The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01288

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
gppqp

'* BRANIPF
AN INDEPTEND
riMfc

a



TO
>
NEIF llORK
ONI WAY ..... $141.00
ROUND TRIP .:.. 2M.M
D^ILT NIW8PAP11
.

TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
Panama Atnmcan
"Lei the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
i----------'--------------i---------------------------
PANAMA, K. P.;THURSDAY, NOVEMBER t, 1951

ScaQram'sYO. i
(Wil)IVV WHISKY
J I
Now... 6 Years Old!
i......i
PTVE CENTS
:

Soviet Counters Big-Three Offer On Atom
orld Disarmament

\->
i
i
PA'*t* A-BOMB BLAST The atomic cloud ,rises over
the frenchman's Flat. Nev.. atomic teatimr ground, after the
test explosion of a compact atom bomb. This blast had the
most brilliant flash of the current series of Atomic Energy
Commission tests. The cloud soared 15.000 feet into the air,
and shock waves were felt BO miles away. (Photo by NEA-
Acme staff photographer Dave Lees.)
I
M
V
>
WHITE HOUSE TALK President Truman and Gen. Dwight
Eisenhower confer In the White House, as Elsenhower reported
to the President for two days of conferences.
it *
NY Times Says Truman
Gaye Ike His Support
4
*

NEW YORK. Nov. 8 (UP)
President Truman "presumably"
offered Gen. Dwight Elsenhower
his support for the Democratic
presidential nomination in 1952,
but the Genernl did not commit
himself, accorrt'ng toa Washing-
ton dispatch to the New York
Times aslgned by Arthur Krock.
The President however, said
today there >s "not a word of
truth" in the Times story. Tru-
man left by air this morning for
a long vacation in Key West. Pla.
At the Eisenhower's supreme
Headquarters in Rockencourt, an
official SHAPE spokesman char-
acterized the report as "purely
fictional"
Kroek's report said Truman
repeated to Risenhower a pledge
he bad pad to the general in
1946 during the Potsdam Confer-
ence pf the victorious Big Four
oowera.
Krock said Eisenhower did not
accept because he did not agree
with the administration on cer-
tain domestic policies among
them proposed amendments to
the Taft-Hartley Labor Law and
other prograit^
Krock wro'e that he received
the Information from a source
that he consioered so thoroughly
reliable and informed," that he
decided to send the dispatch to
his newspape; even though he
expected "categorical and angry
denials."
"States" Faces
Cotfee Drought
In Ship Tieup
NEW YORK, Nov. 8 (UP>
The United States today was
threatened with a coffee short-
age If the 25-day-old unau-
thorized waterfront strike con-
tinues two more weeks:
Roasters said that stocks of
green coffee in the world's blg-
?est coffee producing port had
ailed to a critical low because
rebel AFL longshoremen had
refused to unload Incoming
cargo ships.
A trade source aid that if the
strike lasts two more weeks, the
ntajority of roastera may stop
operating.
i
One source said that several
larger roasters already had be-
gun rationing coffee to retailers,
and well-known brands have
been pulled baik from the re-
tall trade.
They said the stocks of green
coffee beans had. diminished
also because many roasters
operated on a week-to-week
basis, with the hope that prices
per pound would be reduced.
ftgtfftK GUIs
ted Tofeb
By Over $2,000
Capt.V.F Ooidinlei.USN, 19th
Naval District Representative on
the Executive Committee of the
Canal Zono Community Chest
has presented to the Director the
Navy's partial contributions of
1158.68 at community Chest
Headquart>i
A partial contribution of $858.43
from Caribbeai Air Command
Albrook Air Sot ce Base has been
donated to thi- year s campaign.
Col. Edgar Gurther representa-
tive on the Executive Committee
for this Command made the pre-
sentation of funds ,
Individual and Commercial Con-
tribution* Other Than Panam
Canal Company Employes and
Civil Government
Servicio de Lewi* .... .. $ 15.00
Fbrica Nacional- de Sal-
chichas ......... 10.00
Ca. Cyrnos 8.A....... 10.00
Texas Petroleum Co.. .. 21.00
Casa Fastlich........ 25.00
Pacific Ste-ni Navigation .
Company.........' 25.00
Harold W. Wander...... 10.00
20.00
CZ's
Mix Hope
Comment was mixed today on
the chances for success of the
suit filed yesterday lit U.S. Dis-
trict Court by 749 American em-
ployes of U.8. agencies who
charge that application of the
Income Tax to their salaries is
unconstitutional.
Meanwhile Judge Joseph J.
---------!-----1-------
Three Seamen Try
To Jump Ship; Money
Crosses Them Up
Because they tried to pass off
Canadian money in an Ame-
rican Navy Ship's Service, three
merchant seamen wore caught
iast night after they had Jump-
ed ship.
The men swam ashore from
the British ship Allerton which
was transiting the Canal be-
tween Pedro Miguel and La Pi-
ta at 4:20 p. m.
10.00
10.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
3 Killed, 3 Injured
As C-47 Burns, Crashes
ANCHORAGE, Alaska. Nov. 8
'UP) Thre* United States air-
men were killed and three others
seriously.lnjui' d last night when
tholr C-47 burn Into flames and
crashed while attempting an in-
strument landing at Elmendorf
Field.
The piane was *tt*ehed to (he
Six Radar Calibration Unit at
Elmendorf Air
Panam Avto. 8A.....,
American legion Aux.,
Elbert Wald Unit ....
Linao & Mari'iro S A.. ..
F. L MUler.. ......
McMillan ti E&gan, 8.A.
Italian Live .'
The Shell Co., Fidanque
Bros, ft Sons .....,
BUgray's........... 5000
Pedro Migu-1 Women's
Club .......... 5.00
Standard Fruit & S.S Co. 25.00
Ca. de Pmd.ictos de Ar-
cilla, 8.A ........ 25.00
Rev. Heber Oooden ... 25.00
Peter Brennan........ 10.00
Hdqtrs. Caribbean Com-
mand (Partial) ...... 127.10
Dr. O. Slavin........ 10.00
Rowland K Hazard .... 10.00
Panam Canal Yacht
Club.............
Balboa Woman' Club ..
Republic Fl'ms '.f Central
America.........
PanPaclflc Construction
Corp..........
Kav Fisher .. ......
George Bo>olit......
Agenda Intr de Publica-
clones .........
and proceeded to the Ship's
Service building.
A Marine corporal, who was
on Ants;, became suspicious of
the three seamen when they
tried ( buy Bome articles with
Canadian money, and he im-
mediately took them into cus-
tody.
Canal Zone police were noti-
fied, and the men, John Ro-
berta, 21, English, Thomas Gart-
land, 21. English and Oerardus
Pieter Otto, 21, Dutch, were put
back on the ship at Cristobal,
only three and a half hours
after their escape.
Local agent for the Allerton,
which Is headed for the United
ingdptn. is Payne and Ward-
law. No reason was given for
the men's attempted escape..
Playing The Odds
NEW TORK. Nov. 8 (UP)
The first bookmaker's license
issued In New York State will
become merely a stage prep in
a Broadway play, "The Num-
ber."
It was obtained today by
Merrln Vye, who was the role
ef a bookie In the play.
Hancock has under advisement
the claim filed by Attorneys Col-
lins and McNevin, together with
a motion for an injunction to
stop further tax deductions while
the case is pending.
Hancock was also considering
the attorneys' request that he
disqualify himself because he al-
so Is liable for income tax under
the amendment of September
1950 under which it was applied
to American employes of federal
agencies on the Zone.
Among members of the Canal
Zone bar. it was a foregone con-
clusion that the Jurist would
disqualify himself. If so, the gov-
ernment is expected to send an-
other Judge to the Canal Zone to
hear the suit.
It was also conceded generally
that whatever the decisions are
handed down In local and appe-
late courts, the cause will be
heard by the Supreme Court.
One Panama Canal official to-
da v remarked:
"We all hope-it goes through;
we think they have a good foun-
dation."
Another took a different view.
"It's an excellent.#*?." he
said. "But knowing Tthat one
well-known law fjrnf in Wash-
ington would not handle the case,
I feel It doesn't stand a chance."
An employe said: "I think it's
even worthless to try." A woman
came up with:
"You can't lose anything by
trying. I really think it stands a
legal chance."
A woman accountant found
the move "very interesting."
An official said he wasn't im-
pressed with the allegation that
Imposition of tax violator the
spirit of the US treaty with Pan-
ama. His opinion was:
"It's possible for the law to be
unconstitutional In that it's dis-
criminatory, but that's all."
A thumbs-down opinion was:
"Don't think it stands a chance,
because it was a Congressional
measure, and I doubt if the local
US District Court would have
Jurisdiction to set aside an Act
of Congress."
Another commentator held:
"More good could be done by
handling It through the State
Department." ,
A pipe smoker bin" the last
word:
"The only thing It will do is
make the tax apply to all Amer-
icans living in the Zcne regard-
less of employytnent."
It certainly won't help.
UK Shoppers
Rush To Buy
Hams, Sugar
LONDON. Nov. 8 (UP) Chan-
cellor of the Exchequer R. A.
Butler's announcement of a slash
in imports of canned hams and
sugar substiUHles today started
a rush by boM housewives and
retailers to buy up available
stocks.
Meanwhile, Winston Churchill's
Conservative government called
in top leaders today in a bid for
irade union help in Britain's bit-
ter economic < risls.
Churchill and his top min-
isters may tiy American-type
industrial methods to boost
the nation's production to
where Britain can pay her way
in the world.
Churchill gathered his cabinet
together again this morning for
another study of the grave econ-
omic difficulties outlined to a
hushed House of Commons yes-
terday by Butler.
Butler has invited the leasers
of the powerful Trades Union
Congress to see him this even-
ing at the Treasury and he has
asked leaders of the Federation
of British Industries to come to-
morrow.
Key minister
with which the Conservatives
will meet the economic crisis.
Butler waned yesterday that
Britain must Increase her pro-
cuctlon or go bankrupt, lean and
hungry.
Split-Second Bank Robber Team
Pulls $92,000 Milwaukee Job
20.00
10.00
10.00
50 00
5.00
10.00
^---------Jf
Ditablebodied Seaman
OKLAHOMA CITY. Nev. 8
(UP)Navy recruiters here
swore In a new sailor today.
Tonsillitis Jack**.
Tonsillitis left a flock of
other alimenta at hone.
He said he
and sisters.
Iitis. Appen
akeKis and
He told
Kther had
a he
ntaat hor
nsSy eff
ive brothers
re: Meain-
i Laryngitis,
His.
Officer* his
tere throat
MILWAUREE, Wls., No/. 8 Cashier Matthew Knueppel
(UP) Three gunmen, work- said he was forced at gunpoint
ing with split-second timing to open the vault,
against a burglar alarm, rob- Knueppel said he became
bed a branch of the First Wls- suspicions as soon as the un-
consln National Bank of at masked men entered the bank
least $92,000 yesterday and es- and moved toward the burglar
caped under cover of a heavy alarm,
snowstorm. "When one of them vaulted
Three hours later four sus- over the railing and ran to-
pects three men and a wo- ward the cashier's cages, I
man were stopped in a car stepped on the button," Kuuep-
on U. 8. Highway 41 near Wau- pel said"
kegan. 111., and taken to Wau-' But the bandits apparently
kegan for. questioning. Author- had anticipated an alarm and
lties said they had a large sum one stood guard at the door
of money with them. counting off the seconds as his
Milwaukee police said a wo- companions rounded up the
man had been sitting in the cash,
second of two getaway cars
used here by the gunmen. "...20 seconds ... II seconds
They had been forced to ...22 seconds." the bandit-
creep away from the North- guard counted off.
western branch bank in one When the sentry reached 27
car that slipped and skidded seconds he shouted:
In the slushy streets. "That's It, we've got to go."
This auto easily was Identl- Det. Capt Adolph Kraemer
fled by passersby but the ban- said the hutup in*n worked
diti switched five blocks from "like real professionals."
the bank into another car con- All were described as be-
talning a woman. tween 30 and 95 years old. One
Armed with rifles and shot- Wore gold-rimmed glasses and
guns, the gunmen entered the another, apparently the lead-
bank at 10:30 a.m. and threat- er, had a long scar on his
ened 12 employes and six cus- face.
tomers a* they scooped cur- Knueppel said the men seem-
rency Into a white bed sheet, ed to know "jaat where the
The bank had been robbed money was, at If they planned
of $300,000 in 1024. It very welLr
Brown Not Guilty
On Battery Charge
Filed By Spouse
Two verdicts of not guilty were
passed yesterday in the Balboa
Magistrate's Court by Judge Ed-
ward M. Altman.
The 35-year-old American, Wil-
liam Fred Brown was found not
euilty on a battery charge filed
by his wife, Mrs Brown had
charged that following an argu-
ment she had with her husband
he injured her slightly when his
car struck her leg as she was
crossing In front of him. The
Judge found Brown not guilty.
A young Aimv enlisted man,
Jack Frost Davis, Jr. 18, was
cleared of charges of reckless
driving a Jeep on the intersection
of Galllard Highway and Mlra-
llores Bridge in a reckless man-
ner. A
During this morning's session
at the Balboa Court, Otilio Cce-
res, a 28-year-old Panamanian
was sentenced to ten days in Jail
on a vagrancy charge.
Preliminary hearing on a
charge of attempt to commit
grand larceny will be heard to-
morrow afternoon The defend-
ant is Joseph Nathan Williams,
27 Panamanian who, it is charg-
ed, tried to take money from Wil-
liam Coffy.
PARIS, Nov. 8 (UP) Soviet Russia proposed in fti#>
United Nations today that a world disarmament confer*
ence be called before June 1, 1952.
The United States, Britain and France had proposed
a broad new program for world disarmament last night
and offered to tell Russia how many atom bombs, guns
and armies are in the democratic arsenal in exchange for
similar information on Communist armed strength.
The big three agreed to cut down on armies and
armaments, including atomic weapons, if the Soviet Union
would follow suit.
But the offer was coupled with a warning that the
west would continue to rearm until the Korean war is
ended and so long as Russia remains a threat to world
peace.
President Truman appealed to
Russia last night to accept the
West's new disarmament propo-
sals to prevent another war, but
he warned the United States will
not relax Its or.-n defense drive
until a fool-proof program is
nailed down
He made tie appeal in a na-
tionwide rarUo and television ad-
dress only a lew hours after Brit-
ain, France and the United States
unfolded details of their plan.
The President described "the
Big Three prcposal as a "real,
workable system'' and a "com-
mon-sense way" o reducing
costly armaments and lessening
the risk of war.
If Russia reaUy wants peace,
he said, the men in the Krem-
lin will accept the plan and
tell their people about it.
Russia's formal proposalput
sky said more and more voicea
are being raifed in favor of peace.
He said: "Even in the United
States there are louder and loud*
er objections to power poltica.
"Murmur art being heard thai
if the Unite. States continues to
refuse to negotiate this refusal
will have a fatal consequence for
the United States and its Allies.
"As a basi. for the whole for-
eign polio of tne United State
there Is nothing but preparation
for a new r.ar:"
In ear,ier debate United States
Secretary o St&te Dean Acheson
had called on Russia to prove
the Soviet Union wanted peace
by ending the Korean war Im-
mediately.
Vishinsky had replied by bit-
terly accusing the united States
of starting the Korean war.
.-y~?' --- He said Ahat M the United
listers eonUnue to out, .before the United Nations. Gen- states wanttd to ton the Ko-
Hrfe in CWrm*bWFl'P^ie* United Nation* Supreme Com-
mander General Matthew Ridg-
to aicp "hampering tho
on the AssniJb'y to:
1) Declare the Atlantic Pact,
and the establishment of United
States bases in foreign lands, to
be Incompatible with the United
Nations Charter.
2i Call upon all nations parti-
cipating in the Korean war to
cease hostilities, conclude an ar-
mistice at once, withdraw all
troops behind the 38th parallel
within 10 days, and withdraw all
foreign troops Including volun-
teers, from Korea within three
months.
3) Call *. world conference
not later than June 1, 1952, to
study an effective or substan-
tial reduction of arms, and the
prohibition of atomic weapons.
Non-United Nations members
would be included in this con-
ference.
4) Seek a Hi; Five peace pact,
and call on s-11 peace loving peo-
ples to adhre to It.
In putting the proposal before
the Generol Assembly, Russian
Foreign Minister Andrei Vlshin-
way to s'.eo "nampering
truce negotiations by incident*
and absura proposals."
Pedestrian Struck
By Bus May Suffer
Fractured Leg
A Costa Rican woman pedes-
trian who was struck down by
a bus last night on Franglpanl
Street Is in Gorgas Hospital to-
day with lacerations of both
legs, right temple and possible
fracture of the right foot.
Alice Innls, 39, was hit by the
right front fender of a bus
driven by T. B. Anderson, a Pa-
namanian.
The driver told police that
the woman stepped in front of
his bus from behind a car.
Panama Customs
Remains Open Sat.
To Close Monday
The Panama Customs officfe
will remain open this Saturday*
although it is a holiday in Pan-
ama, in order to facilitate Pana-
ma businessmen and mall order
customers.
The derision, announced b%
Raul D. Berbey. Chief of Pana-
ma Customs, was taken in vievr
of the fact that the Panama,
Railroad freight house In Pana*
ma City will remain closed Mon-
day in observance of Armistice
Day.
The Customs chief decided
that the office will remain open
and close down on the saino
days as the freight house to a-
void causing any undue inconve-
nience to customers.
U. S. Prohibits
Big Model Changes
On Civilian Coods
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8 (UP).
The government today prohibit-
ed major model changes in au-
tomobiles, washing machines,
refrigerators television seta, and
other civilian goods after neat
Feb. I.
The action was taken to make
way for a greater output of
machlpe tools for armament
and other defense production.
Snowstorm Leaves Midwest;
New Rainstorm Hits New York
CHICAGO, Nov. 8 (UP).The heavy drifts in the suburbs and to reach Chicago last night and
season's first big snowstorm a sea of slush In the downtown a fire department ambulance
mired Chicago In slushy drifts area. Plows and sand-spreaders took over, crawling and sliding
today and left a trail of choked fought to keep streets open but through drifts to reach the
streets and highways through- transportation was slow. nearest hospital. The girl died
out the midwest. Wisconsin bore the brunt of shortly after admittance.
But U.8. forecasters said the later stages of the storm and at The sodden snow blanket -lay
worst was over. The storm was Milwaukee three bandits engi- 15 Inches deep at Springfield,
veering across Michigan en neered a daring $92.000 bank 111., 14 inches at Vichy, Mo., 11
route to Canada. robbery, creeping in a car Inches at Lansing, Mich., and 10
Meanwhile another blow arose through the swirling snow to at Flint, Mich,
in the east, bringing rain to escape. They were later captur- Most highways were treacher-
Pennsylvanla and New Jersey as ed. ous and many trucks were
it bore down on the New York St. Louis dug out from a rec- stalled,
metropolitan area. ord one-foot tall that all but At Chicago, hog market price
New Yorkers bucked a 43- paralyzed the city. Public and climbed because of light re-
mlle-per-hour wind and driving parochial schools were closed as ceipts. Farmers couldn't reach
rain. The storm waa expected the city fought to clear its the city with their loads,
to pick up speed to 85 m.p.h. gnow-cloeged streets. Air travel had been disrupted
and whistle lino New England. Chicago hitmen lost a race but gradually was returning to
The nation's mldsectlon was with the elements when four- normal as the storm receded,
blanketed with about a foot of month-old Patricia Boles, rush- cold weather continued,
snow from Missouri and Kansas ed by Air Force plane from San meanwhile, and the mercury
to the Great Lakes and east- Antonio, Tex., for emergency dipped to 11 below zero at
ward to Northern Ohio. treatment of a heart condition. Gransburg. Wls.. making the
Chicago, the country's second died in a hospital here. town the nation's coldest for tho
city, was slowed to a walk by The plane bucked the storm second straight day.


w
T^^W^V^^W^^^
i ?AGE TWO
THE PANAMA (MEXICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER t, 1951
S !
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWHKO 4N0 ru.uiMlD at TMB PANAMA ICN Pali!. INC.
NUNMD BT NBlSOft MUNflVILL ih nil
HAKMODIO ARIA*. IOITO*
87 H imiT p> o Box 134. Panama, n or r>
TiLIPHONt Panama NO. 1-0740 CASLI Aobiiii, PANAMmiCAN, PANAMA
OM.ON Oprieii it I7S Cintnai Avinui airwiiN itm and iStn ervirre
POAIION RlHIUNTATIVIt. JOSHUA 0 POWER. INC
S4B MADISON AVB.. NIW Vokk. (171 N. V.
LOCAl Y MAIL
' MONTH. IN """> < 70 t t.BO
OK SIX MONTH*. IN """* SO 1S.OO
OP ONI VIA*. IN """" SS.bO 24 OO
Walter Winche
In New York
"THE BROADWAY LIGHTS
Stage Door: "The Number," a melo, had the Critics' Circle
ling around in one. Their reaction was a blend of Fine, Fair and
. joey, although there was no dissenting about the grand gamut-
i s of Martha Scott, Dane Clark and Murvyn Vye. The Journal
i merican's agent hailed it as "exciting" and the Herald Trib's
llgate called it "a wrong number".. .Maxwell Anderson's 28th
>us, "Barefoot in Athens," deals with Socrates, the Confucius
: om Greece. Most aisle Socrates acclaimed its velvety word-weav-
'. g and silky trouping.. .Dick Watt*' slienp: "A drama of absorbing
) terest". .There were swellulujahs for Phil Silvers' super spoof -
) r and the lilts in "Top Banana," which most reviewers labeled a
; ick song-and-sass show Mr. N. Y. Times Atkinson enthused: "A
< :rj funny musical." "Top Banana," in brief, is a Peach.. .One of
I roadway's hottest tickets, as the ducat brokers say, is for an at-
I action that won't open until Dec. 19th: The Oliviers in the two
.eopatra plays. Their 16-week "limited" booking is completely sold
it., .Playgoers will soon be confronted with some confusion when
i vo new plays arrive. Their names are "Jane" and "Janie."
Labor News
And
Comment
Finders Keepers, Losers Weepers

By Victor Riesel
In the Wings: Mady Christians, the fine a. tress (who passed
ddenly last week), was best known for her role In "I Remember
! ama," but she was proudest of her part In Maurice Evans' full*
1 ngth version of Hamlet...Mr. Evans Is renowned in The Legit
i a "spitter" when his emoting gets.the better of him.. .He apolo-
i zed to Mady after one premiere for leaving her In such a damp
i mditlon. .."Ah," he teased, "but Imagine sharing a stage with
! aurice Evans! What more could an actress want?"..."Ah," she
r.Vd right back. "An umbrella!"
a!
The Cinemagiclans: "The Browning Version" is a generally
r-uchlng Britisher that keeps the heartstrings humming.. ."Want-
I 1: Dead Or Alive" has the familiar prairie hero-zero... A Beet-
' >ven biografllm, "Eroica," offers a conventional yarn placing
i cond fiddle to the symphonic background.. "Massacre Hill"
oves boredom is duller than ever...An Italian import called
' carred" has some flaws in its script, but Anna Magnani g animal
fc I. ephant Stampede" puts you to sleep counting elephants.
1 !
The Alristocrats: Margaret Su!lavan's superb emoting In N.
C award's poignant "Still Life" offered the sort of honest sentl-
i".ent that Inspires mash notes like this... Oodfrey's a.m. alrer
> 'mains an oasis In the desert of morning gabfests... George
i'.ieck's "Startlme" (featuring The Lollipop Set) proves Big Time
unes In small packages.. .Newcomer to the all-night circuit Kal
' Ms Is making WOR llstenable again for the stay-ups.. .The
f jiatra program was embellished by Georgia Glbbs last Tuesday
( .'e'g. Always comforting on the ears...Talk about sillies: Dur-
! -.g a ballerina's teevy routines the cameras concentrated on her
i"xial expressions.. .Herb Shriner's folksy fooling on ABC has a
rplcal tang. One of the better cracker-barrel clowns...The long
I aderwear sketch Inflicted by Alan Young was more hokey than
; .-key.. It helped wreck burlesk.
Twinkling with the Stars: The New York reporters wish all
''nemactresses were as co-operative as Ava Gardner... Iledy
I imarr, who planned doing a Broadway play this Winter, has been
i :ared off by the sufferings of Ginger Rogers and Ann Sothern...
. dd Nc-tiensorship: Movie musical songwriters cannot mention
i girl's leg in their lyrics. Bnt it is okay for M>ss Grable to show
m.. .Remember way back when the col'm described her as Betty
!!) Qrable and Dagmar as ***? Well, those exclamation points
hd asterisks are now used in- the adverts for "A Millionaire for
' nristy (Send check to Runyon Fund, piles).. .The much-tooted
Whistle at Eaton Falls" was yanked after a disappointing fort-
right on B'way. Mitzi Gaynor, the star of "Gold Girl," will be
'. appy to learn Pres. Truman requested that musical for his enter-
. linrent at Key West.
The Press Box: Josephine Baker, who was allegedly refused
:irvlce In a Washington dept. store cafeteria (a year ago), planned
reprisal during her return date there last weekvia "an incident."
Jut the papers didn't bite, so she dropped it.. .After Franchot's
'ittst front-page episode he told coast reporters "No comment."
apparently dislikes publicity... The Runyon Fund considered stag-
'.:ig a baseball game (after the series) between all the Negro stars
mo a team of white favorites It was shouted down by a few wor-
.lers. The Oct. 17th AP dispatches li ided this from Durham, N.
C: "Roy Campanella's Negro All-in., g rapped out a 9-5 victory
over Gil Hodges' All-White major league team here last night"...
Deris Fleeson reported the grimmest laugh with this item: "Histo-
.lan Douglas S. Freeman begins his daily broadcasts from Rich-
mond as follows: 'The scandal in Washington today is.. .*"
ii
II

