loma Sorenta." She was
meld. Nobody could really kill'bidding?"
you for melding the joker with a Curiously enough. I'm not
French Bazaar; Mrs. Raul He-
' rrera. who received two brass or-
'naments from the Eastern Ba-
zaar.
Champagne from Salas Co.
went to Mrs. Jack Levy; a pair
of figurines from Madura's was
won by Mrs. Carl Ender; Mrs.
Alba Burlando received a vase
"rom the Paris Bazaar; wine
from Henrlquez Co. went to Mrs.
A. Katz; Mrs. R. W. Rubelli
won a basket of flowers donated
by Maurer's Flower shop and
Mrs. Julio Salas won the flow-
ers donated by the Central Flow-1
jer shop.
An Interesting program was
Mrs David Pretto
e Canal Zone and
the Naval Station ^nd Army
posts.
Music was furnished by the
60th Army band under the direc-
tion of WO (Jg) Emilio Rodri-
guez. Lt. Victor Mrquez was In
charge of the decorations and
Major J. J. MpCarthy had charge
of the refreshments.
Balloons and flowers were use
in the general decorations and
novelty favors were given th#
children.
The young guests included
Jane Hipson, Joyce Wilkerson,
Nancy Antonsen. Gladys NIC
Magall Sanchez. Linda; Sofk
Sonia Mndez. Karen 'Davi
(Continued on Page Seven)
r
honor, bv Ml1, arid Mis.
VfcGrath on'Weirnwday
John lor of Girl Scouts Activities. Miss|urRer to attend the Pedro Miguel I be your best course of. action.
even-lMsfrv aPtton and Mr. "Dwelle. Woman's Club meeting tonight with three pairs you are ln'fectly reasonable to me.
player. The bidding looks per-Pescod Two readlngs were giv-i
Ing at their
:iJ
residence" at Coco1 Old members attendinq werej at seven thirtyo'clock
Rosemary Hollander, Gloria Mor* b
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panama No 58 Justo Arosemena Ave
Foot Treatments. Corns. Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments Massages
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Male and tmale
operators For information call: 3-2217 Panam
t? a.m.: 2 p.m._________________

KNOW WHAT
in
Chi
to discuss a
mas party.
the Union Churc
the
ch
Charity Raffle
Held Over Until Sunday
Court
the Ca
rica, wished to announce that the
charity raffle on the Gorham
Sterling silver, service for eight.
will b eheld over until Sunday,
November 25. The whining tic-
ket was voided inasmuch as it
was not paid for before the draw-
ing. All persons holding tickets
on this raffle are asked to save
their tickets until next week's
drawing.
excellent shape to fight for the
discard pile. Why weaken your
chance against opponents who
art fighting at a disadvantage?
The best play, in my opinion, Is
to discard one of the tens.
This may persuade your right-
en by Miss i ida Paredes; and
If North fails to bid three dla-Mis., Gertrude Serko danced the
ne Mexican Hat Dance, accompan-
ied by Miss Rosemary Salas-
Tea was served at small rabies
centered with mixed bouquets of
imported blossoms donated by!
the Anton Flower Shop. Presid-
doesn't deserve-to get good cards
And when South reblds the
hearts. North naturally raises to
game In that suit.
t Sancta Maria No. 447. hand opponent to throw a ten tO;South's point of view. North can m" aTthe'ta"and coffee'services
thollc Daughters of Ame-you fairly soon. However, even if easily have slightly stronger ;.,.-. Mr. Ltui nvrri ur,
**** the trap play doesn't work, this hearts and slightly weakerijX EmUlanl Mrs Humberto
discard leaves more room In your'spades; and then the slam isiLeignadler- Mrs Isaac Osorio
hand to accumulate other pairs, cold. Or North can have the ace alternating' were Mrs. Julio Nino,
A third argument in its favor is of clubs, In which case he can Mrg Agustn Cedeo Mrs Perci-
afford to have as Uttteaa three jval Xiberga.and Mrs. Frank L.
to the Jack of hearts. There are! Scott
dozens of hands that North can The' president and Guild wish
bhat your side can win the pack have which will offer a much to thanl aU Atlantic Side real-,
before the opponents can do so. better play for the slam than dents who assisted in making the
The general principle is very North's actual hand. annual event a successful affair,
simple. When you have as many | Moreover, even on the actual _____
hand South had a pretty good I An_Weriary of Activation of
play for the slam Suppose West; AtlanUc Sector Celebrated
h,a clubs. After all aces are seldom actiVation of the Atlantic Sector
led against slam contracts. Ifwnich occurred on December 1,
West opens a spade South wtna. 1M7| was ceiebrated with a din-
PVdk-'ner party at the Cristobal Gun,
Club Saturday evening, by the'
that if the ten turns out to be a
safe discard you may want to
discard other tens in the hope
SUN
SLEEK
&Uf/jm***Hfr CIGARETTE CASK
You'll offer your cigarettes with spec1 pride
when you're showg off an E Amtricm
cigarette case. T_cb one has inspired design-
ing, the rich finish of fine jewelry, and famous
precision craftsmanship. The perfect gift
for Christmas.
DISCOUNT
MEANS?
ll is our last special
SIMMONS9 WEEK
Buy your Christmas present NOW!
Springs: Ace Coil, Plain and Boxtprings.
Maitrestes: "Beauty Rest," "Deepsleep,"
Studio Couches, Steel Garden Furniture -
Crib, Beds.
f
FURMiru
!_NTRALAVE.at21tEST. PHONES: 2-183C
* 2-1833
Bridre Tournament
to be Played This Evening
The weekly duplicate bridge
tournament will be played this
evening In the card room of the
Hotel Tivoli at seven o'clock. New
members and visitors are wel-
come.
RUTH MILLETT Says
If your life seems dull and
pointless, one new Interest could
open up a new world for you.
The woman who really needs
only one new Interest is often
iiscouraged by the thought that
in order to lift her life out of its
dull routine she will have to take
on a great many new interests.
She usually can't think of a
lot of things tif\e can do' that she
would enloy doing. Ad likely as
not, she hasn't time to tike on a
string of outside activities.
What she doesn't realize is that
one activttv is enoughat least
one at a time is enoughto open
up a whole new world.
How can one .new Interest
make such a difference to a
woman? There are a number of
wevs it can.
To begin with. If she pick
something she finds challenging
or fascinating, she has some-
thing new to think about. She
can. while she Is working on her
riobbv. lose herself In it com-
pletely.
Then. too. as she discovers
that she is pood *t something she
tafrM a new pride In her own
ability.
And she will almost surely
make new friends or find a new
congeniality with old ones. For
once a woman gets interested in
a hobby, whether lt Is gardening.
Debiting, dressmaking, wrltln or
twhatever. she is bound to find
other women Interested In the
same thing.
And when a woman Is Interest-
ed In something outside herself
and her family's needs, she be-
comes a more interesting person.
So there is a whole new world
a woman can enter Just by tak-
ing on one new interest.
If you have been waiting for]
the time when you will be able to
make vour life over by doing all
sorts of interesting things, put
that day-dream out of your
mind.
Instead look for 1utt one thing
that you would like to do that
you can start doing today.
as three pairs in your hand, and
when yod have no difficulty hi
making the count, you have a
fine chance to wm the discard
pile. With such hands, play for
the pack.
The reverse Is true when you
have only one set of matched cards a club on dummy's third
cards in your hand. This gives spade, and then runs the dia-
you very little chance to win the monds By the ..time East ruffs,
pack. With such hands you must South has discarded all of his

either play for a fast out or you
must try to help your partner.
For example, you may hold
four or five kings and some wild
cards. That gives you a play for
out. so you meld early and try
to meld out as quickly as possi-
ble.
If you have nothing valuable
at all. no pairs and not even any
real concentration, such as four
of a kind, you must play defens-
ively. Your only hope is that
your partner has a good hand.
Atlantic Sector Headquarters.
Music for dinner and dancing
was furnished by an eight-piece,
, -. ._ orchestral unit of the 60th Army
Even when West makes the Band under the baton o W.O.
killing opening lead of the clubiji) Emilio Rodriguez.
ace. South still has a chance for 5nIormal addresses we're made
y1"1^ naveebe!n by Captain A. B. Davidson. Col
K Henry F. Taylor and Lt. Col. M.
E. Webb.
Those attending the dinner B
his slam
known to break 2-2; or South
may find a singleton honor In
the West hand and guess the
right play on the second round
of trumps.
The mere fact that South did
not make the slam this particu-
lar time does not mean that the
hand was badly bid. The bidding
LAY IT
AWAY TODAY

TAHITI
T H
137
f
* n
t w f
in
ral
I T
o i i
Use your Xmas Dollar and shop early.
k%7
and you must watch his discards {should be considered sound if it
like a hawk so as to be ready to'will lead to successful results In
help him when the time comes, the long run on similar hands.
RCA VICTOR CONSOLE
25 or 60 Cycle
3 speeds
8 bands
8 tubes
Made only for the tropics
Mahogany Walnut
Blonde
What finer Christmas present than this luxurious
RCA VICTOR Radio Phonograph with large 12-inch
dynamic speaker. Unsurpassed tonal quality. Con-
tains marvelous new electronic "Mlcrotunlng." A
never to be forgotten Christmas present.
EXTREMELY GENEROUS CREDIT TERMS
PANAMA RADIO
CORPORATION
Central Avenue Phones: S-SMf y 2-2MI
The tiiuest injury can become in-
fected. Never tain a chancel
USE
BAND-AID'
ADHESIVE iANDA-ES
uj etfcar bond.
They come to you sterilehelp keep
out din and term Mercurocbronw
or tyro-thri-cin pad.
Hav ton- tlwoy, near at hnd.

Today is
jc4mo lohmtm.
elija

Dl_Vou Post'sToastieaiaonly
on* of 7 varieties of nourisiun%
CEREALS in POST-TENS I 10
package* giv the en tir* family
its favorita choice of oaf*' at
breakfast! Try some today I
7 vriiios-
10 pockoflosl
Vost-TEJVS



