The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01291

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
* BRANIFF
t*r
...
TO
MIAMI
ONI WAY ...... % .>
ROUND Till..... 150.10
. -SUMA?
^menean
"Let the people know the truth and the country i$ safe" Abraham Lincoln.

Seagram's YO. :
Now...6 Years Old!

TWENTY-SEVENTH IEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1951
TEN CENTS
3 Tommies Knifed In Suez Canal Zone;
Terrorists Threaten 'Quit Or Coffin'
Mossadegh Expects
Iran To Try Running
Oilfields Unaided
WASHINGTON. Nor. 10 (UP)
Diplomatic sources said to-
night that Premier Mohammed
Mossadegh of Iran Is convinced
that little will come of United
States efforts to settle the Brit-
ish-Iranian oh dispute.
Mossadegh plans to leave for
home Thursday determined to
run his country's vast newly-na-
tionaltied petroleum Industry as
well as he can without help from
the outside world
A spokesman said Mossadegh
will continue Ills talks with As-
sistant Secretary of State George
McGhee up to the last minute,
on the chance something will
turn up."
The spokesman said: "Mossa-
degh wlu liste.i to any new pro-
l.osals aa long as they recognise
the principle of nationalisation
that Is. Iranian management
of the industry."
But after three weeks of In-
decisive negotiation Mossadegh
Is reported far from hopeful un-
less Britain has a sudden change
of heart.
British officials here are Just
as gloomy.
(NBA Radlo-Telephoto)
MR. AND MRS. VOICE Mr. and Mr. Prank Sinatra the
Mrs. is better known as Av Gardner snuggle up cheek to
cheek after, their wedding In Philadelphia. Sinatra, recently
Church of England
divorced, icasped the Judge's handT after the~ceremony~ and I IIaIIICIIMsAJ' Riffle
- sighed, -'Well, we finally made it" iWWJ|H|fwI PltsJ
Tffl'r.Hdli'1. I in, *fafc. Pop* or Mdre
unta Shaky;
By DREW PEARSON

1 WA8inNGTON, Noy. 9 On
the surface business Is as usual
In Caracas. Venesuela, capital of
the most prosperous nation of
its slae In the world today.
But beneath the surface politi-
cal unrest and conspiracy are
swifwy approaching a crisis
which could plunge Venezuela
into civil war.
Developments of the past two
} months, including bomb explo-
sions, quickie*strikes in key in-
dustries, and a dramatic circula-
tion upsurge of underground
newspapers, have put the three-
man governing: Junta oh the
most precarious spot-o its tur-
bulent, three-yea* career.
Ever since a Fascist-minded
army clioar overthrew Veoe-
neia's. liberal elected govern-
ment, in November 1948, the
usurper* have keen trying on-
i successfully to smash too well-
organised! nergreund move-
ment established at that time
by Accin Democrtica, the
sorted regime', political party.
In 1948, a. D. candidates,
headed by famed novelist Rorhu-
,. lo Gallegos as Presidential nom-
inee, had wton 72 per cent of the
{ totes
1 It was the first completely free
r-aad honest election in the coun-
[ trf$ history. But when an inept
VtrM of colonels threw ont Presl-
t Gallegos- and seised power
'"48, they Issued a decree
wing Accin Democrtica,
failed to take effective
sure* to brale up its
'thin 90 days, two dally
newspapers were being publish-
ed by tile party v'that had been
driven underground.
' Although more than 800 "De-
mderatica" leaders, including
tealtnet members and congress-
a^^had been Jailed. Its gross-
political organization con-
to flourish.
Dday. the combined circa- ,
i of A.D.'s 4-odd pabHee-
raoging from comic
i to a monthlv literary re-
, U nearly twice that of
entire official, govern-
censored Venenemn
. (NEA Telephoto)
VACATION TIME President Truman has a broad-handed wave for the crowd at Boca Chica
Air Base as he arrives for a long vacation at Key West, Fla. With hjjn in the car that took
him from the plane to the little Bouse are Cap. Cecil Adell (center), commandant of Key
West Naval Base, and Adm. William Leahy.
1 n..... ---------------' '
Veteran Exemption Accounts
For Most Of Local Deferees
Except for teran exemption,}steal; and twi
the lar
who
tegoiie
percentage of men
le!aiiyLJd *<>
>ea
elecftrVBervlce
they l-egistorca,
the (Board, lave been t ierred be- ^J** men h*ve, llated in
ChflShot England's newspaper cause' of dependent*, a break- the *"?ed forces alnoethey re-
today said Pope Pius" recent're-[down analysis reveals.
natttmeat of birth control was I gistered with the local Selec-
a "disaster" and the advice he t:ve Service Board 118 have been
among Whteh was the U.S. deci-
sion to seek a military alliance
with Franco Spain, have abrupt-
ly altered the plans.
Franco gave Venezuela's mil-
itary dictatorship help in or-
ganising its political police be-
fore it seised power. Ani more
recently negotiations have been
opened with Madrid to obtain
no services of specially train-
ed Falange agenta who would
take charge of the national
policeend turn it it Into a Ve-
amelin Gestapo.
Accin Democrtica sees this
move as the first serious threat
to its existence'.
It* leaders are confident that
the ineffectual Junta, now com-,
posed of two colonels and a ci-
vilian stooge named Suarez
Flammerlch, could eventually be
forced out by peaceful means
But with active aid from Fran-
co, the regime may oblige A.D. I Family, Margarita, he. will
to go all-out for a revolution. burled at Mt. Hope cemetery.
gave was qualified as "Inhuman,
callous and cruel."
The newspaper Is a private lay
publication edited by Anglican
clergymen.
A Church of England spokes-
man said It reflected at least a
segment of the opinions of the
leadership of the Church of Eng-
land.
In the attack on the Pope, the
newspaper said the general pub-
lic could ask with Justification
what would celibate priests and,
especially the "isolated" Pope,
know of the anxieties and res-
ponsibilities of the marriage
bond.
Stevenson Funeral
In Margarita Today
The funeral of the late Mr. E.
L. Stevenson will take place to-
day.
Following requiem mass at 9
a.m. at the Church of the Holy
be
classified as l-A, available for
military service
Veteran exemption accounts
for 54 of the remaining 133.
One man has been given an
occupational deferment.
Dependency deferment has
been granted tc 23, who are clas-
sified In HI-A category.
Next In volume are educa-
tional deferments, with a total
of 21, of which 18 are college-
student deferments and It are
student deferments for high
school pupils
Members of reserve compon-
ents, who are deferred because
of their reserve commitments,
total 11.
Six o( the registrants have
been disqualified for health
handicaps, either mental or phy-
gistered. and one, who has beeh
discharged from the armed for-
ces, has a reserve classification
Compony T Invest-
$30,000,000 In
India Oil Refinery
NEW DELHI. Nov. 10 (UP)
The Government of India and
the Standard Vacuum Oil Com-
pany have agreed on the outline
of a plan to set op an oil refinery
of 1,000,000 tiros capacity near
Bombay.
The company will invest $30,-
000.000, and will control the re-
finery for 30 years.
India will make a gift of the
s!te, and will establish port fact- In China are unable to pay,
l'ties for the refinery. I said
Red Ransom Notes
Reach US Chinese
From Relatives
inf)-^ Th? Chinese Commun-
ists have launched a money-
ralslng1 drive by demanding
"ransom" from Chinese Americ-
ans for relatives-, held In Red
China, according to Chinese
sources here.
CAIRO, Nov. 10 (UP) British authorities announced
that Egyptian terrorists today knifed three British soldiers
in a new outburst of violence in the tense city of Ismailia,
in the Suez Canal Zone.
One of the soldiers was gravely wounded.
Earlier in the day clandestine pamphlets were distri-
buted by Egyptian terrorists warning British soldiers that
they would go home in a coffin if they did not quit the
Canal Zone.
Another pamphlet distributed [ the Middle East defense group
among the families of the Brit- has been Ignored.
ish garrison said:
"Have you forgotten the war
years in Great Britain, or what It
is. to be besieged? Do you want to
di
f
from now on, neither for you nor
go through all this again?
"It la not going to be funny
About 20 persons have recelv-
for your children. We have no
desire to harm your children. We
leave harming children to your
brave soldiers."
The British today began to fly
servicemen's families out from
the Canal Zone.
Three four-engined Hastings
of the Royal Air Forces Trans-
port Command left Fayld with
58 families, totalling 107 women
and children. Ten of the chil-
dren were less than two years
old.
The families will sleep over-
night at Malta, and be flown on
to Britain tomorrow.
Meanwhile the Egyptian gov-
ernment claimed that 10 Egyp-
tian workers imprisoned at Moas-
car, a British army camp outside
Ismailia, have started a hunger
strike to protest their ill treat-
ment by their British captors.
While tension rose in the Ca-
nal Zone, the United States.
Britain, France and Turkey
announced in Paris that they
will carry On with their plan
for a four-power Middle East
defense command, and promis-
ed military aid to any other
country which joins it.
the
Nurl's personal relationship
with Winston Churchill and An-
thony Eden might help in find-
ing a solution acceptable to both
sides.
RP Student Parley
May Decree General
Strike In Veraguas
Students all over the Republla
of Panama were mobilising to-
day for what might be a general
student strike protesting against
the government of President Al-
clblades Arosemena and the new
Minister of Education Ruben D-
Carles.
The Panama Student's Federa-
tion was ready for a convention
to be held today In the J. D.
Arosemena Normal School In
Santiago. Veraguas, at Which the
general strike call may be made.
Most of Panama city hih
school students are reluctant a
bout going on a strike, but stu-
dents all over the Interior have
not been to school all week and
clashes between students and
the police have been reported.
Countries in the area are as-
, sured that the command will not D J flnimc. Of II M
ed such ransom notes within | interfere In their Internal af-' lCU V-iUiin v/i vn
the past 10 days according to | fairs, and that their sovereignty i ___-._ D-^ lJ
Ray Yu Hau. editor of the San! will be respected. LOSSeS DranaC
Francisco Chinese World.
He said requests for money
started arriving last Maroh, but
little attention was paid to them
at that time.
The sums demanded ranged
from a few hundred to several
hundred dollars.
These new Communist tactics
to bring United States dollars
to the Chinese Reds were'Con-
firmed by the Chinese vice-
consul In San Francisco, Der
Shlng Liang.
Most of the demands are
made for past taxes, rentals, or
contributions that the relatives
he
As 'Exaggerated*
LONDON. Nov. 10 (UP) Tho
British War Office today brand-
ed Communist "claims of United
Nations casualties In Korea as
In a clear reference to the un-
easy truce between Israel and
the Arab states, the four powers
announced they will not Inter-
fere in problems and disputes
arising within the area.
. The defense command Is di-
rected only against outside ag--"exaggerated/"
gresslon.
Already In Damascus the Syr-1 The War Office paid tribute to
Ian government of Premier Has- 400 Scottish troops who held off
an El Hakim has resigned due to an attack by 6.000 Chinese.
cabinet differences over Syria's, Then, "to correct exaggerated
participation in the command, i Chinese reports of British ca-
In Cairo it is felt that Iraqi j sualtles In recent fighting." It
Premier Nurl Said may emerge. announced that In this recent
as mediator in the Anglo-Egyp-! fighting British casualties have
tlan dispute, despite the manner i been iff killed, 142 wounded and
In which Egyptian opposition to one missing.
Jane Russell's Gift Toddler
Queried In House Of Commons
a few months ago. the,
ound's strategy was to
bulMIngand occaaion-
LONDON, NOV. TO P) A
member of parliament today de-
manded that the government in-
vestigate how Jane Russell was
able to return to the United
SUtes with a 15-month-old Brit-
ish boy.
Lt. Col. Marcus Upton, mem-
ber for the Lambeth area of Lon-
don, said (he actlop of the Hol-
lywood star might start an "in-
discriminate" export of British
babies to America.
"I don't like this way of taster
a chad out of the country." Lip-
ton said- "I have seen no legal
documents at anv time relative
to the transaction.
"This business lends Itself to
all kinds of abuses. Although
Jane Russell is very well known,
persons not so well known might
be able to take away our babies."
Miss Russell, who zoomed to
stardom wearing a lowcut dress
tiallne-iU strength, in "The Outlaw," traveled to
idea that the fumbling Britain and Germany recently to
would at last be forced to find a brother for her adopted
.* a free vote In the nation- daughter Tracy
ctlons which lt has promls-
ttfor sometime before next) She left London by plane Wed-
JP".'- nesday night with Tommy Ka-
However, recent events, chief vaaaugh. while the baby's tearful
mother waved goodbye from the
runway.
She said she was taking the
child on a visit to the United
SUtes and hoped her husband,
professional football player Bob
Waterfleld. would like him. Later,
In the United SUtes, she said
she did not plan to adopt the
child.
Llpton said he would ask Home
Secretary Sir David Maxwell
Fyfe "whether he Is satUfied
that Thomas Kavanaugh, 15
months, was token from this
country with his parentt' con-
sent and if he will Investigate
the matter."
The boy's mother, Mrs. Flo-
rence Kavanaugh. 26. lives In the
Lambeth area with her husband,
who earns $1180 a week as a car-
penter. They have two other
children.
Mrs. Kavanaugh said she tele-
phoned Miss Russell when she
learned of her search for a child.
She has been quoted as saying
that Tommy left Britain on an
Irish passport and tells her other
children that he has "gone to a
fairyland fax away."_______
Zones Schools Had Humble Beginning
The Canal Zone schools, [ grown 1,000 by November 1908
which will observe American Ed- and the educational system had
ucation Week from Nov. 11 reached such proportions that
through 17, had a very humble it' was made Jf separate division
beginning.
Although the United SUtes
secured control of the Canal
Zone In 1904. the first public
school under the jurisdiction of
the United States Government
did not open until January 2,
1908.
That first school, at Corozal,
was equipped with 'arrowed
tables and chairs, a few sample
textbooks and only the meager
supplies that could be gathered
on the Isthmus that day. There
were seven pupils in attend-
ance.
At the time the American
schools were organised, no more
than 160 pupils were attending
the sketchy municipal schools
that existed before the United
States took over the Canal Zone.
The first allotment of funds
for schools m the Canal Zone
was authorised June 24, 1905. by
William Howard Taf.t, Secretory
of War In Theodore Roosevelt's
cabinet. His authorisation to the
Isthmian Canal Commission ap-
portioned $30,000 of Canal Zone
Government money for an edu-
cational psogram.
Originally established under
the supervision of the Collector
of Revenues, the schools were
turned over to the Bureau of merit.
and placed under the direction
of the Department of Law and
Government
The constantly shifting pop-
ulation of the Canal Zone dur-
ing construction days made the
provision of permanent school,
buildings impossible. Structures!
of various kinds were Uken ov-
er and remodeled for use as;
school houses. Many were poor-
ly designed and no reasonable
amount of rebuilding made j
them suitable for use as schools.!
Up to November 1906, only
$8,864 was spent for school-
house construction a figure
that gives some Indication of
the nature of early school
buildings.
The hustle, noise and distrac-
tion of construction activities on
every hand made it nearly Im-
possible to secure school sites
with proper surroundings for
study.
School desks, seats and other
supplies were also difficult to
secure vth shipping facilites
taxed to the maximum in get-
ting construction materials to
the Isthmus In as short a time
as possible. It was not until
1009, that there was a sufficient
supply of this type of equlp-
Munlclpalltles In May 1906. By
that time, the number of schools
had grown to 18. which were
conducting regular classes, and
the enrollment had climbed to
811. The teaching force that
year toUlled 21.
The number of students had
Although exact cost reports
are not available, there Is evid-
ence that no more than $4,744
was spent for Canal Zone edu-
cation to the 1905 fiscal year.
Despite the generous allotment
of $90,080 for schools made by
Secretory .of War Taft In 1905,
GORGONA SCHOOL December 1904.
the budget for the Canal Zone a building program of 12 schools nal, was established, the Dlvi-
government for the following and contemplated expenditures slon of Schools was placed in
fiscal year provided only $11,400 amounting to the staggering to- the Executive Department un-
for educational purpose. tal of $16,000. der the Jurisdiction of the Ex-
. ecutlve Secretary.
The first real drive for more By 1910, the enrollment had An extensive building pro-
adequate school housing came reached 1.259. gram was undertaken in 1916
from one-time Executive Sec- School property the following when several permanent and
retary H. D. Reed In a request year had reached a total value modern concrete school build-
to the head of the Department of $160.000. uigs were created,
of Law and Government, Rich- When the Canal was eomplet- By 1920, the value of school
ard R. Rogers, then In Washing- ed In 1914 and the permanent
ton, D. C. The request covered organisation. The Panama Ca- (Continued an Page 6. Column 87
I
j^
bEH jj.

*


FACE TWO
ss
THE 8FNDAY AMERICAN
f.
Helicopters Hurdle Old Ideas
B.. ri(-MI/~l ir iri-rn
IPWPAT, WOTHlttta U, igg
fly DOUGLAS LARSEN
WASHINGTON, Nov. 10 (NEA)'- Helicopters are
about to beat guided missiles and atomic weapons in re-
volutionizing modern warfare.
Hert are some of the radical changes taking place in
ib* services as a result of experience with the "flying
windmills" in Korea:
In three or four years it is predicted the Army will be
spending more for helicopters than for trucks. There are
plans to spend a half billion dollars to equip each division
with 'copters.
There are now just about as many men in helicopter
flight training as are learning conventional flying.
The Marine Corps has com- there, explains the advantages of
pletely scrapped its World War the triphibious operation this
II basic plans for takine beach- way:
e$. New name is "triphibious "The helicopter permits en-
operation'' ough dispersion of an Invading
It envisions moving all first task force to make it safe a-
wave! hi by helicopter with later gainst atomic attack,
resupplv as the onlv landing ship "Helicopters "
function As a result the Navy because thev
ias cut way back on buying
andlng craft
Army tacticians are busy re-
writing the book on the speed
with which units can be moved
by helicopter.
Flying windmills eliminate the
oesd for many supply dumps
They completely revise old
limitations on the mobility and
itriking force of ground units.
Arid the present strategic
picture lor the defense of West-
increase surprise
are faster than
landing craft. They make de-
fense by the enemy many times
more difficult because defend-
ers not only have to protect the
beach but any convenient land-
ing place far back from the
MA..'.* L *CX, Jt., 1
And the forces are put down eratlons expert. He says-
all in one place ready to fight
as a compact unit, without first
having to waste time assem-
bling."
In an actual combat test In
Britons Think Over Their Election,
Generate Only Slight Enthusiasm
'nl,s PREVIEW: Important part helicopter, can play In moving combat troop, up to
the front lines fast was demonstrated in thi, combat airlift by U. S. Marines in Korea tWa Fall"
ii_;.. vl wii_-"*'"-" *" n acmai comoat test in
em Europe, the helicopter en- Korea, Capt. Armstrong reveals
hancea the value of limited allied that 1000 men were moved 16
divisions against greater Com- miles up to a front line in four
I more than the hours with 12 heUcoptera
highly-touted atomic weapons
according to the expert*.
Marine Capt. Victor A. Arm-
atrong of Portland, Ore., who pi-
oneered the use of helicopter In
Korea with the first squadron
The Armv'e nth,..!.. *. C; Mftthn,_y &&&*'each Fether V providing better liaison
yhVttffaSK company will have 31 transport Between command?.
ansiad bv cS\ rh.\i KfiW1 and tW0 ""i11 heU" L00*"1" eve ** Into the
Mathenv Jr PtaVtu? C?te" i0r coramnd *< <=n- future. Capt. Armstrong doesn't
a ions exnert He iSL"* P~ nai*an Purpeaw. think that the Navy's new one-
"The use"ohrtirSS2 _. Amit' **.Pi*& be capable man helicopters, which trap to
new concenu FzS&SFJSZ? 0f transPrt ? one "" the lhe back- sufficiently proven
"tans which??ar fiXJSSZl Personnel and equipment for the yet to make predictions on what
cSS-S'S Ctah"e S rutc^SeT 0l *" ""^ ffiy*" d <" ** -
su'aSS sb &jsgtaesieb*tta,ion at one time- her-
its to provide greater mobility, at an average speed of 60 miles
With trucka it would have tak-
the Marines with 'the flying
windmills has proved Just as sue-
--- -----a-------- r* ^ ^.p m
rapid means of tranaport for In-
fantry unit."
ONLY PHYSICISTS BOTHER ABOUT.....
Guided Missiles In Manhattan
Rv million rime. ^m m a %* f
hour.
All of these tactical advant-
age.', he says, are in addition to
the tremendous advantage the
helicopter has alraady proved In
moving out the Injured, in rescue
work, In artillery potting and
in welding all unit* closer to-
By RICHARD KLEINER
NEW YORK, Nov. 10. (NEA)
- When you think about guided
missile research, you Imagine it
uat be done on orne tretch
of deserted land far from cltie.
But a large part of it goes on
m New York, across tha treet
from a brewery and In the sha-
dow of the clattering Third
Avsnue "El."
Hare Is an unimpressive little
fculldlng. guarded like the Inner
sanctum at Fort Knox.
5-'" bnwwn familiarly ma
. The House on 91st Street," ro-
mantically as "Project Cyclone,
and officially a* the Reeres
Instrument Division of Claude
Kaon, faje.
., Inelde the building some 1800
Bidple Work around the clock
!any are closeted Inside rooms
labelled "Restricted."
t'a here that some of the Arm-
ed Forces' most Important tests
of guided missiles take plaet.
What makes possible guided
missile flight* in mldtown Man-
hattan Is something called a
REACReeves Electronic Analog
Computer.
- This computer is a mechanical
brain that thinks in terms of
"things" rather han numbers.
For example. It can be set up
te do Its thinking about wind
pressure and missile weight and
flight distance, whereas the usual
mechanical computer does only
Complicated mathematical prob-
lems Involving dlvlts
Its anwer also differs from
that of the standard computer,
which prints a solution In num-
ber.
The REAC Is tied into a roll
f graph paner and a nen.
which trace the flight pattern
f a guided missile. The so-
lution is thm visual.
Here's now It works. The REAC
-ft. uaually, a battery of REACs
u given a problem, uch u to
find out how far a test model
misslla will po under every con-
ceivable wsnther condition and
how accurate It flight pattern
will be.
Dial and wltehe are et to
simulate fhe teat craft it
weight, the fuel it uses, its speed,
1U course.
Then th wind velocity, the
pull of gravity and all other for-
ces that play on an aircraft'
flight are plotted on other dial
and switches.
The machine 1 tarted.
It ftit.e on "true time"the ac-
tual ti-.e t wo'ild take the mls-
alle tn fIvalthough th flight
u often iowed down or speeded
op for researrh purposes
During the eoune of the run,
the machine can be alterednew
forrea brovtM to play on the
mlaaile or o:d force changed.
A4 the while, a crew of Mm.
bespe<*tac>d phylclU hover
round, checking the reulti.
Thev watrh as the pen traces
--vertng line on the gra-:h
penes-.
To them, each m-.rk menns
eomellilr.g about the nils-lie's
behavior in .nace Mnd ho^v ell
it erj be conrrolled
Vf-lovM colored ight glow as
ne-v factors are brought to bear
on the Imaginary missile.
Cord, like 'hose on a telephone
witcobcard. are plugged in and
te]yo 't.
~'r dials are turned lightly.
a*,.cnes p.,lied, needles on doz-
en of meter flutter. There 1 a
*g#entl humming a the tubes
nn! t.arena,bout 3000 of ttM n
one big REAC aet-up-do their
electronic damdet to peed the
missile along.
Each problem U run through
hundred of time. Each run has
some slight variation of condi-
tion.
Every conceivable arrangement
of the conditions Is tested
Thus the Navy and the Air
Force know, even before they
build a model of a missile, what
its performance will be.
Oecasalonally, all or part of an
actual missile Is brought Into the
lab. It Is hooked up to the REAC,
which takes off on an electronic
flight.
..The real mlaaile la watched as
the REAC operates, and the
scientists note how the missile's
rudder moves or what its ailer-
ons do under every condition.
The Installation avea time
and money.
Once the Navy asked Claude
Neon to test a mlaslle. They had
already had a taff of tatl-
tlclans, armed with pencil and
-Ude rule, figure out how It would
behave.
The Navy's project took six
months and $72,000. The Claude
Neon REAC lab got the same re-
sult m two weeka at a cost of
$3000.
The lab Is ponsored by the
Navy, but does research for all
branches.
Missile, however, are only one
weapon that can be tested In the
REAC lab.
They've done work on sub-
marines, jet engine, Jet plane*
r.nd automatic pilota.
All thl goes on while passers-
by outside seldom even notice
th? building.
They're too busy smelling the
"-' mr!t odor from the brew-
0-1 th treet.
He feel that the greatest fu-
ture In this particular field lies
In the convertiplano, an aircraft
which can go up and down as
well a fly forward a fait a* a
conventional plane, and heli-
copter which can haul heavy
field pieces and tanks.
The Howard Hughe lrm m
California has a big new Jet heli-
copter, oon to fly, which la ex-
pected to lift a medium tank
over a mountain.
By FERN RICH
LONDON, Nov. 10 (NEA)
With Mr. Churchill back to put
a bulldog face on thing, other
countries might begin to respect
England again."
Mrs. Alan Irwln was gardening
around her neat white stucco
house in the Conservative ub-
urb of Wlnchmore Hill. With her,
like with most Briton, the 1951
British general election was still
a very emotional thing. The de-
bate continues to rage.
"In order to make ends meet,"
Mrs. Irwin went on, "and to send
the boys to school decently drea-
sed and to furnish the house we
just bought, I have to go out and
work part time. It's we middle
class that's been neglected." ,
But milkman Henry T.vler, a
staunch Laborite, was bitter over
the result.
"I've still got a memory, which
other people don't ssem to have.
I can remember 1918 and the
years after.
"I was a lad then, but I re-
member the starvation and the
rags on our feet and the old man
out of work. It's the men my age
who'll,alway vote Labor. Now I
can't say what's going to hap-
pen to us."
In her electrical appliance
?hop. Miss Dorothy Oswald aaw
things differently.
"I dread to think what would
have happened If Labor had
won," she said with a delicate
grimace. "Buslnes would have
been thoroughly crushed- Why,
look at the (took on the shelves.
Half Its value eaten up by pur-
chase taxes I"
John Whiiehead, a cheerful,
red-bearded hemlstthe British
equivalent of druggist-had an-
other view of business problems.
"What some of us dont stop to
consider," he said In a booming
voice, "la how much higher prices
would have been and now much
sooner Inflation would have come
If the Tories had been In."
Landscape gardener Albert
Ballard pat hi Conservative
views In an rat nutshell.
- "A drastic % disease needs' a
drastic cure," h said phllosoph-
loally.
Bui driver Herbert Smith,
wearing a Urge, round Labor
Party button on his uniform, left
no doubt of his political leaning.
"I think the Labor Party was
al^EW
g*
Hi jjx
^t35r.
/ ,
W r i^g. M
I ^<
Mu t '4!
ELLIN 8ANDFORS: "Now
well be baek te ... no one la
the middle."
doing all right by the working
man," ha said sadly. "*"'*
"We> go full employment
now and that's more than we had
when I was a boy.
"I remember my dad being out
of work for along, long spell. And
that's what we're going to have
again under the Conservatives "
In his coy sitting room in
Wlnchmore Hill, Rev. C. G. Fron-
ds Dare sat near the fire with
his full teapot. He was unasham-
edly elated about the election
resalta. -
"Frankly, we've always been a
Conservative family, but that's
not a good enough reason for
voting. Is It?
"Honestly feel that the Con-
servatives are' the only people to
get us out of the present econo-
mic and International meet.
"Certainly relations between
England and America In the past
six years have been atralrjad and
1 think the Churchill group can
remedy that and deepen the
friendship between the two
countries.
"This Is Tery important, be-
cause we do heed Amerlea'a help.
dont we?"
At the rreengreeer's, pretty,
blende Ellen Sandford, Just
turned 21, exchanged political
beater with her Omeemtlve ?
customer.
*I dldnt get registered in time
to vote." she aid, "but If I had,
the Labor Party would have had
my vote.
"Now well be baek to having
a lower class and an upper class
and no one In the middle."
That's how it goes In England,
these days. The election la over,
but the speeches go on.
CONVERTIPLANO Aircraft like this"ana by Gyrodyne, which
can go up and down libe a helicopter and fly forward aa
fast as conventional planes, may be the anewer to Army
and Marine Corp transport problems, according to aome
military experts.
ON LOCATION WITH 'THE DESERT FG/i'
REV. C. G DARE: The only
people to Ret us cat at the
esent me.
IMRBtRT SMIfH: Th U-
ber Farty wae doing all right"
mm---------
MRS. ALAN IRWIN: 111 we
middle class that's been ne-
glected (by Labor)."
I

M^MAl
th,2.fc In FU*RY ?,F E N0RTH AFRICAN CAMPAIGN become
Tw.n7i.th r? t "MJy Hg:':X y in ,:,min9 "Th 0rt Fox,"
on52 B >i 1 nowrTc!; 3 J < -w of technician, and actors
qreri2L7 \ Airza.Cs:-'t ''* C ,:, Hathaway guided the
toTZa^Ia f m' 1* M" '<* Gneral Pat-
ton conducted maneuvers there during the war. German tank,, upper
left panel, prepara to go Into action before the cameras while James
Mosorl as Rommel, center panal, keeps a watchful eye on the course
of battla. Director Hathaway, upper right panal, rides tha camera dolly
as technicians erupt the desert sand with explosives. What tha cmaro
f.lmed is shown in tha panel below. "Tha Oasert Fox" was produced
and written for the screen by Nunnollv Johnson who bossed tha itory
on tha biography of Rommel by Brigadier Desmond Young.
Santa up a treet
RADIO STATION HOG will help you
tell CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS about youi1
tremendous selection of Christmu
gift-ware things to delight
everyone from toddlers to Silver.
haired grandpas!
SHOP BARLY. don't be "dogged" by
last minute gift woesl
4 '
.


>

I
I
> I

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE

Radi Programs
Your Community Radio Station


HOG-840
Where 100.000 People Meet
Presents
TJfcPH-T" -.-


Sunday, Nev. 11
:0fr-fn On. -Musical Inter-
.. lude
M5Newsreel UBA. (VOA)
1:30Hymn of 11 Churches
1:00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OF
. THEAIR
9:15Good Neighbors
9:36London Studio Melodies
(BBC)
10:00In the tempo of Jan
10:30Your American Music
lllOO-NATIONAL LOTTERY
11:1The Sacred Heart Pro-
ma
11:30Meet the Band
12:00 Invitation to Learning
r.M.
13:30Salt Lake Tabernacle
Choir
1:00The Jo Staf iord Show
1:15The Chorallers
1:30Re v. Albert Steer
2:00Drama and Symphony
Hbur
4:30what's Your Favorite
6:00The Heritage of Britain
(BBC)
l:S0Mus'c of Donald Voorhees
, (VOA)
7:0American Round table
(VOA)
7:30Living m an Atomic Age
(BBC)
7:45Radio Varieties U.S.A.
:00Sports Roundup and News
(VOA)
from Congress
- i
< ,:"
i ; >
o rr.