!
*1
I
Post-Mortification Dept.: The New York Post was the victim
of a hoax on Friday. It published a photostat of a letter to a Negro
-fup signed Sherman Billlngsley The letter said the Stork Club
vould continue to bar "obnoxious persons," etc.. The signature is
nothing like Billlngsley's, but is similar to his "autograph" on his
ards, which is written by his printers. .Mr. Billlngsley has gone
lo the DA.'s office and filed a complaint against whoever wrote
the letterInsisting on a complete investigation.
The Story-Tellers: The U S. News-World Report's top article
starts with a bang: "World War III Is Here. It ha been here for
i years. In the real war to date, Russia definitely Is winning, U. 8.
Oslng".. .The factual essay confirms and reaffirms every war-nine
Clrit spotlighted by this column...Among those who will be Jolted
nit of their complacency (by reading that piece) are the sleepy
idltors at The New York magazine, who scold Collier's for its re-
cent issue on the next war. The New Yorker described it as "war
Shit hasn't happened".. O. Wake Up!.. That Collier's issue (which
Ordered an extra 500,000 printing before publication! has complete-
ir told out.. In The Saturday Review of Literature biologist R. R.
pencer assures you that "the human race's chances of survival
are good". Feel better?.. Henry Holt it Co. planned publishing
the Life Story of Josephine Baker, with top-flighter Maurice Zolo-
I tew assigned to write it. After confirming several recent reports,
Hhe project was dropped.
_______
Quotation Marksmanship: B. Baruch: Never kick a man when
' up. J. Illy: Oh, for some Blondversation! Faith Baldwin:
ppiness was luminous In her eyes, arrogant in her walk and
ped like a kiss upon her mouth...Jack Carter: She's an over-
ght socialitesort of a tubutante.. J. O'Rrian- Imitation Is
flattest form of sincerity.. George Shearing. A Texas million-
Wk* with Dallas signs all over him.
it
|
I
THIS 1$ YOU FORUM THI READERS OWN COLUMN
| THE MAIL BOX
The Mail Bex is an open forum for readers of Tht Panama Ameriten.
I lit in are rectived a, roterully ml ere handled ie) wholly confidential
If yaa contribute a Utter don't be impatient if if doesn't epaeor the
eat day. Letterr are publnhed in the order received.
Please try fa keep the letten limitad to one eoee length.
Identity of latter writars re held in strictest confidence.
This newipiper assumes no responsibility for statements at opinions
atoned la letter from readers.
NEW YORK Seldom has
the ciO .uotn under such siege
as it Is today I
Never beioie, in the fifteen
years which mellowed and ma-
tured the fiery young labor men
of the thirties who seized and
ran sit-down strikes in the
nation's factories to launch
their CIO, have they met in a
convention so much under as-
sault by so many opponents
as the one they're gathered in
today..
Arrogant left wingers,
ousted /rom CIO two years
ago, are working with John
L. Lewis to dlsaffect mem-
bers of at least four CIO
unions their timetable
calls for splitting CIO some-
time this Spring. These
eft wingers, led by Harry
Bridges while he was in the
East last month, passed
word on to Letols that they
have strong followings rea-
dy to bolt CIO electrical
workers, auto makers, pack-
inghouse hands and furni-
ture crafts.
Disdainfully aware of this
boast, Phil Murray, a man of
restraint and statesmanship,
said In his report to the 13th
CIO Constitutional' Convention,
porbably his last as CIO presi-
dent:
"The CIO Is the property of
no political party, no theoretic-
al sect, no vested Interest."
At the dame time, Murray's
defiant words were warning as
well to Mr- Truman on the
other end of the CIO's political
world.
There are reports in the high-
est CIO circles here that the
President Is beginning to lose
his temper over the strike wave,
scheduled stoppages and critic-
ism of the war production
boards.
Word from the White House
Is that Mr. Truman might
crack down even on his CIO
friends.
Nevertheless, the CIO will
sound off in ringing cadence.
It will criticize the Adminis-
tration so unhesitatingly that
it plans to include a warning
against dispatch of an ambas-
sador to the Vatican.
Emphatically it will warn
that it plans to strike, and
hard, in any industry to
win an average tlO-a-week
raise for its millions. Mur-
ray's steel workers have
over 2,000 contracts, cover-
ing 1.595 companies in the
very guts of our defense in-
dustries, expiring on tht
night of December 31. And
it won't be a very happy
New Year, if there's no
agreement before then.
Walter Reuther's Auto ukiion,
the convention report reveals,
has begun raising a $15,000,000
strike fund.
Jim Carey's electrical, Jet and
atomic workers already are on
the strike front, one such stop-
page at Buffalo's Westlnghouse
plant now nearlng Its third
month.
Obviously the government can
forget its bid for a no-strike
pledge and its hope for mere
passing pot shots at Its De-
fense Department.
Angered by what he charges
are broken promises from Gen.
Marshall and Charles Wilson,
glveh personally to him, Emll
Rieve, the CIO Economic Af-
fairs chief, will blast the war
agencies.
Rleve's speech will bristle with
phrases such as "unrealistic and
unplanned war effort."
He will charge in the name of
CIO that there is a total lack
of urgency in high government
circles.
"We huvt politics at
usual, only worse," he plant
to charge. "We have pro-
fits as usual only higher.
We have minks as usual
only more expensive. No
thing is controlled except
the workers who are being
stabilized, de -emphasized, '
compromised and antagon-
ized!"
Mr. Rieve, a blunt speaking
man when it comes to protect-
ing his people, disdainful of
party affiliation and the CIO's
political .friendship for Mr. Tru-
man (truly an ally of theirs
over the years) also will assail
the government for doing little
about brutal unemployment.
<** WSIIIWTOH
MERRY-GO-R0HD
ly DRiW PIAIION
Drw Pearson says: Motherly Mrs. Truman looks attar the
Secret Service; West Coast GOP leaders want Eisen-
hower to speak up; Grand Mufti of Jerusalem may be
behind Egypt riots.
.#tW^HIN.?T'wThe vs- Secret ervice is supposed to look
after the welfare-of the President and his family; and Its agents
ao a great Job of it.
th. SZi?tve K?u wml8:ht thlnk Wt the other wy round t nw
the agents talk about Bess Truman.
i,...1?e Flrst Lady'a motherly ways have provided many a warm
chuckle among her friends In the Secret Service.
m 1, 0M. ^f"1 re.cently: "I don't dare tell Mm. Truman when
my missus is sick. She'd rush over to my house and take full
?r.g^7eJe.n chanKe the baby's diapers. She's not happy when
she lsn t doing something for others."
While there's no actual record of Mrs. Truman's diaper-
changing, she once showed up unexpectedly at the home of a
Secret Service man whose wife was ill, and cooked the Thanks-
giving turkey.
Another quality that has endeared Mrs. Truman to the
Secret Service, which numbers all faiths, is her frank but tolerant
Interest in the religious beliefs of others.
An Irish Catholic agent stlH Jokes about the time she In-
quired Into his beliefs on divorce.
The agent hesitated briefly, not wishing to be drawn into
a possible debate on theology with his good friend. Mrs. Trum*n
is an Episcopalian.
' Just then the voice of her Baptist husband was heard from
a doorway, where he had been gleefully eavesdropping.
... "n. adylc* oi counsel," the President boomed in his best
Missouri courtroom manner, "the witness may decline to answer."
DOUBTS ABOUT IKE
I
0%*
Cheap Seats
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK.I sure do hop* they Iron the
wrinkles, amicably, out of this business of low-
ering the cost of air travel to Europe, so nobody's
mad at nobody else. '
Because this is the first time in the postwar
that anybody has made a pass at lowering any
prices on anything appreciatively.
Here's how she lays: Pan-Am wants to Insti-
gate a non-luxurious, tourist-class air service to
Europe. It would be a service minus frills, no
champagne; but it gets you there, and for $405
round trip as opposed to the current $711.
TWA, Pan-Am's competitor, wants a cheaper
service, too. but not so cheap as Pan-Am pegs it.
TWA Is playing grandma in the current hear-
ings, largely to enforce R happy household
amongst the United States airlines and their for-
eign competitor, of which there are nine. .
The furrlners aren't high on the Idea; they
claim they can't produce enough speedy equip-
ment to compete.
The TWAs say that the long-time idea of beau-
tiful friendship between everybody Is more im-
portant than paring the price to the bone, and
that the International Air Transport Agreement
between all the nations must not be broken up,
If the welfare of traveling nationals is to be
continued.
But come high water or Juan Trlppe, the Pan-
Ams say that they are going to cut the price or
else, and as of April, If April ran make it.
The Whole argument is to be settled, finally,
In a conference in Nice, Italy, on Nov. 27.
We come out of that either friends or enemies
with the foreign airlinesmost of which operate
under government subsidies to which we con-
tribute in the cases where we lend American dol-
lars to competing nations.
My thought, along about here Is that If the
dollar-thirsty nations need bucks to bolster their
economies, clipping a tourist who can get there
on the cheap is a nice neat way of lining the
pocket.
If you can put a trip to Yurrup into the reach
of the middle-Income man by lowering the cost
of getting there, you have soundly contributed to
a free-enterprise Marshall Plan, and the Ameri-
can taxpayer might possibly preserve a dime or
so.
My thought also is that we have to get along
chumlike with the countries we fly to, and that
the cooperation on tickets, freight, customs and
schedules as run by our competitors is also very
Important. Important enough not to be wrecked
by violent dissension amongst the various lines.
Travel abroad Is very nice now with everybody
being pretty sweet to everybody, and this co-
operation can be laid almost squarely at the feet
of the International Air Transport Agreements,
which is a sort of United Nations of air travel.
But the time has come to take long-distance
flying out of the luxury category, and to put it
well within the reach of the man who never had
a hope of seeing the far places before. H
The ocean-shipping people have been doing it
for years, and with little Inroads on their luxury
trade.
The man who can afford to travel first class Is
a cinch to continue riding high on the hog.
I believe the Bible tells us thit In the old camel
caravans, there was a walking fare for those who
couldn't afford to ride the camels. But there was
never any dearth of candidates for a seat on
the camela.
Largely as a result of the war. we conquered
the problems of air transport in the technical
details.
We have whipped, in terms of speed, even the
barrier of sound. The overseas airline is here,
and we gotta face It that we don't need 90 days
to girdle the world any more.
Economically we might as well then, that the ordinary Joe is entitled to swift
transport at a cheap rate, and that Europe, Asia
and Africa are Just over the hill.
Which is why I hope they work this business
out In terms of what's right for everybody.
We can do it cheaply ladle dollars into for-
eign lands, and still part friends with all hands
if nobody gets too wrought up.
No War Scare
*
By Peter Edson

FILE YOUR COMPLAINT.
BROTHER
Balboa
filter
Mail box
The Panama American
ty
Bear Sir:
"One of the Axed" evidently
has reason to think that he and
Others In his organization were
tlon he must present his ease In
the proper quarters.
HI
PEOPLE JUST WONT
GET SICK ON SCHEDULE
Balboa. C.Z.
To the Mall Box Editor
Dear Sir:
It Just occurred to me why the
dispensaries are being closed.
Someone Is worried about having
demoted simply to provide mo- j that ble; new building built on
i ney with which to promote their
Superior*.
The Individual concerned may
m able to show misconduct m Sofill up the old hospital.
-ajtOce, but to obtain remedial ac- Diege
the other side of Gorgas Road at
the co t of many millions, while
the old building la half empty.
He'll charge Federal agencies
with releasing "completely mis-
leading" figures on unemploy-
ment by offering his own sta-
tistics.
These show that there are
now 23 million breadearners on
part-time work a number
which has tripled in the past
five months. Other union chiefs
will back him up with reports
on Joblessness In their ranks,
a total of 300,000 without any
work at all.
And added to the assault from
the left, the irritation over
massive war production confus-
ion, there is the assault on .CIO
by the AFL.
Ignore the latest AFL peace
offer. It's Just part of labor's
war of nerves..
There is no' doubt that the
AFL's veteran labor leaders
want to Isolate CIO politically.
Nor is there any doubt that
the AFL soon will try to drive
CIO from as many factories at
possible and absorb CIO event-
ually. ;
BERLIN(NBA) When Americans In Berlin
read pieces in the paper about people back home
building bomb shelters, they wonder what the
scare is all about.
Nobody Is building any bomb shelters here.
There is no atomic bomb scare here, and these
people are living right under the Russian guns.
There are some 2000 American civilians here,
In addition to the troops.
Mostly they are the wives and children of Am-
erican officials. There are a hundred or so State
Department people and civilian advisers to the
U. 8. commander, Maj.-Oen. Lmuel Mathewson.
American Express, TWA and. Pan-American
Airline officials and transients make up the rest.
And they all seem to love it. Wouldn't live any-
place else for anything.
Western Berlin society is reviving. Ever since
the airlift, and the Marshall Plan, Americans rate
high with all Berllners.
The wives of the American officers have their
club, and they do relief work among the refugees
who stream across the border from the east Rus-
sian zone.
The children are in school. There is plenty to
eat and plenty to buy. Life goes on.
"We don't need anyone's sympathy," says Ma-
thewson, the big blond paratrooper who has been
in command here since January. "But we would
like to have the people at home a little better
Informed on Berlin."
A new auditorium, sports center, and a row of
apartment houses still under construction, for
party functionaries and picked workers, about
completes Soviet-sone improvements. The place
is dead.
In the Western iones, however, business Is
booming, despite the terrible refugee problem-
there were 6000 arrivals last month, 200 a day
and an unemployment of 25 per eent of the
estlmaterTmllIlon workers.
Industrial production In the Western sones is
only 45 per cent of the 1936 leve!. But this is a
three-fold Improvement over the 14 per cent of
the blockade and airlift days
What Berllners hope for is that they can get
this production up to the 1036 level within the
next four years.
There is no particular incentive for this re-
vival. Berlin businessmen have to pay tan ptt
cent for short-term money.
But there is a determination on the part of the
arlineri, In spite of all Soviet threats, to Bale
rlin again the capital of Germany. Morale here
is high.
There Is no question hut that the Soviet could
push the Western powers Out of Berlin If they
wanted to.
Tempelhof airfield in the American zone and
all of Western Berlin, for that matter, Is In easy
artillery range of Russian gun":. They could pul-
verize any target they chose.
Yet so definite are the Allied commitments
that the Russians know any open attack on Ber-
lin would mean the start of World War III. That
is the only safetv the city has.
There is a theory now that if the Russians
should march west, they might by-pass Berlin.
They surround It now. Rather than trying to
clean it out as a strong point In their path, they
might leave It for siege and starvation in an-
other bloody cltv war.
This is- the threat that Berllners Uve under
and Ignore.
Eighteen freight trains a day and four' pas-
senger trains connect West Berlin with Western
Oermany, 103 miles away at the closest point.
Also there is the one autobahn, or express
highway over which the Russians allow motor
traffic to move, with checks. But they could shut
all this off on a moment's whim
The only agreement which the Western pow-
ers have in writing with respect to Berlin traffic
Is the right to use the air corridor over which
the airlift was flown.
This, as a matter of hindsight is the result of
another American diplomacy blunder. When the
Russians agreed to lift the blockade in lt49, there
was such a relief In Berlin, lu Germany and In
Washington, London and Paris, that another
loose deal was made.
It had been /eared that the blockade and the
airlift might lead to war. When the threat of
this war was evaded, American officials now be-
lieve that a whole new deal should have been
made over Berlin.
Additional railroad and motor highway tran-
sport and communication Unes between Berlin
and the West should have been demandad.
Written guarantees for free movement of traf-
fic should nave been bargained for.
Maybe they couldn't have been obtained. But
the opportunity to get them was lost. And there
Is no new opportunity In sight
Congressman Hugh Scott, Jr., Philadelphia Republican, ran
into significant grass-roots skepticism about Elsenhower's wUl-
lngness to run when he sounded out leaders at the GOP regional
meeting October 13 to 15 in Seattle.
While Scott worked one hotel corridor, Dave Tyjga.Ha, Taft's
manager, was drumming up delegates In the other.
The West Coast leaders frankly told Scott:
"Sure we want Ike, and the worst way.
"But we've got to know whether he is running, and the only
way you'll convince us Is to hear it from him. We are not buying
a pig in a poke.
''We're afraid we'll open the bag next June and find Tom
Dewey in it, and people out our way don't want Dewey again."
Scott, of course, was Dewey's chairman of the Republican
National Committee and his campaign manager.
When Scott came back to Washington, he talked to Senators
Jim Duff of Pennsylvania and Frank Carlson of Kansas, both
outspoken Eisenhower boosters.
Result is that both are working out means of getting Ike's
Intentions on the record.
NOTEWhile it will be Impossible for him to say anything
while he is stlU in uniform, and while he cannot quit bit im-
Kirtant North Atlantic Pact Job until spring, a meeting Of top
ipubllcans-for-Elsenhower Is in the works which will virtually
announce his candidacy.
FLYING BIRDMEN
Newsmen Inquired at the Pentagon the other day about
a story that Individual Marines, instead of landing on beaches,
soon would fly Into battle with a tiny helicopter strapped .on
each man's back.
The Navy reply to inquiring newsmen was: "Just a Pearson
phony,"
Shortly thereafter, however, came an official Navy announce-
ment confirming the "Pearson phony" in detail, even giving
pictures of the helicopter strapped on a Marine's back.
Herewith are some more not-so-phony stories about amazing
new developments in helicopters.
a 1) a-Hellappter experts now have^a machine that cam be fold-
ed In I crate eight feet long by two feet lugh, stowed Inside
a submarine, taken out on the high seas, and assembled on tha
sub's deck in less than an hour. The helicopter can then proceed
on a scouting mission, thus enlarging the sub's range by hun-
dreds of miles.
2) Another type heUcopter Is being developed which wlU be
carried Inside medium tanks to serve as a scout for tank raids.
3) The small, flying bird-man helicopter which can be
strapped on the back of a soldier, has been made possible by Jet
propulsion. The controls are carried on the soldier's chest, and
he can regulate the speed up to 50 miles an hour with an altitude
of 5.1D00 feet.
The nelly can take him straight up even when carrying tha
added weight of a submachine gun or demolition charges. Bach
soldier wears a parachute in case of emergencies.
The above are some more "Pearson phonies" the Nawy may
want to deny.
BEHIND THE NEAR EAST
If the origin of the Arab riots now flaming in Egypt, Iran
and the Near East could be traced, the trail would probably lead
to a bearded man In a red and white fea who boarded a plane In
Paris In 1945 and fled to Egypt.
He is the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, who was paid a cool
Suarter of a mUUon doUars by Hitler and $150,000 by Mussolini to
;lr up Arab resentment against the Jews.
Today the Grand Mufti is most certainly paid by the Kremlin
to stir up Arab revolt against the West, for his trail crops up all
the way from Moslem Karachi, where he recently attended a
meeting of pan-Islamic leaders, to Warsaw, where he started
a Moslem university for the Kremlin In Catholic Poland.
Wherever the Mufti has operated, assassination and blood-
shed have followed In his wake; King Abdullah o* Jordan, mur-
dered by Moslem fanatics; Gen. Saml Hlnnawl of lebanon, shot
u he boarded a streetcar; Premier All Razmara of Iran, a friend
of the United States; Premier Liaquat AH Khan moderate leader
of Pakistan; Abdul Hamid Zanganeh, pro Western Iranian Minis-
ter of Education.
And more recently Americans have warnea the Prime Minia,
ter of Syria, Hassan El-Hakim to be on guard against terrorists.
However, Syrian minister Fall El-Khouri In Washington is not
considered in any danger.
GRAND MUFTI AND HITLEB
Ironic tragedy of the Near Eastern crisis is that the French,
who have a great deal to lose in their Moslem empire, were the
one who let the Mufti escape to Egypt.
Right after V-E day the Mufti was taken prisoner and Installed
In a comfortable vUla in France. ,
MeanwhUe, the American cross-examination of Walter Sehel-
lenberg, Hitler's chief of foreign espionage, revenled the foUowlng
testimony regarding Nazi attemptj to penetrate the United Statea
and Palestine:
Sehellenberg"The mission to North America originated at
the request of Ribbentrop, the two missions to South America were
ordered by Hlmmler In '42, and the mission to Palestine was on -
the basis of the Intervention of the Grand Mufti. Hlmmler order-
ed me to execute it."
Q. "It was suggested by the Grand Mufti to Hlmmler?"
A. "Yea."
Q. "What was the purpose of the first mission to the United
states?"
A. "An attempt was made to approach the lush, Polish, Czech,
Yugoslav and Italian minorities by means of broadcasts."
Q. "Can you give us a few more details about that part of the
mission?"
A. "Rlbbentrop's desire was to approach these minorities and
through clever election propaganda keep them from re-electing
Roosevelt. I took no part in this because it was of no interest to
to."
Q. "Can you give us the details on the mission to PalesttBet'*
A. "The mission was Initiated at the request of the Orgnd
Mufti, who did this because of egotietlstlcal reasons. He wanted
to bring his name to his whole Arabian world.
"It Is Interesting to know that the Mufti wanted to make a
contract with me stating who of the personnel who were to para-
chute rnto Palestine were to administer funds whether tba Ger-
man SB. officers or Arabian members of the party.
The Mufti even wanted to keep part of the money designed far
this mission for himself to Germany.. As far as I remember, the
mission carried carried along one-half hundredweight in gold coins,
twenty thousand in English pounds, and ten thousand in UJU
dollars."
This is the man who was let get back to Egypt 'and is now
working for the Kremlin as he once worked for Hitler.
(Copyright, 1951, By The Ben Syndicate, Inc.) -


IY, NOVEMBER 1951
m "' v
'Like It Shows Ip The Seed Catalog
. Josephine Asher of Utica,
., surprised not only herself,
. .; probably the seed-catalog
writers as well, with the success
Ayier K*ant beanstalk. At right,
\ stands In her back yard ad-
..ifflng the skyscreplng vine that
"* isoduced a three-and-one-half
x>t string bean which she holds
elow. The prodigious plant,
rown from a seed her daughter
ought by mail, Is growing an-
other oversize bean about two
feet long.
Ancient Anarchist
Carried Dynamite,
Bombs, Gunpowder
ROME, Nov. 8 (UP)Giuseppe
le Lulse, 71-year-old self-con-
fessed "anarchist" went on trial
jefore the Court of Assizes to-
day on charges of attempting
to blow up the Spanish Em-
bassy in Rome and kill the
Spanish Ambassador on the
light of Jan. 21, 1950.
De Lulse was arrested out-
ide the Spanish Embassy. He
as found in possession of
nough explosives to wreck a
ty blockfour powerful bombs,
st* tubes of dynamite, six con-
lners of pyrite, 200 grams of
m powder and a pistol.
The explosives were stuffed
ds pockets and in a suitta.se
fas carrying.
e Lulse has a long record of
hrrests for carrying munitions
nd attempted acts of anarchy
ud has served a total of 30
years imprisonment for such
offenses.
(Italian police said he confes-
sed he wanted to blow up the
(xpaalsh Embassy, "as revenge
/ /MrolcAniTmartyred Sfian-
f a oppressed bv Franco."
Police said be told them that
he had nothing personal against
the Spanlsn Ambassador Don
Jose Antonio de Sangroniz y
Castro and only planned a
."symbolic attempt" against the
Embassy Itself.
I
ACOB
CANASTA /5ft
BY OSWALD JACOB*
Written for NEA Service
"We were playing six-handed
Canasta," relates a San Francis-
6 correspondent, "and I had the
hance to take the up-card and
aeke the initial meld. This
would be a very poor play at
four-handef Canasta, so I didn't
meld. Latei on. I was told that
the two ga.nes are quite 'differ-
ent and that I should have meld-
ed. Is that correct?''
It is qultt correfct. You don't
take a mall phr. in four-handed
Canasta because you don't want
to deplete your hand. In six-
handed Can.ista you don't worry
about a depleted hand. There are
two partners to take care of you.
Somebody will make a canasta
tti and meld out before long. The
winning strategy in this game is
to meld as much as you can at
every opportunity.
. few cards of the stock pile, are
you allowed to count them to see
Who gets the last turn?
AYes. You may count the
sards at yovr turn to play. Llke-
ise, you mav count them if It is
our partner's turn and if he has
ted you ior permission to meld
it. whenever a player counts
ne stock \r this way he -must
announce tr.e number of cards.
QA player goes through the
otlon of making a discard,
anges his mind, and discards
mother card. One of the oppo-
ents claims In at the original
jard must be dscarded. He says
it is an exposed card, and that
he can name It. What is the rule?
AIt depends on whether or
not the player's partner saw that
Sriglnal discard. If he did, the
rd Is exposed. If the partner
tyln't see It. no harm has been
One. Certainly the opponent
esnt lose anything by seeing
le of the player's cards. As a
radical matter, It often hap-
ens that pKyer waves a card
. the air In su-h a way that an
pponent rim ee it but so that
la partner cannot see it.
I am naturally assuming that
.ie player's oartner woul dspeak
p like a little man if he had
rally ten tne card. If the card
j actually been seen by the
. iyer'1 partnei, It must be put
ee up on the table. At his next
jrn, the off.mcer may meld that
kposed card; otherwise, he must
beard it
[ JACOPY ON BRIDOt
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
WEST
VJ974
? 843
Q1042
NORTH N
4.A76
VK65
? KJ2
*A985
BAST
? 1093
10S
? Q1075
+ K83
South
1*
3
44>
5*
Pass
SOUTH (D)
AKQJ85
VAQ32
? A9
*J7
Both sides vul.
Wett North
Pass 2N.T.
Pass 3*
Pass 4
Pass 6*
Pass
*
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pats
Opening lsd+2
J
f:
. "What Is the right" way to play
this hand?" asks a fan. "Declar-
er actually won the first club
with dummy's ace, drew three
rounds of trumps, and cashed
the three top hearts. If the
hearts broke, he could concede a
club and claim the rest. When
the hearts broke badly, he fin-
essed the Jack of diamonds. This
lost, and South actually went
down two.
"Was this South's best chance
for the contract?"
It is not the best play for the
slam. South should take the first
club with dummy's ace and then
draw four rounds of trumps.
Dummy discards a low heart on
the fourth trump, but perhaps
the defenders will have a little
trouble. At this stage they can't
be sure what the hand depends
on.
South next leads the Jack of
clubs from his hand. East wins
and returns a heart (the best de-
fense) Dummy wins with the
king of hearts and returns a club
for South to ruff with his last
trump. Now 8outh takes the ace
and king of diamonds.
By this time dummy is reduced
to a diamond, the nine of clubs,
and one small heart.
South has ace-queen-three of
hearts. What three cards can
West save? If he saves his fourth
club, he can keen only twb
heardts, and South wins the rest.
If West gives up his fourth club,
dummy's nine is good.
This line of play would work If
either defender had long hearts
and also long clubs; or if either
defender had long hearts and al-
so the queen of diamonds. South
makes his contract also If the
hearts break 3-3. He may make
it if one of the defenders dis-
cards unwisely on the fourth
trump.
The combination of all these
chances is better than relying on
a heart break coupled with the
diamond finesse. What's more,
if the worst happens, South is set
only one trick. The extra 100
points Is not the chief consider-
ation, but It shouldn't be entirely
disregarded.
Special Charter
The Knights of Columbus ori-
ginated under a special charter
granted by the state of Connecti-
cut on March 29, 1882. It was
founded as a fraternal benefit
association for Catholic men.
DON'T BE A
CERVEZA

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE ran
To keep your budget happy while shopping ... and to make your family and friends
joyous at Christmas ... we present this wide selection of gifts themed to please all!
06Z&S
-, "':
Join our Record Club
For is little as \ loO or 7 Weekly
ar mm
You can select rift records---- as well as those
you want to add to your own collection!
Ca. Cyrnos Cyrnos Gift Shop
No. 1 Jos Feo. de te Ossa No. 18 Tivoli Ave.
(Tivoli Crossing) (Across from Ancon Playshed)
Mr. & Mrs. S. Claus
danced with glee!
... and you will too, when
you see our handsome
CHRISTMAS BAFFLE PBIZES
(now on display in our windows)
Pram now 'til! December 22nd., you will (el numlirrrd llckel for each
SIS* nirchaae (or mulllplr thereof). Prim will be awarded arcordlnf to
Ihe National Lottery Dnwfatf on Dot em Pel 23rd.
FIRST PRIZE: Sterling Silver Tea and Coffee Set
valued at $800.00
SECOND PRIZE: Rosonthal China (service for 12)
valued at $250.00
THIRD PRIZE: Boda Crystal (servcie for 8) valued
' at $136.00
M
awj
14 Tivoli Avenue
PANAMA
45 Front Street
COLON
DRESS UP YOUR HOME WITH
NEW CARPETING FOR THE HOLIDAYS
New Blends New Colors
New Patterns
For very room -* VWro proud of our wido
selection in modern or traditional designs.
CASA SPORT, S. A.
FURNITURE STORE HAKDWAKF. HOME ARTICLES
Ne. 2 Central Ave. Panam
'WHO'S CONTENTED?
EVERYBODY WITH-
RCA VICTOR RADIO
EASY CREDIT TERMS
Nipper knows: An RCA VICTOR RADIO makes the
Best Christmas present in the world (
PANAMA RADIO CORPORATION
t Central Avenue Phones: 2-S364, 2-25M
DIRECT FROM GERMANY ...
Christmas Tree Ornaments
At lower prices than last year!