fAOE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, NOVEMBER It, 115!
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds I
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
N. 4 TWnll Are
Fhene :.Kii
kiusKU DE LESSEES
r.nenU
MORRISON'S
Ne. 4 Fmirth of Jnly Ave.
PKhi 2-4441
KlirilA I'ARLTON
14.4ft Melendci Avi.
Phene tts-Colea
SAI.ON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
He. H Wbi 12tk Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
Ne. IT H" Streetrnan4
Ne. U.I7I Central At.Celen.
12 words
.inimum for
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
==
FOR SALE
Automobiles
. i'i'.
^5S
MISCELLANEOUS f RESORTS COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE:Used 6 rang* caloric For the buving oi telling of your
stove with oven, good con- automobile consult: Agendas Cos-'
Oe eu have drinking atablara?
Writ* Alcoholic, Anenymeae
S*i 2031 Am*. C 2.
gas
dilion Apoly
Steamship Co..
Wlllioms Sonta Ciar* Beach Cottages, j
Two bedrooms. Frigidolres, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
Royal Netherlands
Cristobal.
mos. S. A.. Automobie Row No. BAIL BONDS:Boil end Guarantee HOTEL PANAMERICANO in cool El
29. Telephone 2-4721. Panama.
FOR SALE:60 evele Bendix outo- Early inspection this year replace
tomafic washer, like new $140.00
.> Coco Slito 66-G
" ^v^OP SALE;Carved
made in Mexico.
2301 or
bedroom set.
Telephone 3-
3-4860 Panama.
your shattered glass by our new
expert Mr. De Leon, Tropical Mo-
tors.
FOR SALE:5 piece maple break-
fast set, Colonial, S30.00. 60
cycle electric motor $10.00. Rod-
man, 3454.
WANTED
-Miscellaneous
Compony S. A.. No. 78 "B" Ave.I
Tel. 2-3078, Box 1352; Colon
Agency. Central Avenue 12167,'
Tel. 639.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Voile. Room $2.00 per doy, meols
A La Carte. Special Thonksgiv-
ing Dinner $1.25. Reservotion;
phone Panamo 2-1112.
Houses ON BEACH Santo Clara.
Phone SHRAPNEL Bolboo 2120
or see caretaker there.
| WANTED: Clean soft rags.
Dept Panamo American.
FOR SALE: Underwood portable!
typewriter, telegraphic keys, $35.i
00, excellent condition. Call Navy:
Job 3589. !
FOR SALE-Westmghouse reMger-----------------------------------------------------
otor. work ond paint bench, kitch-; __ feu
, hous. 3238-b, Moga churches Will Join
rito.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE Boot 20 Ft. long 5 1 -2
wide with accessories. Like new
Moderate price. Riviero model
Tel. 3-0680. Panama.
Medics To Meet
Tomorrow In RP
Community Service
On Thanksgiving
Gromllch's Santo Cloro beach-
cottages. Electric Ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
JUST ARRIVED:-TroPicol fish. omU|**2P SANTA C^*A
fit, .u-t. _____._____< -.-:"__. I Looms, food, swimming. No reservo-'
fish, plants, aquarium of stainles!..
steel, superior quality, all CT*" "tcessory. Chole, lot, for sole.
accesories for aquariums ond or-
noments. Jardn Lo Inmaculada
No. 58 "B" Avenue.
FOR SALE:Cheap, a young saddle
mare. Fine for children to ride
Mrs. Nolan 3-381 I.
FOR SALE:Leica $146.25, Bolex
three lenses $350. "Porros,'' Pla-
zo 5 de Mayo. Panomi.
The annual Community
Thanksgiving Service of the Pa-
cific Side is to take place on _
i Thursday at 10 a. m. in the au-
ditorium of the First Baptist PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OF-
Church. FIRS FOR SALE 500 NET TONS
Phillips. Oceonslde cottages. Santa
Clara. Box 435. Belboo. Phono
Ponamo 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
P. T. I.
SAFETY SAW BLADES
COST LESS STAY SHARP
TWICE AS LONG TAKE
HALF THE TIME TO SHARP-
EN AND USE 35% LESS
POWER.
THE GREATEST ADVANCE
IN POWER SAWING since the
Invention of the CIRCULAR"
SAW.
GEO. F. NOVEY, Inc.
279 Central Are. Tel. 3-01*0
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished oport-
ments. Maid service optional. Con-
tact office 8061. 10th Street, New
Cristobal, telephone 1386 Colon.
FERROUS SCRAP
This is an annual service In Sealed bids will be received in the
which a number of churches co-office of the Superintendent of
The Medical Association of the operate1 and the entire communi- Storehouses until 10:30 A. M No-
Isthmian Canal Zone will meet,ty is invited to participate in the;vember 26. 1951 for 500 Net Tons
tomorrow at 7:15 p.m. at the service. I of Ferrous Scrop. Information ond
Qorgas Memorial Laboratory in ...'D'd forms moy be obtained from the
Panama to hear a scientific pro-: Governor F. K. Newcomer wUlj0ffic:e of Superintendent of Store-
gram, and to consider proposed read the Presidential Proclama- lhouse 2-2777 or from Foreman
changes in the Constitution andtion; Rev. Alexander Shaw will s,^,, Bolboo Storenou$e
By-Laws. I bring the Thanksgiving medita- ,------------------------------ ,
Members of the staff of the tion. Rev. R. T. Ferris will read1
Santo Tomas Hospital will pre- the Scriptre and Rev. W. H.;F? SALE:Royo typewriter. 20
sent the following program: Beeby will lead in prayer. inch carriage. '" p"- ,'-
Emergency gastrectomies in the i len* cwl1"1"1' Albrook 86-2139.
treatment of perforated peptic Special music is to be provided F0R SALE._.
ulcer (by Dr. Bernardino and Dr.,by the Gospelaires Male Quartet
Manuel Gonzalez Ruiz': Pulmo-.and the choir of the First Bap- bent-
nar Resections in the treatment list Church. The Thanksgiving; gj * Pedr0 Ml0uel- Pnon -M
of pulmonary tuberculosis (by anthem is entitled "Praise the _____;____________________
Dr. Vicente Avendan and Dr. Lord. Oh Jerusalem."
A. O. Arias>; and Transposition PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OF-
of the Umer Nerve (by Dr. Li- The public Is cordially Invited FERS FOR SALE LUMINAIRES
FOR RENT: Apartment in Sor
Francisco de la Coleta, livingroom
diningroom, 2 bedrooms, modern:
sanitary service, balcony. Apply Li-
brera Preciado Panama.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. t-1713
. 22 E 39th St
FOR RENT
Rooms
smoll upright piono.
excellent condition. $300.00. House
ROOMS AVAILABLE Lieht. ceo1,
entirely renovated and well fur-i
niihed. Rates reasonable. Bache-
lors only. Inquire at The Ame-
rieen Club toen, Da Lesson.
Park.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel n Panama
Wants to buy stocks of:
Abattoir Nal.
And has for sale stocks of:
Clay Products
Cemento Panama
TELS.: 1-4714 3-1 tee
ifSKS1? WfaiSJ. Ai* F0RCE BA?El '"'to R,c- conducting an inspection
of Flight C, 1st Rescue Squadron an operation al-readiness team, above, from Air Rescue Ser-
L?etiroa,S laniletl at Albrook Saturday Tdght in a C-82. The team will
?ft B.AM^?.r5te ?Ke k.t0. conectan annual operational-readiness test on Flight B.
. ai0rfnf?tnHnH0^e SfM" ,c2?."1te 8 8erles of W ""ons to test the readi-
SS. V*nt5E*l-e?"L0lsklU.01 ^!'Bht B Waonnt- At the end of the flying tests the
team will conduct an Inspection of sections supporting flight operations. Left to right are:
Lt. Col. J. L. Jarnagin commanding officer, Flight B; team members. Lt. Col R N. YVilkln-
SnV,M5- A "tFW^ VPL?- W McVey' u- I- J- T- Cousin, cap A Acarado?Maj.
M. C. Frazee; Lt. Col. O. T. Prior, commanding officer 1st Rescue Squadron
____________________________________________________ (Official USAF Photo*
Women i
WU
Nicely furnished room
board if desired. Bello Visto, 46th
Street 18-A upstairs. Phone office I
hours 2-1693 or 3-1789.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUILT
Slipcover Reupholstery
VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto Beree
t. f. de la Osea 17 (Automobile Haw)
Pre* Fattmater Plrkup Deliver*
Tel. 3-4628 K:0e a.m. to 7:M sat
i
sandro Lopez I.
to the service.
L6Ve Plus Human Kji
Produced Happier War Waifs
lv GEORGE McCADDEN kind and cheered him all they
HDNEY, Australia, Nov. 19 could.
_)She was a beautiful Es-; There ame another blow more
tbYiIan. sitting beside him in a cruel than the first. He had fool-
Sydney university dentistry class, ed the doctors and after three
For Leslie Torey it was too much months In hospital was dlscharg-
to hope to marry her for a long ed, 56 pounds lighter,
time, even In this new land of,
opportunity. Life was looking up when, four
Her name is Riina, a demure weeks after his discharge, the
brunette who looks something doctors broke the news: the
like Ingrld Bergman. She was 22, chemicals had entered his stc-
as he was. and she didn't want mach, sealing it off and starving
PLANER *> JOINTER. AND
ELECTRIC MOTOR
Sealed bids will be received until
j 10:1b A. M., December 12, 19511
; for 6 Luminaires, 1 Planer O Joint-
er, ond 1 Electric Motor. Informa-
tion and Bid Forms may be obtain-!
j ed froni Foremon, Section I, Bol-j
boa Storehouse and the office of
the Superintendent of Storehouses,
Balboa, 2-2777.
LEGAL NOTICE
SIDE GLANCES
By Calbraith
Filmtown
Shoptalk
_ By BEN COOK
United Press Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD, (UP).Dewey
Martin is a screen newcomer
who has a suggestion which he
thinks might curb the show-off
tendency of some of his screen
fellow workers. At the same time
he hopes it would help him keep
his breakfast down.
''Movie people who behave in i
delinquents
United States of America
i for Lesne xorey u was too mucn munuuui nuauitai uiawii|- Carnal Zone
I to hope to marry her for a lona, ed, 56 pounds lighter. UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE DISTRICT OF THE
CANAL ZONE
Division of Balboa
John William Piltro.
plaintiff,
Ta.
to say much about her old home him. He lost another 14 pounds. En,m * Wen.
behind the iron curtain. Again the doctors told him cUiionc. D.r.nd.ni.
Torey. a handsome fellow, did- they saw little hope for him. c... n stto
at want to say much about nis But. thev said, they'd do their civil Dock.t is
old life In Hungary, either. Best. u.most .although it meant they'd action foi. divokcr
to-forget it, if possible now that have t0 rem0ve half his stomach TV.* .Lbol'"n.m"' i'.'"i"t-
lie Rnd Rlina had cast their lotand his dQudenum : You ""' */> t. .pp^.r publicly acceptable.
S distant Australia. They'd been' aouaenum. ,i answer th complaint fllrd in the
Id, back there, that Australia! j.t was tnen tnat Torey made J."'.'"tar'tb. *irit'",pabiicitton ,l"*'L'^J ^ey couldn't read about
IS a kind or New America of tne n|s great decision He knew his I lB c"* of ,0J" '"' ,o pp'arii' the next day. they woulan't
South Pacific. chances and so did Rlina He "nH ",w,r- l"eBt win b ukea act the way they do the nlaht
Then.came that awful day in ^ennera ""^WJ e t ** '- "'N!,te salETbS. SfS
the 8ydney factory where Torey witness th. Honorable Joseph j. "" 01 us would be able to get
worked to finance his uniyeisity Thtt it_thev would iHancock, Judee. united stau. du. rough our papers wnnout los-
etlncation There was a blinding marry before he went back to trict-Co0,t ,or ,l" >'<" "' ca-ing our breaklasts.''
aef--j.is.-.fts!ttffl SttttSt* a."........:,-^.Sicasai
CT.rk l0.r Winchester Pictures' "The
public like adult
gripe me," he said.
So he recommends a 1
boycott of movie lads and lassies
wno can'i keep their manners,
ais and wearing apparel

4
Jbded That was months ago and JMff I^SSS .
ftTwas the last that Torey ever ,'2i,_w.hlih he mi*M nTer
smW. He was blinded. ,u"'"-
The shy little Riina rallied to; __ ,,,._., _,.,, uiAU,
bis side at the hospital and he' * d's\c^egJf,trar' *mdlZ
Seeded her encouragement. More * saym^rtlfif]Jy, wuT.^
th4 lust being blind, he could:"" as Torey lay in his bed,
'xmSVu her of his despair and his ?**% "h?"1^1*^"'. We,ak
longing, because the chemical. fnd wwtfjd, barely able to sUp
hid injured his larynx. th ^ on. her finger.
Tben canrrene of the lungs 1,ne-'
. developed. Oite dar the doctors fusion right after the cere-
told him and the faithful Riina mony.
that he could not live. -v. -
Somehow through the black Torey fooled the doctors
despair of dying In a strange again and this time he's on the
land, across the world from all road to recovery. The travail
he knew as home, Torey hung and the suffering were gone
on, always inspired by his Rlina. now, and his luck seemed to be.
The doctors and the nurses were turning, but he and Rlina had;
no home and few prospects in
. crowded 8ydny. They were liv-
saans* Leca I Notice "lg '" Ule Uelel1 KellerHostel
r- 5WSW " ~ tvT !
canal zone He couldn t see lt, but Rlina
V ' vala excitedly told him there it
" the hatter or the ESTATE was. their picture, four co-
lumns wide, right on page one
and a long story of their faith
and fortitude. A fetching, smll-
Big 8ky" at KKO Kadio studio,
saia it is unfortunate that being
a show-on is one of the quick-
Dictated
OF
Ala C. Bu .. .
No. *0tS. Probeta
NOTICE OF TIME SET FOR PROVING
(SEAL)
By Sara da la Pena
Chief Deputy Clerk
To Raima Anne PUtro ----- -- _
The foreaolns aummone la iervedle8t Ways tO attract attention in
upon you by publication puraaant to Hollywood.
1 he arder of the Honorable JOSEPH J.I
HANCOCK. Jodr*. Unite*- Sutea Dia- "That ma ^j ... aa ^
: miK un net i inner. trlet Court for the Dletriet of the Ce- __, h mav SOUnd StUIIy, he
They gave him a blood trans- 11 z- "i entered and filad In tkla action in the i ana bad las If. very time 1 See
SSi U3 t" r S? DifiS a- couple 01 movle now-ofis u
of Balboa on October 14. 1441.
C T. McCarankk, Jr.
Clerk
%"* cSH f*- V*? mlnt hve been raised
in a barn, but why advertise
Phony romances and on-
again, off-again marriages also
rankle in the young actor.
"Back where I come from,'
said Martin (who comes from
Katemcy, Texj, "there is still
some dignity surrounding love.
Dignity and privacy. You don't
blue jeans elbowing their way
into an expensive restaurant or
night club I get a little nauseat-
wriLk and hearing application inn, picture. The public respond-
#01 ttrn.Rs or for assignment ed
. OF ESTATE TO THE WIDOW
I NOTICI ia hereby altea that a pe- pu.- v.. u.. _ _i
ititiea far the pro'.. f the .in of They have a home now, and
Ia r. Buiiock deceaa-d and for the -omething even better, which
ttaauaara of lettera of administration Rlina told the Mirror:
vith the win ann-xed i- th. Pnkiic "Now the doctors think Les-
Admimatrator of the Canal Zone Or i. -.iii -, -,i. -iue k.i.
Far Aa.lrnm.nt tf Estate To T'-.e Wi- Ue W"' W* "" ,i*nt 0ack-
Sew waa filed ia tkla Court an Novem-
Iker 14. Its:, and that December 4.
Ia*41 at o'clock a. aa. In the Court-
rpoaoi af
ihia Court at Anton. Canal
haea eat far toe kearins af
m-- palitien. wken and where any
Verion Inter.lad ma; appear and conukt
,'tke . and ehow cauM. If any. why
laald petition aheuld nnt he ran;ed.
Dated at An-on. Canal /one. thla
Warember IS, 1(41.
HSaal)
C. T MeCORMICK. Jr.
Clark of Court
kj By Laaa E. Harraaan
Deputy Clark mi Court
7
Special
BUSINESS MAN'S
IUHCH- .75
Pur Parmentier or
Fruit Cocktail
Hungarian Beef Goulash
Egg Noodles Saut
Vegetables Green Salad
Hot Rolis t Butter
Dessert
Coffee Tea Beer
"Join as for Cocktail,
from 4 to 6 p.m.
MANHATTANS
MARTIN18
DAIQUIRIS
25 c.
APPIT1ZRS "On Tht Hous*
DUAL PURPOSE Jane Rus-
sell transforms a simple black
silk sun-back dress by topping
it with a dress hip-length fig-
ure-molding, blouse of pastel
satin. By adding all-black ac-
cessories she completes the af-
ternoon ensemble. Miss Rus-
sell wears this dress in RKO
Radio's "The Las Vegas Story,"
in which she shares stellar
honors with Victor Mature.
Retreat Parade
Of Ft. Davis Units

Held Last Friday
FT. DAVIS. Nov. 19A retreat
. parade for the units stationed at
date a dozen glamour-pusses a j Fort Davis was held on the par-
week just to get your name in ade ground on Friday.
the paper, and you don't tele-
phone the reporters when you
quarrel.
"The worst part about those
jokers in Hollywood who do is
that afterward they always
sound off about living in a gold-
fish bowl."
Lt. Col. William J. Bennett, dep-
uty post commander was com-
mander of troops and reviewing
officer. His staff consisted of
Major John H. Wiggs. Major Sal-
vatore J. Verga and Major Albert
A. Picclrllli.
Units of the 7Mth AAA Gun
Battalion and the 370th Engineer
Shore Battalion participated in
the parade. The 784th was com-
manded by Major James W
Scarborough and the 370th by
. Major E. H- Mitchell.
Many wearers ot false teeth hae auf-
^.o^.taLTi^eMc,^ob5edh,.t Headquarters ft Service Com-
)u>t the wrong time Do not live in fear pony of the 370th Engineer was
?i..!hllh?BK2!r,* .' yoi i""1 p'"'1* designated aa the color battery
little rASTEETH. (he alkaline Inon-ncldi .j*h- n.v, Armv Band nrn
peweJer. on your platea Holds false teeth BJld the 60th Army Band pro-
vided music for the parade. The
FALSE TEETH
That Loossn
Need Not Embarrass
snore firmly! so .hey feel mere comfort-
able. Does not sour. Cheeks "piala odor"
(denture breath) Oat rASTEETH at ana
drug atoro.
band also gave a one-hour con-
cert for the residents of the post
prior to the retreat parade.
By GAY PAULEY
United Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK. Nov. 19 (UP)
You just think you pare food bills
to the bone.
A shopping expert, Sidney
Margolius. said he will take any
monthly food bill any woman
i runs up in these days of high
prices and cut it from 10 to 30
per cent.
"It would not run the family
short on tasty and nutritious
meals, either," Margolius said.
Margolius, member of the
board of directors of the Nation- '
al Association of Consumers, said
he realised he was sticking his
neck out by offering to pare the
housewife's food bill.
"I figure it this way." he said.
"A family of four today should
be able to eat three meals dally
every day for $28 per week. If
bills are running higher, there's
a way to cut them."
"Leak items," he said, were
one reason women found their
food bills climbing. They are
meat, prepared desserts and
baked goods. Margolius said
meat and other protein foods are
musts in the diet but meat
should account for only one-
fourth of the food bill.
You get more protein for your
money in milk and the milk
products such as cheese, he add-
Flsh is a cheap substitute for
meat and Margolius said this
year's catch is high and the sup-
ply of frozen fillets is plentiful.
He recommended this formu-
la for protein spending15
cents per person, per portion,
per day.
As for saving on desserts and
breads, Margolius said the home-
maker would just have to "make
up her mind, which does she
have more of. time or money."
"It takes more time to do all
your own cooking," he said, "but
you save money by doing It."
Margolius repeated the com-
ment of other food authorities,
that food prejudices should be
forgotten during Inflation.
"People get all emotional fa-
bout food," Margolius complain-
ed. "Feed a man fish instead of
"Certainly I'm still mad at him! That's why I come in her
every day and ignora him!"
__
steak and he thinks he's being aider the long haul given some
robbed." |fresh produce, the chances ar-i lt
Margolius said some women loses some of its food value. Mo-
scorn canned vegetables and dern canning methods, however,
fruits for fresh ones. [have improved canned and froz-
"Yet," he said,"when you con-Tien foods."
...
al
efr/erybody fsa 5 Classified
4SMwt the totaJ number of earn af polU er state doria* ISM. aiiatdhic U j
for Infantile Faxalysh. Ala shown U a cossspariaon by aUleo af the neussher I
s.w4a)4l4B, The Baital I*!!* rate arta* ISM waa tx.1 sssn ase lW.a-*J
ad with the) M par 104.M4 heeJth aathoriUee set as an "eptdessato" raa J
TO MMKI TOOTH DtCAY VrKTTVEY-.
No other tooth paste, ammonia ted
or regular, has been proved better
then VANAl
I PANA TOOTH PASTE


