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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01290
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01290
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
ttBRANIFF
TO:
PHILADELPHIA
ONI-WAY...,.., $141.00
ROUND'TMr..
4*TI.45
AS INDlPgNDl^^fBB^^^ NEW8PAF
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" ' Abraham Lincoln.

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CANADIAN V/HIS
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PANAMA. R. P., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER If, 1951
PTVE CENT
Longshoremen Threaten To Resume Strike
Unless 'Ceasefire' Agreement Observed
E.ARE-U. S. Marine*- duck the dirt-blasting back-blast u they Puncha
SS?3oR2k2nEJt O ffi Communlris on the Korea MttataqL (Defenda-
partment photo from NEA-AcmeO
Marines Enjoy
Birthday With
Korean Assault
8TH ARMY HQ.. Korea. Nov.
10 (UPi United States Mar-
ines celebrated their 178th birth-
day today by routing Communist
troops from a key hfll mass with
the heaviest bombardment yet
delivered onto a single target in
the Korean war.
Minutes after the artillery
bombardment, nearly 100 fight-
er-bombers roared throu-h the
smoke and dust enshrouding the
target hill and sprayed fleeing
survivors with napalm and de-
layed action bombs.
Every weapon under Marine
command on the east central
front took part In the birthday
shooting promptly at noon.
The Marines made no attempt
to follow up the artlllerv bom-
bardment with an infantry at-
tack.
They spent the rest of the
day relaxing, and holding ink'
promptu celebrations of the
founding of the Corps In 1777.
The Marinea Invited .Eft;
,4s,.
MtNcnwFit vs MTJDPOWER. ' When this Jeep couldn't make it. the broad backs of these
T^rxoopTfuiTieKe^oweT to p3 the vehl efe up a mudd, hill. It took 24 men to shove
the heavily-laden Jeep and trailer up to the top.__________ ---------
Anti-Catholic Teachers Call
Protest Walkout In France

A
'*
Paris suburbs while Jn the capi-
tal's central district many schools
were open.
The Teachers* Union said that
in the Seine Department (Paris
about-86 per cent of the teachers
stayed home. In the provinces
the strike was total.
The situation was similar In
other big centers like Lyons,
Grenoble, Bordeaux, and espe-
cially in Northern Prance, In the
mining districts of Lille and Rou-
baix.
Several newspapers have call-
ed on the government not to tol-
erate the walkouts as It violates
the administration's rules as a
political strike.
Informed sources said the gov-
ernment may bring up the cose
at the next government meeting
and try to work out a law regu-
lating the conditions of (he
strike. Such a law has been pro-
Silsed by the 1946 Constitution,
ut the gap has not yet been
filled.___________________
Former Zone DA
den. Zenon Noriega. Peru's Don McGrOth Off
Minister of War who visited the . __, -.-. -.
U. S. defense installations in the] ffj Npw Hf. fOSt
Panama Area yesterday, left new ****
Peru early this morning by E MoGrgth toft early
military aircraft. i. piare for Washington,
Accompanyteg him were Lt. wherThe will accept a new
S,i.^eCHwS2nJ5JI10fe*- rS* "he Attornev General's
Major Alfredo Castellano-Del- office
gado.
__J__rie,J__tyj_y fr **** c "oently resigned *
During hia stay; he No __Kgj|ot-nr:ment as
guest ot the Caribbean Cun- r, 5 neoeator has been
mand at Quarry Height* amada
PARIS, Nov. 10 CUP) The
long-simmering dispute between
the French Catholics and the
eti-Cathollcs yesterday was
[blighted by a 24-hour strike
of almost all of France's 140 pub-
lic teachers, and there was a pos-
sibility today that more units
will Join the strike.
The teachers, backed by three
anti-Catholic partiesCommu-
nists. Socialists, and Radicals-
struck in protest against the laws
assert by the National Assembly
it September whlph gives Ca-
tholic schools financial aid.
Three political parties which
have a following among public;
and secondary school teachers
claimed the measures violate
France's constitution which sti-
pulates that the state shall pro-
vide "non-rellglous" Instruction
to all children.
The walkout was general in
Per War Minister
Gen. Zenon Noriega
Slops Off In H
New Method Found
To Hunt Uranium
CHICAGO, Nov. 10 (UJ.) A
new method has been developed
for analyzing lead and uranium
ores and eventually may prove
helpful In exploration lor ura-
nium.
The method was worked out in
Joint research by scientists at
the University of Chicago and at
the Atomic Energy Commission's
Argonne national laboratory.
The technique has been used
successfully in studying rocks
containing as little as one part
per million of uranium. It re-
veals more about the nature of
ores that art a billion years old.
The analysis operates \on the
principle that the isotope1 of lead
with an atomic weight of 200
once was uranium 238. and be-
came lead through radioactive
decay ot the original uranium.
Bv measuring the amount of
lead 206 and the relative propor-
tion of uranium and lead, lt Is
possible to calculate the age at
which the mineral was formed.
The Chicago and Argonne re-
searchers found uranium and
lead occur in such rocks tn ex-
tremely minute quantities.
With their new method of ana-
lysis, thev can measure one-tenth
of a mIlonth of an ounce of
lead, whereas "previous methods
of analysis required at least 200
times as much.
"
SCARCITY AMID PLEXTT
GREENWOOD. Miss. (UP.)
Living in one of the capitals of
King Cotton's empire. Mrs. J. R.
Greene thinks it odd she can't
buy a few pounds of loose cotton
to stuff dolls. She visited all the
h offices and cotton com-
presses but they wouldn't sell on
such, g small scale.
' narty.
A week ago they dropped
pamphlets on the hill they had
marked for the anniversaTy
bombardment. The pamphlets
said: 'Wait for an Important an-
nouncement."
A similar pamphlet was fired
onto the hill later In the week.
Then yesterday Marine guns
delivered the final leaflets, in-
viting the Chinese to surrender
and enjoy hot rice at the Mar-
ines' celebrations.
The Marines, even those in the
front Une. ate baked ham. fried
chicken, cranberry sauce, mash-
ed potatoes, fruit salad and ol-
ives.
Elsewhere on the ground front
the war was relatively quiet,
with both sides apparently a-
waitlng the outcome of the Pan-
munjom ceasefire negotiations.
Units of the British 1st Com-
monwealth Division made a
small, probing night attack on
the western front.
The British said they found
the Communist trenches In the
Yonchon sector "so deep they
were hard to get out of."
Nearly 1.000 Red troops drove
United Nations defenders from
two outposts southwest of Kum-
sonc before dawn.
Allied troops recaptured the
ground after six hours fighting.
South of 8inanju 12 United
States Thunderjets returning
from a mission were jumped by
about 30 Mlgs south of Slnanju.
The Thimdrlets damaged one
Mig m the fight.
United States Air Force Ohief
of Staff Hoyt Vandenberg said
i at Kimpo airfield, near Seoul, to-
; dav that he believes Russian pi'
lots mav be flying the Migs.
He said: "The pilots speak Rus-
sian. They also do all their fly-
ing up north, where they con-
trol the ground. They never
come down here where we can
see who's flying the planes we
shoot down
Vandpnberg Is believed to have
Famous Songwriter
Sigmund Romberg
Dies In New York
NEW YORK. Nov. 10 (TJP>
Sigmvnd Rom;?rg. *4. one of
the United States' greatest
songwriters, died here of a
cerebral hemmorrage at 11:15
last night.
The Hungarian-born com-
poser of 65 Broadway musicals.
Including "The Student Prince."
The Desert Song" and "Blossom
Time" had spent a routine day
working on tunes for a new
'. show, according to relatives.
In his lifetime he wrote some
2.000 tunes, mnnv of which have
.become fr-Wrr to almost
1 everyone in the Western world.
come to investigate the Increas-
ing Communist challenge to Uni-
ted Nations air supremacy over
Korea.
UN Yields Kaesong
Armistice Point-
Insists On Line
PTNMUNJON, Korea, Not. 10
(UP)The United Nations nego-
tiators today ottered the Com-
munists the right to veto any ad-
justments sought bv the United
Nations, If the feds will accept
the final Korean battleilne as a
ceasefire line.
The United Nations in effect
dropped the demand that the
Communists hand over Kaesong,
n the northwest, approaches to
as toa price-.of an amis-
i *
Ships Tieup
Hit Hard At
RP Economy
The costly, 26-day New York
longshoremen's strike seriously
affected the economy of Pana-
m, according to reliable esti-
mates mads today
An approximate total of $3,-
000.000 worth of merchandise
earmarked for Panam was tied
up at the NY docks because of
the work stoppage.
Incomplete tabulations releas-
ed by the Panam Bureau of
statistics indicate that the move,
ment of merchandise through
the Panam City Customs office
dropped off some 50 per cent
during the strike as compared to
the same per'id last year.
Some Panam merchants de-
clared today that the effect of
the strike on their pre-Christ-
mas sales had already begun to
manifest itse.t Many of them
had large Christmas orders,
bought ana paid for; on the
docks in New York awaiting
shipment.
Pacific Islanders
Claim Radioactive
raUe^hopes oirboftl side*
that agreement on a truee line
may be near.
The Chinese Communist radio
at Pelplng broadcast a Panmun-
Jona dispatch from Alan Win-
nlngton, correspondent for Lon-
don't Communist Dally Worker,
saying:
"If the Americans give up
their demand for Kaesong, a set-
tlement can be reached in a mat-
ter of hours."
At the same time United Na-
tions 8th Army commander Gen.
James A. Van Fleet, in an Arm-
istice Day message to his troops,
said:
"We trust that a new Armis-
tice date, signalling honorable
and lasting peace, will soon be
forthcoming.
A United Nations spokesman
said that the initial Communist
reaction to the revised truce pro-
posal "was generally negatlye,
but they did not close the door."
Argentines Expected
To Reeled Pern
In Elections Sunday
BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 10 (UP>
About 9.000,000 Argentines go
to the polls tomorrow to elect a made it ,to an island in the New
president, and more thsn 6.000 Hebrides,
other government officials.
Women will participate for
the first time.
Pres. Juan D. Peron is ex-
pected to be re-elected.
Nine other parties are re-
presented tn the campaign but
not all have presidential can-
didates.
The Radicals nominated Ri-
cardo Balbin, the Conservatives.
Reinaldo Pastor, and the So-
cialists /'' 'o Palacio.
SYDNEY. Jttiv, U natives who were adrift Tn the
South Pacific for SVi months be-
fore they found land said they
believed that the compass in
their engine-less cutter was ren-
dered useless by radio-active
rainwater off the Bikini Atoll
The captain of the 24-foot .cut-
ter, whose 8 ft. 3 in. cabin was
Its only shelter, died of starva-
tion. A second native died after
drinking two bottles of after-
shave lotion.
The other five survived the
1.500-mile voyage by eating a few
fish thev caught and licking the
dew off the deck planks.
The boat left Kwajalein July
18 and spent four days trading
at Namu. They were becalmed
for four days on the homeward
trip and the storm then drove
them north to Bikini.
When the weather cleared,
they set thel rcourse for Kwa-
jalein, but failed to find lt.
They decided that radioactive
rainwater from Bikini, where the
United States atomic bomb ex-
periments had been held, had
ruined the compass when the
water turned black.
They drifted for 102 days with-
out sighting land until they
Earthquake Rocks Chile;
No Damages Reported
ANTOFAOASTA. Nov. 10 (UP)
A prolonged earthquake shook
Antofagasta and Tara provinces
in northern Chile last evening,
but no damage is reported
Meanwhile another series of
strong quakes rocked the east
coast of Formosa.

NEW YORK, Nov. 10 (UP) Leaders of New York's
insurgent longshoremen threatened today to tie up thrt
cargo-jammed port all over again unless the terms of a
"ceasefire" which got them back to work yesterday were
observed.
The 25-day strike, which tied up an estimated $1,000,-
000,000 worth of exports and imports, ended with a back
to work agreement negotiated by the State Mediation
Service.
But strike leader John Sampson charged today that
17 men were ordered off a Brooklyn pier in vioketit* of
the truce agreement when they reported for'work.
Week end crews of longshore-
men reported for work today af-
ter an assurance from Joseph P.
Ryan, president of the Interna-
tional Longshoremen's Associa-
tion lAFLi that there would be
no discrimination against them.
Thousands of dock workers
streamed back to work yester-
day as rebel longshoremen agreed
to end this port's longest and
most costly dock strike.
The back-to-work agreement
was reached shortly before 2 a.m.
(ESTi at a marathon meeting
between Insurgent strike leaders
and members of the State Fact-
finding Board agreed to continue
investigating the lntra-unlon
squabble.
By afternoon, police reported
"normal activity at all docks."
Strike leaders estimated that
25.000 men had returned to work
on docks in Brooklyn, Manhat-
tan and Staten Island.
The strike was brought about
by rebel strike leaders, spear-
heading five locals of the Inter-
national Longshoremen Assocla-
ttosuidefiance of Rytn.
tir had reached contracta-'
greerornt with Atlantic Coast
shippers calling for a 10-cen
hourly pay increase. The lnsur-
gents called the wildcat strike 'a
support of their demands for A-
25-cent hourly boost.
CM* Mies West
Of Hanoi, Captured
By Vietnam Troops
HANOI. Indochina, NOr. lt
(UP) Franco-Vietnam troops,
aided by paracutists, today
launched a dawn attack on
strategic Choben Pass, Just 2S
miles west of Hanoi.
French officials slid the of-
fensive advanced 15 miles ape}
occupied 62 square miles of rice
fields by mid-morning be.iind
the 25-mlle wide front.
Officials said "numerous" pa-
rachutists were dropped to aid
in the plncer movement de-
signed to take the 2-mlle Ida
pasS
They estimated the pw< I
noWj. held bv eight rebel Vie' (
minhTWttaHona of whlth only
three could be thrown Into f-
tlon immediately, and five cou'd
be brought in within 12 hcurs-
French officials said that de-
spite the low ceiling, fighter-
bombers and bombers have suo-
ported the offensive since It
Jumped off at dawn.
The French Hl"h Commis-
sioner. Gen. Jean de Lattre- da
Tass'mv personally Inspected
the front
The French announced that
the city of Choben, 28 miles
west of Hanoi, was occupied
shortly after midday when two
Franco Vietam columns acting
as a plncer linked up to take
the town.
French General
Flavs Agitot**s
Of Morocco Riots
-
Bush Fires Sweep
Big Timberlands
In Hew South Wales
SYDNEY, Nov. 10 (DPI The
worst bush fires in Australian
history are spreading over a 15,-
000 square mile area of the rich-
est timber country In the state of
New south Wales-
The fires have been burning
six days. They are still out of
control and are getting worse.
Thousands of firefighters, aid-
ed by their wives, mothers and
daughters, fought the flames
with the aid of Royal Australian
Air Force bombers, which map-
ped the fires' progress.
Families battled vainly to save
their homes and possessions
from the advancing flames.
The Sydney Morning Herald
said the fires have set back the
area's timber industry 40 years.
AF Stratotanker
Burns At McaDill,
Killing Crewmen
TAMPA, Florida, Nov. 10 (DP)
A United 8tates Air Force
Stratotanker (a Stratofrelghter
modified as a tanker for aerial
refuelling operations i overshot Moroccans were Mlled. Oillaume
the runway, crashed and explod- I said: "It was a\ real scandal
ed at MacDlll Ir force base near which shows the world that Its
here at ml.lnlght last night. | authors were not ripe for de-
killing all five of its crew. mocracy. I will show all those
The Stratotanker was on a j who try to create unrest In thla
toutlne training mission, with country who is the stronger
its refuelling tanks empty. *e" __________^________-
FEZ. Morocco. Nov. 10 (DP>-*
The French Resident General in
Morocco. Gen. Augustin Gull
llaume warned Moroccan Naj
tlonallst leaders that "I wil
show those who try to create un*
rest who is stronger here."
Guillaume made reference to
the Protectorate's North Es*t
areas in a speech during an
inspection tour of the section-.
Referring to the riots in Casa-
blanca Nov. 1 in which six
US ladicai A-Bombs Able
Chinese 'Human Sza Attack
To Match
In Korea
torn- then-
..i is "cur-
\nd we can," he said.
WASHINGTON. Nov. 10 Seal Somfc So-ti Mt &-ttUrtg "g works YCus. they can be ,
nlsts may launch In
Zales N. Ecton said
ed%n"tleWRob^mMorth ^detalleY pfan7b7next Jan- erful.
Senate Appropriations Commit- uary for the expansin.
come, will require delivery by air-
f they want to "throw the craft. ,),.-
Gen. Omar N. Bradley, chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Sta.*f,
A- indicated in a Chicago speech
S SSr sss ss^
power.
Ecton declined to give a blank-
senate Appropriations ^omm.i- uij m ^ ':!"r"Vta..ta. r. u,nritv reason* he rave Ecton declined to give a Dians-
grtrasuui :S3ftfsS Jgfca-ws mZlZZZZ
SsseasMra SS-^ 3s,a?srjs: Sr.Hss.r3
'srlrr:. :*ssb.wms asa-ru^ ssatfrsssa?-^


fAGTWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
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Labor New
And
MONTH 10 DVANCt______
a -iKTH im 6vnet_