PISTOLS
IS different styles
Lovely DOLLS
21 different types)
Our prices don't, admit
competition!
Pre-Christmas SALE of
TOYS
at sensationally low prices!
English BICYCLES
at the incredibly
low price of
$35.00
MANGERS
all sizes ... by piece tool
and 80 varieties of
little animals.
Santa, -
^uaaestioni....
MOROCCO and PIGSKIN
PASSPORT CASES BRIEF CASES
BILLFOLDS
with zipper, coin purse, many selections
FLORENTINE LEATHER BILLFOLDS
very beautiful in red, green, black
with 24 kt. gold designs
IRISH LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS
wide and very wide hem, rolled edge
MEN'S BATHROBES
Pin or wide stripe seersucker and silk
LUPI
41 Central Avenue
WISE FOLKS
ARE ORDERING
THEIR SEARS'
GIFTS NOW

... from our big. new CHRISTMAS CATALOG
packed with sparkling gifts for all I
OFFICE
MONDAYS thru FRIDAYS
t a.m. to t p.m. *

Panam City's landmark for the past 30 years
for the lowest prices and most courteous service.
(English speaking sales girls)
PANAMA 25c STORE
HOURS: SATURDAYS a.m. to 5 p.m.
mmmum
COLON
Tenth Se MeMndes
^hrisli
maS
.mil around Ik corntr '
And CHRISTMAS SHOPPING is exciting
fun. when you hop early! Santa and
his Panama deputies extend a cheery invi-
tation for you to come down town and see
what they have in store to make this your
most joyous Christmas ever!



'
.
~_" PAGE FOUR

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN PDEPF.V41ENT DAILT NEWSFAPEH
%
ii

GOP Jubilant, Democrats Quiet
Over Latest Election Results
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER S.
TERRV
ALL THIS AND A SHOVEL, TOO
-": U^ WASHINGTON, Nov. 8. (UP) Republicans
iotlay hailed Tuesday's election results as proof that
"the voters "want a change in 1952" and are out to
,.; "replace incompetence and corruption with honest,
^ _' "efficient government."
'n '. Democratic officials, for the most part, were si-
""lent on everything except the fact they elected a
mayor in the GOP stronghold of Philadelphia for the
i Tii-st time in 67 years.
Bird

Republican National Chairman
Guy C. Gabrielson singled out
as especially significant" and
"Kratifyina" the GOP victories in
the third Ohio congressional dis-
trict, replacing a Democrat, and
the mayoralty contest In Little
Rock. Ark.
He saw the Little Rock vic-
tory as an indication "that the
once-solid South is eager for a
real two-party system," and
laid out the welcome mat for
"those Southern Democrats
who recognize the vital need
for such a development."
As for the overall results, in
which the Republicans gained a
congressional seat and several
mayors. Gabrielson said:
"Wherever national Issues were
at stake, the Republican trend
continued in Tuesday's election.
It was more than a warning to
President Truman to clean house
in his corrupt Administration.
The voters demonstrated that
thev want a change in 1952."
The Democratic National Com-
mittee did not issue the custom-
arypost-electlon statement. One
official did say that the Phila-
delphia victory was "encourag-
> Jna" but refused to comment on
the results elsewhere.
Gabrielson said the Democra-
tic victory in Philadelphia was
an "outstanding exception" but
he saw that one as a contest
mostly on "local issues."
Neither the Democrats nor Re-
publicans had anything to crow
about in New York City where
Independent Rudolph Halley,
former counsel of the Senate
Crime Committee, swamped his
opposition from the regular par-
ties.
Halley's triumph underscored
the impact which charges of
crime and corruption a cer-
tain issue in the 1952 Presiden-
tial elections had on the
off-year balloting.
Among the Republican mayor-
alty gains were several upstate
New York cities and some of In-
diana's largest cities including
Indianapolis, the home town of
President Truman's hand-picked
Democratic National Chairman.
Frank E. McKinney.
"New broom" administrations
swept into a number of offices
across the country on promises
of thorough house cleanings to
clear cities of graft and corrup-
tion found by Senate and local
investigators.
Charges made at crime hear-
ings held by the Kefauver Com-
mittee and the State Crime Com-
mittee echoed throughout New
York State.
Other results included:
BostonMayor John B. Hynes,
rolling up a 2 to 1 margin, de-
feated the come-back attempt of
former city boss James M. Cur-
ley. 77. who once ran the city
from a jail cell. Reformer Hynes
won by a vote of 154.521 to 75.990
after Curley failed to campaign.
New York State Republicans
replaced Democrats as mayors of
11 cities, and the Democrats won
nine mayoralty posts previously
(Continued on Page 6, Column 3)
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted bird,
the willow
10 It -----
completely
feathered feet
13 Scoundrel
14 Fish
15 Individual
i 16 Oriental
measure
117 Expunger
119 Near
20 Footlike part
VERTICAL
1 Malaysian
canoe
2 Canvas shelter
3 Mimic
4Railroad (ab.)
SPlus
6 Wading bird
7 Symbol for
gallium
8 Solar disk
9 Roman
emperor
10 Belongs to
him
Answer to Previous Puzzle
KiilFPALO^P
Brrga fish Wm
M -]i if-} *** [O^CSS
M--"f-j i;i:rj"i..i".M
UUP1I-:: 4 I -t=-lr-lL"JI -j -.<
'21 Negative wordJ A!?".8""
22 Symbol for
Luther Adler Tops Menacing
Roles in 'The Desert Fox
sodium
23 Company
(ab.)
24 Preposition
28 Peruse
28 Burrowing
animal
31 River in
Switzerland
32 Small child
33 Compass point fer
34 Indonesian of
Mindanao
35 Give ear to
37 Flower part
38 Near (ab.)
39 Whirlwind
40 Symbol for
actinium
42 Man's name
45 Worm
47 Letter
addition (ab.)
49 Canadian
province
51 That is (ab.)
52 Mine shaft hut
53 Footed vase
54 Hieroglyph
57 Annex
58 Dwellings
26 Headstrong 48 Une of
27 Facility junction
29 Tardy Versifier
30 Type of cheese 4* Weight of
36Monotony India (pi.)
37 Distress signal SO Conclusion
12 Wheys of milk 40 Water (Latin) 52 Cotangent
18 Type of bomb 41 Coagulate (ab.)
20 Seed container 43 Denomination SS Article
23 Lurch 44 Pain 56 Symbol for
25 Spotted 45 "Emerald Isle" cerium
UH.nM...F>,t<,T,?M currara cm.v wm*tguu j
[ NOW, tM ID TAUM A TRIP.,. IT* MMNMIN* TO I
I cm*oNi-v, i wonpsb. ip avMyscoy ear this
UdVrr TO A6IMW4N UKX CAMP.
FRCELES AND HIS FRIEND*

Prosperity
W MKRRI1X -
#31
/CHICKS
.
ALLEY OOP
Sitting Ducks
Y T. T. H AMI r

Shipping & Airline News
Ei
\
-T.
<
K.L.M. Marks Fifth Year
I of South American Flights
Exactly five years ago, on Oc-
tober 18. 1946. the South Atlantic
I Division of K.L.M. first came
" 'into existence. During this pe-
For a ma n so gentle and quiet i my characterlza t i o n of him j flod f-A JjLJSt th2
in private life. Luther Adler is would have to be 9f^\}SSS^St3SS^S^S^
building himself quite a reputa-'drawn. Playing an historical fig- Ii
tion as a screen menace. In his"
current Twentieth Century-Fox
production of "The Desert Fox,"
the dramatic story of Field Mar-
shal Rommel opening Saturday
In the Balboa Theater, he sur-
passes his previous "heavy" roles
to play his greatest menace to
dateAdolph Hitler.
"I don't know what Hollywood
Is trylnc to do to me," Adler in-
quires, "but every time I'm hand-
ed a part In a movie, I'm always
the one the audiences hisses. It's
getting so bad. that even little
children point to me when they
pass me in the street and ask
their mothers. 'Isn't he the mea-
nle we saw at the movies the
other day?"
tors In the business, he is the
son of the famous actor. Jacob
Adler, and the brother of two
equally prominent Broadway ac-
tresses. Stella and Celia. During
an illustrious stage career, Lu-
ther appeared in "Men in White."
"Awake and Sing," "Golden Boy,"
"Rocket to the Moon" and "Un-
cle Harry."

Adler has a legitimate gripe.
Hit entire movie career Is full of
and evil. In "House of
ngers," he was the consplr-
son who succeeded in bank-
ing his own father, played
Sdward G. Robinson. He was
a*jfhyster lawyer up to no good
In "Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye"
and in "Under My Skin." he
spent most of the picture dream-
ing up cruelties for John Gar-
field As a non-too-honest ship-
ping baron in "Wake of the Red
Witch," he devised so many ways
to give John Wayne grief that it
probably set an alltlme screen
record.
"Playing a menace like Hitler,"
Adler claims, "presente a differ-
ent problem. Here is a figure
who was hated by more people
than any man who ever lived,
the one man responsible for mll-
lions of deaths. I realized that

n r. m,m- a, | i ^
ES
matmm
location
2000 modern rooms
both-rodio-Muzok
ipotlocs comfort
taW*
I'lofLVt. NEW YORK
* thk$ sum it tun air
MAY WE PREPARE YOUR
TRIP BY AIR?
P
Many Extra
Services
V
OYDMOTHIM.IbC
No Extra
Charge
w^>
garden-fresh,
flavor-full green peas?
Recife. Rio de.Janeiro and Bue-
nos Aires, one of the flights be-
ing routed via Frankfurt and
Geneva and the other via Zurich.
The second South American ser-
vice, which was Inaugurated in
May. 1949, runs from Amsterdam
via Nice, Madrid. Lisbon, Dakar,
Paramaribo and Caracas to Cu-
racao and is flown once a week.
All the South American flights
are executed with Douglas DC-6
aircraft.
K.L.M.'s South Atlantic serv-
ice, has developed very rapidly.
In 1950 the traffic on the Ams-
terdam-Buenos Aires service was
three times as large as in the
first year. Altogether. 65.000
passengers have been transport-
ed between Holland and South
America In the course of almost
1.350 flights and of that total
nearly 52,000 passengers travell-
ed on the Amsterdam-Buenos
Aires service. The freight and
mail traffic amounted to 806 and
276 tons respectively. The aggre-
gate distance flown on the two
services during the past five
years was no less than 10,000,000
miles (equivalent to 400 trips
round the equator).
Colombia Expedition Ship
Transits Canal
The Ciudad de'Pereira, a Co-
lombian war ship which spent
some time on the Malpelo Is-
lands on a scientific expedition
for the Colombian government,
transited the Canal yesterday.
The ship is en route to Cartage-
na. Colombia. It belongs to the
Colombian government and Pan-
ama Agencies is the local agent.
was imposed after the vessel da-
maged the Magnolia Petroleum
Company's dock facilities near
here.
The bond whs posted by C.
Flanagan and Sons. Inc., agents
for the vessel which docked
Monday.
The bond was negotiated be-
tween the attorneys representing
the agents smdt Ijbe J Magnolia
Petroleum Co.
U.S. Commissioner Helen Rose
Barry allowed the Juan Peron to
move from Beaumont to the
Texas Company docks at Port
Neches after the bond was post-
ed so she could load 120,000 bar-
rels of oil there.
It is understood that the ship
company agreed to pay for the
damage but the bond was asked
until the bill was settled.
ft SENT AN
'ULTIMATUMTO" .
THAT NERO LOUT 1
TO LEAVE BY
NIGHT OR WE'D
THROW 1M
OUT?
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Oh-hh
BY EDGAR MA!
OWttV .ootc.
TOR VOO Yu.
oo :
NOW IS
THE BEST TIME
TO TRAVEL
AK>0 O MO KfcVVOWVtVi
6&*MGM*& "VrVfe VtMl ,00
V PVKM4TO. 1 MV CjAttG
WAS OU*6 to -\tM3 I
OOVOM WOL 9\CNilT
****. #.*CK OOK.T
V40WWV1
Mt^OO.MR.R'.VW VJVe t TV\*
eMMW&fW VtMWKI \'OMK*GYfc A
*\i s\wfc oowm yoo CWvXHy
FsK>' ?NW VUN>N*t=> OKI fV\'
ttOW.NO tfZt&'
CAPTAIN EAST
Superstition
LESLITt
ONNO WAT rjBB WAS A GREAT OrTER,MATE1
JES OAKE5 15 WHEN OUK HSWW WA5 PONE- HJ
LIKE, BUT HIS VjSCHOOWERs! A HQ3TltR,m0
DAUOHTER SEEMS7 COULD ALWAYS PICK ACRMH
TO BE A PIDCKy v
FIGHTER I
JEB U5TA CROWD TH'
SAILS OH TH' GERTIE 8.
TILL HER DECK WERE
WRTICAl! 16WOTS HEP
MAKE... AM' WOULDN'T HAUL,
CANVAS TILL TH" IBB RAILS,,
WERE UNDER WATER!
PROM WHAT X
OVERHEARD HE
HAS TROUBLE
SBTJIH CREWS
NOW!
HES HAP A RUN O'BAD BREAKSf
POOR HEALTH. COULDMT AFFORD)
OPERM TRAWUMS EQUIPMENT^/OOfST
SUPERSTITIOUS PISHPRMEM fw CREW, EASY.!
HAVE COME TO THWJK HfS J AtTTHEV ALL
AD UICK! _-^>\ SEEM TO BE
OUITTIM'l

Huf e Norwegian Tanker
Arriving Tomorrow
The Dalfonn, a 625-foot. 16,-
440-ton tanker arrives tomorrow
from San Francisco on her maid-
en voyage through the Canal.
The brand new vessel, which Is
about 100 feet longer than an
average American tanker, was
built in Belfast, Ireland. She is
carrying a cargo of 155,000 bar-
rels of fuel oil to Norway. W.
Andrews and Co. is the local
agent.
Tanker Juan Peron
Posts $13.000 Bail in Texas
BEAUMONT. Texas, Nov. S
(UP) The tanker Juan Peron
was freed from federal custody
here today when agents tor the
ship posted $12,000 bond which
MIAMI CHICAGO
LOS ANGELES
MEXICO
Wonderful vacationist the
year's lowest rales await
you in Mexico and the
U. S. A. And there's a new
low combined fare to Los
Angeles. $380.80 round
trip. Chicago is no more
than hair a day away, via
Miami, with DC-6" service
all the way... Your choice
of 2 services to Miami: "El.
Inter Americano" and "H
Turista" flights.
.%* your Tnrtl Arjrnl r
VIC FLINT
A Good Ma
stf MICHAEL dHJpLLL
Ulllt UOAKUIM. HOUSE
7
with
MAlOsi SMMSFLI OUT OUSI Hal
tfy i. K rVllXilMS
flMlUal, re*Jy pop
in!, bailing water.
woetet
*OSf SXPtSMNCM
Pan AMERtcAfi/
tosa* L S*tt N, f,
Tel t 0670
Cab S.I.. m,., i* 109i
xta-si-p
UM.' GOOD MOKMlfJe-.' X
A4A80R AMOS 8. HOOPLE,
(2ER3R.TIMS TO ASSUAAJE
THe P06TOF
STATISTICIAfO IF YOU
WILL EXPLrVlU MV
FUMCTlOMS.X'LLPLJ
MA30R HOOPLE? OM.yfeS.'
YOUR 308 15IM THE (ECeivJlrlG
Zoom, covxsr\H6 sdcks, t
TOWELS AND SO OH SOT
WAIT/ We vJeee-TDLDV&O
WeRE A WAR. VETERAM, ,
ANO CKPECT6D A YOXJM3.
PATRIARCH WITH
CHIN DRAPERY/
WHAT WAR.
WERE VOU IN A
(MetflCAM ?.
-.

^*^



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER I, 19SI
THE FAVAMA AMERICAN AN INDE.TKDENT DAILY NEWSPAFER
pacific ^ocietu

r:
t-..
nu C~Jt:JU~
Bo, 17, Bailo* % &./L. 352/
;7T


>
MISS JEAN KIE8WETTER
KIES WETTER-MANN ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest M. KiMwettcr, of Gamboa, announce
the entaicmcnt and approaching marriage of their daughter,
Jean Kieswetter, to Sergeant Edward J. Mann, son of Mrs.
Clara E. Mann of West Terre Haute, Indiana.
Miss Kieswetter is a graduate of Balboa High School and
attended Bostn University. Sergeant Mann attended school
in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and Indiana State Teachers
College. He is presently stationed with the 20th Military
Police Co. at Fort Guilds.
The wedding will be solemnised on Thursday, December
th, at the Gamboa Union Church.
lean Airways; Captain Lewis C.
Lindsay, Division Chief Pilot of
P.A.A. and Captain David G.
Desmond, the Sector Chief Pilot
of PAA at Miami and Panama
arrived Tuesday on a survey
flight over the new Pan Ameri-
can World Airways new route be-
tween Panama, Guatemala City
and Los Angeles. They were
overnight guests at Hotel El Pa-
nama.
Elks Will Hold Turkey Shoot
The Benevolent and Protective
Order of Elks of Lodge 1414 will
sponsor a "turkey shoot" at 7:00
p.m. on Monday, November 12
at the Balboa Bowling Alley for
Elks only. Turkeys will be the
prizes awarded those with the
highest scores.
V. F. W. Bingo Tonight
There will be Bingo tonight at
V.F.W. Home on Curundu Road.
Play will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Cash prizes will be awarded.
Navy Electronics
Laboratory And Plant
Damaged By Fire
MEMPHIS, Tenn., Nov. 8 (UP)
Fire at the Mllllngton naval
air station near here yesterday
destroyed electronlcis equip-
ment and laboratories while
Gov. Gordon Browning of Ten-
nessee was inspecting the
spawllng West Tennessee base.
Considerable damage was re-
ported, but no estimate was
available.
Cause of the fire was not
known.
The fire destroyed the build-
ing housing the aviation elec-
tronics technical school offices
and laboratories.
The public information office
said the base fire department
kept the fire from spreading.
A strong wind was. blowing at
the time.
Firemen thought they had the
blaze under control after 20
minutes of fighting It but an
explosion spread the flames.

FACE FIT I
%" Special Mission Ambassadors
* Are Visitors Hera
Mr. Lam arle and Mr. Leproust,
1._ the Special Mission Ambassadors
from the French Government to
si
Latin America, arrived Tuesday
by plane from Colombia for a
*. visit of several days to the Isth-
' mus where there are guests at
the Hotel El Panama.
I
The visitors are being enter-
tained, during their stay, by the
, Minister of France to Panama
\ Li and Mrs. Guy Menant. Minister
' '/" Menant returned only recently
ir, from an official visit to Rio de
f Janeiro, Brasil.
*e4 Mr. assifjto JDiaT"
En RMtilsi Europe
The Special Mission Ambassa-
dor from Panama to the general
meeting of ONU in Paris. Mr.
H Temistocles Diaz and Mrs. Diaz
jp .left recently by plane for New
York en route to Europe.
*
Li. Governor Vogel
to Address Rotary Club Today
The Lt. Governor of the Pan-
ama. Canal Company, Colonel
Herbert D. Vogel, will be the
guest speaker today for the Ar-
mistice Day program of the Cris-
tobal-Colon Rotary Club meet-
ing.
Mr. B. B Deemer of Chicago,
Illinois, who is a representative
of Armour and Company, arrived
on Tuesday also and is a guest
at Hotel El Panama.
Mr. and Mrs. O'Connor
Eatertain With Dinner'
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. O'-
Connor Jr., of Balboa, were
hosts Sunday, at a dinner given
in honor of their birthdays and
i those of their daughter. Colleen,
and of Mrs. O'Connor's sister.
Miss Grace Williams. The dinner
also honored Mrs. O'Connor's fa-
: ther, Mr. John L. Williams,.be-
, fore ftis departure for El Volcan.
II
.t
Rheutans Return to Virginia
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rheu-
tan left recently by plane for
their home in Richmond, Virgi-
nia, after a short visit; with Mrs.
Rheutan's brother-in-law and
sister, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce H.
Carpenter.
'?'
Mrs. Beal to Leave Friday
Mrs. Harry Beal, the widow of
the Right Rev. Beal, former
Episcopal Bishop, who has been
the house guest of Dean and
Mrs. Raymond T. Ferris for the
past two weeks, left Tuesday for
the Atlantic side of the Isthmus
where she is a guest at the Ho-
tel Washington In Colon until
her departure on Friday for her
, \home in Los Angeles. California.
_. Vacationers Return
from Santa Clara
-> Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Fox and
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Regan of
P 'ro Miguel have recently re-
tuned from a week' svacation
spent at Santa Clara.
Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Dyas
Entetrain at Hotel Ttvoll
n, Mr. and MrsMlmothy o. Dy-
< jas of Fort Kpbbe, were hosts last
'evening at a dinner at the Hotel
Tivoli. Those attending were
Captain and Mrs. Harry Newhall
syad Lt. and Mrs. James Dyas.
New Arrivals on the Isthmus
tr. Price O. Dodson. the Su-
perintendent of the United Fruit
Company at Puerto Cbrtes, Hon-
dura, arrived Tuesday on the
Isthmus and will be a guest at
Hotel El Panama for a few days.
Miss Connie Sundqust
Honored at Luncheon
Miss Connie Sundqulst. former
nurse at Gorgas Hospital and re-
sident of Pedro Miguel, who Is
visiting her sister. Mrs. Joseph
Medlinger of San Francisco de la
Caleta, was guest of honor at a
luncheon, given today at the
Hotel Tivoli by Mrs. Lots Harri-
son.
Also attending the luncheon
were Mrs Herbert KnCpp, Mrs.
Annie Calvlt, Mrs". Mary Harri-
son, Mrs. Gertrude Gibson, Mrs.
Sylvia Ludwlg, Mrs. Virginia
Pearl and Mrs. Anna Calvlt.
Army-Navy Club
to Hold Informal Dance
The Army-Navy Club at Fort
Amador will hold an informal
dance for members and their
guests on Saturday, at 8:00 p.m.
Dancing will be on the esplanade,
weather permitting.
Hotel El Panama Has Guests
from "Constellation Clipper"
Captain Oliver J. Studeman.
Operations Manager of the Latin
American Division of Pan-Amer-
Jusi Unpacked
NEW COTTON DRESSES <0<
from 0-W
WHITE LINEN SHOES
Pumps Sandals high at medium heels
Can be dyed to match your favorite froeksl
PATENT LEATHER PUMPS
RHODA
I-------No. 2
No. 8 Tivoli Ave.
In Our Main Store
Tel. 2-1111
just unpacked a bright new assortment of
TOYS
Justo AroMmena Ave. Tel. 2-1477.
Jim-
ae&
POND'S now fa.ad.rlan
J powslor II-Ib-sb
Not O cak make-up. Not a greasy
foundation.
Goes on without water. Stays on-
much longer than powder.
Perfect to carry I Can't ipill over
handbag or dark dothei.
la sU enaol-swost shade* Cswplste wHh downy ptsf
YOU MUST GET READY FOR
CHRISTMAS IN TIME
Be practical! Your wife and children will be delighted if you give them new
Furniture for the Home!
We sell only First Quality Merchandise
EASY WASHERS 25 & 60 cycles SERVEL REFRIGERATORS 25 cycles
SIMMONS MATTRESSES and SPRINGS Genuine PHILIPPINE BAMBOO.
i
D
Niagara's Roar
Normally, the roar of Niagara
/alls does not carry more than
wo or three miles. Boatmen on
i he Ntagmra River have heard the
t. "iar of the falls when they were
iht or ten miles away from
If you belong to the Armed Forces or if you have a steady Job come to our
Store and you may choose your own credit terms
0
MR. J. W. NAGLE, Export
Manager and Executive Assis-
tant to the Vice President in
charge of sales for the Gorham
Silver Company arrived today
via PAA from Venezuela.
A complimentary tea will be
given in the Balboa Room of
Hotel El Panama at 4 o'clock
Saturday afternoon at which
Mr. Nagle will give a lecture on
"Fine Art from Modern Indus-
try" and present a film titled
"This Gracious Heritage"
showing the evolution of the
making of silverware through
the ages.
The attendance of various
women's clubs of Panama and
the Canal Zone has been assur-
ed and all women of the Isth-
mus who have silverware pro-
blems have been cordially in-
vited to attend the tea and
take this opportunity Of con-
sulting with Mr. Nagle.
Hansom cabs are named for
Joseph Aloysius Hansom, a Brit-
ish architect anl inventor of the
18th century, according to the
Encyclopedia Brltannica.
You'll Uv
1ft* flavor
ofthiscoftW!
i. H9T coffee
CAUSE IT IS
100% PUIlf COFFEE
ate MA&C
COfNtHmCt
NO POT-NO ROUNDS
HEAVY IN AN INSTANT
SelHCfFIYIOO.'
USERS SKt"h\0*l OiPS
THAN A POUND OF WOUND
cotml AND THERE 15
NO WASTE
I ITi SMMUS. ITI *or TO ( moo!
J
.100% PURE
(.-OFFEE.
L
INSTANT
COFFE*
Lodge Renews Call
For Loyally Probe
In Slate Department
WASHINGTON. Nov. 8 (NU)
Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge last
night Tenewed his plea to Con-
gress to set up an independent
hi-partisan commission to in-
vestigate loyalty within the
State Department.
The Massachusetts Repub-
lican, who first advanced the
suggestion in April, 1950, said
in a statement that such a com-
mission has become imperative
since President Truman dis-
solved the Nlmitz commission
on Internal security anl civil
rights.
The President's action, he
said, "leaves the country with-
out an effective instrument
through which the American
people's confidence in their
State Department tan be restor-
ed."
Mr. Truman dissolved the Nl-
mitz group after Congress re-
fused to exempt members of the
group from laws restricting
their private business connec-
tions after their work for the
government is completed.
The commission originally
was named in the wake of Sen.
Joseph R. McCarthy's controver-
sial Reds-ln -government
charges.
The Democratic majority of a
Senate Investigating Commit-
tee called the charges unfound-
ed but McCarthy labeled the
finding a "whitewash."
Lodge said he feels the best
posslblle Investigation would be
made by a group not answerable
Taxi Service Offered
For Firemen's Ball
The firemen's bail committee
has arranged for transportation
for those who wish to leave
their cars in the Canal Zone.
"Radio Taxi" has beeM engag-
ed to transport personsiom the
Civil Affairs building (Old C. Z.
Airport) to the El Panama Hotel
at 25 cents per person and the
taxis may be used for return
transportation at the same rate.,
There is ample parking space at I
the Civil Affairs Building.
to the President but to the Con*
gress.
"8uch an investigatitjn," ha
said, "will result in cieasUng out
the unfit and in ending any un-
justified suspicion of the many
fine men and women who won
in the SUte Department"
T
&sua/SA/rf/M?o
,.. for 11 ten ana Boys
AFRICAN PREST SPORT SHIRTS
Men's.........$4.75
Boy's......... 3.95
3
>*
...
-
:

i

*
...
" ". r.