4 -
MONDAY. NOVEMBER 1, 1851
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE MEYER
Cranberry Teams With Banana IC/w7 Defense Begins To Roll
In US But Much S till Lacking
FRESH CRANBERRY and banana pie makes a temptinf
Thanksgiving dinner dessert.
BY GAYNOR MADtlOX
Nea Food and Markets Editor
WASHINGTON. NOV. 1 fUPl
Civil Defense Administrator
Mlllard P. Caldwell said yester-
day he ill ask Congress early
next year tor more funds for a
program that .Is "beginning to
roll, but not nearly fast enough."
"If I knew we had five years
to prepare tor atomic raids" on
our cities, I would be optimistic
about the progress which Civil
Defense has made in the past
few months," he said in an in-
terview.
"But we cannot treat Civil
Defense strictly as a long-
range program. The dancer is
both immediate and long"
range."
Caldwell predicted that Civil
Defense appropriations will fare
better ai the next session than
they did tola year when his
request for $535,000,000 was
slashed to $74,945,000,
He said there has been "a
Fresh cranberries and tresh lias. Brush edges of dough with
bananas join their flavors In a egg yolk or mflk Bake in mod-marked improvement' In public
wonderful pie for Thanksgiving erateiy hot oven '400 degrees F.) < interest in recent months which
dinner, it's a lighter dessert to about 30 minutes or until done. should be reflected in the at-,
follow the big feast Note: to use remaining dough, tltude of congress when the
roll out and cut into 3-inch cir-, lawmakers return in January. I
Cranberry-Banana Surprise i ces. Brush with egg yolk. Place | "Public apathy toward Civil
(Makes 6-8 servings) a small portion of cranberry Defense has been largely over-
sauce in center of each and bake come." he said .
One package hot roll mix. 1 cup about 15 minutes I 'The idea U stokir^ in that
water, 1 1-2 cups sugar, 3 cupsj Here's a treat or the break- not one or two, but possibly 20
fresh cranberries, 2 bananas, fast toast:
Prepare hot roll mix according, Crar-berry Peach Apricot Jam taneously We are off dead cen-
to package directions for sweet (Makes about 5 caps) Ur and are beginning to roll.
dough. While dough is raising. tatF^^yu?J g"
combine sugar and water In a Two cups finely ground eran-, people "
saucepan and boil gently for 5 berries, 1/2 cup finely ground: * C'J| "^?!^"*,,-
minutes. Add cranberries and dried apricots. 1/2 cup finely "3?!ta^ls^^h
continue to cook 5 minutes long- ground peaches. 3 cups sugar, 1/8 "*' """^V^V.^ ^
LINCOLN HEAD OF SAPPHIREThe world's largest polished
sapphire was carved into the likeness of Abraham Lincoln, and is
on display in New.York City, with proceeds going to the Damon
Runyon memorial iund for cancer research. Here, the head,
valued at $300,000, is compared with a rough stone of comparable
size. The jet-black sapphire weighs 1318 carats, and required
two years to carve.
'Atlantic Society...
(Continued Prom Pace FIVE)
'Miriam Mrquez, Lynnette Do-
1 meneen, Anna Claire Oberg, Rose
fVasqucz and Karen Davlson,
[ who won the prize for games.
Birthday Party for
Linda Sue Cunningham
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Cunning-
ham of Margarita, entertained
for their daughter, Linda Sue on
her eighth birthday anniversary.
The children who celebrated
with the honoree were: Princess
and Charlie Tobln. Mary Alice |
and Marguerite Engelke. Barba-
ra Erlckson, Dorothy Knox. Celia'
and Johnnv Cronan, Susie and,
Buzzie Rathgaber. Colin Rankln.l
Shirley and Donald Bonneau,
Christine. Chuckle "{id Rlckle
Bath. Ann Gilley. M /!yn Dela-
ney. Patty Lezonboe. Carl New-
hard and Linda's brothers, Eddie
and Tommy.
Mrs. Herbert Engelke. Mrs.
Robert Knox, Mrs. John Erlckson
assisted the hostess.
\S*
iMedV?u.^ta^:Xaft Marshalls Midwest
3jjL Support For Candidacy

Bon Voyage Party
for Mrs. Bigas
Mrs. Carlos Rivera Blgas of
Puerto Rico, who has been visit-
ing at Fort Gullck while her hus-
band has been attending the
USAR CARIB School, was honor-
ed with a bon voyage party giv-
en bv Mrs. Ramon Vale of Fort
Gullck.
A gift shower of mementoes of
, Panama were presented Mrs. Bl-
!gas by her friends.
Mrs. Jose Torres presided at,
the coffee table. The other'
guests were: Mrs. John Hipson.'
Mrs. Roy Wllkerson, Mrs. Joser
A. Nieves, Mrs. Victor Mrquez
Mrs. Archie Davison. Mrs. David I
McCracken, Mrs. Fernando1
Guiot. Mrs. Joseph Wallace, Mrs.
Francisco Mndez, Mrs. Manuel:
A. Domneech and Mrs. Miguel;
A. Ganda.
At a news conference Satur-
day, Lodge, sporting an "I like Sojoarners Meet Tonight
Ike" button, said he had talked Caribbean Chapter No. 21, Na-
, to the general several times .tlonal Sojourners. will hold its
yesterdav this year and that Elsenhower, monthly meeting at t
of cranberry sauce and banana 5 minute*. Pour Into Jelly glass-|cis.
slices, decorating top with baa- es.
_iBrounapeacnes. icupSuBr, i/o, "-7h'7""7ncid"a"d"the WASHINGTON. Nov. 10 (UP)
er. Set aside to cool. After dough teaspoon cloves. 1/4 teaspoon the recent mods and tne _Repubcan prMlaentlal can.
has risen, roll one-third of it out,nutmeg. To demnstrate that real dldate Robert A. Taft and Ben.
to a ten-inch circle 1/16-inch .... HXlnV mate despite Eevefett M. Dirksen (R-ni.)
thick. Place In greased 8-lnch Combine cranberries and dried ;PJP aifund cuts oTld- fed an alliance yesterdav-
round cake pan. fruit In saucepan Bring to a boil. | congressional fund cuts. tid ftlmed ^ ^^told him "more than enough to'Davis Officers Club this evening.
Fill shell with alternate layers stlrrlng^^jonstanUy. Add "P"^*,*1/.- TTaft at the COP national con- convince me that he would ac- starting at 8:30 p.m. with din-.
All 4R states and terrltor,ventlon next July. cept" the GOP nomination. nerat7:30 p.m. I
andill mar cltieVfhav The development was an- Other political developments: The guest speaker will ^tell of,
sef uncivil Srfe^ ^ninSI-.nwnwd by David 8. Incalls. Guy George Garrlelson. Re- the organization of the National
national chairman of the Taft- publican National Chairman. Sojourners with the History of.
committee, who continued an Invasion of the, Caribbean Chapter No. 21.
and wnrklriir0ou7,fetaileri' n'ans W Dirksen will be in charge Democratic. South In hope of. _, -- ..
rSmeetmStr^"A%^tato?.o' Ta's "pre-conventlon af- winning support for the GOP. Captain and Mrs. Heath
1% romes *"""'" fairs" in Illinois. Mindful of anti-Truman senti- Leaving Soon
ai More than 1 000 ooo vol- Ingalls predicted that the ap- ment In some Dixie areas, he Captain Denver Heath. com-
-' !- r>- ,.i,. the manding officer of.the 20th MP:
Company at Fort Gullck. '
greatly" enhance his chances for lor the Republican Party." ceived his orders for duty
victory" on the first ballot. Warren raised prospecta of a Dlx. New Jersey. |
The announcement raised break with the Conservative During their 60 day vacation |
Grisly Double Murdejr
Enlivens Ghost Town
PANAMA, 111., Nov. 19 (UP), Neighbors found the bodies
Ah elderly dairy operator In when they failed to arouse the
this coalmining ghost town was Cerkveniks yesterday and. no-
shot and burned to death and ticed -that the bedroom Iwln-
hls wife apparently was burn- dows of the cottage wero
ed alive In a double murder, smoke-blackened,
authorities reported today. Authorities said one battling
Since a woman on relief feature of the case was that
died here last week leaving the bodies and the bed "were
nearly $50.000 buried in cans badly burned, but that sur-
aher home, authorities fear- rounding objects were barely
a killer was roaming the scorched and the house itself
faded community hunting did not burn,
wealth hoarded from Its boom- But the cottage had been
town days by other aged resi- ransacked and Funk said rob-
dents. bery may have been the mo-
State's Attorney Otto E. Punk tlve.
announced that two suspects
are being held for questioning Cerkvenlk and his wife oper-
in the county Jail at nearby ated a small diary here for 20
Hillsboro. They were unldentl- years, making their own dellv-
fied. erles. They had lived alone
The burned bodies of John since the last of their five
Cerkvenlk, 70. and his wife Jo- children married and moved
hanna, 59 were found a smoul- away.
dering bed In their cottage Panama once was a coal
yesterday. camp town until deposits pe-
. They were believed victims tered out. and was a roaring,
of a fire until an undertaker bootlegging center in prohffji-
later discovered that Cerkvenlk tlon days,
had been shot. Now it has a population of
Funk said that the wife "ap- some 300. many of them aged
parently had been burned a- persons on relief,
live."
Only the head and shoulders Some residents are believed
of her burned body were in- to have hoarded wealth since
tact, but a post mortem show- the town's only bank went
ed no cranial fraoture or other broke in 1932 and after one old
possible cause of death. woman on relief died last week
In addition, police found onlv authorities later found she had
one bullet, a steel-Jacketed .32 hoarded nearly $50.000 to cans,
ca/iber slug, in the cottage. Police speculated that the
oresumably the one that passed Cerkveniks may have hoarded
through Cerkvenrk's body. The their earnings from the dairy,
gun was missing. They said the ransacking ap-
Bvldence showed that Cerk- peared aimed at finding con-
venik was shot from bf'-iind. cealed wealth, since other ob-
tnen dragged to the bed and jects of value about the house
burned with his wife. were left untouched.
tlons which are conductons air
raid drills. Surveying faclUties. "r-President
VteerThave loinedTun 'for 5 pota&wnt win give Taft "a de- said: "We now consider the manding offteer MM u*
Defewe service as air raid cisive grip on the Midwest and South a great hunting ground Company at Fort Gullck. has re-
. ueiense service as air ram _..." ",,,,_ Kt. . fr for the Rermhiimn Pnrtv reivert Ms orders for duty at Ft.
wardens, fire and police auxilia-
ries, or other duties. Some 15
to 17 million voluntters will be
neededmwh7n cTtoftlv oreara peculation" "that" Dirksen" may (Tait> wing of his party to. a Captain and Mrs Heth wul vis-
have the Inside track for first,speech at San Diego. Calif., in It relatives in Wilmington. N.C.,
lzed.
3) A nationwide attack
warning system is set up and
functioning so well that. Civil
Defense headquarter* Sere
could flash the word to any
potential target area within
30 second after enemy bomb-
choice as Taft's vice presiden-1 which he came out for many of and Columbia. S.C.
tial running mate should the'the planks In President Tru-
Ohloan win the GOP Presiden- man's so-called Fair Deal pro- Colonel and Mrs. Pumpelly
, tlal nomination. gram. Bid Cadets Farewell ,
There was no mint of that in, Taft ended a speaking tour colonel and Mrs. James pum-
Ingalls' statement, however. at Cleveland where he charged pelry crossed the Isthmus early
Illinois will have 60 conven- the president's policies smack- Saturday .to bid farewell to the
tlon votes. Heartened by the 1950 ed of dictatorship* ;Nlcaraguan Cadets *h? """''
.ejection results, in which Dirk- He said there is a "strong.their diplomas from the UbAK
. sen defeated Senate Democratic anti-Truman feeling in the CARIB School the preceding day.'
nrotecflhn U V Te^rf m,,r-h leader Scott W. Lucas by 300.000 South." --------
hrt than "sJtSJSErflvotes. Taft forces hope he can' He refused to discuss the Visitor Honored
With the an out ^oonerXn of deliver when the time comes, j Elsenhower threat but said he with Morning Coffee
With the.an-out cooperationof Dlrksen h worked c,oseiy: (Taft. Is "ready for a rugged Mrs. Manning E.
ers were spottend bv the Air
Force rdaar-interceptor aereen.
4) Public education for self-
IPanama Canal Clubhouses**.-
JH>? Showing Tonight! ^-^|
**^^__^______
BALBOA Ether WILLIAMS Red SKELTON
Ar.-omdiiiund "Texas Carniva'' 'Technicolor
Tuesday LIGHTNING STRIKE TWICE"
6:15 A 8:1S
DIABLO HTS.
f:ll A 7:5.1
Robert MITCHUM Av GARDNER
"MY FORBIDDEN PAST"
Tuesday WILD BILL HICKQK IDES'
COCOLI
*:IS ft v:is
----------------8_________
"SUNSET IN THE^WEST*
nil TBAfTir IN CRIME"
________Tuesday "Ele (.r.ndf
GATUN
1M
_i
(Tuesdaj)
HOLLYWOOD CANTECN"
MARGARITA
:U T:S
Mi ZETTERINfi Hugh WILLIAMS
"NAUGTHY ARLETTE"
TnewUy "TEKKSA" ________
CRISTOBAL
Atr-Condltlonea
:IS A 8:15
Jame* MASON Jeulca TANDY
"THE DESERT FOX"
TueMtay "SOUTHStDC I-leaf
Hutchlnaon,
th nr>6 ruriin 'talnltinn mH uimaen nas wuraea ciuseiy >" ""j w uBBcu ears, mouuuis o. """'""jJ
rno^vl? JhduMriM to^flf i? 'lth Hit since succeeding L- campHiin for convention de- f0rmer resident of Fort Davis,
movie industries, tens of mil- I legates." nent. Fridav as the guest of
SB" wL^he^an^t^-i^6 tw0 reeentl,_addressed aJ !* A move
spent Friday as the guest
crease their ehaneeTor survlv bi* OOP rally In Chicago, site headed by nSaiem auto dealer Mrs. Hill, invited a group oi
faTati .tnmio *? of the nominating Convention. William L. PhilUps to swing friends for morning coffee and'
5i A start on trv-kniiini Should the Illinois delegation that State's OOP convention a visit with their former neigh-
mtafi1'" Ta. and wlth Pro-Taft delegation to Elsenhower.
medicar suDDlles can be made
sentiment running high In!
bor.
wit! noon whtrh rnnVrM* i senumem running nign in; -------- The guests were: Mrs. James
taSJSdWS&JmoS^S W Indlttna- Iowa an<> North Star Adds ov'% Namt:Jess-Mrs- Josepn Caianiavrs-
most recem aonronlK Dakota, the Taft-Dlrksen pha- . /-ua uo% ln,e Robert Carroll. Mrs. B. K Ogan
-'lanx could deal a strong blow T. I|M..- Ii..- Mrs Walter Skelstaltls. Mrs.'
to hones of Oen. Dwight D.l IO UreMingrOOIIl UOOr Leo Hock, Mrs. Henry Hartwlg.
Elsenhower's Presidential sup-, HOLLYWOOD Nov 19 Steve Mrs. George Poole. Jr., Mrs.
porters in those states. cochran's pet pooch Tschaikow- Truman Bennett. Mrs. james
sky. has been given a unique Storle. Mrs. Harry
On the debit side of the Civil
Defense Ledger, the most serious
gaps in the program are Usted
by Caldwell and his aides as:
1) Air raid shelters. Con-
gress did not grant one penny
S2tiifh0f of the I250.ooo.t0* which Cald- i!fpXa,V,0".f L ^i1 W^k" "as had the sign on his dress- Kuhn and Mrs. F. R. Schultz.
CLEAN BREAST-Roommates Jerry Cahill. top. and Frank Gaff-
ney whistle as Junte Kellog-g returns to Manhattan College with a
checkered vest and striped cashmere jacket. Kellogg is the six-foot,
eight-inch center who exposed the original basketball scandal. The
Portsmouth, Vs., beanpole was discharged from the Army because
he was too tall. (NEA)
'