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Walter Winchell
In New York

::
BROADWAY BEACON
Comment
m WMM* *"<* t>*n0tS1 DAItT WW8PATEE
Aphonse and Gastn
.-* Je ?.,,,0,i, ,ntimtl wonder if the became Mm. P.ui Weston
1st Spring. Countess De Mun is the adored of Donald Bloom-
,-KSr",(fVehPt" "r* heir Dad*"'r nur,r Br"n will quit as a
i. ial HS" *'*"> ,Ur '."Two on the Aisle" eo-
RS! (.Ad;.lph, Gre!n' recent|y " '" dancer Allyn Mc-
,?*"$' !? f,ndlnS" dancer vera Lee vera condoling... Truman
!' ?' t,o0iLwIU.er,.ha.s drPP'J I* "" name from all the
nmm..Cong. Medal of Honor winner Capt. Lewis Millet (baek
mm Korea) was assigned here to help promote hlood donations
i 2f4i Jw K M- Arm? "'"' him * P*r diem ,or ">>" nd
. \. V" chpest decent hotel room he could find took $6.75
...U".Ky -J?"n, cra,wf0.rd' I*' admirer. Richard Egan, in-
. erited the male lead in her new movie. He is regarded as Ann
: 2 ..' m LJ G.UJwnich ""y 'nd'eate a new coast feud.. The
ZSRJ&JH&* neli n"T gotten twice their money baek...
. he bloodiest fist fight anywhere at any time was the one at Old
na* between movie actors Jimmy Dnnn and Lionel Stander. OTer
communism.
I
i.4* l ^^5 commissioners who paid a Washington barrister a retainer
IVf 100,000 to combat the $So stamp levy and 10% tax against all
;.30kJes...The six met Oct. 28th In a Westche.ter club-between
uckahoe and White Plainsfrom 10 p. m. to 12:30 a. m Not a
ountry club... The lawyer's assignment is to "lobby" for easier
:g.siatlon or get the bill killed entirely.
. Churchill has notified his publisher* that he plans holding up
i nal instalments on his memoirs until retirement They expect
a? .VV.'f%Vear.he?Ce ~lB her n*"n,nf I'nited Artists com-
,?."?" **J?n- ,tr Wne de Carlo kids all her former
i lovie roles Dowager Mrs. C Vanderbilt never leaves her ailing
,hfy "* .''"ctically bed-ridden Have some irony: Wm.
,n.l*m?r ?'w book- "Requiem for a Nun." was panned by most
. iit.es, but is the first of his novels to reach the Best Seller list
- BC scraps more scenery (teery) in a week than Is used by Bread.
!* *| *" Comic Phil Poster U sore at Sinatra.
. I n, M,lLfc1t,Vn--N**,T*e 6n*Mrt Cnn" "' Will pick
rSuT I -'a ln I dy doleg teeyy gaestlnts during her honey-
r.iocn Acre*
i k SLf Tbe book" T"* Desert Fox ws written by a Brit-
n Oeneral (Desmond Youngi, who fought against Rommel (and
eaptured by himi in Africa. Nunnally Joh
P1
Is
._ American
i eiionrous information about Rommel,
By Victor kitiel
NEW YORK With drum
are beat speed the CTO leaders
ar hammering at our home
front war leaders.*
In sharpened pitch, ln angry
verbal duels. CIO leaders served
notice to White House emissar-
ies that not much longer will
they go along with confusion
and wage controls.
And they warned, "W are
solng to hate growing and ex-
tended unemployment sweep key
industrial areas if this isn't
changed!"
Not even the voice of Eric
Johnston, a voice as soothing
as that of any pe*rf the movie industry to which
he soon will return, and the
promise by him that by early
195S an wage controls would
be lifted, quieted the CIO's
leaders.
It was the wan. and ap-
parently fatigued Walter
Revther, goon to be oper-
ated on for an Internal ail-
ment, who had the most
bitter criticism, for soon,
he revealed, there would he
126.000 jobless in Detroit
alone, rovghly one out of
every 10 members of the
Auto union he lead.
"It the mobilization had not
been issued, these workers
would not today be unemploy-
ed. he cried out. "In Detroit
this means a loss of 130.000,-
000 man hours In the first six
months of the .coming yew.""
Then, turntag bitterly on the
Munitions Board and other
redera 1 agencies buying war
equipment. Reuther said they
ter responsible for more time
wasted than any hours lost ln
strikes.
This he blamed on eareless
placement of orders ln new
plants which are being built,
although there are available fa-
cilities ln cities like Detroit.
A total of $1,000.000 worth of
new factories Is being thrown
up while the emergency waits
and his people go workless.
Reuther charged that while
thousands of tanks were built
in Detoit dulng the hut un-
pleasantness, the govenment
mm
irTTaV.rTT-nTii
_
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER It, IS
MERRY- GO- ROUND
IMW 'I1IIOI
k4lm, .fa*?, MUyf; fwi-sol* "CdU
Tm. "" i,m C""oi" ** *")
sssrjs? pe5SM'' srss tetarais
1 -
Boss Man
By BOB RUARK
T!frv y in 1C"2
fit Sby Q0**}*. that he was pure Naxi. The proven fact la
M rommel participated in the attempted Hitler assassination
we can prove every historial fact in the filmDarryl Zanuck." '
L JSSSl T"T0o h tuPuer *-. till the Big Hera over
.f J ?, Un.d. Hr.d * nn't his Dongan Hilh phone. Too ?ow w" approving the cons-
-^^TJfi^ wanting him to endorse thlsnthat, personal apps, idea- truction of entirely new Unk
tK^li?--l^"-iSr'^Pl>lf i***..!lRft0jBiWH0*0* as one in Newark
.S- ? .. T Ro,*l: Thank' *<" h nice rtorv bat there, Delaware. ti
aslsjli. ciistake. Tue eUr was not Fthel Waters but the late Flor-
ence nmi .. be song h;, "Oh, How I Need loa Joe," is Henry
-Bronte's first attempt.. Advance talk about Mlh** "Decision Be-
.,'" D*wn (,du r>nd Yuletlde) rails it one or the best In years
.En^SE. tlVt H,de?r'Ie N*"- European, who ^oras'wlJh
,I i i.S#U F,' \. Nf"r'T eTery nm" Warner-s is in the cast
i f Starlltt." It's about stare flying to Army Wases.
',., 'Ihasn St. George Bissell 3rd denies any connection with a
r^J&S tgr0Up called Amlc8n Vigilant Aliiance (to WmV. nut
%r -.? t0,a 3forn PeUt,?n ,i,ed 'n the N Y. Slate Supreme Court
? t V. Llili, .iwe '? nD'2 lm"head 3 and li mentioned
'VrJFfl. Z'kt TiaLerJeliiam 3l Qeorge BtMeU 3rd h" volun-
'."5?. hi "" of,is home for special committee meetings. We all
-ewe him a special vote of thanks."
r.^^ ^iaUT.'r Crimt Committee Investigations ln Florid have
^ni^^hefr1^.^,1^' dc-*hooters and dealers would never
^TJf'th^rrni..5!!!nt*-'0am'n8 Plces_such Colonial
C?SftSt^.8Cene'kh0a8wbeen taken over bv other eatery" Brous-
,!2.8V^ie.uWwlkwBoh5m? reum a night club (with no back
rueh0Mn'eb SSnt *? PT"5 "*=?-* S*
i*turesque of the joints, is a chop house.
Bytjjiwiau-...Ronald Rogers, tne Glided t.Ve b.?.tone "edIhS
ST.,tt0.rr"WMtiea/i{ Nancy .Ra> ' Neen"h. Wisconsin on the
9fc at the Church of Resurrection The Met Opera trDevine .,,
SflfiXP v-"L K"Wn. f Mo"t'""y' *1-. 1" blTmTl new
2L /". itl-T1;4 TVT- AJnu meM0 *0,c P,u a arable
5F L : K'5ned s riht-nander, H. Newcomb planned invest-
ing $30,000 in Top Banana." but didn't after his wife objected to
OtU: J. Hutchinson, recently married to Doris Stlllman one of the
nation's richest girls, Is Hollywood's new find Ha?3 wZ*i -
"Sti^iSS -mm HUnt,"' ,h' ^n^^ni.VS.
- i .nL*sIe wU1 comm|t merger late this Winter Col-
ytwiUt Robert Ru.rk has readied the book and lyric" for h'ii'mn
?L T5! i0" U bT Ronnle Grh'n- Cliff Norton who ir:
1 !2. *? G""y program will star.. Cngat re^rta that if
roc: think the hltune, "I Get Idea,,' sounds famlllarTjust Dla,'the
hnt-ttme Spanish favorite, "Adis Muchachas". Noli^.r not*.
fHII H YfHJk SQKUM TMI UtADUS OWN COiUMN
THE MAIL BOX
TiM Mall !> n an >r,H Jorum f,t ^,4.,, ,, rk. Ponm A.mM,mm
0 rOMre.! g^Nriliy .M .r. S/ k. .^^TawloK
1 r. Mr**. imim Mt 00 im,0tiM m ft doosa't 00*00, the
"Tliere are thousands of un-
employed men In Detroit who
are experienced at making
tanks, but ln Delaware they
will have to start from ecratch.
taming new .men," he asserted
hinting st long delays id the
actual delivery of the rolling
rorts to our armies.
There re, for example, bat-
teries for the military.
He charged bluntly that
the disruption came from
lower echelon "colonels and
second looter, in the pro-
curement offices." These
lo-per agencies are "a gov-
ernment unto themselves"
""have failed to mesh
civilian and military pro-
duction. -They go their
merry way and do at they
aamn please," Reuther
roared, dlsclostng that war
production chief Charles
wm promised him and
r,nMv Murray that they
will channelUe defense or-
aers to places where plants
abU manpcwer art *
But this hasn't happened.
Reuther said. w""
Reuther's anger, blanching his
face under that well known
bv ntSied hair- WU ttnt**
rro". ??vS * "oor of the
CIOs 13th Constitutional Con-
J2**2 *ho felt that the CIO
tad been too quiet in its cri-
ticism of the war effort
ofTCTOt,nrW* the ,rritacm of
or co iconomlcs Chief Eml)
Wt Textile Workers' union tatf
i?HL2S5*- am PfPSU-i tu a ,ay worry-
hJL Lhuti.her m.feraj,le llttle df, the other night.
how she buys him boots to Keep his feet warm
fn. uow he 'ret* when he is not attacking
the horse meat with his usual vicious vigor.
ndWcontl'W,ehV0Lum? are Wr,tt*n on the c
and control of husbands, and his shortcomings
.have become stock humor. ^"ming
JoVjn totS2*L!i sha,pcd somewhere between
; th1 d08iaced boy, and a blundereome
-j^WBstt-ts&s Seft'TaKasjr'""",''" m
S5&SaaSr^w*S -as=*a^-*-to****
and a little subtle
the Annamese and how we should all turn to
", ?ost omrthlni aUertati the ache ere aU
pretty present once in a whil,. ,
I?,* ?f the ^o "ldom appears
His function is to provide, beget and become
whlmbo" SMI*! 3SSC49 "e:
Hit the bum with the book.
Then,
Imnii^H^M"7 of the eonatant superiority
implication that is vested in the commercial apl
aim aaramption
The only thing the dsmes are not worrying "de ha,rs on the taP' of b- Personalia
And so forth, until no meniil Vfene has not h mn ?4femaJe *? 4ntoUuitarv angel while
been flipped upon its back. ^ *" "0t Sf .d "?n .ftach to be sportbg the wron
fraottS; T^V0 d ~rtWng forT hi
forgotten man or the era-the American hus-
tJJO' wUn to P01"* out th" the American
iad^Jfi fhr^f^ "If04 of the onomy^
wefl hT. iiJil/iir"lon "i5 ets he m'"ht s
wLSlf SS i hand-me-down furnitu e.
unless It develops as part of an advertising
S'Xnta-S.lV" lSy a det on one of
.hnortlnenStl4ayyU,oreTmerC'- thC "*" mM *
personality.
hu.8^an^'' are "*nltive chaps, quick to
ra^^nTworir ^ w " at-tiS
P^'o'f !Sed c^Slty' "^ M -Si
that EUenhow^r^a. SifflS^^he ,ntreP"fd thto to mean
Then, if there was a feal! JL^Sr,?'; Or !wC*5wP on *>* -^-VM
would cooperate ^ rMDOn,e from the RepubUcan PartyTh,
KACE OR WA*T
4 n BEHIND IRON CURTAIN
aSS3ffW*ssMss.-s
aai'vJ5.ltm!e,riI.ly ,dm,t1ted. out husbands are
th^4ffl.fii?js^ ttairMute iordMi8 in
fot^'ui-i^^^ilo^^^^}^ J^'SSi'SSSJSi the rtart, unworthy
R anoth 8^' insurance^1 p^roiect^ Ita^lWSe^^^
hun^be^g1 ta ^ ^ ,01 htoaeli
thIttw-n<,80.muchJthat we M' Persecuted as
^^birrecko?5ndg.eXCept '* ^ "
ibSSS^B1* "--
thaw and friends as dull cousins who cannot
SlS?ta f lnt the ra,n' out wno mSst rtand
quieter in the corner In the presence of wiser
nV.l!l?w.tfl\tlm\.hM fm" t0 "P the foot
and shake the uxorious finger
Ouf wftS^ Un,teL W* ^^ n0tnln8 to 1<5 OUt
on^ S ,urned "t hnos. to be a villain
H^Hn^nrS0. KSl IfSSH " de not shave.
SFS ?5Aft*S^^
feSt*8*-B0 fMUn' nd *
Air War Score
By Bruce Biossat
uehin'tKon *Slrffi^5jB(?^B,S^ S ^P *om
vital, the Prudent said *nd ,oba ta irw countrle* is
ro.neTf lHf -SS^cSm^ n0nM- *** tood.
-WaPlttJ& auo are hotng prea-
&^?S3SSSS
.. rscahrod.
Piooso try to 0000 tbe lotton limited to on* 000a kinoib
SWtoitod m UtMr. r ^da^ ^ "000^nvt
or 0r>l00l
TAX-SUIT PLAINTIFF TALKING
Cristobal, C. Z.
The Panama American
R. de P.
flfcr:
^"^^J?00"!-^ P*^ h011"1 oecoma a party
"-^ presently being engaged in by the firm Of CoUtas *
Hara'awhy:
fSLSt "ETaS?* tt h4nd' -"^ - A& ttkTiK
You cin looe but five bucks. That IS their fee for 11*
ftmr name to the suit. If the suit U won thev^rant a^Athlt
^additional tiranty wToe **&% g^
rBBiiy rn'^h"wlUhaUv1.,J STa'SSalrS^
in mind a claim for refund is valldfor TC.
5? JSS .f the Hn,t# h could very easily take several years fortaial dleSc^
?J?-Iw!r.u " ttUd eUlni for but three vara
mfVSiT "" * l*e'M Pmy to Will
F. W. F.
ara^ShKl-! -f ^ ,ollowers
Slile th.nd' as "euthersald
olrmTf'..; .P'erament still U
permit'Jng its people to use
other e, mtlea forPWK u
ment although textile workers
re being laid off by the tew
or thousands, millions of nta-
cSng *fe ldle> Mld "me m,lla
Only recently, the O. 8
Army Quartermaster Corps
handed a tll.000.000 icool
blanket contract, for a mil---
ton military blankets, to
the prison mm at the red-
rLF*. in Tene Haut'-
rnts deal was made tn-Bos-
ton between the prison su-
per. Letter R. Parhtm. al-
tente* of New England'
unemployed testae -corn-
ers who could tettt us* the
AttwboY of week* worth of J
$i2,mfiH order.
There was no doubt that the
ftp loaders wra ready to
strike hard on the alekst orui
Sh^f,ter.7,f^^
thed to their dlsfessed lol-
'2*r hnmedl.tely. They jurt
wSSZ^Si r xample '-fd ovor nortnwert r"dln-,tt io? ww ta ore*.
taai ^2*-h0c down three ^rrt-thlrdmrthe
^^^.^f.:?5jy U the rest
f^ the meantime, our airmen will ha. ?
"'".Si'*1 *h.t they^ve
-Aartat^ n^J>' werT rel.Uvely
serious ^onh? TiTTi. b*,4?T# "^ hiddatit casti
B^^d^bet^tec%pp,r- ^/uln*" ' to
SlroundTe! ** *" ^^^ ,0,n S-Si
Of nUniw' ,m.'nntfW.,remndo,jv COtl* 1 to'STJU; "*fr;J?f the K^tiB war in 1*0 up
E*f tSiJ?'?' f,utl *nd money to send B-ifs i.. tvelL.of thu y,>T- thl country lost IM
luiiSmifeo.g,,a*t **-*& j-Tiu S- Fh^Vop^^ynar^VAd-an .-AS
eve&r^^Vn^^^
c^oonealS to "^ th ^ ^dtali^oV^man ^&
rJSi ^!n%^U^f^^^lJ^^ b0U,t starts
trum. suddenly yell.S r^tffffi chamU^nV'm. %
old Scots representat ve Bob Crosser nf nhi mESrZ' 77'P**f-
..id"&o5th.I'vi hetrd DOUt ^ " * iw to sn^t m.*
(Copyright 1W1. By Th Bn todies*, rae.)
MWfl 0%&3UL3S
srs
operaUonal iccldenUa toteJaoflV
Tf^ere are many reasons for this showing- ths
greatar number o U. 8. pianr, in <*wbat their
um toclose support of tro*, (not rtatcried by
E*E:'" * oomplacaney over ou^swpSrie;!
ity m the air.
arent Join, to welt a yVar ii^ iS^^L^JW murt *-
and a half. to *!5 f. !,,th# handwilUng on the wan
4 fu,,,., of our iristln*; bombers In
^ R*d Cefehfes se^nst ell our fcwft
ni in ffect!vene wo had letter faca it-
We art getting a real air ehallongo that has
oanlng ter beyond the llmlu of Barren Korea!
SHELL-------------------^OPCN
THE U1^B5-J GIFT
FROM CASAFASTUCH FIRST!
* it + +




.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE THREE
CIO Chiefs Cool Towards Ike
As
Possibility
NEW YORK, Nov. 10.(UP)A Top CIO
leader warned organized labor yesterday not to buy
a "pig in a poke" by backing Gen. Dwight D. Eisen-
hower for President in 1952. ;
Emil Mazey, secretary-treasurer of the United
Auto Workers and a member of the CIO executive
board, said there is "nothing" in Eisenhower's re-
cord to show that he would De an "acceptable can-
didate for president as far as organized labor is
concerned."
1
Mazey spoke at the final ses-
sion of the CIO's 13th annual
convention, which re-elected ail-
ing Philip Murray to his 12th
consecutive term as president
with a shouting, 20-minute dem-
onstration in his honor.
Two CIO vice presidents, pres-
ident Joseph. M. Curran of the
National Maritime Union and
8resident Emil Rieve of the Tx-
le Workers Union, joined Mazey
In his criticism of Eisenhower as
a possible Presidential candi-
date.
"I don't think Eisenhower is
a good man for the Presiden-
cy," Curran said. "No military
roan would be a good candi-
date."
Rieve said, "I think Mazey's
right."
Neither Murray nor United Au-
to Workers president Walter P.
Reuther would comment. But
off-the-record reaction to Maz-
ey's speech Indicated that the
CIO U decidedly cool to Elsen-
hower's possible candidacy.
Mazey said: "I say to people
.looking for a cure winner, let's
I nake certain that we don't find
a pig in a poke and that we don't
try to elect a person whose rec-
ord Is unclear, a person who has
not demonstrated in a single
manner his fitness-for the tough
position in this country of ours."
"We must not make the mis-
take of supporting a person Who
St. Peter's Church
Plans Thanksgiving
Services Next Week ,
St. Peter's Church, La Boca,
will hold thanksgiving services
next Sunday, Nov. 18, celebrat-
ing the time honored festival of
harvest home.
Annually attended by a large
congregation, the services will be
holy communion at 5:30 a.m.,
sung eucharist 7 a.m., and even-
song 7:30 p.m.
Pupils of the church school will
i participate in the celebration by
presenting their envelopes or
I baskets of gifts at a service 3
\p.m., going to the altar In a
.I procession.
Parishioners are asked by the
priest In charge. Rev. Lemuel B.
Shirley, to assist in decorating
the church Saturday evening and
reminded to turn In their har-
vest envelopes.
may be a popular figure, but who
does not have the qualifications
of background and who has not
fitted himself on all of the basic
questions that confront the peo-
ple of our nation.
"General Eisenhower Is a
good general, but no man who
reaches the position of a gen-
eral, who has spent his entire
life in the environment of the
caste system and dictatorship
of the Army, has the proper
basic training to be President
of the United States."
Mazey said labor's support will
be given to a Presidential can-
didate who has "fought for the
basic issues that the labor move-
ment Indorses, that will advance
the interests of all people of our
nation."
The convention backed up this
statement by adopting a political
action resolution urging support
of liberal candidates In next
year's elections regardless of
party affiliation.
L JACOBY ON BRIDQI
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
Canine Breed
HORIZONTAL 4 Buddhist
14 Penetrate
15 Deep hole
18 Beast of
burden
18 Age
6 High
7 River duck
8 Listen to
9 Upon
10 Shothoneirr
Indian
Answer to Previous Puizle
|ff|B|g|L I
IlIaRtVIaJ
'Ml.;. F-JliM;-I :i. /-; II, ,
-4iriiI liiiMiM
am
Burning Electric
Wire Sets Off Fire
Alarm In Amador
SmoRe from a smouldering
electric wire in the air space over
Building Number 45. Ft. Amador
caused a fire alarm to be sound-
ed and work, to be temporarily
suspended in the building short-
ly before 9 p.m. yesterday.
The 536th Firefighter (Eng.)
Detachment was on the scene
quickly and made temporary re-
pairs to stop the smoke. The
building houses the Machine Re-
cords Unit, Headquarters. United
States Army Caribbean; the Spe-
. clal Services Office and the
Ylhaplaln USARCARIB.
TEACHER KNOWS BEST
INDIANAPOLIS (UP.)Kath-
erine Hatton. a teacher, grabbed
even-year-old Sammy Carlton
'rom his seat. She shook the boy,
oeat him on the back and final-
ly stood Sammy on his head.
Sammy's parents didn't com-
plain. They thanked the teacher,
for the "beating" probably saved
he boy's life. He was choking on
t ring caught in his throat.
ss
NORTH
48782
? None
? 884
? AKQJ7S
WEST EAST
J1O0S 4.5
VAKQJ5 V10B62
4-KJS .QIOBJ
4>8 10082
SOUiTMD)
AAKQ4
8 7 4 3
? AT2
+ 64
East-West vul.
Sooth Weat North
1* 2 I
Pan Pan 4 *V
Past Pass
Opening leadVK
East
4V
Pan
"We missed the boat, partner,"
South said sadly when he saw
the durrimy.
"I tried to get you* to slam,"
North reproached him. "Oh well,
play it quickly and maybe we'll
have time for another rubber."
Thus encouraged South play-
ed the hand quickly and found
a very easy way to go down at
his game contract South quaver-
ed miserably that he had played
the hand too hastily, but this
was a poor excuse and he knew
it. The truth was that he'd have
made the same plays no matter
how much time he had taken.
West led the king of hearts, and
dummy ruffert wi*h the deuce of
spades. Declarer promptly led
the six of spades from dummy,
winning with the ace. His next
step was to lay down the king of
spades.
It all seems very natural,
doesn't It? Nevertheless, South
has now foo-z.ed away his con-
tract.
At best, 8outh can ruff an*
19 Diminutive of u Roman
aovSS St""
22GUntldngof 17 Pronoun
.*^n v 20 Enchanters
23 Chapter (ab.) 2i Evening long
24 And (Latin) aMntt
26 Brazilian state 25 Bullfighter
M Wander mtuum
31 Passage of the
brain
32 Sea eagle
33 Line of
Junction
34 Seines
35 Poker stake
36 Operatic solo
37 Symbol for
erbium
M Accomplish
39 Highway (*b.)
41 Notched
47 Symbol for
samarium
49 Lubricate
51 Approaches
52 Observe
33 It is a----- of
canina
35 Spices
57 Mate dear
(pi-)
58 Sources
VERTICAL
i 1 Narrow fillet
2Dry
# Permit
27 Solar disk
29 Against
30 Plateau
39 Steals
40 Filth
42 Termini
43 French island
44 Orate
5 Rang*
46 Former
Russian ruler
4T Dispatched
4S Disorder
50 Meadow
53 Scion
54 For example
(ab.)
56 Compass point
other heart in dummy and begin
on the clubs. Wert can ruff the
second club, however, and South
is stuck with two losing hearts
r.nd two losing diamonds and no
way to get rid of,them. Down
two on a hand that was good
enough for a slam.
The correct pity Is very hard
to find even if you see all the
cards. In actual play I doubt that
one player in a thousand would
make the contract.
At the second trick, North
leads the six of snades, and East
plays the five of spades. South
should not win with a high
trump, but should give up the
trick by playing his low trump.
This remarkable play protects
declarer against a 4-1 break in
trumps. By giving up this trump
'et once South can make twelve
tricks Instead of only eight.
West wins the second trick
with the nine of spades and' re-
turns a trump (as good a' de-
fense as any) South wins, ruffs
a second heart in dummy, and
returns to his hand with a dia-
mond to draw the rest of the
trumps. The clubs then provide
the rest of thearlcks.
m
MN0 ARGUMENT-
WE'VE GOT THE TOPS
. in RADIO
irs RCA VICTOR
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7110
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40
Coln
<<<<<<<<<<<
Rado Programs
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HOG-840
Wh.fi 100.000 People MM
Presents
Saturday, Nov. 10
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00-Mus1c for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Guest Star
6:15Evening Salon '
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00Gav Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00Newsreel U.S.A. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report
9:00Radio University (VOA)
8:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA)
9:45Sports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
F
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish B r o a d|c a s 11 ng
Corp.
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Sunday, Nov. 11
A.M.
8:00Sign On Musical Inter-
lude
8:15Newsreel U.S.A. (VOA)
8:30Hymns of All Churches
9:00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OF
THE AIR
9:15Good Neighbors
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00In the tempo of Jazz
10:30Your American Music
11:00National Lottery (Smoot
and Paredes)
11:15The Sacred Heart Pro-
gram
11:30Meet the Band
12:00Invitation to Learning
(VOA)
P.M.
12:30Salt Lake Ta ble r n a c 1 e
Choir
1:00The Jo Stafford Show
1:15American Chorales
1:30Rev. Albert Steer
2:00Opera and Symphony
Hour
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Opera Concert
7:00American Round table
7:30Story of the Christian
Church
7:45Radio Varieties U.S.A.
8:00Sports Roundup and News
(VOA)
8:15Report from Cong r e s s
(VOA)
8:30Almanac from America
(VOA)
9:00United Nations Review
(VOA)
9:30The Blng Crosby Show
(VOA)
10:00American Symphony
11:00Sign Off
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MAMA'S LITTLE HELPER
ORLANDO, Fla. (UP) John
Richard Dean was jailed for'
helping his mother In her bust-1
ness. Her businessmoonshining.
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WE'LL HOLD THEM
TILL CHRISTMAS!
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OLDSMOBILE HYDRA-MATH,
FIRST TWELVE YEARS ABD...STILL FIRST TODAY!