Wednesday, Ndv. 14

:*7W
t:308how Time (VOA)
1:49The Letter Box (VOA)
:0OUnited Nations Review
(VOA)
:30The Bing Crosby Show
IB: 00BC Concert Hall
ll:oe-SitnO
Monday, Nov, 12
AM.
1:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
:14SEWS (VOA)-
:J0Homing Varieties
8:45^Mnslc Makers
*00V-News
: 15Stand By For Adventure
9:30-As FSee It
10:00NeWs
10:08Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Cont'd)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
ML' '
11:05Luncheon Music
12:SQ-Hit Parade (VOA)
1:00News
1: 15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15It's Time.To Dance
2:3dAfternoon Melodies'
2:43Battle of the Bftnd
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3.lSWThe Little BhOw
3:30Music' for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Show
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00 British Masterpieces
(BBC).
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Kellog Program
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary.
Raymond Swing (VOA)
g:15-Platter parade (VOA)
45Youth Talk* it Over
(VOA)
9:00Story DBA". MVOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports and News (VOA)
10:00The World At Your Win-
dow (BBC)
11:00ThefOWl's Nest
Midnights-Sign Off.
Tnesday, Nov. 11
AM. .
:80-SignOn .
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
1:15NEWS (VOA)
6:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
B;30As I see It
10:00News and Off the Record
10:05Off the Record
11:00News and off the Record
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News and Luncheon Mu-
ele
P.M.
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15 Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15It's Time to Dance
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Notes on Jan
3:00All Star Concert Hail
3.15The Little Show
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15French in the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorita
5:30NEWS
5:35What's Your Favorite
. (Contd.)
6:00British Masterpieces
(BBC)
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Paul Tiinple iBBQ)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary-
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Twenty Questions (VOA)
8:45Arta and Letters (VOA) .
9:00Jo Stafford (VOA)
9:15Radio Forum (VOA) .
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45-4Bports. and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00-lBBC Playhouse
11:00The Owls Nest
12:0-fflgn Off
-
Friday, Nov. 16
S
'
6:00Sign On Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Morning Salon .
8:15News (VOA)
:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Hawaiian Harmonies
9:00News
9.'15Sacred Heart Program
:S0As I Sea It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
FJI.
1:00News
i3i-jp
titPersonality Parade
1:46Rhythm and Reason
2:00A Calf From Lea Paul
2:15 Date for Dancing
2:30Spkftof the Vikings
2:45Battle of the Bands
2:00All Star concert Hall
::15The Little Show
:30 Music for Tuesday
4:00Radio University
4:15Promenade Concert
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00 PANA MSICA 8TORY
TIME
: 15Evening Salon
7:00Ray's A Laugh (BBC)
7:30PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:45Jap Session
:o0NEWS (VOA)
: 15What's On Your Mind
8:46Time for Business (VOA)
9:00Symphony Hall
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sporta World and Tune ot
Day (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Variety Bandbox (BBC)
12:00Sign Off
11:00The Owl's Nest
Ttrandey, Nov. IS
AM. v .
6:00Alarm dock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8 :UNEWS-(VQA)
6:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presenta
9:00NEWS
9:15SACRED HEART PRO.
GRAM
9;30-AaI8ee,It
loroo-Nlrws
10:05Off the Record *
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEWS
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
U15Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN SCI-
- ENCE
2:00Call For Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing .
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3rl5The Little Show
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00PANAMUSICA STORY
TIME
6:15Evening 8alon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON 8PORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00-World News (VOA)
8:15Cross' country. U.S.A.
(VOA)
8:45Jam session (VOA)
8:ooMeet Eleanor Roosevelt
(VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA) .
9:45Sporta Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
AM
6:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7: SORequest Salon
:8:15News (VOA) ,
8:20Morning Varieties
8145Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30As I See It
10(00News and Off the Record
10:05Off the Record
11:00News and Off the Record
11105Off the Record CContd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
PAL
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30-Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personalltv Parade
1:45American Favorite
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15-^Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:46Battle of- the Bands "
2:00 All Star Concert Hail
3:16The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:30What's Your Favorita
6:00 British Masterpieces
(BBC)
6:15Request Salon
V; 00 Mayor of Caster bridge
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary
. Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Musical Notebook (VOA)
8:45Radio In Review (VOA)
9:00The Perry Como Show
(VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sporta and News (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of PC 49
(BBC)
11:00 The Owl's Nest -
1:00 aJn. Sign Off
f.

Satartay, Ner. 17
6:00Sign OnThe Alarm
Clock Club
7:30Jan Salon
8:15 News- (VOA)
era of
the World
Walking The Dog Pays
In Lost Golf Balls
8:46The Duke Steps Out
9:0O-Newa
1:16Women's World
9:30Highwayman's Hill (BBC)
10:00New
10:05Off the Record
11:00New
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet The Band
12:05NEW TUNE TIME (PAN-
AMUSICA)
ML
12:05New Tune Time
12:30The Football Prophet
1:00New
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Tour De France (RDF) .
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:80Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3(00March Time
3:16The Little Show :
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday '
4^0What's Your Favorite
6:00Guest 8tar
0:15Masterworks from France
(RDF)
8:45 American JTolk Songa
7:00Gay Paris Music Hall
.- (fcDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam 8easion.
3:00Newsreel UAA. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA) '
8:45Battle Report.(VOA)
9:00Radio University (VOA)
9:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9:30Radio Amataurs Program
(VOA)
9:45Sports. Tune of Day and
News(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 am^-Slgn Off
BALTIMORE. Md.. Nov. 10
(UP.) Jack Maakell has a
Boston terrier that makes him
the envy of every golf duffer a-
round here.
The terrier, named Boy, has a
special talent for finding lost
golf balls.
Maskell said Boy firat began
about three years ago when he
was walking him by a golf course.
Boy dashed off on a tangent and
came back with a lost golf ball
in his mouth.
Since then the dog has re-
trieved about 3,500 lost balls.
Maakell said that when he
takes the dog on dally walks in
the vicinity of the golf course
he generally cornea up with a-
bout 20 baila a day.
Sheriff Urges Shearinf
Younr Hoodlums' Hair
EL FASO. Tex. (UF:) El
Paso County's sheriff, Jimmy
Hicks, believes a short hair cut
for all long-haired Juveniles ar-
rested will -take the conceit out
of Juvenile gang members.
"AH gang members, especially
the leaders, take pride'in their
loner hair.'' the sheriff said. "If
the young hoodlums' duck tall
shaped locks were snipped I'm
sura U would deflate their ago."
Northern Sea Lane
Open To Russians,
Experts Point Out
STANFORD UNIVERSITY,
Calif., Nov. (UF.) Russia has
a ready route for shifting her
iilps from the Atlantic-Baltic
srea to the Pacific along the
Siberian coast, according, to Dr.
Anthony E. Sokol, Stanford naval
historian.
In an article In the U. 8. Naval
Institute Proceedings, Dr. Sokol
pointed out that the Russians
can send 200 to 300 ships over
that route from July to Sept-
ember.
Passage of a warship through
those, ice-clogged seas seemed
Impossible until recently, Dr.
Sokol .believes. He said the mil-
itary aignlfleaoce of the voyage
may not yet be fully realized out-
side Russia.
Veyage By Naaia
In August, 1940, the Nazi war-
ship Schiff 45 made the voyage
with eaae behind Russian Ice
breakers. The ship completed the
last leg of the voyage without
help.
Chart of the voyage showed
previous information about ice
condition of the northern aea
were misleading. Dr. Sokol thinks
a Siberian route affords greater
security than the Panama Canal
routai
"The Siberian coast must now
be considered Just .as much an
Integral part of Russian military
power as the American west
coast," he wrote'.
Dr. Sokol suggested the Bering
Strait Is the beat place to cut
off the northern sea route. He
warned we should prepare de-
fenses on the Alaskan coast to
meet the problem.
Men Seen Getting
Fussy Over Clothes
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. (U.P.)
Fashion conscious American
mates, who seldom get to see any
noticeable changes in their war-
drobe, will demand innovations
of comfort next fall.
That's the opinion of the Cali-
fornia's Men's Apparel Club,
which predicts that the mas-
culine clothes horse Is going to
want lighter weight goods on his
back from now on.
Sol Greenbaum, of Los Angeles,
retiring' president of the CMAC,
says the general trena in men's
clothing is toward "greater com-
fort."
He aays manufacturers are
making their fall merchandising
plana on that basis.
Among the Innovations, ac-
cording to Greenbaum: An over-
coat lining made of synthetic
material with a light weight in-
sulation that gives aa much
warmth aa a ten ounce flannel
lining hut is leas bulky.
. Feather weight shoes also are
the coming thing, and for that
reason suede is the predicted fa-
vorite for male footwear in the
fall.
Tim comfort trend will be car-
ried out with a new "laceless"
shoe which the club's fashion
experts say combines the ease of
a "loafer" with the support of
an oxford.
Other changes forecast for
men's clothes this fall Include a
two-collar shirt, one with a long j
wing and one with a short wing. I
New Chapter Opens In Story
Of No. 10 Downing Street
WASHINGTON, D.C. Nov. 10
A famous green door with a lion's
head knocker haa swung open a-
gain for the new Prime Minister
of Britain's victorious conserva-
tive government.
The door la the one leading to
Number 10 Downing street,
which, by virtue of his office,
once more haa become the offi-
cial residence of Winston Chur-
chill aa it was In the years from
1940 to 1945.
This modest-appearing house
on a quiet aide street off Lon-
don's Whitehall has been the
headquarters for British politi-
cal power since 1735, says the
National Geographic Society.
There, against a curiously dual
background of private and offi-
cial Ufe. the Prime Minister
meets with hla cabinet to discuss
and decide on affairs of state.
There, too, assembles one of
the most august bodies of the
British legal system, the Judicial
Committee of the Privy Council,
which decides appeals from the
British Commonwealth of Na-
tions around the world.
The story of Number 10
Downing Street gaes back to
the late 17th century and la
linked with early American
history In several ways.
Within its walls were made the
momentous decisions that led to
the American Revolution, and in
one of its rooms Lord North,
then Prime Minister, received
the news of the Boston Tea Par-
ty, and later of the surrender of
Comwallls.
The 8treet Itself was original-
ly named for Sir George Down-
ing, who had been taken to
America as a boy and educated
at the Infant Harvard College.
Returning to England, Downing
won the favor of Charles ll (af-
ter recanting his former Crom-
well allegiance), and waa per-
mitted to build four houses on a
"pretty open space" In Whitehall.
It was one of these houses which
eventually was to go Into the
making of Number 10 and spread
the name of Its owner wherever
British affairs are known.
First Prime Minister to live at
the Downing street house was
Sir Robert Walpole, who took It
over In 1735. Walpole had refus-
ed the place as a personal gift
from his sovereign, George n. but
finally accepted Its use on con-
dition that It be made the offi-
cial home of each First Lord of
the Treasury.
Since the British offices ol
Prime Minister and First Lord of
the Treasury are customarily
held by the same man, the house
Is fixed In public mind as the re-
sidence of the chief of the Brit-
ish government.
Winston Churchill, m addition
to his years of tenancy as Prime
Minister, was also a familiar
visitor there in various official
capacities. Including terms as
First Lord of the Admiralty In
two World Wars.
The mixture of home Ufe and
affairs of state carried on be-
neath its roof makes Number 10
a unique building. Much larger
than it appears from its simple
narrow exterior. It Is a labyrinth
of corridors and stairways, of of-
ficial meeting, dining and draw-
ing rooms, from which one may
wander into a small private sit-
ting room, a pantry, or kitchen.
On any threshold, visitors say.
a household pet Is as likely to
appear as a distinguished states-
man.
Town's Ex-Cop Devotes
His Time To Children
WESTVILLE, N. Y. (UP.)
A former town policeman has a
Job without pay. but enjoys it
more than most persons do their
regular Jobs.
Joseph Tucker Batten. 62, vol-
unteered to look after Westville
school children at busy highway
crossing every day. Affectionate-
ly known as "Tuck." the ex-pat-
rolman devotes several hours a
day to keep the school children
safe.
The job calls for no salary, al-
though at the end of last term,
the board of education made a
gift of $50 in appreciation for
Batten's efforts.
"I refused to take any salary
for this," Batten said. "I didn't
do it for that. I'm hare because
I like to be with kids. After be-
ing with them for so many years
on the force, It's part of my life."
Onlookers Baffled
By Secret Airplane |
NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y.,
iU.Pi The highly secret I
X-lA experimental alrplane|
moved from the Bell plant
to the Bui fallo airport in s\
pen trailer but company
men said nothing vital
vealed.
"Although the plane la
topsecret category. Its ext
appearance Is no secret
looks almost exactly like thi
iginal supersonic Bell X-l
spokesman explained.
The plane was taken to I
Cornell Aeronautical Labora
at Buf ialo airport for Installs
of additional instrument*
paratory to test flights. No!
tion was made of the site or I
for the tests.
MONES START FARM
ELMIRA, N. Y. (UF.) With
two cows. 50 chickens, three farm
buildings, 500 acres and a red
jeep, four Benedictine monks
have begun a monastery near
here which they intend to make
self-supporting through commer-
cial dairy returns.
KEEPS A FELLOW HUMPING !
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Nipper knows: Aa RCA VICTOR RADIO makes the
best Christmas present in the world !
PANAMA RADIO CORPORATION
St Central Avenue Phones: 2-3364 2-2566
Explanation ef Symbssa:
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp-'
RDF Radlodlffusion Francalae
Vet Finds Bullet
In Wrist 33 Years
After World War
NEWBURGH, N. Y., Nov. 19.
(UP,) For J3 years, John W.
McCarthy; 5, carried a World
War I bullet fh his left wrist and
did not know It.
The discovery came as a reault
of an accident. McCarthy slipped
and fell. Injuring hla wrist. The
fall apparently dislodged the
bullet, causing considerable pain.
He went to a doctor, who X-ray-
ed the wriat.
Although the X-rays indicated
presence of the bullet. McCarthy
waa. skeptical. He submitted to
an operation, however, and there
U the bullet.
McCarthy faintly recalls that
one morning In November, 1911,
he noticed a trickle of blood on
his wrist after taking part In an
altnight artillery barrage. Think-
ing It was. nothing more than.a
scratch, he wiped the blood off
and forgot about It.
THIS CHRISTMAS
WISH IS RIGHT
FROM THE
BOTTOM OF
HER HEART
Al**//* X0W0
Mutch it rifh Pwtrfu. Cni+9'mt, Btdtftrnidr...
Alt* enticing L it m / /
W/f'pfi/tfe X*fhrn M/tre
CORNER "H" -ad Parian Street Phone: 2-2181
Alee la COLON: Front Street la "Arena de Colea' Building Tel 1212
COME IN BROWSE AROUND USE YOUR
XMAS DOLLAR



I




age roc
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
)essert Key to Budget
8UNDAT, NOVEMBER 11, INI
"

t'.....
omen's world



-Mandbayi jtn Various JabricS
mar
i -
. M1.K1HT: Fresh pin.**>l* host with W* M d
frslU, alas a luscious orsw nursachin* HIM.
1 t
dinner, like young love, needs
ches of sweetness. Sundaes
p delightful desserts that rest
Jlry within a bride's food bud-
Let'i begin today's lesson on
i ll-fed matrimony with a fresh
lespple.
Summer Sundaes
(Makes 2 servings)
One-half fresh pineapple. 1
,flt vanilla Ice cream from the
-Jrner tore.
Cut a fresh un peeled pineapple
, half, leaving on the leaves.
oop out the center. Spoon Ice
(am into hollow and serve with
nge maraschino sauce. straw-
fries, orange slices, bananas
Ay also be served with sauce.
t: Save pineapple to serve to-
TOW.
Maraschino Orange Sauce
(Make* 1 cup sauce)
lie-third cup orange Juice. 1
ileapoon lemon Juice. 1/2 cup
4 maraschino cherries.
1/2 cup heavy cream,
ed.
ombine orange Juice, lemon
ce and sugar; bring to a boll.
T" In cherries. Cool to luke-
xm. Fold in whipped cream.
Serve over ice cream and
man cannot live on
. alone. And with meat
/ ees so high, the budgeting
^de must go fishing for other
V -s of first-class protein.
Fish Fillets En Papillote
(Make 2 to 3 servings)
One pound fish filleU (had-
dock, halibut, sole i. cut Into 4
fillets, 2 tablespoons butter, 1/3
garlic clove, peeled and finely
diced. 1/3 cup finely chopped cel-
lery. 1/3 cup finely chopped green
pepper. 3/4 cup firmly packed
1 soft bread crumbs, 1/4 cup crack-
, er meal, 1 teaspoon salt, 1- tea-
i spoon dry mustard, dash of pep-
per. 1 egg, i teaspoon vinegar.
2 tablespoons commercial sour
I cream.
Cover fish fillets with hot. not
boiling, water; add 1 teaspoon
salt. Simmer for 5 minutes. Re-
move from heat and drain.
Meanwhile, melt butter In frying
pan over low heat; add onion
and garlic and cook until tender
and golden brown, about 10 min-
; utes. Add celery and green pep- |
per; cook until well heated, but
not browned, about 5 minutes,
i Remove from heat. Add hot ve-
getable mixture to bread crumbs
and cracker meal In bowl. Stir
in salt, mustard and pepper. Beat
In egg. vinegar and sour creara,
(blending well. Place each fillet
1 on piece of brown wrapping pa-
per large enough to completely
cover fillet. Divide stuffing into
4 portins. Place portion of stuf-
' fin on one end of fillet and fold
over. Wrap securely in paper.
Place wrapped fillets on baking
sheet and bake In moderately
hot oven (400 degrees F.) for 10
minutes. Remove from oven;
unwrap and serve hot with cold
sour eream pickle sauce.
t VL P.
ure
bag (up'i"l'.l" h.sVhurer fh.awl'na,W?rdr0b miht vn> we <""> bags. Brown satin cvlln,
to-fes ffg ba^hRedhcowhid.ec.rr^^,F(0^7et *ZS2ft!?t 22? JT38 can gray flannel briefcase (hr rirht) 212? U, 'f1 c"i ?p,?e ,u*We n overnight trip, u
it bag. P^k moirejXH^I/'ffi, ggg g MMKSX SlfflSSS ^
yllnder
spicy
^*****"
C)'n<

-1 ^r .
BY GAILE DCGAS.
MA Woman's Editor
~~ accented with shades of brown
NEW YORK (NEA) In or black. Dark and light gray
this year of rich fabrics, the flannel, gray wool broadcloth
handbag you carry may well be and gray suede all look new
fabrlccued to the suit, coat or The oversize bag has become
dress that you're wearing. New the right bag for travel wear But
bags in broadcloth, antelope, it's also useful to the career girl
flannel, checked and plaid wools, every day. Daniel Ritter does one .
corduroy, velvet and even fur of these in charcoal gray flannel comb and com purse,
make the matter of picking a with black calf handle at a bud-
handbag wardrobe fun. get price.
There is leather, certainly, and Interior is fitted with zippered
sometimes its used with fabric, pockets and places for papers
uede becomes partner to calf and notebooks. Its nearly brief
case size. Another of these is a
red cowhide carry-all by Com-
panion, stitched la white, light
in weight and equipped with neat
top-handles.
\ ARY THE BREADS YOU SERVE FOR BREAKFAST ] o*
yary cereals and beverages. Don't let the Danish pastrT** wM
toast routine become too much of a habit; have raisin toast ae-
ra .slop ally, (f your family likes it, or hot breakfast 'muffin*. Ca-
lina the recipe below an excellent way to put new nark lnt
early-morning appetites. Fragrant muffins, wrapped inside a
snowy napkin, nestling In a pretty basket. Crisp, malt-flavored
Post's Grape-Nuts Flakes give these muffins a delicious flavor
and chewlness. Spread with butter and topped with orange
marmalade, they're a happy answer to your starch for "something
different." Follow the steps described for mixing them, fof you
can spoil a good muffin recipe by giving the dough too much
attention. Overstlrring makes peaks and tunnelsthat'* wh* IF
well to count the strokes.
HOT BREAKFAST MUFFINS


1 4 cup* tilted flour
i teaspoon* Calumet taking Powder
Vt teaspoon talt
s tablespoon tugar
1 egg. well-beaten
1 cup milk
3 tableepoont melted ehortentng
1 J4 cups Grape-Nuts Flaket
Sift flour once; measure; add baking powder, salt, and sugar,
and sift again. Combine eggs and milk and add all at once to
flour mixture; add shortening. To mix, draw spoon from aide of
bowl tor.-ard center (15 times), turning bowl gradually, cato
spoon through batter (10 times). Add cereal and mix (about
5 strokes). Turn into greased muffin pans, filling each about t/S
full. Bake in hot oven (429*F.) 22 minutes, or until done. Makes
9 large muffins.
HAVE YOU DISCOVERED the new, easy way to make French*
fried potatoeswithout peeling, slicing or frying? It's really
wonderful. You Just open a package of quick frozen Birds Eye
French Fries, heat them in the oven, and serve them immediately.
They turn crisp and brown white you prepare other foods, and
require no more attention than an occasional turn with a fork.
They come out of the oven all golden and delicious, ready to
pamper your meat course or sandwiches. There just is no better
way to make French fries ... no easier method, no tastier,
results. They're handy whenever you need them, if you keep
the package fresen. But better buy Birds Eye, if you waflt to be
sure of best quality.
ground, nothing has to be added
or removed to make perfect
BELIEVE IT OR NOT, there
really are people who like to
iron! They enjoy seeing the
wrinkles smooth out, the limp,
damp material turn fresh and
?-attractive again. And ironing
"^w,t",hM"M bro 3ff@tt-3*^NS* -asssxawasR
size takes its interest from its Lewis, for one, does a clutch hair it takes to coax an iron over a
takes its interest from Its
tawny shade. In satiny calf, this
George Morris design has top
handles that are in one piece
with the bag. A satin purse in
the center is fitted with mirror,
Lewis, for one, does a clutch bag,
the favored shape for evening,
in pale pink moire at a tiny
price. Fully fitted with coin
It takes to coax an
sticky starched surface. The
cloth resists the iron, and as a
result you spend more time and
price, runy rilled with coin result you spena moro usnc ui
purse, comb and mirror it closes energy on the task than 1 ne
"*"" '** ---- --- 'cessary. But if you use Satina
this
chocolate.
r *.*..,m suu iiijiiui, ti U1USC
neatly with polishes brass lock,
or patent, fabric bags get leather
touches. i i
Brown is to the bag this year,
fashion-wise, and is considered
the proper companion for black,
brown or gray flannels and for
tweeds. There are bags in black-
Charcoal gray tweed with a
furry coating of frosted white
turns up in a pouch bag with
kippered top by Lewis. Fabric
handle geta contrast treatment
hrough an interlacing
urass ring.
are
euy wun ponsnes brass lock cessary- **w> y uac "
Jeweled and enbroidered bags 'ln your hot starch solution, this
re important as foils for dressy doesn't happen. Satina is an
id semi-dressu intkaa tv._- ironing aid; coats the fibers of
the cloth with a thin film of
and semi-dressy clothes. Topaz
satin, for one, in a small box bag
by Calem gets rich gold bouillon
embroidery encrusted with tiny
white rhinestones and, ln ad-
with ditipn. a gold satin lining.
The cylinder bag, as don* by
initiated appear* in Margolin's
mese are the bags, by the way. spicy-toned suede satchel with
that can take nightgown, tooth- polished brass lock. This Is a city
1&KS&.3&3& ss&Sa -^ "^sys
elegance. Its lid is encrusted with
a huge fake topas ornament to
complement the brown.
rf/ot/iett
St,
own
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lasr.-*^
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Help Husband
Look His Best
HIV UM w.v*. m *.... .... v
wax so that when you start to
iron, presto! The Iron glides
smoothly and quickly over the
surface, without any dragging
or putting to slow It down.
That'* why women who use Sa-
tina say it makes their clothes
3 times easier to iron. Another
Satina "plus" clothes day
clean longer because the smooth
Satina finish Is glossier and
more resistant to dirt than it
would be with starch alone.
CHOCOLATE belongs at the Cop
of the list of Peoples Favorite
Flavors. In cakes, puddings, be-
verages, frosting*for young-
sters and for grown-ups. So it*
important that you meet the
demand with the very best-tast-
ing chocolate dishes. As you
probably know, chocolate comes
from cocoa beans which are
roasted, ground and liquified.
There are times in almwt
every married woman'* Ufe when
iiarticuiariu tr.,. ;. ,u- uiThe grade of the beans used i*
SSSSo^wh^^gSSS^" Pffi important, since it in-
turned-nut wif. ,,.t -f.itT.Jr y" Cuenca the flavor and rlch-
socUl sltuati? 2iSfAu*0 ne f te finished product. To
BRL *t.,0n coupled with an Kive your cooking and your fam-
IT'S IMPORTANT TO PHE-
HEAT THE OVEN before you
bake, so you'll have a steady,
even heat of the right tempera-
ture by the time' you're ready
to use it. Always put your filled
baking pans near the center of
the oven, don't place one psn
directly over another, and don
crowd them too close together.
Baking secrets like these are Im-
portant, for they help to make
the most of your food dollars by
producing lovelier, finer-textur-
ed cakes and muffins. There ara
other details you should remem-
ber, like measuring ingredients
exactly, blending them correctly,
using the right pan sues and so
on. We haven't room to give
them all here, but well be hap-
py to send you a booklet that's
packed with useful baking In-
formation, callad "Learn to
Bake." This booklet is useful \
even to the most experienced*
cook. The recipes are accompa-
nied with clear photographs of
the steps necessary to mix and
blend their Ingredients. Chap-
ters and recipes are divided in-
to "lessons," so that if the coole
is a beginner, she can learn all
she needs to know about baking
from this single 80-page book-
let. We sincerely believe it's
worth many times 15c.so if
you'd like a copy, mall the cou-
pon below.
.,,.,.
untidy, poorly-groomed husband.
If your husband's don't-care
sppearance Is robbing you of the
chance to function as half of an
lly the topmost enjoyment,
you'll be wise to use a brand
that contains an especially fine
blend of cocoa bean*.. .Baker's
Premium #1. It's called "pre-
-__-- -----'"i un ui an premii
rivi him"? -Vntu* tb,e tlme mlum" chocol*t because the
the rreetiZ MESm "Uudge ln blend ot b**n U PriCt that
the direction of good looks. -after they are roasted and
Nagging does no good, as anv
Er whu? trtod lt can **3S.
More subtle measures ar to or-
der, ,
France Barton
Box g*3
Pa*m, R. d P.
Enclosed Is 15c. in coin. Please
send me a copy of "Learn to
Bake."
Name .......................
Addrass.....................

mmimimmwm1
NEW YORK--(NEA) -There slacks for her. no unkempt hair
are stars in Hollywood who al- no loafers unxempi nair,
llll'f urlllaxB eft *U .!. H__.
ways adhere to the rule that
when a movie star goes on a per-
sonal appearance tour, .she
should look like a movie star. Ac-
tress Eleanor Parker is one of
these. No mink coats flung over
Helpful Hints
iMiidenform B[i.i-r
adt Mlv ia tar I niird Sine, of Amenes.
On rbur in connection with her
newest ploture, "A Millionaire
.or Christy." Miss Parker wears
; lie wardrobe designed for her
uy Don Loper. The fashions in
a are clothes any woman would
like to own and might like to
copy, adapting them to her own ;
way of life.
A favorite of Miss Parker' for
atSi '*i0t.eet 70ul ,ron **&lnst c'cln8 wear is a short gow,
. glt,t0 ltarch when *>"*- rnat's a ean-jng gold sheath
?inK.HCl0t.^S .at havf bcen stir- ^amatfzed by cut-out gold-em
fened with this product, rub a broldered blaik velvet Over th s
lhf%PSSafhl(}nt0 the h0t Plate K0CS a b,ack velvet oat and the
I before you begin your smoothing culis have huge circles of black
oa* i fox trimmings.
. for late-day wear, there's a
full, flared skirt and a sleeveless
Peri ,n Pretil}!
2fe
fcrfayfasC\a$sfeJi
coSe'offl'w^a Sudy%Sm1^Tr^ PR
doing tnte the waning ffnu,?/ che,:Kerboard wool lined in red
.Taslp
Ithann^e^ffi'frelh^auT;. S f ^ -^
ZOLD WAVE
b Special 7-50
I'M'v* pmhakly limitet ur
pctmanrnti os Iher >IUh
un.n_V(ilBa will k* Uve-
y loo!
sh 2-1322
Ancon Beauty Shop
LOUIS IIARTMAN, Manager
Old Ancon Theatre Bldg.
.niSm*d ?f polntin ut the
condition of your spouse's shoes
H P"snting him with an ef-
ficient shoe-shine kit. This may
be nothing more elaborate than
a collection of polishes and
brushes in one corner of a kit-
chen drawer. The important
thing is to keep the equipment
handy. You might find the care
pf your own shoes less a chore
too, with all cleaning essentials
assembled to one spot.
If your husband can't be both-
eied with keeping his clothes free
of Imt and dust, you might
awaken his pride with a hand-
some hylon clothe brush. The
Job of keeping the brush washed
will probably fall upon your
shoulders, but this is a mall task
when you soak it. along with
your own brushes. In a detergent
, solution to loosen the dirt. Re-
member, too. to keep his hair-
I brush and combs a* spotless a*
your own.
Dormant masculine vanity can
sometimes be aroused bv simply :
providing a primping place forl
him. If your husband's comb 1*'
kept in the medicine chest along
with a welter of unattractive bot-'
tie*, or if hi* hair-grooming
I preparations get shoved out of
sight behind cosmetics on your I
vanity, it's no wonder he gets
discouraged and gives his hair a
Uck-and-promlse treatment .
Even if the bathroom mirror is
I the only feasible one ln the house
for your husband's grooming
rites, see to it that he has at
least one shelf set aside for his
own things.
A little effort on your part will
go a long way toward making
your husband look as neat a
you da
z
o
s
802 more 802 more 802 more
8
B
t
8
figures
that speak
for thcmielvef
**
Latt month THE PANAMA
AMERICAN sold 3285 cla-
claasrfiad ads as comparad
24*3 in all other daily pa-
papera in Panam com-
binad! \
802 more 802 more 802 more
Dog Tired Dave!
Oavid was a aasy fegew.
heaping aever left ate mellow!
Wars eat, weaiy. tired aad brave.
Why aot read aw Waat Ait, Aavet