well aske*y for this parpse.
Since mot state* and cities
are waiting for matching fed-
eral aid funds, almost nothing
is being done to build special
new shelters designed to pro-
tect inhabitants from atomic
bursts.
21 Local air raid warning
i systems. Getting word of an im-
pending attack to the threaten-
ed city over the civil defense
network Is assured; but at pre-
sent few cities have enough _
sirens at the right places to re- headquarters
lay the warning to their citizens, here shortly
of California, the only other,lngroora door at Warner Bros .;
mSS? K?Pf^8,,,enVa.1-c!!n; where he U currently starring in
dldate who formally launched ..The Uon And fhe HorV"
|hVjK,!? i*8' ^, 'changed to read "Steve Cochran '
Eisenhower has not announc- anrt T^hatirnwak-v
led but has not blocked a cam-!a%ffS?5^.
palgn on his behalf.
Steve said he owed it to Tsch-
ialkowsky who recently received
The Elsenhower bandwagon ihls flrs fan letter after appear-
bagan to roll countrywide last '"It wlth 1? star 'n "inside The
week when 8en. Henry Cabot WaUa oi Folsom Prison ."
Lodge (R-Mass.) took on the
job as director of the Elsen-
hower-for-Presldent campaign
and announced that national
will be opened
fcW-' ,<*
Here's a timely "tip," Fido
Smart merchants are sending their
CHRISTMAS SALES MESSAGES
via,RADIO STATION HOG!
Britain Installs Worlds
1st Atomic Heating System
Garbage Collector
Hurt When Struck
By Car In Diablo
A 32-year-old Panamanian was
Injured slightly Friday afternoon
when he was struck by a car on
Parsons Street, in Diablo.
Pedro Antonio Villar, a Oround
Maintenance Division employe.
ttv-h.t ,..-. nad emptied a garbage can into
LONDON. Nov. 19 (LPS) water heat exchanger This;*" *' of a garbge-collecting
Britain now has the first atom-: supplies hot water for space truck which stopped about two
ic central heating plant in the heating and domestic hot wa-teet from the side of the street.
i at the Ministry of.tar supplies. There is no dan,plcW"P UP to empty can he
street, but
corner
S,,t,Z\, t-f c TT ol'fr supplies. There is no dan: "c*,ng up tne empty c
ti l.,^11 EstaD- ger from radio activity and the s^rted\ fo,cro" the tre
lunment, Harwell, where from water can safely be used for > topped into the left front
today this building containing1 washing
eighty offices will be heated
direct from the department's
I large experimental ato/n pile.
Tests were started with the
new Installation last week and!
have been completely success-;
i ful. Eventually two and perhaps
, three more buildings will also
I have atomic radiators and the
Ministry's coal consumption
will be cut by at least 1,000
tons a year.
sS/oybody featfe Classify
After counting all Incidental'
expenses the saving In cash Is
estimated at 2,830 pounds a
year. The coat of installation
amounts to 16.000 pounds.
Constant hot water which,
will flow through the pipes Is,
obtained by placing heat ex-1
changer In an outlet of the air'
duct of the pile's air cooling
system. Hero there la a bypass
fitted with a damager which
can be adjusted to vary the'
proportion of air flow passing
through the heat exchanger.
Hot water from the ex-
changer Is then circulated nv
a closed circuit by a small
pump to a secondary water-to-
QOLMjJ
VAceitti
Storting THURSDAY!
Filmed entirely In the bad-
lands and black hills of
South Dakota!
Ell-ME
no* ma. i* na < nu < JUu MM.
of a car that was being driven by
an American, Earl L. Baltozer.
As the car grated him, he let
go of the garbage can which fell
on the hood of the car, and broke
the windshield.
Villar was treated at the An-
cn dispensary for superficial
abrasions of both legs, and re-
leased.
Investigation by the police
shows the accident was due to
"careless pedeetrlan." and no
further police ctlon was antlcl-,
pa ted.
It's not He ke rhotmokes yoo
lipit's waot yeo mot with it
THURSDAY AT THE
CENTRAL
The hottest
combination
that ever hit
the screen!'
:IIA O PAKSONS
_ LUX THE AT RE
M Shawi: Ml, 1:5*. S:SS, T:St, t:*5
m
*..
ROBERT MITCHUM
JANE RUSSELL
HIS KIND
OF WOMAN!
* i
fti&w/Cove Sews
ox*
TECHNICOLOR
CENTRAL
Claire Trevor Sally
Forrest, in
'HARD, FAST AND
BEAUTIFUL"
A.-,l\ F'>K YOUR LOTTERY
TICKET \T THI ENTRA.NCE!
^^^i
BELLA VISTA
l.-OS. riS, 4:H. SM. T.IS. S:OS-
Rulh
{ WAROJCK.
in the OcUc^ous. suspicious story
of a letter to...
'THREE HUSBANDS"
^>:
U
- CECILIA THEATRE
SUPER DOUBLE RELEASE!
Rod Camarn Wayne Morris, kt
"STAGE TO TUCSON
(In Technicolor)
Johnny Welsrmuller. In
FYGMY ISLAND",
TROPIC A L
LULLABY OF BROADWAY
with Doris DAY and Gene NELSON
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air CondUtoSM*
Grv Cooper Ruth
Roman. In
"DALLAS"
Also: .
Steve Cochrane Virginia
May. In
HIGHWAY Ml"
TIVOLI THEATRE
SPANISH PROGRAM!
Arturo de Cordova Latida
alma In
"EM LA PALMA e TSJ MANO"
Also: Pedro Infante. In
LAS. riLAS MARIAS '
CAPITOLIO THEATKE
* run. LENGTH hit:
Thomas Gomes. In
"THE HARLEM
GLOBETROTTERS-' .
Alao Fdmond O'Brian. In
"BETWEEN MIDNIGHT
_______AND DAWN"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Johnnv Sheffield rn
"LOST CITY"
Also -
The Mastery of Wolf
"THE GHOST WOLF-


<
m*
fMit KIGHT

THE PANAMA AMFRICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY. NOVEMBER 1, 1J51
' '---------------------------------------- .1, ' ''' '----------------------------"-------\
Puerto Rico Wins Amateur Baseball World Series



yi- by
ym- JOE WILLIAMS
Quick kicks: Yale's decisin to abandon spring foot Sail
practice (the other Ivies are all expected to follow) has this
to recommend it right off: It has the substance of action as
distinguished from the vapory gases of idealistic double talk.
We've had a minimum of the former, a maximum of the latter,
to, simply as a change of pace the decision commands atten-
tion and respect.
Counterpoint
Acclaimed As
Horse-Of-Year
MIAMI. Nov. 19 (UP)An un-
i known when shipped here last
I winter. C. V. Whitney's Counter-
College football has been getting out of hand for some \fHoe%lFto? Ylf*to7thl
Venezuela 2nd, Cuba 3rd,
Dominican Republic 4th
AMATEUR BABSEBALL WORLD SERIES
(Championship Playoffs)
Teams Won Lost Pet.
Puerto Rico 3 0 1.000
Venezuela 2 1 .667
Cuba 1 2 .333
Dominican Republic 0 3 .000

tMt
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 19.(UP)The young
Puerto Rican team which said confidently at the
time now. Some 3D colleges have dropped it altogether. George- "nua oil conducted bv Trian-
Wn.WversHy surrendered with SI.000000 deficit. Apart ftom SfSffl^SSTBaS
the moral issuesthe cominerciahzinK of students who suppos- i f,nilv Rnrinp Form
edly play for funthe financial factor throws a lengthening i """ "-"'B rul
khadow. Imagine a school losing $1,000.000 in football! Walter M. Jeffords' Kiss Me .
f -Most coaches protest against eliminating spring football. Kate, still another Hialeah devel- beginning Of the Amateur Baseball World aeries,
kt s cm-, to me they'd welcome the move. The more the sport opment. was named the best "W ,v;ii m*. it will r>s b reduced to reasonable levels the fewer the strains and ten- three-year-old filly. We. W.IH . "' "i*? .l"e cnamPlon8n,P
ion tli<- will sufier. If football is so complicated spring prac- At Hialeah. Counterpoint was trophy tonight tor doing JUSt tbat.
tke i* imperative then unromplicale it. There was a time when known as "the fastest three-l *
sve-had excellent football without spring practice. Suppose foot- year-old maiden In America" (a1 Francisco Diaz, a non-playing
ball becomes even more complicated, (which is the trend) I maiden, of course, being a horse member of the team, stayed be-
wouldn't we have college football in various phases the year that has never won a race)
round?.
41 Blimlnatlng spring football won't restore sanity overnight.
If won't get to the root of the trouble but it may help and
is; therefore, to be commended. We've had enough empty chat-
ter about this great sport which is played by pure amateurs
In the smaller school anti by semipiolessionals. in the larger
universities (most of thenn. What we want now is realistic
eUon. This may be the first step in the right direction. If It
MtVt; try another. Anything's belter than what we've been get-
tingsanity codes, conference resolutions and pious academic
preachments, the integrity content in none being scarcely vis-
ible to the naked eve.
. m
This has not been a winning season for the Vales. One of
At least, that was what
Trainer Sylvester Veiteh claim-
ed. Actually, as a juvenile, the
colt had been able to finish in
the money once in four starts,
and that was an unimpressive
second.
hind to receive the trophy in ber
half of the club in ceremonies at
Delta Park this evening.
The remainder of the team left
by air at 12:30 a.m. Central Stan-
dard Time today and was sched-
uled to arrive in San Juan at 6:45
a.m. local time where a large and
jubilant delegation is expected to
The chestnut son of Count be on hand to give the champions
Fleet, winner of the Belmont,ia rousing welcome.
Jockey Club Gold Cup and Em- The Puerto Rlcans won the Se-
pire Gold Cup among others,, ries championship last night with
amassed $250,525 in 15 starts this, a dramatic 7r6 victory over a Cu-
year. ban nine that fought right down
-v to the last out of the last game of
Counterpoint will be raced this the championship playoffs.
my colleagues reads an uncomplimentary inference into this. winter at Santa Anita If he re-j The Cubans, favored to win the
The truth is the decision to jettison spring football was made covers from a recent injury, and championship In the pre-tourney
last Sept. 15. This preceded by some weeks the defeats, by Kiss Me Kate has been turned; ratings, had the bases loaded
Brown, Columbia, Cornell and Dartmouth. The Vales just don't
do things that way. They may not always do things right but
they seem to give it a good honest try. With their riches, tra-
Cuba, Venezuela, the Dominican
.lepublic and Nicaragua.
Whatever it was, the young-
Kulikowski, John Mac Advance
In fFort Davis invitational9
Mike Kulikowiki was forced to
go three extra boles before sub-
duing Jim Riley on the 21st yes-
terday in the most exciting
match of the first round in the
Fort Davis (Smoot-Hunnicutt)
Invitational Golf Tournament.
Mike and Jim wound up all tied
with 75's- at the end of 18. Kull-
kowskl finally won oat one-up.
Johnny MacMurray, however,
Lturned In the best golf of the day
when he toured the tough Davis
layout in a brilliant three-under
Jar 49 to whip V. A. Jankus, 5 and
, Jankus' 73 was the next best
score of the day.
In other championship flight
matches, George Riley turned
back Elmer Powell, 7 and , with
a 78, while Pres Trim, 6r. beat
out Roy Hayden, one-up.
The complete results:
CHAMPIONSHIP FLGHT
George Riley defeated Elmer
Powell, 7 and 6.
Johnny MacMurray defeated V.
A. Jankus. 5 and 4. .
Pres Trim, 8r. defeated Roy
Hayden, 1-up.
Mike Kullkowskl defeated Jim
Riley, 1-up (21).
see action at Hialeah. The best the way the Puerto Rlcans went) mond swept by chill winds, the
dltion and alumni, does anyone think the Tales, if so minded, two-year-old filly, Maine Chance: through the whole tournament.
sters pulled out of the slump to
take third place and clinch a
playoff berth in their final game
of the round robin tourney. Even
then they were still rated under-
dogs to the mighty Cubans and
Venezuelans who had finished
the tourney tied for first with
nine wins and one loss.
The Puerto Rlcans had a sev-
en and three record. They had
beaten the Cubans once but lost
to Venezuela. But the angry Bor-, _,
leuas, stung by the taunts of the! Finnegan, T and 5.
Venezuelans, and aroused by the Harry Gardner defeated Jimmy
islanders said there were "dirty Piala, 1-up- ..._,.,
baseball" tactics on the part of George Engelke defeated Sgt.
their rivals, crushed the favored Henna, 1-up. ______
Venezuelans 17-1 in the first, ""FUOHT
A. A. Zalkie defeated Jim Hov-
dia- erson, 5 and 4.
CONSOLATION
' A. Gagnon won from Jim Hln-
kle by default.
J. Schiebler defeated Howard
touM't field a team that would rank No. 1, or thereabouts,
year in and year out? They have a quaint notion at New
Haven football is meant to be fun for the students and the
alumni. If all schools had the same notion we'd have no foot-
ball problem and my friends, the coaches, who seem most dis-
turbed bV this action, would have no headaches.