OU.rn.kilt Super "S~ t-Dr Sees...
Mm, roOTiee. oad Irte iUmUrmud
atf'ea M a*eaa>
y OUMMe F/vaV
^ ** Merit Drum r~Ml
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: GE POCK
II
THE PANAMA AMNUCAN 4- AM DEPENDENT DAILT NEWSrAPn
SATURDAY. NOVEMBER M, 1981
\ H i if
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES
Seventh Day
Adventist
-"*'' Pacific Slat
'"'''Cebo Verde. Panama City. No. 1 J. A
JJiayriard, Psnama City No. 2 Jamaica
.aVsciety HU (Sabbath Service only).
Elphus Lawcs. Chorrillo. P. A. Henry;
'-Wo Abajo. C. D. Abraham: Gambo., A
A. Brlixle. and Spanish Cilv Church. F.-
.Huesdo Rulloba
"^ Atlantic Sida
Colon Third Street. Joseph Brvan; Cris-
eaaal English New Church. E. A. Crueh-
, .shank; Cristobal Spanish Church. B. J.
Uaxon. (No
Or nil I
Sunday night aervtce at
SaDoath school each church Saturday
-.30 ajn. Divine worshipjl a^rn. Sunday
--wight aervlca at I"
gtherwlse Indicated
all churches exospt
Hi v
Union Churches
' > all Ptoleslsats cooperate lib
It, In eeaemtiala, liberty In on-
taaeaHaU and charity in all thinii
THE ATLANTIC S1DI
Catataba I
The Re. Phillip Havener, Paator.
Itis'worship service and Cbtuch-ttaie
'?"Toa^Youn People Meeting
The Rev. J. William L Graham. Pastor
~ SSo"! IoSRroad oo HOK; HP3K
'.end HON. _,
< :4S Sunday School.
11:00 Worahip Service.
i:00 Christian Endeavor.
afanar I ta
The Rev. Henry Ball. I
Phone 3-146. ,
j&SJtEklmmt
*SrYouth Fellowship.
THE PACIFIC SIDE
alhea
"The Rev. Alexander H.Snsw, Putor
Balboa Rd. at San Pablo St.
Phone 2-14MChurch Office 2-323*
t:30 Church School. Free bus service
10:30 Worahip Service. Junior Church
Primary Story Hoar. Churcb-tlme Nur
"?00 Chi Rho-Senlor HI FeUowahlp.
00 Post Hi Fellowship.
"All services in Gamboa Civic .Cantar.
The Rev. Raymond A. Gray,
Phone 6-130. _
00 Sunday School.
730 Worship ervice.
Pea Mlgeel
0:30 Church School.
10:41 Divina Worship. -
7 30 Evenint Vaepera.
Unitarian
l : NIT AR1AN
SOCDCTT
10.30 a.m.
JWB Armed
Forcea Service
Center Library
Balboa. C.Z. '
your Invitation
to liberal
religion.
*,
Baptist
al
. NATIONAL BAPTIST tHUJCH
< Panama BaptiL Prayer Meeting. 5.30
'am. Divine Service, 9 JO am. Divinebar-
<; ice 7:15 pm. and Serving of The Lord
upper at both Servlee Sunday School
' 3:00 D.m
* Boy a Baptist I* Bo*- c- o Divine
Services 11:00 am. and7:30 pm. Serving
the Lord Supper at both Service Sun-
..oa School at 3:00 pjn.
. New Hope. Chiva-Chiva, CZ, Divine
' Servlcea 11 00 a.m. Sunday School
nm D-m.
v. B. N. Brawn. Minister
I Gamiwa. tiJk, Divwe Services a* II :(*
Jam. and 7JO p.m. with Sunday School
SM3;%.v?A.W.Cro^l-lrie,
I Rio AD.jo BP. Sunday School at
?*M MGUfJ BAPTIST CHURCH.
Building 311 Bruja Road
W. Y Pond Jr Pator.
"-Bunoay School ...............:S V"."
-Praachlng Service ........... Mitt a-m
.-training Union ...............6.30 pm.
TKeaching Service ............ 730 pjn.
Brotherhood 7:00 p.m. Mondays.
t?rayer Meeting 7:3c Wednesday.

BBPEMPTION BAT1ST CHURCH
2. "I" Street
(Beside the National Institute)
Box 1442. Panam City.
Rav. Jos Prado eideres. Pastor.
SERVICES IN SPANISH
Sunday Services
Sunday School............ 10:00 a.m.
Preaching Service ........ 7:30 pm
Wednesday, Blhle Study .. 7 JO pm.
m -rfmatt,
riatSl BArTISl UiUBCM
Balboa Height. C.2..
27 Aneon Boulevard
Drawer "B" Balboa Height
Phone Balboa 1727
"To! Charca away tree
with a weleoase lust a frisagly"
Pasto
> JO ajn.
10:45 a.m
g JO pjn.
7:30 D.m
William H.
Sunday School.............
Morning Worship ..........
Baptist Training Union ....
I Evangelistic Service .
Prayer Meeting Wednesday 7 JO pa
W.MS. Bible Study
Tnursdsys ....................... (a.m.
Mana Brotherhood
(Last Monday In month) .. 7:30 o-m
ATLANTIC BAPTIST CHURCH
Bolivar Avenue at 12th Street
Cristobal. CZ.
Rev. Prod L. Jone. Pastor
Methodist
k
__ CHURCH
(British Conference)
Minister Hev. U. Merben Moon
IM a-m. Morning Prayer and Sermon
:0 p.m. Sunday School.
4:*0 Man's Meeting.
7:15 o-m. Evening Prayer and Sermon
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH
7th Street and Meltoda* Avenue,
Ra*. Norman Prate Minaste
Colon. RJ>.
Raw. Norman Pratt, ""tIt-
eVinday Service at (:M ajn. and 7:1
Sunday School for all asas at I
.Monday
fleeting.
73) DJn, Weekly Prayer
RaWNKZER ItETHODlST CHURCB
ver Oty. CZ. ^^
_ BtinsssTj' Services g am. and Sd p.m .
jBJisBday atchool for all agaa at (JO o-m
Prayer Meeting
1 Ta Wat ship''
... 6:45 a-aa.
-----........ 113 ejej,
"tnhot Unlosi............ 630 pm.
Worship........... ...... 7-Mnm
Prayer Meeting (Tbora.) ...TJ p'm
rlaMamaWJ o-......M IUsT as
Tuesday 7 30 Dm..
"Tsejf Uvhatie.
nunnp
Churchti of the many toilht in the Canal Zana, and the terminel
crtiei af Panama and Colon. Republic or Panama, erend a welcome
at all tima to man and women af th armad sarvicoa, and to civilian
neishbori, friends and afrangara
At a public service, the The Panama American lists oelew. By
danommotioni, notice of hours of warship and other regulor activities
Listings ara refalad from tima to tima. Denominations having
only on or two congregations ara listed under "Other Charchas And
Servicei." A special listing it included for services at Army paots,
Air Force basa and Naval stations.
Ministers, church secretaries and chaplains Jre askad to inform
the nawt dash by Wadnesdoy noon at the latest of any changa* for
the coming Saturday's church paga.
Catholic
(Listed below are uie CathoUc Churches
in the Canal Zone and those in the ter-
minal cities of Panama and Colon whose
congregations are primarily EngJisb-
ipeaking Besides these, the Cathedral In
Panama Oty, the Cathedral of the Im-
maculate Conception in Colon, and num-
erous parish churches in both cities, wel-
come English (peaking visitors, though
their congregations are primarily Span-
ish-speaking. I
ST. MARY'S
Balboa
Sunday Massce: 5:S5. COO. 10:00, 11:00.
12:00 am.
Benediction: 5:00 pjn.
Holy Day Masses: 5:33. 1:00. 11:10. 11:55
a.m.
Confessions: Saturday3:30. 5:00 pal
7:00, 8:00 p.m. Thursday for Fust
Friday7.00, (:00 p.m.
Miraculous Medal NovenaMonday at
7:00 pat
Rosary every evening et 7:00.
SACRED HEART
Ancn
Sunday Masses: 5:55. 730, J0 am.
Holy Days: 5:55. 7 JO ajn.
Confessions: Saturday3JO. 5:00 p.
7:00. 8:00 run. Thursday for First
Friday7:00, 8.-00 pjn.
Sacred Heart DevotionsFriday at 7:00
p.m.
ST. TERESA'S
Cocoll
Sundav Mass: 8:30 ajn.
Holy Days: 8:00 am.
CURUNDU CHAPEL
Curundu
Sunday Mass: 8:30 ajn.
Holy Days: 5:45 am.
Confessions: 3:30. 5:00 pjn. Saturdays
ASSUMPTION
Pedro Miguel
Sunday Mass: 8JO ajn.
Holy Days: 8:30 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday7:15. 7:45 p m.
Rosary: Monday, Wednesday and Satur-
day at 7 :00 p m.
Catechism Classes: Sunday1030. U30
am. _
ST. JOSEPH'S
Paraso
Sunday Mass: 7:00 am.
Holy Days: 5:45 a.m.
Cenfeasions: Saturday3 30, 4:00 pjn.
Rosary: Tuesday7:00 p.m.
Catechlam Classes: Sunday10:30. 11:30
"?, VINCENTS
Panam
Sunday Masses: 6:00. (30 am.
Holy Day: .00. 830 ajn.
Confessions: Saturday3:00, 5:00. 7:00.
8:00 p.m.
Before Holy Days: 7:00. g 00
Rosary every evening: 7:00 m
ST. JOHN BAPTIST DB LA SALLE
Rio Abajo
Sunday. Masses: 630. 8:30 am
Beneolctioh: 4:00 p.m.
Holy Day Masses: 5:45 am
Confessions: Saturday-330. 430 pm. -
Friday attar Miraculous Medal No-
Miraculous Medal NovenaFriday 7:00
Rosa'ry:' Monday and Wednesday70
Djn.
ST. THERE:-
Sunday Mass: 7:00 am. Holy Day Mass:
8:45 a.m.
Sacred Heart Devotions'. Friday 7:00
Confessions: Saturday-MO. IM. 1M.
1:00 p.m. _
Rosary every evening except Tueaday at
7:00 p.m.
COCO SOUTO PLAYSHED
Pastor. Rev. Wm. J. Finn. CJH.
Sunday Mase ............... 7 -
Holy Day Masa.............** m.
Sunday School ............. J: a.m
Services Thursday night ... 7:45 om
Cnnfe^lrms before Mam
CHURCB OP THE HOLY FAMILY
Margarita. C.Z.
Rev. William J. Finn. CM
MIRACULOUS MEDAL CHURCH
New Cristobal. 4th. A O St.
Pastor, Rev. Vincent Ryan. CM
Sunday Masses. 7. 8 A 1030 am.
Weekday Mass. 6 JO am.
Sat. 8:00 am.
Holy Day Masses. 8:00 A 8:00 am.
Confessions. Rosary, nightly lMi
Sunday School after the 8 a.ra. Mass.
Miraculous Medal Novena eervlcee -
Mon. 5:00 A 7:00 p.m.
1st. Sat. Devotion, every 1st Sst after
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH
Bolivar Highway. Gatun. CZ.
Pastor, Rev. Francis Lynch. CJ8.
Sunday Mass. (flO am.
Weekday Masse. Thuis. 830 ajn.
Sat 7:00 ajn.
Holy Day Mass. 7:00 a.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Mon. 7:15 p.m.
1st Friday, Confession. Communion.
7:15 pjn.
Confessions Sat 8:30 ft 7:00 am.
ST. THOMAS' CHURCH
Gatun, Near Locks
Pastor, Rev. Francia Lynch. CM.
Sunday Mass. 6:45 a.m.
Weekday Masses. Tuea. A Fri. 8:00 a.m
Holy Day Mas. 6:00 a.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena aervlca
Fri. 7:1 ,
Confessions Sat. 7:15 at 8:00 pm.
:15 pj
feasier
1st Sat Devotion, every 1st
after
HOLY FAMILY CHURCB
Margarita. C.Z.
Paitor, Rev. William J. Finn. CM.
Sunday Matas, 73 A 30 a.m.
Holy Day Mass. 6:00 ajn.
Miraculous Modal Novena eervice
Mon. 7:00 p.m.
Instruction for adults Fri. 7:00 p.m
Confession Bat. oo. (0 A 7:00 to
8:00 pm. _______
ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH
Colon. 10th. A Broadway
Pastor. Rav. J. Raymond Mediate, CM.
Assistant Rav. Robert Vlgnola. CM
Sunday Masses, 5:45 A C80 am
Weekday Mass. 5:49 ajn.
Holy Day Masses. 5:46 A 840 a.m.
1st Fri. Masses, 5:45 A MM ajn.
Communion, (30 a.m.
Baptism Sun-, 430 pjn.
Mlraculoua Medal Novena service
Wed. at CIS A 730 pm.
Noven of the Sacred Heart Fri. 7:15
pjn.
Confessions Sat.. 430. (30 pm A
7:3 to 8:00 pjn.
Sunday School, 3:00 p m.
Discussion Club. Young men of Parish
Sun. 330 pjn.
Instructions for adults easfclng know-
ledge of the Catholic Church. Moo. A
Thurs. at 7:15 p m.
lst Sst Devotion, ovary 1st Sat after
ST.
VINCENTS CHURCH
Silver City. C.Z.
Pastor. Rev. Raymond Lewi, CM.
Sunday Meases, 5:45 A (:00 pjn.
Weekday Mass, 30 a.m.
Holy Day Masses. S3 A 30 a.m.
Sunday School. 1130 a m
Miraculous Modal Novena estres
Tuea.. 730 pjn.
Baptisms Sun.. 3 p.m.
ConfesBlon. Sat 330. 6:0 pm A 730
to (.-00 p.m.
Instruction far adults, Tuea. A Fri.,
730 pjn.
1st Sat Devotion, ovary 1st Sat after
OUR LADY OP GOOD COUNSEL
Gamboa. C.Z.
Paator. Rav. Charles Jacobs. CM.
Sunday Maesas. 730 A (30 am.
Weekday Maesas, 3 am.
Holy Day M......5 45 A (30 m
Miraculous Modal Noven ervlce
Tuea. 730 pjn.
Sacred Heart Noven, service, fri, TA
Confasjlons Sat 73* pm.
1st Sat DevotJoc, ovary 1st Sat after
Lutheran
KJO>U..\UK LUTHERAN CHURCH
"The Church ol the Lutheran Haas
H. T. Bermhal. Pastor
830 Balboa Road. Balboa.
Sunday School and Bible Clam am.
Worship service 10:15 ajn.. "Come Thou
With U- and We Will Do Thee Good." A
friendly welcome waits all visitors Pot-
lurk supper second Sunday each month
6:30 p.m.. gama night fourth Sunday
7 JO p.m. The Service Center, open Wed-
nesday through Sunday, asneada a cor-
dial welcome In ell military otataMiol
Episcopal
ANCON, C.Z
THE CATHEDRAL OP Ml LUKE
The RL Rot. R. Hobor Goodan. Bishop
The Very Rav. Raymond T. Farria, Dear
7:30 am. Holy Communion
:30 a.m. Cathedral School.
10:45Morning Prayer and Sermon.
(Pint Sunday of the month Holy Com.
munion and Sermon.)
7:00 pjn.Evening Prayer and Sermon
CJUSTOasAL, RP.
CHURCB OP OUR SAVIOUR
3rd St near O. Navy
Rev. Milton A Cookson. pastos
Holy Communion 730 ajn
Church School 30 ajn.
Morning Prayer-Sermon 11.30 ajn.
(H.C first Sunday In the month.)
Young People Vesper Service 430
pjn.
Wednesday. Holy Communion 830 pm
Choir Rehearsal 7 3U am.
A House of Prayer for all people
Christian Scientist
CHRISTIAN SClKNCk. CHURCHES
First Church ot Christ. Scientist Ancor
560 Ancn Boulavard.
Sunday 1138: Wednesday IJXI OJB
Sundav School :30 a.m
First Church of Christ, Bete eon, Crtsteea
13th Street A Bolivar Highway
Sunday 1130 a.m. Wednesday 7J0
Sunday School 30
Christiaa Scterace Society,
Civic Center Building
Sunday 1130 am. Pint A Third Wed-
nesday 7:30 p.m.
Sundav School 10:13
Salvation Army
Panama City, Calle i de Fo_-
Servlcea at 11 ajn. and 7 30 pjn. (Mil
or Wilson); today School at J pm
La Boca: Services at 11 ajn. and 73i<
o.m. Sunday School at S3 p-m.
Red Tank: Sarvlooat 73 pjn. Sundav
School at 330 pjn.
Services at........ 11 am at 13pjn
Colon. 14th Street
Service at ...... 11 a.m. A 730 pjn
Silver City
Service at ................. 730 pjn.
Sunday School at........... 1:30 pm.
Chare ef St.
COCOLI
Asstrew
Prayer and Fellowship (or all
1 he Rav. Gideon C Montgomery.
Rev. M. A Cookson. Chap. USNB
Holy Communion 7:30 ajn
Sunday School 30 am.
Public Worship 10:45 ajn.
(H.C. Brat Sunday In the month.)
Young People Fellowship 430 pm.
Choir rehearsal Wednesday evenings
at 30 pjn.
Women's Auxiliary 2nd and 4th Thurs-
days at 730 pun.
House of ~
oeopla.
COROZAL
Geed Shepherd
The Ven. A. P. Nightengale
8:00 a.m. Every Friday; Morning Pruy-
(H.C 1st Friday. |
GAMBOA
St Bisseo't Charca
Rev. Antease Oehee A
Holy Communion .......... 10:30 a.m
Sunday School............. 3.00 pm
Youth Organization 5:00 A 6:80 pm.
Evening Prayer A Blbble
2nd A 4th Sunday ........... 730 pm.
Women's Auxiliary ........ 73 am.
2nd and 4th Thursday
LA BOCA
at Peter's Charco
Rav. Lemuel B. Shirley. Priest
a.m.Holy Communion.
7 s m.Chorsl Eucharist and Sermon
10 ajn.Morning Prayer and Church
School.
5 pjn.Holy Baptism.
7:30 pjn.Vesper anC
Communion Tuesday and Thursdays.
7 a.m., Wednesday and Fridays ajn.;
Girls Friendly 6 and 7 p.m Monday.
Jewish Welfare Board. Bias. m-X. La
Boca Road. Balboa. CZ. Rabbi Nathan
IVltkln director.
Service on Friday, 730 ppau
(Sea siso listing of Jewish sahvtce
under Posts. Base and Stations.)
Congregation Kol Shoatlth Israel. Ave-
olds Cuba and Mth Street Bella Vista.
Panam City. Rabbi Harry A Merfeld
Sesvlce ost Fridav. ajn.
i ni Wednesday and Fridays fari
I 7 pm. Monday,
pm. Tuesday; Vespers nightly al 7.
cept Saturday Compline 730 pas.
MAJgrjARlTA
St. Margaret' Chapel.
Margarita Hospital
The Rev. M A. Cookson
Sunday School am. Evenin Pravas
1:00 p.m.
PALO SECO
Oraren of The Holy ComfeHer
The Ven. A. F. Nightengale
Every Mondap (30 am. Holy Com-
munion, i
PARASO
Rev. D. A. Osoornt
3:00 a.m. Holy Communion 2nd Sunday
:30 a.m. Sunday School.
5JO pjn Evening Prayer: no and 4th
Sundays.
Monday: 7:00 p.m Youth Meeting
Wednesday: 6JO pjn. Girls' Friendlj
Society.
RED TA.NR
Rev. D.A. Osboroc A Hev. C.A. Crggweli
11:00 ajn. Holy Communion and Ser
mon lot and 3rd. Sundays.
1130 ajn. Homing Prsyei sato ado
reas: 2nd. and th. Sundays.
330 p.m. Sunday School and Baptism
730 p.m. Evening Prayer and dota
hid. and 4th. Sundays.
PANAMA CITY
ST. PAUL'S CHURCB ,
A F. Nightengale. o.D. MUX
and The Rev. Rltz Reglnalo Atwal)
.-. VerstraMe Atvdjdeaeoo
6i a.m Holy Communion 3V am
730 am Cvemorur snd Sermon
CHRIS1 CHURCH Bt-THt-St*
__ Colon. A da P.
(Opooelu Hotel Washington)
The Rev. Malnert J Peterseo
______ STB. Rector
SUNDAYS:
ajn Holy Communion
a.m. Choral Eucharist ana Sermon
1J0 a.m. Church School.
a&KLUwST tv""on' UmT
ajn. Holy Communion
730 pjn. Evensong and Sermon.
,URSDA,,sVh,,, t5nflraU' Cl
pm Prayer Guild
FRIDAYS:
pjn. Children's Eucharist
./ASA Cnolr Practice.
SATURDAYS:
1 am. Children's Confirmation Class
730 o.m Compline snd Meditation.
, UATUN
St. George's Church
Gatun, C.Z.
Rev Solomon N Jacobs
a:4S a.m. Church School.
10'.^ *** ^,"-
and Sennor
Holy tuchsr:
." Tuesdays:
7:00 am Holy rjommunlon (Also Holy
Day and Saint Days.)
^_ Wedneadays:
:00 pjn Evening Prayer
8:00 o.m St Vincent' Guild
I JO ojn Choir nalioaiaal
Thursdays-
Church of St Mary The Vlrgi
Archdeacon Waldock, Priest In Charge
Morning Prayer ........... : ,.m
Holy Eucharist and Sermon 730 am.
Church School ............. 3:00 pm.
Solemn Evensong .....,... 6 30 o,m.
Woman's Auxiliary, 2nd Mondara.
Order of St Vincent Acolita Guild.
Tuesdays.
?Mry-Meetlng 2nd Thursdays.
_ Holy Communion, 7 ajn. Thursday
Evensong 73 pm.
r^eSifi PS "* *""*' **
RIO ARAJO
St Chrlataaher'. Cawr,,"
1 St, Parama Lofavre
Rav. Aadaana Oefcaa S.
Pheeie Podra MlgaeJ 4-33
Holy Communion........
Sunday School ..........
Baptisms. ( to pjn. 2nd
days.
aSrerUng PrayerRIM*
1st and Jrd Sunday
Woman'a Auxiliary 2nd A 4fh Sundays
73 pm.
Holy Ccenmunion. Wednesdays, I JR.
Posts, Bases
And Stations
PACIFIC BID
Pi
tORT AMADOR
Sunday School ...
Morning Worship
FORT CLAYTON
Sunday School. Bldg. 1M
Morning Worship ....
FORT EOBBE
f"00?? wjswl ,....'............
Morning Warship ...............
12th SUtlon Hospital ...........
ALBROOK. AIR FORCE BASE
Ribl School ...................
Morning Worship ...............
Youth Group...................
Servicemen's Hour..............
US. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Morning Worship...............
Protestant Sunasy School .......
Coroial Chapel.................
Csthenc
FORT CLAYTON
Daily Mass ...................
Sunday Msssea......8 M. :00 A
irrHSTATION HOSPITAL
Sunday Haas ............'.......
COROZAL CHAPEL
Sunday Mam ................... 10:1
FORT KORBE
Daily Mass..................... 73
Sunday lasase......... S3 A :
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Sunday Mas* ................... 3
ALRROOR AIR FORCE RARE
DaUy Mam ..............v-v-
Sunday Hill.......... 7:45 A 1:45
ALRROOR AIR FORCE RASR
Saturday ..f........
FORT CLAYTON
Saturday ...
FORT ROBRE
Thursday ...... ......>........
JWB, Balboa, CZ.
Friday
ATLANTIC n>g
Fl + taMUl
FORT OAVTS
Protestant Worship Service......
FORT GUL1CK
Sunday School ..................
Marnsna Worahip ...............
COCO SOLO NAVAL STATION
luaday School................. S3
Proteatant Worship Service .....11 U
Cathene
FORT DAVIS
Sunday Mssa ................... 10:60
FORT GULICK
Sunday Mas................... 130
COCO SOLO
Sunday Mas .................gee *>
(ssjgdj
FORT GULICK
Tueadav ........................ 738
730
D* PJO-,
Other Churches
And Services
BAHA'I t'KNTfc'M
Apartment 1 Lux building. 34th Street
Panana Monday; Lectures and Dis-
cussion. :00 D.m.
Chereh at Jess Christ ot
Saints (Mermes) Ball
Sunday School 1:30 ajn.
Service 10 JO a.m.
At JWB Armed Force Service Center
on La Boc* Roed
Evening Service at ( p.m. at a piece
of misting announced at morning ser-
vice.
CHURCH OF CHRIS1
OKI Balboa Road. Balboa
w taarland Dllbeck. Evangelist
Telephone 2-3O02
SUNDAY SERVICES
Bible Clases tot all age* .... 1030 am
Preaching and Communion .. 104 am
Preaching and Communion .. 7 HO o m
MmWEEK SERVICES:
Bible Study...... Wednesday 73U pm
Ladies' Bible Clas Thursday l>
CHURCB OF CHRsST-OM Cristbal
SUNDAYS:
We moot in the American Legion Hall
in front of the Clubhouse.
Morning Worahip 1045
Visitor woleoma
Ladies Bible Study at Gatun
Phone Gatun 416 or Ft Gulick Ml
CUBUNDU PEOTtqriANi
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Chaplsln William H
Sunday School ..........
Morning Worship
Young People- a
Evening Worship.........
Prayer Meeting Thursday .
Choir Practice. Wednesday _
7:00 o-m and Saturday JB am
OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH
Raphael The Archeass)
13th St West No I
(30 am.
Thursday
Holy Eucharist: Sunday at
Tuesdays, Wednesday end
3 ajn.
vice First Sundav of each"
73 om
Meaat Hallbeth Christie Charra
Panami. R.P.
Rt Rev. T. James. D D. Bishop
officiating.
Morning devotion at ........
Holy Communion at .........
Fellowship Worship at ......
Sunday School at............
Divine Service at ...........
Sermon at..................
Holy Cemsnunion st .........
Mondays Roll call and pray-
er meeting at ......7,7..
Wednesdays Evaneellstle Ser-
vices st ...................
Pljthyi, Litany. Falling, and
from ......,.,..,,.
630 am.
638 am.
113 em.
13 pan.
7:30 pm.
8:20 pm.
(38 pm.
73 gun.
7 3 pm
PJss.
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IATDBDAT vnVFMF.
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THF. PANAMA AMKMCAIt A* lrtl>r\ ""DiNT Afl.T NEWSPAPB
i" I
page m
pacific Society
*
& 17, &<&. 5U &~ 352/
AMBASSADOR WILEY HOST AT STAG LUNCHEON
The United States Ambassador to Panama. John Cooper
Wiley, was host Friday at a star luncheon riven in honor of
and to introduce Mr. Ernest V. Mracusa of the Department of
State, who is a recent arrival from Washington, D.C. Mr.
Slracnsa is Officer in charge of Central American and Pana-
ma affairs.
Eighteen guests were present at the hnchasn held at the
Residence on L CresU. |*t
the groom, was the pest man.
The ushers wet* E. A. Crosby,
Jr.. of Sutherland, Nebraska and
D. Bernard Tartrln. of Lakewood
Park, California.
Following the ceremony, a short
reception was held at the church,
after which a buffet dinner was
served to the Immediate families
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E.
M, Piper, 451 Mountain View
Road, Altadena.
The young couple took a cot-
tage at Lake Arrowhead for their
honeymoon. After November IS
they will be at home to their
friends at 341 Hawthorne St.,
South Pasadena, California.
Following her graduation from
Park College, Parkvllle. Missouri,
Miss Piper took a year of grad-
uate study at the University of
Southern California preparatory
to becoming an Occupational
Therapist. A year of Internship
followed at Letterman General
Hospital, San Francisco; the
Children's Hospital, Oakland, Ca-
lifornia and California State
Hospital at Camarlllo. Since 1949
she has been Director of Occu-
pational Therr.py at the Los An-
geles Sanatorium, Duarte, Cali-
fornia.
Mr. Tarvln, a member of PI
Kappa Alpha, took work at Okla-
homa A&M and received his de-
gree from the University of Ca-
lifornia at Los Angeles. For the
past five years he has been in the
employ of the Southern Califor-
nia Edison Company.
Aleman-Corco Nuptials
Solemnised Thursday
The Cristo Rey Church in Vis-
ta del Mar was the scene Thurs-
day evening at eight o'clock of
the marriage of Miss Julia del
Carmen Alemn, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Julio Alemn, to Jose
Enrique Coreo, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Miguel Coreo.
Officiating at. the ceremony
was the Rev. Father Jeans Se-
rrano.
The organist. Miss Lilla Sosa,
presented a program of appro-
Minister of Agriculture and
Commerce Entertained With
Luncheon Thursday
The Minister of Agricultura
and Commerce of Panama, Mr.
Jose Manuel Vrela, was the host
Thursday at a luncheon given in
honor of Mr. Roy W. Roberts of
the Point Four Program at the
Hotel El Panama.
Attending guetts included the
United States Ambassador to Pa-
nama, John Cooper Wiley; the
First Counsellor of the United
SUtes Embassy, Murray M. Wise;
Mr. Louis C. Nolan. Mr. Ernest
V. Siracusa, offlcer-ln-charge of
Central America and Panama Af-
fairs, Mr. Carlos J. Quintero,
Mr. Walton P. Sellers, Mr. Rob-
ert P. Bartholomew, Mr. Lloyd
A. Dhonau, Mrs. Flora Friend,
Mr. William Heffelflnger, Mr.
Charles Cavlness, Mr. Hermit
Stephenson, Mr. CarlKoone, Mr.
B. N. FolHng and,'Mr. Menalco
Soils. ,
Ambassador and Mrs. Wiley
Invited to Attend Armistice Day
Dinner Dance
The Ambassador of the Unitejl
States to Panama and Mrs. John
C. Wiley have been invited to
attend as guests of honor, the Ar-
mistice Day dinner dance to be
given at eight o'clock this even-
hiR at the Legion Club at Fort
Amador by the. American Legion
Post No. 1.
Minister of France and Wife
Entertain-at Luncheon
The Mlnlater of France to Pa-
nama and Mrs. Guy Menant hon-
ored the French Special Mission
Ambassadors, Mr. Lamarle and
Mr. Leproust, who are visiting
the Isthmus, with a luncheon
given Wednesday at the Lega-
tlon.
4
r