%
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1951
. '
.....* iiVi
THE SUNDAY AMERICA!*
':'.
, .
tiu* rrrx
&, 17, &tl 31 &/l~ 352/
MR. AND MRS. LOWELL HOWARD BRENTNER, after their
marriage at the Port Amador Chapel, on Monday, November
fifth. Mrs. Brentner Is the former Bobble Ann Robinson,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Edward Robinson of Gamboa.
Mr. Brentner Is the son of Mrs. Grace B. Lindberg of Balboa.
AMBASSADOR AND MRS. WILEY
It) ENTERTAIN WITH RECEPTION
The Ambassador of the United States to Panama, John
Cooper Wiley, and Mrs. Wiley will entertain with a reception
in honor of the Western Hemisphere Service Attaches at she
o'clock on Wednesday, November 14th at the Embassy Resi-
dence on La Cresta. '" ';.
Four hundred guests have been Invited to attend the re-
ception'.
Representatives and Their Wives
To Arrive Monday
Members of the House of Rep
Mrs. Ann Dimmick, Mrs. Millie
Wentsler, Mrs. Sue Warner, Mrs.
i- Elsie Hanner, Mrs. Jean Smith,
resentatlves Committee of Barlk- Mrs. Henry Carpenter, Mrs. R. H.
. ... ..._ -i____i.... .-.-......*... fr. Mart* larnhi
ing and Currency and their wives
are expected to arrive Monday
for a visit to the Isthmus.
Those expected to arrive In-
clude the Honorable and Mrs.
Abraham J. Multer, the Honor-
able and Mrs. Ralph Robert
Stocwman, the Honorable and
Mrs. Herman T. Eberharter, the
Honorable and Mrs. Clinton D.
McRinnon. the Honorable Henry
O. Tulle and the Honorable Har-
die Scott. The group will be con-
ducted by Mr. W. Tanley Bennett,
Liaison Otfioer for the Depart-
ment of State.
Ambassador WHey to Honor
Representatives at Luncheon
The UnitedJ3tates Ambassador
to Panam, John Cooper Wiley,
wil Ibe host at a luncheon on
Tuesday, November 13th at one
o'clock to be given In honor of
the visiting House Committee of
Banking and Currency.
Those to be honored Include
the Honorable Abraham J. Mult-
er, the Honorable Ralph Robert
Stockman, the Honorable Her-
man T, Eberharter, the Honor-
able Clinton D. McKlnnon, the
Honorable Henry O. Tulle, and
the Honorable Hardle Scott. Also
to be honored at the luncheon
are Mr. Frank Kimball, Mr. Or-
man Fink, Mr. Ralph Roberts,
Commander C. F. Leigh and Mr.
W. Tapley Bennett:
Covers will be laid for twenty-
four.
Peruvian Ambassador and Mrs.
Zevallos Honor General Noriega
The Dean of the Diplomatic
Corps and the Ambassador of Pe-
ru to Panam and Mrs. Emilio
Ortiz de Zevallos entertained
with a dinner given Tuesday eve-
ning at the Embassy on La Cres-
ta, in honor of General Zenon
Noriega, the Minister of War of
Peru* who Is en route from Wash-
ington. D.C., to Lima. Peru.
Special Mission Ambassadors
Leave For Costa Rica
Mr. J. Lamarle and Mr. M. Le-
proust, the 8pecialTkllssion Am-
bassadors from the French Gov-
ernment to Latin America, left
by plane Friday for San Jos.
Costa Rica. During their stay of
several days on the Isthmus, the
visitors were entertained by the
Minister of France and Mrs. Guy
.Men ant.
Commander and Mrs. Halloran
Intertain With Cocktail Party
The officers of the visiting USS
Slack were honored by Conv-
mander and Mrs. Edward Roose-
velt Halloran with cocktails from
five to seven o'clock, Friday at
their quarters on the Fifteenth
aval District Reservation.
Commander John R. Beardall,
Jr., the commanding officer of
the USS Black, is the son of Rear
Admiral John R. Beardall, who,
luring 1945 and 1944 was the
Commandant of the Fifteenth
aval District.
Lieutenant Commander L. W.
adley Griffin, Mrs. Halloran's
rother. Is the Executive Officer
the USS Black.
About seventy-five guests were
resent.
_ Heurteraattc and Son
aves Isthmus
Mrs. Julio Heurtematte, with
yoiuv son. left Friday by
,tk tor Washington, D.C.. after
iveral months visit with reta-
in Panam.
Sower To Honor
s. Annicbarico
-. Today
Mrs. A. S. Zea will be the host
Carpenter, Mrs. Marie Jacobs,
Mrs. Hiram Overall, Mrs. Hazel
Blades. Miss Dorothy Hay ward,
Mrs. w. N. Dillon, Mrs. Gladys
Turner, Mrs. Uita Jennison, Mrs.
Gayle Keller, Mrs. Lucille Bear,
Mrs. Clarabella Hilliard, Mrs. Hll-
degarde Epperson, Miss Betty
Rosner, Mrs. William Davis. Mrs.
Mary Phelan and Mrs. George
Macoubray.
Mr. Morgan Is Recuperating
Mr. Charles F.*Morgan4 a pa-
tient at Gorgas Hospital after a
recent operation and friends will
be interested to know that he is
doing well.
Crdenas Club Meeting
Postponed .
The Crdenas River Garden
Club has postponed the regular
monthly meeting until Tuesday,
November 20th.
Music Group to Meet
Tomorrow
The Music Group of the Canal
Zone College Club will meet at
seven-thirty Monday evening at
the home of Mrs. J. Wendell
Greene, 105 Heights Road, Bal-
boa. Mrs. Nell Branstetter, co-
chairman, will present a program
on brass and woodwind instru-
menta and their music. All Cc-K
leee Club members are cordla.ly
invited to attend this meeting.
Members of this group are espe-
cially urged to be present, since
this Is the first meeting of the
club year.
Mrs. 'Morgan Announces Class
As Usual For Monday
Mrs. Pat Morgan, the instruct-,
or of Flower Arrangement Class-
es wishes to announce that
classes will meet as usual on
Monday morning at nine o'clock
and in the evening at seven
o'clock, at the Balboa YMCA.
Arrangements of fruits and ve-
getables Is the project for Mon-
day's classes and each member is
requested to bring his own mate-
rials. _
Buffet-Supper Tonight
At Hotel El Panama.
Starting at 7:00 p.m. a buffet-
suDPer will be served In the Bella
Vista Room of the Hotel El Pan-
ama.
Bingo Tonight '
Bingo will be played tonight at
the American Legion Club at Fort
Amador at 7:30. Prizes will be
awarded.
Elks "Turkey Shoot" to be
December 12. to conclude the
year's work.
The ladles present were Mrs.
Leon Egolf, Mrs. Alice Clement,
Mrs Robert Gorman, Mrs. Will-
lam Badders, Mrs. Lawrence
Chambers, Mrs. Sallle Foote Al-
len, Mrs. Joseph Irving and Mrs.
Lee Nash.
National Sojourners
Postpone MeeUng '
Caribbean Chapter No. 21. of
the National Sojourners will
not meet Monday evening, be-
cause of the holiday. The sup-
per meeting will be held at the
Fort Davis Officers Club Monday,
November 19 at 6:30 p.m.
Mrs. Walbrldie to
lleude in States I
Mrs. Mildred Walbridge has;
resigned her position op '
NW Arkansas P.C. Society
.i-s Reunion
Frnm the ""Northwest Arkan-
sas Times" Fayetteville, Ark.
lne Panama Canal Society of
Northwest Arkansas hel dits se-
cond semi-annual reunion Mon-
day, October 22. Dinner was
served at the Mountain Inn Ho-
tel to 34 ex-employes of the Pa-
nama aCnal and U.S. Govern-
ment who have lived In the Ca-
nal Zone."
"Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W.
Booth of Fayetteville Were hon-
ored on the occasion qt their
44th wedding anniversary and
William F. Mathues on his
birthday, by the presentation of
suitable cakes.
"Out of state guests were Mrs.
Kathryn Daniel of Ashevllle.
N.C., a composer of note, for-
merly of the Canal Zone; Mrs.
Columbia Relmann. Balboa, C.
Z.; Mrs. Julia Howe and Mrs.
Ella M. Lorio, New Orleans. La.;
Robert E. Rogers and Vernon L.
Clontz of the Canal Zone."
A business meeting was later
held at the home of the presi-
dent. Captain Jack Phillips.
Those present from Arkansas
were Captain and Mrs. Phillips,
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Booth, Mr.
and Mrs. J. C. McNeely, Mr. and
Mrs. A. J. Meigs. Mr. and Mrs.
Newell.N. Shaw, Mrs. Henry E.
Halltn, Mrs. George Cummings
and Miss Elizabeth Thomas, all
of Fayetteville; Mr. and Mrs.
William Mathues and Mr. and
Mrs. J. E. Fitzgerald of Spring-
dale; Mr. and Mrs. Lynn R. Cook
of Cogis; Mr. and Mrs. Ernest
Williams of BentonvUle; Mr. .and
Mrs. C. H. Miller of Farming-
ton; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Shir-
ley from Hot Springs; and Mr.
and Mrs. Lee Gelger from Jop-
lln. Mo.
(Book QrUf. .
BY UNITED STATES
In Melville Goodwin. U. S. A.
(Little Brown) John P. Mar-
quand has dissected the military
mind as personified by Maj. Gen.
Goodwin. Goodwin's whole life
was steeped in the service. His
personality shaped in the stand-
ardizing mold of West Point, he
became an excellent combat
leader, fearless and reliable. It
was this almost perfect fighting
machine but naive in civilian
ways who suddenly found him-
self exposed to the admiring ci-
vilian world through an incident
that brought him national fame.
His popularity also resulted in a
renewal of an affair with Dottle
Peale, whom he had met in Paris
during the war and had prac-
tically forgotten. The story is told
by Sidney Skelton, a radio com-
mentator who is drawn into Gen-
eral Goodwin's orbit in spite of
himself. Another notable char-
acter is Muriel, the General's
competent wife, who managed
his career from cadet daya. Mu-
riel views the General's affair
with Dottle Peale calmly, confld-
- thpt, the army will save him
and bring him back to his care-
,d io her. Marquand has
done bis usual expert job of
characterization and the General
will stay alive for many a' day
in the minda of the thousands of
readers who win follow the un-
folding of his career...
Return from the Pole (Pelle-
R...n ds cudahy) is Dr. Frederick
C. Cook's final effort to substan-
tiate his claim to have discover-
ed the North Pole and to "clear
my good name." He completed it
at the age of 70 in 1935, five years
before his death. In it. Cook
stands pat on his assertion that
he reached the North Pole on
April 21, 190*. nearly a full year
before Robert E. Peary.
He answers two of the most
controversial questions about his
Polar dashwhy his two Eskimo
companions testified he never
reached the Pole and why it took
the trio 12 months to get back
to their base camp.
Cook says he Instructed his two
Eskimos to keep the success of
their mission a secret and to de-
liberately mislead Peary.
As for their delayed return.
Cook contends they got lost on
drifting ice and were forced to
spend the long Arctic night hol-
ed up in a man-made cave.
THE CLOSING SESSION of the third Annual Youth Confer-
ence conducted by the Union Church Leaders at Margarita
Union Church in August 1951. Faculty members were: Rev.
Philip Havener, Rev. J. W. Llmkeman, Archie Sanchez, Mfs
Gehrard Lust, Mrs. Richard H. Jenks, Mrs. Ed Gould, Cpl. Ed
Gould Chaplain Jas E. Hemann, Rev. David Reed, Rev. A.-H.
Shaw, Rev. Henry Bell and Rev. Raymond Gray.
Union Church Chooses Nov. 18
To Celebrate Loyalty Sunday
Next week Sunday, Nov. 18, has been designated as Loyalty
Sunday by the Union Church of the Canal Zone:
At the 10:30 a.m. service of each of the six congregations,
all members win have opportunity to make their subscriptions
toward the Church budget for 1952.
Under the direction of chairmen, designated in each local
Church, more than 150 key workers are being organized to help
canvas the entire Church membership and thus underwrite' for
another year the largest unit of Christian work on the Zone.
Few of present day residents of the Canal 'Zone, remember
cr know of the early beginnings here of th Union Church move-
ment. Construction workers from various denominations in the
States found themselves being served by Chaplains appointed by
and paid by the Isthmian Canal Commission. '. V* ,*V
As the demand developed chapels were erected In.all:f;the
major construction towns and the Chaplain was a veritable Cir-
cuit rider administering to several growing congregations.
Recognizing the waste of leadership and finance in many
competing denominational units, the congregation at Cristobal in
1907 was the first to adopt the Union Church Idea. During- the
next seven years, this Idea grew so that in 1914 when the^per-
manent communities developed, the Union Church of the Canal
Zone was organized and a constitution was adopted.
From this beginning has come this largest single develop-
ment of the Union Church movement which Is affiliated direct-
ly with the National Council of Churches of Christ in the .Unit-
ed States of America, rather than with any one denominational
headquarters.
The first officers selected at a meeting at Corozal on Jan.
25. 1914, included: H. A. A. Smith, president; John F. Warner,
vice president; and W. E. Hoffman, secretary-treasurer. "'
The foresight apd faith of these early pioneers of Interde-
nominational fellowship has been more than justified, as evi-
denced by the present six active congregations; all but one of
which have their own permanent houses of worship.
Working harmoniously together are men and women whose
early experience stems from all of the major Protest? nt groups
In the States. So Important has been this "experiment" that
it is serving as a pattern of work being studied and copied in
other sections of the American Community. .
The Union Church of the Canal Zone now has active con-
gregations at Balboa, Cristobal, Gamboa, Gatun.'Margarita-and
Pedro Miguel. During the past year, the youngest Church at
Cocoll started In 1948 united forces with the Balboa Church.
To serye the children of Cocoll, bus service is provided to and
from Balboa.
The combined budgets of the six Union Church Congrega-
tions are slightly over $60,000 annually. In addition to current
operating requirements, these budgets Include support for two
missionary projects officially recognized by the General Council
of the Union Church. The work of the Methodist Mission In
Panama and the work with the San Bias Indians make up these
projects.
During the past year two major additions have been made
to the Church properties. Already occupied and scheduled for
dedication shortly, is the new educational and worship unit at
Gamboa representing a capital expense of $15.000. Also built
and occupied early In 1951 was the new home for the pastor of
the Balboa Church on San Pablo St. This three-bedroom, one-
story unit, represents an expense of about $18,000 and replaces
quarters dating back to construction days.
One change In leadership occurred In M51. Dr. R. H. Rojof-
son after six years as minister at Balboa resigned to accept a
position with the National Conference of Christians and Jews.
Rev. Alexander H. Shaw, formerly of Cocoll, was called to
the Balboa Church and started his ministry April 1. Other Min-
isters are: Rev. Philip Havener. Cristobal; Rev. Henry Bell, Mar-
rarlta; Rev. J. Wm. L. Graham. Gatun: Rev. Raymond Gray,
Gamboa and temporary supply Minister at Pedro Miguel.
Laymen in the local congregations who will head up the
Every Member Canvas are: Lesleigh H. Davis. Cristobal: Bruce
O Sanders. Margarita: M. Lee Nash. Gatun: E. M. Kieswetter,
Gamboa; Gerald J. Fox, Pedro Miguel; and James Harned, Bal-
boa.
The entire Church membership Is urged to attend service op
Loyalty Sunday. Nov. 18.
^Mllantic J^ociett
B*. 195, (JmUm DJipLe, (mtmrn 379
MISS JUDITH ANNE SMITH,
BRIDE-ELECT HONORED WITH SHOWER AND TEA
Miss Judith Anne Smith, whose wedding on November
Mth to Kenneth Carl Kregh. Is of interest to a wide circle
of friends en both sides ef the Isthmus, was honored with
a miscellaneous, gift shower and tea given yesterday after-
noon at the Cristobal Masonic Temple by Mrs. Anthony Fer-
nandez.
Handsome white embroidered
and lace cloths covered the two
refreshment tables. An Illumin-
ated bride doll centered one ta-
ble and coral "vine with blue hy-
drangeas apd white tapers in
silver holders formed a colorful
arrangement for the other.
Mrs. Arthur T. Cotton of Bal-
boa and auht of the honoree,
served punch tin da cousin, Mrs.
Robert Van Wagner presided at
the coffee and tea service.
The guests Included the mo-
ther and slater of the honoree,
Mrs. David S. Smith With Miss
Mary Emma and Georgia Smith
and the following Pacific Side
friends: Mrs. Charles Cotton.
Miss Dorothy Cotton,-Miss Mil-
dred Neely. Miss Zoe Ann Karst
and Mrs. C. L. .Johnston.
The Atlantic Side guests were:
Mrs. NoelE. Gibson.Mrs. Sam-
uel L. Brown. Mrs. Lee Smith.
Mrs. Robert Glawson, Miss Bar-
bara Brown. Mrs. Margaret Pe-
terson, Mrs. Violet Frecker, Mrs.
Albert McKeown, Mrs. Minerva
Biaas, Mrs. R. R. Grassau. Mrs.
Lawrence S. Myers. Mrs. Joseph
Keuter, Mrs: Joseph Hannigan,
Mrs. Ralph Banners, Mrs. L. H.
Scrantou, Mrs. Earl, C. Orr, Mrs.
Floyd.W. Forrest, Mrs. Robert I.
Barnes, Mrs. L..Aj Skeels. Mrs.
L. W. Mcllyalne. M". Carl R.
Newhard. Mrs. H. O. Engelke.
Mrs: Arnolds: Hudgins, Mrs. C.
T. Swearingen, Mrs, Ernest O.
Cotton, Mr. Jam** L\ Fernan-
dez. Mrs. Mattie Macaulfty, Miss
Grace Williams, Mrs. Eldoii G.
Roush. Mrs. Donald R. Bray ton.
Mrs.,Harold I. Tinhln, Mrs.
Fred L. Wertz. Jr...Mrs. George
W. Wertz. Mrs. Robert Blakely,
Mrs: Henry L. Bell; Mrs. H. P.
Bevington. Mes. W. G. Cotton,
Mrs. Starford Churchill, Mrs. R.
J.Heely.Mrs. Michaels. Greene.
Mrs. Walter Freudlgman. Mrs.
Walter H- Kuhrt. Mrs. Walter
Zimmerman,: Mrs. Harry A-
Stone, Mrs. Raymond R. Grego-
ry, Mrs. John H. Leach, Mrs.
Fred W. CRourke and Mrs.
Harry'C. Seaman.
have its regular meeting on Mon-
day, November 12. but will meet
the following week at the home
of Mrs. A. A. Rankln, Sixth
Street, Margarita.
Graduation Dance
for Nicantuan Cadets
The commandante. staff and
faculty of the USAR CARD3
School at Fort Gullck. will enter-
tain with a formal dance at the
Gullck Officers club Thursday
evening. November 15.
The affair will honor the Ni-
caraguan cadets who are grad-
uating from the school the next
day.
Invited guests Include the con-
sular represent at 1 v e s of the
countries which have students in
the school and the young ladles
of Colon Society.
Miss Moore Concludes
Visit on Isthmus
Miss Eula Moore of Townley,
Alabama, who has been visiting
her niece and nephew. Lt. Com-
m a n d e r and Mrs. V. A.
Schweitzer at the Coco Solo Na-
val Station, left by plane yester-
day to return to her home.
Pedro Miguel Assembly
To Meet
The Pedro Miguel Assembly,
Order of Rainbow for Girls, wia
hold Us meeting at the Lodfg
Hall oh Tuesday, November IK
at 7 30 p.m. The assembly
guests of honor will be the PH
tentate and all Shrmera?~
American Art Week
Closing- Today
The American Art Weak exhi-
bit will close at 9:00 tonight, and
contributing artists are request-
ed to call for their pictures be-
tween 9:00 and 16:00. Otherwla
they should pick then up early
on Monday morning, the com-
mittee has announced.
------------------------------,.. ,
Lobsters Diet Grtrawtt ]
Its Taste For Eating
QUTNCY. Mass. (UP.) A
lobster tastes like what it etta,
says Carl Power, a looeternran:
Men who sell lobsters keep
them in tanks of tea wafer at
least 30 hours before selling
them. That's ao the customer
eating lobater will get the tase*
of lobater.
Power says If a lobster has bees
nibbling on a mackerel just be-
fore you eat it. the lobster taste
like mackerel. After 30 hours,
however, the mackerel flavor
disappears.
I.A.W.C. General Assembly
The General Assembly of the
inter-American Woman's Club
will be held Tuesday at 3:30 p.m.
at their club building.
Members are reminded of the
kitchen shower, knives, forks and
other kitchen utensils are need-
ed.
Announcement of Interest
Mr. and Mrs. Mathew Baas of
Brazos Heights, announce the
birth of their sixth child, a son,
it Gorgas Hospital on Monday.
November 5. The baby has been
named Thomas Anthony.
Mr. Baas is manager for the
Royal Netherlands S.S. Compa-
ny in Cristobal.
k &Bf Seen"
its. a. o. a wm ue uie hum.- o-m k---------- -- ,-
at a shower this afternoon !n, nursing staff of the colon Hospi-
E Fern Room ol the Hote" Tiv-
U to be given In honor of Mrs.
(-"-es Annlcharico,
rhe guests will Include Mm. tion with the Mechanical Dtvi-
ftttth Schecker, Mrs. Mary Rare, slon.
tal and is en route to Washing- !
ton. DC. to Join her husband
who recently resigned his posl-
l
NEWZfALAHPFROPUCT
own ifirfW!
4'59fiafurcfcrwspoons Onfy 75* \
Mi wfcttt-rtar Mf Urn KeHeff s VAMtTY
Veer wmi sedes ioMei oa every piece!
"Sprntare" ie esquieite, heavy
mlvorwar* you'll be prowl to own.
Old Company Plate i
teed by th. Wm. Roger. Mfg Co,
Maridoo, Coan. With opoomv you
got eeaapkfH pattern list ami priees.
Sand today for thie beautiful value.
by...
Katlogs/s vaaiBTTthe pick V
choose packago10
7 oaroal favoritos for
......io....n*"U..-
U. 8. Marine Corps
Observes Anniversary.
The United State Marine cele-
brated the 176th anniversary of
its founding on Saturday. No-
vember 10. The Atlantic Side
celebration took the form of a
get-together at Fort Randolph.
at 9:00 a.m. *
Majors. L. Hamon. the Atlan-
tic Side commanding officer was
In charge of the arrangements.
The members of the Corps with
their families attended the fes-
tivities, which were opened with
the reading of appropriate arti-
cles of the Marine Corps Manual.
Following the official ceremonies
athletic events and group Sing-
ing were enjoyed. ,
Luncheon was served at 11:00
a.m.
The guests included the com-
manding officer of the Coco So-
lo Naval Station. Captain L. L.
Koepke and Mrs. Koepke and
the executive officer of the sta-
tion. Lt. commander T. L. Ap-
plequlst and Mrs. Applequlst.
In the evening Major and Mrs.
E. L. Hamon and Lt. and Mrs.
L. H. Pratt crossed to the Paci-
fic Side to join, the members of
the Corps for a cocktail party at
the Officers Club at Rodman. .
Luncheon Planned
at Fort Gulick
The members of the Fort Gu-
llck N.C.O. Wives Club are
planning a luncheon to be held
at 1:00 pjn. Thursday, November
15 at the club.
All members are urged to at-
tend.
Mrs. Harris Hostess
for link Meeting
The Ruth Link of the Auxiliary
of the Gatun Union Church met
at the home of Mrs. Howard
Harris In Gatun. Thursday even-
ing.
Dessert was served by the hos-
tess preceding the business meet-
ing at which Mrs. Benjamin
Brundage presided.
A social meeting will be held
at the home of the chairman on
Held Tomorrow Night
The Benevolent and Protective
Order of Elks of Lodge 1414 will
sponsor a "turkey shoot" at 7:00
p.m. tomorrow at the Balboa
Bowling Alley, for Elks only.
Turkeys will be the prizes award-
ed to those with the highest
scores.

Monday Musicaie
Postponea. Meeting
The Monday Musicaie will not
25 or 60 CYCLES
ONLY
s 89S0
Down 10.00 Monthly
RADIO CENTER
711 Bolivar C.Ion Tel. M
Fern Leaf Chapter
To Hold Meeting
There will be a stated meeting
of Fern Leaf Chapter, No. 4,
O.E.S.. at the Lodge Hall on Mon-
day, November 12, at 7:30 p.m.
This Is 'Advanced Officers Night'
and there will be the usual bus-
iness and initiation.
NEW YORK (UP.) What
makes Kenneth Clark's 'pier
della Franceses" such pleasura-
ble reading is the harnkatmua
unity of the author's style and
subject (Oxford Unlversitr
Press).
It is the mixture of intimacy
and grandeur that gives the Ita-
lian Renaissance its particular
flavour. Of its chaotic, turbulent
Ufe. Clark isolated a few import-
ant aspects. The narrow context
gives us a touch of the epoch'*
provincial Intimacy: Within thla>
range. Clark developed with pen*
rating clarity the powerful ar-
tistic Idea of the Renaissance,
conveying to us thus the feel of
its intellectual grandeur.
We understand that painting
was a symbolic language for
Plero. Through it he expressed
his deep felt platonio conviction
that harmony and proportion ar.
the chief intellectual revelation
of the divine.
If harmony and proportion aro.
the characteristics of the es-
sential reality, than the artist
must paint an Idealised world in
which the objects and bodies ara
the closest approximations of
mathematical and geometrical
perfect forms, arranged In a
scientifically correct perspective.
Piero thus supported his faith bjr
his science.
Yet none can at with Impun-
ity of the tree of knowledge.
Mathematics and geometry aa
a mysticism became with Piero
an obsession. He devoted his last
24 years to such strange prob-
lems as the reduction of all ap-
pearances to five shapes that, be-
cause of their regularity, wer
thought to partake in divinity.
He became very famous aa a
mystic mathematician.
At the same time, however, he
was losing his interest in art. The
artistic inspiration of this great
painter was slowly drying out.
His art deteriorated, and finally
he gave up painting altogether.
Paul MeeaaayL
are
the ^^^rbecause they ^7
You may be short, medium or tall-it makes no diforeoeel
Kaysrr's Proportioned Hosiery give a smooth,
flattering fit. And Career's patented "Strait On" heel cradlee
your heel for comfort and guarantees atraighler Meats.
A variety of fashionable shades, too!
J)C/t4HM/ir/
KaYM-I?





' '* ''

.....Ill
. PAGE SIX
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE SEVEN
"I

You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds 1
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
Re. 4 Tlvll Ave.
ehwi t-wsi
tUOSKU DE LESSEES
Parqar it LnnW
rowsaaa
MORRISON'S
Wo. a rrfh f Jnir At*.
rhone I-S141
BOTICA CARLTON
IMS M(IM4u At*.
mone 255-Colaa.
SALON DE BELLEZA
II*. H W**t t(lk Mr**t
AMERICANO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
S. st Batt-ruttmt
. 12.17 Cnlfll Ave -C*M*>.
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
f rr.
FOR SALE:G*n*rol Electric stove,
3 burners and oven, used only 3
months, $125. Perfect condition.
Tel. Quarry Heights 4277.
FOR SALE: Bargain. Piano. Ex-
cellent condition. 3rd of November
Street. House No. 5 do*nstolr$.
FOR SALE:60 cycle 9 cu. ft. Re-
frigerator and electric range. Se*
at 233-B. Gotun.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
For the buying or selling of your
automobile consult: Agencias Cos-
mos, S. A., Automobi* Row No.
29. Telephone 2-4721, Panam.
FOR SALE:Owner leaving coun-
try, beautiful Colombian hand
made mahogany furniture. Call 3-
1782_______________________________
tOR SALEBedroom set, twin beds.
Bedroom set, double bed. Dining-
room table, 6 chairs. "White"
electric sewing machine. Toppon
De Luxe stove, .garden hose.
Household articles, 45th Street
No. 9. Apt. 4.
FOR SALI:1949 Pontiac SI. four
doer 'on, food point and tajo*.
Thii car is on ecellent kuy. On-
ly $300 down. COLPAN MOTORS,
your FORD. MERCURY, LINCOLN
dolr, an automobile row. Tele-
phone 2-1031 2-1016. Pan-
ama.
MISCELLANEOUS
O* row have eMsklaf tmmml
writ. Ak*h*ii immmm
* 2011 Am*.. C Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:1941 Ford 4 Door Se-
dan, 5 good tires, motor in good
condition. 1505-A, Akee St.. Bal-
boa. Phone 2-2995.
FOR SALE: 25 cycle Universol
washing machine, $100; glass top
coffee table $20; Lone cedar
chest, $40. All in excellent con-
dition. Call Amodor 5243.
FOR SALE7 piece bamboo living-
room set. excellent condition,
$175.00. No. 23 Nicanor de O-
bario. Apt. No. 4.