"As these lines are written there is small hope George
Trevor will live through the day. George was properly known
as the historian of the Ivy League He wrote with a knowing
mind and an eloquent pen. In his day on The Sun he com-
Sanded a large and loyal following. He spoke the language of
e towering elms and the cloistered halls. Indeed, these seem-
eWtoform the background of his adult world. A decent, gen-
tfe'TiriHIant man who gave so much and asked so little. It was
k lvflege* to know him, an honor to call him friend.
Farm's Rose Jet, will arrive next
week end, and Greentree's Tom
Fool, the best two-year-old colt,
Is a likely nominee for the $50,000
Flamingo here.
\The winners' In the various
categories were:
Horse of the YearCounter-
point.
Two-vear-oldTom Fool.
Two-year-old fillyRose Jet.
Second place In the finals went
to Venezuela, third to Cuba and
fourth to the Dominican Repub-
lic. "Cuba gave us the toughest
fight In the Series," Manager Pe-
pe Seda said as he grinned hap-
pily after the game.
But it was no tougher than
the dramatic comeback the
Puerto Ricans had to make
even to qualify for the cham-
out. Two other divisional cham-, when the last man grounded out.! game of the playoffs,
plons, however, are expected to The narrow victory was typical of I Saturday night, on .
J. Colombi defeated R. r. Alex-
ander, 1-up.
Percy Graham defeated Oil
Morland, 1-up (19).
Anbal Oalindo defeated W. M.
Belvly, 5 and 4.
CONSOLATION
Don Henderson won from
Frank Day by default
Harvey Beall and J. Cllsbee
both, defaulted.
Sam Puller won from R. Super
by default.
Charley Wood shellacked L. L.
Koepke. a-up.
SECOND FLIGHT
Don Mathleson defeated F. Liv-
taking an early lead. Then thejr'the final putout. lngston, 1-up.
hit a mid-schedule slump, losing! Another was pitcher Eugenio. Paul Richmond
three games. Seda said his young] Encarnacin who took over in the MacVlttle, 4 and 3.
squadmost of them less than i seventh with the score tied aV J- K. de Braalt ^ defeated Ted
20 years of age and none over 25 five-all and showed control that Appelquist, 3 and 1.
had the jitters from uncertain pulled the club to victory. J. Hlpson defeated R. Crum. 7
scheduling. Earlier In the day the Vene- and 8.
Many fans said It proved that zuelans had downed the Domi- CONSOLATION
the Puerto Ricans just didn't nlean Republic 13-8 for a win
have the staging power to stand [ that gave Venezuela the runner-
up against such powerhouses as up spot in the standings.
Three-year-oldCounterpoint, pionship playoffs.
Three-year-old fillyKiss Me When the round robin tourna-
Meyer Spread Creates Holes,
Gives Better Blocking Angles
By HARRY GRAY80N
NEA Sports Editor
.
NEW YORK, Nov. 19 (NEA)
The spread is not new In foot-
ball, of course.
Bayloi. for example, used one
terrific, and if you can run just a
little, it makes a fine attack.
"The Spread is a great passing
formation, but can be stopped If
In the 10366. where the Meyer that's the only threat."
Spread* ia now snowballing. Baylor, this fall, for instance,
Leo jBOMrt Meyer's version is! made the mistake of suspecting
a fresh slant, or that TCU's air arm was by far its
series of them, strongest weapon,
[however, and
[Texas Chris-
Itian's veteran
oach has been; Meyer stuck with his double
(working with It wings and spreads right along,
off and on fori The guy who developed 6am-
Imore than five my Baugh, Davey OBrien and
Xate.
Handicap HorseHill Prince.
Handicap MareBed O'Roscs.
SprinterSheilas Reward.
SteeplechaserOedipus.
Omphroy Tennis
Tourney Play
ment started the confident Puer-
shivering Puerto Ricans shut-
out last year's champion Dom-
inican Republic team, 3-9.
Only the Cubans stood between
them and the championship. It
was a narrow victory last night,
symbolic of the way the Puerto
Ricans played the whole tourney,
winning when things looked
blackest.
The entire Puerto Rican squad
played alert ball last night. One
was shortstop Bill Flgueroa who
drove in the winning run and
made a terrific stop in the ninth
to Rlcans surprised everyone by! with the bases loaded to make
ly '
Five Very Interesting Matches
PlayedEnthusiasm, Excitement
Rife Among Spectators
Dr. Manfredo Engel defeated
Dr. Rubn Puertas in the first
match of the Omphroy Tennis
Tourney yesterday morning at
the Olympic Tennis Court, 6-1,
6-1.
The second match, between
Benito Charrls of Banco de Co-
Joe Kenway and H. A. Bailey
both defaulted.
B. Boxwell defeated Col. Pum-
peHys r-wp. '
Higgenbotham won from Rog-
er Orvis by default.
F. Huldqulst defeated R. Rob-
inson, 1-up.
.......THIRD FLIGHT.......
Bill LeBrun defeated Vestal
Morris, 1-up (19).
B. Jorstad defeated R. Pugh, 3
and 2.
The Student Athletic Council >!-ur. Bob Peacher, Jim May, W. O'Shea defeated Pete Dun-
of Balboa High School announc- Dick Ostrea, Charlie Smith, Sam: can, 3 and 2.
ed Friday the list of 22 boys who us. bou Morris. Managers Fritz Humphreys defeated J.
will receive the varsity letter for > Bill Yerkes, Ray Tucker. Hammond, 1-up.
football for the 1951 season. This
group is headed by four boys who
will be getting their third-year
22 B.H.S. Boys To Receive
'51 Football Varsity Letter
CONSOLATION
D. Clark won from Jesse Byrd
by default.
R. Brown defeated J. W. Mll-
lan. 6 and 3.
Ken Forrest won from Cliff
Maduro by default.
Silvester Bubb won from Tom
Drohan by default.
FOURTH FLIGHT
B. Carter defeated D. Mann, 5
and 4.
Inamoratl defeated B. Balcer,
1-up.
George Carnrlght defeated K.
Prehn, 1-up.
C Thompson defeated P. Trea-
nor, 7 and 6.
CONSOLATION
W. T. Johnson won from*J.
Flemmlng by default.
J. O. DesLondes and M. Ken-
worthy, no result posted.
Bob Hurdle defeated M. Med-
ellln, 4 and 3.
M. Chad wick defeated J. Cropp,
1-up.
FIFTH FLIGHT
E. G. Huldqulst defeated J. Gil-
Iillan, 4 and 8.
W. Sands defeated M. Zombo-
ry, 4 and 3.
S. Hlnkle defeated V. Reed, 3
and 2.
H. Hock defeated R. Tandy, 1-
up (21).
CONSOLATION
F. Makowskl won from W.
Beaver by default. /
H. Hardy and D. Klmsey, no re-
sult posted.
John Wlggs defeated A. Pach-
eco, 1-up.
A. Lpez defeated J. Storle, 6
and 5.
SIXTH FLIGHT
J. Davis defeated R. Gaylord, 3
and 2.
J. Loucks defeated R. L. John-
son. 5 and 4.
R. Stevens defeated E. C.
Stroop, 3 and 1.
Pf Whitney defeated J..J. Mc-
Carthy, 1-up.
CONSOLATION
E. H. Mitchell won from Banan
by default.
Albro defeated A. Lincoln, 1-
up.
E. Brooks and Dr. Clark, no re-
sult posted.
B. Roll defeated G .Ellis, 1-up.
SEVENTH FLIGHT <
E. Tanner defeated C. Maher; 6
and 4. '. '"* " '
J. Katallnas defeated L. Park-
er, 3 and 2.
Harry Dockery defeated Bucky
Hall, 8 and 7. ,
J. Boykln defeated Dr. McKay,
4 and 3. I
CONSOLATION
H, Labacs defeated E. Break-
field, 1-up.
M. Smith defeated John Hedg-
es, 9 and 8.
\R. Armstrong defeated J. Bow-
man, 6 and 5.
Newman defeated L. Kestley, 3
and 1. ____
EIGHTH FLIGHT
E. Scarborough defeated J. X
Smith. 2-up.
M. O. Oreene defeated D. Tho-
mas, 1-up.
J. Ryan defeated R. Swearlnf-
en, 3 and 2.
M. Towne defeated Jim Des-
Londes, 3 and 3.
CONSOLATION
W. Horlck defeated J. Hend-
rlcks, 6 and 4.
P. Moser won from M. Murrett
by default.
Ianarelli defeated R. Tudjan,
1-up.
J. Hemann won from R. Chou-
ret by default.
NINTH FLIGHT
McCue defeated C. Lucas, 2-up.
L. Rutland defeated Mundkow-
skl, 3 and 1.
J. Danly won from Pratt by de-
fault.
J. Pescod defeated Parrusa, I
and 6.
CONSOLATION
R. Conover defeated C. Lucas,
1-up.
Parrusa and Mundkowskl, no
result posted.
F. Kraft advanced on a bye.
Lucas and Pratt, no result
posted.
Muluel Dividends
Juan Franco
FIRST RACE
1Mr. Espinosa $6.20, $2.80, $2.20.
2Mueco $2.40, $2.20.
3Pesadilla $3.40.
SECOND RACE
1Eclipse $4, $2.40.
2Resorte $3.40.
First Doubles: (Mr. Espinosa-
EcUpse) $9.80.
THIRD RACE
1Diana $6.60, $2.20.
2Volador $20.
One-Two: (Diana-Volador ()),
$9.N.
FOURTH BACK
1Rlna Rol $2.20, $2.20.
2Annie N. $2.20.
3ululate: (Rlna Sol-Annie N.)
I.
FIFTH RACE
1Chacabuco $16.40, $3M.
2Royal Coup (e) $2.20.
SIXTH RACE
1Popsl Cola $8, $3.30, $3.60. <
2Tropicana $3, $2.40. .'
3Rechupete $4Jflt!"r -. i n<
I: SEVENTH RACE
1-Rlding Bast $5, $4.60, $2.80,
2Notable $6.60,63.40.
3Fair Chance $2JO. -J.
Second Doubles: (Pepsi Cola-
Riding East) $11.64.
EIGHTH ACE
1Scotch Chum $11, $6.40, $366.
2Walnla $3.60, $3.20.
3Apprise $3.40.
Suiniela: (Scotch Chum-Wsl-
$17.36.
NINTH RACE
1Hit $J0, $6.20. $2.80.....
2Goyito $4, $2.60.
3Hurlecano $3.
One-Two: (Hit'Goyito (e)>
$35.
TENTH RACE
1Juan Huincho.MAO, $2.60.
2Pregonero $2.80.
tn vs Mjrron Fisher of General will be getting, their tnira-year
PaU wE won by Fisher, 6-4.!^, tWe Wsmer, ancI one
6-2.
back. Sam Maphts, All-League
FOUR VARIATIONS
The third match between Cat-'fuU&ack. 1 the lone back, while
tleman GeorwMotta and youngitwo other All selections, Clalr
C?rU Oldftelf froniVe Atlantic Oodby. tackle, and1 Dick Dillman,
sSeTprovided an upset. Motta, a guard, are also in the select four,
seeded player, was expected to! frank Bryan, veteran guard, Is
easily eliminate his opponent, the;fourth boyot this group.
"Angel Delvalle beat Carlton agers. Exactly half of the
man-
play-
years. now Danny McKbwn, can't getl,,,,,,, B-t rni/.n A.e .* g.g in a ers are seniors, Including the four
- - three-year boys. There will be
lettermen left in every position
for next year except the tackle
spot, and here all four of the
boys are seniors. It is almost as
bad at the guard positions, too,
Southern Cal-!aw"v 1^^ RWa?an tate-lthTlhing nlp^aVd-tuck^biUtle
in another exciting
IHrteh Meyer
Meyer Spread a^at when IJ* Wort^Ube-,
SdaSle offe^e ,J ^t^L^i^ exciting, and jentertaining
he had ever
seen.
thing different.
Igr
fei
really some-
throw from anywhejjai at any| q,lnnv morning of tenn is as Joe Oliver, junior, will be the
tl;.. ... L. brought oufschedule up" date, only returning letterman to bol-
But Meyer has been around too
long not to know tbat passing
won't work consistently unless It
Naturally, the main Idea is to', is compl mented by a savage
spread the defense wide and toi ground attack.
ke more potential holes /There arelour yartatlons of
^And to give our men better the Meyer_8pwad, in whlcks_the
blocking angles," says Dutch end
Tijrjrr "If run correctly, almost '*
brought our schedule up
The following matches will be
played:
Monday 19. 4:30 p.m. R. B. H.
Stroop vs. Victor Pascual.
Tuesday, 20, 4:30 p.m.La-
ster the midd
ig let
leof
the line.
The flank posts and the back-
field will be best taken care of by,
the returning boys. Although Bill
Underwood, end, and Sam Ma-
ihls, fullback, are both All-
"And to give our men better the Meyer Spread, in wnicU tne Mnttl vs rroeslin Guardia P1*- fullback, are both AI1-
ockmg angles"" say? Dutch ends are 15 yards from the tek-|M^d^8d^ta.3^UpT-How- League, and will be mighty tough
ard Spauldlng vs. Martin Perel- to replace, there will be four ends
fa- 4 30-Webb Hearne vs. My- "turning and a complete back-
*' 52.__" field with one fullback left over.!
every one of our blockers has the
single on bis man. either in or,
out, qp^each play.
notner tremendous factor is
e" Spread permits us to get
servers down field quickly
Actually, the variations
made by moving only one man,
the fullback, either right or left
wide, or in close behind either
guard.
Seasoned observers on the Pe-
rn Fisher.
Thursday 22, 3 p.m.Baby Ma-
duro vs. Sgt. T. F. Branaham;
4 30Lt. Luke vs. Roger Little.
Friday Is reserved for any game
that may have to be postponed
weather..
Mf four, five on some ciflc coast just couldn't believeia bau'e-o{ "darkness or'inclement
'spread would go against South-
our pass threat is always ern California, but when the
*-
FEELING DULL?
ie to temporary sluggishness
that dull feeling ... let
good-tasting Eno help
> ways: At bedtlM* Eno
Mickiy helps neutralize excess
(tomechjsctd; eases that upset, full
Hag. tore breakfast Eno
Hjiha M quick-acting, gentle laz-
aW
L, PLEASANT as a glass of spar-
kling. bubbly soda water!
Froggies made 436 yards from
scrimmage, they were convinced.
It also enabled quarterback
McKown to et an individual rec-
ord for passing against Troy,
with 17 of 25 for 270. The sopho-
more's 340 total-offense yards
were the most ever recorded by
one athlete against the Trojans.
MAIN OFFENSIVE
Meyer warns other coaches
that the Spread must be em-
loyed as the main offensive sys-
2. ANTACID -relieves sourness, gas
and heartburn promptly.
3. LAXATIVE relieves temporary tern, not just an adjunct to the
sluggishness quickly. (Take be-
fore breakfast when needed)
! T. or something else, as some are
Used by millions. Sparkling Eno is
also good for SICK headache, ACTO
INDIGESTION, constipation and
OVERINDULGENCE.
At all druggists Get Eno today.
TAKE GOOD-TASTING ENO
trying to use ..
He also adminlshes them that
the Spread takes a long time to
get everything perfected, as
blocking assignments change
completely from play to play, de-
pending on the defense. A coach
can't put It in on Wednesday and
expect it to click on Saturday.
The Meyer Spread is so simple
that lt fools smart people, but,
like everything else In modern
football, there's vastly more to lt
than the little X's and O's
coaches use in skull sessions.
field with one fullback left over.
Shortly after the Athletic
Council released the list of let-
termen, the football team elected
Dick Dillman as the honorary
captain for the 1951 season. Dili-
man, diminutive guard, was a
true inspiration to his mates all
season long. He was the scrappi-
est player on the squad, and in
spite of his light weight (132
pounds) made more than his
share of tackles.
On two different occasions he
played opposite boys who out-
weighed him by more than 100
pounds, but this never seemed to
make much difference to Dick.
His playing and leadership was
always among the highest on the
squad, and he is richly deserving
of the honor his teammates be-
stowed on him.
Another award that was pres-
ented at this meeting was the
Sprlngall-Whittler award to the
hardest working player on the
squad. l*e Myers, reserve ful-
lback, was given the award, and
will have his name engraved on
the beautiful trophy that rests
in the trophy case in Balboa
High.
Complete list of lettermen fol-
lows: EndsBUI Underwood, Bob
Dolan, Ted Norria, Francis Boyd.
Jim Jones, Ken Knight. Tackles
Clalr Oodby. Jerry Fox, Bill Ril-
ey, Carl Meissner. GuardsDick
Dillman, (Capt.), Irwln Frank,
Frank Bryan, Joe Oliver. Center
Fred Cotton. BacksRay Nlcx-
-
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Prize-Winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1706/Sboa.yrKveBDer T8,"I95. *
The whole ticket has 48 pieces divided In two series "A" "" ot 34 pieces
3JO'
First Prize
Second Prize
0
Third Prize
9747
7382