"
i'
I.t. General and Mrs. Morris
to Hold Reception Monday
' no Commander-in-Chief Ca-
ribbean, Lt. General William H.
H. Morris, and Mrs. Morris have
Issued invitations for a reception
on Monday evening the twelfth
of November from seven to nine
o'clock at Quarters 1,' Quarry
Heights.
Spiger-Wisnilier Nuptials
To lie Solemnised Tonight
..lias Rebecca Splger, daughter
of MrN and Mrs. Yehuda Splger,
of Israel, will become the .bride
of Mr. Abraham Wlanltzer, on
of Mr. Samuel L.WlsBltaer, of
Curacao, Dutch West Indies, this
evening at eight o'clock at the
Jewish Welfare Board Syna-
gogue Rabbi Nathan Witkin will
oficate at the ceremony.
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Schlld-
kraut of Panama City, will give
the bride into marriage and Mr.
and Mrs. Schaye W. WlznKzer,
also of Panama City, will give
tns groom Into marriage.
. allowing the ceremony, a re-
ce.. Jon will be held at the Jew-
it ii Welfare Board Center In Bal-
bo.
..ir. Abraham Wltznltaer, fa-
ther of the groom and Mrs. Ber-
ta Wianltaer. an aunt, arrived
Tuesday from Curacao, Dutch
West Indias, to attend the wed-
ding and are the house guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Schaye W. Wianlt-
aer. ______
Wedding In Los Angeles
of Inteerst to Isthmians
r. and Mrs. Merle L. Piper,
of ijalboa. announce the mar-
riage of their daughter. Helen
Louise, to Gerald E. Tarvln, son
of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Tarvln,
of Wilmington. California, on
Sunday the 38th of October at
Los Angeles, California.
'.the double ring ceremony was
peiiormed in the University
Methodist Church with the Min-
ister, Dr. Wendell L. Miller, offi-
ciating.
In the absence of her father
and mother, Miss Piper was giv-
en in marriage by her only bro-
ther, Edwin M. Piper, of Altade-
na, California, formerly a mem-
ber of the Balboa, Canal Zone
Hi-'h School Faculty.
As her matron of honor. Miss
Piper chose her sister, Mrs. E. A.
Crosby, Jr., of Sutherland. Ne-
braska.
Mr. Carrol A. Tarvta^ of
Compton, California, brother of
ding trip to Costa Rica the young
couple reside in Bella Vista.
Visitor Honored With Dinner
Before Departure
Mr. Ralph B. Deemer, of Chi-
cago, Illinois, who left yesterday
by plane for New Orleans, after
a brief-visit on the Isthmus, was
guest of honor at a dinner given
Thursday evening by Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Scurlock at their re-
sidence In Bella Vista.
Stevenson* are Hosts for Dinner
Dr. and Mrs. O. M. Steven-
son .Of Herrlck Heights, enter-
tained at dinner, Thursday even-
ing at their residence, for Col.
and Mrs. S. J. Beaudry.
Former Balboa Residents
Announce Arrival of Son
Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Wlrtz.
former residents of Balboa, have
announced the birth of a son,
their first child, on November 3,
in Washington, D.C. The baby
has been named Robert Fred-
erick Wlrtz. Jr. Mrs. Wlrts is the
former Virginia Caton, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Wlnard F. Ca-
ton of Takoma Park, Maryland.
New Arrivals and Guests
at Hotel El Panama
Mr. -Frank A. Cardillo, Deputy
commissioner of the Labor De-
partment In New York City, ar-
rived recently by plane and Is a
guest at Hotel El Panama.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Nagle. of
Providence, Rhode Island, will
be guests at Hotel El Panama
until November 12. Mr. Nagle is
the Export Manager for the Gor-
ham Company of Providence, R J.
Mr .and Mrs. B. Fry are new
arrivals from the States and are
guests at the Hotel El Panama.
Mr Fry Is the Assistant Vice
President of the Capitol Airlines.
*"! r___________
Girl Scouts Will
Be Guests Of WAC
Detachment Here
Twenty-five Girl Scouts of
America will be Armistice Day
Sesta. of the 7448th AU WAC De-
chment at Fort Clayton tomor-
row.
According to Capt. Elsie J.
prlate ni'ptial music during me j Chapman, Commanding Officer
ceremony. I of the WAC Detachment, the
Given -in marriage by her fa-1 WACs will spend the day with the
ther, the bride wore a wadding Girl Scouts in order to present
gown of white satin and lace, j to them a more thorough picture
made over princess lines. v:ith of the woman's place In national
long sleeves, full skirt and cathe- defense mm,uh hv
dral length train. Her veil of il- I The Scouts, accompanied by
i
'
i
if
*
" ' i
KLIM
refrigeration
luslon was fastened to a tiara of
lace and seed pearls fad she car-
ried a bouquet of white orchids.
The maid of honor we Miss
Emita Arosemena and the brides-
maids were Miss Viola lea and
Miss Isabel Burgos. Each wore a
rose nylon tulle, with matching
headdress and carried a bouquet
of harmonizing flowers.
The best man was Mr. Rafael
Alemn and the ushers were Mr.
Frank Escoffery and Mr. Hector
Valdea HI.
The flower girl. Mell de la
Guardia was gowned In turquoise
nylon and the tralnbearers, Prls-
cilla Mndez and Ana Elena Arias
wore white nylon' net frocks.
A reception, given by Dr. and
Mrs. Alemn, was held at the Un-
ion Club following the ceremo-
ny
After their return from a wed-
Let us give you a new
lease on beauty this sea-
son with a complete re-
styling permanent wave.
See oar Experts Now.
Balboa 3677
ARMED SERVICE
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YMCA Bldf.) Balboa
Miss Mary Patton. executive di-
rector of the Girl 8couts of A-
merlca here, will attend a non-
denomlnatlonal service at the
Fort Clayton Chapel'with their
hosts at 10:30 am. After the
service they will visit the Detach-
ment, "inspect'' the barracks and
participate in games and song-
fests until noon.
Following dinner they will be
taken on a tour of Fort Clayton,
each accompanied by WACs who
volunteered to be guides for the
occasion. '
MELON GROWS BIG
PATMOS, Ark. (UP) -r B. J.
Drake grew a 120-oound water-
melon this year. It fed a'l the
employes of a Memphis farm
machinery firm.
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JULIO VOS
Na. I -A" Street
TalephosM S-tf?l Panam
^Atlantic J^dciett
Bo, 195, (mlm* J.pkon, Caln 378
By GAY PAl'LEY
United Press Staff
Correspondent v
NEW YORK. Nov.- (UP.)
Black as the basic color in a wo-
man's wardrobe Is on Its way out.
It's a casualty of television, in
the opinion of Rose Bogdanoff,
head clothing designer for NBC
television. l
Miss Bogdanoff explained that
both black and white are taboo
before TV cameras because they
photograph poorly. TV actresses
have taken to colors, manufac-
turers are going along to m*et
the demand, and eventually this
color-consciousness will seep out
to women In general.
"Why. In the old days." said
Miss Bogdanoff, 'no hopeful
young actress was without a lit-
tle black dress. Now they demand
color because they all want to
get Into television."
Miss Bogdanoff, a veteran de-
signer also for movies and the
theater, remembered one actress
who married recently and Insist-
ed on a cream-colored trousseau.
"I want something I can use
later In front of the cameras,"
she explained.
As for the men. Well, no
"regular" on TV ever bays a
white shirt. Rose said "pale
Mie or grey. That's all. Either
looks white bv the time is gets
to the screen."
Miss Bogdanoff. a wiry little
woman with greying hair, said it
was getting so she was more of
a clothing consultant than a de-
signer. Half her calls are from
people wanting, to know what
color suit or dress to buyJust in
case they pet In camera range.
"Tweds are wonderful on
TV," said the designer. They
don't reflect." '
Miss Bogdrnoff has been with
the network just about ever since
it's had a costume and design de-
partment. Costuming actresses Is
part of her job. Costuming come-
dians Is another.
Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis,
regulars on the' Colgate- Comedy
hour, give her a headache along
with laughs.
"They're apt to throw custard
oles at the orchestra or take the
scissors to their own tuxedos,"
she said. "When they're on, we
just don't dare let anyone in the
vicinity wear anything expen-
sive." t
Miss Bogdanoff said one of
the bis problems in television
costuming is the brush-rush
all the time.
Clothes have to be built for
aulck-changes fty the wearer.
That, Miss Bogdanoff said, once
caused televiewers to get a look
at actress Janet Blah- which
wasn't in the script.
Miss Blalr started changing
her costume too soon."
"There she was," said bogdan-
off. "down to her unmentionables
.. .with the camera still on her."
MR. AND MRS. BROWN
HONORED BEFORE DEPARTURE
A number of informal affairs have been given to honor
Mr. and Mrs. James Brown, of Gatun, before their departure
this month to make their home in Rhode Island.
Last evening Mr. and Mrs. Henry Shirk gave an informal
dinner party at the Hotel Washington for Mr. and Mrs.
Brown. Their other guests were: Mr. and Mrs. Leon Egolf.
The group returned to the Shirk's residence In Gatun,
for a social evening.
Saturday at noon, Mrs. J. W. L.
Graham was hostess for a lunch-
eon group, complimenting Mrs.
Brown, at the Hotel Washington.
Her guests were: Mrs. Ralph
Graham and Mrs. Walter Zim-
merman.
Distinguished Visitors Feted
By Rev. and Mrs. Peterson
The Rt. Rev. A. Alfred Voeg-
ell. Bishop of Haiti and the Dom-
inican Republic, and Mrs. Harry
R. Beal, wife of the late Rt. Rev.
Harry A. Beal, Bishop of Pana-
m and the Canal Zone, were the
dinner guests of Reverend and
Mrs. Malnert Peterson Thursday
evening.
Rev. Voegell and Mrs. Beal
came to the Isthmus for the de-
dication of All Souls Chapel of
St. Luke's Cathedral. This chapel
was instigated by them when
they were stationed on the Isth-
mus.
The Venerable John H. Towns-
hend, Arch Deacon of Northern
Colombia and the Very Rev. Ray-
mond T. Ferris, Dean of St.
Luke's were also present at the
dinner with other members of
the local clergy.
The dinner preceded a service
at Christ Church By The Sea.
Mrs. Beal was a guest at the
Hotel Washington during her vis-
it to the Atlantic side. She sailed
Friday morning en route to her
home In Los Angeles.
Bishop Voegell left Tocumen
Airport by plane Friday to re-
turn to his home.
discussed and plans were made
for a morning coffee on Novem-
ber 28. At this time the ladles
will sew and fill Christmas stock-
ings for the St. Vincent De Paul
Orphanage. The coffee will be
held at the home of the presi-
dent at 9:00 a.m. Mrs. William
Beck Is the social chairman.
The members made monthly
contributions of food and cloth-
ing to the orphanage.
Three new members Joined the
club. They were Mrs. Shirley
Crumley. Mrs. Harry Hess, and
Mrs. W. C. Broom.
The other ladies present were:
Mrs. Ella Klnnick, Mrs. Helen
Beck, Mrs. Rbele Crandall, Mrs.
Gladys Smith, Mrs. Jimmy Tulip,
Mrs. Norma Cousins, Mrs. Odell
Harahaw, Mrs. Maxlne Lucky,
Mrs. Mary Lou Tolbert. M":. Wil-
liam Hartz, Mrs. Mary Mundkow-
skl, Mrs. Wanda Wazaluskl, Mrs.
Grace Carlson. Mrs. Jessie Frieze,
Mrs. Robert Moore, Mrs. Helen
Smolka, Mrs. Sue Harvey, Mrs.
Jean Mossman. Mrs. Mary Man-
chan, and Mrs. Peggy Elllngs-
worth.
All members are urged to at-
tend the meeting on the 28th.
mlan ladies, Mrs. Frank Ullrich
and Mrs. Dorothy Melndes.
Mrs. Ullrich gave the Woman's
Club their grand piano, and at
the first meeting she played sev-
eral musical selections. For the
first time In Its new setting she
repeated one of the selections.
Beethoven's "Serenade Appasio-
nata.'
Mrs. Melndez, in her own dis-
tinctive
Fels, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sterna
Mrs. Arthur Crusey, Mr. and Mat,
Allen Arnold, Mr. and Mrs Bal
plak. Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Alearan
der and Mrs. Graves.
Canasta was played afte rdid-
ner with Mrs. Fels and Mas.
Smith winning pollera dolls ate
high score prizes.
manner, gave a few
highlights In her memories of
the club.
Tea was served following the ., and historian,
meeting with Mrs. George En- Holmelin.
Junior American Legion
Auxiliary Meeting __/
Unit 2, Junior Auxiliary, Amer-
ican Legion held their regular
meeting at the Legion Hall la
Old Cristobal.
The following officers were
elected: President, Miss Henriet-
ta Ferrl: vice-president, Judy
Griffon: secretary, Cecilia Alaaa-
altls; sergCant-at-arms, Saas*
Brownie Meeting
Postponed
Brownie Troop 36, of New Cris-
tobal, will not hold their regular
meeting Monday, because of the
holiday.
Coco Solo Ladies Club
Meeting
The regular luncheon meeting
of the Coco Solo Ladles Club was
held Friday at the Officers Club
with Mrs. W. W. Bemls. presi-
dent, officiating, and forty-five
members present.
Mrs. Davis Henderson and
Mrs. F. A. Kraft were hostesses
for the meeting. They had a
Thanksgiving iheme for the dec-
orations of the luncheon table,
using vari-colored foliage, and
berries with harmonizing tapers.
Mrs. W. L. Hall, who arrived
recently from China Lake, Call-
Help Your Piles
Doa't suffer from painful, itching
SUM another hour without trying
nlnaralS. Opon application Chlnareli
itarta curbing Pita mlMrta I way: 1.
Cuh pain and Itching. 1 Helps ihrlnk
lor, woll.n tlatu... I. Halpa natort
ual Irrltatad membrana aftM aTjajr Ma
4Nm. Art roar Drusatat tm
Fort Davis Woman's Club
Meeting
The regular meeting of the Ft.
Davis Woman's Club was held at
the Officers Club Thursday, with
Mrs. James Jess, president .pre-
siding.
The members played bridge in
the morning with Mrs. Henry
Hartwlg and Mrs. Robert Green
winning the prizes.
Hostesses for the day were
Mrs. James Scarborough and Mrs.
Woodrow Schmidt. They usedj fornla. was introduced as a new
cornucopias of fruit and croatan member,
leaves to carry out a Thanksgiv-
ing theme.
A door prize was won by Mrs.
Samuel Donnelly.
Visitors for the luncheon were
Mrs. Robert Alexander, Mrs.
James E. Bowen, Mrs. Donald
Beaver, and Miss Claire Ogden.
Seven new members were In-
troduced by the president. They
were: Mrs. Clalr Wessell, Mrs.
Robert Gaylord, Mrt, Samuel
Donnelly, Mrs. Henry Knlppert.
Mrs. Benjamin Rolls, Mrs. James
Bowman and Mrs. Lloyd Wise.
Miss Ogden, who Is the direc-
tor of the Bella Vista Orphan-
age, addressed the group, telling
them something of the work of
the Home.
Captain Jack E. Worthington
gave a talk on Cub Scouting.
felke as chairman. Mrs. Harry
no and Mrs. T. N. Dagnall pre-
sided at the tea and coffee, serv-
ices.
Birthday Celebration
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Aldrich, of
Gatun, arranged a party at their
residence Thursday to honor
their son, Bobby on his third
birthday anniversary.
Pastel streamers and balloons
were used for decorating and no-
velty favors were given the young
guests. The birthday cake repeat-
ed the pastel shades.
The children who attended
were. Johnny, Lynn, Buddy and Mrs. F. L lexaltis
Tommy Coffin, Elaine Mann, He-
len Marie and Beverly George,
Billy White, Charllne and Cookie
Graves, Butch Pennington, Pat-
ty, Kay and Paul Kunkle, Ray-
mond Scheidegg, Bobby Rice.
Lucy rtlexaltls. retiring
dent, conducted the meeting,
Christmas projects of seta"
books for hospitalized chilcVnyn
and wash cloths for the Old Peo-
ple's Home were planned.
Installation of officer wtl
take place this evening and fur-
ther Christmas plans will.,*
made.
Refreshments were servecTfol-
lowlng the meeting.
The adult members presen'
were: Mrs. Frances Gllley. Mrs,;
Louise Griffon, Mrs. H. G. Ferri,
Mrs. G Holmelin. Mrs. Celia;
Bush, Mrs. Isabel Agulrre, and
Fviscopal Church to
Observe Armistice Day
Armistice Day, Sunday, Novem-
ber 11. is to be observed at thai
. Episcopal Church of Our Savtaajt*
Grace Argo, Jerry and Joan Bren- in New Cristobal, as loyalty Sun-
nan, Richard Smith. Bernadette
Lees, Stanlev Smith, Stephen,
Rachel, Rosalie Radel. and Bob-
by's sister Jackie.
Rosalie won a pollera doll,
dressed by the hostess, for one
game and Rachel won another
prize.
In the evening a cocktail and
supper party featuring native
dishes was given for adult
friends of Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich.
Their guests were: Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Rice, Mr. and Mrs. Ro-
land Lees, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Orvis, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lut-
ro. Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Radel, Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Cox. Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Smith. Mrs. Ralph
Graham, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
cred e%
day. Special prayers of mterceaf*
slon for peace will be offered
the 7:30 a.m. celebration
Hoiy Communion.
At the 11:00 a.m. service Nev-
ln's "Jubilate Deo" and Kipling*,
recessional will be sung by tlav
senior choir, with Mrs. Henrietta,
Cheek as soloist.
The pastor, Reverend Milton Ah
Cookson will preach on the subi
ject, "Gift of Self."
CANT WIN THAT WAY
GARY, Ind. (UP.) Angel
Cruz. 30. won a race with a pas-
senger train at a crossing but
tripped over a rail and suffered
a possible skull fracture when his
head struck a tie.
NCO Wives Club 'Meeting
The regular monthly meeting
of the NCO Wives Club of Fort
Gullck was held at the NCO Club-1 ets, but they may be obtained
Cristobal Woman's Club
'Meets In New Quarters
The Cristobal Wpman's Club
held their first meeting away
from their traditional home on
Wednesday. Forced to abandon
the Gilbert House they are tern-
poraruy at home In the Red Cross
Rooms.
Mrs. R. W. Rubelll oponed the
meeting and called upon Mrs. M.
A. Cookson for a report on the
resolutions of the new commit-
tee on Government.
Mrs. Jesse Byrd, the founder of
the Needlework Guild's Atlantic
Chapter, told something of the
origin and work of the Guild and
Invited the ladles to join and at-
tend the November 17th tea.
It was announced that the
tickets will be put on sale for the
raffle of the picture donated by
Mrs. Jan Koerber. Mrs. Gordon
Karlger will be In charge of tick-
room, with Mrs. Pauline Marsh
presiding.
During the business meeting
from the Individual members for
50 cents each.
On the propram for the after-
the Christmas charities were noon were two well-known Isth-
CL,i
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Telephone 2*3121 Opposite Ancn Post Office
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PANAMA'S FINEST NIGHTSPOT
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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER II, W51
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2'
ail, SALE:Ginerol Electric stove,
*S burners ond oven, used only 3
pnths, $125. Perfect condition.
l. Quorry Heights 4277.
Borgam. Piono. Ex-
rion. 3rd of November
'"Sraet. House No. 5 downstairs.
?$r? SALE: I 1 foot Kelvinotor
Moist Master Refrigerator with
^jlass shelves $195.00. electric
irOnSr (Easy) $95.00, 60 cycles.
Woke up to music Teltchromt
"radio. 60 cycles, used only three
months $30.00. motor for May-
Itofl woshing machine, 60 cycles.
$27.50. Home electric sewing ma-
chine, $50.00. 25 or 60 cycles
Carr Street, Balboa 1425-A.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE1937 Packard Sedon.
motor racently overhauled, new.
monifold, exhaust, tailpipe, muf-
f'er. $250.00. Quarters 2061 -D,
Curundu. Phone 83-6284.
MISCELLANEOUS! RESORTS
D tu M... t Junking rokdr.?
Writ. Alcaholics AaanymsMM
Be 2011 Aneen. C Z.
FOR SALE1941 Studeboker Com-
mander, Sedan, excellent condi-
tion. House 5360 Davis St. Diablo
Heights. Balboa. 29! 8.
For the buving or selling of your
outomobile consult: Agencias Cos-
mos, S. A., Automobie Row No.
29. Telephone 2-4721, Panama.
.FOR SALEDining set 9 pieces.
MihOflany. Very good condition.
Reasonable. 743-A. Enterprise
Place. Balboo.
FOR SALE:60 cycle 9 cu. ft. Re-
frigerator ond electric range. See
at 23 3-B. Gotun.
FAR SALE:Owner leaving coun-
try, beautiful Colombien hand
made mahogany furniture. Coll 3-
172.
FOR SALEBedroom set. twin beds.
iaHroam sat. double bed. Dinlng-
rem table, 6 chairs. "White"
electric sewing machine. Tappan
Ce Luxe stove, .garden hose.
Household articles. 45th Street
Ne. 9, Apt. 4.
FOR SALI: IM P.nfi.c Si, f.ur
doer sedan, food peinr and tires.
Thii car it an excellent buy. On-
ly $300 iii.il. COLPAN MOTORS,
year FORD, MIRCURY. LINCOLN
eleeler, an eutomoaile raw. Tele-
hene 2-1011 2-1036, Pn-
ame.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Phillips. Oceonside cottages. Santo
Claro. Box 435. Balboo. Phone)
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673

Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Steel Shortage Crimps Plans
For New Churches, Theaters
WASHINGTON. Nov. 10 (UP)
The government predicted to-
day it will have to reject roost
applications for construction of wer rejec
muiUty projects in the fourth
quarter of 1*51.
Of the-rA4 impffcafcem, j,4ia
FOR SALE: Fine breed puppies,
very cheop. 9th. street, finol en-
tronca Bonco Fiduciario, Panama
Americon Settlement. Vollorino
family.
FOR SALE,NC-183 Notional com-
munication receiver, perfect con-
dition. Phone Balboa 2-3173.
FOR SALE:2 purebred Red Cocker
Puppies, 2 months old. Call 85-
4187.
Gromllch'i Sonto Cloro beoch-
cotfage. Electric tea boxea, gas
tova, moderott rote. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
"
Spend your Armistice Doy week-end
in cool El Voile ot HOTIL PAN-
AMIRICANO. Rooms $2.00 daily
per person. Children $1.00. Meols
o-la-corte. Reservation. Telephone
2-1112, Panamo.
FOR RENT
Houses
FDR SALE: 25 cycle Universal
washing machine. $100; gloss top
' coffee table $20; Lane cedar
chest, $40. All in excellent con-
edition. Coll Amodor 5243.
WR SALE7 piece bomboo living-
Jaom set, excellent condition,
4175.00. No.
"/bario. Apt.
FOR S
23 Nicanor de O-
No. 4.
LIITIN! Dodge 1949 utility (stotion
wagon I ALL STIIL body. Perfect
condition. Inspect ot house 150.
Prospect street, on* way street to
Ouorry Heights. Phone Balboa.
2820.
FOR SALI: 1949 Far. Caahm
Club Cause six cylinder, new
*inr one1 tin. This car hat new
ear performance, an excellent bay.
Only $400 dawn and rii it
way. COLPAN MOTORS, Year
FORD. MIRCURY. LINCOLN
dealer, an automobile raw. Tele-
ah.ne 2-1033 2-1036, Pane-
mi.
FOR SALE: Winter genuine fur
ccats. $50.00 each. Come eorly
and get one. Caso Americana, be-
tween 6" and 7th St. Bolivor Ave
Phone 157. Colon.
Mathers. JUMPING-JACK Children
shoes giv young feet the right
stort, from cradle to 4 years, sold
exclusively at BABYLANDIA, No.
40, 44th Street. Bella Visto. Tel.
3-1259.
FOR SALE:1941 Ford 4 Door Se-
dan, 5 good tires, motor in gcod
condition. 1505-A. Akee St.. Bol-
boo. Phone 2-2995.
FOR SALE: Building materials
lumber, construction steels. AL-
MACINCS MARTINI, $. A.. 83
North Avenue, phone 2-0610.
Bronch; 3 Mortin Soso St. phone
3-1424.
FCR SALE:Genuine celotex, hord-
boord, notional & U. S. plywoods
MARTINZ. 83 North Avenue
phone 2-0610, Bronch: 3 Mortin
Sosa, phone 3-1424.
FOR RENT:Chalet or private room
in "Las Cumbres." For informa-
tion Tel. 2-3580, Panama.
FOR RENT
Apartment*
P. T. I.
SAFETY SAW BLADES
COST LESS STAY SHARP
TWICE AS LONO TAKJS
HALF THE TIME TO SHARP-
EN AND USE 35% LESS
POWER.
THE GREATEST ADVANCE
IN POWER SAWING since the
Invention of the CIRCULAR
SAW.
GEO. F. NOVEY, Ine.
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modem furnlshecl-unfumlshed apart
ment. Contort office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
Ion.
FOR RENT:One unfurnisred bed-
room apartment, cool, sea view
Uruguay Street No. 2.
JR SALE:Leaving Isthmus, very
"cheap, Frijidoire, woshing mo-1
Jehme. dresser. Colle Estudiante (
JMe. 76 Apt. 3. "Rose Marie" on I
"*Saturdoy and Sunday. Frem Mon- !
.day though Friday, inquire ot
St. Na .18, upstairs.
FfjW-SALE: Bomboo chair, -$40
arm choir, $25, blond webbing
JWiair, chaise lounge. $50; 4
.tobies, $10; white wicker rocker,
X$15; pottery. 58 pieces, $50;
3-nglander box springs, mattress; 4
'Venetian blinds. $12; set 3 green
IWmHs 9' and 6', $25; table lamp,
$7.50; Laundromat. S300. Al-
rook, Qtrs. 20.
FOR.SALE:Double bed frame, ond
Jprinfls, Ration chair, mirror, in-
coar spring couch, kitchen chairs,
^Venetian blinds. House 5426-A
Cioblo Hgts.
FOR SALE:Complete set of bam-
*fcoo. Apply Riviero Apts. Melendei
Tand 3rd. St. Apt. 8. Coon.
FOR SALE:Late 1950 Pontioc De
Luxe, radio, hydromatic, seat cov-
nrs. sun shade, many other ex-
tras, only 7.058 miles. Qtrs. 15-
A. Ft. Kobb, phone 84-2244.
FOR SALI1950 Feed Custom De
Luxe feeder aerk gray, new teat
cavers, WSW ties. This car like
new. Must be teen te appreciate.
Only $520 dawn and drive it
way. COLPAN MOTORS, y u r
FORD. MIRCURY, LINCOLN
dealer, an auteMebile raw. Tele-
fcen 2-03S 2-1016. rW
ama.
FOR SALE:1946 Ford Club Coupe",
duty poid. Rodio. motor overhaul-
ed. Houe 2013-B or phone Cu-
rundu 6159,
FOR SALE: 1951 Bendix home Fnc pfmt
laundry, 25 cycle. Upright piono
FOR RENTApartment, chalet type,
to married couple only. Modern
convenience. "El Cormen" settle-
ment. First Avenue, Panama.
FOR RENT:Cool, modern 2-bed-
rcom-livingroom. etc. oportment.
House 8045. 9th St. New Cristo-
bol. Appfy Apt. I, Colon.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hold (1 P.nam
HAS FOR SALE:
la* sharer Abattoir
3S hare* (nreferreS)
Paree Product
See ihim (rommen)
Panel Product!
TPXS.: 1-eJI I-IKe
Strood, smoll. Mosher, house 173
Williamson. Phone 6-117, Gam-
boa.
FOR SALE:Just receive large vo-
riety of Tropicol fishes, plants,
ornaments, lowest price in Pon- j
orno, aquariums made to order. 11
Via Espaa, opposite Juon Fran- j
ce Stables, Tel. 3-4132 Acuario
Tropicol. '
Large three bedroom
oportment (upstairs). Two both-
rooms, livingroom, diningroom in
Vista del Mor. Tel. 3-0180 Mon-
day 4 p. m. to MODERN FURNITURE
CUS rOM BUILT
Slipcover Reuphobterv
VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM!
Alberta Herat
. r. de la Otaa 77 (AaletMklle Ron)
Pre* tilntales Plckap Dativa
Tel. 3-4.M ..-te a.m. to 7:t r.m.
commercial buildings in the first
half of next year chiefly be-
cause of a shorUge of structural
steel.
The National Production Au-
thority made the forecast in an-
nouncing it had turned down 68
per cent of applications for con-
struction of office buildings,
stores, restaurants, the aters,
churches and similar projects in
the last three months ot this
year.
Officials said curbs on similar
construction will be just as tight,
if not tighter, in the first half of
1952 but that "things ought to
ease up" in the second half of
next year.
In another economic develop-
ment, the Bureau of Labor sta-
tistics reported that average
wholesale prices rose three-
tenths of one per cent during the
week ended Nov. 6, the first rise
in three weeks.
The increase was caused by
higher prices for grains,, raw
cotton, fresh fruits and milk.
Prices of livestock and fresh ve-
getables declined.
By the end of 1953. NPA said,
there should be a sizeable in-
crease in the output of structur-
al steel and less of the metal will
be needed for building and ex-
panding basic Industrial plants.
The report said NPA was asked
to approve $1,000,000,000 worth of
construction of commercial, reli-
gious, entertainment and com-
worth ofcowrtrur>
1579,000,000
tion.
The agency said "the rite of
denials in the first quarter of
next year will equal or exceed
that of the fourth quarter" of
1951. it is unlikely, it added, that
approval "will be given to anv
project not at least 20 per cent
completed."
Officials said the situation
ond quarter ot 1952. But they
added traUtrrtre should be more
steel in the third and fourth
quarters and "we hope to pick up
many of the projects now belntr.
deferred."
Industrial plants, residential
houses, hospitals and schools are
nticovered by the report.
The construction controls di-
vision of the NPA was able to al-
lot only 39,040 tons of steel. 15
P*r cant of the amount request-
ed : 258,794 pounds of copper, S.S
per cent of the amount request-
"may be even worse- in the 1^ fi| and none of ESS/ST
Art Week Exhibition Leaves
Balboa T For JWB Gallery
LI. Col. Ed. J. Dehne
Is New Preventive
Medicine Chief Here
FOR SALE: Radio for Ford 48,
practically new, extra large loud-
speaker. $40.00. Tel. 3-2737.
FOR SALE:Kelvmator Deeo Free-
ze. six cubic feet, new 60 cycle
unit. Cill Coco Solo 605.
1__________________________________
FOR SALEAutomatic woshing ma-
chine. 60 cyclr-, aood condition
'?non* Balboo 2879, 221 A, An-
:. .Jon.
FOR SALE
Motorcvcle*
HCr*. SALE:1946 Harley Davidson
motorcycle, call 2-19S8 working
hours Or 3-2506 after 5:30 ask
for Carlos.
FOR SALE:Mercury 1950, 4 Door
Sedon, radio. $1,800.00. 157-A.
Pedro Miguel. Phone 4-451.
FOR SALI: 1946 Chrysler New
Yorker fear dear tedan, new paint,
feed) tires, radio. This car com-
pletely reconditioned. Jatt like
aw. Only $385.00 down, drive it
way. COLPAN MOTORS, year
FOR D. MIRCURY, LINCOLN
dealer, en automobile raw. Tala-
aheee 2-1033 2-1036, Pen-
ante.
FOR SALE:Cocker Pups AKC re-
gistered. Phone Albrook 2238
FOR SALE: Leeds-sproys China,
old pattern. Washing machine,
wringer, Baby crib. 766-A, 8ar-
neby, Balboa 2-3127.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment,
porch, parlor, diningroom. kitchen,
bedroom, sanitary services, garage
$55.00. Apply 112 Vio Misario
Porras, near Roosevelt Theatre.
FOR RENT
Rooms
ROOMS AVAILABLI U*t. cool
entirely renovated one) wall tai-
nished. R.tci reasonable. Boche
lers only. Inquire a* Tke Ame
rkee Club facia, 0. Lesteai
Park.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
PERSONALS
iVl LOST MY OWNIR:-Wbite.
'>*e-b#ri, yeun* and healthy
dkVa that I am. I'v* been leaking
ha every car aarnf att the An-
ete Cematy far the ..t four *..
wirhaat back. Please edate far at*
a abw I shall have t ed.pt terne
tber home befara I'm picked up
and toba*) ta the dee Mime). My
thanks the sirfa t The Paa-
eaa Amaricen classifieds.'
FOR SALE:Due to sudden leove
1 Studeboker 4 door sedar
Champion 1947. duty paid, ex-
cellent condition. 5 new tires
Phcne Cnstobol 1210 or 1929.
FOR SALI: A Real taraem!
'Si OLDSMOBILI "II"
2-deer taden with radio,
calar Ihjht freen. Same at
new, enly 6.500 miles. Financing
available.
CIVA. S. A.
Year Pantiec Cadillac Dealer
Tel. 2-0170 Panam.
FOR SALI:Lot in Us Cumbres
714 tquera meters, earner ef 7th
street. 1.75 a matar, lass than
cost. Tel. 2-2132 or 2-0610 Pan-
ama, Cecilio.
WANTED: Clean soft rogs. Job
Dept. Panamo American.
LESSONS
Rupert iZezl Bennett (PianoTeach-
er! offers adult beginners com-
plete, 9 months course In basic
fundamentals of piano playing
Phone 2-1282.
Position Offered
FOR SALE:1950 Ford Convertible.
New condition. 8.000 actuol miles.
Undercoated, direction lights, back
up light. extro chrome. W/S
washer. Call Panama 3-4020.
LOST & FOUND
Cl QaivcAo
'./.<-.
II.
tooai
SUNDAY
SPECIAL LCNCHEON
t
Supreme of Fruit El Rancho
or Seafood in Aspic
Minestrone
?. r Consomm Madrilene
tUate Steak Parmrntirr 1.5
||l Saate Marenfo..... I 0t)
PoUto au Gratin
Julienne Vegetables
Rolls and Butter
n Salad. Oreen Onions
and Radish
Coconut. Delifht
I; Coffee --- Peer
COCKTAILS
UJI va. to 2 pa. 15*
LOST:S25.00 reword for return of
billfold ond contents lost Wednes-
day in Cocoli or Curundu. Sue
Lee Nobles, 500-B Curundu Hgts.,
Blx 666, Curundu 83-4101.
Atlantic Camera
Club Holds First
Exhibit Tomorrow
The Atlantic Camera Club will
hold its first international ex-
hibit, sponsored by the Photogra-
phic Society of America at the
Hotel Washington from tomor-
row, through next Sunday, Nov.
' This "Australian one-man
show' consists of 26 DrinU by
the internationally-known pho-
totrapher. E. Robertson A.R.PS
'The Atlantic Camera Club Is
the ninth club to show these
prints.
Before reaching the Canal
Zone they were exhibited by the
Queenaland Kodak Invitational
Exhibit in Australia.
In the United States they were
shown at the Lincoln Park Cam-
r'- h of Chicago, the Wauke-
SALESMEN WANTED: To eorn
$50.00 weekly. Agencios Clough.
Tel 3-4747. Ponama.
WANTED: 6 second hand steel
stenographer chairs. Phone 3-4743,
between 7:30 o. m. and 5 p. m.
except Saturdoy and Sunday.
WANTED 1 or 3 bedrooms, furnish-
ed Apt. for 3 or 4 months. Call
Sgt. Sims, Albrook 86-5155, Sun-
day.
Help Wanted
Joe Medlinger Here
After Eight-Month
Trip Around World
Joe Mfedllnger. Panamanian
businessman, returned yester-
day from an eight-month
"around the world" business
trip. He leit Panama in April.
Medlinger's journey covered
England. Vienna, Italy, Manila,
Japan, China (Bong Kong),
Switzerland, Copenhagen, Paris
and New York.
Merchandise he purchased
during his extensive trip isnow
on display at the Tahiti and
Hawaiian Jelwery stores and
also at the Philippine Rattan
Store.
English.speaking maid to live in. Re-
ferences required. House 1465-C
Bolboo.
Lutheran Potluck
Supper Postponed
Until Next Sunday
The Potluck Supper ordinarily
held tomorrow night at the Lu-
theran Service Center, has been
postponed one week and will be
held next Sundav at 6:30 p m
to coincide with the third anni-
versary of the dedication of the
Redeemer Lut h e r a n church
building.
A special Invitation Is extend-
ed to members of the Armed
Forces.
Commisary Group
Plans Dance On Eve
Of Thankisgiving
The Pacific Commissary Group
is making: elaborate plans to en-
Hrtain friends from both sides
of the Isthmus at a Thanksgiv-
ing eve dance on Wednesday.
Nov. 21, in the La Boca Club-
house.
Invitations have been widely
issued and indications are that
the dance will be well attended.
The Commy Group has secured
the services of the popular Ar-
mando Boza and his "La Perfec-
ta" orchestra. A door prize raf-
fle for a large Thanksgiving
turkey will also be held.
WANTED: Good' laundress for
work by the doy. Avenida Cubo
No. II. "Nestle" Building, en-
trance 28th Street.
FOR RENT
MiBcellaneonj
FOR RENTAmple offices in build,
ing in construction. North Avenue
No. 53. Informotion. Ricardo Gar-
cia, B Avenue No. 17.
Lebanon Foresters
To Honor Senior
Past Chief Ranger
The Lebanon Foresters are
calling a meeting of the Court
Dawn No 5 Monday at 7:30 p.m.
m honor of Charles E. Dodson
Senior Past Chief Ranger who
5 leaving the Isthmus.
Dodson. who has apent 44 years
away from his home in British
Guiana retired in Jan. '40 from
the Panam Canal. He was em-
ployed at the Corozal Hospital.
All Lebanon Foresters are urg-
ed to attend this farewell meet-
ing.
Largest and moat valuable crop
produced in Kentucky la corn.
Portugal la the real birthplace
of the ukulele.
Each star In the sky Is dying
out slowly.
J^ ^La~Ju ,oi' Palntlng by Gladys C. Barnard which
won second prize In the American Art Week exhibition Is
admired by Mrs. R. R. Johnson, left, and Mk and Mrs. Tom
Ogleaby of Panama City.
Since the annual Art Week ex-
hibition by local artists can no
longer be housed at the Balboa
Armed Forces YMCA after to-
morrow at 0 p.m. the prize-win-
, nlng exhibits will be transferred
I to the JWB Gallery in the Jew-
ilah Welfare Center, one block
away..
Eleven pictures out of 10* en-
tries will remain on exhibition
for two weeks more.
Artists whose work recelred
considerable attention from the
Judges (all signatures were cov-
ered) are Mary patton and A. B.
Converse both of whom have ex-
hibited at the JWB Gallery with
"one man shows."
Most of the other artists whosa
work was selected are equally
well known for their past a-
chlevements: B. Sturtevant
Gardner, Gladys c. Barnard,
Betty Bentz, Frances Greening
and Roger Morrow. However,
there la one newcomer in tha
group Mrs. Jeanne 8. Beaudry
who carried off the first prize,
with an oil painting with a larga
figure surrounded by native
weaving and pottery. ,
The entire exhibit Is still on
view at the YMCA today and to-
morrow from 3:30 till 5:30 and
6:30 till 0 p.m.
\
LT. COL. EDWARD J. DEHNE
Lt. ool. Edward J. Dehne',
Medical Corps, has assumed the
post of Chief of Preventive Med-
icine, U.8. Army Caribbean.
Well known in the field of pre-
ventive medicine. Col. Dehne
came to Panama from Headquar-
ters Third Army (Atlanta, Oeor-
gla) where he has also been Chief
of Preventive Medicine.
Colonel Dehne'. a native of
Bismarck. N.D.. was accompan-
ied to Panama by his wife and
two children. Ilanl and Denla.
They are occupying quarters at
Fort Kobbe.
Col. Dehne' la a member of
the following medical organiza-
tions:
The American Association of
Industrial Physicians and Sur-
geons and the American Asso-
ciation of Military Surgeons.
He Is a fallow of the American
Public Health Association and a
diplomat of the American Board
of Preventive Medicine and Pub-
lic Health.
Southern ^oy^ip^CbnfrS
Anti-Truman Rebels On Top
COLUMBIA, 8.C., Nov. 10 (UP)
Gov. James F. Byrnes will leave
by plane today for the atoiitharh
gan Camera Club of V/aukegan. I
.V- Y De9 rborn Camer* Members of the group are: Sid -
i( 1 ') o Chicago and the Dallas ney Squires Henrv Smith mm
I c"Tmt!ra ?fib ,of Dai,'fs, as ; M B^nlck.EHc oakle?; Mule
to attend' C U Crdially *".* ^"ng. Franklin Ree
10 atlend- 'eilbert Spencer and Ernest Jack.
Son Of George Wills
Of Balboa Completes
Sea Year On US Shins
KINGS POINT. N.Y., Nov 10-
.o t.Vm ldsnlpman Donald Fran-
cis Wills, son of Mr. and Mrs
George A. Wills of Balboa. Canal
Zone, was among the 150 men
whp recently returned to the
United State Merchant Marine
academy. Kings Point, New
The men have Just completed
their sea year (sophomore) a-
board vessels of the United
States Merchant Marine "xa
.W"1* completed an extensive
K2S,fl5 ?ort8 and Terminals"
visited during his sea year. To-
gether, the thesis and sea pro-
ject comprised the equivalen* of
a yearscollege work.
Back at the academv as a K*c-
tSa lassman<1 union, cad*>t-
hu2,^maneW1!ls wl continue
his studies for two more years
taking advanced courses in nav-
SL2&SPC and unnery, ship
?S 1-"PaSfiS?" and admiral-
ty law, international trade, and
,. V. su,bJ?ets ln preparatoin for
nts nnal License examinations
^r>e ,.,^dilate in Augt-st,
1953 receiving a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree, a License as Third
Assistant Enslneer. and concur-
rent commissions is Ensign, Un-
ited Sutes Naval Reserve ond
Ensign. United Sutes Maritime
Reserve
SCOTCH WHISKY
Distilled, blended and bottled
in Scotland, Buchanan'
"De Luxe" U Scotch Whisky
at its best, unique
in character, superb
in qualityit is
the'natural choice of
connoisseurs all over
the world.
Governors Conference at Hot
Springs, Ark., with the statement
that he la not going to a "poli-
tical convention." \
The South Carolina governor,
considered a top leader in the
Southern rebellion against Pres-
ident Truman and bit "Fair
Deal" program, Is scheduled to
help lead a panel discussion on
regional education for the South.
Asked about political implica-
tions of the conference, Byrnes
replied:
*I expect to go to a governors'
conference at Hot Springs and
not a political convention?
But Dixie's governors, most of
them avowed opponents of the
President, are likely to do plenty
of political talking*whether pri-
vately or publicly. They will prob-
ably take advantage of the con-
ference to voice verbal protests
of the President and his pro-
gram.
Sources here, however, said on
the eve of the conference that
no outright bolt of the Demo-
cratic Party will come out of tha
Hot Springs conference.
The astute leaders of the
Southern revolt, such as Byrnes
and Sen. Harry F. Byrd (D., Va.)
filan a full-scale fight at the na-
lonal Democratic convention
next summer In an Attempt to
regain control of the natoinal
party machinery.
They also plan an effort at
beating Mr. Truman if he offers
for rt-nomination.
Should they fall, then the time
would be ripe for a revolt if one is
to come. Both Byrnes and Byrd
have hinted at a possible break
next November within the past
several days. But both are also
on record as favoring a fight at
the convention.
which would give him further
prestige as leader of the Dixie
anti-Truman forces. But the pre-
cedent for the past few years is
to make a retiring governor
chairman.
outgoing head Is Gov.
Wright of Mississippi,
The
Fielding
the vice presidential candidate Tn
the 1948 States Rights rebellion.
Last year's chairman was for-
mer Gov. J. Strom Thurmond,
the SUtes' Rights Presidential
candidate.
AACAP Instructors
Commanded for Job
Among Civilians
Certificates of achievement for
"superior performance" as In*
structors in the recent Antiair-
craft Civilian Auxiliary Group
S Col. Sari ford J. Goodman,
bit commanding officer. The
presentations took place in field
antiaircraft positions of the Pa-
nama canal Zone.
The AACAP test was held in
the Canal Zone between June IS
and Aug. 36. to provide the De-
partment of the Army with data
concerning the feasibility of
utilizing civilians in active anti-
aircraft defense.
The instructors, who carried
their AACAP duties ln addition
to (heir regular mlliUry tasks,
were commended by Goodman
for their contribution to the com-
mon defense.
of A-
The "governors conference Is JS$ Ci1.ca? Pa
being held this year ln the home c- B*
-Truman governor,
state of a pro
Sid McMath of Arkansas.
But the States' Rights govern-
ors will be ln full control of the
conference with Byrnes as the
titular leader.1
Kay; SergeanU WllUam A. Alo-
nls and Danny Hatfleld; Corpor-
als Vincent E. Sercu. Richard
St ande and Lloyd B. Ash ton,
Sfcs a Romeskte, Howard 0.
Crowe!l. and Leonard O. Hirst;
new
Br Apr*mmM
Seatcfc WMetr Dmillen
ta mm Ki*| Caerte VI
JANES SUCHANAN CO. ITO.. CLAISOVV. SCOUANO
DON'T BE A
Distributors: AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, S.A*
Ne. 14 Central Aft. Tel. t-ZlU
Byrnes may'wall be named the.*t-_Art'ttr L- 8o"nle.:r.f? "
erenCe!PrniChett?W*?riv."tned S& H.
Lane; Sic Cirilo Martines, and
Francisco Montalvo: SergeanU
Porfirio Veles del Valle. Oscar
Sastre, Raul Rexach. Carmelo
Sanche* and Severo Diaz Ola;
Corporal William Nagron Lopes;
Sic Manuel Lopez Morales; flat.
Sllsler Hernandez; Sic Maximino
Rosario Veres; Sgt. Ntcomedes
Alaarln; Ses Francisco Ramirez,
dOberto a vazejieav Leandro
Sanfells and Francisco Acevedo.
Por rrfen slated fof tha awards
, but who have not yet received
them are: Master Sergeant Louis
G. Common; Sfc William R.
Welch; Sat. Elmer A. Sterling;
Col. Alan R. Rupp.
/"
ft*
VI
1
i.4