Panam
Coln
MOTTA'S

SeL 'Jjtrect from Scotland..,
J-^rinale 100 i (^anmere
SWEATERS
'THE FINEST EVER MADE"
FOR LADIES. ...
PULL-OVERS SL.
CARDIGANS
All sizes up to 42 in white, black
and all fashion colors.
in matching colors.
From
$ 74.95

FOR MEN. ...
SLIP-OVERS-V-NECK
Long and Short Sleeves.
All sizes.

AT BOTH STORES
Felix B. Maduro, S. A.
21 Central Avenue
6 Tivoli Avenue
'
at- %xa.
ElMblq

The Store Where You will Find the Lar gest Assortment of Glass and Linoleum.
86 CENTRAL AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-2465
"Leaders in the Furniture business since 1909"
s*
N
ovemDer
b
I
4
1 )
it '''.-. i
EASY TERMS' BIGGER VALUES THAN EVER!
A SMALL DEPOSIT HOLDS ANY GIFT UNTIL XMAS
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY TORE
W7 < e- n iva t cAl u t 137
COW IN BROWSE AROUND USE YOUR XMAS DOLLAR.
I




tk'.r. six

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER I, lflSt
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
l.KVVIS SERVIO.
Na. 4 T1vtl A*
Phase -tt!
KlOSkti W LESSEF8
rr a* Vmtm
MORRISON'S
Ne. Forth ef July At.
rhn.f MM1
BOTICA AKI.TON
I (.Ni MclaaSea Ave.
Phon. 2HColea
SALON l)K BELLEZA AMERICANO
I, u Wni 121k Strtet
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
> S7 H Mmt-PtHBi
No. 12.17 lenlial AtColea.

I
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Whan
i-OR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE:Mahogany furniture &
Venetian blinds. Phone Balboa
3425.
FOR SALE:Bamboo set, matching
FOR SALE. 1951 4-Dcor Styline
De Luxe, radio. $1,700.00. 4.-
000 miles. Ft. Dovis. Phone 87-
449.
drapes, torch, d.nnette set. chro- FOR SALE 1949 Chevolet Suburb-
mium and plastic, 6 chairs. In-
ntrspring mattress. G E. radio
new. Miscellaneous. Reasonable
8033-C. Margarita.
FOR SALE:Vantiy dresser, maple
finish, in good condition for $7.-
50. Tel. 3-4417, Panama.
I
FOR SALE:Mohogany dining toble
4 chairs and buffet, excellent con-
dition. $200 00. House 184 Por-
tcbilo St New Cristobal, ofter
6 00 p. m.
FOR SALE -One refrigerator Servel
Electrolux, 2 doors. Gcod condi-
tion. Apply house 311-F. Gamboa.
an, excellent condition. $1.400.-
00. duty paid. Call Braniff Air-
ways No. 18 Tivoli Avenue,
FOR SALE:1941 Studeboker Com-
mander. Sedan, excellent condi-
tion. House 5360 Dovis St. Diablo
Heights. Balboa, 2918.
MISCELLANEOUS
Oe yea hove drinking eraa'tmr
Write Alcoholici A>MTmiu
2031 And*. C. Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous

LESSONS
upert i' er for adult beginners or experi-
enced. Learn for pleasure or pro-
! festicnally. Phone 2-1282.
!ii
Mo e this a good Xmas by treating
' i our self to a Ballroom Dance
course. Balboa YMCA. Hornelt 6
Dunn.
FOR SALE
Motorcvele
FOR SALE:1951 PONTIAC avail-
able tor delivery in San Franciice,
California, on Six Cyl. Super De
Luxe Catalina Coup* with Hydra-
netic. radia and directianal sg-
nele. Caler light blue tep end ivory
ay. Immediete delivery. See
yeur Pantiac Oaaler
CIVA. S. A
Panamo Celan
FOR SALE. 1947 Pontiac Eight.
Excellent condition. Rodio. $830
Call Balboa 2697.
FOR SALE:1950 Buick Special. 4
door sedan. Dynaflow, VV/W tires,
seat covers and radio. Call Quor-
rv Heights 3260. 7 a. m. t6 5
p. m.
We just received large assortment
of TROPICAL and GOLDFISH, also
accessories for aquariums. 58 "B"
Ave. Jardn Inmaculada.
RESORTS
Houses ON BEACH Santa Clara.
Phone SHRAPNEL Balboa 2120,
or see coretaker there.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Spend your Armistice Day week-end
in cool El Valle ot HOTEL PAN-
AMERICANO. Rooms $2.00 daily
per person. Children $1.00. Meols
a-la-carte. Reservation. Telephone
2-1 112, Panama.
FOR SALE:Piano, new felts, ma-
hogany finished, mahogany rock-
ingchair, phone 2-2349, Balboa.
FOR SALE: Lionel Electric TroTn
set. Two complete trains; all ac-
cessories and track fastened to
board. Two transformers, 25 cycle.
Completely remote controlled. Old.
but in good working condition.
$75.00 Coll after 3 p. m. House
5157 Blackburn P I a c e. Diablo
Heights; telephone 2-1694.
FOR SALE: Kiddie Koop Babv
Crib. Good condition. $15.00.
Phone 3143 Navy.
Mothers, happy, healthy feet start
in the cradl;. Protect baby's pre-
cious feet with JUMPING-JACK
Shoes, from cradle to 4 yeors. Ex-
clusively at BABYLAND. No. 40.
44th. Bella Vista. Tel. 3-1259.
For the buying or selling of youFOR SALE:Genuine celotixThoTd-
automobile consult: Agencias Cos- ^^ notjono| & ^
mos, S A. Automobie Row No. MART,NZ. ,, N#rt|| "
2LTea^0nL2'-' POn^:-1 Ph 2-0610. Branch: 3 Mortin
FOR SALE: 1946 Studeboker! Sosa, phone 3-1424.
POSEY'sSeaclif Acres apartments
under new managenHnt. very rea-
sonable. Phone 2-3307, Balboa.
Phillip. Oceanside cottages, Santo
Claro. Box 435. Balboo. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
Gromlich's Santo Claro -beach-
eottages. Electric ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contort office No. 8061, 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon
FOR RENT:Cool, modern 2-bed-
rcom-livingroom, etc. apartment.
House 8045, 9th St. New Cristo-
bal, Apply Apt. 1, Colon.
FOR RENT:Unfurnished apartment
with two bedrooms, two bath-
rooms, servants quarters, garage,
hot water, etc. Call 3-2144.
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL,*
VERTAGREEN
3-VVay Plant Food
is cheaper than water
foi it
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. .Tel. J-0140
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29t.b St
FOR SALE:1946 Hcrley Davidson
motorcycle, call 2-1988 working
h^urs or 3-2506 after 5:30 osk
for Carlos.
Champion,
excellent
condition, genuine leather uphols-
tery, real bargain, inquire house
60. 16th Street West 3rd floor.
Nc. deoler.
PERSONALS
I
a
HAVE LOST MY OWNER:White,
native-bern, youne and healthy
dee. that I am. I've been leaking
in every car geing east the An-
een Commy fer the past four days
"without luck. Please com. far one
i. er else I shall have ta adapt same
s eth-r hoaae before I'm pick.e up
-'. aad token te the de pound. My
; thanks fa the Ma at The Pn-
eme Ansericen classifieds.
jr----------------------------------------------
Active Membership
In Pacific Saddle
Club Now Costs $25
* Active membership in the
Pacific Saddle Club is now
Available at a reduced entrance
tee of $25. according to an an-
Jiornceinent bv officers of the
tab.
Active members are those who
own their own horses. Associate
membership for those who have
no horses of their own but who
use club-owned hones are also
available, the officers said.
Facilities for stabling and
feedings horses are available to
members on the Saddle Club's
proDerty, located three-quarters
of a mile from Red Tank on the
C2B Road. Prospective active or
associate members are being in-
vited to inspect the club's facili-
ties
The Pacific Saddle Club.
Which was oragnlzed several
years ago. is a privately spon-
sored communuv organization
for the promotion of riding and
horsemanship for adults and
children of the Canal Zone.
Those interested may obtain
fur her information by calling
the following: H w. Mundt,
I tele jiioiie 2-1598; R. L. Malone,
Wttphone 4-526: e. B. Curling,
telephone 4-382, or J. H. Jones,
telephone 4-343.
'ITr!".01F0R SALE: Building materials
lumber, construction steels. AL-
MACENES MARTINZ, S. A.. 83
North Avenue, phone 2-0610.
Bronch: 3 Mortin Sosa St. phone
FOR SALE:In New York, 1951 2-| 3-1424.____
door De Luxe Chevrolet, lass than F0R SALE. Combination wooden
three months old, 1,500 miles ccun(er with she|ves ,0 fee, ,
Radio, heater *'! W*- 7 feet high. Metal desk. 60 inches
seat covers. $1.825.00. Tel. Bol- far tmmmti Cnair No I4 Cen.
000 2805- tral Avenue. Ask for Ricordo.
Chieftain 49
FOR SALE:-Pont,ac. UIMM w,fpa SALE:-2S Cycle motors 1-3.
block 4 door sedan, radio, Jl,- | _2 3.4 HP 3
295. Telephone Bolboa 2184 even-'
ing or 2895 day time.
FOR RENT
Room)
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, eoel
entirely renovated and well fur-
nished. Rates reasonable. Boche-
Ion enly. Inquire ot The Ama-
ricen Club facing Oe Lessees
Perk.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El ranasaa
500 shares Abattoir 300
shares (preferred 1 Foreat Pro-
ducts 300 shares (common)
Forest Products.
Tels.: 3-4719. 3-1880
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUILT
Slipcover Reupholster
visit ore SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto Herea
t F.delaOssa-n (Automobile Raw)
Free Estimates Pickup Delivery
Tel. S-40* t:ee a.m. u 7:ee m
LOST 7 FOUND
LOST:Strayed, 8 months old, Aire-
dole Terrier, from neighborhood
Balboa YMCA evening November
I st. Anyone having information as
to whereabouts please communi-
cate with telephone Balboa 3085.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Clean soft rags. Job
Dept. Panama American.
WANTEDTo buy youth bed in
good condition. Phone 3-3299.
from 8 0. m. to 12 o. m.
Help Wanted
WANTED: An experienced cook
Must be able to handle small
child. House 10069 Roosevelt
Ave. Colon.
WANTED:Nurse moid to sleep In
the job. must hove good manners
and references. C Street No. 53
Apt. 3, El Cangrejo. Call between
4 and 5 p. m. Tel. 3-3876.
764th Sergeant Major
Goes To Georgia 0CS
FORT DAViS. Nov. 8 Sgt.
Benjamin R. Clevenger Per-
sonnel Sergeant Major, 764th
AAA Gun Battalion, Fort Davis
received official notification
Monday that he has been select-
ed to attend Class No. 17. Officers
Candidate School, Fort Benning.
Georgia,
insects sgt. and Mrs. Clevenger will
and other small animals, are a- 'pave the Isthmus in the near
ble to reproduce lost parts. If a future.
newt loses a leg or tail, it will ,---------------1----------------------
row again.
Grows New Parts
Newts, which live on
*CJ Qtjycko
/antar # *.
special
KJSIMESS MAN S
UIMCM- 75
Have You
Cot Yours?
Remember to make tout re-
servations fer the "Fireman's
Ball" en Not. 9.
Call 2-2392. Tickets may be
Fire Statien.
obtained at any Canal Zone
i1h Chowder el rancho
SConsomrr."
pad Croquettes
Taeaato Sauce
or
Vienna Meat Loaf
lashed Potatoes Vegetables
Dessert
Hot Rolls a* Butter
Tea Beer
Jain M lb CeektaiU-
froJB 4 to p.m.
ANHATTANS
25 c.
tfARTTNIS
DAIQUIRIS
rfMTlZSMS "On Tht Houif
NOTICE
The banks in the ei-
tiefl'of Panama and
Colon will be closed
on Saturday Nov-
ember 10th First
Move Toward In-
dependence from
Spain.
aluminun Vene-
tian blinds. 46" x 58". Fit up
orid down. Double cotton mattress. *OR-REN
Telephone 2-3775/Bolboa.
FOR SALE:Wooden fence. 3 ft.
high. For yard or underneath
house. S20.00. 794-B. Balboa
Tel. 2-3655.
FOR RENT:Nicely furnished room.!
board if desired. Brllo Visto, 46lh :
Street 18-A upstoirs. Phone office
hours 2-1693 on 3-1789.
aeon, best r*-j
Modem' convi-
v-
FOR SALE:Be your own boss. Earn
$10 daily with home delivery fresh
milk business. Telephone Mr.
LteveH 3-4218. Panama.
Cold War Called
Off For 2 Hours
By Soviet Envoy
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8 (UP)
The Russian Embassy called off
the cold war for two hours last
night, but most of the Washing-
ton officials Ignored the truce.
Soviet Ambassador Alexander
Panyushkin was host to a milling
mob of over 2.000 persons who
accepted invitations to the Em-
bassy's annual vodka and cham-
pagne party to celebrate the 1817
Bolshevik Revolution.
But the crowd included mostly
newsmen. Communist fellow-tra-
velers and second-rank diploma-
tic officers.
Only a few top-ranking offi-
cials attended.
There was not a single Cab-
inet officer or Congressman.
John Farr Simmons. Chief of
Protocol at the State Depart-
ment represented the whole
United States government.
The party was a notable con-
trast to the British Embassy re-
ception for Princess Elizabeth
last week when almost every
Cabinet officer. Supreme Court
Justice, and Congressman in
Washington appeared.
GOP JUBILANT
DEMOCRATS
(Centinaed From Page 4)
held by Republicans. A fusion
candidate won in another city.
Republicans won control of the
Buffalo City Council.
New Haven. Conn. Demo-
crat* were said to be ready to de-
mand a ballot recount because
Republican Mayor William c
Celentano was re-elected over
Democrat Richard C. Lee by a
margin of only 10 votes out of
58.000 cast.
Bridgeport, Conn. Socialist
Jasper McLevy defeated two op-
ponents to win his 10th term as
mayor.
Springfield. Mass. Mrs. Es-
ther Naomi McDowell. 34. Virgi-
nia-bom Negro, became the first
woman of her race to be elect-
ed to public office in Springfield.
She defeated George F. Kane for
a seat on the school committee.
JoneiTllle, Va. Republican
J. Martion Smith appeared to
have defeated a dead man for
the Virginia state Senate. His
I opponent, Democratic Sen. Lloyd,
JIM. Roblnette, lor 20 years a Sen-
sidlnfior
niences. No. 13.
43rd Street.
34 Attend First
Boating Class
Al Junior College
Thirty-four men and women
attended the first session last
night of the free class In Piloting
being taught by the local unit
of the United States Power
Squadrons each Wednesday in
Room 104 of the Canal Zone Ju-
nior College. Balboa.
It was the largest number of
students thus far registered In
the five Piloting courses taught
since the establishment of the
local squadron three years ago.
The class, made up of civilians
and servicemen from various VS.
government organizations on the
Isthmus, heard welcoming and
explanatory talks bv William H.
Clark, Jr. and Brodle Burnham.
first and current commanders of
the loetti squadron, respectively
and began their study under the
Instruction of Francis P. Hargy,
administrative assistant for the
Marine Bureau. The session
closed with the exhibition of two
instructional sound films loaned
by the US. Navy.
Boating enthusiasts who were
unable to attend the first session
still may join the class without
difficulty by attending next
Wednesday's session, starting at
7 p.m. The free course is open to
all U.S. citizens 18 years of age
or over, of either sex.
Subjects will include Rules of
the Nautical Road. Seamanship.
Safety at 8ea. the Mariner's
Compass, Aids to Navigation,
Charts and Nautical Etiquette.
Pope Pius Warns
Peace Without God
Is Illusory Dream
CHICAGO, Nov. 8 iUPlPope
Plus, in a message to Catholics
meeting here, said today that
Christian teaching is "one of
the preservatives of modem
civilization against corruption
and decay."
The message was read before
the ninth National Congress of
the Confraternity of Christian
Doctrine.
The Pope warned that the
world must have courage to
shake off the "Illusory and fatal
dream of peace and happiness
Without Obd> wee
The Congress is being attend-
ed by more than 10.000 leading
ecclesiastical and lav members
of the Roman Catholic Church.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Of
i
Wiihoa! Worry Or Care
TrWCUSERVrftr
IS Tivoli Ave. Pan. t-Zt
ate member, took his own life
Priday.
Little Perry. HJ. Mayor Jo-
seph Srhloez. indicted on six
counts of misconduct in office by
a Bergen County grand jury, was
returned to office.
Legion Post Is 2nd
Group To Sponsor
All Scout Branches
Panama Canal Post 1, The
American Legion, recently be-
came the second Canal Zone
Organization to sponsor units
in all branches of Scouting, It
was announced by R. C. wors-
ley. Council Organization and
Extension Chairman of the Boy
Scouts of America. Post 1
achieved this when they voted,
at a recent meeting to sponsor
Darlen Squadron 22, Air Ex-
plorers.
The Legion Post also spon-
sors Cub Pack 3 and Scout Troop
3 of Balboa.
In sponsoring a unit of the
Boy Scouts of America, the
sponsoring Institution promises
to furnish adequate trained
leaders, adequate meeting facili-
ties and some financial assist-
ance when' needed.
Air Exploring Is designed to
give young men. 14 years of age
and ever, training in aero-
nautical subjects, short of ac-
tual flight training, in addition
to the character building and
citizenship training of the Boy
Scouts of America.
Young men on the Pacific
Side, U years of age or older,
who are interested in Air ex-
ploring are invited to contact
Joseph L. Puller. David Mcll-
henny, David Otten, Anton
Pedersen. Bill Elton. Andrew
Van Siclen. Douglas Sasfy or
Julio Wright.
The only other organization
that sponson all branches of
Scouting is the Gamboa Civic
Council. Thay sponsor Cub Pack
10. Scout Troop 10. and Sea Ex-
plorer Ship 10 all of which
operate in Gamboa
The Boy Scout of America Is
a Red Peather Agency.
Passenger Train Rans
Head On Into Fresfnt
I00.0OO Peoale Mast
Presents
Today, Thursday, Nov. I
P.M.
4:00Music Without Words
3:30Music for Thursday
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
8:00Panamuslca Story Time
8: ISEvening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News (VOA)
8:15Cross Country. U. 8. A.
(VOA)
8:45Jam Session (VOA)
9:00Meet Eleanor Roosevelt
(VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The OwUs Nest
12:00Sign Off
Tomorrow, Friday, Nov. 9
A.M.
6:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30As I See It
10:00News and Off the Record
11:00News and Off the Record
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00Songs of France (RDF)
2:15It's Time to Dance
2:30 Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Tygers Heart (BBC)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00British Country House
(BBC)
6: lS^Request Salon
7:00Mayor of Casterbrldge
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Radio In Review (VOA)
8:45Facts on Parade (VOA)
9:00The Perry Como Show
(VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA) wi
:45Sports and News (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures'Of P.C. 49
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m. Sign OH
MUNICH, Germany. Nor, 8,-
upia pasatMger train smash- functions of the department,
d head on Into a stationary

freight train at Walperthklehen
25 miles east of Munich and
first reports from railway orrl-
claU said at least 15 persons
were killed.
The wreck raised to 9f
and more than,
the casuaflBnnj
rail disaste J
days.
Explanation of Symbols:
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Br o deas ting
Corp.
RDFRadlodiffuslon Francalse
Canal Organization
Has 16 Vacancies
There are 88 vacant positions
In the Canal organization to
which eligile qualified employes
may transfer, according to the
latest issue of the transfer-va-
cancy bulk tin from the Person-
nel Bureau.
Half of the jobs are in the clas-
sified and related group and half
are craft positions.
Classified and related positions
are: architect: payroll clerk;
clerk-stenegrapher; clerk-typist;
civil engin^.T. design and town-
site planner; e.ectrlcal engineer;
mechanical engineer; structural
engineer; fireman; guard super-
visor; multili'h operator; physi-
cal science aid; policeman; posi-
tion classifier; signalman; and
storekeeper
Craft nofttirns are: boiler-
maker, wood and steel carman;
yard and roevi conductor; battery
and Ignition e'-ectriclan; plant
electrician: floating crane steam
engineer: chief towboat engi-
neer telephone lnsialler-maln-
talner; macninlst. inside, out-
side, locomotive with air brake
experience, machine erection, re-
frigeration' towooat master; dip-
per dredge mate; construction
equipment operator, lock opera-
tor, cablesplicer unqualified and
machinist qualified, unqualified
and wlremsn. qualified, unquali-
fied; poweihoure operator; body
repairman painter, planning mill
hand; shlpfl tei; and wlreman.
Hivat Station Has
GS-9 Position Open
The Naval Station, Coco Solo,
has a vacancy for Administra-
tive Assistant. GS-9. The appli-
cant who is accepted will be ad-
visor to the Supply and Fiscal
Officer, responsible for manage-
ment and administration of ci-
vilian personnel of the depart-
ment, supervisor of the Service
Group and will perform related
duties In connection with the
The position Is subject to re-
classification within 98 days af-
ter the position is ruled.
Ail applications (Form 17)
ahoul dbe Sarnaod to the In-
dustrial Relations Office, U.S.
...... ________
^KappUcanUo.
EVEN THE BABIES RIDE at the Pacific Saddle Club in Cu-
rundu which has recently announced reduced membership
fees both for those who own their .own horses and for others
who like to tide.
TO PERFORM FOR FIREMEN Julie and George, Interna-
tionally famous husband-and-wife hand-balancing team, will
ao their act tomorrow night at the Firemen's ball in El Pa-
nama Hotel. In addition to performing feats of strength and
dexterity, Julie adds a turn by dancing the mambo 'and
the rhumba.
Before NOW!
'46 CAWLLAC "2"..............*1550 $1425
Sedan Hydramatlc, Seat Covers.
47 MERCURY Convertible ......... 1050 995
Coupe Red Radio. Seat Covers
and w/s Tires. New paint.
'47 CADILLAC "t2"...............1900 1750
Sedan Hydramatlc
- radio excellent tires.
47 WILLYS Station Wtfoa......... 75 J25
(Duty Paid) New paint good tires.
47 0LDSM0BILE "6" ...'.........* ,1000 j 950
Sedan radio good tires.
47 PONTIAC "6"................ 10O0 950
Sedan radio seat covers.
48 DES0T "Dipolmii" ..........11 *> 1100
Sedaji Excellent condition
low mileage.
'
48 PONTIAC "8" ...... ........4 1225 1150
Sedan Coupe Seat covers good tires. ,
'48 PONTIAC ""................. 1300 1250
Sedan Hydramatlc seat covers., i
48 BUICK "Super" ............... 1350 I27S
Sedan Radio, S. Covers Beautiful.
49 0LDSM0B1LE "7"........... 1775 1700
Sedan Hydramatlc
Radio 8c Seat Covers
49 CHEVROLET................. 1350 1275
Sport Coupe Excellent shape.
'49 PONTIAC "6"................. 1700 I650
Std. Sedan Radio
Seat covers new tires
'49 PONTIAC "6" .............. 1775 I790
Sedan Hydramatlc Radio.
'50 PONTIAC ""................. 1950 I875
l-door sedan Hydramatlc.
BUY TODAY!
The above and other BARGAINS
now in stock
FINANCE AVAILABLE!
CIVA, S.A.
Your CADILLAC A PONTIAC Dealer
imoeile 'ANAMA