$
1 9 7 4 i!6!i$l!
14,400.00
7,200.00

No. nit* Na* rrtu | No Prisa) * Print I No Pria NM Prir No. Pit Prtst I'M PrtM. "taw Prtaa
M7 1 144. HI IMT > 144.M { 2*47 144 44 M47 144.M 4M7 144.44 M47 1 144.44 M47 14 4.44 lit; 144.44 L i 1 144.N 47 1 144.44
147 1444* 1147 144.N 2147 1444* 2147 144.M 4147 144.44 S147 144.44 147 144.44 144 44 4147 144.M il 1M.W
CM7 I44.M 1247 144.M 2247 1444* 2247 144 40 1 4247 144 40 S247 144.44 4247 144.44 7147 144.44 8247 1444* 47 IM.M
M7 144.N 1747 144.M 2347 144.M 2247 144.44 1 4347 144 44 S247 144.44 47 144.44 7147 144.44 47 1M.N 47 144.44
447 I44.M | 1447 144 M 2447 144.44 M47 1M.M 4M7 144.M M47 144 44 M47 144.44 7M7 144.M M4T 1444* 447 IM.M
S47 144.H 1547 144.M 2547 1444* 2M7 144.M 4M7 1444* U47 1M.M 47 144.4 7MT 1444* M47 144 44 47 IM.M
M7 I44.M IMT 144.M run 144.44 2M7 144 44 4447 144.44 M47 144 44 M47 1M.M 7M7 144.44 47 144441 M47 IM.M
747 2.4M.M 1747 2.444 M 2747 2.4444* 2MT 2,444 44 4747 2,444 44 $747 2,444.44 47 2,444 44 7t 2,444 47 2.4N.M 47 41.444.44
S47 144.M 1S47 144 44 2S47 144.44 2M7 1M.M 4M7 144 44 M47 1444* 47 14444 7M7 144.44 47 144 4 47 IMM
S47 144.H 1N7 144 44 | SM7 144.44 SMI 144.40 4M7 144 44 M47 144.M 4*47 144.44 7447 IM.M SM7 144 44 47 144.M

Approximations Derived From first Prfrc
; .-
1718
471
I
484.44
4M.M
(74*
41
I
484.44
4742
4741
484.44
M
741
I
484.44
4*4.44
M
748
174
4M.M *7M
51
MM
48*.** n 4*4 4* ms
4M.M,54 484 44 M
484 44
Derived From Second rriie
Mtt 244.44 1182 1 2M.M an 2M.M 2382 4 244.44 4282 2M.M n 4 244.44 4282 244 44 a SM.M 282 1 2M.M
7171 74 IMM IM.M 7274 124.44 124.4* 7277 727 1*4.44 72 124.44 1 7184 124.44 IM.M 7181 72*3 124.4* 124.4* 72M 7SM IM.M IMM 72M 7287 IM.M 124.44 IMS IMS 124.4* 124.4* 7M* 72*1 IM.M IMM
Approximations Derived From fhird I'nze
M74 IMS IM S 144 44 MM M.M M74 IM7 IMS I IMM M.M MM 74 ISM UN 144.M 1 4JM4 144.M MM 1*71 MM MM | NTS MM mtt iMM ten m.m IMS MM N74 IMM 774 1*7 MM ins U77 MM in 144 m tm M.M, ISM M.M | IMI 1 IMM MM M.M M74 IMS un 144.M MM MM
Prise-winning numbers of yesterday's Lottery drawina were sold: 1st in Herrera Province; 2nd 3rd In Panam
The nine hundred whole ticket ending In 7 and net Included In the above Mst win Forty-lifht Dollars ($41.) a.
The whole ticket has 48 pieces which comprise the two series "A" aim "B;"

Signed by: FELIPE ROMERO LOPEZ, Secretary of the Governor of the Province of Panam.
anxry.
WITNESSES:
HUMBERTO PAREDES C., Representative of the Ministry of Tres
JOSE DOMINGO SOTO
Notary Public. Panam
Manuel DiazCdula No. 47-47
Isidoro CastroCdula No. 33-2947
CESAR OROZCO
Secretary


4fO*P>A?, NOVEMBER IS, 1S51
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
Sponsors Of
Postseason Ban Would Put
Backers Out Of Business
By PRESTON WcGrRAW
United Press Sport Writer
NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 19.The sponsors of
the Sugar Bowl, which would be put out of business
if the National Collegiate Athletic Association out-
laws post-season football, rose to the defense of
Bowl games last night.
c*ntual*d 'pressure.' Ninety-
Sugar Bowl Rise To Defense Of Bowl Games-
_i_---------------------:-----------------------------tj
FOOTBALL RESULTS
By UNITED PRESS
SOUTH
Miami 21, Florida
Tampa 14, FSU 8
Appalachian, It, Newberry 8 .
Kentucky 47, G. Washington IS
Georgia Tech 27, Alabama 7
Notre Dame 12, N6.*Caro11na 7
Tennessee 46, Mississippi SI
Georgia 46, Auburn 14
Maryland 5S, No. Clina SUte 6
Tulane 14, Vanderbilt 16
Stetson 7, Wofford 7 -
William ft Mary 14, Duke 13
Louisville 14 Wain, it Lee 7
Clemson 34, Furman 14
centuatea pressuie. nuiy- Virginia Tech 20, Richmond 14
fire per cent of the teams par-. Virginia 21, South Carolina. 27
ticlpating in the four majoi E. Henry_39, Ran.-'Macon 7
post-season games in the past
18 years were beaten or tied

In regular play; an unbeaten
record is not now and never
has been a requisite for a bowl
| invitation."
9. "Only eight of the approx-
imately 450 members of the
NCAA can compete annually in
the four alor post-season
games.'The- rash of bowl games
that developed five years ago
has long since- subsided."
The executive. commitiee^.of
the Mld-Wlnter Sports Asso-
ciation which sponsors the
non-profit Sugar Bowl, Issued
a five-page statement charging
that the titles ef post-season
games failed to recognize the
benefits to players, their schools
and millions of fans.
The statement evidently was
provoked by the disclosure
that the National Collegiate
Athletic Association will con-
sider at Its January meeting a
proposal to outlaw post-season
games as a part of the foot-
ball "deyemphasjs" campaign.
If the NCAA adopts the re-
solution, it will put the Sugar
Bowl out of business and make
useless the $1,350.000 it ha*
spent on Tulane Stadium,
where the games are played
The "facts" Included:
1. "The four major (Rose, They're
Sugar, Cotton, Orange) post so." '
season games have been In ex-;
lstence 18 or more years. In' 12. "Through the
that time none has In any way,BowL fans In the deep
done anything harmful to. any contributed 1,350,000 to
educational Institution, foot- and Improve the football stat-
ball players,, or, ,the game It- ium f Tulane University In
.self." ,- | New Orleans. .Through this en-
. ilarged seating capacity (80.752)
3. "From the date of their most of the teams that have
origin, the four major bowls engaged Tulane at home In re-
have had official approval of guiar season contests In the
conferences governing, colleg- past'10 yews have benefltted
late athletics In their locale."- | through Increase In revenue
3. "The four major bowls through use of these faclli-
been approved by the Na- ties.
"leglate Athletic As-;
nd are regulated un-1 IS. "More than one-half
have
tlonal
Colle
soclatlon and are regulated un-
VMI 27, Citadel 21
Hrndrix 19, Mfllsaps 6
Murray State 23, \V.-Kentucky
Klmhurst 18, Rose Poly
Southern State 14, Delta SUte
Miss. Sou'rn 32, Lou'na Tech 7
Jackson (Miss.) 19, Paul Q'n 8
LSU 3, Mississippi State
W. Car. 34, Caxsrn-Newm'n JS.
Memphis State 13, Chattanooga C
EAST
Penn 7, Army 6 -
Navy 21, Columbia 7
10. "Players participating In Princeton 27, Yale 0
post-season game* are not af-i Harvard 31, Brown 21
fected scholastlcally. The per-' Bucknell 33, Dataware 6
lod of preparaUon for and play Cornell 21, Dartmouth 13
In bowl games Is during the Fordham 35, Temple 6
Chrlstmas-New Year holidays Boston Coll. 20, Villanova 13
when classrooms are closed." i Wesleyan 6, Trinity 8
11. "Players are asked to de- Syracuse 9, Colgate
clde (by vote) If they wish to Boston U. 36, Wichita I
play In a post-season game. Penn State IS, Rutgers 7.
not compelled to do Williams 40, Amherst 7
Connecticut 21, Rhode Island 6
Kings Point 56, Wagner 6
Sugar New Raven Tchrs. 39, Br'kl'n 6
South Pittsburgh 32, West Virginia 12
enlarge Adelphia 46, New York Aggies 12
Mlddlebury 51, Vermont 12
Hamilton 32, Union 20
Rider 26, E. Stroudsb'g Tchss. 7
Lehigh 32, Lafayette
Scranton 12, Waynesburg 0
American Int'n'l 13, Springfield 0
Buffalo 33, RPI 20
Hofstra 19, Upsala 0
Dickinson 31, Allegheny 13
Millersville 28, Mansf'ld Tcbrs. 13
, Bethany 33, Grove City IS
: Susquehanna 19, Ursinus 14
0f Lebanon Valley 34, Juniata
Professor Berra Dishes Out
What Just Comes Naturally
At American Baseball Academy!
._ __________ ti r"
n



By JOHNNY McCALLUM
NEA Staff Correspondent iiiuji
____ o ----- "
NEW YORK, Nov. 19 (NBA)I BOB6LEDDING COSTLY
H the American Baseball Acad- ..'-ii"!
He also was a bobslsdnor .af
parts, suffered his one fjeleat a*.
ah amateur boxer because of this.
my in New York's 212th A_A.A.
armory, Prof. Lawrence Peter
3erra was asked how he account-
:d for his rapid rise as the Yank-
ees' catcher.
"Bill Dickey." replied Yogi
:erra. "Bill learned me his expe-
iences."
Yogi won 14 of IS matches.
"I cut my mouth foolln' around
snow-sledding," he explained, *
begged out of the bout, but ther
Professor Berra participated in' couldn't find a replaeenwnt,_*io I
epl
bu
On The Alleys...
INTO THE PICTURESideline photographers at the Los Angel
with their equipment as Stanford quarterback Gary Kerkorian was
Km.nWa Kir CnilHtfaMt f"l if ^r n i a ta.Ul* fi^k \T m mt 1
Coliseum hastily backed away
[heir equipment as Stanford quarterback Gary Kerkorian was tackled and knocked out-of-
bounds by Southern California tackle Bob Van Doren. 75, topside, and a teammate. fNEAi
ine sports, and his zest for them I went In. I wss so busy
asn't wavered as a fan. | my bandaged lip that
Asked what position he played about my stomach,
n the hockey team on The Hill ""
n St. Lout's, the first catcher "I asked for and got a rstUfr
ver to win the American match, stayed away from a**
League's most-valuable-player a- sledding, and flattened toe burl