SATURDAY. NOVEMBER M. 1951
TUT. PANAMA AMERICAN AN TNDEPBNDENT DAILY NWSPAMCB
PAGE SEVEN
Cargo and ireightShips and PlanesArrivals and Departures
PAST r'KKIIiHTrR SERVIO BETWEEN
tUROPE AMD NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COASTS
IA Urnlltd Number of Pv""lr Berth i
ro n on
S.S. Avrancha ............................_....... ... November 27
TO ECUADOR, PERU CHILE:
S.S. Tron ........................'................ November 17
It) CENTRAL AMI RICA WEST COAST USA.
Id S. Washington ................................... November 18 i
FBOM NEW YORK TO PLYMOUTH LB HAVRE
"Da Grane" ................................... November 10
lie D France.......................,........... November 15 ^
Peeeenter Servlee from CARTAGENA to EUROPE VI* Carlkaaaa Peru:
"Colombia" ...................................... Noveriber 17
Crr.leh.1; FRENCH UNt K'< " *" lal. 1-147 1*1*
Panam- UNDO V MADURO. S A Be* las
Tel Panama S-ISSS J-1MI
i
>
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BX ROYAL CHARTER 1840
Royal Mails lines Ltd.
FAST TREKiliT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COASTS
OF NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA
TO COlioMBrA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "LAGUNA" .................................Nov. 18th
M.V. "CUZCO" ___...............................Nov. lBth
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA,
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUA,
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V. "REINA DSL PACIFICO"* ;............NOV. 17th
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "LOBOS" ..-i-..,... ..........................Nov. 10th
M.V. "SANTANDER"............................. .Nov. 15th
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
M.V. "DURANDO" ...............................:Nov. 11th
M.V. PARDO"....................................Nov. 18th
TO UK/CONTINENT
BS. "DUIVENDYK"................,..............NOT. 18th
Accepting passengers In First. Cabin and Third Class
"Superior accommodation available for Daasencers
All salliags subject te change without notice.
PACIFIC STEAM NAV. CO.. Cristbal. Tel. 1684 v 165S
FORD COMPANY Inc.. Panam Tel. 3-1257/1258: Balboa 158
J
FINEST ON THE GOLD COAST
Cool Clean
Comfortable
(for the entire family)
Nightly Piano Entertainment
"Teddy"
CURB SERVICE
6 miles from Coln on Boyd-Roosevelt Highway.
"
WESTC10X
Big Ban'a Famous Little Brother
>
RELIABILITY kVrf

i
BAiY
BEN
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fat, U*wok y*u ur ... g.f, you "W
n Dm* ... talli you whan It', Hma lo retira.
by tan' two vcluma alarm control allow,
for both light and haavy il.aptr,. Ouiat-Hck
oby Ian e*., ^-^ a ^^ ^ fu^mH ^
* you con raad in dayaht or dariatau. Thlt
no* onW Ana Wartdox or* en dbplay ut your
eSer-a See Hw whale a-lity fin. rf^,
WESTCLOX
taSoNa, Moon, U.S.A.
Waaiam dec* Ca, lid.
ararborowo*, Oai., Can.
fomou$ fmmily Nam of Un* r/m.,j,etl
Shipping & Airline News
Local Passengers Due
Monday on Treln Maersk
The Maersk Line ship Trein
Maersk which is due to dock at
Cristobal Monday morning has
several local passengers aboard
who will disembark here. Com-
ing from Los Angeles, the ship
will discharge general cargo be-
fore leaving. Fenton and Co.,
a're the local agents.
Barbara Brovig
Transited Yesterday
The fruiter Barbara Brovlg ar-
rived yesterday morning from
Esmeraldas. Ouaya q u 11. She
headed for New Orleans last
night where she will discharge
her cargo. Norwegian-owned,
the ship was chartered by the
Standard Fruit Company.
PAA Celebrate
24th Anniversary
Ths 24th anniversary of the
first scheduled International air-
line flight by Pan American
World Airways was marked with
the unveiling of an elaborate
marker by the Historical Asso-
ciation of South Florida at Key
West, Fla.
It was from Meacham Field at
Key West that PAA launched its
first flight on Oct. 28.1927. From
this 90-mile Key West-Havana
flight developed the globe-gird-
ling routes of the Pan American
World Airways, system.______
'Half Angel'-Story of a Sexy
Sleepwalker-Opens at The Lux
LORETTA YOUNG AND JOSEPH COTTEN are the romantic
co-stars of "Half Angel," the technicolor comedy opening to-
day at the Lux Theatre, revealing the shocking story of a
lady sleepwalker.
Mexico Seeks To Modernize
Method Of Making Tortilla
Rapraaaalallva; INIVEKSAL EXPORT CORP.
Jaai rranrUc a la Oau A Calla it|" NaT-It Paaaaaa CU. R P.
CORP UNIVERSAL DE EXPORTACIN
Na. ft ata Irratt aa* Sala* CaMa. R P.
WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 10
Science has caught up with the
Indians and found a new way to
make tortillas, one of the oldest
forms of food in the world.
Nutrition experts in Illinois, at
the request of the Mexican Gov-
ernment, have successfully mill-
ed an inexpensive, dry and sta-
ble tortilla flour from which Me-
xico's ancient unsalted, unleav-
ened corn flapjacks can be made
with greater ease.
Tortillas are the staff of life
today for millions of people, the
National Geographic Society
says. From the southwest United
States through the Isthmus of
Panam, corn-dough cakes have
been the basic food of Indian civ-
ilizations as far back as history
reeorde. Tortillas and beans are
to many Latin Americans what
dates are to desert dwellers,
bread to Europeans and rice to
the ancient peoples of the Orl-
Women in remote sections still
grind corn meal on flat slabs of
rock called "metates." With a
second stone shaped somewhat
like a rolling pin, they crush the
corn and roll it into a moist paste
from which tortilla dough, called
masa" is kneaded.
The corn must-first be boiled
in lime water and then again in
fresh water. Since the soapy-tast-
ing dough- will spoil in less than
six hours without refrigeration,
women's work is never done. The
entire process has to be repeated
for each day's meals. Either the
housewife does it, or as is more
common in much of Mexico to-
day, she buys it in the moist state
from a local "masa" shop, or even
ready-baked in small "tortllle-
riaa.
One of Mexico's most familiar
sounds is that made by women
patting "masa" into tortillas,
flattening, them to pancake
shape. The cakes when baked
can be eaten as they are, rolled
around various meaf stuffings, or
used as spoons for other food.
After one dries out and tough-
ens during a long trip, it can be
used to patch a worn sandal,
Mexicans say wryly.
* .**** asattaac coaaloruaf Cntksra tii aaayi'eak,
anima .^i i^-------.,. .;. ... in, ajalil Ij mil
, ulr raaaaa tad alaal n "aa mace". Par ekai Maria* aati-
aeptfcCatfcaralM
(uticura
V-/ OINTMENT
OMa/aPaawaafMi
CUTIt'ukA SOAP OIKTMRNT. tALCOR

Filmtown
Shoptalk
By BEN COOK
United Pres Staff
Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD odd what a Christmas present
can do to a fellow.
One made a guitarist of Pres-
ton Foster, motion picture acter.
He thinks it's a great thing,
this guitar-playing. He does it
for relaxation and does it so well
that he has turned Into one of
the movie colony's most sought-
after party entertainers.
Foster was given the guitar
three years ago by his wife,
Sheila Darcy. who gave up her
own screen career to concentrate
on being a wife. Foster got even
with her for giving him the
guitar. He roped her into, the act
as a singer.
Already Musical
The actor's musical interest Is
not too unusual. Although he
hashas not played a single sing-
ing role in nearly 100 pictures,
he was trained as a singer and
made his stage bow' with a
Philadelphia opera company.
It was natural for him to be-
come attached to the guitar. He
hardly lays It down except when
he is before the cameras, as he
Is now in "The Big Night," a
Philip A Waxman production for
United Artists/
Foster took no lessons but
practiced steadily and Improved
gradually. Soon he was spending
as much as five hours a day
twanging away.
"I followed the old principle
that if you can't beat him, join
him." Mrs. Foster said. "I started
singing with him."
Carries It Around
As they built their repertoire,
they began singing at Hollywood
parties. Foster was never coy
about his new-found art. and
now he carries the guitar In his
car. just in case.
Foster even stepped out of the
amateur class by singing aa a
guest amateur class by singing
as a guest star on an Ed Wynn
television show. Then there fol-
lowed concerts and camp shows.
The siniring Fosters now have
a repertoire of some 200 (oik
songs, but Preston intend* to
ACOBY.QN
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
I've had a lot of questions re-
cently about the various forms
of Canasta in which you draw
two cards from the stockpile in-
stead of the normal one card.
Most of my correspondents want
to know whether It's all right to
take one card from the discard
pile and the other card from the
stockpile. .
You cannot. The discard pilis
one thing, and the stockpile is
another thing, and "never the
twain shall meet." If you want to
take the discard pile, that's all
you're entitled to. You take the
full discard pile, whether It con-
sists of one card or of umpteen
cards. At that turn you have no
right at all to any card of the
stockpile.
If you decide to draw from the
stock, you take two cards instead
of the normal one. In that case
you are not entitled to any cards
from the discard pile.
In short, you vote one way or
the other. You can't split the
ticket.
QWhat happens if there's
only one card left in the stockpile
when your turn cbmes?
AThat's all you're entitled to.
It counts as a full, normal draw.
Remember THE BOSTON BAR
ARMY
aVILIANS
MICE
NAVY
ALL DRINKS
WILL BE
SOLD AT
Sunday Cf ZJhniridau
from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
QWhat happens if there's
only one card left in the stock-
pile, and that one card Is a red
three?
You must put that red three
down on the table, and the hand
ends at once.- You make no fur-
ther meld or discard.
QWhat happens If there are
two cards left in the stockpile,
and one of them is a red three?
AYou put the red three down
but do not replace It. (There Is
no way to do so.) Then you pro-
ceed as though you had made a
normal draw. You may meld and
discard, as usual.
QrWhat happens if there are
two cards left in the stockpile
and both of them are red threes?
AYou put them both down on
the table, and the hand ends at
once. You make no further meld
or discard.
This procedure is followed In
two-hand Canasta and also In
Samba. Some players like it In
three-hand Canasta also. It ap-
plies to any game In which you
draw two cards at a time from
the stockpile.
keep his singing and acting care-
ers separate.
"Folks are used to seeing me
as an actor, not a singer." he
said. "It gives the act an element
of surprise that I want to keep."
To provide a more stable, stor-
able form of the basic tortilla,
which could be enriched by vita-
mins, minerals or protein to for-
tify the national diet on a whole-
sale basis, the Bank of Mexico
asked the Armour Research
Foundation of Illinois Institute
of Technology to develop a hew
way of processing and marketing
tortilla mix.
The desired product would
have to satisfy modern distribu-
tion systems, make tortilla indis-
tinguishable from the masa-
made variety, and be cheap en-
ough to compete with perishable
masa for the centavos of the
lowest Income groups.
Such a product, a dry flour,
has now been developed by a new
dehydration process. A pilot
plant has been in operation for a
year. More than 500 tons of the
new flour has been used by Mex-
icans without complaints. Now a
factory Is being built outside
Mexico City to boost production
of the flour to a commercial lev-
el. New tortillas are coming to an
ancient land-
Esperanza Cuncil Meets
Tomorrow In Silver City
The Past Exalted Rulers' Coun-
cil of Esperanza Lodge No. 56.
IBPOEW. will hold its regular
monthly meeting tomorrow even-
ing at 8 in the Silver City Lodge
Hall.
Claude Mottley. senior district
officer, is scheduled to give a talk
during the meeting.
..i
SAILES OUTSAILS 'EM
OREENEVILLE. Tenn. (UP.)
George Salles lived up-to his
name when he leaped from-a city
court window and outsailed pur-
suing police. Salles fined $80 for
speeding, walked to the window, j
slid to the street on a guy wire
and "took off like a scared rab-
bit," police said. .




.