' THI'BSDAT, NOVEMBER f, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVER
I
V
V
'v

4*
^Mtlardic Society
&, 195, Qal** Dtbpko* Cjml* 378
MB. AND MRS. ROBERT MANNING WILFORD leaving the
Oatun Union church following their wedding Sunday morn-
ing. Mr. and Mrs. Wllford are now on a honeymoon trip to
' the SUtes. Mrs* Wllford la the former Miss Carol Harvey,
' daughter of Mr. fend Mrs. Raymond L. Harvey of Cristobal.
i'ii I o
HALI.-BERTUNCIM WEDDING j
At a private cremeny at the home of the bride, Miss
-Xenla Bertoncini, daughter of Mrs. Albertina de Bertoncini
and the late Judge!Carlo Bertoneini, of Colon, was wed to
Robert E. Hall, of the Coco Solo Naval Station, formerly of
Father Aureliano Die* performed the ceremony at 7 :t0
p.m. Saturday, November 3rd.
P. StaffordrLt. and Mrs. H. E.
Walthers, Captain and Mrs. W.
R. Llndstrom. Captain and Mrs.
Thomas Greenwood, Lt. Albert
Davis, Lt. and Mrs. E.G. Ellis,
Lt. (Jg) and Mrs. Michael Lea-
hy, Mrs. Roy Nielsen. Mrs. F. A.
Kraft, Jr., Mr. Carl Starke and
Mr. H. T. Pitts.
Miss Bertoncini was escorted
and given in marriage by her
godfather, Mr. Sherman Brooks.
She wore an afternoon dress of
white organdy. It had a sleeves
bodice finished with a large col-
lar which fastened to the bodice
at the shoulders. The iulltekirt
was ballerina length and ishe
carried a shower bouquet of!
white gardenias. In her hair she Mr. and Mrs. Brown
wore a coronet of orange bios- Feted Before Departure
.om. Mr. and Mrs. James Brown of
Mrs Brooks attended the | Gatun, were the dinner guests of
bride and Mr.. Jerry Hooper was Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Graham
best man for Mr. Hall.. -, \ .T"e*day evening.
A cbampaada artas held foW The Brown's are
close friends ^ Island? Mr. Brown is retiring
The bride's table was centered I from the Aides to Navigation Di-
wUh the traditional three-Uered vision.
Sine cake topped with a The other dinner guests were
lahire bride and groom. I Mr. and Mrs. Carl Nix. Miss
t^e. and Mrs. Hall are residing Jeanine Nix and Miss Martha
srtr quarters 53-H Fourth Street,: Graham.
______ Mrs. Brown was honored with
SWprise Birthday Dinner Party a luncheon given by Mrs. Floyd
"Mrs Fred Wrobles arranged a I McDermitt at her Gatun resl-
cocktail\buffet supper party at dence Wednesday.
her quarters on the Coco Solo
Naval Station, Tuesday evening
as a surprise to Lt. Wrobles on
his birthday anniversary.
The friends who participated
In the surprise party were: Lt.
Commander E. X. Pralno. Cap-
tain and Mrs. W. Schmidt. Lt.
and Mrs. L. J. DuCote, Lt. K.
The other guests were Mrs. J.
W. L. Graham, Mrs. Sallle Poote
Allen, Mrs. G. G. Thomas and
Mrs. Charles Hayward.
Bishop Voegell Honored
With Dinner
The Rt. Rev. C. Alfred Voege-
U, S.T.D., was the honored
ROPICAL-TOPAY
Shows: 1:15 3:10 5:15 7:00 8:55 p.m.
/
VVARNCH BROS.i.int'
aton Pass
_MNMS TICI STIVI
MORGAN NEAL COW
Sc*****'.
6COTT FORBES DOROTHY HART EDWIN L MARN tSZ7mZ*i-w ue^.~
m
anama
Lsdaai (clubhouses
Showing Tonight '
BALBOA
Alr-Conditleaaa
:1k :l
Robert CUMMINGS Joan CAULTIELD
"GIRL OF THE YEAR"
(Technicolor)
frlday "BULIJIGHTER TIIF LADY"
DIABLO HTS*
A* 111
t -
"INSURANCE INVESTIGATOR"
aaa "INVniBI F
Friday "SWORP OF
iNrouor
MONTECRISTO"
COCO LI
:U T:I
PEDRO MIGUEL
David BRIAN a Arlene DAHL
"INSIDE STRAGHT"
WtUmr "JUNLE HEAPHUNTBS^
ffiMaij
Jne POWELL Vic DAMONE
. u ,m Mf(|CH_ YOUNG AND PRETTY"
GAMBOA
TaW at.
Ba
Bob HOPE Marilyn MAXWELL
THE LEMON DROP KID'
SalnrdaT "JN81DE STRAIGHT'1
G A J U N
taW P at
_____
(Friday >
Eate PINZA Janat LEIGH
STRICTLY DISHONORABLE'
MAHGARITA
its j
CRISTOBAL
"SIDESHOW"
aaa" -CALL OF THE KLONDIKE"
FtHay -CAVALRY SCOUT'
tmnmr
A.
Mart LANZA Ann BLYTH
'THE GREAT CARUSO'
(Technicolor I
Friday "THF, a^WDOWNCM^
OPENING SATURDAY!
BALBOA "THE DESERT FOX"
guest at a covered dish supper
given Tuesday eveninp; at the
American Episcopal Church of
Our Saviour m New Cristobal.
The dinner was sponsored by the
Woman's Auxiliary with Mrs. Ju-
lius Dlctz as chairman.
Rev. Voegell la the Bishop of
Haiti and Santo Domingo and
was formerly stationed as Dean
at St. Luke's Cathedral In Ancon.
He was welcomed by many for-
mer friends at the dinner, which
was attended by over eighty par-
ishioners .
Bishop Voegell was the main
speaker of the evening. Mr.
Howard White, chairman of the
Membership Committee of the
Church also made a few remarks.
Visitor from Balboa
Mrs. Macon Turner a former
resident of the Atlantic Side,
spent Wednesday on the Gold
Coast and attended the meeting
of the Cristobal Woman's Club.
Cristobal-Margarita Council
to Elect Members
The Cristobal-Margarita Civic
Council will hold elections for
councilmen Saturday. November
10. Of fifteen candidates ten are
to be elected to serve for the
next two-year period.
The Auantlc Side Teen-Age
Association will be In charge of
the ballot boxes in the Cristobal-
Margarita Clubhouses and Com-
missaries from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m.
and 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. In the
clubhouses the balloting will
continue until 8:00 p.m.
The newly elected councilmen
will be installed at the annual
meeting to be held at the Brazos
Brook Country Club Monday,
December 3.
Steven Zilkie
Celebrated Birthday Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. August A. Zilkie
entertained with a party at their
Fort Gullck quarters.
A circus birthday cake centered
the refreshment table and nov-
elty favors and balloons were
given the young guests.
Those present were Stephen
Howard and his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Hugh Howard of Diablo,
Stephen Livings ton, Johnny
Hayden, Terry Thompson, Rober-
ta Moore. Anna Claire Oberg,
Butch Wilkerson, Joe Wallace,
Paulette Forrest, Janice Lalche,
Barry Hemann, Mary Claire
Hankel. Rosemarv Smith. Cele-
rle Coleman and Tina Pumpelly.
Miss Holcomb on Vacation
Miss Jane Holcomb of the
nrlpp" staff of the Colon Hos-
pital left Monday for a visit In
the States. During her three-
month vacation she will visit
Stella Gregg of New York
, formerly of the Colon Hos-
pital staff and her family in Co-
lumbia, B.C. .
Mrs. Maurer Vacationing
Mrs. L. B. Maurer. the head
nurse of Colon Hospital, left by
plane during the weekend for a
vacation in the SUtes.
Recent Arrivals
Mrs. George M. Jones, wife of
Want to sleep
like a baby?
V Put some P08TUM in a cup
V add hot water or milk
V and you'll have a delicious bev-
erage, free of stimulant, which
will help you to enjoy a restful,
soothing sleep.
Oet POSTUM today and try Ml
I HAD TO CONFESS
All my family likes good food,
and when something is spe-
cially tasty, they're unanimous
in their praise. Take the vege-
Uble soup that won their favor.
' Mmm, good!" they chorused. I
beamed, but I had to give credit
where credit was due. I teld
them lt was Campbell's Vege-
table Soup. Father was am axed!
To make this favorite soup
wire delicious, safra nourish-
ing," I said, "Campbell's cooks
mingle choice garden-freak
vegetables, picked at the peak
ef flavor, in a hearty, robust
beef stock! AH I do is add an
equal amount of
and serve."
Father winked:
In itself!" he said.
Robert Pugh Promoted
To Warrant Officer
FORT DAVIS, Nov. 8.Robert
I. Pugh formerly a sergeant
first class and mess sergeant of
"Dog" Battery, 903rd (a unit of
the 764th AAA Gun Battalion,
Fort Davis) received official
notification late yesterday af-
ternoon of his promotion to the
rank of warrant officer (Junior
grade).
Lt. Col. William J. Bennett,
Commanding the 764th, con-
gratulated Pugh and pinned
the new WOJO bar on his shirt
collar In a ceremony held this
morning in the Colonel's office.
Pugh a native of El Reno.
Oklahoma Is now the- Bat-
talion Food Service Supervisor.
He entered the Army as a pri-
vate on March 4. 1943. and took
basic training at Fort Sill,
Oklahoma.
*MJfcOA

Col. 'Jones, the former Miss He-
len Aanstoos arrived Saturday
from Norfolk. Va., to be with her
mother following the death of
her father, Mr. T. A. Aanstoos,
a prominent resident of the At-
lantic Side. Mr. T. A. Aanstoos.
Jr. arrived yesterday by plane
from Austin .Texas.
Balboa Girl Scouts
To Sponsor Cake Sale
The Neighborhood Commit-
tee for the Girl Scouts In Bal-
boa will sponsor a cake sale on
Saturday. Nov. 10, at 8:30 a. m.
at the Ancon Theater Building.
Funds from this sale will be
used for repairs on the Girl
Scout House.
CENTRAL THEATRE
Shows: 1:15 2:58 4:58 6:58 8:58 p.m.
SAVAGE PASSION
Unleashed by treachery
. hate violence!
DANA ANDREWS
CARLA BALENDA
CLAUDE RAINS
SOU**.
cAnoo
with PHILIP DORN
ASK FOR YOUR LOTTERY TICKET AT THE ENTRANCE!
Dana Andrews
Claude Rains
Carla Balenda
. in -
The famous talking MULE
is back.. In his Newest
Hilarious Adventures!

"SEALED
CARGO"
Ak F
Mm Hot Passion
I on i i pi Sees I
or Veilr Lottery Ticket
al the Entrance! _____
FRUrCB
9 GOES TO
THE RACE!
*aeassuesT*m sn a luniMtN'ewn Htm

CECILIA THEATRE
pay Mil I.imi la
"NIGHT INTO MORNING"
Aba: Barry SULLIVAN Arlene DAHL. In
"NO QUESTIONS ASKED"
TROPICAL
"RATON PASS"
Dttmii MORGAN Putrr.iu NEAL
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Cendltteacd
WAHOO! At t p.m. WAHOOI
S115.M in Prises!
Lew Ay rea. In
'LEATHERNECKS HAVE
lANDKIV
Also: Roben Rockwell. In
"Lonely Hearts Bandits"
TIVOLI THEATRE
' PresentpUon of The TAK1R
ABEN EL KADHY
Also -
"EL GATO CHINO"
"AT ABEC ELjHUKRTO"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
BANK NIGHT! SIMM
FRREI At f 00- :00 P.M.
Suajo y ay ward, in
"I CAN GET IT FOR YOU
WHOLESALE"
Pra-itoii Fosiri .11
GUADALCANAL DIARY"
VICTORIA THEATRE
l'r Davis. In
"ALL ABOUT EVE"
Also: -
Deor.i Paaet. In
"BROKEN ARROW"
Everybody featis Classified
I


1
'
PAGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
... J*~ THPRgPAT, NOVEMBER I, 1W
Two New Backers Join Drive To De-Emphasize College Football
BOXING SMOKER ACTIONJuan Tossas (right) of the Popt of
Corozal. unleashes a wicked right at Nick Zayao of the 504th Field
Artillery in a welterweight fight during the boxing amateur smok-
er cponsored by the Post of Corosal at Fort Clayton Gymnasium,
zayas later won by a judges' unanimous decision (U.S Army Photo)
Cuba Takes Over 1st Place
In Amateur World Series
AMATEUR BASEBALL WORLD
SERIES

(The Standings)
TEAMS Won Lost Pel.
Cuba.........5 1
Venezuela .... I 1
Puerto Rico ... 3 1
DO'i'.inican Rep. .i2 I
Co. ta Rica .".....'I 1
( i) inn In.i.......:{ 2
Nicaragua......3 2
Mexico........ 4
Guatemala.....1 .".
Panama........0 3
El Salvador...... 0 4
to Encarnr.cin s rescue but his
team was hlunVi-d at the plate by
i he terrific pitching job of Col-
ombia's En!iuuc Castillo
The Colombian rally started
.833 when Encarnac'n walked Carlos
.800 Herinn Demetrio Ziga, and
.750 Pedro Ortiz jo.s Mednlez dou-
.667 nled to 'rho in three teammates.
.667 Maldonadi was called from the
.600 bullpen to rt'ieve the erratic En-
.600 .333 donado foi one of three hits he
.167 allowed an tocleruiez scored on |
a single to deep left.
Omphroy Tennis
Tourney Entries
Close Today
Today is trie iast day for tele-
i phoning vui.r entrance to the
Omphroy Tennis Tournament.
There is a very representative
list of placers inscribed and in-
terest is at high tide
Omph-oy ha>- been doing all
possible tc have thij tournament
a very well organizer1 one.
The rul of the United States
Lawn Tnnis Association will be
applied thruiiKhout. Matches will
be two best oi three sets until the
semifinals and finals whlcj will
be three best of five sets
Rest periot o ten minutes will
be allowed after the first two sets
in all matches, if they goto three
sets. If players decide to go the
three sets without rest, it will be
acceptable providing both play-
ers are agreeable.
In semifinaLs and linals there
wiil be two rest periods In case;
match gtej to five sets, after the
second and fourth sets, of ten
minutes each.
These matches wiJl be conduct-
ed from tie btglnning with an
umpire, linesmen and service
linesmen. .n appeal is made to
all tennis ,-,'ayers to offer their
services in thrse capacities to(
stimulate more interest in the
trames.
In case a player is unable to
play on a s<-he.1uled date, if he
telephones the promoter, every
effort will te .nad~ to contact
the other p.'ayei and if agreeable
another datt will ce scheduled.
This will oe one only where ac-
ceptable to torn players, other-
wise the rule will be applied. Un-
finished gomes will be resched-
uled at the convenience of both
players.
Cinci. t/., Calif. Coach
To turn Down Bowl Offers
By United Press
NEW YORK, Nov. 8.-Leaders of the drive to
de-emphasize collegiate football have two new back-
ers todaythe University of Cincinnati and Cali-
fornia Coaeh Lynn Waldorf.
< TOP TIGER- Of 57 Princeton plays which started with a pass from center against Cornell,'Dick
Kazmaier handled, the ball 43 times, running himself, passing, handing off or punting once. Tailback
Kazmaier completed 15 of 17 passes for 236 yards and three touchdowns, scored twice himself. The
I 20-year-old Maumee, O.. senior threads his way through would-be tacklen. (NEA)
Cristobal-Key West Football
Game Tickets Already On Sale
Football Schedule
.000
.000
I
YKSTFIUMYS RESULTS
Cuba 9, Guatemala 0 (forfeit).
' fiivii'i. 8. Panam 5 (ten
tarings).
totombia I. Puerto Rieo 0.
Mexico 12, El Salvador 2.
TODAY'S GAMES
Costa Rica vs. Nicaragua.
Panam vs. Dominican Rep.
C uba vs Colombia
Mexico vs. Venezuela.
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 8
Cuba took n.-er (irst place in the
Amateui Ba-er-all vVorld Series
as a result rf an outburst of Gua-
temalan tompcrament and an
upset win by Cnlomr.ia over the
previously ;i.,heaten Puerto Rico.
The Cubans won yesterday's
scheduled ' by default when the Guatemal-
ans forfeit;': the game in an an-
gry protest
changes.
After retiring the side Mal-
donado gave up only two hits
in the next eight innings. But
Colombia's Castillo shut out
the ni a 11. rtii ansone of the
heaviest hitting clubs in the
Serieswith seven scattered
,hits.
The loss dumped the Puerto
Ricans lo third place behind Cu-
ba and Venezuela. The Venezuel-
ans smashed acioss three runs in
the top of il.e tenth to break a
tie and he nd Panam its third
.straight low of the Series, 8-5.
Panam had battled from
behind ivih t three-run rally
of its own in the bottom of the
ninth on Sylvester McDonald's
single, Oliver Hardy's and Cat-
alino Gon7.le7' doubles and Ju-
lio Herrera s triple.
But the Venezuelans struck"
back in the tenth when Ismael
over schedule Arredondo anc; Argento Gils
doubled and Anton.o Torres and
The Gu*.emRlans complained'' ?'&"" SS&tL&Z*
that the tournament officials one tats to Oanri on hi "
switched te.e'r scheduled morn- ?"ui'f ,\?J' l?"'?.on,e-nJaI_f Bame
scheduled morn
tag game with Cuba to the af-
ternoon w'CuDi-t notifying them.
"We are u.-iwilling to sit around
behind the Senes leading Cu-
bans.
In the night game, Mexico
waiting for the officials to make drove hapks" F.I Salvador deeper
up their minds when we are go-' into the collar with a 12-2 de-
tag to play," said one member of eat. The Mexicans poured across
five runs Ij the firs; Inning and
were neve.- headed.
Ball-Carrier Has
Ample Incentive
the Guatemala squad
Eladio Gmez, secretary of
the Guatemalan delegation to
y the toun.ey said, "The com-
mittee's action in awarding
the game lo ( uba was illegal
Bad unjust." lint he said that
Guatemala, which has won on-
; Ijr one game, has no intention
fajf withdrav. mc from the tour-
ament over the incident.
[.Colombia, 'neanwmle. provided
DETROIT. Nov. 8 (NEA)
_ Jack Christiansen was asked
upset of *,n<- day tjy knocking about his speed.
r the previously undefeated n enabled the Colorado A
rtoRic.il) eleb 4-0 in the first and M. sprint star now with
tout of the .Series the professional Detroit Lions
e Colombians lumped on to return two punts for touch-
,ady ,fuer,r Rlcan Pitcher downs against the Los Angeles
nlo Encamacin for four Rams
In the llrst inning. Ramon "You'd run fast, too" the
Monado turned in a fine hurl- halfback replied "if vou had all
* performance after he rushed, those big guys chasing you."
FOR SMART
HEALTHY HAIR
Play safe I Brylcrcem your hair.
OandrufTon your collar, loose hair
un your comb these are danger
signal that point the need for
Brykreem's double benefit :
(1) Day-long smartness.
(2) Lasting hair health.
Massage with Brylcrcem stimulates
the scalp, encourages natural hair
growth, wards offDandruff. It pure
emulsified oil put life into Dry
Hair and impart a splendid gloss.
Don't take any chances, Rrylcreem
your hair most men do I
use
Brylcreem
most men do
I RIDA V
Miami. Fia. W. Chattanooga.
Eurman vs Newberry.
Marshal, vs. Fvansville.
Morris Harvey vs. Davis Elkin.
N.E. Okln. St. vs. Cent. Okla.St.
Occidental Co:, vs. So. Georgia.
Pacific U vs. calif Tech.
Tampa v*. Whitman.
SATURDAY
Alabama U vs. Miss. So.
Army vs. Citadel.
Auburn v.s M.'ss. U.
Boston U. vs. OreiiO n
Utah State vs. Brigham Young.
Califoin'.a U. vs. Washington.
Clemson vs. Boston Col.
Bucknell vs Colgate.
Colo. A. At M. vs. Montana.
Colorado U. vf. Utah.
Columbia U. vs. Dartmouth.
Michigan vs. Cornell U.
Dayton vs Miami Ohio.
Wake Fo.cst vs. Duke.
Florida Sute vs. Wofford.
Florida U vs. Georgia U.
Hard. Sti:.mons vs. Tex. West.
Prirfcton v.s. Harvard U.
Holy Cross vs Marquette.
Wash. Sta'e vr. Idaho U.
Illinois U. vs. Iowa U.
Iowa State vs. Nebraska.
Kansas U. vs. Lovola Col.
Kent State n. Akron.
Houston v.s. Louisville.
Vanderbi.'t vs. LSU
Maine vs. Bowdoln.
Miss. State vs. Memphis State
Mich. Stale VS. Notre Dame.
Indiana vs Minnesota.
Oklahom? vs. Missouri U.
Murray Ky. v.-. Mi'idle Term.
Maryland vs. Navy.
No. Ca Stale vs Davidson.
Wyoming vs. New Mexico U.
North T">:as vs. Midwestern.
Northwestern vs. Purdue.
Cincinnati vs. Ohio U.
UCLA vr. Oregon state.
Pacific C'oi. vs. Denver.
Syracuse vs. Penn State.
Ohio Stat-; vs. Pittsburgh.
Arkansar. vs. Hfce.
Brown vs Rutgers.
So. Cal. i' vs. Stanford.
South Dak. n. N. Dak. U.
Stetson U vs. Ricnmond.
Trinity Tex. vs. Sul Ross.
Tempe vs Arizona U.
Temple vs New York U.
Tennessee U. vs. Wash, c Lee.
Texas A & M vs. SMU.
Texas U < s Baylor.
Kentucky vs. Tulane.
Tulsa vs Kansas State.
Vlllanova vs Detiolt.
Georgia lech vs. VMI.
Virginia v.s. N. Car. U.
So. Carolina vs. West. Va. U.
Draka vs Wichita U.
Wm. & Mary vs. VPI.
Wisconsin vs. Penn U.
Xavier O vs. John Carroll.
SATURDAY MINOR SOUTHERN
Ab. Christian vs. Austin Col.
ADpalachian vs. Erskine.
Camp Leteune vs. St. Bonaven-
ture.
Catawba vs. Guilford.
Sewanee vs. Centre.
Eastern Ky. vs. Western Ky.
Tenn. Tech vs.. East Tenn.
Millsaps \5. Howard Col.
Elon vs. I.-?nolr-Rhyne.
Howard Pr.ym vs. McMurry.
Austin Pecy vs. Mlllikin U.
Rand.-Macon vs. Hamp.-Syd-
ney.
Sam Hpuslor vs. S.W. Tex. St.
Georgetown Col. va. Union
Tenn.
Emory & Henry vs. West Caro-
lina.
Everywhere, among sporting
circles on the Atlantic side, is a
bee-hive of activity ta prepara-
tion for the football game sched-
uled for Dec. 7 against the Key
West (Florida) High School
team. Posters are oetag readied
.. .slogans pre being made, plans
for decorations at the Mt. Hope
Stadium are unoer way... and al-
together plans are rapidly taking
form, to make this game the most
outstanding sporting event ever
held anywhere on the Isthmus.
From the Cristobal Gym comes
the announcement that tickets
for the big game will go on sale
this mornltig (Nov. 8), and dis-
tribution of tickets to various
follow th.- footoall game, that
same ticke*. will entitle the hold-
er to all the games.
Tentative plans are for the
basketball i ..ire* to be held at
the Coco Solo Gymnasium, inas-
much as neither the Cristobal or
Margarita Gyms had adequate
seating capacity.
The Cristobal fighting Tigers
are beginring a more rugged
training schedule, and should be
a well oiled machine by the time
Dec. 7 rolh around. In addition
to the gam* scneduled for Balboa
this Friday night, Cristobal will
play two other .ames at Mount
Hope previous to the Key West
branches of the Canal Zone will game. On tne. 16th Junior College
follow immediately. The price of
admission will be $2.00, and if
Elans are -completed for the two
asketball games to precede and
will play Cristobal, and on the
23rd, Balboa High will move into
the Gold ','oast gridiron.
Although tnat Balboa High
Sports Briefs
By UNITED PRESS