I
.
FOR SALE: Bamboo choir, $40
orm chair, $25, blond w-bbinq
choir, chaise lounge, $50; 4
tobies, $10; white wicker rocker.
$15; pottery, 58 pieces, $50;
Englonder box springs, mattress; 4
Venetian blinds, $12; set 3 green
blinds 9' ond 6'. $25; table lamp
$7.50; Loundromot, $300. Al-
brook. Qtrs. 20. ____________^
FOR SALE:Double bed frame, ond
springs, Rattan chair, mirror, In-
ner spring couch, kitchen chairs,
' Venetian blinds. House 5426-A
.Dioblo Hgts.
FOR SALE: 1949 Ford Currem
Claa Coup* ah cylinder, now
paint ana' tire*. This cat has Raw
car parformanca, an *xc*ll*nt bay.
Only $400 down and drlv. It
away. COLFAN MOTORS, Your
FORD. MERCURY, LINCOLN
dealer, en automobile raw. Tele-
phone 2-1031 2-1036, Fane-
Mi.
FOR SALELota 1950 Pontiac De
Luxe, radio, hydramatic, seat cov-
ers, sun shade, many other ex-
tras, only 7.058 miles. Qtrs. 15-
A. Ft. Kobbe. phone 84-2244.
FOR SALE: Winter genuine fur
ecus. $50.00 each. Coma eorly
and get one. Cosa Americana, be-
tween 6 ond 7th St. Bollvor Ave.
Phone 157, Colon.
FOR SALE: 1951 Bandix home
laundry, 25 cycle. Upright piano
Strood. small. Mosher, house 173
Williamson. Phone 6-117, Gam-
boa.
FOR SALE:Just receive large va-
riety of Tropical fishes, plants,
ornaments, lowest price In Pon-
omo, aquariums made to order. 11
Via Espoa, opposite Juan Fran-
co Stables, Tel. 3-4132 Acuario
Tropieol.
RESORTS
Gramlich's Santa Clora beoch-
cottaoes Electric ire boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rates. Phone 6-
441 c 4-567.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
r
Phlllipi. Oceonside cottages. Sonto
Claro. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-187?. Criatobol i- 1673
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modem furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contact off lea No. 8061, I Oth
St. New Cristobal. Phono 1386. Co-
lon.
FOR RENT:Large throe bedroom
apartment (upstairs). Two bath-
rooms, livingroom, diningroom in
Vista del Mor. Tel. 3-0180 Mon-
day 4 p. m. to 6 p. m.
FOR SALE:Cocker Pups AKC re.
gistered. Phone Albrook 2238
FOR SALE:1950 Ford Custom Da
Luxe fardar dark gray, new oeet
covers. WSW Has. This car like
new. Must be seen to appreciate.
Only $S20 down and driv. *
away. COLPAN MOTORS, y oar
FORD. MERCURY. LINCOLN
dealer, an automobile raw. Tele-
phone 2-1033 2-1036. Pan-
ama.
FOR SALE: Leeds-sproys China,
old pattern. Washing machine,
wringer. Baby crib. 766-A. Bar-
neby. Balboa 2-3127.
FOR SALE:Leica $146.25, Bolex
three lenses $350. "Porros," Plo-
zo 5 do Mayo, Ponomi.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:Complete set of bom-
boo. Apply Riviera Apts. Melendez
ond 3rd. St. Apt. 8. Colon.
FOR SALE:Kelvinator Deep Free-
so, six cubic feet, new 60 cycle
' unit. Call Coco Solo 605.
FOR SALEAutomatic washing ma-
chine, 60 cycle, good condition.
Phono Balboa 2879, 221 A, An-
cn.
PERSONALS
HAVE LOST MY OWNER:White.
native-born, yeang and) healthy
dJof th*t I am, I'r* boa* looking
Sa every car going past th An-
ea* Commy far the patt fear days
without hick. Please com* for aso
or abo I shall have to adapt same
other home befare I'm picked up
hi taken to the dot pound. My
rhentu ta the girls at The Pan-
am* Amaricen claulfiodi.
FOR SALE:Mercury 1950, 4 Door
Sedon, radio. $1.800.00. 157-A.
Pedro Miguel. Phone 4-451.
FOR SALE: 1946 Chrysler New
Yorker four door sadon. new paint.
good tires, radio. This cor com-
pletely reconditioned. Just liko
now. Only $315.00 down. driv. it
away. COLPAN MOTORS, yew
FOR D. MERCURY, LINCOLN
dealer, en automobile raw. Tolo*
phon. 2-1013 2-1016, Pan-
ama.
FOR SALE:1950 Ford Convertible.
Now condition. 8.000 octuol miles
Undercoated, direction lights, back
up light. extra chrome. W/S
wosher. Coll Panama 3-4020.
FOR SALE:Elgin outboard motor
1-2 H. P. 1950 model, com-
plete, now lower end with fishing
and racing prop, and spare parts.
Phone Cristobal 3-1234.
LOST & FOUND
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment,
porch, parlor, diningroom, kitchen,
bedroom, sanitary services, garage.
$55.00. Apply 112 Via Bellsorlo
Porras, near Roosevelt Theatre.
P. T. I.
SAFETY SAW BLADES
COST LESS STAY SHARP
TWICE AS LONG TAKE
HALF THE TIME TO SHARP-
EN AND USE 35% LESS
POWER.
THE GREATEST ADVANCE
IN POWER SAWING since the
tayention of the CIRCULAR
GEO. F. NOVEY, Inc.
t79 Central Ave. TeL 3-9140
The Critic' Corner
FOR RENT
Rooms
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, col
entirely renovated ana) roll fur-
nished. RatOS rejionebl*. loche-
lers only, Inquire at The Ame-
llen Club rocina. Do Lassspi
Park.________________________________
FOR RENT: Cool, comfortable,
furnished rooms, centrally located.
No. 5 "I" Street. Telephone 2-
1541 Panam.
WANTED
Miscellaneous!
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
- 22 E 28th St.
FORTUNE IN GEMS Mrs.
Charles Black, better known to
movie-goers as 8hlrley Temple,
models an Indian, pear-shap-
ed, diamond necklace valued at
$750.000. The exotic Jewels,
from the collection of Harry
Winston, were exhibited m
Washington for benefit of
Washington Home for Incur-
ables.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel Fl Panam
HAS FOR SALE:
1M shares Abattoir
SOS eharet (preferred)
forts' Prodcti
MO shares (common)
r*ra*t rradncU
TXLS.: 1-4711 3-1 Set
LOST:$25.00 reward for return of
billfold ond contents lost Wednes-
day In Cocoli Or Curundu. Sue
Lee Nobles, 500-B Curundu Hats.
Box 666, Curundu 83-4101.
FOR SALI: A Real Saroain!
'St OLDSMOBILI "IS"
2-door aedan with radia,
color light frean. Sama as
new, only 6,500 miles. Financing
available.
CIVA. S. A. '
Year Pontiac Cadillac Dealer
Tel. 2-0170 Panam.
Beachy Head Gives Up Watch
On England's Invasion Coast'
NOT A8 ORDERED
EAST ST. LOUIS (U.P.) A
cafe customer paid $10 for a
large "take-out" order and left
carrying a bag. He was back In
a few minutes. By mistake he
had been handed a back of bones
and scraps the cook was saving
for her dog.
WANTED: Clean soft roos. Job
Oopt. Panama American.
WANTED: 6 second hand steel
stenographer chairs. Phono 3-4743,
between 7:30 a. m. ond 5 p. m
except Saturday and Sunday.
Help Wanted
English speaking mold to live in. Re-
ferences required. House 1465-C.
Balboa.
WANTED: Good laundress for
work by the doy. Avenida Cubo
No. 11. "Nestle" Building, en-
tronco 28th Street.
Uruguay Votes On Plan
To Abolish Presidency
MODERN FURNITURE
cuaroM built
Sllpcorer Keupholstery
visit ova laow-aooM!
Alberto Hi
i t. a*e la Oan
nao
TaL *- ie p.m.
I-T. ei.om.77 (AatoaaeMIr Sow)
[reo Estimates Metro Delivery
reL 1-4SZ IN a. I. 7:** p.-
PET HOSPITAL
a VI* Form (a t'ranclac* 14.)
aeran Ik* brldie on the right.
Dr. J. V. Femlndei U., Veterinary
Hears: t a.m. 11 noon t p.m. p.m.
raone MIS Panam
P. O. Bra f II Panam
ZONE'S SCHOOLS
HAD HUMBLE
(Continued from Page 1)
property had reached $560,000
and enrollments had climbed to
3,485.
Ten years later, the enroll-
ment had Increased to 0,495,
and In 1950, there were 6,353
students in Canal Zone schools.
In 1932, the value of school
property had reached $901.300.
The' building of the Cristbal
High School and the-Canal Zone
Junior College brought the total
value up to $1,654,862. Addition
of the La Boca and Silver City
Occupational High Schools and
many other additions and im-
provements increased the total
value if school property to
$.190,929, In the 1950 fiscal year,
exclusive of property valued at
$344,582 in the Physical Educa-
tion and Recreation Division of
the Schools Division.
The last major change in the
administration of the Canal
Zone schools was the transfer
of the Schools Division to the
new Civil Affairs Bureau, es-
tablished in July I960, in a re-
organization which provided the
framework for the establish-
ment of the new Panam Canal
Company on July 1, 1951.
This year, enrollment in the
Canal Zone schools haa reached
an all-time peak with 9,827 stu-
dents in regular classes in 29
elementary, junior and senior
high schools and junior col-
leges. The teaching force this
year numbers 332.
By JUNE CHAN PAULDING
Most significant and rewarding haa been the serious interest
reflected by a number of people who freely asked good ques-
tions about art during the show at the Balboa YMCA.
All wanted to know what modern art Is about. After fur-
ther conversation, It broke down to a popular Interest in cubism.
This being the moat appropriate time to talk about such mat-
ters, let us devote our efforts in that direction.
What la cubism and how did It come about? Let us first
quickly examine our age, for a contemporary tiling Is the spirit
of its age. Today la an era of new sciences, high specializations,
brand names, economic, political and military upheavals. In the
current of these events, art too haa had to move along simul-
taneously. In its course, modern man's vision has also had to
change. The camera has frosen motion for him. The motion
picture has provided the dimension of time to motion and vi-
sion. The telescope and microscope haa revealed another world
o sights. New needs, materials and construction methods have
given him new architecture. The world looks different from a
speeding vehicle and from the altitude of aircraft.
At the same time, man's thinking has had to change Real-
ization of the Importance of the analytical science concerning
the mind, behavior and the motions, man's thinking has been
revitalized and reeducated.
Henee, there are new things to behold new beau-
ties to enjoy new good and evil forces to evaluate and'
fresh thought* to examine.
Todav, time, motion, space, weight, forces and sound are Im-
portant factors. The modern painter as well as his fellow men
realize that. The engineer, the choreographer, the physicist and
the musician have had to devise new ways to deal with these
factors pertinent to their Individual expression. The old meth-
ods were no longer real nor suitable If we can speak about
things we can not see, we can also create picture of them
but how does one paint sound, space, motion and so forth?
\ Simultaneously, the artists have had to devise other ways to
make these lntangiblea Visible. The old familiar ways of pamt-
WASHINGTON. D. C. Nov.
Beachy Head, Britain's majestic
Chalk promontory overlooking
the English Channel, has lost
tti professional sentinel status.
The 575-foot headland from
Which watchers have squinted
toward the French coast through
countless centuries is reported to
have been relinquished as a
modern naval and coast guard
station, leaving the observation
chores to be carried on from
neighboring points to the east
nd west.
The stretch of Sussex coast 50
Biles southeast of London com-
manded by Beachy Head has
many, landmarks Of the martial
Tents that helped shape Eng-
land's story, says the National
Geographic 8oclety At the little
bay of Pevensey. half a dozen
miles to the east. William. Duke
of Normandy, landed with his
grmy in 1066, while Kinn Harold
as defending bis throne In the
north.
the Normans leisurely unload-
thelr horses, coats of mail,
and lances. They even
ht along carpenters and
harais to build the wooden
Bctures that were soon to rise
the Pevensey beach and at
near-by port of Hastings.
The invaders had time to sack
countryside before Harold,
g his northern enemies,
Sd with hurriedly augment-
forces to meet the foe at the
jlsh Channel. The famous
{tie of Hastings which follow-
dL and which gave William his
'Conqueror" title and unahered
Id the new era of Norman rule
and culture, took place about 15
TfsasTuslT
4**
miles northeast of Beachy Head.
England had been often over-
run before the Normans came
by Romans. Saxons, Danes and
Norsemen, among others. Julius
Caesar, raiding this southern re-
Slon in 55 and 54 B.C., crossed
ie Channel where it narrows
near the white cliffs of Dover,
some 50 miles upebast from
Beachy Head heights.
Again in World War H, the
Beachy Head strip of England's
"Invasion coast" was on the
path first of Nazi bombing
planes and later of the flying
missiles that earned the coast
the nickname "Hell's Corner."
In the shadow Of the Head, the
seaside town of Eastbourne was
considerably battered by the
attacks.
Since the war vacationists and
tourists, attracted by the sun-
flooded beaches and bracing air,
have again flocked to the Beachy
Head neighborhood. The pro-
montory itself, whose name
comes from the French "beau-
chef," beautiful head, is a pop-
ular walking and driving goal for
visitors.
Beet Not Busy Enough
Make Cucumbers Melt
AKRON, O. (UP.) Summit
County's commissioners have a
problem. It concerns how to
build up this area's Inadequate
bee population of 125,000.000.
Northampton Township's cu-
cumber crop this year was a dis-
mal flop and the bee's failure to
carry pollen was blamed.
Commissioner John Poda said
he has heard of flower growers
who have spread pollen by using
fine camel hair brushes when
faced with a bee shortage. How-
ever, the sugirestion apparently
did not catch on because the
WASHINGTON, D. C. Nov. 5
Tough old gauchos dark-eyed
Latin beauties and voluble polti-
cos will go to the polls In demo-
cratic Uruguay on November 29
to decide whether to do away
with their President's job.
A proposed change m Uru-
guay's constitution, already ap-
Eroved by the country's Cham-
er of Deputies, would abolish
the presidential system of gov-
ernment in favor of a nine-man
"colegiado" or executive board
patterned after the Swiss federal
council system.
Voting in a free referendum on
such a sweeping political ques-
tion seems natural today to proud
citizens of this compact South
American republic, the National
Geographic Society says.
Their nation is known around
the world for stable and enlight-
ened self-government. President
Andres Martinez Trueba is him-
self among the strongest propo-
nents of the plan to abolish the
presidency.
Uruguay has not always been
so peaceful. A rich land of gras-
K pampas tucked like a pear-
aped wedge between Brazil
and Argentina where South
America's Atlantic sea coast
curves Inward to the Rio de la
Plata, It has known more than
its share of war and revolution-
ary bloodshed in struggles for the
right to rule an area smaller
than South Dakota.
A Spanish explorer named Juan
Diaz de Soils, searching for a
southern passage between Atlan-
tic and Pacific in 1816. was the
first European to set foot on the
banks of the Plata.
The "River of Silver" Is actual-
ly a baylike mixing basin of the
Uruguay and Parana Rivers; its
name is Indicative of the Span-
iards' subsequent quest for treas-
ure, which they never found In
Uruguay.
Tradition tells that a Portu-
guese lookout for Magellan in
1520 cried "Monte vld eu!" "I
see a hill!" on potting Uru-
guay's Isolated El Cerro cone,
and thus gave a name to the
fortress city, Montevideo built
there by the Spanish more than
two centuries later.
During the Napoleonic wart,
British forces struck at Bona-
C1IICAGO AIR-MINDED
CHICAOO UP. Chicago's
Midway airport is the busiest in
the world. local official say. Os-
car E. Hewitt, commissioner of
throughout the county and" de" j no^Alres ZthXESS*llJS^l DubHc wortM "* n Wf <*
termine what is reducing the ? MaS J^* b^?f 31 pl?nM "> hour tok* '
av. 'population. &no^?^inV^^^^
commissioners decided to hire an
apiary Inspector, as a tmpora" \ZZX r^SatoTSEi ."
reamen ^J^Xg&j&a. SW
_J rerinrleiB th* !
'population.
In the second and third de-
cade of the 1800's, Uruguay won
Its Independence under its most
famous leader. Jose Gervasio Ar-
tigas. But other wars were to
plague the country until the
turn of the 20th century, when
Uruguay entered upon a still-
continuing era of peace and pro-
gress.
Motoring Vet Of '98
Still On Road At 95
NEWBURYPORT, Mass. (UP.)
Charles L. Davis has been
driving an automobile for 53 of
his 95 years.
He said his first ear. In 189S.
was a White steamer. His second
car was an air-cooled Franklin.
Davis takes a leisurely auto-
mobile ride almosV every after-
noon. His Massachusetts regis-
tration plate 894. lowest number
In this city, is familiar to every-
body here-abouts.
Davis la s remarkable man in
many other respects. He became
a drug store owner at 22. He still
owns the same store and now Is
one of the oldest active druggists
in the nation.
Davis' father lived to be M.
Davis hopes to exceed that.
Angler Without Pants
Finds Life Exciting
WEATHERSFIELD BOW Vt.
Nov. (U.P.) A Claremont. N.
H man ran Into trouble when he
went off for a quiet Sunday of
fishing.
First he got a sunburn, so he
decided to cool his seared akin
with a dip in the connection
River.
Someone saw hie clothes,
thought they might belong to s
drowning victim and summoned
help. The fisherman, sans pants.
saw strangers approaching to
search for "the body" and fled
mto nearby woods.
Ultimately be was discovered
by the posse and explained his
predicament, with blushes.
Soviet Eyes Holdings
Of Church In Israel
JERUSALEM, Nov. (UP.)
An emissary from Moscow is in
Israel to take over all holdings
of the Russian Orthodox Church,
valued at about $100,000,000.
He Is enigmatic, 40-year-old
Prof. Kalugln of the Moscow
Academy of Science, an expert
in Near Eastern archeology.
All indications are that be
came to Israel to expand the
scope of Russian activities in the
Middle East other than in ar-
cheology. Neither, it Is assumed,
is his primary mission the wel-
fare of some 120 aged monks and
nuns, here long before the
Bolshevist revolution In 1917.
Local archeologlst know noth-
ing of his scientific standing.
The so-called Russian Or-
thodox Society Is the legal owner
of the property concerned.
The holdings Include an Im-
posing, green-domed Slavic cat-
hedral in a spacious courtyard in
the center of modern Jerusalem.
They also comprise structures
now bousing Israeli courts, po-
lice headquarters, the govern-
ment tuberculosis hospital and
churches, hospices and real es-
tate in Naiareth, Jaffa, Haifa,
Tiberias and Hebron.
To acquire title to all this
property, Prof. Kalugln will have
to prove that the Moscow Aca-
demy of Science which he repre-
sents Is the heir of the Russian
Orthodox Society. The latter is
an organization set up in Russia
in 1812 to support Russian ec-
clesiastical groups In the Holy
Land.
Upon his arrival here. Prof.
Kalugln was Installed with his
wife and a secretary In an apart-
ment not far from Jerusalem's
Russian, compound, with the help
of the Soviet embassy In Tel
Aviv.
Most of the Russian clergy now
in Israel regard Prof. Kalugm's
presence here with anxiety. They
are afraid that liquidation of the
Orthodox Society's holdings and
the transfer of all church pro-
perty to direct soviet control
through the Moscow Academy of
Science will deprive them of a
steady income.
Although they have long drop-
ped any quarrel they may have
had with the Soviet regime, they
feel that the present government
of tbc UBS.ft. nil have nothing
the airport around the to offer to former adherents of
.he Csar.
A custodian of Russian proper-
ty appointed by the Israeli gov-
ernment now administers all the
affairs of the Russian Orthodox
Church. The custodian keeps
track of the church's Income and
maintains its institutions. He
pays the salaries of the clergy
and lay officials of the church.
The Israeli government would
prefer to have a local Russian
Church body take over the vast
holdings of the Orthodox Society
rather than the Moscow Acade-
my of Science. Government of-
ficials would rather have the old
moks and auna live in the Rus-
sian buildings than a corps of
young Russian "scientists" pur-
portedly engaged In archeo-
logical undertakings.
Barber Shop Quartet
Society In Panam
Now Numbers 38
The regular monthly meeting
of the Society for the Preserva-
tion and Encouragement of Bar-
ber Shop Quartet Singing In
America, Inc., was held last Wed-
nesday night in the Beer Lounge
of the Balboa Brewery m Pana-
ma City. A very successful meet-
ing was enjoyed by 25 members.
At the meeting eight new mem-
bers Joined the organization,
bringing a total of charter mem-
bres in this popular organisation
to 38.
The following men were ap-
pointed as members of the Pro-
gram Committee for the remain-
der of the year: John J. Kenne-
dy, chairman, Chris Skele and
Edward J. Brady. These men
will be responsible for maintain-
ing the high entertainment stan-
dards of SP.E B.S.Q S.A. Vic
Kerr was appointed musical di-
rector and Joe Flynn was drafted
as chorus director.
The International office sent a
stack of supplies Including mem-
bership cards, membership certi-
ficates, Individual folios of Bar-
ber Shop arrangements and In-
dividual conies of the society's
quarterly publication. "The Har-
monlsers. These were distribut-
ed to all members present.
After a short business meeting,
the principal accomplishment of
m
ing were no longer adequate. These new ways are "many. ""ThVv
have been identified by critics as abstraction, futurism, construc-
tivism, cubism, dadalsm, surrealism and what have you. This In
short, is our age and cubism is part of our time.
This is how cubism came. Paul Cezanne, French painter of
the late 19th century first conceived that all -natural objects
were essentially geometric solids occupying space, creating rela-
tionships between themselves. That is, a landscape still life
human model whatever the subject may be, was a composite of
spheres, cones, squares, rectangles, etc. Consider the familiar
apple. You too will see that it Is essentially a sphere. Appraise
the pear. It is essentially a sphere with a cone. Viola!' You
have cubism! With Cezanne's concepts the way was paved for
cubism. Through the art of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braaue
the two artistic giants of this time, cubism was born in 1907. '
In cubism, the.first thing that yea notice is that
nothing is recognisable or else there are few objects that !
look familiar. This is why.
. In one kind of cubism (there are 2 chief categories) the
painter analyzes his subject In terms of geometric solids Re-
member the apple and the pear then imagine a more complex
subject analyzed. He breaks down and rearranges natural form
into flat angular shapes, planes, and lines Into- a design to suin
his desire. In the process of breaking down and rearranging,
he departs more and more from the original natural counternart'
till finally, the finished picture often do^s not ^wTtoelub-
Ject.
Cubism can also express time and motion (example Mar-
cel Duchamp's "Nude Descending Stairs." These factors often
become the subject of many cubist's paintings. Why? Because
there is also beauty m time and motion. Thla type nf cubism
Is Just what its name implies Analytical Cubism. It is re-
cognizable by. its angular shapes, superlmposition of drawing.
mear qualities and flat design. Color Is dull and secondary in
.tnpottance. Pigments are subdued and limited because the
chief concern of the artist is that of an analytical nature
i "f..0.*"6* kind of n was developed afterwards
about MIL For want of a better name, the critics call- ,
f synthetic cubism. The cubists went beyond analyv- I !
Ing. They became Interested In texture and color a*
well
Textura! Interest became so strong that paper, cards, fabrlo
or whatever offered an interesting possibility, was glued to the
canvas and integrated Into the design. Paint was applied dif-
ferently. They became aware of canvas surface. For instance,
paint would be heavily applied In one area and In contrast thin-
ned out in the adjoining area. A piece of sandpaper might then
bct,past?d on, >newhere to suit the composition. Synthetic
cubism is distinguished by its rich color, colors so Juicy and
beautiful that one could "eat it" Natural forms are more fa-
miliar. Shapes are less angular. Linear qualities of analytical
cubism are absent
. J* that the success of Art Week has been complete In
that t has stimulated much interest It is hoped that future
stimulation will undermine prejudice, disturb indifference and
awaken more Interest so that some greater understanding of the
more adventurous paintings of our Orne may come.
German Eating Well But Prices
Dig Deep Holes In Pocketbooks
BONN. Germany. Nov. (U.P.)
The Germans of the Bonn Re-
public are eating well better
than many other Europeans
but they dig deep Into their wal-
lets to pay for the privilege.
A government survey showed
that almost exactly BO per cent
of a West German household's
expense is for food. In the 257
households studied, the average
monthly expenditure was 291.08
marks ($66.28). Of that amount,
145.25 marks (S34.57) went to
meet the food bill.
ORIGIN OF NIGHTSTICK
KENT, O. (U.P.) The police-
man's nightstick Is really a
modern edition of the ancient
Indiant war club. Martin L. Da-
vey. Jr., tree expert, says today's
noggin-buster is often made of
Osage-drange. too. The wood i*
hard, heavy, flexible and strong.
Prehistoric man preferred a club
of the lighter and more elastic
ash. It bounced off cranlums
much better.
which was the singing of Flynn
as a member so that he could
start his duties as chorus direc-
tor at once, an ensemble was
formed and ran through the so-
ciety's theme sons/; "The Old
Songs." Before the group broke
up, they had arrived at a tage of
mellow harmony on this selee-
tlon. A few other songs comple-
ted the group singing and the
evening ended with 4 or 8 im-
promptu "quartets" (4 to 7 men)
competing simultaneously. Some
of it was good and all of it was
loud.
The next meeting will be held
on the first Wednesday of De-
cember at 7:30, in the Beer
Lounge as usual. Any men Inter-
ested can Join this famous sing-
ing organisation by contacting
the following: Gordon Dal ton,
Eldent, Panama 2-3012; W. H.
aer, vice president, Balboa
; Frsd J. Oerhardt, secreta-
ry, Panama 2-0891; Don McNe-
vln. director, Balboa 3771; and
R H. Jackson, director, tHry
1779.
Groceries, delicatessens, cafes
and restaurants are well stocked
with everything a gourmet could
want but at an Impressive price.
Imported Items, which still form
40 per cent of the German diet,
are the most expensive.
Luxury items are, of course,
outside the reach of the average
Oerman pocketbook. However,
even staples get a price that is
painful when measured gainst
incomes, coffee is 14 marks per
pound $3.33). Tea is two and one-
half times t^at high.
In glaring contrast to the
meat ration Groat Britain Is
subsisting on, the butcher shops
In this "defeated" nation have
everything. Prices range from 85
cents per pound for lamb to 75
cents for fowl. These represent
a 76 per cent jump over pre-war
prices.
Even cheaper Itemsbutter at
70 cents, bread at 15 cents for a
two-pound loaf, eggs at 70 cents
a dotenhave skyrocketed since
the *30s. Using 1038 as a base of
100, the Bonn food ministry price
index shows gram products at
154, potatoes 111. sugar JM. but-
ter 179, and eggs 133. The only
basic food item that holds below
the 1938 level Is margarine at 96.
The overall food price Index
stands at 172.
Even after three year Of good
eatingever since the IMS coin-
cidental currency reform and be-
5Inning of the Marshall Plan
ie memory of the near-starva-
tion days of the Immediate post-
war period have not been com-
pletely, wiped out. Accordingly,
there Is a minimum of complaint
here about food prises.
'Although the Germans are well'
supplied with nourishing edibles,
they are in no position to ship
any elsewhere. Nearly half the
food consumed by the 47.080,000
residents of the Bonn Republic
It shipped .
The import bill now runs a-
round $100.000.000 monthly. Food
exports, meanwhile, are. so small
as to be eclipsed, approximately
88,000,000 per month.
V


I
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1IB1
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
/AGE SETl
Girl Athlete's Bondage Portrayed
In Hard, Fast and Beautiful'
i.
RACQUET RACKET. Sally Forrest la briefed for a tour as
a tennis prodigy by her manager, Carleton Young, and her
mother, Clalrj Trevor, who figure as exploiteera in "Hard,
Fast and Beautiful." The Ida Lupino production pictures
the swift carear of a talented girl whose romance is side-
tracked for gain. The social drama, distributed by RKO
Radio, co-stars Miss Trevor and Miss Forrest. It comes to
the Central next Thursday.
LUX THEATRE A Sex-Ational Romantic Hit!
Sh.w: lilt SM S:H !M IN p.m.
CENTRAL
JM.JtM, *a5._t.iU. Mjt.m.r
Dana Andrews
Claude Rains
Carla Balenda
. In -
"SEALED
CARGO"
Hot Fusion
On High Seas!

Ask For faw Lottery Ticket
at the Entrance!
BELLA VISTA
1:U. :. S:ia, 7:1)5, f :> pm.
The famous talking MULE
is back.. In his Newest
Hilarious Adventures!
M
mmwm:
./FRlVCiS
/GOES TO
THE RACE
itttJUUfaU.

**mmmm s a-mo. H urn ran
CECILIA THEATRE
1*7 MUX AND In
"NIGHT INTO MORNING"
Ah*.- etarr SULLIVAN Artcoc DAHL, fas
"N^QUE^TICNSASKED"
TROPICAL
"RATON PASS*
Detmu MORGAN Patrid* NEAL
ENCANTO THEATRE
All Condlttoswsl
CUud-iic Colbert Ann
Blyth. In
"THUNDER ON THE HILL"
- Alao: -
David Wayne Tarn
Swell. In
TIVOU THEATRE^
Margaret Sheridan. In
THING"
Alao:
Ranaow
ijr
CAPITOLIOJHEATRB
Stewart Orsnfer Waltar
Pldsvon. In
"SOLDIERS THREE"
Also: -
Piar Ansel! John
Sxlcson, In
_ "TERESA' ____
VICTORIA THEATRE^
SPANISH PROGRAM I
Rita Montanar. In
"NEOItO tt MI COLOR"
Alao: Another great Spanish
picture I
"POURE CORAZN"
pic
>BBE.
LEARNING TO EAT is really Instinctive- but a little teaching
on the part of this mother Waxwing is more than welcome
to her quadruplets. The birds are among the "stars" in
"Nature's Half Acre," Walt Disney's latest release in his True
Life Adventure series via RKO Radio. Picture received the
"Lion of St. Mark" award at Venice Film Festival.
Co-starring Claire Trevor and
Sally Forrest-in a revealing emo-
tional drama with a background
of big-time tennis, Ida Luplno's
production, "Hard, Fast and
Beautiful," develops the confllc
between an ambitious mother
and her athletic daughter.
Realistic national and inter-
national tournaments provide
spectacular action scenes along
with the emotional tension In
the story.
It's due at the Central Thurs-
day, Nov. 15.
Miss Trevor plays the selfish
parent of Miss Forrest, the lat-
ter enacting a girl who zooms to
fame when spurred to capitalize
her prowess on the tennis courts.
The mother's goal Is her daught-
er's professional rewards in the
form of big money prises. Final-
ly realizing this to be the motive
of her parent's urging, the girl
revolts.
Carleton G. Young is seen as
a tennis promoter and ally of the
mercenary mother. Robert Clarke
Is cast as the young heroine's
suitor. Kenneth Patterson per-
forms as the girl's sympathetic
father. Action on the tennis
courts provides spirited athletic
sequences.
Ida Lupino directed the time-
ly offering, which was produced
by Collier Young. Martha Wllk-
erson wrote the screenplay based
upon a novel by John R. Tunis.
RKO Radio distributee "Hard,
Fast and Beautiful" for The
Filmakers, the film which pre-
sents the production.
Popular Music
EW YORK (UP.) "Hark!
The Years!", a new Capitol al-
bum, is a scrapbook of famous
voices with narration by the ac-
tor Frederic March, and musical
settings by Nathaniel Shllkret.
The first personality in the al-
bum in Kenneth Landfrey, the
trumpeter who sounded the
"Charge Of The Light Brigade"
at Balaclava In IBM, who re-
corded the bugle call in 1890.
Other equally impressive bite of
history are recorded in the ac-
tual voices of Florence Night-
ingale, Thomas Edison, William
oOo
"Gems From Sigmund Rom-
berg Shows (RCA VICTOR) has
chestra on eight selections from
his stage musicals "Desert Song,"
"Maytime," 'The Student Prince,'
"New Moon" and the film "The
Night Is Young." The beautiful
melodies sung by Soprano Oene-
vleve Rowe mezzo-soprano Lil-
lian Cornell, tenor Eric Mattson
and baritone Lawrence Brooks
Include "When I Grow Too Old
to Dream." "Drinking Song,"
and "One Alone."
Champion Dancing Team
MARGE AND GOWER CHAMPION have been hailed as unique
in the dancing field. They approach dancing as a story-tell-
ing technique, not as an art to be gazed at In awe. There-
in lies the charm of their work.
Young, enthusiastic and talented, Marge and Gower are
old-timers In the art of the dance, although they are com-
paratively new to Hollywood. The pair created choreogra-
phies for three Broadway hits, "Small Wonder," "Lend an
Ear" and "Make a Wish."
Marge is the daughter of Los Angeles ballet master Er-
nest Belcher and began her dancing career at the age of
three. Later, Gower enrolled as a student at the Belcher
School and it was here that the two met for the first time.
The twin careers, however, travelled along separate roads
until they were married In 194T.
'Pagan Love Song'
Teams Williams,
Kell In Lux Show

ingale, Thomas Edison, William The sight of comely Esther I (Howard Keel), who was come to
Jennings Bryan, and a score of Williams clad In a pareu (Tahit- Tahiti to claim his inherited
others in the past 0 years. Ian version of a sarong), swim- plantation and who mistakes
_ sarong >. swim- plantation and who mistakes
mlng against the Technicolor Mimi for a native domestic,
backgrounds of a lush tropical The confusion, laughs and ro-
isle, alone is worth the price of mantle contretemps which arise
"""' .-... v.,...... ..v... i^it*. BlUtit: *0 WUI 111 HI; fa *v- v* winiiiii ^n i 't n **>' "tiivii *'v
berg Shows (RCA VICTOR) has admission to "Pagan Love Song," I from this comedy of errors pro-
the composer conducting his or- m-G-M's latesaanuslcal romance, vide ao-amusing framework for
chestra on eight selections from coming T.iursASato the Lux the musical interludes, the de-
Also for those who like a quiet,
dreamy evening by the phono-
graph is a new M-G-M album
"Viennese Waltzes" by Macklln
Marrow's Orchestra on waltzes by
Lehar, Godowsky, Strauss, Wald-
teufel. Krelsler. and Lanner.
Slightly more on the gaudy side
is a Decca Ethel Smith album of
"Latin Rhythms" feautring or-
an solos with bando carioca.
mong the eight numbers are
"Mambo Jambo," "Cuban Cutle,"
"The Green Cockatoo" and "Ca-
tana."
Duke Ellington's Orchestra is
_ long way off the pace it once
set in its playing of "Deep Night"
and "Please Be Kind" (Colum-
bia)... Gene Krupa's Band does
a good Job on a new version of
"The Sheik of Araby" (RCA Vic-
tor) ... Tony Martin and Dinah
Shore have another pair of very
Ustenable duets with "Be Mine
Tonight" and "The Old Soft
Shoe" (RCA Victor)... The play-
ing of "Caravan" and "Stormy
Weather" by the Latin American
conductor Luis Arcaras is some-
of the finest big band Jazz to
come along In quite awhile (RCA
Victor)...
Beer drinkers ought to go for "Udi m rae
Guy Lombardo's "The Olocken- ''jE-TSrs*
wuj ^...wv>- ~ ---- rive vcars vi >u5* ** a **"
spiel (Decca)... Nellie Lutcher w h s^dl0 any wouW t
uses her peculiar style of singing the rlght8 to the Hie story of the
to good advantage on "The Birth natl0Ty8 great war time presl-
of the Blue (Capitol)... Joe dent thua cUDt to an end. It
(Fingers) Carr does some of his h.H been made clear by Mrs.
coming vTliun
Theater.
Add to that the clnglng prow-
ess of Howard Keel, who made
an auspicious film debut as the
hero of "Annie Get Your Gun"
and who now lends his fresh
personality and fine singing voice
to a hit parade of new songs by
Harry Warren and Arthur Freed,
and you have an idea of the en-
tertainment delights of this div*
erting new tuner.
Miss Williams has one of her
most appealing and eye-filling
roles as Mlml Bennett, a part-
Polynesian girl who has spent
her life in Tahiti and who en-
liven* her life by shifting from
the attitude of a typical smart
and sophisticated American girl
to that of the pareu-adorned,
sun^exposed native maiden.
the musical interludes, the de-
lightful native dancing sequences
and the arresting swimming
scenes set against glowingly
beautiful settings of lagoons,
natural pools and other scenic
delights of the tropics.
The musical score of "Pagan
Love Song" is one of the finest
to emanate from a Hollywood
musical in some time, with Keel
at his best in such numbers as
"The House of Singing Bamboo,"
"Why Is Love So Crazy." "Eti-
quette" and the picture's title
song. Miss Williams Joins him in
"Singing in the Sun" and has a
solo number in the lovely "Sea
of the Moon."
The stars are given admirable
support by Minna Oombell. cast
as Aunt Kate; Rita Moreno, re-
It is in her latter role that she membered as the Cajun dancer
meets the naive and gullible Ohio
school teacher Hap Endlcott
Eleanor Roosevelt
To Collaborate On
Lile of Husband
Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt has
disclosed that rights to the life
story of Franklin Delano Roose-
velt, long eagerly sought by Hol-
lywood, have been granted to
Motion Picture Producer Stanley
The arrangement Includes the
collaboration of Mrs. Roosevelt
in the film, which Kramer wilt
make for Columbia Piturea re-
lease. Mrs. Roosevelt was repre-
sented In the negotiations by the
Five years of speculation over
had been made clear by Mrs.
Roosevelt that this period of
time would have to elapse before
hearted duets with "More Love
and "So" (M-G-M).
Fingers.
best keyboard rambling on "Ivo-
ry Rag" and "Down Yonder" (
(Capitol)... Johnny Desmond anyone would be granted the
and Monica Lewis have two light- motion picture rights to The
Ka*aat>taB/4 A\\tm lfh \M ill" a T JlVe Ofv^MVPlfc RtOFV
"I am happy that Mr Kramer
will be the one to produce this
picture," Mrs. Roosevelt said. '
am familiar with his work and
gave -great confidence In his
honesty and integrity as wall as
hli ability."
Kramer, film records how.
produced such hits as ''Cham-
pion." "Home of the Brave,
The Men" and "Cyrano de Ber-
gerac" and currently is making
Death of a Salesman."
It will be at least three years
before The Roosevelt Story
comes to the screen, according
to Kramer. Intensive research
into the late president's entire
lifetime and deep study of count-
leas history-making documents
are involved.
In signing the deal, Kramer
said to Mrs. Roosevelt, "This Is
for me a personal dedication to
what I consider the most import-
ant of all American subject for
the screen.
I
In "The Toast of New Orleans"
and now playing a Tahltlan
charmer; and a group of sup-
porting players largely made up
of native islanders selected on
location. Standing out among
them is the handsome Charles
Mauu. a real-life Tahltlan chief
who proves himself an arresting
film personality In his first mo-
tion picture role. There are also
delightful portraits by three
youngsters in the persons of
Charles Freund, Dione Leilani
and Philip Costa, who adopt Keel
as their foster-parent in one of
the story's amusing sequences.
Although Tahiti is the fictional
locale of "Pagan Love Song," the
picture was actually made on the
Pacific island of Kauai, where
Robert Alton, directing, and Ar-
thur Freed, producing, took full
advantage of the lush tropical
backgrounds in giving their story
picturesque scope. They nava
given the screen an offering
which is a treat to both eye and
ear.
SHORTS
PAL STILL THIRSTY
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (U.P>
Jess B. Cleland was only trying
to provide a little Inner warmth
to a friend In federal Jail here
but It cost him a $50 fine. A de-
outy marshal nabbed Cleland as
he tied a bottle of whiskey to a
rope dangling from a second
floor Jail window.
SOMEONE ERRED
PERRY. N. Y. (ILP.) Some-
one in the Perry volunteer fire
department made a mistake
When the village's new 39-foot
4-lnch ladder truck arrived, loc-
al volunteers found it was three
feet longer than the newly-
erected garage it was supposed to
occupy.
BANDITS HAVE HEART
CHELSEA. Mass. (UP.)
Kind-hearted bandits who rob-
bed a supermarket of $3.200
phoned police before fleeing to
make sure that the proprietor.
Abe Bornsteln. would be released
from a refrigerator before he
froze to death. .
Three Husbands' Due to Bow in Thursday
I. G. Goldsmith, who has long
been recognized as one of the
leading film producers of Creat
Britain, having to his credit suqh
firm as 'The Stars Look Down"
and "Hatter's Castle," recently
completed his first American
film, "Three Husbands," which is
being released by United Artists.
The comedy is scheduled to bow
in at the Bella Vista Theater
next Thursday.
For his initial United Artists
production. Goldsmith obtained
a top acting cast. Heading; the
roster is Emlyn Williams, the
famous British actor, playwright
and director who makes his first
American film apoearance in
"Three Husbands." He plays the
charming British bachelor, living
In San Francisco, whose auixotlc
impulse it Is to have delivered,
after his death, letters to his
three best friends, telling them
the explosive news that their
wives have been carrying on ro-
mantic affairs with him.
The three husbands are por-
trayed by Howard da Silva. Shep-
nerd Strudwick and Robert
Karnes. and their respective
soouses are Eve Arden. Ruth
Warrick and youthful Vanessa
Brown. Other strategic roles are
olayed by Billle Burge. Louise
Erickson. star of the radio pro-
pram, "A Date With Judy," Jane
Darwell and the veteran char-
acter actor, Jonathan Hale.
Vera Casoary. author of "Lau-
ra." "Bedela" and other best-
selling novels, a number of which
were adapted for best-selling
films, wrote the original story for
"Three Husbands." Miss Casoary
Is the possessor of the Screen
Writers Guild Award for her
scrlot on the popular film. "A
Letter to Three Wives." Her
theme in "Three Husbands" re-
verses the sexes in the marital
upheaval by having the three
husbands entertaining miser-
able doubts regarding the fide-
lity of their wives.
Irving Reis. who was at the
directorial helm on "Enchant-
ment" and "The Bachelor and
'.he Bobby Boxer." directed
"Three Husbands." Frank Planer
was in charge of photograohy.
Rudolph Sternad was production
designer, and Anthonv Z. Landi,
brother of the late Elissa Landi.
served as Mr. Goldsmith's as-
sociate producer. The amusing
'.an" "Poor Chap" wa composed
bv Herschel Burke Gilbert, with
Edward Eliscu credited with the
lyrics. Gilbert also was In charge
of the picture's background mus-
ic. The set decorations were in
the hands of Edward G. Bovle
the well-known Hollywood de-
signer.
OFF THE CUFF
Star whose fans turned on him
when he was divorced calls 'em
his Fang Club.
With Eve Arden As Star
1 i vg
vi ^^^
JVLjS Mr
Culled from Cuddles Sakall's
fan mall: "I saw you in 'Lullaby
of Broadwav' fifteen times. P. S.:
I am an usher."
A great title for Stalin's TV
yhow. if he ever does one: "Me
the People."
WIFE BISAGBEES-
TRENTON, Tenn. (UP.)
There was a postscript to Joe
Wilson's card of thanks i ft the
local newspaper expressing ap-
preciation for support In an un-
successful campaign for office.
The postscript said: "Mrs. Wilson
wishes to thank all who voted
against me."
HOWARD DA SILVA AND EVE ARDEN are diamonds in tr
rough who arouse plenty of merriment cs an outspoken mar^
ried couple in I. G. Goldsmith's sparkling comedy. "Thre
Husbands." which opens on Thursday at the Bella Vist
Theater through United Artists release. Emlyn Williams, the
celebrated British star, has one of the top roles in the filmJJ
II! HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NBA Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD, (NEAi Guys
and Dolls:
Walt until grandpop gets a
look at Mitzl Gaynor as Eva Tan-
guay in "The I Don't Care Girl."
His eyes may have popped
when Eva snapped her fi.ier.s
and walked on the stage in silken
tights, but Mitzi's costumes will
paralyze the old boy.
"I'm slightly scantier than
Eva," confessed Mitzl. "In Eva's
day. she wore what they ca'led
tennis shorts and husbands left
their wives when they saw her.
If I wore anything like that. I'd
get a yawn."
Anv resemblance to Eva will be \
strictly accidental, Mitzl whls- \
pered. "because thev gave me
one old and dark stlll-plcture of :
her and all I could see was an!
arm and a leg. What can I do;
with an arm and a leg? I lust
have to use my imagination."
Luther Adler's making his rac-
ket-boss role in "The Hoodlum
Empire" a real flesh-and-blood
character on the theory that |
gangsters don't walk around
looking stonv-faced.
Claims Adler:
"Cagnev, Robinson, Muni, even \
George Raft when he did 'Scar- I
face.' never played gangsters the
hard-faced way. That school of
acting came |n with Alan Ladd
and Laurence Tierney.
"Now we know that gangsters
have expressive faces and that's
the way I'm playing this charac-
ter."
"I had five ulcers before they
let me play Jeff Chandler's In-
dian wife in 'The Battle of Apa-
che Pass.' They said Jeff was too
tall for me. I went running from
office to office politicking for!
the part. I reminded them U
i.iui Ha>es h?d played
Gtry Cooper in 'Farewell
Arms' and that the picture
one of Hollywood's greatest id
str-le-."
Dark-eyed Susan Cabot,
hit* the height-measuring at
U two inches over 5 feet, pan
to catch her breath.
Now that she's licked
height problem at UI. 4]
wsnM to battle a?lnst ptaj
"dirk, e^-otie )tttl^ tb'ng*."
"I'm either In Jungles or
"v we Tons." S'isan walld.
don't kn^w w1""'. Mv cp'ori'ipj
exactly like Fliwiceth Tavre
Do they put her hi a saron|
No." .
The search fo- vrhlcle tlj
will put pepo-' Este'ita. Ror"
"iiez Into the l.une Velex actil
lea?>'e is e^M ?--Mibi'- j
he1" *t~r "'*' ** "ameron |
"Fair Wind to Java."
"Th**'*)"" are n","*"'ng out
me." Estellta bubbled. "I
like theeae ttk'-eet-easv fl
Thees comedie* I am making i
eood for me. F.e< batter than!
peeetures. Mak' me feel lak"
worked for beee theengs.*'
r*r
WRECKED BY BLANKET
CARBONDALE, DI. (UP.)
uer>nread wed I oren SanS
to lose control of his car *i
e-a*h into another during a i
storm. Saners pi't the bedsor
over an ooen window in his
*or protection from the rain
it suddenly fell over his head.
Manama Canal Clubhouses SHOWING TODAY!
Diablo Hts. 2:30 6:15 8:10
Louis JOURDAN Drbra PAGET
"BIRD OF PARADISE"
(Technicolor)
"MOR^UI^lKK
RIEB"
COCOLI 2.30 6:15 1:25
Dean MARTIN and Jerry LEWIS
"THAT'S MY BOY"
M.
M 611.....1 'XT'
g P^ |^ ft C) ^\ Air-conditioned 230 4:30 6:30 8:30
Screen
At iost;
...from ^^mk
/
'-ft
ALSO SHOWINO MONPAT COHTmuOUB SHOWS
STARTING AT !M
Pedro Miguel 7:00
"TERESA" STORY Or A BRIDE 1