IMGt EIGHT
."' ^A^AMA AMERICAN AN INDEPFNUENT OAILT NW8PAPKR
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER IS, i95|
Thumps Salvador 37-5 For New Record
-----------------------------'----------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------_________________
SiOCIAL ENCACEMENTRocky Marciano puts his arm around
oe U)us in their first meeting since the Brockton heavyweight
knocked out the old champion in the eighth round at Madison
Square Garden (NEA)
Omphroy Tennis Tournament
To Gef Underway Tomorrow
s
. _
Thursday night the office of
C. W. Omphroy, sports promoter,
was the scene of a garnering of
.over 25 tennis players and en-
thusiasts who assisted in the
draw in? of entries for the Omph-
roy's Tennis Tourney which is
scheduled to start Sunday morn-
ing at 8 o'clock.
Definite and most satisfactory
ilans were made and approved
jy. all present, for the successful
operation of this tourney. Among
those non-players whose enthu-
" slasm prompted their offer to act
I as officials and were present
" .were Germinal Sarrasqueta, Pro-
'' fessor Ferrer Gamboa of the Phy-
'' sical Department, Nicols D'An-
ello and Gustavo Moreno.
It was suggested and unanl-
.. mously voted on that four
f matches be scheduled for Sun-1
days, two in the mornings and
,.two in the afternoons, and
matches are being scheduled ac-
cordingly.
l'ue following pairs drew byes.
In the upper bracket:
Weob Hearne-Clarence Hie.
Benito Charris-Myron Fisher.
Victor Pascual-R. Stroop.
Cyril OldfieldGeorge Motta.
Roger.Little-Lt. Luke.
Angel Delvalle-Carlton Taft.
Lower bracket byes are:
Stanton Brown-
Martin Perelra-Howard Spaul-
din3.
Luther LaMotte Croeslin
Guardia.
Eaby Maduro-Sgt. T. F. Bran-
Dam.
\.'lliam Arthur-Dr. J.B. Hamp-
ton.
Luis Vernacci-Herbert Simp-'
con.
Gilbert Wjlson-Bill Hele.
The following are players for.
the first round of play:
Juan de la Guardia-Earl Omph-
roy. Geza Schay-H. Pittl, Ibsen
..Avila-Dr. C W. Omphrov, Jr., L.
Simons-Harry Willis, Julio Pin-1
ilia, Frank Hladky, Leopoldo
Snchez-Ernesto Plate, Man-
fredo Engel-Dr. Rubn Puerta.
Sunday morning the Olympic
court will be the scene of much
enthusiasm when the following
matches will be played:
8:CO a.m.J. de la Guardia vs.
Bail Omphroy.
9:00 a.m.Geza Schay vs. H.
Pittl.
3:00 p.m.Manfredo Engel vs.
Dr. Rubn Puerta.
4:30 p.m.L. Simons vs. Harry
Wi'lis.
Monday 12lh
4:30 p.m.Julio Plnilla vs.
Frank Kladky.
Tuesday 13th
4:30 p.m.Leopoldo
vs. Ernesto Plate.
Wednesday 14th
4:30 p.m.Webb Hearne
Clartiice lile.
Thursday 15th
Snchez
vs.
Dr.
30 pm Ibsen Avila vs.
Caspar Omphroy, Jr.
i.-i.chti will be two best of
three sens. Rest period of ten
minutes after two sets.
Footfaults will not be called
i until the semifinal round.
I The decision of linesmen will
be final.
Fridays are left vacant for anv
matches that may be rained out
or discontinued because of dark-
ness.
FQOTBAU RESULTS
By UNITED PRESS
"Morris Harvev 23, Davis Elklns 0
Omaha 36, Simpson 18.
Hastings Coll. 62, York Coll. 12.
Miami 34. Chattanooga 7.
Furman 33. Neivberrv 13.
Hard. Sim. 46, Tex. Western 0.
Canadian Club
Tourney Finals
Slated Tomorrow
The finals of the Canadian
Club Tournament will be play-
ed tomorrow at the Brazos
Brook Golf Club.
In the semifinal round of the
tournament, Howard Finnegan
eliminated Lt Waggoner, 5 and
4, while Fitz Humphries over-
came Frankie Day by a score
of 3 and 2.
Finnegan and Humphries
will meet tomorrow to decide
who takes the handsome cock-
tail shaker with the runner-up
receiving six bottles of Cana-
dian Club whisky.
Promoters Clamor
For Services Of
Walcotf, Marciano
NEW YORK, Nov. 10 (UP)
Promoters are clamoring for the
service of Heavyweight Cham-
pion Jersey Joe Waloott and top-
flight contender Rocky Marcia-
no.
Abe Becker of Cincinnati has
made Walcott an offer to meet
the winner of the Bob Baker-Kid
Riviera bout in Cincinnati next
Tuesday. Becker says he has of-
fered Walcott $100,000 or 45 per
cent of the gate, radio and tele-
vision receipts for a bout In mid-
February.
Sam Silverman wants to sign
Marciano for a bout with the
winner of the Ted Lowry-Willie
James bout in Boston on Mon-
day. Silverman says he will guar-
antee Marciano $15,000 for a De-
cember 17 bout in Boston. Lowry
has gone the route twice with
Marciano, although he lost both
times.
Postal inspectors in Brockton,
MassachusettsMarclano's home
townare tracing two postal
cards threatening Rocky's life.
The postal cards said the attempt
would be made today at Marcla-
no's home town welcome party.
Police Chief Edward Sullivan
says, "This Is definitely the work
of some screwball, but I'm tak-
ing no chances."
The warnings apparently were
written by the same person. One
read: "Don't take chances. Watch
Rocky. He will be hurt, better
watch." The other note read:
"Rooky better keep an eye open.
I know he will be shot as soon as
he makes his bow. Money in-
volved."
Winners Collect 32 Hits;
Panama Dumps Guatemala
By United Press
AMATEUR BASEBALL WORLD SERIES
Teams
Cuba
Venezuela
Dominican Republic
Nicaragua
Puerto Rico
Costa Rica
Colombia
Mexico
Panama
Guatemala
El Salvador
The Standings
Won
6
6
4
5
3
2
3
2
1
1
0
Lost Pet.
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
6
4
6
5
.857
.857
.800
.714
.600
.500
.500
.250
.200
.143
.000
Weather Forecast Optimistic
For Today's Football Clashes
NEW YORK Nov 10 TTP __ r-.-o .u.____________. _....
NEW YORK, Nov. 10 (UP)
The weatherman promises to co-
operate for football gamesbut
It's what he did earlier in the
week that is worrying the coach-
es.
The genera] forecast Is opti-
misticcloudy and warm in the
South and East with possible
showers in the Mid-West. But the
snow that fell in the Mid-West
and the rain Eastern folks tried
to dodge this week has turned
many gridirons to mud.
The eight inches of snow
that covered the field at Cham-
paign has been removed but Il-
linois' Rose Bowl bound eleven
Hff 'P
Afhleles Foot
no your f,.et i,,,,. u; i.r, urT
Sr v "nd ',,!Lu "bHrt th'y n'"'y
.fi,,.,y. "I5'.7Th*""' '"* thi
JA Ipung.) Singapore Itch, etc., I.
ii.umiv. germ or para.it that burrow.
HRtEH ln U" "kln- I,on'< worry .nd
Nix0d".er5.t?ll,er day ""out trying
iiSHa!rm- T,1"' sreat medicine get.
d if ?u" Si0011 * k|" <"' t*3
Jlv. I / N;?odrn' work, .o f..t to
BY? >ou oft. .mooth. cle.r kin on
itch* t r b0yl A," r"t ">r otch
0.tN?d?"d 0'h'r.8kln trouble.
> mxoa.rm from your druggl.t today,
S,*or;> Briefs
By UNITED PRESS
NEW YORKIt looks like Su-
gar Ray Robinson will throw his
middleweight title on the line
against Rocky Graviano. Manag-
ing Director Harry Markson of
the International Boxing Club
says that the managers of the
two fighters have agreed "in
principle" to stage a 15-rounder
in Chicago on Feb. 20. Robinson
is also under contract to make a
defense of his crown against Carl
Olsen in San Francisco on Dec
20.
Distributors:
CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
PINEHURST, N.C. The golf-
ing dentist from Memphis, Ten-
nessee Cary Middlecoffrules
as favorite to score a victory in
the North and South Open
Championship at Pinehurst, N.C
Middfecoff heads the field at the
end of two rounds with a 142
Tied for the runner-up spot at
143 are Dick Chapman of Pine-
hurst, Jimmy Adams of Britain
and Tommy Bolt of Durham, N
C. The final 36 holes will take
place today and Sunday.
PRO BASKETBALL
Two games are listed on the
pro basketball cardMinneapol-
is will play at Philadelphia and
Fort Wayne at Indianapolis. No
games were played yesterday.
CLEVELAND The Cleveland
Indians- farm system has a new
bossMike McNalley. McNalley
who succeeds Herold "Muddy"
Ruelhad been president of
Cleveland Eastern League farm
at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.
The 58-year-old McNalley played
with Washington. Boston and
New York in the American
League from 1916 to 1925 as a
utility Infielder. "" "
COLUMBU8, Ohio Informed
sources at minor league baseball
headquarters to Columbus, Ohio
have written off reports that a'
new post of Commissioner of Mi-
nor League baseball has been cre-
ated. Some published reports said
thatTy Cobball-time great De-
troit Tigers' starhad been of-
fered such a Job.
WASHINGTON Senator Ed-
win Johnsonthe president of
the Western Baseball League-
has suggested that colleges set
up a commission to study trends
hi amateur athletics. The Colo-
rado Democrat suggests as fields
for investigationcharges of
over-commercialization of col-
lege sports and widespread fix-
ing of college basketball.
LAREDO, TexDavid Gold-
man of Dallas and Stan Mosel of
.vn -Antonio pace the field as
the International Amateur Golf
Tourney goes Into its second
InUr!nMofi pl*l toda'r- Goldman
and Mosel each racked up 72's on
terday* CXM' COnr"* ye*"i
fears the soggy ground will
ham-string its razzle-dazzle
plays against Iowa.
"Iowa has one of the best rush-
ing records ln the Big 10 Con-
ference," says Illlnl Coach Ray
Elliot. "We've met their fullback
Bill Relchardt, before, and we
aren't looking forward to seeins
him again."
Unbeaten Illinois Is a three-
touchdown (20-point) favorite.
Michigan Statealso unbeaten
and Notre Dame have been
practicing outdoors all week, get-
ting accustomed to handling a
cold, wet pigskin. The Spartans,
who shoot for their 13th straight
NEW^ITCHLeo Kiely takes
a Irw moments from Army rou-
tine at Camp Kilmer, N J., to
write his fiancee, Marilyn
Dunne of Jersey City. The
young left-hander pitched sur-
prisingly well for the Red Sox
atter being called up from the
cham the past Summer. (NEA)
Cristobal High
Whips J.C. 13-0
The Cristobal High School Tig-
era last night biased to two
touchdowns in the secoad half
to beat the Junior College Green
Wave eleven, 13-0, gaining a tie
with the Balboa Bulldogs In the
regular Interscholastic League.
Arnold Manning raced 62 yards
in the third quarter for the first
Tiger touchdown. The try for
the extra point failed. Bailey
went over for the second touch-
down and the conversion was al-
so successful.
The game was a real thriller
all the way. Throughout the first
half the teams see-sawed their
way into each other's territory.
At one point College advanced to
Cristobal's 34-yard line. When
the half ended the ball was in
Green Wave's possession on the
Cristobal 37-yard line.
However, in the third quarter
the tide changed and after sev-
eral fast plays, Manning out-
sprinted the opposition for the
first tally of the game.
The second and final touch-
down came in the fourth quart-
er when, after several perfectly
executed plays, a handoff from
Manning to Bailey moved the ball
nine-yard line where Hi
and goal for the Tig-
win, are one-touchdown (six-
point i layorites over Notre Dame.
"We will be facing one of the
reatest," says Notre Dame
oach Frank Leahy, "and may-
be the greatest, team in the na-
tion. We hope when the game
is over Notre Dame fans will
have cause to respect our
team."
The wlnless Panthers of Pitts-
burgh face Ohio State, the fourth
Big 10 school Pitt has met this
season. Ohio State is favored by
two touchdowns (13 points). Pitt
has played 40 Big 10 schools in
the past decade and won only
four.
Texas Christian, the only team
unbeaten in Southwest Confer-
ence plav, has a day off, but Tex-
as and Rice will try to stay ln
the running. Texas is a one-
touchdown (six-point i favorite
over Baylor, but Arkansas is a
slight (one-point) favorite over
Rice. ,
L The .M game on the West
Coast is between Stanford and
Southern California ln Los An-
geles. A crowd of 90,000 is ex-
pected to turn out for the game.
Stanford is undefeated. And
Southern Cal, has only a second
string team loss to a service club
So they will battle for the Paci-
fic Coast Conference lead. South-
ern Cal is a one-touchdown (six-
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Venezuela 10, Puerto Rico 0; Dominican Repu-
Wic 7, Mexico 3; Nicaragua 37, El Salvador 5: Pa-
nama 16, Guatemala 2.
TODAY'S GAME
El Salvador vs. Costa Rica; Puerto Rico vs. Do-
minican Republic; Guatemala vs. Venezuela; Mexico
vs. Panama.
to the _
was first _
era. Bailey then swung wide to
the right and went over for the
touchdown.
A GIFT FOR YOU
THE SCOn SPOON
Mode of Durable Plastic
n Beautiful Colors
point) favorite on the strength
of triple-threat back Frank Gil-
ford. Stanford will depend upon
the passing combination of Gary
Kerkorian and end BUI McCoil
and the plunging of fullback and
Olympic decathlon champion Bob
Mathias.
Promoters of the Thanksgiving
Day Burley Bowl game in John-
son City, Tennessee, have receiv-
ed an okay from one team it in-
vited. Morris Harvey Collage of
Charleston, West Virginia agreed
to play. The promoters hope to
announce the other team next
week.
That other team definitely
wont be Michigan state, for the
Spartans are against any and all
Bowl games. Dr. John Hannah,
president of Michigan State, goes
so far as to say: "If I had my
way, there would be no Bowl
games at all." Hannah says he
has received "no feelers." And he
adds, "None will be considered
and certainly none played."
MEXICO CTTY, Nov. 10 (UP)
Venezuelan pitcher Bias Rodri-
guez and Panamanian hurler Ar-
turo Valencia turned ln two of
the finest pitching jobs yet seen
m the Amateur Baseball World
Series yesterday only to find ev-
erybody talking about the worst
pitching performance in the
tournament's history.
Rodrigues pitched a three-
hit shutout to lead his team to
a W-0 victory over Puerto Rico
and a tie with Cuba for the
tournament lead. Valencia held
Guatemala to only two hits as
the Panam nine won its first
tournament game, 16-2..
But baseball fans were more
awed by the performance of six
El Salvador pitchers who ware
nursing worn out arms and won-
dering what hit them.
The answer was easythe
Bowerhouse Nicaraguan team hit
em 32 times for 37 runs and an
all-time Series record. The hap-
less El Salvador nine, still hunt-
ing for its first Series win, fold-
ed completely before the power-
ful Nlcaraguans.
The game looked more like a
track meet than a baseball game
as Nlcaraguans trotted around
the basepaths in a constant pro-
cession. The very first El Salva
dor pitch was slammed for a sln-
le and Nicaragua kept up a stea-
y barrage for nine terrific in-
nings. The first ten Nlcaraguans
all scored.
When the first half f' > first
inning ended, Nlcaragi oat
ln front by ten runs just
kept rolling. By the st in-
ning every player on the Nicar-
aguan nine had scored at least
twice and had at least three hits
to his credit. After that Manager
Andrew Epdllta cleaned the
bench.
One shocked fan gasped
when he heard the score,
"What were they playing, foot-
ball?"
The loss left the wlnless El Sal-
vador ln sole possession of the
cellar as Valencia' "beautiful
mound job put Panam into the
win column for the first time.
Felipe Malcolm smashed three
triples to lead Panama's 20-bit
attack.
The two runs were scored off
Valencia in the second when
Guatemala's Francisco Morales
and Oeraldo Valdizan both sln-
5led and came home on Bernal-
Guld0Vly to deep center,
which was dropped.
Venezuela jumped on torea
Puerto Rican hurlers for 17 hits
and ten runs to move into a
first place tie with Cuba which
was idle yesterday. The Vene-
suelana have a chance to mora
ahead of the Cubans today as
they face Guatemala while th
islanders remain idle for anoth-
er day.
The Dominican Republic, last
year's tournament champion,
moved within one game or tha
leaders by downing Mexico in a
n^nt anie, 7-3. The "Jame
boya"pitcher Stanley and back-
atop Walterled the Dominican
batters, scoring three runs and
rapping out five hits between
them.
Stanley James also turned In
an eight-hitter, blanking the Me-
xicans after their three-run ral-
ly ln the first toning.
DALLAS, Tex.Cotton Bowl
officials will hold a drawing to-
day to determine who will get
some 23,000 tickets available lot
the New Year's Day Classic. Thus
far. more than 30,000 letters have
been receivedmost of them re-
questing three or four tickets.
In The
MO IXTIA COSTI Ask for the
lrge Scon's Emulsion package
containing a beautiful tablespoon.
Obtainable aht attract** colors.
Theo give your family cfass sdetv
o'fic, viumvricb food-took every
day, m many doctors raconunead.
You'll soon have a stronger sod
nsalffastr family.
l$QH>I t^WIT I III
n
ANO
0/* SCOtfS EMULSION
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iell-fliilif irrUl>iub
^HtreOme^AubmafictfwJis
or you. K windi HseH with each
arm movement and stores upa
running reserve o 36 hours. 17
jeweh-non magnetic and shock-
proof, Nit lar rnoreaccurale than t
ordinary watches because me
mainspring tension is constant
Swlts Jewelry Store
Chas. Perret
General Agent
Colon, R. P.
<(1 tlIVOII fUflt OMf4
THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by the State
Pay* 2% Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
W make loans with guarantees on first mortages
Or other securities.
CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
25c. 50c. $1.00 and $5.00
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety deposit boxes, for Jewelry and
documants. in 4 different tizas.
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
1SS Central Ave. at
ornar of -I" street
COLON BRANCH:
rrwt St. at earner
of 7tb8t
Q. R. De ROUX
Manager.
CARLOS MOUYNB V.
Sab-Manager.
ODlli
Tri : Mfe St U:M ajn.
SATURDAYS: fret S:SS mm. U Vt.H mm.
Hi

a-


SATURDAY. NOVEMBER It. ltsl

iWi ill
TE PANAMA AMERICAN A* MUtPEHDENT OAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE
a
Notre Dame Joins Penn Fighting College Football Television Curbs In 1952
i
4
You'll as* a dlfferent Charley" Drenen running the Brooklyn*
Mat yew. A much mor* hastened fellow, and for it an improv-
ed manager who'll probably win the pennant he thought he could
win to handily thla year. Some of ui have to learrl the hard way
thd Dreeaen, a* it turned oat, belonged to the lodge.
Perhaps the best thing that ever happened to Dressen wai to
lose when It didn't seem possible, for if he had won he might have
developed such a monumental ego there'd been no Hying with him.
Certainly he appeared to be heading in that direction with the
Bums were out in front by i3Vi games.
At that time he was throwing his weight around something
scandalous, taking so many bows you could see his waistline dimin-
ishing and patting himself on the back so often he looked like a
contortionist who, was madly In love with his work.
There was that mldseason Interview he gave in Chicago. The
Bums were so far in front you needed a pair of heavy binoculars
to see who was second... "But wait until next year," Dressen
promised. "I'm lust getting to know what these fellows can do."
Dressen went out of his way to take a snide slap at Burt Shot-
ton whom he has replaced../'Let's put It this way. Maybe my
methods have something to do with where we are today as com-
pared to where the club was at this time last year. (Ed. note:
Tne 1960 Bums were hovering between third and fourth place.)
Dretsen continued "And the pitchingmaybe my methods are re-
sponsible for the way they are winning. Maybe my methods are
differentand maybe they are better."
GUILTY OP BUSH STUFF
Such comments pictured Dressen as a popoff and an lnsuffer-
C" le blow hard. Even if valid they'd have been better unuttered.
seball can be an unpredictable game and no sensible manager
ever deliberately sets a trap for himself. That s what Dressen did
and when the Bums folded he got precisely what he had foolishly
invitedthe full blame.
Vanity is a common human attribute. Some of us manage to
ride it with a tighter rein than others. This was Dressen's fresh-
men year as manager of a first class, Dig-league team. Being on
top was a new experience and, as proved, the high altitude un-
balanced him; All of a sudden he got the notion be was some-
thing extra special. That's happened to others. Even happened
to a fellow named Napoleon.
Dressen sato and did things he's already lived to regret. Bush
things, such as clearing the bench with one imperious sweep when
the umpires decided the Bums had gone far enough with their
empty, noisy harangues. That may have been considered smart
stuff In Oakland but It was strictly Peora around here.
Nor did it add'to his stature as a big leaguer when he blamed
others for mistakes a manager normally shares or Ignores, at least
for public consumption. Like the comment he made on the home-
run ball Ralph Branca pitched which enabled the Giants to win
the playoffs. ."It wouldn't have happened if Roy Campanella
(crippled) had been catching."
To put it mldry, this was thoughtless. The pitch Branca made
was high, the kind Bob Thomson, with his changed batting stance,
bits best. But it wasn't Branca's first high pitch It was his sec-
ond. The surprise was Thomson hadn't swung at the first one.
But why blame Rube Walker, the substitute catcher? Why didn't
Dressen, after the first pitch, warn Branca? He warot crippled.
BIS STARS FOLDED, TOO
Oh, yes. breasen made mistakes, some very stupid ones, in fact.
But it's unfair to shoulder him with the full blame for the loss of
the pennant. In the final analysis It's the players who win or
lose the games, not the managera fact of baseball Ufe Dressen
has been a long time learning.
Don't forget that Branca; and Don Neweombe couldn't win a
game for the Bums'in five weeks and Duke Snider fell off so badly
during the stretch drive he had to be benched. Even If Dressen
was as good as he thought he was he still couldn't have pitched
tor Neweombe and Branca or hit for Snider.
His reappplntment as manager hasn't been received with com-
pleto Joy in Flatbuah, yet. I'm pleased he's to get another chance.
Hei a sound baseball man and the ordeal he's beep through is al-
Btost certain to give him a different viewpoint and a different set
of standards. If Leo Duroctier could change himself over, there's
surely hope for Dressen.
The Brooklyn head man.. Walter O'MaUey, found himself on
the spot. A year ago he fired Shotton for losing out on the last
day of the season. No matter what the circumstances, he wouldn't
have looked good If he had fired Dressen who. after all, did tie
foz the pennant, and whose major crime was that he couldn't
CharieyPrX d?"aai&r* '"* *"* ^ *" ^^^

>
v a
1

If
*
Notice To Teen-Age Boys
,. '**}&* I"? *H! * u y?f ot * "' * August
1st or will not be 16 years old before next August lit and
*? fo to. l.R*l the "Fastlich Teen Age Baseball League." Please leave your
etnapletOA ballot with Principal T. F. HotiTwbw High
School, or bringu along to the tryoats to be held at the
Ancon Athletic Field (next to Laundry) on Saturday. Nov.
10, and Monday, Nov. U, from 8:3 a.m. antil l:M p.m.
To become a member yon most appear at one Of these
tryoats.
Four phone
"*"..........................(*i15e"?,t.................
neighbor's)
Krth*y ........................'......Ag...........'
Address............%............................
*osttien Ton Dually Play .............................
' ii i ii
Doubts That
Video Hurts
Small Schools
By LAWRENCE ROBINSON
NBA Special Correspondent
NEW YORK(NBA)The big
liattle at the National Collegiate
Athlethic Association conven-
tion two months hence in Cin-
cinnati will be drawn over foot-
ball television.
Notre Dame, for one, Is going
to let fly at further regulation
such as prevails this year.
The Irish will have strong sup-
port, too, from Pennsylvania and
several other colleges which pro-
tested vehemently when restric-
tions were Imposed by the NCAA
this year.
Edward Walter Krause ex-
presses Notre Dame's view on'
the affair as one of repressed
rebellion.
"As an Institution, Notre Dame
believes In televising sports of
all sorts, particularly football, to
advance the cause of higher edu-
cation," says Director of Athle-
tics Moose Krause.
"It presents to the masses an
Interesting phase of college life
"It Is a wonderful medium to
interest people In a college edu-
cation, people who might never
think of it otherwise.
"We want to televise our foot-
ball games and Intend to fight
for tne right; Notre Dame was
willing to go along with the
NCAA experimental program this
season, but we are not going to
consent to further restrictions.
'COST NOTRE DAME SMMM
Krause scoffs at the argument
that spot televising of big games
hurts the ga*s at small schools.
"The mere fact a big school is
Elaying In a small school's area
urts the little fellow," he adds.
"I know because I coached a
.small school, St Mary's, In Min-
nesota's area for five years.
There wasn't any TV then but
whenever Minnesota played at
home, particularly a big one like
Michigan we were murdered at
the gate. Our alumni went off
to see the big game and there
was nothing we could do about
It.
Krause notes that Notre Dame
misses the large chunk of dough
which TV brought in.
This year it would have been
close to $500,000
Notre Dame received a nice
piece of change against Michi-
gan State, but nowhere near
what it might have been had it
made its own arrangement.
The schools split about 80 per
cent of the sponsor's money; the
other 20 per cent or thereabouts
going to the tTCAA to defray the
cost of the season-long survey
being conducted by the National
Opinion Research Center of the
University of Chicago.
EVERYBODY SEES SELLOUTS
The NCAA committee on tele-
vision, headed bv Ralph Fureyof
Columbia, relented in the case
of Lansing, site of the game, and
nearby Detroit Both these cities
were originally scheduled to get
the Maryland-Navy game. A spe-
cltl dispensation was granted to
stay-at-homes in the neighbor-
hood to See the nation's number
one battle la their own back-
vard. It was a logical concession
In view of the fact that the game
had been a complete sellout since
August.
The future of football TV is
still as much in doubt, as far as
NCAA officials are concerned, as
it was when the program of al-
most complete renresslon was de-
signed. It will take a great deal
uf study of facts and figures to
determine what effect TV has
on attendance
A casual survey reported a gen-
eral rise In attendance In the
east and middle west.
But no matter what the re-
searchers determine, a lot Of big
schools are going to go on fight,
lng far the return of TV to the
individual.
Coaches Defend Two Platoons,
But Arguments Are Specious
USARCARIB RIFLE CHAMPS Pictured Is the 45th Reconnaissance Battalion rifle team which
recently (October 0) won the 1951 United Bta -i /rmy Caribbean 1951 Rifle Championships.
The same organization also won in 1960. Left to right: Capt. Albert C. Smith, who was also
individual champion rifle shot; Capt. A. S. Daus, 1st Lieut. E. D. Foster; Master Sergeant E.
C. Budd, who was second high scorer; Sergeant First Class C. R. Breckon, and Lieut. Col. M. T.
Johnston, team captain (non-shooting.) (fjs Army Photo)
By HARRY GRAYSON
NBA Sports Editor
Army Sports
FORT DAVIS INVITATIONAL
BOWLIN G
FORT DAVISOpening game
of the Fort Davis Invitational
Bowling Tournament was held
Tuesday evening, Nov. 6. Lt. Col-
onel William J. Bennett, Com-
manding Officer, 104th AAA Gun
Battalion, and Major Eldon H.
Mitchell, Commanding Officer,
370th Engineer Shore Battalion,
jointly opened the league by
bowling the first two balls.
Sixteen teams are entered In
the league and competition Is so
keen and the teams are so evenly
matched that four teams are tied
for first place with three wins
and no losses, four teams are tied
for second place with two wins
and one loss, four teams tied for
third place wit hone win and two
losses, and the four remaining
teams are tied for fourth place,
no wins and three losses.
Official League Standing
TEAMS W. L-Fto.
"D" Co. 370th Shore Bn
QM Det, 370th Shore Bn
"F" Co., 370th Shore Bn
No. 1............
"B" Co., 370th Shore Bn
7481st Big. Det., Atl. .
"F" Co., 370th Shore Bn
No,a..............-
"ireoird .. .. :;-.. .. n
53th Engr. FF Platoon 2 1
Ofcrs., 370th Shore Bn.
Hq., 370th Shore Bn. ..
Hg., 7,64th AAA Bn.. ..
Ofcrs., 784th AA ABn..
"B" Btry, 784th AAA Bn
"A" Btry, 784th AAA Bn
Prov. Trng. Btry, 784th
"C" Btry, 90rd......
TOO MUCH AT ONCF
SCHENECTADY. N. Y. JF.)
Richard C Miller, bus d.lver,
had a rough day. Within seven
hours, his bus was Involved la
two accidents.
When You Can't Win,
De-Emphasize Them
NORMAN, Okla., Nov. 10 (UP)
John Jacobs was asked how
many of the five meets two-mll-
ers on his track team would win
this fall.
The Oklahoma coach consid-
ered the question for a moment.
"I think," he said, finally,
"we'll win one and de-emphasise
four."
JUST A SUGGESTION
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (U.P.)
Right next to the Trousseau
Shop here Is the Stork Shop.
Along The Fairways
The Ladies' Day event at Fort
Amador Golf course on Thurs-
day, Nov. 8, a Flag Tournament,
was won by Mrs. Pauline Klevan
who shot a sparkling 80 and
planted her flag only a few Inch-
es from the cup of the 19th hole.
Mrs Birdie Hewitt and Mrs.
Jean Ladd also completed the 18
with strokes in hand to start the
19th hole.
The Ringer Tournament, which
ended Nov. 2, was also won by
Mrs. Pauline Klevan who had low
gross and net In the first flight,
so gets gross, with a 63; Mrs. Syl-
va Carpenter the gross with a
50; In the second flight, Mrs. Do-
ris Hamilton won low gross with
a 69, Mrs. Nancy Brown, low net
with 44.
THEY UNDERESTIMATED
INDIANAPOLIS (UP) Mrs.
Alice Howard, 41. said after liv-
ing birth to her 20th child that
she aad her husband originally
had planned "to have only two?
,_*
Before you buy your
STERLING
visit
MERCURIO
141 Central Ave.
y
Our iiscbunt on ofders shipped directly
to the Canal Zone are extremely liberal
<*
PARIS BAZAAR