PITTSBURGH Veteran end I 82-page dr?.ft list today. The list
Val Jansante ol the Pittsburgh! includes the names of minor
Steelers ha. decided to call it a league players subject to draft by
major league teams. The big
league clubs will hold their draft
meeting ta Cincinnati, Nov. 19.
CHIC/ GOr ene ral Manager
career. Jansante announced his
retirement because fans were
booing him too hard. Steeler of-
ficials sav the veteran pass
catcher told tnem earlier this
year that he would quit.
1-OOTBALL
Winter weather cut into the
practice centona of at least half
a dozen Midwestern football
game will not go on the record as
a playoff game, Doth squads, with
the posslviity of the season
winding up tied, will feel that
they have won o moral victory ta
the-1951 taterscholastlc play. The
game may not go on the record
of standings, bt.t it will surely be
remembered for many years to
come.
The Cri3tobai High School au-
thorities are depending upon the
usual outstanding cooperation of
the Gold Coast fans to make this
Key West venture a tremendous
success.
The Atlantic side has always
shown their willingness to sup-
port any \\\zh outstanding ven-
ture, and fila writer has reason
to believe that this time will be
no exception. The Schools and
Playground section are going to a
lot of effort to bring States-side
football to the Isthmus. Your
support will guarantee its con-
tinued sucres.
Tickets will be available, prob-
ably anywhere you go, but for
advance orders fans can contact,
Cristobal High School office and
gym, Balboa Gymnasium, Phys-
ical Recreation and Education of-
fice in Ball/;.a. Any Atlantic side
fan can have tickets delivered to
his door bv calling the Cristobal
HlBh School office, 3-1533, or the
Cristobal Gyin offfct, 3-1817, be-
Offlclals at unbeaten Cincin-
nati say they will turn down any
Kost season Bowl Invitations.
'aldorf. speaking before the
San Franeiseo Touchdown Club
yesterday, said college players
should be student*not gladia-
tors.
Cincinnati, which has won
eight games and has three to go,
made Its "no Bowl game" an-
nouncement through Athletic
Director Charles Mileham.
"The faculty committee on
athletics,' says Mileham, "will
not approve acceptance of an
invitation for the 1951 football
team to play In any post sea-
son game if such an invitation
is received."
Mileham sny.*. the committee
feels Cincinnati's 11 scheduled
games are "quite enough."
Waldorf took his de-emphasls
stand at a inner celebrating the
82nd anniversary of the first
football game between Princeton
and Rutgers
"The game has grown so rap-
idly," said Waldorf, "that It is
necessary to remind the public
our college boys afe students-
schools yesterday. Snow storms one of the feliows we are going
drove the Illinois, Notre Dame to keep," lane says,
and Michigan State squads ta-
Frank Lane of the Chicago White tw^Tt^hours of '8 am. and
oo.. a_. i...e c.'Uu detinuei/ is in- 5 Djn
terested in cstting Ted Williams
from the Red Sox, but not if Chi-
cago has to part with shortstop
Chico Carra-quel. "Carrasquel Is
not gladiators. The major chore
for these youngsters is to study-
not play football."
Waldorf says his California
players put In a total of only 185
hours on the practice field. In-
cluding pic-season training.
"The rest of the time they stu-
dy," says Waldorf. Tf there Isn't
any fun ta athletic competition
then we've lost the finest thing
in sports." *
Waldorf, commenting on
yearly demands on the NCAA
to make rule change, said
"The rules can be changed. But
the NCAA nor any ether gov-
erning body can legislate the
will to win in sports And that
is the important thing in
building manhood."
Coach Clyde Smith of Indiana
who resigned Tuesday says he
won't look for another Job until
the end of the present season.
Smith's resignation Is effective
the end of the present season.
"I have had no offers and am
not Interested ta any right now,"
says Smith. "I'm not making any
plans until aftei our last game.
just resigned at Indiana because
I wantetf toand thit's all there
Is to it."
Along The Fairways
doors while Wisconsin, Michigan,
and North /estera ran through
shortened drills outdoors.
CHICAGOT h e Mid West
snow storm na- forced the Chi-
cago Cardinals to change their
plans for going to Los Angeles
for Sunday's National League
game with the Rams The Cards
were scheduled to .eave Friday
but, because of the weather they
took off eaily today.
CINCINNATI The Baseball
Commissioner's office will start
mailing some 700 copies of the
MINNEAPOLISThe Universi-
ty of Minnesota has lost the serv-
ices of its 1951-52 basketball cap-
tain-elect University athletic
authorities have ruled that Rog-
er Schnobnci cannot play be-
cause he alreaay has used up his
college athletic eligibility.
FIRE CHIEF BURNED OUT
NORRI8TOWN, Pa. (UP.)
John W. Brennan. fire chief, has
a red face to go with his fire-
man's hat. Brennan had to call
on his own company to help put
out a fire which started In a
mattress in his room.
Notice To Teen-Age Boys
All boya who will be 13 years of age before next August
1st or will not be 16 yeara old before next August 1st and
who go to I. S. Rate schools en the Pacific Side are eligible
and are invited to fill out this ballot for membership on
the "Fastlich Teen Age Baseball League." Please leave your
completed ballot with Principal T. F. Hots, Balboa High
School, or bring it along to the tryouts to be held at the
Ancon Athletic Field (next to Laundry) on Saturday, Nov.
10, and Monday, Nov. 12, from 8:39 a.m. until 3:M p.m.
To become a member you must appear at one of these
tryouta.
Your phone
"me..........................(or nearest.................
neighbor's)
Birthday .......................:..........Age.............
BOXING CHAMPCuban Wel-
terweight Champion Charollto
Esplrltuano smiles In anticipa-
tion of another kayo victory
over Colon's Young Finnegan
Sunday night at the Coln Ar-
ena. Charollto flattened Fin-
negan ta two rounds .in a con-
troversial "short count'- bout
the first time they met.
La Parisin Sponsors
Panama Golf Club
Ladies Tournament
A 36-holc medal play tourna-
ment with f ill handicap allow-
ance has been drawn up at the
Panam Golf Club for ladies.
The "Ls Parisin" store of 113
Central Avenue will donate the
prizes for the tourney.
It is hop-d that all members
will participate in this tourna-
ment.
Due to possible poor weather
conditions, there will be one full
week in which to turn in each
li-hole score Each round must
be played with a contestant in
this tournament. The score cards
must be turned in to pro Anbal
Macarrn on Nov. K and Dec. I.
The women members of the
Panam Golf Club thank the
owners of La Parisin, who sre
Joffers themselves, for being the
Irst to sponsor a tournament of
this sort for the Panam Club la-
dies.
The Summit Hills Golf Club
held an alternate-shot tourna-
ment over the week end of Nov.
10,11, and 12. Any combination of
two players may form a team,
whether it lie man and man, man
and lady, or lady ana lady.
One-half of the combined han-
dicaps will be Riven, and prizes
for the low five teams will be dis-
tributed at tne conclusion of the
week end's play. In an alternate-
shot tournament both partners
tee-off on the first hole and se-
lect the beet drive. After the first
tee, every shot Is played altern-
ately until the finish of the 18th
hole.
AND ALSO....
On the evening of Nov. 18 Sum-
mit will Inaugurate its newly
formed card night. Come out and
enjoy an evening ot cards with
Summit members and their
guests. All types of card games
from bridge t canasta will bo
played. Everyone is invited to
come and form their own table.
If they like ?! come and meet the
gang from Summit for real fun.
There will be ho prises arid no
admission fee. '
So remember the tournament
the 10th, 11th and J3th, and the
card party the 16th.
TAGAHOPULOS
INDUSTRIES, S.A.
Phones:
1002 1003
#4041 Feo. Boyd Ave.
Coln R. P
o FRESH MILK
o FRESH BUTTER
o RICH ICE CREAM
Everything
luspetted by the
Health Department
HOME DELIVERY
Address
Position You Usually Play
REF BOOKEDSol Levy, for-
mer referoe of the National
Basketball Association, is book-
ed in New York on charges of
bribery. He was accused ef
helping rig tne scores of three
fames last season It was the-
Irst mention of officials or pro
basketball in the cage fix
scsndais.
*
9
Make your baby inore
Comfortable these ways
f Guard baby's en*** Wic^skij
' with pure, bland Johnson's Bsby 00.
It helps prevent skia ehsftag. drvness,
/?^ and imestioo-
Glands Hade Youno
-Vigour Renewed
Without Operation
if roa feel old befor your tiro* ot
Buffer from nerve, brain and physical
weakneae, you will Una) new happlneee
and health In an American medical
licovery which restores youthful
virour and vitality quicker thai
{land operations. It la a almple home
reatment In tablet form, -discovered
by an American Doctor. Absolutely
harmless and eaay to take, but the
aewest and most powerful lnvioura-
cte dir<
SAVE!!$900
A MERRY CHRISTMAS
SPECIAL OFFER
A NEW
RCA VICTOR
45 RPM "VICTROLA"^
tor known to science. It act
llrectty
en your glande, nrvea, and vital or
gana, builds new,. pure blood, and
works so faat that' you can see and
1 new body power and vigour. Be-
cause of Ita natural action on glands
and nerves, your brain power, mem
try and eyeelght often Improve amai-
txsly-
And taut amaalnc new land
vlsour reetoree, ceiled VI-Take,
and
I
At baby'S bath tims. be saw ts use
gentle, fragrar t Jobaaon's Baby Soap
10 keep baby's skis soft sod smooth.
rot rov
rraciAar-
fofatwCH4->j0iVt0tt
BAY Oil SfB
K7
been tested and preved by Uouaanda
nd la now available at all chemists
here. Oet VI-Taba today. Put It to the
teat. Bee the bur. quick Improvement.
Take the full bottle, which lasts eight
days. It will make you (nil ol
vlsour. energy and vitality, and
(el years younger. A apeclal
bottle of t VI.Ta.ba cost
eve) fsje, __ t Vl-Tabe
VisTabi '
V m eaVWeW* e;.
feres stood asd Vltmllti
25
Cycles
25
Cycles
AND
45 RPM RECORD ALBUM
VALUED AT 29;00
ALL FOR
20.00
ONLY 5.00 DOWN 5.00 MONTHLY
7110
Bolivar
WHILE TREX LAST
RADIO CENTER
P.S. An ideal gift for children.
tmumnnmn


THURSDAY. NOVEMBER t, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICA* All INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE MINI

\ w
24-Hour Recall Of Stars Ruining Minor Leagues, And They Plan War On It
PINEHURST, N. C.Putting one little word after another and
whatever became of the penny poet card? Maybe the new rate
will discourage the pest who writes frum Made In July: "Slept
under blankets last night." The Southern branch of the grape-
vine has Red Blalk quitting West Point at the end of the ason
and George Manger none too happy at Pennsylvania. The British
totters ngNtfMt f,rV A?""?0 itb$. w>re mor* *"
wlldered than enchanted: "If,' a bit mad. eh wot?" >.
. The Americans' victory In the Ryder Club matches was about
as surprising as. the result of a Peronist election Until the regula-
tions are changed to Include the entire British Empire (or what
remains of it), the result must always be the tame. As matters
stand now we have what amounts to 48 states playing fourEng-
land, Scotland, Wales and the North of Ireland Even the American
players are beginning to take a dim view of the matches. However,
they seem to be concerned less with the crusnlng disparity than
the.week they lose from play-for-pay tournaments They'd Just as
soon skip the whole thing. Most professional athletes are the
ame. They'd much rather see their name on a check than on an
honor roll. l
Some SO-odd traps were eliminated for the matches. Unfor-
tunately for visiting sackers this did not Include The Danes. Porky
Oliver was the only American to be beaten in both foursomes and
smiles. Maybe toe was representing the Marshall Plan. Cap'n Sam
Snead's 87, five under par, set a new record for the revised course.
Ben Hogan and Charley Ward each shot the first nine in the morn-
ing In S3, most brilliant stretch of man-to-man golf the matches
psoduced. Over the span Hogan even dropped a hole, the Britisher
shooting the seventh, eighth and ninth In S's. For the first time
Kir for the monstrous Itth was broken. Sneod. Hogan, Jimmy
emaret and Max Faulkner, the British Open champion, got 4's.
Arthur. Lees was the most successful of the Invaders. He col-
laborated with Ward on a 60 to win the Britishers' only foursome
and turned back Porky the Patsy In their only singles win. I
thought the stocky little Yorkshireinan the best iron player In the
field. Reminded me of Tommy Armour's unerring shots when the
Black Scot was in his prime. Fine competitor, too So outrageous-
ly positive were the Americans of whining, they had victory-dinner
invitations printed days in advance
It is necessary to qualify the statement that Dick Kasmaier
of unbeaten Princeton is the best triple-threat hack in college foot-
hill. One of the best is safe. I *ot my first look at Tennessee's
Hank Laurlcena In the North Carolina game Saturday.. .It was aa
eyeful. An eyeful of wonderment, admiration and appreciation
He can do everything Kasmaier can; whether he can da it better
I'm not qualified to judge. Only a professional expert each as
Steve Owen or George Halas could tell.
runs, passes and punts with authority and
;ss box they look strikingly alike In build
Kazmaler is a slender six-footer, weighing
10 Inches and weighs 170) Both are speedy
pace runners who make crafty use of their
alls the plays when hi's In (which Is only
Kazmaler Isn't burdened with this chore.
Kazmaier as a punter. He's a coffin-corner
seen since Harry Klpke of Michigan.
Like Kazmaler, he,
artistry. From the pn
and in performance. (
171; Laurlcella Is 5 feet
seniors and change-of-
ixiterference Laurlcella
about half the time.)
I'd rate Laurlcella. over
specialist, the best I've
. .
.....c,.
On. of tenneasee's potent weapons is the quick kick. It 1
Ktent because of Laurlcella. He beat Alabama with one that went
yards, o feared Is the quick kick with Laurhella back it is
enually devastating as a lake. One such suckered the end in against
North Carolina and Laurlcella galloped 45 yards before he was
overtaken. He has one advantage that Ksemaler lacks. A big, strong,
bard-charging line that must come olose to being the best in the
country. The Princeton line is good,- but fhts line, paced by Fug
Pearman, Ted Daffer and Bill Jasper, Is great.
The Volunteers had.no trouble with the Tar Heels. They didn't
figure to. This Is not one of Carl Snavely's better teams. There Is
a marked absence of speed In the backfleld. verv much marked In
contrast with the swift volunteers The Tar Heels were never in
the game; they didn't get beyond mldfleld unth thf third quarter.
The Volunteers played their customarily conservative game. (Twice
they kicked on fourth down with one to go.) Oen Bob Neyland
scorns the rzale dazzle. The swift powerful precision play Is his
forte. It's beautiful to watch and venomously effective. The late
Jock Sutherland would have been deeply impressed.
I doubt that there Is a better coach in football, college or, pro,
than the taciturn general who is in hh 26th year as Tennessee's
demanding drillmaster. He's never forgotten the importance of
fundamntala His young men tackle with terrifying violence, and
Once a ball carrier gets running his bleckers form quickly and pro-
ceed to upend everybody In sight. In a few seconds a chaotic
scramble becomes a pattern ef disciplined destructionthe mark
and result of long hours of patient and knowing coaching. One
Jim Hahn'(5-11, 110. program) Is the blotkins back In the gen-
eral's modern single wing. If there's a better ene in the country
you tell me about him.
Mays, Mantle
Left Asso. A
Ghost Circuit
By DAN DANIEL
NEA Special Correspondent
NEW YORK, Not. I (NBA)
Among the several dozen ail-
ments which are making life
more and more burdensome for
the minor leagues, with stress on
the Triple A circuits, are the
products of star lifting by parent
major club*.
Ah arrangement known aa
"subject to recall on 24-hours'
notice" Is draining the very life
blood, anaemic as it la. of the
lesser company.
The call to the attack on the
24-hours' notice gimmick has
been Issued by Frank Shaugh-
nessy, president of the Interna-
tional League.
"The abuse reached its height
last season," Shag told me.
"Why, It turned the poor Am-
erican Association, with only
1,200,000 paid. Into a ghost league.
"Repercussions from the
Giants' grabbing Willie Mays off
the Minneapolis team and the
Yankees' pMIling Mickey Mantle
back from Kansas City were ter-
rific.
STAR GOES .OVERNIGHT
"Minor-league fans are not
suckers. They take plenty, but
they have their limit. A minor
club builds up Into a strong draw
In, spite of Interference from ma-
jor television and radio, and has
the customers hollering for a
Mays or a Mantle.
-Suddenly, they read that
overnight the local star has
flown to the major operating
club and a guy named Joe Dokes
has taken his place.
"Then the turnstiles rust.
-The minors are going to gang
up on this abuse at the meetings
In Columbus, O, the first week In
December.
"The welfare of the majors,
too. Is Involved.
"The culprits are the manag-
ers In the big leagues.
"The Yankees' practice of
grabbing stars off the Newark
club had more to do with the
ruination of that property than
Stadium, Polo Grounds and Flat-
bush television," Shaughnessy
continued.
"I am convinced that, operated
[Wan Independent enterprise
independent to the point of not
having a working agreement
with a major organizationNew-
ark could draw and make money.
OTTAWA OUT. NEWARK IN
"Since the Giant* have notified
the International League that
thev will not again operte In
Ottawa, to which they shifted
the Jersey City franchise last
season, we have an opening for
the return of Newark to our cir-
cuit.
"Jersey Citv also Is available
and It has a grand park.
"But there are too many In-
volvements politically in that
locale.
"If the Giants will be reason-
able on their franchise and the
Yankees will be reasonable on
rental for their Newark park,
Louis Basellce. who has had min-
or-league experience upstate, will
take over.
"The Newark plant Is In fine
condition. In fact, the automo-
bile racing people built accom-
modations which the park did
not have for baseball."
Newark has been without a
club for two years. The franchise
was sold to the Cubs and shifted
to Springfield. Mass., In 1950.
Louis Basellce plans to have
liberal Negro representation if
he operates the Bears.
FUL-Q-PEP

C. O. MASON, S.A.
P.O. Boa MS
"anak City ft olon
Keep your hens at a kick
rate of egg production,
and maintain them in good
physical condition. The
oatmeal in Ful-O-Pep
Foods and Mashes for
starting, growing and ogg
production contributes
toward moro profitable
result*.
The wwboi oH CoMiHNiy
Ask far Ful-O-Pea. Poultry Peodinf Ooldo-lt's free!
"' '
This New Amazing
Con"h Mature Comes
From Bl'zzardly
Cold Canada
Compoundeo from rart Conodlan
Pine Balaam. Menthol Glycerine. Irish
Moss ond othe splendid Ingredient
Buckley' Conodtol Mi.iur I dilter-
nt more effective tester In
netton Get o bottl todov toke
3 hMSpoohful. let It lie on vow tongue
a moment then twoltev. ikwry
(eel it' powerful effective action
spreod through throot head end
brooch loi tube Coughing po*m
reate f right ovo> It ttort tc
looter up thick choking phlegm ond
jpen up dogged bronchial tubes
Nov. you'll know why over 30 mil-
lion bottle it Suci'ev's hove been
tolr In cold wintry Conodb.
You* own druggist ho this greot
Conor"** rfltcovotv
DON'T BE A
DYNAMICFullback Byron Townsend, left, carried 228 times for Texas and a new National Colle-
giate Athletic Association record last Fall, is maintaining the pace this season. An 18-year-old fresh-
man, Buddy Leake, center, stepped in when rib injuries sidelined Oklahoma's remarkable tailback,
Brlly Vessels. Halfback Don Robinson helped California serve notice scoring two touchdowns against
Pennsylvania in less than a minuto. (NEA)
Junior College, C.H.S. Windup
Loop Grid Schedule Tomorrow
The fighting Tigers of Cristo-
bal High Scnool will voyage to
the Paclfl.- side of the Isthmus
tomorrow night with one thought
in mind.. .that is, winding up the
regular scheduled interscholasttc
play In a deadlock with the Bull-
dogs of Balboa. In order to tie,
thev will have to overcome the
determined though weak, Junior
College eleven.
Though tne Green Waves have
yet to break into the scoring col-
umn for tie 1851 season, they f-------
have always pored a problem for a tussle.
the Gold Cotst entries. In the
last encounter of theoe two
souads, Cristobal came out on the no.e,x"P"
Bowl Money Or Entertainment?
Give Collegians Choice And See
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, NOV. 8 (NEA)
Leave It to Texans to shoot
straight from the shoulder.
A communique from the Cot-
ton Bowl Informs us that certi-
fication of the forthcoming Dal-
las New Y-Ar's Day game by the
extra-eent* committee of the
National Collegiate Athlette As-
sociation assures the Southwest
Conference champion and the
guest team 8120 00o each.
That's a one-syllable word de-
partment to athletic heads play-
ing high-pressure football, and
In position to collect such a fat
"The pot of gold at the finish
of the Cotton .Bowl game natur-
ally Is a primary consideration In
attracting the nation's boat,"
says theblurb.
"But tne Doys who play are
more impressed with the enter-
tainment they receive than the
money that goes to their alma
matera."
In view tf the developments of
more recent vehrs, a lot >of close
observers woulo seriously chal-
lenge the lattei.
Why don't the competing col-
leges and the Bowl committee
give the cofti btante a choice and
find out?
"Texas c Hirers have built Into
Cotton Bow I Week the greatest
program of no&pltallty and en-
tertainment for teams and offi-
cials over crammed Into seven
days,'' it savs nere.
it Is penectiy sai* to say, how-
ever, that mosl of the Mockers
and tackier* taking the bumps
and lumps would still prefer a
whack at the 8120,000, to which,
in the end they are so richly en-
titled. ,
After all. the Cotton Bowl is
outright commercialism, as are
the Pasadena Rose, New Orleans
Sugar, Miami Orange and all the
others save the two Shrine Hos-
pital Games for Crippled Chll-
Borne uf the curse Is taken off
the Tournamert of Roses, and its
seating capacity crowding 100,-
000, by the conference schools
and the commissioners' offices
sharing in the wag. In that fash-
ion, the winning schools do not
collect enough lor a slush fund.
But any production of this type
remains on the defensive because
college kids are forced to remain
in trainlne five solid weeks after
their championship seasons close.
Worse than that, they are ex-
ploited.
And the couch's success Is
measured by how often he makes
the Bowl
ISO-MAN LELBGATlON FROM
THE ORANGE BOWL
Stressing what these attrac-
tions mear to their resort areas
was the 150-man delegation from
the Orang Bowl wnlch took In
the 14-14 tie between Georgia
Tech and 1'uke In Atlanta, They
wanted to be sure what the were
going to sj.ow In Miami, Jan. 1,
and what it wou'd draw, obvious-
ly had considerably more than a
rooting Interest.
The Cotton Row! seats 76,311
and is, of course always sold out
for this game,'- reminds the tub
thumper 'The teams participate
In groas Income from all sources,
including ticket sales and radio
and television concessions.T
In other words, the purse Is the
lure at the Sugar, Cotton and Or-
ange Bowls. The colleges don't
miss a thing, and come play In
our Bowl, end get it, boys.
If there ever was a vicious cir-
cle, here you have it. The school
spends money for recruiting to
get to a Bowl, and must arrive
there to get it back.
And members of athletic de-
Sartments wonder what makes
ootball anl bhsketnall players
think of money rather than loy-
alty to and honor for their
schools.
It Is indeed a sad commentary
on college footbal. when the
game winds up getting its finest
players a week's entertainment
in Dallas or way points.
Headache, tout atomach, that sick-
ith "morning-after" feeling the
price we often pay for enjoying
too much good food aod drink I
Try this and see how much better
you will feel! Take A Ik-Seltzer
before retiring, xaia-if needed
in the morning.
Alka-Sdczer contain* ao analgetic
for toothing headache, plus alka-
line ingredients to neutralize ex-
cess gastric acidity... two-way
action that bring quick relief.
Not a laxative you can take
A Ik* -Seiner *ny time.
Drop one or two tablets of Alka-
Seltzer into a ilass of water. Watch
it fin into a refreshing solution
data driak it- Pktaeam tatting
AlkaSeltaer will kelp "art yen
right" again. Keep a supply on
bead always!
Alka Siltzir helps
millions dail,
Bisar.
Vlka Seltzer
long end of a 18 to 0 score.. .but
not until tr.ey had battled all the
way down U. the finish; and when
the game was over the Cristobal
boys knew that they had been In
Tomorrow night's game will be
.and there lsprob-
Demure Hoople Gives Credit
To Pythagoras, Ancient Greek
By MAJOR AMOS B HOOPLE
Pythagorean Pigskin Expert
Egad! Many of readers were
astounded when I predicted
Stanford would defeat Wash-
ington by one touchdown.
That was the exact difference
between the two one touch-
down.
It was uncanny, If I do say so
myself.
I have received tons of letters
asking how I achieved this re-
markable result, how I contrive
to pick other upsets. >
I must admit all the credit
does not belong to me, but to an
ancient Greek named Pythagor-
as. after whom several horses
have been named.
The Pythagorean system is too
long and complicated to explain
here.
Numbers, mathematics, astron-
omy, metaphysics are the basis
of the system. Angles play an
important part, and you know
very well how thoroughly school-
ed in all the angles your corres-
pondent Is!
There is a rhythm m football,
you know, and Pythagoras regu-
lated the Intervals of the scale
by mathematical ratios rather
than by consonances har-
rumph!
I have applied these laws to
the gridiron, but I do not sup-
pose there is another person In
the world who would understand
how I've done It.
Oo on with the forecai. fe
Nov. 10:
Washington 14, California 7
Stanford 14, So. California
Notre Dame 21. Mich. State It
Maryland 27, Nary 6
Wisconsin 27, Penn IS
Texas 14, Baylor 6
So. Meth. 20. Tex. A and M. 14
Princeton 34, Harvard
Michigan 20, Cornell 7
Illinois 27, Iowa 7
Indiana 20, Minnesota IS
Oklahoma 27, Missouri 14
Rice 20. Arkansas IS
Alabama 14. Ga. Tech 7
Kentucky 2. Tulane II______
ably nothln.r the Green Wave
outfit would like better than to
tack a defeat on the Cristobal
lads, and uve tne championship
to Balboa High School team.
Junior College, defeated 26 to 0
against Balboa last week, came
out of the gam': undamaged, and
will be at full strength when they
take on Cristobal. Frank Robin-
son will b: calling the plays at
quarterback. This cagey and shif-
ty mastermlider of the Green
wave eleven Is sure to make the
going rough for the Gold Coast
Tatar*.
For the past two years he has
been doing just that in the ln-
terscholastic piay, and was the
big gun In the Junior College vic-
tory last season.
The two mt If back positions will
be amplv covered by BUI Maloney
formerly of CHS ana George Mc-
Arthur. a Balboa graduate. At
fullback will be one of the out-
standing atnletes of Junior Col-
lege, big Henry Phillips, whose
drive through the line has always
been tough to top. All McKeown,
whose play at right end has been
Inspired throughout the year,
will probably be on the receiving
end o manv J.C. passes...and
hitting the line wltn plenty of
power, will be guards, Jack Alex-
altls and Bobby Slevers. The only
J.C. weakness will be their lack
of substitute power...but If the
starting eleven can keep going,
Cristobal wnl have a fight on
their hands.
On the other nana, the Cristo-
bal Tigers are going Into this
game with one thing in mind...
This Is a championship contest.'
A win for the Gold Coast will
wind up the season in a tie with
Balboa High. A loss will give Bal-
boa the crown for the second
time In three years With this
thought In mind, Coach Palumbo
will have his outfit out In full
strength. :___ -
A severe okw to Cristobal s
pennant aims If the announce-
ment that Paul Whltlock, team
captain, and the hottest thing on
the Cristobal teum, will not De a
starter In tomorrow night's con-
test with Junior College. Whit-
lock's great play at guard has
been an inspiration to the rest
of the team, aca the rets of the
squad will have to pat that extra
something in o ihe fight in order
to overcome this disadvantage.
Cristoba.'s offensive power will
center around a last, smart back-
fleld, and a hard-hitting line,
though weakened by the aosence
of Vvhitlojk. arnoin Manning
thus far tut, leadlnit candidate
lor "All-Canal Zone" Quarter-
oack, will fill mat c-erth in the
J.C. game ot Balboa
Fleetfootca Bob Grace will be
at naif back and will probably be
running most ot the plays for the
Cristobal team. Bob Bailey will
be at the other half, filling out
the rest of a'good threatening
pair of fallbacks.
Bill Robertson a yood depend-
able backf leM man, who has seen
limited action for the Tigers, will
undoubtedly see plenty of action
In this contcit Rob<;rson, a Jun-
ior In Cristocal High proved his
wares in prtvious games, and is
certainly rtody to go all-out in
this all-lrrportant contest. .
Absent from the backfleld will
be Talmadce Baiter, suffering
from a Charley-horse," and his
being unavailable will make the
going tough on the cackfleld. al-
ready drained ot most of its stel-
lar replacements. t*s Rlnehart,
hard-hitting ball o fire, was
.lated for a starting berth Friday
night, but Lea nas been having
leg trouble and might not get In-
to too much action
With the exception of Whlt-
lock, Crlstooal's ilne it Intact, and
this hard hitting, fast running
group of lac's along with a palr
of dependable ends m Sklppy An-
derson and Tommy Hughes, will
make themselves felt In the Fri-
day night gnnie.
All this das up to one thing, a
humdinger of a football game
scheduled for Balboa Stadium
this coming Friday night.
Clark Griffith Says Japs
Should Be Given Chance
to Display Baseball Skill
By UNWED PRESS
One malor league club presi-
dent says maybe we ought to give
the Japanese a chance to show
their baseball skill before call-
ing the World Series winner a
world champion
President Clark Griffith of the
Washington Senators admit* it
may be a fev years before the
baseball-mad Japanese can stack
up with major league play as we
know It. But Griffith wants to
give them a pnance based on
scouting revorta by American
stars who have touredand right
now are touringJapan In exhi-
bition games.
"They are very baseball-mind-
ed in Japan." says Griffith. "I
think it would be tine If they
they could plav in this country.
It would be excl'ent for Inter-
national fvodwill."
Griffith poes on to say he does-
n't think the Jfcpanese are ready
for major league competition yet.
"But." savs the Washington pres-
ident, "they should get a chance.
They should first play id the Pa-
cific Coast League. If they beat
them, then they should play ma-
lor league teams." ^_
If the final score of yeater-,
day's exhlbitlor game In Japan
means anything, the Japanese
still are a long way from the
World Series.
Lefty OTJouls touring tan
made only five hito a low for
their exhibliior. torn But tho
Yanks beat an All-Japan pro
team 8-1. It wa the eighth con-
secutive win for the Americana.
Tho only Japanese run cam
on a homer. Cmterflelder Kaoru
Betto hammered one 400 feet in-
to the centfrfleld stands.
Sterling vs. Coin
I
Sterllne silver It 92.5 per eent
silver and 7.3 per cent copper,
the proportion used in British
coinage. Coins ef the TJ.8. use
the oroportlon. of 90 eer eent
anf 10 per cent and this is eall-
ed "coin silver."
tempomfc
AUTOMATIC /
NON-MAGNETIC j
Servirte
MO VA DO WalcU a JJ and
d bif leading jeweltr all over In*
JJ. Jn tl~ ijU it's 3ff,'> and
-'an am a it's (Sosa Zrastlich.
wo
St'yCa/a fa/tlich
STORE
JEWELRY HEADQUARTERS
PANAMA