595, .FFE, winning the first
game by a score of 907 to 874,
dropping the second by 895 to 825,
but taking the third by a score of
925 to 875, and plnfall by 2657 to
2644.
For the winners, Engelke with'
197, 163 and 225 was nigh with
585, followed by Jamison with'
197, 188 and 170 for 555; Thomas
HO MA KEGLERS MAINTAIN
LEAD IN MAJOR BOWLING
LEAGUE
The H. I. Homa bowling team
gained one point In its lead over
the Max R. Stempel & Son five at.
the Diablo Heights bowling lanes
by defeating the Angellnl team
three games while the Stempel, _
Insurancemen dropped a game with 511. Norrls with 504, and
to an Invigorated 7461st team. I Allen with 502. For the losers,
The match betweenithe Homa McCarragher had 195, 184 and
boys and Angellnl was not too 205 for 584, followed by Eady with I
close at any point, with Joe Flle-j 181, 189 and 196 for 566, Gleich-,
bark having a field day with man with 515, and Kelsey with
games of 179, 205 and 205 for a! 507, while Nolan was unable to
total of 589, followed by Fron- hit 500.
nelser with games of 215,189 and The standings of the teams in
160 for 564, Sartorl with 535 In-: the Major League after the play
eluding a game of 223, and Earl! were as follows:
Best with 530, while Payne made TEAMS Won Lost
provisions "st Srth to the this 8U50,000Tula ,, Wesi. M'land 33; John. Hopkins 6
~ indebtedness has
491.
H. I. Homa Co.......28
Max R. Stempel & Son. 23
tried hard Fuerza y Luz........2
by the Sugar Bowl, and
new NCAA regulation,
ftbeen8Xemd! SSftW3SS^
wT and "ine *2K2>'fS?w
mmiuee." inew ww. rcjuatk>ns, .now I Carnefie xech 35, Westminster I
ir major bowls'governing post-season football,. Chester 13, Drexel
bean handled by r*rmlt a deduction from post- *V (KJn, WHkes 1
laM setecte*; by season ems .receipts to^ assure m"
Sttt Siemu; which *et*renierr* >.f.-tt outstanding MIDWEST
NCAA constitution. Two NCAA
representatives are members of
each bowl committee.
4. "The four
have always "
football official*
the confcrcnWM-i
the teai*'Hat* *dfnY Directly obligation
or Indirect**, all rriafc* bbwls
The Angellnl team
but only Jenner with 170,186 and! 7461st AU Signal......21
205 for 561, and Andrews with'Angelini.. .. _......20
ier. Bates and Kiumpp wiwi
476 and 481, respectively,
> unable to help stem the tide
have
slon.'
had OltohfeifeMce'';'sUpervi-
. -lc,i.->
5. "In the .pas* 18 years, the
football UWot Bjflefica, thru
the uptofai At tflijlr major
bowls, have contributed more ..
than $10,000,000 to participat- sUrs.
lng schools. great
8, "All of the four, major
bowls are civic, non-profit or-
ganizations: collegiate In con-
cept and condudt; ffee qf.,any
taint of professionalism.''
7. "The o-ealledv 'pressure
MIDWEST
Michigan State 30, Indiana 26
14. "The Sugar Bowl, to adr Illinois 8, Ohio SUte
dltion to the post-season foot- Northwestern 6, Michigan
ball classic, conducts a mid- Purdue 19, Minnesota IS
Whiter calendar I of sports to Marquette 26, Detroit 13
which are Invited collegiate avier 26, Clnctamatl 8,, .
basketbiff sTiWW*mg teams, I Northern Illinois 7, Omaha 2S
trick and field, and termls Betolt 20, Hope 13
Through these, events j Wisconsin 34, Iowa_ 7
Interest has been de-
veloped In these college 'minor'
sports."
534, were "able to hit over 500.
Walker, Bates and Kiumpp with
498,
were _
of defeat.
Homa won the first game by a
score of 86Ito 826, the second by
912 to 875 and the third 926 to
849, for a plnfall score of 2709 to
2550.
i 5. To further Increase In-
terest aml.partlclpstlon In col-
legiate ipofts, thFSugar Bowl
annually produces a movie, In
for a winner la not the result color, of 1 entire program for
of post-season football games., exhibition, free of any charge...
It existed many vears before these movies provided whole-
the first bowl game was con-:some entertainment for Ame-
celved. It Is a vital paft of!rlcah service personnel ln ,"Zi>r;r T whV'tn (Mo)
every Amerlcsn endvor. be! World War II. The American IB, Wesl y a 14, W
it educatlonsl athle
. feu lor or bujlrlessyi -
I. 'i*dr taM bo*f Whsls
Dayton 34, Marshall 13
New Hampshire 7, Kent State I
Ohio Wesleyan 34, Wittenberg 0
Eastern Kentucky 27, Ohie U. IS
Miami (O.) 34, West'n Reserve 7
Dentoon 14, Case 7
Wooster 47, OberUn 1
Cenfr St <0.) 19, W. Va. 6Ute I
Bowling Green 20, Bradley 6
Wayne U. 27, Mich. Normal IS
Monmouth 6, Knox 6
E. Illinois 46. James Millikin 6
Muskingum 48, Otterbein 19
i urui>.'> la Wiih'f'tn In
12
17
18
19
20
22
25
27
Local 595, NFFE......1
Boyd Bros., Ine.......IS
Almacenes Martins.... 13
The ten leading bowlers of the
league are:
Games
30
Name
Balcer
Madeline
Best
Saylon
Marabella
Engelke
Fllebark
Hi -IKwaisi: fssmfiffiti sSSS
"imovler^ T .hosBltalized
ac-'veterans.** J t TJ

$10,000.00 Stock of
1
INOLEUMS
ust received' All sise rags anfl
vard goeds. More than 190 dif.
ferent designs. Choose yours
today.
Mueblera El Diablo
The Store where you will find
the largest assortment of Glass
and Linoleums."
M Central Avt Tel. 2-2465
"Leaders In the Furniture
Business since 1909."
NOW...i Years Old!

But No Increase
IN PP'CE

^TouTl enjoy Seagram'* V.O.
Canadian Whisky even more no
that it is 6 years old! Honoured
the world over, Seagram'* V.O.
. is the lightest, cleanest tasting
whisky you have ever enjoyed.
:. Try it:.. it's aged Ukpr.
MtfHbvtoW J. timSm fcy.
COMPAMA CVRNOS, S. A.
SeagruutsYG.
CANADIAN WHISKY
Meanwhile, the Max R-Stem-
pel Insurance team was fighting
to keep up with the winning Ho- Thomas
ma team, but dropped the first Eady-
game to the 7461st AU Signal out- McCarragher
fit bu only seven pins, with a
score of 960 to 953.
In the second game, however,
the Stempeleers put op the big
game of the season with a score
of 1017 to 856. The 1017 game Is
the high game of the'season thus
far arid beats the 1014 set by the
Homa team two weeks ago by
three pms. The StempeTteam
came back ln the third game with
another high game of 956tc.win
over the Army unit, which scor-
ed 880.
to scoring the three games 953.
30
30.
30
30
30
30
Average
194- 1
186-25
185-28
185-17
185- 9
185- 8
181-24
ward said: "I skated.''
in the second round.'
i >:
Where did the Squat Man ac- BerrB> wn0 nM switched .
quire his distinctive nickname? den&e from 8t lou1i to Cllffildt
"From the kids on the neigh- Park N j , an the college
' borhood Stag Athletic Club base- ana professional football, base-
ball team on The Hill," he ex- ketball and hockey game* and
plained. "We went to a movie d^w and wrestling matches he
one afternoon, and there was one can fa tmie f0r
of those yogi characters In the
picture. Coming out of the Joint, Professor Berra I* ao popular
one of the kids looked at me, at president Phil Rlszuto school
that prospective outfielders jar.
Qlng
v of the kids .
started laughing, and said:
" 'Hey, Berra walks just like takilng his catching course,
that yogi In the movie.' I've been
Vogl ever since."
BIGGESTElwood Groseclose
at Wanchese proudly exhibits
the largest channel bass taken
with rod and reel from North
Carolina's Oregon Inlet this
Autumn. The Ivanhoe. Vs., nsh-
HOCKEV WAS WOKKOT
The youngest of four sons,
Berra excelled at everything in
i athletics ln the center of St.
Louis' Italian-American popula-
tion. H was the center fielder ln
baseball, Softball and corkball,
guard ln football and basketball,
halfback In soccer, goalie In Ice
and roller hockey, weighed ln at
' 147 pounds in boxing.
"It was a full-time schedule,''
, he explained. "I couldnt keep up
I with both sports and studies, so
I quit school in the ninth grade.".
Two winters ago, Berra caused Buckley's
a minor uproar In the Yankees' '
front office when a newspaper
picture turned up showing htm
. on skates scrimmaging with the
sa ; St. Louis Flyers' hockey team.
Secretary Red Patterson, fear-
ful that the New York club's ac-
complished handler of pltchera
might be Injured by a high stick
or something, telegraphed him to
get off the ice.
>