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'Monday 'Tuesday 'Wednesday
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Mor .. $5.95 NOW . 3.95
AFTERNOON FROCKS
Before . $8.95 NOW . 5.95
Mor* 10.95 & 11.95 MOW .. 7.95
CASH SALES ONLY
NEW YORK (NBA) There
is little question but that col-
lege football Is In graver danger
than It has been since President
Theodore Roosevelt straightened
the boys out in 1905.
That brought In the forward
pass.
/Yet famous coaches defend the
platoon system, which since its
inception has been attacked on
many sides.
Dutch Meyer of Texan Christ-
ian carried his advocacy of the
unit plan to the Pacific Coast
Conference, which has gone on
record as being against it
Meyer gives you the sales talk
of Army's Red Blalk and others
in the upper echelons.
1More boys get to play.
2Because of frequent rests,
the lads are fresher, making for
more-spirited second halves, and
especially fourth quarters.
3All practice at the same
time.
Anyway you look at it. the ar-
guments of coaches favoring
mass substitution are specious,
which is an Ivy League word for
phony.
As Athletic Director Robert A.
Hall of Yale points out, they seek
the perfection of the profession-
als and have gotten away from
the more-essential values of the
college game.
WHO WANTS TO BE HALF OF
A FOOTBALL PLAYER?
As to the greater number en-
gaged, what does lt mean If the
game Isn't made worth while?
It's like putting a new man In
to hit with every pitch in base-
ball.
I'd like to ask coaches advoc-
ating multiple replacements how
often they've been asked by de-
tenders for a crack at the other
blokes on offense.
What player doesn't want a
part in ramming the ball down
the other side's throat?
Who wants to play defensive
tackle all ofternoon?
Who wants to be half of a .foot-
ball player?
The group gimmick denies
young men the chance of win-
ning the affection and under-
standing of teammates by going
through thick and thin with
them.
BE A
2
SERVE
CEBVE2A
Red Blalk Patch Meyer ,
College football Is supposed tfl
be a team game. The original
Idea was that the kid had t
learn to play alone with team*
mates.
It was meant that ha had Ml
learn to take care of his weak*
nesses as well as exploit bit
strength.
COACHES HAVE NO IDEA OB
WHAT IT IS COSTINO
There are ways of getting all
who want to play Into football
without making them specialists.
The principal thing in college)
should be a well-rounded player.
Coaches should leave tha
more-spirited second halves ta
the money players. That's thelc
business.
The- college coach's business la
to bring out the best in what ha
has.
College squads practiced Just
as long before the rules commit-
tee took a leaf from the proa
and gradually loosened up .the
substitution regulation.
At the National CollegJatsJ
Athletic Association meeting U
Cincinnati la January, the rules}
committee should be directed tol
return to the old method at
substitution, which would kill
the platoons deader than yester*
day's gag.
High-pressure football coachea
talking up the two platoons con-
tend that the only drawback la
expeaae.
They seem to have ao Mas
what lt Is costing the gamead
them. |
TAGAROPULOS
INDUSTRIES, S.A.
Phones:
1002 1003
#4041 kco Boyd Ave.
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HOME DELIVERY
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car tyres
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ALL
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for
ENGLISH
CARS
DISTRIBUTORS:
AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, S. A.
No. 14 Central Ave. Tel. 2-37M
Alas available at:
HECRTEMATTE ft ARIAS, 8. A. Panam
C. O. MASON, S. A. Cotn
ARISTIDES ABADA ft CIA. LTDA. David
IMPORTACIONES REVILLA David
ESTACIN VIRZI Santiago
BODEGA INTERNACIONAL Chitr*


AUoTT, MARCIANO BOUT IN OFFING
ssadegh Will
tnounce Oil
$ Failure
AN INDEPICTE^^jfife4^1LT rewal>APBE
Panattra American
(Tut O
TWENTI-SEYENTH TEAR
IvTASHINGI ON. Nov. 10 'UPl ,
Iranian Premier Mohammed
Mossadegh was general!v expect-
JEldday to signal an end to Am-
epican efforts :o mediate the ex-
MDsive lran:,ir oil crisis In a.
niajor policy r..idres* to be made
next Wedne...y.
Barring a last-minute dcvelop-
W#ht. the Premier is ready to
tnaqjjnce 'that three weeks of
tap-level dis- \ slcn.s here have
^BB to produce an acceptable
iolutjcn to the deadlock. i
- Diplomatic informants said !
tjere Is a change further talks
on the working level here and ;
on the highes level in Paris still
Blight product an eleventh hour ",c ""l?"**"*" a urciaea i swi
agreement. Bu; neither the Iran- : aiu nor the British are optimls- British Labor governments pol-1 for
?ir. lev on recoenltion nf RH i
'Let the people knoto the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
PANAMA. R. P., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Britain Sticks By Recognition
Of Reds As China Government
m
ley on recognition of Red
Mossadegh, who blames Brl- China,
tain for blocking settlement, is The British delegation to the
acheduled to speak before the United Nations General As-
National Press Club and pro- sembly Is expected to abstain
Bably will leave soon afterwards tnis afternoon in an Assembly
lor his crisis-torn homeland. He i ve over whether or not to add
has obtained airline reservations t0 he Assembly's agenda. Rus-
tJPE&JSSS; M 'UP'Wins-1 ant Issue before the General, Simultaneous the Weatern
ton Churchill-* new Conserva-1 Assembly as the West reacted: power* pushed threngb. the
tent has decided, swiftly to Russia's rejection of steering committee, by a It
the Big Three's "foolproof" plan, to 2 vote, a demand for full
disarmament. | debate on their plan for an
tor New York for Thursday after-
noon.
A report from Teheran said
Sahah Mohammed Reza Pah-
levl requested Mossadegh's im-
mediate return to deal with
local disorders and the gather-
lag economic storm in Iran.
Aides deni* i Mossadegh re-
ceived any sach summons but
old he is extremely anxious to
wind up the talks quickly one
Waypr the other.
sia's proposal for the admission
of Red China to the United Na-
tions.
Due to Churchill's previous
, criticism of the Labor govern-
ment's recognition of Red
China there had been some
speculation that he might
switch Britain's stand and
more behind the United
States in supporting Chiang
Kai-shek's Nationalist govern-
ment.
American negotiators, headed' JRussla agrees that there
by Assistant Secretary of State I hou'd be one Chinese seat in
George McGhee have submitted the United Nations, as at pre-
. series of proposals In a last-|"nt- Dut wants the Nationalist
ditch effort to bring the two sides' representatives to be thrown
together and save Iranian oil for out and "placed bv a repre-
the free worid. sentative of the Pelping Gov-
j ernment of Mao Tse-tung.
But the agreement has been' Tne United States will oppose
blocked by the Anglo Iranian!thii nove, and will also oppose
dispute over whether the Iran- I *ny more to transfer the Ro-
lan government or a foreign ^rean peace talks to the United
ompany should operate the' Nations, as It is expected Rus-
The United States. BritainI on-the-spot investigation of
and France invited West Ger- political conditions in Soviet-
man Chancellor Konrad Ade- run East Germany.
nauer to Paris on Nov. 21 for a The proposal was put forward
two dav "brass tacks" decision i by the West to determine If
on how soon and how many "free and democratic elections"
German soldiers can be supplied are possible in East Germany on
for Elsenhower's North Atlantic a Soviet scheme for unifying
Pact armies._________ the divided country.
largest oil refinery in the world.
Informed sources said Stale
Department officials have
male important progress in
convincing Mossadegh that he
must follow accepted business
practices it he expects to sae-
ceefl In operating so vast an
Industry as Iranian oil.
They said the Premier now has
gM$d Iran must offer realistic
incentive prices" and contract-
puarantees if it expects a large
HHpany to market its oil around
the globe
But Mossadegh has refused to
""* on his position that Iran
f must operate the refinery.
Is a point, he told American
_ Slala which he could not sur-
Qn the other hand, the Brit-
tasr-atlll believe no solution will
pa possible uniess an experienced
pw "a trained team" oper-
atoa the refinery to assure the
production on which marketing
proposals cou^ be based.
sia might seek to do.
The United States position is
that to obtain a Korean cease-
fire military negotiations must
be conducted by military men
in a military setting that is,
Korea.
Once a ceasefire and armis-
tice is agreed on by the mili-
tary men, the United States
believes negatiations for a
political settlement should
come to the United Nations.
Meanwhile the Big Three
Western power have virtually
abandoned hope of getting any-
where with Russia at this Gen-
eral Assembly meeting on the
question of an overall peace
settlement
The Western Big Three acted
today to peed German rearma-
ment amid bitter Soviet charges
that they are turning Germany
into a base "for military action
aeainst Russia and the people's
democracies."
Germany and German rear-
Sudan, Now Claimed By Egypt,
Is Land With Long History
WASHINGTON, D.C. Nov. 10
Nearly a million square miles of
territory and some eight million
people are involved In the sweep-
ing legislation by which the
Egyptian parliament has pro-
claimed King Farouk "King of
Egypt and the Sudan."
By thus amputating the "An-
glo" from the long accepted
name of the Anglo-Egyptian Su-
dan, the Egyptians in effect
have laid sole claim to the larg-
est single country in all Africa,
says the National Geographic
Society.
Stretching westward from the
Red Sea deep Into the heart of
Africa, the Sudan lies athwart
the continent's overland routes
as well as the Suez Canal-Red
Sea lane. It shares frontiers with
a sizable roster of the indepen-
dent and colonial states of Afri-
ca. From Egypt on the north,
the Sudan is all but surrounded
by Libya, French Equatorial Afri-
ca, the Belgian Congo. British-
protected Uganda, and Henya;
Ethiopia and Eritrea.
British connection with the
Sudan began after the opening
of the Suez Canal in 1869. In the
early 1870's. the Egyptian khe-
dlve. who had gained nominal
control over the wild country to
the south, appointed as Its gov-
ernor Sir Samuel Baker, British
explorer and big-game hunter.
Successor to Sir Samuel was
General Charles ("Chinese")
by earlier distinguished service
in China. Eventually, in 1885,
Gordon was to lose his life In the
Sudan at the hands of dervish
fanatics in the politico-religious
Mahdi uprising.
Still another of Britain1 fam-
ous sons to play a dramatic role
in the Sudan story was Lord
Kitchener, who led the British-
mament emerged as the domln- Gordon, who won his nickname
Badly Wounded Negro Quotes
fla. Sheriff: I Killed The SOBs'
two were handcuffed toge- Four FBI agents questioned
the sheriff in the presence of Irvin said Deputy Yates arriv-
[of them-I killed the judge Hall, also acting coroner added'V U1 h,m' lr^
ipsi ss imsss
SSssaa sI=s1 PS
^ *VcV,rer.nhI*them tooting when hU ttoV one's Sothat "i ourmln?. ? i^'"
Sty^aT r V^rlnVS Son1 Ut ' ** & '" ^^^ " "
n&ZT 17-year-,d B^^^^'^ffi^^^^S"
Is nothing more to say," ghe shot m" "" r'*ht rsehas refu8ed comment <* the
dan campaigns ..
joint British-Egyptian rule in
1899. And one young officer who
fought In the last decisive battle,
at Omdurman In 1883, was Wins-
ton Churchill.
Many other nations besides
Great Britain and Egypt have
found the Sudan a strategically
placed region. During World
War II this country was an es-
sential link in the Allied supply
line to the Middle East and a
bulwark In the battle for North
Africa.
Although Italian forces tem-
porarily occupied parts of the
eastern Sudan and bombed
Khartoum, the capital at the
Junction of the Blue and White
mies, the country held firm. Su-
danese civilians and troops were
loyal.
For the Sudanese people, as
for the Egyptians, the River Nile
is the center of life and prosper-
ity. From the forested, animal-
haunted uplands in the south the
river flows the entire length of
the country, bringing a ribbon of
fertility to desert and scrub-
lands.
Life Is primitive away from the
few urban centers. Nomadic or
seminomadlc, the people are
largely dependent on subsistence
crops and livestock. Cotton has
i become an important money
crop. The Sudan is the world's
gum arable.
The western powers agreed to
a similar U. N. investigation of
the U. S.. British and French
zones.
Soviet delegate Jacob A. Ma-r
lik in two tough and embitter-
ed speeches before the U. N.
charged that the United States
was engineering "another Ko-
rea" in West Germany.
He vigorously opposed the
suggestion that the U. N. look
behind the Iron Curtain to as-
sess political condition In East
Germany as a "violation" of the
U. N. Charter.
"West German industry." he
said, "la being made to run
full blast again and all .West
Germany Is being designed as
an area for military action
against Russia and the people's
democracies.
"General Eisenhower overtly
proposed to include German
divisions in the North Atlantic
armies. German fascist. Ger-
man generals...are. being en-
listed by Elsenhower a his
closest advisers."
In spite of Malik's warnings
and implied threats, it was a
foregone conclusion that the
full Assembly would support the
East German inquiry.
And the Big Three foreign
Sun Doesn't Shine
In Key West-
Consternation Reigns
KEY WE8T. Fia., Nov. 10 (UP)
The president of the Chamber
of Commerce threatened to bring
suit. But the fact remainedit
was rainy and cold yesterday and
President Truman couldn't go
swimming.
Not since the mayor had to go
to work for the WPa had such
local consternation reigned.
"We thought," said one hotel
owner, "that the President would
bring us an early season, Instead,
he came with the rain."
A leading strip dancer said:
"I've had more fun at a street-
car wreck."
Mr. Truman aaid nothing and
bundled up In a woolen shirt,
walking occasionally through the
submarine base to look at the
sailor.
The President got up at 6:30
am., took a look at the soupy I
weather and decided to stay
away from the beach.
He breakfasted on grapefruit
and boiled eggs, then settled
down to a recorded concert of
Tschaikowsky records.
He walked through the base for
about 30 minutes, and returned
to hls'quarters via the press room
where there were no reporters
they were In their quarters try-
%to keep warm.
>e temperature actually was
In the low sixties and the weath-
erman promised better weather
today
During the morning, Mr. Tru-
man met with members of hi
staff and dictated a number of
letters to his personal stenog-
rapher. Jack Romagna. The
President took a long afternoon
nap.
The American Bible Society building In Cristobal.
v *
Isthmian Churches To Join
WorldBibleReadingProgram
Egyptian forces In the final Su- .*"? the, 2* Three forelsm
dan campaigns which ushered in m,n"ter left no doubt they
were prepared to press for
speedy German rearmament, in
view of Russia's refusal of their
peace and disarmament plan.
Hotel Man Charges
Strikers Plotted
To Poison Sugar
Argentina Starts
Skull Bone Bank
To Aid Surgery
largest source of ,
Some gold, Ivory and salt are al-
He snatched both of us and so produced.
THE FIRST THANKSGIVING
Retired Army Vet
Is New Manager
Of Motta's Ranch
Col. Daniel H. Mallan. who
recently retired as veterinarian
for the U.S. Army Caribbean,
was announced as the new man-
ager of a 9.000-hectare cattle
ranch owned by the Motta Bro-
thers in Remedios Panama
Mallan left today for the Uni-
ted States where he will pur-
chase fine breed stock to add to
the 10.006 head of cattle now on
the huge ranch.
The colonel retired from the
USARCARIB on Oct. 31. of this
year and was tendered a farewell
review at Fort Amador last week
His family, Mr. Dorothy
Heintzelman Mallan and four
daughters are at present resid-
ing at Ft. Clayton until his re-
turn from the States.
BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 10 (U.P.)
What may be the world's first
cranium bank has been opened
here.
This bank, operating much like
a blook bank, has on hand sever-
al fragments of human skulls.
They are frozen and may be kept
for 90 day, according to a mem-
ber of the Institute of Neurosur-
gery, which is sponsoring the
bank.
The idea of transplanting a
portion of one human skull into
a cavity In another skull caused
by disease or accident 1 not new.
According to Dr. Ramon Carrillo,
one of the foremost neurosur-
geons in Argentina and also pub-
lic health minister, the idea of a
cranium bank is new.
Skull portions generally are
used In operations for epilepsy in
which the brain and the skull
are injured. It also is used in the
case of tumors when the cranium
is infected and where a portion
of the bone must be removed for
access to the brain tissue.
Too Expensive
Gold and silver plate long
have been used to take the place
of a removed portion of the skull.
That has been expensive. Plastic
also has been used with promis-
ing results. Pieces of the cranium
preserved In alcohol were tested
with no 111 effects on the pa-
tient.
The adrantaee of urinr live
hoe *'"ord'n tei * lntifnte.
Li tha* the r^ft win become one
with t>e b*i*' rrn|mv A
bnrt t,w< ***e* ?* m#r*v
?v>e r.-M.nf t th mft. thus
flna><* *. ?* n**w*. --., ,._
.'" '" H -.
d frrtn Honors who will the
DES MOINES, Iowa, Nov. 10
(UP) Authorities today inves-
tigated charge by hotel mana-
ger Joseph Whalen that waiter
Lewi Fulton was given poison to
mix in the sugar supply of his
Savory Hotel, where a strike 1
In progress.
Fulton was fred on a bond a
material witness.
8avory la one of three hotels
Involved in the trlke by AFL
Food and Service Worker since
Oct. 7.
Fulton is among the employes
who went on strike but he re-
turned to work a week ago.
Authorities began an inquiry
when Whalen reported that five
package of poison were given
Fulton to mix with the sugar.
A Union spokesman claimed no
knowledge of any poison plot.
Churches throughout the ca-
nal Zone and adjacent commun-
ities will cooperate with thou-
sands of churches around the
world in a program of worldwide
Bible reading from Thanksgiv-
ing to Christmas, according to
announcement made by the Rev.
J. W. Llnkemann. associate sec-
retary.of the Cristobal agency of
the American Bible Society.
Millions of Bible readers m
many languages Join m using the
same selected list of .Scripture
passages for this period of ap-
proximately one month preceding
Christmas. The reading list this
year carries the title: The Way
Out of the dark.
President Truman annually
heads up a national committee of
laymen, who sponsor the move-
ment.
A booth for the display of Bi-
bles will be located by the Bible
Society at the entrance of the
Balboa Commissary on Nov. 17,
20, 21 and 23.
The women of the Balboa
Heights Baptist Church have
volunteered to attend this booth.
Additional observance of Uni-
versal Bible Sunday is planned
for Dec. 9. Churches will Observe
special service that day.
Promoted by the American Bi-
ble Society, thl day la intended
to emphasize the primary im-
portance of the Bible as a factor
in the life of our world today and
the work of all churches and es-
pecially in family and pSeonal
Rev. Mr. Limkemsmn stated
that he expects to distribute 9,-
180 of the reading list through-
out this area, and that interest
in this run high in the variouf
churches.
Among the national sponsor
are the following well known lay-
men: Karl T. Compton. John
Foster Dulles, Gen. Dwlght D.
Elsenhower, Walter H. Judd He-
len Keller. Alf M. Landon. R. G.
LeTourneau, John R. Mott.
Capt Edw. V. Rickenbacker,
Francis B. Sayre. Amos Alonzo
Staff. Harold E. 8tasseh, Low-
ell Thomas and others.
CardiDo Will Hear
Compensation Cates
Frank A. Cardillo, Deputy Corn,
mlsgloner of L*bor tor New York
City is In Panam for a four-day
government business trip.
Cardillo mtt\ hoW hearings on
several VM. compensation cases
of injuries to workmen who are
employe* by contractors work-
ing for the US government.
He wiO return to New York
Tuesday.
4fittsbui-th' Officer
Did Isthmian Duty
Commander Grover Stanle>
Hlgginbotham, Executive Offlcur
of the heavy cruiser UB8 Pitts-
burg, which transited the Canul
today, was commanding officer
dt'Hq. 15th Naval District during
his tour of duty here from Auit.
1949 to Sept. 1950.
Yesterday's tory stated erron-
eously that he was eommandar.it
during hi local service.
Illustrated by Walt Scott
h
*
aYes, I always ask for it"
There are definite reason why Scotch whisky can only
come from Scotland; and why none is finer than White
Horse. The reasons lie in the barley, the climate and
crystal-dear water of the Scottish hills; in methods of
distillation hardly changed through centuries; in men who
have made a loving art of their slow, unhurried, work in
bringing White Horse to final perfection. Always choose
Scotch whisky ... and ask firjt for White Horse.
WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky
A pleasure to remembera joy to see again
Sth
Di.tHt**,: COMPAA CYXNOS S^. COLON PANAMA
J