GAMBOA
7:00
Jane POWELL
"Rich, Young & Pretty"
Wjs^^waf^Jlio^ucrUJj^
GATUN 2:30 7.00
Bob HOPE
"The Lemon Drop Kid"
daja"
MARGARITA 2:30 6:15 8:25
Cary GRANT Jeanne CHAIN
"PEOPLE WILL TALK"
Memley IS O'CLOCK HIGH"
CRISTOBAL Air-Conditioned
I *\i ':!
Batty GRABLE MacOonald CAREY
"Meet Me After The She
^Uosaowuuj.
U>n mmm
IOW
a NleJU'





Drawn
in Dots
AN animal
" whose indus-
try at this time
of year in the
zones where win-
ter normally
brings cold and
snow usually
accepted as a
harbinger of par-
ticularly vigorous
winter weather
already is camou-
flaged. You can't
see him In this
picture beca use
of seasonal pro-
tective coloration
he may take on
when snow flies.
However, you can
penetrate his dis-
guise and make
h 1 m appear by
drawing a contin-
uous line from
dot 1 to dot 41,
consecutively.
Where two fig-
ures appear be-
side a single dot,
use the dot for
both.
A-mazing Tour of Mexico Eyes Right?
OUPPOSE you could take a tour of Mexico without getting
'-' lost in its man of roads? Try It, starting at Mexico
City (1) with your pencil and
visiting all these other cities
In order: Juarez (2); Vera
Crux (3): Herida (4).
The idea is to complete
trip without retracing
any part of your route.
Party
Pastime
Twin Test of Wits and Memory
Total Twenty-Two
-T" s 5 Unmarried and Married
1 1 H = 22
a s +
;; 22 22
a a a
H-l M
saa
H-l 1+1 22
a a +
aaa S5 22
a a
313 S 22
a a
11 H-i E 22 22 22
h a a
H H =
aaa =
1*1
b a
X ? Z 22
2 s
22 22 22 1
""THIS provides a
1 test of obser-
vation and mem-
ory. First, have
a watch or a
clock handy to
time youraelf.
Second, provide a
pencil and paper.
Now, lit how
many errors you
can spot in the
draw ing within
ten minutes.
The artist de-
liberately made
26 errors. Spot-
ting 20 er more
in 10 minutes is
an excellent
score.
Finally, put
away the draw-
ing and your first
list and see how
many of the ob-
jects In the draw-
ing room you can
list from mem-
ory. It's surpris-
ing how many
persons can't get
at least 15 cor-
rectly.
Our Junior
readers can get
further pleasure
out of the draw-
ing, by coloring it
with crayons.
"POnOlS DO Suotjq
too op now tC :ox.pis uvp Sop :uoiii*od inn "I II
lou pino juijii -jz :Suo| ooi ujaaaq Jo xai aoo jz :ouq to pj
"O H"< 'R "uoqa ooi adoi iz 'oni j|d uoiM ui pan adoi
10 pu auo oe :>uii tna uo jaSuoi ui Iiivnii 81 :uoua ooi
pnoq pj| suo t\ tpaia no op 01 -fii :j3jj|p aaAOOia -n 'uiiipj auo puu oao|S aoo bjotv aqa
XI :iii Jixa -|i uoddna moiai* oomaoa Sanua u. pijqo 'u
*oh|b *Bai aoo Aiuo aau qauaq rnnoj *oi 'aXamapia maup aaji
ig am :jjjip aigsaai u s :iiv^ uo pjnuoi imj oo) ihj
:uuip wn hoiii laau pinoua ooonaq "q :ati*i ooi iii aoo a
'uoiinod Juojm ui *x*i j|q UN ooi no jjq j tauasa lain)
a ui i*ip jauxoma in lit* '|an aioxia anuaaqao :**nBl8
poR an amusing
* "icebreaker" at a
party, select five
breakable, but not val-
uable objects, such
glass ash tray, hand mirror, egg, water glass,
and framed picture. Place them on the floor in
a line at intervals. Choose an unsuspecting
person to come forward and practice stepping
over the different articles, measuring each pace
and the distance he must raise each foot to
clear the obstacles. When be has done this,
lead him back to the starting place, blindfold
him slowly and test bis ability to walk the
obstacles again. However, while he la being
blindfolded have one or two confederates move
all the obstacles aside. Then, when he begins
to walk, count and step high in fear of breaking the
articles which are no longer, there, the spectators
should add to his imagined difficulties by saying, "Look
out!" "Be careful!" "You Just made that one," ate.
FILLING A LOT OF SHOES
GAZE at this figure in-
tently for 30 seconds
or more. Does It do a
trick with your vision 7 It
baa a deceptive charac-
ter, for it la a classic .ex-
ample of the classic Il-
lusion, a design having
an effect on moat persons
that is a warning that
we can't alwaya believe
our eyes.
Speaking of the eyes,
there ia a perfect ana-
gram of the phrase THE
EYES, that la a phrase
formed of the same let-
ter, which means the
same thing. Do you
aee what It laT
Mb, tu
waits* .
Can You Be
A Detective?
By Samuel Vauyhan
CHIEF DYKE and Detective
Harris looked at the bodies
of Abby and Amy Carver, spin-
ster sisters who had lived alone
In the musty old Carver home- '
atead. The Chief had pieced to-
gether a story of what happened
the night before when the datera
returned homo from church.
Abby gasped a single sentence
aa she lay dying of the blows ahe
suffered.
"Stop bun, Amy! He's smashed
our Gilbert picture, and he ."
It seemed Abby surprised a
housebreaker while Amy re-
mained behind to pay the taxi
driver. She attempted to drive
him out by striking him with her
umbrella handle, but both sisters
were soon beaten down by the
assailant.
"This must be the picture ahe
was so concerned about," Dyke
said. He held a broken gilt frame,
pieces of glass, a cardboard back-
ing, and some folded newspapers
that had been used for padding.
"This la a picture of John Gil-
ts
111 r
mm i -
1 1

1 1
1


1 1 1 ST
,. A|t|H L Elf i
1
1 1, i i ii

II II 1 II
\

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1
AT "ladies night" at an Elks Club, there were no
widowers and no unattached ladles In attend-
ance. A third of the married men present had their
wives with them and a quarter of all the men were
accompanied by their fiancees.
If of 77 persons present at the meeting 25 were
women, how many were bachelors?
ituaut TO loiav-na m a;** ihu : jjiuT
-pHI8 puzzle won't go to your
* head.
'Cause it's about shoes, instead.
Let's criss-cross or fill-in. All
the words given below, describing
varieties of footwear, aro to be
fitted into toe diagram above.
They will interlock vertically and
horizontally. One word is in its
correct position as a starter.
letters
Gym Ice
4 letters-
Boys Polo
Home
5 letters-
Beach Nurse
Creep Sport
g letters-
Soccer
Tennis
7 letters
Lowheel
Service
Skaters
Teenage

Arctic
Casual
Riding
Athlete
Bowling
Gripper
Hunting
Loafers
8 letters
Baseball Stroller
Snowahoe Tramping
letters
Soft-House
io letters
Basketball
11 letters
Archjupport Maternities
IS letters-
Primary school
Magical Moments
A FAMOUS magician offers this advice to those
who wish to be adept at sleight-of-hand and
other tricks: "Don't tell people ail that you intend
to do when you begin a trick, unless the trick Itself
calls for such a statement. This Is almost like re-
peating a trick and Is therefore inadvisable for the
same reason. Alwaya have a next trick in mind, so
that you can go right Into it when you have fin-
ished with the one you are performing. If it is a
similar trick from the audience'a viewpoint, but
with a different method or climax from your stand-
point, ao much the better, because if people think
you are about to do one thing, it la all the easier
to stump them with another."
The fallowing, an easy trick to master, usually
is bailing to beholders:
Lay several objects on the table and ask a person
to concentrate upon one. He la to turn away while
you begin to tap the Objects, other persona watch-
ing you. Each time you tap, you say ao, and he
pella the chosen object to himself.
When h reaches the last letter, say "N" In the
word "SPOON," he la to call out "Stop!" He does
that and you ask him to turn around. To his amaze-
ment he finds that your finger la on the chosen
object. In this case the spoon!
In picking the objects, take those that spell with
different numbers of letters, for example: C-U-P.
F-O-R-K, S-P-O-O-N, N-A-P-K-I-N, A-S-H-T-R-A-Y
Tap any two objects to start, but land your third
tap on tne cup, the fourth on the fork, and so on.
Thus you will always finish the mental spell.
You can use objects with more letters, auch a*
o-i-G-A-R-E-T-T-E. which has two more letters
than the word "ash-tray" but in such cases tap any
odd object in between to allow for the extra letter,
provided the count goes that far.
Of course, next time you do the trick, you must
choose entirely different objects, to make it hardet
for others to catch on how it's done. /'
Timely Brain Teaser
A CLOCK that strikes the hours only has struck
21 In the last three hours. What time la It?
Can you answer in a minute?
(iqlio io tuiujou oop.o iqsai s,j| jaaiaiy
xbert" Dyke said, *
romantic movie atar
who burned up the
aereen playing oppo-
site Greta Garbo. Pro-
bably Amy and Abby were
fans of his." He fingered the
newspapers, looked closely at
the back of the photographic
print "The picture has an outline
pressed into it Seems to have
been two rectangular objects."
vocabulary builder
QUIZ CROSSWORD
T~nE date of November's most
notable holiday this year is
22. That suggested a "22" puz-
zle. You are to supply the figures
that will make each vertical and
horizontal row equal 22. How
quickly can you complete It?
By the way, here la a famous
tongue-tester:
Tootle took train twenty-two
at two to two to Tooner to tutor
a tooter to toot his flute.
Can you say it aloud rapidly
without tripping your tongue?
ti n oe -t t
t 'i 't -it, oi i 'a 't' oe 'i 'u
t 't i i si ii 'oe ot *n '
doi au a von IBBMaSSg
By Eugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL
1Who named Bethel because it
was the place where God
spoke to him? (Gen. 35:15>
6The children of whom built
cities, including Aroer? (Num.
32:34)
9From what place did David
and his men go to bring back
the ark to Jerusalem? (2 Sam.
8:2)
14 Declaim.
ISWho was Josaphat's father?
(Mat 1:8)
16Bury.
17-Where did Lazarus Uve? (John
12:1)
19"And there shall be signs in
the sun, and in the moon, and
in the stars; and upon the
earth distress of -----"' (Luke
21:25)
21Epoch.
22"My fruit Is better than gold,
yea than -----gold" (Pr. 1:19)
23Born.
24"The very ----- of your head
Hi
r-jRi-jnn^OEP.'^r ::nujn
aonHH^w&nfcMiiPiEfii
BBDBHQH^illianRPIPI
S%%Ma5FjnHB%!!Gi
E!tIH%r li>- H%[jEWIinGJ
EOEPlfcUEE'fcC! ?l
9feKBU%ffhlME%H7L:jB
%%DP)%r> ftfiH%riftllDI&
,EE(n%F:[:!iiH%uip.R%%%
anBiiurii:;%s,r:.nLiL't]L-i
BIQHE%EnE%fcBB
IIIUSSMUBD PUZZLE SOLCTION
sre all numbered" fMat 10:30)
27"The ----- of evildoers shall
never be renowned" (Isa 14:
20)
28Jumbled type.
29"The----- of the wlcked shall
. > broken" (Pa 87:17)
30Sprawl.
31Sunburns.
35Chart
34What did Hannah. Samuel's
mother, make him and bring
him from year to year? (I
Sam. 2:19)
35"For ye are ----- with a price"
(1 Cor. 8 JO)
37Hebrew month.
88How many days had Lazarus
lain in his grave before Jesus
raised him from the dead?
(John 11:17)
39Close hermetically.
40Three-toed sloth.
41Who was a mighty hunter?
(Gen.. 10:9)
43"----- us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil
(Mat 6:13)
44 Aptitude.
45Affirmative votes.
46Partially carbonized vegetable
material
47"We know that an ----- ia
nothing in the world, and that
there Is none other God but
one" (1 Cor. 8:4)
48Street (abbr.)
49Exclamations.
SOWhat la the Interpretation of
Cephas? (John 1:42)
51-Held session.
53Snap
54Greek letter.
55"Arise, O Lord; let not man
------: let the heathen be judged
in thy sight" (Pa 0:19)
57What angel was sent from God
to Nazareth to announce the
forthcoming birth of Jesus?
(Luke 1:26)
61Pungent
62Artificial language.
64Musical term meaning slow.
65An herb.
86"The fining ----- is for sliver,
and the furnace for gold: but
the Lord trieth the hearts"
(Pr. 17:3)
67Relieved
VERTICAL
1What Biblical character per-
sonifies patience?
2Land-measura
3Feline
4"The chief priests mocking
said among themselves with
the scribes, He saved -----;
himself he csnnot save" (Mark
13:31 >
5"We roar all like -----, and
mourn sore like doves" (Isa
50;ll)
6Merry.
7Ancient Roman coin.
8 What la the 27th book of the
Old Testament?
"Surely the serpent will
without enchantment; and a
[ftSl) ** D0 better" (EceL
10Blackbird.
11Expiating
12Smooth.
13Gaelic.
18Symbol for sodium.
20 In addition.
22"They have beaten me. and I
not" (Pr. 23:35)
- 24Who vowed revenge on all
Jews because Mordecat re-
fused to bow before hlmT
(Esth. 3:6)
23One of the countries Into
which Paul went (Gal. 1:17)
26Mischievous spirit
27Fly aloft
28Who wrote the Epistle to the
Romans?
30- Noisy.
31Tailless Jumping smphibian.
32Shltrai was in charge of all
the herds that fed in what
place? (1 Chr. 27:29)
34Dove murmura
33"I will-----down his foes be-
fore his face, and plague them
Cesyrlstt, 1H1. Us* restart* ByaUetl*. tas.
that hate htm" (Pa 89:23)
36"Pilate wrote a^------, and put
it on the cross* (John 19:19)
38Chsfa
S9"The gathering together of the
waters called be ------" (Gen
1:10)
42'-Great Is the. ----- of godli-
ness" (1 Tim. 3:16)
43Bound.
44Bustle.
46Who went to Samaria and
preached the gospel? (Acts
47Of what place Was Herod's
brother, Philip the tetrarch?
(Luke 3:1)
49Fourth caliph.
50Dark brown.
51Slight quarrel. '
52Coy
53Lose color.
54Symbol for tantalum.
56Energy
57Obtained
58Those to power.
59Summer (Fr.)
60 "The chUdren of------. Hadid.
and Ono" (Neh. 7:37)
68"He that deviseth to ----- evU
shall be called a mischievous
person" iPr. 24:8)
The sisters were beaten down."
"Let's see," Hank said.
"Couldn't have been mokey .
thia outline ia bigger than the
sue of our dollar billa."
Chief Dykes thought a minute
"Hank, the newspapers thai
padded thia picture have stones
in them about Lindbergh's flight
across the Atlantic That would
mean that the picture waa framed
about May or June of 1027."
"So what's that prove?" Hank
asked.
Dykes said, "Remembering wat
happened about two dozen years
ago. this may have been money,
and may trap our killer!"
How?
"inn am ioaa. Bino* imc
aw o Suiaaaj -wiouoxiiu a/*i ui uo
-laap py 'aoSuaipu axuaq ua|
oi mo ppaoo sjonSinum am 'ana poo
moo o aaneaaq ..patuca, onuj ojm
luq am tv Jaw ajaa< omq peq pu Viol 'aad<>|Mua a at
1110 (..Moiiax.. jo) paipaa-ixn* wmaju
ajqi -Ouajjna loaxino no oaqi mSjv:
'8ZSI oi oonaiMJ io mo mo* ism
iaaooj Xauom o aaaonuua aja* -Bato
-ipui n 'aualqo nappio oqj lawpjaMS
Missing Digits
"THOUGH only four digits are
shown, you should be able to
figure out the othersthose rep-
resented by X's in tola problem
In division :
X XX
(
?
Nw
xs>
Aa a starting clue there is the
tact the first digit ir the quotient
must be 7 to produce a 1 for the
final digit In the first product.
ao oem aAM aaam awi n> (a ppiaip
aofla aajtn tsSat aato imj :M||oej

Pi
?.



>


i.-- "<""......--------;--------m'""''' iim
mmffimmmi, IV-----------, ,,,i.....i-----...y.*........ ------ '.. i .....* ..- r. -, ......... -. \.mmmmmmmmmm
..i^v^ ,,...i..*'
?
A
i
RUSSIAN OIL goes up in smoke in the Zistersdorf fields in the Russian zone of Austria. The
fields were seized by the Russians after World War II as a German asset. In the foreground
is the small village of Zistersdorf. An explosion in the field tanks touched off the oil blaze.
EYE-CAT-CHING screen star Elizabeth Taylor reminds her
smoke Persian, Bonzo, that National Cat Week is just around
the corner. Bonzo, who welcomed his mistress home from
movie-making in England, hopes Cat Week means more liver.
GETTING A LIFT is the nose of a C-119 Flying Boxcar nearing the final assembly stage at the.
Kaiser-Frazer plant in Willow Run, Mich. Workmen later will attach wings to the fuselage.
M-M-M THAT FROSTING is good, says New York's Louisa Runge as she celebrates her 101st
birthday, at a party given by her children. The chipper centenarian was born in 1850.'
Servicemen Drop In On Town Than 'Out of This World'
CTEPPINQ THROUGH the gateway to 'another world," men of the United States 43rd Infantry division tour historic Williamsburg, Va., colonial capital
esses wearing 18th Century costumes, visit.the armory, inspect furnishings in the Governor's mansion and stand where Patrick Henry stood whenje*.
liberty or death speech. The Defense department undertakes the training program to emphasize the founding principles of the natidtt
' ~ A
EXHAUSTED, RUT HAPPY, six Cuban seamen who clung to a life raft for two days, are res-
cued by the crew of the coastal tanker, Henry C. Wallace, 40 miles off Key Largo in Florida.
Their 136-foot motor vessel, the Cocoa, sank while heading for the port of Cardenas, Cuba.
Servicemen from the 43rd Infantry division enter reception center at colonial William$burg. "Gaoler" Julian Dickenj locks up France Robb in the pillory
SHATTERING experience for William Shewell. 42, of Los Angeles, came when his small
coupe was sandwiched between two trucks. The one behind is a 10-ton oil truck-trailer and
the one in front, appropriately enough, is a city dump truck. Shewell got a nose scratch.
Soldiers compare c.lonial .hoe. with their.. *" *""'"?" did"' '*P "" '" "?"
King returtt SytwWceie
p,w An 18th Century blunderbuss gets insertion


.

jr
tGK TEN
THF Sl'NDAT AMERICAN
"SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1M1
otre Dame Shellacked B^ Michigan State 35-0
Panama Provincial Amateur
i$ 3xing Championships Today
................

Tiie finals of the Panama Pro-
vin mi Bnxine Championships
will he held tonight at the Na- .
tional Gym beginning at 8
o'clock.
Six bouts arc scheduled with'
chsmpionship bouts listed for
each class from paper eight to
wel'-rrweight.
T*ie finalists are the survivors
of eliminations that started sev-
eral months ago.
The bouts ill be over four
rounds and will have three-min-
ute rounds instead of the usual
two-minute rounds for simnn
pur- :.
The program:
PAFEltU i.K.aT (101 pounds) I
Toty Elias (Maran) vs. I.uis
Asprilla (Juan Diaz).
FLYWEIGHT (112)
Beau Jack II (Calidonia) vs.
Clifton Innis (Rio Abajo).
BANTAMWEIGHT (119)
Alberto Lawrence (Chorrillo)
vs. Alberto Tern (Pacora).
FEATHERWEIGHT (126)
Juan Moreno (Darin) vs. Vi-
cente Ruiz (Maran).
LIGHTWEIGHT (135)
Horacio Ottis (Chorrillo) vs.
Lincoln Weeks (San Miguel, Cali-
donia).
WELTERWEIGHT (147)
Luis Samuels (Pueblo Nuevo)
vs. Manuel Padilla (Chorrillo).
Price of Baseball Equipment Cut
Following Removal of Excise Tax
(Reprinted from "The Sporting: News")
! The elimination of the ten per cent excise tax on baseball
mi equipmeht resulted in a general price decrease quoted by one
manufacturer, effective November 1. passing on to customers the
tax saving, plus a little extra.
The team price on official, top-grade baseballs, which had
been $33 a dozen, now is $29.40 a dozen. Corhparable reductions
were made on other baseball equipment. A top-grade fielder's
glove which formerly retailed at $30.50 will now sell for $26.50,
._ while a No. 1 catcher's mitt dropped from $38 to $33. The best
bats formerly retailed at $3.80 each, but now are $3.45. Team
prices are slightly lower.
Prices of football and other athletic equipment used primar
' Mly by schools also were reduced following removal of the excise
'.tax. Previously, only public schools had been entitled to the tax
exemption.
Discussing the reductions on baseball and other equipment,
in athletic goods manufacturer commented:
> "We realize, of course, that quite a few users believe prices
--en all athletic equipment are high, but if we are going to main-
. tain quality and workmanship, prices must be kept in line with I
' --raw material markets and labor markets. We would certainly
-* '.like to see top-grade baseballs sell for around $24 a dozen, but
um'er today's costs we simply cannot build a quality product and I
sell it at that price. We will, of course, have lower priced balls
. .in l!:e line, but we will tell everyone frankly that they do not!
-'Ton ain the workmanship and material we have in the No. 1 !
I *ra >."
P*i he new .revenue bill also exempts some types of entertain-I
'"rne t from the federal admissions tax, where schools, churches'
?' .and charities benefit, but the admissions tax remains on ath- !
h'tir contests except those conducted by elementary and second-,
'aiv schools.
.,r-----------
Key Fake Pitch-Out Makes Buck-Lateral
Glenn Turner
BUCKEB Fullback Glenn
Turner, 19, i< one of the young-
sters mak.ng Georgia Tech a
Rambling Wreck. The 190-
pound sophomore mattered his
way to the touchdown that
edged Vanderbllt, kicks the
extra points. (NEA)
Sunday's
Program
1st Race "E" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Mr. Espinosa C. Chavez 107x
Last of a aeries of key plays
diagramed and written by fam-
ous coaches for NEA Service.
By CHARLIE CALDWELL .
Princeton Coach
PRINCETON, N. J. (NEA)
Princeton's Single Wing Play,
Buck 38, Is run with an ubal-
anced line to the right.
It Is a basic
play, one of the
best of our
buck- lateral
series and a
variation of our
single-wing at-
tack.
The ball
comes directly
____ back to Full-
B Aback Russ Mc-
E^JNeil, 3, who
fakes a hand-
VwmU M0S ,0 Quarter-
Chart!. bolts up the middle.
2Mueco
3Bijagual
4Domino
5Volador
6Valaria
E. Guerra 116
T. Medrano 109
R. Ycaza 105x
C. Chong 105x
B. Aguirre 112
Stevens fakes a lateral to Left
Halfback Dick Kazmaler, 4. who
Is fading and swinging out to the
right, as though to pass.
Right Halfback Dick Pivirotto,
1. goes down to take out the
safety man.
The key to the play is Stevens'
fake to Kazmanier.
The right end blocks the right
linebacker, the right tackle the
other.
The left end moves down and
blocks the halfback.
Juan Franco Tips
By ('LOCKER
7Dlezde Mayo R. Vsquez 110
8Luck Ahead J. Phillips 110
9Protn A-. Valdivia 116
2nd Race "O" Natives 2 Fgs.
Purse: $250.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1Monteverde R. Ycaza lOOx
2Componedor M. Arosem. 100
3Mamboleca O. Chanls 112
4Con Valor II G. Cruz 112
5As de Oro M. Guerrero 110
3rd Race "C" Natives V/i Fgs.
Purse: $325.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Batn
2Elona
3Ria Rol
4Tin Tan
5Annie N.
V. Ortega 120
M. ZebaUos 116
B. Aguirre 112
R. Ycaza 103.x
B. Moreno 107
4th Race "F-2" Natives4', Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Fonseca) J. Phillips 116
2Pesadilla) V. Rodrguez 117x
iHercules B. Aguirre 114
4Little Lul G. Snchez 112
5Eclipse J. 8amaniego 114
6Golden Babe E. Silvera 120
7Gold. Faith A. Valdivia 120
8Tap Girl A. Vsquez 117x
5th Race "C" Imported 7 Fg.
Purse: $650.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Mic/oblo J. Phillips 110
2Montlellto G. Snchez 108
3Cherlberibln E. Silvera 111
4Coraggio J. Contreras 110
1Valaria
2Con Valor II
3Rlna Rol
4Fonseca (e)
5Cherlberibln
6Key Heaven
7Curaca
8Rondlnnella
9Porter's Star
10Celaje II
ONE BEST
Diez de Mayo
Monteverde
Annie N.
Little Lulu
Coraggio
Mariscalito
Alto Alegre
Sun Cheer
Levadura
Mayordomo
Rlna Roi.
BUCK 38 Fullback Russ
McNeil, 3, fakes to George
Stevens, 2, who in tun fakes
to Dick Kaxmaier, 4. (NEA)
The left tackle pulls out and
blocks the right guard.
The guards double team the
other guard.
Along The Fairways
La Parisin f 113 Central Ave-
nue is generouslv giving prizes
for the lady members of Panama
Golf Club.
It has been decided to hold a
36-hole medal play tournament
with full handicap allowance,
and it Is hoped that each and
every member will participate.
Due to possible weather con-
ditions there will be one full
week In which to turn in each 18-
hole score; each round must be
played with a contestant in this
tournament. The score cards
must be turned in to Pro Macar-
rn on Nov. 25 and Dec. 2.
We wish to thank the owners
of La Parisin, who are golfers
themselves, for being the first to
offer a tournament of this sort
for the Panam Club ladies.
Omphroy Tennis
Tourney Play
Starts Today
Today the Olympic Tennis
Court will be the scene of the
opening matches of the Omph-
roy Tennis Tournament.
Interest has been developing
slowly since the first days of the
announcement but the final days
saw a rush of entries and even-
tually terminated with a draw-
ing of 39 players.
The entries represent the
cream of the players from Pan-
am, the Canal Zone and Colon.
Some very closely played match-
es are expected and from the
quarter finals on will be packed
with thrills due to the high cali-
bre of the players.
It Is the desire of the promoter,
not only to encourage more play-
ing of tennis among the players,
but to reach directly to the hearts
of the tennis loving public and
getting a liberal attendance at
all games. This appeal reaches
out to the gentle ladies whose
Sresence Is always an Insplra-
lon to pull out the best from the
male.
There are not many benches to
accommodate spectators but this
is because seating capacity has
been sufficient. If the game will
pull out greater audiences, the
Physical Education Department
will undoubtedly gladly furnish
more seating capacity as the
crowd Increases.
Every effort will be made to
maintain the highest level of
sportsmanship both from the
players and spectators.
Georgia Tech Wins Easily,
Invited To Orange Bowl
(By UNITED PRESS)
EAST LANSING, Mich., Nov. 10^-Once mighty
Notre Dame, battered and beaten to a pulp by a
team primed for the occasion, went down to igno-
minious 35-0 defeat this afternoon before Michigan
State team that unquestionaly is the nation's fast-
est rising athletic power.
Up to today Notre Dame was still a great fool-
ball team both on the field and at the gate, but the
Irish were literally torn apart by Coach Clarence
(Biggie) Munn's Spartans who seem determined to
rack up their first undefeated and untied season
since 1913.
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
Southern Methodist and Texas
A. and M. struggled to a 14-14
deadlock in a battle for the Con-
ference cellar.
The battered Methodists match-
ed Texas' running game with so-
Ehomore halfback Jerry Norton
i the starring role as SMU came
from behind twice to gain a sem-
blance of a Conference triumph.
Muluel Dividends
Juan Franco
EVERYBODY HELPFUL
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (U.P.) A
^oortscaster. Jack Brltton, said
the telephone calls rolled in when
he announced a high school foot-
ball game here. They weren't
calls of protest. Britton got the
hiccoughs and listeners were
calling in Cures.
Now is the best
time to travel
by