CUBA LEADS AMATEUR WORLD SERIES
UN Truce Team
Puzzles Over
Reds' Meaning
TOKYO, Nov. 8 Allied
truce negotiators worked into
the early hours of today trying
to riddle out the meanings of
a Communist proposal to freeze
the Korean battle line where it
U now.
MaJ. Oen. Henry I. Hodes of
the United Nations command
told the Communists after the
first quick look that "I do not
accept this proposal." That,
foreshadowed outright relection
when the Joint subcommittee
meets again today.
(Pate
AN INDEPEND
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is gafe" Abraham Lincoln.
rwXNTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA. R. P., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1951
FIVE CENTS
.. 'T*e longer the U. N. deleg-
ate!: looked over the Red plan,
the*morexihoy suspected it con-
tained a lot of hidden mean-
ing"" United Press correspondent
Richard Applegate reported
from Munsan.
; The effect of the Red pro-
Eosal was to freeze the battle
ne while the truce delegates
work out the remaining pro-
blems on the armistice program
The allies want to decide
where the battle line is now. and
leave the cease-fire line to be ad-
Justed according to positions
when both sides are ready to
sign the final armistice.
Hodes said that if the Red
plan meant what he thought it
did, it meant the Communists
till were trying to get a cease-
fire In fact without paying any-
thing for it.
That would relieve them not
only from military pressure, he
aid, but from any other pres-
sure which might force them to
peed up action on the other
three items on the agenda, in-
cluding the problem of war
prisoners.
Record 182 Migs Join Battle;
US Sabres Still Take Victory
f\r\ iha cifHa_ I eh/ii-l 1*. ofta* **.;,l; V,* 1..A rm.__.t -, _. ,
8TH ARMY HQ., Nov. 8 (UP)
. The Communists threw an
i estimated 182 jet fighters a
i record number into four air
| battles today against 70 United
Nations Jets.
But the Red pilots suffered
defeat.
One Mig was destroyed and
'two oamagea. There was no re-
port of any United Nations loss.
It was the first anniversary
of Shooting Star pilot Russell
' Brown shooting down the first
i Mig of the war.
Since Brown's victory the
i Reds have lost 135 Migs shot!
I down, while the Migs have shot
down only 30 United Nations
planea.
Considerably more United Na-
tlona planes have fallen to ene-
my ground fire.
In the first dogfight today 18
United States Sabres took on 80
Migs and damaged one.
In the second fight 14 Sabres
took on about 60 Migs and shot
one down.
In the third fight 28 Sabres
fought about 40 Migs without
damage being reported to either
side. In this fight about 20 more
Migs flew around on the side-
lines without intervening.
In the only fight of the day
where United Nations planes
were not outnumbered, 12
Shooting Stais chased off and
damaged two Migs which tried
to interfere with the Shooting
Stars' railroad busting activities.
On the ground a Communist
battalion of about 1,000 men
shoved United Nations forces off
a hill northwest of Yonchon
shortly after "midnight last
night. The Allies then counter-
attacked behind a heavy artil-
lery barrage and and recaptured
the hill without opposition.
Last night United Nations
I tanks clashed with Red tanks
I for the first time for more than
a year.
West of Yonchon three Red
tanks, believedly Russian-built
T-34's, exchanged fire with
United Nations tanks for 15
minutes in the moonlight.
Then the Red tanks lumbered
back north.
A second clash involving ene
tank on each side later occurred
in the same area.
Farther east United Nations
forces repulsed a series of Com-
munist probing attacks south of
Kumsong on the central front.
Three light Red probing at-
tacks were also beaten off west
of the Punchbowl Valley.
Two Reprieved Negroes Shot;
FBI Checking Sheriff's Story
EUSTIS. F'a.. Nov. 8 (UP)
Two Negroes given a reprieve
from a derf;h sentence for rape
by the UB Supreme Court were
shot by a c-unty sheriff yester-
day -and the Justice Department
promptly onered an Investiga-
tion.
Sheriff Willis McCall said he
killed Samael Snepnerd and cri-
tically woundeo Waiter Lee Irvln
when they attempted to escape
while he was changing a flat tire
on his automobile along a lonely
stretch of road a few miles north
of here. Both were nandcuffed.
The CIO in convention in New
York and th< National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People called on President
Truman to order "every appro-
priate government agencv to in-
vestigate this cold-blooded
slaying."
Shepherd and Irvln were the
last of four Negroes invplved in
the widely publicized Grovel and
rape case Of 1949, which touched
off mob violence in Lake Coun-
ty.
Scores of law enforcement of-
ficers and the National Guard
were caller? in to stop the dis-
turbances
RED HANDS This photo, showing American prisoners
LW3k ML* w Mmp near p.Vn?yang, North Korea, was
Bde by Tibor Meral. a Hungarian Communist correspondent.
3*Hf3!Lihe m?d,e1t^e pictures Oct. 4, 1951. The men are
Bntified as deft) to right) Alois Prokop. U. S. Army no
gOress; Cpl. Marvin King, Des Moines. la.; Capt. James
BJkinson. USMC. no address; Sgt. George Mellward. South
take (state unknown i; William Hanneman. Chicago, and
S/Sgt. Daniel Aldwage. Santa Ana, Calif.
Beating Victim
Still Seriously
III In Gorgas
The 81 year old American.
Charles E. Leaver who was badly
beaten up Monday night, was
still on the se'ious.y ill list to-
day at Oorgas although reports
show he Is feeling better.
Leaver was found unconsci-
ous lying at the crossing of "J"
Street and Tlvoli Avenue at
12:05 a. m. Tuesday.
A night watchman at the Keel
Spot tried to help Leaver up,
but one of '.he assailants hit him
on the jaw.
Police have not yet been able
to identify Leaver's assailants.
One of the four Negroes was
killed at t ie time by a posse. A
16-year-old youth was given life
imprisonment and Shepherd and
Irvin were sentenced to die In the
electric chair.
The U.8 Supreme Court tossed
out their convictions because
they were tried in "an atmos-
phere of prejudice."
Shepherd and. Irvin, both 23,
were being brought from Raiford
State Prison to county jail for a
hearing yerterday, pieliminary to
their new tnai scneduled next
week, when the shootings occur-
red.
Sheriff Vccan told State At-
torney J. W. Hunter that his pris-
oners "jumped" him when he
stopped to repair the flat tire.
McCall suffered a gash over
one eye and sheck to the extent
that he was admitted to a hos-
pital here. He refused to see
newsmen or comment on the In-
cident.
Hunter said when he arrived
at the scene about midnight the
two Negroes were lying against
an embankment still handcuff-
ed. Shepheru was dad and Irvin
In critical conc'itlon.
"I hate tnat it had to happen,"
the sheriff told Hunter.
McCall ws praised by Gov.
Fuller Warren in 1949 for the way
he handled tne mob violence set
off by the four Negroes' alleged
rape of a i7-year-oio housewife.
His calmness ann persuasion
helped dispersr an aroused group
of white men at the time mobs
were burning Negro homes.
Within a few hours after the
shootings the Justice Depart-
ment ordereo the Miami FBI to
investigate tr. see if the Negroes'
civil rights were violated.
Agent-in-charge Robert Wall
of Miami sent two Orlando
agents to the scene immediately.
Attorneys foi the Negroes call-
ed on Gov. Full'.r Warren to look
into the shootings.
Walter White, executive secre-
tary of the NAACP, wired Presi-
dent Truman chat "Immediate
action is Lnpeiatlve in view of
this defiance of the U. 8. Su-
preme Court decision and every
law of human rights and decen-
cy."
"This cold-blooded slaying by
a law enforcement officer feeds
the anti-Ameiican propaganda
mill of our enemies and cannot
be allowed to be whitewashed by
local authorities" White added.
Philip Murray, president of the
CIO, endorsed White's stand and
said in a telegram to Mr. Truman
that "it Is either murder or inex-
cusable bad police work."
October's Rainfall
Above Par On Both
Atlantic, Pacilic
Rainfall was above normal
last month along the Atlantic
and Pacific coasts and below
average from Pedro Miguel to
Gamboa and up the Chagres
Valley, according to the Octo-
ber report of G. E. Matthew.
Chief Hydrographer. ,
The monthly mean air tem-
perature of 97.3 degrees at Cris-
tobal was the lowest for Octo-
ber since 1917. The mean tem-
perature was slightly above
normal at Balboa Heights and
Madden Dam.
The runoff from, Gatun Lake
Basin was 13 per cent below the
average for October, amounting
to 27,086 million cubic feet. The
runoff from Madden Lake
Basin, amounting to 7,767 mil-
lion cubic feet, was 25 per cent
below the average for October.
Rainfall during the month
totaled 19.15 Inches at Cristo-
bal, 3.23 above normal; 13.10
inches at Balboa Heights, which
was 2.68 above normal; 8.37 at
Gamboa, 4.10 inches below nor-
mal; and 9.16 at Pedro Miguel
which was 2.31 below normal.
The monthly mean air tem-
perature was 80.1 at Balboa
Heights, which was .8 degrees
above normal and 69.6 degrees
at Madden dam, St degrees above
normal.
another LINK The first car pays its toll on the southern end of the New Jersey Turn
pike, which became the newest link in the east's network of super-highways Th* rI?ii
tH^St^jS,3tnVUy- flr8t ^ thrUgh the SfflSffi Camden^WoS-1
-7---------------------------------,-------1-----1----------.,-----------.--------,,----------
Grumpy Frankie Marries Ava In Philadelphia
fenred 1947 Cadillac and
Frankie followed.
suit' r K,reM!d to blue
suit and blue topcoat. Miss
Hutton already was in the
weThennr.Xer *efused to ans-
wer Questions and clanned
a Tmera6 wh'ilF
Housewife Blood
Donor Cant' Find
Any Takers Here
NEW YORk, Nov. 8 (UP)
Frank Sinatra and Ava
Gardner were married in Phi-
ladelphia last night after
eloping from here in the af-
ternoon In a hired limous-
ine.
Reports had.circulated that
for some mysterious reason
the wedding had been post-
poned, but Frankie arose in
a grumpy mood at noon and
they took off at 2:30 p.m.
for the ceremony, scheduled
at 6 p.m. at the German-
town, Pa., home of broad-
casting executive Isaac M.
Levy.
The much-publicized lovers
originally were supposed to
have gone to Philadelphia
Tuesday night.
When they did not show
up there, the word went a-
round that there had been
a hitch.
band. Axel Stordahl, Sina-
tra's manager and conduc-
tor and a close friend.
The members of the wed-
ding party slipped out of the
Hampshire House on Central
Park South.
They used a front en-
trance, although not the
main one, apparently in the
hope of avoiding reporters
and cameramen.
Miss Gardner was hatless
and wore a beige cloth coat
She came out first, escorted
by Stordahl.
They got Into the chauf-
A reporter finally found
8inatra at his hotel here and
the crooner threatened to
throw her into the street if
she did not leave him alone.
A short time later, Sinatra
and Miss Gardner drove a-
way accompanied by Singer
June Hutton, who was mat-
ron of honor, and her hus-
Flower Power
ST. CATHERINES, Ont,
Nov. 8 (UP)Orchids caused
the layoff today of 809 CIO
auto workers here.
Florist W. W. Walker ob-
tained and injunction against
the plant where the men
work, on the grounds 'that
fames from the plant were
killing his rare orchids.
Jose Cojdr Escala
Elected To Head
Newsman's Union
Jos Agustn Oajar Escala, re-
porter for the Spanish sectlon-of
this newspaper last night was
elected president of the Panam
Newspapermen s Union in a hot-
ly-contested election.
. ?ai?r ,Esc1a w" opposed by
Luis Carlos Noll. Star and Herald
reporter, and Manuel Mata Val-
des of La Hora.
Other members elected to the
board of officers of the union
were: Carlos Rangel. vice presi-
dent; Moiss Torrljos, secretary
Carlos Cabeza Luna, asst, secre-
tary; Arquimedes Fernandez
treasurer; Miguel Concepcin,
asst. treasurer and others.
Albert McOeachy, Ingaclo de J.
Valds, Jr., and Carlos Sol Bosch
were elected to the tribunal of
honor.
Cajar Escala and his new offi-
cers will be "retailed pext Tues-
day, Nov 13celebrated in Pan-
am as Newspaperman's Day
at the Hotel El Panam.
iABy2unJ! Araerican housewife
J&SE t,,day te frustrated
because she wants to give blood
for Korean soldiers and no-
body nere will take it
I The patriotic lady Is Mrs. La
Rue Johnson, who is 22 years old
and anxious to help by donating
her blooa.
She called The Panam Amer-
ican today inspired by a series
of article that have appeared in
this newspaper regarding the
urgent need for blood for United
Nations soldiers fighting in Ko-
rea.
But unfortunately, there are
no local agencies that would
handle her request. Neither the
Fort Clayton nor Gorgas Hospit-
als are set up for this project,
although they always need don-
ors for local use
Mrs. Johnson the wife of Army
T'Sgt. Curtis Johnson, said that
she knew of many similar re-
auests that have all been turned
down here. She has a 15-month
old son, Bradley and has been
on the Isthmus two years.
HAVE
if
i

l
t

NO FEAR
mid-oetaa, the Mayflower's ma in beam sprung our of place _
Clacked. The Pilgrims debated the wisdom of turning back re Eng-
land. Miles Stendish, among others, argued for pushing on to Awrico.
JMGHTAS WELL
WfSH FOR THE MOON!
OUb HAVE TOM
MOONING ABOUT
JQJ, JEAN IF
MXfD JUST MAKE
Sugg ABOUT..
CMa/m dtodanwnt
MORE EFFECTJVE LONGER
STRIKE OR NO STRIKE
SEARS WILL DELIVER
YOUR CHRISTMAS ORDER
IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS
REPRESENTATIVES FOR ^^EAJtf, ROEBUCK AND &*
Opposite Ancon Post Office
PANAMA
10th Melendez Avesue
COLON
r


Full Text

.-
I ?AGE TWO
THE PANAMA IMERICAN AN IKPOtKPPIT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWinO 4MD fuinmlD SI tHI PANAMA AMMMCAN PBJSSS. INC.
UNDID IV NILIOI. OUHVILL IN >
HAMMODie AMIA*, idito
H strut O o S4. Panama. *. or >.
TlHTMONi *>ANAHA NO. S-074O Cabli addmii. PANAMBUCAN. Panama
OSLOH OPFIC. 12 17 ClNTMAL AVINUI SSTWfIN 1 f"TH AND ISTM STMCST*
PORIION RIRRUENTATIVIS. JOSHUA B PCWtRS. INC
S4B MADISON AVI NfW YORK. 1171 N. V.
LOCAL IT VAIl
SR MONTH. IN """*" I 70 *.BO
OR SIX MONTHS. IN nTTY"T"f BO 13 OO
OR ONI VtAR. IN '-"""" IS BO 14 OO
Walter Winchell
In New York
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER t, 1951
Labor News
And
Comment
Finders Keepers, Losers Weepers
By Victor Riesel

BROADWAY LIGHTS
State Door: "The Number." a nielo, had the Critics' Circle
"Tint around in one. Their reaction was a blend of Fine, Fair and
. oey, although there was no dissenting about the grand gamut-
i c of Martha Scott, Dane Clark and Murvyn Vyc. The Journal-
t nrrican's agent hailed it as "exciting" and the Herald Trib's
legate called it "a wrong number''.. .Maxwell Anderson's 28th
tils, "Barefoot in Athens," deals with Socrates, the Confucius
: ora Greece. Most aisle Socrates acclaimed its vlvety word-weav-
.' g and silky trouping.. .Dick Wall-' sizeup: "A drama of absorbing
i terest". .Then- were swellulujahs for Phil Silvers' super spoof-
) g and the lilts in "Top Banana," which moat reviewers labeled a
! ick song-and-sass show Mr. N. Y. Times Atkinson enthused: "A
' iry funnv musical." "Top Banana.'' in brief, is a Peach.. .One of
1 roadway's hottest tickets, as the ducat brokers say, is for an al-
l action that won't open until Dec. 19th: The Oliviers in the two
' .eopatra plays. Their 16-week "limited" booking is completely sold
jt.. .Playgoers will soon be confronted with some confusion when
i vo new plays arrive. Their names are "Jane" and "Janle."
In the Wings: Mady Christians, the fine actress (who passed
ddenly last week), was best known for her role in "I Remember
? ama," but she was proudest of her part In Maurice Evans' full-
1 .igth version of Hamlet.. Mr. Evans is renowned In The Legit
: a "spltter" when his emoting gets,the better of him.. .He apolo-
i ted to Mady after one premiere for leaving l'or In such a damp
,ndltion..."Ah," he teased, "but Imagine sharing a stage with
" aurlce Evans! What more could an actress want?".. ."Ah," she
r-I'd right back. "An umbrella!"
The Cinemagicians: "The Browning Version" is a generally
touching Britisher that keeps the heartstrings humming.. ."Want-
t 1: Dead Or Alive" has the familiar prairie hero-zero... A Beet-
n-en biografilm, "Eroica," offers a conventional yarn playing
f cond fiddle to the symphonic background.. "Massacre Hill"
oves boredom is duller than ever.. .An Italian Import called
' .carred" hai some flaws in its script, but Anna Magnanl's animal
i -irit tells an interesting Birds-Meet-Bees story ."Bomba and the
I. ephant Stampede" puts you to sleep counting elephants.

The Airistocrats: Margaret Sullavan's superb emoting In N.
f Dward's poignant "Still Life" offered the sort of honest senti-
ment that Inspires mash notes like this... Godfrey's a.m. alrer
mains an oasis in the desert of morning gabfests... George
f -leek's "Startime" (featuring The Lollipop Set) proves Big Time
" imes In small packages. Newcomer to the all-night circuit Kal
! dss is making WOR listenable again for ths stay-ups. ..The
fnatra program was embellished by Georgia Glbbs last Tuesday
i .'e'g. Always comforting on the ears...Talk about sillies: Dur-
I ".g a ballerina's teevy routines the cameras concentrated on her
i-.cial expressions.. .Herb Shrlner's folksy fooling on ABC has a
r-pical tang. One of the better cracker-barrel clowns...The long
i aderwear sketch Inflicted by Alan Young was more hokey than
J .-key.. It helped wreck burlesk.
Twinkling with the Stars: The New York reporters wish all
-'nemactresses were as co-operative as Ava Gardner... Hedy
I limrr, who planned doing a Broadway play this Winter, has been
I :ared off by the sufferings of Ginger Rogers and Ann Sothern...
..dd Kci.sensorship: Movie musical songwriters cannot mention
a Sirl's leg in their lyrics. But it i- okay fbr Miss Grable to show
m.. Remember way back when the coi'm described her as Betty
!.') Grable and Dag mar as "? Well, those exclamation points
id asterisks are now used In the adverts for "A Millionaire for
' hristy." (Send check to Rnnyon Fund, piles).. The much-tooted
Whistle at Eaton Falls" was yanked after a disappointing fort-
right on B'way...Mitzi Gaynor, the star of "(Sold Girl," will be
I appy to learn Pres. Truman requested that musical for his enter-
. linment at Key West.
2
i .;
::
i