The faculty is having a Sough
time splitting up the student
body, as Yogi Berra dishes oi*
what Just comes naturally.
si
"Shueks," replied Yogi, "a guy
has to stay In shape, don't he?"
Berra faced off a game between
This King of aU
Cough Mixtures come
From Bliziardly
Cold Canad
rh. King at all cough nwdlclna*
..ckley' CANAOIOL Mixture j
ho been used lor yeors In over 70%
of Canada's homes. Fast working
triple acting Buckley's Conodie! Ml,
ture quickly loosens and raise* phlegm
lodged in ths tubes clears Ir nes-
iooi soothe rasped rqw tissues,
one or two sipa end worst ejejugblnf
tposm cos.. You get result tes*.
You feel the effect af Buckley's Ins
rentry.
Compounded from tar Canejtbs*
Pin* Balsem and other soothing heel
ing ingredients Buckley'* CANAOfOC
Mixture Is different from earythlnj
v.; triad do g*t_a bottle i Jj*
90
181-'4 Autumn. The lvannoc. v.-, "- uerra rmcoa on nic .yj v.r tried 00 pet a
180-16 erm.n landed the .-Pf^f the New York Rangers and Chl-(or#of Csnodie eewja .....
179-27: with itcWe lnor#*shitabl< WX a. cago Black Hawks at ladlson1dov nt any good drug store.
170-18 i three-pound bluefish. (NBA) 'square Garden the other night.
Lincoln 4, Arkansas State 13
Wlll'm Jewell 58, Cenfl mo.) 6
Illinois Normal 6, Navy Pier iz
Baldwin Wall.-John Carroll, ppd.
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma 35, Iowa State 6
Rice 28, Texas A. ft M. 13
Baylor 4Z. Wake Forest 0
SMU *1> Arkansas 7
Texas 3.TCUZ1 \i-J
Kansas t7, Oklahoma A. M. Zl
Tnlsa 21, Texas Tech 14
N. Tex. State 62, Fresno State 0
Utah 27, Colorado A. tc M. 21
Utah SUte 14. Denver 7
Colorado 6, Nebraska 14
Kansas State 14, Missouri 12
S'eastMlaeeuriTchrs.4fc>--IB>
Ark. A. M. S4, Col. of Oaaafea 14
Ky. State 25, Blnefield St. 1J
New Mexico 34, Brig. Venng
Mo. Valley 14, Southwest St. 7
WestrnN.Mex.2,N.Mex. Mil. 14
Jarvls Christian IS, Butler
Texas State It, Alcorn A. M. 14
Ste'n F. Austin 14, Sam Hosia'n
Lamar Tech 28, Sul Boss 27
McMurray SS, New Mex. A.liM. 14
FAB WEST
Sanford S5, Oregon 8tate 14
California 28, Oregon 86 ;
Washington St. 47, Montana 18
ITCLA 28, Washington 28
Col. Mines 14. Col. College 6
Boise JC 35, Orange Coast 1
WilUamette S3, Chleo State 7
W. SUte 28, Adaass State 26
Whitman 88. British Columbia 6
HIGH SCHOOL
Icala 2B, GalneevBle 18 -
Sarasota 34, Arcadia 12
Plant City IS, Tampa Plant 7
Wllliston IS. Branford 7
8EBVICB ___
LJenne Mar'ns 81. M'rl* HYvy 7
N. Brtt'n Tehs. 87. Caap Bdw*ds 13
Pert Meyer 40, Pert *>e 18
G. Lakee Navy 88, Peaa'e' Navy 6
NEGRO
Florida A. ft M. 36, Southern 6
Ala. V ft M. 41, KneervllW 6
Wins. S I'm Tchrs. 61, St. Pan 6
J. C. Smith 6, Shaw
Tnakegee 13, Allen IS
Morris Brown 25,-Benedlct 6
Dels. SUte 13, St. Augustine 8
Sewanee 41, Howard 6
Wilber orce 18, W. Vg. 8UU i
Fayet'v I Tchrs. 1. Ells. City 8
Lincoln 46. Arkansas State 13
Flsk IS, Merebouse 0
Miss. Industrial 14, Leland IS
Md. State 46. Va. Union 4
Fralrteview 88, Langston 6
Albany Tchrs. 48. Pla. Nermal 6
Miles (Ala.) 1, Rest 7
also set up the high teem series
ot the season thus far. which also
knocked out the high ser scor-
ed by the Homa team two weeks
aao of 2850. The score of the
sfempel team was 2926. Just 76
pins over the Homa cord.
P For Stempel. Bud Balcer was
high with games of 207 222 and
21Q for 638, followed closely by
Billy Coffey with games of 168.
221 and 214 for 60Y, MarabeUa
with 202,192,192 for 586, Colston
with 181 213 and 160 for 554 and
Wllher with 195, 169 and 180 for,
5U &rthe losers, Saylon whI
nteh with 193, 231 and169 for 593
foflowed by Cooley with 220, 132
and 194 lor 546; Lawless with 200,
176 and 167 for 543, and Madeline
with 528.
The Boyd Bros, team scored its
flrit four-pointed of thei asjuu
over the hapless lft-place Mar
tins team by winning. 10**,
fames by score* of 877 864 ano
66 for a series total of 2707.
while the Martlnz quintet was.
MOring 783, 790 and 879 for 245S.'
Morton was high for the winner
with 200, 186 and 212 for 598 fol-
lowed by Schneider with 157, 186
and 212 for 555, Crecelius with
t9d Melanson with 527 while
naiiev was unable to hit ouo.
For the losers, only Owesne and
J. Damin were able to hit 500
with the former hitting 547 and
the Utter 5l. while A. Damin
Burrell and Presho missed the
500 mark. '
In the final match of the eve-
ning, the Fuerza v Luz 8hus;
ers took three points from Local
Imported
Canned Hams
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COUNTERPOINT HORSE-OF-YEAR PICK
T f
WAC Non-Coms
Draw Jail Terms;
BeatUpWACPic
AN INDEPENDEN^
^l
fe^ILY NIWSPAm
Panama Amanean
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
wCAM? ?^ECK.IN^nGEH^o' TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
Nov. 18 'UPtA WAC private)_________________________
who was beaten severely by six
WAC sergeants because he
testified against a friend of
theirs at a court martial was
ordered today not to discuss the
CjUe.
The family of PFC Carol A.
JMerce said at their Mt. Vernon.
5; home that Rep J. Harry
McGregor iR-O.1 told them not
to say anything about the case
McGregor sends them a
ort on the trial of the six
assailants.
The only official word on
the case was fiven in a brief
announcement Saturday that
the, six sergeants had been
riven prison terms ranging
from one to two and one-half
years. They also were dishon-
orably discharged, the an-
nouncement said
PANAMA, R. P.. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1951
TEN CENTS
w
Senator Says Administration
Will Not Help In Tax Probe
WASHINGTON, Nov. 19 (UP)
Sen. John J. Williams (R-
Dei.) said today the current tax
investigations have only
"scratched the surface" and he
accused the Administration of
refusing to cooperate with Con-
gress in exposing Irregularities
and corruption.
Williams is credited with first
Pfc. Kierce. Injured so badly bringing to light the current
by the others that she spent 25 internal Revenue Bureau "scan-
davs in a hospital, said the armv dais."
had ordered her not to say any-. He added that "a lot" of them
thing. were Democrats who "couldn't
Her father. Marshall E8rl stomach" the existing condi-
Klerce, Sr.. railway express agent, tlons.
at Mt. Vernon for 32 years, said, i He also said assistant U. S.
however, that his dauehter tele- Attorney Charles O'Gara in San
phoned him Werinesdav saying Francisco contributed "the bulk"
she might be transferred to an- 0f information which led to the
other post Jor her own safety. suspension Sept. 27 of James C.
Kierce said he visited his Smyth, the San Francisco tax
laughter once when she was collector, and 'even person in
confined to the camn Breckin- nls 0fnC.
ridge hospital. She suffered cuts citing published reports
and bruises, but no broken that 0'Gara might ke fired.
bones, he said.
He said he did not find out
all about the case, but saw
some of the evidence. Including
"bloodv clothes."
Pirst Lt. Arlis Metheney. as-
sistant public relations officer
at Camp Breckinridge. said
Pfc. Kierce testified against a
friend of the six sergeants.
Lt. Metheney did not say
what charges were involved in
this trial, bnt Kierce aid he
believed it was "a small mat-
ter, bnt apnarently the other
Williams said this would be a
"shocking miscarriage of jus-
tice."
Williams discussed the tax In-
quiries on the National Broad-
casting Co. Television program.
"American Forum of the Air."
Chairman Robert Bamspeck of
the Civil Service Commission
also appeared on the show.
The House tax-Investigating
subcommittee, m e!a n w h 11 e,
scheduled closed-door hearings
starting today to go Into, three
Southern California tax cases
Involving "rumors" that lm-
to
didn't think so."
The six waylaid Pfc. Kierce! proper influence was used
Off duty and beat her up last j block fun orosecutlon.
month. Her assailants were dls- About a dozen witnesses have
charged and sentenced after a. been called from California to
three-day court martial which testify, including Ernest M. To-
ended Wednesday. lin, U. 8. District Attorney In
' Pfc. Kierce entered the Army Los Angeles. .
tfov. 9. 1950. She trained at Ft i x|,e president, according to
Lee. Va.. and had been ^ at hith officials witn him at Key
risked their jobs and cooper-
ated in exposing what was
going on," he said. "A lot of
them were members of the
Democratic Party. I take off
my hat to them."
Williams said Congressional
Investigators have done a "good
job" but are "only beginning to
scratch the surface."
He took sharp issue with In-
ternal Revenue Commissioner
John R. Dunlap for suggesting
as Williams put it that the
Inquiries be "played down."
"He (Dunlap) emphasized that
only 22 out of 56,000 tax men are
Involved but he did not point
out that six collectors out of 64
have been Involved," the Sen-
ator said.
Ramspeck said most gov-
ernment employes are honest,
aitd added that men who in-
fluence officials must bear
equal blame with those In-
fluenced.
He attacked wholesale charges
of corruption in government as
likely to weaken publicp-faith
in government Itself, and prais-
ed Williams for citing only spe-
Brecklndrldge for eight months.
Her father said she was "happy'
working at the camp post office
In the postal locator section.
Before entering the army she
was graduated from Mt. Vernon
high school and worked as a
atore clerk before enlisting.
, Kierce said he regretted the
beating but that he is "prond
of mv daughter, who likes the
WAl'S and did her duty."
West, Fla., has ordered a
house-cleaning of the whole
Federal service because he it
"sick and tired of a few men
in official life bringing dis-
credit to his administration."
Three Nations Again
Agree To Keep Ships
Oul Of Antarctic
LONDON, Nov. 19 (UP) Bri-
tain, Argentina and Chile today
Issued a simultaneous declara-
tion of intent not to send war-
ships into Antarctic waters.
Similar declarations were made
in 1949 and 1960. They concern
the movement of washlps In this
area, but all three countries un-
der the agreement are free to
establish new bases or maintain
old ones In the Antarctic.
Argentina and Chile have re-
gistered claims with Britain that
the Falkland Island dependen-
cies, which include four Island
Williams said he was "glad
to see the President beginning 'groups In Antarctic waters and
, to clean house and I hope he j the tip of Graham Land, belong
keeps going." to them.
But he asserted that con- j Britain claims that the depen-
gresslonal investigators In- dencies belong to her through
The girls who were sentencea ciUding himself are getting occupation i and administration
for assault and battery were -no cooperation whatsoever over the past 50 years.
Bgts. Grace L. Morton. San Lo- from top officials."
renzo, Calif.; Juliet Monte. Pe-
cos; N. M.; Marjorle t. Stuck,
8anta Cruz, Calif.; Edith M.
Brown. San Angelo, Tex.: Edna
H. Whlteman, Preble, N. Y.. and
Mary G. Long, Fort Madison.
\ 5________.
RMgway's Figures
On Red Atrocities
Mot Yet Available
"A lot of the assistance I
had was from employes in the
Treasury Department who
Official sources said the agree-
ment to keeo warships out of
Antarctic waters had no bearing
un the territorial claims.
clflc cases with "evidence and | Truman's request to put all tax
facts." collectors under Civil Service,
but said there also must be a
Williams called for an "lnde- thorough check on all those now
pendent audit" of Internal Re- in office.
venue Bureau offices through-! Ramspeck also endorsed put-
out the country as a means of! ting all government employes,
preventing future tax scandals, except those in policy-making
He said such an audit, proposed positions, under Civil Service,
by the Hoover Commission on
government reorganization,
.should be handled by the Gen-
eral Accounting Office, an in-
dependent agency responsible to!
Congress.
Williams favored President
Puerto Rican Seeks
Reversal Of Ruling
On Assassination Try
WASHINGTON. Nov. 19 (UP)
Oscar Collazo one of the two
(NEA Telephoto)
NATURE'S POWER. Snow-crusted power lines sag to the ground along Highway 218, out-
side of Farmlngton, Minn., after' the northern midwest was struck by a savage cold wave.
Up to 12 inches of snow fell on some areas as the ley weather moved eastward.
Gamboa To Vote
Tomorrow For 9
Civic Councilmen
Former Lifeguard
r i T is #a ir J Oscar Collazo one of the two Kesldente of Gmboa w"! f -
13111 10 HaVe \tabhed Puf,rt0 Rlcan Nationalists who the polls; tomorrow'to vote for a
Male With Shears
MIAMI BEACH. Fla., Nov. 19
(UP) Police requested the
State's Attorney today to file
I tried to assassinate President. Prilde1n,t and el8ht
Truman last year, today sought I who wll serve on the 1952 Garn-
er reversal of Mis conviction flravw Council
the murder of a White House po-1 Th P0"8 wi". be <*en ta.*5
liceman Gamboa Commissary from 8:30
tmvumu. i ffl g ^.g p m and from 2;30
Defense attorney Leo Rover, rm., to 4:3D p.m. '
who Is seeking a new trial, is ex-1 On the sla'e for president are
murder charges against a former !Pected to present oral arguments 'James E. Cole. Paul L. Parker,
Special Airmail Cachets
To Mark New PAA Flight
Postal officials of three gov-iing on which department hand-
ernments have authorized spec-1 les them. Central America will be
ial first flight cachetsprized by represented by the cachet of the
i_ , , ,t^. - philatelistsin honor of Pan Guatemala City post office.
TOKYO, Nov 19 'UP) oen- American World Airways' new| To obtain one of these historic
: ral Rldgway- detailed report on service between Panam, Guate-1 cachets, philatelists need simply
Communist atrocities In Korea maia and the United States, to enclose a self-addressed envel-
j-evislng the downward figures which begins Dec. 3. ope In another envelope address-
teleased last eek by 8th Army, post offices of Panam, the Ca- ed to one of the three post of-
fcer. may b; referred to Wash- naj zone and Guatemala will ac- flees, with a note identifying it
; fefton before publication, ac- cept letters to be carried aboard> as a Pan American Airways first
r SJrdlng to an official spokesman.; the first northbound flight of the1 flight cover and requesting a ca-
JIe said "It nas not been de- big Constellation-type Clippers; chet. Both envelopes, of course,
eided whether th' report will be linking the Isthmus, Central must bear the necessary postage.
tgjeased here or in Washington, America and the United States i Postal money orders should be i p.m. White dinner Jacket and
lia't both po'nts simultaneous- Pacific coast by direct air service enclosed for local stamps for the black tie will ce worn. Reserva-
for the first time. first flight cover. Canal Zone air-tlons are rear I red for members
.Headquarters officials here philatelists will have their'mall to the United States Is six
lifeguard accused of stabbing
his roommate to death with a
pair of scissors.
Samuel Acker. 51, an unem-
ployed clerk from Brooklyn. N.
Y., died last night after being
stabbed mroe than a dozen times
in the neck and body with a
seven-inch pair of barber's
shears.
Before his death, Acker ac-
cused his roommate. Salvatore
Ascolese, 30, of Hoboken, N. J.,
of attacking him with the
shears while Acker lay asleep.
Ascolese, a former beach life-
guard and onetime barber shop
Owner, has remained incoherent
since the slaying, police said.
Detective Jack Ferrel said Asco-
lese swallowed a dose of poison
after the stabbing.
Acker's screams as he fought
his roommate aroused Sam
Haraka In a room across the
hall and Haraka called police.
Detective A. W., Armstrong
forced Ascolese to swallow some
soapy water and sent him to a
hospital, which probably saved
him from dying of poison.
Haraka said Acker and Asco-
lese had been friends for years.
Ascolese visited a veteran's hos-
pital recently because he had
been "having bad dreams," Fer-
rell said.
Ministers To Attend
American Society's
Dinner Wednesday
It has been learned that not
only the President of the Repub-
lic but many of the Cabinet will
attend the stag dinner given at
the Union Club by the American
Society Wednesday night.
This dinner Is in honor of Pre-
sident Aroserr.ena. beginning at
worked over the week-end on the; choice of two cancellations and cents. Panama's is six centavos,
srvlew of records from which cachetsa special rubber-stamp and Guatemala's five centavos!
r. James M. Hanley. 8th Array imprint commemorating the first A money order for ten cents is
Crimes Officer estimated flighton the covers of the first ample to cover this postage.
Lv-sk
some 13,400 United Nations, northbound airmail.
United States airmail is
and their guejts.
Members of the American So-
ciety who through oversight may
not have received formal notices
six j regarding the dinner, are asked
in Collazo's appeal to the Dis-
trict of Columbia court of ap-
peals.
The 37-year-old revolutionary
was to have been executed on
and William H. Ward, whose
names also appear on the ballot
as candidates for councilmen.
For councilmen the nominat-
Oct. 28, but the date was moved .ing committee has selected the
up to Feb. 1 so that the court following candidates, J. O. Ca-
could near his appeal. tron, Julius Cheney, Mrs. C. J.
Rover has contended that Col- Connors, R.F. Dunn, Otto C.
lazo did not Intend to kill Tru-'Frlck, G. L. Fi itts. R.A. Gangle,
man but merely wanted to stage M.J. Goodin, Reverend R. Gray,
a demonstration for Puerto R1-C.J, .Hall. Sgt H L Holmer,
can independence. .Miss1 Amanda Hddleston, F.
Marcsak, L.P. Morrison. W.H.
He is expected to argue that|Munyon, Mrs. B O. Orton, J.H.
trial judge Alan Goldsborough Richardson, B. G^ Sanders, F.D,
erred when .he instructed the Spencer.
Jury that Collazo's "views about' Members of the present coun-
the situation In Puerto Rico have i cU have urged all qualified re-
absolutely notning to do with the
case."
Gen. Kiel Leaves,
To Inspect USAF
Mission To Haiti
Brig. Gen. Emil C. Kiel, com-
manding general of Caribbean
Air Command, departed Albrook
Air Force Base this morning for
Port au Prince. Haiti. He will pay
an official visit to the United
States Air Force Mission to Hai-
ti, at Port au Prince.
It' is expected that General
Kiel will be away from Albrook
for approximately one week.
sidents of Gamboa to cast their
votes in this i lection, and all re-
sidents of Oamboa are Invited to
attend the Town Meeting Tues-
day at 7:30 p.m. in the Civic
Center Building to hear the re-
sults of the balloting.
Lawrence Adams'
Funeral Services
At Masonic Temple
Funeral Services for the late
Lawrence Adams, husband of
Dora L. Adams, will be held at
Ancon Masonic Temple at 4:30
p.m. tomorrow. -
Services will be in charge of
Chagres Lodge A.F. and A.M.
AERIAL HITCH-HIKER. Sandra Mateza, 11, of South Bos- '
ton, Mass., walks with New York Port Authority Patrolman
Harold Kennedy Into a police station. She was stopped In
New York after completing the first leg of a proposed non-
paying air trip to California. After getting from Boston to
New York, she got on a Canada-bound plane and asked the
pilot if she needed a ticket.
SHAPE
In Huts,
By ROSETTE HARGROVE
NEA Staff Correspondent
Personnel, Some Now^ Living
Await Move To New Village
jrisoners. including 6.270 Amer-j Letters from the Isthjns will f cents an ounce to the Canal Zone to contact Louis Gomez. Bill
Htns. have been killed by Chin- bear either the imprint of the and 10 cents a half-ounce to the Boyd, Otto Hausmann, John Oo-
m and North Korean Commun-; Canal Zone post of flee or ttiat of republics of Panam and Guate- rln or Paul Sidebotham lmme-
V forces. | the Republic of Panama, depend- mala. cliately.
ROCQUENCOURT, France
Nov. 19 (NEA) The future Is'
full of promlv for Regimental
Sergeant-Major Roger de Llgne.
A member of the. French staff
employed here at SHAPE (Su-
preme Headquarters, Allied Pow-
ers, Europe), h*- Is on the priority
list for a modern apartment in
the "SHAPE Village" project now
Rearing completion.
He and his pretty wife. Reine,
and their three childrenJac-
queline, 11, Menique, 9, and A-
ore, S-^wlll soon be installed in
a four-room apartment with all
modern conveniences.
"I can hardly believe It is true,"
said Reine de I.lgne. "Imagine
the children will be In a place
where they will have paymates of
HE FIRST THANKSGIVING
Illustrated by Walt Scott
:'o"s after Ucv!- '.':. PHfrim, SamI rv
i : r.hetirots el HisImos of a large bond
of worrier*.
JJscsrtofci of Mm Misas' Unties, Stead isl
rite* wrrli a wHirory fuord of honor.
tsOiscHwry, tfcs ladioii i win IW* tfcsy ww fcofas
mni Mi courtesy m motet. They vtrs rsor-
,fMyM*ts-.
HK8
IKE AND THE SERGEANT-MAJOR: Oen. Eisenhower (right)
greets the first families who will soon move into "SHAPE
Village Among the lucky one* are Regimental Sgt. Major
Roger de Llgne (left) holding Andre. Next to de Llgne Is
his wife. Reine, and in front are Jacqueline and Monique.
every nationality aitd I will have
a homethe 16th in our 12 years
of married lifewhere keeping
house will be a pleasure."
For the paii six months, the
de Lignes have been living in a
three-room wooden hut in the
(mllltary camp of the Logos Just
outside Bt. Germain.
ybe_th3t tggt t$ey woiid
i
have to spend the winter in
the hat was a dismal prospect,
but now they are Just waiting
for the signal to go.
Conscious of the housing short-
age and high rents, and of the
need to foster a feeling of com-
radeship among ail the SHAPE
j*.',ffisgjl Q-efc,IS.'fttu J?*. *ft
enhower a few months ago ap
proached the: French Govern-
meBfcilewas able to obtain the
assignment of a piece of property"
situated about 20 miles west of
Paris near thy: town of St. Ger-
maln-en-Layo.
No time was lost In planning
"SHAPE Villuge" and, by the
end of the year, lt Is expected
that the first 100 of the 300 a-
fartments which will make up
he village will be occupied. Pr
ority has been given to enlisted
men of all nationalities.
The property, known, as Hen-
neraont Park, consists of abuot
40 acres of woodland around a
nowtumbledovn chateau built by
S wealthy Paris businessman
way back in 1910. The chateau
may be restored to serve as an
officers' club A'lth sleeping quar-
ters for Allied bachelor officers.
The new construction, which is
being erected under the direc-
tion of the French Ministry of
Reconstruction, is in the form of
en elongated "S," three storlea
high.
There are six modern apart
ments to every main entrance
two on each floorwith from
one to four bedrooms.
Living rooms overlook the park,
with large French windows and
Spanish-style iron balconies.
Other features are sliding pan-
els to the bedrooms, showers for
the children, a separate lavatory,
ultra-modern kitchen and bath*
room, deep closets in every room,
a sun porch, adequate heating
and an open fireplace in the
large living-room The sense of
privacy, so dear to Europeans,
nas been preserved. The porche
are shielded from the gaae of
next door neighbors.
Rental has been fixed by M j
French authortttw. baaed on si* J
istlng le#al decrees.