WOE HOLDThere was plenty of feudin' and fuisin' when these
two women wrestlers mixed it up in a ring set up in the center -of a
Berlin night club. Here one of the German gals applies a toe hold
on her opponent, who's tumbling through the ropes topside. Mo-
ments later the pair continued their Amazon battle on the floor of
the cafe. (NEA photo by staff photographer Werner Kreusch.)
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service Cristbal
S.S. Heredia ................................ Nov 13
S.S. Fiador Knot ........ N0V n
S.S. Chiriqui.................... 11'.'.'.'.i'.'.'.''.'.K0f'. 18
S.S. Inger Skou ............................'. nee. 1
S.S. Chiriqui................................. Dec! 2
Il.ndllnc RefrigeraM Chilled and Otaeral Cargo
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
r SLl,V! V,,N,>*' "' >" berth In Philadelphia annul
November 15th to load carao for Santiago, hinajlon Cartagena
Barranquilla and CRISTOBAL.
PBXQUENT SAILINGS PBOM CRISTOBAL TO WEST COAST
CENTBAL AMERICA
Cristbal to New Orleans via .. .
_ hails from
Tela. Honduras Cristobal
6th Race "F" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $5041.00 Pool Closes 3:33
First Race of the Doubles
1Apretador A. Vsquez 107x
2Mariscalito O. Chanis 111
3Miss Matty M. Guerrero 112
4Beduino E. Silvera 105
5Prestigio J. Contreras 119
6Wild Wire J. Baeza. Jr. 112x
7Key Heaven V. Ortega 115
S.S. Chiriqui ----(Passenger Service Only) ...Nov. 20
S.S. Chiriqui ................................ Dec. 4
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
7lh Race "E"
Purse: 5550.80
Second Race
1Roadmaster
2Pampero II
3Alto Alegre
4Mimo
5Revial
6Curaca
Imported1 Mile
-Pool Closes 4:05
of the Doubles
F. Rose 111
T. Medrano 110
B. Aguirre 114
J. Avila 120
G. Ramos 107x
R. Vsquez 112
8th Race "D" Imported>/> Fgs.
Purse: J600.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Rondinella J. Contreras 112
2Mingo G. Snchez 115
3Supertlclosa) M. Guerr. 112
4Vampiresa i
5Sun Cheer
6Mosquetn
7Pla)
8Soberana II
O. Chanis 112
V. Ortega 112
B. Aguirre 110
E. Alfaro 109x
A. Bazn 112
9Rid. East J. Samaniego 114
FIRST RACE
1Torcaza $5.60, $2.80, $2.60.
2 Campesino $3.60, $2.80.
3Bfalo $4.80.
SECOND RACE
1Miranda $8, $2.80, $3.40.
2Mona Lisa $380, $3.80.
3La Negra $5.80.
First Doubles: (Torcaza-Mir-
anda) $15.40.
THIRD RACE
1La Prensa $4, $2.80, $2.40.
2Resorte $5.40, $10.
3Don Catallno $17.80.
One-Two: (La Prensa-Resorte)
$17.80.
FOURTH RACE
1Caaveral $7.40, 44-40, $3.20.
2Risita $9.80, $5.80.
3Diana $3.
Quiniela: (Caaveral Risita)
$51.
FIFTH RACE
1Vermont $5.20, $2.20, $2.20.
2Sans Soucl $2.40. $2.20.
3La Chata $2.20.
SIXTH RACE
1Hechizo $12.80, $6, $3.60.
2 Mon Etoile $10, $3.80.
3Pepsi Cola $4.60.
SEVENTH RACE
1Cyclone Malone, $7.20. $3.80
2Miss Fairfax $6.40, $5. ($3.20.
3Belfarset $2.80.
Second Doubles: (Heohir.o-Cy-
clone Malone) $79.
EIGHTH RACE
1Nehulnco $13.40, $5.80,
2Hit $3.80. $3.20 .
3Alabarda $8.80.
Quiniela: (Nehuinco Hit)
$26.60.
NINTH RACE
1In Time $7, $3.80, $3.
2Apprise $5.40, $5.60.
3Hurlecano $3.20.
One-Two: (In Time-Apprise)
$26.48.
TENTH RACE
1Tully Saba $7.80, $3.20.
2Guarina $2.40.
CAMBRIDGE Deadeye Dick
Kazmaler threw three touchdown
passes to help set a new Prince-
ton record of 20 consecutive vic-
tories with a 54-13 triumph over
Harvard. Kazmaler completed 12
of 16 passes for a total of 220
yards.'He ran the baU 11 times to
pick up another 36 yards.
BALTIMORE A 100-y a r d
touchdown run by Navy halfback
Frank Brady in the opening min-
utes of the ball game failed to
unnerve unbeaten Maryland and
the Terrapins came back to over-
whelm the Middles 40-21.
A crbwd of 38,000 was brought
to its feet by Brady's length of
the field gallop Just a little more
than three minutes after the
opening klckoff but Maryland
came back to take complete con-
trol of the game and at one point
led the Middies by five touch-
downs.
played unbelievable superiority
and the Irish actually never had
a chance.
It. was one of the most humil-
iating setbacks Notre Dame has
suffered since the school became
a colossus of collegiate football
back on a dim. day in 1913 when
the immortal Knute Rockne and
Gus Doris combined to catapult
them into the national spotlight.
States giants sliced the Irish
wide open with tremendous run-
ning backs for the worst shel-
lacking handed Notre Dame in
Coach Frank Leahy's career
there.
Dick Fannin, Al Dorow, Wavns
Benson, Vince Piaano, and Dor
McCaullffe were the backs that
rallied the Spartans for 391 yards
on the ground and their fourth
victory in the 19 games between
the two schools.
FOOTBALL RESULTS
By UNITED
$3.20.
ATLANTAUnderdog VMI an-
gered Georgia Tech with a first
period touchdown and then
watched helplessly as Darrell
Crawford whistled passes over-
head to pace Tech to a 34-7 vic-
tory.
Shortly after the game end-
ed, Tech, unbeaten and tied
only by Duke, accepted a bid to
the Orange Bowl in Miami on
New Year's Day.
The Cadets surprised in the
first period as they rolled 63
yards for a 7-0 lead but the En-
gineers rode Crawford's accurate
arm to three touchdowns before
the half ended.
Crawford, with the patience
and precision of watchmaker,
waited until the ends, got well
down the field and then rifled
shots over the secondary and In-
to the arms of galloping receiv-
ers.
9th Race "C," Imported7 Fgs
Purse: $450.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Levadura G. Ramos 105x
2Fright V. Ortega 118
3Porter's Star B. Aguirre 117
4Nijlnsky G. Cruz 130
5Piragua O. Chanis 112
10th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $373.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Dalntvwood M. Guerrero 119
2Valehiza
3Forzado
4Celaje II
5 Islero
6Mayordomo
J. Phillips 115
A. Vsquez 112x
O. Chanis 115
O. Snchez 115
J. Rodria'z 115
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JACKSONVILLE Sam Mrvos,
the guard with the missing vow-
el, did not miss the vital extra
point and Georgia squeezed out a
7-6 decision over Florida.
The single Georgia touchdown
came on a pass from Quarterback
Bratkowski to Halfback Zippy
Morocco in the second period and
when Mrvos booted the point the
score stood up through Florida's
fourth Quarter rally.
Halfback Buford Long scored
on an eight-yard end run for the
Oators but Sophomore Rick Ca-
sares missed the point that would
have tied it.
Michigan State had ruled a
slight favorite to win the contest
by most of the experts but right
at the outset the Spartans dls-
Mich. State 35, Notre Dame
Rutgers 28. Brown 21
Princeton 54, Harvard IS
Cornell 21, Michigan 7
Columbia 21, Dartmouth S
Temple 34, New York V. 4
Boston U. 35, Oregon V. 4
Holy Cross 39, Marquette 13 '
Penn State 12, Syracuse IS
WHIIata Mary 21, V.P.I. 7-
Bucknell 21. Colgate SO
Virginia 34, North Carolina 1 '
Georgia Tech 34, VJM.I. 7
Drexel 35, Swarthmore
Minnesota li. Indiana 14
Army 27, Citadel t
Delaware 25, Lafayette 7
Wisconsin li, Penn 7
Oberlin 21, Denlson 27
Ohio State II. Pitt 14
Purdue 35, Northwestern 14
Baylor 18, Texas 6
Mississippi 39, Ankara 14
Miss. SUte 27, Memphis State 21
Texas A. M. 14, So. Methodist 1<
Oklahoma 34, Missouri 24
Maryland 44, Navy 21
Illinois 44, Iowa li
Kentucky 37, Tulane 4
Nebraska 34, Iowa State 27
Alabama 44, Miss. Southern 7
So. Carolina 34, West Virginia IS
Clemson 24, Boston College 2
Tennessee 44, Wash. Ac Leo 14
So. Dakota 35, No. Dakota 13
Wake Forest 19, Duke It
Georgia 7, Florida 4
1
?4
CLEANING UP Wo. Willie
Shoemaker has to stand on a
pail so ho can see himself to
shave in the dressing room' at
Jamaica, but New York's load-
ing Jockey for the 1451 racing
season needs no help when it
'comes to booting home winners.
The California boy has entered
the winner's circle so frequently
this year he's been nicknamed
Three-A-Day" Willis. (NBA)
oyal
J/eiherlands
Steamship
Company
K
N
S
M
TO EUROPE:
HELENA ...........................Nov. M
ORANJESTAD ......................Nov. M
delft.............................t,, ft
TO THE CARIBBEAN:
HELENA ............................ u
ORANJESTAD ....................,,Mov. 24
DELFT................... .........Hov. 28
TOTERU and CHILE:
OLE BULL.........................Nov. 12
BREDA ..... ......................Ms. 24
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(PasMager And Freight)
BOVD BROS.. FANAMA CITY. 2-2*48
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BLOE AGEKCILS BALBOA: 2-3711 (Freight)
<



vdat, November u, iwi
THI SUNDAY AMERICAN
FACE
Finnegan-Charolito In Return Clash Tonight
Sylvester Wallace vs.
Kid Allen In 6-Rounder
\ Celbn's Young Finnegan, former lightweight
champion of the Isthmus, gets a chance to redeem
himself before his followers when he tackles Cuban
Welterweight Champion Charolito Espiritusno to-
night in a scheduled ten-round bout at the Colon
Arena. The program gets underway at 8 p.m.
(Mid night) In the Atlantic City
damper"
S
The first time Finnegan met
Charolito, the Cuban cored a
Mies; two-round knockout over
! ianey boxing Colonlte. Fin-
negan, however, claimed, "I wua
icBbed." .,
HU claim was baaed on an al-
leged "ehort count." But eyewit-
nesses-- Including this writer-
were convinced that Finnegan
tay *d down until the ret atart-
ed to ay "ten" then Jumped to
hU feet. Whether "Cliffy^ mli-
judged the count or not. we do
not know-but we are certain
that-referee Coln Al Brown did
not make a abort count.
Many claim that the poor at-
tendanceabout 100 fana. due to
torrential rain that feu all day
i...
Would Return
Only For Lou
-Deacon Bill
rteuon lab Depend* an
Locating Sab In Florida
(Reprinted from "The Sporting
News")
w AL HIRSHBERG
if the Boeten feet
Si
BOSTON. Mtu. If Bill Mo-
Keehnie can arrange,for some-
one to run hla fruit and veget-
able plantation In Bradenkm,
ria., he will come north next
lummer as first lieutenant to
Lou Boudreu, the new manager
Of the Red Box. McKechnle,
reached by telephone, aid he
will be with the Sox during spring
training and will become a full-
Sedged coach if his business in-
fest* permit.
"X. left baseball of my own voli-
tion two years ago," he aid, "and
I would come back only to work
.. with Boudreau. He's a fine fel-
low, and X want to help him all
X can. I wouldn't consider leav-
ing her* for anyone or anything
but Lou
"I've had a lot of chances to
gat baca into the game. I've
turned them all down. I've been
fortunate down here. My placa
dea* a million dollars' worth of
buln* a year. I can't leave
that aort of thing for another
en* at baseball unless I am cer-
In that It's In good hands."
McKachnl*'* last baseball lob
waa as one of Boudreau' coaches
when Lou was managing Cleve-
land. At the end of the 1949 sea-
' Mn BUI retired and went to Flo-
rida to run his 1,000 aerea.
SU1I MUm the Game
"Do you miss the game?" he
was asked.
"MU* it* You don't apend a
lifetime.in baseball without mis-
sing it whan you leave," he de-
clared.
"What do you know about the
*dj$p?-
'WeuV' Bill aald alowly. "I
Sow most of them. I know what
y have done and I know what
they ean do. I see the club hi
araaotf avary spring and tha
boy* arent strangers to me."
"Row far do you thing the Sox
can go next year?"
"They could go all the way, I
think," Bill answered. "Ill tell
you one thing. If they wont put
out for Lou, they won't put out
for anyone. Boudreau can get
more opt of ball players than
anyone I've seen. He's had a
Sar with them and he knows
em inside and out. It would be
interesting to see how things
an "
yu mean you'll probably atay
with the Sox all year"
McKeehnle laughed..
"I dldntveay that. My farm
comes first. As far as spending
the whole season with the Red
Soxthat remains to be seen.
But," he added, "It would be
nice eeing Boston again at that."
. Jned Finnegan' willing
naas to fight because he wu*
fighting on a itrictly percentage
basis.
Tonight Finnegan will display
whether -ills boaat that he can
beat the Cuban wUl stand up.
The majority of thejexperts pick
the hard-hitting Charolito to
chalk up another knockout. Some
have even predicted that Ftnne
gan wont answer the bell for the
sixth round.
The majority of tha "experta
have been more cautious la their
prediction*. They mention that
Finnegan haa a good chance to
aeore an upaat early in the bout
the same as he almost did in
the first round of their flrt on-
ounter when he had the Cuban
bad shape near the end of the
round.
The
rfast. in this box.
lace will try to get
even with Kid Allen in a six-
semifinal shapes up a*
real aluffest. In this bout f
veaier Wallace will try to
even with Kid Allen in a
round Ill-pound match, Allen
decisioned Wallace more than a
year ago in a ten-round bout at
tha Arena. : _.
Two four-round bouts will
a
Fed
round out the program.
Tesis tackle* Rodolfo Ampudia _.
a 116-pound limit In one while
Kid Zeflne II take on Claco Kid
at ill In tha opening bout of tha
card.
pw............ !!
Baseball Academy
Lures 1,200 Boys:
9 Stars On Faculty
(Reprinted from "The Sporting
Raws") .
By FAT MeDONOCOH
NIW YORK. MX Operating
on the theory that association
with major league stars can be
highly beneficial to boys between
the ages of 10 and II. the Amer-
icanBaseball Academy opened
Its inaugural season on Novem-
ber I.
A total of 1,800 boys from the
New York metropolitan area ara
entered In the 12-week course In
baseball Instructions scheduled
In the 818th A.A.A. Armory on
63nd street in Manhattan, where
nine major league stars will give
instructions five days a week un-
Ul February II.
Phil Rlssuto la president and
co-founder of the Academy, and
hla teaching staff Include Id
Lopat, Oil McDougald, Oena
WoodUng and Yogi Berra of the
Yankees, Monte Irvln of the
QlanU, Ralph Branca and Oil
Hodgss of the Dodgers and Sid
Gordon of tha Bravea. All nina
ara on hand for two one-hour
sessions five days a week, one
starting at 1:80 and the second
at 4:10p.m.
The movement has the enthus-
iastic endorsement and co-oper-
ation of II social welfare alin-
eles, Including the F. A. L., Y-
M.C.A.. C.Y.O.. Boys Club* of
America, Boy Scout* and United
Neighborhood Clubs All boy* are
recommended by these agencies.
Awarde After Six-Weak* Course
These Institutions feel that the
teaching of baseball is a means
of giving the boys lessons In fair
play, good sportsmanship and
Rood citizenship. Awards will be
made after each six-week course
for good conduct In school, at
home and in Academy work. So-
cial workers will co-operate with
the ball players and bring to
(heir attention any matter which
needs correction. It Is felt a boy
wUl pay more attention to ad-
monition from one of his hero**
than from anyona cue, even
parents In some cases.
Co-founder with Rlssuto in the
Academy is Malcolm Child, au-
thor of the book, "How to Play
Big League Baseball."
Notice To Teen-Age Boys
.^ An_bJ!rr* "? "'" rears Me before next Aagmst
1st or will not be 11 y*rs eld iefete next August 1st and
wbe go to C. 8. Rate schools on the Pacific Side sure eligible
V*d 1" lnTited to fiU oat this ballet for membership oa
the "Fastlleh Teen Ase Baseball League." Please leave row
completed ballot witV Principal T. F. Bots, Balboa lgb
School, or bring it along to Cha tryewts to be held at the
***&!!* *&* X*** wTwir>) an Saturday. New.
10. and Monday, Now. II, from Site am. entil 1 to >.m
To become a member rev most appear at ana ef these
tryeefs.
Name .....................
Birthday ................................. Ago.
Tear phone
. (or nearest.
neighbor's)
Address
Position Too OsaaBy Flay
Ted's .232 Mark On Road Seen As Swap Road Block
Hit Only .195
At Cleveland,
.273 At N. Y.
(Reprinted from "The Sporting
Newe")
By BOB ALEMIAN
BOSTON, Mast. Lou Boud-
reau continual to drop strong
hints that slugger Ted Williams
i available as trading material,
but at the same time the Mil-
lionaires' new skipper Is playing
hard to get in considering the
talent offered to induce him to
trade Tha Splinter.
For example, when it waa
brought to Boudreau'* attention
that the Indians would like to
land Williams, Lou retorted:
"X am Interested In talking
trade with the Indians for Jim
Hagan and Bob Lemon, but I'm
not saying I'd give Williams at
those terms. However, I certain-
ly would be eager to talk to Al
Lopes or anybody else in the
Cleveland organisation on a
trade for Hegan and Lemon."
Boudreau emphasised that ho
considers a steady dependable
catcher the No. 1 need for next
season. Secondly, he is after a
shortstop combination, and
thirdly, a topnotch rlghthanded
pitcher. Hegan and Lemon would
fulfill two of the three catego-
ries to perfection. Hank Oreen-
berg, Cleveland general manager,
already has expressed considera-
ble Interest in Williams for next
season. The Indians are eager to
obtain a slugging outfielder.
The 1851 batting figures on
WllUamar however, reveal a star-
tling development which should
be of extreme Interest to rival
clubs.
Hitting in a park which did not
offer a friendly right field tar-
get, Williams batted a whistling
.403. This was his average at Fen-
way Park last season.
Hitting away from home,
Thumping Theodore registered
the worst average of his distin-
guished major league careeran
inemlo asa.
His over-all average for 1951
was .118, highest of all the Red
Box players. He also led in runs
baited In, with ltd. and hme
runs, so. Thus, the kingpin top-
ped his club in all three vital
hitting departments.
Re Waa Walked 144 Time
His .118 average Included 169
hits and the overwhelming total
of 144 passes. .. .
The nom average of .401 sheds
new light on Williams' recent
statements he would quit base-
ball if the Red Sox traded him.
This threat combines perfectly
with the batting average*, un-
related as they may be.
Sympathy has always been ex-
pressed for Williams because his
big league career was spent in a
park which provided a picnic for
rlghthanded hitters and a
graveyard for lefties..
Williams' lofty home average
of last season was a direct con-
tradiction of this situation.
Usually, he has batted higher
on the road. Last season, his road
figures were crippling.
In the Detroit park, where he
formerly ran roughshod, Wil-
liams batted only .189. In the
St. Louis park, a spot where base-
ball man figured he might
threaten Babe Ruth's home run
record, Ted hit only .178. In
Cleveland Stadium, the same
spot where trade talk Is position-
ing him now, Williams had a
mark of only .195.
In Comlskey Park, where It has
bean reported Williams might
in a trade Involving Short-
, Chico carrasquel of the
...It* Sox, Ted batted only .161.
In Yankee Stadium, another spot
where rumors of a Williams swap
involve players like Hank Bauer
Oerry Coleman, Billy Martin and
Tom Morgan, the Red Sox slug-
ger had a mere .273 average. In
Washington, Williams hit only
.887. In Philadelphia he did his
best road work, hitting -398.
Has Lifetime Mark of Ml
Compare these figures to his
lifetime average of .347 registered
over 11 seasons of big league play.
At Fenway Park In O"'-
Hams batted well over .800 e-
alpst every rival club. Against
raahlngton. he hit .500; against
the White Box .476, and against
tha Yanks .400.
harte: Ted WUliams'
home run output of 80 was di-
vided In an van more surpris-
ing basU than hU batting aver-
age. At Fenway, with Its deep
r&ht field. Ted belted 18 hom-
ers. On tha road, where the
fenees are closer In right flaw,
he collected only 13. HU highest
production was at Shlb* Park,
where he had four home runs.
In Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland
and New York, he had only one
each... Commenting on Lou
Boudreau's declared interest in
Jim Hegan and Bob Lemon. Oen-
eral Manager Joe Cronln of the
Red Sow stated he would back up
hla manager all the way In try-
UK to obtain players he wanto.
BLOCKS-A Notre Dame player, upper left, took out Indiana's Bob Inserra to shake John Pettibon
Iooe. A Wl>nin man, upper right, thrtw a rolling block on Illinois' Stanley Wallace, to eae the way
for Harland Carl. Waahinston Stale Tackle Bill Bowen, lower loft, removed Southern California* Bob
Van Doren to enable Halfback Dwight Pool to return a kicked 15 yards. A UCLA boy threw his back
at the running legs of Illinois' Charley Ulrich to let Paul Cameron dart 18 yards. (NBA)
Cubs Counts On Time
To Heal Catcliing His
WID MATTHEWS FIGURES OC-
CASIONAL RBBT WHX HELP
TO KEEP BACKSTOP BRUCE
EDWARDS' ARM IN SHAPE
(Reprinted from "The Sporting
Newe")
Ry EDGAR MCNEEL
CHICAGO, 111. Time heals
all things, That simple truth
could mean a tremendous lift to
the Cuba next season. And It's
not merely that the passage of
time would be the analgesic that
would remove the pain of the
1951 cellar finish- It is founded
on far more solid fact.
The Cubs could be greatly
strengthened next season be-
cause Bruce Edwards may report
with his arm fully recovered. Ac-
cording to doctors who have ex-
amined Edwards, raet is the on-
ly thing that will return the vet-
eran catcher's arm to normal.
"I spent a lot of time during
the World's Series trying unsuc-
cessful to make some deals,"
said Wld Matthews, Cub per-
sonnel director. ''But X also did
some checking with the New
York doctors who handled Bd-
warda while he waa with the
Dodgers. That left me far more
encouraged than any trade talk
I Indulged in.
"Learned that Edwards' arm
(liment revolves about the fluid
i the locket of the arm. Jn Ed-
warda' case that fluid dries out
with exercise. In other words the
arm Is normal as long as he
doesn't work It too much. If be
does, the fluid drains out and the
arm lose* Its Ufe. It becomes
painful and weak.
"When that occurs Edwards
no longer can throw hard or ac-
curate. The report of those doc-
tor* to me checked perfectly with
the history of Bruoe's throwing
for ua last season.
"You know, after we made the
big deal with the Dodgers in
which we landed Edwards along
with three other players, he was
firing that ball to second base
as" well as any catcher In the
league. And thenbloolel be
just couldn't throw anybody out
any more.
"He then suffered an injury
and was out nearly a month.
When he returned he. was throw-
ing well again. But after a cou-
ple of weeks his arm went bad
once more, We had to rest again.
May Be Used Every Third Day
"we Just happened to be in a
Cltlon where we had to catch
i every day after we got him
last spring. Furthermore, we
were eager to learn just how
sound he was. Now that we have
learned the full details of his
peculiar, injury I believe We
might be able to work out a so-
lution whereby we will get the
full value of his services.
"Next season we're going to use
Edwards as a catcher about every
third day. Then, In between
times, we also might be able to
work him In at first base oc-
casionally where he doesnt have
to do much throwing.
"Whop he is out of the lineup
he also will help give us a good
bench, because he can step to the
plate and make us a too*] lona
ball threat a* a pmeh-hitter. All
of these things, of course, are
based on the assumption that he
still will need frequent rest to
keep his arm alive.
"However, It could be that it
won't be necessary. All of the
doctors said that age la in Ed-
wards' favor. He's only 88. The
arm could come around over the
winter."
In other words protracted rest
might be the cure that would
restore Edwards to the topflight
class among big league catchers.
However, if time doesn't want
to fulfill the truth of the adage
then the Cubs will provide the
healing periods by granting Ed-
wards proper rest between as-
signments.
The Cubs have not subjected
Edwards to any further medical
probing as yet. But that may be
done some time this winter Just
so no stone will be left unturned
in the frantic effort to bolster
the catching staff.
Manager Phil Cavarretta was
highly pleased by the perform-
ance of Harry Chltl, burly Des,
Mofcnes rookie, when he joined
the Cubs for the final two weeks
of the campaign. But Chltl, who
hit .301 for Des Molnes and .355
for the Cubs In nins game*, will
b* 19 next month. In view of the
military draft, a youngster of
that age can't be counted upon
too heavily.
Even with the ailing arm Ed-
wards la the better risk. In fact,
be is considered such a good
gamble that It is understood six
clubs claimed him when waivers
were asked.
ARCHER Robert F. KoUy
ffoHs tKeantlers of a 180-pound
l^s-us firsts
a*TBMSrN5S
Most deer shot br archers are
^Within 10 yards. (NEA)
I Won't Wave Big Stick/Frkk
Tells Writers At Party For Him
(Reprinted from The Sporting
News-)
By DAN DANIEL
NEW YORK, N. Y. "I am not
a commissioner for the purpose
of sitting on high and judging
people and keeping them walk-
ing a straight line." expostulated
Ford C. Frick at the dinner giv-
en for him by the New York
Chapter of the Baseball Writ-
ers' Association at Toots Shor's,
October 29.
"There is a serious misappre-
hension afloat that the men who
own the ball clubs are crooks,
connlvers, masters of akuldug-
"The fact Is. they are honest
men, eager for the right, engaged
in an honest business in an hon-
eit way.
"It is not the function of the
commissioner to set himself up as
a threat. He is elected to run an
office, to make decisions. I am
foing to make those decisions,
be best way I know how. Some-
body at times may get hurt. But
Z am not a monitor on high,
readv to swing the big stick.
"I say this without any Intent
at aspersion on my two prede-
cessors. But I want to make it
emphatic, nonetheless.
"I am the commissioner in a
game which has a tremendous
bearing on the American way of
Ufe. I want to say this very ser-
iously. Baseball and our way of
living go very much together.
When they stop going together,
I don't want to have anything
more to do with the office."
The dinner waa attended by
some 100 men, and Sbor did him-
self proud in a culinary way.
John Dreblnger waa the mas-
ter of ceremonies and did a
grand job hi a grandly Informal
way. The writers presented a
wrist watch to Frick, with Joe
Trimble making the speech.
There were a lot of talks, and
all followed the same pattern,
"Baseball Is lucky to have a com-
missioner like Frick."
oOo
Once a Newspaperman Himself
The writers pointed with pride
that the magnates had gone Into
the ranks of baseball reporters in
naming the new big boss of the
game.
Bugs Baer was at his funniest
as he told of Frlck's coming to
the New York Journal as a young
reporter.
"Ford got very blue and dis-
couraged, and I gave him a pep
talk which may have persuaded
him to remain In New York and
go on to the big job he now
holds," Baer pointed out.
Frank Shaughnessy, pre*ldent
of the International League, be-
wailed the fact that Frlck's pro-
motion had ended their canasta
battles in the National Leagn
offices.
- Walter Franela OMalley. Dod-
gers; Horace Stoneham, Olanta.
and Dan Topping, Yankee*,
spoke for the three local clubs
O'Malley made an appeal fee?
leadership In dangerous times.
Tom Meany, Frankie Graham*
Grantland Rice, Umpire Larry
Goetz, Frankie Frlsch, Carl Hub-
bell, Gabe Paul, new general
manager of the Reds, and Red
Smith also spoke. Shor got in
word. too.
The Steven brothers, Frank,
Billy and Joe, were there. War-
ren Giles. WUl Harrldge and Earl
Hllligan telegraphed their re-
grets.
Charles Segar, the new secret-
ary-treasurer of Baseball, waa al
the speakers' table.
Cubs Spent $2,727,297
In 6 Years For Talent
CHICAGO, 111. The Cuba
spent $3,737,897.44 In six year of
talent hunting, with the cost the)
past year near $500,000, Neil R.
Gazel reported in the Chicago
Daily News. More than 450 play-
ers were processed during the)
seven years, but the team fin-
ished in the first division only
once since 1945.
After finishing first In 1948. that
Cubs were third in 194$, and!
went steadily down, sixth In 1847,
last in 1948. 1940 and UBI and
seventh In 1950. The cost of los-
ing went steadily up.
"By and large, we've done.all
right." Treasurer Earl Nelson as-
sured Gasel. "It's been a period!
of high Income, too. We've had
only one losing year since 1848,
and that was In 1980. Still .wo
haven't spared the cash. We'vo
taken every nickel we could lay
our hands on and used It for the
development of the elub and will
continue.to do so."
Owner Phil Wrlgley also de-
clared bis Intention to spend
more millions for a winner. "Be-
fore, we-could buy players." said
Wrlgley.v "Now we haee to raise)
them and when you go Into
farming you have to wait for the
return."
MYI
ufterrrotnt
breath, dlseTm..
kin bl.ml.e.
QLDSM0B1LE HYDRAMATIC
FIRST TWELVE YEARS AG0...STUL FIRST TBDAY!
oumMh sm -a*" aaw*fcew
,m|,w.l, *.....,--.. mmd trim iliiiili
iuhji-1 to cki*, wilkoml MM.
*-
-~x ^-SKs"**3"-
aovio and impovo via tni viaas, niw MVpaa-auTie
n mi eatsacT eaamai soa oiow.oui.rs rasmus -aocasr-i
Reaognhm! Ued of D tho "tocMtto*"OU-ukU* Hyirm-MmUV
Over 1.200,000 OManobile e^en her* thrilled to the Beasts of
ydxa-Mad* driving.! And nowteemed with OHntiiVe rr
bifh-oompreuion "Rocket" Eagiae, HyeVe-Matie i* eve* smoother
... oven soar* rtoponar**... ore store affordeee to operate! So top
tato yosr Oldeamobfle dealer' fj step tot toe^ a* *W aacot aopolor
modwf-Hydre-Metie oor of thest all... the brtlliaat Super "M"!
TOUI NIAMST OLD5MOSILI OIALIR -
PANAMA AUTO, S. 4.
COLON
PANAMA

.tttJtvtM^^tib^tfEKKmj^x^&Ka^
V




Mich. State 35 S.M.U........14 Princeton
3totre Dame.. 8 Texas A. M. 14 Harvard .
54 Maryland ... .40 Georgia Tech 34 Minnesota ... IS
13 Navy........21 V.M.1.......7 Indiana........14

Ohio State 16 Sports Pages:
PHt.........14 10 & 11
*

,
% TAeSUNDAY
Junencan
'Let the people know the truth and the country it safe" Abraham Lincoln.

TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA. R. P., SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 11, 1951
TEN CENTS
Army Likes Its Soldier Girls;
Wants 7 2,000 More WacsNow
V
Armistice Day, long a symbol of peace in the United
States, will this year inaugurate a gigantic Women's Army
Corps recruiting program.
The United States needs 72,000 additional women in
the Armed Forces. And they are needed within the next
six months.
At the present time, 600 WAC volunteers are needed
foi services with the Army in Korea:
This is just one example of the service today's women
can render their country.
Typical of women in the Army, course In character guidance,
is the 7448th AU WAC WAC De- during which he review funda-
tachement at Fort Clayton, Ca- mental moral principles and a
nal Zone. soldier's basic obligations.
Here in the USARCARIB, are Another course in citizenship
women, high school and college stresses the responsibilities vof
graduates, with excellent busi- the Individual and her lmpoft-
ness and technical backgrounds, anee to the Army and her coun-
But, belofe assignment U> the try, The United States of Amer-
Army. each of them had to. pass lea.
a rigorous training: program, Upon completion of basic
which closely parallels the basic training the new WAC may be
training of their male soldier assigned directly to an Army po-
counterparts.
New recruits, either Just out skill.
of high school or Just changing
careers, first report to Fort Lee,
Virginia: for basic training;
sltion comparable to her civilian
PRIVATE FIRST CLASS Vernard Mello, 33rd Infantry, Corporal Marjorle Nelson, Headquarters, Post of Corozal, and Private
First Class Patricia Weishalr, clerk-typist at Headquarters, United States Arma Caribbean, stop on the steps of Panama's
Presidencia to chat with Herlberto Nunez, Simon Dels and Fist Sergeant Jose P. Caballero, a part of the Presidential Guard.
Sight-seeing, in Panama as well as other stations throughout the world, la a favorite pastime with Armed Forces personnel.
J (US Army Pheto)
However she could be sent to
the 'Leaders' course. WAC Offlc-
is hlghtllghed by women
served bj. battle areas.
who
""HOLD STILL,"- cautions Sergeant Bernice Schultz, dental
X-ray technician at the US Army Hospital at Fort Clayton,
as she prepares to "shoot" another patient. Women with a
-preference for medical specialties may be trained in many
phases of activity In the Armed Forces, and according to
, Aptitude may become dental, X-ray, medical, surgical, physlo-
'therapy, psychiatric or laboratory technicians at the Army
Medical Center at Fort Brooke, Texas.
(US Army Photo)
In the first eight weeks they er Candidate School, or any
are oriented In the serious busi- number of Army schools through-
ness of national defense. out the country. Such as crypto-
Subjects covered by the pro- eraphy, photography, informa-
gram are military law, organiza- tion and education, topography,
tion of the Army, map reading,
communications, personal hygi- or any one of the 146. Army Job
ene. physical training, a week of classifications open to WACs.
bivouac (open air camping), and WACs are subject to the same
other related military subjects, niies of discipline as Army men,
and get the same pay. Insurance,
In spite o the rigid training nd other benefits.
schedule, recreational facilities ____
of all types are available for the Although WACs are never as-
oew 'rookies.' signed forward of an Army Head-
The Post Chaplain presents a quarters, the history of the corps
Normandy Beach, Italy, North
Africa, Alaska, and even in the
Jungles of the Pacific theatre.
BOMBERO SERGEANT Julio Garrido explains one of his
Ire rigs to Sergeant Norma Coletta (behind the helm) in
Hie fire station near the Mercado. Sgt. Agnes Ferguson
rides along.
(US Army Photo)
B ^LrTaflsfl 1

V
1 rf'l
W^^r^ 1
wJI i lisiP
i r. *\
ltmmi'- ;'" %'^ ^ ii u
~* 'mm "* "^^'1
vices functions, concerts, thea- for meeting their male friends, part in defense during an emer-
tres, dances, college classes, all and a lounge for groups to in- gency.
without leaving Fort Clayton. formally gather for 'bull see-- In any case, the WACs of For
In turn the women may at- slons.' 7 Clayton, together with women -of
tend classes and social iunctions World events usually head the the Navy. Air Force, and MarirfB
Today. WACs are stationed a- off post, but must be in quarters list of topics discussed, and most Corps, look to the future with
round the world the Far East, by midnight of each night pre- women are deeply aware of the confidence and pride.
In Germany, Austria, at General ceeding a work-day. soldier's postlon in relation to Eager to share the rewards of
Eisenhower's SHAPE Headquart- national defense. their ultimate goal, with those
ers. as well as here in the Carlb- At the Fort Clayton WAC Bar- Most of them agree that all who will march toward it with
bean Command. racks, there is a reception room women should play a definite them.
Though the WAC Detachment
at Fort Clayton is smaller than
many of its "sister-stations," It Is
none the less typical of them all.
At Clayton are more than 90
women, commanded by Captain
Elsie J. Chapman.
They all arise at 5:45 a.m., per-
form last minute details of dust-
ing shoes and straightening foot
lockers, eat breakfast, and then
report to work by 7:00 a.m.
They include clerks, medical
assistants, secretaries, steno-
grapher, information and educ-
ation specialists, administrative
and photographic laboratory
supervisors, finance clerks, dis-
bursing specialist, and a drafts-
man.
All women attend Troop In-
formation and Chaplain's lec-
tures Weekly, as do their male
counterparts. On the Job. women
and men work together with the
same rank and responsibilities.
Though technically the WAC
Is on duty 24 hours a day. there
Is always time for recreational or
educational pursuits.
Aside from 'company meetings'
at-which time an open discus-
sion of 'gripes' and Army life Is
hold. USARCARIB WACs have a
lot of free time.
They'may attend Special Ser-
Roll Call
THE CORPORALS CARROLL are typical of Army couples who share the same career. Jim
whets his appetite with a glass of milk while Penny prepares a quick lunch In their quarters
Just outside Fort Amador. He la a member of the Sloth Military Police Detachment at Quarry
Heights, while she is assigned to the Adjutant General Section. Headquarters, United- State*
Army Caribbean. In the event of transfer of one spouse, the Army arranges the simultaneou
transfer of the other, wherever feasible. (US Army Photo)
LIKE ANY SOLDIERS. Cpl. Marjorle, Sgt. Agnes and Sgt.
Norma have a look around the nearest city when they have
time off. This time the nearest city is Panama.
(U8 Army Photo)
fc
Farther details on the girls
in the adjoining pictures:
SFC AGNES FERGUSON.
Eight years in the Army. A
draftsman In the engineering
section. Eight years Army serv-
ice so far. Been on the Isthmus
since Jone, 1949.
SGT. NORMA COLETTA.
Clerk. Six years In the Army.
On the Isthmus since October,
1949.
CPL. MARJORIE NELSON.
Clerk-typist in the personnel
office, Corozal. Three'years In
the Army. Arrived here May
this year. t
tr: first thanksgiving
Illustrated by Walt Scott
On December II,
1620, the opea boot
landed ot Ptrmouth
Herbar. Hart, Mm
expedition decided,
woi the perfect sita
for thaw catoay.
TKe exploring party returned to the
Mayflower with the news that they
at) faana s Ha
eSaTsaaeeesjai
On Sundoy, December 17, tftonksgiving services
were held aboard the Mayflower at it lay ot
in Plymouth harbor. WiHknn Irodfo.d,
peaking to the group, said:
[cow. it< er K Steffi, Rti --------*r
"May not and ought at the children of these
father rightly say 'Our fathers were English
men which came over this <
ready to perish in rhu will
the Lord and he heard I
lit great ocean and ware
rikUnum but fbey criad
leord their voice and
POETS'CORNER
WACS ABROAD make It their business to find out about
local sports and customs. Here Cpl. Marjorle Nelson studies
Panama's national pastime.
(US.AnorhoU>)
NIGHT WALK ON MAINE "
BEACH
(Fran Yankee)

Above the vault of sea, fain suns
Flame through a vast and cloud-
ed door.
On curving sands a -million ton
Of water topple on the hore.
Far out. the sightless waves thud
home.
We walk and think we under-
stand
Our little life like scudding load
That at our feet spills on the).
sand. \
Secure beyond our senses race
A thousand years of surf and
sea;
And on one point of time and
space,
We drink this beauty, swift and
free.
And then as ocean, life and ledge,
Swings to the hour, begins to
climb,
We turn backs to the changing
edge
And leave our moment drowned
in time.


"It takes all kinds to make a world"
you are assured by Andy Mulligan,
Joan MacLean, Mary Adella Worley
and Barbara Shaw. -
(Tun te face 7 far: CeUejiate Capera Caaal Xeate StyteJ
^menean
Supplement
PANAMA, R. t\, SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 11, 1951
1
fall""l^iM^i?ifHiill f


: Review Of The
s

WORLD-WIDE

THE INCOME TAX Issue Is far from dead. In a suit
, filed Wednesday In the UJ3. District Court at Ancon
; by 749 American citizens, all employed by UJ3. govern-
. merit agencies In the Canal Zone, it Is being charged
that Income tax here Is unconstitutional, and that It
violates the spirit of the Canal treaties between the
u.s. and the Republic o Panam.
, Judge Joseph J. Hancock, because he has a personal
interese in tne case (being subject to the tax nlmself)
u considering a motion tnat he. disqualify himself. In
' court circles it is believed tnat three .peclal judges may
be sent to the canal Zone to sit In the case.
Tne claim was tiled by Attorney i Coliim and Mr-
He vm, togetner With a motion for an injunction to stop
lu i ner tax deduction while the cause is pending.
Although the general tax-paving public waa
. hopeful, several cynics didn't believe tney had "*
leg to stand on." A few felt the only outcome of
the salt wonnld be to call to the government's at-
tention the fact that there were American cltiiens,
l*ving in the Zone, not government employes, who
were not subject to income tax.
Now that the shipping strike seems to be over, Pan-
ama Une ships can sail the seas again according
to schedules. The 8.8. Panama an ved yesterday in
New York after cnurning nortward for days, unaware
ox Its destination. The 8.8. Cristobal will leave Wed-
nesday from New Yorx, returning to her normal sail-
ing outes for the first time In weeks.
-dinmlan shoppers whose grocery bins have been
ahfciitiy hare of iresh vegetables and fruit will welcome
tne news.
Meanwhile an American who waa badly beaten
np and left unconscious on "J" Street, was taken
if the seriously Ul list at Gorgas Hospital. Mys-
teriously accoe.ed by unknown assailants, Sl-
; year-old Charles E. Leaver, a Can.il employe, was
suffering a possible brain concussion wnile police
were still trying to round up suspects.
Two domestic squabbles ended up in court this week
"tening it to the Judge." One American couple, CpL
ana Mrs. Neal Cooper were each fined $10 In the Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court for disturbing the peace.
in the other instance, in which a wife brought a
bauery charge against her husband, the defendant
was found not guilty. Mr. and Mrs. William Fred
Brown had an argument, the court was told. After
Mrs. Brown left the house, her husband followed her
in a car and tried to talk to her. She charged that he
Intentionally pinned her down with the vehicle be-
tween its bumper and a gate near ihe Balboa Pump
Station. Her Injuries required hcspltallzation. Al-
though Brown was found not guilty, the Injuries hia
wife sustained landed her back in the hospital the
aay after the trial. So far she has f-pent 14 days there,
with a possible leg infection.
Three seamen who jumped ship were caught a
few hours later by the alert law enforcement of-
ficers. Swimming ashore from the transiting Brit-
ish ship Allerton, the three men tried to pass off
Canadian money in an American Navy Ship's Ser-
vice. That was their downfall. A suspicious Marine
corporal took them into custody, and they were
returned to their ship.
A little American girl decided to wait a few years
before resuming her driving career at least 16 more.
She is the two-and-a-half-year-old of Sgt. and Mrs.
. Jesse W. Carnell who took advantage of the key be-
ing left in tne car, to start it up and go for a little
jdr.ve.
'_'_. frantic parents returned from the commissary
to discover their younger and old daughter (who
sat in the back seat) safe from the misadventure. Only
calamity slight hold-up of traffic in front of the
Commissary.
One dead and 14 Injured four of them seriously
was the holiday toll as Panam City forgot about
politics and went overboard In the celebration of the
48ih anniversary of Panama's independence from Co-
lombia.
The dead man was Jos Antonio Orael, a police
mechanic, who crashed while riding a police motor-
cycle. Three of the four Injured seriously women
victims of a speeding bus on the Rio Abajo road. The
fourth was a schoolboy who was '.tnbbed by a fellow
tudent following an argument.
The Independence Day pirade last Saturday
was marred by a minor incident .when striking
students tried to divert the traditional school
parade from passing by the Presidencia to be re-
viewed by President Alcibiades Arosemena.
The student strike in protest against the appoint-
ment of a "military" instead of a "civilian" command-
er for the Police Force, threatened to spread out over
an indefinite period as this week came to an end.
Students of the National Institute are on strike and
representatives of all Panama high schools are con-
sidering joining the movement. Hi:jh schools in the
Interior are also on .strike.
Burglaries and robberies also were' reported this
week as a result of the Independence holidays. Big-
gest haul made by theives was from the tire stocks of
Huertematte and Arias, local automobile agents, who
lost $745 worth of tires. This was the second time in
less than two months that the firm had been robbed.
The first time some $3,131 worth Pf auto accessories
were stolen.
As a result oi the New York longshoremen's
strike experts estimated that some $3,M$,M-
worth of merchandise failed to pise through the
Panam customs daring the 25 days the strike
lasted. The estimate was made on the basis of a
comparison with the movement of merchandise
through eustoms at this same time list year.
Member of the Panam Newspapermen's Union,
MUCH THE SAME old rat race got going again hi
the United Nations Oeneral Assembly this week.
Britain (Anthony Eden up) had changed jockeys
(If there are jockeys in rat races) but theJ*P*Z
eat jock with the whip was the only one who had
been in the race right from the start, Russia's
SSnSf Km belting the opposition with hi
whip round the curves and down en?"Sf^_ltl.,n
A disarmament plan, proposed Jointly by Britain
the United States and France, and hinging on the
right of the United Nations'to inspect the arms stocks
and capabilities of all countries, made old peace-lover
Vishinsky laugh. .'__.?-_ ,.
Made him laugh all night, he said
But while he was laughing all night, the Big Three
Western foreign ministers were gathered to play a
8aThe game conriste chiefly of seeing how many troops
(including Germans), guns and planes cante readied
in Europe with all urgency, to stand against the Rea
*VwUa? believe Vishinskywho ha,, not
been dealt In to we NATO school feared tlMltW
making better use of their spare time than he -was
WThhehotm8lhT gthe rat race, who for. solong had
responded to his whippings by wincing,back a few
lengths, had found out that the whip cfijild as easily
be avoided by -sprinting forward a lew lengths.
And for about the first time they believe they have
the stamina to try it. .
Vishinsky will still "Table to make a few danger-
ous nicks at the Western effort to rearm Germany.
In addition to Mr. V, among those that don't
care too much for the project are the MHMn
French and the Germans. They've an of them
had more trouble than they care to recall irem
German armaments In the past century.
Just how deep is the wish to avoid more of the same,
from the same manufacturer. Is not appreciated in
the United States. j ____j
When he speaks of Russia's dislike of a rearmed
Germany Vishinsky may be speaking for millions
rnoreof is countrymen that the IS Poll-bureaucrats
on whose behalf he habitually hoots
The Germans did a bloody Job of getting them-
selves personally disliked In Russia.
o
During the week plenty of purportedly genuine de-
tails leaked out of why Ike came home last weekend,
and what he asked for. __.
Some of the genuine details flatly contradicted one
another a very reasonably state of affairs, it might
be held since If all stories hal only one version there
be a lot mor newspapermen out of work.
But there wasnt much disagreement.tnat ike ae-
manded some hurryup In getting US armaments to
his Atlantic Pact army. __.__-i_
United States arms are now alott.d on these priori-
ties: \ .
1) Korea;
2) Defense of US; c
3) Atlantic Pact army. __
Ike wants 2) and 3) switched. He believes his army,
rubbing up against the Red Army as It does, along
the Iron Curtain la more directly concerned with the
defense of the United States than stay-at-home units
rubbing up against not much but a liberty-town Dar.
Also, the lagging arrival of US arms is providing the
gasping economies of Europe a good excuse for drop-
ping behind on thelr.own arms commitments too.
Another tactician of repute thinks even less of the
current US arms allocation priority system than does
' Winston Chareblll doesn't look on Korea as any-
thing but a nuisance sideshow in the East-West
struggle, and can't think of why anyone should
want much to win It from anyone.
Winnie believes any war busines- with Russia will
be transacted in the usual business areas Europe
and the Middle East.
So, as a prudent businessman in ?uch dealings, he
wants to set up shop in the business area.
Suburban branches, holds Winnie, must remain
str]ctly suburban.
As for Die's other business In Washington, he was
more or less the man that, wasn't there.
Is or Is not Ike a starter in the 1952 Presidential
stakes? ." ...
The polticos being nopelessiy at variance, probably
the best indication would have come from the bookies,
had they been on hand to offer odds.
But unfortulately the new gambling tax has, so
the bookies say, compelled them to leave the business.
As usual, not everyone believes the bookies.
The New York shipping strike ended Friday after
25 days the longest, costliest strike the nation
biggest port has ever known.
While the Reds may have been happy enough
to see It. the strike appears to have teen mainly
a civil war within the International Longshore-
men's Association (AFL). __.,_ _._
And chiefly a revolt against the JLA s lifetime pre-
Sl msuraably Ryan'to the effective custodian of his
union's strike fund. So the striker* 2500 of them
-stuck to their decision for 26 days without any
backing that has yet teen made public.
If there is feeling that strong to nls union, lifetime
president Ryan, despite the ruggeuness of waterfront
organizations, would be prudent to take a step or so
closer to his rank and fue. If he means anything by
lifetime._______________________
PAGE TWO
preparing to celebrate Newspaperman's Day next
week with an installation ceremony at El Panam
Hotel, elected Jos Agustn Cajar E^ala of Panama
Amrica as the new president of fee ^-!* **,",
nesday. Cajar Escala won out over Luis Carlos Nou
of the Star and Herald and Manupi Maria Valds of
La Hora.
Sim., AfMftcM *ippe_Ki
W e e*
SPORTS
CATCHER LARRY ERRA of the World Chamj
New York Yankees won the American League's n
valuable player award tor 1961. ______
The durable backstop, who caught 141 games
the Yanks, was selected by 24 veteran baseball wr
era three from eaeh American League city. Bert
was elected In one of the closest races In the hlsttr
of the award. He won with 184 points only 27 mc
than pitcher Ned Oanrer of the St. I/mia Browns i
ceived. Allle Reynolds, who pitched two no-hitters fl
the Yankees, was third in the voting with 125 polnl
Berra Is the first catcher to win the award slnl
Mickey Cochrane waa honored In 1934 It also marl
the first time that the most valuable player In bot
major leagues has been a catcher. Roy Campanel]
of Brooklyn won the National League award last we-"
Berra hit .2*4 this year, batted in 88 runs and
27 home runs.
The leading contender for "Horse-of-the-Yi.
hofaors In 1961 C. V. Whltney'3 'Counterpoint"
Is through racing this year. ^_
Trainer SyI Velteh says the sea of "Count Fleet'
suffered a separation In his left front feet whllel
winning the Empire City Handicap last Saturday.
Velteh says the three year old eolt will pass up
the. Plmlico Special at Baltimore this month and |
be given a rest at Whitney's Lexington, Kentucky j
faro.
Counterpoint earned $250,225 this year while wL
nlng six stakes. If the Injured hoof responds to treaj
ment, Counterpoint's fcext start may be in the $W
000 Maturity Stakes at California early next year.
Manager Charles Dressen of the Brooklyn Dodget
says he'll sign a new contract with the club in Nel
York right after Thanksgiving.
Brooklyn owner Walter O'Malley announced t
appointment of Dressen In New York Monday.
Dressen says he is "very glad to be back with thl
club." And he says he still thinks the Dodgers "haf
the best club In '51." Dressen refused to comment oi
a possible salary Increase, but said the club had beet
fair to him In the past and he expected no trouble.
------o------ \
The name of Earl "Red" Blalk, head coach at Arr_
has popped up-as a successor to Clyde Smith at It
diana University. Smith resigned as head coach et
fective after this season. The students and alumi
have rallied around Smith.
Jim Bltt, president oi the I-Men's Association in
dlanapolis, says "Lots of people are trying to m
Smith to reconsider his resignation. What the gripe]
don't reallxe Is that the Hooslers play a tough schj
dule. I think Smith Is doing a terrific Job with t
material he nas." _____.
Those supporting Blaik as successor claim he
hasn't teen happy, at West Point since the cnb-J
blng scandal all but wiped out his team. Indiana
officials say bo ene has an Inside track en the
Jobs. Other candidates mentioned informally in-l
elude former Indiana Coach Chuck Bennett, ene-J
time Indiana End Coach Johnny Kovatch andl
Florida State Coach Don Veller.
i
In pro football, the Philadelphia Eagles have
talned fullback Al Pollard from the New York Yanl
And they have asked waivers on veteran halfbal
Bosh Pritchard. Pollard who led the West Poll
team In scoring last year with 83 points workl
out with the Eagles Thursday and is scheduled to -"
against Cleveland today.
The Eagles also welcomed back end Nell Armssro]
from the Winnipeg Blue Bombers In the Canadt*
League. League Commissioner Bert Bell fined Ai
trong two thousand dollars for jumping from
Eagles to the Canadian League the same fine
handed out to George Ratterman who Is back with i
New York Yanks. Armstrong will play against Clel
land. The Eagles asked waivers on end Johnny
Quinn to make room for Armstrong.
President Walter O'Malley of the Brooklyn Dodgl
has released some figures which Indicate baseball I
a nice hobby but a poor business for the owners. I
In fact, OTdaUey says baseball "Isn't big business
it's bad business." _. ,__
"My Dodgers lost $129,318 in 1950," explains O MalM
The 1951 figures still are not available. _
O'Malley says the 1950 deficit included the entl
Brooklyn system from the Dodgers down to
lowest farm club (
O'Malley, defending the farm system, says
"Baseball is nut an evil monopoly. Actually thW
club and others are subsidising baseball to keep"
it a national game." ,
The Brooklyn president says the Dodgers pre!
working agreements with minor league clubs ratr
than outright ownership. i
"But we can't find local cltlsens willing to take ol
the clubs and absorb the losses," says O'Malley. "
the clubs we own were taken over from people -
no longer wanter to go losing money."
O'Malley says M-n.-tul showed a $21,000 profit,
St. Paul a profit of $128,000, with most, of that pr^
going for taxes.
The Chicago White Sox admit they want BosJ
outfielder Ted Williams but say the Red Sox -
D "The Red Sox offered us Williams for shor_
Chico Carraaquel," says White Sox General Mans
Frank Lane, "and Chico Is one of the players we dfl
let go. Well deal a lot of players, but Carrasquel M
ny Mlnoao. Nelly Fox Ed Robinson and Billy PM
we're going to keep."
Welterweight Champion Kid Oariln scored.* qj
TKO over Tony Janlro of Youngstown, Ohio WedJ
day night at Detroit. The Cuba champion 1 oi
Janlro three times before winning in two mini
and 41 seconds of the fourth round of their schej
ed 10-rounder.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, lj
.
,


k -'
"ill 3.M0
fOO/WfiER
OhS
pwiniit*fi(8iB
WIN, FLACK AND TAX. A Wheeling, W. V., businessman
examines a sign placed in bis establishment by horse book
operators, as the new federal excise tax or gambling vent ln-
to effect. In Wheeling, the bookies were passing the tax on
; to their customersif they decided to stay in business at all.
ARKANSAS LEOPARD HUNT A man examines the body of
circus trailer overturned, after the beast was shot by a posse
near Mena. Ark. Another leopard was killed later, and a bear
was captured. The posse pressed the search for two more
a leopard, one of several wild animals that escaped when a
bears and four monkeys which were also freed in the crash.
f I
I
.- i
MONARCH
IHf FAMILY FAVORITE FOR
ALMOST 100 YEARS
Monarch finer foods
are today the stand-
ard of quality all over
the world. They are pre-
pared in the most modern
manner... but retain all the real
old-fashioned flavor. Five generations
have proved Monarch finer foods... the
BEST by TEST. There are over 500
Monarch finer foods. Ask for them in your
grocery store. If your dealer does not
stock Monarch finer foods, inquire of:
MONARCH
World's Largest Family of Finer Foods
Distributors in the Republic:
COLON Tagaropulos, S. A. Tel. 1000
PANAMACia. Panamericana de Orange Crash
HOME DELIVERY Tel. 3.3219
- '
Premier'Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle
1Winged
insect
5>Jud
volcano
10 Food like
tapioca
15SUte of
Insensi-
bility
19Plant used
in embalm-
ing
(Bible)
20Assumed
name
21Poplar
22Across
23Threihold
24Of a ship's
sail
29Measuring
device
MNarrow
way.
27Lone
29Exclama-
tion of
surprise
31Bearded
monkey
33U S. coin
34Extra
36Take out
37Abjure
40Bellowing
42Refresh
46Corn
mush
(Mex.)
47Class
48Cut off
50Waxy
substance
from cork
51Half-pint
BOMZONTAJL
52Circular in 88Herb of
cross-
section
54Of
greatest
merit
5Obtain
57Dutch
cheese
59Flow
against
SOEastern
part of
Mediter-
ranean
61Theater-
box
62Consign
64New
65Click-
beetle
67Trick
California
90Channel;
shallows
91Cap
92Values
94Fire-
cracker
96That
which
imparta
circular
moUon
98Barren
area
99Bearing
101Ascended
102High
tempera-
ture
103Hedge
sparrow
68Number of 107Kind of
vertebrae
in neck
69Peruse
70Run very
fast
73Divide
74Making
wavelets
78Gal
79Smoother
81Swarm
82Indian of
tribe now
with
Snecas
83Vein Of
leaf
84Pure
number
85Return
87Become
ripe
cloth
108Spanish veil
112Calm
113South
American
serpent
115Musical
drama
117Weaving
machine
118Accost
119Darken
120Finer
ltlPoison
122Borough in
Pennsyl-
vania
123Thicket
of bushes
124Hostile
force
125Elysium
Avtrsf* Urn* of Mlatloa M mlaatrs
1Main
body
2Mixture
3A tax
4Spiral
5Man of
learning
6Watchful
7-H*rba.
ceous
plant
8Monkey
9Prank
10Key
fruit
11Malt
liquor
12Tardy
13Correct
14Pullman
car
attendant
15Place of
higher
education
16 Elliptical
17Bill
of
fart
18Son
of
Zeus
28Principle
30Detest
32Choose
34List of
candi-
dates
35Inspirit
37American
snake
38Musical
exercise
39Resinous
substance
DUtrlMM* by Kins
VERTICAL
40Short-
tailed
bird
41Pertaining
to tone
43Cant
44Vassal
45Enroll
47Irritate
49Indite
53Resilient
54Condition
of
excite-
ment
55-^Higher
58Deserve
60One
having
strong
liking
61Water-
wheel
floatboard
63Firearm
64Not
ever
66Fold
68Legislator
69Make
firm
70Leather
strip
71Chief
72Auto-
maton
73-Of
the
- sun
74Copious
flow
75Incensed
76River
of
Africa
PMturtf Syndic!*
77Material
formed by
rock-decay
80Tatter
81Wading
bird
84Small
European
finch
85Sponge
86 Handle
89Thin
plate
91Ground-
work
93False
goats-
beard v
95Disjoin
97Prolonged
declama-
tory
outpouring!
98Ten
100Honorable!
102Seraglio i
103--Pain
104Layer
over
another
105Invent
106Cross
108Mountain
pool
109^-Heavy
*~ burden
110By
itself
111Word
of l
conclusion
114Cup
116Yield
precious
metal
.Answer to be found elsewhere in the Sunday American)
NDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1951
Sea-Going Garage
Shields Vehicles
Grossing Pacific
SAN FRANCI8CO, Nov. (VP.)
Pacific Transport Lines has
devised a "portable garage" for
automobile transportation.
It's the answer of the San
Francisco trarrs-Paciflc carrier
to the problem of getting cars
to their overseas destinations in
perfect condition.
Heretofore subject to engine
and paint corrosion from salt air,
each automobile is now shrouded
in the "portable garage," is made
of an iron-strong heavy gauge
vinyl plastic cover to provide the
car with bumper-to-bumper pro-
tection.
Since the plastic garage Is

Pedagogue Kept Busy
By Wedding Bells
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. (UP.)
Weddings kept Joseph R.
Guerln busy for a while.
Ouerin. a teacher at Dayton
(O.) university, gave away his
sister In marriage at St. Monica's
Catholic Church hen;.
He left soon after the wed-
ding by plane for Madrid. Spain,
to marry Senortti Conchita
Guilbert.
Then he brought bis wife back
to America for their honeymoon.
dustproof. waterproof, wind-
proof, snow and sunproof, and
resistant to salt air or tropical
heat, It protects the car in all
types of weather.
Ice Cream Men Spur
300-Year-Old Ccins
MELROSE, Mass.. Nov. (UP.)
The ice cream peddlers were
running out of humor. So were
the children.
The youngsters were trying to
buy ice cream with two-cent
piceos and other outdated coins,
some of them 300 years old.
Police investigated. They dis-
covered the coins were part of
a collection, apparently stolen,
which had been dropped behind
a tenement house.
They believed the thief was a
youth about 16 who had been
scattering coins for the young-
sters for several days. No one
seemed to know the youth. To
add to the problem, no one had
reported a coin collection stolen.


PAGE TllKL


I
s
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
owr..D NDPuilitHio Y THI PANAMA AMtwICAN PHIS*. INC.
founded Y NILMN HOUNSCVCLL IN ills
NANMO0IO AMIAS. COITO*
. B7. H strut > o Bex 34. Panama. I, or P.
Tclifhon! Panama No 2-0740 _,,. CAtt Address, PANAMMICAN. PANAMA
C^LON OrriCB. IS 17 ONTRA1 AvtNUE SITWSIN I2TN AND ISTH STREETS
FOBIieN HtPRItNTATIV, JOSHUA B POWERS. I.MC.
348 Madison Avi.. New Yon*. <17 N 1,
M MONTH. IN I.W..W. ttn iVsO
FOB IS MONTH. IN ADVANCE_________. f SO IS Oft
FOR OK YA IN AOVANCF 1080 OSS
POETS' C0RNER~
Pearsons Merry Go-Round
ARMORED DIVISION
(From Harper's Magasine)
I stopped my walk
Just to watch a hawk.
Then I turned from speed
To an airborne seed.
And I saw for man
How It all began.
For a chute of llk
Is the milkweed's milk.
And the maple's crop
Is a feathered prop.
In the pltcherplant's lap
There's a booby trap.
The sensitive plant
(May it long enchant)
Was the first to use
A proximity fuse.
The snapdragon's gun
Is a hair-trigger one.
The black bats fly
In a sonar sky,
A bee to thistle
Is a guided missile.
And a sauld can get
Where it wants by jet.