if


i

The Press Box: Josephine Baker, who was allegedly refused
tirvice In a Washington dept. store cafeteria (a year ago), planned
.eprlsal during her return date there last weekvia "an incident."
Jut the papers didn't bite, so she dropped it...After Franchot's
'ittst front-page episode he told coast reporters "No comment."
apparently dislikes publicity. ..Ths Runyon Fund considered stag-
' .ng a.baseball game (after the series) between all the Negro stars
ina a team of white favorites It was -houted down by a few wor-
riers. The Oct. 17th AP dispatches li ided this from Durham, N.
C: "Roy Campanella's Negro All-fcu ., rapped out a 9-5 victory
jver Gil Hodges' All-White major league team here last night"...
3cils Fleeson reported the grimmest laugh with this item: "Histo-
.lan Douglas S. Freeman begins his daily broadcasts from Rlch-
JBond as follows: The scandal in Washington today is...'"
Post-Mortification Dept.: The New York Post was the victim
of a hoax on Friday. It published a photostat of a letter to a Negro
Trtup signed Sherman Billingsley The letter said the Stork Club
Tould continue to bar "obnoxious persons," etc... The signature is
nothing like Billingsley's, but is similar to his "autograph" on his
-ards, which is written by his printers. .Mr. Billingsley has gone
.o the D.A.'s office and filed a complaint against whoever wrote
the letterinsisting on a complete investigation.
The Story-Tellers: The U S. News-World Report's top article
starts with a bang: "World War III Is Here. It ha* been here for
3 years. In the real war to date, Russia definitely Is winning, U. 8.
Oslng".. The factual essay confirms and reaffirms every war-ning
flrit spotlighted by this column.. Among those who will be jolted
jut of their complacency (by reading that piece) are the sleepy
iditors at The New York magazine, who scold Collier's for its re-
cent Issue on the next war. The New Yorker described it as "war
Shit hasn't happened".. O, Wake Up!.. That Collier's issue (which
Ordered an extra 500.000 printing before publication i has complete-
ly told out.. In The Saturday Review of Literature biologist R. R.
fpencer assures you that "the human race's chances of survival
re good"...Feel better?.. Henry Holt & Co. planned publishing
[t Life Story of Josephine Baker, with top-flighter Maurice Zolo-
bw assigned to write it. After confirming several recent reports,
i project was dropped.
Quotation Marksmanship: B Baruch: Never kirk a man when
fa up. J. Illy: Oh, for some Blond venation! Faith Baldwin:
ippinesi was luminous In her eyes, arrogant In her walk and
aped like a kiss upon her mouth...Jack Carter: She's an over-
jfht socialitesort of a tubulartr. J. O'Rrian Imitation la
flattest form of sincerity.. George Shearing. A Texas million-
wlth Dallas signs all over him.
IS IS YOU FORUM THf MADIES OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Ths Msil Bo it an open forum lor reader of Ths Psnsma American.
Latter art rac.ivad frotttully ond ors handled in o wholly confidential
If you contribute a Isffsr don't b. impatient H it doein't appear ths
SsSS day. Letter! are published in ma order received.
PUata try to ksap the letter limitad to one page length,
i Msattty of letter writer it held in itnctcit confidence.
Tills new.p.per anumei ns rejpomibilrt, for ttotementi or opinion
* It) letter from reader.
PILE YOUR COMPLAINT.
BROTHER
Balboa
Altor
aieii
Panama American
Sir:
"One of the Axed" evidently
reason to think that he and
hers in his organization were
tion he must present his ease In
the proper quarters.
JU.
PEOPLE JfST WONT
GET SICK ON SCHEDULE
_ k Balboa. C.Z.
To the Mail Box Editor
Dear Sir:
It Just occurred to me why the
dispensaries are being losed.
Someone is worried about having
SPS. SPLyt pr0Tl.de m-'tht M* new building built on
- with which to promote their the other side of Gorga Road at
atora.
Individual concerned may
able to show misconduct in
attic*, but to obtain remedial ac-
NEW YORK Seldom has
the ciO .udeii under such siege
as it is today I
Never beioie, in the fifteen
years which mellowed and ma-
tured the fiery young labor men
of the thirties who seized and
ran sit-down strikes In the
nation's factories to launch
their CIO, have they met in a
convention so much under as-
sault by so many opponents
as the one they're gathered in
today.
Arrogant left wingers,
ousted rom CIO two years
ayo, are working with John
L. Lewis to disaffect mem-
bers of at least four CIO
unions their timetable
calls for splitting CIO some-
time this Spring. These
left wingers, led by Harry
Bridges while he roas in the
Hast last month, passed
word on to Lewis that they
nave strong followings rea-
dy to bolt CIO electrical
workers, auto makers, pac.c-
inghouse hands and furni-
ture crafts.
Disdainfully aware of this
boast, Phil Murray, a man of
restraint and statesmanship,
said in his report to the 13th
CIO Constitutional Convention,
porbably his last as CIO presi-
dent:
"The CIO is the property of
no political party, no theoretic-
al sect, no vested Interest."
At the same time, Murray's
defiant words were warning as
well to Mr- Truman on the
other end of the CIO's political
world.
There are reports in the high-
est CIO circles here that the
President is beginning to lose
his temper over the strike wave,
scheduled stoppages and critic-
ism of the war production
boards.
Word from the White House
is that Mr. Truman might
crack down even on his CIO
friends.
Nevertheless, the CIO will
sumid off in ringing cadence.
It will criticize the Adminis-
tration so unhesitatingly that
it plans to include a warning
against dispatch of an ambas-
sador to the Vatican.
Emphatically it will warn
that it plans to strike, and
hard, in any industry to
win an average ttO-a-week
raise for its millions. Mur-
ray's steel workers have
over 2,000 contracts, cover-
ing 1,595 companies in the
very guts of our defense in-
dustries, expiring on the
night of December 31. And
it won't be a very happy
New Year, if there's no
agreement before then.
Walter Reuther's Auto Ukiion,
the convention report reveals,
has begun raising a $15,000,000
strike fund.
Jim Carey's electrical, Jet and
atomic workers already are on
the strike front, one such stop-
page at Buffalo's Westinghouse
plant now nearlng its third
month.
Obviously the government can
forget its bid for a no-strike
pledge and Its hope for mere
passing pot shots at its De-
fense Department.
Angered by what he charges
are broken promises from Gen.
Marshall and Charles Wilson,
glveh personally to him, Erall
Rieve, the CIO Economic Af-
fairs chief, will blast the war
agencies.
Rleve's speech will bristle with
phrases such as "unrealistic and
unplanned war effort."
He will charge in the name of
CIO that there Is a total lack
of urgency in high government
circles.
"We hure politics a
usual, only worse," he plant
to charge. "We have pro-
fits as usual only higher.
We have minks as usual
only more expensive. So
thing is controlled except
the workers who are being
stabilized, de -emphasized,
compromised and antagon-
ized!"
Mr. Rieve, a blunt speaking
man when it comes to protect-
ing his people, disdainful of
party affiliation and the CIO's
political .friendship for Mr. Tru-
man (truly an ally of theirs
over the years) also will assail
the government for doing little
about brutal unemployment.
He'll charge Federal agencies
with releasing "completely mis-
leading" figures on unemploy-
ment by offering his own sta-
tistics.
These show that there are
now 23 million breadearners on
part-time work a number
which has tripled in the past
five months. Other union chiefs
will back him up with reports
on Joblessness in their ranks,
a total of 300,000 without any
work at all.
And added to the assault from
the left, the irritation over
massive war production confus-
ion, there is the assault on CIO
by the AFL.
Ignore the latest APL peace
offer. It's Just part of labor's
war of nrvea
There is no doubt that the
AFL'a veteran labor leaders
want to isolate CIO politically.
Nor is there any doubt that
the AFL soon will try jo drive
NOWWrtm^tftfju
$eAaTeie BEAuTFl PiATfWM
. '
^dajy WSUfttiTON
MERRY- GO- RH0
]
y driw PIAtSON
Drtw Peorson says: Motherly Mrs. Truman looks after the
Secret Service; West Coast GOP leaders want Eisen-
Kower to peak up; Grand Mufti of Jerusalem may be
behind Egypt riots.
aft*rWtir^Hiii?T0NrAlhe u s' 8ecret ervice Is supposed to look
th. rnetv.ertarlou5lgtn,tn,nk u'8 the other wy aroua the agents talk about Bess Truman.
e.v,..-Li 8t Lady',.motherl>r way* nve provided many a warm
chuckle among her friends in the Secret Service:
nw muLl"? **T,!,t rc?e?ly: "l d0l,,t dare teU **" Truman when
my missus is sick. She'd rush over to my house and take fuU
Si^SSi7*Jein chan*e,.the baby's diapers. She's not happy when
she isn't doing something for others."
ni,.ihUe tlh*re's no actual record of Mrs. Truman's diaper-
Sfilr"^' 8.he once showed up unexpectedly at the home 7 a
glvln turkeCe "^ 8e W"e WM and cooked t"8 Thanka-
a J*?.?^ tt8"ty tht has endeared Mrs. Truman to the
Secret Service, which numbers all faiths, is her frank but tolerant
Interest in the religious beliefs of others.
An Irish Catholic agent still Jokes about the time she In-
quired into his beliefs on divorce.
The agent hesitated briefly, not wishing to be drawn Into
a possible debate on theology with his good friend. Mrs. Truman
is an Episcopalian.
' Just then the voice of her Baptist husband was heard from
a doorway, where he had been gleefully eavesdropping.
. adTlce or counael," the President boomed in his best
Misaourl courtroom manner, "the witness may decline to answer."
" n
>
|
DOUBTS ABOUT DEE
I
'
Cheap Seats
By BOB RUARK


NEW YORK.I ture do hope they iron the
wrinkles, amicably, out of this business of low-
ering the cost of air travel to Europe, so nobody'a
mad at nobody else. '
Because this is the first time in the postwar
that anybody has made a pass at lowering any
prices on anything appreciatively.
Here's how she lays: Pan-Am wants to insti-
gate a non-luxurious, tourist-class air service to
Europe. It would be a service minus frills, no
champagne-, but it gets you there, and for $405
round trip as opposed to the current $711.
TWA, Pan-Am's competitor, wants a cheaper
service, too, but not so cheap as Pan-Am pegs it.
TWA Is playing grandma in the current hear-
ings, largely to enforce a happy household
amongst the United States airlines and their for-
eign competitors, of which there are nine.
The furrlners aren't high on the idea; they
claim they can't produce enough speedy equip-
ment to compete.
The TWAs say that the long-time idea of beau-
tiful friendship between everybody is more im-
portant than paring the price to the bone, and
that the International Air Transport Agreement
between all the nations must not be broken up.
If the welfare of traveling nationals Is to be
continued.
But come high water or Juan Trippe, the Pan-
Ams say that they are going to cut the price or
else, and as of April, if April ran make it.
The whole argument is to be settled, finally,
In a conference in Nice, Italy, on Nov. 27.
We come out of that either friends or enemies
with the foreign airlinesmost of which operate
under government subsidies to which we con-'
tribute in the cases where we lend American dol-
lars to competing nations.
My thought, along about here is that if the
dollar-thirsty nations need bucks to bolster their
economies, clipping a tourist whc< can get there
on the cheap is a nice neat way of lining the
pocket.
If you can put a trip to Yurrup into the reach
of the middle-income man by lowering the coat'
of getting there, you have soundly contributed to
a free-enterprise Marshall Plan, and the Ameri-
can taxpayer might possibly preserve a dime or
so.
My thought also is that we have to get along
chumlike with the countries we fly to, and that
the cooperation on tickets, freight, customs and
schedules as run by our competitors is also very
Important. Important enough not to be wrecked
by violent dissension amongst the various lines.
Travel abroad is very nice now with everybody
being pretty sweet to everybody, and this co-
operation can be laid almost squarely at the feet
of the International Air Transport Agreements,
which is a sort of United Nations of air travel.
But the time has come to take long-distance
flying out of the luxury category, and to put it
well within the reach of the man who never had
a hope of seeing the far places before.
The ocean-shipping people have been doing Jt
for years, and with little Inroads on their luxury
trade.
The man who can afford to travel first class is
a cinch to continue riding high on the hog.
I believe the Bible tells us thvt in the old camel
caravans, there was a walking fare for those who
couldn't afford to ride the camels. But there was
never any dearth of candidates for a seat on
the camels.
Largely as a result of the war we conquered
the problems of air transport in the technical
details.
We have whipped, in terms of speed, even the
barrier of sound. The overseas airline is here,
and we gotta face it that we don't need 00 days
to girdle the world any more.
Economically we might as well iOok at the fact,
then, that the ordinary Joe is entitled to swift
transport at a cheap rate, and that Europe, Asia
and Africa are Just over the bill.
Which is why I hope they work this business
out in terms of what's right for everybody.
We can do it cheaply ladle dollars into for-
eign lands, and still part friends with all hands
if nobody gets too wrought up.
Congressman Hugh Scott, Jr., Philadelphia Republican, ran
Into significant grass-roots skepticism about Eisenhower's will-
ingness to run when he sounded out leaders at the OOP rational
meeting October 13 to IS in Seattle.
While Soott worked one hotel corridor, Dave Ingalls, Taft'i
manager, was drumming up delegates in the other.
The West Coast leaders frankly told Scott:
"Sure we want Ike, and the worst way.
"But we've got to know whether he Is running, and the only
way you'll convince us is to hear it from him. We are not buying
a pig in a poke.
T'We're afraid we'll open the bag next June and And Tom
Dewey in it, and people out our way don't want Dewey again."
Scott, of course, was Dewey's chairman of the Republican
National Committee and his campaign manager.
When Scott came back to Washington, he talked to Senators
Jim Duff of Pennsylvania and Frank Carlson of Kansas, both
outspoken Elsenhower boosters.
Result is that both are working out means of getting Ike's
intentions on the record.
NOTEWhile it will be impossible for him to say anything
while he is still in uniform, and while he cannot qiiit his im-
portant North Atlantic Pact Job until spring, a meeting of top
Ripubllcans-for-Elsenhower is in the works which will virtually
announce his candidacy.
|
FLYING BIRDMEN
Newsmen Inquired at the Pentagon the other day about
a story that individual Marines, instead of landing on beaches,
soon would fly Into battle with a tiny helicopter strapped .on
each man's back.
The Navy reply to inquiring newsmen was: "Just a Pearson
phony."
Shortly thereafter, however, came an official Navy announce
ment confirming the "Pearson phony" In detail, even giving
pictures of the helicopter strapped on a Marine's back.
Herewith are some more not-so-phony stories about amazing
new developments in helicopters.
*. 1) gHellappter experts now have.a machine that cam be fold-
ed in I crate eight feet long by two feet rngh, stowed tosida
a submarine, taken out on the high seas, and assembled on tha
sub's deck in less than an hour. The helicopter can then proceed
on a scouting mission, thus enlarging the sub's range by hun-
dreds of miles.
2) Another type helicopter Is being developed which will be
carried inside medium tanks to serve as a scout for tank raids.
S) The small, flying bird-man helicopter which can be
strapped on the back of a soldier, has been made possible by jet
Eropulslon. The controls are carried on the soldier's chest, and
e can regulate the speed up to SO miles an hour with an altitud*
of 5,-000 feet.
The nelly can take him straight up even when carrying th*
added weight of a submachine gun or demolition charges. Each
soldier wears a parachute In case of emergencies.
The above are soma more "Pearson phonies'? the Naw nay
want to deny. '
BEHIND THE NEAR EAST

M
4ti
"IJ.
B 7f
l!
4l
*'
*>

No War Scare
*
By Peter Edson
BERLIN(NBA) When Americans in Berlin
read pieces in the paper about people back home
building bomb shelters, they wonder what the
scare Is all about.
Nobody Is budding any bomb shelters here.
There is no atomic bomb scare here, and these
people are living right under the Russian guns.
There are some 2000 American civilians here,
in addition to the troops.
Mostly they are the wives and chlldrpn of Am-
erican officials. There are a hundred or so State
Department people and civilian advisers to the
U. S. commander, MaJ.-Oen. I/muel Mathewson.
American Express, TWA and Pan-American
Airline officials and transients make up the rest.
And they all seem to love it. Wouldn't live any-
place else for anything.
Western Berlin society is reviving. Ever since
the airlift, and the Marshall Plan, Americans rate
high with all Berllners.
The wives of the American officers have their
club, and they do relief work among the refugees
who stream across the border from the east Rus-
sian zone.
The children are in school. There is plenty to
eat and plenty to buy. Life goes on.
"We don't need anyone's sympathy," says Ma-
thewson, the big blond paratrooper who has been
In command here since January. "But we would
like to have the people at home a little better
Informed on Berlin."
the co I of many millions, while
the old building is half empty. CIO from as many factories a
Sofill up the old hospital. |possible and absorb CIO event-
Diofsaas ually.
A new auditorium, sports center, and a row of
apartment houses still under construction, for
party functionaries and picked workers, about
completes Soviet-zone Improvements. The place
Is dead.
In the Western sones, however, business is
booming, despite the terrible refugee problem
there were ooo arrivals last month, 200 a day
and an unemployment of 25 per cent of the
estimatetTmlllIon workers.
Industrial production in the Western sones is
only 45 per cent of the 1938 leve!. But this is a
three-fold Improvement over the 14 per cent of
the blockade and airlift days.
What Berllners hope for is that they can get
this production up to the 1938 level within the
next four years.
There is no particular Incentive for this re-
vival. Berlin businessmen have to pay ten per
cent for short-term money.
But there is a determination cm the part of th*
arlinen, In spite of all Soviet threats, to make
rlin again the capital of Germany. Morale here
is high.
There is no question but that the 8ovlet could
push the Western powers Out of Berlin if they
wanted to.
Tempelhof airfield in the American zone and
all of western Berlin, for that matter, is In easy
artillery range of Russian gun*.. They could pul-
verize any target they chose
Yet so definite are the Allied commitments
that the Russians know any open attack on Ber-
lin would mean the start of World War in. That
Is the only safetv the city has.
There is a theory now that if the Russians
should march west, they mlp.ht by-pass Berlin.
They surround It now. Rather than trying to
clean It out as a strong point in their path, they
might leave It for siege and starvation in an-
other bloody citv war.
This is the threat that Berllners live under
and Ignore.
Eighteen freight trains a day and four' pas-
senger trains connect West Berlin with Western
Germany, 103 miles away at the closest point.
Also there is the one autobahn, or express
highway over which the Russians allow motor
traffic to move, with checks. But they could shut
all this off on a moment's whim
The only agreement which the Western pow-
ers have in writing with respect to Berlin traffic
Is the right to use the air corridor over which
the airlift was flown.
This, as a matter of hindsight is the result of
another American diplomacy blunder. When the
Russians agreed to lift the blockade in 1*40. there
was such a relief in Berlin, in Germany and In
Washington, London and Paris, that another
loos* deal was made.
It had been /eared that the blockade and the
airlift might lead to war. When the threat of
this war was evaded, American officials now be-
lieve that a whole new deal should have been
made over Berlin.
Additional railroad and motor highway tran-
sport and communication Unes between Berlin
and the West should have been demandad.
Written guarantees for free movement of traf-
fic should have been bargained for.
Maybe they couldn't have been obtained. But
th* opportunity to get them was lort. And there
Is no new opportunity in sight.
If the origin of the Arab riots now flaming in Egypt, Iran
and the Near East could be traced, the trail would probably lead
to a bearded man in a red and white fes who boarded a plane in
Paris in 1S45 and fled to Egypt.
He is the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, who was paid a cool
quarter of a million dollars by Hitler and $150,000 by Mussolini to
stir up Arab resentment against the Jews.
Today the Grand Mufti is most certainly paid by the Kremlin
to stir up Arab revolt against the West, for his trail crops up all .
the way from Moslem Karachi, where he recently attended a
meeting of pan-Islamic leaders, to Warsaw, where he started
a Moslem university for the Kremlin in Catholic Poland.
Wherever the Mufti has operated, assassination and blood-
shed have followed in his wake; King Abdullah o Jordan, mur-
dered by Moslem fanatics; Gen. Saml Hinnawl of Iebanon, shot
as he boarded a streetcar; Premier All Raimara of Iran, a friend
of the United States; Premier Liaquat All Khan moderate leader
of Pakistan; Abdul Hamld Zanganeh, pro Western Iranian Minis-
ter of Education.
And more recently Americans have warnea the Prime Minis-
ter of Syria, Hassan El-Hakim to be on guard against terrorists.
However, Syrian minister Faia El-Khotirl in Washington is not
considered in any danger.
GRAND MUFTI AND HITLER
Ironic tragedy of the Near Eastern crisis is that the French,
who have a great deal to lose in their Moslem empire, were the
one who let the Mufti escape to Egypt.
Right after V-E day the Mufti was taken prisoner and Installed
in a comfortable villa In France.
Meanwhile, the American cross-examination of Walter Schel-
lenberg, Hitler's chief of foreign espionage, revealed the following
testimony regarding Nazi attempts to penetrate the United States
and Palestine:
SeheUenberg"The mission to North America originated at
the request of Rlbbentrop, the two missions to South America war*
ordered by Himmler in '42, and the mission to Palestine was on -
the basis of the intervention of the Grand Mufti. Himmler order-
ed me to execute it."
Q "It was suggested by the Grand Mufti to Himmler?"
A. "Yes."
Q. "What was the purpose of the first mission to the United
States?"
A. "An attempt was made to approach the Irish, Polish, Czech.
Yugoslav and Italian minorities by means of broadcasts"
Q. "Can you give us a few more details about that part of the
mUsion?"
A. "Rlbbentrop'a desire was to approach these minorities and
through clever election propaganda keep them from re-electlnc
Roosevelt. I took no part to this because it was of no interest to
me."
. Q. "Can you give us the details on the mission to Palestine?''
A. "The mission was Initiated at the request of the Oread
Maftl. who did this because of ejotlstlstlcal reasons. He wanted
to bring his name to his whole Arabian world
"It u Interesting to know that the Mufti wanted to make a
contract with me stating who of the personnel who were to era-
chute into Palestine were to administer funds whether the Ger-
man 8.8. officers or Arabian members of the party
The Mufti even wanted to keep part of the money designed fee
this mission for himself in Oermany, As far as I remember the
mlnslon carried carried along one-half hundredweight in gold coins,
twenty thousand in English pounds, and ten thousand In Uj!
dollars."
This la the man who was let get back to Egypt and is now
working for the Kremlin as be once worked for Hitter.
(Copyright, iK5i, By The Ben Syndicate, Inc.) -


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E6KH1B8N0_GYODP6 INGEST_TIME 2012-08-21T13:48:50Z PACKAGE AA00010883_01288
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



1M1
IT, NOVEMBER 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
'Like It Shows In The Serf Catalog
*

v
I.Josephine Asher of Utlca,
/., surprised not only herself,
. probably the seed-catalog
Lyrlte as well, with the success
giant beanstalk. At right.
mds in her back yard ad-
the skyscraplng vine that
eed a three-and-one-half
ring bean which she holds
The prodigious plant,
from a seed her daughter
t by mall, Is growing an-
'overslze bean about two
feet long.
I*

ij
Ci
i1
ft!
-i i
lent Anarchist
ried Dynamite,
lbs, Gunpowder
JS, Nov. 8 (UP)Giuseppe
Bise. 71-year-old self-con-
"anarchlst" went on trial
. the Court of Assizes to-
tal charges of attempting
tow up the Spanish Em-
fin Rome and kill the
Ish Ambassador on the
I of Jan. 21, 1950.
._'Lulse was arrested out-
lidefthe Spanish Embassy. He
kas found In possession of
mouth explosives to wreck a
aty lockfour powerful bombs,
Tubes of dvnamlte, six con-
fers of pyrite, 200 grams of
[powder and a pistol.
Jbe explosives were stuffed
us pockets and In a suitcase
I as carrying.
fOe Luise has a long record of
rests for carrying munitions
attempted acts of anarchy
. has served a total of 30
ars imprisonment for such
lenses.
[Italian police said he conies-
he wanted to blow up the
lib. Embassy "as revenge
..roicVitf martyred Sp>n-
oppressed bv Franco."
olice said he told them that
had nothing personal against
Spanish Ambassador Don
Antonio de Sangronlz y
,ro and only planned a
,.nbolic attempt" against the
nbassy itself.
1 JACOBY ON BRIPqi
RY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
NOBTH
M
WEST
42
/J974
4843
? Q1042
A A76
VK65
? KJ2
+ A985
EAST
A 1093
10 8
? Q1075
*K83
South
1*
3
44
5A
Pass
SOUTH (D)
AKQJ89
VAQ32
? A9
*J7
Both side* vul.
Wttt North
Pas 2N.T.
Pan 3 A
Pass 4
Pass 8 4
Pass
r1
Pats
Pa
Pass
Pats
Opening leadA 2
anc
S?
eve
ACOB
UWASTA /5Pj
KHX OSWALD JACOB**
rritten for NEA Service
ire were playing six-handed
Ista," relates a San Francls-
srrespondent, "and I had the
ice !o tsJce the up-card and
|e the initial meld. This
be- a very poor play at
j-handc Canasta, so I didn't
|d. Latei on. I was told that
two gajies are quite dlffer-
and thai I should have meld-
|ls that correct?'
is quite correct. You don't
a small pi.i. in four-handed
Canasta because you don't want
to deplete your hand. In six-
handed Canasta you don't worry
about a depleted hand. There are
two partners to take care of you.
Somebody will make a canasta
kit and meld out before long. The
nning strategy in this game is
meld as much as you can at
ery opportunity.
JWhen yoi: come to the last
few cards of the stock pile, are
you allov.ed to rount them to see
Who gets the last turn?
H
IAYes. You may count the
ieards at yoir t'irn to play. Like-
-Tse, you may count them if It is
our partner's turn and if he has
*ed you !or permission to meld
ft. whenever a player counts
ne stock In this way he must
announce tr.e number of cards.
QA player goes through the
otlon of making a discard,
' tanges his mind, and discards
another card. One of the oppo-
lents claims inat the original
rd must be d'scarded. He says
is an exposed card, and that
ie can name it. What is the rule?
AIt depends on whether or
not the player's partner saw that
iriginal discard. If he did. the
ird is exposed. If the partner
Idn't see it. no harm has been
ie. Certainly the opponent
ant lose anything by seeing
ie of the player's cards. As a
actlcal natter, it often hap-
tns that u pliyer waves a card
| the air In su.'h a way that an
Eponent can fee it but so that
i partner cannot see it.
I am naturally assuming that
ie player's oartner woul dspeak
p like a little man if he had
ten tne card. If the card
A actually been seen by the
iver's parLiei, it must be put
,.ce up on the table. At his next
urn. the off.;ncer may meld that
>osed card; otherwise, he must
ird It
i

. "What Is the right way to play
this hand?" asks a fan. "Declar-
er actually won the first club
with dummy's ace, drew three
rounds of trumps, and cashed
the three top hearts. If the
hearts broke, he could concede a
club and claim the rest. When
the hearts broke badly, he fin-
essed the jack of diamonds. This
lost, and South actually went
down two.
"Was'this South's best chance
for the contract?"
It is not the best play for the
slam. South should take the first
club with.dummy's ace and then
draw four rounds of trumps.
Dummy discards a low heart on
the fourth trump, but perhaps
the defenders will have a little
trouble. At this stage they can't
be sure what the hand depends
on.
South next leads the Jack of
clubs from his hand. East wins
and returns a heart (the best de-
fense) Dummy wins with the
king of hearts and returns a club
for South to ruff with his last
trump. Now South takes the ace
and king of diamonds.
By this time dummy Is reduced
to a diamond, the nine of clubs,
and one small heart.
South has ace-queen-three of
hearts. What three cards can
West save? If he save* his fourth
club, he can keen only twb
heardts, and South wins the rest.
If West gives up his fourth club,
dummy's nine Is rooS .
This line of play would work If
either defender had long hearts
and also long clubs; or If either
defender had long hearts and al-
so the queen of diamonds. South
makes his contract also If the
hearts break 3-3. He may make
it If one of the defenders dis-
cards unwisely on the fourth
trump.
The combination of all these
chances Is better than relying on
a heart break coupled with the
diamond finesse. What's more,
if the worst happens, South Is set
only one trick. The extra 100
points Is not the chief consider-
ation, but it shouldn't be entirely
disregarded.

I
Special Charter
The Knlghta of Columbus ori-
ginated under a special charter
granted by the state of Connecti-
cut on March 29. 1882. It was
founded as a fraternal benefit
association for Catholic men.
DON'T BE A
CERVEZA
To keep your budget happy while shopping ... and to make your family and friends
joyous at Christmas ... we present this wide selection of gifts themed to please all!


w/t4R 'wo
Join our Record Club
For as little as -J J00 or 00 Weekly
You can teleet flit record----- as well as those
you want to add to your own collection!
Ca. Cyraos Cyrnos Gift Shop
No. 1 Jos Feo, de la Ossa No. l Tivoll Ave.
(Tivoll Crossing) (Aereas from Ancn Playshed)
DRESS UP YOUR HOME WITH
NEW CARPETING FOR THE HOLIDAYS
.

New Blends
New Color
For tvery room 4- We're proud of our wida
selection in modern or traditional designs.
CASA SPORT, S. A.
FURNITURE STORE HARPWARE HOME ARTICLES
No. M Central Ave. Panam
Mr. & Mrs. S. Claus
danced with glee!
... and you will too, when
you see our handsome
CHRISTMAS RAFFLE FRIZES
(now on display in our windows)
Prom now 'Ml December 22nd., jrou will el numbered ticket for each
Si.ie purch.. (or multiple thereof). Prliei will be warded according to
the National Lottery Drawing: an December 23rd.
FIRST PRIZE: Sterling Silver Tea and Coffee Set
valued at $800.00
SECOND PRIZE: Roeenthal China (ervice for 12)
valued at $250.00
THIRD PRIZE: Bda Cryttal (ervcie for 8)valued
at $136.00
awj""
TI
Santa -
_3
leitioni....
MOROCCO and PIGSKIN
PASSPORT CASES BRIEF CASES
BILLFOLDS
with zipper, coin purse, many selections
FLORENTINE LEATHER BILLFOLDS
very beautiful In red, green, black
with 24 kt. gold designs
IRISH LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS
wide and very wide hem, rolled edge
MEN'S BATHROBES
Pin or wide stripe seersucker and silk
LUPI
"WHO'S CONTENTED?
EVERYBODY WITH-
RCA VICTOR RADIO
EASY CREDIT TERMS
Nipper knows: An RCA VICTOR RADIO makes the
Best Christmas present in the world!
PANAMA RADIO CORPORATION
t$ Central A venae Fheaea: 2-33*4, J-15M
And CHRISTMAS SHOPPING is exciting
fun. when you phop early 1 Santa and
his Panama deputies extend a cheery invi-
tation for you to come down town and see
what they have in store to make this your
most joyous Christmas ever!