In the katydid's ode
There's a crude Morse code,
And the submerged loon
Has the schnorker's boon
That's Nature, the queer
Old engineer!
David McCord.
The words of the pages move
through grass and through
ground.
We touch the growing root
man found.
We turn from the endless sky,
we drop to knees and find
hidden rivers of earth,
of mind.
Joseph Joel Keith.
FOR ROBERT FROST
. (From The Adelphi. London)
We lift up the book again..
We drop It to the floor.
It lies as solid as stone-
earth's door.
CURIOUS ADAM
(From Recurrence)
Man cannot live by bread alone;
By bread alone, he cannot live;
No. nor by water nor by wine.
For all the pleasure that they
give.
By solitude he cannot live.
Nor by the light in other eyes;
By whispers in the ardent dusk,
By love, by laughter, nor by lies.
But by a crumb of this and
that
Seed of wheat, and seed of
dream '
He nourishes two- appetltles.
Unique in universal scheme
This brute half risen from the
earth
Wh saw the cramped and nar-
row skies
Recede and multiply again
Before the question In his eyes.
Frances Minturn Howard.
Mail or Cable
Transfers through
The National City Bank
of New York
If you wish to transfer money abroad, by
mail or cable, call at the nearest office of the
National City which oilers you the facilities of
us worldwide network of brandies and
correspondents.
Businessmen will find very useful the many
National City services which its experienced
staff takes pleasure in placing at your disposal
THE NATIONAL CITY BANK
OF NEW YORK
ISTHMIAN BRANCHES
Balboa Panama Cristobal
DREW PEARSON SATS: DEMOCRATIC COM-
MITTEEMEN REVOLTED AGAINST MC-
KJNNKY, THEN SWALLOWED WHITE
HOUSE FILL; VICE CHAIRMAN INDfA
EDWARDS RESIGNED IN PROTEST A-
GADiST MCKINNEY; DEMOCRATS FIN-
ALLY BAT OUT OF TRUMAN'S HAND.
WASHINGTON. The Democratic National
Committee almost came apart at the seams when
party officials Journeyed to Washington to "elect"
President Truman's hand-picked candidate as
party chairman.
On the surface all was sweetness and Ught
just as sweet as the Princess Elizabeth, whom HST
was entertaining While his party chieftains
boiled.
But underneath, controversy was so bitter that
at one point top lady Democrat India Edwards
resigned as vice-chairman of the Democratic
National Committee.
In the end, visiting Democrats came to heel in
a most undemocratic manner.
They did exactly what the White House wanted
them to dothanked outgoing Chairman BUI
Boyle for his past services and dutifully elected
Indiana's Frank McKinney, a little-known amat-
eur, to replace him. It had the efficiency of a
well-trained animal act.
The revolt which simmered but never reached
the boiling point, got its initial touch-off two
weeks ago when President Truman called In vice-
chairman India Edwards and offered her Bill
Boyle's place. ;
Mrs. Edwards, an energetic and popular figure
among all Democrats, declined on the grounds
that the '52 election campaign should be run by
a man.
But she specifically and categorically asked
that she be consulted on the selection of the new
chairman. The President specifically and cate-
gorically asked that she be consulted on the sel-
ection of the new chairman. The President specif-
ically and categorically agreed.
KING-MAKER CONNELLY
There after Mrs, Edwards wrote the President,
suggesting several prominent Democrats as na-
tional chairman, including Alabama's Sen. John
Sparkman, Denver's ex-congressman John Car-
roll and Price Administration Mike DiSalle.
Meanwhile, unknown to Mrs. Edwards, presi-
dential aide Matt Connelly was working fever-
ishly to put over his own candidate.
Connelly, who -fancies himself a "king-maker"
and the real "power .behind the power," was
and the real "power ebhind the power." was
plugging for either Pennsylvania's Federal Judge
Jim McGranery or Indiana's Frank McKinney.
When Connelly heard that McGranery would
probably be opposed by Mayor Dave Lawrence of
Pittsburgh and ex-senator Francis Myers of Phil-
adelphia, he devoted full time to promoting Mc-
Kinney.
Connelly's maneuvering was so secret that
neither retiring chairman Bill Boyle nor Mrs. Ed-
wards was aware of It.
Only two days before the committee met was
Boyle informed by the President that McKinney
was "the man."
Boyle immediately got on the phone and passed
the word along to key Democrats, including In-
flia Edwards. When she heard of it, she hit the
ceiling, and promptly* turned in her resignation
as vice-chairman.
THE LADIES REVOLT
News of Mrs. Edwards' resignation hit the De-
mocratic committeemen simultaneously with the
news that Frank McKinney was to be their new
boss.
Both caused consternation, the former because
Mrs. Edwards Is extremely popular, the second
because McKinney was almost unknown to most
Democratic leaders.
Also Southern and Western Democrats felt that
in view of the Vatican appointment, the new
chairman should have been a Protestant rather
than continuing the thirty years of Catholic party
leadership.
Leaders of the revolt Included Carl Thompson,
Democratic commltteeman from Wisconsin; the
two. Kansas committeemen. Car] Rice and Geor-
gia Neese Clark; and Oregon's Monroe Sweet-
The latter suggested that a delegation make A
personal protest direct to the President.
Accordingly, Iowa's Florence Lynch telephoned
king-maker Matt Connelly to ask for an appoint-
ment. King-maker Connelly refused.
He did not want anyone disturbing his plans
to put across his hand-picked national chairman.
The day before the committee was to have its
rubber-stamp sessions, therefore, Mrs. Lynch cal-
led a meeting in her room in the Mayflower
Hotel.
Attending were: Pennsylvania's Emma Guffey
Miller, New Jersey's Mary Norton, Minnesota's
lone Hunt, and Wisconsin's Mrs. Dan Hoan.
All agreed that as between India Edwards and
Frank McKinney, Mrs. Edwards was their gal and
they would stick by her through thick and thin.
So, failing to get past kingmaker Connelly for
an appointment they sent a letter to the Pre-
siden urging him to intervene personally with
Mrs. Edwards and hinting that if he did not per-
suade her to stay, his hand-picked candidate '
might not be committee-picked next day.
Truman got the letter, hurriedly called Mrs. Ed-
wards, apologised for the misunderstanding and
urged her to remain. She agreed.
Thereafter, opposition to new chairman Mc-
Kinney gradually meltedespecially after his re-
sounding speech next day promising to clean out
influence peddlers.
BILOXI GAMBLING BACKFIRES
The Air Force may retaliate against Biloxl,
Miss., whose wide-open gambling got Keesler
Field Into hot water with the Senate.'
What the Air force may do Is quietly abandon
a lucrative, $43,000,000 expansion program at
Keesler, thus depriving Biloxl of some Juicy" con-
tracts and Jobs. ~
The reason is that gambling has been so wide-
spread in Biloxl that the Air Force couldn't keep
Keesler-based personnel from gambling without
placing the whole city off limits, including the
leading hotels, bus station and even the basement
of a church.
Instead, Keesler Field tried to solve the prob-
lem by expanding the recreation program on the
base, establishing a 10:30 pan. curfew and appeal-
tog to the Biloxl authorities to clean up their
tpwn.
However, the gamblers continued to fleece. 18-
year-old recruits and others, until this columnist
first exposed the whole sordid story last July.
This columnist listed the number of gambling
joints operating wide open, reported that one
lieutenant had even committed suicide over gam-
bling losses, and revealed that the majority of
Keesler servicemen were around 18.
The column then turned the evidence over to
the Senate Preparedness Subcommittee. As a re-
sult, Senate investigators cracked down on Bil-
oxl, and the Air Force got a black eye for not
keeping its men out of the dives.
Real blame, according to Senate investigators,
rests squarely on Biloxl authorities, who winked
at law violations and openly conspired with the
gamblers.
Since the gambling trade lured free-spending
tourists into the town, which In turn lowered
local taxes, the townspeople refused to get stirred
up over young recruits squandering one-third of
their pay.
That is why the Air Force may now retaliate
by abandoning its $43.000.000 expansion program
at Keesler, which will cost the city more than
it has been able to pocket in 10 years of playing
footsie with the racketeers.
For the most of the gambling profits don't stay
in Biloxl. They go to the big-time operators in
Manhattan.
All set -for sweeter soig!
No wonder these songbirds re i
inf their hearts out!r
ad
Birdl
far asare la testad, tasty ingre-
dients in very luraet chosen fir
erfactl balanced diet, with a
special Bird Biscuit rshtalaia- daa
trust cmn titbits that asaste has want
* aw h*> aaeet sanaa.
wmm lacsc songoiras are stag
their hearts out! They're ham
I heakhy they' gat FmsSK
Scad I What canary could wish
Herewith And solution to Sunday Crossword Pus-
tie, No. 398. published today. *
?aai ?aiiaa ana:ia aaaa
aaciu auaaa sana
aaaaEQ raaaaajia aaaaaa
uaaaa aanaa aaa aaania
ama naaaaa i,ii2.aa aia
aaan rsaaa aaejua aaaa
ansa sanan aana
Haanui aanaa anaannsia
aaau tiaaaas anaa aana
ana aauaaa aaaaay aaa
?uaaa ana aaaan aanaa
aannaa uaaaaaa eaaaaa
ibl-IuT. auaaa naa
33aa aaasa aaaaa naas
aana aaamE auaaa aama
Jijua laaaaa asasa aaaa
Buanhated a* KM Fa*
SyniiKal
FAGE -FOUR
Cu,
SIIWIiAY NOVRlfRl


Labor News
And Comment
By Victor Riesel
HEARD ON THIS BEAT:
Behind him, on his military headquarters desk, are several
urgent requests for statements on labor which Gen. Elsenhower
won't answer until he consults with his brother, Dr. Milton Elsen-
hower, president ol Pennsylvania State College,
There is. a bloc on anti-Taft and anti-Truman labor leaders
who would Ike him to speak out favorably so they can organize
unionists behind the Elsenhower boom.
However, the only word "Ike" has sent on labor came In a let-
ter to David Dubmsky's Ladies' Garment Workers' Union educa-
tional department, wishing it a successful year. i
But this message was dispatched by fcisemiower as president
of Columbia University and not a the commander of the North
Atlantic Forces.
. Meanwhile, labor is splitting sharply, some swinging to Sen.
Taft, visiting him publicly at his hotel rooms around the country -
syde, pledging their support.
Others, working closely with U. S. Labor Secretary Tobln, a
dynamic speaker, are running a series of Democratic rallies right
across country. Mr. Tait's people are saying he will have more
lapor support thau any other GOP. -candidate can muster, in-
cluding Gen. Elsenhower. .

But whether there is labor support for Taft or Eisenhower, it
is certain that a very strong AFL bloc has begun to roll against
Mr Trumanstill preponderantly the favorite of many other pow-
erful labor chiefs.
Behind the closed door.% of the AFL'-s political strategy session
in Washington's Hotel Hamilton last Thursday, Mr. Truman was
bitterly assailed by leaders of some 4,000,000 AFL members. This
was unprecedented.
Angriest was Dick Gray. Building Trades chief, who, using
such phrases as, "We've been getting kicked around," asked, "Are
we going to follow the Truman policy or make them come clean?"
A spokesman tor Jimmy Petrillo's Musicians' Union wanted
to know why Just three Democrats voted against the Lea Act
which restricted Jlmmle's activity.
It was virtually decided to junk the Taft-Hartley law as an
anti-Republican issue. Instead, the AFL will campaign against
high prices, for rent controls and better housing.
It was said, to some applause, that the Truman Administra-
tion acte das though labor had no other place to go.
But there was sharp criticism Of Taft, too, by other leaders,
who said, irt corridor conversations, that Elsenhower might be
their way out.
Whether these leader.-, spoke for the millions of AFL members
who follow them on the picket lines, however, will be proved only
by counting the votes on the ballot lines.
This is certainif the rank and file does not follow its leaders'
choices in 1952, whoever they may be, many AFL labors chief will
just abandon political action, no matter what you hear.

Meanwhile, way over on the left, the men who control the
legal machinery of Henry Wallace's old Progressive Party are re-
juvenating it in New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware and
Pennsylvania. -
Plans are to go into small towns, especially in the Negro com-
munities, and build campaign machinery for the '52 presidential
race- Word is that the Party will run a Negro on its national
slate.

The men assigned to offer John L. Lewis the presidency of the
left wing labor federation, secretly knit together in the Hotel New
Yorker by Harris Bridges (who called the session) three weeks
agb, are Albert Fitzgerald, head of the pro-Commie United El-
ectrical (atomic and jet) Workers, and Russ Nixon, the union's
Washington front.
Word to the coal digger's chief was that they are willing to
throw their 500.000 followers into District 50 of the United Mine
Workers If Lewis prefers that to leading an independent feder-
ation.
Lewis his been silentwhich means that he has not unloosed
his Shakespearean venom to hurl them into many-syllabled per-
dition

Oddly enough John Lewis has been speaking almost affec-
tionately of CIO leader Phil Murray recently. In that you find
the secret to Phil's all-pervading strength, not only Inside CIO, but
everywhere inside labor.
Not generally known on the outside, where the public believes
that labor Is really a united movement instead of an alliance of
men who don't generally know each other well, is that Philip
Murray is one of the few labor men who knows them all, having
come through the wars with them.
For example, when Phil Murray did not attend the high com-
mand sessions of the old United Labor Policy Committee, the other
CIO men literally didn't know the AFL chiefs personally.
A veteran like Emll Rleye (CIO Textile Union leader) knew
them bv sight. ^~^-
But the younger CIO people knew them only from news photos.
Only Phil Murray knew all the angles and ancient feuds among
the older AFL chiefs.
Even at this stage If Phi: makes good his threat to resign
within a year, there won't be any well informed liaison between
the giants.
Remember that the three men who lead labor today, Murray,
Green and Lewis are ex-coal diggers.
So hard hit by unemployment are some CIO unions that they
say we'd have marches of the jobless to Washington if it were
not for unemployment compensation and some part-time work
by others in the family. Demands for Federal action will be voiced
again and again at the CIO convention here this week.
Textile leaders say unemployment in some areas is worse
than it was In the thirties
They're even starting a drive against prison labor In peniten-
tiary mills to save some work for weavers outside.
(Copyright, 1*51 Post-Hall Syndicate, Inc.)
Walter Winchell I n New York
FOOTLIGHTS AND SPOTLIGHTS
First Nights an social events for audiences. But
they represent a deep personal crisis for creative
artists... They are as devoted to their brain-
children as parents are to their babies... Open-
ing nights are crowded with hopes and chal-
lenges. .. Talent faces its most rigorous test and
ambition reaches its climax... And there Is al-
ways the nervous excitement generated by- fear.
Those who seek success must Inevitably risk fai-
lure... Months and possibly years of difficult
creative effort is unveiled in a few hours... Out
of these hours can emerge a rare work of art or
a dismal flop... Wild fears can become a bitter
reality or the most glorious aspirations fulfilled.
Unwilling to offend his chum. Skinner went
backstage, clutched the hand of the goshaw-
ful Hamlet and ejaculated: "Ah, my friend.
What a night for Shakespeare "
Time may dim the brilliance of premiere
triumphs and failures may relegate a star to
oblivionbut the glow remains in the heart...
After Sarah Siddons scored her initial success, a
veteran player warned: "No matter how success-
ful you aresomeday you will be forgotten."
To which Miss Siddons countered: "But if I am
successful, I will always have something worth
while to remember."
Great performers must be equipped with spirit-
ual strength as well as artistic skills... The true
test of champions is net whether they are always
victoriousbut whether they can triumph when
obstacles are most formidable.
Beatrice Llllie offered one of the most dramatic
illustrations of a Big-Time trouper during World
War H... They handed her a telegram (inform-
ing that her only son was missing In action) an
hour before curtain-time for her new show... The
tragic news spread backtage... A few moments
before "Curtain!" she sent her maid to pin a note
on the bulletin board... "I know how you all
feel, darlings," It said, "so we wont say a word
about it. Let's wow 'em!"... Her heart in agony,
Bea went on to another triumph.
The emotional intensity gripping players
daring inaagurals vibrates every nerve. Stage
frightmare is common. Elisabeth Bergner
was eaee afflicted with a severe jitters ease
in London.. After Act I she was supposed to
emit an agonised scream .. When the cue ar-
arivedshe couldn't .. When throat muscles
were paralysed momentarily .. Bat what ap-
peared to be disaster tamed eat to be a hap-
py incident .. The critics were wildly en-
thusiastic about her performance. They were
especially impressed by her portrayal of
"mated agony."
When Helen Hayes starred in "Mary of Scot-
land," one of the supporting players actually
fainted on ;tage... Helen, however, was equal to
the moment... Remaining in cnaracter. she ad-
libbed: "It is just one of my women, m"Lord. She
is subject to these spells. Help her to my chamb-
er."
The play continued with none out front wiser
that anything unusual had occurred.
No premier* Is complete without the back-
stage atipla following the final asbestos...
Friends pile into the star's dressing room and
shower Mm with superlatives... Otis Skinner
once witnessed a yawny portrayal of Hamlet
which had a friend in the title assignment...
First night audiences are notorious nuisances
Actors often complain about their uncouth
goings-onbut none ever matched the direct ac-
tion of Jane Cowl... She once ordered the curtain
dropped (during a premiere) and announced it
would stay down until the coughers and talkers;
left.
Nora Bayes had her own unique way of hand-
ling coughers... She would fake a coughing fit
on stagethen turn to the spectatorsand wltn
great sarcasm say: "Please excuse my rude be-
havior". .. Ethel Merman is one of the few twin-
klers who takes First Nights calmly... When an
interviewer asked her to explain her poise and
Indifference she flipped: "Why should I worry?
I know my lines'."
Composer Cele Porter, by the way, ta an-
other cucumber type. He always buys tickets
at the box-office for his premieres- arrives
early and trades greetings with friends in the
fover... And there is no false modesty in the
talented Cole's makeup... He enjoys his ow*
shows and applauds all his songs.
This generation probably doesn't know about
this one-time top vaudeville team... Played the
Keith and Orpheum Circuits .when vaudeville
realty mattered... Their trademark song was.
"Hello, Hello, Fish Don't. Perspire!" Another of
* their lines to become a household crack was: "You
can't bounce a meatball"... Panicked the peo-
ple. .. A dozen years ago the team broke up the
act because one was very 111... A few weeks ago
they started rehearsing againhoping maybe the
new monsterTelevision would present another
opportunity... The other day that long-awaited
phone call came. For a top teevy program... "Ah.
at last!" they sighed. Dreams do come true.. But
the sick one was felled again and his partner
responded to the call, anyway... A chap with a^
crew cut met him at the stage entrance .. "My
partner got sick," explained the comedian... "It
doesn't matter," was the reply. "We need old-time
actors for walk on bits. D'ya want it?"... With a
tear in his throat. Sam Lewis of the great 2-a-
day team of Lewis At Dody accepted his first job
in teevy.
Peter Edson In Washington
NEA Staff Correspondent
fiwryfcoftV ftsfck Classified
IIT1
:MBER 11, 1951
BERLIN (NEA) The cold war hi Berlin Is
fought under curious ground rules.
The Russians constantly keep the heat on,
annoying the western powers every place they
ssmVO
And the Western zones keep bombarding the
Eastern zone with anti-Communist propaganda,
through newspapers and radio
Each side would like to get the other out. But
without any formal agreement, neither side mon-
keys with the water supply and sewage systems.
To do so would Inconvenience their own forces
as much as their opponents.
Only four-power cooperation remaining In ef-
fect is the Air Safety Center, where all forces are
supposed to file flight plans, to prevent crashes.
Only the Russians don't file any plans for their
new twin-engined jets,
Also, there's the Spandau prison, where Rudolf
Hess Adm. Karl Raeder, ex-Hitler Finance Min-
ister'Walter Funk and other convicted Nazi war
criminals are kept. The four powers operate this
prison a month at a time, in rotation.
When the Americans operate Spandau. they
feed the prisoners as they would be fed and cared
for In American prisons.
Then the Russians take over and starve the
prisoners. The French feed them a little better,
and the British a little better than the French.
Which leaves it up to the Americans to put the
prisoners back in condition to face another month
of Russian starvation.
AVOID RETALIATION
Russians are now completing a new stretch of
eanei and a railroad spur which will make their
transportation system completely free from Am-
erican. British or French counter-measures.^ ~"
Formerly, In moving barges from the Oder Riv-
er on the east of Berlin to the Elbe on the west,
the Russians had to use canals going through
French and British sectors of Berlin
And when they wanted to move rail freight
from eastern Berlin rail terminals,to the Rus-
sian-zone area west of Berlin, they had to use
tracks that crossed the American sector,
But now. If the Russians want to Impose an-
other blockade of the Western sones of Berlin,
they won't be subject to counter-blockades Im-
posed by the Western powers over the old times
of communications.
HIGHER EDUCATION IN BERLIN
One of the most eager student bodies In the
world is said to be on the campus of the Berlin
Free University, in the western one.
The city gives students who can't pay a $20-a-
month equivalent as living allowance. Meals are
priced at one mark apiece and are always the
samebread, sliced sausage and potato salad.
The f-tudent body numbers 12.000. and about 40
per cent of them come from the east zone.
Ford Foundation has just given the university
a million-dollar grant.
WEST BERLIN STANDARD IS HIGHER -
This Is the current comparison of living stand-
ards In the Russian and the American sectors of
Berlin.
The Russians claim their east German mark Is
. at par with the west German mark. Actually, the
west German mark is 3.8 to the dollar, while the
east mark is 8 or more to the dollar.
The west German wage rate averages a west
mark and a half an hour for a 48-hour week
while the Russian-zone rate is one and a third
east marks an hour.
A Western worker labors two hours to earn
enough to buy a bottle of schnapps.
A Russian-zone worker has to work 20 hours to
earn enough for the same purchase.
A Western-zone laborer works four hours to
earn the price of a kilo of beef, while an east
zoner must work 12 hours.
To earn the price of a pack of cigarets requires
one hour's labor in the west, three hours m the
east.
On bread prices, the two sones are about equal.
HEAVY EATERS
When the Russians brought a million and a
half German youths Into Berlin, American re-
sidents did get a little bit nervous.
They feared a mass movement from the Rus-
sian East aone to the Western zone, with some
incidents and maybe a little rioting.
So details of American troops were scattered
around the city, and were billeted with Amer-
ican famlUes to protect wives and children.
The trouble was. that these troops had to be
fed by the families they were protecting. After
a couple of days of that, the housewives pro-
tested.
So the troops were sent back to barracks. Feed-
ing soldiers was more trouble than fighting pos-
sible Commie agitators.
. I., i.

.
PAGE FIVE



*f
*
\
Members of the second class of the 33rd Infantry Driver Training School hear a lecture on
safety by Cecil M. Greenlaw, assistant safety director. -The class is being held in an old main-
tenance shop which has been made into their theater and classroom.
Cpl. Luis O. Gonzalez, one of the five enlisted instructors of the school, is giving the men
instruction In maintenance using the model truck.

The happy ending: comea at graduation for those who make the trade. The class is addressed
by Col. R. n. Douglas, left, commanding officer of the 33rd Infantry Regiment. Captain Tho-
mas W. Boyd, school commandant, is staadiag beyond the Colonel.
pv; sjx
,
33rd Infantry Boasts
Driver Training School
By Pfe. Carl B. McClure -

A visitor to Service Company must pan two written, and one
Motor Pool may wonder what is practical, examinations,
going: on. Capt. ThomajssW. Boyd. re-
A certain group of men may be gimental motor ofcleer, is school
found m an Improvised theater; commandant and lias as his able
crawling over and under a model assistant, Godofredo Torres. Fire
two and a half ton truck; or enlisted men are assigned to the
listening to a lecture. What are school as Instructors. They are:
these men doing? They dont Sgt. Walter L. Huff, Tank Com-
act like any specimen of mech- pany; Sgt. Lester W. Webster,
ante or driver. Why are they in "A" Company: Sgt. Ambrose A.
a motor pool? Corey, Medical Company; JPfc
The answer to these mysterious Kile Brammer, "H" Company;
questions is that the motor pool and Cpl. Luis O. Gonzalez Ser-
does not only serve as a place vice Company. 504th Flet Ar-
to park and repair vehicles, but tlllery.
also as a "seat of higher learn-
ing." Yes, the men in question Boyd is well qualified to be in
are students; and what subject charge of such a school. He baa
is most appropriate* to a motor taught this type of course to
pool? You guessed it, driving. troops speaking three languages.
The 33rd Infantry driver train- through the use of mterpertors.
lng school was organised last Some of his assignment In this
July and since that time two type of work are: commlstoned
classes have graduated. A third instructor. Armored. Training
class is in progress now. Center, Fort Knox, Ky. Motor
. The aim of the school is to Officer 198th Enginer Dump
teach new inexperienced men Truck Company, 1113 Bngr.
how to drive and perform first Construction \ Group, Kyushu,
echelon maintenance on the japan 1945-194 and Regt. Motor
Army's two and a ha.f ton trucks, officer 44th Inf Regt (Phil-
Classroom instruction; lectures lippine Scouts) in Luson and
by the Army Safety Director, and Okinawa. 194-i947. During- this
Canal Zone Police; and Train- time he taught driving and
ing Films; are used to accom- maintenance to Japanese Na-
plish this goal. lonnls Contenental troops and
Theory and first echelon mam- Philippine Scouts
tenance are taught with the Torres Is a graduate of the
model truck as a training aid. Motor Transport School at Fort
In this way the men can learn Benhing, Georgia and was Bat-
the how and v where of power talln Motor Officer of the 29flth
train, and safety precautions by RCT before coming to the
visual means. 33rd Infantry, recently.
In the final stages of the school Through the efforts of these
the men are taken out for actual seven men the 33rd Infantry
driving experience. They have Driver Training School is train-
practice In convoy driving, day tag selected men from the 33rd
and night, and In difficult driv- Infantry and the 504th F. A.
ing over a specially designed Battalion to drive well the mot-
obstlcal course. or vehicles which our modern
In order to graduate the mea Army depends so much on
Careful driving over nigged terrain is a delicate job. The
students do plenty before graduating. This Is over the 5#4th
Obatieal Ceers*.
INTER AMERICAN HIGHWAY
Bids will be accepted up to the 29th day of November,
1951, at the office of the Minuter of Public Works, third
floor of the National Palace in Panama City, for the
construction of a-section of the inter American Highway
In the Province of Chirlaui.
Proposals received will be opened In the presence of ail
persons interested promptly at ten o'clock In the morinng
of the above mentioned, date.
Prospective bidder may obtain, plana, specifications and
other data pertinent to the projected work at the office*
of the Inter American Highway; va Espaa. No. 18. Panama
City, by depositing, thef sum of. one hundred dollar
($100.00).
Panam, October 84. lti.
NORBERTO NAVARRO
Ministro de Obras Pblicas.
Swday AiffUUn Spflm*i
1 n
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER U,- WR.


Collegiate Capers
- Canal Zone Style
(Picture and comments by Ralph K. Skinner)
Although the Canal Zone may not officially hare
debutantes. It has a Sub-Deb Club Alpha Delta Phi,
which originated In 1941. This group holds monthly
meetings at the home of alternate members. There Is a
party chairman In charge of each get-to-getber who
selects a committee to help. These girls furnish the re-
freshments for the party, and there are nominal dues.
* Older girls remain In the club as honorary members.
The aim of sorority Is friendship. Admittance is by se-
cret ballot. There are two types of Initiation, or rather
The open Initiation Is what the SUNDAY AMERICAN
photographer saw on Balboa Road as initiates carried
their sales offerings of tissue, paper and other items
which they were offering for charity! (Note: The money
collected from willing dupes does really go to charity.)
Secret Is the formal ceremony. And thus the at-
tractive girls cant be shown to their becoming evening
,WJust for a change the sorority ought to parade their
lovely new members in formal attire down Balboa Road
next year. They'd get a real audience, we re sure.
Officers of the Alpha Delta Phi sorority are: Anno
Morrill, president; Kay Cross, vice-president; Marilyn
Bevtngton, secretary; and Judy McCoy, treasurer. Other
members, of which there are 28, Include: Tlbby Nolan.
Beth Lockridge. Nancy.Ladd Nancy Wells, Colla Ooodln
and Arlene Schmidt.
LOOK WHAT'S COMW DOWN THE STREET
THESE BALBOA BKABTIES CANT: BE BEAT.
Andy Mulligan and Jean MacLean set initiated in Sub-Deb Club.
Parasol paradera are these girls who don't want the suns
rays on their beautiful spotted skins. Left to right, Shirley
Million, Pat Peaeher, Joyce Gardner, Georgian Hale, and
EIki Altman.


We're happy as can be. as yen a plainly see? Thus say
Jane Mallan, Arden Ceoke, Jane Mailsin and Mark il Bella.
Aren't these resetting hats? Fetched from the dump, no doubt. Less) to right Marilyn ft*,
Jesie di Bella, Banny dl Bella, and Mary Dillon.
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 11. JH
tlflMVf s^sWPWC#lf sUn^^n^n^^Wt
PAGE SEVEN


*
\
ma.
/
aport /s
99
eview
The latest news from the world of sports!
i
7:3&p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station
HOG-840
Kcs.
tuijtlS : TRUE TO HIS PROMISE, SIR GAWAIN
GOES IN SEARCH OF A STOUT SHIP TO TAKE
PRINCE VALIANT ACROSS THE STORMV SEA
TO THULE.
BUT HIS BROTHERS ARE OF A DIFFERENT
MIND. 'WHY SHOULD WE RtSK A FA/R
SH/P AND CREW FOR THAT HIGH-NOSED
UPSTART?' ASKS AGRAVA1NE.
MB AS A HIKING PRINCE, AND NOW TH4T
TH NORTHA4EN HAVE FOUND THE SEA
ROUTEHITHER WE SHOULD COUNT HIM
AAfONGOUR WORSTENEMIES." SAV5
GAHERJ5.
"WE SHOULD HOLD HIM /TV THE DUNGEON AS
HOSTAGE, SO HIKING RAIDCfiS WILL NOT TROUBLE
OUR SHORES ADDS MORORED.
"WELL SAID, CH/LO." ANSWERS QUEEN MORGAUSE,
'AND A L/TTLE SUBTLE TORTURE MIGHT CAUSE HIM
TO SfGN A TREATY TO OUR ADVANTAGE.' '
TO GAWAIN VIAL 1$ SAVING: ~THt .*:/) A// FROM
'HE NORTH fS LONG AND HARD AND THE MARINERS
ARRIVE IN NEED OF FOOD AND WATER. SO WHY NOT
OPEN THIS PORT FOR TRADE ? THERE WILL BE NO
NEED FOR RAIDING. AND ALL ORKNEY WILL PROFTT."
WHEN GAWAIN LEARNS Of HIS BROTHERS'
?LOTTING HE IS FURIOUS. 'WHY DO YOU
ALWAYS TRY TO DO BY TREACHERY WHAT _
CAN 8E DONE BETTER BY HCW6ST AtANS 7*
oh < vm H*n
*w h.. ^tu. y ^*
'AND YOU, GAHERfS, WILL SA/L WfTH HH,
ro rea the Northmen our port /s
OPEN FOR TRADE TO ALL HIK) COME UN
PEACE f '
IkM*
A TRADE AGREEMENT S MADE READY FOR
KING AGUAR'S SIGNATURE.
N&n- wea-Tfcc Vipgr \imt.
.\
PAGE EIGHT

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1961


YlatinJ(otter? 'rawiruj 11 to 1U5 every SUNDAY MORNING
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Kcs.
I
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1^,( J951
*untoy kftmm kfptonent
tTAi*c* NINE





"Sport Review The latest news from the world of sports!
HOG-840kc,
r
7:30 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station
as
'------------------------------VK FRICMTFULLEU COSRV
FOKVOUAM INCONVENIENCE, *-a5?
GENTLEMEN,'MAY I OFFE* J r^
TME LKE OF MV VEHICLE / / n
4BT ,_ ftf^
'IV'IsS^Ib ^^^^^^r^^t \jB
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PAGE TEN
iunddj
,,,. CufuOj
SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 11, 1951


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lit
IWttat' Lfour ZJi
avon
7 y Phone Panam 2-3066
__! and ask for your favorite recording!
i
4:30 to.,6 p.m. DAILY over Your Community Station
HOG-840**
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1951
JAOE El-EVEh


lA/hat Ljour
avon
.? 99 /
lie
Phone Panam 2-3066
and ask for your favorite recording!
4:30 to 6 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station /"/ Q Cj ~ 8 4 0 *CS

fe.c= A
DOI HAFT BE^
TO}
iKNOWTHATA
HOW DO YOU ^IpE'0***^ AWRI6HT NOW, \WITH THAT BUNCHA JUI
PROPOSE TO ( NEVERVfOOZV, OPEN \ D'YA THINK I'M INSANE?
PULL FOOZY'S/ YOU MINDAUP YOUR FACE \ VD MUCH RATHER KEEP
TOOTH WITH-/ OOOLA... \ AN'WE'LL GO / MY EXCRUCIATING
OUT TOOLS? YOU JUST / TO WORK ON ^s. PAIN/
WATCH ME//THAT BAD
TOOTH/ jK^SI
\
ft
'-.&:
Y'FIXIN' TO PULL IT ) NOW.NOW, FOOZY,TAKE
OUT BY TH'ROOT? \lTEA5tf YOU'RE GONNA
OH, DOUGH/ GEHUBBAlPULL IT YOUR6ELF/
GOLOPPA YISHNA/NOWC'MON.WE GOTTA
<^K ASNOOT' /GET UP IN A TREE SOME-
OWWWUVI. A WHERE/

A
WHAT WE / AW,THERE'S
DOIN1 'WAY I NOTHIN'
UPHERE? V QUEER
I DON'T GET 7 ABOUT
IT...SEEMS \ THIS
PAGE TWELVE
Sunday Aaeman Supplement
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1951
-


Full Text
*
m
,
aport r\
9)
eview
The latest news from the world of sports!
i
30 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station
HOG-840
Kcs.
SpifttS : TRUE TO HIS PROMISE, Sift GAWAIN
GOES IN SEARCH OF A STOUT SHIP TO TAKE
PRINCE VALIANT ACROSS THE STORMV SEA
TO THULE.
BUT HIS BROTHERS ARE OF A DIFFERENT
MIND. "WHy SHOULD WE RISK A FA//?
SHIP AND CREW FOR THAT HIGH-NOSED
UPSTART?" ASKS AGRAVAINE.
HE /S A VIKING PRINCE, ANO NOW THAT1
TH NORTHMEN HAVE FOUND THE SEA
ROUTE H/THER WE SHOULD COUNT HIM
AMONG OUR WORST ENEM/ES," SAV5
GAHERI5.
'WESHOULD HOLD H/M /N THE DUNGEON AS
HOSTAGE, SO VIKING RA/LXRS WILL NOT TROUBLE
OUR SHORES!" ADDS MOROftEO.
"WELL SA/D, CH/LD. ANSWERS QUEEN MOftGAUSE,
'ANO A LITTLE SUBTLE TORTURE M/GHT CAUSE HIM
TO SIGN A TREATy TO OUR ADVANTA6E! "
TO GAWAIN VtM. IS SAVING: "THt cA XOU/6 FROM
'HE NORTH /S LONG AND HARD AND THE MARINERS
ARRIVE IN NEED OF FOOD AND WATER. SO WHy NOT
OPEN TH/S PORT FOR TRADE ? THERE WILL BE NO
NEED FOR RA/D/NG. AND ALL ORXNEy WILL PROFIT.m
WHEN GAWAIN LEARNS OF HIS BROTHERS'
?LOTTING HE IS FURIOUS. "WHV OO /VU
4LWAHS TRy TO DO By TREACHERY WHAT a
CAN BE DONE BETTER By HONEST MEANS ?*
"AND yOU, GAHERKS, WILL SA/L WITH Hli
TO TELL THE NORTHMEN OUR PORT /S
OPEN FOR TRADE TO AU WHO COME IN
PEACE! '
A TRADE AGREEMENT S MADE READY FOR
KING AGUAR'S SIGNATURE.
nT WEEK -Tfcf Vlflgr Wmt.

,\
PAGE EIGHT

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1961


n
s
5*
fonal totter Jrauinc, 11 to 1U5 eveiy SUNDAY MORNING
Your Community Station j-j Qj \J $ 4 O Kcs.
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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER IL 1961
iuwtoy AncfKW MpWMRt
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